Title: UWI today
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Title: UWI today
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: UWI Marketing and Communications Office
Place of Publication: St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
Publication Date: March 28, 2010
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Bibliographic ID: UF00094180
Volume ID: VID00018
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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UWI
ST. AUGUSTINE
CAMPUS


UWI TTOlA
THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES ST. AUGUSTINE CAMPUS
SUNDAY 28TH MARCH, 2010


The newly rededicated Administration Building.


OUR GRAND OLD ADMIN LADY
BY PROFESSOR BRIDGET BRERETON


This grand building which we are rededicating today is
a mature lady, 85 years old this year. From the start, it has
been the flagship building of the two institutions of learning
which have occupied the St Augustine campus: ICTA and
UWI.
ICTA, or rather the WIAC as it was first named, opened
its doors in October 1922, long before this building began


LITERATURE -8 S
How I
became I
a Spy
SNourbeSe Philip
on her journey as a
writer


to be constructed (the refurbished Old Yaws Hospital, in
the area now occupied by the Bookshop building, was used
as its temporary accommodation). But from the start, the
first Principal, Sir Francis Watts, wanted 'a central block
of reasonably dignified proportions' to house the library,
classrooms and laboratories, and administration offices.
The architect was British (Major Corlette), probably chosen


PORT- 14
What the Caribbean Needs
I Executive Sports Management


C


because he'd designed the new government buildings in
Kingston after the devastating earthquake in 1907. As
Watts put it, 'a dignified building is essential to secure the
confidence and respect of the public, and this was the brief
for the architect. He opted for 'the Spanish Colonial style.'
(continued on Page 4)


RESEARCH 10
Breaking
the Silence
* Child Sexual
Abuse


FIFTY AND
FORGING AHEAD
1960-2010






Pages
Missing
or
Unavailable






SUNDAY 28TH MARCH, 2010 UWI TODAY 3


SCAMPU N



A SA IO


"We now face inevitable financial pressure as
a result of the financial landscape globally. We
cannot ignore the issue; everything we want to
accomplish in higher education depends on
a solid, sustainable system of funding," said
Professor Clement Sankat, St Augustine Campus
Principal of The UWI, at the West Indies Group
of University Teachers (WIGUT St. Augustine)
seminar on "Sustainable Funding of Higher
Education in Challenging Times," held in early
March at Daaga Hall Auditorium.
As Prof Sankat brought greetings to
participants, he noted that, "it is imperative
that our institution and others, both public
and private, discuss and explore innovative and
feasible policies to protect and grow significant
investment in higher education in Trinidad and
Tobago and the region."
The WIGUT seminar featured six panels
exploring challenges faced in funding higher
education. Presenters examined a range
of practical issues, such as traditional and
entrepreneurial approaches and models in
higher education, quality assurance and
return on investment, funding models and
case applications in higher education, cost-
cutting and workload issues, and funding the
academy.
Dr Godfrey Steele, Senior Lecturer in
Communication Studies and WIGUT President,


welcomed participants and outlined a higher
education investment policy that incorporates
the views of the academy, meets and increases
funding commitments, and balances the
interests of all stakeholders. Later that day in
response to a comment from Labour Minister
Mr Rennie Dumas that government was
committed to funding higher education, Dr
Steele acknowledged with appreciation the
support of the State. However, he lamented
that although WIGUT had submitted its pay
proposals for 2008-2011 in June 2008, to date
it had neither had a response nor had been
invited to begin negotiations for Academic,
Senior Administrative and Professional Staff.
This was having a negative impact on the
institution, its staff and its students.
Mr Emmanuel Gonsalves, President,
College of Science, Technology and Applied
Arts of Trinidad and Tobago (COSTAATT)
noted that existing funding models were
demand driven and depended on State
revenue. He suggested a fund be set up
specifically for tertiary education needs,
and that it be constitutionally protected
and managed by qualified, experienced and
independent professionals.
Dr Steele is compiling a summary of the
presentations for public information.


The Power of Education


SEarlier this month, we launched the 50th
anniversary celebrations of the UWI St
SAugustine Campus, and rededicated our
Administration Building. It was a time of
reflection, of restating our values and vision
and I would like to share some of my words
from that historic occasion.
We have built an extensive community
of alumni, academics, partners, supporters,
friends and well-wishers, and through their collective efforts and
support, this Campus has withstood the test of time. It is also because
of the generous support of our regional governments and especially
the Government and people of Trinidad and Tobago, that The UWI
St. Augustine Campus has been able to grow and develop over the
past five decades.
In addition to serving our community, our commitment to
regionalism is another unique and defining characteristic of our
beloved institution, but let me say that the essence of regionalism goes
beyond the unique and into the philosophical realm. For regionalism
is premised on a philosophy that is noble. It subsumes values that are
inclusive, compassionate and benevolent, values that promote reaching
out, embracing and supporting our Caribbean brothers and sisters.
This is a philosophy that has guided and nurtured my own life.
Like many, I began my journey as a young, inexperienced-though,
I thought then, witty and charming-undergraduate student. The
UWI St. Augustine Campus soon became the anchor of my personal
and intellectual development, the compass that steered me towards
the pursuit of excellence in my chosen field and the wind in the sails
that took me to later represent my Department, Faculty, Campus and
University in places I had never even dreamed of, when I was growing
up in Corentyne, Berbice, a rural town in Guyana. That was in 1969!
That is the power of education, the spirit of freedom, to be creative and
innovative and the potential for achievement by all, to which each and
everyone here at the UWI St. Augustine Campus is devoted.


CLEMENT K. SANKAT
Pro Vice Chancellor & Principal


From left, Dr Godfrey Steele, WIGUT President; Mr Emmanuel Gonsalves, President, College of Science, Technol-
ogy and Applied Arts of Trinidad and Tobago (COSTAATT); and Professor Clement Sankat, St Augustine Campus
Principal of The University of the West Indies (UWI), at the West Indies Group of University Teachers (WIGUT
St. Augustine) seminar on "Sustainable Funding of Higher Education in Challenging Times", held on March 4th,
2010 at Daaga Hall Auditorium, UWI St. Augustine Campus.


For more information, please contact Elmelinda Lara (868) 662 2002 Ext. 3414
or Elmelinda.Lara@sta.uwi.edu or visit www.sta. wigut.info.


EDITORS*


CAMPUS PRINCIPAL
Professor Clement Sankat

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS
Mrs. Dawn Marie De Four-Gill

EDITOR
Ms. Vaneisa Baksh

CONTACT US
The UWI Marketing and Communications Office
Tel: (868) 662-2002, exts. 2013. 2014
Or email: uwitoday@sta.uwi.edu






SUNDAY 28TH MARCH, 2010 UWI TODAY 5


* EDULINK IN CAPE TOWN TALKS


Dr. David Rampersad, Director, Business Development
Office, The UWI, is preparing for the conference of the
International Organisation for Research Management
Societies (INORMS) to be held in Cape Town, South Africa,
in April.
"My presentation will highlight the EDULINK funded
project, Capacity Building for the Financial Sustainability
of ACP Higher Education Institutions," he said, of the
UWI-led initiative.
The UWI and other Higher Education Institutions
in the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Group of
States and the European Union Member States that are
signatories to the 9th European Development Fund (EDF)
are collaborating on the EDULINK initiative, which funds
cooperative projects between its members.
With this EDULINK project, academic and
administrative staff of all partner universities will be
trained in revenue generation techniques with a focus on


* WOW GIVES STUDENTS A HELPING HAND

WOW 2010 is de-
signed to equip
final year UWI
students with the
necessary tools
WORLDof WORK for long-term
success in the
globalised work
environment. The
WOW Seminar,
which took place
on February 6,
2010, included two feature presentations. Giselle La Ronde
West, Corporate Communications Manager of Angostura
delivered an interactive presentation titled "Dressing for
Success", and Derek Chin, Founder of MovieTowne, spoke
about the roots of his entrepreneurial success.


EDUCINK^




philanthropy, grantsmanship, commercialization of research
and business development. The project is also expected to
result in the formulation of a professional development
programme in resource mobilization and the establishment
of a virtual office at which will provide guidance and manage
the implementation of this project.
While Small Island Developing States (SIDS) offer
considerable potential for research, they have special needs
but few have a mature research funding infrastructure,
networks of higher education institutions (HEIs) and


(Left to right) Ms Deirdre Charles, Director of UWI Student Services,
Mrs Giselle La Ronde West, and Mr Chandar Gupta Supersad, UWI
Careers and Placement Officer at The University of the West Indies
(UWI), St. Augustine World of Work programme (WOW 2010), which
took place at the UWI Sport and Physical Education Centre (SPEC)
from February 4th to March 12th, 2010. For the fourth consecutive year,
WOW is being fully sponsored by Republic Bank Limited.


a cadre of professional staff capable of undertaking
revenue generation and research management, said Dr
Rampersad.
"The paper will demonstrate how The University of the
West Indies, a regional HEI which serves 15 countries and
for which research is a strategic priority, is working with
its African, Caribbean and Pacific partners with funding
provided under the EDULINK programme, to design a
programme that will result in the establishment of a more
diversified funding base which emphasises third-stream
funding coupled with cross-border collaboration," he said.
The focus willbe on training academic and administrative
staff in comprehensive revenue-generating skills and in the
skills required for all aspects of research management who
will serve as trainers for their institutions.
This is the first time that the INORMS conference
will be held in Africa, and representation from African
universities and institutions should be strong, due to
bursaries provided by the Association of Commonwealth
Universities and the Wellcome Trust.


Final-year students at The University of the West Indies (UWI) annual
World of Work (WOW 2010) Interview Preparation and Resume Writ-
ing Workshop, which took place on February 4, 2010 at the UWI Sport
and Physical Education Centre (SPEC). The workshop was designed to
teach participants how to prepare competitive resumes for the global
job market.


1 0 AMPU NEW






SUNDAY 28TH MARCH, 2010 UWI TODAY 5


* EDULINK IN CAPE TOWN TALKS


Dr. David Rampersad, Director, Business Development
Office, The UWI, is preparing for the conference of the
International Organisation for Research Management
Societies (INORMS) to be held in Cape Town, South Africa,
in April.
"My presentation will highlight the EDULINK funded
project, Capacity Building for the Financial Sustainability
of ACP Higher Education Institutions," he said, of the
UWI-led initiative.
The UWI and other Higher Education Institutions
in the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Group of
States and the European Union Member States that are
signatories to the 9th European Development Fund (EDF)
are collaborating on the EDULINK initiative, which funds
cooperative projects between its members.
With this EDULINK project, academic and
administrative staff of all partner universities will be
trained in revenue generation techniques with a focus on


* WOW GIVES STUDENTS A HELPING HAND

WOW 2010 is de-
signed to equip
final year UWI
students with the
necessary tools
WORLDof WORK for long-term
success in the
globalised work
environment. The
WOW Seminar,
which took place
on February 6,
2010, included two feature presentations. Giselle La Ronde
West, Corporate Communications Manager of Angostura
delivered an interactive presentation titled "Dressing for
Success", and Derek Chin, Founder of MovieTowne, spoke
about the roots of his entrepreneurial success.


EDUCINK^




philanthropy, grantsmanship, commercialization of research
and business development. The project is also expected to
result in the formulation of a professional development
programme in resource mobilization and the establishment
of a virtual office at which will provide guidance and manage
the implementation of this project.
While Small Island Developing States (SIDS) offer
considerable potential for research, they have special needs
but few have a mature research funding infrastructure,
networks of higher education institutions (HEIs) and


(Left to right) Ms Deirdre Charles, Director of UWI Student Services,
Mrs Giselle La Ronde West, and Mr Chandar Gupta Supersad, UWI
Careers and Placement Officer at The University of the West Indies
(UWI), St. Augustine World of Work programme (WOW 2010), which
took place at the UWI Sport and Physical Education Centre (SPEC)
from February 4th to March 12th, 2010. For the fourth consecutive year,
WOW is being fully sponsored by Republic Bank Limited.


a cadre of professional staff capable of undertaking
revenue generation and research management, said Dr
Rampersad.
"The paper will demonstrate how The University of the
West Indies, a regional HEI which serves 15 countries and
for which research is a strategic priority, is working with
its African, Caribbean and Pacific partners with funding
provided under the EDULINK programme, to design a
programme that will result in the establishment of a more
diversified funding base which emphasises third-stream
funding coupled with cross-border collaboration," he said.
The focus willbe on training academic and administrative
staff in comprehensive revenue-generating skills and in the
skills required for all aspects of research management who
will serve as trainers for their institutions.
This is the first time that the INORMS conference
will be held in Africa, and representation from African
universities and institutions should be strong, due to
bursaries provided by the Association of Commonwealth
Universities and the Wellcome Trust.


Final-year students at The University of the West Indies (UWI) annual
World of Work (WOW 2010) Interview Preparation and Resume Writ-
ing Workshop, which took place on February 4, 2010 at the UWI Sport
and Physical Education Centre (SPEC). The workshop was designed to
teach participants how to prepare competitive resumes for the global
job market.


1 0 AMPU NEW






SUNDAY 28TH MARCH, 2010 UWI TODAY 7


* NEW PROGRAMME .
CERTIFICATE IN LOCAL
GOVERNMENT STUDIES ---

The UWI Office of the Campus Principal and
the Faculty of Social Sciences launched the
Customized Certificate in Local Government
Studies on Monday 22nd February, at the
Centre for Language Learning Auditorium,
UWI St Augustine.
The Customized Certificate in Local
Government Studies, which the Faculty
of Social Sciences will deliver for staff of
the Ministry of Local Government, will
develop the Human Resource capability of the
Ministry of Local Government, thus enabling
it to discharge its programmes and policies
with greater efficiency. SM.Ii OW

For more information, please contact
Mrs Sandra Roopchand-Khan
at Sandra.Khan@sta.uwi.edu
or (868) 662-2002 ext. 3232.

The Honourable Hazel Manning, Minister of Local
Government, shakes hands with Professor Clem-
ent Sankat (right), UWI Pro Vice Chancellor and St
Augustine Campus Principal, who has just received a
cheque presented by Mrs Cheryl Blackman (centre),
Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Local Gov-
ernment. The University has launched a customized
Certificate in Local Government Studies.






SUNDAY 28TH MARCH, 2010 UWI TODAY 7


* NEW PROGRAMME .
CERTIFICATE IN LOCAL
GOVERNMENT STUDIES ---

The UWI Office of the Campus Principal and
the Faculty of Social Sciences launched the
Customized Certificate in Local Government
Studies on Monday 22nd February, at the
Centre for Language Learning Auditorium,
UWI St Augustine.
The Customized Certificate in Local
Government Studies, which the Faculty
of Social Sciences will deliver for staff of
the Ministry of Local Government, will
develop the Human Resource capability of the
Ministry of Local Government, thus enabling
it to discharge its programmes and policies
with greater efficiency. SM.Ii OW

For more information, please contact
Mrs Sandra Roopchand-Khan
at Sandra.Khan@sta.uwi.edu
or (868) 662-2002 ext. 3232.

The Honourable Hazel Manning, Minister of Local
Government, shakes hands with Professor Clem-
ent Sankat (right), UWI Pro Vice Chancellor and St
Augustine Campus Principal, who has just received a
cheque presented by Mrs Cheryl Blackman (centre),
Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Local Gov-
ernment. The University has launched a customized
Certificate in Local Government Studies.






8 UWI TODAY- SUNDAY 28TH MARCH, 2010


SAPSLTRTR WEEK MA.C *-52 *1


THE JOURNEY


Moving from Tobago to Trinidad was the biggest
event of M. NourbeSe Philip's childhood, but it
was when she went to Canada that her career
as a writer took off. Philip graduated from
The UWI in 1968 with a degree in Economics,
practised law in Canada for seven years before
devoting herself to writing: poetry, novels,
plays, short stories.

As the guest writer at the 2010 Campus
Literature Week at The UWI, Philip attended
readings and closed the week with a reading
on March 5. She feels that the Literature
Week is "exciting" and that literature is a good
investment at every level. She spoke with Serah
Acham on her journey as a writer.

You've said that your switch from practising
law to writing was a surprise to you most of
all. Why was this?
Simply, and maybe not so simply, because when I was
growing up here in Trinidad and Tobago a career in writing
was not something that anybody entertained and certainly
parents weren't thinking of anything like that for their
children. You would come down the hierarchy, doctors,
lawyers, nurses, teachers, the civil service, you know? That
was what every parent wanted best for their children. That's
what they were aspiring to, so certainly a life of writing
was not something we thought of or that we were even
encouraged to get into, so that was why I said that it was a
big surprise for me.
Today when I come here and see students doing an
MFA in writing, it's really encouraging in the sense that
change is possible.

When did you start writing?
I started writing in terms of writing with a view
to publishing probably in the late seventies. While I
was practicing law I published two books of poetry.
I had been keeping a journal for several years before
that. That was a more personal thing, but certainly
writing with a view to thinking maybe somebody
!!!!,! I. 1. interested in what I have to say-it would
I', Inh I..l secventies.

How would you describe
your journey as a writer?
It has been difficult. It has been very
difficult in Canada because the first thing
that comes to mind in my case is when I
was writing, which as I say was in the late
seventies, eighties, Canada was still overtly
Eurocentric. I say overtly because I still
Think it is Eurocentric today although


there is a more public discourse about multiculturalism and
so on. As a woman from the Caribbean writing in Toronto,
there were no elders. There were no models that we could
look to, to pattern ourselves on in terms of writing, so there
is a sense in which people like myself who are from Trinidad,
Dionne Brand, Claire Harris, and others from other islands,
we actually were almost creating the tradition as we were
writing in terms of, you know, when we began writing, in
the seventies and eighties.
Certainly I can't say that there was an embrace by
the Canadian culture-if not open hostility, perhaps
indifference. So it has been a struggle in that respect. Perhaps
a different kind of struggle than would have taken place here
and then also the fact that I'm female and what that meant.
Now, I think one factor in North America that accounted
for what I just told you was the feminist movement. And
the feminist movement certainly was engaged in many
debates around race and racism and issues around how to
be more all-encompassing in terms of women from different
backgrounds: African women, South Asian women, first
nation women, and so on. So that would have been counter
to what I was just talking about in terms of the indifference
of the mainstream Eurocentric tradition. There was a lot
of contestation, a lot of debate going on in the feminist
movement but it certainly was somewhere at least where you
felt that you could engage with some of those issues.






SUNDAY 28TH MARCH, 2010 UWI TODAY 9


OF THE WORD


Do you think it would have been easier here?
No. I don't think so necessarily. I think it would have
been a different kind of struggle. But you have writers here,
like Merle Hodge or Pearl Eintou Springer and so on, who
have published here. Unfortunately, we still don't have a
lot of women writers. I think it's because you have to have
another source of income because you really can't sustain
yourself writing. It probably meant that I would have had to
have gotten a job at the university or doing something else
and once you have a job and you have a family and so on,
all those demands call for time. You only have so much time
in any day. It would have been a different kind of struggle
perhaps. Being further away from your matrix gives you a
certain kind of perspective, but it also puts you at a distance
from it. Being closer, the positive aspect of that is that you're
really immersed in the culture, but then sometimes there's
more resistance within the culture if you want to push things.
I think there are benefits and disadvantages on both sides.

When did you know that you
wanted to become a writer?
I would say sometime around the seventies when I
began writing and thinking, in a very tentative way, "oh,
you know, maybe I have something to say that somebody
might be interested in"


I was always interested in reading. I read voraciously
as a child in Belmont, in Tobago, but no, I can't say I always
wanted to be a writer. I have an essay, "The Absence of
Writing or How I Almost Became a Spy" and, if anything,
probably wanting to be a spy was much more real because
as I say, writing wasn't on the horizon for anybody, and I
used to read books about World War II and people spying
for England. There's a way in which I think writing does
entail spying because you're always observing gestures, what
people are saying, stories they're telling and so on. So I think
there's a sense in which I did become a spy.

What is most challenging
about being a writer?
What's most challenging I thinks earning an income-
if you're doing it in the way that I have tried to do it for
the last few years-which is freelancing. I have taught at
universities for as long as five years at a time, but I don't
have a permanent position there and, so not having financial
stability is, I think, the most challenging thing.

Is there any recurring subject or theme
that you like to focus on in your writing?
Language. Language in all of its manifestations. What
do I mean by language? I think what intrigues me is the
fact that for many of us, particularly African people in the
Caribbean, we lost our languages and historically there was
the intent to split different linguistic groups, split up the
groups so that they couldn't talk to each other, they couldn't
work together to revolt and so on. There was this deliberate
destruction of one's linguistic heritage and coming out of
that you have this, what I call mother tongue English which
is also a father tongue in the sense that it is the language of
oppression, domination, empire, all those things. And we
have to master this language, literally to prove that we are
as good as our former owners and oppressors, so starting
from that, exploring issues of what language do we use
in writing. Do we use Standard English? Do we use the
vernacular? Is that a language? Will people want to hear
it? So language in all those permutations, you know? And
how do I work with that? What language do I work in? Do
I work in the vernacular? That can affect market. Because if
you write something in the vernacular, the publisher might
feel that it's not going to sell. You want something that's more
Standard English.
The interesting thing about English is that English is
itself a vernacular language. It's a mixture of Celtic, French,
Anglo-Saxon words, German words and so on. You have
different kinds of English. In the last couple of decades
there's much more acknowledgement of what people call
pidgin patois and people have been writing in it now, so all
those issues fascinate me. What happens, or certainly what
happened to me, is that the issue chooses you and then
you're condemned to keep rehearsing it, exploring it from
different vantage points.


V-
LU
.-
1....

x
2


* ONLINE EXCLUSIVE
I remember Austin Clarke working feverishly,
in his room at the Caribbean Lodge, on what
would become the prize-winning Polished Hoe.
His computer had crashed just before he came
to Trinidad and he was painfully reconstructing
part of the manuscript. He was way past his
delivery date and his publisher was breathing
down his back....

At the end of the 11th edition of Campus Literature
Week, Professor Funso Aiyejina, continues his
description of its birth and the first decade of its
life (1999-2009) under his stewardship.


PART II:THE WRITERS WHO CAME
is in our online version at
http://sta.uwi.edu/uwitoday/default.asp






SUNDAY 28TH MARCH, 2010 UWI TODAY 11


U NEW PROGRAMME GEOMATICS ENGINEERING AND LAND MANAGEMENT


The Department of
Surveying and Land
Information of The
UWI has changed its
name to the Department
of Geomatics
Engineering and Land
Management.
"In the last 12
S years, our Department
really has outgrown
its previous name,"
S Professor said Professor
JacobOpadeyi Jacob Opadeyi, the
Department's Head.
The Department now offers programmes in Land
Management and Geomatics Engineering, an emerging
field of studies which includes a range of disciplines such as
land surveying, geodesy, photogrammetry, remote sensing,
cartography, land and geographic information systems,
urban planning, cadastral systems, global navigation
systems and hydrography. Undergraduate offerings include
Bachelor of Science (BSc) degrees in Land Management


or Bachelor of Science (BSc) degrees Geomatics. For
postgraduate students, the Department now offers Master of
Science (MSc) degrees in either Geoinformatics or Urban
and Regional Planning. Two research programmes were
recently introduced: the Master of Philosophy (M.Phil)
and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) in either Geoinformatics
or Urban and Regional Planning.
Geomatics Engineering is a modern, rapidly
developing field of study which integrates the acquisition,
modeling, analysis and management of spatially referenced
data. Geomatics engineers use their knowledge of science,
engineering and measurement technology to solve complex
world problems. Technologies developed within the
discipline have revolutionised global navigation, resource
and environmental management and urban planning.
Career opportunities for the Geomatics Engineer span
over both the private and public sector markets and range
from the technical engineering fields to policy making and
planning. The Geomatics Engineer will be able to work in
any of these sub-disciplines and many related fields in the
built environment.
Land Management refers to disciplines involved
in the process of managing land as a natural resource in


a sustainable way. It includes the sub-discipline of Land
Administration, which involves determining, recording and
disseminating information about the ownership, value and
use of land. It also includes urban and regional planning,
which involves the organisation and regulation of physical
development in both the urban and rural landscapes locally
and regionally, as well as valuation surveying, which is the
process of developing a fiscal value for real property. The
Department offers a specialisation of property valuation at
the undergraduate level as well as graduate programmes in
land administration and physical planning.
Graduates of the land management programmes have
several opportunities for employment in both the private
and public sectors as they relate to physical planning,
property valuation, fiscal cadastre development, as well as
managerial responsibilities in local government agencies.

For more information, please visit http://sta.uwi.edu/eng/
surveying/BScInGeomatics.asp, or contact Professor Jacob
Opadeyi, Head of the Department of Geomatics Engineering
and Land Management at jacob.opadeyi@sta.uwi.edu or
(868) 662 2002 ext. 2108 or 3313.


U ENVIRONMENT IN DEVELOPMENT


Professor John Agard (above) delivered his Professorial Inaugural
Lecture in February at the Learning Resource Centre, UWI St. Augustine.
Professor Agard's lecture, titled "Environment in Development: From
Plantation Economy, Biodiversity Loss and Global Warming, Towards
Sustainable Development," argued that the Plantation Economy Model
of Caribbean economic structures and characteristics can be further
elaborated by the inclusion of the environment as a provider of ecosystem
services.
Dr. John B. R. Agard is Professor of Tropical Island Ecology
and Head of the UWI Department of Life Sciences, and has served
internationally as Lead Author in the Fourth Assessment Report of the
Inter-Governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2007, which was
awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.


1 0 AMPU NEW






SUNDAY 28TH MARCH, 2010 UWI TODAY 11


U NEW PROGRAMME GEOMATICS ENGINEERING AND LAND MANAGEMENT


The Department of
Surveying and Land
Information of The
UWI has changed its
name to the Department
of Geomatics
Engineering and Land
Management.
"In the last 12
S years, our Department
really has outgrown
its previous name,"
S Professor said Professor
JacobOpadeyi Jacob Opadeyi, the
Department's Head.
The Department now offers programmes in Land
Management and Geomatics Engineering, an emerging
field of studies which includes a range of disciplines such as
land surveying, geodesy, photogrammetry, remote sensing,
cartography, land and geographic information systems,
urban planning, cadastral systems, global navigation
systems and hydrography. Undergraduate offerings include
Bachelor of Science (BSc) degrees in Land Management


or Bachelor of Science (BSc) degrees Geomatics. For
postgraduate students, the Department now offers Master of
Science (MSc) degrees in either Geoinformatics or Urban
and Regional Planning. Two research programmes were
recently introduced: the Master of Philosophy (M.Phil)
and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) in either Geoinformatics
or Urban and Regional Planning.
Geomatics Engineering is a modern, rapidly
developing field of study which integrates the acquisition,
modeling, analysis and management of spatially referenced
data. Geomatics engineers use their knowledge of science,
engineering and measurement technology to solve complex
world problems. Technologies developed within the
discipline have revolutionised global navigation, resource
and environmental management and urban planning.
Career opportunities for the Geomatics Engineer span
over both the private and public sector markets and range
from the technical engineering fields to policy making and
planning. The Geomatics Engineer will be able to work in
any of these sub-disciplines and many related fields in the
built environment.
Land Management refers to disciplines involved
in the process of managing land as a natural resource in


a sustainable way. It includes the sub-discipline of Land
Administration, which involves determining, recording and
disseminating information about the ownership, value and
use of land. It also includes urban and regional planning,
which involves the organisation and regulation of physical
development in both the urban and rural landscapes locally
and regionally, as well as valuation surveying, which is the
process of developing a fiscal value for real property. The
Department offers a specialisation of property valuation at
the undergraduate level as well as graduate programmes in
land administration and physical planning.
Graduates of the land management programmes have
several opportunities for employment in both the private
and public sectors as they relate to physical planning,
property valuation, fiscal cadastre development, as well as
managerial responsibilities in local government agencies.

For more information, please visit http://sta.uwi.edu/eng/
surveying/BScInGeomatics.asp, or contact Professor Jacob
Opadeyi, Head of the Department of Geomatics Engineering
and Land Management at jacob.opadeyi@sta.uwi.edu or
(868) 662 2002 ext. 2108 or 3313.


U ENVIRONMENT IN DEVELOPMENT


Professor John Agard (above) delivered his Professorial Inaugural
Lecture in February at the Learning Resource Centre, UWI St. Augustine.
Professor Agard's lecture, titled "Environment in Development: From
Plantation Economy, Biodiversity Loss and Global Warming, Towards
Sustainable Development," argued that the Plantation Economy Model
of Caribbean economic structures and characteristics can be further
elaborated by the inclusion of the environment as a provider of ecosystem
services.
Dr. John B. R. Agard is Professor of Tropical Island Ecology
and Head of the UWI Department of Life Sciences, and has served
internationally as Lead Author in the Fourth Assessment Report of the
Inter-Governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2007, which was
awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.


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12 UWI TODAY- SUNDAY 28TH MARCH, 2010


WAR OF WORDS

Haiti's battle over language

BY PROFESSOR VALERIE YOUSSEF


The catalyst for this lecture was the death of Pierre Vernet,
Dean of the Faculte de Linquistique Appliquee in Haiti,
along with those colleagues and students who were in the
building when it collapsed in the earthquake of January 12.
Pierre had worked tirelessly to bring an effective language
education policy to the territory and I had last seen him
when he had invited a group of linguists into Haiti to give
a series of lectures on language education policy. That was
in January 2000, exactly 10 years from the day of his death.
The work he was doing is needed even more today as part
of the effort to bring the Haitian people to empowerment
from within.
Masked in the initial coverage of the relief effort, but
surfacing some ten days later as I wrote the lecture, was
the difficulty of delivering aid to a devastated society, that,
even before the disaster, had little infrastructure to sustain
it. Off the world media radar for some years, and distorted
in its image by constant association with violence, Haiti
had had no way of transmitting its real internal situation,
on which light was now shone. Important as it was to bring
immediate relief, the issues of Haiti's long term sustainable
development needed redress now more than ever. Suddenly
policy suggestions made ten years earlier took on renewed
significance. It was in this context that I set out to write.
Historically, Haiti's succession from Spanish to French
control resembles Trinidad's. From Columbus' invasion in
1492 there were few slaves under the Spanish, but major
decimation of the Amerindian population; then from 1697, a
sugar economy was built up with slaves brought from Congo,
Guinea and Dahomey (now Benin). The Haitian language
developed as the slaves needed a common interactional
mode and this new code was realized out of contact among
regional French varieties and Niger-Congo languages
including most saliently, Kwa and Bantu languages.
When Haiti became the first black independent nation
in 1804, it established a law that any escaped slave who
arrived there could become a Haitian and hence free; it
thereafter served as a haven for slaves fleeing Jamaica and
other territories. The Caribbean's own modern-dayrejection
of Haitians fleeing their circumstances, is further reason for
the region to examine its position vis-a-vis Haiti today.
Sadly, the country was decimated internally by
oppressive leaders from that time on. Foreign influence, in
particular from the USA, has characterized the twentieth
century, and has been heinous in its self-serving force.
Internally, the reign of the Duvalier family from 1957
until 1986 was the most exploitative, first under Francois
Duvalier, and then under his son, Jean-Claude. The economy
was subverted to both Duvalier and US interests, such that
grossly underpaid factory labour became the mainstay
of the masses and peasant agricultural production was
systematically undermined. In that period, Haitians report
that anyone involved in helping others to acquire literacy
or education was arrested.


Professor Valerie Youssef


The Haitian language developed

as the slaves needed a common

interactional mode and this new

code was realized out of contact

among regional French varieties

and Niger-Congo languages

including most saliently, Kwa

and Bantu languages.


Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the people's great hope, came
to power in 1990, but was ousted seven months later, and
in the three-year period of suppression which followed,
extreme brutality was meted out to the population. When
he returned with American support in 2000, his capacity to
change circumstances for the masses was never actualized.
Aristide ultimately proved ineffectual and was violently
ousted from power in 2004. Haitians had believed that
he would rule them justly and their disappointment was
concomitantly more profound. Rene Preval, Aristide's
former protege, has been President since 2006, supported
by UN peace-keeping forces. Haiti remains a country where
56% of the population still lives on less than $1 per day.
So what of language in all this?
Haiti has a population of 8.5M, all of whom are
Krey6l speakers. Outside Haiti there are another 4M.
Krey6l is modern Haiti's national language and one of two
constitutionally-recognized official languages, the other
being French. Despite this, most official documents are
written exclusively in French which is spoken by only one-
fifth of the population. The Haitian birth certificate, for
example, exists only in French. Such French-only policies
create a situation of "linguistic apartheid" which goes against
the spirit of Article 5 of the Constitution which states that
"all Haitians are united by a common language: [Haitian]
Creole".
The particular problem which Pierre Vernet was
concerned to solve was that of creating an appropriate
education system. Children learn better in their mother
tongues. Ethnicity, language and culture are deeply
intertwined and it has been demonstrated that children
acquire language to belong to a community, to fit in with
its norms. When they are encouraged to acquire literacy
in this first language they develop well but when literacy
is taught in a second language against which their own is
devalorized, a condition known as subtractive bilingualism
develops, whereby the child ceases to progress in the both
languages.
Efforts were made in Haiti to avoid this through the
establishment of a standardized orthography in 1978 and a
language education policy in 1987, but the latter was never
properly implemented. The most forceful issue has been the
incapacity to train teachers. Fifteen-year-olds graduating
from high school go back immediately into the school as
teachers.
We must not underrate the extreme thirst for knowledge
of the Haitian people. In 2000, as we spoke nightly, crowds
thronged the venues and asked myriad questions. They
would return nightly until these were answered. Their
misunderstanding of their situation was profound, however,
for they blamed themselves and their language for their
impoverishment. They were amazed to find that there were
successful independent Caribbean nation states for they had
been brought to see success solely in US terms; they were


0 CAMPS NEW






SUNDAY 28TH MARCH, 2010 UWI TODAY 13


empowered by the very notion of a Trinidad and Tobago
which was self-sustained.
In Haiti, we see a society in which coercive and
discursive control has been profound and within which
the path to democracy is only slowly being forged; entailed
within it is a battle over language, over having a voice at
all.
If we look back to the ways in which the young adults
we spoke to viewed their own position we can observe
how insidious such control is. Without French and without
literacy, they have been without an effective voice of their
own, receiving only their own ignorance and failure
from those in power. The government system has kept
them subjugated and illiterate through a French official
dictatorship which has consistently exploited them. In such
circumstances Krey6l has become the symbol of Hai'tiennite:
though the language is both loved and despised through
its inherited representation, it gives a voice to those who
have none.
From the 1980s people have increased their demand
for representation on radio which has become an 'open
microphone' for the democratic movement. The delivery of
news in Creole has brought access to happenings internal
news for the first time. But twenty years, during which
violent oppression has continued, is too short to change
people's image of themselves.
Externally, under-representation and misrepresentation
also undermine the country. I have alluded to Haiti being
off the world's radar before the earthquake. That is the
power of modern media: if you are not their focus then
for the rest of the world you do not exist. The media have
reported that the world stands to account for the long-term
condition of Haiti but the media must take their own share
of responsibility.


Haitians have had to queue for hours to get aid from
international agencies


While the images of survivors being pulled alive brought joy and
hope, there was further heartbreak on the capital's streets after a girl
of 15 was shot dead as a suspected looter.

In the present crisis there has been much balanced
coverage, but a 'looting' focus has also been established.
Discerning readers have made comparisons to Hurricane
Katrina when victims were 'refugees' and 'looting' was the
label used to describe African-Americans searching for food.
In Haiti persons looking for food have been referred to as
scavengers,' and photographs labeled 'looting and lawlessness'
show innocent people being harassed by violent police and
military. The tragedy we see least in the media, is the extent
of police brutality: one 15 year-old, was photographed, shot
dead, over some worthless pictures she probably thought
she might sell to buy food for her family.
In our local press, the reports from returning groups
have been mixed. Some have clearly been distressed by the
horrors but others have spoken of incipient violence in ways
that have not been positive. In The Guardian of Saturday
January 23rd (AS) we read a headline 'T and T charity group
mobbed in Haiti' On reading the article I found no evidence
of'mobbing' Church doors were closed when those waiting
for food started to press forward, but this was inevitable, for
the evidence suggests that the majority have not received
food and water despite the strong effort and many were
watching their young and old die. The orderly lines we see
in many photographs are a testimony to the people. Why
we must consistently undermine the Haitian people, even
now, is unclear.
The Caribbean must support the people of Haiti. Their
entire life experience has been devastating. The capacity for
survival which they have displayed is the greater because of
what they have learnt to endure. We can never make up for
the loss of life but, beyond that, a spotlight has been shone.


The past problem has been one of handouts which have
robbed people of their self-respect and militated against
sustainable growth. Amongst the plans, we need to return
to education within Haiti.
Years ago, a plan was put to the CARICOM Secretariat for
a language education project which took into consideration
the physical, social-psychological and ideological factors.
Any such plan must entail societal adjustment for proper
implementation, so that schooling is related to community
goals and provision of food to children as well as other skills
development. Trainer training programmes in all languages
to be used and taught are very important, since language is
the vehicle of all other education. Only an educated people
can transform Haiti and it has to be transformed ultimately
by its own people, empowered in a way that can enable them
to assume leadership in their communities and develop
small scale industries and businesses. Haitians have been
a profoundly hard working people but have lacked the
educational support that would make them meaningfully
independent. We can hope to do something about that
now.
--The Dept. of Liberal Arts is preparing to mount
language courses in Haitian Creole for experts gong in to Haiti
as part of the relief effort, and to offer language training and
language teacher training to Haitian students/teachers, in
(i ii/'o itti '1o with the Centre for Language Learning.
This is an extract from Professor Youssef's Inaugural
Professorial lecture, Language, Education and
Representation: Towards Sustainable Development for
Haiti. Please go to http://sta.uwi.edu/news/ecalendar/event.
asp?id=1133 for the full lecture.


Professor Valerie Youssef, Senior Lecturer in Linguistics at The
University of the West Indies (UWI) St Augustine with her husband,
Dr Fayez Youssef, former Senior Lecturer at UWI St Augustine,
moments after her Professorial Inaugural Lecture.


UNICA

The Association of Universities and Research Institutions
of the Caribbean (UNICA) hosted its 2010 Conference
on March 15th 2010 at the St. Augustine Campus of The
University of The West Indies. The Conference themed
I',1 in, i 1, for SIi'tiiIIaiil'lity" focused specifically on
mobilizing Caribbean Universities and Research Institutes to
partner with Haiti in the rebuilding effort, with an emphasis
on its tertiary sector.

UWI Vice Chancellor Prof E. Nigel Harris, St Augustine Campus
Principal, Prof Clement Sankat, Haitian representative Dr. Jocelyn
Tourillot, Rector, Universit6 Caribe, and Prof Norman Girvan


1 0 AMPU NEW






14 UWI TODAY- SUNDAY 28TH MARCH, 2010


VICE CHANCELLOR'S


HONOUR


(Left to right) Mr Jack Warner, FIFA Vice President; Dr Iva Gloudon, Director of Sport and Physical Education at The University of the West
Indies (UWI); and Professor Clement Sankat, University Pro Vice Chancellor and St Augustine Campus Principal, at the programme launch of
the new UWI postgraduate diploma in Sport Management.


FIFA/CIES

SPORTS MANAGEMENT


A new Executive Sports Management programme from
The UWI, FIFA and the International Centre for Sports
Studies (CIES) could be just what the Caribbean needs to
strengthen this region's standing in international sport.
On February 19th, Professor Clement Sankat, UWI Pro
Vice Chancellor and St. Augustine Campus Principal, hosted
the launch of a new postgraduate diploma programme in
Sports Management which is being described as the first
of its kind in the region to be offered at a tertiary level.
Professor Sankat acknowledged that the programme was
made possible only by the combined efforts of Government
stakeholders, FIFA/CIES, the local sporting fraternity and
the wider UWI family.
The programme, coordinated by the UWI Department
of Management Studies, covers sport management,
marketing, finance, facilities management and policy
development issues, law, communication, and event
management challenges involved in delivering sports
services in a globalised environment.
Dr Iva Gloudon, Director of UWI Sport and Physical
Education, has said she will call on private and public sector
stakeholders to continue to support the initiative through
its formative years.


Mr Vincent Monnier, CIES International Relations
Director, reminded the new students attending the launch
that through their enrolment in the new UWI/FIFA/CIES
programme, they had become members of the International
University Network (IUN), which includes nine universities
from South Africa, Costa Rica, Argentina, Egypt, Senegal,
Palestine, Turkey, Chile and Ukraine. As IUN members,
students have gained access to resources from any of the
member institutions of this network and have become part
of the international student fraternity operated by the CIES,
Monnier said.
Mr Brian-Anthony David, speaking on behalf of the
inaugural class, said that the group was looking forward to
pioneering solutions to challenges in local sport.
The history of the programme dates back to September
2008, when FIFA President Joseph Blatter and The UWI Vice
Chancellor, Professor E. Nigel Harris signed a Memorandum
of Agreement to undertake cooperative programmes in
the areas of research, training, education and facilities
development in sport within the region. The University's
new Master of Science degree in Sport Management began
in February.


For more information about these programmes, please contact Ms Charisse Broome at Charisse.Broome@sta.uwi.edu
or the Director of Sport and Physical Education atIva.Gloudon@sta.uwi.edu or (868) 662-2002 Ext. 2307.


Larry Gomes, a Trinidad-born left-hander, whose
calm and efficiency established him as a number
three batsman for the West Indies during his career,
was honoured at the 2010 UWI Vice Chancellor's
XI cricket match. Professor Clement Sankat, UWI
Pro Vice Chancellor and St Augustine Campus
Principal described him as, "a thoughtful, intelligent
cricketer, who cared more for the success of the West
Indian Cricket Team than personal fame. West
Indian Cricket is not only about natural talent, but
cricketers of today with the many opportunities
available to them, have to be trained to develop their
all-round professional skills, to put team before self,
and bringing them into academics such as the UWI,
can nurture and shape these. The UWI salutes
Larry Gomes as a model cricketer of our times.


Professor Clement Sankat (centre), UWI Pro Vice Chancel-
lor and St Augustine Campus Principal, greets players at
the 2010 Vice Chancellor's XI cricket match on Friday 26th
February, 2010, at the Sir Frank Worrell Field, UWI Sport
& Physical Education Centre (SPEC).


0 NEW POGRAMME






SUNDAY 28TH MARCH, 2010 UWI TODAY 15


1 :O K


A WELCOME RETURN


TO NEW THOUGHT

BY BRYAN KHAN


It is now been many decades since Caribbean scholars
have acknowledged that the theoretical explanations
offered by mainstream academics have been too generalized
to adequately capture the essence of the realities of the
Caribbean experience. This has been a journey which has
drawn on the intellectual capacities of some of the region's
greatest historians, political scientists, sociologists, and
of course, economists. What is interesting to note, is that
many of the major contributions to Caribbean thought are
attributed to works which have blurred the line between
these different disciplines.
A significant opportunity arises when a literary work
is able to transcend these lines, and contribute to the
development of not only its primary discipline, but to a
uniquely relevant Caribbean ideology. It is in this context
that the concept of the Plantation Economy Model stands
out as a key piece of the mosaic that is Caribbean society.
While the Plantation Economy is at heart, an economic


*ii


From left, Mr Errol Simms, Professor Kari Polanyi Levitt and Mr.
Martin Franklin at the launch of "Essays on the Theory of the Planta-
tion Economy", a new book co-authored by Professor Kari Polanyi
Levitt and the late Dr Lloyd Best, hosted by the Office of the Campus
Principal on February 25th, 2010.


I model, its implications and adaptations have transcended
the traditional economic framework, and have significantly
contributed to the emergence of a holistic and continuously
evolving developmental paradigm.
By establishing the premise that the history of our
region cannot be isolated from our economic context, the
Theory of the Plantation Economy has given us a construct
in which we are able to analyze our positions. By shifting
our focus towards a theoretical construct which is explicitly
based on the unique context of our colonial heritage and
history, the idea of the Plantation Economy is one which
has propelled independent Caribbean thought to its rightful
place.
Essays on the theory of Plantation Economy is a
significant literary work which I am sure will find its way
into the reading lists and course curricula of regional
academics, and hopefully, also into the hands of any casual
reader, interested in understanding the historical evolution
of the Caribbean economic framework. While the various
discourses in this book have been discussed, and in many
instances published, at various points in the past, it is a


significant accomplishment to have compiled these essays
into a single cohesive literary work.
I would also like to highlight the fact this publication is
certainly more than the sum of the individual essays of which
it is comprised. It begins with a comprehensive and insightful
forward by Professor Norman Girvan, appropriately titled
'The Plantation Economy in the Age of Globalization' which
aptly sets the tone of the text, introducing the theme of
the book not only from its historical perspective, but also
adopting a contemporary perspective.
Chapter one is an appropriate opening Best's 'On the
Teaching ofEconomics, first presented at the 1973 Conference
of Secondary School Teachers of Economics. The book
derives its tagline from Chapter two's title A Historical and
Institutional Approach to C1rillel't',i Economic Development'.
Like Chapter two, Chapters three to five are Best-Levitt
collaborations, taking the reader though a discourse on the
Legacy of the Plantation and the Structures of Caribbean
Economies, where the core construct of the Plantation
Model is explored in 'Revised and Expanded Model of
Pure Plantation Economy' a comprehensive and seminal
paper, accounting for almost a third of the book's content.
It is at this point, that the work identifies the plantation
economy as a hinterland, characterized by subordination
and dependency on the dominant metropole.
After being presented with the Best-Levitt Accounting
Framework for the Plantation Economy', the reader is
seamlessly drawn into Levitt's construction of A System
of National Accounts for Trinidad and Tobago.' With the
emphasis on the historical continuities of dependency
established, Levitt seeks to address the question of the
requisite changes which would allow for the break with
dependency, in 'In Search for Model IV, or the connotatively
labeled 'anti-model'
The last chapter reverts to the Best-Levitt formulation,
and provides a Critical Review of the Contributions of Lewis
and Seers, with specific reference to Issues ofIndustrialization
and Employment in the CMi1ie1n,,i; rounding off the book's
theme of Caribbean Development, and leaving the reader to
contemplate the evolution of perspectives within Caribbean
Economic Thought.
With the global and regional economies quickly evolving
via the technological progress characterized by today's
world, we are once again faced with a critical consideration:
What is the impact and significance of the Plantation Legacy
within our evolving economic landscape?"
While the Best-Levitt generation of economic thought
has given us a construct in which we can explain and
understand our regional economies, discourse on the
appropriate way forward still rages on.

Bryan Khan, an economics graduate of The UWI, is Research
Officer, Telecommunication Authority of Trinidad and
Tobago


ON PRIMARY HEALTH CARE


New primary health care providers should be allowed to learn
from the mistakes of those who have gone before. That is the
philosophy behind a new book from a lecturer in Primary Care
at The UWI.
"Psychosocial Issues in West Indian Primary Health Care"
is the new book written by Dr Rohan Maharaj, UWI Lecturer


in Primary Care and Coordinator of the UWI Family Medicine
Programme.
Although written primarily for physicians, the book willbe useful
to many ancillary primary health care workers. Dr Maharaj sees the
book as a tool for the training of medical students, residents and other
primary health care workers in caring for patients.


THE BOOK IS AVAILABLE AT THE UWI BOOKSHOP AND OTHER BOOKSTORES NATIONWIDE.






16 UWI TODAY- SUNDAY 28TH MARCH, 2010


UWI CALENDAR ofEVENTS

MARCH APRIL 2010


LUNCHTIME SEMINARS
Wednesday 31 March and April 7,2010
Noon-1 30prm
IGDS Seminal Room,
St Augustine Campus, UWI

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FUTURE OF FINANCIAL SERVICES
Friday 30 April, 2010
8am-Spm
Hyatt Regency Tiiniclad Hotel, POS

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CARIBBEAN CENTRE
FoR MONEY & FINANCE


100 YEARS OF REVOLUTION
Tuesday 6 to Thurisday 8 Apriil, 2010
The Centre for Language Learning ICLLI,
St Augustine Campus, UWI

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UWI TODAY WANTS
TO HEAR FROM YOU


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A GATHERING OF
LESBIAN AND GAY WRITING
PUBLIC LECTURE AND IGDS BOOK
LAUNCH
Thursday 15 Apiil, 2010
5 30-8 30pm
Daaga Hall Auditorium,
St Augustine Campus, UWI

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SCIENTIFIC CONFERENCE
Tuesday 22 to Saturday 24 April, 2010
Hyatt Regency Trinidad Hotel, POS

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