Citation
Bailey, Cosmo O. to his Mother - Camp near Knoxville, Tenn. - Oct. 18-20, 1862 - Transcript

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Title:
Bailey, Cosmo O. to his Mother - Camp near Knoxville, Tenn. - Oct. 18-20, 1862 - Transcript
Series Title:
Bailey, Cosmo O. to his Mother - Camp near Knoxville, Tenn. - Oct. 18-20, 1862
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Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Confederate States of America. Army. Florida Infantry Regiment, 7th.
Civil War
History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- United States
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- United States of America

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
Bailey03

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida and the Civil War
Cosmo O. Bailey Papers

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Camp Near Knoxville, Oct. 18th, 1862


Dear Mother
We left Camp Convalescence the day before yesterday. That is, we left the same evening
of the day that I wrote you my last letter which I sent by Mr. Roberts. We are here now
in Camp in the edge of town. There is [are] about a thousand men in camp. Our
commander is Gen. Carroll. The company I am in is commanded by Capt. Foster, a
Kentuckian, and three Lieuts [lieutenants] one of whom belongs to the 6 Fla. [Florida].
The company has 123 men in it [and] about 25 or 30 Floridians. The others are from
various states. There is [are] only about 10 of the 7th [7th Florida Infantry Regiment?]
along this time, though there are a good many more at the convalescent Camp. John
Mills [John C.H. Mills, Company D, 7th Florida] is the only one of my company along.
The nights are cold enough up here but the days are quite pleasant. The papers are full of
accounts of the great battle between Bragg [Confederate General Braxton Bragg] & Buel
[Union Major General Don Carlos Buell]. They say that Bragg whipped Buel [Buell] but
still had to retreat, and the report this evening is that Bragg's advance is at Cumberland
gap & that [Price?] is at Mobile and that our army is at Richmond, but I don't believe one
word of the whole of it. I expect we will leave tomorrow but I will not seal my letter and
I will let you know for certain. I am well.

Your Affectionate [Son]
C.O. Bailey [Cosmo O. Bailey]

Camp Convalescence, Oct. 20th, 1862

Dear Mother
Yesterday we came back to this place. We are not exactly in camp Convalescence but
joining it. It seems that the report I sope [spoke?] of in the other page that Bragg
[Confederate General Braxton Bragg] had fallen back was true and so they sent us back
here. Bragg is not quite to Cumberland Gap, and [the] report says that he is going to
make a stand at some place the other side of the gap. Cap[t]. Foster thinks that we will be
sent on before long when things get somewhat settled in the army. The impression
seems to be that there will be a big battle up there. I am in hopes I will get there in time
to take part in it. I can tell you I was sorry when the order came for us to come back here
instead of marching to the gap. I am getting tired of this place. I was on guard last night
and today. I can tell you it was pretty cold. Some say they saw frost, but I did not see
any. We sleep right out in the open air. At least, the most of them do & I am among
them but I don't care much. If it did not rain I would not care. There are only 4 tents to
107 men, so you see there are not many that sleep in tents, but a requisition has been
made for tents. There is [are] only 107 men in the company now. Some have gone to
the hospital and others are on detached service. The regiment consists of something over
700 men now instead of a thousand, and is now commanded by Col. Reeves instead of
Gen. Carroll. I am well and in hopes of soon leaving this place. I have just thought to
say that I don't remember anything about Pa bue [but?] blanket.


Your Affectionate Son









C.O. Bailey [Cosmo O. Bailey]

Item 49853. Transcribed by Nicole Milano, University of Florida, 2008.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Camp Near Knoxville, Oct. 18th, 1862 Dear Mother We left Camp Convalescence the day before yest erday. That is, we left the same evening of the day that I wrote you my last letter which I sent by Mr. Roberts. We are here now in Camp in the edge of town. There is [are] about a thousand men in camp. Our commander is Gen. Carroll. The company I am in is commanded by Capt. Foster, a Kentuckian, and three Lieuts [lieuten ants] one of whom belongs to the 6th Fla. [Florida]. The company has 123 men in it [and] about 25 or 30 Floridians. The others are from various states. There is [are] only about 10 of the 7th [7th Florida Infantry Regiment?] along this time, though there are a good many more at the convalescent Camp. John Mills [John C.H. Mills, Company D, 7th Florida] is the only one of my company along. The nights are cold enough up here but the days are quite pleasant. The papers are full of accounts of the great battle between Bragg [C onfederate General Braxton Bragg] & Buel [Union Major General Don Carlos Buell]. They say that Bragg whipped Buel [Buell] but still had to retreat, and the report this even ing is that Braggs advance is at Cumberland gap & that [Price?] is at Mob ile and that our army is at Richmond, but I dont believe one word of the whole of it. I expect we will leave tomorrow but I will not seal my letter and I will let you know for certain. I am well. Your Affectionate [Son] C.O. Bailey [Cosmo O. Bailey] Camp Convalescence, Oct. 20th, 1862 Dear Mother Yesterday we came back to this place. We are not exactly in camp Convalescence but joining it. It seems that the report I sope [spoke?] of in the other page that Bragg [Confederate General Braxton Bragg] had fallen back was true and so they sent us back here. Bragg is not quite to Cumberland Gap, and [the] repor t says that he is going to make a stand at some place the other side of the gap. Cap[t]. Foster thinks that we will be sent on before long when things get somewh at settled in the army. The impression seems to be that there will be a big battle up th ere. I am in hopes I will get there in time to take part in it. I can tell you I was sorry wh en the order came for us to come back here instead of marching to the gap. I am getting ti red of this place. I was on guard last night and today. I can tell you it was pretty cold. Some say they saw frost, but I did not see any. We sleep right out in the open air. At least, the most of them do & I am among them but I dont care much. If it did not rain I would not care. There are only 4 tents to 107 men, so you see there are not many that sleep in tents, but a requisition has been made for tents. There is [are] only 107 me n in the company now. Some have gone to the hospital and others are on de tached service. The regiment consists of something over 700 men now instead of a thousand, and is now commanded by Col. Reeves instead of Gen. Carroll. I am well and in hopes of soon leaving this place. I have just thought to say that I dont remember anythi ng about Pa bue [but?] blanket. Your Affectionate Son

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C.O. Bailey [Cosmo O. Bailey] Item 49853. Transcribed by Nicole M ilano, University of Florida, 2008.