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Title: Florida agricultural statistical summary.
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Title: Florida agricultural statistical summary.
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Language: English
Creator: Florida State Marketing Bureau.
Publication Date: 1945-1946
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Table of Contents
    Title Page
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    Acknowledgement
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Full Text

















PRODUCTION, TRANSPORTATION AND MARKETING ANALYSIS

1945-46 SEASON

(Also Poultry, Egg, Livestock, Tobacco and Field Crop Statistics)



By Frank H. Scruggs, Market News Specialist



















Neill Rhodes, Commissioner
Florida State Marketing Bureau
Division of
Florida State Department of Agriculture
Nathan Mayo, Commissioner


This Annual Report is available free of charge to parties interested

Released October 10, 1946




Florida State Marketing Bureau
204 St. James Building
P. 0. Box 779
Jacksonville 1, Florida












A C K N OW LED G ME N T


We wish to acknowledge the splendid cooperation we received from both
official and private sources during the preparation of this voluminous statistical
report.

The rail freight and express carlot shipment figures were secured from the
Fruit and Vegetable Branch of the Production and Marketing Administration, U.S.
Department of Agriculture in Washington, D.C.

Exhaustive vegetable acreage, yield, production and value data and other
assistance vwas supplied by Mr. J. C. Townsend and Mr. J. B. Owens, Agricultural
Statisticians, and Mr. G. 'N. Rose, Truck Crop Reporter, U.S. Bureau of Agricultural
Economics, Federal Building, Orlando, Florida.

Mr. E. E. Raasch, Statistician of the Citrus Inspection Bureau, Florida
Department of Agriculture, Winter Haven, Florida, supplied us with important record
data and other information.

Mr. ?/illiam B. Conner, of the Florida Citrus Exchange, Tampa, whole-
heartedly complied with our requests for specified citrus information.

Mr. John A. OtRourke, Secretary-Manager of the Florida Growers and
Shippers League, Orlando, Florida, supplied important transportation information.

Mr. H. F. Willson, Federal-State Citrus Market News Service, and Mr. Hugh
Flynt, of the Federal-State Inspection Service, also supplied useful data for use
in this report.

Mr. La Monte Graw, Manager of the Florida Vegetable Committee, prepared
an article and rendered other assistance.

Several private agencies and individuals not already mentioned supplied
information directly or indirectly to us, for which we extend our thanks.

The preparation of this report is tedious and requires much thought and
long, hard work, and appreciation by the writer is extended to our Bureau staff for
their efforts.



Comments which would lead to the improvement of this Annual Report would
be appreciated.








GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS


Citrus Fruits Only (Oranges, Grapefruit and Tangerines)
Page
Bearing Acreage of Citrus by Counties 1945-46 Season 5
1945-46 Volume and Value Analysis of Citrus 12-13
Volune and Value Analysis of Citrus by Years 16-23
Interstate Truck Shipments of Citrus by Weeks and Months 1945-46 36
Auction Sales 18 Seasons 1928-29 to 1945-46 Seasons 40-42
Florida f.o.b. Sales Averages 1901-10 to 1945-46 45
Price Analysis of Citrus 1950-31 to 1945-46 Seasons 44-45
Canners' Prices for Delivered Citrus and Volume Canned by Seasons 46
Tree to Auction Costs or Vice Versa 47
Inspections of Citrus, including Limes, by Counties 59
Road Guard Station Citrus Passings 5 Seasons 60


Vegetable and Miscellaneous Fruits Only


Can The Florida Vegetable Industry Prosper in Peacetime 6-7
Volume and Value Analysis 1945-46 14
Truck Shipments by Weeks 1945-46 38-39
Road Guard Station Passings 1945-46 Season 61
Acreage, Yield and Value by Seasons 1929-30 to 1945-46 70-76
Gross f.o.b. Packed Value 16 Seasons 77
Fall, Winter and Spring Acreage for 3 Seasons 78-85


All Fruits and Vegetables


General Summary of The 1945-46 Season 1-3
Production as Affected by Weather 4-5
Transportation Problems and Loadings during 1945-46 Season 8-11
Production and Value for 13 Seasons 15
Transportation Freight, Express, Boat and Truck 1945-46 Season 24-27
Transportation Freight, Express, Boat and Truck 10 Seasons 28-31
Transportation Freight Carloads by Counties of Origin 32-35
Acreage of All Fruits and Vegetables and Gross Value per Acre 15 Seasons 36
Federal-State Inspections by Commodities 1945-46 Season 57
Acreage by Commodities, Fruits and Vegetables, 3 Seasons 62-69


General Agricultural Statistics


Poultry Industry Questions and Answers 48-49
Egg and Poultry Prices in Jacksonville 1921-1946 50-51
Livestock Industry Questions and Answers 52-53
Livestock Prices in Jacksonville and Southeast 54-55
General Crop Statistics 1920-1946 56-57
Tobacco Production, Value and Auction Data by Seasons 58






FLORIDA DEPARTIE;IT OF AGRICULTURE
STATE !;RKETI'jG BUREAU
1945-46
ANNUAL FRUIT AND VEGETABLE REPORT
By Frank H. Scruggs, Market News Specialist
VOLUME MAM VALUE OF ALL FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
Once more Florida breaks a previous record in volume and value of fruits and
vegetables moved from groves and farms for all purposes. The equivalent of 286,427
ra-iil carloads moved into use during the 1945-46 season and had an f.o.b. Florida
packed value of .364,000,000.
DISPOSITION OF CROP
The disposition of this 1945-46 crop of all fruits and vegetables revealed that
132,948 carloads moved out by freight and express, including a few by boat, 25,604
carload equivalent by truck, 20,352 consumed in the large and small cities of Florida,
and 107,523 carload pre-war equivalent canned or otherwise processed.
Citrus was disposed of by moving 74,859 carloads to out-of-State markets by
freight and express, including 88 by boat, 6,946 by truck, 104,678 canned or
processed, and the equivalent of 10,567 carloads consumed in fresh form in Florida.
Vegetable disposition showed 50,591 carloads out by freight and express, 15,492
by truck, 8,185 consumed in Florida markets, 2,675 carload equivalents canned or
otherwise processed.
Mixed fruits such as strawberries, watermelons, avocados, limes, etc., accounted
for 7,:498 carloads by rail, 3,166 by truck, 1,600 consumed in Florida, and 170 car-
loads processed.
COMPARISONS OF VOLUME AND VALUE
We have become so used to record volumes and values during the war years that
it is well to go back in the pre-war years and see how far we have come. The follow-
ing table shows the progress we have made. We will gb forward in production but what
we do in value per carload is the 64 question.
ALL FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
Gross FOB Fla.
S-ason Production Gross Value Carload Value
(Carloads)
1935-34 139,451 $ 77,156,615 $ 553
1959-40 184,563 95, 1035,847 505
1940-41 209,5389 11.2,768.552. 538
1945-44 261,197 # 294,633,098 1,128
19-144-45 237,972 3 509,585,680 1,500
1945-46 266,427 3# 564,5329,700 1,272
Last pre-war year. ,! Carload loadinbs averaged approximately 10 percent higher
than pre-war average for all transportation.
The production carload volume in 1945-46 was 37 percent more and the gross value
2'l percent more than in 1940-41, the last pre-war season. Florida has done well
enough in her production effort, which is the real criterion of progress, and has
done exceedingly well in the matter of both gross returns .and net to the grower,
which is good for the grower and good for the State, providing money to pay off
mortgages and bank loan indebtedness, and for further expansion of production. It is
good for the Internal Revenue service.
All of the foregoing value figures have been gross returns from which production,
h'?rvesting, packing and selling charges must be deducted to arrive at a net profit to
the grower, and it is well to mention the net along with the gross.
In the 1940-41 season growers had a net profit of ,8,831,633 for citrus, and a
roughly estimated :58,742,760 for vegetables and miscellaneous fruits, for a total of
7.17,574,393, while in 1945-46 growers got a net profit of $125,551,853 on citrus and
an estimated net of 38,400,000 on vegetables and miscellaneous fruits, for a total
of .'1635,951,853.


Page 1




Page 2
It is estimated -that the vegetable growers had a net of 18 percent of the gross
packed value in 1.940-41 and 30 percent in 1945-46. The 1945-46 gross values per
package were approximately 55 percent higher than in 1940-41, but the production and
marketing costs were considerably higher. It should be understood that these figures
are for the acreage harvested and does not take into account. the acreage r'hich is lost.
through weather hazards and which must be replanted, refertilized and re-worked, or
taxes or depreciation on equipment. In other words, if the f.o.b. Florida package
value of vegetables in 1940-41 averaged $1.55 the grower got 284 after paying for the
production and marketing. If 1945-46 averaged &.2.35 per package the grower got 70,.
In 1940-41 Florida had approximately 360,000 acres of bearing citrus groves
which grossed 'approximately $180 per acre and had a net profit after production and
marketing costs of approximately $25 per acre, and in 1945-46, vith a bearing acreage
of 585,400, the gross was $613 and the net $.36 per acre.
The vegetable,, strawberry, watermelon and cantaloupe acreage in 1940-41 was
approximately 265,000, showing a gross f.o.b. packed value of ..1l83 per acre and a net
after-production and marketing costs of 355, while in 1945-46, with an acreage of
300,000, Florida showed a gross of $427 and a net of bl.28 per acre.
The State Marketing Bureau did not audit the books of the growers in Florida and
the foregoing estimates should be considered only as an informed estimate. HJo one
else would attempt to estimate the net profit to growers, so we- will take the credit
or the blame for trying. It should be understood that. the foregoing are estimated
averages for the State and for 15 commodities.
PIENOMENAL INCREASE IN CITRUS PROC-ESSII'G
The canning of citrus has shown a phenomenr-l increase over 19w'-.54, vhen Florida
canned only 2,667,397 boxes, increasing year by year, when we find 12,970,408 boxes
in 1939-40. In 1943-44 we processed 51,456,489, and in 1945-46 season we canned or
processed 41,871,161 boxes of fresh fruit, which made 48,183,889 cases of 24 No. 2
cans, or the equivalent thereof.
The principal factor in this remarkable increase has been the terrific increase
in processing oranges. Only 61,433 boxes were used in 1933-34, 1,055,399 boxes in
1937-38, 4,197,299 boxes in 1941-42, but there were 14,344,000 in 1944-45, and
19,219,841 boxes used in the 1945-46 season.
Approximately 516,000 boxes of tangerines were processed in 1945-46, as compared
to a minuscule 2,728 boxes the previous season, and practically none in prior season.
Although the portion of tangerines diverted to canners did not show the producer any
profit in the operation above production and picking costs, still the $1.00 a box was
in the nature of a good profit, as many such poorer grade tangerines in past years
were never shipped and were costly to remove from the grove. The f.o.b. packed price
for tangerines averaged $4.80, and the processing of the low grades did not do the
market for the better grades any harm. Very few tangerines have been planted during
the past 10 years for the simple reason that they were not profitable prior to the
war demand. We may see considerable more tangerines planted if the tangerine juice
and concentrates become popular with the consumers. There are less than 4,500,000
boxes of tangerines in Florida in normal seasons, and only a.few in other States, and
a good demand for the canned product would increase the canning volume to 2,000,000
boxes or more at higher prices. The fancier grades of tangerines would move at a
good price in the fresh trade..
WEATHER CONDITIONS AFFECTING PRODUCTION
Florida had the usual uncertain weather hazards such as'a small hurricane in
September 1945, which caused extremely severe damage to avocados and limes in Dade
County and considerable damage to citrus in Highlands County. The season was
generally wet, which was good for citrus and not so good for vegetables. The winter
was mild but there were a few damaging frosts. Altogether the weather averaged a
little better than usual and we had approximately 16,000 acres more vegetables for
harvest than for the -1944-45 season, almost as many as in the 1943-44 season, and
37,000 acres more than in any pre-war season, or an increase of around 25 percent
over pre-war period. The citrus crop at 86,000,000 boxes was 17,000,000 boxes more
than for 1944-45, and 54 percent above the pre-war average.
The snap bean, with 80,200 acres, is still the leader in vegetable acreage, with
a gross packed value of $19,475,000 in 1945-46. The record acreage was 96,500 acres,




Page 3
worth $18,713,000, in the 1943-44 season. Palm Beach County, rith 48,800 acres,
followed by Broward with 20,200, monopolized the bean production, with 12,200 acres
widely scattered over Florida.-
The tomato was the next important vegetable in acreage with 37,300, and the most
important in gross packed value at :26,923,000. Dade County, "with 13,200 acres in
1945-46, was the leader, followed by St. Lucie with 5,750, Broward with 3,250,
Manatee with 2,600, Palm Beach with 1,950, and Hillsborough County with 1,825 acres.
Potatoes with 35,300 acres, the heaviest acreage on record; and the heaviest per
acre yield on record, and almost a record price per bushel, were noteworthy in the
1945-46 season. Some enormous yields per acre -- over 400 bushels -- were reported
although the State yield was 171 bushels per acre, as compared to an average yield of
150 bushels for five years prior to 1941-42. New developments in fertilizers and
insecticides account for the larger yields. St. Johns County led with 7,300 acres,
followed by Dade with 6,770 acres.
Celery usually ranks right along with snap beans as a gross value crop, although
only 13,450 acres were planted to celery, with a gross Florida packed value of
b14,154,000. The gross value per crate in 1945-46 was ,52.50 per crate, which was
considerably lower than the three prior seasons but about Sl.00 higher than the
average for pre-war seasons. Seminole County, with 4,475 acres, has lost the lead in
celery acreage to Palm Beach County with 5,175 acres in the 1945-46 season. Steps are
being taken to get a federal celery marketing agreement in operation for the 1946-47
season. Celery is a very expensive crop to grow and pack, and it appears sensible to
have some controls to aid in moving such a heavy volume. The celery crop provides the
most tonnage and should be the favorite of the railroads. Florida shipped 12,489 car-
loads by rail as compared to 9,591 for potatoes, 7,470 for watermelons, 4,763 for
cabbage, 5,269 for tomatoes, and 4,538 for beans. Many tomatoes, beans, cabbage and
peppers move but of Florida by truck.
While mentioning large acreages we should not overlook the 51,000 for water-
melons, from which 10,965,000 melons were produced at a gross f.o.b. Florida value of
Q8,114,000 in the 1945-46 season. The value of .4740 per 1000 melons was far better
than the previous season, when the OPA ceiling prevailed, and about Q90 higher than
during the 1943 and 1944 seasons. The 1945 average per 1000 melons was $480.
OTHER AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION
September 1, 1].946 estimates show that there were ups and downs as compared to
the 1945 season. Corn production was slightly more than last year, tobacco about 10%
up, peanuts 12% down, pecans 10% up, cotton 12% down, sweet potatoes about the same.
Oth,-r field crops showed little change from 1945. Most of the items will bring as
much or more money than in 1945, partly due to removal of some ceilings.-. The total
value of field crops should run at least $5,000,000 more than v50,000,000 for 1945.
Tobacco prices at 47.75 per pound at auction for flue cured cigarette tobacco was
exceptionally good as against 39.035 in 1945 and 21.410 in 1941. Pecan prices, higher
than in 1945, are indicated. The above crops do not include white potatoes, truck
crop vegetables, citrus or other fruits.
Livestock prices were higher than in 1945. Medium cows ranged $10.00-14.00 per
100 pounds at Florida markets from January to July, as compared to $9.25-11.50 in
1945. Medium steers $12.00-16.00, No. 2 hogs at $13.75-14.35, were above steers at
11.00-14.50, and hogs at ,11.25-14.35 in 1945. Prices moved higher ;when ceilings
were removed Juhe 30, 1946.
Poultry and eggs were under the same ceiling as in 1945 until ceilings were
removed July 1. Florida fresh egg prices at 66Q per dozen wholesale in Jacksonville,
are now slightly higher than during price peak years -- 1921-24. Fryers prices at
48 now almost equal the peak of 500 reached in April 1926. Heavy hens as of October
8 are 420 -per pound wholesale, as compared to a high of 32 in 1921.
OCTOBER 7-8, 1946 HURRICANE CAUSES LITTLE DAMAGE
Tt weakened as it hit Florida below Tampa, moving overland northwards into
Georgia. Wind velocity averaged 45-55 m.p.h. with gusts up to 80, as compared to 1944
October 18-19 hurricane average of 65-70-and gusts up to 108. 'We then lost about
20,000,000 boxes of citrus but probably less than 2,000,000 boxes this October. Some-
thing like 100,000,000 boxes remain this .season. Rainfall accompanying this 1946
hurricane ranged 1-3 inches, being lightest in the principal vegetable sections. The
damage was small, but causes a short delay in planting fields already too wet in
some sections.





Page 4 THE PRODUCTION OF FLORIDA FRUITS hiD VEGETABLES
AS AFFECTED BY 'WEATHER CONDITIONS, 1945-46 SEASCIJ
By..J. C. Tovmsend and G. ilorman RoEe, Agricultural Statisticians
U.S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Orlando, Florida
In general, during the past season we might say that Mother nature smiled upon
the efforts of the Florida farmer to raise a crop of fruits and vegetables, but as
is usually the case, such a statement must be qualified, for disasters, though
limited in scope, continued to plague certain spots on the Peninsular. A hurricane
in September 1945, seemingly in search of limes and avocadoes, wrecked the plantings
of these crops in Dade County, passed thru the Glades and hit Highlands County a
wallop. Where 1944-45 was dry, 1945-46 was wet -- beneficial to citrus, but causing
damage to vegetables. The winter was rather mild, but there were enough frosts and
other' factors to keep the grower of tender crops worried and sustain some damage to
his crops. We suppose that as long as Florida remains between the Atlantic Ocean on
one side and the Gulf of Mexico on the other with its sub-tropical climate we may
well expect these extremes of weather.
FRUIT: The high velocity winds of the September hurricane hit the South Dade
County avocado groves a disastrous blow, leveling most of the tall trees. This area
was just getting into heavy production. Trees have been topped and righted but it
will take several years to get back into former production. While most of the fruit
was blown off the Highlands County avocado trees, damage to limbs was light, and
this area will be the main source of the small production for 1946. Dade County lime
plantings were also damaged by the hurricane and as a result production in this most
important County for the current season was halved. Other citrus, mainly grapefruit,
in South Polk and in Highlands showed storm damage estimated at about 2,000,000
boxes. The State's citrus areas enjoyed ideal weather following the September
hurricane. Rainfall was plentiful and the winter rather mild. The millions of boxes
of oranges, grapefruit and tangerines which had set in June and July to fill out what
promised to be a short crop, developed remarkably under these favorable conditions,
and when August of 1946 rolled around a record crop of 86,000,000 boxes had been
harvested. These favorable winter rains and mild temperatures in 1946 brought out a
heavy normal bloom in citrus groves, and with continual favorable weather to date
(September 21) give promise of setting another record in citrus production in Florida
VEGETABLES: As stated above, the Florida vegetable grower was beset with what
would seem to be more than his share of damages from natural causes during the season
1945-46. The beginner would probably throw up his hands and walk away but the
veteran farmer has long since become hardened to the rigors of the game and
anticipates just such hazards, to come his way.
Early in the Fall the vegetables that were up were slashed and beaten by the
September 15th hurricane, which entered the State just South of Miami, turning North-
ward to pass Lake Okeechobee on the West and continue thru Central Florida, lessen-
ing its destructive powers to the vegetable growers as it proceeded. That which was
not beaten down by the winds was drowned by the excessively heavy rains that-
extended for miles from its center and followed in its wake. The bean growers, of the
Everglades area lost approximately 3,000 acres, while celery, cabbage, escarole, and
other seed beds and acreages seeded to the row were severely damaged. The lower East
Coast (Broward-Dade County section) was not as far advanced as the Everglades and
hence escaped serious losses. Central Florida crops planted to the fields and in
the seed bed stage were damaged considerably while North Florida crops were not
seriously hurt. Plantings and replantings went in rapidly after the storm in all
South Florida areas, although effects of the storm continued throughout the season
in the form of weakened plants for transplanting. Peppers were especially notice-
able and the Pompano winter area continued to suffer throughout the season. Wet
weather, cool nights.and an infestation of aphids took their toll. Heavy rains in
October seriously set back the tomato growers of South Dade and the Dania-Hallandale
area. Later an infestation of blight greatly reduced supplies of good quality
vegetables for fresh market. Potatoes seemed to escape blight in South Florida with
the exception of Ft. Myers,and'a small acreage around Indiantown-in Martin County.
Most all crops throughout the rest of the State made relatively steady progress
until farmers in North Florida received their first set-back by frost on November




Florida Fruits and V'ectables (Cont.'d.) Page 5
5th and 6th and again on November 24th and 25th, vith-a cold wqve on December 1st
that brought frost damage as far South as the Everglades, taking a toll of
approximately 5,600 acres of the .bean crop alone and finishing up all the tender
vegetables of North and Central Florida.
This frost did some damage to tle' early bloom in the strawberry fields but the
growers came thru with a relatively Fuccessful crop. Heavy rains at the end of their
season caused considerable alarm.
Repeated frosts occurring January 2nd and 19th killed the bulk of the bean
acreages left in the Everglades, leaving the East Coast and South Dade County as the
only source of supply in the State. Of course there was some frost damage in the low
spots in these areas and a very heavy rain sweeping in from the Atlantic and crossing
the Pompano area of Broward County caused considerable loss. Heavy rains in the
Hastings area retarded the early Spring potato plantings and damaged the cabbage crop.
Spring Acrenge. Heavy plantings went in throughout the State, especially in
cucumbers, sweet repppers and c.elery. A fairly heavy increase in sweet corn' for fresh
market was welcomed. B2.ight on the seed beds greatly reduced Spring plantings of
tomatoes in the Palmetto-Ruskin area. The Ft. Pierce area was the only section that
really escaped inroads of blight. Farmers of this area were successful in producing
an excellent crop of good quality fruit. Marion County came thru with an increased
tomato acreage that was not damaged excessively. The Spring cucumber and sweet
pepper crop was successful, with the exception of the crop in Alachua County, where
the nfu-:_unbers were almost a total loss by heavy rains in early May. Lima beans in
the Hawthorne section suffered in like manner.
The acreage planted to watermelons this season was greatly increased over that
of the previous year and up until harvesting time all indications pointed to a bumper
crop, but early disease in the Lake County area had caused repeated plantings, which
would have a tendency to extend the harvesting period and excessively heavy rains in
mid-March seriously damaged the North and West Florida crop. In many fields both
seed and fertilizer were washed away and later the land was planted to other crops.
Subsequent rains throughout the entire watermelon producing area caused a heavy
infestation of anthracnose. Later wilt and sunburn caused additional damage. Many
acres in the North Florida area were completely abandoned due to the light yields and
poor quality. The harvested production for the entire season was only slightly
greater than last year in spite of the greatly increased acreage.
In summary, the potato,, celery, cabbage and other leafy vegetable crops could be
said to be most successful. In some instances these crops were produced in excess of
the demand. The season was the reverse of the preceding one, it being a wet year,
whereas 1944-45 could be called dry. However, as stated before, .the veteran farmer
has an abundance of stamina and determination and takes the facilities that are
available and usually comes thru with an abundance of food to supply a hungry nation.
For this they are to be commended.
1945-46 County Acreage of Bearing Citrus
County Oranges Grapef. Tangs. County Oranges -Grapef. Tangs.
Brevard 11,720 35,875 469 Marion 9,015 770 .398
Broward 2,930 320 96 .Orange 35,090 4,080 35,094
Dade 2,960 5,970 403 Osc.ola 4,445 960 585
DeSoto 6,715 1,440 515 Pasco 6,780 1,555 587
Hardee 8,950 970 656 Pinellas 7,290 8,415 659
Hernando 1,555 390 820 Folk 57,530 28,005 -5,471
Highlands 9,120 4,635 820 Putnam 4,410 480 632
Hillsborough 16,00 35,960 1,2355 Sarasota 2,590 1,155 -
Indian River 4,940 6,985 519 Seminole 6,790 770 820
Lake 25,680 7,240 1,952 St. Lucie 8,480 4,730 890
Lee 3,365 35,075 119 Volusia 12,705 1,450 1,923
Manatee 4,625 5,195 117 Miscellaneous 10,285 2,515 771
Source: U.S. B.A.E., Orlando, Florida. Total. 264,870 96,940 23,549
Season- ORANGES GRAPEFRUIT TANGERINES TOTAL ACRES
1945-46 264,870 96',940 235,549 385,559.
1944-45 256,340 96,000. 23,419 375,759
1943-44 251,340 95,190 235,419 369,949
1942-45 246,5340 94,390 23,420 564,150





Page 6 CAN THE FLORIDA VEGETABLE INDUSTRY PROSPER IN PEACETIME
By La Monte Graw, Manager,- Florida Vegetable Committee
End of the war-inspired prosperity of the Florida vegetable industry brings us
face to face with the problem of continuing to profitably dispose of our products.
Market reports during recent months indicate that consumers are less willing to pay
high prices, even for the best produce.-
Prices received by the Florida vegetable grower are tied directly to the
national income and to the willingness of the housewife to buy. When the citizens
of the consuming areas are making good incomes, they are customers for out-of-season
fresh vegetables, but when the housewife's budget is reduced, one of the first to
feel the pinch is the vegetable producer, for she can always feed her family on
cereals and canned foods.
There is little we can do directly about the national income, but there are many
things we can do to increase the part of the housewife's dollar that comes to us,
even when the family income falls off.
Consumption of fresh foods can be increased. Limited trials of consumer packag-
ing have demonstrated that when the product is of good quality, harvested at time of
maturity, properly graded and packaged, and adequately protected in transit, and
reasonably priced, the volume of consumer sales is greatly increased if the
retailer has done his part by effectively displaying the produce in clean, attractive,
well-refrigerated cases.
Some growers and shippers, and many distributors, do not believe consumer pack-
aging is feasible. They offer some extremely sound objections, but there are ample
grounds for believing that their opposition largely arises from a desire to continue
doing business -in the same old inefficient manner. It has been clearly established
that any industry which does not constantly improve its product.and methods will
eventually go bankrupt. Every major industry with the exception of fresh foods has
reduced its costs, while at .the same time giving the consumer. a better and more
uniform product, carefully graded, packaged and branded.
New problems arise if only the finest quality vegetables are to be packaged.
Will so much be added to the cost that the lower-income housewife -cannot buy them?
Can we ship off-grades in bulk to stores in the lower-income areas, to be sold on a
price basis?' If a large percentage is to be graded out at this end, what use can we
make of the surplus and waste?
One of the serious problems facing those who seek to plan for orderly produc-
tion and marketing is the undeniable fact that we cannot control Nature. Many
changes in volume and quality occur during the course of a marketing season, no
matter how systematically growers might space their plantings, or how careful they
might have been in applying plant foods.
If fresh market prices are to be maintained at a high enough level to show the
producer a profit, some procedures must be evolved for diverting excess supplies
and lower grades into by-product uses especially during periods of over-supply.
We do not yet have in Florida the necessary processing plants for handling the
surplus, but it would seem wise to stabilize the fresh market even at the expense of
abandoning some of the product in the field.
The period of transition from the present procedure of growing and shipping
"raw" products, to that of close grading, careful packaging, adequately refrigerat-
ing, and more rapidly transporting, will not be an easy one. When the producer puts:
up a "finished"product, the waste and other losses which the distributor and retailer
must absorb, and the handling labor they must employ, will be considerably reduced.
The distributors and retailers must be prepared to scale their mark-ups downward on
consumer-packaged merchandise, otherwise thb price to the consumer will be too high
or what is more likely the returns to the grower will be proportionately reduced.
Too many growers believe they can continue to 'ship inferior grades. Others
still believe they can stick to the same old operating methods that prevailed before
production reached its wartime levels. But can we?
Production of winter vegetables has increased over 40% during the 'war years.
Florida, California, Texas, Arizona, Mexico, Cuba, and other competing sections grow
far more vegetables than were consumed in the United States before war boosted the
national income. These production areas are sometimes thousands of miles apart, and
disasters which ruin crops in one area may leave others untouched, with the result





Page 7
that. the Florida producer who relies entirely on extremely high prices after a local
disaster to show him a profit is unwise.
Do we want to return to prewar conditions? Some farmers seem to forget that
they were heavily in debt before the war, and that they were able to pay out only
because of wartime high prices. Certainly they do not want to again sell their
products at prewar prices. One can safely predict that we will not be permitted to
return to prewar conditions. The expansion of production in other areas competing
directly with us; the astounding growth of the frozen foods industry (limited only
by shortages of equipment and storage facilities); improvement of canning processes;
and development of other foodstuffs, present greater competition for the housewife's
dollar. The Florida producer must give the consumer what she wants, and at a price
she can and will pay.
This will not be easy to do. Farm labor is less efficient and higher than ever
before, offsetting savings from improved equipment, plant foods and methods. Wages
are not likely to go down, unless the national economy drops sharply.
The answer: More consumption of fresh vegetables. That calls for better
varieties, in appearance, yield and quality; better cultural and plant feeding
methods, at lower unit cost; improvements in harvesting, handling, grading and
packaging procedures; stepped-up transportation; more adequate refrigeration en route;
reduction of distribution and handling costs; promotion of the sale of fresh
vegetables through advertising, and intelligent aggressive merchandising.
This is a big package to hand the farmer. Few have the experience, the
facilities, or the finances to do a thorough job of research. The production of
fresh vegetables in Florida has "grown up" into a highly-specialized industry -
requiring the same advanced techniques as other industries continuous product re-
search, lower production costs, improved handling and distribution techniques, better
merchandising.
Obviously the specialized knowledge and experience required, and the.financial
factors involved, make it impossible for the individual farmer to do this job alone.
There is a greater need than ever before for cooperative action by producers. The
Florida Vegetable Committee, either on its own initiative, or cooperating with other
interested groups and with state agricultural agencies, .is seeking to develop a
reliable labor supply; to study our production and distribution problems; to improve
methods; to reduce farm operating costs; and to keep growers currently informed.
Aided financially by the State Marketing Bureau, the Vegetable Committee is fighting
valiantly for adequate protection for the Florida vegetable grower from unequal
competition with peon-produced vegetables from other nations. This will not be easy
to accomplish, because at present most American producers including our Florida
citrus growers are more concerned with exports than imports.
My opening question was: "Can the Florida vegetable industry prosper in peace-
time?" The answer is emphatically yes!! The future offers great opportunity to the
growers who are willing to take advantage of them. The people of. America are more
"fresh food conscious" than ever before; the national income barring a bust will
be much higher than before the war; millions have eaten fresh out-of-season foods
for the first time, and will buy them if they can. We are closer to the mass
markets an advantage which even the plane cannot completely wipe out. And, many
of us have learned that efficiency of operation pays dividends.
Cooperation is the key to the situation. Together we can solve most of our
problems with a minimum of difficulty and delay. If we insist on going it alone, we
will not be able to keep up with more progressive production areas.
Here is the fly in the ointment: Nations are refusing to sacrifice an ounce of
sovereignty, even to prevent destructive wars. They suspect their neighbors and
refuse to "give" an inch, even though all would benefit from cooperative effort.
Can the Florida vegetable grower profit from this sad lesson? Let us hope so,
for the wartime cooperation between growers and grower groups has demonstrated that
all things are possible to those who want them badly enough.. We can prosper during
peacetime if we will.,
La Monte Graw, Manager
Florida Vegetable Committee
Orlando, Florida





Page 8 TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS
FLORIDA CITRUS FRUIT *.AID FRESH VEGETABLES
SEASON 1945-46
By: John A. O'Rourke, Secy-Mgr., Growers & Shippers League of Florida
From a freight rate viewpoint, the 1945-46 season vwas almost a repetition of the
previous season, i.e. by informal conferences with the officials of the Atlantic
Coast Line, Florida East Coast, and Seaboard Air Line Railroads. The voluntary
reduced rates, which have been in effect for several years'on citrus and fresh
vegetables from Florida, all bearing cancellation dates, were further extended and
were in effect throughout the 1945-46 season. In fact'the reduced rates were mostly
extended to December 31, 1946.
Frcm a transportation viewpoint, as was the situation during the 1944-45 season,
the matter of our refrigerator car supply and .ice for refrigeration purposes required
almost continuous activity, for not only in Florida bMt throughout the United States
there was the greatest movement of perishable products ever experienced. This
situation, coupled with the continuous diminishing supply of refrigerator cars, in
the shortage of materials for construction of new cars, and the reticence of the
private car lines to place orders for new refrigerator car equipment, resulted in a
continuous refrigerator car shortage throughout the year in all perishableproducing
areas, and it is our Confirmed opinion that this. situation will be accelerated until
such time as a substantial number of new refrigerator cars are acquired and placed in
operation. Wbile some producing areas suffered to the extent of actual shipping
stoppages, and to car shortages as much 's 50Q% of. their actual refrigerator car
requirement at times, the Florida Citrus and Fresh Vegetable Industries had only some
extremely tight car situations for short periods. Therefore, our difficulties in
this direction were at a minimum.
In the 1944-45 season we remarked that as we were passing thru a period of war
economy when practically all of our operating rates and many of c.ur charges, rules
and regulations were on a temporary basis and are subject to many changes during the
reconversion period in the immediate post war future, necessitating constant
vigilance in our watchfulness for these changes, and the many expected proposals of
the transportation lines, having to do with traffic and transportation problems.
That time arrived during the 1945-4C season and many such proposals have been
made, and as an aftermath we are now contesting these proposals before the Interstate
Commerce Commission as to the justness and reasonableness of such proposals. First
is a proposal by the War Shipping Administration under I.C.C. Docket "4th Section
Application 16028," wherein the War Shipping Administration together with the
Atlantic Coastal Steamship Lines are seeking to have the railrc.ads substantially
increase the "all rail" rates on citrus fruit so %s to enable the Water Lines to
increase the Boat rate-s, stating the boat lines cannot competitively re-enter the
service on basis of rates now in operation by the all rail routes tc the North
Atlantic Ports. If this proposal were granted by the Interstnte Commerce Commission,
it would penalize the Florida Citrus Industry approximately a2.,500,000 annually.
Next, we have a petition (Ex P3rte 162) from the railroads to the Interstate Commerce
Commission for an increase in all rates and charges on Citrus Fruit and Vegetables of
25%, with a maximum of 150 per 100 pounds, which the railroads claim is necessary to
compensate them for the action of the Federal War Labor Board in granting wage
increases to all railroad labor, and the increased costs of materials and supplies.
If this petition were granted in full it would increase the transportation bill
of the Florida Citrus and Vegetable Industries approximately $10,000,000 annually.
Another proposal or petition (Ex Parte 163) by the Railway Express Agency to the
Interstate Commerce Commission seeks to increase the Express Charges on citrus gift
boxes from Florida by 500 per package, regardless of the size of the package, or
regardless of the destination, to compensate them for increased labor cost and
increases in materials and supplies. The citrus gift box trade has reached
substantial proportions, and the prospective shipment of 4,000,000 gift box shipments,
ranging from 17 to 90 pound's each, would reflect an increase of approximately
$1,200,COO annually to this segment of the Florida Citrus Industry, if the petition
were granted in full.





Page 9
Traffic and Transportation Problems (Cont'd.)

The League as representative of the Florida Citrus and Vegetable Industries of
Florida has been for several months actively engaged in the handling of this
litigation before the Interstate Commerce Commission and is quite optimistic in the
termination of these cases, the handling of which, however, together with our
routine duties, will require our utmost in entering the 1946-47 season.
There were no material changes in the O.D.T. minimum carload requirements for
the loading of citrus fruit and fresh vegetables from Florida, as shown in the
tabulations at pages 7, 8 and 9 of the 1944-45 season Annual Fruit and Vegetable
Report. 1944-45 season data with changes for potatoes is shown on pages 10 and 11
of this 1945-46 report,
In the following tabulations we have shown the O.D.T..minimum carloading
requirements for loading fresh citrus fruits and fresh vegetables from Florida, as
prescribed by O.D.T. 18A-2A, except as otherwise shown.
LOADING PATTERNSFDR:RCITTRUS FRUIT
IN REFRIGERATOR CARS 1945-46 SEASON
ORANGES OR GRAPEFRUIT


Container
IJo.& size
'675
1-3/5 bu
nailed box








#5004
1-3/5 bu
virebound
box

#679
4/5 bu
nailed box
#3677
4/5 bu wire-
bound box


.7500-7525-
7551 Bags

#8026-8050
1 bu basket


675
1-3/5 bu
nailed box


CAR
A 2 tiers on end-- 6 wide x 50 long
1 tier on sides or bottoms-7 wide x 14 long
B 2 tiers on end 6 wide x 31 long
1 tier on sides or bottoms-7 wide x 14 long
B 2 tiers on end-6 wide x 31 long .
1 tier(3 boxes crosswise x 31 long 93
(1 box lengthwise x 14 long 14
B(1) 2 tiers on end-7 wide x 31 long
1 tier(3 boxes crosswise 31 long 93
(1 box lengthwise x 14 long 14
*- i * _ *
A 5 tiers on sides or bottoms-7 wide x 14 long
1 tier crosswise-5 high x 5 wide x 1 long
B 5 tiers on sides or bottoms-7 wide x 15 long
B(l) 5 tiers on sides or bottoms-8 wide x 15 long

A 3 tiers on end-8 wide x 38 long
B 3 tiers on end-8 wide x 59 long
* *i *
A 5 tiers on sides or bottoms-9 wide x 19 long
- B 5 tiers on sides or bottoms-9 or 10 wide
x 19 long


Oranges
Grapefru

5 tiers
(End to


Same as
Same as
Same as


1/2 bu.bag
931
900


lit


1/4 bu.bag
1820
1800


on bottoms-6 wide x 22 long
end offset loading method)

TANGERINES & TEMPLES
Oranges & Grapefruit
Oranges & Grapefruit
Oranges & Grapefruit


Containers
per Car Total
360
98 458
372
98 470
372

107 479
434

107 541


490
15 505
525
600

912
936

855
855
or 950


1/8 bu.bag
3637
3710

660



458
470 or 479
541


#5004 A 4 tiers on sides or bottoms-7 wide x 14 long
1-3/5 bu 1 tier crosswise-5 high x 5 wide x 1 long
wirebound boxB 4 tiers on sides or bottoms-7 wide & 15 long

(Cont d.)


592 392
15 407
420


.A
B

A
B


A
B
B(1)






Page 10
LOADING PATTERNS FCR
Container .


No. & size CAR
#679 4/5 bu A
nailed box B

#3677 4/5 bu A
wirebound box B


#8026-8050
1 bu bskts


CITRUS FRUIT IN REFRIGERATOR CARS-Tangerines & Temples (Cont'd.)
SContainers


3 tiers
3 tiers
5 tiers

5 tiers
5 tiers

5 tiers
(End to


: . .. ]-e
on end-8 wide x 38 long
on end-8 Wide x 39 -long
on sides or boos9id x 19 long
on side's or bottoms-9 or 10de x 19 long
on sides or bottoms-9 or 10 wide x 19 long

on bottoms-6 wide x 22.long,-or
end offset loading method)


r Car- Total
912
956


855 or


VENTILATOR CARS
All cars should be loaded in complete layers or
complete tiers *with no loose boxes on the top layers
MINIJUM REQUIREMENTS Oranges 40,000# -'Grapefruit 36,000#

NOTE: All refrigerator cars MUST be loaded so that each tier or layer covers the
entire flogr space of the car, as the O.D.T. only provides for the height
of the load., i.e., threp, four or five tiers high.
REFERENCE MARKS A Cars less than 33 feet long.
B Cars more than 33 feet long, less than 8'10" wide.
B(l) Cars more than 33 feet long and 8'100 wide or over.

VEGETABLE O.D.T. LOAIINGS-1945-46 SEASON


Beets,turnips,carrots
New fresh harvested
root crop,; fresh mixed
cars
Cabbage, fresh.harvested,
new

Cabbage, Florida new
fresh harvested
Lettuce
Cantaloupes, Honeyballs,
Honeydews, etc. &
Watermelons
Potatoes
White (Irish)


Potatoes,
Florida
(@) ODT.
Potatoes,
Florida
(@) ODT.
Tomatoes


Tomatoes


new crop,

Special Permit
new crop,


Containers
Bulk, or in sacks, burlap, cloth
Half crates
Los Angeles crates '


Bulk, or-in.sacks, burlap, cloth '
Half crates .
Los Angeles.crates
.Bulk, or in bags, or in Bruce crates

Los Angeles crates

Containers as provided in Rate tariffs

Bags, boxes, or paper sacks under 100#
*Bags, b6xes, or paper backs 100#'up
In bulk
Paper, cloth, or burlap bags
Boxes, crates, barrels, or baskets'
P-147, effective January 31, 1945 to June
Paper, cloth, or burlap bags
Boxes, crates, barrels, or'baskets


tin.Loading Req.
S30,000#
640 crates
358 crates

30,000#
658 crates
358 crates
25,000#

316 crates

30,000#

42,000#
.45,000#
40,000#
30,000#
31,500#
16, 1945
(
(56,000#


Permit P-191, effective June 16, 1945, .cancelling Permit No. P-147.
Standard lug boxes, 5 tiers-high, each tier to
cover entire floor space of
the car.


Standard lug boxes, load
divided by center gate.


6-tiers high in each half of
the car, the center space no
greater than 2 stacks or boxes






FLORIDA O.D.T. LOADINGS Page 11
1945-46 SEASON
Est.Wgt. Minimum Carload
Per Pkg. Number Minimum
Container Lbs. -Pkgs. Weight
(Approx.)
0 Beans Bu. hprs. 36# 640 23,040

@ Beans, Lima Bu. hprs. 40#" 520 20,800

* Beet3 L.A. crates 85# 358 30,430

.- Cabbage L.A. crates** 91# 316 28,750
50# sacks 51# 25,000
.12 bu. hprs. 57#' 425 24,225

* Carrots L.A. crates 90# 358 32,220

s Celery Howard 10x16x22 68# 432 29,376
Nailed 10x16x22 68#. 432 29,376

% Cucumbers 1 bu. crate 54# 528 30,096

.* Eggplants bu. crates 57#: 480 27,360

@ Escarple 11 bu. hprs. '43# 450 19,550

* Lettuce L.A. crate ?71# 316 22,436
1 bu. crate 25# 720 18,000
1'bu. hprs. 37# 450 16,650

0 Okra 1 bu. hprs. 34# 640 21,760

, Peas 1 bu..hprs. .. 54#. 572 19,4.48 .

@ Peppers 1 bu. crate .48#. 480 -23,040

Potatoes(new crop) 50#/ bag-paper, cloth or 51# 30,000
:burlap
100# bag 102# .. 30,000
Bu.. crate. 61#, (baskets or boxes) 31,500
.' Barrels 3. 1,500
Q.D.T. Permit P-343 effective Feb. 13, 1946 to Mar. 15, 1946
P-349 effective Mar. 29,. extended by P-354 and P-360
to July 20, 1946
Fla. Potatoes., when ice available 36,000
(New Crop), when ice not available . 30,000
SO.D.T.. Permit,P-345 effective Mar. 15, 1946 to Mar. 29, 1946
P-381 effective July 20, 1946 to Aug. 31, 1946

@ Squash Bu. hprs. 49# .520. 25,480

- Torratoes : Std. lugs 36 700 25,200

* Turnips :. L.A..crate 81# 358 28,998

C Cauliflower 1- bu. crate. 48 480 .,23,040

* O.D.T. 18A-2A "
. Maximum Ventilated Refrigerated Loading, Authority Paragraph 500.72, O.D.T. 18A.
Prepared from material supplied by John A. O'Rourke, Secretary-Manager, Growers &
qh i -no-ecz Taoncnia nf TP 'R fr'icin





RECORDS AID ESTIMATES ON FLORIDA CITRUS CROP FOR SEASON 1945-46


(August 1 July 31)


Freight Total Boxes Gross FOB Returns Production and fNet Return
Carlot and Exp Carloads Freight and Florida.Points Marketing Costs Florida Growers
Shipments Shipped Freight Express Express Box For Crop Box For Crop Box For Crop
Oranges 41,894 41,894 2,414 25,909,798 4.3.55 $91,979,783 $1.72 $44,564,853 $1.83 $47,414,930
Grapefruit 12,201 12,201 907 8,296,704 2.65 21,986,266 1.44 11,947,254 1.21 10,039,012
Tangerines 3,81Z 3,813 55 2,809,372 4.80 13,484,986 2.35 6,602,024 2.45 6,882,962
Mxd.Citrus 16.951 13,575 ..
Totals 74,85S 71,483 3,376 57,015,874 $3.44 [127:451,035 61.70 $63,114,131 $1.73 64,336,904
__GENERAL DI POSIT ION ANALYSIS OF THE FLORIDA CITRUS CROP FOR SEASON
,traightCare MEd.Cars ?.xd.Cars Total Rail Trucked Rail,Boat Canned* Consumed Total
BOXES Freight Freight Express Boxes Out & Truck # Fresh Bxs. Locally Boxes
Oranges 20,974,983 3,969.,279 965,536 25,909,798 2,054,000 28,061,841 19,219,412 2,518,7-17 49,800,000
Grapefruit 6,247,721 1,686,131 362,852 8,296,704 340,400 8,646,904 22,136,149 1,216,947 32,000,000
Tangerines 1.698.303. 1.089.057 22.012 2,809.372 384.000 3.193.372 515.600 '491,028 4.200.000
Total 28,921,007 6,744,467 V350,400 37,015,87.4 2,778,400 39,902,117 41,871,161 4,226,722 86,000,000
CARLOADS
Oranges 41,894 8,281 2,414 52,589 5,1355 57,724 48,049 6,297 112,070
Grapefruit 12,201 3,434 907 16,5-12 851 17,393 55,340 3,042 75,775
Tangerines 3.813 1 860 55 5,728 960 6,688 1.289 1.228 9,205
Total 57,908 13,575 3,576 74,859 6,946 81,805 104,678 10,567 197,050
Estimated Cost of Producing and Marketing 81,805 Cars of ORANGES,.GRAPEFRUIT, AND TANGERINES.
Cost of production on tree such as fertilizer, spray materials, cultivating, irrigation, spraying, pruning,
etc., but not including interest, depreciation, or taxes, on strictly grove acreage. Per Std. Box.
Oranges $ .49 Grapefruit .34 Tangerines .64- ." Weighted Average $ .46
Cost of picking, hauling, packing, selling, and other average ordinary marketing charges.
Oranges &1.24 Grapefruit $1.10 Tangerines 1.71 Weighted Average 61.25
Total ordinary c.nd average cost of production and marketing of citrus
Oranges $1.72 Grapefruit $1.44 -- Tangerines $2.35 .. Weighted Average $1.71
1. Estimated boxes per car: Straight freight: Oranges 500.67, Grapefruit 512.07, Tangerines 445.4,
All Straight Freight 499.43.' Mixed Cars 496.83 boxes. LCL Express 400 boxes. Average All Rail 486.5.
Truck Carlots 400 boxes per car.
2. Mixed Car Analysis: Oranges 61.0, Grapefruit 25.3, Tangerines 13.7 per cent.
3. Freight Box Cars used: Oranges including few Tangerines 5,835, Grapefruit 634, Mixed 2,820, Total 9,289.
* Canning includes interstate by products: Oranges 35,552 boxes, Grapefruit 11,173 boxes, Total 46,725 boxes.
# Exports: Oranges 67,643, Grapefruit 5,000, Total 72,643, and # Boat: Oranges 30,400, Grapefruit 4,800,
Total 35,200 bcxes are included in Rail,Boat and Truck Total.






RECORDS AND ESTIMATES ON FLORIDA CITRUS CROP FOR SEASON 1945-46 (Cont'd.)
CITRUS TRUCKED OUT OF FLORIDA DURING THE SEASON AUGUST 1-JULY 31 (400 BOXES PER CARLOAD.)
Oranges Carlot equiv. 5,135 or 2,054,000 boxes. Gross at $3.55 $ 7,291,700 Net* at $1.83 $ 3,758,820
Grapefruit Carlot.equiv. 851 or 340,400 boxes. Gross at 2.65 902,060 Net* at 1.21 411,884
Tangerines Carlot equiv. 960 or 3' 84,000 boxes. Gross at 4.80 1,843,200 Net* at 2.45 940,800
All Citrus Carlot equiv. 6,946 or 2,778,400 boxes. Gross at $3.61 $ 10,036,960 Net* at $1.84 $ 5,111,504
CITRUS SHIPPED BY RAIL & TRUCK FOR SEASON (A) (Inc. Boat & Export: Oranges 08,043,Grapefruit 9,800,Tot.110,843
Oranges Carlot equiv. 57,724 or 28,061,841 boxes. Gross at $3.55 $ 99,619,535 Net* at $1.83 $ 51,353,169
Grapefruit Carlot equiv. 17,393 or 8,646,904 boxes. Gross at 2.65 22,914,296 Net* at 1.21 10,462,754
Tangerines Carlot equiv. 6,688 or 3,193,372 boxes. Gross at 4.80 15,328,185 Net* at 2.45 7,823,761
All Citrus Carlot equiv. "81,805 or 39,902,117 boxes. Gross at $3.46 $137,862,016 Net* at $1.74 $ 69,639,684
CANNERY CITRUS FRUIT USED DURING SEASON (B1?(400 boxes perlcafload.)
Oranges Carlot equiv. 48,049 or 19,219,412 boxes. Gross at $2.83 $ 54,390,936 Net* at $1.88 $ 36,132,494
Grapefruit Carlot equiv. 55,340 or 22,136,149 boxes. Gross at 1.39 30,769,247 Net- at .59 13,060,328
Tangerines Carlot equiv. 1,289 or 515,600 boxes. Gross at 1.00 515,601 Net* at .20 103,120
All Citrus Carlot equiv. 104,678 or 41,871,161 boxes. Gross at $2.05 $ 85,675,784 Net* at $1.17 $ 49,089,702
FRES .CITRUS CONSUMED IN FLORIDA OR OTHERWISE-NOT ACCOUNTED FOR (400 boxes per carload.)
Oranges Carlot equiv. 6,297 or 2,518,747 boxes. Gross at 3.10 7,808,115 Net* at $1.70 $ 4,281,870
Grapefruit Carlot equiv. 35,042 or 1,216,947 boxes. Gross at 2.40 2,920,675 Net* at 1.20 1,460,336
Tangerines Carlot equiv. 1,228 or 491,028 boxes. Gross at 4.00 1,964,112 Net* at 2.20 1,080,261
All Citrus Carlot .equiv. 10,567 or 4,226,722 boxes. Gross at $3.00 > 12,692,900 Net* at $1.61 $ 6,822,467
CITRUS FRUITS CANNED IN FLORIDA AND.THAT CONSUMED IN FLORIDA (400 boxes per carload.)
Oranges Carlot equiv. .54,346 or 21,738,159 boxes. Gross at $2.86 $ 62,199,051 Net* at 1.86 $ 40,414,364
Grapefruit Carlot equiv.. 58,382 or 23,353,096 boxes. Gross at 1.44 33,689,920 Net* at .62 14,520,664
Tangerines Carlot equiv. 2.517 or 1,006,628 boxes. Gross at 2.46 2,479,713 Net* at .97 977,141
All Citrus Carlot.equiv. 115,245 or 46,097,883 boxes. Gross at $2.13 $ 98,368,684 Net- at $1.21 $ 55,912,169
CITRUS SHIPPED BY RAIL AND TRUCK, AND THAT CANNED OR THAT CONSUMED IN.FLORIDA 1945-46 SEASON
Oranges Carlot.equiv. 112,070 or 49,800,000 boxes. Gross at $3.25 "161,818,586 Net* at $1.84 $ 91,767,533
Grapefruit uarlot,equiv. 75,775 or 32,000,000 boxes. Gross at 1.77 56,604,216 Net* at .78 24,983,418
Tangerines Carlot equiv. 9,205 or 4,200,000 boxes. Gross at 4.24 17,807,898 Net* at 2.10 8,800,902
All Citrus Carlot.equiv. 197,050 or 86,000,000 boxes. Gross at $2.75 $236,230,700 Net* at 31.46 C125,551,853
NOTES: Gross refers to returns fob cars Florida shipping points, and Net* refers-to returns to growers or
fruit owners before deducting for interest, depreciation, and taxes, but after deducting for cost of produc-
tion and marketing. (1) Trucked-out shipment figures based on inspection for interstate movement and on pass-
ings thru Road Guard.Stations, October'1l June 16. (2) Cannery fruit represents average gross price and the
Net* price is the gross less the.picking, hauling, and marketing charges. (3) Consumed in Florida are rough
estimates based on population, intrastate truck, prices, etc. Any person who does not approve this home
consumption estimate may make his own estimate. (A) Rail and Truck totals include Boat and Export shipments,
showing Oranges 98,043, Grapefruit 9,800, Total boxes 107,843. (B) Cannery Citrus totals include interstate
shipments for by products manufacture, showing Oranges 35,552, Grapefruit 11,173, Total boxes 46,725.





RI CORDS AND ESTIMATES ON FLORIDA VEGETABLES, MELONS, AND NON-CITRUS FOR SEASON
Shipped from Florida, or sold .from farms for canning, or for Florida c6onisumption.
Gross values for commodities loaded in cars or in trucks, at Florida loading points.
Production, packing and other marketing charges have not been deducted.


Season
1945-46


CARLOT Rai3 Estimated Florida Trucked Consumed Processed EstimatedTrucked, GRAND TOTAL .
EQUIVALENT & Boat Rail f.o.b. Value out of in in Consumed Canned FLORIDA
SHIPMENTS I Card Car I 'Total F 1 o r id a NVolume Value Volume Value
Strawberries 25 $4,700 $ 117,500 .446 100 20 566 $ 2,346,500 591 5 2,464,000
Watermelons 7,470 800 5,976,000 2,538 1,200 5,738 2,138,000 11,208 8,114,000
Other Non-Cit. 3 2,500 7,500 182 300 i50 632 1,264,500 635 1,272,000
Sub-Total 7,498 4. 814.4 6,101,000 3,166 1,600 170 4,956 $ 5,749,000 12,454 $11,850,000
Beans & Limas 4,538 1i,850 8,595,000 5,129 1,200 1,842 6,171 9,256,000 10'709 17,651,000
Cabbrge 4,763 750 3,572,000 2,083 900 2,985 2,088,000 7;746 5,660,000
Celery.. 12,489 .1,000 12,489,000 566 900 1,466 1-,451,000 13,955 135,940,000
Cucumbers 1,549 2,400 5,717,000 741 250 991 1,685,000 2,540 5,402,000
Eggplant 251 1,700- 426,000 682 250 932 1,118,000 1,185 1,544,000
Escarole 1,5317 630 830,000 20 25 .45 2.8,000 1,362 858,000
lettuce 166 1,200 199,000 95 300 393 472,000 559 671,000
Peas, English 62 2,00.0- 124,000 52 60' 112 224,000 174 548,000
Peppers 1,612 ..1,955 5,151,000 1,524 500 2,024 3,643,000 35',656 6,794,000
Potatoes 9,591 1.290 12,5372,000 759 700 1,459 1,459,00.0 11,050 13,831,000
Tomatoes 5,269 2,750 .14,490,000 5,549 1,100 653 5,282 12,148,000 10,551 26,638,003@
Mxd and Misc. 8,984 --1,800 16,171,000 2,294 2,000 200 4,494 6-,741,000 15,478 22,912,000
Total Vegs. 50,591 .1,502 75,956,000 15,492 8.185 .2,675 26,352 40,313,000 76,943 116,249,000
GRAND TOTAL 58,089 1,415.38'2,037,000 18,658 -9,785 2,845 31,288 lp46,062,000 89,377 l128,099,000
1. Consumed in-Florida figures are based on records and estimates,, and not entirely guess work.
2. Canned and Processed figures are based on records and some estimates for vegetables and non-citrus.
TOTAL VOLUME AND VALUE OF FLORIDA FRUITS ANTD VEGETABLES FOR SEASON 1945-46
Shipped from Florida, or sold from farms for canning, or for Florida consumption.-
Gross Values for commodities loaded in cars or in trucks, at Florida loading points. -
CARLOT Rail Estimated Florida Trucked Consumed Processed EstimatedTrucked, -GRAND TOTAL
EQUIVALENT .: {& Boat Rail f.o.b. Value out' of in -in Consumed, Canned FLORIDA
SHIPFMENiTS I Cars Car I Total F 1 o r id a i Volumew Valu.i Volunre I V-lue
Total Citrus 7-',&5 ,1,701.127,451,055 6,1946 -10,5F7 104,67 122,191&103,779,-.6'3 17,050.1236,230,70 D
Non-Cit. Fruits 7,48- 814 6,101'C000 ,166 1,6C0 170 4',956 5,749,000 ,454 11,85u0,00
VaF tables I 0S.9 .,02 75,2356,00C 1,4? 8.,185 .,675 76,F52 40,3515,000 ?6,4 5 1YJe,240,0CD
rT i ,D TOTAL 1.7 ,'48 *-,l576.-09,4"',C55 ,5,C04 :'0,352 107,525 153,479w154,841 ,.65 286 ,4127,-.564, 9,70

st.ir.at.-d. ]' actual records available for this rough est ir.ate.







FLORIDA FRCDUCTION AND VALUE FOR 13 SEASONS
(Includes Canned and Locally Consumed)


Carloads
Production
55,754
48,411
45,718
51,885
70,000
68,506
65,151
58,560
70,191
63,221
70,219
69,225
76,943


ALL CITRUS
Carloads
Production
76,620
82,865
74,491
102,827
103,964
143,369 :
109,119
140,903
120,089
154,909
181,592
156,759
197,050
ALL VEGETABLES


Boxes
29,276,287
32,835,854
29,462,052
40,601,208
40,939,629
56,447,995
42,973,112
55,890,754
48,400,0000
68,700,446
80,800,000
69,000,000
86,000,000


Florida
Gross Value
$42,401,191
42,797,752'
53,189,191
68-,838,758
53,285,352
58,646,931
50,365,127
64,192,695
80,572,620
153,052,989
199,688,696
201,912,530
236,230,700


Weighted
Average All
Production


Nnrketing
$1.09
1,06
1,12
1.09
1.08
,97
1.05
.99
1.09
1.12
1.31
1.31
1.29


ALL VEGETABLES & MISCL. FRUITS


Florida
Gross Value
$30,598,346
30,134,054
30,666,719
54,445,922
37,306,680
38,489,172
37,962,5385
43,077,816
57,417,670
81,823,200
87,328,5394
99,441,550
116,239,000
ALL FRUIT


Carloads
Production
62,831
57,5306
52,670
60,118
82,130
S77,606
75,404
68,486
80,219
69,445
79,605
81,213
89,377
rS AND VEGETABLES


Net
$ .34
.27
.69
.61
.22
.07
.12
.16
.57
1.11
1.16
1.62
1.46


Florida
Gross Value
$34,755,424
335,936,126
34,144,707
39,090,756
41,410,710
43,575,732
42,738,720
48,562,482
62,706,220
87,555,990
94,944,402
107,673,150
128,099,000


Carloads Florida
Season Production Gross Value
1933-34 159,451 $ 77,156,615
1934-35 140,171 76,733,879
1935-36 127,181 87,333,898
1936-37 162,945 107,929,514
1937-38 186,094 94,696,062
1938-39 220,975 102,220,663
1939-40 184,563 93,103,847
1940-41 209,389 112,768,552-
1941-42 200,308 143,278,840
1942-43 224,554# 240,608,979
1943-44 261,197# 294,633,098
1944-44 28 3593585 080
1945-46 2864.27,7 5b4,539,700.
NOTES: "Production" figures do not include any production which may have been
abandoned, due to quality, condition, low markets or any other reason. "Gross Value"
means the value of the fruits and vegetables at shipping point when ready to be
transported to market packed or unpacked. "Marketing Costs" as used above includes
picking, hauling, packing, if packed, selling charges, advertising assessments,
inspection fees, etc. "Net" as used above shows the estimated net to growers before
deducting for interest on investment, taxes, insurance, and depreciation if any.
#0O.D.T. regulations resulted in citrus and vegetables being loaded heavier than in
pre-War seasons.


Page 15


Season
1935-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46


Season
1933-54
1934-35
1935-36
1936-57
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46


Gross
$1.45
*1.33
1.81
1.70
1.30
1.04
1.17
1.15
1.66
2.23
2.47
2.93
2.75







Records Total
Estimates Carloads
Season Rail&Boat
ALL Shipped
ORANGES Carloads
1927-28 16,437
1928-29 32,428
1929-30(4)21,816
1930-31 40,353
1931-32 25,725
1932-33 32,580
1933-34 31,799
1934-35 28,213
1935-36 2y,746
1936-37 37,208
1937-38 46,061
1938-39 55,697
1939-40 38,285
1940-41 42,597
1941-42 41,598
1942-4.3 52,287
1943-44 61,160
1944-45 49,507
1945-46 52,665


FLORIDA ORANGE SHIPMENTS, VALUATIONS, A'-D OTHER DATA FOR 19-YEARS
Portion With No. Total' -Estimated- Estimated Estimated
Carloads Rail Haul, Rail -' Trucked -. Canned. Consumed(3)
Shipped Shipped & Boat out of- -in in
By Rail by Boat Shipments Florida Florida Florida
Cars Carloads Boxes Boxes Boxes -Boxes.-
16,310 127 5,917,320 520,000 12,000 650,000
51,98' 8 '440 11,674,080 975,000 38,000 1,062,500
21,635 ..181 7,489,633 65,000 40,000 780,000
39,354 .. 999 14,000,130 1,584,000 61,351 1,308,582
24,054. 1,671 9,904,145 1,486,480 36,362 1, 122,000'
26,414 6,166 11,728,800 1,854,000 50,000 1,332,000
18,291 13,508 12,401,565 2,322,000 61,433 1,386,000
14,843 13,370 11,094,459 2,891,643 177,937 1,425,000
17,403 12,343 '11,714,588 2,510,000 140,000 1,500,000
23,382 13,826 14,580,603 2,560,000 620,185 1,700,000'
31,258 14,805 18,005,497 3,442,000 .1,055,399 1,800,000
37,380 18,317 21,528,758 5,175,741 1,186,689 2,000,000
29,286 8,999 14,718,568 4,376,000 4,170,134 1,800,000
31,402 11,195 16,609,828 5,726,000 3,941,261 2,475,000
40,443 1,155 16,8535,616 4,099,200 4,197,299 2,049,885
52,287 None 25,799,784 2,715,823 6,438,274 2,246,300
61,160 None 30,511,378 2 155,200 11,010,841 2,522,581
49,507 None 24,526,000 1,456,400 14,344,000 2,473,600.
52,589 76 26,007,841 A 2,054,000-" 19,219,412 B 2.,518,747


' Estimated
Florida
Production
Utilized .
Total-Boxes
7,099,320
13,749,580
8,374,633
16,954,063
12,548,987
14,964,800
16,170,996
15,589,039
15,86i,588
19,460,788.
24,5302,896
30,015,287#
25,064,702
28,752,089
27,200,000
37,200,181
46,200,000
42,800,000
49,800,000


*NOTES:


(A) Total includes Export 'Oranges. 67,643, and Boat Oranges 30,400 boxes.

.(B) Canning total-includes-interstate oranges, 35,552 boxes,:for by products manufacture.

(3) Figures for "Consumed in Florida" stock are rough estimates based.on supply, price, population,;
intrastate truck shipments, etc.


Includes 124,099 boxes diverted to other uses.


(4) Fruit fly year when production harvest and shipments' rstricted.


(a
I-







Records Cost of
and Es- Produc-
timates tion(2)
Season Before
ALL Picked
'RANGES Per Box
1927-28 $0.72
1928-29 .72
1929-30(4) .80
1930-31: .48
1931-32 .60
1932-35 .47
19353-4 -.46
1934-55 .45
1935-56 .45
1956-37. .42
1937-38 .58.
1938-59- .54
1939-40 .42
1940-41 .. .40
1941-42 .44
1942-45 .40
3943-44 .50,
1944-45 .50
1945-46 .4.8


FLORIDA ORANGE SHIPMJETS, VALUATIONS, AND OTI


includes Export Oranges 67,643, and Boat


Oranges 30,400.


(Included'in Value).


(B) Canning total includes interstate oranges, 35,552 boxes, for by products"manufacture.(Included in Value).

(1) Net -return after deducting- fo6coat.o f .production which includes fertilizer, spray materials, cultivat-
ing, spraying, pruning, etc., but befo6r'ededucting taxes, interest, depreciation.

(2) Cost of production figures added to .net returns to grower will show "On Tree" average price for rail
and boat shipments. -

(4) Fruit fly year when production, harvest and;shipments restricted.


(A) Total


Cost of
Picking,
Hauling,.
Packing,
Selling
Per Box
$1.350
1.28
1.30
1.10
.95

..87
.90.
.95
-.95
.88
-.84.
.91
..87
.90
1.01
1.25
1.21
1.24


Estimated
Gross FOB
Returns
Florida.
Points
Per Box
$4.16'
* 2.12
3.50
2.15
2.30
"1.48
1.71
1.85'
2.30
2.50
1.56
1.43
1.62
1.65
2.10
2.97
3.10
3.50
3,55


Estimated(l)
Net Returns
to Growers
Rail&Boit
Shipments
Per Box
$2.14-
.120
S1.20
.57
.75
.10
.58

..90
1.15
..30.
.25
..29
.36,
.76..
1.56.
1.35
1.79
1.83


Estimated
Net
Return(l)
Rail & Boat
Shipments
Net Value
$12,665,065
1,400,890
8,987,560
7,980,074
7,428,109
1,172,880
4,712,594
5,547,228
10,5453,129
16,767,693
5,401,649'
5;382,190
4,268,365
5,979,538
12,808,748
40,247,695
41,190,360
45,901,540
47,414,950


!R DATA FOR 19
Estimated
Net Return
All Oranges
Harvested
and Used
Net Value
$15,905,825
2,125,630
9,648,310
8,826,500
8,857,319
2,129,300
6,842,686
8,246,123
14,058,129
20,689,419
6,053,959
6,055,321
4,214,941
9,126,658
18,918,916
55,904,492
60,686,532
74,132,856
91,767,555


YEARS
Estimated
Gross FOB
Returns
Rail&Boat
'Shipmerits
Gross Value
$24,616,*051
23,749,050
24',715,789
50,100,280
22,779.534
.17,55.8,624
21,206,673
20,524,749
26,945,552
36,451,507
28,008,575
30,786,124
23,843,970
27,074,020
35,392,595
76,625,358
94,585,272
85,841,000
91,979,783


Estimated
Gross Return
All Oranges.
Harvested
and Used
Gross Value
$26,804,05L
26,224,450
26,157,789
32,738,844
26,455,04L3
20,446,424
25,752:219
26,352,066
33,349,552
44,979,738
34,339,559
39,687,098
33,665,815
42,442,109
51,904,505
101,089,208'
129,867,001
155,655,600
A161,818,586 B









FLORIDA GRAPEFRUIT SH


Records Total Portion With No.
Estimates Carloads Carloads Rail Haul,
Season Rail&Boat Shipped Shipped
GRAPE- Shipped By Rail By Boat
FRUIT Carloads Cars Carloads
1927-28 20,012 19,953 59
1928-29 28,294 28,091 2035
1929-30(4) 16,415 16,554 61
193b-31 30,462 29,809 655
1951-32 20,515 17,865 2,450
1932-33 19,65.9 15,293 4,346
19553-5.4 17,514 11,534.0 6,174
1934-35 19,218 l0,4J8 8,800
1935-56 15,196 8,83.8 6,5358
1936-37 235,786 16,142 7,644
1937-3.8 16,952 11,511 5,441
1958-39 25,047 17,051 7,996
1939-40 12,974 9,160 5,814
1940-41 19,962 14,478 5,484
1941-42 16,813 16,298 515
1942-43 16,529- 16,5z9 None
1945-44 18,041 18,041 None
1944-45 11,742 11,742 None
1945-46 16,554. 16,542 12


&
Sh

7
10
6Y
11i
7
7
6
7
5
9
6
9
5
7
6
8
8
5
8


IPMENTS, VALUATIONS, AND
Total Estimated
Rail Trucked
Boat out of
shipments Florida
Boxes Boxes
,204,5320 240,000
,185,840. 450,000
,541,913 30,000
841,987 792,000
,821,515 897,940
,266,450 980,500
,981,916 684,000
,577,053 1,187,011
,936Y067 1,028,000
,552,859 1,285,600
,602,063 1,233,600
,844,986 1,472,277
,110,591 1,000,000
,956,475 1,559,600
,856,510 1,042,000
,009,154 612,807
,984 800 555,600
,860,000 205,200
,5306,504 A 340,400


OTHER DATA FOR
Estimated
Canned
in
Florida
Boxes
588,000
1,489,5320
1,670,000
2,892,705
930,171
2,750,000
2,605,964
5,6035,996
5,760,000
6,685,527
5,7935,097
8,395,348
8,800,274-
135,870,966
10,142,575
17,584,025
20,445,648
15,136,000
22,156,149 B


NOTES:


(A) This total includes Export Grapefruit 5,000, and Boat Grapefruit 4,800 boxes.
/
(B) Canning total includes Interstate Grapefruit 11,173 boxes for by products manufacture.

(3) Figures for""Consumed in Florida" stock are rough estimates based on'supply, price, population, intra-
state truck shipments, etc.

(4) Fruit fly year when production, harvest and shipments restricted.


(f) Includes 2,388,224 boxes diverted to other uses.


19 YEARS
Estimated
Consumed(3)
in
Florida
Boxes
300,000
675,000
360,000
654,291
782,000
928,700
841,520
875,000
780,000
800,000
750,000
950,000
740,000
1,000,000
1,058,915
1,094,150
1,2135,952
1,098,800
1,216,947


Estimated
Florida
Prodution
Utilized
Total Boxes
8,332,320
12,800.160
8,401,913
16,180,983
10,431,424
11,925,630
11,113,200
15,2435,060
11,504,067
18,121,786
14,578,760
235,050,8355
15,650,865
24,387,041
19,100,000
27,500,116
31,000,000
22,300,000
32,000,000






FLORIDA GRAPEFRUIT SHIPMENTS, VALUATIONS, AND OTHER DATA FOR 19 YEARS


Records
and Es--
timates
Season
GRAPE-

1927-28
1928-29
1929-30(4)
1930-31
1931-32
1932-53
1935-34
1934-55
1935-36
1936-57
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46


Cost of
Produc-
tion(2)
Before
picked
Per Box ..
$9.52
.52
.60
.36
.40
.38
.39
.57
.39
.30
.36
.30
.40
.35
.40
.35
.40
.40
.34


Cost of
Picking,
Hauling,
Packing,
Selling
Per Box
$1.25
1.25
1.25
1.05
.85
.85
.83
.84
.87
.83
.82
.74
.82
.74
.80
.88
1.07
1.07
1.10 "


Estimated
Gross FOB
Returns
Florida
Points
Per Bex..
$3.28
2.02
3.05
1.50
1.50
1.16
1.51
1.29
1.87
1.48
1.53
1.04
1.42
1.21
1.80'
2.33
2.47
3.00
2.65


NOTES:


(A) This total includes Export Grapefruit 5,000 and Boat Grapefruit 4,800 boxes. (Included in value.)

(B) Canning total includes Interstate Grapefruit 11,173 boxes for by products manufacture.(Included in value)

(1) Net return after deducting for cost of production which includes fertilizer, spray materials, cultivating,
spraying, pruning, etc., but before deducting taxes, interest, depreciation.

(2) Cost of production figures added to net returns to grower will show "On Tree" average price for rail ahd
boat shipmerts.

(4) Fruit fly year when production, harvest and shipments restricted.
(-) Minus s4 n indicates Net Loss.


Estimated(1)
Net Returns
to Growers
Rail&Boat
Shipments
Per Box
"$1.51
.25
1.20
.09
.25
-.07
.29
.08
.61
.35
.35
Zero
.20
.12
.60
* 1.10
1.00
1.53
1.21


Estimated
Net
Return(l)
Rail&Boat
Shipments
Net Value
$10,878,523
2,546,460
7,610,296
1,065,779
1,955,328
508,650.
2,024,756
606,164
3,621,001
3,273,500
2,310,722
Zero
1,022,120
954,777
4,113,906
8,810,047
8,984,800
8,965,800
10,039,012


Estimated
Net Return
All Grape-
frt.Harvested
and Used
Net Value
$11,555,563
3,078,488
8,293,796
1,199,727
2,012,557
-1,285,521
2,591,790
199,84-7
5,269,881
4,448,605
2,615,485
-2,099,526
146,121
514,241
6,439,418
18,156,816
28,461,544
30,343,516
24,983,418


Estimated
Gross FOB
Returns
Rail&Boat
Shioment.s
, Gross Value
$23,630,170
20,575,397
19,342,835
17,762,980
11,731,970
8,429,059
.10,542,693
9,774,397
11,100,445
.15,842,231
10,101,156
.10,238,785
7,257,052
9,627,335
12,341,718
18,661,282
22,192,456
17,580,000
21,986,266


Estimated -
Gross Return
9ll Grapefr.
Harvested
and Used
Gros .Value
$25,018,170
22,557,557
21,479,835
20,366,366
13,522,967
10,170,789
13,296,632
13,409,984
15,936,845
19,731,121
15,063,803
14,688,400
12,289,942
17,335,152
22,849,773
-.40,527,501
56,760,588
49,962,240
A56,604,216B









FLORIDA TANGERINE SHIPMENTS, VALUATIONS, AND OTHER DATA FOR 19 YEARS


Records
Estimates
Season
TAN-
GERINES
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30(4'
1950-31
1931-32
1952-55
i933-34
1954-55
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
-1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46


Total Portion
Carloads Carloads
Rail&Boat Shipped
Shipped by Rail
Carloads Cars.
1,427 1,417
2,951 2,917
) 1,254 1,242
3,830 3,786
35,195 35,077
,282 ........ 2,749
35,998 2,657
35,676 2,199
5,974 2,549
5,885 4,046
4,396 3,098
6,523 4,502
4,051 3,315
4,513 3,449
3,534 3,587
7,382 7,5382
6,179 6,179
6,'847 6,487
5,728 5,728


With No.
Rail Haul,
Shipped
by Boat
Carloads
10
34
12
44
118
533 .
1,341
1,477
1,425
1,839
1,298
1,821
756
1,064
147
None
None
None
None


Total
Rail
and Boat
Shipments
Boxes
513,720
1,062,5360
3835,054
1,387,828
1,188,707
1,181,520
1,501,411
1,461,049
1,581,397
2,288,234
1,709,973
2,5535,532
1,620,345
1,791,824
1,432,144
3,407,401
2,818,782
3,149,000
2,809,372


Estimated
Trucked
out of
Florida
Boxes
40,000
75,000
5,000
264,000
141,100
175,680
243,000
267,706
232,000
43Q,QOO
298,000
478,541
457,200 .
434,800
534,800
400,048
382.;800
527,600
384,000


Estimated
Canned,
in
Florida
Boxes





No record
made of the*
very few
Tangerines
processed
prior, to.
1944-45
Season




3,000
515,600


Estimated
Consumed(5)
in
Florida
.Boxes
50,000
212,500
60,000
218,097
136,000
162,000
247,680
275,000
280,000
300,000
250,000
350,000
200,000
525,000
3335,056
392,700
398,418
420,400
491,028


Estimated
Florida
Production
Utilized
Total Boxes
6035,720
1,349,860
448,054
1,869,925
1,465,807
1,519,200
1,992,091
2,003,755
2,093,597
3,018,634
2,257,973
3,381,873
2,257,545
2,751,624
2,100,000
4,200,149
3,600, 000
3,900,000'
4,200,000


: NOTES:


(3) Figures for "Consumed in Florida"
state truc]: shipments, etc.


stock are rough estimates based on supply, price, population, intra-


(4) Fruit fly year when production, harvest and shipments restricted.








Records
and Es-
timates
Season
TAN-.

1927-28
1928-29
1929-30(4)
1930-53,
1931-32
1932-355
1933-54 .
1934-55
1935-36
1936-37
1937-58
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44 .
1944-45
1945-46


FLORIDA TANGERINE SHIPMENTS, VALUATIONS, AND' OTHER DATA FOR 19 YEARS


Cost of
Produc-
tion(2)
before
Picked
Per Box
$0.81
.81
.90
.54
.75
.56
.56
.55
.55
.50
.52
.45
.50
.50
.58
.40
.65
.65 .
.64


Cost of
Picking,
Hauling,
Packing,
Selling
Per Box
$1.70
1.70
1.70
1.50
1.25
1.16
1.05
.95
1.10
1.15
1.16
.95
1.06
1.08.
1.16
1.35
1.68
1.68
1.71


Estimated
Gross FOB
Returns
Florida
Points
Per Box
$5.28
2.90
5.50
1.95
2.05
1.42
1.80
1.66
.- ..00
1.45
1.86
1.34
2.00
1.68
2.85
2..79
.5.,70
4.25
4.80


NOTES:


(1) Net return after deducting for cost of production which includes fertilizer, spray materials, cultivat-
ing,.spraying., pruning,. etc., but. before deducting for taxes, interest and depreciation.

(2) Cost of production figures added to net returns to grower will show "On Tree" average price for rail and
boat shipments.

(4) Fruit fly year when production, harvest and shipments restricted. ..


(-) Minus sign indicates Net Loss.


Estimated(1) Estimated
Net Returns Net
to Growers Return(l)
Rail & Boat Rail & Boat
Shipments Shipments
Per Box Net Value
.$2.77 $1,423,004
.39 414,5320
.90 344,748
-.09 124,905
.05' 59,435
-.30 354,456
.19 285,268
.16 23355,768
.35 5535,489
-.20 457,646
..18 307,795
-.06 153,200
.44 712,952
.10 179,18Z-
1.11 1,5589,680
1.03 3,509,625
1.57 3,861,731
1.92 6,046,080
2.45 6,882,962


Estimated
Net Return
All Tangerines
Harvested
and Used
Net Value
$1,519,104 .
493,945
378,498
11,5345
73,290
281,513
574,535
409,965
883,889
558,726
320,975
-. 2.42,481
945,9.72
219,216
2,280,955
4',223,464
4,884,190
7,437,192
8,800,902


Estimated
Gross FOB
Returns
Rail&Boat
Shipments
Gross Value
$2,712, 442
35,080,844
1,340,689
2,706,265
2,436,849
1,677,758
2,702,540
2,425,341
35,162,794
3,317,939
3,180,550
35,421,465
35,240,690
3,010,264
4,081,610
9,472,575
10,429,493
13,383,250
13,484,986


Estimated
Gross Return
All Tangerines
Harvested
and Used
Gross Value
.$2,892,442
5,435,844
1,459,689
3,188,362
2,713,949
.1,999,258
35,5352,540
3,035,702
35,90Z, 794
4,12Z7,899
35,881,990
4,291,433
4,411,570
4,415,434
5,818,544
11,436,280
15,041,107
16,296,690
17,807,898








FLORIDA TOTAL CITRUS


Records Total
Estimates Carloads
Season Rail&Boat
ALL Shipped
CITRUS Carloads
1927-28 357,876
1928-29 635,673
1929-30(4) 39,485
1930-31 74,645
1931-32 49,235
1932-33 55,501
19553-54 535,5311
1954-35 51,107
1935-36 48,916
1936-37 66,879
1937-38 67,409
1938-39 87,067
1959-40 55,310
1940-41 67,072
1941-42 61,945
1942-43 76,198
1945-44 85,580
1944-45 68,096
1945-46 74,947


Portion
Carloads
Shipped
By Rail
Cars
37,680
62,996
39,231
72,949
44,996
44,456
.32,283.
27,460
28,790
435,570
45,867
58.,9355
41,761
49,5329
60,128
76,198
85, 380
68,096
74,859


With No.
Rail Haul,
Shipped
by Boat
Carloads
196
677
254
1,696
4,239
11,045
21,023
235,647
20,126
23,509
21,542
28,154
135 ,.549
17,.743
1,.817
None
None
None
88


SHIPMENTS,
Total
Rail
& Boat
Shipments
Boxes
13,635,360
22,922,280
14,214,600
27,229,945
18,914,165
20,176,750
20,884,890
20,132,561
19,232,052
26,221,696
26,517,5355
35,927,076
21,449,504
26,558,127
25,142,270
37,216,5319
42,514,960
355,535,000
59,902,117


NOTES:
(A) Includes Export Oringes
total 107,843 boxe's.


and Grapefruit 72,645 boxes, and Boat


Oranges and Grapefruit 35,200 boxes,


(B) Includes Intrastate Oranges 35,522, Grapefruit 11,173 boxes, total 46,725 boxes.

(3) Figures for "Consumed in Florida" stock are rough-estimates based on supply, price, population, intra-
state truck shipments, etc.

(4) Fruit fly year when production, harvest and shipments restricted.


(#) Includes 2,512,323 boxes diverted to other uses.


VALUATIONS, ANE
Estimated
Trucked
Out of
Florida
Boxes
800,000
1,500,000
100,000
2,640,000
2,525,520
35,010,180
3- 5,249,000
4,346,560
35,770,000
4,274,000
4,975,600
7,126,559
5,815,200
7,720,400
5,476,000
35,728,678
2,.893,603
1,989,200
A 2,778,400


I OTHER DATA
Estimated
Canned .
in
Florida
Boxes
600,000
1,527,520
1,710,000
2,954,056
966,5355
2,800,000
2,667,5397
5,781,95533
3,900,000
7,505,512
6,848,496
9,582,037
12,970,408
17,81Z,227
14,5539,874
24,022,299
51,456,489
29,4835,000
41,871,161 I


FOR 19 YEARS
Estimated
Consumed (.)
in
Florida
Boxes
1,000,000
1,950,000
1,200,000
2,180,970
2,040,000
2,422,700
2,475,000
2,575,000
2,560,000
2,800,000
2,800,000
3,500,000
2,740,000
4,000,000
35,441,856
5,73355,150
.4,134,951
3,992,800
B 4,226,722


Estimated
Florida
Production
Utilized
Total Boxes
16,035,360
27,899,600
17,224,600
35,004,971
24,446,218
28,409,630
29,276,287
52,835,854
29,462,052
40,601,208
40,959,629
56,447,995#
42,975,112
55,890,754
48,400,000
68,700,446
80,800,000
69,000,000
86,000,000






FLORIDA TOTAL CITRUS SHIPMENTS, VALUATIONS. AND OTHER DATA FOF


Records
and Es-
t'imates
Season
iLL
CITRUS
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30(4)
1930-31
1951-32 ..
i952-33
1935-34' "
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42'
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46


Cost of
Produc-
*tion(2)
Before
Picked
Per Box-.
' $0.63 :
.64
.71
.43
.53
.45 :
.44 '
.43
.44
.37 '
.38
.34
.42
.39
.43 :
.39
.49 -
.483-
.46 :


Cost of
Picking,
Hauling,
Packing,
Selling
Per Box
$1.28
1.25.
1.29
S-1.10 :"
.92 "
.90 -
.87
.88 :
..94 :
.92
S.88
.82
.90
,.85
.89
1.01 -
1.24
1.25
1.25


Estimated
Gross FOB
Returns
Florida
Points
Per Box
$3 .74
2.08
3.19
1.86"
1.95
1.36 -
1.65 '
1.63
2.14
2.04
1.57
1.31
1.60
1.51
2.06
2.81
3.01
3.483
3.44


Estimated(1)
Net Returns
to Growers
Rail & Boat
*Shipments
Per Box
$1.85-
.19
1.19
.33
.50
.01
'.35
.32
.76"
.75
.30
.15. :
*.- .28'
.27
.74
1.41
1.28
1.75
1.73


(A)" 'Includes I.xport Oraniges and Grapefruit 72;64S boxes, and Boat Oranges and Grapefruit 35,200 boxes;
total 107,845 boxes. (Included in value.)

"(B) .Includes 'Intrastate-'Oranges 35,522, Grapefruit 11;173' boxes,.total.46,725 boxes. (Included-:in value.)

(1) Net return after deducting'for cost of production which includes fertilizer, .spray materials, cultivat-
ing, spraying pruning, etc., but before deducting for taxes, interest; depreciation..

(2) Cost of production figures -added-to net returns. to grower will show "On Tree"-average price for rail -
and boat shipments.. ...

(4) Fruit fly year when production, harvest and shipments restricted.


Estimated
Net
SReturn(1)
Rail & Boat
Shipments'
Net Valle
$24,964,59e-
4,361,670
16,942,604
8,920,948'
9,442,872.
309,774
7,022,618
6,387,160-
14,717,619
19,583,547
8,020,166.
5,228,990
6,003,437.
7,113,479
18,512,534
52,567,533
54,036,891.
-58,913,420-
64,336,904.


Estimated
Net Return
All Citrus
* Harvested
and Used
IJet, Value
$ 26,980,492
5,698,063
18,320,604
10,037,572
'10,943,166
562,466
10,009,011
8,855,935
20,211,899
24,579,298
8,988,419
3,693,314
5,014,792
8,831,633
27,639,289
76,284,772
94,032,066
111,9135,564
125,551,850


19 YEARS
Estimated
Gross FOB
Returns
Rail&Boat
Shipments
Gross Value
.$50,958,663
47,405,291
45,399,313.
50,569,525
.36,948,353
27,465,441
54,451,906
32,724,487
. 41,206,791
. .53,611,677
41,370,281
44,446,374
34,341,712
" 39,711,619
: 51,815,921
104,759,215
127,207,221
116,804,250
127,451,035


Estimated
Gross Return
All Citrus
Harvested
and Used
Gross Value
$54,714,663
52,217,851
49,097,313
56,293,572
42,691,95.7
32,616,451
42,401,191
42,797,752
53,189,191
68,838,758
53,285,5352
58,646,931
50,565,127
64,192;695
80,572,620
155,052,989
199,688,696
201,912,530
A236,230,700 B


.a~.
0
(74


I I II III








FREIGHT CARLOT SHIPMENTS FROM FLORIDA BY COMMODITIES AND MONTHS, FOR 1945-46 SEASON
COMMODITY :Aug.:Sept: Oct.: Nov.: Dec.: Jan.: Feb.: Mar.:April: May : June: July: TOTAL :.
Oranges : 5: 2: 2226: 4428: 4900: 5370: 5190: 6012: 7188: 4659: 1815: 53: 41,848:
Grapefruit., : 315: 2370: 1084: 897: 1326: 1036: 1296: 1794: 1319: 761: 3: 12,201 :
Tangerines : : : 1: 427: 1267: 669: 696: .539: 202:. 12: : : 3,813 :
Mixed Citrus : : 8: 468: 1578: 2677: 2057: 1782: 1510: 1640: 1203: 635: 15: 13,573 :
TOTAL CITRUS : 5: 325: 5065: 7517: 9741: 9422: 8704: 9357:10824: 7193: 3211: 71: 71,435 :
Lemons : : 1: 2: : : : : : : : 3 :
Strawberries : :. : : : : 2: 15: 7: 1: : : : 25 :
Watermelons : : : : : : : : : 10: 3406: 4019: 35: 7,470
TOTAL MISQ3,FRUITS: : 1: 2: : : 2: 15: 7: 11: 3406: 4019: 35 7,498 :
Beans(incl.Limas): : 17: 1038: 547: 476: 69/: 658: 836: 240: 29: : 4,538 :
Cabbago : : : 11: 314: 1055: 927: 1482: 933: 41:' : : 4,763 :
Celery : 443: 2303: 2105: 2791:- 2366: 2186:' 295: : 12,489 :
Corn,Green : : : : : : : : 17: 75: 11: : 104 :
Cucumbers 73: 232: 22: 2: 2: 86: 681: 470: 1: : 1,549:
Eggplant 5: 12: 10: 11: : 3: 32: 78: 95: 5: 251
Escarole : 134: 266: 236: 191: 204: 195: 88:' 3: : 1,317
Lettuce : : -12: 47: 40: 28: .26: : 1: : : 166
Peas,English : :: : 3: 51: 3: : -- : 2:' : : 62
Peppers 4 66: 64: 109: 125: 262: 218: *604:' 160: : 1,612
Potatoes : : 146: 569: 596: 1655: 3673: 2780: 157: 15: 9,591
Tomatoes : 208: 530: 187. 785: 1429: 1417: 659:' 4: : 5,269
Other Vegetables : 4i : : 3: 33: 85: 53: 128: 117: 33: 9: 19: 484 :
Mixed Car Veg's : .: : 71: 433: 747: 1265: 1191: 1391: 1179: 721: 177: 12: 7,217
TO'AL VEGE'iKBLES : 4. : 170: 2180: 3172: 6389: 6703:10145:11679: 7978: 941: 51: 49,412
IO'-CIT'RUS :. V,:*. 41 1: 172: 2180: '3172: -'91: 6718 ,:1152:11690:11584: 4960: 86: 56,910 :
ALL FRUITS & VEG: 9: 326: 5237: 967r- 1201315613: 15422:19509:22514:18577: 8171: 57: 12d,345

PICK-UP-EXPRESS SHIPMENTS FROM FLORIDA STATIONS' FOR 1945-46 SEASON
COMMODITY :;ug..ept: Oct.: Iiov.: "Do'c.: Jan.: Feb.: iMar.:April: i,'iay : June: July: TOTAL :
Mixed Citrus : : : 1: 70: 1144: 436: 438: 527: 430: 173: 55: 2: 3,376 :
Mixed Vegetables : 50: : 5: 30: 137: 123: 108: 136: 146: 153: 130: 161: 1,179 :
TOTAL FR. & VE'3S.: 50: : 6: 100: 1281: 609: 596: 663: 576: 326: 185: 163: 4,555 :


p.,
CD





RAIL FREIGHT & EXPRESS CiRLOT SHIPMENTS, FOR 1945-46 SEASON
CAO1MODIT_ :Au .: Sot : Oct.: io7. : Dcc .: Jan.: Peo.: : Mar. :Aril: ilay : Juno: July: TOTAL
Oranges : 5: 2: 2226: 442b: 4900: 5370: 5190: 6012: 71b8: 4659: 1815: 53: 41,848
Grapefruit : : 315: 2370: 1084: 397: 1326: 1036: 1296: 1794: 1319: 761: 3: 12,201
Tangorlnes : 1: 427: 1267: 669: 696: 539: 202: 12: : : 3,813
Yixed Citrus : : 8: 469: 1648: 3021: 254'3: 2270: 2037: 2070: 1376: 690: 17: 16,949
TOTAL CITRUS : 5: 325: 5066: 7587:10885: 9908: 9192: 9384:11254: 7366: 3266: 73: 74,811
Lemons : : : 2: : : : : : : : : 3 :
Strawberries : 2: 15: 7: 1: : : : 25:
Watermelons : : : : : : : : : 10: 3406: 4019: 35: 7,470
TOTAL NON-CITRUS : : : : : : : : : :
FRUITS & MELONS : : 1: 2: : : 2: 15: 7: 11: 3406: 4019: 35: 7,498


Beans(incl.Limas )
Cabbage
Celery
Corn,Green
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Escarole
Lettuce
peas,English
Peppers
Potatoes : :
Tomatoes
Other Vegetables : 4:
Mixed Car Vegs. : 50:
-TOTAL VEGETABLES : 54:


17:



73:
5:



4:



76:
175:


1038:
11:

1:
232:
12:
134:
12:

66:

208:
3:
493:
2210:


547:
314:
443:

22:
10:
266:
47:
3:
64:
146:
530:
33:
884:
3309:


476:
1055:
2303:

2:
11:
236:
40:
51:
109:
569:
187:
85:
1388:
6512:


697:
927:
2105:

2:

191:
28:
3:
125:
596:
785:
53:
1299:


658:
1482:
2791:

66:
3:
204:
26:

262:
1655:
1479:
128:
1527:


6811:10281:


836:
933:
2366:
17:
681:
32:
195:
12:
3:
218:
3673:
1417:
117:
1325:
11825:


240:
41:
2186:
75:
470:
78:
88:
1:
2:
604:
2780:
659:
33:
874:
8131:


29:

295:
11:
1:
95:
3:


160:
157:
4:
9:
307:


5:




15:

19:
173:


4,538
4,763
12,489
104
1,549
251
1,317
166
62
1,612
9,591
5,269
484
8.396


107;: 212: 50,591. :


NON-CITRUS & VEGS: 54: 1: 177: 2210: 3309: 6514: 6826:10288:11836:11537: 5090: 247: 58,089 :
ALL FRUITS & VEGS: 59: 326: 5243: 9797:14194:16422:16018:20172:23090:18903: 8356: 320 132,900 :
Notes: Other Vegetables include straight freight cars as enumerated: Carrots 289,
Cauliflower 65, Greens(ex.Spinach) 66, Spinach 17, Sweet Potatoes 42,
Turnips 5. Total 484.
BOAT SHIPMENTS (Carlot Equivalent) FROM FLORIDA PORTS (Does not include initial rail haul exports)
COMMODITY :Aug.:,opt: Oct.: :iov.: Dec.: Jan.: Feb.: Mar,:April: May : June:. July: TOTAL :
Oranges : : : : : 13: :. 53: 10: : : : 76 :
Grapefruit : : : : : 12: : : : : : 12 :
TOTAL CITRUS : : : : 25: : 53: 10: : : : : 88 :


.





FLORIDA INTERSTATE TRUCK SHIPMENT PASSING 1945-46 SEASON
...-: ... Actual Check at Eight Road Guard Stations October 1-June 15
"_,_: --'"' '" Estimated for- Augus't and September and June 15-July 31.
COMMODITY Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar.- Apr. May June July Total
Oranges. 5 -64 646 1002 654-. 557 612 504 357 176 58 5135
Grapefruit .. .75 -196 *72 72 96 89 94 81 54 21 1 851
Tangerines LCL 160 326 139 148 135 45 7 960
Total Citrus 80 760 878 1400 889 794 841 630 418 197T 9... 6946.-
Avocados 20 10 2 LCL LCL LCL LCL LCL LCL LCL 10 42,
Limes 20 10 4 LCL LCL LCL LCL LCL LCL 3 14 12" 63
Strawberries 66 188 144 45 3 446
Watermelons .-- "4 861 1473 200 2538
Other Fruits 6 .- 3- 28 30 10 77
-Total Misc. Fr. 46 .23. 6 -LCL. CLCL. 66 188 144 49 895 1517 232 3166
Beans, Snap 8- 311 232 470 488 633 563 127 2- ~E2832
Limas LCL 6 22 32 .53 46 113 25 -297
Butterbeans 1 22 98 21 LCL 142
Cabbage 10 95 504 532 682 244 16 2083
Celery 33 130 136 147 69 46 5 566
Cucumbers 42 73 27 20 8 53 356 162 LCL 741
Eggplant 3 11 29 34 -59 70 122 111 137 91 15 682
Escarole LCL 5 8 4 -3 20
Lettuce 1 23 30 20 16 3 LCL 93
Peas, English 3 5 18 9 10 7 LCL 52
Peppers 6 41 26 120 232 262 299 414 112 12 1524
Potatoes LCL 23 89 1 8 167 236 126 5 LCL -759
Toma toes 136 238 348 400 608 933 783 98 LCL 3549
CoiTL, Green .5 5 LCL 35 261 83 5 392
Peas, Field 4 4 LCL 43 435 66 1 553
Okra 7 5 7. 4 LCL LCL 2 1 6 53 55 10 155
Squash 1 2 27 56 37 52 96 131 205 44 2 653
Bunched Vegs. LCL 1 2 21 16 13 6 LCL 59
Other Vegs. LCL .7 18 120 99 64 20 .11 1 340
Total Vegs. 11 '7 105 682 307 2011 22 2965 3234 2836 564 43 15492
Tot.Ve-s.& Misc. 5- 35 111 682 80'7 20'~7 2415 3109 323 37131 231 275 I 8ob
Tot.all Fr.& Vegs.- 5 110 871 T561 TG --~2T966_7 320-9 39750 3915 4149 227 334 25602T~
i7OTE: Estimated shi pments for Junie 16-30: Oranges 79; Grapefruit 12; Limas 5; Buter -Beans 4
Celery 1; Eggplant 40- Peppers 45; Potatoes 2;Tomatoes 25; Gr. Corn 25; F. Peas 5; Okra 20; quash
Limes 3-8; Waferir+elons 500; Other Fruits 12. Shipments for August, September, June 16-30 and July
estimated t-,y this Bureau. LCL mean" less than rail carload.


0

















1;





CAR LOT SIlIPi'lEI;TS(FREIGHT,EEX'PRESS BOAT & TRUCK) FRUITS A.;D VEGETABLES BY .IOUITHS FOR SEASON: 194.5-46
Augus-t 1-July 31 'Truck u ctobcr 1-June 1i7 except wI' r 'c estimated)
COl'HIODIT'Y :Auf,. Sep!t: Oc t.: 1ov. Dc.c Jmn. Feb.: \kir. :April: L : June: July: TOTAL
Oranmes : : 7: 2790: 5074: -915: 6024: buO0: 60o4: 7692: 5016: 9l: 111: 4 ,Ob
Grapel'ruit : : 390: 2566: 1156: 931: 1422: 1125: 1390:-1375: 1373: 782: 4: 13,064
Tangerines : : .. 1: 587: 1593: 808: 844: 674: 247: 19: : : 4,773
Mixed Citrus : 8: 469: 1648: 3821: 2543. 2270: 2037:. 2070: 1376: 690: 17: 16,949
TOTAL CITRUS : 5: 405: 5826: 8465:12310:10797:10039:10735:11884: 7784: 3463: 12: 81,845:
Avocados : 20: 10: 2:lc :lcl .:lcl :lcl :icl :lcl :lcl : : 10: 42
Lemons : : 1: 2 : : : : : : : : : 3 :
Strawberries : : : : 68: 203: 151: 46: 3: : : 471:
Watermelons : : : : : 14: 4267: 5492: 235: 10,008
Other Non-Citrus : 26: 13: 4:1cl :lcl :lcl :lcl :lcl :lcl : 31: 44: 22: 140
TOTAL MISC.FRUITS: 46: 24: 8:1cl :lcl : 68: 203: 151: 60: 4301: 5536: 267: 10,664
Beans(incl.Limas): : : .25: 1349: 785: 968: 1217: 1544: 1445: 480: 54: : 7,667 :
Cabbage : 21: 409: 1559: 1459: 2164: 1177: 57: : : 6,846 :
Celery: : : : : 476: 2433: 2241: 2938: 2435: 2232: 300: : 13,055 :
Corn,Green : : : 6: 3: : :cl : 52: 336: 94: 5: 496 :
Cucumbers : : 115: 305: 49: 22: 10: 119: 1037: 632:. 1: 2,290 :
Eggplant : 3: : 16: 41: 44: 70: 70: 125: 143: 215: 186: 20: 933 C~
Escarole : : 134: 271: 244: 195: 207: 195: 88: 3: : 1,337 :
Lettuce : : 13: 70: 70: 48: 42: 15: 1: : 259 :
Peas,English : : 3: 8:. 69: 12: 10: 10: 2: : 114
Peppers : : : 10: 107: 90: 229: 357: 524: 517: .1018:. 272: 12: a,136
Potatoes : :cl : 169: 658: 679: 1822: 3939: 2906:. 162: 15: 10,350
Tomatoes : : ...: : 344: 768: 535: 1185: 2087: 2350: 1447:. 102:1cl : 8,818
Other Vegetables : 12: 7: 38: 7G: 90: 278: 266: 337: 419: 679: 154: 30: 2,386
Mixed Car Vegs. : 50: : 761 493: 884: 1388: 1299: 15.27: 1325: 874: 307: 173: 8,396
TOTAL VEGETABLES : 65:, 7: 280: 2892: 4116: 8523: 9038:13246:15059:10967: 1635: 255: 66,083
VEGS & MISC.FRUITS 111:*31: 288: 2892: 4116: 8591: 9241:13397:15119:15268: 7171: 522: 76,747
ALL FRUITS & VEGS: 116:.436: 6114:11357:16426:19388:19280:24132:27003:23052:10634: 654: 158,592





FLORIDA SHIPMENTS BY VARIOUS MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION FOR TEN SEASONS
(These figures have been revised and rearranged and may not agree or seem to
agree with some previous tabulations. The totals are substantially the same.)

Freight Shipments


1956-37 1937-38 1938-39 1939-40 1940-41 1941-42 1942-43


1945-44 1944-45 1945-46


Oranges 18,826 26,131 51,065 24,812 27,084 34,374 43,590 51,405 41,049 41,848
Grapefruit.- --. ---13,277 8,518. 13,290 6,85Z.. 12,155 12,650-- 12,.258 13,441 -. 8,534 : 12,201
Tangerines 2,706 1,980 2,817 1,896 2,171 1,865 5,017 3,856 4,370 3,813
Mixed -Citius 7,517 7,887 *11,073 7,249 6,770 10,062 13,162 13,626 11.102 13,573
Total Citrus-- 42,126 ..44,516 58,.245 40,789 48,160 58,951. 73,827 82,5328 65,055 71,435
Strawberries 1,263 888 686 43 4 6 22 43 25
Watermelons- 4,223 6,679 35,406 4,977 5,028 5,565 3,363 6,116 8,566 7,470
Miscl. Fruits 7- 8 2 16 15 3
Total Non-Citrus 5,494 7,567 4,092. 5,020 5,034 5,565 3,369 6,154 8,424. 7.498
Beans & Limas 5,587 5,482 4,451 2,910 2,700 3,335 5,943 6,596 4,682 4,538
Cabbage 1,487 5,287 1,610 4,238 2,256 5,568 4,534 6,378 5,157 4,763
Celery 8,902 8,270 7,696 7,769 8,689 9,119 8,557 9,349 11,057 12,489
Corn, Green 54 -55 32 22 2 7 17 18 42 104
Cucumbers 515 1,351 809 1,153 981 1,181 461 405 988 1,549
Eggplant 56 26 23 36 29 175 246 304 251
Escarole 788 818 816 882 573 -818 1,003 1,120 1,347 1,317
Lettuce 319 555 233 371 255 147 197 207 152 166
Peas, English : 413 .663 186 270 80 130 115 153 85 62
Peppers 920 937 719 516 647 863 1,352 1,805- 1,622 1,612
Potatoes 5,395 5,411 3,767 5,116 3,306 5,540 4,756 5,282 7,068 9,591
Tomatoes 5,469 11,460 )8,660 5,222 5,679 5,035 *4,567 4,592 5,505 5,269
Squash (estimated)- -30U'-" *:-350 -- 300 -- 275 275 -300' 400 400- -500 400
Other Variety Vegs. 80 50 29 25. 36 86 133 364 426 484
Mixed Car Vegs. 2,909 53,3516 2,681 1,427 1,354 2,113 3,975 5,855 6,884 7,217
Total Vegetables 53,192 41,829 51,992 30,196 24,849 32,271 35,983 42,770 45,597 49,812
Total Vegs. & Non-Cit 38,686 49,5396 56,084 35,216 29,885 37,836 39,352 48,924 54,021 57,310
ALL FRUITS & VEGS 80,812 9L,912 94,329 76,005 78,043 96,787 113.179 151,252 119,076 128,745
NOTES: Mixed Citrus includes oranges, grapefruit, tangerines; usually around 57% oranges, 26,1 grapefruit, and
17% tangerines. Ijliscl. Fruits include lemons Key limes, Persian limes, mangoes, cantaloupes, grapes,
blueberries, etc. Mixed Cars of Vegetables include beans, cabbage, eggplant, peppers, squash, and practically
all other Florida vegetables. Other Variety Vegetables include straight cars of turnips,. carrots, cauli-
flower, greens, spinach,, sweet potatoes and some others. The mixed car analysis varies from year to year.
No provision is made by Federal G'overnment for a report on straight cars of radishes and squash which
are shipped each year.


Commodity





FLORIDA SHIPMENTS BY VARIOUS ?MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION FOR TEN SEASONS (Cont'd.)


Express Shipments


Commodity 1936-37 1937-38 1938-39 1939-40 1940-41 1941-42 1942-43 1943-44 1944-45 1945-46
EXPRESS
Mixed Citrus 1,444 1.351 688 972 1.169 1.,177 2.371 35100 3,041 3.376
Strawberries 8 36 235 180 47 58 55 1 -
Miscl. Fruits 100 100 100 75 75 125 175 175 -
Total Non-Citrus 108 136 335 255 122 183 230 176 3,376
Beans & Limas 333. 243 44 76 45 -
Tomatoes 7 -
Mixed Car Vegs. 1,022 836 550 388 396 605 1,074 1,285 1,148 1,179
Total Vegetables 1,355 1.086 594 464 441 6(5 1,074 1.283 1.148 1.179
Total Vegs & Non-Cit. 1,463 1,.222 929 719 563 728 1,304 1.459 1,148 1,179
ALL FRUITb & VEGS 2,907 2.573 1,617 1,691 1.732 1,S65 3,675 4,559 4,189 4,555
BOAT Boat Shipments
Oranges 13,818 14,797 18,311 8,997 11,189 1,153 76
Grapefruit 7,639 5,438 7,992 3,812 5,481 514 12
Tangerines 1,837 1,297 1,819 735 1,063 147
Mixed Citrus 15 10 12 5 10 3
Total Citrus 23,509 21,.542 28,134 153549 17,743 1,817 88
Strawberries -
Watermelons 10 25 17 16 -
Miscl. Fruits 10 10 10 10 5 -
Total Non-Citrus 20 35 27 26 5 No record of any
Beans & Limas 219 319 662 211 154 1
Cabbage 52 55 20 21 14 boat shipments
Celery 188 230 335 117 148 -
Corn, Green 1 during (War Period)
Cucumbers 29 92 86 32 40 -
Eggplant 184 250 279 11 35 1942-43 thru
Escarole. 2 1 -
Lettuce 2 5 1944-45 seasons.
Peas, English 1 3 1 1 -
Peppers 956 1,545 1,107 241 163 6
Potatoes 1,5377 2,009 1,674 1,176 898 -
Tomatoes 161 214 114 34 13 -
Squash 65 90 80 80 40 1
Other Variety Vegs. 155 215 175 171 103 3
Total Vegetables 3,389 5,028 4,535 2,095 1,609 11i
Total Vegs & Non-Cit. 3,409 5.063 4,562 2,121 1,614 11 -
ALL-FRUI'S '* '-GS 26,718 26,605 32,696 15,670 19,357 1,828 88






FLORIDA SHIPMENTS BY VARIOUS MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION FOR TEN SEASONS (Cont'd.)


Trucked Out Shipments
Commodity 1936-37 1957-58 1938-39 1939-40 1940-41 1941-42 1942-45 1945-44 1944-45 1945-46

Oranges 6,400 8,605 12,959 11,148 14,515 10,248 6,790 5,588 3,641 5,155
Grapefruit 5,209 35,084 35,681 2,546 3,899 2,605 1,532 889 513 851
Tangerines 1.076 745 1,196 1,105 1,087 857 1,000 957 819 960
Total Citrus 10,685 12,434 17,816 14,799 19,301 135690 9,522 7,234 4,975 6.946
Strawberries 300 600 1,190 1,228 1,073 860 500 164 263 446
Watermelons 450 1,000 990 838 976 695 190 630 654 2,538
Miscl. Fruits 100 250 328 496 321 250 110 192 452 182
Total Non-Citrus 850 1,850 2,508 2,562 2,570 1,805 600 986 1,3569 5,166
Beans & Limas 1,000 35,000 6,075 5,020 5,485 6,526 2,400 2,504 2,257 5,129
Cabbage 700 2,000 2,487 4,959 2,298 3,539 1,900 2,116 1,449 2,083
Celery 600 550 684 1,260 1,681 1,582 560 401 405 .566
Corh, Green 150 300 409 599 219 200 150 190 121 392
Cucumbers 100 600 800 1,269 1,196 866 265 250 444 741
Eggplant 100 250 620 301 586 734 300 525 380 682
Escarole 10 10 15 257 205 116 15 7 25 20
Lettuce 100 100 104 204 252 150 26 54 51 93
Peas, English 80 150 -295 268- 221 222 20 77 53 52
Peppers 175 600 1,155 956 1,445 1,656 900 865 809 1,524
Potatoes 3 525 600 642 1,289 1,068 1,116 500 426 872 759
Tomatoes 700 2,000 5,243 -3,655 3,988 3,994 1,700 35,190 2,826 35,549
Squash '.200 400 478 761 560 538 500 440 447 653
Other Variety Vegs.' 250 800 5C6 793 859 805 450 661 680 1,249
Total Vegetables 4,490 11,160 1,5313 21,551 20,041 22,044 9,286 11,706 10,819 15,492
Total Vegs Li Non-Cit. 5,340 15,010 21.821 23,913 22,411 235,849 9,886 12.692 12,188 18,658
ALL FRUITS & VEGS 16,025 25,444 59,637 58,712 41,712 37,539 19,208 19,926 17,161 25,604

NOTE: Shipments in packages, pounds, dozens, or units were converted in 1945-46 season as follows: Beans 600,

Limas 500, Cabbage 25,000 lbs., Celery 370, Cucumbers 450, Eggplant 470, Escarole 450, Lettuce 550, English

Peas 580, Peppers 480, Potatoes 550, Straviberries 450, Tomatoes 500, 0O.ra 500, Squash 500, Bunched Vegs. 2,000

doz, Green Corn 2,000 doz, Field Pens 500, Other Vogs. 500, Avocados 700, Limes 800, 'Watermelcns 1,000, Other

Fruits 500, All Citrus 400. See Page 26 for Truck Shipments in more detail for 1945-46 season.






FLORID SHIPMENTS BY VARIOUS MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION FOR TEN SEASONS (Cont'd.)


.Total Freight. Express. Boat and Truck Shipments from Florida


Commodity


1956-57 1937-38 1938-59


1959-40 1940-41 1941-42


1942-45 1945-44 1944-45


Oranges 39,044 49,533 62,315 44,957 52,588 45,775 50,180 56,793 44,690 47;059
Grapefruit .. 24,125 17,040 24,96.5 15,190 ..21,515 15,769 135,790 14,550 9,047 15,064
Tangerines 5,619 4,022 5,852 3,736 4,521 2,849 6,017 4,815 5,189 4,775
Mixed Citrus 8,776 9,248- 11.775 8,226 7,949 11,242 15,5355 16,726 14,143 16,949
Total Citrus 77.564 79,843 104,885 70,109 86,573 75,635 85,520 92,662 73,069 81,845
Strawberries 1,571 ..1,52.4. .2,111 .1,451 1,124 918 361 187 306 :471
Watermelons 4,685 7,704 4,415 5,851 6,004 6,260 5,553 6,746 9,020 10,008
.Miscl. Fruits 218 560 453 581 405 575 285 383 467 185
Total Non-Citrus 6,472 9.588 6,962 7,865 7,531 7,555 4,199 7,516 9,793 10,664
Beans & Limas 7,159 9,044 11,212 8,217 8,5384 9,862 8,543 9,100 6,959 7,667
Cabbage 2,239 5,5342 4,117 9,218 4,568 7,107 6,434 8,494 6,606 6,846
Celery 9,690 8,850 8,715 9,146 10,518 10,701 8,917 9,750 11,442 135,055
Corn, Green 204 354 441 421 221 207 167 208 163 '496
Cucumbers 644 2,043 1,695 .2,454 2,217 .2,047 726 655 1,432 2,290
Eggplant 340 526 922 512 657 763 475 771 684 9335
Es.carole 798 828 8553 1,140 776 954 1,018 1,127 1,572 1,337
Lettuce 421 460 3557 575 467 297 225 261 203 259
Peas, English 494 816. 482 538 502 552 135 250 156 114
Peppers 2,051 35,082 2,981 1,693 2,255 2,525 2,252 2,670 2,451 3,136
Potatoes 7,095 8,020 6,083 7,581 5,272 6,656 5,256 5,708 7,940 10,550
Tomatoes 6,3550 13,681 14,017 8,891 7,680 9,029 6,067 7,782 8,151 8,818
Squash .5.65 .. 84Q 858 1,116 875 859 700 840 947 1,055
Other Variety 7egs. 485 1,065 510 989 998 894 583 1,025 881 1,733
Mixed Car Vegs. ___ 5,91 -4,152 3,251 1,815 1,750 2,718 5,047 7,138 8,257 8,596
Total. Veetables- 42,426 59,103 56.434 54,106 46,940 54,931 46,345 55,759 57,564 66',43
Total Vegs & Non-Cit.-48,898 68,691 63,396 61,969 54,471 62,4&4- .50,542- 65.075- .67,357.- 77,147
ALL FRUITS & VEGS. 126,459 148,554 168,279 152,078 140,844 138,119 136,062 155,737 140,426 158,992



NOTE; No boat shipmentss reported during 1942-43, 1943-44, and 1944-45 seasons due to War restrictions, but
there might have been small amounts to the West Indies and some perhaps on Naval vessels or Army Transports,
if any in Florida Taters. A few boat citrus shipments went out during the 1945-46 season.


1945-46


t
C.



P5
H-





Pago 32


CARLOTS
Florida
Counties


Alachua
Dradford
Brevard
BrowA rd
Citrus
Clay,
Collier
Columbia
Dade
De Soto
Dixie
Duval
Es cambia
Flagler
Franklin
Gilchri st
Glades
Hamilton
Hardoe
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmines
Indian River
Jackson
Jeffurson
Lake
Lafayette
Loe
Mad ison
'.anrate o
Marion
Mart in
Oheechoboe
Orange
Oscoola
Palm Beach
Pas co
Pinellas
Polk
Putnr.am
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminol a
St. JJo.hns
St. Lucio
Sumto r
Suwvannao
Union *
Vo lus ia
Valtonr
'Vazhington

Straight Cars
Boat

G1A3;D TOTAL


:1



:2


119 : 5
1118 : 5h
21 : 1


13 : -12
156 : 2
748: 38
3 :




57
70 : 8
171 :.' 335L
1080 : 9
287 : 1681

4919 : 511
50 : 38

8 : 150
1409 b7
:
.0096 : 869





85 56
1753; 21



767 : 27


184 :12201
I










S76 : 12

1-92 4 :12213


7:
1:



62
97




1 :
192 :


6

13 3.3
1:

1 :
14o


15:



30 -


56 :


163






3815 :


5 :
590 :




260
2141:




10
119 :
311 :
66 :

1700:
20

38
19 :

2523

107




900 :

554 :


576



3573


69?14 :9


129
2259:
31


25
760
112):




68:

2260
1559
21)40 :

7473
109

227
1735
2 :
1456 :




"419
2, :



126
2957



133 :




7149 :


7146 899


181 :



1

1147







3
1 :








51
2


3018




11 :
10
6"
2




1538

-5--
2558


70

5:
45

10



10

157

15 :
2 :
62


37



18L
70

370
1633:

*79 :
217 :
31' :


10
6 :
152 :



14763


14763 :


271,:

7




8







289


28'? :


34







2








2:








65


65


The above figures do not include 25,604 carloads shipped out of State by truck,
4,555 carloads br L.C.L. E'xpross, 86 carloads by boat, 21,.00 carload. or more
consumIed in Floridsa and 107,000 carload- or moro canned or processed irL Florida.
PracticaLlly all of :the abovo tot5l of 159,000 or m:cre carloads moved out of the
Comity in which trhLy v'wer3 produced. It should be pointed. out that some freight snhip-
iments loaded in one" County vere actuaLlly produced ir a-Inotlher Count,'. Trucks moved
practically all oi the 15 ..,, or more in addition to 132,98. carloads by rail freight.


RAIL FREIGHT SHIPMENTS BY COUNTIES
1915-46 SEASON
(August 1-July 31)
:Oranges:Grape-:Tanger-: Iixad : Total iBeans &:Cabbage:Corrot.:Cauli-:
:fruit .inos : Citrus: Citrus!Limas :flower:


]
.1


:
:







Fage 33
RAIL FREIGHT SHIPIENITS BY COUNTIES
1945-46 SEASON

CARL OTS (August 1-July 31)
Florida : Celery : Greon : Cukes :Eggplant:EscaroleiGreens :Lottuce&: Peas
Counties : Corn : : : : :Romaine :English:

Alachua 121 : 1 : 220 11 : I :
Bradford : :
Brevard : :
Broward 17 25 : : 30 :
Citrus
Clay
Collier : : : 8 : : :
Columbia : : 6 : :
Dade : :
De Scto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler : 1 : : : : : 2
Franklin : : : : :
Gilchrist : : : : :
Glades
Hamilton : : : :
Hardeo : : : 18: 1:
Hendry 30: 1: : : 30:
Hernando
Highlands : : : : : 8:
Hillsborough : 1: : 137: 85: : : 21: 2:
Holmes
Indian River : : :
Jackson 65
Jefferson
Lake : : 35 : : : 1 : 1 :
Lafayette : : :
Lee 127 : 38:
Levy : : : ::
madlson 4
Manatee 1 : : 91 32 : 181 : 5:
L'arion : 58 : :: 9 : : :: :
martin 10: 5: :
Okeechobee
Orange : 875: 1: 116 : 109: 1: 3::
Osceola
Palm Beach : 3926 : 25 :35 : 600 : : .50 : 58
Pasco
Pinellas :
Polk
Putnam
Santa Rosa
Sarasota : 189 : : 11: : :
Seminole : 561 : 65: : 1: 13:: 26
St. John
St. Lucio : : : : : : 12 :
Sumter : : 386 :
Suwannee
Union : : : 7 :
Volusia :: 2
Walton :
Washington


Straight Cars
Boat
Pick-Up-Eyp. :
GRAMID TOTAL


12489


12L89


104

lQ :
10/4 :


15l9

15h9 :


251


251


1M17


1517


66


66


166


166


62


62





Page j} RAIL FREIGHT SHIPLEIUTS BY COU1-TIES
19L45-46 SEASON
(August 1-July 31)
CARLOTS
Florida :Peppors: Pota- :Spinach.--Sweet : *TojLa- :Turnips: Mixed Tctal
Counties : : toes : os :Potatoes: toes :& Ruta.: Vor's :Vezetablos:

Alachua : 72 : 29 : 21 150 115 :
Bradfor:::::: : : :
Brovnrd : .: : 1 : : : 1 :
Brov :rd : : : 8h : 2552 1: 461
Citrus : : : : : :
Clav : 6 : : : : : : 91 :
Collier : 186 25
C6lu mbia : : : : :
Dde : : : : 190: 2287 :
Dd Soto : : : 7
Dixio : : :
D 1 : : : : : : : : :
Egcambia : 119 : : 2 : 121
Flaglor : : 521 : : ::: 53:
Franklin : :
Gilchrist :: : : : : :
Glades : : : : : : : : 157
Hgnilton : : : : : : : :0 :
Hardoo : 8 : : : 8 : : : 15 :
Hendry : : : : 0: : 29 :
Hernando
Highlnds : lh::::: 26 : 1
Hillsborough : 537 : 2 : 2235 : 509 : 16
Holm s : : 10 : : : : : : 10 :
Indian River 310: : :10:
Jackson : : : : : 65 :
Jefferson : : : : :
Lake : : : : 7: : 9: 90:
Lafa'-ot:o : t :
Lee 0 1 8 : 5* S, 11 1 : 197 44
Madon : : :
Manatee : : 312: : 113: 101C
Marion : 1 : : : 17: : 356 60::
Martin : 2: : : : : 2 :25
Okeecriobee : : 1 : 110 : : : 11
Orange : 57: 52 : 17:" : : 596: 2271:
Osceola : : : : :
Phln Beach : 99: 0 : : : 116 5: 1919 13035
Pasco
Pinell.as : : : : :
Polk : : : : : : : : 7
PutnanL 699 : : : : : : 91 :
Santa Rosa : :
Sarata : 2 : l: : : : 2 1977
Seminc. : 9 : : : : : : 62: 7
St. .TOLZv 5 1 : : : : 4 o663:
St. Luci : : : : : 107: : 1125
Sunter : 12 : : : : : : 73 : 61 :
Suwan o:::::: :
Union : : 16: : : : 58
Volusia : : : : : : : : 1
Walton : : : : :
Washington : : : : : :

Straight Crs : 1612 9591 : 17 L2 5269 : 5 : 7217 : 49412
Bbat : : : :
Pick-Up-Exp. : : : : : : 1179 : 1179
GRAND TOTAL' 1612 : 951 : 17 : 42 : 269 5 : 596 : 50591
The above figures do not include 25,604 carloads shipped out of State by truck,
4,555 carloads b'.' .C.L. Express, 83 cnriods by boat, 21,CL0, carloads or more
consumed in Florida and 107,00 carloads or morT:, canned or rDrocossed in Florida.
Practicall-, all f bove ttf the b total 159,000 or morj .rlo'.ds moved out of the
County in which they,' wero produced. It should be r,'inted out that some freight ship-
ments loaded inr orneo County vw.ro actually produced itn not.-thr County. Trucks moved
practically all of the 1i5,000 or more in addition to 132,983 carloads by rail freight.









CARLOTS
Flo rida
Counties
Alachua
Bradford
Brovard
.3rowvard
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
De Sota
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flaglor
Franklin
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardue
Her.dry
Hernando
Highlands
Hi lsborough
Homes
Indian River
Jackson
jofforson
Lake
Laf'ayet te
Lee
Lovy
Liad is on
'anatee
,ar ion
?Iartin
Okeochobee
Orange
Osceola
Panl Beach
Fasco
Pinellas
?Polk
Putnam
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sumtor
Suwannee
Union
Volusia
Walton
Washington

Straight Cars
Boat
Pick-Up-Exp.
GRAND TOTAL


RAIL FREIGHT SHIPMENTS BY COUMiTIES
lq19h5-6 ZEASON
(Aug.ut 1-July 31)


Lemons : Stravr-
: berries


















25














:











3 25


S25


ea1
me.


S


Total
N:on-(


Page 35


GRAND TOTAL


tor-
lons l



1 :
1 :

43
2-




803
28



15 :9
2j :



2 :
31 :
3 114
951

71

73
12
14




538
612
20
25

77470


7470


Total
Non-Citrus &

6li2


1 :
1 :







808
28


1 l/,
165


l52

2 :


951.

71

73






538 :
612
20
25

7498


7498 :


Vog's :
Citrus i

1780
L:
1 :
L81 :
1 :



30
415
121 :
556 :
513 :


26 :
l1 :
1828
10
?:



1015
15205




23)2 :

.0

1 :
1977.:
7627
4663
1125
1139
612
1308
173
29 .

56910
1179
58089


1900
2260
h818
32

12
312



554
815
1Q7
38
1465
593
2331
5337
10
2750
3a9
9515
30
955

128
27
110
16905
1315
612
25509
1349
1
210
105


612
58
1512
1
29

128345


132988






Page 36



StL.ASO


I IJf.ST.IT- .TRUCK SHIPRETS OF C.ITRUS BY i,,
19l5-6 Season. Oct. I-June 15
rloads--of .O P Co:-.es.. '...


Orcngs- fruit TanIa j


Au ,u -t
S.ptonber (c)*
Oct. 1-6 0.7u
7-15 ".9
1L--20 172.8
21-27 185.0
28-5 10.0

C-)
:INcv. 4-10 1b0.7
11-17 1)7.0
18-2L 161.'
r4-1 1c1*.E

18-22 --,
De,. 2-b 21. .

1227- 52.1
,-2 112 .
J:n. '.-1! 129.1
-26-19 iL.U
-,JC-2 I- .
Feb. 5-9 170.2
10-16 1 0.1
17-2; 122 .'
21-27 114.2
10-i6 19.16
17-25 1 ,41.6
2Lo50 1)1.7
7-1' 125.c
21-27 112.2
28-. L 0.1


(7,)
; 1
56.1
A7T.5
h2.1
26.9
20.5
1.2

17.2
17.9
21 .0
7.2

19..
2,3.
ID.9
20.6


16
c 1


19.
16.
22.2
20.19
16.2
16.9)


-2


7.8
- 0
oi .i
76.i

92.2
127.0



2h3-

28.1
t.2
i'.9

: 1.
-
;i.7
2.5
17.9

i.
.1
.1


1L .al

(80)*
86.8
21h.9
217.0
1'5.1
187.2
257.L

co.9




2L7. 7

1 1,.J
1 .0
121.3


1 1.,4
15 I..
1. !4.'
1,).1


Hay 5-11
12-1I
19-2;
26-f
June 2-6
9-15
16-50
July


Oct. 1-
July 31

1LiJER

' J2ASO;'
I


77.



Li0
.(77


FEtS
J


.- G fruit Tan's zo

13.7 2.2 9.i
*.9 .9 7 .'
S- .I .7 ?7.
-- 1- 1 .o 9 .
.7

:12) 9
( :1) (59


L4995 762 r(6,o 6715

STATE TRUCK S PTUTS OF CITRm.S
,fh n';THS .'.-fr -, SU.,SO;I


Orsnc--o. C-_ruit- T L'r'


Au',ust
Sept.ember (L:
('ctober L5".
JIov robe r 'i-'55
Dec b, r 1001 .o
aJin uary '.
Fobru'ry ra .L
L' rch 12.1.
April 50l. 2
; ', 35'7.0
Jun I- 1-1, 7.
16-50 (79*J
July ( a,'
tLstimr.tes bV.sed f.n
st,'te truck: chiprmen


(75),"
:!9o.

71.
88.
4^


1Z


cU.7
). I
0.,, I L
52.;

(12)?
incpecticr
ts


T ctA


.9.6 877.
6.O 1 ,99




L'PL i06b

. for Irite


R, JAE ;!iD ',ALUE OF Ir CO17f-O l I i S I 0O. _L5 SEA $IIS
,.c..b. FLOF1,i ': PA.D', V Lii ,. '!:LU P ,acP
Grc.os
'ros,-': Pckied Value
Acr~V V-, I Fx.rL


1ir -fO
160^,0a,
1.3 ,9,0

20 9,53 ':
1 ,fl, L,-,
215,00
1 CL 0 ,.

221,200
1'-12, [.0
251,600
^51,,700
27 5,,'0'
i ,- 55o

"-1 LL


2 5,7 nn,000n
19,--^,000
.';, 192,000
27,817,000
29.25 Io000
55,.522.000
;O-,l -I'000

57,259,000 .
i, ,&$1,000O
51, O0" 6,000
77,119,000
.t 7'25,72 ,00
'' t', c95,00
i 1 ,h70, oc.o


160
122
10
11
1140
192

251
ho 01
;1
398
L05,


'DOTE: The cc.rmmor liti-es covered in love t.bu'ltit:in are Ben. s,
Limas, C.abbase, Cel.r;,, rueunbers, Eggplcint, E:.carol:, Lettuce,
Poas. Pepp,:er' Pot9to -.:, TomjratCoes, Cant'loupes 3Str' i brri.es nrid
Va t- r me i ons.
NOTE: The above acrecce do,: not in.chlU-" ain-' which hwd to be
replantedl or vwas :,ban.Joled bc js,: of fr.-.-t inter or other
wV: 't he]r h[iardcS .


. F. 5 ,.'i


1971-32

1 ,-iL 7-
1957- ',
l957-',-,
19^- 9

19LO-L$l

19h/.-L.
19L45-h46





FLORIDA
FEDERAL-STATE INSPECTION SERVICE
Shipping Point Inspections
July 1. Iq5 thru June 50, 91,6


Commodity


CITRUS
Oranges
Grapefruit
Tangerines
Mixed Citrus
Total Citrus


Type Container
(or unit)

Std. box oquiv.
Std. box equiv.
Std. box equiv.
Std. box equiv.


VEGETABLES
Beans Bushel hampers
Cabbage 50 lb. bags
Carrots 50 lb. bags
Chicory Bushel hampers
Celery Crates
Corn 50 lb. bags
Cucumbers Bushels
Escarole Bushel hampers
Onions 50 lb. bags
Peppers B~shels
Peppers 1- bu. crates
Potatoes *** 1l0 lb. bags
Potatoes 50 lb. bags
Potatoes ** Bulk (pounds)
Potatoes *
Potatoes (Sweet) Bushels
Tomatoes Lugs
Mixed Vegetables Packages
Total Vegetables
MISCL. FRITTS
Limes Std. box equiv.
Watermelons Melons
Total Miscl.Frts.
Total Vegs. & Miscl.Frts.


Peanuts


Bulk (pounds)


GRAND TOTAL


Number of Cars


40,200
11,395
3,7l3
69,675


290
2
10,716
92
46
29
92
1
79



1,850


18
4612
25,99h
48
95,717


Number of Units Average Containers
(or containgers3 (or Units per car)


20,170,095
5,852,866
1,701 668
7098.321
34,822,950


h,96
1,279,9 3
58,159

6,551
h,631,387


2,h01,20


501.74


50oo.00


637.63


2.
.00


652.83
0.00
00.00




599.57

361.94
1,000.13


50,029.58


* A considerable number of cars contained 100 lb. and 50 lb. bags and 1 bu. boxes of Potatoes. No segrega-
tion wn.s made of such cars. For this reason no average units per car are shown. Howvvor Equivalent to
throe hundred 100-lb. bags aro usually loaded per car. ** and *** Inspoctod for U.S. Production and
Marketing Administration.




Page 38


Date by Weeks

Oct. 1-6
7-15
14-20
21-27
Oct. 28-I!ov.3
4-10
1.1-17
18-24 .
Nov. 25-Dec'.
2-8
9-15
16-22
2,5-29
Dec. 30-Jan.S
6-12
13-19
20-?26
Jan. 27-Feb.2
3-9
10-16
17-23
Feb. 24-M.iar.2
5-9
10-16
17-23
24-50
Mar. 351-Apr.6
7-13
14-20
21-27
Apr. 28-May 4
5-11
12-18
19-25
May 26-Jun.l
2-15
9-15


TRUCK SHIPFHETS OF FLGRIDA VEGETABLES AID NON-CITRUS FRUITS
BY WEEKS FOR 1945-46 SEASON


(Rail Carload Equivalent)*
Oct. 1. 1945-June 15.1946-,


Cab- Cel- Egg- Esca- Let- Eng. Pep- Pota- Toma- Gr.
Bean3 Limas bage ery Cukes plant role tuce Peas pers toes toes Corn


LCL
LCL
LCL
17
8
67
98
72
78
64
52
70
27
69
108
120
106
119
120
98
141
125
162
164
119
144
120
145
1335
141
84
55
17
3


LCL
LCL
1
4
LCL


5
6
6
7
8
6.-
11
153
9
14
13
12
6

17
15

22
43
20
10
6


LCL
1

8
10
12
24
28
91
105
112
128
118
12.5
144
144
129
183
163
157
154
111
72
37
25
15
- 6
2
2


LCL
1
6
15
28
28
18
15
7
9 8
6
8
5

7
4
3
4

2
2
1
2
6
16
27
58
70?
84
101
79
76
Z 7

4
LCL
LC L


LCL
1
4
3
6
6
10
6
7
10
5


12
16
14
15
11
14
16
19
25
20
51
51
54
30
2,6
24
25
21
21
29
57
57
25
24


LCL
1
-
1

1
2
LC-

1
2
3

1


LCL
3
LCL

3


LCL

C-
4
6
8
2
9
7
7
7
6
4
5
6
5
6
3
5-
2
1
2
LCL
LCL
LCL
LC L


LCL
1
2
6
5C
11
15
153
5
5
8

17
24
36
28
26
47
79
49
68
61
64
57
61
50
55
65
92
115
110
83
88
65
354
26


I

24
45
67
69
6':
50
27
87
87
68
60
81
80.
91
119
135
130
122
135
164
160
219
230
249
255
211
186
134
109
46
12


LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
LCL
1
7
20
27
36
50
79
80
35
19


Total Above 283.57 292 [2084 566 744 627 22 94 56 1470 759 5529 562

Total by Mos.'2832 29 120o8, 565 741 624 20 93 I 52 1467 757 5524 362


* Road Guard Stations' check of


Fassings out of State while stations operated. Some


truck shipments w.e-re made prior to October 1 and more after June 15. See page 26 for
complete truck shipments. Pre-.':ar rail carload equivalent retained for more accuratc-
comparisons vrith other years.
NOTE: LCL means less than rail carload.
NOTZ: Converted into pre-lar rail carload equivalent on basis of: Beans 600 bu; Lirpas
500 bu; Cabbage 25,000 lb3; Celery 370 crates; Cukes 450 bu; Eggplant 470 pkgs;
Escarole 450 pkgs; Lettuce 550 pkgc: English Feas 580 bu; Feppers 480 pkgs; Potatoes
550 pkgs; Tomatot.s 500 pkgs. Gr. Corn 2000 doz.
NOTE: The difference between Total by Weeks and Total by Months is principally a
matter of fractional carlots -- hard to explain, but it is alright.





Page 39
TRUCK SHIP!EfITS OF FLORIDA VEGETABLES A;D HOIO-CITRUS FRUITS (Cont'd.)
BY WEE:S FOR 1945-46 SEASON

I. i
Squ- Bun. Oth. w Tot. Avo- '- Oth. Tot. Grand
Date by Weeks Okra ash Vcgs. Vegs. ," Vegs. cados : Limes Mel. ru. Fru. Total

Oct. 1-6 1 LCL LCL LCL 1 1 1 2
7-13 2 3 'LCL 1 8 1 3 4 12
14-20 2 5 LCL 1 19 1 LCL 1 20
21-27 2 11 LCL LCL 2 58 1 1 2 40
Oct. 28-Nov.3 1 12 LCL 1, 63 LCL 63
4-10 1 13 LCL LCL 21 133 133
11-17 1 19 LCL 2 1 188 LCL LCL 188
18-24 LCL 13 LCL 5 LCL 167 LCL 167
Nov. 25-Dec.1 LCL 9 LCL 5 LCL 200 LCL 200
2-8 LCL 5 2 LCL 183 LCL LCL 183
9-15 LCL 8 1 4 176 LCL LCL 176
16-22 LCL 14 LCL 7 i 224 LCL LCL 224
23-29 6 LCL 3 1181 LCL 1 118
Dec. 30-Jan.5 9 5 17 368: LCL LCL LCL 568
6-12 LCLI 11 4 21 4561 LCL 11 .,LCL 11 467
13-19 LCL 12 5 31 475: LCL 21 LCL 21 496
20-26 LCL 11 5 26 459; LCL 20 LCL 20 479
Jan; 27-Feb.2 LCL 12 4 36 4681 LCL 25 LCL 23 491
3-9 LCL 17 4 20 485 LCL 40 LCL 40 525
10-16 1 27 4 26 550 LCL 45 LCL 45 595
17-23 LCL 26 4 28 627 LCL 54 LCL 54 681
Feb. 24-Mar.2 1 29 4 22 616 LCL 49 LCL 49 665
3-9 LCL 36 4 20 713 LCL 29 LCL 29 742
10-16 LCL 51 3 17 694 LCL 37 LCL 37 731
17-23 LCL 25 5 14 652 LCL 31 LCL 31 685
24-50 LCL 52 3 8 LCL 686 LCL 37 LCL 37 723
Mar. 31-Apr.6 1 45 2 9 4 679 LCL 20 LCL 20 699
7-13 LCL 55 2 6 11 745 LCL 11 LCL 11 756
14-20 LCL 51 1 2 16 749 LCL 9 LCL 9 758
21-27 4 47 2 1 24 838! 6 LCL 2 8 846
Apr. 20-May 4 3 26 LCL 4 511 767 LCL 2 LCL 3 5 772
5-11 6 18 LCL 1 1071 717i LCL 1 LCL 25 26 745
12-18 13 6 LCL 5 127i 596i LCL 1 1 140 1 143 739
19-25 20 5 LCL 4 1501 5951 LCL LCL 2 319 8 329 924
May 26-Jun.1 21 1 LCL 1211 488' LCL LCL 1 435 23 459 947
2-8 17 1 1 54j 225 5 452 7 462 687
9-15 15 LCL LCL 12; 117_ 2 462 7 471' 588

Total Above 112. 647 60 341 685 15283 3 447 14 1838 46 2348 17631

Total by Mos. 113 6491 59 5340 684115257 3 447 14 1858 46 2548117605
* Road Guard Stations' check of passing out of State while stations operated. Some
truck shipments were made prior to October 1 and more after June 15. See page 26 for
complete truck shipments. Pre-war rail carload equivalent retained for more accurate
comparisons with other years.
NOTE: LCL means less than rail carload.
NOTE: Converted into pre-war rail carload equivalent on basis of: Okra 500 pkgs;
Squash 500 pkgs; Bunched Vegetables 2000 doz; Other Vegetables 500 pkgs; Field Peas-
Butter Beans 500 pkgs; Avocados 700.pkgs;-.Strawberries 450 pkgs;..Limes 800 pkgs;
Watermelons 1000 melons;.Other Fruits 500 pkgs.
NOTE: The difference between Total by Weeks and Total by Months is principally a
matter of fractional carlots -- hard to explain, but it is alright.





Page 40 FLORIDA AUCTION SALES, 1928/29 1945/46
Furnished through courtesy of the Statistical Department
Florida Citrus-Exchange, Tampa, Fla.

ORANGES


Season.

1928-29 Cars


Average $


1929-30 Cars
Average $

1930-31 Cars
Average $

1931-32 Cars
Average $

1932-53 Cars
Average $

1933-34 Cars
Average $

1934-35 Cars
Average $

1955-36 Cars
Average $

1936-57 Cars
Average $

1937-38 Cars 1
Average $

1938-39 Cars 1
Average $

1939-40 Cars
Average $

1940-41 Cars 1
Average $

1941-42 Cars
Average $

1942-43 Cars
Average $

1943-44 Cars
Average $

1944-45 Cars
Average $

1945-46 Cars


N. Y.


PHILA. BOOST. PITTS. CLEVE.. CHIC. ST.L. CINCI.


..


Average $4.72 $4.44 .$4.70 $ 4.48


550 757


6440 5193 1449 816
3.45 5.01 .3.03 2.79

4848 1409 982 739
4.94 5.98 4.43 3.79

8444 3164 1679 952
3.55 3.30 3.57 3.14

6517 2228 1182 511
3.40 3.21 5.24 3.06

9238 2868 1419 579.
2.43 2.45 2.53 2.35

7613 2632 1436 515
2.75 2.62 2.69 2.54

8245 2720 1419 511
2.61 2.47 2.58 2.44

7503 2624 1561 540
3.02 2.93 3.02 2.95

9112 3164 1657" 429
3.23 3.15 3.28 3.12

0228 3376 1849 495
2.26 2.20 2.24 2".18

2440 4049 2132 694
2.10 1.99 2.16 2.11"

8758 2908 1290 364
2.45 2.25 2.47 2.16

L0089 5320 1385 426
2.37 2.26 2.45 2.31

9053 3064 1377 5337
2,86 2.76 2.'90 2.73

6771 2330. 851 439
3.85 3.79 3.82 3.72

6239 2257 678 522
3.98 3.82 4.02 5.86

4765 1651 425 293
4.62 4.38 4.47 4,27'

4510 1478 563 237


2.82

395
4.70

707
3.27

497
3.20

555
2.40

526
2.65

578
2.53

559
35.04

824
5.21

298
2.28

1091
2.20

589
2.31

647
2.44

568
2.91

485
3.85

488
3.86

264
4.~54


DET


- 582


3.12

621
5.08

1112
3.34

776
3.25

921
2.55

894
2.67

1070
2.59

878
3.15

1080
3.33

1394
2.39

1659
2.26

1012
2.41

1020
2.45

865
2.88

959
3.77

815
5.89

532
4.29


: 197 345 196
$4:43 $4.39..$4.24


211 '
4.15

358
3.05

174
2.90

273
2.30

266
2.46

258
2.34

249
2.72

264
3.01

413
.2.05

511
2.01

318
2.09

512
2.25

204
2.70

.359
5.70

476
'3.67

271
4.17


2.79

483
4.38

729
3.14

447
3.14

614
2.30

495
2.47

. 553
2.35

555
2.87

708
.3.12

1181
2.16

1555
2.01

1031
2.05

1077
2.18

1002
2.64

742
3.55

516
3.65

299
4.02


35
23.

17
5.2

2


2.4


24
2.6

2
2.4


3.

4:
5.

5
2.

7
2.

34
2.

4
2.

5i
2.

4
5.

6
3.

43
4.


372 262 308 8268
$4.17 $4.43 $4.45: $4.58


R. BALT. TOTAL

- 13787
- 3.15

..- 9688
-- 4.62

)8 17453
1 3.40

9 12511
6 3.30

56 16721
6. 2.44

37 142 14786
59 2.88 2.70

80 258 15890
47 2.44 2.56

71 2A40 14780
)8 2.82 3.00

12 282 17932
27 2.98 3.21

50 302 20686
26 1.98 2.24

17 396 25224
16 1.94 2.09

953 173 16836-
25 2.23 2.55

34 261 18971
42 2.22 2.35

553 312 17133
88- 2.77 2.03

12 277 13603
07 3.56 3.79

58 200 12849
85 3.71 3.90

65 157 9022
37 4.39 4.48




.'W -


Se3son..

1928-29 Cars
Average

1929-30 Cars
Average

1930-31 Cars
Average

1931-32 Cars
Average

1932-355 Cars
Average

1953-34 Cars
Average

1934-35 Cars
Average

1955-36 Cars
'*- Average

1936-37 Cars
Average

1937-38 Cars -
Average

1938-39 Cars -
Average

1939-40. Cars
Average'

1940-41.Cars -
Average

1941-42 Cars
Average

1942-43 Cars
Average

1943-44 Cars
Average


N. Y. PHILA. BOST. PITTS. CLEVE. CHIC.


C:


S.
S.








S.


1944-45 Cars
Average $
1945-46 Cars,,.
Average $


5.88


$3.67 $53.88 $3.06


425 1149


3868 1147 814
i3.61 3.09 3.12

3253 1153 756
p4.45 4.00 4.00

5269 1610 1037
)2.66 2.42 2.44

4680 1254 935
p2.49 2.34 2.50

5158 1266 892
?2.05 1.95 2.06

3948 1129 696
p2.41 2.25 2.40

4895 1326 898
?2.04 1.81 1.93

3928 1072 872
p2.67 2.38 2.49

5376 1650 956
;2.24 2.06 2.22

4881 1244 814
12.20 2.06 2.13

6389 1429 1020
I1.75 1.57 1.73

4765 1153 653
>2.21 1.92 2.10

5035' 1334 865
51.96 1.75 1.95

4519 1166 712
,2,55 2.36 2.55

3411- 967 48'7
35.18 2.97 3.21

2628- 778 558
~5.63 35.48 3.64

2320 498 185
4.35 4.03 4.11
3293 737 2135


480
2.92

640
5.70

762
2.41

505
2.38

429
2.02

310
2.38

389
1.94

262
2.40

274
2.14

190
2.05

329
1.68

181
1.92

249
1.76

125
2.33

142
2.90

128
3.36

31
3.74
55


2.89

458
.4.15

718
2.44

510
2.49

433
2.21

388
2.39

403
2.09

396
2.54

415
2.29

313
2.11

384
1.77

141
2.11

256
1.92

136
2.61

96
2.90

49
3.32

23
3.01

$2.60


* 3.32

1029
4.81

1388
2.55

805
2.59

738
2.29

684
2.55

721
2.19

395
2.68

494
2.58

353
2.28

361
1.95

182
2.29

513
2.00

208
2.85

114
5.17

69
3.20

21
3.31
19'


DET


ST.L.




235
4.03

462
2.38

207
2.41

228
1.96

221
2.57

200
2.05

132
2.40

151
2.53

72
2.16

118
1.85

62
2.10

109
1.77-

51
2.73

19
2.96

44
3.51

13
3.38
2


CINCI,

278
2.79

303
3.95

425
2.33

554
2.51

409
2.01

370
2.29

444
1.92

340
2.-32

423
2.24

342
2.09

432
1.66

241
1.98

416
1.74

222
2.33

201
2.67

90
3.05

16
3.13
1-8


$3.62 v3.33 $2.91 $2.81 $3.19 $3.82


NOTE: See page 47 for Auction average and costs back to Florida on tree equivalent.
Many of the better oranges,and grapefruit went to auction.and averaged higher than
private sales. Auction tangerines averaged lower than private sales.


Page 41


FLORIDA AUCTION.SALES, 1928/29 1945/46 (Cont'd)

G RAPEF R U I T


51
2.5

32
2.5

35
2.3
2.5

29
2.5

35
2.)
2.1

25
2.6

30
2.4

21
2.2

27
1.8

14
2.0

21
1.9

9
2.6

8
3.0

9
3.3

1
3.1
1


R. BALT. TOTAL

.... 8161
- 3.54

- 7827
- 4.28

.6 12187
1 2.54

:8 9578
54 2.47

'0 9863
1 2.06

)8 41 8085
1 2.42 2.39

0 155 9759
.0 1.86 2.00

11 117 7765
2 2.28': 2.57

)7 151 10197
:1 2.12 2.23

.9 127 -8555
.1 1.88 2.16

'7 187 10926
0 1.46 1.72

0 85 74835-
6 1.75 2.13

.5 91 8823-
1 1.61 1.91

'8 88 7525
4 2.60 2.52

5 82 5604
0 2.70 3.10

'7 45 4264
1 3.14 3.56

.3 14 3132
.5 3.54 4.24
4 45 **4586





FL(OR3DA AUCTION SALES, 1928/29 1945/4 ...(Cont'd)


Season N. Y.

1928-29 Cars 1078
Average $2.06

1929-30 Cars 612
Average $2.44

1950-31 .Cars 1311
Average ,1.62

1931-32 Cars 1190
Average $1.54

1932-33 Cars 1308
Average E1.28

1933-34 Cars 1134.
Average $1.21

lo34-35 Cars 1071
Average $1'18

1935-36 Cars 1124
Average $1.35

1936-37 Cars 1557
Average ;1.12

1987-38 Cars 1511
Average 1.26

1938-39 Cars 1851
Average .1.07

1939-40 Cars 1192
Average $1.37

1940-41 Cars 1425
Average $1.23

1941-42 Cars 1152
Average I1.86

1942-43 Cars 1485
Average 41.82

1943-44 Cars 326
Average $2.16

1944-45 Cars 669
Average $2.42

1945-46 Cars 1188
Average F2.67


T A N G E R I E S
(I box basis)
PHILA. BOST. PITTS. CLEVE. CHIC. ST.L. CINCI. DEIR. ALT. A


455


162


189


138


L2.52 42.43 2,58 Z' 2.68


1.90 1.80 1.76 1.77

238 95 119 56
2.19 1.94 2.02 2.74

426 207 229 154
1.49. 1.46 1.48 1.45

396 203 175 116
1.44 1.49 1.39 1.4L

375 157 95 108
1.20 1.28 1.23 1.21

433 144 142 114
1.15 1.17 1.25 1.24

356 132 136 71
1.10 1.12. 1.25 1.27

365 157 139 116
1.32 1.30. 1.40 1.42

572 196 210 193
1.03. 1.05 1.19 1.09

382 149 95 117
1.21 1.20. 1.28 1.30

551 172 152 189
.92. ,93 .95 .98

345 ':66 65 104
1.34 1.41 1.37 1.47

454 109 77 1541
1.16 .1.19 .1.07 1.20

359 78 39 106
1.75 .1.75 1.65 1.82

C70 143 108 188
1.84 1.62 .1.81 1.86

134 22 22 22
2.28 2.27 2.32 .?.37

300 32 72 66
2.38 .2.35 2.49 2.45

414 57 70 86


163
1.68

62
2. 63


1.44

161
1.52

180
1.22

179
1.21

155
1.25

217
1.56

306
1.14

149
1.25

257
.97 .

142
1.45

195
.1.22

135
1.66

303
1.81

40
2.27

150
2.42


2.

C
1.


1.:


1.:


1.:


1.:


1.(

1'
1.


1.

1
I(









1.


1.


1.

1
1.
-1.









-2.


.2.


- 105
- 1.68

L2 30
78 2.58

62 97
36. 1.45

35 88
32 1.41

58 102
14 1.09

67 96
21 1.15

66 108
26 1.20

54 113
32 1.34

03 138
10 1.08

74 125
10 1.18

07 203
86. .91

48 115
31 1.27

59 149
09 .1.12

38 105
52 1.58

01 193
66 1.80

26 21
36 -2.26

41 53
15 2.40


1.4


.1.:


.1.


.1.


.1.




1
.1.


1.

1

I.


1.







1.
1

1.




1.
1.
1.

1.


.2.


167 46 88 59 26 2201
$ .54 &2.32 2.59 W2.50 $2.61 $ 2.61


Page 42 -


- 2290
- 1.92

- 1224
- 2.35

26 2849.
48 1.53

60 2454
53 1.49

73 2456
22 1.24

71 1 2381
22 1.48 1.20

71 31 2197
28 1.22 1.18

87 26 2398
41 1.23 1.35

16 33 3424
16 .96 1.10

88 25 2513
23 1.98 1.24

48 33 3663
96 .79 1.00

57 9 2143
34 1.33 1.37

82 13 2717
14 1.06 1.19

48 25 2085
76 1.50 1.79

.51 57 3399
74 1.53 1.80

31 644
40 2.23

73 9 1465
47 2.77 2.41








RAIL AND BOAT SHIPMENTS


SEASONS


AVERAGES AT TAMPA OFFICE ON PACKED FRUIT
.*I J
*' F *Floilida TCitri ,y.c'hinge 'R4pr r
" e 'Seasons 1909-10 to 19 930 t *


ORANGES


ORAFEFRUIT TANGERINES*.


I.
* I


11.1




I'
S..


















-1

J.


f 1950-31 2.15
19 32' '2.5 '

1933-34 1.71
; .,1934-35 1.85
195-536 a . ,5 0 4

1957-38 1.56
1938-39 .145 .
1959-40- 1.62
1940-41 1.65
1941-42 2.10
1942-43 2.97
1943-44 5. .10
1944-45. .50
1945-46 3.55-


. 5o .
S150 ,
1.16
1.51
1.29

'1 -1 4 t- l1
1.53
1.04
1.42
1.21
1.80
2.4 33
S 5.00
..2.65 .


2 05 .
1.42
.1.80
1.66
* *2*,0 * *
' 1145' 1
1.86
1.3,4'
2.00
1.68
2.85
2.78
5.70
4.25
4.80'


*. .... . .. . 8 i *" (
S1969:1'"' ' $1;15 : .' ' 2.38 $1.81
1910-11 1.51 1.95 2.60
1911-12 1.93 3.58 1.93
191215 .1,.97 . .201. .1.92 .
, 1913-14. .' *. ,..6P1 6 . ' ** .5 1
* 1914-15 1.47 1.32 1.66
1915-16 1.99 1.89 2.07
1916-17 1.94 2.07 2.82
1917-18 ; 3.92. 2.72 4.59'
'918-19 53.69 3. .18 4.79
1919-20 4.20 2.84 5.49
1920-21 2.57 .'2.46 4.96..
1921-22 5.77 2.41 . 5.57 .
.1922-23 2.96' .10 4.39
1925-24 1.86 1.51 4.31
1924-25 3.51 1.94 4.43
1925-26 3.58 2.92 4.85
1926-27 .7.8. 2.25- 3.0 O
'1927-28 4.39' 3.22 5.28
1928-29 1.99 2.07 2.91
1929-50 3.22 2.98 3.38

. *FLORIDA STATE MAIRKETTfG BUREAU AVERAGES
S* Seasons 1930431',to-1945-46 .
S' (Comirale t '. bpe priqe) : ..
] ; ,iGross f.o.b. Florida per box '


t.-
* I -


I


-


Page 43



I'


LL CITRUS
average)
51.34
1:.65
2.21
,1.96 '
1.8
1i42
1.96
2.01
3.46
5.52
5.'57
2.Q5
3.17
2.62
1.82
2.74
3.36
2.58
5.90
2.09
5.13




-I
$1.86

1.56", ,
1'.65
1.63
2.14 '
2.04;, ,.
1'.57
1.31
1.60
1.51
2.06
-2.81
3.01
3.48
5.44


';, |






CITRUS PRICE ANALYSIS 1930-31 TO 1945-46


I LORIDA GROSS FOB MARKET OR EQUIVALENT PER BOX


BOX YILLD


GRAPEFRUIT


ORANGES
1930-31
1931-52
1932-55
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46


* RALL- & TRUCKED FLORIDA FLORIDA- GROSS
BOAT OUT CONSUMED CANNED ALL


$2.15
2.30
1.48
1.71
1.85
250
2.50
1.56
1.43
1.62
1.63
2.10
2.97
3.10
3.50
35.55


$ .90
1.40
1.00
1.25
1.35
1.60
1.90
1.12
1.15
1.52
1.58
2.05
2.91
- 3:10
3.50
3.55


$ .90
1.40
.90
1.15
1.25
1.50
1.70
1.12
1.15
1.32
1.28
1.70
.2.50
2.60
3.00
3.10


$ .58
-.65
.70
.80
.80
1.00
1.25
.36
.41
.19
.80
1.08
1.70
2.02
2.60
2.83


1930-31 16,180,983 $1.50 $ .80 '$ .80 $ .50
1951-52 10,431,424 1.50 .90 .90 .50
1932-33 11,925,630 1.16 .50 .40 .32
1953-34 11,113,200 1.51 .90 .90 .53
1934-35 15,243,060 1.29" .,C .70 .37
1935-36 11,504,067 1.87 1.20 1.10 .73
1936-37 18,121,786 1.48 1.10 1.00 .55
1937-38 14,5378,760 1.53 1.10 1.10 .48
1938-39 23,050,835 1.04 .80 .80 .22
1939-40 15,650,865 1.42 1.30 1.12 .33
1940-41 24,5387,041 1.21 1.10 .86 .37
1941-42 19,100,000 1.80 1.70 1.45 .71
1942-45 27,5300,116 2.35 2.25 1.85 1.05
1943-44 51,000,000 2.47 2.47 2.00 1.53
1944-45 22,5300.000 3.00 3.00 2.60 1.91
1945-46 32,000,000 2.65 2.65 2.40 1.39
-* ret to grower (or fruit owner) indicates the amount per box
costs -c ot interest taxes and depreciation. The "On Tree"
ororuction costs to "netto Grower" return.


16,954,063
12,548,987
14,964,800
16,170,996
15,589,059-
15,864,588
1,460,788
24,502,896
30,015,287
25,064,702
28,752,089
27,200,000
57,200,181
46;200,000
42,800.000
49,800,000


NET*TO GROWER
NET
NET- RAIL &-
ALL BOAT


$1.93
2.10
1.36
1.59
1.69
*2.10
2.51
1.41
1.32
1.37
1.48
1.91
2.72
* 2.81
35.17
3.25

$1.25
1.5533
.96
1.19
* .88
1.39
1.09
1.05
.64
.79
.71
1.20
1.48-
1.83
2.24
1.77


RAIL AND BOAT
COST
PICKING
COST HAULING
PRODUC- MARKETING
TION RAII&BOAT


$ .52
.71
.14
.42
.53
.88.
1.06
.25
.20
.17
.32
.69
1.45
-1.;31
1.73
1.84

$ .07
.22
-.11
.23
.01
'16
.25
.18
-.09
-.01
-.02
.34
.67
.92
1.36
.78


$1.10
.95
.90
.87
.90
.95
.93
.88
.84
.91'
.87
.90
1.01.-
1.25-
1i.21
1.24


$ .57
.75
.10
.38
.50
.90 -
1.15
.30
.25
.29
.36
.76
1.56
1.35 -
1.79
1.83

$ .09
.25
-.07
.29
-.08
.61
.35
.35

.20
.12
.60
1.10
1.C0O
1.53
1.21


after deducting production ard all other
average price may be obtained by adding


$ .48
.60
.48
.46
.45
-.45
.42
.38
.34
.42
.40
.44
.40
-.50 -
.50
.48

$ .36
.40
.38
.33
-.57
.59
.30
.36
.30
.40
.35
.40
: .35
.40
.40
.34


I


$1.05
.85
.85
.83
81
.87
.85
.82
.74
.82
.74
.80
.88
1.07
1.07
1.10






CITRUS PRICE ANALYSIS 1930-31 TO 1945-46


FLORIDA.GROSS FOR MARKET


BOX YIELD


TANGERINES
1950-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1-935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
TOTAL CITRUS


1,869,925
1,465,807
1,519,200
1,992,091
2,0035,755
2,093,397
3,018,654
2,257,973
3,381,873
2,257,545
2,751,624
2,100,000
4,200,149
3,600,000
3,900,000
4,200,000


OR EQUIVALENT PER BOX


RAIL & TRUCKED FLORIDA FLORIDA GROSS
BOAT OUT CONSUMED CANNED ALL


$1.95
2.05
1.42
1.80
1.66
2.00
1.45
1.86
1.34
2.00
1.68
2.85
2.78
3.70
4.25
4.80


.oo00
1.00
1.00
1.40
1.15
1.50
1.15
1.28
1.05
1.90
1.65
2.80
2.70
3.70
4.25
4.80


$1.00
1.00
.90
1.25
1.10
1.40
1.05
1.28
1.05
1.70
1.31
2.40
2.25
3.00
3.60
4.00


p















1.00


1930-31 35,004,971 1.86 .88 .88 .50
1931-32 24,446,218 1.95 1.20 1.18 .31
1932-33 28,409,630 1.36 .80 .70 .33
1933-34 29,276,287 1.65 1.19 1.08 .54
1934-35 32,8355854 1.63 1.19 1.05 -.38
1935-36 29,462,052 2.14 1.48 1.37 .74
1936-37 40,601,208 2.04 1.58 1.43 .61
1937-38 40,939,629 1.57 1.12 1.13 .46
1938-39 56,447,995 1.31 1.07 1.04 .24
1939-40 42,9735,112 1.60 1.51 1.29 .28
1940-41 55,890,754 1.51 1.49 1.18 .47
1941-42 .48,400,000 2.06 2.05 1.69 .83
1942-43 68,700,000 2.81 2.78 2.28 1.22
1943-44 80,800,000 3.01 3.10 2.37 1.70
1944-45 69,000,000 3.48 3.57 2.95 2.25
1945-46 86,000,000 3.44 3.61 3.00 2.05
* Net to grower (-or fruit owner) indicates amount per box after
except interest taxes and depreciation. The "On tree" average
tion costs to the "Net to Grower" return.


$1.71
1.85
1.32
1.68
1.51
1.86
1.37
1.72
1.27
1.95
1.60
2.77
2.72
3.62
4.18
4.24

1.61
1.75
1.15
1.45
1.33
.1.81
1.70
1.30
1.04
1.17
1.15
1.66
2.23
2.47
2.93
2.75
deducting
price may


NET*TO GROWER
NET
NET RAIL &
ALL BOAT


$ .01
.05
-.18
.29
.21
.42
-.18
.14
-.07
.42
.08
1.09
.98
1.36
1 91
2.10

.29
.45
.02
.34
.27
.69
.61
.22
.07
.12
.16
.57
1.11
1.16
1.62
1.46


$-.09
.05
-.30
.19
.16
.35
-.20
.18
-.06'
.44
.10
1.11
1.03
1, 57
1.92
2.45

.33
.50
.015
.336
.32
.76
.75
.305
.15
.28
.27
.74
1.41
1.28
1.75
1.73


production and
e obtained by


RAIL & BOAT
COST
PICKING
COST HAULING
PRODUC- MARKETING
TION RAII&BOAT


$ .54
.75
.56
.56
.55
.55
.50
.52
.45
.50
.50
.58
.40
.65
.65
.64


$1.50
1.25
1.16
1.05
.95
1.10
1.15
1.16
.95
1.06
1.08
1.16
1.35
1.68
1.68
1.71


.43 1.10
.53 .92
.45 .90
.44 .87
.45 .88
.44 .94
.37 .92
.38 .88
.34 .82
.42 .90
.39 .85
.43 .89
.39 1.01
.49 1.24
.48 1.25
.46 1.25
all other costs
adding the produc-









Page 46


ESTIMATED PRICESPPAID BY CANNERS
(Delivered to Canneries)
1942-43, 1943-44, 1944-45 & 19L5-46 Seasons


September
October .
November
December
January
February.
March. '
April
May
June,,
July ,
Average.
Tangerines (Jan


O~ANGES


Per Bo0.

$ $ 9
2..03 1.98 2. 9
2.0 1.98 2.41
1.50 2.0 1.9 2.52
1.25 1.8 2.1 2.57
1.48 1.63 2. 2. 1
* 1.76 1.87 2.74 2.62
2.00 2.27 3.11 3.00
2.40 2.25 .25 1.66'
2.15 2.20 .0 .68
2,.6 2.7 1.06 350
1.70 2.02 2.60 2.83
. to'May, inclusive). 1.00


S GRAPEFRT.ITT

$ $ .1.30
1.37 1.81 1 50
* -1.37 1.5 1.r,3
.92 1.L5 1.8 1. 1
.96 1. 1.S 1. 9
1.08 1.40 2.0 1 2.
1.20 1.0o 2.17 1.22
1.2 1.4 2.19 1.29
1.7 1.79 2.20 1.67
1.50 1.co 1.92 1.76
1. 0 1.67 1.77
1.05 1.53 1.91 1.39


TOTAL PRODUCTION. AND PORTION CANNED AND PROCESSED
DELIVERED PRICE PAID BY CANNERS
IN FLORIDA


Total
Production
Boxes


ORANGES


SPdrtion
Canned
Boxes


FARG EFRM I T


* Ganner'.s .Total Portion
Price Production 'Cinned
Per Box Boxes Foxes


Total
Oranges .
anner's Grapefruit


1931-32 ;12,,548,000 36,000 $0.65
192-3 14,9,000 . 50,000 .70
9534 16,171,000 61,000 .80-
19 3-5 15,590,000 178,000 .80'
19 5-36 1 ,86,000 oooo000 1.oo
1,936- 7 1,46,000 20,000 1.2
1957-8 .2,303,000 1,055,000 .3
198-59 30,01-5,000 .1,867,.00.0 ..1
1939-40 25,065,000 ,170,000 .19
19 0- 1 28,752,000 3,941,000 ..80
191 -12 27,200,000 4,197,000 1.08
194-45 7,200,000 ,38,000 1.70
194-44 46 ,200o000 10,912,501 2.02
19 4-V.5 02,800,000: l;3 ,000. 2.60
1945-4+ 49,800,000 19,1 5,860 2.83
* Includes 515,600 boxes-of tangerines.
ESTIMATED CARLOADS CANNED BY
0 0'.


ORANGES
lP1QL-.5 15-11&6


10,451,000
11, 6,000
11,l5, 000
15, 24,000
11,0 ,000
18,121,000
14379,000
2 .50,50,0ooo
'1 ,650,000
387,000
19,100,000
27,300,000
31,000,000
.22,500,000
32,000,000


MONTHS. 19)J-L5 AND 19-)h-6 SEASONS
- e l d A. .


Sept. LCL 131
Oct 209 1,230 908 1,236
Nov. 2,233 4,928 5,796 5,020
Dec- .3,227 996 10,534 5,000
Jan. 5, l ,61,8 10,759
Feb. 7'11 82 5 10 7,
Mar. 9 11 ,281-. .2 6 9,0 2
Apr. 6 7 660 1,292 9,395
May 2 9 7,819 465 .7,539
June 101 3,117 28 2,899
July 129 377
Aug. 1
Carloads 5,;559 4L7,960 3 7,855 j5 55,512
Boxes' il4.'25,89 19,l83 ,860 i5Il 3,817 22, 124,976


264
7 1
7. 40
.- . 16-l.--
8


1,117
8,029
13 761
16,157
12,528
11,180
7.806
2,714
129


2,466
7,948
9,996

1 ,808
17,221
15,366
6,016
506
1


73,401 104 ,56i
29,360,434 41,824,436


r


A4(.1 boxes Q. far oau
GRAPEFFVUIT- TANGERINES TOTAL
.19Wi-5 "I65.-.h U-L IQ 154L1S3. 19L -L6


Z7, 9.1,289
72 15s600














Auction Sales at Terminal Markets
Terminal Selling & EVpenEs
Net at Terminal-
Transportation Cost
Florida F.O.B. Equivalent


Carloads Sold


Florida Marketing Charges .0 .0
Advertising & Inspection .0 .05 .0
Packing & Processing .80 .80 .81
Picking, Loading & Hauling .34 .30 .32)
On Tree roujvqlen
Estimated Production Costs
Net to Grower before Interest, Taxes & Depreciation
GRAPEFRUIT Carloads Sold
Auction-Sales at Terminal Markets
Terminal Selling & Expenses
!let at Terminal-
Transportation Cost
Florida F.0.B. Equivalent
Florida Marketing Charges .08 .08 .08
Advertising & Inspection .05 .05 .0O
Packing & Processing .70 .72 .
Picking, Loading & Hauling .2 .22 .
On Tree Euivaln
Estimated Production Costs
Net to Grower before Interest, Taxes & Depreciation

TANGERINES Carloads Sold
Auction Sales at Terminal Markets
Terminal Selling & Expenses
Net at Terminal
Transportation Cost
Florida F.O.B. Equivalent
Florida Marketing Charges .08 .08 .08
Advertising and Inspection .07 .07 .07
Packing & Processing 1.03 1.06 1.08
Picking, Loading & Hauling .50 .47 .48
On Tree .Equivalent
Estimated Production Costs
Net to Grower before Interest, Taxes & Depreciation
Approximate Percentage all freight shipments sold
at Auction Oranges Grt
194)-41 32.6I
1941-42 32.7%
1942-3 27 %
1943-i; 21.2%
191^ 518.
1 5-6 15. 7


$ 1.25 $'1.21 $ 1.24


$ 1.80



1.507
$ 1.60








$ 3.46
.07





3.
1.07





$ 1.68
rr^






1.28


.6
$ 25


$819





2 .8%
2 1.2)

26.8


$ 2.41
---250



1.07
1 .91
3.142
2.0




.168

1.07
4 2.



3 9" i
S1.95 *

$ 4 ;82
,.10,
4.72
r5.91
1.68

& 2.23
$ 1.58


2.4

$ 2.00
,L,38b
5.82
.08
5.7


1.10-

$ 1.90


2.201
$ 5.22 *
.10
5.12
14.51
1.71

2,JQ
1,


Tangerines
7 .3
I.

35.
01 Cfl


Note: As has been stated above and in other pages of our report for many years, the
citrus net prices do not allow any deductions for interest on investment, for taxes,
or for depreciation of groves or equipment. Pages 10-11 of this report which
includes private as well as auction sales of citrus should be used along with this
page. Private sales of tangerines averaged considerably higher than auction sales
in the 1944-45 and 1945-46 seasons. See pages 44-45 for Citrus Price Analysis.
See pages 40-42 for Auction Cars and Price Averages yearly comparison.


Page 47


ESTIMATED COSTS FROM TREE TO AUOTIO: S
1-f7-15. 1l-hL AliD 15-h6 SEASONS.


9021
. .0

4 .62


12.811Q
$ 3.90
.085
3.8T2-
5,77
S 3.05


i31&L.
e.26R
$ 6.58
0.9
77
3 5j72





Page 48
QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT FLORIDA
POULTRY INDUSTRY
By F. W. Risher, Marketing Specialist, Poultry and Eggs
From out of State, requests received are for all kinds of information.
Some of these questions are listed below with the general type of replies to them.

1. Does Florida offer opportunities for one to locate there and produce Cegs
and poultry meat?
Since Florida is an importer of almost as many eggs as is now produced,
there are openings for many more producers of eggs. Then too as a general rule the
consumers prefer to buy a locally produced product. More than half of the poultry
moat, like broilers, fryers and roasters, are imported. Florida producers can meet
this competition by efficient management and volume production.
2. Where would you advise one to locate?
Generally speaking, from a market standpoint, it is usually best to locate
as near the market as possible or close to a city. There are, however, successful
producers who are located in the general agricultural areas of the State long
distances from the Florida consuming market. Lower costs of production in a measure
offset transportation costs to market. These producers grow some of the feed they
use on their own farms.
3. Can you grow poultry successfully in Florida?
Records from-birds raised in Florida entered in egg laying contests in
other States and in Florida are as good as those made by birds entered from other
States-. The many successful poultry farms in Florida are evidence too that the
State is adapted to poultry raising.
h. How do prices of eggs and poultry compare to those in other sections of
the country?
The fact that the State is an importer of eggs and poultry meat gives the
advantage of a considerably higher price than those which prevail generally in the
heavy exporting States. Grade for grade prices are in line with those like the New
York and Eastern strictly fresh markets.
5. Do you have more diseases among poultry in Florida than we do where.we
have a cold climate?
No. On the -other hand, we have less trouble, because poultry does not
need to be confined to houses for days and weeks, as is necessary where the climate
is cold. In Florida, houses are used mostly as shelters and as a place in which to
lay eggs. The birds are out doors most of the day, on the range.
6. What kind of feed can be grown?
There are sections in North Florida where corn and oats are grown on the
general farm and used extensively by the farm flock owner for feeding chickens. The
commercial poultryman,-however, finds it more efficient to devote his entire time to
tending to his flock and purchasing his feed. The exception to this is that
commercial flock owners do provide green feed, usually in the nature of good pasture.
There is practically no time in the year when he cannot have a green pasture for his
chickens.
7. What kind of poultry houses are used in Florida?
The first requirement is a good roof to keep out rain, and open construc-
tion to provide ventilation to keep the birds cool. Information on poultry house
construction to fit Florida conditions can be obtained in bulletin form from the
Agricultural Extension Service of the University of Florida, as well as timely advice
on feeding and growing healthy chickens.
8. Do poultrymen have organizations in Florida?
There are quite a number of local or County Poultry Associations and a
State-wide Poultry Association. This State Association publishes a monthly magazine,
The Florida Poultryman and Stockman. These associations are mostly educational
organizations. A few of them do some marketing for their members.
9. Are eggs sold by grades?
Yes. There is a Florida egg law that requires eggs to be sold by grade
and size. The Federal grades and weights for size have been adopted as standards
for Florida. The enforcement of the egg law and poultry law is administered by the
State Inspection Division of the Florida Department of Agriculture.





Page 49
Questions Asked About Florida Poultry Industry (Cont'd.)

10. What assistance does the State give poultry producers?
The Agricultural Extension Service of the University of Florida maintains
a staff of specialists to aid in production. The Market Bureau of the Florida
Department of Agriculture has a specialist to assist in marketing. The Livestock
Sanitary Board has charge of Poultry Improvement under the National Improvement Plan.
There is a County Agricultural Agent in practically every County to give assistance
right *its the farm..
11. What are' some of the leading egg producing Counties in commercial egg
production?
Some of the leading Counties are- Nassau, Hillsboro., Duval, Dad.o, Pasco,
Browar'd, Lake, Marion, Cblumbia. Leading broiler producing .Counties are Dade, Duval,
Putn-.', Palm Beach, Hill'sboro,' Orange, Lake, Broward.
ESTIMATED-VOLUME AND VALUE OF EGGS AND POULTRY PRODUCED 19h5
Number dozens of eggs produced 18,300,000
Number pounds farm chickens raised o10,862,000
Number pounds .commercial broilers raised 10,000,000
Value of eggs, broilers and chickens raised. lh, 538,000
LEADING DAIRY COUNTIES.
The leading whole milk areas are located near the-large cities where the
dairymen have a ready market for milk. Those Counties are the leaders: Dade,
Hillsboro, Duval, Broward, Pinellas, Pelm'Beach; Polk, Escambia, Orange.and Volusia.
The State production was &bout 35hl,41,800 pounds -of fluid milk and.
36,800 pounds of butter fat. "This does not take into-account the milk produced for
home use on the farm. In addition to the'Counties listed-, two new whole milk sheds
are coming into prominence. Number'one of-these is around Chipley, where the.State
Agricultural Marketing Board started a sour cream plant which was-converted into a
whole .milk plant and is'operated by'a large milk distributor, and is producing whole
Milk at about an average of 3',000,000 pounds per year-, and is growing rapidly..
The other area around L&dison is just getting started- by a -local company.
12. Does Florida import' dairy' products?
Yes. At the present time' fluid milk-is -imported;- however, ju.st-before
World W7Ar Ty.o began the' State" was producing all. the fluid milk that was. consumed.
It has always been necessary to import most of the butter consumed and.all the-cheese
Ls well as most of the sweet cream used.
NOTE: Soe pages 50-51 for the Jacksonville market showing prices -to retailers.
The producer of eggs -generally -receives 2/ per dozen less than wholesale
price for .graded eggs delivered to 'wholesaler's platflo-rm or full prices, for sales
direct to retailer. In recent yeaps most eggs are placed in consumer cartons., for
which a premium df 1/ to 2/ is paid above the wholesale.market. A large portion..of
the eggs sdld by the producer are in case lots -and are cartoned-by the .wholesaler.
Most of the Florida poultry which .finds its way into the retail store-is.
dressed or else dressed and drawn. Many -small or medium -siz-e poultry wholesale
houses do A retail business. They-.dress-and draw for family use as-well as foar the
stor., restaurant and hotel trades, The-business is similar in Jacksonville, Tampa
and Miir.i. Producers usually sell to wholesalers at.2/ less per.;dozen.than the
wholes'al-: quotation to retailers.
The Jadksonville egg quotation-is used-generally.as a basis- of -sales
throughout'the State. *Many yearly contracts- are made on Jacks-onville market..or-else.
at 1), 2, 'or V/ above-or below. The prices in the Southern half of the State
generally run 1/-3/ above Jacksonville market. Many Florida-eggs move from the
NIorth half of the State to the South half and transportation, etc.-must be added.
South Florida producers generally pay a little more for commercial feeds from other-
States. Miami is the highest price market, the retailer's margin generally wider.
There are some'sales by producers direct to the consumer-in all sections.
State Marketing Bureau F. W. RISHER, Marketing -Specialist
P.O. Box 779, Jacksonville, Florida Dairy & Poultry Products






Page 50


JACKSONVILLE JOBBING MARKET
SALES TO RETAILER OR EQUIVALENT SALES
MONTHLY SIMPLE AVERAGES

EGGS Florida White Grade A 24 oz. per Dozen
Yearly
Year Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug.. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Avg.

1921 74.5 48.6 36.0 31.5 50.5' 31.9 42.7 47.9 50.0 59.4 64.8 .60.0 .48.1
1922 48,0 40.7 26.5 29.4 28.5 34.7 37.5' 37.5 52.8 55.0 62.8 55..9 40.6
1925 49.6 56.0 30.0. 29.5 29.0 553.8 39.5 42.6 .49.8 :56.3 59.5 58.0 42.8
1924 47.4 44.6 26.6- 25.8 28'.5 32.5 39.0 43.6 52.1 62.0 66.2 64.9 44.4
1925 56.8 45.3 30.Z 55.5 30.3 38.6 44.4 48.4 55.2 64.0 65.6 67.0 48.3
1926 57.2 42.1 51.5 34.1 52.5 36.1- 41.6 44.4 51.8 62.2 61.0 57.1 45.9
1927 47.6 55.9 28.0' 29.2 27.9 29.7 33.9 41.4 49.0 52'.1 55.0 50.4 40.0
1928 48.0 52.4 50.0' 29.7 28.2 33.4 36.5 41.7 48.5 54.8 55.0 48.5 40.4
1929 42.2 34.5 35.1 29.2 50.2 33.7 -59.5 45.2 45.2 54.1 55.5 54.0 41.5
1950 47.1 55-.4 .28.5 27.0 27.0 27.0 30.6 54.9 38.2 45.4 43.9 40.9 35.5
1931 32.0 22.0 23.0 22.0 20.0 21.0 25.0 28.5 52.0 37.5 38.0 3550 27.9
1952 26.5 .16.5 18.0 15.5 14.7 18.3 21.0 25.0 28.2 *31.5 .52.6 35.2 23.5
1933 25.5 17.0 15.5 15.5 17.5 16.5- 22.9 25.5 31.4 33.0 52.0 34.4 25.7
1954 28.7 25.6 .19.2 19.8 20.1 25.5 28.0 31.6 36.8 38.0 40.0 40.0 29.'3
1955 35.8 51.8. 23.0 24.9 26.3 26.8 51.5 35.6 39.0 39.5 37.0 40.6 32.6
1936 33.5 51.2 23.5 22.9 24.1 25.7 31.9 34.0 37.5 38.4 41.9 45.4 52.3
1937 29.8 27.5 25.1 25.5 24.2 25.8 50.1 33.0 57.2 38.1 39.6 38.0 31.2
1938 32.5 26.6 22.2 22.5 25.0 25.7 31.5 32.8 36.3 56.5 36.8 40.1 30.7
1959 30.8 24.5 21.6 21.9 22.6 25.0 29.1 29.6 28.8 32'.4 355.9 30.9 27.4
1940 31.4 26.8 2.0.7 20.8 .21.2 25.5 28.8 51.7 34.5 36.4 36.5 38.2. *29.2
1941 33.5 25.4 24.1 25.2 28.4 31.2 36.8 39.2 41.4 42.0 44.5 42.2 54.5
1942 40.0 31.5 30.5 51.4 31.4 34.7 59.5 45.0 46.1 48.0* 48.0* 48.0* 59.7
1943 47.6 38.7 58.0 58.4* 45.0* 45'.6- 46.9* 51.0* 54.8*. 58.0* 57.0* 53.6*-47.6
1944 49.53* 59.7* 57.1* 37.0* 38.2* 41.44 45.2* 50.35* 55.1* 58.6* 59.9* 59.0* 47.6
1945 50.0* 44.0* 37.8* 42.4* 42.6* 44.9* 49.5* 54.4* 57.8* 58.6* 59.9* 58.8* 50.0
1946 49.7* 40.7* 39.0* 59.1* 42.4* 45.0**-50.7 55.6
FRYERS Heavy*Breed '

1921 39.1 39.7 46.9 49.5 46.6 35.0 31.2 30.3 34.0 35.5 29.1 29.0 37.2
1922 29.0- 29.5 38.4 40.0 40.0 35;5 31.5 29.0 31.0 29.0 29.0 29.0 32.6
1923 29.5 31.0 36.5 37.0 -59.8 56.7 30.0 30.0 553.0 32.4 31.0 51.0 5335.1
1924 32.7 36.6 37.8 42.0 42.5 37.4 32.7 30.7 34.0 55.0 31.5 34.3 35.4
1925 41.4 44.0 45.6 45.9 43.7 59.4 '56.0 55.0 58.0. 39.0 57.0 38.6 40.3
1926 45.5 48.0 49.7 50.0 48.3 38,.5 57.8 55.3 55.0 35.0 .35.3 57.1 41.1
1927 42.0 45.0' 45.0 46.3 43.0 36.1 31.8 50.0 30.0. 31.1 55.1 35.8 37.4
1928 37.0 36.2 358.9 59.0 59.0 38.1 54.5 31.2 33.0 35.3 56.5 55.7 36.5
1929 26.0 36.2 59.1 42.8 57.7 37.5 31.0 51.1 55.0 54.2 36.1 36.8 36.1
1950 33.1 32.9 33.6 36.7 52.7 52.8 24.5 27.4 29.0. 29.0 29.0 29.0 50.9
1931 50.0 31.0 37.0 40.0 57.0 55.0 29.0 27.0. 27.5 26.0 24.5 24.5 30.6
1932 24.4 25.2 27.1 26.8 23.9 23.5 18.0 17.3 .18.0 18.7: 17.3 14.9 21.0
1955 14.6 20.4. 22.2 24.3 22.1- 18.0 15.4 16.1 .17.0 17.0 15.7 16.1 18.2
1934 17.6 20.2 25.9 25.2 24.9 22.5 20.1 '18.7 19.7 20.0 20.5 20.5 21.2

(Cont'd.)

Ceiling prices in effect.
**Ceiling prices ended June -30, .1946







Page 51


JACKSONVILLE JOBBING MARKET
SALES TO RETAILER OR EQUIVALENT SALES
MONTHLY SIMPLE AVERAGES

FRYERS Heavy Breed (Cont'd.)
Yearly
Year Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug., Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. AvA.

1955 21.5 24.3 26.1 25.9 22.8 23.1 21.2 20.3 21.0 22.4 23.2 24.5 23.0
1936 25.5 25.6 27.0 27.2 25.7 25.5 23.1 22.6 22.3 21.2 20.5 20.0 23.7
1937 22.5 24.0 24.1 27.0 24.1 25.3 25.5 24.5 25.8 27.1 26.7 27.7 25.4
1938 25.8 24.6 27.2 27.8 24.0 21.8 20.5 21.6 22.9 22.9 23.0 23.6 23.8
1939 23.4 21.6 21.9 24.8 22.0 21.8 22.5 21.9 21.0 22.0 22.3 22.1 22.3
1940 22.0 21.8 22.8 22.6 24.3 23.2 21.4 20.5 21.5 21.9 20.8 21.5 22.0
1941 21.8 22.4 23.8 24.3 23.0 .22.8 22.8 22.2 22.6 23.0 23.9 24.0 23.1
1942 24.1 23.7 24.2 25.6 26.8 27.5 27.4 27.5 29.0 30.5 30.5 31.4 27.4
1943 31.8 31.8 31.8 31.9* 30.6* 30.6* 30.6* 30.6* 30.6* 30.6* 30.6* 30.6* 31.0
1944 30.6* 30.6* 50.6* 31.0* 32.6* 31.8* 31.1* 30.6* 30.6* 30.6* 30.6* 30.6* 30.9
1945 30.6* 31.6* 32.0* 32.4* 32.8* 31.6* 31.4 31.3* 31.3* 31.3* 31.3* 31.3* 31.6
1946 31.6* 32.1* 32.5* 32.9* 33.5* 33.0**39.1 38.5

HENS Heavy Breed

1921 33.6 32.6 31.7 29.3 26.9 26.3 25.1 26.2 30.3 31.8 26.0 26.0 28.8
1922 26.0 26.0 26.7 25.5 25.4 24.0 24.0 24.0 27.5 26.0 26.0 26.0 25.6
1923 26.0 26.0 26.0 25.0 23.0 23.0 20.9 21.1 24.7 26.0 24.3 24.7 24.2
1924 27.8. 26.0 26.4 26.0 27.0 25.1 24.0 26.6 29.4 30.0 28.6 27.8 27.1
1925 -31.6 29.2 29.7 28.0 20.0 26.6 25.9 29.0 30.0 31.0 28.1 29.3 28.7
1926 30.7 30.2 32.5 31.8 31.9 30.0 30.0 29.7 31.0 51.0 30.2 31.1 30.7
1927 30.0 30.0 29.8 29.1 29.0 24.7 25.7 25.6 26.0 26.0 25.0 25.0 26.9
1923 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 24.5 25.0 21.9 21.1 25.9 27.2 25.5 24.5 24.3
1929 24.8 26.4 28.8 28.8 27.4 29.3 28.0 29.0 31.2 29.5 29.5 29.8 28.5
1930 29.8 30.0 28.5 27'.5 26.6 24.5 22.5 22.6 23.0 22.8 23.0 23.0 25.3
1931 23.0 20.0 22.0 -24.0 25.0 22.0 21.0 20.0 21.5 23.0 22.5 22.0 22.0
1952 20.5 18.6 18.7 19.0 17.5 16.1 14.5 14.5 15.5 16.7 17.0 14.4 16.9
1935 13.2 13.5 13.0 14.7 14.1 13.1 15.0 14.6 15.8 16.7 15.4 14.0 14.5
1934 14.3 15.5 16.0 15.5 18.3 16.0 15.7 14.8 16.6 .17.2 17.8 17.5 16.1
1935 17.5 17.8 18.3 18.0 18.0 18.7 18.2 18.4 19.3 21.0 21.7 20.6 19.0
1936 20.0 19.9 19.5 20.3 20.8 20.5 20.9 20.7 20.2 19.6 19.6 18.7 20.1
1957 18.7 19.3 18.6 18.5 19.0 19.5 16.8 16.0 17.5 18.7 20.2 20.7 18.6
1938 20.1 19.0 19.9 19.7 19.0 19.3 19.4 18.7 20.2 20.2 21.0 21.2 19.8.
1939 21.4 20.7 20.4 21.1 19.3 18.8 17.8 18.2 16.9 16.9 17.9 15.3 18.7
1940 16.2 16.7 17.5 17.5 17.1 16.2 15.5 16.1- 16.5 18.5 17.8 17.2 16.9
1941 17.6 18.1 19.0 19.9 19.8 20.8 20.7 20.5 '21.1 21.5 23.0 23.1 -20.4
1942 23.9 22.8 23.0 23.6 23.2 21.5 21.0 21.8 24.9 26.5 26.5 27.8 23.9
1943 29.3 29.3 29.3 29.4* 27.1* 27.1* 27.1* 27.1* 27.1* 27.1* 27.1* 27.1* 27.8
1944 27.1* 27.1* 27.1* 27.5* 29.2* 28.4* 27.6* 27.1* 27.1* 27.1* 27.1* 27.1* 27.5
1945 27.1* 28.1* 28.5* 28.9* 29.3* 28.1* 27.4* 27.1* 27.1* 27.1* 27.1* 27.1* 27.7
1946 27.6* 28.1* 28.5* 28.9* 29.3* 28.1- 29.1 29.2

- Ceiling prices in effect.
* Ceiling prices ended June 30, 1946





Page 52 GENERAL FArTS ABOUT FLORIDA'S LIVESTOCK INDUSTRY
By L. H. Lewis, Livestock Specialist, Florida State 1.iarketing Bureau
CATTLE AND CALVES
Q. 1: How many cattle has Florida? Answer: The U.S.D.A. states that on January
1, 1946 there were 1,022,000 beef or range cattle, 140,000 dairy milk cattle milking,
and 43,000 head of dairy heifers 1 to 2 years of age, making a total of 1,?05,000
head9 however many in the industry believe that the beef and range cattle figure
should show at least 1,250,000 head, making a minimum total of 1,433,000 head.
Q. 2: What position is Florida as a cattle State? Answer: Florida is the 16th
State in number of range or beef cattle 36th in dairying, and 27th in total cattle.
Unofficial rank in range or beef cattle would be 14th.
Q. 3: What are the 15 leading range or beef cattle Counties in Florida? Answer:
Polk, Osceola, Highlands Marion, Glades, Hillsboro, Hardee. Okeechobee Jnckson and
Sumter. Clay, Pasco, P'unam, Alachua and Manatee -- these counties, with 600,000
head, account for 48% of total.
Q. : How many cattle and calves are 'sold or used for slaughter in Florida?
Answer: t is estimated that about 30% of the total cattle and calves on the farms as
of January each year are. slaughtered. that year..
Q. 5: How fast is Florida growing in cattle? Answer: I.t- is estimated by the U.S.
Department of Agriculture that no State in the Union has increased faster in number
and in' quality during th'e past' ten ybars than hab Florida.
Q'. 6: How many purebred or registered beef cattle herds' in Florida? Answer: Dur-
ing the year 1945 there were about 52 registered' herds- of Angus, 67 of Brahman, 53 of
Hereford and Polled Hereford (most of the Hereford herds are Polled), 4 of Devon, 3
of Rb.d Polled, and 15 herds of Shorthorns., There are numerous herds of high grade.
cattlo'in the State carrying the above breeding. The Brahman breed at the present is
the leading breed.'
Q'. 7: Where are most of the cattle in Florida found? Answer:'About'2/3 of the
beef or range cattle in Florida are South of a line drawn from Jacksonville thru
Gainesville to Cedar Keys. About 75% of the total beef or range cattle are fenced.
No progress could be made in Florida until tick eradication had advanced or been
completed in any area; therefore the average size and slaughter grades are below the
average of the U.S.A. The following tablet shows the live weight, dressing percent,
and average dressed weight of slaughter livestock in Florida for the year 194YL. (USDA
data)..


glass Live Wnight
Cattle 6 56 lbs.
Calves- 25
Hogs
Sheep & Lambs 68
The following table.shows.the grades of
and Florida (USDA data) for tho year 1944:


Dress



cattle for
cattle for


sing Average Dressed
mnt Weicht
S21 lbs.
122
113
.36
the U.S.A., Southern States,


Grades of Average Southern Florida Cattle Fla. Calves Florida
Cattl1' USA Stats Auction* Estimated Auction only* AULCalves
A31 Salfs, All S-alRs All Sales'
Choice 19.2.5 -
Good 31.1 12.2 1.66 4.00 5.98 6.00
Medium 23.1 33.5 11.93 22.00 33.o0 8.00
Common 14.7 22.6 27.52 30.00 45.82 .00
Cutter 11.7 29.2 25.89 22.00 15.16(culls)2 .00(culls)
Canner 11.7 29.2 -A r00 -??. -
Total l00o 1007 i0 _- 100% 10Q%.
The above figures for Florida represent cattle and calves moving thru livestock
auctions. *Much higher grades are moved as directs than thru livestock auctions.
Q. 8: How many livestock slaughterers are there in Florida? Answer: According
to USDA data, there were 'in 194j, four Federally inspected plants, or Class 1
slaughterers; three Class 2-A slaughterers; Seventy-seven Class 2-B slaughterers; and
533 lass 2-6 butchers in Florida.
Q. 9: When does Florida market her slaughter livestock?- Answer: The following
table shows the average monthly marketing of slaughter livestock for the U.S.A. and,
for Florida for a 3-year period, 1940-1942, inclusive. Florida produces .and sells
more seasonally than the average producers of the U.S.A., as most cattle are sold as
grass-fat, and hogs are produced and'sold mostly'finished on peanuts.





Page 53
Liv.'--s stock ?Monthlvy M ar'tin-. -vg r period. IQ)i0-lLOl-0l).ah U.S.A. ys Floride.
Cattle Cattle Calves' Calves Hogs Hogs
Average Average Average Average Average Average
month U.S.A. Florida U.S.A. _Floria S.U. .A.. Flri 'dr"
January 8. 6.73 7. 5.7 10.56 20.07 oto
February 7.03 .- 6.52 6.96 2.2 8.06 11.96). .
March 7.3 5.61 8.2 1.4 8.1 7.5
April 76 6. 00 2.2 7.8 5.1
May .9- 7.6' 8 .9 Z.3 .67.
June Z. 8.16 0 ,
August 8. 7.9 1 .0 0.
Se tember 8. 1 9 Not .2 1 .o. Not 6*.7 o
October 10.16 1-1.2 '9.76' 1 .3 82 6
November 8. 6 10.05 *8.67' 1 .0 9.76 8.o 1 .0
December 8 6A9.29 8. -.N "i 1 INote'
.100, 10) o/. 10/ l ,lOO10070. 10O0 1o00T
Note: The above Peflects percentages as of 195.5 and 1916 to date. .
Florida needs additional packers-and'abattoirs, or the present-plants n4oe t6 be
enlargAd to'take care .of the slaughter;' however there are major and independent pack-.
ing p 6nts in'Florida, South Georgia and Alabama which help to solve sope of the .
marketing needs. There are 20 livestock auctions, 6 cooperatives, and 4 cash daily .
markets, not including many livestock dealers which producers .patronize.'
Q., 10: Do the same general 'breeding, feeding, core and mahago ent-and marketing
practices of the U.S.A. apply in Florida? Answer: Yes. Purebred and high-. grade *
herds of the .different breeds are doing- well in. Florida. .
Q.-ll: Do cattle do weLl generally over the State in' Florida? .Answer: Yes. The-
purebred herds are found scattered-:over the entire State. ,
Q.'12: Phat housing facilities are necessary in Florida .for cattle? -
Answer: Most of.the range cattle run out in the.open-the year around. Purebred
breeders have sheds-and barns. Those'producing.and finishing lot-fed.cattle feed them
under sheds, yet many of them'.are finished,out in the open with the feed bunks-'under
sheds. '
Q. 13: Does Florida have Breeder Associations? Answer;. Ye.s. The cattlemen as a
whole have a State Association, consiating *of about-30 locals. The Angus., Hereford,
and Brahman breeders each have an. association; the Guernsey and Jersey breeders each :
have an association; the Duroc-Jersey hog breeders have an association, and. the
Quarter horse and Palomino. horse breeders each are organized. Thero may--be-others.-

Q. l.: Hbvr"does Florida-rnnk as a'-hog State? Answer: "Florida is- 2th in hog.
numbers of the States of the U.S.A.
Q. 15: How many hogs does Florida'produce for slaughter? Answer:. During-theyear
19U| there were. 57.3,000 head used for this purpose, of which 62,000 4ient thr.u
Federally inspected plants, 219,000 thru non-Federally inspected plaits,-250,000- -form
slaughtered, and 42,000 shipped out. About .75% of these.hogs are produced North-and-
West of a line drawn .from 'Jacksonville to Cedar Koys. .'
Q. 16: What feeds are' principally used for Florida? Answer: i-Abu the-same-foeds
as any other"-State. The. principal conoentrat-&fe'eds a're..'p.eanuts,- corn, oats, and '
sweet potatoes-, in'order' named. -Tankage,- fish' meal, peanut, and potton 'seed meal,'
skim milk are used as prbtein. supplements. Thbe-Floridh Experiment Station, Gaine's- '
ville, Florida has worked out- mineral mixtures suitable for cattle in swine feeding
adaptable to Florida conditions. -- .
GENERAL QUESTIONS -
Q. 17-.Are there frozen food lockers -for .individual and. a onsumer,-use:-. Answer:.
There are.between 40 and 45 frozen.food lockers used for'this purpose et present(1946)
in Florida.
Q. 181 Is Florida s.elf-supporting in beef-and veal, -pork and lard? Answu r:
Florida is producing about 65% .of its beef and veal, and about 70f/ of its pork'and'
lard basis con'sumptiion. There is no reason Why. Florida should not be self-supporting.
Q. 19: What are. the opportunities in Florida for cattle and hogs? Answer: There
are about 35,000,000 acres of land in Florida, of which about 25,000,000 acres-are
adaptable to the production of good grasses when put in improved pastures and..capable
of carrying a cow on 2 to 4 acres; there are-about .10,000,000 acres of land adaptable
to the growing_.of grain- crops, not including about 14000,000 acres of muck land. The .
climate and the soil are such to provide grazing easily 9 to 10 months of the year"
throughout the State, and in some areas and seasons 12-months. The rainfall..is-
lightest during the winter months (an advantage to cattle out in the open), and
irirreases from June thru September. Thero has-never been a general .drought or a
general flood in Florida. -.The lands arc generally safe.






ge JACKSOVILLE LIVESTOCK .LARU:FT
(Substantially Southeastern Prices)
COWS CALVES STEERS HOGS
I Medium Common Good M-Adium Good Medium Io., 1 1Io. 2
100 lbs. 100 ibs. 100 lbs. 100 lbs.
3-4 :5.0oo-6.oo:4.oo-550:7.oo-8.25: 50.5-7.00:7.oo-8.50:6.00-7.00:8.50 7.50
9-5 75-.50: 5.25-.75:5.00oo-6.50 .00-5.00:5.00-6.00:4.00-5.00:9.25-9.5 :8.25.-. 50
3- .5 o-4.25:2.50-.50.: 5.50-6.50:..7-5-.50:5.50-6.75:-.50-5.50 6.00 : .50
9-4 :2.5o-.2 :2. 0- .75-. 0-5.00:.o-4.oo:4. o-4.75: .OQ4.25:5.25 : .75
:2.50-3.0 :-1. 7-2. 50 :.50-4.75 :3o-4.00:3.50-4.25:5.00-5.75:5.50 :5.20
9- :2.25-2.75:1.2:-2.00:3.75-U.25:3oo00-3.50:4.00-5.25: 3.50-.25:3.75 ;5.50
53:2.00-2. 5:1.50-2.00:.25-.75.25 5.50-.25.oo-.50:2.65 '.4o
9-5 :2.00-2.75:1.00-2.00: .25-.75 0 2.5 0-.25: 3.75-4.2 s.00-*.75:3.7-4U.OO .50-3.75
3- :2.25-2.75:1.50-2.25:4.oo-4.75:3.oo-4.oo:4.oo-4.50:3.50-4.oo0:3.75-4.oo .50-3.75
9-5 :2.eo-2.50:1. 0-2.o00:3.50-.25:2.50-3.75:U.oo-4.25:3.25-4.oo:5.-.60: .90-5.90
-5 .50- .OO:1.75-.25:5. 0-6 .50:.75-5.25:6.25-7.2 : 5.00-6.25:7.00-7.25: .25-6.5o
.5-. 0:2.o-.5: 5.-6. 2: 0-. 0:6.0o-7.58 :..75-6.00:7.25-7.50:6. -.5
: 7. 7 .5 :. o- .5:5.506.5 0 :;.05.50: .-6. :: c00 .2:9.2; -9.75 :8. -9.5
12-6:3.2 5-. : 2.50-3. 55.00-5.75: 4.oo-5. 5:5.75-6.7 : .75-5.0o:7.75-8.: G .25-7.50
7
2-6:4.o00-5.00:3.25-4.oo05.75-6.'50:4.50-5.75:6.0oo-7.oo005.o00-6.o :750-7.7 '.0o7.25
5 .2 -5oo: .50-5.2 54 .25-6.00:.50- 5.25:6.25-7.oos-5.75-6.50:8.0 -856:.0-8.
-4 :.7 -5 .oo-.7 o.0 00: 025- o:5.50-6. 0. : .o o-.50:o. 0-9.oo
2-:.56-.o0; .75-.50 .00-6.00: .25-5.25:5.25-6.oo: .50-5.:5so.60-8.90 08. -8.40
3-12:4.. oo-450:5.25"-.00: 5.25-5.75:4.00-5.25:6.00-7.25:5.00-6.50:8.00-8. o40:7.6o-7.90
6-4 : 0.50- 5oo:.5 4.25:5.75- .5o:4.75-5.50:7.00-8.oo0:5.50-6.75:9.5-lo :9.0o-9.5o
9-7 ;.o00-5.25:05.00- .OO:5.50-6. o:8 .5o-5. 5:6.00-7.25:5.o00-6.25 8.75-9.00: 8.25-8.50
12-7:4.00o-.50: 3.00-.oo:5.00-5.50:U.oo-5.25:6.oo-7.00o:5.oo-6.oo.6.25-6.65:6.oo-6. o
25-5.5 : .25 -.2 5:5.5-6.50 :4.5-5.0:6.25-7.00: 5.5-6.50:6.75-7.75: .25-7.25
6-7 4:50- 5.5 .5-.2 52 50.5- o: 5-5. :6.50-7.50: 5.o-6. o 7.7o :7.2
9-6 :4.60- 5.0: .oo-4 .o: 5.o0-6.oo:.0-5.25:6.25-7.0: 5.50-6.5o:7.0- :6.50
12-3 .o- .500-1 .-4 .00:5.50- 675:s- .5 550 6 50-7.5 05. 5-6. : 5:.00 5 .50
6-4 9 .l 50 7.00-* 5- 1 22.
5 :-.75-. 0 .75-.75:6.50-7.50:5.oo-6.50: 7.oo-8.oo:6.oo-7.oo:6.85 0
6- 5.00oo-5.7 5:.00-5.00:6.00-7.50:5.00-6.00:6.50-8.00: 5.50-6.50:6.00 5.50
9-2: 4.50-5.25:.oo-.75:5-.75-7.25:4.75-5.75:6.50-7.50: 5.50-6.505.90 5.0
12-2 4.50-5.25:3.75-.50:6.0oo-7.25:5.0oo-6.o00:7.00-7.75: 6.00-7.oo:04.90 65
3-2 :5.oo-5.75:4,00.oo-.oo00:6.25-7.25:5.25-6.25:7.00-8.00o:6.00oo-7.o0.: 5.0o ,75
6-1 :4.75-5.25:5.75-4,75:6.50-7.50:5.50-6. 50:7.00oo-8.25:6.o-7.oo0: 5.25 :5.00
9-7 :4.25-5.00s:.75-4.50:6.oo00-7.oo:0 5.00-6.00:6.75-775: 5.50-6.75: 6.75 :6o50
1-:4.25-5.00: .oo-4.50:6.00-7.00: 5.oo-6.oo00:7.0oo-8. 25: .00-7.00:5.65 : 5.o
3-1 : 5.25-6.oo: .50-5.25:6.25-7.50: 5.25-6.50 7.50-8.758 g.50-7.50 6.50 .oo
6-7 :5.25-6.25:4i25-5.25:6.7 -7.75: 5.50-6. 50:7.75-8.50:6,75-7.75:8.90 r840o
9-6 :5.50-6.75:4-.50-5.50:7.50-8.75 6.50-7.50: .o-9.00:7.00-8. o:10.25 :9.75
12- :5.50-6,50:4.25-5.50:7.00-8.oo;6.oo0-7.o0:750-8.50:6.50-7.50:8.25 :7.75
3-6 :7o50-8.25:5.75-7.25:8.20-10 :6.75-8.00:9-10,50 :8.00-9.00oo:11.25 :10.75
6-6 :7.00-8.56:6.00-7.0:9.00o-11 :7.60-9.00:10-11.52 :8.75-10 :12-B.'oo0 :115-12.5
9-4 750-8.50:.25-7.50:10-11.oo-00:8.oo-10 :9.75-11i :8.00-10 :.75-1,44 -12,75
12-4:750-8,506 .0-7.25:10.00-117:8.00-10 :9.25-11- :8.00-9.25:11.50-12 :1-ll.50
-5 :9.00-11 :7.50-8.75:1.00-1 :9.00-11 :1113.50 :9 00-11 :13575- t-13.75
6-9 :9-10.50 :7.00-8.75:;11:.0-1:9.50-11 :11-13.50 :9-11.25 :1-i357 ;l75-1
Sept:9.00-10.5:8.00-9.0:12-13.50 :12.00-13 :1300.oo ,:2.00-13 :150-lt:l2.75-15
Dec.:8.50-10 :7.25-8.50:12-12.50 :1-11.50 :12-15.30 :9.50-12 :i1-i2.50;lo.5-ii.75


***' a






JACKSONVILLE LIV
(Substantially Sout
____ 0 S C A L V ES
u Cboon Goo100d LMdm
In0lIbs. 100 Lbs.


STOCK MARKET (Qont'd.)
eastern Prices)


S T
Good
100


Jan.:9.00-10 :7.50-8.50:12-12.50 :11-12.00 :12.50-14
Feb :9.00-10.5:7.75-9.50:12-14.00 :11-12.00 :13-14.50
Mch :9.75-11 :9-10.00 :12-14.00 :11-12.00 :1.2 -15
Apr :9.50-10.5:u.00-9.50:14-15.00 :11-13.00 :1 -1.00
June:9.25-10. 5:8.00-9.00:15-14.00 :11-12.00 :1.5-15
July:.25-10. 5:7.25-9.2c:13-14.50 :10-12.00 :15.514.
Aug :8.75-10 :7..0-8.56:12-14.50 :10-12.0Q :1-l4..0o
Sept:0.25-10 :0.,.-8,50:12-1 400. :9.50-11ii :1 4
Oct :8.25-9.60:6.-8.10:12-14.00 :9-11.75 :12.50-4
Nov :8.10-9.50:6.25-8.00:12-13.50 9-11.75 :12.25-14
Dec :8.60-10 :7.25-8.,50:12.50-14 :9.75-1 :12.56-14,
Jan :9.25-10- :8.00-9.50:12.75-14:i10. 0-1 13.50-15
Feb :9.50-10- :9.00-9. 0:14-15.50 :11.50-14 :1-15.25
ch :9.75-11 :9.25-9 75:14.00-15 :12. 0-14 1-15.5
Apr :10-11.59 :9.2 -10 :14-15.50 :12.00-14 :1.25-15I
May :9.75-11i :9.00Z-0 :15 50-tU :11.50-i 4.50-16
June:9.50-11 :9.00-9.50:1. 50-15 :11.00-1i 1-15.50
July:10-11.50 :9.25-10 :15 .0-15 :11.00-19 :1 -15.50
Aug :9.50-112 :8.50-9.50:1 .50 9.50-15 14 15.50
Sept:9.50-11 :8.00-9.00:1 .00-15-:9.50-12 :1 1- -i
Oc :9.50-11 :8.oo0-9.2 :12.50-L :1100o-}3 : I5 I
Nov :9. 50-11- :8.50-9.5 :12.50-I4 :11~ : 1~.50- ;
Dec :9. 0-1l4 :8.50-9.50:13.00-14 :11 .0-3 :15.00-15
Jan :10.00-13 :8.50-10, :.1 -l- :11.00-14 14-1 -
Feb :11-13.50 :9.50-10- :l1 550 5. 0-1: 4.0-17
Mar :11.00-14 :10:00-T1 : 06- 12.50-15 .0-17
Apr :11.50- :10-16:15%.50-1 :.50-17
May :11.50-13 :10-12 1 :14-.50-16 :12-15.50 :15.00-17
June:12.00-1 :10-12.50::14.50-17 :12.00-16 16.00-18
July:11.50-16 :11.50-14-:14.00-18 :12-16.50 :17.00-19


Pagq 55


EERS HOGS
'-,dium No. I No. 2
ll,. 100 ibs.
1944
:10-12.00 :11-12.10 :1 O1-11.3
:10.50-13 :11-13.00 :10-12.2?
:11.5-1 .5:12-15.25 :11-12.2.
:11.5-1.5:12.2 -1 115- 12
*:10- 3.50 12-15.0 :11.25-17-
5:10-13. 00 12- 3.50:11.5-12.75
:10-12.5 :15-1.55 :11.7-14
:9.50-12:1 -1j,. 5 :12-1i.00
:9.25-12:1 -1. :12-13.25
:9.00-12-i : 5-1. :12-1l.75
:9.75-13 1 -1. 11 4
:11.00-15 :12-1i.5- -1
:11.50-1 : 13,85-1 5:3-
:12.00-146 : 14. : 1
:12.00-1 1-. i- .
2.5 -1. 1

:11.- . 1.75-35
:12-150 :14.only: 5 only
:11.25-1 only: 1. 5 only
:13.00-16 only:4. only
:11.0o-15 t.5 1-.3
011-15. o 4-14.5 4-1.55
:11.00-53 :15.751 135-.75-1135
:12.00-14 : -14.53 :17 :-1.55
:12. 0-1: i-l4.R 5:1 7 .;5
12,50-1 : 14- on y Only
:12.50-1 : 4.onliy: l. !? only
15.00-16 :1. only : 5 only
:12.50-16 : only: .55 only
:13.00-17 :15. 0-19 :15.50-19.


SUPPORT PRICES FOR HOGS, Basic Data Compiled by P.M.A., Market News, Thomasville, Ga.
As announced by U.S.D.A., Oct. 23, 1945, effective from-Oct. 1, 1946 to Sept. 30,1947.
Prices in dollars per 100 pounds, live weight, good to. choice grades.
Chicago Florida Florida
Dates Weeks Applicable Hard Hogs Hard Hogs Soft & Oily Hogs
Nov. 30, 1946 & Jan. 4, 1947 $10.75 $10.35 $ 8.85
Nov. 23, 1946 & Jan. 11, 1947 11.00 10.60 9.10
Nov. 16, 1946 & Jan. 18 & 25, 1947 11.25 10.85 9.35
Nov. 9. 1946 & Feb. 1, 1947 11.50 11.10 9.60


Nov. 2, 1946 & Feb. 8 &'15 and
May 3 to June 21, ;1947
Oct. 26, 1946, Feb. 22 to March 1,
April 12 to 26, June 28, 1947
Oct. 19, 1946, March 8 to April 5
and July 5, 1947
Oct. 12, 1946, and July 12, 1947
Oct. 5, 1946, and July 19, 1947
July 26 to Aug. 30,-1946 and
Sept. 29 and 30th,.1947
Sept. 6 to Sept. 27, 1947


'11.75

12.00

12.25
12.50
12.75

13.00
13.25


11.35

11.60

11.85
12.10
12.35

12.60
12.85


9.85

10.10

10.35
10.60
10.85

11.10
11.35


Soft and oily hogs at any point in Florida shall not be in excess of $1.50 per
hundred under hard hog prices at that point. Hard hdgs in Florida 40 a hundred
pounds under Chicago hard hogs. Support 'prices are the least prices for good to
choice hogs. Maximum prices would be that permitted under OPA ceilings.






Page 56


VOLUME AIM VALUE~ ZFLRDA GENERAL FAR 4 CROPS


rf" ,,71r\ r4 r


Corn
Cotton
Tobacco
Peanuts (Picked & Th:
Sweet Potatoes
Cow Peas
Dats
Velvet Beamn
Hay
Su'ar Cane Syrup
Sugar-R:.w
Black Strap Molasses
P n.,c'


reshed)


Bu,
Bale
Lbs.
Lbs.
'Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Tons
Tons
Gals
Tbns
Gals
T 1-,


1q20


8,668,000
20.000C
4,200,C000
40,000,000 o
2,300,000
255,000

85,0001
5,678,0000
No R,
'"No R,
I.Jx 000


Fn rm V,,1ijq


$ 9,795,000
1,782,000C
2,04 C1,000
2,520,000
3 174,000
cluded in O0
230, 00
cluded in C0
1.768,000C
3,45, oo0.
cord
cord
11 0,I


-192
Unitl Productjon1 Fsrm Valiin


Bu.
Bale
Lbs.
Lbs.
Bu.
.her
Bu.
:her
Tons
Gals
Tons
Gals
T _


8,808,000
28,000
,C 000
26o, ,000
1,68,000'
fieldd Crops
180,000
fieldd Crops
64,000
2,320,000
nIo R
No R.


$ 7,110,000
. 902, OC,000
1 551,000
1 4,000
2,18 4,000
137,000
1,2V, 000
1,05',000
cord
cord
'jl


Total Incomplete I, 24,90 ,000 $17,858,000
Other Field Crops Mis *2.000000 Mis l.00,000
lL '1925
Commodity Unit Production Far- V,-lue Unit Production F-.rn Value
Corn hu. 7,200 ,00C 7a84', 000C Bu. ] 8,262,C00 0 7,6 4o000
Cotton Balo 21,000 2 ,51, 00C Bale 43,000 ;4, 51,000
Tobacco Lbc. 901,000 1, 916,000 Lbs. 5,810,000 1,7 5,000
Poanuts (Picked & Threshed) Lbs. 2, 000 1, 74,000 Lbs. 2 O,000 1 000
Sweet Potatc.es su. 1, ,, 000 2,699,000 Bu. .1, 0, 5,18,000
Cow Peas Bu. ,4 .000 170,0C00 Bu. 36,000 12 9,0'J00
Oats Bu. 1 8,C,000' 138,000 Bu. 125,000 8 ,000
Velvet Beans Ton 59 000 8h,000C Tons 5 ,000 753,000
by Tons 5 .,000 1,119.000 Tons C,000 1,0l,000
Sugar Cano Syrup Gals 1,55 ,000 1 350,000Ga lS 1,6 ,000 1,72,C000
Sugar-Raw Tons o R- core No Record Very Light
Black Strap classes Gals no RT cord Gals flo Record Very Light
Pans b____________ L. 00,000 ,.,000, Lbs. 1,016.000 L 00
Total Incomplete $20,158,C00C 22,890c,000
Othr-r Field Cr-op .i c_ V____ ,I .50, T.AO MiscI ~L500)0.E.C0.
1928 1 '0__
Commodity i Unit Production Farmn Valuo U.ni-t Production oFarm Value
Corn Bu. 7,075,000 $ 7,L27 ,000 Bu. 5,886,0000 5,180,000
Cotton Bale 22,000 1,091,000 Bale 5,000C 2, 20,000
Tobacco Lbs. 8,635,000 2,5 9,000 Lbs. 9,7l8, 000 2,672,000
Peanuts (Picked & Threshed) Lbs. 28,175,000 1,352,000 Lbs. 2o ,50,000 902,000
Sweet Potatoes Bu. 1,700,000 2,465,000 Bu. 1,360,000 1,6Lv,000
Cow Peas Bu. 48,000 162,000 Bu. 86 000 23,0C00
Oats Bu. 135,-000 92,000 Bu. 112,000 87,C000
Velvet Bbans Tons 68,000 877,000 Tons .. L,000 572,000
Hay Tons 54,000 1,0 8,000 Tons 48,000 830,000
Sugar Cane Syrup Gals IL6,0c' 1,262,000 Gals 1,550,000 994,000
Sugar-Raw Tons ,CO ie. Record Tons 27,000 lo Record
Black Strap !1c.lazse Gals 13i,000 ho R:ecord GCls 2 ,202,000 tic Record
PncrIns LbF. 2,- 0.0(00 .000 Lbs. 1 1"0'000 C, 2.000
Total Incomplote $19,o,000 $10,158,000.
Other Field Crops Misc. *2500000 0Mis. *2,,00.000
S1902 ____ ___
Commodity Unit Production Farm Value Unit Production Farm Value
Corn Bu. 6,350,000 $ 2,921,000 Bu. 7,496,000 $ 5,322,000
Cotton Bale 18,000 556,000 Bale 31,000 1,576,000
Tobacco Lbs. 5,510,000 6,000 Lbs. 8,680,000 2,98,000.
Peanuts (Picked & Threshed) Lbs. 4,0370,000 1,3561,000 Lbs. 38,450,000 1, 11l,000
Sweet Potatoes Bu. 1,560,000 1,232,000 Bu. 1,610,000 1,68,0
Cow Peas Bu. 94,QCO 90,000 Bu. 88,000 154,000
Oats Bu. 75,000 26,000 Bu. 112,000 77,000
Velvet Beans Tons 60,000 255,000 Tons 70,000 700,000
Hay Tons .1,000 69,000 Tons .52,000 582,000
Sugar Cane Syrup Gals 1,70,000 64,000 Gals 2,660,000 984,000
Sugar-Raw Tons 37,000 **,29,000 Tons 42,000 **l,470,000
Black Strap Molasses Gals 3, 49,000 ,900 Gals 3, 92,000 395,040
Pecans Lbs. 625,000 N.000 L2s 1 .O0. 00 15 .000
Total Incomplete 9,914,900 $16,295,040
Other Field Crop's Misc. *1 0500.000 Misc. *2,000.000
* Estimated by Marketing Bureau
**Estirate from unofficial sources.


Al fi
:.Z"AWM L Al.
F.Qrm Vnl"-g





Page 57


VOLUME AND VALUE OF FLORIDA GE!TERAL FARl' CROPS (Cont'd.)
(For Selected Ye-rs)


Corn
Cotton
Tobacco
Peanuts(Picked & Thr
Sweot Potatoes
Cow Peas
Oats
Velvot Beans
Hay
Sugar Cane Syrup
Sugar-Rawv
Black Strap Molasses
Dara n


eshod)


Tnit+


19 ~8


I p Lu&. n. U A. 1. .L.


Bu.
Bale
Lbs.
Lbs.
Bu.
Eu.
Bu.
Tons
Tons
Guls
Tons
Gals
T.hS


8,452,000
26,000
19,684,000
56,250,000
10,0OO0
88,000
1o0,000
S 65,000
66,000
2,000,000
92,000
5,,97,000
1 7T7, 00


S5, 071,000
1,202,000
5,525,000
1688,000
1 ,27,000
158,000
6),000
7 54,000
654,000
**3,60 ,000
657 ,80
10 000 nr


.Unit Production I F.rm VrLlie


Vu.
Bale
Lbs.
Lbs.
Bu.
Bu.
Bu.
Tons
Tons
Gals
Tons
Gale
T _


8,052,000
21,000
16,528,000
75, 0,ooo0
55,000
,000
9,000
1,000
1,120,000
7,000
5,17o,000
1 l. P nnn


? 5,636,000


2,000
92,000
102,000
6.9,000
,000
5~ ,ooo000
*L,268,000
,*1,15,ooo
6 nn000
(ir6nnn


Total Incomplete I21,61, 160 :21,112,000
Oth.r Fi-ld Crops Mic. .2-5600 Mi _________ I. 000.000
10)L1 191_____
Commodity Unit Productioni FIrm Vnlui Unit IProdutiQon Frn Vnlun
Corn Bu. 6,.8O,000 5, 09,000 Pu. 7, 15,00 0 8 7,74 ,000
Cotton Bale 17,651,000 X,1,61,000 Bale lo, 39,000 ,5,000
Tobacco Lbs. 1l,7 11000 4,052,000 Lbs. 11,77 8,000 6, ,000
Peanuts(Picl:-d & Threshod) Lbs. 61,770,000 2,471,000 Lbs. 69,600,000 3,550,000
Sweet Potatoos Bu. l,22,000 1,559,000 Bu. 1,1 0,000 1,o65,000
Cow PoaF Bu. 5,:000 102,000 bu. 5, 000 122,000
Oats Bu. 160,000 107,000 Bu. 168,000 141,000
Velvet Beans Tons 65,000 845,000 Tons 35,000 7l2,000
Hay Tons 64,000 813 ,000 Tons 13,000 99,000
Sugar Cane Syrup Gals 1,600,000 880,000 Gals 1,760,000 1, ,000
Sugar Cane Tons 9,000 li,081,000 Tons 648,600 3,07',000
Black Strap molasseses Gals 5,157,000 928,000 Gal? 4,100,000 -
Pcrns Lbs. L6, 672,0)^10 7 L7.0 QLb( IL.600.000 752.000
Total Incomplete ;,22,24 000 ,-28,29.,000
OthQr Fi.ld Crops ', isE. '22.0 0.00. Mice. c28,00,000

Cc.mnodity Unit Production Farm Vtlue Unit Produrt.ion Fnrm alie
Corn Bu. 8,151,000 ;.12,,55,000 Bu. 7,190,000 .11, 8,000
Cotton Bale 15,915, 000 1,67,000 Balo 13,000 1,4,000
Tobacco Lbs. lO0,000 9,205,000 Lbz. 20,095,000 10, ,000
Peanutc(Picked & Threshed) Lbr. 75, 10,000 ,267,000 Lbs. 72,8C0,000 5,46,000
Sweet Potatoes Bu. 1,608,000 ,70,000 Bu. 1,400,000 ,l6 ,000
Cow Peas Bu. 36,000 000,000 Bu. 52,000 15 ,000
Oats Bu. 150,000 170,000 Bu. o,0o00 504,COO
Velvet Beans Tons 62,000 1,240,000 Tons 8,000 1 5, 000
Hay Tons 75,000 1,175,000 Tons c&,000 1,06,000
Sugar Cane Syrup Gals 2,Q0u,000 2,Ou,O00 Gals 2,21.0,000 2 128,000
Sugar Cane Tons 665,000 3,149,000 Tons 818,000 3,705,000
Black Strap Molasses Gal 5r,200,000 Gals 5,tou,000 -
Pcns b____. ,. L2h.,', b,0.,00 Lb',. 100.000 I. M .000
Total Incomplet1e :;: ,2 5,000 .:41,155,000
Oth-r Field Crors Mi _________ 00 Mire. *_________ 0o.00
10; 191L A
Comrimodity dv Uni Production Farm ValuIn 'jit. production (Incomplete)
Corn Bu. 6,900,000 .[i ,790,OOO Bu. 6,252,000
Cotton Bale 8,000 89 ,000 Bale 7,000
Tobacco Lbs. 20,082,000 10,92,000 Lbs. 21,567,000
Peanuts(Picked & Threshed) Lbs. 71,550,000 ,7 ,000 Lbs. 6600,000,000
Sweet Potatoes Bu. 1,152,000 2,880,000 Bu. 1,170,000
Cow Peas Bu. 36,000 172,000 Bu. lot Available
Oats Bu. 480,000 51h1,000 Bu. 396,oo00
Velvet Beanz Tons "56,000 1,5t8,000 Tons :ot Available
Hay Tons o3,000 1, l[0,000 Tons 62,000
Sugar Cane Syrup Gals 2,040,000 2,0O0,000 Gals Not Available
Sugar Cane Tons l,lh9,000 6,950,000 Tons 1,114,000
Black Strap Molasses Gals 6,500,000 Gals 5,700,000
Pecins ILbs, l. 000 1,010,0001 L. ,100 000___
Total Incomplete 4 )?5,616,000
Other Field Crops ,.is __.___200.000
Subject to revisions.
EstLTated by MarketinK Bureau of farm value not otherwise accounted for.
** Estimate from unofficial sources. -
All of the above information from the U.S. Agricultural Statistician in
Orlando, Florida, except when noted.


oC ed i t


Production


nE Vn l y






Page 58


S .FLORIDA TOBACCO
Flue Cured (Bright Leaf) Type No. l1


Year
192
19 1
1912
19 5
195 b
19 5

1987
19L4


194
19 4


Acreage
6,500
7 5C'0
6, OOC
2,000
5, 000
4,700
7,000
16,800
16,500
29,500
12,700 oo
11,500
15,000

.19,: 00
20,4 00
Suin Cured


Production
,100 000 lbs.
,7 67,000
,5000
1,200 000
S5,700,000
3,408,000
6,020,000
7,200 000
l4,112,000
15,892,000
20,650,000
11,748,000
8,102,000
11,160,000
11,8 2,000
17,1 0,000
1,19,000
18,7 6,000
(Filler 19O0-190Q Binder.
(Types 45 and 56)


Acre.ge
700
700
200
100
500
700
4CO
700
900
1,000
1,000
600
600
200
100
100.
200
Filler (Type
continued to
Rhnr r


145)


TFp P
F
F
F
F
F


& B 1
& B
B
B

B.
B
B
discontinued


reduction
791,000
6,, 000
62,000
560,000
770, 00
380, 000
784,000
,110,000
160,000
,500,000
50,000
70,000
93,000
180,000
after 1939.


Estimated
Farm Value

2 ,000
,000
,000
10 ,000
51,000
106 ooo

11 ,000
15,000
11 ,000
37,000
19 000
id1y000
B: Binder (Type 56)


date.
Grown-Air Crpiip.r (DnyrV T.-Anqf) Wrpnnrr Tvna AP


Per owund
20.1d
lh.92
114.9?
1 .58
10.
1 &
lo'


l2.9
14.4/
17. 5
-22$
27 .0 i

started in


1930 2,
1931 2,
1932 2,
193 1,
1934 1
19 '7 2,
1936 2,
197 2,
19 9 2,
19 0
1
194 2
195 2
19 6 2,
Original Sales
19 8
1 99
19 0
1941
19L2

192


, 00
,600
000
100
600
100
000
100
,400
500
200
,00
800
600
600
400oo
700


. ~ Production
5,190,000 Ibs.
2,616,000
1,970,000.
2,0,000
1, 4,000
1, 890,000
2,050,000
1,890,000
2, 12,000
2,1 50,00
5,280,000
5,069,000
2,968,000
2, 12,000
2 25 000 '
2,820,000
2,619,000o
Florida Auction Sales Flue
Vo 1 ume
10,989,275 lbs.

6 015 352
8,228,284
9,246,183
1 ,680
14,768,370


timai
$1,9 ,000
785,000
690,000
3 0007ooo
8 4,000
1,2 ,000
1,414,oo000
1,30 4,000
1,95,000
1,57 0000
2,296,000
2,240,000
2, 879,000
,087, 000
4,212 000
4,;230,000


ed Type No,
T ot a
$2,230,690
.1 80 969
1,487,557
1, 05,14
2, 669, 49
1 O
2 '


ted Farm Value
or 60o per lb.
" 30 "
" 50 "
" 2/f "
" 9.9/ per lb.
" 6 per lb.
" 704 "
" 72 "
" 73 "
i" 7V "
" 75 "
S$13 "
" 1 1 "
." I "
" 1. 5" "
" -


V a 1 u
20.21z
12.20?
17.735
21 .41
2. 4
4o.8
9.0
7 5


Estimated
Q 25 UOO r
60C 000
287,000 "
1 000 "
S000 "
2000 "
1,006 000 "
1,584,000 "
5226 000 "
6i 000

0,000oo "
1,i000 "

,?.2ooo "

l,-LM6)Dark Lpaf


Year
Summer
19 0
19 1
19 2
19
19
19
19

19 9
192
19
19
19
19
NOTE: F:
1936 and


Farm Vabtlue
18.I per
10. .
6. "
11r "
12/ "
20/ "
17.8! "
22d "
21.1 "


2. "
20.85 "
.8 "
-, iZ ,


I&-


Cur


4r))





Page 59


INSPETIONS OF FLORIDA CITRUS FOR SHIP.MEST
BY RAIL AND TRUCK BY COUNTIES
SEASON SEPTEMBER 1, 1945 JUNE 30, 1946


Grapefruit


B 0 X E S (1-3/5 bushels)
Oranges Tangerines


Alachua
Brevard
Brov.ard
Citrus
Dade
DeSoto
Duval
Hardee
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Indian River
Lake
Lee
Manatee
Marion
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sarasota
Seminole
Volusia


TOTAL


3,155
392,026
25,450
4,024
29,629
17,722
77,350
1,080
12,592
199,311
126,194
1,050,884
429,785
26,141
95,964
74,269
741,158
34,121
51,635
85,185
768,708
3,168,966
8,579
121
895,037
19,979
207,118
62,706

8.604.889


57,538
767,175
79,985
27,700
71,553
359,805
574,406
34,313
78,526
891,966
797,457
288,100
3,249,783
54,188
31,391
911,752
6,572,782
141,908
74,622
204,616
374,187
8,969,749
195,527
31,718
754,923
46,047
1,460,016
710,262

27.791.995


2,586
26,457
1,471
1,466
161
88,180
98,291
3,143
106,729
39,693
104,345
20,762
3558,629
1,419
943
46,922
789,920
26,037
5,554
31,531
49,173
1,000,447
42,513
31
77,330

176,172
149,174

3 228.679


63,279
1,185,658
106,906
33,190
101,343
465,707
750,047
38,536
197,847
1,130,970
1,027,996
1,359,746
4,018,197
61,748
126,298
1,032,943
8,103,860
202,066
131,611
319,532
1,192,068
13,139,162
246,419
31,870
1,727,290
66,026
1,843,506
922,142

39.62.5 53


CERTIFIED LIME SHIPMENTS By Counties, By Months-Season.1945-46
(In Terms of Equivalent Standard Boxes, 1-3/5 Bushels)
Hills-


Brevard Brovward Dade


July 1945
Aug. ,,
Sept. "
Oct. "
Nov. "
Dec. "
Jan. 1946
Feb. "
Mar. "1
Apr. "i
May i"
June ,i

TOTAL

Percentage


33,446
32,925
12,575
918
421

120
218

452
9,599
21,768


Highlands borough


5,143
6,657
1,899
1,369
770
95

207
765
288
215
3,952


4,)0
2,62
1,1
65
1






1,54


Lake Manatee Polk


29 3,968
21 253 5,056
59 52 1,915
55 219 4,935
32 19 2,424
- 24 148
- 265


- 208
- 45
- 202
- 2,808


Totals

46,688
47,520
17,590
8,076
5,855
267
391
425
973
785
10,016
50,077


152 39 112,438 21,360 10,173 294 253 21,954 166,665

.1 67.4 12.8 6.1 .2 .2 13.2 100.0


Note: The above data supplied by E. E. Raasch, Statistician, Florida Citrus Inspec-
tion Bureau, Winter Haven, Florida


County


102
50
12



6




2


Total


7 -






Page 60


VOLUME OF FLORIDA CITRUS TRUCKED THROUGH
STATE ROAD GUARD STATIONS AND PATROL
FLORIDA STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Eight road guard inspection stations were maintained on all roads leading
out of Florida or into the northwestern part of the State here all trucks carrying
citrus fruits were checked from October 1, 1945 to June 15, 1946 for proper inspec-
tion papers, inspection.and advertising stamps and fruit itself. All stations were
manned by sufficient inspectors to operate shifts twenty-four hours daily. Regular
station inspectors were supplemented by patrol men who were on duty at all times to
maintain contact with stations and to see that no trucks carrying citrus fruits
evaded station inspection. In addition, these inspection stations and the road
patrol were important factors in assisting with the administering of the Federal-
State 1.hrketing Agreement by exercising vigilance regarding restricted fruit and
furnishing daily records of truck movements to the Growers Administrative Committee.


STATION
LOCATION

Wilcox
Branford
Ellaville
Suwannee Spgs
White Spgs
Lake City
Hilliard
Yulee


High-
way

US 19
Fla 5
US 90
Fla 50
US 41
Fla 82
US 1
US 17


Equivalent
ORANGES


40-41 41-42 45-44 44-45 45-46:

2023 1086 937- 635 853
.76 72 14 .8 15
437 258 188 79 117
469 201 22 9 40
2746 1978 1441 986 1399
112 60 9 6 8
1808 977 657 413 521
6644 4869 2274 .1578 2251


Carloads of 400 Boxes
GRAPEFRUIT


40-41 41-42 45-44 44-45 45-46

349 145 122 82 116
13 11 3 2 3
94 53 32 20 27
115 48 4 2 11
752 395 204 121 201
77 12 1 1 2
459 221 98 51 74
2062 1575 421 251 370


TOTAL
* 1942-43
STATION
LOCATION


14315 9501


Road Guard
High-
way


Wilcox
Branford
Ellaville
Suwannee Spgs
White Spgs
Lake City
Hilliard
Yulee


US 19
Fla 5
US 90
Fla 50
US 41
Fla 82
US 1
US 17


5522 3712 5186: 3899 2460


Stations not open and no records
TANGERINES


40-41 41-42 45-44 44-45 45-46:

114 77 155 120 173
2 4 2 1 2
20 15 27 17 18
30 25 5 2 5
191 145 266 271 277
9 5 1 1
123 74 98 64 76
598 498 441 569 457


available.
TOTAL CITRUS


885 550 804


40-41 41-42 45-44 44-45 45-46

2486 1308 1212 835 1124
92 87 19. 11 20
551 326 247 116 162
611 272 29 13 56
3669 2516 1911 1578 1877
198 75 10 8 11
2390 1272 833 528 671
9304 6942 3156 2198 3058


1087 837


990 845


989:19301 12798


7397 5087 6979


Converted to cars on basis of 400 boxes to pre-War rail carload to maintain
same comparative basis with pre-War'conversions. Actually 499.43 boxes should be the
conversion factor for 1945-46 season to obtain freight rail carload equivalent.
Freight loadings were 497.5 boxes in 1944-45 season, 499.2 boxes in 1945-44, 491.3
boxes in 1942-43, 406.1 boxes in 1941-42, and 390.1 in 1940-41. Whether or not
freight car loadings will ever average as low as 400 boxes per car is a question
which remainss to be answered.
The above passing include West Florida destinations, which are mostly
intrastate in character and not credited to interstate government.

The above arranged from data secured from the Citrus Inspection Bureau in
Winter Haven,'Florida.


TOTAL


O







Recapitulation of Number of Carloads (equivalent to rail carloads) of VEGETABLES, STRAWBERRIES, AND MISCELLA-
NEOUS FRUITS,moved from Florida via Motor Trucks from October 1, 1945, to June 15, 1946, inclusive, through
designated Highway Gateways, as reported by Road Guard Inspection Stations of the Florida State Department of
Agriculture.

(Compiled by a private agency from Daily Market Reports of Florida State Marketing Bureau,)
Conversion Lake White Suwannee Ella-
Factor Yulee Hilliard -City Springs Sprijngs .ville Branford Wilcox -Total
State Road 3 4 82 2 50 1 5-A 19
U.S. Road 17 1 41 90
Beans,Snap 600 1669.8 169.9 1.4 459.9 1.3 116.1 1.7 403.5 2823.6
Butter 500 76.3 10.6 .4 16.7 .2 1.7 25.5 131.4
Lima 500 210.0 8.7 .9 37.0 1cl 3.2 lcl 55.7 295.6.
Cabbage., Lbs 25,000# 1064.5 171.7 .5 574.8 2.4 84.8 icl 184.0 2082.7
Celery 370 253.4 41.8 .5 136.5 1.0 17.7 ic 113.3 564.1
Corn,Green,(Doz Ears)2,000 205.7 15.9 5.2 111.0 .5 6.3 20.0 361.6
Cucumbers 450 478.1 23.5 1.9 93.9 .8 16.6 Icl 89.6 704.5.
Eggplant 470 291.3 16.7 2.0 64.2 Icl 27.2 1.0 212.9 615.5
Escarole 450 18.7 lcl icl lcl .6 19.6
Lettuce 550 54.3 9.0 .1 10.7 lcl 1.0 17.7 92.8
Okra 500 54.9 6.5 .7 17.1 .2 2.6 icl 24.0 106.1
Peas,English 580 24.8 4.9 .6 7.5 .7 icl 14.7 55.2
Field' 500 152.2 27.8 6.5 106.4 1.9 9.2 .8 234.8 539.6
Peppers 480' 726.2 33.2 -5.1 211.5 .7 62.6 .4 417.6 1457.5
Potatoes,Irish 550 265.6 54.6 1.0 222.4 6.4 39.5 2.0 165.4 757.0
Squash 500 263.5 41.9 4.3 127.4 ...7 36.8 Icl 153.1 627.9
Tomatoes 500 1608.9 260.5 9.3 855.1 3.3 99.0 1.9 663.6 3501.6
Vegetables,Bun, D'oz 2,000 23.5 10.2 lcl 12.7 Icl .8 11.8 59.1
Other VegetabLc 500 266.3 13.2 lcl 41.7 3.8 14.4 339.4
Total Vegetables 7708.0 920.6 40.4 3106.3 19.4 526.6 7.8 2802.2 15132.6
Avocados 700 .8 .5 icl -- ~ .2 "l6
Limes 800 6.9 icl .4 icl .8 .5 8.6
Strawberries 450 384.0 8.0 35.3 1.0 3.5 12.2 444.0
Watermelons(No..Melons)1000M 680.2 86.7 '19.1 413.8 101.4 45.3 10.8 418.0 1775.3
Miscellaneous Fruits 500 21.0 2.2 1.6 11.3 .. lcl 8.6 44.8
Total Non-Citrus Fruits 1092.9 97.4 20.7 460.8 102.4 49.6 10.8 439.5 2274.3
Grand Total 8800.9 1018.0 61.1 3567.1 121.8 576.2 18.6 3241.7 17406.9
NOTES: Bushels: Beans, Butterbeans, Limabeans, Cucumbers, Escarole, Okra, English Peas,Field Peas, Squash.
Crates: Colery Strawberries.
Packages: Eggplant, Lettuce, Peppers, Potatoes, Tomatoes, Other Vegetables, Avocados, Limos, Other Fruits.
Per Dozen: Bunched Vegetables, Ears of Corn.




FRUITS A.ID VEGETABLES
r-COil'TY ACPEAGE SEASO-iS 1- 4 '-ii 1 rh -hC AHD 1:c,h-hL6


Flor ida
Count iPs

Alachua
B'rsdford
Brev'. rd
Brov':, rd
Ca 1 houn
Charlotte
Cit rus
C i-.' "
Colier.
Columbia
Dad-
DeSoto
Dixie
Dural
Escarribia
Flagler '
Gadsden
Gilchris t
Glides .
Harti ltorL
Hardee d .
Hendry ',
Hernrindo
Hichl.inds .
Hill sbo rogh.
Holmes -
Indian RIvr. r
Jac kc n
Je fi-esc'n
Lak e
Lafaylette e
Lee
Leon
Lev,
Madison
Manrtee-
Mar ion
Marti .
Oke-echob e
Orange
Osceols
Palm BI3ch-
Pasco
PinAllas,..
Poll.:
Put nIm
Safitsa lsa
Sarssot-a '
Seminole "
St. Johnc.,
St. Lucie.
Sumter
Suwanrnee
Tay-lor
Union
Voluczia
ra lt on
Washin tor
Mi ;co I T1 ri :ne 1


' 'w


20,500




. ,5o_





;00
*00


350
2C00
59

800
850
*- L .








)4C,0



'00
1 0
800
j-








5 700
50
C
150


-
^.


500
120
CI
19,800








1 ~C
5,000




200











5C1
2-50










1-11
1 -,0


ic5o




250

. ,100




; i50



-


i _
,0


3, 56C
15C'








3100







iio

250
I C










I
-
I
c 0

C













200
4-0
250
-
















200
r.l n


1,000"
200
2 0"




50

150







































50
30
l {,2


L~iJc~
'15b


2,25~







:0,)



52


.1,100
100

150





150












100
*- *


-I


700O


.5,5.5.




50'J





-_,
3001

50





"i
I


-. -I
1 2~


1,,Loo
2001
r-
150





100:








-_
-


-1


250 L 00
150 150






200 2' 0)
oo 'o 50



,0,0 7 00
200 100

,0,,00 050

105 100
1 50 50
300 50
360' 1SC'
C, -2






50 - 50


6000 00
4--


10 c

700-
500






1 ,500'


:,00


300
- s"
i~


3c.'So


100

1,000
50

800




500
5
* ,500



200


150
3,00


I,


500 ~'fl iOO 80, 2Q01
-4-.


7,000 2,5300 17; .00 15,200


NOTE' 195-46 figures sc of Sept.-r,r 2' sutjeot *-o revision.

SCtURCF: U.S;. Bureau of A.:ricultural EconVmics., Orlar'do, Floridfa


I .


Pago 62


2C'0


1


'1


Total


S h A
IC .- cE -85 .-L 6 1.0-jh .Q.I^ .J
. * I


200
100
50
ho


200

50


100
100
800
50
55o

50









5C0


150

500


'650

,ooo


900
1 0
1 ,000

50


2,00


1 0


PnyFco-a


4,500 ,8Ioo





Page 63


FRUITS A'.D VE.T.-.PLS -7S
Co,;.iiTY ACREAGE .sg ,',.jS I^ <-JL. 3F_5,- Arrr' 1C,;,,.-I,


imuph-ri rs :--... P. nt .


Florida or. .,, __ u
ro.unt:-A I', 10.-I1), LQIj-,-i
Alachua 100 150 1351 1,200
Bradford -| 150
Brevard -
Bro' ard 4 00
Calhc'un -, 100
Charlotte -I -
Citrus -' -
Clay -
Collier -! 200
Columbia -
Dude 50
DeSoto -
PDiyie -

Cadsd.Jn -
Gilchrist -j -
GlIdes -
Hamilton 100
Hardee 600
Hendr 00
Hern:'ndo -
Hisrhlands 50
Hill'7borouch 35
Holmes -
Indian River 100
Jackson .
le-fferson -
Lake 225 350 810 200
L fa,'ette .
Lee 350
Leon -
Le "/ 50
i.' .adison -
;.anatee 200 100 1001 375
i.,aricon 250 200 2201 150
!Martin -' 50
Okeecrnobee -
Oranc-e 325 950 1,165 200
Osceola -
Palm Beach 5,500 4,125 5,175i 250
Pasco -
Pinell s -0
Folk 50
Putnam -
Santa Rosa -_
Sar sotta 1,200 1,300 1,560! 175
Seminole 4,100 3,850 4, 75; -
St. Jolns -I -
St. Lucie 275
Sunter 600
Suwannee -
Taylor -
Union -;
Volusia -
Wa Ilton -
Washin:.ton -
i YlIn ______u 25 __13 10


Total I


9,900 11,050 13,450i 6,300


C111 -),L 1 1 1t-j, ]C.)L.,-! Lt
2,000 2,250 .150
150 200 2-
20
400 450 500
500 200 -
.. -
-I -
-- -
150 300j
25 7
50 100 -oo


.100 "
-I -

400 00
825 1,200 175
25 100 -

5 -
475 800 425







5o 50 -
25
l00 500
200 1400 80
300 500 500
100 200 -
100 950 375
225 300 250
25 50
150 o400 125
550 700 500

50 50 -

150 150 25
25
100 150 150
500 1,050 1oo0
50
150 150 -


75 200 7r5

7,700 11,950 3,500


150


-5
475



25






100

100
75
-5
100
25
350



100

375


150
125

25
700






125
150




I NO


200

425



25






50

250

25
147



50

350



225
925


775













17E;


'NOTE: 19L5-46 figures as of September 20 sugject to revision.


3,250 4,050


IC11,11-11,; Y-I)L'i4lf,




Page 64


Fiorid:'


Aluchu
Er dford
Erc.vard
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrur

Col ier
C clurmbia

DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lake
Lafayette
Lee
Leon
Levy
Madison
1Manatee
Marion
Martin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
St. Johns
St. Lucie.
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Valton
Washington
Misn(a T neou i


L".ttuce
S- -





-- -I -



di, 1 I51 -


6oo
75


175

1,000






S400oo









1O00


475
50


225

1,600oo





100
350


20





400
10


150

1,4oo00





20
6oo


100


50

2,000






100









n


150
10C0


50

1,800






10C0


w
u

- 100
100







100
400
3 m










50
100


50

900oo






1 00


275
*350


25

250






200
I -


-
-
-
-
-









-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-So
200
-
-


loo
-
-
-
-
-
-
150
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-


EELLIS AiM VE'EETA 'LRS
COIiUNTY ACREAGE AIMSE UrH'S i..-. l'",.L A-' 1 "


Total 2,30 2,800 2,600 2,500 2,600. 2,000 -1.,100 400 500

'NOTE:.1945-46.figurss as of September-20 subject to revision.





FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
CnJUTY ACREAGE SFASONJS i I'a-,). IQl-hl and lQoq-hr6


.-Fler-ida -
Counties
Alachua
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler.
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hi ilsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson"
Jefferson
Lake
'Lafayette I
Lee
Leon
Levy
Tviadison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
'Polk
Putnam
Santa Rosa
Sarasota'
Seminole
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Walton
Wa.shington
Mi l n 1 n M n (I


Lettuce
IQ^-hh hIQ 1h6.-r


50




400




150








200
25

25
300


50

50







1 OC


*1


300




175








25
50


525



50

25






r-


30














400




250








150
50
1-















180
250


25
-




C


1,000 1,4501


8,950 9,350 12,0001 28,600


31,100 35,300


NOTE: 1945-46 figures as of September 20 subject to revision.


Page 65


Potatoes


300
50
2,500



.25

25






5300
-






1,225
40



500


400
150
250
125
1,350

150

50
200
225
450




7,1 n


600
.ho
3,000





25






225


.1,850



100

575


150
125
135
75

.1,500

200

0
225
175
500


S500
50
5,200













450


2,675



150
500




150

350
1,900

' 300


100
275
100
725




100
iOO


1,6oo00
.100






6,000
150

700
2,600



100


400
150


100











2,050
50


7,900
50

100
oo


1500
100


T,_" Peppers T -,
10li-ih 1qff- 5 lQLB-ir6 19q-ihh


1Qjh-^h
2,000
100




100
50
6,loo


800
2,000



100

200
400
UO





50


50
1,200


100
50
300
6,300

50
2,850
500
150
6,900



100
150
50
1 C;o


Total


1,350


100 100


19)5-16
2,200
150




100

6,770
100

850
2,250



50

80
630
50




1,360-


50
100
240
240
9,200

50
2,600
280
200
7,500



150
150
50
Ion




Page 66


FRUITS AID VEGFTAB, S
COUNTY ACREAGE SEASONS 1 -L. 1C-hT AID laL^-Lo


Florid.

Alachua
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gadsden ,
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee.
Hendry
Hernando
Hi hlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lake *
Lafayette
Lee
Leon
Levy
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas'
Polk
Putnam
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
St. Johns
,t. Lucie
unmter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Walton
Washington
Miscellaneous
'Total" ........

NOTE: 1945-46


To .. Totl Ver,, tables a r C ntal ou1e0 '

' 100 '75 ,750. 7,175 8,715 --' iO 150
1 0 00 0 1050 -765 900 50 25 50
3;0 200 260 0 20 250 -
5,000.. 5,000 3,250 29,400 .29,0 5 27,71 -
-. 100 50 200
100- '100' -' -
t t \ _- -_


600oo.

12,000
,250





200

1,000
1 400.

1,850
900


550
1,100


2,650.-

3500
225

1,150

100.

S400,.

550
1,500


1,175 ..
13,000o
125 -







1,025.


1,250

S575.

325

450.


2,225
450o
250

75
2,100..
lo i













100 .

100.,

2,500
1,250




.-. 0


1,1400 .

13,200 .
225,.1
1 ,

-:



2,025.


1,825

'300


375
700


2,600
1,050
50o


1,950

200


75.

:
-I
5,750
1,300





275


34,900 32,500- -37,300


925
200,
23,20
5

700
:3,600
500

1,1950
200.
2,025



5,850
150.
1,300
5,975

1,50

2,0550










200"
1 250
84,75.0

12000'
3,600









2.6o00
50
2,5400
6,775
10,400'-

200


k1400
225
23,000
350

800
2,700
300.
100
900 .
00









2,700
350
25

1,500

2,775
2,700
77,275

850
4,400

2,200
6,075
9,100
77,275







850

50

507
1 07 r


1,725
-Si
23,470
1425
100
1,180
3,250
50

1ro

150
9,005
500


50
2,095

3,410
3001

5,950.
,380
1,905

3,385
50
77,675
I
-i
1,0ooo
3,765
2,1351
7,2001
9,800
6, 40oo01
3 505!
-1
640
350
50
1.64 ;


223,950 204,550 221,000


I --


1
-
-
-
-
200









200











1- O


-I
1

-
-
-
-


75'
-
-i


-
-

-
-O0
-



100
I
-





150

-1
-I


1
-
-
1




75
-
-
1





75
1
-
-
-





lO0
1
1




75
-
1
1


10
-
-

25o
-
-


500 -- 800


figures as of September 20 subject to revision.


L21;,




Page 67


FRUTTS ATID VFnETAILES
COU;iTY ACREAGE SFASOt!S LI .-hh ALJ .- JJD 1!1-h6


Florida
C.o.unt i J
Alachua
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee i
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hi lsborough!
Holmes .
*Ind'ian Rjiver
Jackson
Jefferson
Lake
Lafayette
Lee
Leon
Levy
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sumter
Suwannee
.Taylor
Union :
Volusia
Walton
Washington
M iscPl aneous
Total ..- :


125






100







150


6oo00








25


S25



200




50


200






100







200


1,100








25


S25



200





75


1,400 2,050


2,000
. 225 100

700

'- 100

100
150 -




S 50
2,200
150
200 50
50
100

1,700 00
,, 5. 50
2,- 00
5,500
100
100
0 5600
2,000
S- 2000

100

S500
300 lOO
100




100 1,0
2,800
100

600
S 5










-12___150-
2,800 2-5,500


3,000
100
100
1,000
100

300

100


50
1-



100
100
50
300
100
5,000
1,200
6,500
-O


100
100
3,000
1,200




500


1-

50
100
2,100
5,000
50
50
5,000
50








'1,000
I m


39,000


100
350
200


100


200
100
100

,400
200
100
,000
,800
6,000
1,000
150
200
2,500
2,000
150
3,500

1,200
200
200
200
100



100
2,700
5,500
100
250
800
P(n


51,000


2,000
275

700
100

100
100




50



50
100



2, 00
200
5,500
100
100
600
2,000
25
2,500

125

5QO





50
1 ,100
2,800

S100
50
6oo
C;


27,450


3,100
325
100
1,000
100

500
100
100


50
s ^
3,500
975
100
50
S1,400
100-
5,000
1,200
6,500
150
100
1,300
3,000
5,150

125
100
500
350
100


50
1 00
2,200
'5,000
100
* 50
1,000
ann


6,50

200
300
200
100
350
150


100


50
5oo




2,100
200
100

6,000
1,000
150
200
2,600
2,000



1,200
200
200

100


100


150
100
100
250
800
;7


41,550 54,6oo


NOTE: 19h5-46 figures as of September 20 subject to revision.





Page 68


Florida :

Alachua
3ravford
Br-ev'' o r d
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hi lsborough
Ho line s
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lake
Lafayette
Lee
Leon
Levy
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sumter
Suwanne e
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Walton
Washington
Miscellaneous
Total


Total Vegetablec
.- "- ---- r -it l ra p 'L

7,750 10,575 15,665 -
1,525 1,090 1,275 -
5 70 250 250 11,310 11,510
29,00 29,175 27,915 2,510 2,560
800 1,500 500 -
100 -
100 100 200, -
950 700 3 00oo
025 1,00o 1,825, -
500 r25 Loo -
23,350 23,oo00 23,620 2,760 2,820
525 o50 7251 6,530 6,b60
100 -
100' -
700 800 l,180 -
3,600 2,700 3,2501 -
550 350 550 -
2,200 360 5,50 .- -
1,950 .900 1,060 -
550 75 25 -
2,725 2,675 4,365 8,550 8,720
925 -25 400 -
250 500 190 1,510 1,540
1, 00 925 4o0 8,800 8,970
6,875 6,900 11,105 16,090 16,410
.. 200 50 250 -
1,165 725 400o 4,770 4,870
2,500 5,100 ,575-
800 o 1,200 50
7,555 8,275 8-095 23,630 24,100
5- -, 1,000 -
3,950 2,850 3,560 3,270 3,330
100 100 200 -
850 1,600 2,900 -
2,000 3,025 2,000 "
6,o000 5,00 6,10o0 ,520 8,610
5,900 6,025 8,10) 8,800 8,970
1,800 1,335 1,905 -
50 -
3,950 2,900 4,585 32,670 23,320
150 100 .50 4,270 4,360
84,750 77,375 77,875 -
500 500 200 6,280 6,1410
- 7,140 7,180
1,300 1,200 1,500 54, 40 55,650
3,700 .4,500 3,865 4, 70 ,30
50 --
2,ob00 2,200 2,135 2,510 2,560
6,775 6,075 7 200 6,530 6,660
10,,o00 9,350 9,800 -
1,50.0 3,50 6,500 8,040 8,200
5,000 5,275 6,355 -
2,800 5,050 5,500 -
50 50:--
300 6o50 740-
650 500 4150 12,320 12,560
0 250 -
-
6oo 1,050 850
O0 --
2,985 1,375 2,020 9,820 10,000
251,400 246,100 275,600 251,340 256,340


-1 r~l0I~ ~r~ef~4t


11,720
2.950


1




-1 $
2,960
6,715






8,950


16,900
4,940

25,680
3,365


4,625
9,015

0 : '

6,780
7,290
-1 o












57,550
4,410
2-,590
6,790
8,1480



12,705

10 .28


380
4,570
3,900
6,760

7,140
3,050





3,900
950

1,520
8,280
27,610
1480
I, o


















4,470
1



















1,4350

2.- 0


5,08L0
90












960
S80
4,6O10
3,9140
6,820

7,200
3,070


5,180
770

4,060
960
1, 5O40
27,: 8O
480
1,150
770
4,510



1,140

2 .(6o


264,870 95,190 96,000 96,940


NOTE: 1945-46 figures as of September 20 subject to revision.


Cj I1S__.$ T_" VF'11 P.T ] AS. j,
COUHTY AfRFArJE SF.,.3 S ,C' o--- 1- i'^L=L)! "A;P iOQ ,.-lh ,'


1--4


3,075
.20






















48970










l.-15
970










4,7305
,0750
-






















2.C.IC




Page 69


SFR ITS AN'D VG ET.)1: PLD S
COUN1JTY ACREAGE SE-r' .-5 '10 ,; tq VID 1,lq-l .


Florida
Coun 'a ip
Alachua
Bradford
3rcvard
3 r o-.- r d
Browmrd
Calhoun -
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lake
Lafayette
Lee
Leon
Levy
Madison
Manatee
Marion
martin
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sumter
Suviannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Walton
Washington
Miscel annn' c


515






656
820
820
1,218
515

1,944
117






595





820
890



1,920


7L0 7c0


468
94




398
515






656
820
820
1,218
515

1,944
117





3,04

52
-
-

















820
890



1,920


40-
514
96











656

820
820
1,233
519

1,952
119





3,004
5-5
187
59



5,471
b32

820
890



1,923


771


Tcv-ha l P.vu-


15,578
2,896
2- 9




7.058






10,156
2,710
14,190
21,208
12,045

32,714
6,437


9,777
9,958

39,614
5,805
8,385
15,976
87,607
5,382
15, -o
1


Z M




:615






10,336
2,740
,400
21,568
12,205

33,244
6,517


9,907
10,138

40,424
5,905
8,555
88,927
5,672
,10
,250
13,60o


15,670 15,920

1I 1i0 1I; 91 l


Total 23,419 23,419 23,549 369,949 375,759 3


rp r i a Total Citr
""" X. w p


Tone." on no<3


NOTE: 1945-46 figures as of Septemb3r 20 subject to revision.
SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Orlando, Florida.


l)1t-'J1, I IQ -4


8c 6 4 6 8F 6 -c- J


16,o6









-
16 0











10,576
2,765
14,575
22,09)
12, 14

34,872
6,559


9,937
10,183

42,26i
5,990
8,922
16 ,36
91,006
5,522
-














14,100



16,078

13,571
;fl. 2(-Q


Grqnd Tntnl

7,70 10,575 15,665
1,5 1,090 1,27
16 8 16,098 16,3
32,29 32,119 31, 61
800 1,500 500
100 -
100 100 200
9 0 700 o00
?25 1,400 1,825
30,08 30,28 30,953
9,oo000 8,9 5 9,39
100 10
100
700 800 1,180
3,600 2,700 3,250
550 350 50
2,200 3,600 5,
1,950 goo00 1,80
550 875 825
12,881 13,011 14,041
925 325 o00
2,960 3,040 2,955
15,49o 15,525 15,035
28,0 3 2,6N 33,19
200 50 2,0
13,210 12,930 12,844
2,;00 5,100 ,75
00 ,200 ,50
40,269 41,519 42,967
- 1,000
10,387 9,367 10,119
100 100 200
850 1,600 2,900
2, 000 ,025 2,000
1577 :,907 16,07
15 &8 1,163 18,313
1,800 1,335 1,905
o50 -
43,564 43,324 46,8 9
5,955 6,005 6,obo
82,750 77,375 77,875
8,185 9,0M 1,12
15,976 16,85 16,36
88,907 90,127 92,506
9,082 9,972 9,387
6,o0 0 5,910 ,880
14,885 14,525 15,580
10,100 9,550' 9,800
17,900 17,050 20,600
5,000 5,275 6,355
2,800 5,050 5,500
50 50
300 650 740
16,320 16,420 16,528
2 0-
600 1,050 8
16 16.15 E I r5 5I
2l _3|9 621 _89 660 959





0
AVRELGF. YIELD A UUD VALUE OF SELECTED CO!,L10DITIES IN FLORID L BY S
BEANS. S1rA


Yield
Acr-E i- usherls


80
101




98
d6




1:
0


Prodnution
2 1",2 0G0
,' 2,000

o,216,000 O
,h,94e J
h, 688, :,oG


S,79u, J0
6,M 7, OO
"I7 ,a,, 00,,

2, 7:7),00


FOP Packod
Totril Valun


A/( 28 .,000C .
A,,(;l,000)
A/(t 350,000)


A/(288, :00)



A/ 269,00 )
A ,1. ,. o,0 )


$2.15
1.95
1.01
.910
1.00
1.21.
1.17
1.0o
1.47
1." Canning
2.62 ,1.27
2.56 1.29
2.*72 1.
2.73 1.67


e6,805, 000
6,592,000
r-9, 8,000
rl,;,.56,ooo
',773,000
,967 ,ooo


h,31,000
1,480,000
L4,9;3-,'000
17,989,000
18 1,'h 0',o0
19Q', 7,45


i Hot harvested, duo to economic ab'indoUm'nt Values cov.r hrvestod portion of
crop. Canning production: 19141-L2 bu. 1,367,000; 19k2-3 bu. 2,677,000; 1913-14
1,2c8,000j 19@4-h-5 bu. 1,836,000; 1945-1o bu. 1,106,000.
L ..1''S


Product on


Price por
Bus hl' 1


1.6o
1.oI
I. I
2. 10

ji/jiu~ 45'
). )/4


FOB Packed
Total Value


C B..OE


Yield
Acreage Tons


6,500O
5,500
6,200
10,700
5,600
9,000
8,500
9,400
10,000
16 ,000
10 000
18 000
10,000
23,500
17,500
15,200


7.4
4.0
7.0
.0
5.2
.0
6.5
:5
.0
.0
6.0
8.5
7.?
7.:
8.8


Production


48,100
2,100
,400
,200
2q,120
6,oo000
51,000
61,000
55,000
112,000
60,000
108,000
85,000
166,800oo
131,000
116,200


A/(7,100)
A/(6 500)


A/(20,000)




A/( 1,7,100)
A/( 2,500)


Prico per
Ton


$22.40
32.00
16.00
16.00
17.o00
16.00
16.oo
18.00
18.40
8.9
7. O0
36.oo
37.00
52-50


FOB Packed
Total Value
$ 918,000
704,000
590,000
685,000
1,650,00oo
612,000
496,000
978,000
990,000
2,061,000
2,34,o000
1, 02,000
6,160,000
,o309,000
5,959,000
5,969,000


NOTE: All 1945-46 acreage figures are preliminary as of
subject to revision.


Fago 7


1929-5 L
19 1-52
19 2- 7


1954-
19 E- 3'

1931-42

19

19h=- /


Iil, DO
01,0
50, 00
61,300
65,500
80,206


c2,00.:
68 ,70

ju, ,,j.
80,200


Se&Cson


Yi.ld
uiishl'
C,
70
65
7



59
4-7.


Season
1950- 1
1931-52


195 -3
19 5-
195 -38
1938-5 9
1954- o
1941-2

19 5


A Not harvested, duo to economic abandonment. Values cover harvested portion of
crop.-


September 20, 1946 and are





ACPRAGE. Y~ELD AIFD VAlUE OF SELECIr10.~.OL1llESJ1L


Page 71
FLORIDA BY SEASONS (Cont'd.)


CF ERY,


Yield Crates
SeF.ron Acreage N.Y. Fla.


Price
rt 2/3
Crates


Production


Price
per
FOB Packed 1Fn.
Total Value Crqtes


1950-1 6,150 30 1,8 6,000 $2.5 $ 5,212,000 1.6
191-2 6 8 255 2 1 7 6,000 27 3,78,000 1.5o
19,2-55 6, 60 22 17 3,000 A/(207,000) 1.2 1,94,000 .0
193-i 6,060 512 50 1,72,000 1.6 2,996,ooo
19- 6,000 80 7 1,6 0,000 2.60 ,6,000 1.o
19-3 6,500 265 1 723,000 2.60 ,000 1.
295- 7,500 280 67 2,097,000 2.16 4,552,000 1.)0
1937--' 8000 286 77 2,2 000 A/(255,000) 1.2 ,2 ,000
1938- 5 7,300 2 490 2,1 4,000 2.46 3 5,5,000 1.
1909- 6 7,500 504 57 2,279,000 2.57 86 000 1.5r
Q6-1i 9,100 27 463 2,531,000 .1 8,066,000 1.91
9 0 269 608,ooo 0,70) 2.74 7,1,000 1.o
a19 ,ro lo15,500 0a. s. 11ooo
193 9,90 -, 000 A 4000. 1 0,000 8
1 5 11050 3 000 A ?f0- 1 ,000
1 5- ,;450 .9 o, 9,00 A, 00 ) ,,000 2
A Not harvested due to economic abandonment. Values cover harvested portion crops.
Florida crates are approximately 60 per cent as largo as NY 2/? crates


Yield
*Bushels
224
240


180
286
283
261
326
207
180
237
278
259
2 1
.3 2


I49,000
'61 000
061,ooo
91,000
371,000
474 000

6 850 000
-876, 000
1,1 86,000
1,064,000
912,000
p20,000
,000
1,000
1;301,000


Production
377,000
432,000
387,000
520,000
184,000
270,000
15,000
10,000
R0,000
66,000
A29,000


880,000
S1,263,000


Prico per
Bushel
$2.42
1.:5
1.58


1.98

1.
1.
2.2
8.9


Price per
Bushel
$1.20
.82


.79
.85

.79



A 1. 5
2.06
1.97


FOB Packed
Total Value
$1,568,000
1,293,000
655,000
M 6,000
705,000
928,000
1,101,000
1 053,000
1 391;000
1 958,000
1 858,000
2 02,000
2 592,000
2 079,000
3 '57,000
5 99,150


~G GB LANL
FOB Packed


FOB Packed
Total Valuo
$ 454,000
556,000
277,000
9,000
89,000
212,000
268,000
623,000
66,000
514,000
17,000
378,000
643.000
1,294,000
1,501,000
1,814,000
2,489,550


A 40,000 bushels not harvested due


Season
1929- 30'
1930-31
1931-52
1932-53
19 255


1937-34

19-4
1938-..59




1945-.


12,100

,600
7,000
,100
700
5,600
7,000
7,600
8,200
8,800
9?700
6,500
6,o00
7,700
11,950


Yield
Bushels

1





121


75
110
109
121
94
73
110
log


Ro n qn
1929-30
1930-31
19 1-32.
19 2-33
191 -4
19358-
1937-38
19 8

1941-42
1942-45
19-
194 -4
1 o


Acreage
1,680
1,800
S 1,950
2,45
2p 0

1,500
1,800
2,100
1,400
1,800
2,350
1,950.
3, 00,
050
: So


ArRFC,: YlEiD JUM VhL F OF SFLECTFD--M,-2-1Qf-,T -


to economic abandonment.


to economic abandonment.






P .a iAGE. YIELD MID VALUE OF SELFI.,.jj.jiOl.-tES IiT FLORIDA Y SEASON (Cont'.


Yield
jSI: q *L. .Crates


qsiron
19S1-32
i> 2- < ,-
19 2--3
190c -
19 a-z




1 6L2 L2
1 -
6,L4-45


FPSCdR1o.E
ProdJuction


700
700
56
1 I

1,35
700


1,2.30
1,h50

'i t-i LV


Price
Cr r t S*


$1.2D
AS




.93

1.15
2 .1h.
l.1io


~bu.hpr.





i t "
it "


FOB Packed
Totln Va hl
' 20,000oo
212,030
267,000
25',000
20 CZ7)
06,00r
20U,000

26, 000
S1,L2,000

1,225,000


1L -- J I'- '- --^ ____-'
-o doz. Icttiice crates, A 538,09 0' 19,3-4 ) l _,0 (1 4-h5)(l- biu. not
hcrvfted do- to on^mc .:lhmtb ydT orLCtrw.:__t..- --
,LFTTUCE' ozton ,'Ld R-comino,')


Yield
rnF -4 do-'..CrtF. Production
1, 000 2 0 ?0.c,, '.)0,.
950* 295 20' 0,000
1,100* 23> 26.:, 000
i.'* 210 1 -'',0 0

9 1O* l"5 1h,. 'O
000_ 18 1--,0,'0
1 50 180 1',000
0.,O iS.O 175,000.
500 1C20 75, 10
-,0 1U00 c7 .-,,
S175 17,0,, ,00
1,iuO 150 165,000 "
l-00,, 2u0 30,000
55o 15o0 32,000c,
,-/1q,7-,8 include bontoh h.-. in, l~ bor-.
LE'Ti-C. (Ic.borf)
L-t' d' z. .:rates


Prico
.Crqtes .
'1.28
1 .1'
1.35
1.25
1.12
.90
1.5
1.10
2.00
2.60
2.150
2.'5
A-r,:,:,c00


FOB Packod
Total Vfaluo


E. 2.6,000
26,, 000


18o,000
170,000
11 ,000
I' -loc

-7 ,o.0o

427,000
22b, 300
216,"000
233,700
cr* t *- net }T"| st ed- -1 r


193'3-39 25:' 18C I,,.'.. $1. 5. 67,000
19,o-o- 1,iLJ' 180 1' 2..0 ';55,000
196'- 1- 2,00' 75 1 .,, O 1.6 21',0.:.'o
1914i-2 ,00 c.1c.5, 2.01 ".',000
2-. 1, 700. : 23 oo 3.97
S1,5.0 1 1 ,000 A 2.90 05\,000
19 -IC 1 -. 1Ih 1 , v,,.-, i 3.,1 51 ,00-
1"-L -1_:5_ 000 D11.72 91', ,250 .
Noto: Prior to 193'-5-'? the acreqge of .Icoberr typ:. wI.s not cominm-rci lly ir.iportant.
A 7b,000 crates itn 'h-L4 nrid 24,l,000 in 1-L!it-4L not h'-rvested-ccononic abandonment.


Production


Price per FOE Packed
Bushoi Tot-il Vilun


19 1- 2,.. ,800 3, 15.,0 .'2.:'o 26,6,000C
19 2- 3. C,600 i- 2__,000 1.6. L.0,C00
19 -54 4.800 6 i, 1.10 57,

19 7 6,200 1.3 5, ,a 1.55 .,.
19 5,6 2000 Q. 0 8 ,, 1.1Y ) '
19 ,000 7 2 0 A,0,'.) 00, 1..1 ,0000
19i-.4 000 70 .4,0.o ,. 1 ,5 10, OO
19142 ,500 235,0J 1.5 580,000C
192-, 00 ,-. 9 '3'' 2.50 2 c,000
19 2,500o. 150,0' 5, C'000
19-5 2,00 75 195,05 A 2.70 000
1945- 4 2,000 7 150,000 3.20 ,000
A 90,000 bu. in 19L4-4 season not h.ryv.-stcd, duce to cconormic b"-rdo..dnmn'nt. Values
cover harvested portion of crop.


t it t
" 10,000
" " :'7,503

" " _O6,000


SPa.--on


Season.


Anroeigo


Yi.:ld
EPbhgls


1 I I I


*^* ^ j -. -





.ORFAGE-. YIELD AN VALUE OF SELECTED C IT I FLORDA SEASONS


PEPPERS. GRIE[I
Yield
Bushels Product:


,200 228
,050 221
,300 266
,000 241
,700 149
,500 226
,200 221


1,869,000
i2,8, ooo
2 1,0,000
1,W 6,000
1,150,000
1,46 000
1 59 ,000
2 180,000
2,212,000
1,390,000
1,621,500
1,792,000
2,018,000
2, 71, 000
2,687,000
2,822,000


Price per
Bushel
$1.25


1.11
.87
1.20


.77


2.6


Page 75
(Cont'd.)


FOB Packed
Total Value
$2,24 ,000
1, 70,000
1,284,000
1,6 o,00
1,2 7,000
1,2 ',000
1,9 )000
1,6i6,000
2,771,000
2,121,000
2,5 7,000
3,1 35,ooo
,17,000
,9 000
,625,000
7 616 700


1,000
S 27,000
21,500
17,000


25,600
261,00
2 6700
25,000
26,200
28,600
31,100
55,5300


POTATOES
Yield Price per


Bushels
80
132
i
15 2

911
M 1?


162

171
171


Production
2, 80,000
2,264000
2,4V,000
3,290,000
2,406,000
2,255,000
5,842,000
4,177,ooo000
5,255,000
4,020,000
3,126,000
2,848,000
:,525,000
5,212,000
5,055,000
,019,000


Bushel
$1.86

.85
1.0
1.45

1.10
.90

2.00
2.56
2. 5


FOB Packed
Total Value
$4,806,000
S,818,000
1,933,000
1,908 000
3,708,000
2, 50,000
3, 18000
5, 08,000


2,799,000
5,924,000
5,914,000
6,451,000
11,821,000
13,567,000


TOMATOES


Yield Production
Sonson Acreago Bushels Fresh Canning


2,371,000
2,020,000
2,25 ,000
2,954,000
2,746,000
2,714,000
2,95 ,000
2,7a6,000
,9R3,000
2,9 4,000
265,000
3,41 ,ooo
2,226,000
,405,000
,456,000 A
- m42,000


557,000
589,000
521,000
16, 000
500,000
312,000
2g2,000
165,000
951,000oo
395,000
289,000
265,000


Price per Bu.
Fresh Canning


$3.79
1.87

2.8
2.46
2.75
2.75
1.73
2.47
2.3
3.92
,30


$-3





.28
.28
.28
.28
.46
.28

.74


FOB Packed
Total Value
$ 8,976,000
3,778,000
,76, 000
6,855, ooo
8,22M,000
7,688,000
8,711,000
12,32,000
8, 16 000
8, 18,000
13,821,000
11,795,000
19,712,000
20,256 ,000
26 923 920


A- 542,000 bushels not harvosted..due to economic


abandonment.


All 19W46acreage figures are preliminary as of September 20, 1946 and are subject to
revision.


Season
1929- 0
1930.- 1
1931- 2
1952-1-

1939-,0
19
19;-
19 1-
19-


194-4
19 5. -
194-


1929-30
1930-31
1931-72
1932-35
19 -36
1935-36
19 7-3o
198-59 -
19 9- 0
19 0-4
194 1- -
19 -4


51,260
26,800
23,700
24,900
0,00
5,700
4700
4, 500
900
2 500
27,500
7' ,00


76
75

11.
102
100
86
120

110
101
102
109
17





Faco 74
11A1i YIELD AND VALUE OF SELECTED CO~ .1 DITES III FL0 1DA BY SEASONS (Cont'd.)
rAUTALOiT-FES


19 9- .0
1950- 1
1951-52
1932- 5
1^ =- .
l9 -J

191 0-41

19 1-42
194,- 1
1914- 4-
1945 -)46
A 5,000


600
250
200
L00
;00
200
200
300
700
500
500

00
550
S00
00


Yield
Crnt.-s


Pr-nlction
50,000
12,000
15,000
2, 000
1 ,000
12,000
12,000

1.0,000
7.5,000
50,000
:7 000
55,000o
,000
N; gooo
no 0o,)o


Price per
Crate
.~1.75
1.50
1.00
1.00
1.50

1.75
1.28
1. 1
1.10
I1.10
1.5o
.2

2.50.


FOB Packed
Tot'l Value
-5)2,000
18,000
1'., 000
2f4,000
25,000
1 ,000
15,000
28 000
6 ,000
58,000
3 ,000
52,000
32,000
15 ,000
120,000
100,000


r-'te-' not harvested du'i t.o r ic'rirrrc falhbr ni.on '.-nt.
STR-,I'HFRR I-S


Acretoe L Crts. Prodlcti on


FOB Packed
Total VfluP


1929-? 0
1950-51
1933-32
1,)I- )2





1 '-)
19'2-

19 -Lo4
19;i--L5
1 4


8,800
9,100
7,800
10, 600
8.,00
8,000
8 ,900
8,800
7,500
9,000
7,200

2,600
1,400-
2,050
2,800


I.low shipped almost exclusively in
Several years ago, used and it is


590,0o00 6.7.0 35,- ,000 .02
05 000 5 7,o.,000 3.1
5 ,000 2.0 4L6,000 7.0
,000 00, 2 2, 000 2.25
630.000 .20 2, 'o.000 3.1
So0, 000 .30 2,2 o000 3.2
V71,000 .oI 10 ,972,000 3.O8
572,000 .80 2,746,000 3.60
52r.,000 L .100 2, 100,000 .00
O76,000 -1'4 1717 000 3.11
2o ,00 ,.7) 2 o,) .40,
3 ,o00 7 2, N,000 ,26
S,000 .0 2, 275,000 L.88
156,0oo) 9. 0 1 ,L9 ,00. 7.20
8,)o 11.0 1i,107,000 h.L7
11 ,000 10.70 1 1 1,00 8.0%
224,000 12.50 2 00,0)00 ,9-5 9
3--pFc. crates. The 24-qt. cr'teo was for:%ierly,
continued here for statistical purposes:


WkATERNELONS
Production
1000 melons


10, 110
10,230
5,700
,950
,212
,600
4,48o


6850
6,885
7,150
4,06

10.965


Price per
1000 melons


A/(937) $250
200
160
200
185
110
t g^o 200
A/, 590 20
*A/(675) 150
175
210
225
650

740


FOP Packed
T .l -i'i Vrklue

E2,56 6,000
2.C0ll,,000
912,000
9'0,000
779,000
726,000
896,000
1,310,000
945,000
976,000
1,193,000
tl,g45,850
1,609,000
261.1,000
o5,000
8,095000
,11 ,100


P5 Fint


Season
1929-3o
1930-3.1
1931-3 2
1932-32
1933- 3
1934-35

19-4 6
190-
19412
19 9



1Q 14
12-40 r
19 -


Acre ae
,700
1,000
28,500
22,500
253,?00
20,000
16,000
19,500
22,500
22,600
23,500
25,500
22,000
12,500
25,500
39,000
51,000


Yield
1/onI


00
30
200
220
180
330
280
00
0o
290
270



215


A Not harvested due .to economic abandonment. Not included in total value figures.
The average carload is usually figured at 1000 melons but new varieties of round
tvno melons have lowered this average to 950-975 melons.
All 1945-46 acreage figures are preliminary as of September20, 1946 and are subject to
STTT 1' cI (Vli -


21L Ouirts*





ACREAGE OF PRINCIPAL FLORIDA TRIJUC CROPS 21 SEASOiS
(for harvest)


Pago 75


Celery Cucumbern
Ayrnnmn A ornp. (r


1
1
1
1
1
10
1
1
1, 00
1, 00
1, 00
2, 400
U,500
,800
4,000
7,000
5,000
400
U,500
,800
7,000


lima figures ar
of 'habv limnns r


,660
,010
2,900
6,500
5,700
S500
r,500
6,200
10,700
5,6000
0,000
8,500
* 9,h00
16,o000oo
10,000
18,000
10,000
23,500
17,500
13,200


included with snap beans pr:
e for the Fordhook or large
or butterbhnns.


5,520

6,620
6,150

6,ooo
6000
6,500
7,3500
6~000
S00


7,500
13 450


ior to th
variety


1925-26
F0, 1926-27
1927-28
11,04 1928-29
1 00 1929- 0
9,650 1950-1
7,500 19 1- 2
,60o 19 2-
,000 19 3-
,100 1954- 5
700 19 5- 6
,600 196-7
ooo 19 7-58
7,600 19 8- 9
8,200 19 9- 0
8 800 1940-41
9,700 19J1-42
6,00 192-54
6, 00 19-
11,950 19 5-L~
eO 1933-34 season. The
and do not include acreage


Boston Iceberg English
SEopnlant Earol r Lettuce Lettuce Peas _
.27---- (4) (5)
Season Acreageo Acre'ge Aoroao.e Acreage Arnrn.ap Seson


1925-26
1926-27
1927-28
1928-29
1929- 0
190-31
1931-52
1932-3
19 i


19-9
1939-40
1940-41
19 1- 2

19.


1,020
630
1, 0O
1,:80
1,800
1,950
2,050
1,500
1,100
I 80
1, 800
2,100
1,400
1,900
2,350
1950

4050


00
960
S6o
850
700
700
700

900
1,000
1,000
1 350
1, 00
1 200
1 450
2 550
2 800
2,500


1,500
1, 00
1,500
1,5000
1,100


6oo
1,000
950
900
550
500
900
750
900
500

1,100
400
550


2{0
1,100
2,000
000
1,700
1,350
1:-






1,000
1,450


760
700
1,230
1,250
700
2,000
,800
5600
,800
5,000
8,200
6,200
6,200
5,000
,o00
,000
,500
1,500
2,5 00
2 600
2,000


All 1945-46 acreage figures are preliminary as of September 20, 19146 and are
subject to revision.


Season


B'oans
A rnrn ",,


Notes: Escarole acreage included with lettuce prior to 1927-28 season.
4 Big Boston figures include Romaine acreage.
5) Iceberg Lettuce included in Big Boston acreage figures until the 1938-39
season.


Limas Cabbage
Anrnn ar A f,* von (T






ACfRFAGF OP PETUCTPAT. PLO,'T2A _T.ICi' CROPS.


Page 76


R.n c nn


1925-2,
1926-27
1927-28
192-:-27
19.'- 50



19 -.
19 5-23
193o-?9
19 -~8
19hJ0-M

1945-h O


(For Harvest)


Tomre t-s
AerptrRa


,570


8 200
8 050
6,000
7,700


7.200
7,200
6 C10O
7 ^oUo


P1 RE"AS.'IRS (Cont'd.)
Total
Aernarr- S


28 060K
, 000
31,000
27,000,
21, 00
17,00


51,-oo
21, 00
2e, 00


2 ,200

2,300


eRson


20,700
29, u00
29,280
8, 700
21 260
* 26,800
23 700
2, 900

22,500
2 5L,00

72,100
2 000
,5700


2 ,5o0
7, .000


Cantaloupes Strabe rrrLs Yfatormolons .. Randd Total
( 3 ) "-. S
So-s:., son _____,A At, r.,.' e.,-A--j 0cra,. r 7Ae"' :' ,__ lr ae ^e S.-m son


2,080
3,680
S00

9,100
7,800
10 ,600
8 400
8 000
8,900
8,300
7,500
9,000
,200
500'
006oo
1,600
2,050
2,800


37,640
29,l20
35,900
34,700
51,000
28,500
22,500
253,400
20,000
16,000
19,500
22,500
22,600
2,500
25,500
21,500
12, 00
25,500
',000
',0.00


108,920
131,210,
158,710
165,280
175,100
170,900
158,5o0
18 0
10 0
185,250
1814,950
181,450
194,9 0
214, 300
209,600
19.50 : .
1,100 0
221,200
192,550
2.51,oo
275 550 o


Notes: (3) Acreage of
available, but


cantaloupes for 1926, 1927 and 1928 seasons not immediately
is estimated the same as for 1929 and 1930 seasons.


(4) Those acreage figures do not include 56,600 acres abandoned in various
stages of growth for reasons other than economic marketing.
All Acreage figures are preliminary as of September 20, 1946 and are subject to
revision.


Po.t.to.s
Aprp)LreA


81,190

12-7'40
122 ,o
151 ,000

121 0
12,54I0
1. 1 50
15o,7 0
15 a

177,500
10 2,250
165,900
15,100
170,8
227,9 0
20, 1 ,0
220, 950


Peppers
APpnPr
AnrAR r n


1925-26
192o-27
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30

1930-'1
191- 2

19 -


19Y2-
1939-h
19 -

195-
19


1925-26
1926-27
1927-28
1928-29.
1929- 0.
19o- 51
19 1- 2
1932- 3
1933- 4
195- 35
1935- 3
1936- 1


1941- 2
1942-49
1 9-
19l -k


600
600
600
6oo00
250
400
200
300
200
500
700
500
00
00
00
550
K000
800


1925-26
1962-27
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30

195-59
1951-3

19 7-57
19 -29

1932-40
190-a9
1941 -
1945
19
1M5-46




?LORIDk 1IY!LPACKED VALUE OF SELECTEfljTE~F.TABL~S ANT) NON-CITRUS FRUITS FOR 16


SeF. on
19 0-51
1952-
19 5-
19 "

19 0-57

19-
194 -.
19-
1 5-


$ 6,592,000
5, 8,000 oo
S056,000
5, 77,000
4,967,000
6,250,000
,0 1,000
6,2 2,000
5,0 1,000
6,4 0,000
,015,000
11,412,000
17,989,000
10,116,000
18,405,000
19,475,450


Limais
$ Included
with
noans
256,000
270:000
202,000
93,000
507,000
20,000
420,000
616,000 o
1,704,000
1,456,000
1,779,000
1,711700o


.918 ,000
04,000
9,000
5,000
1,6'3,000
612,000
496,000
978,000
990,000
2,061,000
2,335 000
1,002,000
6,46J,000
4,284,000
5,959,000
5,909,250


Ccl-ryv
$ ,212,000
2,78-,000
1,94 030
2,990, 000
4,58 000
4,488,000
4,52,000
3,289 ,ooo000
,368 000
6,0668,ooo
6:066,000
7, 1 ,00ooo
17,18, ,,ooo
16,2 o,000
16,26, 'JOO
18,5 C 000
it, f ooo 000


,000
.000


Potatoes
$3,81 8,000
1,953,000
1,908,000
5,708,000
5,18 ,000
000
,000
5 725 0008
2,79 ,000
6,013,000
514, 000
7,56,000
11, 000
13,567,000


Cantaloupes
$18,C00
15,000
24,000
23,000
18,000
15,000
28,000
65,ooo
44,000
58,000
57,500
52,000
84,500
91,000
120,000
100,000


000
000


3 '76 000
5,748,000
4,577,000
6,g76,000
* 6,855,000
8,22-,000
7,638,000
8,711,000
12,5 25,000
8,216,000
8,618,000
15,468,000
11,795,000
20,754,000
20,251,000
2692 3,920


Strawberries
3, 66,000
2,846,000
2,522,000
2,46,oo000
2,256,000
1,972,000
2,6,000ooo
2,100,000
3,175,000
2, 44,000
2,194,000
2,275,000
. 1,49, 000
1,107,000
1 ,51,000
2,800,000


266,000 1,780 000
403,000 1,284,000
507,000 1,676,000
520,000 1,277,000
508,000 1,273,000
48,o000 1,95, 000
642,000 1,668,000
648,000 2,771,000
520 000 2,121,000
9,500 2,5 7,000
4h4,000 2,858,000
25 ,000 5,917,000
450,000 5,460,000
284,000 6,25,000
80,000 7,616,700
Total Value
Vegetabes
$2,98,000
21, 54,ooo
2 o,000
16,5,000
2,532,000
29, 5,o000
26,76 ,000
3! 1,000
000
844 000
,187,000
,896,000
80,025, 000
89.67, 000
100,455,670


Wat erme1 ons
$2,046,000
912,000
990,000
779,000
726,000
896,000
1,310,000
945,000
976,000
1,193,000
1,5 850
1,572,000
2,6: 41,000
,595,000
,867,000
8,114,100


Total Value
Misc.Fruits*
& Vegetables
$30,819,000
25,g57,000
19,6 6,000
29,192,000
27,817,000
29,215,000
3322,000
29, 78, 000
4o,146,ooo
37,259,000
40,521,000
51,086,000
77,119,500
85,725,000
95,695,000
11 ,469,770


supplied by
gross packed
commercial


Cucurnbrs
$1,295,000
0 ),000
8M 000
765,000
92,5 000
1,101,000
1,055,000
1, 9,000c
P, 9 ,, 030
1, ,,000
2,1 ,000
2,592,000
2,079,000
3,5 o,000
5,o6:-150


Season
1930-31
1931-32
19 2- 3
19333
19
19 7-
1939- 9
1940-41
1941-12
1942-4
1943-44
1944-


;e: *Does not include citrus fruits. Tabulations based on information
U.S.Agr. Statisticians, Orlando, Fla. Valuation figures represent
value, when packed at Fla. shipping points. Several vegetables of
importance not included above.


7LORTM, F04 PACKEM V1,LUP OF SPT.F.CTFr) VFGrTABLES AITD 11017-CITRIIS FRUITS FOR


Pe, e 77
16 SEAS -iS






Pape 7'8


FLORIDA -VMEETABLE, STRA-iBERRY AND "iATER.ELOJl ACREAGE
BY COU'riPS A!ID SFc.SOIS-lL--Ll,. 1'LL-IL,, lab-
Source: U. S. Agriculturci Stactisticians, OrlAndo, Florida
.1. -.. ____ _..L-L. : . I .r, "


ALACHUA
Beans 150 800 9c0 50 750 800 100 1L50 15,0
Line 1000 1660 1100 1100 1OO00 L00
Cabbage 200 400 200 200
C ler. 100 100 I0c 150 155 155
Cucumbers 1200 1200 20O 20600 50 2200 2250
Eggolant 50 100 150 50 100 150 100 100 200
Lettucee 50 50
Peas, Enr. -' 100 .- 200 200 200 200
Pepper.z 500 o00 600 600 500 O00
Po toes- 1000 100 .- 2000 2000 2200 200
i catoei -t 0 100 100 7 0 0
Tcytal Vegs. 2'JO -..5200 5700. 100 200 677T .?T ,2 .50 h T65 8715
C nt oup. 100 150 1 0
nt ere ions 2000 500 - .- -6
Grand Total 200 5200 7700' 100 200 o0775 10575 250. O .--2215 15o65


BPADFOFPD
Beans 50
LinL -s
Catbbc,9e -
Cucurners
Peppers
Pot toes -
Toms toes -
Total Vegs. 50
Cantiloupes -
Strawberries -
Vla t r ine 1 o n -
Grand Total 50
BR EVARn
Cabbefe
Ecgplisnt 20
TomVtoes i20
Tot--l Veg.-. 120


- 200 250
- 200 200
- 100
- 150 150
- 50 50
- 100 .100
- 1;0 1 0
- 85e 100io
- 50
- 125
- 100
- 850 -1275


25 100 125 50 100 .150
- 100 100 200 200
- 150 100 100
- 10 1;O 200 200
- o o 50 5)
- 100 100lo 150 150
- lOO 10'0 50 50
25 59o 765 50 100 750 .900


- 25
- 200
25 -. 590 100,
25-. 590 109')


- 50 50
- 225 225
o- 12700
.o .25 8OO 1275


- 10 50 50 50
- 1,) .......
- ?25O 7 100 100 200 c0 150 0
- 250 520 100oo oo00 250 50 50 150 250


. BRO 1 :RD
Beans
Lima z
Csbbacr
Cucum6rerz
Eggp1l nt
Pepper
Tol atoes
Total Vegs.


5000 15r;0O
o
300 100
-=.Ln


- 20500 2200 17600 19800 3500 16900
- loo00 150 150 1
- 100 .250 &0
- o00 200 200 hOO ,O_ 100
- 500 50 225 200 L75. 5 200
0 2,00 100 2200 700 3000 1;0 2100
- r.00 200 I.CO .00 =.000 2F000 2'.
0 29-00 275.0 2L675 1L00 29075 L075 22070


iatermel ons -. 100 200
Grand Total 55u0 25 00 500 29,00 2750 '2]'..75 100 29175 LO 5 220LO 1600 27915


CAL OU .in
Cucumber rs
VW term10 Ionz
C AR LOTTE
To'rin toes
C ITRUS
V!atermelon

Cabbage
Pot ato s
Total Ve-;s.


- 100 100
- 700

- 100 100

- 100

- 750
- 1O 1,.0
- 150 900


- 500 500
- 1006oo


- 100

600
100 100
- 100 700


- 200 200
- 500


- c200

- 200 200
- 100 100
- 200 100 300




Page 79
.LORI ) E B CNEIJ- ID -'_____-
Fl .' S.. 31.tTji. ar.r *Clot, I-l in SrTotal
COLLiRL
LirLs 50 -' 50 -
Cucumbers 100 100 200 0 100 150 100 150 50 300
Egplant .25 .........- -- 25 25 25
peppers 25 25 -
Potatoes 50 50 50 7 1
Tomatoes O100 00 600 275 53 600 1105 200 600 600 lhQO
Total Vegs. 225 600 oo00 925. 350 350 700 140 325 750 650 1725
wVatermelons -- ---.- 100
Grand Tot. 225 600 100 925 350 350 700 1400 325 750 650 1825


COLUfT.A -R
Cabbage
Cucumbers
Total Vegs.
Watermelons
Grand Tot.


- 100
~- -- ioo
- 100
- 100
- 200 -


20025
-, 25 225
- 300 *
-. 25 525


- 50 50

- 50 50
50- - 0
- 50 o00


DAMDE
Beans
Limas
Cabbage
Cucumbers
Lettuce,Ice.
Potatoes,
Tomatoes
Total Vegs.
Strawberries
Grand'Total


- 4500 4500 3000 3000 3100 3100
50 100o 150 .50 loo .150 -. .- 50 50 1oo
- - -40 350 300 300
- 50 50 -
S- 00 6000 . 6300 200 6500.- -. 6500 270 6770
12000 12000 500 12io00 13000 .2-00 10000 3000 1-200
- 22600 150 23150 500 21850 500 23000 200 19950 3320 23470
- 100 100 150 150
- 22600 150 23250 500 21850 300 23100 200 20100 3320 23620


DSOTO0
Cabbage .. 100
Cucumbers -
Peppers 25 25
Potatoes .- 150 150
Tomatoes 250 250
Total Vegs. 25 150 250 525


Watermelons -
Grand Total 25 150 250 525 50

Watermelons -
UVCabbage -AL
Cabbage


-- .- 50
- 50 50
25 25
100 100
25 100 125
50 250 350


250 350


50 50 loo
- 100 100
25 200 225
75 350 25
75 350 72500
75 550 725


S100


- 100


- 100


ESCAMBIA
Beans
Cabbage
Potatoes
Total Vegs.
FLAGLER
Cabbage
Cucumbers
Peas, E.
Potatoes
Total Vegs.
GADSDEN
Beans
Cabbage
Total Vegs.
Watermelons
Grand Total
GILCHRIST
Eggplant
Watermelons


- 700 .70.
- 700 70

90
- 2 -Q 6
- 2600 260
2600- 350

S 500 50

- 500 65


- 230 230
S- 100 100
- 800 800 850 850
0 800 800 100 1080 1180

0 700 800 800
S- 100 100
S- 100 .100
0 2000 2000 2250 22;0
0 2000 2700. 900 2350 3250

0 200 200 150 300 450
0 -" 1Q0 50 50
0 200 300 150 50 300 500


- 50 -
. 500 .700 .. -

- 100
- 2200 -


- 50 -
- 200 350 -150

- -. 100 50
- .- 3500 -


50 300 550

- 50
- 5400oo




Page 80O
FLOT,!DA V.AGFTABL[.F. STRA -;;.BRY AD I '.TER O ACREGE BY COUL1TIES Aim SEASOIIS
c.W i in, Snr. lp lI rll t 1I.. i, Z i.tl a1m. i -. sr., Toti, l
B-.ns 200 200 50 200 250 50 60 110
Cbba~e 750 050 50 -
Lettuce, Ice. j50 __- 00 ;u0O _- _
Total V4-. 200 350 1300 50 300 200 -900 50 950 o0 10b0


HAE'H Lro
C hba,
CuciLrIbe rs
Total VE Cs.


- 100
- 100 100
- 100 200


Cantaloupes 200
WaterTmelons _- 150
Grand Total 100 550


- 100
- Loo
- 500

875


- 50 50
- 00 2,00
- 50 500 550
-Z1
- 50 575 '25


Beans 50 150 200 50 50 hO hO
Cabbage 100 o0 50 50
Cucumbers 100 200 600 50 500 85 00 700 1200
Eggplant ilO 25 175 10u 100 250 250
Peppers 1500 300 175 50 225 h00 50 450
Po&to 100 100 100 100 50 50
Tome.tos 1000 1000 P2 1000 1)j q r 2000 20
Total V-.7s. 900 100 1575 2- 61 5 1700 2-,75 1175 50 260o Lu65


Strawberries 1O -
YWatermelonz _0 -
Grand Tot. 900 100 1375 2675 025


- 200 200 200
- o10 ;--- ),Oc0
- 1700 2o75 1175 250 240 135


HENRY
Beans 50 50
Cabbage .- 200
Cucumbers 50 50 100
Peppers 25 2- 8 ,2
Tomatoes -
Total Vegs. 125 50 775


- 100 150

-?5


50 1oo 150
.. 50 50
100 100


75 loo 225 50 -150 loo 300


Watermelons
Grand Tot.
HERNALMO
Beans
Eggplant
Total Vegs.
Watermelons
Grand Tot.
HIGHLANDS
Beans
Limas
Cabbage
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Peas, E.
Potatoes.
Total Vegs.


125 450 825

150 150

150 150
100
150 250


- 100
75 100 325

- 150 150
50 50 100
50 200 250
- 50 2 00 300
50 200 0oo


500 100 600 200 200 150 550
100 100 -
- 100 100
50 50 50 50
S- 25 25

- 10 150 200 200
- 650 250 1000 200 200 425 925


50 150 100 Lx00

- 1o0 140
50 25 75
50 150 165 215

50 150 165 215

- 230 230
- 25 25
- 25 2
100 10
80 80
125 335 3 60


HILLS BOROUGH
Beans 50 800 850 50 200 250 100 1100 1200
Limas ..100 100 100 100 250 250
Cabbage 00 50 500 500
ge 50 1 0 00 00
Cucumbers 25 550 37 12 5 45 500 Soo 800
Eggplant 7 50 2 5 50 150 $25 475
LeC uce, Ice. 150 15 175 175 200 5 2
Peas. E. 100 200 -. 200 400 0O
Peppers 75 1150 11225 50 1800 1850 75 2600 2675
Potatoes 4- 00 400 200 200 400 300 330 6 0
Tomatoes 00 I55O- 186 100.- 1150 1250 G25 100 1825_
Total Vegs. 525 550 4300 5875 375 575 4100 5500 950 1400 6655 '9005
Strawberries 600 .. 1100 1700 1700
Watermelons 700 - 00 00
Grand Tot. 525 550 o500 6775 375 575 4100 90 950 3100 6655 11105
*L9




Fn;eC 81
LRIDA VFETABL-:. STRA-,VRRYAj?'D .AT7 LON Ar7RF COUNiTIF.S .., T,.Ol
F --%I l h" lyhh-hq c kL -hn .^_1


i'ota.toes
.tltern'l ons


- 50 50 -
150 -


- 50 50


- 50 50
- 200


I'MDIAN RIVP
bea:,s 50
Cabbage -
Cucumbers 50
Egj,c-plant 25
Peppers 140
Tom toes O
Total Vegs.. 5 65
Watermelons -
Grand Tot. 565


Cucumbers
Cantaloupes
Watermelons
Grand Tot.
JEFFERSON
Beans
Watermelons


- 50 100 -
- 50 50 -
- 50 100 -
- 25 -.
- 460 -
- 500 QOO _175_ 50 50 .'575 150 150 o00
- 600 121.5 175 5 350 625 150 150 3oo
- 100 00
- 600 .1215 175 50 350 725 150 150 4oo

- 100 100 500 500
S- 75 75
- 2;00 _- 5000 000
- 2500 100 5100 575 5575


- 800


- 1200


50 50
- 5800


LAFAYETTE
Watermelons -- 1000
JLAK. w .- .
Beans 400 o00 350 350 .. 140 140
Cabbage 400 300 150 150
Celery 50 225 275 50 300 350 135 675 810
Cucumbers 200 200 200 200 400 400
Eggplant 30 50 80 100 100 50 50
Escarole 20 20
Peppers 100 100 150 150
Potatoes 50 50 -
Tomatoes _0 r00 550 25 00 225 25 350 375
Total Vegs. 80 50 1375 1905 25 50 1400 1775 25 305 1765 2095
Watermelons r00 6~oo0 6000
Grand Total 80 50 1375 7405 25 50 1400 8275 25 305 1765 8095
LEE_
Cucumbers 300 50 350 150 150 300 00 100 100 500
Eggplant 200 200 00 75 250 50 375 100 150 100 50
Peppers 400 100 500 100 275 375 3 50 150 500
Potatoes 1400 1400 1200 1200 150 1360
Tomatoes 500 9 00 500 1100 150 00 L 0 .LOO 00 7- 00
Total Vegs. 1400 1700 650 5750 475 2025 200 2700 1150 2060 200 .10
Watermelons 100 -10 10
Grand Total 1400 1700 650 3850 475 2025 200 2850 1150 2060 200 3560


LEON
Watermelons


- 100


100


- 200


Beans 50
Cabbage -
Cucumbers -
Total Vegs. 50
Cantaloupes
Watermelons -
Grand Ttt. '50
MADISON
Cucumbers -
Watermelons


- 50 100 Ioo i00 50 50
- 100 100. 50 50
- 9O 0 O 100 100 200 200
- 100 250 200 300 50 250 300
"- '! 1. 100 100
- 600 1200" -* 200
- 100 850 . 200 l&00 50 ,.50 2900


S 25 25.
- 2000 3000 "


- 2000




Page 82
FO.CRIA VEGE'A.E. STRA'TBERY AND VATIRMLO I ACRFAGE BY COU1TIES A _ND S3AJis
Lau Toal j n. n pr. Total Fall VR. 5n o. Fl
Ba ns 100 59 150 250 250 50 400 40so
Cabbage 6- 0 1000 300 00
Celery 150 150 100 100 100 100
Cucumbers 75 500 75 5- 0- 0 100 50 500 950
Eggplant 275 00 7 0 100 150 150 100 5,0 500
Escarole 550 -4 75 .00 ,00
Lettuce,Bos. 225 1i0 -0 50
" Ice. 100 100 55 5 160 50 150
Peas, E. 150 150 50 50
Peppers 500 100 bO 50 ,0 c0 150 150 200 350
Potatoes 100 100 50 50 100 .50 -
Toiiatos 6.0 2000 2,0 175 100 1Q50 ?.-? r;OO'"" 0OO 2600
Total Vegs. L20 5350 2-50 5725 25 475 2450 L 75 hLOO 1150 3 00 5'950


- 25'


Grand Total lI00 350 2550 5750


MARI ON
Beans 300 500 800
Limas 20 250
Cabbage 750
Celery 20 250
Cucumbers 0 1 0
Eggplant 200 0 2 0
Escarole 5
Lettuce,Bos. 350
" Ice. 25 25
Peas, E. 100
Peppers 150 150
Potatoes -
Tomatoes.- 500 500
Total Vegs. 500 .- 1875 3650
Cantaloupes ..200
Watermelons 2000
Grand Total 500 1875 5850
MARTIN
Beans 200 500 700
Limas 50 150
Cabbage 250
Cucumbers 50 50
Eggplant -
Peppers 50 200 250
Potatoes -
Tomatoes 950 200 50
Total Vegs. 400 850 250 1750
ORANGE
Beans 300 450 750
Cabbage 1000
Celery - 150 125 275
Cucumbers 200 200
Eggplant 125 125
Escarole 100
Lettuce,Ice. 25 25
Peas, E. 50
Pe pers 425 425
Potatoes 400 400
Tomatoes 75 150 225.
Total Vegs. 925 575 925 3575


25 o -
100 150
325 75 250 50000 0 1150 oo oo

200. 300 500 .100 700. 800
0 00 700 700
- 500 500 500
200 200 220 220
225 225 300 500
100 2 125 150 75 25
o 10 10
150 200 200
50 ... .50 - .50 50
100 100 100 100
25 100 125 25 100 125
100 100
l 50 5 -L9- -1OO 100
325 150 1700 2875 275 810 3295 4380
150 250 250
000 3500
325 150 1700 6025 275 810 3545 8130


200 200 200 600
150 150

25 -
15 1
50 50
100 0 100 250
325 '00 3O 60 1335

100 100
800
150 00 .. 9.50.
150 1 0
25 5
25 25
50 50
300 300
75 75
100oo 00 1450 2775


100 240 40
100 200 00
3.00 00

0 125 50 225
00 50 150
240 240
100 00 100 500
200 1065 640 1905

0loo 50 150
650 65
4- 90 675 1105
400 oo
50 50
;50 130 180
50 50
350 5 0
0 200 2 0
500 1430 1455 3385


Strawberries 25 25 -
Watermelons 100 100 1200
Grand Total 925 575 925 3700 .oo 200 1450 2900 500 1430 1455 4585


S. OSCEQLA
7 Beans
, Cabbage
,. Total Vegs.
OKEECHOBEE


- 50 50
- 50
- 50 10oo0


- -0
- -: 100


* ~- 0 -
- 50 50


- 50


Strawberries
Watermelons





Pa-' c '.3
FLORIDA V ,_..AB .... S .R....ERRY A;..D "';ATE.P.!7^ILOI ACPRAO BY Cr'OUiTJI FS AND S .SO"_F'.


Sbans 22000 18000 17500 57500 16800 16300 19000 52100 17800 17800 13200 48800
Lims 950 1000 19 1500 750 2250 2175 1350 525
Csbbr'e 56 0 6100 3000 ;O0
Celery 2200 1000 3200 5500 825 G125 27o 142L 5175
Cabb age 2200-05 4 108 82 I E/: 5 17
Cucumbers 200 50 250 150 200 50 500 5 0 5 700
EgLplant 50 350 200 600 50 200 50 700 25 0 775
Escarole 500 1600 100 1L00
,ettuc-,Bos. 100 25 100 100
Ic:. 250 250 325 325 150 100 250
Peas, . 2000 00 100900 90J
Peppers 150 1000 200 1350 100 1050 350 1 00 100 12cO 5.n 1900
Focutoes 3500 3500 3800 2500 6 00 r-0o0 4200 9200
Tonatoe-s 500 IL5O q 9 100 0 00 00 ?00 1000 .7__0 i1c,
Total Vegs 22100 26750 20400 76650 17200 29375 24975 77275 16525 >7075 22075 77075
Watermelons 100 00
Grand Tot. 22-00 26750 20400 76650 17200 29375 24975 77375 1525 37075 22075 77875


PASCO 0
Waternelons
POLK
Beans
Cabbage
Cucumbers
Peppers
Potatoes
Tomatoes
Total Vegs.
Strawberries
Watermelons
Grand Tot.
FJUTNAM
Beans..
Caboage
Lettuce,Ic .
Potatoes
Total Vegs.
Watermelons
Grand Tot.
ST. JOHNS
Cabbage
Potatoes
Total Vegs.
Watermelons
Grand Tot.


- 500

- 50 50
- 400
50 50
150 150
150 150
- 100 100
- 150 350 900
- 200
100


- 150 350 1200
- i -o
50 50
- 2050 2050
- 2100 3500
- 100
- 2100 3600

- 2300
- 7900 7900
- 7900 10200

- 7900 10200


- o500


- 200


50 50 200 200
00 200 200
50 50 50 50
- 200 200 300 300
50 50 50
100 100 - 20000
- 0 850 200 800 1000
200 309 300
- 10 200
- 50 1200 500 800 1500
S 20 240
- 1500 900 900
50 50 25 25
S 280 2850 2600 2609
- 2900 4oo0 900 2865 3765
- 00 100
S 2900 4500 900 2865 3865

- 2400 2500 2500
60oo 6900 7300 700
- 6900 9300 2500 7300 9 00

- 6900 9350 2500 7500 9800


ST. LUCIE
Beans
Limas
Cabbage
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Peppers
Potatoes
Tomatoes
Total Vegs.


50 200 250 50 50 100 100 100
150 150 300 loo00 200 300 125 75 200
100 50 50 50
175 100 275 50 100oo 00 50 10
150 150 25 50 50 125 50 ?o
75 150 225 25 Ioo 50 175 50 50 100
o- 50 -50 -
17'0 1O00 -0Q0 800 100 1600 2POO 2700 200 2850 750
2050 500 1750 4400 950 350 2000 3350 3000 425 2975 6400


Watermelons 50 100 100
Grand Tot. 2050 500 1750 4450 950 350 2000 3450 3000 425 2975 6500
SANTA ROSA
Potatoes 50 50 -




Page 8L
LO- IDA VEGETABLE. STRA.;BFBRY QA;D *iAIL&EaLON ArF'AGE BY C)OUNiTIES AlT? SEASONS
11:5-4-4 19-5 1945-46
qll Vfiin. Sn-r.. Total L.a 1,.L -2r. Totq FIill !Vin.. _Sr. Tot.l
Ctbage 200 213 100 100
Celery 1000 150 1150 800 500 1360 1000 60 1d60
Cucumbers 75 100 175 25 125 150 50 00 150
Eggplant 25 25 -
Escarole 00 20 20
Lettuce, Ice. 50 50
Pepers 50 5 100 100
otato 250 250 100 200 300 100 180 280
Tomatoes 200 200 100 100 7 75
Total V~es. 300 1250 500 2250 25 900 925 2200 50 1570 715 2155
SFI 1I IOLE
Beans 100 200 500 50 100 150 100 250 5}O
Cabbage 1100 1150 1000 10u0
Celery 2550 iLOO 57 L0 2400 Li5.0 3850 5075 1400 L475
Eggplant 25 25 -
Escarole 350 050 600 600
Lettuce, Bos. 1,0 o 1Q 10
" 50 50 2 -
Peas, E. 100 106 100 100 16o
Peppers 200 200 25 200 225 25 250 275
Po atoes 200 '200 1, 6 20 200
Total V,.g. 1-25 2'00 1.00 6225 75 2r25 1900 6075 125 975 2100 72010
SUMMER
Beans 50 500 450 2. L50 h175 - 230 250
Cabbage 0 200 50 50
Cucumbers 600 o00 500 500 50 1000 1050
Eggplant 5 e5
Eggplant 50 50 100 150 150 150 150
Peppers 450 L50 0 500 0 00 2 700 72
Tomatoes 1500 I500 ,0 180 11250 50 12'0 130~u
Total Vegs. 100 3100 :.50 75 2b00 3075 125 50 35o 0 5505
Cantaloupes 50 25 50 50
Strawberries .. 75 103 100
Watermelons 1. i *- 210) 2700
Grand Tot;. 100 3100 )4900 75 2.00 5275 125 150 53,0 o55s


SUWANiEE
Cucumbers
Watermelons
TAYLOR
Watermelons
UNION
Beans
Limas
Cabbage
Celer
Cucum ers
Potatoes
Total Vegs.


- 200
- 2800


- 5o 50 -
- 50 -
- iio -o -
- 100 100 -
150 200 -


- 50 50
- 5000


- 5500


- 50

- 100 100 240 240
- 50 50 50 50
- 150 50 50
150 150 -
- 150 1.0
- 100 100 5 10 10
4- 00 550 50 590 0


Watermelons 100 100
Grand Tot. 150 300 400 650


- 100
- 50 590 740


Cabbage
Potatoes -
Total Vegs.
Watermelons
Grand Tot.


- 250
- oo00 50
- 300 550


- 300
- 150 150
- 150 h50


- 150 500


- 200 200
- 150 150
- 200 150 350
- 15- l
- 2oo 150 450


WALTON
Watermelons
WASHINGTON
Potatoes
Watermelons


- - 250

50 50 50 50
600 1000 800


- 300 600





Page 85
FLP TDA VEGETABLE, STRA7BF ARPY iAND ^TERELON ACREAGE BY COUNTIES __ 4D Q?_
Fall Win, Sr. Total ll Win. Tr.. ot;! -ll Kin. Sn. r tLal
I1lSrELLAoE0US
Beans 200 500 300 1000 50 200 50 300 50 460 510
Limas- 50 50 100 50 50 75 50 125
Cabbage 350 135 135
Celery 2 25 10 10
Cucumbers 50 100 150 25 75 50 50 100 200
eggplant 75 7 50 25 5 25 50 100 175
Escarole 7 -
Bettuce,Bos. 2 -
" ,Ice. 75 25 100 25 25 15 15
Peas, E. 50 -
Peppers 60 50 200 10 2 25 50 100
Potatoes 100 100 5 100 150 lo go 100
Tomatoes 125 200 500 825 _510 150 50 50 17i 5 ?27
Total Vegs. T35 975 1250 3160 125 350 450 1075 175 420 1050 1645
Cantaloupes 50 .25 50 50
Strawberries 15 125 125 125
Watermelons 00 - 200
Grand Tot. 435 975 1250 3485 125 350 450 1525 175 545 1100 2020


TOTAL ALL COUNTIES

Beans 16500 25500 38000 80000
Limas 2300 3100 5400
Cabbage 10000
Celer 5950 2800 8750
Cucumbers 2000 4500 6500
Eggplant 700 550 700 1 50
Escarole 150
Lettuce, Boston 800
" Iceberg 1200 500 1700
Peas, English 1500
Peppers 1500 2900 2700 7100
Potatoes 26600
Tomatoes 1000 6500 15000 25Q00
Total Vegetables 24700 24900 67300 177250
Cantaloupes 400
Strawberries 2600
7;atermelons 12500
Grand Total 2Q7oo 4900O 673oo 192750
______ 19Ll-h5 ____
Fal Yin. -r Total
Beans 20000 37500 23000 80500
Limas 2000 2800 4800
Cabbage 17500
Celery 6800 4250 11050
Cucumbers 1200 400 6100 7700
Eggplant 800 800 1650 3250
Escarole 2800
Lettuce, Boston 400
" Iceberg 450 150 2000
Peas, English 2 26000
Peppers 750 3800 4800 9350
Potatoes 11800 19300 31100
Tomatoes 2800 18600 11100 ~2~00
Total Vegetables 25550 85150 73150 204550
Cantaloupes 500
StIawberries 2050
Watermelons 50005
Grand Total 25550 85150 73150 246100


29000 39500 23000 91500
1500 3000 4500
19000
5900 3250 9150
1800 4500 6 00
1500 1000 1200 00
650
1050 100 1150
2500
1950 3600 3400 8950
1 000 15600 28600
A00 18500 12000 900oo
5850 84050o 66050 212550
550
1400
-a25500
38 50 84050 66050 6oooo
19i5-6_
Fall YLin. Spr.. Total
22100 38000 20100 80200
2675 4325 7000
13200 13200
8550 4900 13450
2700 750 8500 11950
14oo00 825 1825 4050
2600 2600
500 500
1000 I+50 50
2000 2000
1700 3800 6500 12000
13600 21700 35300
5300 ,15000 17000 75o00
33200 102.500 85300 221000
800 800
2800 2800
5100Q
33200 105300 86100 275600




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