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UWI today ( 08-31-2013 )

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UWI today
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UWI today
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UWI Marketing and Communications Office
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St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
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TRULY INDEPENDEN TUWI SPEC INTERNATIONAL HALF-MARATHON 15Sweating It Out e Perfect TenHis instinctive response when he brought home gold at the IAAF World Championships on August 15 the rst since Ato Boldons in 1997 was that we had to believe that we could do it locally. We had to believe in ourselves. These were the sentiments that led this region, more than half a century ago, to begin working towards that state of independence, primarily from colonial rule. Today, as we mark the 51st anniversary of Trinidad and Tobagos Independence, we celebrate our young UWI student, who truly believes that we can be responsible for our destinies and that we have the capacity to make it on our own strengths and demonstrated it on a world stage. At 21, entering adulthood, he is the spirit of independence we aspire to. We salute you, Jehue Augustus Gordon. (See interview on Page 13) PHOTO COURTESY: THE TRINIDAD EXPRESS.HONORARY GRADUAND 10Publishing Pioneer Ian Randle OFF CAMPUS 08Retreat and Refresh A Night in the Vice-Chancellors Bed? HONORARY GRADUAND 12Tireless Campaigner Marina Salandy-Brown

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SATURDAY 31ST AUGUST, 2013 UWI TODAY 3 CAMPUS NEWSOutgoing Dean of the Faculty of L aw, Dr Kusha Haraksingh, with the Canadian High Commissioner, Grard Latulippe, during his visit to the St. Augustine Campus on July 14. PHOTO: ANEEL KARIMCANADIAN HIG H COMMISSIONER VISITS CAMPUS EDITORIAL TEAMC AMPUS P RINCIPAL Professor Clement Sankat D IRE CT OR OF M ARKETIN G AND CO MMUNICATI O NS Mrs. Dawn-Marie De Four-Gill D IRE CT OR OF M ARKETIN G AND CO MMUNICATI O NS Ag.) Mrs. Wynell Gregorio E DIT OR Ms. Vaneisa Baksh CO NTACT US The UWI Marketing and Communications Ofce Tel: (868) 662-2002, exts. 82013 / 82014 Or email: uwitoday@sta.uwi.eduHis E xcellency Grard L atulippe, High Commissioner for Canada to the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, paid a courtesy call on PVC and Principal Professor Clement Sankat, on July 14. e courtesy call took place at the Conference Room of the O ce of the Campus Principal. His first visit to the University since assuming the post of High Commissioner in F ebruary, Mr. L atulippe was warmly welcomed by Professor Sankat and members of Senior Campus Management. Professor Sankat said that e UWI has long shared deep links with Canada, and that Mr. L atulippes presence and support were greatly appreciated. Professor Sankat is a longstanding member of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological E ngineers (ASAB E ) and was recently elected to the grade of F ellow of the Canadian Society for Biological Engineering (CSBE ). During the discussions, which focussed mainly on the existing relationships between e UWI and various Canadian universities, and the possibilities of expanding and deepening such relationships, Mr L atulippe mentioned that Canada had three priorities for the Caribbean region: investment, security and education, a field in which it aims to become a global actor. He also expressed in e UWIs plans for reviving the agricultural industry with the expansion of its F ield Station to Trincity, and the wider implications for food security and domestic production. Perhaps one of the strongest links that e UWI currently has with Canada, it was said, is the partnership agreements with the University of New Brunswick through The UWI School of Business and Applied Studies L imited (trading as RO YT E C), which offer internationally recognised qualifications and study abroad opportunities. Canada has also provided signicant assistance through a CDA$20 million grant from the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) to e UWIs O pen Campus to increase the number and diversity of distance education programmes. Mr. L atulippe was presented with a signed copy of Professor E merita Bridget Breretons book, F rom Imperial College to University of the West Indies: A History of the St Augustine Campus, Trinidad and Tobago, and aerwards was given a tour of the Campus, stopping along the way to admire the newly refurbished South Block of Canada Hall. Canada Hall was the Universitys rst Hall of Residence, generously funded by the Canadian G overnment.Canada has also provided signicant assistance through a CDA$20 million grant from the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) to e UWIs Open Campus e Spirit of Independence FROM THE PRINCIPAL As we mark the 51st anniversary of Trinidad and Tobagos Independence, there will no doubt be jubilant celebrations across our country. While there is much to celebrate, there must also be time for reection; not only on our performance, well-being and development as a nation, and by extension the region, but also on our capacity to take command of our destiny. Many who proudly embraced nationalistic pride in our post-independence years are concerned by the slow pace of regional integration, such as in the area of free movement of agricultural products; by the indecisiveness regarding the Caribbean Court of Appeal eight years aer its establishment; by the underfunding of tertiary education and especially, the lack of investment in university research, which aects our regions ability to bolster its development agenda with indigenous knowledge and talent. In many instances, we continue to look to others for solutions to our problems. en along came a 21-year-old who declared to the world that claiming our own success is not only desirable but possible. at young man, our own UWI student, Jehue G ordon, is bringing home his gold medal when he returns to our St. Augustine Campus in a few days. He has announced that his victory in Moscow was a result not only of his discipline and focus, but mainly of the support of three key people in his life. Jehue has insisted for years that if you believe that you can do it, you can accomplish anything from anywhere, and he chose to do all his training and learning here at home. is has included choosing e UWI over several others internationally, which were oering athletic scholarships, and we will continue to support his quest for education. We are at the start of a new academic year and as we prepare for our Matriculation Ceremony, where our alumnus President Anthony Carmona will welcome our new students, I would like to encourage all our students, new and continuing, to follow the credo of Jehue G ordon; to believe in yourselves, your institution and your country and take charge of your destiny. In commemorating our Independence, I salute the spirit of fearless determination, hard work and achievement that is necessary for the progress of our country and region. Happy Independence! CLEMENT K. S AN KATPro Vice Chancellor & Principal

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4 UWI TODAY SATURDAY 31ST AUGUST, 2013 UWI APPOINTMENTSM ona P rincipal SecondedThe Office of the Vice-Chancellor of The UWI has announced that Professor Archibald McDonald has been selected to succeed Professor G ordon Shirley as Principal of the Mona Campus. Professor McDonald is the current Deputy Principal of Mona, a post he has held for the past year. Professor McDonald has had an outstanding career as a surgeon in trauma and emergency medicine. A UWI graduate, he received his postgraduate DM degree in 1987. He is credited with starting the rst Accident and E mergency Department in Jamaica at the University Hospital of the West Indies and, with colleagues, established the Advanced Trauma L ife Support Programme in Jamaica. He also conducted seminal studies that dened the epidemiology of injury in Jamaica and which led to development of Jamaicas Injury Surveillance System. He has published some 125 papers and abstracts in peerreviewed journals. From 2002 to 2005 Professor McDonald served as Chairman of the Department of Surgery and then as Dean of the F aculty of Medical Sciences, Mona Campus, from 2005 to 2012. While he was Dean, he led historic changes in the F aculty resulting in a complete restructuring of the MBBS curriculum, a 200% expansion in student intake and accreditation of the medical programme by the Caribbean Accreditation Authority in Medicine and the Health Professions (CAAM-HP). He spearheaded the eort to create a state of the art building on the Mona Campus: the F aculty of Medical Sciences Teaching and Research Complex. F or his exceptional leadership and scholarship, he received the Vice-Chancellors Award for E xcellence in 2008. Professor McDonald is Chair of the Jamaican Research and E ducation Network, a member of the Board of Directors of the Caribbean K nowledge and L earning Network and Chairman of the Board of St Josephs Hospital. He will assume the O ffice of the Principal on September 1, 2013, the date on which Principal G ordon Shirley demits oce to become President and C EO of the Port Authority of Jamaica and will continue for three years until his retirement date. Professor Shirley was seconded for three years by the G overnment of Jamaica primarily to oversee the expansion of the Port of K ingston and the establishment of a L ogistics Centre to take advantage of the increased business expected from the widening of the Panama Canal. N ew D eansAs of August 1, 2013 the following new Deans have assumed duties in the respective positions: DR I SAA C BEKELEDean, Faculty of Food & A griculture, St Augustine for two years until his retirement on July 31, 2015. PROFESSOR R OSE M ARIE BELLE A NTOINEDean, Faculty of Law, St Augustine, for a term of four years. DR COLIN DEP RADINEDean, Faculty of Science & T echnology, Cave Hill for a term of four years. PROFESSOR HORA CE F LET CH ERDean, Faculty of M edical Sciences, M ona for a term of four years.On one of his regular visits to the site of the South campus of e UWI, Principal of the St Augustine Campus, Professor Clement Sankat walks past the framework for the Moot Court, part of the Faculty of Law, with members of the construction and campus teams. e new Dean of the Faculty of L aw, Professor Rose-Marie Belle Antoines appointment took eect earlier this month. She replaced Dr Kusha Haraksingh, who held the post as interim Dean for one year. PHOTO: ANEEL KARIM P rofessor Archibald McD onald Professor Gordon Shirley UWI Mona Campus, Jamaica

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SATURDAY 31ST AUGUST, 2013 UWI TODAY 5 ENERGY CAMPUS NEWSPresident Carmona to Attend MatriculationE very student enters e U WI with one goal in mind G raduation. e anticipation of this day, and its signicance is most prominent in students minds throughout their tertiary education experience. L ike most journeys, it seems as though the end is more anticipated than the beginning; however, students should remember that before they can become Alumni, they must rstly be initiated as a member of e UWI student community. At the beginning of each academic year, e UWI hosts its Matriculation ceremony, a special event that officially recognises new students as members of the Universitys academic community. It is an important rite of passage which symbolises the new student body joining the long list of great men and women who have graduated from e UWI. e Matriculation and Welcome ceremony 2013 will be held on September 19th, at the J FK Quadrangle, UWI St. Augustine. It is generating much excitement, as His E xcellency Anthony Carmona, President of Trinidad and Tobago, will be in attendance. As a past graduate of the University, the presence of His E xcellency not only adds pomp to the already prestigious event, but further signies the depth of accomplishments achieved by some of those who were once initiated into the University. The ceremony is marked by the signing of the Matriculation Register and the reading of the Academic Vow; and will be ociated by a number of university officers including the Vice-Chancellor, the Campus Principal, the Deputy Principal, F aculty Deans, and the Guild President. Matriculation bears significance for University students, as well as the top ve S E A and CXC students. is year, the top ve S E A and CXC performers will be invited to the Matriculation ceremony to receive awards of recognition and special University tokens. Matriculation holds significance for new students, future potential students, and attending Alumni. Just like Graduation this occasion is a monumental event in the journey of a UWI student. His Excellency Anthony Carmona, President of Trinidad and Tobago

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6 UWI TODAY SATURDAY 31ST AUGUST, 2013 CAMPUS NEWS e Caribbean features are as follows. Films marked with an asterisk are in competition. N ARRATIVE SELE C TIONSAbo So Juan F rancisco Pardo A ruba, 2013, international premiere* A nas F ilm D aniel Daz T orres Cuba, 2012, T&T premiere Chrissy! M arcia Weekes Barbados, 2012, T&T premiere God Loves the F ighter D amian M arcano T&T/ USA 2013, world premiere* I Am a D irector Javier Coln P uerto Rico, 2012, T&T premiere* K ingston Paradise M ary Wells, Jamaica, 2013, C aribbean premiere* Melaza Carlos L echuga Cuba, 2012, T&T premiere* Payday S elwyne Bourne Barbados, 2013, international premiere The S wimming Pool Carlos M achado Quintela Cuba, 2012, T&T premiere Three K ids Jonas d A desky Haiti/Belgium, 2012, T&T premiere* DOC UMENTARY SELE C TIONSCarmita L aura Guzmn and I srael Cardens, 2013, Dominican Republic// M exico/ C uba, C aribbean premiere* Fatal Assistance R aoul Peck Haiti/France, 2013, T&T premiere* Forward E ver: The Killing of a R evolution Bruce Paddington T&T /Grenada, 2013, world premiere No Bois Man No F raid Christopher L aird T&T 2013, world premiere* Poetry is an Island: Derek Walcott Ida D oes A ruba/ T he Netherlands/ S uriname/ S aint Lucia, 2013, world premiere* Red, White and Black: A Sports O dyssey Robert D umas T&T 2012 S ilent Music M elissa G omez Antigua, 2012, C aribbean premiere S ongs of R edemption M iquel G alofr and Amanda S ans Pantling Jamaica/ S pain, 2013, T&T premiere* The Stuart Hall Project John A komfrah UK/Jamaica, 2013, C aribbean premiere* Ten Days of M uharram: The Cedros Hosay Che Rodriguez, T&T 2013, world premiere* Viva Cuba L ibre: Rap is War! Jesse A cevedo C uba/ M exico/ USA 2013, C aribbean premiere* The Wind that Blows T homas Weston St Vincent and the Grenadines/ USA 2013, T&T premiere trinidad+tobago lm festival treatsForward Ever from Bruce Paddington premieresTwenty-two feature-length Caribbean and diaspora lmsten ction lms and 12 documentarieswill screen at the trinidad+tobago lm festival (tt) which runs from September 17 to October 1. The 22 films come from 14 Caribbean countries, and all but one will be making their local premiere at the Festival. F ive will be world premieres, nine will enjoy their Caribbean premiere, and two their international premiere. F ourteen of the films will be in official competition, for one or more of four awards: Best Narrative F eature, Best Documentary F eature, Best T&T F eature and Best Caribbean Film by an International F ilmmaker. Bruce PaddingtonE very year, e U WI welcomes incoming undergraduate and postgraduate students with a series of orientation events. Its ocial orientation programme was rebranded the F irst Year E xperience (FYE ) in 2012, and themed MY UWI L .I.F.E It kicked o at the Sport and Physical E ducation Centre (SP E C) on August 29 and 30 with UWI L ife, the campus calendars most highly anticipated event of the year. e new theme encourages students to embrace the tenets of L .I. F.E L earn, Imagine, F ocus, E ngage which will help them succeed throughout their academic careers, and FYE has been lauded as a rousing success since its 2012 launch. According to Dr Deirdre Charles, Director of Student Advisory Services at e UWI, the programme was developed to help new students those in their rst year as well as rst timers to manage their transition to university life. Several events and activities are carried out in two phases over the course of FYE e rst two weeks of the semester are packed with activities that help set the stage for a positive experience during the students stay at the University. e aim of the rst phase, the highlight of which is UWI L ife, is primarily to familiarise students with the campus and allow them to forge initial connections. e second phase shis its focus to more transitional programmes to directly support students various needs while at e UWI. e FYE programme is developmental, providing the necessary skills for students to evolve and adapt to a new environment. In particular, it assists in striking a balance with the newfound freedom so characteristic of the university experience, emphasising personal development, health and wellness, and career development. Dr Charles stresses that students must see FYE as an integral part of their university experience and use it to build their relationship with e UWI. Students should also be able to dierentiate between orientation (UWI L ife) and FYE, as orientation is but a small part of the holistic, yearlong FYE programme. It is this very holistic nature that has facilitated FYE s positive reception, not just by students, but F aculty as well. Many F aculty members are able to marry the dierent aspects of FYE and view the programme as a whole a multi-faceted system whose parts work symbiotically with the students who use it. They also agree on the programmes importance, as academic performance is aected if a students experience is not adequately managed. e UWI goes a step further by extending and adjusting the programme to include the Second and F inal Year E xperiences, which cater to students changing needs as they advance through the University, Dr Charles adds that each individual student experience is unique and distinct. University life is a time for experimenting, self-discovery and character buildingfor students of all ages. It is therefore important that FYE be viewed as a programme which, while providing umbrella support for all students, it is also diverse enough to address individual needs, whatever they may be. O ne of Dr Charles favourite quotes is K now thyself, and do thyself no harm. She believes that this approach should be applied to the FYE programme, as students should know themselves and which methods work best for them. e F irst Year E xperience programme can provide students the necessary level of support along the journey of self-discovery, as well as academic development, in their new university environment.K now T hyself The First Year WelcomeD R DE IRDRE C HA RLES, Director of Student Advisory Services

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8 UWI TODAY SATURDAY 31ST AUGUST, 2013 CAMPUS NEWS If youve driven alongside e UWI recently, on its eastern perimeter, just past Carmody Road and the Catholic Chaplaincy, you might have noticed that the Senior Common Room, known fondly as the SCR for donkeys years, has been dismantled. What you might not have observed is the building to its north, innocuously tucked away amidst the greenery. ats because the signage hasnt been placed yet, but when it is, it will invite you to the University Inn. e Inn is meant to be a boutique bed and breakfast, offering top quality accommodation primarily to the visiting academics and other guests of the University, but open, of course, to the public. It has been taking in guests for just a couple of months now, but its G eneral Manager, L isa Blake-Williams, said its ocial opening is planned for O ctober. She explained that while the main building is complete and fully appointed, with 16 sta members, there are plans to expand with an entirely new block, designed to also accommodate long-stay guests. Most of that new block is nished and furnishings are being installed, she said. e SCR too will form part of this expansion project; one that pro Vice-Chancellor and Campus Principal, Professor Clement Sankat, says has been very dear to his heart. He said he had long wanted to see the SCR transformed and be updated and the Inn itself was not only a welcome addition to the campus facilities, but it lled a long-standing need for proper accommodation within close proximity for guests of the university. O ne of the two Assistant Managers, Philena Williams, who is a graduate of UWIs BSc in Tourism Management programme, provided a tour of the facilities, rst of the central building, which was once the home of the Harnanan family. e structure remained essentially intact, she said, and one is struck by the graceful and comfortable design of the house, which blends so harmoniously with the exterior garden. ere is an air of tranquillity that seems to invite pause and reection a place that suggests that you stop and smell the roses (while you write an academic paper!) with a steaming cup of aromatic coee nearby. e reception area opens to the small dining area, which overlooks a patio and garden. It also leads to the rooms on the lower oor, while a wooden staircase climbs to the tastefully appointed rooms above. ere is a distinctly Caribbean feel to the dcor: warm, earthy tones and much of what looks like indigenous material form the furnishings. Room at e InnBY VAN E ISA BAK SHe Inn is meant to be a boutique bed and breakfast, oering top quality accommodation primarily to the visiting academics and other guests of the University, but open, of course, to the public Kerina Khan (le) and Makeda Alexander at the reception desk, just one of the many duties they have as interns at the Inn. e dining area overlooks a little garden. e general reception area.

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SATURDAY 31ST AUGUST, 2013 UWI TODAY 9 e rooms each carry a dierent colour theme, and much care has been given to the details that travellers will tell you are what can make even a simply furnished space feel like home. Williams was so pleased to show o the room specially designed to accommodate guests with disabilities, and who might need a wheel chair, for instance the two peepholes on the door, one at seated eye level; the bathroom with a special drainage feature so that a chair can roll right in; the special built-in controls on the bed head to allow for easy access to xtures despite her serene demeanour, her pride was obvious. O n the other side, her colleague was all exuberance and condence. I love my name, he said, so Im telling you all of it: Colin Christian Dickson, and he launched into an account of his eventful life, littered with happenstance, that led him to this quiet neck of the woods. O ne of his recent stints has been for four years at Disney (where he became one of their certied trainers) and his creed is theirs excellence in service delivery. To watch him move around guests, anticipating their needs and lling them quickly and condently is to watch a man who revels in what he does. With the sophisticated polish of G M L isa BlakeWilliams, the calm eciency of Williams and the energetic solicitude of Dickson, there is obviously a great team waiting to give guests a true, boutique experience. L earning the R opesA lthough it is run by a company specially set up by T he UWI to look after its aairs, the U niversity I nn has been branded as a place aliated to the campus it overlooks. A ssistant M anager, Philena Williams says that its culture should oer respite, comfort and an environment conducive to research and reection. I t must also be a place of learning, she said, as she pointed out that it is a place where students in various hotel management, tourism and other service programmes can come to do internships. T wo students from UWI s B S c in I nternational T ourism M anagement are currently doing two-month internships at the I nn before beginning their third year when the semester begins in S eptember. The programme, oered by the Faculty of Social Sciences, is a mixture of courses in nancial management, tourism planning and development, integrated service management, event management, and so on. I t also requires a two-month internship at a local hotel, and a four-month international one. K erina K han seems shy as she explains that she comes from Biche (she travels to and from daily) and had been pretty sheltered, but the experience has helped. I like dealing with guests, she said. One of the benets of being here is being exposed to dierent people and socializing. I m introverted but because the place is small, it has been easier for me to talk to new people. Makeda A lexander at 21, is just a year older than Kerina, but she is more self-assured. A lthough she is from P oint Fortin, she shares an apartment in St. A ugustine with her older brother, S harlon, who is also a UWI management student. Her condence practically oozes as she explains that she is the last of four children with three brothers ahead of her. You must be spoilt, I say. Well, daddy prayed for a girl and he got me, she says, smiling smugly. S he too has enjoyed interacting with guests and she feels being at a small place like this has given them an opportunity to be part of all aspects of managing a hotel, learning all the ropes; because thats her dream, to own her own place someday. Right now, her immediate excitement is about the prospect of doing her four-month internship at a M arriott Hotel in New York, where her brother lives, and where she can look forward to some international experience, and some more spoiling from home. What Y ou G etT here are S tandard Queens PV C Junior S uites and even a V ice Chancellor S uite with all room rates quoted in US currency and under $150. T he rates include, newspapers, coee and tea, and a full buet breakfast and are paid on arrival. T here is a small kitchen on the premises, and as the place expands, there are plans to include a casual dining menu. T hey also provide printing, copying and fax services, airport transfers, laundry and taxi service, and are willing to help arrange sightseeing tours. T he rooms are air-conditioned and contain mini fridges and safes. T hey also have HD at screen, wall mounted televisions with cable, and internet access. F or F urther InformationL isa Blake-Williams, G eneral M anager The U niversity I nn, 30 St. A ugustine C ircular Road, St. A ugustine, T rinidad. T el: (868) 645 5959 Email: theuniversityinn@sta.uwi.edu Lisa.Blake-Williams@sta.uwi.edu Visit at: www.facebook.com/T he U niversity I nn General Manager Lisa Blake-Williams (right) leads a touring party led by PVC and Campus Principal Professor Clement Sankat, who was hosting a courtesy call from His E xcellency Grard Latulippe, High Commissioner for Canada to the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. PHOTOS: ANEEL KARIMe rooms at the Inn.

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10 UWI TODAY SATURDAY 31ST AUGUST, 2013 GRADUATION CEREMONIES VB: What drew you into publishing? IR: I was not so much drawn into publishing as much as I fell into it by accident. At the start it was just a job that was oered to me towards the end of my undergraduate studies at UWI, Mona and I simply stuck with it. And even when I took a break aer ve years to do graduate studies, publishing literally pursued me as I was head-hunted to set up Heinemann in the Caribbean and the rest, as they say, is history. It is therefore not without good reason that I have been described as the accidental publisher! VB: What has been the most satisfying aspect for you? IR: I suppose I would say it is the creation of something where nothing really existed before. True, there was some publishing taking place, but it was uncoordinated and unsustained the odd book here, the odd book there. Today aer one generation we have a regional publishing industry with many practitioners and as for myself, there is the legacy of a few hundred books and the selfcondence given to writers which is something for a younger generation to build on. VB: What has been the most disappointing? IR: For me the most disappointing aspect of the publishing experience is that I/we have failed to develop the prole and appeal of the industry to make it an attractive career option for bright young Caribbean graduates from ALL disciplines. Publishing still remains the Cinderella of the creative industries in that it has failed to impress its creative, business and career potential on nanciers, support organizations, the media and would-be career seekers. We have, except in a few instances, failed to attract bright entrepreneurs to inject capital and fresh ideas and the units that make up our regional industry still bear the marks of the individuals who created them, threatening their sustainability beyond the lifespan of those individuals. VB: Given the Caribbeans literary history, has the publishing industry developed suciently? IR: e Caribbeans literary history is one of writing, or if you will, literary production, not one of publishing or even reading! at history was built on a tradition of writers being exposed and published by metropolitan houses in Britain and North America and their works being introduced to audiences in those countries. It was therefore natural for a new generation of writers of the postindependence era to continue to seek solace in the arms of the metropolitan publishers. Our local industry has not developed along those original literary lines because of that tradition but more tellingly because of the size of our markets and its attendant small readership numbers but also for economic reasons. It is no accident therefore that the most signicant development has taken place in the area of educational publishing, where the economies of scale allow local publishers to successfully produce and sell books in numbers that make their businesses viable. VB: How threatening are new forms of online publishing and reading to traditional print formats? IR: ere is no question that traditional print formats are under severe threat from new electronic methods and Caribbean publishers are no less threatened as many are beginning to realize. While I do not think the printed book as we have come to know and love it, will die, it will certainly not continue to have the monopoly it has had from the 15th century when Johannes Gutenberg invented mechanical movable type that ushered in the printing process. And why should it? No one shed any tears when the old HONO RARY G RADUANDIan L ucein Randlee Reluctant Publisher Among our six honorees this year is Ian Lucein R andle the chairman of Ian Randle Publishers L td, a company he founded in 1990 as the Caribbeans rst commercial scholarly publishing company. Mr Randle will be conferred with the LLD and will address graduates of the F aculty of Engineering and Law at the ceremony on October 24. He shared some thoughts on publishing in the region with editor, Vaneisa Baksh.vinyl record became obsolete and along with them the record player and the juke box; the cassette player had a relatively short life aer cassettes were superseded by CDs and today the DVD and its accompanying player are fast becoming old technology both for music and lm. e music and the lm have not died but the methods by which we access them have died several deaths. Books are not very dierent. e answer for us publishers is to redene our concept of the book to incorporate the increasing variety of modes and formats in which the modern reader or researcher has available and to see the book (grudgingly) as simply one variety among those formats. To do less is to threaten our own survival. VB: What would you say has been your biggest contribution? IR: Simply put, it has been to allow us to tell our own story. For all of our recorded history, what we have known about ourselves as Caribbean people, including our history, our culture, who we are and so forth, has been written about and published by others. My generation and all others before, were educated on assumptions and perceptions based on research and writings that did not include our input. By giving voice to our researchers and writers I believe I have contributed to the re-education both of a past generation, also of the current one and all others to come. It is a process that cannot be reversed and its value one that cannot be fully computed. Above that, a contribution to the enhancement of human knowledge is the highest possible calling and the most satisfying achievement. VB: What does the honorary degree mean to you? IR: It is rst and foremost a validation and recognition by others of the value of my lifes work. I have been the recipient of a Jamaica National Honour the Order of Jamaica (OD) and more recently an International award as a Prince Claus laureate for 2012. I consider the UWI honorary degree a regional honour, and in many respects it is the one I value most. Why? Because although I am a proud Jamaican I have always seen myself as operating a Caribbean company based in Jamaica. And to receive the honorary degree at the St Augustine campus is doubly gratifying because it is for me, a recognition of the specic Trinidad and Tobago publishing I have done, not to mention the regional dimension of my publishing.

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SATURDAY 31ST AUGUST, 2013 UWI TODAY 11 GRADUATION CEREMONIES VB: What do you make of the growing number of non-communicable diseases, the lifestyle disasters, plaguing the world? You have been working in this area for decades. TP-K: Non-communicable diseases have become a global problem, largely due to the rise in living standards and the western pattern of development; called westernization, but fundamentally related to lifestyles. PAHO and CARICOM have studied the problem extensively for the past ten years. Dr. Edward Greenes studies are excellent and should be on the CARICOM website. VB: How best can our health care system tackle this category of illness? They are obviously an enormous burden. TP-K: Our health care system is totally inadequate to deal with the problem of diabetes, obesity and hypertension. e Ministry seems to be more concerned with providing services for the complications with more dialysis centres, etc. e emphasis should be on preventing complications. e chronic disease clinics at the Health Centres and the Diabetic Clinics at the hospitals should be re-organized to provide an annual medical audit. Treatment really is a tripod. Patients should be made more aware that they are responsible for their own care with diet, exercise, medication and advice from health care workers. High risk families should be screened for pre-diabetes. VB: Is it unfair to say that private doctors are now more like agents of pharmaceutical companies? Are they medicating more than treating? TP-K: It is true that there is over-medication a pill for every ill but patients oen demand injections, etc. Some doctors receive their information about new drugs from drug representatives rather than the medical literature. is highlights the need for continuing medical education and CME credits.HONO RARY G RADUANDDr eodosius Ming Whi PoonK ingDoctor Extraordinaire Among our six honorees this year, is Dr eodosius Ming Whi Poon-King, whose career has earned him international acclaim. Dr Poon-K ing will be conferred with a DSc at the ceremony on O ctober 26, where he will address graduates of the F aculty of Medical Sciences. Dr Poon-K ings work has ranged from the eect of scorpion stings on the heart, coronary heart disease, hypertriglyceridaema (elevated triglycerides), diabetes, poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (a severe inammatory kidney disease), acute rheumatic fever, streptococcal infections, immunology of streptococcal disease, and yellow fever to paraquat poisoning. He traced the source of Typhoid F ever in outbreaks of 1967 and 1969. He helped control Poliomyelitis in 1971, and in 1977 during a Yellow F ever outbreak, he worked with a team that demonstrated the virus on electron microscopy in human liver for the rst time. rough him, four new nephritogenic streptococci were discovered locally and added to the international literature. It is already a formidable range, and yet does not include work he has done in endocrinology. rough his work on type 2 diabetes, the belief that a diet high in fats was what contributed to the large number of diabetics was dispelled and rened carbohydrates were recognized as the real culprits. Dr Poon-King shared some of his views with editor, Vaneisa Baksh.VB: What would you say has been your biggest contribution to the region? TP-K: My biggest contribution to the region has been the establishment of the Streptococcal Disease Unit in 1966 for the investigation and control of acute rheumatic fever and recurrent epidemics of acute nephritis. Both diseases were eradicated by rapid and intensive treatments of patients and their families with streptococcal infection in their throats and skin. Surveillance of schools and communities were implemented. We discovered four new streptococci for acute nephritis and one for acute rheumatic fever. e Streptococcal Disease Unit in San Fernando was recognized as a centre of excellence by the experts attending the four-day International Conference on Streptococcal Disease at the Trinidad Hilton, organized by our coresearchers at Rockefeller University in 1978. VB: What does this honorary degree mean to you? TP-K: I am happy to become an Honorary Graduate of e University of the West Indies and join the rest of my family who are already graduates of the University. My wife, eldest daughter and two sons graduates in medicine, and one son a graduate engineer. I shall cherish the Honorary Doctorate in Science and wish the University all the best for the future.

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12 UWI TODAY SATURDAY 31ST AUGUST, 2013 VB: Start the Week, the programme you produced at BBC Radio 4, what was it about? MS-B: With my presenter, Melvyn Bragg, now Lord Bragg, I turned Start the Week into the top discussion programme in the country on both TV and radio. It had been oundering, having lost ground to TV chat, but STW had always been an important programme in the schedules and I was determined to develop that morning slot as a unique place where intelligent conversation about important matters could be discussed, making it the place where esteemed statesmen, writers, artists and scientists wanted to appear in each others company. It went for the high ground when the media seemed to be catering only for the lowest common denominator. It was my ambition to give place to people of all ethnicities and walks of life at a time when people of colour were not much featured in regular programming. It was also the rst non-specialist programme that scientists appeared on. It popularised science and explored the arts, politics, economics, and social sciences equally. It became perhaps the most important programme in the BBC portfolio of live programmes and set the standard for discussion. VB: There is no point having diverse people if you dont allow them to be diverse, is attributed to you. What was the context of that statement? MS-B: When I joined the BBC in 1984 there were no people of colour working in radio production in the four national domestic services, except one producer from India. In BBC TV there was programming in Indian languages only. It is commonly believed that Trevor McDonald presented on the BBC. He did so only on the World Service (radio), never BBC TV. On BBC TV there was one Caribbean woman news presenter, Moira Stuart, a former secretary in one of the domestic radio services. I was determined not to be the rst and last Caribbean person to be a BBC radio producer. I immediately started making programmes about people whose voices were never heard by the British public. I made programmes that promoted Caribbean and developing country cultures, politics and people alongside STW or whatever general programme I was working on, whether in TV or radio. e programmes won prizes and proved that there was a world of stories out there to be told and that all people could be included in the BBC without outraging the British public. ey just had to be the very best in quality. I was able to recruit researchers and producers of nonEuropean origin to my production teams, one of them is now the Commissioning Editor of BBC Radio Four, a top job open to very few people of any origin. I also introduced new non-European presenters and subjects GRADUATION CEREMONIES HONO RARY G RADUANDMarina Salandy-BrownStart Me Up Among our six honorees this year, is M arina Salandy-Brown, journalist and media consultant, with 28 years of experience in the broadcast industry. Ms Salandy-Brown will be conferred with a D L itt at the ceremony on O ctober 26, where she will address graduates of the F aculty of Humanities and E ducation. Her international awards include the Sony G old Award, Best News Programme 2000, UK (for BBC Radio); Radio Journalist of the Year 1994, UK; New York F estivals Award, Silver, 1992; Programme of the Year, UK Television and Radio Industries Club, 1990, and the Sony Silver Award for the Most Creative Use of Radio, 1988, UK. She answers some questions posed by editor, Vaneisa Baksh.to the airwaves. My success paved the way for others to follow as sta members and as presenters. Many of these found their way to other areas of the media. I later worked on a BBC Diversity Policy that was meant to move the BBC away from its colonial way of recruiting. ere were strong strategic reasons for the BBC to change this model. e highest growth in population was among the new immigrant groups, yet thats where most dissatisfaction with BBC output existed. Implementation of new recruitment, training and programming polices took place as a result. It took a long time to happen and it met with many obstacles, including deliberate sabotage. And, even when the argument was won over hiring a work force that represented the population, myopic editors would oen pigeon-hole non-white producers and presenters. It was in this context that I was quoted. VB: The NGC Bocas Lit Festival, which you helped to create, is growing at a heartening pace. Do you think it is a sign of how starved the region is for space to have literary discussions? Or do you think you are now creating that desire for such conversations? MS-B: As part of my work at the BBC and in other private pursuits I was very integrated into the arts, including literature. In all these areas, as indeed in my BBC work, I have seen that most people do not know what they are missing. Once you point it out to them you discover an appetite that is hungry for satisfaction. ere is need that not all know how to meet. ere is talent that is waiting to out itself. ere are opportunities that just have not been tapped into. What the NGC Bocas L it Fest as a non-prot company has set out to do is to help writers, readers and the publishing industry. ere are reading groups in this country, people use our libraries, bookshops sell novels, writers are scribbling away, but they just needed being drawn together more, and real opportunities grasped for advancing their work. Writers need readers and society needs writers. It is a symbiotic relationship that needs encouragement. Judging from the success of the NGC Bocas L it Fest, I would say that the desire for literary discussion was there. It is true too that we are creating desire where there was little or none. Bringing readers and writers together is important and bringing writers together too. So many of the visiting Caribbean writers had not met one another, yet they know each others work and feed o it. e festival allows that level of discourse and exchange and we, their readers, are the beneciaries too. VB: Where would you like to see it go? MS-B: Considering how the lit fest is developing, I am impressed by the corporate sector and the government ministries that nancially support it. Unlike the lm industry, which has been ocially identied as an area for development and exploitation and has an agency with a budget to look aer its aairs, literature had been overlooked. Bocas has sprung up between the cracks and established literature as worthy of greater consideration and given expression to the appetite for it. I would like to see Bocas nancial future ensured so that it can carry out the work we have planned. I would not like to see our ambitions exceed out capacity to realise them. e Bocas project is to reach all parts of the community, locally, regionally and internationally. We have been going just three years now and it has been hard work to gather all the resources, human and nancial, to host the festival every April and establish it internationally as a quality event, but it is our plan to do a festival outside of Port of Spain and one in Tobago, and to work with writing and reading groups nationwide. VB: What does this honorary degree mean to you? MS-B: It is an extraordinary and surprising honour to have conferred upon me. It was always a regret of mine that I was not in TT during the earlier years of our postIndependence development. I would have loved to have attended UWI. I consider it a very important Caribbean institution and I have respect for it. is way part of a wish has been realised.

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SATURDAY 31ST AUGUST, 2013 UWI TODAY 13 SPORT It has been just a couple of hours since Jehue G ordon arrived in L ondon from Moscow to overnight at a hotel before heading to his aunts before taking o to Italy for two races in the rst week of September. Might seem a hectic schedule, but hes grown used to it aer four years. Were talking by phone because theres no internet. He has a bit of a cold, he says, so his voice is a little raspy. I tell him his comments on winning the gold medal at L uzhniki Stadium about doing it local were striking and had touched a chord in the country. What inuenced his decisions to stay local? e support from my family, he says immediately, being able to stay in my comfort zone. Caribbean culture is so dierent from American culture. In Trinidad your parents do everything for you. My mum basically does everything, she cooks, cleans, washesI just had to concentrate on training. F or Jehue, it was not simply about having people do things for him. It was recognising by watching the example of Marcella, his mother, and her hard work and dedication to his success, that he understood that it didnt matter the size of the space you grew up in (money is not everything is a common phrase in his lexicon); it mattered how large you set your goals. He was never one to think small, and perhaps this is what caught the eyes of the other enormous pillars of support his life has had since he was 12: coaches and mentors, Dr Ian Hypolite, a psychiatrist and the almost 73-year-old 400m O lympian Edwin Skinner. Jehue is very clear that he was fortunate to have steadfast support from what he calls his close circle: Marcella, Ian and E dwin, who have stuck with him through thick and thin, and who have acted as inspiration, guides and protectors from Jehue Gordon at the St Augustine campus where he returns this September.N o Small P lace called Homethe vagaries of a world that has not always been kind. Since winning the gold medal in the 400m hurdles at the IAAF world Championships on August 15, he has been interviewed countless times and he has consistently showered praises on these three, crediting them with providing him with the physical, mental and spiritual sustenance he has needed for his journey so far. It rings true, all of it; nothing shallow about this young man, who is able to identify exactly what he means when he talks about its signicance to his upbringing and outlook and his capacity to focus and be disciplined enough to achieve his personal goals. Mind you, Jehue was not simply a wheelbarrow to be rolled along; from very small he had a keenly competitive mind and a erce desire to excel. I hate people to feel theyre better than me, he says, as he defends his choice to stay at home to prepare for the world in the face of many criticisms that he would be better o with foreign fare. E verything I do, I do to the best of my ability. His belief that everything we need to do well can be found right here in the Caribbean was not just inculcated by the three pillars, but embedded because of the deep trust he feels towards them. He describes their relationships and how he knows that they didnt do it for money. ey encouraged me to further my education even when opportunities came for me to go professional, he said, as he explains how Doc insisted that he would be better prepared if he nurtured his intellectual life just as fully. ree years ago he had enrolled in the Sport Management Programme at UWI, and when the semester reopens in September, he will be entering the fourth and nal year. E ven that choice had been questioned because hed received oers of athletic scholarships from universities like Harvard, University of Florida, Mississippi State, Florida State and Texas A&M. I wanted to show people I was not normal, that we can do things here. A lot of people limit themselves. ey ask, why you want to study at UWI? Ask the CEO s of big companies here why they studied at UWI. I am 150% red, white and black! So how has he been managing both his athletic career and his studies? It has been tough, he admits. Success doesnt come easily. It is hard work. But I dont want people to feel I dont work hard. He says that he has had great support too from other classmates on the programme, who shared notes and had study group sessions to help him catch up. G iven his mantra, he doesnt ask more of the teachers, though he was really disappointed that one lecturer would not give him the one additional mark that would have made one of his papers an A. Still, he shrugs that o, and hopes that this upcoming year will be manageable now that most of his friends are nished with the three-year programme and are ocampus. He remains unwavering in his belief that Caribbean people should feel more condence in their abilities. I tried to get people to understand what I have been trying hard to do for all these years, he says. ey didnt see that. It was a big hurdle for him to cross, and now with his gold medal to prove it can be done, Jehues message that when you think big, there is no such thing as a small place, might nally come across.BY VAN E ISA BAK SH

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14 UWI TODAY SATURDAY 31ST AUGUST, 2013 UWI SPEC INTERNATIONAL HALF-MARATHONWhen UWI SPE C ocially opened its heavy doors on M arch 16, 2003, it was already bursting with ideas for the development of sport and physical education in the region. T he Director of S port and P hysical Education at the St. A ugustine C ampus, Dr Iva G loudon to whom SP EC has been like her very own child, was clear that it was going to be branded as a site for excellence in the region for that and more. Just about a year and a half later, on November 14, 2004, the rst UWI SPE C I nternational HalfM arathon came pelting out the heavy doors, bringing a number of innovative rsts to the region, and it has not looked back. I n that first year, though the prize money was all of $100,000, and the entrants were around 300, it caught the publics attention for several reasons. It had managed to secure the rst trac-free course in the region. T he 13.1 mile journey, beginning at 6.30am, would use the P riority Bus Route up to La Resource and loop back to the nish at UWI SP EC. U niversity students from all over were invited to attend as the idea was to involve students in the concepts of healthy lifestyles as well. A s she looked forward to the rst edition, Dr Gloudon had said, We wanted UWI SP EC to be tied in to the excellence in sport and physical education from an international standpoint. We dont know of any other trac-free road race in the C aribbean. A nd it is also an exciting way to have a laboratory for our students in the sport management, coaching certicate and physical training instructors programme. I ts an opportunity for all of these students to practise the craft in a practicum setting. A nd in a wider sense, to begin to brand UWI as an institution committed to having its students focused on having a wellbalanced, well-rounded education. T his year marks the tenth edition of that rst step, and it is interesting that some, like F irst Citizens and R aque S hah (though he is no longer hands-on as technical advisor), have gone the distance, throw ing their support be hind an event that has indeed grown to be a major international event, just as Dr Gloudon had intended. But if some things have remained the same, much has changed as well. S ince then the cat egories for entries have grown. I n addition to UWI sta and student groups, the wheelchair and physically chal lenged categories, there is now a team category for a minimum of 15 ath letes, for instance. Over the years, as registration grew, a decision was made to cap it off at the first one thousand. For current director of S port and P E at UWI, Justin L atapyG eorge it has been a privilege to preside over this special edition. Latapy-George, who is also the Race Director, says the honour is also magnied by allowing me to be a part of the U niversitys long-standing support of academia and S port and P E while promoting a healthier lifestyle choice that is aptly supported by the races sponsors; principles that allow me to enjoy my role tremendously. T his year, as part of the special commemoration of this tenth year, a number of symbolic changes have been made. Registration will be open to the rst 1010 runners; and the race, will get going a bit earlier, starting at 10 minutes to six. T he focus in this tenth year is giving; giving to charitable organisations, and so, the M arketing and C ommunications Oce team, led by acting C ommunications M anager, R enata S ankar-Jaimungal (who is also a Sport M anagement M asters student), came up with a plan to invite 10 people to champion 10 charities and to encourage the public, as well as sta and students to pledge $10 towards one of these people and the money would go towards their chosen charity. A nyone can pledge, even as groups, organizations, faculties; anyone can, because the aim is to support the marathon and its related charities. Organizers are hoping that pledges can be made through sta deductions, bank deposits into a special account, by deposit at the Bursary C ashier on the St. A ugustine campus. For every $10 received 10% will go towards marathon funding and the rest to the named charity. P ledges will also be taken on the day. T his team, called T he 10, are not there just for their looks though, they have to be part of a 12-week training programme, specially designed by SP EC One would imagine that the training programme would have been 10 weeks long in keeping with the theme, but there is no compromise when it comes to ensuring that they are t and ready to race, on the big day, October 27. (Vaneisa Baksh)T he10thLAP THE TEN TRAINING T he 12-week training programme has a fairly intense schedule, with sessions carded for Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays with distance running on the weekends. The Ten have been hauling themselves to SP EC as best as they can to take part in training. T his includes eld Fartlek (Fartlek is a training technique, used especially in running, in which periods of intense eort alternate with periods of less strenuous eort in a continuous workout), pace work and sprints. T he gym sessions involve circuit training, core, legs, upper body and stretches. Of course, there are drills involved, and some hill work too. By the time race day arrives, even if they did not make it to all the sessions, The Ten are going to be more than t and ready! Justin Latapy-George Dr Iva Gloudon

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SATURDAY 31ST AUGUST, 2013 UWI TODAY 15 ENERGY UWI SPEC INTERNATIONAL HALF-MARATHON1 Your charity of choice is the Guardian Neediest Cases Fund; have you been involved in any other charitable organizations? I ve been involved with many charities over the years. I am still very much involved in the work of Rotary, through the Rotary Club of M araval. 2 A re you a UWI alumna? I f not, whats your alma mater? I am a UWI alumna! I graduated from the C aribbean Institute of M edia and C ommunication, UWI, Mona in 2006. I also studied journalism at the C olumbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York.3 How did you come to journalism? By chance actually... I had applied to do I nternational Relations at UWI, and I chose M edia and Communication as my second option because it was also being oered at the M ona C ampus. As it turned out, the school of communications accepted me rst. I n hindsight it had to be divine intervention, from my very rst television journalism class I was in love. I had found my career path!4 Do you ever feel nervous in front of the cameras? Of course! Especially when its a special programme of some sort, like election coverage. I used to be really, really nervous when I just started doing on-camera work. But I got some good advice from a mentor of mine who told me that the most important thing about being in front of the camera is being able to relax. When you relax you think more clearly, speak more eloquently and generally seem to be in control. Basically, nerves are an unwelcome enemy. 5 How much of your time is spent preparing for the nightly broadcast research, interviews, hair, make-up, and so on? M y whole day is spent preparing. I am editor as well, so I spend the day reading scripts and checking facts. Then, about an hour before the newscast I head to make up.One of the chosen ten raising funds for the half-marathon is editor and news anchor, Golda L ee Bruce from CN C3 S he shares some light marathon moments with editor, V aneisa Baksh 6 I s your spouse in the same eld? I f not, what does he do? He also works in media. Hes a photographer [Micheal Bruce]. But I like to call him a photo journalist because he is so involved in the news and current aairs. Sometimes he stays up late to read the next days papers online. He lives and breathes the news, which is good for me because he keeps me informed!7 How have the training sessions been going? Ha Ha! When I do make it to UWI the sessions are quite rewarding. I have to say, it is harder than I thought to wake up early and drive to UWI for an intense training session, then face a whole day at work. But I feel really accomplished when I have a good session. 8 I s your spouse helping you to train? Yes, he runs almost every day and he also plays football a lot. So when he is stirring in the morning he makes sure that I am up and ready to go. P lus I get really good back rubs. :)9 Would you consider yourself a sporting or athletic person? No. But I can dream. 10 Would you say you are competitive? P erhaps. :)10 Q withGolda L ee Bruce

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16 UWI TODAY SATURDAY 31ST AUGUST, 2013 UWI CA LENDAR of EV E NTSSEP T EMB ER NOV EMB ER 2013UWI TODAY is printed and distributed for e University of the West Indies, St Augustine Campus, through the kind support of Trinidad Publishing Co Ltd, 22-24 St Vincent Street, Port of Spain, Trinidad, West Indies. MARKETING AND EBUSINESS W ORKSHOP The Internationalisation of SM E s Marketing and eBusiness Workshop is being hosted by the Caribbean Centre for Competitiveness. It will cover two important components of internationalisation of businesses and use a combination of exercises and searches for knowledge to transfer information. e target participants will be SM E s who are already exporting regionally (within the Caribbean) and/or positioning themselves in the international market, policy makers supporting internationalization of SM E s and University professors and researchers working in related areas. Registration: US$50 For more information, please contact: 224-3715; ccfc@sta.uwi.edu; or visit: www.uwi.edu/ccfc THE WELCOME At the beginning of each academic year, The UWI hosts a Matriculation Ceremony for its new students. It is an important annual academic ritual, its signicance being that it is the platform on which new students are ocially initiated into and recognised as members of the Universitys academic community. This is a momentous occasion for the University and its new students, as it is the only time during the academic year, apart from the G raduation Ceremony, that a full academic procession takes place. For more information, please contact: Student Aairs (Admissions) at 662-2002 ext.82154, 82157, or admis@sta.uwi.edu. CELEBRATING 3Cs e theme of the inaugural Human Communication Studies International Conference 2013 is Celebrating the Caribbean in Communication, Culture and Community. It is organised by the Department of L iteracy, Cultural and Communication Studies at St. Augustine. Academic, graduate and undergraduate researchers can submit full papers by August 22. Aer the conference, please consider submitting your conference papers to an international panel for peer review for a proposed publication, e Human Communication Studies Journal in 2014. For more information, please visit https://sta.uwi. edu/conferences/13/humancommunication/ GENDER TRANSFORMATIONS Under the auspices of the Institute for G ender and Development Studies (I G DS), Regional Coordinating Unit, Mona, the St. Augustine Campus hosts the 20th Anniversary Conference on G ender Transformations in the Caribbean. e aim of the three-day regional conference is to map the legacy of interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary discourses in the areas of Caribbean and diasporic research on gender. For more information contact: IGDS at 662 2002 ext. 83573/83577, or igdssau2013@sta.uwi.edu SRC OPEN HOUSE 60 years of Science & Safety: The UWI Seismic Research Centre invites the public to a free O pen House on the last ursday of every month at the Centre on G ordon Street, St. Augustine. E ach-90 minute session includes a tour of the Centre, demonstrations on earthquake and volcano monitoring techniques, safety and preparedness tips and information material. Time slots: 2pm, 3pm and 4.30pm. 13 years and over. Space is limited. For reservations and details call 662-4659 or email info@uwiseismic.com CONFERENCE ON THE ECONOMY (COTE) 2013 COTE is an annual landmark event of the Department of E conomics at UWI, at which ndings from quality research and other studies are presented to inform stakeholders on economic and social policy. is years conference honours previous Head of Department, Dr Ralph Henry, and will examine the theme Managing for Development in the Caribbean: Addressing the Challenges of Poverty and Inequality. For more information, please visit http://sta.uwi.edu/conferences/13/cote/index.asp. UWI RESEARCH EXPO Research that has made a difference will be showcased at the Research E xpo, where interactive displays will feature work in the arts and sciences done by UWI sta and students. A Symposium on Research, Enterprise and Impact will also be held at the L earning Resource Centre. ere will be miniworkshops, book readings, concerts, special tours, lm screenings and a gi shop where UWI products including UWI Press publications, chocolates and plants will be on sale. On Saturday 5, members of the public are welcome to enjoy e UWI Market Place and Childrens Fun Park. For more information please contact: Anna Walcott-Hardy at 662-2002 ext. 84451 or email: uwiresearchexpo@sta.uwi.edu. U WI TO DAY WA N TS TO HEA R FRO M Y OUUWI TODAY welcomes submissions by sta and students for publication in the paper. Please send your suggestions, comments, or articles for consideration to uwitoday@sta.uwi.edu