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Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida ( NEH Preservation and Access Education and Training Grant P...
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Title: Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida ( NEH Preservation and Access Education and Training Grant Proposal )
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Publisher: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, FL
Publication Date: 2009
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Holding Location: University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Main
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    Appendices
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Project Significance


The University of Florida (UF) will partner with the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA),
Florida State University (FSU), the University of Central Florida (UCF), the University of Miami (UM),
and the University of South Florida (USF) to provide training to archivists and others who care for
historical records through a workshop series covering preservation and access standards and practices
including: 1) preservation and management of photographs, 2) minimal level processing of multi-format
archival collections, 3) descriptive standards, and 4) archival information systems used to document and
access historical materials. NEH funding is requested to support a regional education program, Advancing
Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida, which will provide training at no cost to participants.
A secondary goal is to establish a level of expertise among key Florida archivists and professionals so that
they can implement and sustain an in-state education program. A third goal is to determine educational
needs through surveys and evaluative tools. An analysis of these needs will be used to expand and
prioritize educational offerings in years to come.

It is estimated that there are over 450 archives, museums, historical societies, and other cultural heritage
repositories in Florida that maintain important collections of archival records, manuscripts, photographs,
audiovisual recordings, artifacts, electronic records, and digital objects. Florida's documentary heritage is
older than most other regions in the United States, with historical records dating from the earliest Spanish
explorations in the 1500s. Without adequately trained staff, whether professionals or volunteers, the
challenge of both preserving and making accessible these essential historical records is significant. There
is a critical need for knowledgeable professionals. Florida is the fourth most populous state in the U.S,
and is projected to remain as one of the top five fastest-growing states through 2030. The high demand for
education and training in the state will continue to increase proportionally with the increase in population.
The critical time to properly train the stewards of Florida's humanities collections is now.'

The one-year Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices program will train 130 archivists,
librarians, curators and other professionals in accepted preservation and archival documentation practices
and standards. Specifically, the program will provide tuition waivers for participants attending four
workshops:

* Understanding Photographs: Introduction to Archival Principles and Practices a two-day
workshop with an enrollment of 35 participants.
* Implementing DACS in Integrated CMS : Using Archon a two-day workshop for 35 participants.
* Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS) a one-day workshop for 25 participants.
* Implementing More Product, Less Process: a one-day workshop for 35 participants.

The project is supported by the Society of Florida Archivists (SFA), and the workshops will be conducted
by the Society of American Archivists (SAA). Participants will be an appropriate mix of archivists and
personnel from large research universities, smaller colleges, historical societies, state and local
governments, parks and historic sites, and other repositories of historical records. In addition, the intended
audience also will include graduate students attending Florida colleges and universities offering degrees
and certificates in library studies, public history, museum studies, and information science. Although
designed for a Florida audience, each workshop will reserve a limited number of seats for out-of-state
participants. The series will be held in major population centers including Miami, Orlando and Tampa,
ensuring easy and inexpensive travel for most participants.

1 Guide to Florida Archives and Manuscripts Repositories,
http://library.ucf.edu/SpecialCollections/GuidetoRepositories/; Florida Association of Museums,
hip \ \ \ .flamuseums.org/; U.S. Census Bureau, http://www.census.gov/Press-
Release/www/releases/archives/population/004704.html






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida

Table of Contents

N narrative ................... .. ............................................ 1

Project Significance and Im pact......................................................... .. ........................ 1

Project History and Institutional Profiles for UF and Partners............................................. 5

C curriculum and W ork P lan ....................................................................... ...................... 6

Access and Preservation W workshops ................................. ........................ .............. 7

Education Needs Survey ................................................. ................ ............ 9

Project Im plem entation .................. ......................................... .. .............. 10

E v a lu a tio n ................................................................................................................ 1 0

Staff, Faculty and C consultants .................................................................. 11

Project Steering G group ..................................... ................. ............ .. .......... .. 11

W workshop Instructors ......................................................... ............ ............ .. 12

B budget .................................................. 16


APPENDICES

Appendix A: Letters of Support

Appendix B: Selected Comments from Opening Archives Training Participants and Survey
Respondents in Florida

Appendix C: Tentative Questions for Florida Education Needs Survey

Appendix D: Sample SAA Workshop Evaluation Form

Appendix E: Project Director Resume

Appendix F: Letters of Commitment






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida

Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida

Narrative


Project Significance and Impact
The Guide to Florida Archives and Manuscript Repositories lists over 240 public and private cultural
heritage organizations in Florida that collect archives and manuscript materials. These include special
libraries, public libraries, college and university libraries, community colleges, city and county
governments, state government and government agencies, historical associations, genealogical societies,
museums, historic sites, state parks, corporations, newspapers and church libraries. The holdings of the
state's public universities alone are estimated to exceed 30,000 linear feet of archives and manuscripts and
366,000 photographs.'

These unique humanities collections include letters, diaries, manuscripts, legal and financial records,
photographs, maps, architectural and engineering records, artwork, scientific logbooks, sound recordings
and artifacts like clothing and campaign buttons. In many cases, they are the earliest and only surviving
records of human activities in Florida. They are the rich primary sources that reveal Florida's rich cultural
and natural heritage. Most of these holdings are related to Florida, but there are also extensive holdings
covering the United States, the Caribbean and Latin America. Florida's collections provide evidence of
the lives of significant politicians and great writers, as well as documenting Florida's social history, the
state's exceptional ecology, its explosive growth in recent decades, and countless other topics.

Florida's geographic location and its geopolitical history place increased pressure on archivists in terms of
preservation and access. Given Florida's presence within the Caribbean Basin, it is inevitable that the
scope of collections held in Florida's repositories are as diverse as the cultures and people that share the
Caribbean. Archivists and librarians provide access to cultural materials pertaining to a variety of islands
including Puerto Rico, Cuba, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Haiti, as well as past colonizing countries
including Spain and France. Likewise, Florida's location in the Caribbean also imperils the preservation
of its humanities holdings. Florida's documentary heritage is constantly at risk because of the hurricanes
and Caribbean storms that threaten the state annually. Archivists in Florida require a significant amount of
education so that they have the knowledge and skills to anticipate and respond to these unique
circumstances.

Historically, preservation and access education for archivists and other custodians of rare or unique
humanities collections in Florida has been woefully underfunded. The number of education grants
submitted by Florida institutions to federal, state and private funders is extremely low considering the size
of the state's population and geography. The number of preservation and access education projects
receiving direct federal funds from NEH and other agencies is even lower. Since 2000, no Florida
institutions, organizations or agencies have received NEH Education and Training grant funds. During
this same period, states with smaller population sizes such as Delaware, Georgia, Minnesota, and
Pennsylvania have received multiple grants. For example, Minnesota has received four grants totaling
over $1.6 million, and Delaware was awarded four grants totaling over $904,000. States with comparable
populations including California, Texas and New York, have received grants annually in the millions of




' Guide to Florida Archives and Manuscripts Repositories, Compiled by the Special Collections Dept., University of
Central Florida Libraries, 1999-present: http://library.ucf.edu/SpecialCollections/GuidetoRepositories/; The Florida
Association of Museums lists over 340 museums in Florida: http://www.flamuseums.org/






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida

dollars. Of course, these were worthy regional projects with commendable goals, and these examples are
provided simply to demonstrate the history of successful grant seeking in other regions.2

Frankly, Florida has done an extremely poor job of raising funds for preservation and access education.
Although Florida has been very successful in recent years raising funds for outreach activities, marketing,
and attracting donors, the same is not true for funding preservation and access. Institutional funding for
education and training is often the lowest priority, and as a result many archivists simply lack the basic
knowledge necessary to successfully 1) plan preservation and access projects and 2) to compete for
funding. For many years, Florida archivists and librarians have relied on local and regional consortia such
as the Southeastern Library Network (SOLINET) to provide training opportunities in the state. Since
2000, SOLINET has received four NEH Education and Training grants, and has offered workshops in
various Florida locations on hurricane preparedness, disaster recovery, and similar preservation topics.
However, access to SOLINET workshops has depended greatly on the availability of funds to cover the
travel and registration fees, which were prohibitive for many archivists in small repositories.

In recent years, a handful of Florida institutions have led statewide efforts to improve education and
training related to access. In 2001-2002, the University of Florida (UF), the Florida Center for Library
Automation (FCLA), and three other state universities participated in Enhanced Access to Special
Collections, a project funded by the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA). As part of this project,
staff members from UF, Florida International University (FIU), Florida State University (FSU) and
the University of South Florida (USF), participated in a training workshop conducted by the Society of
American Archivists (SAA). The training provided valuable knowledge and experience key personnel in
the Florida archival community regarding Encoded Archival Description (EAD), an international standard
for encoding descriptive information about archival materials. These descriptions are generally known as
finding aids. This pilot project established key regional EAD experts who in turn could train colleagues in
their own repositories and other archivists around the state.

The Enhanced Access to Special Collections project also improved access to Florida humanities
collections by creating a statewide database of archival finding aids. Archives Florida
(http://palmm2.fcla.edu/afl/), hosted and maintained by FCLA, allows researchers to search and browse
finding aids collectively or by individual repositories. Any archives, library, museum or similar repository
in Florida with archival collections is eligible to contribute EAD finding aids to the database. During the
project, participants created and contributed a small number of EAD finding aids to Archives Florida.
Based on this pilot test, the partners concluded that Archives Florida would only be successful if
Floridians received training, such as the EAD workshop that the project participants attended.

Evidence indicates that lack of appropriate training is a significant, ever-increasing obstacle for archivists
and other custodians who seek to preserve and provide access to historical records. The final report of the
Enhanced Access to Special Collections project concluded that one of the major barriers to access was lack
of training, and that future training should be similar to that offered by the SAA. The A *Census, a
comprehensive nationwide survey of the archival profession funded by the Institute of Museum and Library
Services, was conducted in May 2004. There were 103 responses from Florida, of which 36% were from
academic institutions, 35% from some government sector, and 24% from other non-profit organizations.
When asked about barriers to participating in the training they desired, the most highly ranked factors were
travel and cost. On a scale from "no barrier" to "very much a barrier," 60.7% of Florida respondents ranked
distance above the midpoint and 57.5% ranked cost above the midpoint. Few employers cover the full cost




2 National Endowment for the Humanities, "Recent Grant Awards," http://www.neh.gov/news/recentawards.html






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida

of training; more than a quarter reported their employers pay no part of travel or registration fees for
continuing education.3

This data is particularly meaningful in the context of available continuing education opportunities intended
primarily for archivists. The SAA regularly offers training workshops in various cities throughout North
America, but the cost of registration and travel expenses are often prohibitive for all but the largest
institutions. There are no programmatic training opportunities available to archivists in Florida, and the
Society of Florida Archivists (SFA) does not offer a continuing education program. In January 2005,
archivists, librarians and curators from the state's eleven public universities completed an informal survey
identifying training needs related to the implementation of the EAD standard in the state. All of the
participating institutions had personnel who required some level of training.

Because training opportunities have been limited primarily to out-of-state venues requiring expensive
travel and registration, the archivists and librarians who had participated in the Enhanced Access to
Special Collections project sought to create an in-state solution. In 2005-2006 and again in 2007-2008,
FCLA, UF and the partner institutions received additional LSTA funds to develop an educational
curriculum and offer training to archivists, librarians, curators and other cultural heritage professionals in
Florida. The goals of the project, entitled Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in
Florida, were to raise the general level of technical expertise among archivists, to promote the use of the
EAD standard in Florida, and to increase archival information sharing using the statewide Archives
Florida database. In addition to FCLA and UF, members of the project steering group included personnel
from FIU, FSU, the State Library & Archives of Florida, the University of Central Florida (UCF), and the
Tampa Bay Library Consortium.

During the 2005-06 Opening Archives project period, a project team consisting of four regional trainers
from FCLA, UF, UCF and FIU began by conducting an education needs assessment survey for the state.
Based on 75 responses, the team developed an EAD training curriculum, workbooks, a suite of free EAD
tools and templates, and an EAD guidelines document: Best Practice Guidelinesfor the Implementation
ofEAD Version 2002 in Florida Institutions. In the four workshops conducted, the regional expert
trainers provided free training for 80 participants from 41 Florida repositories. The team collected
evaluative information following each workshop and at the end of the project. In addition, the trainers
conducted follow-up site visits to five sites and provided free consulting services to repositories in their
regions.4

During the 2007-08 Opening Archives project period, a project team consisting of five regional trainers
from FCLA, UF, FIU and FSU repeated the successful training conducted in the previous project and
provided training to 110 participants from 32 repositories. In this project period, however, the steering
group decided to diversify the workshop topics based on feedback from previous training participants and
survey respondents. In addition to the three regional EAD workshops, the partners agreed that the best
way to raise the level of technical expertise among Florida archivists would be to host additional
workshops offered by the SAA. A total of 54 trainees participated in three EAD workshops created and
conducted by the Opening Archives expert trainers, and 56 trainees participated in four SAA workshops
covering: 1) style sheets for EAD, 2) the Archon archival information system, and 3) Describing
Archives: A Content Standard (DACS).5


3 A *CENSUS: Archival Census and Education Needs Survey in the United States: hp \\ \\ \\ .archivists.org/a-
census/
4 Training materials and final project reports (with outcomes, evaluative data, and lists of repositories receiving
training) are available on the Opening Archives web site: http://www.fcla.edu/dlini/OpeningArchives/
5 Information about Archon: The Simple Archival Information System is available at hump \ \\ \\ .archon.org/.
Information about DACS is available at himp \ \ \ .archivists.org/catalog/pubDetail.asp?obiectID=1279.






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida


Despite the successful implementation of the Opening Archives curriculum over the past four years, it is
increasingly obvious that archivists and other custodians of humanities collections in Florida require
additional training opportunities to sustain preservation and access activities. Multiple surveys including
the national A*Census revealed that Floridians, like their colleagues around the nation, require training in
areas such as conservation, preservation, descriptive standards, and access. One comment from the 2005-
06 Opening Archives project is typical of the feedback received from participants:

"This is a really fabulous project... with so many in the museum and archives field in Florida
lacking basic training and knowledge to preserve and process the precious collections in their
care there is a huge need for training that emphasizes the basics as well as best practices for
archival arrangement and description ".

And, following the introduction of SAA workshops during the 2007-08 project period, some participants
called for an expansion of education offerings:

"We need more of these SAA workshops in Florida! Appraisal, processing, etc. Bring 'em on! "

Appendix B contains selected comments from training participants and survey respondents.

The proposed Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida project seeks to replicate the
successful Opening Archives model used to implement EAD in Florida by utilizing SAA expertise to
build a strong network of trained regional experts who in turn will train others in the state. The project
also is an expansion of the previous training projects, with a greater diversity of educational offerings.
Four workshops will be conducted in 2010 by the SAA, relying on trainers from around the nation with
expertise in a variety of preservation and access standards and practices. Two of the workshops will focus
on Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS), the "output-neutral set of rules for describing
archives, personal papers, and manuscript collections [which] can be applied to all material types."6 With
NEH funding UF will provide tuition support for 130 participants attending the four workshops:

Understanding Photographs: Introduction to Archival Principles & Practices (2 days)
Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS) (1 day)
Implementing DACS in Integrated CMS: Using Archon (2 days)7
Implementing More Product, Less Process (Iday)

All of the workshops have a limited enrollment of 35 participants each, with the exception of the
"Implementing DACS... Using Archon" workshop, which has an enrollment of 25 participants. The
participants will be an appropriate mix of staff from a range of cultural institutions, large and small,
public and private. The primary audience will be archivists, as well as librarians, curators and graduate
students. Each workshop will include a limited number of seats for out-of-state participants. The
workshop series will be presented in Orlando, Tampa and the Miami area to attract the largest number of
participants and to ensure inexpensive travel costs for most participants. No workshops have been


6 DACS is the U.S. implementation of international standards including ISAD(G) and ISAAR(CPF) for the
description of archival materials and their creators. Society of American Archivists web site. Accessed June 11,
2009 at hip \ \ \ .archivists.org/catalog/pubDetail.asp?objectlD=1279
7 UF and its partners selected the Archon workshop based on feedback from archivists and librarians at a variety of
repositories. This selection is not an endorsement of the Archon system over other archival information systems,
including The Archivists' Toolkit.






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida

scheduled in North Florida, but personnel in that region have traveled to Tampa and Orlando for training
in previous Opening Archives workshops.

In addition to satisfying the critical need for training, another goal of Advancing Access and Preservation
Best Practices is to establish expertise among key archivists and professionals in order to sustain and
expand educational offerings in years to come. These SAA workshops will produce a higher level of
knowledge and skills among Floridians, who in turn can provide training to other personnel in their
regions. For example, three members of the project Steering Group from Tallahassee and Gainesville will
be able to serve as regional experts in North Florida to educate staff who were unable to attend the
workshops. In addition to establishing a network of regional experts who can serve as trainers in the
future, the project Steering Group also will conduct an education needs analysis in Florida. During the
project period, the Steering Group will create and disseminate a survey in order to identify current
education needs. The results of this survey, as well as feedback collected during the training workshop
series, will guide the development of future education and training programs in the state.


Project History and Institutional Profiles for UF and Partners
University of Florida (UF) (Gainesville). The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections in the
UF George A. Smathers Libraries supports the information needs of the University community, as well as
communities worldwide, by providing access to all relevant forms of recorded knowledge. Utilizing
professional standards and best practices to preserve, develop and maintain special and area studies
collections, the Department supports a wide diversity of research endeavors. In addition to manuscripts
and archives collections, the Department includes the state's preeminent Floridiana collection, the P.K.
Yonge Library of Florida History, which includes holdings dating back to the earliest Spanish
explorations in the 1500s. The Department also preserves and provides access to rare books; an
internationally recognized historical children's literature collection; and significant African, Asian, Judaic
and Latin American collections. Department personnel have led statewide education efforts for the past
eight years by collaborating on the Enhanced Access to Special Collections project and the two Opening
Archives projects. John R. Nemmers, Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist, has served as the UF
representative in the previous Opening Archives projects. He has served as lead instructor or co-trainer for
seven Encoded Archival Descriptions workshops in Florida during that time. In 2007, the Florida
Division of Library and Information Services recognized the Opening Archives project with an
Exemplary Project Award. That same year, the Society of Florida Archivists recognized the project with
its annual Award of Excellence.

The Florida Center for Library Automation (FCLA) (Gainesville) provides state-of-the-art, cost-effective
information technology to assist the libraries of the public universities of Florida in their support of
teaching, learning, research and public service. More specifically, FCLA implements and centrally
supports high quality computer systems that help the libraries acquire, manage and provide access to
information resources. FCLA provides software to enhance access to information for students and faculty,
increases the productivity of library staff, improves inter-library sharing, and preserves digital materials
for future use. Through planning with the university libraries, FCLA services are integral to the
University libraries' ability to carry out their own missions in support of teaching, research and service.
Priscilla Caplan, Assistant Director for Digital Library Services, will serve as a regional expert in
upcoming years.

Florida State University (FSU) (Tallahassee). The FSU Special Collections Department, University
Libraries, houses rare, unique, and valuable published and unpublished materials. Among the collections
are historical records and publications pertaining to Florida, literary manuscripts, a large poetry
collection, the Napoleon and the French Revolution collection, and additional rare printed and manuscript






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida

materials. Eddie Woodward, FSU Heritage Protocol Archivist, serves on the project Steering Group and
will serve as a regional expert in upcoming years. The mission of the FSU Heritage Protocol is to
identify, record, assist in the preservation of, and promote knowledge about the heritage of FSU and its
predecessor institutions. Students, faculty, staff, administrators, alumni, and friends have expressed this
heritage through published, unpublished, audio, and visual materials, memorabilia and ceremonial
objects.

University of Central Florida (UCF) (Orlando). The UCF Special Collections and University Archives
Department serves as an instructional resource for university faculty and the public by providing access to
unique personal and organizational papers on University and Orlando local history. The Department has
five distinct collecting areas: Floridiana, travel and tourism, the Caribbean and West Indies, book arts,
and the University Archives. Archivist Judith Beale serves on the Steering Group and will serve as a
regional expert in upcoming years.

University of Miami (UM). The UM Libraries are central to the University's mission to educate and
nurture students, to create knowledge, and to provide service to our community and beyond. The Special
Collections Division preserves, provides access to, and promotes the use of an outstanding array of
historical documentation in many forms and subject areas, including collections of rare books,
manuscripts, photographs, maps, and other research materials. Core holdings document the history,
development and culture of Florida, the Caribbean, and Latin America. The Cuban Heritage Collection
houses materials dating from colonial times to the present that document Cuba's history and culture as
well as the experience of Cuban exiles and Cuban-Americans outside of the island. Kyle Rimkus, Digital
Projects Librarian, serves on the Steering Group and will serve as a regional expert in upcoming years.

University of South Florida (USF) (Tampa). The USF Tampa Library Special and Digital Collections
Department collects, preserves, and provides access to significant collections of Floridiana, archival and
manuscript materials, 19th-century American imprints, children's literature, rare books, science fiction,
sheet music, and Holocaust & genocide studies, in physical and digital formats for use by students,
faculty, and the general public. Assistant Librarian Tomaro Taylor serves on the Steering Group and will
serve as a regional expert in upcoming years.

Project Steering Group. One representative from each project partner is a member of the project Steering
Group, to guide project outputs and outcomes based on the needs and experiences of their local
constituency. Members have significant archival description and/or training knowledge. The Steering
Group will meet via phone or Internet as needed, in order to design the needs assessment survey and
coordinate the scheduling of the workshops. John Nemmers (UF), will chair the Steering Group and will
serve as primary liaison with the Society of American Archivists. All Steering Group members will share
the responsibility of promoting the workshops and disseminating information about the project goals,
methodology and outcomes at a variety of forums, including state and local meetings of archivists,
librarians, and curators.

Curriculum and Work Plan
The plan of work for this one-year project consists of scheduling four SAA workshops to be held in the
2010 calendar year. UF and its partner institutions will host the workshops in three locations: Orlando,
Tampa, and the Miami area. Prospective host sites include the University of South Florida (USF), the
University of Central Florida (UCF), and the University of Miami (UM). The project Steering Group will
provide appropriate classroom space at the host sites, including required computer and AV equipment.
The Steering Group also will be responsible for promoting the workshops, registering Florida
participants, and submitting registration fees for the series to SAA. Grant funds will cover registration
fees for workshop participants, ensuring increased participation by staff from a variety of smaller, non-






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida

profit repositories and institutions. The Steering Group also will develop and disseminate an education
needs survey, which is described below.

SAA will process all registrations for the workshop, and send confirmation letters and packets to
participants. SAA will provide all course handouts, booklets, and other materials, and will be responsible
for all instructor arrangements, including contracts, travel and lodging. SAA also will promote the
workshops widely, to encourage registration of non-Florida participants. Evaluation of the training
curriculum will be integral to the success of the workshops. Following each workshop, participants will
complete evaluative questionnaires and SAA will provide UF with a summary of the participant
evaluations.


Access and Preservation Workshops
The SAA workshops, which are described in detail below, were selected to address significant training
needs that were identified during previous projects. The "Understanding Photographs" workshop presents
the fundamental principles of managing and preserving photograph collections. Participants will gain
invaluable information about applying appropriate preservation methods based on the formats of the
images. The "More Product, Less Process" workshop focuses on increasing access to historical materials
by using minimal level processing to reduce processing backlogs. Both the DACS and the "Implementing
DACS... Using Archon" workshops will train participants to improve the creation and the online delivery
of descriptions for their holdings, thereby improving discoverability and access. All workshops are at the
basic or intermediate levels, which is appropriate for the education level of Florida participants. Those
attendees participating in multiple workshops will be especially prepared to preserve and to provide
access to humanities collections.

Understanding Photographs: Introduction to Archival Principles and Practices
(2 days Attendance limited to 35)
Photographs are heavily-used resources in an archive, yet many professionals lack any specialized
training to deal with them effectively. This introductory workshop will teach the basics of managing and
caring for photographs. Participants will discover how to apply standard archival techniques to
photographs in eight modules: reading and researching; identification and handling; preservation, storage,
and housing; appraising and acquiring; accessioning and arrangement; description and cataloging;
copying and digitization; and public service and outreach. Workshop objectives:
Apply basic archival concepts to specific work with photographs;
Identify resources and techniques for understanding photographs, such as researching
unidentified photographs or identifying common photo processes;
Learn about photograph preservation risks and concerns, such as environmental requirements and
the inherent vice of nitrate- and acetate-based films;
Build awareness of archival housing and storage options for photographic materials;
Learn about photograph copy services and digitization planning;
Discover tools, practices, and standards for processing and describing photographs;
Set priorities and make informed choices in appraisal and strategic planning, including
consideration of legal and ethical concerns; and
Understand special considerations for using photographs in reference and opportunities to
incorporate them in outreach.
Workshop participants will receive copies of the SAA publication, Photographs: Archival Care and
Management, by Mary Lynn Ritzenthaler and Diane Vogt-O'Connor, with contributions by Helena

8 All workshop descriptions are from the SAA "Continuing Professional Education Program Catalog":
li p \ \ \ .archivists.org/prof-education/course cataloglist.asp






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida

Zinkham, Kit Peterson, and Brett Camell. Of the 35 seats available in this workshop, 25 will be reserved
for Floridians and 10 will be reserved for out-of-state registrants.

Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS)
(1 day Attendance limited to 35)
Participants will learn practical DACS implementations through an in-depth consideration of key
concepts and descriptive elements in Describing Archives: A Content Standard, the new U.S. standard.
Participants will explore strategies for incorporating this standard into workflows for accessioning,
arrangement, and description through discussions and hands-on work with a variety of exercises,
culminating in a DACS-based analysis of existing finding aids. This workshop, a basic introduction to the
standard, will focus on application of DACS rules and concepts, which participants will be able to apply
to repository processes and descriptive outputs. Workshop objectives:
Apply the rules to formulate the content of descriptive elements for a minimal standardized
description;
Understand the different application of DACS in single- and multi-level descriptive outputs;
Integrate DACS into basic repository processes, such as accessioning, arrangement, and
description; and
Articulate how integration of a content standard into basic repository processes facilitates reuse of
information in a variety of outputs.
Workshop participants will receive copies of the SAA publication, Describing Archives: A Content
Standard. Of the 35 seats available in this workshop, 25 will be reserved for Floridians and 10 will be
reserved for out-of-state registrants.

Inmplemeniting DACS in Integrated Content Management Systems: Using Archon
(2 days Attendance limited to 25)
This two-day, hands-on workshop will focus on how to describe collections according to the rules of
DACS, the national content standard for preparing such descriptions within the context of one integrated
content management system. Archon is an open source application available for managing descriptive
information about archival records and manuscript collections. The archival data elements and rules
supplied by DACS are an integral component of Archon and provide an easy way to integrate standards-
based description into a repository's processing workflow. Practical exercises, lecture, class discussions,
and demonstrations will assist in learning Archon's basic functions and relationships to DACS. Workshop
objectives:
Understand technical and administrative issues relevant to implementing Archon;
Install and configure Archon for a specific repository and its staff members;
Manage physical locations within a repository;
Describe accessions, collections, and digital objects using Archon's Web forms;
Manage name and subject authorities, and link them to collection and digital object descriptions;
Produce and output descriptive records in standardized formats such as EAD and MARC;
Import accession, collection, and legacy finding aid records into Archon; and
Customize data input screens and output files for local implementations of Archon to meet an
individual repositories' needs.
All of the 25 seats available in this workshop will be reserved for Floridians.

Imple) renting "More Product, Less Process"
(1 day Attendance limited to 35)
Backlogs don't have to weigh as heavily as they do! This workshop will focus on implementing concrete
strategies for increasing processing rates and reducing backlogs, as outlined in the Greene-Meissner
article, "More Product, Less Process: Revamping Traditional Archival Processing." Participants will learn
as they share information and experiences. Topics will include appraisal, arrangement, description,






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida

digitization, and preservation, as well as development of processing plans, policies, and benchmarks. This
array of topics will be addressed through lecture, case studies, and group discussion. Workshop
objectives:
Understand the concepts and arguments outlined in "More Product, Less Process;"
Implement strategies for increasing processing rates in a variety of institutions;
Apply techniques for managing efficient processing programs, including developing processing
plans, policies, and benchmarks;
Understand how descriptive standards such as DACS can assist in the creation of descriptive
records that adhere to "minimum" requirements, and assist in the reuse of data in a variety of
outputs; and
Develop strategies for integrating processing with other archival functions, particularly
accessioning.
Of the 35 seats available in this workshop, 25 will be reserved for Floridians and 10 will be reserved for
out-of-state registrants.


Education Needs Survey
An important part of this project will be a survey of archivists and custodians of cultural heritage to
determine education needs and priorities. During the project period, UF will develop and disseminate an
education needs survey modeled upon previous surveys created by the Opening Archives Steering Group
and the 2004 national A *Census survey. Although these earlier surveys provided invaluable data
regarding Florida's education and training needs, the Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices'
Steering Group hopes to improve in a number of areas. The response rate for previous surveys was fairly
low considering the number of archivists, librarians, records managers, and other staff who work with
historical records in Florida. The national A *Census survey elicited 103 responses from Floridians, and
the statewide survey conducted during the 2005-06 Opening Archives project received only 75 responses.
UF and its partners intend to improve these response rates by actively promoting the new survey using a
variety of methods including electronic listservs, direct email to members of SFA and other associations,
and advertisements in newsletters. Members of the Steering Group also will encourage participation by
personally appealing to colleagues in their regions.

The survey design will allow us to collect comparable data on a number of factors, which will permit
longitudinal analysis of changes in skills and needs. Data requested will include:

Type of position (archivist, librarian, curator, educator, consultant, etc.)
Type of institution/business (historical society, research library, religious archives, etc.)
Employment status (full-time, part-time, volunteer, student, unemployed, etc.)
Location in Florida (geographic region, rural vs. urban, etc.)
Recent education activities (workshops, courses, seminars, internships, etc.)
Issues limiting education activities (registration fees, travel, time, etc.)

Although it will be important to compare these responses with previous responses, the crucial questions
of the survey will address future education needs. Respondents will be asked to prioritize specific
education and training topics at basic, intermediate and advanced levels. In previous surveys, for example,
the majority of the respondents ranked preservation and/or conservation in the top five topics requiring
further education. Those categories were broad, however, and the new survey will attempt to narrow a
topic such as preservation by asking about preservation of specific record types and formats. Appendix C
contains a sample of survey questions.






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida

Project Implementation

Schedule Workshops (Months 1-3)
Schedule dates for workshops (Steering Group; SAA)
Arrange host sites in Miami, Orlando, Tampa (Steering Group)
Publicize workshops 1 and 2 (Steering Group; SAA)
Register Floridians (Steering Group) and non-Floridians (SAA)
Submit payment to SAA for workshops (Steering Group)

Conduct DACS and Understanding Photographs workshops (Months 3-4)
Publicize workshops until capacity attendance (Steering Group; SAA)
Process all registrations for each workshop (SAA)
Make instructor arrangements, including contracts, travel and lodging (SAA)
Send confirmation letters and packets to participants (SAA)
Make final arrangements for host sites (Steering Group)
Provide UF with a summary of participant evaluations (SAA)

Create and disseminate Education Needs Survey (Months 5-7)
Use previous survey data and feedback from workshops 1 and 2 to design survey (Steering
Group)
Publicize and disseminate survey using listservs, direct email, etc. (Steering Group)
Publicize workshops 3 and 4 (Steering Group; SAA)

Conduct MPLP and DACS-Archon workshops (Months 8-9)
Publicize workshops 3 and 4 until capacity attendance (Steering Group; SAA)
Process all registrations for each workshop (SAA)
Make instructor arrangements, including contracts, travel and lodging (SAA)
Send confirmation letters and packets to participants (SAA)
Make final arrangements for host sites (Steering Group)

Complete Education Needs Survey and Create Final Report (Months 10-12)
Provide UF with a summary of participant evaluations (SAA)
Analyze the comments of all workshop participants (Steering Group)
Analyze responses for Education Needs Survey
Develop recommendations for future education and training needs
Prepare and submit final report to NEH


Evaluation
Evaluation is an essential part of this training project. At the end of each workshop participants will
complete a formal evaluation questionnaire created by SAA. These evaluations will be used by UF and its
partners to assess the success of the project. The Steering Group will review all responses, as well as other
feedback collected informally from participants, in evaluating the project. The results of the Advancing
Access and Preservation Best Practices' evaluation will be included in the final report to NEH.

The primary goal of the project is to provide training to archivists and others who care for historical
records through a series of workshops covering preservation and access standards and practices. As such,
one indicator for evaluating the project will be the number of workshop participants who affirm that they
learned new knowledge or skills regarding preservation and access. This goal also will be evaluated based






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida

on the number of participants indicating that the workshops satisfied their education needs. The goal will
be achieved if 90% of the participants learn new knowledge or sills and state that the workshops satisfied
their needs. This information will be collected directly from the participants when they complete the
workshop evaluations. Appendix D includes a sample workshop evaluation questionnaire.

A secondary goal is to establish a level of expertise among key archivists and professionals in order to
sustain and expand educational offerings in years to come. It is expected that the SAA workshops will
function as "train the trainers" workshops. Another evaluative indicator, therefore, will be the number of
Steering Group members or other key participants who state that they learned to teach others these topics
and can serve as regional experts. This goal will be achieved if 10 or more participants agree to serve as
trainers in future in-state workshops. This data will be collected by members of the Steering Group
following each workshop.

A third goal of the project is to identify current education needs and future training priorities. This goal
will be met when UF and its partners create a prioritized list of future education and training topics in
Florida. The Steering Group will prepare this list using data collected by the Education Needs Survey.


Staff, Faculty and Consultants

Project Steering Group
One representative from each of the project partners will be a member of the project Steering Group, to
guide project outputs and outcomes based on the needs and experiences of their local constituencies.
Members have significant archival description and/or training knowledge. The Steering Group will meet
via phone or Internet as needed, in order to design the needs assessment survey and coordinate the
scheduling of the workshops. All Steering Group members will share the responsibilities of promoting the
workshops and disseminating information about the project goals, methodology and outcomes at a variety
of forums, including state and local meetings of archivists, librarians, and curators.

John R. Nemmers, Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist, has served as the UF representative in
the previous Opening Archives projects for the past four years. He has served as lead instructor or co-
trainer for seven Encoded Archival Descriptions (EAD) workshops in Florida during that time. He holds
an MLS from Florida State University and a Specialist degree in Archives & Special Collections
Librarianship from FSU. He participated as an EAD implementer in the Enhanced Access to Special
Collections project while employed as an archivist at FSU. He is the principal author of Best Practice
Guidelinesfor the Implementation ofEAD Version 2002 in Florida Institutions. As project director and
chair of the Steering Group, he will oversee the budget, ensure scheduling and delivery of the workshops,
and serve as the principal liaison with SAA. Nemmers will lead the effort to create and disseminate the
Education Needs Survey, and he will be responsible for submitting the final project report to NEH.

Priscilla Caplan, Assistant Director for Digital Library Services at FCLA, has led efforts over the past
eight years to expand education opportunities related to access and EAD through the statewide Enhanced
Access to Special Collections and the Opening Archives projects. She will represent FCLA on the
Steering Group and will serve as a regional expert in upcoming years. Caplan manages the Florida Digital
Archive, a cost-effective, long-term preservation repository for digital materials in support of teaching
and learning, scholarship, and research in the state of Florida. Previously, she was the Assistant Director
for Library Systems at the University of Chicago and Head of the Systems Development Division for the
Office for Information Systems at Harvard University Library. She has served as a chair and member of
several national and international working groups and committees relating to digital libraries, metadata






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida

and standards. She is the author of Metadata Fundamentals for All Librarians and numerous articles on
metadata, reference linking, digital libraries and digital preservation.

Eddie Woodward, FSU Heritage Protocol Archivist, will represent Florida State University on the
Steering Group and will serve as a regional expert in upcoming years. Since February 2007 he has served
as director/archivist for the FSU Heritage Protocol program, the mission of which is to identify, acquire,
catalog, and preserve items related to the institutional history and cultural heritage of FSU and its
predecessor institutions. Key components of the program include the creation of an item level inventory
utilizing the Archon archival management software, and a digitization element utilizing DigiTool as the
digital asset management program. For the eight years prior to taking this position, he served as a Local
Records Archivist at the Library of Virginia in Richmond. In 2008 he represented FSU on the Opening
Archives advisory committee. During that time he served as a regional co-trainer for EAD and Archon
workshops. He holds a MA in history from FSU (1998) and an MLIS from Rutgers University (2008),
and also has received certificates of completion from the Modem Archives Institute (2000) and the
Preservation Management Institute (2007).

Judith Beale will represent the University of Central Florida on the Steering Group and will serve as a
regional expert in upcoming years. She is Senior Archivist at UCF where she has worked since 2004. She
received her MA in History from UCF in 2000 and certified as an archivist in 2006. Her work focuses on
the arrangement, description and digitization of the University Archives. She assisted in the initial
implementation of UCFs EAD program, which she currently maintains and manages.

Kyle Rimkus, Digital Projects Librarian, will represent the University of Miami on the Steering Group and
will serve as a regional expert in upcoming years. He manages digital projects and oversees collection
development in French and German Literature at the University of Miami Richter Library. He joined the
faculty of the UM Libraries in 2007. He has an M.S. in Library and Information Science and an M.A. in
French Studies from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has served, since 2008, on the
advisory board of Opening Archives, for which he also provides consultation and training to South
Florida archives interested in adopting EAD. At the University of Miami, he has led the campus-wide
implementation of the Archon open source collection management tool, and oversees a Digital Production
Lab whose services support the digital needs of his university's archives and special collections.

Tomaro I. Taylor will represent the University of South Florida on the Steering Group and will serve as a
regional expert in upcoming years. She is an Assistant University Librarian for Special and Digital
Collections at the USF Tampa Library. A Certified Archivist with a Master of Arts in Library and
Information Science, Taylor serves as the curator of the Special and Digital Collections' archival,
manuscript and personal papers collections as well as the Latin American, Caribbean, and Spanish
language monographs and sheet music collections maintained by the department. Since 2004, Taylor has
supervised graduate assistants, staff, faculty and volunteers engaged in processing archival and related
collections and the subsequent development of EAD finding aids for the USF Libraries, and as a site
supervisor for USF School of Library and Information Science fieldwork/internship projects (off-site).
She developed the USF Libraries' processing manual, currently in use by the main and system libraries,
and led the departmental implementation of EAD.


Workshop Instructors
Instructors for the four workshops are provided by SAA. Each has years of experience as educators and
leaders in the archival profession. Instructors have been assigned based on scheduling and availability.
Below are brief descriptions of proposed instructors, listed according to workshops they will conduct.

Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS) instructor: Bill Landis.






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida

Bill Landis currently works as Head of Arrangement and Description & Metadata Coordinator in
Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University Library. Landis has been involved in the development and
implementation of archival description standards since 1995. He served from 1997 to 2003 as a member
of SAA's Encoded Archival Description Working Group, contributing to the production of both versions
of the EAD Tag Library and the EAD Application Guidelines, Version 1.0. More recently, he served for
three years as a member of the U.S. contingent of the Canadian-U.S. Taskforce on Archival Description
(CUSTARD) and contributed to the new U.S. standard emerging from the work of that group, Describing
Archives: A Content Standard (DACS). He has published articles, given presentations, and taught classes
and workshops on the subjects of archival description and associated standards, user and usability issues,
and archival information access systems. Landis has served SAA in a variety of capacities as chair of the
Technical Subcommittee on Descriptive Standards (TSDS), 1998-1999; chair of the Description Section,
2000-2001; member of two Continuing Education Task Forces, 1999-2000 and 2002-2003; co-chair of
the Committee on Education, 2003-2005; and currently as chair of the DACS Working Group.

Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS) instructor: Kelcy Shepherd
Kelcy Shepherd is the Digital Interfaces Librarian at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Prior to
her current position, Shepherd worked as an analyst and Five College liaison for the Archivists' Toolkit
project, an effort to develop an open source software application for managing archival information.
Before this she led a collaborative MARC and EAD retrospective conversion project for the Five
Colleges, improving access to over 1,000 archival collections by making their finding aids and catalog
records available online. Shepherd has published and made presentations relating to shareable metadata
for archivists, the Archivists' Toolkit, EAD and MARC, usability of archival finding aids, and metadata
standards for architectural records. Holdzkom co-authored Standard Series of Architecture and Landscape
Design Records: A Tool for Arrangement and Descriptions of Archival Collections, winner of the 2001
C.F.W. Coker Award of the Society of American Archivists. An active member of the Society of
American Archivists, Shepherd has served as chair of SAA's Description Section and member of the
Technical Subcommittee on Descriptive Standards. She has been an SAA workshop instructor since 2006,
and also teaches XML and metadata courses for Simmons College Graduate School of Library and
Information Science.

Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS) instructor: Lynn Holdzkom.
Lynn (Roslyn) Holdzkom began working in the Technical Services Section of the Manuscripts
Department, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, in January 1987 and has been there since,
except for a brief time spent as university archivist at the University of Washington in 1997. At UNC-
Chapel Hill, she started as assistant technical services archivist, chiefly processing manuscript collections
and supervising student workers. She was instrumental in implementing MARC cataloging and Encoded
Archival Description markup of finding aids in the Department and in establishing the Department's web
presence. She is now assistant curator, head of technical services, and departmental cataloger. She co-
presented "Archival Cataloging as a Component of Description," a two-day workshop offered through the
SAA, to archival and library groups across the country, 1999-2003, and served on the SAA committee
that produced Describing Archives: A Content Standard (2004). She also teaches archival description at
the School of Information and Library Science at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Implementing DACS... Using Archon instructor: C Ihn I ii/ IJ. Prom
Chris Prom is Assistant University Archivist and Associate Professor of Library Administration at the
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he is responsible for managing digital projects,
supervising archival processing, and overseeing records scheduling. His research interests address the
ways in which archival users seek information relevant to their needs and how they use electronic tools.
Prom was the recipient of a 2003-04 National Historic Publications and Records Commission fellowship
and a 1997-98 Fulbright fellow. He holds a PhD in History from the University of Illinois, where he
wrote a dissertation regarding mutual aid societies in late-Victorian Britain, and he also studied at the






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida

University of York (United Kingdom). He most recently authored (with Ellen Swain) "From College
Democrats to the Falling Illini: Identifying, Appraising, and Capturing Student Organization Web Sites,"
which appeared in the Fall/Winter 2007 edition of American Archivist, and he is co-editor of College and
University Archives: Readings in Theory and Practice. Along with Scott Schwartz, he is one of the
principle developers of the University's open-source collections management tool, Archon, created to
meet the descriptive and access needs of small academic and institutional archives and special collections
libraries. In 2008, Prom and Schwartz were awarded a $100,000 Mellon Award for Technology
Collaboration for leadership and development work on Archon.

Implementing DACS... Using Archon instructor: Scott Schwartz.
Scott Schwartz has been the University of Illinois' Archivist for Music and Fine Arts and the Director of
the Sousa Archives and Center for American Music since September 2003. In addition he serves as
Associate Professor of Library Administration and teaches archival administration and arrangement and
description courses through the University's Graduate School for Library and Information Science. Prior
to his tenure at the University of Illinois, he served over ten years as an archivist for the National Museum
of American History's Archives Center where he was responsible for the arrangement, description, and
long-term preservation of the Center's music collections, related photograph collections, as well as the
creation of new on-line information access tools. Along with Christopher Prom, he is one of the principle
developers of the University's open-source collections management tool, Archon, created to meet the
descriptive and access needs of small academic and institutional archives and special collections libraries.

mplqemenCting "More Product, Less Process" instructor: Daniel A. Santamaria.
Daniel A. Santamaria is Assistant University Archivist for Technical Services at the Seeley G. Mudd
Manuscript Library at Princeton University. In his current position, he oversees accessioning, processing,
and descriptive practices. He also led the implementation of EAD for the Department of Rare Books and
Special Collections at Princeton and coordinates EAD encoding for the department's collections. He is a
member of SAA and MARAC, and has made numerous presentations at meetings and conferences. He
co-authored an article examining case studies of the implementation of DACS that appeared in a 2008
issue of the American Archivist. Santamaria previously worked at the New York Public Library and both
the Special Collections Library and the Bentley Historical Library at the University of Michigan.

Understanding Photographs: Introduction to Archival Principles and Practices: Marcy Silver Flynn
Marcy Silver Flynn is a consultant specializing in collections management services for visual materials
and other special collections. She formed Silver Image Management in 1994 to support responsible
stewardship in archives, libraries, and other collections. Most consulting projects involve collection
assessment, establishing best practices, selecting standards, planning for processing and providing
training to improve access and preservation. Prior to consulting, Flynn worked in prints and photographs
departments at the Library of Congress (1991-1994), the Historical Society of Pennsylvania (1988-1991),
and the Maryland Historical Society (1984-1988). She just completed a term on the SAA Standards
Committee (2005-2008). Some other examples of SAA participation includes serving as the liaison to the
Association for Information and Image Management (1998-2005 ) and chairing the Visual Materials
Cataloging and Access Roundtable (1996-1997). Flynn authored SAA's Understanding Photographs:
Introduction to Archival Principles and Practices workshop in collaboration with MaryLynn Ritzenthaler
and Diane Vogt-O'Connor.

Understanding Photographs: Introduction to Archival Principles and Practices: Dana C. Hemmenway
Dana Hemmenway is a senior photograph conservator at the Library of Congress. Her duties include
serving as a conservation division liaison to several custodial divisions coordinating the conservation and
preservation needs for their photographic collections. Hemmenway also works closely with the
Interpretative Programs Office coordinating, reviewing, and preparing collection material for exhibition.
For the past year and half Hemmenway works one day per month, at The Phillips Collection as their






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida

conservator of photographs surveying and treating the collection, as well as, reviewing items for loan.
Hemmenway received a Master of Science degree from the University of Delaware/Winterthur Program
in Art Conservation where she specialized in photographic materials and minored in paper conservation.
Upon graduation Dana served as an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. She
received further training as one of the first group of conservators to participate in the Advanced
Residency Program in Photograph Conservation sponsored by George Eastman House and the Image
Permanence Institute (IPI). In the following two years Hemmenway stayed on to work for the Program
developing a conservation library and performing duties as Program faculty such as advising and
mentoring fellows with conservation research, and lecturing on selected conservation and preservation
topics. Hemmenway has taught and lectured on various aspects of photograph conservation/preservation
on the undergraduate, graduate and professional levels, most recently for School of Library and
Information Science students at Catholic University. She was invited to speak at Preserving Photographs
in a Digital World, an annual seminar sponsored by IPI in 2001 and 2003, and Identification and Care of
Photographic Collections delivered at the Texas Association of Museums Annual Meeting in 1999. Her
professional presentations include: preparing collections for moving to offsite storage facilities, cleaning
of daguerreotypes, and identification of diazotypes.






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida

Budget Narrative

UF will use NEH grant funds to contract with SAA to provide four workshops in Florida. The service fees
for presenting four workshops total $24,575 and include:
Instructors honoraria, per diem, and lodging
Travel (airfare, portal to portal, parking)
Printing & shipping of course handouts, booklets, certificates and other materials.
Administrative fees covering the costs to process registrations for workshops, to make instructor
arrangements, to promote the workshops, and to analyze the workshop evaluations.
Workshop participants in the Understanding Photographs workshop also will receive copies of the SAA
publication, Photographs: Archival Care and Management, by Mary Lynn Ritzenthaler and Diane Vogt-
O'Connor, valued at $84.95.

The budget includes $1,000 for administrative fees to host sites for providing training facilities for the
four workshops. This amount includes an estimated $250 per workshop based on facility rates at the
regional facilities used for workshops during the previous Opening Archives projects.

UF and its partners will contribute over 30% cost share for the project, consisting of salaries and benefits
for members of the project Steering Group. UF uses a contracted indirect cost rate of 26% for off-campus
instruction projects. The total indirect cost is 26% of the direct NEH funds ($25,575) and the salary and
benefits for UF employee John Nemmers ($3,336). The total cost share, $10,141, includes $867 in
indirect costs.






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida


List of Participants

Beale, Judith. University of Central Florida. Project participant; steering group member.
Caplan, Priscilla. Florida Center for Library Automation. Project participant; steering group
member.
Estorino, Maria. Cuban Heritage Collection, University of Miami. Author of letter of support.
Nemmers, John. University of Florida. Project director; steering group member.
Rimkus, Kyle. University of Miami (FL). Project participant; steering group member.
Summers, Carla. Matheson Museum, Inc. Author of letter of support.
Taylor, Tomaro. University of South Florida. Project participant; steering group member.
Woodward, Eddie. Florida State University. Project participant; steering group member.
Zaidman, Michael. Jim Moran Foundation; Society of Florida Archivists. Author of letter of
support.

Workshop Instructors
[Note: Instructors for the four workshops are provided by the Society of American Archivists and will be
selected based on availability. Listed below are the possible instructors for the workshops.]

Flynn, Marcy Silver. Consultant, Silver Image Management. Possible instructor for
Understanding Photographs.
Hemmenway, Dana C. Library of Congress. Possible instructor for Understanding Photographs.
Holdzkom, Lynn. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Possible instructor for Describing
Archives: A Content Standard (DACS).
Landis, Bill. Yale University. Possible instructor for Describing Archives: A Content Standard
(DA CS).
Prom, Christopher J. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Possible instructor for
Imqeme)nting DACS... Using Archon.
Santamaria, Daniel A. Princeton University. Possible instructor for Ilmpementing "More Product,
Less Process.
Schwartz, Scott. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Possible instructor for
Implementing DACS... Using Archon.
Shepherd, Kelcy. University of Massachusetts Amherst. Possible instructor for Describing
Archives: A Content Standard (DACS).










National Endowment for the Humanities
Budget Form
Project Title: Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida

Project Director: John Nemmers
Applicant Organization: University of Florida
Requested Grant Period: February/2010 Thru January/2011


Section A Year #1
Budget detail for the period from:


February/2010 Thru January/2011


1. Salaries & Wages


Name/Title of Position
Nemmers, J./UF Descriptive Archivist (Project Director)
Beale, J./UCF Senior Archivist
Caplan, P./FCLA Digital Library Services Asst. Director
Rimkus, K./UM Digital Projects Librarian
Taylor, T./USF Assistant University Librarian


Computation
Method

5% of $52,163
2% of $36,407
2% of $93,129
2% of $55,640
2% of $46,275


NEH Cost
Funds (a) Share (b)


$2,608
$ 728
$1,863
$1,113
$ 926


Subtotal Salaries & Wages


$ $ 7,237 $ 7,237


2. Fringe Benefits


Salary Base
$4,471
$ 728
$1,113
$ 926


NEH Cost
Funds (a) Share (b)
$ $1,246
$ $ 247
$ $ 284
$ $ 259


Subtotal Fringe Benefits


Total (c)
$1,246
$ 247
$ 284
$ 259


$ $ 2,037 $ 2,037


3. Consultant Fees
Include payments for professional and technical consultants and honoraria.


Name of consultant


No. of
days


NEH Cost
Funds (a) Share (b)


Daily rate of compensation


SUB-TOTAL


4. Travel

From/To


Subsistence
Costs +


SUB-TOTAL


Total (c)

$2,608
$ 728
$1,863
$1,113
$ 926


Rate
27.90%
33.95%
25.50%
28.00%


Total (c)










5. Supplies and Materials


Computation
Method


SUB-TOTAL


Basis/Method
of Cost
Computation
6. Services

Four SAA Workshops Itemized budget attached
Facility Rental for Four Workshops (Sites to be determined)

SUB-TOTAL


NEH Cost
Funds (a) Share (b)


$ 24,575 $
$1,000 $
$- $
$ 25,575 $


7. Other Direct Costs


Item
SUB-TOTAL


8. Total Direct Costs (TDC)


Basis/Method
of Cost
Computation


NEH Cost
Funds (a) Share (b)
$- $-


$ 9,274 $ 34,849


Item


NEH
Funds (a)
$-
$-


Cost
Share (b)
$-
$-


Total (c)
$-
$ -


Total (c)


$24,575
$1,000
$-
$ 25,575


Total (c)
$ -


$ 25,575











Four SSA Workshops Budget Detail


SAA Fees for Understanding Photographs 2-day workshop (2 instructors)
Honorarium, per diem, and lodging $ 3,260
Travel (airfare, portal to portal, parking) $ 1,500
Printing & shipping of materials $ 400
Supplies & Certificates $ 100
"Photographs: Archival Care and
Management" publication for participants $ 775
SAA Administrative fee $1,840
Total $ 7,875

SAA Fees for Implementing DACS-Archon 2-day workshop (2 instructors)
Instructors honoraria, per diem, and lodging $ 3,260
Travel (airfare, portal to portal, parking) $1,500
Printing & shipping of materials $ 400
Supplies & Certificates $100
SAA Administrative fee $1,840
Total $ 7,100

SAA Fees for Implementing MPLP 1-day workshop
Instructor honorarium, per diem, and lodging $1,000
Travel (airfare, portal to portal, parking) $ 750
Printing & shipping of materials $ 400
Supplies & Certificates $100
SAA Administrative fee $2,550
Total $ 4,800

SAA Fees for DACS 1-day workshop
Instructor honorarium, per diem, and lodging $1,000
Travel (airfare, portal to portal, parking) $ 750
Printing & shipping of materials $ 400
Supplies & Certificates $100
SAA Administrative fee $2,550
Total $ 4,800











9. Indirect Cost Computation


This budget item applies only to institutional applicants. If indirect costs are to be charged to this project, CHECK
THE APPROPRIATE BOX BELOW and provide the information requested. Refer to the budget instructions for
explanations of these options.

X Current indirect cost rates) has/have been negotiated with federal agency. (Complete items A and B.)


_ Indirect cost proposal has been submitted to a federal agency, but not yet negotiated. (Indicate the name of
the agency in Item A and show proposed rates) and base(s) and the amounts) of indirect costs in item B.)

_ Indirect cost proposal will be sent to NEH if application is funded. (Provide in Item B an estimate of the rate
that will be used and indicate the base against which it will be charged and the amount of indirect costs.)

_ Applicant chooses to use a rate not to exceed 10% of direct costs, less distorting items, up to a maximum
charge of $5,000 per year. (Under Item B, enter the proposed rate, the base against which the rate will be
charged, and the computation of indirect costs or $5,000 per year, whichever value is less.)

_ For Public Program projects only: Applicant is a sponsorship (umbrella) organization and chooses to charge
an administrative fee of 5% of total direct costs. (Complete Item B.)


Item A. Name of federal agency: DHHS
Date of agreement: 1-Jul-06


Item B.


Rate(s)
Year 1 26.00%


Base(s)
$28,911
TOTAL INDIRECT PROJECT COSTS


NEH Cost
Funds (a) Share (b)

$6,650 $86
$6,650 $86


Total (c)


7 $7,517
7 $7,517


$ 32,225 $10,141 $ 42,366


10. Total Project Costs












National Endowment for the Humanities
Summary Budget
Project Title: Advancing Access and Preservation Be,


;t Practices in Florida


TOTAL COSTS FOR
First Year ENTIRE GRANT PERIOD


Budget categories
1. Salaries & wages
2. Fringe benefits
3. Consultant fees
4. Travel
5. Supplies & materials
6. Services
7. Other costs
8. Total direct costs
9. Indirect costs
10. Total project costs

1. REQUESTED FROM NEH

Outright

Federal Matching

TOTAL NEH FUNDING


$ 7,237
$ 2,037
$-
$-
$-
$ 25,575
$-
$ 34,849
$7,517
$ 42,366


$ 32,225 Applicant's contributions
Third-party contributions
$ Project income
Other federal agencies
$ 32,225 TOTAL COST SHARING


3. TOTAL PROJECT FUNDING (Total NEH Funding + Total Cost Sharing):


$ 7,237
$ 2,037
$-
$-
$-
$ 25,575
$-
$ 34,849
$7,517
$ 42,366


2. COST SHARING


$ 4,203
$ 5,938
$-
$-
$10,141


_ _


$ 42,366






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida
University of Florida








Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida




APPENDICES

Appendix A: Letters of Support

Appendix B: Selected Comments from Opening Archives Training Participants and Survey
Respondents in Florida

Appendix C: Tentative Questions for Florida Education Needs Survey

Appendix D: Sample SAA Workshop Evaluation Form

Appendix E: Project Director Resume

Appendix F: Letters of Commitment










Appendix A
Letters of Support


Appendix A 1













FLORIDA DEPARTMENT of STATE

CHARLIE CRIST STATE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF FLORIDA KURT S. BROWNING
Governor Secretary of State

June 25, 2009



Mr. John R. Nemmers
Special and Area Studies Collections
University of Florida Smathers Libraries
Gainesville, FL 32611-7005

Dear Mr. Nemmers:

On behalf of the Florida State Historical Records Advisory Board and the State Archives of Florida, I want to
express our strong support for the grant project Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida,
proposed by the University of Florida and its partners. One of the goals of the State Board, identified in its
strategic plan, is to increase the public's access to historical records held in Florida's repositories. This project
would help considerably in achieving this goal through the development of additional finding aids and other
access tools. There is an extremely high demand for education in Florida. Although a statewide Encoded
Archival Description training program, Opening Archives, has existed for the last few years, Florida archivists
need additional educational opportunities in basic practices and standards pertaining to preservation and access.

This one-year project will provide free training in four workshops to approximately 130 archivists, librarians,
curators and other professionals in accepted preservation and archival documentation practices and standards. The
workshops will be conducted by expert instructors provided by the Society of American Archivists (SAA).
Participants will include a good mix of archivists from research universities, colleges, historical societies, state
and local governments, businesses and other repositories of historical records. By holding the workshops in
Orlando, Tampa and the Miami area, most participants will enjoy easy and inexpensive travel. This is especially
important when most organizations now have limited travel funds.


Sincerely,





Gerard Clark
State Archivist and Deputy Coordinator
State Historical Records Advisory Board


DIRECTOR'S OFFICE
R.A. Gray Building 500 South Bronough Street Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0250
(850) 245-6600 FAX: (850) 245-6735 TDD: (850) 922-4085 http://dlis.dos.state.fl.us
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT STATE LIBRARY OF FLORIDA STATE ARCHIVES OF FLORIDA
(850) 245-6600 FAX: (850) 245-6643 (850) 245-6600 FAX: (850) 245-6744 (850) 245-6700 FAX: (850) 488-4894


LEGISLATIVE LIBRARY SERVICE
(850) 488-2812 FAX: (850) 488-9879


RECORDS MANAGEMENT SERVICES
(850) 245-6750 FAX: (850) 245-6795


ADMINISTRATIVE CODE AND WEEKLY
(850) 245-6270 FAX: (850) 245-6282






THE

TMI FOUNDATION
"THE FUTURE BELONGS TO THOSE WHO PREPARE FOR IT."


Board of Directors
Jan Moran
Chairman and President
Founding Director


Larry McGinnes
Vice President
Founding Director


Melanie Burgess
Executive Director
Secretary
Founding Director


Tom Blanton
Treasurer
Assistant Secretary
Founding Director


Dr. Melvin T. Stith
C.,F.r1 rdi D-


or'Ut


June 22,2009


John R. Nemmers
Special and Area Studies Collections
University of Florida Smathers Libraries
Gainesville, FL 32611-7005

Dear Mr. Nemmers,

The Society of Florida Archivists (SFA) offers its full support and complete endorsement
of the grant project Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida as
proposed by the University of Florida and its partners. The opportunities that would be
presented to improve the care and management of archival collections throughout the state
would be invaluable to all those working in the field from graduate students to experienced
professionals.

Over the past year, members of SFA and the Florida Association of Museums Foundation
conducted collaborative statewide forums intended to document risk assessment for
Florida's diverse archival collections. These evaluations definitively indicted a significant
need for advanced training in the preservation, digitization and on-line access of Florida's
diverse collections.


S To achieve this objective, the one-year project will provide four free training workshops for
approximately 130 archivists, librarians, curators and other professionals throughout the
state with easy and inexpensive travel costs. The workshops will be conducted in Orlando,
Director Tampa and the Miami area by expert instructors from the Society of American Archivists.
Participants will represent archivists from research universities, colleges, historical
societies, state and local governments, businesses and other repositories of historical
Rink Nnland records.


Assistant Treasurer
Director



Legal Counsel

Francis B Brogan, Jr., Esq.





In Memory of
Jim Moran
Founder
1918-2007


I personally offer my best wishes for the success of the grant, so that I may enhance my
archival education. The members of SFA would greatly benefit from, and certainly look
forward to participating in the proposed workshops as well.

Sincerely,



Michael Zaidman
Senior Archival Administrator, The Jim Moran Foundation
Vice-President, Society of Florida Archivists


100 JIM MORAN BOULEVARD, DEERFIELD BEACH, FLORIDA 33442
Phone: 954 429 2122 Fax: 954 429 2699 www.jimmoranfoundation.org




352-378-1216 p.1


ALACHUA COUNTY H-ISTORIC LRsI'Rl;S

4 >g y^C4%J.{;


513 East University Avenue
Gainesville, Florida 32601

Telephone: 352.378.2280
Fax; 352.378,2286
www.math esonmuseum.org
A $ *
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Patricia Hilliard-Nunn, Ph. D
President
Mark V. Barrow, Ph. D
Vice President
Ivy Bell
Secretay
Barry D. Baumstein
Treasurer
V. ,
David L. Autl, Ph.D.
Donald Caton, M. D.
Jim Craig
James G. Cusick, Ph..D.
Jack E, Davis, Ph.D.
Philip Dclancy
Von Fraser
Carolyn Frederick
.Debbie Gallagher
KendTa illum
Sam H. Gofortt
D. Henrichs
Mildred A. Hill-Lubin, Ph.D.
Sol M. Hirsch
J. K. "Buddy" Irby
Clayton Kallman
Parker Lawrence
Harold McCee, ASLA, CSI
Rebecca M. Nagy
Jolln R. Nemmers
Paud Ortiz, Ph.D.
Ann P. Smith

EMERITUS
Sandra P. Burnett
Anne M. Clayton
Mary Ann H. Cofrin
William King
Marines H, Lateur


June 24, 2009

John R. Nemmers
Special and Area Studies Collections
University of Florida Smathers Libraries
Gainesville, FL 32611-7005

Dear Mrefmers

This letter is to express my enthusiastic support forAdvancing
Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida, proposed by
the University of Florida and its partners. I have been an archivist
in Florida fTr over 32 years and can assure you that there is a great
need to advance best practices through education. I was involved
in the design phase of the statewide Encoded Archival Description
training program, Opening Archives, which has existed for the last
few years and done so much. I feel this new project will continue
to enhance educational opportunities in basic practices and
standards pertaining to preservation and access through providing
free training in four workshops to approximately 130 archivists,
librarians, curators and other professionals in accepted preservation
and archival documentation practices and standards. The
workshops will be conducted by expert instructors provided by the
Society of American Archivists (SAA) exposing Florida archivists
to the professionalism that SAA represents as well as to excellent
educational content Participants will include a good mix of
archivists from research universities, colleges, historical societies,
state and local governments, businesses and other repositories of
historical records.

Sincerely,



Carlt M. Summers, CA, CRM
Executive Director
exccutivedirector@,mathesonmuseum.org


Jun 24 09 11:25a


Matheson Museum, Inc.






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida


Appendix B
Selected Comments from Opening Archives Training Participants and Survey Respondents in
Florida

Throughout the Opening Archives training projects in 2005-06 and 2007-08, project staff collected useful
feedback through questionnaires, email and comments made by participants. The following are
representative comments received:

"Thank you for organizing this important educational program for Florida archivists."

"[The workshop] was an excellent workshop. I am now aware of... enough knowledge to be able to apply
for funding for hiring a [full time] person to create EAD finding aids."

"Everyone I've talked to has found [the workshop] valuable and there's a need for more people to be
trained."

"This is a really fabulous project. With so many in the museum and archives field in Florida lacking basic
training and knowledge to preserve and process the precious collections in their care there is a huge need
for training that emphasizes the basics as well as best practices for archival arrangement and description.
My staff came back from the workshop feeling they learned just as much about best practices and
arrangement and description as they did about EAD, and I feel much more confident in my skills. Thank
you!"

"I learned a lot more than I expected."

"I totally admire [the trainers]. They were amazing. They had great knowledge and were wonderful
trainers. They were among a few great instructors I've ever had. They were well paced, patient, and
extremely knowledgeable. Thanks to [the trainers] and kudos to [FCLA and the partners] who made this
workshop possible."

"The instructors were great and the training was excellent. I'm a cataloger so I understand metadata, but
this was eye opening and educational."

"I need more workshops like this! I attended an EAD workshop many years ago, but I forgot a lot. This
really helped!"

"I never have enough time or money to learn new technology, so this was perfect!"

"I was so tired of seeing great workshops in other regions of the country that I couldn't sign up for. Now,
I've attended one in FL Finally!!"

"We need more of these SAA workshops in Florida! Appraisal, processing, etc. Bring 'em on!"


Appendix B 1







Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida


Appendix C
Tentative Questions for Florida Education Needs Survey

1. What obstacles prevent or hamper your efforts to obtain continuing education? Please rank each of the
following obstacles (Circle one for each: 3 = major obstacle; 2 = moderate obstacle; 1 = minor obstacle; 0
= not an obstacle):


Major
Obstacle


Moderate I Minor


Not an
Obstacle


Registration costs 3 2 1 0
Travel/lodging costs 3 2 1 0
Distance No local education opportunities, 3 2 1 0
too far to travel

No institutional/administrative support 3 2 1 0
No education opportunities relevant to my 3 2 1 0
needs

Other (please elaborate): 3 2 1 0



2. How much financial support did you receive from your employer last year for continuing education and
professional development (e.g., registration fees and/or travel/lodging to attend workshops, seminars,
etc.)?

3. Which of the following would you most like to learn more about in the next few years? (Select up to
10 responses)


Acquisition and appraisal
Architectural records
Archival Management Systems Archivists'
Toolkit
Archival Management Systems Archon
Arrangement
Business archives
Cataloging
Conservation general
Conservation of paper
Conservation of photographs
Conservation
Copyright
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
(DACS)
Description
Digital content management
Digitization
Disaster preparedness
Disaster recovery
Donor relations


EAD (Encoded Archival Description)
Electronic records appraisal and
accessioning
Electronic records description and access
Electronic records preservation and
storage
Ethics
Exhibitions
Fundraising
Grants
Legal Issues
Literary manuscripts
Management of cultural institutions
Maps/cartographic materials
Metadata
Micrographics/reformatting
Minimal level processing ("More Product,
Less Process")
Moving images (film, video)
Oral histories
Outreach/public relations


Appendix C 1






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida


Performing arts collections Privacy
Photographs Records management
Political collections Reference and access
Preservation general Security
Preservation of photographs Sound recordings
Preservation of sound recordings Web site creation/management
Preservation of moving images Other (Please specify)

4. From the list above, pick the one topic you would like most to learn more about in the next few
years:


5. How interested are you in obtaining continuing education and training from the following sources?
Workshops or seminars provided by national/international associations
Workshops or seminars provided by regional, state or local archival organizations
Workshops or seminars provided by your employer
Workshops or seminars provided by another provider
Self-directed (professional publications, training manuals, Web-based, tapes, or videos)
Non-degree college or university coursework
On-the-job training
Mentoring
Internships
Fellowships
Other (Please specify)
None of the above

6. Which of the following best describes your employer?
Academic Institution
Archives
Library/Special Collections
Museum
Historical Society
State/Federal Historic Park/Property
Government agency
Non-profit organization
For-profit organization
Self employed
Other (Please specify):

7. Please indicate the region of Florida in which you work.
Northeast Region
Northwest Region
North Central Region
East Central Region
Tampa Bay Region
South Central Region
Southeast Region
Southwest Region





Appendix C 2







Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida


Appendix D
Sample SAA Workshop Evaluation Form


PROGRAM EVALUATION FORM


Workshop Title:

Date: Location:

I. Assess the workshop from the standpoint of what you gained from the experience:
How well did the workshop meet the following stated objectives?

Not at all On target


New knowledge/skills acquired


Likelihood of applying concepts to your work


Expectations met per advertising/brochure

II. Rate the methods and materials relative to


Clarity of participant handouts

Content of participant handouts

Pre course readings

Exercises/group discussions

Clarity of audio-visual aids

Content of audio-visual aids


Very little
1

Not likely
1


Not at all
1

their value in

NA Poor
0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1

0 1


2 3 4 5
2 3 4 5
2 3 4 5
2 3 4 5
2 3 4 5

Substantial
2 3 4 5

Very likely
2 3 4 5


2 3

accomplishing


On target
5

workshop:

Outstanding
5

5

5

5

5

5


III. What aspect of the workshop methods/materials was most valuable to you? Why?


IV. What aspect of the workshop methods/materials would you change? Why?


Appendix D 1







Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida


V. How would you rate the individual instructors?

Instructor:


Knowledge of topic

Preparation

Ability to handle questions

Presentation skills

Additional Comments:


Instructor:


Knowledge of topic

Preparation

Ability to handle questions

Presentation skills

Additional Comments:


VI. How did you hear about this workshop?

VII. Please list other program topics you are interested in attending:


Appendix D


Poor
1

1

1

1


Outstanding
5

5

5

5


Poor
1

1

1

1


Outstanding
5

5

5

5






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida


Appendix E Project Director Resume

Vita of: John R. Nemmers
Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist
Assistant University Librarian

Selected Work Experience:
University of Florida
George A. Smathers Libraries, Special and Area Studies Collections, PO
Box 117007, Gainesville, FL 32611-7007
From: August 2003 To: Present
Title: Descriptive and Technical Services Archivist

Florida State University
Claude Pepper Library, 636 W. Call Street, Tallahassee, FL 32306-1123
From: August 1998 To: July 2003
Title: Project Archivist

Education:
Specialist in Education Florida State University Date: 1998
MS in Library Studies Florida State University Date: 1998
BA in History Florida State University Date: 1996

Selected Publications:
"Testing the Federated Searching Waters: A Usability Study of MetaLib" (with
Marilyn Ochoa, Rae Jesano, Carrie Newsom, Maryellen O'Brien and Paul Victor,
Jr.). Journal of Web Librarianship v.1 no. 3 (2007): 47-66.

"Metasearching: An Annotated Bibliography" (with LeiLani Freund & Marilyn
Ochoa). Internet Reference Services Quarterly 12 no. 3/4 (2007): 411-430. Also
published in Christopher N. Cox's Federated Search: Solution or Setback for
Online Library Services (Binghamton, NY : Haworth Information Press), 2007.

"Opening Archives: Improving Access to Hidden Archival Collections in Florida"
(with Elizabeth Konzak and Chuck Thomas). Florida Libraries 49 no. 2 (Fall 2006):
16-19.

Public Services in Special Collections (with Florence Turcotte). SPEC Kit 296
(Washington, D.C.: Association of Research Libraries), 2006.

Best Practice Guidelines for the Implementation of EAD Version 2002 in Florida
Institutions (available at: http://www.fcla.edu/dlini/OpeningArchives/), March 2006.

Florida's Political Past: A Guide to Manuscript Collections, Archival Records, and
Other Primary Historical Documents of Florida's Politicians. An annotated
bibliography (available at: http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pkyonge/political/flpols.htm),
March 2005.

"The Usability of Online Archival Resources: The Polaris Project Finding Aid" (with
Burt Altman). American Archivist 64 no. 1 (Spring/Summer 2001): 121-131.


Appendix E 1






Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida


Selected Papers and Presentations:
"Opening Archives in Florida: An Overview of Florida's Statewide EAD Training
and Support Program." Presented at the Society of American Archivists Annual
Meeting, August 2007.

"EAD Workflow Considerations" (with Salwa Ismail Patel and Chuck Thomas).
Presented at the Society of Florida Archivists Annual Meeting, May 2007.

"Introduction to EAD and Archival Description." Presented at the Tampa Bay
Library Consortium, May 2007.

"Uncovering Buried Treasure: Making Primary Sources Available" (with Elizabeth
Konzak and Chuck Thomas). Presented at the Florida Library Association
Conference, April 2007.

"A Usability Study of MetaLib: Process, Issues and Possible Solutions." Poster
session (with Marilyn Ochoa, Rae Jesano, Carrie Newsom, Maryellen O'Brien and
Paul Victor, Jr.). Presented at the American Library Association Annual
Conference, New Orleans, June 25, 2006.

"Archival Description and EAD." Presented at the Society of Florida Archivists
Annual Meeting, May 2006.

"Strategies for the Creation and Maintenance of EAD XML Finding Aids."
Presented at the Society of Florida Archivists Annual Meeting, April 2005.

"PALMM: Florida Heritage, Ephemeral Cities, and Florida Archival Collections."
Presented at the Society of Florida Archivists Annual Meeting, April 2004.

"The Claude Pepper Library: Digitization Initiatives." Presented at the Southern
American Studies Association Biennial Conference, February 2003.

Selected Grants:
2009. "America's Swamp: The Historical Everglades Project." National Archives and
Records Administration. Amount funded: $160,024.77. Funding dates: January
2009 December 2011. Role: Principal Investigator.

2005-2008. "Opening Archives: Improving Access to Primary Sources in Florida."
Department of State Division of Library and Information Services Library Services
and Technology Act (LSTA). Funding dates: 2005- 2006; 2007-2008. Role:
Steering Committee chair and Regional Trainer.

Selected Professional Activities:
Society of Florida Archivists, 1999- (Vice President, 2007-2009; Director, 2006-
2007)
Digital Development and Access Committee, Council of State University Libraries,
2003-2006


Appendix E 2







Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida


Appendix F
Letters of Commitment


Appendix F 1









"017' University of University Libraries
Central
Florida





June 23, 2009


John R. Nemmers
Special and Area Studies Collections
University of Florida Smathers Libraries
Gainesville, FL 32611-7005

Dear Mr. Nemmers:

The University of Central Florida is pleased to partner with the University of Florida in the grant
project Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida, funded by the National
Endowment for the Humanities Preservation and Access Education and Training program. Over
the past four years, UCF personnel have enthusiastically participated in the archival training
program, Opening Archives, both as instructors and trainees in workshops. The current project
is a logical continuation of this education endeavor. The one-year project will provide free
training in four workshops to 130 archivists, librarians, curators and other professionals in
accepted preservation and archival documentation practices and standards.

UCF will commit to Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida by approving
Judith Beale to serve as a member of the project steering group. She will serve no more than .02
FTE the entire year of funded activity, and this in-kind contribution will be offered as cost sharing
for the grant.

As a member of the project Steering Group, Judith will meet via phone or Internet as needed, in
order to coordinate the scheduling of the workshops. She will assist in promoting the workshops
and disseminating information about the project goals, methodology and outcomes at a variety
of forums, including state and local meetings of archivists, librarians, and curators. She will be
able to attend any or all of the four free archival workshops in Florida.

Sincerely,






Laila Miletic-Vejzovic


Laila Miletic-Vejzovic, Department Head
Special Collections and University Archives
P.O. Box 162666 Orlando, FL 32816-2666 (407) 823-2788 FAX (407) 823-2529
Imiletic@mail.ucf.edu
http://library.ucf.edu/SpecialCollections





FLORIDA C ENTI- E FOR LI UI-RY AUTOMATION
5830 N.W. 39TH AVENUE

Phone: (352) ;'"-'iL M Suncom: 622-9020 Fax: (352) :." 2-9185





June 22, 2009

John R. Nemmers
Special and Area Studies Collections
University of Florida Sm Ii.t t-r i Libraries
Gainesvillc. FL 32611-7005

Dear N I. Nemmers:

The Florida Center for Library Automation is pleased to partner with the University of
I. I. ti d. in the grant pi 'i.Li Ii s, i g Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida,
funded by the N:,il ,nal Endowment for the Humanities Preservation and Access
Education and Training program. Over the past eight years, has taken the lead in
developing and prl imotin the statewide archival training program, Opening Archives.
The current project is a logical continuation of this education endeavor. The one-year
project will provide free training in four workshops to 130 archivists, librarians, curators
and other professionals in accepted preservation and archival documentation practices
and standards.

FCLA will commit to A, hj.v, Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida by
a'pp rl in Priscilla Caplan to serve as a member of the project st-i i.g r:iup. She will
serve no more i-i a .02 FTE the entire year of funded activity, and this in-kind
contribution will be offered as cost sharing for the grant.

As a member of the project 1c. rci inI'U Group, Priscilla will meet via phone or Internet as
necdcd. 'in order to coordinate the scheduling of the workshops. She will assist in
prim1' tin i the v,. Irli -p-.1 and di .nmiraiiin information about the project goals,
Inclh,,d, h l;.. and outcomes at a variety of forums, including state and local meetings of
archivists, librarians, and curators. Priscilla will be able to jilcild any or all of the four
free archival ,. 1.-.hi ip, in Florida.

Sincerely,



SJames F. C, ':.
iy


AN AFFIRr.1 .TIVE ACTIOCl / EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER






UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI \ LIBRARIES


June 22, 2009

John R. Nemmers
Special and Area Studies Collections
University of Florida Smathers Libraries
Gainesville, FL 32611-7005

Dear Mr. Nemmers:

The University of Miami is pleased to partner with the University of Florida in the grant
project Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida, funded by the
National Endowment for the Humanities Preservation and Access Education and Training
program. Over the past few years, our personnel have enthusiastically participated in the
archival training program, Opening Archives. The current project is a logical continuation
of this education endeavor. The one-year project will provide free training in four
workshops to 130 archivists, librarians, curators and other professionals in accepted
preservation and archival documentation practices and standards.

The University of Miami will commit to Advancing Access and Preservation Best
Practices in Florida by approving Kyle Rimkus to serve as a member of the project
steering group. He will serve no more than .02 FTE the entire year of funded activity, and
this in-kind contribution will be offered as cost sharing for the grant.

As a member of the project Steering Group, Kyle will meet via phone or Internet as
needed, in order to coordinate the scheduling of the workshops. He will assist in
promoting the workshops and disseminating information about the project goals,
methodology and outcomes at a variety of forums, including state and local meetings of
archivists, librarians, and curators. He will be able to attend any or all of the four free
archival workshops in Florida.

Sincerely,





4r4hon *. SfrtU-
1-4 4t.. Zoo5






University of Miami Libraries 1300 Memorial Drive Coral Gables, Florida 33124-0320
Phone 305-284-3233 Fax 305-284-4027 www.library.miami.edu











UNIVERSITY OF
SOUTH FLORIDA


June 22, 2009

John R. Nemmers
Special and Area Studies Collections
University of Florida Smathers Libraries
Gainesville, FL 32611-7005

Dear Mr. Nemmers:

The University of South Florida is pleased to partner with the University of Florida in the
grant project Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida, funded by the
National Endowment for the Humanities Preservation and Access Education and Training
program. Over the past few years, our personnel have enthusiastically participated in the
archival training program, Opening Archives. The current project is a logical continuation of
this education endeavor. The one-year project will provide free training in four workshops
to 130 archivists, librarians, curators and other professionals in accepted preservation and
archival documentation practices and standards.

USF will commit to Advancing Access and Preservation Best Practices in Florida by
approving Tomaro Taylor to serve as a member of the project steering group. She will
serve no more than .02 FTE the entire year of funded activity, and this in-kind contribution
will be offered as cost sharing for the grant.

As a member of the project Steering Group, Tomaro will meet via phone or Internet as
needed, in order to coordinate the scheduling of the workshops. She will assist in
promoting the workshops and disseminating information about the project goals,
methodology and outcomes at a variety of forums, including state and local meetings of
archivists, librarians, and curators. She will be able to attend any or all of the four free
archival workshops in Florida.

Sincerely,





Mark I. Greenberg, MLS, Ph.D.
Director, Special & Digital Collections Department


TAMPA LIBRARY SPECIAL & DIGITAL COLLECTIONS
University of South Florida 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, LIB 122 +Tampa, FL 33620-5400
813-974-2731* FAX 813-396-9006; http://www.lib.usf.edu