• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Board of control
 Letter of transmittal
 Introduction
 Table of Contents
 University of Florida
 Main
 Florida State College for...
 Florida School for the Deaf and...
 Florida Agricultural and Mechanical...
 Back Cover














Group Title: Report of the Florida Board of Regents
Title: Report of the Board of Control
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094136/00019
 Material Information
Title: Report of the Board of Control
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Florida. Board of Control.
Publisher: Board of Control
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, FL
Publication Date: 1922
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094136
Volume ID: VID00019
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: electronic_oclc - 55693843

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Board of control
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Letter of transmittal
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Introduction
        Page 7
    Table of Contents
        Page 8
        Page 9
    University of Florida
        Page 64
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    Main
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    Florida State College for Women
        Page 230
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    Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind
        Page 288
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    Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes
        Page 303
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    Back Cover
        Page 323
Full Text


REPORT '


BiAID OF CONTROL


Institutions


Higher Learning of Florida


Biennium Ending
June 30, 1922


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REPORT
OF THE

BOARD OF CONTROL
OP THE


Institutions


Higher Learning of Florida


FOR THE
Biennium Ending
June 30, 1922






I1





















BOARD OF CONTROL



P. K. YOUNG, Chairman................................. ....Pensacola
E. L. WARTMANN...............................................Citra
J. B. SUTTON..................................................Tampa
JOHN C. COOPER, JR.....................................Jacksonville
W. IT Weaver................................................... Perry

J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary .................................Tallahassee
u-






















J. I. DI.AMO>D, Secretary . ... .. . .. . .. .. .. .. .'rallahss~ee







S S ~28


LErTEi OP TRANSI'TTAIL



January 11i, 19n.

To His ExcellenC,
Cary A. Hardee,
Governor of Florida

Sir;

In compliance with the provisions of Chapter 5884. Laws of Flori
herewith la submitted biennial report of the Boad of Control for the
period from Juir 1 19. to June 30, 1922, to be transmitted by you to
the Legislature,
esapecttully,
BOARD OF CONTROL,
Br P. C. Yone,. Chlaimat.












l*' INTRODUC!lOY




We bon to submit herewith cor blenntal report on the State IIUtonal
hituttnos uner our maasagernit, uiz*

UnlWralty of Florida.
Florida State Colleee for Women.
School for the Deaf and the Blind
Agricultura and Mebanald Coll ege for Negoom.

The report is Made under different hedB as followS

L Membership.
II. Reports
II,. inad, BulldIngs and Improvements,
IV. Finances
V. Budget.
VI Growth and Service
VII Conclualon,



I-MEMBERSHIP.

The term of thre aeme ers of the e Board expired In Jul, 1921. v:
Mr. J. B. HOdges, of Lake City, Mr H B. Minum, of Jacksonville, and
Mr. P. K, Yongo, of Peneaclan-Mr. Tonge having beea appointed In
March, 1921. In place of Mr W. W. Flournor, of DePunlak Spring,, who
had resigned. To fill the above vacancies Mr. W. L WOaer, of Petry,
was apponfed to succeed Mr J. B Hodge Mr. John C. Coper, Jr., o
Jacklonvflle, was appointed to succeed Mr H B. Minimum, and Mr.
P. K. YmDe, of Pensaola, wao appointed to succeed himusell Mr. YTon
was elected Chairman of the Board

II-REPORTS,

We present herewith as a part of this report, the reports from the
four Institutions under the management of this Board. vie:







BOARD 0 COTOL* .


oE J. T. Diamond, Boretary ..............................

SUMoSti SCHOOL

Report of W. B. Cawthoen State Supetrl t ndnt .............. 3

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA,

Report of A. A. Murpbree, A M., L L. D,,President.............. 64
College of Arts and Scenace-
Report of James N. Anderson, M. A., Ph. D, Dean and Pro
fesor of Ancient Languages .. ...................... S
College of Agriculture
Report of Wilmon Neael, M. S., D So, Dean Instructional
Division w .. .. .. ... ........... .. 90
Report of Wilmon Newell, M. S., D. Sc., Director-Experiment
Station, Research Division . ............ .... 119
Branch Experiment Stations:
Report of Citrus Station .. .. 12
Report of Tobacco Station .................. ... 1
Report of Everglades .. .. .. .. b......... 137
Report of Agricultural Extension Division 1.. . 139
College of Engineerng*
Report of J. R Benton, B. Ph. D, Dean and Professor of
Electrical Engineerin .. ....... 159
College of Law.
Report of Harry R Trusler, A M., L. L D., Dean .nd Professor
of Law ..... .. . ....... 173
Teachers Colege and Normal School
report of James W. Norman, nA M, Ph. D., Dean and Professor
of Education .... ...... ........... ........ 177
Report of James R Full, A M, Ph D, Professor of Education 19
Report of Joseph Roemer. A M, Ph. D., Professor of Secondar
Setdacateln .... .. ........... .... .. ... ... .. ,
Report of James W. Day, B. S A., M A., Protegsor of Agnicul-
tural education. ....... .............. ... .. .. .. 194
Report of L. 3S Green, M S, Professor of Industrial Education 19
General Extenelon Division.
Report of B C Riley, B. A B. B. A., Director. ............ 199
Balness Administration
Report of Cor Miltmore, Librarian ......... ............. 214
eport of T Van Hynatg, Curator of Museum........ ... .. 217
Department of Mlitary Science and Tactils:
Report of Jamne A. VanFlet, Major Inaantry. D. 0. L .... .. 21B









DOepartent ot Hrstoem:
BRpon O Albeit W 3weg t M. A. ph. Df. Director mud .Profe
of E le ............................................ .. Ms
Report O Ethel Cowan. Registrar .....................,,,,..... 223
Report of K H. Graham Auditor .................... ........... 25

FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN.

Report of Edward Conradi, A M, Ph., D, President and Professor
of Philosophy ... .. ....... 20.. 0
College of Arts and Sciences
Report of W. G. Dodd, A. M. Ph. D.. Dean and Professar of
English .................................... .. ... .. 254
School of Sducation and Normal School.
Report of N. M. Saley, A. B, Dean and Professor or Education 25&
School of Bome Economics:
Report of Margaret R Sardels, Dean and Professor of Home
EconomIca .. .. ..... 29
School of Music.
Report of Ella Sooble Opperan, A-. B,, B- M., Dean .... 262
Home Demonstration Work:
Report of Sarah W. Partridge, State Agent . .. ... 263
Business Administration:
Report of J. G Kellum, Business Manager,
Financial Statement ... ..... ..... 2
Boarding Fund ........ ...... 282
College Farm ...,,,.... .. 286

SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND.

Report of A. H. Walker, A B, D Litt .. .. 288

A. & M. COLLEGE FOR NEGROES.

Report of N. B. Young, A. M, UItt D., President and Professor of
Pholisophy aEd Ecoaomtks ........ .. .. .. ........ ..... 303
Report of Homer Thomas, A. M., Professor of Educat[on ......... 306
Report of Allert L. Mebane, B. Agr, M S A., Profeesor of Asriul
tre .................... ... ...........-......... 307
Report of W. H A. Howard, A. M., Proeesor t Mechanic Arts,,.... 00
Report of J. V. Hlyer, MI. N.. Superintendent of Sanatorium.. ... 312
Report of J. F Matheus. A. M., Auditor and Professor of Modem
.ngasge .....,,..... .. .. ............. ...............
Report of B. M. Hawkins. Dean Home Economic .. ..........


A






















^ ROGR10S AND SIRVICi.-|

be rapidly emerge$ from the statue of a mall
of multiplied students and ever-wdeanng scope of
Sserlvce.. During the last two r the attendant s ea
I1 eetWton, as may be demonstrates in the Regsltrar's a
Sattenb e for f-21 and 21-192. Omitting the
~ enrolled 748 student. the attendance during th
efMlo of the University wa 78. Fifty-two couuntl
o and thirty states and foreign countries were represented. TI
ear the rand total was 129 students. Of this number, 7
'mateto tod in the a mmer school ot 1921, leaving 1046 as th
during the regular sessio. Of this number 69 Florlda co
ie 3 st attes and foreign countries were represented.
S Pith ermore, the number ot rgistration by correspondence, taught
the General Ulnivesity Extenulon Divilon during these two
tacd the grand total of 668. The Itension Divislon h10
d of etlzens in other ways through its bureau of publi
oh of civics, teacher-tratng Institutes and other ften

Btenslon Division of the College of Agriculture
k of extending i information in agrloulture and hoise
Sho are unable to attend the state InsUttuon
-i. a oe made by county aset t
dPy $,000 Gloe, agents 1r
0on00a thrmr' wiles Attende

.. A -bn4he -a






















iarto those who have eepride in nori. '
~::tku anx swe teeteelatao orabbnir
-. 'b ge, are ixow ntoogsed*o aazrnBTtkt,
oolsa oftths 4oont. The U nist nu-de'
-two o, -tWit'oty indtition, oi htaer learnh ns 4)4k
?Ytth~'etollegesand UnoivrsleM otathe loath8h Stete.if
or S2Otollce e it the Southeast onlr Aftdy are
and Eharacter by the' MAe,.Uon Of Coles fii .
e~'l 66 n~ th Htther Staes OE'hi number, liesblP
demonlay two in rioran tu
dre DwoveG' *
'~om~ rloaodl Amation ot esn cd
dlige iorr E th uoIiOe
d'
6 %ednt~shwhl ig d~~ag enoe 6 tr~a edl

:r' jmentnual beas j
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t o, protesor be employed, that th
O twt e faeb tar.n that the number 4i !
thie iitand t at adequate material equipment be viet

Just now, on account of the greatly Inreased attenande, t
verslty Is in danger of falling below some of the standard reoufres6
To 3jeep the University on a fairly decent plane of efficient teadtig
and acceptable service our budget tor the next two years ha ben
worked out
HI.-NEEDS AND BUDGET.

The general University budget for expenditures that reach out over
the five colleges, alike, is presented in detail below The Itemied bud-
gets of the e fie colleges and the Extension Division and their respective
departments are described and given detail by the several eens of
the University. These budgets will be summarized below, but it is
Insisted upon that only by an open-minded and thoughtful reading and
consideration of the dean's report, which follow, and by personal observa-
tions, can the condition and needs of the University be understood and
appreciated
The spirit in which these appended budgets have been prepared is
Indicated by the following letter addressed to the heads of the different
colleges and to e re the rector of the Extension Division.

May 6, 1922.

My dear Dean:
Our biennial period will end June 0Oth, next, and we are
called upon Dow to prepare a report on our work and status
for this period, and a statement of our needs in all depart
ments of the College for the next two years. It is desirable
therefore, that you communicate with various heads of de
apartments of your Conllege calling upon them for reports on
these three paes f their departments, and that you pre-
pre yor benal statement of your college acordiny '"

It IS needles to add that the nanmeal dopreoa of
than reqrea that no padded report from
a ptet, ad that en the ser




















*- le th 'tg lor whech t6ee to no im i
pai demand. With thea itI=os i mind, there is
.mS tof sal thlle eUrI 'otue mi4tetr that ap
and dilvisonr of the Institution, preceded by a brief
e Dsiteome bnt fomun1 l the mudgets of er Viobs yeare.
GENERAL lESPfSl AND GZNB.L A '
opr INSTRUCTION FOR ALL COILEBGHS A4ND
Dwrollne or Tai3 UNIVMRSITY.
S d6Bprtmits of I~ntracti fon r all colleges, our
tn.- de to the need o full time from the director of ph
Sa: d to and cah of major sports and to the need t an ma8 *
'' l t ofa physal education, also to the item for apparatus

1-Phyelcal Traintg and Gymnasium Equlpment
Ph
'KOmur experience in the late war demonstrated more clearly than !
b ae ver understood before the neceldty of the physical education
Srig. generation., American youth must have sound, physal bod
,Jqreto sere their country well whether it be In peace o
,Wi nore than .thousand student, it possible tor
an meet its dut to the tudent In PBllitraining wI
SInsftrtr and the ftiU time oatho, e who are n
sce s tta e tare u i nrto e ,owtl
.# mber o thqe.mnatraizs and comad
tt^an^a flt that th ae Stat. r *tsr
men






















conhob0, wortdof ta eiowsiflenthshie&fro4





'he Cadet M S paart er f -t he tary oranizat ad 4tf- w
th e lu at ir o n0 nsortc of intar my ental mt .p A asfll t r

Inthe s ry that has been paid heretofore is called for now. ieh t
nstrutor in this department Is a useful ofIcer. ThesOUsn, D'awfin
charge is aering at considerable sacrifice. The salary must be In-
creaed 1 we retain the series of so competent an official.

a--Moral Trailneg .

The stsuents are paying part of the ary of the instructor I lb
and T. M A. Se tary. The amount that Is used from the 4afile d 7h
budget should be devoted to other purposes and this salar tal ore fr -
ou budget The amount shown here Ie wht is at present enIAg I IAI
-only the difference of $700O Is contributed by students' noldtft lkb
moral tone and religious lfe of the University e funDie t i
trainln of good eltlzens. To oster and maintain t hi lhs
verdty 11fe we comnder k legitimate and an essential pafr
* da a sneesatry charge in ur budget.

hv 4-Dep.tsiett 6a P Uf blood

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i oi< =ea H~iftv
ell rei ut Mesost unWIlM
BMW Xrsalayrt'Bm emakht l these m
W^O MAOIbtbutn'tbe Ue o& te.
a-uttfl%:aSibirtterrtoi one lIbrarianc to nvt^
0an efy Auft b4 atalogin and iare bofol
t18ieauitytA4' asoegant librarian -mut

call unitlncrease lt ie appropriation for
^ -.4n ieeleU stes tfor the singer uefghneaB of the ib

-> J -T'ie'State Muaeum. -, ?

Itate Muenorn ha grown t suhel-proortion that the f ll
Qecurator l required. The splendid colleotlon of natural b
iatfngC to forids is 1e*g greatly nelegeted .beoausoi lbl
it thUnratorhla dlevote'4 tte lkrr >ot' thp Epe!p
i thertalt to th Mueum. .The Xeiment, B
Siinbxarin. The curatorasibp, oth MtJanaaim lPm
;Jps0ntesane ie ssfefmentiato.tahDoser dsv
t gw w Ua is ftithI lolar calou
Ml^^^ ^^jaaQ0tioatin v*ealtointgfl esateasl 1W
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-0 tq 10 to 890"1
aTheirt tepaelse bn h thp
Se Pto pa a other executive ines whlc onome.i ,
t of .elr re atve oo P hermo re theSe me ap
St e n after the opening of the seslon for at least a m*ti -
Stbs the regular, professors. It is only lair that the d
ae, as such, should be increased $800.00. We would, ot oouneWr (
p reasosM, recommend tht the Vice-PreoldOnts alary beiaereagid4-
These would add only $100-00 per annum to thCb
Ss ie sxi officers. It is respetlely urged that thi aeputiL
ante as a simple matter of eutlme. :

S!V-BIBUIDINGS. 0

Sf the matter of permanent improvements the Goern or haJ ,
a tir ta blding program be outined, o that ea. c dl
. aOp am nbthe moe important ands preasnla reqIren, .
ae the Altimate and
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\tihifltk .&ot* Iamfle Ji loitefl flTdoDWl,
nDobsoeIre g t, meals AD4he Qpinmop r.Bildifgi. t4 Wydujs
leabOto,0o0.0 O.I adLdthe SouthbefrSd-Znd the itpahn-to tthhis.
additions which were on the'orllel pians but never built tor la ,Ok
tfnds. TlheSouth end of the dining blal, and this kitchen whoe ad
would aeord-sutaftlent room to secommodate 800 boys. The cansaitl
uAw e 400.
We would ay, then, that next to the completion o the auditorium
unit of the Adminsltraton Bailding, the most indispenelble and presae 1
need le a house for the Library and State Museum, to cost at les
$100,000,00. One hundred ffty thousand dollars would be more adequate
to the present demands of these two departments of the University. To
costruct a buldi a band furnish It for $109000.00 under present labor.
conditions and prices of building material will not ulla sets evena
the present demands of the University.

3-Chemlstry Building.

or almlatr reasons set forth above we place next in iporte
llbtsryl and Museum Buildie, a building for the Department Qt
asa, Physeal and Aricultural Chemistry. Next to-the ibra r
ably no department on the campus is so overcrowded ai tihe
apartment. The small space allotted to this department
lo ~t Sence Hall and the fact that 92 students bae bee
t imes for both recitation ad laboratory work, be ait
6fltti.O inmsultry DBuladin s s gUreatly needed L "5. anW zft
Tu r Bunidl e not made In the budget for'libt
i -thl Mbal prmfeasor o0 Ohemlstry "this. dpt
ia llOut sthe ned of tse* r s m b Its-

















-- flrentire
_a lhas hIs ort pr

'el


'ridrts e, if not eaboe all the rest, is the need of an
Reading, where the sak may be cared for an lfaclites pro
Aegeno cases. 3inergenoles may arIse at any time amongst
f lo4i_ y of so large a number. The old barracks, a shell of a wood
,t i &ubilt fto the acommodation of soldiers during the war, is now
ptfldu an Inflirary. Such a building cannot be wholly sanitary, r
I^ta fthreca andr expense to keep it in order, Its floor pace is
adequate to the plreset demands. In the event of an epidemic, it would
bbM mposV ble to give proper attention and accommodation to the se
ItIs devoutly whed that $50,000.00 could be granted by the next
Is lat ure for twhi pur Thi will provide one unit of an Infirmar
be added to as the State may decide and the institution may require.

--Dormitories.

Lat, we place the need of at least two dormitorie, with complete tur
niahings. and additions to the dining hall.
IWe place these bualdlnga last for reasons advanced above. A tthoUand
boys may be fairly comfortable in the present dormitorle and Sul-
d iadnt reeidenda near the campus. Other near by private homes an
ra Aig houe are gong up constantly; but the aim of the UniversHyl
Si jlim d to provtie suffilent dormitory space to accommodate all
'a 'a2l suB advanced, students as may be unable to pay the
,InW kt prtate homes. The policy should be to require all fiMr.
Uumli freo'athe high solhooe, and learvg their homeao
Ira In the Univetity dormttors at lesst during the
qlsl Idd be ntrr constant eupervt and ontrol
flldtj.tnfon tm the home -nvi
aIme agc Ibndetartrs a lg ut.
t^tpwj rset t tot



























F Pl@^ de'-
ifawff to k barl here inire cdii aigsB
^^i&^tl^ *ireei~talwn-h d~tilarTei^^^
b'rY~c ~~~~reinfeQ edi


timidistae^-ir -bh
z .~ ab ,
wwimmin ee






























Ciee a ea Tmpoafl
OYabdgl ar It down tnlEor olam : o bol
frai t'i s lf'ZA 1 to uue boi a023;, showl
4au d n Jiy h,,92a,ato.-June 80, 1924; 3, howling t
MQ. it%.425 and 4, showlpg v
1.^i WvS4p0. 4 qelea qA 9J1C- 10
-l nl.ggiy tip t te ereaurs!
4ttals 4 lp,>t neMe tW



^^^^ JaehfequO'fltadflole, <
-Wiiflig Uyqo41sh























gij-Sls r artd^Qbt &dli fl


ti6nte rsei h ewlU-to @briot1 to 'Qe^a@ e
AMto4tbisal Collge and DOretor oa th'Bstep it
aturai Etensor Dlvialont The tdotal'amo
lea tthes.e ore'dTalnBi.le Ohe St
T hjbDiin, wi'aut lie labnee appear bel*
lbflt'be kept in mind that ince' our leat MbleaikTrt
'&aMtiit'ia 'addet to the arieUntkt l researiellnib
nrity'abuttstatons, the Tobacco Iteotment Stattnrft
e erae aton, the her ot lthe trainagb dah*t
Siltdia 4taWpl there Is alo the Iake Alfred 'Ottrie Satiom .at4p
R^?i-l *iam BStations are to fuctton frlON. thhSherVrti
tila;dkimutli iyo' thed praes hla erelepet oB
&3 Qmmblife4 add etormonsily to'thi dgitA
V| tk ^teetibcm~at the' Veivereity ILn, bhen hipning aItki& oVm
tofler S If.-ohlieh coia le4 te adee
vin mar'nditrltolt-Vrmblm* h-

a fnted without queetlo oftab ut
ntb -n been guaraataeethBt a praflcal t



























tel tniflaernity lnai
j, tqm them the tt
fl ur t*\qpreBe4t .aducS4I
aBLa eat relgl u d pflu a
of*iJ99fl #a9d ty, this wqy
B9el Q ip be, compelll4
44 sTtM ah %ibdatkwqsuroes. We CA
8Ato^ 4e ifte4ltlfi3o asnD. uoation to mA
?j(S PziOWet, 1pideor -the* p"T

t-fapNpfl eniXlduation or.*
tot thi.,pW,
^^^h~ai ^opabii orB an

^^^p!aya *. AiWon




~salte



















'2<


Respeattally main


etita 'r 3S
A. A, iUtPEREli:
-PaBddn:.


GeNERAL CUR~IT PENSES OF THE UNIVRSITT OF
FLORIDA, NOT INCLUDED IN THE DEANS' BUDGET
OF THE SmVflAL COLLEGl.


sil laa b








H. IWPsNT OF TRU- a
I. = GUTIV. "d

PrlsdentdS .. 50.. .......... .000 5,000$ 5,000 OO0
Vio^ePr"Edent o... ..... 200 500 500 1,000
Secretary to Preldnt ... ..... 1,00 1,500 1,500 ,000

nI. DRPALTMENTB Or IlNSTRU
TION
1tPhylucl Edunation and Hygiene-
SBlarie;
Director and Professr of Hygiene 8.500 30( 8001 70
thretor of Physi~ca Edation ad
C ha(ofMr or port $A.......... aWOO (t .: a


,,O r of Pylsal Education --
doa d O Minor Sports....,


'thet yortg wen of plari and M a of1 olk
'OD m" rd sl~d o



















Brrn

6 Untvreity ........ 675 1,00 1000 2000,
asstn e .............. 200 600 600 1i,

lies..n d F e and 0
plies d Necelettl L
t. en ...................... ...... 400 400 800

t Bproemeet:
Sa n Improvement of Target
ange .. .................... 100 N00 500 1,000
Sast Ban - -
eloas,
f Gg of flustruagtal music
parewotopg Ca anm and t



or n ble and Y. M. A
........................ ~. i"W ,HIo M

+--' .N 't ,.

























R Dnot ibmrovaemnt:
o^thr leedeo y ulpment
toi Material ....
TRAa OPPICIA

/Res",lw ..........^......... :T1
M'Bta graphr' and Assistant
pr.......... ... ...




^^ym w'es -
^^I% ^S.......... .

























0 90Q




'4 uy


'Jo


II





















*pr ite Fire Proted
Ur "Hi ot B dingS and
Personal Proiwrty ot
Ste Stte on the Com-
Campus See P 00 ...
Total ...... .. .........


. ..... ..... ... .8..0.00 .SG.
I 985,136.00 3s6,006.00 402.700.011,72884.A68


4 1;:W3~~


r '''t,~b~t


I ~ w~; i





















.. ....... .-...... .. $192,21

... TOTAL BUDGETS OF ALL COLLEGES AND DIVISIONS
opaR TEl4 TWO YAR BEGINNING J 1, 1923, AND
ENDING JUNE 30. 1925.


Li I I


1. general sense, not in-
-eluded in te Deans' Bud-
fets of the several Col-
lesa End University E
tension D on, P. 00.... $108,160.00
norease of 5 Deas from
200 to $600 each per an-


. College
SPlencea.
port ..,..


of rt
See fleaa'e


$ 48,050.00


m. F Uese of Agriculture
5anl Ex~perient Statlonn.
S of Agrlature,
^. ........ 95DP0,OO 28.400.(
S ttionl:

Vtr t






















Sr ..v .... 0. 99210 ... ..
lr EDC'appropiation tar
aditlonal County and
-olhe Demointartlon
Agent. ,.., ... ..... 66,000.00 .... ....
'4. Farmers Meetne, P 00 ......... 8.00000
S r lt ... .. 4,00.00,

493.06.06 248,876 00
See Dea's report,

IV College of Enineering
-e Dean's report P. 000 7,8000 4,40.00

V. TeaCoher' CoUege ..... 6,2000 ......
A Sm ner Sohool ... 0,000 00 .....
B. Teacher Spring Re-
iew ................ 2,4 000 ..........

72.6e0000 3,000.00
See Den's report, P. 170

VI. Law College, See Deans
report ..........-- .- 7,80O.00 900.00


. General Un rsity Es-

lI -nd Crrest Eils
pea as u own I de
ta I Dinteor's Bud'
O' 8- ..........-'-


**, I ^ --7

8,0000.
4,000.O

I 8309.a2 ,7


8100A
























id 2O,000 continuing approplaltioJn om 1. I. Board.
Sdeuctiona from th l in the dean's budget are on
tea and should ot be considered. The permanent income fr
h .re abo~v stated are correct; and the dedutions thereof leave
Amount of appropriation for the EKXT TWO E S













1. r
,. ) .

^*i." --%' ~ \" -/























7 !fa jl-t l. .
S tf "p. r re 1


g~~tahit^ tID s ar fteoUeges l
t Un ourrent expenses
^^- qtle"pTmtutheat hniprovflments
^^ ^Blaboratories,- inaehine abopB *
a t .. .............. . .40.. .
^^Si'oenerwat U~ntierity 3Dten-
:,' B D "cledapondenc, teaching
el : .;......,......... .... I .,O.
- ). lior Agricultural. ]tperliment
M ation, ca pus .............. o.0oc
,-BoP Branoh Experiment Sta-

ll) la Alfred .............. .......
*(/" Qul ac tobacco Staton ... 80,0
:(8) ver.lades . ...... ... 430,0C
.ar Agrl altural !teilo and
vg al ome Emontrao Agenl.
? Maladingii:'
(a) warmerr meag, $.8000
fc' t) Bir eJite, 34w000... 125M.1


..... ....... ..... 100.
^i^^ ad allH em- ,



ff*a** Heft law


ir~li~


I~




sk











twsratlinlSg appropriation from


kRr T, 0 COtLJJG OF AjTS AND SCIENCES,
NR OF FWORWDA.

o the Preelnt:

The outstanding feature in the history of the University of Florida
and of the Colege of Arts and Selences in particular for the past bleu-
num is the continued rapid growth in numbers in the student body. ID
1917-18 we had 92 men enrolled in this College; in 1919-20 the number
increased to 179 and n 1920-21we had 300 men in this division of the
Univere~ ty This shows at once the great problem we have faced and
are still acting. The large enrollment means not only large classes but
in many instances more classes "More classes" calls for more class-
roome and more teachers Let me illustrate. Nearly all freshmen except
law students take English This year the class in english I was so
large that was necessary to divide it into eight sections We some-
times had three sections reciting at the same time under three different
teachers and Freshman English alone called for twenty-four hours a
week of teaching.
Now what 1s true in regard to English is true to a less extend in re-
gard to almost all freshmen subjects. It was necessary to break the
classes up into sections. This meant more teaching hours and the ques-
tion of handling the classes was soluble in only three ways:
1. Let the professor teach temporarily under these circumstances
more hours or larger classes than is permitted in standard institutions.
2. Let the professor teach the proper number of hours and omit such
upper-lass electives as t may be necessary to omit.
3. Find new teachers. It there is no other way, upper-clasmen must
be put in charge of freshmen work.
Despite the obvious and serious objections to each of these methods,
we have been compelled to employ them all during the past year and
shall be compelled to continue this policy until we are in a position to
employ regular, ul-time teachers






















*1 library is not mention naWme the varos
ta temants must be made here.
I445 1 .typry iprtant parl t eof otr eq% qnt ap
0 tOo,Ritspal r mYary o our coure
paue s an re e wo we sB ha ge Wt
library f~oilite. We must Improve these f~lel

ifor he library.
ppalpol& 4 3mOst eve depaw nt Is eg Ung foral lra

\ ADVANCIID WORK.

W, he crowded condition of our lower classes we musqt
S th very important work of he wper claes and graduate M
S see ha t tht the tm has now arrived or la lft approabelh
sawt ogie more attention to dreilopiie oor Gra4ate School
therlfg re rch work in all department of the Unversity
flitu o estimate the advantl es that may cern to the B
: Zh t wor. We could very proStably nie more scholarIbs ip
shipa along thl lines ,

TRAVKlUfNG AYD INCIDENTAL BX!PJBSNB!SWS

We e ar removed from the centre of the United State
pau delf a imfflt ahd ci enile for us to attend
9- aned*4t1 In whieh we are intorsid. usyft n
-that t the head oe departments attde
I keep touob with what their
o th-e ooentr. It Wofld tol' nWUl
* yar or tnU eling i iaeiaibih




























bher


Zj~~eiin~.~

#t~ItW,~b e x1

ITa -,





















Sphere bri bea- deit cotltS l' 0



M10 -2o there were 171 students eaoedin the th
t In 1921-22 the numer was 323, an increase of S9%
Ith ls the fact that the inereas in the upper lauae w .
m o6oitbly larger than the increase in ''resfuinu vnlfy
Si tdents were enrolled in this class. The department, 6j
ilea In asang for a teaching force and equiplAent
i li haere o the large numbers. Th advanced work hll
Spre4anded ad extended s rapidly as possible. Doubtlesa g
Snded in suplies and equipment but we must bear i d b tl
dibatory fees will now defray part of the laboratory pexan
te j wi pr-obably amount to $2,00.00 a yemt. ^
new bundln g for Chemistry ~s asked for. The questlon'o'
SlIence Hall I a serious one but perhaps the buldirn rojedf
S peolned a little whe.
In retard to Chem ial naeering and A ltural
Sthe report of the deas of the Colleee concerned.
S Tere follows the chemical budget as subnitted m'~lbi e '"

'' -benhmab n OChemistry ,yS........-..-$-.--- ..; -
Organfo hemlt.r...... .............w- .. j 4'.



., Q talve A Snal B .. ........ .......... '. .
Sm ietrl o i ........... ...-....

tala motlstry ........ '

mm























Sr f'trde afslBift and a sall am,

Prr" spp,, qt 1i 0
I -
,i .eilt c l, lere enrolled "in 15L*
.4t edi'l i, Atvided into eight Stioeeo
menC arZtnotaohif i and sometimes have elae
asot-i&r,,
uileA5ai rofir Becka'~l be absent o lev avdt"
anieonbrofeaor Farr, and Asistant Profesor
n aitlatant Prot sd hy vfli hail hibs time to tW
JF, or J928l 1 Mr. Book should be prooted to a
l Aaltant Protesors Robertaon and Hathawfay
f tMh Another instrctor is aked tor, Chbaira areo
^ ii Q'te~ol~a-ras now in ag. *1
4N c;Y;or, in
Ir mar beui se

SlareIn 19r22, al prMbably be 1aer
Sthe- Cot a n.l Buaines .:AdmltratIop
isetor, ln tIhrwee sCloo

'b Will mew a xdforme Aital


Vi r it





















ItD I



testaoer are needed, probably e a
MIn-Mflntor .I SpnlMi a =fls t wPcce
an* sq. to so

P PLOSOPHY AND PSHYOROZ .

IL ioDb (General Pyhology) 66 etudenA were
u' i T la abehould be ntbddMed. The prt
'ome ive me more of bis advned course foT wh b
Smp md. He suggestst the appointment o an tsels t

for a student assistant an $00 a yer or labd



s k 3 t na In Physics an aqtal pat rPXof pe a
Ce but einee the head of he deaprtent
oit seein most coavenent tomet
-on P leb with bl report on Mte college Bof nmeei










Wiltd S [FA, ;,v
~Bh
W. ~uS-;









W W PAGX ~OF ARTS A
W0WNU4G JULY 1, 1928 ,
rSo lsS.


Balarle;:
Dean ..................... .
Asaltant xn Ofce ............

Current Expensa:
Ofce Supplies, Stationery etc.,
for dean and faculty .......

II. ANCIENT LANGUAGE.
Salaries:
ProfeBor ........ ...........
Instructor .................

In. BIOLOGY AND GEOLOGY.
Salaries:
Head ProfesBor ... ... ...
Professor ........... .. ....
Instructor ................
4 Student A tat ..... .
Current expense ..........
Permanent Improvements ..


IV. CHEMISTRY
Balarari:
Head Professor ........... 3,400.00
Assistant Profsor ........... 2,200.00
Curator ...................... 1,00.00
8 Teaching Fellows .... ... ..
2 Student Aalatnts .......... 50000
Current ElIpena .. ....... 2,000.00
Permanent Improvement ..... 8,00000


'0 -i I

1d~ -a 1


200.00


I .


[bllA~!~


~i~:;~sa~aF~b-~
~C' 'S::ail~Ar ~.c























6t1t rojer ...........


at. Proe ........... .


NVI. HISTORY AD POLITICAL
SCIENCE.
Slarele:

str actor ....................

7IIL MATHEMATICS.
Sal.les:
Pro fes o~ ................
Aslstant Profe or ........ .
Instructor ............. .....

IX. MODERN LANGUAGES.
Salaries:
Profs or .......... -....-...
Asitant professor of French.
Instructor n Spanh ..........



L aYCEHOLOGY AND PHILO
pa .ortBY ;.L

.........e.t A.. .te.t .. .........-
St ant proAett nt .... -





























jb. ift i '
-f l nymShlMWInstretoA 1td

((oad

i nr t the dtlinot ohite ooft
ear are ere treateM of der
'5F
Is~j ,.


lol


''''~






















.,latnt pre or ag served lqg en.pt.
Shi worth-to merit being raised to thrbAr-
S~cntural Ensgneerne. Be should be riPeved ,ot,
gr 4ony and be given an aaMttat with te ,
Al Oer that a mniobeedd moo=ue in taase ablop
te.gtven and, ti e large clases dded into mller sbctonasU,.J
abt0oratry praotta, or more efficient wor. t
Thb work In Agrlcultural Joutallim ba doTvloped Xapidly .id
-l tekafls p of the present asiatant Poteor, with stet l, fr
attendance e s lterest. .. t
Te increased Importance of poVutry raitsg as well as tld
tsteeBt ad attendance, makin it i pert that the ProfMt t ~
try Husbandry be employed for the fl school year inatel di~t
'baha e year Ba at present 1 ,
SThe importance of agricultral chemistry to many grosw he
t tMhe ate, such as tertlller and sugar manufaetuArg neaBlte
'Oe*aed fat lltte for teaching thi subject ana the rem ttl
the Departmnent Chemistry that a fll professor l thP id M It
jptedtf ieeby t ally concurred t. '
tfh progredA and needM of tbe several deprt ntls At
t.

J l ,tq w health are m~Jtue sh item, a
r t.sny /artkrui %rueznal daset l nt.
+Ie .B wsn 9tll t ma of wai4 Ivah
61% a w a pwttber Of tfra a t ft u .iagiW. n v w M

bie











oiao 4geof the b
gagi and roads of the
ncan hardly ilall its
h. folow agriculture as a vocation
Ia lige hae that respect for the Institutl
jiA # lteIntt demand that the work of the College be placed
Ste people of the State through exhibits made at State and
ae famir. Aside from affording the public information as to what
aervce the College can render, such exhibits have a direct educational
value and provision should be made for a reasonable number of these
' i extbit.
I-Agronomy and Agricultural Engineering.
This Department has gone forward during the past biennium and has
been able to meet the needs of the students in many subjects but be-
cause of Insufficient instructors it has been unable to meet all the
Seeds. We give herewith the subjects taught and those which should
be added at once it the College Is to stay in the vanguard of progress.
Sols. All students of college grades are required to take the course
in soil study. Three courses are offered, one of which is for one and
two-year men. There were 94 students enrolled in these courses during
1920'21 and 126 In 1921-22. One instructor can hardly do justice to more
than 15 men in the laboratory at one time. The laboratory is adequate
but the equipment is not and the present Instructional force cannot make
the best use of what we have. .At least one or two other courses in
soils should be offered for advanced students and one full-time Instructor
could well be employed in the subjects of soils alone.
Field and Forage Crops. Three courses of one-half year each are
given n these subjects and during the past year 127 men were taught.
The work was fairly efficient but there is a strong demand for courses
in sugarcane and pasture grass production and these we are not able
to offer with present equipment and teaching force. .
Fertilizers Two courses are offered in fertlizers, one of which is for
our one- and two-year men. Fifty-one students were registered in these
courses during the past year. This work is efficient but an advanced
course Is also essential.
Farm Manaement. Three courses are offered in this subject, one for
one and two-year men, with an enrollment of 52 for the year just closed
hls is one of the most important subjects in the College since it at-
tempts to organize the four years of work, in the various subjects taught
into a well-rounded whole It Is applied to the arm as a unit making
this unit the most efficient and economical producer possible. There is
a demand for an advanced course as well as for a course In farm book-
k"eeping. This p res ubpect requires considerable individual attention, on the













their flnanntl ta
a, pl ged. These serves enable our
Sof the wrk required and the return to be
pf of farming and are of immense value to farmer
iat farers. Farm management stresses production and profit
man rather than production and profits per acre.
Marketing. We have been unable to offer any course in markting,
tPi bham become one of the most Important subjects confronting the
American farmer and we cannot afford to longer neglect this all-mpor-
tant subject. Instruction In marketing cannot be given unless we either
drop subjects already being taught or have additional tIntructors
SRural Law. One half-year course s offered in this subject, which is
optional for juniors and seniors. Eighteen men took this course the past
year.
Agricultural Engineering. This section has been able to offer course
along three general lines during the past blennium, viz, F rm Machinery
and Motors, Drainage and Irrigation and Farm Buildings, In these three
lines of work we have had a total enrollment of 160 students. With one
man devoting halt time to Agricultural Engineermng subjects we are
fadling to meet the demands of our rapidly developing State. In addition
to the abov courses we should have courses in woodwork and forge
work and an additional course in irrigation, none of which we are able
to give under present conditions In the past we have depended upon
manufacturers for the loan of agricultural machinery for our class work.
Most of this machinery was removed during the war period and some
of the manufacture haeurrs have r ed further loa consequently we have
to use the machinery on the college farm, which s inadequate for our
large classes in machinery. In order to secure the best results not over,
15 students should be handled in the laboratory at one time. The reg-
istration in this course last year was 9S, which made it necessary to
have more than 30 students In each laboratory section.
In our farm motors laboratory we own only two gasoline engines and
with such limited equipment we failed to give the 86 students In thsl
course last year as much practical work as they should have received.
The importance of agricultural engineering In Florida is suffllent to
justify the expenditure of more money In equipment and a full time pr
fessor should be provided for this work

nll-Aanmal Husbandry and Dairying.

The Colege work In Animal Husbaudry and Dairying ha p
in a fairly nsaactory way during the puat wo yeas with a


















Sca' s tt d t; 06 proVided for.
i 'diea' -judfl clsae~a have recently
S aitet worka't state and county fairs, securing "tS
l a n ian ca. ufficlent prise money to mo1
tVIpr expn s on e h taps. At the State Pair at Jacksonville in Nd
rae, 1921, a large number of agricultural students were able to
an work with a splendid exhibit of cattle and hogs, as well as to ben4
it from the general exhibit of the Univeraty. A team of three advanced
students, accompanied by their professor a coab, was sent to the
southeastern Fair at Atlanta, Ga., to compete in stock-judging with teams
tfrm other southern agricultural colleges. This team made a fine record
winning second place as a team and the members winning a large share
of the Individual pries. Funds for the Atlanta trip were secured through
contributios by Interested professors, by members of the team, and from
the student budget fuInd of the University. It is hoped such trips can
be repeated each year and made use of to reward industrious and efi-
deent students.
The breeding herds of the College and Experiment Station farms,
available for instructional purposes, have increased slightly during the
blennium by exchanges and the raising of some animals. We were not
able to make any important new pUchases as funds for this purpose I
were not available. The work would be greatly strengthened by an ap-
propriatln of $10,000 to 16,000 for the immediate purchase of better
live stock or a continuing allowance of $,000 to $3,000 per year for this
purpose. Teachers and students are making the best use possible, under
the ercumatance, oM the herds of private breeders In Alacha and ad-
joining counts.
The prospect look bright for the establshment of a small reamery
tad lce f ream factory in Ganeaville, In the vionity of the College, s
that praotce an be secured In such work by advanced students. Th
now being gtien to dairy work by the xtendlon Dirynma will aa
n1110eloping community work and enlag the demand f our tned
gradantea.
U.*B ftf dEly y90wa otn vnoed bisater tta. of 61
so aldir dtatdily creaift unaklei



















.lhe viroue &" e = c s Ibls
Ib work, a n, brooder house for 0 ra
haadrditional equipment are bed. Peaoletm SB r
Stat isit th plant It is seed weell by hundred of Iie.
'S" 'treBent demands should be Bena e
"Ecaufe of lack of t nand, Instructfon in poultry wdrl't ti.'G it "
ig' been given for only One-hal of each year. The work dea
n t hat cane m ade full use of for twelve months not
ateOlbtatalon, work, but in teaching. The professOr of poultr't
bandry should give all bhi time to this work and a studet a
should be provided.
V-Veterinary Sciaence.

The ossDepartent of Veterinary Balence hatde be ent
proved nd better systemlzed during the past blennium ad add
teret hda been shown by the students in the work giVeL.
The addit[n of a small operaltig room made poaslble by tilM
ropriated by the last Legislature, enables the department
students a practical course In animal diseases. Thi addition a
helped the t own te sState. as patients sare admitted 'r
meant f various non-contagious diseased conditions. A cino i e
rday afternoon, to which the farmers living with rne It
veralt may bring their aick animals for treatment
All tsidents eleelng animal huSbandry as their Major alb t
flttred to tlere a icorse In 'etarnary anatomy sad pleifo
.bot ati e e othe than thbe pedl ftinn a Aima husnali
thti The stdnt s required to do a certafh Ahtm
Ibt melk ana study the Internal aorga of
S w thr ourse ha wmore sfi otor ika
.b of li" 0e tr od en Aflt

S ef '

-2"~ -





























C la laniiriktD ad lant popeqtJOfl ha
t.fltadantilwe pao B.vel.
I'4gb ?e4s trata the ro
SHaetet B omB conelderatifon but
$Pal. ~)Bt 4 Is to ,pCpply
tAV l &dS At J ou hout the 8

aher~woqcNl



. -. lnthoug ..h
a arospotlan.


XzK











H BUDGET OF AGRICULTUAL.CL cuS





IH a11a p 1



I. GDBfRAI.--------- ----
Salaries:
Dean .. .. ......... .. .. ... .. 200 200 200 400
* Assistant Dean .... .. ..... 100 100 100 200
Protessor, Agricultural Chemistry ...... 3,000 .100 6,100
Asst. Professor, Plant Pathogy ......... 2,500 2,500 5,000
Assistant Professor. Entomology .. ...... 2,500 2,500 5,000
Asst. Professor, Agricultural Journ
alism (Part time) .............. 200 200 200 400
Secretary and Stenographer for
Dept Heads ................... 1,200 1,200 1,200 2,400
Farm Foreman (one-half time)..... 900 1,000 1,000 2,000

Current Expenses'
Printing and Publishing ......... 500 500 1,000
Exhibits at Fairs ..................... 500 500 1,000
Office Supplies .................. 400 400 400 800
Labor on Farm ............. 1,200 1,0 150 2,00
Seeds and Fertilizers ............ 600 600 600 1,200
Tools and Implements ........... 100 250 250 500
Tractors and Attachments ....... .... 600 600 1,200

Permanent Improvements,
Completing and furnishing 3rd floor
of Agrlcultilral Building ........ . 3,000 ....... 3,000
Repalrlng and painting farm build
ng .......... ... .................. ...- 7650 7 1,500
Repair of fences .............. 200 200 .00 400

I. AGRONOMY AND AGRICUL-
TURAL EN INEERING.
Palario, ne os A0
Profess of Asronomy ......... -. 3,400 8,400 3.400 4,800 ,























0 m00 600 8
.50 250


10 .... 500 00 00 1


:. .... ... ...... ..... .+ , 050 1 0 3
,a+iYnI + ery ...... 4(0 1,5000 1,000
a a hop F lptment. ...... 800 400
an ti o an equipment ....... 00 00o 1




Am MIn dUstry ........ 8,400 8,00 3,400





D.Pal rme. ....... Bo0 30S
......... 260 250 250
and ulqpment go 800 g o00 s0
neing Pasuree .... ...... 400 400
'e Crops ..:. 600 600 600 1
.M,.an Mog.. 800 g* No00( .



















V



-^Tof. oyetVrinary Solence ....-..>
'............ ................

C: Gurrent CLeamea:
N Equpla ent tor Claen Work ........


Permanent Improvemnta:
Disaeotlg Room ..........


'VI. HORTIOULTURf.
Salaries:
Prof. ot Horticulltue ............
Ast Prol of Horticulture .........
structor in orttcultre ......... .
Foreman, Hortitaltural Grounde ...
Two Student Aaistnto at $00....

Current Expenses:
Ibt, Orchard ad Truno Garden .
Equipment: Supplie, ertil
gee, Plata, Etc. ....i....
Traveling expense .......*

Pormmaut mprovmets:
Br rsom o .ro ..........- D*I*
SV SmS ot Irrigtion an Drain-

- OWl A ..s-....-...-*** I
It 4 at appropritio
mat lt nde& above .......-.-***.


:4"






I~ut



4M~ it




KI























l tani the AtM
twim of the MllaWse Mp o ,
iAcf ot Greos, each ate agrlcituTal
Snit tated reeirves .kintervwotfxsarfot r18OOO
Tl', as the Adams Fnnd and atbih -ud Tle
- ,used eiuely for technical sclentitc i tnvetlations
research wor o problems ilattely rtlatew t t
o the everal states. The expenditure tro bot
.bs4wlperipaM of the Offlte brt1zilment Stew
lgricultre J and'J b6 me only on su
t a pre proved by the OfeMce di Atp nmt sat
f ulf are not appro)blAtedby itobea for the
-V malantbing ktas drlnt 4tatlonu:
state biundsmis t IB th re'incumbent>
m laj ildirgie, "a= ,*opett e-
a n brngs n al' iuellar wfbrs e




















y ,orkwith present reo le .



,hie g stBlishment pf a branch station for citrs
ogislatur e o 1907, and f brach stations for t4oAb
and the study of verglades problems, by t= e Letslaure,
it possile for the ~ l periment S on to etly enrei
antis. vites. Thes te br h tatiosare regard a sa U
tbe experiment station system of the state and it Is te
co-ordlinte the activities of all of them in the interest of eoq
are treated of. in the present report, foUowlug- the discus
various eectons or lines of work of the man station. "
In the folowln sections we present brefly a rort n
each department aid, following these discuasloa, t tD
amnanl needs of the Station during the ap oai
etlmates given are based upon careful study of the noi
of the various agricultural industries of the tate
m, been radured to the lowest possible ree
ienV and profitable returns. For a lore
ofhe S tation the reader Is repetful rer
Btaon and to the AnnUal Repit of the
Syerart fllng June 3o, 1921, and June 3la4. e


As a matter dt oI int 1 aenamkse.tt
-me. t the Stnn whhtdh ble"ct
K t e aiseflrar -Drsar; o;si nrs






















Minidan Pa&r andf ih

thi'ofa k tb to n Ma t Wti&atong'the varous e
te Stato, as is the prnate at present
oib of apparMl.B
aldoratj e lr of farm OahI
e n 1 r eat *ierp Buch work reQulrfT
etd one man's t meI it be moe economical to employ
i i ry ean to emply various artisans and worked
tot Ie, Ua is done at peet, and vwe recommend that pt-
tir the services of smea a workman.
he oblet of meeting the demands for bulletins on agricultural sub
bpI~e anuteb Not only is every oatizen of the state entitled to
an a gr acioltural subject, but under the Smith-lHghes Act
s made incumbent upon the Station to uply all agricul-,
nessaary for students taking agrlocltural courses in th e
1e 01* of the state At present there are of these agWi-
tol in the state and more a re being provided for. Dur-
k r,'y ia, liL spte'of te most earnest efforts at economically
aett the distrbution ha been far in excess of the num -
.1 Ahl eush published by the Station to date, 129 are
,of print If thN Station Is to properly fulfll its fImction alo
S s coneldeable amount of money must be immediately devOtbd
fll ballethi as wnll a tp printing those contaninig newr


ta itgg U fe. m n ta xewor oR jutm
|ffSant ho4kve6























| n|ei Pdw te M tha is irila



I~ Lvddi ad wm

nathl'staid'B needed.

IT-Malungf Department

wfl tet is equipped with .ddlogr&apb, tintoI~pt
tter and other equipment necessary for epe dtfol tiWW A a
ir alsg bulletin and printing dronlar letter.
b i done at very marked fving c0m
IrW lE t e of teary the talltg Clerk I
~IdhteHi^mon DivilIon, Thie expnseg incurred
bopeiaring mupplief etch Aa ttedlej *p
labor frothtikme to Une in mailing .

th -Ansat In =dtr q d






oau- ranal.
















and Other feeds thoughtP
b this:repartment have ased
aL 0onehsther things ad possible
methods to the farmers which to a larA
T hiswork is being teadlly continued
ithe point where the nvestation cannot be carried
D onouilon without somewhat more elaborate faculties.
ehr thina, shede sad cement feeding floor are needed at one
eldsa on the Station farm are used both or producing teed for
toc and for s uch experiments in field practice as circumtanses
t During the past year there have been 60 head of cattle, 50 ho
Smiles on the Sation farm and for these the farm has produced
i aige and ipature required. The acreage of cleared land s
and d Is, furthermore, land of very poor quality so that consider
leed must be purchased n connection with the dairy and experimetal
All ml from the Jersey herd a sold to the University at a rea-
1 9o0abl1e fur use ue by students boarding in the Mea Hall. All sur-
lus animals are sold at te best prices obtainable Sales during the
rear have aggregated about $4,000 and income to this amount is
ded in the prospective resources for the coming year, being de-
eo. a su bsequent page, from the total estimated amounts re-
to operation of the Station.
ure4p hie of additional stock at this time is a necessity. Some of
now na use were bought In 1908 and some In 1910. In order
the datry herd in good condition for experimental work it
to Introduce new blood from time to time. Only one Jersey
~aen ,ur~hased during the last 15 ears. The present dairy
SAp almost entirely of Jerseys and while they are mostly of
danaiy. animalsa of other dairy breeds are very necessary or

Wam, built several years ago, ha never been completed. It
S i~th, veauilatorl and screen. The build-
IAs irqdeprac latio The tee of te
.nt. ear it has reau "lred
-ain a their.preseat
., T he-




































































pdp

















ee'abg P th-tg llli

&S t petintwt r ilnts tabitetortcoopgi
tme o an other lin ,tMet e' ads-af entae dt
nri' nd ia-inaidtto tfi Weot arem InluAde



s, oom, are ompoed map showing the types of gols
ir iatlton, are the trot vaTue in connection with the
a ar~i ser, adaptllty ot varieties and suitabilty of sols
~t rlub crops. The Station is constantly in receipt of requests of
i a, not only trym Elorida citizens but from prospective inves-
' y.et, ll ptaly unable to comply with these requests.
Spat ear the Bures of SoUls, S. Department of Agrlculture, has
j ol aurreys of certain areas and counties in Florida, the total
,a, 'tha esd ad msvyed and being apptmately 10.000 square
mile The maps of these areas, published by the Breau, are practi*
'.ly out ok aint. We are assured that te Bureau of Sofis stand
ufagw tegl! surely work In Filorida b6 will not do so without
* lo~,;otp the State of Florida upon In approximate "50-50

&At WOrk wouTd be of great vlal t ll the tagrlitural
: thte-dpor nity of getting it fone at a cost to the
fif.Obent c tb'total cotmt oold not-be gored. The
&kv^Sy amtmrrnuintlly 3 qnrw e mnea The
eyv iea Rthe it tLOO Pal p dquir mile, or a
hfalt4Nhhs4 tt adti *<a'nMaonad or
=92:,Z "pAILOO" a'tscaulle 0410
8Mi^liz^t'bm WIrSt earath toib
2w


























es beproided for


0Xp3DS ottano fold, bh$- e

w 9Wr aU ot s. Occu Me


4o' a nd vegetfdblBaa oc ulr t
In J, Al
h .cel industry of thp tate experiences
Op. atia ,aswiv and i t la deemed aperat J
|t oM hese d iseaes, which r was dcntinued in Septenber
^tlPee qppu delay. ,

gr -gi. ga3e i i nWted afl a remt
A W gaA, nbe t, A'
-1 4 1 pRIo a


"' ^ ^.






~& -

























P*a.me Pt




erm et
the fact t

)IiiT consisted
r sperimenol


ifact that the
dto doits part In tilt
o ver, nomeroum
oittl b and- hortleou-
ti'%tatlem uiiertake
i that a como-

Sibxlent tet C
about 16 acre
and to man
mofutes oi


is "pubIk
r panhs.
Aop n




















l m, w b awlet Jam
- Ir9I&JmxuirOvd methpos of cu~ltIny a sial
of the insects and diseases attaohi
abe increased manfiold. IsALad ag n ngae wer
S.sd bein, u inestgat ion, partheroularly asg
S Ira t7her tore i avaUsble nthoug the ,fOa 6
Sstn boe greatly bhandimpped in attemptig t
Aih hae s been received during the padt tiw
esga o a- oealdurly toduin$ rapes In the Mtate. Ox
]ar fl Iaga4 y rotating Is koWn as to varieties, ar
fl n., gafpre u ndmu ner conduits existing in the tate
o be investigated without rather dela. It may t e
ees ~a great arpae industry in Florida. On the ote had,
epRibasona why this cannot be done it is equallr as emart tir -
a In order that the usesles lavestment Wo
boavolded. .
4 &Aw ta asams thing mar be said of the sooallbd
n o e culture. Mob interest has already been mnaniefa in
I asd some etensive plantings have been made. &e f
it 4W fruit and'ts poaselbltles houd o etsrmiene by
szch as the Dperimet Station.


a.






















I"& arndd tced

t once. The w^iIt det n de-ce ees only o he bth
ei I l id& dsetlited thbi b eed bt NorthForda, f rd t a-
roetie immune to thiis dse rlreetdy Exjlt blut are oakwn to te
mWfor F loa armes i adatbfllti t- .lorida soils sh l
to det rd ermied by erimet. A thouan dollars invested n t
S v wo at e present whl l dthe "l, retu hytnred of ton toUSes
to don to florin t iers. AsB the tran 6 the boll weevil invetl-
gatlons from tha Pnt Board to the pt erlment Station la contemplated
S Ad s the Plat oard s expending about $,000 per an-
num in this work, the amount recommended below ($2190,00 per an-
num) would be an e a creas of ,20.00 per annum over and above the
amount now bebag expended from state aproproritions for these pur-
po se. In view of the developments mentioned above and the apparent
opportunity to make short staple cotton aan a dependable crop n
S northern lord, this amount does not appear exoealve.

IlMI-Dlaas of Live Stook.

Sarms and live stock producers Ia Florida have a comperativ
lare nmbu er l of tae to oontEtd w th. Many o these diseases w
Sffle downd W their faseg baue not Ibn dtcmine. Aomng theme
bm a ieo d the scaed at i a" oattle, let h" e
af h t. and kffte worMt l ho. TI ere e undoeibtel
cwl" eNI, bin or leNt bbiur%,dte t6 plte. of ariV s
W IM lint AlMte d & th Kr id dbate o tf o
S rj -n agr gti sm00,0000 a yer b ftorida A Ig
























Ih otortSoc Mtnre

contrary, the question of "
'griultural prosperity of mthe' tt.
i waybuilds up on th forest floor i
tiB leaves etc., wbich supply la mnitkt-
pmacea under the plow. The'frohswhti
wooded laads of Florida are contanl
trial and when the forests iSal ate etenltaly i
many of them will be found pratically ,d'an f
That there will shortly be an akedingt-t1'bWtih i
ondtion there e an be no doubt ad itn lf ely t
the state will enact legislation along thV lbles d l recooile
improvement. It is doubtful, how r, It autflt a aifI
upon whibh to basee elective 1agll&atf(o. May htea
question of forest coserv lor 'and 6oreitatflO&nb cllb u
being the cattlemen, swine grower, lumbermen, turentlien
and farmera; yet it ln not at all inprobable that, through
tional work, the interest a al can be reconalled. For examl
not improbable that a Brytem otf-orest management sai be d
Swill permit of reforestato while at the same lfa t
the forest lands for grain purposes. In view o the
thee problems to the Jfture agricutura welaS
jested tat vlgat pt these U poble bS tbe

ClAmnto Sttich l ita9 'Mdtea as mhe
Inatio a. cnenMe Jr flr

tA an~ag if gunt-e J4lm- '^f
JAIWEIRR~ IC Z~hLo

*9R


















14ag per blleb
-ia! andp ar
n^ )l $addition, tbe llet
Sof Agrilolture anthe various state experiment
Smou f room r i s totally madeateu .
ito ma, olfume afli ntlfl and farm journal
e In te.ar many article of value referred to in
ltog htea a&d tor, w h m proqeor, students and staton ,
e daiil,,all8: yet ute, ? ot be .ed ,because Inaccessible
O ihelf room and prope ar cement. The library posesse
no general reterence woe u whae should also be made
H numbers In the fles of various selentild c and agricultural
ThPre are many thousands of valuable publications and
5 .9 )ynd which should be bund in order to prevent their loss
t re an hardly exMect the .tate to supply, at one
lt fdtas to atone for.the neglect of year; yet we feel that
i tm unds bould be provided to make ts literature available to
siAiant body and Inveatatorf
Seet e th Station funds have prenltted of the employment of a
ra l .halptme only. It has not been iosipe for him to pro-
o he IIbrary, catalogue publlcatelo, prepare Indces, keep
S a ,etc. His absence froe the ltrary tor one-half of each
etel .In .the los of hundreds ao dollars worth of pub*L .
leh eanot riae t ,any price. A full-U me
l ?n pB~lta^ hpny be rve.






lA AW4 '<-

tZW4t
































^^ gpher, eal ntautry and


uher ad Betno le..... 1
Agrultural wore
uletin................... .800
S ......trat ..... ..
cand "Carpeater ........ ....

~Lr.Cunt teases:
re or .. ............ 600
l a tant .... .... ....... ... ..
and Reprintin BulletinS.. ,00
A B ... ............ o20
Sattlonry, etc......... 00

D pan.'J.'legrame ... ..... 'l

r............ .o%
~idar
























., 311.o .20 0 200 400



S I d ReIis ............ 0 BO00 500 1,000
. ...... ........... ... ..... 250 250 600

4* Au sTRn AND


dustri t ............... 3,600 3,740 3,710 7,480
(hat time) ........ 900 1,000 1,000 2,000
i. Foreman .2.....0..... .... 1,200 1,200 1,200 2,400
SChemst, Dairy and Soft
estigotIanB ............... 2,000 2,400 2,400 4,800

xeiMs Field CroDp:
bor ......... ................. 1,000 1,500 1,500 3,000
B upplies...................... 75 100 100 200
S..................... 300 500 500 1,000
r Mul '................... 500 900 900 1,800
e urrt, Sewae Irrigation
.. .................... 125 150 150 300
f9t I.,r a I ........ 125 6 u50so
... ....... .... ....... Sle SOD
MOW, t l.+esUm ,

.......... 600 1,050 l 2.100
......* 150 2560 20 500
-....... 8*700 ,4,,00D0 8000











o Otl........... 400 OO 0 M

O t zmpeases, Swine Invettiss.

0........................ go go No 00
Feeds .......... ........... 200 0 50 1,000

-1
Psrmauent Improvements:
New Machinery; Wagons, Flowr,
Cultivators, ea ............ ....... 250 250 00
Completion od Dairy Ern ceilingg
and painting) ..... .... 600 600 1,200
Cement pending Floor, for oa;s. ,, ...... 200 n. 200
Purchase of tUve Stook: H ae and
Bea Cattle ........... .. ....... 500 700 1,200
Fencing and Repir .... .. .. ....... 1,000 1,500 26<00

IV. GRASS AND FORAGE CROP IN-
VESTIGATIONS.
Salaries
Grass and Forage Crop Specialist 2,200 3,000 ,000 6,000
Assistant ..... ... 1800 1,00 3,600

Current Expenses.
Repairs ..., ............. 0 50 50 100
Traveling Expenses ......... 100 250 250 o00
Freight and Express .... ...0 75 7 160
Labor ....4................. 1,400 1,800 1,800 8.00
Fertilizers ...... .. ....... 100 200 00 400
Seeds, Plants and Sundries ........ 10 100 100 00
Office Supplies and Record Blankse,. ..... 100 100 200
Book ..... .................... ... 5 50 100
Machinery ........... ........ ., 10 150 00
Feed for Mules ............. ... .....-. 150 150 300
Team of Mules ....... ..... ...... 460 .... 40

Permanent Improements:
Clearing and fening land for paa
ture grass epertments .............. . 1,250 1,500

V. CHEMISTf .
Salaries:
CShendit .... .................... 31,00 8,740 S.l40 7T4


























iuMleBo llaaes Bpense ..........
i a m Nutrition Invstisation
SlDpment ad Che-als .......
Soertllzet periment.:
*CltrB,
Fertllzer, Cooperative Experiments
b or ...........................
Trtavel .........................

lSugar Cane
Pertilzer ............. ... .....
.Labor ....... ............. ....
STratelng Expenses............
S rtllizer m periments:
* *Peanm.


S fertiltler .....er ............. .
jao.. ..... .......... .
STray ag 1. pen... .. ...... ...
SBertlatr experiment:
S-lel p rops.
S..................



S J Equippmit ftor
't{ "Ctru
~~MF 'asus


0J4


a0o S,500
10( 100
250 1,000


76 50S
25 100
300 300


Errprmst etwoC


a.a-mw 0I.c


I
















- PO.


V ao 4 tlate Patholeo1at, Truck Crop
s ............. .. ..... 2400
Aaoate Pathologist, Diseases of
RPeae, DeMduous and Subtropi
,, cal ra lts ................... . ..
AsBoclat Pathologist DSak of
Fru and Vegetables in Transit
tenographer .. .. .......

Current Expenses:
Books and Subscrptions ........ 150
Laboratory and Offie Supples ... 100
Citrus Canker Investigatons ...... 17
Truck Crop Disase InWestlgatons:
Traveling Epene ..........00
Field xplerment .............. 00
Laboratory and Ofnce SuppMes...
Labor ......... ........ 00
Pecan, Deoiduous and Subtropical
Disease Investigation:
Frnuits.
Traveling peses ............ 200
Field Experlm s ............. 200
labor ... ........ ........ 100
Laborator and Ofice Supp .. .......
Decay--Transit Investitions ....
Travelng pee .......... ......
Storae Experiments ......... ....
*To be condted Ip coetln wt the
Dept. Arleolte a baOf 4.
**At prIest an -l r~t an pathtolglat Is em
.***opfalf t ne ar .,^ wa ^


7 ~A0O -














































1 3 L























p L'




*p LL




















Gr eh............


7 emiment Iprovements:
"Property Protection" Pence Around
ortituTral Test GrowID (44
aores) eat .......... ........
atablishment of periental Vine-
yard:
leaning Land for .......-----...
Vines, support, t ............
Fertilizer and Labor ...,. ......
Establlshment of Experimental Pe-
can Grove
Clearing Land for ..... .......
Trees and Fertilicers .e--......
labor, Care and Maintenance,,o.
TrT vel ....... .........-- -.
Tree Blueberry Investlgations.
EstabliShment of Blueberry Or-
chard ..... .- I. . ..
Traveling Expenses ...... .-
K. COTTON INVESTIGATION AND
BOLL WEEVIL CONTROL
Salaries:
Cotton Specialist ..............


*To permit of cooperative eoan field experiments with U
of Agrlculture.
**During 1, the State Plant Board provided, in its blgt
for boll weevil lnvetatig on

j tanu Cotton Bree ad
r.etr at ........
AMlstnt, Cotton Diseas Inv.stig. t ....1 A
fl eDn .umme..ha...tthd.ve *-. ^ **



















and u .... .......
Dea et s ue .......

Weer Control Experdments;
See M nery etc.
Sto Cooperatie lperietB on


permanent Improvements:
boratory Equipment ..................
OOks and Publjations ........... ......

M. DISEASES OP UTV STOCK.
Salaries:
Wsetsrmn* n
e terlarian ............. ....... ....
Aslietant Veternaan ............ ....... 2,

Current Expenseso
Feed for. Roeearh Aimals ....... .....
S raveling Epensoa, 2 maen ...... .......

Permanent improvements:
laboratory Equipent and Med-
e olation Pens .............. ......
Tholson Ps...

XI= FO-MITRY INVS5TIOATION8.
BSla:rie:



t end Supplie .........
Pbforeater ................................




n to the Au l........... .......

the doloultral CoUege b e.


2.6001 5,000


















....... ..... ..... ...0 1....0 6;
*.S Ub......e ................ M I 00
^Woks' and Purchases to
I?.- b ~ (Fc.ete Fi.es ...... ,,....... ....... 1000 1.000 ,00
I nref h. b.... t ......... ... .. ....... . 76 1i
IY lSunaoUe Bl nppl .n ............ Jb 100 100 no


ron Book Stlok, Double ........ ....... 00 ....... 00
Card Index Cabinets ........... ....... 100 100 M0
EDmanalon Blader, 10-Inch ........ ....... 100 200 s800
Hopanal on Blders, 14- and 18-inc. ....... 00 1,3000 1,200 4
Iron Shelving .... .............--.. ... Soo o 1,000
Des k ............. ........... ....6 7C 1.0 1 n
Typewriter ........... ....... . --. ....... 100 100

$ 63,446 $188,115 $176,190 W,1 0L M
Items provided for out of re-
ourceas for 1922-2, not In-

Total reoarces of Soutaon,
1922-23 .. ......... $71453.27

Less Sales Fund (estimate at $4,000,00)
and Govermment Funds (Adas t
Fond, $15,i00.0, and Hatch Fund
;15,000.00) .......... .. ... ..... 000 8,000 68,000
Aoproion required Dean "able I
Sources I. ............ ........ .......W 1 Us 041.190 M ,
*Eibrardan employed onyr ont all time at present, -
**Amount available for labor. i I
**Conelatg of. Adaml Fund, $15,00.006; at h Fail ,J
Sale (etimatoed), 4,000.00, State Appropria.tion, IO00.,
manc (otdte appropriation) carrid forward Ju1 SO; IW n















S et.c therefor shou.143W depb9 to &:.
i pleia00 Donaton to thisd amont ,.0 o
Sand on Jaly 14th of that year th Board of Con-
a ite o 84 acre, for purposes of the Station, near the
t Iake Afnd, the land being donated by the Florida Friltlaund
OW, separate asd apart from the cash donations made. The Board re-
fmded to the orida Frutlands Co. the actual cost of 14% are of
eCtrs grove on the property at the me title passed to the state In
addition tothe Florence Villa Pacing Aeaociation, through
assessment upon Its members, raised $1292.16 which was turned over
to the Board of Control on March S, 1921, to form a part of the CiOtr
station Fund. On April 6, 1921, the Board of County Comaissionera of
Polk County aid to the Board of Control the sum of $200 00 as a fr-
ther contribution to the Citrus Station. Following is a statement of
receipts and disbursements to the end of the fiscal year, June 20, 1921:

FINANCIAL STATEMENT, BRANCH (CITRUS) STATION FUND,
JULY 1, 1919, to JUNE 30, 1921.

RECEIPTS.
July, 19--Donations collected by committee ............... 10,000.00
March 8, 1921-From Plorence Villa Packlig Association..... 1,28216
April 6 1921-From Polk Coty Commissoners ............ 2,500.00

Total ...................................... ....1.. $3,782.S1

DISBURSEMENTS.
Reimbursement to lorlda Fruitlands Co. for 14%
acres of citrus on Droperty .................... 900.00
Care and Supervion of property, salaries and
labor ................................... 8.49u.69
Tool and ferllber shed ....................... 5174
Emeinlg .............................. 867
Nurery stok and seeds .............. ........ 4
Wer ........ .......... .................. 408.8
Tlooe and implement ......................... 4
P it n ..................... .... 4.71






















4t was necessary for the Board to have the citrnu groves-al ed
r dontractd for tertllaing, spraying, cultivatig, etc. On October
r. John Jenrerle was appointed superintendent and at oeas
pned spervision of the property
Of the 84 acres in the property ,14% acres were in ltrus grove when
Stoeved by the Board, about 17% acres in marsh and meadow and about
Sme were uncleared. Slace acquseltion of the property, about 12
bave been learned, the greater part of which was planted to citrus dur
iag February, Figs. Seed bes and nurseriea have been arted, a tol
house constructed, a shallow wel drll ed, water tank and tower erected
and a house erected or the superintendent and his family. About ball
the property has been placed under substantial fence and, through th
coutresy of the City CouncUi o Lake Alfred, a road rnuning the ful
length of the property, along its east side, has been asrfaced with clay.
Of the area now In lctrus, 4% acres consists of Duncan grapetruit and
Tardif orange trees which were planted on February 5, 1 15 This
grove is being used by the Chemist of the Unlvereity of Florida Expel-
meat Station for fertilizr e eperlments, Ten acres co(stng of Lne
Gim Gong and Pineapple orange, Marsh Seedless and Silver C ter
grapedtra and Dancy tangerine trees 3 years old, s also being used by
the Chemist in the study of die-bock. The remaining eltro rea
planted in February, 1922, is devoted In part to a comparaIve tH of
Srdoottock--rough lemon, grapefruit and sour Orae d to p ny
experiments with the fe standard orae varieties the later expe
meats being conducted In co-operation with the Bureau of Plant I
try, 0. U Department of Agrlniture. Additional Jmel eBhrqIai'ji
not be made until additional citrus acreage Is plaNted and t--
b d ne until funds are avallabe for clearing land sl jiIdia
as for care of the treeB after they are plaintd, -,L 0 a1H
t n ecoperatibs with the Station, the State Plant Boardaj.
m inaodiofl screened Quarantine cage" on the proemi.i; t
Braa tree and plants, brought fom antdlie th ate, dt l












Seatelt alat bb

S d a"pproprlion was made toIe
y i ai fare and the only reference to thi
uldi' appropriatn item for the University at Fr
i e t Station at Galn, ince. "In ina tem the Citrus Sttion
S:Ited as one o the snmerous things to be provided or ot of those ,
na appropriation of $30,000.00. Already in a serious condition Us
re.ut of practlefaly no state support during 191-'21, the Station at
Gainesvllle coud f afIrd to divide its much needed appropriation with
another experiment statlo.
The Citrus Station therefore entered upon the fica year ending Jol
1, 1921, witith its resources conatng of the balance ($3,343.21) remain-
Ing of the donated funds and seuh amount as the Board of Control could
devote to itt out of the appropriation for the Gaineille station. This
amounted to $5,114.85 during the year which ended June 30, 1922.
The balance of the donated fund, $3,848.21, was expended as shown by
the following statement:
STATEMENT.
Citrus Station Fund (Donations),
1921-2.
Resources
July 1, 1921-Balance on hand ................................ $34.1
Expenditures.
SupDerntendent' cottage-
Lumber ... ......... ............ $ 15176
Electrical supplies .................... 42.00
Cement and tile -....................... 45,35
Lumber and hardware ................ 2,d67.7
Plumbing and plumbing supplies ........ 73.4
Labor on cottage ......-.............. 783.72

3.153.00
Labor on grounds .......... .. ....... 112.560
S Fertilizer ...............*.... ........ 73.50
P. Postage and telegraas ... .... .... l .
Adertising for bids on bulldng supplies., .00


i~i33-M





















... ............ .... ... .... ..........

.tools. ec............




From the foregone it wIll be seen that cities of Polk
contributed to the Citrus experiment Station, to date, $1.78R11id
sad a tract of land worth at least $8,400.00, or a total of 2,IS ,.
against these donations the state has expended only $5.U45 In
'of the Station. Thus far, the state has not kept faith n thi matter
t\c altrus growers of Polk County nor has it complied with its p
Hindered in the Act of its Legislature i 1917, to support and
a eltrus station upon donations therefore being made tb the a
A"lde from these considerations, the Citrus Station oler op
t properly supported, to solve problems which will lave man &h
of dollars annually to the citrus industry of Florida. The
siafance and cooperation of the U S. Department of rA
Sa fnanl al way and through its citru its citrus spealt ed
state places at the Lake Alfred station adequate tacllitief
patlments workers.
There has been expended on the superlntendent' tt
on wbleh gI,5no. was out of the donated fundsaand 58
fnds. With this sum of money it was not pos
building: roll rooting was used instead ot,
othe second story has not been flashed a t.
bnt one coat of paint. Tls building shoIdl e.
* W to prevent deterioration.
SA commodioUs office and lalorr b k
Sit recommended that 1

ean station by m ebejst#
svatble~4 c4'a
11
m~b~-t















'Ipos, eta. is nc
rm y am s on r snIt needed, together Vl
amold a so IW i pivie for grave wor,
siOter for spring the kroves and for spraying eo-

tie experimental work cannot be apprflbly enlarged
alahd is dearged, fenced and Drepred tot planting.
Sthe foregoing we submit the following annual budget for
E and maintenance, together with a list of the permanent im-
ment that should be made.

DETAIL BUDGET FOR CITRUS EXPERIMENT STATION.



p. -,


altr : I I


Superintendent ............. ..... ...... 2,400 $ 2,400 $ 4,800

Current Expenses:
bor ...................... ...... ....... 1,6 0 1,651 300
lpfertlt er ......................... .... .. 3,000 3,000 6,000
, eed and Veterinary Segrvie ....... .. .... o00 500 1,000
S rayn ... .... .............. ....... 800 3001 600
Freight and Express .................... 350 350 700
Barn and Implement Shelter ..... .. 700 700 140
rmpIements Harness and Tools ........... 5 1,100
Rep ; ner .. ...... ..... 10 100 200
Books and T ical agazne .... ....... 100 10 200
Tre K kat and Seeds ......... ....... 10 160 320
Lt aew sena es ....... ...... ......0 00 1,200
am 0 art.ais1,Sairw to umpn. .en-
ttA Z .. ...........-..... ....,.. 2 200 400
a Iaatts eit ..... So w0

ITgel






















kesw a expended on the Citre Stro
S ermalty of Florida lperlment

:00OKBACCO EXPERIMENT STATION. si

alsthment of a tobacco experiment Station in Gadse
"torlaed by Act of the Legislature, Approved May 10,
na that Gadaden County or the cIttens thereof donate
SThe Act appropriated $30,00.00 for equlpmet i.
je cotemplated tobacco station for th
Lt" 1 but also speci ed that no art of this a
available u t e necessary land had been donated
od of Control made several trips to Gadden County .I
autima and early winter of 1931 to examae tracts d
te" Station, title to the land finally selected did bot i
lida until December 15, 1921 so that the begii f
Was delayed natil after this date The Station pt
8 11 acres of rolling land located about one-ealt mfii
S area 6% acres were cleared and had bee'
InmaInder was uncleared. The sOil ty pI
loami with a little Orangebuirg aMd
bi the lower area.
janumay 9, 194 the Board instr
and speclcatlios for a two-story bif
that the land be sUrvered and
.On this date. l ieo1
Pboot of the Unfh
t tkl e study of tobaoo




















flas boo sM
Sthe



Jne 0, 1922, baIe bIon as
TmB~nT or eistorrorEnaikCo m RMaNl
IP
. STATION, FISCAL mEAR ENDING JUNi0 8, 192.

lullSOrRGIII.

tpopratio (haptr 2) ........... 1000.00



Al' onlatOratory bulldnin ., ,,,.,,.. f 81.18
M ga fPlant Pathologiet andtoreoma. s 1





'~Ri~~xE~ ~'-or~






















RIIt in p eil

t a proper m least two alo
o uater constrnecton shetod be eqdippl
ddional land should be cleared and la
S wrk stok sbhouldbe rested, some tiledrin
S dwa and drives should be esxtndbed a deep *
Stogether with a pump and Irrigating plant
'ta ortion of the tobacco acreage, orae
t Improve dte appearance of toi property an at least
d.T "i the latter connection, it Is highly desirable tJeatb t
l tyeeslde upon the poperty as a creation u d
bne of the most urgent needs is a greenhos e,
e Of tobacco insects and dileass may be carried
i 6ths, thie greay reducing the time requited 'or
Sandy speolf Icnvestigation, ''
hten-nieeshary thus far to limit the working tfE'tb



il ild alde be made for chemical wort .For tiWl
aeelary to eqtoip & chemical laboratory at Outhr
U ;* a oehemlial work can be done asat Ph
i.eldi iould present be ite,

M^fi'^'aiuxlal operatlDg and ialn aM1
SpLmtnt- whioba should be

*V > .
'' :V 6 0























S Implaents ...... 1....... 450 2n0
o t Mlefs ................... ....... 500 .......
d md Veterlary sermce. ....... ..,,,, 400 400
Manrs Fertm l ser ................ ....... ,,000 2,000
StIeeds and Plants .............. ........... 0 50
a bor ............. .................. ....... u1,800 O
G- G aoln, OH, Repm; Pump and
SMachinery .................... ....... 480 480
'- Typwrltera and Office Supplle .... ....... 260 2
Postae, Teleorame, etc~ ........... ....... 76 75
Freight and press .............. ....... 300 so
Subcriptlion, TechnIal Magasnes ....... S2 25
uel, Laboratory Building .......... ....... 125 125
'lectrc Current ............... ....... 125 126
Fi les and Record Blanks .... ..... 100 10
SSmaUl Tpole ............. ..,,... ....... 125 125
Telephone Service ........... ....... 28 28
Travelng Expensee .,.4....... ....... 1,200 1,200
. Traveln Expenses, Contingent anM[
Mihsellaneous ................. ....... 500 500

Prmanet Improvements:
aa houne and Heati Plant tor
,.,,ame .. ........................ ...... 3,000
F rnl re and Laboratory Equimen

SBarn for Work Stock and Irmplement ....... 40 10
I brTry on Tobacco Smbet .............
Photographic Equipmeat ............ o:
t e A e f Adtonl Shade ..... ..
S* *......*.. ...... 00
el timated .........,.... -- 800









lper OdVisla,4 m ,-..<., BTWi ,..i>
.HMitiNilutad pypes., ta..= ....... 2,000 a
6saatb', aisteailon ofa Road- *

iotm t.r one employee ............... ........ 4,00M
I6 $ 15,000 1 8S,G13 $ 85E2138 I t1.8


EVRGLAES EXPERIMENT STATION,

The Everglades Experiment Station Lwa provided for by Chapter 8442,
Laws of Florid, Approved June 14, 1921. This Act provide that this
station, while subsidiary to the Experiment Station at Gainesville, "sall
be under the direction of the State Board of Education of Florida and
the Board of Control, who shall at all times advise with the Trustees
of the Internal Improvement Fund in the management and conduct of
the aeme. The Act also provides appropriations aggregting o,000.00
per annum for the two years commencing July 1, 1921, with continuing
appropriations theretater totaling $10,000.00 per annum. The appropriate.
tons for the first two years consist of $10,00.00 per annum out to the
general revenues of the State and $10,00000 per annum authorized to
be set aside out of funds in the hands of the Board of Commissloners
of the Everglades Drainage District. The Trustees of the Internal Im-
provement Fund were authorized by the same Act to set aside land,
owned by the state, for the purposes of the Everglade Experiment Sta-
tion.
On August 24. 1921, the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund
set aside 160 acres of Everglades land located in Section 3, Township
44 South, Range 27 East, on the Hillsborough Canal, about 3 miles from
Belleglade.
The land until recently had been saw grass land but at the time of
this action the saw grass was being quite rapidly replaced by weeds.
On September 12 1921, the State Board of Control and the State
Board of Education met in joint session in Tallahassee to consider the
provisions of the Everglades Station Act and plans for carrying out its
provisions At this meeting a committee. consisting of Wilmon Newel,
Director of the University of Florida Experiment Station, and F. C.
Elllott, Chief Engineer of the Everglades Drainage District, was ap-
pointed and instructed to visit the site set aside or the Everglades
Station and to prepare recommendations as to procedure, this committee
to report at the next joint meeting of the Board of Control and Board
of Education.
During October. Messrs Newell and Hlllott visited the site of the pr.
posed station, examined the land and vegetation thereon and pre
definite recommendation, as to the construction of ditches, dock buld-
lage, etc. This report was Bbmtted to the State Board of Hdno& ,








No br 141981. he

&. t -aapspmoM2 and Ithe aomatlou
^ P -MH^th oi f ER IS4eUMlencya, the Governor,
'eZb cim.t.te. waB authorized to proceed with the
of dUatces, doak and buildings according to the
,Wet ast atodep towards preparation a the property

h he Board of Commlaoners of the Everglades Drainage
intot bad at its disposal launches, barges, boats, pie driver and other
a.qi meant eful in consrctio work and transportation of materials,
Swas felt by the committee tht the constructionwork could bet be
handled by the Chief Engineer of the Drainago District and that after
dock and building were ready for use the agricultural and experimental
work could then be taken up by the Director of the University of Flor-
ida Es periment Station The preparation of specifications, advertising
for bids and letting of contracts was accordingly left to the Board of
Commislloners and Chef Engineer of the Everglades Drainage District.
Various contingencies between November, 1921, and June 30, 1922, oper-
ated to delay the letting of contracts for the construction work
To the time of submitting the present report (July, 1922) ditches have
been dug on the property under supervision of the Chief Drainage En-
gineer and a preliminary soil sure has been made under supervision
of the Director. Records have also been made of the character of vege-
tation on the land d its distribution.
Following is a statement of expeditures from the appropriation of
$10,000,00 out of the general revenues of the state, for the fiscal year
ending June 30, 1923:

RESOURCES.

Appropriation .............................. $ 1000000

DISBURSEMENTS.

Traveling expenses of Director ....................$ 29.67
Telegrams ...................,......... ........ 82
Minute Book for Secretary of Boards .............. 400

Total disbursements .... ................ 34.49
Balance uex nexpeded une 30. 1922........... 9.965.1

$ 10,000.00
Vouchers drawn against the $10,000.00 per annum authorized to be set
aride by the Board of Commissioners of the Everglades Drainage Dis-















S pon he progre ca n
n uldiSB, porehae of equipment, et
ton o the Act quoted above ay part of the $40,00fl,
lat for the years 1921-'28 remaining onepended on JelO
UlII,. Wll revert to the Treaury. It. therefore, clreuomtanae are h
etween July 1922, Jane 30. 1028, as to make completion of tha
b~udldp and physical equipment impossible a new appropration for
these purposee will have to be requested.
On the other hand, assuming that these improvements will be com-
pleted daring the coming 1d months, it Is believed that not less than
$20,000.00 per annum should be available for added Improvements, break
Ing of land, purchase of equipment and atual experimental work. The
followgl amount Is therefore recommended:

For mprovem t ents a general expenses, per annum.$20,000 00
Lees continuing appropriatls provided for by
Chapter 8442 ................................. 10,00000

Spelal appropriation required, per annu ......... 10,000.00
Special appropriation required for the bienaum... $20,000.00

AGRICULTURAL DIVISION.
(County Agent and Home Demonstratlon Agent Work and Related
Activities.)
It is te function of this Diiso of the College of Agriculture to
oarry information on agricultural subjects and home economic to those
who, for various reasons are unable to attend the state institutions I
pron. The work Is done for the most part through the county and
home demonstration agents, both of whom are ndaer the direct sup-
iieon and control of the College of Agrieulture oR the Univerit'eo
Forida. The county and home demonstration agents usualy have he.d
quarters at their county seats. The supervisory force of the Oen
agents Is located at the VnlverEnty at Gaineav lle, of the bn e t-
straon agent at the F e Flllorda e o g for Women at Tallhanl I
atD to negro agent at the Florid A. & I. College tHe
TallUhaM ee. Al of these supervlsory-orces are directly TW
to te Director o Agriadhltrti HitnBiLo loated tile
Odfatl@Yil. '-' :








HfMA t 1t9te-ial bugtwth of the "farm
theM1ir terla eo A. Knapp med iax-
a li n ~1 It was given a great impetus and placed
mniueat basae of org loa through the passage by Congress
r -Leve Act which became a law on July 1, 1914
7S' d ral funds for the extension work, conditioned upon
S *io m amd Iat, over and above an initial federal appropriation
i WU.00Fa perm anm, being appropriated by the state legislature The
'origall ederal Smith-Lever appropriation (1914) wea $480,00000 per
um, for 1915, $600,000.00 and for seven years theratter increased at
the rate of $00,000.00 per annum, so that for the fiscal year 1923 the
total appropriation is $4,560,000.00. No further automatic increases take
place. This fund is allotted to the various states on the basis of rural
population and the allotment to lorida for the years 1923-24 and 1924-'25
is 658,872.25. This amount, less $10,00.00 per annum, or $48,872 25,
must be appropriated by the state legislature in order for Florida to
secure the benefit of this federal fund. The Supplementary Smith-Lever
Fund, amounting now to $16,496.08 per annum, is also required to be met
by funds from state sources. As the annual allotment from federal
funds will remain constant from now on, the state off-set should be
made a continuing appropriation. Under the terms of the Federal Smith.
Lever Act, all funds appropriated by the state as of-sets are subject to
the same rules and regulations as the federal funds.
To assist the county and district agents in meeting special problems
a limited number of Specialists are employed. These specialists work
with the district and county agents, not being restricted to special ter-
ritories They attempt to work wherever most needed. In Counties
where there are no agents, these specialists work with individual farm-
ers and growers. However, the best results are secured when they can
work with county workers. The extension specialists coordinate their
work with various departments of the University of Florida Experiment
Station and thus keep the county workers in close touch with what the
Experiment Station s doing. When specialists of the United States
Department of Agriculture visit Florida for particular work they too,
work with the district and county agents, being directed to localities
most in need of their services or best suited to their purposes Through
the cooperation of the College of Agriculture and the United States De-
partment of Agriculture, various bureaus, departments and state agencies
Share so organized that duplication of effort may be reduced to the mini.
mnm.
County agents are under the direction of the State leader and the dis-
trlet agents. Boys club work Is under the direction of the boys' club agent
nad the district agents. Boy' clubs in various counties are organized by
the county agents with such asestance as they can secure from their
counties Spelaliats are responsible for the subject matter in their par-
ticular lnes, as it applies to agricultural work.


















.clat1Peaneflakdislttb
ilaBA Improved materially tbe Uilldtoid
o nutle where tWhey have wo~r
n4toenle* and eiclency in operation the AgrlAo
divided Into so-clled projects, all of wblitil
and approval of the Office of fitension work of the
epartment of Agriculture These roets at present a
z:
>~ at IA, Admtnatrauto. W
= eot LB. Printing and' Dstribution of Publlatiaondf. 4o
A* eWt-n, County Agent Work.
SProeot I, Bys' Club Work.
*' flpJ et IV. Home Demonstration Work. i -
'.w otV, Dairy and Animal lusbandry, Gras. and lFre 1
;P~a Ict VI, farm & Home Makers Clubs. (iteaeno wofta fi -
grDoe.) u d
hProject VII Entomology and Plant Patbho ,
Project VIII, Poultry Husbandry.
Project IX, Extension Schools.
-'.-n-n iV~fm IA D M INItft A rifw f ..rltlln i


ROJCT IAA STRA , ,I

This covers the admlnstrative work necessary in oe&
Sliultural and home demonstration activities. It tl
&d lesrlal work, records, lspeetion and 8upa$rvll.t
ai na t ofa projects, correpODadenee, phUideg,
tb national and state meetings of extention' w
tWa seenve work
PROJECT IB-PUB mCA

Salg the paswt blennium tan t bltig a
sad 104 lees o f te
addition to a large number t
gh wiatron ere ii W


~ti

















l"p t .-, 10,000
#^| an4Westflorlda......ei 5 5,000
flora d ........................1 20,000
l i .......... ... b.......... h4 6,000
le and Marmaleads ...... ....... 25000
tor'F t Year Sewing ................ 20 10000

PROJECT lI-COUNTY AG]iNT WORK

- nsrch as toe money allotted to county agent alaries, out of state
a fd federal funds, must be supplemented by tunds in each county-
uaSly in the form of appropriations by the Board of County Conars-
4lonerel-the number of counties having agents 8is constantly varying.
At the cloe of the biennium on June 30, 1922, there were county agent
in 34 counted, out of the 61 counties in the state. Following are sum-
feris of the county agents' activities during the two yeaar anding De-

QGNERAL ACTIVITIES.
Visits made by county agents ................................ 62,245
Cals on agent relative to work ,............................. 8,708
Farmer' metlog held ............ ........................ 1,505
Addresesa made at meeting .......... ........................ ,58
TfItal attendances ... ....................................... 96,795
d meetings held by agents ............................... 494
Tptal attendance at these meetings *........................... 13,890
Percentage of time spent In office work ........................ 2
PFcentae of time spent in field work ................. .... 74
OfiAtl l letters written ...... ..... ............. 34, 9
Artipes prepared for publication ............ .............. ,736

S A. Bulletins distributed .........- ................... 42,19
I P m tat forces distriuted.............. 32,730
g' l' Y '** *as-tcujtura --ims........... .... 1,8

.D *....Qplt...... 1o,1













o one at college as relt of


w.iddltlurlal or father schools or colleges -A repnlt


0alt4 by specialists from college or departments ...... I 7
tor, cooperators and club members making exhibitss. 1


qgirations in truck or smai fruit ....................... 4
e lr i keeping cost records at agent' Instances ............... 83
SB ero practicing fa prac fll plowing a result county agents work. 2,1


FARM AND HOESTEAD IMPROVEMENTS.


BrUdling erected .......-...- .......
Farm balldliae improved ...... ... ..-
New building plans furnished ... ... .... ..
Farm building painted or whitewashed ......
Home water systems installed or Improved ...
Home lighting systems installed ...........
Home grounds improved .- .... -
Parm and home sanitary conditions improved ...
Homes screened against fies and mosquitoes ..
Sanitary privies erected .. .... -- ... .- -.
farmers induced to adopt a systematic rotation .
Total acreage In systematic rotation .... ...
New pastures established ................
Old pasturesrenovated ............ ....
Acreage comprised in these pastures ........
Drainage systems established .. ..........
Farmers Induced to drain their lands ......
Land drained:
By tile, acres - ... ..--..........
By ditch, acres .. ...-..-.. ...*** **.... .
warmer who removed stumps ........
Total area e stumped ... .....- ..........
Farmers induced to terrace eloping land ......
Total acreage terraced ... ..................
Home gardens planted ......................
Farmers turning under cover crops .. .........
New implements and tools bought .............


.. ......... 6,014
.......... n11
............ 9,975
............ 81, 7
............ 1,944


DEMONSTRATIONS ON BARMS .


Oo > .... ...m . 1 ...-'. .....- -gh .......... ?.
Cotton ........... ........ ........ .........
*"-


. . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
..............
. . . . . . .

. . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .


. . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
















.. .. ............ .. ..... .... ..... ..... 10
.l Ae 40

l ,e ............................. .. .................... 9110




ogs ....................................................... 17 ,79
SHo ges ,,..,. ... .... .. .............,, ,... .. ..... ,, ., 37f
It Clsesoe and e Arnial treated by or at inslcme
ob oomnty almon
Mottle ..... 0...3............... .. . . . . ... 91,103
S...... .............. ... .... ..................... .......176.37 9
S Ho ps ...... ................ ......................... .... $79
Manure:
Farmers Induced to re for manure ..... .,,............... 1. ,81
estimated manure saved and used, to. ............... . .102.000

PROJECT H-BOYS' OLUB WORK

The farm boy of today Ia the farmer of tomorrow. It la te purpose of
the Extenalon Service to aid in the education of the farm boys and girls
of the state, to Inspire them with high ideals and to point out to them
the opportunities along agricultural, home making and related lines.
In keeping with thi policythhe farm boys are organized Into clubs by
the county agents, assisted by the tte Cl ent, the State B's Club Aent, and the girls
Into similar clubs by the home demontatmlon agents
The boys are organized into clubs for instruction in various subjects
At present we hae oys' Corn Clubs, Sweet Potato Clubs Peanut Clubs,
Bee Clubs, Citrus Clubs, Pig Clubs nd Fat-Barrow Clubs. The Club
members are given instruction in the bet methods of producing corn,
sweet potatoes, peanuts, etc., and at the end of the crop season club
eonteste are held wherein the boys compete for prizes. The successful
contestants are awarded scholarships which permit them to attend the
Short Course given annually at the University and designed entirely for
the purpose ot giving ooys instruction and field practice in practice
agriculture and tor opening to their view the wonderful posibliytles in
Sfflwling an agricultural career. These scholarships are awarded by
bankers, busiess men, various association, railroads, et. Successful
club conteataanta n the various counties also send their Droducts to state
Sand county irs, many of them winning prizs of considerable value
A Anna campSy are held, at which Instruction in antation, health, ath-
and od tl Esenehlp is gien. I wll as in strictly a*Vl cltia
M eate.





















.. *-.-.......-.. ..-.......................... flt


PROJECT IV-HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK.

Home Demonstration work Ai specifically provided for In the Smith
Lover Act of Congress and la regarded as of equal rank and important
with the County Agent Work. All activities which contribute to the be
termet of farm homes and their occupants fall within the proatnee
of the home demonstration work. Among the home demonstration
acivtles and instructional work may be mentioned nutrition and PrD
paration of foods, sewing, gardening, ConiD& poultry rating, home
Improvement, sanitation. care of children, home dairyin, community
betterment and instruction of girl club members In these and related
subjects. The Agricultural Extension Divislon allots to home demon
stration work In the counties the same amount as to the county agent
work. These funds are supplemented from county sources, usually by
Boards of County Commissioners or School Boards.
AS In the case of the county agent work. specialaits in various sub-
jects, particularly In home dairy and farm poultry work, nutrition and
sewing, are employed to assist the county bome demonstration agent
and to supplement their work These spedal workers, together with.
the isrict Demonstration Agents, carry the various linea of
work, as far as possible, Into these counties not provided witst ho ,
demonstration agents.
The home demonstration work has had the hearty Tsmpathy apt.
Instance of the President of the Florida State College for Women and
his assoate on the College faculty.
'On June 0, 1922, there were home demonstration agent l 28
ties n addition to these, there were 9 nero women
in home demonstration work among negroes (See
The following figure showing avtites of the C
strtton agents during the 12 months endi Do b
an idea of the vast amount of gt adlipVh U d
7 r ,













,atl,.bsu4 ofce..........s......6o..........i5B

Sho emon ator ( e) ...... .......... ...... 7,7
S0t -meetage tended .................................... 4,778
e of cb members at meeting ..................... 60,06
Other meetl.ng partepated t .............................. 1,07
S iftndated attendance at other meetings ...... ............... 360

DEMONSTRATIONS GIVEN.

Plant propagation ........................................ 429
Labor-flavng appliance ... .................................. 302
Poultry ........... ... .............................. ....... 1,087
Food preservwaton ...... ..................... ... 1,772
Dairy ............. .. ...... ......... .... .... ... ..... ... 67
Home Improvement .... ................,............ ........ 544
Food utiliation (cooking, nutrition) .......................... 1,297
Beautfying the farmstead ..... ............................. 249
Clothing and handicraft ....... ............................. 1,666
Total demonstrations given ..... ........ .................. 7,800

ENROI LMENT AND MEiMBERSHIP.

Girls, Women.
Total enrollment in all lines of work ........... 5,818 3,707
Total number reporting ............. ........... 3,98 2,160
S Total number in clubs .... .................... 4.204 101

GAi, EN, OROHARD, GROVE AND VINEYARD.

S Total garden, orchard or grape demonstrators... Lis 2,421

BG ABlB8l, FRUITS AND MEATS CONSERVED.

Numb of oer s, fruit in glass............ 6ftl0 804,068
Number of containersfrult in tn ....... ........ 90,21 46,7"4
Value oa fruits canned n tin and glaes.......... 85,688.10 $108
Number of contaner, vgetablea in ........ ,13438
number of contalern, tegetables n tin..... ... 3n210 91,91
- Value of eaned v tn nd a tin and sla.......S I $ 7780
















l d standard egs pur ased ...... l ,
r o demonttra e purchasing Atundr
bl ts .................................. 12
ei of demonstratora usig inubatos ...... 417 31
W Imber of demonstrators purchasing standard
breeding atock ............................. 1n 410
Number of standard bred chickens purchased.... 1,361 2,204


TEXTILS, MATERIALS, STRAWS. ETC.

Number of demonstrators ....................
Number reporting .........................-.
Number of garment and other articles made.....


Number of camps for the istruction of club meon
bere and prize winners in county ............ 19
Total attendance at these camps 628
Number of community exhibits, fairs and poultry
shows held in counties ............ .... 49 24 M
Number of club members and demonstrators mak
Ing exhibits ...............- .............. 1,82M 6805
Number receiving awards ... ......... ...... 475 20
Number of county aitrs ....... .....-- -16
Number of club members and demOnsrMtor mak
Ing ehibits ...... .....-................ 764 051-
Number maklg eiblts at district or state fairs 644 1,00
Number receiving exhibit awards at county, di- -
trict or state fairs ................ ....--.... 9
Total value of prices including scholarbip
awarded to club members .......... $6,41745
Number of ldb members payrg part or all of their
sabool expenses from mo aey earned In lub work 1
jmber of c am b members who Mave bWkAbeppl












of de3onatrato 0..................... a 04
- ag)er report!" ..........-.....-....--- -*.. 47 3 M
Nmbnerl adopting praei.es ,,.,.......... *..... 269 430

IMPROVEMENTS AT INSTIGATION OF AGENTS.

Water stems nstaled .................................... 65
Septic takn nlstaled ............... ........ ......... 1
Irghting systems installed ...... ........................... 23
Heatdg systems installed ...................................... 8
KItchens Improved by sareentig .......................... 211
Floors improved ............................................... 119
Equipment rearranged ........... ....... ........ 96
OTHER HOME IMPROVEMENT.
Flors ............... ....... ... ........ ...... ... 73
W alls ..................... .. .. .... ....... ........ 121
Pences repaired .. ................. .... ..... .. 103
Sleeping porches built -........... ... ... .................. 65
Living rooms improved .......... ............. 182
HouBes screened . .. .
Kitchen cabinets Instailed ......... ... ....... 22
Wooden boesa Installed ... .... .................... .... 94
Wheel trays secured ........ ............................... 22
Flower boxes built ..... 99..........,,,,,,..... .. 99
Siaks and dralnboard added .................................. 72
Washing machines put into use ..... ............ .... .. 63
Ironing boards put Into use ................ ................ 38
Other laundry equipment installed .... ....... ...... 2
Piroless cookers secured ........ .. ..................... 30
Holusos repep ed .. ....... ... ..... ..... 120
Houses remodeled ...... .... ........... .......... 92
New houses built .......... ....... ... 113
Unsightly building re d or rre ed o repaired .................... 2
Farmers planting trees ....... ....... ., .. .. .......
Earmenrs seeding lawns ..... 11
Farmer plans nt hrb .............. 3 4
Farmers planting Dfowers and vinea ....................... 9
Shade trees and shrubs planted ........................... .. 2,

PROJECT V-DAIRY AND ANIMAL HUSBANDRy, GRAS AND
FORAGE WORK
Interest n dafrng has steady increased in the stat during the past

















rby prevented. On he h
Pblejo asecrtati that in a #ambe Ot
o i rrameam stations shipping o cmal
ttable and a number of these have already,
l 0ork of the ixtenlon Dairyman ha also een
t tptn,,pf better and more economical feeling ayems
s'pf.aertal cities and towns, or the adoption of bett
St armethods of handling milk and dairy products
ift plb for the county agents to offer first-hand and rR a
wpstio concerning dairy questions in their respective opvuli
pqpnection with the Home Demonstration work an Et ion
liy Agent is employed, with headquarters at Tallahassee. This w
bppWrating in conjunction with both county and home demonstet .
Sbnt. gives special attention to the small or home dairy, to theapro
Sprepration of home dairy products and securing profit therierom nAd
totkbe best use of milk and its products in the home.
C pader this project, also, is included extension work in animal
try. Mr. John M. Scott, Animal Husbandman of the ]xperlment St
old appointment as Animal Husbandman for the ~ixtenoeon 3 i i
and in thia capacity assists both livestock producer and count g t
with their problems. ,
Considerable work has been done along extenelon lines by the '
and rage Crop Specialists, surveys of grasese and forage crops
been made in several counties and the county agents adviBeasa~,
bet usae to be made of available grasses within their cowntle,
tin on grasses has also been published during the blenum)

PaOJECT V--FARM AND HOMEi MAlKERS J
(Extenaion Work with Negroes.)
For the purpose of this work colored farmeraj i
organized into Farm and Home Makers' Cbs;flp
tkn is given In farm operation and practice, m
onenr ences ae e profit, health, adJ e
pltry racing, gardnin ood olinip, e
So rdt t from county source Mha,
work, work amon ner








g o at soopS slfl Ibaide with both
and the Flort ltatecollege tr Woman Local
l em traon eagetn are employed in counties hav-
scored farm popmu o and these local agents submit their
re t to their county and home demonstration agents, reape-
e Colored boys and gils a lso organized into clubs, somewhat
comparable to the lbs organized among white boys and girls and for
almnar purposes. Special stress is laid upon Industry, thrift and good
Atlkmship.
During the fiscal year which ended June 80. 1922, Local (Negro) County
Agents were employed n 6 counties and Local Home Demonstration
Agents (Negro Women Agents) In counties. These were all colored
people of unusual ability and intelligence. fully awake to the proper re-
lationship to be maintained between white and colored citizens and
earnest in their efforts to improve farm and home conditions for the
colored people in their respective communities. More literal provision
for such work should be available than Is the case at present
The following tables show the work accomplished with colored farmers
and farm women during the calendar year which ended December 31,
1921:


Corn Clubs:
Clubs organized ...........................
Number enrolled .... ......... ......... ...
Number reporting .... . ...............
Bushels harvested ........ ................
Value of crop .......... ............. $
Average bushels to the acre ....... ...
Highest bushel yield ..... .. .....
Market price (bushel) ... . ............

Potato Clubs:
Clubs organized .......... .........
Number enrolled .. ...........
Number reporting ... .......
Bushels bavested ..............
Value of crop .......................... .
Average bushels to the acre ...............
Highest bushel yield ... ..........
Market price (bushel) ..............

Peanut Clubs:
Clubs Organized .........................
Number enrolled ......
Number reporting ......................


















r E ......I..*............** .* 1
o 4.. I .... ... ..............
placed ......................... 77
raised .... ................... ........ 40.76


Senrolled ................................

w reporting ...........................
Amt saved by cdubs ............. .........


stores made ............................. ... ..
o W made ,.......................... ............
iBter made ..... ....... ............ ....
|e adv c aned ........................ .......... .......
T pwhiteb shed ..... ... .... In........ .... ....
ae painted ...... ... ..... ......... .. ...
remodeled ............................ .....
if crea ed ................ ... ......... ... ... ...
pur ha aBed by influence of Dg t ............ .........
e aB set o n t ........ ..... .......... ..... .....
Fuie T B ot ot....... ............ ......
sr temBs installed .... ............ .....-- **..
Use Wntadled ..... ............. ............. ......
adt eo t demonstrators ................. ...
Smade to club members .......................... ....
Br nieetln held ..... ..... ............ .....
L .............. ...................... -.-.. .. .. .


HOME MAKERS' CLUBS (COLORD).

ubte: Worn
,t . ..... ......... .. .........- 1
reporting ...... ..................... 1
Wffltd be tha ajiartm, esmajtbed ...... AW
ffIes In la Am pints, estimated ...... M1
LUmr 52M pIrt% Odi bllim~dt..d.a












1W

--4 tiw-, 8.105
swi'e ........ ..- ;... ..'. 1| 831S5
Sor hoome Mee. dos .... .... s4 10
kM b, club members doe ........ 271 195
mardwtked by club mobers pa nds ...... 5 1,110
t po u ry f ed .............. 498.70 $ P8u7l r


em "" .....""'-"------* 141 25
flmber repoting ........................... 103 148
rlee cookers mae ............... ..... 373 105
Soap made from waste fats, bars ............. 5,219 1,370
Houses whitewashed 3.................------... 9 8
Houses painted 4.... ..,............. ..... 11
Homes remodeled ...................-.. ...- 109 90
Homes purchased ..................... ... 5 ..
Fruit trees set out 2 ....................... 06 132
Grape vines uot out ................. .... 330 212
aRgs and other articles made from broker sacks 901 309
Rag rage made ........ .................. 1423 8
Floor mops made from old stockngh ..... .. 222 98
Hata made roe fro i gras, pine needles and
shauks ...32............. ......... 378 257
Baskets made from wire grass, pine needles and
palmetto ........ ... .... ..... ..... ... .. 211 192
Water systems Installed ..... .... .. 2
Telephones installed .... ............ 6
Value of articles made from unmarketable and
discarded materials from farm and home... 398.60

Datry Clubs:'
Enrollment ................ ............ 45 10
Number reporting .............. ..... 23 5
Cows kept for milk used in home ............ 265
Batter made by club members pounds ........ 4,320 2,574
lhe dairy products marketed by club members.$ 278 40 $ 108 0
Ptoess butter mkde in home, pounds ........ 2,208

PROJBCT PV-ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY.
e county agents are called upon to deal with a great many oUt




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