• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Letter of transmittal
 Main
 Biennial report of the president...
 The Florida State University president's...
 Biennial report of the Florida...
 Biennial report of the president...
 Back Cover














Group Title: Report of the Florida Board of Regents
Title: Report of the Board of Control
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094136/00012
 Material Information
Title: Report of the Board of Control
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Florida. Board of Control.
Publisher: Board of Control
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, FL
Publication Date: 1954/1956
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094136
Volume ID: VID00012
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: electronic_oclc - 55693843

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Table of Contents
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
    Letter of transmittal
        Page A-3
    Main
        Page A-4
        Page A-5
        Page A-6
        Page A-7
        Page A-8
        Page A-9
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        Page A-35
        Page A-36
    Biennial report of the president of the University of Florida to the Board of Control
        Page B-1
        Page B-2
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        Page B-304
    The Florida State University president's report
        Page C-i
        Page C-ii
        Page C-iii
        Page C-1
        Page C-2
        Page C-3
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        Page C-78
    Biennial report of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
        Page D-1
        Page D-2
        Page D-3
        Page D-4
        Page D-5
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        Page D-71
        Page D-72
    Biennial report of the president of the Florida State School for the Deaf and the Blind
        Page E-3
        Page E-4
        Page E-5
        Page E-6
        Page E-7
        Page E-8
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        Page E-76
        Page E-77
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text






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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Membership of Boards .-.-............-..._.......................
Letter of Transmittal ........................ ....... ......
Report of Chairman of Board:
Introduction .-----....--.... -..-.. ....................-....... ...
Coordination Progress .......................... -...--......-
Council for the Study of Higher Education ...........


Page


Board of Control Action on Recommendations


Made by the


Council ......----...............-..-....-


Community College Council -....-.......-.. 13
Buildings ..----.................................--------- .........----._-.. 14
Student Enrollment ..........-............. ........-... .. ..15
Academic Salaries ...---.-.---------....-....-..--..--.... 19
President of the University of Florida ..-----..-..---...-- 20
J. Hillis Miller Health Center................................-. 20


John and Mable Ringling Museum of


Art ....... ....


Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind -----........... ..... 20
Board of Control Membership -.....-..---...-. --...-..---.... 21
Conclusion ..............-------------................................... 21
Report of .Board's Executive Director:
Letter of Transmittal .-.........-..........-............ 22
Summary Statement of Operations, 1954-56 ._......---...... 22A
Interest and Sinking Fund Balances and
Revenue Certificates Outstanding as
of June 30, 1955, and 1956 .---.-- .....--. 22C

Report of the Architect to the Board of Control-----._ 23

Report of the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art .- 27

Printed Reports from Izstitutions Under the
Administration of the Board of Control

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State .Board of Control


Institutions of Higher .Learnng


pa L. MranE, Chalnr-


___-Orlando


JaEn j. LowV-

Bi B. KbNT..

IH-iLa R WEmar


-- ,Qinmcy

-Jadsonville


... Miami


J. aiE Baa.r.zAxtn .. ...... .....-.-.-.-St. Petersburg

S.. ,ENaBKx GUENmSEY --.._....... ....Jacksonville


JA4Es D. CAMP,


SnB -.-. ---- --.---.-...-. .-. Ft. Lauderdale


State Board of Education

LEROY COLLINS Chairman- ..........-...........Governor


R. A. GAY.


._...-_....__...Secetary


of State


J. EDWIN


LASONa- ............--- ....... Treasurer


BIxCARD W. Eavmr -----............ Attorney General

TxoMas D. BAILEY __.... State Superintendent of Public Instruction

LIBRARY

FLORICA STA :E UNIV[RSRI
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA


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Letter of Transmittal


Orlando, Florida

March 15, 1957


To: His EXCELLENCE, LEROY COLLINS


Governor of Florida


I have the privilege of submitting herewith the biennial report of the Board
of Control for the period beginning July 1, 1954, and ending June 30, 1956,


for transmittal by you to the Legislature.


This report is handed you in com-


pliance with the provisions of Chapter 5384, Laws of Florida, 1905.


Respectfully submitted,


BoARD OF CONTROL OF FLO DA,

BY: RALPR L. MnL, Chairman


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195C, has-been a -most
at progress toward an
of the institutions of


'ad semrv .


Through the efforts


r4t 4stlheatink of our youth, Florida is emerging as a State
^ty it i4alted future for providing education beyond the


b soo forr the mans q)a4qfr'o^r gg people 'who will
^-'i -
scu t ion.


be seeking


p r.


SThe
this iep
this'repo


Predsid r~itsa,vk .piered


reS"peCts a institutions,
irt. It is itoped that the


detailed


These


readers


comments


comments


of this


statements


are contained


section


will also


relative


elsewhere


review


institutional reports.


Coordination Progress ,


In 1952 the Board of Control drew up a program directed toward improve-
plent.of business practices and the overall control of higher education in Florida.
A review of this program* and the results accomplished is shown below:
1. Bot d Policies:


(a) Assemble


:and arrange. in


systematic


and orderly. manner


present


policies of the Board.


(b) Study 1
policieses,


he1 podcirsa


in order


to determine


and the need for additional


the adequacy


of existing


policies.


(c, Assemble and arrange


shall govern the
activities.


various


in final form for ready reference


institutions


in future financial and


policies


which


educational


A policy manual has been written and
istrators of the institutions.


now in the hands of the admin-


2. Institutional


Constitutions-Organization


and Operating


Policies:


Review


the Constitution of the institutions with


reference


(1) Organization of the institutions
(2) Authority delegated
(8) Operating policies


(b) Approve such changes as are necessary to:
(1) Increase effectiveness of organization


(2) Obtain more uniformity


in organization


(3) Obtain standard operating policies


All institutions now have constitutions and they
insofar as is feasible and practical.
4






^& ^ -". "^
^ ^ ^*^* .-^ -. *' "-
'W^^^ -^f *- -. .


are being standardized


.3, -
A *


I









REPORT OF CHEMW A~F


3. Financial Records and Repor
(a) Require adequate fnn


-.~ *.^ >i: 'cy ,r
:al record and rpori oni
atal recordbandiweortbsarl 46


generally accepted college and imfversity standards:
(1) Adequate double entry system


(2) Budget preparation
(3) Budget operation and control
(4) Periodic financial and budgetary statements and reports


This is an area in which the


greatest improvement


has been shown.


the above


have been


placed in effect,


however,


due to


personnel


problems


additional effort is necessary at Florida A.


& M. University.


(b) Other


financial, cost, and


instruction and operating
(1) Administrative cost
(2) Instructional cost


statistical


activities


analyses


, including


and reports
analyses of:


relating yto


Maintenance cost
Other miscellaneous cost


In
and the


analyses.


cooperation
institutions,


with the


the Board


State Auditor,


office has be


It was necessary to correct accounting


the office of the Budget D
!gun a cost study to obtain


procedures


before


p2


director
these
progress


could be made in this area.
(c) Comparative cost studies


with institutions


of other States.


Before valid comparisons among other, institutions can be made itis
necessary that accounting systems and data-collecting methods be standardized.


Because


of these variations valid data has been unavailable.


We hope to be able


to make studies in the future which will compare
other state institutions.


Florida state universities with


(d) Establishment


of adequate


controls


of physical property and


supplies:


(1) Inventory records
(2) Identification of equipment


are proud


have taken the


to report that the


lead throughout the


ment are tagged, inventoried


institutions under the Board


State in this


program.


and are set up on the records


of Contil


All items of: equip-
of each institution.


"A,
-
;t. ^


*l'~ .,t
>J-T',^


8 W ki itl f d f t l t


(OJ v)ru


The Florida
procedure, follow


control


over invent


to operate more e
exist in the maint


()4. 4urchaset
(a) R!64frJbi
4 L- -y i^


ngUL UCjpX Lun or erafltU t WUula sF ,
State University was the firstt fsttudt>c' mto II iis
3d by the University of Florida. 1itepro eduiswai
stories and internal repair programs. It allows tbewi4tit
ffliently and immediate wh
nrance a ndr arshwea, r ,, -
,- -m ". ^;;';-*Ti'i^' ^ i^ *^ea ^'s ^ ^


I
*1 .


letir^F




















fl 'r<te$ 194blJ report
J e'P1 A11 Cf th fiie reo TiiifeldatZoDs fiade to
c9 &6 Sfaite'iaih 'sf actions presented herewith:
tor the Sttady "of Higher Education in Elorida unanimously


"1. That the State of Florida prepare to serve a greatly expanding enroll-
; ment cj ,oeg Students in the next ten to fifteen years, and that the plans be
Sas on n.. oiepieted erollment by 1970 of at least three times the number
/of. $tuJs ,atteinf4coflege in the state in 1955.
"2. That diversified programs of education beyond the high school be
provided andcmaintained to meet the needs of the expanding student population,
|p. to serve the rapidly developing and changing economy of the state, and to
Spr&ide' essential .research, both fundamental and applied.
._ *"8, That existing public universities be expanded to enable them to meet
the intreasing-demands being made upon them, and be supported adequately
i to enable them to continue to improve the quality of their services.
-, That private institutions of the state further clarify and define for
themselves goals which are realistic in terms of the resources they can expect
from their constituencies and which are consistent with the purposes for which
Stey exist, and that they continue to strive for the development of high-qualitv
pro prams.
"a. That private interests be urged to provide necessary financial support
: or' private and church-related institutions to enable them to continue to serve
pM r~msstuntial .poportton df the students in Florida, but that a general pattern
li"af, pupbio money for the operation of private institutions not be developed

S,- "t"'l~' T' i i thaiority to grant charters to private groups for the establishment
... "ad operadon of schools and colleges be centralized in one agency, and that
....: ta d of E dcation alppoit a temporary commission, representative of the
l tmsa' Ivolve, to -denvlap speclfec proposals for char-
Ksti %SttiC to be considered by the- 1957 Session of the Legislature.
| ^^r^vW ^ 4*M4 '





9 #/ VI




- ..
r~~~~~~' i *.;*-**-'-


REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


colleges to provide a broad range of ednoational programs at the xeMlan ea4
sophomore level for youth and contiminug eduaaton for adults (It doml4 be
noted that steps to put this recommendation into effect have already been taken
by the 1955 Legislature through the establishment of the Community Co&e
Council.)


"6. That immediate steps be taken to establish additional


granting


institutions in the Tampa Bay


"a. That the new state institution
baccalaureate degree in a wide range


and in selected professional fields,


area and on the lower


s offer initially programs
of liberal and applied ar


and leading


to the master's


state degree-


East Coast.


leading


to the


ts and sciences


degree


in those


fields in which


for the


the need can be


baccalaureate degree


demonstrated


after accreditation


is achieved


programs.


"Ib. That the need for still


the Board of Control,


other degree-granting


institutions


be studied


with a view of recommending new establishments in


places and at such times as the Board may consider additional facilities necessary.


"7. That high school and college students be encouraged through


and effective


appro-


guidance and counseling services to attend the institutions


best qualified to serve their individual interests and abilities.


"8. That the


higher education
continued.


general pattern of


coordinating


through a state-wide


board


supervision of state-controlled
(the Board of Control)' be


"a. That the Board of Education,; looking toward the time when the Board


of Control should become an independent


define areas


in which the


Board of Control has final


authority


and responsibility, subject


only to the


agencies


state government


and to


the Legislature.


"b. That the Constitution


of Florida


be revised


to extend the termrsfor


members
in such a


of the


Board


of Control to seven


way as. to make the


years,


that the members be sPeected


Board representative of the interests of the


state


as a whole, and that the present restriction against residents


as members


of certain counties


of the Board be removed.


"c. That the Board of


Control


be relieved


of. responsibilities


Collegiate functions,


education


be conducted


and that all fun


through the


actions relating to
universities under


"d. That the Board of Control


assume


oar.


fully and.


effectively
education.


the function. of. long-range plan


^cftoe
tiF:"~i:


higher edtcattots labn
will craeo snuc ptblic


st-t ufliestMy syste


w' -
:: -*-^"


-t


(- -* f


'-^^'Y
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"e. Ttiaattfi











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^ I-1
^ -^ .- ^ >t,-f ^ \


ir


*aunlvtti v oeiy^ *4nd to a. e qidenta-- of tle. iftiqae, and
B d concern itself primarily with activities of a policy-making nature.

^la aWh dt.i- -ail togprovide for oqre lay participation in detenaining
oipOcias 1une, whbioh the -state-ntrolle4, institutions operate, the, Board of
Contol establishor each institutionacommittee or board of:regents to which
it should delegate responsibility for polie decisions conceming the operation


respective


dCoteo' The me


in the


institutions, su]
numbers of the'


case of each


regents


statutory


bject


to the general


committee
institution,


or board


to represent


desirable


policies of


regents


the interests


to give


e Board of
should be


of the


these committees


status.


1IL That steps be taken to achieve better coordination of programs
the institutions. '


among


"a. That inter-institutional faculty


committees


be established


within


state university system by the Board of Control in those areas in which programs
are now duplicated, or are likely to be duplicated, with responsibility for


planning
faculties


related programs,


of the


private


and that


such committees establish


liaison


institutions in their respective areas.


"b. That there be established a council of presidents of the


state institu-


tions under the


chairmanship of the executive officer


to consider matters emerging


of the Board of


from the inter-institutional committees


maker ominendations on questions pertaining to


more than


Control
and to


one institution


-which are


come before


the Board


of Control.


' ". That


provide necessary information


S,;: -1X2.
Forme to


That
relate


continuing studies


for efficient


opera


he staff of th
management


a conference of Florida college


i


public and


higher


education


e


ation, including cost
Board of Control to
of the institutions.


"18. That there be established


professional
community'


system


personnel to


colleges,


relate


and the


programs


universities,


of public education in the


or committees


of the secondary


schools,


a well-coordinated


state.


"14. That adequate facilities be provided in the state university


immediate and emerging needs for instruction,


research,


system
service.


"& That conditions of faculty
hiMtf cl-wnt apfift aiibn^


/


->."'2 Y C
^ ; :'Th... --
;:'- *- .- -
r-f ~ -^T*'- tl '


service


be improved to attract and retain


S,
P*^.
i^-


of the


apoinited,


entire 'state-
or boards of


Ultimately it will- probably be


analyses


of programs be maintained by


of institutional


private


university


in the state.


presidents


a liaison committee


to meet


so as to provide


*-' -


v


I




C~ -' i,
1..
.r


REPORT OF CHAIRMAN BF :BOARD


"b. That capital outlay funds be provided for the two mew state tti
recommended for the Tampa Bay area and the lower East Coasit-area.

"c. That for the existing state universites capital outlay funds ke provided
in the immediate future for only such nonresidential facilities as are necessary
to replace obsolete and temporary buildings and to provide facilities for such
specialized needs as faculty offices, new programs of instructip, and expanding
research activities. .. :

"d. That the existing state universities be encouraged to provide additional
housing for students, through projects that are either -entirely or primarily self-


liquidating,


so as to provide residential facilities for the maximum number of


students that can be


accommodated in their present nonresidential space.


The Board of Control has not adopted all of the


recommendations,


has taken steps


to implement


those agreed


upon.


These


will be


discussed in


a subsequent section.


A summary


of the findings of the


Council


is shown below:


"1. The population of Florida is expected to more than double between
1950 (2,771,000) and 1970 (6,119,000), and there will be increasingly large
concentrations of population in urban centers as ell asa continiation of
the shift of population to the south.
"2. Income.of Floridians will increase at-ai somewhat mdre rapid rate than
the population, but, even so, the resulting increase in per capita-income. in
Florida will leave Florida in about the same relative position among the states.
"a.- In 1953 constant dollars, the& total income of Floridians was about
5 billion in 1954 and will be between 12 and 18 billion in -1970; per- capital
income was about $1,500 in 1954 and will be approximately $2,000 in 1970.


"3. The economy of Florida in 1970-
and- somewhat less dependent on tourism;
manpower, both technical and professional;,
compensate for a decline in the relative size


will -be more highly industrialized
it will -be in need of well-trained


:to:increaseioutput per w
of the Florida labor force.


orker


There


is convincing- evidence


that there will be at:least three times


as. many


college


students: in


1970 (132,000).,as


in- 1955 (44,526).


and :that


. ti will be to the best


? s-' 1'


interests -of .the -state


and of th-in'dividuals concerned


to make appropriate provisions for:education beyond the highsechool level for
at least this number of students. .
"5. Existing programs ad. facilities: av ..been developed b.blic r,, h|
and private institutions in response to a rapid increase in enrollment, and fr
Plorida institutions have been senseitive'a fhadreMs portuild&srv'ce
"6. Programs of education beyond the highls4 tg j
vocational, and semiprofessinal nature are not sald well developSb in
Flarida to aeet prnsnt.nfe AtU&dtS;suM orbtkhesb oupe
jlibich RFloida aipires1-. ;::I; -it I- ,wia-^n*s ?ttnhsL4 A^wr^Sn ^,





:1 r ,, , s

~: .. . :
4~~~~.-; ~;; f24I., ~ ~ *~~t~


. - "S4
- ,-x.4
















4onstintutics play Ottaihpdrtant ols) in. higher /tusaoFfn in
pontdkEd &uhen<1ybea 'slte 1950^fbrsapproximately 47


provide undergraduate instruction on an eomn
of substantialresidential space as well as some


"10. Unless provision is made for enrollment of large numbers


of students


in expanded or new
state degree-granting


private inst
institutions,


itutions, in community


it may


necessary


colleges, and in


to enlarge


existing


universities as


much


as four or fivefold.


is fortunate


degree-granting institution
when the state university


served


a special. clientele


in having


is, but patterns


a single state-wide board for all state
of operation which were satisfactory


system was small and when each of


not been adjusted


to changing


the institutions
conditions and


requirements.


"a. Top-level control of the state university system is


state a;
hold it


agencies,


and the Board


accountable


for the


of Control does


proper


exercised


not have sufficient


a number
authority


operation of the system.


"b. the Board


(such as the


School


of Control has responsibilities for noncollegiate functions
for the Deaf and Blind, the Ringling Art Museum, and


State Plant Board)


which require time and attention that might


well be


devoted to the coordination and control of higher education.


"c. The' Bard of Conrol


devised procedures


which afford it


relief from


burdensome


details,


but it


is still preoccupied


with administrative


matters which


could better be delegated to the heads of the


institutions; more-


ovea-the
planning,


Board has n<
coordination,


ot provided


or used staff


and supervision


services


programs


required for


effective


and institutions.


"d. The heads of


the institutions


do not have


or do not exercise


sufficient


authority to provide


for the most effective


institutional administration.


e. The Board of Control has not been provided with sufficient
(, a of per cent of the funds for which it was responsible in 195S
iiklabl for its own operation).
at* ^ :- :<


support


144


was


,i "1. While the present operation of the


state universities


in Florida make


a god me of resources, sufficient economies in the operation of the instructional


"11. Florida


some









REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


programs can be realized, without jeopardizing the quality of programs, t


permit such upward adjustment of salaries


retain


qualified staff in


necesaryV


a highly competitive market.


to atatrat and to


"a. Economies in the operation of instructional programs can be effected
by the elimination or sharp reduction of the number of small duplicate and
repeat sections, by reduction through inter-institutional cooperative programs
of the number of courses for which there is small demand, and by slight increases


in teaching loads both in semester hours


number of additional faculty


taught and


members required


as 40 per cent if suggested adjustments are made.


"'. Economies can also bN
extending the weekly schedule,


classrooms,


and, possibly,


e effected


average


may be


in the utilization


by better adjustment of


reduced by


as much


'* I


of classrooms


class size to size of


by operating on a trimester or four-quarter plan.


"13. To accommodate a possible enrollment of


58,000 students in the state


university


system in


1970 (assuming


that 38,000 will be in


existing universities


and 10,000


in each of two additional


state institutions)


would


require the


addition


if a marked
amount per


of nonresidential space costing


reduction in space


1953 constant


dollars) $48,000,000


per student is made, and $84,000,000


student presently available is provided-and


if the


the addition of


residential space costing $99,000,000


by revenue certificates)


(a major portion of which may be financed


if the present amount of space per student is maintained.


"14. To accommodate


58,000


students in the state university


system in


1970 would require educational and general expenditures of at least $60,585,000
if a higher student-teacher ratio than that currently found is employed-and


$75,264,000 if present student-teacher ratios


are maintained. If general revenue


provide the
a 1953-1954,


the higher


same per cent


$58,271,000


student-teacher


"15. The 1970


programs wit
and operated


economy


necessary


effectively, with


higher education in Floridai
which was required in 1950."


son


of the


of general


educational


and general funds


state funds would be


ratios-or $66,232,000


if present ratios


of Florida will be able


if they
ae less


in 1940, but


to support


that it


required under


prevail.


appropriate


are planned, coordinated, governed,
effort than was required to support
with some additional effort over' that


- ;,.i :^ "
;*- ~ ~ .- 'A .^


-.. -,. i:? c it


I
:-- G^j


'v\*it ^/
'^, '-_


facilities


I '^ ;


|I rh; 1


' -:,.






















estor recommended in th uxma4itb iurE'ofithe council,
3ni e dy and consultafton the Board i taking a position on each
pohi&n Someofi he pr is' reit 8ped, others are held for
,as i jitsila oth' -


colleges


as as'way-to. increase' the availability of higher education, to


provide programing t now


provided in the universities,


and to accommo-


date a substantial portion of the total enrollment.


b. The Board has identifiedd a site at Temple


Terrace for


the recommended


degree-granting :institution 'of the state university system in the Tampa
Bay' area, aeid, following the establishment of the institution 'under
Chapter 80k98, Acts -of 1955, by the State Board of Education, the
. Bbard-oftCiitrol is requesting funds from the 1957 Session of the


' tegislaturetd6 enable it to open the institution
S' an Ainitial enrollment of ,400.


in the Fall of 1960 with


Board has identified a site at


Boc


i.; -degree-granting institution on the lower
*,: .'mended that this site .be accepted by the


institution should be developed aS


a Raton for
East Coast,


the recommended
and it has recom-


State: Board of Education. This


soon after the Tampa Bay institution


as is feasible.


d. The


State Board of Education has authorized the Board to


select


a site


in Escambia County. The immediate use of this site is not contemplated
in the immediate future but it is believed essential that one be accepted
while sufficient land is available.
.:. e. The Board has approved operating and capital outlay budgets for the


three existing


state universities


which will enable those institutions to


make more adequate provisions for rapidly growing student bodies.
4. The Board of Control has moved to organize and to strengthen the


professional staff


services


necessary


for its proper operation as a policy and


cooodfnatlng body and to enable It to perfoan more effectively its dutiesn
elaetiawito the nagement of the tmversdtie.


-' ;
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-..,.
^tt', \ ,5 :

^^^4^'-^ **1 -


<"-


4 ^ ,' -









'I


a. The intr-stitut


of Presidents of
Board serves as


b. The title of the


:
^"


changed from Executive Secretary to Executive Director.


c. The Board of Control has requested of the 1957 Session dF-tie Legi-
lature adequate funds for the effective operation of its genial ofice.

d. The Board of Control is establishing inter-institutional faculty;cmnittees
to plan for cooperation and coordination of programs and administrative
activities of the universities in the system.


e. The Board of Control has establi


late and coordinate


system-wide


shed a principal staff officer tostimu-
studies in order to provide the'Board


and other agencies of government with comparable -data required 'it
the proper operation of the state university system. : -.


Community College Council


(


It will be of


interest


the important results coming froi
the Community College Council


to those reading this -report to know that:one: of


n the Council's
This Council


ommendations relative to the establishment of junior


throughout the State, and the first
to the 1957 legislature. Realization t


cope with a th
college network


beyond the high


ree-fold increase in


necessary
school to


to provide
those stui


The Executive Director of the
College Council. Coordination of ti


study was the creation. o
was created to make iee-


or coinmunity colleges


of these recommendations will be made
hat the State university system could not
enrollment by i970 mad a cbmwu
education in a boad raxige of program
dents desiring uh oppoiti~ ty..
Board is a m bembi of ihe boi~d ii4
1e two systems communityt olt d


higher education) will be accomplished through his effortssdu the a nouti
and through conferences with the heads of the various institutions., a '"


.- -i -I? ,
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!i fl y ; *'^


0 a -^ r
sl i\ I


5


BkEPO~


r rCHAIRMAN OF BOAB>

ional oonmulttes hbe e reonstiutd as tae Cmdl
State Univerites, and'-p .. a
the Chairman of the Couee nc. t

executive officer of the Board of control has, thsbp




























'emsion i.Servipe,, a&:th^e
,. "..ap;po iiated .b. the 1956 S
''-f the psyhia floor to t

SThe aboys -ppropriatio
L" but classes will coqtiueto
are provedto remove ahtiq
i rlopuaedt ul desirable a
T Prograo
but casse *sill conq'*u "-o' 1


per;Agrleultural Experiment Stations, Agricultural
Teaching Hospital. It also includes $1,225,000


special Session of the
he Teaching Hospital.


ns relieved


classroom


Legislature for the addition


shortages


a great extent,


be held in temporary space until additional funds
lated buildings and space provided for departments
nd inefficient quarters.
m


I ~ -


leeds of the universities and the a
requests to the legislature.


enro


agencies


under the Board


are con-


If we are to accommodate


llments, additional dormitory space must be provided.
been requested to provide approximately half of the c
Ii the remainder being financed through revenue certify


C


ever
The
)st of


icates.


we 49 longer
'FK-IS 12-


ve obligated all dormitory income which was not encumbered,
are able to construct dormitories from rental charges. State


Necessary


we are'to house additional students.


seceue Certificates


The ou
195., (See


Ltstanding funded debt of the Board of Control as of June 30,
Exhibit B of the Executive Director's report) amounted to $13,-


517,000. As stated previously, without


state assistance, additional construction


is virtually impossible with the resources presently available.


The universities are housing the following
campus in state-owned dormitories:


percentages


of students on


University of


Florida State University ..--....--.. -... 50.15%
Florida A. & M. University---...---.......- .........-.. 4.4


Florida. .- .................. 43.615





flR@EPORWT @MSVS 0CHAIRMA O


Stut Enrollment


The "bdal wave d u8att we w
arhve during 195I49. i e following table indicate the antcipated ktao
of increased enrollment:


Uniuersiy Florida Fo~~
of State A.&
Florida Uiversity U idere tA
1954-65 (Aual)* ............. 9,863 5,650 2,414
1955-56 atual)*.............. 10,756 6,442 2,649
1956-57 timated)*.......... 10,809 6,982 2,698
1957-58 et ted)*.......... 12,045 7,650 3,040
1958-59 (Etimted)*.......... 13,030, 8,370 8,a00

Fall semester.
The Council for the Study of Higher Education predicted enrollmentsas
follows for the years shown: L *
I 4 I


State
University
System


Public
Comnmmnity
Collges


Per Cent Number


11,829
15,1Q52
18,375
20;438
22,087
25,175
30,156
38,602


Per Cent


Privrate
Institutions,. -;


Number


24,000
24,495
24,766
25,548
28,609
3010 O
81,500
32,310
3~i66


Per Clsn


36.2%
33.4
31.0
30.0
31.0.
30.0 "
28.6
27.5
26.3
Fk%,


;It is re4 ify apparent ron?
is taced with a crucial poblemp
citens whomuill wbat to pesrs

wandi i o
tintokit

-$~i

~16


Total
Enroll-


Number


-' "

































: "' GfiADUATIONS
S:UNIVERSIT OF FLORIDA
1 j :* r. *_____


















MV ^*-??'^ ^^


' 1


f t-


194041....

1942-48. ;

1948-44.....
1944-45.....
1945-46. . .
1946-7.....


19417-4 ....
1948-40.....



1961-52.....
1952-63.....
1953-4 .....
1954-55.....
1955-56.....


1
* *t a *A .* *
V
. .t. S. PS.P


* . P S P
*


,* *.Ss. h *
. &. A... S AD
'*' d'11 h *


Ar


,t+ ,
<, <. ,_ "
..- + *
'- -i -" J ' '

.$


194041.
1941-0.


194*-*6,
194-4.L

l1t48 47.
inJJJJJJJJJJJ
inj~


. /&
J A M t a






























































-_ 4s t.4* .t -, ,




416 3 31 ..
: : ;.i ....,..4.. ., ..... 0 3 34 1 47 . "









-- 1 -
^ - '


i-
S'


i
1
At.


.
" ^ -, '


I^,- .


i *


. 4 1


i.
SJ ,

' ,l
-? :-x P' --


L
I ~
/ r "-' r, .

i '' -


; I
.-1




-"C I -
* -\ -,-


wowr cr awlBaw rnF-^


Anudmic Salaries


The 19SS session of the legislature did not heed the plea for
demic salaries. Many well-trained individuals have poved to ma
positions. As a result of this, the Board of Control has recopn
following salary policy for the University of Florida and Florida Sta5
which will, we hope, enable us to retain and attract qualified peas


10 Mos. Basis


Average


Professor
Associate
Assistant


1957-58
*$8,300
__--- 8,450
--_ 5,400


Professor
Professor


1958459
$8,500


Instructor ___________ 4,800


The basis of this policy


over the


current


was authorizing


scale and a 5% increase


a 10% increase


the second


for the first year
of next biennium


over the first
were agreed


summary


year. A study


was also done of eighteen


universities


upon by the Board of Control and the Budget


of which


Director)


is presented herein.


COMPARISON OF 1955-56 MEDIAN SALARIES AT EIGHTEEN UNI-
VERSITIES' WITH MEDIAN SALARIES AT THE UNIVERSITY
QF FLORIDA2 AND FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY ,-
10 MONTHS BASIS


Professor
Associate


Professor..


Assistant Professor
Instructor........


r. .


Eighteen
Univer-
sitie95
1956-656


University
of
Florida
1955-56


Florida.
State
University
19s556


< Amount
Average
of 18
Universities
exceeds
University
of Florida


Amount
Average
of 18
Universities
ezexeed'
F.B.U.


$ 1,041'
424
C'45
60too


'Univemlr ity Mispuri.


versity of North


Carolina.


Glpiga-


University of


Oregon, Univerity of Califonia, Loua daa State


versityUaIpity( tplin*a. Univerailr of Ten Uxa, pvTip qf-Min poat po 4pb Uw
Pennafl'aie tanto UnXiry,^ Univeruity' of Wiacou4O^hio ate ~niturfl'
aity. State Dnx editj of Io Th~vriqtVrsyaity tfiamti. 1NDsi& o
'iulneffint awl~wuMdI~nA~ft ttlthdnL *11 Ii^ sr antp- b9H!
Data for Florida State UnivA eraity refer to 3UhbgaMpwea tbetba*) Ba iwn
It wil-beotet6Boaro
than the aergao *
inSatutions eshalk
Floida ittitiais ,-^t flS


























g~Mature has hzovi d the funds nec
S ;ispit'aiad work has already begun
400 beds when in full operation and


first patients in September 1958.
during the biennium covered by
students entered in. September 191
thus provid~ig another important
Florida.


lessary for the
on this facility
is scheduled fo


science


building


this report and the first medi'


This number will be
L of instruction which


construction of
'. The hospital
ir accepting its
was completed
cal class, of 50


eacn year,
needed in


John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art


The 1955 Session


museum


and the


authorized the beginning of a re]
residence.. Due to the lapse of


pair program
time betwe


e


at both
n John


Ringling's deathand the i
deteriorated considerably.
with tepjairs piopdsed'iri 1
fairly good condition.


taking A


)ver of the
renovation


estate
program


by the Board, the buildings
am now in progress, along


this


A complete
report.


report from the


Director


of the Museum


is appended to this


Florida School For The Deaf and The Blind


.*-

laadtehr
load thus


institution has recently begun a program of reclaiming approximately
of marshland to be used for expanding its facilities. The additional
r acquired will provide space for another dormitory and additional


la~moomsrwhch have been requested.


progress


is being made in equipping the graduates of this


l t ibe productive citizens of Florida through various types of vocational
hkfft MAny are now going on to institutions of higher learning for pro-

; ; "tPe President has submitted a complete report of the activities during
S'- e hbtrmnntmn which is incrporatd blwhee in this report.


*irl have


The medical


accepted
is vitally


next two bienniums, should place


facility in


Cntiued


;' '^ : "'' '











Boa-Ia#44 0p'


The following changes its personnel of i
previous biennial report. Ronatable W.
by Honorable Jame J. Love Qufuqs ks.
d


was succeeded
R. H. Gore,
Camp Sr., als


Appende
under the' su
accomplishme
The prol
beyond thde i
Board of Con
cation of the
that steps be
pated enroll
done in a ha
and construct
of the first cd
The Boa
of the Cabine
direction.


-T ';, -f. ,-
r -- =r t .- *-' j*
tse -oar itWo

teediae a
.- ' > I * ^ "/ ^ &


i y IKoiSqEendrick G-ernsey,
Sr., Fort Lau&rdale, was succeededd by .
o ofEPrt2 atadieadle. "

Conclusion
d hereto are the &dompiehebsiit et p i os: re
peridori of the .Boasrd d Coautrit *ce
nts during this biennium. ,E N'& i '[ j
blems facing the -people o j t l'tda ?oitBa "on'
dgh school for- its y "mun"i-thtlteestbha deodewtdd 4 tl
itol has apprised th Legislafreg A teu- -
estimated nTumb&e Wf'Wjets e'I '0.
taken in an ordrly.1 ertopviae ai r i-
lents. Provisid t an tii
haphazard .anarerA At least our 'yeas te is required to pia'
a new.institgti iand to assemble personnel prior to the andmissi..
Iss.. .', ' .
rd desires to express its appreciation to the Governor, mem"b
et, and the Legislature for their support of the ag~tcies under"i4:

BOARD OF ONr!ROL
;Ralph kJ-N#I.

,T A ^, /


Lr- -
-: *. . I- -
I <: ". .
*-. ; -^ : :


4J'


". ~. ~


-<= <>,a t
-" ^ '*\; "'































*eIebbenaf4a1 upo rthvarious
3nSR^Z <^(3cnbvl1 or'ei the ||iennium
VK: '


9ia ;Mom innTfa a Bt~ome Operatiod andiehstransac-
r^;eoIfetlebei adtt andi adiiiismdjftads.yed


,V .,^...[-r


It
.-' "'l ': i2 A~


.*:r -A- -*
ACI^W?
- 4j9


:lh:i) ti,' a^
.. .


'7' ii p;


U-> .r--r'


if



I -






I CONTROL


SUMMARY STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1954 THROUGH JUNE 30,


EXHIBIT "A"


z-.. *


t '*
.4 4 *t 4 I

fl ***_*4t


<.lii ..e1 4 .' ^ ftf. ft.* .. ft
..R"f.^^*'' -....


es* ..*14 *..tI*Mi............


' ,, ,,
--^ ..-.


l* *
+,.
Sj~..
~);j~j~a~b~rrri-.. l


,1t .< *
'. \

i( t t t


ft .. f .{, 1 .l
* j . .
* ..4 *

i* A 4 *I *


, . .


I -.I I I i ,


$ 2,488.71
4,783.63
245.091
242.21

$ 7,760.46


66,204.20

$ 66,204.20


$ 8,800.00
16,500.00
* 25,300.00

4 -120,152.50
07,588.95
60,08.31
6,000.00


RecAipt and
ApOpropriions


$ 60.346.00
853.11
21,280.83
925.00


Expenditures


Reerted to
General Revenue


$ 2,488.71
562,25
144.56


Fund Balance
June 80, 1956


$.......


Receipt and
Appropriation.


$ 64,011.00

18,282.00
1,000.00


64,011


985.86 i


17,445008
900.82


Fund Bolanc
June .0, 1958


2,025.14

99.08


$ 83,404.94 $ 01,165.40 $ 87,969.49 8,195.91 j.............. $ 83,293.00 $ 83,293.00 1 80,381.27 C 2.881 78


272,121.26


572,500


, 84*,000.00

.'0 90,000.00
S', 20,500.00


158.08
155.77
65.26
,826.48
S602.18
5;030.49


$ 338,325.46


459,890.00
138,000.00

597,890.00


307.79
424.04
235.75
817.55
1,219.05
13,609.78
326.32
2,440.09
314,847.41
614.99


250.00
249.97
255,039.08


$ 256,489.05


528,130.00


75.00
250.00
450.00
9,871.80


..........08


.03 I


$ 14,010.00
55,750.00

$ 69,760.00
$ 286,213.81
113,494.10


.
......I...i....


81,886.88


81,886.88


S........


. ... .. -. .. .
""7,267.


.... +...


403,335.63


403,335.63


510,000.00


510,000.00 5

579,000.00 5


35,000.
8,085.


150.00
153.63
63.51
473.20
435.85
11,763.42
131.19
2,027.36,
177,482.33
295,00
828.20
435.83
6,834.53
313.00
96,885.04
205.00
31.65
162.99
39,991.85


, *"% .
u--' -


Expenditures


. f. L t.. *. f *. -*,.,........


,*^....,.....ll^ .,. .<..


.. . .


f


485,222.01


" "4 7 660 .4 8 '
It 47,580.48


437,;661.58
437.61.58


485,222.01


.. .... .... ,,


510,000.00 $

510,000,00 8

579,000.00 $


510,000.00 8

574,820.16 t


36,000.
15,352.


8,3.527.17
6,416.87


457.79
578.57
224.26
1,040.75
1,204.90
15,561.40
457.51
3,467.45
8337,269.74
900.99
668.69
1,080.40
11,492.69
706.96
185,988.57
585.00
356.78
1,340.87
79,637.38


" ","...+....1. *


ass-s^


alut tl Bm


00 1


510,000.00


4,179,.85


1;472088
8,036.68


800,00
876.00
150.00
675.00
675.00
6,610,00
800.00
1,750.00
168,157.35
150.00
340.00
424.50
. 4,758.00
300.00
80,153.58
800.00











n t 1N' B Q Lr

Rn
?-i '


jtBBan~mub....
II I *.q ; '.
murd...
'I1u t h i 411
[ P d*<****jf,
IK~f>' *** * ?" n
^- J /1


SUMMARY STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1954 THROUGH JUNE 30, 1956-(Continued)


*rlrjlit iii >rfiip
......-...........
.t. s4,. ..*. 1
. ..4 ..*. ** W. I


I f-^ 1 A


I
K 'l 4 *

hU ~ fi *<* j -II 9 4
U *-+ *, $ 2:: i~


Fund Balance
July 1, 1964

$ 59,790.11
672.23


74,880.72
558.97

889.58
18,404.19


$ 5,000.00
5,000.00
8,000.00
700.00
2,600,00
10,000.00


18,810.95
10,000.00


* 1,000.00
'. 6000.00
:: '~ ',ooo
--*L ^ -


Receipts and
Appropriations


88,684.32
9.54
12,809.20
74.64


, ..6-,. ..


-* .- I


$ 98,474.43
681.77


87,190.01
633.51
1,146.04
16,831.74


$ 5,000.00 $
5,000.00 .
700.00 ..
2,500.00
10,000.00 .
13,81.95 -


13,81000.005
10,000.00
1,000.00


9,610.89


8400o00


I7
a^^^&n^r


$ 47,804.04

9,184.60


......... ...l S..............


::::::::::::::::


~a(B~j~


FundBalnew
June 80, 1968

$ 52,112.10
091.38


Fund Balonce
June 3D, 19SS

$ 50,670.30
681.77

78,005.41
633.61


Receipts and
Appropriations


S 53,549.50

18,758.60

1,048.50

1 73,351.60


$ 64,91.30 I
9.56 I


86,230.46
681.38
24.10
15,716.62


341.04
14,7568174


$ 5,000.00
5,000.00
3,000.00
700.00
2,600.00
10,0oo0.00


S 6,000.10
6,0000.I
8,000:10


1..............


13,810.96
10,000.00
1,000.00
6,000.00
10,125.12


246.


13,684.6'

1,000.00


10,128,12


614.23


3,400.O0
23,400.00

13,203.28
18,000.00


s.. . . . S...
7,900.00


175.00


* :-1':.^ *- < *< 7' -


. f. v


S14,819.82
176,00;


348.12


EXHIBIT "A"


8 6,000.00
5,000,00
3,000.00
700.00
10,000.00
smooo~o
":so~oo~















AND SINKING FUND


CERTIFICATES


OUTSTANDING


AS OF JUNE 80, 1955, AND JUNE


SI


law mar an 8mxno FUND EBALACBS
As or Jun 30, 1955


Inoetmnts


... $ 381,9'18.4
4,228.06
4.292.42
S 18,197.45 :
21,021.61
1r r4
*C(4 rtao*<<,eiv.ge


RI EvNB CERUTIPICATnS


Tot led


I I I -- I -I---I ...----- "--- I.. I ... '---


June 30 95


In ratm r Ao SinINGno PuN BA Ncs
AB OF JUNE 30, 1956


Rlintm Carmem a


$ 57,000.00
370,000.00
35,000.00
160,000.00
6,000,00


S618,000.00


280,000.00


1 o000,00




doo


S 88,978.48
374,228.05
89,292.42
168,197.45
27,921.61


1 608,617.96


153,431.57
38,0756.00
tSRa


$ 457,000.00
3,628,000.00
650,000.00
1,708,000.00
1,000000.00
600,000.00

$ 8,033,000.00


404,000.00
58,000.00
115,000.00
200,0000
4,310,000.00
600,000.00
300,000.00


$ 170,000.00
333,000.00
397,000.00
110,000,00


1 1,010,000.00


166,000.00
27,000.00
20,0000.00
22,000.00
100,000.00


88,000.00
17,000.00
44,000.00


" 0(10' '":


$ 287,000.00
3,295,000.00
153,000.00
1,688,000.00
1,000,000.00
600,000.00

i 7,023.000.00


248,000.00
31,000.00
95,000.00
178,000.00
4,210,000.00
500,000.00
300,000.00


$ 114,000.00
43,000.00
381,000.00
', 810,000.00
S 1,348,000.00
.51~3,3$,000.00


$ 27,924.53
8,378.25
20,497.42
28,727.00
33,132.85
21,564.89
14,279.75


154,505.5i


150,800.26


26,784.53
11.51
28,087.46
70,697.88


35,000.00
370,000.00
1 35,000.00
150,000.00
S15,000.00


$ 605,000.00


$ 46,000.006
30,000.00



* . ..........
S, 4390,000.00
; GO, O ,
-*' *'___________
' ) 386,000.00


59,000.00


$ 62,924.53
378,378.25
55,497.42
178,727.90
48,132.85
21,564.89
14,270.75


750,505.59


$ 132,775.99
35,025.00
1,705.10
3,527.50
315,883.73
5o,882.63
460.41
$ 646,860.26


$ 457,000.00
3,628,000.00
550,000100
1,7098,000,00
1,000,000.00
600,000.00

S 8,033,000.00


* 404,000.00
58,000.00
115,000.00
200,000.00
4,310,000.00
600,000.00
300,000.00
$ 5,887,000.00


$ 202,000.00
60,000.00
425,000.00
810, .00


86,00.00 $ 21,18 0.871 S 1,497000.00e ,0


I 186,000.00
407,000.00
421,000.00
250,0000.00


1,284.000.00


9.171,000.00
24,000,00
27,000.00
203,000.00


$ 464,000.00


087,000,00


$ 1,518,46.72


$Sl,417,000.00


8 271 ,000.00
.33:;1.000.00
139,n.00
1,848,000.00
1,000,000.00
.00000.0

$ 8,760.000.00


$ S






$,48 M: U -,. -

,.
"^^.


*22C;:A A

-ce
-


- ,V
^,^ ^ -- i-


. r


!? ..^ ."*

^^^' ,-'


BALANCES


AND REVENUE


EXHIBIT


Total Rired


Insedments


Total famed


l atoT Belfred







eRss or wasw OF 0sw i


Report of the Arhitect

OaitonOJlle. Florida -'
March 15,19 57
TO TaI Su BogBD or CONTROL:

CENTLfEMlIN:
The Architect to the Board of Control has, during the 1954-56 Biennium,
designed and/or supervised construction of the following buildings at the
various institutions under the Board of Control:

PROJECTS COMPLETED FOR
OCCUPANCY DURING
THE BIENNIUM:
(Costs are final contract sums)

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, INCLUDING
EXPERIMENT STATIONS:


*Medical Sciences Building ._.._ ._ $ 8,576,985.88
*Central Power Plant No. 2-Building 141,861.86
*Central Power Plant No. 2-Mechanical. 1.005.914.88


*Central Power Plant No. 2-ElectricaL__
SFoundations-Teaching Hospital
First Unit-Main Agriculture Building-
Laboratory Equipment-Main Agri. Bldg.
*Second Unit-Main Agriculture Building
Veterinary Research Unit
'Plant Pathology and Agronomy Green-
house '
Main Station Entomdoogyf and Horticulture
Greenhouses -
Agronomy Seed Laboratory
*Superintendent's Cottage and Utilities
Horticulture Equipment and Seed Storage
Building
Agronomy Laboratory and Cold Stoite I
lRnfilino" ra


K


-""a --a- --* --
Office Building-Homestead -
Greenhouse and Headiouse--ot
..Laboistor ai P S u BIll


Florida Es


144,692.18
970,688.72
1,406,241.95
164,518.64
212,521.47
188,750.20

46,802,51 -

81,15965,
17,788.1
11,582.00

11477.85 -95
^.: ^. L ^^ *. i


:i-


FIV'Jt sfcb*


admuniteeag^^


Fertilizer -aad See
Superintenadea
Greenhouse t|
Hay Drynlag
*AddttIan to




4 -J i


SJRD


CII_~


I


P


b


















SVt
i~e -.^r ^;


::^C
3^'" '' '


~F~W"


-1 ;. - '
'A' ?* ^r^ .-


7 ~


78,50yW': ,<0 -
1252,QO2 0 sn:
129,018.58
- tS%48-$f t Z881,118.41


UNVRALt AND
41L UNIVERSITY:


tmiieient for Science, Building:-
C.mmercial Shelving


I '


-;..oi< ?i^H r. --"--.'


K. ^- -^ ',-


4S58,8a


" *Laboratory and Home Making Equii^ :,, ::
men .- :


*Air Conditioning andm
*Kitchen E qgit?
OLight-Proof 4
1956 Alterations foEziha:


^8 386iOQ8
^,880 0o
1,902.65


allnrea *t.


. 8,1722.00
810,189.00


donomics Building


irst Unit


-Second Uni,
iampsouni M,-,


ius
fltobflistribupnysf sza
&.e.i Daormitory-

, ;.4. etic Stadi np


889,008.94
.4S,2:51.85
:171,471.00


84,450.18
. 5595L20
2,482.82


46iAo .3o


$.2,594,875.13


W" 's :t n


4-:
r;iw^asl
tp F' U. -


^^nteOB^S


'.w-^la


:! -: 1




* '


*Alteatons to Rhyne and McLane Halk
(To Provide Bathrooms for Hosano"-


4A697.00


-. ^ .. i *


e8 i,476.1


RINGING MUSEUM OF ART:
'Addition to Ringling Museumi
Revised Sewage Disposal System for Addi-
tion to Museum .....
"Electrical Alterations to Ringling Museum
fRe-roofing Ringling Museum ____


*Replacement


of Cast Stone Ringling


Museum -.._._.


Re-roofing Ringling


Residence --... .


*Replacement of Architectural Terra Cotta
Ringling Residence -..-.-_._. -


289,880.23

8,568.90
12,641.02
12,320.00

11,183.94
7,267.00


9,882.00


301,738.09


TOTAL VALUE OF PROJECTS
COMPLETED FOR OCCUPANCY_

PROJECTS UNDER CONSTRUCTION
DURING THE BIENNIUM:


(Costs


$14,6837,474.69


are original contract sums)


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, INCLUDING
EXPERIMENT STATIONS:
'Teaching Hospital, J. Hillis Miller Health


Center -
Laboratory
Building


$ 7,580,024.40


School and Industrial Arts


*Women's Dormitory (HHFA Project)
"Men's Dormitory (HHFA Project) "-
.'Physics Mathematics Psychology Class-
room .
Production Research Building (Citrus Sta-


' *Offie and Laboratory--


okalee


: "Equipment Fertilizer Storage--Immokalee
Laboratory and Office-Watermelon Lab-


1,010,262.66
J1,141,721.00
. 1,995,107.00

928,480.00

71,825.00
11,460.80
S.826G08


cx aora ty -- -,-- s. 1
--* ^Agronomy 3 ldk aboErary ,
..a4n -ab ^.l Tt -. VIJ ^l U rcg ilU A~ -' k- ''J'L^'*JJJ


UIUKa


- T.


Alpha Epsilaho Phi
AlphatEpaikh^i;
Tan ^si1bb Phi

V.! '- i -'..
^ .Y4.''^^
.. t,- '<


I.4
ut '^ ir
; ,,^


* C >


,n-
-4>: ^' -


In!


;- -^ "
































1956 Extensions to Underground Steam
Service
Water, Storm and Sanitary Sewers_


61,200.00


FLORIDA SCHOOL FOR THE
DEAF AND THE BLIND:
*Enclose Swimming Pooln,
*Build andEncloSe Swimmr ni Pool_____


'-Dornitcary and DB
- Jindustrial Buildin


S-T TOTAL VALUE OF
CONSTRUCTION
SOTAT VALUE AL



.. 2z uatioa .of draiiw
i pmtecs not so ma
-," ittets,but







-,t
1 i
-~r ik2'--.
,g:.:, -


44,000.00
89,250.00
272,000.00
41,750.00


908,571.00


-447,000.00


$16,648,889.22
81,285,818.91


ia ts entirety by the Architect to the Board, that is, prep-
s s Specifications and supervision of construction. On
iked, drawings and specifications were prepared by other
cfslron was done by the Board's Architect


Respectfullrbqny s-ted o
Qol dtC. toiB ar, r
Architect to the Board of Control


Building


ining Hall Unit
g for Negroer _


PROJECTSS UNDER

PROJECTS


- n *








REPORT THE JOHN MAUtLE-:lJCPla!LB$iMSBCTM O' ,it" ."



To THE S'rArsg BoneD or CournOL:
GE THEMN: B i -- .N. 0,.958
Following is the report of our progress and activities for the biennium,
1954-56: .
A. GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
Attendance. During this biennium, 207,560 adults visited the Art Museumn .:
and of these, 63,612 were admitted on combination tickets, 68,588 on tickets
to the Art Museum only, and 75,860 free on the 104 free Sundays; 140,555
adults visited the Residence, 638,61 on combination tickets and 76,948 on
single admission tickets. 41,002 adults visited the Circus Museum on single
admission tickets. No tabulation was made of the children under 12 who
are admitted free when accompanied by adults. In addition, 7,250 students
in 145 school groups were admitted free to the three Museums. (See Exhibit I, .
Report of Admissions and Receipts.)

Until June, 1955, the combination ticket which admitted the purchaser '
to the three museums was $2.00; single admission to the Art Museum was $1.00, .
to the Circus Museum, 50 cents, and to the Residence, $1.50. The Residence .
ticket included admission to the Circus Museum. In June, 1955, admission to
the Residence was .reduced from $1.50 to $1.00 and no longer included admission "
to the Circus Museum. Other prices remained unchanged.

Combination ticket sales in 1954-55 increased greatly over those of the
preceding year. The increase in sales of indiMdcd"al tickets and the concomitant
decline in sales of combination tickets in 1955-56 i m incided exactly with the -
closing of the Circus Museum from December 9. 195 to May 24, .1956. .

Buildings and Grounds. During the tea years of liigation after Mr. Ringling's
death and the ensuing nine years of state operation of the Museuni, few ajitOr
repairs were made on either the Art Museum :building or the fesideme oe -'Lj
Legislature consequently appropriated,$ 00,0 E0 n tie. begningn ag&a-o-a, s
and reconstruction program in 1955. Repairs an im arnnr tpt '
ings were started. .litcah. 1958.G: .:.Bt-e I *a
one-sixth of the 4$15,0(00 .aIIotboe tol heAituir ieimi Micpa, :-t :-.
The work done at, teA ~e deml ,D M"
meant of mtof steel, b h lL,.... ---.




the .-
.-.. -

a,;ij ty:.
% 6' *














xrepaits and


Road, next to tl
*c whih exse


^fe^^- ',



'- .
t'-^ -^''^'-


?i:'I,

I
K ; *
\ .


r"ib flwatd to an
enttrafc4 *1a id 'out
P^^ic .8tsae booth.
I *Jf~ ti r .' *


S ate oaartent paved the Art Mu;eum parking lot east of
:e lokaA, the Residence parking souJtf the .sjidence, the new
S*troaJ, and the connecting rboai iteeti S.41anhd Bay Shore
d X^e skater ~iie connecffon witb. the city lines was made at Bay
S''at 'extended to die ne*' theater building to service that building
e public toilets which ar idobated it the north wing of the Ait
building An extension of service was also made fronmthe four-inch
canned to'the Residence, Cifrns. Museum and Caretaker's cottage; all


city water.


The underground sprinkling


system.


from the pumphouse to the rose garden and the Residence circle. The


water sprinkling system in the Art Museuri'courtyard:


was entirely renovated.


- -' New electrical service connection adequate to the anticipated needs of the
f. Miiserm' aid the'Residence have'been installed in both of those buildings.

;: The. Residence tower was made structurally sound by replacing Gunite
beainsreplattering-the dome interior replacing and Guniting the face tile.. :
Asolo Theater Building. -The construction of a new .buildirig,: designed; by
Manrion Manlev. A.I.A.. in association with Guy C. Fulton, A.I.A., Architect


I tl-e State Board of Control, to house' the Asolo Theater,


was -begun on


-fi*:l 1495&. At the end of the ,1955-56 fical period, 'the bmiildihg was nearing
bmi1fMfohi. The Asblo Theater in the niew building-will not only-provide the
Musetii with an- adequate auditorium but will be a unique exhibit in itself,
Since it is the only original Italian 18th century theater in America.
eablicltay. Atsvith each biennium, written information about the Ringling
likeuams-:hasbecome -more widespread,. and increased greatly in-volume. In
addition tO the bcoal, state and national publicity that has been initiated within
th*Musnem, atore oand: morb requests have come for written material, and
fai~j i n *Oi reptodice paintings and. other art objects.. Material has been
rh d*::-n mertus religious: magazines, several aiithologies' and three
eh Lengthy at mtles have appeared in eight national American
,gi ar-t and general), and in the English APOLz. which carried three
aesnd seven hilustrations.- Scores ofl.hbuse organs and other special
: i"atien f have raun teft and pictures, with variety ranging from


-stnian,


t trhoise fow farm and truckers. Articles, usually


gehdtei^no-;,:in.a ftIy;paiera biut in Sunday supplqmants
1Mw4 aclba Uoo:sculE :es>. ta-is the Warcesteri. (Mas:)


*!W


S^-^i


* I ./ >
^^-*,.-


lar giB




1~~ .. L


Cazette-Teleggwa. TFhe mst aaoriao&fld^ba d i afl ghM^tS h
Veroneseo Ret on the Flight Into EBgwt, t*IbU libas leenpulished atfeaw?
seven time in magazines and nw.papers, induding The New York TIna
often in color. Programs, maps, and'even restaurantt menus and candy boiM
throughout the country have carried information and pictures about the RBiglin
Museums. Advertising has appeared in local newspapers and in seven gided
Ten large and two small outdoor advertising signs are strategically pla e
throughout the State. Statewide promotion. has been enhanced, as usum
through membership in the Florida Attractions Association, and local promotion
increased by helping to form the Sarasota Attractions Council, with fivd
members. Preliminary arrangements were made for the creation of three
Viewmaster reels, and for the NBC Wide Wide World telecast in November,
Business Office. Fiscal procedures have been regularized by the Comptioller
and revised for greater efficiency. A complete IBM property inventory system
has been installed. This inventory is maintained constantly and checked
periodically. The business office was moved from its former quarters in the
Art Museum building to the renovated rooms of the second floor in the
Residence, formerly used as servants' quarters.
Financial Report. See Exhibit II for a statement of the financial operations for
the years ending June 30, 1955, and June 30, 1956.

B. THE ART MUSEUM
The efforts of the Museum staff during this biennium have been directed
primarily towards extending the program of conservation and restoration,
completing the rehabilitation of the galleries, and expanding the educational
services.

CONSERVATION AND RESTORATION
Restoration of Paintings. The restoration of the four Rubens cartoons, a project
so immense that it is being followed with great interest by museum officials
and restorers throughout the country, was begun in June, 1954, by Edward O.
Korany. During the 1954-56 biennium, the relining, cleaning and restoration
of The Four Evangelists and Abraham and Melohisedek, and the relining of
The Fathers of the Church was completed. Special materials for the best preser-
ration of paintings in a sub-tropioal climate, such as wax and resin adhesives
and plastic varnishes, were employed. The project is scheduled for coiapleton
during the next biennium. During this biennium, seven other paint iti ja*re
completely restored, including the Isenbrant Descent from the Cross, the mot
important work of that master in this iountxy, ad eight others weated pei
preservative treatment. & .

Protection of Works of Art aw li f~
colors m the cinuis andha*"a;titnE^





jPpapter f.a i ~th1 i -


r;1 e~i I ] I I ] I II


'1'





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*-* 7
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.[.
.-4,
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'**
113


I_ I








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2w,




~5-~4#riA -C- ZA


,' .I C
M- -'
'* .t y


Picture storage racks, upon which paintings not
f~fire n, have been constructed in the south basement of the
A* Mui'.us ic. 'The acks, installed on tracks for easy movement, are spaced to
allow paintings to hang freely and to permit maximum air circulation necessary
Si bifilt mildew growth. The picture storage area has been closed off from
the:rest of the south basement to protect paintings from moisture and shop dust.

.GALLERY IMPROVEMENTS
' ilhe furring out and covering of the walls of all galleries with cloth, essential
to protect the paintings from the moisture of the plaster walls, has been com-
pleted during this biennium. A false ceiling, an inner skeleton wall hung with


cloth, and a new lighting system


were added to the Rubens cartoon room


(Gallery 2) for the protection and most effective display of the newly restored
paintings. The Sales Desk room (Gallery 1) was completely refurbished.
Galleries 15 and 16 were rehabilitated and a gallery of decorative arts (Gallery
17) was made of the former publicity office to provide space for the exhibition
of; 18th century furniture and ceramics.


EDUCATIONAL. SERVICES


The educational


services


of the Ringling Museum


were considerably


increased during -the 1954-56 biennium despite the difficulties of securing
ttaied personnel in lower echelon positions.


Circulating Exhibitions and Visual Training Aids.


In an effort to stimulate


appreciation of art and arouse interest in the Museum through the entire state,
a program of circulating exhibitions was initiated. Fifteen exhibitions were
deqignet. and constructed at the Museum during this period and circulated
to 86 schools. The response has been so enthusiastic that a considerable


qpsiunla4 this program is planned.
ntton l^csenMge from which film t
WIta. s* can he borhrwed. A
*|Wlg^ reaqres fdbthip lb1Uaat
:jsbri~oao~ atociluh~ i ta^^^^^w^^tittf


The Museum has established an educa-
trips and colored slides of the paintings
ew film strip, "A Vieat to the Ringllng
on department, is being circulated to
before theyt visit it.








DEPORT I
' I'



aroo&Tn~P;1


I I .,
Ai-
S r .


StIawW^


encouraged to seid y.bntmao -fsi
free and are provided wt pga6t
in correlation with their 0ltSoom
consisting of 7,750 studatena~'ivlte&


WIIQ nd
^fifil^Sf-~qi .Iswdi~ai sile

ti btexioec~n aduonctional fan
:t aE.140 school groalp,
uspeum-: bi-nnium /


Gallery Talka for AduaP. GCallry wli4 ~ iin Mtce daily by px
fessional members of the staffwere atteni b approximately 80,000 visit
during the biennium. In addition, 812 adult groups totaling approximately
7,550 persons, attended special galley talks provided for bus tours and adult
groups not connected with educational institutions. a
Symposium. Concerted efforts were made to secure the participation of students
and faculty of the University of Floiida, h*e. University of Miami and tie
Mingling School of Art in the eighth and ninth annual spring symposia sponsored
jointly by the Florida State University and the Ringling Museum. Registration
for the 1955 symposium on contemporary art. was 474 and for the 1956
symposium on contemporary American art was 885, both signal increases over
previous registrations.
Children's Art Classes. The Satur;lJay wqrg children's art class was introduced
in January, 1951, as a ten-week class limited to 40 students with a registration
fee of $2.50 to cover the cost of'matetals. Aet a J.ape of two.years, the class
was offered as a twelve-week course limited to& 40 students, but at a fee of


$12.00 per student to


cover


costs of instrutin; and material. Because of the


great demand for radmission,.to, h*,tclaardthe limitation .on the number of


students


was eliminated the following yaRteand additional instructors


were


employed. The length of the class was established at twelve weeks. In January,
1955, 71 students registered at a: iep of *$10f a.in 1956 -enrollment increased
to 103 students at a fee of $12S.O each.k Te:Zoirnse it taught by professional
artists, Syd Solomon andjack Catlidgei- with b assistance of the staff of


the Museum's education ,.prtbnat.:


.4-> ~-^


-.--; Ii;- ; ^


ACQUISITIONS'
Five paintings
the intention w tich
should be cont4tgw
Giovanni Bat I


og 4iii ia bimcomp6iace with
e~ss ,i his, wa1it WIEooie oolidH
wi i vjt sE i S";-


LENE C(dtbe 4I
Jean Pillemenb OEtaA ilf)
h^- E^^i.^^


17D9-1l4^


Nicolas


I:::I
+- .
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L -
'-" j^t


School Groups.















pt.d firh thea



,- Two Veanetian 18th century wooden benhaesw pu ad far the theater.
GftS. Mr. Edward W. Beattie, Jr., of Sarasota, piesented to the Museum a
eileotion of thirteen German watercolors and prints by ~eorge Grosz, Christian
zn Karl Hofer, Richard .~eewald Franz A .Ewld Matare and Kathe
/z. Al of these work formerly bel ed o German Museums. In the
rthirties, they were removed by fte Nazi Government and offered for sale
to foreign museums and collectors. 'Mr. Beattie, at that time an American
newspaper correspondent in CGemanj, bought them from official sources. This
gift is the first group of contemporary works of art accepted by the Museum.
Other gifts were a North Italian Faience Bowl, c. 1750, from Mrs. Francisco
Terry of Paris, France, in memory of ,her husband; a Greek vase from Mr.
Manual Ortiz, of Sarasota, Florida; and three engravings from Mrs. Wallace
Thompson, of Galesburg, Illinois.
LOANS TO OTHER MUSEUMS
The esteem in which the Ringling Collection is held both in Europe and
America is again indicated by the number of requests for loans of objects for
temporary exhibitions'. Thirty-one paintings, six sculptures, and one kylix were
borrowed by American institutions during this biennium, and seven paintings
were included in .exhibitions in Bologna .and Vercelli in Italy, in Bordeaux,
France, and;.Haarlem, Holland. The Ringling paintings included in the com-
prehensive exhibitions of Guido Reni in Bologna and Gaudenzio Ferrari in
Vercelli were widely discussed in European publications and were reproduced
in the elaborate and scholarly catalogues of the exhibitions.
LOANl EXHIBITIONS
The scope of the loan exhibition program was broadened during this
bie umn to appeal to a greater numberof Floridians with diversified interests.
'WSl~'designed objects of daily use, lhiotographs and models of architecture,
prints and Oriental calligraphy were exhibited as well as paintings and sculp-
tures. In recognition of the professional achievements of Florida artists, the
Dtst comprehensive, invitational exhibition of contemporary Florida paintings
*edd inr 95an d a comparable' show of contemporary Florida architecture
was arranged in 1956.
tIa *<al^bi onI presented in the 1954-55 season were: Contem-
P (Americian Federation of Arts); The Skyscraper (Museum of
ar' aCoQEtoilYo (Karl A. Bitekel John Henry Macdonnell
SCkotet; aC itr ofk the Chrcu (Saramta Art




i.4


Association); ad F4ffg Florida 4t#nt, b ayn1 senl oetb1tios of t
1955-56 season wef: IRenWkap $ gwenia;qrtaf (Qerge Binoth Arkr
of the Orlent (collection of 4lJdirneff0ac Ao odate Professor of .Himaaita
University of Florida); Dealgsed4 to dsu WRA/(rell designed objects aaiylab1t
in Florida shops); AS Half Centwr fintpo (Museum of ModemrnArt); TMh
Art of Eating;'Pairg nsg s ae jkwSa.<.sto Art Association); iand..CotMn-
porary Florida A /hwe'ctBr. -ll: ratedd, cataloges of .the Three Sarfata
Collectors, Directors' Choice,-ifty Florida ,Pnters, and -Th Art of. ERing
exhibitions were published .by the Museum forsale and distribution to other
Museums and educational institutions in this country and.ign Europe. . *.
MUSICAL AND THEATRICAL EVENTS .
A rich variety of activities., of -the type which enhances .the. Museum's
national prestige and broadens its statewide appeal took place in the Asolo
Theater during the past two seasons. The New Music Quartet and the
harpsichordist Sylvia Marlowe with the cellist Bernard Greenhouse gave. recitals
in 1955; the Dublin Players returned for four performances each season; the
Kingsland Marionettes 'gave.Christmas performances; Virgil Thomson, composer
and critic, and Ann Barzel, Associate Editor of Dance Magazine, appeared as
guest lecturers. The professional staff of the Museum gave a series of special
lectures each season. In March, 1956 the National Grass Roots Opera Company
presented Mozart's Cosi Fan T.ite n Rossi' Tie Barber of Sedille in thi
Museum court. .
LIBRARY
The transformation obf oln Ringling's collection of art books into an art
reference library was beu i'irSeptember, 1958. During the 1954-56 biennium,
free-standing open metal-library stacks replaced the odds and ends of bookcases
formerly used. Existing library material was systematically reorganized for
convenient open shelf use and an etivt program of binding of periodicals
and paper covered books ws.e4m eai :ei chased during this period
were for the most part basiot, rga. ep o af summer of 1954, the
library acquired articles and monographs written by the most noted scholars of Dutch and
Flemish paintiagps Itee past seventy-fie years. Many of these sa-d6
completely irreplaJedile; a great nnumb~ i tlhe tbs. are o-hiebi rare.
Dr. Hans Shaefer presented to the ta "40I ',e "hdsan siOn
catalogues and mi igpean and American at pedodimak valtldinatp 1,a
$3,000. During this period the baswM A sz MIikt. tI tMvreio
both for staff drence work and Eafr Abd-ar uaEr-*aNfus
Baroqueart .




May I, .
Magic
her


-^
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A- ,











, '; ,


4
* ^. ^


RIPOAT


-*fw
--<-^ A:.'




















-IP


^ *-'^s^
s^&&v*s'-^^ ^
PBB^'TT^BS
;;tf;?y,'-Sa ^
**'' HTt -*--^-
0XH^ TBIB
^f^pr-^H^q-^^ ^^^^^T^^F
- '/^ '
' _*,J^J^i^^/i.^^__
Xttanner.


iwC \ a i -m -WW *TI. I g
i ^ *j ^';'"**"
BL t' ^ -. ^- * >


wcmree i gitboth early
411E6ingh Brothers
igons were structurally
qtbjt tie contemporary
W. Ranger Fund .of the


S-t 28 rar s 19th century American circus
IE Schewes and Mr. and Mrs. Billy Schowles,
t ..etethry librettE for pantomimes and early circus


ra t a nuanber of rooms not formerly open to the
eepon n e smer of 1954. Ar the rooms on the first three
exception of the servants' quarters, were open to visitors in


Respectfully submitted,
A, EVEEsrr AUSTN, JR.
Director


. EXHIBIT I


: GLING MUSEUtMS
AMissIoNsS AND Rf TCEIrS
rtYARs, JUtLY 1, :1954 TO JUNE f0l 1956


alAdmissionsa @


Admissions


2.no00 .


86,443


MlwAnissionu $tOO with


a r "dnbion @42.odwith
adi 'n .,.-.- .. ._ ._ 889
~inB s to Museum @ $1.00 27,778



S u0 a students 1
Keudea s $1. S1,754
r.^W'Bigiim Latos'


Receipts
$ 72,886.00

1,492.60

889.00
27,778.00


473.45


45.50
4781.0oo


126.75


S7


>*-d


1dT~r 1 I I


a^te^d'^-N^ "^;
11 *__ ." J L
|^fc* ' J'/ ^ .
^p^^'ift^''i^"-"?1^ --*
-' i "" *


:.w/;E


S- r L -
N.06


ELe


I-. J: *I' / '
iL-'t .' ^'.'








REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


Paid Admissions to Ringling Residence @ $50
(students) 128
Paid Admissions to Circus Museum @ $.50- 22,578
Paid Admissions to Circus Museum @ $.50 with
50% discount .___ 16
Sales Counter Receipts ...
Movie Receipts _
Special Events .-__ -__...
Memberships .__ _...
Miscellaneous Receipts -.-.__._.__

Total Receipts -......--____..
Free Admissions-52 free days-Art Museum .. 41,988
*15% discount for groups of 20 or more.
**50% discount allowed for convention groups.


11,288.50

4.00
16,203.97
2,287.72
2,927.98
1,822.00
1,768.97

$186,681.94


***Admission to Circus Museum included in Residence ticket until price
reduced.
* *Admission to residence reduced to $1.00 at end of fiscal year.
1955-56


Paid General Admissions
Paid General Admissions


@ $2.00 ..--.--..
@ $2.00 with


24,858


15% discount ---...... ---..--.-.----


Paid General Admissions @
50% discount
Paid Admissions to Museum


$2.00 with
406
@ $1.00 39,108


Paid Admissions to Museum @ $1.00 with
15% discount ---
Paid Admissions to Museum @ 50% disco
Paid Admissions to Ringling Residence @
Paid Admissions to Ringling Residence @
with 15% discount
Paid Admissions to Ringling Residence @
(students)
Paid Admissions to Circus Museum @ $.5
Paid Admissions to Circus Museum
@ 50% discount
Sales Counter Receipts
Movie Receipts
Special Events
Memberships
Miscellaneous Receipts


$ 49,716.00

1,084.60

406.00
89.103,800


678.20


unt ... 272 186.00
$1.00 43,634 43,634.00
$1.00
1,018 865.80
$.50
288 119.00
0 18,405 9,202.50

8 2.00 -
19,054.90 "
1,79050 -i


4



i'-
* V. 4.


*- ^:r:


8,660.40'
1MLW
4,004.5
i- -^ MB -i'. S -y ^
*'-; -^^^^^
1-- -.i'i'^^
.- .* i T ^^.w~js^


Total Reeipts--
Free Admissios- ee Days-Art Musen S
*-- -i.


/ .. A


S* *
-' 'A^


-, ~'!* .
I '


f -.
**-r^
t


,,'7
-WA"'?

I'-:?.
\"-t


was
















NTlOL
^ SUMMARY STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1954 THROUGH JUNE 30,
; ; ^- : -


Fund
Balance
Juay 1,19S4


O6.200.00


Receipts and
Appro-
priations


$30,000.00
59.000.00


Total
Available


$30,000.00
59,000.00
196.200.00


389,000.00 15285,200.00


,681.94
^304500


18,395.07
64,122.67
4,490.62


Expenditures


$29,991.31
55.734.21


$85,725.52


$197,726.65
3 28,420.01
. 8. .

26,146.66

*11,872.18
^i,~..*-


Reverted to
General
Revenue


$ 8.69
3,265.79

$ 3,274.48



$. . . . .


Fund
Balance
June 80, 1966


196,200..
$196,200.00
'$196,200.00


$120,668.42
35,702.66
4.490.62


Receipts
and Appro-
priation


$35,000.00
50,128.68
200,00.00


Total
Available


$35,000.00
50,128.63
396.200.00


Expenditures


$34,999.19
50,125.15
150.267.62


EXHIBIT II


Fund
Balaen
June 8, 1860


$ .81
8.48
246.982.88


$285,128.68 1$481,328.638 1285,891.96 $246,986.67


$174,672.
I 30.700.0


$295,41.384
66,402.66
4.490.62


$258,894.49
28,716.27
. .. ... .. *6


$160,861.70 1 205,872.9 |$366,284.62 1$282,110.78


3,274.48 1$357,061.70


$490,501.55


$847.568.25


$ 17,502.73


$41,946.85
87,686.89
4,490.62

184,18.S


9-


'' ';- '-' .'-'1 '- '"
^^*-*-'^:;,"
'^w^
<"..-:^," *-
^*^.* -.


~~__~___~__I


[^S^Asi33 6


*** -'*
I
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BIENNIAL

TO
BOARD OF


REPORT


rHE


CONTROL


July 1, 1954 June 30, 1956

Presented By
J. WAYNE REITZ
President, The University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


FOR THE BIENNIUM
ENDING JUNE 30
1956


;.4


:: r


-




















































rl




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Tau Runt or ra PnRsman ow fl UVueuvr
RaOR or Trn Daisa aD AmD muN sw u v a ns
The Buffla Manager
The Dean of the University Colle e -
The Dean of the College of Arts and Scien~ces
The Provot for Agriculture .
The Dean of the College of Agriculture.
The Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station -
The Director of the School of Forestry
The Administrative Offcer of the University of Florida
Conservation Reserve,


- --


-V
1 \I

____ 4


-, / ^

---U
h
-_S-ia


Th


-4
,,,
I ?
, '


-


Le Director of the Agricultural Extension Service "-
ie Dean of the College of Architecture and Allied Arts ,
ie Dean of the College of Business Administration 18 --- .
te Dean of the College of Education __ __ -- M
ie Dean of the College of Engineering -,
te Director of the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station ..- 169
te Dean of the Graduate School ----- 10
ie Director of Research -- --- 20 '&
te Director of the School of Inter-American Studies _,- 22o -
ie Dean of the College of Law ------------------
'e Provost of the J. Hillis MillerHealth Center _________-8 ,
ie Dean of the College of Medicine - --'
ie Dean of the College of Nursin-... 24
ie Dean of the College of Pharmacy r---- ,,-,-.-.-W,-
ie Director of the Teaching Hospital and Clinics -.-0----,
ie Director of the Division of MuSic : 2l .
ie Dean of the College of Physical Education and Health --__-- |_ _
ie Dean of the General Extensiin Division
ie Director of Alumni Afairs
e Difreeti. of Inter~idlegiat A letices ....
e Director Libttr t .. ...
re Coordinaflr oaarDe



e Director eu w i


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re a~Bl~o
































































































Fr
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To the Bnorable


The Board of Control of the State of pflri lla

Gentlemen: V
The biennial reports of the past presidents to the Boards of Control stit
a history in serial form of the development of the University of FloidaTh
are a constant source of reference to scholars, staff members, 'and others ic-r
cerned with specific phases of the institution's growth. One cannot. read these
reports without experiencing a deep sense of pride in the vision, the courage,- te
dedication to educational and public service, and the sacrificial effort whichPk a.
gone into the building of the University. The printed word has not aJlways been
adequate to interpret the spirit of the institution. The joys accompanying each
successful effort to push back the barriers of ignorance, whether by research,
the inculcation of knowledge, or by precept and example, as well as the tragic
disappointments and frustrations of those who attempted to carry the University
forward from year to year are not easily described.

In reading biennial reports since the transferral of the University to Gaines-
ville in 1906, it is obvious that the positive factors far outweigh the negative,
and the forces of progress, though lagging at times, have eventually overcome
the retarding forces.
When the Board of Control and the Board of Education honored me by their
invitation to accept the presidency of the University of Florida in the Spring of
1955, I knew the magnitude of responsibility involved, for I had had the privilege
of serving as a teacher and administrator, respectively, under two distinguished
men who had held that high office. One cannot be associated with an institution
such as the University of Florida for two decades without having its interests


and welfare imbedded deep in his thoughts and affections.


Consequently, I ac-


cepted the challenging offer and entered upon my new duties April 1, 1955, with
the determination that I would to the very best of my abilities endeavor to carry
forward the work of the University in the fine tradition set by my predecessors.


The two year record covered by the biennial report for the period July 1, 1954 to
June 80, 1956, like many preceding reports, shows high peaks of achieve
as well as disappointments. Some discouragements are perhaps. inevitable., h,^ y,:i
sap the vitality and effectiveness of the total University program. it31. W .
cere hope that contributing causes will be remedied in the new biqnii. -

For their patience, understanding and cooperation dturing*e' dB Eiie
orientation in the presidency, I wish to express thanks to a, ph-li;:dif



.



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BIENNIAL REPORT '
The operaon of the Uveity are so vast that t is no longer St
integrate the college, school, and departmental reports into an ame!pabe .:*
within the brief apace allotted for the President's report. The individual repet
will have to be examined separately for details of the biennial activities. Theg
are all worth reading. A selection will be made of certain units or portions
departmental reports for the purpose of focusing attention upon some
problem, which in many instances will be applicable to the whole institutional
structure.
A proper perspective of the last two years must inevitably take into considera-
tion some factors which not only cast their shadow over world events Le., national
and international affairs, but also over that closer area just beyond the confines
of our academic community, namely the State of Florida, whose interests and
people the University is designed to serve. Some of these factors likewise have
a bearing or will have a bearing upon the new biennium which we are about to
enter. I beg .indulgence, therefore, to touch as briefly as I can upon some of them.
We are in a period of global unrest. Possibly at no time in history has the
world witnessed a greater political, economic, social and moral upheavel, es-
pecially in "peace-time." Education at home and abroad cannot escape the impact
of the dynamic changes that are taking place.
In the past, new educational concepts evolved to meet the demands of the
times. For instance, church oriented and dominated colleges were formed in
colonial days to provide an educated citizenship for Colonial America, all pat-
terned after institutions in Western Europe. Later state supported universities
evolved from many of the colonial colleges when the latter were no longer able to
meet the demands of a new, dynamic society. The new institutions, however, re-
tained much of the old, especially the liberal arts programs and other features
of the colonial colleges.
The land grant colleges were formed at a time when the nation needed to
democratize its educational opportunitiesfor the benefit of an expanding popula-
tion, increasingly dependent upon agriculture and industry for a livelihood. The
land grant movement, begun with the passage of the Morrill Act in 1862, formed
a new and revolutionary concept in higher education, according to Thwing, whq
wrote of it:
"The time was favorable to-enrichment and enlargement-it was a period "
of newness-mighty anticipations of mighty powers were filling the heartst:a'
and. minds of men." -
Edward D. Eddy, Jr., of the University of New Hampshire, recently;pointed
out in an address before the Land Grant College Association that "probably no
other country in the world would have produced these land-grant college," and !% :
citing them as "Democracy's colleges," he calls attention to' the fact tet "the '-
have become a pattern for higher education in many struggling replbfies *t* >.v
tempting to find and -assert themselves. What-was. once a great tontdbution toq ,
America is now becoming an even greater contribution to thefworld."sF. A
the land grant type of institution adjusting to change, hes.a le n r a, :V
"Americas .demands -of its ptbl~ acallegel :e; ablit ev~il
adaptthemselves~shii uabfltt-Uai mgingankm etotmepy *b
of suciety"t .*t-^, !'^ **/^ **'.






















etoie dMid~~ eii' R *o i&e -ii.ofo A imerican higher
b:, eldho ^ wln ebiT y"are cerd to have ait een greater
bearing upon it in the years just aSl 1f hi orthia r hoaboi? hriesic& has been
tlb Wit~;&i1stisr bbieej itibnf o ~eittsin'f' 'her distin-
gis iMng'WB^ len 'b#11WdAiiit eduicato~ s thaftSoviet fUlsia has flung
SuvialeStW s nifit diiih vat tilitMs a ~i-ireprations and rapid
rk E -6.ek t acihe.1OAT W indsiirial dedIoljmidtt.- The USSR Challenge
i as iitip'htri&i-o ninss tttftidht educational ideals of
tb6viU iStt aD id69'tith1 d;lilihtja ki tinii ifri orfhity for all, or we shall
ThW'Mt I6 t ltdu'fii) or *ttllbiee wrid 1
She Americans whose opinions I would like to share with'you are hot alarmists.
idfd &%^ezien ite Wlliminim in,&^foiier Vied President of the Uni-
.t ',a AieS^jtr itSSf rdin Cootineetieut, and now Chairman
.. a n ie'di Br~inic fithin; Whose discourses on the subject
dldt^ lea eS i~pi, bliwioizig a recent trip there, have aroused
aQ1 45.e het3'Ytu i~litXhf~h 3.; President'of the*Massachusetts In-
l tutt of Technology, has also sounded a warning. Space will permit only
g ,p'" ,o som, e., f he facts .id before educational America by Senator

1. "The U.S.S.R. has already surpassed the U. S. both in number
^t: bt adeant enrolled in histitutlons above the secon-
^; s, o ow-ie ooo4A(O000 in 1955: 8,5Q0,000 in the teckhnikums
;t lu -,.1,82,000 in the. universities and higher
t,.s tsta, is ~1 per cent higher than our comparable 1955

....f .. ..ba3 school Bh iays a week, ta months
-...4 Yfilyr.tflsliy orrs art lrn^t . stab student takes six yars of a


..htt* w wslttatk4is4tStaaled uirsl aBein t a ts afiang
iy.ta& je st fl< 7eGrs. In 1900, for ample, 6 per cant
as5*>A^ \ -* ., ,







ttuu jN wbnlr0M^Bta~hs epaRt bat is 1808 dl. fhSt^-
in tbs pe i o&aAtwgstwp thea defa. was Im a' pw o i
in100 t.U pewr eo tin 2!9.4a phyrsi; it was rm 19 per eaitt d a.. .
l1O to 4p Ocat in 1Wt. Jhasbeorta. oftacer the fie ti th
haa bees growing iQcita l. Last year fr 28,000 U.S. a
abooas we prodded on VSs6 .w certified teacher~ for phyalc s. <
4 The U.8.. eems to think that after four or ive years of:-
physics in a ten-year school, another four years of physics in a peda- ,-
gogical institute is enough to train a physics teacher for a high
school!
5. A typical Soviet profeesor earns 6,000 rubles a month-about
ten times the salary of an ordinary worker. An outstanding research
man or engineer can earn as much as 40,000 rubles a month when
consulting fees are included. This means a town apartment, a ear .
and chauffeur, a dacha in the country, perhaps a villa in the
Crimea with a vineyard.
6. The University of Moscow, which dominates the Soviet capitol
with its gleaming new 38-story central tower, dedicated to the
sciences, enrolls 23,000 students. The investment of three billion
rubles for this new building, completed in 1953, is astonishing by our
standards. This is equivalent to at least 150 million dollars. This
building cost more than has been spent for the complete physical
plant of all but a very few American universities. It contains 1900
laboratories. It was built to symbolize to all Russia what lies ahead
in the fulfillment of Soviet educational ambitions for youth.
7. The Soviet Union' is today producing almost three times as
many new engineers as we are, yet its own industrial capacity is
still only half the size of ours. What will happen to this growing
crop of trained men? Premier Bulganin, at the 20th Soviet Congress
in February, said that under the new five-year plan, 4,000,000 gradu-
ate technicians would pour out of Soviet institutions by 1950. Where
will they go? Most assiiredly a substantial block will be exported.
They are new-type, front line .troops. The countries of Asia, Africa,
and Latin America' are. hungering for the knowledge and know- r :
how which these men command. ''
8. The number of 1iaiifd engineers in the U.S.S.R. increased
from' 41,000 in 1929 to '541,00 in 1954-an increase of 06,000 ::
in 'twenty-five yetrs, or 1ai00 er cent. In the United State0, our": nt
increase .as "foi 21,000 to 600,000 in approximaIel th.. saitf' '
period, aboiit 25 i cent. The ntunber of engineers grdautihdira mi n
Soviet' higer'i ffti increased from 28,000 in 1'0o tdo g3oO# 6
in 1965. Idtn toh ^npi& i i6 nuiiOber of eg#meetfln t iu8:it!' td<%
in the ttteld &tesi iiiitt rbdrni2,000oo owxi to 8,80 '0Tri
trend of di'-I* ":^i6Wt6%zb*1 Y'betu reiirieTdY
You mal.ke)F):b aegip@:'E t,1*ga ai do tIeiaestf lS a
the biennial activities of the Univesitro Plorida ".- .4nr-Pit rizsPiW
are ,tflda etm
challeng-e rM o( ef
~sli~~nr~e~ab;~8E-
ci - r'4
-:


r
A -- -' '\ '-K*J ''^
SI :-t ,' -,-,- -
-.~~~A :.4^ ^^














*(*SV students"
"W ~tea".it .umbera of
^^^et^t em .]ame symptom.
I af i'e $ii tieS. Y- o hal otCanada are
aa4b d^tdietesteeita t1bto3eAtphe problem effectively

-t rai r thePrxeiident of the TUhited States called 'White House Conference
S4etipmte niht's hts-collegiatesld.T, e Januay~ of a56, the President in his
amesnae to Congrestindicated thathe, would appoint a, committee to deal with
ie sub .iep. hii hr education. 'i' saQ doing, he- ip paving the way for a
tndationd3Mydorganized look at;the problems of higher education?" The Committee
which t1 undertake'thiJsapa^aisal -haa been'designated a'f."The Committee on
Education. Beyond~e. High School" "l. ::'
.Alrbkt situltane$sly, another inmplirtt committee Will undertake a study.
It is the National dominittee for-Development' of Scientists and Engineers, es-
tablished "to assist the F&de'ral Goveinment in identifying the problems con-
cerning the production and! development of:scientists and engineers."
An important area in which major state universities, land grant colleges,
and urban universities 'ace in general agreement is that of tightening up on
admission standards. -
Thesa'institutions recognize the need to provide equal educational opportunity
for all-qualified youh; "an- intelligent matching of educational opportunity to
individual ability," is, the way President Carl BR. Woodward of the University of
BRbode lEalands.ety aptly states it. Florida, along with other states, has embarked
upon a program involving a more careful selection and admission of students for
the Fall semester of 1956.
The rniety.of Florida, because of its dual nature of combined land grant
and st .u iversity, has: certain obligations to the State and to the Federal
govern it4otxesit ington any of its sister institutions in the state, either public
or rlW jbpleresearch programs in agriculture and engineering which
have .poCdj4 ZE fundamental to the economic development of the state
are iutcies of a land grant institution. Through-federal grants or re-
searehf tpai$W aavorable state and federal partnership has evolved over the
year.se t -t, far flung activities of the Agricultural Extension Service
covering t~agent and home demonstration work represents a joint federal,
state and local government cooperative effort. Great professional schools such
,teia, Medicine and Pharmacy place special obligations on the

tt rPog mm of the University has made such significant
t'2eiar't tetftnat ew insttatitma in the couny can now boast of any-
~uirif~t j UQtEandOrPgrpi teaching staff Is regarded as excellent.








ehiyonen td snt1a;sid a



order ais demanded. W1if e' ^ t ^
culture could auger :a as1 biiafjif3
might easy result in s ddedb <,
The international-.-naioad, ast ^hataPd a
the renewed emphatcs ilad :'6l~ :
mand for humfaiaf~eally ~'iBi-fl.a pb .if
balance between the'' ceniaoded aM it riS~.-tt el e' ahiht '
siderations for the new biennium.' .
We have not been iesita"ih'rriA i W t it~t rgo '
Some of these will 'b briefly et n e ,ithb I



One of the major polie e.- #,ngP^ riefse' xumis hato elaeddto ai
which, at least during -the: .'^^lteD fi ibin um,%wi l tlchumri eb-
versity College. The freestna~lcr l est adl~,,tdCtep^^e i l950mit ,i
first to enter the Uliversit i*^eagtlted- k
Control which limits admission sesi~hO ai s-lrhe e auplere6O Waa 4f?'^
high school placement testr~seoyaha ginftia s^t~t@h h3 o-
will give reasonable reasonable assjuranDea^g xtetbin 8~ iaptiorzay zwaejo, ti ,
sity work. This is fdreflitiijaw t 4i8qttbr da t 1afi^w- ge] N
followed for the pal fi vera wuPdyrM14u4igptQyidrth8&Ryok >atLd
other educational or vocatidnal- opvor*zt cities *hent tbeir records dd'd not- sR6*
promise of adequate, performat -0tynl ti ut tbscn the u woe ~:i
is based on experi nee.gainetd~V4 A t o*&lenttyWfar in giving ulrlt.
placement tests: ,iad si.uiw. eEdihio: z 4sewon, 4
At first glance ithe. -ia m1M1 9p$t therbefin
is actually the 3otase ~DtldathW O eptb
school gradtuite~tadi tnd~oi
to some thatbW" 1et. .

40 pereeht group "
gained from --
were 2,592 ent
lower 40.:p
1,175 or 4M -
It may We
their '
group,
ed durb
Bth.




t


Smphsized,
;crtStraialapkr dedncip ndiiniafte1pliostbot one of
;a;tbetesta i- fa ivilfcM~nlew wll permit
P4t to(.t *i ^pdttted. In the
4^- a g p& 4^l^8 mqf)6ation must
W49mweedph eh ~ APP n tyigp^atf ea {e 4iy :;-po.any student
1.2so^ ^ 11 i49en19 Y ^WJble s !i om i.4kingta satisfactory

1 A .:rTfis.srco"nti.ued its usual fine performance
~ 4ecto - satve p~podunativit in spite of mounting en-
rollnents. A goodly proportion of new staff members recruited hold doctorates
orom leading graduate schqQls, ; -
The Department of Physical ~ences'has been bolstered by the acquisition of
facilities for observational td k i"n astronomy; An 8 inch refracting telescope
nahued : teihnafndatfr rer,: Gaertmer Scientific' Company, at $20,000 was pre-
serieantb a&st by Mr.- Richard. E. Schmidt of Chicago. The University is greatly
iilebelit lti for this generous gift and to Dr. Guy Owen, formerly of the C-2
ita~sfo9 servibg aas'intermediary in the negotiations. A small brick and concrete
ibsnewatowy has :been erected to house this telescope and a 10 inch reflector
lire4iouslytpresenbed by Mr. Fred Heath of Gainesville.
- 'T'i honorsmin the biennium centered on Dr. Archie F. Carr of the Biological
SOttitw staff who was cited by the National Academy of Sciences as the person
mflilttthe greatest contribution itn the field of Zoology last year in the nation.

AGRICULTURE

With the elevation of the Provost to the presidency, and the retirement of
tbariO. Noble as Dean of the College of Agriculture, and H. G. Clayton as
Director of the Extension Service, the top administration of the research,
teahingc and extension divisions underwent a reshuffling. Willard M. Fifield was
promote fram the Directorship of the Agricultural Experiment Station to Pro-
vet~ Joseph .R:Beckenbach, formerly Associate Director, replaced Fifield as
Diretor Boge :W, Bledsoe, Formerly Assistant Director, was made Associate
Dfretow! Marshall O. Watkins was promoted from Assistant Director to Director
do:the gricultural Extension Service to replace H Clayton, and Marvin A.
Brooker was elevated from the assistant deanship of the College of Agriculture
to the :ea p needing Dr. C. V. Noble. All of these men are experienced
fl tggjgjtjatme with year of familiarity with Florida agrIeutuare.
A-o-jT tA leade sh-p for the State's important agricultral activi-
"eM MJ*gi dm"eabk1 sand has been assured with the above shift in appointments
l hl be ahoen or departmental leadership
*___ita ia.S*eKw ag Iwar b sietfc teaehi tejn ar and re-
lulf rtfjfa W t4 Isp t hl wta yo acr e the ta. that thee win be no







diminution in the productive research and educational programs which have been
established.
We have lost, by resignation, two key scientists during the past year whose
leaving was a severe blow to us. They were tempted by much higher salaries.
Temporary replacements have been named pending a thorough search for quali-
fied successors. Outstanding men must be found if a permanent crippling of the
programs is to be avoided.
The construction of the new Agriculture Building has heartened all engaged
in agriculture. The building will be dedicated on December 1, 1956, in honor of
the late Governor Dan McCarty, a graduate of the College of Agriculture.
The added space will result in greater efficiency throughout all of the agricultural
units. The completion and occupation of the new Agricultural Engineering Build-
ing in August 1955 has been a great boon to this important segment of the Uni-
versity.
The Department of Horticulture will be divided, effective July 1, 1956, into
four departments, Food Technology and Nutrition, Fruit Crops, Ornamental
Horticulture, and Vegetable Crops.
In July, 1955, Botany was separated from Plant Pathology and set up as
a separate department.
During the biennium, 278 active research programs of work were pursued.
Increased attention has been given "to developing basic research projects related
to our major agricultural endeavors since these programs are vital to developing
new products, new industries, and greater efficiency in many existing operations."
Progress in the developing and releasing of new varieties of legume crops,
fruits, and flowering plants; in identifying plant diseases; in improving insecti-
cides and means of control; and in marketing has been significant. There have
been fruitful results in many phases of animal science research. The detailed
reports will be found most interesting.
Much of the research of the Citrus Experiment Station has been directed
towards work on the burrowing nematode which in 1953 was found to be the
cause of spreading decline of citrus. Dr. A. F. Camp, who has long served as
Vice Director of the Citrus Station, requested retirement to become effective
early in the new biennium. He has served as a consultant to the Argentine and
other governments in the problems of citrus decline and production problems.
His retirement will remove from the scene one of the best known men in the
nation in the field of citrus culture.
The Extension program has expanded or modified its activities during the
biennium to meet the new and changing development of the State. A large in-
crease in urban families served has been noted. The total number of rural and
urban families served increased by 32 per cent or from 165,127 to 218,288 families.

ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS
Possibly none of the professional schools ha~i beeh' subjected 'tW "
disappointments and limitations, during the bienni-m ks the ColliEdtge t HiWS
tecture and Allied Arts. Hopes'B hhigh during the' 1955 sessi of tt' lI
ture when it -appeared that' a new building would be tauthbrized 'idhZf
activities of this Tapidly expkading college. These were dashed-wh&i
drew to a close andd azn api .plo atifri for theia
meant tnat the woAtr af t11he 11Colo touldW D a'htli *Weidfthjij^fl







WV .~iA -
d~ ~ ~ : 1~ <'*-. &


: v I







w&-^h?-&.v l >'Q A6&^*


"gagcid 4ly.pcattered
ated from each other
ets and faculty are
bitions and a unified


i e fia n florida's: population, the (change from a rural to an
-economy. and the industrial growth demand meticulous attention to Com-


SPlanning and Building Construction. Florida set a new record in con-
^a 1(964 and another new record in 1955. The new high of $1,047,215,000
r$5. was 28 per, cent above the.record for 1954. Yet the only Florida source
Ssupiy of designers, architects, and builders for this expansion is the College
of Architecture and Allied arts at the University of Florida.


-. During the past five years thirty staff members in
Construction, and Community Planning have been lost.
included in a study of average salaries in schools of arc)


Architecture,


Building


Among 41 institutions
litecture during 1955-56,


Florida stands in the lowest quarter in all but one instructional rank. The average


salary of professors
$4,800 to bring the a
the middle of the rn


in architecture at Florida would need to be


Average


ange.


or no experience are receiving


increased by


to the top of the range, and by $1,900 to bring it to
Florida graduates with bachelor's degrees and little


starting


salaries


higher than


teachers


master's degrees and several years


experience.


This is, indeed,


as much of


a compliment to the


effectiveness of


our teaching


as it is


the low esteem in which the teacher is held.


W. T. Arnett, who has served the College of Architec


a sad commentary on

ture and Allied Arts


as Dean for


a decade, has


requested


relief from administrative responsibilities


in order to resume his professional teaching. To him and his staff


we owe a deep


debt of gratitude for
stances.


carrymg


on through the


years


under


such trying circum-


The college


will enter


the new biennium under


a new title "The College of


Architecture and Fine Arts." Top priority has been given for a new building
to house the important work of this college. We are hopeful that the new biennium


will witness the


realization of the


dreams


so badly shattered in 1955.


ARTS AND SCIENCES


One of the most


encouraging


aspects


of the biennium under


review


was the


authorization, following legislative approval, to proceed with plans for a Physics
building, the need for which has been so urgently presented by the College of


Arts and Scien
several biennial


ces, the College of Engineering, and the Graduate School for
legislative sessions.


"Physics is responsible for su
atomic bomb, and radar. Physics


ch recent developments as nuclear energy, the
is fundamental to such areas as electricity, op-


tics, electronics, and


engineering


in general. Further development in these


areas


is dependent upon research in physics. Physics is taken by engineering and pre-
medical students, chemists, pharmacists, predental students, and science teachers,
among others, and the field is rapidly expanding."
I am happy to report that plans are nearing completion for the new Physics
Building and it is anticipated that bids will be let for construction of the build-


ing in the early fall.


The completion of this building in the new biennium will


go a long way toward placing the University of Florida on a sounder footing as

14


I







a leader among educational institutions. A strengthening and implementation
of the Physics faculty, especially for work on the graduate level, will be one of
the most urgent demands of the new biennium.
Undergraduate and graduate enrollments in Arts and Sciences continue on
the increase. In terms of areas covered and number of degrees granted, the
doctoral program is the largest in the University. In spite of this, several
important areas need up-building so that graduate programs may be offered in
them.
Undergraduate enrollments for the first year of the biennium was 1159; and
the second, 1434. Graduate enrollment stood at 926 for the first year of the
biennium and 882 for the second. The Ph.D. degrees granted were 32 and 42
respectively for these periods.


COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The death of Walter J. Matherly on September 25, 1954, removed from our
midst one of the most capable members of the Administrative Council and the
Dean of one of our most progressive colleges. He had served the university
twenty-eight years, and was the first dean of the college, which he organized in
1926. We were fortunate to secure as his successor Donald J. Hart who, in the
relatively short period since his appointment on January 15, 1956, has shown a
fine grasp of the college and its important activities.
Dr. Hart received his Bachelor's degree at Lake Forest College and his
Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees at the University of Wisconsin.
In addition to practical experience in industry, Dr. Hart has served in the busi-
ness operation of Iowa State College, as a professor of economics and business,
and as Dean of the College of Business Administration of the University of
Idaho, from which post he came to the University of Florida.
As in other major divisions of the University, keen competition exists for
professional staff members. Faculty salaries are, in many instances, below the
earnings of first year graduates with the bachelor's degree, whose services as
auditors, accountants, statisticians, and the like are in constant demand by busi-
ness organizations.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
Dean Joseph B. White points out in the biennial summary of the College of
Education that, within a five-year period, the number of white teachers employed
in Florida increased from 18,885 to 27,920, or slightly more than 50 per cent.
The number of students entering upon teaching education as a career has not
kept pace with the rapid growth of the school population.
Upon this College will rest much of the responsibility of training teachers to
staff the state public school system for the avalanche of students predicted A
the next decade. A maximum of expansion is essential. To provide this without
sacrificing quality in the process will tax the ingenuity of those responsible,or
.this important part of the University program.
During the past year a self-evaluation of the College's program wa; bee
under way. The staff in the college is .making a continuous effort to4- al
qualifications. ..This is reflected in the fact that in 1950 twenty entq
the staff had. doctor's degrees and .in-1956, fifty menbaersr6


,
- b _
-.
^ -; -^;^











r-^^ :'

N '-'*


SI there Comlleges wo wlh t oi me secondary teachers, to participate
In a core program of twenty-four semester hours. This new policy undoubtedly
MI lead to an harmonious settlement of differences and criticisms leveled at the
College in the past and paves the way for a larger percentage of graduates from
vthep colleges to enter the teaching profession if they should choose to do so.
Real problems have been encountered in building the new P. K. Yonge Labora-
tory School Building authorized by the 1955 Legislature. Bids, opened in the
spring, were so far in excess of estimates and funds available that substantial
alterations in plans had to be effected. It is hoped that the new bids to be opened
in September may be met so that construction on this important building may
proceed without further delay. The space will go far to relieve the almost hope-
less space situation now existing with respect to the College of Education.

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL EXPERIMENT STATION
With world attention focused upon scientific achievement and scientific pro-
gress, it is but natural that the engineering programs of the University of Florida
would reflect some of the aura of importance attached to this professional field.
Our programs, both in teaching and experimental research, are vigorous and
thriving. The two programs are complimentary and each has aided the other in
attaining successively high goals of achievement. A qualitative and energetic
faculty in the teaching division was largely responsible for the referral to this
institution of substantial war related research involving millions of dollars. These
funds aided substantially in holding the faculty, .and both the teaching and
research units have profited thereby. State funds have been utilized to initiate
projects which showed promise of having economic value. When sufficient evi-
dence accumulated to indicate a project had possibilities if further developed,
industry has been invited to share in the further cost of such research. In this
way industry and the federal government have furnished a substantial part of
the cost of our engineering research program. It is estimated that the outside
funds in the operating budget of the Engineering and Industrial Experiment
Station are approximately five times as great as those available from State ap-
propriations.
In calling attention to the salary situation as it effects Engineering, Dean
Weil points out that they are in closer competition with industry than some
of the other professional fields. Like other deans, he regards his staff as over-
loaded and underpaid. He states, "the situation is particularly peculiar in this
field due to the fact that in the case of 80 percent of our workers, their salary
in its entirety is reimbursed. Research contractors have, almost without ex-
ception, indicated that they felt that our workers were underpaid and have in-
dicated their willingness to pay higher salaries." He further argues that often
contractors are disturbed because they feel there may develop work stoppage or
16








interruptions because of the threat of workers leaving for higher salaries else-
where.
Dean Weil recommends, and I believe his arguments have much merit, that
Florida should now grasp the opportunity which has been thrust in her direction
because of the momentum of a new industrial boom, to "create a great scientific
and technological center which will continue to attract more industries to our
State." Furthermore, Florida has the opportunity of becoming the focal point
of technological development not only from the standpoint of our own country
but also from the standpoint of South America and the countries to the east of
us in the decade ahead. Large sources of money would be required to bring
this about initially, but it is the consensus of leading industrial planners that the
results would more than justify the investment. As in all great enterprises,
timing is of the essence. Whether the time is now at hand for Florida to strike
out boldly and match some of the large-scale undertakings associated with other
major educational institutions such as those of California, Illinois, Ohio, Iowa,
Michigan, New York, and other states would be up to the Governor and the
State Legislature to decide.

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
and
OFFICE OF CONTRACT RESEARCH
In March, 1956, new standards of admission to the Graduate School, based
upon the Graduate Record Examinations, were adopted. All but two of the col-
leges of the University adopted an admission standard of 500 average score on
aptitude sections of the Graduate Record Examinations in addition to a B-average
undergraduate record for upper division students. The College of Education and
the College of Physical Education and Health asked for a lower admission stand-
ard based on an average GRE score of 400, and a 2.5 undergraduate grade-point
average. This will enable approximately twice as large a percentage of college
graduates to meet the graduate admission standards for studies in the latter two
colleges as for other subject matter fields. The new policy will result in im-
proved selection of graduate students in all divisions of the University although
the concept of a single admission standard has not as yet proved practical.
Dean L. E. Grinter who has made a notable contribution to the development
of our Graduate School and in stimulating research since joining our staff in
1952, points with concern to certain factors which will influence the future de-
velopment of these most important phases of our educational program. Chief
among these is the matter of adequate salaries to recruit and maintain a competent
graduate faculty. At the risk of duplicating a good part of Dean Grinter's
report, I shall quote at some length therefrom to substantiate this view.
He asserts that "the quality of graduate work cannot be further enhanced"
-by merely paying more attention to or improving upon administrative procedures,
but "The next step in improvement of graduate study can only come from-a basic
strengthening of the graduate faculty.... The policy in staffing graduate' schx~46
has always, been to select individuals both from the undergraduate faeult~y M d
from other institutions, government and industry who have the special apfitA
He recommends, and I heartily concur, in the necessity oftr p aitig U
limited number of graduate professors of top salary rank dhUt'h rit4'Y ia -
biennium. He suggestss that thirty such appointments would be B






.a-b i s-i--- as. oe of .the
tate imrveraities. Such ap-
ffiiii d6 ea pri s f 3ftl- poP the basis
lfl gf4*il. mptt ualiafie& avafleN pgSo^neL. Some of the
-i the f l-ty vold qnalfy for such appointments and they

T,^o xmoaf h reaommendation as may be feasible should be implemented
- ixthe new biennim .
She total face value of research contracts in force at the end of the fiscal
.year 1954-55 was $2,682,849.91, and for the fiscal year 1955-56, $3,568,419.21.
There -was some overlapping of contracts between the two years of the biennium
as there will be within the new biennial period. A research backlog or unexpired
value of contracts in force as of June 30, 1956 amounted to $1,334,776.30.
An Analysis of Sources of Contracts and Research Grants will be of interest
at this point.


ANALYSIS OF SOURCE OF CONTRACTS AND
RESEARCH GRANTS
June 30, 1955


Amount


Supported by Department of Defense $1,896,261.04
Supported by other Federal, State or Local
Government 522,414.80
Supported by Non-Profit Foundations or Societies 55,736.57
Supported by Industry or Industrial Associations 208,437.50
Total face value of contracts in force $2,682,849.91
Face value of contracts divided by years
in force $1,571,007.00


June 30, 1956
Supported by Department of Defense
Supported by other Federal, State or
Local Government
Supported by Non-Profit Foundations or Societies
Supported by Industry or Industrial Associations
Total face value of contracts in force
Face value divided by years in force
Research backlog or unexpired value of con-
tracts in force as of June 30, 1956


Percentage


70.681

19.472
2.078
7.769
100.


$2,528,848.21

779,361.00
63,360.00
196,850.00
$3,568,419.21
1,607,160.21


1,334,776.30


LAW
The establishment of a chapter of the Order of the Coif brought added recog-
nition to the College of Law during the biennium. The inspection which preceded
approval of petition for the new chapter covered "not only the formal program
and statistical data which reveal the operation of the school, but many intangible
items such as student and faculty morale and the overall spirit of the college."
Enrollment increased 21.5 per cent during the biennium and all indications
point to similar increases for several years to come. An orientation program for
law students introduced in the biennium has proved most helpful. Students are

18






introduced within a five day period to the traditions, ethics, and activities of the
legal profession. Several of Florida's most distinguished barristers have par-
ticipated in the programs.
It would be difficult to assess the place of the Law College in the life of this
state. If Martindale's Law Directory were consulted, I suspect no state would
show so large a percentage of its first-rate lawyers coming from a single institu-
tion as Florida. An increasingly large number of judges, legislators, members of
the Congress, and cabinet officers are drawn from the ranks of Florida's Law
College graduates.
Again the matter of faculty salaries is disheartening. We cannot say too
emphatically that some amelioration of this situation must take place if the
integrity of the Law School is to be maintained.
Later in this report, I shall touch upon the activities of our new Health
Center, of which all of us are so justly proud. Without indulging in any un-
favorable contrasts to the detriment of any unit, I think it but fair to say that
the medical college, which will be opened to students this fall, will enjoy from the
outset the resources of a Library far more adequate for its purposes than the
Law College, whose library has been in use for a half century. We are proud
of the adequacy of the Medical Library-to have less would not be in keeping
with the destiny of the medical sciences on our campus; but, Law, too, deserves
something better. It seems fitting to lift from Dean Henry Fenn's Biennial Re-
port his statement concerning the Law Library.
"During the biennium 2,645 volumes were added to our library, bringing the
total collection to 48,707 volumes. The library stands forty-sixth in size among
the 129 law schools approved by the American Bar Association. There are few
law schools with which we feel we should be upon a competitive basis that have
as small a library as ours. Most of the mid-west state university law schools
have libraries double the size of ours. Before steps can be taken to remedy this
situation, it will be necessary to greatly increase our accessions budget and also
provide additional space for library expansion during the next biennium."


THE J. HILLIS MILLER HEALTH CENTER

The combined reports of the deans of the College of Medicine, the College of
Nursing, the College of Pharmacy, and the Director of the Teaching Hospital
and Clinics, constitute a new and interesting sequence addition to the biennial
report of the University of Florida. From a standpoint of institutional history,
this section of our biennial report may be regarded as the most important. It
should bring pride to every citizen of the State of Florida. Florida was late to
recognize its need for health service education, but when it finally faced up to
the need, it did so boldly and magnificently. There is nothing mediocre in the
whole Health Center picture and program. A generous legislature provided appro-
priations to take care of the first phase of the Health Center development according
to thebest estimates of consultants and experts. These were to erect (1) a medical
sciences building and (2) a teaching hospital and clinic. When the amount .ap-
propriated for the Teaching Hospital was found to be inadequate, an additional
appropriation was provided in an extra session by the Florida Legislature, iTp
request for additional funds was included in the agenda of matter. s tb bpN
sidered at the Extra Session by the generous consent of Governor Collins.
19


'. ^
. .r





I r - ~ .- '* -

f it jftfiatillerM very aptly pointed
..... me&al ool that "The worst thing in
ie wtrld: is to establish a poor medical school, which csa so easily happen if in
its :tiEnot we do- not first assess the health need of the State and the need
4,addeqig a-physieal facilities in order that the school will meet the specific
health problems of otr peopleA.'-
- Furthermore, his concept of a new health center was one involving integra-
tion' with and fullest use of all existing University facilities. We believe that the
Health Center which will bear his name has met these specifications.
Medicine
The following excerpts from Dean George Harrell's report bear repitition:
The Medical Sciences Building is now nearing completion. Teaching of the first
two years of the medical curriculum will be largely conducted in this building.
An adequate library for the initiation of teaching has already been collected,
valuable accessions having been acquired as gifts from the professional libraries
of a number of Florida's physicians. A young and enthusiastic faculty is being
recruited. A nation-wide search was conducted for each department head, and
an average of six candidates was interviewed for each post. The faculty for the
teaching of courses in the basic medical sciences will be in residence early in
the next biennium.
Teaching grants have permitted the early addition of other faculty members
for educational planning and explanation of teaching techniques, as well as early
initiation of research.
The first class of fifty students has been largely selected and instruction will
begin in September, 1956.
The readers' attention is directed to Dean Harrell's complete report for details
concerning the splendid faculty selected to date.
Dean Harrell, in addition to interviewing applicants and selecting a faculty
for the Medical School, has continued to serve on numerous medical boards and
has published ten scientific articles during the biennium. He and Dr. Russell
Poor, Provost for the Health Center, have made numerous public appearances to
explain the progress of the Medical program.

Nursing Education
We were fortunate in securing as the first Dean of the College of Nursing,
Dorothy M. Smith, who came to us from the Hartford Hospital School of Nursing,
Hartford, Connecticut. Dean Smith received her B.S. in Nursing Education from
Columbia University, New York City, in 1941, the Master's in Education from
Harvard University 1947, and has done graduate work at Duke and New York
University.
She has had both teaching and administrative experience at hospitals in New
England, and the Duke University School of Nursing.
Since joining our staff in February, 1956, she has developed a curriculum
plan for the four academic years' program leading to a Bachelor of Science in
Nursing degree which plan has been approved by the Florida State Board of Nurse
Registration and Nursing Education. She has also interviewed prospective stu-
dents and faculty members. The first students will be enrolled in September,
1956.

20






Pharmacy
For many years Pharmacy has operated as one of the University's strong
independent colleges. This biennium witnessed its integration with the Health
Center under the provostship of Dr. Russell S. Poor. Dr. Perry A. Foote, who
has served the college so effectively as Dean since 1949, will continue in this
capacity under the integrated program. This administrative adjustment has
served to bring about a closer relationship between Pharmacy and its kindred
professions of medicine and nursing.
The need for more adequate space to accommodate the rapid growth in this
professional field has been recognized and a Pharmacy Building at a cost of
$1,250,000 will be urged in the next requests before the Legislature.
As in practically all units of the University, substantial salary increases are
deemed of primary necessity if a first class operation of the College is to be
maintained.

Teaching Hospital and Clinics
Plans for the Teaching Hospital and Clinics were developed during the year,
following numerous conferences with consultants, architects, and engineers with
the staff of the various units of the Health Center. The final plans called for
building the substructure of the hospital under a separate contract from that
of the superstructure. Completion date for the hospital has been set for October,
1958.
Certain portions of the building as originally planned were eliminated from
the plans put out for bid in order to make sure the building would come within
the hospital appropriation. Specifically the psychiatric floor, the fourth, fifth,
and sixth floors of the connecting wing, and the 1st floor of the specialty out
patient clinics and certain unfinished areas had to be restored to give maximum
efficiency of operation. Realizing the desirability of reinstating these units as
well as the economy factors involved, the Governor incorporated in his call for
the special Legislative Session, a portion of the teaching hospital.*
Mr. Michael J. Wood, who assisted with the Commonwealth Study and who
has been identified with the planning and programming of the Health Center from
the beginning was chosen to be the Director of the Hospital and Clinics.
The next phase of planning will involve the selection of a competent staff
and the purchase of equipment. It is expected that the entire unit will be in
operation so that patients may be admitted and the first medical and nursing
students can enter upon their clinical work by 1958.

THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH
There is cause for rejoicing in the report of the Dean of the College of Physical
Education and Health. The biennium witnessed no major health problems among
students, but a definite improvement in their general physical fitness.
The programs sponsored by the College involve (1) a "Required Physical
Education Program for Men and Women" which seeks to assure every member
of the student body a maximum of physical fitness both during and after, their
college experience. The relatively small percentage who, because of. health :re-

*An Act making an appropriation of $800.000 from the General Revenue ynwiw ftor the 1hn
Hospital, to supplement and to be used in conjunction with the 1955' aPropnittdn, an:mi
of 425,000 previously allotted for furniture and equipment. were ntbo#ith %.o,
signed by the Governor and became a law on July 31. 95. -

21 ,

i-i












Cpanienhan. r'a -desi gn~ d to-rovide 'teachers in physical education, health


professional work in physical therapy.
The Student Health Service has been staffed by a competent corps of phy-
eians, nurses, and technicians, who have been adequate to meet our student-

body health needs. The Infirmary served 4002 in patients and 114,095 out patients
during the biennium. In addition, 2,057 pre-employment physical examinations
were administered to non-academic employees of the University, and 1,598 food
handlers' certificates were awarded.

The old gymnasium assigned for use of women students was condemned
early in the biennium and while in the process of restoration, classes have been
held ion the Florida Gymnasium and the recreation rooms of Broward Hall.

Additional staff members are needed to handle the greatly increased enrollment
of women students. Altogether, the health of a student body is a major factor
in any educational program and it is gratifying to be able to report that our ex-
cellent student health program was maintained with maximum efficiency and
without incidennium. In addition, 2,057 pre-employment physical examinations
without incident.


SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS


This school stands on the threshold of a great future. It s
educational possibilities that lie in the fields of radio and tel
well that facilities were provided during the biennium equal
new quarters, located in the stadium, total 30,000 square f<
graduating class of June, 1956, was 80 per cent larger than any
ing class in the history of the School.
The transfer of the radio and television teaching program
ment of Speech to the School became effective at the beginning
A Radio-Television Production Center was also created in the
Center went on the air with its first educational programs
1956.
It is hoped that the University may avail itself soon of th
channel set aside by the Federal Communications Commission


ymbolizes the vast
vision. It augurs
to its needs. The
set of space. The
previous graduat-

from the Depart-
g of the biennium.
school. The Radio
in the Spring of

ie TV Educational
for its use.


STUDENT PERSONNEL PROGRAM
Counselling
The student counselling service originating in and supervised by the Office
of Student Personnel through the Dean of Student Personnel, the Dean of Men,
the Dean of Women, the Fraternity Advisor, Foreign Student Advisor, Student
Placement Officer, and Director of Clinical Services has been satisfactory.
The Dean of Student Personnel requested and has been granted a release from
administrative duties during the forthcoming academic year to accept a visiting

22





professorship at Columbia University, after which he will return to the University
as a member of the faculty of the College of Education.
With the adoption of a stricter policy of admission, it is believed that a more
mature type of student will come to the University in the future, a class better
fitted mentally and psychologically to undertake serious academic work. It is
to be hoped that these more mature-minded students will be more self reliant
and not so dependent upon frequent day-to-day counseling as some of the less
mature ones who have burdened the counseling services in recent years. The
next biennium will be a testing period which will be closely observed. Meantime,
it is the consensus of several highly respected members of the Administrative
Council, in which I concur, that problems of discipline should decline as greater
emphasis is placed on academic work. Advisement for students seeking loans,
financial help, employment, or those wishing to participate in extra curricular
activities will continue as in the past.
Florida's traditionally strong student government was founded on the Ameri-
can precept that the best governed are the least governed. In the coming biennium
we shall continue to emphasize this tradition. Under the skillful leadership of a
corps of good counsellors now performing an excellent service, we have every
expectation that our students will be able to govern themselves.
Housing
More adequate housing for our ever-growing student body remains on the
list of our critical needs. The completion and dedication of Broward Hall in
the latter part of the last biennium brought some relief for women students. Dur-
ing the Spring of 1956, room applications from freshmen women and men in-
creased about 28 per cent over the same period of the preceding year; the number
of applications from entering upperclassmen and women increased 43 per cent,
while applications from married students increased 19 per cent.
Inasmuch as the University was unable to accommodate all applicants the
previous year, this represents a very substantial group of Florida students who
had no chance of securing housing at the State University of their choice.
A federal housing loan of $3,000,000 will provide additional space for 1,000
students by 1958; however, temporary structures accommodating 400 will be
razed, so that the net total gain in space will be only 600.
Some housing facilities for married students must be provided to take the
place of rapidly deteriorating Army barracks, which have housed married GI
students for more than a decade. This is especially true with the emphasis which
we expect to place on our Graduate program.
The housing facilities of the University have been largely self-liquidating
projects. From the standpoint of cost, they constitute a smaller burden upon
the State than any of the University's facilities. No effort should be spared in
the new biennium to secure additional facilities which will enable the University
to accommodate a larger percentage of its students with adequate housing and to
provide for an inevitably larger student body. In this objective we earnestly solicit
the aid of our legislature.
The- counseling system in the residence halls is regarded as excellent. Harold
Riker, who received his doctorate from Columbia University in 1955,hasmBinm@e
hiss.wark as Director of Housing after a two-year leave of absence. :~ :
|-:: A: new:-Union- building designed to meet the demands-of student ihdp,,
156,0, ,o:U'2 ,00D is urgently recommended. Undoubtedly, su.ch a bdtdiriisg o ^w


Ann a-wrn-----




r ~kasll~~nxaplrra~~*t ~:$~;t


^^^^Bg i3BMi^^ttwbradn tBe weMinr t ohe largest number of foreign
" "l"t...e..he Sp.ing semester of 1956, 240 foreign students from
fftider riesin re~nrolled. The majority or about half continued to come
* th I ltin American countries. An increasingly large group is coming
Ifrm Asiatie countries. Much of the growth of enrollment of foreign students
bha been at the Graduate level. "Agriculture, Arts and Sciences, Engineering,
Architecture, and Education (in that order) are the most popular fields of study
Among foreign students."


DIVISION OF MUSIC
"Students and staff of the Division of Music have contributed generously
to the enlargement and the enrichment of the music life of campus and State.
A year-round service program has been maintained in cooperation with education
and music organizations throughout Florida. . Accomplishment is evaluated
not only in terms of numerical increases; there has been an equally rewarding
extension in taste and literary lines. Florida's music is well on its way to maturity
and the role it will play in our expanding educational structure and community
planning (recreational and avocational) begins to take on an entirely new stature.
The Division of Music helped lay the groundwork for this new era, and is ready


to meet
marines
Director
The
zations
Few
our Mu:
of time.
deserves


the full responsibilities it brings to our doorstep." This, in essence sum-
the spirit of the Division of Music for the biennium as embodied in
r A. A. Beecher's report.
active participation of staff members in State and national music organi-
and the position of leadership held by them is impressive.
units of the University have made a more significant contribution than
sic Division to the educational program in such a relatively short period
The need of the Division for a large auditorium and permanent quarters
s early and favorable consideration.


THE MUSEUM
The Florida State Museum, which serves as both a University and State Mu-
seum, is a growing cultural and scientific asset. During the biennium it has ful-
filled within serious limitations of space and finances, the major functions for
which it was created, i.e. "(1) to assemble and maintain collections of cultural
and natural objects; (2) to encourage productive research on this material by
Museum staff and others; and (3) to disseminate knowledge through publications
and displays." During the biennium, Museum displays were viewed by 275,000
persons. Valuable accessions during the biennium brought the collections in
custody to over 600,000 specimens or lots of specimens.
Under a cooperative arrangement with the State Board of Parks and Historic
Memorials, displays were developed and constructed for two small museums, one
at the Olustee Battlefield near Lake City, and the other at Constitution Memorial
Park near Port St. Joe.
The museum under the enthusiastic leadership of Dr. Arnold Grobman, has vast
possibilities of usefulness to the University and the State. Lack of space is the
principal obstacle to bringing the Museum into a position of major usefulness.


^ff'r^^ '
^-^ \"
i iij *^ *
!s\l**** ,
-^' -. .
!^ .
^ ,
IT







It is estimated that a building suitable for displaying the collection of Florida's
interesting fauna and flora (regarded as among the most interesting in the
northwestern hemisphere) would cost approximately $1,250,000. We must begin
to give serious thought to this potentially great cultural asset as soon as some
of our more pressing needs have been met.

THE UNIVERSITY PRESS
The Press, after a decade in makeshift space, moved into its new quarters
in Florida Field Stadium in October 1955. The new quarters give this important
activity a background and place of operation in keeping with its importance in
the total institutional program. It has published twenty-five volumes in the
biennium and plans to issue fourteen books in each year of the coming biennium.
A majority of the Press publications were the works of University of Florida
authors. While commenting on this aspect of the University's cultural program, it
is appropriate also to call attention to the very large number of excellent books
that have been authored by University scholars during the biennium, published
by other Presses. A complete listing will not be made, but attention is directed
to the following:

Florida Under Five Flags by Rembert W. Patrick (Revised)
Guide to the Reptiles, Amphibians and Fresh-Water Fishes of Florida by
Archie Carr and Coleman J. Goin
Your Florida Garden, by John V. Watkins and Herbert S. Wolfe
The Land Called Chicora by Paul Quattlebaum
Russia's Japan Expedition of 1852 to 1855 by George Alexander Lensen
D. H. Lawrence: A Basic Study of His Ideas by Mary Freeman
The Yellow Ruf and the Scarlet Letter by Alfred S. Reid
The Pricing of Cigarette Tobaccos by Elmo L. Jackson
Fletcher Martin by Barbara Ebersole
Guide to Dance Periodicals, Vol. V and VI, compiled by S. Yancey Belknap
Aging and Retirement (Vol. 5) and Aging: A Current Appraisal, ed. Irving
L. Webber
Medical Education in the University, Vol. 5, ed. Louis J. Maloof
Gringo Lawyer by Thomas W. Palmer
Man and Land in Peru by Thomas R. Ford
Peasant Society in the Columbian Andes by Orlando Fals-Borda

THE SCHOOL OF INTER AMERICAN STUDIES
Our Inter-American Program continues to develop in usefulness and as a
characteristic unit of our institution. Our proximity to Latin America quite
naturally has led to a greater emphasis and interest in that area than in other
parts of the world.
During the past year, the University, in keeping with federal government
policy, has lent the services of a number of its key personnel to other countries
under ICA contracts or through special institutional contracts. Some have gone
to Asia and Europe, but a majority have accepted Central or South Anierican
assignments. The University has been invited to initiate contricta With Ait
countries to supply technicians and teachers who might' introduce A;mecan
research a td teaching methods into backward areas; hover, S we flve t^t

25

:-

2:'' 'r* V f -',**'i^J-1V '


^.
. 1'
*- -1^




~9%p~~a~nL~ ":i'." -'V '3


^l j Lain America

Si'-J"4fls of Borid ha oto developing its Carib-
beam fectfias, inthe University Librar for the expanding use of Latin Ameri-
9eafi. larend others Hefd'theli e aribbean are
"h-der n Irnter-American Area Studies Program, a group major is offered on
ie nderrduat6 level in both the College of Arts and Sciences and College of
iu 'en Administration. At the graduate level, an area program is offered lead-
mg to the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. During the biennium
twenty-four students were enrolled in the graduate program; five completed work
for the M.A.; several received the Ph.D.
The Annual Caribbean Conference, which brings together delegates from
the United States, Latin America, and the British West Indies, continues to
focus attention upon problems and cooperative means to meet them as well as
cultural aspects of the various participating countries. Scholars, diplomats,
government officials, and representatives of business and industry are patronizing
these conferences in increasingly large numbers from year to year. We feel that
the University of Florida is making a significant contribution in this way to a
very important phase of international relations.
Expenses of the Caribbean Conferences have been shared for several years
by the Alcoa Steamship Company to whom we are greatly indebted for their sup-
port. We are fortunate in having the United Fruit Company as a co-sponsor
for the Conference to be held in the Fall of 1956. Mr. Walter B. Fraser of St.
Augustine has continued to give the program encouragement and very generous
support.
The School is at the center of all Latin American campus activities. We have


already pointed to the large
University. In recent years
Agriculture has rendered
Counsellor assisted in the
thirty-five students in the
of the biennium. He also
eighteen additional Point
students, staff members, an
Rockefeller Foundation has
for a three-year period by


ge number of Latin American students attending the
i, a special counsellor for Latin American Students in
an excellent service in a much needed area. The
matriculation, orientation and general guidance of
first year and forty-nine students in the second year
assisted in carrying out shorter training periods of
IV trainees and accompanied visiting agricultural
id technicians on agricultural tours of the State. The


assisted in this phase of our Latin American program
substantial grants.


UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES


The Library collections now number in excess of 700,000
biennium has witnessed an increased use of these collections. It
this increased circulation means that more students are studying
is made of one of the institution's chief resources.
This increased use of Library facilities has placed heavie
Library staff and on the limited book funds.
The acquisition of the Raymond Robins Library and the fur
home at Chinsegut Hill, through the gift and courtesy of Miss Lisa


volumes. The
is assumed that
and greater use


r loads on the


mishings of his
Von Borowsky,


l-" i.-'-^ -
^ *.-;- *
- >-.
-.


land' mant and


I






constitutes the largest single gift by a private donor in the history of the Uni-
versity Libraries. The collection is rich in labor and religious content and is
already being put to good use by specialists and scholars interested in labor and
industrial relations.
The need for additional reading rooms is critical as well as larger appropria-
tions for implementing our collections pursuant to the growing demands of the
University both at the graduate and under-graduate levels.


CONCLUSION


Those whose interest in the biennial activities of the University has been
sustained up to this point will no doubt conclude with the writer of this report
that significant progress was achieved in spite of serious handicaps; moreover
than an impartial evaluation of the needs of the institution for the new biennium
is a difficult task indeed. If the reader has analyzed the departmental reports,
he would with certainty agree that the needs presented are bona fide and, in
most respects, urgently pressing.
If the cumulative requests and recommendations of department heads could
be met ,the University would be elevated to a new dimension in educational
service to the State. To ignore the essential departmental demands, even for a
two-year period, is a deterrent to progress. The problem then is to seek a solu-
tion for those demands which seem most pressing, while bearing in mind constantly
the potential ability and willingness of the State to meet the cost of financing
them.
Our primary need is and my first aim shall be to secure an upward adjustment
in faculty salaries. This is essential if we are to retain our best staff members for
another biennium. Competition is now keen. Indications are that it will be even
worse, especially in Florida, where industry is moving in so rapidly. This will
include also a very substantial increase for key administrative personnel to meet
at least the minimum salaries paid for like positions at like institutions. Strong
deans build strong colleges. They can attract strong department heads who, in
turn, build up strong faculties. Weakness at the top levels is the poorest type of
economy. In most instances we are unable to fill vacancies which develop in key
positions without offering two or three thousand dollars more than was previously
paid, and our searches for replacements have been nation-wide.
We are giving top priority on our Building List to a new College of Archi-
tecture and Fine Arts Building. The very reputation of the subject field repre-
sented in this College is at stake. Florida will suffer the diminishing prestige of
one of its most valued colleges to its own great detriment.
Additional housing and classroom space is absolutely essential, even if the
undergraduate enrollment remains constant. Hundreds of qualified Florida stu-
dents sought admission in the biennial period drawing to a close who could not
complete their matriculation simply because no room accommodations: were avail-
able. In our building requests, we are asking for new construction to meet our
minimum needs. Other building needs and their priorities are as follows:
. -h ^ -


,` .C'
" ,.^


*- c


., r '
; -. -~~~~- -' '* ,y k ^
'' + V
-
.4 -t*'





i '- -9alx


" '


.' 'T ':




-' .* S
* '


.~e ~ 3;~Lt~lS~,~iE~I;a~S AsSB~ tBbr!OVTEMEN TS
tt'i9 ~~n.:-~i;: tFMe iFOB ~sTE2 "1957-9 -BIBNNIIJW:'
A*y .t's ^ ^ -ta'K ; tjz ^ *}- -q
Gi iENERAoL
Total Estimated


Designation of Project


Utilities Expansion
Facilities for Agriculture (College, Exp. Sta. Ext.)
a. Poultry Classroom and Office Building
b. Completion of Meat Laboratory for Animal Husbandry


c. Addition to Dairy


Science


Building


d. Citrus Packing House and Classroom Building


e. Storage


and Headhouse for Forestry


Architecture


Auditorium and Gymnasium, P. K.


Yonge


Laboratory School


Classroom Building and Teaching Auditorium


Addition to Law Building


Remodel Present P. K.


Yonge


Bldg. for Col. of Education


$1,500,0001


88,000
110,000
40,000
35,000
12,000
1,500,000
382,949
1,000,000


160,000
112,000


Residence Halls for Single Students
Facilities for Agriculture
a. Large Animal Building at Nutrition Laboratory
b. Central Feed Storage Unit, Animal Husbandry
c. Herdsman's House at Swine Unit
d. Elevator for Horticulture Building (Rolfs Hall)
e. Plant Science Unit No. 1


6,675,0002


37,850
27,000
12,500
50,000
300,000


Florida Center of Nuclear


Science


and Industrial Develop.


TOTAL


11,950,000
$23,992,299


HEALTH CENTER


Pharmacy


1,250,000


AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE


Brooder and Rearing House


Laying House
Laying House


TOTAL


10,856
10,750
10,750
32,356


AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS


MAIN STATION


Agricultural Plant Science Unit No. 2
Cold Storage and Low Humidity Rooms with Covered
Packing Platform-Horticulture Unit
Pole Barn-Hay and Feed Storage-Dairy Unit
Lath House-Horticulture Unit
Turf Equipment and Laboratory Hort Unit


$570,000


18,000
15,000


iPreliminary estimate subject to adjustment after making detailed engineering survern
23,6076,000 of this amount to be financed by revenue certllcates.

28


PtM'ty
1






Total snthUd
Cost


Designation of Project


Priority
BRANCH
1

2


3
4
5

6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15.
16
17


[ STATION
Addition to Laboratory and Office Building-Indian
River Field Laboratory
Addition to Production Research Building-Citrus
Experiment Station
Station
Foreman's Cottage-Cortez Farm-Gulf Coast Experiment
Foreman's Cottage-South Florida Field Laboratory
Library and Conference Room-Everglades Experiment
Station
Greenhouse Headhouse Unit-Gulf Coast Experiment Station
Addition to Steer Barn-Range Cattle Experiment Station
Two Labor Cottages-West Florida Experiment Station
Storage Building--West Florida Experiment Station
Machinery & Truck Storage-Everglades Experiment Station
Headhouse and Greenhouse-Everglades Experiment Station
Pesticide and Fertilizer Storage-Potato Investigations
Sprayer and Equipment Storage-Pecan Investigations Lab.
Addition to Implement Shed-Suwannee Valley Ex. Station
Staff Residence-West Florida Experiment Station
Foreman's House-Central Florida Experiment Station
Staff Residence-Range Cattle Station
TOTAL


48,000

65,000
10,000

12,500

30,000
10,800
15,000
15,000
9,900
13,000
4,900
3,400
1,200
1,100
15,000
12,500
15,000
$894,400


The future pattern of higher education in Florida has not yet been firmly


established, despite certain recommendations appearing in the r
that subject. The National Committee on Education Beyond the
cently appointed by President Eisenhower, will undoubtedly make
will have a bearing upon the educational future of Florida, as it
states. There is a possibility that Federal finances may come
to meet construction costs for initiating multiple college progri
students in our large urban areas. In the past, junior colleges


ecent
High
prop
will
into
ams
and


; Report on
School, re-
iosals which
upon other
the picture
to care for
urban uni-


versities have developed according to community needs, privately or municipally
financed, and they have been regarded with pride by the sponsoring communities.
A greater use of new techniques involving radio and television, especially
for extension courses and adult education, no doubt will be proposed. A wider
use of existing high school plants and facilities for night courses and technical
training in urban areas is already being advocated in some quarters. -
In any eventuality, whether the problem of handling the numbers who desire
higher educational opportunity is solved by an expansion of existing facilities
or the creation of new ones, the Graduate School programs of the Univeasity'must
be properly provided for. The institution cannot much longer command; theiaehpqt
which it has enjoyed up to the present time without making. aupremei eftwt
to develop an exceptional graduate faculty and provide the, tools fordittto w
with. This means augmenting our staff with several distinguished sdholla 4p
strategic areas. It means strengthening departments thatshro'W.eaiew '
selecting .only the most talented personnel for vervacanc hat &


'I "- ^- p^ I . '







tl ir 4, iaH-ary conl, and the expansion of
: and research facilities -.
SAs Dean L E. Grinter has pointed out in his report "Our upper salary level
is now $10,000 below that of the strongest graduate institutions." For those not
acquainted with the total American educational picture, this may seem un-
bieTilvable, but it is nevertheless true. Florida's vital interests demand that some-
thing be done to narrow the distance which now separates it from a more respec-
table place in the American educational picture at the graduate level.
Much of my biennial report has dealt with our scientific and research pro-
grams. I should like to balance the picture somewhat on the humanistic side
by quoting from a recent address by Dr. Mortimer Graves, a distinguished Ameri-
can scholar.
"Our society supports the scientists, not through any love for the constant
and relentless probing of the unknown which science is, but because it sees and
cherishes the results of applied science. Up to the present, it has not seen
and thus has had no chance to cherish the applied humanities.
"There are very definite things to be done. The whole dimension of Asia-
or better, perhaps, of the non-West European world-must be added to higher
education. . Higher education in the humanities is no longer-if it ever was-
only a local responsibility; it is an element of our national security and welfare."
The major problems ahead of us are not problems of sheer science and knowl-
edge but problems which are quite hopeless of solution without the specific compe-
tence and the general attitudes of humanistic scholarship."
Obviously a well balanced program for a University of today and the future
must place proper emphasis on the humanistic and social studies. This the
University of Florida has been doing and will continue to do.
These various factors which have been mentioned as comprising a balanced
program together with constant emphasis on improving the quality of our educa-
tional performance is consistent with the changing policy on admission standards.
We have every reason to expect better students, and students who will properly
assume their obligations of leadership in a university community.
The University of Florida stands today in point of development, student en-
rollment, budgetary support, and national prestige at about the same place the
University of Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin and a few others stood between
one and two decades ago. Florida stands today economically, that is to say, in a
relative position of personal and per capital income where states supporting such
institutions stood between one and two decades ago. Today those state-supported
institutions are among the great intellectual centers of the world. Florida, if
it is to fulfill its destiny, must join this company and do so as soon as possible.
The decision lies largely with the people of Florida as expressed through their
legislative representatives. It is encouraging to observe recent statistics issued
concerning Florida's standing in the nation with respect to rate of increase for
total personal income and per capital income respectively during the past twenty-
five years. It stands at the head of the list. Florida's total personal income shot
up from $752,000,000 in 1929 to $5,923,000,000 last year, a phenomenal 687 per
cent increase. Since 1939 the real income per capital in Florida has increased
76.5 per cent. These figures, coupled with the astronomical predictions relating
to Florida's future growth, measured in terms of increased population and in-
creased industrial activity, would seem to indicate that she will be financially able
to support a first class educational program both at the high school and college
80






and graduate levels. Within a decade, with appropriate biennial financing, it
would be possible to bring the University to a place of eminence in the American
educational picture. In addition to the need for new classrooms, a technological
center, a more equitable salary scale and more adequate student housing, a new
music auditorium, and a new Union building for students, we need a faculty club
where staff members may gather to exchange views and associate with others
not in their department or specialized fields. These things will go far toward
meeting the specifications of a real University center.
The University lost during the biennium, by virtue of retirement, fifteen of
its most devoted staff members and, by death, seventeen others, whose passing
was mourned by a host of former students, colleagues, and friends. The service
rendered by these servants of the State is beyond measure. All whose lives have
been touched and enriched by them would join in an accolade of thanks for their
particular contribution to the cause of education.
The University and the State of Florida will ever be indebted to the follow-
ing staff members who retired during the biennium: '
Gulie H. Blackmon, Horticulturist and Head of Department
Harold G. Clayton, Director, Agricultural Extension Service
Madison Derrell Cody, Professor of Botany
Harwood B. Dolbeare, Professor of Economics
Beverly E. Lawton, County Agent
Lucie Kramer Miller, Lake County Home Demonstration Agent
Clarence V. Noble, Dean and Professor, College of Agriculture
James W. Norman, Professor and Dean Emeritus of Education
George Sheldon Price, PMS&T and Coordinator of Military Departments
Ila R. Pridgen, Law Librarian
George Edgar Ritchey, Agronomist in Charge, Suwannee Valley Station
Hallie B. Sherman, Professor of Biology
Blanche Estelle Skinner, Instructor, P. K. Yonge
Charles H. Steffani, County Agent
William B. Tisdale, Professor and Head of Botany
and to the following, who answered the final summons:
Warden C. Allee, Head Professor, Biology
Clyde K. Beale, Editor, Agricultural Experiment Station and Extension Service
Donald Lee Bensinger, Assistant in Research, Chemical Engineering, EIES
Leonard Paul Elliott, Professor of Physical Sciences
Norman Byron Flagg, Assistant Professor of Architecture
Stewart Walter Freyburger, Instructor in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology
Leonard William Gaddum, Head Professor of Physical Sciences


Arnold Glen Hutchinson, Glades County Agent
James Miller Leake, Head Professor of History and Political Science
William L. Lowry, Associate Professor of Journalism
Walter J. Matherly, Dean of the College of Business Administration
Hugh Clyde Maxwell, Assistant Professor of Business Education
Ambrose E. Nesmith, County Agent
.Lew Sarett, Visiting Professor of Speech
Johannes:A. Sorensen, Bay County Agent
-: Kate V. Wofford, Profesar and-Head of Elementary. Education s:'
Julia Wold, Assistant Librarian and Assistant Professor of LIbr Sry

31


tF,.. J14 .


*^ I


S': C
52?>;
'
rj: f-"^'^ '


Al'
***:





A '
I'-ir: ^e -heh on t -s 4 '



Sir rd the honor to present to! you the followhig report on the conduct of
t ih businessmanagement activities of the Univeisity or the 1954-56 biennial
period. 'The pertinent financial schedules are attached hereto and indicate in
detail. the result of financial operations during this period.
I would like to take this opportunity to comment specifically upon the following
points.

General
1. The development of a comprehensive punched card accounting system has
been continued and during the period of this report all accounting records have
been maintained on punched cards. This has greatly facilitated the preparation
of the periodic operating statements necessary for effective management and has
also enabled us to provide many analyses and studies for administrative attention.
2. The effect of the operation of the Health Center, particularly the Teaching
Hospital, upon the organization and functions of the Business Office has been
the subject of careful study and planning. In cooperation with the Provost for
the Health Center organizational responsibilities and channels of authority have
been developed to meet this need.
3. We believe it is appropriate to insert in this report the following comments
from the audit report of the State Auditing Department for the fiscal year
ending June 30, 1955;
"All expenditures were properly supported by vouchers and were
kept within the provisions of the applicable laws. Those disburse-
ments made from funds on deposit with the State Treasurer were
pre-audited and approved by the State Comptroller prior to payment.
The financial and accounting records of the University were well
kept and adequately reflect the financial transactions during the year.
Adequate budgetary controls were in operation throughout the year
under review."

Fiscal Operations
1. Effective July 1, 1955 and pursuant to Chapter 29800, Acts of 1955, a
Working Capital Fund was established for the purpose of providing central cost
control for general services necessary to the operation of all University depart-
ments and the auxiliary enterprises. All items furnished from central stores
inventory as well as services such as maintenance, repairs and transportation are
being financed from this fund by billing the appropriate operating department
on the basis of actual cost for materials and services furnished, including reason-
able overhead and depreciation charges.
2. During this period a comprehensive cost study has been initiated in collabo-
ration with the State Budget Director and State Auditing Department. The
results of this study will be of inestimable value to management in determining
as accurately as practicable the instructional costs of the several areas of in-
struction represented in the University

32






S. Plans were initiated to expand and refine the accounting systems and pro-
cedures of the Agricultural Experiment Stations in order to provide additional
information relating to the cost of the various research projects carried on by
these stations.

Physical Plant
During the period covered by this report, the Medical Science Building, au-
thorized by a $5,000,000 appropriation made by the 1953 session of the Legislature
was substantially completed. The contract was let for the construction of the
Teaching Hospital authorized by an appropriation of $8,600,000 by the 1955
session of the Legislature and work on this project was initiated. Detailed plans


were developed
Building and th
ture. Arrangem
for a $3,000,000
for both men a
in progress and
ized by the 195
certificates sold
sorority houses.
this period. In


for the construction of the new P. K. Yonge Laboratory School
e Physics Classroom Building as authorized by the 1955 Legisla-
ents were concluded with the Housing and Home Finance Agency
loan to provide approximately 1,000 additional dormitory spaces
nd women. The architectural drawings for these buildings are
construction is expected to begin in the fall of 1956. As author-
3 session of the Legislature plans were developed and revenue
to provide for the construction of six additional fraternity and
Three of the group began construction on their houses during


order to


assist


the University administration in overall campus


development and planning a survey of land use was made by (
and the results of this survey are being used as a guide.
The routine maintenance of buildings, equipment and
scheduled on a systematic basis and from an inspection of 1
are confident that all University buildings are in a good state
Details indicating the nature of buildings and improvements
this period as well as the results of the financial operations
are indicated in the schedules following this summary.


outsidee consultants


grounds has been
bhese facilities we
of repair.
authorized during
of the University


Respectfully submitted,
W. Ellis Jones
Business Manager

SCHEDULE OF BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS
AUTHORIZED DURING THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1954 TO JUNE 30, 1956

Amount
NAME OF PROJECT Authorized
or Expended
-^-- _-^ ^ _----- -~~~ I. -.- II,. . . i -


Teaching Hospital --
Extension of Campus Utilities -
Physics Building
Laboratory School
Small Dormitories-Univ. Campus -
Dormitory Construction -
Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity Property
Agronomy Field Laboratory --
Office Building-Sub-Tropical --
Production Research Building (Citrus Station) -
Machine Storage-Meeting Building Range Cattle Station
Animal Feeding Shelter (Everglades Station)
Greenhouse and Headhouse (Sub-Tropical Station) -




: ^ ^
j


9O40.000
-22,000Q

1,285,000*
750.000
8,.00000000
*2.48'
A2.000
o41.00o
; N4>o






















d B SFacilties Blnding
'^.-P'l -#$l O *) Buildin


- Dining flI Equipiment and Water Coolers
Concrete Ben ch-,-- -
Saintinr and Repairs
4-H Club Camp in Highlands


TOTAL


2-- 2.600
-6,000

28,900
-.. ..",6,600
L 74100
-56,000
"-1,600
500
600
------------00
1,000
25,000
$15,981,980


*$485,000 obtained from the sale of Revenue Certificates


SCHEDULE OF LAND ACQUIRED DURING PERIOD
JULY 1, 1954 TO JUNE 30, 1956


Acreage


Agricultural Experiment


Agricultural
Agricultural


Sigma


Scruggs


Experiment
Experiment


Phi Epsilon


Station-Range
Station-Farm
Station-Farm


Land
Land
Land __


Fraternity ..--..


Property


Palmer Property


540.00
218.00


1964-66
1954-55
1955-56
1954-56
1955-56
1955-56


10.00


Total


$ 22,682.50
57,500.00
24,283.00
25,520.00
10,000.00
9,861.90
$149,797.40


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
STATEMENT OF CURRENT INCOME BY SOURCES


Years


1954-55 and 1955-56


1954-55 1955-56
SOURCE Amount Percentage Amount Percentage


State Appropriations


Federal


Appropriations ........


Student Fees -.-..-.......
Auxiliary Enterprises -.. .-


Gifts and Grants


From


Private Sources .-.. .
Agricultural Sales -------.... -
Sales and Services .----
Endowment .---..
Miscellaneous -...-..-.


$11,175,645.00
900,565.52
1,415,646.77
3,758,966.11

846,048.80
274,777.24
1,121,702.91
2,082.84
12,961.00


$13,188,684.00
1,058,000.37
1,638,216.07
3,609,569.66

467,007.18
394,428.72
1,270,471.17
1,240.00
11,918.59
$21,584,65856.76


Totals . .....$1 0... $.1


100.0%


100.0%


9,008,246.19





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


... ... SUMMAI
g -: FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1


tY OF FUNDS
, 1954 THROUGH JUNE 30, 1956


tt
f ^"1 "


Balance


July 1. 1954


0tttn Outlay ..


'^ ., ent Funds -
4uttih' funds, General .
*^A~~tV-f-ei 4 {.' -..


$ 16,888.61
172,219.98
218,486.15
40,082.88
685,619.78
2,541.25
16,765.26


Additions


$ 6,468,567.00
1,014,880.00
496,447.46
1,481,882.70
1,557.91
18,686.46


Deductions


$ 6,629,348.02
1,172,949.46
470,905.665
1,816,918.78


Reverted


Balance


June 30,


$ 16,338.61
105,608.74
4,015.10
4,032.27
798,623.61


9.079.07


1955


836.17


51,361.59
61,541,97
1,815,09
4,099.16
21,322.65


Reclasslifed
As to Fund


$ 113,728.78
(836.17)
(51,361.59)
(61,541.97)


Additions


$ 6,960.779.00
890,014.00
246,706.00
1,620,038.47
1,865.62
16,568.58


Deductionsu


$ 100,599.650
6,701,964.74
726,665.82
212,505.80
1,489,866.56
1,891.66
14,622.05


y-,At~~~~ ~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~ -T _____ ______----- ^ ^ ^ ^


June 80
Jane S0, 19tU


18,189.18
258,814.88
168.858.88
84.200.70
181,988.o00
4.068.12


$ 1,146,8568.81 $ 9,421,921.58 $ 9,499,195.88 $ 928,613.33 $ 140,965.68 $ 9,734,961.62 $ 9,248,104.18 $ 67,828.18


50,028.55


2.02 $ 205,000.00


88,946.75


601,898.830
78,818.719
127,741.94

(81.015.99)
880.00
'88,200.00
180062.97


779,5662.58


8,609,889.82
1,141,618.60
828,498.91

182,779.48
1,240.00
1,830.00
200,468.97


$ 204.998.73
798,414.89


8,760,054.71
1,102,970.83
307,617.68

139,445.65

1,330.00
236,306.99


83,695.57
105,067.35


-0-
70,083.39


267,532.84
12,394.21
148,623.17

(87,682.21)
2,070.00
538,200.00
44,224.95


(50,028.55)


$ 867,850.00

190,788.87
226,080.00
882,194.69
12,500.00

4,162,714.58
1,274,748.81
280,618.70


107,771.88
1,240.00
1,880.00
207.899.78


$ 852,662.44

111,881.87
226,077.88
895,526.80
10,291.08

8,850,247.48
1,189,721.85
248,558.61


119,284.58
1,100.00
1,880.00
192,804.09


$ 504,687.56

128,986.65

66,751.68
2,208.92

t79,999.89
97,411.11
180,689.71

(49.195.46)
.2,10.00

f9.820.59
(r,xeolm.4)
aeldoO
llllsOQa
smlo. on


$ 995,478.78 $ 6,299,878.26 $ 6,546,139.48 $ 188,766.21 $ 560,446.35 $ 8.204,786.656 7,198.978.88 $ 1,866,80585
S2,142,827.09 $ 16,721,799.79 $16.046,385.36 $ 1,117,379.54 $ 701,411.98 $17,989,697.18 $16,447,088.81 $2.1O40L,0
$ 811,859.57 $ 890,962.28 $ 447,656.69 $ 254,655.16 $ 798,940.80 $ 796,068.51 82st,.9.
I-












UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
SUMMARY OF FUNDS
FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1954 THROUGH JUNE 30, 1956


AUXILIARY FUNDS:
Bookstore ..-..
Printing Department .....
Food Service Division --
Laundry


$ 126,482.50
37,011.97
79,700.53
14,176.73
94,329.81
112,021.86


241,686.67
94,288.36
134,785.34
12,045.36

26,900.25
4,380.30
10,974.02


729.88


Fundsa -.----.


Additions


$ 496,179.52
139,6956.653
1,066,707.42
28,965.36
222,675.15
102,686.82


496,217.01
78,969.63
347,909.17
184,332.60

126,868.34
20,846.81
80,859.16

16,587.562


Deductions


$ 465,120.47
150,322.79
1,034,178.88
25,967.35
216,694.93
203,003.48


466,903.00
59,733.94
238,026.40
181,083.22

121,436.98
9,441.94
81,266.69

17,647.05


Reverted


Balance
June 30, 1955


Reclassified
As to Fund


$ 156,541.55
26,284.71
111,229.12
17,164.78
100,310.08
11,604.20


271,000.68
113,524.04
244,668.11
15,294.74

32,332.61
15,785.17
10,576.49


(280.15)


Additilon



189,007J9P
1,06Q.72,.8
84,880A,9

196,186.18


426,429.44
88,108.71
419,499,25
242,051Oi5


125,108.47
20,986.51
88,514.68

22,082,83


989,513.07 $ 3,407,289.03 $ 3,270,716.07 $ 1,126,086.03 $ 8,B6Z,07g.89


LOAN FUNDS $----- $
ENDOWMENT FUNDS:
'A. DuPont Memorial --- $


Silent Hoist and


Crane


Co. .....


Robert Grer Industrial


Development


Fund ....-


Total Endowment Funds


182,754.76


4,000.00
5,859.87

8,282.00
12,591.87


7,880.71


4,800.00
161.62

800.00
5,761.62


453.02


4,800.00
25.00


$ 140,182.44


4,000.00
6,496.49

3,932.00
13,428.49


100.00


4,9256.00


$ 18~4V1.51


6,075.00
168.11


158.00


6,891.11


UNEXPENDED PLANT FUNDS:
Funds for Plant Additions:
State Building Appropriations:


Medical Center
Old Appropriation
Fire Replacement


Forward -
Fund .......


$ 4.851,811.40
94,129.46
1,526.77


246.49


$ 1,093,403.94
93,678.92
420.49


$ 3,757,907.46


$ 2,557,814.87


450.54


1,351.77


Balance


July 1, 1954


Student Health


Radio Station


Service ...


WRUF __.__-


Student Housing:
Permanent Dormitory


Rental


Temporary


Flavet


Fund .-.---


Dormitories ---


Villages __..-- _-


Dormitory Operating Fund -
1952 Student Hall Dormitory


Operating


Rental
Florida


Property:


Fund ......
y Operations --


Union ...--


Forest Ranger School


Caetera
Total Auxliary


4--
T~ < 'iT3 ?: w f ^*r ,

'S
$ u.n1ii*i. -


- ~~ i ****.**:.WiBS'/BWlm^^ ^^








w.. : r(#FIPe

EK ff^. -,-'. ?h --
'tA >' ~ tt-




^*- ^' *',..
|^?;T^A cm
'if'**-<,
1'& ..A v$.*
%^^J 0)




~ww5.^b^4y^i
4~'-'^ ^ ^.t'


SF:
-


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
SUMMARY OF FUNDS
FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1954 THROUGH JUNE 30, 1956


Balance Balance Reclassified Balnwe
' Jnly 1, 1954 Additions Deductions Reverted June 30, 1955 As to Fund Additions Deductions June 80, 1M
*_ ^ 9 .f _________ ^ ^ ___________ _____ - _ ^ ^ - -- -


It.BANT FUNDS (Continued)

n a- --- 108,717.
FtBUild inf nd $ 16,971.


02
98


156,988.89

108,284.60


1,160,497.56
$ 94,967.91
1,487.10


61,431.25


989,349.40
$ 53,067.21
158,470.49


53,487.43


274,865.18
$ 58,872.68


$ 18,585.82
$ 81,941.58


116,228.42


196,966.09


2,000.00

4,750.00


298.451.00
$ 180,072.72


28,944.66

1,185.25


$ 10,741.49


289,49,85


814.75


4,760.00


98,118.16

166,784.24


100,000.00


98,942.93

147,086.49

1,248.96
40,176.16


371.21


3,804.02


119,647.75


8,804.02


122,549.54


16,746.72


3,515.75


242,197.29


20,262.47


1,806,200.00

225,000.00

42,000.00

41,500.00


881,956.90

128,681.59

2,000.00

81,985.00


974,248.10

101,868.41

40,000.00

9'A8*0.


75,771.48


75,771.48


$ 2,545,008.7


$ 2,800,103.90


1,248.96


56,922.88


821.75


$ 1,551,8328.67


$ 4,349,424.00


$ 4,22,885.77


$ ,599,026.98


2aBU46,.M




IIk


UNIVERSITY OF. FLORIDA
SUMMARY OF FUNDS


FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1954 THROUGH JUNE 80,


B .-
g -^ - ~ ^ --^ fVT R ^^


Balance


July 1,


1954


Additions


Deductions


Reverted


Balance


June 30, 1955


Reclasstfed
As to Fund


UNEXPENDED PLANT


FUNDS


(Continued)


Funds


for Debt Service:


Dormitory


Revenue


Certificates,


Interest and
Series 1988


Srlers


Sinking


Funds:


--. -- -- .--


$ 147,125.66
277,928.18
220,877.78


196I4 .-..-.....
19BB55 .. . ...


$ 35,617.82
267,882.29
160,9385.92
43,828.94


$ 93,765.05
181,112.60
208,403.95
16,907.50


$ 88,978.48
864,647.87
173,409.70
27,921.44


S- 1,160:00
184,871,88
144,988.89
50,98.89
21,664.89
18966a.84


Student Activity
Seholanhhip Pun


Certificates.


Fund


Interest and


Total Funds


Total Unexpended Plant Funds


AGENCY FUNDS:
Student Bank -- -- --
Brakage Deposit --
k Memorial ..-... -.


P . Yone


Internal ...


ROTO Deposits and


Losses .


81,827.87


-. $ 677,759.44
_ $ 6,276,785.42


72,373.29
12,796.29
11.97


844.50


4,442.14
70,177.77
154,268.86
69,762.94
2,783.50

20,589.25
4,591.71
1,756.48
1,626.78
943.34


548.02
060.95


337,587.80


$ 845,802.77
$ 2,397,126.44


$ 1,837,699.11
14,461.00


3,035.08
57,774.58
59,252.23
328,476.26
408,841.91
79,183.53

2,000.00
39,392.20


4,775.40
2,748.00


330,254.90


$ 829,444.00
$ 8,629,547.90


$ 1,883,463.26
9,249.43


821.75


39,160.77


44,686.86


$ 694,118.21
$ 5,048,542.21


$ 8,010,928.86


$ 2,089,817.10
1 448.4#r


$ 76,609.14
18,007.86
11.97


175.08


3,204.50
58,161.15
54,825.00
272,309.85
400,836.63
78,360.83

2,840.00
36,143.75
1,756.48
5,278.55
2,288.00


4,055.57
74,605.00
210,480.27
72,768.22
38,606.20

19,749.25
7,840.16


2,502.92
54,779.86

366,179.21
509,075.6282
101,142.78


800.00


30,988.28

5,989.87
1,656.50
422.00


1,128.68
1,403.34
548.02


S 4
9 2,088,1


862,860.8A
448,886.48
52,72S.88


9,240.00
80,966.88

8,678,f9
2,889.00


-- .i
-7V


Sinking


Funds .....
ds ___,_


Rug. Loan Fund -... ...........
Sorority and Fraternity
Land Dopesit .-. ..-.-..


Contractors' Bid
Point IV Orient


Deposits ...
nation ..............


Program
aminatlon


Frolics ..-..-.....- -


516.95 698.81 479.59


Stadium


Ad


Revenue


--\1. '^,


for Debt Service


Depoitts .-.....--..-.


Point IV
National
Summer


Agriculture
Teacher's Ex


Chbt Fund ................


Campus


1,947.80 485.89





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
SUMMARY OF FUNDS
FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1954 THROUGH JUNE 30, 1956


Balance


Reclassfied
As to Fund


Additions


Deductions


June I, IS


804.27


8,360.00
42.50


S164,489.00

8,040.00
1,760.85

88,850.00
8,706.00
1,424.20


1,578.00
80,484.92


426.00
846.97
316.00


3,800.00


11,058.25


2,275.00
627.37
1,161.10


189.68
154.82


4,500.00
49.87

6,380.75

3,040.00
1,760.85

36,576.00
3,077.63
263.10

1,678.00


30,484.92


236.64


189.u6


4,050.00
91,88

27,884.49

4,000.00
1,886.90


1756.00
27.84


2,662.88


89,584.18

6,846.50
372.41


426.00
110.38
816.00


5,800.00
84.42

82,684.41


1,893.11

86,675.00
8,104.97
1,640.25

1,678.00
89,584.18

6,124.10
424.84


8.260.00
6.*88


68086


7,040.00
1.754.64


17'5.00


1,18i.28


1,64840
58.40


816.00


8,261.22


$ 12,242.21


2,450.00

32,263.45

8,479.20
238.85
2,288.75

2,888.49
18,885.80


4,266.08


$ 11,287.35


$ 28,678.70


6,857.85

1,267.22

1,178.54
17,817.40


2,460.00

8,684.75

1,621.85

1,026.t8

1,159.91
BM 1


$ 420,049.28 $ 2,947,166.90 $ 2.820,610.27 $ 563.098.86 $ 8,890,174.04 $ 8,297,78.00 ,*48?o


928,679,676.18 $28,6e8,284s86s 7u18,798.


498.90
154.82


4,960.00


SC e
tel ( Course
qtiHocation -.


it Insurance
%rmna y

"Tt-*"""""""


$ 1,118,201.29 $ 7,882,402.17


^(|ot(B


$26,219,244.81


10,291,881.00


$24,877,966.77










grt to PK t:: --U-T--7tY Conee 4reportt, by departments.
wS s d encan inatitutionr:

tt Sn the opinion of its staff, the C-l Department, which conducts the course
24lerican Institutions, is making satisfactory advances in developing the
.:4taes.intao genuinely general-education course. While still insisting on basic
.a4~ ~ material, more and more the emphasis is on teaching students how to
deal with facts and information in a meaningful and conceptual way.
During the past year the C-l study guide or Syllabus, which is prepared by
the staff, has been doubled in size and a major part of the student's required
reading is now in the Syllabus. We find that freshmen do more reading when
the readings are actually put in their hands.
The evolution of the Syllabus exemplifies the increasing emphasis being
placed on how to use factual materials to think independently and constructively
in social, economic, and political matters, on how to use information to detect
social and political trends and to analyze their causes, implications, and inter-
connections. Much more time is now allotted to such concepts and analyses as
the basic cultural attitudes and values of Americans, the many-faceted nature
of the American private-enterprise economy, the extraordinary dynamism of the
American economy, a comparison of the American economy with significant
foreign economies, the operation of the balance-of-power system in international
relations and how balance of power is entwined with ideological conflicts, the
implications of atomic energy for the American economy and for future inter-
national relations, the meaning of democracy, and the meaning of liberty.
In making replacements and adding new members to the C-1 Staff, marked
progress has been made during the past year toward achieving our personnel
goals, that is (1) to appoint members of the staff from a wide variety of the
large graduate schools of the prestige universities; (2) to appoint members of
the staff from a wider variety of the social science disciplines, particularly from
cultural anthropology and institutional economics, to insure a better balance
between history, political science, sociology, and economics; (3) to appoint those
who have not ony a thorough grasp of their individual specialties but also the
intellectual ability to think in larger terms and to see how their specialties
affect and are affected by other areas of knowledge; and (4) to appoint those
who have had actual experience in teaching general education as well as in
teaching their specialties.
W. G. Carlton


Physical Sciences


The Department of Physical Sciences (C-2) has made progress during the
past biennium along the following lines: (1) improvement of quality of the
teaching staff (2) the acquisition of facilities for observational work in astronomy
(3) revision of syllabi and (4) interdepartmental cooperation.
(1) Five new members of the permanent staff have been obtained. Of these
four have Ph.D. degrees which were received at California Institute of Tech-
nology, the University of Chicago, Indiana University, and Pennsylvania State,






and one is completing his doctoral dissertation here at Florida. Two are
theoretical physicists with experience in general education at the University of
Chicago, one is a physical chemist with training in general education at Harvard
on a Ford Foundation Fellowship, and two are geographers. One of the men
from the University of Chicago is recognized nationally as an authority on
cosmology.
(2) Before leaving Chicago to become a member of the C-2 staff, Dr. Guy
Omer was able to conclude negotiations with Mr. Richard E. Schmidt for the
gift of an 8 inch refracting telescope. The lens for this telescope was ground
by Alvin Clark who is generally regarded as the best lens maker this country has
produced. The telescope is valued by the manufacturer, Gaertner Scientific
Company, at $20,000.
To house this telescope and a 10 inch reflector previously presented to the
Department by Mrs. Fred Heath of Gainesville, a 16 by 32 foot brick-and-concrete
observatory has been erected just south of the brow of the hill at the old WRUF
site. The refracting telescope has been completely reconditioned in the shop of
the Department of Physics, and it is expected that the observatory will be com-
pleted so that the telescope can be installed in the next few weeks.
The observatory will be used for observation sessions with C-2 and astronomy
students, for research, and for the public. It will supplement the Spitz plane-
tarium, which has been used for classroom instruction, and for demonstrations
to twenty-eight groups from off the campus during the last two years.
(3) The C-21 text OUR PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT by Gaddum and
Knowles of the C-2 staff has been adopted for use by about sixty colleges and
universities during the last two years..
H. L. Knowles

Reading, Speaking, and Writing
Self-Evaluation

Effective teaching being a primary consideration in the University College,
the C-3 staff has followed its continuous program of self-evaluation. During
1955-56 the course Syllabus underwent complete revision, based on new and
improved textual materials. This revision, the nineteenth in twenty-one years,
will be put into use with the opening of the University in September, 1956.
Each semester studies have been made of the testing procedures, of the
instructors' scores on speeches and written compositions, and of the parallel
reading reports and timed-reading charts of all C-3 students. These studies,
made to determine not only the quantity and quality of work done by C-3
students but also the effectiveness of the instructional staff, have served as a
basis of staff meetings, where the meaning and results were discussed and where
plans for improvement were formulated.

English for Foreign Students

At the beginning of the biennium Professor David P. H its join te l
staff to direct the C-3 sections reserved for foreign students. L 't


*1 t
4II .. -
_"~~~Ll~~ti~~tLY~ -~T~p~CU:t 'S- )i~;w
StK


.'I.
- St-'
," :








~isu~owdr~iisr~l
flwrei tiieetbP erff :tf thh ista1
others ate pisued u advance
or rdit ed'im books and thr


s -

Sthe:staf f s I beenStiS il aiolarly purs.its. n
-" bare eamedthe ftdotorats d1ThrifgkthiBsperiod; Six
ed graduate study. :Meabers of oth^ staff have written
ee exercise manuals during this period; ten members


have done editorial work on other books and publications; and twenty-four have
published -articles in regional or national periodicals. .Professor- George D.
Spache has published privately Good Books for Poor Readers and Resources
in Teaching Reading, and, in collaboration with Professor Paul C. Berg, The
Art of Efficient Reading (Macmillan Company). There was also published
a manual to accompany this latter book. Professors J. Hooper Wise, J. E.
Congleton, and Alton C. Morris (of the College of Arts and Sciences), at the
request of Harcourt, Brace and Company, have prepared revised editions of
College English: the First Year and The Meaning in Reading. This is the fifth
edition of the last named book. Both books have accompanying exercise manuals.
Professor R. H. Bowers has edited Robert Johnson's Essayes (1607).

Professional Activities

Members of the C-3 staff have also been active in the programs of professional
and learned societies. Eight members of the staff have served as chairmen of
committees or of programs, and one, Dr. Spache, has served as president of
the National Association for Remedial Teaching and as a member of the Board
of Directors of the International Reading Association. In all twenty-nine papers
have been read before professional and learned groups. Such organizations
include, in addition to those named above, Modern Language Association, South
Atlantic Modern Language Association, Conference on Communication and Col-
lege Composition, National Council of Teachers of English, Florida Council of
Teachers of English, Southwest Reading Conference, and National Association
of Foreign Student Advisers. In addition, other members of the C-3 staff have
been active in the above and other organizations. In all, there have been eighty-
four participation in activities and programs of a professional nature.
J. Hooper Wise
Applied Logic

The course in Applied Logic has reached the age of maturity. For the first
19 of the 21 years of its offering, the course was in process of basic growth and
formulation. It differs from courses in traditional logic found in many collegiate
institutions in two respects. In the first place, the selection of subject matter
has been made solely with the view to its application and potentiality of appli-
cation in the present and future lives of our students. In the second place, this
course endeavors to bring to the student an understanding of the factors which
impel him to think at all and of the factors within himself and concerning him-
self which direct and mold his thinking. In this latter respect the course in
Applied Logic as offered in this University seems to be unique. It is this respect
also which required the long period of basic study and formulation before
it could be said that the course had reached the age of maturity. This study and
experimentation resulted in the publication of a textbook by Little, Wilson,
and Moore in April, 1955. The primary value of this book lies in the fact that
it presents the course to the student in an organized, integrated, and readable
42





form, and at the same time provides him with an abundance of practice material.
The vitality of a staff is usually reflected in the activities of the individUal
members. Five of those who teach Applied Logic are counselors in the University
College and as such are in positions of responsibility and service with respect
to the individual student, over and above the responsibility of the classroom.
This dual assignment of teaching and counseling is reciprocally valuable. The
counseling brings about a better understanding of student problems and enables
the staff member to be more effective in the classroom and the work in the
teaching of logic often enables him to do a better job as a counselor. Several
members of the staff have been invited by fraternity, sorority, religious and
other groups to give talks and addresses. Dr. Moore and Dr. Wilson have, by
invitation, conducted periods of instruction in sound thinking before groups of
the Parent-Teacher Associations at the annual short course held at Florida
State University and at high schools in Tampa and Gainesville. Dr. Wilson also
conducted four hours of instruction in sound thinking for the Dade County
Council of Parents and Teachers.
The need in the department is for continued study and research. It is gratify-
ing that practically every staff member is engaged in meaningful research in
the field of his principle interest. Of greater concern from the standpoint of
applied logic is the formulation and execution of studies designed to explain more
effectively when and how a person thinks and what can be done to improve his
thinking. The observation of psychologists that human beings think to justify
prejudices or to sustain decisions already adopted seems to be correct for most
persons in most circumstances and perhaps there is no more important topic
for investigation than the explanation of man's behavior in the realm of think-
ing and of ways in which he may be induced to improve and to utilize his
thinking potential. This and the improvement of practice material for our
students constitutes a series of projects which two members of our staff plan to
pursue as intensively as other duties will permit. *
W. H. Wilson

Fundamental Mathematics

(The report from this area has been included in the General Mathematics
Department report presented by the College of Arts and Sciences.)

The Humanities

We have been assembling a body of desirable materials concerned with the
influence of the Humanities in contemporary life and using these materials
experimentally in one Humanities syllabus. In January 1955 these essays were
published for our use in book form by the Dryden Press, entitled The Humanities
in Contemporary Life. Since its publication this text has made a real contribution
to the effectiveness of our program. In addition to The Humanities in Con-
temporary Life we also use our text in philosophy, Philosophies Men Live, By.
It has been a source of real satisfaction to see this text, written for our program
and published by the Dryden Press, being-adopted in more than a hundred othei
colleges and universities throughout the country. ,,
During the past two years two members of our staff have had leaves of
absence to accept scholarship awards. Professor Graeffe spent a year aa sting
professor at Okayama University in Jtpan under a Fulbright award; Prefeesso


-+


-
"-i* l




-, -L :




-... tlidm the second World

*sibriati f-rmbd~arindnsata Engidh Departmen tat
BoEties, yrteas a visit n member ;of,,oorSmtaf during Mr. Funkls absence
hordltpftte wretrninag tothe .University. Mr.cnnk resided from our staff to
eaept *an appointment to the United States Information Service at Damascus
at a considerable increase in salary.
.' I April of this year the chairman was asked to speak at the annual Human-
ities; Festival at Peabody College for Teachers in Nashville. While at 'Peabody
he spent some time in consultation with committees at work evaluating the gen-
eral education program in that institution. He was also asked by the American
Association of Colleges for Teacher Education to serve as a consultant in a
Teacher Education and Religion Project which the Association now has under-
way. In May Professor Carson spent two days at Chipola Junior College in
Marianna where he spoke to the faculty and visited a number of classes in
seeking to help them strengthen their Humanities course.
As usual, both Professor Carson and Professor Freeman Hart have made
rather extensive contributions to various community enterprises. Mr. Carson
has been especially active among high school groups, speaking on the importance
of the arts in every day life. He has likewise been asked to judge several art
contests. Mr. Hart has not only been active in community enterprises but also
in the work of the national fraterity to which he belongs and as a member of
the Athletic Committee at the University.
Among our younger staff members both Mr. Tilley and Mr. Livingston have
spent considerable time in completing work for their Ph.D. degrees. Mr. Living-
ston expects to receive his degree from the University of Minnesota during the
present year and Mr. Tilley hopes to complete his work at the University of
* Chicago with another year.
Robert F. Davidson

Biological Sciences
There have been no major changes in C-6 or its administration during the
past two years.
The faculty has grown, replacements have been few, and scholarly work has
been outstanding. The national recognition given to Dr. A. F. Carr on the
publication of his books deserves special mention. The staff in general has been
very active in research while maintaining a satisfactory level of teaching interest
and ability.
Some experimentation has been done on the selection and presentation of
material. For three semesters a series of general lectures has been made part
of the course for that portion having the smaller enrollment (C-62 the first
semester, C-61 the second etc.) Various types of lectures and presentation of
material has been attempted. The staff for the most part feels that this has
been a successful program but time and space make it difficult to apply to the
course as a whole. C-6 should be a four hour credit course instead of the three
hours it is at present.
During the past two years a considerable amount of time has been spent in
discussing the desirability and ways and means of adding some laboratory
experience to the C-6 course. The problem has not as yet been satisfactorily

44




solved.
Another pressing problem associated with the administration of C-6 centers in
the relationships between C-6 and other units of the University concerned with
programs in the field of Biology. Four Coleges apart from the University Col-
lege are principally involved: The College of Arts and Sciences, College of
Agriculture, College of Medicine, and the College of Education.
At present most of our staff members teach upper division courses, supervise
graduate students, hold research contracts, or conduct research work under
arrangements with the Department of Biology. In turn most of the faculty of
that Department teach sections of C-6 and take an active part in determining
staff policy in C-6. For many years this symbiotic relationship has continued
successfully with only a few instances of serious disagreement. (ex. Bly. 181).
This cooperative policy should be continued with the Department of Biology
and extended to include other interested units in the University. Currently, less
well developed cooperative staff agreements have been established with College
of Education (Dr. MacCurdy), Department of Botany (Dr. Griffith), Depart-
ment of Psychology (Mr. Corlis), the College of Medicine (Dr. Leavitt, and
perhaps through joint appointment next year of Dr. George W. Hunter III),
and the Florida State Museum (Dr. Grobman and Dr. Dickinson). The lecture
program has also given us an opportunity to utilize the services of special
lecturers from these other faculties.


Officers


in Scholarly


Organizations


Berner, Lewis, Vice-President and Trustee of Highlands Biological Station,
Highlands, N. C.-Committee for Meritorious Teaching Award, Associa-
tion of Southeastern Biologists.
Carr, A. F., Reappointed Research Associate of American Museum of Natural
History in 1955 for three year period; Associate of Florida State Museum;
Board of Governors of American Society of Ichthyologists and
Herpetologists.
Griffith, M. M., Program concerning community health for high schools under
supervision of State Board of Health.
Leavitt, B. B., Associate in Marine Biology on Research Staff of Woods Hole
Oceanographic Institute, Woods Hole, Massachusetts.


Editors of State or National Journals
Berner, Lewis, Editor of The Florida Entomologist.
Carr, A. F., Editorial Board of Everglades Natural History; Editorial Referee
of Tulane Studies in Zoology.
Kilby, J. D., Associate Editor of Quarterly Journal Florida Academy of Sciences.

Research Grants

Special research grants secured in the biennium under review are listed and
analyzed somewhat in Table 1.

-


- ";'^-; ^--^u
,P
j. :


*


*.; -: *






'^' ,.


T SNOALL


.I < ? .^-


- A


e. .
,1,.
-; ^ 5 *s


*V


r' ,1 -" "-

\


-i', :'*T^ *


* a C eRtarcdi Gci&n*o dxhd6 ih&U:vestsity
1954-156^ -


Granting Agent
National Science Foundation
National Science Foundation
National Science Foundation
Nat' Institutes of Health
Nat'l Institutes of Health
Office of Naval Research
Am. Philosophical Society


Recipient
B. B. Leavitt
A. F. Carr
J. D. Kilby
L. Berner
R. M. DeWitt
J. L. Yount
M. J. Westfall


Amount
$ 1,300
18,000


1956 Summer


17,000
14,816
20,000


1956 Summer


$71,866


C. F


REPORT OF THE


COLLEGE OF


DEAN


Byers


To the P


'resident


of the


University:


I respectfully submit the following report of the activities of the College of


Arts and


Sciences


for the biennium ending June 30, 1956.


Student Personnel

The following tables indicate the number of students formally enrolled as


"majors" in the College during this period.


Data are also presented showing


the number of degrees recommended by the faculty of the College during the


biennium.


Ph.D.
areas


Attention


degrees


invited to the consistent


increase in


the number of


In terms of


largest in the University.


College of Arts and Sciences
Student Enrollment


Undergraduate
1954-55


Summer


Session


Spring .... ..
TOTAL


1955-56
Summer


Session _.._..._


Spring -..
TOTAL


Duration
1954-55
1955-57


1953-56
1955-5&
1952-56


ARTS AND SCIENCES


being earned by graduate students of this College.


covered and number of degrees granted, our doctoral program is the


Graduate


- b 1 4


: "





Degrees Recommended


Undergraduate
BS in BS in BS in


JM Comm. MA


Graduate


MS PHD


August -- .-. 1954
January .. 1955


TOTAL


August _.. .... 1955
January .... 1956
June ......... 1956


TOTAL
1954-55


TOTAL UNDERGRADUATES
TOTAL GRADUATES ...


(No Jm or Comm)


1955-56
TOTAL UNDERGRADUATES (No Jm or Comm) ............ 236
TOTAL GRADUATES _....__....._._ .._..-... ........_...... 101

Faculty Personnel


During the first


year


of the biennium there was a slight decrease in the size


of the instructional staff of the College.


For the academic year 1954-55 there


were


159 full-time faculty on our staff. During the second


year


of the biennium


this number was increased to 168.
I regretfully report the death of Dr. Lew Sarett, Visiting Professor of Speech,
Dr. W. Clyde Allee, Head Professor of Biology, Professor W. L. Lowry, Associate
Professor of Journalism, and Dr. James Miller Leake, Head Professor of History
(retired).
Dr. Sarett was appointed to the faculty of the College in September 1951
following his retirement from Northwestern University, and died August 17,


1954.


Dr. Allee retired from the faculty of the University of Chicago in 1950.


He accepted the responsibility of heading our Department of Biology in Sep-
tember 1950 and died March 18, 1955. Professor Lowry served in our Department
of Journalism from his appointment in 1930 until his retirement on February
28, 1955. He died in May 1956. Dr. Leake retired as Head Professor of History
and Political Science June 30, 1950. He had served as a member of our staff


since 1919 and died June


1956.


Dr. H. B. Sherman, Professor of Biology, was retired from active duty at his
request on January 31, 1955. He served as a member of the Biology Department
from 1925 as Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, and Professor. He served
as Acting Head of the Department from January 1, 1947 to January 31, 1950.
Resignations from our staff:
C- .. F. Cook,. Assistant Professor of Physics
D. B. Dusenbury, Associate Professor of Speech


David Ellis, Associate Professor of Mathematics
D. A. Furber, Instructor in French
E. C. Hanna, Instructor in Journalism

47


' -







S"f ~Gei"iatry and Assistant Professor


i.' Ts tkt Plrfessodiof I~bitical Science and Director of
^i^^ uE administration CltaringrService
, a. ntiar Try,;Assistant Professor of Sieech and English
2 'Paal Mozson, Assistant Professor of Phlilsophy
: M;W. Petrce, Instructor in Libraiy Science and Assistant in Reference
^ and Bibliography, University Library
F. P. Rikker, -
i; S. S. Sadler,
J. V. Slater, Assistant Professor of Biology
A. Sosin, Assistant Professor of Physics
M. L. Van Natta, Instructor in Chemistry


E. C.


Williamson, Instructor in History and Collector of Florida Manu-


scripts
J. W. Young, Assistant Professor of Mathematics


Leaves of absence


were


granted during the biennium as follows:


Ernest R. Bartley,


Associate


Professor of Political Science--Ford Founda-


tion Fellowship
Tom C. Battin, Assistant Professor of Communications-To set up TV
Workshop for. Teachers at the University of Houston
Richard L. Day, Instructor in Geography-Professional Improvement


Alfred


Diamant,


Assistant


Professor


of Political


Science-Danforth


Teacher Study Grant
David L. Dowd, Associate Professor of History-Social
Council Grant


Science


Research


William


C. Havard, Assistant Professor of Political Science-Southern


Fellowships Fund Grant


Edwin


C. Kirkland, Professor of English-Officer of Cultural Affairs with


the U. S. Information Service at Bombay, India
Eugene G. Kovach, Assistant Professor of Chemistry-Military Duty with


the U.


S. Navy


Cynthia Larry, Assistant Professor of Speech and English-Professional
Improvement


William Frederick


Larsen,


Assistant


Professor


of Political


Science-


National Municipal League Senior Staff Fellowship
Rembert W. Patrick, Professor of History-To teach in Graduate School
at Columbia University
John Edward Van Meter, Instructor in Speech-Professional Improvement
Richard B. Vowles, Assistant Professor of English


During the past two


years


the following changes occurred in the administra-


tive structure of the College:


Dr. Donald E. Worcester, Professor of History, was designated Head Pro-
fessor of History
Dr. H. K. Wallace was appointed Head Professor of the Department of
Biology.

48






Faculty Accomplishment

During the biennium the faculty of the College participated in an ever-
increasing number of research and professional activities. The results of these
activities are indicated in the following:


Books published _-__ ___
Journal articles ..._______...
Reviews and other publications -.__ __._
Staff Members Filling Major Offices ----.-. .
Editorial Positions Held by Staff -
Number of Meetings Attended .___..___
Number of Papers Presented _...-..........-_..-


Graduate Program-College of Arts and Sciences


Each year has shown a slight increase in the number of graduate students
admitted to the program. The Departments of the College are increasingly aware
of the necessity of maintaining admission standards so that the quality and
successful performance of graduate work has been most satisfactory. The num-
ber receiving advanced degrees has been stabilized at an average of about 34
per semester.
The Department of Geology has been given permission to give the Master's
degree as soon as their staff has been increased by one new Ph.D. instructor.
The Department of Geography has been approved for the giving of work leading
to the Ph.D. degree.
Efforts have been made to increase the quality of graduate work as admin-
istered by our various Departments. The addition of qualified faculty, an increase
in the salary scale, and the provision of adequate space and equipment are vital
for maintaining and further developing our graduate program.
For the coming year, the use of the Graduate Record Examination with
specified "cut-off" scores for admission will pose one of our most important
administrative problems.


Student Advisement


The College has continued to maintain its thorough academic counselling
program during the past academic year. Thirty members of its faculty served on
the Advisement.Panel and all students in the College had at least one appointment
with an adviser during each term in residence. This program has now been in
operation for 5 years. During each year about one-fifth of the Advisement Panel
members are replaced for one reason or another. As of the present time, about
fifty of the present faculty members of this College are serving or have served
as members of the Advisement Panel. This amounts to a quarter of our entire
faculty. Perhaps never before in the history of the College has so great a pro-
portion of its faculty been so well-educated in the details of degree requirements
and related student difficulties. The system would appear to be resulting in a
steadily increasing dividend in effective, -but informal faculty advisement in
addition to the regular program of academic counelng, cn a
A d- -_ .










--il5eel 9 o di~tiona space cctiaues tao fe. the basic problem confronting
tbeCoUege. Inneaeh of my biennial reports since 1948 I have reported a desperate
need for space. Currently the.need is greater than it was eight years ago. With
a steady increase in the number of students, and with the College constantly
accepting additional academic responsibilities, I once again respectfully request
that additional space be made available for our use.
The instructional programs of several departments of the College are seriously
retarded because of inadequate teaching facilities. Additional class rooms are
badly 'eeded. Once again I request that consideration be given to the advan-
tages to be derived from the construction of a University theatre.


Respectfully submitted,
Ralph E. Page
Dean


REP/dc


Attention


the College of


is directed to the following publications by members of the staff of
Arts and Sciences during the biennium July 1, 1954-June 30, 1956.


Biology


Allee, W. C. and J. C. Dickinson.


Dominance and Subordination in the Smooth


Dogfish Musetlus Canis (Mitchill). Physiol. Zool. 27(4), Oct. 1954.


M. Banks. Relations Between Flock


Size and Agressive


havior in Common Domestic Hens. Anat. Rec., 120(3), Nov. 1954.


...------. .--. Potter.


Some effects of Experience with Breeds of Gallus gallus


on behavior Hens Toward Strange Individuals.


---.............. E.
ordinance in
April 1955.


Bader, R.


[. Banks.


Effects of an Androgen on Dominance and Sub-


Six Common Breeds of Gallus gallus.


S. Variability and Evolutionary


Physiol. Zool. 27(2).


Rate in the Oreodonts. Evolution,


Vol. LX(2), June 1955.


Berner, Lewis.


The Southeastern


cidae) Quart. Jour. of
A new Species
Ent. Soc. of Washingtoz


Species


of Baetisca


(Ephemeroptera Baetis-


Vol. 18.


of Paraleptophlebia from the Southeast; Proc. of
i. 57(5), October 1955.


---....... Mosquitoes of the Shire River System, Nyasaland. Annals of the
Ent. Soc. of America, 48(4), July 1955.


-. --- . The


Genus


Neophemeridae.)


Neophemera


Annals Ent.


in North


America


(Ephemeroptera:


Soc. of Amer. 49(1), January 1956.


Briggs, John C. Behavior pattern in Migratory Fishes. Science, 1 p.


Illustrated works on fishes.


--- A monograph of the clingfishes.
pp. 114, figs, 15 maps.


and David K. Caldwell.


Copeia, No. 3, pp. 243-245. 8/55.


Stanford Ichthy.


The characteristics and distribution of


the spotted cusk eel Otophidium omostigmum (Jordan and Gilbert). Quart.
Jour. Fla. Acad. Sci. 18(4) :285-291, 5 figs.

50


- I---_. __...__ E.







Brodkorb, Pierce.


A chachalaea from the Miocene of Florida.


66(3) :180-183, 1 fig.


- - ..- .
- -- - .


Wilson Bulle.


The type locality of the Florida sandhill crane. Ak,72(2) :207.
Number of feathers and weight of various systems in a bald eagle.


Wilson Bull., 67(2):142.


The avifauna of the Bone


Valley Formation, Florida Geological


Survey, Report of Investigations, 14,. pp. i-iv, 1-57, 11 pl.
....-.. .Pleistocene birds from Eichelberger Cave, Fla.Auk,73 (1


:136-137.


Animal


Remains


from


Four


Preceramic


Antiquity 21(4) :383-395. April 1956. [with


Sites


in Fla. Amer.


T. Neill and H. J. Gut].


Brookbank, J.


W. and Albert Tyler.


Antiersa that Block Cell Division in De-


veloping Eggs of


Sea Urchins.


Proc. Nat. Acad. of


Sci. pp. 304-307.


--..---.-----.. and _-.._.-. ...._..... Inhibition of Division and Development of Sea


Urchin Eggs


by Antisera Against


Fertilization.


Proc. Nat' Acad.


Sciences. pp. 308-313.


Carr, Archie F. Elements of Ecology (Review of G. F


121(3156)


Clarke's book.) Science


:1, June 1955.


--- .......... Report of Committee on Research.
Philosophical Society, pp. 138-140. 1954.


.Year Book of the American


David K. Caldwell.


Don't Give Tag to Baby.


Fla. Wildlife,


April 1956.
Dickinson, Jr., J. C.


Florida Bird Life.


(Review of Alexander Sprunt)-2pp.


.---.._-----.-,-..._., T.


H. Hubbell,


& A. M. Laessle.


The Flint-Chattahoochee-


Apalachicola Region and Its Environments. 1(1). Fla. State Museum Bull.
January 1956.


Goin, Coleman J.


Rediscovery of the Frog Litoria luteola Gossee in Jamaica.


Mus. of the Inst. of Jamaica, No. 7,


August 1953.


Description


a New


Sub-species


of Frog


Eleutherodactylus


Ricorde for the Bahama Islands. Amer. Mus. Nov., No. 1708.


andWalter


Auffenberg.


The fossil


Salamanders


of the


Family


Sirenidae.


Bull. Mus. Comp. Zool. 112(7): August 1955.


Gregg, James H., Alice L. Hackney and J. O. Krivanek. Nitrogen Metabolism of
the Slime Mold D. discoideum during growth and Morphogenesis. Biol.


Bull. 107(2)


:226-235,


October 1954.


---....... Serological


investigations of cell adhension in the slime molds, D.


discoideum, purpureum and P.
813-720. May 1956.


violaceum.


Jour. of Gen. Physiol. 39(5)


Hussey, Roland F
United States


Some new or little-known Miridae from the northeastern


(Hemiptera)


Proc. Ent.


1 fig.


Soc. Washington, 56(4): 196-202,
1 7


Concerning some neotropical


Stenopodinae


(Reduviidae, Hemip-


Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer., 47(2) :287-300, 13 figs. 1954.


S. Notes


on some American


Veliidae


scriptions of two new species from Jamaica.'
Fla. Ent., 37(3) : 133-138.


(Hemiptera), with the de-
edo-author, Ca'rl 7. 13kBi t
- l ; -


Some records of Hemiptrf ter ..rida' iafi


Acad. Sci. 18(2) :120-122.


Concerning the genus Microvelia


- II > 'I*'


- ......... ......... and









.V.Hi :ptr: Veliidae). [co-author, C. J. Drake, Iowa'State College]. Fla.

iu l-J. C, Elinsa.. Review of the genus Doldina Stal (Hemiptera:
edariidae). Quart. Jour. Fla. Acad. Sci. 1955, 18(4) :261-278.
IWhy, Jolin B. The Fishes of Two Gulf Coastal Marsh Areas of Florida. Tulane
Studies in Zoology, 2(8), 1955.


and David K. Caldwell.


the Florida Peninsula.


A list of fishes from the southern tip of


Quart. Jour. Fla. Acad. of Science, 18(3), 1955.


Layne, James N. Notes on the Development of the Red Fox Fetus; N. Y. Fish and
Game Journal. January 1956.


Odum, Howard T. Boron in Florida Waters.


17(2)


1954.


___. and


D. K. Caldwell.


Fish Respiration in


the Nat


Copeia, No.


nural Oxygen
2, May 1955.


Sherman, H. B.


The Occurrence of Bison in Florida.


Quart. Jour. of Fla. Acad.


of Sci. 17(4), Dec. 1954.


..........Description of


a new race of Woodrat from Key Largo, Fla. Jour.


of Mamm. 36(1), Feb. 1955.


....... A Record of Lasiurus and of Vampyrops from Paraguay. Jour. of
Mamm. 36(1), Feb. 1955.


Slater, John


The Quantitative Evaluation of Dissolved


Organic Matter in


Natural Wate
.............. Some


irs.


Vol. LXXIII, No. 4, Trans. of Amer. Micro. Soc. 10/54.


Observations on the Cultivation and Sterilization of Protozoa,


Amer. Micro. Soc. Vol. LXXIV, No. 2. January 1955.
Influence of Uracil and Certain Nucleotides on Growth in Tetra-
hymena. ASB Bulletin.
_-.-..-------_ Differential Activity of Certain Rations on Growth and Survival
of Tetrahymena. Ant. Rec. 120(3), Nov. 1955.
----- Anti-Leptospiral Action of Tetrahymena. Ant. Rec. 120(3), 11/54.


.......... Influence


of Certain


Krebs


Cycle


Intermediates


on Protozoan


Growth. Anta. Recor. 120(3), November 1954.


-....... Flame-Photometric


Determination


of Calcium


in Tetrahymena.


Anat. Rec. 120(3), November 1954.
Twente, John W. A Population study of Cavern-Dwelling Bats. 11 pp.


Westfall, M. J.


New Dragonfly Record for the United States.


37(4),


Fla. Ent.


12/54.

BOOKS
Guide to the Reptiles, Amphibians and Freshwater Fishes of Florida. A. F. Carr
and C. J. Goin. University of Florida Press. 1955.
The Windward Road. A. F. Carr. Knopf. 1956.


52


Quart. Jour. Fla. Acad. of Science


Gradient of an Anaerobic Springs in Florida.





Physics


Publications:

M. M. Gordon


"Concerning the Rutherford Scattering Formula,"


Physics, Vol. 23, No. 5 (May, 1955),


pp. 247-248.


"Stripping Theory and the Be9 (p,d) Be8 Reaction.


American Journal of

(Abstract) Physicel


Review, Vol 99, No. 5


(Sept. 1, 1955),


pp. 1625-1626.


A. G. Smith
"Daylight Visibility of Stars From a Long Shaft," Journal Optical Society


of America,


45, 482. (1955).


A. G. Smith, M. L. Vatsia
"Effect of a Long Shaft on Polarization of Skylight," Quar. J. Fla. Acad.


Sci. 18,


123 (1955).


A. G. Smith, M. J. Saunders
"Atmospheric Turbulence,


Physical


Review


1627 (1955)


Abstract.


"Phase


Contrast Observations of Flames,"


J. Applied Physics


(1956).

A. G. Smith


Editor and co-author of


classified reports on electronics for U.


S. Navy,


July, 1954 to June, 1955.
"An Optical Evaluation of the Contraves ETOS
Air Force Report, August, 1955.

Speech


Phototheodolite,"


Lester L. Hale


Published the article on Dr.


James Rush appearing in A History of


Speech


Education


in America


(Appleton, Century, Crofts, 1954).


Dallas


C. Dickey
Published with Streeter chapter on "Lucius Q.


of History


and Criticism


of American


Revised with Oliver and Zelko


C. Lamar" in


Public


Address


Communicattve


Speech


Volume III
(Longsman,
,h (Dryden,


1955).
Douglas W. Ehninger
Published:


"Whately oni


Dispositio"


Quarterly Journal of


Speech,


1954.


"A Bibliography in Rhetoric and Public Address for the
Monographs, 1955.


Year


1954, Speeck


"The Intrinsic


Sources


of Blair's Popularity,


With Golden.


Southern


Speech Jounal, 1955.
Book Reviews: SSJ-1955-56, QJS, 1955.
H. Hardy Perritt i A
Published: - ,
"Robert Barnwell Rhett: Prophet of Resiatenee," .Southen SpeeJb nwll


.-" -" L


",I '


,
. -* .^ **--











"Blame it on the Architect," Pkayers Magsfne, 1955.


- -U


* ? *
' .* -4


-


"F*t* in- ohi ., -
LYatgs of yocaf Chracteristicus Speeci 3(bvznorazsfs, 1966.
'<. -It .E fus #.t 4-


Chemistry


Anthony.
Aiialysi for total and isotopic carbon in intermediary metabolism studies.
Anthony, D. S., and Long, M. V. Oak Ridge National Laboratory report
No. 1303. Available from Office of Technical Services, Dept .of Comn-


merce, Washington, D. C.


Experimental Data
and Multiple Exp


(Twenty cents).


Useful in Establishing Maximum Permissible Single
iosures to Polonium. Anthony, D. S., Davis, R. K.


(R. A. Taft San. Eng. Center, U. S. Public Health Service, Cincinnati,
O.), Cowden, R. N. (Deputy Coroners, Montgomery Co., Dayton, 0.),


Jolley,


W. P.


(Contractor to Aero Med.


Wright-Patterson Air


Force Base, Dayton, O.). Paper published by the U. N. in Proceedings
of the International Conference on Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy.


Aug. 8-20, 1955, Geneva, Switzerland.


Vo. XIII.


Analysis of Mixtures of Radioactive Isotopes by Gamma Ray


ments Application of the Method to Actinium227


Thorium227


Measure-


, and Ra-


dium223


. Anthony, D. S., Campbell, J. E. (R.


U. S. Public
address), anc


Health


i Robajdek,


Service,


Cincinnati,


E. S. (Nutritior


A. Taft Sai
0.), Hagee,
i Research


n. Eng. Center,
G. R. (same
Lab.. Archer-


Daniels-Midland


Co., Minneapolis, Minn.


Radiation Research


(1956).
The metabolism of Actinium227 and its Daugthers Thorium227


dium2a2 by Rats.


R. A. Taft


Campbell, J. E.


286-93


and Ra-


(Dept. of Health, Ed., and Welfare,


San. Eng. Center, Cincinnati, O.) Robajdek, E.


Daniels-Midland Co., Minneapolis, Minn.), and Anthony, D.
Research 4, 294-302 (1956).


The Effects of Small Amounts of Pol


San. Eng. Center,


Stevenson, G.


U. S. P'


T. (Dow Chemical


S. (Archer-
S. Radiation


onium on Rats. Davis, R. K. (R. A.
ib. Health Service, Cincinnati, 0.),
Co., Midland, Mich.), Busch, K. A.


(R. A. Taft' San. Eng. Center, U.


John I


0.), and Anthony, D. E
'. Baxter
GENERAL CHEMISTRY
Revision, August, 1954.


S. Public Health


Service,


Cincinnati,


. Submitted to Radiation Research, Fall 1955.


A Laboratory Manual of Semi-Micro Methods.


Anion Exchange Behavior of Metal Fluoride Complexes in Aqueous Solu-
tion. A Preliminary Study- (with G. B.'Kauffman), May, 1955.
A. P. Black


"A Survey of the South."
Sec. 11 (8/30/54).


Southen Issue, American Dyestuff Reporter,


"The Water Superintendent and Fluoridation" (reprinted) Mueller Record,

54'


I^\





Aug. 1954.


(Pages 4-8).


Special Report on Florida's water resources in "Florida on Parade" see-


tion of September-October 1954, issue of Industrial Development.
22-23).


"A Rational View on the South's Pollution Problem."


trial Wastes Conference.
Manufacturing Chemists J


CEEDINGS, M.C.A. (1954)


Pages


Southern Indus-


Southern Association of Science & Industry.
Association & Texas Chemical Council. PRO-


(Pages 1-7).


"Water Requirements in Florida" ENGINEERING PROGRESS AT THE


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.


Bulletin No.


April 1955 (Page 14).


"Facts in Refutation of Claims by Opponents of Fluoridation.
Dental Assn. June 1955. (Vol. 50, pages 655-664).
"The Strange Case of Fluorine-the Blessed Impurity." W


Jour. Am.


Torld Health


Organization
(Back page).


Newsletter.


Vol. VIII.


No. 2-


3. February-March 1955


"The


Water


Resources of the


South.


Institute. Birmingham, Ala., Vol.
"Salt Water Encroachment-A Wa


Engineering.


Bulletin


VIII No.


of Southern Research


2, 1955. (Pages 12-24).


ter Resource Problem."


Water Works


Vol. 109, No. 4 April 1956. (Pages 338-342).


"Higher Education and Florida's Future-Chapter "The Water Resources
of Florida." Vol. 2 in press.
A. M. Buswell
Chapter 14-Fermentations in Waste Treatment-Industr. Fermentations,
Vol. 2, 36 pp. Edited by L. A. Underkofler, Chem. Pub. Co., N. Y., 1954.


Section on


Sewage,


Encyclopedia


Interscience Encyclopedia, Inc., N.


of Chemical


Technology,


Vo. 12


, 1954, 14 pp.


Bacteriological explanation of rate of oxygen consumption in the BOD


test. Swge. and Ind.
I. Van Meter).


Wastes


, Vo. 26,


No. 3,


1954.


(with H. F. Mueller,


Quantitative measurement of rainfall by radar.


Assn.


Jnl. Amer.


Wtr.


Wks.


Vol. 46, No. 9, September 1954 (with G. E. Stout and J. C. Neil).


Bactericidal effects of ultrasound. Ind. and Engr; Chem. Vol. 46, p. 1751,
September 1954 (with L. A. Russell and others).
Laboratory studies on the kinetics of the growth of nitrosomonas with


relation to the nitrification phase of the BOD test.
Vol. 2, No. 1, 1954 (with T. Shiota and others).


Appl. Microbiol.,


The BOD Test and Total Load.


Swge.


and Ind.


Wastes.


Vol. 27, No. 11,


November 1955.
Water. Scientific American, Vol. 194, No. 4, p. 77 (with W. H. Rodebush).
April 1956.
G. B. Butler
"Preparation and Polymerization of Unsaturated Quaternary Compounds.


V. Propargyl Derivatives."


J. Am. Chem.


Soc. 76, 713 (1954).


. "Preparation and Polymerization of.. Unsaturated Quanternary Ammoninm


Compounds. VI. Derivatives of
Soc.,: 76, 2418 (1954).


1,4-Diaminobutene-2.


Chem.


>1
4 .
t '*
: ^


., .- -* *."


J[< An.









-*


2*^fl'in;a -Nrwyk*&ttIfons. IEL Luafr*ndeA~teti bit tb;.Course of
^t ^444ffiqfiin $ Vbwl ethes o Uhnsatu* 1beuoli.'? J3. An. Chem.
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7:


with


,


.
* ^ -'




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