• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Letter of transmittal
 Table of Contents
 Florida Board of Regents
 University of Florida
 The Florida State University
 Florida Agricultural and Mechanical...
 University of South Florida
 Florida Atlantic University
 University of West Florida
 Florida Technological Universi...
 Florida Agricultural and Mechanical...
 Back Cover














Group Title: Report of the Florida Board of Regents
Title: Report of the Board of Control
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094136/00023
 Material Information
Title: Report of the Board of Control
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Florida. Board of Control.
Publisher: Board of Control
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, FL
Publication Date: 1964/1966
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094136
Volume ID: VID00023
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: electronic_oclc - 55693843

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Letter of transmittal
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Florida Board of Regents
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
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        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 32a
        Page 32b
        Page 32c
    University of Florida
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
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        Page 49
        Page 50
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        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    The Florida State University
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 82a
        Page 82b
        Page 82c
        Page 82d
    Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
    University of South Florida
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
    Florida Atlantic University
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
    University of West Florida
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
    Florida Technological University
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
    Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University Hospital
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
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        Page 167
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        Page 169
        Page 170
    Back Cover
        Page 171
        Page 172
Full Text



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Report of

FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS











INCLUDING REPORTS FROM:

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Gainesville

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY
Tallahassee

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL
UNIVERSITY
Tallahassee

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA
Tampa

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY
Boca Raton

UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
Pensacola

FLORIDA TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY
Orlando

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL
Tallahassee



1964-1966























Tampa, Florida
November 1, 1966
THE HONORABLE HAYDON BURNS
GOVERNOR OF FLORIDA

DEAR GOVERNOR BURNS:

I have the privilege of submitting herewith the Biennial Report of the Flor-
ida Board of Regents for the period beginning July 1, 1964, and ending June
30, 1966. This report is presented in compliance with the provisions of Chapter
5384, Laws of Florida, 1905.

In addition to the report of the Chairman of the Board of Regents, the
volume contains a report made by the head of each of the institutions which
by law operate under the Board of Regents.

The two years cover the period of transition from the Board of Control to
the Board of Regents. Much progress in higher education has been made during
this time of change and growth.

The members of the Board of Regents appreciate the cooperation of you
and the other members of the State Board of Education, as well as that of
the Legislature, in making these accomplishments possible.
Respectfully subr it.td,
CHESTER H. FERGUSON, Chairman
FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS

















THE FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS

CHESTER H. FERGUSON, Chairman ---------------------------- Tampa

WAYNE C. MCCALL, D.D.S. ------------------------------- Ocala

WOODROW J. DARDEN ..--------.------------------------------- Titusville

CLIFTON G. DYSON ----------------------------- W West Palm Beach

HENRY KRAMER --..--......----------..- --------- ------ --- Jacksonville

CLARENCE L. MENSER, D. LITT ......--.--. .. ..--- ---- --- ----. Vero Beach

Louis C. MURRAY, M.D. ------------------------------- Orlando

JOHN C. PACE ....-- -- --- ------------ ----- Pensacola

MRS. E. D. PEARCE ----------------------- --- Miami


DR. J. B. CULPEPPER, Chancellor
Tallahassee


HENDRIX CHANDLER, Corporate Secretary
Tallahassee


THE STATE BOARD

HAYDON BURNS, President ----..-

FLOYD T. CHRISTIAN, Secretary ---_

TOM ADAMS --------...

EARL FAIRCLOTH -- ------

BROWARD WILLIAMS ---------- --


OF EDUCATION
----------- Governor

Superintendent of Public Instruction

...----..---------.---- Secretary of State

.--------- Attorney General

--------- State Treasurer
















CONTENTS
Page
The Report of the Chairman of the Board of Regents -- 3
Office for Continuing Education _-- 11
Office of the Architect --.--------- ---- -- 25
Report of the Administered Funds and Interest and
Sinking Fund Balances and Revenue Certificates
Outstanding --___------.-------------------- 32
The Report of the President of the University of Florida .------ 33
The Report of the President of the Florida State University --- 63
The Report of the President of the Florida Agricultural and
Mechanical University _-_---. ----------- ---- 83
The report of the President of the University of South Florida 115
The Report of the President of Florida Atlantic University --- 127
The Report of the President of the University of West Florida 139
The Report of the President of Florida Technological University 147
The Report of the Administrator of the Florida Agricultural
and Mechanical University Hospital -- 157












FLORIDA
BOARD
OF
REGENTS












FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS 3

GENERAL SUMMARY
Major changes in the governance and administration of the State University
System took place during the biennium as Florida moved ahead on several fronts
to meet problems of growth and complexity in public higher education. The
changes were potentially the most far reaching since the System was estab-
lished in 1905.
The Board of Control which had served as the governing board for the state
universities since 1905 was succeeded on January 1, 1965 by the Florida Board
of Regents under authority of a 1963 law and a constitutional amendment
adopted by the people in November, 1964.
On July 1, 1965 the Chancellor became the chief executive officer for the
State University System replacing the Executive Director, and the Staff of the
Board was expanded and assigned increased responsibilities.
Some of the same problems of growth and complexity which led to creation
of the University System operation in 1905 influenced the 1963 and 1965 Legis-
latures to make the changes.
The 1905 Act was written to relieve the elected State Board of Education
of details of governing the institutions of higher learning and to consolidate
seven small state-supported schools into two major institutions which eventually
became the University of Florida and Florida State University.
Changes provided by 1963 and 1965 laws were designed to provide greater
continuity for members of the board by increasing the terms of office from four
to nine years and expanding the membership from seven to nine, and to make
the administrative structure more modern and flexible by delegating certain day-
to-day functions to the chancellor and presidents.
The first Board of Regents, appointed by outgoing Governor Farris Bryant,
organized on January 13, 1965 and made the transition from the Board of Con-
trol, carrying forward the policies and procedures which had been in effect under
the Board of Control. Members of the first Board of Regents were Baya M.
Harrison, Jr., Chairman; Gert H. W. Schmidt, Vice Chairman; Marshall M.
Criser, Sam T. Dell, Dr. Wayne C. McCall, Payne H. Midyette, Robert M. Mor-
gan, John C. Pace and Fletcher G. Rush.
Members of the first Board resigned on March 3, 1965, and were succeeded
on March 31 by the following members appointed by Governor Haydon Burns:
Floyd T. Christian, Clifton G. Dyson, Chester H. Ferguson, Henry Kramer, Dr.
Wayne C. McCall, Clarence L. Menser, Dr. Louis C. Murray, John C. Pace and
Mrs. E. D. Pearce.
Mr. Ferguson, a Tampa attorney, was elected to a four-year term as chair-
man, and Dr. McCall, an Ocala dentist, was named to a four-year term as vice-
chairman. In October, 1965, Mr. Christian was appointed by Governor Burns to
serve as State Superintendent of Public Instruction and he was succeeded by
Woodrow J. Darden, Superintendent of Public Instruction of Brevard County.
Elected by the Board of Regents to serve as the first Chancellor of the
State University System was Dr. J. Broward Culpepper, who since 1954 had
been serving as Executive Director of the Board of Control and of the Board
of Regents.
A basic change in administration of the continuing education program of
the State University System became effective July 1, 1965, under authority of a







4 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

1965 Act when the Florida Institute for Continuing University Studies was
abolished, and coordination of continuing education programs was brought di-
rectly under the Board of Regents.
The new pattern of administration was designed to allow each university to
respond directly to the continuing education needs of Floridians in its own geo-
graphical area and its own distinctive fields of competence.
The Office for Continuing Education of the Board of Regents was assigned
responsibility for making certain that Florida's university system is meeting
continuing education needs in the most effective and efficient way.
The Board of Regents was designated by Governor Burns as the administra-
tive and coordinating agency in Florida for two important federal education acts
designed to aid business and industry and to help in solving community prob-
lems.
These are the State Technical Services Act which provides federal matching
funds to support approved programs of public and private colleges and universi-
ties designed to promote commerce and to encourage economic growth, and Title
I of the Higher Education Act of 1965 which provides federal matching funds to
assist urban areas in solving their economic, social and other problems.
Few states in the nation have experienced the rate of growth of Florida's
state universities.
From two institutions with a few hundred students in 1905, the State Uni-
versity System had expanded in the fall of 1965 to five universities with 43,846
on-campus and 6,442 off-campus students. The on-campus enrollment more than
doubled during the past 10 years, having totaled 19,959 in 1955. Due to the
heavy birth rate following World War II and the Korean War and the increas-
ing trend of young people to attend college, enrollments are expected to virtually
double by 1970, and to double again by 1975.
Projections by the Board of Regents staff are that the 1970 enrollments will
total 86,252 and the 1975 enrollments will total 153,908, assuming that sufficient
faculty and facilities are provided.
In order to help prepare for the enrollment crush, the Board of Regents at
its April, 1966 meeting established new higher ceilings on enrollments for exist-
ing and emerging institutions for 1975. These ceilings are: University of Florida
25,000; Florida State University 25,000; Florida A & M University 6,000; Uni-
versity of South Florida 18,000; Florida Atlantic University 15,000; University
of West Florida 10,000, and Florida Technological University 12,500. This was a
total of 111,500.
The University of West Florida will open in Pensacola in 1967 and Florida
Technological University will open at Orlando in 1968. The University of West
Florida like Florida Atlantic University, will be an upper-level institution offer-
ing courses at the junior and senior level and moving toward limited graduate
work. Florida Technological University will be a four-year institution, opening
at the freshman and junior levels in 1968 and adding the sophomore and sen-
ior years in 1969, with graduate work being added later on the basis of justified
need.
Even with the expansion of existing and emerging universities, it is appar-
ent that Florida will not be able to provide for all of its capable young people
who want to attend college by 1975, and additional institutions will need to be
built.









FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS 5

The 1965 Legislature recognized this need by authorizing the establishment
of two additional institutions. A four-year degree granting college was author-
ized to be established in Dade county, and the establishment of a state university,
branch of an existing state university or a state college was authorized for Du-
val county. Feasibility studies were authorized for both institutions, but no
funds were provided for these studies.
Florida's state universities are changing in character as well as growing in
number and size as they move under a coordinated plan with the junior colleges
to help serve the largest number of Florida students at the lowest possible cost.
With the expansion of the public junior college system, the older state uni-
versities have been limiting the sizes of their freshmen and sophomore classes
and have been growing at a much faster rate at the upper level (juniors and
seniors) and the graduate level. Two state universities, Florida Atlantic Univer-
sity and the University of West Florida, have no freshmen and sophomore
students.
During the past three years enrollments of the state universities as meas-
ured by full-time equivalent students increased by 27 percent. The enrollments in
the Lower Division (Freshmen and Sophomore) gained by 15 percent, while the
enrollments in the Upper Division jumped up by 42 percent and the graduate
enrollment expanded by 56 percent.
For budget making purposes, total enrollment in the state universities is
expressed in terms of full-time equivalent students. An undergraduate full-time
equivalent student averages 15 hours per term and a graduate student averages
12 hours.
The following table shows the number of full-time equivalent students by
institutions for the fall terms of 1963, 1964 and 1965 by institutions:
This trend in the student mix has caused a substantial rise in operating
costs of the universities. Upper level instruction is more than twice as expensive
as lower level instruction, and graduate level costs more than four times as
much due to smaller size classes, specialized laboratory equipment and other
factors.
During the next ten years the state universities will have to more than
double the size of their physical plants in order to take care of the number
of qualified young people seeking admission.
Complying with a requirement of the 1965 Legislature, the state universities
have estimated their building needs over the next 10 years on the basis of uni-
form standards of utilization. These standards will assure that there will be no
waste of state dollars in meeting the state's higher education needs.
Effective September, 1967, the state universities will begin operating under
a quarter calendar plan with four terms of from eleven to twelve weeks in
length.
The change from the trimester system of year-round operations was ap-
proved by the Board of Regents and the State Board of Education upon recom-
mendation of the Council of Presidents after detailed study by an interinstitu-
tional committee.
The trimester system has been in effect in the State Universities of Florida
since September 1962.
Shortly after the initiation of the trimester system there began to emerge
feelings of pressure on the part of both faculty and students in that the shorter







6 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT STUDENTS*
State University System of Florida

Lower Upper
FALL 1963 (Fresh-Soph) (Jr-Senior) Graduate Total

University of Florida 7729 5117 1053 13,899
Florida State University 5260 3629 914 9,803
Florida A & M University 1765 879 81 2,725
University of South Florida 2796 1200 3,996
SYSTEM TOTAL 17,550 10,825 2048 30,423

FALL 1964
University of Florida 8042 5638 1198 14,878
Florida State University 5513 4110 1117 10,740
Florida A & M University 1957 850 77 2,884
University of South Florida 3647 1555 39 5,241
Florida Atlantic University 17 626 2 645
SYSTEM TOTAL 19,176 12,779 2433 34,388

FALL 1965
University of Florida 7795 6256 1303 15,354
Florida State University 5855 4652 1467 11,974
Florida A & M University 2272 850 116 3,238
University of South Florida 4251 2050 91 6,392
Florida Atlantic University 1593 214 1,807
SYSTEM TOTAL 20,173 15,401 3191 38,765

Percentage Increase 1965/1963 15% 42% 56% 27%

* Data taken from Fall Enrollment Report, Florida Board of Regents.



calendar made it more difficult to cover the academic material of the semester in
the trimester operation. Many students experienced difficulties in transferring
from high school and from junior colleges, and some faculty members who
wished to teach in other universities during the summer period found it impos-
sible to complete the two and a half trimesters required under contract and to
accept teaching and research opportunities in other institutions during the sum-
mer.
There also were problems in determining compensation of faculty members,
since faculty were reimbursed for two and a half trimesters, whereas in other
institutions faculty members were usually reimbursed on an academic year basis
(two semesters or three quarters).
In approving the quarter system, the Board of Regents took these factors into
consideration:
1. The quarter system will allow full use of the educational resources of the
universities, with the institutions being in operation for not less than 46 weeks
of the calendar year.
2. The quarter system lends itself by the nature of its length of terms more
nearly to a true year-round plan of operation.









FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS 7

3. The quarter system permits easy transfer of both students and faculty
from the junior colleges of Florida and from other degree-granting institutions
over the State and nation, since this system is a widely recognized academic-
year plan.
4. The quarter system provides a better opportunity for the adoption of a
systemwide 'sabbatical" plan, thus allowing members of the faculty periods for
professional growth and development.
5. The quarter system will permit students to complete their undergraduate
degrees in three years without pressures experienced under the trimester system.
6. This plan complies with the Legislative intent that the University Sys-
tem operate year-round.
In a move which will permit members of the faculty opportunities for pro-
fessional growth and development, the Board approved a faculty development
program which would allow qualified members of the faculty time off with part
pay for professional study and development.
Initially, if approved by the Legislature, the plan would provide for par-
ticipation by three percent each year of the eligible full-time faculty of each
institution. To be eligible a faculty member would have had to have had six
years of full-time service and would have to be a full-time faculty member with
the minimum rank of assistant professor or equivalent.



New and Expanded Programs
During the next ten years the people of Florida must be prepared to expand
the size of the faculties and the facilities of the state universities to provide
for enrollments more than three times existing enrollments. They must also be
prepared to broaden the variety, improve the quality and increase the efficiency
of higher education.
In order to make the wisest investment of the State's resources, it is essen-
tial that there be developed and regularly reviewed a master plan which will
chart the course of higher education for the next ten years. Procedures for
strengthening essential programs, for eliminating unnecessary duplication and
waste, and for predicting future needs must be continually reevaluated to de-
termine their effectiveness.
A proposed master plan for public post-high school education in Florida for
the next ten years has been recommended by the Council of Presidents of the
State University System. This plan currently is under study by the Board of
Regents.
An essential part of the proposed Master Plan is a continuing Role and
Scope study which each institution in the University System has been following
since 1960.
The central objective of the role and scope work is to prevent uneconomical
duplication of programs in the State University System as the system expands
its offerings.
During the past two years role and scope authorizations have provided for
expansion of graduate programs at two newer institutions, the University of
South Florida and Florida Atlantic University, as well as for older institutions.
The following role and scope decisions were taken during the biennium:








8 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

Date of Board
Meeting Board Action on Role and Scope Recommendations

6-12-64 Authorized development, beginning at the junior class level, of
integrated, continuous, sequential undergraduate-graduate pro-
grams through the master's degree in chemistry, biology, and
selected areas of education, including science education, at
F.A.U.
7-23-64 Authorized degree of Master of Fine Arts in theatre and crea-
tive arts for F.S.U.
Approved establishment Department of Social Work, Depart-
ment of Criminology and Corrections and Department of Social
Welfare in School of Social Welfare at F.S.U.
Approved combining Department of Home Demonstration Edu-
cation and Department of Home Economics Education at F.S.U.
The combined departments took the name of Department of
Home Economics Education.
Authorized degrees of Master of Science in Statistics and Mas-
ter of Statistics for U.F.
Approved establishment of an International Marketing Re-
sources Center in the College of Business at U.F.
9-18-64 Authorized degrees of Master of Arts and Master of Science in
international affairs for F.S.U.
10-26-64 Authorized degree of Master of Arts in secondary education
and K-12 certification areas for U.S.F.
Authorized degree of Master of Business Administration for
U.S.F.
Approved degree of Master of Arts in Mathematics and Natu-
ral Science for U.S.F.
Authorized degree of Bachelor of Independent Studies for
U.S.F.
Approved establishment of a non-degree research and training
program in exceptional children for U.S.F.
Approved development of a professional program in engineer-
ing at U.S.F.

2-12-65 Approved an undergraduate major in humanities for F.S.U.
Authorized the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical
Engineering for U.F.
4-9-65 Approved plan which provided that F.T.U. would open in 1968
with undergraduate degree programs in arts and sciences, edu-
cation, and business administration.
5-3-65 Approved a Center for International Studies at U.F.
Authorized a School of Law at F.S.U.









FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS 9

6-21-65 Approved establishment of the Regional Research Center for
Research in University Instruction of Science and Mathematics
at F.S.U.
Authorized degree of Doctor of Business Administration for
F.S.U.
Authorized degrees of Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of
Education in art education for F.S.U.
7-19-65 Authorized granting of the degree of Doctor of Jurisprudence
by the College of Law at U.F.
Authorized degree of Master of Education in administration
and supervision, curriculum and instruction, guidance, and hu-
man behavior for F.A.U.
Approved negotiation for a Naval R.O.T.C. program by
U.W.F.
9-24-65 Approved Laboratory school for F.A.U.
10-18-65 Authorized degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in
Slavic and East European studies for F.S.U.
11-22-65 Authorized degree of Master of Engineering in electrical engi-
neering and engineering administration for U.S.F.
1-10-66 Approved undergraduate degree programs in arts and sciences,
education, and business administration for U.W.F. when it
opens in 1967.
Authorized the degree of Master of Science in physics for
F.A.U.
Approved basic skill courses in Chinese and Japanese at
U.W.F.
2-11-66 Authorized the degree of Master of Arts in sociology for
U.S.F.
3-14-66 Authorized the degree of Master of Fine Arts in visual arts
for U.S.F.
Authorized the degree of Master of Arts in psychology for
U.S.F.
Authorized the degree of Master of Arts in East Asian studies
for F.S.U.
Approved establishment of a Department of Ophthalmology in
the College of Medicine at U.F.
4-4-66 Authorized degree of Master of Arts in English for U.S.F.
Authorized degree of Doctor of Philosophy in operations re-
search (industrial engineering) for U.F.
5-9-66 Authorized degree of Master of Arts in psychology for F.A.U.
Authorized degree of Doctor of Education in special education
for U.F.
Authorized degrees of Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Ed-
ucation in special education for F.S.U.








BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66


The Board of Regents feels strongly that a system of state universities of
high quality is absolutely essential to the growth and development of the State.
There is a direct relationship between the development of distinguished uni-
versities in this state and the growth of its commerce and industry, the quality
of work done by its professional people, the vitality of its cultural life, and
the range of opportunities open to its citizens.
With such a system of universities, the growth and development of Florida
will be continued and broadened. The foundations of its prosperity and vitality
will be strengthened. The quality of medicine, law, education and other profes-
sions will be enhanced. Most important, the opportunities open to the youth of
the state will be advanced.
Two of the basic requirements for the development of a system of distin-
guished universities are adequate financial support and sound management. The
universities also must be allowed to operate in a climate which is conducive to
learning. This is essential to the whole philosophy and nature of intellectual
inquiry and learning for which a university exists.
In order to attract to Florida the top faculty and students which will bring
a reputation of distinguished universities, and in order for the universities to be
provided a proper climate in which to operate, Florida must take several im-
portant steps in the 1967 Legislature, as follows:


Recommendations
1. Fiscal and administrative authority commensurate with responsibility
must be provided for the Board of Regents and the state universities which will
free the institutions to serve the State with full effectiveness.
2. Adequate operating funds must be provided to allow Florida to meet the
intense national competition for faculty and professional administrators and to
provide for the increasing emphasis on higher cost upper level and graduate
work.
3. Funds must be appropriated which will allow the universities to build
facilities for enrollments that are expected to double during the next five years.
4. Libraries must be enlarged and modernized to keep pace with increased
enrollments and the rapid expansion of knowledge.
5. Outlays for oceanography and other important new programs must be
increased substantially in order to permit Florida to take full advantage of its
opportunities for industrial and cultural development.
6. Professional programs must be expanded sufficiently to allow Florida to
meet critical needs of population growth.
7. Continuing education programs must be provided which will serve effec-
tively the needs of Florida citizens.
8. Scholarship and loan programs must be expanded to make it possible for
all qualified students to attend college.
9. Teacher education programs must be improved to provide an adequate
supply of well-trained personnel for Florida public schools, junior colleges and
universities.
10. More effective use must be made of newer instructional devices such as
educational television and computers to strengthen and extend instructional and
service activities.









FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS 11

The Board of Regents is cognizant of the fact that the State has other
pressing needs which must be met and that there is not an unlimited amount of
tax dollars. The Board recognizes its responsibility to make certain that increas-
ing investments of public money in higher education be expended with maximum
efficiency and economy.
Respectfully submitted,
CHESTER H. FERGUSON, Chairman
THE FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS


THE BOARD OF REGENTS OFFICE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
The 1964-66 biennium was a transitional period brought about by the abol-
ishment of the Florida Institute for Continuing University Studies (FICUS) and
the pursuant reorganization of continuing education activities within the State
University System.
The move to further improve and broaden the State's interinstitutional sys-
tem of extension was inaugurated on July 1, 1965, when coordination of con-
tinuing education programs was brought directly under the Board of Regents.
The new pattern of administration is designed to allow each university to re-
spond directly to the continuing education needs of Floridians in its own geo-
graphical area and its own distinctive fields of competence. Statewide coordina-
tion is to be carried out through the Board of Regents Office for Continuing
Education. The new organization also allows institutions to service statewide
needs based on special requests involving those competencies peculiar to a given
institution or requests for services which are unable to be met by the closest
university.
The biennium portrayed herein will show increased enrollments, a diffusion
of university involvement, continued expansion of programs and general accel-
eration of the total off-campus program. The program, despite its rapid growth
pattern, has yet to meet the demonstrated needs of Floridians in the areas of
credit instruction, non-credit activities and correspondence study. It is hoped that
increased legislative appropriations will enable the University System to meet
more of these needs during the 1966-68 biennium.
Throughout this two-year period both FICUS and the reorganized system
haven striven to increase the quality of existing programs and to work closely
with other educational agencies within the State of Florida to avoid costly dupli-
cation in both programming and utilization of space. The cooperation which has
evolved interinstitutionally could allow Floridians considerable savings in tax
dollars.

I. Identification and Appraisal of Needs
Under the new plan for statewide extension, as was true with FICUS, a
primary goal of extension personnel is to identify and appraise the needs that
exist for service throughout the State of Florida. The new system allows each
university to act as a contact point for its region in meeting continuing education
needs. Requests for off-campus credit courses are directed to the Office for Con-
tinuing Education of the nearest institution. Course offerings of a non-credit
nature are structured by institutional educational coordinators working in con-









12 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

junction with regional groups to be served. If a university does not have the
qualified faculty or resources for a particular program the nearest institution
capable of conducting the program is called upon.
The Board of Regents Office for Continuing Education also processes re-
quests for instruction. It channels requests to the university which can most ap-
propriately provide the best service at the lowest cost. Except in unusual circum-
stances this is the nearest university which has the resources to provide the de-
sired services. The Board office assumes the responsibility for coordination
of statewide offerings and the avoidance of costly duplication.
As a flexible statewide system of university extension the new administra-
tive plan encompasses offerings in the areas of off-campus credit instruction, non-
credit course offerings, correspondence study and a limited responsibility for edu-
cational radio and television course productions and offerings.
The following paragraphs will attempt to appraise the growth and devel-
opment of these programs during the 1964-66 biennium depicting the final year
of FICUS operation and the newly evolved system of decentralized operation.
During the 1962-64 Biennium, the University of Florida and Florida State
University provided approximately ninety percent of all the off-campus credit
courses around the State. Both the distribution of continuing education respon-
sibilities and the growth of the two newer universities have contributed signifi-
cantly to the changing roles of the various universities with respect to the over-
all credit program. These changes are illustrated graphically in Figure 1.
Since 1958 the number of registrations in off-campus credit courses has more
than doubled while the number of courses offered has tripled. Figure 2 shows the
marked increases in the number of courses and registrations over the past four
bienniums.


II. Off-Campus Credit Courses
A rapidly expanding body of knowledge in all professional disciplines finds
our physicians, lawyers, engineers, teachers, and other business and professional
personnel facing a constant need for updating of skills and an ongoing program
of continuing education.
A primary responsibility of the off-campus program is to allow those people
engaged in full time employment to continue additional university study, whe-
ther it be for certification, a degree, training or retraining in a location where
they may continue to be gainfully employed and not have to return full time to
the campus of a university.
The off-campus credit program during the 1964-66 biennium attempted to
meet the needs of Floridians faced with a problem of pursuing additional grad-
uate study in the areas of teacher education, business, engineering, etc., and the
following accomplishments might be noted:
During the biennium
1. Residence credit courses were offered in 38 communities as opposed to
eleven the 1962-64 biennium-of the locations, four were designated con-
tinuing education centers.
2. A total of 82 master's degrees were conferred on students who had taken
all their courses off campus.








FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS


3. A total of 1,346 courses represents a 35% increase over the previous bi-
ennium.
4. The total number of registrations in off-campus credit classes jumped
from 24,233 in the previous biennium to 38,378 during 1964-66-an in-
crease of 38%.
5. Off-campus classes were offered in 53 of the 67 Florida counties during
the biennium.
6. Eighty percent of the students registered in off-campus classes indicated
they were graduate students.


1962-64
1964-66


UF FSU FAMU


I ll


USF FAU


Figure 1. Percentage of the total number of courses which were provided by
each university in 1964-66 as compared with 1962-64.





BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66


I


~Iz


I


I









FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS 15


A. Off-Campus Credit Programs in Teacher Education

1. Summary
During the past biennium 82% of all off-campus credit courses and 88% of
all registrations were in the broad category of teacher education.
There was a substantial increase in the credit offerings for teachers by the
state universities in off-campus locations during the 1964-66 biennium. The num-
ber of class sections offered was 1,105, representing an increase of 31.5% over the
previous biennium. The number of registrations in courses for teachers increased
37.9%. All of the state universities which were operational during the biennium
offered programs for teachers off-campus.
2. New and Expanded Programs
The state universities have stepped up their response to requests from county
school systems for in-service courses for teachers in new subject-matter content.
For example registrations in classes in the "new mathematics" increased from
2,779 in the previous biennium to 4,720 in the 1964-66 biennium.
In addition to classes in mathematics taught as regular extension classes,
a number of off-campus institutes in mathematics and science for teachers were
sponsored jointly by state universities (Florida State University and University
of Florida) and the National Science Foundation. Under this program a total of
43 classes in mathematics and/or science were offered with 1,189 registrations
during the biennium.
The urgent need for widespread dissemination of new subject matter,
methods, and materials of instruction to teachers already in the schools has posed
a problem of monumental proportions. Florida universities have responded to this
challenge in a variety of ways. During the second year of the biennium, Florida
State University was encouraged by the American Association for the Advance-
ment of Science to begin a large-scale introduction of the new AAAS curriculum
in elementary science to Florida teachers. During the summer of 1965 a group of
highly qualified teachers and supervisors from all over the State were brought
to the Florida State University and trained in the new curriculum. During 1965-
66 this group taught, under the supervision of campus professors, a total of 21
courses in 15 different counties with a total enrollment of 481.
In order to make the limited resources in mathematical talent on the cam-
puses available to large numbers of elementary teachers in service, the universi-
ties have tried new ways to bring instruction of high quality to larger numbers
of teachers. Teams were formed whereby an instructor from a university, as-
sisted by carefully selected and trained local teachers and supervisors, taught
large groups of elementary teachers.
Another way of reaching more teachers has been through ETV. Florida
State University developed and video taped a three semester hour course in mo-
dern mathematics at the elementary school level which included lectures and dem-
onstrations using an ingenious variety of visuals. Work-text materials were pro-
duced to accompany the video tapes so that there is now available a package pro-
gram which has the capability of presenting high-quality instruction to very
large numbers of teachers with minimum demands on the time of the campus
professors. With the cooperation of local school systems and ETV stations, this









16 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

program was field-tested during the past biennium and is now available for use
statewide by all of the universities who wish to use it.


B. Off-Campus Credit Programs in Business

1. Summary
During the 1964-66 biennium the credit offerings in the business administra-
tion area increased significantly. The number of courses offered was 104, which
was a marked increase from the 28 offered in the previous biennium. The regis-
tration total soared from 636 to 2,114. Four of the state universities offered busi-
ness courses off-campus in 8 counties, but over 70% of the activity came from
Florida State University and its program in Brevard County.
2. Detailed Explanation
The growth in the business programs, which has been considerable, is a tri-
bute to the availability of off-campus programs as contrasted to isolated courses,
in two sections of the State of Florida.
Late in December, 1963, contracts were signed with the National Aeronau-
tics and Space Administration and the Patrick Air Force Base for the Florida
State University to offer a Master of Science in Management degree in the Cape
Kennedy area. These contracts provided that two groups of 30 students each, ap-
proved by Florida State University and selected by NASA or PAFB, would enter
the program in January, 1964, and be able to take all their work off-campus.
Needless to say, these activities occurred during the previous biennium, but the
mass of the course offerings and student enrollments from these contracts occurred
during the 1964-66 biennium. Forty persons received their masters degrees
in December, 1965, and three were awarded theirs in April, 1966. The demon-
strated success of this contract program has led to the development of a non-
contract program of similar nature, which has been of equal success. The
cooperation, interest, and efforts of Florida State University and its staff are
appreciated over the whole Cape area.
In January, 1964, the University of Florida began a series of graduate level
MBA courses in Pinellas county. It was possible under this program for an MBA
candidate to obtain 50% of his course credit off-campus. However about a year
later the University of South Florida received approval from the Board of Con-
trol for the inauguration of an MBA degree and program. When the University of
South Florida decided to offer its degree program in Pinellas County, University
of Florida phased out its own. The students who entered the University of
Florida program were given the choice of remaining with the University of Flo-
rida or of transferring to the University of South Florida. Almost all made the
transfer.
The total number of courses offered in the biennium was 104, with 46 offered
in the 1964-65 school year and 58 in 1965-66. This increase in 12 courses repre-
sents a percentage increase of 26% for 1965-66 over 1964-65. The student regis-
tration in the biennium was 2,114, with 888 for 1964-65 and 1,226 for 1965-66.
The increase from the first to the second year was 338, or 38%. Study of the un-
derlying data indicates clearly that many qualified students live in locations away
from the present university campuses and that they are willing to enter gradu-









FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS 17

ate degree programs. Even more important, a large proportion of them complete
the programs!
The off-campus instructional staff may be composed of on-campus faculty
traveling to the class location, resident faculty, or adjunct faculty hired to teach
a particular course. In the business program, 81 of the 104 courses were taught
by full time faculty persons. Of these 55 were taught by professors resident in
the Cape area and 26 were taught by commuting professors. Only 23 courses
were taught by adjunct personnel.


C. Engineering and Science
The number of students and courses showed that the needs were being met
as the number remained essentially static. The last biennium reported 2,379 en-
rollments, including the offerings in Daytona Beach, Cape Kennedy, and Orlando
which were absorbed into Genesys. This biennium there were 1,997 enrolled,
reflecting the approximately constant factor.
Courses and programs continued at West Palm Beach with 559 enrollments,
St. Petersburg (602), Pensacola (253), Panama City (201), Jacksonville (73),
Sarasota (39), Patrick Air Force Base (36); these were joined by a new loca-
tion, Bartow (218) and two special courses at Orlando (6) and Tampa (10).
The biennium also marked a cooperative effort between the University of
Florida and Florida State University at Panama City for students at the U.S.
Navy Mine Defense Laboratory for which University of Florida provided a
special Physics course in Underwater Acoustics. This course was incorporated
and accepted into the degree programs of the graduate students admitted to
Florida State University from the laboratory.
Expected to come to fruition in the next biennium will be the establishment
of a resident professor in engineering at Pensacola. This will be the attainment
of a long sought goal by the industries in the area.

III. Non-Credit Instruction
The attainment of a diploma or degree no longer affords our citizenry the
luxury of "leaning on their educational oars." Every person is faced today with
the dilemma of a rapidly growing and changing body of knowledge bearing di-
rectly on their daily work and increasingly complex existence. Non-credit pro-
grams designed to impart current knowledge in an intensive four or five day edu-
cational program are rapidly becoming a must item on the agenda of those people
not wishing to wear a tag of human obsolesence.
The 1964-66 biennium saw an increase in non-credit programs from the
1962-64 figure of 29,233 people involved in 319 conferences to a level of 46,297
people involved in 498 conferences. The following graph illustrates the expansion
from the 1962-64 biennium to the 1964-66 biennium.
The final year of the FICUS operation saw increased interinstitutional
utilization of the residential facility developed at the St. Petersburg Maritime
base and was highlighted by activities such as "The Florida Cooperative Work-
shop for the Improvement of College Teaching," a program in which almost all
of the institutions of higher education in the State of Florida sent teams of
instructional personnel to work cooperatively on developing better methods of










BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66


50,000


40,000 -


30,000 .





20,000





10,000


62-64


64-66


Figure 3. Number of participants in non-credit activities, 1962-64 and 1964-66.



classroom teaching. The St. Petersburg facility was also honored by the presence
of Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson, when she addressed the first graduating class of the
national VISTA program (Volunteers in Service to America), a training pro-
gram conducted by the State University System and staffed on an interinstitu-
tional basis.
The University of South Florida was assigned the residential facility in the
reorganization. Nineteen educational programs were housed at the University of
South Florida Bay Campus during 1965-66 listing such fine programs as the
training of Head Start Teachers for the public schools and the training of
Peace Corps members for foreign service.
The two-year period saw professional and community groups, such as phy-
sicians, engineers, business executives, municipal employees, P.T.A. groups, and
teachers, served by both FICUS and the Offices for Continuing Education of each
of our respective universities.


I I









FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS 19


IV. Grant Programs

In 1964-65, FICUS was involved in a number of grant programs such as
Civil Defense, Head Start Training, and Quantum Theory-Winter Institute. In
the reorganization, the same programs were continued at the university level,
i.e., Civil Defense (FSU), Head Start Training (USF), Quantum Theory-
Winter Institute (UF).
The need for a centralized coordinating function for federal programs re-
quiring overall coordination of institutional resources by a state agency was
recognized and met. It seemed logical, as the federal programs were to be non-
credit in nature and involved institutions of higher education, that such a co-
ordinating function be vested in the Board of Regents Office for Continuing
Education.
Consequently, State Plans for Florida were developed by this Office and ap-
proved for Title I of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (Community Service
and Continuing Education) and the State Technical Services Act of 1965.
Title I of the Higher Education Act of 1965 provides federal financial
assistance for continuing education programs planned to solve community prob-
lems in rural, urban and suburban areas. Florida received $239,000.00 from the
USOE to support fourteen programs from eight institutions of higher education
(public and private) during Fiscal Year 1966.
The State Technical Services Act of 1965 provides federal assistance to
support approved programs designed to promote commerce and encourage eco-
nomic growth. Florida received $67,396.00 from the U.S. Department of Com-
merce to support thirteen programs at four institutions of higher education
(public and private) during Fiscal Year 1966.
The Office for Continuing Education has also served as a catalyst for addi-
tional programming in continuing education as federal support has related to
other institutions and agencies in the State. For instance, contacts by the Office
for Continuing Education with the National University Extension Association
offices led to a $90,000.00 grant to the Board of Regents and subsequently to
Florida State University to serve as one of nine national centers for the training
of Adult Basic Education Teachers.



V. Correspondence Study

The reorganized plan for Continuing Education placed the responsibility
for the administration of the systemwide correspondence study division under the
University of Florida.
In addition to forty high school and non-credit classes in the area of
English, Social Studies and Mathematics, the division offered approximately
100 various college level courses each year during the biennium. The accompany-
ing table portrays the number of students participating by activity.
The Correspondence Study division spent a great deal of time revising thirty
courses during the 1965-66 year and intends to press for increased revision and
implementation of new courses in the year ahead.










20 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

CORRESPONDENCE STUDY ENROLLMENTS
1962-64 and 1964-66

1962-64 1964-66

College Courses 6,404 7,015
High School 1,151 1,271
Non-Credit 3,139 2,049
TOTAL 10,694 10,335



CORRESPONDENCE STUDY INCOME
1962-64 and 1964-66

1962-64 1964-66

Fees $219,865.83 $266,655.20
Books 26,784.69* 59,685.00
TOTAL $246,650.52 $326,340.20

Figures available for 1963-64 only.



VI. Radio and Television
The 1963 Session of the Legislature appropriated approximately $135,000.00
to the Florida Institute for Continuing University Studies for the production
of Radio and Television courses in each year of the 1963-65 biennium. Most of
the efforts of the Division of Radio and Television were devoted to planning
course productions during the 1963-65 biennium. However, in the 1964-65 year,
three television productions were started, six productions which were started in
a prior year were completed, and one complete course revision was made. Total
production expenditures for that year were $55,473.87.
The new organizational structure for Continuing Education, which went
into effect July 1, 1965, made no provisions for Radio and Television productions.
Rather, this function was to be performed by an interinstitutional committee.
However, four television productions were in process which had been started by
FICUS, and the Board Office for Continuing Education accepted the responsibil-
ity for having these productions completed. As a consequence, during the 1965-66
Fiscal Year $79,151.46 was expended by the Board Office for Continuing Educa-
tion to complete these productions.
During its short life, the Division of Radio and Television reviewed and
evaluated twenty-three series of video-taped credit courses of the ETV Com-
mission, revised five of these series and planned and completed eleven new
series. In addition, several other series had been partially planned and the work
on these will be continued by the Interinstitutional Committee on Radio and
Television.









FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS 21


VII. Systemwide Extension Library
The University of South Florida assumed the administrative responsibility
for the systemwide library under the reorganized operation and continued to
service the other institutions within the system.
Considerable discussion and study by institutional librarians and other per-
sonnel are currently underway concerning the most effective organizational struc-
ture for a state library unit. It is anticipated that appropriate recommendations
will be forthcoming in Fiscal Year 1967 as to the future direction for the ex-
tension library operation.


VIII. Evaluation Projects During Biennium
The following survey and evaluation projects were undertaken at the
Board level during the biennium:
1. A survey of personnel and students involved in continuing education
programs to determine the effectiveness of the current off-campus pro-
gram from the points of view of local contacts, university personnel and
instructors, and students.
2. Changing roles of the different universities with respect to providing
courses in the geographical areas which they serve.
3. A survey of university personnel to determine the nature and scope of
continuing education programs at each of the universities as well as
current plans for the expansion of these programs and the needs which
must be met if these programs are to be realized.
4. A survey of selected National University Extension Association-Associa-
tion of University Evening Colleges institutions to determine methods
used to provide salary, additional compensation, travel expenses, etc., for
university personnel engaged in providing instruction for continuing edu-
cation activities.
5. A survey of students in teacher education courses to determine their
preferences for credit hours per course and scheduling of classes under
the quarter system. (This is a part of the project being undertaken by
the Task Force on Teacher Education.)


IX. Registration for Extension Courses
The final year of the biennium herein reported is a transitional period for
the registration process. A decision was made to phase out the centralized regis-
tration process during 1965-66 and the entire registration procedure will be
assumed by individual campuses in July of 1967.
A committee composed of registrars from each of the State Universities and
representative from the Board of Regents Office for Continuing Education has
assumed the responsibility for an orderly transfer of the 100,000 student records
involved.










22 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66


X. Biennial Statistics

I. SUMMARY OF COURSE AND ENROLLMENTS, 1964-66

1964-65 1965-66 64-66 Biennium

Regis- Regis- Regis-
Courses trations Courses trations Courses trations

Off-Campus Credit Courses
Florida A & M University 30 693 26 555 56 1,248
Florida Atlantic University 79 3,188 131 3,942 210 7,130
Florida State University 241 6,058 232 5,021 473 11,079
University of Florida 265 6,037 191 4,022 456 10,059
University of South Florida 27 538 124 3,324 151 3,862
TOTAL 642 16,514 704 16,864 1,346 33,378

Non-credit Conferences and
Institutes 217 17,097 281 29,200 498 46,297

Correspondence Courses
College Courses 104 3,565 105 3,450 209 7,015
Non-credit Courses 9 1,064 9 985 18 2,049
High School Courses 32 671 30 600 62 1,271

TOTAL 145 5,300 144 5,035 289 10,335


II. SUMMARY OF OFF-CAMPUS CREDIT COURSES AND REGISTRATIONS
BY SUBJECT CONTENT AREA

1964-65 1965-66 64-66 Biennium

Regis- Regis- Regis-
Courses trations Courses trations Courses trations

Teacher Education 531 14,639 574 14,628 1,105 29,267
Business 46 888 58 1,226 104 2,114
Engineering 65 987 72 1,010 137 1,997
TOTAL 642 16,514 704 16,864 1,346 33,378




XI. Income and Expenditure Data
Two tables are needed to show the accounting data for the biennium. One
table pertains to the last year of the Florida Institute for Continuing University
Studies and the second table incorporates the first year of the new Board of
Regents Office for Continuing Education activity. These data are not summaries
of all Continuing Education activities in the System. To be so encompassing,
data pertaining to the independent activities of the several universities, including
GENESYS, Bootstrap, Eglin, etc., would have to be included.










FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS


FLORIDA INSTITUTE FOR CONTINUING UNIVERSITY STUDIES
OPERATING INCOME AND EXPENDITURES FOR FISCAL YEAR 1964-65

Amount Percentage

INCOME
State Appropriations $1,622,591 53.5
Student Fees 1,036,532 34.1
Sales and Services 183,815 6.1
Grants and Donations-Federal 180,526
Grants and Donations-Private 10,012

TOTAL INCOME $3,033,476 100.0

EXPENDITURES
General Administration $ 533,467 18.9
Instruction 2,029,473 69.2
Library Services 59,781 2.3
Radio and Television Productions 55,474 1.8
Books for Resale 98,929 3.3
Capital Outlay 134,116 4.5

TOTAL EXPENDITURES $2,931,240 100.0




BOARD OF REGENTS OFFICE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
OPERATING INCOME AND EXPENDITURES FOR FISCAL YEAR 1965-66

Amount Percentage

INCOME
State Appropriations $1,045,487 43.6
Student Fees 827,082 34.5
Sales and Services 17,445 .7
Grants and Donations-Federal 341,621 14.2
Grants and Donations-State 90,000 3.8
FICUS Phase Out 76,998 3.2

TOTAL INCOME $2,398,633 100.0

EXPENDITURES
General Administration $ 259,588 11. 9
Phase Out of FICUS 188,720 8.6
Radio and Television Productions 79,151 3.6
Transfers to Institutions:
University of Florida 443,057 20.3
Florida State University 483,296 22.2
University of South Florida 491,951 22.5
Florida Atlantic University 155,268 7.1
Florida A & M University 44, 998 2.1
University of West Florida 19,760 .9
For School Service Centers 17,935 .8

TOTAL EXPENDITURES $2,183,724 100.0














Fees
Collected
Total Fees Not Total Fees Transferred Transferred Transferred Transferred Transferred
Department Collected Transferred Transferred To F.A.U. To F.A.M.U. To F.S.U. To U.F. To U.S.F.


Teacher Education
321 Tri. I $202,926.00 $ (18.00) $202,944.00 $ 42,126.00 $ 4,200.00 $ 82,068.00 $ 45,948.00 $ 28,602.00
322 Tri. II 187,116.00 (1,818.00) 188,934.00 49,922.00 10,920.00 47,922.00 34,894.00 45,276.00
323 Tri. III 157,399.50 27,217.50 130,182.00 40,000.00 2,000.00 26,288.00 28,764.00 33,190.00

TOTAL TEACHER
EDUCATION $547,441.50 $25,381.50 $522,060.00 $132,048.00 $17,120.00 $156,218.00 $109,606.00 $107,068.00
Science and Engineering
331 Tri. I $ 39,588.00 $ 142.00 $ 39,446.00 $..................... $..... .......... $ 2,300.00 $ 21,400.00 $ 15,746.00
332 Tri. II 35,076.00 ................ 35,076.00 .................. ................ 3,300.00 13,004.00 18,772.00
333 Tri. III 19,004.00 3,268.00 15,736.00 .......... .................... ................... 6,236.00 9,500.00
TOTAL SCIENCE &
ENGINEERING $ 93,668.00 $ 3,410.00 $ 90,258.00 $ ..........$......... $ .......... $ 5,600.00 $ 40,640.00 $ 44,018.00
Business
341 Tri. I $ 27,101.25 $ (96.75) $ 27,198.00 $....- --................ $............. $ 19,838.00 $ 1,260.00 $ 6,100.00
342 Tri. II 42,849.75 1,419.75* 41,430.00 1,120.00 .............. 31,936.00 1,974.00 6,400.00
343 Tri. III 25,352.10 2,216.10 23,136.00 ............................ 18,772.00 .............. ........ 4,364.00
TOTAL BUSINESS $ 95,303.10 $ 3,539.10 $ 91,764.00 $ 1,120.00 .................... $ 70,546.00 $ 3,234.00 $ 16,864.00
GRAND TOTAL $736,412.60 $32,330.60 $704,082.00 $133,168.00 $17,120.00 $232,364.00 $153,480.00 $167,950.00

* Includes $1,276 to U.F.








FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS


XII. Registration Fees Collected and Transferred, Fiscal Year 1965-66
Under the reorganization of Continuing Education, the Board of Regents
Office for Continuing Education had the responsibility for registering students
in off-campus credit classes during 1965-66. The table on facing page represents
the accounting for student fees collected for these classes for each university.



ARCHITECT TO THE FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS
The University System has experienced the largest two year construction
program in its history. Projects completed, under construction and in the planning
stages total approximately One-Hundred and Thirty Million Dollars ($130,000,-
000). All professional services for the University System construction program,
including those such as Master Planning, Design and Project Coordination,
Resident Inspection, Programming and Budgeting, and Fiscal Accountability,
have been provided for an average fee of 6.1 percent.
The Architect to the Florida Board of Regents has, during the 1964-1966
Biennium, administered, coordinated and supervised construction of the follow-
ing projects for the Institutions of Higher Learning:



CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS COMPLETED FOR OCCUPANCY
FROM JULY 1964 THRU JUNE 1966

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA:


Utilities Expansion-Proposed Well #5
Gulf Coast Experiment Station ---- ....
Extension of UF Engineering College (GENESYS)
Addition to Pilot Plant & Laboratory-
Citrus Experiment Station ---
Nuclear Service Building -.... ..
Delta Phi Epsilon Sorority --.. ..
Pesticide Laboratory ....
Air Condition Infirmary .. ...
Architecture & Fine Arts Building .... --
General Classroom Building
College of Education Renovation
Central Florida Experiment Station-Sanford-Land
Sub-Tropical Experiment Station-Homestead-Land
Relocate Plants & Grounds-Feed Plant Facilities
Relocate Plants & Grounds-Swine Unit
Air Condition Infirmary ---....


$ 43,132.00
179,765.00
738,527.00

130,265.00
---- 1,592,664.00
... 128,947.00
--..- 212,085.00
..-- 106,796.00
1,518,835.00
..- 1,392,940.00
328,217.00
40,000.00
50,000.00
57,295.00
29,320.00
106,796.00


$ 6,655,584.00








BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN PROGRESS AS OF JUNE 30, 1966


Student Union Building-Food Service Equipment -----
Student Union Building -------------
Library Addition -----
Maintenance & Central Stores Building ....----------
Maintenance Shop, Grounds Dept., Janitorial
Headquarters & Garage Building -----
Relocate Plants & Grounds-Extension of Utilities
Relocate Plants & Grounds-Printing Shop
Relocate Plants & Grounds-Laundry Building ----
Connect Engineering & Industries Building -------
Engineering Unit #1-Elect., Areo. Env., Chem. ----
Chemistry Research Unit
Life Sciences #1 (Biology)-----------
Utilities -
Lambda Chi Alpha
Phi Gamma Delta --
Pi Kappa Phi -
Married Student Housing
Total Body Counter------
Animal Research Laboratory Building -----
Psychotic Children's Unit --
Men's & Women's Dormitory --
Health Center Project-Part I --
Health Center-Finish Operating Rooms & Other Areas


$ 203,936.00
4,451,616.00
1,796,777.00
201,034.00

380,141.00
104,623.00
110,512.00
241,216.00
463,373.00
5,354,000.00
1,436,591.00
1,688,749.00
2,916,644.00
147,437.00
179,752.00
137,008.00
1,567,841.00
48,289.00
217,774.00
919,207.00
3,256,000.00
179,494.00
100,000.00


$26,102,014.00


CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN PLANNING AS OF JUNE 30, 1966


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA:
Hydraulics Engineering Building ----
Metallurgy Engineering Building ---
Materials Engineering Building -----
Institution of Food & Agriculture:
Unit D. McCarty Hall .--------------
Plantation Field Lab.-Ft. Lauderdale:
Office & Laboratory Building
Animal Isolation Building & Lab. -
Citrus Experiment Station-Lake Alfred:
Office & Laboratory Building ----
Central Florida Experiment Station-Sanford:
Office & Laboratory Building -----
Sub-Tropical Experiment Station-Homestead:
Entomology & Pathology Building .. ---
Indian River Field Laboratory-Fort Pierce:
Library & Conference Room -- --
North Florida Experiment Station-Quincy:
Tobacco Processing Laboratory -------


$ 381,841.00
589,000.00
517,000.00

1,679,500.00

131,000.00
67,800.00

234,000.00

100,000.00

81,900.00

17,200.00


38,800.00








FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS


CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN PLANNING AS OF JUNE 30, 1966-Con'td.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA-Con'td:


Range Cattle Experiment Station-Ona:
Library, Conference & Laboratory Addition
North Central Florida Area:
Land to Relocate Agronomy Farm
Apopka Foliage Plant Building:
Office & Laboratory Building
Marianna Swine Research Unit:
Office & Laboratory Building ---
Minor Buildings Throughout the State
Rolfs Hall Elevator .
Law Center -- --
Music Building-Planning Funds
Life Sciences-Psychology
Renovate & Air Condition Florida Union Building
Graduate & International Relations Study Facility
Space Science Research Building ___
Campus Credit Union Building
Addition to Out-Patient Clinic


30,200.00

80,000.00

43,100.00

30,200.00
147,300.00
45,000.00
2,504,500.00
25,000.00
60,000.00
474,000.00
-. 1,038,000.00
1,219,000.00
60,000.00
64,000.00


$ 9,658,341.00

CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS COMPLETED FOR OCCUPANCY
FROM JULY 1964 THRU JUNE 1966


FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY:
Athletic Field House
Student Union Building Box Culvert
Enlargement of Campbell Stadium
Swimming Pool --. ..-...---
Changes & Additions to Central Heating Facilities
Physics Building, Phase I, West Tower -_
Geological Storage Facility, Antarctic Core Library ---
Psychology Building Addition
Changes & Additions to Electrical Distribution System
Dormitory for Men -----..... --_
Nuclear Service Building, Part V
Student Union Building
Additional Boiler & Accessories --- --
Married Student Housing ----- ----
Student Union Building-Kitchen Equipment -----
Bath House & Locker Building
Enlargement of Post Office & Bookstore ---- ---
High Rise Apartments---------------------
Oceanographic Institute-Coastal Facilities
Land Acquisition


$ 141,547.00
24,904.00
439,207.00
- 204,159.00
495,842.00
1,529,855.00
215,578.00
1,016,750.00
242,160.00
1,981,405.00
-- 253,594.00
2,011,806.00
70,123.00
2,335,041.00
141,883.00
94,905.00
58,962.00
1,003,878.00
187,984.00
237,900.00

$12,687,483.00








BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN PROCESS AS OF JUNE 30, 1966


Physics Building-Computer Facilities
Chemistry Unit #1 .-.. ...-----.------
Library Addition -----
Infirmary -...--.
Social Science Building --
Biological Science Unit #1-- --
Relocating Greenhouses, Etc. --


--...---..-.--. $ 81,995.00
3,665,545.00
--- -- 1,714,246.00
...-.- 871,661.00
-..- 2,403,759.00
.....--.- 1,813,593.00
..- ---- 215,000.00

$10,765,799.00


CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN PLANNING AS OF JUNE 30, 1966

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY:


Biological Science-Connecting Bridge Science Center -------
Fine Arts Building, Unit I ----- ---
Campus Improvements & Utilities ....... ----
Engineering Science Building- -
Chemistry II .- --- -- --- ----
Renovation-History Building-Planning Funds .--------------
Women's Dormitory ...- -- ------
Land Acquisition --- -- --------
Child Research Facilities & Institute for Human Learning --


$ 50,500.00
1,900,000.00
747,800.00
919,300.00
1,477,000.00
30,000.00
3,735,000.00
850,000.00
16,412.00


$ 9,726,012.00



CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS COMPLETED FOR OCCUPANCY
FROM JULY 1964 THRU JUNE 1966

FLORIDA A & M UNIVERSITY:


Covered
Campus
Married


Walk & Guest Unit Addition to the Union Building
Utilities-Central Heating Facilities --- ---
Student Housing -------------


- $ 160,945.00
159,028.00
632,686.00

$ 952,659.00


CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN PROGRESS AS OF JUNE 30, 1966
Men's Dormitory & Diamond Hall Renovation ---.-------- $ 1,382,201.00
Vocational-Technical Building -- ------- -------------- 1,399,843.00
Hospital, Air Condition Two Floors -----.-.---------- --- 114,989.00
Stadium Lighting -__-. ... ------------------------ 104,191.00

$ 3,001,224.00










FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS

CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN PLANNING AS OF JUNE 30, 1966


Music & Arts Classroom Building -----
Classroom Building
Campus Improvements & Utilities -
Women's Dormitory ----- ----- ...------
Health & Physical Education-Demonstration School -----
Renovations --------


$ 905,000.00
1,254,000.00
359,000.00
780,000.00
399,809.00
176,700.00


$ 3,874,509.00


CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS COMPLETED FOR OCCUPANCY
FROM JULY 1964 THRU JUNE 1966

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA:


Physics, Astronomy, Mathematics, Laboratory
Classroom & Office Building -----
Swimming Pool------
Central Receiving & Storage Building
Men's & Women's Dormitory-Group II ------
Educational Transmitter Building --
Dormitories & Central Core Cap Grouting -- ---__ --


$ 1,477,823.00
46,317.00
237,101.00
1,717,556.00
36,215.00
147,062.00


$ 3,662,074.00


CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN PROGRESS AS OF JUNE 30, 1966
Extension of Utilities-Central Power Plant
and Science & Technology Building ---------.....--------- -.-..- $ 1,691,416.00
General Classroom & Business Administration Building 1,178,141.00
Health & Physical Education Classroom Building ......-------- 1,255,185.00
Outdoor Physical Education Facilities ---------------------------- 230,036.00
Dormitories & Central Core-Fall 1966 ----.--- ----- 3,350,422.00
Science & Technology Building .. ---------------------------- 1,610,859.00
Health & Physical Education Classroom Building-Natatorium -- 261,000.00
Dormitory Equipment -------- ----- ------------------ 98,000.00

$ 9,675,059.00


CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN PLANNING AS OF JUNE 30, 1966
General Classroom Building-Education ------ $ 1,275,000.00
Science Center-First Stage --- ----------- -------------- 2,075,000.00
Extension of Utilities ---------------------- 461,600.00
Faculty Office & Classroom Addition-Core Unit 1966 251,000.00
Social Science Classroom & Office Building ----- ------------- 1,950,000.00

$ 6,012,600.00










30 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS COMPLETED FOR OCCUPANCY
FROM JULY 1964 THRU JUNE 1966

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY:


Boca Raton Airport Improvements -------------
Utilities Expansion
Cafeteria Central Area-Part I & II ---- ----
Mech. Modification, Learning Laboratory, Science Building -------
Athletic Field House ...... ----------
Dormitory I ..-- -------
Physical Education Facilities-Shower & Locker Building ---------


$ 20,505.00
1,098,783.00
651,029.00
35,086.00
186,361.00
884,723.00
186,361.00


$ 3,062,848.00



CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN PROGRESS AS OF JUNE 30, 1966
Auditorium & Humanities Building --- ------ ---- $ 1,497,459.00
Social Science & Administration Building ------ 1,199,451.00
Science Building .----------------------- -- 1 0 1,177,598.00
Dormitory II --- -- -------------- 787,250.00
Physical Education Facilities-Handball, Tennis Courts, Etc. 90,146.00
Dormitory Equipment ----------------------------- 150,000.00

$ 4,901,904.00



CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN PLANNING AS OF JUNE 30, 1966
General Classroom Building ------------------------- $ 1,550,000.00
Expansion of Utilities to Central Plant and
Extension to Classroom Building -------- 638,000.00
Dormitory Fall 1967 ------- ------------------------ 950,000.00
Dormitory Fall 1968 ------------------------------ 1,430,000.00

$ 4,568,000.00



CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN PROGRESS AS OF JUNE 30, 1966

UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA:
Administrative-Classroom Building ------- $ 1,171,196.00
Library ---------- ---1,159,589.00
Utilities Plant & Distribution System ------------------- 1,367,324.00
Science-Classroom-Humanities Building Complex -----. -------- 1,829,342.00

$ 5,527,451.00











FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS


CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN PLANNING AS OF JUNE 30, 1966


Planning for 1965 Construction --_--.. .. .......
Food Service & Dormitory & Classroom Building
Food, Health & General Student Service Building


.. ........------- --- $ 42,500.00
1,515,200.00
840,000.00


$ 2,397,700.000



CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN PLANNING AS OF JUNE 30, 1966

FLORIDA TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY:


Degree Granting Institution Planning
Library-Learning Resources .
Utilities -
Science Building-Phase I
Student Center-Dormitory
Construction Planning ----


$ 21,410.00
2,100,000.00
1,600,000.00
1,480,000.00
625,000.00
37,000.00

$ 5,863,410.00










32 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66
















FINANCIAL REPORTS
Appended are the financial reports of the various funds administered by
the office of the Florida Board of Regents for the biennium ending June 30,
1966.
Exhibit "A" is a "Summary Statement of Operations" and reflects trans-
actions during the biennium for the operating and administered funds.
Exhibit "B" is a statement of "Interest and Sinking Fund Balances and
Revenue Certificates Outstanding as of June 30, 1964, Through June 30, 1966."
This exhibit is presented for information as to the funded indebtedness of the
Board of Regents.
Chester H. Ferguson, Chairman
THE FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS







SUMMARY STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1964, THROUGH JUNE 30, 1966


EXHIBIT "A"


Appropriation
or Reverted to
Fund Balance Receipts & Total General Fund Balance Receipts & Total Fund Balance
NAME OF FUND July 1, 1964 Appropriations Available Expenditures Revenue June 30, 1965 Appropriations Available Expenditures June 80, 1966


CURRENT FUNDS
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION:
Salaries.-........... .. ...................... ..
Expenses -- ......---........--- .... -------
Capital Outlay -------------.....-
Other Personal Services...........--............--

Total General Administration........ ............ ......................

DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE:
Incidental Fund.............------ ..-....-...... ... $

Total Department of Architecture ............. ....-..-.... $

RESTRICTED FUNDS:
Regional Education Program Regular Appropriation.............- $.
Annual Payment to Accredited Medical School ..................
Southern Regional Council on Mental Health....-..... ...
Out-of-State Aid for Negroes ........ -----
Educational Survey Fund... --- ....
University System Capital Improvement Revolving Trust Fund
Scholarship Funds-University of Fla.:
Arthur E. Hamm Scholarship Income...-...-....... .........
David Yulee Scholarship Income.......................................
Cecil Wilcox Memorial Scholarship Income........-.. ...
Albert W. Gilchrist Scholarship Income -...-.............
Tufts Scholarship Income... ................---- ...........
John G. & Fannie F. Ruge Scholarship Income......... .- ......
William Loring Spencer Scholarship Income-........-- .....--- ---
Agnes Peebles Scholarship Income .... .................-----
Racing Scholarship Fund.-...... .
Ex-Confederate Soldiers & Sailors Home Endowment Income
Scholarship Funds-Florida State Univ.:
Mrs. Sarah Levy Scholarship Income ...................--.
Albert W. Gilchrist Scholarship Income -... ....--........
Tufts Scholarship Income --.. ........---. --- ........
John G. & Fannie F. Ruge Scholarship Income....------.. .. ..- .
Racing Scholarship Fund. .....------....- .....
Ex-Confederate Soldiers & Sailors Home
Endowment Income......-..-..... ............. .........................
Scholarship Funds-Univ. of South Fla.:
Racing Scholarship Fund.........- .....- ...
Scholarship Funds-Fla. A & M Univ.:
J. C. McMullen Scholarship Income ... -----. ...
Mrs. Sarah Levy Scholarship Income......-.... ....... -- ........
Racing Scholarship Fund ---- --.. ............ .....
Scholarship Funds-Fla. Atlantic Univ.:
Racing Scholarship Fund ........... .-...... ....... ..........
Scholarship Funds- Univ. of West Fla.:
Racing Scholarship Fund .. .......
Other:
Children of Deceased World War Veterans Scholarships --------.
Helen Henderson Scholarship Fund...............................
Ramsaur M memorial Income .................................. ..
James 1). Westcott Estate Income ...........-......---
Principal of American Legion Fund Income -.....-..................
David Yulee Lectureship Income.....-- ---- ........
Race Track Scholarship Fund-Undistributed -...---.-..........
Ex-Confederate Soldiers & Sailors Scholarship Fund-
Undistributed Income ...............------.....---

Total Restricted Current Funds -......... ------ $

Total Current Funds --- -------...... .$.-


12,792.37
98.52
277.89
99.22


$ 191,773.63
50,937.05
3,322.11
4,600.78


SI I I I


204,566.00
51,035.57
3,600.00
4,700.00


203,587.91
50,555.25
3,584.55
4,458.17


$ 978.09
480.32
15.45
241.83


$ .........................


280,133.00
67,112.00
12,500.00
10,500.00


280,133.00
67,112.00
12,500.00)
10,500.00


$ 249,979.96
62,692.23
12,339.80
8,739.25


30,153,04
4,419.77
100.20
1,700.74


13,268.00 $ 250,633.57 $ 263,901.57 $ 262,185.88 $ 1,715.69 $.................... $ 370,245.00 $ 370,245.00 $ 333.751.24 $ 36,409.76


9,868.33


$ 1,746,996.92


$ 1,756,865.25


1,750,099.51 $.


$ 6,765.74


$ 1,514,782.66


$ 1,521,548.40


$ 1.463,495.06


9,868.33 $ 1,746,996.92 $ 1,756,865.25 $ 1,750,099.51 $.................... $ 6,765.74 $ 1,514,782.66 $ 1,521,548.40 $ 1,463.495.06 $ 58,
....i7(i6 ~ 1 ,~SYh ... Bii7 1511 1 ( 10lY i ?


26,577.00
17,781.01

10,731.11
13,410.80
91.829.50

222.82
221.01
93.48
504.90
708.31
6,653.21
216.01
4,240.78
2,045.00
5,337.70

13.86
400.81
1,014.75
5,337.34


1,512.73



677.27
1.320.19
6,731.38





214.76
52.52
25,150.00
601.29
1.027.57
485,959.37


$ 475,000.00
990,500.00
8,000.00
40,000.00
116,900.63
850,911.31

214.67
209.13
76.20
471.83
651.00
5,783.41
156.84
3,277.04
188,357.34
1,269.75

320.09
388.27
650.96
4,664.60
188,357.34

1,269.75

23,544.68

46.91
170.10
70,634.00

15,000.00

- - --- --- - -- -
5,000.00
223.98
31.21
24,393.31
1,648.78
137.53


$ 501,577.00
1,008,281.01
8,000.00
50,731.11
130,311.43
942,740.81

437.49
430.14
169.68
976.73
1,359.31
12,436.62
372.85
7,517.82
190,402.34
6,607.45

333.95
789.08
1,665.71
10,001.94
188,357.34

2,782.48

23,544.68

724.18
1,490.29
77,365.38

15,000.00



5,000.00
438.74
83.73
49,543.31
2,250.07
1,165.10
485,959.37


$ 453,357.00
970,306.24
8,000.00
24,634.94
105,774.36
832,533.01

220.00
220.00
90.00
500.00
700.00
5,350.00
215.00
3, 000. 00
190,402.34
600.00

300.00
390.00
800.00
2,625.00
188,357.34

1,500.00

23,544.68

150.00
300.00
71,326.98

15,000.00



4,725.00

28.00
24.000.00
1,240.00
1,027.50
485,959.37


48,220.00
37,974.77

26,096.17


275.00

........................-...
- - - - - - . - - - - -
- - - - - - - -. - - - - - -


$............-.....


24,537.07
110,207.80

217.49
210.14
79.68
476.73
659.31
7,086.62
157.85
4,517.82
---...----------------------
6,007.45

33.95
399.08
865.71
7.376.94


1,282.48


574.18
1,190.29
6,038.40


438
55
25,543
1,010
137
......................

-----.-----------------


.74
.73
.31
.07
.60


$ 500,000.00
1,282,700.00
8,000.00
40,000.00
138,100.00
1,065,610.96

221.46
215.27
82.54
479.39
692.20
4,657.57
150.10
3,338.70
294,721.87
---------------...-..-.--...

417.13
395.65
692.26
3,643.55
294,721.87



121,338.31

51.76
267.15
140,520.70

62,517.00

31,068.80

8,000.00
233.60
32.44
25,383.07
1,143.22
133.04


8,200.89
8,200.89


$ 500,000. ()
1,282,700.00
8,000.00
40,000.00
162,637.07
1,175,818.76

438. 95
425.41
162.22
956.12
1,351.51
11,744. 19
307.95
7,856.52
294,721 S7
6,007.45

451.08
794.73
1,557.97
11,020.49
294,721.87

1,282.48

121,338.31

625.94
1.457.44
146,559.10

62,517.00

31,068.80

8,000.00
672.34
88.17
50,926.38
2,153.29
270.64


8,200.89.
8,200.89


$ 491,224.00
1.282, 609.30
8,000.00
17,101.45
156.571. 30
1.074.9 71 .66

217.49
210.14
79.68
476.73
659.31
5.4110.62
157.85
3.,7i2. 00
137.331.20
6,007.45

150.00
400.00
775.00
7,350.00
137,331.20

1,282.48

17,166.43


1,050.00
51.462.20

15,000.00



3,750.00

28.00
25,100.00
1,240.00
-----------------.----------
----.---------------.-.-----


710,586.48 $ 3,018,260.66 $ 3,728,847.14 $ 3,417,176.76 $ 112,565.94 $ 199,104.44 $4,037,730.50 $ 4,236,834.94 $ 3,447,083.49
v.33,722.81~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ $ ,1,11 ,4,1.6 $541421 1,8.3 25801 592781 ,128,628.349 6 5,2447,032.79


:.10
4,6 .52
157,30.67
.00

301.08
094.73
782.97
3,670.49
157,890.67
.00

104,171.88

625.94
407.44
95,096.90

47,517.00

31,068.80

4,250.00
672.34
60.17
25,826.38
913.29
270.64


BOARD OF REGENTS


's6,128,628.34 $ 5,244,329.79


733,722.81


$ 5,015,891.15


$ 5,749,613.96


$ 114,281.63


205,870.18


$5,922,758.16


$ 5,429,462.15





SUMMARY STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1964, THROUGH JUNE 30, 1966-Continued


EXHIBIT "A"


Appropriation
or Reverted to
Fund Balance Reccipts & Total General Fund Balance Receipts & Total Fund Balance
NAME OF FUND July 1, 196./ Appropriations Available Expenditures Revenue June SO, 1965 Appropriations Available Expenditures June 0S, 1966


Loan Funds-University of Florida:
Dudley Beaumont Scholarship Loan Fund....... ............
John G. & Fannie F. Ruge Loan Fund ................... ..... ....
Eldridge H art Loan Fund..............................................................
Loan Funds-Florida State University:
John G. & Fannie F. Ruge Loan Fund-.....................................
John & Ida English Loan Fund.............................. ...........
Zadie L. Phipps Loan Scholarship Fund.................. .....
Martha Simpkins Mays Memorial Fund ......... .......................
Loan Funds-Florida A & M University:
John & Ida English Loan Fund ........................ .................
Millard Caldwell Loan Fund................... ...................
Ruby Diamond Loan Fund ...........................
The Harry Wilderman Scholarship Loan Fund.....----.--

Total Loan Funds ...--- ............. ........................ ..........


Endowment Funds:
PRINCIPAL TO BE HELD INVIOLATE:
For University of Florida ................................ ..............
Eldridge Hart Loan Fund.......-................ .....................
Arthur E. Hamm Scholarship Fund.......................................
David Yulee Scholarship Fund -.... ................ .... ................ ......... ..
David Yulee Lectureship Fund -...............- ................
Ramsaur Memorial Fund .........-- ...... - .... .......
Cecil Wilcox Memorial Scholarship Fund ................... ...
Principal of American Legion Fund...... ...............
Albert W Gilchrist Scholarship Fund............................ ... ......
For Florida State University:
James I). Westcott Estate Fund*............ .....
Albert W. Gilchrist Scholarship Fund................... ....... ......
For Florida A & M University:
J. C. McMullen Scholarship Fund............................
For University of Florida and Florida State University:
Tufts Scholarship Fund................................................
Mrs. Sarah Levy Scholarship Fund .
Other:
Helen Henderson Scholarship Fund.-------...........-........ ............-

Total Principal to be Held Inviolate...... ......... ........ ........... ......


PRINCIPAL MAY BE USED:
For University of Florida:
William Loring Spencer Scholarship Fund ....
Agnes Peebles Scholarship Fund ...... .............................
For University of Florida and Florida State University:
Ex-Confederate Soldiers & Sailors Home
Endowm ent Fund ............... .................

Total Principal Which May Be Used....................... ..........


GIFTS FOR RESTRICTED PURPOSES:
For University of Florida:
Frank H. W ade Estate Fund ...-..... . ....... ........................ ...


Total Gifts for Restricted Purposes .............. ..............


Total Endowment Funds ............................

TOTAL ALL FUNDS ..... ..............


................. $


$ 56.855.45
8,035.81


25,000.00
695.92
166.35
206.17

197.28
30,194.37
21.33
6,053.54

8 127,426.22


24,478.89
5,000.00
5,000.00
3,000.00
700.00
2,500.00
40,545.87
10,000.00

12,718.65
10,000.00

1,000.00

15,180.63


5,000.00


400.00
8,225.12
933.89

6, 621.92
11.51
5.06
8.85

444.42
357.59
371.10
260.01


17,642.47


57,255.45
16,260.93
933.89

31,621.92
710.43
171.41
215.02

641.70
30,551.96
392.43
6,313.55


$ 145,068.69


$....


8,035.81
933.89


13,612.92
............................
............................

355.00

168.03
- - - - - - .- - - - - - - -


$............... ..
$ - - - - - - -


23,105.65 $..........................


$ 57,255.45
8,225.12


18,009.00
710.43
171.41
215.02

286.70
30.551.96
224.40
6,313.55


$ 121,963.04


$ 400.00
6,986.36
1,016.70

5,465.32
20.94
5.65
9.24

497.04
583.75
9.64
262.04


15,256.50


57,655.45
15,211.48
1,016.70

23,474.32
731.37
177.06
224.26

783.74
31,135.53
234.04
6,575.59


$ 137,219.54


$......................
8,225.12
1,016.70

10,000.00
-----..---------------------


180.00

...............00


19,851.82 1 $


I I I I ~-- -~-1~- -I I I I .1


........ ....


694.15


$ 24,478.89
5,000.00
5,000.00
3,000.00
700.00
2,500.00
40,545.87
10,000.00

12,718.65
10,000.00

1,000.00

15,874.78


5,000.00


$........--......


.........................


$ 24,478.89
5,000.00
5,000.00
3,000.00
700.00
2,500.00
40,545.87
10,000.00

12,718.65
10,000.00

1,000.00

15,874.78


5,000.00
5,1000. 00


$.........


ii.... .
8 -- -- - -- - -- -
- - - - - - - -


728.48
9,750.00


24,478.89
5,000.00
5,000.00
3,000.00
700.00
2,500.00
40,545.87
10,000.00

12,718.65
10,000.00

1,000.00

16,603.26
9,750.00

5,000.00


$ - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - .- ..-- - -
- - - - - - - - .- .-- -
.- - - - - -. --. - - - -
- - - - - - - - - - -
- - - - I - - - - - -


57,655.45
6,986.36
.00

13,474.32
731.37
177.06
224.26

603.74
31,135.53
234.04
6,145.59


117,367.72


24,478.89
5,000.00
5,000.00
3,000.00
700.00
2,500.00
40,545.87
10,000.00

12,718.65
10,000.00

1,000.00

16,603.26
9,750.00

5,000.00


S 135,124.04 $ 694.15 $ 135,818.19 $........ ............ .... .................. $ 135.818.19 $ 10,478.48 $ 146,296.67 $........................ $ 146,296.67




$ 3,135.00 S.. .... .... $ 3,435.00 ... ... .... .......... 3,435.00 ............ 3,435.00 .......................3,435.00
43,311.64 ..... . 43,311.64 ... ............. ........... .............43,311.64 ................ ... 43,311.64 .......... ...... ... 43,311.64


49,450.00 ......................49,450.00 ................ ........... ............ 49,450.00 ....................... 49,450.00 ................... ... 49,450 .00

S 96, 196.64 8 ........ S 96, 196.64 $................ ........ 96,196.64 .. ............ .. 9 196.64 $... ......... ... 96,196.64




19.743. 54 788.51 20,532.05 ................. ........... ........ $ 20,532.05 $ 833.5 21,365.64 ...................... $ 21,365.64


S 19,743.54 $ 788.51 $ 20,532.05 . .. $............................ $ 20,532.05 $ 833.59 $ 21,365.64 $........................ $ 21,365.64


251,064.22


. $ 1,112,213.25


$ 1,482.66 $ 252,546.88

$ 5,035,016.28 $ 6,147,229.53


$....


$ 252,546.88


$ 5,452,567.80 $ 114,281.63 $ 580,380.10


$ 11,312.07 $ 363,858.95

$ 5,949,326.73 $ 6,529,706.83


$ .---- $ 263,858.95

$ 5,264,181.61 $ 1,265,525.22


* In addition to Cash and Investments, there is Real Estate with an Estimated Value of $116,781.35.


A


-1 - -- I -I I I I I I I --- - -- ~ -- 1 -


-I-


-I-


-1 1 1 1 1-


__ --------


BOARD OF REGENTS


----------------------------





INTEREST AND SINKING FUND BALANCES AND REVENUE CERTIFICATES OUTSTANDING AS OF JUNE 30, 1965 AND JUNE 30, 1966


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA:
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1938, 4%.......
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1948, 3.25%_
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1954, 3.010%
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1955, 3.25%.
Laboratory School Revenue Certificates, 3.50%..
Housing System Revenue Certificatts of 1960
Series "A", 3% ..----------- -----
Series "B", 2.75% -- -----
Series "C", 2.75%-...... -......-----.
Series "D", 2.875%-... -...............
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1962, 3.50%..
Apartment Revenue Certificates of 1964, 3.50%-

Total-University of Florida -.........

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY:
Dining Hall and Landis Hall Revenue
Certificates, 4%..--.------- ----.-----.--
Bryan Hall Revenue Certificates, 3%.......----
Senior Hall Revenue Certificates, 3%.....--.------
Revenue Certificates of 1950, 3.1% & 2.75% _
(Demonstration School Revenue Certificates,
3.25%-................. ----------
(Demonstration School, Series of 1959, 4.8% --
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1954, 3.25%-
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1956, 4%.......
Apartment Revenue Certificates of 1958, 2.75%.-
Apartment Revenue Certificates of 1959, 3% ----
University Stadium Revenue Certificates
of 1960, 4% ...--. --- ... ..
Apartment Revenue Certificates of 1961, 3.5%..
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1963, 3.375%
Apartment Revenue Certificates of 1963, 3.5% --
Florida State University Infirmary
Revenue Certificates of 1964, 3.625%.........

Total-Florida State University-.......... -----

FLORIDA A & M UNIVERSITY:
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1938, 4% .-..-
Laundry Revenue Certificates of 1949, 3% -
Hospital Revenue Certificates of 1950, 2.90%.
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1952, 3.01%.
Apartment Revenue Certificates of 1963, 3.625%
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1964, 3.625%

Total-Florida A & M University........ .................

FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY:
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1964, 3.50%--

Total-Florida Atlantic University -- ---. .

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA:
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1959, 3.125%
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1960, 3.50%
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1961, 3.375%
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1962, 3.50%
Dormitory, Dining and Auxiliary Enterprises
of 1965, 3.75%.................. .... .....

Total-University of South Florida.........................


INTEREST AND SINKING FUND BALANCES INTEREST AND SINKING FUND BALANCES
AS OF JUNE 30, 1965 REVENUE CERTIFICATES AS OF JUNE 30, 1966 REVENUE CERTIFICATE


Outstanding
Cash Investments Total Total Issued Total Retired June 30, 1965 Cash Investments Total Total Issued Total Retired


$ 850.55
3,138.84
16,344.41
1,070.40
1,295.32

101,682.65


9,083.49
73,809.62


$ 57,000.00
391,000.00
114.000.00
50,000.00
54,000.00

1,325,500.00


12,000.00


$ 57,850.55
394,138.84
130,344.41
51,070.40
55,295.32

1,427,182.65


21,083.49
73,809.62


457,000.00
3,628,000.00
1,000,000.00
600,000.00
485,000.00

3,500,000.00
1,238,000.00
3,176,000.00
1,896,000.00
400,000.00
1,786,000.00


361,000.00
1,206,000.00
147,000.00
68,000.00
79,000.00

246,000.00
190,000.00
281,000.00
177,000.00
- - - - - - -


96,000.00
2,422,000.00
853.000.00
532,000.00
406,000.00

3,254,000.00
1,048,000.00
2,895,000.00
1,719,000.00
400,000.00
1,786,000.00


$ 6,926.89
3,130.66
32,774.46
12,049.69
1,807.73

61,188.56


15,534.29
62,607.11


$ 26,000.00
394,000.00
87,000.00
45,500.00
56,500.00

1,419,000.00


.. 22,000.00
-----------.-.----------------


$ 32,926.89
397,130.66
119,774.46
57,549.69
58,307.73

1,480,188.56
------------------------------


37,534.29
62,607.11


457,000.00
3,628,000.00
1,000,000.00
600,000.00
485,000.00

3,500,000.00
1,238,000.00
3,176,000.00
1,896,000.00
400,000.00
1,786,000.00


$ 384,000.00
1,312,000.00
166,000.00
79,000.00
92,000.00

272,000.00
230,000.00
342,000.00
211,000.00
- - - - - - - -- - - -- - --


S


Outstanding
June 30, 1966


73,000.00
2,316,000.00
834,000.00
521,000.00
393,000.00

3,228,000.00
1,008,000.00
2,834,000.00
1,685,000.00
400,000.00
1,786,000.00


$ 207,275.28 $ 2,003,500.00 $ 2,210,775.28 S 18,166,000.00 $ 2,755,000.00 S 15,411,000.00 $ 196,019.39 $ 2,050,000.00 $ 2,246,019.39 $ 18,166,000.00 $ 3,088,000.00 $ 15,078,000.00


$ 7,603.27 $ 54,000.00 $ 61,603.27 $ 404,000.00 $ 324,000.00 $ 80,000.00 $ 3,021.68 3 45,000.00 $ 48,021.68 $ 404,000.00 $ 344,000.00 $ 60,000.00
933.35 5,000.00 5,933.35 115,000.00 63,000.00 52,000.00 670.79 6,000.00 6,670.79 115,000.00 68,000.00 47,000.00
1,435.75 5,000.00 6,435.75 200,000.00 79,000.00 121,000.00 708.19 6,000.00 6,708.19 200,000.00 86,000.00 114,000.00
27,985.22 295,000.00 322,985.22 4,310,000.00 1,602,000.00 2,708,000.00 9,464.99 270,000.00 279,464.99 4,310,000.00 1,804,000.00 2,506,000.00

251.99 98,000.00 98,251.99 500,000.00) 120,800.00 519,000.00 1,517.91 92,000.00 93,517.91 500,000.00) 140,800.00 499,000.00
...-...... . . .. ..... .. .. ... .................-..-- 139,800.00) .. .................. ............................... 139,800.00) .... ........ .. . .... .......
669.99 30,000.00 30,669.99 300,000.00 33,000.00 267,000.00 3,967.37 30,000.00 33,967.37 300,000.00 38,000.00 262,000.00
1,821.40 13,000.00 14,821.40 125,000.00 6,000.00 119,000.00 923.26 15,000.00 15,923.26 125,000.00 7,000.00 118,000.00
7,012.42 226,000.00 233,012.42 2,300,000.00 385,000.00 1,915,000.00 970.94 249,500.00 250,470.94 2,300,000.00 426,000.00 1,874,000.00
20,753.05 109,000.00 129,753.05 1,925,000.00 146.000.00 1,779,000.00 8,236.29 131,500.00 139,736.29 1,925,000.00 177,000.00 1,748,000.00

...-.- 373.49 373.49 400,000.00 144,000.00 256,000.00 11,873.82 37,000.00 48,873.82 400,000.00 184,000.00 216,000.00
20.864.04 60,000.00 80,864.04 1,486,000.00 40.000.00 1.446,000.00 11,359.10 80,000.00 91,359.10 1,486,000.00 60,000.00 1,426,000.00
8,848.85 25,000.00 33,848.85 1,814,000.00 .............. 1,814,000.00 4,581.37 54,000.00 58,581.37 1,814,000.00 152,000.00 1,662,000.00
398.11 ......... ..-398.11 3,748,000.00 .. ... 3,748,000.00 128,498.80 15,500.00 143,998.80 3,748,000.00 54,000.00 3,694,000.00

...-.........-....-.1,407.68 1,407.68 476,000.00 ....... ... .. 476,000.00

$ 98,950.93 $ 920.000.00 $ 1,018,950.93 $ 17,766,800.00 $ 2.942,800.00 $ 14,824,000.00 $ 187,202.19 $ 1,031,500.00 $ 1,218,702.19 $ 18,242,800.00 $ 3,540,800.00 $ 14,702,000.00


$ 11,768.01 S 38,000.00 $ 49,768.01 $ 202,000.00 $ 172,000.00 $ 30.000.00 $ 37,891.76 $ 38,000.00 $ 75,891.76 $ 202,000.00 $ 182,000.00 $ 20,00000
75.00 .. .. 75.00 60,000.00 55.000.00 5.000.00 ... ... .. ...... ... .................60,000.00 60,000.00 .00
27,602.98 10,000.00 37,602.98 425,000.00 159.000.00 266,000.00 9.987.23 10,000.00 19,987.23 425,000.00 173.000.00 252,000.00
105,742.62 55,000.00 160,742.62 810,000.00 148.000.00 662,000.00 18,853.24 55,000.00 73,853.24 810,000.00 254,000.00 556,000.00
11,147.02 .........11,147.02 445,000.00 ..445,000.00 - .. -... .. . ........ ..... .. .................. 445,000.00 5,000.00 440,000.00
.. .. .. ........ 825,000.00 ..... ...... .. 825,000.00

$ 156.335.63 8 103,000000 S 259,335.63 1,942,000.00 8 534.000.00 $ 1,408.000.00 $ 66,732.23 $ 103000.00 $ 169,732.23 $ 2,767,000.00 $ 674,000.00 $ 2,093,000.00


$ 22,685.72 S-. S 22,685.72 8 992,000.00 $8 . .. $ 9092,000.00 $. 8. $ ............ ....... .. $ 992,000.00 $ ..................... $ 992,000.00


$ 22,685.72 $ -- .8. S 22.685.72 $ 992,000.00 $ --S 992,000.00 $.- .... .......- $.. .. $-


1,511.10
1,441.33
1,765.61
861.47


126,000.00
88,500.00
49,500.00


127,511.10
89,941.33
51,265.61
861.47


$ 5,579.51 $ 264,000.00 $ 269,579.51


1,200,000.00
1.420,000.00
2,430.000.00
2,220,000.00


89,000.00
131,000.00
120,000.00
170,000.00


$ 1.111.000.00
1,289,000.00
2,310,000.00
2,050,000.00


1,110.37
2,330.75
3,425.89
2,132.45

103,095.00


126,000.00
150,000.00
120,500.00


127,110.37
152.330.75
123,925.89
2,132.45

103,095.00


$ 992,000.00


$ 1,200,000.00
1,420,000.00
2,430,000.00
222,000.00

2,900,000.00


$ .....-..... ..


109,000.00
151,000.00
155,000.00
199,000.00


$ 7,270,000.00 $ 510,000.00 $ 6,760,000.00 $ 112,094.46 $ 396,500.00 $ 508,594.46 $1 10,170,000.00 $ 614,000.00


$ 992,000.00


$ 1,091,000.00
1,269,000.00
2,275,000.00
2,021,000.00

2,900.000.00

$ 9,556,000.00


Toa or fCnrlReeu etfct uds$ 40870 ,9,500 ,8,2.7 $ 616800 ,4,8(.0 $3,9,0.0 6,4.7 $35100.0 $41:,4.7 $ 037800 ,1,800 241000


---------- ,Tra :


BOARD OF REGENTS


EXHIBIT "B"


$ ,781,327.071


$ 3,2010,500.00


Total Board of Control ]Revenue Certific~ate Funlds $ 400,.827.07


-S 46, 1.36.,800. 00 1 6, 741,800. 00 1 S 39, 395, 000. 00 1 S 562,048. 27 1 $ 3,581 ,000. 00 1 $ 4,14:3,048.27


$ 50,337,800.00


$ 7,()I(!,,S.00 1 $b 42,421,000-00










UNIVERSITY
OF
FLORIDA













UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 35


INTRODUCTION
The role of the University in providing educated leadership and knowledge
is a major one. The planning of the past, the current endeavors, and the plans
of the future are all designed to further this role.
In recognizing its responsibilities as the state university and as the state's
land-grant University, the University of Florida seeks to meet the demands for
knowledge from its students, from industry, and from all segments of its popula-
tion.
It recognizes that the attainment of a society is dependent upon the educa-
tional opportunities available to that society. It has been the goal of the Uni-
versity of Florida to seek quality and excellence in order to achieve this ob-
jective.
Knowledge doubled from the birth of Christ to 1750. From 1750 to 1900,
a mere 150 years, knowledge doubled again. But what is even more striking,
from 1950 to 1960, a brief span of only 10 years, knowledge once again doubled.
This rate of growth of knowledge requires more time on the part of faculty
for scholarly activities and research. It demands more elaborate equipment and
more specialized courses. If the University is to maintain its posture as a creator
of knowledge and a contributor to science, industry, and the humanities by
giving Florida the leadership required to compete with other states, the Uni-
versity's demands caused by this knowledge explosion must be satisfied. The
pressures upon resources become enormous. To run only as fast as we have
in the past is to stand still or fall behind.
In this same context, considerable progress has been made on the University
of Florida campus toward attracting excellent faculty and providing the type
of physical facilities necessary for good teaching and research programs. But
much is yet needed to be done. Many academic programs are still housed in
temporary facilities dating from the Second World War. For a 21 year period
from 1928 to 1949, only one new major educational facility was added to the
University campus. Our current building programs are correcting this deficit,
but they do not provide for an expanding enrollment which is outpacing all
predictions.
Florida's citizens deserve an educational system of excellence. There is no
set formula for obtaining this goal, but there are factors which we can readily
recognize as necessary components in support of the number one requirement
of housing a first-rate faculty. We know, for example, that good physical
facilities are necessary to attract good faculty in competition with other uni-
versities. We know that an academic climate which encourages inquiring minds
and scholarly expression with responsibility is necessary for the development of
an outstanding faculty and student body. We also know that the quality of
overall performance goes hand-in-hand with the amount of state support. For
example, the Universities of California, Illinois, Texas, and Wisconsin lead the
list of state universities in state tax support and the quality of their programs
reflect this support. The University of Florida ranks 19th in state support
among state universities.
It is also known that proper fiscal authority assigned to a university system
is a primary factor in having the necessary flexibility for attracting and re-
taining top faculty. If the University of Florida is ever to reach the distinctive










36 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

position that this state deserves, this authority commensurate with responsibility
is absolutely essential.
Florida remains as one of the last states to recognize this need. The Board
of Regents and the universities must have this authority if their administrative
responsibilities are to be carried out efficiently and effectively.
This new legislation would place the authority for university operations
where it squarely belongs-in the hands of the Board of Regents and its re-
sponsible administrators. The universities would still justify all funds requested
in appropriations and every penny of subsequent expenditure would be subject
to detailed audit. Responsibility is directly focused and legal liability is clearly
maintained.
Enrollment at the University of Florida continues to increase at a rate far
beyond projections made but a few years ago. It was previously predicted
that the University would reach an enrollment of 20,000 in the early 1970's. At
the current rate of growth, this enrollment will have been reached by 1968. This
increase in enrollment can be largely attributed to the ever increasing numbers
of junior college graduates transferring to the University at the junior level
plus a dramatic increase in graduate or post baccalaureate enrollment. Graduate
level enrollment (graduate students and students in the professional programs of
law and medicine) reached 23.67 percent of the total enrollment of the University
during the fall trimester of 1965. Freshman enrollment has been maintained at
2,800.
It is, therefore, evident that the University of Florida has assumed an
ever increasing leadership for education at the graduate and professional school
levels. In this respect it must be recognized that the cost of education at this
level is more than four times that required for the education of freshmen and
sophomores and in the case of medical training, more than six times as ex-
pensive.
The quality of the student body and faculty continued to improve during
the biennium. This has been reflected by the demand for admission to our grad-
uate programs and by the continued high standard of performance by our grad-
uates on nationally administered examinations.
Considerable private support was obtained during the biennium and it de-
serves special mention. With the beginning of the biennium, a Division of De-
velopment Services was activated under the direction of the Dean of University
Relations and Development. This program is proving to be extremely valuable
to the University and the state. The primary responsibilities of the Division
include the identification, research, and evaluation of all major potential sup-
porters of the University and maintenance of files relating to soliciting, receiv-
ing, acknowledging, and recording gifts. As the result of the establishment of
the Division, the University endowment grew from $350 thousand at the be-
ginning of the biennium to in excess of $2.5 million at its close. Additional gifts
still in probate will increase this figure past the $3 million point in the relatively
near future.
A major project begun during the biennium was a funding program for the
construction of a new Florida State Museum. Following an initial state appro-
priation of $350 thousand toward the realization of this objective, a $1.1 million
federal grant was obtained. Some $800 thousand is needed in private support








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Enrollment (September)*


18,048 (Est.)


16,874


15,701


14.810


13,826
.I<-r I


ROLE & SCOPE
PROJECTION


1960


1961


1962


* Excludes Graduate Engineering


1963 1964

YEARS
Education System students.


STUDENTS


20,000 -


18,000 -




16,000 -




14,000 -
13,100




10,000 -



8,000 -



6,000 -


13,634


1965


1966








38 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

to complete the funding of the building. At the close of the biennium, $280
thousand of this amount had been raised.
The University of Florida became one of the first universities in the United
States to participate in the Higher Education Facilities Program during the
biennium. Under this program, a graduate research library has been constructed
and funds have been obtained toward the construction of a center for the College
of Law. In addition, this program will provide for the renovation of the old
Florida Union Building for use by the College of Arts and Sciences.
Substantial federal funds were also awarded the University for use toward
the construction of a new wing on the chemistry complex, a biological sciences
building, a new building for the Florida State Museum, a four-story, space
sciences research center, a graduate and international center, and several major
additions to the engineering complex. With these federal funds available to the
state and in light of our needs, the University needs to be in a position to
take additional advantage of federal support in the future.
The end of the biennium saw the completion of a new physical plant
division and the establishment of a $4 million program to update and expand
the University's utility system. This program will be accomplished in three
increments.
In conclusion, I want to again emphasize the Herculean task which lies
ahead in meeting the demands of increasing enrollment; but above all I want
to emphasize the importance of recognizing the position of this University in
seeking excellence in all of its programs in undergraduate and graduate educa-
tion.
I also want to express my sincere appreciation to the Board of Regents
for their dedicated support and for the positive direction they have provided
in advancing the interests of the University in behalf of the students, faculty,
staff, and administration.
J. WAYNE REITZ
President


UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM
The dramatic increase in undergraduate enrollment during the last several
years emphasizes the growth which has strained the resources of the University
of Florida. From the fall of 1963 to the fall of 1965, the undergraduate enroll-
ment increased some 1,465 students, a 37 percent increase above the previous
two-year period. During the 1965 fiscal year, 2,177 bachelor degrees were
awarded. By 1966, this figure had reached 2,525. A major percentage of the
University's growth is resulting from transfers from the state's 31 public and
private junior colleges.


Freshman Orientation
The University College continued to direct the highly successful early
registration program each summer. Some 15 sessions were scheduled during the
summer of 1966. An overnight visit to the campus acquaints parents and stu-
dents with the philosophy, objectives and facilities of the University and permits
students to be counseled and registered in a relatively leisurely manner. A more








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 39

personal welcome can be extended and up to 75 percent of the freshman class
can be registered prior to September.
The orientation program immediately preceding the fall term has been
streamlined to three days. Classroom instruction now begins the fourth day,
thereby establishing the academic climate at a much earlier time.


Student Morale
General campus student morale remained high during the biennium. The
new building programs have resulted in increased pride in the University, and
this has been reflected by Student Government support of a number of improve-
ments including the acquisition of attractive refuse containers, distribution bins
for campus newspapers, and lighting for tennis and handball courts. Although
the conduct of students as a whole has been excellent, there were several minor
demonstrations which obtained some publicity. Such disturbances cannot be
assessed as integral to any grass root student discontent, but must be recognized U
as the overt evidence in thinking of a small minority group. There is considerable
evidence to support the contention that some of the campus disturbances are
supported by off-campus influences of dubious origin and purpose. While the
majority of the faculty and students disagree with the viewpoints and tactics
of this small and vocal minority, they strongly defend the right of these groups
to express their views in keeping with constitutional law and academic freedom.
It is incumbent upon the students, faculty, and administrative personnel to
work together in a cooperative way to reach solutions where minority expres-
sions will enhance the University.
The University seeks to preserve the constitutional rights of its students
and constantly strives to clarify administrative due process as well as to de-
lineate the attending student responsibilities.
The advent of a new Florida Union is expected to make a tremendous
change in the complexion of the campus and in the general cultural enrichment
of the student activity program.


International Students
Students from 70 countries enrolled in all colleges of the University during
the biennium. The largest numbers of foreign students enrolled in engineer-
ing, agriculture and arts and sciences. About 40 percent of this group were
graduate students. To insure admission of students with excellent potential,
English language ability is required as well as the same admissions criteria re-
quired of other students. It is felt that the presence of these foreign students is an
invaluable factor in enhancing international understanding and relations.


Student Financial Aid
The University student loan program reached $1.5 million annually, student
employment $1.4 million annually and University scholarships just under 60
thousand dollars annually during the biennium. This $6 million biennial pro-
gram was accomplished through 16,373 aid releases to approximately 4,000 stu-
dents.








40 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

Health Services
Infirmary services were improved during the biennium with a two dollar
increase in student fees and the inauguration of more modern patient handling
procedures. There has been no increase in the physical size of the Infirmary since
1945 when the campus enrollment was some 10,000 persons below the current
enrollment. It is predictable that without a new facility and an improved financial
situation in two or three years, it will be possible to cope with the patient load
only by a drastic reduction of services to students.


University Housing
In August of 1965, a new housing project with 208 apartment units was
opened for married students. The apartment village, which was named in honor
of the late Emory Gardner Diamond, a past president of the student body,
features study cubicles in two-bedroom apartments. Twenty-four married stu-
dent apartment units were also added to Corry Village. However, in spite of these
excellent improvements, some 428 apartments in converted World War II bar-
racks remain in full use.
No new housing facilities for single students have been built since 1961.
However, in the spring of 1966, an addition to the University of Florida Stadium
was initiated which will provide accommodations for 200 students. Funds for the
preliminary planning of housing facilities for 670 law students were made avail-
able to the University in May, 1966, by the Federal Community Facilities
Administration and just prior to close of the biennium, construction was begun
on a housing project for 800 students. There is considerable need to up-grade
the physical condition of many of the older halls. All residence halls should be
air conditioned.


University College
The University College, the college in which all freshmen and sophomore
students are enrolled, moved into a new, completely air-conditioned general class-
room building during the biennium. Four of the seven department offices of the
college are located in the building and more than 125 faculty members are
housed on the top floor. The proximity of the departmental offices will serve
immeasurably to strengthen the identity of the College, to provide for frequent
and easy access among instructors in the several departments, and to facilitate
administrative relations.
The University Counseling Center has also been located in the building and
this has already resulted in greater communication, more effective understanding
and development, easier access to records, and more efficient service to students.
The new structure supports the philosophy of the College, particularly the
conviction that the most nearly ideal conditions for instruction, guidance, and
learning should be available to students during their first year of college and
that the program of general education should reflect the unity and relatedness
of the several aspects of human living and learning.
Freshman enrollment has been limited since 1961 to approximately 2,800
due to limitations of facilities and faculty. Even with this relatively constant








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 41

factor, enrollment in University College and the production of student semester
hours continue to grow. A number of factors account for this growth. More
students are succeeding in college and the retention rate from year to year is
greater, and increasing numbers of students are transferring from the public
junior colleges to University College prior to finishing the two-year curriculum.
In view of this constant growth, it may become necessary to stagger the matricu-
lation of both entering freshmen and transfers by a quota system geared to
four admission dates in order to maximize and at the same time to regularize
more effectively the use of faculty and other resources.
A significant change in the general education curriculum occurred in the
second year of the biennium. A reduction was made in the number of credit
hours required in comprehensive English and Social Science to lessen the strain
on students entering the sciences and engineering. An option was also provided
to allow students to omit one unit in the mathematics-science area. Although
the change was made with reluctance, it was made with minimal damage to the
balance and integrity of the general education program and recognized the very
real pressures that are facing the upper division colleges.
Even though the faculty of University College carried heavy teaching
responsibilities, they mobilized an impressive number of man hours for academic
advisement. The significance of the fact that during every hour of every working
day between six and twelve teacher-counselors are available for consultation
cannot be overestimated. The University is pledged to maximize this kind of
personal contact and service.


NEW AND EXPANDED PROGRAMS AND CURRICULUM CHANGES
As any progressive institution must, the University of Florida continues to
encourage constant examination and evaluation of curricula in all fields.


College of Architecture and Fine Arts
The College of Architecture and Fine Arts moved into a new three-building
complex during the biennium. The new facility has had a stimulating effect on
the faculty and students of the college. The Department of Music remains housed
in a completely inadequate temporary building, and it is still necessary to house
some students in Architecture and in Interior Design in temporary quarters.
The completion of the new Architecture and Fine Arts Complex provided a
facility, for the first time, for a University Gallery. During its short period of
existence the Gallery has been able to present 14 outstanding exhibits to the
University community and citizens of the state.
The Gallery, which is a "classroom" in the truest sense, hosted 59 lectures
during the biennium for groups attending exhibitions. Over half of these lectures
were presented to groups of school children and the remainder were given to
University classes and civic groups. In addition, a special series of Gallery lec-
tures were inaugurated to bring to the campus an outstanding scholar or expert
to talk within the general subject matter area of the exhibition on display.
The Bureau of Architectural and Community Research has been established
within the College of Architecture and Fine Arts to conduct and coordinate re-
search related to the Building Arts and Fine Arts in the state of Florida.








42 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

Within this framework, it is anticipated that research may span virtually all
aspects of the man-made environment-from design, construction, and mainte-
nance of building elements to studies involving community development. Studies
will undoubtedly involve sociological and psychological aspects as well as physi-
cal evaluation. The Bureau will also complement the teaching program and pro-
vide opportunities for faculty members and graduate students to pursue investi-
gations in their particular areas of interest.


College of Arts and Sciences
A division of Biological Sciences was created during the biennium by the
University Senate and located in the College of Arts and Sciences. Three other
divisions were then organized by the Dean of Arts and Sciences: The Division of
Humanities, the Division of Physical Sciences and Mathematics, and the Division
of Social Sciences. This administrative structure has resulted in greater effective-
ness in confronting the diversified problems of the College.
Undergraduate enrollment in the College of Arts and Sciences increased from
7,100 to 8,819 during the biennium-an increase of 24.21 percent. Graduate en-
rollment increased from 3,745 to 5,024 for an increase of 34.15 percent. The
faculty of the College participated in an ever-increasing number of research
and professional activities. Eighty-eight books and 572 journal articles were
written and published during the two-year period and 223 research grants were
in force.
The increase in graduate enrollment enabled a substantial strengthening of
the College's program, particularly in the area of research. An African area
studies program and a Far Eastern area studies major were established. The
African program is a natural outgrowth of the Latin American studies which
have increased in strength during the biennium. It is difficult to move far in
anthropology, sociology, literature and music of Latin America without involving
both Europe and Africa. The African area major is being limited to those studies
and those geographical areas of Africa which complement and add to our strength
in the Latin American programs.
The College has long had an interest in non-western studies and integrated
programs in Asian and Russian area studies are now available to the student.
The inauguration of this Far Eastern studies program is designed to narrow
the diffusive character of the previous program and to integrate the interests of
the faculty now on campus who have developed a background and expertise in the
Far East.
The College has continued to join in the development of a strong inter-
disciplinary nuclear sciences program. With the construction of the Nuclear
Sciences Building, members of the staff of the Departments of Chemistry, Mathe-
matics, and Physics; the Quantum Theory group, which is jointly a part of
Chemistry and Physics; the Division of Biological Sciences; and the Department
of Nuclear Engineering in the College of Engineering, and the Department of
Radiology in the College of Medicine, are now located in one central area. The
joint use of equipment has meant close cooperation between members of the
staffs of the different departments. This in itself has served as a keen stimulus
to research with resulting achievement and recognition on the part of scientists
nationally and internationally.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 43

All of the areas encompassed in the nuclear program have shown a
phenomenal increase in numbers of graduate students and in graduate degrees.
Indirectly, the attraction of topnotch students who are seeking the best possible
training is a measure of the success of the program.
The Quantum Institute continues to attract outstanding theorists from the
entire world and has grown in reputation.


Biological Sciences
The creation of the Division of Biological Sciences provided for the estab-
lishment of a faculty in cellular and molecular biology, in genetics, in develop-
mental biology, in parasitology, and in marine biology. It was recognized that
well qualified staff were located within the various colleges and schools for work
in these disciplines, however, the formation of the Division of Biological Sciences
permitted these staff members to join together in establishing a program for
graduate students and cooperative research.
In example, the Division of Biological Sciences has provided a means of con-
stant communication among the departments of microbiology, biochemistry, anat-
omy, physiology, pathology, and pharmacology in the College of Medicine, and
the departments included in plant science and animal science in the College of
Agriculture, the department of bioenvironmental engineering and biomedical en-
gineering in the College of Engineering, and the departments in the College of
Arts and Sciences included in the Biological Sciences. This has been most fruit-
ful in terms of developing programs, in strengthening the research which is be-
ing carried on and in attracting the favorable attention of other universities and
granting agencies.
The biological sciences at the University of Florida have shown remarkable
strength and the encouragement which has been given to the staff through the
Division has resulted in a marked upsurge in productivity. Through this coop-
erative work, a strong move has been made to develop an outstanding program in
teaching and research in areas of cellular and molecular biology, genetics, devel-
opmental biology, parasitology, marine biology, as well as in the areas of eth-
ology, ecology, and natural history.


College of Business Administration
There were five major developments within the College of Business Admin-
istration during the biennium: (1) significant enrollment increases at both the
undergraduate and graduate levels; (2) projection of the IBM 1620 computer
facility into instructional uses; (3) establishment of the Business Associates
program; (4) establishment of the International Marketing Resource Center;
and (5) initiation of curricular changes in conjunction with the projected shift
to the quarter system.
The College of Business Administration experienced an 86 percent increase
in graduate enrollment and a 43 percent increase in undergraduate enrollment
from 1962-63 to 1965-66.
Early in the second year of the biennium, the College initiated the Business
Associates program for the purpose of attracting continuous and expanding
financial support from private business firms throughout the state. In the first









44 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

year the program generated more than $17,000 in contributions. This has made
possible the offering of a high-level seminar exclusively for participating com-
panies, the expansion of published materials useful to Florida and area indus-
try, and the establishment of additional master's degree fellowships.
The Management Center of the College of Business Administration continued
to offer various short courses, seminars, institutes, clinics, and other adult educa-
tional programs to businessmen and public officials. The total operation of the
Center continues to be hampered by inadequate personnel for meeting the needs
of the state as reflected in the inability to meet growing requests for additional
offerings. This situation will prevail until the state of Florida permits supple-
mentary payment for sporadic additional instructional assignments of this kind.
Florida appears to be unique among the 50 states in prohibiting such supple-
mentary payment.
An international Marketing Resource Center was established in 1965 for the
purpose of improving the quality and range of information needed by Ameri-
can industry for more successful penetration of foreign markets. The program is
being developed on a self-sustaining basis. Approximately $10,000 has been re-
ceived to support the first year's operations.
The IBM 1620 facility which was installed in the last half of the preceding
biennium was used initially for research purposes. As skill has been gained in
using this computer, the faculty has utilized it increasingly for classroom teach-
ing purposes. Plans are now being made to develop a new required course for
all undergraduate students in the College to assure exposure to computer uses
and limitations.



College of Education
The biennium was a period of important transition and growth in the Col-
lege of Education. One of the major achievements of the period was the organi-
zation of the Florida Educational Research and Development Council. Twenty-
one counties of the state have joined with the University of Florida in an
organization designed to promote innovation and research in the public schools
of the state. The organization of the school systems and the College of Educa-
tion into a cooperative research and development agency provides the channel
through which the research activities of the College can be used to assist in the
achievement of excellence in education in the public schools of the state.
During the 1965-66 year, three research institutes were organized in the Col-
lege. They are the Institute for Curriculum Improvement, the Institute for
Development of Human Resources, and the Institute for Educational Leadership.
Each Institute is a confederation of research projects related to a common
problem. The purpose of the Institutes is to prove a means for helpful inter-
action and sharing of services.
An additional Doctorate of Education program was approved during the bien-
nium with emphasis on special education. Areas of concentration include mental
retardation, emotional disturbance, learning disabilities, and counseling.
A grant for $34,000 was received for program development in the areas of
learning disabilities and a grant of $12,000 for program development in prepar-
ing teachers to work with emotionally disturbed children.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 45

A tutorial program for socially disadvantaged children was begun. One hun-
dred and twenty-five students in Human Growth and Development worked with
selected underprivileged children, seeking to increase the children's academic
skills. From all indications, the activity was a very effective laboratory experi-
ence that increased the understanding of the pre-service teacher and gave him
practical experience in guiding the learning process.
A program providing internships in Europe was developed by the Second-
ary Education Department. Arrangements have been made so that each intern
teaching in an Army dependent school will live with a native family, thereby
increasing his language competency. This program will be expanded to Latin
America as well as Europe.
A relationship was also established between the College of Education and a
dependent school in Asuncion, Paraguay. Under the agreement, the University
provides consultant help and assistance with the selection and in-service develop-
ment of teachers.
In the fall of 1964, the College of Education conducted a Peace Corps train-
ing project for 60 Peace Corps trainees on their way to work in Jamaica and
the British Honduras. A part of the program included the supervision of teach-
ing internships for the trainees in the public schools in the Virgin Islands.
During February, 1965, a group of Chilean educators spent a month on the
campus in a seminar studying elementary education. These presidents and deans
of Chilean teacher education institutions had an opportunity to study American
elementary schools and to hear more than 15 members of the College of Educa-
tion staff present interpretations of the development of the present elementary
education program in the United States.
A Ph.D. program in Education has been developed and submitted to the Grad-
uate Council and it is expected that this program will be approved in the near
future.
The number of doctoral students in the College of Education has doubled.
The major factor has been the rapid increase in the number of assistantships
and fellowships to support advanced study, provided by the research and train-
ing grants that are coming to the college.
An indication of the teachers produced for the state during the biennium is
provided by the number of interns supervised which includes in-teacher educa-
tion from other colleges within the University. During the biennium, supervision
was provided for 1,282 interns-795 secondary, 456 elementary, and 31 in music
and art.


College of Engineering
The College of Engineering has made substantial progress in advancing its
educational programs during the past two years. The most immediate and tangi-
ble evidence appears in the approval of the Ph.D. degree for the departments of
mechanical engineering and industrial and systems engineering. All degree-
granting departments in the College of Engineering offer the master's degree
and all but one, agricultural engineering, now offer the Ph.D.
The application of engineering to all phases of the ocean, its resources, and
the land ocean interface is assuredly one of the most significant trends clearly
on the horizon. Water supply transportation and traffic, urban planning and









46 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

development, and city planning are also problems that worry America today.
Increased attention will be provided these problems during the coming years.
By 1970, enrollment in the College of Engineering is expected to reach 1,500
undergraduates and about 700 graduate students. Current enrollment is nearing
1,000 undergraduates and 300 graduate students. The College has been housed in
facilities inadequate for half these numbers; however, fortunately, the Board of
Regents and the Legislature recognized the growing seriousness of the problem
and allocated $5,715,000 in state funds to the College of Engineering. The Uni-
versity was especially successful in securing federal matching grants totaling
$2,814,117 to combine with these state funds, and ten buildings, totaling nearly
375,000 square feet, will now be realized.


Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
On July 1, 1965, the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences began opera-
tion as a single budgetary and administrative unit within the University. The
College of Agriculture, School of Forestry, Agricultural Experiment Station, and
Agricultural Extension Service are the four major agricultural units comprising
the Institute.
The development of the Institute organization has resulted in: (1) a more
unified effort by and closer coordination of the three closely related functions of
teaching, research, and extension; (2) a more effective administration and effi-
cient operation of many functions common to the four major agricultural units;
(3) greater flexibility in and more efficient utilization of existing Institute per-
sonnel; (4) easier visualization and evaluation of the total agricultural efforts of
the University; (5) more consistent coordination of the Institute's efforts with
those of other segments of the University's total program; and (6) greater
contributions through an integrated approach in the development of programs of
technical assistance to developing nations.
In reviewing the activities of the past two years, it is important to point
out that the 1965 Florida Legislature provided funds to meet some very critical
needs in building and capital improvements for the agricultural programs of the
University. Included in these requests were funds to construct an additional wing
to McCarty Hall, establishment of a new branch station for swine research at
Marianna, and the establishment of a new branch laboratory for research in
ornamental horticulture at Apopka. The planning and development of these fa-
cilities has progressed during the past year and should materialize during the
coming biennium.
In 1964, a study program was initiated by the University to analyze the
trends, problems, and needs as related to each of the major commodity or indus-
try groups in the Florida agriculture. The purpose of this program which was
conducted with the full cooperation of industry was to help accelerate the growth
of Florida's economy through a more complete development and use of Florida's
agricultural resources. This program was labeled Operation DARE (Developing
Agricultural Resources Effectively). Following the initial evaluation, the Uni-
versity provided the leadership required to implement the needs and action phases
of the program. County groups were organized by Agricultural Extension to plan
and implement county programs.
It is believed that Operation DARE has provided an excellent basis for study-









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 47

ing the state's agricultural problems and needs, and for reorienting and strength-
ening the program at the University in such a way that the University might
render the greatest service to the agriculture of Florida.
A Center for Tropical Agriculture was authorized within the Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences in February, 1965, by the Board of Regents.
The Center, which is being financed through the support of a Ford Foundation
grant and contract funds, encourages research and training activities on tropical
problems within the state and in tropical countries.
During the biennium, the Institute initiated a technical assistance contract
in Costa Rica and developed planning for contracts in Jamaica and Panama.
Staff members participated in several assignments on the development of agricul-
tural institutions in Latin America. Reports have been published on agricul-
tural development in Nicaragua, British Honduras, Jamaica, and Central Amer-
ica as a whole.
Enrollment continued to increase in the College of Agriculture at both the
graduate and undergraduate levels. Two hundred and five baccalaureate degrees
and 162 advanced degrees were awarded during the biennium. Of the latter, 45
were Doctor of Philosophy degrees. This resulted in a total of 367 for all de-
grees awarded and was 22.3 percent more than were awarded in the previous
biennium.
All departments have continued to upgrade and improve their course offer-
ings. Recognition of the increasing opportunities and needs for veterinary serv-
ices led to the authorization of a College of Veterinary Medicine at the Univer-
sity of Florida by the 1965 Florida Legislature. The Board of Regents has acted
to begin the implementation of this act during the 1971 Legislature.

College of Physical Education and Health
The College of Physical Education and Health continued to progress both
in the quality of its teachers and in the numbers of graduates. The graduate
program continued to expand and it is anticipated that there will be a need for
two additional master's degree programs and a Ph.D. in physical education by
1970. The year 1966 marked the 20th anniversary of the college.

School of Journalism and Communications
National honors came to the School of Journalism and Communications
during the biennium. The School won first place in the William Randolph Hearst
Foundation writing competition and was awarded a gold medallion and certificate
by President Lyndon Johnson for this achievement. It also became the third
largest professional journalism school in America with an increase of enroll-
ment during the biennium of 49 percent. WUFT, the University's educational
television station, won the Freedom Foundation award for a special Fourth of
July program, "Hymn to Remarkable Americans," and the Minneapolis Tribune
selected the University of Florida for one of its journalism scholarships to be
awarded annually for the next five years.
Expansion of Educational Television on the campus continued during the
biennium under the supervision of the School of Journalism. Of major importance
was the extension of an underground cable from the School of Journalism to
the College of Education in Norman Hall and on to P. K. Yonge Laboratory
.School. This installation makes it possible for the College of Education teachers-









48 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

in-training to observe teaching in the P. K. Yonge classrooms via television from
their own classrooms in Norman Hall.
The cable was also extended to the J. Hillis Miller Health Center for pur-
poses of recording operations, demonstrations, and for supplying previously
taped programs to classes in the Medical Center.
Other broadcasting activities of the School were expanded by offering
supplemental course work in the Comprehensive courses by radio from Radio
Center.

Center for Latin American Studies
The primary functions of the Center for Latin American Studies are to
encourage and coordinate research and graduate training pertaining to Latin
America throughout the University, and to administer directly Latin American
instructional, research, and publication programs which do not properly pertain
to colleges, schools, and departments.
There are presently 142 graduate students registered in the Latin American
study programs of the Center. Future enrollment is projected at a growth rate
of 15 percent a year.
The Ford Foundation made a grant of $440,000 to the Center during the
biennium for the strengthening of training and research programs. This grant
is being administered in close cooperation with the University's Center for
Tropical Agriculture. A $230,000 grant was also received from the Rockefeller
Foundation for a cooperative teaching and research program between the Uni-
versity of Florida and the Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia. Twenty-six
graduate students and eight faculty members received research grants through
the Caribbean Research Program totaling $40,908, an increase of $10,000 over
the previous biennium.

Florida State Museum
In February of 1966, the National Science Foundation awarded the Uni-
versity of Florida $1,112,650 toward the construction of a new Florida State
Museum. The 1965 Legislature appropriated $350,000 and an additional $800,-
000 will be sought from private sources to permit the realization of this structure.

University of Florida Libraries
Construction was begun during the biennium on a Graduate Research Li-
brary. It is anticipated that this building will be completed by January, 1967.
A critical need was filled with the completion of a library in the new
Architecture and Fine Arts Complex, and plans are now being made to enlarge
the Hume Library located in the Agricultural Complex which will consolidate
library holdings in agriculture and the biological sciences.
A Teaching Resources Center was established in the Library during the
biennium for the purpose of contributing to the teaching technique on the campus.
This center is making a major contribution to classroom instruction.
The University of Florida Library is one of 15 in the nation which has
been invited to work with the Library of Congress in its first pilot project in
the use of computerized cataloging information. The use of a computer system
in library operation is a very exciting possibility and one which should reduce
the library workload.




2,700


2,400






2,100






1,800






1,500






1,200






900






600






300






Year


2,525




2,330


Total Degrees
Granted


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Degrees Granted

1 July 1964 30 June 1966


1964-1965
1965-1966


DEGREE
BS
MS
JD
PhD
MD
EdE
EdS


3365
3737


% INCREASE
8.0
10.0
56.0
2.0
31.0
50.0
40.0


794
710 /











144 141
114
6 5 I15/ 65 306 14

64-65 65-66 64-65 65-66 64-65 65-66 64-65 65-66 64-65 65-66 64-6565-66 64-65 65-66


Degree BS MS JD PhD. MD Ed. E Ed. S
(DED)









50 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

The increasing interest in international studies by students makes it vir-
tually certain that the Library will need to double its rate of acquisition of
monographs, journals, and documents from Africa, the Far East, and Southeast
Asia during the next two years. This is but one example of the demands a
sophisticated student body and faculty is placing on the Library.
By June 30, 1966, the total number of volumes in the University Libraries
had reached 1,147,711. The University is proud of its library holdings; however,
it must be recognized that the average number of acquisitions of the 24 other
state universities which offer more than 100 Ph.D.'s per year is some 20,000
more than the University of Florida has been financially able to acquire. The
cost of developing and maintaining a great library is large, both in dollars
and in the demands on the talents and energies of all concerned. It is, however,
one of the essentials of a great university.

Military Training
Air Force and Army Reserve Officers Training continued to be an integral
part of the freshman and sophomore curriculum at the University of Florida
during the biennium. Considerable reconstruction of these programs occurred
which resulted in their being considerably more attractive to the student. Trans-
fer students from junior colleges without previous ROTC instruction can now
enter the program and qualify for a commission at the end of two years. It is
interesting to note that in 1964-65, University of Florida commissioners ranked
first in academic achievement among the 35 other colleges and universities in
Third United States Army Area consisting of the seven southeastern states.

EARNED DEGREES CONFERRED
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
July 1, 1964-June 30, 1965

Trimester Bachelor's Med Law Master's EDS DED PHD Total

Trimester III, III B 426 14 270 5 1 47 763
Trimester I 595 63 154 4 7 42 865
Trimester II 1060 27 159 1 4 37 1288
Trimester III A 249 42 10 127 3 18 449

Total 2330 42 114 710 10 15 144 3365


EARNED DEGREES CONFERRED
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
July 1, 1965-June 30, 1966

Trimester Bachelor's Med Law Master's EDS DED PHD Total

Trimester III, III B 533 32 318 8 14 49 954
Trimester I 701 87 152 4 8 30 982
Trimester II 1008 40 198 8 40 1294
Trimester III A 283 55 19 126 2 22 507
Total 2525 55 178 794 14 30 141 3737









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 51

GRADUATE EDUCATION
Enrollment in the University of Florida's Graduate School has been increas-
ing at the rate of about 11 percent each year and there is every reason to believe
that this rate of growth will continue through 1975 when the campus graduate
enrollment will have reached 6,000. This tremendous demand for education be-
yond the bachelor's degree has strained the resources of the graduate faculty;
however, a number of major fellowships and institutional grants were obtained
during the biennium which have assured the growth and development of an ex-
cellent graduate program.
Among these was a $4.2 million National Science Foundation Science De-
velopment grant. The grant has allowed the University to develop a strong re-
cruitment campaign for research professors and for post-doctoral fellows in the
areas of physical science, mathematics, and engineering. Considerable research
equipment has also been acquired in these areas through this grant.
The University of Florida was also awarded 95 National Defense Education
Association Title IV fellowships in November of 1965, and this award, in con-
junction with the NSF grant, has had a stimulating influence not only in physical
science and engineering but in the life sciences, social sciences, and humanities
programs. As a result, there is a new feeling of assurance in the entire Uni-
versity that continuing progress can be made in all academic programs. An
indication of this progress is the fact that three internationally distinguished
research professors will join the departments of economics, anthropology, and
statistics for the fall of 1966. Fifteen of these Graduate Research Professorships
exist, and it is the objective of the Graduate School to obtain at least one such
appointment in each area in which the Ph.D. degree is awarded.
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration institutional grant and
the NASA fellowship program continue to strengthen the Graduate School in the
fields of science and engineering. These grants are being expanded into other
areas related to the nation's space program. One such area is psychology. A
NASA space science research building to be constructed in 1966-67 will further
increase the activities of graduate students in the broad area of space science.
The fact that this building is almost entirely financed by NASA is evidence
of the University's success in implementing the NASA fellowship and research
programs.
In 1960 the Ford Foundation selected the University of Florida as one of
the institutions to be awarded grants of $200,000 for development of three-year
master's degree programs. The objective of this program is to supply needed
teachers for junior colleges and four-year colleges. By the end of this biennium,
40 students had graduated under the auspices of the program; 76 students are
currently enjoying its sponsorship.
A $400,000 grant has been obtained by the Graduate School from the
United States Office of Education for the construction of a Graduate School
Headquarters and Center for International Studies. Some $50,000 was au-
thorized by the 1965 Legislature for architectural plans and an appropriation
of $960,000 is being requested from the 1967 Legislature to build the structure.
This facility will provide a badly needed facility for Graduate School activities
and will also draw together some 40 professors and over 100 graduate students
interested in international studies. The result of this concentration of interest
should be a great development of interdisciplinary research in the international









52 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

field with much enhanced sponsorship by foundations and government agencies.
A number of new graduate degree programs have been established since
1964. Two new master's programs were established in statistics and a procedure
was established for expanding the Master of Arts in Teaching and the Master of
Science in Teaching to areas outside the College of Arts and Sciences. Ph.D.
programs were authorized in environmental engineering, pathology, pharmacol-
ogy, mechanical engineering, systems and industrial engineering, and the De-
partment of Personnel Services was authorized to offer an Ed.D. in Special
Education.
The University of Florida has awarded 1,505 master's degrees, 24 Spe-
cialist in Education degrees, 45 Ed.D. degrees, and 285 Ph.D. degrees since
July, 1964. This brings to a total 10,583 graduate degrees which the University
has awarded since 1934. The University has one of the most extensive graduate
programs in the nation with 52 areas in which the doctoral degree is awarded
and 86 areas approved for master's degree study.

Genesys
The Graduate Engineering Education System program approached its full
development during the biennium. The purpose of GENESYS, which was estab-
lished by the 1963 Legislature, is to make a high quality program available to
professional people concentrated in the space age industries locating in Florida.
There are five operating facilities: one each in Cape Kennedy, Orlando, Day-
tona Beach, Melbourne, and on the Gainesville campus. All five terminals are
inter-connected by a closed-circuit talkback television system, thereby making
the University faculty available to students in east-central Florida.
Provisional accreditation of GENESYS as an experimental program was
requested by the University and approved following inspection by the Southern
Association of Colleges and Schools. Master of Engineering degrees now awarded
through GENESYS are therefore accredited graduate degrees and it is possible
to meet the needs of fully or partially employed personnel in any GENESYS
location, with reasonable cooperation of the employer, without changing the
residence requirements for degrees. Since GENESYS courses enroll both campus
students and GENESYS students, it is recognized that this establishes and
maintains acceptable standards of achievement. GENESYS grew from a 225
course registration in the fall trimester of 1964 to a 388 course registration in
the fall trimester of 1965. Fifteen resident faculty at the various centers, as
well as faculty on the University of Florida Gainesville campus, provided courses
in 11 subject areas: aerospace, chemical, civil, electrical, industrial and systems,
mechanical, metallurgical, and materials engineering, engineering science and
mechanics, physics, mathematics, and statistics.
Forty-three different courses were available at Orlando during the 1965 fall
trimester. Most of these were conducted over the closed-circuit talk-back tele-
vision network originating from Port Canaveral or Gainesville. Thirty-six
courses were available at the Cape locations and 39 at Daytona Beach. In addi-
tion to the courses offered for credit, several non-credit courses for professional
improvement in some of the engineering disciplines were offered each trimester.
There are presently four buildings at Port Canaveral, including a class-
room building, auditorium, research building, and library-administration build-
ing. Orlando and Daytona Beach each have a single building for classroom,









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 53

offices, and research. A television studio was added to Daytona Beach in 1965.
Receiving points have been installed at Merritt Island Launch Area and at
Patrick Air Force Base in the Cape area. A remote control camera is being
provided in Gainesville so that telecasts can originate from locations other than
the GENESYS studio.
As a result of a proposal to the Office of Education, the College of Engineer-
ing received a grant of $458,227 during the biennium to expand physical
facilities for the GENESYS program.


GRADUATE LEVEL PROGRAMS

Law Center
The College of Law experienced a dramatic increase in enrollment during the
biennium moving from 536 students in the fall of 1963 to 759 students in the
fall of 1965. This increase influenced the Board of Regents and the 1963 Legisla-
ture to approve the construction of a Law Center designed to handle up to 1,200
students, with a faculty of 50, greatly expanding library facilities, and an
eventual dormitory and cafeteria unit to house the growing student body.
Another significant development during the biennium was the reinstatement
of the Juris Doctor degree to replace the Bachelor of Laws degree as the first
professional degree in law. This degree emphasizes that the College of Law is
both a professional school and a graduate institution within the University.
Admission standards for the College of Law were raised for the third time
in recent years during the biennium. It is anticipated that the increased ad-
mission standards utilized by the Admissions Committee will maintain the Col-
lege's enrollment at approximately 700 students until the new Law Center
facility is occupied in 1968. The faculty of the College of Law deliberated very
carefully before again recommending that the admission standards be raised.
This decision was reluctantly reached only after crowding had become a
threat to quality legal education.
Basically, the Committee's recommendations centered around two points:
(1) that the academic qualifications for entrance into the Law College should
be raised; and (2) that a faculty committee be created and vested with the
authority and discretion to pass on applicants whose qualifications fell within
certain limits. This recommendation was approved by the University and the
newly created Admissions Committee began its work in the fall of 1965. As the
result, the quality of the law student body has continued to rise.
Although Bar examinations are not designed to evaluate law school instruc-
tional programs, the high percentage of University of Florida law graduates
passing the Florida Bar Examination casts some light on the effectiveness of the
instruction. Ninety-eight percent of the Florida graduates taking the examina-
tion for the first time in March, 1966, passed the examination. The passing
percentage for all other law school graduates taking the examination for the
first time was 90 percent.
The College of Law maintains an active research program. All faculty are
expected to conduct individual research which will strengthen and enrich their
teaching programs. Outstanding in this regard has been the development of a
Latin American program in law which has stressed both individual faculty









51 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

research and interdisciplinary seminar work. The seminar, which has utilized
the University's pool of internationally-known specialists on Latin America who
teach in other disciplines on the campus and visiting Latin Americans, has con-
centrated on legal problems of Latin American trade and investment and the
study of Latin American legal institutions. Selected problems within these topics
are studied by work teams composed of law students and of graduate students
from other areas of the campus. Within the last few years, the College of Law
has acquired what is probably the most up-to-date collection of Brazilian law
in the country.

J. Hillis Miller Health Center

The J. Hillis Miller Health Center matured during the biennium from an
adolescence involving rapid physical growth into one of the major academic
units of the University with greatly increased level of productivity in all areas.
No amount of impersonal statistical data alone can accurately depict the signifi-
cance, the scope, and the true meaning of a health center. However, there are a
number of factors which can provide some indication.
Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, John W. Gardner, cited the
College of Health Related Professions as one of the nation's examples of co-
ordinated programs for training much needed health professionals. Gardner
singled out the Florida program during testimony before a Congressional sub-
committee considering a bill which could increase training opportunities in the
allied health professions.
Dr. Herbert E. Kaufman, Chief of Ophthalmology, was named one of
America's Ten Outstanding Young Men by the United States Junior Chamber
of Commerce. He was the third College of Medicine faculty member to receive
the honor. He is credited with establishing the first known cure for a virus which
is one of the major causes of blindness.
There was increasing evidence during the biennium of interdisciplinary
activities which involve the Health Center programs with those of the entire
University. A Center for Neurobiological Sciences, for example, was established
in the Health Center to facilitate the exchange of academic information
among all teaching and research areas in the University concerned with brain
function. The Center will propagate and facilitate collaboration among the De-
partments of Medicine, Surgery, Anatomy, Physiology, Psychology, and others.
The major orientation is towards education and research at a level of graduate,
medical student and postgraduate programs. The establishment of the Center
has given great impetus for activity in this area and it will be the nucleus for a
new program in the behavioral sciences, inasmuch as consideration of the
physiology of the central nervous system can be considered a pivotal point in
research and teaching of a broad field ranging from molecular biology to human
behavior.
A Human Development Center has also been established under University-
wide representation. The formation of the Center was facilitated by a state
appropriation of $500 thousand for the construction of a Children's Mental
Health Unit in the J. Hillis Miller Health Center and the award of a matching
grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.
Education, sociology and occupational therapy, together with a wide range of









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 55

medical disciplines, are working as a cooperative enterprise in anticipation of
the completion of the Center and Children's Mental Health Unit.
A Dental School program was initiated by the University of Florida during
the biennium. Planning funds were provided by the last session of the Legisla-
ture and a dean has been named. The 1967 Legislature will be asked to provide
funds for construction of a building for this college. Federal funds are expected
to provide a significant part of the cost of building and initial outfitting.
Although the past biennium has been a great period of consolidation, of
maturation, and of accomplishment for the J. Hillis Miller Health Center, it
has brought into critical focus certain problems which become more acute with
each passing year. The two most pressing problems are the need for additional
faculty and supporting staff and the desperate shortage of space which now
inhibits the growth of the Center.



CONTRACT RESEARCH
University research has a profound economic and cultural effect on our
society. The economic growth and development of the state of Florida depends
greatly upon the availability of large numbers of highly educated and trained
people and the availability of these individuals is directly related to the research
programs of the state's centers of education. In order to develop the needed
support for graduate study, doctoral research, post-doctoral research, and faculty
research, supplementary funds from federal and private sponsors are required
and are vital to our program.
The volume of sponsored research at the University of Florida has con-
tinued to grow steadily during the biennium. The face value of contract research
and research grants from outside sources represented $11,898,488 on June 30,
1964. By June 30, 1966, this figure had reached $19,826,443, an increase of 77
percent. During the first year of the biennium, the actual expenditure rate
was $7,600,000. During 1965-66 it was in excess of $9,400,000.
More than 600 proposals and 500 contracts and grants are processed each
year. Some of the overhead funds generated by these contracts and grants are
used by the University to promote new areas of research, particularly in areas
where continued funding can be attracted from outside sources. The intent of the
legislation authorizing the establishment of the Division of Sponsored Research
specified that all overhead funds be returned to the University for special alloca-
tion in support of research and graduate study. Previous budgeting for the
biennium overlooked this new legislation; however, the Budget Commission de-
termined that only 40 percent be available to the University for special needs
for the remainder of the biennium. It is important to the growth of the Uni-
versity research program that full return of overhead funds be obtained rather
than for the 60 percent being allocated to the incidental fund for general Uni-
versity operations.

Future Growth of Research
Research contracts and grants for the University have increased at an
average rate of about 25 percent per year for the last seven years. This rapid
rate of expansion doubles the sponsored research activity every three years.










56 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

Although it would be unrealistic to assume this growth will continue because of a
saturation of the facilities and resources available in the areas of recent rapid
growth, several new areas of research growth are developing. These areas
include the availability of research funds for programs in the College of Educa-
tion, the social sciences, the humanities, law, and fine arts and architecture.
The creation of a Biological Sciences Division on the campus has improved the
coordination for research funds in that area and the completion of the new engi-
neering complex, NASA Science Building, Chemistry research wing, and the
Graduate Research Library will generate research growth in these respective
areas. It can be predicted that the non-science areas will show the most rapid
percentage of growth from outside research funding in the next few years.


ANALYSIS OF RESEARCH CONTRACT
(June 30, 1966)
University Breakdown


Agriculture and Forestry
Arts and Sciences
Business Administration
Education ---
Engineering -------
Health Related Professions --
Medicine -
Nursing
Pharmacy
Institutional Grants
Other ....


Total


AND GRANT FUNDS


Number Face Value
S178 $ 1,822,308
92 3,307,997
3 138,505
6 459,584
79 3,753,198
5 232,593
124 3,382,997
3 98,973
8 187,647
6 5,772,342
25 670,299

529 $19,826,443


Categories of Sponsors


Perc


entc


Department of Defense ....- -----------------_--- ---- 14.0
Dept. of Health, Education and Welfare --_ 24.0
Atomic Energy Commission .- -----........-----.--... .... 2.4
National Aeronautics and Space Administration ---------10.0
National Science Foundation .----- -. -----------------.. 35.0
Other federal agencies _- --------- 4.9
Foundations, industry, state and local -..--- ---------- 9.7
Services Performed*
Direct probable benefit to industry
Contribution to human health .. ..-.......
Direct Probable benefit to agriculture and forestry
Contribution to the national safety (defense)
Basic Research and Education contracts ----...-


ige Amount
$ 2,821,061
4,685,483
481,802
1,994,345
6,928,542
984,265
1,930,944

2,315,509
4,248,822
1,451,748
2,815,473
17.542.336


*Many projects contribute to more than one service objective. Hence, any total
of these groups would be meaningless.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 57

ORGANIZED RESEARCH

Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations
The Agricultural Experiment Stations are organized into 19 departments
on the University of Florida campus at Gainesville and at 20 branch stations
throughout the state. These locations make possible research on different soils,
under varying climatic conditions, and on many commodities such as citrus,
vegetables, field crops, pastures, livestock, ornamentals, tropical fruits and for-
ests. While production research receives the most attention, research projects
are also conducted in processing, handling, marketing, utilization, engineering
and economics. Basic research is a vital part of all disciplines.
A major strengthening of the Agricultural Experiment Stations research
program occurred during the biennium with the adoption of a more coordinated
program of academic staff appointments. Liaison appointments have been made
among the various disciplinary and commodity departments and courtesy ap-
pointments have been made between the departments on the University of
Florida campus at Gainesville and the various branch station personnel. As the
result, research faculty at the branch stations have been more closely involved in
program planning and reporting.
Total funds for agricultural research reached an all-time high during the
biennium of $8.5 million annually. Federal support and commercial grants con-
tinued to increase, representing about 18 percent of this total. The benefits of
this research support have been legion and can be directly related to the growth
of Florida's billion dollar agricultural industry.
Research accomplishments during the biennium included the discovery that
it is financially advantageous to provide supplement to yearling steers on pasture;
a significant beginning toward the mechanization of vegetable harvesting; the
development of several promising selections of black shank resistant tobacco;
the evaluation of 408 sub-tropical grass introductions; and the substantiation
that bulls gain faster and more efficiently than steers or heifers in the feedlot
and that there appears to be little difference in tenderness between the beef
produced by the three groups.
New peach, nectarine, and blackberry varieties were released during the
biennium by the Agricultural Experiment Stations which extend the season of
production and improve the product available. These releases tighten Florida's
control of the very early market. Several outstanding blueberry selections have
also received additional testing and should soon be released.
Cold hardy selections of citrus are being tested and some Chinese tea varie-
ties have been discovered to grow well in Florida's climate. Additional research
is being conducted to determine the adaptability of these varieties for com-
mercial production.
Other research findings included the identification of copper deficiency as a
growth-retarding nutritional disorder in some container grown woody ornamental
nursery stock; the development of a new and improved Bermuda grass; the de-
velopment of a sweet bell pepper resistant to Y virus and tobacco mosaic virus;
the discovery that low protein diets delay sexual maturity of broiler breeder
pullets; the finding that the uniformity of vegetable harvest produce can be
decidedly increased by seed sizing and precision planting; and the discovery









58 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

that certain drugs will successfully clear infected horses of one type of piro-
plasmosis.

Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station
The purpose of the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station, which
was created by legislative act in 1941, is to organize and promote the prosecu-
tion of research projects of engineering and related sciences, with special em-
phasis on problems important to the development of industries of Florida. The
basic legislation founding the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station
was not only far-sighted, but it clearly recognized that research activities are
integral to the College of Engineering's education programs.
The Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station can be proud of its
many accomplishments. To mention a few, research programs have been estab-
lished in sanitary engineering relating to sewage disposal for Florida communi-
ties, coastal engineering, nuclear engineering, engineering mechanics, and in
metallurgical and materials engineering.
Some 221 research projects were active during the biennium. These projects
include the study of air and water pollution, weather radar, nuclear propulsion,
solar energy, beach erosion, pulp and paper, asphalt technology, and fibrous
materials.


EXTENSION AND SERVICE
Agricultural Extension Service
Florida's rapidly expanding population resulted in increased demands upon
the Florida Agricultural Extension Service for intensified educational service
during the biennium. The specialized nature of Florida's agriculture has re-
sulted in a need for highly technical assistance in solving the many problems
which must be faced if the state is to continue its current rate of development
in this important segment of our economy. The tremendous population expan-
sion, coupled with the stresses and strains of modern living, has also brought
greater demands for educational work with homemakers and families. These de-
mands, along with new federal programs designed to provide special help to low
income families, have strained the resources of the home economics staff at both
the state and county levels.
County Extension agents will need to expand their test demonstration work
in order to speed up the application of new knowledge to highly technical agri-
cultural operations. Knowledge of research techniques will be essential in carry-
ing out this work. This will call for greater academic training for extension
agents who carry out these educational programs. It will mean a continuation
and expansion of cross-county line agent work, a stepping up of specialized area
work and more and closer working relationships with research.
(1) To carry out this type of program it will be necessary to establish
salaries which will attract and hold young men who are capable and qualified
to perform this type of educational work.
(2) Every effort is being made to provide the state with an aggressive and
far-sighted program designed to develop Florida's natural and human resources.
In the area of home economics, there is need for a greatly stepped-up consumer









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 59

education program to reach all families, but especially those with limited budg-
ets so that limited family finances can be stretched and consumers gain more
from their incomes. Extension's youth programs must also be stepped up to
reach young people from low income families who most seriously need the kind
of educational program which the Extension Service can provide.
(3) Florida's homemakers and their families will need more intensive train-
ing in such subjects as home management, family economics, child care, home and
family life, and money management in order to strengthen and stabilize the
family unit and enable it to withstand the pressures of today's living.
(4) The Florida Agricultural Extension Service faced greater internal ad-
justment during the past biennium than in any comparable period in its exist-
ence. There is every indication that even greater adjustment will be necessary
during the current two years.
If Florida is to maintain its competitive position and to continue the growth
of its agricultural industries, the very best in technical educational programs
will be required by commercial agricultural producers, those who serve these pro-
ducers, and those who transport, process, and merchandise agricultural products.

Division of Continuing Education
During the biennium, the State University System experienced broad
changes in the orientation and administration of Continuing Education. These
changes provided each state university with autonomy in the field of Continuing
Education. Each now has a budget and an administrative unit for continuing
education on its campus, enabling it to respond directly to needs in this instruc-
tional area. At the same time requests for services in excess of capacities or
beyond the academic competencies of a single institution are referred to another.
The University of Florida has a long and enviable history of responding to
the needs and demands for additional university-level Continuing Education
which are increasingly evident, growing and imperative. This history covers a
period of more than 50 years from the authorization of the Agricultural Ex-
tension Service in 1915 and the establishment of the General Extension Division
of Florida in 1919.
On July 1, 1965, the Division of Continuing Education was established to
more effectively coordinate the Continuing Education activities of the University
of Florida. During the transitional period, the University continued and ex-
panded provisions for making its instructional resources available to the people
of the state at convenient times and places to enable them to seek and achieve
intelligent solutions to their individual and collective problems.
The Division of Continuing Education is responsible for coordinating Continu-
ing Education courses and programs from the various colleges of the University
of Florida through its departments of credit classes, correspondence study, spe-
cial non-credit programs and those federally funded programs authorized in
1965 by the State Technical Services Act, the Elementary and Secondary Educa-
tion Act and the Higher Education Act of 1965. The Division's functions also
include administration of the State Center for Continuing Education which is
located in Jacksonville.
Credit classes were offered in 32 of Florida's 67 counties during the bien-
nium. The majority of the credit classes were on the graduate level. These resi-
dence credit classes enabled students admitted to graduate school to complete off-









60 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

campus as much as half the course requirements for the master's degree from
the College of Business Administration; and all course requirements for a mas-
ter's degree from the College of Engineering.
The largest number of credit classes, 237, and the largest number of enroll-
ments, 5,907, were in the field of Education. Arts and Sciences was second in
enrollments with 3,310, and Engineering ranked third with almost 1,000 off-
campus graduate students. A total of 457 credit classes were taught during the
biennium to 10,958 students for an average class size of 23.9 students.
In addition, 10,335 enrollments in correspondence study courses were re-
ceived from every county in the state during the biennium, and special non-
credit short courses and classes provided instruction for 15,704 Floridians.

J. Hillis Miller Health Center

The J. Hillis Miller Health Center patient care program is another major
area of service which the University of Florida is able to provide the citizens
of Florida.
In 1964-65, 97,490 in-patient days of care were provided by the Health Cen-
ter's William A. Shands Teaching Hospital and 65,969 out-patient visits were
logged as compared to 93,579 in-patient days of care and 58,370 out-patient
visits in 1963-64. In 1965-66, this number had risen to 105,120 in-patient days of
care and 72,566 out-patient visits. The average daily census for the latter
year had risen to 288 as compared to 245 during the first year of the previous
biennium.
One of the notable developments in the area of patient care and in clinical
research during 1965-66 was the beginning of construction of a hospital wing to
house the Childrens Mental Health Unit. Built at a cost of $1,200,000 equally
shared by the state and grant sources, this new facility is expected to open its
doors in December 1966. It will house and meet the clinical treatment require-
ments of up to 25 psychotic children in-patients, and will provide a teaching and
research laboratory unexcelled in the Southeast for the study of emotional and
mental illness in the young.
Another area of service with great potential impact for the foreseeable fu-
ture involves the extension of the team approach to medical practice into the
area of community medicine. In this concept, the total resource of the local com-
munity and even larger social groupments would be brought to bear on the prob-
lems of community health, particularly in the area of preventive medicine. With
roots deep in the educational milieu and with the Health Centers of great
universities coordinating the development of institutional care with non-
institutional community agencies, the age-old dream of total health care for each
member of society becomes a near reality. Through the implementation of the
total health care philosophy, it is believed that the Health Center will provide
its greatest contribution to the science of medicine and at the same time to the
individual citizens of the state of Florida who have made this great experiment
in medicine possible.
A neurosurgery suite, for patients with epilepsy and other neurological dis-
orders, was opened in the Shands Teaching Hospital during the biennium. The
suite, one of the few in the country, is the only one in the South which coor-
dinates the use of an electroencephalograph in the operating room to monitor










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA OPERATING INCOME AND EXPENDITURES*
Fiscal Years 1964-65 and 1965-66

Percent
Total
1964-65 1965-66 1964-66 1962-64 1964-65

INCOME
Stait. Appropriations_ -......... $30,055,807 $32,120,299 $ 62,176,106 59.2 55.9
Sales and Services .----.... -... ... 4.670,681 5,715,544 10,386,225 9.5 9.3
Student Fees ....- - - -..... 3,246,864 4,788,914 8,035,778 6.1 7.2
Federal Appropriations -.. 1,840,117 2,095,838 3,935,955 3.5 3.5
Contracts and (rants-Fed(ral)... 8.554.530 12,427,059 20,981,589 17.4 18.9
Contracts and Grants-Pri ate)... 2,.179,124 3,554,431 5,733,555 4.2 5.1
Endowment Income .... .. ... 3,566 3,322 6,888 0.1 0.1

Total Income .........--... $50,550,689 860,705,407 8111,256,096 100.0 100.0

EXPENDITURES
General Administration- ...... $ 2,353.866 $ 2,586,391 $ 4,940,257 4.5 4.4
Resident Instruction.................. 14,928,248 17,239,992 32,168,240 29.8 28.9
Organized Research ......... ..... 16.222,279 18.120.025 34,342,304 32.3 30.8
Extension.......-........ ... ...... 3.166.624 3.531.786 6,698,410 5.6 6.0
Operation and Maintenance cf
Physical Plant ....- .. .....- 2.404,360 2,727,240 5.131,600 5.2 4.6
Libraries and Museum ....- 1.403.261 1.595,846 2,999,107 2.7 2.7
Organized Activities Relating to
Instructional Departments ..... 10.640.476 11,405.486 22,045,962 19.1 19.8
Other .. ..... 595,717 2,524,055 3,119,772 0.8 2.8

Total Expenditures .. 851,714,831 859,730,821 $111,445,652 100.0 100.0

*Excludes Self-supporting Activities









62 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

neurological responses during surgery. A lung station was also opened to expand
diagnostic and treatment services.

Other Service Activities
The University of Florida Press published 62 volumes during the biennium
which raised the total number of press titles to 316. The printing of these pub-
lications results in a great service to the state of Florida. Many of these series
have been in constant demand by educational systems and libraries throughout
the state and others have been of vital importance to scholars throughout the
state and nation.
A list of the Library system's holdings of scientific periodicals was made
during the biennium in cooperation with the University's Computer Center and
this list is now available to other educational institutions and research industries
throughout the state.
WRUF, the University station, was one of seven Florida stations selected
during the biennium by the United States Government as key stations for emer-
gency operation during a civil defense crisis.
Through the facilities of the School of Journalism and WUFT, the Univer-
sity's educational television station, surgical operations in the Health Center
have been relayed for viewing by doctors in Jacksonville.
Members of the College of Physical Education and Health continued to serve
the state. Curriculum guidance was provided elementary and secondary schools
in the state and assistance and consultation was provided in the preparation of
a number of health publications for community and state agencies.
The University of Florida Museum completed work on site museums at Crys-
tal River and St. Marks. Work was also begun on several other special proj-
ects by the State Board of Parks and Historic Memorials. Special exhibits were
constructed at St. Augustine and at the New York World's Fair.
Service to the state by the College of Education, in addition to the prepara-
tion of teachers and other professional personnel, included consultations, surveys,
school evaluations, preparation of curriculum bulletins.










THE
FLORIDA
STATE
UNIVERSITY












THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY 65



GENERAL SUMMARY
(Editor's Note: Dr. John Elmer Champion was selected presi-
dent of the Florida State University on June 22, 1965, and was
inaugurated on March 15, 1966. President Champion succeeded
Dr. Gordon W. Blackwell, who provided distinguished leader-
ship from September 17, 1960, to February 1, 1965.)
The biennium of 1964-66 was a period of vigorous growth, accomplishment,
and change. Limited space requires us to provide only quantitative information
along with a very few examples of outstanding activities and programs in our
report. Because of this we cannot portray the air of excitement-the air of dis-
covery-the air of learning-nor the air of expectancy that permeates the Flor-
ida State University.
During the biennium, the student body continued to grow at almost double
the predicted rate, increasing 16 percent to 13,200 students in the fall of 1965.
Graduate enrollment moved above 2,000 students in 1964-65, and increased 28 per
cent during the biennium.
The largest increase in new enrollments came from Florida's public junior
colleges, making the junior class the largest in the University. New enrollments
accounted for less than one-third of the increase, reflecting the significantly
high retention rate stemming from continued high standards of admission.
At the end of the biennium, the University was attracting freshman students
with a mean average Florida Twelfth Grade Test Score in excess of 400. The
quality of the student body at the upper-division and graduate levels shows a
comparable improvement.
The improving quality of the students, combined with the continuing shift in
emphasis toward an increasing responsibility for upper-division and graduate
instruction, put more pressure than ever on the University Library. Library
space and book holdings are critically inadequate. The completion of an addition
to the Library during the coming year promises some relief for a backlog of
needs, but projected doubling in student population by 1975 threatens to crowd
many a student out long before then.
Moreover, the increasing emphasis upon graduate instruction and significant
research has emphasized the critical shortage of Library book holdings to an
extreme degree.
The University continues to re-emphasize the importance of the individual
student, recognizing its awesome responsibility of helping each student to be-
come a well-educated citizen capable of making significant effective contributions
to society. However, it has become increasingly difficult. During the biennium the
following degrees were conferred:

Undergraduate 4,576
Master 1,162
Doctorate 257
Total 5,995

Unfortunately, the growth in students was not matched by a proportionate
increase in faculty members. As in the preceding biennium, classes increased in









66 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

size, sometimes becoming too large for optimum instruction. A considerable num-
ber of faculty members were asked to teach 12 months rather than 10 months a
year. As in the past, graduate students on some occasions had to assume full-
time teaching duties because of the shortage of positions for the employment of
full-trained professional personnel.
The faculty responded admirably to the challenge of increasing enrollment
pressure, but not without sacrifice to all concerned. Extra teaching and adminis-
trative duties frequently denied creative faculty members the time needed for
vital research projects and kept the energetic teacher from devising new courses,
improved instructional programs, or enhanced approaches.
Levels of faculty salaries, though increasing, declined relative to national
levels during both years of the biennium for a net relative deficit of more than
5 per cent.
Nevertheless, the University continues to attract distinguished faculty mem-
bers through its constantly growing stature in teaching, research, and service,
frequently resulting in national recognition. The faculty has been willing to try
new programs-new ideas-even when handicapped by inadequate funds and fa-
cilities. Practically every new program and school at the University began in
sub-standard space, with inadequate numbers of faculty and staff and with in-
sufficient resources. Despite these obstacles, significant improvements have been
accomplished. The University is confident of continued improvement, because its
faculty continues to demonstrate its ability and willingness to move forward
rapidly.
The University has a superior faculty and staff today. But it is increasingly
difficult to retain these personnel, and more men and women of their caliber are
desperately needed.
During the biennium the total annual expenditures for contracts and grants
were:

Contracts and Grants Research Nonresearch Total
1964-65 $3,380,831 $2,225,322 $ 5,606,153
1965-66 3,847,632 2,997,515 6,845,147
Biennial Total $7,228,463 $5,222,837 $12,451,300

The continually rising student population requires a constantly expanding
physical plant and a marked increase in academic and service equipment. Al-
though $12.5 million in buildings were completed during the biennium, they were
not forthcoming in sufficient quantity nor soon enough to meet the needs. Space
for teaching and research is in demand from virtually every division in the Uni-
versity. And the immediate future points to even more severe space inadequacies.
For example, the new Student Health Center just opening its doors will be
too small to adequately serve the students within three years. Proportionately
fewer students are housed on the campus with each passing year. Classroom
space has been exhausted to the point that non-academic space must be occupied
for instructional purposes.
A table containing a report on $31.2 million in buildings completed or pro-
jected during the biennium is contained elsewhere in this Report.
Again, because of space limitations, we cannot express adequately our ap-
preciation to the Board of Education and the Board of Regents for the leader-









THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY 67

ship they have provided in the interests of higher education. Because of their
leadership, the spirit de corps on our campus has been improved.
Looking to the future we recognize that achieving greatness at the Florida
State University will depend upon how effectively the Board of Education, the
Board of Regents, the University administration, the faculty, the staff, and the
students fulfill their respective responsibilities, obligations, and commitments.
All of us must recognize that we are a part of the total University. In conclu-
sion I should like to state that I am enthusiastic-I am optimistic.
Respectfully submitted,
JOHN E. CHAMPION
President


PLANS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
As the University plans for the change from the trimester to the quarter
system, it has an excellent opportunity to develop more constructive and effective
methods of providing the quality of education its students deserve.
To assist the President in determining needed innovations in the academic
and research program, a President's Advisory Council of seven faculty mem-
bers has been appointed.
Major personnel appointments and organizational changes already have
been accomplished to effect more efficient operation, and to enable administrative
officers to devote more time to planning and implementation of long-range goals
as well as to immediate problems and needs.
At the close of the biennium, administrative responsibility for the operation
of the Offices of the Registrar and the Director of Admissions-because the work
of these offices relates so closely to academic matters-was transferred from the
Division of Student Affairs to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. To
strengthen and to place them in a more proper role of complementing and
supplementing academic programs, Educational Television and Radio and the
Educational Media Center were transferred from the Division of University
Relations to the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
To bring all of the specialized external information and University relations
functions under the direction of one unit reporting directly to the President, the
Offices of University Development and Alumni Affairs were placed under the
Director of University Relations.
Immediate University plans include a determined effort to secure for the
University greater administrative authority and flexibility; a realistic budget
adequate to meet operating needs; a proposal calling for some $45 million of
construction funds; additional, badly-needed land; a salary structure that will
make the University competitive with the best, and sufficient numbers of faculty
and staff to permit reasonable if not optimum work loads.


NEW PROGRAMS AND CURRICULUM CHANGES
Florida State University has not been afraid of innovation or change. It
continues to examine its own teaching techniques, courses of study, and its re-
search and service activities in the light of the best techniques, practices, and
policies.









68 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

To improve instruction and to meet the needs of an ever-expanding popula-
tion, the University has, among other things, appointed an Experimental College
Board, pioneered with a "cluster" plan that is attracting national attention,
expanded honors programs for students, and revised completely the General
Education program.
In addition, the University has established a College of Law that will enroll
its first class in September, 1966; added doctoral programs in Business Ad-
ministration, Adult Education, Art Education, and Special Education; sub-
stantially strengthened the oceanographic program and provided a new coastal
facility with a channel that will accommodate moderate-size ocean vessels; de-
veloped the overseas University Study Center at Florence, Italy, and revised
completely the Continuing Education Program.
Other specific highlights:
New departments of Urban and Regional Planning, of Religion, and Centers
for East Asian Study and for Slavic and East European Studies were estab-
lished in the College of Arts and Sciences. New master's programs were added
in Fine Arts (Art and Speech), International Affairs, Slavic and East European
Studies, and Asian Studies.
A program leading to the bachelor of arts degree in humanities was ap-
proved and a program leading to an M.S. degree in English Linguistics has
been initiated jointly by the Departments of English and English Education.
Major programs of area emphasis and a coaching minor have been developed
by the Department of Physical Education and Recreation.
Other program highlights are contained in the Division Reports.


DIVISION REPORTS

The Graduate School
In 1964-65 enrollment in the Graduate School moved above 2,000 students
for the first time. Enrollment at the graduate level increased by 28 percent
during the biennium, comprising more than 18 percent of total University en-
rollment. This compares with a figure of 15.09 percent for 1962-63. By every
index, student quality has improved as student numbers have increased.
The Division of Sponsored Research, established late in the 1962-64 biennium,
has been invaluable to the University's research program. Research funds from
foundations and from other private and federal sources increased nearly 30
percent during the biennium and now account for 27 percent of the University's
expenditures.
Resumes of the recent operation and accomplishments of the University's
research organization and new graduate programs are included elsewhere in this
report.

College of Arts and Sciences
The College provided some 65 percent of the instruction in the University.
Overall student enrollment increased by 15.8 percent and graduate enrollment
was up a startling 53.5 percent.
Several members of the College faculty received national and international
recognition. Others were honored by the University. The Coyle E. Moore, Jr.









THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY 69

Award for Outstanding Excellence in Teaching was presented to Mrs. Katherine
Hoffman, Chemistry, for 1964-65, to Dr. Steve Edwards, Physics, for 1965-66,
and to Mr. Michael Shaara English, for 1966-67. Miss Eva Mae Atwood,
Modern Languages, received the first George Miller Award for 1966-67 and
Professor Raymond Sheline, Chemistry, was named Distinguished Professor for
1966-67.
The Board of Regents approved an overseas University Study Center at
Florence, Italy, for the academic year 1966-67 under the auspices of the College.
The Center was staffed by seven faculty members who will teach 120 students.
The Asolo Theater Festival at Sarasota, directed by members of the College,
was declared by the Legislature to be the official state theater of Florida. A
special program of instruction for a pilot cluster group of 30 freshmen was
sufficiently successful to attract nationwide attention. The College planned to
increase this group to 16 percent of the freshman class in 1966-67.
The College's general education program was intensively studied and in
1966 was thoroughly revised to provide an even more challenging, flexible and
up-to-date curriculum.

Degree 1964-65 1965-66
Bachelor 729 722
Master 150 203
Doctorate 66 66

College of Law
The 1965 Florida Legislature authorized establishment of the College of
Law, which planned for an initial enrollment of 100 students.
A nationally-recognized Dean was selected, an able faculty recruited, and
the first-year curriculum and program of the College was completed. Plans are
being formulated for the second- and third-year programs. Course mergers were
planned to provide room for courses in new areas of law study without
sacrificing traditional subject matter. Emphasis will be placed throughout the
program upon individual and seminar study to supplement work done in large
classes.
The primary need of the College is the construction of a College of Law
complex, which should contain adequate space for library and study areas, large
classrooms, seminar rooms, faculty and administrative offices, and other facili-
ties required for teaching, research and service functions. Another pressing need
is a major expansion in the book holdings of the law library through additional
gifts and purchases.

School of Business
Perhaps the most significant development was planning and approval for the
Doctor of Business Administration degree program to begin in September, 1966.
In the two-year period, there was a 35 percent increase in undergraduate
degrees awarded and a 72 percent increase in graduate degrees awarded. The
quality of the graduate class, as indicated by test scores, also increased. Class
enrollments increased 31 percent over 1963-64.
Significant research projects during the biennium included studies of fac-
tors leading to consumer bankruptcy; effects of decision making on group per-










70 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

formance; computer simulation of decision making; intervention and wage price
guidelines; the impact of Social Security amendments on private insurance, and
overinsurance against medical expenses and loss of income.
In numerous short courses, seminars and institutes, the faculty taught
public accountants, CPA candidates, food service operators, the Governor's
Committee on Resource Planning, executives of the paper industry and of the
hospitality industry, state tax officials, and members of the advertising and pub-
lic relations professions.
Faculty members had numerous publications during the period, including
thirty-two articles.

Degrees 1964-65 1965-66
Bachelor 465 495
Master 25 76


School of Education
The School of Education, now second largest in the Southeast and South-
west, developed new programs of study in virtually every department.
Among significant research and service projects conducted during the bien-
nium were participation in the establishment of the new science curriculum in
Turkish schools; inauguration of a five-year junior high school science curricu-
lum project; development of numerous computer-assisted instruction projects by
several departments; analysis of pre- and in-service education of social studies
teachers; off-campus teacher education courses designed to upgrade in-service
teachers, supervisors, and administrative personnel; consultative and advisory
service to state and local educational agencies, and establishment of desegrega-
tion institutes for school personnel from Alabama, Florida, and Georgia.
Faculty members played leading roles in regional and national professional
organizations and published numerous articles, reports and books. The Depart-
ment of Mathematics Education, for example, published a number of major
works including 17 textbooks. Many of these materials are used abroad as well
as throughout Florida and the United States.

Degrees 1964-65 1965-66
Bachelor 632 660
Master 140 178
Doctorate 39 45

School of Engineering Science
The School reflected steady growth during the biennium. Pre-engineering
enrollment increased to 187 students in 1964-65, and to 240 in 1965-66. The num-
ber of cooperative students increased significantly with work assignments at 10
different industrial and governmental laboratories.
In anticipation of the increased enrollments which can be accommodated in
the proposed engineering science building, the undergraduate curriculum was
broadened to prepare students for the technical functions of operations, manage-
ment, and design, in addition to current training in development and research
functions.









THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY 71

Increased emphasis is now given to the technical specialities of astronau-
tics, electronics, materials and systems. The honors program was revised to pro-
vide a three-year period of integrated study leading jointly to the B.S. and M.S.
degrees with thesis preparation extending over the last two years.
The first contracts and grants, totalling $159,408 were received, including a
scholarship grant of $5,100.

Degrees 1964-65 1965-66
Bachelor 12 12
Master 6 7

School of Home Economics
Enrollment in the School increased substantially at all levels. There was a
24 percent increase in the number of bachelor's degrees and a 120 percent in-
crease in master's degrees conferred over the last biennium.
The University conferred the Distinguished Professorship for 1964-65 on
Dr. Betty Watts of the Department of Food and Nutrition.
Faculty research studies were concerned with the weathering of textiles,
child development, problems of low-income families, the aged and family man-
agement, the variation of dietary components, and control of changes in proc-
essed foods.
Major grants were received from the U.S. Office of Education, USPHS, and
from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Degrees 1964-65 1965-66
Bachelor 103 125
Master 5 20
Doctorate 9 9

The Library School
The on-campus program of the Library School increased steadily during the
biennium. The faculty has pioneered in archives education and in library history
during the last two years, and has continued to strengthen established programs
in information science, special libraries, secondary school libraries, public libra-
ries, and academic libraries. Members of the faculty published several books
and more than 20 professional articles in recognized journals.
Several research grants and instructional grants were received during 1964-
65. The Materials Center acquired 13,000 volumes in 1965-66 alone, bringing
total holdings to more than 31,000 volumes.
A record number of master's degrees was awarded during the period.

Degrees 1964-65 1965-66
Master 53 82

School of Music
The number of majors increased 23.5 percent over the last biennial period.
There were 529 music majors in 1964 and 558 in 1965. Steps taken to improve
the music curriculum included establishment of a complete graduate study pro-
gram in music, including Ph.D., Ed.D., and Doctor of Music degrees.









72 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

Significant research and service projects carried out included the Summer
Music Camp, complete review of music curricula, performances by the State
Symphony Orchestra of Florida and the State Opera of Florida, the second and
third annual Conducting Symposia, and the Junior High School Choral Clinic.
Individual research and creative work by faculty members included the com-
position of an opera, an operetta, other original music works, a number of re-
search articles, and a college textbook.

Degrees 1964-65 1965-66
Bachelor 56 72
Master 20 34
Doctorate 9 12

School of Nursing
With an annual enrollment approaching 300, the School of Nursing con-
tinues to lead the 11 professional nursing schools in Southern universities in
enrollment.
The most significant changes in the instructional program were an expanded
use of programed instruction, the preparation and use of approximately 30 tele-
vision tapes on basic nursing procedures, and the relocation of the maternal-
child instructional center from Miami to Tallahassee.
In addition to standing grants under Public Law 911, the School was
awarded a new grant for preparation of public health nurses.
Many special services to the state and region were performed by faculty
members who served as officers and committee members in professional associa-
tions or as consultants to various agencies.

Degrees 1964-65 1965-66
Bachelor 56 64

School of Social Welfare
The rate of increase in enrollment in the School of Social Welfare con-
tinued to be higher than the 16 per cent rate for the University as a whole.
Research completed during the biennium included published studies in de-
linquency, social work, criminology, conjoint therapy, child welfare, and retarded
children.
The School conducted institutes, workshops, off-campus courses, and corre-
spondence courses.
The School also inaugurated an honors program, and has increased its offer-
ings in marriage counseling in connection with the Interdivisional Doctoral Pro-
gram in Marriage and Family Living.

Degrees 1964-65 1965-66
Bachelor 173 200
Master 68 95
Doctorate 1 1

Continuing Education
Following the termination of the Florida Institute for Continuing University
Studies in 1964-65, the Office for Continuing Education was established. It is









THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY 73

responsible for off-campus credit courses in business, engineering science, teacher
education, and other vital credit programs; non-credit programs including short
courses, conferences, institutes, and workshops; community-service education pro-
grams, and programs operated under the School Services Center established to
help local public school systems. The Director of the Office was appointed in
1966 and staffing was begun.
Students enrolled in continuing education programs during the biennium
were:
1964-65 1965-66
Off-Campus Credit Courses 6,058 5,021
Non-Credit Programs 9,617 12,880
Civil Defense Offerings 1,460 1,295
Correspondence Courses for
Degree Credit 1,329 1,478

Student Affairs
The magnitude of this Division's task is reflected in the growth of the
student body, not only in numbers but also in the characteristics related to age
(junior college transfers), in academic ability (higher retention rates), and in
the degree of participation in University affairs (Student Government). Al-
though its staff increased at a much slower rate than did student enrollment,
the Division continued its services to students at the same or higher levels;
and, with the cooperation and influence of Student Government, made significant
steps toward real student involvement in the total educational process at the
University.
An increased capability in the areas of preventive medicine and diagnostic
services was instrumental in providing a more effective health service for stu-
dents during the biennium. Although out-patient visits increased in proportion to
enrollments, admissions to the hospital increased by only eight percent and the
average stay dropped by 15 percent.
Over $2,500,000 in direct financial aid was made available to students during
the biennium. More than 2,500 applications for scholarship aid were filed
and over $750,000 in scholarship aid was granted from institutionally ad-
ministered programs and those sponsored by outside organizations.
The Counseling Center more than doubled its average monthly case load
during the biennium and now serves nearly 300 students a month.
The Placement Office added over 2,500 sets of credentials to its files and
mailed out over 5,000 in response to requests from students and alumni. Indi-
vidual interviews with students numbered almost 6,000 during 1965-66. A major
organizational change has consolidated the Educational Placement Office and
the Central Placement Office. Coincidentally, a pilot study in Computer Aug-
mented Placement Services was begun and is attracting national interest.
In November, 1964, a major physical addition was realized with the opening
of the University Union, which quickly became the center for extracurricular
activities on campus with its educational, social, and cultural programs for the
entire University community. Supported entirely from student fees and income
generated by the activities it sponsors, students actively participate in its di-
rection and are involved in every detail of its operation.


I









74 BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

University Relations
The Office of Information Services (formerly Public Relations) and the
News Bureau continued to enlist public understanding of the University's pro-
grams and policies by interpreting them through various media. Increased efforts
with representatives of national media resulted in a number of favorable reports
on the University by national magazines and metropolitan newspapers.
The Office of Publications supervised the printing of eight scholarly books
by members of the faculty. In addition to supervising all phases of printing and
official publications for the University, the Office produced a new General Informa-
tion Bulletin for prospective students and their parents.
The Photographic Laboratory provided central photographic services for the
University with approximately 60 percent of the work directly related to in-
struction and research. By necessity, color photography was introduced.
WFSU-TV scheduled an average of 60 hours a week with weekday daytime
hours devoted entirely to in-school lessons for the University as well as junior
colleges and county schools. The station received recognition from the Alcoholic
Rehabilitation Center for the best program series of 1965, entitled "The Fourth
Problem." The film production unit of WFSU-TV was utilized extensively to
provide necessary footage for various University and state-wide programs.
WFSU-FM continued to provide quality programming in the areas of music,
drama, current affairs and lectures by members of the faculty and visitors to the
campus. The station, in 1965, was awarded a certificate of merit by the Arm-
strong Memorial Research Foundation for a two-hour music documentary on
Ernst von Dohnanyi.
The Educational Media Center (formerly the Audio-Visual Center) con-
tinued to upgrade the most complete collection of films in the Southeast, adding
500 new titles at no cost to the University. Revenues from film rentals increased
40 percent.

Development and Alumni Affairs
The Office of University Development continued to implement new private
support programs which were practically non-existent at the outset of the
biennium. Organized support by faculty, staff and student body was begun.
Approximately $3 million in bequests were recorded and a $1 million gift-
annuity was received. Other gifts of consequence were acknowledged, including
books for the Library and the College of Law, recordings, paintings, and original
manuscripts.
Activity in the Office of Alumni Affairs has grown fourfold. Transfer of
records to data processing was basically completed. Thirty clubs in as many com-
munities are now active. The Office now serves 37,412 alumni of the University.

Business Affairs
Major developments included the Maintenance Department's increased
occupation with new buildings and operations--amounting to $2,299,000 in total
gross receipts for the two-year period--and its increased attention to new con-
struction totaling $31,219,042. (See tabulation elsewhere in this report.)
Expansion of facilities added 159,000 square feet of area to facilities cleaned
and maintained by the Building Services Department. The total is now 1,400,000
square feet.









THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY 75

The Purchasing Department's load continued to increase about 15 percent
each biennium, and the Supply Store has made a transition to IBM card inventory
through which it now controls its orders. In the Property Records Department,
separate inventories of property furnished by the federal government on contracts
and grants, and frequent reports on those inventories to governmental agencies
have greatly increased the responsibilities. Some 18,500 new items valued at
$3,260,000 were added to the property record cards, bringing the total to 135,000
items valued at $15,108,000.
The Campus Security Department handled 3,308 complaints, an increase of
36 percent over the previous two-year period. Ambulance calls increased 30 per-
cent to 1,799. In a few cases, fast and skilled action by trained officers was
directly responsible for saving lives.
New machines in the Letter Service Department greatly increased its effi-
ciency; and facilities in the Addressograph Service were greatly improved by
a gift of additional equipment from the Tallahassee Bank and Trust Company.
Remodeling and construction of the University Union resulted in relocation of
the Post Office and the addition of 3,600 student mailboxes. Mail processed was
over 13 million pieces, with total cash receipts of $517,000. Relocation of the Uni-
versity Bookstores in areas vacated by the Post Office and created by the Union
resulted in a major increase in total sales of $1,080,000 for 1964-65 and $1,392,000
for 1965-66.
A new cafeteria in the Union began operation in 1964, resulting in a total
increase in food service sales of 33 percent and gross sales for the biennium
amounting to $2,756,000. Rent and depreciation receipts from Food Services for
the two years were $48,411 for 1964-65, and $88,821 for 1965-66.
A linen rental service was begun in 1964-65 to compensate for the loss of
student laundry fees with the result that the Laundry showed a profit in the
second year of the biennium. Similarly, operation of the Dairy Farm has con-
tinued on a successful basis at a per-bottle-of-milk cost far below that of com-
mercial market prices.
Maximum utilization of equipment and personnel in the Duplication Depart-
ment was approached during the biennium, resulting in a 20 percent increase in
sales.


UNIVERSITY EXPENDITURES
Educational and General Contracts and Grants
1964-65 $15,964,158 $ 5,606,153
1965-66 18,037,932 6,845,147
Total $34,002,090 $12,451,300











SOURCE OF FUNDS

State State
Building Appropriations Bond Program FSU Federal Grants Total Cost


Men's Dormitory ............. .........
University Union.................--......-
Physics Unit I--..-.........-...-...
Psychology Research.---..-..-.-...----
Married Student Housing and
High Rise Apt ----------------..
Nuclear Research Addition...........-
Antarctic Core Storage....-...........----


Library Addition......----....-- -----
Chemistry Unit I ..- -------
Infirmary--......--..--- .------- ...
Social Science .----. .....---...........
Biological Sciences ........-. .....


Fine Arts--.---..--..---------------
Engineering Science -......-.. ..........
Chemistry Unit II...--................-
Oceanographic Coastal
Facilities-.....-.-- ----......


Buildings completed during the 1964-66 biennium:
$700,000 $ $
2,402,000
1,874,000
699,972


5,800


$


263,475
39,716
4,516


Buildings under construction as of July 1, 1966
S$ $ 1,490,000 $ $
2,750,000
250,000 298,500
2,470,000
1,300,000
Buildings funded and to be under construction by July 1, 1967
- $ $ 1,987,000 $ $
997,000
1,155,000

230,000


Total........--- -................ $700,000 $17,610,772


1,814,000*


525,028

3,748,000*
244,700
230,600


523,513
1,584,529
476,000
880,000
662,127


313,000**
400,666
550,000

349,900


$606,207 $12,302,063


*Loans
**Application Pending


$ 2,514,000
2,402,000
1,874,000
1,225,000

4,011,475
290,216
235,116


$ 2,013,513
4,334,529
1,024,500
3,350,000
1,962,127


$ 2,300,000
1,397,666
1,705,000

579,900

$31,219,042


--
-














Exhibit A


THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


Florida State University
Fund Balance Sheet
June 30, 1965


CURRENT FUNDS: ASSETS
General:
Cash ....._...... ...............___..._.. _. $
Advance to Revolving Fund ..--..........-.-
Advance to Research Development Fund....
Due from Contracts and Grants-
Overhead.....------- --- ..
Restricted:
C ash....................................... ......-
Unreimbursed expenditures for Various
University Activities ..................-..--...
Due from Vendors-............. -----....
Due from Grantors.-......---.---------...-..
Due from Contracting Agencies -...........
Investments (A-)..--..............---------
Advances of Petty Cash to Various
University Activities- --.-.. --... __
Accumulated Revolving Fund Shortage..


Auxiliary:
Cash (A-3, A-4)........... .........-..... ..-
Accounts Receivable (A-3) ..........................
Jobs in Process (A-3) .....-...............-----
Merchandise Inventory (A-3) .......... ...
Materials and Supplies Inventory (A-3) ....
Miscellaneous Current Assets (A-3) ......
Accountable Equipment (A-3, A-4) ....----
Less Accumulated Depreciation.....__
Investments-Securities (A-l, A-3, A-4) ....
Investments-Property (A-3)......-......
Advances to Other Funds (A-3)..............
Advances to Other Departments (A-3) .....
Miscellaneous Other Assets (A-3) ---......
Scholarship:
Cash....... --------.. -----
Deposit with United Student Aid Fund
(B-3) ...... ... .........-- ..... ....._.... .
Investments (A-l, B-3) -......---.....


$ 2,671,426.82
1,267,737.74


Total Current Funds ___......- ._..........__ ... ... ....


LOAN FUNDS:
Cash ......-- ---..-..- .-----.-_- .
Deposit with United Student Aid Fund (B-5)
Loans Receivable (B-5)................
Investments (A-l, B-5)_..
Total Loan Funds........ __.__ ___
ENDOWMENT FUNDS:
Investments (A-l, B-4).... -......._. __


Tctal Endowment Funds............ ....~. .......... ..- $ 73,206.89


PLANT FUNDS:
Unexpended Plant Funds:
Building and Equipment Funds:
Cash.... .......-..-.. ....------
Investments (A-l, A-6)..... ......


$12,512,120.00
659,763.77


Revenue Certificate Repair and
Replacement Funds:
Cash ........-............ .............. $ 21,979.75
Investments (A-l, A-7)-....--.... ..-- ... 336,443.73


Revenue Certificate Operating
Reserve Funds:
Cash...._...... .........._.. .__..
Advance to Loan Funds (B-5)....-_
Investment (A-l)---_____.---


$ 10,170.44
37,750.00
24,460.25


72,380.69 $13,602,687.94


$ 41,699.53
75,000.00
100,000.00
312,837.40

$ 850,635.07
115,353.28
100.05
2,867,610.12
347,108.22
252,363.96
27,738.11
52.15


$ 495,881.19
175,199.37
89,688.01
550,854.42
44,099.56
8,468.73
1,403,689.08
740,962.10
41,692.12
104,090.00
114,751.29
1,027.12

$ 83,347.12
1,000.00
69,973.73


$ 529,536.93


4,460,96 6


3,770,402.99


154,320.85

S 8,915,221.73






$ 2,119,840.93


$ (10,347.31)
6,100.00 -
1,979,664.38
144,423.86


$...... 73,206..89
$ 73,206.89


$13,171,883.77



358,423.48










BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66


Florida State University
Fund Balance Sheet
June 30, 1965


Revenue Certificate Retirement Funds:
Cash .....................---------------------------................................
Investment (A-l, A-8)---..--........-----------.................--
Invested in Plant:
Land (A-5).-.........-....-..-- ........------------
Buildings (A-5)....._......................... .
Building Improvements (A-5)..................
Other Structures & Improvements (A-5)._
Accountable Equipment (A-5)...............
Books (A-5) ----.....-... ......................---

Less, Plant Assets Shown Elseawhere on
this Exhibit:
Auxiliary Investments in Property...._
Auxiliary Accountable Equipment -......_
Agency Investments in Property.-_.......


$ 628,275.94
51,132,383.58
1,649,550.81
3,705,290.21
13,718,710.30
4,383,101.97


$ 41,696.12
2,671,426.82
69,251.76


Total Plant Funds ..................................... ----------- ..........................


AGENCY FUNDS:
Cash-...--------...--------- .................-----
Investments (A-l, B-6).......-. -...- ..........
Investment in Plant Assets -.......................
Advance to Revolving Fund ..................... _
Advance to Loan Funds (B-5)..........--- ...........
Total Agency Funds..............................


TOTAL ALL FUNDS..................________ .. _____


LIAB~ILITIES AND) FUTND BAL SC.


CURRENT FUNDS:
General:
Incidental ...-...-- ------- --.....
Extension Incidental..---...--.....-......_

Restricted:
Liabilities:
Research Contracts and Grants:
Due to General Current Funds:
Contract and Grant Overhead_..._
Advance from Incidental ..........__
Non-Research Contracts and Grants:
Due to General Current Funds:
Contract and Grant Overhead ...._
Revolving Fund:
Due to Incidental Fund...........
Due to Agency Fund.........-...___
Funds Transferred in fcr "Stale"
Checks written in Various Funds
and not yet cleared ........-.
Reserves:
For Contract and Grant Commitments:
Research........................ ...-.
Non-Research ------- _.
Fund Balances:
Westcott Estate...
Seminary Interest..... ..
Fire Repls cement .......__........____.
Audio Visual-Trust....-__
Auxiliary:
Liabilities:
Due to Revolving Fund (A-3)......
Accounts Payable (A-3).......
Accrued Vacation and Sick Leave (A-3)..
Accrued Payroll (A-3).__
Taxes Payable (A-3)........__ _


S 303,315.42
100,000.00

9,521.98
75,000.00
125,000.00

955.94


$ 2,076,079.77
1,721,913.38

$ 41,790.56
1,578.46
1,389.74
4,415.71


ASSETS


$ 83,125.98
933,644.24


Exhibit A


1,016,770.22


72,434,938.11
$87,054,396.27


$75,217,312.81




2,782,374.70


$ 48,184.26
720,874.24
69,251.76
125,000.00
55,460.30


$ 1,018,770.56

$99,181,436.38


$ 512,465.92
17,071.01


$ 529,536.93


4,460,960.96


S 613,793.34



3,797,993.15




49,174.47


250.00
257,979.28
10,995.43
5,908.93
2,386.42


LIABLITIS AN FUD RA.AN .












THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


Florida State University
Fund Balance Sheet
June 30, 1965


Deferred Credits to Income (A-3).-..-......... $ 114,735.19
Advances from Other Departments (A-3) 114,751.29
Fund Balances:
Accrual Basis Auxiliaries (A-3).............. $ 2,570,613.84
Cash Basis Auxilaries (A-4) ......-...._-__ 692,782.61
Scholarship:
Fund Balances.................._...----.. --..--

Total Current Funds ..........._._-.._.....................-.-..---- ..-
LOAN FUNDS:
Liabilities:
Due to Auxiliary Funds (B-5) ......---------------. 84,090.00
Due to Revenue Certificate Operating
Reserve Funds (B-5) ............................... 37,750.00
Due to Agency Funds (B-5)........................ 55,460.30


Fund Balances.....................-.. ........
Total Loan Funds......... .................. ................................
ENDOWMENT FUNDS:
Fund Balances ........................................


507,006.54


3,263,396.45

$ 154,320.85


$ 3,770,402.99


154,320.85
.-- .......-..- ..... 8,915,221.73





$ 177,300.30
1,942,540.63
.-.- .-.S.......... 2,119,840.93

S 73,206.89


Total Endowment Funds...--.............................................


PLANT FUNDS:
Unexpended Plant Funds:
Building and Equipment Funds:
Fund Balances (A-6)-................................
Revenue Certificate Repair and Replacement
Funds:
Fund Balances (A-7) --............................
Revenue Certificate Operating
Reserve Funds:
Fund Balances.............-- -.. -......
Revenue Certificate Retirement Funds:
Fund Balances (A-8).......-.... ...-- .-----..
Invested in Plant:..........- --..... ..-..- .....
Liabilities:
Revenue Certificates Outstanding (A-2)
Stadium Loan Payable .-....---.-.. ......-
Invested from State Appropriations,
Revenue Certificates, and Other Sources..


$14,824,000.00
525,575.68


Total Plant Funds --..... .. .....................
AGENCY FUNDS:
Fund Balances (B-6)... ......
Total Agency Funds ............ ..... ..................... .........


...... ...-........-........ ...................... 899,181,436.38


Exhibit A


$13,171,883.77

358,423.48

72,380.69





$15,349,575.68

57,085,362.43


$ 1,018,770.56
$ 1,018,770.56


$ 73,206.89


$13,602,687.94

1,016,770.22





72,434,938.11
$87,054,396.27



$ 1,018,770.56


---^


TOTAL ALL FUNDS_












BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

Florida State University
Fund Balance Sheet
June 30, 1966


CURRENT FUNDS: A
General:
Cash...............
Unexpended Appropriations ......-----
Advance to Revolving Fund..............-..
Advance to Research Development Fund......
Due from Contracts and Grants-Overhead ......
Restricted:
Cash ............. ...---------------.--
Unreimbursed Expenditures for Various
University Activities..--..-...............-----
Due from Vendors--.......................... --
Due from Grantors.....-............-..----
Due from Contracting Agencies- ..---.--
Investments (A-l)........................-- ----
Advances of Petty Cash to Various
University Activities -----.. ------.--
Accumulated Revolving Fund Shortage...__

Auxiliary:
Cash (A-3, A-4)-............--.------- ..-- -.-
Accounts Receivable (A-3) --. -.. --...-......
Jobs in Process (A-3).--................----..--
Merchandise Inventory (A-3) .............. -.
Materials and Supplies Inventory (A-3) -.
Miscellaneous Current Assets (A-3)--.....
Rental Linen Inventory (A-3)-......--.....-.----
Less: Accumulated Depreciation (A-3)................
Accountable Equipment (A-3, A-4) .....
Less: Accumulated Depreciation (A-3, A-4) -..
Investments-Government Securities
(A-3, A-4)-..... ................................-- -
Investments-Property (A-3)..........-............
Advances to Other Funds (A-3)--...... .........
Advances to Other Departments (A-3) ....--
Miscellaneous Other Assets (A-3) ............--
Scholarship:
Cash---...- ..-..-----......- ------------
Deposit with United Student Aid Fund (B-3)
Investments (A-l, B-3) ~....------...... --...----
Total Current Funds--............---- .................... ..
LOAN FUNDS:
Cash...... ................ -- .......
Deposit with United Student Aid Fund (B-5)
Loans Receivable (B-5).........- ..... -. .. ..
Investments (A-,1 B-5)-....... ----.....--. --_-..
Total Loan Funds..................-....--........
ENDOWMENT FUNDS:
Cash--..--.........---...............................----------------.....-...............
Investments (A-l, B-4)-..------------.............--.......------
Total Endowment Funds ..-.............- --...
PLANT FUNDS:
Unexpended Plant Funds:
Building and Equipment Funds:
Cash---.................--- ----......... .. ---- -
Revenue Certificate Repair and
Replacement Funds:
Cash......---....--------..................------------.........
Investments (A-l, A-7)1
Revenue Certificate Revenue Funds and
Operating Reserve Funds:
Cash---..........-------..---.--
Advance to Loan Funds (B-5).S--.--


ASSETS


$ 31,255.26
5,893.57
$ 3,063,695.88
1,511,834.50


* 39,768.95
365,121.21


$ 130,941.88
357,348.15
75,000.00
100,000.00
246,735.41

$ 305,823.81
82,477.72
101.05
5,068,316.79
584,399.92
39,667.13
29,863.11
61.29


$ 1,092,010.31
325,422.78
890.83
532,190.31
40,032.03
4,504.17
25,361.69

1,551,861.38

644,811.77
74,122.71
104,090.00
107,419.88
255.00

$ 85,230.37
1,000.00
41,821.82



$ 119,574.97
8,100.00
2,351,539.74
138,639.24



$ 30,387.50
38,991.26





$ 15,472,685.19


404,890.16


$ 533.99
88,143.00 88,676.99


Exhibit A


910,025.44


$ 6,110,710.82


4,502,972.86



$ 128,052.19
$ 11,651,761.31






$ 2,617,853.95




$ 69,378.76


$ 15,966,252.34











THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

Florida State University
Fund Balance Sheet
June 30, 1966


Revenue Certificate Retirement Funds:
Cash-..... --.. --------.......- -
Investments (A-l, A-8) ........... ..---------------
Invested in Plant:
Land (A-5) -........ -------...... --... -
Buildings (A-5) ...... ------------------
Building Improvements (A-5) ................-
Other Structures and Improvements (A-5) .....
Accountable Equipment (A-5) ..-....--. --... ..---
Books (A-5)----......................... --------
Less, Plant Assets Shown Elsewhere on
this Exhibit:
Auxiliary Investments in Property (A-3) .....
Auxiliary Accountable Equipment
(A-3, A-4) -................-----------
Total Plant Funds.............-----......--------.......
AGENCY FUNDS:
Cash......... -.................- ----------
Investments (A-l, B-6) .. --------------..
Advance to Revolving Funds ............ ...........
Advance to Loan Funds (B-5)..............----------
Total Agency Funds.- --....-....--.- ---.. ....---
TOTAL ALL FUNDS.......... ... ..............- ...- ..


$ 298,850.65
1,016,478.61


$ 720,667.34
55,841,688.19
1,974,263.17
3,496,266.71
15,432,711.82
4,973,874.56


$ 82,439,471.79


$ 74,122.71
3,063,695.88 $ 3,137,818.59


$ 118,069.61
263,997.42
125,000.00
55,460.30


LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES


CURRENT FUNDS:
General:
State Appropriations-Educational and
General. -- ---------...... ...-....
Incidental --...... -- -. -- ------
Extension Incidental ...........--............

Restricted:
Liabilities:
Research Contracts and Grants:
Due to General Current Funds:
Contracts and Grant Overhead ..----...
Advance from Incidental -.........-. .--
Non-Research Contracts and Grants:
Due to General Current Funds:
Contract and Grant Overhead ....-----
Revolving Fund:
Due to Incidental Fund .......... .-----
Due to Agency Fund ------
Funds Transfered in for "Stale"
Checks Written in Various Funds
and Not Yet Cleared ...- ------.. ....--


$ 357,348.15
468,968.88
83,708.41


$ 910,025.44


225,036.87
100,000.00

21,698.54

75,000.00
125,000.00


1,345.80


Reserves:
For Contract and Grant Commitments:
Research. --- ... ...-------- $ 2,488,115.98
Non Research.-..................... 3,015,702.19


Fund Balances:
Westcott Estate ..-....... ....---------
Seminary Interest.-.-.......... .......-- ..-
Fire Replacement-.._................----- --
Audio Visual-Trust ..... ...............

Auxiliary:
Liabilities:
Due to Revolving Fund (A-3) --------...-.. $
Accounts Payable (A-3) ..........------------
Room Deposits (A-3)-........--.........._...
Accrued Vacation and Sick Leave (A-3) .......
Accrued Payroll (A-3) ..........------------


$ 30,393.14
1,702.36
5,086.74
21,629.20


$ 548,081.21



5,503,818.17




58,811.44 $ 6,110,710.82


1,000.00
249,197.59
252,977.00
12,347.62
8,676.65


Exhibit A


$ 1,315,329.26


$ 79,301,653.20

$ 96,583,234.80






$ 562,527.33
$111,484,756.15











BIENNIAL REPORT, 1964-66

Florida State University
Fund Balance Sheet
June 30, 1966


Taxes Payable (A-3).................._.._. ........_ $ 2,180.60
Deferred Credits to Income (A-3) ....... 746,682.91
Advances from Other Departments (A-3)...... 107,419.88


Fund Balances:
Accrual Basis Auxiliaries (A-3).-....- ........
Cash Basis Auxiliaries (A-4)-___

Scholarship:
Fund Balances............_- ..__... ...

Total Current Funds......_......__-_...._ ....
LOAN FUNDS:
Liabilities:
Due to Auxiliary Funds (B-5)..........................
Due to Revenue Certificate Operating
Reserve Fund (B-5) ....- --..... ..............
Due to Agency Funds ......-._............... ....
Fund Balances........... .._....__....
Total Loan Funds.................. ___ ...
ENDOWMENT FUNDS:
Fund Balances-.............._--.._... .._ .
Total Endowment Funds.....-.....-....__........
PLANT FUNDS:
Unexpended Plant Funds:
Building and Equipment Funds:
Fund Balances (A-6) .. ....-...... ............
Revenue Certificate Repair and
Replacement Funds:
Fund Balances (A-7) ...........-............-.......-.....
Revenue Certificate Revenue Funds and
Operating Reserve Funds:
Fund Balances.....---..._ .._ ......
Revenue Certificate Retirement Funds:
Fund Balances (A-8) ..........-.....
Invested in Plant:
Liabilities:
Revenue Certificates Outstanding (A-2).___...
Stadium Loan Payable-..........____
Invested from State Appropriations,
Revenue Certificates, and Other Sources__

Total Plant Funds..--..-.. _
AGENCY FUNDS:
Liabilities:
Due to Student Depositors.-___
Fund Balances ..-.....
Total Agency Funds-..........--
TOTAL ALL FUNDS ....... ....


$ 2,811,051.79
311,438.82








$ 84,090.00
88,143.00
55,460.30


$ 1,380,482.25



3,122,490.61 $ 4,502,972.86


$ 128,052.19







$ 227,693.30
2,390,160.65



$ 69,378.76





$ 15,472,685.19

404,890.16

88,676.99


$ 14,702,200.00
512,520.00 $ 15,214,720.00

$ 64,086,933.20





$ 117,963.33
444,564.00


$ 128,052.19
$ 11,651,761.31








$ 2,617,853.95



$ 69,378.76


$ 15,966,252.34

1,315,329.26


$ 79,301,653.20
$ 96,583,234.80





S 562,527.33
$111,484,756.15


Exhibit A










SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS
For the Year Ended June 30, 1965


EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL



Total Incidental And Auxiliary Scholarship Endowment Loan Agency
Educational And General Extension Contracts Funds Funds Funds Funds Funds
General Revenue Incidental And Grants Other (B-2, 7) (B-3) (B-4) (B-5) (B-6)


Fund Balances 7-1-64----.........-....--............-...............
Reporting Adjustments- ..........-.... ....................- ---...........
Adjustments Applicable to Prior Periods............................... ..
Released State Appropriation (1963-64) Expired...............-...........

Adjusted Fund Balances 7-1-64 ......... ..............- -...........-- ..........

REVENUES 1964-65
State Appropriations-Educational and General..................... ...........
Incidental:
Matriculation-...........- --- ---.................
Out-of-State Tuition.................................--......
Music Fees- ........ ..........--- ..........---- ..-...........
Application Fees ...---...-............ ----.... .. ...... .........
Library Fines........ ..... ....................................
Transcripts........-..-......------------.......-- ... ------- ------
Child Development Fees. .....- .............. ...... ....... ... ... ....
Photographic Fees-........ ..... ..... .. ...................... .....
Test Service Fees-..-.... .----....------ -------..----------.---
Sale of Scrap-. ................................ --
Overhead Earned-Research Contracts and Grants.............. ..............
Overhead Earned-Non-Research Contracts and Grants.................- ...
Miscellaneous Departmental Revenue................................ ...........----
Miscellaneous Non-Departmental Revenue..... -....... .--- ........---..
Bootstrap Fees, Short Courses and Institutes...................................
Research Contracts and Grants Received-....- ............. ............
Non-Research Contracts and Grants Recd.........-..-......-..-.............
Endowment Income .--.-------------------..... .....---..------..--
Fire Replacement Fund-Insurance Proceeds................... -...-..-..........
Audio Visual-Rental and Sales.... ..................................
Sales and Services...---...-----------------------------.------- --
Rentals_-.......... ............... ---- -- -.------
Interest Earned.-........-.........-..-.....-......-.............
New Loan Funds Received. -...... ...... .................................
New Endowments Received .. ...------------ ------..........-.........
Other Student Fees --.....- --- -----------.........-- ------ -----
Deposits Received.--...... -- -....-..---..........----- ----......-- ---
Scholarships Received---.--.-..-....--------.. --------........---- ---.--------..
Other Revenues --..- .-----. .......-------------------------.....- ---

Total Revenues..... -- .... .. ... .... .................. .....--

EXPENDITURES 1964-65
General Administration, Student Administration & General Expense (B-l)..----
Instruction (B-l) --......-- -- -......... ........ .......... ............
Organized Research (B-l)................ -. .......-...... ..........
Non-Research Contracts & Grants (B-l) ---- -...... ...----.....-----......
Extension (B-l)-........---- ...........-.....-.. .......
Library (B-1)...-..........-........ ..-..... ---...... ....-...
Division of Plant & Grounds (B-l)...--......------.--...... -----...- ....
Activities Related to Instruction (B-l) --........ ----......................
Purchase of Audio Visual Equipment (B-l)....... .......-- .....--. .... ...... .......
Repairs to Fire Damage (B-l).-... ---......................----....
Cost of Auxilary Sales .- --.-... .....-------------.-----
Auxilary Operating Expenses ........ ......-- .............-..............
Auxilary Debt Service........................... ...............


$ 4,852,241.92

(309.23)
(5,752.48)


$ 132,081.03


(5,752.48)


$ 601,734.30
----------------------------


$ 4,081,545.84

(309.23)


$ 36,880.75


$ 868,850.83
2,436,478.30


$ 406,310.43
(256,604.96)


68,206.89


$ 1,733,109.55
............................


Plant
Funds
(A-6, 7, 8)


962,957.53 $21,372,228.10
(86,436.10) 94,806.73


$ 4,846,180.21 $ 126,328.55 $ 601,734.30 $ 4,081,236.61 $ 36,880.75 $ 3,305,329.13 $ 149,705.47 $ 68,206.89 $ 1,733,109.55 $ 876,521.43 $21,467,034.83


$12,342,642.00 $12,342,642.00 $ ......................... $.......................... $- ................- .....- ... $.......................- $.................. ....... $-....................--.---- $ ......................... $ --..- ..................... $ (6,000.00)

536,809. 706 5 -..-....-...7...........0 536,7809.06
536,809.06 ---------- 4 8 8 92 --------------- --------------- --------------- --------------- -------------- ------- ------ ------------------------536,809.06-----------
64,818.92 ....................... 64,818.92 .............. ......................... ..................... ....... ................... .... ... .......................... .... ............ ..........64,818...............92
121,082. 16 ...-1..-21.......-...... 121, 082. 16 .. ..... ......
11,393.25 .... -................. .... 11,393.25 .......... ... ...............
6,930.34 ........------.... ... ...- 6,930.34 ... ................. ............. ....... ..... ...... .. ............34.......................
9 ,633. 20 -...--.- ..... ....- ... ....- 9 ,633 .20 .. ....... .... ............. .. ....-.-- ..- - .. ... ......................... --......-.....-.-.. ...... .-- ...........................-.- ..........- ...-- -..... .- ........................... ............................
9,633.20 ................. ..... 5,731.00 ............................ ............................ ... .... ...... ........................ ...........................20
5,731.00 95 ....-....................... ,5 6.95 .... .... ...................~.. .-. ---..... ......5,731...00
4,586.95 ........-.....-- ...- 4,586.930 5......- .....5. ... ... .... ......5. .. ............................5.... ...- .. .
546.30 ......... 546.30
504, 658. 95 (504,658.95)
.......................----.-.---.----.............. 5 ,68,223 .92 (68,223 .925 ) .. ............. .... -.... .. .. .... -..... ......................... .- ...........-- ......-- --...-.-.....- ............ .- ........................... -............................
3,387.97 .........-..... .......... .3,387.97 ---- ........................... ... ......------ -..-. -- --- ..........
3,171.69 ...-..--......... ...... 3,171.69 .
518,191.04 ................. 518,191.04
3,508,044. 53 ..........................---..............3,508,044.53 .......... -- .............508,. ... ................04 53.............
2,411,897.03 ........................------------- 2,411,89!7.03 --------- ..... ....... ........... .---------------------------- -..- ..-......--------- .-834, 782.00
39,272.94 ........................ ........ . .. ... .. .......... 39,272.94- ............................ -2,490.30 ..........
3,454. 98 .- ----------------- -------..... ........ 3,454.98 ........................... -------------- ............ ................ --.. -... ------ .....3,454.98
66,084.76 ..- - --..-..........-.. 66 -- - --.-- - .. ..66,084. 76. .......... .. .............
.......... . . . ........... .......2,752,518.49 .......-.---.. .... ... ........ ... . ....- -..... .... .... 1,231,475.02
-....-.....-- ---........... ..-.......- .....-.-.......... .. .......... ...... .. .... 68 ,0 12 14 ...........................-.- .....- ........--- ---------- -- 15 --................
- - - - -- -0- -- -- -- ---68,012.14- - - - - - -
---- -----........... -................-....... . .. .. I. .... 2,490.30 16,647.22 ---.....-....-- ...... 715,384.84
--........................... -. .......- --........-.. .. ..... .. -- ----5 .00 370 ,084 .16 .............
.... ... ...5,000.00
..... ............ ..-- -............ .... ...... 2,356, 2.34 622. 34 .......................... .. --------------- ---------- ........ 213,636.21 ............
--- -- ---- - -- -- -- --- --- --..................... ... ....... ... - ....... . ---- ...-- ...- ...-- -- 1 72 3 ,3 5 9 11 58 0 3.
....--- .-- -...-.....- ... .-- ......-.. ..... .. 4,094.00 358,043.46 ......................
------ 603,831.55- .-.--.....- -..- ........... .... ...0.- ------------- 136,283.90 762,531.06


$21,378,350.87


$ 1,634,418.75
9,219,325.96
4,266,504.67
2,225,321.80
571,024.46
740,381.92
1,922,443.77
923,695.42
64,601.04
2,593.37
- - - - - . - - - - -. .
-------------------.--.-----


$12,342,642.00


$ 3,579,837.50


$ 1,634,418.75
9,190,001.41
885,673.32

571,024.46
740,381.92
1,922,443.77
923,695.42


$ 5.347,058.69


......................
$----------

3,380,831.35
2.225,321.80


$ 108,812.68


$........-..........--- -
29,324.55


64,601.04
2,593.37
- - - - - - - - -


$ 5,785,078.52


$--... ..-...........----
---..-----------------------


1,338,531.98
3,764,181.48
799,798.41


$ 360,533.76


$ 7,490.30


$ 386,731.38


$...............-- ....


$ 3,304,754.24


......-...---... ........


$ 2,306,697.90


.-------------..--










(2--------------02.4)
-- - -- -- -- -- -- - -


II _


-1 1 1-''-- - -


BOARD OF REGENTS


FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


EXHIBIT "B"







SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS
For the Year Ended June 30, 1965


EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL



Total Incidental Awnd A u.iliar/ Scholarship Endowment Loan A i,
Educational And General Extension C(ontracts Funds Funds Funds Funds Funds
General Revenue Incidental And Grants Other (B-2, 7) (B-3) (B-4) (B-5) (B-6)


Scholarship Awards...........................................................--- --- -----------------------------...------------- --------------................... .............. ....... $ -------------- ................ $ ...................... $...... $............... $ 233,916.49 $ 394,224.23 $ ..........................
Cost of Agency Operations --------------------------------------------------- ......------------------------------ ------- ............... .------------------------------------------------- --------------------------68
Refunds of DAg en y Operationsposits .-------- ------.....--.-..... -.... ..................... ............................ .. .......................... ....... ..... ----.............. ....- ---------- -- ....-- ................-----------------.. .......................... ............................ 1,321,134 .68
T ransfers of E ndow m ent Incom e-------------............................................................................... ..... .......................... .. ......................... .. .......................... .. .......................... .. ............................................. 2 490.30
Bond Principle Payments---...-------------------------------- ......._- ---
Bond Interest Payments---- ----------------
Repair and Replacement Expenditures -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- .-

Total Expenditures .-.....--------.--------------.........................................---- ....... $21,570,311.16 $12,297,481.18 $ 3,570,157.87 $ 5,606,153.15 $ 96,518.96 $ 6,136,428.36 $ 394,224.23 $ 2,490.30 $.......................... $ 2,976,377.41

Excess of Revenue Over Expenditures..........................................--------------------..... ($ 191,960.29) $ 45,160.82 $ 9,679.63 ($ 259,094.46) $ 12,293.72 ($ 351,349.84) ($ 33,690.47) $ 5,000.00 $ 386,731.38 $ 328,376.83


Fund Balance After 1964-65 Operations --------..................................... $ 4,654,219.92 171,489.37 $ 611.413.93 $ 3,822,142.15 $ 49,174.47 $ 2,953,979.29 $ 116,015.00 $ 73,206.89 $ 2.119,840.93 $ 1,204,898.26
Adjustments & Corrections-Prior Years 3--,5.-- .........-------------------------------------------------------- .- .- 33,516.74 --
Additions to Fixed Assets 7795.6(2------------ .- - --- ----------- ----- ----------- -377957.69----24------------- 110. 92)
Transfer to General Revenue--------------------------- ------------------------- ------------ ----------.......................................------ ---------........................---. (27,607.28) ---------------------------- (27,607.28)-------------
Transfers to and From Other Funds---- ......------------------------............................................. (106,026.00)-- .---------------.................... (81,877.00) (24,149.00) .) .....------------------ (74,449.99) 38,305.85 ----- ---- ----------- -- (162,016.78)
Released State Appropriation (1964-65) Expired..........-.............-------------------------------...................... (171,489.37) (171,489.37) ......---------------------------- -

Adjusted Fund Balance 6-30-65 ......... -- .- -- .......... ---------- $ 4,376,704.55 $--.....-- .. $ 529,536.93 $ 3.797.993.15 $ 19,171.47 $ 3.263,396. 15 $ 1541.320.85 $ 73,206.89 $ 2,119,810.93 $ 1,018,770.56


Plant
Funds
(A-6, 7, 8)


$......-................
............................
............................
............................
365,000.00
492,690.94
37,223.99

$ 641,312.52

$ 1,665,385.38


$23,132,420.21

(8,598,569.01)
----.-..----..--------------
85,606.96


$14,619,458.16


BOARD OF REGENTS


FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


EXHIBIT "B"








SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS
For the Year Ended June 30, 1966


EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL



Total Incidental And Auxiliary Scholarsiip Endowment Loan Aic ncy
Educational A nd General Extension C(ontracts Funds Funds Funds Funds Funds
General Revenue Incidental And Grants Other (B-2, 7) (B-3) (B-4) (B-5) (B-6)


Fund Balances 7-1-65 ..- ---........... .............--------------. ----
Reporting Adjustments .. .. --....... ---------- .. -
Adjustment Applicable to Prior Periods ..-.......... ..... ...... ....

Adjusted Fund Balances 7-1-65........... ...... ..... ...... .... ...... .......

REVENUES 1965-66
State Appropriations-Educational and General...........-........-- .. ......---
Incidental:
M atriculation.-.....- ........ ............... ................................... .............
Out-of-State Tuition..........................................................................
Music Fees--.............--.-- --.. -------.....----------- --.
Application Fees .... . ....-..- -..-- -------- -- --- ---
Library Fines ..... -..... --........ ..---
Transcripts..-- ..-.... .... ............ ........ ............ .....- .........-...--.
Child Development Fees ..................................... .----......-- ..
Photographic Fees ---....-.. . ...-.. ...- .... ...... .. ... ..- ---
Test Service Fees.--- -----............--- ....-- ---..------.---- --...-------
Sale of Scrap....... ..... ... .... .......... ...................... .... ...............
Overhead Earned-Research Contracts and Grants ............. .-..---...
Overhead Earned-Non-Research Contracts and Grants--.......... ---....---..--
Miscellaneous Departmental Revenue -..- -... -. .... ---------------
Miscellaneous Non-Departmental Revenue. .... .................................
Bootstrap Fees, Short Courses, and Institutes.................. .............
Research Contracts & Grants Received .............-....-..... --.
Non-Research Contracts & Grants Received ---...------ ........ ..... .-................ ---
Endowm ent Incom e............................... .. ......
Fire Replacement Fund-Insurance Proceeds ...-... --...... ....-..
Audio Visual- Rentals & Sales ........----------- .... ....- .. -- .--
Sales & Services .......-- .......- -- .......... ...... ........ ........ .....
R entals . .. .... ......... ......................................
Interest E arned...... ..... ... ............. ......- ... .......... ... ... ....... ..
New Loan Funds Received...... ........ ... . .
New Endowments Received. .... ......... ..... ..
Other Student Fees ........... ----------................---------- --.. -- -. --
Scholarships Received -.. ..... ..
Revenue Certificate Proceeds .. ..... .. .... ..... ........................
Other Revenues -- --- .. ------ -- ----- .........

Total Revenues ---..--... . . ..--------- ---- ------

EXPENDITURES 1965-66
General Administration, Student Administration, & General Expense (B-l)..........
Instruction (B -l) .- -........ .... ............
Organized Research (B-I) .--- ..... ..... ...........................
Non-Research Contracts & Grants (B-1)... .. ...... ......... ...........
Institutes and Conferences.... ....... ............. ..... ......--............
Extension (B-l)... -..... .
Library (B-1) ---........................ .....
Division of Plants & Grounds (B- ) ...................................
Activities Related to Instruction (B-1) -..... ..................
Purchase of Audio Visual Equipment (B-1) ............ .................. ..
Repairs to Fire Damage (B-l)........... ....................... ....
Cost of Auxiliary Sales.... --...................---.- -- .. ... ...
Auxiliary Operating Expenses .... -------------- ----- --. ----- .......
A auxiliary D ebt Service -.. ... .. ..-.... ... ......................... .... ......


$ 4,376,704.55

229.63


I ------..- -


$ 529,536.93


$ 3,797,993.15

229.63


49,174.47


$ 3,263,396.45

26,444.44


154,320.85
- - - - - - -


$ 73,206.89


$ 2,119,840.93

450.00


$ 1,018,770.56
(703,000.37)
55,460.30


Plant
Funds
(A-6, 7, 8)


$14,619,458.16
........37,"750.00
37,750.00


8 4,376,934.18 8.-.~..-. $ 529,536.93 $ 3,798,222.78 $ 49,174.47 $ :;,2s9,8-10.89 $ 154,320.85 $ 73,206.89 $ 2,120,290.93 $ 371,230.49 $14,657,208.16


$13,715,085.00

2,202,826.16
671,562.02
64,862.00
130,850.13
12,691.96
6,240.88
9,022.80
4,347.30
4,071.25
9,095.08


3,896.89
2,825.41
1,088,646.77
4,696,112.68
4,263,835.86
14,646.92
3,831.14
71,598.18



- .- -- -- ---. - --. .. . ..






$26,976.048.43


$ 1,725,437.87
10,005.315.92
4,796,298.64
2,767,557.15
229,958.02
1,093.620.52
1,145,024.29
2,147,224.53
918.123.77
54,384.69
134. 14


$13,715,085.00


2,202,826.16
671,562.02
64,862.00
130,850.13
12,691.96
6,240.88
9,022.80
4,347.30
4,071.25
9,095.08
708,614.31
94,249.21
3.896.89
2,825.41
1,088,646.77
-- --- ....... ....


(708,614.31)
(94,249.21)



4,696,112.68
4.263,835.86


$13,715,085.00 $ 5.013,802.17 $ 8.157.085.02


$ 1.725,437.87
9. 979, 395. 48
948,666.60


1,093,620.52
1,145,024.29
2,147,224.53
918,123.77


3.847.632.04
2.767,557.15
229,958.02


14,646.92
3,831.14
71,598.18


$ 90,076.24


-...--............--.-
25, 920. 44







54,384.69
134.14


$--......... ...


3,287,543.34
2,062,891.64


b l3;,i20 52


863,145.99

$ 7,057,201.49


1,694,727.11
4,117,676.58
758,178.13


$......................-


2,501.43








--366,032.60
366,032.60


(3,326.70)

2,000.00


..........................


22,394.57
475,168.45


8 368,534.03 ($ 1.326.70) $ 497,563.02


$-...-.....................


1,381,095.13




330,198.85


173,860.28

$ 1,885,154.26


----------------------------

















1,517,713.00






76,424.36




6.348,477.00
1,444,228.78

8 9,386,843.14


$- --------
- - - -. - - - - - - . . ..
............................




--------------------





..........................-
............................

............................
............................


----------------------------
-- ----------------
--------------- I ------------
--------------
.......... .................
- --------------- ---------


- ------------------~~~~~~~~~~
--------------------~~~~~~~~~~
------------------------------
- ---------------------------


BOARD OF REGENTS


FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


EXHIBIT "B"







SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS
For the Year Ended June 30, 1966

EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL



Total Incidental And A auxiliary Scholarship Endowment Loan Agency
Educational A md General Extension Contracts Funds Funds Funds Funds Funds
General Revenue Incidental A nd Grants otherr (B-2, 7) (B-3) (B-4) (B-5) (B-6)


Scholarship Awards ------.. ----- -.. ......... - ......... ... $ .............------.......--- $ ........ ...-. .. ........ $........................-...- $ 275,833.- 24 $ 396,846.4--5 $ -...-..-..-...... $....... .... .... $......................
Cost of Agency Operations .. ----..---..-... ------..--.---.. .. ... --.....---------........... --.......-...................... ....-... .. ....................... . ....................... ...--..--...... ......---..----------------.. 1, 506,907.68
Refunds of Deposits .. ---- ---..........--- ...-- .......- ............................. .............. 1 4.14,948.11 --- ---- .
Transfers of Endowment Income -- ---- .- .--..- ---2,501.43--------------- -----3 ---------- ----....-.. -.... --- .-. ..-.--------..
B o n d P r i n c i p le P a y m e n t s - -- - -- -- -- -- -- - .. --- --- --- - - -- -- -- -- -- --- - -- -- - -- - -- ---- -- -- -- -- -- --- -- --.. -. .. . ---- --- - -- - -- --- - -- - -- - --- --- - -- - --- - -- -- -- - I - --- -- -- - --- - -- - - -- -- -- -- -- - -- - -- - --- -- -- -- -- - -- - -. . .. ..-- -- - --- -- --- - -- - -- --
B o n d I n te re s t P a y m e n ts ... ......... ... - ---- -- --- -- - -- --- ---- -. ---- ------ --- -- -- ---- . ...... -- -- ..-- -. -.--- -.- ---. -- -- -- -- -- -- --- --- - - - -. ------ .. .. .. .. .. . ------ ---- --- ---- ---- ----- ------- -- -- ---- ----.--- - -- - -- .---.-.--. . ...-.--.. . .. . . .. . .... .. . .. . .
R repair and R eplacem ent E expenditures -- ---...... -....... ................................... ........ ........... .... .... . ... ...... .................... ... ................ ...................

Total Expenditures...... ---- --------------...... $24, 883, 079.54 $13,357,602.85 $ 4,599,890.21 $ 6,845,147.21 $ 80,439.27 $ 6,846,415.06 $ 396,846.45 $ 2,501.43 $ $ 1,521,85579

Excess of Revenue over Expenditures....-------..... .. -----$ 2,092,968.89 $ 357,482.15 $ 413,911.96 $ 1,311,937.81 $ 9,636.97 $ 210,786.43 ($ 28,312.42) ($ 3,828.13) $ 497,563.02 $ 363,298.47

Fund Balance After 1965-66 Operations ..-------...........--.....-- $ 6,469,903.07 $ 357,482.15 $ 943,448.89 $ 5,110,160.59 $ 58,811.44 $ 3,500,627.32 $ 126,008.43 $ 69,378.76 $ 2,617,853.95 $ 734,52896

Adjustm ents and Corrections- Prior Y ears ---.. ... ....... --. .. .... .... .... ..... .. .. -.-- -- ............... ........ ...(50, - .......583 .. 5 54) ......................
Additions to Fixed Assets.. ...-.- ....- ...-.... ..- .. .-- .- ..---- -..-..- ...... -.. ... ......... .......... --............................----- 35,732.28 ................. ........
Adjustm ents and Corrections- E quipm ent............................--------.... .............. ......... ......... ................. ...... .......------- -(28,270.69)
Transfers to and From Other Funds ...-- ........- -- -------------------------....... -- 2,885.98 ,...-8 (390,771.60) 393,657.58 ............ ... (335,014.76) 2,043.76 (172,001.63)
General Revenue Unallocated Expired ..- - .. .0..-- .- ...-.-. .. . (134.00) .00) (134.00). .............. -.. ....... .... .. .................. ---- -- -- -

Adjusted Fund Balnece 6-30-66 .. $ 6,472,655.05 $ 357,348.15 $ 552,677.29 $ 5,503,818.17 $ 58,81 I $ 3,122,490.61 $ 128,052.19 $ 69,378.76 $ 2,617.853.95 $ 562527.33


lHIBIT "B"


Plant
Funds
(A-6, 7, 8)


$ ........................
............................
............................

592,425.00
486,792.88
60,924.44

$ 1,140,142.32

$ 8,246,700.82

$22,903,908.98


(5,344,823.50)

(277,503.88)


$17,281,581.60


BJOARD OF REGENTS


FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY




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