Group Title: Historic St. Augustine: Block 9 – Lot 2
Title: The Field News
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 Material Information
Title: The Field News Sanchez House
Series Title: Historic St. Augustine: Block 9 – Lot 2
Physical Description: Brochure/pamphlet
Language: English
Publication Date: 1969
Copyright Date: Public Domain
Physical Location:
Box: 4
Divider: B9-L2 Francisco Xavier Sanchez
Folder: Francisco Xavier Sanchez B9-L2 (Ind. Life Ins. Bldg.)
 Subjects
Subject: Saint Augustine (Fla.)
105 Saint George Street (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Francisco Xavier Sanchez House (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Poujoud House (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine -- 105 Saint George Street
Coordinates: 29.894588 x -81.312675
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094100
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: B9-L2

Full Text

THE FIELD NEWS
INDEPENDENT LIFE-HERALD LIFE-INDEPENDENT FIRE JUNE 1969 VOLUME 45. NUMBER 6


SANCHEZ HOUSE






The INDEPENDENT LIFE and Accident Insurance Company


HERALD LIFE Insurance Company


INDEPENDENT FIRE Insurance Company

HOME OFFICE JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


SERVING 14 STATES THROUGH 156 DISTRICTS


The Independent Life and Accident Insurance Company Qualified and in Operation
j Herald Life Insurance Company Qualified and in Operation
Herald Life Insurance Company Qualified for Operation


JAMES C. CRAIG
Editor-in-Chief

BETTY DEDMON
CAROL KISER
CYNTHIA HERRING
Assistant Editors

R. N. CREWS
Art Director


THE FIELD NEWS

Issued monthly by the Public Relations Department of The Independent Life and Ac-
cident Insurance Company and its subsidiaries, Herald Life Insurance Company and
Independent Fire Insurance Company. The Field News is published for the employees
and their families to keep them informed on Company progress and to recognize their
achievements. Member of the International Council of Industrial Editors, and the
Northeast Florida Industrial Editors Association. Address correspondence to the
Editor, Public Relations Depatrment, P. O. Box 629, Jacksonville, Florida, 32201.















COMPLETE RECOVERY



FOR VIETNAMESE YOUTH


Looking strong and healthy and very happy, Thi Van
Liep boarded National's Flight 49 out of Miami for a
cross-country trip to San Francisco and a Pan American
jet to Saigon May 29. Van Liep is the 17-year old Viet-
namese youth with the heart defect whom Captain Richard
Tessler, son of Agent Sam Tessler, Miami 1-5, Florida,
discovered in a remote village in Vietnam. Captain Tessler,
surgeon for the 2nd Battalion, 25th Infantry Division, be-
came acquainted with the youth when he visited a village
called Muy Han. After examining Van Liep, Dr. Tessler
consulted with another physician and both agreed that
without corrective heart surgery, the young man could not
live more than a year.
Since there were no facilities for open heart surgery in
Vietnam, Dr. Tessler enlisted the aid of his parents in an effort
to bring Van Liep to the United States for surgery. Together


they wrote army officials, congressmen, hospitals, government
agencies anyone who would listen.
After many months they finally succeeded. Pan American
flew him to the United States free of charge. Men of the 2nd
Battalion donated enough money to pay for his exit visa and
the trip to Miami from San Francisco. Miami Heart Institute
paid for his hospitalization and a surgical team in Miami do-
nated their services.
The operation was a complete success. After several
months of recuperation he returned to his homeland to face
life with good health.
What this young man carries in his heart, who can say?
One thing for certain, he holds no animosity for Americans or
the United States. This noble thing that Dr. Tessler did,
although he faced discouragement at every turn, represents the
finest of the human spirit.
-By Betty Dedmon


d;


The Miami 1-5, Florida, district gave a picnic in honor of Thi Van Liep, who
faces a better life after open heart surgery.


Looking the "picture of health," the Vietnamese
youth is shown with Agent Sam Tessler.


JUNE 1969/ THE FIELD NEWS 1








Action In The Ordinary Agencies


MAY

MOST

VALUABLE

MAN OF THE MONTH


FRANK R. LIBERSTEIN, the "Most Valuable Man of the
Month" for May 1969, is a special Ordinary agent in the
Charleston, South Carolina, agency. Agent Liberstein who
entered the service of the Company in January 1969, has
placed $50,000.00 new fully prepaid applications, $160,000.00
new business and $1,625.81 first year commissions for a total
of 4,316 points. Second place winner was N. H. Derrin of
Miami, Florida, with 1,602 points. Third place winner was
R. T. Lee of Knoxville, Tennessee, with 1,492 points.


1969 ORDINARY LEADERS THROUGH MAY
Florida Division
R. G. Daniels, C.L.U., Acting Division Manager $4,151,985

Miami Agency
Al Agress, Agency Manager $ 926,057

Tampa Agency
W. Horace Parrish, Agent $ 437,570


APP-A-WEEK CLUB


C. E. Logan
T. E. Flanagan
W. H. Parrish
N. H. Derrin


R. T. Lee
129 Weeks
84 Weeks
40 Weeks
20 Weeks


248 Weeks
F. R. Liberstein
J. C. Breward
R. A. Spector
C. W. Copeland


18 Weeks
18 Weeks
11 Weeks
8 Weeks


AGENT BURRUEZO HAS BIG MONTH


Agent F. Burruezo, Tampa 1-47, Florida, was really busy
between the dates April 29-May 28. During that time
he managed to close two cases. Both cases were appli-
.cants who are physicians and each bought a $25,000 execu-
tive whole life policy plus $1,000 per month disability on
one doctor and $600 disability on the other. He also


BRYAN PRESENTED TRAY AND TROPHY


Assistant Vice President Windham recently awarded Ordi-
nary Agent C. B. Bryan a trophy and silver serving tray
for winning the 19th Anniversary Grand National Tour.


wrote a $20 per day hospitalization plan on each doctor. He
collected a quarterly premium of $884.94. His superinten-
dent, E. U. Wilson, was instrumental in closing the cases and
his manager, J. S. Sarvis Jr., had only praise for the Tax and
Proposal Service, under the direction of Assistant Vice Presi-
dent James B. Windham, who prepared the proposals.


SECRETARY COMPLETES INSURANCE COURSE


Atlanta, Georgia, Agency Manager K. M. Suffridge presented
Mrs. Helen Hearle with a certificate for being the first Ordinary
secretary to complete the "Step Into Life Insurance" course.


2 THE FIELD NEWS/JUNE 1969


Obt










Bryan Attends MDRT Meeting...



Vacations In Europe


Agent Carter Bryan, Jacksonville Ordinary Agency, who
became a certified applicant for the Million Dollar Round
Table by selling $1,000,000 in volume during 1968, will spend
June 19 through June 24 at the annual meeting held at the
Diplomat Hotel in Hollywood, Florida.
According to Bryan, the annual meeting is held for all
certified applicants and members of the Round Table. New
members meet the top producers and discuss ways to increase
sales and other points of interest.
Speakers will include distinguished educators, philoso-
phers, economists, bankers, lawyers and accountants who will
add scope and significance to the meetings.
An estimated 2,000 members and certified members will
attend. Already over 7,530 have qualified for the Million
Dollar Round Table in 1968.
The Million Dollar Round Table is both an organization
and a way of excellence. As a professional association for the
world's elite life insurance salesmen, the organization is dedi-
cated to improving the ability of life insurance representatives
who serve the public.
Goals that bind members of the Million Dollar Round
Table are a common determination to excel in selling
and as individuals to support the highest principles of the
profession.
The Million Dollar Round Table has four classes of mem-
bership. Certified applicants are candidates for membership.
They must meet all qualifications for either each of two
consecutive years, or each of any three years within a period
of five consecutive years to become a qualifying member.
To become a member of the Round Table is no easy
task-one must be wholly dedicated to the insurance pro-
fession and willing to work many long hard hours. If past
performance is anything to go by, Carter Bryan will become a
member of the Million Dollar Round Table in 1969.


June 26 will be a very special day in the life of Agent
Carter Bryan, Jacksonville Ordinary Agency, and his lovely
wife, Cheryl. This is the day they will leave on the glorious
European holiday won by Bryan for reaching a $1,000,000
volume in 1968. The prize for this achievement was a trip,
first class, to Paris. However, instead of spending the entire
time in one place, Bryan took what it would cost to stay in
Paris and applied it to a European vacation that will include
three days in Paris, visits to Germany, Austria, Switzerland,
England, and Italy. The Bryans will return to the United States
July 28.
Bryan will visit some of the most fascinating cities of
the entire world. Among them will be: Salzburg, Austria,
which is the city where the movie "Sound of Music" was
filmed; Lucerne, Switzerland; Venice, Italy, famous for its
canals and gondolas; Rome, Italy; London, England; and
many more.
Bryan is looking for competition in the year 1969 and at
the Sales Seminar persuaded at least four agents to give him a
"run for his money." He feels that with a great deal of hard
work, many of Independent Life and Herald Life's field force
can win this trip.
There is no question that Carter Bryan has worked long
and hard to achieve this goal! According to Bryan, he has
always been afraid of selling and has overcome this by losing
himself in his prospective client. His primary interest when he
tries to sell a new prospect is not how much commission he
will make but rather "giving the best service I know how."
The only regret that he has about the trip is the time lost
that could be used to reach the million and a quarter goal he
has set for 1969. According to Bryan, he has not yet reached
the maximum of his career, and feels that his "success" is just
ahead. What makes Carter Bryan run? The "sweet smell of.
success."


ORDINARY AGENTS' TRAINING PROGRAM


Seven agents in the Company's Ordi-
nary Program recently visited the Home
Office for a one-week training program.
Pictured left to right are: Assistant
Vice President Robert H. Ivey, Agents
J. L. McMillian, R. C. Henly, H. Parrish,
S. C. Wisniewski, J. D. Sanders III,
C. W. Copeland, Advanced Under-
writing Consultant-Ordinary R. G. Dan-
iels, C.L.U., Agent R. W. Human and
Assistant Vice President Windham.


JUNE 1969/THE FIELD NEWS 3









Promotions in the Field


SUPERINTENDENT
W. V. GIFFORD reentered Independent Life
January 11, 1965, in Ocala 1-30, Florida, and
was promoted to superintendent May 5, 1969.


SUPERINTENDENT
J. D. WATKINS earned the position of super-
intendent in Florence 3-19, Alabama, April 28,
1969. He entered Independent Life September
7, 1964, in Murfreesboro 5-8, Tennessee.


SUPERINTENDENT
D. R. JONES entered Independent Life Decem-
ber 26, 1966, in Tuscaloosa 3-10, Alabama, and
was promoted to superintendent May 5, 1969.


Basic Training Course Graduates

The following agents have completed the Company's 35-week training program to earn their Basic Training Course certificates.


D. H. Adams, Jacksonville 1-41
L. E. Akins, Jasper 3-17
N. R. Barlow, Jackson 5-6
R. T. Barrett, Orlando 1-9
J. L. Bonner, Opelika 3-14
J. P. Borden Jr., Gulfport 6-5
J. J. Bowes, Miami 1-4
J. J. Bowling, Tampa 1-15
J. W. Braswell, Jacksonville 1-2
R. E. Brimlow, Orlando 1-9
W. M. Carter, Houston 44-3
C. M. Core, Little Rock 41-1
R. L. Douglas, Little Rock 41-1
L. G. Driggers, Conway 4-10
M. J. East, Houston 44-3
0. L. Edwards, Selma 3-8


D. L. Emmit, Knoxville 5-2
J. A. Gullo Jr., Tampa 1-16
J. R. HARRISON, Eufaula 3-16
P. M. Hyman, Charleston 4-2
C. A. Ingle, Chattanooga 5-1
D. S. Johnson, Athens 2-20
R. E. Johnson, Daytona Beach 1-22
R. W. Johnson, Norfolk 40-3
S. Keaton, Albany 2-1
R. M. Lopez, New Orleans 42-2
B. H. Montgomery, Tupelo 6-5
D. C. Mosby, Memphis 5-7
LC. McGowen, Houston 44-3
W. Osmun, Orlando 1-9
G. W. Parker, Murfreesboro 5-8
L. D. Perkins, Greenville 4-13


E. G. Pickens,Greenville 4-13
B. H. Prescott, Orlando 1-9
J. E. Price, Richmond 40-1
D. E. Rix, Tampa 1-47
F. G. Rumore, New Orleans 42-2
T. L. Stalvey, Ft. Pierce 1-46
J. R. Starnes, Gastonia 8-3
P. M. Suits, Dallas 44-2
C. R. Taylor, Rock Hill 4-9
J. A. Vendetti, New Orleans 42-2
L. L. Vickery, Valdosta 2-6
G. G. Wheatley, Greenville 4-13
W. M. Wilbanks, Clarksdale 6-4
O. E. Wilson, Tampa 1-47
0. W. Wilson Jr., Daytona Beach 1-21
R. D. Williams, Rome 2-18


First Quarter Honor Superintendents


L. E. MADDOX, Lakeland 1-27
Central Florida Division

K. L. FOSSETT, Fayetteville 8-2
North Carolina Division

A. R. BLADEN, South Bend 45-6
Atlas Division

D. J. ORLANDO, Brunswick 2-27
Northeast Florida-Georgia Division


4 THE FIELD NEWS/JUNE 1969


D. W. DAY, Homestead 1-7
South Florida Division


C. R. BROACH, Florence 4-8
Coastal Division

J. E. CHAMPION JR., Albany 2-1
Northwest Florida-Georgia Division


D. R. SEGERS, Andalusia 3-22
Alabama-Mississippi Division

H. G. WALKER, Augusta 2-28
Georgia Division

C. H. HARRELL, Memphis 5-5
Mid-South Division

B. T. SPECK, Little Rock 41-1
Southwest Division










From The Home Office


BROOKE HEADS DISASTER UNIT


MRS. VLASSELAER

ELECTED TO OFFICE


Assistant Secretary-Treasurer Mrs. Nell C. Vlasselaer was installed as
first vice president of the Pilot Club of Jacksonville on May 27.
Mrs. Vlasselaer entered the service of Independent Life in 1940 as
the Company's ninth employee and secretary to President J. H.
Gooding and Secretary-Treasurer C. G. Snead. In 1943 she was pro-
moted to executive secretary and elected assistant secretary-treasurer
in 1959. Active in many organizations, she has held the offices of
secretary, second vice president, is immediate past district secretary
and has served as chairman of many committees in the Pilot Club.


Richard Brooke Jr., assistant vice president, has
been named to head the disaster preparedness
and relief committee of the Jacksonville area
chapter of the American Red Cross. Brooke has
been a member of the chapter's board of direc-
tors for six years and on the executive com-
mittee for two years.


STANLEY MAKES PRESENTATION ON BEHALF OF INDEPENDENT LIFE


Second Vice President James H. Stanley recently presented a
Palamino mare on behalf of Independent Life to Channel 7 for


the annual auction held May 30 through June 6. The auction
is held to defray expenses for the publicly owned station.
JUNE 1969/THE FIELD NEWS 5









15 YEARS


Service





Milestones










25 YEARS


l


20 YEARS


MISS JULIA MATHIS serves on a debit in
Columbus 2-13, Georgia, and celebrated her
20th anniversary with Independent Life June
14. She is a member of the President's
Club, having won pins, plaques and a Sales
Seminar invitation. Miss Mathis is active in
her church and is a charter member of the
Eastern Star.

20 YEARS


H. M. HUDSON celebrated his 15th anniversary
with the Company June 21, 1969. He began on
a debit in Thomasville 2-7, Georgia, and still
serves in this district. In 1956 he was promoted
to superintendent and still serves in this capacity.
He is a member of the President's Club, the
local LUA and is a graduate of LUTC Parts I
and II. He has served all offices of the LUA
and was LUTC instructor for four years.

15 YEARS


E. P. RENNER, special agent in the Northeast
Florida-Georgia Division, began his career with
Independent Life on a debit in St. Petersburg
1-17, Florida, on June 5, 1944. In 1950 he
was promoted to special agent. He is a Presi-
dent's Club member and has won numerous
pins, plaques and Sales Seminar invitations. He
is a charter member of Civitan International.

20 YEARS
J. I. RAY JR. became an employee of the
Company in 1949. He is presently serving as a
superintendent in Live Oak 1-24, Florida.

20 YEARS


0. L. JACKSON celebrated 20 years with the
Company June 13, 1969. Beginning in Talla-
hassee 1-23, Florida, he has served in Florence
4-8, Sumter 4-12 and Anderson 4-11, South
Carolina. He has also served in Winston-Salem
8-5, North Carolina.

15 YEARS
MRS. MARTHA WILLIAMS entered the service
of Independent Life as a secretary in Jackson-
ville 1-2, Florida. She observed her 15th anni-
versary on June 14.


15 YEARS


G. E. LUTES, manager of the Thomasville 2-7,
Georgia, district office, celebrated his 20th year
with the Company June 2, 1969. Beginning on
a debit in Swainsboro 2-17, Georgia, Lutes trans-
ferred to Thomasville in 1957 and assumed the
position of manager. He is a member of the
President's Club and has earned numerous pins,
plaques and Sales Seminar invitations. Lutes is
a graduate of LUTC Parts I and II. He is a
member of the Thomasville LUA.


C. D. BURDEN entered the services of the
Company in 1954 and will observe his 15th
anniversary on June 28. He is presently located
in Tampa 1-47, Florida. He has served also in
Birmingham 3-12, Alabama. He is a member of
the President's Club and is on the board of
directors of the Tampa LUA.


D. L. PRUITT began his career with the Com-
pany in Ocala 1-33, Florida. He is a member of
the local Life Underwriters Association and is a
graduate of LUTC Part I. He is also a member
of the President's Club and has won several pins
and plaques.

15 YEARS
J. G. CROTEAU came to work for Independent
Life in St. Petersburg 1-18, Florida, and has
served there since 1954.

15 YEARS












H. R. DOBLE JR. marked his 15th anniversary
with the Company on June 21, 1969. His
career began on a debit in Charleston 4-2, South
Carolina. In 1961 he transferred to Columbia
4-1, where he presently serves as superintendent.
He is a member of the President's Club and has
earned pins, plaques and Sales Seminar invita-
tions. A member of the local LUA, he has also
completed LUTC Parts I and II.


6 THE FIELD NEWS/ JUNE 1969









10 YEARS
F. BURRUEZO, an agent in Tampa 1-47, Flor-
ida, celebrated his 10th year with Independent
Life June 8. He is a member of the President's
Club with pins, plaques and Sales Seminar invi-
tations. He is also a member of the local Life
Underwriters Association.


10 YEARS


R. JOHNSON, a superintendent in Ocala 1-33,
Florida, marked his 10th year with Independent
Life on June 1. He entered in Marianna 1-26
and has served several districts. He is a member
of the local LUA and is a graduate of LUTC
Parts I and II. He also holds membership in the
President's Club.

10 YEARS


A. L. ALFORD will observe his 10th anniversary
with the Company on June 29. He began on a
debit in Conway 4-10, South Carolina, and ad-
vanced to superintendent in 1962. He is a
member of the President's Club and is a graduate
of LUTC Parts I and II. He is also a member of
the local Life Underwriters Association and the
American Legion.


10 YEARS
E. D. KIRKLAND marked his 10th year with
the Company June 22. He is a member of the
local LUA.

10 YEARS
F. A. STOERKEL has been with the Company
since 1959, serving as an agent in Homestead
1-7, Florida.


10 YEARS


A. D. JONES, superintendent in Pensacola 1-11,
Florida, celebrated his 10th year with Indepen-
dent Life June 15. He earned his advancement
to superintendent in 1967. He is a member of
the President's Club and has earned two Sales
Seminar invitations. A member of the Pensacola
LUA, he is a graduate of LUTC Parts I and II.

10 YEARS
D. E. BURGESS became employed with Inde-
pendent Life on June 29, 1959. He is an agent
in Greenville 4-4, South Carolina.

10 YEARS
J. C. CRONK was introduced on a debit in Ft.
Myers 1-32, Florida, on June 15, 1959. He has
served in this capacity since that time.


10 YEARS


10 YEARS


Service





Milestones














10 YEARS
MRS. KATYE MOORE celebrated her 10th
year with Independent Life on June 1. Mrs.
Moore serves the Company in Charleston 4-2,
South Carolina, as an agent.

10 YEARS


MRS. MARELLE MITCHELL serves the Com-
pany as a cashier in Pensacola 1-12, Florida.

10 YEARS
J. A. DESARIO joined the Independent Life
family in 1959. He entered on a debit in
Daytona Beach 1-22, Florida, and has served as
a superintendent since 1960.

5 YEARS


M. H. TURNER, superintendent in Troy 3-15,
Alabama, celebrated his 10th year with Inde-
pendent Life June 15. He began on a debit in
Troy and advanced to superintendent in 1967.
Turner has completed LUTC Part I and is a
member of the President's Club.


J. B. PARKER JR., began his insurance career
in Valdosta 2-5, Georgia, in 1959 and earned a
promotion to superintendent in 1960. He has
completed LUTC Part I and is a member of the
local LUA.

10 YEARS
R. L. CARTER began his service to Independent
Life on June 8, 1959. Beginning in Memphis
5-5, Tennessee, he soon advanced to the position
of superintendent. In April 1969 he transferred
to Florence 3-19, Alabama, to assume the
responsibilities of manager.


MISS SANDRA MOORE has served the Com-
pany as a cashier in Birmingham 3-5, Alabama,
since 1964. Miss Moore enjoys swimming and
water sports.


JUNE 1969/ THE FIELD NEWS 7








First Quarter Honor Awards


FT. PIERCE 1-46, FLORIDA
Assistant Vice President James E. Crouch, left, awarded
Manager A. H. Causier, center, with the South Florida
Division's First Quarter Honor District plaque while
Division Manager A. L. Baucom, C.L.U., right, looked
on. The award was presented during a banquet given in
honor of the occasion, with district personnel and their
guests in attendance.


BRUNSWICK 2-27, GEORGIA


Left photo: Agent G. Kirkland, left, was presented the First
Quarter Honor Agent plaque for the Northeast Florida-Georgia
Division by Division Manager E. L. Forrest, right. Pictured
8 THE FIELD NEWS/JUNE 1969


with Kirkland and Forrest is Mrs. Kirkland. Right photo:
District personnel attended the banquet given in Agent Kirk-
land's honor.














WINSTON-SALEM 8-5,
NORTH CAROLINA
Left to right: North Carolina Division Man-
ager J. E. Culbreth was on hand to present
Agent T. J. Parker with the division's Honor
Agent plaque for the first quarter of 1969.
Next to Agent Parker is his fiancee, Patricia
Myers, and Manager H. H. Fairchild.


AUGUSTA 2-28, GEORGIA


Top left photo: Georgia Division Manager J. A. Davaney, left,
looks on while Manager E. A. Shaw, center, proudly accepts
the First Quarter Honor District plaque from Vice President
Cecil B. Carroll, right. Top right photo: Left to right is Divi-


sion Manager Davaney; Superintendent H. G. Walker. one of
the first to receive the Honor Superintendent's plaque; Vice
President Carroll, making the presentation; and Manager Shaw.
Bottom photo: District personnel attending the banquet.
JUNE 1969/ THE FIELD NEWS 9





















"A magnificent contribution," "enchanting," "absolutely
lovely," "wonderful," "thanks to Independent Life for restoring
this house," "beautiful," "I'd love to live here"! These are
just a few of the comments entered in the guest book of the
Sanchez House in St. Augustine since the opening on May 11,
1969.
President Jacob F. Bryan III is a member of the St.
Augustine Restoration and Preservation Commission. This
group was formed to protect and restore antique landmarks in
and around St. Augustine. Through the Commission's efforts,
15 buildings have been restored.
Bryan has personally hand picked each item for the
Sanchez House. Choosing antiques from all over the United
States, his choices are excellent, both in beauty and design.
When the Company bought the Sanchez House, it was
completely run down and the inside looked as if it should be
condemned. The back porch sagged and termites had eaten
much of the first floor wood. The back yard was unkept, high
in weeds and extremely unsightly.
The scene is completely changed now. The exterior
walls are restored and painted a brilliant white, while the
shutters and wrought iron gates are a contrasting black. From
the front balcony hangs five colorful flags, the St. Augustine
Coat of Arms, Spanish, Old Glory, the Union Jack (British),
and the Confederate, representing the different governments
under which St. Augustine has been ruled.
To the left of the front door is a wrought iron gate that
leads to the rear court yard. The back yard that once was
unsightly to the eye, now is a beautiful thing to look upon.
Covered in concrete, with a fountain to the rear, it has flower
beds planted with colorful blooming annuals spaced against
the fence that surrounds the yard.
Entry to the house is made through the rear door. To
the right after entry is a bedroom furnished with birch antiques.
Everything in this room is early 19th Century. The bed has
round knobs at the head and foot to which ropes were tied to
hold the mattress. The chandelier is an exact copy of birch
candle holders which could be lowered and lighted and then
brought back up to its original position. The mirror over the
chest has a brass rim around the glass which denotes it is very
old.
Throughout the house beautiful Persian rugs are used.
This particular rug is unusual because it is very heavy and is
approximately 100 years old. The bedspread is a reproduction
of a pattern popular at this time. The draperies match the
paper, for in Colonial days fabric was much cheaper and more
plentiful than papet, thus the entire wall was covered with
fabric.
The master bedroom to the immediate.left of the rear
door has a carved poster bed that rises very high off the floor.
10 THE FIELD NEWS/JUNE 1969


The beds were so high in fact, that they had a large step by the
bed which opened up and inside could be concealed a chamber
pot. On the bed is a bed warmer which was filled with hot
coals on winter nights and then was moved around close to
the bed to make it comfortable for the occupants. The wash
stand is unusually beautiful, the bowl and basin is of crown
derby. It has inlaid work which is Hepplewhite-dated 1790.
This room also has a cradle dating back to 1790 with a bisque
baby doll with original costume made out of fine linen. The
small cradle with the doll is early 19th Century. The rug in
this room is 100 years old.
Up the hall to the right is the Insurance Room. This
room is used by the agents in the St. Augustine area. The map
over the fireplace dates back to 1873. It is the map of the new
world at that time. It shows Cape Canaveral, St. Augustine,
Cumberland Island and the Matanzas Inlet. The clock on the
mantel is early American vintage, New England. The chandelier
is an old candelabra that has been wired ingeniously to hold
electric lights. It is dated in the 17th or 18th Century. It was
lowered by chain to light the candles and pulled back up to
the ceiling.
Across the hall from the Insurance Room is the room
which houses the historical documents. President Bryan has
exerted much effort to secure original documents for this room.
It contains a $3.00 bill used by the American Insurance Com-
pany, dated January 14, 1883. Insurance companies were
allowed to issue currency in the 1800s. Some of the oldest
insurance documents in the world are in this room. Over the
fireplace is the Phoenix, a bird out of Greek mythology, which
is supposed to rise out of the flames of fire and start life anew.
This was the symbol of the Phoenix Fire Company of London
1834. The desk in the corner of the room is Queen Anne. On
the wall is the picture of a shipwreck. This is supposedly
the first type of insurance sold by Lloyds of London.
Up the beautifully carpeted stairs to the left is the green
bedroom. It has two three-quarter beds cut down to fit into
this room. They are high posted and are skillfully carved. The
rug is 150 years old and is most unique in that the color is
green rather than the deep purples usually found in Persian rugs.
The rocking chair is probably one of the most unusual and
beautiful in the world. It is held together completely by wire.
The living and dining area are on the second floor as was
the Spanish custom. Spanish houses were built extremely
close to the street and the living quarters on the second floor
would, of course, keep the noise of the street to a minimum.
Bringing food in was no problem, for servants were plentiful
and were housed in the rear of the main house as was the
kitchen.
The living room of the Sanchez House is beautiful. It
has two chairs which are exact reproductions of the chairs of


]KO'UI








































-Photo courtesy of Phillip Whitley, St. Augustine Record
Standing in the beautiful living room of the Sanchez House are left to right: First Vice President Wilford C. Lyon Sr., Mrs. Jacob F.
Bryan III and President Bryan. In the left side of the room are the two chairs, exact reproductions of that time. Right forefront: The.
three-cornered chair designed especially for. the hoopskirts, popular in the 1 700s. The Sheraton sofa still looks lovely, but was too old
to receive another upholstering job.


that time. The china tea service is Georgian. The design
stamped on the tea service is Staffordshire. The wicker baby
chair is early 18th Century and is hand made. The fire screen
is the oldest furnishing in the house and probably dates back
to 1700. The very interesting three-cornered chairs are 1790-
1820. The story is told that these chairs were especially
designed to accommodate ladies with hoop skirts or gentlemen
with cutaway coats. The sofa is a reproduction of the Sheraton
sofa and was too old to receive another upholstering job. The
paintings are around 1830. The secretary desk is dated by the
dealer at 1790. The interior shows it is probably that vintage.
The glass in this desk has the original blown glass in the panels.
The chandeliers in the living and dining room are from a
matched pair of large standing candleholders which were taken
from an old French hotel in New Orleans and wired as hanging
chandeliers.
Opposite the living room is the dining room. The furni-
ture in this room is set apart by the carved woodwork. It is
Louis XIV and XV furniture.. southern France and Spain.
The china is of the old wet paste thumb print with thumb
signs, which was usually ordered by the colonists from a china
factory in France. The floral arrangement is around 1860 and
is made from dried real flowers. The dining room table and
chairs are early French Provincial. The dessert set is old
sandwich cranberry glass-very uneven in application and color.


All the silver is coin silver which was hammered from silver
coins at that time. The glass is old pressed glass.
There are no words to describe how very impressive the
Sanchez House is. At your earliest opportunity, plan a trip to
see St. Augustine again and spend an hour or so just browsing
through the Sanchez House. You will be guided by two very
lovely and charming hostesses, Mrs. Trudie Hines and Mrs.
Hayzel Brewer. There is no admission charge, something
almost unheard of in St. Augustine or any other place for that
matter. Directions to the House are as follows: Out U. S. No. 1
South (Phillips Highway). This road takes you into the city of
St. Augustine. After reaching the city, take the Historic Route
to Cathedral Street at the Bridge of Lions which is located just
past the Matanzas Fort. Turn right, one block to St. George
Street. Turn right on St. George and go about two and one
half blocks. There is a parking lot across the street from the
House with meters. You may also park in the rear of the
building and enter the courtyard through the iron gates. Ad-
mission to the House is through the rear door. Days that you
may see the House are: daily from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed
Thursday and Sunday. Sunday admittance will be announced
later in the Field News.
The Sanchez House is an absolute delight and is one
more reason to be proud to be a part of Independent Life.
by Betty Dedmon
JUNE 1969/ THE FIELD NEWS 11










Home Office Visitors


The following people recently toured the Home Office and were photographed while being greeted by an official of the Company:


'4 f





I~I ...'
'I." 1


Left to right: Hostess Jima Potter,
Superintendent K. M. Lamb, Hostess
Brenda Rains, Coordinator of Field
Training-Combination F. S. Thran-
hardt, Hostess Susan Griffin, Agent
D. W. Mason, Agent N. C. Powell,
Superintendent H.W. Bartlett, Agent
C. R. Watson, Agent B. W. Clements
and Agent L. L. Blackwell.


PENSACOLA 1-11, FLORIDA


McRAE 2-23, GEORGIA
Left to right: Assistant Vice Presi-
dent Jack W. Rice, Hostess Jackie
Shiver, Superintendent R. H. Sum-
ner, Agent W. R. Wilkes, Agent M.
A. Stephens, Agent J. W. Sumner,
Hostess Jackie O'Hare, Manager L.
Haymons, Hostess Gloria Capps,
Agent A. M. Spires and Agent H. W.
Pearce.


Left to right: Supervisor of Hospital Claims A. J. Weeks, Hos- Left ro right: Supervisor Weeks, Agent J. H. Bonelli, Mrs. Bonelli,
tesses Jackie Shiver, Susan Griffin, Manager W. M. Sweat, Mrs. Agent L. W. Nowling, Agent S. T. Bonelli, Hostess Rhoda Galbraith,
Sweat, Mrs. C. Wise, Hostess Ann Sullivan and Agent Wise. Superintendent H. C. Randolph and Hostess Sharon Ludwig.
12 THE FIELD NEWS/JUNE 1969









Home Office Visitors


GRIFFIN 2-21, GEORGIA
First row, left to right: Superinten-
dent J. O. Stewart, Agent C. A.
Johnson, Agent F. E. Craig, Agent
W. L. Kite. Second row, left to
right: Second Vice President James
H. Stanley, Hostess Loraina Dyer,
Director of Field Training-Combina-
tion H. T. Prince, Hostess Ernestine
Carlton and Coordinator of Field
Training-Combination Thranhardt.


pI


First row, left to right: Agent
J. F. Jones, Agent A. O. Stewart,
Agent P. M. Smith, Agent F. G.
Jarrell. Second row, left to right:
Second Vice President Stanley, Hos-
tess Loraina Dyer, Director of Field
Training-Combination Prince, Hos-
tess Ernestine Carlton, Coordina-
tor of Field Training-Combination
Thranhardt and District Manager
A. N. Crouch.


SUMTER 4-12, SOUTH CAROLINA


Left to right: Agent W. M. Henry, Hostess Gara Davidson,
Agent L. T. Giles, Agent T. C. Talley, Superintendent B. B.
Henson and Vice President James C. Craig.


Left to right: Supervisor Weeks, Agent C. A. Ridgeway, Hostesses
Myra Assaf, Marilyn Hedrick, Iris Mackenzie, Superintendent L. W.
DeHart, Agents J.W. Hicks, E.R. Griffin, S.W. Cribb and N. L. Cross.
JUNE 1969 /THE FIELD NEWS 13


CHATTANOOGA 5-1, TENNESSEE











Fielding


FARRIS RECEIVES
LEADING AGENT AWARD
Agent J. C. Farris, left, received the district leading
agent award for the month of April from Superin-
S tendent R. F. Broussard. Farris' record was $50.67
CPI and $41,500.00 CVI.






BAILEY ELECTED
VICE PRESIDENT OF G.A.M.A.
C. P. Bailey, Manager of West Palm Beach 1-29,
Florida, was recently elected vice president of
G.A.M.A. of Palm Beach County. He has also
served as president of the LUA and Junior Chamber
of Commerce.




S LEADING STAFF TROPHY PRESENTED
Superintendent L. A. Knox, left, Opelika 3-14,
Alabama, received the leading staff trophy for the
first quarter of 1969 from Superintendent R. C.
Oliver. This trophy is based on CPI per debit and
his staff had $125.83 total for an average of $25.16
per debit, with $169,210.00 CVI for an average
r per debit of $33,842.00.









PRESIDENT'S CLUB WINNERS
President's Club plaque winners for 1968 in Rich-
mond 40-1, Virginia, are from left to right; front
row: Superintendent J. E. Morck, Agent W. P.
Thomas, Superintendent R. B. France, Superinten-
dent E. C. Jeffries. Second row: Agent G. R.
Goble, Agent C. J. Short, Superintendent W. E.
Ferrand, Agent R. E. Steele, and Agent Z. C.
Ferguson.


14 THE FIELD NEWS / JUNE 1969









Fielding


ALBANY 2-1, GEORGIA, WINS CONTEST


Since the Florida-Georgia Division was split, there has been a the losing district. The losing district must dress in white
running contest between the Georgia districts and the Florida serving jackets as waiters customarily do. The contest ended
districts. The winner is selected from the two groups at the with Georgia leading. Albany 2-1 was the leading district with
end of each calendar quarter. The winner is determined by $23.70 CPI per debit and $32,334.00 CVI per debit. Left
the amount of CPI and CVI per debit with a 10 percent pen- photo: Manager C. T. Straughn, Quincy 1-25, "volunteered"
alty for those districts who maintain excessively high arrears. to carry Manager R. V. Costantino's tray to the "seat of
The winning district is treated to a luncheon and is served by honor." Right: The serving line led by Manager Costantino.


UNCLAIMED ALLOTMENTS


Missing any collection commissions?
Government allotments received for the
below do not match Home Office Debit
accounts. If you identify any of the
names, write to Home Office Debit
immediately.


Austin Walter Jr.
Larry G. Beasley
Karl A. Bradshaw
Donnie R. Chastain
Alton H. Evatt
James T. Greaves Jr.


$11.31
$10.65
$ 5.28
$ 4.16
$ 9.65
$24.36


Colorado P. Green
Richard F. Harbeson
James B. Hogan
Alfus D. Manley
Paul S. Stewart
Junious Williamsn


IN MEMORIUM


We extend our deepest sympathy to the
family and friends of Agent E. W. Adams
of Atlanta 2-22, Georgia, who recently
passed away. Agent Adams entered In-
dependent Life in Decatur 2-34 April
15, 1963, and transferred to Atlanta
in 1965.


We are deeply saddened to report the
death of Agent Betty Jane Blackwell, Ft.
Myers 1-32, Florida. Mrs. Blackwell en-
tered the services of the Company Octo-
ber 28, 1968. To Mr. Blackwell, her son,
Harold, and daughters, Roberta and Lo-
retta, we offer our sincere sympathy.


JUNE 1969 / THE FIELD NEWS 15


$18.82
$10.25
$16.90
$ 6.33
$ 6.48
$ 5.95









Fielding


SNICHOLS COMPLETES
DALES CARNEGIE COURSE
Superintendent J. O. Nichols, left, Jackson 5-6,
Tennessee, receives congratulations from Bob Alex-
ander upon his graduation from the Dale Carnegie
course.













GLASS LEADS DISTRICT
Agent J. J. Glass, left, Birmingham 3-5, Alabama,
was presented a trophy for leading the district in
February by Superintendent H. W. Tam.













HOUSE LEADS DISTRICT
-- j Agent J. W. House, right, Houston 44-3, Texas.
receives his staff leadership trophy for the month
of March. Presenting the trophy to him is Super-
intendent C. W. Hetchler.


16 THE FIELD NEWS /JUNE 1969









Fielding


ADAMS HAS 52 WEEKS INCREASE
Agent C. M. Adams, Norfolk 40-3, Virginia, receives
a trophy from Manager D. G. Copen for having 52
consecutive weeks of increase issue, for a total of
$569.32. He was assigned a debit in Norfolk April
21, 1968, and has not had a decrease since this
assignment.












HIGGINBOTHAM
RECEIVES TROPHY
Superintendent C. W. Hetchler, Houston 44-3,
Texas, presents Agent C. H. Higginbotham, right,
with the staff's leadership trophy for the month
of April.








SYMPATHY

We offer our condolences to the following employees:
t Agent L. L. Walker, Ft. Myers 1-32, Florida, upon the passing of his
grandmother, May 7, 1969.
t Superintendent and Mrs. J. W. Johnston, Ft. Myers 1-32, Florida,
upon the passing of Mrs. Johnston's father, May 7, 1969.



FORRESTER AND PINDER RETIRE .
Manager H. A. Forrester and Superintendent Staf-
ford Pinder of Miami 1-34, Florida, were honored
with a retirement dinner at the Everglades Hotel,
May 9, 1969. Both were presented with beautiful
silver trays. Pictured left to right: Assistant Vice
President James E. Crouch, Manager H. A. Forrester,
Mrs. Forrester, Vice President Cecil B. Carroll,
Mrs. Stafford Pinder, Superintendent Pinder, and
District Manager W. L. Picot.


JUNE 1969 / THE FIELD NEWS 17










Fielding


TAYLOR HONORED
WITH RETIREMENT LUNCHEON
Daytona Beach 1-21, Florida, gathered to honor
Superintendent R. H. Taylor with a retirement
luncheon recently. Left to right are: Northeast
Florida-Georgia Division Manager E. L. Forrest,
Mrs. R. H. Taylor, Superintendent Taylor, and
Assistant Vice President James E. Crouch, present-
ing him with a gift.


NEW ARRIVALS
Congratulations to the following parents who announced the recent
birth of their children:
t Agent and Mrs. Johnny Watkins, Marietta 2-29, Georgia, a son,
Max Donald, March 29, 1969.
t Agent and Mrs. Joe W. Thompson, Marietta 2-29, Georgia, a son,
Joseph Sean, May 13, 1969.


AGENT HAS OUTSTANDING RECORD
Agent J. D. Williams, Norfolk 40-3, Virginia, was
assigned a debit February 24, 1969, and since that
time has had $114.02 in CPI. He has maintained
arrears of less than 25 percent and collections of
109 percent.


18 THE FIELD NEWS/JUNE 1969









Fielding


RAY DISTRICT LEADER

Manager Clyde Walker, left, Opclika 3-14, Alabama,
recently presented an electric roaster oven to Agent
J. E. Ray for leading the district in the first
quarter of 1969. Agent Ray has $58.09 CPI
and $68.000.00 CVI.







DUNHAM LEADS DISTRICT

Agent G. L. Dunham, right, Opelika 3-4, Alabama,
receives a chafing dish from Manager Clyde Walker
for leading the district in CPI during the week of
the Sales Seminar.









BLACK PRESENTED
DISTRICT LEADER TROPHY
Agent J. H. Black, right, Birmingham 3-5, Alabama,
was presented a trophy for being district leader ror
March by Superintendent J. T. Berryhill.


1 1




LITTLE ROCK 41-1, ARKANSAS,

I LEADING CPI STAFF
Left to right: Agents C. M. Core, T. L. English and
W. K. Slack look on as Superintendent B. L.
Grimsley, Little Rock 41-1, Arkansas, accepts a
trophy from District Manager W. E. Money for
having the leading CPI staff for the month of April.
The CPI increase was $111.05 or an average of
$22.76 per man for the month.


JUNE 1969/ THE FIELD NEWS 19









Combination


Division Leaders


Through April 30, 1969


COMBINED PREMIUM INCREASE


DISTRICT AVERAGE


AGENT


COMBINED VOLUME INCREASE


DISTRICT AVERAGE


AGENT


NORTHEAST FLORIDA-
GEORGIA



NORTHWEST FLORIDA-
GEORGIA



SOUTH FLORIDA




CENTRAL FLORIDA


GEORGIA


ALABAMA-MISSISSIPPI


COASTAL


MID-SOUTH




NORTH CAROLINA




SOUTHWEST


ATLAS


Brunswick 2-27
C. A. Pharis, Mgr.
$53.95


Albany 2-1
R. V. Costantino, Mgr.
$37.35


Ft. Pierce 1-46
A. H. Causier, Mgr.
$91.19


Lakeland 1-27
J. F. Schofield, Mgr.
$137.33


Athens 2-31
H. R. Griffin, Mgr.
$57.36


Columbus 6-6
H. M. Eubanks, Mgr.
$83.89


Aiken 4-20
A. T. Stanford, Mgr.
$39.00


Tupelo 6-5
J. K. Harrell, Mgr.
$158.44


Greensboro 8-7
C. R. Culbreth, Mgr.
$195.74


Beaumont 44-7
P. L. Bell, Mgr.
$79.28


Columbus 45-3
E. B. Kerrick, Mgr.
$31.58


J. F. Cribbs
Brunswick 2-27
$186.70


J. N. Symes
Albany 2-1
$124.58


R: L. Whte
Ft. Lauderdale 1-42
$480.11


W. H. Parker
Lakeland 1-27
$469.12


D. J. Johnston
Atlanta 2-22
$372.98


W. T. Hayes
Mobile 3-3
$248.89


J. E. Chavis
Greenville 4-4
$230.99


B. W. Cupples
Tupelo 6-5
$264.06


R. B. Golden
Winston-Salem 8-5
$344.09 .


R. G. Haymes
Little Rock 41-1
$224.11


L. D. Ams
South Bend 45-6
$85.38


Brunswick 2-27
C. A. Pharis, Mgr.
$53,048


Albany 2-1
R. V. Costantino, Mgr.
$51,698


West Palm Beach 1-29
C. P. Bailey, Mgr.
$72,235


Lakeland 1-27
J. F. Schofield, Mgr.
$79,393


Augusfa 2-28
E. A. Shaw Jr., Mgr.
$52,987


Columbus 6-6
H. M. Eubanks, Mgr.
$58,992


Columbia 4-16
J. G. Day, Mgr.
$47,987


Tupelo 6-5
J. K. Harrell, Mgr.
$60,617


Greensboro 8-7
C. R. Culbreth, Mgr.
$70,800


Beaumont 44-7
P. L. Bell, Mgr.
$55,201


Columbus 45-3
E. B. Kerrick, Mgr.
$42,322


H. R. Jones
Waycross 2-30
$141,250.00

C. W. Stuckey
Albany 2-25
$187,674.00


R. L. White
Ft. Lauderdale 1-42
$240,289.00


W. H. Parker
Lakeland 1-27
$314,070.00


D. J. Johnston
Atlanta 2-22
$431,610.00


B. E. Kornegay
Eufaula 3-16
$175,184.00


J. E. Chavis
Greenville 4-4
$176,207.00


W. D. Byrd
Memphis 5-7
$153,388.00


E. S. Jones
Fayetteville 8-2
$234,750.00


M. E. McDaniel
Dallas 44-4
$222,750.00


D. Stearns
Columbus 45-3
$96,500.00


20 THE FIELD NEWS/ JUNE 1969


DIVISION








THE INDEPENDENT LIFE



AND ACCIDENT INSURANCEE COMPANY





















Seralb ClU



3nettvantt Compnnaiu i^ ^


OFFICERS


Jacob F. Bryan III .


Wilford C. Lyon Sr. ............... First Vice President
James H. Stanley ............... Second Vice President
G. Howard Bryan ................ Third Vice President
Charles A. Snead ................. Secretary-Treasurer
J. Alex Howard ..................... Vice President
Richard M. Lyon .................... Vice President
Cecil B. Carroll ..... Vice President and Director of Agencies
Burton C. Bryan ....... .Vice President and General Counsel
William A. Howard . . . . . . . ..... Vice President
James C. Craig . . . . . . . . . . ... Vice President
Thomas H. Pate ............. Vice President and Actuary
James E. Reeder ............. ........ Vice President
Robert H. Abbott .................... Vice President
Robert A. Mills ..................... Vice President
Peter A. Massaniso ................... Vice President
George M. Baldwin ................... Vice President
Earl M. Barker ............ ........... Comptroller
John J. Sittig ................... Assistant Comptroller
Thad P. McEntyre . . . . . .... Assistant Vice President
James E. Harrison . . . . . .... Assistant Vice President
James E. Crouch . . . . . ..... Assistant Vice President
John M. Ingalls .............. Assistant Vice President
Richard Brooke Jr. ............. Assistant Vice President


President and Chairman of the Board


Dana H. Estenson .............. Assistant Vice President
James B. Windham ............. Assistant Vice President
Wilford C. Lyon Jr. ............ Assistant Vice President
Joe H. Bailey ................. Assistant Vice President
R. Wendell Sheppard ............ Assistant Vice President
Boyd E. Lyon ................ Assistant Vice President
John E. Finley ................ Assistant Vice President
Robert H. Ivey ................ Assistant Vice President
Jack W. Rice .. ............ .. . Assistant Vice President
Etheridge Jordan . . . . . .... Assistant Vice President
Jack W. Hatfield ............... Assistant Vice President
William E. Dietz ............... .Assistant Vice President
Thomas B. Culbreth ............ Assistant Vice President
Gerald C. Hand .................... Associate Actuary
David E. Norton ................... ... .Associate Actuary
Nell C. Vlasselaer . . . .... Assistant Secretary-Treasurer
Robert D. Williams .......... Assistant Secretary-Treasurer
Arthur P. Sterritt ........... Assistant Secretary-Treasurer
Robert M. Vestal ........... Assistant Secretary-Treasurer
Carroll L. Cox ............. Assistant Secretary-Treasurer
George F. Carswell . . . ... Assistant Secretary-Treasurer
Charles R. Clouse . . . .... Assistant Secretary-Treasurer
Wilbur C. Sumner. M.D. . . . . . ... Medical Director


Edward W. Cavin ................. Buildings Manager








I AM THE UNITED STATES

BY BENJAMIN DEGASSERES



0p years all the peoples of the earth have held me as a hope in their

ry in the last 150 years that had for its aim more freedom has
s Constitution.
roh people of all colors, religions and races
e under the folds of Old Glory.
In 1 Iaes and living to the highest point
a
I 0 Bv ^^a . ri ri s from menial to com-
d past or present.
en,

P oIre B s of floo
q
s agal

I have given 0tRo^^M i of individuals
hand personal freeE m^ i ^raas Je
world the os
ost hum b I time o ci wo
record coln.
hbm-ade the wor Americ
world imB fs a Supreme ourve
govern history.
o call frosed peo ered b
have ma and I havR -1 have
em final to rectify whatever ve

My mighty wearing estsa
oceans have travel for w ermits
or a spy system.
I was born in Philadelphia
I gave the world its model Consti
I froze, shoeless, in the snow at Valley Forge.
I hung on by a hair for my life at Gettysburg.
I freed Europe and myself from the deadly menace of Prussian ilitarH
1917-18.
Today I lift myself to my full proud height and proclaim that I who froze at
Valley Forge and battled for my life at Gettysburg shall lay in the dust
those enemies who again seek to enslave me. For-

I AM DEMOCRACY IN ACTION!
I AM THE UNITED STATES!




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