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Title: Florida agricultural statistical summary.
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Title: Florida agricultural statistical summary.
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Language: English
Creator: Florida State Marketing Bureau.
Publication Date: 1947-1948
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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Acknowledgement
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
    Main
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Full Text










FLORIDA STATE MARKETING BUREAU


ANNUAL FRUIT AND VEGETABLE REPORT

PRODUCTION, TRANSPORTATION AND MARKETING ANALYSIS

1947-48 SEASON

(Also Poultry, Egg, Livestock, Tobacco and Ficld Crop Statistics)



By Frank H. Scruggs, Market News Specialist
















Neill Rhodes, Commissioner
Florida State Marketing Bureau
Division of
Florida State Department of Agriculture
Nathan Mlayo, Commissioner




This Annual Report is available free of charge to parties interested

Released October 11, 1948




Florida State Marketing Bureau
505 West Adams Street
P. 0. Box 779
Jacksonville 1, Florida








A C K N O L LE D G .: E N T


We wish to acknowledge the splendid cooperation wve received from both
official and private sources during the preparation of this rather comprehensive
statistical report.

The rail freight and express carlot shipment figures were secured from the
Fruit and Vegetable Branch of the Production and Earketing Administration,
U.S. Department of Agriculture in Washington, D.C.

Exhaustive vegetable acreage, yield, production and value data and other
assistance vwas supplied by IMr. J. C. Townsend, Jr. and MIr. J. B. Ovens, Agricul-
tural Statisticians, and Mr. G. N. Rose, Truck Crop Statistician, U.S. Bureau of
Agricultural Economics, Federal Building, Orlando, Florida.

Mr. A. L. Scarborough, Statistician of the Citrus and Vagetable Division,
Florida Department of Agriculture, Ivinter Haven, Florida, supplied us with important
record data and other information. Mr. Hugh Flynt, Assistant Director of this
division, supplied a detailed summary of inspections for the season. The daily
reports from their Road Guard Stations, operated by the Citrus and Vegetable Divisic
showing passing of fruits and vegetables, were very h-.lpful to shippers and growers
throughout the season and for record purposes in this report.

L-r. H. F. Willson, Federal-State Citrus I'arket Hews Service, also supplied
useful data for use in this report.

Mr. H. G. Clayton, Director of Agricultural Extension Service, Gainesville
Florida, prepared an interesting article on government price supports.

Mr. LaLMonte Graw, Manager of th,- Florida Fruit and Vegetable Association,
prepared an article on the farm labor situation.

Mr. Lilliam B. Conner, of the Florida Citrus Exchange, Tampa, whole-
heartedly complied with our requests for specified citrus information.

Several official and private agencies and individuals not already mention
supplied information directly or indirectly to us, for which we extend our thanks.

The preparation of this report is tedious and requires long and hard work,
and appreciation by the writer is extended to our Bureau staff for their efforts anc
accomplishments. Mr. L. H. Lewis, Specialist, Live Stock and Field Crops, and 1'r.
Gifford N. Rhodes, Specialist, Live Stock Market Novws, of this Bureau, supplied
certain livestock information.



Comments which would lead to the improvement of this Arnnual Report would
be appreciated. We have never gottn any suggestions for improving this report and
therefore we suspect that no one reads this page.






GENERAL TAL'LE OF CONTENTS
Parc
Citrus Fruits Only (Oranges, Grapefruit and Tangerines) iiunmbur

Citrus Acreage, Yield per Acre, Yield per Tree and Prices Received h
Volume and Value Analysis of Citrus for 19L7-48 Season 6-7
Canners' Prices for Delivered Citrus and Volume Canned by Seasons 10
Tree to Auction Costs or Vice Versa, for Last 3 Seasons JI
Interstate Truck Distribution by States 1947-h8 Season li
Rail Distribution of Citrus by States for 2 Seasons 15
Volume and Value Analysis of Citrus by Years 1927-28 to 1947-48 (21 Y.-ars) 16- 3
Inspections of Citrus, Including Limes, by Counties 3'
Auction Sales 18 Seasons 1930-31 to 1947-48 i,0-]?
Florida F.O.B. Sales Averages 1909-10 to 1947-48 Seasons L3
Citrus Price Analysis 1932-33 to 1947-48 Seasons )h-45
Bearing Acreage of Citrus by Counties 3 Seasons 76-77
Production of Citrus by Florida, California, Texas, and other Stat:r 86
Citrus Trees :oving from Nurseries 1946-47 Season 87
Citrus Trucked Through Road Guard Stations and Truck Shipmicnts by Yonths 88

Vegetables and .Uiscellancous Fruits Only

Acreage, Yield, Production and Value of 1947-48 Season (U.S. Dept. of Agri.) 12-13
Truck Shipments by Weeks for 1947-L8 Season 38-39
Gross F.O.B. Packed Value 16 Seasons 61
Acreage of Principal Truck Crops for 23 Seasons (2-page suImary) 62-63
Acreage, Yield and Value Selected Commodities by Seasons 1929-30 to 191?7-48 64-68
Fall, Winter and Spring Acreagc by Counties for 3 Seasons 78-85
All Fruits and Vegetables
General Summ.ary of the 1947-46 Season by F. H. Scruggs 1-2
Florida's Farm Labor Situation (Article by LaT[onte Graw) 3-4
Production and Value for 14 Seasons 5
Disposition of Units of Production and of Carloads According to Uses 8-9
Transportation-Freight, Express, Boat and Truck by Months-1947-h8 Season 24-27
Transportation-Frcight, Express, Boat and Truck 10 Seasons 28-31
Transportation-Rail Freight Carloads by Counties of Origin 32-35
Federal-State Inspections by Comaodities 1907-48 Season 36
County Fruit and Vegetable Value Formula (By F. H. Scruggs) 48
Weather Conditions and Production 1947-48 Season (By J. C. To-nsond, Jr.) 60
Acreage by Counties, All Fruits and Vegetables, 3 Secsons 70-77

General A;-ricultiural Statistics

Government Price Supports (Article by H. G. Clayton) 46-47
General Crop Statistics 1920-1948 (Crop, Cotton, Peanuts, etc.) 49-51
Tobacco Production, Value and Auction Data by Seasons 52
Egg and Poultry Prices, Jacksonville 1921-48, Tampa and L'iami 1939-48 53-55
Livestock, General Facts of Industry (By L.H.Lewis and Giffonrd IH. Rhodes) 56-57
L'_vEstock Prices in Jacksonville and Southeast, 1930 to 1948 58-59
Average Prices Received September 15 with Comparison 69






FLORIDA DEPArT;EINT OF AGRI C;:L'TUR;
STATi. 17 .11.rll;G r 'r.AirI
134,11-4C
An]:UAL FR'.'IT AI :D VL,;:.A'Ji h}E "JRT

By Frank H. Scruggs, ;.Thr.'et Ne.ws Specialist

VOLUME AJD VALIJE uF ALL FRlIT'T. A.JD VLG}3ABLLS

The first paragraph of our l1st ye':r'z (194G-47) Annual Report was as follow;
to. .vit: "Another cventf'Ul crop sc-acon has passed but the beginning of the 1947-48
season is so upset as these v.s..rds bre vrritt.en, Oct,.ber 17, 1947, that it br-rely seens
useful to go into the hi-stor. of .:-* 1916-47 season, .-:hich was only r.odrratcly and
Lue-..enly su.cessfu 1." I-e can r,. n.lm~:t tri .-, s :i thing for 1947-48 sretsonr this
Octob-r 1L', 1948, and for tur' 1948-49 sc.sr-cn getting underway.
Ve had t.wo hurrLcanT ui the fall of 1947 and two lesser ones In late epte"n-
her '-and .a::rly, October cof tni.s '' ar *.'e had morc v:atr sr.,-ad ovcr Florida in Octo.bcr
1947 than in Octobcr 194?, but wve hi'.' f.r .nor, than we .:-.:d rig.:t now. The ve-otabl:
plantings in South florida 'rc b inS gri'.:-.tl' d&lay'. d. This is true to a lessor extent
in sor.- oth-r v'-.rtabl' se-ct i on; of F'lorid a.
Th;-r.: is little: good to s,.' :b',',t tlc ,rcasa just passed except to say it
cculd have brcn ai litr.le w.-rsc for citr,. .-id mucrihi',ors. for vepgotaoles.
'.e h:.d t r.nt of 10' :", r box on citr'.:s l'.ast zasr which was the lowest since
the 1958-7.9 -.e- on ',:te-n .". had 7..' -,n] in -.I; 19; 2-5.3 .-c-on wh ren ;c ;had 2 net.
Sa:-:..s and int..ruzt on inv.'. at rr, nt. -hould hb dd j.-t.-d fron t'lis not which .akcs the
1947-40 citr...s or, tot.l o '.; a.- f .r '.S t.h .. ., r1i... rowvor is concerned. All he
did was to voz! for no-hi:n. for sa lot of pr-.pli Too much citrus is gonzo to the
cannr-r .t u low:' pric._ to be sold L-- r in c:.Jnc at a )ricc- f.r too low for the good of
fr.-sh citrus, On th.: cth -. r r -rr. cha:'ring ,hc consurm r too much for
fre. h citrus. Sorrn: of t' .!;-. '.or-. on a 10': p cnt. .r'1 u If 35 ?o r c(nt was
enoughh befor.. th.: -..-ar c nrt. -: .n ,' 40 p-r c '-:t scU'-.ro noci,,r-' now.

.{LC.'.'
Florida produced and utilii zed 237,' 4 c'.lo'.-s ,j fruits and vegetables last
s. ason ca co.mpbr.t. d to 6C2 ,99. c ri o:, ,q:iv.l. t it, th'-_. 11,16-47 season, The gross
fob value was nou.cv.r Lnly .i114,74 ".,000 comp:.r, d to 4.. ,700,000 for the 1946-47
I season.
Citrus alone acc-.uint-d for 214,045 ccarloods pr )'iJccd at a gross fob value ot
only .:ll- 1 ,92, 000. Th.- o'vrae pr-c- on earlo..-d 'ar ,..s r 30 ptr cent off from
a,%'ragc for 1946-47 s"Esn.
Ve t tables, strwvb.-rriec and w.i'r.me.'ons, cc"it ed for 83,939 carloads with
a gross 'value ,o-f '9',8i7,00 co-. npired t- 72,2-' carlo.'; and 4.102,144,000 for the
1946-47 so-ason. They w'e-'A off 15,; fror,-'.erngr- price in 1946-47 season.
Sira lar inforratioIo to that above mary be found o-.n page 5 of this report
cove:.ring. al t h- s_-asors fron 19,:4-5 to dare.
Instead of using up several pa,--s to exrors: his own ideas, the vwriter has
called it: sore of the --xp.-rts of' the State, to say f".*.'vords.
Lal.:nt,- Gru:':, r.r.,.:.r of the Flori'!a iF'riit and Veg, itable Assn., a non-pro-
fit org-ani'ation,, forat.rly the Florida ir r.-.tbl- .o:-ni tte':, gives us a summary of the
Plorida farm Labor Situation. P -a:,ys that lon:ir *-:.p.rie.-n has shownm t.iat higher wag.
ra-es (to certain kinds of l"'r.m work.-!s) u'.:;-ly r-dv.ce rather than encourage
efficiency and r.:liability. This is :.n int..-re:;t. i u observation and there are more
inte resting thoughts ini his article. TuIrn to p:. .', S 1-_'I-r on.
C. C. Cla'-to!, Dir..ctcr 1.'f th:i Airi, It aral rErtcnsion Service, one of the
for.nmozt leaders of ar-ricultur- in Florida, are-d to dre iss in question and answer
forrm.Price Support, Purit'y, "Stcao-li" co.-..diti.-., etc. If you cannot name the six
basLc co-,nodit i:-s an.r th: St-.fali cownon it ics ai d:' net lnow'; the definition of
parity y,'u should turn to pgc.c 46 Jo thi: r.:p':.!t. This Annual Report is used by a
larg.- r-,unnr of' st'dnts u'..utur & p-rof. sio'n l :.co!o1 -i-ts, and also research
Page 1





Page 2
specialists,and I an sure :r.:.nr' L tic.:n ,lli b, l..as .'l to !I .. thc s.. aiian w .r v'hcCe
they can find then easily. 'i n t1 !! t i -- har.!i t.o r-.n..mb.,-b mu.:n .es r.coli,.-0:t.
Some questions and arn::xw '. r *n l. d-. i 1 i st ci: ~ ..r'cJ tb L. .. Lcvi, :. :'id
Gifford N. Rhodes, Livwstock 3p: ci:-.il sts .f t;c .tr.t.: !.iar:. ti. g .ur. ... c .' r. fo-uni
on page 56. You know, of c..'r.r: tihat il ri.l.- rani-. l th i n .If' :r r:.ng. c'ittlj.
35th in dairy cattle and 25th ii. total c i ttl ... T r_.. lo 't ,:,rf c-i l 1ii1.. 1-tirn O rn
the rarking of Florida in cat.t l, pr:oducti :ci. .*c :.rc m i:,n:; r:pid pr rxr :, .t .r.
not pushing Texas out of th: picture ,ct. 1hi.:r: i: p.. h- s mi r- r:al.ob lit, .f -r. t
expansion in livestock than in .:-.n ,.th r FlOrid-la a rc. lt r.i al- .-.I ty.
J. C. Townscndd. Jr., .I. i.Jricr ultjr:l i :T-.tl stii. t, ; i,-'.'.r .'
Florida's Crop Reporting Sc r-'ric: .i,: z.: *: s tI.. Pr.:d .c ion ..' r' I :.i: !'r : ..n.
Vegetables as affected by '". ..t r .. r Cc i-nd t :i *t'ruL tl .: 1947'-49 ..,: ..:.-. .I h. _-' .
you some agricultural fact t- b t.: itt. tii .ri a -,:p ri -t rror;, t.ii I_.1 ba *. p._ge- 60.

1947-48 PRICES C'.i',irLU '.'1TH 111 L i.'46-47 .j.uJ i,45-'46 ..:..


The following tabui, t] ,i no' tic l .''-b. Fi i-i ..la
of the commercial fruits and --: tabL-. 1 ". Florid-.


Florida
Commodities


Beans, fresh mkt.
Beans, for processing
II II
Beans, all uses
Limas
Cabbage
Celery
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Escarole
Lettuce,Boston & Rom.
Lettuce,Iceberg
Peas,English
Peppers
Potatoes
Tomatoes, fresh mktb.
Tomatoes, fresh mkt.
Tomatoes, processing
II 11

Tomatoes, all
Carrots, Winter
Cauliflower, Winter


Cantaloupes
Strawberrie s
Watermelons

Oranges
Grapefruit
Tangerines ..
All Citrus


i"'AP i!i,,t \V lu,-e
T19 -4.- 1:'i--47 -11'15. -i


Uni-


Bu. .
Ton '9r.7 ,,'
Bu. 1. '
Bu. 2.51 .
Bu. .'
Ton [r2.
Crt . .
Bu. .
Bu. i '.
Itpr: 1 .,:5
4-': ...: 'r : .K."t.
4-6 1.., c .' '.'
Bu. 2.5,
Bu. 2.1;
Bu. 2.7
Bu. 7.
Lur a: aci .-...;
Ton 2. .r5:
Bu. .7
Bu. 5..,.,
Bu. ., ,
Crt ',


Jurn b: C .t .
36--" :r' .
lOC -i ;.: ,:,,,


Bo:.e:

Be:- -


.!.5 ,
7.95
5 ,-, ,





.41
1 .' -


11I-3 .u'.'
1.6-
':!. ;.1

.51
3 .1
3. %4
.1.

.-_* 2


1I.;0
-. .3 1

2.:9
1. .,5

r.1
.* 5
-..* i :
-r .'1 1O
50
:. 50

7 .. .,
.' I. X,1
1 .0'.'
.0' *
1. 05

1 5.7::


9. <-
. ., 5


1.25
,...,9
' '
I 7 C


,; ..-L

iil 4
1 .47





1. *
1 ,,..
ii ,, f



1 .

1-. 0.:
..,


i ..,
S..'.7.

.5
. '.5
'
.'5:
5.. e4



**' -'-
- -r

-. '5
5.5.1-'


1- 7'-
S.2.5
1.771
r.24


g ,r:-.: : pack, ol v" 'lc ,f' ,.Of.-m,


.,: 1 u-,- 'r:..lct c:d **
1'4,-4. 1]: ?4-4, 1i43-4r
( h:,,"-l: ,,,;!TJ"* ,...nit,-.J)


5.-' .3


1 i- 1
,
i-i.
;-, 6':'1
l .5'5.




1 r,

2 ,8 ". ,,

.., ..1-
,.,5.. 5



5-:-6



c
It?
7 *"- ^
.- I

i 9
i 3,: '-,.5


3,',, 4 10
3.5,000

9- *-. r.


5,7-1'


,

401




712
i, i



1'2 ..'
6"-'

2,1 .-









- .- ,-

i2.1.,


-

1,1'

Ji IJ


1, ..44
1, 3t4

142



,050

4,47'-

-
212
.1,670





1575


55,70. 49,3'00
09,00 52,':'00
4 7. ( -, 20'
' -' I .:. : ."
.4,4 9-


* The tomato lug has a not i,. i lit. r. r..:. 'it. I'" .. I1 r c : t ..l t:.: t-,,t .
bushel.
** Those total volumes inclu di<.,- v '-,i -i-. .,L.- .J,_ ...t ,L ,, f .t t n.: td.
justify harvesting. Co sid .. "r ',:,~ l va ..I: b'u-nin. 0 during th,. r'-. tw-:o :..' rs.
See pages 64-68 for morc J.:.t.113.
The Florida citrus forrcact ,:, li- : .,-._ 0, t .:'..r- 10 f,:, 1,4 -4. ..ea :n i- ,
ol ows Oranges 64 00,00,- rp-ut 21 -' ,O : Tan:-inis 4,Or.a., t.tal
of 99,000,000, 1-3/7o buO'bo0: . -





FLORIDA'S :AFR: LABOR SIT'ATIOil
by: La?.Lontec Gr:'., :3.c./.-.if Ir.
Florica Fruit and Vegetable As'ociation
(Formerly the Florida Vegetable Committee)
Prior to YLorld War II, farm wave rates in Florida were low --- .1.60 to
..2.00 per day. The workers available were for the most part younger, stronger and
more killing to work than those who are now paid J5.00 per day and upward -- and fal
more for piece rates when harvesting. In spite of these low wage rates, many pro-
*.-ar farms did not survive, because of the small profit margin between cost and soll-
ing price.
During the war many of the best workers went to industry, thus reducing tM.1
supply at a time when Florida's farm labor needs were increasing 50,' or more. Thuse
who remained were less able to perform field tasks, or to learn now ones, and could ,
make enough in two or three days to carry them through the week. They worked short
hours, and produced less per man, because they lacked the vital necessity of working
full time to obtain the week's cash requirements.
From the standpoint of the nation's economy, it is difficult to justify
wages as low as Q2.00 per day, even in pre-war dollars. Yet the fact remains that
few Florida vegetable producers grossed sufficient income from their products before
19h2 to have permitted them to pay higher wages for the services performed.. If a
grower had offered higher wage rates, without a corresponding increase in efficiency,
or worker output, he would soon have gone broke.
Despite these wage increases thct provide the opportunity for a good farm
hand to earn from .,O to $100 per week on vegetable farms, th; average Florida farm
worker has shown little initiative or desire for economic advancement, or to
accumulate funds. Higher wages have meant merely that he worked fewer hours for thl
dollars to pay for that week's needs.
Some industries have been able to reduce their unit costs by cutting the
number of hours worked and increasing wa:e rates. This has been true where labor
saving equipment was used, and conditions permitted the employer to adopt better
production practices. During the past ten years many Florida growers have adopted
improved practices that materially, reduced the number of man-hours. of labor require,
but this reduction is in large measure offset by the higher wage rates and v.orker
inefficiency, resulting in unit costs often being higher than before labor saving
devices were purchased.
This was not important during the war years, whcn good prices prevailed f,
all products, including some that should have gone to the cull bin. A seller's
market permitted the grower to ignore sound business practices and still make a
profit. Such will not be the case in the future.
Production-of fresh vegetables over widely separated areas in the United
States, Cuba and Iexico, has increased to a point where the nation's markets can be
kept constantly over-suppliQd except after major disasters. Unless the Florida
producer can reduce his cost per unit of marketable products, he cannot long expect
to compete with Texas, Cuba Pnd KLexico, wlich have far lower labor costs, or with
California, whose hi-lher rago rates are offset by higher yields.
So long as national employment and living costs are high (and prices for
Florida products will drop before wages) there is little likelihood that the wages
paid Florida farm workers will be materially lowered, in spite of their inc fficienc
They may even rise during the present shortage.
The Florida producer can lower his unit production cost through the more
efficient use of more cfficinnt and reliable workers. To attract this type of
worker, or to induce: those we have now to do better, we must offer incentives other
than the pay, for long experience has shown that higher v:age rates usually reduce
rather than encourage efficiency and reliability.
The Florida State and U.S. Employment Services are seeking to recruit
sufficient workers to produce and harvest our crops, but they cannot compel or indu
the worker to accept employment when offered. The Florida Fruit and Vegetable
Association, through its labor division, is providing more than 1- million man hour
of supplementary Bahaman labor. The latter is not a permanent solution to the
problem, for there aro. economic and political reasons w:.hy the use of foreign worker




Page h
cannot be continued beyond the present emergecrcy. .Lhcn they lcv,, f:rrm..rs na;: find
themselves unable to get sufficient labor.
Improvement of the Florida farm labor situation, s,., that th- former c-n
afford to pay today's wage rates and stay in business, and continunce of t.i. aimrost
total absence of labor strife that has been the history of ti.: FloridJ v._-t:bl-:
industry, are largely dependent on the development of a procedure which ,--iv'e both
the worker and the employer greater assurance that their mutual needs c .ill h.: F,.: t.
It must be a program that "recognizes" the worker as an indi'.-idu1l rnd rnot -.: "ju,-t
another migrant;" it must reward him for effort and accomplisidn :nt -- in addition t,.
his pay; competent workers must be given greater consideration thin tlios.;: .f 1...s.,
skills and willingness, including assurance of the best availabic lihousin'. X:imum
opportunity for employment, and other incentives that. will encourj;e: Imi to beh r,.;
diligent, more interested. in his work, more reliable and thrifty, and m.r, d...:irous
of improving his skills. And it must provide the grower with i iop. n'di.. vork-
ing force than can enable him to grow and harvest his crops .atl mi::imuT t' .:.,
and a maximum of efficiency.
Individual farmers, who employ migrants for only sort p.-ri..d during, .-ac
season, can greatly improve their methods of handling farm workers, but ti.:,- canot
provide them with adequate incentives and rewards to keep up the intcr..t. o thi..
worker. Continuity of contact with the individual workerer, to', .',-.urc th:it he iz
sufficiently "recognized" and rewarded for merit, is possible c.nl,- throajh a crntcril
organization which can maintain records from season to soason. and nr:. cert.ir thet
the worker gets his just dues, no matter where he may be empLo,'o.'.
With these factors before it, Florida Fruit and Voe-tiLlc A.sso.iti7'n's
Labor Coimmittee is studying various methods of attaining the deir.:d rvult-., and it
is hoped they can be developed and put into operation soon enough to -:1d tl.:. grower
in meeting the labor shortage anticJipated for .1948-49. END.
CITRUS ACREAGE, YIELD PER ACRE AND TREE, AiND Pr. I'.T -1 TI.;i
All Fruit ilct
Total Box Boxes uross Let i Insiolz Dollars
Production Yield Yield Per Return Return Abarnd.:-nc-i Per
Season Acres in 1-3!/Bu Box Per Acre Tree Box .o:.: o:::s A- e
ORANGES
T----- .2.,ho 37,200,000 711 2.3 .2. 72 1 .L2'. "' 19
19- 2,30 200 000 18 2.8 2.1 1. 1
l9h-45 2 6,30 L2,800,000 17 2.5 3.17 2
19>-L46 264,900 h9,800,000 l18 2.0 3.2 ... -*6
19L6-47 270,000 53,700, 000 199 3.0 1.93 F.: ,), 5
9lg7-RB 2d0, 00 8,h00,000 208 3.2 1.L 31
GRAPEFRUIT
T .I2T- 9h,390 27; 300;000 289 h.h i.h8 .6 19h
193-- 95,190 31,000,000 326 4.9 1.83 .*' 301
1 -5 90 oo 22,300,000 2 8 ',8 2.2 -
19-L6 90, 500 32,000,000 3 h 1. 77 -
1N 91,000 29,000,000 3 1.8 1.2' d '-u:-
1h-h 93,000 33,000,000 355 5 .82 -.:i ': ;.
TA:;T'RINES
17) 2 23,hl9 ,200,000 179 2.7 2.72 .9 17
19- 23419 ,600Uo0o 15h 2:3 .62 -. 2
-w 23,19 000 000 171 2.6 13 .i1 --
19 -h6 23,5h9 200,000 178 2.7 6 .-h 2.1h. 3
19 6 7 23 705 7,0,000 198 0 2. "
1907-8 23, 800 ,000,000 168 2. 25 i ,i
TOTAL CITRUS
iT2-5T- = ,1h9 68,700,000 189 2.9 2.23 ".11 D'
19 c-.9 39~9 60,800,000 218 3.3 2.L7 l.,. 2
19-4, 369,7 9 69,100,000 187 2.8 2.93 3. ',',- .
h.5- 6 3d78,9L0 86,000,o0o 227 ?,.h 2.7 -.' -
1946- 7 3,7o5 87,hoo,00ooo 227 3.h 1.76 -.L' -',, 1b
19h7-L 397,3 00 95,0000000 2)0 3. 1.2 'I,' 2L
There are several reasons why the production per tr.2e has iLncrar c. One rea-on
is that the bearing surfaces of the trees have -been increasing --ch .--. r. .m.--. of
the non-bearing acreage set out during the war may reduce th av-ra- Icr t.:"e .urfin
the next few years as it comes into bearing. Another reason if-.r in.re.--c pr.dctio ,
per tree i better grove care. Some say the groves have been psh ....
The' Nct Return is the net after production costs and all .:-th. co.-t e .t,
taxes, interest on investment, and depreciation on equipment.




Se


FLORIDA PRODUCTION AU' VALUE C'eR 1 SEASONS
(Include-s Canned and Locally Consumed)


ALL CITRUS


Carloads
Production
8B,865
74,491
102,827
103,964
143,369
10),119
140,903
120,089
154,909
181,592
156,759
197,050
1901730
214,045


ALL CITRUS


Florida
Gross Value
4t2,797,752
53,189,191
68,838,758
53,285,352
58,616,931
50,365,127
64,192,695
80,572,520
153,052, 89
199,688,696
201,912,530
236,230,700
1466,565,500
114,925,000


lreighted
Avcrare All
Production a
Larketinr Ni-t:
1.- .-27
1.09
1.0 8 .22
.()7 07
1.05 .1
.99 .16
1.09 .57
1.12 1.11
1.31 1.16
1.31 1.62
1.29 1.46
1.32 .44
1.16 .10


ALL VEGETABLES


Carloads
Production
48, 411
45,718
51.885
70,000
63,506
65,151
58,560
70,191
63,221
70,219
69,225
76,943
58,049
68,670


Florida
Gross Value
S$30,134,05T
30,666,719
34,445,922
37,306,680
38,489,172
37,962,385
43,077,616
57,417,670
81,823,200
87,328,394
99,441,550
116,239,000
91,618,000
89,237,000


ALL VEGETABLES & M.ISCL. FRUITS


Carloads
Production
3T-,'30()(
52,670
60,118
82,130
77,606
75,1'401
61,486
80,219
62,11.5
79,6o.5
81,213
89,377
72,262
83,939


Florida
Gross Value
T33,9367127
34,144,707
39,090,756
hl,410,710
143,573,732
42,738,720
48,562,482
62,706,220
87,555,990
94,944,402
107,673,150
128,099,000
102,144,000
99,317,000


ALL FRUITS AND VEGETABLES


Season
1934-35)
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1936-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-142
1942-143
1943-44
19144-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48
* Net before deducting for taxes,


Carloads
Production
1o0, 17.1.
127,181
162,945
16,094
220,9 75
184,563
209,389
200,'308
224,55h
261,197
237,912.
286,427
262,992
297,9864
interest on i


investment


Florida
Gross Value
$ 77,156,615
76,733,879
107,929,514.
94,696,062
102,220,663
93,103,847
112,768,552
143,278,840
2)1.0,608, 79
294,633,098
.309,585,630
364,329,700
218,7C9,580
214,742,000
and depreciation if any.


Season
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
174o0-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
19144-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48


Season
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-145
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48


Gross
.133
1.81.
1.70
1.30
1.014
1.17
1.15
1.66
2.23
2. 47
2.93
2.75
1.76
1.26


Boxes
32, o37,7;4
29,462,052
40,601,208
40,939,629
56,447,995
42,973,112
55,890,754
48,400,000
68,700,446
80,800,000
69,000,000
86,000,000
83;100,000
91,100,000




0?!COEDS. aD ,CTIt.'ATES ON 0FLOhIDA CITRUS CROP FOR SEASOh-AJGUST 1. 1947r-JULY 31, 194b


Carloads Boxes Freight
Total Boat, Truck
Freight E:.press and Express
3?7,341- 2,267 '5,330, 266
13,999 777 8,631,094
3,548 62 2,367,660
Cornvet ed I


36.338,040


Gross FOb Returns
Florida Points
Box For Crop
i2.10 53,21E,501
1.80 15,535,969
2.90 6,866,214

2.08 75,614,684


GENERAL DISPOSITION ANALYSIS OF THE FLORIDA CIRRUS


4--


Production and
Market inr. Cost s
Box For Crop
1.82 $46. 117,501 U
1.44 12,428,775
2.50 5,919,150

1.77 64 465 426


CROP FOR SEASON 1947-4R


istraigntGars .;axa.-cars xci.Car[s Ilo0.oxcs .ru cKe ceci il i Uanne Uousumea U-rana rotal
BOXES Freight Freight Express Rail Out Trucks I Fresh Bxs. Boxes ,Exports Boxes
Oranges 16,793,544 1,836,946 906,952 19,587,442 5,707,300 25,339,286 130,76,340 2,656,990 27,384 58,400,000
Grapefruit 6,089,194 1,085,720 310,600 7,485,514 1,143,367 8,631,094 19,448,586 1,210,947 9,537329,300,000
Tangerines 1,346,631 328,336 24,848 1,699,P15 667,845 2,367,660 598,505 433,835 -- 3,40,0000
Total 24f,29,369 3,301,002 1,24-2,400 28,772,771 7,518,5121 3,338,040 50,42 3451 4,301,772 36,757 9a 100,000
Total Rail Ba I'i
CARLOADS Rail Boat at Truck Truck EIports
Oranges 33,532 ,817 2,267 1 1263 5095 75,941 6,851 6 136,855
Grapefruit 11802 2,197 777 1476 -1477676 28581 17640 48,621 3,045 23 69,329
angerines 2,884 664 62 561 3-C01, 1670 528C 1 496 1,085 7.861.
Total 48,218 6,6781 3,106 580C2 58002 187961 76915 126,0501 10,981! '911 214.045
__ .~~~ IT. A ,- m r7 -I1T lTT "T TKf Tr'


ESTIMATED COST


OF PRODUCING AND NAR C


Cost of production such as fertilizer, spray materials, irrigation, pruning, labor, fuel, etc.,
interest or taxes on strictly grove acreage, per Standard 1-3/5 bushel boxes.
ORANGES 3 .50 GRAPEFRUIT P .35 TAN-GERIES R S .68 NEIGHTED AVERAGE 0 .48


Cost of picking, hauling, packing, selling, and
ORANGES $1.32 GRAPEFRUIT -*1.09


but not including


other average ordinary marketing charges.
TANGERIIES 1 1.92 WEIGHTED AVERAGE $1.29


Total ordinary and average
ORANGES $1.82


cost of production and marketing of citrus
GRAPEFRUIT .01.44 TANGERINES $2.50


WEIGHTED AVERAGE 1.77


Estimated boxes per car: Straight Freight-Oranges 501.6, Grapefruit 519.1, Tangerines 467.9. Mixed Freight-494.3.
Mixed Car Express 400 boxes. Export 400 boxes. Truck 400 boxes per car.
2.1.ixed Car Freight Analysis: Oranges 57.7, Grapefruit 32.4, Tangerines 9.9 per cent.
3.Mixed Car Express Analysis: Oranges 73.0, Grapefruit 25.0, Tangerines 2.0 per cent.
4.Ventilated Box Cars Used: Oranges 2934, Tangerincs 13, Grapefruit 442, Mixed 1052. Total 4441 cars.
5.Abandonod for Market Reasons: Oranges none, Grapefruit 3,700,000, Tangerines 600,000. This total of 4,300,000 boxes
not included in Disposition Analysis. These estimates made as of September 17 and subject to revision,
* Interstate "y- product Oranges 44,544 (111 cars), Grapefruit 2,213 (6 cars), added to rail & truck, & included in totals.
# Exports include U.S. Government exports of 27,384 boxes of oranges and 9,373 boxes of grapefruit. All e:xportc included
in Grand Total of boxes. No Domestic coastwisee) boat movement reported.


i


:-et Return to
Florida Growers
?'ox For Crop
4 .23 7,095,000
.36 3,107,194
.40 947,064

.31 11 .49,258


-4-


I


I


)
-i_






RECORDS AND ESTIMATES ON FLORIDA CITRUS CROP FOR.SFASOn 1947-48 (Cont'd.)
TRUCK. SHIPI ,iT3 TO OUT-OF-ST.'AT ...RK:TS (400 boxes to car)
ORANGES Carlot equiv. !,L,2G6 or 5,707,300 boxes. Gross at $2.10 11,985,330 Net* at ; .28 Q 1,598,044
GRAPFFRUIT Carlot equiv. 2,858 or 1,143,367 boxes. Gross at 1.80 2,058,061 Net* at .36 411,612
TANGERINES Carlot equiv. 1,670 or 667,845 boxes. Gross at 2.90 1,936,751 Net* at .40 267,138
ALL CITRUS Carlot erqiv. .16,76 or .7,518.512 boxes. Gross at 4;2.13 Z 15,980,142 Net* at .30 2,276,794
FREIGHT, EXPRESS, BOAT AND TRUCK SHIPMENTS TO OUT-OF-STATE IANRKETS
ORANGES Carlot equiv. 53,995 or 25,339,286 boxes. Gross at 42.10 ; 53,212,501 Net* at Q .28 $ 7,095,000
GRAPLFriUIT Carlot equiv. 17,640 or 5,631,094 boxes. Gross at 1.80 15,535,969 Net* at .36 3,107,194
TANGERINES Carlot equiv. 5.280 or 2,367,6G0 boxes. Gross at 2.90 6.866,214 Net* at .40 947,064
ALL CITRUS Carlot equiv. 76,915 or 36,338,040 boxes. Gross at 2.08 7 75,614,684 Net* at .31 :11,149,258
EXPORT SHIPMENTS BY BOAT (400 boxes to car)
ORANGES Carlot equiv. 63 or 27,384 boxes. Gross at p2.10 .; 57,506 Not* at & .28 ? 7,668
GRAPEFRUIT Carlot equiv. 23 or. 9,373 boxes. Gross at 1.80 16,871 let* at .36 3,374
TANGERINES Carlot equiv. -
,ALL CITRUS Carlot equiv. 91 or 36,757 boxes. Gross at $2.02 $ 74,377 Net* at ( .30 .i 11,042
FRESH CITRUS CONSU7ED IN FLORIMM (400 boxes to car)
ORANGES Carlot equiv. 6,642 or 2,656,990 boxes. Gross at $1.90 5,048,281 Net* at $ .18 $ 478,258
GRAPEFRUIT Carlot equiv. 3,027 or 1,210,947 boxes. Gross at 1.60 1,937,515 ileti at .-20 242,189
TANGERINES Carlot equiv. 12085 or 433.835 boxes. Gross at 2.60 1,127,971 Net* at .25 108,459
.LL CITRUS Carlot equiv. 10,754 or 4,301.772 boxes. Gross at 41.89 Q 8,113,767 Net! at & .19 828,906
FRESH CITRUS USED FOR PROCESSING IN FLORIlD (400 boxes to car)
ORUANGES Carlot equiv. 75,941 or 30,376,340 boxes. Gross at 4 .80 0 24,301,072 Net* at S .03 911,290
GRAPEFRUIT Carlot equiv. 48,621 or 19,448,583 boxos. Gross at .34 6,612,519 Net* at -.19 -3,695,231
TANGERINES Carlot eqiiv. 1,496 or 598,505 boxes. Gross at .35 209,477 Net* at -.60 359,103
AtLL CITRUS Carlot equiv. 126,058 or 50,423,431. boxes. Gross at .62 8 31,123,068 Net* at v-.06 Q-3,143,044
TOTAL RAIL, BOAT, TRUCKED, PROCESSED, AND LOCALLY. CONS UED
ORAPNGES Carlot equiv. 136,646 or 58,400,000. boxes. Gross at <1.41 4 82,619,360 Net* at 4 .15 9 8,492,216
GRAPEFRUIT Carlot equiv. 69,311 or 29,300,000 boxes. Gross at .82 24,102,874 Net* at -.01 342,474'
TANGERINES Carlot equiv. 7,861 or 3,400,000 boxes. Gross at 2.41 8.203,662 Net* at .20 696,420
ALL CITRUS Carlot equiv. 213,818 or 91.100,000 boxes. Gross at se1.26 4114,925,896 Net* at .10 8.846,162'
NOTE: *Gross refers to returns FOB cars Florida shipping points, and net refers to returns to growers or fruit
owners before deducting for interest, depreciation, and taxes, but after deducting for cost of production
and marketing.
.1. Trucked-out shipment figures :wre based on inspection certified for interstate movement. Road Guard
Stations for checking were open October 16 May 31. Aug. 1 Oct. 15 and June 1 July 31 estimated.
2. Cannery fruit represents average gross price and the not price is the gross less the estimated picking,
hauling, and marketing charges.
3. Figures for Consumed in Florida are rough estimates based on population, prices, etc. Any person who does
not approve this home consumption estimate can make his own estimate, but this volume, which is probably
under estimated cannot be ignored.





OF FLORIDA VEGETABLES AND FRUITS BY REDUCTIONN UNITS


1947-48 SEASON


C OMMO DITY


Unit


Beans :Bu.
Limas :Bu.
Cabbage :50L
Cabbge :Ton
Celery :Crt
Cucumbers :Bu.
Eggplant :Bu.
Escarole :Bu.
Lettuce,4-6 doz.:W1.C
Peas,English :Bu.
Peppers :Bu.
Potatoes :Bu.
Tomatoes :Bu.
Miscl.Vegetables :Bu.


,b

.



rt


: Straight : Mixed :
s: Freight : Freight :
,427,909: 310,000:
104,000 26,000:
s :(2,440,000) (120,000)
61,000: 3,000:
3,810,000: 38,000:
720,000: 86,000:
1009,000 132,000:
564,000: 336,000:
: 27,000: .9,000:
9,000: 6,000:
1,079,000: 468,000:
2,451,000:. 51,000:
1,512,000: 71,000:
: 60,000: 991,000:


-Trucked
Out


:Boat :Processed :


LCL
Express
24,000:
4,000:
--:
--:
4,000:
8,000:
28,000:
8,000:
6,000:
1,200:
72,000:
2,000:
8,000:
40,000:


2,503,000: -:
171,000: -:
(2,000,000)
50,000:
510,000: -:
900,000: -:
354,000:
90,000: -
56,000: -:
10,000:
954,000: -:
703,000: -:
1,607,000:
1,336,000:2,500:


Total :Abandoned:
Florida :Production : (not
Consumed :Units Used :..included)


458,000;

--1


123,000:







34C,000:
80,000:


553,000:
50,000:
(400,000)
10,000:
296,000:
116,000:
88,000:
11,000:
69,000:
10,000:
184,000:
407,000:
390,000:
1,000,000:


5,6',5,000:
355,000:
(4,960,000)
124,000:
4,658,000:
1,950,00D:
711,000:
1,109,000:
167,000:
36,000:
2,757,000:
3,614,000:
3,934,000:
3,709,500:


1Mixed uars : :Converted :Uonverted :Conrverted: -: -: -:
TOTAL JNITS(VEGS) :15,012,000: 2,644,000: 205,200: 11,194,000:2,500: 1,004,000: 3,574,000: 33,635,500:2,653,000:
Strawberries 36-pt.Crt: 27,000: -: +4,000: 144,000: 28,000: 49,000: 252,000:
Watermelons ***Crts:(4,554,000) -: -: (1,751,500) -: -: (557,000) (6,862,500) -:
Watermelons Melons: 9,108,000: -: -: 3,503,000: -: -: 1,114,000: 13,725,000: -:
Miscl.Fruits :Bu. : -: -: **80,000:. 60,000: -: 80,000: 120,000: 340,000: -:
TOTAL UNITS(MISC.FRTS), 4,581,000: -: 84,000: 1,955,500: -: 108,000: 726,000: 74,545,000:
OrangFs :Boxes:16,793,544: 1,866,946: 906,952: 5,707,300: -:30,376,340: 2,656,990: 58,400,000:
Grapefruit :Boxes: 6,089,194: 1,085,720: 310,600: 1,146,367: -:19,448,586: 1,210,947: 29,300,000:3,700,000:
Tangerines :Boxes: 1,346,631: 328,336: 24, 48: 66'.845: -: 599,505: 433. 835: 3. 4,000: 600.000
TOTAL UNITS CIT.: :24,229,369: 3,301,C'L:'1 2'- ., 7.515, 1 : -:50, .4431: 4 ,* 1, : . 1. .j .:4, 3 .000:
GRAND TOTAL UNITS# :43,822,369: 5,945,00 :i.. I.:,1 : ,i :u._!,, 50 5 55 : I 2:'O.?'90,,'C: 6,"5 0LCO"
".'ot : c -: Pf_,., u I d 9:


NOTES: There is considerable difficulty in w :rL:iring :it a dJ tailed dip-.sitin sLe-t fo.r .g.--.tables d miscel aneou.~E
fruits as-comprehensive data is not as avail"i.; is for cit rus. First it .':as conir,3sider.J i'tabl.- to. try to use th: '.S.
Dept. of Agriculture estimate of total pr.',dLcti-n j vw.-.-r back fromr t(ri-:. ..'e h.'e the reci-rds -on thi. trucl: ship-
ments out of State which figures are used. e ,'ve t.- recc.rds h.n str'igtt fr.-ight uid b.:it fo.r xdid.ldual cc.-i".di-
ties. We have only the totals for mixed freight and. LCL e:-cp.rss. T'hc Florida co".nsiumpti...r figur..s a:-,-n.. ly :-stimites
as there are no actual records. VWe had to a,.,rt in. t ,e rrd:-ed freight ,~d mixed expr:.ss totals s b..st "*tc could to
the various commodities with the handicap orf trying to mrel- :.il :.f the scparat,- totals check With the t,.tal official
crop estimate. An additional problem was th.- diss;,:.iti:n 1.of the volumre of squash, ra.dil-es,ca-uliflomr,carr.ots,spinach,
broccoli,endive,etc., included in the misclian,.--.us figures for .et:i.les. Miscellaneous Fruit- included avo.rcados,
Persian and Key limes, mangoes, grapes, g.ivas, p.rsirno.ns, blu.eb.-rri.c., Ikiiq,.att, e-tc.


225,000:
32,000:
(840,000)
21,000:
867,000:
50,000:
197,000:
266,000:
33,000:

143,000:
--:
--:


EST_ AkTED DISPOSITION







ESTIMATED DISPOSITION OF FLORIDA VEGLTABLLS AND FRUITS Ih CARLUTS, un ELwUIVALLNT, JiD VALUE


:Straight: Mixed : LCL :
:Freight :Freight :Express:


Conunodity ,
ecanz
Limas
Cabbage
Celery
Cucumbers
EgFplant
Escarole
Lettuce
Peas, English
Peppers
Potatoes
Tomatoes
Miscl. Vegetables


Co s :
2,940:
200:
4,934:
8,966:
1,500:
182:
1,039:
90:
16:
1,499:
4,807:
3,782:
519:


Cars
500:
50:
240:
90:
180:
220:
525:.
30:
11:
650:
100:
150:
1,696:


Crrs :
GO:
10:

10:

70:
-:


10.
3:
180:
5:
20:
165:


1947-48 SEAS
:Trucked :
Boat : Out :
Cars : Cars
-: 4,172:
-: 343:
-*:" 5,983:
-: 1,381:
-: 1,999:
-: 754:
-: 200:
-: 103:
-: 18:
-: 1,987:
-: 1,278:
-: 3,826:
5: 3,341:


:Florida :
Pro- :Consump-:
cesced : Lonn
,'GL: 9 1:
-.: 100:
-: 800:
*: 800:
266: 258:'
-: 187:
25:
-. 222:
-: 18:
-: 383:
-: 740:
865: 975:
: 2,500:


Total
Used
Carl ot 3


9,364 :
703:
9,957:
11,247:
4,203:
1,413:
1,789:
455:
66:
4,699:
6,930:
9,618:
8,226:


:Abandoned:
:(not in- :
clouded)## :


* 375:;
64:
168:
2,343:
111:
420:
591:
106:

298:


Total
FOB
ross Value :
14, 00,000:
1,065,000:
6,500,000:
9,800,000:
* "6,235,000:
1,175,000:
1,165,000:
440,000:
* 92,000:
5,982,000:
10,073,000:
22,936,000:
9,274,000:


Mixed Cars : -:Converted Converted -: -: -: -: -:-
TOTAL V.GETABLES : 30,482: 4,442: 533: 5: 23,385: 1,894: 7,929: 68,670: 4,476:. 89,237,000:
Strawberries : .56: -: *(10) -: 321: 58: 110: 555: -' 2, 000,000:
Uatermelons : 9,247: -: -: -: 3,503 -: 1,114: 13,864:. -: 6,860,000:
Miscl. Fruits : -: -: *( 200) -: 150: 200: 300: 850: -: 1,720,000:
TOTAL MISC. FRUITS: 9,303: -: 210: -: 3'974: '258: 1,524: 15,269: -: 10,580,000:
TOTAL VLGS. AND
MISCL. FRUITS : 39,785: 4,442: 743: 5: 27,359: 2,152: 9,453: 83,939: 4,476: 99,R17.000:
Oranges : 33,532: 3,817: 2,267: -: 14,268: 75,941: 6,851: 136,855: -: 82,620,009:
Grapefruit : 11,802: 2,197: 777: -: 2,858: 4B,621: 3,045: 69,329: 9,250: 24,100,000:
Tangerines : 2,884: 664: 62: -: 1,670: 1,496: 1,085: 7,861: 1,500- 8,205,000:
Mixed Citrus : -: Converted : -: -: -: -: -: --
TOTAL CITRUS : 48,218: 6,678: 3,106: -: 18.796: 126,058: 10,981: 214,045: 10,750:4 114.925,000:
GRAND TOTAL : 88,003: 11.120: 31849: 5: 46,155: 128,210: 20,434: 297,984: 15,226:$ 214.742,000:
Notes cover Pages 8 and 9
NOTES: # Ordinarily units of different kinds are not added but if the 50-lb sack is used for cabbage instead of
tons and the number of watcrmeljns *** are divided by two to get crates, we find that all of the units are bushels
or the near equivalent of bushels with the exception of citrus which are in 1-3/5 bu. boxes. The 10 cars of
strawberries assigned to L.C.L. express is without record data to support it. We know that some strawberries went
out L.C.L. express and we included in this figure any shipments by dir. ** 7e have no shipping record to support
this 200 car estimate for L.C.L. express miscellaneous fruits, except we have 84 cars of Persian limes for express
shipments. Probably another 116 cars or more of avocados, mangoes, Ietc., went out by L.C.L. express.
ft" Abandoned because of market conditions and not included in the g1.oss FOB Florida value. The gross includes the
production, marketing costs,and packing costs if packed, and profit; if any.




Page 10


OP A NLGES
Ppr) R7 cm


7. !I
P. r 4r)


SSeptember $ 2.U9 $ .
Oc ober 1.98 2. 9 1.33 *.7 i.u3 1.53
Novonber 1.98 2.1 1.00 .87 1. 1.*
December 1.93 2.52 .55 *80 1 1.p
January 2.18 2.37 .5 1. '; .:
February 2.40 2.31 .:5 1.09 .01 ).
March 2.7 .2.62 .69 .91 217 1 .
April 3.11 3.00 1.17 .70 2.19 1.
my 3.2 3.66 1.16 ,5 I 2.I 1.7
June 3.06 3.68 1.08 .j1 1 '
July i.06 .0 7 9 ,I9 .-
Average F .0 2.83 2 .0 2 .60 3 ,' i.,,
Tan-er.nes(For Season). 1.00 .O0 .35(1:?7-.h8 :.rice: rr ront
Dec hO0/; Jan. 30,; Feb. 35.; -arch 354; Anril d'.
'TOTAL PROD'UCTTON. ArN PORTtONl CA'NT D AMD) pK1FLSrD:n
D TVF.RED PTTC PATD BY CA.NNRS
IN FLO.TnA


ORANIIGES
Total Portion Canner's
Production Canned Price
Roxes Boxes Per Box


1931-32 12,548,000 36,000 $0.65
1932-33 1 ,9b,000 0,000 .
193 -34 16,171,000 61,000 .
193-3 1,590,00 178 000 .80
1935-36 15,65, 000 140 000 1.00
193 -37 1,46l,000 620 000 1.2k
1937-36 2, 303000 1.05 000 .3
19 -39 30,01l 000 1 67 C000 .:
1939- 0 2 ,06 ,000 4,170 ,000 .19
1940- 2,752,000 3,9)41,000 '.80
1941-42 27,200,000 4,197,000 1.08
1942-43 37,200,000 6,438 000 1.70
1943-4 Lj6,200,Q00 10,912,501 2.02
19 4-. 42,800,000 14,3,00ooo 2.60
1945- o hb9800 000 19,1 3,860 2.83
196-7 -,70O,000000 19 ,825485 .82
19L7- 58 000 30376,340 .80
- Includes 515, 00 box,. of angerines
598,505 boxes for 1917-48.
ESTTfhATED CARLTOADS CANNED BY


September
October
November
December
January
February
March
April
June
July
August
it vfeek ending


LCL
1,311
3,188

8 07
11,376
6A6g
3 16
5 2
August


*76
,5~37

14) 100
3,278.
~,621


100#
28th.


Total Portion Canner's
Production Canned Price
SBoxes Boxes Per RoL.


10, 31,000
11,926,000
11,113,000
15 21), 000
11 5ou cooo
18,121 000
11,379,000
23,050 .000
1 6r0'oo00o
2 3367,000
19,100,000
27 300,000
31,000,000
22 300,000
32 000,000
29,000,000
33- 0,000
for l9l1>-6,


930,000
2,750,000
2,605,000
5,603,000
3,76o,o0oo
.6685;000
5)793,000
8 b95,000
.8,00,000
13,871,000
10, 1 ,000
17 8" ,000oo
20 ,21 ,310
15,136,000

^'M


0O .30
.32
.F3
.37


.22
.33
.37
.71
1.05
1.53
1.91
1.93

192-- 7,


a .i


.1
.1
K1
~1.
1

-r
* .-.'


Total
Or ari'es
Gracei rui t
TanFerines -

,-foc.,0.u
2,800,000
2,'66, 000
5,781,000
3;900,000
17,05,ooo
6,O000
10 262,000
12,970,000
17,012,000
1 i340,000
24,022,000
31, 1,811
29 2 30
al ,4U36
36,620 582
5o 423, 31'-
and


;V110 N1Ti S. IC*)i r')- j7 MI ) 2) 17-418 S EAS 0'%1:-


(400 Boxes to Carload)
GRAPEFRUTT .TANG-RINE_._
1926-)7 19h17-l i647. 19)i7hTi-


218
1,983
6,3 0
0, 55
h4602
9,688
3 238
1 206
150
26


714
2,67)
5,936
7,074
7.211
I-'
5., 178
2,529
1, 161
225 )


235
927
.287
32
1


72
5l49
615
260
1


218
3,294
,761
6 51
14 068
12 965
18,297
11, 928
S28 4
602
60


1,501
7,283
16, 231
21, 54
21,571


8 917
2 962
325


Carloads 1 49, 6 0 75,941 39 ,661
Boxes 19,825,)45 30,376,340 1lO 64,3)46

Season 19)-7-48 Utilized
Oranges Ut5 7-I?
Grapefruit 29,300,000
Tangerines 3OO00 000
Total -91,I0u'OO


*)Kj 620
1,W2, 586


2327 1)'7 91 5(- ~12/,o56
930,751 5950 3(66M582 50,43,)431


Abandoned
3,700,000
600,000
4 u0,00U


Total
d ,) 000,Oo
33,000,000
h,000.000
gF o~o


F;TI 4ATEDP:'0 PAITT) T--- (:ATV7T-
WDe Nrerecl to Garuitrare3I
115,44-45j, 15)4 D 6L9 46-7 and 1947-LK 'isri


-- TO'PAL
L97i -6--h 7 '12) 17 -) M





Pagc 11

(Private Gales not inclu.od)
9)1(-P,-r 1 9
lQi-,6 .9 -h7 19h7-h8


Carloads Sold


Auction Sales at Terminal Markets
Thrinal Sellipi & Ex-(nses
!let at Terminal
Transpnrtntion Cost
Florida F.O.B. Equivalent


-.1 r I /


Florida f-arketing Charges .08 .08 ) .08
Advertising & Inspection .03 .0h ) .O
Packing & Processing .81 .8 .86
Picking, Loading & Hauling .32 .3 .3h
On Tree Euinvnlpnt
Estimated Production 'Costs
'let to Grower before Interest, Taxes & Depreciation


GRAflPE'RlTTT Carloads SoJ
Auction Sales at Terminal Markets
TerminaiL S]lling & Expenses
Net at Terminal
Trannport.at.ion Cosht
Florida F.O.B. Sguivalent
Florida Marketing Charges .08 .08
Advertising & Inspection .05 .05
Packing & Processin .773 .71 )
Picking, Loading & auling .2h .2L
On Tree Eqnivalent,
Estimated Production Costs
Net to Grower before Interest, Taxes & Depreciation


TA NGER1E S Carloads Sold
Auction Sales at Terminal ia.arkets
Terminal Sell i ne Expenses
Net at Terminal
Transportat.i on Cost.
Florida F.O.B. Equivalent
Florida Marketing Charges .08 .08 ) .06
Advertising & Inspection .07 .07 .07
Packing u Processing 1.08 l.l 1.20
Picking, Loading & hauling ..8 .6 .*7
On Tree qouvalenf,
Esti.matcd Production Costs
Nct to Grower before Interest, Taxes & Depreciation


Approximate Percentage all freight shipments sold
at Auction Orpnrep Grn


19 0-l
1941-L2
15h2-L3
194 3-
19h h
19h7-16,


32.6%
32.7%_
27 ;
21.2'>
18.3%

26.0;


ld


8.26L
.009
4.4"-
.77


j 11.26


2 2
:$2.00


0. 2
03.02
_Rl
3.7)
13.00
) 1.10


$1.90
.5i
"s1.0 ^


y5.22
.10
$.12
.31
1.71

T2.6O0


1\,770 ..: Li
53.0 : .2
0 7 0 .
.3.63 *.20
,.80
$2.b3 42.'2

$1.30 1.32


, : .33


,3.07
3.01
-9(
,)2 .11
1.09

1.02


2.21 9

.38
.0o

.2.93
1.82


.!i


friiit.


36. ,

21.
31 *"13
26.2%
26.80
.^
3( 1 :8"


T.ngnrines
48.3
11.2%'
21. r'
3.
5:^


NOTE: As has been stated above and in other pages of our report for many years, the
citrus net prices do not allow any deductions for interest on investment, for taxes,
or for depreciation of equipment. Pages 0-7 of this report which include private
as well as auction sales of citrus, should be used along vith this page. Private
sales of tangerines averaged considerably higher than auction sales in the last few
seasons. See pages h4-h5 for Citrus Price Analysis.
See pages hO-h2 for Auction Cars and Price Averages yearly comparison.
THIS DOES NOT INiCLUDE AiNY PRIVATE SALES.


1o.A I '7,S


.\i1-,=Lin


39_)6-)17 19)7- 1


1.3,3
u. O

7.09)1
4 .29
.07-
3.22
.77c

1.08

,1.37
.17
,1.00




.09


1.79


,6.
S.94





P. g-- 12


FTr n T [)A


SUAP PFUWS
Fall tU r-jh)


WVint cr( l're:,hi
" iPrc'ceaT)
" (Total)
Spring ( Fre :h
" (Procet:
" (Tot-il)
TOTAL FRESH
TOTAL PROCESS
TOTAL ALL
TTA FBEANS
Winter
Spring
TOTAL
CARRAGFE
.inter
CRinTSe
Winter


A- FAC,. TI JF D.I P n' ilh-TrIL AimH VAT!Ir.
l % Af T -l I- U 7 ." I 1.'l J


.i: A in- : ,Product ic'r: .F'JI: ftal Val.ue
___ .i .._ __.],,= : P .r _._J, rh 1,-- ..


: : For :


1,900

5,000


.1,500
.750
U4250


16,500 16,100


r-ATUT,TFT,O\'2?R--:,,iil'u.!O00


65
91


Tons
9T


Bu.
5h0 200
Crt.
00 200


98, 000
387,000


32.000
32,000


98,000
355;000


3.65 358,000
_3.05 7,07 ono
3..00' 1,065,00q0


lh.,900 21,100 123,800T 52.50 6,500,000


90,000
80,000


90,000
Crt.
80,000
rt.
2,79b,000


3.00
2.20


270,000
176,000


Winter
Spring
TOTAL
C1JCIPn'S
Fall.
Winter
Spring
" Pickling
TOTAL
EGGPLANT
Fall.
Winter
Spring
TOTAL


Q(SONWinter)
I (Spring)
rO0AL
PEAS. EhGT,TST
Winter

Fall
Linter
Spring
pTAL


6,300


5, oo
5,400
. 1,000
10,000
QOO


6,300
. 00,
11,600
*1; ooo


1,000
9,000
9,000
noN


Crt.
29


Bu.
100
85
1LO0
19 of


3,087,000
5,25;2ooo

500,000
85,ooo
1,260,000


289,000
867doo


2.25 6,295,000
2.05 9 ,0,000"


50.000 0,% 000
05 ,000
1,260,000
1 1 % n0


3.95.
35.20
3.05
1 ') <


1, 78,000
2,000
3, 3,000
N 0N0


17,300 15,900 123 1,957-OOo 50.,000 .1,907 000 3.25 6,203 000
Bu.
950 00OO 75 30,000 0,000 3.95 118,000
375 325 310 101,000 101,000 3.50 35h,000
2.75Q0 ,0 20 O763.000 197.000 56600 1 .?20 679.000
4,075 3,225 277 89L,000 1970000 697,000 1.05 1,151,000
Bu.
3,500 3,200 430 1,376,000 266,000 1,110,000 1.05 1,165,000
Crt.
750 .550 125 690ooo 23,000 26,000 2.05 9,o000
1,300 1,000 120 120,.00 10.000 110,000 2.S5 32h,000
in inn 1_0 in.on J 10 00000 025 2P 000
2150 1,650 121 199;000 33,000 166000 2.65 o 40,000
Bu.
700 600 60 36,000 36,000 2.55 92,000
Bu.
00 00 185 92,000 92,000 .35 o00,000
2,00 2,600 390 1,01 ,000 l,O 1,000 2. 5 2 ,86,000
9.100 8O .0 910 1.71~.o000 1)A.000 1 611.000 1o., (9000 o0
12,00u 11,h450 250 2 ;60,000 lj,000 2,'717;000 2.17 5,686,000


O'TE: Celery was corrected at the last minute, making total abandoned 25 000 crates
-ess and total value $228,000 less, but this small revenue is not reflected in some
of the Grand Totals and on Page 65, which should be corrected with above figures.


II I I ......... I l i I II


: 19,LOO: 1 ': lu, : 1,0i .C 0 1:..l-"-^ 1,4. :,1-9 : ,S ^ '"JO

7) .,000 3 ,0L'L 7L0 L 0I,000 100,'jI u Li, j'j,0.) . .. ,l o,
1.. 1. 1J 5 00 *.. 110,,O 1.. 1.70,0
3,*.. "- 100 3') u0 10 K 1 . L ..7u..0C
".') l L IJ I'I

) i. 10, 1, 0 0 i 1 1,3.: 0.0 0 1 .. 3, OI4 'j.
2 ,00'. u 17 0 173,00 0 "1.0 ? .
rb.___l ^ L,,,O oJoip. '71c; o o'"'
.1. I . L'U. U I UU 1~ JI .I
i -4, U 71 70 6 2,U ,'5 1 2_5. ,J'J'": 1II o.'J, .' i : ', .. :,'J .- r o''*' 5I I
72,900 65,200 u2. 5,3l5,u0u 225,000 5,OI ,000 .: l, u5,000
79,h00 71,700 82? 5,89',000 225,000 5,o673oo,000 2.55 1,Tio000


.


.


D


.






Pare 13


_,'C'{ A,,:". "]T r.p._ _.nir'cl n!} "dJ._n
VT','I; Ir D ['",. T *(i '',1 L' .i-7''.!i! ;
'r*l."' V-17 T .Q ._ 1 *_(,

or : : Production: Aban"
*v+t. :pi 1d: TIn o : doned


POTATnl
Linter
Spring
TOTAL


T11 I I F S
Fall(rresh)
" (Process)
" (Total)
Linter(Fresh)
(Process)
" (Total)
Spring(rresh)
" (Process)

" (Total)
TOTAL FRESH
TOTAL PROCESS
TOTAL ALL


8,100
;1 800


1

i
*i


7,400
20,800


:Uni ts.:
Bu.
200
17T


Bu.
7,250 2,500 155
300 300 155
7, TS0 2,b00 155
.2,700 '10,000 9
1,100 1,100 9
.3,800 11,100 95
.5,000 15,o00 150
1,300 1,300 150
6,300 16,300 1.50


LUi t. : Units


1,680 000
2. 1 .0(-0)


388,000
3 h,000

950,000
910,000

2,210,000
196,000
2,446,uOO


34,950 27,.00 130 3,58&,000
2.700 2.700 D 124 ?i8 _


37;650


30,200


TOTAT. VES. 213,125 191,525


1-30 3,93,;000


:Sea;on :
:Productior :Avg FO]!:Total Value
: of Vlu : Pr ; Co !: ia.ke."l


: Uni.h : Luita. : 0.0113.2".


l,lo0,000
3.61h, 000


,$ 2.8') $ L,218,000
-27k ', -.- .000,
2.79 1 ,'.})731 .l


388 ,000 6.0 2,560,on)
S6,000 .7 00'
.,'7 OT 2s, 0 ( _n: '
9503,000 ^9. V,.,'.

20-,000 000
0 000 ',000
2,2 Q,000 .50 12,375 000
19 ,000 .7> Lb ,000
2, T00W0 5.1" 12,521,000


3,588,000
3,938;000)


6.32
.21
5.83


(Packed Value per Acr H-Iarvjstod `lT20)


22,677,000
2-,o ,000
22,936,000
'80,219,000


CAN'TAT .OIPES
Spring
STR A,'TERRTES
Linter
WATpRAMLONSg
Spring


CiLts.
1,200 1,200 S


8,200 4,200


768,000


24-gqb.crt.
U5 189,000


per 1000
$1,000 45,000 303 13,725,000


TOT. ALT
*TrTnnL.F71JTTS $6,400 50,800
rGRAND TOTAT. 269,9 2 2); l9Q?


78,000 h.35 $ 339,000

189,000 10.60 $ 2,003,000


13,725,000


(Packed Value per Acre *'arvasted )183)
(Packed Value per Acre I-arvested t370)


500.00 6,862,000


$ 9,201,000
9 .l2 000o


TOTA, ACRES. VAT.JF PER ACRE AMt) TOTAT. PACKED VT'JT T; 19,6-,)7 SEASON


Vegetables
Miscellaneous Fruits
Grand Total


Ar-reI3 UIcpd
201,h50
25; 000o


176
743


To~tal Va-liim
$80,712,000
9,60.on0
9.89 972 000
,6 9)9t2,0ooo


The above officially reported acreage does not include a large acreage of miscell-
aneous vegetables such as squash radishes, broccoli, collards, turnips, carrots, okra
baby limas, etc., and it does not include avocados, limes, mangoes, guavas, cLc. in
miscellaneous fruits. Citrus. acreage and value is. covered elsevhers in this report.
Some beans and tomatoes processed show volume in tons as well as in bushels. The
value for the ton volume is in parenthesis and should not be included in the totals
as it would be a duplication.
The above tabulation was prepared from data supplied by Mr. J. 2. Owens and hir.
G. N. Rose, Agricultural Sta'ibbicians, U.S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics,
Federal Building, Orlando, Florida. They are the original and only source for
acreage and production estimates of vegetables and miscellaneous fruits in Florida.
If you have any questions on acreage, production and values not shown in this report
you may write directly to the above named statisticians. They have all the acreage
data.
Frank H.-Scruggs
(See pages 62-68 for acreage figures for other seasons.)


!'P1 n n +--H R q rup-t-C"i el d Tot'll LaQJjLL(".


: AcreTeage_
: :- F
lP;l ant.d ;Ha r


A DIROLF





Page 1i InTERSTATE fPUL. [ISrRIDJTIOii., 1L-'LIDA C;,TFRLS, )]?L -L" FASCOI

(Made available thru the courtesy of thli State Dept. of I.. Ji.'.niture. '.- 1-T Hav,...,, a.,
and H. F. Liilson, 1'ed,-ral-StaLe ."ir,-:et iJe -. v>-r. ce, Lal:olandril, iot' -ia, .
Qct. 1 '. l -9 to La' : 31', 1 3, Irclus.ivE.


Dest i nat ..


l-.o:X'I S


Alabaj.,a
Ar : ansF 2an
Coloradc.
Conn -c t c'it
Dela 'a e
Dict. of Cilumnbia
Geurjia
illiioir
Indiana
Iowa
Kan:as
Ker t.uc',-
Louisiana
S.air.e
i.arl-'mid
! .a-sa !h1- ; t tt
Siclijgan
F.in'esI -t a

I..1 is. ouri
I:eb..rask:a
Iie., J jersey
liew York
:icrth Carolina

'Ckla hoi, a
F enss'lv. 'inia
Rhode Islarnd
South Carolina
T'r ees'oe
Texas
VJe r.,on t
Virginia
1,est Vi rl1nia
V'iscc i I
Cut of State
'Ta nad a

Grand Total Bo:-:-,
Oct. l6- Ji,' 31, Ci-,'


- 7, ,-% I I-

37'

,-., "'L, ?'

1 1,

6 ,11
.., a .", ,, j')L l'

2 .1 :
1,
t'r:. ""



ii'-, .ii
. L'

0, .'. ,

17-, "'7




1- P', OO 1'
117, 1/
i'.j., 3'





-'-'S
151,
2'7,;i1



i1
", ,, -,




t_. L7
., ., -'a


7' ',1
ii7,,
1,2'h2





I .,
.L ,
-.1i


c- .'-- I'-'
'.]" ', .


-'... : '


~2q .iI',44
I:.:':


G a..frui.t
F. :. .


3..h ,'].77,-
3,19 I1
i/ '. I'
1'//
325
,6'.',
171 ,11


1
r?



?1,' i
i 'I, l .







3 9
1,9,^

: ''^:,
*. '- 1 iI'-






-I

1-' ~'4 ** ;-
Cla

107 ,r,
'* i ^


.


,1


1, I
107,' '
S11", :' I

1..'






2,1 -
I ,i


'.2,31)
2,1 .'~ P


i.LiI. Li
..o: :c s


.3-''i, 3'w 1
1, 2O)'u

1, ;13

' . f

1 -1
. '2



.
'A, -,2

PC'




: '
-." '.- --





-a ,
."u1.,

. ,- 4I

:, 1
'..U
:L., i' 2
EL,
-* i ..: ". .
^'J







3. ,L7'

..

1, 33
.l, :.9



3i,; ^


>-:-, --


l!orth Vlest Florid- -Px: 117 ,6'. 23 .,'770 ,, 797 1 1,63
if f Ca-s ,s_*b L


Grand Total b,5,:-es

Oct. 16-,..y 31, Cars
Sept. 1-Ai, 3.1, Ca ':-


5, 1 :;'',) I'j


1 !,2t'K
1L in


S '. 1. 4- ,
*- ', .A4-' .


it
* I~--'


6t,- ,-:


'NC
1 ,'171'


13,7)6


Ilote: Tlei fLiimr: for bept. l-A,-. 31 til.-e: rcqn a dif,: -.r r.t aourco th:.n trno..e for
,-c t. i'(,-i a", .


s ,-:


1''
L'-".. ,3"; 2'


:L I
i, ."-'.'



1)114 ,'- >-'

1,1,
33' ^
"...-. -1



-1 1
3: .


16i^ ..c;
6 .; ,.],';
1-' 'iL1'
2b.', ,

1"5,,1.


33,", .
3 ,.,I
'", '39


'
7L 4jI'0':







?'- 16
33'', '1'"


*LE' e'1
I.-'. : L',"

"?,I~ I.",,




13, 8,!. 3
1.L,r*!-b


i [,,i, ,
)'. L;, "

l.,K-.L7
3a,1 8


6,. etC?,?->-
16.529


.:, 3, L1





Page 15


,rC.1P'ITULAriiCJ CF "AIL DTST'.T'.IOjN1 :LA'I'A CIT :U.U FRUITS
BY 3TAT7S 19L7-48 A:.) I 9L(-L7 ,ASO.:S

: rFG S : G 'A'PFFRU.T : \.' fiL.L :..I:: r CITRUS : .LU!'T TOTAL :
:7- :6- 7 : 6- :L:at'7-,t.:/l_-);7 :17-'3 :h6-t7 :h7-,iC : I;-L7 :
:Rail :Rail -:Rail :Rail :al 7r l :.-L :.;ail C:.a.:l :.-1.; :
:n-ilv :Boat :Cn1. :D.olt :Only Po:,t :01il- :oat :n.l :.;.-,.t


Care Cars Car: C .r a Car Cars C'-:' s


C..I rc Car,. 3ar;


Alabama
Arkansa:
ColorEd.:'
Conn-cti cut
De lava re
Dist. of Columbia
Floridca
Georgia
Idaho
I1linois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
i:aine
I:aryland
,assachus-tts
:';ichiga.n
Minnesota
?:issi si]r.-i
u icsouri
!'.ntana
Il:-braska
!.cwv liar.pshire
New Jer.e,'
l-kw Yorl:
ilorth Carolina
H-orth Dakota
Ohio
CO-klahoma
Orc-.gon
Penns"lvania
.Rhicde" Island
South Carolina
South Dal:ota
Tanne ssc:'e
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
.'a shin ton
.Vist V-ircinia
7isconsin
W/yomi ing
CANADA


569
9
0





306
567
11
L ,
331

2,603
1 ,160
2 3
S-, ,3
110
1
bb


-.I,
10,035
5 y,
2,392;
17
1


1
1,209
30
10



1


22
129
1 ,0,,1
937


21
99 -
2,1. 14


o00
137
1 0l
3,0c ;

-l,
3'7


J.L
1 ,2?.
1,217
3,T70
12
7
$,723




9"

232
1.


97
L
c
169
2-4 .
167-
283
LI
(II
9t

6L




377
2Lo
1414



95

12'
8.?
1
09;
LL



P.3
6
231












319
2680
p,322
263



1,76lj
'121
2?
1
109
i

319
50
1|


10i
6


0
1;.
205
350
31
21-~-'
32o
$1


A, ~
66 -









1.:.
1















lb
602
*I.'
;'6"
92
1
69
9

'13
o.003
201





9
L66 -






J.
iy
20
lb

3,
22 -
53 "


3 6
2 -
6 3,
32 96
10 22
1 29,



16 1'
1 1
14 1
91 11i
232 ?L3
20; 211
21 24
1
81 46
-
.? 6
15 25
90: 1,190
20 li



) L]
C .



) 1 3


16 3
1


375 .71 3) L47? 51 127


57






-33
1

36

-


1





AI
6?






i
36


2

1
1
-)


29
1

5

1
30
25
7

11
3
2
21
40
23



5

.,70
hU
47

76
31

14

31
I1
c


3 726
3 16
2 21
2 980
1 39

3* 967-

0 L06
9 80
1 17
6 571
2 3149
2 129
3 2,073
5 ,179
1,79
2 130
3 737
5 70
3 23
7 1;263
3 17,469
3 1,393
- 6
1 3,251
2 24
2 29
6 8,026
586
S 616
1 2
3 ,1,884
2 37
1 2
.6 1i
3"1 1,101
1 67
)2 337
-7 396
S 2


31 66 817 1,343


T..TAL 33,7.,3 1 h,71, 11,783 13,3:6 2,970 3,L-. h,7,c6 7,110 $3,292 70,650


# Includes Jac:sonville.
' Petersburg not included


-. Does n-'t incluic Savannah.


S1 ATE


1,352
3
1i
7).
1,54
3,195






277
961

52
1 5






1,187
2,292
4, 6









277
961
8





o2
13
215941
1,879
4,708
31




FL uIDA 0FAG:CC SHPIEIITS, VALUATIONS, AND COTHIR DATA 1l0 21 YEARS


Records Total Portion "ith rio.


Estimates Carloads Carloaads
Season Rail?-0oat Shipped
ALL Shipped _y Rail
ORA-lGES Carloads Cars
1927-28 16,437 16,310
1928-29 32,428 31,988
1929-30(4) 21,816 21,635
1930-31 40,353 39,354
1931-32 25,725 24,054
1932-33 32,580 26,414
1933-34 31,799 18,291
1954-35 28,213 14,843
1935-36 29,746 17,403
1936-37 37,208 23,382
1937-38 46,061 31,258
1938-39 55,697 37,380
1939-40 38,285 29,283
1940-41 42,597 31,402
1941-42 41,598 40,443
1942-43 52,287 52,287
1943-44 61,160 61,160
1944-45 49,507 49,507
1945-46 52,665 52,589
1946-47 54,421 51,513
1947-48 39,616 39,616


Rail Haul,


Total
Rail


Estimated
Trucked


Shipped i: Boat out of
by Boat(2) Shipments Florida
Carloals Boxes Boxes
127 5,91-,320 520,000
440 11,674,080 975,000
181 7,489,633 65,000
999 14,000,130 1,584,000
1,671 9,904,145 1,486,480
6,166 11,728,800 1,854,000
13,508 12,401,563 2,322,000
153,370 11,094,459 2,891,643
12,343 11,714,588 2,510,000
13,826 14,580,603 2,560,000
14,803 18,005,497 3,442,000
18,317 21,528,758 5,175,741
8,999 14,718,563 4,30,000
11,195 16,609,828 5,726,000
1,155 16,853,616 4,099,200
None 25,799,784 2,715,823
None 30,511,378 2,155,200
None 24,526,000 1,456,400
76 26,007,841 2,054,000
2,908 26,787,122 3,509,600
19,659,370 A 5,707,300


Estimated
Canned
in
Flori ds.
Boxes
12,000
33,000
40,000
61,351
36,362
50,000
61,433
177,937
140,000
620,135
1,055-399
1,186,689
4,170,134
3,941,261
4,197,299
6;438,274
11,010,841
14,544,000
19,219,412
19,825,4856
30,376,340


.stimatcd
Consumed ( 3)
in
Florida
0oxe S
650,000
1,062,500
780,000
1,'308,582
1,122,000
1,332,000
1,386,000
1,425,000
1,500,000
1,700,000
1,800,000
2,000,000
1,800,000
2,475,000
2,049,885
2,246,300
2,522,581
2,473,600
2,518,747
2,677,793
2,656,990


Estimated
Florida
Production
Utilized
Total boxes
7,099,320
13,749,580
9,374,635
16,954,063
12,546,987
14,964,800
16,170,996
15,589,039
15,864,588
19,460,788
24,302,896
29,900,000
25,06"-,702
28,752,089
27,200,000
37,200,181
46,200,000
.42,800,000
49,800,000
52,800,000 B
58,,400,000


NOTES:


(A) Includes 27,384 boxes of oranges for export and 44,544 boxes for interstate by-products.

(B) Does not include 900,000 boxes abandoned in 1946-47 season for marketing reasons. No oranges
abandoned in 1947-48 season. Abandonment, if any, prior to 1945-46 season not shown.

(2) Domestic boat in coastwise trade.

(3) Figures for "Consumed in Florida" stock are rough estimates based on supply, price, population,
intrastate truck shipments, etc.
(4) Fruit fly year when production harvest and shipments restricted. Many trees cut down and many so-
called host plants destroyed by the federal agencies.






FLORIDA ORANGE SHIPMENTS, VALUATIONS, AND OTHER DATA FOR 21 YEARS


Records
and Es-
timates
Season
ALL
ORANGES
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30(4)
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-3.9
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-4.4
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47*
1947-48*


Cost of
Produc-
tion(2)
Before
Picked
Per Box
$0.72
.72
.80
.48
.60
.47
.46
.45
.45
.42
.38
.34
.42
.40
.44
.40
.50
.50
.48
.53 (3
.50


Cost of
Picking,
Hauling,
Packing,
Selling
Per Box

1.28
1.30
1.10
.95
.90
.87
.90
.95
.93
.88
.84
.91
.87
.90
1.01
1.25
1.21
1.24
) 1.25
1.32


Estimated
Gross FOB
Returns
Florida
Points
Per Box
~ 4.16
2.12
3.30
2.15
2.30
1.48
1.71-
1.85
2.30.
2.50
1.56
1.43
1.62
1.63
2.10
2.97
3.10
3.50
3.55
2.62
2.104


Estimated(l) Estimated


Net Returns
to Growers
RailBoat
Shipments
Per Box
($2.14
.12
1.20
.57
.75
.10
.38
.50
.90
1.15
.30
..25
.29
..36
.76
1.56
1.35
1.79
1.83
.84
.28


Net
Return(l)
Rail & Boat
Shipments
Net Value
$12,663,065
1,400,890
8,987,560
7,980,074
7,428,109
1,172,880
4,712,594
5,547,228
10,543,129
16,767,693
5,401,649
5,382,190
4,268,365
5,979,538
12,808,748
40,247,695
41,190,360
43,901,540
47,414,930
25,320,348
7,095.000


Estimated
Net Return
All Oranges
Harvested
and Used
Net Value
:;13,905,825
2,125,630
9,648,310
8,826,500
8,857,319
2,129,300
6,842,686
8,246,123
14,058,129
20,689,419
6,053,959-
6,035,321
4,214,941
9,126,658
18,918,916
53;904,492
60)g868 ; 32
74,132,856
91,767,533
26,395,989
8,492.216


Estimated
Gross FOB
Returns
Rail6Boat
Shipments
Gross Value
$24,616,051
23,749,050
24,715,789
30,100,280
22,779,534
17,858,624
21,206,673
20,524,749
26,943,552
36,451,507
26,088,575
30,786,124
23,843,970
27,074,020
35,392,593
76,625,358
94,585,272
85,841,000
91,979,783
78,975,370
53.212.501


Estimated
Gross Return
All Oranges
Harvested
and Used
Gross Value
$26,804,051
26,224,450
26,157,789
32,733,844
26,455,041
20,446,424
25,752,219
26,352,066
33,349,552
44,979,738
34,339,559-
39,687,098
33,663-,815-
42,442,109-
51,904,503
101,089,208
129,867,001
135,653,600
161,81, 586'
101,927,124'
82.619.360.


NOTES:
* Truck


Shipments included with Rail & Boat, their FOB price's being same.


(1) Net return after deducting for cost of production which includes fertilizer,
pruning, fuel, labor, etc., but before deducting taxes and interest.


spray materials, irrigation,


(2) Cost of production figures added to net returns to grower will show the Marketing Bureau "On Tree"
average price for rail and boat shipments.

(3) An allowance was made for unusual cost in grove protection in 1946-47 season. (February freeze.)

(4) Fruit fly year when production, harvest and shipments restricted.


- I I


fl a | .. .






Records
EsLi mates
Season
GRAPE-
FRUIT
19217-28
1928-29
1929-30(4)
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-5
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
19k3-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48


' ct al
Carload.
Raili2Dat
Shipped
Carloads
20,012
.28,294
16,415
30,462
20,315
19,639
17,514
19,218
15,196
23,786
18,952
25,047
12,974
19,962
16,-813
16,529
18,'041
11,742
16,-554
17,800
14,776


-LC.IIDA GRAP'FRPUT SHIPMENTS,
Portion .,itl Jo. Total
Ca"rloads Rail Haul, Rail
Shipped Shipped i Boat
by Rail by Boat(2) Shipments
Cars Carloads Boxec
19,953 59 7,204,320
28,091 203 10,185,840
16,354 61 6,341,913
29,809 653 11,641,987
17,865 2,450 7,821,,313
15,293 4,346 7,266,430
11,340 6,174 6,981,916
10,418 8,800 7,577,053
8,838 6,356 5,936,067
16,142 7,644 9,352,859
11,511 5,441 6,602',063
17,051 7,996 9,844-,.986
9,-160 3,814 5,11 U.5911
14,478 5,484 7,956,475
16,;298 515 6,856,510
16,529 None 8,000-, 134
18,J041 None 8,984', 800
11,742 None 5,860,000
16,542 12 8,306",504
10,'363 1,437 8,8783, 857
14,776 7,497-,100


OTIER DATA FOR


VALUATIONS, AND
Estimated
Trucked
out of
Florida
Boxe s
240,000
450,000
30,000
792,000
897,940
980,500
684,000
1,187,011'
1,028,000
1,283,600
1, 233,-600
1,472,277
1,000,000
1,'559,600
1,042,000
612,807
355,600
205 ,200
340,400
558,000
A 1,143,367


NOTES-:

(A) Includes 9,373 boxes of grapefruit for exp-ort and 2,213 boxes for inter-state by-products.


(B) Does not include 3,700,000 boxes of grapefruit abandoned for marketing-reasons. Abandonment,
years prior to 1947-48 scagon not shown.
(2) Domestic Boat Shipments in coast-wise trade...


if any, for


(3) Figures for "Consumed in Florida" stock are rough estimates based on supply, price, population, intra-
state truck shipments, etc.
(4) Fruit fly year when production, harvest and shipments restricted.

(#) Does not include 2,388,224 boxes diverted to other uses.


Estimated
Canned
in
Flcrida
Boxes
586,000
1,489,320
1,670,000
2,892,705
930,171
2,750,000
2,605,964
5,603,996
3,760,000
685,327
5-,793,097
8-,395,348
8,800,274
13,870,966
10,142,575
17,584,025
20,445,643
15,136,000
22,136 ,149
15,864-,346
19,448,586


21 YEARS
estimated
Consumed(3)
in
Florida
Boxes
300,000
675,000
360,000
654,291
782,000
928,700
841,320
875,000
780,000
800,000
750,000
950,000
740,000
1,000,000
1,058,915
1,094,150
1,213,952
1,098,800
1,216,947
1,098,797
1,210,947


Estimated
Florida
Production
Utilized
Total Boxes
8,332,320
12,800,160
8,401,913
16,180,983
10,431,424
11,925,630
11,113,200
15,243,060
11,504,067
18,121,786
14,378,760
20,662,611#
15,650,865
24,387,041
19,100,000
27,300,116
31,000,000
22,300,000
32,000,000
26,400,000
29.300,000 B






-LOI'IDA GRAPEFRUIT SHIPMENTS, VALUATIONS, AND OTHER DATA FOR 21 YEARS


Records
and Es-
timates
Season
G:'APE-
FRUIT
1927-28
1923-29
1929 -30(4)
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47*
1947-48*


Lost of
Produ;c-
tion(2)
before
Picked
Pur box
p0.52
.52
.60
.36
.40
.38
.39
.37
.39
.30
.36
.30
.40
.35
.40
.35
.40
.40
.34
.57 (3)
.35


Cost, oi'
Picking
Hauling,
Packing,
Selling
Per A3ox
S1.25
1.25
1.25
1.05
.85
.85
.83
.84
.87
.83
.82
.74
.82
.74
.80
.88
1.07
1.07
1.10
1.08
1.09


Lstimated
Gross FOB
Returns
Florida
Points
Per Box
,3,28
2.02
3.C03
1.50
1.50
1.16
1.51
1.29
1.87
1.48
1.55
1.04
1.42
1.21
1.80
2.33
2.47
3.00
2.65
2.18
1.80


Estimated(i)
Not Returns
to Growers
Rail&Boat
Shipments
Per Box
.1.51
.25
1.20
.09
.25
-.07
.29
.08
.81
.35
.35
Zero
.20
.12
.60
1.10
1.00
1.53
1.21
.73
.36


estimated
Net
Return( 1)
Rail& foat
Shipments
Net Value
"10,878,523
2,546,460
7,610,296
1,065,779
1,955,328
508,650
2,024,756
606,164
3,621,001
3,273,500
2,310,722
Zero
1,022,120
954,777
4,113,906
8,810,047
8,984,800
8,965,800
10,039,012
6,440,575
3,107,194


i'strimated
Nie Return
All Grapefrui
Hlaryvested
and Used
Net Value
411,555,563
3,078,488
8,293,796
1,199,727
2,012,557
1,285,321
2,591,790
199,847
5,269,881
4,448,605
2,613,485
2,099,526
146,121
514,241
6,439,418
18,156,816
28,461,544
30,343,516
24,983,418
6,883,612
342,474


LsTimated Lstimnted
Gross FOB Gross Return
b Returns All'Grapefruit
Rail&Boat Harvested
Shipments and Used
Gross Value Gross Value
23,630,170 -!25, 018,170
20,575,397 22,557,557
19,342,835 21,479,835
17,762,980 20,366,366
11,731,970 13,522,967
8,429,059 10,170,789
10,542,693 13,296,632
9,774,397 13,409,984
11,100,445 15,936,845
13,842,231 -19,731,121
10,101,156 15,063,803
10,238,785 14,688,400
7,257,052 *12,289,942
9,627,335 17,335,152
12,341,718 22,849,773
18,661,282 40,527,501
22,192,456 56,780,588
17,580,000 49,962,240
21,986,266 56,604,216
19,640,839 32,971,887
15,535,969 24.102.874


NOTES:
* Truck shipments included vdth Rail & Boat, their FOB prices being


(1) Net return after deducting for cost of production which includes fertilizer, spray materials,
pruning, fuel, labor, etc., but before deducting taxes and interest.


irrigation,


(2) Cost of production figures added to net returns to grower will show the Marketing Bureau "On Tree" average
price for rail and boat shipments. The speculator's profit or loss is not calculated.

(3) An allowance was made for unusual cost in grove protection in 1945-47 season.

(4) Fruit fly year when production, harvest and shipments restricted.

(-) Minus sign indicates Net Loss.


same.






FLORIDA TA:'IGFRINE SHIPMENTS, VALUATIONS, AND OTHER DATA FOR 21 YEARS


Records
Estimates
Season
TAN-
BRIMES
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30(4)
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-48


Total Fortion
Carloads Carloads
Rail&Boat Shipped
Shipped by Rail
Carloads Cars


1,427
2,951
1,254
3,830
3,195
3,282
3,998
3,676
3,974
5,885
4,396
6,323
4,051
4,513
3,534
7,382
6,179
6,847
5,728
4,543
3,610


1,417
2,917
1,242
3,786
3,077
2,749
2,657
2,199
2,549
4,046
3,098
4,502
3,315.
3,449.
3,387-
7,382
6,179
6,847
5,728
4,323
3,610


With No.
Rail Haul,
Shipped
by Boat(2)
Carloads
10
34
12
44
118
533
1,341
1,477
1,425
1,839
1,298
1,821
736 -
1,064 -
147
None
None
None
None-
222


Total
Rail
and Boat
Shipment s
Boxes
513,720
1,062,360
383,054
1,387,828
1,188,707
1,181,520
1,501,411
1,461,049
1 ;581 ,397
2,288,23,1
1,709,973
2,553,332
1,620,345
1,791,824
1,432,144
3,407,401
2,818,782
3,149,000
2,809,3.72
2,058,146
1,699,815


Estimated
Trucked
Out of
Florida
Boxes
40,000
75,000
5,000
264,000
141,100
175,680
243,000
267,706
232,000
430,000
298,000
478,541
437,200
434,800
334,800
400,048
382,800
327,600
384,000
438,400
667,845


ELsti matn e
Canned
in
Florida
Boxes






No record
made of the
very few
Tangerine s
processed
prior to
1944-45
Season




3,000
515,600
930,751
598,505


Estimated
Consumed(3)
in
Florida
B oxe s
50 .900
212,500
60,000
218,097
136,000
162,000
247,680
275,000
280,000
300,000
250,000
350,000
200,000
525,000
333,056
392,700
398,418
420,400
491,028
472,703
433,835


NOTES:


(A) Does not include
not shovm here.


600,000 boxes abandoned for marketing reasons. Abandbnment, if any, for prior years


(2) Domestic Boat Shipments in coast-wise trade.

(3) Figures for "Consumed in Florida" stock are rough estimates based on supply, price, population, intra-
state truck shipments, etc.


(4) Fruit fly year when production, harvest and shipments restricted.


Estimated
Florida
Production
Utilized
Total Boxes
603,720
1,349,860
448,054
1,869,925
1,465,807
1,519,200
1,992,091
2,003,755
2,093.397
3,018,634
2,257,973
3,381,873
2,257, 45
2,751,624
2,100,000
4,200,149
3,600,000
3,900,000
4,200,000
3,900,000
3,400,.000 A






FLORIDA TANGERINE SHIPMENTS, VALUATIONS, AND OTHER DATA FOR 21 YEARS


Redords
and Es-
timates
Season
TAN-
GERINES
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30(4)
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47*
1947-48*


Cost of
Produc-
tion(?)
before
Picked
Pur Box
70.81
.81
.90
.54
.75
.56
.56
.55
.55
.50
.52
.45
.50
.50
.58
.40
.65
.65
.64
.68
.68


Cost of
Picking,
Hauling,
Packing,
Selling
Per Box
S1.70
1.70
1.70
1.50
1.25
1.16
1.05
.95
1.10
1.15
1.16
.95
1.06
1.08
1.16
1.35
1.68
1.68
1.71
1.72
1.82


Estimated
Gross FOB
Returns
Florida
Points
Per Box
5.28
2.90
3.50
1.95
2.05
1.42
1.80
1.66
2.00
1.45
1.86
1.34
2.00
1.68
2.85
2.79
3.70
4.25
4.80
3.75
2.90


Estimated( 1) Estimated


Net Returns
to Growers
Rail & Boat
Shipments
Per Box
2.77
.39
.90
.-.09
.05
.-.30
.19
.16
.35
-.20
.18
-.06
S.44
.10
1.11
1.03
1.37
S 1.92
2.45
1.35
.40


Net
Return(1)
Rail i Boat
Ship -ient s
Net Value
$1,423,004
414,320
344,748
124,905
59,435
354,456
285,268
233,768
553,489
457,646
307,795
153,200
712,952
179,182
1,589,680
3,509,623
3,861,731
6,046,080
6,882,962
2,778,497
947,064


Estimated Estimated Estimated
Net Return Gross FOB Gross Return
All Tangerines Returns All Tangerines
Harvested Rail&Boat Harvested
and Used Shipments and Used
Net Value Gross Value Gross Value
$1,519,104 $ 2,712,442 $ 2,892,442
493,945 3,080,844 3,435,844
378,498 1,340,689 1,459,689
11,345 2,706,265 3,188,362
73,290 2,436,849 2,713,949
281,513 1,677,758 1,999,238
574,535 2,702,540 3,352,340
409,965 2,425,341 3,035,702
883,889 3,162,794 3,902,794
558,726 3,317,939 4,127,899
320,975 3,180,550 3,881,990
242,481 3,421,465 4,291,433
945,972 -3,240,690 4,411,370
-219,216 3,010,264 4,415,434
2,280,955 4,081,610 5,818,344
4,223,464 9,472,575 11,436,280
4,884,190 10,429,493 13,041,107
7,437,192 13,383;250 16,296,690
8,800,902 13,484,986 17,807,898
3,522,030 8,310,248 11,666,569
696,420 6.866.214 8.203.662


NOTES:
* "Truck


shipments included with Rail & Boat, their FOB prices being same.


(1) Net return after deducting for cost of production which includes -fertilizer,
pruning, fuel, labor, etc., but before .deducting for taxes and intere-st.


spray materials, irrigation


(2) Cost of production figures added to net returns to grower will show the Marketing Bureau "On Tree"
average price for rail and boat shipments. The speculator's profit or loss "is not calculated.

(4) Fruit fly year when production, harvest and shipments restricted.

(-) Minus sign indicates Net Loss.





FLORIDA TOTAL CITRUS


.


SHIPMENTS. VALUATIONS, ANID
Total Estimated
Rail Trucked


Records Total Portion 7Vith No.
Estimates Carloads Carloads Rail Haul,
Season Rail-Boat Shipped Shipped
ALL Shipped by Rail by Boat
CITRUS Carloads Cars Carloads
1927-28 37,876 37,660 196
1928-29 63,673 62,998 677
1929-30(4) 39,485 39,231 254
1930-31 74,645 72,949 1,696
1931-32 49,235 44,996 4,239
1932-33 55,501 44,456 11,045
1933-34 53,311 32,288 21,023
1934-35 51,107 27,460 23,647
1935-36 48,916 28,790 20,126
1936-37 66,879 43,570 23,309
1937-38 67,409 45,867 21,542
1938-39 87,067 58,933 28,134
1930-40 55,310 41,761 13,549
1940-41 67,072 49,329 17,743
1941-42 61,945 60,128 1,817
1942-43 76,198 76,198 None
19q3-44 85,380 85,380 None
1944-45 68,096 68,096 None
1945-46 74,947 74,859 88"
1946-47* 76,766 72,199 4,567
1947-48* 58-002 58 002


& Boat
Shipments
Boxes
13,635,360
22,922,280
14,214,600
27,229,945
18,914,165
20,176,750
20,884,890
20,132,,561
19,232,052
26,221,696
26,317,533
33,927,076
21,449,504
26,358,127
25,142,270
37,216,319
42,314,960
33,535 000
39,902 117
37,724,125
28.772.771


Out of
Florida
Boxes
800,000
1,500,000
100,000
2,640,000
2,525,520
3,010,180
3,249,000
4,346,360
3,770,000
4,274,000
4,973,600
7,126,559
5,813,200
7,720,400
5,476,000
3,728,678
2,893,600
1,989,200
2,778',400
4,506,000
7,518,512


NOTES:
* Truck Shipments included with Rail & Boat, -their FOB prices being the same.


(A) Includes Export Oranges and Grapefruit 36,757 boxes, and 44,
Grapefruit, classified as Inter-State By-Products.


544 boxes Oranges, and 2,213 boxes of


(B) Does not include 4,300,000 boxes abandoned for marketing reasons.

(2) Domestic Boat in Coastwise Trade.

(3) Figures for "Consumed in Florida" stock are rough estimates based on supply,,price, population, intra-
state truck shipments, etc.
(4) Fruit fly year when production," harvest and shipments restricted.
(+) Includes 2,512,323 boxes diverted to other uses.


,


,


OTHER DATA
Estimated
Canned
in
Florida
Boxes
600,000
1,527,320
1,710,000
2,954,056
.966,533
2,800,000
2,667,397
5,781,933
3,900,000
7,305,512
6,848,496
9,582,037
12,970,408
17,812,227
14,339,874
24,022,299
31,456,489
29,483,000
41,871,161
36,620,582
50,423,431


FOR 21 YEARS
Estimated
Consumed(3)
in
Florida
Boxes
1;,000,000
1,950,000
1,200,000
2,180,970
2,040,000
2,422,700
2,475,000.
2,575,000
2,560,000
2,800,000
2,800,000
3,300,000
2,740,000
4,000,000
3,441,856
3,733,150
4,134,951
3,992,800
4,226,722
4,249,293
4.301,772


.9


Estimated
Florida
Production
Utilized
Total Boxes
16,035,360
27,899,600
17,224,600
35,004,971
24,446,218
28,409,630
... 29,276,287
32,835,854
29,462,052
40,601; 208
40,939,629
56,447,995#
42,973,112
55,890,754
48,400; 000
68,700,446
80,800,000
69,000,000
86,000,000
83,100,000
91.100.000 B






CITRUS SHIPMENTS, VALUATIONS, AND OTHLR DATA FOR 21 YEARS


Records
and Es-
timates -
Season
ALL
CITRUS
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30(4)
1930-31
1931-32
,:932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
19.39-40
1940-41
1?41-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47*
1947-48*


CosL of
Pruduc-
tion(2) .
before
Picked
Per Box
$0.63
.64
.71
.43
'.63
* .45---
.44
.43
.44
.37
.38
.34
.42
.39
.43
.39
.49
.483
.46
.50
.48


Uost of
Picking,
Hauling,
Packing,
Selling
Per Box
Q1.28
1.25
1.29
1.10
'.92
.90
.87.
.88
.94
.92
.88
.82
.90
.85
.89
1.01
1.24
1.25
1.25
1.24
1.29


Estimated
Gross FOB
Returns
Florida
Points
Per Box
V3.74
2.08
3.19
1.86
1.95
1.36
1.65
1.63
2.14
2.04
1.57
1.31
1.60
1.51
2.06
2.81
3.01
Z.483
3.44
2.59
2.08


Estimated( 1)
Net Returns
to Growers
Rail Boat
* Shipments
Per Box
$1.83
.19"
1.19
.33
.50
.01-5-
.33-
.32
.76
.75
.3a
.15
.28
.27
.74
1.41
1.28
1.75
1.73
.85
.31


Estimated
Net
Return(1)
Rail ?: Boat
Shipments
Net Value
l24,964,592 $
4,361,670
16,942,604
8,920,948
9,442,872
309,774
7,022,618
6,387,160
14,717,619
19,583,547
8,020,166
5,228,990
6,003,437
7,113,479
18,512,334
52,567,333
54,036,891
58,913,420
64,336,904
31,591,356
11.149,258


Lstimated Estimated
Net Return Gross FOB
All Citrus Returns
Harvested Rail&; Boat
and Used Shipments
Net V'lue Gross Value
26,980,492 $50,958,663
5,698,063 47,405,291
18,320,604 45,399,313
10,037,572 50,569,525
10,943,166 36,948,353
562,466 27,465,441
10,009,011 34,451,906
8,855,935 32,724,487
20,211,899 41,206,791
24,579,298 53,611,677
8,988,419 41,370,281
3,693,314 44,446,374
5,014,792 34,341,712
8,831,633 39,711,619
27,639,289 51,815,921
76,284,772 104,759,215
94,032,066 127,207,221
111,913,564 116,804,250
125,551,850 127,451,035
36,791,631 100,679,009
8,846,162 .75,614,684


Estimated
Gross Return
All Citrus
Harvested
and Used
Gross Value
$54,714,663
52,217,851
49,097,313
56,293,572
42,691,957
32,616,451
42,401,191
42,797,752
53,189,191
68,838,758
53,285,352
58,646,93-1
50,365,127
64,192,695
80,572,620
153,052,989
199,688,696
201,912,530
230,230,700
146,565,580
114.925,896 A


NOTES:
* Truck Shipments included with Rail & Boat, their FOB prices being the same.

(A) Does not include the production value of 4,300,000 boxes abandoned for marketing reasons.

(1) Net return after deducting for cost of production which includes fertilizer, spray materials, irrigation,.
pruning, fuel, labor, utc., but before deducting for taxes and interest.

(2) Cost of production figures added to net returns to grower will show the Marketing Bureau "On Tree"
average price for rail and boat shipments. The speculator's profit or loss is not calculated.


(4) Fruit fly year when production, harvest and shipments restricted.


FLORIDA TOTAL




rFRLIGT C-..' 'T SKI. LNKTS FROh FLOr-,!L.A BY COi.-,ODITIES ANiD i:;.u'Il, FOR 1947-48 SEASON


COMiODITY : Au;.:Sept.: Oct. : Nov. : Dec. : Jan. Feb. :Marsh :April : May :June : July TOTAL

Oranges 50: : 703: 3082: 4062: 4418: 4254: 4516: 4396: 4055: 3114: 574: 33,524
Grapefruit : : 98:' 2202: 1505: 886: 1027: 1313: 1177: 1396: 1339: 698: 154: 11,801
Tangerines : : : 37G: 1311: 1020: 177: : : : : 2,884:
Mixed Citrus : 8: : 125: 699: 1342: 1199: 890: 547: 648: 678: 413: 118: 6,667
TOTAL CITRUS : 64: 98: 3070: 5662: 7601: 7664: 6634: 6540: .6440: 6072: 4225: 846: 54,876
Stra7wrberris : : : : : 5: 3: 18: 32: : : : 56:
Watermelons : : : : : : : : : .O: 5109: 3781: 327: 9,247
TOTAL .JISCL.iRUITS : : : : : 3: 3: 18: 52: 30: 5109: 3781: 327: 9,5303
Beans( incl .Limas) : : : 19: 237: 782: 407: 200: 698: 559: 228: 18: : 3,148
Cabbage : : : : : 113: 519: 792: 1455: 1917: 137: 1: :-4,94 :
Celery : : : 24: 343: 1122: 1S36: 1758: 1781: 1653: 644: : 8,966
Corn, Green : : :3: 55: 128: 152: : 338 :
Cucumbers- : : : 15:- 223: 176: 13: : 115: 787: 171: .: : 1,500 :
Eggplant : : 1: : : : : : 23: 66: 77: 12: 182 :
Escarole : : : : 42: 186: 279: 161: 147: 127: 97: : : 1.039 :
Lettuce & Romaine -: : : : 18: 39: 10: 14: 9: : : .: 90
Peas, English : : : : : : 6: 7: : : 3: : : 16 :
Peppers : : : : 9: 19: 16: 47: 392: 313: 539: 164: : 1,499 :
Potatoes : : : : : 1: 89: 630: 1021: 1620: 1439: 7: : 4,807 :
Tomatoes : : : :- 37: 550: 378: 92: 293: 802: 1642: 8: : 3,782 :
Other Vegetables : 2: : : : 18: 38: 56: 17: 13: 13: 5: 19: 181 :
Mixed CarVegetables : : : 34: 9: 43: 449: .584: 962: 1065: 633: .151: 1: 4,442
TOTAL V GET,.FLES : 2: 1: S: 65S: 2:.-C: .-: .21i9 6?73: 9062: G749: 1227: 32: 34,924 :
NON-CITRUS & jTJS. : 2: 1: 6,: 6 9: 2079: .32S: 427: r6905: 1?2: 11358: 5008: 359: -14,227
ALL FRUITS VEG.S. : 66: 90: Z'?.: 6351: 10280: 10)03: 10871': 13445: 15532: 17.?40: 9233: 12'5: 09,103

PICY-UP-EXPRES, .IIP.ETT FT FLORI DA STATI0liS FOR 1947-48 CEASOi'
COMIODTTY : Aug.:Sept.: Oct. : 'ov. : Dec. : Jan. : Feb. :I.,rch :April : May : Junre : July : TOT.L :
Mixed Citrus : : : : 7 : 14115: 374: 51C: 416: 24'7: 113: 51: 21: 3,115 :
Mixed Vegetables : 31: 29: 47: 62: 64: 58: 29:' 35: 30: 64: 66: 21: 533
TOTAL FRUITS ." VLGS.: 31: 29: 47: 98: 1479: 432: 545: 378: 273: 177: 117: 42: 3,648 :






&- EXPRESS CARLOT SHIPMENTS, FOR 1947-48 SEASON


COMMODITY : AuR.:Sent.: Oct.: Nov.: Dec. : Jan. : Feb. :March :April : May : June : July : TOTAL
Oranges : 50: : 703: 3082: 4062: 4418: 4254: 4816: 4396: 4055: 3114: 574:' 33,524
Grapefruit G- 98: 2202: 1505: 886: 1027: 1313:- 1177: 1396: 1339: 698: 154: -11,801
Tangerines : : : : 376: 1311: 1020: 177:. -. : : : 2;884
Mixed Citrus : 8: : 125: 735: 2757: 1573: 1406: 893: 891: 791: 464: 139: 9-782
TOTAL CITRUS 64: 98: 3030: 5698: 9016: 8038: 7150: 6886: 6683: 6185: 4276: 8C7: 57,991

Strawberries : : : : : 3: 3: 18: 32: : : : : 56 :
Watermelons : : : : : : : : : 30: 5109: 3781: 327: 9,247
TOTAL MISCL.s'RUITS : : : : : 3: 3: 18: 32: 30: 5109: 3781: 327: 9,303
Beanj(incl. Limas) : : : 19: 237: 782: 407: 200: 698: 559: 228: 18: : 3,148 :
Cabbage : : : : : 113: 519: 792: 1455: 1917: 137: 1: : 4,934 :
Celery : : : 24: 348: 1122: 1636: 1758: 1781: 1653: 644: : 8,966
Corn, Green : : : : : : : : 3: 55: 128: 152: : 338 :
Cucumbers : : : 15: 223: 176: 13: 115: 787: 171: : : 1,500 :
Eggplant : : : : : : : : 3: 23: 66: 77: 12: 182 :
Escarole : : : 42: 186: 279: 161: 147: 127: 97: : : 1,039
Lettuce & Romaine : : : : 18: 39: 10: 14: 9: : : : : 90
Peas, English 6: 7: : : 3: : : 16
Peppers : : : : 9: 19: 16: 47: 392: 313: 539: 164: : 1,499
Potatoes : : : : 1: 89: 630: 1021: 1620: 1439: 7: : 4,807
Tomatoes : : : : 37: 530: 378: 92: 293: 802: 1642: 8: : 3,782 :
Other Veg-etables : 2: : : : 18: 38: 56: 17: 13: 13: 5: 19: 181 :
Mixed Car Vegetables : 31: 29: 81: 161: 528: 507: 613: 994: 1095: 697: 217: 22: 4,97.5 :
TOTAL VEGETABLES 33: 30i 115: 751: 2740: 3384: 4248: 6905: 9092: 6813: 1293: 53: 35,457 :
NON-CITRUS & VEGS. : 33: 30: 115: 751: 2743: 3387: 4266: 6937: 9122: 11922: 5074: 380: 44,760 :
ALL FRUITS & VEGS. : 97: 128: 3145: 6449: 11759: 11425: 11416: 13823: 15805: 18107: 9350: 1247: 102,751 :
NOTES: Other Vegetables include straight freight cars as enumerated: Broccoli 3, Carrots 48, Cauliflower 28,
Greens(ex.Spinach) 61, Spinach 8, Sweet Potatoes 31, Turnips 2. Total 181.

BOAT SHIPLENTS (Carlot Equivalent FROM FLORIDA PORTS (Does not include initial rail haul exports).
COMMODITY : Aug.:Sept.: Oct.: Nov.: Dec. : Jan. : Feb. :March :April : Nay : June : July a TOTAL :
Sweet Potatoes : : : 1: : : 1: 1: 1: 1: : .. : 5 :


NOTE: No Domestic Boat Shipments of Citrus reported.


AIL FREIGHT





FLORIDA INTERSTATE TRUCK SHIPMENT PASSING 1947-48 SEASON
Actual Check at -Nine Road Gu :rd Stations October 16 -I:Iay 31
Estimated for August 1-October 15 and June 1-July 31 Periods


COr1MODITY : Aug.: Sept: Oct. Nov. : Dec" : Jan. Feb. ::'arch : April: Iay : June : July : TOT.Ai--

Oranm-es 7: 4: 675: 1547: 2376: 1568: 1810: 1990: 1550: 1583: 944: 214:" 14,268
Grapefruit 18: 61: 376: 309: 206: 267: 306: 329: 324: 360: 204: 98: -2,858 :
Tangerines : : :1cl : 261: 697: 559: 149: 4:c01 : : : : 1,670 :
TOTAL CITRUS : 25: 65: 1051: 2117: 3279: 2394: 2265: 2323: 1874: 1943: 1148: 312: 18,796 :
Avocados : 10: 10: 16: 28: 7: 1: : : :Icl : : 10: 82 :
Limes : 6: 4: 1: 2: 1:lcl : 1 : 1: 1: 4: : 10: 30 :
Strawberries : : : :1al - 41: 50: 89:. 128: 10: 3: : : 321 :
Watermelons : : : : : : : : :lcl : 1754: 1549: 200: 3,503 :
Other Non-Citrus Frts: 2: 2: : : : : : : : 29: 3.:5-- 2 38 :
TOTAL I"SC. FRUITS : 18: 16: 17:1 30: 49: 51: 89: 129: 11: 1790: 1552-. 222: 3,974 :
Beans, Snap : : : 21: 352: 742: 471: 457: 1009: 833: 285: 2: : 4,172 :
Limas : : : : :lcl : 63: 30: 47: 103: 92: 8: : 343 :
Baby Limas : 10: 111: 22: 2: 145:
Cabbage : : :lcl : 2: 147: 644: 972: 1143: 947: 128: : : .3,983
Celery : : : -7: 66: 230: 298: 313: 225: 162: 80: : 1,381
Corn, Green : : : : : 1:11 cl 1: 138: 398: 109: 15: 662
Cucumbers : : : 41: 205: 158: 105: 49: 245: 862: 321: 10: 3: 1,999
Eggplant 1: 1: 3: 14: 19: 20: 21: 89: 238: 190: 128: 30: 754
Escarole : : : : 5: 48: 25: 40: 24: 31: 27: : : 200
Field Peas : 5: 5: 4: 5: l:cl : :1c1 : 135: 505: 129: 15: 804
Lettuce & Romaine : : : : 3: 20: -6: 19: 8: 7: : : : 103 :
Okra 4: 2: 7: 8: 1: 1: 1: 4: 11: 77: 50: 20: 186 :
Peas, English : : : :lcl : 4: 4: 3: 4: 3: : : : 18 :
-Peppers : : : 2: 12: 39: .72: 256: -147: 511: 5.12: 91: 15: 1,987 :
Potatoes : : : : : 61:. 125: 290: 424: 370: : .1,278
Squash : : : 4: 15: 85. 85: 65: 175. 273: 81: 2: : 815 :
Tomatoes : : : : 34: 27: 33.1: 274: 357: 776: 1521: 241: 5: 3, 6 :
Bunched Vegetaoles : : : : 1: 11: 25: 28: 27: 17: 1: : 110
Other Veretables : 1: : 1i. : 5: 31: 103: 201: 169.: 54: 34: 7: 15: 619 :
TOTAL VEGEIA9LES : 11: 8: 82: 69: 1617: 2337: 2839: 4351: 5598: -1845: 879: 120: 23,385 :
VEGS. 2 4. FRUIT'- : 0, 4: *9: 72e: 1666: 23 88 2928: 0 -440: 5609 66P5: -2431: 342: 3,35a
,GRiJD TOTAL : 54: 89: 1150: 2845: 4945: 4782: 5193: 6603: 7q33: 8578: 3579: 654: 46,155

See bottom. c.f c .pge 30 for ':.nvcrziin fct.-r-:..






CAhLO' SFHIP;: I:I. ( 1'F IrrID, E 3.3LSS, BOAI IRUCK ) FRUI-S A',D V,-LiA LEC BY L.:0:! OIS ro :ASCo:- 1947-.18
August 1-July 31 (Truck October 16-riiay 31 except w.,ere estimated)

COOIOIDITY : Aug.: Sect: Oct. : Nov. : Dec. : Jan. : Feb. :-arch :April : I,;ay : June : July : TOTAL :
Oranges : 57: 4: 1378: 4629: 6438: 5086: 6064: 6806: 5946: 5C38: 4058: 788: 47,792
Grapefruit 24: 159: 2578: 1814: 1092: 1204: 1619: 1506: 1720: 1699: 902: 252: 14,659
Tangerines : : :Icl 637: 2008: 1579: 326: 4:lcl : 4;554 :
Lixed Citrus : 8: -: 125: 735: 2757: 1573: 1406: 893: 891: 791: 464: 139: 9,782
TOTAL CITIRUS 89: 163: 4081: 7815: 12295: 10432: 9415: 9209: 8557: 8128: 5424: 1179: 76,787
Avo:iados : 10: 10: 16: 28: 7: 1: -: -: :1ic : -: 10: 82
Limec : 6: 4: 1: 2: 1:lcl :1l : 1: 1: 4: -: 10: 30
Strawberries : : : :cl : 44:. 53: .107: 160: 10: 3: : : 377
"!atermel ons : 30: 6863: 5330: 527: 12,750 :
Ot'cr Non-Citrus : 2: 2: -: -: -: -: -: -: -: 29: 3: 2: 38 :
TOIAL idSC. FRUITS : 18: 16: 17: 30: 52: 54: 107: 161: 41: 6899: 5333: 549: 13,277 :
Boans(incl. Limas) : : : 40: 589: 1524: 941: 687. 1754: 1405: 605: 28: : 7,663 :
Cacbage : : :cl : 2: 260: 1163: 1764: 2598: 2864: 265: 1: : 8,917 :
Celery : : : : 31: 414: 1352: 1934: 2071: 2006: 1815: 724: : 10,347 :
Corn, Green : : : : :cl : 1:lcl 4: 193: 526: 261: 15: 1,000 :
Cucumbers : : : 56: 428: 334: 118: 49: 360: 1649: 192: 10: 3: 3,499 :
Eggplant : 1: 2: 3: 14: 19: 20: 21: 92: 261: 256: 205: 42: 936 :
Escarole : : : : 47: 234: 304: 201: 171: 158: 124: : 1,239 :
Lettuce & Romaine : : : : 21: 59: 56: 33: 17: 7: : : : 193
Peas, English : :4 10: 10: 4: 3: 3: : : 34 :
Peppers : : : 2: 21: 58: 88: 303: 839: 824: 1031: 255: 15: 3,486
Potatoes : : : : : 9: 150: 755: 1311: 2044: 1809: 7: : 6,085
Tomatoes : : : : 71; 767: 759. 366: 650: 1578: 3163: 249: 5: 7,608
Other Vegetables : 11: 7: 16: 59: 116: 150: 151: 224: 460: 788: 208: 56: 2,246
Mixed Car Vegetables : 32: 29: 81: 166: 559: 610: 814: 1162: 1149: 731: 224: 37: 5,594
TOTAL VEGETABLES : 44: 38: 198: 1449: 4357: 5722: 7088: 11257: 14691: 11658: 2172: 173: 58,847:
VEGS. 1 MISC. FRUITS : 62: 54: 215: 1479: 4409: 5776: 7195: 11418: 14732: 18557: 7505: 722: 72,124 :
ALL FRUITS & VEGS. 151: 217: 4296: 9294: 16704: 16208: 16610: 20627: 23289: 26685: 12929: 1901: 148,911
IOTES FOR TRUCK SHIP1MiHT (See previous page): The above vegetable and lion-citrus passing were checked at
Florida State Road Guard Stations October 16, 1947 to August 31, 1948. August 1 to October 16 passing were
estimated, based on general information available. June and July were likewise estimated.





FLORIDA SHIPMiENTS BY VARIOUS iviEANS OF TRANSPORTATION FOR TLEN SEASONS
(These figures have been revised and rearranged and may not agree or seen to
agree with some previous tabulations. The totals are substantially the same.)

Freight Shipments
Commodity 1938-39 1939-40 1940-41 1941-42 1942-43 1943-44 1944-45 1945-46 1946-47 1947-48

Oranges 31,065 24,812 27,084 34,374 43,390 51,405 41,049 41,848 43,390 33,524
Grapefruit 13,290 6,832 12,135 12,650 12,258 13,441 8,534 12,201 12,606 11,801
Tangerines 2,817 1,896 2,171 1,865 5,017 3,856 4,370 3,813 2,974 2,884
Mixed Citrus 11,073 7,249 6,770 10,062 13,152 13,626 11,102 13,573 9,599 6,667
Total Citrus 58,245 40,789 48,160 -58,951 73,627- 82,328- 65,055 71,435 68,569 54,876
Strawberries 686 43 4 6 22 43 25 99 56
Watermelons 3,406 4,977 5,028 5,565 3,363 6,116 8,366 7,470 7,963 9,247
Miscl.Fruits 2 16 15 3 9 -
Total Non-Citrus 4,092 5,020 5,034 5,565 3,369 6,154 8,424 7,498 8,071 9,303
Beans (: Limas 4,431 2,910 2,700 3,335 5,943 6,596 4,682 4,538 3,668 3,148
Cabbage 1,610 4,238 2,256 3,568 4,534 6,378 5,157 4,763 2,459 4,934
Celery 7,696 7,769 8,689 9,119 8,557 9,349 11,037 12,489 8,747 8,966
Corn, Green 32 22 2 7 17 18 42 104 166 338 P
Cucumbers 809 1,153 981 1,181 461 405 988 1,549 1,138 1,500 2
Eggplant 23 36 29 175 246 304 251 81 182 m
Escarole 816 882 573 818 1,003 1,120 1,347 1,317 827 1,039
Lettuce 233 371 235 147 197 207 152 166 116 90
Peas, English 186 270 80 130 115 153 83 62 14 16
Peppers 719 516 647 863- 1,352 1,805 1,622 1,612 744 1,499
Potatoes 3,767 5,116 3,306 5,540. 4,756 5,282 7,068 9,591 4,001 .4,807
Tomatoes 8,660 5,222 3,679 5,035 4,367 4,592 5,305 5,269 3,249 3,782
Squash (estimated) 300 275 275 300 400 400 500 400 4:00* 500*
Other Variety Vegs. 29 25 36 86 133 364 426 484 224 181
Mixed Car Vegetables 2,681 1,427 1,354 2,113 3,973 5,855 6,884 7,217 4,704 4*442
Total Vegetables 31,992 30,196 24,849 32,271 35,983 42,770 45,597 49,812 30,538 355424
Total Vegs.& Non-Cit. 36,084 35,216 29,883 37,836 39,352 48,924 54,021 57,310 38,609 44 727
ALL FRUITS & VEGS. 94,329 76,005 78,043 96,787 113,179 131,252 119,076 128,745 107,178 99,603

NOTES: Mixed Citrus includes oran es, grapefruit, tan erines; usually around 57% oranges, 29% grapefruit, and
14/ tangerines. Miscl. Fruits include any lemons and cantaloupes. Mixed Car of Vegetables may include beans,
cabbage, eggplant, peppers, squash, and practically any other Florida vegetables. Otlhr Variety V.getables
may include straight cars of-broccoli, turnips, carrots, cauliflower, greens, spinach, sv..:'.t po'~aites, etc.
The mixed car analysis varies from year to year.
No provision is made by Federal Government for a report on straight cars of radishes and squash whiich
are shipped each year. Squash carlots estimated at 500 carloads.







BY iARIOUZ iEA[iS OF TRASifPORTATIOil FOR TF'l SEASOlI (Cont'd.)


1938-39 1939-40 1940-41


Express Shipments
1941-42 1942-43 1943-44 1944-45


1945-46 1946-47 1947-48


Mixed Citrus
Strawberrie s
Miscl. Fruits
Total Non-;itrus


688


3100
I00+


335"


972


180
75*


255


1,169
47
75*
122


1,177
58
125*
183


2,371
55
175*
230


3,100
1
175*
176G


3,041 3,376

90* 90*
90 90


beans & Limas .44 76 45 -
Tomatoe s -
MMixed Car Vegs. 550 388 396 605 1,074 1,283 1,148 1,179 848 533
Total Ve-etables 594 464 441 605 1,074 1,283 1,148 1,179 848 533
To+al Ves.& INon-Cit. 929 719 563 788 1,304 1,459 1,148 1,179 948 "633
ALL FRUITS &AVEGS. 1,617 1,691 1,732 1,965 3,675 4,559 4,279 4,645 4,578 3.748,
BOAT Boat Shipments'
Oranges 18,311 8,997 11,189 1,153 76 2,908
Grapefruit 7,992 3,812 5,481 514 12 1,437
Tangerines 1,819 735 1,063 147 222
Mixed Citrus 12 5 10 3 -
Total Citrus 28,134 13,549 17,743 1,817 No record of any 88 4,567
Strawberries -
Waternelons 17 16 boat shipments -
Miscl. Fruits 10 10 5 -
Total Non-Citrus 27 26 5 during (War Period) -
Beans c Limas 662 211 154 1 -
Cabbage 20 21 14 1942-43 thru -
Celery 335 117 148 100 -
Corn, Green 1944-45 seasons. 3 -
Cucumbers 86 32 40 3 -
Eggplant 279 11 35 -. -
Escarole 2 1 -
Lettuce -
Peas, English 1 1 -
Peppers 1,107 241 163 6 -
Potatoes 1,674 1,176 898 164
Tomatoes 114 34 13 -
Squash 80 80 40 1 -
Other Variety Vegs. 175 171 105 3 2 5
Total Vegetables 4,535 2;095 1,609 11 272 5
Total Vegs. Non-Cit. 4,562 2,121 1,614 11 272 5
ALL FRUITS & VEGS. 32,696 15,670 19,357 1,828 88 4,839 5


3 630

100*
100


3,115

10OC*
100


Commodity


EO




0
0

-4


0
4-)


0
4

0
C-


r.
o
0










0
0


0
*J-P


FLOR-(I A iP;..i.





FLOKIDA SHIPMENTS BY VARIOUS LEANS OF- TRANSPORTATION FOR TEN SEASONS (Cont'd.)


Trucked Out Shinments


Commodity


91 42-43 1943-44 1944-45 194 6


1946-47


1947-48


Oranges 12,939 11,148 14,315 10,248 6,790 5,388 3,641 5,135 8,774 14,268
Grapefruit 3,681 2,546 3,699 2,605 1,532 889 513 851 1,395 2,858
Tangerines 1,196 1,105 1,087 837 1,000 957 8&W 960 1,096 1,670
Total Citrus 17,816 14,799 19,301 13,690. 9,322 7,234 4,973 6,946 11,265 18,796
Strawberries 1,190 1,228 1,073 860 300 164 263 446 615 321
Watermelons 990 838 976 695 190 630 654 2,5W% 3,278 3,503
Miscl. Fruits 328 496 321 250 110 192 452 182 181 150
Total Non-Citrus 2,508 2,562 2,370 1,805 600 986 1,369 3,166 4,074 3,974
Beans 6 Limas 6,075 5,020 5,485 6,526 2,400 2,504 2,257 3,129 3,448 4,515
Cabbage 2,487 4,959 2,298 3,539 1,900 2,116 1,449 2,083 3,003 3,983
Celery 684 1,260 1,681 1,582 360 401 405 566 1,020 1,381.
Corn, Green 409 399 219 200- 150 190 121 392 479 662
Cucumbers 800 1,269 1,196 866 265 250 444 741 896 1,999
Eggplant 620 301 566 734 300 525 380 682 756 754
Escarole 15 257 203 116 15 7 25 20 145 200
Lettuce 104 204 232 150 26 54 51 93 90 103
Peas, English 295 268 221 222 20 77 53 52 26 18-
Peppers 1,155 936 1,445 1,656 900 865 809 1,524 1,586 1,987
Potatoes 642 1,289 1,068 1,116 -500 426 -872 759 701 1,278
Tomatoes 5,243 3,655 3,988 3,994 1,700 3,190 2,826 3,549 2,526 3,826
Squash 478 761 560 538 300 440 447 653 645 815
Other Variety Vegs. 306 793 859 805' 450 661 680 1,249 1,347 1,864*
Total Vegetables 19,313 21,351 20,041 22,044 9,286 11,706 10,819 15,492 16,668 .23,385
Total Vegs.& Non-Cit. 21,821 23,913 22,411 23,849 9,886 12,692 12,188 13,658 20,742 27,359
ALL FRUITS & VEGS. 39,637 38,712 41,712 37,539 19,208 19,926 17,161 25,604 32,007 46,155


** Other Vegetables include carloads as follows:
110, and Miscellaneous Vegetables 619.


Butterbeans 145, Field Peas


804, Okra 166, Buiched Vegetale.


NOTE: Shipments in packages, pounds, dozens, or units were converted in 1947-48 season as follows: Beans 600,
limas 500, cabbage 25,000 lbs., celery 370, cucumbers 450, eggplant 470, escarole 450, lettuce 550, English
peas 580, poppers 480, potatoes 550, strawberries 450, tomatoes 500, okra 500, squash 50C,, bunched .v.g',-tablcs
2,000 dozen, green corn 2,000 dozen,- field peas 500, other vegetables 500, avocados 700, limes 8C00, vwatcrmelons
1,000, other fruits 500, all citrus 400. See page 26 for Truck Shipments in more detail for 1947-48 season.


Trucked Out Shi-oments


1938-39 1939-40 1940-41 1 2






FLORIDA SHIPMENTS BY VARIOUS LEANS OF TRANSPORTATION FOR TEN SEASONS (Cont'd.)


TotAl Freight. Express. Boat and Truck Shipments


from Florida


1938-39 1939-40 1940-41


1941-42 1942-43


1943-44 1944-45


1945-46 1946-47 1947-48


Or-ages 62,315
Grapefruit 24,963
Tangerines 5,832
Mixed Citrus 11,773
Total Citrus 104,883
Strawberries 2,111
Watermelons 4,413
Niiscl. Fruits 438
Total Non-Citrus 6,962
Beans Limaas II}
Cabbage 4,117
Celery 8,715
Corn,Green 441
Cucumbers 1,695
Eggplant 922
Escarole 833
Lettuce 337
Peas, English 482
Peppers 2,981
Potatoes 6,083
Tomatoes 14,017
Squash 858
Other Variety Vegs. 510
Mixed Car Vegs. 3,231
Total Vegetables 56,434
Total Vegs.e: Non-Cit. 63,396
ALL FRUITS VLGS.. 168.279


44,957 52,588
13,190 .21,515
3,736 4,321
8,226 7,949
70,109 86,373
1,451 1,124
5,831 6,004
581 403
7,863 7,531
8,217 8,384
9,218 4,568
9,146 10,518
421 221
2,454 2,217
312 657
1,140 776
575 467
538 302
1,693 2,255
7,581 5,272
8,891 7,680
1,116 875
989 998
1,.8.15 1,750
54,106 46,940
61,969 54,471
132,078 140,844


NOTE: No boat shipments reported during 1942-43, 1943-44,


and 1944-45 seasons due to War restrictions, but


there might have been small amounts to the West Indies and some perhaps on Naval vessels or Army transports,
if any in Florida waters. See Page 29 for further information regarding boat shipments.


Commodity


45,775
15,769
2,849
11,242
75,635
918
6,260
375
7,553
9,862
7,107
10,701
207
2,047
763
934
297
352
2,525
6,656
9,029
839
894
2,718
54,931
62,484
138,119


50,180
13,790
6,017
15,533
85,520
361
3,553
285
4,199
8,343
6,434
8,-917
167
726
475
1,018
223
135
2,252
5,256
6,067
700
583
5,047
46,343
50,542
136,062


56,793
14,330
4,813
16,726
92,662
187
6,746
383'
7,316
9,100
8,494
9,750
208
655
771
1,127
261
230
2,670
5,708
7,782
840
1,025
7,138
55,759
63,075
155,737


44,690
9,047
5,189
14,143
73,069
306
9,020
467
9,793
6,939
6,606
11,442
163
1,432
684
1,372
203
136
2,431
7,940
8,131
947
881
8,257
57,564
67, 357
140,426


47,059
13,064
4,773
16,949
81,845
471
10,008
185
10,664
7,667
6,846
13,055
496
2,290
933
1,337
259
114
3,136
10,350
"8,818
1,053
1,733
8,396
66,483
77,147
158.992


55,072
15,438
4,292
13,229
88,031
714
11,241
280
12,235
7,116
5,462
9,867
648
2,037
837
972
206
40
2,330
4,866
5,775
1,0415
1,573
5,552
48,326
60,571
148.602


47,792
14,659
4,554
9,782
76,787
377
12,750
150
13,277
7,663
8,917
10,347
1,000
3,499
936
1,239
193
34
3,486
6,085
7,608
815
1,431
5,594
58,847
72,124
148.911





Page ;2


RAIL FREIGHT SHIPITIITS Bv COUUTTES
197:7-L, 71EASCJ,
(August 1-July, .il)


CARLOTS
Flcricda
Counties
Alachua
Brad ford
Brevard
Broward
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
De Soto
Duval
Escambia
Flaglc.r
Gilchrist
Glades
Harmilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hi Ilsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
l.adison
I.anatee
IHarion
Hlartin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Washington

Straight Cars
Boat
Pick-Up-Exp.
GRAND TOTAL


:Orances-,

: 108 :

: ":
: 29 :
d I3










:1353
:1375
'67 :


3211 :
101:


:98
187.:

: 8188
128 :
: 13 :









4
. '667















2
1361
: 12
1569



: 57


33224


33524


Grac.- :Tan'er-
fruit :ine :


477 : 7
3 :


: h7
52 : 120


5: :4

1: 123:



1227:


318 222:
25: 2
: 2 :


176
77 29

533 : 775
3 : 12 :
13 : :


1: 71:
1226 : 22 *
12 :
63 : 159:



18 247


11801 : 2 84


1.1801 : 288


;ired:,
Citrus
7

L:
58 :



116 :
113-
113





71
120
175
521


858.
14



76
120
1:
791
27
1.




500 :.
1:
232
1:


311


74111*
2371-:":

9782


T',al :

3.22
:,




I7 :
Jo :










2028:
.179.2
2219


b609



2083 :
1 :
.028:

2322 :
17377
201
2
3117
: 25
2023




1033
(-7414
55620 :
23719 :
57991 :


As of September 2, 1948. Subject to Revision.
* 744 straight cars ex press which was distributed by counties should be deducted from
freight and added to express, thus making 3115 for mixed citrus and total citrus
by express.


h:

*17 :


L5









:
:








27

33
1986

1
:








8:


1


Lroc- : CaLba.e:
c..li






3:
4:











76
10

S 17 :



: 6:15
2
260
3: 1529

32
: 11:2












Z.573
11



19
175:


3: 493


3: 93 :


3148:


318 :





Page 33


RAIL F'rJG!'T SHIPll~T:: BY COT.UT,.S
19T7-,-- cA3n-,
(August 1-JIJ.y 31)


CAUT,OTS
Florida
Counties
Alachua
Bradford
Brevard'
Brovward
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Colrmbia
Dade
De Soto
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendcry
Hernando
Vihlands
Hil sborough
Holmes
Indian river
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
Ladison
EUanatee
:-arion
Martin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
'ashington


Straight Cars
Boat
Pick-Up-Exp.

GRAND TOTAL


.Grcen :Cucnmbrc ::.plant:sc:'role :

Corn


:Carrots







: :.




: :
: :-


: :







: :8
: 2









: :8
: :



:2:



: :

: :


Cauli-:
flower:









2. :







2 :
:
:.








6
5:




: :














:







2 3
:2
2- :


Celery

13




















810



19


400
2155





1411
39h3






a6.


7


3I






33
19





33
73



18c
72















.33


$3 9

: 32: 20:

112 : : : ;
: 8 : : 9 "




20
202 :


: 16 : : :





S 1!. I 15


: 207 36 : 171
9: : : 2



S]3 55 438 2 22-
-I.-,-,
: : : : :


6
: 20: : 20;
: 42 : : :
S: 230
329 1
L: 2




S: 1500 182 : 1039: 61:


: 1500 182 1039 61:


.






Page 3L



CAP.LOTS
Florida
Counties
Alachua
Bradford
Brevard'
Broaward
Citrus
Clay
Collicr
Columbia
Dade
De Soto
Duval
Escanbia
Flal --r
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands;
Hi llborou
Holme s
Indian Riv
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayett'c
Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Okeechotee
Or- n ,
Osceola
Pal:-. each
Pasco
Pi nllac
Poll:
Pu1tn an
St. Johns:
St. LucJ.e
Sarasota
Seminole
Sunte i
Sm:annee
Ta:.'lor
Union
Volusia
Washin-, tn,


Straight .:- -w :-
Boat
Pick--Up-- n. :


RAIL FTlIG'IT SHIPIL!!T DY COL;TILS
-19h7-j 1SASJul
(AUgu--t 1-Jul:,-3'1)


:Lettuce .: Peas :
:2o.aine :EngFish
: 1 : :






: : :







0 :
: : :
;h : 5 : :

r r : :

: :
: :







c,
: :, :
h : 5 : :



: 4'
v : : :

: : :


7

: : 13





1.5.
: : .
: ,5 : :

: : :
: : :


20 : 16


= .


1 U 92


I. -


II
-I *.


90' : 16 : .9' : 4I :'.


:Pc


95 :
1 :

.;26 :



1






9








21 :

:
1 :
1 :

35 :

10 :.

:


Ilh;':

:
:
. lb :



1!? :-
1 :*


G:-i.D- T"TAL :


l: :
110 *



1 :

1569 :









2 :





318
n.














5:


1 :
'C,t












1 :
:
I : ';
: '*~
:


:PC


Peppers :PotatLoes:Spinach: Sweet :To,.n.oes:Turn:.ps:


: :


















7 :











:.


ta oes::


1236




z LL5 C

1 :







:L 573:


2


6 2
1 : :

S 806:
: 31
7 : :

: : 2
: 2 : 2

: :
: :






7 : 18




: .









CARLOTS
Florlaa
Count.icz-
Alachua
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
De Soto
Duval
Escambia
Fla-ler
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hi 1llsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
Madi son
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwanne e
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Wl7ashington


Straight Cars
Boat
Pick-Up-Exp.

GRAND TOTAL


RAIL FRET,-,T SHIfP?2.TIT 13Y COUNTIES
(A *1gu7-T SAS-J ..
(AMgu t 1-J],y Y'1)


: Total :Straw- :
:Ve-ictibl,'-z :b rric :


me
I r"'
TIC


: ?ixed
: V.-F I
S 8L

1342

3
12


1
1
4h3




7


93


72
191
82
276
1280



36
9
7
: 20
91




: 2

: 33

S 975


tlr-
lons


if"
Me


: Total :Totatl Ver's :
:Non-Citrus :& on-Citrus:


$20
6
3081
23
189
10
2161

7
$79
202

272

10

lh5
9

859
596
1
7
1467
h9h
92
223
15h6
7893


3o5
1261
149h



23
17


As of September 2, 1948. Subject to Revision.
* 744 straight cars of mixed citrus express distributed by counties should be
deducted from freight and added to express, thus making total express 3648 carloads.


Page 35


GRAND :
TOTAL :


56

























56


$6


-834 :
2 :
29



71


1298
22


7 :
313
1 :
80
390
19$8 :

53C
120
1323

17

313 :
13 :
121 :
23


0
580 :
2 :
19
U3
7

927


9247 7


2 :
29


71 :


1298 :
22


7 :
369
1 :
3 :
80
390 :
28 :
198 :

538 :3
120
1323

17

313 :
13 :
121 :
23 :
'28

10:39
2 :
1 :
43 :
7 :

9303


9303


13 :
6:
2 :
3031
29
25 :
19 :
2161
76
7
$79
128 :
209
26
2 :


28 :




1 :
54 :5


920


7823
31328
137
162
37 :
3o55
1281



92
218
7223:

416227
533
3075 :
7hG=


533

351'62


h76
6;


2 :
196
21-)
2278 :
962
7;
1119
1298 :
209

209 :
31
2005
3810
2367
R9
390
28
7626 :
738
54;)
120- :
1817 :
3900 :
92
2h :
11850 :
198 :
7906 :
909 :
233 :
17 39 :
7.6 :
3057 :
,06 :
1 19 :
7 79,

2 :
L2.
1251 '


998 7*:
290*:

102756





Page 36


FEDERAL-STATE IlJSPECTIONI .SERVICE
-uly 1 179i June 30), 1'7


FLORIDA
Commodities Type Container
CITRUS
Oranges Std.Box Equiv.
Grapefruit "
Tangerines "
Mixed Citrus "
Total Citrus

VEGETABLES
Beans Bu.
Cabbage 50#` Bags
1, Crts.
f 1-- bu. Hprs.
Cauliflower Crts.
Celery Crts.
Corn Crts.
t" 50#o Sks.
Cucumbers Bu.
Escarole Bu.
Peppers Bu.
" 11- Bu.Crts.
Potatoes Coml.501t Bags
" 100y "
" P.M.A.100# "'
" Bu.
Tomatoes Lugs
Svweet Potatoes
Mixed & :iscl.
Total Vegetables


Limes
Watermelons


Std. Box
Melons


Total Fruits & Vegetables

Peanuts Bulk-100 lbs.

Grand Total Carlots-1947-48
1946-47


No. Units Average- Cont-ine'rs
No.of Cars- or (or Units poi Car)
Inspected Containers lt-L-', 1, 6-IL7 L5-I0 i1 hi-65


32,238 16,091,.481 h99'
.11,073 5,701,651 5
2,835 1,237,.453 L37
7,069 3,494,287 Lhh
53,215 26,524,872 L9o


11
: 1,990
1,270

20
7,800
21

207
5
91

1,995
1,898
7

1,597
8
25
16,915

12
7,916

78,088

74

78,162
85,934


6,:993
997,370
610,491

11, 129
3,318,887
10,717

77,136
3,200
47,856

1,279,10)4
563,818
2,520

1,087,531
h,313
10,168


4,786
7,794,5oo


37,630


636
501
481

556 .
126
510

373?
640
526

61,1
297
360

681
539
o07.


503
15o1




641
503

)424 "

425
442 "

459
612
672

651.
307
355
563
693
527
602


502


19>


638
501.



445

696
137
6042
652

619
300
300

689
552


364
938' 1008


62O
508


1453
h43

620
570
610
782
471
638
300

642
691
539
578


397
1058


- "502


'NOTE: Except for citrus, celery, cabbage, potatoes, tomatoes and watermelons, the
inspection sample was too limited to indicate the actual rail carlot loadings.
Loadings are different in different sections of Florida. In some sections the
Federal-State inspections are used little except when mandatory.' For some
vegetables the official inspections are little-used.

The above is tabulated from a report made by Mr. Hugh S. Flvnt, Assistant
Director, Vegetable Branch, Citrus. aidl Vegetable Inspection Division,
Florida Department of Agriculture, Room 305, Post Office Building, Orlando,
Florida.




INSPECTIONS OF FLORIDA CITRUS FOR SHIP?:;[T
bY ?AIL Af.D T;:.UCK LY C:i;:': IFS
SFBASON AUGUST 1, 19) 7 JULi 1, 19L8


Grapefruit


L a C" S 1-3/-bu-:hes)

Oranges Tangerines


Total
1947-48


Alachua
Prevard
Browarda"
Citrus
Dade
DeSoto
Duval
Hardee
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Indian River
Lake
Lee
Kanatee
Marion
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sarasota
Seminole
Volusia
Others
TOTAL
Used '147-48


NOTE: Some c
These inspect


Total
1956-L7


3,Z88 59,936 2,755 66,479 9a,62
-368,318 919,709 19,913 1,307,940 1,031,95,
6,780 . 73,692 973 -"81, 445 184, 35
3,542 25,565 1,181 30,28U 32,9.L?
33,746 85,588 325 119,659 91,62!;
51,834 673,88h 54,6bi; 780,362 786, 7--.
45,515 474,109 94,216 613,84o0 719, 2"6
854 35,331 2,906 39,091 1.6,]3
11,785 104,121 63,900 379,809 322,347
291,581 762,569 38,654 1,092,80) 1,314,50)
204,727 1,064,907 76,279 1,345,913 1,7143,32
822,634 435,605 12,287 1,270,526 1,325,819
319,660 2,541,37h 255,621 3,116,655 3,955,427
13,519 6L,727 2,921 81,167 139,440
118,922 79,255 5$4 198,631. 199,464
79,383 1,338,041 29,233 01,4j6,657 1,588,329
522,044 5,971,1i63 577,6,5 7,071,162 7,622,162
45,b13 221,428 32,789 299,630 328,312
31,718 75,3!5 4,067 111,300 146,280
.99,249 235,602 83,791 383,642 369,220
841,200 149,612 51,1450 1,314,292 1,327,337
3,791,170 6,1493,027 57,,83J6 10,862,013 13,437,088
9,788 133,797 54,923 198,508 260,350
73 29,216 29,291 27,910
809,003 950,260 36,929 1,796,12 1,943,367
6,486 6,536 13,022 93,527
111,403 1,369,147 161,016 1,6L1,566 1,917,621
40,961 469,566 178,808 689,h25 865,123
60 1,102 1,162 -
6,6^,'1bo 25,1 ,719 472,3b7,T^~ 3b>210,521 ~1,9lT^O
29,300,000 56,400,000 3,400,000 91,100,000 63,100o,00
ommodities are produced in one County and inspected in another County
ons do not include J.ruit for processing and some other classes of fru


PERSIAN CERTIFIED LL.IE SHIPMENTS By Counties, By Months Season 1947-4'8
(In Term s cf Equivalent Standard Boxes, 1-3/5 Bushcl-:)
Dade Highlands Hillsboroufh Pinellas Polk Totals
July, 1947 297595 3,2945 =5276 -~ 716 T; 7
Aug. 25,920 3,882 1,701 221 5,14o6 36,870
Sept. "' 10,37- .. 2,314 ,06 708 12,900
Oct. 6,050 328 38 6,416
Nov. ,543 144 .65 64,752
Dec. 4,246 16 708 4,970
Jan., 198 2,611 3 2,614
Feb. 1,834 145 1,979
Mar. 2,972 231 3,203
Apr. 5,043 221 5,264
May 9,839 529 10,368
June 26,059 3,375 690 .639 901 31,664
TOTAL 129,07b 14,133 5,733 1,576 11,161 161,667
Percentage 79.8 b.8 3.5 1.0 6.9 100.0
NOTE: No shipment certifications reported for Broward and DeSoto Counties.
NOTE: The above data supplied by A. L. Scarborough, Statistician, Citrus and
Vegetable Inspectioh Division, Winter Haven, Florida.


County


Pa:;e 37


it.






TRUCiK SHIP ,EITS OF FLORIDA VEGETABLES AiD iJ,-CITRiS FRUITS


BtY W1,ES FO- 1F 7- SEASO':L
(Rail Carload .Equi'lert:


_~~_______~__ Oct. 15, 19h7-May 31. 19"8


Th,1-.c~ hv Wpc.IR~ins


Aug.
Oct.

Oct.
Nov.



Nov.
Dec.


Dec.
Jan.



Feb.



Feb.
Mar.


Mar.
Apr.


Apr.
May




June
July

Tota


1-Oct.l L
15-18
19-25
26-Nov. 1
2-8
9-15
16-22
23-29
30-Dec.6
7=13
14-20
21-27
28-Jan.31
4-10
11-17
18-24
25-31
1-7
8-114
15-21
22-28
29-Mar.61
7-13
14-20
21-27
28-Apr.31
4-10
11-17 I
18-24
25-May
2-8
9-15
16-22
23-29
30-31
1-30 *
1-31 *

LI


LCL

16
36
76
120
109
186
185
180
108
146
166
123
68
61
91
133
96
109
229
264
210
221
196
215
200
173
183
114
114
30
6
2
1


Ltmi S


J.CL





LCL
LCL
LCL
1
22
18
12
10
10
7
14
8
7
10
9
14
21
4 6.
21
15
13
16
19
43
9
1
8


Cab- Cel-
bac'e or'y


LC L
LCL


LCL
2

22
34
29
911
129
136
174
171
2181
236'
2371
239;
206,
297;
265:
250
276
32,6
2321.
1721
120
68i
35i
71
31
LCL


LCL


Cokes


Er- Esca--
plan t I rle


LCL
10
L'.J
57
45
54
36
28
33
58
30
21
44
25
16
11
12
15
10
10
5
9
32
96
182'
2414
288
1314
138!
136
106
50
10
.2
3


I1


2
LC L
2
-I
1
4
3
4

2
4
6
4
6
7
6
4
2
4
6
6
5
6
6
21
34
66





49
12"
43
7
128
30


Let- .e-ng.
tuce Pea:


LCL
I LCL
L.LL



3
1
1 1
8

I 10


', 7
5


LCL
LCL
LCL
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
LCL
LCL
LCL
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1


h741 344 39801 13801 1990 758 1 202 104 19 9,9 1989 1278 3832


*Estimated from special information. (1) LCL means less than rail carload; (2) The
above shipments represent passing through Florida Road Guard Stations Oct. 15, 1947
to ay 31, 1948; (3) Above truck passing converted into ure-War rail carload
equivalent on basis of: Beans 600 bu: Limas 500 bu Cabbage 25 000 lbs; Celery.370
crates Cukes 450 bu; Eggplant 470 pkgs; Escarole [50 pkgs; Lettuce 550 pkgs; English
Peas 5d0 bu; Peppers h80 pkgs; Potatoes 550 pkgs; Toma oes 500 pkgs; Green Corni

The Weekly Totals differ from, and are usually slightly higher than the Monthly
Totals, du to' fractional totals by weeks.' ..


Page 38


"Tom'
Sep- FPota- Toa-
pe1r,7 toes toe.


LCL
LCL


10



2
1
2
1
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL


L.CL
LCL

1
2
2
7
9
5
15
8
9
16
16
13
20
56
58
66
67
87
114
101
104
81
99
126
132
150
155
160
123
69
9
91
15


LCL




LCL
.LCL
1

2
4
12
16
16
14
15
17
36
47
145
714
82
72
614
111
106
88
92
123
148
714
13
2


1
8
21
35
5U
78
47
90
112
82
49-
76
63
77
63
57
61
76
85
111
103
100
131
219
314
405
496
322
216
314
241


LCLi
'61
191
46
814
163
160
153
109
21
151
17


Lim3. s. ba,- r- I


I I





Pace 39
TRUCK SHIPr ENTS OF FLOPILA V'"GETABLES Af)D ;ON-CITRUS FRUITS
BY WEEKS FOR l' L7-Lb SE...SON
(l'ail Ci'!.alad iEq'ivall;t)
Oct. 15, 1947-?.:ay 31, 19L8

Gr. Squ- Bun. Oth. Tot. Avo- W- Oth.! Tot. Grand
Date by weekss orn Okra ash Veus. Vec. Ver. cados Limes nel. Fru. ru. Tota.
Aug. 1-Oct.14- 6 1 18 20 10 4 3!t 52
Oct. 15-18 1 LCL LCL 2 2 LCL LCL 2 ,
19-25 3 2 LCL 1 27 i LCL 1 31
Oct. 26-Nov.1 3 2 LCL LCL 67 11 LCL 11
.2-8 4 3 LCL '107 7 1 8 115
9-15 2 7 LCL LCL, 137 9 1 10 10 7
16-22 1 17 3 215 7 1 8 223
23-29 1 14 1 2 207 2 LCL 1 3 210
.Nov. 30-Dec.6 LCL 15 2 6 316 3 LCL LCL 3 319
7-13 1 27 1 4.361i 2 7 1 10 371
14-20 LCL LCL 30 4 11 469 i 14 LCL 15 b8l
21-27 LCL LCL. 10 1 2 264 2 14 LGCL 16 280
Dec. 28-Jan.3 LCL LCL 14 6 16 45h 4 1 lh LCL 15 469
Jan. 4-10 LCL 1 29 6 22 640 LCL 21 LCL 21 i 661
11-17 LCL; LCL 25 6 13 520 LCL 14 LCL '14 534
18-24 LCL, LCL 14 6 27 482 i LCL 6 LCL 6 488
25-31 LCL1 LCL 10 $ 33 482 LCL 2 2 484
.Feb. 1-7 LCL, LCL 10 5 48 603 LCL 5 LCL 5 608
8-14 LCL: LCL 16 6 55 719 LCL 9 LCL 9I 728
15-21 LCLT LCL 14 8 1'7 630 17 171 697
22-28 LCL2 1 19 3 42 703 1 43 LCL 3 751
Feb. 29-Mar.6 LCL 1 26 8i 43 814 66 LCL 66 880
Mar. 7-13 LCL 1 27 7 47 1024 23 LCL 28i 1052
14-20 LCL LCL 36 5 36 961 i 21 LCL 21i 982
21-27 LCLI 1 50 6: 34 1066 j 16 LCL 16 1082
Mar. 28-Apr.3 1: 2 66 4 27 1142 10 1 11! 1153
Apr. 4-10 81 1 69 91 17 1398 5 5i03
11-17 20 2 69 3' 9 13301 1 1 2 1332
18-24 5: 3 5! 2 13 1211 LCL LCL 1211
Apr. 25-1.iay 1 71 6 58 2 7 1330 1 LCL 1 1331
May 2-8 108 13 35 1 10 1432 1 LCL 44 LCL 451 1477
9-15 111' 19 22 LCL 10 1493 1 LCL 262 2 2651 1758
16-22 81: 22 14 LCL, 5 1017 LCL 1 1 587 7 596! 1613
23-29 73; 18 4 4 616i LCL 1 708 17 7261 1342
30-31 16i 5 1 2 108 1 151 3 1551 263
.June 1-30* 109 50o 2 7 b60 -549 3 1552 T 2412
July 1-31* 151 20 15 117 10 10 200 2 122 339

Total 661 188 813 ].12 I 619 23392 I 81 322 30 3501 38 i 3872 27364
(4) Converted into pre-,ar rail carload equivalent on basis of: Okra 500 pkgs; Squash
500 pkgs; Bunched Vegetables 2000 doz; Other Vegetables 500 pkgs- Field Peas-Butter
Beans 500 pkgs; Avocados 700 pkgs; Stravberries 450 pk-s; Limes 800 pkgs; Late-melons
1000 melons; Other Fruits 500 pkgs. '(5) Pre-lVar carload conversion factors retained
for more accurate passing vrith other years. #Field P-as 804; Buttcrbeans 145 car-
loads.
The Shipments are 'the passing by Road Guard Stations (ooen October 15th to !,'av 31,
1948) and destined for out-of-State points, excepting sowie carloads to !Test Florida.
Several carloads of Ibest Florida vegetables going out of State i;ere not included.
Watermelons originating West of te-. Svuwanne- River and going out of State were
included in the sti:as for perd after May 31 lt.




Page 40


Season

1930-31 Cars.
Average


1. Y. FHIL.A BOST. FITTS. CdVN,. CHIC.

8LLL 316L ..1679 2 70j7 11- "
.1.. 3.30l) 3.37 3.14 3.27 3.3!


ST .L.CH~C-1.

- I -'I.)
3.05 .al


DE h.

30.
3.21


,ALT. TCTU.

17 3
-" 3.20


1931-32 Cars 6517
Average ,3.-LO

1932-33 Cars 9238
Average >2.L3

1933-34 Cars 7613
Average .2.75

1934-35 Cars 82L3
Average ..2.61

1935-36 Cars 73'33
AveraLe .v.02.

1936-37 Cars 911y
Average .3.2 3

1937-38 Cars 10228
Average .2.26.

1938-39 Cars 12LL0
Average ,'2.10

1939-40 Cars 87T8
Average *.,2.L3

1940-hl Cars 10089
Average i.2.3


2228 1182 ?1i
3.21 3.2L 3.06


L97 76. 1/L Lhi/
3.20 3.25 2.20 3*.iL


17)
3.26


2..68 il'? 179 53 921 273 2
2.'13 2.53 2.35 2.10 2.55 2.30 2. 3 22..6


2632 113 15 52.
2.6 .62 2.D' 2.63


2720 IL '"1
2.L7T ..53


262, 15(1 -' 5
2.'"3 3.':'2 2."


-. 1 ..
13.3

- 1'721
- 2.LL


.'L 266 1.95 267 IL2 1L 7O
".5T7 2.L6 ?.Li '..: 2.8' 2.70


511 7.3 1070 325 53 2802
2., 2.53 -2.', 2.3L 2.3 2.L7


2%8 15890'
2.L4 2...


,' -. -'" 9 cc5 271 2- 0 il780
3.OL 3.15 '.72 2.87 3.0 2.82 3.00


31. ] J'., '2- :5.'. 1 .. .o 26' 703 l,12 282 17932
3. J 3.2'. '. 3.21 3. i3 3.01 3.12 3.27 2.98 3.2


.332.- .' L
2.2 ".2L


L2.1
2 11


L4,h9 2132 ,6h
1.9> 2.j. 2.11-

29O8 1290 361
2.25 2.L7 2.16


2"'" '3'i !-13 1101 .50 302 20686.
2.2J 2.3.' 2.05 .16 ;'.2'j 1.98 2.2L

1091 L'63- 511 L-. . 17 36 2522!i
2.20 ".2.." .01 2.01 2.16 1.914 2.:9


2.i;1
2.71


1012 312. 1031 33. 173 16836
2. iI "'. 1,' .' 2.' 25 2.23 ,2.3


3320 1335 L26. CL 1020 31i" 1"077 1,3 261 18971.
2.2 2.15 2.31 2.-L 2.L5 2.22 2.18 2.L' .2.22 2.35


19h1-h2 Cars 9053 36L 1377 337 563 863 20'
Average ;2.66 2.7P 2. 0 2.73 2.91 2.3.. 2.70


353 312 1133
2.8 2.77 2..83


1942-h3 Cars 6771
Average 23. ;'

19h3-hh Cars (.'23.'
Avera e- .".3.9'

194h-h5 Cars L,,.5
Average L.2


230 351 >39 'i. 3
3.7' 3.12 3.72 3.U5


32 35 72 112 27 7 13i :13
3.77; 3.7' 3.5> 3.87 3.56 3.79


. 3. .02 3.8 3.. :.. 3.


1'5i '. 293 21 '
L.38 L.L? L.27 L ..1


r'
1 !,' C


532 271 29y 365 157 9022
i.?9? .17 L.0 L.37 L. 39 L'.L


1945--46 Cars 1SO 1L78 36.3 23,
Average .L.72 L.L.Lh .70 .1 :..


197 .",5 196 372
.L. 3 L..3." 1,.25. 1?


262 308
L.L3 6 .L
L -,, 14 .-, q


626.
N4.58


1946-h7 Cars T2:? 1:30 170 '.0 3' 921 L30 801 562 373 1L770
Average '3.'0 3.35 3.62 ,.2y 3.'7 -.38 3.2' 3.25 3.L7 353' 35.0


19h7-h8 Cars -.,,
Avera,- '.3.1.0


2550 ,:67 3L2 t3h .5 ,: 2':' 68' LU7 23L 13L06
3.1. 3.. 3.1..' 3.. 2.91 3.1 3.01 3.1 /.96 3.27


FLORILA AUCTIONC SALES. 193u-31 19Li-L6
Furnished through courtes,- of the Statistical Department
..... ... .. .....Florida. Citrus E chmnre., Ta.,-_a "FJ a.

C R A II G ES


200 12813
3.71 3.,'0




Page 11


FLOIDI.' ..UCTIO;.S.-.LE3, 1930-31 19L7-L8 (Cont'd.)


G R A P E F R U I T


Season _. Y. PHILA.

1930-31 Cars 5269 1610
Average $2.66 2.42


1931-32 Cars 4680
Average $2.49


BOST.

1037
2.44


FITTS.

762
2.41


CLEVE.

718
2.44


CHIC.

1388
2.55


ST.L.

462
2.38


CInCI. DETH. BALT. TOTAL


425
2.33


1254 935 505 510 805 207 354
2.34 2.50 2.38 2.49 2.59 2.41 2.31


516
2.51

328
2.54


- 121.87
- 2.r),

- 9573
- 2.47


1932-33 Cars 5138 1266 892
Average $2.05 1.95 2.06


1933-34 Cars 3948
Average $2.41

1934-35 Cars 4893
Average $2.04

1935-36 Cars 3928
Average $2.67

1936-37 Cars 5376
Average $2.214


1129 696
2.25 2.40

1326 898
1.81 1.93


1072
2.38


872
2.49


1650 956
2.06 2.22


429
2.02

310
2.38

389
1.94

262
2.40L

274
2.14


433
2.21

388
2.39


738
2.29

684
2.55


403 721
2.09 2.19


396
2.54


228
1.96


409 330
2.01 2.31


221 370
2.37 2.29

200 h144
2.05 1.92


395 132 340
2.68 2.40 2.32


415 4914
2.29 2.58


151
2.53


1937-38 Cars 4881 1244 814 190 313 353 72
Average Z$2.20 2.06 2.13 2.05 2.11 2.28 2.16


423
2.24

342
2.09


298
2.51


9863
2.06

41 8085
2.42 2.39


350 135
2.10 1.86

251 117
2.62 2.28


307
2.1hi

219
2.21


9759
2.00

7765
2.57


151 10197
2.12 2.23

127 8555
1.88 2.16


1938-39 Cars 6389 1429
Average $1.75 1.57

1939-40 Cars 4765 1153
Average $2.21 1.92

1940-41 Cars 5035 1334
Average $1.96 1.75


1941-42 Cars
Average


4519
$2.55


1166
2.36


1942-43 Cars 3411 967
Average $3.18 2.97


1943-44 Cars 2628
Average $3,63

1944-45 Cars 2320
Average Q3.35


1945-46


1946-47


1020
1.73


329
1.68


633 181
2.10 1.92


805
1.95

712
2.55

487
3.21


778 338
3.48 3.64


L98
4.03


Cars 3293 737
Average $3.u8 3.67

Cars 4894 890
Average $3.39 3.11


1947-48 Cars
Average


4258
$3.22


1260
2.82


183
4.11

213
3.88

5146
3.17

456
2.89


2L49
1.76

125
2.33

142
2.90

128
3.36

31
3.74

33
3.06

63
2.89

73
2.55


384 361 118 432 277 187 10926
1.77 1.95 1.85 1.66 1.80 1.46 1.72


11.1
2.11


182 62 241 140 85 7483
2.29 2.10 1.98 2.06 1.73 2.13


256 313
1.92 2.00

136 208
2.61 2.83


1.77


416
1.74


51 222
2.73 2.33


215
1.91

98
2.64


91
1.61

88
2.60


8823
1.91

7325
2.52


96 114 19 201 85 82 5604
2.90 3.17 2.96 2.67 3.00 2.70 3.10


49
3.32


69 44 90 97 43 4264
3.20 3.51 3.05 3.31 3.14 3.56


23 21
3.01 3.31


13 16
3.38 3.13


12 19 2 18
2.60 3.62 3.33 2.91

80 154 31 183
3.10 3.16 3.55 2.87


85
2.99


106
2.92


34
2.97


158
r- 543


13
3.15


14
3.54


14 145
2.81 3.19

111 142
3.18 2.54


92
3.03


138
2.31


3132
h.24

4386
3.82

7094
3.29

6660
3.07




Page 42


1930-31 Cars 1311
Average $1.62

1931-32 Cars 1190
Average "1.54

1932-33 Cars 1308
Average $1.28

1933-34 Cars 1134
Average $1.21


426 207 229 154
1.49 1;46 1.48 1.45


396 203 175
1.44 1.49 1.39


116
1.41


237 62
1.44 1.3,


161
1.52


97
i 5


65
1.32


375 157 95 108 180 58 102
1.20 1.28 1.23 1.21 1.22 1.1L 1.09


433 144 142
1.15 1.17 1.25


1934-35 Cars 1071 356 132 136
Average $1.18 1.10 1.12 1.25


1935-36 Cars 1124
Average $1.35

1936-37 Cars 1557
Average $1.12


365
1.32


157
1.30


139
1.40


114 179
1.24 1.21

71 155
1.27 1.25


116
1.42


572 196 210 193
1.03 1.05 1.19 1.09


1937-38 Cars 1311 382 149 95 117 149
Average $1.26 1.21 1.20 1.28 1.30 1.25


1938-39 Cars
Average


1851
$1.07


67 96
1.21 1.15


66
1.26


217 54
1.36 1.32


108
1.20

113
1.34


126
i .Lb

60
1.53

73
1.22


- 281~9


- 2LL5L
- 1.i~


- 1.2L


71 1 2381
1.22 1.48 1.20


71 31
1.28 1.22


87
1.41


306 103 138 116
1.14 1.10 1.08 1.16


74
1.10


125
1.18


88
1.23


551 172 152 189 257 107 203 148
.92 .93 .95 .98 .97 .86 .91 .96


26
1.23


2197
1.18

2398
1.35


33 3424
.96 1.10

23 2513
1.08 1.24

33 3663
.79 1.00


1939-40 Cars 1192 345
Average $1.37 1.34


66
1.41


65
1.37


104 142 48 115 57
1.47 1.45 1.31 1.27 1.34


1940-41 Cars 1425 454 109 77 154 195 59 149 82 13 2717
Average $1.23 1.16 1.19 1.07 1.20 1'.22 1.09 1.12 1.14 1.06 1.19


1941-42 Cars 1152 359 78
Average $1.86 1.75 1.75


1942-43 Cars 1485
Average $1.82


39
1.65


106
1.82


135 38 105
1.66 1.52 1.58


48
1.76


25
1.50


2085
1.79


670 143 108 188 303 101 193 151 57 3399
1.84 1.62 1.81 1.86 1.81 r.66 1.80 1.74 1.53 1.80


1943-44


Cars 326
Average $2.16


1944-45 Cars 669
Average $2.42


1945-46


Cars 1188
Average $2.67


134 22 22 22
2.28 2.27 2.32 2.37


300 32 72
2.38 2.35 2.49

414 57 70
2.52 2.43 2.58


40
2.27


66 150
2.45 2.42


26
2.36

41
2.15


21 31
2.26 2.40


53
2.40


86 167 46 88
2.68 2.54 2.32 2.59


73
2.47

59
2.50


9
2.77

26
2.61


1946-47 Cars 1233
Average $2.28
1947-48 Cars 943
Average $2.09


335 69 91 139 202 63 128 108 35 2403
2.18 2.11 2.12 1.99 1.90 1'.92 1.99 2.04 2.08 2.17

433 69 77 147 193 63 120 140 24 2209
2.01 1.87 1:81 1.88 1.91 1.70 1.81 1.73 1.92 1.98


FLORIDa ...UCTCIO S.LLF.S, 1930-3' 19?7-L8 (Cont'd.)

T A N G E R I N 5 S
(- box-basis)

N. Y. PHILA. BOST.- PITTS. CLEVE. CHIC. ST. L CI'CI. DETR. 3,LT. TOT..L


Season


9
1.33


2143
1.37


- 644
- 2.23


1465
2.41

2201
2.61






Pace 43


IL'.IL AND 5UAT SHIP.EI'TS

AVEP.GC -.6 OZ ) .C:. r T'.JI. T

Florida Citrus Exchangc Report
Seasons 1909-10 to 1929-30


SEASONS .

1909-10
1910-11
1911-12
1912-13
1913-14
1914-15
1915-16
1916-17..
1917-18
1918-19
1919-20
1920-21
1921-22-
1922-23
1923-24
192L-25
1925-26
1926-27
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30


. CORANGES-

31.15
1.51
1.93.
1.97
1.69
1.47
1.99
1.94 -
3.92
3.69
4.20
2.57 .
3.77
2.96
1.86
3.51
3-.56
2.783
I.39
1.99
3.22


. GRAPEFRU


$2.38
1.95
. 3.58
2.01
2.09
1.32
1.89
.07
2.72
3.13
2.83
2. 3.6
2.41
2.10
1.51
1. 92

2.25
3.22
2.07
2.98


IT" TAi';GERINES*

$1.81
2.60
1.93
1.92
2.51
i1.66
2.07.
2.82
4.39
L.79
5.h9
SL h.96 '
5.57
h.39
b.31
. . UL h3 *
4.83
3.50
5.28
2.91
3.38


..LL CITRUS
TAverage)

1.65
2.21
1.96
1.83
1.42
1.96
2.01
3.16
3.52
3.37
2.65
3.17
2.62
1.82
2.74
3.36
2.58
3.90
2.09
3.13


FLORIDA STATE J.ARKETING BUREAU ..VE.iL.ES
Seasons 1930-31 to 19"-W4b
(Comparable to above prices).
Gross f.o.b. Florida per box


-- ---9.30-31
1931-32
1932-33
-1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
193-h45
19LL-h5
1945-h6
1946-47
1947-48


$2.15
2.30
1.45.
1.71
1.855
2.30
2.50

1. 3


2. 10
2.97
3.10
* 3.50
3.55
2.62
2.10


See pa7es 44-45 for the Ci.trus. 2iice Anal.-sis cov-irinr period 1932-33 to
1947-L3,inclusive. This analysis sho->.s wecighted average prices for
truck shipments, Florida local consmption, an.- for fruit used in canning
or_.ther processing.


$1.50
1.50
1.16-
1.51
1.29
1.87

1.08 .

1.42
1.21
1.80
2.33
2.;7
3.00
2.65
2.10
1.80


2.05
1.42
1.80
1.66
2.00
-1.5
1.86
1..3h
2.00
1.68
2.65"
2.78
S -3.70
4.25

3.75
2.90
C..


01.86
1.95
1.36
1.65
1.63
2.1[
2. 0
1.57
1.31
1'.60
.1.51
2'.06
2.81
3.01
3.48
3.64
2.59
2.08





CITRUS PRICE ANALYSIS 1932-33 TO 1947-48


BOX


ORANGES
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-.38 .
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
1947-486
GRAPEFRUIT


FLORIDA GROSS FOB
R.EIL &
YIELD BOAT


14,964,800
16,170,996
15,589,039
15,864,588
19,460,788
24,302., 896
30,015,287
25,064,702
28,752,089
27,200,000
37,200,181
46,200,000
42,800,000
49,800,000
52,8300,000
58,400,000


$1.48
1.71
1.85
2.30
2.50
1.56
1.43
1.62
1.63
2.10
2.97
3.10
3.50
3.55
2.62
2.10


MARKET OR EQUIVALENT PER BOX NET*TO GROWER
TRUCKED FLORIDA FLORIDA GROSS ON TREE NET NET RAIL
OUT CONSUMED CANNED ALL ALL ALL AI'D BOAT


$1.00
1.25
1.35
1.60
1.90
1.12
1.15
1.52
1.58
2.05
2.91
3.10
3.50r
3.55
2.62
2.10


$ .90
1.15
1.25
1.50
1.70
1.12
1.15
1.32
1.28
1.70
2.50
2.60
3.00
3.10
2.35
1.90


$ .70
.80
.80
1.00
1.25
.36
.41
.19
.80
1.08
1.70
2.02
2.60
2.83
.82
.80


$1.36
1.59
1.69
2.10
2.31
1 .41
1.32
1 .37
1.48
1.91
2.72
2.81
3.17
3.25
1.93
1.41


$ .62
.88
.98
1.33
1.48
.63.
.54
.59
.72
1.13
1.85
1.81
2.23
2.32
1.03
.65


$ .14
.42
.53
.88
1.06
.25
.20
.17
.32
.69
1.45
1.31
1.73
S1.84
.50
.15


$ .10
.38
.50
.90
1.15
.30
.25
.29
.36
.76
1.56
1.35
1.79
1.83
.84
.28


1932-33 11,925,630 $1.16 $ .50 $ .40 $ .32 $ .86 $ .27 $ -.11 $ -.07 $ .38 $ .85
1983-34 11,113,200 1.51 .90 .90 .53 1.19 .62 .23 .29 .39 .83
1934-35 15,243,060 1.29 .80 .70 .37 .88 .38 .01 .08 .37 .84
1935-36 11,504,067 1.87 1.20 1.10 .73 1.39 .85 .46 .61 .39 .87
1936-37. 18,121,786 148 1.10 1.00 .55 .1.09 .55 .25 -.35 .30 .83
1937-38 14,378,760 1.53 1.10 1.10 .48 1.05 .54 .18 .35 .36 .82
193-39 23,050,835 1.04 .80 .80 .22 .64 .21 -.09 .30 .74
1939-40 15,650,865 1.42 1.30 1.12 .33 .79 ,39 -.01 .20 .40 .82
194Q-41 24,387,041 1.21 1.10 .86 .37 .71 .33 -.02 .12 .35 .74
1941-42 19,100,000 1.80 1.70 1.45 .71 1.20 .74 ".34 .60 .40 .80
1942-43 27,300,116 2.33 2.25 1.85 1.05 1.48 1.02 .67 1.10 .35 .88
194-44 31,000,000 2.47 2.47 2.00 1.53 1.83 1.32 .92 1.00 .40 1.07
1944-45 22,300,000 3.00 3.00 2.60 1.91 2.24 1.76 1.36 1.53 .40 1.07
1945-46 32,000,000 2.65 2.65 Z.40 1.39 1.77 1.12 .78 1.21 .34 1.10
1946-47 26,400,000 2.18 2.18 1.90 .65 1.25 .63 .26 .73 .37 1.08
1947-48 29,300,000 1.80 1.80 1.60 .34 .8F .34 -.01 .36 .35 1.09
*Net to grower (or fruit owner) indicates the amount per box after deducting production and all other costs
except interest, taxes and depreciation. The State Marketing Bureau "On Tree" average price may be obtained
by adding Produotion Costs to. 'Net to Grower" return for All Fruit.


COST
PICKING
PACKING
MARKET ING
RAIL&BOAT


COST
PRODUC-
TION

$ .48
.46
.45
.45
.42
.38
.34
.42
.40
.44
.40
.50
.50
.48
.53
.50


.90
.87
.90
.95
.93
.88
.84
.91
.87!'
.901
1.01.
1.25
1.21
1.24
1.25'
1.32





CITRUS PRICE ANALYSIS 1932-33 TO 1947-48
COST
PICKING
FLORI D\ GROSS FOB MARKET OR EQUIVALENT PER BOX NET* TO GROWER COST PACKING
RAIL & TRUCKED FLORIDA FLORID GROSS ON TREE NET NET RAIL PRODUC- I.ARKETING
BOX YIELD BOAT O0T CONSUMED CANNED ALL ALL ALL AND POAT TION RAIL&BOAT
TANGERINE S
1932-33 1,519,200 41.42 01.00 0 .90 $- .32 & .38 --.18 3-.30 0 .56 :1.16
1933-34 1,992,091 1.80 1.40 1.25 1.66 .85 .29 .19 .56. 1.05
1934-35 2,003,755 1.66 1.15 1.10 1.51 .76 .21 .16 .55 .95
1935-36 2,093,397 2.00 1.50 1.40 1.86 .97 .42 .35 .55 1.10
1936-37 3,018,634 1.45 1.15 1.05 1.37 .32 -.18 -.20 .50 1.15
1937-38 2,257,973 1.86 1.28 1.28 1.72 .66 .14 .18 .52 1.16
1938-39 3,381,873 1.34 1.05 1.05 1.27 .38 -.07 -.06 .45 .95
1939-40 2,257,545 2.00 1.90 1.70 1.95 .92 .42 .44 .50 1.06
1940-41 -2,751,624 1.68 1.65 1.31 1.60 .58 .08 .10 .50 1.08
1941-42 2,100,000 2.85 2.80 2.40 2.77 1.67 1.09 1.11 .58 1.16.
1942-43 4,200,149 2.78 2.70 2.25 2.72 1.38 .98 1.03 .40 1.35
1943-44 3,600,000 3.70 3.70 3.00 3.62 2.01 1.36 1.37 .65 1.68
1944-45 3,900,000 4.25 4.25 3.60 4.18 2.56 1.91 1.92 .65 1.68
1945-46 -4,200,000 4.80 4.80 4.00 1.00 4.24 2.74 2.10 2.45 .64 1.71 >
1946-47 3,900,000 3.75 3.75 3.30 .80 2.99 1.58 .90 1.35 .68 1.72
1947-48 3,400,000 2.90 2.90 2.60 .35 2.41 .88 .20 .40 .68 1.82
TOTAL CITRUS (And Average of All Citrus)
1932-33 28,409,630 1.36 .80 .70 .33 1.15 .47 .02 .015 .45 .90
1933-34 29,276,287 1.65 1.19 1.08 .54 1.45 .78 .34 .336 .44 .87
1934-35- 32,835,854 1.63 1.19 1.05 .38 1.33 .70 .27 .32 .43 .88
1935-36 29,462,052 2.14 1.48 1.37 .74 1.81 1.13 .69 .76 .44 .94
1936-37 40,601,208 2.04 1.58 1.43 .61 1.70 .98 .61 .75 .37 .92
1937-358 40,939,629 1.57 1.12 1.13 .46 1.30 .60 .22 .305 .38 .88
1938-39 56,447,995 1.31 1.07 1.04 .24 1.04 .41 .07 .15 .34 .82
1939-40 42,973,112 1.60 1.51 1.29 .28 1.17 .54 .12 .28 .42 .90
1940-41 55,890,754 1.51 1.49 1.18 .47 1.15 .55 .16 .27 .39 .85
1941-42 48,400,000 2.06 2.05 1.69 .83 1.66 1.00 .57 .74 .43 .89
1942-43 68,700,000 2.81 2.78 2.28 1.22 2.23 1.50 1.11 1.41 .39 1.01
1943-44 80,800,000 3.01 3.10 2.37 1.70 2.47 1.65 1.16 1.28 .49 1.24
1944-45 69,000,000 3.48 3.57 2.95 2.25 2.93 2.10 1.62 1.75 .48 1.25
1945-46 86,000,000 3.41 3.61 3.00 2.05 2.75 1.92 1.46 1.73 .46 1.25
1946-47 83,100,000 2.59, 2.67 2.21 ..75 1.76 .94 .44 .85 .50 1.24
1947-48 91,100,000 2.08# 2.13 1.89 .62 1.26 .58 .10 .31 .48 1.29
*Net to grower (or fruit owner) indicates the amount per box after deducting production and all other costs
except interest, taxes and depreciation. The State Marketing Bureau "On Tree" average Trice may be obtained
by adding Production Costs to "Net. to Grower' return for:A11 Fruit. '# Rail;-Boat and Truck.






Page h6 O10,j, 3STTONS AND ANSWERS
By: H. G. Clayton
(In a recent meeting of the Acricultural Division .f th.: Flri.a State
Chamber'of Commerce I heard MrL. H. G. Clayton, who is 'the Dir?ct:,r cf the Agricul-
tural Extension Service, County Agent and Home Demonstration 1.oih, di.ccu. the
subject of government supports for agricultural commodities. ?.ir v.'-.o ha:
be--n in the Federal-State agricultural work for more than 25 ;.-ear: i, toi. rankirtz
positions, is well qualified to discuss such a subject. I a-'k. tlen an i there t-,it
he give in question .and .answer form simple explanations of price s.'ppr:rt:., r.tis,
increased yields, population trends, etc. I am very pleased to r-ic t!i.E pr.ric
support explanations in black and white where I can refer to th-m ih'r.n I nee-.d lo.
Unless everyone else is smarter than I am they may be able to u.-e -'.:me of t'il t.'.)
Fr-0,: {'0. c3', -_"-'.C .
-What is the .-background of Price Support Programs?
A few farm crops have had price support since 1933 as p1-rt of .:.v,:rIll
program of economic recovery. The ever normal granary idea of tC ir,; ti. uriw.l; :,
years of high production was a part of this program. From l'18-'i 1 sup-i.ort i rLic1s
were instrumental in building up large stocks of cotton, corn and ]iheat t '.-. .'e
helpful to the war effort -- by making it possible to expand livestock to i-upply moat
to our military forces and those of the-allies, and to reduce cotton acreage and
plant this land to oil seed crops needed in the war effort.
During the war Congress passed the Steagall Amendment which provided that
when farmers were asked to increase production of any crops or livestock, price
support would be available for a period extending two years after the end of the war.
During this same period industry operated on a cost plus basis wth guarantees
against loss. s u b
Agriculture has been operating under a goal progrm'.un for many products since
1941 and the goals have been for maximum production and the result has been aDprox-
imately a 0O percent increase in output. This high production has kept prices from
rising higher than they have in the face of the greater food consumption at home (12
percent per.capita more than pro' war) and the competition from buyers in foreign
countries whare food is still short.
How do price support n rorams operate?
Programs must vary with the various commodities. For staple commodities
that can be stored loans are tlhe usual method of support. Such loans enable farmers
to market their-cemmodities in an orderly-manner. For perishable commodities direct
purchases to support the market when prices fall below the support level are used' in
some instances. In other instances tno commodity is diverted,as :in the case of
direct purchases of dried eggs the vendor is required to pay the producer at least a
fixed minimum price for eggs. There are many variations.
Name the six basic coumnodities.
Corn, wheat, cotton, tobacco, rice and peanuts.
What is the Support Level for basic commodities?
90% of parity except cotton and this is 92- percent of parity.
'Name the Steagall'Commodities.
Milk butterfat, hogs, chickens, eg-s, turkevs, dry beans, dry poas, Irish
potatoes, swee. potatoes, American Egyptian cotton, flax seed, soy beans and Deanuts
or oil. roo0l is also supported and there is provision to support other commodities
under certain conditions.
uhat is the present Support Level for Stoagall Comrmodities?
Not less than 9-0% of parity through December 31, 19)[8.
what will the support levels be after 19L8?
-ber ,90O, of arity for cdrn, wheat, cotton, tobacco, rice and peanuts marketed
before June 30, 1 0. Irish potatoes harvested boore January 1 19O9. Milk and its
pr ducts, hbgs, cijickepns and eg:"s marketed before January 1, 1
The 19o price support Luvel (about h2 cents a pound) for wool.
level .t les. than 60 percent of.parity nor more than the 19t8 price support
S or. dry beans dry peas, sweet potatoes, flax suod soy beans turkeys,
merican Egyptian cotton and Irish potatbos harve.ted af ior January 1, 19.9.
ceProvision for continued price support, f'or other agricultural co.-modities under
Contain conditions. )
(Cont'd.)




Parg ), 7


V'wiat is Parity?
As applieJ to an. agricultural comtodi.ty, parity i. th.. oric. jor Lr.
conmojI.'y 1 .'hh will give a purchasing po.rcr with respect to articles that far,.irs
buy, .e-quiv-alent to the pur'chasi-ii, power for such commodity in the base period.
ja.ic periods are selected years during which price relationships were foun1l
to be e. quitable. For most commodities the base period is August 1910 to' July 191Uj.
However for most kinds of tobacco August 1919 to July 1929 is the base period. F' )r
flue-cured and Burley tobacco the base period is August 1934 to July 1939.

Lhen does parity go down?
It automatically go. s down if prices paid by farmers go down.

Do price supports apply to beef cattle and lambs?
io, they are not included in the support program. Pressure on food prices
comes from livestock products all of which are well above parity at the present time.
(Hogs are included with the Stoagall commodities.)

Name some co.mmoditius that arc now close to support lcvel.
Potatoes, eggs, .'heat, corn, and cotton.

.hat is the egg-feed ratio?
The number of pounds poultry feed equal in value to one dozen eggs.

that is the corn-hog ratio?
The number of bushels of corn equal in value to 100 pounds of live hogs.

Have crop yields increased or decreased in recent years?
Average crop yields increased about 13 percent from 19h2 to 19h7. This
increase was due to the use of more fertilizer and to technological developments
such as higher yielding varieties, improved cultivating and harvesting methods and to
better soil management.

that is the world relationship between crop land and population?
There are about 1-3/h acres o0 crop land per person. There are 2-1/h
billion people and the world has about h billion acres of crop land.

lbhat is the United States relationship between crop land and population?
About 2-3/4 acres nor person. There are 145 million people and the United
States harvests about 350 million acres of crops annually from about h00 million
acres used as crop land.

At what rate is population increasing?
For the United Stato;s the increase is about 3/h million per year and world
population is increasing about 20 trillion per year.

Is there any relation between soil fertility and the nutritive value of
foods?
Yes, there is a-direct relation and if the soil is deficient in certain
plant food elements the crops grown on the land will be deficient in nutritive value.
The livestock produced from pastures and crops grown on soils deficient in certain
plant food elements cannot develop properly unless those deficiencies arc supplied.

How do cover crops benefit the land?
By protecting the land from vi:nd and ratherr erosion direct rays of the sun,
by producing organic matter to turn back into the land and if a legume by adding
nitrogen obtained from the air. (END)

h1r. H. G. Clayton is Director of Cooperative Extension X;ork in Agriculture
and Home Economics under the College of Agriculture of the University of Florida and
the United States Department of Agriculture cooperating. His office and address is
in Gainesville, Florida. Prior to assuming this important position !vMr. Clayton was
top man of the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Florida, ahd rendered outstanding
service during the recent war.
F. H. Scrugrs.





Page h8 ,E ,,I3H 'VE HAD IT
BY; F. H. Scruggs
Florida State MarketIng Bureau
A few of our readers are never satisfied with the great voluivie- o, ii'-f-rr-
tion we have prepared in compact form for them in our Annual Report. Ti,,:: don't
write us that we have the best statistical report released by any State a:nr.: of
the principal fruit and vegetable States and that they cannot get anything like
this from California or Texas, but they do ask us for more data.
They ask us some very good questions but most of them are question viwe
have been getting for twenty years.
The question which comes up most often from various people is about the,
volume of production of some particular County. The question however co,'-io us aL
follows: "How many rail cars were shipped from County?" forgettin.- al.'out truCL.
shipments for fresh use, truck to port for boat shipments, express shipine-t:, and
volume trucked to canners and processors. .e can give them the rail freight ship-
ments loaded in and credited to a particular County but we have to explain t,h a
commodity may be produced in one County and loaded in and credited to an adjoining
County or even to a County far away.
All of the production moves from grove or field to packing house or rail
siding on trucks and once these trucks are loaded they can go five miles or twenty-
five miles with little difference in expense in relation to value of product.
le do not know the volume of each County which goes out by truck or by
express, or which may be canned within the County. V.e could guess. Le have learned
from experience not to guess for if we guesij for ons season then someone wishes.the
same information for every season since 192T. The writer has been working up this
Annual Report for nineteen years and knows the sources of information fairly well and
he has the desire to give every bit of important volume and value data he can. So
if you do not find the data in this report it probably is not obtainable.
tie also get requests for the value as well as the volume of production in
individual Counties or in particular groups of Counties. We have said above that we
don't know the volume of production of fruits and vegetables in any particular
County, therefore, we cannot know the value of said volume.
The writer can give his readers a formula for estimating the volume and
value of fruits and vegetables in any particular County. It is not perfect. For
example, we will use a mythical County with theoretical acreage.

UASCO11COTT.JL=
State Total State
Unit Produc- Average Total
Commodity VAcrs Yildl tion jUnjit LVl. Gross Value
Beans 600 x 80 bu. = h8,000 x ,p2. bu. ,= 120,000
Limas 100 x 70 bu. = 7,000 x 3. 0 bu. = 24,500
Eggplant 100 x 250 bu. = 2, 000 x 2. O bu. = 62,500
Cucumbers 200 x 100 bu. = 20,000 x 4.00 bu. = 80,000
Peppers 200 x 220 bu. = h 000 x h.00 bu. = 176,000
Potatoes 200 x 150 bu. = 30,000 x 2.00 bu. = 60,000
Tomatoes QQ.0 x 110 bu. = 4,000 x 5.00 bu. =. 2P0 OOO
Total Vegetables 1,800 73,000
Miscellaneous Vegetables 180 (10/ of Vegeotable Total) 74,300
Miscellaneous Fruits 90 (M5 of Vegetable Total) 37150
Oranges 1,700 x 192 boxes = 326,400 x ,1.93 bu. = 629,952
rapefruit 1,000 x 290 bo::cs = 290,000 x 1.25 bu. = 362,500
Tangerines 2 x 122 boxes = 24,00 x 3.00 bu. = 7.. POO
Total Citrus o 66
County Total 001

An 1 R All of this acreage, yield, production, and unit value may be found in this
Annual Report. 1e do not Thno the volume and the values in each County. Some
Counties may average a litt].e more in yield and price than others but not much more.
mae Counties which have some of the best yields and prices during part of the season
may have some of the poorest yields due to frosts and water, and sbme of the poorest
prices due to poor market conditions in anoth.:r Dart of the same season.
..... e a low 10c of officially reported acreage to cover miscellaneous
vegetables such as broccoli, carrots, squash, etc. %e allow 51o to cover miscellaneous
fruits such as avocadoes, limes, mangoes, pears, persimmons, g
In some Couities the percentage ma be a 01tt, ,he osr mons uavas iorap etc.
To find the volume and value in the manner sho'vn above will be a little
tedious but not difficult.




Page 49


VOLUI:E AND .VA.LU 0 FLORIDA GEnJtA!. F.UA.' CROPS.
(For Selected Y-.:ar:)

.1920 _. 1922
Unit production FJarm\ Value .Unit Production Farm Value


Corn
Cotton
Tobacco
Peanuts(Picked & Threshed)
Sweet Potatoes
Cow Peas
Oats
Velvet Beans
Hay
Sugar Cane Syrup
Sugar-Raw
Black Strap molasses


Bu.
Bale
Lbs.
Lbs.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Tons
Tons
Gals.
Tons
Gals.


8,668,000 $ 9,795,000 Bu. 8,888,000 C 7,110,O00
20,000 1,782,000 Bale 28,000 2,9o02,000
4,200,000 2,041,000 Lbs. 3,330,000 1,551., O0C
40,000,000 2,520,000 Lbs. 26,875,000 l,3!j'),000
2,300,000 3,174,000 Bu. 1,680,000 2,184,0-)0
Included in Other Field Crops
255,000 230,000 Bu. 180,000 137,000
Included in Other Field Crops
83,000 1,768,000 Tons 64,000 1,254,000
3,675,000 3,454,000 Gals. 2,320,000 1,067,000
No Record Ton-s Ho Record
No Record Gals. No Record


Pecans Lbs. 440,000 141,000 .-Lbs. 880,000 309,000
Total Incomplete $2)4,905,000 $17,858,000
Other Field Crops Misc. .: 2,000,000 i.c. ..... 1,100.000

.1924 1925
Commodity Unit. Production Farm Value UnJt Production Farm Value

Corn Bu. 7,200,000 ,. 7,8848,000 Bu. 8,262,000 $ 7,684,000
Cotton Bale 21,000 2,451,000 Bale 43,000 4,561,000
Tobacco Lbs. L4,901,000 1,916,000 Lbs. 5,810,000 1,743,000
Peanuts(Picked & Threshed) Lbs. 26,350,000 1,474,000 Lbs. 23,400,000 1,147,000
Sweet Potatoes Bu. 1,764,000 2,699,000 Bu. 1,840,000 3,386,000
Cow Peas Bu. 54,000 170,000 Bu. 36,000 129,000
Oats Bu. 168,000 138,000 Bu. 125,000 85,000
Velvet Beans Tons 59,000 844,000 Tons 53,000 753,000
Hay Tons 58,000 1,119,000 Tons 51,000 1,061,000
Sugar Cane Syrup Gals. 1,350,000 1,350,000 Gals. 1,650,000 1,732,000
Sugar-Raw Tons No Record Tons No Record Very Light
Black Strap Molasses Gals. No Record Gals. No Record Very Light
Pecans ... Lbs. 1,300,00 h49,000 Lbs. 1 6916,000 ..609,000
Tobal Incomplete $20, 5U,000 :,22,b90,000
Other Field Crops ...i.. cic. .. 1,500,000 Kisc. . 1,500,000

S.19.28 .. 1930
Commodity Unit Production Farm Value Unit Production..En v Value

Corn Bu. 7,073,000 $ 7',427,000 B-. 5,886,000 5,180,000
Cotton Bale 22,000 1,091,000 Bale 56,000 2,720,000
Tobacco Lbs. 8,635,000 2,539,000 Lbs. 9,748,000 2,672,000
Peanuts(Picked & Threshed) Lbs. 28,175,000 1,352,000 Lbs. 26,520,000 902,000
Sweet Potatoes Bu. 1,700,000 2,465,000 Bu. 1,360,000 1,666,000
Cow Peas Bu. 48,000 162,000 Bu. 86,000 233,000
Oats Bu. 135,000 92,000 Bu. 112,000 87,000
Velvet Beans Tons 68,000 877,000 Tons 44,000 572,000
Hay Tons 54,000 1,048,000 Tons 48,000 830,000
Sugar Cane Syrup Gals. 1,485,000 1,262,000 Gals. 1,530,000 994,000
Sugar-Raw Tons 1,000 Ho Record Tons 27,000 No Record
Black Strap Molasses Gals. 1314,000 Ho Record Gals. 2,202,000 No Record
Pecans Lbs. 2,000,000 .545,000 Lbs.- .1,150,000.. 302,000
Total Incomplete 719,670,000 $l,1 000
Other.Field Crops Misc. .. 2,500,000. ;.sc. .. 2,000,000
* Estimated by marketingg Bureau


Commodity




Pa co 60


Corn
Cotton
Tobacco
Peanuts(Picked &
Sweet Potatoes
Cow Peas
Oats
Velvet Beans


Threshed


Hay
Sugar Cane Syrup
Sugar-Raw
Black Strap Molasses


Bu.
Bale
Lbs.
) Lbs.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Tons
Tons
Gals.
Tons
Gals.
T T-


6,350,000 $ 2,
18,000
3,310,000
24,070,000 1,
1,560,000 1,
94,000
75,000
60,000
41,000
1,760,000
37,000ooo(1,
3,489,000


921,000
556,000-
836,000
361,000
232,000
99,000-
28,000
255,000
369,000
634,000
295,000)
248,900
Q


bu.
Balc
Lbs.
Lbs.
Eu.
Lu.
Du.
Tons
Tns
Gals.
Tons
Gals.
r L-,.


7, 96,0(1 5 5, 22,00y
31,00'0 1,576,C0'
8 3168 60I0 i, .3 0 ,00 D
.38,L30, "00" 1,1-,C'1000
1,610,00j 1, 36 .'"00X

11?,'l' 77, .Ou


2,660,5 1' 3 0L,' i0
42, o000 (, 470,000)
3,292,000 395,040
1 1.0 000n -I if n.0


Pecans Lbos. 2,00uu40, 0,u00 Lus. ,, J,
Total Incomplete .... $ 9,91,900... .. $16,293,040
Other Field Crops Misc. 1,500,000 Hisc. 2,000,000

1938 1940
Commodity Unit. Production Farm Value .Unit Production Farm Value

Corn Bu. 7,760,000 $ 4,656,000 Bu. 8,418,000 $ 5,893,000
Cotton Bale 26,000 1,158,000 Bale 21,000 1,102,000
Tobacco Lbs. 19,720,000 5,325,000 Lbs. 16,328,000 4,552,000
Peanuts(Picked & Threshed) Lbs. 56,250,000 1,688,000 Lbs. 68,400,000 1,915,000
Sweet Potatoes Bu. 1,400,000 1,274,000 Bu. 900,000 810,000
Cow Peas Bu. 48,000 75,000- Bu. 40,000 67,000
Oats Bu. 140,000 69,000- Bu. 154,000 102,000
Velvet Beans Tons 57,000 661,000 Tons 59,000 649,000
Hay Tons 70,000 763,000 Tons 70,000 665,000
Sugar Cane Syrup Gals. 1,815,000 817,000 Gals. 1,120,000 560,000
Sugar-Raw Tons *-(920,000);( 3,680,000) Tons i-(970,000):0(h,268,000)
Black Strap Mlolasses Gals. 5,497,000 -; (657,000) Gals. 5,170,000-^(1,125,000)
Pecans Lbs. 3,575,000 309,000 Lbs. 3,564,000 341,000
Total Incomplete .21,132,000 2 ;22,0O9,000
Other Field Crops Misc. 2,500,000 Misc. 3,000,000

1941 1942
Commodity Unit Production Farm Value. Unit Production Farm Value

Corn Bu. 7,200,000 0 5,904,000 Bu. 7,766,000 $ 8,154,000
Cotton Bale 18,000 1,461,000- Bale 17,000 1,534,000
Tobacco Lbs. 11,711,000 4,052,000 Lbs. 1l,778,000 6,808,000
Peanuts(Picked & Threshed) Lbs. 57,800,000 2,312,000 Lbs. 65,550,000 3,343,000
Sweet Potates Bu. 1,260,000 1,399,000 Bu. 1,122,000 1,560,000
Cow Peas Bu. 16,000 102,000 Bu. 45,000 122,000
Oats Bu. 160,000 107,000 Bu. 210,000 176,000
Velvet Beans Tons 65,000 845,000 Tons 53,000 742,000
Hay Tons 6,000 813,000 Tons 72,000 979,000
Sugar Cane Syrup Gals. 1,750,000 962,000 Gals. 1,980,000 1,287,000
Sugar-Raw Tons 949,000 3,768,000 Tons 949,000 3,072,000
Black Strap LMolasses Gals. 5,157,000 *-* (928,000) Gals. 4,100,000 (750,000)
Pecans Lbs. it,672,000 h7h,000 Lbs. 4,600,000 752,000
Total Incomplete ;23,127.,.000 ...... .29,279,000
Other Field Crops I-isc. 3,000,000 3,500,000
Estimated by the State Marketing Bureau -
- Figures in parenthesis ( ) are estimates from unofficial sources.


VOLU-LE AND VALUE OF FLORIDA GEIFERAL FARE' COPS (Cont'd-1.)
(For S.ol-c.tcd. Years.'

1932 1'"35
Commodity ... Unit .PXQo.dction F.arm Value.. Unit Production Far.m Value




Page 51


VOLUIIE AND VALUE OF FLORIDA GEi'E-:AL FARM CRO.S (Cont'd.)


(For Selected Years)


1943
Unit Production Farm Value


Commodity


19L,4
Unit Production Farm Value


Corn
Cotton
Tobacco
Peanuts(Picked & Threshed)
Sweet Potatoes
Cow Peas
Oats
Velvet Beans
Hay
Sugar Cane Syrup
Sugar-Raw
Black Strap Molasses
Pecans
Total Incomplete
Other Field Crops


Bu.
Bale
Lbs.
Lbs.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Tons
Tons
Gals
Tons
Gals
Lbs.


8,522,000
16,000
14,240,000
74,800,000
1,365,000
36,000
300,000
62,000
66,000
2,040,000
694,000
,100,000
4,524,000


Misc.


$13,124,000
1,678,000
9,203,000
5,236,000
3,044,000
141,000
342,000
1,240,000
1,063,000
2,040,000
3,040,000
-* (750,000)
1,060,000
$41,961,000
* 4,500,000


Bu.
Bale
Lbs.
Lbs.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Tons
Tons
Gals.
Tons
Gals.
Lbs.


7,550,000 -12,231,000
13,000 1,343,000
20,095,000 10,421,000
62,500,000 L,688,000
1,156,000 2,821,000
32,000 153,000
704,000 887,000
43,000 1,152,000
65,000 1,079,000
. 2,400,000 2,280,000
780,000 3,487,000
. 5,400,000-:x(1,000,000)
5.100,000 1,143,000
$42,6b5,00')
5,000.000


1945
Unit Production FaTrm Value


Commodity


1946
Unit Production Farm Value


Corn
Cotton
Tobacco
Peanuts(Picked & Threshed)
Sweet Potatoes
Cow Peas
Oats
Velvet Beans
Hay
Sugar Cane Syrup
Sugar-Raw
Black Strap Lolasses
Pecans
Total Incomplete
Other Field Crops


Bu. 7,755,000
Bale 8,000
Lbs. 20,082,000
Lbs. 66,000,000
Bu. 1,024,000
Bu. 36,000
Bu. 900,000
Tons 56,000
Tons 63,000
Gals. 2,090,000
Tons 1,042,000


$13,339,000
896,000
10,923,000
5,280,000
2,652,000
17,4,000
963,000
1,568,oo000
1,147,000
2,090,000
6,387,000


Gals. 5,700,000--(1,200,000)
Lbs. 4,234,000 1,010,000
$47,629,000
Misc. 5,200,000


Bu
Bale
Lbs.
Lbs.
Bu.
Bu.
Eu.
Tons
Tons
Gals
Tons
Gals
Lbs.


6,910,000 $13,060,000
6,000 983,000
22,251,000 15,739,000
46,500,000 3,860,000
1,088,000 2,959,000
40,000 220,000
720,000 99L,000
4,O000 1,408,000
57,000 1,037,000
* 1,930,000 3,168,000
1,037,000 7,207,000
. 6,711,000 -(1,200,000)
4,526,000 1,507,000
53, 3142,00UU
5,500,000


1947
Commodity Unit Production rarn. Value


Preliminary 19.48
Unit Production ,armI Value


Corn
Cotton
Tobacco
Peanuts(Picked &
Sweet Potatoes
Cow Peas
Oats
Velvet Beans


Threshed)


Hay
Sugar Cane Syrup
Sugar-Rawr
Black Strap Molasses


Pecans


Bu. 8,638,000 "1M,572,000
Bale 11,000 1,749,000
Lbs. 27,036,000 16,054,000
Lbs 69,300,000 6,514,000
Bu. 1,275,000 3,251,000
Bu. 36,000 245,000
Eu. 600,000 960,000
Tons 44,000 1,408,000
Tons 63,000 1,292,000
Gals. 2,400,000 3,000,000
Tons 923,000 7,061,000
Gals 5,400,000::- (1,080,000)
Lbs. 2,774,000 628,000


Bu.
Bale
Lbs.
Lbs.
Pu.
Eu.
Bu.
Tons
Tons
Gals
Tons
Gals


8,027,000
14,000
21,097,000
66,960,000
1,005,000

399,000

64,000

1,213,000
"


Lbs. 5,037,000


Total Incomplete .,63,614,000 // Estimate not yet available.
Other Field Crops Misc. 6,000,000


Final
Value
Estimate
Not Yct
Available
as of
Sept. 15.


* Estimated by the State Harketing Bureau. -::- Figures in parenthesis ( ) are estimated
from unofficialsources. All other production and farm value figures supplied by the
IT- A r'ini 1.nir a R +.i-t.i .iranr.. R.A.-7.. pr.ral Buildinr,. Orlando. Florida.


Porriodit",


o o


isc.


Commoditv




Page 52


Year
1932
19 3
1936
1939
1936
1937
1930
1939
1940
1941
1942
193
19146
195
19 6
1947
19h6


Acreage
2000
'5,000
,700
71000
8,000
16,800
16,300
29,500
12,700
11,300
13,000
13,600
19,000
19,o00
20 700
22,00
17 ,100


Production
l,200,000;Lbs.
3,700,000
3,408,000
6,020,000
7,200,000
14,112,000
15,892,000
20,650 000
11,708 000
8,192 000
11,180,000
11,832,000
17,100 000
17,169,000
19,176,000
23,256,000
15,561,000


Sun Cured (Filler 1932-19329 inder, 1936-48) Dark Leaf
(Types 45 and 56)


Acreae TvDe Pr6?uction
2bdT lW) OO 0
1. 00 F 2 2000 F
300 F 360,000
700 F 770,000
400 F & B 380,000
.700 F B 784 000
.900 F B 1,116 000
1,000 F & B 960 000
1,000 B 1,300 000
600 B L50 COO
600 3 630,000
200 B 166,000
100 B 70,000
100 B 93,000
100 B 105 00Q0
200 B 14o 00o
100 B 9b0000
F: Filler (Type 45) discontinued after 1939.
1936 and continued to date.


Estimated
Farm Value Per Pound
9,000 114.
43,000 1r. e
1000 13.Lc
51 ,000 13.'<
106,000 13.5?
151,000 13.5?
127,000 13.2'
174,000 13.1'
65,000 1)4.
110,000 17.$
37,000 221
19,000 27.0/
31,o000 33.0 o
5).000 ooo5.0
66,000 47.0.
B: Binder (Type 56) started in


Shade Grown-Air Cured (Dark Leaf) 'Wrapper T:.re 62


Year Acreage
1932 ",000
1933 1 100
1934 1,600
193 2,100
1936 2,000
193' 2,100
1938 2,400
1939 2,500
19L0 3,20C
19 1 3, 300
19 2 2,o 800o
1943 2,600
194 2, 600
19 2 ,00
19 6 3,00
19b 3 00
19 3, 00
FIl
Ori-inal Sales F-
19 0
19 1
19 2
19o
194
1942
1946
1947
1948


auction
0,000 Lbs.


,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
000
000o


Estimated
.9 .690,000 or
31 000 "
85 o,000 "
1.,22 ,000 "
1,414,000 "
1,30) ,000 "
1,953,000 "
1,570,000 "
2,296,000 "
2,2L0,000 "
2,879,000 "
3,0 7,000 "
_,212,000 "
4;2,3,o000 "
6,53 000 "t
0,910 000 "


Farn Value
35 per lb.
32' t "
Sp.9 -p-!pr lb.
65,1 per lb.
69; 1'
70>' "
72^ "
73; "
70' "
73'. "
l1. 0" "
1. 49" "
1,50" "
2.20" "
2.h5"t "


ft ft
ft ft
ft ft
ft It
ft ft
ft ft
ft ft
ft ft


iLL IDA pi ',ACCO
Flue Cur.:. I Pright L'eaf) Tp, 'c.. lb


Estimated Farm Value
$ 13,000 or 11/ r
000 12- "
682,000 20', "
1,066,000 17.8d "
1,584,000 22 "
2,970,000 21'..r "
3,226,000 20.3: "
2,5O000 1.3' "
2,056 000 17.Y t "
1,7 5,000 21.3: "
3,611,000 2.-3:, "
L, 27,000 40.bu "
6,190,00U 36.2'/ "'
6,662,000 38.8 "
9,147,000 u7.7.' "
9,070 000 39.0- "
7,391 ,75 I .,7.5' "


Year
'S u-er
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1939
1940
1941
1942
194
19h0
19%5
1946
19W7
194OTE
NOTE:





POULTRY AID EC'J IOL;':SALE P2ICES-TA''PA AND) IAI1i
TAHPA (Janu.nr-y 1, 939-- -dpnhber 3Q, 1910)
"- pHITr ;3 (GU (Standard ?2 ,z.)


I.av June Jul"
23.4 25.0 30.5
22.3 24.2 29.5
28.4 3 .0 27.5
2.4 35.5 1.0
43.0 ?.3.1 !7.1"
38.6 .6 U.3
42.0 .8 9.3
L2,0 5.1C 51.1
850 60. t8


Aug.
29.0
32.5
0.0
146.1..
51.3.'
5o.5
55.0
56.0
66. 4
69.0


Year
1939
1941.
1942
192
19
194
1945
1946-
1947
1938-

19 39
19 0O
19 1l
192 4
19
19 "
194
1946
1947
19 82

1939
19O
1941
1942
194
19
19
1946
19U7
1948


Seot. Oct. Ilov.
31.6 314.3 35.3
35.9 37.5 37.1
1'.-1 43.3 5.1
7.3 1 .0oC 9.0
5.0 5.3 57.3
52.2 5.&6 60.0
57.9 58.7 60.1i
61.2 67.0 6 2.
70.8 74.0 75. C


Jan.
31.2
31.5
A.6
41.9
48.7
46.5
49.3

9.6

19.1.-'
17.
17
24.5
28.5
27.-
27.5
27.3
31.1h
38.6

19.1
21.5
19.2
25.8
33.0
30.9
31.0
31.6
39.9
0o.5


Feb.
21.5
29.2
26.2
33.2
L0.5
ilj.
U.0



17 .8

214.0
27:.
27.
28 .3
31.14
36.0

17.3.
19.5
20.2
31.5
30.9
31.3
32.6
32.9
10.5


Page 53


IEar.
22.1
21.5
21.2
31.2
39.0
37.1
38.2
39.0


17.9
17.3
18.9
23.1
29.'4
27.
28.8
28.5
36.1
36.0

19.8
21 .h
23.5
31.6
30.9
32.3
32.8
U.6


MIAMI (January 1 1939-September 30, 1948)
I'ITE ERcGS (Standard 24 oz)
1939 35. 27.3 2L.3 2$.0 24.9 Unavailable 33.6 37.2 39.5 36.5 31.5
190 3M6. 3.3 26.0 2$.8 25 .$ 25.8 31.8. 35.0 T3.h J 3.1 L0.0 1.2.9 N
191 3. 31.7 28.1 29.0 31.6 3b. 6 38.6 Q1. 4 3.1 75.0 47.8 8.0 I
1942 3.0 1.0 3.0 .0 35.0 .2.0 '7.0 9.0. )1.0 ,2.00 2.0 5 2.0 4.4
1943 2.0 44.0 42.0 ?-.5 541.5 -46.5 149.6 3.9 7. 60.9 59.8 55.2 50.9
19 51.5 47.5 .5 44.5. 14.5 1455 o0.0 54.5 57.6 8.0 60. 59. 51.e
194 50.8 45.6 1i3.2 13.2 43.2 L$.6 9.9 1.7 50.3 9.2 60.$ )9.u 1.2
1946 50.7 3.2 3.2 53.2 c.8c 0.3 2.0 57.0 63.6 61.0 ).? 50.5
197 1 2.0 52.2 7.6 3.71 62.6 66.9 72. 75.6 76.0 77.9; 62.9
1948 66:1 52.o 53.9 56.7. 54.h 6.0 62. h 66.8
iJS (Heavy reed)
1939 24.5 23.6 24.Q 23.3 21.5 Unavailable 21.7- 2L.0 23.5 22.8' 23.
1940 22.5 22.0 22.0 22.0. 22.0 22.0 22.0 22.3 22.0 23.5 23.0 23.0 22.4
1941 23.0 23.0 23 23.0. 23.> 214.5 26.5 25.0 25.0 2$.0 25.5 26.0 2)4.
1942 27.0' 27.0 30.0 30.. 30.0. 30.0 30.0 30.0 32.0 32.0O 28.0 28.0' 29.5
19143 28.0 28.0 2.3.0 28.0. 28.0 28.0 (- No quotations on accountt of cbnsicer
194 able price ceiling confusion ) 2.7- 29.7- 29.7' 29.7 29.T 29.7' -29.7
194 29.7 28.5: 29.9. 31.6. 29.1. 2 27. 27 27. 27.27- 2 7.5 2 27.e 27.5 28.5
1946 27. 27.5 27.5 27.5 1. 32.C 3 3?.8 3u.7 31.9 30. 140.0 32.3
1947 Lo0.6 Lh: .9 .3 .9 38:.3 3 3.0 37. 18.6 38.7 39.0 39.1
19W 8 1.0 U3.8 45.2 L5.0 h2.6 39.h 3Y.6 36.9
FRI'ERS (Heavy Breed)
199 24.3 24.7 26.0 25.0 23.4 Unavailable 23.9 25.0 21.5 23.8 24.5
1910 23.5 22.9 23.0 23.0 23.0 23.0 23.0 24.6 25.0 24.1 2.0 22.0 23.6
1941 2$.0 25.0 27.0 26.5 25.0 25.0 26.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 26.0 27.0 25.6
19 42 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 32.0 35.0 35.0 3$.0 37.0 37.0C 32.0 32.0' 33.0
194 32.0 2.0 32.0 32.0 32.0 32.0 - No quotations on account of consider
194 able rice ceiling confusion - ) j3.2 33.2 33.2 33.2 33.2 33.2 33.2
194 33.2 "32.0 33.4 35.2 32.2 32.5 32.0 32.0 2.0 32.0 32.0 32.0 32.5
1946 32.0 32.0 32.0 '2.0 35.9 37.1C 38.7 30. .0 16.3 3. .0 38.1
1947 3.2 7.0 39.6 10.0 4.3 i. 011 3.0 3.0 145.7 2.6 39.6 .$ a.O
198 i.8 .7 47.0 9.6 3 U.2 2.3 9
C Ceiling prices. See notes for Jacksonville market quotations. N-Not calculated.
I Incomplete, part month only. See pages for Jac'sonville prices.


Apr.
-23.14
22.1
26.0
33.0
43.0
37.0
39.3
52.3
56.3

17.9
1 .0

29.4
27 .1
29.2
28 .'7
35.5
36.0


16d6
1628
21.1
23.9
27 .. L
27.-'.
27.3
31 .-2
31.-


18.6
19.4
22.7
29.9
30. '
30.9
31.6
)o0..
,1.7


17.2 16.'
16.6 1725
23.0 23.7
26.)OC 26.,0
27. 4 27. '
27.1h 27.L.i
27.3 27.3
35.6 32.1
33.0 34.7

19.1 19.1
19.5 19.7
23.0 23.7
31.OC 31.0
30.9 30.9
30.9 30.9
31.6 31.6
h7.3 43.0
L:O.G 3 .0o


Yearly
Dec. Av ,
32.5 2u.6
38.6 30.2
13.5 3^.2
3. 018.3
6>.. 45.1
63.8 '-.
76.0 63.2


16;. 17.2
17.'5 16.7
24.0 20.6
26.-0 2h.1
27.4 28.2
27.4 27.7
27.3 27.9
32.0 29.3
37.0 32.8


19.0 18.9
12.4 20.0
21,.0 21.8
31.0 27.7
30.9 31.3
30.9 31.2
31.6 31.8
.4:6 37.1
3O.3 37.6


SHEIS I(Hle5vy Breed)
-. 17.3 16.9 16.0
17:0 16$.5 1.8 1 .7
190 20.2 21.0 20.5
24. 2 22. 22.3 22.0
29.' 27. 27.h 27..h
29.. 28 27,. 27 4
29. 28.5 27.6 27.14
29. 28..7C 2h.b 25.1
30 .. 30.0 30. 31.h
36.0 36.0 34.h 33.0
lERS (Hea'vy Breed)
18.6 19.8 1i.3 18.2
21.3 22.4 16.6 17.9
19.. 20.7 22.2 22.5
26.7 27.0 27.6 29.0
31.1 30.9 30.9 30.9
33.1 31.9 30.9 30.9
33.1 32.Q 31.7 31.7
33.0 33.5C 35.2 l3.1
6.7 37.0 39.3 L1.4
&2.3 6.O 51f.2 39.0




Page 5h JACKSOINILLE JOBBING I:A-RKET
SALES TO RETAILER 0Ct EX!IVALLT SALES
UIOIUTHLY SIlPLE. A.XRAGES
EGGS' Florida VJhite Grade A-24 oz.' er Dbzen

Yearly
Year Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. Jay June July Ag. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Avg,.
1921 74.3 48.6 36.0 31.3 30.5 31.9 42.7 47.9 0.0 59.4 64.8 60.0 L8 1
1922 8.0 40.7 26.5 29.4 28.3 3.7 37. 37. 248 55.0 62.8 53.9 06.o
1923 9. 36.0 30.0 29.5 29.0 33.5 39.5 12.6 49.8 56.3 59.3 58.0 I 2.8
92 6 .3 30.2 33.5 30.3 38.6 1.4 5.2 6. .5.6 .0 .3
1926 57.2 42.1 31.3 3.1 32.5 36.1 1.6 1.8 62.2 .0 7. .9
1927 7.6 35.928.0 29.2 2.9 29.7 33.9 11.14 49.0 5.1 .0 0.0
1928 4.0 32.! 30.0 29.7 2 .2 33.4 36.5 41.7 '8.3 5 .8 55.0 5. 10.
1929 2.2 3 3 29.2 30.2 33.7 3.3 .2 .2 ..1 0.3 4.0
1930 47.1 3 26.5 27.0 27.0 27.0 30.6 3 3 .2 5. 43.9 0.9 335.
1931 32.0 22.0 2 .0 22.0 20.0 21.0 25.0 2 .5 32.0 37. 3.0 33.0 27.9
1932 26.5 16.5 1 .0 15.5 14.7 18.3 21.0 25.0 28.2 31.5 32.6 3.5.2 23.5
1933 2.5 17.0 15.5 15.5 17.3 16.3 22.9 2.5.5 31. 33.0 32.0 3 .4 23.7
193 28.7 25.6 19.2 1. 20.1 23.5 28.0 3 1.6 36.8 .0 04.0 LO.O0 29.3
1935 3 31. 23.0 .9 26.3 26.8 31.5 3.6 3-9.0 39.3 37.0 40.6 32.6
1936 33.5 31.2 23.5 22.9 24.1 2 .7 31.9 3.O0 3.7.5 338.4 1.9 4.3, 32.3
1937 29.8 27.5 25.1 2.5 2~.2 25.8 30.1 33.0 37.2 38.1 39.6 38.0 31.2
198 32.5 26.6 22.2 22.3 2 .0 25.7 31. 32.i 36 3 36.3 36. 30.7
1939 30.8 24.3 21.6 21.9 22.6 23.0 29.1 29.6 28. 32. 33.9 30.9 27.1
19 0 31.4 26.8 20.7 20.8 2-1.2 2-3.5 28.8 31.7 6.1 36.3 .2 2.2
1941 33.3 25.h 2-4.1 25$. 2 8.4 31.2 36.8 9.2 hl. 2.0 1., 42.2 34.5
1942 40.0 31.5 30.5 31.4 31. .7 9.5 4.0 6.1 8.0 .0 0 4 9.7-*
19 7.6 38.7 38.0 3.8.* 73.0 .60 5.9. 0* .8 .0 .0- 3.6* 7.6
1 9 .3- 39.7-2- 37.1-0- 37.05- 3,8.2- 5.2 5.3 5.1- 58.61- 9 .99* 5 .0*, 47.6
1914 0.0 14.0* 37.8*: 02.14 p2.6- 1.95 *.3 7.8* 8.6 $9.9 58.8 50.0

19 6.6 57.2 .1 7.7 60.2 63.3 68.2



FRYERS Heavy Breed

1921 39.1 39.7 6.9 9.5 46.6 35.0 31.2 30.3 34.0 35.5 29.1 29.0 37.2
1922 29.0 29.5 3.: 140.0 40.0 35.5 31.5 29.0 31.0 29.0 29.0 29.0 32.6
1923 29.5 31.0 36.5 37.0 39.8 36.7 30.0 30.0 33.0 32.4 31.0 31.0 33.1
1924 32.7 36.6 7. 2.0 42.5 37.4 32.7 30.7 3.0 33.0 31.5 34.3 35.4
192 1. .0 5.6 5.9 3.7 39. 36.0 35.0 3 .0 39.0 37.0 3.6 40.3
1926 3. .0 .7 50.0 8.3 38.3 37.8 35.3 35.0 35.0 3.3 37.1 41.1
1927 2.0 45.0 .0 6.3 I3.0 36.1 31.8 30.0 30.0 31.1 33.1 35.8 37.4
1925 37.0 36.2 38.9 39.0 39.0 38.1 34.5 31.2 33.0 3 .3 36.3 35.7 36.3
1929 26.0 36.2 39.1 42.8 37.7 37.3 31.0 31.1 35.0 3 4.2 36.1 36.8 36.1
1930 33.1 32.9 33.6 36.7 32.7 32.8 24.5 27.4 29.0 29.0 29.0 29.0 30.9
1931 30.0 31.0 37.0 40.0 37.0 35.0 29.0 27.0 27.5 26.0 24.5 24.5 30.6
S1932 2h. 23.2 27.1 26.8 23.9 23.5 18.0 17.3 18.0 18.7 17.3 1 .9 21.0
1933 1.6 20.4 22.2 24.3 22.1 1.0 15.4 16.1 17.0 17.0 15.7 16.1 18.2
1931 17.6 20.2 23.9 25.2 24.9 22.5 20.1 18.7 19.7 20.0 20.5 20.5 21.2


(Cont'd)


* Temporary ceiling prices in allpoultry and eggs went into effect October 3, 1942.
-,' All ceiling poultry and egg prices ended June 30, 1946.





Page 55
JACKSOIVNiLL!: JO I'I!G .I ARi-'T
SALES 7u RL.TAill..i 0. LQ'.'IV'A .1T ;A[.::S
!' ;LJ':': Y Iq 'P _. AV -.!?. G .S
FRYERS Heavy Breed (Cont'd.)
Yearly
Year Jan. Feb. liar. Apr. I:ay June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Hov. Dec. Av1'.
1935 2. 2.3 26.1 25.9 22.8 23.1 21.2 20.3 21.0 22.2 2 3. 20.0 23.0
1936 2:.5 2 .6 27.0 27.2 2..7 25.5 23. 22.6 2. 21.2 20. 20.7 2 3./
1937 22.3 24.0 2h.1 27.0 2 .1 2. 25. 24.5 2. 27. 26.7 27.7 25.h
1938 25.8 2 .6 27.2 27.8 24.O 21 21.6 22.9 22.9 23.0 23.6 23.
1939 23.4 21. 21.9 24.8 22.0 21.8 22. 21.9 21.0 22.0 22.3 22.1 22.3
19LO 22.Q 21. 22.8 22.6 2L.3 23.2 21.: 20.5 21.9 21.9 20.0 21.5 22.0
1941 21.d 22.4 23.8 2.3 23.0 22.8 22 22. 22.8 23.0 23.9 24:0 23.1
1942 24.1 237 2.2 26 26.8 27.5 27. 2.5 29.0 30.5 30.5 31.u 27.4
1943 31. 31.5 31.8 31.9* 30.6* 30.6* 30.6* 30.6* 30.6- 30.6* 30.6* 30.6 31 .0
19 30.6* 30.6* 30.6* 31.0* 32.6* 31.:8 31.1* 30.6- 30.6* 30.6* 30.6 30.6* 30.
195 30.6-- 31.6& 32.0-- 32. 4*32.8-*- 31.6' 31.4* 31.3 31.3* 31.3- 3.1.3- --.31 31.6
1946 31.6* 32.- 32- 32.9 33.3 33.039 38.5 '3. 0 h7.1 41.5 1.2 37.2
19H 36.2 32. .5 '5.0 37. 38.0 38.7 39.0 37.9 34.7 36.8 36.3
198 0.2 39. 1.:9 2.4 0.3 41.7 32.7 39.0



IETS Heav- Breed'


33.6 32.6 31.7 29.3, 26.o
26.0 26.0 26.7 25.5 25>.
26.0 26.0 26.0 25.0 23.0
27.8 26.0 26.4 26.0 27.0
31.6 29.2 29.7 26.0 23.0
30.7 30.2 32.5 31.8 31.9
30.0 30.0 29.8 29.1 29.0
25.0 25.0 2 5.0 25.0 2.0 .
24.8 26.4 28.8 28.8 27. T
29.8 30.0 28.5 27.5 26.6
23.0 20.0 22.0 24.0 23.0
20.5 18. 13.7 1?.0 17.5
13.2 13.5 13.0 1! .7 1.1.
1 .3 15.5 1,.0 1.5 1l.8
17.5 17.8 11.3 18.0 18.0
20.0 19.9 19.5 20.3 20.8
18.7 19.3 18.6 18.5 19.0
20.1. 19.0 19. 19.7 19.0
21.4 20.7 20.h 21.1 19.3
16.2 16.7 17.5 17.5 17.1
17.6 18.1 19.0 19.9 19.8
23.9 22.8 23.0 23.6 23.2
29.3 29.3 29.3 29. 27.1-
27.1* 2.1l 2.1* 27.5* 29.2-
27.1* 20.1* 20.5- 23.9- 29.3*
27.6* 28.1* 28.5* 28.-2 29.3*
33 1 3.5 8.1 '.6.4 3..
0.5 0.2 1.7 2, 3.:0


26.2 30." 31.3 26.0 26.0 28.8
24.0 27. 26.0 26.0 26.0 25.6
21.1 2.7 26.0 2b.3 2L.7 24.2
26.6 29.f 30.0 28.6 27.8 27.1
29.0 30.0 31.0 28.1 29.3 28.7
29.7 31.0- 31.0 3U.2 31.1 30.7
25.6 26.0 26.0 25.0 24.0 26.9
21.1 23.9 27.2 25.5 2;.5 24.3
29.0 31.2 29.5 2'.> 29.8 2_.5
22. 23.C 22.8 23.0 23.0 25.3
20.0 21 .5 23.0 22.5 22.0 22.0


Ib.4 19.3 21.0 21.7 20.6 19.0
20.7 20.2 19.6 19.6 18.7 20.1
16. 17. 187 202 20.7 .6
18.7 20.2 20.2 21.0 2,.2 19.8'
1p.2 16.9 16.9 17.9 1o.3 18.7
16.1 16.5 18.2 17.8 17.2 16.1
20.5 21.1 21.5 23.0 23..6 20.0
21.8 27.9 26.5 26,0 27.8 23.6
27.1- 27.1 27.1* 27.1 1 2 27.1- 27.'
27.1* 27.1* 27.1s- 27.1* 27.1- 27.5
27.1 27.1* 27.1* 27.1" 27.1* 27.7
29.2 35.0 4o.6 35.2 35.0 31.2
33 9 36. 36. 37.5 37.9 35.3


Permanent ceiling prices went into effect on March 6, 19)13 on e':gs and
April 6, 1943 on poultry.
All ceiling poultry and egg prices ended June 30, 19'6.


1921
1922
1923
192
1929
1936
1927
1928
1929
1930
19315
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
19,9
19 0

194h
1945
1946
1967
198'





Page 56'S IT1 I. INTR
By: L. H. L v:. ;. L-'.*-*st'..ck .nci.ii t, Flcr i r i .tat.- 1ij cktii. tL.-.i : .u,
Gifford I,. -ho.es, Li .-t cl- ,.ia"'r.t IV1 Fl, .r:*.. t, r:- I 'l,- ir au
CATTLE Am D CALVS ..S
Q. 1: 'blat is the r.nbii-r arid a f'.ie f -t l..e -an -i C::..s n i 1o. .. i ?
The following Table .-h-.v' rnurmb -r .f ,-" j-i, u ,i : .r i"h- :. tot l. ..al.* I for
selected year-: ror I11/, -t.

1* 'c .,.' n-1. uV j.I.. "' .

I 'Y 1 '" I' "' i '..I I o Jr.i
12 : '6j t i s '- 1 '-. '- 1 ., . '

19 beef 1or "I1.' -v_2 t *'-_'iC; r-
1 1 11' :. 0 Li il ..11. u
19 1 -L U' U) j 3 0-. 00
e total beef cattle in the Stat. Their rder' -in 'hbers : Polk. '
Q.2: sclt is Flori'ands, 17 arion, ades, s a tHarde, ct. eobce Jackson,
In beef or ray-, Pasco,- Putnam, in' ria and Manatee. About 7' oattlf the 'otal
. '3: V'hiere are most ,:,L t,.r r-,:,', .o ur beel ca^ tL r, ih Lor,.Lr lla .- .iu,.-l?
Most farm beef cattle ir, l.'?- l]Jor lj ;:'r. '-t ran-i, b---.:-i.' c, ttiL i tfl-.'--rni- n ul-ir
of Florida, or South Florida. The 1- leading beef'cattle Counties have hQio of
the total beef cattle in the State. Their order of importance'Jin nuihbers: Polk
Oscela, Highlands, Marion, Glades, Hlll.sborough, Hardee, Ok.echobce, Jackson,
Stimber, Clay, Pasco, Putnam, Alachua and Manatee. About 75, or the botal
cattle in the State are fenced.
h: Hoiw many purebred registered beef cattle herds are there in Florida?
Approximately 225 herds. The order of their imnorban:ce as to numbers is:
Brahman, Hereford, Angus, Shorthorn, eod Polled'and Devon.
5. 5: Are there any purebre.1 cattle State breeders' associations?
Yes, for Angus,, Brahain, eoroford and Shorthorn. Dairymen have an association
for Guerhseys and Joi'ses.
). 6. hiat kind of marketinh facilities for livestock arb found in Florida?
There are l meat packin.- plants'., 1, abattois, about 500 butchors, 2h live-
stock auction markets, 6 ca's daily markets fio linbluding packers and abattoirs,
as'well as numerous loca3 Luvers. These facilities are scattered well over the
StaLbe
3. 7: Hot, does' the average" price per hindred'pounds (cattle an.'l cl].vs) in Florida
compare With the average U.S.A. price?'


U.S.A. $lh.50' 5.30 ... 50 $20. h
Flbrida 11.20 13.00 12.20 lh.00
These differences between U.S.A. and Florida' avrraa!1 prices arij due iirinly to
breeding and fbedin.
Q. 8: How does the calf crop in Florida compare vith the' U.S.A. avcrhge?
In' 1946, U.S.A. 80 Floricaa 6h:. In 1917, U.3.A.' 81/ Florida 6h%.
Q. 9: ,;hat was the approxainate average weigiit and average pr.ce received for Florida
ranhe cattle (iurinc the past yeal?
The ifollbwin3 yarly' average firuures were obtained based on sales of over
25,000 range cattle fiarkletbd at-bne sales point irn' peni:sular Florida for a
period of one year ending ',une 30, 9l0l;:
I, ', i. :< SI Tnt
Pet. by lasses 1' 5.6% 6.. ''. 3 15. 34'.6% 2.3 5.1) 100.0
Avg. I- Iiht Lb'. Lw'x*b 5.0 29. 4 20 .l'
Avg. Price per Hd. .0.22 5 2.9. :.06 .72:18 107.21 ,1:.70 ..20
* Average cattle ;;ciht l 76.7 calves 20.1 lbj.
Averar: cattle price c. ....ll..-
31.1 c prc calves c. 2 [.4.3 Per Ilead, cattle $71.30, calves
Q.10: How many cattl.. and calves were marketed in Florida in I'),7?
Approximately 302,500 head of cattle and calves slaughtered. Total numbers
Omarkctd ludin- those sol. as :tockers and f'ede'rs, probably exceeded
1.11: L'hen are most of the cattle and calves marketed in Florida?
A greater percentage are markbcLed from July through January, calves mostly
June through Jecember, as shown b.y the following table:
(Cont'd.)




Pr' '.'- I 'o'r t I T.Y ,T '!? T' '2.''-I' c. :ALV.P -- E
__ ,AITT"-: CLT.VES F..___I L.-
eo.H2.aJ ParcnL I-o.I;:ad Percent Jo. H.: P-rcent
January 2,200 b.u1 9,u,00 .6 29,.. 00 7.3
February 160000 .50 .- 6,00 O 22,00 .o
,.larch 1L,000 5.6 7, 200 .20 21,20 0 r.5h
Aoiil 15,0U0 o.0, 7 00 7 3. 2 200. d
S19o00 7.72 000 .60 2b,000 .
.Juhe 15,000 T .2 11 200 8.;2 30,200 7. O
Auu 200 1." ,300 10.145
,-.51 -b. 23,000 9.3h lh 000 10.27 300 / .6
October 27,000 10.97 17 000 12.h7 ,00. : .11.50
November 23 000 o9.3 lo,000 11. 0 3,000. .10.20
December # 2 000 74 q 11,300 ,8.27 7800 E
Total 266,200 100% 136,300 100;. .362,00' 3],001o .
. E Q
Q. 12: Lhat is the number and value of hogs in Florida?
The following Tablo shows numbers and value 'of hourss 'on FloridI Farms fori yards
indicated? .
19.25 498,000 .O 3,37,O000.00
1930 h90000 *7.50 3, 7O00.00
195 hu7,000 3. 1, ,8'50.C00
190 '* 000 ".30 2,3,700.00
191^ 60' 000 10.80 6, '37,000.00
196 30,000 1'2.70 001,000.00'
S19T7 .0)000 16.20 10,206,00.00'
196. 6 40000 2-3.o0 1U,976,000..00
Source of Tables above.:U. S.D.A. ,YearhooK and A ricultural Statistica]
Yearbook U.o.D.A.
Q. 13: ",hat is Florida's .osi.tion as a hoE State?.
Comparative figur. s ,i.n.cat. that Flori ta has remained about 26th in total
number of hogs. .
Q. 14: Lh'ere are most of: the boys in Florida. found?
Abbut 75/0 of" Florida's nocs ar.t found north and -;ost from Jcala in ia-rion
County. The ladin. hog. nro luciin.;.. Ccuiti.s in Flori.-a in. order ar-: 'ackson,
Siarion, Gadsden, ,adison, '/ianni-e, olmes, Lfay:etcto, Liburtv, Alaehua,
ilchrist and \.ashington, all of 'v4ich are. in north-central aha west Florida.
q. 15: How does the'aver ig weirht'of Florida hoo, compare .;ith avra' foa tho-U.S.A?
The U.S.A. averad. is about 230 lbs.,' lorida's "bout 170 ibs.
Q. 16: How..does the number of pigs per litter in Florija comopa-e ,:ith the U.S.A?
10-year average 137-19h0 gives t.3.A. 0.23 pi.cs, Flori oa.1 or letter,
]. 17: How does the average value per head of Florida ho.;s coimpar': ith U.3.A?

Average 1936-h5 41I.90 1 7.20
Average 19h7 3.00 1.20.0
This differefice is due mainly to nanage.aent breeding, and feed.
Q. 18: Hoi; miany hops are marketed tn Flo.'ida annually?.
Approximately 500 000 and iboiit 250,000 additional are for farm use.
4. 19: \.hen are,most of the h6gs marketed in Florida?
About 0T27/,, are marketed from December 1st bo l.iarch 1st.
G. Ei.KRAT, LFJVSTOQK *
Q. 20: Is ,Florida self-supporting on meats?
Florida is producing about 60'., of its -beef and veal and'about 70>' of its pork
and lard. There is no r ason why Florida should not be self-supnortin- in
meats.
Q. 21: k.hat 'is the 'gross 'income from'meat animals .in Florida?
The folldv'intg Table shows the, grqss income in Florida front .m.at animals for
years indicate:
Y 'r. Cott-.lp f C-fly 110 ?- P-i .q n & Lambn- Totql
1930 2,130,000 ,.92.00. .000 .O1.000
S1935 3,232,000 17000600 7 600
1O 3 o000 11'2,00a 22,000 000
S' 189,000 1 621 000 .13,000 32, 23',000
000' 000 20,000 8,890000
19otal 22,770,000 2, 017,000 21,000 U-6, 08, 000
"Does not include wool.
inany people overlook the fact that Florida's income from hogs and )igs- for
the past 5 years ha3 nearly equalled that from cattle and calves.
Q. 22: How many frozen food lockers are t:h're in Florida?
There are about 70.
NOTE: See Livestock INarket Quotations on pages 56 and 59.




Page 58 JACKSOIVILrE LIVESTOCK IA'F KRT
(Substantially Southcastern Pric.-s)
CO WS C A L VES STEERS H 0 G S
Tfedium Common Good 7 Iedium G(ood j'ledium W4o. IJo. ,'
IOU lbs 1I lbs. LOU IDS o s iu,., :s
3- $.00-6.00:.0oo-550:7.00-8.25:$.50-7.00:7.00-8.50:6.00-7.00:S.5q .->0
9-5 :3.75-U.50:3.25-3.75:5.00-6.50:h.00-5.00:5.00-6.00:h.00-5.00:',.25-9.5:..25-8.:0o
3- :3.50-.25:2.50-3.50:5.50-6.50:.75- 5.50:5.50-6.75:.0-.:6.o .
9- :2.50-3.25:2.00-2.75:L.OO-5.00;3.00- .OO:00.-U.75:3.00-U.25 :,.25 ...,,
12 132
?2LF:2.50-3.00:1.75-2.50:3.50-h.75:3.00-h.00:3.50-,.25:3.00-3.75:3.0Q ~7..'
9-6 :2.25-,.75:1.25-2.00:3.75-U.25:3.00-3.50:o .00-5.25:3.50-.25:3. 5 :3.-50
1933 1933
9T :.2.00-2.50:1.50-2.00:3.25-3.75:3.00-3.25:3.50-4.25:3.00-3.50:2:.6,i --7. .
9-5 :2.00-2.75:1.00-2.00:3.25-3.75:2.50-3.25:3.75-h.25:3.00-3.75:3.75-bL.C.. .5,,,-3.7
193 1 t93Lh '
7 ":2.25-2.75:1.50-2.25:h.00-h.75:3.00-h.00:h.00-4.50:3.50-4.00:3.759- .D7T.50-3.75
9-4 :2.00-2.50:1.00-2.00:3.50-h.25:.2.50-3.75 :h.00-h.25:3.25-h.00:5.o0-5.60 :h.90-5.90
193 5 1935
3-T .:3.50-. Q0:1.75-3.25:5.50-6.50:3.75-.25:6.25-7.25:5.00-6.25:7.00-7.193.25-6.50
6-7 :3.25- .50:2.00-3.50:5.25-6.25 :. 0-5.50:6.00-7.50:4.75-6.00:7.25-7,50:6.50-6.75
9-6 :2.75-h.25:2.00-2.75:2.50-6.50:. -5.50:.50-6.25:u.00-5.25:9.25-9.75:8.75-9.25
12-6:3.25-h.50:2.50-3.25:5.00-5.75 :.00-5.25:5.75-6.75:h.75-6.00:7.75-8.00:7.25-7.50
1936 19 6
-6-:0.0-5.00:3.25-.o o:5.75-6.5o:4.5o-5.75:6.00-7.00:5.00-6.00:7 .50- 7.00-7.25
6- :.25-5.00:3.50- .25:5.2>-6.00:1.50-.25:6.25.5-7.00oo:5 75-6.50:6.00-8 .50:7.50- .o00
9- :3.75- .5o:3.oo-3.75:5.00o-6.o00 :.25-5.oo:.50-6.00 :.O-5.5o0:9.00-9.50:.50-9.00
12-h:3.50-h0oo:2.75-3.50:5.00-6,00:h.25-5,25:5.25-6.0,:h.50-5.25:8.60-8.90:8.10-8.ho
1937 1 1937
3-12 :,.oo-5.5o:3.5-.oo00:5.25-5.75:h.o-5.25:6.00- .2:5.00-6.50:8.00-8.1o:7.60-7.90
6-h :h.50-5.00:3.5o-4.25:5.75-6.5o:4.75-5.5o:7.oo- .oo00:5.50-6.75:9.50-lo :9.00-9.50
9-7 :h.00-5.25:3.00-4.00:5.5o0-p.00 :.50-5.25:6.00-7.25:5.00-6.25:8.75-9.00:8.25-8. 50
12-7 :.00oo-,5o 0:3,oo-,oo:5.00o-,50:b.oo-5,25:6.00-7.00:5.00-6.00:6.25-6.65:6.00-6,.o
1938 1938
3-7-:4 .5-.o00o:3.5-4.25:*2.-6.50:0-5.^ :6.25-7.00: -6.0:6.75 -7.7 ',.25-7.25
6-7 :.-5.25:3.0-.25:5.50-7.00:.0-5.5:6.5 0-7.5:5.50-6.50:7.70 :7.20
9-6 :L.00-5.00:3.00-.oo00:5.00-6.00:L .50-.25:6.25-7.00:5.50-6.50:7.00 :50
12-3: ,oo-,5o:3.oo-,oo00:5.5o-6,75:4.50-5,5o:6,5o-7,.5o:5.o-6,o:6.oo :,50
1939 1939
T- :h..75-.50 .75- .75:6.50-7.50:5.00-6.50:7.00-3.00:6.00-7.00:6.85 .30
92 : .5-.0-7: 75.
6-3 :5.00-.7:0.00--.0o:6.00-7.50: .00-6.00:6.50-8.o00:5.5c-6.50:6.00 :-. o
9-2 :U.50-5.25:.00-.75:5.75-7.25:,.75-5.75:6.50-7.5o.0:.50-6.50:5.90
12-2 :05o-5 .25:3.75-4.50:6.00o-7.25:5.00-6o.00o7.00o-7.75:6.00-7.00 :.90 : ,65
190O 19 0
T-7-:.oo-5,75:h.-5. 00:6.25-7.2:5:5.5-6.25:7.00-8.00:6.o-7. 00:5.00 75
6-1 :.75,25:3.75-. 5:6.50-7.50:5.5o-6.50:7.00-8.25:60-7 .00:5.2 :.00
9-7 :.25-5,00:3.75-.50:6.00-7.00:5.00oo-6.00:6.75-7.7 :5.50-6.75:6.7 :.o
12-7:4.25-5.00:4.00-4.50:6.00-7.00:5.00-6.00:7.6o-8.25:6.00-7.00:5.6 : .0o
191 19_1
31-:5 .25-6.00:h.5o0-.25:6.25-7.5o:5. 2-6.50:7.0-8.75:6.50-7 .50:6.50 --7.00
6-7 :5.5-6..25:.25-5.25:6.75-7.75:5.50-6.50:7.75-8.50:6.75-7.75:8.90 :8.ho.
9-6 :5.50-6.75:h.50-5. 0:7.5 0-.75:6.50-7.50:8.00-9.00:7.00-8.00:10.25 :9.75
12-5:5.50-6.50:h.25-5.50:7.00-8.00:6.00-7.oo :7.50-8.5o:6.5o0-7.5o:8.25. :7.75
19h2 19L2
3-6 :7.50-8.25:5.75-7.25:8.20-10 :6.75-8.00:9-10.50 :8.00-9.00:11.25 :10.75 '
6-6 :7.0-8.50:6.00-7,*O:900-11 :7 00-9.00:10-11.59 :8.75-10 :12-13.00 :11,5-12.5
9-h :7 50-8.50:6.25-7.50:10-11.00 : .00-10 :9.75-11- :8.00-10 :12.75-13-112--12. 75
12-h:7.50-6.50:6.00-7.25:10.00-11:8.oo- :9.25-11 :8.00-9.25:11.50-12 :11r11.5
193 19 .
3- :9.00-11 :7.50-8.75:11.00-13,:9.00-11 :11-13.5o :9oo00-1 :13 75-1 3t 3.7
6- :9-10.50 :7.00-8.75:11.00- 3W:9.50-11 :11t.13.50 :9;-11.25 :13z-:13.7:112 7.-133
Sept:9.00-10.5:8.00-9.00:12-13.50 :12.00-13 :13.00 :12 00-13 :13;50-14:12 7 -13.65
Dec.:8.50-10 :7.25-8.50:12-1i.50 :11-11.50 :12-15.30 :9.50-12 :11i-12.0:10.5-11.75





JTAC 1:.S;OUV ILLL L.Tvr, TQC 1: -:.A -,T (Contid.)
CSbtni1y.,~ta~~r Fcs


CO


Ticalum


1 9 h b ':
Jan.:9.00-10
Feb.:9.00-10.5
MIch :9. 75-11
Apr.:9.50-10.5
May :9.50-10.-
June:9.25-10.5
July:9.2 5-10.5
Aug.: .75-10
Soet: e25-10
Oct.: 8.25-9.6C
Nov.:8.10-9.50
Dec.:8.60-10
.:9,25-10-
Feb.:9. 50-10Q
Mch :9.75-11
Apr.:10-11.59
Iay :9.75-11 -
June:9.50-1,
July :10-11.5
Aug.:9.50-112
Sept:9. 50-11-
Oct.:9. 0-11,
Nov. :9. 0-11i
Dec.:9.50-11-
19L6
Jan. :10,00-13
Feb. :11-13.50
Mch :11.,00-!4
Apr.:11.50-1}
May :11.50-13I
June:12.00-14
July:11.50-1 6
Aug.:11.50-16
Sent:10.20- 4
Oct*:11.1-1 .6
Nov.:10.50-14
Dec.:11,35-1
197
Ja-. :13-15,10
Feb.:12 -15, 0
Ich :13--15. 40
Apr.:1l-16.50
MIay :14-16.50
June:lh,10-17
July 114.00-16
Aug. :14.00-16
Sept:lt.00-18
Oct.:14.50-17
Nov. :1L-16.50
Dec :15-20.00
1Jan:18-2L .00
Feb.:19-2 .00
Mch :19.50-23
Apr.:19.50-24,
'lay :20.50-24L
June :20.50-25
July:20.50-2 l
Aug. :19.50-231


NOTE: here figure shows, for example, 10,5 it means that the animal sold for 10,5.
per pound or ;'10.50 per hundred lbs. Ceilings went off about Oct. 15, 1946.
Much of this information furnished through cooperation of Production & i-arketing
Administration, 402 Upchurch Bldg., Thomasville, Georgia.


Page 59


W S C A L V E S STEERS H 0 C S
Common (nood ,Medium Good r;ed1iun No, I io. 2
Ibs. UU 1 3bs. j-00 Ib:j. lUUt iDs.
:7.50-8.50:12-12.50 :11-12.00 :12.50-14 :10-12.00 :1 -12.1 E -11.35
:7.75-9.50:12-l.00 :11-12.00 :13-1).5-0 :1r5-3 :11-13.00 :10 -12 .
:9-10.00 :12-1h.00 :11-12.00 :13.25-15 :11.5-13.5:12-13.25 :11 -12.0
:8.00-9.50:1h-1.700 :11-13.00 :1l-15.00 :11.5-13.5:12.25-13. -11 512
:8.00-9.50:13-1.5O :11-13.00 :i-15-.00 :11.5-13. :12-13.25 :11.23-1.35
:8.00-9.00:13-lh.00 :11-12.00 :13.-15 :10-13.50 :12-13.00 :112.?-12?
:7.25-9 ,2:13-1.50 :10-12.00 :i3. 5-1.':10-13.00 :12-13. 0:11.-1 2.5
:7.50-8.50:12-14.50 :10-12.09 :1i3-.50 :10-12.59 :13-14.35 :11.7-lh
:6.75-8.30:12-21.00 :9.50-13), :12-1l.,0 :9.50-124i :13 5 :12-1L1.0O
:6.50-8.10:12-1 .00 :9-11.75 :12?5.Q-1 :9.25-123 :13-14.1- :12-1 .5
:6.25-8.00:12-13.50 :9-12,.75 :122-1l ,:9,00-12- :13-13.15 :12-13.75
:7.25-8.50:12.50-14 :9.70-12 :12.50-i :29.75-13 :12-123.23 :11 -13.
:8.00-9.50:12.50- .-1 :10- .50-15 :11.0-13 :12-14.35 15--13.35
:9.00-9.50:15-15.530 :11.50-13 :14-15. 5 :11.50-)h :1385-1.35:13-1h 35
:9.25-9.75:13.00-5 :12.00-1 :1 :1-15. 0 :1. :-4-1 .l-.35:1 3.7-14.35
:9.25-10 :14-15.>0 :12.00l-14l :1).2-1 :12.00-1L :1 t-1 .35 :1 -1 .35
:9.00-10. :13. 0-11 :11.50-13-,:1 .50-16 :12.5,0- :1H -: .35:1- 1-.35
:9.00-9.50:13.50-1] :11.00-13- :1.-1.O :12.0-1.5- :i L-l.35 :14-1 .35
:9.25-10, :13.50-15 :1l.-13 :0-1 :.50-17 :11.50-16 :1 4il.35ony:1 --.3l.3
:80.50-91150:13-1h.50 :9120-1, :5.00-17 :11.20-13 :l 5- 1 .35:1l.4-1 n.3y
:8.00-9.00:12.00-17 :9.50-16- :13 6.00- :112.50-13 :14h-4..3:1 y: l. on35
:8 .Q0-9.1:12.50-14 :12-160. 0 :137.0- :11.0-13 :21 -1.35 :1 l .355
:8 50-950 :12.50-1) :11i.0-13- :31.5-1 :12-13.50 :1 -.35 :L -.3-9
:850-9.50:1300-16.0 :11,00-130 :1300-8.2 :11,00-13 :13.75-1o.3:13.75-1.36





I:1.50-1..0 iLL ,.6)- .60-26
:8.90-10 :13.50-18 :12.00-17 : :12.00-1 :h lli2.350:13.72-12.3
:9.50-1025 :I-15.50 -17:11.00-16 :150-127 :12.50-165 :12-- :18-353.22: 35
:10.00-13 :5.500-1620:1.00-15 : .50-17 :123.0-16 :1 i;35only:l2.3
:120-11. :-0-.16 :13.5-9.6 :18.0-17 :15-21.5016 :.35onl-23 :1.3only
:10.50-1 :1i-0-16, :12-19.50 :15.00-17 :1.00-16 :19.-235only:.3only
:10-1250,:1-22C-10 :12.00-16 :16.00-8 2.0:12.50-16 :-2.35. :1.0-235only
:11.50-1:19-23.00 :1:120-16.50 :17.00-19, :13,-17 :-25.50-1 :12.50-19








:11.50-2,5 :1-25.00 :15.00-20:19.50-23-:I5.50-20 :2L-26.50 :23-25.75
:9.50-12 :13.25-215:11.00 : -16 :1.50-2318 -:12-178.50 :1.-322 :2135-22
:8.15-18.50 :13-16.50 :118.-50 -:2h-8.20 :11-12.50 :1253 only: ..50-15.6
,:8. O-1.:13-16.90 :11 -16^ :' 0-18 :12-l..0 lsl.-26 :6 .60-26
:8.90-1.0 :13.0-18 :12.0-200 : -19 :19-16, :-22,50 :215.75-2 .75
:9-13.25 :23.50-17 :13.00-.6 :23.-22.10:19.5-16 :1-220.0 :18-22.00
:10,00-13 :21.50-20 :l20.0-8 :21.50-28:13.00-19 :17-22 195:16-18.57
':10.00-13 :16.50-21-:1 -18,50 :15.72-22-:13.50-16 :21)--2 :20--2-2
:11, 5-13 :16.50-22 :1 -18.90 :l .00-23 :1 .60-20O:22J-26 :22.00- 6
:12.40-14 :17-23.78 :1 -19.50 :18.00-23 :15-21.50 :17,5o-23 :17,00-D3
:11.50-21 :26-312 :15-9.00- :1825.50-22 :1 .50-20 :19--2.510:'17-225-,
:11.00-1 :18.70-22:1.00-19 :19270-23 :l.00-280 :22.-26 :20.75-235.5
:10.00-21 :19-22.50 :.00-19 :19-23.50 :.00-2-2.0 :23-27.25 :21.50-25
:11.00-050 :19-23.00 :21.00-19 :19.00-23:1-1:22.50 -2:25-2.50 :23.25-25
:11.50-15 :19-25.00 :1 .00-20 :19.50-23-?-:1'.50-20 :2h-26.50 :23-25.75
:11-1U.50, :17-1?.00 :3 -l8. 0 :18.00-22 :1'.50-18-:22-26.75 :21-2..0
:11.50-1 :18-21.00 :lh-l8.5 :18.00-23 :lJ-l8.50 :22.50-2 x:21,7 -23i
':12.50-16 :19-22.00 :16-20.00 :20.o0-26 :1.6.00-22 :24-25.25 23-2E*50
:15-18.50 :2h-26.00 :l8.50-25 :24-28.50 :18-24.50 :23-25. .50-2h-I
:16-19.00 :2h- 3.00 :20-25.00 :24-26.00 :19-2li,00 :17-22:50 :l5.75-21.75
:17- 0.00,:2 .50-29 :19.50-2 5:2 50-28 :19.50-25 :17-20.00 :16-19.00
:17.50-20g-: 2 .50-30 :20.50-25. :250-28N;205. :17-19.25 :16-18.5
:10 50-21-: -31. 00 :21.5 -2 :2.5-30 :21.*0-27 :18-22.50,:17-21.7'?
:18-21, 00 :27-3400 :23. 0-26 :27-32.00 :23-28.50 :22.50-26_:20.75-2 .50
:19-21.0 :26-33.00 :22-27.50 :27.50-33 :23-29.001:26-27.25 :2h.50-26.50
:18-20.50 :25-29.00 :21.50-26-:26.50-31 :22.50-27.:25-27.25:2.25-26.5




Page 60THE PRODUCTION OF FLORIDA FRUITS AITD VEGETABLES AS AFFECTED E" 7 AT,!ER
Co:DIrTIOSi: 191'i-b SEASOl[
By J. C. Townsend, Jr., Agricultural Statistician
Florida Cruop Reporting Service
The regularity of occurrence of.storms and .freezes the past few ye.jrs eeps u:
from using the old'stock phrase of-calling these phenomena. "unusual." .I, .hve
started off too many seasons with hurricanes and have had enough' cold w,;:.ther-in
January and February to deem them abnormal. The crop year l'5L-h-' w's no e:.:carpti.,.
The season began with'a hurricane in September which was a,:comranied iil hlai- rai.n-.
Three months period, of r.ecupora.tive weather followed and in riid-Junuary th:- idnter1
freeze occurred. Spring. and early summer. were generally fav-.rabl, and the final
resulting production of fruits and vegetables approached ncrrmal or above' norriial
voluine. Another record crop of citrus wa's chalked up in th-: b.e.ol: 'anr' sorne vec -
e.tables exceeded or neared former peaks of production.

FRUIT '- Despite storTm losses 'of two or three inillion bo.es :.fi itru1: in the
Indian Rive'r area in September, Florida's 390,000 acres of citrus- prcdi.uced another
*record volume. When an .economic loss of 3,7.00,000 boxes :of )rap.c'fruii .'d 600,000
boxes of tangerines are -included, the total citrus .crop reached r:..] rly' : 9 million
boxes a'jump of nearly 9 million over 194&--47. Set -of fruit lact .-;vr vcas only
moderately heavy but plenty of moisture and generally warm weatho'r during 'the' grow-
ing season boosted sizes in building up a record production.. Lov. prices, especially
for grapefruit, resulted in about 4 million 'boxes being left unharvested. The
January freeze also caused a loss of several 'hundred thousand boxes of tangori-nes.

VEGETABLES Heavy fall rains reduced the acreage and''production of early
vegetables, delaying seddinig of tender crops in some areas so that a greater than "*
usual toll was taken by the mid.-January freeze. Overall loss of acreage from
adverse weather conditions amounted to some '30,.000 acres out of 270,000 acres
planted. This loss was not as heavy as the .year before when 25 percent of the
planted acreage (or nearly 70,000 acres) was destroyed. Sinoe the freeze .came in
January instead of February, growers were ableto replant without too much loss to
acreage in the spring. .Despite storms, rains, freezee and frosts, a few new veg-
etable records were set in 19h7-48. The 15,900 acres-of cucuLmbers, 3,200 .acres of
escarole, 11,400 acres of peppers are all new peaks in acreage harvested.. Green pea
plantings at 700 acres were the lowest in 20 years; whilc 20,800acres of 'Irish
potatoes represented the smallest acreage since 1933.. 1,'aturnelons set a new produc-
tion record when 13.7 million melons wure harvested. Nearly 2 million bushels of
cucumbers also set a neW peak for that crop. Second only to 19L4h-h4, cabbage
production in 1948 amounted to nearly 1L,000 tons, and escarole a- 1,376,000-
bushels produced and. 1,100,000 harvested.was another top performance.

(In general, fall vegetable production' was sharply cut Trom a year ago as a
result of water loss.es. Fall acreage harvested was only 57 percent of the year
before and' production 64- percent of 1916.)

Growe.rs planted 12 percent fewer across of winter vegetables but harvested a
higher percentage and with generally higher yields' produced a g'rca'tur volume during
the winter of 19)4 than in 1947. Returns to grovors woro disastrously, low onA celery
and pe'ppcrs during the winter 'but most o'f the others brought higher returns :than in
.1946-47. .Some production -was left in the fields. '

Spring plantings followed the same general pattern -ith most of the reduction
in .snap beans. Plantings of cuctmbers,celery, and peppers were increased. :Yields
were considerably higher this past spring, resulting in higher production. Low
prices continued through the spring for celery, eggplant and peppers, resulting in
some abandonment. Returns from other crops were higher. The overall returns for
vegetables for the 19h7-48 season amounted to nearly 90 million dollars at the
F.O.L. Level -- about the sane a, 1946-47. (END)

Mr. Townsend's address is U.S. Bureau of Arricultural Economics, 302 Federal Bldg.,
Orlando, Florida. l.rite to him with regard to acreage, production and value figures.




Pace 61
FOrjT \A FOR Pc.:rtn Vy T.tI, 07 SmT.jT": VP'."-f A )ID I'-ivr-T'-!, ". 11 rL-T :rf' 1 7': i


$ 369, o
289 000
212, 000
268)000
3 000
356 000
2l8,OOO
l,000
37,000
028,000
1,294,000
1,501,000
l, 81h 000
1,80 ,000
1.M75 000
1.151 o00


F.sarols o
$ 22,000
26 7,000
235,000
207,000
306,000
204,000
264,000
30, 000
3o61,000
32b,000
1.142,000
6 5 000
1,352,o000oo
875, 000
1,183,000
S165, 000


, 90' 000
3,708,000
2,503,000
3,187,000
5 078 000
2 ,39,000
3 ,64,000
3 725,000
? 799 000
0,018,000
5,914iooo
7, 31,000
12,0 33,000
11 ,7.,000
5,475,000
10.073.000


n:iscl. Fruits does not

2,000
23,000
18 000
15,000
128,000
65000
3 000
37,500
52,000
85o00o
91 000
120 000
54 00ooo
102 000
339 000


All Tpttinc
269,000
S286,000
25,;o000

1 59 000
970 000
012 000
i19,000
17,O000
o12,000
h23,750
,81,000
1,3l.0,000

1,2 ,220
554,000
6oioo0


4 3 000
07, 000
520,000
508,000
08,000
)42 000
6t8 ,000
520 000
0o, F500
434,000
2 4,000
l0, 000
28,000
339,000
189,000
9 000


, 6,000
6635,000
S688)000
8,711,000
12 323,000
8,216,000
8 618 000
13 ,68 000
11, 795,000
20 ,73,000
203,76,000
22,1 05,000
19.098,000
22.936.000


include Citrus.
St.rawherri
$2,322,000
2,642?,000
2,236,000
1,972 000
2,74 6,000
2,100,000
3,175,000
2;34, 000
2,194,000
2,27 5,000
1,49,000
1,107,000
1,541,000
2,363,000
3,737,000
2. 00. 000


Wa t..rn.Il onq
., 990 000
77 9,000
720 000
896,000)
1,310,000
9,5 000
976,000
1,193 000
1 ,.5 850
1, 72 000
2,641, 000
,593 000
5, 552 o000
6 2 000


SflHson
1932-33
1933-3-
1934-35
1935-30
1937-37
1937-36
1936-39
1939-
1941- 2
1942- 4
194 -
19 4-
19 45-4
1946-47
19h 7-i


P ,'nn r.
$1,4oy000
1 ,u7o, 000
1,277,000
1,273,000
1 ,0o 000
1,668,000
2,771,000
2,121,000
-2,537,000
2 ,838 000
2,917,000
2,360,000
6,123,000
7,187000
6,5!2,8ooo
9,0P6,000
Total Value
VeLeis:c u'its
,161,31, 000
2,l4g ,000
24, 37,000
296,33,000
27,831,000
26,7 8,000
335,90,000
,3 844,000
3 86 000
S7,187,000
72,896,000
80 ,025,000
89,442,000
902, ,220
80,52 ,000
79',773,000
Total Value
Misc.Fruits*
$19 ,686 000
29,192,000
27,817,000
29 215,000
33,522,000
29,878 000
40,l6,000
7,259,000
0,21,00oo0
51,086 000
77,119,500
85,725,000
96,02,000
8,067,220
,7 7,000


Season
1932-33
1933-34
1934-3$
193o-36
1936-37
1937-33
1938-39
1939- 0
1940 -1
19.41-2
1942-43
1943-44
1945-6
1946- 7
1917
Note: *
S ason
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-36
1938-39
1939-4O
19 0-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-1
194 -46
1916-47
19 7- h


HoTe: Tabulations based on information supplied by U.S. Agricultural Statisticians
Orlando, Florida. Valuation figures represent gross packed value, when packed
at Florida shipping points. Several vc'-etables of commercial importance not
included above. Does not include Carrots .270,0C0 and Cauliflower $176,000.




Page 62


ACREAGE O(For PH.Ti PAT TT.OTDA r t. r-
(For Harve' W)


Beans


v.T-onn A cr f ,a .- e .A c r ea p,-r;.1,---- ,A r-,-- ...-- ... ...--


lina figures are
of baby limas or


crT91ant
Aer-F gp Iq t


1925-26
1926-27
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-3b
1936-37
1937-38
1939-40
190-41
191- 42

190 -
19-
19k-

1947-
Notes:


1,020
630
1 ,550
1 320
1 680
1, 800
1 50
2 ,50
1,500
2 900
13 80
1, 00
2,100
1 900

1 ,50
3 500
2 ,50
3,900
3,300
3,225


,(1) 0,0 .,,02
310 79,0q



1, 00 5,00 o ,
1, 00 0, 00 ,0, 0
1,200 10,c'00o 7,
1 ,00 1 ,000 7, o00

7*00 ~ 10,000 73
1,3 00 10 60700
i40 17,500 11S50O
300 1 ,200 13, $0
1 200 i,000 11,700
,200 1 ,00' 11,600
included with snap beans orior to the 1
for the Fordhook or large variety and
butterbeans.


7,A: rqg, oIP.
(2)
A rnz'iry- p.


340

850
700
700
700
700
900
1,000
1,000
1,350
1,00
1,200
1 .0
2 O0
2, 00
2, 00
2, 8,00
3,200


Boston
Tnt.t.J1ne
(3)
r r' t'p cnP


1,500
1,500
1,500
1i,00
1,100
1,600
1,000
950
1,100
900
800
900
750
900
500


7oo
100
U00


700
55o


Iceberg

A cr'p fOp


250
41




1,100
2,000
3,000-
1,700
1,350
1,000
1,300
1,125
1,100


All 197-48 acreage figures are preliminary as of September 20, 1948 and are
subject to revision. s o


English

A nrpn ffp


760
700
1,230
1,350
700
2,000
3,800
3,600
5,800
,000
8,200
6,200
6 200
5,000
3,000
3,$00
3,500
32,600

1,600
1,600
600


qffaRnn


1925-26
1926-27
1927-2d
192 -29
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
193 -36
193b-37
1937-36
1938-39
193 9-0
19 .0-41
19141-42
1942-H3
19 .3-4
19 5-46
19 46-47
1947-48


(2) Escarole acreage included with lettuce prior to 1927-28 season.
Big Boston figures include Romaine acreage.
( 9 Iceber Lettuce included in Big Boston acreage figures until the
1938-39 season.


P 1 1rr-Inb r-




ACPPEAGV OF Prflh7NTPAT. *LOi.D,\ TRI C. ,;OP.Q 2?3_S.A.Ol (Cont'd.)
(F'or Ha vaL, )
Total
P.ppr.c-rs Pot.Tt. Tomato.e Vof- t In f
A r- r- A ^ l- A .., .,- ,'k.. ,,,


qn i -- nVI


1925-26 3,370 23,070 20,700 81,1.90
192'-27 2,700 28 000 29,800 97,510
1927-2b 6,10 30 000 29 280 115 ,70
1928-29 5,650 22,000 38 700 122,80
1929-30 0,550 31,000 31,260 131,000
1930-31 8,200 27,000 26 800 130,550
1931-32 8,050 21 500 23 00 121,d50
1932-33 300 17,000 2,900 127 ,150
13-3 2 ,00 30,5 00 1 ,
I;3-3, 700 2 ,000 32,500 1i 70
1935-30 6,500 2L;500 32, 1 30
1936-3,7 7,200 31, 300 3N,700 l'6 0
1937-38 7, QO 31 00 q 300 183 '0O
193 -39 7 300 26700 40,700 1b'7,00
1939-4O 6,200 25,600 3000 1 63,0
19 0- 1 7,200 2600 2 500 165 900
19 -U2 o,500 25,000 3,000 19 ,100
19 2- 7,100 26 ,00 2,500 176.8
19- ,950 28 600 3 ,900 223, 50
19- 93 31,100-- 32 500 0 -
19 -U 11,080 35,300 30 O0O 220 ,,0
196-7 50 2 100 2,00 2200 O.
1907-4 8n11, 0 20,0 30 200 190o,o, -
* Does not include bOO acres of cauliflower and .)50( acra of cormnercial
Does not include acrtar.- for souash, rac'ishoc, broccoli, or any other
not named. The Miscellaneous V..,etabLes -.robably total 20,000 acres.


;es on


Cantaloupes


carrots.
vegetables


I orslnn-


Of' i. ciallyv Reported (5)
A m*^' -T ~ %or. Q r


600
600
600
600
600
250
200
h00
300
200
200
300
700
500

4oo
500

00
100
1,200


(3) Acreage of
available, but


2,980
2 808
,500
8 000
9,100
7 800
10,600
8,400
8,000


9,000
7,200
,8 00
S,0000
72E000
5)600
2,800
,1 50
2, 00
6,"O


cantaloupes for 1026,
is. estimated the sa,:,6


24 ,150 108,920 1925-26
29,1120 131,210 1926-27
378,,h0 158,710 1927-28
3;, 900 1o 280 1928-29
34 700 175,100 1929-30
31,000 170;900 1930-31
26 500 1Q8,350 1931-32
22,500 160. 1932-33
23, O 18 250 193 -3h
20,000 18 ,0 193 -3
16 000 181,Uc 193 -36
19.500 1A9 980 193 -37
22, C00 21i 300 1937-38
22;,00 209 1,00 1938-0
23 o00 19U U50 1939-40
25 500 190 100 1540-1O-
2L; 00 221,200 19,1-.12
32, 00 1-92 350 19112-!i
25,500 2 1, 00 1903-h3
3.9 000 2 700 1 704
9,000 275,5500 1 79-


1927 and 1928 seasons not immediately
as for 192') and 1230 sc:asons.


(C) These acreage firurcs do not include acres abandoned in various stages of
growth for reasons uoh-.r than cc.'r:onic r.arketin (poor .,arktL,:).
Does not include 21,600 acres of -, ---:tables and 6,000 ac-es of water-elon.
planted but not reaching harvest eta-e. Some'additional acreage was abanhdon-
ed for marlketing reasons. .-
(5) Does not include o20 acres of carrots and WO acres of caul.iflo'.r
officially reported. Oee par;cs 12-13, also 64-68.
All acreage fir-ures are prolinin.ar-. as of eentc-icr 20, 19A8 anu. are subject
to revision. Years prior to 1947-L8 .-y hav, been revised sligrhly.


Pas- 63


1925-26
1926-27
1927-2
192 -29
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
193 -35
1935-36
193b-37
1937-38
1930-39
1939-O0
190-11
1941-42
1942-h2
1941-46
194-h7
19 47-8

Notes:


A ry ,-.-# r-




Page 6h


, .1 Ifr-.I i "


YThLD AID VMIW_~P ~TTCFTD0~rflTTT~ TI ~T.Y~1fl~ P.Yr$I~i;~


Harvested Yield Voluie Abandoncd Price p.- FOB Packed
].9"9-30 T5,,00 3.179,'00 .nclud.lI. ,, 2.1 ,, 3 ,oo
1930-31 L6000 8 3, ,00 TotaL rodu;+iJ n 1. -) 000
1931-32 l, 00 ]0 [ $,SU,000 A/(2h,000) 1.1 9(, oC

193L1-3 613,000 7 1780000 1. ,000
1?32-32 -0 6200 71 ,,3 000 A/() .90. 6, 53,000
193u-37 -23 800 71 b,. 00 ,O0 -* 1.0 .,037 ,oc
193-3U 6 700 *89 .5 3, 00 1.17 ,2 1 2,00 0
193'-3' 6N 000 ]11 7,13; 00 A/(288,0oo) 1.03 7,1,"
1939-S30 e. 000 ,090,000 1.47 1 M6 000O
19 0-41 2 500 92 ,7O.,0, -- 1 Can"in" V 00
19b1--2 673,00 105 5,713,c0C 1 .5' 11,91- 000
1942-h] 61;,00 131 6,75, 000 A/ 2.", 1 i.27 1.,&90p 00
$194-ho 23,500 16 0 2I,0O i 713 ,C' 00O
0500 O 1,.' o0,0'00 7 2. b,L00
1945-e 80,20.0 0- ),000C A.,' 1,23) 000) 2.o3 17(i 2123 9,000
191-iL 51,JA I0 6o700 AIl 13;000 A k. 0 1.' ,0, 000
19)17-15:, 71,00o __ _____ ,A00_A'A/ L'0l0 2 .L T 1L K'jPQ.00
A i ot h.a7r:-t.t, icmu t poor markets. C0in':. .. j-t.1.~; 1l.i--. Li 1 ,. 'j000
1952-b3 bu. 2 677000; 19l3-4U bu 1,260,000, 190-bu ,36 ,000; 19 li5-6 1 'bu
1,106,000; 19o6-47 bu 800,700; 197-38 00bu '3,000.


Abandoned Price per
Volume Rlshal
n2 .00
1. 60
Account 2. 0
poor ... 1.
markets 1. '0
1. O0
2.20
2.10
.10
A/C1,000) 4.38
A/(7,000) 3.28
3.51
A /(900P -()()) 00


FOB Packed
., 270,000
202,000
390,000
507 ,000
720,000
420 000
160 000
682,000
1,04, 000
l,h3o,000
1 779,000
1 ,33,000
1, 7,000
1 .C/^.Ooo


Volume
Prodert! on
W ,100
22,100
43 6,oo
,200
29,120

61000
55,000
1O2,000
112.000
60',000
108 ;000
85,000
16 800
13 '000
116 200
1T4 900


Abandoned
Volume
A/(Y{,1 U)
A/(6. 500)
A,(21,400)

A/(20,000)




A/. 4,100
A 24, 000)
A/ 2 ,500)
AX 16,200)
A 21.100)


Price per
Ton used
022.40
3 .00
16.00
l6.oo
56.00
17.00
16.00
16.00oo
18.00
18.40
38.90
17.80
76.00
36.00
37.00
9.00
3.0


FOB Packed
Total Va-ie
$ 918,000
701,000
590,000
605,000
1,630 000
612,000
96 oo000
978,000
990,000
2, 061,000
2,33,o000
1 602 000
6,';160 000
4,309,000
3,959,000
S6,51,000


A Not harvested, due.to economic abandonment. Values cover harvested
crop. Abandoned volume is included in production volume.
NOTE: All 1947-48 acreage figures are preliminary as of September 20, 1
subject to revision. Revisions are usually of minor' consequence.


portion of

948 and are


193 -3$
1935-3b
1937-38
193d-39
1939-40
1940-1I
1941-h2
19421-3
1943- 4
195 -4
19 -46
1946-47
19 9h7- x


"Harvested
1)500
2,100

,000
000
000
,00
3,00
i200


Yield
Bushals
90
70
75
100
70
h0
LO
59

88
65
91


Volume
PrndDl rti nn
135,000
12b,000
16 ,000
338.000
8o 00ooo
280,000
280,000
325,000
321,000

,000
33oo000o


Seaq son
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934 -3
1935-3
1936-37
1937 -38
193o-39
1939-40
1940-41
941-42
1942-43
1943-42
1941-15
191 5-
1946-47
19 i7-hiA


Harvested
Acr. ea p
6 500
5 500
6,200
10, 00

18600
0, 000
23,500
917,400
10,000
16,000
10 000
18,000
10,000
23,500
17 500
13,200
14,000
1h.100


Yield
Ton.
7.11
7.0
7.0
.2

7.0
6.0


6.0
8.5
7.1

9.0


CAEEAGE.


- 9


. . ,- _




Pa,,e 65
A,'RFAG7 YV17LD AND VALUW' 0-,- 57TT.E(YE7. C0.'FODTTIPS I P .' L0?Tfln Y (Coiifl'ci)


1930-31
1,31-32
1932-33
193 -34
193 -3
193 -39
193 -3
1937-39
1939-3O
126- l
1941-42
1942-43
19UJ3-4,
194-45
1945-46
1 O,7-),r,


Harvested
Acre a f



6,500
6 ,300
6 7,500
6 00o
8,000
7 300
7 500
9,100
S350
8 750
9 900
11,050
13 ,50
11,700
11 Apo


Y


A tCot harvested,due
Florida crates ar


Prices Price
per per
ield Crates Volume Abandoned NY 2/3 FOD Packed Fla.
S Fl Produrti on Volume Crqtx -Tot-, VI I e rraiEt.-
308 13 1, ,000 v 2.75 Y 5,212,000 1.c-
2$ 2? 1,7L ,000 2.17 3,783,000 1.3
262 37 1 3,000 A/(207,000) 1.7 1,949,000 .76
312 0 1, 72,000 1.60 2,96000 .96
20 7 1, ,oo000 2.60 368,000 1
25$ *h2 1,723 000 2.60 8 8 000 1.0
280 7 2,097,000 26 ,2,000 1.30
286 7 2 2 o000 A/(255,000) 1.69 3. oo .
29 C9 2, 16 000 2. 31 2 .
30 07 2),79,000 2.57 000 1.Ch
263 2,31000 31? 06000 1.91
?9 6 2 ,8000 F4(4,347,000) 27. 71 oo 16)
47 h;175. ( la.Crts) 17,150 000 .l
02 ,69,000 A/ o00O00) l .3000 3.18
93 5,146,000 A/(102 000) 1 53,000 3.U7
79 ,h, 000 A/(151 000) 14, 2,000 2.27
30 ; o 000 17 000 3.
7 000o A/(892,000) 5___ o7 0 2.0
to economic abandonment. Values cover harvested portion crops
e approximately60 per cent as large as NY 2/3 cra'cs.


Harvested
12,100
Z,300
5,00
000
5100
5700
5,600
7,000
7,600
6 200
8,800
9,700
6 ,500
6,300
7 700
11,150
15 V


Yield

95
100



0h5
93
62
65
121
114
121
80
73
110
16


I' E l RL t.-3
Volume Abandoned
irnucti on Volume
649,000
961,000
390,000
361,000 -
b,000 -
3L ,oco
d50,000
1,166,000 -
1,o6 000 -,ooo
912,000. -
520,000 -
,ooo000 -
8h ,000 -
1,520 000 A/(76,000)
S0 A/(o,00)
IL.-, UU A!/ 5o0oo00)


Price ner
- $2.hp


1.75
1i.M
1.o2
1.98
3.02
1.58
1.63
1.75
2.2
4.98
It.55
4.31
.72;


FOB Packed
Total Value
$1,56b,000
1,293,000
$55,000
633,000
8h,000
76 ,000
928,000
1,101,000
1,053,000
1,391,000
1,938,000
1,8 8,000
2,Q02,000
2,592,000
2,079,000
3,637,000
5,37,000
1, ")


1E(CVIPTIA~NT


Harvested
1 ,6b0
1, 800
1 ?50
2 oo
2,0 0
1 ,500
1,100
1 ,60
1 800
2,100
Sho00o
1 ,800
2,350
1 ,50
3 ,500
3,230
3,900
2?


Yield
22
2!O
189
253
67
180
286
283
261
326
207
180
237
259
271
3h5
220
277


Volume
377,000
32, 000
367,000
020,000
38)4 000
270,000
10,000
l63 000
290 000
324,000
5$, 500
908 000
880 ,000
1,3$4,000
A o 000
9 000oo


Abandoned
Volume
.









A/(4o0,000)
A/((20,000)


Price per
';?1.20


.75

.7
.76
72



1.63
2.00


FOB Packed
TotnI Y,1 Va1
L 5hl.,000
3$6,000
356 000
277,000
289,000
22,000
26.000
32 ,000
36 ;000
214,000
378,000
17,000
b1,29 ,000
?1 000
1,81, 000
1,80 000
1 8,,O 000


A Not harvested,due to economic abandonment. Value covers harvested
crop. Abandoned volume is included in production volu-e.


Spqson
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933 -3
1934-3g
193 -3
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-uO0
19O-41
1941-42
1942-4
19 4-
194- 4
1946-47
19 17-U8


Se-sonn
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-3
193 -35
193~-36
193 -37
1937-36
193 -39
1939-40
192-4 2
194 -h
19 2- 5
19 ,-4
19 7-Ni,


portion of


A/ 197 00c") 12 1 51"000


,,




PaCr A
AC PL7.1E, YIELD Al1iD VALUE OF SEL.ICIQTED COnI:I'.OITI.S Ii NcFUDI'DA FY SEA SEA.'I i C-.nt td. )


1932i-31,
19 '35 -36
19)36E- 3 7
193T-3,'
q ~


.19141, -111


Harv. E e~ .
A c ie a!7
7C


~714-b ~':. l t ucrac &s A Aba!rd'D~r:r1 1913LJ) 3 ,'uO,1L1-- 4,00' .Ccid
19'17tW 26E.11.D0 hprs. __________________


Season
1932-33*
1933-34*
193h-35*"
1935-36"-
1936-37-
1937-38*
1938-39
1939-40
19140-i1
1911- 42
19h2-h3
1943-44
194 -45
195- 6
1946-h7
1947-H8
-Seasons


Harvested
Acreage
950-
1,100-
900*-
00*
900*
750
900
500o
5oo00
800
1,100
1400
550o

1932-33/1937-3b


1938-39 250
1939-40 1,100
1940-41 2,000
1941--2 3000
19.2-. 3 1,700
194 3-4 1 350
19M 45 1000
194 -6 1,300
19406-7 1 125
1947-hl 1,100
A Abandoned (not harve


LL I 11' b:': tork b:. ht:'i) 'l,- I
Iield Volume Abandoned Price
4-6 doz.Crts. Production Volume Crates
295 20,000 0 .96
236 260,000 1.10
210 189000 1.35
270 148,000 1.25
185 148,000 1.1
185 166000 .90
180 135,000 1.50
180 162, 000 1.10
150 75,00ooo 2.00
100 50,000 2.60
175' 1 40000 3.05
150 165,000 A(59,000-) 2.15
200 80,000 2.70
258 1h2,o0o A(17,000) 3.00
100 70, 000 2.95-
125 69,000 A(23,000) 2.05
include Boston, Romajine, Iceborg. A-Crates not
LETTUCE (Iceberg) 4t-6 doz.crates.
iOU ),. ,000 -- 1.49
180 198,000 2.30
75 10,000 1.83
55 165,000 2.16
1 230,000 3097
13 1 o3,000 A 78,000) 2.90
13 3,000 2000) 3.51
161 211 000 20,000) 3.72
10o O119,000 29
11 130000 A(10,000) 2
sted, due to poor markets).


FOB Pa3c'led
Total Value
269,000
286,000
255,000
185,000
170,000

178 000
150,000
130,000
427,000
220,000
216,000
375,000
206,000
a ,000
harve sted.


0 67,000
27,000
356,000
913,000
33,000
[01,000
910,250
3'3,000
346,000


PEAS. ENGLISH
Harvested Yield Abandconed
Season Acreage Bushels Volumne
1932-33 ,600 70 -
193-3 800 96 -
193 -35 5000 80 -
193 -36 8,200 2 -
193Y-36 6200 90 -
193 -39 5,o000 70 -
199- 10 5,000 90 A/(75,000)
i94o-h!3 ,00 70 -
1941-42 3,500 70
1912-43 1,500 65
1943-44 2,500
1944-45 2,600 7. A5(9O,OOO)
19 645- 1,600 7 A/1,000)
1947-6 6600 %0 -


Volumb
Production
252,000
461,000
LO0,000
508,000
310,000
500,ooo
30,000
U50,000
210,000
2145,000
98,000
150,000
195,000
113,000
36,000


Price oer
-Bushel
$1.60
1.10
1.30
1.00
1.35
1.15
1.85
1.30
1.95
1.55
2.60
3.00
A 2.70
X 3.00


FOB Packed
Total Value
$ 403,000
507,000
520,000
08 ,000
60,000
3,000
25000
588,000
810,000
3O,000
284,000
339,000
9 2,000


L")lume

14T ~ ~~ 7 31 ;
33:114 -1 1
L If- C, if if i
_$ l4 if if It~

11I I '( i~ If IfI tz!I
IF~~i I F :1: A*if If
~ 14 Fr F cc 1 F 6
Eu 1i~-i* 0~, r cc t P. p

37r I 11 I f* YY 6I: L If If


iDc'E PacI:?-d
212' al alu
67,0cc

S)I -. 1)I
.V1 cc
1L.1


) 4




I "go 67
ACREAGE, YTLDJ AlD VAL rE OF SL!'.CE.D CO!CT'OIr' 1: i.-LOUPA PBI SEASOO.S (Cont'd.)
PEPPE.iS, G"LETJ
Yield Price per FOB Pac;:ec
Season Acreage Bushels Production Bushel Total Vali
1930-31 8,200 228 1, 69 000 01.23 2". 2;,2h,0(
1931-32 8,050 221 1.,762,000 1.00 1,730,0(
1932-33 8,300 266 2,210 000 .50 1 ,231, 0(
1933-31i 6 000 2 1 141,6, 000 1.16 1,676,0(
1934-35 7 ZOO 119 1,1.0 000 1.11 17 77 0,
1935-36 6 500 226 1 67 000 .87 1 273,,0
1936-37 7, 200 22, 1, 90 000 1.20 1 900,0(
1937-3d 7, 400 295 2,180,000 .77. 1, 6,~ .
1936-39 7,300 30 2,212,000 1.25 ,771,(
193 -O 6,200 22 1,3)0,000 153 2,121 0(
19 0-hi 7 200 22) 1,621,500 1.56 2,537,C0
19h1-42 6,500 27 1 72,000 1.7 3,133,0(
1942-3 100 28 2,016 000 2.93 5,>17,0(
194-U4 8 265 2,371,O00OA (86,000)2.16 I,964,0(
19 9 30 28 2 000 2.6 6, 2,0(
194 -6 11 0 27 3050OO00A(380,00000o)2.5 6 o,,0(
19 10,50 208 2,193,000 a P0(
19 17- 1l 0 250 2,860,000A(1)43,000 )2.17 5,86,0(
A 1Not harvested, due to economic abandonment'(poor markets).


Acrea-e
27,000
21,500
17,000
2 OO
2 ,t00
2 4,500
31,300
31,00
2 700
2600
26,800
25,000
26,200
2, 600
31,100
3 300
2,100
20 800


Yield
Bushel
132
70.
132
97
91'
123"
133
121
157
117'
15(1,
134
112'
162'
170
11)4'
174'


POTATOES
s Production
3, 6,000
1 05,000
2, 000

2,2N5,000
3, 20,000


7,177, 000
,235,000
020,000
3,126,000
3) ,8,000
3 ,23,000
3 ,21 2,000
5,035,000
6,010,000
2, 73,3, 000
3,614,000


Yield
Season Acreage Bushels
1930-31 26,800 75
1931-32 23,700 95
1932-33 2900 9
193N- 30 ,500 113
193 935 32,500 102
1935-36' 3 ,600 100
1936-37 700 86
1937-38 5,300 120
1938-39 0,700 129
1939-LO 34,000 88
19 0-41 26,500 110
1941-42 43,000 101
1942-43 25,500 102
1943-4L 3 ,900 109
19445 32,500 137
1945- 6 30, 00 15)4
194 6-47 29,500 107
19 7-18 30,200 130


TOMATOES
Production


Fresh
2 020,000
2,255,000
2,3 3,000
2 ,86,000
2 714,000
2 951,000
2,760,000
4,953,000
4,9E,000
3,225,000
2 ,765,000
3, 12,000
2,226000
,li05,00O
h56,0000A
h,670,OOOA
3,198,000:-
3,588,000


Uanninig


S7, 000
$89 000
321,000
311,000
500,000
312,000
232,000
l(?,000
9, ,000
325,000
289,000
262,000
306,000
346,000


A 342,000 bushels in 19h-)45 and 221,000 bushels in
economic abandonment.
All 1947-48 acreage figures are preliminary as of
subject to revision.
Separate volume and price not available for 19WL


Price per Bu. FOB Pack
Fresh uanninr Total Va
.1, *5 3 ,7
2.55 5,7),i,
1.87 ,377,i
2.86 .39 8,7
2:. .310 6 p,,
2.75 -.31 8,22 ,
2.76 .32 7,688 ,
1.73 .28 8,711
2.07 .28 12,323,1
2. 3 .28 8,216,,
3.10 .28 S,610,
3.92 .U6 13,021,i
5.30 11i,795,i
5.72 .59 19,712,
5. .72 20,376.
5.25 .74 22,)05,
6.5 1.00 19,098,
5.83 .75 22,936,(
1945-46 not harvested due to


September 2
2-43 season.


ed
lue


0, 1948 and are


Season
1930-31
1931-32
1932-3
1933-3
193 -35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-3d
193 -39
1939- 0
1960-41
1941-h2
19)!2- 3
19)-45
19 bt
1945-46
1946-h7
19 7-48





A C.f-AGE, YTELD AirD VALUE OF SELECTED CO; I':D1TIS I1!. FLOT!.A 'D SEASON (ContId.)
CA .AL.i. P'


Sc a s,.nri
1930-31
19 1-
193L-3)
-'" ,-- ."
1936-3
1930-'3
193i-+:_
194 :'-43
10 ,

19L1-h-
Z9 L -;-- 3
1943-j.hi
19LL-Ji
I1CLr,-li|

19 i-L:-.


Acrc ~4FC.
i-I
ri-
L
I.


I.
Ill
Ill
I-:
i~L
t -
I.
0---
1 ,,~''K'


"e i+.)
Cr-ate'
c,'
J
&-I*

w


[J.u
,'0
i.)



4^.
6


,,,i ,., t ii n
_vi L', 0,)' )
(. nn

*.- ^IJIA
(I

1
1:1:1:
-,t I '.-" .'."



is;, ""'"'"
.": J'.'L'




' '-
,1 II I
1-t1 ,'.'7C

-Y


A K ~ Oci'.:'
A 1~ ~ I


. i'"e per
Cr te
1.50

1.0

I. ?
i .i0?

1.1




.11
i. !0.Il-

Jz .00
--,-.,-,


i-'O P'cledJ
trtal alue
, 1 i, .,
,I Ju

'.Li ,U"'
i I> II I
*] I II'


'.'1-"
1?4,0.1

J. L II I-


A Crates n-t harv:,st:- -iu,: t.. -:ccc. mi-: .-'-an,'ri ment. .'- :r e


Season Acreage 24-Qt..Crts.


1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
193 -3
193 -3
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939- 0
19 0- 1
19 1-42
19 2-43
19 3-4L
19jh- 1
1946-46
19)6-47
1947-6


9,100
7,800
10,600
8,hoo
81000
8,900
8,80c
7,500
7,200
5,500oo
5,000
2,600
i,0oo
2,050
2,800
4,750
4,200


72
76
* 73
* 7



70
70
.685
70
70
. 60
70
70
80
65
45


STriAV)EERIES
(48 Pints)
Production 24 Quarts;-
655,000 .7
,)93,000 :.6O
774,000 .00
630,000 4.20
20, 000 4.30
481, 000 L.10
72 ,000 L. 80
525,000 4.00
76 ,000 .l<
5o0, ooo ) I.,
384,000 -.61
350,000 6.50
156,000 9.60
S8,000 11,30
l4 000 10.70
22 ,000 210.55
309,000 12.10
189,000 10.60


FOB Packed
Total Value


3 766 Q000
2,8463000
2,322,000
2,646,000
2,236,000
1,972,000
2,746,000
2,100,000
3,175,000
2,3,oo000
2 ,19,000
2,275,000
1,498,000
1,107,000
1,)41,000
2,363,000
3,739,000
2,003,000


-Now shipped almost exclusively in 36-pt.crates. The 24--t. crate was formerly used,
and it is continued here for statistical purposes. Florfda crate -i- .75% as large.


Yield Production
Season Acreage .felons 1000 melons
1930-31 31-,000 330 10 300
1931-32 28,00 200 ,1700
1932-33 22.,500 220 4 ,50
1233-34 23,400 .80 4,212
1934-35 20,000 330 6,600
1935-36 16,000 260 4,60c
1936-37 19,500 300 580
93 I-36 22,5 ioo 310
9- 22,600 240 -,2
5- 9 23,00 290 6,
940-L1 25,500 270
1941-42 2Z,000 325 7,iD




197-4 45 ooo 305 13,725F
harvested due to economic abandonment. Not
The average carload is usually figured at 1000
type melons have lowered this averne +.n O~ -Q),1


Abandoned Price per
Volume 1000 melons
":>200
160
200o
185
110
200
A/ 390) 240 "
A/ (67r) 150
180
175
2.0
225


25
4750
65oo


FOB Packed
Total Value
.,2,046, 000
912,000
990,000
779,000
726,000
5,'6 000
1,310 ,000

1,193,000
1,609,000
2,61 000
095,000oooo
h, 918,000
5,52,000
,419,000
6.8^,2.000


6R02.000


included in total value figures.
melons but new varieties of round
n m-lnCe ,,,*- -n ') A--


36 Pint
Crate
"'L.31
3.60
2.25
3.15
3.23
3.60
3.00
3.11
3.49
1.28
4.88
8.U7
8.03
7.92
9.08
7.95


0 '





Ptr'5 619


AVERAGE. Pi'iC 1.- t"..CE.VED FO F r.; PRODUCTS
BY FIR'L:RS-ALJO il:D:,: NU::.*,S


- - . - - -


Sent.:


Aug.
15
, ahI


Sept.
1:
1 oh.1


Average
Aurum
1905 to


_ _._ li !.-TZllT_ _" :-
Sopt. : .\ur. Sen)f.
1i' : 1> 159
1c|,7 '.8 1 9 fi


Corn Pu. 2.21 2.25 2.05 .642 2.40 1..1 1,7.
Oats Bu. 1.05 1.65 1.6B .I3 1.08 .6; .F
Potatoes Bu. 2.20 2.15 2.1 /1. 1.8 .3
Sweet Potatoes Bu. 2.90 2.5 2.50 2.O0 2.$ 2.32
Cotton Lb. i 32.0 30.8 30.2 12.L 31.21 30. :. 0.L
Cottonsced Ton 70.00 70.00 62.00 22.55 7r.60 76.60 I0
Tobacco Lb. / 37.5 10.0 0O.7 h7. L6.7
Peanuts Lb. / 9.7 9.6 .8 4.8 10.0 10.h 10..
cOwnpEsu. .6000 6, 0 SQ- 3 L.J -Iji
Hogs Cwt. 22.0 2 .00 23.00 7.27 a/26.70 27.10 27.JO
Beef Cattle Ct. 1. ,.O 17.00 16 .0 .42 a/.00 2h .i0 2).2r
Veal Calves Cwt. J/ 20.20 19.60 2i.0 2 2 .20
Sheep Cv. .50 9.00 9.00 .53 ,a/ .oh 10. .20 3
Lambs Cwt. ? l>.00 15.o0 1,.00 /2!.50 2L..o C. 0

Chickens Lb. d 2.0 36.0 36.0 11.1 27. 32.5 31.9
Turkevs Lb. 8.0 8. 0 fh.0 14. 33. 3.2 43.
____s _. __b _- /Lb.O O 21. ,O h9l.2.
Butter Lb. ( 69.0 72.0 70.0 25.5 68.5 66.7 66.2
Butterfat Lb. 65.0 70.0 o.0 26.3 84.0 81.1 75.6
!ilk, Wholesale Cwt. 6.50 a!/7.10 7.20 1.60 a/h.h a./5.00 5.08
Milk. retail h/ _t. ,210 2 _22 < 6.8 17.6 .19.0 1.
Wool Lb. :,yUO.o 46.0 46.o 18.3 a/7l.? 17.1 L6.3
H-v. lose Ton T 2h.O 1'0 0.. 2.1L0. 11 .87 l10,! 17,80 18.00
Oranges, on tree Box 1.31 l.h3 1.96
Tangerines, on tree Box (Included in Oranges)
Grapefruit on tree Box 4 - .h 2.53 1.01 .36
Lim.-s on tre_____ Rox ,_._i__ 0 .9 -
&/ Revised. h/ Sold by farmers directly to consumers.

INDEX I'!Ui.EERS August 1909 July 191h 100

Aver-a e
Sept.: Au&. Sent. Au'ust Sect. Au:. Seot.
15 15 15' 1909 to 1- 1 5 15"
Conmmodit-- _ 19h7: 1948 19i2 j l ,'l) 19hF .7 1_ 19:1
ATT, FRK PODUnCTS 191 169 169 100 286 293 290
rain 253 257 235 -.
Food Grain ,- 100 278 227 223
Feed Grain and Hay 100 297 235 223
Cotton and Cottonseed 211 204 198 -- -
Cotton 100 252. -L5 250
Dairy Products 190 212 216 100 282 305 302
Poultry and Eggs 2_6 247 253 100 2 A7 2
Meat Animals 308 39 3 7 100 3"7 3, 11 0
Citrus 81 2 h2 -
Fruits 100 181 183 155
Truck Crops 2.4h 215 215 100 179 172 10'
Miscellnnouis 10 3f ________________
J. C. Tov.Tsenid Jr. & John F. Steffens, Jr., Agri. Statis.
U.S. DeDartment of Atriculture
Federal-Building, Orlando, Florida

The foregoing set of price's and index numbers may be read in connection
with the article by ILr. H. G. ClayLon nn pages l6-147 explaining so.ae of the govern-
ment support prices.


+





Page 70
S70 FRITS AID VEGETAFLFS

COUIITY ACREAGE SEASOli ].19i5-l6, 196-)7 A!iD 19,7-1h


Florida Snap Deans Limaa B.-.ns C..b..
Counties I-Li;-L6 l'yho-fE lYLi-l':b-L, iYgo-hl i L'Il(-h __l.-l__ .'b.-_ _',__- 10
Alachua 1,55,0 1,700 1,275 1,,'0, o 1,'o 1,200 200 150 200
Fradfor.d 150 150 125 200 1.. C 100
Dr.,vard -, ,0 o -
Brovward 20,200 18,300 13,700 iO 100 Lu CO 50 -
Calhoun ..
Charlotte -
Citrus -
Clay 200 200 400
Coll ier -
Columbia -. 0 0
Dade 3.100 2.000 3,000 100 100 300 350 200
DeSoto -
Dixie -
Duval 100 100 100
Escambia 230 250. 100 100 50 50
Flaler 00 1,000 1,5QO
Gadsden 50 .50 350 0 0 50
Gilchrist -
Glades 110 50 50 1,500
ilamilton 50 0 50
Hardee 50 50 50 50 150
Hendry 50 5 50
Hernando O0 -
Highlands 230 --0 00 -25 -5 25
Hillsborough -1,200 1,50 1,050 250 500 100 500 70 350
Holmes -
Indian River ... -
Jackson -
Jefferson i0 50 -
Lake 140 100 300 150 150 150
Lafayette -
Lee -- -
Leon -
Levy 50 o 50 25
Kadison 5 -
Eanatee i50 550 450 300 200 300
Marion 800 1,300 -800 700 600 300 500 400 500
Martin 340 600 700 300 125 100 100 75
Okeechobee 0 -
Orange 150 350 600 0 800 600
Osceola 0 -
Palm Beach 18,800 51,400 )j6,800 3,525 1,850 2,100 3,000 3,500 3,600
Pasco ..
Pinellas ..
Polk 200 200 100 200 150 100
Putnar 2b0 250 -. 900 1,000 1,400
Sarasota 100 100 75
Seminole 350 550 600 1,000 1,000 1,200
St. Johns 2,500 2,700 2,800
St. Lucie 100 1CO 200 100 50 100
Sumter 230 250 0,' -~ 50o 50 50
Suwannee -
Taylor -- -
Union 210- 250 350 50 150 50 50 150
Volusia -. .- 200 200 200
Walton ..
Washington .. -
liscellaneous 5].0 450 150 125 50 100 135 100 100
Total 80,200 81,700 71,700 7,000 5,200 4,250 13,200 111,000 16,100








CO;JTY ACPEACE


F'iUITS AND VEGETABLES
SEA30I1 19L5-Ih6, 194i6-hi AlND 19h'i-h8


or a C-lery Cucuer E plant
Co, t.is ;-t-7 T ~lc-T,- l9 --hl4'._1 9 -h16 1-T617 1%9-7-7 lh-h46 1',- T T


Alachua
Braid forn
!re-.'ard
T.ro-ard
Calhoun
Ch( alc.ttc.
Ci t rus
Clay
Collier
Colur:bia
Dade
DoSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Fla.ler
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hcrnando
Hi-hlands
HIllsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lake
Lafayette
Lee
Leon
Lcvy
Madicon
Manatee
Hlarion
martin
Okeechobee
Oranges
Osceola
Pal- PBeach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnamn
Sarasota
Seinole
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
UInion
Volusia
!alton
dashin.ton
Ilisccllaneous


Total


13i. 130



-- o-



-- .




















100 75
220 190

1,165 695
5,175 4,280



1,360 1,285
b,475 h,,l5







10 20


13,1 !0 1 1,700


i$

350


h20


1,365
;;, 0



I,3u0
14,065







-


2,2500
200
O5O
200


30'1

100





500
,200
100

500
.















200

950
100


700
) G
















200


ii, 11~.QX


150
65o
I-7
50

32.5

125


50



1,,o00
200
5o
1,975
200
75
375
375O

70


-.7"
l00

.o400
1,600

200
2 SC




2$0

LUOO
2000

200


S25


1,$525
200
800
250
100

100
100
S0






2,20(
3$0

1, 20C
5C
00c










$20C
2, 2








S30



h3o(

2 3c
22C
2 2

30C
1.32C
'30C
3 S










2- _
2.25


13,.775 1i,9'
-L^j 'l -' ?o (*


200





25






50

250
So







25




$0
350




22^
50
2 2?
5o












775





50
i-o





175


250

500





2-
3-




25
.




150


30G








375
20o
200










$75
100



1O0


)5,5















100


625
-









25




12:5
125
5o


975

100










25
-


J!,C.5 3,30J 3,225


NOTE: 1947-h4 figures .as of Septec..'ber 20 subj.'ct to revision.


Page- 71


o






Page 72


FRUITS A1ID VEGETABLES
COUiTY ACREAGE SEASONS 19P-h6, .l9bC-L7 A.,. 1947-08


Florida
Counties

Alachua
Biradford
Erevard
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gadcden
Cilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hornando
Hihlilandz
Illsbor.uh
liblnes
Indian River
Jac.:son
Jef person
Lake
Lafayette
Lee
Leon
Levy,
Lad ison
iKanatee-
1.io rion
l:artin
Okecchobee
Orange
Osccola
Palm Beach
Fasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
Saras ta a
Seminole
St. Johns
Zt. Lucie
Summer
Suwvnnree
TaYlor
JUnion
Volusia
V;alton
Washin-ton
Iliscellanreou.-

Total


Escarole
:19h5-46 19h6-i7 19L7--L"


-0





io
1 .
-
60

-



-
-

-
i
-
-
2O


O
10

150
I, C


-0
-00


-O




'i
u














-0


1?0

1,700'




-0
ii
-







..
2-
-o

19-
1,7 .,


,


2,600 2,800


-0


'*0


250

-
-, o


L-O




-


3,2001


on _u-a ne
196-1(,196-i 19h 7-)0168 l-ht.-,-7 19 17-66


20u


















100



1'"-",-'












'Ji"1



900;

















2,000


130 100













50 25
-s -











20:. 150










,1 .-1








25 25
-
2-)
































10 -

i, 600 60C1


-
-







-
-























50 1;5
?00C ?C 0

2-

10,0' 125





15o 2 C0










0- 700
-00 70


:I







: 1
- I
-









1 1
-
-
"--"




~-\
-


-
-
-
I
-


-!


I



i


5O
I
-
-



-








2,o !
1-o
90


I


l- L.


-
i
h





P:.ge 73


FRUIrj .1' :D L C..TAJI .:..
CoUr:T.' AC .:A\CI S_.1SO ": lh5-,6, .19!,-.07 A:!:, .D 1 L7-i,8


Florida
Couiti. s
Alachua
13ra. f.;rdj
E.r-eva rd
Lrowvard
Calho oii
Charlotte
Ci rus
Cla-"
Collier
Colimbia
PaJd
De oto
Dixie
Duval
Escarnbia
Flagler
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Clades
Hamiilton
Hiardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highland s
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lake
Lafayette
Lee
Leon
Levy
'adison
I anatee
I:arion
I.artin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putna.i
Sarasota
Seninole
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sunter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
'%alton
Washinaton
Miscellaneous


Total


LC Liucf.
-ipobc-"r_
m.'L,- o r;,1)-^^, t'A-'


400




1- 50








150
50

180
250


2>
50
50







i-


225




325



25




100
25

25

275
P5


















50


2
So


1,650 1,125


--U











o75
-














150


50
200




75

75





75
-


-


' r.,- r:-


500


-,





9:'0
-.







0o



2,6,75








30
1-







100
5O
725
7-5


iol),l 12,000~


U50
S0
2,075





25
25







2.8

-

-







2,600

2 5

250

hoo


310
225


1,62r
2 5c
1 2














525
2-
125

600





190


55o
-)

1,8 oo00

75












175


3,350





325


-0
-
-



















200
S-C

175
2,000

700

125

775

100


10,550 ll>'0


P.v~ ~r'


2,200 1.,50
150 100




100 500

6,770 6,000
100

IOG 709
2,250 2,100



50

CI -
80 -
630 100
QO 100




1,360 )00


5o -
100 50
2 0
2L0 i-0
2,200 3,250
-- -
50o
2,600 2,200
230 50
200
7,300 6,200




150 -
clc -
100 550
3%,300 2)',300


ITOTE: 197-48 figures as of ScpteLber


1,600





.0

)0, 5



1,950
-195






200





950








5,750
SEC
1,1JO


2,l000









100

20,800


20 subject to revision.


,





Page 74


F.TUITS A ID VI::'TADLES
COUIITY ACtfAG7 STASONS I hi'-'.6, Ih.-h? AJi.- 19l7-48


Florida
Counties
Alachua
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
IIillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lake
Lafayette
Lee
Leon
Levy
Madison
Iianatee
H.Iarion
.Martin
Okeochobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
Sarasota
3eminole
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Walton
Jashington
Miscellaneous


Tomaboes


50 25 100
50 5 -
200 50 qO
3,250 3,460 1,250
275 100

1,h00 1,200 800








2 375
13,820 8,77200 2,10,00

37225 175 200







700 55o 250
50
2,600 1,250 1,850
3 V7-












1,250 750 2,00
200 1750 00






75 -


5,750 75,0 5,oo00
1,300 650 1000





275 325 275


Total 37,300 29,800 30,200 221,00U 2. 1,L50 1i.0,52 .? l,20u
Notez -*- Total Vegetables Acreage incLidcs- Carj..T iT-:": ,:'5', hihlands 50,
Orange 280, Ser..inole 20, lrsc1lieous '... rad Tot11 t ,.'.
Total Ve-etable Acr age includes-- Cauli..:,e' fa: ll ,-: :iillb.r.''cuh 250,
I'anabee 100, Seminole 25, :iscellaneutf -.. 7 'r-..... i..-,t..il LOO.


:1945-a6 19L6-47 1947-a8


Total V,'L tab] es C . ctaloup.s
;19h5-1j6 3]9g -7 lt'h7- I';'-T i.-46 1 ,6_i 7--:.!it 7- to
8,715 7.30 Q OQ 150 250 5600
900 650 "2 50 -
2590 100 -.
27,715 25,125 18,L20 -- -
200 17L. 2, -
325 275
6 i --
300 2 0 -- -
1,7?85 1,0 1,2u0 -
50 2 10 I0
23,470 16,700 1',0 -
425 'U 30 -
100 100 I' -
1,180 1,000 7'00 -
3,20 3,2(0 -, 5?
O. u i" -
5 0 -
1,060 850 2, -
S55 62. 1u 7,- 50 50
,,065 3 ) ,c _
300 .. 2I -
190 10., -
1460 o0 9,5 ..
9,00> 9,7-5 10,, -
50 ,: -- -
3D00 p' -




300 J.'. ;, 1u 50 -7
S" 5. ... .0 .



1,905 j ,*iC- LU,'-
12,02 1 :i 7' -





77,675 71, c..'..,5-
O .... 7. ._











3,765 32,.. .1 4i.,A
2, 135 f -
7,200 ci2j *,7r'
-0 10 I i- -
50 -






o -61 .,- -
2, 005 2-, L--u 5. ,- -7-






1,6,5 2 ,o2.: 1.,hSO So. 5 75





Page 75


FRUITS AND V:);AL.,LtES
COUNTY ACI-JAGE S.ASOi.S 1.)5t-),, 1'2.'-h)' AID 1947-h8


Florida
Cou.ties
Ala,-hua
L'radford
Brevard
froward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Col lier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
HIernando
Highlands
Hillsborought'
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lake
Lafayette
Lee
Leon-
Levy
I'adison
Kanatec
Marion
iMartin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
Sarasota
Seminole
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sumter
Suiannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Walton
1'Jashington
ii scellaneoud


Total


: Stravber,'ie- b'.i(.ri ,.lon : iJ.scellan,)us rutsis
1'3-h6 ils^ i.- l'b,7-h.Al,.T .c J. ,-7-'J7 L;7: T -t7b "l F I Cl 1'.T, 77. '


225






150







200


1,700















300



100



12
1-5


0oo


3,000
-o























500
-



















15o
i-6


2,800 4,750


1 ~o
h00









2,900

















50C

Sc




5c
4,20


6.0:. : 5000 l ,700
S'100 io' io
200 100 150
300 i5o i5o0
200 200 .150
100 50 r50
350 250 300
300 100 l00
100 100 100


5o 100
5,j00 '5,800 6,200
S-
200 250 350
100o 50 75
100 50
-- 5
00 500 600
200 l.)00 hCO
100 150
5,000 2;500 1,000
3,800 3,200 2,00
6,OCO 8 ,500C 6,200
1,000 700 1,000
150 50o 50
300 50o 50
2, 00 ,1 00 2,200



1)200 1,100 100
200 200 150
200 750 1,200
100 100
200 350 700
100 300 150
50

100 50 300
2,700 3 200 3,500
5,500qo 3,000 2, h900


250 i5o -
600 5oO 500
200 100 325
51,000 h?,000 45,000


4. -~


6,95o0 5,o 5,,200
375 500 25o
>5U
200 100 1o0
300 5o0 1 0n
200 200 1 U
100 50 0
350 250 350
150 150 -
300 100 h00
100 100 100


50 100
5,LOO 5,600 6,200
275 300 00oo
300 50 h75
100 SO

2,100 3,00 3,500
200 OO 400
100 150
5,075 2;600 1,000
3,800 3,200 2,00
6,000 5c00 6,200
1,000 700 1,000
150 0o 50
200 50 5O
2;600 2;150 2,275
2,000 1,u 0 1,550
150 J0O 100
3,750 h,700 6,800

1,200 1,100 100
200 200 150
200 750 1,200
100 100
500 050 1,200
100 ,300 150
5 -

100 50 300
2,850 3,400 3,7-25
5,500 3,050 2, 25
50 100 50
100 50 200
100 50 250
250 150 -
800 500 oo00
375 300 650
51-;600 52,550 50,400


figures as of September 2C subject to revision.


MOTE: 1947-48






-. ,u I [UITF. ANID 'GF.ETA L[ES
CO :i'fY ACI ,ACuL tEAS': 3S -6,-'i 6. iL T r'/, -h1'-T

Total Ve ta l : ,.rit
F l ,-, r~d a : s . -- i n ,- .. u l r i t 0 :: O r c u t
Gount ies n tI he' - iL ic- ,1 l. Li -h.1 l'.L'h -Lh. 19Ji'.- I, -...7 uL.:'.-,Lo I'.'iL-' I i, -lj'
A-iachi.a ] 13,0" 12 10 -.
Bri.; ford 1'. L,15' 77 -. -. .
Br,-vai'd .,_ 'I'd' i 1 1 ,7. ...2..3
Br.::.v.ard ..*7 1 Zj .... .. 7 "' "
Calh:.' r' - -. -
Charl,.ttc 25 .- .- -.
IC itru3 20"' 1 -. -
Collier 1,623 1,575 1,20 -
Columbia 400 275 500 -
Dade 23,620 16,80 19,600 2,960 3,030 3,230 3,710 3,720 3,760
DeSoto 725 .450 70 6,715 6,765 6,835 1,350 1,350 1,360
Dixie 100 100 100 .. -
Duval 1CO 100 100 -
Escambia 1,180 1,000 700 -
Flagler 3,250 3, 00 3,525 -
Gadsden 0 00 00 -
Gilchrist 5, 0 $,825 6,200-
Glades 1,060 '850 2,635 -
Hamilton 825 925 50 -
Hardee I,365 3,610 5,150 8,950 9,090 9,290 910 910 910
Hendry 00 5$2 775 -
Hernando 190 100 1,555 1,585 1,665 360 360 360
Highlands 460 750 915 9,120 9,260 9,460 4,330 4,350 4,340
Hillsborough 11,105' 13,265 13,800 16,900 17,170 17,790 3,700 3,720 3,800
Holmes 250 700 550 -
Indian River 400 675 550 4,940 5,050 5,310 6,520 6,600 6,8).0
Jackson 5,575 2,97$ 100 -
Jefferson 3,850 3,250 2, 400. -. -
Lake 8,095 10,360 7,790 25,680 26,450 27,980 6,760 6,810 6,980
Lafayette 1,000 700 1,000 -
Lee 3,560 2,900 2,200 3,365 3,405 3,445 2,880 2,0890 2,900
Leon 200 50 50 -
Levy 2,900 2,550 2,100 -
Madison 2,000 1,850 1,550 -
Manatee 6,100 4,590 3, 93 4,625 4,655 4,785 b,860 4,870 4,890
Marion 8,130 8,665 10, 0 9,015 9,065 9,335 720 720 730
Martin 1,905) 1,750 1..050..
Okeechobee 700 -
Orange 4,$5C '4,315 3,970 3,00 36,Q 3,Oi0 3,810 3,860 4,010
Osceola 50 4 3605 900 900 00
Palm Beach 77,875 72,180 66,700- 0 90
Pasco 200 0 1,200 6780 7,120 7,)20 l,5o0 1;480 1,510
Pinellas 100 100 ,290 0 7 800 7,860 7,890 8 040
Polk 1,500 2,125 2,575 57 30 $3 890 61 ,250 26,l 0 26, 250 26 740
Putnam 3,865 3,775 4,150 14,10 4,420 h,450 4 0 450 450
Sarasota 2,135 1,790 1,625 2 590 2 610 2,630 1,080 1,080 1,100
Seminole 7,200 72,5 70 6,790 6,80 7,110 720 720 720
St. Johns 9,800 b 900 -
St. Lucie 6,500 8 225 5,825 8,480 6,620 9,180 4,h20 4,460 h,780
Sumter 355 6,225 7,575 -
Suvrannee 5,00 3,250 2,72 -
Taylor 50 100 50 .
Union 7h0 7 0 1,20 -
Volusia 250 20 45 12,705 12,745 12,885 1,350 1,350 1,360
17alton 250 150 ... -.
Washincton 850 500 550 -
Miscellaneous 2,020 2,320 1,900 10,315 10,285 10,285 2,300 2,3O0 2,340
Total 275,600 254,000 241,925 264,900 270,000 280,500 90,500 91,000 93,000





FRUITS AM;D VEGETABTLFS-


COUNTY ACREAGE SEASOi.S 19h5-L6. 19L6-h7 AND 19l7-h8


Florida
Counties


Alachua
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lake
Lafayette
Lee
Leon
Levy
Madison
1Manatee
Karion
Martin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
Sarasota
Seninole
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sunter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Vialton
Washington
miscellaneous
Grand Total


.
691: 5-66


469
96












656
820
820
1,233
519

1,952
119

11
39




5,71
632
820
890



1,923

S771


Tangerines


. Total Citr


691 6-h? 1987-68:1965-66 196647


h70
100




425
520






660
830
83







1,2-
525

1,980
120


120
hoo

3,105
590
.590
5, .
-o














640
825
900



1,930

745


h70
100




1435
520






665
830
0
1,25-
525

1,990
120


125
boo

3,115
590
.590
670
5,515
640
825
900



1,940

750


23,549 23,705 23,800


:19h5--


15,809
3,326
-




,?80
-.
..





10,516
2,735
lh,270
21,833
11,979

36,329
6,364


9;602
10,133


5,930
8;817
15,809
89,141
5,492
3,670
8,330
13,790



15,978

13,3!6


15,860
3, 70




Z^175
,635






10,660
2,775
1L,I30
22,130
12,175

35,24o
6,635



10,1L5
-











5,975
9'IR-


5,o10
9,690
,38

13,980



16,025

13,370


h -


378,969 386,705


,us Grant. Total
1917-h8 :19h5-L6 19h6-47 197-hi


16,200
6,270
.-




,715





10,865
2,855
1h,630
22,3).5
12,675

36,950
6,h65


9,800
104h65

45,165
6,095
9, 520
16,510
5,5,0
3,7-30
b,655
1H,860



16,185

13., 375


397,30C


15,665 13,080 ]2,100
1,275 2,150? 77T
16,059 1,96C 16,300
31,2 2 2,69 22,)20
500 325 UoP
325 2"
200 200 16
S300 B50 o
1, 20 1,057 1,250
OO 27 5. 00
30,693 26,025 27,092
9,305 9,065 9,L65
100 100 100
100 100 100
1,180 1,000 700
3, 0 3,,00 3,525
50 500 500
5, 0 5,32 6,2J30
1,060 350 2, 63
825 925 550
16,881 1lh,70 16,015
100 > $
2,925 2,875 1,685
1,' 730 1:,1,0 i>,54
32,938 35 ,35 36,0.5
250 700 505
12,379 12,850 13,225
5,575 2 975 1 ,00
3,850- 3,250 2, 00
h2 ,87 5,600 4h,740
1,000 700 1,000
9,926 9,315 8,665
200 50 50
2,900 2,550 2,00
2,000 1,5o0 1,550
1.702 1i,235 13,735
18 ,263 18,830 20 ,)'
1,905 1,750 1,500
700
,5?9 h7, 20 49,135
,,Q 5 9g5 6,095
77,875 72,lu0 66,700
9,017 9,940 10,720
15,809 16,OLO 16,610
90,6l 92, 96,030
9,35 9,2 5 9,690
S805 80 5,355
l,530 15 -10 1 35
9,800 ,900 ,
20,290 22 200 20,M5.
b,355 6,225 7,57
>,500 3,250 2,720
S0 100 50
M70 750 1,250
16,A28 16,27 5 1.,635
20 150 -
850 500 550
15,h0.6 15,690 15,275
65h:,509 638,705 639,225


revision.


SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Agricultural Econo;ics, Orlando, Florida.


Page 77


NOTE: 1947-h8 figures as of Septenber 20 subject to


Tangerines


Total Citr





Page 78





ALAC;-;A -
I.,:..in -
T i .,L Iaca


Cucumbers
Egrplant
Letuce,.Cce.
Ieas, englishh
Pcepers
Pot atoes
Tomatoes
Total Vegs.

Cantaloupes
Watermelons
Grand Total

BRADFORD
Beans
Limas
Cabbage
Cucumbers
Peppers
Potatoes
Tomatoes
Total Vegs.

Cantaloupes
Strawberries
.iater felons
Grand Total

B2EVARD

Torniato'cs
Total Vers.
Water,.ielons

BRCJIARD
Beans
Limas
Cabbage
Cucumbers
Ecplant
Peppers
Tomatoes
Total Vegs.
Yaternelons
Grand Total
CALHOU N
Cucumbers
VWatermelons
Grand Total

CHARLOTTE
Cucumbers
Peppers
Tomatoes
Total Vegs.

CITRUS
MTaermelons

CLAY
Cabbage
Potatoes
Total Vegs.


i*L: D.' : TAEL,:., T.u. BiL:.:..: j iiIAT R T.LOii A--E.A -.

S..urc,": iJ. S. Acric'" ltual 1Sta .'stiJ n n.:- .'u:, i' ., i .-..


I'.L T -
_;i- -*J .. -'.-.- To tal


* :' -


1i :+5- ,J.

al! .i 1'.. 1.' C1
1'"' 'l',: l "-i.--i
S 1' 12'
-', 1"',:,0 ':I2
!1 ', i,:"- 1,'
I 'i I I-l
1 .ll- 37 ,
,'I


2!S u -- l ',r


1I I
l..0


-- -L'." 15c'.c ;


9 I 1 I. 1
-. lu 15
1i00 1 i:"
II
-

'1 "
S o ... ...


-
-_ '1,i
i<
.-., c'. :' >


5o
150 20'
3O 27


3300 16900 20200
1<0 1J0o
0 Go
350 100 5o0
75 200 150 2425
150 2100 950 3200
200 25590 500O 3250
107b 22U 1600 2Y71
L{- J 200
U075 22UnU UU 2yi5)

-- 200 200
300
200 "DO0


!ID
-''
1 ~


1 L1

1'
1


] -,i'u

1.'01:'

1' ,I'.'

1 L '


- I - i
._ ..., > 5 .
-0 *" ."' -.,,


'i 1';' LS[
- i 1_ '

- II L
- L- I [ 1
- 9"
: i ,v .
'" 1 "- I'1"'
g" ",


1. 00



, ,.


uc
..'oI-i
-~ 'I ,
I- ~


-- I
L
.J. 1(14
I 1(~u


%I-I

I.) [jIJI'

1

U

- 1 I' I liii I


- -- 1'i.. 1 "-"" '5I
-. -,t .- -- .
I *.. L *-*


Th 30 10)7
-., -5", -]_o



h500 12000 .100, 1830C
100 100C
5o So)
300 ,0 300 56rS
S0 250 200 500
175 1900 2075
500 2150 800B 3150

100 100
55 2 .6UU J.OUU j2am

175 175
150 150
-. 325 325


-- -_ 50 50
) o0 50
-- 5 50


1500 12000 200 13700
300 100 o00
500 200 100 800
717 7,
I'-: : 1 :'


"- I- 1 1 50




1 '; 5'
1 i.


- 50 50 o 1,7 10

- 150 125 275 _
- -- J. 2Y 325 ~ -- --


- 200


- 200 200
100 100
- 200 1-00 300


- 200 200


200 200
2 50 20
-- 200 50 2,0o


- 150 150


00 400
7 U -0 boo5
- ho 0 o 0
- 800 .... ,;o 80


-
-





Page 79
FLO"'-A VTGETAFLE, STRA'U."TE:Y AN;D VIATF :.LO: ACF:'ACC Ei CO;:Ti S ..:-7 5'.ASO;'
ra_ li I ,in. arr. '-ot,.: .a! j I. 2,;'r. :,'t .1 -c li .. r. I'otal .
COLLIER
Cu cumbers 100 150 50 300 200 125 325 200 100 100 400
EgFplant 25 25 -
Toma toes 200 600 600 hO00 2q0 700 250 1200 300 500 800
Total Vegs. 325) ( 65U 1(25 hIo (OU 35 152U. ooU GiU 60- 120(U


Watermelons 100 O 50
Grand Total 325 I5/0 65(U 1i2.5 IMI (u 142.5 15 T


COLUMBIA
Cabbage
Cucumbers
Total Vegs.
Cantaloupes
7:atermelons
Grand Total
DADE
neans
Limas
Cabbage
Carrots
Peppers
Potatoes
Tomato es
Total Vegs.
Strawberries
Grand Total
DE SOTO
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Pepners
Potatoes
Tomatoes
Total Vegc.
'iaternelons
Grand Total
DIXIE
watermelonss
DUVAL
Moabge
ESCA! BIA
Beans
Cabbage
Potatoes
Total Vegs.


- 950


- 50


5(2 50

-
-- -- 0 --- -- UU


- 25 25
- 25 -5 25

- 20 25u
- 27 250 275'


3100 3100 1700 300 2000
5 0 50 100 50 50 100
300 300 35C 350
25 25
2 2 -
6500 270 6770 6000 6000
200 10000 3000 13200 1500 6200 500 8200
2u00 199y0 3320 23U/0 15f0U'1350 b0O 16(/00
1q0 .10 ]GO -- 10
200 20100 3320 220 2 03 1500 1i4.500 50u 106o5


50 50 100
- 25
- 100 100
25 200 2295
j5 -35 L- 5
- 300C
75 350 125

- 100


- 100


- 100


- 230 230
- 100 100
- 850 850
- IOO iOO 1100


FLAGLZR
Cabbage 800 800
Cucumbers 1Cc 100
Peas English 100 100
Pota{.oes 225C 2250
Total Vegs. 900 2350 3J250
GADSDENi
Beans 150 300 h5C
Cabbage 50 50
Total Vegs. 150 50 300 >u0
-7atermelons 5C
Grand Total 150 50 300( 5u
GILCHRIST
Lggplant 50 50
Yatermelons L0OO
Grand Total 50 h450


75
25
2)


50 125
25
25
- 150 175


100 10C
1)0 300 130






250 250
0 50o
- 00 700
50 950 1000

1000 1000
0 iooo
o S
2100 2100
-00 21.50 32D0O

15C) 300 50
J5.0 50
150 7D 300 5u00

0bo 50 ju 0 5


800o s800
25 500o b02)


So 50
270 T-15 (10 -u 125D

50 50
100 109

5o 5o
3) 3-0
b J7 c 3

200 2500 300 3000
2C0 200

5Gro 5850
200 8000 2300 10500
LO 166020 26-0 y19600

h0u 16600 26(W 19600


- 150
- 200

- 200


150


200


o. 350
)0O L00
'-( (750

100 100

100 100

100 100
O0 l0
50 50
5 5o 5Uo


1500oo 1500
2 0 50
1950 19 0
1 2) 20(0 3>2)

150 200 3.0
0 50
150 50 203 =oU
100 100
1 0 o0 3oo0 5O0


6200 6200
6200 620U





_FLFT!.A V.(? T.V L 2fR.A .,"*T'V Aifi "A' '1 AC'.A(. U" Cnlil]l-] T .


E'- rIs <,, -i ,,, i.- ...
,.a ILtk :
,Cabba- e. ', -" -
Cucumb ITS -.--F ",'
Total t.- t c.".
To'rn d t.., "]-..

EX: I[T :,-
Cabba-t .
Cucurrber. ,,,, -, .- .. .
Total ,."- '-." "' 1. ., .- ... . ....
Cant 1 u -
.pr s .. r ... 1 1
CGrar.d Ttal -

B-n., '-' ',- .- '
Cabb eie 0 '0* -, 0' -- L''
Cucumil rc 70," i ',', .," Eggpla r-,t -0 i'. -- I 1- ,7,
r.-nd "-ota1c. ".., 1 1 k,. -5- .,2 .1
Potato .Z -
T o ria t ,_, i': '" i 2 ,' v ,, .1- -
T o t a l 7 -, s T T ^ ; .' ." h , ,. . 1 . 7 . . 1 T .. . . . l7.. .7
Strawberries 200 200 0. br: LOG -- 400
V.aternelons '0 50 ; 75 75
:grand Total 17 250 2iLj O- T. T-277 7h1 i)7235 T15 50 j 2 L 5


}ENDRY
eans 0 100 10 .. .. -
Cabbage 50 0 0 S0
Cucumbers 10U 100 1O -- 50 200
Tomatoes 27
Total Ve-s. '5T 150 1.t 37 21 oc 7 77 L 2
Watermelons 100 -
HERF' T 0DO
Beans 10 10 10C 100
Eggplant 50 .- 0 --_ -* -
Total Vegs. 7T -- 3 17 1'T ~TCO
HIGHLANDS
Beans 230 230 200 350 550
Cabba:e 25 25 25 25
Carrots 25 25
Cucumbers 50 50
Eggplant 2 2 2' 2
Peas,English 100 100 50 50
Potatoes 80 80 -
Tomatoes 25 25
Total Vegs. 125, 3353 h 300 .100 35 07,0--
V.aterraelons -. -


200 100 50 350
17S 200 375


-- 50 5o




2- 00 500
2 25
O -0
0 50
50 50


Lo 200 240
1-1-5 7o0 66
o 50


HILLSBOROUGH
Beans 100 1100 1200 150 1700 1850 200 850 100
Limnas 2. 20 250 500 500 100 100
Cabbage I00 Soc. .0 750 350 350
Cauliflower 300 300( 250 2. 50
Cucumbers 300 C00 800 275 700 927 20U 1000 1200
Eggplant 150 32b b75 7 : 250 3 0 75 750 872
Escarole o lO C
Lettuce,Ice. 200 50 250 325 325 17 17
Peas,Eng. 400 00 200 200 1 0 - 150
Peppers 75 2600 267 2600 200c 25 -- 3Q25 38 0
Potatoes 300 333 630 .- 1.00- 100- 50 150 200
Tomatoes 325 -- 100 182 Jh25. 5130 1775 ,60 150 1500 2100
Total Vegs. 7U 50 Ci 00 925 1 7200 ---0 5c)1T7'T TT T'T)o0
Strawberries 1700 1700 3000 3000 29U0 2900
Grateroelons 60 -1 900 500 600 600
Grand Total 950 3100 6655 1110l 925 )i,0 7700 13265 950 4075 "775 13800




Page 81
FLORID"A VEGETABLE, STRA'..IEU Y A:"D ."AT :z ELOI: AC(;A': B'.-' C1 *TU '. A:.'. '-A :;S
'1-_L-r. br'. -_- 19j)( -- 1:4- 7 -h
tall ,irin borr. o'rltT r II 1 .. In, Lr frTotal _.raA-i '.' . -,- ctai


Tucu be r s
Potatoes
Total Vegs.
l.a termelorns
I:.DIAi R I',r .
Cu umb2 c rs
Eggplant
PF'epFers
Toma toes
Total Vegs.
watermelons s
JACKSON
Cucumbers
Cantaloupes
Watermelons
Grand Total
JEFFURSON
Peans
Watermelons
LAFAYETTE
;';Ia 1. r']el ns
LAKE
Cabbage
Carrots
Celery
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Escarole
Lettuce,Ice.
Peppers
Tomatoes
Total Vegs.
V1atermelons
Grand Total
LEE
Uuc-mber s
Eggplant
Peas,Eng,
Peppers
Potatoes
Tomatoes
Total Vegs.
VYatermelons
LEON!
Hatcnrmelons
LEVY
BTeans
Cabbage
Cucumbers
Tomatoes
Total Vegs.
Cantaloupes
17atermelons
Grand Total
?IADISONi
Cantaloupes
'.Vatermelons
Grand Total


50 50
- 200


150


- 150 300


1.50 -- 3 'IOU U
100

500 500
75 75
5000
at> 7 5575

So o50
3800

1000


1 10 0 110
1 1-0
135 675 810
1100 100
50 50
20 20
10 1o
25 350 375
2i 35 '(65 2U1>
25 30> 1 b65b 0U

300 100 100 500
100 15o 100 350
350 150 c00
1360 1360
o00 300 700
-1b5u 2uo 2uUo jUio
150

200

- 5o0 O
0 0
200 200
50 250 300U
100 100
2G00
>0 bu 2,u0


2000
2000


- 200 200
- 100 100
- 3O Ju00
- 400 h00


75 75 -
2- 25 -
25 2 -
350 200 $550 50


.3) 25 jnu 57W


375 375
100 100
2500 2500
2)/( 2(>/


50 50
3200 3200

700 700


100 100
150 150
20 20
225 6$0 875
75 200 27,
4o 4o0
2 25
100 150 250
25 10O 125
200 ii6u 1200 IOou
0 800 700;


- 1$0 1:0
-- ----150 -
- 400 ;Io0


- 3"0 350


150 150

00 5uO
1000 1000
15UO 1500
i5oo i -u


2400 2o00

1000 1000

10C 200 300
150 150
150o 150
50 o00 50o
25 $
50 0
25 25
10 200 2h0
200 200

f190 35 225 fy 51


500 200 700 250 100 50 400
100 150 50 300 25 100 100 225
250 150 100- -
- 50 200 75 325
900 900 950 950
o50 100 $50 50 200 250
IujOO i30 250 2b50 375 1550 22) 2150
-50 50 5o 50


- So 5o

- $0 $0
- o So0

- 50 50 100
- 2100 24CC0
- >0 2u > 0

- 50o 50o
- 1800 1300
- 135o 1d35


- 50 50


- 25 25
- 1o So
- 2> 1u0 125
- 75 75
2200 2200
- 25 23t5 2hU

- o0 50
- 1500 1500
- 15o0 1550





Page '1 I r ,52 ALFI IT2A .(-.Y .-J. .,ATL T.,I.-,' I VY .7. 1. F"UTIJiIS A _- -A '-0
L _J1 'n. r___T 1 t. i ,.-,. ..r.AIMr. cta 1 J_ !'. _r. ,7.^ 1

U -NiATEE
I:.i T.C ., .. -,- .. .- I i -.'
Cabba re - :
Cauli fi owe - '1 -
Celr -- --
Cucu,-rs ., ,"
Egg niant 1i" 10: 2..'."" i .. i 1 ii .. "--',, J 1
Escari. LO' ,! i'X- ,," -.,
Lectte,. -t..r- 12 1 -'
I-.b r I' I. I1", 1' i -- 1 ,
PeasLncish C 2
Pepper i- 2 '" '..
PoLat:o2 -, ....
Tonat ., :ri? ,- ?"_,.. *" 7,(,' 7 I 1 i L- -.': 1 l ''
Total I 1.-s. , I '- ,' lo ... L -. 77 T '.' l ,.,,, ,, ,, ..
Wat: ei.lns 1i : -- 1i5 15' i''.' 100
MARIOi
B3ansn 100 700 800 300. .1000. 1300. 200 600 800
Limas 700 700 600 600 300 300
Cabbage 500 500 100 00 00 00 00
Celery 220 220 60 130 190 1,20 h20
Cucumbers 300 300 25 250 275 2$ 300 325
Eggplant 150 75 225 200 200 7) 50 12$
Escarole 10 -- 10 50 50 -
Lettuce ,Boston 200 200 200 200 5- 0 50
Iceberg. )0 0 -- -- 2' 25 -
Peas,English 100 100 25 25 25
Pepoers 25 100 125 150 130 200 200
Potatoes 100 100 50 50 - o0 S0
Tomatoes 1050 100 00 $00 900 900
Total VGs. 2/5 O 3295 73 7 0 5 310 310 39-65 3,00 S$ 2620 3695
Cantaloupes 250 250 150 150 300 300
Watermelons 3 h550 )5l$ 6500 6500
Grand Total 275 3T10 1T 130 750---1 7 05 66- ) 300 3( *.7620 710 05
MARTIN
Beans 100 210 3)0 200 200 200 600 100 200 h00 700
Linas 100 200 300 12$ 12$5 -
Cabbage 100 100 100 100 75 7
Cucumbers 50 50 100- 100 5 5
Eggplant 0 125 50 225 $0 125 2) 200 25 2 50
PeDoers 100 $0 130 75 100 50 22 0 50 100
Potatoes 2,10 20
Tomatoes 100 300 100 500 300 100 o00 25 50 75
Total Vegs. 200 1063 65 O 0T9 -(2 75 7 2 5 173 1 00 '7 -057T5 UU
OKEECHOBEE
Tomatoes 150 50 700
ORANGE
Beans 100 50 150 150 200 350 600 600
Cabbage 650 650 800 800 600 600
Carrots 330 330 280 280
Celery 4)90 675 1165 315 330 695. 325 1040 1365
Cucumbers )UO 1OO 50 350 400 100 -- 300 bOO
Eggplant 0 0 -
Escarole 1-0 150 190 190 350 350
Lettuce,Boston 2. 2 -
i Iceberg 50 130 180 2$ 25 50 50
Peas,English ...0 5 -
Ppers 350 3o0 256 20 17 17
Po atoes Ot 200 21l0 1$0 1o0 0 So S
Total Vegs. 300 1430 1l4b 33<-. 1a4O .8b 100 3215 5(5 160$ 1390 370(
Waterr.Ielons 1200 1100 1100 100 100
Grand Total 500 1130 lb 145 4585 7 57- 278-4 0 31, ( 160] 10090 IO0U
OSCEOLA
Cabbage $0 50 5- -. -.. .





Page 83
FLORIDA V-CETA LE. STPA":I'FT Y A M "T*AT' 1TLO- ; AC.AG C 7 Cni.:TTS A:,D 3IA3 iS
19L5-h6 16-7 19 -h_____
rail .,iin ". i'otaL 7-57i7 .In. Sn oTT ail ,i,:. ..r.'. i- aJ
FAL:: D-ACH --- -- I- -T ~- -
Bearns 17800 17800 13200 l8800 13300 IL500 23600 51l00 13000 21800 12000 hL 300
Limas 2175 1350 3525 1200 650 1850 1200 900 2100
Cabbage 3000 3000 3500 3500 3600 3600
Carrot 50 50 -
Celery 3750 1L25 5175 3000 1280 h280 19u0 2100 )OO00
Cucumbers 300 350 50 700 1000 200 400 100 1500 500 lo00 200
Eggplant 125 200 h50 775 125 250 200 575 100 J 75 /75
Escarole lhOO 100 1700 17uO 2000 2000
Lettuce, 3oston 100 100 125 125 2 '5 275
" iceberg 150 100 250 225 50 275 100 1O 2 0
Peas,English 900 900 1000 1000 200 2.0
Peppers 100 1250 550 1900 125 lhOO 100 1625 12')0 3&0 2000
Potatoes 5000 4200 9200 2800 h50 3250 500 600 1100
Tomatoes 200 1000 750 1)50 200 500 50 750 200 700 900
Total Vegs. 10525 j7u0'5 220Y5 776 /b 1U>O 30 JU4U 26/0 190u 0 103u J33>,5 Io/(5 665-0
.'atermelons -200 200 200 15 150
Grand Total 10525 37075 22075 7767'5 1i750 3U450 269dO (2160 1i500 3375 16625 (6700


PASCO
Tatermelons
PINFEALLAS
Vatermneons
POLK
Beans
Cabbage
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Peas,English
Peppers
Potatoes
Tomatoes
Total Vegs.
Strawberries
Watermelons
Granr' Total


- 200


- 750 750


- 100 100


- 200 200
200 200
- 50 50

300 300
-50 50
- -- 200 200
- 200 buJ 1UOuO
- 300 300
- 200
- 500 du8 1)007


PUTNAM
Beans 2L0 2h0
Cabbage 900 900
Cucumbers -
Lettuce,Iceberg 25 25
Potatoes 2600 2600
Total Vegs. 90U 2065 375f'
Watermelons 100
Grand Total 900 2065 3675o


ST. JOHNS
Cabbage
Potatoes
Total Vegs.


- 2500 2500
7300 7300
- 2500 7300 96000


200 200
150 150
100 100 200
2 25
25 o00 525
S 175 175
125 TT I!? 12.)/
500 500
350 350
125 5 i125 2125

250 250
1000 1000
25 25
2200 2200
1 21b75 /5
300 300
1o00 2(75 3775

2700 2700
6200 (200
-- 2700 6200 U900


- 1200 1200

- 100 100

- 100 100
- 100 -.100
S 250 250
- 100 100
- 25
700 700
- 100 100
- 125 1250 17t
-- 50o 500
- 700 700
-- 62) 19o 257>


1- 4o0 1o00
- 200 200
- 2800 2h00
- 1 200 2C,0 0UU
- 10 110
- iLuu 2730 i1UO

- 28-" 2800
- 570 5750
- 2u 37o 50 0550


ST. LUCIE
Beans 100 100 100 100
Limas 125 75 200 100 100 --
Cabbage 50 0 100o 100
Cucumbers 100 50 150 200 200 00 150 150 300
Egplant 50 50 50 50 25 125 -
Pe-ppers 50 50 100 75 25 100 25 25
Tomatoes 2700 200 2890 5753 aU50 3000 7h5O 1300 800 2900 5000
Total Vegs. 300UU 02 27I5 6000 1H5 I0 3250 bl'> 1550 90c1 30U0 5352
Watermelons 100 o0 50 300 '300
Grand Total 3000 425 2975 6500 h775 150 3300 8225 1550 900 3375 5825





Page 8h
F O1RI!'A v-'GZTAFLF.. STFIA'. -FIFY AIF -.AT I 7 ; ':-A S C 1i OU TII '- A'D EASC!JS
1 I-b I 7.. --1 C. -, l_______*i -
la i .tIi. "Ii al n.ill .iI l. lI 17 11 t, a I. tai rl. Sr'r. i
- - - - - - - - -


SARASODTA
Cabbage
culIflowcr
Celery
Cucumube r
Escarole-
Lettuce,Iceb rg7
Peppers
Potatoes
Tomatoes
Total Ve'rs.
Watermel.-.nr
SEIINOLE
Beans
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflco.ier
Celery
Escarole
Lettuce, L.,t),n
11 Iceber,7
Peas,Enghlsh
Peoperc
Potatoes
Total VcS.-


SUMTER
gBeans
Cabbage
Cucumbe-r:, )
Egnlant -
Le tuct., Iceb-:r -
Peppers,
Tomatoes '5I
Total Ve, s. 17
Cantaloupes -
Strawberie: -
Watermelons -
Grand Total !JI

SU.[ANNEE
Cucumbers -
Cantaloupes -
vatermei :ns -
Grand Total -

TAYLOR
t iter clo n-
UNION

Limas
Cabbage
Cucumbcrs -
Pepperc.-
Potatoci -
.Total Ve-s. -
W'atermelorns


VOLUSIA
Cabbage
Potatoes
Total V.-.;s.*
Taterneli'ns
WALTON
3T trne lonr

'VASHINGT':,IJ
C-ucumbt. -r,
Potato:
Total V-t:.
Waterar l) r-1ns


100

1000
ii-


1':":'










L,
1(0











lOi
1 I'
1-



-I
-( )

i I


1LO


<- *M
1563



-I I
-I
c .0 ilII


1 i
100

i 5
5'J









100



Cl.'
71

,iIu
; L',

-,'^,I-







,i <"ircI


'irI I-'
1i yu 105')i
1 'c i;



- 1 F. Ii:

2 T.





5i p,
J)7 2t''

I '-







-- 1 i
l"' 15
15o

'i-1
_- I
1 .:]':


- i%: i
- -' 1 Ii U

- 1 00

- 1 I


- I )
- 5 ,>


-. ii-,,.-,

-. r'I


I-


- L~ ~


iL I
-I I


-)


I *i I








in:

T777


-." II
8 ',
I- i ,


-.1
TV'


L 15i
< <,''




,r
5:'0(

-L-
15


Si -' ,




"i
ii:'


i' ,
i? _. ,.
15,'T

1 i1-I1


- .. .IF I
- L
- Ci'
- ,- ;u I.'


-- i 1 i

-I I 2 'I
- 15 1'





F t0
-- -- -. I Z



.7 .

- F I
- .) I


I--I




5 -
1:5 1U2.o


IF I,




1


13')



113;




2.25


C-
1 .1 Ii


5
II-)'
1


jk


i0":' 00 i 600

200 b"' 1100 IJO^
17 1-




1i' I7
j'j'i.i 1000


I I. '

-A ^ c:, i r'Tp


300i
:5
7I 77


c- 1- .- I- I



- ji1 lit
I o 3' I 1
-- 3 35.0
- 1' 100
- 1 1I




.I IC
-. .I '1) I
- .. A.'


-- 1>. i;c -

- Lq.


- F~I L ,,~ H -


- :',
---L--


-tai


- I




P;r.-o 85
FLORIDA Vk., FTAFLK. :.TRAV.1E RY Atf ::AT Z1- .:' ACTA.-Z r" C7-,., TA( A'. 1.9
E1 ,L-5-Lo i_-',-, _____1'u-T, .7-,17 ,_-7
ail J .!in. 'pr. 'lot3l a i i n. S' r. lo' ',.] F'iJ j .n "r. r Total
I.!ISCELLAiLEJ US
Dans 50 Li 510 100 1.00 '250 i0 50 100 150
Limas 7, 50 *.12. 25 25 5 O 100 100
Cabbage 135 135 100 100 100 100
Crros .- 50 50
Cauliflower 20 20 25 -- 25
Celery 10 10 20 20 hO 25, 65
Cucumbers 50 50 100 200 50 50 25 125 50 175, 22
Eggplant 25 50 100 175 25 2.5 50 100 25 25
Escarole 0Q 10 50 50
Lettuce.Boston 2- 25 50 -
, Iceberg ]5 15 2$ 25 7S 75
Peppers 50 50 100 90 25 75 190 60 50 50 160
Potatoes 10 90 100 200 350 550 5O 50 n00
Tomatoes 50 50 175 275 100 l0 17 325 25 50. 200 *75
Total Vegs." l'/ 20 I050 6-5 365 6b 9 202' 105 W54 (25 .510
Cantaloupes 50 50 50 50 75 75
Strawberries 12 125 150 150 50 50
Watermelons 200 1" 00 l0 32' 325
Grand Total 175 546 1100 2020 365 335 1120 2320 1 $5'oC 112$ 1900


TOTAL ALL C3OUTIES
1944-45 1945-46
Fall Vin. Spr. To tal Fall V7in. Spr. Total
Beans 20000 37500 23000 865'00 22100 38000 20100 80200
Linas 2000 2800 11.800 2675 4325 7000
Cabbage 17500 132,uO 13200
Celery 6800 h1250 11050 850 )900 135,0
Cucumbers 1200 hOO 6100 7700 2700 750 000 11950
Eggplant 800 800 1650 3250 lu 85 25 1 1050
Escarole 2800 200 2 o0
Lettuce,Boston -..- 0- OO .. -. 500 L00
" Iceberg 850 150 1000 1000 450 lL50
Peas,English -- 2600 2600 2U00 2000
Peppers 750 3800 L800 9350 1700 3800: 6500 12000
Potatoes 11800 19300 31100 13600 21700 --3300
Tomatoes 2800 18600 11100 32500 5300 15000 17000 37300
Total Vegetables 25550* 85150 ..73150 .20550.. .33200 102500 25300 221000


500
2050
39000
25550 S5150 73150 216100
1946-07


Fall Win. Spr. Total
Beans 19700 28500 33500 31700
Limas 1600 3600 5200
Cabbage l4000 100O
Carrots 500 500
Cauliflower 600 600
Celery 7300 7300
Cucum ers 5000 300 8675 13775
Eggplant 1200 1000 1100 3300
Escarole 2800 2800
Lettuce,Boston 700 700
" Iceberg 1000 125 1125
Peas,English 1600 1600
Peppers 1750 3600 5200 10550
Potatoes 9900 14200 2100O
Tomatoes 10000 93900 10000 29800
Total Vegetables 37650 03200 80600 201'50


Cantaloupes
Strawberries
Watermelons
Grand Total


800 800
L750 4750
47000 7(7000
37650 87950 128OO 251-000


300 800
2800. 2800
o1000
33200- 105300 86100 275600
1947-48
Fall Yin. Spr. Total
17200 36500 18000 71700
1500 2750 4250
.16100 1610
L50 50
00 100
-. 300 .- .5300 -11600
5000 1000 9900 15900
.00 325 250Q.... 3225
3200 3200
550 550
1000 100 1100
600 600
500 2600 8350 1145o0
7400 13400 20300
2 100 11 16300 30200
25o00 6 9025 76600 191525
1200 1200
1200 &200
-- 45000 5000
25900 93225 122800 241925


Cantalounes
Strawberries
Watermelons
Grand Total




Pafge O6
UNlITED STATES: TOTAL ,ORAiHl.E AND TAiJCERIHE PR.DUICTIOil-P' STATES FOI SELECTED YEARS
Dy: ii. I-, .illson, Federal-State '.arl:et Ihew: Ser.ic,, Lakeidnd, Florid

Crop Year CALIF. FLk. T3I. ARTIZ. ALA. LA. lilSS. TOTAL
T ho u s a ri Do :< s -
188U ,IL- 3,1L7 - -- -- L7'-
1919 16,632 8,'0CC 9 80 20 37 31 0,',"
1923 2L.J5" 13,700 6 U6 22' 75 55 ",?,
1928 39,159 1,. 125 99 8 220 '.,i'.
1923 23,L39 17,900 L30 155 3 2L5 2 L 7,17'
193 L1,L20 13 0 2,,5 0 ,0 96 238, 7','-1
1.39 ,,L'L, 218,0C00 2,360 20 7p. 22,3 7,
19l' 3 51.,961 L9,800 3,5,0 1,100 2L0 [106,l .
19L6 ,-530 9 'O ."', ,' : 0O L1O ]l1 -cg
19$7 L6,600 ',2,l, i". .,-800 7 300 i___ 1,':_,:.
Oranges include Tang'rin-3s .r 3ll States.
I'LOIIDA PRODIUCTIOI1 SEGPRE.TED EAr'LY FI' ID-SEASO', 'ALEi LAS ._: TAIRIifIS
---r Ci, To t o l
Crop Ya.r I :id-Eeason Valenci i _; Trin'e rine Prodjuct ion
1,0'0 bo:.-.:es i. ,C'C'j t.:,x(.s 1, Y',,' oo::e:-- 1.C'C,' bo:-xes
1938-39 17,1 -' .1 2,70 400 33.300
1939-L' 15,60u 10,0 ',100 2'8 ,0'00
19'hO-L 16, 200 2, :0 2, 7'0C 31, 30 :'
191,-h2 I"200, J .O.. 2, 100 29,'300
192-L3 I',100 1..;., 1.0 Lj, 200 1, L'0
.-LL 2 ,-.''0 .., C.:' 3, 6Cu.0 L'9, 00
19Lh4-LS 21,700 2ll,., lj L.0C0 L6,8-00
lL- 1 O 29 ,,, ,0-0 ,200 FL, OOO
l:,.6-.7 30,- 00 ;,3:200 ", 700 $.8,6OO
1 L' 7-L8 31,000C 2 7, h0 U.'O' 62, 100
This includ'-3s aon,' product ioin in any Stte, abanndoneJ ici market.' roascns.

UNITED STATES: iOTAL GRAPFFFil P'h.DCE',CTI'Ci .-. S' ?ATES [OR' SELECTED E\5
Crop 'Year FLA. TE:';. CALIf A F.. TOTAL
-1"$-- 1i.,' .T h o h usn d B o c s. s ---.----.
1 19 1.,','-, 3 3" 3 2') 6, 2'
1923 3,2'0' ,' '63 ,023
1923 1130 753 972 211 13,
19"' 10,900' 1,,200 1,772 I 1",6?
193 23,3'0. 15,670' 1, 92 2,700 h3,9'L
1939 15,90' : l4,O 1,97" i 2.2 .0 3I,1735
19L3 31,0C'0 1 7,710 3,3, 0 .i,0, 0 '. 0. '
.9. ,CC 3,,300 30 ,120 i.'O0 59, 20
19? 7 33,n000 2C'.O,, :,CC.'6-0 3.00., -2, '60

v.FLOrC'. I A PROFi' iCTiC SI-: --FATD ELDLESS .liD OTHLEK.
jt_.:,F ,A -% SE1'1 S AI- (,T ..,


C thr i
1 o ., "J b..: -
15,500
', L 'C '


17 '. ,
l7,0,",
13, 00'
l U _''~


'..tsit Grap-fruit
1r'i- ut'.c t ion
i,C'O bo:ces
23,300
15,C00
2L, 600
195,200
27,300
31, 000C
22,300

29,000
ii: .00


Cror' Year. -1

1 33-3
1932-LO'
19L0-L1
12L1-L2I
1;5.2-- 3.
19L3-LL
191W -LS
l'?L'h-h6

A?146-L7
:9L7-L8


7,7 100
10, 300.
lu,000.:,

l,,,000
. 1h0,.,(,
l5,0 0:'







TOTAL NU1.[ OF ALL CITiiUS T,':ES :'OVIf':. FP'G ?,lij. ]: I;J FI.'T FIA
AS REi"OiTED 'k '1-:'* :1 l h 'Jnb Il'5 i r.,Th7 ( S'IA':. i 'iA'1 bi 'A 'tU,
u ^: ILLw L, FLL.,'A
.1)6-47 brASON

ALL CITRUS

Variety :ou. 'rees


Grance
Grapefruit
Mandarin
LiLj
Lemon
Tangelo
Liqccllaneous
Total
ORANGES

Variety No. Trees


Valencia
Pineapple
Parson Brown
Hamnlin
Lue Gi m Gong
Navel
Unnamed
Liscellaneous
Total


329,089
77,952
87,517
120,2)49
22,459
11,093
2,196
783,327
72b,o id2


LIES. TE::PLES, AND TANGERINES

Variety No. Trees


Limes:
Persian
Unnamed
Other
Total
Temples
Tangerines


13,373
5,603
15,779
34,755
92,192
22,3)49


723,882
281,637
123,895
34, 755
6,328
6,259
10,104
1,196,860
GRAPEFRUIT

Variety N.o.; Trees


Marsh
Duncan
Conner's Early
Foster
Thompson
UcCarty
Excelsior
Hennin.,er Ruby
Unnamed
L aisccll-neous
Total


59,069
61,912
1,924
2,915
81,035
7,122
9,804
45,,98
6,616
5,282
2L1,037


LD'OIS


Variety


Villa Franca
Perrine
Meyer
Sperriola
Unnamed
Others
Total


No. Trees


86
3
1,7L7
15
661.
3,816
-, 326


Compiled by the Department of-Agricultural
Station, University of Florida.


Economics, Agricultural Exjeriment





Page E88 .S.ATTED FLORIDA IINTERSTATE TRUCT SilIFIPEHTS FuO 19L 7--L8 SEASON:

Ora ng-,es Grap' fru it Ta r inrs to tal

Au:ust 1 -
,-pFtc'mber n '61 -
,-,, tb.r 675 3', LCL 1,051
I.j .,-nber 1, 7 0''-' 26. 2,11'7
Dc: eber o37 ..6 6:i7 3,o
January 1 '76 I67, I* -
February 1-..10 '6 1l ,-u
"a r 1,* cI
A..n i i 1,50:' 3'i L(C L 1, ;
Tao,' 1, a3 3 0 1,'- .i
June ',Lb iLh 1 iL;'
july 21b .- 2..-31
Total IL. n. _. .I. .r-': l',79r
Tre fi:iures above v.ere based .,rn the Inr'pc'tio Lr.' for I iter.-t.iat Trucl: ..hip,--nt. Ifor
period Augi-ust 1 to. Jul; 31 -1 ilii t I.itLh actual r-.-po:.rt: ,A 'fir cl: P s.:ir,- On1.i ....or 16 to
.,'v 31 at Road Guard Insp'.ction Stationr: i t points: ica1 in;: out of Florida. Th.-c
licur!"e' ,i',c subsantiaii;, corrct.______________________
INSFECTOi.S FOR fiiTERSTATE TRUC'-: SHIt i:LIITS 'A.SSI G.- Tifi,.,H I'..A GUARD S' ATI'Ill3
ib ,o-LT ra:, e- Tang- c.1 6-- Grape- Tang-
Seas 3 ron Oranges fruit riti--s Total .:ay 31 Or ,;Ls fr'] t ei n-.s To tal
AuL iL 2'- Aug. p.
Sept. h ,,i (.L Sort. A
Oct. 6t7T L30 LCL 1,1 'C.n ..3 136 71
'o7. 1,5.31 325' 27. 2,12 6 !r.,'- ;<.,, 30. 2. .-,117
,-.,L. 2.;,'. ,23 71 3,.-i3 Dec. 2 376 L0r, ,1'7 .,1'1
4 1o1h J.
Jan. 1,613 7. ,7..,. ,I r. 1, .:;. ..6; LI -. .3 ,
Feb. 1, .7L.'' 322 lb3 2.1,3L F1 b. 1,.1b 306 1iL? ".'
:ar. ,' 3 2 1 ,j-' ,' 0 3" 3
Apr. 1.'. 35L' LCL 1,?31i Ar. ] ,':0 3-.! LCL 1,.7
Ma.:, 1, ,L. 37. LCL 1,'L.y. :_ i ,' ,',;3 3 C.., i,943
June 9LL. I.1' .lJun,. .
.Jul, 2L 1i0'- 317 Jul:, I
'i t.tal i l J,ubL 1,7,' i. ,1.:>.:' Total 13,u.'- .-,23, 1,,7- 1i.,'. :'.
Sorme.? fruit insp-r t.n for,:, Int,-.i-tatc Trueo : .St- p,:;-,nt doe-.s nt -0 ," 'ut 0f1 th,- S.at -.L buI
i. conri.Jied vn thin.
A-Road GCuird In tLionL Stationrs nut open Auju- '. 1 to Coct..b-rr 1, and .June 1 to
Jul','v A3 u: t 19'.. .Shi: -ment: : ri an. : ,-: '..', '. ra;:.fruit ';i:.:e] Citru. 10.
B-Fassiu:-.. thi oughh Koad 'iGuard-j Statior.:ns i n.- lule for .est. Florida: 'iarg.-. .' I' e-
fruit '. Tan'criri ,: \ h t ;i 'To.-l -1 3 7 C.rloads.

CITRUS "rilC i .'. THR.uGH F i:I.A RC'Al. Uil.b TATI J
1, -. ,:, .,- .S a:,on .o: t. .- ;1..;,- ,31
(.Tabulated fri'nm :..c...rd : CLtri.r rn..i VL tar.-.], Inp.ct .-,n Divi.sion)
Stat ionr i-',. 'Orn- .: G iru:.t -, 'ne rinere To tal
.Si1,1::.: uS i9 4." .' .:" 212 "


F.ranr ord F1-.:-, 7..
Ella'.il le US ? 77
Suonr; ,:..5- riri g: US 12'
'hltte Sprin.t US Li ,:
Hilliard U.S i ], '
'l 1 ,- U.i 1 / :. 5 ,
Lake C0 t.' FEi. ,!
LuJr .'il- :. Fla. I 1
Total 1]2 ,,
li r T 'L .: : r.n i l a r i .,f ._ r ,!: i ..: o ,i -, .' 0,- L .!..l 3 : ,. t :. i ,i,- 7


C 1 '


c -
5,,L7
115
17
.'L' tO"


131

66L

LC L
I-! ,-. 7, .


*; I




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