Citation
Mallory, Stephen R. to his Wife Angela - Richmond, Va. - Transcript

Material Information

Title:
Mallory, Stephen R. to his Wife Angela - Richmond, Va. - Transcript
Series Title:
Stephen R. Mallory Papers
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Civil War
History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- United States
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
Mallory3jc

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Richmond, [Va.], Monday, 27 May [18]62


Mrs. S.R. Mallory

My Dear Angela,
Since I last wrote to you I have reed [received] your two letters, each enclosing a letter
for persons in the army, which letters I have delivered to the proper offices of the War
Dept. to forward.

Senac & Mr. Lifts have also left here, and they promised to go to see you if they possibly
could, & I presume that Senac will do so.

I yesterday went out on horseback to the enemy's lines, which are now only six miles
from town. I rode up within far range of their picket guards, and saw the Yankeys [sic] in
considerable numbers. Their pickets must be afraid of our sharp shooters as they kept
continually moving back & forth, on horseback & on foot, no sentinel standing still
except when behind a tree. If I had my sharps rifle here, I would go out daily and take at
least a dozen shots at them. We daily expect a battle, and intend to give the enemy a good
whipping.

I have worked night & day upon the defences [sic] of the river, and have now got them so
strong that I am afraid the enemy will not make a second attempt to pass them. I want
themm to try them once more. You will see in the papers the results of their last attempt,
and on that occasion we had but four heavy guns in battery, whereas we now have
fourteen, & many of a superior calibre [sic]. I ride a great deal on horseback, and my
health is improved by it; but my time at home is a solitude. My heart swells, & the tears,
I am ashamed to say, come to my eyes, every time I enter the bed room you occupied.
My darling wife, our affection for each other, based as it was upon mutual esteem, and
free from any selfish alloy, grows with our age [?]; and though I can never love you more
than I have, I feel that I can never love you less. This to me is a solace for all the ills of
life. News, authentic, from Genl. Jackson [Thomas Jonathan Stonewall Jackson] etc.,
tells us of his victory over the Federals. Have you yet recd. [received] the box? Lily &
Rubin arrived safely.

My love to my dear children. God bless you my sweet wife.

Yours Ever
S.R. Mallory

I rode to Tomb's [General Robert Toombs'] camp yesterday, & he insisted that I must
ask you to visit his wife, who he says is only twenty miles from you, or four hour's ride (I
forget which) & that Mrs. Brown is with her.


S.R.M.









Transcribed by Nicole J. Milano, University of Florida, 2009




Full Text

PAGE 1

Richmond, [Va.], Monday, 27 May [18]62 Mrs. S.R. Mallory My Dear Angela, Since I last wrote to you I have recd [receive d] your two letters, e ach enclosing a letter for persons in the army, which letters I have delivered to the proper offices of the War Dept. to forward. Senac & Mr. Lifts have also left here, and they promised to go to see you if they possibly could, & I presume that Senac will do so. I yesterday went out on horseback to the enemys lines, which are now only six miles from town. I rode up within far range of their picket guards, and saw the Yankeys [sic ] in considerable numbers. Their pickets must be afraid of our sharp shooters as they kept continually moving back & forth, on horseb ack & on foot, no sen tinel standing still except when behind a tree. If I had my sharps rifle here, I would go out daily and take at least a dozen shots at them. We daily expect a battle, and intend to give the enemy a good whipping. I have worked night & day upon the defences [ sic ] of the river, and have now got them so strong that I am afraid the enemy will not ma ke a second attempt to pass them. I want [t]hem to try them once more. You will see in the papers the results of their last attempt, and on that occasion we had but four heavy guns in battery, whereas we now have fourteen, & many of a superior calibre [sic]. I ride a great deal on horseback, and my health is improved by it; but my time at home is a solitude. My heart swells, & the tears, I am ashamed to say, come to my eyes, ever y time I enter the bed room you occupied. My darling wife, our affection for each ot her, based as it was upon mutual esteem, and free from any selfish alloy, grows with our ag e [?]; and though I can never love you more than I have, I feel that I can never love you less. This to me is a so lace for all the ills of life. News, authentic, from Genl. Jackson [Thomas Jonathan Stonewall Jackson] etc., tells us of his victory over the Federals Have you yet recd. [received] the box? Lily & Rubin arrived safely. My love to my dear children. God bless you my sweet wife. Yours Ever S.R. Mallory I rode to Tombs [General Robert Toombs] camp yesterday, & he insisted that I must ask you to visit his wife, who he says is only twenty miles from you, or four hours ride (I forget which) & that Mrs. Brown is with her. S.R.M.

PAGE 2

Transcribed by Nicole J. Mila no, University of Florida, 2009