Citation
Bailey, Cosmo O. to his Mother - Camp Near Blanes Cross Roads - Transcript

Material Information

Title:
Bailey, Cosmo O. to his Mother - Camp Near Blanes Cross Roads - Transcript
Series Title:
Cosmo O. Bailey Papers
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Confederate States of America. Army. Florida Infantry Regiment, 7th.
Civil War
History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- United States
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
Bailey04

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida and the Civil War
Cosmo O. Bailey Papers

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Camp Near Blanes Cross Roads, Oct. 31st, 1862


Dear Mother
I received your letter of the 19th this morning. I don't know what to make of it. Have I
fallen so low in your estimation that you think I have got into the habit of getting drunk?
I don't know that I have given you any reason to think so. I have not tasted a drop of
liquor since I left home. It is true I met with Mr. Burgheim and I may have been chewing
tobacco but, I do not remember chewing more than usual and as I was well I may have
talked lively. I think Mr. Burgheim must have added something to it thinking you would
be glad to hear that I was in good spirits. To day [today] is Friday. I came here Tuesday
night. I would have written sooner but I wanted to know where we were going. Last
evening Maj. Ingram [Tillman Ingram, commanding, Company D, 7th Florida] came back
from Knoxville and he brought the order for us to go to Cumberland Gap. We will start
today or tomorrow I suppose. I left Knoxville Tuesday about 9 o'clock and got here
about 8 at night. It is 18 miles and I marched all the way. I was pretty tired when I got
here.

I met Col. Perry [Madison Stark Perry, commanding, 7th Florida] on the road to
Knoxville as I was coming here and he has gone home from there without coming back
here. Dr. Mcaa [Thomas A. Mcaa, regimental surgeon] tried to go also but could not get
a furlough. The boys say they have had a hard time of it since they have been gone
marching all day and all night a good part of the time. They went as far as Frankfort and
there they camped a month. They were not in any battle at all but they were in hearing of
the canon [cannon] at the Battle of Salt River and marched nearly all day to get into the
battle but it was a running fight and the enemy retreated as fast as they marched. When
the retreat commenced they marched very hard and when a man gave out he had to be
left. 15 of our company were left in that way. The regiment now musters about 400 men
sick and well. Our company now musters 42 rank and file. About 10 went to Knoxville,
though Tuesday I expect we will see a hard time of it at the gap but I am in hopes I will
not have to stay there all the winter. I must stop now for the man that I am giving to send
this by will start before long. I never have received that letter from Pa that you speak of
in your last letter. This, the second letter, [is the] only that I have recieved [received]
since I left home.

Your Affectionate Son
C.O. Bailey [Cosmo O. Bailey]

Item 49854. Transcribed by Nicole Milano, University of Florida, 2008.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Camp Near Blanes Cross Roads, Oct. 31st, 1862 Dear Mother I received your letter of the 19th this morning. I dont know what to make of it. Have I fallen so low in your estimation that you think I have got into the habit of getting drunk? I dont know that I have given you any reason to think so. I have not tasted a drop of liquor since I left home. It is true I met with Mr. Burgheim and I may have been chewing tobacco but, I do not remember chewing more than usual and as I was well I may have talked lively. I think Mr. Burgheim must have added something to it thinking you would be glad to hear that I was in good spirits. To day [today] is Friday. I came here Tuesday night. I would have written sooner but I wa nted to know where we were going. Last evening Maj. Ingram [Tillman Ingram, commanding, Company D, 7th Florida] came back from Knoxville and he brought the order for us to go to Cumberland Gap. We will start today or tomorrow I suppose. I left Knoxv ille Tuesday about 9 oclock and got here about 8 at night. It is 18 miles and I marche d all the way. I was pretty tired when I got here. I met Col. Perry [Madison Stark Perry, commanding, 7th Florida] on the road to Knoxville as I was coming here and he has gone home from there without coming back here. Dr. Mcaa [Thomas A. Mcaa, regimental surgeon] tried to go also but could not get a furlough. The boys say they have had a hard time of it since they have been gone marching all day and all night a good part of th e time. They went as far as Frankfort and there they camped a month. They were not in an y battle at all but they were in hearing of the canon [cannon] at the Battle of Salt River and ma rched nearly all day to get into the battle but it was a running fight and the enemy retreated as fast as they marched. When the retreat commenced they marched very hard and when a man gave out he had to be left. 15 of our company were left in that way. The regiment now musters about 400 men sick and well. Our company now musters 42 rank and file. About 10 went to Knoxville, though Tuesday I expect we will see a hard time of it at the gap but I am in hopes I will not have to stay there all the winter. I must stop now for th e man that I am giving to send this by will start before long. I never have received that letter from Pa that you speak of in your last letter. This, th e second letter, [is the] only th at I have recieved [received] since I left home. Your Affectionate Son C.O. Bailey [Cosmo O. Bailey] Item 49854. Transcribed by Nicole M ilano, University of Florida, 2008.