Citation
Mallory, Stephen R. to his Wife Angela - Richmond, Va. -  Aug. 21, 1862 - Transcript

Material Information

Title:
Mallory, Stephen R. to his Wife Angela - Richmond, Va. - Aug. 21, 1862 - Transcript
Series Title:
Mallory, Stephen R. to his Wife Angela - Richmond, Va. - Aug. 21, 1862
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Civil War
History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- United States
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
Mallory6jc

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text





Richmond 21 Aug. [18]62


My D[ear] Wife,
My constant application from morning until nights lately, and the necessity I have been
under from the sickness of Mr. Tidball [Edward M. Tidball, chief clerk, Navy
Department], to work at night also, has left me so used up that I have allowed longer time
than usual to slip away without writing to you; and Congress, having convened on the
18th is already at work carving out work for all the Departments & giving as much trouble
as possible.

My friend Mr. Conrad (Conradi) [Charles Magill Conrad] has already displayed his
venom by moving a resolution in the House to abolish the office of Sec. of the Navy & to
commit its functions to the Sec. of War. He feels spiteful at the loss of his property in
N.O. [New Orleans] and chooses to think that I could have saved the city. This
resolution will show his spleen and venom & that is all.

News has just reached us that Pope [Union General John Pope] has retreated before Lee
[Confederate General Robert E. Lee], and that we will not be able to force him to fight.
McClellan [Union Major General George B. McClellan] has abandoned his position on
the James River, and has gone, it is thought, to join Genl. Pope.

You must not suffer your mind to dwell on the idea that we are to be "crushed," as you
say; but on the contrary you must look at the character of our revolution justly, & you
will see that we cannot be "crushed." The very fact that the Lincoln Govt. [Government]
have been forced to resort to draughting [drafting] men, shows that there [sic] people will
not fight us without compulsion.

And this resort to drafting will render the war more odious & unpopular than ever, & the
effect has already been such that Lincoln has deferred it until the 18 Sept. You will see
by the papers that placards denouncing Lincoln & the war are already being put up
secretly in Northern cities. To me, my dear wife, the signs of weakness & decay in the
U.S. are everywhere evident, and if they can escape a military despotism they will
surprise the world.

Mrs. Saunderson of Jacksonville, who has for a year past, been under medical treatment n
New York, came last night. She has been trying for three months to get a passport, & the
enemy finally sent her down to Newbern, N.C. She awaits her husband here. She says
the South has many strong friends North, & the time is rapidly coming when they will
speak out.

Pila, for whom you inquire, returned here soon after receiving your letter. She spent two
days with me & then went home. She preferred remaining in N.C. & I think she is
disgusted with G.









Mrs. [Shansbury?], Mrs. Chilton, Mrs. [Carte?], Mrs. Elzey &c [etcetera] are still all
absent. Mrs. Lee & Mrs. McLane are at the Spotswood, & Mrs. Morton & family are at
the Amelia Springs. Genl. Joe Johnston is not yet well and she is with him at the springs.

Mrs. Fry, with whom I had a sweet interview, & another with Col. Fry [D. R. Fry], will
let us have the room that Genl. Elzey [Arnold Elzey] had & the adjourning one that Carte
had, and boarders, the children & Nancy, for ten dollars per day ($10), we finding our
towels & linen as theirs have given out.

This is a high sum, but not as much as house keeping would cost, though house keeping
is in many respects preferable. We can't keep house for less than $15 per day. I am
paying $15 for a pair of shoes for Zack, $1 per doz. for eggs, $20 per barrel for flour,
seventy five cents for sugar, 50 cts for [???], 60 cts for ham &c &c. My tea gave out
some time since, as I kept but very little, two or three pounds of yours, & I have not
bought any more as it is now selling, green for $12 & black for $15 per pound.

Your tea is in Charlotte, N.C. and I have ordered some to be sent to you.

Mrs. Hamson's lease expires on the 22 prox. & I am perplexed & annoyed to know what
to do and need your counsel & advice. Write me candidly your views & preferences &
wishes. I despise sympathy as a general rule, but I look naturally & gratefully to you
always when I need it; whether I do now or not you must judge.

I am working with unceasing perseverance in getting up iron clad ships, and am certain of
success. The obstacles in the way would deter most men, but they excite my
perseverance.

Mr. Sanders [Saunders?] dined with me last Sunday in company with Ben Hill (Hon
Senator Hill of Geo.) [Benjamin Harvey Hill] & Mr. Neal was to have come but he was
taken sick the day before. I regretted that Mr. Sanders did not bring Mr. Neal to my
house at once where I could have given him every attention, & I asked him to do so.

Young Sanders [Saunders?] is a very gentlemanly nice fellow & a gallant soldier.

My love to [Mann?] & all the children & may Heaven bless my dear wife.

S.R. Mallory

I sent you to letters a day or two since.


Transcribed by Nicole J. Milano, University of Florida, 2009




Full Text

PAGE 1

Richmond 21 Aug. [18]62 My D[ear] Wife, My constant application from morning until nights lately, and the necessity I have been under from the sickness of Mr. Tidball [Edward M. Tidball chief clerk, Navy Department], to work at night also, has left me so used up that I have allowed longer time than usual to slip away w ithout writing to you; and Congress, having convened on the 18th is already at work carving out work for all the Departments & giving as much trouble as possible. My friend Mr. Conrad (Conradi) [Charles Magill Conrad] has already displayed his venom by moving a resolution in the House to ab olish the office of Sec. of the Navy & to commit its functions to the Sec. of War. He feels spiteful at the loss of his property in N.O. [New Orleans] and choos es to think that I could have saved the city. This resolution will show his spleen and venom & that is all. News has just reached us that Pope [Union General John Pope] has retreated before Lee [Confederate General Robert E. Lee], and that we will not be able to force him to fight. McClellan [Union Major General George B. McClellan] has abandoned his position on the James River, and has gone, it is thought, to join Genl. Pope. You must not suffer your mind to dwell on the idea that we are to be crushed, as you say; but on the contrary you mu st look at the character of our revolution justly, & you will see that we cannot be crushed. The ve ry fact that the Lincoln Govt. [Government] have been forced to resort to draughting [d rafting] men, shows that there [sic] people will not fight us without compulsion. And this resort to drafting will render the war more odious & unpopular than ever, & the effect has already been such that Lincoln has deferred it until the 18 Sept. You will see by the papers that placards denouncing Linc oln & the war are already being put up secretly in Northern cities. To me, my dear wife, the si gns of weakness & decay in the U.S. are everywhere evident, and if they can escape a military despotism they will surprise the world. Mrs. Saunderson of Jacksonville, who has for a year past, been under medical treatment n New York, came last night. She has been tryi ng for three months to get a passport, & the enemy finally sent her down to Newbern, N.C. She awaits her husband here. She says the South has many strong friends North, & th e time is rapidly coming when they will speak out. Pila, for whom you inquire, returned here soon after receiving your le tter. She spent two days with me & then went home. She preferred remaining in N.C. & I think she is disgusted with G.

PAGE 2

Mrs. [Shansbury?], Mrs. Chilton, Mrs. [Carte?] Mrs. Elzey &c [etcetera] are still all absent. Mrs. Lee & Mrs. McLane are at the Spotswood, & Mrs. Morton & family are at the Amelia Springs. Genl. Joe Johnston is not ye t well and she is with him at the springs. Mrs. Fry, with whom I had a sweet interview, & another with Col. Fry [D. R. Fry], will let us have the room that Genl. Elzey [Arnold Elzey] had & the adjourning one that Carte had, and boarders, the children & Nancy, for ten dollars per day ($10), we finding our towels & linen as theirs have given out. This is a high sum, but not as much as house keeping would cost, though house keeping is in many respects preferable. We cant k eep house for less than $15 per day. I am paying $15 for a pair of shoes for Zack, $1 per doz. for eggs, $20 per barrel for flour, seventy five cents for sugar, 50 cts for [??? ], 60 cts for ham &c &c. My tea gave out some time since, as I kept but very lit tle, two or three pounds of yours, & I have not bought any more as it is now selling, green for $12 & black for $15 per pound. Your tea is in Charlotte, N.C. and I have ordered some to be sent to you. Mrs. Hamsons lease expires on the 22 prox. & I am perplexed & annoyed to know what to do and need your counsel & advice. Write me candidly your vi ews & preferences & wishes. I despise sympathy as a general ru le, but I look naturally & gratefully to you always when I need it; whether I do now or not you must judge. I am working with unceasing perseverance in ge tting up iron clad ships, and am certain of success. The obstacles in the way woul d deter most men, but they excite my perseverance. Mr. Sanders [Saunders?] dined with me last Sunday in company with Ben Hill (Hon Senator Hill of Geo.) [Benjamin Harvey Hill] & Mr. Neal was to have come but he was taken sick the day before. I regretted that Mr. Sanders did not bring Mr. Neal to my house at once where I could have given him ev ery attention, & I asked him to do so. Young Sanders [Saunders?] is a very gen tlemanly nice fellow & a gallant soldier. My love to [Mann?] & all the childre n & may Heaven bless my dear wife. S.R. Mallory I sent you to letters a day or two since. Transcribed by Nicole J. Mila no, University of Florida, 2009