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UWI today ( May 26, 2013 )

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UWI Marketing and Communications Office
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St Augustine Campus has the exclusive on the BA in Carnival Studies a mix of arts entrepreneurship, cultural & events management, cultural studies research & practice and carnival arts design. See Page 6 PHOTO: KENWYN MURRAYCAMPUS NEWS 03Ewart Williams BBF5 Honoree RESEARCH 04Horse Burger, Anyone? Is horse meat safe to eat? CAMPUS NEWS 1410 Digital Marketing Strategies Kelli Richards AWARDS 13Laurel Bhairosingh Captures IEEE AwardCarnival Studies student bends wireMAKING OF AMAS ENTREPRENEUR

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SUNDAY 26TH MAY, 2013 UWI TODAY 3 EDITORIAL TEAMCAMPUS PRINCIP AL Professor Clement Sankat D IRECT OR OF MARKE TING AND C OMMUNICA TIONS Mrs. Dawn-Marie De Four-Gill D IRECT OR OF MARKE TING AND C OMMUNICA TIONS Ag.) Mrs. Wynell Gregorio EDI T OR Mrs. Maria Rivas-McMillan ACTING EDIT OR For the period from May 1 to August 2, 2013, Mrs Maria Rivas-McMillan will be editing UWI TODAY, please address all correspondence for the paper to her at maria.mcmillan@sta.uwi.ed u during this time. CAMPUS NEWS Take Back Our Children FROM THE PRINCIPAL We have just marked Mothers Day and in a few weeks we will celebrate Fathers Day. Both are meant to recognize the important role played by parents in the family unit and in society. As we pay tribute to their invaluable contribution to family development, I am at the same time concerned about the pressures faced by many families in todays society and the urgent need for families to inculcate the right values in our children so that they can lead successful and fullling lives. L ike many across the globe, our society is grappling with a growing number of issues substance abuse, domestic violence, gang activity, divorce, peer pressure, bullying, to name a few and the psychological eect these are having on our young people, oen negatively aecting their performance in school and, later, in the world of work. As P rincipal of a Campus with more than 19,000 students, male achievement in education is of primary concern to me. I see this as directly linked to addressing broader societal issues and the health of our families and of our nation. is concern calls on us to focus on the importance of positive family values love, respect, discipline, mentorship, togetherness and a community approach to raising our children. Our society must come together to protect our children, to encourage them to be excited about education and to have a thirst for knowledge beyond studying to pass exams. Based on our own data and analysis, our young males, in particular, seem to be losing interest in pursuing higher education. More and more they seem to be underrepresented in education but overrepresented in criminal activity. T his is cause for grave concern since it will aect not only the demographics of our schools, universities and workplaces but ultimately the dynamics of human relations in our society. It is our collective responsibility to x this. EWART WILLI AMS2013 BBF Honoreeere was an international gathering of business, nance and academic attendees at the 5th Biennial International Business, Banking and Finance Conference on May 2 and 3 at e U WI. It was also the occasion when Ewart Williams, a Distinguished Alumnus, was recognised as that Conferences Honoree. Mr. Williams, who graduated with a Bachelor of S cience degree in Economics from the S t Augustine Campus, was later a member of the rst graduating class in the Master of S cience in Economics P rogramme, again from S t Augustine. In a 30 year career at the International Monetary Fund, Mr. Williams rose to the level of S enior Advisor/Deputy Director, Western Hemisphere division. He led IMF missions to several countries in Africa, L atin America and the Caribbean. More specically, he was the mission leader that negotiated one of the stand-by arrangements with Barbados in the 1980s and served as the Mission Chief to Mexico during the Mexican Financial Crisis of the mid-1990s. In 2001, he was the main architect of the Caribbean Regional T echnical Assistance Centre (CAR T AC), established by the IMF and other multilateral and bilateral agencies to assist the region in capacity building in public nance, banking and statistics. Mr Williams, Chairman of T he U WI S t Augustine Campus, is also a former Governor of the Central Bank of T rinidad & T obago. During his tenure, he spearheaded signicant achievements for that institution. Noteworthy among these are the Banks improved capacity for economic research and support for monetary policy and the shi to a more market based monetary policy framework based on the repo rate. Mr. Williams also ensured the strengthening of nancial supervision through the introduction of new statutes and amendments to existing legislation and nancial infrastructure such as the electronic payments system. Mr. Williams tenure culminated with the re-introduction of the $50 note in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of independence.E wart Williams (2nd right) admires his painting. (From le) are Department Head/E conomics L ecturer M artin Franklin, P rincipal Clement Sankat and E rrol Simms, Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences At e UWI, we are questioning these issues and looking at creative ways to attract more male students to university life. Be it through new types of academic programmes with strong practical and application components, new technology-intensive modes of course delivery or the integration of social media, Caribbean music or sports, we must bring our sons back to education. Our society needs them; our families of the future depend on them. One of the projects funded by T he U WI the T rinidad and T obago Research and Development Impact Fund is examining the issue of at-risk youth in schools through targeted interventions involving psychological testing as well as individual and group counselling. In June we will host an At Risk Youth Conference to share the ndings of this research, propose strategies to reduce violence in schools and present a preliminary White P aper that makes specic recommendations for strengthening national policy and legislation on this issue. As an educator, I believe that a large part of the rescue eort must take the form of helping young males understand the value of knowledge, the difference between memorization and learning, the importance of investing time and eort in ones own development, appreciating education in its broadest sense, and in having to make sacrices in order to achieve set goals. Certainly, what is often presented on television as overnight success, does not happen overnight. No matter your socio-economic background, access to quality tertiary education (as we have in T rinidad and T obago through the GA T E facility) can transform young peoples lives forever. We need our mothers and fathers to support our eorts as a university and help take back our children, particularly our young males, and reclaim them from the lure of the fast life and quick money. We need to instil good values and nurture a generation of respectful citizens who are committed to building a country of which we can all be extremely proud in years to come.CLEMENT K. S A N KA TPro Vice Chancellor & Principal

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4 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 26TH MAY, 2013 P eople around the world drew back in horror at the clandestine mixing of horse meat with other types of meat in some parts of Europe. is raised a number of ethical issues about the rights of consumers to make fully informed choices regarding what they eat and about the safety of horse meat for human consumption. Here in T rinidad & T obago, horse meat has for several years been advertised by Carnival fete promoters as an exotic item on the menu in the hope of dierentiating their event from the rest. Four graduate students of Bioethics in a course lectured by P rof Dave Chadee Kerresha Khan, Hema Ramdial, Maurice Rawlins and Akilah S tewart posed a question: is the meat in fact safe to eat? Armed with their videographer S omdutt Bhaggan, they set out to determine the bioethical issues surrounding the consumption of horse meat in T rinidad & T obago, where the horse meat scandal is not quite a scandal. In recognizing that horse meat is increasingly being consumed by the national community, the team of bioethicists used surveys, key informant interviews and review of secondary sources to gather their information. eir quest took them to popular street food areas in Valencia and S t James where they learnt that geera horse and hops was usually sold on a Friday night or Saturday morning. ere was even a lead for a horse meat vendor in P etit Valley. Horse meat was apparently not dicult to come by, if you knew the right people. A survey showed that the largest proportion of horse meat eaters were in the 15 to 25 age bracket. Indeed, 7.9% females versus 45.1% males had consumed horse meat Kerresha Khan is a PhD student in Environmental Biology; Hema Ramdial is an MPhil student in Plant Science; Maurice Rawlins a PhD candidate in Environmental Biology; and Akilah Stewart an MPhil Student in Riverine Ecosystem Services. All are in the Department of Life Sciences. ey presented their research ndings orally and via video at People, Science and the Environment, the 3rd Annual Research Symposium staged by the Department of Life Sciences in April. RESEARCHHorse Burger, Anyone?P olice M ounted Branch and e UWI Biological Society Horse R iding E xercise on the campus where questionnaires and key informant interviews were carried out. PHOTO: AKILAH STEWART Horse meat has for several years been advertised by Carnival fete promoters as an exotic item on the menu in the hope of dierentiating their event from the rest.previously. A similar pattern existed for those willing to try horse meat: 22% of females versus 65% of males were willing to consume horse meat. Interestingly, the most popular reasons given for not consuming horse meat were the fear of steroids and painkillers or because of a sentimental attachment. T o the others who consumed horse meat, it was just meat. P roblems identified by the team concerned the potential human health issues due to consuming horse meat and the treatment of the animals themselves. ere was some indication that one painkiller, phenylbutazone which was found to be associated with cancer in humans, is still used as a painkiller for horses. S ince most consumers were not aware of the source of the meat they ate, it was quite uncertain whether the recommended 3-6 month period for horses to be o all medical treatments prior to slaughter, was upheld. e UWI bioethicists noted that horses in T rinidad & T obago are not reared for human consumption, in which case there would be oversight on the chemicals administered. T oo oen respondents made the comment that since horsemeat isnt commonly consumed, it shouldnt be too much of a worry! The bioethicists countered with how many times do you really need to consume chemically treated horse meat to be aected by it? Just once may be enough to trigger allergic reactions to these chemicals. U ltimately, they say, it is up to each individual to make an informed decision on what they consume or, as the saying goes, caveat emptor (buyer beware)!

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SUNDAY 26TH MAY, 2013 UWI TODAY 5 ENERGY CAMPUS NEWSThe Penal/DD ebe South Campus represents a major expansion of the St. Augustine campus to the southern part of Trinidad. This rst phase will include accommodations for the Faculty of Law, a Campus Library, a General Academic/ Administration Building, Student Union Building, Students Halls of Residence and Playing Fields. Completion is  expected in the academic year 2014/15.PHOTOS: ANEELANEEL KARARIMUWI StT Augusti UGUSTINE SOuthUTH Ca AMpusPUS, PENalAL/DEbBE Student RR esidences Faculty of LL aw MM oot Court

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6 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 26TH MAY, 2013 CAMPUS NEWSExpressions of CreativityAn exhibition by the Department of Creative and Festival Arts in the Faculty of Humanities and Education featured the work of 23 graduating students of the BA in Visual Arts. eir work was completed over a rigorous multi-disciplinary foundation programme. Here are just three of the delightful pieces displayed by the students. An undergraduate degree in Carnival Studies, you say? Well, why not? T rinidad & T obago is aer all the Mecca of all things Carnival from the music to the mas and the fetes that usher it all in. Were the go to people for Carnivals globally and our designers and band leaders can be found wherever there is a Carnival. Its only tting therefore that the S t Augustine Campus should have the exclusive on the BA in Carnival S tudies. Its the only programme where students pursue a mix of studies in arts entrepreneurship, cultural and events management, cultural studies research and practice and carnival arts design. It provides those strong linkages and practical engagement with creative enterprises and oers a classroom experience in which students are exposed to a range of disciplines: communication studies, theatre, visual arts, lm, economics, tourism and hospitality and engineering. And thats just the tip of the iceberg. For almost two decades, the Department of Creative and Festival Arts, through its Carnival S tudies U nit, has given focus to developing the human resource capacity within the masquerade industry and the wider cultural economy of the Caribbean. e end result is a degree that prepares graduates for engagement in the Carnival and Creative industry as leaders in innovation, cultural research and festival management. In the nal year, students have to undertake a year-long Festival P roject, their own arts-based, multi-disciplinary project. In fact, according to Dr Jo-Anne T ull, Co-ordinator of the Carnival S tudies programme, many student projects emerging from this course have become business models, events, community projects in their own right beyond their nal year assessment. A strong reinforcement of the Festival P roject is Festival Management which exposes the student to events and festival management (planning, marketing, market research, nancial planning, audience development, event staging, and impact assessment). e nal course that achieves the Carnival S tudies Degree programme is the (LEFT) H ANDS : Aya Waithe, a talented young designer, enjoys working with dierent materials to create sculptural pieces and contemporary paintings. Her pieces capture the elements of human nature in an innovative way by combining a resilient material to recreate the human form with her ceramic hand lights. (CENTRE) WOMAN IN RED P ANT S : Richard Rampersad is a young and upcoming vibrant artist. Alongside his practice as a painter, Richard also practices jewellery design, ceramics, textile design and Rangoli art. Richard says he strives to translate thoughts and visions on the canvas with the ripeness of colour and texture. (RI GHT) SOU C OUY A NT: A visitor admires a painting by Anika Best. Anika loves creating texture and mixed media art and in this particular piece, she combines this love with her favourite theme folklore to recreate some of the characters from her childhood.PHOTOS: ANEEL KARIMStudent Susan Keyl has her head piece design tted by Chaconia awarded crasman N arcenio Gomez PHOTOS: KENWYN MURRAYEconomics of Copyright which is designed to take students beyond the legal framework of copyright and expose them to the political economy of copyright, highlighting the dynamic nature of the topic and how it impacts on the creative Industry. S o if you want to go beyond the mas playing and the mas making to become a mas entrepreneur, then contact Dr Jo-Anne T ull, jo-anne.tull@sta.uwi.edu 663-2222 / 662-2002 ext 82510 for further information. But you have to hurry deadline for the submission of applications is May 31st!e M aking of a M as E ntrepreneur M asks by Student M artin Soverall

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8 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 26TH MAY, 2013 INTERVIEW UT: You say the EM Act of 1995 was umbrellatype legislation and that more than 100 pieces of legislation dealing with environmental issues exist. RR: More than 100 pieces of legislation impacting on the environment did indeed exist prior to the passage of the Environmental Management Act. e main problems associated with these pieces of legislation were lack of awareness as to their existence and usefulness; low penalties associated with infractions; the general malaise that many governmental entities had towards the environment prior to the 1990s; and perhaps the lack of a political will to put environmental law and enforcement on the front burner. Only briey, in the era of the NAR, was there a separate Ministry of the Environment headed by L incoln Myers. An entire decade of the 21st century has passed and 2013 may be the rst time that we see a separate Ministry of the Environment. While having a stand-alone Ministry may reect a greater political will to deal with environmental issues, the results are still to be qualitatively assessed. UT: You are now a professor of environmental law but you have been a practitioner for some time. Is environmental law practice a well-populated eld in the region? RR: ere are many practitioners engaged in environmental law cases, especially on behalf of the S tate. However, in terms of persons with specialized environmental legal knowledge, the eld is still relatively small. P erhaps when we see the body of environmental law increase and enforcement strengthened, young attorneys may be more inclined to develop an environmental law practice. UT: What do you think are the major challenges for practitioners? RR: My observation is that practitioners without formal environmental law training utilize general legal principles as the basis of case preparation and shy away from really exploring specic environmental legal principles. e challenge to practitioners is to master and use principles such as sustainable development, the precautionary principle, polluter pays principle, the right to a healthy environment, to name a few, in the pursuit of environmental law matters. ese concepts are somewhat interdisciplinary in nature and require some work to achieve a level of mastery so as to facilitate their integration in the corpus of our judicial learning. Happily, we are already seeing the slow percolation of these environmental principles into judicial proceedings. UT: What are the salient environmental concerns re the resurfacing issues surrounding the $7billion highway project? RR: e major environmental issue, in my opinion, was lack of recognition of environmental democracy. Increasingly, it is recognized that environmental democracy is critical to sustainable development. Environmental democracy, in a nutshell, involves public participation in the environmental decision making process. In the rst environmental case led in T rinidad & T obago, Fishermen and Friends of the S ea challenged a decision by the EMA to grant a Certicate Pioneering Environmental LawUWI Today spoke to D r Rajendra Ramlogan on issues raised in his paper, Using the Law to Achieve Environmental Democracy and Sustainable Development.Increasingly it is recognised that environmental democracy is critical to sustainable development

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SUNDAY 26TH MAY, 2013 UWI TODAY 9 of Environmental Clearance to bpTT e P rivy Council made it very clear that, if public consultation was compromised, it would have been prepared to intervene so important is public consultation or stakeholder participation! is matter reached the P rivy Council but we lost on a technical challenge of being late in ling our action. In our successful Alutrint S melter judicial challenge, Justice Mira Dean-Armourer made it clear that it would have been procedurally irregular for the EMA to issue the CEC on the basis of awed public consultation. S o, public consultation is quite important to environmental democracy. Environmental democracy includes proper consultation of stakeholders in the environmental decision making process; presence of relevant information to all stakeholders to eectively participate in the environmental decision making process; early opportunity for stakeholders to be consulted; and the timely opportunity to judicially challenge environmental decisions. ese are just some aspects of environmental democracy and can be tested with respect to the Highway P roject. UT: Can you elaborate? RR: In this case, the rst question might be whether there were proper stakeholder consultations. Judging from Recommendation 2.6 of the Highway Review Report, the answer must be no. .6 Finally, eective stakeholder participation is essential in the decision making process. e relevant agencies must ensure that proper consultation is carried out following eective communication of information to all stakeholders. What has transpired with this project may not have occurred if an appropriate process for incorporating stakeholder involvement was applied. e second question would be whether the public had access to all relevant information. is highway runs through a signicant wetland area and there are fears of ooding. Of critical importance would have been a hydrology report. T o quote from the Highway Report: While other inadequacies are present in the EIA, this review has focused on those considered most critical to decision making where this Highway is concerned. 2.5.4.1 Hydrology S tudy e omission of a hydrology study as part of the EIA is one of its most signicant deciencies. e discharge and ow of water within the wetland, both surface and groundwater is the most important factor that denes that type of terrestrial environment. It is essential in determining soil conditions and therefore the type of vegetation that can be supported, which in turn determines habitat conditions and ultimately the type of fauna How can there be proper stakeholder consultations when a critical document that would advance eective public consultations is missing or has not been prepared or provided for public comment? e third aspect of environmental democracy I nd troubling is the timing of the granting of the CEC for the disputed highway segment. According to a press release, then P rime Minister P atrick Manning advised the P resident on April 09, 2010 that a general election was to be held on May 24, 2010. e country was thrown into election fever two years before the end of term of the then P NM government. Yet the EMA, according to the Highway Review Report, stated CEC 1372/2006, which was granted on April 20, 2010, and which directly or indirectly inuence the approach to hydrology issues in the design, construction and operation of the highway section between Debe and Mon Desir In the aermath of a controversial election date announcement, the EMA chose to approve what is perhaps the largest and most divisive infrastructural project in the history of T rinidad and T obago. Why the haste? e implication of this decision is that the clock started running on the judicial review of this CEC on April 20, 2010 and action would have had to be taken within three months of that date or face the tremendous judicial hurdle of delay. It is hardly surprising that, in the run up to the election and its immediate aermath, the public eyes would have rested squarely on the political aairs of the nation and not on a CEC. I believe this approach to granting this CEC, especially in the absence of certain information deemed relevant by the Highway Review Committee during one of the most controversial political periods in our history, may have contributed to the failure of NGOs or stakeholders to launch a judicial review challenge within the statutory three-month period. e timing of the grant of the CEC may have been entirely coincidental and the action of the EMA may be devoid of any mala de but unfortunately we are a society that has learnt not to trust coincidences. It is my opinion that the granting of the CEC for the Highway P roject based on the Highway Review Report impacted negatively on the development of environmental democracy. I must add that I am concerned with the governance of the EMA that was largely responsible for the approval of this project and indeed approved same prior to the election of the P eoples P artnership. Responsibility for proper consultations is squarely within the ambit of the EMA. e responsibility for having all relevant information is that of the EMA and the responsibility for granting the CEC is solely that of the EMA. If there is one criticism I must make of the Highway Review Report, it is that it failed to probe deeply what went wrong with the governance process of the state agencies vested with statutory responsibility for the highway project. It is not oen that I nd myself agreeing with the EMA but if the comments of its CEO Dr. Joth S ingh, as reported on March 13, 2013 in an article by Gail Alexander entitled EMA knocks Armstrong team: Highway report awed, decient, are correct, then the Highway Review Committee missed the opportunity to properly assess the role of the EMA in the Highway conict and perhaps correct any misapprehensions of their conduct. T o quote, But S ingh said EMA wasnt asked by the review team to meet or discuss anything with them. If talks were held, he said, some of the items Armstrongs team agged would have been easily resolved via explanation. ere were deciencies in their report and it was incomplete...e fact we werent consulted makes it incomplete so that was a huge aw in their procedure, S ingh said, adding the team was negligent. Dr. Rajendra Ramlogan is Professor of Commercial and Environmental Law in the Department of Management Studies. He has published numerous articles and authored several books including Sustainable Development: Towards a Judicial Interpretation; Judicial Review in the Commonwealth Caribbean; and e Developing World and the Environment: Making the Case for Eective Protection of the Global Environment. IB IS IN S HADOWCamille King sees her work as a symbol of nation. This recent piece, Ibis in Shadow, expresses her discomfort in disappearing symbols, disappearing habitats. S he notes that the S carlet Ibis found on the national coat of arms seems to hold little importance to the citizens. e Ibis population in the Caroni S wamp continues to diminish while the exotic Anthuriums are oen overshadowed by imported owers. Ibis in Shadow formed part of Inspired, an exhibition of her watercolour paintings at S o Box S tudios. e work is in partial fullment of the requirements of the Master of Art in Cultural S tudies. e Ibis population in the Caroni Swamp continues to diminish while the exotic Anthuriums are oen overshadowed by imported owers. PHOTO: SOFT BOX STUDIOS

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10 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 26TH MAY, 2013 AWARDS ARTS & LETTERSP RO F CARYL PHILLIPSSt Kitts & Nevis (OECS)e young Oxford graduate, Caryl P hillips, had decided to make his career as a writer, a writer who would spotlight in some way the Caribbean which gave him birth. A lovely ideal that went a bit haywire when his Dole payments ceased and he found himself over-qualied for and uninterested in the jobs that could put bread on his table. A break from a helpful BBC producer saw his literary career begin as a playwright. S ince then hes gained fame as an essayist and a novelist, winning many awards for his writing, including the James T ait Black Memorial P rize (for Crossing the River, in 1993) and the Commonwealth Writers P rize (for A Distant Shore in 2004). P rof P hillips, however, poses the question: what practical use is literature in the world we live in today. How do the arts help us to pave roads, build schools and hospitals, maintain employment, extend our tourist infrastructure, or in more general terms develop our economies and societies in general? He answers: By engaging with language one extends the capacity to think and express oneself clearly. By engaging with character one shows a curiosity about lives which are not ones own. In other words, there is a demonstrable extension of empathy toward other human beings. In our world today, Facebook, T witter, and a whole roster of other social media, encourage a terrible, narcissistic navel-gazing and a real retrenchment to the kingdom of Me, Myself and I. We need something which counterbalances this narrowing of our visions and this corruption of language. P rof Caryl Williams is currently a professor of English at Yale U niversity and has enjoyed a distinguished career of accolades with a continuous advocacy for Caribbean people, writers and ideas via his novels, his teaching, and his work as an editor and critic. He holds an Honorary Doctorate from e U niversity of the West Indies SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (Joint Laureate)PRO F D A VE C HAD EETrinidad & TobagoP rof Dave Chadees lifelong fascination with the wonders of science took ight when a delightful mint green Bamboo P age buttery emerged from the caterpillars his father had begun rearing. Another experience, many years later in 2001, would evoke further change: as part of a Cornell U niversity eld team, I travelled to the Amazon Forest in P eru. At nightfall we discovered that there were no lights on the boat. As we started hitting oating logs and other debris, the fear that the boat would be damaged and sink was real. In complete darkness the river was all-consuming. Many people removed their life-vests so that the end would be quick. Eight hours later they had arrived safely at their destination but his life had gained new meaning and purpose. An entomologist and parasitologist, P rof Chadee is an expert in vectorborne diseases whose work has positively aected the lives of hundreds of millions of people across the world. e practical applications of his research can be found in areas like the relation between climate change and dengue outbreaks in the Caribbean, and various other dengue-related areas like mosquito breeding patterns in the region; the eect of parasites on regional ecologies; the impact of cell-tower radiation on the well-being of local populations; and the transmission of ST Ds (specically trichomoniasis). His work on mosquitoes has led to the development of mosquito traps, new disease surveillance systems and new control strategies. He admits a scientists implicit responsibility to conduct research relevant to the needs of society, ensuring that results impact the welfare, the rights and the treatment of the community not forgetting the wider society, future generations and the biosphere. At e U WI S t Augustine Campus, Dave Chadee is professor in the Department of L ife S ciences, Co-Chairman of the T ropical Medicine Cluster: Infectious Diseases, and Co-Chairman of the Biodiversity and Environmental Cluster: Biogenics of Natural P roducts. He is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Epidemiology and the Global Health P rogramme at the U niversity of Miami. SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (Joint Laureate)P RO F ANS ELM HENNISBarbadosAt the age of 11, Anselm Hennis knew he would be a doctor. He just didnt know how he would achieve that ambition. One scholarship and Henry S chullers words as his mantra, T rust in God, believe in yourself, dare to dream and he was able to turn his vision into reality. P rof Hennis is a prolic researcher, the results of which have had signicant impact on healthcare policy regionally. It is because this research translates into direct gains for the world population that he has attracted more than US$25 million in grant funding over his career. S ome of his recent major studies include the USA-Caribbean Alliance for Health Disparities Research (2011), the Barbados Salt S tudy (2010), the 1000 Genome P roject (2009), Novel Inammatory Factors and Disease Activity in S ystemic L upus Erythematosus (2009), e Health of the Nation, a baseline survey of chronic disease in Barbados (2008) and, more recently, a global study of Hyperglycemia and Adverse P regnancy Outcomes which has led to the development of guidelines for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Now he plans to be part of the group that develops the next generation of Caribbean clinicians and researchers; creating opportunities for them to function in the region while still having a global impact through their ideas and work. I have learned the art of perseverance by taking on major challenges while being ill-equipped and underresourced, but having to hang in there to the end. It is my hope that our Governments also utilize the evidence provided by medical research in the region to optimally inform policy and practice to the betterment of our people. P rof Anselm Hennis heads the Chronic Disease Research Centre, T ropical Medicine Research Institute of e U WIs Cave Hill Campus, where he also teaches medicine and epidemiology. He is Deputy Dean of research in the Faculty of Medical S ciences at that campus, a research associate professor at S tony Brook U niversity in New York, and a consultant physician at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Barbados.Beyond theME, MY S ELF & ISince the launch of the Anthony N Sabga Caribbean Awards for Excellence in 2005, ve sets of Laureates have been named. All have excelled in one of three areas Arts & Letters; Science & Technology and Public & Civic Work. ese Awards recognize signicant Caribbean achievement and seek to encourage and support the pursuit of excellence by Caribbean persons, for the benet of the region. Laureates are proposed by country nominating committees and selected by a regional panel of eminent persons. e Awards are now considered the English-speaking Caribbeans leading recognition programme. Four persons were honoured this year. Four persons who, when one looks below the surface, all have two things in common: their marker is excellence and they all serve mankind through the works of their minds and hands. Well, actually, there are three things that they have in common they are all Caribbean people. Among the four Laureates for 2012, three have their roots in e UWI. e fourth Laureate, Rhonda Maingot, CMT, was honoured for her Public and Civic Contributions. Ms Maingot has created more than 20 religious and secular organizations, missions, and service institutions throughout the Caribbean and further abroad.

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SUNDAY 26TH MAY, 2013 UWI TODAY 11 AWARDS P atron of the Awards Anthony N Sabga (2nd right) with L aureates (from le): P rof Anselm Hennis, P rof Dave Chadee, R honda M aingot and P rof Caryl P hillips PHOTO COURTESY: ANTHONY N SABGA CARIBBEAN A WARDS FOR EXCELLENCEThese Awards recognize signicant Caribbean achievement and seek to encourage and support the pursuit of excellence by Caribbean persons, for the benet of the region.Youre invited! As part of its 60th anniversary celebrations The UWI Seismic Research Centre (SRC) has opened its doors to visitors at monthly Open House sessions throughout 2013. The UWI-SRC monitors earthquakes, volcanoes and tsunamis for the English-speaking countries of the Eastern Caribbean; conducts research on these hazards and manages an education and outreach programme to build awareness of these geo-hazards. Trinidad & Tobago lies in a high earthquake zone for the Caribbean and earthquakes are felt regularly. People might be interested in learning more about what causes these events, how we measure them and most importantly how they can protect themselves, said Stacey Edwards, Education Ocer at the Centre. We started in February and the response to the Open House so far has been great with some of the sessions actually being overbooked, added Edwards. The Open House provides insight into the work and role of the SRC in the region while promoting earthquake and tsunami safety in Trinidad. Ninety minute sessions are offered on the last Thursday of every month at 2:00pm, 3:00pm and 4:30pm at the Centres oces on Gordon Street in St. Augustine. Each session includes a tour of the Centre, demonstrations on earthquake and volcano monitoring techniques, interaction with Earth scientists as well as safety and preparedness tips. The Open House is suitable for persons 13 years and up; however a session for families with younger children is being planned for later in the year. Space is limited and bookings are highly recommended. FOR RESERVATIONS AND DETAILS call 662-4659 or email info@uwiseismic.comKeen interest is reected on the faces regarding earthquake monitoring techniquesUWI SEISMIC RESEARCH CENTRE SRC OPEN HOUSE

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12 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 26TH MAY, 2013 RESEARCH R esearch by Drs Sandra Celestine and S helton Jeerson starkly reveals that crime and violence in our schools are now national development, national security and national health care imperatives. ey guarantee a worsening of school misbehaviour and youth violence if these issues are not addressed cooperatively by all sectors government, business, teachers and parents. A U WI funded research project, the T rinidad & T obago Youth P roject ( TT Y P ) poses ve hypotheses regarding at risk youth misbehaviour, school crime and violence problems: A t risk, hot spot communities generate increased risk of damaging psychological problems among the families and children living there. H opelessness, depression, unresolved grief and loss are the major types of emotional problems aecting at risk youth. A multi-modal approach including therapeutic counselling of the child, family guidance sessions with the parent/child and peer group counselling oer the best short-term intervention methods to bring about positive change in the youth and the family. Music is one of the best methods to engage children and bring about immediate and positive change. N o one method can solve all the environmental factors (drug tracking, gangs, poverty, etc.) aecting our youth. A ny public policy adopted should be culturally relevant to T rinidad & T obago and have measurable outcomes.Celestine and Jeerson view the newly released Ryan Report as a very good starting point for abetting T rinidad & T obagos problems with youth violence. ey note that, while the Report touts the need for multi-disciplinary solutions, it does not include analysis by a criminologist or economist and the psycho-social perspective of psychologists or clinical social workers. It does however highlight the need for further analysis regarding the eect of music on youth violence and misbehaviour and the impact of hopelessness and depression on youth violence and crime. is Youth P roject is researching how depression and hopelessness aect youth behaviour and how the use of music may change it. P reliminary results indicate that the environmental factors present in so-called hot spot areas contribute to hopelessness and depression which manifest themselves in physical and mental health problems. TT YP estimates that more than 50% of school youth involved in school crime and violence are aicted with health problems. ese health problems include depression, emotional, verbal, or physical abuse, mood disorders, unresolved grief and loss (caused by witnessing/experiencing the death of friends or family). S uch mental health maladies show up daily in school settings as unrepressed anger, disrespect for authority, ghting, sexual misconduct as well as acts of the and robbery. e oen-unseen impacts of these mental health problems are hopelessness, self-harm, suicidal thoughts and suicidal attempts. According to Dr Celestine the immediate successes of the project are improved behaviour for some students and identication of the specic issues causing a student to misbehave. S he emphasizes that initial research data conrm that successful interventions to eradicate student misbehaviour and school violence must include counselling for both child and family. e researchers are clear. e school system and the criminal justice system are neither trained nor prepared to deal with children having serious mental health problems. Any recommendation to resolve school crime and violence problems must include mental health practitioners such as clinical social workers or clinical psychologists. TT YP will release a White P aper in June and host an At Risk Youth Conference on June 17. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION Please email: sheltonj@atriskyouthtt.comis Youth P roject is researching how depression and hopelessness aect youth behaviour and how the use of music may change it.YOUT H AT R I SKFilling in the Gaps

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SUNDAY 26TH MAY, 2013 UWI TODAY 13 ENERGY CAMPUS NEWS She is an engineering student who has studied classical Indian dance since the age of four or perhaps shes a dancer who loves to analyse power system operation and application of advanced technologies to improve transmission eciency. A huge mouthful but thats the research area of this nal year student in Electrical and Computer Engineering at e UWI, S t Augustine Campus. L aurel Bhairosingh is a young woman who believes that no matter how many times you fall (literally and guratively), all that matters is how many times you get up. at gives some indication as to why shes also the recipient of the 2013 IEEE P ower & Energy S ociety S tudent P rize P aper Award in honour of T Burke Hayes. e IEEE P ower & Energy S ociety is a leading provider of scientic and engineering information on electric power and energy, enriching humanity through innovation. is particular award recognizes an outstanding original student paper in electrical power engineering and the competition is based solely on judging of written papers related to the electric power industry. e purpose of this award is to encourage students in their professional development, to stimulate interest in the programmes of the electric power industry, to encourage students to prepare quality technical papers with faculty supervision and to recognize the schools and faculties that provide guidance in these areas. S he described the application of her research which focuses on asset management and improving the usage eciency of overhead power lines. As industrial growth continues, demand for electricity has increased, resulting in the occurrence of transmission network bottlenecks. I am investigating the feasibility of increasing the amount of current that can be transferred using existing network infrastructure and generation resources. S o, why engineering? And why that area, electrical and computer engineering? e reason for her selection has its genesis in those genes that make her want to dance. S he sees it as a eld that would allow her to create something new that can positively impact the lives of many. Her choice of area lay DONT RES T O N Y OUR LA URELSL aurel in authentic O dissi dance attire. Also known as Orissi, O dissi is one of the eight classical dance forms of I ndia.in that same social consciousness. e departments mission statement resounded with her personal life goals: to produce bold, articulate engineering graduates and to conduct relevant and innovative research and development for the social, economic and intellectual growth of the Caribbean region. S he found a mentor in Dr Sanjay Bahadoorsingh who constantly and patiently emphasized to her the need to always give her best. S he credits him and the support of P rofessor Chandrabhan S harma with her success. e discipline that comes from classical dance classes once a week for more than a decade, under the tutelage of Guru S andra S ookdeo, and the self-expression through movement come together in her pursuit of excellence in engineering. Escape into dance allows L aurel to manage the stress of studying and to keep balance in her life. Next steps include gaining industry experience and, later, graduate studies in the eld of power engineering. But always, always, for L aurel, there will be dance. P APER DETAILS TITLE OF PAPER: D evelopment of a MATLA B Based D ynamic Line R ating S oftware T ool This asset management oriented project focused on improving the usage eciency of overhead power lines to yield an increase in grid power transfer. The factors influencing an overhead conductors rate of heating and cooling were thoroughly reviewed. Real time environmental conditions including ambient temperature and wind speed were employed to dynamically determine optimal power transfer ratings for transmission lines. A graphical user friendly software tool for overhead dynamic line rating was also developed in MATLAB. The award will be presented at the IEEE PES Student/Faculty/Industry Luncheon of the 2013 instalment of the prestigious IEEE Power & Energy Society General Meeting in July in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. e discipline that comes from classical dance classes once a week for more than a decade, under the tutelage of Guru Sandra Sookdeo, and the self-expression through movement come together in her pursuit of excellence in engineering.

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14 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 26TH MAY, 2013 CAMPUS NEWS Charisse Bacchus is going places. A S port S ervice Ocer at the S port Company of T rinidad & T obago, she has been selected as one of the 30 best all-round applicants from a pool of hundreds of applicants around the world, to pursue the FIFA Master the International Master in Management, L aw and Humanities of S port. Making the transition from athlete to sport professional was important for Bacchus. Her P ostgraduate Diploma in S port Management at e UWI, oered in collaboration with the International Centre for S ports S tudies (CIE S ) under the auspices of the Fdration Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), provided an excellent base. It covered S trategic Management of S ports, S ports Marketing and S ponsorship, L aw and S ports, Communication in S ports, S ports Finance, S ports Facilities Management, Event Management and Human Resource Management (HRM) in S ports. e P ostgraduate Diploma gave Bacchus insight into the other side of sport: you gain a much greater appreciation for your managers, your liaisons, and the people who are there working behind the scenes to ensure your paperwork is in order. A collaborative eort by the Embassy of the U nited S tates, T rinidad and T obago, and the U niversity of the West Indies, S t. Augustine Campus made it possible for former Apple executive and current P resident and CEO of the All Access Group LL C, Kelli Richards to deliver a stimulating and insightful open lecture on digital marketing strategies at e UWI on T uesday May 7. An established pioneer and trailblazer in the arenas of digital music, media and entertainment, author, and much sought-aer professional coach, Richards shared with the audience some of her extensive knowledge on how lmmakers, authors and musicians may best market their products and businesses on digital platforms such as Amazon, iT unes and a host of others. S peaking from more than 20 years of senior executive experience, Richards urged listeners to take advantage of the plethora of free and paid online platforms specically designed for the promotion of such products. S he le audience members with 10 key marketing strategies that could be broadly applied to music, media and entertainment markets: A vailability Have as wide and varied a consumer/fan reach as possible. S trong online presence Own a website, join as many social media/media/market platforms as possible, and then create specific accounts branded towards your product/company. Knowledge of your audience and market Your target market must be relevant, as should be any content released to it. M anagement of expectations for financial and professional reasons Not all ventures will immediately achieve a stable level of success. L ocal CIES Coordinator and Coordinator of e UWI/ FIFA/CIE S P ostgraduate Diploma P rogramme Charisse Broome said that T rinbagonians make up the highest percentage of the FIFA Master studentship and we are incredibly proud and pleased that a graduate of the P ost Graduate S ports P rogramme here joins them. P rofessor S urendra Arjoon, Department of Management S tudies Head, is pleased at Bacchus accomplishment: We can boast that graduates of e U WI/FIFA/CIE S P rogramme are able to make their mark in both local and international sport. Her achievement bears testament that our graduates are adequately prepared to compete on an international level and we extend our congratulations and best wishes for success at the FIFA Master P rogramme. Organised by the International Centre for S port S tudies in partnership with three universities De Montfort U niversity in L eicester (England), S DA Bocconi S chool of Management in Milan (Italy), and the U niversity of Neuchtel (S witzerland) and endorsed by FIFA, the FIFA Master in Management, L aw and Humanities of S port was created to promote management education within the sports world. It oers a dynamic international environment with I nvestment in your product One must spend money to make money. Free Giveaways! It is sometimes wiser and more protable to build an audience base and a brand that sustains over time than making a quick buck. C onnection Creating connections can take your product to great heights. If you dont ask, you dont achieve. E ngagement and P roduction C onnected = E ngaged. Its all about content! A dapting, E volving to new technologies and emerging markets Keep relevant and connected to your work while expanding product reach and boosting skills. N o single path to success Leaders create their own. Jhivan Pargass has a BA in Spanish with a Minor in Communication Studies from e University of the West Indies, St. Augustine. Shes just joined the Marketing & Communications Oce of e UWI.10 Digital Marketing StrategiesBY JHIVAN PARGA SSCharisse Bacchus (le) receives her award from L ystra Francis of e UWI Sport & P hysical E ducation Centre (S PEC)some 20 dierent nationalities in a class of 30 postgraduates selected each year. e international multi-disciplinary approach provides postgraduates with the opportunity to learn a broad range of subjects and develop their analytical skills to better cope with the fast-changing trends in the sport industry. For further information please contact Charisse Broome, Programme Coordinator/ Local CIES Co-ordinator of e UWI/FIFA/CIES Post Graduate Diploma at 662-2002 exts. 83724 or 82105 or email Charisse.Broome@sta.uwi.ed uUWI ALU MNA S ELECTED FOR P RESTIGIO USFIFA MAS TER P RO GR AMME Kelli R ichards, P resident and CEO All Access Group LLCPHOTO: ANEEL KARIM

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SUNDAY 26TH MAY, 2013 UWI TODAY 15 CAMPUS NEWS Sustainability in an Extractive IndustryBY JUSTIN J OS EP HT rinidads southwest peninsula will nd an upcoming conference of particular interest. Hosted by the Trade and Economic Development Unit of the Department of Economics, it is part of a wider development project, Developing and Implementing a LED Framework for Regions with Extractive Industries, which is jointly funded by Atlantic and the Inter-American Development Bank. At the macroeconomic level, Trinidad & Tobago is propelled by revenues from its extractive industries. In 1990, oil revenue as a percentage of total revenue stood at 41.2%; 21 years later, in 2011, the percentage stood at 47.3%. Likewise in 1990, petroleum value added accounted for 28.7% of total Gross Domestic Product (GDP); by 2011, this percentage had increased signicantly to 43.5%. This upward trend in economic importance signals that greater eorts must be made to harness its capacity to nurture the sustainable development of the respective host communities. Typically, Local Economic Development or LED strategy is a bottom-up approach to development, oering local government, the private and not-for-prot sectors, and local communities the opportunity to work together to improve the local economy. It is in this context that the Conference, Achieving Sustainability in Regions with Extractive Industries, is pitched. It will bring together local, regional and international experts in the area of sustainability in regions with extractive industries, to present the best practices associated with the development challenges peculiar to such regions and thereby seek to enhance the overall governance processes for regions with extractive industries. Among the issues on the agenda are economics of regions with extractive industries, the imperative for small business development in localized host communities and linking extractive industries to the wider economy. A 3D Poster competition for secondary school students, sponsored by the Caribbean Local Economic Development project, provided a medium for young people to voice their opinion. The conference is at the Paria Suites Hotel in La Romaine on June 14. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION Please contact the Trade and Economic Development Unit at 662-2002 ext 83233 or 83231 Justin Joseph is a Researcher for The Trade and Economic Development Unit, Department of Economics, UWI. He holds a Bsc. and Msc. in Economics. Shes a 26 year old MS c student of Management S tudies, Marketing at e UWI. S he is the Manager and founder of T ambran by T amara, established October 2012, and shes an Artist. Her name is T amara P rosper. From a pool of 493 applicants, T ambran by T amara was selected as a nalist for the rst edition of the Caribbean Innovation Challenge, going on to win the E nvironmental E ntrepreneur Award 2013. e CIC is an international entrepreneur competition and business start-up accelerator for young people in CARICOM Member S tates. It is a component of the UND P project Youth Innovation (YouthIN): A Caribbean Network for Youth Development. Little did I know, I would be heading to Guatemala to represent the Caribbean and compete on the hemispheric level in the TIC Americas and Eco-Challenge Caribbean 2013 in June, T amara said excitedly. S he had entered the competition, submitting a business plan, market feasibility study, market testing, and promotional video and graphic presentation of prototypes. Hers was the lone Grenadian team to partake in this prestigious competition, proving that she had a credible, feasible and viable business. From waste to treasures is the companys mantra. The business utilizes recycled materials to create ecofriendly accessories. T ambran does online direct sales via its Facebook page and, soon, its website; it also wholesales to retail businesses. e company seeks partnerships with going green organisations, encouraging them to recycle through T ambran as one of their environmentally friendly practices. For more information on the Caribbean Innovation Challenge, visit http://www.youthin-cic.net/index.php; on TIC Americas and Eco-Challenge Caribbean 2013, visit http://www.ticamericas.net To view and purchase Tamaras pieces, like their Facebook page Tambran by Tamara. Call 748-6093 or email tambranline@hotmail.com! YOUTH-IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP A partnership between U N DP Barbados and the OECS and YABT, Youth-IN Entrepreneurship, promotes innovation and youth entrepreneurship, in coordination with public/private alliances and stakeholders, generating a favourable ecosystem for the development of young entrepreneurs in the Caribbean. U sing cardboard paper tubes, old vinyl banners, wood residue from carpentry shops and jersey fabric, T ambran not only creates products that are largely popular on the market, but also alleviates the impact of waste materials on the environment. Among their many product oerings are hand painted wooden and fabric jewellery, wooden key ring souvenirs, luxury clutch bags, shopping and make up bags and laptop cases. About The Caribbean Innovation Challenge T he Caribbean Innovation Challenge (CIC) is an international entrepreneur competition and business start-up accelerator for young people in the CARICOM Member states. Awarding projects in three categories (S ocial, Economic and Environmental), the CIC promotes innovation, the development of entrepreneurial initiatives, and taps into the potential of young people to generate ideas that benet their societies and communities. e CIC is a component of the UND P project Youth Innovation (Youth-IN): A Caribbean Network for Youth Development which responds to the needs of youth identied in the report of the CARICOM Youth Commission (2010): Eye on the Future: Investing in YOUTH NOW for Tomorrows Community . It differentiates itself from other existing business model competitions by incorporating before and aer stages, focusing on training and mentoring as preparation for the competition, and providing follow up services that include access to nance, networking activities, internships and promotion opportunities which are key support services for young entrepreneurs.GO GREEN WITH T AMBRAN

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16 UWI TODAY SUNDAY 26TH MAY, 2013 GOLFAID 2013 June 9 M illennium Lakes Golf and Country Club Trincity Amateur golfers can test their mettle and help 3 worthy causes at the same time, simply by playing in this tournament. 50 teams of two will vie for top honours at the inaugural GO L FAID, hosted by the Faculty of Medical S ciences in aid of e U WI S tudent S upport Fund, Autistic S ociety of T&T and P ersons Associated with Visual Impairment ( P AVI). e tournament is under the patronage of His Excellency Justice Anthony Carmona, SC. T eam fee: TT$3,500, inclusive of dinner and drinks at the prize-giving ceremony. For more information, please contact the Secretariat at the Faculty of Medical Sciences: 645-2640 ext. 5025, 5009; Millennium Lakes; 640-8337; or Richard Lara: 681-9864. GROWING SECURITY June 30 July 6 Hyatt Regency Port of Spain T he 30th West Indies Agricultural Economics Conference, Agribusiness Essential for Food S ecurity: Empowering Youth and Enhancing Quality P roducts, hosted jointly by the Caribbean AgroEconomic S ociety, the Caribbean Food Crops S ociety (CFC S ) and the International S ociety for Horticultural S cience (IS HS). For more information, please contact Hazel Patterson Andrews at 662-2002 ext. 82445/82308 or via e-mail at info@caestt.com or caesconference@gmail.com. TRADE & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT UNIT (TEDU) PRESENTS A CHIEVING SUSTAINABILITY IN REGIONS WITH EX TRACTIVE INDUSTRY June 14 Paria Suites, La Romaine For more information, please contact Mr. Joel Jordan or Ms. Cindy James Tel.: 662-2002 ext. 83231 Email: extractive@sta.uwi.edu joel.jordan@sta.uwi.edu www.sta.uwi.edu/conferences/13/ted/ registration.asp THE R ULES OF THE GAME HAVE CHANGED: RESPONDING TO THE NEW D YNAMICS IN HIGHER EDUCATION July 11 13 Hilton Rose Hall Resort & Spa M ontego Bay T he 12th Annual Conference of the Association of Caribbean Higher Education Administrators Final P aper S ubmission Date: May 31st For more information, please email achea@sta.uwi.edu INAUGURAL HUMAN C OMMUNICATION STUDIES INTERNATIONAL C ONFERENCE 2013 Celebrating the Caribbean in Communication, Culture and Community September 26 27 Call for P apers: Abstracts by June 30; Full P apers by August 15. T he 2013 Conference celebrates the works of S tuart Hall, Aggrey Brown and others; it celebrates the Caribbean in the verbal and nonverbal communication of its artists in word, music, dance and movement, and theatre in our creative, cultural and communicative spaces. After the conference, please consider submitting your conference papers to an international panel for peer review for a proposed publication, e Human Communication S tudies Journal in 2014. For more information, please contact, humancommconference2013@sta.uwi.edu or contact the Department of Literacy, Cultural and Communication Studies, UWI St. Augustine1ST INTERNATIONAL R AMLEELA C ONFERENCE July 12 14 UWI Learning Resource Centre T his first conference will be co-hosted by T he U WI Faculty of Humanities & Education and the National Ramleela Council of T rinidad & T obago Inc. Final Date for S ubmission of Accepted P apers: May 30. For more information, please contact, Mr Rawle Gibbons or Ms Kamalawatie Ramsubeik Rawle.Gibbons@sta.uwi.edu; kramsubeik@hotmail.comUWI CALENDAR of E VENTSJUNE S EPTEMB ER 2013UWI T ODAY is printed and distributed for e U niversity of the West Indies, S t Augustine Campus, through the kind support of T rinidad Publishing Co L td, 22-24 S t Vincent S treet, P ort of S pain, T rinidad, West Indies. U W I TO DA YWANT S TO HEAR F ROM YOUUWI T ODAY welcomes submissions by sta and students for publication in the paper. P lease send your suggestions, comments, or articles for consideration to uwitoday@sta.uwi.edu