• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Acknowledgement
 Foreword
 Main














Title: Florida agricultural statistical summary.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094069/00021
 Material Information
Title: Florida agricultural statistical summary.
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Florida State Marketing Bureau.
Publication Date: 1953-1954
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094069
Volume ID: VID00021
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: alephbibnum - 000979003

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

VID00021 ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page A
        Page B
    Acknowledgement
        Page C
    Foreword
        Page D
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
Full Text














I *MARIANNA
* D OEFUNIAK SPRINGS* L ....... QUINC, MIO
.... .. MOHTICELLO
PENSACOLA I",' ----* L







This outline map of Florida has been requested by
numerous firms and individuals in Florida and in other states.
The map is a reproduction of a larger map reduced in size to
meet the requirements of this Annual Report. The county
designation is therefore in very small print. The cities and
towns were superimposed on this map and are in much
larger print.
Most of the larger cities of the state are shown. The
locations of our field market news stations are shown as well
as most of the leading livestock markets. There are a few
other cities to represent general agricultural sections.
Tallahassee is the capitol of the state, and the Florida
State Department of Agriculture is located there. The Florida
State Marketing Bureau is in Jacksonville. The Agricultural
Extension Service and College of Agriculture are located at
Gainesville. The U. S Bureau of Agricultural Economics
(Florida agricultural statistics) is in Orlando. Winter Haven,
Fla., in.Polk County, is the headquarters of the Florida Citrus
and Vegetable Inspection Division with a branch office in
Orlando. The office of the State Agricultural Marketing Board
(State Markets) is located in Winter Haven.
The Federal-State Shipping Point Market News offices
are located as follows: (1) Lakeland for citrus; (2) Plant City
and Dover for strawberries and vegetables; (3) Hastings for
potatoes anid cabbage; (4) Sanford-Oviedo for celery, cabbage.
corn and vegetables; (5) Leesburg and Gainesville for water-
melons; (6) Belle Glade for beans, celery, corn and vegeta-
bles; (7) Pompano for beans, peppers and vegetables. Florida
City and Dade County, Fort Pierce, Fort Myers, Palmetto,
Ruskin, Immokalee, Zellwood, Weirsdale, Wauchula, Webster,
Sarasota and Starke vegetables are reported in' field Market
News reports.
Florida poultry and egg markets reported include
Jacksonville, Tampa, Miami, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Talla-
hassee and Palatka.
Livestock markets reported include Jay, Gainesville,
Live Oak, Ocala, Arcadia, Lakeland, Wauchula, Monticello,
Marianna, Graceville, Madison, Belle Glade, Okeechobee,
Kissimmee and others.


MAOISON .
HASSEE ,.' JACKSONVILLE
^ -' i~VE OAK ,L iI


ASTi NS*


S,'L ----.. \
OALC AL

S TER S .A .... "

SORLANOO



. LA ELANO
U %APLENT CITY ......
ST.PETERSBURI 'JRG
PALMETTO WAUCHULA FT. PIERCE*



CLEWI "TON BELLE OL

f. M RS* WEST PALM BEACH

POMPANO
\^ J.^-


E~
--.'-
Ii ~-


/303


6














FLORIDA STATE MARKETING BUREAU


ANNUAL FRUIT AND VEGETABLE REPORT

PRODUCTION, TRANSPORTATION AND MARKETING ANALYSIS

1953 54 SEASON
November, 1954

(Also Poultry, Egg, Livestock, Tobacco and Field Crop Statistics)
See outline map on back cover


By Frank H. Scruggs, Market News Specialist
Elmo F. Scarborough, Assistant Market News Specialist


Neill Rhodes, Commissioner
Florida State Marketing Bureau
Division of
Florida State Department of Agriculture
Nathan Mayo, Commissioner



This Annual Report is available free of charge to parties interested




Florida State Marketing Bureau
505 West Adams Street
P. 0. Box 779
Jacksonville 1, Florida





GFJSEMAL TABLE OF (00.TENTS

CITRUS Page No.

VOLUME, VALUE AND DISPOSITION FOR 1953 1951 SEASON 6-7

FLORIDA CITRUS F.O.3 AV-RAGES 193.0 TO 1954 24

ORANGE, GRAPEFRUIT AND A.NGERINE SHIPMENTS, PRODUCTION. COSTS, VAJLUE, ETC. 3.0 SEASONS 25*-29

AUCTION SALES AT 10 MA.RUES 1944-45 TO 3.953-54 SEASONS 30

CARS TO AUCTION AND AV.RA3E PRICE PER BOX FOR INTERIOR AND INDIAN RIVER CITRUS 1942-54 313.

ANALYSIS OF CITRUS PRICES AND COSTS PER BOX 1933-32 TO 1953-54 SEASONS 32-33

ON TREE EQUIVALENT PRICES BY IDONTHS PER 1-3/5 BU BOX; ALSO FLORIDA CITRUS HISTORY 34-36

FREIGHT RATES OF CITRJS TO AUCTION MARKET IS 1953-54 S ASON 36

F.O.B. CITRUS PRICES OF INTERIOR CITRUS FRUIT BY WEEKS 1953-54 SEASON 37

PRICES PAID BY CAiNERS AiD FRESH VOLu 1 PROCESSED 1942-43 TO 1953-54 SEASONS 38

CANNERY AND PROCESSING PRODUCTION OF FLORIDk IN DETAIL 1922-23 TO 1.953-54 SEASONS 39

ANNUAL PACKS BY YEARS AND STATES, FRO7EN AND uIFROZ7.E 1934-35 TO 1953-54 SEASONS 40

ACREAGE AND PRODUCTION IN FLORIDA AND O0IHER STATES 1924-25 10 1953-54 SEASONS 41

RAIL DISTRIBUTION BY STATES 1953-54 SEASON REPRESENTED BY UNLOADS IN 135 CITIES 42

TRUCK DISTRIBUTION BY STATES 1953-54 SEASON 43

INSPECTIONS BY COUNTIES FOR RAIL ANL TRUCK SHIPMENTS 3.953-54 SEASON 44

TRUCK PASSING THRU ROAD GUARD STATIONS BY STATIONS AND MONTHS 1953-54 SEASON 44

TREE TO AUCTION COSTS OR VICE VERSA FOR 3 LAST SEASONS 45

GROVE VALUE-ACREAGE, YIELD PER ACRE AND TREE 1944-45 TO 1953-54 SEASONS 47

VEGETABLE AND MISCELLANEOUS FRUITS

SHIPMENTS 1953-54 SEASON TRUCK PASSING BY WEiEXS 22-23

AVOCADO AND LIlNE PRODUCTION AND F.O.B. VALUE 3.930-54 PERSIAN LIME INSPECTIONS 1953-54 46

ACREAGE, YIELD, PRODUCTION AND VALUE 1953-54 SEASON Bf U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 50-51

ACREAGE, YIELD. PRODUCTION AND VALUE BY COMMODITIES AND BY SEASONS 3.935 TO 1954 52-56

ACREAGE-FALL, WINTER AND SPPJRIN BY COUNITES 1953-54 SEASON BY IUS DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE 57-60

RAIL FREIGHT RATES EFFECTIVE 1953-54. CITRUS TRUCK RATES, ESTIMATED PACKAGE WEIGHTS 61

ACREAGE-PRINCIPAL TRUCK CROPS FOR 28 SEASONS 62-63

F.O.B. SALES PRICES AT SHIPPING POINT 1953-54 SEASON 77-82

SHIPMENTS-TRUCK PASSING BY ROAD GUARD STATIONS AND COWMODITJ0TES 1.23

SHIPMENTS-TRUCK DESTINATIONS BY STATES AND MARKET IF 1953.-5A SEASON 124-129

ALL FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

SUMMARY OF THE 1953-5A SEASON 1-5

DISPOSITION, ACEMiGE AND VAlUE FOR 1953-54 SEASON 8-9

SHIPMENTS-FREIGHT, EXPRESS, BOAT AND TRUCK 3.953-54 SEASON 10-13

SHIPMENTIS-FREIGHT, EXPRESS; BOAT AND TRUCK 10 SEASONS 14-3.7

SHIPMENTS BY COUNTIES-RAIL FREIGHT 1953-54 SEASON 38-21

ACREAGE BY COUNTIES AND COMMODITIES FOR 3 LAST SEASONS 64-76

FEDERAL-STATE INSPECTION FOR RAIL AND TRUCK 1953-54 SEASON 83

PRODUCTION AND VALUE FOR 20 SEASONS 132






LIVESTOCK Page No.

LIVESTOCK NUMBERS BY STATES 10-YEAR COMPARISON FLORIDA WITH OTHER STATES 120

FLORIDA POSITION WITH RESPECT 0TO OTHER STATES CATTLE, HOGS, SHEEP AND LAMBS 106

FLORIDA RANK WITH RESPECT TO OTHER STATES HORSES, MULES, CATTLE, CHICKENS AND TURKEYS 107

CAITLE ON FARMS, VALUE PER HEAD, ETC., FLORIDA AND U.S.A. 108-109

LIVESTOCK MARKET PRICES AUCTION AND MARKET NEWS 105

CATTLE ON FLORIDA FAR)& BY CLASSES 110

FLORIDA LIVESTOCK NUMBERS BY COUNTIES, JANUARY 1, 1950 111

HOGS ON FARMS, VALUE PER HEAD, ETC., FLORIDA AND U.S.A. BY YEARS 1929 TO 1954 112

HOG INVENTORY FOR FLORIDA 1924 TO 1954 113

OUT-SHIPMENTS FOR 1953; ALSO CITRUS BY-PRODUCT FEEDS 1940-1953, LIVESTOCK FEED 114

SLAUGHTER RECORDS BY MONTHS, NUMBER AND WEIGHTS; ALSO ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 115

FLORIDA LIVESTOCK MARKET PRICES (SUBSTANTIALLY SOUTHEASTERN PRICES) 116-117

PREVENTABLE LIVESTOCK LOSSES 118-119

SLAUGHTER PLANTS-NAMES AND ADDRESSES 121

GENERAL AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS

ANNUALL FLORIDA CROP SUMMARY OF AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE 84-85

VOLUME AND VALUE OF GENERAL FARM CROPS 1920 TO 1953 SEASONS 86-87

iONEY PRODUCTION BY STATES FOR 1953; FLORIDA 1953 PRODUCTION AND VALUE 88

TURKEY PRODUCTION FOR FLORIDA AND OTHER STATES 1940 TO 1954 89

FLORIDA TOBACCO-PRODUCTION OF FLUE CURED AND SHADE 90

FLORIDA TOBACCO-AUCTION SALES-LIVE OAK, LAKE CITY, JASPER AND HIGH SPRINGS 91

PEANUT ALLO MENTS-AVERAGE PRODUCTION YIELD BY FLORIDA COUNTIES 92

TOBACCO ALLOINENT BY FLORIDA COUNTIES. SHIPMENTS ACROSS STATE LINE 93

POULTRY AND EGG MARKET FOR JACKSONVILLE 1932 TO 1954 94

POULTRY AND EGG MARKET FOR TAMPA 1932 TO 1954 95

POULTRYY AND EGG MARKET FOR MIAME 1939 TO 1954 96

POULTRY AND EGG MARKET FOR ORLANDO AND TALLAHASSEE; PALATEA AND ST.PETERSBURG FRYER FOB 97

'OMPARISON OF JACKSONVILLE AND TAMPA AVERAGE QUOTATIONS 98

POULTRY FACTS FOR FLORIDA ARTICLE BY F. W. RISHER, ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER 98-99

DAIRY ARTICLE BY W. P. MCPHERSON AND R. F. LUCKEY, JR.. AND E. E. BROWN 100-101

GLADIOLUS ARTICLE 102-103

CONSUMPTION BY IMPORTANT FOODS IN UNITED STATES 122

AVERAGE PRICES RECEIVED FOR FARM PRODUCTS SEPTEMBER 15, 1954 FOR FLORIDA AND U.S.A. 104

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL VOLUME AND VALUE (AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES) 1939 TO 1954 130

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL VALUE (AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES) 1939 TO 1954 131

SPECIAL ARTICLE

MARKETING INFORMATION IN 1940 AND 1954 BY NEILL RHODES, MARKETING COMMISSIONER 48-49







A C K N 0 'L E D E N T

'e "ish to acknowled-e the splendid cooperation we received from both official
and private sources during the preparation of this report.

The rail freight, boat and express and carlot shipment figures were secured
from the Fruit and Vegetable Branch of the A-ricultural Marketing Service, U.S.
Department of Agriculture, in lashin'ton, D.C.

Exhaustive vegetable acreage, yield, production and value data and other
assistance was supplied by Mr. J.C. Townsend, Jr., Mr. J.B. Owens, Mr. Paul
3huler, Mr. F.T. Galloway, Agricultural Statisticians, and Mr. G.N. Rose,
Truck Crop 3t tistician, Ui. Bureau of Agricultural Economics, 302 Post Office
Building, Orlando, Florida.

Mr. A.L. Scarborough, Statistician o" the Citrus and Vegetable Division,
Florida Department of Agriculture, Winter Haven, Florida supplied us with
important record data and other information. Mr. Hugh 3. Flynt, Assistant
Director of this division, supplied a detailed sumrary of inspections for the
season. The daily reports from Road Guard Stations, operated by the Citrus and
Vegetable Division, showing passing of fruits and ve-etpbles, were very helpful
to shippers and growers and for record purposes.

Mr. H. F. ":illson, Federal-3t-te Citrus Market News Service, Lakeland, Florida,
also supplied rail and truck citrus destinations for this report.

Mr. William B. Conner, of the Florida Citrus Mutual, Lakeland, fully complied
with our requests for much specific citrus information. Much of this information
would be difficult to obtain from other sources.

Y!r. James T. Duncan supplies some very useful rail and truck rate tabulations
for this report. Mr. Duncan is Manager, Traffic Division, Florida Fruit and
Vegetable Association, AO01 East Colonial Avenue, Orlando, Florida.

Miss Dena 3nodgrass, Research Analyst, State Chamber of Commerce, supplied
certain miscellaneous statistics on Specialty Crops and general statistics. Her
office is in the Hildebrandt Building, Jacksonville, Florida.

Several official and private agencies and individuals not already mentioned
supplied information directly or indirectly to us, for which we extend our thanks.

Useful information was received from the U.S. Agricultural Stabilization
and Conservation Committee, Gainesville, Florida. An interesting Dairy article
was supplied by Dr. "'.K. McPherson, R.F. Luckey,Jr., of Florida College of
Agriculture and E.E. Brown of t'e Gainesville Acricultural Experiment station
in Gainesville.

The preparation of this report is tedious and renuires long and hard work,
and appreciation by the writer is extended to our Bureau staff for their efforts
and accomplishments. Cormissioner L. Neill Rhodes contributed several important
pages in this report. Mr. rGifford N. Rhodes, Specialist, Iivestock Market News,
and Mr. F. r. Risher, Assistant Commissioner, of this Bureau, supplied several
pages of good livestock and poultry information,


- C -








FOREWORD


"The last shall be first" holds true in applying the finish-
ing touches to the Annual Fruit and Vegetable Report for the 1953-54
Season. All the pages have been prepared except this one. I do not
want this fir3t-page position to create the illusory impression that
the report is the fruitage of my efforts. Quite the contrary, all
credit is due to Market News Specialists F. H. Scruggs and E. F. 3car-
borough, and the many others of the Bureau staff and clerical force
who so ably contributed and labored to release a creditable report.

The purpose of the Annual Fruit and Vegetable Report is both
singular and plural. First, Florida 3tatues require: ".....the
State Marketing Commissioner to receive and compile reports on all
fruits, vegetables and other farm products as are grown in the
State.... and to keep and compile a statement of all shipments mov-
ing out of the State..." Then serving the agricultural public de-
mand for the statistical information, unobtainable elsewhere in as
condensed yet complete form, we regard as a most worthy purpose.Too,
the reports save time and public funds allocated to the Bureau.
7"ithout such ready-reference availability of detailed data for the
current and previous seasons, it would require a far larger force
than the entire Bureau personnel to prepare the statistics on a
single-shot, intermittent basis for the thousands who request them.
Finally, better to be truthful than suppress the fact that we
ourselves would forget much of the mass of detailed compilation un-
less "we set it down."

All tabulations and conclusions of the Specialists responsible
for them were drawn without any restraint in the assignments. They
were not requested to leave out, go "over once lightly", or partic-
ularly emphasize any of the material considered for or contained in
this report. The result is, no point was played up or down, no
person or agency was praised or censured. The user of the informa-
tion, presented without color or flavor, is entirely free to draw
his own conclusions from the array of factual content.

To Mr. F. H. Scruggs and Mr. E. F. 3carborough the credit
is all yours. To the agricultural industry their fine Production,
Transportation and Marketing Analysis is all yours. May the 1953-54
Annual Fruit and Vegetable Report serve well the aforementioned pur-
pose to which it is dedicated.


Neill Rhodes, Commissioner
Florida State Marketing Bureau






FLORIDA DE'-ARTMENJT OF AJRICJLTURE
SIA',IE IIARKETING bUREAU
19 -54
'I' U.UL FRiT ".D VEriETABLEt REPORT

By: F.-anlk P. Scrjags, Market News Specialist
ELri ?. Scarborough, Asst. I1arket News Specialist
S UMMA RY
iWhen writing up the sum'-ary of the season just finished we
analyze the volume, unit price, and value to see if there is anything
outstanding that we can be proud of and write about. We do not find
much to be boastful about but we do find something which is outstanding.

Our acreage was the greatest ever, we having brought to harvest
state 318,125 acres of vegetables, 116,050 miscellaneous fruit and
474,216 acres of citrus for a grand total of 908,391 acres. Florida's
record citrus crop approximated 12,000,000,000 pounds or 6,000,000 tons
or 274,000 carloads. The other fruits and vegetables weighted around
3,500,000,0C00 pounds, or 1,750,000 tons or 142,000 carloads. So if
no mistakes have been made in calculating Florida citrus accounts for
77.4 percent of the fruit and vegetable crop volume by weight and
64 percent by volume.

We exceeded 1952-53 by more than 40,000 acres. We now become
used to important annual increa.-es in acreage during the past 20 years.
Cur acreage increase has been just as noteworthy as our population gain
which is something to be proud of,

Our yields per acre have also shown an increase during the
years and the natural result of this is a very large volume of fruits
and vegetables to move at a price which will show a livable profit to
the producer.

We can be proud that we harvested in 1953-54 season the equiv-
alent of 426,092 rail cars of fruits and vegetables with a gross f,o.D.
packed and bulked value of 1401,000,000. The season before we harvested
364,C00 carloads with gross value of '376,000,000e In 1933-34 we had
140,000 carlo-ds and $77,000,000, 1939-40 185,000 and !93,000,000,
1949-50 231,000 carlo ds and $362,000,000,

During the 1953-54 season we had the volume and we also had
the necessary quality but we needed an average of 20/ more a oox crate
or bushel to have made our season a success. The producer did not have
the best weather conditions. dinds, rain damage and cold operated at
different times to upset the growing and marketing schedule, otherwise
things might have been some better price-wise. Economic conditions in
many of the best northern marketing areas were not too good. There was
some unemployment and less overtime wages. But the real trouble was
perhaps just the fact that we had just a little too much volume.

An average of 10 percent less volume would have been much
easier to market and might have returned just as much to the grower.
The writer has been connected with the Florida fruit and vegetable
industry long enough to know that many, many producers say, "There is
no over-production, but just under consumption, and that it can all
be cured by proper distribution." Florida is determined and iron bound,
to grow and to do things in a big way and there is little room for
pessimists, or pessimism. OK, let's live it up. Florida is the fastest
Page 1




Page 2


growing large state having gained 25.9 percent since 1950. We are almost a|
the 3,5CO,000 mark and reaching for (the bank) 5,000,000 before 1960. We
have passed Alabama, Kentucky, Virginia in population and look out Georgia
by 1956. However, we wish to see Georgia continue to gain and believe
they will

Now getting back to 1953-54 fruit and vegetable statistics. A whole
book could be written about Florida citrus. The industry growth during
the past 20 years has been phenomenal. In 1933-34 we produced 29,276,000
boxes of citrus while in 1953-54 season we had the tremendous amount of
136,500,000 boxes even after we had abandoned 1,800,000 boxes because
of poor marketing conditions.

ORAI\ ES

The orange crop in 1953-54 season accounted for 340,000 acres
or 37- percent of our total fruit and vegetable acreage. The crop yield
amounted to 182,500 carloads or nearly 43 percent of the volume, The
gross sales value amounted to 182,000,000 or 45 percent of the total value,

We are not a one crop State by any means, but it is plain to
see how much the Orange dominates the fruit and vegetable industry. The
economic life of several hundred thousand people rides on the upswing
or downswing of the orange crops. Almost everyone in Florida is affected
by the orange crop and orange prices. Florida produced in 1953-54
91,300,000 boxes of oranges more as compared to 1952-53 figures of
45,330,000 boxes in California, 1,000,000 in Texas and 900,000 in Arizona,
We are not trying to belittle the once orange proud state of California
but they just ain't in it.

GRAPEFRUIT

This crop dominates all other crops in Florida but it does
not have anything like the economic importance of oranges in Florida.
We produced from 111,308 acres a total of 82,263 carloads or 19.3 per-
cent of the total fruit and vegetable carloads for Florida. The gross
fooobo value amounted to $56,500,000 or 14 percent of the total fruit
and vegetable value for 1953-54. From a national viewpoint Florida
grapefruit dominates the grapefruit volume in other states even more
than oranges dominate the national orange crop. Florida produced
42,000,000 boxes of grapefruit compared to around 6,500,000 boxes in
Arizona, California, and Texas. We have fine quality grapefruit too,
but there are just not enough people who like grapefruit. The taste
is just a little too pungent for most babies and children and some of
those much older who still have the baby taste. The orange is a taste
which people young and old take to. It has an intrinsic taste quality
just like apple sauce.

While we have no figures to back us up the writer believes
that 75 percent of the grapefruit is eaten by people over 30 years old,
while 75 percent of the oranges are eaten by people under 35o Your taste
has to be somewhat mature before you give up sugar on grapefruit and
use salt instead. Grapefruit juice on the rocks with a generous dash
of salt is good stuff. Grapefruit in large volume could remain a mar-
keting problem because it uoes not always have that intrinsic sweet
taste quality that makes babies go for ito

On the other hand we know that the citrus industry is very
resourceful as we have seen them solve a lot of difficult problems
during the past years. Advertising may materially aid grapefruit0




Page 3


Advertising agencies are very ingenious and have come up with a
television program which should move a lot of grapefruit Reference
is made to the twenty questions television program. The writer thinks
the desire for some of these grapefruit drinks and salads will make the
housewife go out and buy some juice concentrate, segments or salads.
There is something for the children and young folks too. The foregoing
is just the writer's opinion and no charge is made for it.

Progress in Frocessed Fruits

Grapefruit got the start on oranges oy seven years. The
writer lived in Sanford 1924 to 1927 and there was a great deal of
talk about putting up grapefruit sections so that they would taste
exactly like fresh grapefruit. Men in Sanford and Orlando and other
places were working on this. They were using vacuum packs in glass
jars. They were looking for a perfect vacuum and a perfect product.
Along about 1929 some people in the industry decided that the canned
grapefruit did not have to taste exactly like fresh and after that
they put the product they had in cans and great progress was maae for
two years. In 1928-29 the industry put up 957,000 cases of grapefruit
segments, the next season 1,317,000 cases, the following season
2,712,000, and then dropped back to 907,000 cases in 1931-32, The
highest volume reached was 5,000,000 in 1946-47 and in 1953-54 its
back to 4,332.000 cases. This is not very much progress for 25 years
by Florida standards. In 1929 when the canners decided to can the
segments they also decided to can the juice. They had 202,000 cases
of juice that season. The volume jumped to 2,2J7,000 by 19j5 and
14,882,000 by 1954. We put out 16,778,000 cases in 1943-44, much of
this for the armed services, and some for export. The first orange
juice was canned in 1929-30 season. The volume haa jumped to
2,851,000 cases by 1939-40 and 25,593,000 in 1947-48 and it was back
to 17,790,000 boxes in 1953-54. This was a real achievement. The
real story is in frozen orange concentrate which first started in 1945-
46 with 226,000 cases, jumping to 10,232,000 gallons in 1948-49 and way
up to 65,531,000 gallons in 1953-54 season.

Canned and processed citrus in 1953-54 season was 32 times
what it was 20 years ago.

Tail Bites Dog

Twenty-five years ago the talk was that we needed to get some
way of using up the surplus or undergrade fruit of good inside quality
just like was done with peaches, pears, tomatoes, etc., which were put
into cans, The canning business was to be an adjunct to the fresh
citrus business. In 1928-29 there were 1,527,000 boxes used in canning
out of a total crop of 27,900,000 boxes. This meant 94L percent fresh
and 51 percent volume canned (processed), In 1953-54 we had 84,031.000
boxes processed out of a 136,500,000 box crop. This meant 38- percent
fresh and 61l percent processed. The tail has not only oitten the dog
but it may swallow it. In any case the tail is wagging the dog, or the
dog is dragging his big tail behind him. Page little So-Peep.

VEGETAtLES

Vegetable production during the 1953-54 season grossed Florida
growers tPlj0,831,000- This sum accounted for 20 percent of the State's
agricultural cash returns.





Page 4

The 1953-54 vegetaole production was harvested in 52 Florida
counties from 318,125 acres. The five most important producing counties
were Palm Beach with 88,270 acres, Dade 37,525 acres, Broward 18;850
acres, St. Johns 13,400 acres and Hillsborough 12,075 acres. The
second group of five counties included Lee, Orange, Seminole, Alachua,
and Collier,

The 116,765 carloads of vegetables harvested and shipped in
1953-54 was the highest on record and was some 1200 carloads more than
the previous peak year of 1951-52. However, the average value per car-
load was a low of $1120 in 1953-54 compared with $1218 per carload for
the 1952-53 season and $1381 per carload for 1951-52.

Over-production on many commodities along with plenty of fresh
vegetables from competing winter and spring producing states and countries
were the primary factors which caused many Florida vegetables prices to
sell at a low price figure. Generally the winter vegetable gross returns
were much better than the returns for spring crops. About the only
exception was the spring round white potato deal which met a generally
good demand at moderate prices, while the winter red type potato deal met
a slow demand at low prices.

When comparing the 1953-54 season with that of ten years ago,
1943-44, one notes marked acreage increase's-' Tomatoes, the
number one Florida vegetable, in gross value, made a noteworthy increase
of 112%, potatoes, another big item was 200% larger, cucumbers 250%,.
peppers 63% and celery 45%. Beans and cabbage have continued at about
the same acreage level for the past ten years. The better yields and
quality of Florida Iceberg lettuce has aided it to increase in volume.
Now lettuce of all types, Iceberg is the most important type lettuce in
the state, is almost a million dollar crop. Squash acreage has increased
about 20% and it is considered a two million dollar crop Radishes
grown by specialty growers are about comparable in gross value to squash.

It is unusual for so many crops to have surplus acreage during
the same growing season, However, it does indicate that lower acreage
adjustments are necessary for peacetime consumption on present markets.
Not only are lower acreages essential to the vegetable industry but ad-
justment to other trends as well. These would include more mechanization
where feasible for field harvesting and packaging units such as one finds
in the celery and sweet corn industry, changes in package merchandising
as in radishes and the trends in the possible increase in demand for
vine ripened tomatoes. Vegetables are a big business in Florida and the
industry has a difficult task of exploring the future and analyzing
the past. We hope these statistics will aid growers and shippers to
make a good analysis of their particular conditions.

MISCELLANEOUS FRUITS

Miscellaneous fruits include semi-tropical fruits such as Avocados.
Limes and Mangoes, melons of various kinds, and strawberries. This
group of fruits has shown a substantial increase in acreage and dollar
value except for strawberries which have remained virtually unchanged
in acreage the past ten years. These fruits are important to the
economy of Florida,

Avocados and Mangoes are grown commercially in South Florida.
The production increase of avocados in 1953-54 was 130% greater than
ten years ago with a gross value increase to $1,145,000,




Page 5

Limes are produced mainly in South Florida with Polk, Highlands
and iHillsborough counties becoming more important growing sections,
Limes have shown an increase of 111,) production volume in the past ten
years, and a gross value increase to "1.854,000., The demand for con-
centrated lime juice has oeen helpful in the lime industry growth,
Approximately i10 percent of the 1953-54 production was used in making
concentrated lime juice.

Watermelons have been an important crop in many sections of
the state. This crop has lent itself favorably as an early money crop
in North Florida. In the western part of Central ard South Florida it
has been used mainly as a money crop the first year after cleaning off
woodland. The cut-over woodland is clean cultivated a year followed by
planting to groves and pastures. With the growth of the cattle industry
more pasture land has been needed therefore in the past several years
there has been a notable amount of land cleared in the western part of
Central and South Florida. Watermelons are one of the ten most important
money crops in the state. The gross returns to the growers in 1953-54
were only >9,613,000 compared to 14,310,000 in 1952-53 and $5,095,C00
in 1943-44.

Strawberries are grown mainly in an area around Plant City
for January 1 to March 20 marketing. There is some spring production
in the Starke area. Berry prices in 1953-54 averaged $8-55 per crate
compared to $6.85 per crate in 1952-53. Adverse fall and early winter
weather injured some plantirp and there was only 3000CO acres for harvest
in 1953-54 with yields very light However, there are indications of
larger acreage for production the winter of 1955,

HAJOR tHUIT AND VEjETABLt CHOPS
Rank and total Crop Gross Value comparison for 1953-54 & 1952-53 seasons
1953-54 1 1952-53
RA.K CONAI~AR ACKiS r'ROJCoJI, GRuSS VALLY GROSS VALUE RANK
JSEJ
1. Oranges Std. Boxes 339,o08 91:3uU.0 $ 181,720,u00 $ 13,145.0JO Oranges 1
2. Grapefruit Std. Boxes 111-308 40.700,000 5o,494,000 53,601:000 Grape fruit 2
3, Ibnatoes 3ushel 57:200 9:353.000 37,711,000 38,898,000 Tomatoes 3
4. Beans Bushel 71-000 7,993;O000 19211.000 20,225,000 Beans A
5. Tangerines Std. Boxes 23.300 4;5u0-330 10,751.000 17,083,000 'angerines 5
0. Potatoes Bushel- 31,700 9,730;000 15,009,000 15.536.000 Potatoes 6
7. Celery Crates 10,700 0-642:000 11,463,000 13:299,0u0 Celery 8
8. Corn Crates 39,300 5.132,0J3 10,220,000 10,130,000 Corn 10
9- watermelons Melons 9d,000 29,578.000 9,013,000 14,310,030 ...atermelons 7
10. Peppers Bushel 13,100 3.718,000 9;700-030 9,152,000 Peppers 11
11. Cucumbers Bushel 19S6J3 2,:-30,000 3,318:000 13,447,000 Cuoc.ubers 9
12- Cabbage 50 lb Sacks 15,500 a4720.:O03 3,976,000 4,033,000 Cabbage 12
13. Others }lso. 7d,075 5,131,000 21:029:000 21.115.000 Others 13
GRAND TOTAL 90oJ 391 221 447.0WO 4Ul;215;0UO 375.974,0U00 GRAJD 1OTAL

TRArfSPURTA-'IO CCMM1'-'S

During the 1953-54 season we shipped 229,204 carloads of fruit
and vegetables from Floriua. Of these there were 100,278 carloads ship-
ped by freight. 4560 carloads shipped by railway express: 1458 carloads
by boat, and the equivalent of 123.722 carloads by truck. Transportation
by truck accounted for 53 percent of the carlot shipments, while freight
represented 44 percent of the carlot volume with 3 percent of the produce
being shipped by other means of transportation. The percentage of lead-
ing commodities shipped last season which were routed through truck
channels to fresh outlets were: Oran';es 58 percent, grapefruit 54 percent.,
tc-atoes 63 percent, bans 75 percent, tan-erines 60 percent, potatoes
43 percent, celery 32 parent, corn 51 percent. watermelons 55 oermnt
and peppers 71 percent.
The distribution of Florida fruits and vegetables was generally
unchanged from the past two seasons.





RECORDS AND ESTIMATES ON FLORIDA CITRUS CROP FOR SEASON-AUGUST 1, 1953-JULY 31, 1954


Freight Carloads Boxes Freight Gross FOB Returns Production and Net Return to
Carlot Straight ToItal Boat, Truck Florida Points 1hrketing Costs Florida Growers
Lhiinent & Maxed Freight Exress and Express Box For Crop Box r Croa Box Rail Truck-a.t

Oranges 16,716 19,819 2,846 24,752,994 $2.90 $ 71,783,683 $2.08 $51,486,228 $ .82 $20,,.97,45!j
Grapefruit 15,187 19,081 984 18,955,118 2.35 44,544,527 1.77 33,550,559 .58 10,993.963
Tangerines 2,228 2,729 66 3,003,317 4.75 14,265,756 2.92 8,7(69,686 1.83 5,490.070
Mixed Citrus 7,498 (Converted) (Converted) e31 -
Total 41,629 41,0--- 3,896 46,711,429 $2.80 $130,593,966 $2.01 $93,806,473- 9 3_79.9


Straight uars
Freight

8 750,659
7,344,585
1 041,122


GENERAL DISPOSITION ANALYSIS OF THRE FLORIDA CITRUS CROP FOR SEASON 1953-54


Mixed Cars
Freight _

1,485,008
1,863,124
239..867


M.xed Cars

1,137,100
393,000
26.500


Total Boxes
RsiL Boat 0

11,372,767 744,435
9,600,709 100,307
1.307.489 -


Trucked
Out

12,635,792
9,254.,102
1,695,828


Rail, Boat
& Truck

24,752,994
18,955,118
3,003,317


Processed
FreshBxs*0

62,903,318
20,089,228
1,037,957


onTsuied-
Boxes

3,643,688
1,655,654
458,726


'tal"' 17-1363'66, 3,587,999 i,56600 22280, "96 844,742 23,585,722 46,711,429 84,030,503 5,758,0o8 138,300,000
CARLOADS converted )
Oranges 16,716 3,103 2,846 22,665 1,489 25,272 49,426 125,807 7,287 182,520
Grapefruit 15,187 3,894 984 20,065 201 18,508 38,774 40,178 3,311 82,263
Tangerines 2,228 501 66 2,795 3,392 6,187 2,076 919 9,182


34,131


7,498


3,896


45,525


1,690


47 ,172


94.387


168,061


11,517


94,8-


1
Boat carlots reported Oranges 1,299, Grapefruit 159, Total 1,458. Othes reports in boxes indicate: Oranges 1,489, Grapefruit 201,
if the above box figures are converted into carlots.
Included in Florida Processing for disposition purposes are the Interstato shipments for by-products manufacture.
Sptal crop in boxes include Ecoaomic Abandonments Grapefruit 1,300,000 boxes (2,600 cars). Tangerines 500,000 (1,000 cars).
Potal 1,800,000 boxes (3,600 carloads).
E A D CO T OF PRODUCING AND MARKETING 46 711 429 BOXES OF ORigGES G APEFRDIT AND TANGER T


Cost of production -uch as fertilizer, spray materials, irrigation. pruning, labor, fuel, etc., bu' not including interest or taxes on strictly
grove acreage, per standard 1-3/5 bushel boxes.
ORANGES $ .60 GRAPEFRUIT $ .45. TAGERINES $ 67 WEIGHTED AVERAGE $ .54
Cost of picking, hauling, packing, selling, and other average ordinary marketing charges.
ORANGES $1,48 GRAPEFRUIT $1,32 TANGERINES $2o25 WEIGHTED AV.RA-GE $1.47
Total ordinary and average cost of production and marke-fing of ciFrus.
ORANGES $2.08 GRAIIEFRUIT $1.77 TANC CRITS S $2.92 VWFC-ITED AVERAGE $2,01


Estimated boxes per cars Straight Freights Oranges 523,5, Grapefruit 483.6, Tangerines 467.3, WMixd FiX .. 9.5, Nixed Express 400,
1Tuck 50O, Boat approximately 500 boxes per car Estimated boxes per car are those acrage:s -hown by r ,i' I.nspections.
Mixed Cp.r Freight Analysiss Oranges 41.4, Grapefruit 51.9, Tangerines 6.7 perocut.
Nixe'C 0Express Analysisg Oranges 73,0, Grapefruit 25.3, Tangerines 1.7 percent.
Ven i aiTed box Cars Useds Urange" "'.,370, Grapefruit 388, Tangerines 13, Mixod 1,116. Total 2,887 earn.
Taters reShipments for By-products M3aufacture*n.ot included in shipment figures Dranges 55,888 boxes, Grapefruit 15,110 boxes.
E B l irap efru t Exportst o ) (Gonti d) Or es Graefruit
Government Rail 7C,32,087 -tonmercial .R-. ,119 1008
Gover'wont Truck 8,595 9,260 Commercial Truck 39,827 18,830
Go-. .-sment Boat Commercial doat 744 43- 100,307
Government Total 7 7 S Commercial Total


BOXES

Oranges
Grapefruit
Tan geri n B


lotal Crop
Boxes"*

91,300,000
42,000,000
5,000,000


"


'


'


.. ..13


273,965








RECORDS AND ESTIMATES ON FLORIDA CITRUS CROP FOR SEASON 1953-54 (Cont'd.)


TRUCK SHIPMENTS TO OUT-OF-STATE MARKETS (500 boxes to carload ) AUGUST 1 JULY 31

ORANGESs Carlot equiv. 25,272 or 12,635,792 boxes vGross at $2.90 $ 36,643,797 Note at $ .82 $ 10,301,34'
GRAPEFRUITs Carlot equiv. 18,508 or 9,254,102 boxes *Gross at 2.35 21,747,140 Net* at .58 5,367,j .
TANGERINES: Carlot equiv. 3,392 or 1,o95,828 boxes *Gross at 4.75 8,055,183 Net* at 1,83 3,103,3t .
ALL CITRUSs Carlot equiv. 47,172 or 23,585 722 boxes *Gross at 2.82 66,446,120 Net* at -.--9 l 0-,
FREIGHT, EXPRESS AND BOAT SHIPMENTS TO OUT-OF-STATi MARKETS, AUGUST 1 JULY 31
ORANGESs Carlot nquiv. 24,154 or 12,117,202 boxes *Gross at $2.90 $ 35,139,886 Net* at $ .82 $ 9,936,106
GRAPE FRUITs Carlot equiv. ?0,266 or 9,701,016 boxes &Gross at 2.35 22,797,388 Net. at .58 5,o. ,589
TANGERINESs Carlot equiv. 2,795 or 1,307 489 boxes *Gross at 4.75 6,210,573 Net- 1.83 2,392,705
ALL CITRUS: Carlot equiv. 47,215 or 2'3,i259,707 boxes *Gross at 2.77 64,147,847 Neto at -7T 17,955,400
FRESH CITRUS USED FOR PROCESSING IN FLORIDA (500 buxes to carload) AUGUST 1 JULY 31
ORANGESs Carlot equiv. 125,807 or b2,903,318 boxes *Gross at $1.60 $ 100,645,318 Net' at $ .68 $ 42,774,256
GRAPEFRUITs Carlot equiv. 40,178 or 20,089,228 boxes oGross at .43 8,638,368 Net* at .27 5,424,092
TANGERINESg Carlot equiv. 2,076 or 1,037.957 boxes *Gross at .45 467,080 Net* at .84 871,883
ALL CITRUSs Carlot equiv. 18--6'1 or 146,70705O boxes *Gross at IT 1I097750T766 Net* at .43 36,478,281
FRESH CITRUS CONSUMED IN FLORIDA& (500 boxes to carload) AUGJST 1 JULY 31
ORANGESs Carlot equiv. 7,287 or 3,643,688 boxes vCross at $2.55 $ 9,291,404 Net* at $ .70 $ 2,550,582
GRAPEFRUITs Carlot equiv. 3,311 or 1,655,654 boxes cGross at ".00 3,311,308 Net' at .45 ,745,044
TANGERINESs Carlot equiv. 919 or 458,726 boxes cGross at 4.40 2,018,394 Net* at 1.75 802,771
ALL CITRUSs Carlot oquiv. 11,517 or 5,758,068 boxes *Gross jt -.57 14,621,106 Net* at .71 4,098,397
TOTAL RAIL, BOAT, TRUCK SHIPMENTS, PROCESSED AND LOCALLY CONSUMED CITRUS, AUGUST 1 JULY 31
ORANGESs Carlot equiv. 182,520 or 91,300,000 boxes oGross at $1.99 $ 181,720,405 Net' at $ .72 $ 65,622,293
GRAPEFRUITs Carlot equiv. 82,263 or 40,700,000 boxes'' *Gross at 1.38 56,494,204 Net& at .16 6,314,920
TANGERINESs Carlot equiv. 9,182 or 4,500,000 boxes**" Gross at 3.72 16,751.230 Net* at 1.21 5,426,958
ALL CITRUSt Carlot equiv. 273,965 or 136,500,000 boxes oGross at 1.87 254,9657839 Net- at .7 77,304,171

NOTEs 'Gross refers to returns FOB cars Florida shipping points, and Net refers to returns to growers or fruit owners before deducting
for interest and grove taxes, but after deducting for cost of production and marketing.
** 1,300,000 boxes Grapefruit and 500,000 boxes Tangerines abandoned for economic reason no1 included.

1l Trucked out shipment figures were based on inspections certified for interstate movement.

2s Processing fruit represents average gross price at processor's door. Processing fruit includes -.1 for canning and concentrat-
ing, and the Net price is the Gross less production, picking, hauling, and other marketing charges.

3s Figures for Consumed in Florida are rough estimates based on population, prices, etc. Any person whr does not approve this home
consumption estimate may make his own estimate, but this volume, which is probably underestimated, has to be counted. This
locally consumed volume of citrus includes packed, unpacked, inspected and uninspected. No thorough survey of local or Florida
consumption of fresh citrus has ever been made.









ESTIMATED ACREAGE, YIELD, PRODUCTION AND VALUE FOR 1953-54 SEASON


Yield
Acreage Acreage Acreage per
Commodity Planted Lost Harvested Acre


Beans
Limas
Cabbage
Celery
Corn
Cucumbers
g (Pickles)
Eggplant
Escarole-Endive
Lettuce
Peppers
Potatoes
Tomatoes
Cauliflower
Squash
Radishes *o
Field Peas **
Butterbeani ~o
Miscl. Vegetables *


74,300
2,450
16,000
10,800
42,750
19,300
2,100(P)
2,450
4,600
3,300
13,400
31,700
60,600
1,200
10,400
7,000
16,000
3,175
10,750


3,300
50
500
100
3,450
1,500
300
50
200
400
300

3,400

600


71,000
2,400
15,500
10,700
39,300
17,800
1,800
2,400
4,400
2,900
13,100
31,700
57,200
1,200
9,800
7,000
16,000
3,175
10,750


Total
Units
Unit Produced


Ru.
Bu.
Tons
Crts.
Crts.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
4 dz.Crt.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Crts.
Bu.
Buo
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.


8,370,000
208,000
148,000
6,894,000
5,132,000
3,132,000)
144,000)
893,000
2,090,000
377,000
3,718,000
9,700,000
9,465,000
318,000
1,013,000
870,000
525,000
127,000
2,150,000


Economic
Abandonmen


377,000

30,800
252,000




123,000



112,000

69,000


Total
Units
Harvested


7,993,000
208,000
118,000
6,642,000
5,132,000
(2,836,000
144,000
893,000
1,967,000
377,000
3,718,000
9,700,000
9,353,000
318,000
944,000
870,000
525,000
127,000
2,150,000


Price
per
Unit


$2.40
3.03
33.69
1.73
1.99
2.94
1.30
1.71
1.00
2.90
2.61
1.55
4.03
1.50
2o59
2.50
1.40
2.50
2.00


Total
Gross
FOB Value


$ 19,211,000
631,000
3,976,000
11,463,000
10,220,000
8,318,000
187,000
1,529,000
1,967,000
1,093,000
9,070,000
15,009,000
37,711,000
477,000
2,441,000
2,175,000
735,000
318,000
4,300,000


TOTAL VEGETABLES 332,275 14,150 318,125 130,831,000
Watermelons 105,000 7,000 98,000 335 Melons 32,830,000 2z,00o 29,5N6s,0O0 $ 32- $ 9,613,000
Strawberries 3,200 200 3,000 73.3 36 pt.Crt. 220,000 220,000 8.55 1,874,000
Cantaloupes 2,500 500 2,000 45 Jumbo Crt. 90,000 90,000 3.65 328,000
Avocados 4,400 o 4,400 97 Buo 50C 424,000 424,000 2o70 1,145,000
Limes 6,000 a 6,000 62 1-3/5 bu. 370,000 0 370,000 5001 1,854,000
Mangoes 0o 650 650 77 Bu. 50,000 a 50,000 5.00 225,000
Other Mi~oloFruits oa 2,000 2,000 100 Bu. 200,000 a 200,000 1.90 380,000
TOTAL MIS=LoFRUITS 123,750 7,700 116,050 34,184,000 30,932,000 15,419,000
Oranges, bearing 339,608 39,608 268 1-3/5 bu.Box 91,300,000 91,30,000 $1.99 $181,720,000
Grapefruit, bearing 111,308 111,308 340 1-3/5 buoBox 42,000,000 1,300,000 40,700,000 1.38 56,494,000
Tangerines, bearing 23,300 23,300 215 1-3/5 buoBox 5,000,000 500,000 4,500,000 3.72 16,751,000
TOTAL CITRUS 474,216 474,216 292 138,300,000 1,800,000 136,500,000 1.87 254,965,000
GRAND TOTAL 930,241 21,850 908,391 401,215,000

(P) Spring pickles for processing.
o No information or estimate.
on Estimated, We have a record of truck shipment volume of field peas and radishes. We have a record of avocado, lime and mango
truck shipment volume, also production volume for avocados and limes. Avocados and limes show "on tree" value.
S Abandoned because of market conditions and not included in Total Gross Value. Gross Value includes production, packing and
marketing costs, if any, and profit, if any.









ESTIMATED DISPCSITICN OF FLORIDA VEGETABLES AND FRUITS ~N C.ARLCTS, OR EQUIVALENTS, A~D '(AWE 1953-54 SEASON


Commodity


Beans
Limas
Cabbage
Celery
Corn
Cucumbers
g (Pickles)
Eggplant
Escarole-Endive
Lettuce
Peppers
Potatoes
Tomatoes
Cauliflower
Squash
Radishes
Field Peas
Butterbeans
Misol. Vegetables
TOTAL VEGETABLES
Watermelons
Strawberries
Cantaloupes
Avocados
Lines
Mangoes
Miscellaneous Fruits


Straight
Freight
Cars


2,050
(25)
2,843
10,157
4,203
1,294


1,160
46
1,303
9,026
7,117
56
150
237


150
39,817
13,794
3
10

0
*
*


Mixed
Freight
Cars(a)


600
20
250
150
50


220
1,000
110
700
40
135
100
180
230
23
9
1,204
5,021


0


*


LCL
Express
Cars(a)


LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
4
4

2

277
326
32
25


Inter-
state
Boat Truck
Carlots Carlots


7,088
184
5,833
4,788
4,328
5,323

1,173
916
717
3,157
8,325
11,951
497
1,345
868
576
63
986
58,118
16,835
323
78
793
599
30
45


Total
Shipped
out
Carlots


9,738
229
8,926
15,095
8,581
6,617

1,393
3,076
873
5,160
17,391
19,203
653
1,675
1,335
599
72
2,344
102,960
30,629
328
88
1,070
925
62
o


Florida
Processed
Carlots


1,150


Florida
Consumed
Carlots(a)


1,200
80
780
950
1,000
200

80
130
350
220
500
1,500
180
250
115
250
150
1,090
9,025
19000
80
100
100
180
50
250


Total
Used
Carlots


12,088
309
9,706
16,045
9,581
6,817
320
1,473
3,206
1,223
5,420
17,891
23,773
833
1,925
1,450
849
222
3,634
116,765
31,629
488
188
1,170
1,410
112
365


Abandoned
Carlots
(Not In-
cluded) f


628

2,464
615




200



280

115
*
*
*
*


4,302
3,7752


*
*
*
*


Total FOB
Gross Valwe
Cars Used


$ 19,211,000
631,000
3,976,000
11,463,000
10,220,000
8,318,000
187,000
1,529,000
1,967,000
1,093,000
9,070,000
15,009,000
37,711,000
477,000
2,441,000
2,175,000
735,000
318,000
4,300,000
130,831,000
9,613,000
1,874,000
328,000
1,145,000
1,854,000
225,000
380,000


TOTAL MISCL. FRUITS 13,807 662 18,703 33,172 435 1,760 35,362 3,252 15,419,000
Oranges, bearing 16,715 3103 2pB4-6 .1,4U9 25z,22 49,425 12, BU 7I,287 182,5ZO 2,600 187,/20,000
Grapefruit, bearing 15,187 36894 984 201 18,508 38,774 40,178 3,311 82,263 1,000 56,494,000
Tangerines, bearing 2,228 501 66 3,392 6,187 2,076 919 9,182 16,751,000
TOTAL CITRUS 34,130 7,498 3,896 1,690 47,172 94,386 168,061 11,517 27-,965 3,600 254,965,000
GRAND TOTAL 87,754 12,519 4,562 1,690 123,993 230,518 173,276 22,302 426,092 11,154 401,215,000


a Estimated, based on some incomplete figures.
b Processed Waterselonn, if any, included with Miscellaneous Fruits.
o No information or estimate.
0o No information or estimate.
t Abandoned because of market conditions and not included in the gross
marketing costs, andpaoking costs if packed, and profit, if any.
% Included in Miscellaneous Vegetables, if any.


FOB Florida Value. The estimated gross includes the production,


320



40

3,070





200
4,780

80


305

50


OF FLORIDA VEGETABLES AND FRUITS IN CARLMTS, OR EQUIVALENTS, AND VALUE 1953-54 SEASON


ESTIMATED DISPOSITICKN






SHIPMENTS FROM FLORIDA BY COMMODITIES AND MONTHS, FOR 1953-54 SEASON


00MWODITY s Aug. Sept : Oct. s Nov. s Dec. s Jan. r Feb. -hrch .April s fy s June 2 July 8 TOTAL t

Oranges I 78: 10s 402: 12972 2213: 2153: 2143: 2336; 21931 21372 1269% 482: 16,713 :
Grapefruit 8 29: 334g 1164: 1242% 1459: 2111: 1789: 2332t 1945s 1777g 802: 214: 15,198 s
Tangerines s s 1 s 617: 1051s 420s 84: 55: 1s : : : 2,228 s
Mixed Citrus : 4s 3s 192: 8012 1402: 1176: 888. 1156: 844s 647s 266: 115: 7,494 1
TOTAL CITRUS s 111 347: 1758s 3957: 6125: 5860: 49041 5879s 4983: 4561: 2337: 811: 41,633 :

Cantaloupes 9s s : s s 1: 9: : : 10 :
Strawberries S : s s s 8 t 2s 1: : : : : 3
Watermelons s s : s s:s s s 328: 4951s 8480: 35: 13,794 s
TOTAL MISCL. FRUITS : S S : s 8 2: 1: 329: 4960: 84d0O 35: 13,807 2
Beans (Incl. Limas) s : I 15: 4161 509s 283: 229: 231: 306: 82: 4: 2,075 1
Cabbage 2 2 1 3 : 66s 2901 469% 1309: 649: 601 : : 2,843
Carrots 1 : 1 : s : s : 7: 3: : : 10 :
Cauliflower : : s : s 13: 22: 14: 5: 2:s : : 56
Celery $3: : 231 642: 1334: 1420: 2105: 2260: 1794: 579: i 10,157 $
Corn, Green S : s : 10: 64: 172: 314: 521: 1056: 1426: 640s : 4,203
Cucumbers : 13: 206: 239: 34: 25: 20: 235: 521s 12 : 1,294 s
Escarole-Endive s :s 77$ 162: 182: 178: 210: 181: 166: 4: s 1,160 t
Greens (ex. Spinach) S : s I 4: 17. 18: 301 24: 9: 8: : 110 3
Lettuce & Romaine 1 : s 6: 10: 6: 2: 12: 10: : 46 2
peppers : : s : s 8a 27: 120: 286: 145: 497s 220: : 1,303 %
Potatoes : : S : : 3: 210: 637: 1958: 3089: 3110: 19: : 9,026 s
Radishes : S $ 8 69: 28: 42: 42: 35: 18: 3: : : 237 s
Spinach o. s : t : : 8: : : : : s 8
Sweet Potatoes : : 2 S : : : : : $ 13: 8: 21 :
Tomatoes s s .s 2 67: 989s 1168: 913s 1029: 1353: 1547s 51: : 7,117 s
Turnips l : $ % 2: l : 1 2
Mixed Car Vegetables s 8 9: 148: 4362 686: 890s 1206: 1019: 521: 103: 3s 5,021 s
TOTAL VEGETABLES 1 2S 37s 1026, 3186s 4482: 5283: 8951s 10340s 9738: 16348 11: 44,688 s
TOTAL NON-CITRUS & VEGSs 2 37 1i026s 3186: 4482: 5285: 8952: 10669s 14698S 10114: 46s 58,495 s
ALL FRUITS & VEGTA3LE s 113 347: 1795: 4983: 93119 10342s 10189s 14831? 156527 192598 12451, 05Y-.7 100,128 s

PICK-UP-EXPRESS SHIPMENTS FROM FLORIDA STATIONS FOR 1953-54 SEASON
COMMODITY s u s Septo. Oct. Nov. s Deo. Jan, 7Fobb, rMaroh jAril May :- ,une : Jaly s TOTAL
Mixod Citrus 221 2277s 466: 397: 403: 243: 77: 11: 3,8966
TOTAL STT-- s 2 8 '228969 ./9: 403: 243: 77: 11: 3896

BOAT SHIPMENTS FROM FLORIIDA STATIONS FOR 1953-54 SEASON
COMMODITY i Au, Seapt, s Oct. Nov. Y Dec. Jan, s Febb. March :opril May Y June 2 jaly : IOTAL 2
Oranges 2 2 41 9 9: 1472 494: 512: 133s : 1,299
aape fruit : g 9: 260: 40: 8 24 82 40" 11i: : 2 159
T$A CT.---: 8 -l33: 155: 53=4 523 1'33 S 245-


FREIGHT CARLOT








FLORIDA FRIICIT, ETXPRTSS AND BOAT CARJOT SHIPMIITS, FOR 1953-54 3SE30N


CO MOD~ITTY__ _: Aug s _op-._ Oact.o Nov. 2 Dec, : Jan. : Feb. ilaroh :April : M; y as June : July : TOTAL i


2
Oranges s 78:
Grapefruit t 29:
Tangerinos
Mixcd Citrajs 4:


10
343:

3:


402;
1190

192:


1301:
12021
6173
3231


2213.:
1460
1051:
3679;


2162
2135
420
16-12


s a s
: 2290; 2830
I 1797: 2372:
: 841 55t
1 1285: 1559:


2705C:
1956:
1:
103871


i l
2270: 1269:
1777: 802;:
1 !
724: 2775


IDTAL CITRUS 1 ils 356: 1724 4023 8A4031 6359: 5456s 6816: 5749: 47711 2348; 011: 41,633 s

Cantaloupes 5 : : : : : : 1i 9; t s 10
Strawberries : t : : : a : 21 11: : : : 3 :
Watermelons : a : a3 : 323: 4951: 8480s 35; 13,794
TOTAL MISCLo FMJITS : : a : : 21 11 329: 49601 84801 35: 13,807 I

3oans (Incl. Llmas) t 15: 4161 5091 283: 229: 2311 306: 32: 4: : 2,075 t
Cabbage 4 56 : 566 290: 4691 13091 649: 60: i : 2,043 3
Carrots J l : : l 71 31 : 10 O
Cauliflower l : 131 22: 14 5: 2:1 l : 56
Calary : : 23: 542: 1334: 1420; 2105: 2260: 1794: 579: a 10,157 ;
Corn, Green a l 101 54: 172: 314j 521: 1056: 1426: 640t: 4,203 :
"ucuurbers s i 1 135 2061 2391 341 251 20: 235: 521: 1: : 1,294 :
Eaoarolo-"ndive : s 771 1621 182: 178: 2101 1811 1661 4; : 1,160 ;
Groons (Ex. Spinach) s : : S 41 171 18: 301 24: 91 8: : : 110 1
Lottuoc & Romaine : 61 101 6: 2: 12: 10: : 45 ;
Pappars : : a sl 82 27: 120: 2861 145: 497: 2201 1 1,303 1
Potato.1s : : 3s 2101 637: 1958: 30091 31101 191 : 9,026 s
Radi-hoas 59: 28: 423 421 35: 18: 3. l : 237 :
Spinach : : : :31 : l : :: : s 8 s
3-aot Potatoe 3 : l : : : S : a : 131 8: 21 s
Tomatoes : : : : 67: 9899 11681 9131 1029: 13531 15475 51: : 7,117 t
Turnips & Rutabagas : : I : a 1 1: : : : 1
amxed Car Vegotablos : :l 9: 148: 436: 686s 8901 12061 1019: 5211 1031 31 5,021 1
TOTAL VEGETABLES : : : 37: 10261 31861 4482: 5283s 8951: 103401 97381 16341 11: 44,688 1

NCM-CITRUS & VIGETABLES l : 37: 1026; 31861 4482% 32851 89521 10669: 14698: 10114: 46: 58,495 t

ALL FRUITS & VGLCTABI.ES : 111 356: 10211 5049: 11509! 10841: 10741: 157580 16418: 19469: 12462s 8573 100,128 1


482:
214:

115:


16,713
15,198 t
2,228
/,494 a






FLORIDA INTERSTATE TRUCK SHIPL NT PASSING FJR 1953-54 SEASON
Actual Check at Nine Road Guard s-tations August 1-Julv 31


CC'~0ODITY_ Aug, : 3ept Oct. Noov, : Dec. Jan s Feb. I Arch: Aprils h3y s June July I TOTAL s

Oranges 3 2: 108; 2081: 3110s 4110: 3119; 3353: 3683: 2645: 1934: 814: 163: 25,122
Grapefruit 20: 921: 2129: 2084: 1775s 2430: 2149: 2715: 2096: 1547: 451: 171: 18,388
Tangerines S: 12: 1234: 1559: 475: 72: 33. 5: 1 'CL : : 3,391 :
IOT AL CITRUS s 22: 929; 4222: 6428: 7444: 6024s 5574: 6431: 4746: 3402: 1265: 334: 469901 ,

Avocados : 103; 135: 177: 152: 120: 38: 1: : 10: 57: 793
Cantaloupes : : : : : 2: 31: 45sLCL s 78
Limes : 93: 49: 7: 14: 15: 7: 2: 3: 8: 52: 193: 156: 599
goes : : : : : : LCL : 16: 13: 30
Stra:berrie : : : : 3: 69: 121: 122: 8: : : 323
Watermelons S r 1 ; 1: 307: 4010: :;'8560. ,-456; 13,335: ;
Other Non-Citrus Fruits : l.LCL :LCL ; : : 2: 4: 6: 10: 20: 2: : 45*:
0TaIL IMSCL. FRUITS s 199: 184: 194: 166: 138: 116: 128: 132: 335: 4113: 3826: 682s 15,203

3eans, Snap : 26: 851: 367: 978: 1186: 1340: 1330: 500: 10: : 7,088
Limas & Butter eans s 1: 4: 10; 10: 8: 35: 147: 32sLCL : 247 :
Cabbage : : 3; 225: 1130: 1476: 1957: 965: 77: : : 5,833
Cauliflower s : :LCL : 49- 133: 201: 89: 23: 2: : : 497
Celery : : s 43: 417: 710: 851: 948: 893: 719: 207:LCL 4,788
Corn, Green : : 2 21: 94s 253: 453: 877: 11151 1107: 403: 5: 4,328
Cucumbers : 3: 78s 690: 587: 583: 441: 531: 1295: 1095: 20: : 5,323 s
Eggplant : : 1: 30: 90: 93: 154: 145: 186: 157: 159: 115: 43: 1,173 s
.scarole8-ndiv7-Chicory : : :LCL : 69: 110: 143: 156: 182: 179: 73: 4: : 916 :
Field Peas 1: 1 10: 9: 4: 4: 2: 4: 61: 428: 50s 2: 576
Lettuce i : :LCL 3 50: 108: 137: 165: 175: 68: 13: 1: : 717
Peppers : 1 16: 70: 323: 569: 681: 564: 700: 225: 8: 3,157 s
Potatoes : : 9: 178: 351: 995: 3136: 3634: 22: : 8,325 s
Radish ; : : 9S 122: 114: 176: 116: 163: 120: 48:LCL : : 868 .
Squash sLCL : : 14: 86: 101: 183: 222: 297: 328: 98: 36: 1.,345 t
Tomatoes : : 3: 205: 1013: 1704: 1810: 2246: 2444: 2357: 169: : 11,951 ]
Bunched Vegetables : 8: : 2: 13: 55: 60: 78: 16: 8:LCL : 232
Other Vegetables : 12: 15: 21: 17: 49: 80: 104: 123: 88: 117: 94: 34, 754
TOTAL VEGETABKiJS : 13: 20: 192: 2275: 3927: 69341 8318: 10880: 12817: 11282: 1368: 92: 58,118
IOTAL VEGSo & NON-CITRUS : 212: 204: 376: 2441: 4065: 7050: 8446: 11012: 13152: 15395: 10194: 774: 73,321 s

ALL FRUITS & VEGETABLES : 234: 1133: 4598: 8869: 11509: 13074: 1420D: 17443: 17898: 18877: 11459: 1108: 120,222 :

NOTEm Includes 44 carloads of Icebox Idelons.o Does not include truck shipments from points West of Suwannee River
estimated as 3,000 for June and 500 for July.








CART SHIPMTS RIGHTH, XPRSS, AT & TRUCK) RUIS 3 MOTHS FOR SEASON 1953-54
August 1-July 31,nclusive)
COMMODITY j Aug. $ Sapt. j Oct, 3 gov, Dec. : Jan. Feb. :March :April j tay : June : July T IOD.L :

Oranges < 801 118: 2483 4411: 6323: 52381 5643: 6513: 5350: 4204 20831 645: 43,134 x
Grapefruit j 49: 1164: 3319: 3366: 3235: 4565: 3946: 5087: 4052: 3324: 1253: 385: 33,745 :
Tangerines : : 12: 1851: 2610: 895: 156: 88: 6: 1;LCL : : 5,619
ifxed Citrus 1 4: 3: 1921 823: 3679: 16421 1285: 1559: 1087: 724: 277: 115: 11,390 :
TOTAL CITRUS : 133: 1285: 6006: 10451; 15847: 123831 110301 13247: 10495: 8253: 3613: 1145: 93,888 s
Avocados s 1031 135: 177: 1521 120: 38 1: : : : 10: 57: 793
Cantaloupes I a : : : 1 3: 40: 45:LCL : 88 :
Limes I 93: 49: 7s 141 15: 7: 21 3: 8: 521 1931 1561 599 1
Mangoes : i : a : I : :ICL i 16: 13: 30 :
Strawberries 3: S : : 3: 69: 123: 123: 8: 1 : : 326 s
Watermelons 1 l: : : : 1: 635: 8961: 17040: 491: 27,129 :
Other Non-Ci nrus Fruits : 1:LCL :LCL 3 1 : 2: 4: 6: 10: 20: 2: a 45 s
TOTAL MISCL. FIITS : 199: 184: 1841 166: 138: 116: 130: 133s 664: 9073: 17306: 717: 29,010 :
Deans (incl. Limas :S 41: 1268: 1380s 12711 1425: 1579: 1671: 729: 46:LCL : 9,410 %
Cabbage : : ; : 3s 291; 1420: 19451 3266: 1614: 137: : a 8,676 :
Carrots : 1 : : : : : : 7: 3: : : 10
Cauliflower : a : :LCL : 62: 155: 2151 94: 25: 2: : : 553 1
Celery : s 1 s 661 10591 2044, 2271: 30531 3153: 2513s 786sLCL : 14,945 1
Corn, Green 1 : a : 311 158: 425: 767: 1398: 2171: 2533: 1043: 5: 8,531 1
Cucumbers a 31 91: 896: 826: 617: 466: 551: 1530s 1616: 21: 1 6,617 :
Eggplant : : 1: 30: 90: 93: 1541 145: 186: 157: 159: 115: 43: 1,173 :
Escarole-Lndive-Chicory : :LCL : 146: 272: 325: 334: 392; 360: 239: 8: : 2,076 s
Field Peas : 1s 1: 10: 9: 4, 4; 2: 4: 61: 428s 50: 2s 576 :
Greens (ex. Spinach) 1: : : 4: 17: 18: 30: 24: 9: 8: : : 110 s
Lettuce & Romaine z a ILCL : 56: 118: 143: 167: 187: 781 131 1: : 763 ;
Peppers : : 1: 16: 78: 350: 689: 967: 709: 1197: 4451 8: 4,460 s
Potatoes S : : : : 12: 388: 988: 2953: 6225: 6744: 41: : 17,351 s
Radishes a s : 9: 191: 142: 218: 158: 198: 138s 51sLCL : : 1,105 :
Spinach : : 8: : : : a : S 8 s
Squash :LCL : I 14s 86: 101: 183s 222: 297: 328: 98: 16: : 1,345
Sweet Potatoes : : a : : : : : 13: 8: 21
Ibmatoes : 3: 3s 272: 2002: 2872: 2723: 3275: 3797: 3904: 220: : 19,068
Turnips S : : : : 1 : 1: : 1 a I:
Bunched Vegetables : : 2: 13: 55: 60; 78: 16: 8:LCL : 232
Other Vegetables I 12: 151 21: 17: 491 80: 104: 123: 88: 117" 94: 34: 754 :
1ixed Oar Vegetables : : : 9: 148: 4363 686: 890: 1206: 1019: 521: 103: 3: 5,021 :
OTAOL VEGETABLES : 13: 20s 229: 3301: 7113: 11416: 13601: 19831: 23157: 21020: 3002: 103: 102,806
NON-CITRUS & VEGETAB3LS : 212: 204: 413: 3467: 7251: 11532: 13731s 19964: 23821: 30093: 20308: 8201 131,816 s
ALL FRUITS & VEGETABLES s 345s 1489: 6419: 13918: 23098: 239151 24761: 33211: 34316: 38346: 23921: 1965: 225,704 1









FTjORIDA SI-IPMENTS BY VARIOUS ,MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION FOR MTE SEASONS


(Theso figures have been
agree ;with some previous


revised and rearranged and may not agree or seem to
tabulations. The totals are substantially the same.)


Freight Shipments
1944-45 1945-46 1946-47 1947-48 1948-49 1949-50 1950-.51 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54


Commodity

Oranges
Grapefruit
Tangerines
Mixed Citrus


41,049
8,534
4,370
11,102


41,848
12,201
3,813
13,573


43,390
12,606
2,974
9,599


33,524
11,80.1
2,884
6,667


26,603
13,826
2,923
8,155


14,345
7,671
2,205
4,804


19,457
13,718
2,476
9,1C6


22,745
15,907
2,369
11,431


16,469
13,182
2,608
8,293


16,713
15,198
2,228
7,494


Total Citrus 65,055 71,435 58,569 54,876 51,507 29,025 44,757 52,452 40,552 41,633
Strawberries 43 25 99 56 110 182 145 40 58 3
Watermelons 8,366 7,470 7,963 9,247 8,864 10,054 9,834 11,359 12,114 13,794
Miscellaneous Fruits 15 3 9 2 20 2 10

Total -.on-Citrus 8,424 7,498 8,071 9,303 8,974 10,238 9,979 11,419 12,174 13,007


Beans & Limas 4,682
Cabbage 5,157
Celery 11,037
Corn, Green 42
Cucumbers 988
Eggplant 304
Escarole 1,347
Lettuce & Romaine 152
Peas, English 83
Peppers 1,622
Potatoes 7,068
Tomatoes 5,305
Squash (estimated) 500
Other Variety Vegetables 426
Mixed Car Vegetables 6,884


4,538
4,763
12,489
104
1,549
251
1,317
166
62
1,612
9,591
5,269
400
484
7,217


3,668
2,459
8,747
166
1,138
81
827
116
14
744
4,001
3,249
400
224
4,704


3,148
4,934
8,966
338
1,500
182
1,039
90
16
1,499
4,807
3,782
500
181
4,442


3,628
5,457
9,345
1,223
1,052
70
974
102

1,364
6,593
6,783
400
202
4,472


2,550
4,016
10,011
2,191
787
47
919
123
2
1,842
5,322
6,003
300
242
4,654


1,789
5,621
10,811
2,300
1,293
77
701
180
4
1,496
6,592
6,530
200
374
4,968


2,331
5,180
11,610
3,521
1,023
46
846
72

1,144
6,476
8,521.
200
417
6,343


1,543
4,098
10,126
3,629
1,028
44
1,123
92
1
1,224
9,826
7,209
200
532
5.067


2,075
2,843
10,157
4,203
1,294

1,160
46

1,303
9,026
7,117
150*
443 *
5,021-.*


Total Vegetables 45,597 49,812 30,538 35,424 41,665 39,009 42,936 47,730 45,742 44,838
Total Vegs & Nonitrus 54,021 57,310 38,609 44,727 50,639 49,247 52,915 59,149 57,916 56,645

ALL FRUITS & VEGEZABLES 119,076 128,745 107,178 99,603 102,146 78,272 97,572 111,601 98,468 100,278

NOTES Includes an estimated 150 straight cars of Squash not officially reported.
Other Variety Vegetables include carloads as follows: Carrots 10, Cauliflower 56, Greens 110, Radishes 237,
Spinach 8, Sweet Potatoes 21, Turnips 1, Total 443 carloads.
M** Mixed Car Vegetables includes eggplant, peppers, escarole, squash, and all o ,her ve;ecables shipped in mixed cars.








FLORIDA SHIPMENTS BY VARIOUS MLANS OF TRANSPORTATIO.' FOR TANI


i.aASONiS (Cont')i


Commodity 1944-45


Express Shipments
1945-46 1946-47 1947-48 1948-49


1949-50 1950-51 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54


xYPRaSS
lxad Citrui 3,041 3,376 3,630 3,115 3,412 3,062 3,903 4,441 3,764 3,896

Strawbarrie s 1 2 20
'.r ta _c, %__!- 3_I.i ts 90 90 100 100 90 325 360 430 461 660,
Total Ni'on-Citrus 90 90 100 100 90 325 360 431 463 662

Mixed Car Vegetables 1,148 1,179 348 533 433 336 43 11 9 2*
botal Vogs. & Non-Citrus 1,238 1,269 948 633 523 661 403 442 472 664
ALL FRUITS & VEGETABLES 4,279 4,645 4,573 3,748 3,935 3,723 4,306 4,883 4,236 4,560


GOAT

Oranges
Grapefruit
Ihngerinos
Mixed Citrus
Total Citrus


Cabbage
Celery
Corn, Grean d
Cucumbers
Poppers
Potatoes
Other Variety Vegetables


- -_ Poat Shir.ants


2,908
1,437
222


No record of any


boat shipments

luring (War Period)

1944-45 Sea.> n


Total Vegetables

ALL FRUITS & VEGETABLES


3,087
1,662
409


1,299
159


88 4,567 35 5,158 22 384 288 1,458


- 100 248 -

- 3 1 -
- 7 -
- 164 191 -
- 2 5 7 -
- 272 5 457 -

88 4,839 5 35 5,615 22 384 288 1,456


NOTEs 1953-54 Soason LCL Express estimated
Fruits 25, carloads


as follows


Strawberries 2, Avocados 277, Limes 326, 'angoes 32, MLscellaneous


** 1953-54 Season Boat Shipments direct from Florida ports with no previous rail haul. Vie have other records September 1,1953
to August 31, 1954, which show Oranges 1,489 cars, Grapefruit 201 cars. fotal 1,690 cars.


..... I








FLORIDA SHIPMENTS BY VARIOUS MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION FOR TEN SEASONS (-ont'd).


Commodity

Oranges
Grapefruit
Tangerines


1944-4D5

3,641
513
819


1945-46

5,135
851
960


1940-47 /

8,774
1,395
1,096


Trucked Out
1947-48

14,268
2,858
1,670


Shipments
1948-49

30,356
8,708
2,702


1949-50

20,451
6,931
2,706


1950-51

17,271
9,505
2,243


1951-52

23,791
13,492
2,641


1952-53

22,096
13,983
3,262


1953-54

25,122
18,388
3,391


Ibtal Citrus 4,973 6,946 11,265 18,796 41,766 30,088 29,019 39,924 39,341 46,901

Strawberries 263 446 615 321 410 724 577 486 366 323
Watermelons 654 2,538 3,278 3,503 4,888 4,500 6,909 10,398 14,973 16,835
Avocados 327 42 72 81 97 230 437 744 -705 793
Limes 100 63 44 31 111 164 205 389 326 599
Miscellaneous Fruits 25 77 65 38 56 200 141 128 92 153
Iotal Non-Citrus 1,369 3,166 4,074 3,974 5,562 5,818 8,269 12,145 16,462 18,703

Beans 2,123 2,832 3,219 4,172 5,642 6,702 6,174 6,203 6,377 7,088
Limas 134 297 229 343 503 540 387 272 243 247
Cabbage 1,449 2,083 3,003 3,983 3,543 5,327 5,874 6,187 5,492 5,833
Celery 405 566 1,020 1,381 2,345 3,481 4,143 4,277 4,148 4,788
Corn, Green 121 392 479 662 1,803 2,735 2,885 3,502 3,727 4,328
Cucumbers 444 741 896 1,999 2,564 4,121 4,169 4,885 5,892 5,323
Eggplant 380 682 756 754 1,153 955 818 1,233 1,152 1,173
Escarole 25 20 145 200 284 421 535 988 894 916
Lettuce 51 93 90 103 142 355 562 611 750 717
Peas, English 53 52 26 18 16 27 -
Peppers 809 1,524 1,586 1,987 2,983 2,775 2,354 2,783 2,963 3,157
Potatoes 872 759 701 1,278 2,697 3,629 4,101 6',726 7,913 8,325
Tomatoes 2,826 3,549 2,526 3,826 6,907 8,797 9,790 11,393 10,165 11,951
Radishes (a) (a) (a) (a) (a) (a) (a) 835 958 868
Squash 447 653 645 815 1,098 1,358 1,385 1,130 1,264 1,345
Butterbeans 46 142 94 145 o o *
Field Peas 288 553 658 804 728 630 642 525 574 576
Okra 76 155 111 186 252 265 150 ** 0* *0
Bunched Vegetables 45 59 50 110 56 38 454 485 149 232
Other Vegetables (a) 225 340 434 619 870 1,310 2,282 2,027 1,308 1,251
Total Vegetables 10,819 15,492 16,668 23,385 33,586 43,466 46,705 54,062 53,969 58,118
Iotal Vegs. & Non-Citrus 12,188 18,658 20,742 27,359 39,148 49,284 54,974 66,207 70,431 76,821
ALL FRUITS & VEGETABLES 17,161 25,604 32,007 46,155 80,914 79,372 83,993 106,131 109,772 1230722


Lima Beans.


Cauliflower for 1953-54 Season.


NOTE 8


Estimated 70 cars Butterbeans included with
Okra included with Other Vegetables.
Other Vegetables includes 497 carloads of


.... .. 7' ... .. .... ..








FLORIDA SHIPMENTS BY VARIOUS MANS OF TRANSPORTATION FOR 'TM SEASONS (Cont'd).

ToIbtal Freight, Sxpress, Boat and Truck Shipments from Florida
Commodity 1944-45 1945-46 1946-47 1947-48 1948-49 1949-50 1950-51 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54

Oranges 44,690 47,059 55,072 47,792 56,994 37,883 36,728 46,753 38,790 43,134
Grapefruit 9,047 13,064 15,438 14,659 22,534 16,264 23,245 29,566 27,228 33,745
Tangerines 5,189 4,773 4,292 4,554 5,625 5,320 4,719 5,010 5,870 5,619
Mixed Citrus (Rail) 14,143 16,949 13,229 9,782 11,567 7,866 13,009 15,872 12,057 11,390
Ibtal Citrus 73,069 81,845 88,031 76,787 96,720 67,333 77,701 97,201 83,945 93,888

Strawberries 306 471 714 377 520 906 722 527 426 326
Watermelons 9,020 10,008 11,241 12,750 13,752 14,554 16,743 21,757 27,087 30,629
avocados (Uruck & Express) 382 77 127 141 127 330 537 874 705 793
*)Limes (Truck & Express.) 130 103 79 63 161 364 405 639 326 599
()Miscl. Fruits (Exp. & Truck) 30 90 84 46 66 225 166 198 555 163
Ibtal Miscl. Fruits 9,868 10,749 12,245 13,377 14,626 10,379 18,573 23,995 29,099 32,510

Beans & Limas 6,939 7,667 7,116 7,663 9,773 9,792 8,350 8,806 8,163 9,410
(a)Butterbeans (Truck) 46 142 94 145 ** ** ** *
Cabbage 6,606 6,846 5,462 8,917 9,000 9,346 11,495 11,367 9,590 8,676
Celery 11,442 13,055 9,867 10,347 11,690 13,740 14,954 15,887 14,274 14,945
Corn, Green 163 496 648 1,000 3,026 4,926 5,185 7,023 7,356 8,531
Cucumbers 1,432 2,290 2,037 3,499 3,616 4,909 5,462 5,908 6,920 6,617
Eggplant 684 933 837 936 1,223 1,002 895 1,279 1,196 1,173
Escarole 1,372 1,337 972 1,239 1,258 1,340 1,236 1,834 2,017 2,076
Lettuce 203 259 206 193 244 478 742 683 842 763
Peas, English 136 114 40 34 16 29 4 1 -
Peppers 2,431 3,136 2,330 3,486 4,347 4,624 3,850 3,927 4,187 4,460
Potatoes 7,940 10,350 4,866 6,085 9,290 9,142 10,693 13,202 17,739 17,351
Tomatoes 8,131 8,818 5,775 7,608 13,690 14,800 16,320 19,914 17,374 19,068
Squash 947 1,053 1,045 1,315 1,498 1,658 1,385 1,543 1,264 1,345
(a)Radishes 1,217 958 1,105
(a Field Peas (Truck) 288 553 658 804 728 630 642 525 574 576
(a)Okra (Truck) 76 155 111 186 252 265 150 j i
a Bunched Vegetables (Truck) 45 59 50 110 56 38 454 485 149 232
a Other Vegetables (Truck) 225 340 434 619 870 1,310 2,282 2,027 1,308 754
b Other Vegs (Freight & Bot) 426 U48 226 186 202 249 374 421 532 703
6 Uxed Vegs.(Freight & Express) 8,032 8,396 5,552 4,975 4,905 4,990 5,011 427 5,076 5.021
Total Vegetables 57,564 66,483 48,326 59,347 75,684 83,268 89,484 96,475 99,520 102,806
Total Vegs. & Miscl, Frts. 67,432 77,232 60,571 72,724 90,310 99,647 103,057 120,470 128,619 135,316
ALL FRUITS & VEGPrABLES 140,501 159,077 148,602 149,511 187,030 166,980 185,758 217,671 212,564 229,204

NOTEs Includes estimates for Express Shipments of Avocados, Limes, Mangoes, etc. ** Butterbeans included with Other Vegetables.
Truck Shipments only, some volume included in Miscellaneous or Mixed Cars. (b) Freight and Boat only.
Freight and lirpress only. Prior to 1951-52 Season Radishes were included with Miscellaneous Vegetables.
e Okra not reported separately for truck during 1951-52, 1952-53 and 1955-54 Seasons and was included with Mixed Vegotables.





Page 18


RAIL FREIGHT SHIPMENTS BY COUNTIES
1953-54 SEASON
(August 1-July 31)


CARLOTS
Florida
Counties

Alachua
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
De Soto
Dixie
Duval
Flagler
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Union
Volusia
Walton -
Washington


8 Orange s


731







461

535



S

3

104 8
1,090
541 8
8
410



1,476
1



43
733 8
g



1
177
90 8
3,950
107 8
1,010

4
657



315
17 :
0S
3,950 _8


Gra
fru

























2,


1,



1,
4,


2,


Straight Cars t 16,713 s 15,
Boat 8 1,299 :
Pick-Up-Express S a


GRAND TOTAL S 18,012 s 15,


pe- : Tanger- 8 Mixed
it s ines : Citrus



621 : s 333
21 8

S


s2
17 s 19 8 10;
8 S
99 s 26 s 76
t g
a I
8 8
a 8
8 8
S 4 8 4

26 s 151 $ 56
442 8 14 8 434
362 s 21 s 287
S S
,817 s 2 s 492
a


933 z 104 8 824
8 : s 2
8 a
a S
28 s a 9
114 S 4 8 105
: 8

,050 s 935 : 979
76 8 1 : 42
28 s s 21
68 s 9 s 106
560 8 11 S 117
639 8 556 s 2,311
1 8 86 8 34

,097 s 1 s 733
8 a
31 8 8
149 8 88 s 229



11 s 196 i 191


8 a


.198 s 2,228 s 7,494
159
8 8 3,896


,357 s 2,228 8 11,390
__ 8 _____ a ___


Total
Citrus



1,685
21



8

2 a
604 8


18







18


736 s





11 8

337
1,980
1,211







88


956


7,198
159
50 :


1,778
11,456

228

3,841
35
1,1238



71359 s





41,633
1,458
3,8961 s



46,987


8


Beans & ;
Limas ; Cabbage 8

42 : 24 s
3 :

622 : 1


S 3 8
S 7 8

40 3 106 s
8 S


0
:


s
s
s

$

2
t



33







$
$
6 "



28
5
33 s
:







20
00
1,9 ^
6






6 ;
28
3 s
s





2,7 \




j:
2,7 :
28 S


1


s

121 8
8

69 S

10 8
139 8








3



52
4

808


602
35









138



405


25





,83 3




,843


2




2






Page 19


RAIL FRi.IGT S3fiPMENS YF COUNTIES
1953-54 SEASON
(August l-.July 31)


C-a..ti'es Carrots

- *-h'uJ. : :
". "rd

3ro -a :
Srl -te
i tr -
---V
-J m







1m..- : :




.1 z-n$ :
i -n- r o
a:'-i 1-.n







i-i rna 3e
Ja-k~ -.


--c : e
martinn : :
.ee hobee











ra" t ae : :10
P:.l Seach : 10




<', Johns :



Seninle :
2-T..er :
an"?a.iee ;
.i on r :
'clusia.





:%rain. t Cars 10 :

PF~-1-;p--uzp3 re s s :


G. j_ >' TOtsL : 10 :


Cauli- :
flower























14























10



2A









56




56


Celery

519




























80'





285


370

3. 758







1,319
3,102









0,157




.0:157


Green Escarole-; Greens I
Corn Cucumbers : n.dive :(ex. Sninacn)

: 40
10 32

213 85 : 6
1 : s


26 171

232 : 2





35


437
: 33 :

3
5 12
9

9


126
97: 153



43 : 51
14
14
1 : 1
632 27 : 408 : 78

2,654 644 2




S 2 :
13 : 23

: : 1 :
208 2 53
: 29
: 19
: 1






4,203 ; 1-294 1,0 : 110 :




4,203 1,294 1,163 110







Page eO


PRAIL FREIGHT SFHP.HZNTS 3 COJN'ITES
1953-54 S2ASON
(August l-.uly 31)


CARLO 2TS
Flcrida :I
Counties :j

Alachu a
Bradford
3revard
3roward
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
De Soto
Dixie
Duval
F agler
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough 3
Holme s
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
ivadison
1'Anatee
Mahrion
Martin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa Ro sa
Sarasota
oeminol e
Su.nt er
Suwannee
Uni on
Volusia
,.i ton
,~tshington



Straight Cars
Boat
2ick-Up-xpre ss


GRAP-D TOTAL


lettucee &:
romaine Peppers

3 : 151
13

477
3


24










S 11
3


1 3457






11




3
9

19

8 37








,12 : 76
138


15





46 1,303




46 1..303


PoTatoes: eataishes

286
31

91.





3,499
16


1~,009







43
32






401





33

52

69 61



504
3,049


61
6 20









9,026 : 237




9,026 237


Spinp.ch






































5

3


















8




8


Sweet
Potatoes jbTmatoes

4


50



917

2,768








68
229


S 263

70




2 84



648
204
9
205


70





19 1,523



5








21 7,117




21 7,117


6Tirnips &:
FRtujabagas:
: 1as:







: S






































S 1.
: a





:





:

























1.



a 1






Page 21


RAIL FRnIG;T SHIPMr.qTS 3Y COUJT-.S
1953-54 S ASON
(August 1-.Jul.y 31)


Vlori -a
Count- es

Alachua
3?adford
J reva rd
3rowa rd
Charlotte
Ci trus

Collier
Columbia
Dp.de
.se Satc
ji7ie
J. al
Fla ler
2adsden
Gilchrist-
lah.es
Hamilton
Haprdee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
.iillsborough
Hrolnmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferscn
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
L-eo
Levy
Maiison
2.tnatee
.hrion
\&r, in
Okeechcbe e
Oran ea
Osceola
Palm each
? sco
Pirellas
Pol..<
m-utnam
3t, Johns
3t Lucie
Santa Rosa
Saras ota
Senincle
'um t e r
Suwanne e
Unicn
Vola -ia

.;I ngt on


Straight Cars
33--T
Pick-Up--xpres s


G?.,L TOTAL


: Mixed : Total : o.nt?.- Straw- W ater-! lbtal : Total Ve,' :s
:7e-etables:Veetab])es: louoes berries: melons Non-Citrus:, Non-'itrus :Grand TItal

8o 1.257 986: 986 : 2,243 2,243
27 : 116 56: 56 172 : 172
S6 6 6 1,691
S 1,389 2,93- : 1 2;934 2,955
5: : : 59: 59: 6 : 64
: : ; 63: 63 : 63 : 3
3 : : 3 3
S 12 : 1,157 1.90: 196 1,353 : 1,333
: 190: 190 190 : 190 :
: 13: 6,660 10 : 10: u,670 : o,b72
: 16 : 100: 100: 116 : 720
43: 43 43 : 43
S: : : 736
11:30 1.130 : 1,130
: 2 3 : : 8: 8 11: 11 :
3 38 : s .,214: 1,214 : 1,252 1,252 :
: : 59: : 31: '31 100 100
: : : : 20 20: 20 : 20
40 : 556 42: 42 : 598 609
1 405: : 103: 103: 508: 5038 :
S: 482: 482 482 : 819
77 : 123 1 : : : : 123 2,103
97 : 786 : : 3 : 1,192: 1,195 : 1,981 3.192 :
S 9 : : 91: 91 100 100 :
S: 70 : 76- 76: 146 2 3,867 :
9 : 147: 147 156 : 156 :
S: : 318; 318 : 318 : 318
73 73 73 73
27 959 1 : : ,4 1,444 2,403 : 5 740
17 : 778 : : 113: 113 891 : 902
S: 7i 7 7 7
: : :2 : 1,2351 1,236 : 1,236 1,236
::: : 2011 201 : 201: 201
: 3 : 797: : 15: 15 : 812 892
87 631 : : 1,528; 1,528 : 2,159 3,115
1: : 66: : ; 103: 103: 169 : 169 s
: ? 206 : 76: 76 282 ; 282 :
354 2033 : : : 58: 58 s 2,091 s 9,289 :
: : : 44: 44 % 44 203
2,272 : 11,489 : : : 3: 3 : 11,492 : 11,542
: 954, 954 1 954 ,314
: : : : : 32: 32 32 1.810
: : : 663- 663: C-3 12,119 $
539 52- 52 : 53] 819
20 4,219 42t 42 4 26 4.261 $
1,579 42: 42 : 1.621 : 5,462
: : 7: 7: 7 7
52 1,433 : 4, 33 1,468
: 397 : 4,311 24 24 4 335 5 45o
4: 2 : 242 : 790: 790 1.032 : 1,032 :
19 :f 665: 665 684 684
S: : ; 58- 58 59 : 59 :
S: : 70 -0: 110 : 823
: : : 21 21 21: 21
50: 50 : 50: 50 :



5,021 : 4,688 : 10 3 : 1.3,794: 13,807 58 495 : 100,128 ;
:1,58 :
3,896 :


5,021 : 44,688 10 3 : 13.794: 13,807 : 5,495 105,482 :







,age 22






ate by 7Weeks B

ug1
ug. 2-8
ug. 9-15
ug, 16-22
ug. 23-29
ug- 30-Sept,5
ept -6-1.2
ept.13-19
ept-20-26
ept,27-Oct. 3
-t. 4-10n
at 11-17
-.t 18-24
st c 25-31
vv- 1-7
v 8-14
3v, 15-21
Dvo 22-28
Dv, 29-Dec. 5
sco 6-12
-c. 13-19
c,' 20-26
;c- 27-Jan- 2, 1954
in, 3-9
3n. 10-16
in. 17-23
in. 24-30
in. 31-Feb. 5
ib. 7-13
bo 14-20
,b. 21-27
,b, 28-Mar. r,
ire 7-13
ir- 14--20
ir, 21-27
iro 28-Aor 3
>r, 4-10
)r. 11-17
)r. 18-24
)ro 25-Mpy 1
a.y 2-8
iy 9-15
-y 16-22
4y 23-29
ty 30-June 5
me 6-12
me 13-19
me 20-26
me 27-July 3
ily 4-10
r.!y 11-17
l.y 18-24
ily 25-31.


T





means


RUCK PASSING OF FLORIDA VEGETABLES AND NON-CITRUS FRUITS
'i SAwS i;9 .L(bi-bJ4 GA WCA A.i CAL AiAD j&."LVALXNT)
j2dJU.OA )UAJ GUJAp.. Tj2ATI'it2
AU(.7 .1, J.a5 ..i.u- 31, 1954
Limas&
Butter Cab- Caul- Cel- Gr. Egg- Esca- Field Let- Pep- Pota- Rad-
Beans bage flo. er-i Corn Cukes plant role Peas tuce pers toes ish


2 LCL
3 1
.. 3 4
S- 6 5
2 26 9
25 43 12
135 1 104 16
230 LCL LCL 2 126 18
280 LCL LCL LCL 20 7 232 29
179 LCL' 2 17 9 205 24
193 1 7 2 55 17 121 21
266 1 23 5 65 32 192 24
195 2 52 20 .A8 27 133 27
117 LCL 46 11 73 9 99 10
165 1 1I4 20 127 21 112 28
194 2 223 17 140 38 123 38
212 1 272 22 152 52 133 30
239 3 299 43 170 61 137 34
262 2 285 41 186 85 126 35
287 3 321 40 214 82 107 38
282 3 372 54 196 96 109 31
331 2 396 59 224 121 116 33
293 2 385 48 222 148 115 44
280 2 396 21 199 158 89 39
272 2 432 11 210 154 86 41
313 2 435 16 215 209 94 49
310 2 438 29 214 218 132 42
292 1 442 18 203 249 261 37
279 3 338 12 232 292 227 49
370 5 232 2 217 255 301 40
330 6 137 1 187 224 323 24
307 25 90 2 197 306 421 35
263 27 37 1 172 249 456 33
137 27 18 1 193 226 317 32
24 39 8 178 265 162 41
14 45 2 1-24 246 53 38
6 25 89 200 21 37
3 10 83 119 5 30
2 46 85 3 29
LCL 1 11 41 1 19
JCL 2 21 14
LCL 1 13
LCL LCL 16
LCL 5
LCL LCL


LCL

iCL
LCL

LCL
LCL
LCL
1
1
4
2
LCL 2
1 3
18 2
26 2
17 1
20 1
28 2
31 1
19 LCL
31 1
33 1
32 LCL
34 1
31 1
31 1
37 1
46 LCL
41 LCL
34 LCL
37 1
46 1
42 1
A6 2
46 2
52 14
32 20
37. 35
19 76
21 106
12 117
7 1,-
7 3.1

1 9
2
LCL
1
ICL
1
LCL


3
LCL 1 6
2 4 12
11 3 28
4 3 33
18 5 39
16 9 34
23 11 3 30
36 32 2 26
14 7 1 15
31 26 9 33
35 59 40 35
30 63 48 33
27 81 42 54
37 99 42 36
38 340 57 23
32 140 84 30
46 140 91 27
49 1-8 113 36
38 167 139 32
34 172 199 32
45 155 221 36
36 135 287 42
31 114 351 37
19 151 447 32
19 124 643 27
16 124 827 27
7 142 1173 23
2 175 1280 18
6 192 1160 11
3 154 739 10
2 124 286 6
1 122 30 1
71 3 LCL
35 2 -
8 -

5 -
LCL -
LCL -


t4al by Weeks 7097 247 5832 49r5 4790 4326 5325 1174 916 574 718 3158 8328 867

ital by Months 7038 247 5833 497 4788 4328 5323 1173 916 576 717 3157 8325 868

)TE, Passings were converted into carload equivalent on basis of," 3,eans 620 bu, Limas & Butter Beans
!0 bu9 Cabbage 500 pkgn., Cauliflower "00 crt's, Celery 420 crts. Corn 500 pkgs. Cucumbers 450 bu, Eggolant
'0 pkgs Escarole- .niae-Chicory 650 pkgs. Field Peas 620 bu, Lettuce 320 large and 700 small crtsP
*ppers 700 pkgs. Potatoes 600 bu., Ra&?.sb 1200 pkgs.


ie Weekly Totals differ front Monthly Tc,-als due partly to fractional amounts








TRUCK PASSING OF FLORIDA VEGETABLES AND NCN-CITRUS FRUITS
BY W-"eKS rOR 1953-54 SEASON (RAIL CARLOAD EQUIVALENT)
JiUCK ROAD Uu'AR L STAfi,-IS
AUG-ST 1, 1953 JULYX z3, 1954


Date by Weeks

Au -g. 1
Aug 2-8
Aug. 9-15
.Aug 16-22
Aug. 23-29
!ug. 30-Sept.5
Sept.5-12
Seot.13-19
Sept 20-26
Sent,27-Cct- 3
Oct. 4-10
Oct. 11-17
Cct, 13-24
0 t 25-31
Ncv. 1-7
Nov, 8-14
Nov, 15-21
Nov 22-28
Iov. 29-Dec. 5
Dec. 6-12
Dec. 13-19
Dec. 20-26
Dec. 27-Jan.2,1954
Jan. 3-9 -
Jan, 10-16
Jan. 17-23
Jan. 24-30
Jan. 31-Feb, 6
Feb, --13
Feb. 14-20
Feb. 21-27
Feb. 28- 'ar. 6
Mar. 7-13
Mar. 14-20
Mar. 21-27
Mar. 28-Apr. 3
Apr. 4-10
Apr, 11-17
Apr. 18-24
Apr. 15-May 1
May 2-8
May 9-15
May 16-22
Ma,' 23-29
May 30-June 5
June 6-12
Janre 13-19
June 20-26
June 27-July 3
July 4-10
July 11-17
July 18-24
July 25-31


Squ- Toma-
ash toes


LCL









2
4 2
7 1
14 8
12 -2
28 6a
28 87
21 167
32 250
27 279
12 184
22 265
41 467
40 325
41 379
46 389
53 367
46 454
63 505
62 471
51 437
47 482
80 667
79 494
67 463
82 535
91 519
69 501
75 757
36 786
20 569
17 570
10 268
5 142
7 -10
3 15
2 2
LCL -


Bun. Oth, Total
Vegs. Vegs. Vegs.


LCL
1
1
LCL
3
2
3
1
8
12
13
12
15
10
10
18
20
14
21
20
18
11
6
2
2
3
3
1
1
3
LCL
LCL


2 2
3 3
3 3
3 3
2 2
4 4
4 4
4 6
5 10
4 13
5 22
5- 53
5 103
A 304
2 485
5 744
4 635
5 693
15 1004
12 1053
12 630
11 1055
19 1526
18 1476
18 1675
20 1738
21 1833
24 2001
34 2252
25 2222
30 2126
18 2250
25 2629
33 2552
29 2654
19 2771
26 2939
14 2864
21 3655
17 3552
24 3061
32 23-"2
33 1372
30 747
24 411
21 251
22 119
9 53
10 30
12 28
6 12
2 2


Oth. Total
Str- W- Avo- C- Man- Misc. Misc. Grand
ber. nel. cados Limes lopes goes Fr. Fr. Total


1


































1
7
18
81
244
353
512
957
1749
2378
2509
2120
151.
636
140
80
16
4


1 -
LCL -
LCL LCL
LCL LCL
LCL LCL

LCL


LCL

LCL











1
LCL










-3
LCL
LCL
5
-1

-1
LCL
-3

-7

4
LCL 4
LCL 2
LDL
2 LCL
LCL

3
4
2 -
4
3 -


16
44
48
43
45
32
55
44
45
32
38
39
41
45
43
47
53
20
43
37
40
14
18
28
25
29
21
25
29
44
27
25
29
37
28
21
10
23
84
255
370
524-1
983
1782
2437
2561
2160
-599
693
192
130
78
48


4C
51
4C
4
34
59
4E
51
42
51
62
94
14E
343
532
797
65t
73e
1041
1091
644
10" 2
15 5
1501
1704
1759
1856
2030
2296
S2-19
2151
227C
266
258C
2685
2781
2962
294-
3921
40-C2:
:538
335:
31i-
3164
297:
2 11

171E
746
222
158
90
50


Total by Weeks 1343 119^5 234 755 58115 321 13323 792 594 76 30 43 15179 73294

Total by Months 1345 11951 232 754 58118 323 13335 793 599 78 30 45 15203 73321

NOTE: Passings were converted into carload equivalent on basis of: Squ2sh 600 pkgs, Tomatoes 400 pkgs,
IBunched Vegetables 1000 doz, Other Vegetables 600 pkgs, Strawberries 470 pkgs, Watermnelons 1000 melons,
Avocados, Aug. 1953-June 1954 (1200 pkgs), July 1954 (1100 pkgs); Limes, Aug. 1953-Jure 1954 (1200 pkgs),
July 1354 (1400 pkgs); Mangoes Aug. 1953-June 1954 (1200 pkgs), July 1954 (1600 Pkgs), Miscellaneous Frui,
Cantaloupes 475 crts Other Fruits 500 pkgs.

I'The Weekly Totals differ from Monthly Totals due partly to fractional amounts.


Page 23









FLORIEDi FOB PRICES 1910-1954
AVERAGES ON PACKED .'RJIT -- RAIL AND BOAT
(Florida Citrus Exchange Report)
Seasons 1910-11 to 1929-30


ORANGES

$1- 51
1-93
1 .97
1.69
1-47
1.99
1-94
3,92
3 69
4.20
2,57
3,77
2,96
1.86
3 ,51
3.58
2 .78
4,39
1,99
3.22


GRAPEFRUIT

$1-95
3.58
2.01
2.09
1,32
1.89
2.07
2,72
3.18
2.84
2,46
2.41
2,10
1-51
1.94
2,.92
2,25
3.22
2.07
2,98


TANGERINES

$2.60
1-93
1.,92
2.51
1,66
2.07
2-82
4.,39
4-79
5-49
4.96
5.57
4,39
4.31
4.43
4.83
3 50
5.28
2.91
3-38


FLORIDA STATE MARK TENG BUREAU AVERAGES
Seasons 1931-32 to 1953-54
(Comparable to above prices)
Gross fiorb. Florida per Box


ORANGES

$2-30
1 -48
1-71
1,85
2.30
2-50
1.56
1=43
1,62
1-63
2-10
2c97
3=10
3,50
3 55
2 .62
2-10
2.80
3-55
3 .12
2 46
2.80
2,90


GRAPEFRUIT

$1 ,50
1-16
1,51
1.,29
1,87
1.48
1-53
1,04
1 42
1-21
1i80
2.33
2.47
3,00
2.65
2,18
1-80
2.35
3 -41
2,73
2.36
2-50
2 -35


TANGERINE S

$2,05
1,42
1.80
1.66
2-00
1.45
1,86
1-34
2.00
1,68
2.85
2.78
3.70
4 25
4.80
3-75
2,90
3-70
3-85
4.35
4,30
4.35
4 75


a Rail, Boat and Truck prices, with track f.o.b. price same as rail and boat,


Page 24


SEASONS

1910-11
1911-12
1912-13
1913-14
1914-15
1915-16
1916-17
1917-18
1918-19
1919-20
1920-21
1921-22
1922-23
1923-24
1924-25
1925-26
1926-27
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30


(Average)
ALL CITRUS

$1.65
2.21
1.96
1.83
1.42
1.96
2 .01
3.46
3,52
3,37
2,65
3.17
2.62
1,82
2.74
3 36
2 58
3.90
2.09
3 13


SEASONS

1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46

1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54


(Average)
ALL CITRUS

$1-95
1.36
1.65
1.63
2 .14
2.04
1-57
1-31
1,.60
1.51
2-06
2,81
3.01
3 48
3.44
2 59
2,08
2,74
3.54
3.06
2.53
2-81
2 80






FLORIDA ORANGE SHIP1MNTS, VALUATIONS, AND OTHER DATA FOR 10 YEARS


Records
Estimates
Season



1944-45
1945-40
1946--47
1947-43
1943-49
1943-5 )
195)-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54


Total
Carloads
Rail& .ioa t
Shi- aed
Crloaius

49,507
52,065
54,421
39,ulb
33,257
22,3 J4
27,751
32,2U2
23,695
24.154


Portion
Carloads
Shipped
by Rail I
Cars

49,507
52,539)
51,513
39,016
33,222
19,213
27,751
32,005
23,470
22,665


With Ho,
Rail Haul
h hi pped
byBoat l)
Jdirloaus


76
2,908

35
3,091

217
225
J .'a89


NOTES: (1I Domestic boat in coastwise trade .)r other boat -'.rct from Florida. Exports of 1,489 cars for 1953-54 included.
(2) Figures for "Consumed in Florida" ;tnock are rouh estimates based on supply, price, population, intrastate track


shipments, etr


FLORILA 3RA ,G S.1IP,''NT.;, VALUATIJONS, AND OTiEiR iATA FOR 10 YEARS


Estimated
Net Returns
to Growers
Rail & Boat
6hionents
Per ox

$1.79
1.83
.934
.28
'9)
1.65
1.15
.46
.73
,82


Estimated
Net
Rc turn(l)
Rail & Boat
Shi ments
*,e: Value

$43,901,540 RE
47,414,930 Ri
25,320,348 R.
7,0155, 000 "
25,730,332 "
34,640,484 "
25,530,093 "
12,744,209 "
17,091,902 "
20,296,455 "


Estimated
Net Return
All Oranges
Harvested
and Used
det Value

$74,132,856
91,767,533
26,385,989
8,492,216
45,510,967
88,387,609
62,825,443
19,644,723
49,033,445
65,622,?93


is tima ted
Gross FOB
Returns
Rail ) Boat
bhiDments
Gro ss 7alue

$85,841,000 RB
91,9/9,733 RB
78,375,370 RT.
53,212,5j1 "
80,049,920 "
74,529,527 "
69,264.253 "
60,154,133 "
u3,809,7o8 "
71 783,683 '*


Lstimat ed
Gross ietarn
All Oranges
Harvested
and Used
uross V-ilue

$135,653,000
lol,81 ,586
101,9/7,124
d2,oly,3o0
127,743 ,o43
loo,271,3:9
156,520,275
124,87v,214
14d,145,194
Itl,.723.43)


Truck Shipments included with Rail & Boat, their FOB prices being same. (RTB) Rail, Truck, Boat,
Net return after deducting for cost of production which includes fertilizer, spray materials, irrigation, pruning, fuel,
labor, eto,, but before deducting taxes and interest.
Cost of production figures added to net returns to grower will show the Marketing Bureau equivalent "On Tree" average
price for rail and boat shipments. This not necessarily same as U. S. Department of Agriculture "On Tree" price


Ibtal
Rail & Boat
Shipments
Joxes

24,526,030
20,037,J41
2o,737,122
19,659,370
10,446,857
10,71., 718
13,421,125
15,053,343
11,b46,. 19)
12.11 /,2u2


Estimated
Trucked
Out of
Florida
doxes

1,456 5,400
2,354,0JO
3,509,600
5,707,300
12,142,400
10,23 ,515
8,778,950
11,351 ,58d
11,142,384
12,635,792


Estimated
Processed
in
Florid a
Boxes

34,344,000
19,219,412
19,825,4635
30,37o,34)
26,d51,b46
34,657,323
41,914,351
47,507,330
45,901,284
62.903,318


Estimated
Con3suned(2)
in
Florid a
does

2,473,00o0
2,511,747
2,677,793
2,650,990
2,359,097
2,d4d '144
3,185,uo8
3,387,od3
3,539, 13
3 c43,633


Sotimat 3d
Florida
Production
Utilized
io al rcxes

42,800,000
4 ,800,0)00
52 ,bJ,JJ0
58,4)u,J-)
58,300,0.) 0
58,50j0,oju
07,30u,0JU)
78,n00,000
72,200,000
91 ,300,330


Records &
Es timates
Season
ALL
ORANCES

1944-45
1945-46
1946-47 #
1947-48
194 4-49 *
1949-50 *
1950-51 -
1951-52 *
1952-53 *
1953-54 .


Cost of
Produc-
tion (2)
Before
Picked


$ .50
.48
.53(3)
.50
.50
.52
.57
.57
.03
.60


Cost of
Picking,
Hauling,
Packing,
Selling
1-er -rj-

$1,21
1 24
3 25
1.32
1,40
1.38
1.40
1.43
1.45
1 48


Estima ted
Cross FOB
lReturns
Florida
Points
Fer Box

$3.50
3.55
2.02
2,.10
2,80
3.55
3.12
2.46
2.80
2 90


;;OTESS s
(1)

(2)





FLS If E jgl VLUATIGTS, AlD OTHER DATA FRO 10 YEARS


Records
Es tim tes
Season




1 45-46
1 1.5 47
W71-19
-1' -.949
19 49-50
1> 50-51
1051- 2
1'52--53
1953-31.!



(2)


To tal
Carloads
Rail&Boat
Shipped


11,742
16,554
17,000
14,776
17,738
11,710
18,109
21,883
17, -19
20.266


P rbtion
Cirloads
jhippe d
by Rpil


11,742
16, 542
15, 363
14,776
1// 38
10,048
18 ,109
21,716
17,356
20 065


With No,
Rsil Haul
Shipped
ByIBoa t(1)



12
1,437


1,662

167
63
201


Total
Rai 1 Boats
ShIpments
T3 oxCs 5

5,860,000
8 ,306,504
8,378,857
7,407, LOO
8,826,811
5,792,144
9,081,799
10.769,098
8,603,312
9,701,016


Domestic 3oat Shipments in coastwise trade, Exports of 201 2ars in 1953-54 included.
Figures for 'Consinmed in Florida: stock are rough estimates based on supply, price, 7.zoula zion, intrastate trick


shiLpmenas, a -*. usoes not include i,JUU,UUU boxes ab.andoned for economic reasons. '

CLT
0.o
FLORIDA CR.APEFRUTIT SHTPhNTS, VALUATIONS, AM) OTH1R DATA ~f70R ]0 -OJARS


Es.tio tod
Net Returns
to Growers
Rail & Boat
Shipments
TPaFr ox

$1,53
1.21
,73
.36
.82
1 .91
1,12
.66
.75
,58


Es tinted
Net
Return(l)
Rail&Boat
Shioments


$ 83,965,800 RT
10,039,012 RT
6,847,915 RTB
3,107,194 "
10,094,209
17,872,376 a
15.545,730 *
11,615,954 "
11,843,622 *
10,993,968 **


Estimated
Net Re turn
All Grape f.uit
H arvs ted
and used
Net7-.,lues

$ 30,343,516
24,983,418
6,883,612
- 342,474
10,009,553
36,725,607
18,469,555
7,109,434
11,494,590
6,314,920


Ectimaced
Gross FOB
Returrs
Rail ', Boat
Shaipmets
--r-oss Va-lue

$ 17, 5-,000 R0;
21,0q6,266 Rmi
20 ,-:44 ,'9 RI
15,53 "5 5 '
28,928,526 :'
31,903,274 :'
37,892,717 "
41,535,835 '
39,478,740 :
44,544,327 "


Estimated
Gross Return
All Grap fruit
Harvested
and Used


$ 49,962,240
56,004,216
32,971,887
24,102,874
41.549,598
61,332,727
57,849,066
50,281,500
53, 601,305
56,494 ,204


COTES (
.. (1)

(2)


Truck Shioments included with Rail and Boat, their FOB prices being same, (RT3) Rhil, Truck, Boat.
Net return after deducting for cost of production which includes fertilizer, spray materials, irrigation, pruning, fuel,
labor, etc., but before deducting taxes and interest.
Cost of production figures added to not returns to grower will show the Marketing Bureau "On Tree" average price for
rail and boat shipments. The soecualtor's profit or loss is not calculated..


Es tir mpted
Trucked
Out of
Florida
~ToeI's

205,200
340,400
553,000
1,143,367
3,483,200
3,565,121
4,798,317
5,830,832
7,188,184
9,254,102


Es timr ted
Processsd
in
Florida


15,136,000
22,136,149
15, 864, 345
19,448,585
16, 30.: 920
13.,P5,200
17,3''3 677
13,677,666
15,034,978
20,089,223


Estiia ted
Consun-ed (2)
in
Flori da


1. 098 800
1,216,947
1,098,797
1,210,947
1,584,159
1,356 535
1,466,207
1,722,404
1,673,526
1,655,654


Estimated
Florida
Production
Utilized
TotaLT3oxe

22,300,000
32,000,000
26,400,000
29,300,000
30,200,000
24,200,000
33,200,000
36,000,0CC
32,500,000
40,700,00C


ecord.1 &
5?s ii.nat.s
Seas on

FRUIT

194-4 45
1945--46
1)43-47
1947-48 '
1942-49
1949-50 7
195C-51
1951-52
1952-53 *
1953-54


Cost of
Produc-
tion(2)
Before
Picked


$ ,40
.34
.37
,35
,35
.37
.43
044
,45
045


Cost of
Picking,
Hauling,
Packing
3S11ing
Per 0x

$1.07
1,10
1 .,08
109
1,18
1,13
1 .18
1 26
1.30
1.32


Es timsted
Gross, FOB
Returns
Florida
Points
~Per box

$3.00
2.65
2.18
1,80
2.35
3,41
2,73
2,36
2.50
2.35





FLORIDA TANGERIJM SHIPMENTS, VALUATIONS, AND OTHLR DATA FOR 10 YEiARS


With No.
Rail Haul
Shipped
by doat(1)
Unarloaos


Records
Estimates
Season
TAN-
G. RI:ES

1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54


Domestic doat Shipments in coast-wise trade.
Figures for "Consumed in Florida"' stock are rough estimates based on supply, price, population, intra-state truck
shipments, etc. Does not include 5U0,,)0 hbo.e3 abandoned 'or economic reas,:.s.


FLORIDA TANGJRINM 3HIP.'NTi'S, VALUAfIOJ., A.J 0 f i< DAl "' 10 i ^nAiAS.


Estima ted (l)
Net Returns
to Growers
Rail & Boat
Shipments
rer Jox

$1.92
2.45
1.35
.40
1.17
1.30
1.77
1.50
1.50
1.U3


estimated
-et
return (1)
,ail ? Boat
Shiomonts
Nt"lue

$ 0,046,083 RE
6,882,962 RE-
3,373,337 I1
947,064 "
3,402,191 "
3,740,011 "
4,735,504 "
4,309,163 "
4,899,059 "
5,496,070 "


Estimated
Het d.turn
All Ta.ngerines
harvested
and Used
Set. Vnt--e

$ 7,437,192
8,800,932
3.522,030
o90,420
3,259,910
3,991,182
4,834,019
4,515,866
4,806,376
5,42j,958


Estimated
3ross :-L3
Returns
rai 'l-:=oat
%ni'nent s
rGross value

$13,3d3,2J-0 i.
13,4J4,,9O4 U
9,362,048 R.
6,806,214 "
10,759,067 "
11,078,556 "
11,638,103 "
12,352,933 "
14,207,270 "
14,2o05,750 "


Istimted
Gross ie turn
All lan,-erines
Harvested
and Used
Gross Value

$lu,290,o0J
17.807,898
11,ooo,30o9
b,2J3,6o2
12,894,25o
14.300,329 i)
14,884,J83 3
14,901,857 3)
17,082,493 3)
10,731..23iv 3)


qOTL" o Truck shipments included .ith Rail & 3oat, their FOI prices being same, (Ki'J) rail, Lruo.-, 3oat. (R3) Rail, jdat
(1) Net return after deducting for cost of production which includes fertilizer, spray materials, irrigation, pruning, fuel,
lab3r, etc., but before deducting for taxes and interest.
(2) Cost of production figures added to not returns to grower will show the Mirkuting bureauu '"On free"' avera je price for .-a-1 and
boat shipments. The speculator's profit or loss is not calculated. This estimated "On free"' price is not necessarily the same
as tho U. S. Department of Agriculture "On Tree" price.
(3) Takes into account a loss of $669,567 on tangerines to processors in 1948-49, $300,833 in 1949-50, $u53,380 in 195J-51,
$591,602 in 1951-52, $861,949 in 1952-53, and loss on 1953-54 process. volume.


Total
Carloads
Rail&Boat
Shipped
Carloads

6,847
5,728
4,543
3,610
4,024
3,321
3,382
3,316
3,438
2,795


Portion
Carloads
Shipped
by HIail
Cars

6,847
5,728
4,323
3,610
4,024
2,912
3,382
3,316
3,433
2,795


Total
Rail
and Boat
Shipments
Boxes

3,149,000
2,809,372
2,058,146
1,699,815
1,827,050
1,500,955
1,540,672
1,522,263
1,609,225
1,307,489


estimated
trucked
Out of
Florida
oxes

327,600
384,000
438,400
667,845
1,080,800
1,376,592
1,634,754
1,350,51.2
1,656,814
1,o95,828


-stimated
Processed
in
florida
boxes

3,000
51 5,600
930,751
598,505
999,354
1,594,928
3,354,572
o57,136
1,004,134
-c,03/,9g)7


NOTES: (1)
(2)


-stimated.
Consumed (2)
in
'loricda
Joxes

420,400
491,028
472,703
43.,J35
492,790
5 7,52t5
573,002
570,0d9
569,U27
45J, 726


Estimated
Florida
Proaaction
Utilized
i'utal Ooxes

3,900,0 J
4,200,000
3,900 JUO
3,4J3,juO
4,400,u0J
5,JJO,JOJ
4,OUOU ,OJ
4,53J',J)3
4.9JJ,3)0J
4 ,50, J0-


Records &
Estim't es
Season
TAN-L
G SR INES

1944-45
1945-46
1946-47 *
1947-48 o
1-48-49 *
1949-50 *
1950-51
1951-52 6
1952-53 o
1953-54 .


Cost of
Produc-
tion(2)
before
Picked
For Box3

$ .65
.64
.68
.68
.68
.70
.68
.69
.67
St)7


Cost of
Picking,
Iauling,
Packing,
Selling
Per Box

$1.68
1.71
1.72
1.82
1.85
1.85
1.90
2.11
2.18
2.25


s tima ted
Gross FOB
Returns
Florida
Points
Fer Box

$4.25
4.80
3.75
2.90
3.70
3 85
4,35
4.30
4.35
4 75






FLORIDA TOTAL CITRUS SHIPMENTS, VALUATIONS, AND OTHER DATA FOR 27 YEARS


Records
Estimates
Season
ALL
CITRUS

1927-28
1928-29
1929-30 (3)
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54


Total
Carloads
Rail&Boat
Shipped
Carloads_

37,876
63,673
39,485
74,645
49,235
55,501
53,311
51,107
48,916
66,879
67,409
87,067
55,310
67,072
61,945
76,198
85,380
68,096
74,947
76,766
58,002
55,019
37,335
49,242
57,481
44p552
47,215


Portion
Carloads
Shipped
by Rail
Ci rs

37,680
62,996
39,231
72,949
44,996
44,456
32,288
27,460
28,790
43,570
45.867
58,933
41,761
49,329
60,128
76,198
85,380
68,096
74,859
72,199
58,002
54,984
32,173
49,242
57,097
44,264
45,525


Yith No.
Rail haul
Shipped
by Boat(l)
Carloads

196
677
254
1,696
4,239
11,045
21,023
23,647
20,126
23,309
21,542
28,134
13 ,549
17,743
1,817
None
None
None
88
4,567

35
5,162

384
288
1,690


Ibtal
Rail & Boat
Shipments
Boxes

13,635,360
22,922,280
14,214,600
27,229,945
18,914,165
20,176.750
20,834,890
20,132,561
19,232,052
26,221,696
26,317,533
33,927,076
21,449,504
26,358,127
25,142,270
37,216,319
42,314,960
33,535,000
39,902,117
37,724,125
28,772,771
27,100,724
18,003,817
24,043,596
28,144,704
21,859,356
22,925,707


NOTES

(1) Domestic Boat Shipments in Coastwise Trade. Boat Exports in 1953-54s Oranges 1,489, Grapefruit 201, cars.

(2) Figures for "Consumed in FloridaO stock are rough estimates based on supply, price, population, intrastate truck shipments, etc.

(3) Fruit fly year when production, harvest and shipments restricted. Does not include 1,800,000 boxes abandoned for economic reasons,


Estimated
Trucked
Out of
Florida
Boxes

800,000
1,500,000
100,000
2,640,000
2,525,520
3,010,180
3,249,000
4,346,3f0
3,770,000
4,274,000
4,973,600
7,126,559
5,813,200
7,720,400
5,476,000
3,728,678
2,893,600
1,989,200
2,778,400
4,506,000
7,518,512
16,706,400
15,225,228
14,712,027
20,032,933
19,987,382
23,585,722


Estimated
Processed
in
Florida
Boxes

600,000
1,527,320
1,710,000
2,954,056
966,533
2,800,000
2,667,397
5,781,933
3,900,000
7,305,512
6,848,496
9,582,037
12,970,408
17,812,227
14,339,874
24,022,299
31,456,489
29,438,000
41,871,161
36,620,582
50,423,431
44,156,820
49,738,451
61,123,100T
61,842,182
62,000,396
84,030,503


Estimated
Consumed(2)
in
Florida
Boxes

1,000,000
1,950,000
1,200,000
2,180,970
2,040,000
2,422, ;00
2,475,000
2,575,000
2,560,000
2,800,000
2 ,800,000
3,300,000
2,740,000
4,000,000
3,441,856
3,733,150
4,134,951
3,992,800
4,226,722
4,249,293
4,301,772
4,936,056
4,732,504
5,221,277,
5,680,181
5,752,866
5,758,068


Estimated
Florida
Production
Utilized
Total Boxe3

16,035,360
27,899,600
17,224,600
35,004,971
24,446,218
28,409,630
29,276,287
32,835,854
29 .,462,052
40,601,208
40,939,629
56,447,995
42,973,112
55,890,754
43,400,000
68,700,446
80,800,000
69,000,000
86,000,000
83,100,000
91,100,000
92,900,000
87,700,000
105,100,000
119,100,000
109,600,000
136,500 ,000*








FLORIDA )lOTAL CITRUS SHIPMntTS, VALJArIONS, AND OTHER DAIA FOR 27 YARSS


Records &
Estimates
Season

CITRUS

1927-28
1928-29
1929-30(3)
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1933-36
1936-3J7
1937-38
1933-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47 *
1947-48 a
1948-49 *
1949-50 *
1950-51 *
1951-52 *
1952-53 *
1953-54 e


Cost of
Produc-
tion(2)
Before
Picked
P'er Box

$0.63
,64
.71
.43
.53
,45
.44
.43
'.44
,37
,38
.34
.42
.39
.43
.39
.49
.483
.46
.50
.49
.47
.49
.53
.53
.55
.54


Cost of
Picking,
Hauling
Packing,
Selling
Per Box

$1 .28
1.25
1,29
1.10
,.92
..90
.87
.88
,94
.92
.88
.82
.90
.85
.89
1 01
1.24
1.25
1.25
1.24
1.29
1,37
1.35
1.35
1,40
1 45
1..47


Estimated
Gross FOB
Returns
Florida
Points
=er" Boix-

$3 74
2.08
3 .19
1.86
1 95
1 ,36
1,65
1.63
2.14
2.04
1.57
1,31
1.60
1.51
2.06
2.81
3.01
3.483
3 .44
2.59
2.08
2,.74
3,54
3.06
2.53
2.81
2.80


Estimated
Net Returns
to Growers
Rail & boat
Shipments
-Ter Box

$1.,83
19
1 .19
,33
.50
01%-
.33-S
.32
.76
.75
.30)
15
.28
,27
.74
1 .41
1,28
1,75
1.73
,85
.31
,,90
1..70
1.18
.,60
.81
.79


NOTES:
(*) Truck Shipments included with Rail & Boat, their FOB prices being the same. See RTB.

(1) Net return after deducting for cost of production which includes fertilizer, spray natorials, irrigation, pruning, fuel, labor,
etc., but before deducting for taxes and interest..

(2) Cost of production figures added to not r turns to grower will show the kafrketing Bureau "On Tree" average price for rail and
boat shipments. The speculator's profit or loss is not calculated.

(3) Fruit fly year when production, harvest and shipments restricted.


E; -imated
Net Return(l)
Rail& oa t
Shipments
Net Value

$24,964,592
4,361,670
16,942,604
8,920,948
9,442,872
309,774
7,022,618
6,387,160
14,717,619
19,583,547
8,020,166
5,228,990
6,003,437
7,113,479
18,512,334
52,567,333
54,036,891
58,913,420
64,336,904
35,538:600 FJ
11,149,258
39,226,732
56,253,671
45,811,327
28,669,386
33,834,583
36,787,493


Estimated
Net Return
All Citrus
Harvested
and Used
Tet Value

$26,.980,492
5,698,063
18,320,604
10,037.,572
10,943,16o
562,466
10,009,011
8,855,935
20,211,899
24 579,298
8,988,419
3,093,314
5,014,792
8,831,633
27,639,289
76,284,772
94,032,066
111i,913,504
125,551,850
36,791,631
8,846,162
58,780,430
129,105,458
86,129,017
31,290,023
65,334,411
77,364,171


Js tina tod
Gross FOB
Returns
Rail Uoamt
Shipments
Gross Value

$50,958,063
47,405,291
45,399,313
50,5o9,525
36,948,353
27,465,441
34,451,906
32,724,487
41,200,791
53,611,077
41,370,281
44,440,374
34,341,712
39,711,619
51,815,921
104,759,215
127,207,221
116,804,250
127,451,035
108,787,717 F
75,614,684
119,737,513
117,516,357
118,795,073
122,042,901
117,495,778
130,593.900


Estimated
Gross Return
All Citrus
Harvested
and Used
Gross Value

$ 54,714,o63
52,217,851
49,097,313
50,293,572
42,o91,o57
32,616,451
42,401,191
42,797,752
33,189,191
08,838,758
53,285,352
58,u40,931
50,365,127
64,192,695
80,572,020
153,052,989
199,688,096
201,912,530
236,230,700
146,5b5,580
114,925,896
182,187,502
241,904,455
229,259,424
190,122,571
218,828,993
254,965,839





page 30
FLORIDA AUCTION SALES 1944-45 1953-54
Furnished through courtesy of the Statistical Department
Florida Citrus Exchange, Tampa, Florida and
Florida Citrus Mutual, Lakeland, Florida.
0 RAN G ES

Season N. Y. PHILA, BOST. PITTSo CLEVE. CHIC. ST.L. CINCI. DETRo BALT. IOTAL
1944-45 Cars 4765 1651 425 293 264 532 271 299 365 157 9022
Average $4.62 4.38 4,47 4.27 4.34 4.29 4.17 4.02 4.37 4.39 4.48
1945-46 Cars 4510 1478 363 237 197 345 196 372 262 308 8268
Average $4.72 4.44 4.70 4.48 4.43 4.39 4.24 4.17 4.43 4.45 4.58
1946-47 Cars 7824 1930 870 420 639 921 430 801 562 373 14770
Average $3.60 3.35 3.62 3.29 3.47 3.38 3.27 3.25 3.47 3.35 3.50
1947-48 Cars 6856 2550 367 342 534 608 249 689 479 234 13406
Average $3.40 3.16 3.34 3.12 3.19 3.08 2.91 3.01 3.12 2.96 3.27
1948-49 Cars 6512 2377 772 393 544 818 416 571 593 137 13133
Average $4.35 4.04 4.35 4.17 4.17 4.14 4.10 3.86 4.23 3.96 4.23
1949-50 Cars 5364 1727 516 244 401 635 278 421 448 31 10065
Average $5.10 4.85 5.10 4.65 4.78 4.71 4.44 4.46 4.85 4.23 4o95
1950-51 Cars 5920 1972 560 363 530 699 322 542 648 132 11688
Average $4.49 4.40 4.47 4.23 4.28 4.18 4.02 4.08 4.26 4o10 4.39
1951-52 Cars 5916 2061 709 418 636 913 427 656 726 213 12675
Average $3.89 3,73 3.75 3.58 3.68 3.58 3.34 3.43 3.72 3.54 3.75
1952-53 *Cars 4760 1671 473 295 469 686 262 501 585 137 9839
Average $4.45 4.36 4.36 4,04 4,13 4.16 3,84 4.04 4o20 3.99 4.31
1953-54cCars 4724 1792 641 361 489 683 240 496 581 141 10148
Average $4.67 4.41 4.54 4.26 4.35 4.27 3.86 4o12 4.30 4.06 4.48
Temple Oranges included.
GRAPE FRUIT T
1944-45 Cars 2320 498 183 31 23 21 13 16 13 14 3132
Average $4.35 4.03 4.11 3.74 3.01 3.31 3.38 3.13 3o15 3.54 4.24
1945-46 Cars 3293 737 213 33 12 19 2 18 14 45 4386
Average $3.88 3.67 3.88 3.06 2.60 3.62 3.33 2.91 2.81 3.19 3.82
1946-47 Cars 4894 890 546 63 80 154 31 183 111 142 7094
Average $3.39 3.11 3.17 2.89 3.10 3.16 3.55 2.87 3.18 2.54 3.29
1947=48 Cars 4258 1260 456 73 85 106 34 158 92 138 6660
Average $3.22 2.82 2.89 2.55 2.99 2.92 2.97 2.54 3.03 2.31 3.07
1948=49 Cars 4406 1287 464 158 222 355 168 237 308 36 7641
Average $3.87 3.58 3.72 3.49 3.86 3.68 3.71 3.33 3.80 2.82 3.77
1949-50 Cars 3387 923 237 106 189 324 120 223 245 18 5772
Average $5.38 4.75 4.86 4.54 4.97 4.66 4.32 4.56 4.77 3.54 5.10
1950-51 Cars 4673 1323 356 301 379 681 292 461 579 60 9105
Average $4.33 3.92 4.06 3.41 3.75 3.94 3.26 3.48 3.68 3o0O 4o05
1951-52 Cars 4423 1241 498 305 462 841 348 480 658 114 9370
Average $4.03 3.71 3.92 3.61 3.86 4o02 3.32 3.48 3.82 2.80 3.88
1952-53 Cars 3976 1020 441 243 "397 765 278 392 608 45 8165
Average $4.40 3.97 4.34 3.92 4.17 4.30 3.59 3.68 4.21 2.96 4.22
1953-54 Cars 4562 1148 706 368 463 762 350 471 749 74 9653
Average $3.97 3.67 3.92 3.56 3.88 3.94 3.32 3.27 3.82 2.98 3.83

T A N G E R I N E S (1/2 box basis)
1944-45 Cars 669 300 32 72 66 150 41 53 73 9 1465
Average $2.42 2.38 2.35 2.49 2.45 2.42 2.15 2.40 2.47 2.77 2.41
1.945-46 Cars 1188 414 57 70 86 167 46 88 59 26 2201
Average $2.67 2.52 2.43 2.58 2.68 2.54 2.32 2.59 2.50 2.61 2.61
1946-47 Cars 1233 335 69 91 139 202 63 128 108 35 2403
Average $2.28 2.18 2.11 2.12 1.99 1.90 1.92 1.99 2.04 2.08 2o17
1947-48 Cars 943 433 69 77 147 193 63 120 140 24 2209
Average $2.09 2.01 1.87 1.81 1.88 1.91 1.70 1.81 1.73 1.92 1o98
1948-49 Cars 1345 516 86 79 132 230 65 108 163 13 2737
Average $2.75 2.48 2.51 2.36 2.39 2.24 2.24 2.09 2.36 1.96 2.55
1949-50 Cars 1279 452 51 71 140 248 53 78 171 7 2550
Average $2.74 2.62 2.53 2.48 2.62 2.44 2.32 2.30 2.51 2.60 2.63
1950-51 Cars 1056 382 47 92 146 232 64 90 182 17 2308
Average $2.66 2.59 2.23 2.33 2.53 2.50 2.32 2.31 2.50 2,02 2.56
1951-52 Cars 1126 450 27 86 115 234 54 100 167 23 2382
Average $2.84 2.67 2.42 2.39 2.48 2.29 1.90 2.18 2.44 2.16 2.63
1952-53 Cars 1070 424 50 78 127 256 64 104 176 18 2367
Average $2.66 2.55 2.49 2.43 2.37 2.33 2.25 2.29 2.66 2.00 2.53
1953-54 Cars 1066 370 30 58 85 198 42 80 136 20 2085
Average $3.05 2.86 2.51 2.52 2.73 2.50 2.61 2.47 2.79 2.34 2.87






FLORIDA CAAS Tu ACTION FOR SEASON 1942-43 W) 1953-54 INCLUSIVE
(Including Freight, doat and Eruok)


W'teighted Avera e


Prices and J'er Cent Indian River fruit


INTERIOR
S3ASU'NS CAr AV'G. -


1942--3
Oranges
Grapefruit
Tang's, 1 Bx(not


1943-44
Oranges
Grapefruit
Thng's, I Bx(not

1944-45
Oranges
'rapefruit
Tang's, Bx(not

1945-46
Oranges
Grapefruit
Tang's, 3x(not

1946-47
Oranges
Grape fruit
Tang's, -- Bx(not

1947-48
Oranges
Grape fruit
Tang's, ? Bx(not

1948-49
Orange s
Grapefruit
Tang's, Bx(not


segregated)





segregated)




segregated)




segregated)




segregated)




segregated)




segregated,


1949-50
Oranges
Temple Oranges(not segregated)
All Oranges
Grapefruit
lang's, - Bx

1950-51
Oranges
Temple Oranges(not segregated)
All Oranges
Grapefruit
Tang's, A Bxx

1951-52
Oranges
Temple Oranges(not segregated)
All Oranges
Grapefruit
Tang's, dxc

1952-53
Oan ges
Iemple Oranges, 1-3/5 Bu.
Grapefruit
Tang's, Bx

1953-54
Or -r.es
Ttmple Oranges, 1-3/5 Bu.
Grpefruitt
Tarher-nes, & Dx


11,030
2,985
0



9,880
1,583
0


b,550
1,079
0


6,033
1,469
0


11,826
3,215
0


9,424
3,430
0


9,830
3,894
0


6,747
0
6,747
3,821
2,520


7,299
0
7,299
4,759
2,247


7,918
0
7,918
4,648
2,293


6,301
730
3,346
2,311


5,867
1,031
4,313
2.035


$3.71
2.77
0



$3.77
3.18
0


S4.30
3.72
0


$4.41
3.21
0


$3.37
2.90
0


$3.08
2.53
0


$4.15
3.42
0


$4.68
0
4.68
4,45
2.61


$4.16
0
4.16
3.43
2.56


$3 -49
0
3.49
3.32
2.63


$4.10
5.12
3.70
2.52


$4-16
5.01
3.13
2.89


I.ADIAN RIVER.
CArAS AVG.


3,576
2,619
0



2,969
2,681
0


2,472
2,053
0


2,230
2,917
0


2,982
3,884
0


3,982
3,230
0


3,303
3,747
0


2,594
0
2,594
2,369
30


3,360
0
3,360
4,346
61


3,360
0
3,360
4,722
89


2,463
344
4,186
56


2,829
421
5,340
50


$4.12
3.48
0



$4.31
3.79
0


$4.97
4.51
0


$5.05
4.12
0


$4.03
3.61
0


$4.68
3.64
0


$4.4b
4.13
0


$5.29
0
5.29
5.99
2.51-


$4.58
0
4.58
4.72
2.50


$3.85
0
3.85
4.41
2.68


.4.43
5.56
4.78
2.77


$4,69
5.97
4 4O
2.65


COMBINED
CA RS AVG.


13,606
5,604
3,399



12,849
4,264
644


9,022
3,132
1,465


8.266
4,386
2,201


14,808
7,099
2,403


13,406
6,660
2,209


13,133
7,641
2,737


9,341
724
10,065
6,190
2,550


10,659
1,029
11,68a
9,105
2,308


11,278
1,397
12,675
9,370
2,386


0,765
1,074
6,165
2,367


8,696
1.452
9,653
2,035


$3.79
3.11
1.80


$4.46
4.24
2.41


$4 .58
3.82
2.61


$3.50
3.29
2.17


$3.27
3.07
1.98


$4.23
3.77
2,55


$4.85
3.13
4.73
5,04
2.61


$4.29
5.40
4.39
4.35
2.56


$3.60
4.96
3,75
3.88
2.63


$4.19
5.26
4.22
2,53


$4 33
5 36
3-83
2 87


KCT2E The above infornmtion supplied by the Floride Citrus l'utual, Lnkeland, Florida


P'ge 31


IND.
RIVER


18,9
46.7




23,-
o2.9



27.4
05.5



27.0
6o.1



20.2
54.8



29.7
48.5



25.2
4-).u



27.8


38.3
1.2


31.5


47.7
2.6


29,8


50.4
3.3


2Jcl
32.0
51.3
2.4


3, E
25 3
55 3
2-




CITRUS PRICE ANALYSIS 1932-33 T1 !953-54


ORANGES
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54

GRAPEFRUIT
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-513.
1951-5?
1952-53
1'953-54


11,925,630
11,113,200
15,243,060
11,504,067
18,121,786
14,378,760
23,050,835
15,650,865
24,387,041
19,100,000
27,300,116
31,000,000
22,300,000
32,000,000
26,400,000
29,300,000
30,200,000
24,200,000
33,200,000
36,000,000
32,500,000
40,700,000*


FLORI]

BOX YIELD

14,964,800
16,170,996
15,589,039
15,864,588
19,460,788
24,302,896
30,015,287
25,064,702
2d,752,089
27,200,000
37,200,181
46,200,000
42,800,000
49,800,000
52,800,000
58,400,000
58,3009000
58,500,000
67,300,000
78,600,000
72,200,000
91,300,000


$1.16
1.51
1.29
1.87
1.48
1.53
1,04
1.42
1.21
1.80
2.33
2.47
3.00
2.65
2.18
1.80
2.35
3.41
2.73
2.36
2.50
2.35


$ .50
.90
.80
1.20
1.10
1.10
080
1.30
1.10
1,70
2.25
2.47
3.00
2.65
2.18
1.80
2.35
3.41
2.73
2.36
2.50
2.35


EQUIVALENT PIER BOX
ONORITUMD PROCESSED ALS
CONSUMED PROCESSED ALL


DA GROSS FOB MARKET OR

BOAT OUT

$1.48 $1.00
1.71 1.25
1.85 1.35
2.30 1.60
2.50 1.90
1.56 1.12
1.43 1.15
1.62 1052
1.53 1.58
2,10 2.05
2.97 2.31
3.10 3.10
3.50 3.50
3.55 3.55
2.52 2.62
2.10 2.10
2.80 2.80
3.55 3.55
3.12 3.12
2.46 2.46
2.80 2.80
2.90 2.90


$ .90
1.15
1.25
1.50
1.70
1.12
1.15
1.32
1,28
1.70
2.50
2.60
3.00
3.10
2.35
1.90
2.50
3.25
2.92
2.16
2.45
2.55


$ .40
.90
.70
1.10
1.00
1.10
.80
1.12
.86
1.45
lo85
2.00
2.60
2.40
1.90
1.60
2.10
3.10
2.53
2.06
2.15
2.00


$ .70
.80
,80
1.00
1.25
.36
.41
.19
.80
1.08
1.70
2.02
2.60
2.83
.82
.80
1.51
2.38
1.86
1.04
1.65
1.60


$ .32
.53
.37
.73
.55
.48
.22
.33
.37
.71
1.05
1.53
1.91
1.39
.65
.34
.57
1.87
.91
.38
.70
043


$1.36
1.59
1.69
2.10
2.31
1.41
1.32
1.37
1.48
1.91
2.72
2.81
3.17
3.25
1.93
1.41
2.19
2.84
2.33
1.59
2.05
1.99


$ .86
1.19
.88
1.39
1.09
1o05
.64
.79
.71
1.20
1.48
1.83
2.24
1.77
1.25
.82
1.38
2.53
1.74
1.52
1.65
1.38


$

.38
.85
.55
.54
.21
.39
.33
.74
lo02
1.32
1.76
1.12
o63
.34
.68
1.89
099
.68
.80
.61


NETo TO GROWER COST
NE RAFI PRODUC-
ALL BOAT TEON


EQUIV.
ON TREE
ALL

$

.98
1.33
1.48
.63
.54
.b9
.72
.13
1.85
1.81
2.23
2.32
1.03
065
1.29
2,03
1.39
.84
1.28
1.32


$ .14
.42
.53
.88
1.06
025
.20
.17
.32
.69
1.45
1.31
1.73
1.84
.50
.15
.79
1.51
.82
.27
.68
.72


$-.11
.23
.01
.46
.25
.18
-.09
-.01
-.02
.34
.67
.92
1.36
.78
.26
-.01
.33
..52
.56
.24
.35
.16


$-.07
.29
.08

.35
.35

.20
.12
.60
1.10
1,000
1.53
1.21
.73RBT
.36RBT
.82RB T
1.91RBT
1.12RBT
.66RBT
.75RBT
.58RBT


$ .38
.39
.37
039
.30
.36
o30
.40
.35
.40
.35
.40
.40
.34
.37
.35
.35
.37
.43
.44
.45
.45


$ .10 $ .48
,38 .46
.50 .45
.90 .45
1.15 .42
.30 .38
.25 .34
,29 .42
,36 .40
.76 .44
1.56 .40
1.35 .50
1.79 .:'0
1.83 .48
,84RBT .350
.28RBT .50
.90RBT .50
1.65RBT .52
1.15RBT .57
,46RBT o5 7
.75RBT .60
.82RBT .60


$ .85
.83
.84
.87
.83
.82
o.74
.82
.74
.80
.88
1.07
1.07
1.10
1.08
1.09
1.18
1,13
1.18
1.26
1.30
1.32


PICKING
PACKING
bREM NG
RAIL&BOAT
UostsT-
$ .90
.87
.90
o9b
.93
.88
.84
.9..
.87
.90
1.01
1.25
1.24
1.25
1.32
1.40
1.38
1.40
1.43
1,45
1.-i8


* Net to grower (or fruit owner) indicates the amount per box after deducting production and all other onsts except interest, taxes ana
depreciation. The State Marketing Bureau 'On Tree" average price may be obtained by adding Production Costs to '"Net to Grower*
return for All Fruit.
RBT Includes Trubk Shipments. o Excludes Grapefruit abandoned for economic reasons,




CITRUS PRICE ANALYSIS 1932-33 10 1953-54


FLORIDA GROSS FOB MARKET
RAIL AND TRUCKED
BOX YIELD BOAT OUT


TANGERINES
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54


1,519,200
1,992,091
2,003,755
2,093,397
3,018,634
2,257,973
3,381,873
2,257,545
2,751,624
2,100,000
4,200,149
3,600,000
3,900,000
4,200,000
3,900,000
3,400,000
4,400,000
5,000,000
4,800,000
4,100,000
4,900,000
4,500,000


$1.42
1.80
1.66
2.00
1.45
1.86
1.34
2.00
1.68
2.85
2.78
3.70
4.25
4.80
3.75
2.90
3.70
3.85
4.35
4.30
4.35
4.75


OR EQUIVALENT PER BOX


FLORIDA FLORIDA GROSS
CONSJMED PROCESSED ALL


$1.00
1.40
1.15
1.50
1.15
1.28
1.05
1.90
1.65
2.80
2.70
3.70
4.25
4.80
3.75
2.90
3.70
3.85
4.35
4.30
4.35
4.75


$ .90
1.25
1.10
1.40
1.05
1.28
1.05
1.70
1.31
2.40
2.25
3.00
3.60
4.00
3.30
2.60
3.40
3.50
4.15
4.00
4.00
4.40


1,00
.80
.35
.46
.90
.65
.50
.56
.45


$1.32
1.68
1.51
1.86
1.37
1.72
1.27
1.95
1.60
2.77
2.72
3.62
4.18
4.24
2.99
2.41
2.93
2.87
3.24
3.65
3.49
3.72


TOTAL CITRUS
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948.-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953 54


(And Average
28,409,630
29,276,287
32,835,854
29,462,052
40,601,208
40,939,629
56,447,995
42,973,112
55,890,754
48,400,000
68,700,000
80,800,000
69,000,000
8O,000,000
83,100,000
91,100,000
92.900,000
87,700,000
105,300,000
118,700,000
109,600,000
136,500,000$


of All Citrus)
$1.36
1.65
1.63
2.14
2.04
1.57
1.31
1.60
1.51
2.06
2.81
3.01
3.48
3.44
2.59
2.08
2.74
3.54
3.06
2.53
2.80
2.77


0 Net to grower (or fiult owner) indicates the amount per
and depreciation. The Stato Marketing Bureau "On Treo"
return for All Fruit.
RBT Inolude. Txuok Shipmeuts. % Included Eoonocao


box after deducting production and all othor costs except interest, d.ixea
average price may be obtained by adding Production Costs to "Net to Grower"

Abanionmentt Grapefruit 1,300,000 boxes & an,,erines 500,000 boxes.


EQUIV.
ON TREE
ALL



.76
.97
.32
.66
.38
.92
.58
1.07
1.38
2.01
2.56
2.74
1.58
.88
1.42
1.50
1.73
1.79
1.65
1.88


N2i. TU GROUR
14ST RAIL AND
ALL BOAT

$-.18 $-.30
.29 .19
.21 .16
.42 .35
-.18 -.20
.14 .18
-.07 -.06
.42 .44
.08 .10
1.09 1.11
.98 1.03
1.36 1.37
1.91 1.92
2.10 2.45
.90 1.35RBT
.20 .40RBT
.74 1.17RBT
.80 1.30RBT
1.05 1.77RBT
1.10 1.50RBT
.98 1.50RBT
1.21 1.83RBT


$ .80
1.19
1.19
1.48
1.58
1.12
1.07
1.51
1.49
2.05
2.78
3.10
3.57
3.61
2.67
2.13
2.77
3.54
3.06
2.55
2.82
2.82


$ .70
1.08
1.05
1.37
1.43
1.13
1.04
1.29
1.18
1.69
2.28
2.37
2.95
3.00
2.21
1.89
2.46
3.24
2.94
2,31
2.52
2.54


$ .33
.54
.38
.74
.61
.46
.24
.28
.47
.83
1.22
1.70
2.25
2.05
.75
.62
1.14
2.19
1.57
.89
1.40
1.30


$1.15
1.45
1.33
1.81
1.70
1.30
1.04
1.17
1.15
1.66
2.23
2.47
2.93
2.75
1.76
1.26
1.96
2.76
2.18
1.64
2.00
1.87


$

.70
1.13
.98
.60
.41
.54
.55
1.00
1.50
1.65
2.10
1.92
.94
.58
1.10
1.96
1.35
.80
1.15
1.11


$ .02
.34
.27
.69
.61
.22
.07
.12
.10
.57
1.11
1.16
1.62
1.46
.44
.10
.63
1.47
.82
.27
.00
.57


$ .015
.336
.32
.76
.75
.305
.15
.28
.27
.74
1.41
1.28
1.75
73
SSRBT
IRBT
,R2T
1. iP.BT

.OORBT

.77.-'


$ .45
.44
.43
.44
.37
.38
.34
.42
.39
.43
.39
.49
.48
.46
.50
.48
.47
.49
.53
.53
.55


$ .90
.87
.88
.94
.92
.88
.82
.90
.85
.89
1.01
1.24
1.25
1.25
1.24
1.29
1.37
1.35
1.35
1.40
1.45
1.47


COST
PRODUC-
rl ON

$ .50
.56
.55
.55
.50
.52
.45
.50
.50
.58
.40
.65
.65
.64
.68
.68
.68
.70
.68
.69
.67
.67


PICK NG
PACK NG
MARKXfING
RAIL&BOAT

$1.16
1.05
.95
1.10
1.15
1.16
.95
1.06
1.08
1.16
1.35
1.68
1.68
1.71
1.72
1.82
1.85
1.85
1.90
2.11
2.18
2.25





Page 34


FLORIDA CITRUS


Equivalent ON TREE Prices, Per Box by vbnths


Oct. Nov. Dec.


Jan. Feb.


Mar. Apr. Season Average


ORANGES Sales for FRESH Use Early & Mid-Season Type


Season



1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54



19 3-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946=47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54*

Season



1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
2951-52
1952-53
1953-540



1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54.



Season

1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
19489-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54*


$2.07
1.98
1.98
1.39
.73
.45
1.10
1.37
.85
.74
1.32


$1.94
2.10
2.31
.92
.53
.64
1.15
..49
.77
1.00
1.28


$2.12
2.14
2.24
2.52
1.93
1.13
2.49
2.06
2.03
2.35
1.38



$2.12
2.12
2,23
2.27
1.55
.94
2.34
1.72
1.67
1.93
1?24

Feb.



$2.04
2.30
2.21
.81
1.17
1.37
3.10
2.33
1.07
1.77
1.09



$1.83
2.21
2.15
.47
.87
1.24
2.97
2.02
.81
1.66
.98


$2.05
1.90
1.96
1.17
,67
.41
1.02
1.24
.75
.67
1,19


$1,90
1.97
2.25
.73
.52

Lo22
1,34
.71
.91
1.15

Apr.


$1.52
1.98
2.06
.61
.55
.89
2.14
1.41
.65
1.19
1.09


$1.06
2.15
2.05
.81
.82
1.03
2.91
1.88
.62
1.48
.98


$1.49
2.08
2.17
1.01
.91
1.25
3.09
2.09
.62
1.76
179


$1.76

2.37
1.01



2.03
1.75

2.11


$1.66
2.06
2.14
1.14
.71
.78
1,74
1.58
.78
1.15
1.23


Methods of Sale Early & Mid-Season Type


$1.50
1.90
2.04
.43
.58
.81
2.15
1.41
.63
1.23
1,04

May


$1.10
2.11
1.96
.49
.80
1.01
2.86
1.86
.53
1.41
.93

June


$1.48
2.16
2.17
.63
.75
1.31
3.05
1.96
.63
1.46
1.23

July


$1.79

2.40
.87



1.91
.80

1.64


$1.61
1.98
2.09
.84
.66
.75
1,80
1,46
.67
1.12
1.08

Season Average


ORANGES Sales for FRESH USE Valencia or Late Type


$2.03
2.40
2.39
1.53
1.18
1,58
3.14
2.19
.94
1.57
1.07


$2.18
2.55
2.58
1.60.
.73
2.14
2.61
2.04
.80
1.38
1.52


$2.22
2.62
2.91
1.30
.70
3.14
2.28
1.98
1,06
1.51
2.03


$2.18
2.62
2.98
1.29
.69
3.32
2.59
1.69
1.19
1.59
2.20


$2.38

2.98
1.20
.69
3.31
2.80
1.63
1,85
2.52
3.70


ORANGES All Methods of Sale Valencia or Late Type


$1.90
2.38
2.31
.96
.92
1.57
3.10
1.95
.80
1.49
.96


$2.09
2.62
2.58
1.33
.54
2.10
2.54
1.96
.71
1,37
1.41


$2.09
2.70
3.07
1.11
.50
2.94
2.32
2.00
.98
1.45
1.91


$2.05
2.63
3.11
1.10
.43
3.19
2.42
1.63
1,16
1,85
2.02


$2.24

3.02
.93
.34
2.92
2.70
,86
1.66
2.41
3.03


$2.17
2.45
2,60
1.42
.82
2.24
2.73
2.01
.97
1.54
1.57



$2.06
2.45
2,67
1,10
.60
2.16
2.61
1.87
.88
1.51
1.50


TANGERINES Sales for FRESH USE 1-3/5 Bu, Box


Nov. Dec.


$1.85
2.03
2.40
3.00
2.01
1.30
2,81
3.09
3.01
3.45
2.70


$1.95
2.28
3.68
1.63
.92
1.41
2.15
2.81
1.18
1,54
1,87


Jan.

$1.77
2.01
1.74
1.02
.73
1.24
1.5?
1.09
1.14
1.28
1.12


Feb. Mar.


$1.89
1,97
2.06
.99
.82
1.41
1.38
.99
.81
1.12
3.08


$2.38
1.91
1.06
.82
3 .I
3.10
2.17
1,40
4.47
3.80
3.68


Apr.

$2.38

2.02


3.58

1.41


* Preli inary. Subject to revision.
Sources florida Crop and Livestock Reporting Service, Federal Bldg., Orlando, Florida.
ob+.ainp*l *fT-rm minn'hl^na-irn lr-nnwyn e a rT.nPTTIA (TMDTTC 7PDTTTrn A_--I cz.,-__. f. 1oco


Season Average

$1.89
2.11
2.64
1.58
.99
1.51
1.92
1.99
1.56
1,76
2.10

M-eae figures


ORANGS All




Page 35


FLORIDA CITRUS

Equivalent ON TREE Prices, Per Box by Months


Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar, Aor. r ay June July

GRAPEFRUIT Sales for FRESH USE Seedless


Season



1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
*1953-54



1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
*1953-54


1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
*1953-54



1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
.1953-54


$1.43
1.77
1.92
1.44
.33
.43
2.00
1.34
1.15
1.42
1.13


$1.25
1.e6
..53
.80
.50
.69
2.10
1.25
1.08
1.21
.92


$1.12
1.85
1.36
.97
.51
.65
2.12
1.52
.81
1.11
.78


$1.26
1.95
1.55
.62
.38
1.15
2.24
1.35
.77,
1.00
.88


$1.45
2.07
1.60
.00
.24
1.86
2.20
1.33
.57
1.08
.82


$1.50
2.07
1.65
.45
.35
2.46
2.07
1.05
.79
1.15
.87


$1.59
2.06
1.69
.54
.37
1.92
1.61
.81
.68
1.72
067


$1.40
1.30
1.38
1.42
1.50
.66
2.75
1.44
1.80
Sept.1.59
2.40 1.11



$1.39
1.26
1.30
1.32
1.40
.59
2.64
1.27
1.58
Sept.1.37
1.74 .98


$1.17
1.30
1.38
1.16
1.08
.43
2.27
1.05
1.18
Sept. .90
1.91 .80


$1.17
1.27
1.31
1.09
.88
.36
2.09
.88
.89
Sept. .72
1.37 .55


$1.46
1.60
1.41
1.40
.75
.44
2.03
1.22
1.20
1.26
1.15



$1.42
1.62
1.33
1.11
,61
.35
1.89
1.11
1.04
1.09
.96



$1.32
1.48
1.36
1.18
.61
.45
1.53
.88
.74
.62
.77



$1.30
1.60
1.34
1.07
.41
.31
1.51
.66
.46
.37
.42


$1.22
1.65
1.20
.53
.31
.50
1.96
1.10
*92
1.04
.71


$1.15
1.83
1.11
.53
.31
.57
1.93
1.40
.66
091
.55


$1.26
1.95
1.19
.41
.20
.99
2.07
1.20
.63
.87
.62


$1.48
2.05
1.31
.44
.13
1.62
2.09
1.14
.44
.84
.60


$1.51
2.05
1.53
.36
.16
2.19
1.88
.81
.57
.96
.61


$1.55
1.95
1.60
.40
.18
1.41
1.42
.59
.42
1.37
.43


GRAPEFRUIT Sales for FRESH USE Seeded


$1.32
1.65
1.58
1.16
.33
.35
1.56
.92
.70
.66
.73


$1.10
1.61
1.31
.73
.31
.47
1.74
.87
.63
.71
.59


$1.03
1.83
1.21
.69
.25
.52
1.73
1.04
.43
.53
.39


$1.14
1.92
1.23
.54
.20
.79
1.70
.98
.38
.61
.39


$1.22
2.02
1.32
.40
.14
1.25
1.74
.94
.30
.66
.36


$1.46
2.06
1.33
.40
.14
1.80
1.56
.78
.38
.69
.39


$1.49
2.06
1.64
.44
.17
1.56
1.46
.65
.44
1.07
.39


GRAPEEIJIT All Methods of Sale Seeded


$1.26
1.63
1.39
.72
.25
.32
1.65
.67
.47
.48
.39


$1.20
1.64
1.14
.48
.22
.36
1.84
.77
.40
.54
.30


$1.16
1.81
1.07
.43
.18
.46
1.77
1.04
.25
.47
.17


$1.27
1.95
1.05
.37
.12
.63
1.74
.91
.19
.47
.08


$1.50
1.99
1.12
.31
.07
.86
1.75
.76
.11
.47
.15


$1.53
2.02
1.45
.23
.07
1.31
1.28
.48
.13
.49
..20


$1.45
1.91
1.56
.25
.05
1.23
1.25
.41
.13
.70
.12


$1.59

1.69
.54
.37
1.90
1.52
.63
.96
1.32
1.66



$1.56

1.59
.36
.18
1.08
1.44
.35
.48
1.23
1.34


$1.48

1.62
.43
.17
1.56
1.52
.45
.52
.84
1.16



$1.46

1.59
.27
.02
1.17
1.37
.23
.19
068
045


T.TLW~ 1-~I5 hu sores


All Methods of Sale
----------------------------- Season


... . -.. ...... .. .. .Season
Season Apr. May Jane July Aug Seot. Oct. No';. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Average
1943-44 $5.45 $5.64 $4.68 $6.70 $3.89 $2.65 $1.20 $ .84 $1.00 $1.63 $1.95 $4.30 $3.99
1944-45 8.35 8.45 6.29 4.14 2.25 1.84 1.12 3.18 1.73 2.36 2.57 2.91 3.81
1945-46 4.80 5.20 3.94 2.20 1.89 1.54 3.22 2.11 2.40 3.30 4.40 5.60 2.77
1946-47 8.20 13.20 2.57 3.22 1.46 1.25 1.30 1.76 2.46 2.73 1.70 4.60 3.12
1947-48 7.00 7.00 3.89 2.00 1.40 2.40 .80 .80 .80 .80 1.79 4.27 2.51
1948-49 6.37 4.48 3.52 2.19 .96 .89 .80 .92 1.68 1.32 2.50 4.70 2.25
1949=50 6.29 7.13 3.70 2.70 2.24 .95 .98 1.25 1.76 2.96 3.70 4.65 2.98
1950-51 5.58 4.73 1.38 1.78 1.36 .81 1.16 .80 .99 1.13 1.78 2.72 1.88
1951-52 6.81 7.52 8.33 2.54 l-O1 1.06 .92 .83 1.24 3,02 3.72 4.15 3.00
1952-53 5.49 4.66 2.18 5.40 3.10 2.38 1.78 1.72 1.58 2.35 2.48 2.38 3.39
*1953-54 7.72 10.74 5.83 6.17 5.29 2.63 3.43 3.04 3.28 2.65 3.35 5.83 5.01
* Preliminary. Subject to Revision.
Sources Florida Crop and Livestock Reporting Service, Federal Bldg., Orlando, Florida. These figures
obtained from publication known as FLORIDA CITRUS FRUIT, Annual Sumrmary for 1953.


Season
Average


GRAPEFRUIT- All Methods of Sale Seedless


$1.28
1.66
1.50
.92
.26
.34
1.85
1.18
1.01
1.20
.93


$1.39
1.83
1.58
.91
.59
1.09
2.12
1.30
o93
1.21
.95



$1.35
1.76
1.33
.64
.33
.85
1.94
1.09
.74
1.01
.72



$1.22
1.58
1.38
.99
.41
.67
1.72
1.01
.54
.68
.57



$1.28
1.67
1.23
.62
.20
.50
1.66
.80
.30
.49
.25






Paga 36


FLLRIDA CITRUS Season Average ON TREE Prices Per 1-3/5 bu box.


Sold for: Sold for :ALL MIthods: Sold fors Sold for :ALL METHODS, Sold for: Sold for ;ALL Methods
Season FRESH Use:PROCESSI3NG of Sales :FRESH Use:PROCESSINGS of Sales :FRESH UsesPROCESSING: of Sales


Early and Wid-Season Oranges


$ 194
1-55
1,66
2.06
2.14
1.14
.71
,78
1.74
1,58
.78
1.15
1.23


$ .67
1.10
1.42
1.76
2,00
.25
.62
.71
1,84
1.38
,65
1.11
1,02


$ .90
1,47
1.61
1,98
2.09
84
066
75
1.80
1.46
.70
1-12
1.08


Seedless Grapefrmit


.80
1.21
1,39
1,83
1.58
.91
.59
1.09
2.12
1,30
.93
1.21
.95


.54
.84
1.30
1,69
1,14
.32
.10
.44
1.62
.59
.05
.36
.08


.73

1,3-)
1,76
1,33
.64
.33
,85
1.94
1.09
.74
1.01
.72


Late (Valencia) Orangess


$1.43
2o09
2.17
2.45
2.60
1,42
.82
2.24
2.73
2,01
-97
1,54
1.57


$ .93
1.72
1,79
2=45
2.76
.67
.41
2.06
2.52
1.79
.90
1.49
1.47


Seeded Grapefruit


.63
.88
1.22
1.58
1.38
.99
.41
.67
1,o72
1,01
,54
.68
.57


.54
.84
1.30
1.69
1.19
.49
.14
.43
1.64
.74
.14
.42
.15


.56
.85
1.28
1.67
1.23
.62
.20
.50
1.66
.80
.28
.49
.25


$1.35
2.02
2.06
2.45
2.67
1.10
.60
2.16
2.61
1.87
.93
1.51
1.50


ALL ORANGES


$1.15
1,81
1.87
2.23
2.35
1.25
.76
1.47
2.19
1.76
.86
1.31
1.39


$ .79
1.40
1.62
2.18
2.41
.46
.52
1.29
2.12
1,57
.76
1.27
1.22


$1.10
1.74
1.81
2.21
2.37
.95
.63
1.39
2.14
1.65
.80
1.28
1.27


ALL GRAPEFRUIT


.73
1.08
1.34
1.72
1o50
.94
.52
.95
1.99
1.22
.81
1.08
.86


,54
.84
1.30
1.69
1.16
.43
.13
.43
1.63
.70
.12
.40
.13


.63
.92
1.31
1.70
1.27
.63
.26
.67
1.79
.94
.52
.76
.50


Preliminary. Subject to revision.
Source. Florida Crop & Livestock Reporting Service, Orlando, Florida.

FLORIDA RAIL FREIGHT RATES TO AUCTION POINTS
Also Showing California Rates for Comparison

Season 1953-54


Auction Points


Baltimore
Boston
Chicago
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Detroit
New York
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh

Average Rate


Oranges
Cars Rate


141
641
683
240
496
489
581
4,724
1,792
361


$1,054
1.434
1.203
1.203
1.125
1.356
1.356
1.249
1.092
1,212


SF LO RI DA
1-3/5 Bushel Box Basis
Grapefruit
Cars Rate


74
706
762
350
471
463
749
4,562
1,148
368


$1,039
1.392
1.187
1.187
1.116
1.349
1.349
1.237
1.082
1.195


Targerines
Cars Kate


20
30
198
42
80
85
136
1,066
370
58


$1.052

1.197
1.197
1.122
1.355
1.355
1.245
1,089
1.207


10,148 $1.236 9,653 $1,229 2,085 $1.213


CALI FIR NIA
1-2/5 .8u. Box Basis
Oranges
Cars Rate


238
2,183
1,673
041

637

3,720
1,074
770

11,404


$1.897
1.912
1.844
1.844
1.872
1.872
1.872
1.897
1.397
1.872

$1.881


Car loading based on 525 boxes Florida and 462 boxes California rates effective May 2, 1952.

The above Freight rates include 31/ revenue Tax and Charge for Standard Refrigeration.
California cars are for Florida Season only.

Sources Compiled by Florida Citrus Mitual from Rail Rates report from Florida Citrus Exchange,
Traffic Department, Tampa, Florida.


1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-5 0
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54 o


1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54."









Par? K7


F 0 B PRICES FLORIDA DITERIOR CITRUS 1953-54 SEISO"


Based on cuc- 2tions reported daily to the Market Information Deprtmen, -
Flcrida C:trus l'utual.and represent general averages weighted as to sizes, L.S. f 1


Week
Ending




5S, -13
2
27
Oc -:. 3
10
17
24
31
?o'-. r 7

21
2e
De;. 5
12
19
2
1954 2
jan t
16
23
3

20
27
S--,. 6
-13
20
27
ADr. 3
10
17
24
30
"2' e 7
14
21
28
June 5
12


SIN TER I OR

: OW CS : GRIPEF.RIT : T__ RIDESS : TMTFL-S
Seeded : Seecless : Pinks : : : rr. ',es)
S Poxes : oxes oxe s : Boxes : 4/5 Bu 0ox2s :4/5' Fcxes
Average Average ve rae e average .ver?5e .-r~-


4,75
S.10 S
3 ^35
3 ,C5
2-90
2,70
265
2-75
2.75
2,75
2.85
2.90
2..08C
2.75
2,75
2.50
2.50
2. 50
2.50
2.45
2.55
2 55
2,40

2.50
2.50
2.45
2 ,5
2 55
2.30
2.95
3 20
3.25
3.70
3.70
3.70
3.9C
4.25


$4.0&
4.00
3 00
2.45
2 35
2,40
2-30
2,15
2:-5
2.20
2-25
2.25
2,.25
2o25
2.25

2,25
2-10
2e00
1 95
1.85
1.80
1.70
1.70
1,70
1.75
1.75

1,70

1 75
1-80
185
1:85
1,95
2-15
2 25
2- .5
2 15


$4.75
a 75
3.80
2.70
2 45
2.50
2.35
2.25
2.30
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.35
2.35
2 35
2,25
2,25
2.15
2.00
2.00
2.15
2.20
2.20
2.20
2.20
2.25
2.20
2,15
2.15
2.25
2,35
2.35
2-35
2.45
2~55
2-45
2.45
2.45


$5.25
4.60
4.20
S.05
3.75
3.95
3.65
3.55
3.60
3.40
3.50
3.50
3.35
3.40
3.25
3-25
3.25
2,75
2.55
2.55
2.45
2.30
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.35
2.40
2-50
2.50


3.20
2,35
2.65
2 20
2.15
2 ~I




2.30
2.30
2.25
2.25
2.15
2-05
1 85


2,E5
2 65
2 35

2 20
1 ,25

i 85
1.65
2.00
c-











2 30
2-50
2.50
2.60


.C2:: 'o in D-'nari1n available for July and August.


Indian River fruit not included in the above fob average prices





?'-e r--.ila'ble to t'-e Federal-S-ate }'arket News Service. Lakeland., Florida, -rufra. +t.t
cc:--rtasy of the Flcrida Citrus ;'utual Statistical Department, Lakeland, Florid?.







ESTIMATED PRICES PAID BY CANNERS AND PROCESSORS 1944-1954
(Florida Citrus Delivered to Canner's Door)


Ag. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July
ORANGES
I~44-45 $2.37 $ $1.98 $1.98 $1.93 $2.18 $2.49 $2.74 $3.11 $3.25 $3.06 $3.06
1945-46 2.49 2.49 2.41 2.52 2.37 2.31 2.62 3.00 3.66 3.68 3.50
1946-47 1.33 1.33 1.00 .55 .55 .54 .69 1.17 1.16 1.08 .79
1947-48 .79 .87 .87 .80 .80 1.09 .91 .70 .65 .51 .49
1948-49 .49 .46 .46 .53 .73 .96 1.20 1.70 2.20 3.10 3.40 3.00
1949-50 LCL 1.70 1.20 1.53 2.36 3.10 3.30 2.77 2.60 2.55 2.55
1950-51 1.00 1.40 1.48 1.64 2.15 2.06 2.20 2.30 1.90 .75
1951-52 1.10 1.00 .98 .79 .78 1.00 .98 1.44 1.50 1.65
1952-53 .85 .91 1.25 1.56 1.72 1.75 1.75 1.75 2.40 2.40
1953-54 1.45 1.50 1.45 1.40 1.30 1.25 1.75 2.25 2.30 1.75


GRAPEFRUIT
1944-45 1.67
1945-46 -
1946-47 1.77
1947-48 .40
1948-49 .24
1949-50 1.10
1950-51 -
1951-52 -
1952-53 -
1953-54 -
TANGERINES
1946-47 -
1947-48 -
1948-49 -
1949-50 -
1950-51 -
1951-52 -
1952-53 -
1953-54 -


1.83 1.83
1,30 1.30 1.52
1.18 1.19 1.18
.51 .51
.39 .39 .42
1.29 1.29 1,72
.65 .80 ,80
.40 .54
.22 .34
.52 .37

1.50
.50
.46 .46
.50
.50
.40
.50
.50


1.83
L.51
.77
.44
.42
1.90
.80
.57
,74
,56

1.00
.40
.46
.80
.50
.50
.50
.40


1.85
1.29
.60
.40
.48
2.05
.94
.50
.82
.50

.60
.35
046
.80
.50
.50
.50
.40


2.01
1.23
.52
.36
.60
1.98
1.24
.40
.72
.38

.60
.35
.46
.80
.70
.50
.70
.75


2.17
1.22
.53
.31
.75
1.95
1.08
.35
.71
.27

.65
.35
.46
1.05
.70
.50
.70
.45


2.19
1.29
.53
.28
.83
1.93
.91
.27
.70
.37


2.20
1.67
.44
.28
.92
1.42
.81
.26
.54
.46


1.92
1.76
.39
.25
1.06
1.43
.55
.29
.80
.38


1.77
.40
.24
1.10
1.43
.40
.38
.70
.30


Average

$2.60
2.83
.82
.80
1.51
2.38
1.87
1.04
1.65
1.60

1.91
1.39
.65
.34
.57
1.87
.91
.38
.70
.43


FLORIDA CITRUS VOLUME CANNED OR. PROCESSED
(Carloads of 500 Boxes)


Au Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May


June July


ORANGES:
1947-48 27 605 3630 7797 11092 11280 6622 6097 6999 5110
1948-49 80 3 1269 4463 6930 9126 9409 8616 6007 5497 2246
1949-50 236 5056 13333 14044 8844 5676 7938 10007 4135
1950-51 1 2 827 5928 11708 12956 10060 7350 8672 13716 10740
1951-52 636 5292 7958 12658 15160 15900 17292 13432 6214
1952-53 20 2 376 5882 13096 18354 13510 7630 12732 13766 6068
1953-54 (88)o 2107 10512 15896 23737 20098 10685 19432 18517 4388
GRAPEFRUIT
1946-47 LCL 174 1586 3470 3319 5246 3682 5511 5043 2590 965
1947-48 21 596 2139 4749 5659 5769 6107 6602 4142 2323
1948-49 180 224 1607 4384 4946 6378 5818 5341 2328 904 534
1949-50 4 22 160 1151 2809 5875 5870 4826 2075 2099 201C
1950-51 3 190 847 3599 4343 5679 5959 5200 4033 3024 1905
1951-52 746 1988 2946 4538 4166 3622 3192 3012 2032
1952-53 208 64 574 2054 4368 6156 6368 6540 2408 992 490
1953-54 '(67)- 178 1507 3391 4375 6458 5778 6728 4934 4755 1826
TANGERINES
1947-48 58 439 492 208 LCL -
1948-49 37 582 654 621 83 14 7 -
1949-50 48 511 1086 1210 334 1 -
1950-51 22 279 668 1018 705 17 -
1951-52 66 386 456 342 64 -
1952-53 60 444 744 628 250 -
1953-54 360 874 667 156 19 LCL -
TOTAL CITRUS
1946-47 LCL 174 2635 6208 6761 11254 10363 14638 9541 7427 3699
1947-48 48 1201 5827 12985 17243 17257 12729 12699 11141 7133
1948-49 260 227 2913 9429 12530 16125 15310 13971 8342 6401 2780
1949-50 4 22 396 6255 16653 21005 15924 10836 10014 12106 6145
1950-51 4 192 1674 9549 16330 19303 17037 13315 12722 16740 12645
1951-52 1382 7346 11290 17652 19668 19586 20484 16444 8346
1952-53 228 66 950 7996 17908 25254 20506 14420 15140 14758 6558
1953-54 (155)o 178 3614 14263 21145 30862 26032 17432 24366 23272 6214


Total


1441 60,700
59 53,705
47 69,316
1756 83,716
472 95,014
216 91,652
347 125,807


120
929
143
75
735
1114

101


31,706
38,736
32,787
26,976
35,627
27,356
30,278
40,178


1,197
1,998
3,190
2,709
1,314
2,126
2,076

482 73,182
2370 100,633
202 88,490
122 99,482
2541 122,052
1586 123,684
272 124,056
528 168,061


NOTES o The August volume is for August 1954. Volume for August 1953 is omitted.


Page 38




P., 39
F.O.rl..' ..'-. PR3CSSI..G ?ROWJCTl..- FOR SiASONS 1922-23 r.dRJ 1953-54

i.2:ATR:AL.D A, R e<. a. : CASlo .- 2- ;Ai3 JO. 2'S FuR SI.;GL STR.EGCrH CJCI ArRAT I.. GCA3:LOS


iJRNISHED 3Y Fu.-.-A 1IRJS


MJT-JAL F.R.I TA.. RECORDS OF ":E FLDl.JjA C-A. S A3SC. .T:J.;


S3ASO.;S
L922-23
L923-24
L924-25
L925 -26
L92o-27
L92 7-28
.928-29
,929-30
.930-31
,931-32
.932-33
.933-34
.934-35
.935-36
.v 0-37
.937-38
.938-39
.939-40
.940-41
941-42
.942-43
.943-44
944-45
945-46
940-47
947-48
948-49
949-50
.953-51
951-52
952-53
953-54



'A 3SO.3

922-23
923-24
924-25
925-26
920.-27
927-28
923-29
929-33
930-31
931-32
932-3 3
933-34
934-35
935-36
936-37
937-33
938-39
939-40
940-41
941-'2
942-43
943-44
944-45

945-46
946-47
947-43
943-49
949-53
950-51
951-52
952-53
953-54
OTES i


3


(1,003 30: Z '
.,: G3 ZFP.T. ,S


6 -aC


e4 / 2 S (S I NG L E S
O jA. JE O3,.A..J 1 BLE.JDED
JUIC-t SECTIONS JJICE


GRFR ?.
JUICE







232.0337
173,934
412,066
247.652
727,SJ3
61j,115
2,23o ,726
1; 758,437
3,91J,.604
3,370,002
5,502,1)2
4,632,057
.)j -),032.792
o0,179,7o0
15,192,952
10,773,124
12,025,099
15,039,056
8, 533,317
7,936,515
8,842,616
7,894,324
12,741,553
8a735,247
10,853 .520
z. 3, - - . J


7 A S 2



153000'
20.,Cg3
-50 2
400.. ."
7 .3,J

-57,3uCO
1 ,316,736
2,712,439
937.323
2 182.597
2,1l .-577
3;: fd,04 2
2,251,775
4,057,672
3 .41 ).22t0
4,105s, 75
4,133 C-:'
3,121. ,-'
4,433 137
887.77
942,247
411,145
2 .406,524
5,C93,136
3,158,32-7
4,237,720
3,379,357
4.527,779
3,396,300
3,180,786
332.0 -


0 ? : C C D ; .. R z i
..; G -i.L J S i s000
65-3RiBX 42":RLP. _..AL ZQ-,-"


13 J3 -
121 lo, -
:17 317 -
362 362 -
-33 533 -
_.3 543 -
1,0"9 1i,-9 -
1,o40 1,t0 -
61 2 893 2,954 -
34 92 7 -
-1 2,526 2,--7 -
56 2,369 2,4?? -
255 5,545 5,10 -
213 3,646 23,u59 -
550 6,723 7,273 -
1,109 3,051 7,160 -
1.184 3,472 3,556 -
3,952 3,757 12,709 -
3,947 13,188 17,135 -. 930 -0
-,1,26 7,u52 12,307? -. -',2J -
3,515 17,'52 20,C7 1,o82.245 -
8,723 20,337 29,061 1,232,742 -
12,951 15,145 25 097 243.300 -
Processed frozen
13,662 21,825 43,847 2L4,005 225,684
17,318 15,452 3,>491 1.446,841 559,309
24.864 15,770 41, 52 1,73d,852 1,935,968
15,079 15 602 32,74 1,397,810 10,232,831
14,312 11,593 27,303 1,529,422 21,647,447
15,478 17,247 33,699 2 523,671 30,757,656
13,746 12,086 26,172 1,897,d48 44,030,633
12,034 12,553 2o.204 536,660 4o,553,695
1 -3 1 "- 7.,. ?.:: '. 3 3,222 65.531,204
(r) -?s lir-'; .proo:-i ,-) 6-4,193 cases packed for
etotl Jis tr-r .-. (3 -.. _7 g lcas fcr feeding


65,93
93,333
1, J.2,245
1.232,742
240,030


I:RJS TO iAL
SAuD CAJ',ED


T R E J C T i)
1., JRI .
JJiCS
VI- : c














8F
9
9
5-
2
7
9-

8
5
4
7 1,26J,067F
5 7-.4,629
1 1,253,617
0 1,500,355
6 1,158,311
9 453,084
0 748,7dO
0 800,560Q


150,000
200,000
350,030
430,000
700,000
630,000
1,15),000
1,52z,224
3,185,665
1,191,337
2,947,658
2,852,370
6,065,735
4,322,876
3,833,833
8,260,441
11,377,638
13,156,469
18,817,939
10,386,291
22,165,898
30,972,006
34,120,130
48,183,889
42,580,521
50,577,492
42,446,918
37,394,428
43,310,033
38,933,972
38,175,628
45,081,525


S.... -12 CAJ.;TcRY
a-..-.f. : ,4. G.
O;!G., 2<'RT.
"Paid at Cannery" in-
oludes advertising
& inspection taxes.


- 8
- O
1.00
- .70
- .80
- .00
- 1,30
- 1.25
- .30
.41
-- .19
- .80
- 1.07
- 1.70
2.02
- 2.o0


469,689 2.83
2,006,150 2,7~ .0o2
3,674,750(3) 4,916 .oQ.
12,130,541 13,820 1.31
23,176,869 19,64-, L.38
33,287,327 25,761 1.99
45,92o,431 33,204 1o30
47,090,355 33,275 1.43
65,670,42 4
S?..Ao r.>t ir-lud.u (2) Any
occuoie 3.rn'i;:y L incl-.aded


3 .50
o70
o32
.53
.37
.73
.55

.22
.33
.37
.70
1.35
1.53
1 91

1.39
,65
.34
.57
1.87

,48
.77
.44


S1.25
2.12
2.72
2.14
1.11
1,80
1 62


37,552F -
01ol,110 -
36,3o2 -
37,258 -
57,678 -
240,967
162,452 -
498 206 -
3 o.183 33,430F
926,278 13,626
,3851,375 1,998
o73',043 23,913
: ,406,332 1,332
2,42J,251 -
7,075,467 -
13,939.381 -
18,420,825 -
17.2)4,334 15,355
25,593,134 116,123
16,757,028 110,929
17,419,271 10,047
2.,,031,348 35,165
19,321,032 37,477
16,906,938 25,829
-'0,137 21,785


84,95
271,59
647,32
699,29
1,402,66
2,537,43
2,304,30
3,675,91
6,176,16
7,744,50
12,267,48
10,303,89
11,893.73
10,252,13
6,768,37
8,796,84
6,443,72
5,700,98
6,401,72(


65,1)4F
87,758
84,271
130,562
84,693
23,913
1,3d2




295,415
1,115,029
986,877
422,694
919,344
547,103
o62,795
-3 -


;, I^j


1,ZLL


diff- re nve in.





age 40
ANNUAL PACKS OF GRAPEFRUIT AND ORANGE SEGMENTS AND JUICE FOR SELECTED YEARS
(Some years omitted for lack of space) (In Thousands)
CALIF.& TOTAL GOV, COMM. FOR
FLORIDA TEXAS ARIZONA U. S. PU.o EXP. DOMoMKTS.
(1,000 cases for 24 No. 2 Cans)
RAPEFRUIT SEGMENTS
1934-35 3,588 7 4 3,599 & 1,159 2,440
1939-40 4,134 57 4,191 C 1,397 2,794
1945-46 2,407 289 2,696 7 7 2,689
1948-49 4,238 189 4,427
1949-50 3,379 3,379
1950-51 4,628 4,628
1951-52 3,405 3,405 z
1952-53 3,814 3 3 3,814 7
1953-54 3,405 3,405

GRAPEFRUIT JUICE
1934-35 2,237 361 442 3,040 0 t 3,040
1939-40 4,682 5,955 296 10,933 0 574 10,359
1945-46 15,089 9,601 1,372 26,062 397 467 25,198
1948-49 8,843 4,944 518 14,305
1949-50 7,894 2,680 1,633 12,207
1950-51 12,742 4,551 993 18,286
1951-52 8,731 595 9,326
1.952-53 10,853 790 11,643
1953-54 8,731 / J 8,731

RANGE JUICE
1934-35 241 0 704 945 0 0 945
1939-40 2,851 0 744 3,595 0 110 3,485
1945-46 18,421 56 3,705 22,182 2 247 21,933
1948-49 16,757 296 2,209 19,262 9
1949-50 17,429 145 1,892 19,456 $
1950-51 20,031 870 1,607 22,508 Y t
1953-52 19,278 # 1,763 21,041 7 t
1952-53 16,907 # 2,007 18,914 7 2
1953-54 19,278 & 4 19,278 2
,ENDED JUICE
1935-36 85 85 0 85
1939-40 1,403 30 1,433 0 1,433
1945-46 12,267 626 568 13,461 96 13,365
1948-49 10,252 229 348 10,829 SE -
1949-50 6,768 45 582 7;395 $ i &
1950-51 8,797 369 355 9,521
1951-52 6,396 A 302 6,698 1 ,
1952-53 5,707 & 410 6,117 z
1953-54 6,396 6,396


FLORIDA PRODUCTION OF CERTAIN CITRUS PRODUCTS AND BY-PRODUCTS
CONCENTRATED ORANGE JUICE GRAPEFRUIT JUICE
(1) CITRUS MO- CITRUS CQ'1CEiRAl TANGERIWE
FROZEN PROCESSED FEED LASSES OILS E JUICE
GALS. GALS. TONS TONS LBS, FROZ. PROC. R =.
(000) -77U- 7ToToT- 735) (0U00 ~(-oT 6T) 70T 00 T {T0O
540-41 66 33 -
41-42 94 30 A -
?42-43 1882(1) 47 A 227 -
343-44 1,283(1) 67 14 275 -
?44-45 240 69 19 290 .
45-46 226 244 108 44 372 -
346-47 559 1,447 96 58 -
?47-48 1,910 1,798 154 66 1.4 1,440, -
?48-49 10,233 1,898 134 41 116 19 112 -4 -
?49-50 21,647 1,529 163 42 $ 1,584 28 1,303 -
350-51 30,758 2,529 188 70 A 188 148 245 -
?51-52 44,035 1,824 218 54 $ 1,098 -535 349
?52-53 46,564 537 223. 39 $ 1,159 51 480 551
953-54 65,531 1,339 270 $ 1,556 55 965 443
Not immediately available.





CITRUS ACREAGE AND PRODUCTION IN STANDARD BOXES (1) (In Thousands)


FLORIDA


CALIFORNIA


TEXAS


ARI Z 0 N A


OTHER STATES


Season Acreage Production Acreage Production Acreage Production Acreage Production Acreage Production


ORANGES
1924-25 106.2
1934-35 187.3
1939-40 216.2
1944-45 256.3
1949-50 300.9
1950-51 309.5
1951-52 322.1
1952-53 331.8

GRAPEFRUIT
1924-25 45.7
1934-35 78.3
1939-40 87.5
1944-45 90.0
1949-50 98.5
1950-51 100.0
1951-52 104.3
1952-53 108.0


10,400
15,600
25,600
42,800
58,500
67,300
78,600
72,200


8,900
15,200
15,900
22,300
24,200
33,200
36,000
32,500


173.0
206.7
229.2
237.8
215.6
208.4
202.5
198.8


3.8
13.7
16.4
14.6
10.4
9.5
9.4
9.3


18,506
45,047
44,425
60,500
41,860
45,210
38,410
45,330


387
2,167
1,992
3,830
2,500
2,730
2 160
2,430


1.0
20.9
24.2
28.4
28.0
28.0
17.7
20.8


2.4
57.9
73.1
77.0
56.0
56.0
17.9
20.9


17
650
2,360
4,400
1,760
2,700
300
1,000


301
2,740
14,400
22,300
6,400
7,500
200
400


.9
4.1
7.3
7.1
8.3
8.3
8.3
8.3


.5
7.2
13.8
13.0
9.6
9.4
9.4
9.4


60
170
595
1,150
9835
1,4UO
r;Q
9CO


105
1,240
2,900
3.750
3,400
3,150
2,140
3,000


Crop


52.4
157.1
190.8
194.6
176.0
174.9
141.0
147.6


GRAPE FRUIT
9,693
21,347
35,192
52,180
36,500
46,580
40,500
38,330


FLORIDA
TANG ERINE S
Acreage Production


6.2
24.1
252.1
23.4
24.0
22.5
22.8
23.0


900
2,000
2,400
4,000
5,000
4,800
4,500
4,900


FLORIDA
LIMES
Acreage Production
2.5 36
2.1 15
3.7 95
5.1 250
4.7 260
5.2 280
5.5 260
5.9 320


TOTAL FLORIDA
TANGERINE.S, LIMES
.Acreage-- Production
8.7 936
26.2 2,015
28.8 2,495
28.5 4,250
28.7 5,260
27.7 5,080
28.3 4,760
28.0 5,220


CALIFORNIA
LEMON S
Acreage Production
41.3 5,301
40.4 10,747
52.0 11,983
62.7 12,550
58.2 10,500
54.1(E) 13,160
55.0) 12,600
55.1 E 11,900


TOTAL TANGERINES,
LIMES, LEMONS
Acreage Production
50.0 6,237
66.6 12,762
80,8 14,478
91.2 16,800
86.9 15,760
81.8 18,240
83.3 17,360
84.2 17,120


ALL CITRUS FLORIDA
Acreage reductionn
1924-25 160.1 20,236
1934-35 291.8 32,815
1939-40 332.5 42,995
1944-45 3"'48 61),350
1949-50 428.2 87,9t0O
1950-51 438.5 105.580
1951-52 454.7 ]19,300
1952-53 462.8 109,920


CALIFORNIA (A)
Acreage Production
218.1 24,194
200.8 57,961
297.6 58,400
315. 76,880
284.2 55,720
272.5 60,940
267.2 53.370
263.4 59,660


TE XA S (A)
Acrea e Production
3.4 318
78.8 3,390
97.3 16,760
105.4 26,700
84.0 8,160
84.0 10,200
35.9 500
42.1 1,400


A R I Z 0 N A (A)
Acreage Production
1.4 165
11.3 1,410
21.1 3,495
20.1 4,900
17.9 4,385
17.7 4,550
17.7 2,870
17.7 3,900


OfHER STATES
Acreage Production
3.5 77
6.6 521
8.3 362
4.5 360
4.5 360
4.5 300
4.5 50
4.5 50


UOTAL UNITED STATES
Acreage Production
387.0 44,990
649.3 96,097
756.8 123,012
819.9 178,190
818.8 156,585
817.2 181,570
780.0 176,150
796.4 174,930


NOTESs (1 Thousand of bearing acres, and thousand of boxes. Florida and Texas 1-3/5 bu., California and Arizona slightly smaller.
(A) Freezes In 1948-49 did severe damage in California, Texas and Arizona.
(E) Estimates based on subtotal of oranges and grapefruit deducted from grand total for California.
Florida bearing acreage for 1953-54 Season wass Oranges 339,608, Grapefruit 112,308, Tangerines 23,300. Total Citrus 475,216.
Bearing acreage,which is currently being added, amounts to approximately 17,300 acres per year, with something like 538,000
acres in prospect by 1957. The yield should then be -over 152,000,000 boxes.


IOTAL UNITED STATES

Acreage Production

284.6 29,0W
425.6 61,98a
489.2 73,342
534.L 109,210
557.3 103,465
55H.7 116,910
555.1 118,090
564.2 119,480


1924-25
1934-35
1939-40
1944-45
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53





,9^.j 1j.uAmt j.j. J U4 1 Ij.L0.LJDU VJUVXJ.LJA IAU)j finua


BY STATES 1953-54 SEASON
(Approximately bOU Boxes per Car)


Unloads by Cities
GRAPE- TANG.- MiXED
CITY, ORANGES FRUIT ERINES CITRUS


CITY


ORANGES


Unloads by Cities
GRAPE- TANG-
FRUIT ERINES


Albany, N.Y.
Altoona, Pao
Atlanta, Ga.
Baltimore, Md.
Birmingham, Ala.
Boston, Mass.
Bridgeport, Conn.
Buffalo, NoYo
Butte, Monto
Charleston, So Co
Charleston, Wo Va.
Charlotte, No C.
Chattanooga, Tenn.
Chicago, Illo
Cincinnati, On o*
Cleveland, 0.
Columbia, So C.
Columbus, O'
Davenport, Iowa o
Dayton, 0.
Decatur, Ill.
Denver, Colo.
Des Moines, Iowa
Detroit, Micho
Duluth, Minn.
Evansville, Ind.
Flint, Mich.
Ft. Wayne, Ind.
Ft. Worth, Texo
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Hartford, Conno
Huntington, W. Va.
Indianapolis, Indo
Jacksonville, Flao
Kansas City, Mo. *-
Knoxville, Tenn,
Lexington, Ky.
Los Angeles. Calif.
Louisville, Ky.
Madison, Wis.
Memphis, Tenn.
Milwaukee, Wis.
Minneapolis-St.PaulMinn.
Montgomery, Ala.
Nashville, Tenn.


52
3
84
574
81
1,245
119
137
9
5
2
135
17
803
616
600
119
100
3
30
8
4
3
813

3
2
7
3
54
122
41
22
3
2
52
3

123
27
245
88
3
21
218


91 2 24
30 38
25 7 57
377 78 228
28 5
907 203 353
77 1 6
148 44 5
29 4
1
2
54 7 -
3 5
1,074 149 368
508 85 227
618 127 285
13 9
77 11 90
2 =
13 6
35 -
4 2
2 -
925 211 210
2 1
1 -
1 13
3 5 12
2
38 4 9
.48 6 19
11 1 59
22 21 11

7 39
34 45
21
3
37 4 20
54 -
89 4 83
180 12 82
59 17 -

46 3 109


Newark, N.J. 298
New Haven, Conno 64
New Orleans, La. 10
New York, N. Y. ** 3,763
Norfolk, Va. 94
Oklahoma, City, Okla. 3
Omaha, Nebr. -
Peoria, Ill.o
Philadelphia, Pa. 19785
Phoenix, Arizo -
Pittsburgh, Pa. 629
Portland9 Me. 45
Portland, Ore. 55
Providence, Ro I. 214
Rallegh, No C. 108
Richmond, Va. 65
Roanoke, Va. 4
Rochester, N. Y. 59
St. Louis, Mo. 295
Salt Lake City, Utah 3
San Antonio, Texo 2
San Francisco, Calif. -
Scranton, Pa. 142
Seattle, Wash. 86
Sioux City, Iowa -
Spokane, Wash. 23
Springfield, Masso 125
Syracuse, NMo Y. 43
Tacoma, Wash. 6
Toledo, 0. 57
Tulsa, Okla co 2
Washington, D. C. 78
Wichita, Kans. -
Wilkes Barre, Pa. 12
Youngstown, Ohio 36
20 other Cities 5
Montreal, Que. *s 402
Ottawa, Ont.-o 11
Toronto, Onto *c 338
Vancouver, B. Co @* 12
Winnipeg, Man. ** 60
TOTAL 100 CITIES AND IMP-
ORTS 5 CANADIAN CITIES >15,535


189 20
60 11
2
3,538 574
20 -
1

6
1,052 175
9
563 139
12 4
187 18
98 29
38 4
27 =
1
27 13
412 48
31 -


71 13
281 39
5
50 2
73 15
11 6
21 3
73 10
2 -
60 11

5 3
11 1
3
563 23
98 2
556 42
185 -
96 2


14O097


2. 227


3

13
1,770




544

200

7
3
21
32
4

157
2


1
5

4
15
11

10

21
7
6

2
1
1
2
8
10

5.307


NOTES Data includes boat converted to carlot equivalents for 1953-54.
Rail distribution represents abstracts of tables in the Florida Citrus
Summary by Federal-State Market News Service, Lakeland, Florida.


0 Includes Moline, Ill.and Rock Island, Illo
*o Additional Unloads Imports Includes boat converted to rail. UNITED STATES ORANGES* Seattle 12 Louisiana; GRAPEFRUIT*
Cincinnati 2 Cuba, New York City 144 CubaB TANGERINESs Los Angeles 1 Bahamas, Louisville 1 Calif, San Francisco 1 Bahamas.
CANADA, ORANGES2 Montreal = 3 Spain, Ottawa 1 Mex, Toronto 2 Japan, 18 Spain, 1 Mex, 1 Palestine; Vancouver 276 Japan5
Winnipeg 56 Japan. GRAPEFRUITS Montreal 12 Central America; Ottawa 1 C. America; Toronto 9 C. America; Vancouver 2 C. America;
Winnipeg 1 C. Amerioa; TANGERINESS Toronto 1 Japan.


CITRUS
CITRUS


14 09 s 2







INTERSTATE TRUCK DISTRIBUTION, FLORIDA CITRUS 1953-54 SEASON

(Approximate cars on baslo 500 boxo3 per car)


Alabama
Arizona
ji 'rkans s
Callifrnia
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
I owa
Kansas
Xeon tucy
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachuse tta
Miohigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraoka
Nevada
New Harpsahire
Now Jersey
Now Mexio
Now York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhod3 Island
South Crr olina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
* States for amounts
** Approximate Carlot
Truck distribution
Lakeland, Florida.


-JNCIS

1,270

328
15
101
145
14
364
2,139
1
1,242
942
225
95
369
963
90
995
455
362
266
493
487

88

13
590
13
2, 316
1,547
21
8Z1
281
1
1,825
117
1,181
10
981
1,441


CR APE- TANG-
.FuIT n'INES


470
1
298
177
281
72
8
319
744
5
1,262
697
701
219
212
276
54
588
428
522
840
84
727
1
245
1
11
348
22
1,974
675
78
732
267
9
958
64
430
53
494
771


81

24
23
32
30
2
49
169

2-14
117
21
19
42
46
5
128
82
89
40
19
76

13

1
50
3
615
187
2
147
16

368
19
129

82
181


GRAND
TOTAL

1,821
1
650
215
414
247
24
732
3,052
7
2,748
1,756
947
333
623
1,205
149
1,711
965
973
1,'146
596
1,290
1
346
1
25
988
38
4,905
2,409
101
1,700
564
10
3,151
200
1,740
63
1,557
2,393


STATES (Cont'd)


Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Waa ington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
W'yoming
State Not Speci

TOTAL CARLOJ
Northwest ?lori
GRAND TOTAL
CARLOADS, U.





CITY
A lanta, Ga.
Baltimore, Md.
Boston, Mass.
Chicago, Ill.
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Tax.
Denver, Colo.
Detroit, Mich.
Fort Worth, Tex
Kansas City, Me
Los Angeles, Ca
New Orleans, La
New York, N, Y.
Oakla nd, Calif.
Philadelphia, P
Pittsburgh, Ea.
3t Louis, Mo.
San Francisco,
Seattle, Wash.
Washington, D.

TOTAL 20 CIT


field *

LDS
da

S.


CRANES

23
18
1,019
1
299
209
2
12


GRAPE -
7RUIT


TANG-
ERINES


24,190 17,318 3,348 44,
/9101 09


24,469


17,419


3,417


FLORIDA TRUCK RECEIPTS OF CITRUS **
IN 20 m ITTr (R ?TiT S-THRUJUNE 30, 1954
CifHLE- TANG-
ORANGES FRUIT ERINES
--T"[6 ""72
501 334 103
369 365 60
950 751 273
177 129 32
283 112 -
117 257 31
69 85 9
127 80 2
177 334 39
lif. 21 109 35
1. 590 173 40
1,559 1,338 459
1 14 1
a. 692 465 148
277 216 100
164 143 41
Cal. 3 31 2


C.

'IES


1
442


7,736


5,754


1,495


shown not specified.
- 500 Boxes ner Car.
represents abstracts of tables in the Florida Citrus Summary, Pagfes 19-22, by Federal-State Market News,


GRAND
TOTAL


82
32
1,749
10
482
586
13
25


856
449

305


45,


LIMES

1
8
13
7
2

1

6
7

47

14
3
3
3
1
4




Page 44


INSPECTIONS OF FLORIDA CITRUS FOR SHIPMENT
BY RAIL AND TRUCK BY COUNTIES
SEASON AUGUST 1, 1953 JULY 31, 1954


County
Alachua
Brevard
Broward
Citrus
Dade
De Soto
Duval
Hardee
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Indian River
Lake
Lee
Manatee
Marion
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sarasota
Seminole
Volusia
Others


(Boxes 1-3/5 Bushels)


Oranges Grapefruit


754,671
944
22,985
48,591
624,157
396,138
20,989
137,472
1,216,460
1,083,624
454,409
2,772,303
8,934
19,654
1,111,898
5,404,878
192,189
7,043
272,104
152,421
6,761,801
189,746
12,570
867,005
5,951
1,177,807
369,099
29,884


503,874
17,793
2,901
4,440
70,375
123,791
7,443
59,216
771,282
567,288
1,806,070
1,768,316
13,668
25,557
209,851
1,788,765
116,695
21,103
130,935
1,488,725
7,439,946
13,515

1,462,993
32,397
410,136
39,821
2,331


Tangerines

7,974

472

43,081
79,114
5,385
101,803
32,219
78,809
5,336
329,936
26

36,860
987,387
53,149
392
17,228
25,041
802,709
75,377

20,902

193,574
169,517
167


TOTAL ABOVE 24,115,727 18,899,227 3,066,458 46,081,412 41,270,062 46,960,052
TOTAL CROP 91,300,000 42,000,000 5,000,000 138,300,000 109,600,000 115,100,000



CITRUS TRUCKED THROUGH ROAD GUARD STATIONS-AUGUST 1-JULY 31, 1953-54
(Tabulated from records of Citrus & Vegetable Inspection Division, Winter Haven, Flao)

GROUP 1 Highway Oranges Grapefruit Tangerines Ibtal Citrus

Wilcox U.S. 19 4,130,927 3,715,762 418,465 8,265,154
Branford Fla. 27 105,166 65,985 13,301 184,452
Ellaville U.S. 90 178,348 126,086 25,629 330,063
Suwannee Springs U.S. 129 34,268 17,744 3,357 55,369
White Springs U.S. 41 1,462,169 925,265 185,381 2,572,815
Lake City Fla. 441 42,915 16,459 5,591 64,965
Luraville fla, 51 1,184 662 88 1,934
GROUP 2
Hi-liard U.S. 1 4,733,029 3,156,423 667,928 8,557,380
Yulee U.S. 17 1,820,135 1,007,986 349,495 3,177,616
Glen Sto.Mry Fla. 125 9,571 3,031 1,269 13,871
TOTAL BOXES ALL STATIONS 12,517,712 9,035,403 1,670,504 23,223,619
Group 1 Stations at bridges over Suwannee River; Group 2 at bridges over St. Mary's River.

TOTAL ALL STATIONS
Date Oranges Grapefruit Tangerines Total Citrus
Boxes Cars Boxes Cars Boxes Cars Boxes Cars
August 3,250 7 11,691 23 14,941 30
September 50,126 100 412,363 825 462,489 925
October 1,021,768 2,044 1,052,254 2,104 5,740 12 2,079,762 4,160
November 1,503,283 3,007 1,011,857 2,024 583,086 1,166 3,098,226 6,197
December 2,065,411 4,131 874,258 1,748 779,973 1,560 3,719,642 7,439
January 1,579,145 3,158 1,207,089 2,414 246,601 493 3,032,835 6,065
February 1,678,988 3,358 1,049,446 2,099 35,449 71 2,763,883 5,528
March 1,828,564 3,657 1,304,396 2,609 16,558 33 3,149,518 6,299
April 1,323,717 2,647 1,027,293 2,055 2,956 6 2,353,966 4,708
Nby 965,629 1,931 774,978 1,550 131 1,740,738 3,481
June 412,778 825 227,797 456 10 640,585 1,281
July 85,053 170 81,981 164 167,034 334
TOTAL BOXES 12,517,712 9,035,403 1,670,504 23,223,619
TOTAL CARIOkDS(500 BOXES) 25,035 18,071 3,341 46,447
NOTE: The above Road Guard Stations also report on vegetables and miscellaneous fruits.


The data above supplie by the Florida Citrus and Vegetable Division of the Florida State
of Agriculture at Winter haven, Florida.


TIbtal
1953-54

1,266,519
18,737
26,358
53,031
737,613
599,043
33,817
298,491
2,019,961
1,729,721
2,265,815
4,870,555
22,628
45,211
1,358,609
8,181,030
362,033
28,538
420,267
1,666,187
15,004,456
278,638
12,570
2,350,900
38,348
1,781,517
578,437
32,382


Total
1952-53

1,127,695
512
39,248
44,335
663,684
504,366
191,301
349,451
1,880,055
1,525,791
1,581,005
4,804,210
10,148
30,641
1,188,647
7,335,494
309,443
58,484
555,375
1,438,401
13,051,824
246,926
19,438
1,801,254
10,164
1,702,485
750,898
48,787


Total
1951-52
43,510
1,252,416
1,853
33,007

759,679
625,944
310,802
296,080
1,991,456
1,892,124
1,613,200
5,281,808
18,540
42,549
1,109,257
8,661,595
386,590
58,724
602,771
1,563,204
15,124,915
258,465
25,013
2,031,806
129,642
1,864,647
938,832
41,623


Department




Pag, 45


ESTI'AhED COSIS FROM TREE TO ACTIONS
1951-52, 1952-53 AND 1953-54 SEASONS.
(Private Sales not Included)


ORAGSES (1-3/5 bu. Box) (Includes Temples)
Auction Sales at Terminal Markets
'Terminal Selling & Expenses
iet at Terminal
nransoortation Cost
Florida F.0.i3. equivalent
1951-52 1
Florida NVrketing Charges .
Advertising & Inspection .04
Packing & Processing ,90
Picking, Loading & Hauling .41
On Tree Equivalent
Estimated Production Costs
Net to Grower before Interest, Taxes e Depreciation


GRA/-FIJIT (1-3/5 bu. Box)
Auction Sales at Terminal Markets
Terminal Selling & Expenses
Net at Terminal
Transportation Cost
Florida F.O.B. Equivalent
c Florida thrketing Charges .10
Advertising & Inspection o07
Packing & Processing .80
Picking, Loading & Hauling .34
On Tree Equivalent
Estimated Production Costs
Net to Grower: before Interest, Taxes & Depreciation


Carloads Sold


952-53
o10
.04
.90
.40


1953-54
o10
,04
.92
.^2


Carloads Sold


.10
07
.80
.34


.10 1
.07 )
.80 )
.35 )


1951-52
12,675
$ 3.75
.08

1.17
SF =.


1952-53
9,839
$ 4.31

4.23
1.$ 23
$ 3.V-Z


1953-54
10,148
$ 4o4,
0&
4 39
1,24
S 3.15


$ 1.45 $ 1.44 J


$ 1.05
.60
$ ,45


9,370
3 ,t8
.07
3.81
1.16
$ 2T65


$ 1 56
.60
.96


8,165
$ 4.22
.07
4.15
1.23
$ 2..~


1.67
,63
1.J37


9,653
$ 3.03
.07

1.23
$ 2.)3


$ 1.31 S lo31 $ 1.32


$T794 $-TF51 $ Ts E-
.47 .4b .43
$ ,87 3 1 .- $ S7


TANG.RINES (1-3/5 bu. Box)
Auction Sales at Terminal Markets
Terminal Selling & xopenses
Net at terminall
Transportation Cost
Florida F.O.B. Equivalent
o Florida l&rketing Charges .10
Advertising & Inspection .07
Packing & processingg 1,35
Picking, Loading & Hauling .70
On Tree Ebuivalent
Estimated Production Costs
Net to Grower before Interest, laxes & Depreciation


Carloads Sold


.10 )
.07
1.35
.70 )


2 ,32



1 .15
$ 4.03


2,367
$ .oJ6
.08
1 4.98
1.22


$ 2,22 $ Zo72 $ 2.25


.1U
.07
1.36 )
.72 )


.70
I= 1".


.67


Percentage of all freight, express, boat and truck shipments sold at auctions


Oranges

RBT Auction Auction
Carloads
45,775 17,133 .37
50,180 13,613 .27
56,793 12,849 .22
44,690 9,022 .20
47,059 8,268 .17
55,072 14,770 .26
47,792 13,406 .28
56,994 13,133 .23
42,871 10,065 .23
45,677 11,688 .25
56,393 12,675 .22
40,177 9,839 .21
50,527 10,148 .20


Grapefruit


RBT -.uction
Carloaas
15,769 7,325
13,790 5 ,o04
14,330 4,264
9,047 3,132
13,064 4,366
15,438 7.014
14,659 6,660
22,534 7,641
18,840 5,772
28,305 9,105
28,332 9,370
32,398 8.165
38,391 9,553


-uction

.46
.403
.29
o3r
.33
.45
,45
.33
.30
.32
.33
o25


Tangerines


R3 T Auction
Ca rloa 3
2.UV49 2

5,]L9 ,405b
4,773 2,201
4,2_2 2,403
4.554 2,20':
5.o?- ?, 737
o,074 2,35j
0.134 -.30a
o,130 2,362
7,41- 2,307
o~i3<'; 335


INOTEs If handled by Broker or Sales Representative.

The State Marketing Bureau takes note of the reports which say that the ".ali y 01
fruit going to the auction markets is usually higher than the State average.


2,085
$ ---74--
.10
$ 775-:5-
1.21
423


.66
IT32


Season
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54


Auction

o 3
.5o
.1i
.27
.46
.55
.40
.48
.36
o37
.39
.32
o3J.





Page 46


FLORIDA PRODUCTION AND VAUUE OF AVOCADOS AND LIME'S APRIL 1 to MARCH 31


AVOCADOS


SL I ME S (Persian Type.


Year
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
L935
L936
L937
L938
L939
1940
1.941
L942
L943
L944
L945
L946
L947
L948
L949
L950
L951
L952
.953

i0TES


Crop
V0lumee
Tons
620
820
1400
2200
2000
1000 (a)
600 (b)
2100
2200
2500
880(c)
1250
2100
4600 (d)
5800
3200
1600 (e)
2300
3100
3900
5500
6500
8700
10600


January 1 -

Bu.o
50 Lbso
24,800
32,800
56,000
88,000
80,000
40,000
24,000
84.000O
88,000
100,000
35,200
50,000
84,000
184,000
232 .000
128,000
64,000
92,000
124,000
156,000
220,000
260,000
348,000
424,000


Crop
s Volune
Farm 1-3/5 bno
Value Boxes


Lower yield account freeze December 9, 1934.o Last Lime figures are for
Lower yield account hurricane in November 1935. April 1,1953-March 31,1954.
Lower yield account freeze of January 26-30, 1940o Extremely severe.
Higher yield account good crop and care with full harvesting0
affected by higher prices.
Lower yield account hurricane November 15-16, 1945.
Heavy increase in yield account new acreage in Polk County coming into production
High prices due to shortage and high prices of California lemons.
Lower prices due to larger production.
Higher prices due to smaller production0
For Persian type only. Prior to 1942 Key type were included.


FLORIDA PERSIAN


countyy

ougust, 1953
;eptember, 1953
October 1953
november, 1953
december 1953
"anuary, 1954
'ebruary, 1954
frch, 1954
Lpril, 1954
&y, 1954
une, 1954
uly, 1954


Dade

36,861
43,079
30,888
18,198
13,090
8,367
2,583
5,083
5,189
21,619
63,093
73,384


LIMES CERTIFIED FOR SHIPMENT BY COUNTIES, BY 1MNTUS
August 1, 1953 July 31, 1954
(In Terms of 1-3/5 Bushel Boxes)


Highlands

34
547
62
20
13
39
128
500
95
1,028
7,978
7,997


Hills -
borough


Lake


State
Total


Polk


157 7,046 44,098
3,044 46,670
351 127 2,310 33,738
5,372 23,590
= 1,643 14,746
8,406
919 3,630
548 6,131
5,284
135 22,782
1,380 4,120 76,571
752 14,142 96,275


STATEWIDE TOTAL 321,434 18,441 2,775 127 39,144 381,921
Percentage of
State Total 84.162- 4.829% o727% .033% 10.24S% 100O
Others
Total 1952-53 222,902 17,683 4,231 487 39,957 285,260
Total 1951-52 243.099 30,539 9,420 None 23,435 306,493
Total 1950-51. 172,233 22,794 4,770 6.10 7,123 207,530
Total 1949-50 205,252 26,742 2.981 3,183 14,766 252,924


Avocados &


December

Value
Ton
$192
145
88
98
75
95
120
95
64
68
98
100
136
120
140
144
336
200
180
150
134
106
122
108


31
Tarm
Value
Bu,
$4.80
3.63
2.20
2.45
1.98
2.38
3.00
2.38
1.60
1.70
2.45
2050
3.40
3000
3.50
3.60
8040
5.00
4.50
3o75
3.35
2.65(h)
3.05
2.70


Year ending March 31isersian Limes
-,ara s Combined
Value Farmn Far
Box Value 8 Value
$4.00 $ 32,000s$ 151,040
3.50 31,500s 150,400
3,00 30,000: 153,200
2.50 30,0005 245,600
3.00 45,000s 195,000
3.75 45,000- 140,000
(f) 3.25 146,250s 218,250
3.25 227,500s 427,000
2.60 247,0008 387,800
2o80 266,0008 436,000
2.85 223,0008 314,240
2.10 315,0008 440,000
1o92 (j) 336,0008 621,600
3o99 g) 758,100s 1,310,100
3o81 (g) 952,500s 1,764,500
2.77 554,000 1,014,800
3.12 530,4008 1,068,000
2.51 426,700s 886,700
2o25 450,000s 1,008,C00
2.98 774,800, 1,359,800
lo88 526,400s 1,263,400
3o00(i) 780,000S 1,469,000
3.39 1,084,8008 2,146,200
5.01 1,853,700: 2,998,500


$119.040 $
118,900S
123,200s
215,6008
150,000s
95,000g
72,000s
199,5008
140,8008
170,000s
86,240s
125,000:
285,600s
552,0008
812,000,
460,800 S
537,6008
460,000 ,
558,0008
585,000t
737,0008
689,000?
2.,061,400,
1,144,8008


8,000
9,000
10,000
12,000
15,000
12,000
45 000
70,000
95,000
95,000
80,000
150,000
175,000
190,000
250,000
200,000
170,000
170,000
200, 000
260,000
280,000
260,000
320,000
370,000











19.1-14 0-

195 N-.5
1.947. :3
'. 13- 9
12D9-:0
1S30. -51
135L- 52
29192.- 53
1..3 -54


1943 146
1!46-. 17
1947 48
1943-49
1914)-50
1U.0 -51
131--52
.952-53
1953 -54


.>X Y1ol..l
par A-oro

J.'67 "
1.00
199
200
201
194
211
214
224
2:63


235,3 10
,:54,O' )
.70,3'3)

2900,
200,9)0
309,500
32? ,100
322,100
339, :03

90,000
50,300
91,00CO
93,000
95,000
90,500
10 ,000
104 ,J00
104,308
112, 308


Do:-
-lold p3ar

2.5
2.0
3.'J
3.2
3.1
2.9
3.2
3.7
3.4
1.1


' 1-.,i/oS.'. m



53 ,700,000
- 3,400,000
;,3400,000
SJ,7300,000u
67200,000
73,0U0,300
72.200,000
31,300,000

22,300,000
32,000,000
20,9)0,000C
31 ,000,000
30,230,300
24,200,000
33,200,000
2 5,0J0,')00
12,'530,000
42,000,000


uro.,r


33.17
3.25
1. >3
1.41
2.1)
2.04
2.33
1.59
2.05
1.99


1.36
.78
,20
- .01
.33
1.52
.56
."24
.35
.16


: bh'
u0 turn

$1.73
1.84
._0
.15
.79
1.51
.93
.27
.50
.-/2


2,500,000
3,700,000



3,000,000

1,200,000


J37
276
75
- 3.
105
378
186
33
109
53


IIt par
-b.ndoned before TJ
&Boxp3 e o'i
-- ^^:39
46
900,000 'X)
31
159
-- 203
195
56
152
193


1 :4--f 23,419
194-3-46 23,349
194i5.-47 23,705
1947- 1J 23,300
.94-19 24,000
194.- 124,100
1,30-51 2-1,200
1951-52 23,000
195)2-33 22,300
131.1 .:4 23,300

.'.4 *- .359,159
19 45 ,3 373,949
1946 17 304, 05
1947. W 107,300
1.. 3-4 19 108,900
1119.50 423,500
19'3-5 1 433,700
1)51.-2 !49,000
193 2-533 449,216
1953-54 474,2 16


1,000,300 171
-1200,000 178
4,700,000 193
4,030,000 168
4, 100,000 103
5,000,000 207
1,300,000 199
4,'300,000 196
4 3O,000 215
3,000,000 215


69, 100,000
06,000,000
37, 100,000
95,400,000
92,900,)00
87,700,900
105,300 ,000
119,100,000
109,600,000
138,300,000


2.5 1.18 1.91 150,000
2,7 4.24 2.10
3.0 2,99 .90 So00,o00
2,5 2.41 .20 600,000
2.8 2.93 .74
3.1 2.37 .30 -
3.0 3.-' 1.015 200,300
3.0 3.65 1,10 400.000
3.3 3.19 .98 -
3.3 3.72 1 21 :500,000


2.93
2.75
1.76
1.26
1.96
2,/6
2.18
1.64
2.30
1.87


1.62
1,46
.44
,10
.63
1,47
,82
.27
.60
.57


130,300

3,400,00UO
4,300,000


200,000
3,400,000

1, C00,000


315
374
149
29
135
166
200
216
209
257

303
33l1
96
.'3
143
304
193
72
146
166


-*t hit rrc):qe

3710
1490
200
1350
1600
3300
2153'
2093
2570


3J30
3310
960
230
1430
3040

720
1460
1560


NO1TIG The net after taxes and depreciation may be around 7 porerpnt perhaps. The depreciation is fairly steady and Ihe taxes generally
advance rather slowly, while the net received per acre fluctuates widely. The value per acre shown above is purely -tatistical and
changes markedly from season to season. The real value changes more slowly and is based on the avurags inccoie over toin of years and
prospects for years ahead, The average includes all of the poor grove as well as the best.


2.24
1.77
1.25
.,82
1.33
2.53
1.74
1.52
1.05
1.38


Va?'u3 per Aori
.ore 'aa3 cn n.oae
ionX i3 L'.,'na

2390
3460
980
31.0

_930
560
1520
1930
at \.O r.noem9
3J 70
2/60
750

1050
3780
1350
830
1090
550


"1l


'r-f ,.' :1a' ^ i q, rnOgLI "-,Siyj?;s







Page 48
BETTERING FLORIDA'S ECONOMY
by
Neill Rhodes
Commissioner
Florida State Marketing Bureau


Bettering Florida's economy- improving the general welfare of the State in the
immediate and distant future is another way of saying our agricultural stability must
be maintained. Meshing the gears of all other Florida industry and agriculture is a
must,- for as Florida agriculture goes, so goes our general economy and prosperity,

Florida agricultural volume has in some phases emerged from the status of
deficit production. For example citrus fruits, winter vegetables, fluid milk. When
the State produces more volume than can be consumed locally, or absorbed profitably
by outside markets, temporary or seasonal surplus accumulates. Processing more than
half the State's citrus production illustrates that similar means of utilization may
have to be employed if vwe continue increasing production of milk and some other
perishable farm products. We should not admit having reached the over-production
disaster stage of agricultural commodities until we have exhausted all practical
methods of processing and by-product manufacture. ihile our fluid milk production is
adequate, if dairy production continues its rapid increase and should suffer loss of
military and defense purchases, either production must be curtailed or the surplus be
utilized in the manufacture of by-products. While Florida does not import any
appreciable amount of fluid milk, it does import a tremendous volume of dairy by-
products. As Florida agricultural production has advanced from supplying cornered
home market outlets a limited quantity at premium price, it has entered the strongly
competitive field,- for example in our poultry and egg production which still remains
far below the volume we consume<

Forerunning the heavy agricultural productive volume, the tourist industry
was long looked upon as Florida's greatest income producer. Our climate was merchan-
dized to a transient population, The tremendous expansion in citrus fruit, vegetable,
dairy, poultry, and livestock production linked with the rapid increase in diversified
manufacturing in the State is proof positive that Florida no longer is exclusively
dependent upon tourist patronage for substantial income.

Marketing,- that is profitable disposition of agricultural production,- has
become of equal if not greater importance than production, with serious problems to
solve, The cost-price squeeze, intensified considerably in latter 1952 and early
1953, of production items has continued in 1954- Farm production expenses advanced
from around 5-8 billion dollars in 1938 to about 18.9 billion dollars in 1948. Largely
as a result of the Korean War, production expenses advanced rapidly after 1949 and
were at the record high of approximately 23 billion dollars in 1952, or nearly 3-
times those in 1940.

Farm production prices in the upswing of prosperity are about the last to
benefit and yet strangely enough on the downswing of prices, farm production is about
the first to feel the pinch. The current downturn of farm-product prices began in
early 1951. the price of farm products as a group beginning to decline about one year
ahead of dairy production prices, The peak in prices for farm products as a whole
was reached in February 1951, dairy prices reached peak in February 1952o





Page 49
Marketing charges for farm food continued to increase in 1953 although the
farm value of a market basket of farm foods was about 7% lower than in 1952c Increase
in wages. transportation rates, costs of materials, rents, and other marketing costs
have resulted in a steady rise in marketing charges since early 1950, which re-
emnhasizes that though these costs may change slowly they do not necessarily move in
the same direction as prices of farm products.--- the marketing costs have been higher
while the prices to the farmers have been lower and the farmer's share of the consumer's
food dollar has declined during the last two years, being the lowest in 1953 since
1941.

Research devoted to lowering production and marketing costs is most essential
to discourage the trend of leaving the farm in an increasingly industrial nation. Twice
as many people lived on the farm 40 years ago as in 1952 when only one person of every
six lived on the farm-

Granted that what is good for Florida agriculture is good for the general
public welfare of the State of Florida, liberal funds should be provided State and
Federal agricultural agencies for agricultural research, which amount so far is very
small compared to other segments of our economy. In 1951 the Federal Government spent
about $56 million on agricultural research, the States slightly more, or a total of
113 million. This was less than 3 tenths of 1 percent of the total cash receipts from
farming that year- Industry has spent a little more than this on certain lines of
agricultural research and to develop and apply the results in Federal and State
laboratories, In glaring contrast, the aircraft industry spent 13 percent of its sales
income for research, the electrical machinery industry 6 percent, the chemical industry
21 percent and the Federal Government furnished about half of the funds used for re-
search by all industry. Federal appropriations for agricultural research comorised
less than one-fortieth of total Federal expenditures on research, so that Congress and
State Legislatures should be urged to provide agricultural departments with adequate
funds for their keeping pace with other segments of the economy and other agencies re-
ceiving public funds for their maintenance,

The farmer's market depends upon people engaged in industries other than food
production having the purchasing power for foodstuffs. Much of the national farmer's
market depends upon other than food consumption. The general gr-cultural development
of the United States has been paralleled by the production of commodities for nonfood
and nonfeed uses. Cotton, tobacco and flax became important in agriculture before the
production of food crops was adequate.

Every encouragement should be given the Florida agricultural industry in
cooperative, organizational team-work procedures, realizing there is this one striking
difference between commercial industrial and agricultural operations,- in industry the
raw product must be purchased, processed or manufactured and then sold, while in agri-
culture the commodity in grown and sold by the producer himself Ti.ere is no plausible
reason against agriculture being on an equality with industry, nor is t_-.ere sound logic
to support the farmer's remaining in the exclusively restricted class in which someone
else marks the price on both his purchases and sales- It might be well to summarize
all the agencies dealing with the farmer in the production and marketing of his products,
who like himself are unorganized: None.

Possibly it may require another decade or two for Floridians, for so long
accustomed to the "winter tourist season", to thoroughly establish departure from the
common "winter fruit and vegetable season", the principal months of which are the peak
months of tourist patronage. Such departures based upon the seasoned judgment and
pioneering initiative for which Floridians are unexcelled are I believe in the interest
of bettering Florida's economy,






ACREAGE, YIELD, PRODUCTI: 24 AND VALUE
FLORIDA VEGETABLES AND MISCELLANEOUS FRUITS
19 53-54 SEMAON


FLORIDA

SNAP BEANS
Tail Fresh)
tProcess)
(Total)
Winter (Fresh)
'Process)
(Total)
Spring Fresh)
Process)
(Total)
TOTAL TRESH
TOTAL PROCESS
TOTAL ALL

LIMA BEANS
Winter
Spring
TOTAL

CABBAGE
Winter [resh)
Winter (Kraut)
TOTAL


CAULIFLOWER

CELERY
Winter
Spring
TOTAL

CORN,SWEET
Fall
Winter
Spring
TOTAL


CUCUMBERS
Fall
Winter
Spring
TOTAT FRESH
Spring Pickle s

EGGPLANT

Winter
Spring
TOTAL


Acreage
For
Planted Harvest Yield
----- Un it

18,800 17,500 110
6,500 6,500 110
25,300 24,000 110
23,200 23,200 120
5,800 5,800 120
29,000 29,000 120
14,000 12,000U 125
6,000 6,000 125
20,000 18,000 125
56,000 52,700U 118
18.300 18.300 118


Production
Total
Units


1,925,000
715,000

2,784,000=
696,000
3,2a0,000
1,500,000
750,000
2,250,000
6,209,000
2,161,000


abandoned Production
A of Value
Units Units

200,000 1,725,000
715,000
200,000 2,440,000
2,764,000
696,000
3,480,000
177,000 1,323,000
750,000
177,UU000 2,073,000
377/000 b5,832,000
2,161,000


Season
Avg.TOB
Price
Per Unit


A


Total Value
Marketed
Dollars

$ 4,226,000
1,251,000
5,477,000
7,656,000
1,392,000
9,048,000
3,374,UU000
1,312,000
4,5f6,000
15,25670 0
3,955,000


74,300 71,000 118 8,370,000 377,000 7,993,000 2.40 19,211,000

Bu.
450 400 70 28,000 28,000 4.20 118,000
2,000 2,000 90 180,000 180,000 2.85 513,000
2,450 2,40/C 8i 208,000 08'000 3.03 631,000

Tons
15,500 15,000 9.6 144,000 30,800 113,200 34,70 3,928,000
500 500 9.6 4,800 4,800 10.00 48,000
16,000 15,500 9.6 148,800 30,800 118,000 33.69 3,9769000

Crts.
1,200 1,200 265 318,000 318,000 1.50 477,000

Crts.
5,900 5,900 660 3,894,000 3,894,000 1.85 7,204,000
4,900 4,800 625 3,000,000 252,000 2,748,000 1.55 4,259,000
10,800 10,7050 644 6,894,,000 252000 6,642,000 1.73 11,463,000

Crts,5 doz.
1,850 1,300 125 162,000 162,000 3.05 494,000
12,500 11,000 145 1,595,000 1,595,000 2.50 3,988,000
28,400 27,000 125 3,375,000 3,375,000 1.70 5,738,000
42,750 39,300 131 5,132,000 5,132,000 1.99 10,220,000


Bu,
5,200 4,600 200 920,000 46,000 874,000 2.60 2,272,000
3,000 2,700 100 270,000 270,000 6,10 1,647,000
11,100 10,500 185 1,942,000 250,000 1,692,000 2.60 4,399,000
19,300 17,800 176 3,132,000 296,000 2,836,000 2.94 8,318,000
2,100 1,800 80 144,000 144,000 1.30 187,000

Bu.
650 600 270 162,000 162,000 2.15 348,000
800 800 445 356,000 356,000 2,00 712,000
1,000 1,000 375 375,000 375,000 1.25 469,000
"",450 "2,400 3/2 893,000 893,000 1./1 1,529,000


ESCAROLE & ENDIVE
Winter 4,600

LETTUCE (Boston & Iceberg)
Winter 3,300


PEPPERS
FETT
Winter
Spring
TOTAL

POTATOES
Winter
Spring
TOTAL


500
4,200
8,700


Bu.
4,400 475

Crt.
2,900 130


400
4,000
8,700


Bu.
210
430
220


2,090,000


377,000


84,000
1,720,000
1,914,000


123,000 1,967,000 o100


377,000 2.90


84,000
1,720,000
1,914,000


4.60
2.80
2.35


1,967,000


1,093,000


386,000
4,816,000
4,498,000


13,400 13,100 284 3,718,000 3,718,000 2.61 9,700,000

Bu.
11,500 11,500 300 3,450,000 3,450,000 1.40 4,830,000
20,200 20,200 309 6,250,000 6,250,000 1.63 10,179,000
31,700 31,700 306 9,700,000 9,7 00,000 1.55 15,009,000


A- Abandoned because of poor market prices at certain times during the season.

Source, U. S. Agricultural Marketing Service,, Orlando, Florida.


ppge 50


$ 2.45
1.75
2.24
2.75
2.00


1.75
2.26

1,83




ACREAGE, YILLD, FCD'JCTIQ; AND VALUE
F'LORITDA E'TA5 ';.T = 1LLAj -S FT -.ITS
.Zt53-5Z Si;ASCN'


For
Planted Harvest


S QUA SH

Winter
Scoring
TOTIL


2,100
3.800
4,500
10,400


TOMATOES
Felt Fresh)
(Process)
(Total)
Winter Fresh)
Process)
Total)
Spring Fresh)
Process)
Total)
TOTAL FTRESi
TOTAL PROCESS
TOTAL ALL

TOTAL VEGS

CANTALOUPES
Sprang
STRAWBERRIES
InTrter
WATERMELONS
Spring
TOTAL
MISCL. FRUITS

GRA'D TOTAL


10,600
2, 700
13,300

2,600
25,400

2,100
27, bU00
53,200
7,400


1.900
3, 700
4,200
9, W


8,300
2,700

15,900
2,600
19,500
24,0 UU
2,100


7,"=0
-4,,e0


Yieid


80
125
95
103


Bu.
145
145
145
205
205
2U7b

145

-165
1.6


Production
Total
Units

152,000
462,000
399,000
lUO3,OO0


1,204,000
392,000
3,5,6000
533,000
3,998,:000'

3,249000


I. 229, .-


Abandoned
A
Units



69,000
579,000


Season
Production Avg.FOB
of Value Pri ce
Units P erTUnt


152,000
462,000
330,000
444,UUU


1,204,000
392,000
1.596.000
3,465,000
533,000
3, 6,O0b,
112,Ob 3,455,00O
304,000
1i2,00g 3, 759,0 CjG
112,000 6,124,0j0J
1,229,000


$2.95
3.10
1.70
2.50


4.95


4.95
.65
3.89
4.55
.65
4.03
4.40
.60

4.09
.6^


Total Value
Marketed
DoI-ars

$ 448,000
1,432,000
561,000
2, 441, 00


5,960,000
255,000
C, 21 5,0=7
1575,7 00
346,000
6o,1 2,C00

182,000

36,926,000
783 000


60,6JU 00 576,'4o-0 S LiiOJO 7,353,000 4.05 37,7il.070

295,350 281,200 51,602,800 1,259,800 50:343,000 123,933,000

Crt.
2,500 2,000 45 90,000 90,000 3o65 328,000
Crt. (24 qto)
3,200 3,000 55 165,000 165,000 11.40 1,874,000
Melons
105,000 98,000 335 32,830,000 3,252,000 29,578,000 325.CO 9,613,000

110,700 103,000 33,085,000 3,252,000 29,833,000 11,815,COO

406,050 384,200 84,687,800 4,511,800 80,175,000 135,718,000


A abandoned because of poor market price at certain times during the season.

The above report and that on page 50 covers the vegetable and miscellaneous fruit acreage
reported by the Truck Crop Reporters of the U.S. Agricultural Marketing Service, U-S. Departnet of
Agrioalture in Orlando. End of official report.


There are, however, a number of fruits and vegetables for which there is no official report
for acreage.

The Market News Specialist of the State Marketing Bureau undertakes to make some rough
estimates of these unreported commodities.


UNOFFICIAL ACREAGE, PRODUCTION & VALUE ESTIMATES


Acreage
for
Planted Harvest


Butterbeans
Field Peas
Radishes
Miscl. Vegs.o


3,175
16,000
7,000
10.750


3,175
16,000
7,000
10,750


Yield


40
35
127
200


Production
Total
Units

127,000
525,000
875,000
2,150,000


Production
of Value
Units

127,000
525,000
875,0CC
2,150,000


Seas on
Avg.T CB
Price
PerU nj. t

$ 2.5C
1.40
2.50
2.00


To al Value
Marketed
Dollars

$ 318,000
735,000
2, 175,000
4:-300, 000


(See Pages 8 and 9 fcr further estimates.)

o Miscellaneous Vegetables included broccoli, okra, celery, cabbage, onions, carrots, turnips, mustard,
beets, collards, parsley, spinach, watercress, English peas, The total production of these was
estimated at 3,634 carloads, with 986 carloads going by truck, 150 by straight freight, and 1,204
carloads estimated shipped in mixed cars. The remainder was processed, consumed locally, or went
out in LCL express shipments.

Having made these estimates, some without enough basin data on which to make as good an
estimate as we desire, we hope no one disagrees with us abori mnen umlss they have cata which could help
us with estimates next year. These estimates are made in order to cc-.-lete -he acreage, yield, production
and value picture. We have always tried to do that even if round esti-ates are necessary.

See Pages 8-9 for unofficial estimates on miscellaneous fruits- The infcrmaticn on which we
base these estimates is in some instances incomplete.


Page 51


FLORIDA







...REAGE. YIELD AND VALUE OF SELECTED COMMODITIES IN FLORIDA BY SEASONS
EE.f.3, SNAP


For H '?et Yield T'eta Abandoned
Season Acreage Bu. Production Volume(A)


1935-36
1936-37
1937-'98
1938-39
1939-O.0
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
19-'4-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-^8
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51,
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54


59.200
58,800
60.,700
64,000
52,000
52,500
68,000
80,000
96,500
80,500
80,200
81,700
71,700
79,000
73,300
74,300
76, 700
65,400
71.000


71_
80
89
'111
98
92
105
131
86
92
106
80
82
106
101
102
98
105
118


4,183,000
4,688,000
5,381,000
7,135,000
5,090,000
5,780,000
5,783,000
7,795,000
8,273. 000
7,440,000
8,469,000
6,549,700
5-898.000
8,389,000
7,368,000
7,575,000
7,492,000
6,867,000
8,370.000


288,000




269,000
496,000
1.:240:000
561,000
225,000
1.154,000
286,000
1,276,000
629,000
75,000
377,000


Volume
Used

4,183,000
4.688,000
5,381.000
6-847,000
5:.090,000
5,780,000
5,783,000
7,795.000
8,00A:000
6,244,000
7,229,000
5:988,700
5-673,000
7,235,000
7,082,000
6,299,000
6,863,000
6,792,000
7,993 000


Price per Bu-
Fresh banned


$1-4 9
1.50
1.17
1,03
1.47
1,55
1-84
2.62
2.56
2.92
2-73
2-90
2. 57
(F) 2-43
F 2-49
F 2,89
F 2,89
T 3.23
F 2 62


.91
1.27
1-29
1-67
1.67
1,67
1.54
C)1-63
C 1-41
C 1)i-54
(C 1,56
(C)2 19
C) 1.83


Av 2.01
Av) 2 45
Av 2.71
Av) 2 74
Av 2-98
Av)2 40


FOB Packed
Total Value

$ 6,250,000
7.037,000
6 272,000
7,041-000
7-480,000
8,933.000
11,913,000
I7,989,000
18,713,000
18,405,000
18,359,000
16,389,000
14-484,000
16,884.000
17,354,000
17,092,000
18:801,000
20.225.000
19 211 000


For Canning: 1941-42 bu. 1.367,000; 1942-43 bu 2 677,000; 1943-44 bu 1 268.000; 1944-45 bu 1 486 000;
1945-46 bu. 1 106.000; 3.946-47 bu 800,700; 1947-48 bu 583,000; 1948-49 bu 843,000; 1949-50 bu
878,000; ..950--51 bu. 752 000; 1951-52 bu 780,000; 1952-53 bu 1,632.000; 1953-54 bu, 2.161 000.


Season

1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941.-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1.945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54


Season


For Harvest
Acreage

2,400
4,500
4-800
4,000
7:000
5. 000
5,400
4.500
4,800
6,?00
5.200
4,250G
3,050
3,^ 00
2;900
3,200
2 900
2,400



F:r H'r"est
Acreage


1935-36 9,000
1936-37 8.,500
1937-38 9:-AO
1938-39 10,000
1939--40 3.6:000
1940-41 10,000
191-.42 18,000
1942-43 10,000
1943-44 23,500
1944-45 17.500
1945-'6 13,200
1946-47 14,000
1947-^8 16,1.00
1948-49 16,000
1949-50 17,000
1950-51 19,000
1951-52 15,500
1952-53 13,000
1953-54* 15 500
aIncludes kraut 500


LIMAS
Yield T-talI
Bu- Production

65 156,000
75 338 000
100 480.000
70 2-0,000
40 280,000
65 325,000
59 321,000
77 345,000
88 420,000
88 555-000
65 333-000
91 ?37,000
105 319,000
76 258.000
70 20 3000
92 294,000
73 212,000
87 208,000


Yield
Tons


4-0
6.0
.5-
5.5
7-0
6.0
6.0
8.5
7.1
7-5
8.8
7-1
9 0
9 6
10-8
11 0
10.6
10.0
9 6
9.6


Abandoned
Volume(A)


1.4,000
87,000

32,000



38.000


CABBAGE
Tctp.? Abandoned
Production Volume(A)


36,000
513000
61,000
55,000
112, 000
60,000
108,000
85,000
166,800
131,000
116,200
99,400
144, 900
154,000
183,600
209:000
164 200
180,000
:.48.7000
4,800


20;000


..


47,100
24,000
2,500
18,200
21,100
30.000
56,900
50,700
10,000
47,000
30,800


Volume
Used

156,000
338,000
480:000
280:000
280,000
325.000
321,000
345.000
406:000
4658,000
338,000
419,000
319,000
258,000
203,000
256,000
212,000
208 000


Volume
Used

36-000
31.000
61,000
55,000
3.12,000
60,000
108,000
85,000
119,700
307,000
113,700
81,200
123.800
124,000
126.700
3.58,300
154,300
133,000
118 000
4,800


Price
Bu.

$2,50
1 50
1.50
1.50
2.20
2.10
3-31
4-16
4,38
3 28
3:51
3.00
2-97
2 74
2-63
3-05
3-33
3 03


Price
Ton

$17-00
16.00
16 n0
18-00
1.8-40
38-90
17.80
76-00
36-00
37-00
49-00
37 80
52 50
44-60
30-50
68 -00
62-50
30. 10
33 69
10 00


FOB Packed
Total Value

$ 390,000
507,000
720,000
420,000
616.000
682:000
1,041,000
1,43?..000
1,779,000
1.533,000
1,187,000
1-065,000
946,000
707.000
534,000
780,000
706,000
631 000



FOB Sales
Total Value


$ 612,000
496,000
978,000
990,000
2,061,000
2,334,000
1.602,000
6,460,000
4,309,000
3,959,000
5,571,000
3,069,000
6.500,000
5:530,000
3,864,000
10:764,000
9,644..000
4,033,000
3 976,000
48,000


Z Tu f 1


Page 52


O : 9b3-b figures


preliminary and s n





ACREAGE, YIELD AND V .IL-E CF SELECTED -.1,'CDITIES IN FLORIDA BY SEASONS (Cont'd.)--a
CELERY


Season

1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54


F'r "Hrrest
Acreage

8,750
9,900
11,C50
13.450
11,700
11.600
9,500
9:.500
10;400
10,400
10,100
-0.700


Crts. Total
Fla. Production

447 4,175,500
502 4,969,000
493 5,448,000
479 6,-39,000
390 4 564,000
487 5,651,000
581 5,518,000
649 6,170,000
662 6,885,000
694 7,216,000
630 6,366,000
644 6,894,000


Abandoned

(Fla.Crts.)
400,000
102,000
151,000

892,000
181,000

195,000


252,000


Volume
Used

4,175,000
4,569,000
5,346,000
6,288,000
4,564,000
4,759,000
5,337,000
6,170,000
6,690,000
7,216,000
6,366.000
6,642,000


(A) Not harvested, due to economic abandonment. Values cover harvested portion crops. Florida crates
are approximately 60 per cent as large as NY 2/3 crates.

CUCUMBERS
For rK-?-est Yield Total (A) Volume Price Per FOB Packed
Season Acreage Bu. Production Abandoned Used Bushel Tot. Value

1937-03 7.000 121 850,000 850,000 $1.24 $ 1,053,000
1923-39 7,600 115 876,000 876,000 1.58 1,391,000
1939-40 8,200 1I5 1,186,000 1,186,000 1.63 1,938,000
1940-41 8,800 121 1,064,000 1,064,000 1.75 1,858,000
1941-42 9,700 94 912,000 912,000 2.24 2,042,000
1942-43 6,500 80 520,000 520,000 4.98 2,592,000
1943-44 6,300 73 459,000 459,000 4.55 2,079,000
1944-45 7,700 110 844,000 844,000 4.31 3,637,000
1945-46 11150 136 1,520,000 76,000 1,444,000 3.72 5,377,000
1946-47 13,775 87 1,204,000 1,204,000 4.14 4,984,000
1947-a8 15,900 123 1,957,000 50,000 1,907,000 3.25 6,203,000
1948-49 15,500 124 1,800,000 46,000 1,754 000 $3.24 P) 2.00 Av $3.17 5,558,000
1949-50 14,200 154 2,190,000 2,190,000 F 3.38 P 1.25 Av 3.32 7,263,000
1950-51 14,300 221 3,157,000 510,000 2,647,000 F 2.70 P 1.25 Av 2.64 6,998,000
1951-52 13,600 193 2,629,000 2,629,000 F 3.80 9,999,000
1952-53 15,800 192 3,030,000 3,030,000 F' 3.37 (P) 1.85 (Av) 3.30 10,201,000
1953-54 19,600 167 3,276.000 296,000 2,980.000 F 2.94 P 1,30 (Av) 2.85 8,505,000

F-Fresh; P-Pickles. Includes 1800 of pickles yielding 144,OCO bu. with value $187,000 for 1953-54.

CARROTS
F-r Harvest Yield Total (A) Volume Price per FOB Packed
Season Acreage Crts. Production Abandoned Used Crate Tot. Value

1947-48 450 200 90,000 90,000 $3.00 $270,000
1948-49 500 200 100,000 60,000 40,000 1.30 52,000
1949-53 None Reported -

CAULIFLOWER
1947-48 4OO 200 80,000 80,000 $2.20 $ 176,000
1948-49 500 260 156,000 156,000 2.25 351,000
1949-50 850 300 255,000 255,000 1.85 472,000
1950-51 1,100 290 319,000 319,000 1.95 822,000
1951-52 1:200 365 438,000 438,000 2.00 876,000
1952-53 1,500 275 412,000 412,000 180 742,000
1953-54 1,200 265 318,003 318,000 1 50 477,000
CORN, GREEN
1947-48 6,000 80 480,000 480,000 $2.75 $ 1,320,000
1948-49 12:000 140 1,680,000 1,680,000 2.70 4,536,000
1949-50 29,000 120 3,480,000 530,000 2,950,000 2.15 6,342,000
1950-51 25,700 123 3,168,000 3,168,000 2.47 7,817,000
1951-52 33,500 124 4,150,000 4,150,000 2.16 8,955,000
1952-53 30,400 145 4.413,000 4,413,000 2.30 10,130,000
1953-54 39.300 131 5.132,000 5,132,000 1.99 10,220,000


For Harvest
Acreage
2,800
3,200
2,800
3,300
4,700
A carnr


Yield
Bu. Hpr.
325
430
400
450
505
A c~r.


ESCAR
Total
Production
910,000
1,376.000
1,120,000
1,485,000
2:374,000
o oneq nr-N


OLE & ENDIVE
(A)
Abandon

266..00

145.00
646,00


Volume
Led Used

)0 1,110,000
- 1,120,000
)0 1,340,000
)0 1,728,000
- ^2,O.noo


FOB Packed
Total Value

$17,158,000
14,530,000
18,553,000
14,260,000
17,535,000
9,778,000
16,021,000
12,295,000
15,075,000
14,735,000
13,299,000
1,463,000


rice
Fla.
Crts.

$4.11
3.18
3.47
2.27
3.84
2.05
3.00
1.99
2.55
2.04
2.09
1.73


Season
19-116-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
10 CZ1 -q


Price
Bu.H-r.
$1.30
1.05
1.50
.95
1.40
1.20


FOB Packed
Tot. Value
$1,183,000
1,165,000
1.680,000
1,273,000
2,419,000
2.646.000







ACREAGE, YIELD AND VALUE OF SELECTED COMMODITIES IN FLORIDA BY SEASONS (Cont'd.)

EGGPLANT


F-r Harve ."
Acr Eage


2,100
1 400

2,350
1:950
3,500
3.:250
3,900
3 300
3,225
3,300
2,450
2,200
2.650
3 100
2. 00


Yield Total.
Bushels Production

261 470.000
326 686,000
207 290.000
180 324:000
237 556,500
278 541.500
259 9908,000
271 880,000
345 1.344,000
220 725,000
277 894,000
271 894,000
296 726,000
310 682,000
344 912,000
299 927.,000
372 893 000


IA)
Abandoned







40,000

210,000

197,000


Volume Price per FOB Packed
Used Bushel Tot. Value


Season

1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941--42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-53
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54-



Season

1.943-44
194A- 45
19.45-16
1946-47
1947-48

1940--41
1941-42
1942-13
1.943-44
1944--45
1945-46
1946-47
1.947-^8

1948-49
,949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53


$ .-6
,75
1.44
1.17
1 16
2,39
1.65
2.06
1-63
2.42
1.65
1.63
1.62
1.93
1.82
1.68
1.71


$ 366,000
514,000
417,000
378,000
643,000
1,294,000
1,501,000
1,814,000
1,805,000
1,758,000
1,151,000
1,456,000
1,178,000
1,318,000
1,657,000
1-556,000
1,529,000


LETTUCE (Boston and Remaine)


For Harvest Yield
Acreage ,5-6 doz.Crts.

1: 100 150
400 200
550 258
700 100
550 125


T ta".
Production

165,000
80 000
142,000
70,000
69-000
LETTUCE
1.50, CMJ
165,000
220:000
193,000
143,000
214,000
1193,000
23SO,000
LETTUCE
?.88 L-U
?52,000
429: 000
320,000
384,000


(A)
Abandoned


59,000

17,000

23,000
(Iceberg)



78,000
24,000
20,000

10,000
(All)

64-000
86,000
.-


Volume Price FOB Packed
Used Crates Tot. Value


106-000
80,000
125.000
70,000
46,000
4-6 doz, crates)
150,000
165,000
230-000
115,000
1.9:000
194,000
119,000
120:000


188;000
288,000
343,000
320,000
384,000


$2.15
2.70
3,00
2.95
2.05

$1.83
2,16
3 97
2.90
3 51
3-72
2.97
2-88

$3.10
2.80
2,65
3-50
2-50


$ 228,000
216,000
375,000
206,000
94,000

$ 274,000
356,000
913,000
334,000
41.8,000
910,250
353,000
345,000

$ 583,000
806,000
909,000
!,120,000
960,000


9.0.-" .t) 37,000UU / /,000j 2 .90 1, 09 U, 0L
PFAS, ENGLISH
Fnr Har'-es; Yiel.d T P"'. (A) Volume Price FOB Packed
Season Acreage Bushe.. Production Abandoned Usid Bushels Tot. Value

1943-44 2,500 60 150,000 -- 1.50,000 $3.00 $ 450,000
3.944-45 2,600 75 195,000 90:000 105,000 2 70 284,000
..945-46 1,600 74 118,000 5.000 113,000 3-00 339,000
1946-47 1,600 40 64;000 64,000 2.95 189,000
1.947-48 600 60 36,000 36,000 2.55 92,000
1948-49 400 40 165,000 16,000 2.62 42,000
1949-50 "CO 60 24, 000 24,000 2-80 67,000
1950-51. 350 70 24,000 24.,000 2.85 68,000
1951-53 Report on English Peas discontinued due to very light a-reage, To,. nuch competition
fret. ".-ozen prs 'f go)d quality.


SQUASH
Yield To+a .
Bushels Producti on


(A)
Abandoned


1947-48 7,900 82 651,000
1948-49 9,000 91 817,000
1949-50 1.0,100 85 860,000
1950-51. .0,00 108 1..156,000 127.
1951-52 10,700 80 853,000
1952-53 10,600 81. 860,000
1953-5/,4 9 800 .03 1.013 000 69


Volume
Used

651.000
817,000
860,000
1,039,000
853-000
860,000
944 000


Price FOB Packed
Bushels Tot. Value


$2-83
2.76
2-40
2-53
3.41
2-79
2 59


$1,839,250
2,2253000
2.060,000
2,626,000
2.911-000
2,396,000
2,441,000


NOTE. :'.953-54 fI.gure:; pr].imln,'.ry nd subjec. to revi,.ia


Page 54


470:000
686, 000
290,000
324,000
556,500
541,500
868,000
880,000
1,104,000
725,000
697,000
894;000
726,000
682,000
912,000
927-000
893.000


2,000
3,000
1700
-.,350
1,000
1,300
1,125
1.100

1,500
2,200
2,600
2,000
2, 00


Fer H rr-est
Season A'ceage







ACREAGE, YIELD AND VALUE OF SELECTED CC'O0DITIES IN FLORIDA

PEPPERS, GREEN


BY SEASC'S (Cont'd.)Page 55


Season

1935-36
1935-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948--49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54


For Harvest
Acreage

6,500
7,200
7,400
7,300
6,200
7,200
6.500
7.100
8,950
9,350
11.080
10,550
11,450
11.100
13,750
11.200
11,150
13.200
13.100



For Harvest
Acreage

24,500
31,300
31,400
26,700
25,600
26,800
25,000
26,200
28,600
31,100
35,300
24,100
20,800
20,300
23,200
23,500
29,500
40,300
31,700


POTATOES


Yield Total
Bushels Production

91 2,235,000
123 3,842,000
133 4,177,000
121 3,235,000
157 4,020,000
117 3,126.000
154 3,848,000
134 3,523,000
112 3,212.000
162 5.035,000
170 6,010,000
114 2.738,000
174 3,614,000
264 5.362,000
231 5,370,000
265 6,230,000
258 7,625,000
252 10,143,000
306 9,700,000


Yield Total
Bushels Production

226 1,467,000
221 1,590,000
295 2,180,000
303 2,212,000
224 1,390,000
225 1,621,500
276 1,792,000
284 2,018,000
265 2.371,000
287 2,687,000
275 3,050,000
208 2.193,000
250 2,860,000
268 2,972,000
292 4,015,000
322 3.608,000
303 3,435.000
272 3,590,000
284 3.718,000


(A)
Abandoned

















324,000


Volume Price per
Used Bushel


(A)
Abandoned








86,000

380,000

143,000

175,000
129,000


$ .87
1.20
.77
1.25
1.53
1.56
1.75
2.93
2.16
2.46
2.45
4.14
2.17
2.55
1.87
2.38
2.97
2.55
2,61


Volume Price per
Used Bushel


2,235,000
3.842,000
4,177,000
3,235,000
4,020,000
3,126,000
3,848,000
3.523,000
3,212,000
5,035,000
6,010,000
2,738,000
3,614,000
5,362,000
5,370,000
6,230,000
7,625,000
9,819,000
9,700,000


$1-43
1-32
.70
1.13
-93
.90
1.54
1.96
2.00
2-39
1.95
2.00
2.79
2.30
1.79
1.84
2.43
1.58
1.55


1,467,000
1,590,000
2,180,000
2,212,000
1,390,000
1,621,500
1,792,000
2,018,000
2,285,000
2,687,000
2,670,000
2,193,000
2,717,000
2,972,000
3,840,000
3,479,000
3,435,000
3,590,000
3,718,000


TaMATOES


For HarvestYield
Season Acreage Bu.


1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54


32r600
35,700
45,300
40,700
34:000
26,500
43,000
25,500
34,900
32,500
30,400
29,800
30,200
38.200
42,500
50,200
55,900
57,300
57,200


Total Prod.
Fresh Canning


2,954,000
2,746,000
4,953,000
4,948,000
3,225,000
2,765,000
3,412,000
2,226,000
3,405,000
4,456,000
4,670,000
3,198,000
3,588,000
6,300,000
6,448,000
7,420,000
8,845,000
7,765,000
9,465,000


321,000
314~000
500,000
312,000
232,000
165,000
951,000

395.000
289,000
265,000
306,000
346,000
675,000
469,000
1,360,000
1,348,000
1,091,000
1.229.000


(A) Volume Price Bu.
Abandoned Used Fresh Canned


342,000
221,000






112.000


3,275,000
3,060,000
5,453,000
5,260,000
3,457,000
2,930,000
4.363,000
2,226,000
3,800,000
4,403,000
4,714,000
3,504,000
3,934,000
6,975,000
6,917,000
8,780,000
10,193,000
8,856,000
9.353,000


$2.75
2.76
1.73
2.47
2.53
3.10
3-92
5-30
5.72
5.27
5.25
6.50
5.83
5.12
4.96
5.24
5.62
4.91
4.55


$ .31
.32
.28
.28
.28
-28
.46

.59
.72
.74
1.00
.75
.64
-50
.95
.73
.69
.64


Av $4.68
Av $4.66
Av $4.58
Av $4.97
Av $4.39
Av $4.03


FOB Packed
Tot. Value

$ 8,224,000
7,688,000
8,711,000
12,323,000
8,216,000
8,618,000
13,821,000
11,795,000
19,712,000
20,376,000
22,405,000
19,098,000
22,936,000
32,666,000
32,247,000
40,194,000
50,670,000
38,898,000
37,711,000


T CCE 1953-54 figures preliminary and subject to revision.


FOB Packed
Tot. Value

$1,273,000
1,905,000
1,668,000
2,771,000
2,121,000
2,537,000
3,133,000
5,917,000
4,964,000
6,623,000
6,545,000
9,086,000
5,886,000
7,569,000
7,188,000
8,293,000
10,200,000
9,152,000
9,700,000



FOB Packed
Tot. Value

$ 3,187,000
5,087,000
2,939,000
3,644,000
3,725,000
2,799,000
5:924,000
5,914,000
6,431,000
12,033,000
11,744,000
5,475,000
10,073,000
12,316,000
9,609,000
11,455,000
18,523,000
15,536,000
15,009,000


Season

1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
19Z4-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54






pig 55


SEASONS (Cont'd.)


ACREAGE, YIELD AND VALUE OF SELECTED COMMODITIES IN FICRIDA BY


Season

1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950--51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54
(A) Crates


Yield
Jumbo
Crates


For Harvest


300
700
500
500
500
500
400
550
500
800
800
1,200
1,200
1,400
1,300
1,500
1i800
2,000
not harvested


CANTALOUPES


Total
Production


16,000
52,000
40,000
35,000
30,000
35,000
26,000
33,000
25,000
36,000
40.000
78,000
48,000
84,000
78,000
112,000
81,000
90,000
economic abandonment.


(A)
Abandoned


-

5,00
1800


Volume Price per FOB Packed
Used Crate Tot. Value


16,000
52,000
40,000
35,000
30,000
35,000
26,000
33,000
20,000
18,000
40,000
78,000
48,000
84,000
78,000
112,000
81,000
90,000


$1.75
1.25
1.10
1-10
125
1.50
3.25
3.75
6.00
3,00
2.55
4.35
4.00
2.25
4.00
3,65
4.00
3.65


STRAWBERRIES


For Harvest 24-Qt.
Season Acreage Crates


8:-800
7,500
9,000
7,200
5,500
5,000
2,600
1,400
2,050
2,800
4,750
4,200
4,000
5,400
6,000
4,700
4,600
3, 000


Tot-al (A)
Production Abandoned

572.000 -
525,000 -
765,000 -
504,000 -
384,000
350,000 -
156,000 -
98,000 -
144,000 -
224,000 -
309,000 -
189,000 -
220,000 -
432,000 -
360,000 -
258,000 -
230,000 -
165.000 -


Volume (48 Pts.)
Used 24 Qts."


572.000
525,000
765,000
504,000
384,000
350,000
156,000
98,000
144,000
224,000
309,000
189,000
220,000
432,000
360,000
258,000
230,000
165,000


$ 4,80
4.00
4.15
4.65
5.70
6.50
9.60
11.30
10.70
10.55
12.10
10,60
10.91
8.69
9.95
10.40
9.13
11.40


FOB Packed
Tot. Value

$2,746,000
2,100,000
3,175,000
2,344,000
2,194,000
2,275,000
1,498,000
1,107,000
1,541,000
2,363,000
3,739,000
2,003,000
2,401,000
3,737,000
3,582,000
2,682,000
2,099,000
1,874,000


55
75
80
70
60
70
65
60
50
45
50
65
40
60
60
75
45
45
due to


Now shipped almost exclusively in 36-pt. crates, The 24-qt. crate was formerly used, and it is
continued here for statistical purposes, Florida crate is 75% as large.


WATERMELONS


For Harvest Yield
Season fAreage Melons

1936-37 19,500 300
1937-38 22,500 310
1938-39 22,600 240
1939-40 23:500 290
1940-41 25,500 270
1941-42 22,000 325
1942-43 12,500 325
1943-44 25,500 305
1944-45 39,000 260
1945-46 47,000 225
1946-47 47,000 290
1947-48 45,000 305
1948-49 59,000 240
1949-50 63,000 300
1950-51 57,000 315
1951-52 68,000 320
1952-53 86,000 320
1953-54 Q8,000 335


Total
Production

5,850,000
6,975,000
5,424,000
6,815,000
6,885,000
7,150,000
4,063,000
7,778,000
10,140,000
10,575,000
13,623,000
13,725,000
14,160,000
18,900,000
17,955,000
21,760.000
27,520,000
32,830,000


(A)
Abandoned

390,000
675,000










4,900,000



3,252,000


Volume Price per FOB Sales
Used 1000 Melons Tot. Value


5,460,000
6,300,000
5,424,000
6,815,000
6,885,000
7,150,000
4,063,000
7,778,000
10,140,000
10,575,000
13,623,000
13,725,000
14,160,000
14,000,000
17,955,000
21,760,000
27,520,000
29,578,000


$240
140
180
175
210
225
650
655
485
525
447
500
450
395
455
595
520
325


$ 1,310,000
945,000
976,000
1,193,000
1,445,850
1,609,000
2,641,000
5,095,000
4,'18,000
5,552,000
5,419,000
6,862,000
6,372,000
5,530,000
8,170,000
12,947,000
14,310,000
9,613,00O


?re t-iin'ry ,nd subject to revision.


$ 28,000
65,000
44,000
38,000
38,000
52,000
85,000
124,000
120,000
54,000
102,000
339,000
192,000
189,000
312,000
409,000
324.000
328,000



Florida
36 Pt.
Crate

$3.60
3.00
3.11
3.49
4.28
4.88
7.20
8.47
8.03
7.92
9.08
7.95
8.18
6.49
7.46
7.80
6.85
8.55


1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953--54





Page 57


FLWRIDA VEGETI3BL., S RAWBERRY AjD AA LRMELON AC.-.AGE dY COUNfalS *J3R 1953-54 SEASON
Source: U.J. Agricultural otatistlcians, rianao, rloiiaa.


Fall Win. Spr.
A.2.tCiJA
3tans 175 1700
Lima-s B& ,'tter Beans 325
Cabboae 53 -
J lery o25
Cucu:jsers 25 1300
, -plant 53 135
.j;'tuce 50 -
Spoers 950
?ot,)toes 950
Squash 75 200
:ttal Ve.,s. 35 100 ol85
Cantaloupes 400
,zt:rnielons 3330
r, .nd 2o-al 325 175-- la
* A-l-cu & ..arion combined.


aL ;. 25 203
;ips s( Dut er 3eans 100
_abbage 50
-orn 10O0
_ucun.ers 330
-2ppers 350
?o'tto es 353
Squash 25 75
obta 1 Vegs. 50. 245
Stra;; berries 150
"a, ,ernelIons 330
Grand Total 50 2875


3 B VARD
Tonat oe s


ui lias
Cab oa e
Corn
ac Linb'rs

?cpprs
Potatoes
S:ua sh
Tona toe s
Ibtal Vegs.

CALHO J
u o,-i o bers
'Atermelons
'-and Ibtel

CUARLOTTE
Cucumbers
_plant
Papers
roraat oe s
b-nl Vegs.
..at erimelons
Cranc Total

C: TRUS
..a -r.-elons

CLAY
;a Dba-e
COLLISR
Corn
Cucumbers
:0lant
?-= ers
Squa sh
Tx-atoess
Ebtal Vegs
Cantaloupes
.'a terel ons
Sr2nd 2otal


- 1000


3300 9000 400
50 50
100
1100 -
25 100 25
50 200 230
50 1400 625
300
175 1100 500
100 -
3500 135 22(00


350
830E
1150


Total

1875 Jabba6e
325 'at te rnelons
53 Jrand Ibtal
o25
1325 DADE
185 Jean s
50 Ca bba, e
953 Cauliflower
950 Corn
275 Cucumbers
uolO Esc-role
43 Lett-ice
6330 ?ep:ers
I3~u Potatoes
Squash
Tomatoe s
Total Vegs.
225 Cantaloupes
100 Grand Total
53
1330 uE SO I
300 Cucumoers
353 Potatoes
350 Toma0.oes
100 Ibtal Vegs.
2475 .,atermelon s
150 Randd Total
330
2925 DIXIE
;,ater-melons

1430 DJjVL
Cabop.-e

12700 ESCAlAB
1003 Cabba e
100 Cucumbers
1130 Potatoes
150 Ibtal Ves.
450
2075 FLAGL .R
330 Cabbage
1775 Potatoes
100 Ibtal Vegs.
18850
GADSDEN
Beans
350 cabbage
800 Squash
1150 Ibtal Vegs.


GILCHRIST
350 275 530 1125 Cucumuars
25 50 75 Peppers
200 2JO TItal Ve.s.
250 250 225 725 watermelons
o25 775 725 2125 Grand Total
800 800
72 773 1525 292o GiADi:S
Caboa e
Lettuce
700 730 Tomatoes
Ibtal Vegs.
,;ateermnelons
300 330 Grenc Total

700 700 HAMI L TON
500 430 700 1600 Cabbage
25 50 75 Ccumoers
203 125 325 Squash
40 2300 50 290 Ibtal Vegs.
1030 900 1150 3050 Cantaloupes
15o5 2450 2025 0040 ..a -erelans
75 75 Gr-nd Total
1930 1900
15o5 2450 4000 8015


Fall in.. Spr. Total

25 25
22JO 2200
25 2200 2225


30u


50
230




50
50 0
9900

99jo


4330
400
50
1930
100
25
150
50

7300
15200
22675

22 d75:


1403


1UO
100




353
2830
4750
0o33


- 300


- 100


- 25 --
- 100
- 900
25 TOU)


1400
3300
140 330-0


850
- M
53
900


325
325
325
-




53
5)

-E


350
450



25
833




25


500

25
525


303
150
450
8200
ou050






300
3O0





250
53
300
25
950
/075


400
50
2050
400
25
150
50
8800
1100
18533

o30
3d125


140
75
75
290
7U0
990


30O


100)


25
100
930



14003
3300
4700


1353
50
75
1475


300
150
450
8230
8o50


350
450
925
1725
300O
2025


25
250
103
375
25
950
IYTJ





Page 58


FLORIDA VEGETABLE, STRAWBERRY AND WATERMELON ACREAGE/ BY COUNTIES FOR 1953-54 SEASON


HARDEE
Cabbage
Corn
Cucumbers
eggplant
Peppers
Squash
Toma to e s
Total Vegs,
Strawberrie s
Watermelons
Grand Total

HENRY
Cucumbers
Squash
Tomatoes
Total Vegs.
Watermelons
Grand Total

HERNAJDO
Eggplant
Watermelons
Grand Total

HIGHLANDS
Beans
Cucumbers
Escarole
Total Vegs.
Vatermelons
Grand Total


Fall Win, S__

50 -
75
800 1300
100 25
125 75
40 75
400 930

100
700
14656 SOb 3250


45
2
100
147



15
-TI

1C
10
2

12

re


HILLSBOROUGH_
Beans 10
Limas & butter Beans
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Corn
cucumbers 15
Eggplant 2
Escarole
Le ttuce
Peppers 2
Potatoes 15
Squash 20
Tomatoes 100
Total Vegs- 16
Strawberries
Watermelons
Grand Total I17
HOLMES
Cucumbers
Watermelons
Grand Total


INDIAN RIVER
Cucumbers
Squash
Tomatoes
Total Vegs,
Watermelons
Grand Total
JACKSON
Cucumbers
Watermelons
Grand Total
JEFFERSON
Cucumbers
Squash
Total Vegs.
Watermelons
Grand Ibtal
LAFAYETTE
Watermelons


10


50 250 700
5 100 25
)0 1100 2700
73 1457 3425E
- 1500
75 1450 492


50 -
- 1600



)0 300
0 50
- 50 -
0 50 350
- 100
'0 50 4501


0 775
- 950
- 250 -
- 350 -
- 1000
0 375
25 300
- 25 -
- 150 -
5 3400
50 500
0 1150
10 1200
- 7-75 9650
- 2450
S 5800
. 775 17700

- 250
- 1400
-- 1650

- 70
0 60 -
75 75 1450

- 400
1 35 T92-

- 575
- 2700
- 3275

- 125
9 -12

- 2400
o0 s252

- 1900


Total
LAKE
50 eea-ns
75 Cabbage
2100 Corn
125 Cucumbers
200 Peppers
115 Tomatoes
1300 ibtal Vegs.
396b5 1termelons
100 Grand Total
700
476 LE__
Cabbage
Corn
1400 Cucumoers
150 Eggplant
4800 Peppers
6350 Potatoes
1500 Squash
7850 Tomatoes
Ibtal Vegs-
Cantaloupes
150 Watermelons
1600 Grand Total
1750
LEON
Cucumbers
400 Watermelons
70 Grand Total
50
520 LEVY
100 Beans
620 Z Limas
Cabbage
Cucumbers
875 Squash
950 Total Vegs.
250 Cantaloupes
350 VWtermelons
1000 Grand Total
525
325 MADISON
25 Cucumbers
150 Cantaloupes
3425 WVatermelons
650 Grand Total
1350
2200 =NATEE
12075 Beans
2450 Cabbage
5800 Cauliflower
27-2"5 Corn
Cucumbers
250 Eggplant
1400 Escarole
1650 Lettuce
Peppers
Squash
70 Tomatoes
110 Tobtal Vegs.
2400 Cantaloupes
2580 Watermelons
400 Grand Total
29587
OKEECHOBEE
575 Cucumbers
2700 Tomatoes
3275 ToIbtal Vegs.
Watermelons
Grand Total
125
100 OSCEOLA
225 Watermelons
2400
62-5 PASCO
watermelonss
1900


200



90
25


50
150
1100
1615-


1515


Fall

50


50








220
1300
25
50
1700
60
200
3555

3555


Win. Spr. Total

125 175
25 25
930 900
125 175
150 150
250 250
25 1550 1575
7400 7400
-E F950 9575


100 100
1300 1520
1200 1600 4100
175 25 225
300 100 450
-- 1700
200 75 335
450 675 1325
=7 2"475 9755
150 150
600 000
S7210505


100 100
300 300
0 400


50 50
25 25
25 25
25 25
100 1.50
25 200 275
100 100
5800 5800
o00 0175


400 400
25 25
2200 2200
2625 2025


300 500
300 300
250 250
100 100
450 540
25 50 100
25 25
200 200
75 125
100 250
2150 3250
875 T350 5640
50 50
600 600
875 3800 6290


- 60 60
0 125 600 1575
50 I~ 10 1535
- 200 200
S T "860


- 250 250


- 5800 Qnl


Preliminary figures subject to revision as of Uotober 20, 1954.


85
85

~g!


5
87
~9





FLORIDA VEGiTAMLE, STRAOBERO! AND 'tfATR.-MLON A .. AG. BY COUNITS FOR 1953-54 SEASON Page 59


hRI0N
Beans
Limas .& utterBe.ns
Cabba ge
Corn
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Lettuce
Peppers
Squash
Tomatoe s
Ibtal Vegs.
Cantaloupe s
Wat ermelons
Grand Total

MARTIN
meanss
Cucumbers
Lettuce
Peppers
Potatoes
Sjuash
Toma ,oe s
Ibtal Vegs.
Wat ermelons
Grand Total


all

450



25
50


275

800






100




625
725

725


i n. Sur.

750
50
125 -
350
125

253 -
100
500
2250
375 W125'
350
8400



300 300
75 410
150 -
100 -
100
100 -
550 1350

1275 290-


ORANGE
Beans 950 800
Cabbage 625 -
Cauliflower 80 -
Celery 750 950
Corn 3400
Cucumbers 65 125
Escarole 1275 -
Lettuce 200 -
Squash 60 100
Ibtal Vegs. =73 2930 5375
Ratermelons 250
Grand fotal 1075 2930 5625
Note: Orange & Lake Celery combined.

PALM BEACH
Beans 16700 15200 9200
Limas & Butter Beans 325 100
Cabbage 3650 -
Cauliflower 50 -
Celery 2735 2160
Corn 1000 5900 19400
Cucumoers 125 300 125
Eggplant 50 275 175
Escarole 2600 -
Lettuce 800 -
Peppers 50 lu50 825
Potatoes 850 100
Squash 175 1000 353
Tomatoes 575 533 1325
Total Vegs. 19525 34987 33760
Watermelons 400
Grand IbTtal 19525 34985 341o0


POLK
Beans
Cabbag e
Corn
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Peppers
Potatoes
Squash
Tomatoes
Total Vegs.
Strawberries
Watermelons
Grand Ibotal

ANIA ROSA
,ucu mb ers
watermelonss


- 2300
- 75 -
- 50
- 50
- 25
- 500
- 25
- 100
- 25
- 9 -75
- 200
- 2300
- 75 3475


- 75
- 350


Total Fall
PU TNAM
1200 Beans
50 Cabbage
125 Cauliflower -
350 Potatoes -
150 Tobtal Vegs. -
53 '.atermelons -
250 Grand Total -
100
775 ST. JOHNS
2250 Cabbage
5-30 Cauliflower -
350 Cucumoers -
8400 Potatoes
14050 Squash -
Total Vegs.

600 ST. LUCIE
585 Cucumbers 100
150 Potatoes
100 Tomatoes 1850
100 Ibtal Vegs. 95
100 ;Iatermelons -
2525 Grana Total I=93

800 SAkAS0 A
-49 Cabbage
Celery
Escarole
1750 Lettuce
625 Potatoes
80 Total Vegs. -
1700
3400 SFMINOLNL
190 Beans 050
1275 Cabbage
200 Cauliflower
160 Celery
9380 Corn
250 Cucumbers 50
9030 Eggplant 25
Escarole -
Lettuce
Peppers -
41100 Squash 25
425 Total Vegs. 7506
3650
50 SUMTER
4895 Beans 50
26300 Cabbage
550 Cucumbers 50
500 Lettuce
2600 Peppers
800 Tomatoes
2525 Total Vegs. 100
950 Cantaloupes
1525 Strawberries -
2400 Watermelons
88270 Grand Total 1My
400
d8870 SUWAA1NE
Cabbage -
Cucumb ers -
200 Total Vegs. -
75 Cantaloupes -
50 Watermelons -
50 Grand Total -
25 UNION
500 Beans 50
25 Limas & Butter Beans -
100 Cabbage
25 Corn
Cucumbers 50
200 Eggplant
2300 Peppers
3550 Potatoes
Squash 150
fotal Vegs. 25U
75 Cantaloupes
350 to-1 nn


Viin. Spr.

50
lo50 -
25
320J
Io73 353
400
1o75 3350-


3250
75 -
50
10000
_- 25
3325T 10375


250
=253
"- S




25
o40
125
50

840



2000
300
1750



275
100


4425



25

150

T








50


175



150






150


33
120
2975

330
3425



140


50
190


350


925
300
175
25


375
100
2250


400

400

000
2700
4100U
75
50
o600
10825


175
175
25
6300
0500

100
100

250
125
15
75
100
53
615
25
400


Total

50
lo50
25
3200
4925
400
5325


3250
75
50
10000
25
13400


130
120
5075

3u0
5-25


25
780
125
50
50
1030


1000
200
300
2675
300
225
50
275
100
375
125
7425


450
25
450
150
o00
cOO
2700
4375
75
5J
6600
11100

50
175
225
25
6300
0550

150
100
150
250
175
15
75
100
200

25
4)0





age 60FLORIDA VEGETABLE, STRAWBERRY AND WATERMELON ACAiAGE BY COUNTIES FOR 1953-54 SEASON


TAYLOR
Wat ermelons

VOLUSIA
Cabbage
Lettuce
Peppers
Total Vegs.
Watermelons
Grand Total
WALTON
Cucumbers
Watermelons
Grand Total


VASHINGTON
Cucumbers
Wat ermelons
Grand Total

TOTAL ALL COUNTIES


Fall Wn-. Spr

250


125
125 -
100
250 100
800
5 900o

50
700
750-


- 75
- 1800
- 1875


Total Fall
MI SCELLAIEO US COUNTIES
250 Beans 50
Limas -
Cabbage -
125 Cauliflower -
125 Celery
100 Corn 30
350 Cucumbers 35
800 Eggplant
1150 Lettuce
Peppers 50
50 Potatoes -
700 Squash 75
-= Tomatoes 50
Total Vegs. 290
Cantaloupes -
75 Strawberries -
1800 Watermelons -
-- Grand Total 290


Win. Spr.

200 100
25 300
125 -
20
25 -
100 75
80
25 25
75 -
25 200
130
240 200
300
860 T140
100
50
850
8 4o0 241-0


TOTAL ALL COUNTIES


1950-51


1951-52

FAll Win. Spr.


Fall Win. Spr.


Beans
Limas
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Celery
Corn, Green
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Escarole
Lettuce & Romaine
Peas, Green
Peppers
Potatoes
Squash
Tomatoes
Total Vegs.
Cantaloupes
Strawberries
Watermelons
Grand Total

TOTAL ALL COUNTIES


13500




800
3600
650



400

1900
10400
31250


37000 24500
900 1900
19000 -
1000 -
6300 4350
25000
500 9900
500 900

2400
400 -
2500 9600
8500 14600
4500 4800
14500 26000
98000 121550


6500 -

31250 104500 121550


Total

75000 Beans
2800 Limas
19000 Cabbage
1000 Cauliflower
10650 Celery
25800 Corn, Green
14000 Cucumbers
2050 Eggplant
4400 Escarole (Incl.Chic
2400 Lettuce & Romaine
400 Peas; Green
12500 Pepoers
23100 Potatoes
11200 Squash
50900 Tomatoes
255200 Total Vegs.
1400 Cantaloupes
6500 Strawberries
62000 Watermelons
325100 Grand Total

TOTAI ALL COUNTIES


1952-53


Beans
Limas
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Celery
Corn, Green
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Escarole(incl.Chic)
Lettuce & Romaine
Peppers
Potatoes
Squash
Tomatoes
Total Vegs.
Cantaloupes
Strawberries
Watermelons
Grand Total


Fall Win. Spr.

17400 28500 19500
500 2400


6200 3900
900 7500 22000
4500 2000 11200
1000 900 1200


800 4400 8000
15000 25300
2200 4300 4100
14300 17000 26000


41100 86300 123600




41100 86300 123600


Total

65400 Beans
2900 Limas
18000 Cabbage
1500 Cauliflower
10100 Celery
30400 -orn, Green
17700 Cucumbers
3100 Eggplant
3800 Escarole
2400 Lettuce & Romaine
13200 Peppers
40300 Potatoes
10600 Squash
57300 Tomatoes
276700 Total Vegs.
1800 Cantaloupes
4600 Strawberries
86000 Hatermelons
369100 Grand Ibtal


Total


23300




1000
3300
550
c) -


300

2400
10800


3200
60


660
720
160
80



370
1070
420
1870


'0 18300 73600
0 2600 3200
- 15600
- 1300
0 3800 10400
0 24700 32900
0 10700 15600
0 1200 2550
- 4800
- 2200O

0 6700 10700
0 19100 29800
0 4000 10600
0 24000 53500


41650 86100 115100 266750
1500
4500
72000
41650 86100 115100 344750


1953-54

Fall Win. Spr. Total

24000 29000 18000 71000
400 2000 2400
15500 15500
1200 1200
5900 4800 10700
1300 11000 27000 39300
4600 2700 12300 19600
600 800 1000 2400
4400 4400
2900 2900
400 4000 8700 13100
11500 20200 31700
1900 3700 4200 9800
11000 19500 26700 57200
43800 112500 124900 231200
2000 2000
3000 3000
98000 98000


43800 112500 227900


Preliminary figures for 1953-54 Season are subject to revision.as of October 2u, 1954.


Total

350
325
125
20
25
205
115
50
75
275
130
515
350

100
50
850
3560


384200






1952-53 RAIL RA
Sources James


Commodity

Beans & Limas
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Celery
Corn
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Esos role-Endive
Lettuce
Peppers
Potatoes
Radishes
Squash
Tomatoes
Tomatoes*
Strawberries**-
Watermelons


Origin


T.


ON ITEMS LISTED IN CEWTS PER 100-LBS., INCLUDING KX PART 175: EXCuJDING RIFRIGeRA2IOM CHARGES


Dunoan, Itnager, Traffic division, FloriCa fruit and Veeotable Association, Orlando, Floriaa
(1953-54 Uail rates substantially the same)


Minimum St. Minne-
Carload Best N.Y. Phila Balto 'itts (aeve Uet Chgo Louis Cinti aool.


Belle Ilade
Belle Glade
Hastings
Belle Glade
Belle Glade
Pompano
Belle Glade
Belle Glade
Belle Glade
Belle Glade
Belle Glade
Belle Glade
Belle Glade
Belle Glade
Belle Glade
Plant City
Leesburg


20,0)0
24,030
20,000
20,030
24,030
24 ,000
24,000
17,500
16,000
20,000
30,000
20,000
20,000
20,000
34,000
17,000
28,000'.


* Lower rates published to certain markets based on 34,000-lb. load.
o* Depending upon type melon and type car in which loaded, minimum carlot weight ranges from 21,2U0 to 35,200
Strawberry freight rates. Note: Rates subject to packing requirements and estimated weights


lbs.
specified in tariffs.


( nd)

A TABLE Of SUGGESTED TRJCK RAPrS FOR 1952-53 FROM FLORIDA'S PRINCIPAL CITRUS SECTION SUBMIT'fiD BY ONE TRUCK UiNE.
(These rates cover Oranges and Grapefruit. Some truckers haul Grapefruit at a lower rate)
Baltimore $1.05 Cleveland $1.36 Houston, Tex. $1.21 Memphis $ .90 Philadelphia $1.15 -t. Louis $1.21
Boston 1.46 Denver, Colo. 1.98 Kansas City 1.46 Milwaukee 1.36 Pittsburgh 3.31 Topeka, Kan. 1.57
Buffalo, N.Y. 1.41 Detroit, Mich. 1.41 Knoxville, Tenn. .95 New Orleans .84 Portland, Me. 1.57
Chicago 1,26 Fond der Laco 1.46 Louisville, Ky. 1.21 New York 1.21 Portland, Ore. 3.27
Cinoinnati 1.21 Grand Rapids 1.46 Los Angeles 2.65 Oklahoma City 1.46 Richmond, Va. .90
See Page 36 for Citrus Rail Rates based on Winter Haven, Florida.


POPULAR CONTAINERS AND ESTIMATED WEIGHTS


Commodity
Beans
Limas
Cabbage

Cauliflower
Celery
Corn
Eggplant
Esca role-Endivo
Lettuce (Boston)


Type Container
1 bushel hamper
1 bushel hamper
50 lb. bags
Wirebound ort. 5102
T1irebound ort. 3800
Virebound crt. 3601
Wirebound crt. 3730
1 bushel basket
1 bushel hamper
Vilrobound crt. 3803


Estimated Billing
Weights
35 lbs.
43 lbs.
51 lbs.
55 lbs.
34 ibs.
60 lbs.
43 lbs.
39 lbs.
28 lbs.
23 lbs


Commodity
Lattuoe (Iceberg)
Pep pe rs
Potatoes
Radishes
Squash
Tomatoes
t.
is
Strawberries
it


ype Container
Western Lettuoe Crt. 935
1 bushel basket
50 Lb. bags
Wirebound crt. 4126
1 bushel basket
Wirebound ort. 4015
Fibroboard tomato box
Lug box
24 pint crates
32 quart orates


Estimated Billing
Weights
75 lbs.
28 lbs.
51 lbs.
17 lbs.
49 lbs.
67 lbs.
43 lbs.
3o lbs.
25 lbs.
03 lbs.


rTES


K.C. Diklla& N.O. Atla.





'age 62


eason

926-27
927-28
928-29
929-30
930-31
331-32
332-33
933-34
934-35
935-36
936-37
937-38
938-39
939-40
940-41
941-42
942-43
)43-44
944-45
945-46
946-47
947-48
)48-49
)49-50
950-51
951-52
?52-53
953-54


Beans
Acreage

19,490
29,730
27,000
35,800
40,000
41,500
50,800
61,300
65,500
59,200
58,800
60,700
64,000
52,000
62,500
68,000
80,000
96,500
80,500
80,200
81,700
71,700
79,000
73,300
74,300
76,700
65,400
71,000


ACREAGE OF PRINCIPAL FLORILA TRUCK CROPS 28 SEASONS
(Available for Harvest)
Caul-
Limas Cabbage Carrots Celery flower
Acreage Acreage Acreage Acreage Acreage


1,500

1,500
1
1
1


1,500
1,500
1,800
2,400
4,500
4,800
4,000
7,000
5,000
5,400
4,500
4,800
6,300
5,200
4,250
3,050
3,400
2,900
3,200
2,900
2,400


3,010
2,900
6,500
3,700
6,500
5,500
6,200
10,700
50600
9,000
8,500
9,400
10,000
16,000
10,000
18,000
10,000
23,500
17,500
13,200
14,000
16,100
16,000
17,000
19,000
15,500
18,000
15,500


N 0 T

R

E

P

0

R

T

E

D


None
IS
I'
lb
H


450
500
Rep o rt ed

H


4,240
3,380
6,620
6,650
6,150
6,850
6,650
6,000
6,000
6,500
7,500
8,000
7,300
7,500
8,700
9,350
8,750
9,900
11,050
13,450
11,700
11,600
9,500
9,500
10,400
10,400
10,100
10,700


NOT

R

E

P

0

R

T

E

D



400
600
850
1,150
1,200
1,500
1,200


Cuomber
Acreage

7,440
9,450
11,340-
12,100
9,650
7,300
5,600
5,000
5,100
5,700
5,600
7,000
7,600
8,200
8,800
9,700
6,500
6,300
7,700
11,950
13,775
15,900
14,100
14,200
14,300
15,500
17,700
19,600.8


Season

1926-27
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941=42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54


)3sE (1) Limas were included with snap beans prior to the 1933-34 season. The lima figures are for the
Fordhook or large variety and do not include acreage of baby limas or butterbeans.
Includes acreage grown specifically for pickling, 1900 acres for 1952-53 & 2100 acres for 2953-54

*Endive & Boston Iceberg All English
Corn Eggplant Escarole Lettuce Lettuce Lettuce Peas
( T 4 --- --47
;ason Acreage Acreage Acreage Acreage Acreage Acreage Acreage Season
926-27 630 (2) 1,500 1,500 700 1926-27
327-28 1,550 340 1,500 1,500 1,230 1927-28
328-29 1,320 500 1,500 1,500 1,350 1928-29
929-30 1,680 460 1,100 1,100 700 1929-30
930-31 1,800 850 1,600 1,600 2,000 1930-31
931-32 1,950 700 1,000 1,000 3,800 1931-32
932-33 2,450 700 950 950 3,600 1932-33
333-34 2,050 700 1,100 1,100 4,800 1933-34
334-35 1,500 650 900 4 900 5,000 1934-35
935-36 1,100 700 550 4 550 8,200 1935-36
336-37 1,480 900 800 4 800 6,200 1936-37
937-38 1,800 1,000 900 4 900 6,200 1937-38
938-39 2,100 1,000 750 250 1,000 5,000 1938-39
939-40 1,400 1,350 900 1,100 2,000 5,000 1939-40
940-41 1,900 1,000 500 2,000 2,500 3,000 1940-41
941-42 2,350 1,200 500 3,000 3,500 3,500 1941-42
942-43 1,950 1,450 800 1,700 2,500 1,500 1942-43
943-44 3,500 2,350 1,100 1,350 2,450 2,500 1943-44
944-45 2,850 2,800 400 1,000 1,400 2,600 1944-45
945-46 3,900 2,500 550 1,300 1,850 1,600 1945-46
946-47 3,300 2,800 700 1,125 1,825 1,600 1946-47
947-48 6,000 3,225 3,200 550 1,100 1,650 600 1947-48
948-49 12,000 3,300 2,800 1,500 5 400 1948-49
349-50 29,000 2,450 3,300 2,200 5 400 1949-50
950-51 25,700 2,200 4,700 2,600 5) 350 1950-51
951-52 33,500 2,650 4,500 2,000 5 (S) 1951-52
952-53 30,400 3,100 3,800 2,400 5 6 1952-53
953-54 39,300 2,400 4,400 2,900 5) (6 1953-54


Escarole acreage included with lettuce prior to 1927-28 season.
Big Boston figures include Romaine acreage.
Iceberg Lettuce included in Big Boston acreage figures until the 1938-39 season.
Iceberg, Boston and Romaine Lettuce combined.
Discontinued because acreage so small.
Endive included with Escarole beginning with the 1950-51 season.


OTES: 2)
3


(6
*





ACRtAGE OF ?RIJCIPAL FLORLA TRjC L CHOPS 28 SEASONS ((
(Available for -iarvest)


Season

1926-27
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54
* Does not
estimate ed


Peopers.
Acreage


2,700
6,410
5,650
6,550
8,200
8,050
8,300
6,000
7,700
6,500
7,200
7,400
7,300
6,200
7,200
6,500
7,100
8,950
9,350
11,080
10,550
11,450
11,100
13,750
11,200
11,150 2
13,200
13,100
include acreage for
at 30,000-35,000.


Potatoes
Acreage


28,000
30,000
22,000
31,000
27,000
21,500
17,000
23,500
24,800
24,500
31,300
31,400
26,700
25,600
26,800
25,000
26,200
28,600
31,100
35,3u0
24,100
20,800
20,300
23,200
23,500
29,500
40,300
31,730
radishes,


Squash
Acreage





















7,900
9,000
10,100
10,800
10,700
10,600
9,800


Ibmatoes
Acreage

29,800
29,280
38,700
31,260
26,800
23,700
24,900
30,500
32,5.0
32,600
35,700
45,300
40,700
34,000
26,500
43,000
25,500
34,900
32,500
30,400
29,800
30,200
38,200
42,500
50,200
55,900
57,300
57,200


butterbeans, field peas, collards,


Cont'd)

Total
Vegetables *
Acreage


97,510
115,770
122,480
131,000
130,550
121,850
127,150
153,150
156,750
156,350
166,380
183,600
177,500
163,250
165,900
195,100
176,850
223,950
204,150
211,730
200,350
205,425
221,350
245,150
253,300
272,400
276,700
281,200
turnips, etc..


Page 63


Season


1926-27
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54
roughly


Cantaloupes
T-IT-
Acreage

600
600
600
600
250
200
400
300
200
200
300
700
500
500
500
500
400
550
500
800
800
1,200
1,200
1,400
1,300
1,500
1,800
2,000


Strawberries

Acreage

3,680
4,500
6,300
8,800
9,100
7,800
10,600
8,400
8,000
8,900
8,800
7,500
9,000
7,200
5,500
5,000
2,600
1,400
2,050
2,830
4,750
4,200
4,000
5,400
6,000
4,700
4,600
3,000


Wa termelons

Acreage

29,420
37,840
35,900
34,700
31,000
28,500
22,500
23,400
20,000
16,000
19,500
22,500
22,600
23,500
25,500
21,500
12,500
25,500
39,000
51,000
47,000
45,000
59,000
63,000
57:000
68,000
86,000
90,000


Grand Total
Officially Reported
Acreage.

131,210
158,710
165,280
175, luO
170,900
158,350
160,650
185,250
184,950
181,450
194,980
214,300
209,600
194,450
198,100
221,200
192,350
251,400
245,700
2o6,330
252,900
255,825
285,550
314,950
317,600
346,600
369,100
384,200


NOTES: (1) Acreage of cantaloupes for 1927 and 1928 seasons is estimated the same as for 1929 and
1930 seasons.
(2) These acreage figures do not include acres abandoned in various stages oforowth for reasons
other than economic marketing, that is, poor markets. Does not include any commiodities
not reaching harvest stage. Some additional acreage was abandoned for marketing reasons.
Does not include avocados, limes, mangoes, and other miscellaneous fruits.


Season

1926-27
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54


Season

1926-27
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
1943-49
1949-50
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54





Page 64
Page FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

COUNTY ACREAGE FOR 3 SEASONS: 1951-52, 1952-53 AiD 1953-54
(Acreage Available for Harvest)


Florida Snap Beans Lima Beans

Counties 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54

Alachua 1,350 lr,950 1,875 700 400 325
Bradford 200 225 225 200 100 100
Brevard -
3roward 15,600 13,100 12,700 100 50 100
Calhoun -
Charlotte -
Citrus -
Clay -
Collier ---
Columbia -
Dade 5,200 6,000 6,000 -
DeSoto -
Dixie -
Escambia 100 -
Flagler -
Gadsden 350 250 1,350 -
Gilchrist -
Glades -
Hamilton -
Hardee -
Hendry -
Hernando -
Highlands 450 450 400 -
Hillsborough 1,200 950 875 900 950 950
Ho lmes -
Indian River -
Jackson -
Jefferson -
Lafayette -
Lake 250 275 175 -
Lee -
Leon -
Levy 50 100 50 25
Madison ..
Manatee 350 500 500 -
Marion 800 1,350 1,200 50 50 50
Martin 850 600 600 75 -
Okeechobee -
Orange 300 625 1,750 -
Osceola -
Palm Beach 43,500 36,500 41100 575 800 425
Pasco .
Pinellas -
Polk 200 200 200 -
Putnam 100 100- 50
St. Johns .
St. Lucie -
Sarasota -
Seminole 1,300 1,000 1,000 -
Sumter 700 575 450 _
Suwannee _
Taylor _
Union 150 200 150 100 100 100
Volusia _
Walton _
Washington -
Miscellaneous 600 450 350 500 450 325


Total 73,600 65,400 71,00O 3,200 2,900 2,400

iNote. 1953-54 figures preliminary and subject to revision.


Sources U.S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics, P.O. Building, Orlando, Florida.





Page 65
FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

COUNTY ACREAGE FOR 3 SEASONS: 1951-52, 1952-53 AND 1953-54
(Acreage Available for Harvest)


Florida Cabbage Cauliflower
Counties 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54 1951-52 1 1952-53 1953-54

Alachua 75 75 50 -
Bradford 50 50 50 -
Brevard -
Broward 100 100 100 -
Calhoun -
Charlotte -
Citrus -
Clay 250 300 300 -
Collier -
Columbia 25 25 25 -
Lade 300 450 400 75 50 50
DeSoto -
Dixie -
Duval 100 100 100 -
Escambia 50 50 25 -
Flagler 1,050 1,150 1,400 -
Gadsden 103 100 50 -
Gilchrist -
Glades 600 800 350 -
Hamilton 50 50 25 -
Hardee 50 -
Hendry -- -
Hernando -
Highlands 50 -
Hillsborough 250 450 250 540 675 350
Holmes -
Indian River -
Jackson -
Jefferson -
Lafayette -
Lake 75 50 25 -
Lee 150 300 130 -
Leon -
Levy 25 25 25 -
Yadison -
IAdi son -
Ihnatee 350 600 300 160 200 250
thrion 125 150 125 -
I&rtin 50 -
Okeechobee -
Orange 300 350 625 -0 -0 80
Osceola -
Palm Beach 4,550 5,200 3,650 50 50 50
Pasco -
Pinellas -
Polk 100 100 75 -
Putnam 1,250 1,300 1,650 50 50 25
St. Johns 2,650 2,700 3,250 150 100 75
St. Lucia 25 -
Sarasota 50 50 25 -
Seminole 2,450 2,700 2,000 2500 3500 300
Sunter 25 50 25 -
Suwannee 75 50 50 -
Taylor -
Union 75 200 150 -
Volusia 150 200 125 -
V'alton ----
Washington -
Miscellaneous 75 275 125 25 25 20


Tbtal 15,600 18,000 15,500 1,300 1,500 1,200


o Cauliflower Orange County combined with Seminole county for 1951-52 and 1I52-53.
1953-54 figures preliminary and subject to revision.
Source: U-S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics, P.O. Building, Orlando, Florida.




Page 66

FLORIDA FJRUITS AND VEGETABLES

COUNTY ACREAGE FOR 3 SEASONS: 1951-52, 1952-53 AND 1952-54
(Acreage Available for Harvest)


Florida Celery Corn, Green


Counties 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54 13951-52 3.952-53 1953-54


Alachua 500 625 200 100
Bradford 1,750 850 1,000
Brevard 200 A 9 -
Broward 900 1,350 1-100

Charlotte -
Citrus -..
Clay -
Collier 700
Columbia -
DA.de 950 1,;300 27050
DeSoto -
Dixi -
Duval -
Escambia I ---
Flagler -
0-dsden -
Gilchrist 100 -
Glades 350 300
Hamilton -
Hardee 150 100 75
Hendry -
Hernando -
Highlands -
Hillsborough 1,200 1,100 1,000
Holmes --
Indian River -
Jackson .
Jefferson -
Lafayette -- _
Lake 1:655 1,800 4,000 A 3,300 900
Lee 1,050 660 1,520
Leon -
Levy .
hadison ~ -
Mrnatee 100 100
Marion 225 350
Martin 300
Okeechobee -
Orange 1..00 n 3;400
Osceola -
Palm Beach 4,210 4,010 4,895 19,500 19;450 26,300
Pasco -
Pinellas -
Polk 150 100 50
Putnam -- -
St. Johns -..
St, Luoie ..
Sarasota 925 915 780 - o
Seminole 3,110 2,825 2,675 800 700 30O
Sumter -
Suwannee -
Taylor -
Union 450 250 250
Volusia -
Walton -
Washington .
Miscellaneous 550 25 525 840 205


Ibtal 10,400 10,100 10,700 32,900 30,400 39 300
._______1_______ ________ ___________


Note: *Celery- Marion included in Alachua County. Oranges included in 'ake County for three seasons-
Marion and Alachua probably make up most or all of "Miscellaneous County" figure.
*Corn Orange County included in Lake County for 1951-52 and 1952-53 Seasons-. Lee and Hendry
Counties combined for 1951-52 and 1952-53 Seasons, Brevard and St. Lucie Counties
combined-
1953-54 figures preliminary and subject to revision-
Sources U, S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics, P.O. Building. OrIandn. F1n.in.-




Page 07


FLORIDA FRUITS AND 'G:CTABLES


COtJNr! ACH~AG~ FOR 3


SEASONSI 1951-52, 1952-53 AlD 1953-54


(Acreage Available for Harvest)


Florida Cucumbers Eggplant


Counties 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54


Alachua
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
Madison
Manatee
Maarion
Ntrtin
DOeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Folk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Walton
Washington
Miscellaneous


1,550
100

300
300
700


900
30
425
75




50
100

280
1,425
1,200

75
950

360 *
350
100
70
250
1,625
100
50
400
575
275
435
0
340

450


75


290 *
110

50
675
360

100



100


1,550
125
0
275
475
650


1:600
75
300
100




30
125

150
1,450
1,500

100
625

75 *
250
150
25
250
3,700
85
50
475
525
200
325

275

325


50


300 *
200


600
125

200



385


1,325
300

150
350
1,125


1,600

400
140


100

3 J,
30O

250
2,100
1,430

70
525
250
70
575
125

175
4,100
100
25
400
540
150
585
00
190

550


50

50
130
75

225
450
175

175

50
75
115


175


475 *
















100

100
315






25
300



135



50 o

625


25





1






125


200


550

50


100











150

150
325






50
350



175
100
I
















100

675


250









100
32

I

50






lO =






m



100o


185


450

75


75











125

150

325






225



100
50




500


25





50



15



50


Total 15,600 17,700 19,600 2,550 3,100 2,400


Note *Cuoumbers -
included in
a Eggplant -


1953-54 figures preliminary and subject to revision.
Z T"i w T 0 iw^ -0 AL^. -.. -- -_*_- * r *.- -^ ^ i ^- 'n A -


Okeechobee included in St. Lucie County for 1951-52 and 1952-53 Seasons. 3revara Uount3
Indian River County.
Seminole County included in Oranoe County for 1951-52 and 1952-53 Seasons.


COUNTY ACREAGE FOR 3





Page 68


FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

COUNTY ACREAGE FOR 3 SEASONS,, 1951-52, 1952-53 AND 1953-54


(Acreage Available for Harvest)


Florida Escarole Lettuce and Romaine


Counties 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54


Alachua
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Daval
Escambia
Flagler
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
ialton
Washington
Miscellaneous


60





880 o



so
80


o

3 .300






100
340







40


25





750 o




50



o

2,500






75
375







25


25












50
25










25



1,275

2,600






125
275


50









75













175










140 o
40


175

1,100 o






-
115
175



70


85


150













225










175 o



150

1,175 o





o
100
200



75


150


50









150







450





150










200
250
150

200

800






50
100
150



125


75


Ibtal 4.800 3,800 4,400 2,200 2,400 2,900


NOTES OEscarole Lake and Orange Counties combined for 1951-52 and 1952-53 Seasons.
oLettuce Sarasota included in Manatee Counties, Glades included in ealm Beach County
and 1952-53 Seasons.
1953-54 figures preliminary and subject to revision.
SourceS U. S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics, ?. 0. Building, Orlando, Floriua


for 1951-5.




Page 69


FLORIDA FRJITS AND VEiETABLES


COUNTf ACREAGE FOR 3 SEASONS, 1951-52, 1952-53 A1;D 1953-54
(Acreage Available for Harvest)


Florida Peppers Potatoes


Counties 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54


Alachua
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gadsden
Gilohri st
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
Iadison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwanne e
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Walton
Washington
Miscellaneous


875
250

2,125
o

o
0












100
o


2,550 o
o

650 o

425 o

50

-
125
100



2,550


300


50 o

250
(650) o


50
75


175


1,000
275

2,300
o


140 o

75









275
o


3,200 o

-


875 o
640 o



o
150
50

80

2,900


400

o

325
(875) o


60
100


355


953
350

2,075

2033


325

50






150


200



3,425-




150
450



125
100
100



2,525


500




375
600

75

100


275


650
250





-
-

8,000



800
3,000








775





2,000 o





325



1,225


50 o
3,500 o
9,000

-




50



175


1,050
300




o
o

10,800



1,200
3,700








1,125





2,850 o





800



2:,700


50 o
4,200 o
11,100
3l,7O0

o
50



150



225


950
350

300






8,800
75


900
3,330








650





1,70)





100
-


















950


25
3 ,2U0
10,000
120
50




100



130


Thtal 10,700 13,200 13,100 29,800 40,300 31,700

Note:o Peppers Hendry included in Collier County, Charlotte included in Lee County for 1951-52 and
1952-53 Seasons. Charlotte included in Lee and Indian River in St. Lucie County for 1951-52 and
1952-53 Seasons. OPotatoes Sarasota included in Polk County, Clay included in Putnam Gounty,
Sarasota in Polk County for prior seasons.
1953-54 figures preliminary and subject to revision.
Source: U. S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics: P.O. Building, Urlando, Florida.





Page 70


FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES


COUNTY ACREAGE FOR 3 SEASONS, 1951-52, 1952-53 AND 1953-54
(Acreage Available for Harvest)


Florida Squash Tomatoes


Counties 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54


Alachua
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayett e
Lake
Lee

Levy
Madison
Yanatee
Marion
Martin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Walt on
Washington
Miscellaneous


275
75

2,300




225
25
1,250





50


125
150
225


1,450

75

50


250

50
50
225
900
100
o
o

2,200


150


25 o

100 o
75


75



125


350
125

2,200




275
25
850





125


100
125
225


1,325

150

25


275

100
50
250
975
175
o
o

2,050


150

o

150 o
50


200



275


275
100

1,775




290

1,100





75


100
115
150


1,350

110

100


335

150

250
775
100

160

1,525


100

25


125



200



515


2,900
700

-


2,200

18,800
100






950

1,000
2,950


3,550

2,450



250
900 o



3,500 o
1,700
2,700
1,425


1,375


100


3,250
0

2,400






300


3,065
300
o


3,650

16,700
100






1,350

1,000
4,350


2,500

3,225



200
1,900 0



3,800 o
1,800
2,600
1,485


2,200


50


4,225
o

2,200






600


1,400
100

725


3,050

18,500
75






925

1,300
4,800


2,200

2,400



250
1,325



3,250
2,250
2,525
1,575


2,400


25


5,075


2,700






350


lbtal 10,600 10,600 9,800 53,500 57,300 57,200

Notes o Squash Okeechobee included in St. Lucie County for 1951-52 and 1952-53 Seasons. Oranges
included in Seminole County for 1951-52 and 1952-53 Seasons.
o Tomatoes Charlotte included in Lee County for 1951-52 and 1952-53 Seasons. Sarasota included
in anatee County for 1951-52 and 1952-53 Seasons.
1953-54 figures preliminary as of October 20 and subject to revision.
Sources U.S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics, P.O. Building, Orlando, Florida.





Page 71
FLORIDA FRUITS AdD VGIAkBLES


COUNTY ACREAGE FOR 3 SEASONS, 1951-52, 1952-53 AND 1953-54
(Acreage Available for Harvest)


Florida Ibtal Vegetables Cantaloupes


Counties 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54
_____________________ 1 ______________________________________________


Alachua
Bradford
3revard
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
lafayette
Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
,adison
Wanatee
Mrion
i-rtin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
0Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
ialton
Washington
Vriscellaneous,


6,400
2,875
3,100
22:600
300
700

250
3,325
80
35,075
175

100
950
4,050
550
200
1,900
455
2,925
4,375
100
890
13,600

2,885
350
150
70
8,035
6,700
100
225
450
5,615
4,340
4,935
1,425
1:165

85,210


1,150
4,900
11,800
3,640
110
1,075
8,765
4.050
435

1,050
295


2,850


6,675
2,050
3,065
20,225
475
700

300
5,765
125
36;675
200

100
1,250
4,850
505
125
2,450
300
3,100
6,075
150
875
13,150

3,450
250
175
25
7,550
10,675
85
275
525
6,275
4,775
4,550
1,485
1,580

80,535


1,125
5,650
13,900
4,525
20O
1.040
8.575
3.:675
175

1,360
375


4,705


6:610
2,475
1,400
18,850
350
2,125

300
6,040
25
37,525
290

100
1,025
4,700
1,475
450
1,725
375
3,965
0,350
150
520
12,075
250
2,580
575
225

1,675
9.755
100
275
400
5,640
5,300
4 160
1,635
9,380

88,270


1,050
4,925
13,400
5.325
75
1,030
7,425
4:375
225

1,215
350
50
75
2,560


550

















25













50
50

400













150
50





225


600































100


450














100






550


400







75

600








25











150

100
25
50
350













75

25




100


bTotal 266,750 276:700 281,200 1,500 1,800 2,000

Note: 1953-54 figures preliminary as of October 2u and subject to revision.

Source: U. S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Post Ofjice Building, Orlando, Florida.






Page 72


FLORIDA FUJITS AND VEGETABLES

COUNTY ACRiAGE FOR 3 SEASONS 1951-52, 1952-53 AND 1953-54
(Acreage Available for harvest)


Florida Strawberries Watermelons


Counties 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54 1951-52 1952-53 '1953-54
---------------~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~i---------------------------------


Alachua
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Esca-mbia
Flagler
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
dardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Luci e
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Walton
Washington
Miscellaneous


350









50










300



3,300





















325







75







100


275









50










250



3,550





















325







75







75


-
150

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
100
-
-
-
2,450
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

200
-
-
-
-
-
-
50
-
-
-
-
-

50


6,600
200


300
450
800

1,200
1,100

350
100




6,300

500
600
500
800

2,500
600

1,800
1,700
1,150
8,500
400
300
3,800
1,600
350
7,700


1,400


5,800

1,300
650

350



4,100
5,900
100
350
250

400
1,200


7,600
75


750
750
400

2,700
1,750

600
275




7,500
300
750
950
2,000
900
125
3,500
750
350
2,400
1,900
1,900
9,300
1,050
250
4,300
1,900
600
7,100
500
275
450
300

5,700

1,300
300
100
300
300

100
3,600
7,000
150
350
450

1.400
700


8,300
300


800
800
700

1,900
2,200

700
300




8,200
330O
950
700
1,500
1,600
100
5,800
1,400
400
2,700
2,400
1,900
7,400
bUO
300
5,800
2,200
600
8,400
800
200
250
250
400
5,800

2,300
400

3JO30
350


6,600
6,300
250
400
800
700
1,800
850


Total 4,500 4,600 3,000 72,000 86,000 98,000


Source U. S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Post Office Building, Orlando, Florida.
Notes 1953-54 figures preliminary and subject to revision.





FLORIDA FRUITS AND ViEGETABLES

COUNTY ACREAGE FOR 3 SEASONS, 1951-52, 1952-53 AND 1953-54
(Acreage Available for harvest)


Page 73


Florida Total Miscellaneous Fruits Total Vegetables & Miscellaneous Fruits


Counties 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54

Alachua 7,150 8,200 8,700 13,550 14,875 15,310
Bradford 550 350 450 3,425 2,400 2,925
Brevard 3,100 3,065 1,400
Broward 22,600 20,225 18,850
Calhoun 300 750 800 600 1,225 1,150
Charlotte 450 750 800 1,150 1,450 2,925
Citrus 800 400 700 800 400 700
Clay 250 300 300
Collier 1,200 2,700 1,975 4,525 8,465 8,015
Columbia 1,100 1,750 2,200 1,180 1,875 2,225
Dade 50 50 600 35,125 36,725 38,125
DeSoto 350 600 700 525 800 990
Dixie 100 275 300 100 275 300
Duval 100 100 100
Escambia 950 1,250 1,025
Flagler 4,050 4,850 4,700
Franklin _
Gadsden 550 505 1,475
Gilohrist 6,300 7,500 8,200 6,500 7,625 8,650
Glades 300 300 1,900 2,750 2,025
Hamilton 525 750 975 980 1,050 1,350
Hardee 900 1,200 800 3,825 4,300 4,765
Hendry 500 2,000 1,500 4,875 8,075 7,850
Hernando 800 900 1,600 900 1,050 1,750
Highlands 125 100 890 1,000 620
Hillsborough 5,800 7,050 8,250 19,400 20,200 20,325
Holmes 600 750 1,400 600 750 1,650
Indian River 350 400 2,885 3,800 2,980
Jaokson 1,800 2,400 2,700 2,150 2,650 3,275
Jefferson 1,700 1,900 2,400 1,850 2,075 2,625
Lafayette 1,150 1,900 1,900 1,220 1,925 1,900
Lake 8,500 9,300 7,400 16,535 16,850 9,075
Lee 400 1,050 750 7,100 11,725 10,505
Leon 300 250 300 400 335 400
Levy 3,850 4,400 5,900 4,075 4,675 6,175
Madison 1,650 1,900 2,225 2,100 2,425 2,625
Manatee 350 600 650 5,965 6,875 6,290
Marion 8,100 7,550 8,750 12,440 12,325 14,050
Martin 500 800 4,935 5,050 4,960
Okeechobee 275 200 1,425 1,760 1,835
Orange 1,400 450 250 2,565 2,030 9,630
Osceola 300 250 300 250
Palm Beach 400 85,210 80,535 88,670
Pasco 5,800 5,700 5,800 5,800 5,700 5,800
Polk 1,625 1,625 2,500 2,775 2,750 3,550
Putnam 650 300 400 5,550 5,950 5,325
St. Johns 100 11,800 14,000 13,400
St. Lucie 350 300 300 3,990 4,825 5,625
Santa Rosa 300 350 110 500 425
Sarasota 1,075 1,040 1,030
Seminole 100 8,765 8,675 7,425
Sumter 4,325 3,775 6,725 8,375 7,450 11,100
Suwannee 5,950 7,000 6,325 6,385 7,175 6,550
Taylor 100 150 250 100 150 250
Union 350 350 425 1,400 1,710 1,640
Volusia 250 450 800 545 825 1,150
Washington 400 1,400 1,800 400 1,400 1,875
Miscellaneous 1,525 1,325 1,700 4,375 6,030 4,260


Total 78,000 92,400 103,000 344,750 369,100 334,200


Sources U.S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Post Office Building, Orlando, Florida.

Notes 1953-54 figures preliminary and subject to revision.





Page 74


FLORIDA FRUITS ANDL VEGETABLES

COUNTY ACREAGE SEASONS 1951-52, 1952-53 AND 1953-54
(Bearing Acreage)


Florida Oranges Grapefruit

Counties 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54

Alachua -
Bradford -
Brevard 12,262 12,262 12,262 3,692 3,692 3,692
Broward -
Calhoun -
Charlotte -
Citrus -
Clay -
Collier -
Columbia -
Dade -
DeSoto 7,031 7,031 7,031 1,385 1,385 1,385
Dixie -
Duval -
Esoambia -
Flagler -
Gadsden -
Gilchrist -
GLades -
Hamilton -
Hardee 10,646 10,646 10,646 846 846 846
Hendry -
Hernando -
Highlands 12,662 12,662 12,662 5,446 5,446 5,446
Hillsborough 17,908 17,908 17,908 3,523 3,523 3,523
Holmes -
Indian River 7,631 7,631 7,631 9,385 9,385 9,385
Jackson -
Jefferson -
Lafayette -
Lake 37,600 37,600 37,600 9,923 9,923 9,923
Lee 2,800 2,800 2,800 1,492 1,492 1,492
Leon -
Levy -
Madison -
Manatee 4,261 4,261 4,261 3,539 3,539 3,539
Marion 10,338 10,338 10,338 890 890 890
Martin -
Okeechobee -
Orange 48,738 48,738 48,738 6,277 6,277 6,277
Osceola 3,985 3,985 3,985 753 753 753
Palm Beach -
Pasco 13,123 13,123 13,123 2,615 2,615 2,615
Pinellas 7,615 7,615 7,615 7,661 7,661 7,661
Polk 71;323 71,323 71,323 31,314 31,314 31,314
Putnam 4,400 4,400 4,400 400 400 400
Sto Johns -
St. Lucie 12,800 12,800 12,800 7,492 7,492 7,492
Sarasota 2,585 2,585 2,585 877 877 877
Seminole 6,323 6,323 6,323 753 753 753
Sumter -
Suwannee -
Taylor -
Union -
Volusia 12,246 12,246 12,246 1,415 1,415 1,415
Walton -
Washington -
Miscellaneous 15,831 15,831 15,831 4,630 4,630 4,630

Not apportioned 9,700 17,500 3,700 7,000
Total 322,108 331,808 339,608 104,308 108,008 111,308

Notes 1951-52 Season revised on Oranges and Grapefruit.

Sources U.S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Post Office Building, Orlando, Florida





Page 75


FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

COUNT! ACREAGE SEASONS 1951-52, 1952-53 AND 1953-54
(Bearing Acreage)


Florida Tangerines Total Citrus



Counties 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54


Alachua
Bradford
Brevard
Browas rd
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Daval
Escambia
Flagle r
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
SMadison
lanatee
lirion
Martin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
|Pinellas
Polk
'Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Walton
Washington
Miscellaneous


[ot apportioned
Ibtal


INote: 1951-52 Season


492








492








646


784
985

338



2,369
62



62
215


3,169
431

662
584
5,465
584

831
15
753




2,369


1:492


22,800


492








492








646


784
985

338



2,369
62



62
215


3,169
431

662
584
5,465
584

831
15
753




2,369


1,492


200
23,000


492








492








646


784
985

338



2,369
62



62
215


3,169
431

662
584
5,465
584

831
15
753




2,369


1,492


500
23,300


revised on Tangerines and Total Citrus.


-

16,446








8,908








12,138


18,892
22,416

17,354



49,892
4,354



7,862
11,443


58,184
5,169

16,400
15,860
108,102
5,384

21,123
3,477
7,829
-

























lo,030


21,953


449,216


16,446








8,908








12,138


18:892
22,416

17,354



49,892
4,354



7,862
11,443


58,184
5,169

16,400
15:860
108,102
5,384

21,123
3,477
7,829




lb, 030


21,953


16,446








8,908








12;138


18,892
22,416

17,354



49,892
4,354



7,862
11,443


58,184
5,169

16,400
15,860
108,102
5,384

21,123
3,477
7:829




16,030


21,953


13,600 25,000
462:816 474,210o


source: U.S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Post Office Building, Orlando, Florica





Page 76


FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

COUNTY ACREAGE SEASONS 1950-51, 1951-52, 1952-53 AND 1953-54


Florida GRAND TO TAL


Counties 1950-51 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54


Alaohua 11,875 13,550 14,875 15,310
Bradford 2,575 3,425 2,400 2,925
Brevard 18,254 19,546 19,511 17,846
Broward 23,415 22,600 20,225 13,850
Calhoun 650 600 1,225 1,150
Charlotte 350 1,150 1,450 2,925
Citrus 800 800 400 700
Clay 300 250 300 300
Collier 3,775 4,525 8,465 8,015
Columbia 675 1,180 1,875 2,225
Dade 32,425 35,125 36,725 38:125
DeSoto 9,259 9,433 9,708 9,898
Dixie 100 100 275 300
Duval 100 100 100 100
Escambia 1,000 950 1,250 1,025
Flagler 4,200 4,050 4,850 4,700
Gadsden 500 550 505 1,475
Gilchrist 5,825 6,500 7,625 8,650
Glades 2,550 1,900 2,750 2,025
Hamilton 675 980 1,050 1,350
Hardee 15,232 15,963 16,438 16,903
Hendry 3,975 4,875 8,075 7,850
Hernando 765 900 1,050 1,750
Highlands 18,653 19,782 19,892 19,512
Hillsborough 41,816 .41,816 42,616 42,741
Holmes 600 600 750 1,650
Indian River 19,676 20,239 21,154 20,334
Jackson 1,750 2,150 2,650 3,275
Jefferson 1,850 1,850 2,075 2,625
Lafayette 1,000 1:,220 1,925 1,900
Lake 57,409 66,427 66,742 58,967
Lee 9,755 11,454 16,079 14 859
Leon 150 400 335 400
Levy 2,675 4,075 4,675 6,175
Madison 1:.700 2,100 2,425 2,625
Manatee 16,457 13,827 14,737 14,152
Marion 24,388 23,883 23,768 25,493
Martin 4,145 4,935 5,050 4,960
Okeechobee 1,650 1,425 1,760 1,835
Orange 60,381 60;749 60,214 67,814
Osceola 4,908 5.-169 5,469 5,419
Palm Beach 78,980 85,210 80,535 88,670
Pasco 18,499 22,200 22,100 22,200
Pinellas 15,538 15,860 15,860 15,8b00
Polk 106,953 110,877 110,852 111,652
Putnam 10,203 10,934 11,334 10,709
St. Johns 10,250 11,800 14,000 13,400
St. Lucie 25,684 25,113 25,948 26,748
Sarasota 4,852 4,552 4,517 4,507
Seminole 15,996 16,594 16,504 15,254
Sumter 9,325 8,375 7,450 11,100
Suwannee 4,650 6,385 7,175 6,550
Taylor 300 100 150 250
Union 635 1,400 1,710 1,640
Volusia 16,904 16,575 16,855 17,180
Walton 750
Washington 700 400 1,400 1,875
Santa Rosa 110 500 425
Miscellaneous 23,586 26,328 27,983 25,513

Not apportioned 13,600 25,000
Ibtal 751,293 793,966 831,916 858,416

Note: 1953-54 figures preliminary and subject to revision.

Sources U. S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics, ?ost Office building, Orlando, Florida.




Page 77
F.O.3. SHIPPING POINT PRICES FLORIDA SG... S:ASu.I 1953-54
By- Neill Hr.odes, Uommis. in -r
Florida State Marketing oursau

The prices listed below are weekly ranges and represent the bulk of sales of good merchantable
quality and condition.


Shipping Point Prices of Beans in South ?lcrida
Lake Jkeechobee Section
Sales F.0.3. shipping point in oushel ha.ners
nes Contenders T-Greens Plentifuls Fla.Belles


Aeek
Ending

Nov- 13
20
27
Dec. ^

18
25
,an. 1

8
15
22
29
Feb. 5
12
19
26
?'ar. 5
12
19
26
Aor. 2

16
23
30
May 7
14


33.03--3.50 32.15-2.90 $2.00-2.40
2.50-3.35 2.00-2.70 2.10-2.55
2.25-2.75 2.00-2.75 2.33-2,33
2,25-3,25 1.90-3.25 1.75-2.65
1.75-2-25 1.80-2.60 1.65-2.53
3.05-3.30 2.40-2.85 2.35-3.35
2.40 2.30-2.40 No Sales
suppliess insufficient to quote
between January 2 and January 21.


33.35-4,25
?. 5j--',.305
2,75-3.50
2.50- .10
2.50-2.95
2.93-4.20
2.73-3 50




2,50-3.50
3.25-3-75
3.-25-3 .85
4,00-5.00
2.75-4.00
3.53-4 .85
4.30-4 95
3,80-4,60
2,50-4.10
3.75- .80
2,JO-A. 300
2.25-4.00
3.JO-4.65
3 -0-4.25
2.50-4.33
2,25-3 25
2.75



Valentines

?,2.25-3.75
1-75-3,00
3.00-5.00
2.50-3-75
2.25-5,00
4.00-5.50
3.25-5.00
2.50-3,50
2,50-a4 00
3-25-4.50
3,25-5,00
2,.75-' -00
3.50-4 .50
4.00-5,00
4,00-5,00
3.00-4.75
4.00-5,00
3,00-4.50
3,75-4-50


Insufficient to quote
Insufficient to quote
2.40-2.50 Insufficient
2.50-3.00 Insufficient
2.50-2.85 Insafficient
2.03-2.95 Insufficient
2.40-2.90 Insufficient
1.75-3,05 Insufficient
1.80-2.90 2-75-3.50
2.10-3.00 2.00-4.10
2.60-3.30 2.10-3.30
2.75-3,50 2.25-3.)0
2.00-3,25 2.90-3.03
2.20-3.00 2.70-3.85
2.30-2.65 2.35-4,35
1,50-2,30 1.65-2.25
1.75-1.85 1.85


,ade County


:Foles ieans


7-Greens


$2- J.-2,33
2,30-2 -53
2,JO
1.75-2.30
Jo Sa e s
.:o Sales
."o Sales


j]ote
quote
quo te
uote
quote
quote
Sales
Sales
Sales
Salts
Sales
Sales
Sales
Sales
Sales


Pompano Beach Section
Sales to local buyers in ousnel hanpers
Plentifuls T-Greens War:


2-25-2,50
3.40-3.65
2.93-3.45
3.10-3.60
2.50-3.75
2.65-3.50
2.90-4,25
2=00-3.00
3.00-3,85
2.25-3.50
2.03-3.60
2.00-3-50
2,50- .00
2.35-3.75
11o Sales
.io Sale s
No Sales



Conrenaers

$2-00-3.75
1,75-3-00
2.50-4.35
2.25-3.25
2,00-5,00
3-00-4,75
3.00-4,75
2-00-3.25
2.50-3.50
2.75-4.25
3.00-4- 75
2.35-4.25
3.25-4,00
3.50-4.25
3-50-4,00
3,00-5,00
4,00-4,25
2.25-3.50
2.75-3 .50


$2.10-3 .u0
1.50-2 -53
2.30-3.25
2.30-2.50
2.00-3.50
3.25-4 ,25
2.50-4,.25
2.00-3.00
2.25-2.50
2.25-3.00
2.40-4.00
2.00-3.75
2,50-3.25
2,50-3,00
2.50-3.00
2.35-2.75
2.50-3.00
2,00-2-50
2.50-3.50


$2 75-5.25
3,50-4,50
3.00-6-.00
2 75-4.50
2,25-4.25
3-25-5.30
3,75-5 -00
2.50-5 00
3-00-4.33
2. 75-4,50
3.50-4.50
2-75-4.25
4,00-5,00
4.5j -5, 00
4,00-5.53
3.uO-5-00
5,50
4, Ju-5.25
4.50


Z4.25- .75
3.30-4.50
4.00
4.300-5 .j0
4.00-4.50
3,53-4,00
4,30- 4.50
5j,u-5.25
3 Ju-4 .JJ


$2.53-2-75
2-25-2-60
2,75-3-30
2.75-3-00
2.75-3.00
2.o00-3.00
2.25-3-00
2.50-2-85
2.75


Poles Lima-gutter


S 5-50
e.50-5.50
4.00-4.25
3-00-4.25
2-50-.3 00
4 50-5.00
4,00-4-50
4,30-4-50
2.60-4.-50
2,75-4-00
2-75-3.50
2.75-3.25
3.00-4.25
4.00-4,50
5-00
4.0J-4.50
3 .00-4.50
3,25-5 .35
5 ,J3-5.50


$4.00-5 .u0
A-00-4.50
4.25-4.75
3-50-4.25
3.50-5.00
4,00-5-vO
5.00-5-50
3.50-5.25
4.00-4.50
4-00-6,00
4 .00-5-00
4-00-5.00
4,00-A, 75
3.50-5.00
4.00-5.25
4.00-5.50
4.00-6,00
4.75-5,50
4.75-5-50


W.eek


L9. Pole s

9 $4.50-5,75
16 2~-75-5-50


Plant City Section
Auction Sales, Prices to growers.
"eek


ending

Apr. 23
20


Poles

$3.00-4.25
4,00-6.00


WEEKLYY CAJLIFLO-ER F.O.B. PRICES IA. 1:E ,.;kL--RUS:XI- SECTIO.f
Double Deck Crazes i-14 heads
I*eek Week .'eek
Endin -nding .-ningg


Feb. 5
12
19


,$2.00-2-25
2.00-2,25
2-O30


Feb. 26
Mar. 5


$ 2.00
2-00-2.25


Valenti


$1,50-2.50
1.75-2,25
1.70-3,75
1.,75-3-00
2.00-3.50
3.00-4-25
3,00-4.50
2,00-3.00
2-75-3.50
2.50-3.50
3.00-4.00
2,00-3.50
3.00-4.00
2.75-3.85
3.00-3,75
2,75-3.75
3.00-4.00
2.50-3.00
2.50-3.50


Dec.
11
18
25
Jan. 1
3
15
22
29
Feb. 5
12
19
26
Nkr. 5
.12
19
26
Apr. 2
9


*cseK
.ndian;

.ay 7
14


15
22
29 -


Poles

$2&00-3.50
2,25-4.25


$2 00-2,50
230-2,50
2 ,0-2.25


I





Page 78



Week
Ending
Dec. 11
18
25
Jan. 1
S
15
22
29
Feb. 5
12


$2.00-2.15
2,00
1- 75-2,00
1-5)-2.00
1.75
1,50-1,75
1.50-1-75
1.50
1.50
1.50


Week
Ending
Feb. 19
26
Mar. 5
12
19
26
Apr. 2
9
16
23


$ 1.50
1,50
1.50-1. 75
1. 75-2.00
1.90-2.25
1.50-2.25
1.25-1,75
1.25-1.50
1.50
1.50


CHINESE CABBAGE F.O.B. PRICES
IN LAiE OKEECHOBEE SECTION
10 Inch Crates,Wrapped


CABBAGE F.0O.B. PRICES IN TAHE
LAIKE JSCAOBE0 SECTION
in 1-3/4 nushei Crates


Week
Ending
Jan. 8
S15
S22
.: 29
$ Feb. 5
S12
s 19
S26
S Mar. 5
S 12
- 19
S26
: Apr. 2


Domestic Round
S3105-1.25
1-25
1.00-1-25
1.10
1.10
1100-1.10

1. JO-1.10
1, .:0-1 10
1.25-1.75
1.15-1 .75
1. 00-1.60
1..)0-1.10


F.O.B. CELERY PRICES SATFORL-OVILEDO Z7','1 'LD SZECtLOJ
Prices belo-;, are confined to stock of generally'good rmerchantanic qualityy in lb' crates, trimmed tops,
individually washed. Some celery of irregular quality was shipped du.rin, the season, and the. J.0.3.
prices quoted below would not be a fair indication of the returns received by growers for this quality.
A charge of 10-11 cents per crate was made for precooling.


1eek
Ending
Jan. 9,1954
16
23
30
Feb. 6
13
20
27
Nar. 6
13
20
27
Apr. 3
10
17
24
'4ay 1
8
15
22


Price range 1954
P AS CAL
4 Dozen 6-10 Dozen
1tI.50-1.75 $1.50-1.75
1.50-1,75 1.50-1.75
1.75-2,00 1.75-2.00
1.75-2-00 1.o 75-2.00
1.50-1.75 1,50-1.75
1.50-2,25 1.50-2.25
2.25-2,50 2.00-2.35
1,75-2.25 1.75-2.25
1.65-2,00 1,75-2:00
1 75-2,00 2,00-2.25
1.75-2.00 2.25-2,50
1.75-2,00 2.50-3.00
1.25-1.75 2.25-2.75
1.15-1.25 2.00-2.50
1.10-1.25 1.50-2,50
1.00-1,25 1.35-1.75
1.00-1.15 1.25-1.50
1.00-1.15 1.25-1.50
1-00-2.50 1.25-2 25
2.25-2.50 2.25-2.50


G 0 N S N
3-4 Dozen o-10 Oozel
$2,UO-2.50 $2.25
2,00-2,50 2.25
2.00-2.50 2.00
2.75-3.00 2.50-2.75
2.75-3.00 2.75-3.00
No quote
3.00-3,25 3.50
3,53-3,75 3.75-4.00
3.25-3.75 4-00-4.25
3.00-3,25 3.75-4.25
3,00-3.50 3.75-4,00
1i75 3.25
1.50-1.75 3.00
1.50 2.50-3.25
1.50 2.50-3.25
No iuote
1.25 2,00-2,50
1,50 2.00-2.50
2.00-2.25 2-50-2.75
3.00-3.50 3.50-4.00


F.0.3, CELERY PRICES BELLE GLADE


G U LJDUN
3-4 Dozen 0-10 Dozen
$1, 75-2-5O 317 --225
2.00-2-50 2.00-2Z50
2.00-2.50 1,75-2.25
2-50-3,00 2-50-2.75
2,50-2.75 2,75-3,00
2,.50-2-.75 2.75-3.25
3-00-3-25 3.50-3.75
3.25-3,50 3.75-4.00
3,00-3,50 3,50-4,00
3,00 3 75
2.25-3-00 3.75-4.00
1-25-2-00 2.75-3.25
1.25-1,50 2,75-3.25
1.50 2.50-3,25
1 35-1,50 2.50-3.25
1-25-1-50 2-00-3,25
1.15-1-25 2.00-2,50
1.40-1.50 2,00-2,50
1.50-3-00 2,00-3.00


16 auart Baskets
30-'3 oz film bags_
$2.00-2.25
2.00-2.10
1-95-2.00
2.00
2,00
2.00
2.00-2.25
2.25-2.80
2-50


2-3 Doz
$1.75-2
2.00-2
2.25-2
2,25-3
1.50-2
2 00-2
2.50-2
2.00-2
1.75-2
1.75
1,50-1
1.25-1
1.25-]
1.25
1.15-]
1,15-]
1.15-1
1.15-1
1.25-3


PAS C A L
zen 0-10 Dozen
.75 $1,40-175-
2-50 1o50-1.75
2-75 1.75-2.00
00 1.75-2.00
2,25 1.25-1.75
.75 1,75-2,25
,.75 2.25-3,25
V.50 2.00-2.25
2.25 2.00
2.00-2.25
.75 2.25-2,50
1.75 2-50-2,75
L.50 2.00-2.75
1.75-2.50
1,25 1.50-2.25
1.25 1,25-1.75
,25 1.25-1.50
.50 1.25-1.50
.25 1.25-2.25


F.O.B. CELERY PRIDES


Week
End ing
1904
Jan .15
22
29
Feb. 5
12
19
26
Mar. 5
12
19
26
Apr. 2
9


RADISH F.O.B. PRICES IN THE LAKE


We ek
Ending
Jan. 15
22
29
Feb. 5
12
19
26
Mar. 5
12


Topped and washed Reds
16 Uuart Baskets
30-8 oz film bags
$2.65-2.75
2.25-2-75
1,85-2,25
1.65-1,90
1.65-1.80
1,65-1.75
1.50-1,75
1.50-1.75
1.65-1,90


2-3 Doz.

$2.25-2,50
2.25-2,75
2.50-3.00
2.00-2.25
2,00-2,75
2,25-2.75
2. 00-2 50
1,75-2 00
1-75
1,50-1,75
1.-25-1-75
1, 25-1,35
1.15-1.25


SARASO TA


ASC AL
4 Dozen

$1.50-1,75
1,75
1 75-2.00
1.50-1.75
2.00-2,25
2.25-2.50
1 75-2,00
1.75-2,00
1 75
1,75-2 00
1.75-2. 00
1, 50-1 75
1,25


6-10 Doz-.

$1 .50-1 75
1 75
1-75-2.00
1.50-1,75
2-00
2,25-2.50
2.00-2,25
2.00
2 00
2,00-2.50
2.50
2.25-2-50
2,00-2.25


OKEECHM3EE SECTION


*eek
Ending_
Mar. 19
26
Ar. 2
9
16
23
33
1ty 7


16 Auart Baskets
30-d oz fiim- bags
$.L,75-2 0
1. 75-2,<00
1 75-.-- 90
1-75-1.-85
1,75-1.90
1.75-1 .85
1. 75-1.85*
1,75-1,85


Red
$ -

1,75-2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
1,50-1.75
1-25
1.25
1.25
1.00-1.25
1,00-1,25


2-3 Dozen
2- 00-2. 75
2,00-2.50
2.25-2 75
2.50-3 .00
1,75-2.25
2,00-2-75
2.50-2,75
2.00-2.50
1.75-2.25
1, 60-1 75
1, 50-1 75
1.25-1.75
1,.10-1.50
1.00-1,25
1.10-1,25
1,00-1.25
1,30-1-25
1,00-1,50
1..25-3.00
2,75-3-00


?eek
Ending
Jan., .
15
22
29
Feb. 5
12
19
26
Var. 5
12
19
26
Apr. 2
9
16
23
30
May 7
14


Week
Ending
Nov. 13
20
27
Dec. 4
11.
18
25
Jan. 1
8


-








CJUJM32R PIECESS IN SOUTH FLORIDA
.n rusr.e.. -,s, x'.;\xe-t
Generally good quA.lity


Pompano
Beach
Section

Sle to
local 1
Buyers

$ -
..75-2.50
2.00-2.50
2.00-5-00
3.50-5-00
4.50-5-50
6-25-7.00
6,00-7-25
3,50-5-50
4,00-5.25
5-00-8,50
8.00-10 50
7-00- 8.75
7.00-12,00
10.00-11-25
10.00-12,50
9.00-12 00
9.00-11-00
4-00-6.50
4.50-6.10


ort Myzrs--
iTnnok'.lee
Section


Sales.F.O B.
.hip.FPoint

.I. 75-2-25
2-00-2,50
2.00-2-75
2 00-^ 50
4.00-4.50
5.50
6,50-7,50
7,00-3.,00







11,00
10-00-12-50
9-00-10-00
4-0u-7.00
4.50-6-00
A.00-6- 00
3-00-4.25
2-50-3 50


V'luchula
State
farmers
MIrket
Auc ti on
Bu -Field
C-ates,hulk
net grower

$ .50-1.50
.50-1 85
.65-1.75
.25-1.25














2.90-7,65
1.75-5.05
1.15-3.60
85-2 -90
.50-1.50
,50-1,.75


Page 79
SWSi'T COJJ PRICES IN SOJUT FLORIDA
in s'irooouncg poritsn.
F.O.3. shipping point basis


1ake
Okeechobee
Section


- Ueek
: Ending


: Dec. 4
: 11l
18
: 25
;Jan- 1
: 8
S 15
- 22
29
Feb. 5
S 12
: 19
26
Mar. 5
12
19
S 26
:Apr. 2
: 9
* 16
23
30
: Ma. 7
: 14


Dpde
County
Section


Ft- Mere-
immo.loalee
Section


Fancy Fe.ncy Fancy
5 :!zern 5 Dozon 5 Dozen


deek
Ending

Nov. 27
Dec. 4
11
.18
25
Jnn. 1
8
15
22
29
Feb- 5
12
19
26
AMr- 5
12
19
26
Apr. 2
9
16
23
30
MAy 7
ie.


3.00-3.50
3 00


3.75-4.00
3 .75-4 .-JO
2.75-3.50
3 00
2.50-3.00
3-J 0-3-25
3.00-3.25
2-75


EGGLAIT SHIPPING POINT PRICES
Pushol .rst:a-;s; -e.er.-i.Ly Gooa le,%.ity
Po3mpano Beach Section Fort 1,ors-Im.ok nee Section
Sai)es to -.ocal c'ar1oers bJ.ea3 .O.Ld. snipping point
"eek
jndin g.


Dec. 4

18
25
Jan. 1

15
22
29
Feb 5
1-2
.19
26
!hr- 5
12
319
26
Apr. 2
c


?,2-25-3,00
2,25-2-73
2-00-2-75
2-25-3.25
2,00-2.75
2.00-2,73
2.25-3r00
2.00--2-.60
2,50-3.00
2,50-3,00
3..00-3-50
2 -00-3 .50
1,50-2 -25
1-75-2.25
1.75-2-00
1-25-2-.00
1.00-.-.75
1-00-1.75
1-00-2 .00


$2.25-2.50
2.00-2,75
2.00-2.50
2,00-2.25
1.75-3.00
1..75-2.50
2.50-2.75
2-00-2,75
2-00-2.5*
2,00-2.50
2.00-3-00
2-25-3-25


WEEKLY ENDIVE A1D ESCAROLE F.0.B. ??PCES

jn .--'-/'9 'usne.'. ".-ates


: eek
Ending

Dec. 4
: 11
: 18
25
Jan. !
* 8
: 15
22
29
Feb. 5
12
S 19
: 26
Mar, 5
12
S 19
26
Anr- 2
S 9
16
23
30
: Ly 7
14


Endive

$ 1.25
.90-1.15
1 -00-1-25
1.25-1,35
1-15-1.25
1., 00-.25
1.00-1 25
1-00-1,50
,90-1.15
-90-1. 310
1.00-1-25
1-00-1,25
-90-1.10
,90-1.310
-90.-1.10
,90-1,10
90-1.10
.90-1-10
1.00-1.75
1,25-2-00
1-35-1,50
1.50
1-00
1.-50


Escarole

$ 1-30
.90-1.00
.90-1.15
.90-1.10
.00-1-00
1 10-1.25
1.15-1 50
1 25-1 -FO
3. 00-1.35
1-00-1.-.10
1.00-1-25
1.-00-1.25
-90-1.00
.00-1.00
-90-1.10
-90-1-10
-90-1-10
.85-3-00
85-1 25
-90-1.2"
.90-1-00
-90-1-00
1.00-1. 10
1 00


$3-00-4,00
3-00-3-50
3,25-3.50
2.75-3.50
2.50
4.00
3.75-4,00
3.00-3 75
3.00-3.25
2.75-3 .-00
3.00-3.25
3.00-3.25
2.75-2.90
2-50-2.75
2,50-2-75
2,75-3-00
2-75-3.00
2,50-2.75
1.85-2.15
1-60-2,00
1-75
2,15-2-73
2.40-2-75
1.75-2 -u0






Page 80


SHIPPING POINT PRICES OF PEPPERS IN SOUTH FLORIDA


VWeek
Ending

Dec. 4
11
18
25
Jan. 1
13
15
22
29
Feb. 5
312
19
26
Mar. 5
12
19
26
Apr. 2
9



Week
Ending

Jan. 8
15
22
29
Feb. 5
12
19
26
Mar. 5
12
19
26
Apr. 2
9
16
23
30
May 7
14


Pompano Beach Section
Sales to Local Buyers
Medo-Large
Bu.Baskets Bu. hampers
World Beaters Hungarian A ax


Med.-La rge
BauBaskets
Calif. "onders

$5.25-7,25
5.00-7,50
4.50-6.25
4.50-8.75
5-00-7,50
6.00-7,50
6.50-8.25
7,00-8.50
6.50-9=00
4,50-7,50
4.00-5.25
2 75-4.25
2.25-3.00
2,75-3.50
2.00-3.50
1,85-2.50
2.00-2, 75
2,00-2.50
2.50-3.50


Ft. Myers-Immokalee Section
Sales P.O.B. chipping Point
Bushel Baskets, Medium-Large
Calif. Wonders

$6.00-7.50
7.00-8,50
8.00
6.50-8-25
5.00-5.50
3.50-4.50
3.75-4.00
2.50


5,00
3.50-5.00

4.25-5.00
3.00-4.50
3-00-3,50
2.50-3.50
1.75-3.00
1,00-2.50
1.25-2,00
1.75-3.00
1.25-1.75
1.50-2,50
1.05-1.75
1.40-2.00
1.50-2.75
1.00-2.00
1,00-1.75


Lake Okeechobee Section
Sales F.O.B. Shipping Point
Bushel Baskets, Medium-Large
Calif. Wonders

$ -






2, 75-4.95
3.00-5 .00
2.50-3. 50
2,60-3.25
2.80-4,00
3,75-4.25
2.50-4,40
3.00-4.80
No Sales
3.00-3,45
3.50


Bu. Hampers
Italianelle s

$ -
4.75-5 .50
5,00
4.50

4.50-4.75
4-00-5,00
3.50-4-50
2.00-4.50
1.75-3,00
1,75-2 50
1,75-2.35
1.50-2.25
1,50-2.00
1.00-1.75
1,00-2,00
1.50-2.UO
1.25-2.00
1.00-1.75


Bu- Hampers
Anaheims

$ -

3,00


2,75-3.00
2.50-3.00
2,75-3M50
2.50-3.00
1.50-3,00
1,50-2.50
2.00-2.50
2.00-2.50
2.00-2.50
1.50-2.00
1.25-2.00
1.50-2.50
S.Ou-2.00
.75-1,50


Plant City Section
Price to Growers
Bu. Baskets ,Medium-barge
Calif. Wonders

$ -











3.00-5 ,00
3,00-6.00
3.00-4.00
3,50-5c00
3.50-5-00
o1.75-4,00


SHIPPING POINT PRICES OF SaUASH IN SOUJH FLORIDA


Bu. Hampers
Week Wrapped
Ending Yellow Straightnecks


Dec. 4
11
18
25
Jan. 1
8
15
22
29
Feb. 5
12
19
26
Mar. 5
12
19
26
Apr. 2
9


S .50-2-25
2,00-2.50
1.75-4.25
1,75-3.00
3,00-4.75
4.50-6.50
4.50-6.00
2,.75-4.00
2.00-3.50
2.25-3.75
4.00-5, 25
2,00-3 00
1.35-2.75
2.50-4,00
3.50-4.75
2.50-3.50
1.50-3,00
1.00-2.50
1,40-2.25


Pompano Beach Section
Sales to Local Buyers
Bu, Hampers Bu. Hampers
Wrapped
Yellow Crooknecks 'vhite


$3.50-4.50
2.50-3.10
2-75-6,50
5.00-6.00
5 .50-7.00
6,00-8.00
6.50-8,00
3,00-5.50
3-00-3,50
3.00-4.00
4.00-6.50
2.75-3.50
2.50-3.75
3.50-5.00
4.50-5.00
2,00-2.75
1,50-2.50
1.75-3.00
1.60-3.00


$3.50-3.75
3,00-3.50
3,00-5.00
3.00-3,50
3,00-4.50
4,00-6.00
5.50-6,50
5.00-6,00
4,00-5.25
3.50-4.50
3.50-4.50
2.75-3,50
1.50-2.50
2.50-3. O
2.50-3.00
1.50-2.50
1,00-1i.50
1.00-1.50
1.00-2-00


1/2 BuBaskets
Jocozelle
zucchinii

$ .75-1.60
,75-1 50
1,00-2,,50
1.00-2.00
1.25-2.25
1,75-2.50
2, 00-3 .-00
1,75-3.25
2,00-3.25
2.00-3.00
1.75-3 00
1,75-2.75
1.50-2.25
1-75-2.50
1,75-2.50
1 .00-2.00
1.00-1,50
.50-1.25
.75-2.00


$4.25-5.25
4.25-5.50
4.00-4.75
3.50-4.50
4.00-5,75
4.75-6,50
5.50-6,75
6,00-6.50
4,50-6.75
2.50-4.25
2.50-3,25
2.50-3.00
1.40-1,75
1.75-2.50
1.25-2., 00
1,00-1.50
1,00-1-35
1,00-2.25
1.25-2.50


Bu.Baskets
Waxed
Acorn

$ -




3,00-3.50
2.75-3.50
3,25-3.50
3.00-3.50
3.00-3,50
3,00-4.00
3o00-4.00
3.00-3,50
4.00
4,00
3.00-4.00
3.50-4,00
3.50-4.00
3-00-4.00







Page 81


F.O.3. SHtiPPI;G PJi.Jf PRIC3 uF POTAifJS IJ 3,JTH FLC.IDA


i.ake Ukeochobee Seco. :
Washed
Round Red
US~LA US-A3B :


Aeek


Jan. 8
15
22
29
Feb. 5
12
19
26
thr. 5
12
19
26
Apr. 2
9
16


In 50 lbt sacks
Fort Myers Section
Wasted :
Lound Red
JSU1A UaIB :3


1.75-2.00
1.50-2,00 :
1.25-1.50
1.25
1.25
1,00-1.25

--:

-_;


2 25-2.50
2,JO-2.25
1,50-2..)0
1.50-1.75
1,50
1-25-1.50


bade County Section
..ashea, some itaxed
Roand Red
USL US-IB

$ -


1 -1.,50
1 -10-1 50
1.25-1.50
1,25-1,40
1-25-1,45
1.35-1,50
1035-1.50


1.25-1,40
1.2J-140
1.25-1.40
1.25-1.40
1.3U-1.50
1.3u-1.50


F.O.B, SHIPPING POINT PRICES OF POLt2)2OS AT HASTINGS
(Quotations on U.S. 7, stock of S.bagos, burlao sacks)
100 lb.Sacks 50 lb.Sacks : 10o lb. Sacks
Size A oize B bize A oize B : Date oiz 7. isze 3


$ 2.50

2.00
"-oo
2,00
2,00
2,00
2.00
2,00
1.50
1:25-1.50

1..50
1-25-1,50



1.00-1,25
1.25-1.50
1,25-1.50
1.50
(The

2.00

2=25
2,25
2.25
2.25
2 -00


$ 1.80 $ 1.30:
--:
1.55 1,05:
1.55 1.05:
1,55 1,05:
1.55 1.05
1.55 -
1.30 .75- .80:
1.30 ,75- .80;
1,30 -
1.30 c75- .80s
1.30 .75,
1.30 -
1.05-1.30 -
1-05 -
1,05 -75- .80t
1.17- ,80:
1,172 75- ,80
1.30 .80:
prices below are on ".tound
1,55
1,55
1,67- -
1.67- 1,17:

1,67-
1.67 1.17 ,,
1,55
1.55


prices have been used where available, rather


DADE COUNTY SECTION SQUASH PRICES
Sales i.O.B. shippingg Point

ki. Hamp ers
Yellow Crooknecks

$3,00-3.50
3 J00-3 .50
3 -50-4,00
4-50-5o00
3.00
2-00-2.50
2,00-2,50
2.00-3.50
1. 50-2.00


Apr.29 $2.50 $
30 2.50
.vhy 3 3.Ou
" 4 3.JO
5 3.00
o 3.00
" 7 3.25
10 3.501
11 3.50
12 4.00
* 13 4.00
" 14 4.00
17 4.00
" 18 4,00
" 19 4.00
" 20 4.00
" 21 3-1--4
" 24 3,50
" 25 3-3z'
Reds" in ourlap
Apr.28 2,50
"1 29 2.50
tl. y 3 2,--2-3/1
" 4 2-.s--23/4
" 5 -_z3/-3
* 6 2-3/4-3
*' 7 3,00
* 10 3.00


1.,5

2.,)D
2.00
2,00
2.00
2.00-2.25
2.00

2.00
2.JO
2.00
2.00
2,00





sacks)
1.50
1.50
1.75
1 1,75
2.03
2.00
2.00


50 lb. Sacks
Size A Size 7


$ 1,30 $
1.30
1.55
1.55
1.55
1-55
1, 67-j 1
1.80
1.80
2.05
2.05
2.05
2.05
2,05
2.05
2.035
1.o22-2.35
1.80
1.55-1.67-,

1.33
1.30
o1.30-1.42,
1.33-,142-,
1.42 -1.55
1.42-1-1.55
3 .55
1.55


.80
.80
1.05
1.05
1.05
1.35
-05-1.171
1.05
1.05
1.05
1.05
1.05
1.05
1,05






.80
.80
.92
.92t
1.05
1.05


(Lnd of season for iteds)
than the full range.


FIAi T CILY SECTION SOJUAS4 PRICES
Auction sale prices to gro-vers


*eek
Lndin f

Apr. 9
16
23
30
L.av 7


Bu. Hanpers
Yellow Crooknecks

$1-5J-5 ,O
1,00-2.oO
2.JO-4-Ju
1.00-2.00
1.25-2,50
1.25-2.53


$2-00-2.25
2.00-2.25
2.25
1.75-2,00


$1,75-1.85:
1,50-1-75:
1.50 :
1.00-1.25:








--
--:
--:

--:
:
-- :$


Date

Apr.
n"





1
" 1
1
1
" 1
S 2
2
2
" 2
" 2
2
" 2


$3.50
few 3.25
3.00
3.00
3.00
3,00
3.00
2.50
2.50
2.50
2.50
2,50
2.50
2-2.50
2 00
2-00
2.25
2.25
2.50

3,00
3.00
3 .25
3.25
3.25
3.25
3.25
3.00
3.00
nMost ly"


Week
Ending

Feb. 26
29
Mar. 5
12
19
26
Apr. 2
9
16





Page 82


6x6 Larger

$14.00-16.00
8.00-16.00
10.00-14.00
7.00- 9.00
7.50-12.00
8.50-11.00
7.00-8.50
Too few to quote


6x7

$13.00-15,00
7.00-14.00 O
8.00-13.00
6.00- 800
6.00-11.00
8.50- 9o50
5.00- 7.50


Week
Ending

Nov. 27
Dec. 4
11
Apr. 16
23
30
Yy 7
14


60 lb.
Week
Ending

Mar. 5
12
19
26
Apr,a 2
9
16


Week
Ending
Dec. 25
Jan. 1
8
15
Apr. 9
16


$4o00-5.00
2.50-3.50
3.00-4.00
3.00-4.50
3.00-3,50
2.00-5.00
3.00-4.50


7x7

$11.00-12.00
6.00-11.00
6.00-10.00
4.50- 6.00
4.50- 8.00
4.00- 6550
3.00- 5.00


60 lb.
Week
End ing

Apr. 23
30
bMy 7


$2.50-3.00
1.50-2.00 :
1.50-2.25 s
1,50-3.00
2.00-2.50 :
2.00-3.00 s
2.00-3.00 O


Fort Myers-Immokalee Section
60 lb.crt., 85% or more US Z. quality


6x6 Larger
$6.50-7.00
7.00
8.00
8.00
8,00-9O00
8.50-9.00



Plant City
1954
Range


23-48
18-35
22-41
25 -40
18O-4o
18-38
20-42
20-44A-
22-41
15-37
12-30 -
10-32
10o-32
Plant Citys ales per pint
Containers included Plant


6x7
$5.50-6.00
6.00
7.00
7.00
7c00-8o00
7.50-8.00


7x8

8 8.00-9.000
4.00-8.00
4-00-7.00
2.50-4.00
2.50-6.00
2.50-4.00
2 ,00-3.50


F.O.B. SHIPPING POINT PRICES OF TOMATOES IN SOUTH FLORIDA
In 60 lb. crates
Fort Pierce Section

60 lb. crate, 70-850 or more U. S. Al quality


Manatee-Ruskin Section
crto, 85% or more US jl quality


6x6 Larger

$9.50-12.00
10.00-12.00
7.50- 9.00
8.50- 9.00


6x7

$8.00-10.00
9.00-10.50
6.50- 8.00
7.50- 9.00


f Florida City State Farmers Yarket Auction
$ Per 0O lb. nets field run, bulk net to grower
W eek
Ending Range Average
s Feb. 26 $1.08-8.70 $4.28
SMar. 5 108-8.20 4.62


12
19
26
Apr. 2


1.08-7.50
1.08-8.00
1.08-8.10
1.08-6.30


4.56
4.32
3.05
289


SHIPPING POINT AUCTION SALES OF STRAWBERRIES


rs Market
1953
_Aange
25-39 inc.
20-50-
20-43
20-36
20-33
15-29
18-3 2-2
18-33
14-2r6
10-23-
10-27N-
10-3 O-


without crates; Dover sa
City and Dover auctions.


Dover
1954
change


1953
Range
32-38


22-47 23-45g-
18-35- 20-38
21-41 20-31-?
25-43- 15-25
18-41 18-31
18i-37 18-33-
20-45 15-27
20-40 12-231
18-43 10-28
16-35 10-20
15-32
12-28
18-27
les per pint crates included.


Monthly and Seasonal ~2.1 Number of Crates over
Plant City Auction ald Average Price fer Pint.


1953-54

923 crts
36-1/80
17,501 crts
29-5/80
31,036 orts
29-1/80
30,434 crts
25-3/40
82,366 crts
27-7/8


1952-53

1,013 crts
37-1/2 0
25,894 crts
27-1/20
48,529 crts
21-1/20
19,526 crts
17-1/80
95,157 crts
22-1/2


1951-452

6,123 orts
30-3/80
34,736 orts
25 "
43,347 orts
23-1/20
19,769 orts
24-1/20
104,347 crts
24-5/80


* Season crates and average include month of April.


1950-51

844 crts
54-3/80
23,986 orts
32-1/20
47,684 crts
24-1/80
49,589 crts
18-1/20
123,63U crts
23-5/80


1949-50

3,602 crts
35-1/20
53,966 crts
22-1/80
63,757 crts
19-1/4
19,791 crts
24-3/44
141,116 crts
21-5/8(


1948-49

11,572 crts
24-5/8a
21,029.orts
30-3/80
41,213 crts
25-1/40
23,359 crts
27-5/8(
979314 crts
26-7/8(


40 lb. cartons
70-85% or more
US 4i quality
6x6 larger

$7.00-9.00
8o00-10o00
8.00
6.00-7.50
7.00-8,00
6.00-8.00
5.00-6.00
5.00-8.00


$7.00-9.50
7.50-8.00
7.50-8.50
6.50-9.00
6.00-7.00
5 00-8.00
550-7.50


$6.50-7.50
4.50-6.00
5.00-6.00
4.50-7.00
4.00-6oC0
3.50-7.00
4,00-6.50


Dade County Section
crate, 70-85% or more U.S. 1 quality

6x6 Larger 6x7 7x7 7x8_


Week
Ending
Jan. 2
9
16
23
30
Feb. 6
13
20
27
1&r. 6
13
20
27
Apr. 3
10
In 1953
In 1954


Farme


Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Yar.

Season
Thtal




Page 83


FEDERAL-STATE INSPECTION SERVICE


FLORIDA
Commodities
Oranges
Grapefruit
Tangerines
Mixed Citrus
Total Citrus
Beans
Cabbage

Celery
Corn
Cauliflower


Carrots(for Proc.)
Cucumbers

Chinese Cabbage
Eggplant
Escarole-Endive

Lettuce-Romaine
Peppers

Potatoes


Radishes
Spinach
Sweet Potatoes
Tomatoes
it


Type of Container
Std. Box Eouiv.
Std. Box Squiv.
Std. Box Equiv.
Std. Box Equiv.


JULY i, 193 j
alil Uars
Inspected
17,363
16,204
2,397
2,194
38, -54

1,246
289
7,744
3,342
1
24
12
10
133
24
2

31
47
2
108
5
4,091
2,092
58
1
2
25
791
1,124
98
2,417


Containvr- -' Units per Car


1951-52 1950-t1 1949-5(


- JUNE 30,
Un.its or
Containers
9,089,549
7,836,419
1,120,084
1,030,035
19,076,087
55
570,521
143,818
3,149,577
1,848,907
615
13,424
7,459
346,356
53,422
30,340
857

15,032
2.4, 699
997
68,758
3,276
2,537,352
627,680
174,000
625
1,444
14,028
512,786
414,921
51,765
874,556


Tota- vegezaoles 23,720 48A 453 460 471 485
Watermelons Melons 12,268 10,862,802 5-----0 962 0'J54 -7
~Total Melons and Vegetables 35,988 -
Peanuts (Shelled) Tons 284 6,969 5 25 -
Tung Oil Tons 7 212 30 -
GRAND TOTA (Razl) 74,433
INSPECTION FOR TRUCK SHIPMENTS IN CARLOT EQUIVALENTS
Co7mnercial uannery Total Truck Inspection
Boxes Cars Boxes Cars Boxes Conv.oac-. Cars
Oranges 11,418,911 2 3 62,712,8Z 125,425 7T 7 500 18,25
Grapefruit 8,233,289 16,467 20,048,892 40,097 6-,282,181 5000 55,564
Tangerines 1,218,382 2,436 1,037,957 2,C-5 2,255,615 5X00 4,511
Mixed Citrus 3,543,405 7,087 3,543,405 5000 7,087
Total Citrus 24,413,987 48,828 83,799,703 .15, 597 16o2i,955 21775


v Container

Crts.
50* Bags
Crts.
wer 1-1/3 Bu.
Oth.Pkgs.
Crts.
Cabb.Crts
Crts.
s $ Bu.
1/3 Bu.
1-1/9 Bu.
ot Bu.
ve Bu.
1-1/9 Bu.
aast Buo
A Crts.
Oh .Pkgs.
Crts.
S Bu.o
1-1/9 Bu.


Units ConvrFaov Cars
157,T395 5565 -7T
399 500 .8
95,980 498 192
282,805 458 617
37,582 559 67
27,490 687 40
1,609,697 407 3,955
125 429 .3
2,415,024 553 4,367
288,784 402 718
167,800 1264 132
1,870 445 4
70,239 508 138
18,874 497 38
15,731 542 29
163,880 609 269
23,362 320 73
24,776 393 63
1,790 500 4
542,248 637 851
15,784 655 24


Commodity Corsmainer Units CcTifacst. Cars
FoToTos A 50This- 1, ^757-7- 2, R 7T"6
" ICQc Fag- 6< ,-;2 300 2,138
SOth.Pkgs. ,5? 522 5
Radishes 16-Qt.Bsa-ts. 6,302 565 10
* Bu. 4,585 600 8
Spinach Bu. 36S 722 .5
Squash Bu. 73,73: 450 164
Sw.Potatoes Bu. 35, 14 561 63
Tomatoes $ Bu, 1,247,167 352 3,445
1-1/4 Eu. 205,220 359 5564
__ Oth.Pkgr. 51,272 583 88
Total _Vegetables __ ;77__72W4.6
Cantaloupes Bxs. E660 -0 2
Strawberries 3t-pT.Crts. 83.-1 'O 17
Watermelons Melrnna 333,160 5E5 382
Total 1.'iscl. 'r its _0 __
"Total Vegs. M...Frts. 21, 28T1.6
Feanuts-Farmers Stock =.ns 7-e T I "i 5, Z.7
Peanuts-Shelled Tc.t 7,276 24.5 296
Feanvts-Regrades Tenrs &CE 12 67
Tung Oil C7,OCr t113. and 381,005 gallons 7
GRAND TOTAL 259,923.5


* Arbitrary figure. Actual Rail Equivalent runs around 524 for Oranges, 48' for Grapefruit, 467 for
Tangerines, and 469 for Mixed Citrus.
. Includes inspections made at Farmers' Auction Markets.

The information shown above was provided by Hugh S. Flynt, Assistant Di rectcr, Vegetabl3 Branch
of the Florida Citrus and Vegetable Inspection Division, located in Orlando, Flori'-a.


Comnodit
Beans F
Broccoli
Cabbage

Cauliflo

Celery
Chinese
Corn f
Cucumbez


Eggplant
Esc-Endi

Field Pe
Leti-Rom

Parsley
Peppers
9


Pe


1954
Ave ra
1953-54
524
484
467
469
500
556-
457
497
406
553
615
559
621

401
1264
428

474

498
536
655
52C
3CC
3?00
525
722
561
646
369
523
361


1952-53
499
494
454
483
491
--09-
474
491
403
552


618

424

431
508
632
620
626
627
672
515
299

1193

498
547
375

J-8


494


488
501
450
482
488
635
472
499
421
568

-,

447



630

769
541

52A
302




670


382


4Q1


Bu.
Std. Crts.
509 Bags
Std. Crts.
Crts.
1- Bu.
1-1/3 Bu.
1I Bu.
Pounds
Buo
1/3 Bu.
Crts.
Bu.
Bu.
1-1/9 & 1-1/2 Bu.
Crts.
Bu.
1-1/9 Bu.
50 Bags
10CI Bags
104 Bags
16-qt. Basket
Bu.
Buo
304 Lugs
l1 Bu.
Other Pkgs.
Bu.


-..





Page 84
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Agricultural MIrketing Service
Post Office Box 273, Orlando, Florida
Date of Report Jaunary 1954
1953 FLORIDA ANNUAL CROP SUNMARY
Crop production in Florida in 1952-53 declined slightly reflecting smaller citrus crop since a greater
tonnage of field crops and vegetables were harvested by the State's growers. The total production of
7,272,400 tons of food, feed and fiber in 1952-53 compares with an all time record of 7,566,900 tons
in 1951-52. The State's 39 principal crops were grown on 2,387,200 acres in 1952-53 compares with
2,320,500 the year before. Due to a $41 million'increase in citrus valuation, the total value of all
crop production increased about 4 percent to $371,329,000 in 1952-53 from $358,207,000 in 1951-52.

FIELD CROPS There were 1,355,800 acres of field crops planted with 758,100 tons of food, feed and
fiber taken from 977,800 harvested acres. This production was valued at a little over $61 million.
The 16,000 acre decrease in acreage harvested was largely attributed to a smaller corn planting which
failed to offset increases in cotton, oats, peanuts and potatoes. Florida farmers produced yields of
corn, hay and peanuts larger than in 1952. Prices for practically all field crops were lower in 1953.

FRUITS AND NUTS A 9.4 million box reduction in the citrus crop for 1952-53 more than offset record
crops of avocados, pecans and tung nuts, dropping the total tonnage of these crops from 5.2 million to
4,8 million tons. Valuation, however increased $40 million as the citrus crop brought in $164 million
at packing house-factory door levels. Despite record production, pecans and tung nuts failed to return
the grower as much as a year ago.

VEGETABLES Florida growers planted, harvested and sold another record crop of vegetables during
1952-53 when 406,600 acres were planted, 375,400 acres harvested yielding 1,682,200 tons of truck crops,
valued at $141,614,000. While acreage and production set new records, the valuation was a little lower
than 1951-52. Watermelons, snap beans, tomatoes, potatoes and sweet corn covered the most acreage with
100,000, 69,700, 61,500, 41,600 and 34,900 acres respectively. Dollarwise, tomatoes with $35.5
million, snap beans $20.0, potatoes $15.7, celery $12.8 and corn $10.5 were the top crops.

SUMMARY YEAR ACREAGE PRODUCTION VALUE OF PRODUCTION
Planted Harvested In Tons a/ b/
Thousands Ihousands Thousand Dollars
TOTAL FIELD CROPS 1953 1355.8 978.8 760.3 62,842
1952 1345.6 993.6 742.4 70,801
TOTAL VEGETABLES 1953 406.6 375.4 1682.2 141,614
1952 365.2 344.2 1588.9 158,997
TOTAL FRUITS & NUTS 1953 624.8 540.1 4829.4 168,538
1952 609.7 524.6 5235.6 128,409
TOTAL ALL CROPS 1953 2387.2 1894.3 7271.9 372,994
1952 2320.5 1862.4 7566,9 358,207

FRUITS AND NUTS
CR 0 P PRODUCTION SEASON AVERAGE VALUE OF
PRICE a/ PRODUCTION bj
1951-52 1952-53 1951-52 1952-53 1951-52 1952-53 Unit
Thousands Dollars Thousand Dollais
Avocados, actual tons 8,700 10,600 122.00 108.00 1,061 1,145 Tons

ALL CITRUS 119,360 109,920 1.17 1.49 123,547 164,213 Box
Grapefruit, All 36,000 32,500 .81 1.o05 26,708 34,225 Box
Seedless 17,700 17,100 1.02 1o29 17,544 22,059 Box
Other 18,300 15,400 .58 079 9,164 12,166 Box
Oranges, All 78,600 72,200 1.12 1.65 88,266 119,239 Box
Early & Aidseason 43,800 42,300 1.03 1.49 45,114 63,027 Box
Valencias 34,800 29,900 1.24 1.88 43,152 56,212 Box
Tangerines 4,500 4,900 1.85 lo92 7,585 9,408 Box
Limes 260 320 3.80 4.19 988 1,341 Box
Pears 110 87 1.15 1.00 126 87 Bu.
Peaches 18 18 2.60 2.45 47 44 Bu.
Pecans, All 4,300 7,300 .210 .147 900 1,069 Lb.
Improved 2,800 4,000 .225 .160 630 640 Lbo
Seedlings 1,500 3,300 .180 .130 270 429 Lib.
Pineapples 19.0 28.0 6.50 6.00 124 168 Box
Tang Nuts, actual tons 31,000 28,400 84.00 65c00 2,604 1,846 Ton

Tons
TOTAL ABOVE CROPS 5,235.6 4,829.4 128,409 168,538

a/ Citrus price equivalent packing house or factory door, all methods of sale.

b/ Value is for marketing season or crop year and should not be confused with calendar year income.






Page 85


1953 FLORIDA ANNUAL FIELD


YEAR ACREAGE
Planted Har-
vested


CROP


Thousand Acres


Corn, All

Cotton, Lint

Cottonseed

Oats

Cowpeas, Alone

Cowpeas for Peas

Cowpeas Interpltd.

Hay, All

Hay, Cowpea

Hay, Peanut

Hay, Other Tame

Lupine Seed

Peanuts, equiv-
alent solid
Peanuts, Alone

Peanuts, inter-
planted
Potatoes, Irish
All
Sweet Potatoes

Tobacco, All

Tobacco, Type 14

Tobacco, Type 62

Tobacco, Ga. Fla.
Type 62 Shade
Sugarcane for
Syrup
Sugarcane for
Sugar and Seed
Velvet Beans,
All Purposes
Soybeans


1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952


611
650
71
59


180
164
33
33


18
16





40
26
120
120
225
230
195
195
60
70
42.9
31.7
12.0
8.0
24.5
26.7
21.2
22.7
3.3
4.0
4.4
5.1
6
-5
45.0
43.7
45
60
17
14


599
637
70
57


40
36
18
16
3
3


89
78
5
5
44
47
40
26
10
11


56
54


42.0
31.0
12.0
8.0
24.5
26.7
21.2
22.7
3.3
4.0
4.4
5.1
6
5
45.0
43.7
45
60
12
12


CROP SUMIARY (Cont'd from page bb)


YIELD
Per
Acre


16.5
15.5
171
262


30.0
30.0


5.5
4.5


.80
.69
.75
.65
.62
.56
1.00
.95
500
650


975
890


243
246
70
70
1067
1141
1070
1140
1045
1145
1022
1147
180
145
33.0
34.9
570
500
18.0
20.0


UNIT PRO- SEASON
DICTION AVERAGE
PRICE
Thousand Dollars


Bu. 9,b8
Bu. 9,8"
Lb. (Bale)
Lb. (Bale)
Ton
Ton
Bu. 1,2(
Bu. 1,08


Bu.
Bu.


Ton
Ton
Ton
Ton
Ton 2
Ton
Ton
Ton
Lb. 5,0(
Lb. 7,1


Lb. 5,,6(
Lb. 43,0<


Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Lb.
Lb.
Lb.
Lb.
Lb.
Lb.
Lb.
Lb.
Gal.
Gal.
Ton
Ton
Lb.
Lb.
Bu.
Bu.


10,2(
7,6
8'
5
26,1
30,45
22,68
25,8"
3,41
4,58
4,49
5,85
1,0
7
1,45
1,52
(Ton)
Ton)
2
24


34 1.50
74 1.76
27 .324
31 .389
L1 53.80
13 63.80
00 1.00
30 1.11


16 5.00
L4 4.80


71 23.00
54 26.70
4
3
7
26
43 -
25 -
00 .035
50 .040


00 .101
50 .102


06 1.61
26 2.44
40 3.50
50 4.11
32 .678
58 .707
34 .515
78 .513"
48 1.75
30 1.80
98 1.75
50 1.80
30 1.05
25 1.35
59 7.95
65 8.15
L3 38.00
15 40.00
16 2.30
40 2.79


TOTAL ABOVE CROPS,


(Not including Commercial Potatoes)

1953 1355.8 978.8
1952 1345.6 993.6


Ton 760.3
Ion 742.4


a/ Value is for marketing season and should not be confused with calendar year.


NOTE: The foregoing report was supplies by the U. S. Bureau
Post Office Suilding, Orlando, Florida.


of Agricultural Economics,


VALUE OF
PBODUCTII
a/
'Ihous.Dols.

14,826
17,378
4,361
6,048
592
829
1,200
1,199


80
67


1,633
1,442

-



175
286


5,515
4,902


15,846
18,607
2,940
2,302
17,716
21,519
11,682
13,275
6,034
8,244
7,872
10,530
1,134
979
11,679
12,437
494
600
497
670


62,842
70,801





Page 86


VOLUME AND VALUE OF FLORIDA GENERAL FARM CROPS
(For Selected Years)


;oamodity


;orn
;otton
tobaccoo
'eanuts (Picked & Threshed)
weet Potatoes
;ow Peas
>ats
velvet Beans
[ay
igar Cane Syrup
sugarr Raw
Lack Strap Molasses
'ecans


Unit

Bu.
Bale
Lbs.
Lbs.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Tons
Tons
Gals.
Tons
Gals
Lbs.


1925
Production Farm Value


8,262,000
43,000
5,810,000
23,400,000
1,840,000
36,000
125,000
53,000
51,000
1,650,000
No Record
No Record
1,916,000


$ 7,684,000
4,561,000
1,743,000
1,147,000
3,386,000
129,000
85,000
753,000
1,061,000
1,732,000
Very Light
Very Light
609,000


1930


Unit Production


Ba.
Bale
Lbs.
Lbs.
Bu.
Bu.
Ba.
Tons
Tons
Gals.
Tons
Gals.
Lbs.


5,886,000
56,000
9,748,000
26,520,000
1,360,000
86,000
112,000
44,000
48,000
1,530,000
27,000
2,202,000
1,150,000


Farm Value

$ 5,180,000
2,720,000
2,672,000
902,000
1,646,000
233,000
87,000
572,000
830,000
994,000
No Record
No Record
302,000


Total Incomplete $ 22,890,000
other Field Crops Misco o 1,500,000



1935
Unit Production Farm Value

brn Bu. 7,496,000 $ 5,322,000
btton Bale 31,000 1,576,000
'obacco Lbs. 8,680,000 2,398,000
'eanuts (Picked & Threshed) Lbs. 38,430,000 1,114,000
weet Potatoes Bu. 1,610,000 1,368,000
bw Peas Ba. 88,000 154,000
ats Bu. 112,000 77,000
velvet Beans Tons 70,000 700,000
;ay Tons 52,000 582,000
.ugar Cane Syrup Gals 2,660,000 984,000
igar Raw Tons 42,000 **(1,470,000\
lack Strap Molasses Gals. 3,292,000 395,040
'ecans Lbs. 1,490,000 153,000

Total Incomplete $ 16,293,000
either Field Crops Misco o 2,000,000



1943
Unit Production arm Value

brn Bu. 8,522,000 $ 13,124,000
btton Bale 16,000 1,591,000
tobaccoo Lbs. 14,910,000 8,883,000
'eanuts (Picked & Threshed) Lbs. 74,800,000 5,236,000
iweet Potatoes Bu. 1,365,000 3,044,000
ow Peas Ba. 36,000 141,000
iats Bu. 300,000 342,000
'elvet Beans Tons 62,000 1,240,000
ay Tons 66,000 1,063,000
iugar Cane Syrup Gals. 2,040,000 2,040,000
Ugar--. Raw Tons 699,000 3,062,000
lack Strap Molasses Gals 4,505,000 750,000
'ecans Lbs. 4,524,000 1,060,000
Total Incomplete $ 41,576,000
other Field Crops Misc. 9,725,000


$ 16,138,000
MLsc. 2,000,000



1940
Unit Production Farm Value

Bu. 8,418,000 $ 5,893,000
Bale 21,000 1,102,000
Lbs. 16,328,000 4,552,000
Lbs. 68,400,000 1,915,000
Bu. 900,000 810,000
Bu. 40,000 67,000
Bu. 154,000 102,000
Tens 59,000 649,000
Tons 70,000 665,000
Gals 1,120,000 560,000
Tons *.(970,000) o*(4,268,000)
Gals. 5,170,000 **(1,125,000)
Lbs. 3,564,000 341,000

$ 22,049,000
Misc. o 5,564,000



1944
Unit Produc~aon a arm Value

Bu. 7,550,000 $ 12,231,000
Bale 13,000 1,343,000
Lbs. 20,095,Q000 10,421,000
Lbs. 62,500,000 4,688,000
Bu. 1,156,000 2,821,000
Bu. 18,000 86,000
Bu. 704,000 887,000
Tons 48,000 1,152,000
Tons 64,000 1,062,000
Gals. 2,400,000 2,280,000
Tons 780,000 3,689,000
Gals. 5,545,000 1,000,000
Lbs. 5,100,000 1,143,000
$ 42,803,000
Misc.


Estimated by the Florida State Marketing Bureau.
* Figures in parenthesis ( ) are estimates from unofficial sources.




PRODUCTION VOLUME AND FARM VALUE OF FLORIDA PRINCIPAL FIELD CROPS


lorida Commodity

orn
otton
obaooo
eanuts (Picked & Threshed)
weet Putatoes
ow Peas
ats
elvet Beans
ay
ugar Cane Syrup
agar Cane for Sugar
lack Strap Molasses
eoans
Agar 'jw
lorida Commodity

orn
otton
tobacco
eanuts (Picked & Threshed)
weet Potatoes
ow Peas
ats
elvet Deans
ay
sugar Cane Syrup
ugar-Cane for Sugar
lack Strap Molssaes
ecans


Un ts 1944


Bu.
Bale
Lbs.
Lbs.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Tons
Tons
Gals.
Tons
Gals.
Lbs.
Tbns


7,550
13
20,095
62,500
1,156
18
704
48
64
2,400
780
5,545
5,100
68
1944


$12,231
1,343
10,421
4,688
2,821
86
887
1,152
1,062
2,280
3,689
1,000
1.143


1945

6,798
8
20,082
66,000
896
22
900
37
71
1,900
1,041
6,317
3,944
100
1945

$11,693
896
10,923
5,280
2,331
106
963
1,036
1,384
1,900
6,381
1,200
941


$


PRODUCTION VOLUME
1946 1947 1948
(Thousand-- Omitted)
6,490 7,476 6,230
6 11 15
22,251 26,812 20,846
46,500 69,300 85,250
884 1,022 640
16 15 15
720 600 399
29 30 21
60 67 77
1,700 1,815 1,530
1,037 921 1,010
6,716 5,430 7,141
4,100 2,650 4,580
94 00 80
FARM VALUE 80
1946 1947 1948
"~TousandsUOmTtted)
12,266 $15,924 $10,591
983 1,703 2,303
15,739 18,188 18,279
3,860 6,514 8,440
2,404 2,586 1,596
88 105 90
994 990 674
928 960 672
1,092 1,347 1,417
2,720 2,269 1,224
7,207 6,309 5,212
1,200 1,080* 1,472o
1.361 602 508


Group Totals $42,803 $45,034 $50,842 $58,577 $52,578 $47,834 $57,005 $68,361 t71,180 $64,061


lorida Commodity
,Ung Nuts
money & %,x
iadisoli a
ursory Products s


Units

1,000 Lbs.


1944
77Uo
10,520


1945
=TT0
9,273


MtSCELLANE01
PR-OUC
1940

15,570
Volume not
Volume not
PRODUCT


'lorida Commodity 1944 1945 1946
(Ehousands
.Ung Nuts $ 700 $ 823 $ 1,490
moneyy & %ax 1,711 1.519 3,031
ladioli o 3,900 4,300 4,400
nursery Products 4,500 5,304 8,986
Total $SlII $11,946 $177957
o Estimates ti'iI unUrfo i source. All otherr production and farm valu,
Bureau o 'Ag 'Ailti'i 1 Eoonomios, Federal Building, Orlando, Florida.


US FLORIDA CROPS

1947 1948
1T=2o iT-3o
8,390 8,298
determined
determined
ON VALUE
1947- 1948
Oci'Tted)
$ 748 $ 80a
2,169 1,624e
5,300 5,50(
10,033 10,68.

e figaires supplied


by

by


1949

11,510



1949

$ 972
1,746
0,000
9,334
$157the U. S.
the U. S.


1950
2I0 o
16,500


1951

1,1lo2


1952
317,97
17,297


1950 1951 1952

$ 934 $ 1,300 $ 2,634
2,420 2,982 2,827
d,U00 9,00U 9,750
11,981 13,819 13 793
$23,365 $_771 Z7 $7,j ,T"
Agricultural *t'iti 3tcians,


1949

7,162
17
25,143
51,255
561
16
256
27
53
1,050
1,126
6,877
3,130
105
1949

$ 9,382
2,347
17,238
5,126
1,487
87
350
945
912
735
7,285
1.380*
560


1950

8,582
14
23,268
61,200
598
14
288
28
56
980
1,169
8,583
4,150
105
1950

$12,787
2,781
19,387
5,814
1,393
67
412
980
1,036
1,029
8,662
1,516
1.141


1951

9,616
33
32.392
56,550
510
14
500
18
57
960
1,260
8,749
5,280
122
1951

$15,482
5,946
23,422
5,316
1,454
60
660
684
1,357
1,200
10,2'.6
1,560.
964


1952

9,874
3 1
30,458
48,060
560
14
1,080
15
54
725
1,495
9,304
4,300
154
1952

$3 7,,.L
6,048
21,519
4,902
2,302
67
1,199
600
1,442
979
12,184
1,760*
900


1953
9,884
27
26,132
54,600
840
16
1,200
13
71
1,080
1,453
8,121
7,300
150
1"3
$14,826
4,361
17,716
5,515
2,940
80
1,200
494
1,633
1,134
11,551
1,542a
1 ,J9


1953
237;0o
18,377


1953

$ 1,846
3,181
9,770
14,127
$28,924





Page 88
UNITED STATES DEPARTk N 3} j AGRICULTUREE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Post Office Building, Orlando, Florida

1953 FLORIDA HONEY REPORT
Florida Honey Production Sets a ew Record inIy53~. While the national hone, crop for 1953
was the smallest sTn-e1948 ana 18 percento-elow 1S52TFTorida produced a record crco -f a little over
18 million pounds and now ranks third among the States. Florida's colony number at 23c,Oc-0 is the 5th
largest in the nation and represents a steady increase since 1949- Average yield per colony in 1953
was 76 pounds, a one pound increase over 1952. The production of beeswax is placed at 289,000 pounds
compared with 272,000 pounds a year earlier. In mid-December Florida producers reported 1,628,000
pounds of honey on hand.
The value of the 1953 honey and beeswax also set a new record at $3,181,000, representing a
value of 18,088,000 pounds of honey at 16.9 cents (U.S. 16.6) a pound, and 289,000 pounds of beeswax
at 43 cents (U.S. 41) per pound. Component parts of the average price of 16,9 cents for Florida
showed extracted honey 13 cents for wholesale, 22 cents retail and chunk 24 cents wholesale, 27 cents
retail,
FLORIDA PRODUCTION AND VALUE
COLONIES HONEY PRODUCTION PRODUCTION VALUE OF HONEY VALUE OF BEESWAX
YEAR OF BEES PER COLONY OF HCNEY PRODUCED PRODUCED
Pounds Pounds Dollars Dollars
1944 178 000 58 10,324,000 $1,631,000 $ 80,000
1945 182,000 50 9,100,000 1,447,000 71,000
1946 191,000 80 15,280,000 2,903,000 128,000
1947 195,000 42 8,190,000 2,097,000 72,000
1948 199,000 41 8,159,000 1,624,000 60,000
1949 189,000 60 11,340,000 1,678,000 68,000
1950 208,000 78 16,224,000 2,304,000 116,000
1951 218,000 82 17,876,000 2,842,000 140,000
1952 227,000 75 17,025,000 2,707,000 120,000
1953 238,000 76 18,088,000 3,057,000 124,000
NOTE: No complete records prior to 1944.
Honey production in the UNITED STATES in 1953 totaled 224,126,000 pounds. 18 percent less
than in 1952 and the smallest crop s-nce 1948. In mid-December, producers had about 53 million pounds
of honey for sale -- 24 percent of total production. The 1953 honey crop of 224,126,000 pounds was
produced by 5,533,000 colonies of bees, or 40.6pounds per colony. The U.S, beeswax production totaled
4,093,000 pounds compared with 4,825,000 pounds in 1952, a decrease of 15 percent,
Compared with 1952, honey production was down in all regions of the country. The production
in the North Atlantic region was down 24 percent. A cool wet spring followed by a very dry summer
resulted in poor production per colony. Production in the South Central States was down 18 percent.
Very dry weather reaching drought proportions over much of this region cut yields sharply. The crop
in the West North Central States was down 13 percent. Production in the East Ieorth Central States was
down 5 percent. The South Itlantic region was down 8 percent mainly due to the very dry weather. How-
ever, FLORIDA which produces more than half the honey in the area had a crop slightly above that of
1952. (Increased orange acreage accounted for much of Florida's stead" increase since 1949.)
The leading honey producing States in 1953 were California, Linnesota. Floride, Wisconsin,
Iowa, Texas. New York, Ohio, l.chigan, Idaho, Arizona, Indiana and Colorado. These 13 States produced
about 68 percent of the total crop. (Arizona's production is increasing rather rapidly.)
Weather conditions in California were unfavorable for honey in 1953 A cool cloudy spring
followed by dry weather resulted in a light yield. The eucalyptus flow was fair, orange poor, sage
poor, buckweat poor to fair, and cotton and alfalfa fair to good. The 1953 Texas yield per colony,
though below a year earlier, turned out better than expected. Many colonies were moved because of dry
weather. Movement into Southeast Texas was heavy but continued rains curtailed production from bees
moved into this part of Texas. Yields in Minnesota and Iowa were down sharply mainly because it was
too wet during the main honey flow.
STOCKS Estimated stocks of honey on hand for sale by producers in mid-December totaled
53,408,000 pounds 24 percent of the 1953 crop. Stocks as a percent of production were 36 percent in
the East North Central, 30 percent in the North Atlantic, 24 percent in the West North Central, 23 per-
cent in the West, 14 percent in the South Atlantic and South Central States.
PRICES The average price received by beekeepers for all honey sold in 1953 was 16.6 cents
per pound, including the combined wholesale and retail sales of extracted chunk and comb honey. Bees-
wax prices received by beekeepers declined from 43.1 cents per pound in 1952 to 41,0 cents in 1953.

State 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953
California 22--28 16~970 2T7 542 2T70O 27~~50 28,_26 4F'74 235 28
Minnesota 18,538 20,332 21,750 24,708 23,375 23,375 24,795 21,335
FLORIDA 15.280 8,190 8,159 11,340 16,224 17,876 17,025 18,088
isconsin 7,844 11,660 7,410 12,675 12,025 14,550 15,908 15,600
Ohio 11,264 8,952 11,235 9,760 11,507 12,390 6,622 8,428
New York 6,897 13,140 12,045 10,074 9.030 11,286 11,825 8,979
Iowa 17,152 24,096 7,380 17,974 17,302 10,890 17,072 14.091
Michigan 5,550 7,140 8,650 9,699 9,984 10,120 8,575 8,100
Idaho 6,837 6,760 6,020 9,018 7,434 9,568 6,764 6,586
Texas 10,920 12,264 5,943 13,373 15,850 9,424 10,944 9,636
OTHER STATES 91,404 99,128 95,171 86,457 87,732 110,391 104,137 89,655
Total US. 7IT 22858Z 2T 4 S7 25 T 272~I M24- 17
1951, 1952 Revised. 1953 Preliminary.





UNITED 3T.I2AS DEPAkT. i.. AjR.CULTJR.F
ACRICUJL URAL lAr'KiiC :. "VICE
WASHINg3ION, D U.


Pae 89


Jate of Report August 2u. 195A
RECORD NUMBER OF TJRK:YS RAISED TAHla YL2A
Farmers are raising 61,04' jJu turkeys tnis year -- percent ab-vi .ast year, according tj a
..:r-Li.inary estimate of the Crop Re-orting joard. Large varieties increased in nimoer by o percent
and small varieties by lo percent. 2he previous record crop was oJ.Jo6.000 in 1952. .{owever. light
areets :'we-e 30 percent of the total this year, compared with 24 percent reported for 1952.

.-e vy breeds increased from last year in the -ast iorth Jentrai, ,'est ,or-n Jentr. in:.l Jc :ti
'.'.tic. States by 11 percent, 12 percent and 18 p .rcent. respect-vely. ne i.ortn ...Iantlu ta.es
-. .-wn 1 percent and the South Central down 4 percent. Junbers in tne .-est ..ere aooit t..e sa:.e as


ar. r il tjrkeys raised this year. Small varieties as a percent of all turkeys raised tlis year are 51.3
:c2cent in the South Atlantic. 32.3 percent in the >lest diortb Central. 31-0 percent in the -',.rth
..tinti, 3).J percent in the East North Central, 23 5 percent in the South Central aud 14.2 p-rcent
-. tl.= ,est. All sections of :he country showed increases n tne number of snail v;.riety tur.:eys
raised, compared with last year. Increases %were 40 percent in the .,est lorth *- n-ral. z3 pircunt .n
*..- ..trLt -tlantic, 19 percent in the South Central, 11 percent in tie "est, o percent in the -3t
.Oarta Central and 3 percent in the South Atlantic states
EARLIERt a i.~KTilGS
enc trench toward earlier marketing coDntinues growers marketed 9 9 percent o- 1 .is yvar':a crop
e"ore .A;.ust 1, npared with 9.0 percent reported last year. If growers carry out their intentions,
:-n : will market o,0. percent of the crop in -ugust, 11.1 percent in Septe.m..cr anc 17.3 in ,tom.r.
,r: ers expect to na ket 45.1 percent of their turkeys in vctooer or earlier niis ya; r, c'~n~ rc with
-,- percent last year. expected marketing in november at 30.2 percent are ta.e sane as a year a,;o.
Le-e:-ber marketing are ex-rected to account for 19,o percent of the crop; compared wita intended in 1953, January or lazer narketin's will be 5.1 percent of t:.e crop, compared wita 4.J per-
j ~.rt 1 year,
.he actual rarke:in,s of the 1954 crop after 4Agust 1 :ill depinc to a considerable extent upon
lazor devel -p.ents. Storage stocks of turkeys on July 31 totaled 4,0 illicn pounds, compared with
4, mi-lion a y- ar ago and tne 5-year avera e of 3z million pounds
3: -.LL A.JuIE.S OF TURZEYS AS A P.RCL-T ~F A.L TJRK-'YS 3:-fNG RAISED 1/
Includes 3eltsville unites and other small varieties


Geographis
S.-is -ons


1951


northt h Atlantic
.ast aorth Central
..-st North Central
- th -.tl-intic
- :ta Central
,'-3 tern
Jni ted t-'ates


1952
?P


23.o 27.3
la 7 18-8
14.6 18,1
51,0 47-6
17,9 15-5
14.2 17,0
21-0 24.0
PJRiRKYS RAISED 0:1 FARMS


ercen t


1953

2o.o
31.1
27 .0
54.7
19,9
7.7
27.3


(Preliminary)
19 54


31.0

32.3
51.3
23 5
14. 2


Geographic
J iision
^ri.n ',.-antic
- N Central
. .,.' Central
S Atlantic
L Central
..est


Average
1940-90

3,739
10,327
2 -.958
4. 895
3., 792


1950
c379
5.368
11.095
5,520
4.749
13 .161


.,unoer naisea ()
Thousands
1951

6 050
12.274
d,082
5,446
lo,317


1952

7.118
12 946
11 522
5,127
17 003


1953

7.265
13 .247
9,668
5,571
17,728


(Prelininary)
195j

7,956
15,696
1b.59U
5,o07
!5,908


o aa uni-ec. ota es 35 ,50o6 3,79Z 523476 OJ.O57 33J,ju230 O.,
U: L'AUDIJG STATES I4 1954
'nou sand s
Cali.-r..ia 4,615 7,202 9-507 10.933 9,899 0,00
;-innesota 3,343 4,146 4,644 5,231 5.0 o7 7,583
Vir,-rnia 1,120 2,294 3.070 5,762 4.610 5,117
:owa 2,246 2-956 3,222 3,073 3;673 4,350
Ta:.as 3 215 2,927 3,22J 3,733 3,407 3,271
Oh- c 1,023 1,361 1.565 1,878 1.972 2:2od
.r.- .- 2,001 1,965 2,223 2,134 1,9u3 1, j4
Jtah 1,447 1-673 2,075 1,971 1.734 1 ,9 4
:.nri-na 692 1,249 1,436 1,795 1,705 1, -37
?e:nt-vlvania 1,214 1,682 1.817 2.100 1,744 1,79o
~,ru Tocalj 20,921 27,475 33,379 39,230 3o,324 39,u70
FLORILA AJD ...ARBY STAfES
iTousar ds
l.;is.issi oni 109 113 136 131 115 115
Al.cara 159 152 175 338 231 2Je
:-o.rgia 173 316 569 o20 372 391
l10ri ia 110 131 151 idl 136 195
3. Carolina 337 771 1,002 1,252 1,173 1.325
::. ro.li.a 330 559 783 1.018 0o7 1,064
Group Tstal 1,215 2,042 2,816 3,510 3,044 3,29c-


I




Page 90


Flue Cured


FLORIDA TOBACCO
(Brigt Lealf) 'I. No. 14-


Year

1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954


Acreage

2,000
5,000
4,700
7,000
8,000
16,800
16,300
29,500
12,700
11,300
13,000
13,600
19,000
19,400
20,400
22,800
16,400
18,900
18,000
22,500
22,700
21',2C0
21,400


Production

1,200,000 Lbs.
3,700,000
3,408,000
6,020,000
7,200,000
14,112,000
15,892,000
20,650,000
11,748,000
8,192,000
11,180,000
11,832,000
17,100,000
17,169,000
19,176,000
23,256,000
16,554,000
20,223,000
18,270,000
27,000,000
25,878,000
22,684,000
26,108,000


Estimated Farm Value o


$ 132,000
444,000
682,000
1,056,000
1,584,000
2,978,000
3,226,000
2,540,000
2,056,000
1,745,000
3,611,000
4,827,000
6,190,000
6,662,000
9,147,000
9,070,000
7,918,000
7,644,000
9,391,000
13,716,000
13,275,000
11,682,000


110
124
200
170.7
220
21.10
20.30
12.30
17.50
21.30
32.30
40 .8
36.20
38.80
47.70
39.00
47.80
37.80
51.4
50.80
51.30
51.50


per Lb.
00 "
OD 00
00 00
9000
00 00
00 OR
00 0
00 g0
00 02
00 90

00 00
go 0

00 0







00 go
go 0
ai n
00 9

'



0 M
ai g
" w



10 "
a" n


Sun Cured(Dark Leaf)Type No. 56


Year
Summer


Acreage


Type


Production


Estimated
Farm Value


1,000 B 1,300,000 $174,000
600 B 450,000 65,000
600 B 630,000 110,000
200 B 166,000 37,000
100 B 70,000 19,000
100 B 93,000 31,000
100 B 105,000 58,000
200 B 140,000 66,000
100 B 70,000 42,000
100 B 85,000 (Estimates D
Less than 100 acres. No importance, practically discontinued. No fu
Report discontinued.
B: Binder (Type 56) statistics started in 1936 and continued to date.


Per Pound

13.40
14.4A
17.50
22.0*
27.00
33.00
55.00
47.00
60.00
isoontinued)
rther reports.


Shade Grown-Air Cured (Dark Leaf) Wrapper Type No0 2


(Prelimiary)


Acreage

2,000
1,100
1,600
2,100
2,000
2,100
2,400
2,500
3,200
3,300
2,800
2,600
2,600
2,400
3,000
3,300
3,600
4,000
4,200
4,100
4,000
3,300
3,700


Production

1,970,000 Lbs.
990,000
1,424,000
1,890,000
2,050,000
1,890,000
2,712,000
2,150,000
3,280,000
3,069,000
2,968,000
2,912,000
2,925,000
2,820,000
2,970,000
3,416,000
4,212,000
4,920,000
4,998,000
5,392,000
4,580,000
3,448,000
4,699,000


Estimated Farm Value

$ 90, 000 or 354 per 1
317,000 320 W
854,000 600 W
1,228,000 650
1,414,000 69 '
1,304,000 690
1,953,000 720 '
1,570,000 73 '
2,296,000 750 m
2,240,000 ) 731 w
3,087,000 $1.04 m
4,019,000 1.38 -
4,212,000 1.44
5,217,000 1.85 0
6,534,000 m 2.20
9,052,000 m 2.65
10,319,000 s 2.45
9,594,000 1.95 0
9,996,000 0 2.00 m
9,706,000 1.80 0
8,244,000 1.80 0
6,034,000 m 1.75 "


(Preliminary)


1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
NOTE


Year

1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954


NOTEs Flue Cured Type No. 14 is generally known as cigarette tobacco
Shade Grown Type 62 is generally known as cigar wrapper tobacco.
Sun Cured Type 56 is generally known as cigar filler tobacco.
a Farm Value based on production estimate and auction price average.
(Auction Volume and Value on next page.)





FLORIDA AUCTION S;& 3
(Flue Cured Tobaoco i&pe 14)
Revised figures of the Tobacco Branch, A.M.S., U.S. Department


of A-riculture


Season


1940 7,903,700
1941 5,726,227
1942 7,269,574
1943 8,110,475
19A4 12,330,566
1945 12,148,104
1946 13,192,482
1947 16,596,141
19-8 12,346,106
1949 16,262,984
1950 13,773,151
1951 20,807,570
1952 20,486,535
1953 18,280,109
1954 22,751,657


Pounds


Producer's Sales
Value

$ 1,300,069
1,211,684
2,381,502
3,308,024
4,496,293
4,742,528
6,353,484
6,510,858
5,896,173
6,129,689
7,137,519
10.837,572
10,609,752
9,451,882
12,407,724


Resales
Va-ue


Average (1)

$16.45
21.16
32.76
40.79
36.46
39.04
48.16
39.23
47.76
37.69
51.82
52.10
51.30
51.70
54.53


PounOi

689,982
707,736-
748,850
1,135,708
1,255,424
1,219,300
1,595,702
2,020,091
1,698,258
1,707,535
1,704,686
2,190,056
2,322,331
3,029,531
4,061,370


* Estimated. (1) Average Price per 100 lbs.

1949-54 Sales by Tndividual Markets

Producers Resales
Pounds Value Founos Value

High Springs 1953(First Year) 797,632 $ 373,173 215,008 $ 99,382
1954 1,973,660 1,003,424 776,396 430,400
1949 3,122,799 1,131,006 369,408 114,939
1950 2,612,372 1,378,365 388,442 204,666
1951 4,857,527 2,427,309 580,474 287,965
Jasper 1952 4,737,907 2,484,908 789,526 443,804
1953 4,251,526 2,278,519 871,396 466,257
1954 5,236,680 2,857,483 1,120:944 605,846

1949 4,483,162 1,714,472 367,016 117,590
1950 4,099,281 2,077,067 268,832 106.186
1951 5,384,295 2,800,906 392,920 177,361
Lake City 1952 5,604,290 2,880,322 43A,497 191,780
1953 4,236,272 2,101,314 412,286 185,330
1954 5,025,891 2,686,975 497,770 231,183

1949 8,657,023 3,284,211 971,111 346,729
1950 7,061,498 3,682,087 1,047,412 526,885
1951 10,565,748 5,609,357 1,216,662 624,537
Live Oak 1952 10,144,338 5,244,522 1,098,308 569,771
1953 8,994,679 4,698,876 1,530,841 754,739
1954 10,515,426 5,859,843 1.oo4.200 871,871

1949 16,262,984 $ 6,129,689 1,707,535 $ 579,258
1950 13,773,151 7,137,519 1,704,686 837,736
1951 20,807,570 10,837,572 2,190,056 1,089,863
Totals 1952 20,486,535 10,609,752 2,322,331 1,205,355
1953 18,280,109 9,451,882 3,029,531 1:505,708
1954 22,751,657 12,407,724 4.061,370 2.139,360


PRODUCTION ALL


FLORIDA TOBACCO


Flue, Sun and Shade Cured


Pounds

16,328,000
11,711,000
14,778,000
14,910,000
20,095,000
20,082,000
22,251,000
26,812,000
20,846,000
25,228,000
23,268,000
32,392,000
30,458,000
26,132,000
30,807,000


Farm Value

$ 4,526,000
4,050,000
6,808,000
8.883,0CC
10-421,000
11,910,000
15,739,000
18,188,000
18,279,000
17,238,000
19,387,000
23,422,000
21,519,000
17;710- v
( Aot yet available )


Page 91


Season

1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954


Acres

16,900
15,200
16,400
16,400
21,700
21 900
23,500
26,300
20,100
23,000
22, 200
26,600
26,700
24,500
25,100


Price
Per Lb.

$ .277
.346
.461
.596
.519
.593
.707
.678
,877
.683
.833
.723
.706
.678


$ 107,670
143,309-
227,892
470,026
417,923
452,203
706,444
740,141
782,141
579,258
837,736
1,089,863
1,205,355
1,505,708
2:139,360


ALr ra ge

$15.60
20-25*
30.43
41.39
33.29
37.09
44.27
36.64
46.06
33.92
49.14
49.80
51.46
49.70
52.66





Page 92 U.S. AGRICULTURAL S TABILIZATEION D CO~NSERVAZON COWM TTlEE
Gainesville, Florida
PEANUTS UNDER MARKETING QUOIN.

MWrketing quotas were effective on the 1953 crop of peanuts, farmers having voted in favor of
quotas on a National basis in 1950 for a three-year period 1951 through 1953. A referendum was also held
on December 15, 1953 to determine if quotas were to be effective on the 1954 crop. Nationally the 7ote
for quotas was 94,3 percent. In Florida the vote was 85.4 percent for quotas. Quotas were voted on the
1954, 1955 and 1956 crops.

Acreage allotments totaling 57,897.0 acres were established on 5,780 farms located in 28
counties in the State. Total acreage harvested (picked and threshed) as determined by measurements was
50,065 acres or 86.5 percent of the total farm acreage allotments. The total production reported was
50,497,744 pounds for an average yield of 1,009 pounds per acre.

The level of support was at 90 percent of parity with a National average support price of
$237,60 a ton. lasic support prices by types were as follows
Runners $213.00 Ton
S.E. Spanish 234.00 Ton
SUMMARY OF 1953 PEANUT ALLOTMENTS ACREAGE
PICKEDD, THRESHED AND ACTUAL YIELD)


Lou =ts


Alachua
3aker
Bay
Calhoun
Columbia
Dixie
Escambia
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Hamilton
Holmes
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Leon
Levy
Liberty
Madison
Marion
Okaloosa
Putnam
Santa Rosa
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
W3kulla
Walt.on
Wa shingt.on
0ETAL (ASC)
STATE MOTAL (A


No. Allotment
Farm s


123
2
8
158
144
10
8
120
119
29
621
2,320
108
104
58
179
1
27
188
94
5
617
244
2
2
36
280
373


Allotted
Acreage


1,852.7
121l
100ol
1,925,9
807.7
16.8
48,9
1,009o5
253,7
242 o 8
3,857o6
29,157o7
1,283o2
213,7
556.o5
2,094o8
8.0
297.1
2,365.6
83902
98o0
6,114o8
1,488o2
9.0
2o0
594.3
1,510.2
1,136.9


Total Picked
and Threshed
Acrea ge
1,706
10
0
1,709
595
15
38
804
201
165
3,327
25,253
1,018
129
400
1,910
0
151
2,061
706
0
5,753
1,466
8
0
531
1,267
842


Production


1,494,832
5,814
0
2,123,694
440,403
7,780
42,377
787,548
12d,265
50,122
3,569,824
25,216,837
557,014
88,979
210,407
1,413,445
0
97,043
1,568,893
845,477
0
7,563,993
1,593,412
3,320
0
376,136
1,4482,331
862 798


5,780 57,897.0 50,065 50,497,744 1,009
LL PRODUCTION) 56,000 54,600,000


FLORIDA FLUE-CURED TOBACCO 1953 SEASON
Marketing quotas were effective on the 1953 crop of flue-cured tobacco, farmers having voted in
favor of quotas on a National basis on July 19, 1952 for a three-year period, 1953 through 1955.

Nationally 98.8 percent of the farmers voting favored continuation of quotas. In Florida the
percentage was 96.7 in favor. As a result, quotas will be effective through the year 1955 unless
something unforeseen develops.

Acreage allotments totaling 21,999o6 acres were established on 7,125 farms in 3J counties in
Florida under the 1953 program0 The total harvested acreage was 20,980o1 acres on which the production
was 22,597,140 pounds for an average yield of 1,077 pounds per acre.

A summary of acreage and production data by counties is shown on the following page. Data re-
lating to the price support program for the 1953 crop of flue-cured tobacco is carried under the Price
Support part of this report

A summary of across-state-line moveiient of the 1953 crop is shown on next page. iThe figures
show that approximately 20.2 percent of the 1953 Florida crop was marketed in Georgia0 Only a small
amount of tobacco from other States was marketed in Floridao


Avg, Yield
Per Acre

876
581
0
1,243
740
519
112
980
638
304
1,073
999 '
547
690
526
740
0
643
761
1,198
0
1,315
1,087
415
0
708
1,144
1,025





Page 93


Aoruss-State-Line I. jm-L i,


Produced in
State

Alabama
Florida
Georgia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Virginia
Total


County


Pound s

657,264
4,572,368
410,878
42,035,740
30,482,186
8,803,025
86,961,461




No. Allot-
ment Farms


Florida Georgia


40,038

408,106
183,606
177,816


615,970
4,572,368

8,214,942
12,409,415


809,566 25,812,695


Sold in
Vo.L-rolinA



2,772

17,888,841
8,795,165
26,686,778


-So.9T' inia




5,244,624 28,392,568
0,114


7,660
5,253,740


2d,398,o82


SUMMARY CF 1953 FLUE-CURED TOBACCO ALLO'D..TS
Planted Acreage and Actual Yield


Allotted
A-rea Ae


Planted Avg. Yield
Acreage er Acre
iLbs. )


Allot.


Jo. 'arms
Planting
withoutt
Allot.


Alachua 691
Baker 193
Bradford 106
Calhoun 3
Columbia 90b
Dixie 66
Duval 5
Gadsden 161
Gilchrist 257
Hamilton 542
Hillsborough 3
Holmes 31
Jackson 111
Jefferson 250
Lafayette 414
Lake 1
Leon 33
Levy 108
Liberty 1
vhdison 1,052
Marion 14
Nassau 47
Orange 3
Polk 1
Putnam 1
Sumter 40
Suwannee 1,692
Taylor 192
Union 201
Volusia 1
TOTAL (ASC) 7,125
STATE TOTAL (ALL PRODUCTION)
DOTAL STAiE PRODUCTION


2,831.4
373.7
3^3.,1
3.5
2,406.1
152.2
3.5
300.7
564.2
2,821.1
4.7
60.6
23b.5
49b.3
1,618.5
0.3
63.3
205 .7
0.6
2,855.1
33.8
91.7
3,2
1.1
0.2
62.0
5,375.7
438.7
648.1
2.0
21,999.6


2,657-8
352.9
310.9
4.8
2,359.3
143.8
2.7
303.0
514.3
2,722.9
3.3
52.8
187.6
465 ,0
1,589.9
0
55.1
186.7
0.6
2,748.0
28-7
74,8
1.3
1.1
0
4A.0
5,114.9
439.0
612.9
2.0
20,980.1
21,200


1,048
1,148
1,048
950
1,088
1,088
926
1,111
978
1,165
1.326
1,064
877
1,009
1,072
0
870
819
870
1,057
875
1,240
782
809
0
730
1,062
1,197
1,179
0
1,077


22,684,000 lbs.

TOBACCO (Flue-Cured) PRICE SU??ORT


Price support to eligible producers (those harvesting within their aozeage allotment) on -he 1953
flue-cured tobacco crop was provided by Commodity Credit Corporation through te F-ie-Cured Tobacco
Stabilization Cooperative Corporation. This Cooperative operated at each auction warehouse. 2he level
of support was at 90% of parity.
The average loan rate was 47.9 cents per pound and varied from a low of 9 cents per pound to 68 cent!
per pound for untied tobacco (the average for tied tobacco was 5 cents higher on each grade).
Eligible tobacco sold at auction by farmers (who held membership in the cooperative) which did not
sell at or above the applicable support price for the grade involved was placed -u. load by the
Stabilization Cooperative with use of Commodity Credit Corporation funds, and prod-c3rs were paid the
support price less usual warehouse charges and deduction of 12 cents per hundred 3er,'ce charge for
overhead expense of cooperative.
Approximately 560,464 pounds of the 1953 crop in Florida failed to bring the support price at the
auctions and was purchased at the support price of $223,629,72. This represented only -bcu-t 2.5 of the
total 1953 production in Florida.
The net gain made by the Cooperative on the 1950 crop jf flue-cured tobacco from the entire belt
was approximately $3,000,000, and these funds were distributed to farmers in January 195^. No record
is available of the amounts distributed by states,

Note, Flue-Cured known as Type 14 is also known as cigarette tobacco.


657
180
96
3
879
60
2
156
233
5:i

25
87
237
413
0
28
92
1
i.0 20
9
36
1
1

32
1,677
181
1?6


45


22,684,000 ibso

TOBACCO (Flue-Cured) PRICE SUPPO


I




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs