St. John tradewinds

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Title:
St. John tradewinds
Alternate title:
Saint John tradewinds
Portion of title:
Tradewinds
Added title page title:
St. John tradewinds newspaper
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tradewinds Newspaper Inc.
Place of Publication:
St. John, V.I
Creation Date:
July 8, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Saint John (V.I.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States Virgin Islands -- Saint John

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Dates or Sequential Designation:
Description based on: vol. 3, no. 5, May 1979; title from caption.
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Numbering varies.
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Successor to The St. John Drum.

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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 52130251
System ID:
UF00093999:00280


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ShNyah Bacon Wins 2014 St. Thomas Carnival Princess TitlePage 9Island Solar Energy Becoming More Affordable Than EverNet Metering Helps WAPA Bills DisappearPage 7Islands Newest Fuel Station Opens on South Shore RoadPage 4 Former St. John Police Chief and DPNR Chief Sentenced in Drug CasePage 3 LETTERS: PAGES 16-18April 21-27, 2014 Copyright 2014 Education and Transportation Are Top Issues at Coral Bay MeetingPage 5 VIPA To Meet with Marine Operators About Enighed Repair WorkPage 2St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Tom Oat VILLA PARKING ONLY! parking ticket for the operator of the safari bus parked in the recently-designated waterfront parking spaces reserved for Licensed Villa Company on Thursday, April 17, but the unattended bus had been parked there in the early morning hours to await a pre-arranged tour and the driver could not be found. St. John Police Allow Detainee One for the RoadPage 23

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2 St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 EDITOR/PUBLISHER MaLinda Nelson malinda@tradewinds.vi NEWS EDITOR Jaime Elliott jaime@tradewinds.vi COLUMNISTS & CONTRIBUTORS Andrea Milam, Mauri Elbel, Chuck Pishko, Yelena Rogers, Tristan Ewald, Andrew Rutnik, Craig Barshinger, Jack Brown, Mares Crane, Dan Boyd, Bob Malacarne, Raven Philips NEWSLINE (340) 776-6496 www.tradewinds.vi editor@tradewinds.vi ADVERTISING advertising@tradewinds.vi MAILING ADDRE SS Tradewinds Publishing LLC P.O. Box 1500 St. John, VI 00831 CIRCULATION Call the newsline to be added as a newsstand site SUBSCRIPTIONS U.S. & U.S.V.I. only $90.00 per year email: info@tradewinds.vi THIRD CLASS PERMIT U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 3 St. John, VI 00831 COPYRIGHT 2014 All rights reserved. No reproduction of news stories, letters, columns, photographs or advertisements allowed without written permission from the publisher. TRADEWINDS PUBLISHING LLCThe Community Newspaper Since 1972 Autism Conference Set for April 28The Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities is sponsoring the 7th Annual Autism Conference from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Monday, April 28, on St. Thomas at the University of the Virgin Islands at the Administrative and Conference. Featured presenters Dr. Ann Cox and Dr. Somer Bishop will provide information on autism spectrum disorders. For more infor mation, call 340-776-9200 ext 2334. Ruby Rutnik Scholarship Applications Available; Deadline Set for May 15The Ruby Rutnik Scholarship Fund, Inc. scholarship applica tions are now available for the 2014-2015 school year. This year two $2,500 annual awards are being offered to two qualifying St. John females whose families or selves have resided on St. John accredited college or university. Applications may be picked up at Connections in Cruz Bay (776-6922) or Coral Bay or by contacting the Rutniks at 693-8069. The deadline for submission is May 15, 2014. Notice will be given on or before June 5, 2014. Applications are also available at Gifft Hill School or by call ing Beth Jones at 776-1730. The Ruby Rutnik Scholarship Fund and the Rutnik family wish to thank the community for their continued support of this Scholar ship fund established in 1997 in memory of their daughter, Ruby Rutnik. Green Thursday Seminar April 24The next Island Green Living Association Green Thursdays seminar, entitled St. John in Layers: Maps of Paradise An Aer ial Tour of St. John, will feature a map exploration of the island, nearshore marine communities, and data layers developed using Geographic Information Systems technology. More than 30-plus data layers of information on the St. John environment will be displayed and used to show how we can better understand the island environment, how it has changed in the recent past and how we can use this technology to plan from individual parcels to island sustainability planning. The seminar will be on Thursday, April 24, at 5:30 p.m. at Gifft Hill Schools upper campus atrium. Come out and youre sure to be amazed by seeing St. John as you never have before. All are welcome to attend. Join Nana Hendricks at Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Ser vice, on Sunday, April 27, at 10 a.m. at Gifft Hill School Lower Campus, for the topic: Journey of the Soul. In this gathering Hendricks will discuss the keys to Living from Soul and How the Soul Operates within the Matrix of Human Consciousness. Get in touch with who you are beyond the skin you are living in and the mind you are processing with. From the multifaceted brilliance of your own inner being. Hendricks is an International Spiritual Teacher and Healer. She teaches that we are not our stories, programming or beliefs, but source inside of them and living from a place of peaceful empowerment. For more information visit www.thespiralstair.com. For more information go to: www.uufstjohn.com.Hendricks Is Guest Speaker at UUF Pot Hole Patchwork at Francis BaySt. John Tradewinds News Photo by Tom OatThe moonscape that was the access road to Francis Bay Beach in the V.I. National, Park has been been patched by the VINP to ease access for the scores of

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By Judi Shimel St. John Tradewinds A veteran St. John police sergeant and the former chief federal prison terms April 17 for smuggling more than 15 pounds of cocaine. Retired Police Sergeant Angelo Hill and DPNR Environmental Enforcement Chief Roberto Tapia received 21 months and 70 months, respectively. Hill pleaded guilty in December 2013 to drug conspiracy charges. Tapia pleaded Chief District Judge Curtis Gomez sent Hill and Tapia away after telling both men they did a lot to save themselves more time behind bars than they could have gotten by cooperating in the prosecution of other defendants. Credit for T estifying Against Others Judge Gomez credited the cooperation each defendant gave investigators after their arrests in handing out the sentences. Hill otherwise could have received up to 84 months under federal sentencing guidelines. Tapia was facing life in prison, Gomez said. The two men were arrested in May 2013 after a team of local and federal law enforcers used surveillance methods to track the course of a day-long drug smuggling operation on May 17. Six other individuals were arrested in the course of that investigation. backpack carried by Tapia after he made a trip from Cruz Bay by ferry boat after a rendezvous with Hill on St. John. During testimony given at a recent trial of another coconspirator, Hill admitted helping Tapia, who was armed and in his DPNR uniform, retrieve the cocaine and transported Tapia to the Loredon Boynes Ferry Terminal in Cruz Bay in his unmarked police cruiser with the cocaine in a backpack. at the end of its trip across Pillsbury Sound to St. Thomas. Four Puerto Rico men who had rendezvoused with Tapia to provide the money to buy the drugs, were subsequently charged and plead guilty. Two other men, including Hills cousin, Walter Hill, a to their involvement in the smuggling. The two are awaiting sentencing. I think you should take it to heart that this sentence is not as severe as it could have been, Judge acknowledged. Both Hill and Tapia were already being held in a federal detention center in Puerto Rico at the time they heard their fates. They were also ordered to serve supervised release at the end of their prison terms, to perform community service Hill served with the V.I. Police Department for 25 years until he was arrested on May 24, 2013. Tapia was a former ronmental Enforcement for DPNR. Both men submitted their retirements after their arrest and are eligible for their individual pensions. Airport Smugglers Get Heavier T erms In an unrelated case, Judge Gomez sentenced a 25-yearold baggage supervisor at Cyril E. King Airport to 151 months in prison for attempting to smuggle more than 13 pounds of cocaine through Cyril King Airport on St. Thomas to a courier in September 2012. The courier was arrested as he attempted to board a tence. St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 3 Thursday, April 17th Former St. John Police Chief and DPNR Chief Sentenced in Drug Case INDEXBusiness Directory ..............24 Church Directory .................22 Connecting with Nature ......19 Crime Stoppers ...................23 Cryptoquip ...........................21 Letters ............................16-18 On the Market .....................13 Police Log ...........................23 Real Estate ....................26-27 By T om Oat St. John Tradewinds The V.I. Port Authority will be meeting with the islands marine operators to take control of the indiscriminate usage of the Enighed Pond Port facilities, according Carlton Dowe, Execu tive Director of the V.I. Port Authority. Those boats that are doing repairs have to leave, Dowe told St. John Tradewinds on Tuesday, April 15. We will meet with the operators to discuss what activities can be conducted. There are some challenges and we will be meeting on the 29th of the month, Dowe said. The usage is managed by the ports marine manager. Permit Allows Incidental Repairs The federal Army Corps of Engineers, which issued the permit for the construction of the port, restricted work in the port to inciden Since the construction of the port in the for mer salt pond, residents of the Contant neighborhood on the south shore have complained that the operators of several island marine companies have conducted repairs of vessels not in service at the port for lengthy periods of time. The repainting of one of the islands three regularly-scheduled vehicle barges currently in service began in early April at a makeshift private commercial site on leased land on the south shore of the pond. The property is directly under the hillside neighborhood, which reignited complaints from residents. The south and east shoreline of the pond adjacent to and opposite the barge ramp consist of sheet steel pilings driven into the pond to protect the shoreline mangroves planted as a mitigation area as part of the federal approval of the opening of the former salt pond for conversion into a commercial port. No Direct Impact from Sandblasting The sandblasting of old paint off the vessel is not an environmental problem as long as the owner keeps the sand and paint from any scraping and sand blasting out of the water at the adjacent mangrove shoreline, according to tion area are also a nesting area for migratory shore birds. We didnt see any direct impact, said the and Natural Resources who inspected the mangrove work site on behalf of the Army Corps of Engineers. We didnt see any evidence of discharges.V.I. Port Authority T o Meet with Marine Operators About Enighed Repair Work may be hard to remember what the Enighed Pond waterfront looked like before the construction of the wastewater treatment plant and subsequently the port. These show when the waterfront area across South Shore Road from what is now The Marketplace, was a dumping ground and junkyard.

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4 St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 www.facebook.com/yelena.rogers.photographyYelena Rogers Photography PO Box 554, St. John, VI 00831 340-774-4027 603-401-4757 St. John Tradewinds News Photos by Kelly Morris Gas Station on South Shore Road on Saturday, April 19.By T om Oat St. John Tradewinds After going from three gas stations to one for the past several years, St. John now has a second gas station with the long-awaited opening of the Racetrack Gas Station on the east side of the renowned Jacobs Ladder hill on Southshore Road between the Westin Resort and Cruz Bay, on Saturday, April 19. The construction of the purported $1 million gas station on a long narrow strip alongside the steep two-lane road is an engineering marvel, with tower ing concrete retaining walls creating the space for the pumps and tanks. Additional commercial space is being developed between the new station and the neighboring St. John Market in the neighboring commercial center adja cent to Guinea Grove apartments and the Westin. The E&C Gas Station in Contant has been the only Cruz Bay station since the construction of the roundabout took the former Texaco station. The former Dominos gas station on Rte. 20 on the shore of Coral Bay subsequently closed at the expira Controversy has surrounded the construction and completion of the South Shore Road gas station near the entrance to the Westin Resort and adjacent to St. John Market. Heirs of the Estate of Edward Power Boyd have sought government intervention to prevent the development of the property which they claim is in the estate and was illegal transferred to the developer of the station. a ruling requested by V.I. Police on the prosecution of complaints by heir Dr. Monica Boyd Richards, an attorney, related to the property dispute. Controversy seemed to follow the project as the was unable to navigate the steep approach section of the road known as Jacobs Ladder. Station owner Nedal Salem directed a tanker transporting new shipment of fuel arrived during the Saturday opening celebration which featured refreshments and a DJ. Ironically, an equipment malfunction left the islands other station, E&C Gas, unable to pump regular gasoline on the same day the new competitor was opening. Coral Bay drivers, meanwhile, are hoping their community will once again have its own gas station. Boynes Trucking owner James Boynes has announced plans to rebuild a gasoline station for the Coral Bay community on the old gas station site. Boynes, who is leasing the former Dominos property from owner Wilma Marsh Monsanto, is hoping for expeditious government approvals for his plan to build a new station to service the isolated commu nity. Islands Newest Fuel Service Station Opens on South Shore Road Hillside Carlos FURNITUREHAS IT ALL!FREE Delivery/Setup to St. John at Tutu Park Mall Queen Beds....................from $399Living Room Sets ............from $999Fridge & Stove Combo ...from $1100Open 7 Days a Week340-693-0016 / 340-642-7926Come see what everyones talking about! ~ Large selection of bedroom sets to choose from ~ Special guests gas jockeys, above, were on had to serve customers for the opening.

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By Judi Shimel St. John Tradewinds The fate of the Guy H. Benja min Elementary School and transportation issues topped the list of concerns expressed at the Tuesday evening, April 16, town meeting in Coral Bay. The meeting, hosted by the Coral Bay Community Council, drew about 40 participants, many of whom shared their opinions and concerns. Members of the 30th Legislature and their representa tives traveled from St. Thomas to hear from their constituents. Much of the talk at the twohour meeting centered on a pending decision by Governor John P. deJongh as to whether Guy Benjamin School can stay open as a public elementary school. Because of a drop in enrollment, caused in part by the transfer of the kinder E. Sprauve School in Coral Bay, Gov. deJongh is expressing concern about the $1 million he says is needed to keep the school open. One alternative, being promoted by the Department of Education and some lawmakers, is converting Benjamin School into a an early learning center. Senator Tregenza Roach says a model already exists in the school system at the Jane E. Tuitt School in Savan on St. Thomas. The idea of the early child hood center was the most promising, Sen. Roach said. Cram All the Students Into JESS Several residents who grew up in Coral Bay said they like their public school the way it is. They were joined in that sentiment by parents of current GBS students. It looks like they want to cram all the students into JESS. Its ridiculous, said Donna Matthias. Senator Donald Cole urged concerned citizens to invite the governor to their next town meet ing. Some in the meeting suggested the best person to address would be whatever government will guide Gov. de Jongh in his decision making. Insular schools superintendent Jeanette Smith-Barry. Resident Robin Gallup raised the idea of starting a petition to present to the governor, but Anna Adam said one petition is already being kept. (Senator Craig) Barshinger is taking a tally of how many chil dren will be going to Guy Benja min next year, Adams said. CBCC Director Sharon Coldren said Sen. Barshinger indicated he would attend the April 16 meet ing, which was held at Benjamin School, but would arrive late. The senator-at-large, however, did not appear. Smith-Barry issued a statement several days ago, urging St. John residents to show their support for keeping Benjamin School open by registering their students for the 2014-2015 school year. Meeting participants also raised concerns about meeting GBSs short term spending needs. While most public schools have a goverment-issued imprest fund that allows them to make small expenditures. But teacher Jane Roskin said Education took the schools checkbook back after Principal Brenda Dalmida went on sick leave in December. When Ms. Dalmida goes on sick leave the district took the checkbook, Coldren said. To cover their needs school administrators have been relying on organizers of the annual Guy Benjamin School Regatta for funds, which meeting participants said is causing tensions. Public T ransit Lacks Funds Meager funding was also blamed when the subject turned to St. John Vitran bus service. The service is operated by the DepartSt. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 5 Education, Transportation Top Topics at Coral Bay Town MeetingContinued on Page 22 St. John Tradewinds Senator Donald Cole (center) hears from constituents in Coral Bay at a town meeting at GBS on April 16.

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By T om Oat St. John Tradewinds If rain is Gods blessing the Johns Folly Learning Institute was truly blessed on the occasion of its 18th anniver sary program on Saturday, April 19th. Organizers of the event prepared for the weather as a line of a heavy rain storm slowly approached the JFLI facil ity at the former Horace Mann School on the bluff overlooking Johns Folly Bay and the eastern Caribbean Sea. The gathering crowd of neighborhood students, resiand summer program was safely indoors for the ceremony to celebrate the low-key institutes history and future with the help of a few island and visiting dignitaries as the heavi est rains fell. Nine-term V.I. Delegate to Congress Dr. Donna Christensen, an annual attendee at JFLIs program and now a candidate for V.I. Governor, was the guest speaker and she extolled the service of the JFLI program as she introduced special guest speaker Paul Monteiro, who coordinated the White House Mentorship Program for young men in D.C. area high schools. Guest Speaker from White House Monteiro, who has been appointed the new director of federal VISTA program (Volunteers in Service to America) by President Barack Obama, is a partner in Value Partner private partnerships between faith-base organizations. A major project of Value Partnerships is the My Brothers Keeper initiative recently announced by President Obama which is designed to improve life outcomes for minority boys and young men.6 St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 JFLI Celebrates 18th Anniversary of Serving Neighborhood Youth St. John Tradewinds News Photos by Tom Oat Community elder Eirleen January, left with Ital Anthony, was introduced to the of the Calvary Baptist church Choir, sisters Hilda Anthony, Joan Thomas and Lilian Plaskett and her daughter Laverne, above, delighted the audience with a musical presentation audience. FULL VETERINARY SER VICESCanines, Cats & CrittersOur new location is 2.5 miles out of Cruz Bay on Centerline Road (next to Moses Laundromat) BOARDING GROOMING PET SUPPLIES tel: 693-7780 l email: k9 catscritters @yahoo .com Continued on Page 22

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By Andrea Milam St. John Tradewinds Its no secret that solar energy can reduce, or even eliminate, your power bill. But buying into solar ener gy has long been expensive and out of reach for typical St. John locals. All that is changing now thanks to decreasing prices and programs like Caribbean Solar $65,000 in loans to customers. Caribbean Solar Company owners Kevin Schnell and Maya Matthews-Sterling sought out the residenlar World. nancing options for about a year, said Schnell. Solar World actually vetted a number of compa nies and chose one for us to work with. Through this partnership, were able to offer unsecured loans up to $40,000 with a 10-year term at 6.99 percent, and we can also do an additional $25,000 no-interest nopayment loan, which is like a bridge loan customers can use toward their federal income tax credit. make the move to solar, the V.I. Water and Power Authoritys net metering program allows customers to borrow against excess energy theyve generated and fed back into the grid, meaning those high power bills can all but disappear. Essentially what youre doing is generating power during the day which is utilized immediately in your home before its ever delivered to the grid, and if the house doesnt need some of the energy thats being produced, its delivered back to WAPA, explained Schnell. The meter keeps track of those credits, and once the sun goes down and you start using power from WAPA, youre using the credits that you generated during the day. Youre essentially using WAPAs grid as storage. Credits are rolled over month to month before be-St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 7 A lot of people here refer to their W AP A payment as a doing is essentially reducing or eliminating your power bill while making an impact on our not only great for the homeowner the environment as well.Kevin Schnell, owner, Caribbean Solar CompanyIsland Solar Energy Becoming More Affordable Than EverNet Metering Helps WAPA Bills Disappear St. John Tradewinds News Photo Courtesy of Carbbean Solar CompanyCaribbean Solar Company workers install energy saving solar panels on the roof to selected at Impact Meet!These issues ...& more 4 youth! Speak up NOW! You DO have a say! Voting ends April 30th ...we need YOUR help to pick the top 10! What can we do to make St. John a better place? Go to www.sjcf.orgMake YOUR opinion COUNT!on St. John Priorities commFOUNDATION JOHN ST Go To www. sjcf.org Care about St. John Click Link to VoteGo to the St. John Community Foundation webiste (www.sjcf.org) and click on the link at the top of the page to access the survey that contains a consolidated list of 40 needs citizens. Join us and help us determine what to focus on NOW! Voting ends April 30th. Results announced May 1st! GO TO WWW.SJCF.ORG Vocational School Ban Plastic Bags Downtown Shuttle Habitat Restoration Save Guy Benjamin School Recreational Facility Upgrades Services for the Homeless Bike Paths on North Shore Road Keep STJ Beautiful Anti-Litter Plan Town Council Development Continued on Page 20

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8 St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014

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St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 9 GET IN YOUR CUSTOMERS F ACE AD V E R T I S E ON. . ISLANDTREASUREMAPS@GMAIL.COM WhatT oDoVI@gmail.com App-solutely Fabulous W hatT oDoV I www.SkinnyLegs.comBe here even when you are thereCoral Bay, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands 340-779-4982 Follow us on facebook By Judi Shimel St. John Tradewinds The 2012 St. John Festival Princess staged an encore performance Aprill 13 at the Lionel Roberts Stadium by winning the title of VI Carnival Princess. Eleven-year-old ShNyah Bacon bested two fellow contestants to win the crown before a sizeable crowd of classmates, families and Carnival fans. The dium events staged each year as part of the monthlong celebration. Bacon, Contestant No. 2, also won the titles of Best Evening Wear, Best Madras Cultural Wear, Best Sportswear, Miss Intellect, Best Talent and Miss Congeniality. The winning contestant had to overcome a segment in the talent portion when the scenery was blown over by a gust of wind. Contestant No. 1, Rachelle Lanclos,was chosen by photographers as Most Photogenic. Cemi-Leila John, Contestant No. 3, won the title of Most Cooperative Contestant. Hordes of friends, family and supporters swarmed the newly crowned princess at the end of the threeand-a-half hour competition. She smiled and patiently posed as cameras and smart phones captured the moment. When asked how she felt about her victory, Princess ShNyah was brief. Amazing, she said. Bacon is a sixth grade student at the Julius E. be to lead the pre-teen Carnival tramp up Main Street to Carnival Village at the Fort Christian parking lot on Tuesday, April 29.2014 St. Thomas Carnival Princess Title Goes to 2012 St. John Winner St. John Tradewinds Double Crown: 11, share the joy of victory Sunday night, April 13, at the Lionel Roberts Stadium on St. Festival Princess. A large crowd of family, friends and supporters showered the winner with hugs and kisses moments after the big announcement.

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St. John Tradewinds Easter holiday greetings from the members of St. John Rescue. March was a very special month for us because of the generosity of two St. Johnians. Ronnie Klingsberg and Ian Samuel spent countless hours organizing a spectacular fund raiser for St. John Rescue. These two well-known gentlemen were steadfast in their desire to help St. John Rescue raise funds to keep our Those of you who were able to attend the Blues Blowout were treated to an exceptional show. The performers, Samantha Fish, Johnny Rawls, Anthony Gomes, and T.C. Carter rocked the Winston Wells captivating music. Ian and Ronnie are dedicated to helping St. John Rescue maintain its ability to provide the best rappel ling, extrication, stabilization, and emergency medi cal service to our friends, neighbors, and guests on St. John. Words alone cannot express our gratitude for their hard work. If you missed this years concert stay tuned for information on next years event. We have been experiencing some problems with our website. If you wish to visit our site please use photos of our past events and trainings. Once again this year Trauma Nurse Lee Singer has returned to offer training to St. John Rescue members. The topics she covered were: Submersion injuries, Patient Assessment, and Traumatic Brain Injury. In addition, Lee was able to arrange for a very special training by Gary Ferrucci. Gary is a CSI detective with the Nassau County Police Department Garys presentation focused on crime scene preser vation. He is a dynamic instructor and provided us with invaluable information about how to deal with a crime scene. He also detailed motor vehicle crashes and what to look for when approaching a crash site. This week Jono Bryant is traveling from North Carolina to provide us with training in Wilderness medicine, treatment of marine bites and stings, how to handle Multiple Casualty Incidents, and patient assessment. WE are so fortunate to have such talented people willing to travel to St. John to train our responding members. We conduct CPR training classes on the second Saturday of each month. Our next class is Saturday, May 10, starting at 9:30 a.m.. All CPR classes are at our headquarters on Centerline Road in Estate Pastory. If you are interested in taking a CPR class please contact me at (340)626-5118 or starvillas@msn.com. During the month of March we responded to the following: March 2 hiker down in Coral Bay March 10 DOA transport in Cruz Bay March 12 Man down in Cruz Bay March 13 Missing snorkeler found safe March 18 Man down in Cruz Bay March 19 Man down near the tennis courts March 21 DOA transfer from Coral Bay March 30 Car off the road Costanzo Rd The events where we stood by: March 6 St. John School of the Arts concert March 22 The Coral Bay Flotilla March 29 The St. John Blues Blowout March 31 Transfer Day activity in Winston The members of St. John Rescue are proud to serve the people of St. John. We live in a small community where the spirit of neighbor helping neighbor is still alive. You can always count on the dedicated volunteers with St. John Rescue to come to assist you when you call.10 St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 To The Rescue crane ROBERT CRANEARCHITECT, A.I.A.P .O. BOX 370 CRUZ BAY, ST. JOHN U.S.V.I. 00831(340) 776-6356 www.stjohnweddingplanner.com www.katilady.com 340-693-8500 Wedding Consulting Travel Coordination Accommodations KatiLady since 1997 Open TuesdaySunday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tel: 693-5579Beautifying Americas ParadiseHUGE DISCOUNTon volume sales Happy Holidays! GRADE 2MRS. ROSKIN GRADE 3MRS. BROWN GRADE 4 MRS. BURKS GRADE 5 MS. CAMERON GRADE 6 MRS. PENN Congratulations Honor Roll Students!Guy Benjamin Elementary School Honor Roll Students Third Marking PeriodEaster Greetings

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St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 11 By Andrea Milam St. John Tradewinds Locals and frequent visitors know that Joes Rum Hut offers one of the best happy hours on island with $3 you-call-it from 4 to 6 p.m. daily. But apparently the Wharfside Village bar was on the radar of Mens Journal magazine, which just named Joes one of the best hidden beach bars in America. There are plenty more famous beach bars in the USVIs and BVIs, but for a chill time with some locals its hard to trump this Froot Loops-hued tiki bar on Cruz Bay Beach about a minutes walk from St. Johns ferry dock, says the Mens Journal online feature. Rock, country, and reggae music spill into the street, and patrons often space out their drinks with a swim. The article recommends ordering a simple moji to made very quickly, a drink for which Joes Rum Hut is well-known. Joes manager Mike Hedy knew something was up when Mens Journal contacted him asking for high-resolution photos of the bar. They said they were doing an article on Joes and on St. John, said Hedy. I sent them photos and asked if they had questions, but I never heard anything back from them and had no idea what was going on. About a month after sending the photos, Hedy was surprised to see the article show up in his email inbox. Its an honor really, said Hedy. Its quite a sur prise. Patrons of the bar have since mentioned seeing the article naming Joes one of the best hidden beach bars in America. The Wharfside bar was also recently recognized by the Virgin Islands Daily News as the best happy hour in the territory. Jost Van Dykes Soggy Dollar Bar also appeared in the Mens Journal online feature, where it was recognized for its world-famous painkiller.Joes Rum Hut Garners National Publicity W ith Mens Journal Magazine Feature Happy Holidays! St. John Tradewinds News Photo Rotary T rying T o Raise $50,000 for Basketball Court

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St. John Tradewinds Animal Care Center President Lucy Banks announces the panel of judges for the 2014 Wagapaloo za. Waga, as the fundraiser is affectionately known, will be at the day, May 10, starting at 5 p.m. Banks has named the judges as Nancy Anderson, Candy Caine, Rob Crane, and Ian Samuel. In addition, in recognition of the growing number of St. John youngsters who have become owners and caretakers of island dogs, this years panel will include twelveyear-old Skyler McGrath. With the addition of a Bouncy House to the Waga attractions, the fabulous response to the ACC request to the schools for students to create animal-theme posters, and now the addition of a school-age St. Johnian to the panel of judges, ACC is responding to the island childrens growing concern and affection for our puppies and dogs. More announcements of Waga 2014 notable volunteers include Michael Beason as DJ. Beason, well-known on the island as the Ben and Jerry delivery man, will Jane Kyser has volunteered to staff ACCs table at the front gate where Parade of Paws participants and other show dog owners can register before the formal opening of Waga 2014. There will be no charge for visitors who are simply attending Wagapalooza. Joe Palminteri, Wagas pur veyor of beverages throughout Waga, announces that Kara Taylor and Courtney Christensen have volunteered to work with him in dispensing cold drinks at the beverage booth. Taylor and Christensen will be serving the ACC signature Waga drink which is essentially a rum punch with or without alcohol. Suggestions are still coming in for a name for this years signature beverage. Banks says that registration for participants in the show classes may register online at www.wagapalooza.com or at the gate. In addition, the volunteers at ACCs Tuesday Adoption Clinics held at be accepting advance registrations for dogs entered in the announced classes. Please see Tradewinds issue April 14-20 for a listing of the classes.12 St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 Anderson, Caine, Crane and Samuel Are Selected as 2014 Waga Judges; Youth Judge Is McGrath Sunday 10am HAWKSNEST BEACH facebook Freshwater Church St. John USVITerry Lansdale, Pastor 340.514.6578(CHILDCARE AVAILABLE) ISLAND SOLAR V.I. 300-watt panels 300-watt inverters SunDrum solar hot water systems Battery stand-alone systems Energy audits Diesel generators Conventional solar hot water systems Power management systems Off-grid living for over 12 years on Lovango Cay. Dan Boyd t: 340-626-9685 e: islandsolarvi@gmail.com We are anAuthorizedV.I.EnergyDealer& Grid-Tie Systems as low as $3.50 per watt and Nohidden SAY NO TO W APA www.iglavi.org www.facebook.com/Island GreenLivingAssociation PRESERVE ST. JOHN! Donate and shop at the ReSource DepotTuesday-Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturdays 7:30 a.m. to noon Git Hill & Centerline Road, across from the dump Join us Thursday, April 24 at 5:30 p.m. Git Hill Schools upper campus atriumSt. John in Layers: Maps of Paradise An Aerial Tour of St. JohnA GREEN THURSDAYS SEMINAR St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Tom Oat decided not to argue with V.I. Department of Planning and Natural Resources Bay beach Wednesday, April 16, and commenced to unload all his equipment off the skiff, including the engine. Faced with the potential of an abandoned boat, Civil Disobedience?

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St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 13 Income-producing Coral Haven Is Ideal InvestmentSt. John Tradewinds News Photo PO BOX 429, ST. JOHN, VI 774-1625 ACROSS FROM LIBRARY U. S. VIRGIN ISLANDS 501 (3) c NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION Queenie is 1-2 years and weighs 25 lbs. She is a very sweet girl who loves belly rubs and playing with other dogs. Queenie looks like a lab mix in a corgi body. She is looking for a loving and forever home. ST. JOHN S LAW FIRM SINCE 1989Real Estate / Land Use / Environmental / Trusts and Estates / Probate Business Entities / Consulting / Litigation / Personal InjuryLocated at beautiful Est. Lindholm, aboe Asolare, 340-693-8255, www.stjohnilaw.comJ. Brion Morrisette & Raf Muilenburg, Partners Clyde Murphree, Of Counsel By Andrea Milam St. John Tradewinds Looking for a property to put into the short-term rental market? Look no further than Coral Haven in Emmaus. Want a property you can live on while earning rental income? Coral Haven can do that too. How about a property with the potential to build? Coral Haven offers that as well. This more than a quarter-acre property with stunning Coral Harbor and unique Hurricane Hole and V.I. National Park views features a home with two studio units as well as a main house slab with cistern, septic connection, and plumbing already in place. The possibilities with Coral Haven are endless, explained 340 Real Estate Company owner/broker Tammy Donnelly. It has the potential to appeal to somebody from the states looking to move down here, or to someone who already lives here and is looking to be invested in the island, said Donnelly. It has a lot of potential for different uses. You could live in one unit and rent out the other, or rent both units out to two separate parties or to one large group. The water views and two-person hot tub make the existing two-unit cottage ideal for short-term rentals. The main house slab offers endless possibilities. The hard work is all done for your main house, said Donnelly. All it needs is walls and a roof, and in a pool if you wanted; theres ample room to expand. Coral Haven also offers two separate access points, with a driveway down to the main house slab and a two-car parking pad with a gate and stairs down to the existing cottage, offering privacy to the buyer who wants to build out and live in the main house while renting the cottage. In addition to the propertys future potential, it has some great features, including close proximity to Coral Bay and to the North Shore Road, which is just 10 minutes away. Coral Havens current owner has beautifully planted the grounds with various fruit trees and vegetables. At just $709,000, Coral Haven is a steal with endless possibilities. For more information on this property, contact Donnelly at 340-779-4478.

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14 St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 GRAND OPENIN G!!! wholesale CARNATION HELLMANS MAYO E E VERYDY SUGAR 10LBS. WESSON OIL 1 GAL 19.95 PER CASE $ 16.95 PER GAL. $5.95 PER BAG $ 10 .95 EA. RAMEN NOODLES GOLD MEDAL FLOUR 10LBS. RICELAND 50 LBS UNCLE BEN RICE 10 LBS 3.95 PER CAS E $6.95 PER BAG $30.95 PER BAG $ 14.95 SV BLEACH 1 GAL FABULOSO 28 OZ PUREX 50 OZ SUAVITEL 1 GAL $ 1 .95 EACH $1.95 EACH $2.95 EACH $ 8 .95 EACH FABULOSO 1 GAL FINA L TOUCH 64 OZ BOUNTY 8PK $ 7 .95 EACH $2.95 EACH $7 .95 GAIN 100 OZ CHARMIN 12DB SCOTT 12 ROLLS $ 11.95 $ 8.95 EACH $ 9.95 EACH CHARMIN 30DR VIVA 8 ROLLS BRAWNY 6 BIG ROLLS CHARMIN 30DR $ 19 .95 EACH $6.95 EACH $ 9 .95 EACH $19 .95 COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG FABULOSO 1 GAL FINA L TOUCH 64 OZ BOUNTY 8PK $ 7 .95 EACH $2.95 EACH $7 .95 GAIN 100 OZ CHARMIN 12DB SCOTT 12 ROLLS $ 11.95 $ 8.95 EACH $ 9.95 EACH CHARMIN 30DR VIVA 8 ROLLS BRAWNY 6 BIG ROLLS CHARMIN 30DR $ 19 .95 EACH $6.95 EACH $ 9 .95 EACH $19 .95 FABULOSO 1 GAL FINA L TOUCH 64 OZ BOUNTY 8PK $ 7 .95 EACH $2.95 EACH $7 .95 GAIN 100 OZ CHARMIN 12DB SCOTT 12 ROLLS $ 11.95 $ 8.95 EACH $ 9.95 EACH CHARMIN 30DR VIVA 8 ROLLS BRAWNY 6 BIG ROLLS CHARMIN 30DR $ 19 .95 EACH $6.95 EACH $ 9 .95 EACH $19 .95 FABULOSO 1 GAL FINA L TOUCH 64 OZ BOUNTY 8PK $ 7 .95 EACH $2.95 EACH $7 .95 GAIN 100 OZ CHARMIN 12DB SCOTT 12 ROLLS $ 11.95 $ 8.95 EACH $ 9.95 EACH CHARMIN 30DR VIVA 8 ROLLS BRAWNY 6 BIG ROLLS CHARMIN 30DR $ 19 .95 EACH $6.95 EACH $ 9 .95 EACH $19 .95 COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG NIAGARA WATER 24 CT @ 2/$10.00 EVERYDAY SUGAR 10 LBS. $5.95 PER BAG Saturday, A pril 26th Come by for Hors Doeuvres 8am 5pm 340-776-5322 Boulon Center, Cruz Bay HOTEL/VILLA SUPPLIES CLEANING SUPPLIES RESTAURANT SUPPLIES GROCERIES best prices on island!!!

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St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 15 GRAND OPENIN G!!! wholesale CARNATION HELLMANS MAYO E E VERYDY SUGAR 10LBS. WESSON OIL 1 GAL 19.95 PER CASE $ 16.95 PER GAL. $5.95 PER BAG $ 10 .95 EA. RAMEN NOODLES GOLD MEDAL FLOUR 10LBS. RICELAND 50 LBS UNCLE BEN RICE 10 LBS 3.95 PER CAS E $6.95 PER BAG $30.95 PER BAG $ 14.95 SV BLEACH 1 GAL FABULOSO 28 OZ PUREX 50 OZ SUAVITEL 1 GAL $ 1 .95 EACH $1.95 EACH $2.95 EACH $ 8 .95 EACH FABULOSO 1 GAL FINA L TOUCH 64 OZ BOUNTY 8PK $ 7 .95 EACH $2.95 EACH $7 .95 GAIN 100 OZ CHARMIN 12DB SCOTT 12 ROLLS $ 11.95 $ 8.95 EACH $ 9.95 EACH CHARMIN 30DR VIVA 8 ROLLS BRAWNY 6 BIG ROLLS CHARMIN 30DR $ 19 .95 EACH $6.95 EACH $ 9 .95 EACH $19 .95 COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG FABULOSO 1 GAL FINA L TOUCH 64 OZ BOUNTY 8PK $ 7 .95 EACH $2.95 EACH $7 .95 GAIN 100 OZ CHARMIN 12DB SCOTT 12 ROLLS $ 11.95 $ 8.95 EACH $ 9.95 EACH CHARMIN 30DR VIVA 8 ROLLS BRAWNY 6 BIG ROLLS CHARMIN 30DR $ 19 .95 EACH $6.95 EACH $ 9 .95 EACH $19 .95 FABULOSO 1 GAL FINA L TOUCH 64 OZ BOUNTY 8PK $ 7 .95 EACH $2.95 EACH $7 .95 GAIN 100 OZ CHARMIN 12DB SCOTT 12 ROLLS $ 11.95 $ 8.95 EACH $ 9.95 EACH CHARMIN 30DR VIVA 8 ROLLS BRAWNY 6 BIG ROLLS CHARMIN 30DR $ 19 .95 EACH $6.95 EACH $ 9 .95 EACH $19 .95 FABULOSO 1 GAL FINA L TOUCH 64 OZ BOUNTY 8PK $ 7 .95 EACH $2.95 EACH $7 .95 GAIN 100 OZ CHARMIN 12DB SCOTT 12 ROLLS $ 11.95 $ 8.95 EACH $ 9.95 EACH CHARMIN 30DR VIVA 8 ROLLS BRAWNY 6 BIG ROLLS CHARMIN 30DR $ 19 .95 EACH $6.95 EACH $ 9 .95 EACH $19 .95 COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG COOR LIGHT PRESIDENTE CORONA HEINEKEN $21.95 PER CASE $23.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE $28.95 PER CASE BUDWEISER BUD LIGHT GUINNESS $22.95 PER CASE $22.95 PER CASE $30.95 PER CASE LEG QUARTERS 40 LBS CHICKEN WINGS 40 LBS PARTY WINGS 10 LBS WHOLE CHICKEN $29.9 PER CASE $74.95 PER CASE $ 24.95 PER BAG $1.39/LBS $7.95 PER 10LB BAG NIAGARA WATER 24 CT @ 2/$10.00 EVERYDAY SUGAR 10 LBS. $5.95 PER BAG Saturday, A pril 26th Come by for Hors Doeuvres 8am 5pm 340-776-5322 Boulon Center, Cruz Bay HOTEL/VILLA SUPPLIES CLEANING SUPPLIES RESTAURANT SUPPLIES GROCERIES best prices on island!!!

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16 St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 Crossword Answers (Puzzle on Page 24) Letters To St. John TradewindsJudi Buckley, Member 30th Legislature of the U.S. Virgin Islands Dear Member Buckley, I hereby represent Parents Matter (an adhoc family support group) in the capacity of its Public Relacomed, represented and included. You are respectfully requested and expected to have this letter read into the shortly upcoming hearing whereat this measure (Bill #30-0136) will be discussed. It is my profound hope that it resonates with a perspective often in synch with ourselves, our children, and the teachers/support staffs of a System to whom we daily entrust them to. your bill to ban corporal punishment in the classroom is quite fascinating. While we have been listening and following the discussion, we cannot recall you or your committee soliciting mass testimony from this community via all social media that is to say testimony well as the students under their watch. (From the discussions, we too often leave out the ones most discussed.) Not everyone has access to computers, and not enough people with such access make public what they the only voice you consider. Parents really DO matter! (As a matter of fact, too often school-related decisions are made without the foreknowledge, consent or consensus of us, their parents. While all of those decisions are life-impacting but are not always life-threatening or detrimental, the fact is some are. Apparently there is a difference of opinion amongst parents/guardians and school administrations on whom or what determines what parents/guardians should be apprised of prior to implementation. When decisions can be life-threatening or detrimental, we believe the Board of Education and/or our Legislature philosophies of most [Caribbean] parents and guardians.) While we need to take more time to digest your bill, in the meantime we directly ask of you the folor removes it altogether? Does is counteract corporal punishment? Why is it not applicable to preschoolers, the root start of the bills population? Why not to college students? Could not the same offending teacher one day become a professor? Do you think that his or Parents Matter Group Responds T o Bill Regarding Ban on Corporal Punishment in Schools Continued on Page 18 Medicare, O, Medicare Your decisions I must confess Certainly do cause me A high level of distress. It certainly came as news To both me and surely to you When Medicare refused to pay A claim for care that was due. No, No, said Medicare To my Virgin Islands claim. Youre a foreign country. Thank you just the same. We dont pay in foreign countries, Wrote someone less traveled than me Who perhaps had never heard of paradise, And assumed it was Africa or the South Sea. Here is a suggestion when you hire A new test should be done On high school geography The results might shock or be fun. So Medicare, when a claim comes in From Virgin Islands folks Please remember were a U.S. territory We just dont have the votes. Muse of Reef BayOde T o Medicare It seems like were living in a confused world. Folks are unsure about who to love, who to vote for, which church or social group to attend, which job is right and so on. At a time when decisions need past history and emotions are clouding our judgment. We dont want to make the same mistakes, yet were uncertain about peoples true intentions. Many times a persons words and behavior dont match up and tage. We feel used, dejected and discouraged. To be totally honest, some folks hide who they are and some are as plain as day. So therefore, we have to accept the facts about a situation and deal with the results whether its ter, unplanned pregnancy or false friends. The lesson is, we have to change our perspective on the important issues. We may have been brought up in a certain church, political party, family, group of friends or even business. But if it isnt meeting your needs and encouraging you to grow, it may be time to let go. Living on a small island means that everyone will know your business whether true or false. And they will challenge you on it, even if what youre doing is right. Thats because most folks dont want to bring undue attention to themselves. So they suffer through mediocrity and so-called normalcy. Having given up on higher standards, they have lost the incentive to make a difference amidst naysayers. The folks that doubt have no vision and those who believe have little power. So we are stuck in a cycle of meaningless rituals. We vote because its time, attend church because its Sunday, work because its a job, live together because were attracted. Life without true convictions leads us to become drones, piloted by unknown forces. Each one must make a personal journey of selfdiscovery. What am I here for? What do I truly believe? What are my talents that can be better used to better society? We are standing on the edge of a renaissance era or a continual destruction of our community. There are so many great artists, musicians, poets, dancers, speakers and leaders amongst us, who are hidden beneath layers of doubt and fear. our true potentials, life will consume us thru war and poverty. Non-denominational churches are gaining in popularity because they are charting a course of new discovery. Eliminating the monotony of tradition in favor of meeting peoples needs head on. This has proven to be effective as folks today are hurting spiritually, per sonally and professionally. Whatever you intend to do, consider deleting old programming and initiating a new operating system. Only then can results change. Cleaner future, Emmanuel PrinceInitiate New Operating System

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St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 17 SEND LETTERS, GUEST OPINIONS & OBITUARIES: editor@tradewinds.vi Letters To St. John TradewindsI found myself at a reparations forum held at Kingston College, Jamaica, on the 15th of April. I must say that my hopes of hearing better arguments in support of reparations were not realized. However, calling for reparations use half-truths and emotion ally over-charged and baseless arguments. The main speaker, Professor Hilary Beckles presented several arguments that could never survive in any reasonable court. The professors claim that Jamaica experienced genocide during slavery based on the 1.2 million persons who were sent here as slaves against the 300,000 persons who were here in 1884 is a good example. What the professor forgot to mention was that that 1.2 million includes those Africans who were shipped here through out the entire slave period, many decades before. Most of them would not have been alive in 1834 even if they have lived to a hundred. By 1834, most would have already died on account of old age alone. That 300,000 is a good representation of the number that would have been here even if there was no slavery. The professor noted that the Durham conference said that slavery should have been a crime. Of course, we in the 20th and 21st centuries can say anything. The notion of slavery being a crime is perhaps the greatest example of how slavery has been taken out of its correct historical context. The truth is that the average person in the 19th century and the centuries before saw slavery as normal. I must mention that by average person, I also mean our black ancestors. The Jewish holocaust also came up. Any attempt to compare this with slavery is invalid for several reasons. Anti-Semitism was normal in Europe during and before the holocaust. So when Hitler was march ing the Jews off to the camps supposedly to work as far as the average German knew, but actually for extermination, most Germans didnt give the worthless Jews a second thought. Hitler was fully aware that what he was doing to the Jews was wrong. That was why he likened British reports of it as lies designed to discredit the Nazi regime. Hitler was clearly embarrassed by the holocaust, thats why he ordered the anti-Semitic posters all over Germany to be removed during the 1936 Olympics. Notice that the extermination facilities were placed deep in the woods? Indeed, had the average German knew what was really going on, Hitler would not have lasted and he knew it. Slavery was very different. Our ancestors in Africa openly and proudly exported Africans to the West, and as we all know, the Europeans had no moral qualms in buying them. The professor noted that the British claim that slavery was important to them is a good argument that can be used to condemn them. However, the African governments that were exporting slaves made the same claim. Indeed, when Britain began her naval blockade to halt the trade, African governments sent delegations to Britain, urging a lifting of the blockade so that their economies can be saved. The maroons in Jamaica signed that treaty that obligated them to help preserve the slave system on account of their need to survive. If it is right for the Africans and the Maroons to see the need for slavery to survive, why isnt it right for the British too? Then the professor noted that the reason why the British are being pressed more than any one else for slavery is because they got the most out of it. But why should we damn the British because they were good at what they did? Also, they werent the only ones to of the most powerful kingdoms in Africa. Theirs was an economy that was almost entirely based on the export of slaves. Why arent they being damned too? This argument is like saying that the only time a would-be bank robber is to be prosecuted is if he was successful in getting any money. If he broke into the bank but didnt get anything then he should not be charged! Total nonsense! As for repatriation, that plan is totally impractical it cannot happen. However, it would be interesting if the leaders of those calling for repatriation would lead by example and go back to Africa on their own, as many of them have the means to do so. Alas, I am sure most really would not want to go and for obvious reasons. One last point the issue of the Zong came up. Over 140 slaves were thrown overboard to enable the slavers to collect on the insurance money. Accounts like these were used by the professor to whip up emotions against European involvement in slavery. However, its a pity the professor didnt tell the forum about the millions of Africans who were killed in Africa, by Africans when they were being sent to the slave ships. Did you know, for instance, that when the Africans were preparing slaves to be placed on ships, the excess slaves who could not be carried were not freed but beheaded by their African captors? I am certain that when those of us who are demanding reparations go to Europe to plead the case; they will be seen as a laughing stock. I have no doubt that the Europeans will run rings around these weak arguments. It is certain the Europeans have no reason whatsoever to pay us anything. Michael A. Dingwall Kingston, JamaicaReparations Arguments T oo Weak and One-Sided

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18 St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 ORIGINAL LISTING COURTESY OF RICH GREENGOLD The live music scene on St. John is bigger and better than ever! supporting weekly live music for the season, there are days of the week with over 10 gigs. music this good in their stateside cities. All postings are regular weekly events booked eyes and ears open for annoucements of other gigs featuring a variety of visiting bands. Cut out, save, laminate and post in your homes, cars and rentals. SUNDAYS 10a-1p Concordia Bo Guitar 3:30-6:30 Aqua Bistro Lauren Guitar Vocal 4-7 High Tide Lemuel Callwood Steel Pan 5:30-9:30 Asolare David Laabs Classical Guitar 5:30 8:30 Sun Dog Cafe Various Open Mike 7-10 Shipwreck Landing Hot Club Coral Bay String Swing Vocals MONDAYS 4:30-7 Concordia Lauren Johnny B Open Mike 5:30-8:30 Aqua Bistro Matt Guitar Vocal 6:30-9:30 Ocean Grill Rascio Steel Pan TUESDAYS 6-9 Ocean Grill Lauren Guitar Vocal 6-9 High Tide Chris Carsel Guitar Vocal 6:30-9:30 Barefoot Cowboy Erin Hart Guitar Vocal 6:30-9 Tamarind Inn Steel Pan Tropical WEDNESDAYS 4-6 High Tide Lemuel Callwood Steel Pan 5:30-7 Coconut Coast Studio St John Flutes Classical Duets 5:30-8:30 Virgin Fire Hot Club Coral Bay String Swing Vocals 6-9 Pickles Micheal Beason Open Mike 6:30-9:30 Barefoot Cowboy Ike Guitar Vocal 6:30-8:30 Ocean Grill David Laabs Classical Guitar 7-10 Shipwreck Landing Chris Carsel Guitar Vocal THURSDAYS 4:30-6:30 Concordia Wayne & Pam Guitar Vocals 5-8 High Tide Erin Hart Guitar Vocal 6-9 Skinny Legs Lauren & Bo Guitars Vocal 6-8 Pickles T Bird Guitar Vocal 6-9 Ocean Grill Chris Carsel Guitar Vocal 6:30-9:30 Barefoot Cowboy Ike Guitar Vocal 6:30-9:30 Tamarind Inn Brothers Nature Rock 7-9 Banana Deck Lemuel Callwood Steel Pan 8-11 Beach Bar 3rd String Allstars Rock FRIDAYS 5-8 High Tide Mikey P Guitar Vocal 5:30-8:30 Aqua Bistro Steven Sloan Guitar Vocal 6-9 Balcony James Guitar Vocal 6-9 Skinny Legs Chris Carsel Guitar Vocal 6:30-9:30 Ocean Grill Rascio Steel Pan 6:30-8:30 Cinnamon Bay Eddie Bruce Drumming 7-9 Barefoot Cowboy T Bird Guitar Vocal 7-10 Rhumb Lines Erin Hart Guitar Vocal 8-11 Beach Bar Flipswitch Rock SATURDAYS 5-8 High Tide Jason Jones Guitar Vocal 6-9 Ocean Grill T Bird Guitar Vocal 6:30-9:30 Skinny Legs Hot Club Coral Bay String Swing Vocals 7-10 Rhumb Lines Lauren Guitar Vocal To be added to this live music schedule, the event must be a regularly scheduled event (sorry, no temporary performances), email info@tradewinds.vi with: day, time, location, performer and style. NO PHONE CALLS.her habit of practicing or applying corporal punishment stops at the lower level? What does your bill offer as a replacement behavior, should lawful corporal punishment be removed and our children/students act out of sorts? Are there enough on-site monitors and in-school procedures to curb the reasonably perceived outcome? Did you elicit the positions of the local AFT (American Federation of Teachers) or the U.S.V.I. PTSA (Parent Teacher Student Association)? At least two entity you do: the Legislature of the Virgin Islands. From where did you get the bulk of your research? How can this measure of great implication just pass from committee to session? It is our position that these quick sets are what causes the belly-up of many meahold that no laws should be made which only favor one sect of a same group within one jurisdiction. Your bill lends to penalizing some teachers rather than all teachers; that feature breathes both contempt and discrimination. To that end, we concur with the recent position of your colleagues Kenneth Gittens and Janette Millin-Young who both made public that the bill is unbalanced and there is no reason for this measure to have bypassed the Committee on Rules. From our current vantage point, it is the broad consensus of this community that cor 17 87 and 130understood as any form of contact or non-contact / physical or emotional punishment NOT to the extreme of beating, spanking, or abuse) is acceptable in our schools. If it is removed, it cannot be so done because it exempts application to preschools, private and parochial, and college. It speaks exclusively to children in the V.I. public school system. Although many groups may not wish to make their position public, point blank we believe that the [unbalanced] ban of corporal punishment will only result in fur ther waywardness of children who choose to be obstinate! Thus, the practice must remain the teachers psychological training to deal with testy children. As we are the ultimate sect to bear the backlash when all else fails, we believe our position should be one of the most heavily considered, if not the most. While we remain at odds as to where we individually stand on our personal conhit our children, and some of us have even voiced permission or no permission to teachers to hit/spank/beat our own children, we plication of the measure. Why such a limited application, rather than in all schools across this territory? Was that posture legally veting? Is crime not crime? Are we then saying that your bill needs amending, including but not limited to, application to all levels of education (primary, secondary, and post-secondary) as the ofadults? Not necessarily. It can be a good bill if it spoke to all teacherstudent relations; but it will be a poor bill if it yields more disreAs such, we desire your across-the-board strengthening of all domestic violence deterrents, noting that domestic no longer denotes solely altercations which take place in a residence or usual place of abode, but it has now spread to distinguish any region or community within borders, i.e. foreign or domestic. Lastly, we would be remiss if I end this communication without gratitude for any attempt you have laid to create a more sound community. We believe you have shown some degree of concern for the many negative pressures our children face, both in and out of school. However, we do not believe your current bill will have any positive impact in addressing them. As we stated earlier, some students have found themselves having to physically defend themselves from even adult bullies in the guise of school ofSystem! It is just their daily reality. Ask the students; they will tell you. We would be remiss if we failed to make mention of at least two greater and somewhat related ills this currently ad-hoc organization of all parental concerns face. We wish to see legislation properly vetted and passed, to address with harsher penalty, the following measures: (1.) health risk violation of our children who are subjected to eating third and fourth rate foods in their abused federally-subsidized National School Lunch Program, all without the foreknowledge, consent or consensus of their parents; and (2.) the rampant breaking of the law against under aged sex, and alcohol consumption. In closing, while we want our children to remain children: that is to be kept in the line of discipline without being given the adults crossing that line. Your bill does not offer both prongs. Together as adults, WE the however (and with all due respect), your the line for and by themselves; and (respectappreciate your attempt to curb evident ills in our schools, we politely dissent from you and some of your colleagues; and we concur with other school-related stakeholders (i.e. the AFT Locals) that any passage of this Bill will simply take our already-fragile community further in the wrong direction. Sincerely, Harriet Mercer, P.R.O., P.M.Corporal PunishmentContinued from Page 16

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St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 19 St. John Tradewinds West Indian Locust pods (stinking toes), left, CSA plate with oranges, soursop, tomatoes, tamarinds and sorrel, above.St. John Tradewinds This winter my husband and I were excited to be able to get a weekly delivery of organic fruits and vegetables from the Ridge to Reef Farm in St Croix. www.ridge2reef.org. Every Thursday we go to the Gifft Hill School Upper Campus and pick up our share of the farms output that week we signed up for one box of vegetables and another one of fruit. When we enrolled, we signed a statement that we understood some of the items would be unfamiliar and that we would be willing to be adventurous (assisted by the information and recipes provided in the farms weekly newsletter). There have been many familiar foods including delicious tomatoes, lettuce, beans, scallions, kale, bok choy, okra, radishes and eggplants, as well as tons of green bananas and oranges in the fruit box. sop and stinking toes (otherwise known as the pods from the West Indian Locust tree). Soursops have now become our favorite fruit incredibly delicious, though they look a bit intimidating. When I offered one to a friend he wondered if it was an iguana butt because of its green spiny skin. Ha, ha. you can pull off the skin and eat the creamy, sweet and tart white tufts of and some people claim it can cure cancer. We have carefully saved the seeds and begun planting them around our yard, hoping to have our own tree one day. Another tasty surprise was the fruit called black sapote. It was round and green and hard when I saw it in the bag, with a little cap on top. It looked like it might be a weird tomato so I left it out on the table at room temperature. After a few days I picked it up and thought it must be rotten because it was really squishy. But the farm newsletter said it was supposed to get very soft and then would taste like chocolate pudding. Amazing but it turned out to be true. The least food-like things we tried were the stinking toe pods. I had seen them around, most often when the hard, woody outside had been carved to make a necklace. My friend said he had one of the trees and the pods fell loudly on his roof, but it had never occurred to him to try to eat them. They certainly did smell like dirty socks, especially after we smashed the pods with a hammer and exposed the dry, powdery, feathery stuff inside. It was slightly sweet, but didnt have a good mouth feel and stuck to our teeth. My Jamaican friend said we should soak it in water and mix in sugar and cinnamon to make a tasty drink. Supposedly it is good for your nerves. we are healthier, and living more sustainably. We are also becoming even ones that are not commercially available. Years ago, after a bad experi ence with an overripe papaya, one of our sons refused to eat any of the fruits growing in our yard. He wanted real food from the store. Now he wants his own garden. With some luck our grandchildren will be able to pick soursops and other fruits off trees that grow from the seeds we are planting this spring. Gail Karlsson is an environmental lawyer and part-time resident of St. John. Her book The Wild Life in an Island House is available on amazon.com or view some of her other writing at gvkarlsson.blogspot. com. Connecting with Natureby Gail KarlssonSoursop & Stinking T oes

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ing dissolved and reset at the beginning of each year. Setting up net metering through WAPA and applying with the Department of Planning and Natural Resources for a permit to install solar panels the thought of which might be enough to deter some residents from going the solar route is handled entirely by Caribbean Solar Company, ensuring a relatively painless process for customers. Were the agent for the customer throughout the entire process, said Schnell. We make it really easy for everyone to navigate through. We dont have the customer do any of the grunt work. Once the system is in place, thoughts then turn to maintaining the solar panels. Caribbean Solar Company customers dont have to think twice about keeping their system up and running thanks to a three-year workmanship warranty which ensures the solar panels are working correctly, and most importantly, that the customers net metering account with WAPA is working correctly. Thanks to its notoriously high power rates and abundance of sunshine, the Virgin Islands is the per fect place to make the switch to solar. A lot of people here refer to their WAPA payment as a second mortgage, said Schnell. What were doing is essentially reducing or eliminating your power bill while making an impact on our dependency on fossil fuels. Its not only great for the homeowner to reduce costs, but its good for the environment as well. To learn more about Caribbean Solar Company, visit www.caribbeansolarcompany.com. 20 St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 St. John Tradewinds welcomes notices of community-orient 776-6496, e-mail editor@tradewinds.vi or fax 693-8885. Thursday, April 24 The next Green Thursdays seminar, entitled St. John in Layers: Maps of Paradise An Aerial Tour of St. John will be on Thursday, April 24, at 5:30 p.m. at Gifft Hill Schools upper campus atrium. Friday, April 25 The 2014 Earth Day Environmental Fair is scheduled for Friday, April 25. The fair will at the National Park Ball Field in Cruz Bay from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The St. Thomas/St. John District Board of Elections will meet Friday, April 25, at 11 of the Elections System, #9200 Lockhart Gardens Shopping Center. Sunday, April 27 Join Nana Hendricks at Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Service, on Sunday, April 27, at 10 a.m. at Gifft Hill School Lower Campus, for the topic: Journey of the Soul. For more information go to: www. uufstjohn.com. Monday, April 28 The Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities is sponsoring the 7th Annual Autism Conference from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Monday, April 28, on St. Thomas at the University of the Virgin Islands at the Administrative and Conference. Featured presenters Dr. Ann Cox and Dr. Somer Bishop will provide informa tion on autism spectrum disorders. For more information, call 340-776-9200 ext 2334. T uesday, May 6 The Virgin Islands Territorial Emergency Management Agency (VITEMA) will host a series of Town Hall meetings territorywide to present new information on the Agencys tsunami preparedness efforts and to dialogue with residents about to being ready for this meeting will be on St. John on Tuesday, May 6, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Julius E. Sprauve School. Saturday, May 10 The Animal Care Center of St. John will have its annual spring fundraiser Wagapalooza on Saturday, May 10, from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Winston Wells Ball Field in Cruz Bay. Saturday, May 17 The University of the Virgin Islands will host its 2014 Commencement Ceremonies at 7 p.m. on Saturday, May 17, in the Sports and Fitness Center on the St. Thomas CampusTradewinds News Photo Courtesy of Carbbean Solar Company Schnell and Maya Matthews-Sterling. ALCHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS All meetings are now open. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday 6 p.m. Nazareth Lutheran Church, Cruz Bay; Thursday 7 a.m. Nazareth Lutheran Church, Cruz Bay; Sunday 9:45 a.m., Hawksnest Bay Beach; Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday 6 p.m. at Moravian Church, Coral Bay NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS Narcotics Anonymous has open meetings from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. every Saturday at St. Ursulas Church. AL-ANON MEETINGS For Al-Anon meeting location and times, please call (340) 642-3263 Solar Energy Becoming More Affordable Than EverContinued from Page 7 Tradewinds News Photo Courtesy of Carbbean Solar CompanyA porch roof is covered with solar panels at Vida de Mar, above left. Workers start the installation of solar panels on the rooftop of Half Moon House in Reef Bay, above right. Solar panels were installed on the roof of the car port at Amarillo Villa, below.Solar Energy Becoming More Afford-

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St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 21 St. Thomas: April 28, 2014 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. University of the Virgin Islands Administration & Conference Ctr. St. Croix: April 30, 2014 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. University of the Virgin Islands North West Wing Great Hall University of the Virgin Islands The Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) and the Virgin Islands Autism Network (VIAN) 7th Annual Autism Conference Somer Bishop, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College and a Clinical Psychologist at the Center for Autism and the Developing Brain Ann W. Cox, Ph.D., Scientist at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina and Co Principal Investigator/Director of the National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders REGISTER ON LINE AT: http://events.viucedd.org For more info call: 340 -693 1173 or 340 -776 -9200 ext. 2334 (STT) 340 -692 -4266 (STX) VITEMA Tsunami Awareness Town Hall Meetings Scheduled TerritorywideFirst meeting to be on St. John Tuesday, May 6St. John Tradewinds The Virgin Islands Territorial Emergency Management Agency (VITEMA) will host a series of Town Hall meetings territorywide to present new information on the Agencys tsunami preparedness efforts and to dialogue with residents about to being ready for this rare but deadly event. May 6, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Julius E. Sprauve School. Topics will include Tsunami Hazard, Tsunami Warning, Evacuation Maps, Evacuation Routes and Signs and Assembly Points. VITEMA has made major strides in tsunami readiness with the placement of more than 100 tsunami hazard zone and evacuation signs along coastline areas, the installation of an outdoor siren warning lands Tsunami Evacuation Maps, said Elton Lewis, VITEMA Director. Our main objective now is public outreach to ensure everyone has the information they need to be ready in the event of a tsunami especial ly those who live and work in a coastal community. VITEMA will also hold town hall meetings at Frenchtown and Red Hook on St. Thomas and at downtown Frederiksted and Gallows Bay during the months of June and July. The dates and venues for those meetings will be announced in upcoming weeks. Presenters at the St. John town meeting include Roy Watlington, a St. Thomas native and scientist, who retired from the University of the Virgin Islands after serving 27 years as a tenured professor of physics. Watlington is co-author of Disaster and Disruption in 1867; Hurricane, Earthquake and Tsunami in the Danish West Indies. In 1997, he convened a meet ing of global tsunami experts who, over the years, has advanced tsunami hazard awareness in the Caribbean region. Also presenting are: Irvin Mason, VITEMA Traininstructor, and Joseph Hodge, VITEMA Emergency Operations Center Manager for St. Thomas. We encourage everyone to come out and bring their family and friends, Lewis said. The informa tion being provided is vital and may one day save a life. For more information about the St. John Tsunami Awareness town meeting call Linda Williams, St. John Emergency Operations Center Manager, at 340776-2244 or e-mail linda.williams@vitema.vi.gov. St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Tom Oat will be pleased that there will no longer be the continuous threat of a sewage system failure in the middle of carnival village. The Sweet Smell of Success?

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ment of Public Works, which has reported in previous years that St. John ridership gives public bus service the greatest support. However for the past several months Vitran discontinued weekend service. Meeting participants said the lack of service has left riders, including elderly churchgoers, stranded. If the buses had more ridership Vitran would have money, said resident Joan Wilson. Coldren told the group that when she inquired with Public Works about the weekend bus service she was told that when lawmakers passed a bill letting residents over 60 ride Vitran for free, Vitran could no longer afford the gasoline to keep the buses running all week. included Senators Roach, Jackson and Cole; a representative of Senate President Shawn-Michael Malone, and Senatorial candidate Justin Harrigan.22 St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 Bahai Community of St. John For Devotions and Study Circles, call 714-1641 7:30 p.m. Fridays; Study Circles 9 a.m. Sundays 776-6316, 776-6254 Bethany Moravian Church Sunday School 9 a.m., Divine Worship 10 a.m. Calvary Baptist Church 13 ABC Coral Bay, 776-6304 Sunday School 10 a.m., Sunday evening 6 p.m., Thursday 7 p.m. Christian Ministry Cinnamon Bay Beach Inter-Denominational, Sunday 8:30 a.m. Christian Science Society 10:45 a.m. SundayMarketplace Wednesday Testimonials 7:45 p.m. on last Wed. of Month Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Sun. 9 a.m., on St. Thomas 776-2379 Sun., 5 p.m., STJ, Lumberyard Cruz Bay Baptist Church Sunday 11 a.m., 6 p.m. 776-6315 Emmaus Moravian Church Coral Bay, Divine Worship 8:30 a.m., 776-6713 Freshwater Church Sunday Service 10 a.m; Monday Bible Study 6:30 p.m. Thursday Womens Bible Study 9 a.m. Saturday Mens Bible Study 10 a.m. Follow us on Facebook for Locations or call (340) 514-6578 Jehovahs Witness 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays; 7 p.m. Saturdays (Espaol), 10 a.m. Sundays, 340-715-053 Missionary Baptist Church 9:30 a.m. Sunday Services, 10:45 Worship, Tuesday 7 p.m. Bible Study 693-8884 Nazareth Lutheran Church Sunday 9 a.m., Sunday School 8 a.m. 776-6731 Our Lady of Mount Carmel Catholic Church The schedule is as follows: Saturdays at 6 p.m. Sundays at 7:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays at 7 a.m. Fridays at 7 p.m. Call 776-6339 for more information. St. John Methodist Church Sunday 10 a.m, 693-8830 Seventh Day Adventist Saturdays, 779-4477 St. John Pentecostal Church Sunday 11:05 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays Prayer 7:30 p.m., Thursdays Bible Study 7:30 p.m. 779-1230 St. Ursulas Episcopal Church Sunday Church Service, 9 a.m. Bible Class on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. 777-6306 Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 9:45 a.m. Sunday, 776-6332 Church Directory Education, Transportation Top Topics at Town MeetingContinued from Page 5 St. John Tradewinds News Photo by Tom Oat to Congress Donna Christensen, right, and JFLI Founder Alvis Christian, center.We need more people like this, Monteiro told the audience in praise of JFLIs Christian, convinc ing young people they have a purpose. Christian thanked former Senator at Large Almando Liburd and former island administrator Julien Harley for helping get the abandoned Horace Mann school as a home for JFLI. Christian also thanked the community for its support of JFLI. Christian and his son, Alvis Christian Jr., the director of the JFLI summer program, also spoke about future plans for the institutes students, including a planned 2017 trip to Ghana, Africa, to learn about the roots of island culture. I have to take these kids to Ghana, Alvis said. I have to expose these kids to their history. JFLI board member Pam Love sang a musical interlude accompanied by JFLI campers and four mem bers of the Calvary Baptists Church Choir made their annual appearance led by Joan Thomas to present a musical well-received selection. With the rain stopped, the crowd poured out of the institute after the program to enjoy a luncheon complete with a giant birthdaycake for JFLI.JFLI Celebrates Serving Neighborhood YouthContinued from Page 6

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St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 23 All crime has a cost that is ultimately paid by law-abiding citizens through higher prices and taxes. Reducing that cost puts money back in our pockets. If you know something, say something, as law enforcement cannot control crime without your help. Make sure no crime goes unsolved. Even the smallest bit of information may be just what is needed to solve these cases. St. John On March 5th police received a report that a home was burglarized at 1KE Estate Bethany. The home had been locked and secured by the residents that day at about 10:00 a.m., and when they returned at 3:00 p.m. they discovered that the home had been broken into. Several pieces of 14k gold and diamond jewelry were stolen, including ear rings, a cuff bracelet and a necklace. Please help police solve this crime by telling us what you may know. St. Thomas On Sunday, April 6th a man stated that at 4:30 pm he was walking in the Hospital Ground area heading home when he heard several gunshots. He ran and later realized that he had been shot in the lower body but was unable to provide information about the shooter. If you were in the area at that time and know anything about this crime, please call us. Step up. Be part of the solution. Continue to help make our islands a safer place to live and visit by telling us what you know about these or any other crimes at www.CrimeStoppersUSVI. org or by calling 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). You can also text USVI plus your message to CRIMES (274637). All three methods will keep you anonymous.Crime Stoppers U.S. Virgin IslandsBy T om Oat St. John Tradewinds At 5:30 on Saturday afternoon April 5, a typiwalks and the corners of the intersection at First Bank and Connections as early diners at restauof the four contiguous bars and restaurants. A steady stream crossed from Woodys Seafood Salon to The Other Side bleachers at The Quiet Mon Pub overlooking the busy street scene. VIPD cruiser already were perturbed after being section while a taxi heading in the opposite direction dropped off passengers at Woodys. When Solution Is Part of Problem cuss driving rules with the taxi driver, but decided cruiser. After it turned the corner, however, the cruiser immediately rolled to a stop in the middle of the street and the driver called to one apparently sunsoaked tourist leaning against one of the stately trees beside Connections. The bystander looked to be in his early 20s red face from too much sun, beer, rum or all three, with close cropped hair and wearing t-shirt and shorts was holding a can of beer and talking with some young island men. young man as he got out of the cruiser. I want to talk to you. Show me some ID The young man came over to the cruiser, put his back pack down and set his beer can carefully on the side of the road. and checked the pockets of his baggy shorts while they stood in the road at the side of the cruiser, cargo area of the cruiser and told him to get in the back seat for a ride around the block to the station. What About My Beer? The young man cooperated, but not before he asked permission to take his beer with him ter a slight hesitation. (By some interpretations, it is legal to drink and drive in the U.S. Virgin Islands.) The young man cooperatively picked up his beer and climbed into the back seat of the cruiser Meanwhile, the regular roadside troubadour across the intersection in the chained-off Cruz Bay Realty corner parking space had closed up his guitar case and quietly disappeared along with his entourage/audience of sun-burned workers and vacationers. There was no police report of an arrest in connection with the mans trip in the police cruiser, but at least the young man didnt have to waste his beer as a result of the encounter. Now everyone will want to take one for the road when climbing into a St. John VIPD cruiser. St. John Tradewinds Lieutenant Governor Gregory R. Francis is reminding Virgin Islands property owners who have not previously applied for property tax credits 2013 and 2014 property tax bills. Property owners of record can apply for the tax credits until May 15, 2014. Applications for the tax credits can be found online at www.ltg.gov.vi. In order to be eligible for homestead credits against the 2013 and 2014 property tax bills, a person must be the property owner of record as of January 1 for the applicable tax year. Property owners may not apply for more than two credits homestead and any one of the other catego ries for which they may be eligible. Tax credits are available in the following categories: 1. General Homestead: Property owners who occupied the home as their primary residence as of January 1 of the applicable tax year are eligible. Applicants must show proof of residency by providing a valid United States Virgin Islands drivers license or voter registration card. Applicants are also asked to show proof of occupancy by providing a current utility bill. Maximum tax credit: $400.00 2. Veterans: Property owners must meet occupancy requirements and have been honorably discharged from the U.S. Armed Services. Applition to a valid USVI drivers license or voter registration card. Maximum tax credit: $650.00 3. Seniors: Property owners must meet occupancy requirements Applicants are also eligible to claim this credit for properties held by tenants in the entireties, if either spouse is 60 years or older on January 1 of the applicable tax year. The credit is available only when individual Annual Gross Income (AGI) is less than $30,000 and household AGI does not exceed $50,000. Applicants are asked to provide a stamped copy of their 2012 or 2013 tax return and proof of age at time of application. Maximum Tax Credit: $500.00 4. Disabled: Applicants must meet occupancy requirements and be suffering from a disability as determined by the Social Security Administration as of January 1 of the applicable tax year. Applicants are reas a stamped copy of their 2012 or 2013 tax return to verify they meet the income requirement. Maximum Tax Credit: $500.00 5. Class 1 Inheritance: Applicants must be owners of unimproved property of 5.0 acres or less. The property owner must have acquired the property through inheritance. Tax Credit: Credit equal to 80% of the real property taxes levied until $5,000 or more of improvements are made on said property. 6. Visitable Home: Available to property owners who hold a Cer Resources, pursuant to Act 7320. Maximum Tax Credit: Credit equal to 20% of the taxes levied by the Tax Assessor. 7. Tax Credit Circuit Breaker: Will be available to property owners whose property tax bills increased by 125% or more and whose household gross income is less than $135,000. Maximum Tax Credit: Credit equal to 40% of the real property tax increase for homestead and unimproved property. Tax credit not to exceed $5,000.00. Tax credits are also available for Virgin Islands farmers, who are reProperty owners who may be eligible for these tax credits are encour tact the (340) 776-8505 in St. Thomas, 776-6737 on St. John, 773-6459 Property Tax Credits Available for 2013/14 BillsWheres the Police Log?Rousting Saturday Afternoon Street Corner Partier, Police Allow Him One for the Road

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24 St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 AccommodationsCaribbean Villas & Resorts tel. 1-800-338-0987 or locally 340-776-6152 Island Getaways 888-693-7676, islandgetawaysinc.com kathy@islandgetawaysinc.com Suite St. John Villas/Condos tel. 1-800-348-8444 or locally at 340-779-4486ArchitectureCrane, Robert Architect, AIA tel. 776-6356 P.O. Box 370, STJ, VI 00831Art GalleriesBajo el Sol Gallery Located in Mongoose Junction tel. 340-693-7070 Kimberly Boulon Fine Art Gallery Located at The Marketplace 340-693-8524BankingFirstbank Located in downtown Cruz Bay 340-776-6881FurnitureCarlos Furniture 340-693-0016 Located at Tutu Park Mall on STT Free delivery and setup to St. JohnGreen BuildingIsland Green Building Association check www.igbavi.org for Seminar Series info and ReSource Depot inventoryInsurancePGU Insuracne Located at The Marketplace 776-6403; pgunow@gmail.com Theodore Tunick & Company Phone 775-7001 / Fax 775-7002 www.theodoretunick.comJewelryR&I PATTON goldsmithing Located in Mongoose Junction 776-6548 or (800) 626-3445 Chat@pattongold.com LandscapingAlfredos Landscaping tel. 774-1655 cell 513-2971 P.O. Box 91, St. John, VI 00831 Coral Bay Garden Center tel. 693-5579 fax 714-5628 P.O. Box 1228, STJ, VI 00831Real Estate340 Real Estate Company, LLC 340-643-6068 or 340-779-4478 340realestateco@gmail.com www.340realestateco.com Debbie Hayes, GRI tel. 714-5808 or 340-642-5995 debbiehayes@debbiehayes.com www.stjohnvirealestate.com Holiday Homes of St. John tel. 776-6776 fax 693-8665 P.O. Box 40, STJ, VI 00831 info@holidayhomesVI.com Islandia Real Estate tel. 776-6666 fax 693-8499 P.O. Box 56, STJ, VI 00831 info@islandiarealestate.comRestaurantsFish Trap Restaurant and Seafood Market tel. 693-9994, Closed Mondays La Tapa Restaurant tel. 693-7755 Open 7 Days a Week Ocean 362 American Contemporary Cuisine For reservations, call 340-776-0001 Skinny Legs A Pretty OK Place tel. 340-779-4982 www.skinnylegs.comServicesC4th Custom Embroidery tel. 779-4047 Located in Coral Bay Island Solar "Off the Grid Living for 10 Years" tel. 340-642-0531Wedding ServicesWeddings by Katilday www.stjohnweddingplanner.com 340-693-8500 Consulting, Travel Coordination, Accommodations St. John TradewindsBusiness Directory TA-DA!ACROSS 9 Black Sea port 21 Dorm-mate, e.g. 22 Yam, for one 23 Pulling a plug while at work? sequence 28 Part of NYC 31 Rough amt. 32 Cat covering 34 Water balloon battles? 42 Waikiki neckwear 66 Part of a full house 69 Symphony writer Mahler 76 Entice 78 Letter after sigma 79 Legitimate a suitor? 88 Water, in Paris statues shopping? tippling? 112 Maple syrup source 114 Fashionable 116 Conger, e.g. 118 Utter impulsively 121 Twenty cents in change? 127 Straight arrow its natives Mary Lou 133 Light hits 134 Playwright William DOWN 2 More than forgetfulness 4 Nagging pain 8 Entre go-with 11 Just about forever 12 Singer Kate 13 Vigorous strength 16 Crucial artery 17 Sunny? 18 Elegance become pres. 33 New Jersey river 36 Bottom-line 61 Mil. rank 62 Movie format 63 Dress up in 67 Q followers 74 Ones getting wages 77 Snaring 84 Beach lotion abbr. 93 Pale-looking 96 Taproom 99 Linking up 126 By birth

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St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 25 Commercial Space Available COMMERCIAL SPACE AVAILABLE Prime street level retail location, FIRST MONTH FREE with one year lease For more information: or AndyNick at (340) 771-3737 / Andy at (340) 690-1260 For Rent *3 ACRES* Adjacent to National Park, Gentle grade, easy build. Convenient beach access. Call Peter at John Foster Real Estate 340-513-1850 Located at Battery Hill, only a short walk away from Cruz Bay. This 2bd/2ba Harbor View condo has breathtaking views and cool breezes. $475,000. Peter @340-513-1850 John Foster Real Estate Real Estate APTS FOR SALE: Two apartments in compound located in Cruz Bay Valley. 340-776-3455 SCENIC PROPERTIES 340-693-7777 CRUZ BAY Bay, $700 Cruz Bay, $800 One bedroom apt, Power Boyd, $950 One bedroom, one bath apt, w/d, pool, awesome view, $1800 Two bedroom, one bath apt, screened deck, washer, near Cruz Bay, $1500 Two bedroom, one bath apt, screened deck, washer, ocean view, $1700 Two bedroom, two bath apt, large deck, w/d, $1800 CORAL BAY One bedroom, one bath apt, small deck, $1100 STORAGE: SECURED LOCKERS, AUTOS FROM $35 MONTH 643-3283 PASTORY SELF STORAGE Available Immediately 5x5x8 up to 10x20x8 Starting at $85/mo. One mile from Cruz Bay. 340-776-1330 TRADEWINDS SUBSCRIPTIONSSend Check Payable to Tradewinds Publishing LLC, P.O. Box 1500, St. John, VI 00831 1 YEAR SUBSCRIPTION $90.00 USD Name _____________________________________________________________ Address ___________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Email ____________________________________________________________ Telephone/Cell ___________________________________________________ EVERYTHING YOU NEED ON EVERY LEVEL GREAT PLACE TO SHOP, DINE AND WORK COME JOIN US WE HAVE SPACES AVAILA BLE RETAIL, OFFICE OR STORAGE340-776-6455 Commercial/Ofce Storage FOR SALE BY OWNER Giveaway $695,000, turnkey condition, pool, 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, cement, beautiful and views of Coral Bay Unbelievable Price. Call (508) 939-1414 email: usvinancy@gmail.com Download Tradewinds each week on our web sitewww.stjohnnews.com Cruz Bay Leasehold For Sale e 3 3 i cres SEPTEMBER 12, 1989, neverthe PRINCIPALS ONLY INQUIRES: TWBUILDING@EARTHLINK.NET FOUND: brand dingy with motor, no name or registration number. Found adrift on east side of Great St James, call 340-998-1940 to describe further. GREETERS NEEDED Full service real estate experienced guest greeters. Please email info@ stjohnproperties.com Employment Lost & Found LOTS FOR SALE Saunders Gut, Coral Bay Island views $175,000 Investor wanted construction for Eco Villas 779-7445

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St. John Tradewinds Elisa Thomas was crowned Miss University of the Virgin Islands 2014-2015 at the 34th Annual Miss UVI Ambassadorial Competition held on Saturday, April 12, at UVIs Reichhold Center for the Arts on St. runner-up, and Sheresia Gumbs, 20, was the second runner-up. Kimberlee Donovan, 21, was named Miss Popularity. Wilson was named Miss Photogenic, and Gumbs received the title of Miss Congeniality. In addition to winning the Miss UVI crown, Thomas, 20, won Most Intellectual Speaker, Best Performing Talent, Best Business Wear, Best Ambassadorial Presentation and Best Evening Wear. She will receive a full-year UVI scholarship, which includes tuition, room and board. She also received other prizes. Thomas is a junior majoring in communication. She was born on St. Thomas and is attending UVI on the St. Thomas Campus. Thomas aspires to work as a news anchor, host events and produce/host her own local television show. The Miss UVI Ambassadorial Competi tion was sponsored by the Student Government Association Queens Committee. Miss UVI serves as a goodwill ambassador for the University. This role includes but is not limited to participation in UVIs recruitment efforts, representing the University locally and abroad, and maintaining a highly visible role on UVIs campuses on St. Thomas and St. Croix. Outgoing, Miss UVI 2013-2014 Murchtricia Charles, placed the Miss UVI sash on Thomas on Saturday. One of Thom2014 UVI Carnival Troupe in the Adults Parade on Saturday, May 3.26 St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 St. John Tradewinds News Photo Elisa Thomas www.IslandiaRealEstate.com | www.SeaGlassProperties.comO: 340-776-6666 F: 340-693-8499Amarilla Villa l $1,999,000 3 bed | 3.5 bath l 4,490 sqft Serving St. John for Over 40 Years Southern Cross | $3,500,00 4 bed | 4 bath | 4,800 sqft Sea Palms | $1,679,000 3 bed | 3.5 bath | 3,510 sqft Unicorn by the Sea l $1,595,000 3 bed | 3 bath | 3,150 sqft Adventure Villa | $775,000 4 bed | 3 bath | 4,100 sqft Calabash Boom | $675,000 2 bed | 3 bath | 1,497 sqft Pebble Cottage | $450,000 4 bed | 3 bath | 2,665 sqf Palm Terrace Unit 6 | $749,000 4 bed | 3 bath | 2,183 sqft Turtle Haven | $349,000 1 bed | 1 bath | 950 sgftCall Today to Schedule a Showing! Providing professional rental management and marketing services for St. John s finest vacation villas and condominiums.For reservations For St. John or brochures business call1-800-338-0987 340-776-6152Vi e w o u r v i l la s a t w w w c a r i b b e a n v i l l a c o m Lumberyard Complex P .O. Box 458 St. John USVI 00831 C a r i b b e a nV i l l a s & R e s o r t sM A N A G E M E N T C O Exceptional St. John Villa Offered Through Debbie Hayes E XCLU SIVE REAL EST A TE SERVICE IN THE VIRGIN ISLANDS DEBBIE HAYES, GRILICENSED U.S VIRGIN IS L ANDS REA L ESTATE BROKER/ OWNER Ofce: 340 714 5808Cell: 340 642 5995DH@DH. www.StJohnVIRealEstate.com I C B r Br V I f r nf t t r Eb V R. O .M DebbieHayes-TW CasaBueno 11.26.2012.indd 1 11/30/12 2:37 PM $1.550M Elisa Thomas Crowned Miss UVI 2014-2015

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St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 27 COMPLETE REAL ESTATE SE R VI C ESST JO HNS OLD EST R EAL ESTATE F I R M SE R VI N G ST. JO HN F O R 54 YEA R S! INFO@HolidayHomesVI.com TOLL FREE: WWW.HOLIDAYHOMESVI.COM GIFFT HILL View, quiet area & con venience! Two unit home-Live in one, rent the other! Main level features 2 bdrms, bth & a generous great room w/ sliders to Pillsbury Sound view deck. Lower level studio apartment with porch. Lush, level property with easy parking. FISH BAY 4X2 INCREDIBLE VALUE! Huge panoramic views and a quiet, pri vate, breezy location that bor ders Nature Conser vancy property make this home a must see! VERY MOTIVATED SELLER! SABA COTTAGE offers an open oor plan & valley views of historic sugar mill. Room to expand this small but well constructed home. Two parcels-keep one and sell the other. MERMAID FALLS -prime Peter Bay location & spectacular 5 bdrm/5.5 bths villa. Views to St. Thomas, Natl Park beaches & BVI. Custom-designed & built, it features a lagoon-shaped pool, mahogany doors/windows, ac, private verandas, waterfall & spa, & lovely grounds. WATERFRONT ON THE EDGE Breathtaking views of 8 islands, perfect private location, minutes from Cruz Bay w/ 500+ ft. of shoreline. Gated estate on nearly 2 ac. designed for island living & entertaining, heated pool, romantic master suite, 2 add. BR suites & extensive common areas, plus solar array. CATHERINEBERGS CINNAMON RIDGE 5 bedroom villa on 1+ private acre, bordered by National Park, features stunning north shore views, pool w/waterfall, spa, easy access to Cinnamon Bay beach. VILLA KALORAMA Panoramic views from classic modern 5 bdm, 4.5 bth rental villa in Virgin Grand Estates features native stone, ipe hardwoods, glass walls & a secure property. Dramatic great room opens onto 40 foot pool and large verandas for spectacular indooroutdoor living. GALLOWS POINT SEAVIEW great location for development, walk to beach and town! Masonry 2x2 home on .58 ac. Combination of R-4 & W-1 zoning allows for condos or commercial uses. ENIGHED BREEZES has designer air, great views, minutes from town! 3 bdrm main home plus 2 apts. Special features: contemporary kitchen, sky lights, granite slab counters, Soli Stone backsplashes, traver tine tile, stone showers, vessel sinks, spa tub, & Murano glass tiled pool w/ waterfall. WINDCHIME is a very private 1.4 ac. estate set high atop Gifft Hill. Dra matic views to the east w/ spectacu lar breezes and sunrises. This 3 bdrm villa has room to expand with an oversized pool facing the terric view. WHALE WATCH Enjoy pristine East End in this lovely, 2 bedroom villa with big water views. Downstairs apartment offers additional living & income space. Hear the sound of the waves lapping below. TREE PALMS Versatile 5 BR 5 BA property with solid rental history. Charming home w/ 2 kitchens, covered verandas, stone entrance, garden fountain, concrete pool and spa deck. Solar panels, and ocean views complete the package! SAGO COTTAGE adorable Caribbean style masonry cot tage with wonderful down is land views and great rental history. VILLA MIMOSA IS A BEST BUY! 4 bedroom private rental homeawesome down island & Coral Bay views! Turn key! Originally $1,700,000 now priced to sell. BORDERS NATIONAL PARK! EXCEPTIONAL CARIBBEAN CRAFTSMANSHIP masonry home w/ FLEXIBLE FLOORPLAN is a must see! Private, end of road FLAT lot with additional cottage. Completed in 2010 by Owner/builder/ furniture maker from Santa Fe. The Company that gives back to St. John OWN A MONTH IN A LUXURY HOME Choose a 3 BR 3.5 BA or a 4 BR 4.5 BA villa in upscale Virgin Grand Estates. These 3,000 sq ft villas feature STT & sunset views, pool, AC & more. Priced from $42,000 $975,000 MLS 13-207$1,125,000 MLS 13-204 $475,000 MLS 13-267 $3,095,000 MLS 13-454 VIDEO $215,000 MLS 13-199$2,999,000 MLS 11-59$695,000 MLS 13-459 $7,500,000 MLS 11-385 VIDEO$995,000 MLS 13-3 RAINBOWS END AT BATTERY HILLclean and cheerfully decorated poolside condo is conveniently close to town w/ nicely manicured grounds. Seller says make an offer! $465,000 MLS 12-358 $650,000 MLS 12-176 $3,995,000 MLS 14-66 VIDEO $499,000 MLS 13-347 BEACHFRONT GRANDE BAY RESORT Has great views! Beautifully fur nished & easy access to shop/restau rants. Large pool & deck area, tness & reception center, indoor parking & elevator service. G RANDFATHERE D HOA FEES3 BR/2 BA $1,195,000 1 BR/1 BA $745,000 BEACHFRONT $1,295,000 MLS 13-516 $1,450,000 MLS 14-60 $4,599,000 MLS 13-538 VIDEO WATERFRONT SEARCH ENTIRE ST. JOHN MLS, VIEW PROPERTY VIDEOS AND NEWSLETTER/SALES HISTORY AT WWW.HOLIDAYHOMESVI.CO M LOTS OF LAND LISTINGS!! MOTIVATED SELLERS!! SOME SELLER FINANCING!! CAROLINA from $ 55,000 EMMAUS hillside $ 75,000 FISH BAY from $ 79,995 CHOCOLATE HOLE from $ 118,500 HANSEN BAY hillside & WATERFRONT $ 139,000 GLUCKSBERG from $ 195,000CONCORDIA from $ 225,000 FREEMANS GROUND from $ 225,000 CALABASH BOOM hillside $ 235,000 VIRGIN GRAND ESTATES from $ 249,900LOVANGO CAY South shore from $ 250,000UPPER MONTE BAY/RENDEZVOUS from $ 799,000 SABA BAY hillside & WATERFRONT from $ 999,000 PETER BAY/NORTHSHORE from $ 1,650,000 WESTIN TIMESHARES from $ 500/weekONE MONTH FRACTIONALS from $ 42,000 St. John Tradewinds Virgin Islands property owners are asked billing information has changed in order to ensure delivery of their 2013 and 2014 property tax bills. Property owners who have their mail delivered to a physical address are also what was assigned to them by the U.S. Postal Service. number of bills were returned to the Tax Astenant Governor Gregory R. Francis reminds all property owners that it is their responsibilchanges to their billing address and that they are also responsible for timely payment of the on St. Thomas, 776-6737 on St. John and on St. Croix at 773-6459 for Christiansted or EARTH DA Y 2014: EPA and The Nature Conservancy Partner to Connect People with NatureProperty Owners Reminded to Update Address InformationSt. John Tradewinds The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and The Nature Conservancy are teaming-up this April to encourage people to reconnect with nature through the Earth around the country are encouraged to go outside, take a photo of themselves in ing plant and post it on the Earth Day Naalso share their photos on Facebook, TwitYou dont have to travel great distances to connect with nature, says EPA Regional Administrator Judith A. Enck. Nature can be found in the smallest of green spaces, in the local park or in your backyard. This is a fun and easy way for people to connect with nature, and observe possible impacts of climate change. We are encouraging people of all ages to it online. discover the magic of nature and get back outside after what has been for many a very long winter, says Stu Gruskin, The Nature Conservancy in New Yorks Chief This Earth Day, The Nature Conservancy wants people to spend time in nature with their friends and family, whether that means visiting one of our many preserves across the state or taking a walk around their block or in their local park. The EPA will continue the project in future years so that participants can return on the same day each year and take a photo that can be compared to photos from other years. Changes in blooming patterns will be examined and may have a connec tion to climate change. The planet is getting warmer and we are already feeling the effects. The 12 hottest years in recorded history have all come in the last 15 years. According to the EPA, the timing of natural events such by climate change. Scientists have a high rival of spring is linked to recent warming trends in global climate. For more information on leaf and bloom dates, visit http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/science/indicators/society-eco/leaf-bloomdates.html For more information about this project and other ways you can celebrate Earth Day, visit www.epa.gov/region2/earthday and www.nature.org/nyearthday.

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28 St. John Tradewinds, April 21-27, 2014 SJSA Faculty Concert Entertains Residents St. John Tradewinds