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UWI today ( 07-28-2013 )

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CRAZY for YOUFor four nights in July, disbelief was suspended at Queens Hall, when Must Come See Productions presented the Gershwin comedy classic, Crazy for Y ouCAMPUS NEWS 10Internationalisation at the Forefront Strategic International Collaborations LEWIS-BECKFORD MEMORIAL LECTURE 09Caribbean Agriculture at the Crossroads Professor Clement Sankat Lecture CAMPUS NEWS 12Tamaras Journey A Journal of her UWI Discover Experience Bobby as Zangler in Slap that BassCAMPUS NEWS 06A Real Dilemma: A chieving Sustainable Development in R egions with Extractive Industries

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SUNDAY 28TH JULY, 2013 UWI TODAY 3 EDITORIAL TEAMCAMPUS PRIN CIP AL Professor Clement Sankat D IRECTOR O F MARKE TIN G AND COMMUNICATI ONS Mrs. Dawn-Marie De Four-Gill D IRECTOR O F MARKE TIN G AND COMMUNICATI ONS A g.) Mrs. Wynell Gregorio EDI TOR Mrs. Maria Rivas-McMillan A CTIN G EDITOR For the period May 1 to August 2, 2013; Mrs Maria Rivas-McMillan will be editing UWI TODAY; please address all correspondence for the paper to her at maria.mcmillan@sta.uwi.ed u during this time. CAMPUS NEWS UWI & CARI C OMProponents of Regional I ntegration FROM THE PRINCIPAL Earlier this month, from July 3 to 6, member states of the Caribbean Commu nity (C AR IC OM ) met in Port-of-Spain for the 34th meeting of the Conference of Heads of Government. Interestingly enough, this years meeting of regional leaders also marked the 40th anniversary of the signing of the T reaty of Chaguaramas that established CARIC OM on July 4, 1973. e UWI, with its 65 years of existence, pre-dates this regional grouping and it would be fair to say that this university, which now boasts four campuses across the Caribbean and is the second largest regional university globally, had a part to play in the integration movement that led to the formation of CARIC OM. Indeed, at the O pening Ceremony on Wednesday July 3 at the Diplomatic Centre, I was heartened by a statement made by the Honourable Prime M inister, K amla Persad-Bissessar, who herself is an outstanding graduate of e UWI. e Prime M inister gave great credit to e UWI for the important role it has played in regional development and regional integration and also in the formation of many of our leaders in T rinidad & T obago and across the Caribbean region. T rinidad & T obagos Prime M inister K amla Persad-Bissessar assumed leader ship of CARIC OM from Haitian President Joseph M ichel M artelly at the end of this meeting and I wish her every success as she takes the Caribbean Community forward in challenging times. While the eects of the current economic climate on member states and the framework within which the Community can achieve growth and development were major agenda items, there is one area that I would urge the team of regional leaders to seriously consider that is the role of agriculture and agri-business in ensuring a sustainable Caribbean. In the pages of this U WI T oday, we have focussed a great deal on this sectors challenges as well as the opportunities, many of which are obtainable through regional co-operation and political will. e answers we seek are there; they have been iterated over the generations by various experts such as Sir William A rthur Lewis and Professor George Beckford. Forty years later our young people are having their say as evidenced by the CARIC OM Y outh A mbassadors who organised an internet-based discussion in celebration of their 20th anniversary. ey do not foresee a viable future without integration, without C AR IC OM is discussion was viewed by almost 74,000 people regionally and internationally. O ur students and many of our alumni are a part of this generation and their research, ideas and vision will continue shaping the Caribbeans future. e U niversity of the West Indies stands ready, willing and able to work with regional governments to ensure, in the words of the Secretary General of CARIC OM A mbassador Irwin La R ocque, the success of a Caribbean Community that provides a safe, secure, viable and prosperous society that is the envy of all. CL E M E NT K. SAN KAT PVC & Principal ose words were the lure for recent university graduates and nal year students, enticing them into an Entrepreneurship Boot Camp. e U niversity of the West Indies in collaboration with the N ational Entrepreneurship Development Company Limited (NEDC O) and the Entrepreneurial T raining Institute & Incubation Centre hosted their second Entrepreneurship Business T raining Series or Entrepreneurship Boot Camp from July 1-6. It focussed on the signicant contribution of small and micro-enterprise economies to economic diversication and building a self-sustainable economy and provided a wide range of business concepts, real life challenges, entrepreneurial failures and successes. e boot camp assisted graduates to develop entrepreneur-type attitudes and provided them with exclusive insight into the real life challenges of successful entrepreneurs. It also equipped them with essential business plan writing skills in a dynamic and interactive environment. e end result was an expectation that participants would see entrepreneurship as a viable option and give them the impetus to start their own business. UWI/NEDCO ENTREPRENEURS HIP B OO T CAMPTurn your academic knowledge and ideas into your own business Earnest budding entrepreneurs PHOTOS: ANEEL KARIMWinner T amara P rosper receives her award from Sharan Singh, Director, Oce of Institutional A dvancement and Internationalisation

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4 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 28TH JULY, 2013 CAMPUS NEWSIts crazy! e heir to a N ew York banking company with a secret dream of life on stage is sent to Deadrock, N evada, to foreclose on the tiny towns only theatre. For four nights in July, disbelief was suspended at Queens Hall, when M ust Come See Productions (M CSP) presented the Gershwin comedy classic, Crazy for You! Patrons were treated to the timeless music of George Gershwin by a live band, with tunes like I Got R hythm, N ice Work if Y ou Can Get It, Embraceable Y ou and Someone to Watch O ver M e, all under the musical direction of Jessel M urray, Head of the Department of Creative A rts at e UWI. Directed by Debra BoucaudM ason, this high-energy, T ony A ward-winning comedy Bobby and the Follies PHOTOS: DARRYL STEELEere is a well known folk song that starts with a clarion call, an ode to mangoes. e varying notes in which the word itself is sung is a testament to the absolute joy that eating a mango of any variety can bring. M angoes, however, are more than just gestational delights and on July 5 the N etwork of R ural Women Producers ( NR WP), T he U WIs Faculty of Food and A griculture, the M inistry of Food Production and the InterA merican Institute for Cooperation on A griculture (IICA) brought stakeholders together for a conference that provided a forum for research work relating to the exploitation of mango from seed to table. R esearch and Development is the basis of the success of the mango at the producer and commercial level and therefore the growth of the mango industry in T rinidad & T obago. T he M ango Conference week of activities, which included a mango luncheon, culminated with the 4th M ango included mistaken identity, madcap mishaps, plot twists, fabulous dance numbers. M CSP has been at the forefront of musical theatre, producing smash hits over the years including last years popular Hairspray e Crazy for You musical recounted the life of young N ew Y ork banker, Bobby Childs, who yearns to have a career on stage but has to escape the city to start a new life in rural N evada where he hopes to revive a dying town by putting on a big theatrical production. Of course, he also had to win the heart of the tough-as nails town beautyPolly Baker. It featured a talented cast and crew including Cacique award-winning actress K endra Sylvester-Flores as cowgirl Polly Baker and newcomer Isaiah A lexander as Bobby Childs. U WI theatre students K imberly Jones and A nton Brewster (both seen in 2012s Hairspray ) acted as Irene, a N ew Y ork socialite and Lank, a cowboy entrepreneur, respectively. M ichailean T aylor, a UWI eatre A rts graduate, acted as the playboy impressario Z angler. A lso part of the all star artistic team were Cacique award winning choreographer A dele Bynoe, assisted by Dr. Jorge M orejn of The UWI, scenic designer Dara Jordan-Brown and costume designer A ndrew Seepersad. T he team was rounded off with the dual stage management of Donna-M arie Bertrand and A sha Stewart, lighting designer K nolly Whiskey, sound designer T reldon ompson and make-up artist A yana Jordan.Festival at e U WI Field Station in M t. Hope. e throngs of visitors who trekked or shuttled to the Field Station learnt about the many economic opportunities available through the sustainable use of the mango. e Festival featured a range of mangoes and mango products, and visitors were able to purchase items such as muns, cake balls, crumble, raisin cookies and nutbread, lotions, creams, soaps and scented candles all made from the mango. ere were even mango pedicures! A variety of the locally grown fruit was on display at every booth: sweet, juicy, versatile and delicious mangoes of every size and variety such as the sinfully sweet Julie, considered the Queen of mangoes, as well as R ose, Hog, M ary, Calabash, Doux doux, La Brea Gyul, T urpentine, and Graham a gra of the Julie mango. Graing demonstrations, mango and livestock tours, exhibitions, childrens activities, mango eating competitions and other entertainment rounded o the day.MANGOES, MANGOES, MANGOES...Enticing mango salad PHOTO: GUYTN OTTLEYCrazyfor You P olly Baker

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SUNDAY 28TH JULY, 2013 UWI TODAY 5 ENER GY RESEAR CHThe New CropUWI RESEAR CHERS CONTINUE TO FOCUS ON FOOD & A GRICULTUREBY ANNA WALC OTTHARD YThe UWI St. Augustine Campus has the prodigious distinction of having evolved from the Imperial College of T ropical A griculture (ICTA) over 50 years ago. ere is a legacy of multi-disciplinary research at e UWI, discoveries that that have had ripple eects throughout the world from the Cocoa R esearch U nits genebank, which was key in rejuvenating cocoa varieties on the brink of extinction, to the work of former U WI Vice-Chancellor and N obel Prize winner, Sir A rthur Lewis pioneering research into economic development which had particular consideration of the problems of developing countries. Current Vice Chancellor, Professor E. N igel Harris, is renowned for his work as a rheumatologist, having helped to dene a disorder called Antiphospholipid Syndrome and devising a diagnostic test (anticardiolipin test) for it, along with doctors Aziz Gharavi and Graham Hughes. ese are just a few UWI stalwarts of research, there are many others. O ver the decades, the university has re-invigorated its research agenda from the bottom up, although there have been challenges in funding e UWI has consistently built on this legacy of innovation in the arts and sciences. is focus has had rewards across the board; one area is the substantial 57% increase in postgraduate student enrolment from 2007 to 2012. O ur researchers have found solutions to some key, hardedged issues aecting these islands. R esearchers need time to move from hypothesis to real world solutions through the process of investigation, experimentation, testing and production. Its time consuming, it takes years, sometimes decades, but the rewards are invaluable, Campus Principal, Professor Clement Sankat stated recently, adding that many critical UWI research projects have emerged that are key to national and regional development. In O ctober, e UWI Symposium on R esearch, Enterprise and Impact will showcase research that has impacted three key areas: innovative products and services; the strengthening of national policy frameworks; as well as community engagement. e Symposium is part of a university-wide R esearch Expo to promote projects and programmes from across the Campus seven Faculties from O ctober 2nd -5th. e Campus JF K Quadrangle and A uditorium will be transformed into a showcase of interactive 3-D displays, experiments, digital demos, virtual exhibits, live presentations and skills workshops, as well as artistic performances, including poetry readings and mini-concerts. Professor Carlisle Pemberton, Dean of the Faculty of Food and A griculture at e UWI, St. A ugustine Campus, spoke about the importance of research at UWI: What are some of the key strategies being adopted by The UWI and the Faculty of Food and Agriculture in moving forward in the development of research as well as teaching? CP: U nder the R egional T ransformation Programme for A griculture, UWI and the Faculty of Food and A griculture are responsible for human resource development. e Faculty is thus focusing on developing a regional, integrated tertiary level system that would meet the human resource needs of the sector. One key element of this system is the introduction of a Diploma in A griculture programme in the Faculty, to provide seamless entry to the Facultys undergraduate programmes of students from the regional agricultural tertiary level institutes (TLIs). T he Faculty also adopted a strategy of research and development to further the achievement of food and nutrition security in the R egion. T o this end, the Faculty has introduced a new option in M anaging Food Security in its graduate degree oerings and has partnered with M cGill U niversity to undertake a large scale research project on improving the food and nutrition security of households with school-aged children. UWI and the Faculty also just joined with three professional organisations in agriculture, to stage an important conference focusing on agribusiness and youth development for improving regional food security. e Faculty has re-energised its research programme to contribute to the drive for regional and national food security and agreed with the M inistry of Food Production to focus its research on the priority commodities identied in the M inistrys N ational A ction Plan for the sector Agriculture Now. Why is there urgency in the strategic development of this sector in T&T and the Caribbean? CP: ese strategies are important since the issue of food and nutrition security remains of vital concern regionally. In addition to the burden the levels of food imports place on regional foreign exchange resources, the health and wellness of the Caribbean society are being threatened by nutritionally related diseases such as diabetes and hypertension, which are also burdening the health sector of the region. us the region has to refocus on using the agricultural sector to produce the kinds of foods that will lead to a more healthy population and one that would contribute to regional and national economic development, rather than being an obstacle to this process. What is your outlook on the impact these strategies will have on the development of the agricultural sector? How soon before we see real change in our national approach and a revitalisation of the sector? CP: I do believe that these strategies will make an impact on the development of the agricultural sector especially in the medium to long term. It has to be borne in mind that the food and agriculture sector exists within a holistic economic system and so oen the food and agriculture sector is aected more by what happens outside the sector than what takes place within it. N evertheless the current emphasis on the sector is well placed and should lead to rewards in terms of an improved food and nutrition status for the Caribbean region.

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6 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 28TH JULY, 2013 CAMPUS NEWS UWIs T rade and Economic Unit ( T ED U ) of the Department of Economics posed it as a statement, rather than a question: Achieving Sustainability in Regions with Extractive Industries. However, participants at a conference dealing with the issue saw it as a how to and a real dilemma. e tightly packed conference was part of a larger local economic development initiative jointly funded by A tlantic and the InterA merican Development Bank, in partnership with T ED U and the Point Fortin Borough Corporation. e aim is to enhance sustainable development options for persons and communities in the southwest peninsula of T rinidad, where oil and gas extraction dominate industrial activity. Dr Bhoendradatt T ewarie, M inister of Planning and Sustainable Development, opened the conference and the innings. He set the context of a southwest peninsula that is targeted as a growth pole for an energy industry, with 12 major oil and gas players, which contributes half of the countrys GDP. e devolution of power to the two regional corporations Point Fortin and Siparia is meant to complement the development process. T ED U Coordinator Dr R oger Hosein and Central Banks Dr A lvin Hilaire situated the conferences examination of development opportunities against a background of macroeconomics of countries with extractive industries (EI). Both presenters underscored trends such as Dutch disease and rent-seeking activity, typical of countries dependent on revenues from extractive industries. Dutch disease refers to the negative consequences arising from large increases in a countrys income and is primarily associated with a natural resource discovery. R ent seeking relates to the use of resources for an economic gain without reciprocating any benets to society through wealth creation. Dr Hosein examined eects such as de-agriculturisation, lower productivity in the manufacturing sector, increased levels of pollution and ineciencies in government spending and social programmes. He proposed solutions such as harmonising local economic development strategies with growth pole policy, tapping into the diaspora to provide development funds and re-emphasising the C AR IC OM market. R evenue from taxation of these industries allowed governments to undertake large projects, to invest and save. Dr. Hilaire cited the Heritage and Stabilisation Fund as one example of savings. M acroeconomic challenges to the local economy are not just external but also internal, such as political economic decisions and answers to questions such as, who owns extractive industry wealth, the rate at which extraction should proceed and who should benet from these nite resources. He considered T rinidad & T obagos experience of two energy-related booms the most recent ending in 2008 during which surpluses were accumulated. Conference presenters examined the interests and opportunities for meaningful participation of all major stakeholders impacted by EIs. ese include civil society, EI industry professionals and companies and multistakeholder partnerships the private sector, government and civil society, small and medium-sized enterprises. e need to forge eective links among government, extractive industry companies and local communities emerged as a continuous thread. A R eal Dilemma:Achieving Sustainable Development in Regions with Extractive Industries S USTAI N A BLE DEVELO P MEN T I N 3D A 3D poster competition sought to allow students to explore the link between the extractive industries and sustainable development, by discussing what sustainable development means to their communities. Team entrants had to include the statement Sustainability The Way Forward along with three 3D components. The bases for judging were overall impact, concept, originality, innovative design, craftsmanship, execution, completeness of work and the use of materials tied to extractive industries. Five schools in the south west peninsula were targeted, with only two responding to the challenge. Point Fortin East Secondary entered four teams; while Vessigny High School had three. A Point Fortin team emerged the winner, capturing the highest points in all these categories.Structured opportunities for multi-stakeholder partnerships are available at the international and national levels. O n the international front, M ark R egis of the T rinidad & T obago Extractive Industries T ransparency Initiative outlined milestones in moving from candidate country to compliant country status with regard to this global partnership. Civil society, government and business are on the steering committee guiding this process. Dr T hackwray Driver presented case studies of a local industry associations innovation in the creation of standards via the Energy Chambers S TO W Safe to Work standard. He underscored that standards are aimed at facilitating economic development and, as such, the Energy Chamber had worked with the N ational T raining A gency to create a competency assurance system which addresses EI companies interest in having a competent workforce. Lennox Sirjuesingh, president of the Local Content Chamber, emphasised local capacity and competence as signicant for creating jobs and possibly replacing state expenditure in social spending and poverty reduction. Dr R on Sookram and Sharon Bradshaws presentations addressed the question of civil societys role as an active participant in the management of EIs and, more broadly, in inuencing the enhanced quality of life which EI revenues can facilitate for host communities and countries. Civil society organisations social movements, trade unions and other non-governmental organisations may have challenges of capacity to undertake an informed and sustained role. Bradshaw proposed that civil society build their knowledge of the EI sector, develop institutional frameworks for collaboration among themselves and in so doing seek support for both processes. Gillian Friday shared the corporate social responsibility of Petrotrin, a national EI company. Its basis for engagement echoed previous themes with its emphasis on local content, the imperative for balancing development inequalities among regions where EI corporations are located, and transparency. Fridays presentation disclosed levels of revenue earned by the company as well as levels of taxes paid to government over a period ending 2011. K izzan Lee Sam of the Caribbean Local Economic Development (LED) Programme identied links among extractive industries, LED strategies in regions with EIs and opportunities for small business development in those regions. Business training, networking, mentoring and research analysis which identies opportunities and facilitates local procurement are all critically needed support areas for small and medium enterprises. She advocated clustering small and medium enterprises in the C AR IC OM region to more eectively develop resources and access markets. Minister Bhoendradath T ewarie at the podium PHOTOS: ANEEL KARIMSome of the TEDU 3D P oster Competition entrants

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8 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 28TH JULY, 2013 CAMPUS NEWS In 2013, e UWI has been at the forefront of several agribusiness and food security conferences at home and abroad, including the recently hosted A gribusiness Essential for Food Security: Empowering Y outh and Enhancing Quality Products at the Hyatt R egency Hotel in Port of Spain from June 30 to July 6, as well as the Beijing A gricultural Conference, hosted by the Chinese A cademy of A gricultural Sciences in Beijing in June. In order to address the issues of food security, sustainable development of an agribusiness approach and increasing food prices, the Caribbean A gro-Economic Society (C A ES), along with the Caribbean Food Crops Society (CFCS) and the International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS) hosted the timely A gribusiness conference. T he conference examined key issues including enhancing food quality and safety throughout the food chain; the risks associated with food production and agricultural development which contribute to price volatility and food insecurity; relevant methods for empowering youth with agribusiness essentials for food security; appropriate mechanisms for addressing the global impact of food and nutrition insecurity; and tertiary education and training for food and nutrition security. For Dr M ario Fortune, Chairman of the local organising conference committee, all of the great scientists in agriculture have taken part in this annual conference which began in 1963, there is your Professor Clement Sankat, Professor Carlisle Pemberton, Dr. Gary Garcia, Dr. N krumah R obertsits a great place for scientists, researchers to get together and share their ideas. e CFCS has a mandate to foster communication and contribute to the development of science, technology and the production of food crops and animals in the Caribbean. U WI Dean of the Faculty of Food and A griculture, Prof. Carlisle Pemberton, agrees that the emphasis on the development of the agricultural sector and associated teaching programmes, research initiatives and outreach projects, are key components for future development of the region. He explained that the Faculty has also adopted a strategy of research and development to further the achievement of food and nutrition security regionally by introducing the new option in M anaging Food Security in its graduate degree oerings and partnering with M cGill U niversity to undertake a large scale research project on improving the food and nutrition security of households with school-aged children. e issue of food and nutrition security remains of vital concern to the R egion. In addition to the burden the levels of food imports place on the foreign exchange resources, the health and wellness of the Caribbean society is being threatened by the nutritionally related diseases such as diabetes and hypertension, which are also burdening the health sector resources, Professor Pemberton explained. us the R egion has to refocus on using the agricultural sector to produce the kinds of foods that will lead to a more healthy population and one that would contribute to regional and national economic development, rather than being an obstacle to this process. Similarly, Professor Clement Sankat, Principal and PVC for the St A ugustine Campus of e U WI, congratulated the organizers for having a forum on youth empowerment and one on young farmers. is ttingly describes the direction in which we in the Caribbean ought to be moving. First, we ought to cultivate a passion for producing and consuming local and regional agricultural products of quality and distinction that are fully West Indian. A nd second, we ought to nd creative ways to get our young people interested and involved in agriculture, the Principal stated. e UWI St. A ugustine Campus has been looking very carefully at ways in which it can positively impact the food and agricultural sector in T rinidad & T obago and the region. In addition to new innovative programmes in the Faculty of Food and A griculture, the university has acquired prime land at O range Grove, which will be transformed into a modern, new Field Station. THE JAGDEO INITIA TIVE U WI experts were also part of a meeting of the technical management advisory committee ( TMA C) set up by C AR IC OM to look at co-ordination of agricultural research and development in the region. TMA C was established to dene ways to address one of the 10 key binding constraints identied in the Jagdeo Initiative, Inadequate R esearch and Development. is was led by the M inistry of A griculture, St Lucia and convened by the Caribbean A gricultural R esearch and Development Institute (CARDI). N amed after the former Guyanese President, the Jagdeo Initiative is a strategy for removing constraints to the development of agriculture in the Caribbean. It builds upon past regional eorts to develop a common agricultural policy (CAP). It is expected that the meeting would agree on the way forward for a regional strategy for research and development, a strategy for linkages with Latin A merica, and identication of essentials to address climate change. THE BEIJING CONFERENCE A t this conference, which attracted scores of participants from across the globe, Professor Clement Sankat participated in a panel discussion that explored the challenges and prospects of Caribbean agriculture. A griculture, he said, is the mainstay of several Caribbean countries, with a primary focus on bananas, sugar, rice, tropical fruits and vegetables. Its contribution to GDP ranges from 0.8% T rinidad & T obago, to 26% in Guyana and 28% in Haiti. On the other side of the scale, the top six food imports in the Caribbean as of 2010 are rice, wheat, maize, processed foods, meat and vegetable oil. While wheat and maize are not produced here, certainly Guyana has lost competitive market share in rice, a key staple, to cheaper and/or more expensively branded products. e Caribbean needs, he emphasized, to consume more of what we produce and hopefully produce much more of our foods such as rice, root crops, meat, milk, sh and coconut oil. is loss of market share has fed a vicious cycle where lower domestic production leads to higher imports, which in turn aect consumer preferences through the lower priced and oen more consistently available imported substitutes. ese imports further restrict the domestic market and squeeze prot margins for producers. In this context, open market conditions have le the sectors leading export industries exposed and vulnerable. is in turn has led to sharp declines to GDP, unemployment and negative social eects. ese challenges are further complicated by rural to urban/regional/international migration in search of jobs; an aging farmer population and lack of interest by youth; limited nances for agricultural investment; the absence or, at times, inconsistent policies across the region to support key development areas; as well as insucient attention to dedicated research at the highest levels. Professor Sankat recapitulated the need to move beyond primary production, from agriculture production to food production, to embrace the concept of the value-chain system of interrelated economic transactions and to engage a wider set of actors in the system. K ey action areas must be investment in new research development and transfer, linkages and relationships in the agricultural sector and a new class of food producers. All of these must be supported by national and regional policies, extension capacity, restructured curricula at various levels and an expanded local marketing infrastructure. He concluded by stating that, in tandem with all of the above, there must be improved quality and safety, improved market access (current and potential), a focus on food and nutritional security, along with the adoption of biotechnology and climate smart technologies so critical for vulnerable small island states such as the Caribbean.P rof Carlisle P emberton speaks at the opening ceremony for the agribusiness conference. PHOTO: RICHARD SPENCEAgribusiness and F ood Security for the Region

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SUNDAY 28TH JULY, 2013 UWI TODAY 9 LEWIS-BECKFORD MEMORIAL LECTURE P air the statistics (centre row) with a warning that came from the U nited N ations in 2012 that world grain reserves are so dangerously low that severe weather in the U nited States or other foodexporting countries could trigger a major hunger crisis next year. A ccording to the UN failing harvests in the U S, U kraine and other countries this year have eroded reserves to their lowest level since 1974. e US, which experienced record heat waves and droughts in 2012, now holds in reserve a historically low 6.5% of the maize that it expects to consume in the next year. Lester Brown, president of the Earth Policy R esearch Centre in Washington, makes the point in a new book that Food shortages undermined earlier civilisations. We are on the same path. Each country is now fending for itself. e world is living one year to the next. It is in this context that Professor Clement Sankat, Principal and PVC of the St A ugustine campus of e U WI, titled his Lewis-Beckford M emorial Lecture Caribbean A griculture at the crossroads. His lecture was presented at the joint A gricultural Economic Conference at the Hyatt R egency, T rinidad, on July 1st. T here are many reasons for the current crisis: population growth, urbanization, rapid development in East/South East A sia, national calamities and droughts, slow supply response, a falling dollar, rising oil price, agro-fuels, low agricultural productivity, neglected aid for science, technology and innovation, few country producers in staple foods for trade. He makes the point that bearing in mind the new global realities of agriculture and its holistic contribution to development, we should attempt to pursue a more balanced strategy which leverages agriculture as an integrator and pushes its value creation to new heights. Professor Sankat cited statistics from N orth, Central and South A merican countries to debunk the myth that as a country grows, the agricultural sectors contribution to the economy declines. e new thinking measures agriculture as an expanded sector, with linkages to other sectors, and this in fact shows a signicant increase in the contribution of food and agriculture to national GDP. e CARIC OM statistics other than for Guyana (22%) and Belize (12%) were a bit grim in comparison with countries largely showing a attening or decrease in agriculture and its by-products. Professor Sankat drew reference to the 10 key binding constraints identified by the Jagdeo Initiative: limited nancing and inadequate new investments; outdated and inefficient agriculture, health and food safety systems; inadequate research and development; fragmented and unorganised private sector; inefficient land and water distribution and management systems; deficient and uncoordinated risk management measures; inadequate transportation system particularly for perishables; weak and non-integrated information and intelligence systems; weak marketing systems, linkages and participation in growth markets; lack of skilled human resources. O n the eve of the historic C AR IC OM Summit in T rinidad & T obago, he urged Caribbean leaders to walk the talk and work to remove all physical and technical barriers to agricultural trade in the region as a matter of urgency. Such action would unleash the creative potential of all peoples in the region with possibilities for agricultural and enterprise development, enhanced income and employment, and increased food security. e Caribbean, he says, has a competitive advantage in its exotic fruits (T rini scorpion peppers are the hottest in the world, Grenadas nutmeg is world famous as is Jamaicas Blue M ountain coee, the nest cocoa and avocado can be found here and the Julie mango originated in the Caribbean) as well as in its livestock (Barbados Black Belly sheep, Jamaicas Hope cow, T rinidad & T obagos Bualypso and wild meat, especially the agouti and lappe). He indicated that an appropriate strategy for agricultural development in the Caribbean would be one that recognizes the new global realities of agriculture and its holistic contribution to development; he strongly recommended a balanced strategy that recognizes both the need for import substitution as well as agricultural diversication and the exports of CHI NA10% of G D PE mploys 37% of the population T wofold increase in food production in the last 50 years. A chieved 95% self-sufciency in rice, wheat and maize SOU TH K OR EA3.4% of G D PE mploys 7.9% of the population S elf-sufcient in rice since 1978 T RI N ID A D & T O BAG O0.8% of G D P G UYANA26% of G D P HA ITI28% of G D P P rofessor Sankat gives the 2013 M emorial L ecturePHOTO: ANEEL KARIMProfessor Clement Sankat, Principal and PVC of the St. Augustine Campus of e UWI, is a registered professional Mechanical/Agricultural Engineer with the Board of Engineering of Trinidad & Tobago. He holds a Bachelors Degree (First Class Honours) and Masters in Mechanical Engineering from e UWI and a Doctorate from the University of Guelphs School of Engineering (Canada). He is a Chartered Engineer (CEng), a Fellow of the Institution of Agricultural Engineers (FIAgrE) of the UK and a Fellow of the Association of Professional Engineers of Trinidad & Tobago (FAPETT). products that could be described as uniquely West Indian in character. e concept of unique value propositions is a winning strategy for agribusiness development in the Caribbean, one which has a stronger comparative advantage in this area than in a strategy of price competitiveness for homogenous products. China, India and the U nited States, he noted, are the leaders in increased spending on agricultural research and development but, unsurprisingly, the worlds poorest countries lag behind. Professor Sankat reminded the audience that back in 1967 Sir William A rthur Lewis made the point that the bases for agricultural progress are well known.. M oney must be spent on research and agricultural extension to bring knowledge of new seeds, fertilizers and pest and disease control to the farmers. Investment is also needed in roads, water and processing facilities, following up five years later that our small farmers ought all to have gone to agricultural institutions. Indeed, between 2005/2006 and 2010/2011 enrolment in programmes oered by the Department of A gricultural Economics and Extension had just about doubled, from 334 to 671. However, according to UWI data, only 27% of agriculture graduates were employed in the agricultural sector. O thers were employed across other sectors, mainly education (22%), health (15%) and nancial (10%). Surveys showed that agriculture graduates were among those least likely to say their degree discipline is related to their job and were the least satised with their jobs. Embedding and integrating agriculture means mentoring our Caribbean youth. He pointed out that education, internships and mentorships were absolutely important ingredients to encourage young people into the food and agricultural sector but these eorts must be supported by access to land, nances, labour, markets, and good physical and social infrastructure, particularly in rural communities. He encouraged the exposure of young people in urban communities to agriculture with a view to attracting them to get engaged, possibly in more rural settings. In T rinidad & T obago, there is a Y outh A pprenticeship Programme in A griculture ( YA P A ), St. Lucia has its A griculture Forum for Y outh (SL AFY ), and Guyanas K uru K uru Co-operative College has a long history of programmes targeting the young. T he Campus Principal mentioned the rise in the availability and production of shale gas in the U nited States and other countries, the rise of biofuels, and the new alternative energy technologies that are gaining ground, all of which will reduce dependency on traditional oil and gas exporters. e future outlook from both a price and production perspective could therefore be challenging for countries like T rinidad & T obago and presents an additional imperative to truly put diversication of our economy at the top of the agenda. A griculture, in all its forms, is not an easy choice as a career but it is increasingly a necessary choice if a sustainable agricultural sector is to be strategically nurtured and integrated into the matrix of Caribbean society.C ARIBBEAN A GRICUL TURE at the Crossroads

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10 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 28TH JULY, 2013 CAMPUS NEWS With internationalisation at the forefront of e U WI St. A ugustines developmental agenda and strategic international collaborations taking place more than ever before, Professor Clement Sankat, PVC and Principal of e UWI, St. A ugustine Campus hosted a brunch at his oce to thank A mbassadors and High Commissioners from the Diplomatic Corps, heads of international agencies and Honorary Consuls for their considerable collaboration with the Campus and to explore opportunities for enhancing that collaboration in the future. So, on that sunny Saturday in July, in one of the oldest wooden buildings in the country, this mix of senior diplomats and academic leaders relaxed in an informal atmosphere over a sumptuous local meal whilst they chatted about a broad range of contemporary matters. ere was laughter, exchange of information and, at the end, a keen interest on the part of those present to build upon the existing relationships to develop new international partnerships, research projects, scholarships and other forms of collaboration. Chairing the event was Sharan Chandradath Singh, UWI Director at the Oce of Institutional A dvancement and Internationalisation, who has played a central role in developing the increased engagement between the Campus and the Diplomatic and Consular Corps as well as international agencies. Professor Clement Sankat spoke on U WIs unique strengths and areas of research while Frances Seignoret, Director of the Europe Division in the M inistry of Foreign A airs and a U WI alumna, brought greetings on behalf of the M inister of Foreign A airs. Some unique ideas emerged from the fruitful discussions including opportunities for increased language training at a national level, sharing of critical information between both sectors and ideas for new collaborations focussed on capacity development locally as well as across the Caribbean region. Carded to be a regular event on the calendar of the Campus, this Heads of M issions Brunch demonstrated the eectiveness of e U WIs signicant collaborations with this important and committed group of international leaders and it provided a renewed energy and focus on the signicant potential for international collaboration to make meaningful local impact.H eads of MissionsInternationalisation at the forefront G iving the international audience an overview of e UWI PHOTOS: ANEEL KARIMH.E. R aymundo R odriguez Diaz, A mbassador of El Salvador, chats with Ying L iu of the Chinese Embassy. In the background is H.E. Fernando A yala, A mbassador of Chile Dark chocolate bars made from the renowned international genebank at e UWIs Cocoa R esearch Unit A quip from H.E. Jacques Sturm, A mbassador of the French R epublic draws laughter from Sharan Singh and P rincipal Sankat

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SUNDAY 28TH JULY, 2013 UWI TODAY 11 CAMPUS NEWSDr. Jos G raziano da Silva meets P rof SankatPHOTO: ANEEL KARIM UWI and FA O Strengthen TiesO n July 5, Director-General Dr. Jos Graziano da Silva of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), paid a courtesy call on Professor Clement Sankat, Principal and PVC and sta of the new Faculty of Food and Agriculture of The UWI. The courtesy call came on the heels of Professor Sankats presentation at the 30th West Indies Agricultural Economic Conference on July 1, where he urged Caribbean leaders to walk the talk and deepen the support of research, development and innovation in Food and Agriculture through the urgent adoption of several initiatives, including the removal of physical and technical barriers to agricultural trade in the region. Between 2003 and 2004, Dr. Graziano da Silva served in the President Luiz Incio Lula da Silva cabinet of Brazil as Extraordinary Minister for Food Security, and was responsible for implementing the Fome Zero programme, which took 28 million people out of the national poverty line during the 8 years of the Lula administration. Elected on June 26, 2011, Dr. Graziano became the rst Latin American Director General of the Food and Agriculture Organization. Having assumed this role on January 1, 2012, his term will come to an end in July 2015. Acting Dean, Dr. Carlisle Pemberton, gave the delegation, which included Carlos Hartog, Special Adviser, FAO, Rome; Sharon Brennen-Haylock, FAO, New York; Dr. John Deep Ford, Sub Regional Coordinator for the Caribbean and Representative for Barbados, and Dr. Barton Clarke, FAO Representative, United Nations, a presentation of the work and achievements of The UWIs Faculty of Food and Agriculture. They then received a guided tour of the Chocolate Production Lab at the internationally recognised Cocoa Research Centre of the St. Augustine Campus. The contingent was in Trinidad & Tobago to participate in the 34th Regular Meeting of the Conference of Heads of Government of CARICOM.We can never overstate the geological hazards, to which our region is vulnerable and the necessity to properly monitor the primary indicators of unrest, said Dr. Joan Latchman, A g Director and Seismologist at e UWI Seismic R esearch Centre (UWI-S R C). She was expressing her gratitude to the Government of Chile whose ongoing commitment to assist T he U WI-S R C with strengthening its monitoring capabilities was again demonstrated with the donation of a pair of seismic recording digitisers. is equipment will be added to the Centres seismic network, joining the high precision GPS receivers which Chile donated to the Centre last year. T he U WI-S R C monitors earthquakes, volcanoes and tsunamis for the Englishspeaking Eastern Caribbean. L loyd L ynch, R esearch Fellow (Instrumentation) and Dr. Joan L atchman, Director (A g.), Seismic R esearch Centre with the equipment donated by H.E. Fernando A yala (right) on behalf of the Chilean government. G overnment of Chiledonates monitoring equipment toUWI Seismic R esearch CentreA mbassador of Chile, His Excellency Fernando A yala, highlighted his countrys commitment to the region. Chile has always been strongly committed to this region and has developed a very active cooperation agenda, said His Excellency. We are convinced that through South-South and trilateral cooperation with developed countries, we can advance together towards a better standard of living for our nations, added the A mbassador. In keeping with the spirit of collaboration, the A mbassador also announced the visit of the President of the U niversity of Chile later in 2013. A technical cooperation agreement between the U niversity of Chile and e U niversity of the West Indies is expected to be signed during this visit.Chile has always been strongly committed to this region and has developed a very active cooperation agenda

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12 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 28TH JULY, 2013 CAMPUS NEWS S A O P A OLO May 20, 2013I admire how when I travel my phone syncs automatically to the new place that I am in, automatically scanning the atmosphere for a signal to which it is compatible so that it can still operate, allowing me to make calls or receive texts. I think international travel is like that. Y our inner channel scans the new environment searching for a compatible signal. I may be exaggerating but I think my heartbeat synced with the rhythm of Sao Paolo at the airport arrival hall, and we have been vibing on the same wavelength ever since!UWIs DISC O VERTamaras Journal ENGAGING THE BRICSIn 2001 Jim oNeil of G oldman S achs coined the word BRI C in reference to a group of emerging markets that at the time represented only 15% of the gross national product of the six major advanced industrial economies,but which economists predicted would catch up to these six in under 40 years. T hese emerging markets are Brazil, Russia, India, C hina and most recently, S outh A frica. T he S ocioE conomic and G eopolitical circumstances of the C aribbean mandates active engagement with key global players and in this regard, with the the BRICS aggressively exerting their inuence on the international playing eld, it is imperative that our current and future C aribbean leaders have as intimate an understanding and sensitivity for these countries as possible. In the UWIs Discover Series ,students, staff and graduates or any C aribbean H igher E ducation Institution are provided with a guided immersion into the culture, history, politics, education, architecture, food, people and various other facets of these future superpowers. L ed by expert academic experts, the 2-3 week visits have resulted in a many new lessons, perspectives and even collaborations. In 2014, the UWIs Discover Series will carry groups to India, Brazil and S outh A frica. e D ISCO VER Brazil team at Escadaria Selaron, world famous tiled steps named aer Chilean artist Jorge Selaron V iew from the top, M ercado M unicipal de Sao P aulo; Brazil is the third largest exporter of agricultural producePHOTO: JULES SOBION O ur rst stop brings us to Sao Paolo. e largest of cities, it is the heart of commerce and demonstrates that Brazil is a country that is more developed than it is developing. Huge trac jams mean that many of the high rises are equipped with helipads denoting that getting to work by air is an option used by many. Sao Paolo is a huge metropolis where public art and public displays of aection are commonplace. e city is full of entrepreneurial, artistic, tropically passionate people who freely express their love for one another and for Brazil. ey drink tiny cups of black coee and eat massive servings of sweet desserts ubiquitously consumed by being held in a napkin -never, never with ones bare hands! RIO DE JANEIR O May 30, 2013e city of R io de Janeiro is known as the marvellous city and there is a reason for that. It is nestled between dramatic sheer mountains and the beautiful A tlantic O cean. e stunning shoreline contrasts with the sharp shale mountains a perfect spot to locate the former capital of Brasil or Christ the R edeemer, standing watch over his charges. Luckily for us, we stayed at a lovely posada run by a French woman in a quaint mountaintop village called Santa eresa, with its riotous cobbled stone streets; it provided breathtaking views of the Western side of the capital, and great exercise when we explored its tumultuous alleyways! Tamara Brathwaite is a librarian attached to the Institute of International Relations at The UWI, St Augustine Campus. She is also an avid journal writer. Tamara has always wanted to travel under The UWI umbrella and UWIs Discover provided the opportunity to bring her love for travel and writing together. Travel with her as she discovers that there is more to Brazil and India than what youd nd in the travel books.

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SUNDAY 28TH JULY, 2013 UWI TODAY 13 In 2012 the series started with a visit to India and continued in 2013 with a visit to Brazil. is August, UWI s Discover will again visit India. SALV ADOR DE BAHIA June 2, 2013A s we landed and drove through a bamboo grove that heralded our arrival in the state of Bahia, I felt that there was something hauntingly familiar about the capital city, Salvador de Bahia, the very rst capital of Brazil. I experienced an unfamiliar dj vu, as though some part of my spirit was here before. What I do know is that of the Brazilian cities that we have visited thus far, Salvador resonated with me. M y roommate, Chelsea M arie M endes, probably got fed up of my whistling David R udders Bahia Girl every morning but, in the song, I think that there is a line that goes ...you see T rinidad and Brazil has the same vibration and nothing was ever as true for me as our brief sojourn in Salvador. BRASILIA June 6, 2013Brasilia. Brasilia. Brasilia. How do I tell you about Brasilia? Inaugurated just about the time that the Caribbean was waking up to the idea of independence in the early 60s, the current capital of Brazil, is a dream come true for a developed nation; it is a modern contemporary planned city straight out of a science ction novel. In 1000 days, the then government of Brazil fullled a constitutional promise to create a new capital in the middle of the country. Clearing what was once desert and brush land, to plan and build a city that meets the needs of an exploding population took just four years. Laid out in sectors, the federal district is shaped to resemble a plane, with a central administrative core as the cockpit and supporting sectors as wings. A government sector steers the residential sector, the banking sector, the cultural sector, the diplomatic sector; everything is pretty much sectioned. e area is perfectly symmetrical, so what is on one half precisely mirrors the other. M y favourite activity of all in Brazil was meeting and chatting with R icardo Wahrendor Caldas, a professor of international relations at the U niversity of Brasilia. I interrogated him about all of the things that I had seen on this trip and he patiently responded. e opportunity to juxtapose these answers later that evening at a dinner hosted by the A mbassador of T rinidad & T obago to Brazil, A mbassador Hamza R afeek was stellar! I was able to further satisfy my inquisitiveness about Brazil from a T rini perspective, allowing me to connect all of the dots with regard to Brazil, how it is portrayed, how it is viewed and its place in the world. In the end, it all made sense. INDIA The Start July 21, 2012Its been a week since weve been in India and still the adjectives to describe this experience, escape me. A ctually, I dont have an adjective, I have an experience. N ight before last, at one of the many welcome receptions, we were given a welcome drink, a fruit punch. It was cool in temperature, brown in colour and ornate with bright green muddled mint leaves, and crunchy bits of local apple oating around in it. It was seasoned, spicy and sweet. T o the taste it was sweet yet tart, spicy yet refreshing, strange yet familiar I could not identify the elements of the drink. T oday I asked one of our companions, and it was revealed that it is a drink made from green mangoes. Only then could my tongue recollect the elements of a mango chow in the drink. Ambi ka panna it is called. Ambi ka panna is India, the elements are familiar but the combination of ingredients is unusual to the senses.The End August 5, 2012 ere is no doubt that we have journeyed through India. Six ights, eight hotels, 15 travelling companions... we have been taken from the sweltering capital of N ew Delhi to the base of the Himalayan M ountains in the N orth, to the reverent shores of the Ganges R iver, to the teeming coast of Cochi in the South. Weve visited academic institutions, cultural industries and monuments of inspiration; had new experiences of aggressive haggling for bargains, using omnipresent squat toilets and collapsing tiredly at 5 star hotels at varying hours of early or late night. Ive tasted new things, seen new sights and heard new sounds and Ive come up initially with two truths. I am Indian...West Indian. When probed about where I am from while in India my response as West Indies is greeted by huge smiles and the names of cricketers roll o of the tongues of merchants... Gary Sobers, Clive Lloyd, Brian Lara, Chris Gayle! A ll Indians are keen to engage in discussions on the politics of cricket. It is actually quite refreshing, to be recognised by our sporting ambassadors of a past time. But, prior to the question, I would not have identied myself as West Indian, or even Indian... ough an accident of Columbus is my inherited fate, I dont feel uncomfortable being cast in an Indian light, in that, I can identify with the culture and the practice and the nuances that may not overtly belong to me but is as much a part of my reality as is any West Indian living in T rinidad & T obago and it is in that regard that I am an Indian that hails from the west, I am a West Indian. Secondly, as open minded as I know that I am, and I know that I am! M y world is small, my ability is challenged by my inability to see as far back as possible and as far forward as innity. M y view is severely limited by my island boundaries and my lack of historical reference. I have travelled to a continent that dees carbon dating, that has monuments older than discovery and prides generations of families dating Before Christ was B.C. e ghosts in India are well preserved. I have travelled to a limitless continent, which has so much to give to the world. ere is a forever in India, a forever that will never leave me, since I have been to a place that does not end, that is historically rich, geographically wide and culturally deep. I have the niggling suspicion that though our journey to India has ended; our discovery of India had just begun. Hardly a nutshell, but these excerpts are some of my thoughts while we travelled under the e UWIs Discover umbrella. e truth of the matter is that though the journey has ended, the discovery has only just begun. Obrigada and Namaste, TamaraA sunny day at the Indian Institute for A dvanced Study, V iceregal L odge (1888), Shimla e inaugural UWI DISCO VER team at the world famous T aj M ahalINDIA PHOTOS: CANDACE GUPPY OF THE INTERNA TIONAL OFFICE, ST. AUGUSTINE CAMPUSCows are sacred in India and feeding them is looked upon favourably

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14 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 28TH JULY, 2013 CAMPUS NEWS RESEAR CHIts a profession that struggles for validity. Jean R aabe is passionate about the eld and regrets that in spite of the wealth of research that proves music therapy is eective as a treatment modality, the profession still struggles for wide-range understanding and respect. R aabe rst came to T rinidad & T obago in 1993 on a FulbrightHayes Summer Study A broad, hosted by e U WI. It was then that she fell in love with the steel pan and purchased a used one. Since that early introduction, shes been a part of 15 Carnival seasons and Panoramas playing with Phase II steel band and, more recently, also with the youth-oriented, smaller Highlanders. In 2002 she decided it was time to give back and oered to do guest lectures at e UWIs Department of Creative and Festival A rts. Student response was so positive that it turned into a semester-length course that gives participants an idea of what it would be like to study music therapy. In 2005, she began conducting workshops in secondary schools and at the M t Hope M edical School. e rst music therapy course, MU SC 3503 M usic erapy was presented to music students in 2009 no pre-requisites required. O ne year later, the rst non-music majors took the elective course and now its student population comprises 1/3 non-music majors and 2/3 music majors. M usic therapy1 is dened as the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals Dr. Sandra Celestine began her remarks to the Y outh at R isk Conference by telling participants right o the bat that they were not embarking on an academic exercise. I am, she said, rst and foremost a clinician. e UWI A t R isk Y outh Project is about providing real world solutions to real people. She was speaking at the Y outh A t R isk Conference hosted by the Department of Behavioural Sciences. e densely packed room included company representatives from bp TT R epublic Bank, UNDP, the T rinidad & T obago Chamber of Industry and Commerce, T he N ational Security M entorship Programme, YT EPP, T rinidad & T obago U nied T eachers A ssociation and the M inistry of N ational Security. By the end of the day, several organisations began discussing additional funding for the T rinidad & T obago Y outh A t R isk Project. e Project, which is active in schools and in the community to bring about real change for youth at risk and their families, denes an at risk student as one who consistently breaks the rules of the M inistry of Education. eir study on the ecacy of using a multi-modal therapeutic counselling approach to help stem the tide of increasing youth misbehaviour, school violence and school crime quickly revealed multi-faceted problems requiring multi-faceted solutions. Sustainable solutions could only be found by making changes in the countrys educational, health care, national security and national development policies. P an M usic erapy For A t R isk Y outh?M ore than 50% of school youth involved in school crime and violence were found to be aicted with health problems. ese health problems include depression, emotional, verbal, or physical abuse, and unresolved grief and loss (caused by witnessing or experiencing the death of friends or family). ese mental health maladies show up daily in school settings as unrepressed anger, disrespect for authority, ghting, sexual misconduct as well as acts of stealing and robbery. e oen-unseen impacts of these mental health problems are hopelessness, self-harm, and suicidal thoughts and suicidal attempts. e immediate successes of the Y outh Project were improved student behaviour for nearly 40% of students and 95% identication of the specic issues causing a student to misbehave. Group counselling produced faster results than individual counselling for within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy programme. e music therapist assesses the clients emotional well-being, physical health, social functioning, communication abilities and cognitive skills through musical responses and designs music sessions based specically on individual needs. e music therapist then participates in interdisciplinary treatment planning, evaluation and follow-up. A ccording to the literature, music therapy is for persons of any and every age who have mental health needs, developmental and learning disabilities, A lzheimers disease and other age related conditions, substance abuse problems, brain injuries, physical disabilities, and acute and chronic pain, including mothers in labour. Hospitals use music therapy to alleviate pain, elevate patients moods, promote movement for physical rehabilitation, to calm or sedate and to counteract depression, fear or apprehension. In psychiatric facilities, music therapists help patients to explore personal feelings and make positive changes in mood and emotional states. It gives them a sense of control over life through successful experiences and enables them to practice problem solving and working co-operatively with others. It also helps them learn how to resolve conict, which leads to stronger family and peer relationships.Youth A t R isk: Y outh Intervention Strategies T o R educe Crime and Violence Jean Raabe has been a Board Certied Music erapist (MT-BC) for three decades, working primarily with children and adolescents in psychiatric care facilities. She has a Bachelor of Music in Music erapy (Western Michigan University) and a Master of Education and Master of Business Administration (Regent University). She is currently a part-time lecturer at e University of the West Indies Department of Creative and Festival Arts and started to integrate the steel pan into her music therapy practice 18 years ago. For more information, please contact Jean Raabe, MT-BC, jean.raabe@sta.uwi.edu For more information, please contact Dr. Sandra Celestine, Principal Investigator and Head of UWI At Risk Youth Project, sandra.celestine@sta.uwi.edu or Dr. Shelton Jeerson sheltonj@atriskyouthtt.com e complete White Paper can be found at www.atriskyouthtt.com P articipants at one of Dr R aabes M usic erapy workshops. Far right are UWI R esearchers in A t R isk Youth, Drs Sandra Celestine and Shelton Jeersonmost students and parent guidance sessions improved therapeutic outcomes. M usic therapy proved to be a very strong intervention method for getting youth to become engaged and talk about issues such as sex, aggressive behaviour, problems with parents and issues surrounding bad choices that lead to violence and criminal activity. e White Paper that came out of their scholarly research provides government, businesses, professional service providers and community leaders with information and tools that could help them to analyse and develop policy to direct needed funding toward understanding and correcting school misbehaviour, school violence and school crime issues. Counselling, she pointed out, is only a tool and not a panacea for correcting youth misbehaviour and school violence. If T rinidad & T obago is to stem the tide of increasing youth misbehaviour, counselling has to be supported by school disciplinary policy, teacher training and responsibility, community and economic development. T hese, in turn, require co-operative business, community and multi-sector government action and the involvement of mental health practitioners. T o this end, e U WI T rinidad & T obago Y outh Project is committed to working with the M inistry of Education in training and developing supervision methodologies for their mental health practitioners. e country must also be prepared to invest in research to develop evidencebased solutions.e immediate successes of the Youth Project were improved student behaviour for nearly 40% of students and 95% identication of the specic issues causing a student to misbehave.

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SUNDAY 28TH JULY, 2013 UWI TODAY 15 CAMPUS NEWSI am extremely pleased to inform you that you have been elected to the grade of CSBE/SCG A B Fellow. e Society is very proud of your accomplishments and achievements. Thats how Qiang Zhang, President of CSBESCG A B, started his email congratulating PVC and Campus Principal Clement Sankat on his achievement. CSBE/SCG A B stands for the Canadian Society for Biological Engineering/La Socit Canadienne de Gnie A groalimentaire et de Bioingnierie, the technical Society of choice for professionals who are interested and active in the scientific development and application of engineering principles to environmentally sustainable biological systems for the production of food, bioproducts, and bioenergy. Bioengineers ensure a growing population has the necessities of life: safe and abundant food and water, timber and ber for shelter and clothing, plentiful and renewable energy resources and clean air. CSBE/ SCGAB provides key platforms for the compilation C OL Celebrates 25 Years! Twenty five years ago Commonwealth Heads of Government met in Vancouver, Canada and decided to establish an organisation that would use distance learning and technologies to promote education and training in Member States and to strengthen Commonwealth co-operation. Today the Commonwealth of Learning (COL) has admirably fullled that vision and become a well-respected organisation that helps governments and institutions to expand the scale, eciency and quality of learning that leads to development. Principal and PVC Professor Clement Sankat, who is a member of COLs board, was in Canada to celebrate the 25 year milestone and to recognize the tireless eorts of the many from around the Commonwealth and the strong and stable foundations they have laid.Dolly now AIAEE Fellow Dr David Dolly, Lecturer in A gricultural Extension in the Faculty of Food and A griculture, has been recognised as a Fellow of the Organisation of International A gricultural and Extension Education (AI AEE). T his award recognises and nourishes A I A EE members who have made exceptional contributions to the extension profession. Fellows must have no less than 8 years and no more than 15 years service as a professional in agricultural and extension education and must show great promise for continued contributions. Dr Dolly was one of ve members to achieve this new award and commemorative medal for 2012. His association with AI AEE has been long standing; he provided valuable leadership within a local organising committee when AI AEE held its very rst international conference in 1999 in T rinidad & T obago. He has also worked with professionals from the organisation to understand modern agricultural extension technique and philosophy. A t this years conference in Dallas Fort Worth, he presented a paper on rebranding agricultural extension in the Caribbean together with colleagues Dian Francis and Brent eophile of the Institute for International Cooperation in A griculture (IIC A ) T rinidad & T obago. is study was based on a regional panel discussion at the Caribbean Week of A griculture in Grenada in 2010. Dr Dolly plans to continue promoting the regions agricultural extension eort and to gain the support of the international agricultural community in assisting the regions agricultural development. of knowledge and the dissemination of technology, including the publication of a refereed journal and of standards of practice, conducting annual conferences, workshops for Continued Professional Development, and technical meetings. In part, Professor Sankats citation read: Professor Clement Sankat is nominated for his contribution to engineering for agricultural, food and biological systems for over 37 years as a member of CSBE/ SCG A B and 33 years A S A BE ( A merican Society of A gricultural and Biological Engineers) through T eaching, R esearch Development and Public Service specically in the area of Post-Harvest T echnology, Processing of T ropical Crops and Food Engineering and M anaging Innovation, service to engineering professions in Caribbean nations and leadership role in various committees and organisations, particularly at e U niversity of the West Indies( U WI),St A ugustine, T rinidad. e ceremony was held at CSBEs banquet and annual awards ceremony in Saskatoon, Canada.Principal Clement Sankat, CSBEDr Qiang Zhang (le) and T ony Kajewski, A SABE P resident ank P rofessor Sankat

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16 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 28TH JULY, 2013 THE UWI SEISMIC RESEAR CH CENTRE S3 MALL T OUR & OPEN HOUSE 60 years of Science & Safety: e UWI Seismic R esearch Centre continues its roll through of shopping malls in A ugust. Get information on earthquake and tsunami science and safety at the R oving Display. A sk about their O pen House days on the last ursday of every month at the Centre on Gordon Street, St A ugustine! For reservations and details call 662-4659; email info@uwiseismic.co m or visit www.uwiseismic.com FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE UWIs annual student orientation is a compilation of all orientation and transition events that embrace every aspect of university life. It is a comprehensive, innovative way to introduce new students to the ins and outs of campus life. Meet and Greet A ugust 19 30 A irport Greeting for all regional and international students Campus T ours A ugust 20 30 Faculty T ours for all new rst-year students Check-In A ugust 24 25 Weekend activities for all regional and international students K now Your F aculty A ugust 26 28 & S eptember 2 7 Faculty Orientation events UWI Clicks A ugust 28 & S eptember 2 A n introduction to UWI website and student portal UWI Guild F est A ugust 28 S eptember 6 e Guild of Students Orientation events For more information, please visit www.sta.uwi.edu/fy e UWI Life Support A ugust 29 UWI S port and Physical E ducation C entre, 6.00 pm Parents, Guardians, Spouses of new students, rest assured! Get the information you need to continue to support your U WI student in their university life at UWI Life Support. For more information, please contact 662-2002 ext. 83635 UWI Life Student A ugust 30 UWI S port and Physical E ducation C entre, 9.00 am T ransitioning from secondary school/work life to university life for new, full-time, parttime and evening undergraduate and postgraduate students is not easy but it is important. Experience U WI Life Student and bridge the gap by hearing about your faculty and student support services and meeting your fellow students. Feel the spirit as you build camaraderie through interactive activities and music! Set the tone for a rewarding university life. For more information, please contact 662-2002 ext. 83635 THE INTERNA TIONALISA TION OF SMES MARKETING AND EBUSINESS WORKSHOP hosted by the Caribbean Centre for Competitiveness S eptember 19 20 HEU, C entre for H ealth E conomics 25A Warner S treet, S t. A ugustine For more information, please contact: 224-3715; ccfc@sta.uwi.edu; or visit: www.uwi.edu/ccfc UWI RESEAR CH EXPO O ctober 2 5 JFK Quadrangle & A uditorium, L earning Resource C entre S t A ugustine C ampus Impactful, enterprising research programmes and projects that have made a dierence at home and abroad will be showcased at e UWI St A ugustine Campus R esearch Expo in O ctober. Exciting, interactive displays will bring to life research in the arts and sciences being done by UWI sta and students. A Symposium on R esearch, Enterprise and Impact will also be held at the Learning R esource Centre. ere will be mini-workshops, book readings, concerts, special tours, film screenings and a gi shop where U WI products including UWI Press publications, chocolates and plants will be on sale. O n Saturday, members of the public are welcome to enjoy e U WI M arket Place and Childrens Fun Park, where learning, fun and family entertainment come together. For more information please contact: Anna Walcott-Hardy at 662-2002 ext. 84451 or email: uwiresearchexpo@sta.uwi.edu INAUGUR AL HUMAN COMMUNICA TION STUDIES INTERNA TIONAL CONFERENCE 2013 C elebrating the C aribbean in C ommunication, C ulture and C ommunity S eptember 26 27 T he Department of Literacy, Cultural and Communication Studies, St. A ugustine, invites all academic, graduate and undergraduate researchers to submit full papers by A ugust 15. Celebrate the works of Stuart Hall, A ggrey Brown and others; celebrate the Caribbean in the verbal and nonverbal communication of its artists in word, music, dance and movement, and theatre in our creative, cultural and communicative spaces. A er the conference, please consider submitting your conference papers to an international panel for peer review for a proposed publication, e Human Communication Studies Journal in 2014. For more information, humancommconference2013@sta.uwi.ed u UWI CALEND AR of E VENT SJU L Y 2013UWI TO D AY is printed and distributed for e U niversity of the West Indies, St A ugustine Campus, through the kind support of T rinidad Publishing Co Ltd, 22-24 St Vincent Street, Port of Spain, T rinidad, West Indies. UWI T OD A YW ANT S T O H E AR F R O M YOUUWI TO D AY welcomes submissions by sta and students for publication in the paper. Please send your suggestions, comments, or articles for consideration to uwitoday@sta.uwi.edu