Citation
Bailey, Cosmo O. to his Father - Camp Near Chattanooga, Tenn. - Sept. 27, 1863 - Transcript

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Title:
Bailey, Cosmo O. to his Father - Camp Near Chattanooga, Tenn. - Sept. 27, 1863 - Transcript
Series Title:
Bailey, Cosmo O. to his Father - Camp Near Chattanooga, Tenn. - Sept. 27, 1863
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Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Confederate States of America. Army. Florida Infantry Regiment, 7th.
Civil War
History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- United States
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
Bailey10

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida and the Civil War
Cosmo O. Bailey Papers

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Camp near Chattanooga, Sept. 27th, 1863


Dear Father
We are both still alive and well though we have been through some pretty rough times
since we left Knoxville. I wrote home last monday while we were on the battle field but I
doubt whether you ever got the letter-the last letter before I wrote at Ottowah[?], a
station just above Chattanooga. I have not received a letter since we were at Loudon, nor
have [any?] of the regt. [regiment] scarcely. I will now give you a description of the
battle.

It commenced on friday with heavy [???]. On Saturday the Battle commenced in earnest.
We were in line of Battle all day saturday but were not engaged until late in the evening
when we were ordered forward, which we did in quick time until we [came?] to a corn
field (we had been in the woods until then) when we were ordered to fire. I stood some
time without firing, looking for something to shoot at but I could not see anything, and
they [the] boys kept shooting so that I though [thought] I would shoot too. So, I shot
right aheat [ahead] of me. There was a battery [playing?] on us a good piece over in
another field. Soon the order came to cease firing and to forward, which we did with a
yell, and at a double quick. We kept on until we came to a fence between the two fields
when we [were] ordered to halt and then right face forward march double quick, which
carried us at a right angle to what [where?] we were going before, and then the grape and
shell came thick and fast. We kept on until we came to the woods where we were
ordered to lie down, which we did in a hurry, I let you know, the shot and shell falling all
around us. It is a great wonder to me how so few were wounded, only some 14 or 15 out
the ret. [regiment?] and one killed. His name was Strickland [William Strickland]-he
belonged to Capt. Thomas' [Roland Thomas] old company. York [Henry F. York] is
Capt. at this time. We lay where we were until about dark when we fell back a little and
our company was sent on picket just along the first fence where we had halted and fired
before gaining into the field. We stayed there until morning when we were relieved by
another company. It was not long after we were relieved before we were ordered to fall
in, when we went off to the right of where we had fought saturday and formed another
line of battle which we kept continually changing until late sunday evening when we took
some prisoners [and] one stand of colors. The Flag was a beautiful thing-it belonged to
the 21st Ohio. Just after we took the prisoners we were fired into but none of the regt.
[regiment] was hurt. We then went back with the prisoners and camped and the next
morning the Yanks were gone. The cannonading on sunday was awful and there was a
continual roar of small arms. I saw some awful looking sights going over the Battle field,
men shot in every shape and form.

We camped on the field all day monday and monday night and on tuesday we left and
camped that night and cooked up 4 days rations and came on to this place the next day
and we have been moving around here ever since, the Yanks shelling us occasionally but
doing little or no damage. Everything has been quiet today and last night. Yesterday
morning there was a little skirmish between the pickets yesterday morning but nothing
serious. I like to forget to tell you about our camp. We went in on saturday with musket
and when we went in on Sunday we all had either springfields or enfields. We captured









them all over the field. Guns and cartrige [cartridge] boxes were strewed and the boys
threw away their old muskets and got a gun to suit themselves. From what I can learn
Gen. Bragg [Confederate General Braxton Bragg] intends to make Rosecrans [Union
General William Rosecrans] come out and fight him. He, I mean Bragg, has a line of
Breast works running from Lookout Mountain to the river and Rosencrans [Rosecrans]
will have to come out this way or cross Waldren's ridge [Walden's Ridge] which is all
most [almost] impassable for an army. I think Gen. Bragg intends to cut off Rosy's
supply [Rosecrans' supplies] and force him to fight his way through and when ever he
tries to do that he will get a worse whipping than he did at Chiccamauga [Chickamauga].
I don't know that I spell the word right. That is the name of the battle I believe we have
just fought. I don't know, but that is what I think Gen. Bragg intends doing if he can.

I wish Ma would send me some clothes [at] the first opportunity. We are both in need of
clothes. Write soon.

Your Affectionate Son
C.O. Bailey [Cosmo O. Bailey]

My stamps are out and 2 will have to [frank?] this. There is no chance to get stamps here.

Item 49850. Transcribed by Nicole Milano, University of Florida, 2008.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Camp near Chattanooga, Sept. 27th, 1863 Dear Father We are both still alive and well though we ha ve been through some pretty rough times since we left Knoxville. I wrote home last monday while we were on the battle field but I doubt whether you ever got the le tterthe last letter before I wrote at Ottowah[?], a station just above Chattanooga. I have not re ceived a letter since we were at Loudon, nor have [any?] of the regt. [regiment] scarcely. I will now give you a description of the battle. It commenced on friday with heavy [???]. On Saturday the Battle commenced in earnest. We were in line of Battle all day saturday but were not engaged until late in the evening when we were ordered forward, which we did in quick time until we [came?] to a corn field (we had been in the woods until then) wh en we were ordered to fire. I stood some time without firing, looking for something to shoot at but I could not see anything, and they [the] boys kept shooting so that I though [thought] I would shoot too. So, I shot right aheat [ahead] of me. There was a ba ttery [playing?] on us a good piece over in another field. Soon the order came to cease firing and to forward, which we did with a yell, and at a double quick. We kept on until we came to a fence between the two fields when we [were] ordered to halt and then right face forward march double quick, which carried us at a right angle to what [where?] we were going before, and then the grape and shell came thick and fast. We kept on until we came to the woods where we were ordered to lie down, which we did in a hurry, I let you know, the shot and shell falling all around us. It is a great wonder to me how so few were wounded, only some 14 or 15 out the ret. [regiment?] and one killed. His name was Strickland [William Strickland]he belonged to Capt. Thomas [Roland Thomas] old company. York [Henry F. York] is Capt. at this time. We lay where we were until about dark when we fell back a little and our company was sent on picket just along th e first fence where we had halted and fired before gaining into the field. We stayed there until morning when we were relieved by another company. It was not long after we we re relieved before we were ordered to fall in, when we went off to the right of where we had fought saturday and formed another line of battle which we kept continually ch anging until late sunday evening when we took some prisoners [and] one stand of colors. The Flag was a beautiful thingit belonged to the 21st Ohio. Just after we took the prisoners we were fired into but none of the regt. [regiment] was hurt. We then went back with the prisoners and camped and the next morning the Yanks were gone. The cannona ding on sunday was awful and there was a continual roar of small arms. I saw some awful looking sights going over the Battle field, men shot in every shape and form. We camped on the field all day monday and monday night and on tuesday we left and camped that night and cooked up 4 days rations and came on to this place the next day and we have been moving around here ever since, the Yanks shelling us occasionally but doing little or no damage. Everything has been quiet today and last night. Yesterday morning there was a little skirmish between the pickets yesterday morning but nothing serious. I like to forget to tell you about our camp. We went in on saturday with musket and when we went in on Sunday we all had e ither springfields or en fields. We captured

PAGE 2

them all over the field. Guns and cartrige [cartridge] boxes were strewed and the boys threw away their old muskets and got a gun to suit themselves. From what I can learn Gen. Bragg [Confederate General Braxton Br agg] intends to make Rosecrans [Union General William Rosecrans] come out and fight him. He, I mean Bragg, has a line of Breast works running from Lookout Mountain to the river and Rosencrans [Rosecrans] will have to come out this way or cross Wa ldrens ridge [Waldens Ridge] which is all most [almost] impassable for an army. I think Gen. Bragg intends to cut off Rosys supplys [Rosecrans supplies] and force him to fight his way through and when ever he tries to do that he will get a worse whipping than he did at Chiccamauga [Chickamauga]. I dont know that I spell the word right. That is the name of the battle I believe we have just fought. I dont know, but that is what I think Gen. Br agg intends doing if he can. I wish Ma would send me some clothes [at] th e first opportunity. We are both in need of clothes. Write soon. Your Affectionate Son C.O. Bailey [Cosmo O. Bailey] My stamps are out and 2 will have to [frank?] this. There is no chance to get stamps here. Item 49850. Transcribed by Nicole M ilano, University of Florida, 2008.