Title: The Seasons of Adjustment : Parent's Guide to the First Year Experience
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00094026/00003
 Material Information
Title: The Seasons of Adjustment : Parent's Guide to the First Year Experience
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Division of Student Affairs
Publisher: Division of Student Affairs
Place of Publication: Gainesville, FL
Publication Date: 2008-2009
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00094026
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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HELP RESOURCES


UF MAIN SWITCHBOARD/DIRECTORY ASSISTANCE 392-3261


UF Area Code = 352


Alcohol and Drug Resource Center 392-1161 x4281
www.shcc.ufl.edu/GatorWell
Athletic Ticket Office (In-State) ....800-344-2867 x6800
www.uaa.ufl.edu
Bookstore............... ......... ............ 392-0194
www.ufl.bkstr.com
Career Resource Center .......................392-1601
www.crc.ufl.edu
Counseling Center.................................392-1575
www.counsel.ufl.edu
Dean of Students Office .......................392-1261
www.dso.ufl.edu
Disability Resources...............................392-8565
www.dso.ufl.edu/drc
Financial Aid Office ...............................392-1275
www.sfa.ufl.edu
Financial Services...................................392-0181
www.fa.ufl.edu/ufs/student-links.asp
Gator Dining Services ...........................392-2491
www.bsd.ufl.edu/Dining/default.asp


Housing & Residence Education ..........392-2161
www.housing.ufl.edu
Honors Program .................................. 392-1519
www.honors.ufl.edu
J. Wayne Reitz Union.............................392-1649
www.union.ufl.edu
Lake W auburg ...................................... 466-4112
www.recsports.ufl.edu/lakeWauburg.aspx
Learning Services Center .....................392-1521
www.advising.ufl.edu/information/Isc
Libraries (General Information) ............273-2525
www.uflib.ufl.edu
New Student Programs.........................392-1261
www.dso.ufl.edu/nsp
Oasis Program .......................................392-0788
www.oasis.ufl.edu
Police Department.................................392-1111
www.police.ufl.edu
Reading and Writing Center ................392-6420
www.at.ufl.edu/rwcenter

ACADEMIC ADVISING OFFICES


Recreational Sports ...............................392-0581
www.recsports.ufl.edu/home.aspx
Registrar.................... ........ ............ 392-1374
www.registrar.ufl.edu
Southwest Rec Center...........................846-1081
www.recsports.ufl.edu/facility_swrc.aspx
Student Involvement .............................392-1671
www.union.ufl.edu/involvement
Student Health Care Center .................392-1161
www.shcc.ufl.edu
Student Legal Services..............................392-5297
www.sg.ufl.edu/organizations/SIS
Student Mental Health Services ...........392-1171
www.shcc.ufl.edu/smhs
Transportation and Parking ...................392-2241
www.parking.ufl.edu
University Ombudsman ........................392-1308
www.ombudsman.ufl.edu
Vice President for Student Affairs..........392-1265
www.ufsa.ufl.edu


Academic Advising Center *:. 392-1521 *: www.advising.ufl.edu
The Academic Advising Center provides academic advising to incoming students during Preview, UF's orientation program. The Academic Advising Center also provides assistance to undecided
students who have not chosen majors and to those students who are considering changing their majors. In addition, the Center works with Liberal Arts and Sciences students including Pre-
Professional majors (law and health). Once a student starts at UF and selects a major, the individual department within each college advises students on requirements for their majors:


Accounting..........................................273-0200
Agricultural & Life Sciences ..............392-1963
Building Construction ........................273-1180
Business Administration ....................273-0165
Design, Construction & Planning ........392-4836
Education......................................... 392-0721 x400


Engineering ........................................392-0944
Fine Arts............................................ 392-0207
Forest Resources and Conservation ..846-0853
Health & Human Performance ............392-0578
Public Health & Health Professions ....273-6400
Honors Program ................................392-1519


Journalism & Communications............392-1124
Liberal Arts & Sciences ......................392-1521
Natural Resources & Environment ......846-1634
Nursing......................... ............. 273-6400
Pharmacy ............................................. 273-6217
UAA Office of Student Life................375-4683 x5800












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Childe Hassam, American, 1859-1935, Northeast Gorge
at Appledore, 1912, oil on canvas, museum purchase by
exchange, gift of Louise H. Courtelis with additional
funds provided by Michael A. Singer


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August


WHAT PARENTS CAN DO...
* Communicate with your son or daughter to
listen and provide reassurance.
* Reassure your student that adjustments
are common and expected for first-year students.
* Encourage your student to participate in
campus activities like Gator Nights at the Reitz
Union and the Center for Leadership and Service.
* Encourage your student living in a residence hall
to talk with a Resident Assistant (RA).
* Suggest exploring opportunities for involvement
in a student organization or in the residence hall.
* Recommend regular exercise and use of the
Student Recreation Centers. A fitness assessment
is a great way to get started.
* Encourage your student to participate in
residence hall and Weeks of Welcome (WOW)
activities, as well as the numerous student
assemblies from mid-August through
September. www.dso.ufl.edu/nsp/WOW
* Encourage your student to participate actively
in class and meet with instructors during office
hours to get to know them and discuss class
expectations.
* Remind your student that regular class
attendance is important, whether it is required or
not.
* Encourage your student to visit the myufl
portal: my.ufl.edu
* Encourage your student to track financial aid
on ISIS at www.isis.ufl.edu. Discuss money
management and have your student become
familiar with financial aid services.


SUN


18







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Interfraternity
Council
Recruitment Begins


MON


TUES


WED


THUR


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UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA


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September


WHAT PARENTS CAN DO...

o. Reassure your student that feeling
overwhelmed is normal for new students
learning to manage academic demands and
new personal responsibilities.
. Remind your student that attending classes
regularly and keeping up with assignments
are keys to academic success.
o Encourage your student to create a time
management schedule and stick to it. A
good resource for time management is
available at: www.counsel.ufl.edu (click on
self-help info button).
. Talk honestly with your student about family
problems but avoid creating guilt because
he/she is not home or available to help.
. If your student experiences severe
homesickness, encourage him/her to get
involved with a campus organization,
volunteer in the community, seek a part-
time, on-campus job, or find some way to
get involved on campus.
. If other adjustment problems seem severe,
encourage your student to talk with a
counselor in the Counseling Center or at
Student Mental Health.
. Ask your student about Gator Times, a news
site and weekly email that provides
information on campus opportunities.
o Encourage your student to get involved in
one of the many intramural sports leagues.
o Learning to budget can be overwhelming.
Check in with your student frequently about
finances.


SUN


MON
1


TUES


WED


Leisure
Course
Registration


14 115


21 22


THUR


17 18


Stdn Involvement. Fair


25


(detail) Carlos Garaicoa Manso, b. 1967, resides in Cuba, Untitled
(decapitated Angel), 1995, duraflex print, museum purchase, funds
provided by the Caroline Julier and James G. Richardson Art
Acquisition Fund


FRI SAT



Multicultural
Greek Council
Recruitment












19








26


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AUGUST 2008
S M T W T F S
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31


OCTOBER 2008
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31


F Division of
U FStudent Affairs
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA


23 24^^tI^E^i~^^^^^^^^^^








GETTING SERIOUS ...


(7h. business of academics makes October important.
Midterm exams occur this month. University courses are
almost always more difficult than high school courses, and
new students normally experience increased stress and
anxiety before micIterms. Most students adjust to the changes
after their first few exams. If your student experiences stress
and anxiety beyond the norm, help is available at UFs
Counseling Center or Student Mental Health. If your student
does not meet her/his own expectations on micIterms,
encourage her/him to seek academic assistance. A variety of
academic support services are available on campus including
individual and group tutoring. Remind them that good FW!
students make good use of their resources!
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UF has an exciting array of possibilities for majors. This first
year is a good time for personal and career exploration.
The Career Resource Center and the Counseling Center
have many services that can help students begin to explore
career options, including majors.

Seeking friendship and involvement is a key strategy for
success during this transition month. Most students are -* .....
beginning to feel more at home at UF and making valuable
friendships that will last across their lifetimes. However it is
normal to see differences in how quickly various students
adapt and make connections. Encourage your student to
seek friendship and involvement and not compare themselves
to acquaintances, friends, and/or roommates in how quickly
they are making friends, joining organizations, or fitting in at
college. Sometimes the new freedom of college life can lead
to risky behavior: partying, drinking, and being sexually Boardman Robinson, American, b. Canada, Nova Scotia,
active may result in unwanted consequences, so discuss 1876-1952, Excavation, 1926, tempera on Plaster,
these things and encourage healthy behaviors. The transition gift of Kraushaar Galleries
to independence is a personal journey and each student
progresses at his/her own pace.











October

WHAT PARENTS CAN DO...
o Be open to listening to the frustrations of trying
to "find" one's place at the University.
Register for Family Weekend and visit with your
student in Gainesville on October 17-18.
Be sympathetic but careful not to provide too
many suggestions on how to "fix" your
student's problems. Convey your confidence in
his/her "own" ability to find his/her way around
this new environment.
Encourage your student to contact organizations
like the Center for Leadership and Service to
get involved in helping others while meeting
new friends.
Encourage your student to read the student
newspaper or visit the Student Activities Center
in the Reitz Union to seek out organizations of
interest.
Encourage your student to meet with an
academic adviser prior to advance registration
for spring which begins in late October.
Remind your student of previous success in
making friends and having relationships so that
impulsive actions are mediated by common sense
and memories of success before college.
Talk to younger children concerning how they are
feeling about their sibling being away from home.
Encourage your student to explore career paths:
www.crc.ufl.edu/selfassessment and
www.counsel.ufl.edu.
Discuss budget planning issues with your student,
so that financial issues do not build up and
interfere with academics.


SUN


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TUES


WED


I 11 1 I


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12 13 14 15 16







19 20 21 22 23
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Francisco Zuniga, Mexican, b. Costa Rica, 1912-1998,
Juchiteca de pie, 1965, bronze with green patina,
museum purchase, gift of Dr. and Mrs. David A. Cofrin


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November


WHAT PARENTS CAN DO...

* Give your student encouragement and support.
* Remind your student about tutoring services
offered on campus.
* Encourage your student to visit professors
during office hours to get help or discuss
academic performance.
* If your student seems depressed or anxious,
encourage her/him to talk to a counselor in the
Counseling Center or at Student Mental Health.
* Should you have concerns about alcohol
and drugs, consult the Student Health Care
Center Web site at: www.shcc.ufl.edu/gatorwell
* If your student lives in a residence hall and is
feeling isolated, encourage him/her to talk
with an RA or Hall Director.
* Even though this may be a time of increased
academic pressure, encourage your student to
try to achieve a balance of healthy diet, adequate
sleep and exercise, and some relaxation.
* Remind your student to visit the Student Health
Care Center to take care of any health needs.
* If you are concerned about your student and are
not sure where to turn for help at UE call the
Dean of Students Office and ask to speak to an
available staff member.


SUN


OCTOBER 2008
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31


2 3







9 10


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TUES


WED


DECEMBER 2008 r.
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1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 a
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31


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25 26


THUR


13 14







20 21







27 28




7..


William Morris Hunt, American, 1824-1879, Florida Landscape,
1875, oil on canvas, gift of Dr. and Mrs. David A. Cofrin


F Division of
U Student Affairs
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA


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December SUN MON TUES WED THUR FRI SAT
1 2 3 4 6


W HAT PARENTS CAN DO... I Residence Hall
Rent Due for
4 Reassure your student that although the next Spring Semester -.
few weeks will be stressful and challenging, you
will be there to help if asked.
o Remind your student about seeking academic/ 7 9
tutoring support services on campus if he/she
expresses concerns about taking finals
Fall Classes
and reviewing course materials. End
o Encourage your student to eat a balanced diet,
get a reasonable amount of sleep, and avoid
too much caffeine.

o Suggest that your student participate in 14
stress-reducing activities such as exercise or
mind-body sessions at the Recreation Centers.
o If your student seems quite anxious or depressed,
or expresses feelings of hopelessness,
recommend that he/she talk with someone at the
Counseling Center or at Student Mental Health.
21 23 24 25 26 27
o Offer support by phoning, sending emails, or
writing letters. You will want to avoid putting
another demand on your student's time unless
it is absolutely necessary.
o Consider sending a package with your student's
favorite snacks or goodies. It doesn't have to be
elaborate or expensive, but this "Coping with 28 29 30 31
Finals" gesture is a real morale booster.
o Establish plans for your student's trip home for
the holidays and determine the method of travel.
o Have your student check with the financial aid
office on how fall grades may affect their spring
financial aid award, including Bright Futures.
(detail) Carrie Mae Weems, American, born 1953, In the Halls of Justice
(Dreaming in Cuba series), 2002, gelatin silver print, museum purchase, Division of
funds provided by the Caroline Julier and James G. Richardson
Acquisition fund and the 2004 Photo Forum Acquisition Fund Student Affairs
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA




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January

WHAT PARENTS CAN DO...

* Reassure your student that the feelings described
above are normal when beginning the second
semester during the first year at college.
Encourage your student to take a renewed,
invigorated look at new classes and potential
classmates as opportunities for new connections
and improved academic performance.
Encourage your student to seek new
opportunities for involvement in campus
activities and programs.
Discuss with your student "what worked and
what didn't work" fall semester, including time
management strategies.
Encourage your student to apply to be a Housing
RA for 2009-2010.
Begin to compile the necessary tax information
to apply for financial aid. Be aware of application
deadlines.
Have your student search for scholarships,
possibly within their departments or field of
study. Visit SFAs Scholarship Finder at:
www.sfa.ufl.edu.
Encourage your student to make an appointment
with a personal trainer at one of the Recreation
Centers.
Encourage your student to attend the Study
Abroad Fair.


SUN


DECEMBER 2008
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31


18


25


MON


FEBRUARY 2009
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28


Dr Martin
Luther King Day
(no classes)





2 6
Reiec Hal


TUES


WED


THUR


1 2 3
2009-20010
Financial Aid
Applications
Available


13








20


27


(detail) Jerry Uelsmann, American, born 1934, Apocalypse II,
1967, hand-coated platinum print, courtesy of the artist


U Student Affairs
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA


SAT


17


24








INTO THF


SFMFSTFR ...


(7h..gh early in the semester, some students may
begin to feel the pressure of keeping up with
;AL
assignments and preparing for weekly exams or quizzes.
Now is the time to begin semester projects or
assignments, though some students may procrastinate
telling themselves that they have plenty of time.
Encourage your student to be thinking ahead now
regarding academics, planning for Spring Break, and r
planning for work or academics for the summer.

In February, students who live on campus must make
decisions about future living arrangements. "Should I live
on or off campus?" "Should I live in the same building?"
"Keep the same roommate?" It's a good month to
practice time-management skills, but some students
may need encouragement and support to plan ahead.

With the change in the weather comes pressure from
other students to socialize and enjoy the spring season.
Final exams seem far away. Although involvement in
student organizations is essential for a successful college
experience, too much involvement can interfere with
academic commitments. The key for most students is
finding a balance between organizational involvement, Carl Robert Holty, American, b. Germany, 1900-1973,
obligations to academics, and commitment to self-care. The Grove, 1948, oil on board, museum purchase,
gift of Mrs. Ruth Pruitt Phillips
As Valentine's Day approaches, students tend to focus
more on relationships, less on academics. Relationship
anxieties-both positive and negative-may increase
as some students strengthen their ties while others
experience weakening relationships. Now more than
ever, positive communication is needed from home.











February

WHAT PARENTS CAN DO...
* Communicate with your student the
importance of balancing work and social
activities.
* Encourage your student to speak with someone
to seek help with procrastination issues.
* Remind your student to visit professors with
concerns about schoolwork.
* Encourage your student to meet with an
academic adviser prior to summer and fall
registration.
* Discuss summer plans with your student:
summer enrollment, study abroad opportunities,
internships for credit, and summer employment.
Information about summer jobs, internships, or
selecting a major is available from the Career
Resource Center.
* Be sure to apply for financial aid before the end
of the month; discuss the process with your
student. Have your student address any
questions to their financial aid adviser. For
more information, visit www.sfa.ufl.edu.
* Relationships are a focus during this month and
your student may need you to listen to his/her
experiences with friends and significant others.
* Encourage your student to consider potential
Spring Break activities. For creative alternatives,
visit: www.crc.ufl.edu/externships.
* You may want to evaluate your student's
financial needs to see if extra spending money
is needed.


SUN


MON


TUES


WED


THUR


1 2 3 4 5 6 7







8 9 10 11 12 13 14







15 16 17 18 19 20 21


(detail) Asante people, Ghana, Man's Cloth "Mmaban" (kente),
1920-1940, rayon, museum purchase, funds provided by the
Phil and Barbara Emmer Art Acquisition Endowment with
additional funds provided by the Caroline Julier and James
G. Richardson Acquisition Fund


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F Division of
U IStudent Affairs
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA



































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March

WHAT PARENTS CAN DO...

* Take the time to discuss living options with
your student for next year. Listen to your
student's ideas about what he/she would like
to do and what he/she thinks is feasible.
* Ask your student to speak to academic
advisers in preparation for Advanced
Registration for summer and fall semesters.
* Remind your student that, while spring is
a time for much social activity, balance is
important.
o Be supportive of your student if he/she is
experiencing emotional difficulties. Help
guide him/her to campus resources for
further support.
* Encourage your student to think through
choices regarding Spring Break activities.
* Acknowledge to your student that you
understand how competitive the academic
environment is at UF and you share
reasonable expectations of success.
* Suggest spring activities like those at Lake
Wauburg: sailing, boating, wakeboarding, the
climbing wall, or just relaxing at the dock.
* Encourage your student to plan ahead for
financial aid if attending summer school. Have
your student discuss summer work plans with
a financial aid adviser to see how it may affect
fall financial aid.


SUN


22


MON


TUES


WED


THUR


29 30 31







(detail) Todd Walker, American, 1917-1998, Creosote Sky,
1980s, offset lithograph, gift of the Estate of Todd Walker.


SAT


FEBRUARY 2009 APRIL 2009
S M T WT F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30


F I Division of
U Student Affairs
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA











DEADLINES APPBOACH ...



(7h. pace of the semester escalates academically, socially, and personally after
Spring Break through Finals Week at the end of April. Academic pressures are
predictable. Final projects and papers are due this month. Group assignments Vggj 0 JO 4
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may demand coordinating schedules and work among three to five or more a q
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fellow students. Research for term papers requires competency in using the 44 44 10 go 4.
library or Internet. Stress and fatigue may cause students to miss class, which is
counterproductive to academic success. Registration for summer and fall is
occurring, and students may have questions and concerns about the
selection of classes and course availability.

Many organizations schedule end-of-semester banquets, picnics, formal,
and award ceremonies in April. First-year students seek to fit in and belong
and want to attend these events but often are nafve about the costs in time,
money, and energy to attend all events. Again, seeking to find the balance
between academics and involvement is the key to success. For students who
have performed competently and responsibly in classes and who have kept
a healthy personal balance, the month of April is exhilarating.

For students who may be seeking summer employment before returning in
the fall, the Career Resource Center is set to provide assistance with resume
writing and interviewing skills. The CRC can also direct students to on-line job
postings and career-related Web sites.









Ross Bleckner, American, b. 1949,
Gate #2, 1986, oil on canvas, gift
of Irma Braman











April

WHAT PARENTS CAN DO...

* Send care packages and messages complete
with brownies, multivitamins and
encouraging notes.
* Stress the wisdom of approaching finals with
the attitude of doing the very best your
student can, not worrying about what has or
has not happened so far in the semester.
* Encourage your student to talk to professors
to assess course performance so far.
* Encourage your student to schedule some
exercise, healthy meals, and sleep to prepare
for finals.
* If your student plans to attend summer
school at another institution, make sure
he/she completes a "transient student form"
at UF, available online.
* Be supportive if your student is having
difficulty selecting a major. Encourage
him/her to consider career counseling before
summer registration.
* Encourage your student to track their
financial aid application and award for the
coming year on ISIS.
* Reassure your student that it is normal to
reconsider a major and career path. Help is
available at the Career Resource Center:
www.crc.ufl.edu.
* Make plans for how your student will move
home or to a new location with belongings at
the end of the semester.


SUN


MON


TUES


WED


7 J81


THUR


2







9


12 13 14 15 16

Education
Recruitment Day
Reitz Union Grand
Ballroom


SAT


18


19 20 21


Utagawa Hiroshige, Japanese, 1797-1858, Fukuroi:
Flying Kites, Edo Period (1615-1858), 1848-1849, ink
on paper, museum purchase, gift of private donors


I I II


F Division of
U IStudent Affairs
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA





Fi nal Exas(thro.gh May 1)l


10



.Dea..i..
to Withdraw^
from U^BBniversity^








THE TRANSITION ...



f gratulations to your student and to you! You have made it through the first
or,
year of college. Now it is time to move forward with summer plans. Those who
return home for summer need to adjust to living at home again and working or
attending summer school at community colleges or universities in or near their
hometowns. Others will enroll in summer school at UF and choose to continue
to live on campus or have their first experience living off campus.

Students who return to their parents' homes during the summer to work and/or
take classes can find themselves in conflict with parents about issues of
independence and house rules. After a full school year of living on their own,
often college students don't see the necessity of home rules, especially when
there are younger siblings living at home. Expectations of college students
in regards to social behaviors, home rules, duties, and responsibilities
should be negotiated and communicated as soon as students return home
for the summer.

Students who enroll for summer courses at UF need to adjust to the rapid
pace of summer with little turnaround time for assignments and exam
preparation. Long daylight hours and the frequent opportunities for social
and recreational activities that summer brings are inviting to students who
spend many long hours in class. The informal atmosphere that characterizes
a UF summer is enjoyable but can lead students to erroneously believe that
they do not have to study as long or as hard in the summer as they do during
fall and spring. Summer courses are not abbreviated versions of courses; the
reality is that there are a set of objectives or topics that have to be covered
no matter what semester a course is offered. Time management is essential
for academic success during the summer.




Indian, Dancing Ganesh, 13th
century, black stone, museum
purchase, gift of Michael A.
Singer with additional funds
provided by the Kathleen M.
AxIine Acquisition Endowment


............
...........
................. .....












May


WHAT PARENTS CAN DO...

* Talk with your returning student ahead of time
about your expectations while he/she is living
at home.

* If your student is enrolled in summer school,
talk about the importance of effective time
management.

* Discuss with and help your student make
connections with peer support groups at home.
In some cases, many childhood and high
school friends will have moved away.
Encourage your student to find ways to make
new acquaintances for support during this
break from school.

* This may be the first time your student has
time to reflect on the meaning of the academic
experience. Discuss how initial academic
interests and career plans have been affected.
This can be an occasion for increased
motivation towards original goals or an
opportunity to explore alternative plans.

* If your student is attending summer school at
UF or away from home, be sure to remain in
contact and keep lines of communication open.

* Discuss spring grades and academic strategies
and priorities related to next semester.


SUN


APRIL 2009


S M T
1
6 7 8
13 14 15
20 21 22
27 28 29


W T F
2 3 4
9 10 11
16 17 18
23 24 25
30


MON


TUES


JUNE 2009
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30


WED


THUR


5 6

Residence Halls
Open for
Summer A/C
Noon


onil ISIS J




10 11



[ .'R "-.. I ../ l
SumerA/


24



31


Drop/Add Ends

Deadline
to Drop Withdraw
w out Fee Liability


16


19 20 21 22 23

Summer A/C
Fee Payment
Deadline
3 30 pm



26 27 28 29 30


U IStudent Affairs
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA


I


25 j B












































Claude Monet, French, b. Germany, 1840-1926,
Champ d'avoine (Oat Field), 1890, oil on
canvas, gift of Michael A. Singer










JSUN MON TUE WED THUR FRI SAT
June 1 2 3 4 5 6


WHAT PARENTS CAN DO...

* If your student has returned home for the 31
summer, take some time to get reacquainted.
* Remind your student that maintaining good _
health by diet, rest, and exercise is important. 7 9 10 11 13
SDiscuss your thoughts about summer
employment while your student is home or
attending summer classes.
o Establish clear expectations about house
rules if your student returns home for the
summer to live with you again. Acknowledge 14 15 16 17 18 20
the possible differences in your lifestyles
after living apart for the past year. Residence Halls
* As the summer progresses, your student may Close
Summer A
express some loneliness for friends made at Noon
college or the campus as the "home" away
from home. Discuss the value of your student
having developed a positive sense of campus 21 27
life and plans for involvement next year.





on ISIS in Evening nby 5:00 pm
30 .ii'

Drop/Add Ends

Deadline
to Drop W.thdr.w
w oCu Fee L.3bl.Ity


(detail) George Bellows, American, 1882-1925,
Jim Twadell's Place, 1924, oil on canvas, gift Division of
of William H. and Eloise R. Chandler Student Affairs

UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA













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July

WHAT PARENTS CAN DO...
* Review the events of the first year with
your student.
* Help your student identify problem areas
and encourage your student to consider
possible solutions.
* Review with your student financial needs
for the coming academic year, evaluate
changes that may be needed for money
management, and work together to
establish a tentative budget.
* Discuss how new living arrangements will
impact the academic year.
* Take some time to discuss the needs and/or
benefits of a part-time job.
* Explore the need for career counseling to
establish career or academic goals.
* Encourage your student to establish a
tentative academic plan for the full
academic year.
* Review time-management skills with your
student and/or the balance of time devoted
to school, work, and recreation.


SUN


MON


TUES


12 13 14







19 20 21







26 27 28







(detail) Zwelethu Mthethwa, South African, b. 1960, Untitled,
2000, Chromogenic print on FujiCrystal Archive paper,
museum purchase, funds provided by the Caroline Julier and
James G. Richardson Acquisition Fund


WED


THUR


FRI SAT








11







17 18


U IStudent Affairs
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA


I
































__
L
L
-r-










SUN MON TUES WED


August


WHAT PARENTS CAN DO...
o Encourage your student to continue to
seek new opportunities for growth
experiences.
o Be supportive of your student's search for
the best career path by listening as he/she
discusses options.
o Encourage your student to explore
supplementary academic pursuits such as
Study Abroad or internships in his/her
field.
o Continue regular communication and let
your student know you are there to help if
assistance is needed.
o Encourage your student to enhance the
academic experience as much as possible
by staying involved in activities on
campus even if living off campus.
o Discuss part-time employment as a way
for your student to gain additional
independence from you and gain valuable
work skills. Studies show that students
who work tend to do better with
academics.


JULY 2009 SEPTEMBER 2009
SM T W T F S S M T W T F S
1234 12345
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
26 27 28 29 30 31 27 28 29 30


I


on] ISISl*'


Residence Halls
Open 9 00 am
tentative


24
Fall Classes
& Fall Drop/Add
Begin


Chinese, Seated Guanyin, Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), 15th-16th
century, bronze, gift of Dr. and Mrs. David A. Cofrin


F [ Division of
U Student Affairs
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA


22







29


THUR FRI SAT












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OFFICE OF THE VICE P I H S & R EDUCATION- -.-B. ..3.iB - ..-. -
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Divis^^P M fion o SudeBntfflairs icludng policy development; program development and & Residence Edcaio prvdswllmitie, o mnt-riented facilities where^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


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stuen avc y. The Paen -and Famiies Associat ion is c f t office.






























aY


The artwork featured in this calendar is in the collection of the Har Museum of Art located atthe University of Florida Cultural Plaza.
The 86,800 square foot facility is one of the largest university art museums in the country with nearly 7,000 works in its collection focusing
on African, Asian, modern, and contemporary art and photography. The Museum enhances the activities of the University of Florida and
serves a culturally diverse audience through stimulating exhibitions and educational programming.

Q9 t owrc~ee~ou~


Buy a Membership at the Harn
For an annual donation of $25, students can join the Student Art
Museum society, have the opportunity to meet others with similar
interests, and receive benefits that include invitations to member-
exclusive events, subscription to an e-newsletter, and discounts on
purchases at the Ham Museum Store. Parents may also become
invested in the university community by purchasing an individual
membership which starts at$50 per person or $75 per couple for a
dual membership. If you are interested in additional information
about membership, contact Tracy Pfaff at 352-392-9826 or e-mail
tpfaff@harn.ufl.edu. Admission to the museum is free, and
membership supports exhibitions and programming.

Become an Intern or Volunteer
Students can earn course credit and gain valuable experience at
the Har while receiving guidance in a number of professional
fields and creative atmospheres.


Visit the Museum Often
The Har offers a variety of exhibitions and programs that appeal
to students and families. Museum Nights, sponsored by UF Student
Government and held Thursday nights from 5to 9 p.m. during the UF
academic year, provides students an opportunity to enjoy a night
that is planned and promoted by other students. Offerings include
free food, entertainment, and activities that correlate with exhibits.
Admission to the Museum is free. Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 5
p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 1 to 5
p.m. Sunday. The Camellia Court Cafe, located on the lower level of
the Museum, is open seven days a week from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. For
more information call 352-392-9826 or visit www.harn.ufl.edu.

Cover: El Anatsui, Ghanaian, b. 1944, Old Man's Cloth
2003, aluminum and copper wire, museum purchase
with funds from friends of the Harn Museum


Contact Infrato




FI .MERGENCY INFO*ATION




^^^^^^^Yj~l'nF Homeage ww~ul~edu ^^^^






FOR INF REAE TO PERONA










8 a.m.-5 p.m.




on'all adinistato





RAI IFRAIO


*RU AM 5
political opnions or afiliatifSions, or veteran status.^















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The University of Florida Division of Student Affairs and You...


IEdctn I *.^I*lIs IoGloalT Community


The Division of Student Affairs educates students to assume roles of leadership, involvement and service
in a global community. The Division plays a vital role in creating and maintaining a healthy campus
environment through services, programs, and innovative learning experiences beyond the classroom.

As a family member, you can help enhance these and other opportunities for students by participating in
the University of Florida Family Fund. Your contribution will enable us to continue to provide a wide array
of social and developmental programs and opportunities to UF students.

During the fall semester, you will be contacted and asked to consider making this financial investment as
we work to achieve our goal of "Educating Leaders for a Global Community." Every contribution makes
a direct impact on the future of your student and the University of Florida.



How can YOU contribute to the Family Fund?
Contact: Myra F Morgan, Director of External Relations
P. 0. Box 113250, Gainesville, FL 32611-3250
352-392-1265 | myram@ufl.edu
www.ufsa.ufl.edu



UFf UNIVERSITY of

UF IFLOR IDA
The Foundation for The Gator Nation




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