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 Report of Board of Control State...
 Biennal report of the University...
 The Florida State University President's...
 Biennial report of the Florida...
 Biennial report of theUniversity...
 The president's report Florida...
 Florida Institute for Continuing...
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Group Title: Report of the Florida Board of Regents
Title: Report of the Board of Control
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094136/00016
 Material Information
Title: Report of the Board of Control
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Florida. Board of Control.
Publisher: Board of Control
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, FL
Publication Date: 1962/1964
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Bibliographic ID: UF00094136
Volume ID: VID00016
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: electronic_oclc - 55693843

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
        Front Cover 3
        Page 7
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Report of Board of Control State of Florida
        Section 1
        Page 5
        Page 5a
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
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        Page 19
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Biennal report of the University of Florida
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
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    The Florida State University President's report
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
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        Page 77
    Biennial report of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
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    Biennial report of theUniversity of South Florida
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
    The president's report Florida Atlantic University- Boca Raton
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
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    Florida Institute for Continuing University Studies
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
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    Biennial report of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University Hospital
        Page 164
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    Back Cover
        Back cover 1
    Back Cover
        Back cover 2
Full Text




















Trans. #: 313413 111111 11111 11111111111111 I I I

Title Report of the Board of Control./ VOLUME FOR
1962/1964 ONLY SEE NOTE BELOW
S Author Florida. Board of Control.
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Loaned To: FTU University of Central Florida DLLI

ILL Office Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00am-5:00pm
Phone: (813) 974-3847 illreqs@lib.usf.edu





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St. Petersburg, Florida
November 1, 1964

THE HONORABLE FARRIS BRYANT
GOVERNOR OF FLORIDA


DEAR GOVERNOR BRYANT:

I have the privilege of submitting herewith the Biennial Report of the
Board of Control for the period beginning July 1, 1962, and ending
June 30, 1964. This report is presented in compliance with the provisions
of Chapter 5384, Laws of Florida, 1905.

The two years covered by the report were ones of significant growth and
development in Florida's system of Higher Education. The accomplish-
ments recited here would not have been possible without the cooperation
and guidance of you and the other members of the state Board of Educa-
tion, and for this we extend our sincere appreciation.


Respectfully submitted,

BAYA M. HARRISON, JR., Chairman


THE BOARD OF CONTROL OF FLORIDA
















THE STATE BOARD OF CONTROL

BAYA M. HARRISON, JR., Chairman ................. St. Petersburg
GERT H. W. SCHMIDT, Vice Chairman. ................. Jacksonville
CHARLES R. FORMAN, D.V.M. ................... Fort Lauderdale
JOHN C. PACE ................ ..... ..................... Pensacola
WAYNE C. MCCALL, D.D.S. ................................Ocala
CHESTER E. W HITTLE ................................. Orlando
JAMES LAWRENCE KING .................................. Miami

DR. J. BROWARD CULPEPPER, Executive Director
Tallahassee

HENDRIX CHANDLER, Corporate Secretary
Tallahassee



THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

FARRIS BRYANT, President ............................. Governor
TOM ADAMS .................................. Secretary of State
J. EDWIN LARSON ................. .............. Treasurer
JAMES W KYNES ............................... Attorney General
THOMAS D. BAILEY, Secretary .... Superintendent of Public Instruction















CONTENTS


Page
The Report of the Executive Director of the Board of Control .... 1

Appendix A-The Executive Director's Report of the
Administered Funds and Interest and
Sinking Fund Balances and Revenue
Certificates Outstanding

The Report of the President of the University of Florida ...... 26

The Report of the President of the Florida State University .... 50

The Report of the President of the Florida Agricultural and
Mechanical University ................. .............. 78

The Report of the President of the University of South Florida . 122

The Report of the President of Florida Atlantic University ..... 134

The Report of the Director of the Florida Institute for
Continuing University Studies ......................... 146

The Report of the Administrator of the Florida Agricultural
and Mechanical University Hospital .................... 166








REPORT TO THE
BOARD OF CONTROL BY THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

General Summary
Growth and expansion highlighted developments in the State Univer-
sity System during the biennium. Existing institutions and programs were
expanded and new institutions were planned to meet the pressures of rec-
ord enrollments and of new knowledge.
Governor Farris Bryant, in his opening message to the 1963 Legisla-
ture, declared that "by far the most critical need that we face in this com-
ing biennium is the need to make sufficient provisions for the higher ed-
ucation of the young people of Florida."
Figures compiled by the research staff of the Board of Control show
that not only is there a steady increase in the number of high school grad-
uates in Florida, but the percentage of high school graduates entering in-
stitutions of higher learning in the state is accelerating.
The State Department of Education reported that 52,446 young people
graduated from public high schools in Florida in 1963. The number of
graduates jumped to 58,557 in 1964. The projected number of graduates
for the years immediately ahead are: 1965, 59,535; 1966, 60,468; 1967,
61,911; 1968, 65,248; 1969, 68,982; and 1970, 72,182.
In the fall of 1958 the first-time-in-college enrollment in Florida institu-
tions of higher learning was 48.8 per cent of the number of high school
graduates that spring. The percentage increased to 50.5 in 1962 and 53.5
in 1963.
Approximately 22 per cent of the in-college students from Florida at-
tended institutions outside the state in the fall of 1963. Fourteen per cent
of the total enrollment in Florida institutions came from outside the state,
making Florida a debtor state in this regard.
Faced with reliable forecasts that enrollments in all institutions of
higher learning in Florida would more than double by 1970, the Board of
Control under authorizations by the Legislature began the establishment
of two new degree-granting institutions at Pensacola and Orlando.
On the basis of an educational study directed by Dr. John Guy
Fowlkes of the University of Wisconsin, the Board of Control and the
State Board of Education decided to establish an upper-level institution
(juniors and seniors) in the Pensacola area to serve the needs of West
Florida and the remainder of the state. Junior colleges in the area will
provide most of the students.
A 1,000 acre tract about eight miles north and east of Pensacola was
selected as the site for the new institution which was named the Univer-
sity of West Florida. The Board of County Commissioners of Escambia
County, in addition to providing the property without charge to the state,
donated a 165-acre beachfront site on Santa Rosa Island as a recreational
area.







BIENNIAL REPORT, 1962-1964


Judge Harold B. Crosby, Dean of University Relations and Develop-
ment at the University of Florida, was named the first president of the
University of West Florida, effective July 1, 1964. Educational planning
was started by the Board of Control staff preparatory to its opening in
September, 1967. Construction of an Administrative-Classroom building
is to be started with a $1,400,000 appropriation of the 1963 Legislature.
Thirty-two sites of a minimum 1,000 acres each were offered free of
charge to the Board of Control for the establishment of a new full-fledged
university in East Central Florida. After several weeks of inspection and
study, the Board accepted the 1,220-acre Adamucci tract about 12 miles
northeast of Orlando. Educational and physical plant planning were
started by the Board staff, looking toward opening of the institution in
September, 1968.
Florida Atlantic University completed its staffing and curriculum plan-
ning preparatory to opening of the new upper-level institution at Boca
Raton to a predicted 2,000 students (juniors) in September, 1964.
Off-campus programs of the State University System were broadened
to meet the needs of industry and to provide other educational services.
Increased opportunities were provided to permit Florida scientists, engi-
neers, and other persons to work toward advanced degrees while em-
ployed full time on their jobs.
The Florida Institute for Continuing University Studies, created in
December, 1961, as the administrative unit of the University System
through which the universities extended their programs and services to
off-campus locations, was given legal status by the Legislature. Enroll-
ments and course offerings increased steadily under guidelines set forth in
the Educational Extension Act of 1963.
As a result of other legislative authorization in 1963, the Board of Con-
trol approved the creation of a new off-campus program called the Grad-
uate Engineering Education System (GENESYS). The University of
Florida College of Engineering will utilize a system of closed circuit talk-
back television transmission and reception, as well as professors in the
classroom, to teach students in East Central Florida.
The on-campus enrollment at the state universities climbed to 33,348
in the fall of 1963, distributed as follows: University of Florida, 14,810;
Florida State University, 11,162; University of South Florida, 4,593; and
Florida A & M University, 2,884. Total enrollment in the fall of 1962 was
29,219.
Projections made for the Board of Control by the Florida State Univer-
sity Institute of Social Research show that the enrollment of state univer-
sities will climb to 75,902 in 1970 and to 135,439 in 1975.
The character of the older state universities continues to change. With
the establishment of more junior colleges, the University of Florida and
Florida State University have concentrated more on the upper undergrad-
uate and graduate levels.








REPORT OF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR


While this reduces the pressure on freshman and sophomore enroll-
ment, it increases operating costs. National records show the cost of up-
per-level instruction (juniors and seniors) is twice that of the first two
years, while graduate training costs are four times as much. Graduate en-
rollment in the fall of 1963 was 1,624 at the University of Florida; 1,575
at Florida State University; and 269 at Florida A & M University.
The Legislature and the people of Florida gave their backing to the ex-
pansion of the State University System by the passage of the College
Building Amendment which provided the state universities, as well as the
public junior colleges, for the first time with a plan for financing con-
struction on an orderly, continuing basis.
The program, approved by Florida voters in the November 5, 1963,
special general election, authorized issuance of bonds to finance $75 mil-
lion worth of buildings in 1963-65. Of this amount $45 million will be
spent on state university buildings and $30 million on junior college con-
struction. The Amendment authorized the issuance of $50 million in
bonds in 1965-67 for buildings for state universities, junior colleges and
vocational-technical schools. The bonds will be paid off from an existing
1% per cent tax levied on the gross receipts of utility companies.
The complex problems of relating the state's system of degree-granting
institutions to the space era of science and technology was a priority
concern of the Board of Control during the biennium.
With the assistance of private funds raised by businessmen and indus-
trialists of the state through the Council of 100, the Board directed in
November, 1962, that a study be made of the state's space age needs and
opportunities in higher education.
In March, 1963, the task forces of top personnel drawn from the state
universities and private colleges and nationally known consultants re-
cruited for this Space Era Education Study made a report of their find-
ings at the Governor's Conference on Higher Education.
The report said that in many respects Florida institutions were doing
very creditable work. It also stated that Florida was not taking full ad-
vantage of its opportunities in other areas, particularly in advanced
higher education in the fields of space sciences, engineering and oceanog-
raphy.
Recommendations were made to the 1963 Legislature by the Board of
Control that $22,522,000 be appropriated from General Revenue to ac-
complish the key recommendations in the Space Era report. However, the
Legislature was able to find funds to finance only a small part of this pro-
gram.
Because of pressures brought on by increased enrollments and expan-
sion of knowledge, the State University System after careful study initi-
ated in September, 1962, a trimester plan of year-round operations.
Throughout the country there is a trend toward year-round operation of
colleges and universities to allow greater use of expensive physical plants.







BIENNIAL REPORT, 1962-1964

Florida was the first state to inaugurate a trimester plan of operation for
an entire system.
Reaction to the trimester system has been varied. At this stage, this
much can be said regarding the experiences under the plan:
The trimester plan of operation is one of the several means being em-
ployed to use more effectively the facilities and the faculties of the uni-
versities. While it has certain disadvantages, by the same token it has
many advantages. To give a full and complete evaluation and judgment
at this time is premature. Careful study of the trimester plan as it now op-
erates in Florida is under way, and after a student generation has passed
through the universities under the plan, perhaps evaluation will lead to
some adjustments, some modifications which will improve the system. In
any event, it appears wise to continue some plan of year-round operation.
Revision of the Operating Manual of the Board of Control was com-
pleted during the biennium. A policy statement on "Academic Freedom
and Responsibility" has attracted wide attention and acclaim. Through
policies and procedures the Board has set guidelines of responsibility for
the Board and the universities with a more realistic system of delegation
of authority to the Executive Director and to the presidents of the insti-
tutions. The goal of the Board has been to establish policies and pro-
cedures flexible enough to allow maximum efficiency for the institutions
and firm enough to allow the Board to fulfill its public trust as guardians
of the State University System.
The jurisdiction of the Board of Control was confined to the State Uni-
versity System for the first time since it was created in 1905. The Legis-
lature, upon the recommendation of the Board of Control, removed the
State School for the Deaf and the Blind from its supervision and trans-
ferred it to a Board of Trustees set up under the Board of Education, ef-
fective July 1, 1963. This transfer has proved helpful both to the state
universities and to the State School for the Deaf and the Blind.

New and Expanded Programs
In order to improve coordination, the Board of Control decided in
1960 that each of the universities would develop a long-range master
plan to guide their growth within their respective roles. The study is a
continuing Role and Scope study of each institution in the University Sys-
tem.
The Space Era Education Study from November, 1962, to March,
1963, was a part of the continuing Role and Scope Study, and resulted in
the following accomplishments in the area of new and expanded pro-
grams:
1. An undergraduate College of Engineering has been established at
the University of South Florida. A dean of engineering has been
hired and plans have been drawn for the first building which will
cost more than $2 million in state funds.








Report of
BOARD OF CONTROL
STATE OF FLORIDA


1962-1964








REPORT OF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR


2. The University of Florida was authorized to offer new programs
leading to the Ph.D. degree in mechanical, aerospace and industrial
and systems engineering and to make substantial improvements to
buildings and facilities at the College of Engineering.
3. Florida State University at Tallahassee has expanded its Depart-
ment of Engineering Science into a School of Engineering Science.
It also was authorized to plan toward a Ph.D. program in engineer-
ing science. The school offers a program cutting across conventional
areas of civil, mechanical, electrical and chemical engineering and
emphasizing graduate education.
4. Florida Atlantic University has been authorized to establish as soon
as practicable undergraduate degree programs in engineering sci-
ences and in such applied and engineering specialties as may be ap-
proved by the Board of Control. It also has been approved as a
holding institution for a Hydrographic Engineering Center in South-
east Florida.
5. Divisions of Sponsored Research have been set up at the University
of Florida and Florida State University under authorization of the
1963 Legislature. The law allows the universities greater flexibility
in the management of federal and private research grants. The
Board of Control expects that the program will stimulate growth of
research programs in the universities, allow the universities to do a
better job for private industry and the federal government and im-
prove educational research generally.
On the basis of a study by its Program and Curriculum Committee, the
Board of Control decided that graduate work would be offered at Florida
Atlantic University at a future date under certain terms and conditions.
The guidelines established for graduate study were:
1. That no formal graduate work for graduate students on the campus
at Florida Atlantic University be authorized during the first three
trimesters of operation;
2. That Florida Atlantic be authorized, beginning in September, 1964,
with students at the junior class level, to develop, and initiate an in-
tegrated, continuous, sequential undergraduate-graduate program,
for its undergraduate students only, carrying through to the Master's
degree in (a) chemistry, (b) biology, and (c) selected areas of ed-
ucation, including science education;
3. That Florida Atlantic be authorized, commencing in September,
1964, to give some selected graduate courses in education off cam-
pus, through the Florida Institute for Continuing University Stud-
ies, which may be counted as credit toward the Master's degree in
education at Florida Atlantic University. It must be distinctly un-
derstood that these offerings be limited, so as not to interfere in any
way with the on-going program of instruction and planning neces-
sary to develop a strong undergraduate program.



















/5 t







BIENNIAL REPORT, 1962-1964


Under authorization granted by the Board of Control on January 10,
1964, the University of South Florida inaugurated graduate work by of-
fering a Master of Arts degree program in Elementary Education, starting
in Trimester 3-B, 1964.

Significant progress was made during the biennium in the definition of
the role and scope of each of the institutions in a number of fields. The
volume of role and scope activity continues to be greatest in the field of
instruction as distinguished from research, administration and extension.

The central purpose of role and scope work is to prevent uneconomical
duplication of programs in the State University System as the System ex-
pands its offerings in the effort to provide more educational opportunity
to the people of Florida.

The following summary of role and scope actions taken during the past
two years will serve to indicate the effectiveness with which the role and
scope function has been implemented:


Date of
Board Meeting Board Action on R & S Recommendations

6/19/62 Approved City & Regional Planning:
Graduate professional curriculum in City and Re-
gional Planning allocated to F.S.U. as sole location
in System.

Approved Nursing in System.

9/14/62 Rescinded Approval of Nursing

10/18/62 Approved Business Administration:
Allocated baccalaureate degree programs to F.S.U.,
U.F., and U.S.F.:
Accounting Finance
Economics Marketing
Risk Management
Statistics and Quantitative Analysis

"Single-location" baccalaureate degrees, at this time,
were allocated as follows:
Real Estate-to U.F.
Hotel & Restaurant Management-to F.S.U.
Transportation and International Trade-to U.S.F.

Authorized Master's and Doctor's degree programs
at F.S.U., U.F., and U.S.F., when ready.
6







REPORT OF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Date of
Board Meeting Board Action on R & S Recommendations

10/18/62 Approved Modern Foreign Languages:
Allocated baccalaureate degree programs to
F.A.M.U., F.S.U., U.F., and U.S.F., as follows:
French Russian
German Spanish
Portuguese Italian
"Single-location" baccalaureate degree programs
were allocated as follows:
Chinese-to F.S.U.
Arabic-to U.F.
Japanese-to U.S.F.
Allocated master's degree programs as follows:
To F.A.M.U.-French and Spanish
To F.S.U.-French, German, Russian, Spanish
To U.F.-French, German, Portuguese, Russian,
Spanish
To U.S.F.-French, Russian, Spanish
Allocated doctor's degree programs as follows:
To F.S.U.-French, German, Spanish
To U.F.-French, German, Spanish, and also
Portuguese and Russian when master's
is sufficiently developed.
Approved interinstitutional study of Cent'rs of
Foreign Studies in relation to Modern Foreign
Language; study to involve FICUS.
Approved Music:
Reaffirmed Board decision to have a single school
of music in the System (at F.S.U.).
Allocated degree programs as follows:
To F.S.U.-Baccalaureate degree program in per-
cussion; Master's degree programs in
woodwind specialist, brass specialist,
percussion specialist;
Ph.D. program in music history ai-d
literature when ready.
To U.F.-Baccalaureate degree programs in or-
gan, piano and voice, and "additional
areas, the number of which to be kept
in strict limits."
Master's degree in music education
(graduate work at U.F. to be limited
to this degree).
To U.S.F.-B.A. in music and music education.







BIENNIAL REPORT, 1962-1964


Date of
Board Meeting Board Action on R & S Recommendations

11/16/62 Approved Biological Sciences:
Allocated applied biological science degree pro-
grams to U.F. such as:
Animal Husbandry
Horticulture
Forestry
Allocated principal responsibility for systematic
biology to U.F.
Authorized baccalaureate degree programs to all
universities, as needed.
Authorized master's degree programs for U.S.F. and
for F.A.M.U.
NOTE: Ph.D. programs are already in force in the
biological sciences at F.S.U. and at U.F.

1/18/63 Approved Medicine, Dentistry and Health Related
Services:
Medicine:
Authorized a department of preventive and com-
munity medicine at U.F.
Authorized master's programs and doctor's pro-
grams at U.F. as follows:
Radiation Biophysics
Radiation Safety
Pharmacology & Therapeutics
Dentistry:
Allocated a dental school to U.F. (By 1970)
Health Related Services:
Authorized baccalaureate degree programs in the
following areas for U.F.:
X-Ray Technology
Medical Record Librarianship
Hospital Dietetics
Authorized master's degree programs in the fol-
lowing areas for U.F.:
Medical Technology
Hospital Administration
Occupational Therapy
Physical Therapy
Medical Illustrations







REPORT OF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR


Date of
Board Meeting Board Action on R & S Recommendations
1/18/63 Authorized doctor's degree programs in the fol-
lowing areas for U.F.:
Occupational Therapy
Rehabilitation Counseling
Authorized baccalaureate degree programs in the
following areas for U.S.F.:
Speech pathology & Audiology
Medical Technology
Microbiology

2/8/63 Approved Nursing:
Authorized master's degree program (in medical
and surgical) for U.F.
Authorized master's degree program (in clinical
specialist in psychiatric nursing) for F.S.U.
Authorized Ph.D. planning for U.F.

3/26/63 Approved Florida SEES-R & S related recommenda-
tions on Oceanography:
F.S.U. to be in charge of entire Gulf program,
with U.S.F. cooperating;
F.A.U. to be holding institution for Hydrographic
Engineering Center in southeast Florida;
U.F. to continue to direct coastal engineering and
harbor development projects.

Approved Florida SEES-R & S related recommend-
ations on Engineering:
F.A.U. to initiate a program of "physics, chemis-
try and engineering" at the earliest possible
date. To have undergraduate Institute of En-
gineering.
U.S.F. to be authorized for Engineering School.
F.S.U.'s Department of Engineering Science
changed to School of Engineering Science.

5/10/63 Approved Journalism & Communications:
Reaffirmed Board decision to have a single school
of journalism in the System, to be at U.F.
Authorized Ph.D. program in mass communications
for U.F.
Approved F.S.U.'s undergraduate inter-divisional
degree program in radio and television.







BIENNIAL REPORT, 1962-1964


Date of
Board Meeting Board Action on R & S Recommendations
12/6/63 Librarianship:
Reaffirmed decision to have only one (1) profes-
sional School of Librarianship in the System and
provided for inter-university cooperation at the
undergraduate and graduate levels in providing the
opportunity for students to meet more conveniently
degree requirements.

1/10/64 Authorized Master's degree in Elementary Educa-
tion for U.S.F.

2/14/64 Approved Engineering

5/15/64 Approved undergraduate Department of Religion for
F.S.U.

Recommendations
If the State University System in Florida is to fulfill its obligations in
providing for greatly increased enrollments and expansion of knowledge
during the next two years it must maintain, and accelerate insofar as pos-
sible, the momentum begun during the past biennium.

This means that operating funds to be provided by the 1965 Legisla-
ture must be sufficient to allow the older institutions to continue their
planned expansion and development in their particular roles and Florida
Atlantic University to add the senior class and limited graduate work.

Sufficient funds must be provided so that the University of West Flor-
ida at Pensacola will be prepared to receive its opening class in Septem-
ber, 1967, and so that the new university at Orlando can open in Septem-
ber, 1968.
Adequate funds must be provided so that the off-campus arm of the
state universities, the Florida Institute for Continuing University Studies,
can meet the rapidly expanding demands by business and industry, and
so that the Graduate Engineering Education System (GENESYS) can
assist persons in space establishments in East Central Florida to work to-
ward advanced degrees while employed full time on their jobs.

The universities began catching up on their backlog of building needs
with proceeds from the $75 million College Building Amendment ap-
proved by the voters. In addition to the bond proceeds, Florida is ex-
pected to receive $5,195,000 each of the next three years under the Fed-
eral Facilities Act but this money must be divided among all public and
private universities and junior colleges.








REPORT OF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR


These bond funds and federal money will meet only part of the ac-
cumulated needs. The Board of Control estimated in 1963 that $103 mil-
lion would be required to take care of the backlog, even without con-
sidering needs of new growth. So, while the bond funds and federal funds
will go a long way toward catching up, they will fall short of meeting the
total needs, and other funds must be provided for capital outlay.
Unless the state plans wisely and meets the demands now facing it,
there may be as many as 17,000 to 25,000 qualified young people each
year by 1970 who desire to attend college in Florida who will have no
place to go.
There is an urgent need for the updating at the earliest possible date of
the master plan developed in 1954-56 which will provide the basis for the
development of a reasonably adequate, comprehensive program of post-
high school education for Florida through 1975.
Such a system of post-high school education, appropriately supported,
will meet for the foreseeable future Florida's needs for public post-high
school education, will provide for a diversity of educational opportunity
with quality, and will provide for an increase in availability of education
for the numbers of citizens of Florida who need it.
The state has now implemented almost all of the recommendations
made in 1956 by the Council for the Study of Higher Education in Flor-
ida, and there is need for effective planning which will give the state con-
tinued direction from this point.
The Council's specific recommendations regarding the expansion of the
degree-granting sector of public education in Florida were realized by the
establishment of the University of South Florida and the Florida Atlantic
University. Further, in accordance with the Council's recommendations
that other degree-granting facilities be added when and where needed,
two new institutions and an extension of the University of Florida's Col-
lege of Engineering were authorized by the 1963 Legislature.
The master planning must address itself to these fundamental issues:
1. What programs of degree-granting facilities will Florida provide to
how many of its people in the years ahead?
2. How many of what kinds of institutions will be needed in which lo-
cations; when will each new institution be opened; and how will the
five existing institutions, the new University of West Florida and the
Orlando institution fit into the larger plan?

Funds should be requested of the 1965 Legislature for the purpose of
developing in detail the Master Plan for higher education in Florida for
the future. A plan also should be proposed to the 1965 Session of the
Legislature which will provide the best possible pattern of system-wide
organization and administration of the state universities.
It has long been established that the real worth of any institution of
higher learning rests largely with its faculty. The difference between a







BIENNIAL REPORT, 1962-1964


great university and a mediocre university generally is a relatively small
number of outstanding faculty members who can serve as a magnet to
attract bright young scholars and teachers. The market for college faculty
is a national one. Because of this, the salaries paid faculty members in
Florida institutions must be favorable not only with those in the South-
east, but with those institutions of comparable size and programs through-
out the nation.
Within recent years, salaries paid faculty in the State University Sys-
tem have advanced due to a greater appreciation by the Legislature of
the need for better pay. But salaries must continue to increase if these in-
stitutions are to make acceptable bids in the market place to attract the
type of teaching talent which the young people of Florida must have to
compete with those from other states. Nothing is more costly than an
inferior education.
In addition to the requests for professors included in the asking budget
of the Board of Control, it is most desirable that the Legislature make a
special appropriation for the naming of a limited number of distinguished
professors of national and international reputation to be employed in the
University System in certain critical areas of the space sciences, mathe-
matics, engineering and oceanography.
With 8,426 miles of tidal coastline-more than any other state except
Alaska-Florida is the one state best situated and endowed to develop
programs of education and research in the vast, little explored world of
the seas.
Florida will miss an opportunity to gain a position of national emi-
nence and leadership unless it moves immediately to take advantage of its
unique location for broad and extended study in the marine sciences,
oceanography and hydrographic engineering.
Many of the great industrial corporations of this country already are
looking toward a major industrial expansion arising from graduate educa-
tion and research centers in these fields.
Recommendations developed on the basis of studies by the Florida In-
terinstitutional Committee on Oceanography can serve as a basis for an
accelerated program in this field.
This committee is comprised of representatives of all state universities
and the University of Miami. The committee has recommended an ex-
panded program in oceanography to comprehend the seas surrounding
the state, their interrelations with contiguous oceans, their boundaries,
properties and processes; to apply this comprehension in the interest of
the citizens of Florida, to enhance the cultural development, the national
posture and the economic growth of the State of Florida.
One of the principal objectives of the work of the interinstitutional
committee is to achieve sufficient coordination of efforts to eliminate un-
necessary duplication of costly facilities within state supported institu-
tions.







REPORT OF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR


The Board of Control already has authorized the Florida State Univer-
sity and the University of South Florida to work together in oceano-
graphic study and development in the Gulf of Mexico and to obtain and
outfit a ship which would be based on Tampa Bay.
With the increased complexity of the higher education system, it be-
comes imperative that a well-thought-out and efficient pattern of govern-
ing the State University System be developed.
While some progress has been made in this area, more study needs to
be given in order that there can be a system of control and administration
which will permit the achievement of the greatest quality and economy
in the state universities.
The Board of Control is cognizant and appreciative of the support
which it has received from the State Board of Education, the Legislature
and the people of Florida.
This type of support will in the years ahead provide the impetus to
higher education which will make its universities pre-eminent centers of
learning and leadership and institutions of national distinction in their
respective roles. The benefits will accrue to the young men and women of
Florida, who are the state's most valuable assets.
The people of Florida have demonstrated in the past that they will
support higher education if its needs are made known to them, and there
is every reason to believe that they will continue to do so.
The prospect of continued substantial growth in higher education
creates a proper public concern that increasing investments of public
money in this important enterprise be expended with maximum efficiency
and economy, giving the Florida taxpayer and the Florida college student
the greatest possible return for each dollar invested.
This concern is shared by the Board of Control which has established
controls to assure that there will be maximum economy as the. state uni-
versities go about their task of providing for quantity and quality in
higher education.
J. B. Culpepper, Executive Director
THE BOARD OF CONTROL OF FLORIDA






BIENNIAL REPORT, 1962-1964


ARCHITECT TO THE BOARD OF CONTROL
The Architect's Office has experienced two of the most eventful years
in its history. The State Revenue Certificate Program for University con-
struction has provided the assurance of available funds which enables
the Architect to coordinate planning and proceed with construction on a
systematic basis. This factor has proven to be very important with the
largest dollar volume of projects in planning, under construction and
completed for occupancy that the University System has ever experi-
enced.
The Architect to the Board of Control has coordinated the design of
buildings by private architectural firms throughout the State of Florida,
and supervised construction of the following projects for the Institutions
of Higher Learning during 1962-64:

Construction Projects Completed for Occupancy
From July, 1962, thru June, 1964
FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY:


Molecular Biophysics
Married Student Housing
Nuclear Service Building IV
Athletic Field House


$ 998,843
1,363,344
188,556
141,547
$ 2,692,290


Construction Projects in Progress as
of June 30, 1964
FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY:
Psychology Building Addition
Physics Building, Phase I, West Tower
Student Union Building
Student Union Building-Kitchen Equipment
Student Union Building Box Culvert
Bath House & Locker Building
Swimming Pool
Field House
Men's Dormitory
Additional Boiler & Accessories
Addition to Existing Boiler Building & Extension of Steam
Extension of Electrical Utilities
Enlargement of Post Office & Bookstore
Nuclear Service Building, Part V
Married Student Housing III
High Rise Apartments
Enlargement of Campbell Stadium


$ 994,839
1,518,780
1,989,045
141,883
24,904
88,840
203,897
141,547
1,949,425
70,274
468,604
233,800
59,312
269,616
2,154,600
998,000
439,207
$11,746,573








REPORT OF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Construction Projects in Planning
As of June 30, 1964
FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY:
Chemistry Unit I
Library Addition
Infirmary
Social Science Building
Biological Science Unit I
Relocating Greenhouses, Etc.
Oceanographic Institute Coastal Facilities
Geological Storage Facility
Land Acquisition


$ 3,680,000
1,260,000
767,000
2,125,000
1,100,000
196,000
155,000
207,500
237,900
$ 9,728,400


Construction Projects Completed for Occupancy
From July, 1962, thru June, 1964
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA:


Health Center-Primate Colony
Remodel Buildings 22 & 23-Lake Alfred
Women's Dorm
Men's Dorm
Silo at Jay, Fla.
Floyd Hall Repairs
Benton Hall-Fire Escapes & Roof Repairs
Pecan Lab
Strawberry & Vegetable Lab
Citrus Pulp Pilot Plant


$ 116,379
45,000
1,636,418
2,301,608
11,165
50,000
41,208
22,998
45,464
18,960
$ 4,289,200


Construction Projects in Progress as
of June 30, 1964
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA:
Utilities Expansion-Proposed Well #5
General Classroom Building
Architecture & Fine Arts Building
Nuclear Service Building
Student Union Building
College of Education Renovation
Air Conditioning of Infirmary
Phi Gamma Delta
Phi Kappa Phi
Delta Phi Epsilon
Pesticide Laboratory


43,132
1,093,600
1,513,052
1,592,866
4,441,638
308,600
105,528
167,698
136,877
128,962
192,517
$ 9,724,470








BIENNIAL REPORT, 1962-1964


Construction Projects in Planning
As of June 30, 1964
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA:
Library Addition
Relocate Plant & Grounds, Prepare Site
Connection of Eng. & Industries Bldg. to Reed Laboratory
Engineering Unit I
Coastal Hydraulic & Metalurgy Engineering
Chemistry Research Unit
Life Science (Biology) Part I
Health Center Project, Part I
Lambda Chi
Married Student Housing
Whole Body Counter
Gulf Coast Experiment Station
Addition to Florida Field Stadium
Psychotic Children's Unit
Surge Buildings-Two


$ 1,845,000
893,500
463,000
4,139,500
355,000
1,421,000
735,000
170,000
140,000
1,500,000
30,000
183,500
1,000,000
500,000
160,000
$13,535,500


Construction Projects Completed for Occupancy
From July, 1962, thru June, 1964
FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY:


Initial Group of Buildings


Construction Projects in Planning
As of June 30, 1964
FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY
Cafeteria Central Area, Part I
Utilities Expansion
Auditorium & Humanities Building
Social Science & Administration Building
Science Building
Physical Education Facilities
Cafeteria Central Area, Part II
Dormitory I
Boca Raton Airport
Dormitories


$ 4,695,561


$ 460,110
1,043,000
1,531,000
1,417,000
1,301,500
321,000
240,000
830,000
22,900
830,000
$ 7,996,510






REPORT OF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR


Construction Projects Completed for Occupancy
From July, 1962, thru June, 1964
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA


Campus Water Wells, Roads, Lighting, Etc.
Classroom-College Union-Cafeteria
Men's Dorm
Classroom Humanities Building
Extension of Utilities-Addition to Central
Refrigeration System
Dormitory and Central Core Unit
T.V. & Radio Studios
Campus Sidewalks
Physics-Astronomy


$ 199,104
1,547,581
1,161,462
1,565,879

201,579
2,033,167
74,463
32,255
1,477,823
$ 8,293,313


Construction Projects in Progress
As of June 30, 1964
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA:
Physics, Astronomy, Mathematics, Laboratory
Classroom & Office Building
Men's & Women's Dormitory, Group II
Swimming Pool
Dormitory Equipment


Construction Projects in Planning
As of June 30, 1964
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA:
Extension of Utilities & Other Campus Improvements
General Classroom Building Inc. College of Bus. Adm.
Health & Physical Education Classroom Building
Central Receiving & Storage Building
Maintenance Service Shops
Extension & Central Utility Plant
General Classroom Building Inc. College of Education
Outdoor Physical Education Facilities
Dormitories for Fall of 1966
Planning for Central Core, Fall of 1966
Science & Tech. Building
Science & Tech. Building, Utilities Extension


$ 1,477,823
1,704,346
46,317
98,000
$ 3,326,486


$ 802,300
1,060,000
1,480,000
115,500
115,500
616,000
1,275,000
234,000
2,550,000
700,000
1,430,000
220,700
$10,599,000






BIENNIAL REPORT, 1962-1964

Construction Projects Completed for Occupancy
From July, 1962, thru June, 1964


FLORIDA A & M UNIVERSITY:
Campus Utilities-Electrical Distribution System
Renovation & Extend Lee Hall
Renovation of Young Hall
Health & Physical Education Bldg.
Emergency Standby Generator, Hospital
Conversion of Flower Rooms to Baths-Hospital



Construction Projects in Progress as
of June 30, 1964
FLORIDA A & M UNIVERSITY:
Campus Utilities-Central Heating Facilities
Student Union Building Addition



Construction Projects in Planning
As of June 30, 1964
FLORIDA A & M UNIVERSITY:
Men's Dormitory
Diamond Hall-Renovation & Repairs
Vocation Tech. Building
Hospital-Air Conditioning 2 Floors
Music & Arts Classroom
Married Student Housing


$ 53,546
482,413
75,396
825,665
29,000
5,244
$ 1,471,264


$ 157,760
629,913
$ 787,673


$ 1,200,000
92,000
1,450,000
63,700
850,000
588,000
$ 4,243,700


Construction Projects Completed for Occupancy
From July, 1962, thru June, 1964
FLORIDA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND BLIND:


Preservation of Reclaimed Area-Sprinklers
Preservation of Reclaimed Area-Grass
Rehabilitate White Industrial Bldg.


$ 11,475
13,855
411,097
$ 436,427


Construction Projects in Progress as
of June 30, 1964
FLORIDA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND BLIND:


$ 371,027


Boiler Plant and Utilities








REPORT OF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR


Construction Projects in Planning
As of June 30, 1964
PROPOSED EAST CENTRAL FLORIDA UNIVERSITY:
Extension of UF Engineering College (GENESYS) $ 710,000
Proposed Degree Granting Institution Planning for
Construction 180,900
$ 890,900


Construction Projects in Planning
As of June 30, 1964
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA:
Administration-Classroom Building
Planning for 1965 Construction


$ 1,050,000
180,000
$ 1,230,000














FINANCIAL REPORTS
Appended are the financial reports of the various funds administered
by the office of the Board of Control for the biennium ending June 30,
1964.
Exhibit "A" is a "Summary Statement of Operations" and reflects trans-
actions during the biennium for the operating and administered funds.
Exhibit "B" is a statement of "Interest and Sinking Fund Balances and
Revenue Certificates Outstanding as of June 30, 1964." This exhibit is
presented for information as to the funded indebtedness of the Board of
Control.
J. B. Culpepper, Executive Director
THE BOARD OF CONTROL OF FLORIDA







SUMMARY STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1962, THROUGH JUNE 30, 1964


Appropriation
or Receipts and Total Reverted to
Name of Fund Fund Balance Appropriations Available General Fund Balance Receipts and Total Fund Balance
July 1, 1962 Expenditures Revenue June 30, 1963 Appropriations Available Expenditures June 30, 1964


CURRENT FUNDS
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION:
S a la ries .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . .
E xp en ses ... .. ................................ ........
C capital O utlay ........................................
Other Personal Services ................................

Total General Administration ........................... .

DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE:
Incidental F und ........................... ..........

Total Department of Architecture ...................... .

RESTRICTED FUNDS:
Regional Education Program Regular Appropriation.......
Annual Payment to Accredited Medical School............
Southern Regional Council on Mental Health.............
Southern Regional Nuclear Energy Advisory Council-
E xp en se ... .......... ...............................
Out-of-State Aid for Negroes............................
Educational Survey Fund ..............................
University System Capital Improvement Revolving Trust
F u nd ...........................................
Project Construction Trust Fund........................
Scholarship Funds-University of Florida:
Arthur E. Hamm Scholarship Income ..................
David Yulee Scholarship Income .................... .
Cecil Wilcox Memorial Scholarship Income. ............
Albert W. Gilchrist Scholarship Income ................
Tufts Scholarship Income ............................
John G. & Fannie F. Ruge Scholarship Income..........
William Loring Spencer Scholarship Income............
Agnes Peebles Scholarship Income................... .
Racing Scholarship Fund................. ..........
Ex-Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Home Endowment
Income ......................................
Scholarship Funds-Florida State University:
Albert W. Gilchrist Scholarship Income.............. .
Tufts Scholarship Income ............................
John G. & Fannie F. Ruge Scholarship Income..........
Mrs. Sarah Levy Scholarship Income ..................
Racing Scholarship Fund.............................
Ex-Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Home Endowment
Incom e ..... ......................................
Scholarship Funds- University of South Florida:
Racing Scholarship Fund ............................
Scholarship Funds-Florida A & M University:
J. C. McMullen Scholarship Income ...................
Mrs. Sarah Levy Scholarship Income ..................
Racing Scholarship Fund.............................
Scholarship Funds-Florida School for the Deaf and Blind:
Albert W. Gilchrist Scholarship Income ............. .
Elizabeth M. Bess Scholarship Income ............... .
Roy J. McCrary Scholarship Income...................
Charles Leyvraz Student Aid Fund ....................
Other:
Children of Deceased World War Veterans Scholarships. .
Helen Henderson Scholarship Fund ...................
Ramsaur M memorial Income...........................
James D. Westcott Estate Income .....................
Principal of American Legion Fund Income.............
David Yulee Lectureship Income......................
Race Track Scholarship Fund-Undistributed...........
Total Restricted Current Funds ........................ .

Total Current Funds............... ........ ............


$ 2,959.38
1,830.43
871.46
2,238.05


$ 143,158.28
41,537.57
3,878.54
(1,038.05)


146,117.66
43,368.00
4,750.00
1,200.00


$ 142,818.07
42,975.18
4,742.97
1,028.51


3,299.59
392.82
7.03
171.49


$ 181,890.00
46,522.00
18,230.00
3,800.00


$ 181,890.00
46,522.00
18,230.00
3,800.00


$ 169,097.63
46,423.48
17,952.11
3,700.78


$ 7,899.32 $ 187,536.34 $ 195,435.66 $ 191,564.73 $ 3,870.93 $.............. $ 250,442.00 $ 250,442.00 $ 237,174.00 $ 13,268.00

$ 91,713.13 $ 861,708.89 $ 953,422.02 $ 851,053.67 $.............. $ 102,368.35 $ 775,770.04 $ 878,138.39 $ 868,270.06 $ 9,868.33

$ 91,713.13 $ 861,708.89 $ 953,422.02 $ 851,053.67 $ .............. $ 102,368.35 $ 775,770.04 $ 878,138.39 8 868,270.06 $ 9,868.33

$ 48,250.00 $ 463,000.00 $ 511,250.00 $ 421,790.00 $ 89,460.00 $.............. $ 450,000.00 $ 450,000.00 $ 423,423.00 $ 26,577.00
96,318.79 990,500.00 1,086,818.79 944,426.09 142,392.70 ................ 990,500.00 990,500.00 972,718.99 17,781.01
.......... .....8,000.00 8,000.00 8,000.00 ................................. 8,000.00 8,000.00 8,000.00 ................

3,500.00 3,500.00 7,000.00 ................ 7,000.00
25,893.59 60,000.00 85,893.59 33,513.37 52,380.22 ......0............ 40,000.00 40,000.00 29,268.89 10,731.11
107,747.36 167,680.00 275,427.36 173,798.25 ................ 101,629.11 180,659.79 282,288.90 268,878.10 13,410.80

1,448,951.92 535,574.72 1,984,526.64 1,910,547.58 ................ 73,979.06 643,205.25 717,184.31 625,354.81 91,829.50
................ 25,402,468.14 25,402,468.14 25,163,265.55 ................ 239,202.59 11,819,555.97 12,058,758.56 10,951,624.56 1,107,134.00

154.10 215.28 369.38 113.00 ................ 256.38 215.44 471.82 249.00 222.82
253.49 215.75 469.24 226.00 ................ 243.24 203.77 447.01 226.00 221.01
52.22 77.42 129.64 ................................ 129.64 76.84 206.48 113.00 93.48
301.66 431.27 732.93 226.00 ................ 506.93 472.97 979.90 475.00 504.90
1,511.56 627.83 2,139.39 1,017.00 ................. 1,122.39 585.92 1,708.31 1,000.00 708.31
8,653.77 6,383.40 15,037.17 3,390.00 ................. 11,647.17 5,657.21 17,304.38 10,651.17 6,653.21
124.96 159.19 284.15 113.00 ................. 171.15 157.86 329.01 113.00 216.01
3,287.02 2,798.23 6,085.25 3,000.00 ................ 3,085.25 2,955.97 6,041.22 1,800.44 4,240.78
141,704.97 151,113.22 292,818.19 143,396.72 ................ 149,421.47 ................ 149,421.47 147,376.47 2,045.00

3,444.56 1,371.31 4,815.87 450.00 ................ 4,365.87 1,271.83 5,637.70 300.00 5,337.70

432.00 430.61 862.61 400.00 .................. 462.61 388.20 850.81 450.00 400.81
650.99 627.83 1,278.82 650.00 .................628.82 585.93 1,214.75 200.00 1,014.75
4,352.33 4,217.83 8,570.16 4,054.00 ................ 4,516.16 4,471.18 8,987.34 3,650.00 5,337.34
356.24 34.77 391.01 356.00 ................ 35.01 328.85 363.86 350.00 13.86
129,132.00 146,483.47 275,615.47 129,132.00 ................ 146,483.47 ................ 146,483.47 146,483.47 ................

1,194.58 1,371.31 2,565.89 1,200.00 ................ 1,365.89 1,271.84 2,637.73 1,125.00 1,512.73

16,142.00 18,310.43 34,452.43 16,142.00 ................ 18,310.43 ................ 18,310.43 18,310.43 ...............

579.98 47.92 627.90 ................................ 627.90 49.37 677.27 ................ 677.27
2,246.62 34.76 2,281.38 ................................ 2,281.38 178.81 2,460.19 1,140.00 1,320.19
54,633.40 54,931.30 109,564.70 48,609.00 ................ 60,955.70 ................ 60,955.70 54,224.32 6,731.38

282.92 210.16 493.08 ................................ 493.08 216.54 709.62 ................ 709.62
481.17 571.88 1,053.05 375.00 678.05 587.94 1,265.99 ................ 1,265.99
149.73 49.52 199.25 ... ....... . ........... .. 199.25 51.51 250.76 ................ 250.76
5,214.76 5,214.76 ................ ... 5,214.76

3,500.00 5,000.00 8,500.00 3,750.00 4,750.00 ...... ......... 5,000.00 5,000.00 5,000.00
704.10 245.66 949.76 ................................ 949.76 241.76 1,164.52 949.76 214.76
46.19 31.20 77.39 28.00 ................ 49.39 31.13 80.52 28.00 52.52
27,185.59 24,800.00 51,985.59 26,100.00 ................ 25,885.59 23,974.13 49,859.72 24,709.72 25,150.00
1,023.73 1,648.78 2,672.51 2,480.00 ................ 192.51 1,648.78 1,841.29 1,240.00 601.29
722.36 150.34 872.70 ................................. 872.70 154.87 1,027.57 .................1,027.57
.................... ........ .... ..485,959.37 485,959.37 ................ 485,959.37

S 2,133,965.90 $28,053,313.53 $30,187,279.43 $ 29,040,548.56 $ 295,982.92 $ 850,747.95 $ 14,673,846.79 $ 15,524,594.74 $ 13,699,433.13 $ 1,825,161.61


,, 29 98.5. 14,.IV51-O 0 1_ l U 0 I .JL Lqz0, o .o, .


12,792.37
98.52
277.89
99.22


I


BOARD OF CONTROL


EXHIBIT "A"


.............


$ 2,233,578.35


$29,102,558.76 1 $31,336,137.11 1 $ 30,083,166.96


992 853. 85 $


953,116.30 1 3 15.700.058.83I~


8 16653175 13


14Rn4R 77 14 1 1 94929794Q





BOARD OF CONTROL SUMMARY STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1962, THROUGH JUNE 30, 1964 EXHIBIT "A"


Appropriation
or Receipts and Total Reverted to
Name of Fund Fund Balance Appropriations Available General Fund Balance Receipts and Total Fund Balance
July 1, 1962 Expenditures Revenue June 30, 1963 Appropriations Available Expenditures June 30, 1964


Loan Funds-University of Florida:
Dudley Beaumont Scholarship Loan Fund..............
John G. & Fannie F. Ruge Loan Fund. ................
Eldridge Hart Loan Fund ......................... .
Loan Funds-Florida State University:
John G. & Fannie F. Ruge Loan Fund. ................
John & Ida English Loan Fund..................... .
Zadie L. Phipps Loan Scholarship Fund ................
Martha Simpkins Mays Memorial Fund................
Loan Funds-Florida A & M University:
John & Ida English Loan Fund ..................... .
Millard Caldwell Loan Fund ....................... . .
Ruby Diamond Loan Fund ...........................
The Harry Wilderman Scholarship Loan Fund. .........

Total Loan Funds .......................................

Endowment Funds:
PRINCIPAL TO BE HELD INVIOLATE:
For University of Florida:
Eldridge Hart Loan Fund............................
Arthui E. Hamm Scholarship Fund.................
David Yulee Scholarship Fund........................
David Yulee Lectureship Fund........................
Ramsaur Memorial Fund...........................
Cecil Wilcox Memorial Scholarship Fund Income........
Principal of American Legion Fund..................
Albert W Gilchrist Scholarship Fund..................
For Florida State University:
James D. Westcott Estate Fund*.....................
Albert W Gilchrist Scholarship Fund ..................
For Florida A & M University:
J. C. McMullen Scholarship Fund . . . . ...
For Florida School for the Deaf & the Blind:
Roy J. McCrary Scholarship Fund ...................
Albert W Gilchiist Scholarship Fund..................
Charles Leyvraz Student Aid Furd ...................
For University of Florida and Florida State University:
Tufts Scholarship Fund ........................... .
Other:
Helen Henderson Scholarship Fund ....................

Total Principal to be Held Inviolate ..................... .

PRINCIPAL MAY BE USED:
For University of Florida:
William Loring Spencer Scholarship Fund........... ...
Agnes Peebles Scholarship Fund ........... ........
For Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind:
Elizabeth M. Bess Scholarship Fund ................. ..
For University of Florida and Florida State University:
Ex-Confedcrate Soldiers & Sailors Home Endowment Fund
Total Principal Which May Be Used .......................

GIFTS FOR RESTRICTED PURPOSES:
For University of Florida:
Frank H. W ade Estate Fund........... .. .........
Total Gifts for Restricted Purposes..... .. ................

Total Endowment Funds............... ....... ..........


Total All Funds..................................... $ 2,623,934.12


900.00
10,000.00
763.88

5,951.74
15.03
15.09
108.76

269.20
429.74
215.50
239.64


55,755.15
18,121.10
763.88

42,851.38
682.35
661.45
5,197.68

832.72
29,751.63
476.90
5,804.24


. . . . . . . .
18,121.10
627.82

12,750.00

300.00
4,590.00

620.00

230.00
................


. . . . . . . .


55,755.15

136.06

30,101.38
682.35
361.45
607.68

212.72
29,751.63
246.90
5,804.24


1,100.30
8,035.81
926.25

6,331.76
13.57
4.90
8.49

174.56
442.74
142.43
249.30


56,855.45
8,035.81
1,062.31

36,433.14
695.92
366.35
616.17

387.28
30,194.37
389.33
6,053.54


. . . . . . . .

1,062.31

11,433.14

200.00
410.00

190.00

368.00
. . . . . . . ..


56,855.45
8,035.81


25,000.00
695.92
166.35
206.17

197.28
30,194.37
21.33
6,053.54


$ 54,855.15
8,121.10


36,899.64
667.32
646.36
5,088.92

563.52
29,321.89
261.40
5,564.60


$ 141,989.90 $ 18,908.58 $ 160,898.48 $ 37,238.92 $.............. $ 123,659.56 $ 17,430.11 $ 141,089.67 $ 13,663.45 $ 127,426.22



$ 24,972.89 $ .............. $ 24,972.89 $ 494.00 $ .............. $ 24,478.89 .............. $ 24,478.89 $ .............. $ 24,478.89
5 ,000.00 ............. 5 ,000.00 ................ ............. 5 ,000.00 ............. 5 ,000.00 ............. 5 ,000 .00
5,000.00 ................ 5,000.00 .................. 5,000.00 ................ 5,000.00 ............... 5 ,000.00
3,000.00 ................ 3,0 0 3,000 00 3,000.00 ...............3,000.00 ................ 3,000.00
700 .00 ................ 700 .00 ................ ................ 700 .00 ................ 700 .00 ................ 700 .00
2,500.00 ................ 2,500.00 ................................ 2,500.00 ................. 2,500.00 ................ 2,500.00
40 ,545.87 ................ 40,545.87 ................................ 40,545.87 ................ 40 ,545.87 ................ 40 ,545.87
10,000.00 ................ 10,000.00 ................................ 10,000.00 ................ 10,000.00 ................ 10,000.00

12 ,718.65 ................ 12,718.65 ................................. 12,718.65 ................ 12 ,718.65 ................ 12,718.65
10 ,000.00 ................ 10 ,000.00 ................ ................ 10 ,000.00 ................ 10 ,000.00 ................ 10,000.00

1,000.00 ............... 1 ,000.00 ............................... 1,000.00 .............. ,000.00 ................ 1 ,000.00

1,000.00 ............... 1 ,000.00 ................ ................1,000.00 . . . . . ..... 1 ,000.00 ................ 1 ,000.00
4,000.00 ................ 4,000.00 .................................4,000.00 ............... 4,000.00 ................ 4,000.00
..... .... .. ... ... .... ... .. ... . . .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . ... .. . .. .. .. 5 ,2 14 .76 5 ,2 14 .76 . . . . . . . 5 ,2 14 .76

13,811.68 674.06 14,485.74 ................................. 14,485.74 694.89 15,180.63 ................ 15,180.63

5,000.00 ................ 5,000.00 . . . . . 5,000.00 . . . . .... 5 ,000.00 ................ 5,000.00

$ 139,249.09 $ 674.06 $ 139,923.15 $ 494.00 $ .............. $ 139,429.15 $ 5,909.65 $ 145,338.80 $ ........ .... $ 145,338.80



$ 3,400.00 $ 35.00 $ 3,435.00 $ . . . . .. .............. $ 3,435.00 $... . . . . ... $ 3,435.00 $ . . . . .. $ 3,435.00
24,999.99 16,931.65 41,931.64 .................. 41,931.64 1,380.00 43,311.64 .. . . . . 43,311.64

13,028.28 . . . . 13,028.28 ...13,028.28 ................ 13,028.28 ................ 13,028.28

49,450.00 ...... . . .. 49,450.00 . ....... . . . ..... 49,450.00 . . . . .. 49,450.00 ................ 49 ,450.00

$ 90,878.27 $ 16,966.65 $ 107,844.92 $ .............. $. . . . . . . $ 107,844.92 $ 1,380.00 $ 109,224.92 $.............. $ 109,224.92


$ 18,238.51 $ 737.23 $ 18,975.74 $ .............. $ .............. $ 18,975.74 $ 767.80 $ 19,743.54 $ .............. $ 19,743.54

$ 18,238.51 $ 737.23 $ 18,975.74 $ . .. . . . .......... $ 18,975.74 $ 767.80 $ 19,743.54 $. .............. $ 19,743.54

$ 248,365.87 $ 18,377.94 $ 266,743.81 $ 494.00 $.............. $ 266,249.81 $ 8,057.45 $ 274,307.26 $.............. $ 274,307.26


$29,139,845.28


* In addition to cash and investments, there is real estate with an estimated value of $116,781.35


$3176,79.0 3,10,9988$ 29,5385$ .33,2567 1572554.3 I$ 7.6857.01 1481,50.4 $2,5003.4


...........


$31,763,779.40


$ 30,120,899.88


$ 299,853.85


3 1,343,025.67


15,725,546.39 1 S 17,068,572.061 8 14,818,540.64 1 Sb 2,250,031.42








INTEREST AND SINKING FUND BALANCES AND REVENUE CERTIFICATES OUTSTANDING AS OF JUNE 30, 1963, AND JUNE 30, 1964


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA:
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1938, 4%.......
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1948, 3.25% ....
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1954, 3.010%. ..
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1955, 3.25%....
Laboratory School Revenue Certificates, 3.50% ....
Housing System Revenue Certificates of 1960
Series "A," 3% ................... ...........
Series "B," 2.75% .......................... .
Series "C," 2.75% .. ... . . . . . . . . .
Series "D ," 2.875% . . . . . . . .........
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1962, 3.50%....

Total-University of Florida .................. ..

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY:
Dining Hall and Landis Hall Revenue
Certificates, 4% ......................... .
Infirmary Revenue Certificates, 4%...............
Bryan Hall Revenue Certificates, 3% ............
Senior Hall Revenue Certificates, 3% .............
Revenue Certificates of 1950, 3.1% and 2.75%.....
(Demonstration School Revenue Certificates, 3.25%
D 1Demonstration School, Series of 1959............
[Revenue Certificates, 4.8% .....................
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1954, 3.25% ....
Dormitory Revenue C('rtifi.ates of 1956, 4%.......
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1958, 2.75%....
Apartment Revenue Certificates of 1959, 3%. .....
University Stadium Revenue Certificates of 1960,4%
Apartment Revenue Certificates of 1961, 3.5%..
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1963, 33%...
Apartment Revenue Certificates of 1963, 3.5%.....

Total-Florida State University .................. .

FLORIDA A. & M. UNIVERSITY:
l)ormitory Revenue Certificates of 1938, 4%.......
Laundry Revenue Certificates of 1949, 3%. .......
HIospital Revenue Certificates of 1950, 2.90% . . .
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1952, 3.01% ....

Total Florida A. & M University...................

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA:
l)ormitory Revenue Certificates of 1959, 3 %.....
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1960, 312%.....
IDormitory Revenue Certificates of 1961, 3 %.....
Dormitory Revenue Certificates of 1962, 3%.....
Total University of South Florida ................ .

Total Board of Control Revenue Certificate Funds. .


Interest and Sinking Fund Balances
as of June 30, 1963


Cash


$ 32,370.75
52,959.65
38,993.42
28,116.32
34,314.21


381,346.20


Investments


$ 25,000.00
378,000.00
78,000.00
9,000.00
21,000.00

702..........00..
702,500.00


Total


$ 57,370.75
430,959.65
116,993.42
37,116.32
55,314.21

............20
1,083,846.20


Revenue Certificates


Total Issued


$ 457,000.00
3,628,000.00
1,000,000.00
600,000.00
485,000.00

3,500,000.00
1,238,000.00
3,176,000.00
1,896,000.00


$ 568,100.55 $1,213,500.00 $1,781,600.55 $15,980,000.00


$ 22,485.23
8,634.58
3,315.10
5,912.50
7,597.88
24,680.40

...............
2,246.8:3
2,404.32
90,630.02
12,004.22
3,884.91
19,789.54
. . . . . . .


$ 203,585.53


$ 31,026.01

26,690.98
154.620.01

$ 212,337.00


$ 31,000.00


240,000.00
70,000.00

20......00.00
10,000.00
110,000.00

20,000.00


$ 53,485.23
8,634.58
3,315.10
5,912.50
247,597.88
94,680.40


22,246.83
12,404.32
200,630.02
32,004.22
3,884.91
19.789.54


$ 404,000.00
58,000.00
115,000.00
200,000.00
4,310,000.00
500,000.001

139,800.00J
300,000.00
125,000.00
2,300,000.00
1,925,000.00
400,000.00
1.486.000.00


Total Retired


$ 317,000.00
1,006,000.00
111,000.00
47,000.00
54,000.00

200,000.00
110,000.00
164,000.00
112,000.00
...............


$2,121,000.00



$ 286,000.00
50,000.00
53,000.00
66,000.00
1,249,000.00

83,000.00

24,000.00
4,000.00
308,000.00
86,000.00
69.000.00


Outstanding
June 30, 1963


$ 140,000.00
2,622,000.00
889,000.00
553,000.00
431,000.00

3,300,000.00
1,128,000.00
3,012,000.00
1 ,784,000.00


Interest and Sinking Fund Balances
as of June 30, 1964


Cash


$


3,429.96
4,458.43
46,596.23
7,652.74
27,615.77


75,741.74


8,997.40


Investments


$ 54,000.00
385,500.00
78,000.00
36,000.00
28,000.00


1,322,500.00


$1:,,.yS,000.00 1$ 174,492.27 $1,904,000.00


$ 118,000.00
8,000.00
62,000.00
134.000.00
3,061,000.00

556,800.00

276,000.00
121,000.00
1,992,000.00
1.839.000.00
331,000.00
1,486,000.00
. . . . . . I . .


$ 501,000.00 $ 704,585.53 $12,262,800.00 $2,278,000.00 $9,984,800.00


$ 38,000.00

10,000.00
55,000.00

$ 103,000.00


$ 69,026.01

36,690.98
209,620.01

$ 315,337.00


$ 202,000.00
60,000.00
425,000.00
810,000.00

$1,497,000.00


$ 154,000.00
47,000.00
133,000.00
115,000.00

$ 449,000.00


$ 48,000.00
13,000.00
292,000.00
695,000.00

$1,048.000.00


24,862.70 $ 31,000.00


468.35
1,495.75
71,068.98
37,851.79


1,496.86
3,234.32
70,050.26
3,994.22
3,653.91
15,754.54


5,000.00
5,000.00
240,000.00
60 ,000.00
............

24,000.00
10,000.00
145,000.00
20,000.00


Total


$ 57,429.96
389,958.43
124,596.23
43,652.74
55,615.77


1,398,241.74


8,997.40

$2,078,492.27



$ 55,862.70
. . . . . . . .
5,468.35
6,495.75
311,068.98
97,851.79


25,496.86
13,234.32
215,050.26
23,994.22
3,653.91
15,754.54


Revenue Certificates


Total Issued


$ 457,000.00
3,628,000.00
1,000,000.00
600,000.00
485,000.00

3,500,000.00
1,238,000.00
3,176,000.00
1,896,000.00
500,000.00

$16,480,000.00


$ 404,000.00
58,000.00
115,000.00
200,000.00
4,310,000.00
500,000.001
. . . . . . . .
139,800.00)
300,000.00
125,000.00
2,300,000.00
1,925,000.00
400,000.00
1,486,000.00
1,814,000.00
3,748,000.00


$ 233,931.68 $ 540,000.00 $ 773,931.68 $17,824,800.00


$ 21,217.01 $ 38,000.00 $ 59,217.01


27,146.98
119,712.91


10,000.00
55,000.00


168,076.90 $ 103,000.00


37,146.98
174,712.91

271,076.90


$ 202,000.00
60,000.00
425,000.00
810,000.00

$1,497,000.00


Tota Reired Jun 30,196


$ 339,000.00
1,104,000.00
129,000.00
57,000.00
66,000.00

223,000.00
150,000.00
221,000.00
144,000.00


$2,433,000.00



$ 304,000.00
58,000.00
58,000.00
72,000.00
1,417,000.00

101,800.00

28,000.00
5,000.00
346,000.00
115,000.00
106,000.00
20,000.00

. . . . . . . ..


Outstanding
June 30, 1964


$ 118,000.00
2,524,000.00
871,000.00
543,000.00
419,000.00

3,277,000.00
1,088,000.00
2,955,000.00
1,752,000.00
500,000.00

$14,047,000.00



$ 100,000.00

57,000.00
128,000.00
2,893,000.00

538,000.00

272,000.00
120,000.00
1,954,000.00
1,810,000.00
294,000.00
1,466,000.00
1,814,000.00
3,748,000.00


$2,630,800.00 $15,194,000.00


$ 163,000.00
51,000.00
146,000.00
131,000.00

$ 491,000.00


$ 49,037.59 $ 86,500.00 $ 135,537.59 $1,200,000.00 $ 53,000.00 $1,147.000.00 $ 28,635.85 $ 86,500.00 $ 115,135.85 $1,200,000.00 $ 70,000.00 $1,130,000.00
42,124.58 33,000.00 75,124.58 1,420,000.00 92,000.00 1,328,000.00 47,688.02 33,000.00 80,688.02 1,420,000.00 111,000.00 1,309,000.00
.. ........... 27,000.00 27,000.00 2,430,000.00 ................ 2,430,000.00 21,235.00 ................ 21,235.00 2,430,000.00 32,000.00 2,398,000.00
................ ... ............. ........ .. ........ .... ...... ........ . . 8 ,476 36 ................. 8 ,476.36 2 ,220 ,000 .00 ................ 2 ,220 ,00 0 .00

$ 91,162.17 $ 146,500.00 $ 237,662.17 $5,050,000.00 $ 145,000.00 $4,905,000.00 $ 106,035.23 $ 119,500.00 $ 225,535.23 $7,270,000.00 $ 213,000.00 $7,057,000.00


$ 39,000.00
9,000.00
279,000.00
679,000.00

$1,006,000.00


~


I I I


-)------


EXHIBIT "B"


BOARD OF CONTROL


Total Retired


I-


$37,304,000.00


$1,075,185.25


$1,964,000.00


$3,039,185.25


$34,789,800.00


$4,993,3000-00 1 829,796R,800.00 1- 682,536.08


$2,666,500.00


$5,767,800.00


1 $3349,036.08 1 $43,071,800-00






BIENNIAL REPORT
of the
University of Florida


July 1, 1962 to June 30, 1964
Gainesville, Florida











University of Florida







INTRODUCTION


To review the accomplishments and programs of an institution such as the
University of Florida with its diversity and multiple purposes in a relatively
few pages is a difficult task. In the pages which follow we have attempted,
in the briefest possible fashion, to enumerate some of the accomplishments
and changes during the biennium ending June 30, 1964, and to take ad-
vantage of the opportunity to project goals for the future. Although this re-
port covers a specific biennium, liberty is taken at one point to make a com-
parison in enrollment in 1963 with September 1964. Although we find many
unmet needs in fulfilling our mission as the combined state university and
land-grant institution of Florida, the report contains ample evidence of prog-
ress and solid achievement.
Change is a universal part of life. It is equally true in the life of a uni-
versity, particularly when that university is a vital and integral part of a
rapidly changing state. We are encountering more than a population ex-
plosion since developments in Florida are also indelibly related to the explo-
sion of knowledge and its application. The university is central to the con-
tinuing development of those industries operating in the frontiers of present
knowledge. While performing its role in a period of great and rapid change,
it is also cognizant of its responsibility as a repository of knowledge and a
citadel for preserving and enunciating cultural values.
The role of the University of Florida in providing leadership and knowledge
in such a period is a major one. The decisions we have made during the past
few years and our plans for the future have been directed towards furthering
that role. With the expansion of educational opportunity at the undergradu-
ate level in recently established state universities, the University of Florida is
becoming more oriented towards graduate and research activity. It must at
the same time provide a quality undergraduate program and continue to
meet the expanding needs of the professions through its specialized schools
such as architecture, agriculture, and pharmacy which are the prime source
of education and training in highly essential branches of knowledge within
the state.
At the undergraduate level the University took a significant step when
it determined to limit freshmen enrollment on a quantitative as well as
a qualitative basis. The result was that, although the enrollment of the
University increased by almost a thousand students between the fall of 1963
and the fall of 1964, the number of entering freshmen remained at approxi-
mately 2,750. In the immediate future the entering freshman class will not
exceed 3,000 students, as the University continues its growth to a projected
enrollment of at least 20,000 by the early 1970's. Planning for additional
growth must now be undertaken.




BIENNIAL REPORT 1962-64


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
TOTAL ENROLLMENT (SEPTEMBER)


/io000


16,000


14,000


12,000


10,000


8,000


6,000


13,826
13,634


.3612,710


1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965


Role a Scol
15,701 Projection
14,810 A -o





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
The increase of approximately 1,000 students in the fall of 1964 occurred
at the upper division and graduate levels. Junior college transfer students
will constitute an increasingly significant segment of the University's en-
rollment. Such transfers will enable our upper division colleges in fields such
as architecture, agriculture, pharmacy, journalism, and certain other pro-
fessional schools to continue to serve the entire needs of the state. The Uni-
versity is giving increasing attention to those aspects of its operation which
will insure a transition from junior college to upper division work with essen-
tially the same ease as transfers from our University college to upper division
colleges and schools.
The possibility exists that enrollment in certain upper division colleges
may have to be limited. The University has attempted to provide leadership
in finding effective ways of insuring that well qualified students transfer to
upper division colleges. Any methods of evaluation will be applied to students
finishing their first two years at the University as well as students transfer-
ring to the University from other institutions. In its search for criteria the
University has turned to national services and has cooperated in devising
and testing experimental programs of evaluation.
During the biennium the University received full reaccreditation in those
specialized areas which came up for review by various accrediting agencies.
Our College of Nursing had its first evaluation. Although its program con-
tains many innovations from standard curricula in collegiate schools of nurs-
ing, the accrediting agency gave enthusiastic endorsement. The program of
our College of Nursing is now recognized as being unexcelled in the nation.
Enrollment at the graduate level in all of the University's colleges and
schools continues to increase. Among public institutions the University stands
18th-and is 28th among all universities in the nation-in Ph.D.'s awarded.
Of all universities in the South the University of Florida ranks second only
to the University of Texas in the number of Ph.D.'s awarded. More gratifying
than any growth in numbers, however, is the steady rise in the quality of
graduate students. The logical conclusion from this fact is that more and
more superior students select the University of Florida as their first choice for
graduate study rather than as an alternate. The University will continue to
inaugurate graduate programs in additional disciplines as demand, warrants
and the strength of a department justifies such action.
The attraction of able students who have a wide range of choice of institu-
tions reflects on the quality of the faculty. The University of Florida has
made significant additions to its staff at all levels during this biennium. We
were pleased to add another member of the National Academy of Sciences
to our faculty and take pride in having increased the number of faculty
holding a doctor's degree in the College of Engineering by one third.
The University has sought to improve its administrative structure so that
it can take advantage of every opportunity to use its resources wisely. It en-
gaged during the past year in an intensive study of its administrative and
business structure by utilizing the services of an outside consulting firm. The
constructive report which emerged is being implemented immediately when
possible and more gradually when such a course is more appropriate.
A continuing analysis of the academic structure resulted in the adoption
of a new constitution by the University Senate and the Board of Control.
There was also established a Division of Biological Sciences. The newly
adopted constitution marshall for greater effectiveness the enormous talent





BIENNIAL REPORT 1962-64


215 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
U DECREES GRANTED 1 JULY 1962-30 JUNE 6


962


2200

2000


1F00


1600


1400

1200

1000

800


600


400


July 62- June 63-2707
July 63- June 64-3082


PERCENT INCREASE 1962-63/1963-64
DEGREE INCREASEI
B.S. 11.0
MS. 22.0
LLB. 18.5
PhD. 40.0


108 0
108 mm -n 101I


40 44
27 21


. I L.L.B. I PhD. I M.D. I Ed.E E


TOTAL DEGREES
GRANTED


200


YDEGRE
D E I FEf


B.S. I M.S


"d.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
and capabilities of the faculty in the governance of the University. Involve-
ment in policy determinations of those directly concerned with teaching and
research recognizes the role of a mature and responsible faculty. Coordina-
tion is assured by the location of sufficient authority in the administration to
enable effective leadership and implementation of approved policies.
Of great significance was the activation of a Division of Sponsored Re-
search, made possible through enabling legislation of the 1963 Legislature.
The Division will provide added impetus to the sponsored research program
of the institution. It will also enable the University to maintain a better bal-
ance between those disciplines for which sponsored research funds are readily
available as compared with less favored disciplines in the matter of outside
support. In the latter categories are the humanities and some areas in the
social sciences.
Another important change was the consolidation of related units in agri-
culture and forestry into an Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The
Institute will enable cross-disciplinary programs to be inaugurated with
greater ease and will provide for more effective and efficient use of personnel
and other resources.
As we review this past biennium and more particularly anticipate our
future responsibilities, the two most pressing needs of the University are
additional personnel and additional space. For at least two biennia there
has been a critical need for additional faculty. The College of Arts and
Sciences, the very heart of the University, has been especially handicapped
over the failure of the Legislature to recognize our needs for an increase in
faculty. The formula used in allocating the number of faculty positions
has not taken into account the changing role of the institution at the upper
division and graduate levels, its research function, or the enrollment esti-
mates which must be anticipated two to three years in the future.
Our need for buildings is equally acute. At a time when new state uni-
versities and colleges are being favored with facilities which are modern and
air-conditioned, the University of Florida remains the sole institution of higher
learning in the state which houses many of its activities in temporary build-
ings erected to meet an emergency at the close of World War II. -Approxi-
mately 17 per cent of the faculty office space and 12 per cent of the instruc-
tional and research space is in such buildings. The backlog of accumulated
needs is far from being satisfied by the buildings now under construction
or authorized.
As we prepare for more effective and efficient operation in meeting the
demands of the future, we are increasingly concerned with the cumbersome
administrative machinery imposed upon the University by existing statutes.
This machinery is antithetical in many instances to the goals assigned to the
University by its various policy-making and supervisory bodies. The admin-
istrative machinery of any organization should be a mechanism which aids
in achieving assigned goals. It is imperative that sweeping changes be made
if the University is to fulfill its role as a fountainhead of economic, social,
and cultural creativity which is so essential to the future of Florida. The
University and its various supervisory groups, including the Legislature, must
in partnership devise improved techniques which will enable the University
to function more effectively in the area of administration. This is one of the
most crucial issues facing higher education in Florida. There is a desperate
32






BIENNIAL REPORT 1962-64
need to achieve efficiency through greater freedom in handling the minutia
of our daily operations.
As the University changes to meet the demands of a changing society of
which it is a part, it seeks support and understanding. The degree to which
it fulfills its assigned role in providing quality education and intellectual
leadership so vital to the state will depend to a great extent on the resources
made available to it. It is our conviction that a progressive and far-sighted
citizenry through its administrative and legislative bodies will extend that
understanding and support.



J. Wayne Reitz
President







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM

During the 1962 fiscal year 1,962 bachelor degrees were awarded students
completing the undergraduate program. By 1964 this figure had reached
2,175. Specific examples of growth in the undergraduate program include
the College of Education which awarded 537 degrees in 1960-62 and 744
degrees in 1962-64, an increase of 38.6 per cent. The total increase in stu-
dents receiving bachelor's degrees in teacher education programs in agri-
culture, arts and sciences, architecture and fine arts, education, and physical
education and health is 281 or 40 per cent over the previous biennium.
Growth in the College of Business Administration has been just as spec-
tacular with an undergraduate enrollment increase of 35.6 per cent during
the four-year period 1960-64. The Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Architecture
and Fine Arts, and Agriculture and School of Journalism experienced similar
increases without corresponding increases in facilities and personnel. In
light of this increase in enrollment, there is a pressing need for additional
faculty, classrooms, and capital equipment funds. This need is emphasized
by the College of Architecture and Fine Arts which will soon move into a new
unit which is nearing completion. Although the new unit will greatly aid
the programs of this college, it will still only provide a portion of the facilities
needed. The College will be forced to continue use of four temporary build-
ings.

Freshmen Orientation
The early registration program initiated at the University of Florida in
1959 matured during the biennium. In 1964 almost 80 per cent of the enter-
ing freshmen students and their parents took part in two days of early
summer registration, designed to familiarize them with the academic and
physical environment of the University without the duress that is inevitable
in September. The fact that most students were accompanied by their parents
meant that a realistic and mutual understanding of what lay ahead was
made possible in an unusually fruitful fashion.

Honors Program
The University's program for markedly superior students grew from 50
to 75 during the biennium with more than 100 enrolled in the program for
the 1964-65 academic year. These students are carefully selected for ability
and motivation and then placed in accelerated classes. Although the program
is primarily concentrated in University College in the social sciences, physi-
cal sciences, English, effective thinking, chemistry, humanities, and biologi-
cal sciences subject areas, the students move on to honors work in the upper
division colleges and frequently become members of the Three-Year Masters
Program. Thus, they are a resource for Florida as a whole, both in her com-
munity life and as teachers in her colleges and universities or as research
specialists in industry.

Student Morale
General campus morale is higher and the student body more orderly, more
receptive to positive plans for continued improvement, more reasonable in
its criticism and suggestions, more aggressive and willing to assume initia-







BIENNIAL REPORT 1962-64
tive in constructive rather than destructive causes than in any time in recent
years. Much of this improved attitude can be credited to the work of the
Office of Student Affairs and to the University's policy of accepting students
who have demonstrated their ability and willingness to learn.

International Students
Over 70 countries now have students on the University of Florida campus.
Countries furnishing the greatest number of students are in order: Cuba,
India, China, Japan, Colombia, the United Kingdom, and Thailand. It is felt
that the presence of these foreign students is an invaluable factor in increas-
ing international understanding and relations.

Student Financial Aid
Student financial aid has expanded through scholarships, short and long
term loans, and student employment. The growth of this program is largely
due to increased federal support.
Student applications for scholarships reached 550 during the 1963-64
academic year; approximately 1,000 were filed for the 1964-65 academic
year. Since the amount of scholarship resources from which awards can be
made has increased only a small amount, the job of selecting scholarship
recipients has become even more a matter of selecting a few from among
many qualified, worthy, and needy students.
Four types of long-term loans are now available to students at the Uni-
versity of Florida. Shortage of funds early in the biennium resulted in the
issuing of loans only as collections came in. This situation improved with
the addition of $225,000 in the National Defense Loan Program. This loan
program is now the most significant student aid program and is certainly
the fastest growing. In the 1962-63 academic year 522 students borrowed
$319,700. In the 1963-64 academic year 960 applications were received and
852 loans made for a total of $498,362. During the current year 1,700
applications were received with loans committed to 1,145 students for a
total of $856,610.

Industry Recruitment of Graduates
An 18 per cent increase in the number of employers visiting the campus
occurred during the biennium. This is due in part to the spreading reputa-
tion of the University and the achievements of its graduates. One major
company recently reported that the University of Florida now ranks third
in the nation among the colleges and universities from which it recruits its
scientific and executive personnel.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



NEW AND EXPANDED PROGRAMS AND CURRICULUM CHANGES

As any progressive institution must, the University of Florida continues to
encourage constant examination and evaluation of curricula in all fields.

College of Agriculture
The College of Agriculture completed a study of its programs during the
biennium which resulted in modification reflecting shifts in technology and
at the same time which brought about added efficiency in the use of facilities
and faculty. Undergraduate curricula in the departments of agronomy, fruit
crops, vegetable crops, and ornamental horticulture have been consolidated
into a single curriculum in plant science. Similarly, curricula in the depart-
ments of animal, poultry and dairy science have been consolidated into a
single animal science curriculum. Curricula in dairy manufacturing and
food technology have been combined into a food science curriculum.

College of Engineering
A major revision of undergraduate curriculum also occurred in the College
of Engineering. Academic standards were raised through an elevation of
the mathematics program. This change merely reflects contemporary national
thinking in engineering education. A second revision, initially begun during
the biennium, will provide two channels toward a career in engineering, one
aimed at research and development and highly scientifically oriented and
the other aimed at operations, service, manufacturing, supervision, and
strongly oriented toward the general practice of engineering. This action
has not yet been fully implemented.

Center for Latin American Studies
The University's interest in Latin America expanded considerably during
the biennium. In September of 1963, the Latin American programs of the
University were reorganized and a Center for Latin American Studies was
created to provide a suitable organizational structure for the growing range
of activities. The primary functions of the Center are to encourage and co-
ordinate research and graduate training throughout the University and to
administer directly instructional, research and publication programs which
do not more properly pertain to colleges, schools and departments.
The Center assumed responsibility for the University's annual Conference
on the Caribbean and for the interdisciplinary Latin American area degree
and certificate programs. In addition, the University's National Defense
Education Act Latin American Language and Area Program and its Caribbean
Research Program were incorporated as component units.
The Latin American Language and Area Program began operation in
1963 through a grant from the U. S. Office of Education. It provides fellow-
ships for students working toward graduate degrees in the Center for Latin
American Studies and in the several participating departments as well as
funds to encourage research and teaching related to Latin America. The
Caribbean Research Program was instituted in 1961 under a grant from the
Rockefeller Foundation. Its purpose is to encourage interdisciplinary re-
search on problems of the Caribbean area, and it involves investigators from
36






BIENNIAL REPORT 1962-64

the social sciences, humanities, biological sciences and agriculture. The
Program provides assistantships and grants for field research to candidates
for graduate degrees at the University of Florida, faculty research awards,
and funds for the acquisition of research materials by the University of
Florida libraries.
Several new Latin American projects were started during the biennium.
One of these is concerned with an analysis of Latin American armed forces
as political and social groups and their role in social change and national
development.
In the spring of 1964, the Center and the Institute of Food and Agricul-
tural Sciences entered the field of Peace Corps training with the responsi-
bility of providing specialists in American, technical, and Latin American
studies for a Peace Corps training program held at Camp Crozier, Puerto
Rico. Following this program, the Center and the Institute organized an
on-campus program for the training of volunteers destined to work in Brazil
in the fields of agricultural extension, home economics, and public health.
University plans call for the continued development of Spanish American
studies, but with a movement away from primary and rather exclusive iden-
tification with the Caribbean toward a broader program including not only
the island Caribbean but Mexico, Central America, and northern South
America as well.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



GRADUATE EDUCATION

Our American society is now feeling the need as never before for educa-
tion beyond the bachelor's degree. This is evidenced by an increase of 30
per cent in the University of Florida's graduate student body over the bien-
nium. In the fall of 1948, 997 students were enrolled in the Graduate School.
By 1953 the enrollment had jumped to 1,172 students and by 1963, to 1,838.
The spring trimester of 1964 saw 2,080 graduate students enrolled on the
Gainesville campus.
Significant improvement in the intellectual quality of graduate students
has accompanied this growth. When the Graduate Record Examinations
were made a requirement for admission in 1956, 35 per cent of the students
accepted scored above an average of 550 on the verbal and quantitative
aptitude tests. After five years, 50 per cent of the entering students scored
550 or above. In 1964, this percentage rose to 57 per cent. It can be pre-
dicted with confidence that in three or four years fully two-thirds of all
entering graduate students will present average Graduate Record Examina-
tion scores above 550. There was a 13 per cent increase in applications for
admission to the Graduate School for the fall of 1964. Further growth in
quality and quantity can be anticipated as students are anxious to enter and
graduate from an institution that has a reputation for high standards.
The Graduate School has continued its recruitment of distinguished pro-
fessors. Professor H. S. Green, an internationally known mathematician, was
one of those recruited during the biennium to join the faculty in the fall of
1964. Dr. A. D. Wallace represents another distinguished addition to the
mathematics faculty. Arrangements were also made for Dr. J. C. Slater,
formerly Institute Professor of Physics at MIT, to join the staff as graduate
research professor of physics and chemistry. Dr. Slater is a member of the
National Academy of Sciences and is one of the most distinguished quantum
scientists in this country. Dr. Alex Green was appointed graduate research
professor of physics in the fall of 1963. He had been engaged by the aero-
space industry as a director of research and is now developing research in
space physics. Through the addition of these distinguished professors to an
already outstanding faculty which includes Dr. Per Olov Lowdin, graduate
research professor of chemistry and physics, and Dr. Alex Smith, professor
of physics and astronomy, it is now evident that a nucleus of real distinction
has been established in the Departments of Physics and Astronomy and
Chemistry with strong relationships extending into the Department of Mathe-
matics. Dr. Smith focused national attention on the University of Florida
this past year for his work on the radio emissions of the planet Jupiter.
Off-campus graduate work has been stimulated by the organization of
FICUS and the interest of the Colleges of Engineering, Education, and Busi-
ness Administration. It is believed that these three colleges will continue to
be the principal agencies involved in off-campus programs because of their
professional associations.
During the biennium the only off-campus graduate program leading to a
master's degree was in the area of engineering. The degree of Master of
Engineering has been given on an experimental basis for work completed
entirely in St. Petersburg or in West Palm Beach. This program has been






BIENNIAL REPORT 1962-64
based on the British system which does not specify rigorously the process
of study by the student, but which bases the award of the degree largely
upon the final examination. If this program of awarding professional degrees
by examination following off-campus or center study should be expanded to
cover the fields of education, engineering and business administration with
the approval of the accrediting associations, a very large operation would
quickly result.
A major step forward in the off-campus graduate engineering program
occurred during the biennium with the appropriation of $1,415,950 by the
1963 Legislature for the Graduate Engineering Education System. The pur-
pose of GENESYS is to make a high quality program available to professional
people concentrated in the space age industries locating in Florida. The plan
includes five operating facilities: one each in Cape Kennedy, Orlando, Day-
tona Beach, Melbourne, and the University of Florida. All five terminals are
to be interconnected by a closed circuit talk-back television system, thereby
making the University faculty available to students in east-central Florida.
The Ford Foundation selected the University of Florida in 1960 as one of
the institutions to be awarded grants of $200,000 for development of three-
year master's degree programs. The objective of this program is to supply
needed teachers for junior colleges and four-year colleges. During the bien-
nium, the number of students participating in this program grew from 27
to 124. In an attempt to accelerate student participation, efforts have been
made to establish a coordinated undergraduate program at several four-year
colleges in the state whereby baccalaureate graduates of those colleges could
be accepted directly into the graduate portion of the program at the Univer-
sity of Florida. This effort promises to bear significant and exciting results
in the form of coordinated educational efforts among various institutions in
the state.
The Graduate School was responsible for preparing a request to NASA for
an institutional grant to be used to develop the space sciences and engineer-
ing at the University of Florida during the biennium. The request was
approved and funded by NASA at the rate of $330,000 per year beginning
on November 1, 1963. The grant will allow the development of the physical
sciences and those fundamental areas of engineering which have contributed
heavily to space age developments.
A number of new graduate degree programs have been instituted since
1962. Included are master's degree programs in radiation biophysics, veteri-
nary science, engineering, and nursing and Ph.D. programs in French lan-
guage and literature, rural and urban sociology, and aerospace engineering.
The University of Florida has awarded 1,086 master's degrees, 18 special-
ists in education degrees, 55 Ed.D. degrees, and 173 Ph.D. degrees since July
of 1962. This brings to a total, 8,524 graduate degrees which the University
has awarded since 1934. The University now has one of the most extensive
graduate programs in the South with 47 areas in which the doctor's degree
is awarded and 84 areas approved for master's degree study.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



GRADUATE LEVEL PROGRAMS

Law Center
The College of Law began the biennium with a note of accomplishment
and confidence. A new wing had just been added with additional library
reading room and classroom space and four new faculty offices.
An inspection of the College by Dean John Wade of the Vanderbilt Uni-
versity School of Law for the American Bar Association had praised the con-
tinuing progress of the College. Although substantial increases in enrollment
were expected, it was predicted that this increase could be absorbed in a
process of orderly growth. At about the same time, a study by the Florida
Bar Committee on Strengthening Legal Education indicated there would be
no need for the establishment of another law school in the state in the
foreseeable future. Before the biennium ended, however, all of these predic-
tions proved to be wrong-the physical plant of the College was crowded
to maximum capacity, space for shelving books almost exhausted, reading
room facilities greatly overtaxed, and every faculty office already in use with
no space remaining for necessary expansion.
What is the explanation for this dramatic change in outlook which took
place during the biennium? Projected enrollments were based on studies
which estimated the increase in enrollment from growth patterns set during
the past several bienniums. As the result, the law enrollment passed the
predicted 1970 size in the fall of 1963 and the 1975 projections in the fall
of 1964. This phenomenal growth is due partly to the increased birth rate
following World War II and partly because with many more colleges and
universities opening their doors in the State of Florida, there are many more
students with the ambition to enter the legal profession.
A reevaluation of the demand for enrollment in the College of Law deter-
mined that the most accurate basis for predicting enrollment was a formula
based on state university enrollment, state population and national univer-
sity enrollment. On this basis, the indicated enrollment for 1964-65 is 605
and for 1965-66, 742. Demand for enrollment will pass 1,200 by the fall of
1968. With the expected increase in legal business that will be generated by
the further increase in population and industrialization of the state in the
next decade, the demand for lawyers in 1975 is still expected to exceed the
supply of attorneys trained in the state.
In the fall of 1963, the College of Law reevaluated its admission stand-
ards. New admission standards now result in the rejection of about 10 per
cent of the applicants the College was accepting, but in view of the growth
and needs of the state, the law school enrollment will continue to increase
rapidly despite this relatively small upgrading of the admission standards.
As the result of the upgrading, the entering class in the spring of 1964 had
an average test score on the Law School Admission Test of 527.6 in compari-
son with a national average of 485.

J. Hillis Miller Health Center
Although the J. Hillis Miller Health Center is one of the youngest members
of University Family, it now comprises one of the major academic units
of the University of Florida.






BIENNIAL REPORT 1962-64
Chronic disease and disability have become the concern of our society as
a whole. Some 17 million Americans are now disabled from mental and
emotional diseases and 12 million suffer from vascular diseases. The solu-
tion to this problem of disability is the training of qualified young men and
women to care for this massive human problem. With this purpose as its
objective, the Health Center furnishes the educational setting for the Col-
leges of Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Health Related Professions. Em-
phasis is placed on developing superior students who relate individually and
collectively to the patient both as scholars and as practitioners.
The major new development within the College of Health Related Profes-
sions has been the establishment of a Master's degree in Health and Hospital
Administration which accepted students for the first time in September 1964.
The graduate program of the College of Pharmacy continued to grow with
32 graduate students enrolled at the close of the biennium. By 1975, the
College expects a graduate enrollment of 50 students. The expansion of this
College was made possible by the completion of a seven story wing on the
Health Center in 1962 which included facilities for Pharmacy. At the pres-
ent, the College of Pharmacy graduate program needs fortifying by addi-
tional faculty members.
In 1960, the W. K. Kellogg Foundation appropriated funds to finance a
graduate program in nursing. This program was jointly sponsored by the
College of Education and the College of Nursing and led to a Master in Edu-
cation degree. Enrollment increased from one student in 1962 to 10 students
in 1964. This program was formally discontinued with the inception of a
new program leading to the Master of Nursing degree in September 1964
with an enrollment of approximately 20 students.
Applications for admission to the College of Medicine in the M. D. cur-
riculum increased from 402 in 1962-63 to 503 during the 1963-64 fiscal
year. This compares with 188 enrolled in the M. D. curriculum in 1962-63
and 204 in 1963-64. The limiting factor for admission is lack of space.
During the biennium, 84 students were awarded M.D. degrees. Six Master
of Science and seven Doctor of Philosophy degrees were awarded in the Basic
Medical Sciences. A new graduate program at the Master's level in radiation
biophysics was instituted and the first students graduated.
The faculty has continued to receive international recognition. Of particu-
lar note are the Mead-Johnson Award for pediatric research to Dr. Richard
Smith; the Bela-Schick Award to Dr. Elliot Ellis for research in allergy; the
Distinguished Service Award of the American Medical Association and the
Julius Friedenwald Medal of the American Gastro-Enterological Association
to Dr. Lester Dragstedt; the citation of the National Council to Combat Blind-
ness to Dr. Richard Copenhaver; and to Dr. Herbert E. Kaufman, the Edward
R. Holmes Award of the Chicago Institute of Medicine, Albion 0. Berstein
Award of the New York State Medical Society, and the Ophthalmologist of
the Year Award of the New England Ophthalmological Society.
At the end of the biennium, the College of Medicine had active 49 re-
search training and teaching grants with a face value of $1,773,817. These
grants enrich and extend the academic program beyond that possible with
state support alone.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



CONTRACT RESEARCH

The volume of sponsored research at the University of Florida has con-
tinued to grow steadily during the 1962-64 biennium. The rate of this growth
is fully reflected by reviewing the last four years. The face value of contract
research and research grants from outside sources represented $4,598,263
on January 1, 1960. By January 1, 1962, this figure had grown to $7,204,732
and by January 1, 1964, $10,461,533. The annual rate of expenditure com-
puted by dividing each grant by the number of years in which it will be in
force was $4,388,689 at the beginning of the biennium and $6,912,777 at
the end of the biennium, an increase of 57 per cent.

Research Growth by College
During the biennium the research contracts and grants in Agriculture and
Forestry increased from $671,772 to $1,277,511, an increment of 90 per
cent. For the College of Arts and Sciences, the corresponding change from
January 1, 1962, to January 1, 1964, was from $1,709,209 to $2,317,777, an
increase of 35 per cent. The College of Business Administration increased
the face value of its grants and contracts from $52,000 to $275,746, a five-
fold increment. In Engineering, the change was from $2,698,801 to $3,053,-
585, an increase of 13 per cent. Grant research in the College of Medicine
grew from $1,472,045 to $2,447,020, a change of 66 per cent. The College of
Pharmacy also increased the face value of its grants and contracts from
$42,107 to $114,391, a nearly three-fold change.

The Core of Research Strength
Since research and graduate work go hand in hand, the University's in-
creases in research sponsorship have been accompanied by a 30 per cent
increase in the number of graduate students. The number of postdoctoral
fellows is another evidence of growing strength in research as the post-
doctoral research fellow can usually select the institution he desires to
attend. In 1961-62 there were 27 postdoctoral research fellows or associates
at the University of Florida. This number more than doubled to 58 in
1963-64.
The University has continued its program of granting summer research
appointments to ten of its faculty each year. However, there is a need for
four or five times this number.
The continuing success of the Graduate Research Professor program in
attracting persons of distinction to the campus gives further evidence that
the University of Florida is maturing as a research center and is destined
to take its place among the distinguished research and graduate institutions
of the nation.

Future Volume of Research
If the current rate of growth of research at the University of Florida can
be continued, the annual volume of sponsored research at the University
should reach 12 million dollars in 1970 and 17 million dollars in 1975. This
projection is based on a study of the growth curves set during the last
several years at the University of Florida and at other institutions.







BIENNIAL REPORT 1962-64

The Future of Sponsored Research
With the formal establishment of a Division of Sponsored Research, the
University is now in the position to expand its promotional activities. If the
University of Florida is to further distinguish itself in research, the income
from sponsored research will need to be tripled during the next decade. It
is believed that the combined strength of the Division of Sponsored Research
and the Graduate School can stimulate the necessary activities to rank the
University of Florida among the nation's most distinguished institutions by
1975 or earlier.


ANALYSIS OF RESEARCH CONTRACT AND GRANT FUNDS
(June 30, 1964)


University Breakdown
Agriculture and Forestry
Arts and Sciences ......
Business Administration
Education ............
Engineering ...........
M medicine .............
Pharmacy ............
Institutional Grants ....
O their ................


Number
. . . . . . . . . 152
. . . . . . . . 96
. . . . . . . . . 6
. . . . . . . . . 1
...... . . . . 69
.. .. . . . . . . 1 13
. . . . . . . . . 9
. . . . . . . . . 3
. . . . . . . . . 1 1


TOTAL ...................................460


Face Value
$ 1,464,303.70
2,640,937.50
235,977.00
54,490.00
3,457,425.80
2,875,116.00
169,650.00
732,083.00
268,478.00

$11,898,488.00


Categories of Sponsors
Department of Defense ......
Other Federal, State or
Local Government ........
Nonprofit Foundations or
Societies .................
Industry or Industrial
Associations ..............


Amount
. . . ... $2,374,307.00


. . . ... 8,156,774.00


. . . ... 632,151.00


. . . ... 735,256.00


Services Performed Amount*
Direct Probable Benefit to Industry .................... $ 1,813,182.00
Contribution to Human Health ........................ 3,390,918.00
Direct Probable Benefit to Agriculture and Forestry ....... 1,266,081.20
Contribution to the National Safety (Defense) .......... 1,620,580.00
Basic Research and Educational Contracts .............. 10,243,601.93

*Many projects contribute to more than one service objective. Hence, any
total of these groups would be meaningless.


Percentage
19.95


68.55


5.31


6.18






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



ORGANIZED RESEARCH

Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station
The Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station, which was created
in 1941 by act of the Florida Legislature, has worked effectively now for
nearly 25 years. It is, therefore, appropriate that a few of the outstanding
accomplishments during this period be reviewed:
*Research in sanitary engineering related to sewage disposal for Florida
communities led to the birth of the Sanitary Engineering Research Labora-
tory in 1947. It has since grown into a major division with full undergradu-
ate and graduate programs.
*Station-supported research in coastal engineering began in 1955. The
Coastal Engineering Laboratory was officially established in 1958 and is now
actively engaged in basic and applied research and education.
eNuclear research in the early 1950's quickly led to a program which has
remained among the leading in the nation. The expansion of this program
resulted in the establishment of the Nuclear Engineering Department in
1957.
*Research in engineering mechanics led to the establishment of the Ad-
vanced Mechanics Research Section in 1959. This has now evolved into a
major department of Engineering Science and Mathematics.
*Another example of the birth of a full-fledged teaching department from
early research efforts is the Department of Metallurgical and Materials En-
gineering which was organized in 1963.
These departments are evidence that the Station has provided a valuable
stimulus to the advancement of the teaching program in the College of
Engineering and are testimony to the fact that research and education are
inextricably intertwined.
Nearly 200 research projects were active during the biennium. These
projects include pulp and paper research, erosion and tide studies, artificial
heart development, nuclear propulsion problems, asphalt durability studies
and space mirror construction.

Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations
A major reorganization of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations'
research program has been initiated to facilitate the development of inter-
disciplinary teams. The Experiment Stations' system is organized into 19
departments and sections at the Main Station on the University of Florida
campus. In addition, 20 branch stations and field laboratories are located
throughout the State. Provisions are being made, through joint or courtesy
appointments, to tie personnel at the Branch Experiment Stations and in
commodity-oriented departments at the University back to their basic dis-
ciplinary departments. This will encourage professional intercourse with
others having similar training and interests, including participation in basic
research projects, seminars and graduate training programs in the basic
disciplines.







BIENNIAL REPORT 1962-64
Florida's agriculture is extremely diversified, including such products as
citrus, vegetables, field crops, pastures, livestock, fibers, ornamentals, tropical
fruits, forests and others. In order to keep abreast of the agricultural prob-
lems confronting the state's increasing agricultural enterprises and activities,
80 new research projects were initiated during the biennium. Currently
there are 398 projects underway, with investigations touching all segments
of Florida's vast agricultural industry. Of these, 11 are cooperative with
other states on a regional basis. One-hundred and four projects were termi-
nated during the biennium and the results of the research published.
The total research program of the Agricultural Experiment Stations can
best be characterized as a combined basic-applied effort. In addition to pro-
duction research on the various crops and livestock, much of the effort is
directed to expanding research in processing, handling, marketing, utilization,
engineering and economics. Basic research continues to receive increased
attention.
Research accomplishments during the biennium included the development
of a harvesting bulk-curing system for tobacco; significant findings in the
management and feeding of livestock and poultry; effective chemical control
of lawn chinch bugs, hunting billbug, mole crickets, wireworms, pickleworm,
corn earworm, fall armyworm and a number of insects and mites attacking
ornamental plants; improved methods for handling sweet corn insuring a
better product for the consumer; increased crop yields through fertilization
studies; and better controls for livestock and poultry diseases.
Some idea of the significance of the Stations' contributions to the state
can be more fully realized by a review of the crop varieties developed or
screened for adaptability to Florida's varied soil and climate during the
biennium. Crops either released or approved for release during this period
include: two new soybeans which outyield standard varieties in north-
central Florida by 20 per cent or more; new nectarine, peach and black-
berry varieties, the release of which it is felt will contribute greatly to the
development of Florida's deciduous fruit industry; two new Southern Pea
varieties which should contribute materially to the importance of this crop
for fresh market and for processing; a rust resistant pole bean adapted for
the important production area of Dade County; three citrus rootstocks re-
sistant to the attacks of the burrowing nematode; two new tomato varieties
and a new celery variety; a new variety of oats superior to available varieties
for cold hardiness and resistant to soil borne mosaic virus; a rust resis-
tant ryegrass; a new shade tobacco with high black shank resistance and
a higher quality leaf; and a watermelon variety with resistance to both
anthracnose and Fusarium wilt.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



EXTENSION AND SERVICE

Agricultural Extension Service
Demands on the Florida Agricultural Extension Service for educational
services continued to increase during the biennium. A growing population,
an agricultural industry that is increasing in size and complexity, and the
' need to carry out information educational work on U.S.D.A. programs
strained its resources.
In the face of these demands, a number of major changes were made
which strengthened the Extension Service's educational programs. Among
these changes was the consolidation of 34 projects into eight basic project
areas, calling for broad inter-disciplinary involvement of staff from all sub-
ject matter fields. County and district staffs have been reorganized to provide
for more effective administration and programming, while specialists on the
state staff have been made members of the various subject matter depart-
ments within the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, allowing
greater coordination with the Institute's research and teaching programs.
Among the significant developments and accomplishments of the bien-
nium was an expanding communication program. Radio and television pro-
grams reached into every Florida community providing educational informa-
tion on nearly every phase of Florida life. This was made possible through
the cooperation of commercial radio and television stations in providing pub-
lic service time for these educational programs. Because of these improve-
ments and the coordination of the distribution of publications with the mass
media programs, demands for research, extension, and U.S.D.A. publications
have reached 1,500,000 per year.
Extension specialists at the state level and agents in 66 counties continued
their educational programs through meetings, field days, tours, demonstra-
tions, circular letters, radio and television talks, personal correspondence,
and otherwise. Increased average crop yields, the adoption of an improved
fertilization application method on citrus, acceptance of a disease resistant
rose understock, technological progress in the vegetable industry, and the
implementation of improved livestock and poultry management practices are
only a few of the advances which can be credited to their efforts.
Home economists continued to provide vital information on family living
in such areas as food and nutrition, clothing and textiles, health, home
management, and house furnishings. In addition, programs were expanded
to reach special audiences such as low income groups, older citizens, young
marrieds, and teenage boys and girls. The latter group was given specific
help on foods and nutrition since Extension had been asked to assist with
the national human nutrition problem. Extension educational programs in
home economics subjects complemented efforts of other agencies and Ex-
tension personnel cooperated with public and private agencies concerned
with health, public housing, community service, older citizens, rural areas
development, and civil defense. New residents, both rural and urban, con-
tinue to seek help and information on family living problems unique to
Florida.
Florida's 4-H Club enrollment reached a peak of 45,556 during the bien-







BIENNIAL REPORT 1962-64
nium with approximately 31 per cent of the total enrollment coming from
urban areas. Leadership development, both adult and youth, continued to
receive emphasis as the key to providing needed guidance and training to
these young people.

Other Service Activities
A dramatic increase in inter-library loan service of the University Libraries
occurred during the biennium. From the fiscal year 1962-63 to the fiscal
year 1963-64, a 393 per cent increase in service to Florida industry occurred
through the loans of books, microfilm, or photocopy. In 1962-63, 319 out of
453 requests from industries were satisfied. During the past fiscal year 1,255
out of 1,620 requests were satisfied. Although this service is something
which is more or less taken for granted in the world of research, it is none-
theless a major and somewhat costly contribution which the University
is making to industry in Florida and in the South.
In addition to industry, loans from the University's libraries, which now
shelve more than one million volumes, were made to students and faculty
of other colleges and universities in the state. Over 1,000 volumes were
loaned to the libraries of these other educational institutions during the
past two years.
Health services provided through the University Teaching Hospital and
Clinics also increased during the biennium. Almost 10,000 patients are an-
nually referred by a family physician to receive health and medical services
which are not normally available through community hospitals and other
agencies.
The Florida State Museum was placed in the position to greater serve the
public of Florida during the biennium by the acquisition of the Leigh M.
Pearsall Collection of North American Indian artifacts. This collection, valued
at more than $500,000, was purchased and given to the University of Florida
Foundation. Adequate museum facilities must be obtained, however, before
the collection can be properly displayed for the Florida public.
The University of Florida Press supervised the editing and production of
77 volumes during the biennium. Among the special accomplishments of the
biennium was the printing of the Atlas of Florida and the Quadricentennial
Edition chronicling Florida's settlement and development.
The atlas, which interprets all the basic facets of Florida's development,
is the first of its kind to be prepared for any state in the nation.
The Quadricentennial Edition includes 12 outstanding books on Florida
history dating back to the days of the first white settlements. These books,
which have been faithfully reproduced in every detail, have long been out of
print and unavailable except in private libraries. According to distinguished
librarian Thomas R. Adams of the John Carter Brown Library, the printing
of these volumes marks the first time in over 100 years that any state has
sponsored or underwritten the re-creation of its own history and cultural
beginnings for the general public.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
OPERATING INCOME AND EXPENDITURES*
FISCAL YEARS 1962-63 AND 1963-64


1962-63


1963-64


Total
1962-64


Percent
1960-62 1962-64


State Appropriation ............
Sales and Services .............
Student Fees .... . . . . . .
Federal Appropriations .........
Contracts & Grants Federal . .
Contracts & Grants Private . .
Endowment Income ............

Total Income .............


. . . ... $25,514,033
. . . ... 4,111,148
. . . ... 2,663,557
. . . ... 1,576,722
. . . ... 6,441,822
. . . ... 2,229,550
. . . ... 4,087

. . . ... $42,540,919


EXPENDITURES
General Administration .................. .$ 1,979,824
Resident Instruction .................... 12,369,415
Organized Research ..................... 13,683,617
Extension ............................ 2,377,707
Operation and Maintenance of
Physical Plant ....................... 2,263,956
Libraries and Museum ................... 1,135,548
Organized Activities Relating
To Instructional Departments ........... 8,108,207
Other ................................. 557,367

Total Expenditures ............ ... $42,475,641

' Excludes Self-Supporting Activities


INCOME


$28,939,136
4,633,144
2,953,096
1,670,756
9,602,671
1,621,810
3,181

$49,423,794



$ 2,061,630
14,608,241
15,544,788
2,645,804

2,328,288
1,282,932

9,222,630
187,992

$47,882,305


$54,453,169
8,744,292
5,616,653
3,247,478
16,044,493
3,851,360
7,268

$91,964,713



$ 4,041,454
26,977,656
29,228,405
5,023,511

4,592,244
2,418,480

17,330,837
745,359

$90,357,946


65.0%
10.9
5.6
3.7
10.6
4.2
0.1

100.0%



5.1%
30.7
31.5
7.6

6.0
2.9

16.0
.2

100.0%


59.2%
9.5
6.1
3.5
17.4
4.2
0.1

100.0%


4.5%
29.8
32.3
5.6


19.1
.8

100.0%














THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


PRESIDENT'S REPORT


For The Years


1962-1964











Administrative Officers


The Florida State University


GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
GORDON W. BLACKWELL, PH.D., LL.D., D.H.L. ................. President
JOHN E. CHAMPION, PH.D. .............. Vice President for Administration

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
KARL DITTMER, PH.D. ............... Vice President for Academic Affairs
JOHN K. FOLGER, PH.D. .................... Dean of the Graduate School
E. LAURENCE CHALMERS, JR., PH.D. Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
MODE L. STONE, PH.D. .................. Dean of the School of Education
HORTENSE M. GLENN, PH.D. ....... Dean of the School of Home Economics
KARL OTTO KUERSTEINER, PH.D. ............. Dean of the School of Music
Louis SHORES, PH.D. ........................ Dean of the Library School
COYLE E. MOORE, PH.D. ............. Dean of the School of Social Welfare
CHARLES A. ROVETTA, M.B.A. ............. Dean of the School of Business
VIVIAN M. DUXBURY, M.A. ................ Dean of the School of Nursing
GROVER L. ROGERS, Sc.D. ....... Dean of the School of Engineering Science
N. ORWIN RUSH, M.S ........................... Director of Libraries

STUDENT AFFAIRS
HARRY P. DAY, ED.D................................. Dean of Students
KATHERINE WARREN, M.A. ........................... Dean of Women
DONALD LOUCKS, P.E.D ................................ Dean of Men
MURRAY W. KENNA, ED.D ................................. Registrar

BUSINESS AFFAIRS
RODERICK KIRKPATRICK SHAW, B.S. ........ Treasurer and Business Manager
GEORGE E. FORTIN, M.B.A., C.P.A. ......................... Comptroller

UNIVERSITY RELATIONS
PATRICK W. HOGAN, B.S. .......... Acting Director of University Relations










THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

TALLAHASSEE


OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT







Members of the Board of Control
State of Florida

GENTLEMEN:
The Biennium of 1962-64 was a period of unprecedented growth and vigor.
This report can touch only the most essential highlights of the past two years
at the Florida State University, but it has been a time during which many
thousands of our people-faculty, staff, students-conducted the affairs of a
great University with increasing distinction. To all of these people I am deeply
grateful.
The Biennium was a time of growth. Student enrollment reached the highest
level in the history of the University-not only in numbers but in quality of
achievement. More degrees were awarded than ever before-and more students
were elected to Phi Beta Kappa. The number of faculty positions increased.
Faculty salaries continued to rise toward a level more closely competitive with
universities throughout the country. We began the most extensive building
program the University has experienced.
The Biennium was a time of vigor. Trimester operation brought more stu-
dents into our classrooms for longer periods than ever before. All of our people
-faculty, staff, students-had less time for extra-curricular activity. And our fac-
ulty received research grants totalling some $10 million.
This institution has already fulfilled the promise of its beginning and has
moved with firm steps toward real distinction among the universities of the
nation. In order to maintain this momentum, Florida State must continue to
expand its services, strengthen its commitments, preserve and protect those
qualities of greatness already achieved.
The primary goal of the University has been the achievement and mainte-
nance of an intellectual climate in which students develop respect for truth
and excitement in discovery. Such a climate must prevail despite all possible
increases in student enrollment. We must, therefore, make a greater effort to
attract and hold a faculty capable of dynamic teaching and imaginative leader-
ship. We must encourage a climate in which meaningful faculty-student rela-
tionships are a recognized part of every faculty member's responsibilities. We
52







FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


must increase faculty rewards, not only in salary, but in released time for re-
search and creative work. We must strive in every way possible to increase
the excellence of our faculty. For it is the ability of the teacher which deter-
mines the ability of the student. And, in the end, the excellence of the stu-
dent is the fundamental purpose of the University.
We must maintain as a major goal the development of distinguished gradu-
ate programs. The University recognizes graduate research as a most signifi-
cant and most productive form of education. We must expand our graduate
programs to meet the needs of a projected 4,000 graduate students by 1970.
We must do our best to encourage new interests, new approaches, new cur-
ricula, in the highest traditions of interdisciplinary scholarship.
We must adjust to the changing character of the student. body. The junior
class is now the largest in the University. Soon the majority of our students
may no longer come directly from the high schools but from the junior colleges.
A major reorientation is necessary in many areas, including curriculum plan-
ning, admissions and selection, and personal counselling.
Enrollment will continue to rise. The University must keep pace with the
needs of the youth of our state. There must be adequate financial support in
the form of classrooms, laboratory and office space, library facilities, dormi-
tories, capital equipment, new positions both academic and staff, increased
salaries and operating expenses. And finally, we must recognize that educators
will get on with the business of education more effectively if administrative red
tape and delay, internal as well as external, are reduced substantially.
This is my last biennial report as President of the Florida State University.
I leave with pride in our achievements and an abiding faith in the future of
the University.
Respectfully submitted,



Gordon W. Blackwell
President








PRESIDENT'S REPORT


GENERAL SUMMARY
ENROLLMENT
The class of 1963-64 was the largest in the history of the University. En-
rollment exceeded 10,000 for the first time in the fall of 1962 and rose to
11,162 in the fall of 1963. Graduate enrollment for September, 1963, totalled
1,715 students, an increase of 18 per cent over the fall term of the first year
of the preceding biennium. Steadily rising enrollment, with all its attendant
problems, was the main highlight of the biennium. Enrollment pressure was
felt in every area of the University.
The growth of the student body was not matched by a comparable rise in
faculty positions or supporting personnel. The student body increased by 12 per
cent, faculty by only 6.8 per cent. Classes were inevitably increased in size,
often beyond desirable limits. In many cases graduate students were called
upon to fill vacancies where full-time academic personnel were not available.
The faculty as a group responded superbly to the increased pressure, but there
has been undeniable loss of time for creative research, as well as time for
student-teacher relationships which are invaluable in the development of a dis-
tinguished university.
There were critical problems in the areas of housing and facilities. No new
dormitories were built during the biennium. We were able to house only about
half of the student body in on-campus housing. A supervised program of off-
campus housing was begun, enabling the University to house 400 more women
in private homes. An Off-Campus Housing Office was opened, which served
from 300 to 500 students each month and provided assistance to staff and
faculty through cooperative arrangements with local realtors. A new area of
Alumni Village (185 apartments) was opened in September, 1962. Some
limited housing for single graduate students was provided by converting 25 of
the old, temporary houses in Mabry Heights to attractive apartments. Although
three new housing projects, accommodating slightly more than 1,000 students,
will be completed by September, 1965, the availability of on-campus housing
will become more critical.
The costs of providing non-academic services to the student climbed to
more than $2,000,000, of which nearly five-sixths came from student fees or
income from student activities. Facilities were expanded wherever possible.
Construction of a new Student Hospital was approved and is expected to open
by September, 1965. But we have at present a student-physician ratio of only
1:2,000, where experience indicates a ratio of 1:1,000 is essential for adequate
medical care.
One of the most significant developments of the biennium was the shift in
emphasis toward upper-division and graduate-level instruction. While the num-
ber of the freshman class has been held relatively constant for the past four
years, the junior class has continued to grow so that it is now the largest in
the University. This shift has been necessary in order to accommodate junior
college transfers. But it has stretched our inadequate library and laboratory
facilities beyond reasonable limits. Normal library standards recommend one
chair for every four students-Florida State has only one for every nine stu-







FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

dents. Florida State ranks 16tpl among 17 southeastern universities in book
stock, and 13th in expenditures. Although limited physical space for library,
classrooms and lecture halls will be constructed immediately, a comparable
effort in expanding library holdings and staff must be made if we are to con-
tinue to emphasize upper division studies.
One result of the constant size of the freshman class has been a continual
rise in standards of selection. The incoming freshman class is now the best
qualified in the history of the University, ranking above the 75th percentile in
college entrance exams throughout the country.
The quality of the student body shows a notable improvement at all levels.
Degrees conferred during the biennium:

Undergraduate 3,879
Master 861
Doctorate 177

FACULTY
Faculty salaries continue to fall below comparable national levels. This is
particularly true at the Associate Professor and Professor levels, where our
losses have been most acute.
It is difficult to assess faculty turnover and recruiting problems in the light
of political developments. The Board of Control worked with Faculty Senate
to issue a new policy on academic freedom which was acceptable to both.
But there is no doubt that this question and political attitudes toward it within
the state continue to concern many of our professors.
We have worked more closely with other institutions throughout this bien-
nium than ever before. The fact that the University of South Florida was
placed under censure by the American Association of University Professors
must affect us all.
Perhaps the most significant development of the biennium was the change
to trimester calendar. Trimester operation began in the fall of 1962 and con-
tinued throughout the biennium. After two full years it is possible to reach a
number of tentative conclusions. On the positive side there has been increased
use of facilities, enabling more students to attend the University or to complete
more courses in a calendar year. During Trimester III of the biennium's first
year, 6,716 students were enrolled, as compared with a previous fall enroll-
ment of 10,391. The following year, 6,866 students attended Trimester III.
On the negative side, there is widespread concern among faculty members
that the quality of education and the amount of creative scholarship have
been curtailed. The trimester was inaugurated without a comparable increase
in faculty positions. Increased teaching loads have been pushed to a level
which may well jeopardize the quality of instruction. The addition of 60 new
faculty positions this coming year is a vital step forward. But 66.4 per cent
of our faculty are now called on to teach twelve months in the year.
In the face of these pressures new University-wide programs have been ini-
tiated in an effort to support instruction and research. The new Council for
Instruction provides assistance to faculty members concerned with enhancing







PRESIDENT'S REPORT


their teaching efficiency, while the new Division of Sponsored Research has
made it possible to provide additional support for existing and projected pro-
grams of research.
Total yearly expenditures from contracts and grants continued to increase,
and reached a record high of $5,532,398 during the 1963-64 fiscal year, as
compared with $3,340,000 during the last year of the previous biennium.
Here are some of the highlights of activity by the research institutes, and
some special research programs of the University:
The Nuclear Research Program continues to operate the 12 MeV tandem
accelerator 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Requests for machine time
have been in excess of available time by as much as 50 per cent. Outside con-
tract and grant support attracted by the Nuclear Program has amounted to
approximately $1,000,000 per year for the biennium. Twenty-four students
have been awarded Nuclear Fellowships during the biennium.
The Oceanographic Institute, established in 1950, has nine current research
grants with an annual value of $127,258.
The Institute of Governmental Research has projects on voting behavior,
attitudinal surveys, state administrative organization, impeachment, local gov-
ernment, political party finance, and urban and regional planning.
The Computing Center conducted approximately 40,000 runs for some 150
research projects during the last year of the biennium. The computer is now
in operation 24 hours a day, Monday through Saturday.
The Institute for Social Research is in the second year of the Mental Health
Training Grant received from the National Institute of Mental Health for a
Community Mental Health Training Program. This grant will continue for an-
other three years.
The Institute of Human Development is involved in a five-year longitudinal
study of twins begun in 1960 and is also studying the effect of trimester
operation on kindergarten through third-grade children.
The Institute of Molecular Biophysics attracted internationally known sci-
entists to its staff and published seventy-five new publications during the aca-
demic year 1963-64, reflecting great credit upon the Institute and the Uni-
versity.
The above is a small cross-section of the activities of our faculty. The range,
vigor, and value of their efforts is reflected in the steadily rising stature of
Florida State as a distinguished University.

STUDENT AFFAIRS
The University was peacefully integrated throughout the biennium. Due
credit must be given to the increasing maturity and responsibility of the stu-
dent body, and most particularly to those student organizations-notably the
student newspaper, The Flambeau-who gave time and understanding to
what might otherwise have been a grave problem.
The biennium was marked by two main trends in student behavior: First,
there has been a definite increase in our students' social and political aware-
ness. While overzealous behavior on the part of some of the more radical ele-
ments has caused concern, we believe this trend is a sign of improving Uni-







FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

versity stature, of the increased intellectual responsibility among our students
so essential to a great university.
Second, there has been a definite decrease in normal social activity, due
to trimester operation. Time lost to compressed schedules has come from that
formerly used for social and recreational activities. It is probable that higher
admission standards, together with a more exacting level of classwork, may
have considerable bearing on this development, but it is certain that the stu-
dent nowadays has less time for relaxation.
The Honors Program, firmly established during the 1960-62 biennium, has
continued to grow. The effect of the "honors concept" has begun to be felt
throughout the undergraduate system. The number of honors students in the
Division of Basic Studies increased during the biennium from 195 to 270.
Fifty-three students were graduated with honors from the College of Arts and
Sciences.
Perhaps the most widely publicized of all student activities was the Florida
State "Flying High" Circus, which has continued to attract favorable attention
to the University. The Circus made a month-long trip to Europe in May and
June of 1964 with the active support of the U. S. Department of State. Per-
formances were given in Barcelona, Nice, Florence, and Athens. The trip will
be featured on two national television programs, and has been lauded by State
Department officials for the favorable image of the nation and of the Uni-
versity which it created in four foreign countries.

BUILDINGS
The biennium saw the inception of the most accelerated building program
in the history of the University involving funds totaling $27.3 million. Many of
the new buildings are to be located in a new area designated as the FSU
Science Center. Working in, cooperation with the Board of Control Architect,
revisions have been made in the Master Campus Plan showing anticipated
building needs over the next 10 years.
The following is a breakdown of buildings completed or projected during
the biennium, showing sources of funds:




State State
Building Appropriations Bond Program FSU Federal Grants Total Cost
Buildings completed during the 1962-64 biennium:
Molecular Biophysics $611,297 $ 475,000 $ 1,086,297
185 Married Student $ 85,000 1,486,000* $ 1,571,000
Apartments
Swimming Pool and $ 216,000 88,400 $ 304,400
Bathhouse
Additional Floor 232,000 1,292 $ 233,292
Nuclear Building
Field House 150,000 $ 150,000
Buildings under construction as of July 1, 1964:
Men's Dormitory $700,000 $1,814,000* $ 2,514,000
University Union $2,402,000 $ 2,402,000
ox Physics Unit I 1,874,000 $ 1,874,000
0 Psychology Research 699,972 525,028 $ 1,225,000
Married Student 195,649 3,748,000* $ 3,943,649
Housing
Buildings funded and to be under construction by July 1, 1965:
Final Floor 5,800 39,716 244,700 $ 290,216
Nuclear Building
Geology Addition 230,613 $ 230,613
Library Addition 1,490,000 $ 1,490,000
Chemistry Unit I 2,750,000 1,584,529 $ 4,334,529
Infirmary 200,000 250,000 476,000* $ 926,000
Social Science 2,500,000 $ 2,500,000
Biological Science Unit I 1,300,000 700,000 $ 2,000,000
Oceanographic Institute 200,000 $ 200,000
Total $ 1,311,297 $14,019,772 $660,057 $11,283,870 $27,274,996
*-Loans.








FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

NEW PROGRAMS AND CURRICULUM CHANGES
The 1963 Legislature passed a bill permitting the University to establish with
Board of Control approval a Division of Sponsored Research for the adminis-
tration and promotion of research programs. The Division became operative on
January 1, 1964.
Graduate Programs in research and development management were initiated
on an experimental basis at Cape Kennedy and Patrick Air Force Base in
cooperation with FICUS.
The School of Business has modified the curriculum to include more mathe-
matics and quantitative analysis. Courses in management have been adapted to
TV instruction, and classes will begin in September, 1964. A curriculum for
pre-law majors was developed within the School. Progress is being made in
developing a curriculum leading to a doctoral degree.
The Department of Engineering Science was separated from the College
of Arts and Sciences and established as a separate School of Engineering
Science.
In January, 1964, the President approved the Faculty Senate's change from
compulsory to voluntary ROTC effective in September, 1964.
The Board of Control approved Masters degree programs in German and in
Urban and Regional Planning. Doctoral programs were approved in French,
Economics, Philosophy, and Oceanography.
The Department of Chemistry inaugurated a new sequence in elementary
Chemistry to meet the needs of better prepared high school students. Physics
has developed new laboratory experiments to correspond with new instructional
materials.
The Department of Modem Languages expanded its language laboratory
twofold. The Foreign Study program, which has long operated a large sum-
mer program at Monterrey, Mexico, was extended to include a summer session
at the University of Valencia in Spain.
The University School has established a pilot program of non-graded, year-
round operation.
The Elementary Education Department has completely revamped its under-
graduate and graduate programs placing strong emphasis on modem instruc-
tion in reading for elementary pupils.
The English Education Department has revised its popular text on the
teaching of literature in high school.
Foreign Language Education has completed a text for the teaching of Ger-
man.
The State Symphony of Florida, created by the 1963 Legislature, was ar-
tistically and financially successful.
The Library extended its hours in response to student requests, now being
open 14 hours longer per week than it was at the beginning of the biennium.
Registration procedures were streamlined to permit the registration of al-
most twice the number of students in little over half the time formerly re-
quired. An experiment in preregistration was conducted in December, 1963,
which could eliminate the need for a period of mass registration at the begin-
ning of each trimester.
A Summer Orientation Program was begun for new students.
59







PRESIDENTS REPORT


DIVISION REPORTS

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

Growth of the graduate program and a report on degrees awarded are in-
cluded elsewhere, as are reports on new graduate programs initiated during the
biennium. To prepare for the large increases anticipated in graduate programs
and in research activity, the Graduate School made some significant organi-
zational changes. Most important was the establishment of the Division of
Sponsored Research within the Graduate School, headed by a director who is
also an Associate Dean of the Graduate School.
The Graduate Council, university policy-making body for graduate educa-
tion, was also reorganized, and an executive committee of the Council was
created. Graduate School procedures were streamlined, and more responsibility
for graduate program requirements was decentralized to the departmental
level.


COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

The College provided approximately 65 per cent of the instruction in the
entire University during Trimester I, 1963-64.
Student enrollment increased 5.8 per cent.
Graduate student enrollment was up 31.1 per cent.
Faculty to handle these needs was increased by only 3.5 per cent.
Graduates of the College were honored with fellowships for study at many
of the better universities in this country and abroad. During this period 81
students (more than 7 per cent of those earning the bachelor's degree) were
elected to Phi Beta Kappa.
Members of the College were honored by the University during the bien-
nium. The Coyle E. Moore, Jr., Award for Outstanding Excellence in. Teach-
ing was presented to Dr. William Rogers, History, for 1962-63, to Dr. James
Jones, History, for 1963-64, and to Mrs. Katherine Hoffman, Chemistry, for
1964-65. Dr. Michael Kasha, Chemistry, and the Director of the Institute of
Molecular Biophysics, was selected as Distinguished Professor, 1962-63. Dr.
Dorothy Hoffman, Professor of Spanish, was designated Distinguished Professor
for 1963-64. Professor Karl Zerbe, internationally recognized painter and
teacher, was awarded an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree by the Uni-
versity in April, 1963.
Other significant honors have come to the faculty as evidence of the grow-
ing stature of the faculty as a whole.

Degrees: 1962-63 1963-64
Bachelor 552 714
Master 131 127
Doctorate 43 41







FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Most significant development was the accreditation of the graduate pro-
gram of the School by the American Association of Collegiate Schools of
Business.
The number of undergraduate degrees awarded increased 25 per cent over
the preceding biennium. Graduate degrees were up 47 per cent.
A recent survey by the University of Texas indicates that the FSU School
of Business is among the top 16 in the nation making use of computerized
decision-making simulation in the teaching of management.
Progress has been made in developing a curriculum leading to a doctoral
degree. A program of limited study in Multinational Business Management
will begin during the coming year.
Significant research projects during the biennium included:

-A wage and salary study for the Florida Board of Health
-A nation-wide study under the Management Research Grant Program of
the U. S. Small Business Administration for the Florida Development
Commission
-A state-wide study for the Florida Council on Economic Development
-An economic-impact study for the Jacksonville Expressway Authority

Two textbooks by Business faculty members were published during the bien-
nium, one text was revised, three are in progress.
The Finance faculty helped to organize the Council for Economic Educa-
tion for the State of Florida.

Degrees: 1962-63 1963-64
Bachelor 413 436
Master 33 40


SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
The School of Education produces approximately 16 per cent of the student
semester hours taught in the University. While other divisions of the Univer-
sity are actively engaged in the education of teachers, the School of Education
has some part in all such programs. A survey of the spring graduating class of
1962 revealed that approximately 40 per cent of the baccalaureate graduates
had interned to teach.
The Department of Research and Testing was established during the bien-
nium. Other divisions of the University, as well as the State Department of
Education, have made extensive use of the services of this Department which
has been instrumental in encouraging other departments to do research.
The English Education Department, through the 'cooperation of the U. S.
Office of Education, has one of the 11 English curriculum centers in the
United States. The current project in this curriculum center represents a $212,-
000 grant for a four-year period.







PRESIDENT'S REPORT


The Mathematics Education Department is engaged in an extensive pro-
gram to develop a technique capable of handling large groups of elementary
teachers in an in-service program. The Department is currently involved in
such a program for 250 teachers in Broward County.
The Kellogg grant for preparation of Junior College personnel by the
Higher Education Department has been renewed in the amount of $302,000
for a three-year period.
Special Education has received a Federal grant of $64,000 for research in
the area of mental retardation.
Degrees: 1962-63 1963-64
Bachelor 544 576
Master 110 124
Doctorate 21 36

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING SCIENCE
The Cooperative Program in Engineering Science was begun and is now
operative with seven southeastern industries and government laboratories.
Twenty-five students are enrolled.
An Engineering Science Program was begun at Panama City, in cooperation
with FICUS. Twenty-eight men from the Naval Mine Defense Lab are en-
rolled.
An Engineering Science Program was begun at the Graduate Center at
Eglin AFB. Twenty-five are enrolled.
The first industrial grant was recorded: $17,000 from the General Elec-
tric Co.
The first sponsored scholarship was recorded, in the amount of $750, by
the Ring Power Foundation of Jacksonville.
The first National Science Foundation graduate fellow was enrolled for
graduate study.
Students enrolled in pre-engineering numbered 174 in 1962-63 and 179 in
1963-64.
The following four divisions are now projected for the School: Electronics,
Materials Science, Mechanics, and Systems Science.
The first MS degrees in Engineering Science were granted, four in 1962-63
and three in 1963-64.
Degrees: 1962-63 1963-64
Bachelor 3 11
Master 4 3

SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS
The number of upper-level and graduate students in the School increased
by 25 per cent. The total number of students served in 1962-63 was 48 per
cent higher than in 1960-61.
In 1962-63 more Ph.D. degrees were earned in the School of Home Eco-
nomics than in any other home economics program in the country.
62







FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

Seven extension courses were taught and many workshops conducted in vari-
ous parts of the state.
Members of the faculty held 44 offices or committee chairmanships in state
and national professional organizations. Members of the faculty participated
as speakers and coordinators at 78 professional and non-professional groups.
Research has continued in various areas of Home Economics under grants
from such agencies as the National Institutes of Health, the U. S. Department
of Agriculture and the University Research Council. Selected research areas:
The effects of atmospheric conditions in Florida on various types of fabrics.
The effect of diet on the synthesis of lipids.
Social and motor development of twins.
Familial correlates of father-presence and father-absence.
Attitudes of youth toward the aged.
High school marriage.
Plans are underway to develop a cooperative project with the Home Eco-
nomics Section of the U. S. Office of Education.
Degrees: 1962-63 1963-64
Bachelor 79 107
Master 12 5
Doctorate 10 8

THE LIBRARY SCHOOL
Information Science, an advanced, specialized area of Library Science, has
now completed its first year of operation. The first students to earn master's
degrees in this new area have already been placed in key positions.
Development of the field of Library History, including Library Philosophy
and Comparative Librarianship, moved forward despite failure to add a new
and urgently needed faculty member.
The Library School has been gathering over a period of 12 years archives
relating to libraries and library development in Florida and elsewhere. These
are now being catalogued and tested for computerized word indexing.
Tentative plans were developed for extending both the Oral History and
Archives Programs.
Since 1958, the Library has described the urgent need for a doctoral pro-
gram in Library Science at FSU. It is the faculty's hope that the Graduate
School and the Board of Control will affirm this need as quickly as practicable.
Now known as the Materials Center, the Library School laboratory library
has grown steadily and extended its services both to the Library School and
the School of Education.
The course for graduate students and the review of all these and disserta-
tions written on campus continues as one of the mast creative and useful pro-
grams of the Library School.
Degrees: 1962-63 1963-64
Masters 58 47
63







PRESIDENT'S REPORT


SCHOOL OF MUSIC
The first Florida State University Fine Arts Festival was organized under
the chairmanship of the Dean of the School of Music for the spring of 1963.
It included 23 events from the fields of architecture, art, drama, dance and
music. The festival was an artistic contribution to the University and the
community and resulted in massive publicity throughout the state. The festival
was highlighted by the appearance as conductor-composer of the world's most
celebrated musician, Pablo Casals.
Faculty awards were established two years ago in honor of three former
music faculty: Ella Scoble Opperman, Ernst Dohnanyi, and Warren Allen.
These are awarded after keen competitive standards have been evaluated.
For the second time within the past few years, a member of the School of
Music faculty, Professor Carlisle Floyd, was selected as Distinguished Professor
for 1964-1965.
Recently a Building Committee was added to the comprehensive list of active
music faculty committees. The University Committee on Buildings and Cam-
pus Developement has been contacted verbally and in writing regarding the
need for an addition to the present Music Building. The space needs of the
School of Music must be described as critical.

Degrees: 1962-63 1963-64
Bachelor 51 57
Master 22 20
Doctorate 8 6

SCHOOL OF NURSING
The most significant event of the biennium was the initial accreditation of
the registered nurse program. Together with continued accreditation of the
baccalaureate program, this places the entire undergraduate program on a firm
basis. This is especially significant in relation to the rating of the new master's
program, scheduled to begin admitting students in September, 1964.
Our students continue to achieve outstanding results on the Florida State
Board of Nursing licensing examinations. In "a study of candidate attainment,
two-ability categories" released by the Board during this past year, the
Florida State School of Nursing ranked highest in the state in both categories.
In September, 1963, enrollment reached a total of 302. During the biennium,
the following degrees were conferred:
1962-63 1963-64
Bachelor 44 64

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WELFARE
During the biennium, two Ph.D degrees were granted in Criminology and
Corrections. These are believed to be the first doctorates granted by an Ameri-
can university in this field.








FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


The faculty is engaged in planning for the expansion of the program in
Marriage Counselling and Social Work to a doctoral level.
One member of the faculty completed a baseline study of the characteristics
of the Florida prison population under a grant from the Florida Council on
Mental Health Training and Research.
Another faculty member is in the process of completing a study of the effects
on the family of the incarceration of the male head of the family. A third
member of the faculty is working on a study of the relationships between vic-
tims and offenders under a grant from the National Institute of Mental Health
In the area of marriage and family living, the School conducted 43 insti-
tutes, 6 workshops, and 6 off-campus courses. In the summer of 1964, two
correspondence courses were revised and three new ones prepared.
The Department of Criminology and Corrections conducts the annual South-
ern Conference on Corrections and the Southern Conference on Law Enforce-
ment. The former is now in its tenth year, the latter in its second year.
Enrollment showed phenomenal growth, particularly in the Law Enforce-
ment Program.
Degrees: 1962-63 1963-64
Bachelor 94 134
Master 55 67
Doctorate 1 3
STUDENT AFFAIRS
The Division of Student Affairs functions through the following offices:
Chaplain, Counseling Center, Dean of Men, Dean of Women, Financial Aid
and Student Employment, Hospital, Housing, Placement, Registration, Ad.
missions, and Student Activities.
Increased responsibilities were assumed by Student Government, primarily
in the budgeting and administration of student activity fees which now total
more than $450,000 per year. The Student Courts continued to play a major
role in maintaining standards of conduct at a high level. A major change in
the Student Body Constitution modifying the Academic Honor Code was
adopted.
The Flambeau, which became Florida's first collegiate daily newspaper in
the fall of 1962, served as a sounding board and release valve throughout the
biennium.
During each year of the biennium more than $1,000,000 in aid was granted,
primarily to undergraduate students.
The number of business and industrial recruiters spending more than a day
on campus exceeded 300 last year, and more than 2,200 students were inter-
viewed. The Education Placement Office compiled more than 800 sets of
credentials for prospective teachers, copies of which are furnished without
charge to prospective employers.
Nearly 10 per cent of the more than 2,500 applications for admission from
foreign countries were accepted. The foreign student program continued its
steady growth.
In August, 1963, a new nine-hole golf course was added to facilities avail-
able to students, staff and faculty.







PRESIDENTS REPORT


UNIVERSITY RELATIONS AND SERVICES

The University continued to expand its broad range of services. More than
3,500 non-resident students were enrolled in extension courses during the past
year through the Florida Institute for Continuing University Studies. University
instructors travelled hundreds of miles during the year to teach off-campus,
serving such areas as Eglin AFB, Patrick AFB, and Operation Bootstrap.
WFSU-TV scheduled an average of 55 hours of television programming per
week, including 10 program hours per week presented to the public schools
in the Big Bend area, serving approximately 80,000 students in Leon and six
surrounding counties with in-school lessons. WFSU-FM maintained a year-
round weekday schedule of 7:00 to 8:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. to midnight. The
station continued to provide quality programming in the areas of fine music,
drama, current affairs, and lectures by faculty and visitors. The film produc-
tion unit was used extensively to provide necessary footage for the University
and the state.
The University provided facilities for many conferences, such as the week-
long seminar on Continuing Education for Women, conducted for distinguished
alumnae, designed to furnish intellectual refreshment to women long out of
college.
A new Office of Conferences and Special Events became operational July 1,
1964. Under this office the University's conferences, institutes, short courses,
adult educational activities will have a proper home for the first time. Profes-
sionally competent personnel will be employed to develop these activities.
The Audio-Visual Center has the most complete collection of educational
films in the Southeast and continues to render an unusual service to the state.
Revenue achieved from film rentals was nearly five times more than during
the previous biennium.
The Faculty Senate unanimously urged the President to work toward the
establishment of a Florida State University Press. Actually, no new mechanical
equipment will be necessary, for commercial printers will continue to print the
books. During the biennium, the Office of Publications supervised the printing
of six scholarly books by members of the FSU faculty and staff.
The Public Relations Office and News Bureau have given additional atten-
tion to exploiting public interest in the process of students getting an educa-
tion. Efforts are being directed toward putting some of the following questions
before the public: What are the earmarks of a good college teacher? How does
he operate? How do students relate classroom knowledge to outside activity-
for example, student politics? What goes into the training of an Art teacher,
an English teacher, etc?

BUSINESS AFFAIRS

Business operations of the University include the following Departments:
Purchasing, Receiving and Supply, Maintenance and Construction, Property
Records, Safety, Building Services, Campus Security, Food Services, Bookstore,
Dairy Farm, Duplicating, Laundry, Post Office, Robotype and Addressograph.








FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


It is not possible to detail the varied activities of all these offices. Some high-
lights:
Telex equipment has been added in the Purchasing Department. Telex is
superior to telephone calls because a written legal quotation is obtained and
the message cost is approximately one-fifth that of a long-distance call.
The Maintenance Department completed $268,000 in major repairs to
Housing facilities. A total of $370,096 was billed for labor and material during
the biennium for work done on academic buildings and utilities.
The Property Records Department maintains records on 116,145 items
valued at $11,884,167. The Department compiles 263 annual inventory list-
ings each fiscal year covering equipment on Government contracts and in each
University department.
A compulsory eye safety program was established in the Chemistry and In-
dustrial Arts Department, with the resultant probable saving of two eye losses.
The University and the Safety Department were awarded a Wise Owl Charter
by the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness.
Sheltered, stocked spaces for civil defense were increased from 10,000 to
14,000.
Qualifications for employment in the Department of Campus Security were
raised.
Under the existing service contract the University received in rent and de-
preciation from food service operations $71,585.27 for the year 1962-63 and
$87,678.79 for the year 1963-64.
Total sales for the University Bookstore were $798,126 for the last year
of the biennium. Net profit for the year was $119,071.85, which is still obli-
gated to the 1950 Revenue Certificate Amortization Fund.

UNIVERSITY EXPENDITURES
Educational and Contract and Grant
General Expenditures Expenditures
1962-63 $16,131,829 $4,332,420
1963-64 $18,989,242 $5,366,415
Total $35,121,071 $9,698,835








PRESIDENTS REPORT


FINANCIAL STATEMENTS



FOR YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1963
Exhibit A-FUND BALANCE SHEET ................ Pages 69 and 70
Exhibit B-SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS ............ Pages 71 and 72


FOR YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1964
Exhibit A-FUND BALANCE SHEET ................ Pages 73 and 74
Exhibit B-SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS ............ Pages 75 and 76






FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY
FUND BALANCE SHEET-JUNE 30, 1963


Exhibit A


ASSETS


CURRENT FUNDS:
General Current Funds:
Cash ....................... ..... ....... .....................
Advance to Revolving Fund ............. .... ..............
Advance to Research Contracts Fund............................
Due from Research- Overhead ..................................
Investments.................... ...................... .
Restricted Current Funds:
Cash ................. ......... ... . ..............
D ue from G rantors......................... ................
Due from Contracting Agencies..............................
Investments.......................... . ...............


$ 79,335.99
75,000.00
100,000.00
135,285.01
24,811.68

$ 444,863.38
2,903,702.86
235,144.65
513,051.76


$ 414,432.6




4,096,762.61


Auxiliary Current Funds:
Cash....................................... .................. $ 288,518.06
Accounts Receivable...................... ................... 132,685.20
Jobs-in-Process ........................... .. ........ ........ 79,657.34
M merchandise Inventory.................... ..................... 405,451.66
Materials and Supply Inventory ................................. 38,194.17
Investment- Bonds.......................................... 160,959.77
Advances to Loan Funds..................... ..... ......... 32,214.34
Miscellaneous Other Assets .................... ................. 17,173.97 1,154,854.51
Total Current Funds............................................................... $ 5,666,049.81
SCHOLARSHIP AND LOAN FUNDS:
C ash ......................................... . ................. 168 ,789 .91
Loans Receivable............................................... 1,309,121.61
Investm ents...................................................... 132 ,756 .32
Total Scholarship and Loan Funds ....................... ........................... $ 1,610,667.841


PLANT FUNDS:
Unexpended Plant Funds:
Building and Equipment Funds:
Cash.......................... ........ $ 5,307,358.62
Revenue Certificate Retirement Funds:
Cash .................................. $ 231,553.21
Investments............. ................. 484,599.66
Revenue Certificate Repair and Replacement Fund:
Cash ...................................... $ 61,616.25
Investments ........................... ... 231,314.83
Auxiliary Fixed Asset Replacement Fund:
Cash............................. 3 706,849.41
Investments ............................... 160,807.72
Advances to Loan Funds .................... 71,875.66
Investments in Property ............... ..... 41,692.12
Invested in Plant:
Educational and General and Agency Activities:
Land ...................................... $ 236,911.69
Building ................................... 21,522,577.74
Building Improvements...................... 951,677.19
Other Structures and Improvements .......... 2,632,706.05
Accountable Equipment..................... 8,876,945.69
Books .................................. 3,822,884.26
Auxiliary Enterprises and Activities:
Land ...................................... 150 ,601.06
Building .......................... ..... 17,714,023.16
Building Improvements...................... 266,735.14
Other Structures and Improvements .......... 63,349.97
Accountable Equipment..................... 1,963,516.43


$ 5,307,358.62


716,152.87


292,931.08



981,224.91 $7,297,667.48


S 38,043,702.62




20,158,225.76


58,201,928.38


Total Plant Fund............................................. .. ....... $65,499,595.86
AGENCY FUNDS:
Cash ..... ..................................................... $ 396,067.39
Accounts Receivable- Payroll Taxes....... ........................ 615.67
Investments.. ................................................. 368,757.74
Advance to Revolving Fund ........ ............................. 75,000.00
Advances to Plant Funds ........ ..... ............................ 26,032.00
Total Agency Funds ........ ............................................... $ 865,872.80
OTHER FUNDS:
Cashier Account:
Cash ..................................... .................$ 96,088.19
Items Held as Cash.. ......................................... 8,887.26 $ 104,975.45
Revolving Account:
C ash ......................................................... $ 25 ,151 .83
Unreimbursed Expenditures for various University Activities........ 118,233.12
Permanent Advances of Petty Cash to Various Activities ........... 7,718.11
Accumulated Fund Shortage.................................... .48.29 151,151.35
T total O their F unds .................................................................. $ 256 ,126 .80
TOTAL ALL FUNDS .... ................................................... $73,898,313.14


1





FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY
FUND BALANCE SHEET-JUNE 30, 1963


LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES


CURRENT FUNDS:
General Current Funds:
Fund Balances:
Incidental .......... ..........
Extension Incidental ..........


.......... ........... $ 304,91478
................... .. 109 ,517 .90 $


Restricted Current Funds:
Fund Balances:
Research Contracts and Grants:
Reserve for Research Commitments ................... . .$ 3,840,133. 55
Research Liabilities
Due to General Current Funds
Contract and Grant Overhead .......... 135,285.01
Advance from Incidental .............. 100,000.00 235,285.01
Other Funds:
Westcott Estate .................... .... $ 9,581 43
Seminary Interest .. ... ................ 4,159.43
Fire Replacement........................ 817.07
Audio Visual- Trust ..................... 6,786.16 21,344.09
Auxiliary Current Funds:
Liabilities:
Cash Overdraft........... ...............$ 296,951.00
Due to Revolving Fund.................. 950 00
Accounts Payable ............. .............. 63,912 66
Accrued Vacation Sick Leave ...... ..... 40,279.68
Accrued Payroll .................... ....... 4,690.56
Deferred Credits to Income .................. 92,451.24 $ 499,235.14
Fund Balances:
Auxiliary Current Fund Balance .............................. 655,619.37
Total Current Funds. ................. .......................... ................
SCHOLARSHIP AND LOAN FUNDS:
Liabilities:
Due to Agency Funds .......................... $ 27,682 30
Due to Auxiliary Plant Funds................... 84,090.00 $ 111,772.30
Fund Balances:
Scholarship Funds ............................. $ 181,330.02
Loan Funds ...... ...................... 1,317,565.52 1,498,895.54
Total Scholarship and Loan Funds ........... ..........................................
PLANT FUNDS:
Unexpended Plant Funds:
Fund Balances:
Reserve for Plant Additions ..................... ............ S 5,307,358.62
Reserve for Debt Service ............................. .... 716,152.87
Reserve for Repair and Replacement .......................... 292,931.08
Reserve for Replacement-Auxiliary Fund Assets .......... 981,224.91 $
Invested in Plant:
Educational and General and Agency Activities:
Liabilities:
Revenue Certificate Debt (Shown under Auxiliary)
Fund Balances:
Invested in Educational Plant............................ $ 38,043,702.62


414,432.68











4,096.762.65


1,154,854.51
5,666,049.84


1,610,667.84





7,297,667.48


Auxiliary Enterprises and Activities:
Liabilities:
Revenue Certificate Debt ................. $ 9,981,800.00

Fund Balances:
Invested in Auxiliary Plant ............... 10,176,425.76 20,158,225.76 58,201,928.38
Total Plant Fund . ....... ............................... ..................... $65,499,595.86
AGENCY FUNDS:
Fund Balances:
Agency Funds.. ......................................... 865,872 80
Total Agency Funds.. . . . ................ ... ......... .......... $ 865,872.80
OTHER FUNDS:
Cashier Account:
Liabilities:
Due to Student Bank Depositors ............................. $ 103,975.45
Due to Revolving Fund......... ......................... 1,000.00 $ 104,975.45


Revolving Account:
Liabilities:
Due to Incidental Fund......... ....... .................. S 75,000.00
Due to Agency Fund......................... ............... 75,000.00
D ue to Vendors. .......................................... 153.28
Funds transferred in for "State" checks written on various funds
and not cleared this date............. .................. 998.07
Total Other Funds.............. ............................................
TOTAL ALL FUNDS......... ...................


151,151.35
S 256,126.80
$73,898,313.14


Exhibit A








FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY
SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1963


Exhibit B


Fund Balances July 1, 1962.....
Funds Reverting to State
General Fund (1961-62)......
Adjustments Applicable to Prior
P eriods....................
Additional Releases on 1961-62
Appropriations Subsequent to
June 30, 1962 ...............

Adjusted Fund Balances July 1,
19 6 2 .. .... ........ .. ...

REVENUES 1962-63
State Appropriations-Educa-
tional and General....
State Appropriations-Home
Demonstration Extension.
State Appropriations-Ninth
Grade Testing (and Trust).
Incidental:
Matriculation.............
Out-of-State Tuition .......
Music Fees. .............
Application Fees ..........
Library Fines ............
Transcripts ..............
Child Development Fees...
Photographic Fees.........
Test Service Fees..........
Overhead Earned-Contract
and Grants.... ........
Miscellaneous Departmental
Revenue....... ........
Miscellaneous Non-Depart-
mental Revenue ........
Bootstrap Fees, Short Courses,
and Institutes............
Research Contracts and
Grants Received..........
Endowment Income ........
Fire Replacement Fund-
Insurance Proceeds
A udi V..J-4-R._n_ --d


EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL


Total
Educational
and General


$ 3,353,612.39

3,446.60

6,608.80


59,038.82


General
Revenue


Incidental Research
and Extension Contracts
Incidental and Grants


58,296.04 $ 627,489.58:$2.653.462 59


3,446.60

9,480.73


59,038.82 ........


Other


$14.364 18



1,742.55


Auxiliary
Current


Loan
Funds


Scholarship
Funds


Agency
Funds


Other
Auxiliary
Funds


Unex-
pended
Plant
Funds


$ 721,856.66 $1,089,730.51 $172,833.84 S 612.949 70 S 19,585.46 $2,301,507.92


34,032.92 ..


380,404.47


$ 3,415,813.41$ 123,368.99 622,875.10$2,653,462.59 $16,106.73 755,889.58 $1,089,730.51 $172,833.84$ 612,949.70 19,585.46 $1,921,103.45


9,679,424.74159,679,424.741 ........... .. . ....... $......... S... ... ... . $ .......... $.


68,194.00

60,973.34

1,458,646.67
451,314.11
57,183.85
47,207.05
8,715.56
3,561.49
6,722.80
4,796.77
5,226.88


68,194.00 .............

60,973. 34 .. . ... . ......


2,270.15 ...........

3,668.66 ...........

386,454.72 .. ........


5,519,091.09
28,397.21

377 24


1,458,646.67
451,314.11
57,183.85
47,207.05
8,715.56
3,561.49
6,722.80
4,796.77
5,226.88

495,897.51


2,270 .15 ....... .... ...... .... . .. ... .. ... .... ................. ..

3 ,6 6 8 6 6 . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . ... . . . .. . .. . . .. . . . . .


495,897.51 ............ ...........................


386,454.72 .............


........... ............. 5 ,519 ,091.09


28,397.21

377.24


$ ............ ... . $ 563,992.00


I I J I. I_. I I.. I---- 1.. 1. I


32,191.00


4,614.48. ...........


I


i I--------( I I


I


I --i----


.............
.............





.............
.............


.............
. . . . . . .
.............
.............


............
..........


...........
...........


. ... . .. . . .
........... .

............


. . . .

. . .





Total Revenues ...............


EXPENDITURES 1962-63
General Administration, Stu-
dent Administration, and
General Expense ..........
Instruction ...... .......
Organized Research.... ....
E extension ..................
Library .................. .
Division of Plant and Ground
Activities Related to Instruc-
tion .....................
Purchase of Audio Visual
Equipment ......... .. .
Repairs to Fire Damage.....
Cost of Auxiliary Sales......
Auxiliary Operating Expenses.
- Auxiliary Debt Service ......
Scholarship Awards.........
Cost of Agency Operations. .
Refund of Deposits .........
Bond Principal Payments ...
Bond Interest Payments ....
Repair and Replacement
Expenditures.............

Total Expenditures ...........

Excess of Revenue over Ex-
penditures .... ..........

Fund Balances after 1962-63
Operations...............
Additions to Fixed Assets ...
Transfers from and to Other
F unds .....................
Released Funds (1962-63) Re-
verting to State General
F und ....................
Incidental Funds Transferred to
State General Fund..........

Adjusted Fund Balance
June 30, 1963..............


I ........- I. .


New Loan Funds Received. I ...
Other Student Fees ..
Deposits Received........... ............
Scholarships Received........ .............
Other Revenues............ ..............
Revenue Certificates Proceeds ....... ......


. I .' : ... . . . . .... .


r


$17,822,501.94 $9,808,592.08 $2,931,666.22 $5,023,193.58 $59,050.06 $3,872,273.99 $339,607.31 5498,622 34 $3.417,101.98 $149,417.93 $6. 17.8, i'9.42




$ 1,333,828.56 $1,333,828.56 $ ............ ........ $ ......... .. ... ............ ............
6,823,498.90 6,794,918.20 ......... 28,580.70. ... .......... ........... .. .. .. .. ......
4,485,459.81 648,937.19 3,836,522.62 2.6
553 ,497 .78 553 ,497 .78 . .. .. ........ ...... ....... ... .. ........ ... ..........
543 ,252 .83 543 ,252 .83 ... ... ....... ... ........ ......... ...... .. ...... ... .. ..... .......
1,618 ,336 .13 1 ,618 ,336 .13 ....... ... .... ... .. ..... ... ............... ......

748 ,722 .99 748 ,722 99 ...... .... ........... ............. .. .....

25,232.00 .. ... 25,232.00 ........................... ...... .
... 1,130,060.1 .......... ............ ............. ............
2,198,241.82 ..................... ..........125,438.78 ...........
......... ........ .... ......... . . ....... 375,686 .00 ........ ......... ............... 11,603 .96 371,489.96
S. . . . . . . . . . . ... 5 5 9 2 5 . . . ... . . ..55 9 ... . 5. . .
.. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . ... . . . . .... . . . . . 9 1 9 ,6 16 10 . . . . . . . . . . .. .
. . . . .. . . . . . . .. .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ,9 0 5 ,7 9 0 .54 . . . . . . . . . .
S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . .. . 5 1 3 ,9 0 0 .0 0
S . ... .....-.. . ........ .. .. ............ 326,552.19

S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4 0 ,9 9 6 .7 7

$16,131,829.00 $9,918,428 89$2,323,064.79 $3,836,522.62 $53,812.70 $3,703,987.99 ......... $559,428.50 52,825,406i 64 $137,042.74 S 509,959.00


$ 1.6961 672 945 109,836 .1$ 608,601 43 $1,186,670 96$ 5,237.36$ 168,286 00$339,607.315 60,806.I1'. 591,695.34$ 12,375.1955,668,130.42


$ 5,106,486 35$ 13,532 1851,231,476 5353,840,133.55$21,344.09$ 924,175.5851,429,337.82$112,027. 6 -$1 2114.,45 4.4$ 31,960.65$7,589,233.87
252,559.29 ....................... 21,024.60 42,329.57 1,341,305.60

104,043 85 ............ 04385 . . ....37,211. 00 .......... 69,3<12 34 317,747.64 31,583.00 165,004.85


13,532.18 13,532. 18 ........................ ......... ............. ..... ........ ...... 96,490.55

713,000.00 .......... 713,000.00 ............. ... ...... ............ ................................................. .............


414,432.68$3,840,133.55 21,344.09$ 634,405.9129,429,337.82$181,330.02 $ 865,872.80$ 21,214.08$6,316,442.57


S 4,275,910.32


AL I"


. . . . .


... . . . . .. .. . . .. .. .. . ., m .. .
...... . .. . ..385.. 12.. . .

.......... ........ 87 ,476 3. . .......


.. .. 452,712 18
.......... 2,036,797.78
498,622.34 ............
........... 154,844.02


I I


~-~~..-L------------.--- i~-~- IIL~


........... 1 328,940.57
........... 5,230,889.31


.............




FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY
FUND BALANCE SHEET-JUNE 30, 1964


Exhibit A


ASSETS


CURRENT FUNDS:
General Current Funds:
Cash ............................................. ........... 229,279.77
Unexpended Appropriations .................................... 132,081.03
Advance to Revolving Fund ................................... 75,000.00
Advance to Research Development Fund ......................... 100,000.00
Due from Contracts and Grants-Overhead. ...................... 197,454.53
Restricted Current Funds:
Cash ........................ ......... ............. ............ $ 1,080,823.38
D ue from Grantors ............................................ 2,481,711.24
Due from Contracting Agencies ................................. 358,309.96
Investments............................................ .... ... 495,036.54

Auxiliary Current Funds:
C ash ......................................................... $ 209 ,638 .53
Accounts Receivable ........................................... 166,671.16
Jobs-in-process ................................................ 104,934 .18
Merchandise Inventory......... ................................ 484,429.26
M materials and Supply Inventory ................................. 41,236.53
Investments- Bonds ......................... ................... 173,481.08
Advances to Loan Funds ....................................... 29,633.17
M miscellaneous Other Assets ..................................... 2,553.17

Total Current Funds ..................... ............................................


SCHOLARSHIP AND LOAN FUNDS:
C a sh . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Loans Receivable................. ............................
In v estm en ts ............................................ ..........
Total Scholarship and Loan Funds .....................................


$ 173,897.05
1,632,411.25
333,111.68
.... .... ... .


733,815.33


4,415,881.12









1,212,577.08
$ 6,362,273.53




S 2,139,419.98


PLANT FUNDS:
Unexpended Plant Funds:
Building and Equipment Funds:
C ash .... ..... ... .. .... .. .... .. .... .. .... $
Investm ents....................... .. ...
Revenue Certificate Retirement Funds:
Cash .......... ........................... 5
Investm ents ............. ...................
Revenue Certificate Repair and Replacement Fund:
Cash ........................... ........ 3
Investm ents............................ ...
Auxiliary Fixed Asset Replacement Fund:
Cash ................................... .
Investments .......... .... ........ ......
Advances to L6an Funds ....................
Investments in Property ............. ......
Invested In Plant:
Educational and General, and Agency Activities:
L a n d .. ...... .. ..... .. .... ... .. .. ... . . S
B u ild in g .. .... .... .. ..... ...... .. .... .. .. 2
Building Improvements......................
Other Structures and Improvements .........
Accountable Equipment ..................... 1
B o o k s . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . .. . . .


Auxiliary Enterprises and Activities:
L a n d . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .
Building............................
Building Improvements ......................
Other Structures and Improvements ..........
Accountable Equipment .....................


$
1


19,589,101.72
556,002.16 $20,145,103.88

367,746.00
524,350.75 892,096.75

30,426.32
304,601.15 335,027.47

776,635.35
238,437.13
74,456.83
41,692.12 1,131,221.43


335,311.69
!6,285,789 19
1,138,138 76
2,954,198.90
10,016,874.87
4,109,289.88 $44,839,603 29

68,231.06
17,682,757.96
294,111.53
41,896.53
2,056,723 48 20,143,720 56


T otal P la n t F u nd ............................... .. . ..... ...............
AGENCY FUNDS:
Cash .................. .. ............ ... ...... ............ 4 460,582.42
Investm ents.............................................. ........ 327 ,375 .11
Advance to Revolving Fund ....................................... 175,000.00
Total Agency Funds. .... . . . . . ............................. ..... ...........


OTHER FUNDS:
Student Depository:
Cash ............................. ........... ................ $ 23,680.67
Item s H eld as Cash ........................ .................... 700.81
Investm ents ................................................... 50 ,000 .00 $
Revolving Fund:
Cash ...................................... ............. ... $ 41,890.21
Unreimbursed Expenditures for Various University Activities.. .... 181,414.70
D ue from Vendors.......................................... ... 20.45
Permanent Advances of Petty Cash to Various University Activities. 27,583.11
Accumulated Fund Shortage................................'.... . 47.47 $
Total Other Funds........... . . . . .. .................................. .. .
TOTAL ALL FUN DS.................................................... ......... $9


$22,503,449.53


64,983,323.85
$87,486,773.38




$ 962,957.53


74,381.48





250,955.94
325,337.42
17,276,761.84




FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY
FUND BALANCE SHEET-JUNE 30, 1964 Exhibit A

I LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES


CURRENT FUNDS:
General Current Funds:
Fund Balances:
State Appropriations-Educational and General ................. $
Incidental ......................... ...... .. . .............
E extension Incidental ........................................


Restricted Current Funds:
Liabilities:
Research Contracts and Grants:
Due to General Current Funds:
Contract and Grant Overhead.......... $
Advance From Incidental ..............
Non-Research Contracts and Grants:
Due to General Current Funds:
Contract and Grant Overhead..........


132,081.03
385,553.06
216,181.24


$ 733,815.33


181,656.47
100,000.00

15,798.06 $ 297,454.53


Reserves:
For Contract and Grant Commitments:
Research...................... ......... $ 1,603,482.80
Non-Research ........................... 2,478,063.04
Fund Balances:
W estcott Estate ............................ S$ 30,193.05
Seminary Interest ........................... 3,227.58
Fire Replacement ......................... 528 13
Audio Visual- Trust ........................ 2,931.99
Auxiliary Current Funds:
Liabilities:
Cash Overdraft ............................. $ 91,795.04
Due to Revolving Fund . . . . ............ 950 00
Accounts Payable ........................... 137,293.68
Accrued Vacation and Sick Leave ............. 30,003 16
Accrued Payroll ............................ 5,035. 75
Deferred Credits to Income.................. 78,648 62
Fund Balances:


4,081,545.84




36,880.75


4,415,881.12


343,726.25


Auxiliary Current Fund Balances ............................. 868,850.83 1,212,577.08
Total Current Funds. ... . . . . . ........ S 6,362,273.53
SCHOLARSHIP AND LOAN FUNDS:
Liabilities:
Due to Agency Funds .. ................. $ 55,460.30
Due to Auxiliary Plant Funds .......... ...... 84,090.00 $ 139,550.30
Fund Balances:
Scholarship Funds ............................. $ 406,310 43
Loan Funds................................... 1,593,559 25 1,999,869.68
Total Scholarship and Loan Funds ............................... ...... .............. $ 2,139,419.98
PLANT FUNDS:
Unexpended Plant Funds:
Fund Balances:
Reserve for Plant Additions ................... ......... $20,145,103.88
Reserve for Debt Service .......................... .......... 892,096.75
Reserve for Repair and Replacement ....... ......... ..... 335,027.47
Reserve for Replacement Auxiliary Fixed Assets ... ..... 1,131,221.43 $22,503,449.53
Invested In Plant:
Educational and General and Agency Activities:
Liabilities:
Revenue Certificate Debt (Shown under Auxiliary)
Fund Balances:
Invested in Educational Plant............................. $44,839,603. 29
Auxiliary Enterprises and Activities:
Liabilities:
Revenue Certificate Debt .................... $15,194,000 00
Fund Balances:
Invested in Auxiliary Plant.................. 4,949,720.56 20,143,720.56 64,983,323.85


Total P lant F und ............. ........... ......... ....... . .
AGENCY FUNDS:
Fund Balances:
Agency Funds ............ .... ....
Total Agency Funds ...............................................
OTHER FUNDS:
Student Depository:
Liabilities:
Due to Student Depositors ......... ......... ..............

Revolving Fund:
Liabilities:
Due to Incidental Fund ............................
Due to Agency Fund ........................... .....
Funds Transferred in for "Stale" Checks written
on various funds and not yet cleared ........................


$ 962,957 53




$ 74,381.48



$ 75,000.00
175,000.00

955.94


Total Other Funds ........... . . . .
TOTAL ALL FU N D S .........................................


... $87,486,773.38


$ 962,957.53




$ 74,381 48


$ 250,955 94
5 325,337 42
$97,276,761.84


74


---










FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY
SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1964


Exhibit B


Fund Balances July 1, 1963.....
Adjustments Applicable to Prior
Periods........... .......

Adjusted Fund Balances
July 1, 1963 ................

REVENUES 1963-64
State Appropriations-
Educational and General...
Incidental:
M atriculation ............
Out-of-State Tuition ......
Music Fees.. ............
Application Fees ..........
Library Fines .............
Transcripts ..............
Child Development Fees ..
Photographic Fees........
Test Service Fees.........
Delinquency Control Insti-
tu te . . .. . . . .. . .
Sale of Scrap.............
Overhead Earned-Research
Contracts and Grants....
Overhead Earned-Non-
Research Contracts and
G rants .................
Miscellaneous Departmental
R evenue...............
Miscellaneous Non-Depart-
mental Revenue.........
Bootstrap Fees, Short Courses
and Institutes ............
Research Contracts and
Grants Received..........
Non-Research Contracts and
Grants Received..........
Endowment Income .........
Audio Visual-Rental and
Sales ....................
Sales and Services ...........


EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL
_____________________________________Other Unex-
Auxiliary Loan Scholarship Agency Auxiliary pended
Total Incidental Research Current Funds Funds Funds Funds Plant
Educational General and Extension Contracts Other Funds
and General Revenue Incidental and Grants


$ 4,275,910.32 ............ S 414,432.68$3,840,133.55821,344.09$ 634,405.29$1,429,337.82$181,330.02 865,872.805 21,214.08$6,316,442.57

30,077.99 ............. 4,989.85 ............. 25,088.14 18,520.28 ........... ........................ .......... ..............


$ 4,305,988.31$............ $ 419,422.5383,840,133.55546,432.23$ 652,925.57 $1,429,337.82$181,330.02$ 865,872.80$ 21,214.08$6,316,442.57


1,631,823.02
425,694.68
57,528.00
88,825.00
9,049.98
3,840.55
6,433.05
8,045.93
5,895.19


2,475.00 ........ .....
2,226 .82 .............


2 ,279.65 .............

4,005.85 ........... ..

512,696.78 .............


1,631,823.02
425,694.68
57,528.00
88,825.00
9,049.98
3,840.55
6,433.05
8,045.93
5,895.19


$ ...........


$ .......... 779,000.00


2,475 .00 ........... ..... ..... ............ ......... ............. .......................... ...........
2 ,226 .82 ............ .......... .......... .. ............ ............................................... ..


441,748.93


45,420.59


441,748.93 ........ ....................


45,420.59 ........


2,279.65 ........... .. .... ............. .......... .. ..................... ..........

4,005.85 ............. .. ........................................................

512,696.78 ............. ...... ............. ............................................


3,474,744.451 ............. .......... 3,474,744.45 ......... .


2,133,083.27 ............. .......... . 2,133,083.27| .. ..... ............
27 ,465 .35 ............. ...... .... . ............ 27 ,465 .35 ...........


... ... ... .......... ....... ........... 312,300.00


49,213.79 ...... ... ... ............. ............... 49,213 .79
. . . . . .. . . . . .


1,561,444 56 1,378,473.15 159,565.881


$11,112,249.00|511,112,249.001$


$. ...


. . . . . . .
.............
.............
. . . . . . .



.............


. . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . I . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . I . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . I . . .
. . . . . . . . . I . . . . . . .
. .. ..... ... .. ..... ... . .. .... .
. . . . . . . I . . . . . . . . .


.............
.............
.............
.............

............
.............
.............
.............


. . . .
. . . .
. . . .

. . . .
. . . .
. . . .


I 1 I


I .


1,376,473.15


. . . . . .


1,561,444.56 .


I:


.169.666..
159, 65. a





Rentals................ .... ..
Interest Earned............. ..
New Loan Funds Received. .. .
Other Student Fees.......... ..
Deposits Received........... ..
Scholarships Received . .. .. .
Revenue Certificates Proceeds .
Other Revenues ....... . ..

Total Revenues .. . . . . $1


EXPENDITURES 1963-64
General Administration, Stu-
dent Administration and
General Expense...... ... .$
Instruction ... . ........
Organized Research.........
Non-Research Contracts and
Grants .. ........... ...
Extension. .. ............
Library. . . .
Division of Plant and Ground
Activities Related to Instruc-
tio n ...... .. . .
Purchase of Audio Visual
Equipment ..... ..... .
Repairs to Fire Damage ....
Cost of Auxiliary Sales .
Auxiliary Operating Expenses.
Auxiliary -Debt Service .
Scholarship Awards. .
Cost of Agency Operations.
Refund of Deposits. . .
Bond Principal Payments .. .


1,447,061.62
8,152,929.15
3,946,396.12

1,628,581.96
464,447.42
669.980.63
1,802.526.00

824.173.81

52,856.10
288 94


$1,447,061.62
8,119,843.57
695,732.17

............
464,447.42
669,980.63
1,802,526 00

824,173.81


Bond Interest Payments . . ... . ....
Repair and Replacement Ex-
penditures -. .. '- "

Total Expenditures. ..... $1 41 754$10,980,167.97 $3,043,597.25

Exce,,s of Revenue over Expen-
ditures .. .... $ 568,333 61$ 132,081.033 204,391 77

Fund Balances after 1963-64
Operations .. ... .. $ 4,874,321,921$ 132,081.03$ 623,814 30
Additions to Fixed A assets. ... .... .......... .. .. s......
Transfers from and to Other
Funds . ..... 22,080 0 ........ .. 22,080.00

Adjusted Fund Balances
June 30, 1964 ... .......... $ 4,852,241.92$ 132,081.03$ 601,734.30


$ . . . . . . . . . .
............ 33,085.58
q o25n 99q C9


1,628,581.96
. . . .


............. .......... 1,583,058.67
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


............
............
............

. ..........
............
............


52,856.10 .............
288.94 . ... .. ..
.......... 1,090,425.72
........ 2,342,383.72
398,733.00


$4.879,245 91 $86,230.62


$ 241,412


$3,831,542.441


29$ 9.551 48. 283,398.48


$4,081,545.84 $36.880.75





$4,081,545.84 $36,880.75


$ 936,324.05
106,499.63

29,741.82


$ 800,082.60


.............
.............
.......... -
.............
............
............
.............


.............
.............
.............
............
. . . . . . .
.............


14,;048.61
289,723.12
...........



...........


22,441.48
376.64

...........



...........


S ......... $ .....

. .. . . . . . . . .


25,362.42




18,462,895.27
601,531.61


....... 116,646.50
S. ....... . . . ....... 16 ,204 .18 5,937. 18
. . .. . . .5 8 6 ,7 9 1 8 5 . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . .. .

.. . 1,654,676.35 .
. .. . . . .. . . 1 5 7 8 98 2 6 2 . . . .. . . . . . . . .


.... . .... ... ....... .. ... 438 ,244 .19

.. . 39,858.16

$ ..... . $586,791.85 $3,233,658.97 $132,850.68 $ 399,125.17


$303,771.73$126,330 41$3 393,734.93$ 49,533.32 $19,781,964.13


$1,733,109.55 $307,660.43 $1,259,607.73 $ 70,747.40 $26,098,406.70
......... ........ . 50.081.62 10,045.15 5,040,453.37

....... ... 98,650.00 246,568.58 8,065.98 314,274.77


$1,733,109.55$406,310.43$ 962,957.53$ 68,768.23 $21,372,228.10


III


1957,7.3$1,1,29001324,890 $,2,6820$6,7.4 411,40930,717 $1,222 $,273390$8234.0$0,8,093


443,962.65



526,475.04


...........
...........
...........
...........
713, 122.26
...........


431,413.24
1,689,391.13


130,116.38


. . . . .


/: : : : : . : : :~~












































Ik~






BIENNIAL REPORT


OF THE

Florida Agricultural


And Mechanical


University


GEORGE W. GORE, JR., President


JULY 1, 1962 TO JUNE 30,


1964


Tallahassee, Florida











OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

During the 1962-64 biennium, the university was chiefly concerned with
(1) undergoing a period of reorganization in order that the program of the
institution might more nearly prepare citizens of the state for the newer
developing and expanding industries and professions, (2) adjusting to the
challenges of the trimester system, (2) continuing to upgrade the entire
academic program in order to meet the evolving accrediting criteria of the
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and other professional ac-
crediting groups, (4) revising the university activities to enter more fully
into the Florida State-wide system of higher education.
During the period greater emphasis was placed upon quality rather
than quantity. The enrollment did not increase significantly due to the rapid
growth of junior colleges and the establishment of a minimum cut-off score
on the Florida twelfth grade examination for all entering freshmen.
It is significant to point out, however, that the institution during this
period became permanently a senior college with some emphasis on graduate
and professional work. More than 60% of the enrollment was in upper di-
ivision classes. Enrollment for the biennium included representatives from
64 of Florida's 67 counties. The only counties not represented during the
period were Flagler, Union, and Gilchrist. A total of 168 foreign and out-
of-state students enrolled for the period. They represented the States of
Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Georgia, Illinois,
Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missis-
sippi, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma,
Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.
Six Foreign Countries were represented, namely; Canal Zone (Panama);
Republic of Panama; Nigeria; Nassau, Bahamas; and St. Vincent, B.W.I.
During the past biennium the enrollment in the university has been
2,884 with an additional 484 students in the University Demonstration School.
A total of 1,171 degrees have been conferred distributed as follows: Bachelor
of Arts, 115; Bachelor of Science, 829; Bachelor of Laws, 10; Master of
Education, 217.
Physical additions to the plant during the biennium included a new
Health and Physical Education Building with swimming pool costing over
one million dollars and additions to the Student Union Building including a
bowling alley, the total costing in excess of $750,000.
An analysis of the distribution of degrees held by the FAMU instruc-
tional faculty reveals the following: 279 bachelor degrees, 229 master degrees,
and 47 doctorate degrees-a total of 548 degrees.
These degrees were earned from a total of 117 colleges and universities.
The highest number of bachelor degrees were earned from Florida A. and
M. University, 69; Hampton Institute, 16; Tennessee A. and I. State Uni-
versity, 11. The highest number of master's degrees were earned from Atlanta
University, 15; Columbia, 23; Florida A. and M., 14; Indiana University, 21;
University of Illinois, 10; University of Michigan, 16; Ohio State Univer-
sity, 16. Doctorate degrees were earned from Boston University, Columbia
University, University of Connecticut, Cornell University, Free University
of Amsterdam, George Peabody College, Indiana University, University of







BIENNIAL REPORT, 1962-64
Illinois, Iowa State College, Kansas State University, University of Massa-
chusetts, University of Michigan, New York University, Northwestern Uni-
versity, Ohio State University, Oklahoma State University, Pennsylvania
State University, Southern Illinois University, University of Tennessee,
Washington State University, Wayne State University, University of Wis-
consin and Yale University.
The President served as a representative of the University on numerous
occasions. He served as a representative of the Senate Committee on Federal
Education of the Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges,
the Southern Regional Educational Board, Board of Trustees of Florida
Memorial College, and the executive committee of the Florida Association
of Colleges and Universities, charter member of Epsilon Chapter of Phi
Delta Kappa, professional education fraternity, elected to membership in
Pi Gamma Mu (Social Science Honor Society), and junior past president
-e Association of College Honor Societies.
Honors received by the president were as follows: Lily White Security
Benefits Society's Distinguished Educator Award for meritorious achieve-
ment in the field of education and for outstanding contributions to the growth
of human relations; tribute by the ROTC Cadets which read "To our
Commander-in-Chief;" Distinguished Service Award by the National News-
paper Publishers Association "In Recognition of Pioneering Efforts in Jour-
nalism Education;" plaque from the Faculty, Students and President of
Langston University, "On the Significant Milestone in your Contributions
to the Arts;" Distinguished Service Award from the New Frontiers of
America "Distinguished Service in the Promotion of Education;" Appreci-
ation Award from the Southwest Bar Association.
The president attended a significant conference on Education at the
White House, the National Conference on Higher Education of the Associ-
ation for Higher Education in Chicago, and a conference called by the
Phelps-Stokes Fund of New York at Capohosic, Virginia, to consider prob-
lems of Negro colleges in the sixties.
The University won laurels in Athletics with an especially fine record
in football, basketball, baseball, and track. Robert Hayes, by breaking the
world's record for the 100-yard dash at 9.1 seconds, was heralded as being
the "world's fastest human being."
FAMU's Band, the "Marching 100" appeared twice in connection with
pro-football game playoffs. In connection with the Band's appearance in
Nassau plans are being projected between the University and Nassau, and
our Department of Music is working with the Bahamian officials in im-
proving the quality of music in elementary and secondary schools.
Another significant achievement during the biennium was the publi-
cation of The History of Florida A. and M. University by the University
of Florida Press.
Among the present physical needs for the University are additional
farm land, air-conditioning of existing buildings, elevators in constructions
of more than three stories high, classroom building for the School of Edu-
cation, a gymnasium for the Demonstration School, inclose swimming pool,
erect tennis courts, lights for the athletic field, program of campus improve-
ment to include additional walkways and parking area.







FLORIDA A. & M. UNIVERSITY
The University has made many adjustments in connection with the tri-
mester system. Enrollments have been rather low during the first half of
the third trimester; however, the second half of the trimester, which is
equivalent to the second semester, has been featured by a series of signifi-
cant workshops and short courses, notably among which have been those
sponsored by the National Science Foundation in earth sciences and in
mathematics, and by the Southern Education Foundation for teachers in
junior high schools, libraries, reading and vocational education.
During the period the following members of the staff have earned
doctorate degrees: Sybil Mobley, University of Illinois; Joseph Awkard, Jr.,
University of Virginia; Henry E. Finley, Indiana University; Lucia James,
University of Connecticut; Larney G. Rackley, Oklahoma State; Sylvia Render,
George Peabody.
Several members of the staff were on leave for foreign service in un-
developed areas of Africa with a special emphasis on Nigeria. They were
Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Archer, Dr. B. L. Perry, Jr., Dr. and Mrs. E. 0. Minor,
Dr. and Mrs. W Austin.
The following people are on leave studying at the institutions listed:
Grace Johnson, Boston University; James Latimer, Boston University; Howard
Lewis, Pennsylvania State University; Essie C. Lopez, Columbia University;
Sylvester Tate, Columbia University; Mary Brooks, Columbia University;
Lowell Simmons, University of Washington.
The series of reports which follow give some insight into the operations,
activities, and problems of the various divisions of the university.

Respectfully submitted,
George W. Gore, Jr.


SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS

Department of Home Economics
The curricula and activities of the Department of Home Economics
are planned such as to contribute to the optimum development of the indi-
vidual it serves, to strengthen the quality of family life, to contribute to the
enrichment of relationships of individual within families and the family
to the community, and to prepare the individual for professional speciali-
zation.
There has been an increase in the enrollment of non-majors in home
economics courses. Also, new courses for non-majors have been developed
and offered on request. In addition home economics personnel routinely teach
some related non-major courses in psychology and education.
Home economics graduates are gainfully employed in the Peace Corps,
extension work, vocational adult programs, public schools, hospital dietetics
and school lunchrooms.
Through professional meetings of local, district, and t 1i r
the staff and students have made numerous contributions to the local a:.\i
state-wide community. The department's program has involved w rk wit.
82






BIENNIAL REPORT, 1962-64

vocational homemaking teachers, home demonstration agents, 4-H girls, high
school homemaking groups (NHA), rural farm families, and school lunch-
room personnel. Staff members have served on many programs as speakers,
consultants and coordinators. During the biennium two staff members pre
sented scientific papers at regional and national meetings. Also several have
published articles in professional' periodicals.
The most urgent need of the department is provision of funds for ope-
rating the food service laboratory unit as a part of the instructional pro-
gram. Other needs include employment of full-time laboratory assistants,
additional teaching staff, and air-conditioning in all laboratories.

Department of Vocational Agriculture and Technology
Members of the instructional and non-instructional staffs of the Depart-
ment of Vocational Agriculture and Technology worked diligently toward
achieving the basic objectives of the department during the biennium 1962-
64. The instructional staff carried out their instructional responsibilities in
order to meet the basic needs of the curriculum. Five persons were gradu-
ated from the department in 1962 and three in 1963 with the Bachelor of
Science degree in Vocational Agriculture. These students were employed in
positions as teachers of vocational agriculture, county agents and United
States Peace Corps members.
Members of the staff also worked diligently to cooperate with various
agricultural state agencies. They served as consultants to the Annual 4-H
Club Conference, the Annual Conference of Teachers of Vocational Agri-
culture and Home Demonstration Agents. At the request of farmers, teachers
of vocational agriculture and county agents, the department conducted 15
one-day tractor clinics during 1962, with a combined enrollment of 500 par-
ticipants. The department held a one-week workshop in the "Operation, Care
and Maintenance of Farm Machinery" with 45 participants. The Department
of Vocational Agriculture and Technology held its first Annual Agricultural
Field Day during the summer of 1963.
Several research projects were initiated and completed by members of
the staff during the biennium. Members of the staff also attended several
national meetings and presented research papers at these meetings.
A member of the staff has received a grant-in aid from the Dow Chemical
Company in the amount of $500.00 for student assistance. A National Science
Foundation Grant in the amount of $52,900.00 to conduct a summer institute'
for high school science teachers was also received. This institute was conducted
during the summer of 1964.
A minimum of two visits were made by the itinerant teacher-trainer to
each first-year teacher of vocational agriculture in the State of Florida.
A member of the staff was granted a Leave of Absence to serve with the
United States State Department in Nigeria, West Africa, in the area of
farm mechanics.
The university farm was successful in producing enough feed, pasture
forage and grain to partly support the dairy and beef cattle as well as the
university swine.
83








FLORIDA A. & M. UNIVERSITY

Department of Agricultural Science
The 1962-64 biennium for the Department of Agricultural Science
one of significant expansion and achievement. Along with the regular a,:1-
demic program, the department has supervised six productive areas including,
beef cattle, dairy cattle, horticulture, ice cream laboratory, poultry and
swine. These areas serve as laboratories for regular academic classes, as
demonstration areas for special groups such as 4-H Club members, Nev
Farmers of America, Farmers Conference, and for special foreign students.
The by-product of instruction of the dairy and ice cream units furnishes all
the milk and ice cream needed by the food service area. Much of the poultry
products used on the campus is a by-product of teaching in the poultry
area and the same is true for swine, beef and horticulture.
The department has a close working relationship with the State Voca-
tional Agricultural Department, State Extension Services and the State St)iL
Conservation Services. Members of the department assist these agencies it
their training program for 4-H Club members, New Farmers of Aon .i
and Farmers Conference. Six short courses have been provided for these.
groups. They have assisted in setting up five major livestock shows in various
counties in the state, and served as official judges for these shows. A Livt
stock Grooming and Fitting Clinic was also conducted in northwest Gadsdv!
County.
The department has cooperated with the United States Government in
providing regular and special training for foreign students who plannm :
to return to their countries as technicians and leaders in the various field
of agriculture. Some of the regular enrolled students of the department w.
have graduated are working in. foreign countries.
All areas of livestock production have been upgraded. Many of the d'
springs in the dairy herd represent blood lines from the best sires i;
America. Plans have been completed for further expansion of all six anra
in the department to meet the ever growing needs of all regular, special ani:
foreign students, who undertake training in the department.
Great emphasis has been placed on maintaining our position and pt
spective in the local and national program of progress. Members of the stall
have attended local and national meetings and professional agriculture;
workers conferences. The Livestock Judging Team has participated in t',
annual contests of the Southern Region Livestock Judging Association and
has made creditable showing at each contest.
The greatest need of the department at present is for completion
the proposed and approved expansion program of each area. This inclui!,'
complete relocation of the beef, poultry and swine areas to other locations
This was made necessary by immediate campus expansion.

Recommendations
Recommendations to cover the needs for the biennium 1:11;-'; have V -
submitted in our budget request. If approved, the School of Agriculture a.,
Home Economics will have the basic needs for a strong program of pi
duction, instruction, and research.







BIENNIAL REPORT, 1962-64

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Since its establishment as one of the major instructional units of the
University in 1953, the College has regarded its general objectives as co-
terminous with the stated objectives of the University. The faculty of the
College, along with the faculty of the University, re-affirmed its commitment
to these objectives during the recent Role and Scope Study.
During the period covered by this report, the faculty continued its
efforts to achieve fuller implementation of objectives: Course syllabi were
revised in acordance with the anticipated demands of the trimester system;
library holdings were re-assessed and expanded; an enrichment program
(The Humanities Project) was inaugurated; group guidance and supple-
mentary educational programs were provided in regular departmental as-
sembling and additional teaching aids were acquired.
The level of training of the faculty, although still below standards for
an institution of this type, was raised during the biennium. For example, the
percentage of doctorates increased from 15% in 1962-63 to 18% in 1963-64;
and the percentage with one or more years study beyond the master's degree
increased from 16% in 1962-63 to 29% in 1963-64.

Although 86% of faculty time was devoted to instruction and 7% to
academic administration in 1963-64, several members of the faculty published
articles in reputable journals and several others continued individual re-
search activities. Two members of the faculty co-authored the first published
history of the institution. Many others contributed to the influence and pres-
tige of the University by rendering a variety of services on the local, state
and national levels. Two members of the faculty were on leave in 1962-63
and 1963-64 on assignments in Africa.
The College served an average of 9,392 students in 339 classes during
each of the first two trimesters of 1962-63. In the same year, there were
more than 1300 students majoring in the departments of the College. And
230 students were graduated from the College in academic 1962-63.
Evidence afforded by the number of graduates who have received fellow-
ships and assistantships for graduate study and by the number of others
who have enrolled in graduate and professional schools in the two-year
period indicates that the College continues to make a substantial contribution
to raising the level of education in the State.

The faculty feels that the greatest single deterrent to the effectiveness
of instruction is the inability of the majority of students to read with a
reasonable degree of speed and comprehension. We recommend, therefore,
that a testing program be instituted for all students who enter this Uni-
versity for the first time and that each student who can not read in accord-
ance with expectation be required to take a course in Developmental Reading.
In regard to the latter we are recommending that two of the five weekly
periods in English 100 to be devoted to developmental reading in the Reading
Center.







FLORIDA A. & M. UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Objectives and Organization
Through the years, the primary responsibility of the School of Edu-
cation has been to develop and to administer the Professional Education
Phase of the curriculum for prospective and in-service teachers. In pursuit
of this commitment, the faculty and staff engage in the following: (1) de-
velop and teach the professional education courses; (2) identify and use,
as laboratory centers, accredited public schools, in which effective procedures
and techniques are employed; (3) cooperate with faculty personnel in other
divisions of the University on matters relative to the preparation of
teachers; (4) conduct experimental and other types of research studies in
professional education; (5) cooperate with members of the teaching pro-
fession, educational agencies, and lay civic groups on whose understanding
of educational problems the improvement of schools must depend.
During the current biennium, however, projections were initiated to
broaden the responsibilities of the School of Education to include the adminis-
tration of the total pre-service phase of the programs for the preparation
of teachers, within the framework of policies developed by the Inter-Area
Teacher Preparation Council. The enlarged function is in the process of
being achieved primarily through establishment in the School of Education
of the Office of Academic Counseling for Prospective Teachers. The director
of this service is designated as the Coordinator of Academic Counseling. His
functions are to develop appropriate records and to put into operation
effective procedures that will facilitate the implementation of the policies
and standards developed by the Inter-Area Teacher Preparation Council.
The School is organized to achieve its objectives as follows: four
(4) instructional departments (Elementary Education, Secondary Education,
Industrial Education and Physical Education); three (3) campus laboratory
schools (N. B. Young Nursery, Lucy Moten Elementary and University
High); and five (5) service areas (Audio-Visual Center, Academic Coun-
seling Services for Prospective Teachers, Curriculum Laboratory, Internship
Teaching Office and Special Fields Curricula.)
The curriculum of each department provides the three essential ele-
ments in a balanced program for preparing capable teachers in a democracy;
namely, (a) a broad foundation of general education, (b) a planned sequence
of professional education, and (c) a planned core of experiences in the area
of specialization. Growing out of the exhaustive investigations conducted
during the previous biennium in connection with the University Role and
Scope Study, and during the current biennium, the NCATE Self Study,
several curricular innovations are in evidence. The revised program for
majors in elementary education represents probably the most radical de-
parture from the former pattern. Here each student is required to obtain
greater depth in one content field by completing successfully eighteen to
twenty-four additional semester hours in the area. The second most signifi-
cant development is found in the Department of Physical Education with its
projections of programs in swimming and recreation.
Special Achievements and Contributions
The faculty and students of the School of Education have to their credit
many varied and distinctive achievements for the current biennium. It would







BIENNIAL REPORT, 1962-64

be very difficult to telescope all of these within the limited space allotted in
this digest.

Representative, however, of the accomplishments are the following:

Teaching Load
A typical example of the relative teaching load carried by the faculty
of the School of Education in comparison with that of the other schools
and colleges is afforded by the statistics for the second trimester of the
1963-64 term. Of the 81,350 student semester hours produced by the faculties
of the eight schools and colleges of the University for this period, 20,278 or
24.91) are credited to the School of Education.

Professional Growth of Faculty
Substantial professional growth of the faculty was stimulated and
encouraged as evidenced by the following facts: Twenty-two instructors, or
more than one-third (1/3) of the faculty, pursued additional advanced study
during the biennium, earning a total of 263 semester hours of advanced gradu-
ate credit. Two members of the faculty received one-year leaves for full-
time study-one at the post-master's level; the other at the post-doctoral.
Another member of the faculty earned the doctorate degree. Three individuals
with doctorate degrees were added to the faculty.

Significant Research and Publications
Considerable emphasis was placed by the faculty on significant re-
search and writing as evidenced by publications in the following periodicals:
(a) "Journal of Human Relations School Activities;" (b) "Quarterly Review
of Higher Education Among Negroes;" (c) "Clearing House;" (d) "The Social
Studies;" (e) "Improving College and University Teaching;" (f) "Univer-
sity of Michigan Journal;" (g) "Journal of Educational Research;" (h) "Scho-
lastic Coach;" (i) "The Instructor;" (j) "Grade Teacher;" and (k) "Bulletin
of the Department of Supervision of Florida State Teachers Association."
One member of the faculty had a book published by Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Extensive Travel
Extensive travel was encouraged and approved for the faculty to attend
professional meetings. In addition, the dean participated in a study tour
of Higher Education in India and visited several European countries.
Enlarged Physical Plant
Many improvements were made in providing an enlarged physical plant
for selected aspects of the program. Among these were the following: (a) re-
location of the Curriculum Laboratory in the Perry-Paige Building; (b) con-
struction of a new gymnasium.

Accreditation
Possibly the greatest distinction bestowed on the program for this
period was the admission of the University High School to full membership
in the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.








FLORIDA A. & M. UNIVERSITY

Persisting Challenges
(1) A clear and more precise definition of the role of the School of
Education in the Administrative Structure of the University which is de-
signed to facilitate the university-wide program for the preparation of
teachers; (2) The official inauguration of revised subject-matter-centered
curricula for majors in Elementary Education; (3) Refinement of the design
and operational procedures for conducting Directed Observation in public
schools; (4) Development of more effective procedures for coordinating the
efforts of the faculties of the College of Arts and Sciences and the School
of Education in planning more effective curricula designed for prospective
high school teachers; (6) Inauguration of effective ways and means to moti-
vate the faculty to improve more systematically their formal education;
(7) The design and execution of representative investigations on selected
aspects of the program for the purpose of documenting the need for the
following: additional instructional and clerical personnel, markedly financial
outlay for Internship Teaching, the Curriculum Laboratory, and the Audio-
Visual Services; (8) Inauguration of closed circuit television as an integral
part of the instructional program; (9) Providing a laboratory to facilitate
the teaching of professional courses in elementary and secondary school
science methods; (10) Acquiring a building constructed especially to ac-
commodate a modern program of teacher education.

GRADUATE SCHOOL
Organization and Purpose
The Graduate School is organized under the Graduate Council with the
graduate dean serving as chairman. Graduate work crosses the boundaries
of the various departments, schools and colleges comprising the university,
with the major instructional programs at the graduate level being in educa-
tion under the headings of the following departments:
1. Administration and Supervision
2. Elementary Education, including curriculum and teaching
3. Guidance
4. Home Economics
5. Secondary Education
6. The Area of Foundations Courses
The Graduate School is fully accredited by regional and national agencies,
with programs designed for the purpose of advancing the training of men
and women in a wide variety of fields for service and leadership in the state
and nation. The promotion of research resulting in contribution to knowledge
by faculty and students in an atmosphere of freedom of inquiry is a contin-
uous challenge in the implementation of the graduate program.
Students Served
Most of our students are experienced teachers, administrators, guidance
counselors, etc., who are currently employed in the public schools of Florida
and bordering states. Exceptions are those students who proceed to graduate
instruction immediately after receiving their baccalaureate degree.
The following chart reflects the statistical status of graduate student
enrollment during the period covered in this report.







BIENNIAL REPORT, 1962-64


Summer, 1962

647

Third Trimester
1962-63, Part B
585


First Trimester
1962-63
246

First Trimester
1963-64
269


Second Trimester
1962-63
205

Second Trimester
1963-64
249


Third Trimester
1962-63, Part A
121

Third Trimester
1963-64, Part A
164


Degrees conferred during the past

Summer, 1962
First Trimester, 1962-63
Second Trimester, 1962-63
Third Trimester, 1962-63, Part A
Third Trimester, 1962-63, Part B
First Trimester, 1963-64
Second Trimester, 1963-64

Totals


two year
M.E<
80
8
13
4
80
20
12

217


Preparation of Graduate School Faculty
Master's Degree
Summer, 1962 0
First Trimester, 1962-63 0
Second Trimester, 1962-63 0
Third Trimester, 1962-63, Part A 0
Third Trimester, 1962-63, Part B 0
First Trimester, 1963-64 0
Second Trimester, 1963-64 0
Third Trimester, 1963-64, Part A 0


rs were as follows:
d. M.S.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0




Doctor's Degree
30
12
14
8
24


Total
80
8
13
4
80
20
12

217




Total
30
12
14
8
24
11
11
10


Additional Staff Needs
There is a need for another instructor with a major in elementary edu-
cation, and who has an earned doctor's degree in this field. The Graduate
School's program in psychology and guidance should be strengthened by at
least one additional instructor, holding earned doctor's degrees, in each of
these areas. An additional full-time clerical assistant is needed for the
Graduate School office. This would greatly facilitate matters providing for
up-to-date record keeping for students; and would render valuable assistance
for better services and information requested by students, faculty, and
various educational agencies at the local and national levels.

Facilities
A successful program in graduate studies is primarily based upon ade-
quate library books and related materials and space for students to study
and carry on research activities. Although there has been some improvement
in this area, the present situation is still short of what is needed to give
assurance for the best results. The emphasis on automation and data pro-
cessing are contributing factors to this observation.
89






FLORIDA A. & M. UNIVERSITY
A laboratory and related facilities are seriously needed to provide
necessary experiences for students who have major interest in the area of
Guidance. Current trends and demands necessitate a practicum on laboratory
experiences for students in counselor education.

Special Features
1. Because of the demands and support by interested agencies, workshop
experiences for a selected number of principals, supervisors and teachers
are provided by the department of secondary education.
2. For elementary school personnel, workshop experiences are provided in
reading for the study of basic comprehension abilities needed for suc-
cessful reading.
3. The Graduate School is sponsoring for the summer session of 1964,
a two-day institute on crucial issues in education. One of the country's
outstanding specialists in education has been invited to serve as con-
sultant and general resource person.
The administration of the Graduate School, its faculty, staff and stu-
dents are continuing to move forward progressively in terms of services
and other significant contributions to the broad field of education and so-
ciety. Research, the improvement of teaching techniques and skills, re-evalu-
ation of course syllabi and examinations for the purpose of obtaining better
results, are continuously utilized for the improvement of instruction at all
levels. Due recognition is also given to the use of audio-visual equipment
and materials for instructional purposes.

COLLEGE OF LAW
The College of Law seeks to prepare qualified men and women for the
active practice of law in any common-law jurisdiction, and to provide legal
training for those who may plan to enter public service or the commercial
world. It also seeks to further the inculcation of the spirit, the ideals and
the ethical standards of the common legal heritage of English-speaking
peoples. Only those persons who are qualified by prior training and experi-
ence, and who are seriously determined to complete the entire period of
study with creditable scholastic records are desired as students. Students
are urged to think of law study as a solemn commitment, a commitment to
a high level of service to private individuals and to the public in the ordering
of human relations, a function which is the prime concern of the law and
of lawyers.
It may be safely assumed that law students, as a group, are unusually
mature and purposeful. Thus, they are not in the need of the shock of a
sudden plunge into strange waters. What is indicated, and thus supplied,
is friendly guidance and encouragement calculated to facilitate adjustment
to a new intellectual environment. The law is a great profession unsurpassed
in exciting intellectual challenge and in opportunities for vocational service
and for contributions to significant progress.
The regular full-time faculty consists of six members, of which the
dean is one. While the College is free to draw, and does, through volunteer
part-time lecturers, upon the experience and skill of persons active in law
practice or in service as judges, it is committed to the policy that law






BIENNIAL REPORT, 1962-64

teaching is a branch of the total work of the profession to be performed
primarily by lawyers who make a career of it.
Perhaps the most striking quality of the faculty is the diversity of its
membership. No less than six states are represented among the six full-
time faculty members. Of the six present members only two engaged in
undergraduate study at the same institution. Six different institutions are
represented. Even more striking is the fact that eight law schools are repre-
sented.
The varied professional experience of the faculty is suggested by the
'act that, between them, they have legal experiences totaling more than a
century and enjoy membership in the Bars of eight states and the District
of Columbia.
The average faculty age is just above forty-five. Individual ages are
pretty well distributed on both sides of that figure covering a range of
some three decades.
In pursuance of our belief that law schools should welcome and initiate
activities tending to effect closer cooperation with the practicing branch of
the legal profession, we have conducted two major legal institutes, or pro-
grams of continuing legal education during the period of this report. In
1962-63 and 1963-64, we focused attention on Administration of Justice.
These institutes drew capacity audiences for practically every session.
This is appreciable indication of the stature of the persons who served as
lecturers and consultants, as well as the interest inherent in the subject
matter. It is deserving of mention, I believe, that Florida lawyers of every
recognizable ethnic group attended the programs. Further, the heavy regis-
tration of these past two years extended our attendance figures for eleven
institutes just over the figure of two thousand.
By virtue of our having provided a forum for the discussion, by lawyers,
of issues of current, national and local importance, thoughtful leadership
has had more meaningful information with which to attack problems. More-
over, we are somewhat sure that we are, through the medium indicated, de-
vising current changes in the law and making possible those developments
which point to the proper direction for the future.
The atmosphere of the College of Law is one of friendly informality but
real seriousness of purpose. Full-time members of the faculty may readily
be found in their offices throughout the day; contacts with students are not
limited to set office hours. There are substantial personal and educational
values in out-of-classroom interchange between teachers and students and
that type of relation is nurtured. A student who seeks out a faculty member
in order to discuss study methods, a difficult point of law that he has been
unable to master, or anything of real concern to the student receives a
friendly response. Professional study is at a mature level and intellectual
traffic between teacher and student is not hampered by artificial barriers.
The ideal for the College of Law is to reduce the incidence of failure
to the vanishing point. However, advance estimates of students' capacity for
legal work are subject to error. More important, there usually are some
students who fail to appreciate that law study calls for intensive and creative
intellectual effort. In addition, as we all know, the bulk of our students are
culturally disadvantaged. Therefore, one may properly assume that there







FLORIDA A. & M. UNIVERSITY

will be at least a percentage of failures, in school and at the bar. At the
same time, there are so many intangible human elements in the process that
it would be foolish to take any mechanistic or fatalistic view of a given in-
dividual's prospects. Strong motivation and effective personal mobilization
may well make the difference.

SCHOOL OF NURSING
The faculty developed the philosophy that a baccalaureate program in
nursing should:
1. Be dedicated to the total development of the individual and should there-
fore provide opportunities for personal growth that would help the
learner gain keener insight into himself, the nature of man and society.
2. Promote the belief in the intrinsic worth of all individuals.
3.. Seek to maintain an atmosphere which fosters a democratic way of life.
4. Provide learning experiences which stimulate the learner to think criti-
cally and creatively in meeting present and future situations.
5. Embody those experiences which contribute to a deeper understanding
of human needs and enhance the learner's ability to assess and manage
problems confronting patients and family in the hospital, home, and
community.
6. Encourage creative functioning as an individual, a responsible citizen,
and a professional nurse capable of making a unique contribution in a
dynamic society.
7. Provide educational experiences which are necessary for leadership po-
sitions in nursing and as a foundation for graduate study.
The Educational Director of the Florida State Board of Nursing made
two visits to the School during the biennium for the purpose of surveying
the program for State Accreditation. There was a survey in January 1963,
which did not reveal any deficiencies. Another survey was made December
1963, which revealed several deficiencies in the instructional area. All of
the recommendations made have been implemented, or, are in the process
of being implemented.
The School of Nursing utilized the following agencies for providing
clinical experiences for the students: Florida A. and M. University Hospital,
N. B. Young Nursery School, W. T. Edwards Tuberculosis Hospital, Talla-
hassee, Florida; Duval Medical Center, Jacksonville, Florida; and Palm Beach
County Health Department, West Palm Beach, Florida.
The faculty has worked diligently during the term 1963-64, in reviewing
and revising the total curriculum. A consultant was secured through the
National League for Nursing to guide the faculty in revising the curricu-
lum. This faculty is composed of persons holding the Master's degree in
,.their area of specialization, with the exception of one. This person has com-
pleted all work toward the degree except the thesis.
The faculty and students were active in the University and community
activities, as well as State and National Nursing Organizations. Some of
the faculty pursued short courses, workshops, and attended summer sessions
for educational improvement.
The Nurses' Residence in Jacksonville is in need of a complete reno-
vation to include the addition of storage, recreation, and laundry units. The
92






BIENNIAL REPORT, 1962-64
grounds are in need of landscaping. The campus unit is also in need of
storage area.
There is a need for additional staff and faculty in order for the school
to function efficiently.
We are deeply grateful to the administration for the support and en-
couragement given. We are most grateful for the increase in the total budget
for the school year 1963-64. This is the first year that we have been able
to operate the school without many financial problems.

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
The majority of the enrollment of the School of Pharmacy is made up
of Florida residents. However, an analysis of our enrollment data will indi-
cate that we serve the entire Eastern Seaboard of the United States.
The 1964 graduating class consisted of fifteen (15) persons, all of whom
are registered in the State of Florida and a few are also registered in Ala-
bama or Georgia. There were nine (9) graduates in the Class of 1964.
Some of the major student activities of the School of Pharmacy during
the period of this report (1962-64) were as follows:
1. Expanded the activities of the Student Branch of the American
Pharmaceutical Association.
2. Inducted nine (9) of our male students as charter members of the
Alpha Gamma Chapter of the Chi Delta Mu Fraternity.
3. Helped to host the 56th Annual Meeting of the Florida Medical, Den-
tal and Pharmaceutical Association and Women's Auxiliary.
4. All of our graduates have successfully taken the State Board of
Pharmacy Examination. Some of them are also registered in states
other than Florida.
We have been successful in increasing to a small degree, the amount
of financial assistance which is available to our students. These are as fol-
lows:
1. The McKesson and Robbins Award
2. The School of Pharmacy Loan Fund
3. Contributions from civic-minded individuals
Some major achievements of the School of Pharmacy were as follows:
1. Instituted the Annual Pharmacy Seminar for the Continuing Edu-
cation of our students and pharmacists throughout the State of
Florida.
2. Instituted the Pre-Pharmacy Seminar
Some of the special needs of the School of Pharmacy are as follows:
1. More financial aid for deserving students.
2. A complete air-conditioning and dehumidifying unit for room 200
to prevent further damage to equipment.
3. A new manufacturing laboratory so that course offerings can be
expanded.
4. All offices should be air-conditioned.
5. Full time laboratory assistants.
6. More and better personnel.
7. Additional space for library.




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