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Significance of caves in watershed management and protection in Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094035/00002
 Material Information
Title: Significance of caves in watershed management and protection in Florida workshop proceedings, April 16th and 17th, 2003, Ocala, FL
Series Title: Special publication Florida Geological Survey
Physical Description: 1 CD-ROM : ; 4 3/4 in.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Geological Survey
Conference: Workshop on the Significance of Caves in Watershed Management and Protection in Florida, (2003
Publisher: Florida Geological Survey
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 2003
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Caves -- Congresses -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Watershed management -- Congresses -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Aquifers -- Congresses -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Conservation of natural resources -- Planning -- Congresses -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Environmental policy -- Congresses -- Florida   ( lcsh )
 Notes
Summary: Agendas, proceedings, and PowerPoint slides from the workshop. The workshop was divided into three focus topics: Bridging the Gap between Cavers & Scientists; Utitlization of Cave Data in Hydrogeological Investigations; and Cave Resource Management: Politics, Public Relations, and Funding.
System Details: System requirements: Microsoft PowerPoint Viewer and Adobe Acrobat Reader for PC and Mac (both can be installed from the CD-ROM).
General Note: Title from disc surface.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: alephbibnum - 003163931
oclc - 58550787
System ID: UF00094035:00002

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WELCOME & INTRODUCTION
to the
WORKSHOP ON THE SIGNIFICANCE OF CAVES IN
WATERSHED MANAGEMENT AND PROTECTION IN FLORIDA
April 16 & 17, 2003
Dr. Walt Schmidt

On behalf of the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) / Florida Geological
Survey, and the Hydrogeology Consortium, I welcome you to the Workshop on the
Significance of Caves in Watershed Management and Protection in Florida. Just as
one of our prior workshops was appropriately held here last May (titled: Workshop to
develop blue prints for the management and protection ofFlorida springs) this location
again is a natural and logical place to discuss caves, and their significance to our
understanding the dynamics of groundwater movement. The Ocala, Marion County area
is high on the Florida Platform and upper Eocene limestones that comprise the top of the
Florida aquifer system in the area are located close to the land surface. As a result we
have many landforms associated with karst geology readily observable in the vicinity.
Sinkholes, caves, and springs are abundant and common, and contribute to make the area
beautiful and famous. We all know of the world famous Silver Springs just east of here,
and the equally well known rolling karst hills covered in rich grasses famous for their
horse farms.

Anyone that has looked at a satellite photo or high altitude photograph of the State of
Florida immediately notes the many circular lakes we have. And the fact that many of
these lakes are not interconnected to each other. Many of these surface water features are
the manifestation of surface erosion mechanics in conjunction with mechanical and
chemical subsurface weathering of limestone's and dolostones. This "internal" drainage
into the underlying rock layers has been occurring for millions of years and continues
today. Where does the water go, if not drained off via surface streams? Well, our vast
underground aquifers are as plentiful as they are because of this long standing dissolution
of the carbonates. The prolific nature of the Floridian aquifer system is the result of
millions of years of slightly acidic surface water entering the ground and dissolving away
rock leaving behind voids and increased porosity. And these voids are interconnected
thereby allowing groundwater replacement and movement in the subsurface. It's hard for
the layman to comprehend how riddled with pore spaces some of our limestones and rock
layers can be. Think for a moment of some photos you have seen, or locations you have
visited on various fieldtrips. Visualize the volume of material that has entered subsurface
horizons and rock layers from above. The volume of rock, sediment, soil, and water that
was consumed at the Winter Park Sinkhole in 1981 (it took one house and a shed, a
swimming pool, most of a four lane highway, part of a auto-repair facility, 2 Porsche
sport cars three others and a camper that were retrieved, many trees, and millions of
cubic feet of soil / sediment). Think of the Devils Millhopper, Big Dismal, Lake Jackson,
or Paines Prairie. There are thousands of examples. When we as geologists have an
opportunity to view, this weathered and solution riddled rock when overburden or soil is
scrapped off, we are amazed at what we see. Recall the, now famous photo taken by Bill
Wisner in 1972, of the Buda limerock mine between Newberry and High Springs, that









showed the honeycomb of round solution pipes. In other instances, we plot depth to "top
of rock" from cores and wells in one place, then find that within 100 feet away the same
top of rock may be a couple of hundred feet deeper in elevation. Sea level changes,
surface erosion, and subsurface solution has greatly modified our landscape and left
behind what we see today.

Our departed colleague Bill Wilson reported in 1995 that based on his data and
calculations he has estimated between 145-650 buried sinkholes per square mile in
upland sites and between 1,200 and 8,700 per square mile in lowland sites. He further
reported dissolution openings in the top of the Floridan aquifer ranging from 32,000-
1,900,000 per square mile. While these numbers seem daunting themselves, consider he
also estimated the cave density in parts of the unconfined Floridan aquifer system. He
suggested the open cave density per unit area is typically 670-5,100 miles/mile2. This is
an enormous amount of cave passages, no wander we have such large transmissivities.
He suggested that such data would call for an average distance between cave passages of
between 370 and 500 feet. Meaning no point in the aquifer would be more than maybe
200 feet from the nearest open cave! So,..... IS UNDERSTANDING CAVES AND
ASSOCIATED CONDUITS IMPORTANT TO REALLY BEING ABLE TO
CONSERVE AND PROTECT OUR AQUIFERS? IS CAVE AND GROUNDWATER
DYNAMICS A CRITICAL COMPONENT TO GROUNDWATER PROTECTION,
MOVEMENT, CLEAN-UP, AND GENERAL WATER MODELING EFFORTS? We
are past the point that the answers to these questions are up for debate! It's clear to the
professional hydrogeologic community, understanding cave systems is fundamental to
understanding groundwater dynamics.

Caves and their relationships to our aquifers have been known and reported on for some
time in Florida. As early as 1674, a Friar with the Spaniards exploring North Florida
reported their group spent the night in a cave where more than 200 men could be lodged
comfortably, and he went on to say "there was a brook which gushes from the living
rock." He was talking about the caves north of Marianna, we call Florida Caverns. We
also have evidence in the form of artifacts of post-Columbian (prior to about 1500 AD)
use of various caves by the earliest of human occupation of the area. Other records and
various stories document Indian use of caves and use made during the Civil War. I know
student chapters of the National Speleological Society (NPS) at FSU and other
Universities have for decades gone out on caving trips and provided many surveyed and
mapped reports of their fieldwork.

During the past two to three decades many professional cave diving groups such as the
Cave Diving Section of the NPS, the National Association for Cave Diving, the U. S.
Deep Caving Team, the International Association of Nitrox and Technical Divers, and the
continuous local efforts of the Wakulla Karst Plain Projects team, have gathered an
enormous amount of submerged cave data and mapped passage information. Some of the
most highly respected members of the international professional cave diving community,
reside and work in Florida and have shared their expertise and results of their work with
other professionals so that we may understand our aquifer dynamics a little better, with
the benefit of an "eye-witness." The continuing contributions and cooperative efforts









between the professional cave diving community and our hydrogeology professionals is a
natural and critical marriage to better understand and conserve our groundwater resources
and these unique subterranean environments.

The Springs Task Force made numerous recommendations to further our knowledge and
ability to protect and conserve our spring's resources. Knowing that springs are but one
component of our karst landforms, and all the surface / subsurface features are
interrelated, the Task Force recommended a comprehensive database be compiled to
include these features and their surveyed maps. The Florida Geological Survey has
coordinated with many professionals to instigate such an endeavor. One glitch in the
effort, however, is the obvious concern for locational information to be made public for
the many pristine springs and cave entrances. The FGS has proposed legislation to allow
such data to be filed and maintained in a confidential manner in accordance with the
instructions of the source of the information and or owner of the property. This however,
is not being pursued this year due to other priorities within the DEP.

General and detailed understanding of karst features and subsurface hydrogeology is
fundamental to the protection and hoped for cleanup of contaminated aquifers within our
state. We at the FGS are involved in surface geologic mapping, subsurface detailed
lithologic descriptions, and the spring's initiative with numerous in-house and contracted
studies, and upgrading the DRASTIC maps with the Florida Aquifer Vulnerability
Assessment (FAVA) project adding karst features. The subsurface caves and conduits
clearly are a critical and important part of our overall understanding or our aquifer
dynamics, groundwater transport, and surface water / groundwater interactions. So, you
are the "choir" and we all know that. But coming together in a workshop such as this,
helps us focus our efforts, and helps us speak with one voice when elected and appointed
government officials ask us for input or for our professional opinion on recommendations
to conserve and protect our groundwater resources. As individual scientists, geotechnical
engineers, professional cave divers, etc, we appropriately disagree on things, maybe
that's an understatement. But, workshops such as this help us form common ground for
the big picture, and having a consistent message from the geoscience and hydrogeologic
community to decision makers is important for our credibility.

This workshop is divided up into three general focus topics to initiate discussions. First
is: Bridging the Gap between Cavers & Scientists, second is: Utilization of Cave Data in
Hydrogeological Investigations, and last; Cave Resource Management; Politics, Public
Relations, and Funding. Choose the group which interests you the most, or amble back
and forth between groups. Thank for your interest and participation. We look forward to
an interesting and useful couple of days.


c/Geo Invest/Hydrogeology









Significance of Caves in Watershed Management and Protection in Florida: April 16th and 17th, 2003, Ocala, FL


Plenary Session Panel Discussions Special Presentations Panelists and Speakers

Sponsors of the workshop included: Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Geological Survey, the Hydrogeology
Consortium, and Hazlett-Kincaid, Inc.

List of Attendees
Agenda df Florida Springs Protection Award
Excel worksheet










aHJiet Ktintcald, Inc.













The Woodville Karst Plain from space. Photo Courtesy NASA










Special Presentations
(Note: some of these files are large and may take a few moments to view. Downloading to your computer may quicken the process)

A Cave Database

Mr. Al Krause
Cave and Karst Resource

Mr. Krause presents his work on the development of a database on Florida caves, which currently contains location and descriptive information
as well as maps and photos for more than 4000 caves in Florida. Cave Discharge Measurement

Mr. Pete Butt
Karst Environmental Services, Inc.

Mr. Butt discusses the design and implementation of Karst Environmental's discharge measurement apparatus that can be installed inside caves
to accurately measure cross-conduit velocity profiles and thereby discharge from spring vents and individual tunnels within an underwater cave.

Cave and Karst Education

Dr. Todd R. Kincaid
Hazlett-Kincaid, Inc.

Dr. Kincaid discusses the components of the Florida Geological Society's educational exhibit and video on Florida's karst ground water resources.
The exhibit is comprised of a set of informative posters and a 25 minute video that will be made available for public use by the Florida Geological
Survey. Contact Dr. Jon Arthur at the Survey for more information on how you can obtain a copy. Water's Journey
A Florida Springs Expedition

Mr. Wes Skiles
Karst Productions

Mr. Skiles presented his new high definition film "Water's Journey" on Florida Springs. The film takes the viewers on a journey from the spring
recharge basins, through underwater caves, up from the springs and to rivers downstream. To learn more go to
www.floridasprings.org/expedition/










I Florida Springs Protection Award


Jim Stevenson Presented the Florida Springs Protection Award to:


Al Burt

Al Burt worked as a journalist for 45 years, the last 22 of which he spent as a roving Florida columnist for the Miami Herald. The
recipient of numerous journalism awards, he has been a freelance contributor to many magazines, including The Nation and
Historic Preservation, and is the author of several books, among them Florida: A Place in the Sun (1974), Becalmed in the Mullet
Latitudes (1984) and Al Burt's Florida (1997). In his honor, the 1,000 Friends of Florida established the annual Al Burt Award for
Florida journalism. (University Press of Florida)















Final Workshop Agenda

April 16-17, 2003
Ocala Florida (Ocala Hilton)

Day 1: April 16

0730 0830

0830 0850

0850 0905

0905 0915

0915 -1230


Registration & Continental Breakfast

Welcome & Introduction Dr. Walt Schmidt (FGS)

Workshop Overview Dr. Rodney DeHan (FGS)

Breakout to Focus Groups

Focus Group Presentations & Deliberations


Bridging the Gap
Dr. Rick Copeland Moderator



Mr. Wes Skiles
Cave Explorer & Videographer
Karst Productions


Mr. Jarrod Jablonski
Cave Explorer & Instructor
Global Underwater Explorers


Cave Resource
Management
Dr. Rodney DeHan
Moderator


Mr. Ron Kerbo
Resource Manager
National Park Service


Ms. Sandy Cook
Park Director & Resource
Manager
Wakulla Springs State Park


Utilization of Cave Data
Dr. Jon Arthur
Moderator


0915-0935




0935-0955


Dr. Todd Kincaid
Karst Hydrogeologist & Cave
Explorer
Hazlett-Kincaid, Inc.


Dr. Steve Worthington
Karst Hydrogeologist
Worthington Groundwater


0

















I Break


Ms. Angela Chellette
Resource Manager
NWFWMD


Dr. Sam Upchurch
Karst Hydrogeologist
SDII Global


Mr. Casey McKinlay
Cave Explorer
Woodville Karst Plain
Project




Mr. Tom Morris
Cave Explorer & Biologist
Karst Productions


Focus Group Deliberations

Lunch with Luncheon Presentation by Dr. Tom Scott of the FGS

Return to Focus Groups

Focus Group Deliberations

Break

Focus Group Deliberations


Cave Discharge Measurement
Mr. Peter Butt
Karst Environmental Services


Cave & Karst Education
Dr. Todd Kincaid
Hazlett-Kincaid, Inc.


Mixer sponsored by Earth Tech Inc. of Orlando Florida


0955-1015


Mr. Geary Schindel
Karst Hydrogeologist &
Resource Manager
Edwards Aquifer Authority




Mr. Hal Davis
Groundwater Modeler
USGS Tallahassee

Mr. Joe Meiman
Karst Hydrogeologist &
Resource Manager
Mammoth Cave National Park


1015 -1030


1030-1050


1050-1110


Mr. Gary Maddox
Resource Manager
FDEP


Mr. Harley Means
Resource Manager
FDEP


1110-1200

1200-1330

1330-1345

1345-1515

1515-1530

1530-1700

1700-1730


Special Presentations

A Cave Database
Mr. Albert Krause
Cave & Karst Resource


I


1700- ?













Day 2: April 17

0800 0830

0830 0840

0840 0855

0855 0910

0910 0925

0925 0940

0940-1110

1110-1125

1125-1200

1200-1230

1230-1400

1400-1415

1415-1425

1425-1445

1445-1505

1505-1525


Continental Breakfast & Mixer

Reconvene Plenary Session

Overview of Focus Group 1 Progress

Overview of Focus Group 2 Progress

Overview of Focus Group 3 Progress

Return to Focus Groups

Focus Group Deliberations

Break

Focus Group Deliberations

Preparation of Focus Group Findings

Lunch with Presentation of "Water's Journey" by Wes Skiles

Presentation of The Florida Springs Protection Award to Mr. Al Burt by Mr. Jim Stevenson

Reconvene Plenary Session

Presentation of Findings from Focus Group 1

Presentation of Findings from Focus Group 2

Presentation of Findings from Focus Group 3











Concluding Remarks Dr. Walt Schmidt (FGS)

Adjourn Workshop


1525 -1540

1540













Arthur Jon FGS 903 West Tennessee St. Tallahassee, FL 32304 850-488-4191 jonathan.arthur@dep.state.fl.us
Baker Alan FGS 903 West Tennessee St. Tallahassee, FL 32304 850-448-4191 Alan.Baker@dep.state.fl.us
Bente John FL DEP- Rec & Parks 4620 State Park Lane, Panama City, FL 32408 850-233-5110 John.Bente@dep.state.fl.us
Brewer Toby FL DEP #1 Causeway Blvd, Dunedin, FL 34698 727-816-1890 toby.brewer@dep.state.fl.us
Brooks Robert NSS/TBAG 700 N. Ave Brooksville, FL 34601 352-796-8238 tturner2@tampabay.rr.com
Bryan Dana Florida State Parks/DEP 3900 Commonwealth Blvd. Tallahassee, FL 32399-3000 850-245-3104 dana.bryan@dep.state.fl.us
Butt Peter Karst Environmental Svcs 5779 NE County Rd, High Spgs, FL 32643 386-454-3556 KES@atlantic.net
Cervone Sarah University of Florida 302 NW 14th Avenue, Gainesville, FL 32601 not provided watergrrl99@yahoo.com
Chelette Angela NWFWMD 81 Water Management Dr, Havana, FL 32333 850-539-5999 angela.chellette@nwfwmd.state.fl.us
Cichon James FGS 903 West Tennessee St. Tallahassee, FL 32304 850-488-4191 James.Cichon@dep.state.fl.us
Cook Robert FL DEP 2021 Angus St. Tallahassee, FL 850-245-8771 Robert.cook@dep.state.fl.us
Cook Sandy Wakulla Springs State Park 550 Wakulla Spgs Park Dr, Wakulla Spgs 32327 850-224-5950 Sandy.A.Cook@dep.state.fl.us
Copeland Rick FGS 903 West Tennessee St. Tallahassee, FL 32304 850-488-9380 rick.copeland@dep.state.fl.us
Czerwinski Michael Environmental Consultant 1850 North Pimlico Point, Crystal River, FL 34924 352-564-8008 mczerwin@tampabay.rr.com
Davis Hal USGS 2010 Levy Avenue, Tallahassee, FL 32310 850-942-9500 x3038 hdavis@usgs.gov
Deadman Richard Dept of Community Affairs 2555 Shumard Oak Blvd, Tallahassee, FL 32399 850-922-1770 richard.deadman@dca.state.fl.us
DeHan Rodney FGS 903 West Tennessee St. Tallahassee, FL 32304 850-488-9380 Rodney.DeHan@dep.state.fl.us
Denizman Can Valdosta State University Nevins Hall, Valdosta, GA 31698-0055 229-249-2745 cdenizma@valdosta.edu
Desai Anil FL DEP 3319 Maguire Blvd, #232, Orlando, FL 32803 407-893-3305 Anil.Desai@dep.state.fl.us
Doonan Terry FWC Rt. 7 Box 440 Lake City, FL 32025 386-758-0656 terry.doonan@fwc.state.fl.us
Florea Lee USF/NSS 4204 E. Fowler Ave. Tampa FL 33620 813-784-8490 Iflorea@cas.usf.edu
Gilboy Tony SWFWMD 9925 CR49, Live Oak, FL 32060 904-362-1001 gilboy_t@swfwmd.state.fl.us
Greenhalgh Tom FGS 903 West Tennessee St. Tallahassee, FL 32304 850-488-9380 tom.greenhalgh@dep.state.fl.us
Hill Melissa University of South Florida 4202 East Fowler/ SCA 528, Tampa, FL 33620 813-974-8751 mhill@mail.usf.edu
Hirten Joshua Earth Tech 30 S. Keller Rd., Orlando, FL 32839 407-660-9896 joshua.hirten@earthtech.com
Huth Bill UWF- Office of Research not provided 850-474-2826 whuth@uwf.edu
Jablonski Jarrod GUE 1110 South Main St, High Spgs, FL 32643 386-454-0811 jj@gue.com
Johnson Charlene FL DEP not provided not provided Charlene.R.Johnson@dep.state.fl.us
Jones Jolyn P. NSSCDS RT 21 Box 322 Lake City FL 32024 not provided jpjpss@bellsouth.net
Kerbo Ron National Park Service P.O. Box 25287, Denver, CO 80225 303-969-2097 Ron_Kerbo@nps.gov
Krause Albert Cave & Karst Resource 1721 SW 76TH TERRACE, GAINESVILLE 32607 352-392-7396 aakrause@ufl.edu
Ley Lou FL DEP 3319 Maguire Blvd, #232, Orlando, FL 32803 407-894-7555 Louis.Ley@dep.state.fl.us
Li Guangquan FSU-GFDI FSU 18 Keen Bldg. Tallahassee, FL 32306 850-644-6447 li@gfdi.fsu.edu
Long Annette & Mark P.O. Box 2656, Chiefland, FL 32644 352-490-8930 mlongshorn@aol.com
Loper Dave FSU-GFDI FSU 18 Keen Bldg. Tallahassee, FL 32306 850-644-6467 Loper@gfdi.fsu.edu
Maddox Gary FL DEP 2600 Blairstone Rd, Tallahassee, FL 32399 850-245-8511 gary.maddox@dep.state.fl.us
McClean James FGS 903 West Tennessee St. Tallahassee, FL 32304 850-488-4191 James.McClean@dep.state.fl.us
McCracken Robert S. University of Florida 120n SE 8th Street, High Spgs, FL 32643 352-514-4056 destro@ufl.edu
McDonald Kathy Subsurface Evaluations Inc 8010 Woodland Ct Blvd #100 Tampa,FL 33624 800-508-2509 kathy@subsurfaceEvaluations.com
McKinlay Casey Woodville Karst Plain Project P.O. Box 4689, Clearwater, FL 33758 727-517-9589 mckinlay@tampabay.rr.com
Means Harley FGS 903 West Tennessee St. Tallahassee, FL 32304 850-488-9380 guy.means@dep.state.fl.us













Meiman Joe NPS P.O. Box 7 Mammoth Cave, KY 42259 270-758-2137 joe_meiman@.nps.gov
Miller Marvin FL DEP 9225 CR 49, Live Oak, FL 32060 386-362-1001 w.marvin.miller@dep.state.fl.us
Morris Tom Karst Environmental Svcs 2629 NW 12 Ave Gainesville, FL 32605 352-373-0741 troglobyte46@yahoo.com
Mosler Allen NSS/SCCI 71 S. Spruce Ln. Havana, Fl. 32333 850-539-8416 moslera@bellsouth.net
Ngyen Hinh Polk County 4177 Ben Durrance Rd. Bartow, FL 32830 863-537-7377 not provided
Poucher Mike NSS-CDS 4625 NE 28th Terrace, Ocala, FL 34479 352-840-0167 mike.poucher@atlantic.net
Roeder Eberhard FSU 6854 Hanging Vine Way, Tallahassee 32317 850-294-6841 eroeder@mailer.fsu.edu
Schindel Geary Edward Aquifer Authority 1615 N. St. Mary's St. San Antonio, TX 78215 210-222-2204 gschindel@edwardsaquifer.org
Schmidt Walt FGS 903 West Tennessee St. Tallahassee, FL 32304 850-488-4191 Walt.schmidt@dep.state.fl.us
Scott Tom FGS 903 West Tennessee St. Tallahassee, FL 32304 850-488-9380 thomas.scott@dep.state.fl.us
Scroggins Nicole Earth Tech 30 S. Keller Rd., Orlando, FL 32839 407-262-2906 nicole.scroggins@earthtech.com
Skiles Wes Karst Productions, Inc. 5780 NE CR 340, High Spgs, FL 32643 386-454-3556 KES@atlantic.net
Smith Christopher FL DEP 2600 Blairstone Road, Tallahassee 32399-4400 850-245-8652 christopher.p.smith@dep.state.fl.us
Spencer Steve FGS 903 West Tennessee St. Tallahassee, FL 32304 850-488-9380 Steve.Spence@dep.state.fl.us
Stevenson Jim FL DEP 4797 Lakely Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32303 850-245-2784 jim.stevenson@dep.state.fl.us
Sweetin David GUE 1110 South Main St, High Spgs, FL 32643 352-870-3767 sweetin@gue.com
Toledo Heriberto Public Citizen/Cave Diver 2617 Liz Lane, Kissimmee, FL 34744 407-932-3158 betelgeusel @yahoo.com
Upchurch Sam SDII Global Corp. 4509 George Rd, Tampa, FL 33934 813-496-9634 supchurch@sdii-global.com
Weesner Darlene SHASTA 655 SW 80th St., Ocala, FL 34476 352-237-2838 not provided
Werner Colleen FDOF 13019 Broad St. Brooksville, FL 34601 352-754-6777x125 werner@doacs.state.fl.us
Wilson Diane Subsurface Evaluations Inc 8010 Woodland Ct Blvd #100 Tampa,FL 33624 800-508-2509 dwilson@subsurfaceevaluation.com
Wood Walter Lake County Government 315 W. Main St, Rm 511 Tauares, FL 32778 352-343-9738 wwood@cd.lake.fl.us
Worthington Steve Worthington Groundwater 55 Mayfair Ave, Dundas, Ont., Canada L9H349 905-627-1781 sw@worthington@groundwater.com












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VISKA Very Intensely Studied Karst Area
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(GW Demonstration Basin/Project)
Desired characteristics
Scale/size: 2nd mag springshed or part of 1st mag?, Fan/Man? Subset
of Wakulla?, SRWMD areas Suwannee Farms, Ocala Natl. Forest
(i.e. Silver Glenn); SWFWMD: Weeki Wachee?
Cost factors
Political issues and connections
Conservation easements
CREP program (Mammoth Cave) as cost-share model; NRCS
examples
Available historical data
Depth <400'
Land-use ability to modify or implement BMPs and monitor results














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In my experience, both groups usually work together very well, BUT there is always
room for improvement.

"Bridging the Gap" means cavers and scientists understanding each other's needs and
motivations.

What motivates each group?

- Scientists want to study caves or some aspect of them in order to answer questions
(some scientists are also cavers);

- Cavers want to explore the "underground wilderness" through physical interaction
and discovery (some cavers are also scientists);

- Both groups are curious about some aspect of caves.


Examples of the types of "services" provided by cavers to the scientific community:

- Eyewitness in-cave observations;
- Water quality sampling (collection of physical samples as well as "meter" analytes);
- Sediment and rock sampling;
- Biological observation and sampling;
- Flow measurement;
- Dye tracing assistance;
- Cave surveying & mapping;
- Radio-location assistance;
- Lithostratigraphic, biostratigraphic or hydrostratigraphic mapping or observation;
- UW photographic documentation (stills and video).



Examples of potential "services" provided by researchers to cavers:

- Enhanced understanding of in-cave observations and other aspects of the cave;
- Potential access to otherwise closed caves (some caves are only accessible for
scientific data gathering purposes, which almost always includes an exploration and
mapping component);
- Recognition of the value of caver participation in the scientific literature;
- Logistical and financial support.










WHAT SCIENTISTS NEED:


1) An understanding of when caver / diver services are needed, versus when other
options should be pursued;
2) Awareness that Mother Nature is in charge: "Stuff" Happens bad weather, low
visibility, other factors which may affect the diver's ability to perform within
acceptable safety parameters;
3) A better general understanding of the training, planning and equipment requirements
necessary to complete the types of dives needed, and associated risk management
procedures;
4) Knowledge of basic human diving physiology, including physical stressors, and
especially task loading;
5) Lead time notification the proposed dive schedule. This allows time for the
research staff to prepare equipment and arrange for on-demand services, such as
laboratory analytical services. Additional sample prep may also be required in the
field.


WHAT CAVERS NEED:

1) Presentation of the project goals and proposed methodology (Research Project
Plan). This gives the cave team a better understanding of the scientific project
underway, and a general idea of what will be required to accomplish the data
gathering tasks; kept in the dark... BS
2) An understanding of the value of caver contributions to the overall effort;
3) Clear instructions from scientists in the use of any sampling equipment or data
gathering devices, or necessary training to carry out the needed work;
4) Importance of QA/QC procedures in assuring data integrity;
5) Land side logistical support;
6) Financial support (depending on the nature of the project);

WHAT BOTH CAVERS AND SCIENTISTS NEED:

- Pre-Dive Briefing time must be reserved at some point prior to the dive(s), so that
expedition and support staff understand completely how to collect data / samples,
and scientists understand factors which might affect the diver's ability to perform
these functions. Both groups must discuss the feasibility of the data gathering effort,
and how it fits in with other dive objectives;
- Dive Plan Review scientists and cavers need to discuss the Dive Plan. Depth,
distance and cave configuration will help determine the logistics, equipment
configurations, and degree of effort involved (i.e., staged dives, use of scooters, gas
mixtures?);
- Cave Map Access (if available) helps the scientist understand the dive(s), and
provides a visual reference during planning discussions;









- Post-Dive Debriefing scientists will need to interview members of the team to
ascertain details about any issues or irregularities encountered during data
collection;
- Follow-up and continued communication from cavers regarding changes in cave
conditions, and from scientists, research results and publications.



What's missing from this picture?

- Role of the cave owner/manager without cave access, neither group gets what it
wants, so it makes a lot of sense for cavers and scientists to WORK TOGETHER in
proposing projects which benefit both interests!

- Educational outreach publicity about many cave projects can carry a positive
educational message to the public, which benefits all who want to conserve and
protect caves. Scientists and cavers, because of their specialized knowledge, should
consider devoting time and effort to educating the public about their work ...
















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WAK SPRINGS PROJECT
UNITED ES DEEP CAVING TEAM




















































1
il's Den

riston, FL


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il's Den

riston, FL


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il's Den

riston, FL


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il's Den

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WHAT SCIENTISTS NEED:~~ I11


5) Lead time noification th

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6) Financial support

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Other Related Issues:





Other Related Issues:

Role of the cave owner/ manager without cave
access, neither group gets what it wants, so it makes a
lot of sense for cavers and scientists to WORK
TOGETHER in proposing projects which benefit both
interests!





Other Related Issues:

Role of the cave owner/ manager without cave
access, neither group gets what it wants, so it makes a
lot of sense for cavers and scientists to WORK
TOGETHER in proposing projects which benefit both
interests!


Educational outreach publicity about many cave
projects can carry a positive educational message to
the public, which benefits all who want to conserve and
protect caves. Scientists and cavers, because of their
specialized knowledge, should consider devoting extra
time and effort to educating cave owners / managers
and the public about their work ...




























































K-f'














Sam B. Upchurch
SDII Global Corporation
Tampa, Florida











Karst
Science
* Cave divers provide
public awareness and
popularize problems
* Karst scientists provide
understanding and
credibility













* Expertise
* Public involvement and awareness













x -II w-%I LY II xI- I IlV, L4-I r V V XLJ %JL V V X X%11 X X %% V %11 X II-
systems develop
* Support by specialized scientists (biologists,
paleontologists, geochemists, karst
hydrologists)














-II
* Need for standard data collection protocols
* Need for quality assurance plans
* Absence of trained divers













* No funds for support
* Needs are driven by schedules and budgets













* Find ways to involve the cave diving
community
* Train cave divers to recognize important
data (biota, karst features, cave sediments,
conduiting, flow systems, etc.)














-II
ask to be involved

* Make interesting observations available

* Share cave maps













* Develop a clear set of goals to enhance
communication and data transfer


















* We need to find ways to
integrate information
* We need to develop methods
to look at the interface
between the accessible cave
system and the bulk of the
springshed


Area of
Known ---
Conduiting
and Available
for Sampling













* Develop training program to introduce cave
divers to technical issues and karst science
and karst scientists to cave diving
* Standardization of data and development of
data repositories






Regional Ground-Water Flow


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