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UWI today ( 06-30-2013 )

Digital Library of the Caribbean University of the West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad and Tobago)
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094180/00045

Material Information

Title: UWI today
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: UWI Marketing and Communications Office
Place of Publication: St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
Publication Date: 06-30-2013

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00094180:00052

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094180/00045

Material Information

Title: UWI today
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: UWI Marketing and Communications Office
Place of Publication: St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
Publication Date: 06-30-2013

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00094180:00052


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VET GRADS CELEBRATEINTERVIEW 12Keeping e Beat New Registrar, Richard Saunders CAMPUS NEWS 03Confucius Institute for St Augustine Teaching of Chinese Language and Culture CAMPUS NEWS 04Startups and Upstarts Universities are No Longer Ivory Towers CASE STUDY 08 UWI Vet Makes History e Story Began with a Telephone Call On Friday, June 7, 23 graduating students of the School of Veterinary Medicine took the Hippocratic Oath, pledging to the ethical practice of medicine. e Oath was taken in the presence of Dr D avid Kangaloo, Chief Veterinary Ocer of Trinidad & Tobago at e UWIs Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex, Mt Hope. PHOTO: DEXTER SUPERVILLE

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SUNDAY 30TH JUNE, 2013 UWI TODAY 3 EDITORIAL TEAMCAMPUS PRINCIPAL Professor Clement Sankat D IRECTOR O F MARKETIN G AND C OMMUNICA TIONS Mrs. Dawn-Marie De Four-Gill D IRECTOR O F MARKETIN G AND C OMMUNICA TIONS A g.) Mrs. Wynell Gregorio EDITOR Mrs. Maria Rivas-McMillan A CTIN G EDITOR For the period May 1 to August 2, 2013; Mrs Maria Rivas-McMillan will be editing UWI TODAY, please address all correspondence for the paper to her at maria.mcmillan@sta.uwi.ed u during this time. CAMPUS NEWS JUNE A Time for Reection and Renewal FROM THE PRINCIPALJune is traditionally associated with weddings and new beginnings. However, it is also a fitting time for mid-year reection. A s The UWI academic year comes to a close, there is much for which we must be grateful, just as theres a lot to which we can look forward. is University has come of age in a period that tests its mettle on all fronts: strained economic circumstances nationally and regionally and a changing, highly competitive landscape for tertiary education institutions. These pose challenges that affect everything, sometimes in unexpected ways. Against this background e UWI must continue to play a leadership role in driving the regions development. Institutional excellence at e UWI is a core value and the foundation on which we have built our reputation for quality. Just as we seek to transform our society, so too must e UWI continue to transform itself if it is to survive. This means looking beyond and seizing new opportunities and forging new partnerships, as we are doing in the A CS countries and even further aeld. F or example, on June 1st we signed an historic MOU in P ort-of-Spain with the DirectorG eneral of Hanban and Chief Executive of the Confucius Institute Headquarters of the P eoples Republic of China, Madame Xu Lin, in the presence of the Honourable P rime Minister K amla P ersadBissessar and the P resident of China, H.E. Xi Jinping, to establish a Confucius Institute at UWI St. A ugustine. is Institute will create a focal point on our Campus in Trinidad & Tobago for those wishing to study Chinese language and culture as well as the political, economic and commercial issues of contemporary China. Our commitment to transformation is reected in the many new initiatives upon which we have embarked to enhance our eciency and build a more enterprising academy. Our current Change P rogramme is illustrated by a cog motif a series of interconnected wheels depicting CONFUCIUS INSTITU TEfor St. Augustine Campus motion, which have a critical component at the centre: You. We want all employees at every level to be a part of this process, to feel empowered and to contribute to our transformation eorts so that we can position our university for even greater success. Our transformative change is focussed on human, nancial, physical and academic matters. In the pages of this edition of UWI Today, new Campus Registrar Richard Saunders highlights the use of smart technology for the benet of our sta and students. In tandem, our P rojects Oce and Division of F acilities Management are engaged in major capital projects to provide an environment that can meet international standards. A mong the other features in this issue, there are stories of our graduates who are doing tremendous work in Trinidad & Tobago and regionally. In 2013/2014 we expect to launch a series of new undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in areas such as A lternative Energy Technology, Bio-Medical P hysics, A griculture, Local G overnment, to better prepare our graduates for a new environment. My annual Campus Management Retreat took place this past week and we used the time to take stock of where we are, where wed like to be and what needs to happen to enhance our nancial sustainability and create an enterprising academy. We are aware that, as part of a regional university, we do not operate in a vacuum. In fact, the St. A ugustine Campus is one component of the bigger regional UWI machinery that is focused on implementing our UWI Strategic P lan 2012-2017, which supports the holistic development of our region. So beyond the reflection that June inevitably brings, it also brings the wherewithal to re-energise, re-engineer and renew our commitment to advancing tertiary education in Trinidad & Tobago and the Caribbean through excellence in teaching, research, innovation and public service. CLEME N T K. S A NKAT Pro Vice Chancellor & Principal On June 1, Professor Clement S ankat, P rincipal and P ro Vice Chancellor of e UWI, St. A ugustine, had the pleasure of hosting Madame XU Lin, Director G eneral of Hanban and Chief Executive of the Confucius Institute to a guided tour of the Campus. She and her team of ve were part of the delegation visiting Trinidad & Tobago led by P resident of the P eoples Republic of China, Xi Jinping. eir visit to e UWI was a follow on to a three-year Memorandum of A greement (MO A ), signed on December 10, 2010 between the Confucius Institute of the P eoples Republic of China and e UWI St. A ugustine Campus, in which the G overnment of China provided a Lecturer in the Mandarin language and Chinese culture to e UWI Centre for Language Learning from January 2011. It culminated with the two leaders signing an A greement to establish a Confucius Institute at St. A ugustine so as to strengthen educational cooperation between China and Trinidad & Tobago, support and promote the development of Chinese language education and increase mutual understanding among people in China and Trinidad & Tobago. Confucius Institutes are non-prot public institutions that operate within established universities, colleges and secondary schools around the world, providing funding, teachers and educational materials. Its headquarters are located in Beijing and the programme is overseen by the Oce of Chinese Language Council International (Hanban). rough e UWI, the Confucius Institute will teach Chinese language and provide Chinese language teaching resources; train Chinese language instructors; provide information and consultative services concerning Chinas education and culture; conduct language and cultural exchange activities and serve as the centre for the HS K Examination (Chinese P rociency Test) and tests for the Certication of Chinese Language Instructors. is Confucius Institute will be the second of its kind in the English-speaking Caribbean, with one other established at e UWI Mona Campus in Jamaica in July 2010.Professor Clement S ankat and M adame XU L in with other members of the delegation outside the Alma Jordan library during a tour of e UWI S t. A ugustine Campus PHOTO: ANEEL KARIM Professor Clement S ankat and M adame XU L in sign the agreement to establish a Confucius Institute at e UWI. ey are anked by President of the Peoples R epublic of China, Xi Jinping and Prime Minister of the R epublic of T rinidad & T obago Kamla Persad-B issessarPHOTO COURTESY THE DIPLOMA TIC CENTRE

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4 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 30TH JUNE, 2013 R emember the days when universities were ivory towers? G one. Here at home, e University of the West Indies continues to catalyse regional development by engaging with, and bringing together, entrepreneurial minds from all walks of life to build and execute their dreams of starting businesses. In the most recent initiative, the F aculty of Engineering and the Engineering Students Society were the local partners of the global Startup Weekend franchise in hosting the rst ever Startup Weekend Trinidad & Tobago, May 22 24, on the St. A ugustine Campus. One hundred and seventeen budding as well as established entrepreneurs, from four Caribbean countries, organically assembled into teams around the most popular of 57 business ideas pitched at the events opening session. During the two days, teams powered through ideation, customer validation, business case development, design and prototyping for their startups. The energy was electrifying. A ll needs were met to enable uninterrupted creativity over 54 hours: oodles of 4 G wireless internet courtesy Digicel; meals with an abundance of meals, munchies and drinks, courtesy the events major sponsor, i G ovTT, as well as P restige Holdings and Caribbean Bottlers; and delightful teas courtesy Chief Brand P roducts. e shared vision for local entrepreneurial possibilities was evident through the generous support of many sponsors which also included NEDCO, IBM, TTNIC, IEEE Trinidad and Tobago Section, Teleios, Flow, P at & Max, Maritime, B P D A ssociates, Odyssey Consultinc, First Citizens Bank, Trini Trolley, Entrepreneur Spirit, Electrosign and Brightpath F oundation. In his keynote, K ama Maharaj shared his personal journey in building Sacha Cosmetics into the giant it is today, challenging participants along the way: Most of the colours were developed at night on my kitchen table. How far are you prepared to go? Brian Mac F arlane, who spoke on behalf of the judges, expressed their delight in the melding of disciplines to make magic. P ooled together, judges backgrounds represented investment finance, entrepreneurship, technology, design and fashion. In the 14 coaches, participants benetted from a rich portfolio of creative, nance, business and technical disciplines. The emerging start-up themes captured the rich multidisciplinary reach of attending entrepreneurs. P ropositions included a mobile app for gaming as well as those to locate car parts, to nd local places and events, to arrange secure local transportation services, to discover the beauty of T&T, and to provide full service for the entire tourist eco-system. P latforms were presented for crowd-funding, for innovative payment modalities; for entrepreneurial community building; for linking of N GOs, volunteers and collaborators, to facilitate e-commerce for local fashion designers, and to provide augmented reality brand development and advertising. A smart appliance converter was also presented, as was: a service for smart data driven strategies and visual analytics; technology-enabled, future design; and solutions for nano-structured super hydrophobic and oleophobic coating of structures. e top team in the end was GI A., the Tourist EcoSystem mobile app. Doubles Tycoon mobile game took second place and P ublicMine, the smart data driven strategies and visual analytics services, took third. A ll teams are committed to launching their businesses and the outpouring from the local community to support Startup Weekend Trinidad and Tobago alumni can make it happen. ere is resonant consensus that all participating teams and individuals are winners, having fully engaged in the experiential learning exercise, validated their ideas and made critical connections in the growing local entrepreneur community. In the words of one energised participant: ank you, Startup Weekend, for making a start at lling the huge void where Trinidad & Tobagos youthful entrepreneur ecosystem should be!! is was a positively ground-breaking three-day experience for Start-ups and Upstarts all across Trinidad and Tobago. I cannot thank the organisers enough for the invaluable lessons Ive learnt and for the genuinely warm, friendly and growth-oriented environment that they made possible.Startup Weekend is a global network of passionate leaders and entrepre neurs on a mission to inspire, educate, and empower individuals, teams and communities. It focuses on building a communityempowerment model to help train and foster community leaders, ignite more entrepreneurial activity and map and connect the worlds start-up ecosystems. Founded by Andrew Hyde in July 2007 in Boulder, Colorado, the rst weekend, which had 78 people attend, launched a random idea into a worldwide movement. It quickly became a nexus for early stage start-up activity in communities across the globe. In September 2010, Startup Weekend received a grant from the Ewing Marion Kauman Foundation, allowing Startup Weekend to come closer to reaching its potential in attempting to understand the unpredictable science of successful entrepreneurship. To date more than 9000 ventures have been launched at Startup Weekends around the globe. FOR MORE INFORMATION http://trinidad.startupweekend.org/ and to pitch in, go to https://www.facebook.com/ StartupWeekendTrinidadTobago. Participants are invited to make a submission to ICT Pulse, http://www.ict-pulse.com Startup Weekend Trinidad and Tobago was conceived, coordinated and facilitated as a supremely collaborative exercise between current and past members of sta and students at UWIs Faculty of Engineering, along with local and foreign Startup Weekend alumni. CAMPUS NEWSStart-ups and Upstarts S tartup Weekend E verybody PHOTO: ANEEL KARIM

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SUNDAY 30TH JUNE, 2013 UWI TODAY 5 ENERGY CAMPUS NEWSA Research Expo with a Difference The Campus showcases its landmark research in OctoberBY ANN A WALCOTT HARDYThe University of the West Indies will showcase research projects from across seven Faculties from October 2 to 5 at an Expo and Symposium at the St. Augustine Campus. Renowned for its legacy of comprehensive research in the arts and sciences, the Campus JFK Quadrangle and Auditorium will transform into a showcase of interactive 3-D displays, experiments, digital demos, virtual exhibits, live presentations and skills workshops, as well as artistic performances, including poetry readings and miniconcerts. Patrons will gain hands-on information on a range of issues aecting the region, from volcanic eruptions to UWI-developed mobile applications that help shermen at sea. This novel exposition will feature a wide range of impactful projects including Alternative Energy Generation, UWI-developed Computer Games, as well as renewable energy and nanotechnology projects. L earn about research on infectious diseases such as dengue A Wind/Photovoltaic Hybrid S ystem at the S t. A ugustine Campus is system not only powers a security light, but provides the added benet of a plug and USB charging unit where persons can charge their computers and cell phones while on Campus. Information on innovative medical science research on chronic and non-communicable diseases including diabetes and cardiovascular disease, as well as on infectious diseases like dengue, HIV and inuenza, will also be shared. Faculty-led skills training workshops will allow patrons to learn about entrepreneurship, creative writing, Caribbean sign language pathology, lm production, and a host of other interesting and exciting topics. A symposium on Research, Enterprise and Impact will be hosted at the Campus, to highlight the ways in which UWI research, funded by the government of Trinidad & Tobago through the Research and Development Impact Fund (RDI), has led to the development of innovative products and services, as well as the strengthening of national policy, legislative framework and the mobilisation of communities. Saturday, October 5 will feature for the very rst time, The UWI Marketplace and Childrens Fun Park where UWI research, learning, family, shopping and entertainment will converge on the open grounds near our Learning Resource Centre. UWI Field Station dairy and vegetable products, chocolates by the Cocoa Research Unit (CRU), as well as special varieties of disease resistant anthurium owers and plants, are just some of the many items that will be on sale. Patrons can look forward to a dynamic, fun, and highly informative experience at the Expo. There will be special door prizes, and a UWI gift shop, featuring UWI publications and UWI products. The main sponsor of the UWI Research Expo is the National Gas Company of Trinidad & Tobago Limited. The government of Trinidad & Tobago provides dedicated funding to The UWI-Trinidad & Tobago Research and Development Impact Fund.

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6 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 30TH JUNE, 2013 CAMPUS NEWS In the early morning of F riday, A pril 19, 2013, in the Commonwealth Caribbean Island of Dominica, a motor vehicle fell into a 13m deep and 25m wide ravine. at ravine had rapidly formed across a major road, at a culvert crossing, aer heavy rains (estimated to be approximately 44 cm) in the preceding three days. is accident at P ont Cass unfortunately led to the death of two persons who were members of Dominicas National F ootball Team. Three UWI graduates hold senior positions in Dominicas Ministry of Works: Senior Engineer Emile Lancelot, Chief Technical Ocer K endell Johnson and P ermanent Secretary Lucien Blackmoore. They turned to the F aculty of Engineering for technical consultation and two sta members from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Dr. Derek G ay ( G eo-technical Engineering) and P rofessor G yan Shrivastava (Hydraulic Engineering) headed o to Dominica. eir three-day mission was to provide specic analytical support in G eotechnical, Hydrologic and Hydraulic Engineering for the investigation of the road failure and in the engineering design of remedial measures. F or the lecturers, the visit also provided a valuable opportunity to see these UWI graduates, all former students, in action as they contribute to the maintenance and improvement of the lifeline infrastructure in the challenging mountainous terrain of Dominica. P reliminary engineering analyses indicate that the failure was caused by a rainstorm of return period in excess of 100 years (a probability of occurrence of less than 1 in 100) and the mechanism of failure was geotechnical as well as hydraulic. e UWI team will analyse all the topographic, geo-technical, hydrological and hydraulic data and submit a report to the G overnment of Dominica. Gyan Shrivastava is a Professor in the Department of Civil & Environmental EngineeringGrads in Action at Pont CassBY PRO FESSOR GY AN S HRIV A ST A V AR oad Failure at Pont Cass PHOTO COURTESY: CHIEF TECHNICAL OFFICER, MINISTRY OF WORKS, GOVERNMENT OF DOMINICA e UWI S t A ugustine is a hotspot for ideas, initiatives, new and innovative products. ats the way a university should be, aer all, the questions to ask though are: what do you do with these bright ideas and are they at all commercially viable? A nswering that question led to e UWI collaborating with the National Entrepreneurship Development Company (NEDCO) and the Incubation Centre to host the first Minister of T ertiary E ducation and S kills T raining, the Honourable Fazal Karim (centre) is anked by NED CO CEO, R amlochan R agoonanan; Permanent S ecretary Ministry of L abour and S mall and Micro E nterprise D evelopment Carl Francis (L), and Campus Principal and Pro Vice Chancellor, Professor Clement S ankat (R) at the ribbon-cutting ceremony.N EDCOcomes toe UWIEntrepreneurship Boot Camp in 2012 on the St A ugustine Campus. G raduates found resources to build condence in their ability to turn their business dreams into reality. It was such a success that e UWI and NEDCO solidied their partnership in October 2012 with a Memorandum of Understanding for a strategic working relationship on entrepreneurial development. e establishment of a NEDCO physical presence on e UWI St A ugustine Campus, in the Student A ctivity Centre, marks the delivery of one of the promises made in that agreement. Campus P rincipal Clement Sankat was condent that NEDCOs presence on the Campus would embed the spirit of entrepreneurship in the Campus community, encouraging and supporting ideas for new products and services while facilitating the translation of these ideas into reality. It is a step further in the creation of an enterprising academy at e UWI. He urged sta, students and graduates to take Seth G odins advice in P oke the Box and draw their own entrepreneurial maps rather than simply follow directions. A n entrepreneurial culture is critical, he noted, if Trinidad & Tobago is to successfully diversify its economy. e St. A ugustine Campus and NEDCO will co-host a second Entrepreneurship Boot Camp from July 1.

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8 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 30TH JUNE, 2013 CASE STUDYe local newspaper heading screamed Cow gets new limb and new life. It was a lovely story about an ill boy and G irlie G irlie, his pet cow, a gi from his grandfather. A heavily pregnant G irlie G irlie had lost the lower part of her hind leg due to rope burn. She was given a new lease on life through the eorts of her veterinarian and the tting of what is touted to be the rst prosthetic limb for animals in the Caribbean.But who is the vet behind this historic achievement? Nicole Lambie has a BSc in A griculture and is a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM). She also has an MSc in Tropical A nimal Science and P roduction and her academic interest is in animal reproductive bio-technology, in particular the water bualo. Dr Lambie is also a 5th Degree Black Belt who has represented Trinidad & Tobago, getting Bronze at the 20th CA C Games. She was nominated for Sports Woman of the Year in 2006, 2008 and 2009. A nd, at Christmas time, when shes not dedicating her time to her patients, shes performing with Los P aranderos de UWI, winning the Best Marac P layer award on two years. It all began with a telephone call to the Curepe oce of the Ministry of F ood P roduction from P aula Baptiste, a farmer and owner of a mini mart, and her husband A drian, a sherman. It was referred to Dr Nichelle Jasper as a possible cull case. Dr Lambie went along to assist. ere they found a cow with a gruesome foot injury but otherwise in remarkably good condition and that was (unknown to its owners) about 8 months pregnant. e cow, G irlie G irlie, had been a gi to the last grand-son of a man who had passed and the rst calf had been promised to another grand-son. A t that point, Dr Lambie adopted the case and was determined to bring the cow safely to parturition much easier said than done. e cow was in Maracas Bay and her oce was in Sangre G rande. ere was just one cell phone contact with the family which was oen not available for various reasons. It would turn out to be a 7-week odyssey. Dr Nicole Lambie is a Veterinarian at the Ministry of Food Production and Girlies Adopted Vet. All photos were taken on her cell phone by Drs Wharwood and Jasper as well as by Dr Lambie.UWI VET GRAD MAKES HISTORY: 1st Prosthetic Limb for Animals in Caribbean 1 e rst visit to G irlie at Maracas Bay: Her le hind hoof had been mutilated from a rope injury. e skin and bones of the hoof would slough away to expose her metatarsal bone. A week later the bone broke but, luckily, it was a level break and her medication prevented infection. 2G irlies wound is terrible and her leg is amputated. Her le leg is now 9 inches shorter than the right, resulting in a large pelvic tilt. Her immense distress was made worse because of pregnancy. Dr Lambie began looking for something to support her; it would have to be able to carry 700 lbs and be light enough for G irlie to move around. It shouldnt irritate the stump. G oogle and YouTube became Dr Lambies friends as she researched other prosthetics elephant prosthetics and that of a cow named Dottie being the best examples of rudimentary designs. With her colleagues, she brainstormed ideas, materials. P ersons to whom she showed pictures oered help and advice. Some even contributed bandages. Her voyage of discovery would eventually lead her to Trinidad & Tobago Orthotics and P rosthetics Limited (TTO P). 3G irlie the mother her bull calf, Reno, was born on G ood F riday 2013. It was an assisted delivery by Nally, Rubens uncle and neighbour, who followed Dr Lambies instructions conveyed to him by his girlfriend Joan via cell phone. 4I was determined to nd a resolution despite those who thought it a lost cause. A n idea began to take shape and these are my sketches and measurements for a rudimentary, low cost prosthetic to somehow do myself. e plan was to use ber glass. is design was made on a blank copy book page given to her by A drian. Her main problem then was how would it stay on without strapping to her hips? 5e A wesome F oursome: Dr. Selene Warren, Dr. Nicole Lambie, Dr. Nichelle Jasper and Dr. Cheryl-A nn Wharwood. e newspaper article (Sunday Express, April 14, 2013) made reference to Dr. Lambie and her team but this was a collaborative eort: assistance may have been to brainstorm, record data, drive around with me to source materials in pouring rain, take turns driving the many treks to Maracas, accompany me on a weekend to treat G irlie, make one of the numerous phone calls to the farmer for updates on G irlie, to hold a rope or tail while I attended to G irlie and to simply take an interest. ey are all graduates of St A ugustine Veterinary Medicine, UWI. 1 2 3 7

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SUNDAY 30TH JUNE, 2013 UWI TODAY 9 10e ones who made it all possible: Russell Boone, Richard G onzales, Dr. Nicole Lambie, Mario G uidel. Together we did the seemingly impossible. Russell Boone is the owner/director of New Life Brace and Limb based in Houston, Texas. New Life is the parent company for Trinidad & Tobago Orthotics and P rosthetics Limited (TTO P) and he generously donated the companys rst animal prosthetic. Richard G onzales of TTO P made the brace and Mario G uidel was adventurous enough to accept a challenge.UWI VET GRAD MAKES HISTORY: 1st Prosthetic Limb for Animals in Caribbean 4I was determined to nd a resolution despite those who thought it a lost cause. A n idea began to take shape and these are my sketches and measurements for a rudimentary, low cost prosthetic to somehow do myself. e plan was to use ber glass. is design was made on a blank copy book page given to her by A drian. Her main problem then was how would it stay on without strapping to her hips? 5e A wesome F oursome: Dr. Selene Warren, Dr. Nicole Lambie, Dr. Nichelle Jasper and Dr. Cheryl-A nn Wharwood. e newspaper article (Sunday Express, April 14, 2013) made reference to Dr. Lambie and her team but this was a collaborative eort: assistance may have been to brainstorm, record data, drive around with me to source materials in pouring rain, take turns driving the many treks to Maracas, accompany me on a weekend to treat G irlie, make one of the numerous phone calls to the farmer for updates on G irlie, to hold a rope or tail while I attended to G irlie and to simply take an interest. ey are all graduates of St A ugustine Veterinary Medicine, UWI. 6 & 7Mario G uidel of TTO P and Dr Lambie make a mould of G irlies stump. His initial reaction had been hesitant but a nights sleep and a change of heart saw him willing to give it a try. is trip to Maracas was done the day aer Ruben had been admitted to Mt Hope Medical for a serious infection. is mould was used to get the shape of the stump so as to make the prosthetic. When they were nished, they turned around to nd a lot of onlookers including Nicoles entire family! 8G irlies prosthetic leg was made of 10 layers of carbon ber and titanium. Here she is being tted. eres a pink inner piece that holds it in place while the prosthetic is the black part. It would go back to TTO P for minor adjustments aer the rst tting. 9It took G irlie just about 10 minutes to adapt to her new leg. Her speed may have been due to an enticing bit of grass that had hitherto been beyond her reach. 11G irlie-G irlie, with her real owner 5 yr old Ruben Baptiste, out in a pasture where shes most happy. Dr Lambie is deeply appreciative of everyone who helped her to help G irlie, even if it was to make sure she had water when the family could not be there. Commitment and team eort resulted in this successful outcome. G irlie G irlie is doing well. 6 5 4 8 9 10 11

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10 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 30TH JUNE, 2013 In 2007, e UWI St A ugustine Campus had some 15,000 students and 1,700 sta. Six years later, there are in excess of 19,000 students and 3,000 sta. A university is a living, breathing organism. Its forced to grow physically as the student population grows but it also grows organically to meet the needs of a maturing society. Campus management pays close attention to quality standards and continually works to provide additional facilities and equipment for teaching, learning, research, student accommodation and recreation. e overall square footage of built space has increased by 30% to cater for these additional services yet every eort has been made to preserve the green space. e UWIs Division of F acilities Management, led by Director S uresh M aharaj and Campus P rojects Oce, led by Senior P rojects Ocer Alfred R eid, had their plates full driving urgently needed capital projects to fullment. Heres a look at some of the major projects at the St A ugustine Campus.Building with an Eye on the Future CAMPUS NEWSF AMIL Y DEVELOPMENT CENTRENo. 32 S t. John R oad St. A ugustine now houses both e UWIs Childrens Research Centre and a new F amily Development Centre is new 2-storey building covers 665 square metres and accommodates administrative oces, a meeting/ lecture Hall, library/research Room as well as oces for Research F ellows. e centre is designed to promote a greater understanding of the contexts, processes and diverse factors within families, communities and institutions that inuence the growth and development, early education, health and general well-being of children and families in Trinidad & Tobago and other Caribbean communities. TH E UWI SOU T H CAM PU S Penal/DebeA pproximately 40.5 hectares (100 acres), in the vicinity of the Debe High School, has been identied for e UWI St. A ugustine South Campus. e lands are part of a gently rolling green eld site previously cultivated with sugarcane. It is bound on the east by the San F ernando/Siparia/Erin Road, on the west by P apourie Road and on the south by the M2 Ring Road. e campus area will occupy 24,050 sq. metres. A n urgent need to nd a home for the newly expanded F aculty of Law led to a decision to allocate the signature building project at the St. A ugustine South Campus to the housing of the F aculty of Law. In this regard, facilities will be created to meet the needs of students most of whom will come from areas far and wide. ese would include accommodation for 100 students, recreation areas, including playgrounds and hard courts; as well as pedestrian, parking and roadway facilities. ST U DE N TS ACCO MM O DAT ION S San Fernando General HospitalR enovation of the existing three-storey building at the San F ernando G eneral Hospital is done. rough the renovation, medical students with early and late clinical hours can now be accommodated in any of the 22 bedrooms. Two lecture rooms, a general oce, kitchenette, washroom and laundry facilities as well as parking spaces for 11 vehicles add to the practical and convenient educational experience. It permits for achievement of the learning outcomes, a mandatory requirement of the accreditation process.

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SUNDAY 30TH JUNE, 2013 UWI TODAY 11 S E NIO R C O MM ON ROO M Upgrade and ExpansionD FM has initiated a tender action process to convert e UWIs Senior Common Room into a convention centre with seating for 200. In addition to the conference hall, features will include handicapped ready male and female washrooms, kitchen space, oce areas, a conference room, lobby area, janitorial space and outdoor terrace. e existing building will be reused with modications to the structure, oce space and washroom facilities. CAMPUS NEWSCA N ADA HALL OF R ES I DE NC E Refurbishment & RenovationsCanada Hall of R esidence was the rst Hall of Residence constructed for the St. A ugustine Campus in 1963 to accommodate 192 students. P rimarily two 3-storey dormitory blocks, four rooms on each oor were converted to two kitchens in 1983, reducing the number of rooms to 168. In spite of minor modications in the last 50 years, the time was right for major refurbishment and renovation to upgrade the hall. Existing dormitories are being extended and renovated to conform to modern congurations for halls of residence. In the rst phase, the South block is receiving an upgrade of rooms including a new lobby and common areas, new furniture and ttings (desks, beds, closets, book shelves). e same will be done to the North block beginning in the last quarter of 2013. P hase 3 involves construction of a new block to house 80 post graduate students and a residence manager.AC ADEM Y OF N U RS INGe team also completed renovation of the western building at the El Dorado G irls Youth Camp. is teaching facility, which is part of the A cademy of Nursing, can provide training to nursing students at a national level on par with international standards. e existing building is a three-storey, reinforced concrete monolithic building with approximately 16,530 square feet of usable space. It has been retrotted to provide administrative oces, laboratories, lecture theatres and tutorial rooms. In addition, the building was modernized with the installation of new communication infrastructure (telephone and internet). NE W S E I SM IC R ESEAR CH BUI LD ING e D FM is currently constructing a new building for the Seismic Research Unit. e new three-storey structural steel building has approximately 9,975 square feet of usable space and will improve the seismic monitoring operations of the Unit. e importance of preserving the building and associated seismic equipment during and aer a natural disaster meant that it was designed using the latest engineering codes and stringent seismic requirements. It is 80% completed and nal nishes/xtures are being installed. When completed, the facility would increase the eciency and eectiveness of the monitoring, research and response to earthquakes, volcanoes and tsunamis. Beneciaries would be the English speaking countries of the Eastern Caribbean who rely on this primary source of information during any one of the natural disasters identied above. T EA CHING & L EAR NING C O M P LE Xis multi-storey building includes 4 Lecture eatres seating from 200 to 400 students, 2 Lecture Rooms seating 90 students each, 8 Tutorial/Seminar/ Teaching Rooms seating 20 to 25 students each, Oces for the CETL and Specialized Biology and Chemistry Science Labs. e project is substantially complete with testing and commissioning of the services to go. ST U DE N T R E C REAT ION AL / ST U D Y CE N TRE Mt. Hope, Faculty of Medical SciencesConstruction works on this two storey building started in July 2012 and is now complete. e facility will accommodate study rooms, a computer lab and a meeting room. ere is also a lounge, a gym and a minimart. e centre is expected to be fully functional later this year.

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12 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 30TH JUNE, 2013 INTERVIEW For the new R egistrar, R ichard S aunders, its a bit like returning home but on the other side of the fence. In his undergraduate days as an engineering student, he served as vice president of the G uild of Undergraduates. A nother big change for e UWI graduate is the current tertiary education environment. Fiy years ago, UWI was the only tertiary academic institution in Trinidad & Tobago. Today e University is being challenged to operate in a new competitive environment with more than 10 other institutions providing educational options. Immediately prior to coming back to St A ugustine, Saunders was Managing Director of a local rm involved in property development, project management, real estate and design/build of recreation and sporting facilities. In addition to his BSc, Engineering from e UWI, he completed an MSc in Electronic Instrumentation at the University of Wales, Swansea. A ll of his interests, experience and expertise come together to t him for the role of Registrar who is, in eect, a universitys chief operating ocer. A chief operating officers job is no easy task and even more so in face of todays challenges: e UWI has to reduce reliance on state support and expand private and corporate donations, strategically manage endowments, as well as generate revenues from research opportunities. ese shis, he says, decisively redene the role of e Universitys administrative officers, who must become engaged in more active and strategic management of the institution. A student population of 19,000, averaging 4,000 undergraduates and 2,000 graduates annually, translates into very many student transactions happening at any point in time. He is very aware that the administrative personnel share responsibility with the F aculty for the experiences in higher education and have an important support function in helping to ensure excellence in the educational experience. A dministrative personnel must therefore work with the academics and lead in eorts to better serve our students, our communities, the Caribbean and our global society. Saunders training makes him analytical, his experience in management makes him aware that while The UWI is embarking on an exciting period to make it 21st century ready with a global reach, the transformation must be carefully planned and executed. e UWI is a laboratory of cultural diversity, representative of the Caribbean. We have to work in teams but remotely. A t the same time we Keeping the beat throughT ransformation and B eyondOn June 8th, e University laid to rest in its cemetery a man who had been an intrinsic part of its history and had been one of the few surviving A ssociates of the Imperial College of A griculture (AICT A). P rofessor Emeritus Nazeer A A hmad of the Department of F ood P roduction in the F aculty of F ood and A griculture was born in 1932 in what was then British G uyana. A n undergraduate from 1949-1952 (DICT A ), then a postgraduate student ( A ICT A ) from 1952-1953, he went on to do his MSc in Canada (Mc G ill University and the University of British Columbia) and P hD in the UK. In 1957 he took up the position of A gricultural Chemist and Head of the Division of Soil Science in the Ministry of A griculture in his homeland of G uyana. In 1961, P rofessor A hmad returned to Trinidad & Tobago and assumed the position of lecturer at e UWI. He became a P rofessor of Soil Science in 1969 and was a Canada Hall warden for a number of years, mentoring many students from across the region. P rofessor A hmads work in Tropical Soil is internationally acclaimed. He was awarded the InterA merican Institute for Cooperation in A griculture (IIC A ) G old Medal for his contribution to research in Soil Science in the Caribbean and Latin A merican region. e University family, past and present, mourns his passing.RememberingP rofessor EmeritusNAZEERAH MAD are setting a framework to produce a graduate who can be a good player in any market. He has a list of things needed to fast track e UWI St A ugustine into an internationally recognised university of choice: new and more exible learning spaces, online information and library services, widely accessible computing facilities, wired residence facilities and an increasing array of lifelong learning programmes and services, are just a few of the items on his wish list. is ambitious agenda is aimed at positioning e UWI to attract students from a wider pool, penetrating the A CS countries, beginning with G uyana, Suriname and Curacao. e University has no choice but to adapt to the changing environment. It must become market and value driven to survive. We need therefore to review our relationship with our students, visitors, retirees, alumni, donors, policy makers and the general public. Employee engagement assumes vital proportions in this scenario. e goal: to build a sense of ownership, of team, of One Caribbean. e UWI is a regional institution, not four separate campuses and the thinking as well as the action must reect that thrust. Saunders indicated that well developed leadership capacities are essential in any organization. However, he noted, the leadership challenges in higher education are more complex and dicult than in the private sector. In the private sector reporting lines are clearer, you know you are pursuing prots and the revenue objectives are more clearly defined. P eople in leadership roles in the private sector have ways of incentivising their sta and sanctions to motivate and encourage change, advancement and innovation. Leadership in the University environment is more challenging. You must be prepared to engage in collaboration and ensure all are consulted and involved to avoid resistance to implementation. Saunders draws on his pan playing days to make an analogy: in an organisation like this, a lot of things happen at the same time and you have to keep your focus which is the job of the rhythm section in a steelband. e people of the Registrars office are the rhythm section of The UWI; well keep the beat through transformation and beyond.

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SUNDAY 30TH JUNE, 2013 UWI TODAY 13 ENERGY PROFESSORIAL LECTURE A gouti, lappe, deer, manicou, wild hog and iguana: each name undoubtedly evokes a dierent image depending on whether youve eaten Trinidad & Tobago wild meat or not. Like it or not, wild meat forms a major part of Trinidad & Tobagos cultural culinary landscape. Classied as Neo Tropical animals, the demand has been steadily growing and there is the belief that commercial wild meat production has immense economic potential since Trinidad & Tobago leads the way in Neo-tropical A nimal Conservation, Management, P roduction and Utilization in the Caribbean. P rofessor Gary Wayne Garcia is one who holds that belief. In 1992 P rofessor Garcia began his study of the natural fauna that lives not only in Trinidad & Tobago, but also in the surrounding Caribbean and Latin A merican countries. A long the way he developed a high level of understanding about these animals and the threats that exist to their longterm survival due to human pressures. In his P rofessorial Inaugural Lecture, he outlined how the wild/non-domestic (neo-tropical) animals in Trinidad & Tobagos backyards and natural environments became the motive force and transportation mechanism for his professorial journey. He summarised important and novel outcomes from this knowledge acquisition adventure. The first outcome was the establishment of the largest A gouti ( Dasyprocta leporina ) production unit for scientic purposes, since 1996, initially self nanced and now operationally supported by students and On the Job Trainees. Located at the Wildlife Unit at e University Field Station, it houses a living collection of seven A gouti ( Dasyprocta leporina ) genotypes [white, brown, black, gold, brown with a golden rump, white with a golden rump and brown with white feet] thus challenging the existence of 11 species within the Dasyprocta genus. He later developed A Conceptual F ramework for the development of Intensive P roduction Models for Neotropical animals [1998] and the establishment of the Open School of Tropical A nimal Science and P roduction [2001]. His Intensive A gouti (Dasyprocta leporina ) production model revealed the following: birth and while milking or lactating interval of about 127 days] is work also reported the rst method for live semen collection and evaluation from the male A gouti (Dasyprocta leporina ), the pioneering of A gouti (Dasyprocta leporina) semen preservation techniques and the pioneering eorts to train the male A gouti (Dasyprocta leporina ) for live semen collection without sedation. A n award of a P h.D. in Livestock Science by e UWI to Dr William Martin Mollineau, under the supervision of P rofessor Garcia and P rofessor A ndrew A dogwa from the School of Veterinary Medicine, was a tting culmination to this research. P rofessor G arcia has suggested a sustainable way forward for A nimal P roduction in the Caribbean, linking conventional domestic animal and food crop production systems with neo-tropical animal production, involving the need to develop harmony between neo-tropical animal wildlife conservation, management, production and utilization. Resources (omas Reginald Preston; pdf) tropical Animals) with the Available Feed Resources (Gary Wayne Garcia) e packed audience at his professorial lecture learnt that his international network assisted in the establishment of a semi-commercial Collared P eccary [Tayassu tajuca/ Tayassu pecari] production unit in Santa Cruz, Trinidad & Tobago, with nancial support from the F rench G overnment through INR A A ntilles-G uyane. is collaboration helped in the establishment of 5 semi-commercial Collared P eccary [Tayassu tajuca/Tayassu pecari] production units in F rench G uyana. His commitment to the indigenous fauna of Latin A merica and the Caribbean led to collaboration with CXC and CAP E and the eventual introduction of Neo-tropical A nimals and Neo-tropical A nimal P roduction into the CXC School Syllabus; it also resulted in a B A in A gricultural Education P rogramme at the University of Trinidad and Tobago (UTT). F urther, he established working and publishing collaborative linkages with colleagues researching Neo-tropical A nimals in Latin A merica such as EMBR APA (Belem, Brazil), Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (Bahia, Brazil), Universidade F ederal do P ara (P ara, Brazil), University of Suriname, INR A (Martinique, G uadeloupe and F rench G uyana) and Iquitos ( P eru). It was because of his vast experience, expertise and prior educational collaboration with the South Eastern Hunters A ssociation that P rofessor Garcia contributed on behalf of e UWI, in the Consultation on the Dra Wildlife Bill. Last May in A rgentina he made a pitch, entirely in Spanish, for The UWI to host the 11th Conference on A mazonian Wildlife (XI CIM FA UN A ) in A ugust 2014. e unanimous vote of approval means that, for the rst time since its inception in 1992, this hemispheric conference will be held outside of Central and South A merica. In eect, this conference will serve to position Trinidad & Tobago as the leaders in wildlife production for food security and as a conservation tool. P rofessor G arcia hopes to establish in Trinidad & Tobago the rst Centre for Neo-tropical A nimal P roduction and Conservation. Professor Gary Garcia teaches courses in Livestock Products Technology and Tropical Animal Science in the Faculty of Food and Agriculture and in the School of Veterinary Medicine, UWI. He has produced books on the Agouti and the Collared Peccary, which were self published courtesy of e UWI Credit Union. Professor Garcias Lecture, From Wild to Semi-domesticated: Neo-tropical Animals and a Professorial Journey, on May 16, ended the Professorial Inaugural Lecture Series at e UWI St. Augustine for the academic year 2012-2013. e series resumes in the new academic year in September. Christine Nanton, who has a degree in Media & Communications from e UWI Mona, is a Marketing & Communications Ocer at the St. Augustine Campus. A Professorial Journey in Wild M eat and Neo-tropical A nimal ProductionBY CHRISTINE NANTONProfessor Garcia hopes to establish in Trinidad & Tobago the rst Centre for Neo-tropical Animal Production and Conservation.

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14 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 30TH JUNE, 2013 CAMPUS NEWS Janadi Gonzales-L ord, UWI alumna, is a teacher at Bishop A nstey High School East. It was there that she took note of a hearing-impaired child who was isolated, almost invisible, and unable to participate fully in the rhythms of the school. She took note and took action. ey were 11 and 12 year old girls at the time newly minted from primary school. ey learned through the dedication, diligence and caring of their teacher that they could be instruments of change for the better. With her students and members of the community, G onzales-Lord developed a specialized science curriculum by using Microsoft technology to create interactive, accessible learning activities. According to the young chemistry and integrated science teacher, they brainstormed ideas for a science project that would incorporate content accessible to children of all abilities. A key learning objective, she said, was to help students better appreciate the challenges that people with hearing disabilities face each day while promoting the importance of inclusiveness for all learners. It helped that the school already had a culture of everyday use of computers so she was able to take advantage of soware-based accessibility tools with which the students were familiar. During the 20112012 school year, G onzalez-Lord and her students devised a project called e Solar System: Reaching for the Stars and, in collaboration with students from the Cascade School for the Deaf, developed activities and learning assessments. In the rst phase, they built a planetarium bringing the planets in the solar system to life and created video journals, chronicling the journeys of their peers through the planetarium. Next, the students invented a video game which teaches hearing impaired as well as hearing students about the solar system. Instructions are in sign language and written form. F inally, the project focussed on assessing performance against key learning objectives, again using a number of Microso technologies. She contacted the Touch of Christ Community for the Deaf and arranged sign language lessons for the students of the ve participating form ones and realized that it turned out to be less about sign language and more about learning about the deaf culture. A t Microsos Latin A merica and Caribbean P artners in Learning Innovative Educators F orum, in Lima, P eru, last September, she walked away with rst place in the category of Innovation in Dicult Circumstances. G onzalez-Lord notes: My students knew they were solving a real life problem that many students face every day. It made them try even harder; staying up nights, over and beyond studying from a book to make this a reality. If I had told them to go and nothing to them. But they will never forget this projectit Its A bout M aking ChangesB uilding the PlanetariumPHOTO: STUDENTS OF BISHOP ANSTEY EASTBeing part of the Post Graduate Diploma in Education programme at e UWI has given me was more than just learning about the solar system. is was about making changes. Microso brought together more than 500 of the most innovative teachers, education leaders and government ocials from 80 countries in P rague last November. She was amazed at the global impact of her project, changing her view of the education process: Seeing what other countries face in terms of minimal resources, gender bias in terms of freedom of choice to be how lucky we are in Trinidad & Tobago and how much we take for granted especially in the eld of education. We complain but many countries really have much less than we do but are . Her project was used as the basis of a case study for accessibility uses of Microso products and she plans to pursue research in game based learning especially in the areas of science, improving male learning and improving learning for the dierently able. Being part of the P ost G raduate Diploma in Education programme at e UWI has given me hope since many teachers in the programme really try to make a dierence in students lives. I remain hopeful and guardedly optimistic that change will come soon and that I will be a small part of that change.

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SUNDAY 30TH JUNE, 2013 UWI TODAY 15 CAMPUS NEWSEast Indian culture is deeply interwoven into the Trinbagonian society, easily identiable everywhere in food, language, music, dress, names, art and many other forms of culture Professor Clement Sankat continued making the point that East Indian culture has therefore contributed and continues to contribute significantly to our colourful tapestry in Trinidad & Tobago as we enjoy a rich fusion of peoples from all over the globe from India, Africa, Europe, China and the Middle East among others. He was speaking at an Awards Ceremony by the Hindi Foundation of Trinidad and Tobago on being selected as its 2013 award recipient for education. The organisation recognised that, in addition to strengthening ties with India at the national level, as Principal of The UWI St. Augustine Campus, he has been moving to deepen and expand cooperation with India and in particular with Indian higher education institutions. Indeed, The UWI has been moving to deepen and expand cooperation with nations through collaboration with higher education institutions and other agencies. This year, The UWI St. Augustine welcomed three Chairs funded by the Government and People of India: a Chair in History; a Chair in Ayurveda Medicine; and a Chair in Hindi. A contingent from The UWI will also return to India in August for the UWI Discovers academic series, which provides academic immersion experiences while exploring the BRIC countries. The award was made as part of the Hindi Foundations 168th Anniversary celebrations of Indian Arrival in Trinidad & Tobago. Professor Clement S ankat receives an award for education from Chanka S eeterram, President of e Hindi Foundation of T rinidad and T obago. Other executives look on. PHOTO: ANEEL KARIMFrom L: Dr. A nton Cumberbatch, HEU T echnical A dvisor; E rrol S imms, D ean, Faculty of S ocial S ciences; Dr. S teven Forsythe, Project Director, Futures Institute; Dr. Althea L aFoucade, HEU A ssistant CoordinatorAn Award for EDUCATION!In 1929, at a time when psychology was still young, the P si Chi Honour Society in P sychology was formed at the 9th International Congress of P sychology at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. More than eight decades later, P si Chi has come to St. A ugustine. Its founders envisioned P si Chi as a way of encouraging, stimulating and maintaining excellence in scholarship while advancing the science of psychology. is was summarised in two G reek words that became their motto: Psyche Cheires. Psyche suggests the mind or scholarship and enrichment of the mind. Cheires meaning hands, stands for fellowship and research. Psyche Cheires expresses cooperation in the investigation and cultivation of the mind. Establishment of a P si Chi Chapter at the St. A ugustine Campus is a bit of a coup, considering that P si Chi only went international in 2009! P si Chi has chartered about 1,100 chapters at colleges and universities, 10 of which are considered international and are found in Canada, Ireland, New Zealand and the Caribbean. e UWI St. A ugustine Campus therefore represents one of a select number of international higher education institutions that have gained entry into this Society. Its more than that though. Membership opens up unprecedented funding and research opportunities for eligible psychology students at all levels of study. e lifetime membership status provides students with immediate international recognition for their academic excellence (a minimum cumulative and psychology GPA of 3.0 is required for eligibility). rough the sense of community among local, regional and global members, P si Chi membership facilitates leadership development and student research by providing over US$300,550 in awards and grants. A ctive members may hold oce and vote on issues of societal For four days in M arch, 50 persons huddled together in workshop setting being trained on Costing with a focus on HIV programmes. They were all senior policy and technical officers from Ministries of Health or national AIDS programme co-ordinators and represented 17 countries in the English and Dutch-speaking Caribbean. Collaborators from The UWIs HEU, Centre for Health Economics, the US A ID Health P olicy Initiative and the P an A merican Health Organization (PAHO) pooled their technical, nancial and administrative resources for this capacity building/ train-the-trainers Workshop. Experts in the eld, including the Caribbean Health Research Council/C A R P H A conducted sessions importance to P si Chi, as well as attend regional and societal annual psychology conventions. Students are also given the opportunity to develop their publication record through submissions to the Societys academic journals. On March 21, the Department of Behavioural Sciences, in collaboration with the ANSA McAL P sychological Research Centre, hosted the Installation and Inaugural Induction Ceremony of e UWI St. A ugustine Campus P si Chi Chapter. P si Chi F aculty A dvisors, Dr. Derek Chadee, Head, Department of Behavioural Sciences, and Dr. Jannel P hillip, faculty member of the Department s P sychology Unit led the historic induction ceremony of 40 undergraduate, postgraduate and alumni members who pledged to accept P si Chis standards and purposes as their own. Inductees were selected by the F aculty A dvisors for their excellence in scholarship and promise in the eld of psychology. Each new member was presented with certicates and membership cards from the P si Chi Central Oce and signed the Chapter Registration Book as evidence of membership. rough videotaped welcome messages, P rofessor Jason Young, P si Chi Society P resident, and P rofessor Martha Zlokovich, its Executive Director, encouraged the latest members to apply for research grants and chapter awards. P sychology, as a discipline at the St A ugustine Campus, has seen a tremendous growth spurt in the last 16 years. A signicant increase in registered students for the programme and the need to expand curricula made it necessary to create a distinct Department of P sychology, a vision not far from realization. is successful launch of a P si Chi Chapter means that e UWI is responding to the forces of globalisation and establishing a competitive advantage in the diverse market of tertiary education. that were a balance between theory and practice. ere was also hands-on use of the Spectrum tools. e Costing Workshop exposed them to the Spectrum Model, a model developed and maintained by the F utures Institute out of the United States of A merica. e Model is a suite of easy-touse tools that provide policy and decision-makers with critical information so as to make informed decisions. It consolidates earlier versions of individual tools into an integrated package of components with the capability of projecting impacts, resource needs and costs and can play a pivotal role in supporting programmatic and national goals by guiding meaningful responses to the HIV epidemic. e Caribbean joins countries Lesotho, Mozambique, East and West A frica, South and Southeast A sia, Latin A merica which have benetted from capacity building activities in the Spectrum Model. While the primary focus is on the impact and costs of HIV/ AIDS interventions, the tools are applicable to the wider health system. e results give a better understanding of the epidemic and the associated costs of interventions, allowing planners to make more informed decisions on the allocation of resources while keeping an eye on nancial sustainability. Decision-makers can better determine the optimal level of funding to attain strategic goals, what is achievable using available resources and the impact of alternative injection of resources on goals and costs. On a broader level, participants dealt with the importance of strategic planning in the modern health environment, assessing and identifying gaps in the health system as key components of the planning stage. e basics of costing and economic evaluation in health were also outlined from the perspective of linking health costs to associated benets. What does Costing have to do with HIV? Psi Chi at e UWI Psi Chi is a member of the Association of College Honour Societies and is an aliate of the American Psychological Association and the Association for the Psychological Science. On April 11, the Chapter elected its rst serving ocers President, Nikita Psychology (First Class) from the St Augustine Campus and an MSc in Clinical Psychology (Dist) from the Faculty of Medical Social Psychology. www.psichi.org

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16 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 30TH JUNE, 2013 GROWING SECURITY June 30July 6 Hyatt Regency Port of Spain 49th A nnual Meeting of the West Indies A gricultural Economics Conference, A gribusiness E ssential for Food S ecurity: E mpowering Youth and E nhancing Quality Products in co-operation with the Caribbean A gro-Economic Society, the Caribbean F ood Crops Society and the International Society for Horticultural Science. For more information, please contact W OMEN IN LEADERSHIP C ONFERENCE 2013 July 12 The Hilton Trinidad and Conference Centre e A rthur Lok Jack G raduate School of Business hosts the Women in L eadership Conference, featuring Libby G ill author, leadership and business coach and CEO. For more information, please email THE UWI SEISMIC RESEARCH CENTRE S3 MALL T OUR July & August Sixty years of science and safety: The UWI Seismic Research Centre is rolling through shopping malls across Trinidad & Tobago during July and A ugust. G et information on earthquake and tsunami science and safety at the Roving Display. com for schedule. Ask about their Open House days! A CADEMIC IMMERSION INDIA August 1 Be immersed through UWI Discovers in all contemporary aspects of the global powers of the BRICS countries Brazil, Russia, India, China and South A frica. e second UWI Discovers tour, led by P rofessor K apil K umar, P rofessor at the Indira G andhi National Open University, Delhi, leaves for India on A ugust 1 for three weeks. 11 cities; 21 days! Included is an orientation session with a basic language introduction. For more information, please contact Candace Guppy at or visit http://sta.uwi.edu/discover/india2013/index.asp INAUGURAL HUMAN C OMMUNICATION STUDIES INTERNATIONAL C ONFERENCE 2013 CELEBRATING THE C ARIBBEAN IN C OMMUNICATION, CULTURE AND C OMMUNITY September 26 Call for Papers: Abstracts by June 30; Full Papers by August 15 Celebrate the works of Stuart Hall, A ggrey Brown and others; celebrate the Caribbean in the verbal and nonverbal communication of its artists in word, music, dance and movement, and theatre in our creative, cultural and communicative spaces. A erwards, you are invited to submit your conference papers to an international panel for peer review for a proposed publication, e Human Communication Studies Journal in 2014. For more information, please contact, Department of Literacy, Cultural and Communication Studies, UWI St. Augustine 1ST INTERNATIONAL R AMLEELA C ONFERENCE July 12 UWI Learning Resource Centre Co-hosted by e UWI F aculty of Humanities & Education and the National Ramleela Council of Trinidad & Tobago Inc For more information, please contact Rawle Gibbons at Rawle. CRITICAL SEXUALITY STUDIES: THEORY AND PRACTICE Institute of Gender and Development Studies (IGDS) July 9August 2 The 4-week course is created by the Caribbean International Resource Network in collaboration with e UWI I G DS St. A ugustine Unit and supported by e F ord F oundation and the International A ssociation for the Study of Sexuality, Culture and Society (I A SSCS). SEXUALITIES IN THE TENT : P ATRICIA GONE WITH MILLICENT MEETS VS NAIPAUL, A QUEER TRINIDADIAN July 13, 10.00 am.00 pm Old Fire Station, NALIS, Port of Spain Celebrate Caribbean lives and loving through calypso and stories a 2-day event looking at Caribbean sexual citizenship. For more information on the two events above, please http://www.facebook.com/IGDSStAugustineUnit ENTREPRENEURSHIP BOOT C AMP July 1 The UWI, St. Augustine Campus The UWI in collaboration with the National Entrepreneurship Development Company Limited and the Entrepreneurial Training Institute & Incubation Centre will host the second Entrepreneurship Business Training Series, E ntrepreneurship B oot Camp. The boot camp will assist graduates in developing entrepreneur-type attitudes and focus on the signicant contributions of small and micro-enterprise economies to economic diversication, building a self-sustainable economy as well as a wide range of business concepts, real life challenges, failures and successes of the entrepreneur. For more information, please contact the Oce of Institutional Advancement & or register online: http://sta.uwi.edu/ebc/. CRAZY FOR Y OU! July 4July 7 Queens Hall What happens when the heir to a New York banking company who secretly dreams of life on stage is sent to Deadrock, Nevada, to foreclose on the tiny towns only theatre? Must Come See Productions presents the G ershwin comedy classic. Specials for families, couples, school children and seniors For more information, please contact Jessel Murray at 662-2002 ext.2013/2014 or MANGO C ONFERENCE July 5, Chancellor Hotel MANGO FESTIVAL July 7, The University Field Station Hosted by the Network of Rural Women P roducers and e F aculty of F ood and A griculture, the Ministry of F ood P roduction and InterA merican Institute for Cooperation on A griculture, both the Conference and the F estival will show that research and development are the basis of success of the mango industry at the producer and commercial level. For more information, please contact Chanelle Joseph at u; THE R ULES OF THE GAME HAVE CHANGED: RESPONDING TO THE NEW DYNAMICS IN HIGHER EDUCATION July 11 Hilton Rose Hall Resort & Spa, Montego Bay 12th A nnual Conference of the A ssociation of Caribbean Higher Education A dministrators (A CHEA).UWI CALEND AR of E VENTSJUN E T O SE P TEMBER 2013UWI TOD A Y is printed and distributed for e University of the West Indies, St A ugustine Campus, through the kind support of Trinidad Publishing Co Ltd, 22-24 St Vincent Street, P ort of Spain, Trinidad, West Indies. UWI T O DA YW A N TS T O H EAR F R O M YOUUWI TOD A Y welcomes submissions by sta and students for publication in the paper. P lease send your suggestions, comments, or articles for consideration to uwitoday@sta.uwi.edu