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NEWS l etter of the History of Science Society Vol. 40, No. 2 April 2011 Table of Contents Notes from the Inside 3 News and Inquiries 5 In Memoriam 18 Member News 21 Yanked From the Margins 28 How Science, Policy, Gender, and History Meet each Other Once a Year 30 Donors List Calendar Year 2010 33 THE INT ER N A TI O N AL YEAR OF CHEM I S T R Y In honor of the International Year of Chemistry, we have reprinted three articles Reunited (and It Feels So Good), Palmer the Poisoner, and rough the Looking Glass all by James Voelkel, the Curator of Rare Books at the Chemical Heritage Foundation. ese articles rst appeared in Chemical Heritage, the magazine of the Chemical Heritage Foundation, and we are grateful for permission to reproduce them here. REUNITED (AND IT FEELS SO GOOD) By James Voelkel English physician Henry Stubbe (1632) was a man of strong convictions who did not hesitate to publish them. In fact, his superabundance of opinions and his inability to leave well enough alone make his books an excellent illustration of a feature of 17thcentury publishing that 21st-century readers may not appreciate. In the 17th century some books particularly in England grew by accretion. e result was complicated books in which earlier title pages often appear in the middle of a book, causing headaches for modern collectors and curators as they try to untangle questions of edition, issue, and state. An unhappy outcome is that Henry Stubbes biting critiques of the Royal Society, originally appended together but separated over time, were happily reunited by CHF [Chemical Heritage Foundation] 338 years after publication. Image courtesy of the Othmer Library of Chemical History, CHF; Roy G. Neville Historical Chemical Library, CHF. Continued on Page 2

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2 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter a later edition is considered defective if it lacks one of its constituent parts. Happily, the Chemical Heritage Foundations Othmer Library of Chemical History recently made a defective book whole by reuniting it with its other parts. Stubbe combined a prodigious skill in Greek and Latin with a thorough knowledge of history and mathematics and a great respect for the ancient physicians. One day he heard a man quip that all ancient science was useless to the physician and did not so much as contribute to the cure of a cut nger. When pressed, the wag said that this was an opinion of Joseph Glanvill and the other members of the recently founded Royal Society. Outraged, Stubbe began writing an impassioned screed against the Royal Society. His rst target was Glanvill. After reading Glanvills Plus Ultra, Or, e Progress and Advancement of Knowledge Since the Days of Aristotle (1668), Stubbe composed a scathing critique. He titled it A Specimen of Some Animadversions upon a Book Entitled Plus Ultra, Or, Modern Improvements of Useful Knowledge Written by Joseph Glanvill, a Member of the Royal Society which he had printed in the spring of 1670. When the book arrived, Stubbe decided that his To the Reader note did not suciently express his outrage and that the title didnt contain enough vitriol. So he composed a new preface and a zingier title: e Plus Ultra reduced to a Non Plus: Or, A Specimen of some Animadversions upon the Plus Ultra of Mr. Glanvill, wherein sundry Errours of Some Virtuosi are discovered, the Credit of the Aristotelians in part Re-advanced; and Enquiries followed by 12 bullet points detailing his rebuttal of Glanvill. ese additional seven sheets were printed and appended to the front of the book. A copy of the book in this state found its way to bibliophile Roy G. Neville, whose collection is housed in the Othmer Library. In the meantime it had become clear to Stubbe that omas Sprat also needed to be taken to task for his History of the Royal Society (1667). To be sure, both Sprat and Glanvill had been almost giddy in their unabashed promotion of the Royal Society. Why else publish a laudatory history of a society that was barely ve years old? Stubbe sought to bring them down to earth with another 1670 publication titled Legends no Histories: Or, A Specimen of some Animadversions upon the History of the Royal Society which, after two long sentences further elaborating the contents, ended Together With the Plus Ultra of Mr. Joseph Glanvill reduced ED IT OR I AL POL ICI ES, ADVER TI S IN G A N D SUBM I SS I O N S The History of Science Society Newsletter is published in January, April, July, and October, and sent to all individual members of the Society. The Newsletter is edited and published in the Executive Oce. The format and editorial policies are determined by the Executive Director in consultation with the Committee on Publications and the Society Editor. All advertising copy must be submitted in electronic form. Advertisements are accepted on a space-available basis only, and the Society reserves the right not to print a submission. The rates are as follows: Full page (7 x 9.25), $625; Horizontal or Vertical Half page (7 x 4.6), $375; Quarter page (3.5 x 4.6), $225. The deadline for insertion orders is six weeks prior to the month of publication and should be sent to the attention of the HSS Executive Oce. The deadline for news, announcements, and job/fellowship/ prize listings is rm: Six weeks prior to the month of publication. Long items (feature stories) should be submitted eight weeks prior to the month of publication. Please send all material to the attention of the executive oce: info@hssonline.org. 2011 by the History of Science Society EXE C U TI VE OFF IC E (N EW ADDRESS, EFFE CTI VE 16 AUG 10) History of Science Society 440 Geddes Hall University of Notre Dame Notre Dame, IN 46556 Phone: 574-631-1194; Fax: 574-631-1533 E-mail: info@hssonline.org Web site: http://www.hssonline.org/ SUBS C R IPTI O N IN QU I R I ES University of Chicago Press Phone: 877-705-1878; Fax 877-705-1879 E-mail: subscriptions@press.uchicago.edu Or write: University of Chicago Press, Subscription Fulllment Manager, PO Box 37005, Chicago, IL 60637-7363 Moving? Please notify both the HSS Executive Oce and the University of Chicago Press. History of Science Society THE INT ER N A TI O N AL YEAR OF CHEM I S T R Y Continued from Page 1 Continued on Page 9

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3 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter NSF Awards HSS Travel Grant After some months of anxiety regarding the status of the Societys latest application for travel grants for graduate students, independent scholars, and recent PhDs to attend the annual meetings, I was delighted to learn that the National Science Foundation has funded this important grant. e anxiety a byproduct of these types of appeals and the fact that our prior grant had expired was intensied by the talk of severe budget cuts in the history of science at NSF. at the panel and NSF chose to fund this latest application speaks to the many supporters and friends we enjoy in the eld. e new grant marks a departure in several ways from earlier travel grants, which have been a vital part of HSS meetings since the mid 1990s. As an accommodation to the budget crisis in the US, the grants duration was reduced from 5 to 3 years (for the 2011, 2012 and 2013 conferences) and, most signicantly, only those who are US citizens or who are attending US schools are eligible. (is is an unfortunate development that we hope we can correct, in part, by raising money for non-US scholars to attend our conferences.) e biggest change, though, is the expansion of the grant to include other academic societies. Earlier grant iterations involved 4 Societies: HSS, PSA, SHOT, and 4S. is new version expands the list to 7 societies: HSS, PSA, SHOT, the American Society for Environmental History (ASEH), the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science (HOPOS), the International Society for the History, Philosophy and Social Studies of Biology (ISHPSSB), and the International Society for the Psychology of Science and Technology (ISPST). (I had hoped to include the American Association for the History of Medicine but NSF will not fund AAHM in this way.) e main reason for the expansion was to foster closer ties with these groups, many of which are familiar to our members. I know the ocers and/or presidents of all but one of these organizations and have been impressed by the work that they do. I was able to meet with ocers from PSA, ISHPSSB, and HOPOS in Montral to explore some of the collaborative features of the grant and came away from that meeting with a new enthusiasm for working together. As disciplinary boundaries increasingly blur, this type of collaboration will become all the more important to the history of science. Application forms for the travel grants will become available on the HSS website, shortly after the publication of the preliminary program (only those participating in the program are eligible). Applicants to the other societies conferences will need to contact the individual societies for information about their grants. HSS will provide administrative oversight for all of the grants, including the annual audits, standardization of forms and procedures, reimbursement of the societies, annual reports, etc. It should be noted, and with emphasis, that the direct costs associated the administration of these grants are not covered entirely by the grant itself. In fact, the grants would not be possible without your membership in the HSS and from the generous support of the Executive Oce by Notre Dame. We view such administrative oversight as a courtesy to the profession, a courtesy that would not be possible without your membership and support. ank you for your membership in the HSS. Jay Malone, HSS Executive Director Notes from the Inside

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4 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter NOTRE DAMES REILLY CENTER SEEKING RESEARCH ASSISTANT DIRECTOR The University of Notre Dames Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values ( http://reilly.nd.edu/ ) is a privately endowed center that is home to a wide array of educational, research, and outreach programs. We host a ve-year, Arts & Letters/Engineering dual-degree program, an undergraduate Science, Technology, and Values Program, and a Graduate Program in History and Philosophy of Science. We sponsor conferences on topics ranging from the regulation of nanomaterials and the impact of Darwin in the 21st century to the history of astronomy and Galileo and the Church. A book series, an e-journal, online lectures, and ethics workshops bring our faculty and students into contact with a broad campus constituency, policy makers, and the general public. We welcome a diverse group of visiting scholars in the Center. A rapidly expanding research agenda includes collaborations with scientists and engineers working on nanotechnology, environmental change, advanced diagnostics and therapeutics, genomics, and many other topics. Among our own research projects is a multifaceted initiative on the ethics of emerging weapons technologies. The Reilly Center now seeks to hire a Research Assistant Director. This Ph.D.-level position will provide support and direction for the Centers research collaborations and initiatives. We seek an individual with training and experience in the sciences, engineering, science policy, the history, philosophy, or sociology of science, or other relevant disciplines and with a serious commitment to exploring questions about the ethical and societal impacts of science and technology. Experience in grant writing is essential. Strong leadership potential, communication skills, and management experience will all be advantages. In addition to coordinating the Centers research activities, this individual will be expected to produce original research on topics related to the Reilly Centers mission. The Research Assistant Director will report to the Reilly Centers incoming Director, Prof. Don Howard, and will join a team that includes an Assistant Director for Educational Programs, a Communication and Outreach Coordinator, an Administrative Assistant, and the fty Notre Dame faculty who are Reilly Center Fellows. The salary will be commensurate with the candidates experience and skill level. APPLICATION PROCESS: Please apply online at http://ND.jobs to Job #11131 or visit https://jobs.nd.edu/applicants/ Central?quickFind=56618 For further information about the Reilly Center and its many programs, please visit our web site: http://reilly.nd.edu Queries about the Assistant Director position should be directed to Prof. Don Howard, Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values, 453 Geddes Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, 574-631-7547/1147, dhoward1@nd.edu Interested applicants should submit to the same address: (1) a formal letter of application outlining ones background, qualications, and career goals; (2) a curriculum vitae; (3) a 3-4 page statement of research interests and research projects that one would like to pursue; and (4) contact information for at least three references. The review of applications will begin at the end of April 2011. For additional information about working at the University of Notre Dame and various benets available to employees, please visit http://hr.nd.edu/why-nd The University of Notre Dame is committed to diversity ( http://diversity.nd.edu/ ) in its sta, faculty, and student body. As such, we strongly encourage applications from members of minority groups, women, veterans, individuals with disabilities, and others who will enhance our community. The University of Notre Dame, an international Catholic research university, is an equal opportunity/armative action employer.

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5 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter NEWS A N D IN QU I R I ES History of Heart Transplantation Lecture On 25 January 2011, Dr. David Cooper presented a lecture on Christiaan Barnard and the history of heart transplantation to the C. F. Reynolds Medical History Society at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Cooper, when he was in Capetown, performed heart transplants with Barnard, and so has rst-hand stories of the man and his work. is presentation is now available for viewing online at: http://mediasite.cidde.pitt.edu/mediasite/Viewer/? peid=0934815fd4154df984f71032e0fe61d1 New Open Access to the Isis Bibliography By Stephen P. Weldon, HSS Bibliographer I am pleased to announce two new ways to access the Isis Bibliography making large portions of the bibliography freely available to researchers worldwide. First, the HSS website now provides open access copies of the last several published bibliographies (from 2004 to 2009, reserving only the most recent volume for subscribing members). ese are all searchable PDF documents that include all relevant front and back matter as well as bookmarks for easy navigation within the document. Second, the Isis Bibliography data can now be accessed in database form through WorldCat.org, a free, open-access database hosted by OCLC. Currently, this data comprises that from CBs 2000 to 2009. e source of our data is noted in every record as ISIS Bibliography of the History of Science; History of Science, Technology, and Medicine Database. Since the WorldCat.org database includes records from resources all over the world, having our records tagged this way means that anyone pulling up one of our records will know where it came from, and will see that the Society has contributed directly to this worldwide open scholarship initiative. In addition, a particularly useful lter exists for historians who seek to look just at the Isis data. By adding xisi2 in the keyword search box, in addition to any other search words, only Isis data will be returned. All of this makes WorldCat.org a perfect place for accessing bibliographical data for individuals who are neither Society members or who are unaliated with a library subscribing to the HSTM database. ose using WorldCat.org, will nd that it is not as robust a search engine as OCLCs subscription search engine subject index terms, for example, are not displayed nor does this database contain the most recent data; here again, the data from the most recent years bibliography is withheld. e WorldCat.org database, however, oers the great advantage of providing an open resource for researchers of all kinds to nd peer-reviewed and scholarly citations. ose who would like to try this search engine can go directly to the url: http://www.worldcat.org/ or they can go to the Isis CB website, where I have included a search box on the front page with a brief discussion of its use and limitations: http://www.ou.edu/cas/hsci/isis/website/index.html 19th Century American Science Website Announcement Clark A. Elliotts website on 19th-century American science has a new URL: http://historyofscienceinthe unitedstates-19thcentury.net Although the content remains the same, the design and layout are newly refurbished (by Andrew J. Elliott). e site features aids for research produced through 2007, including bibliographies of reference works, books (by subject), and a searchable chronology of science in the United States, 1790

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6 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter 1910. Also available on the site is a downloadable bibliography (in Excel) of books on all periods of American science (not just the 19th century). is compilation is taken from the new books section of the Forum for the History of Science in America newsletter, News & Views from 1980 to 2007. Dissertations in the History of Science and Technology e latest group of recent doctoral dissertations pertaining to the history of science and technology can be viewed at the following URL: http://www.hsls.pitt.edu/histmed/dissertations Colloquium: 50th Anniversary of Eisenhowers Farewell Address An afternoon seminar commemorating the 50th anniversary of President Dwight D. Eisenhowers Farewell Address took place Tuesday, January 18, in the AAAS Auditorium in downtown Washington. AAAS and the Consortium for Science, Policy, and Outcomes (CSPO) of Arizona State University cosponsored the seminar. President Eisenhowers address is mainly remembered for his warning of the perils of a military-industrial complex. Less widely known, but no less important was his caution, a few sentences later, about the danger that public policy could itself become the captive of a scientic-technological elite. is seminar explored the historical context and current relevance of Eisenhowers worries about this scientictechnological elite. e seminar featured a panel of veteran science policy observers moderated by Steve Lagerfeld, editor of e Wilson Quarterly Joining Lagerfeld on the panel were: Dan Greenberg, science journalist and author of several books on science policy, Gregg Pascal Zachary, author of the authoritative biography of Vannevar Bush, William Lanouette, a journalist on science policy and from 1991 to 2006 a senior analyst on energy and science issues at GAO, and Dan Sarewitz, co-director of CSPO. Further Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VtIZBcWBcis CFP: KronoScope: Journal for the Study of Time Edited by an international board of scholars and representing the interdisciplinary investigation of all subjects related to time and temporality, the journal is dedicated to the cross-fertilization of scholarly ideas from the humanities, ne arts, sciences, medical and social sciences, business and law, design and technology, and all other innovative and developing elds exploring the nature of time. KronoScope invites critical contributions from all disciplines; we accept submissions on a continuing basis. Manuscripts of not more than 8000 words, and using e Chicago Manual of Style may be submitted electronically to the Managing Editor Dr. C. Clausius at cclausiu@uwo.ca We also welcome review articles as well as creative work pertaining to studies in temporality. For further submission guidelines, please visit the Brill website at: http://www.brill.nl/kron or the International Society for the Study of Time website at http://www.studyoftime.org/ CFP: Expositions (Villanova University) Expositions is an on-line journal where scholars from various disciplines gather as colleagues to converse about common texts and questions in the humanities. We seek to publish two types of contributions: Articles that either have an interdisciplinary character and appeal or are exemplary in their respective disciplines while being of interest to those from other disciplines, or notes, insights and reections on Teaching the Great Books that benet teaching, research, and the life of the academy. ese contributions include: notes that reect upon or challenge existing scholarship; and, insights that provide intriguing new paths of interpretation and close analysis of a text and/or that are just too exuberant, provocative, or risky to t in an ordinary article. Word-length will typically be 1,000 to 3,000. Our next issue will appear in April 2011. For more information, contact Greg Hoskins ( gregory.hoskins@villanova.edu ) Phone: (610) 519-8100; Fax: (610) 519-5410.

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7 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter D.C. Art & Science Evening Rendezvous (DASER) D.C. Art & Science Evening Rendezvous (DASER) partnered with Leonardo ( http://www.leonardo.info/ ), the International Society for the Arts, Sciences, and Technology, to present D.C. Art and Science Evening Rendezvous (DASER), a monthly discussion forum on art and science projects in the national capital region. DASERs provided the public with a snapshot of the cultural environment of the region and fostered interdisciplinary networking. e monthly series began on 16 February 2011 at 6 p.m. at the Keck Center. Historically, the artist has communicated, educated, and preserved the ideas of science. But how is the work of scientists, engineers, physicians, and experts from other disciplines informed by the creative processes of artists? How do artists use science and technology to advance the creative and cultural discourse? In the D.C. metropolitan area, practitioners from many institutions, including universities, museums, and embassies are interested in the ways that various disciplines inform one another with tangible results. Each DASER featured presentations by such practitioners along with time for discussion and socializing. e February 16 kick-o event included presentations by Lee Boot, associate director, Imaging Research Center, University of Maryland, Baltimore County; Carol Christian, scientist, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore; Gunalan Nadarajan, vice provost, Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore; and omas Skalak, vice president for research and professor of biomedical engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville. Upcoming DASERs are scheduled on April 21, May 19, June 16, and July 21, 2011. Future speakers include Pamela Jennings of the Computer & Information Science & Engineering Department, National Science Foundation, Arlington, Va., Max Kazemzadeh, assistant professor of art and media technology, Gallaudet University, Washington, D.C., and Jane Milosch, director, WWII-Era Provenance Research Project, Smithsonian Institution. Publication of Special Issue of Atlantic Studies A recent special issue of Atlantic Studies was dedicated to science and medicine in the Atlantic world: Itineraries of Atlantic science new questions, new approaches, new directions. is special issue contains 5 original essays, an editorial introduction, an interview with Bernard Bailyn, a set of collective reections on the 2009 Harvard International Seminar on Atlantic History, and three book reviews. Two additional essays, which because of space constraints were not able to be included in this issue, are forthcoming in Volume 8.1. For further questions, contact: Neil Saer neil.saer@ubc.ca Assistant Professor of History, University of British Columbia, Vancouver and Co-Editor Atlantic Studies: Literary, Cultural, and Historical Perspectives Further Information: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/14788810.asp Property and the Biosciences Videos Available Online Videos from the Intellectual Property and the Biosciences symposium, held on 7 July 2010 at the University of Leeds as part of the White Rose IPBio Project, are now available for free viewing and download. e day oered perspectives from a range of disciplines and domains, including history of science, social studies of science, legal studies, patent law and science policy. e speakers were Robert Cook-Deegan (Duke), Daniel Kevles (Yale), Bronwyn Parry (Queen Mary), Jane Calvert (Edinburgh), Aurora Plomer (Sheeld), Antony Taubman (World Trade Organization), Lady Lisa Markham (Harrison Goddard Foote, patent attorneys, Leeds) and Rebecca Eisenberg (Michigan). e symposium marked the public launch of the White Rose IPBio Project, which brings together sta and students from across the White Rose universities (York, Sheeld and Leeds). e aim is to stimulate better understanding of the role of intellectual-property arrangements, past and present, in shaping the biological and biomedical sciences and their impacts.

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8 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter For more information on the project, please contact Greg Radick at G.M.Radick@leeds.ac.uk To join the wider IPBio Network, please contact Berris Charnley at berris@ipbio.org Further Information: http://ipbio.org/WRIPBiomedia.htm Bioinformatics as an Adaptable Model for HPS Informatics AAAS and HSS members Manfred D. Laubichler and Jane Maienschein argue in AAASs Scientia blog that embracing bioinformatics will enable members of the history and philosophy of science community to carry out their individual studies while contributing to collaborative enterprise. Further Information: http://membercentral.aaas.org/blogs/scientia/ bioinformatics-adaptable-model-hps-informatics CFP: Feminism & Psychology Special Issue Jeanne Marecek and Nicola Gavey will edit a Special Issue of Feminism & Psychology : DSM-5 and Beyond: A Critical Feminist Dialogue. Psychiatric diagnoses wield considerable inuence in western high-income countries, helping to shape everyday understandings of what is normal and what is abnormal. ey also undergird structures of funding for treatment and shape its very nature. Feminists and others have pointed to cultural, social and political inuences on the system and practice of psychiatric diagnosis. ey have highlighted ways diagnoses have been deployed to legitimize patriarchal, racist, colonial, heteronormative and other regimes of power. Yet despite such critiques, diagnoses increasingly give meaning to private experiences and personal identities and provide a lens through which we view social life. Not surprisingly then, the impending release of the DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition), scheduled for May 2013, has generated overwhelming public interest. is Special Issue carries forward the tradition of critical feminist scrutiny of psychiatric diagnosis and of the interplay between psychiatry and the cultural imaginary. We call for work concerning psychiatric diagnosis its history, its uses and misuses in the mental health elds (especially in regulating masculinities, femininities, and sexual expression), its deployment in popular culture and everyday talk and its implications for feminist theorizing of psychological suering, feminist research, and applied feminist practice. Possible topics include: e proliferation of diagnostic categories, as well as conceptual bracket creep (the tendency for diagnostic criteria to expand over time, so that more and more everyday experience is deemed pathological and said to require professional intervention). Conicts of interest in the psychiatric and psychological professions that may aect diagnostic practices; the colonization of psychiatry by pharmaceutical interests Examinations of the epistemological features of DSM-style diagnoses (e.g., the disease model, biological reductionism, universalism, and categoricalism) and implications for feminist theory and practice. Critical histories of eorts by feminists and other progressive groups to inuence diagnostic categories and practice. What can we learn from their successes and failures? Critical analyses of how conventional diagnosis practices inhibit or facilitate feminist and other critical approaches to research, practice, psychotherapies, and social action. We invite articles (up to 8000 words), brief reports (up to 3000 words), and commentaries (up to 2000 words). (Note that these word limits include reference lists.) We discourage submissions that focus on a single diagnostic category, unless the analysis illuminates broader theoretical, epistemological, or conceptual concerns. Submissions will be subject to the usual review process. To discuss a possible submission or the scope of the issue or to submit a manuscript, contact Jeanne Marecek at jmarece1@swarthmore.edu Closing date for submissions is 15 November 2011. Further Information: http://fap.sagepub.com/

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9 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter to a Non Plus, &c He appended this title, 11 other sheets of front matter, and 127 new pages of text to the front of e Plus Ultra reduced to a Non Plus. In 2008 a book dealer advertised a defective copy of Stubbes Legends no Histories that was lacking the Plus Ultra reduced to a Non Plus ough unappealing to collectors, for a research library already holding the other piece of the puzzle, it was kismet. e Othmer Library purchased the book, reuniting the pieces. As a bonus, bound in with this defective book was yet another book, the nal part of Stubbes 1670 string of rants against the Royal Society, A Censure upon Certaine Passages Contained in the History of the Royal Society, As being Destructive to the Established Religion and Church of England. PALMER THE POISONER By James Voelkel Alfred Swain Taylor, author of A Treatise on Poisons in Relation to Medical Jurisprudence, Physiology, and the Practice of Physic was often called as an expert witness at trials, including that of William Palmer. An estimated 30,000 people gathered outside Staord Prison on 14 June 1856 to witness the hanging of William Palmer, also known as Palmer the Poisoner. His had been the trial of the century, gripping the public imagination in Victorian Britain. e case was so notorious that, to avoid a prejudiced jury, the trial was moved by a special act of Parliament from its local jurisdiction to the Old Bailey in London (which served only to heighten interest in the case). After training in medicine, Palmer returned to his native Rugeley in Staordshire, married a local woman, and seemed destined for the quiet life of an English country doctor. But one element of country life proved to be his undoinghorses. Within a few years his obsession with horseracing and betting led him essentially to abandon his practice. He fell deeply into debt andinexplicablyhis closest relatives started dying. First to die was his mother-in-law, in Palmers home in 1849. Palmers wife inherited a trust that upon her death would revert to the mother-in-laws family. Palmer then took out three life insurance policies on his wife totaling ,000. Mrs. Palmer died in September 1854. In January of the following year, Palmer insured his brother Walter, again for ,000. Walter died that August. e insurance companies, now suspicious, refused to pay and assigned a private detective to the case. Palmers now desperate nancial state led to another alleged murder. In November his associate and betting partner John Parsons Cook won a handsome sum, then grew strangely ill. Palmer collected the winnings, and after several days of his ministrations, Cook too died. At this point the father of English toxicology, Alfred Swain Taylor (1806), became involved. Taylor had written the book on poisons, A Treatise on Poisons in Relation to Medical Jurisprudence, Physiology, and the Practice of Physic (London, 1844). When an inquest was called into Cooks suspicious death, the stomach contents and viscera went to Taylor at Guys Hospital in London for chemical analysis. Taylor was at the height of his career. e pioneering toxicologist had been Lecturer in Medical THE INT ER N A TI O N AL YEAR OF CHEM I S T R Y Continued from Page 2 Continued on Page 10

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10 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter Jurisprudence at Guys for 25 years, his Manual of Medical Jurisprudence was in its fth edition, and he was a seasoned and eective witness for the prosecution. He became the star witness in the case, ensuring Palmers conviction. Ironically, it was not chemical analysis that sealed Palmers fate. Taylor testied that strychninewhich Palmer had purchased in the days before the murder but could not account forwas dicult to test for even in controlled laboratory conditions. Instead Taylor told the court that the spasms Cook displayed in his paroxysms of death could occur only in cases of tetanus and strychnine poisoning. With tetanus ruled out, Taylor deduced poison. Even after his conviction Palmer never confessed to the crime. He went to the gallows saying, I am innocent of poisoning Cook by strychnine, an enigmatic denial that, paired with ambiguous forensic evidence, has created an enduring mystery. THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS By James Voelkel Among the dening characteristics of the scientic revolution of the 16th and 17th centuries were the invention and development of new scientic instruments. e thermometer and barometer enabled experimenters to quantify heat and air pressure. e vacuum pump made it possible to manipulate the physical environment. And then there was the creation of the telescope and the microscope, which expanded the range of human senses. After the publication of Galileos spectacular telescopic observations in 1610, the race was on to apply the magnication technology to the mundane world. But microscopes were more dicult to make and observations depended a great deal on the skill of the observer wielding what was essentially a glass bead functioning as a really powerful magnifying glass. Easily the most skillful user of the single-lens microscope was Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (1632 1723). Although he did not have a university education, nor mastery of Latin the language of sciencevan Leeuwenhoek was nonetheless a devoted student of nature and a talented microscope maker. He was responsible for the discovery of blood cells, spermatozoa, protozoa, and bacteria, among other things. Despite his modest background, the scientic world beat a path to his door in Delft, Holland, and he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of London in 1680. At the time, the Royal Society was home to another of the worlds foremost microscopists, Robert Hooke (1635). Although also from a modest background, Hooke landed in the center of English science, making important contributions in the theory and practice of a number of dierent disciplines. His most notable book is Micrographia, Or Some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies Made by Magnifying Glasses with Observations and Inquiries ereupon (London, 1665). Hooke had constructed a serviceable compound microscope, complete with focused light source, which did not give him as much magnication as van Leeuwenhoeks, but was far easier to use. He published a series of observations he conducted as curator of experiments for the Royal Society, mostly of natural objects. (Hooke coined the word cell in its biological sense.) Hookes research was a showpiece for the young Royal Society, and his work was published in Micrographia in a large folio with magnicent foldout engravings that remains a much sought-after landmark of scientic printing. THE INT ER N A TI O N AL YEAR OF CHEM I S T R Y Continued from Page 9

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11 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter Soliciting Nomination for 2011 Forum for the History of Science in America Article Prize e Forum for the History of Science in America has begun gathering articles for its 2011 Publication Prize. Here are the eligibility criteria: Any article published in the English language in a professional journal issue (or chapter in a multiauthored edited volume) dated 2008, 2009 or 2010 and Authored by a scholar(s) who received a PhD in 2001 or afterward (i.e. recent PhDs and graduate students are eligible for the article prize), On a topic in American Science (American loosely dened to include the western hemisphere, science conservatively dened to exclude articles focusing on either the clinical and social history of medicine or the history of technology). Authors are encouraged to self-nominate. Please submit pdfs of published articles to David Spanagel: spanagel@wpi.edu between now and July 31, 2011. Forum for History of Human Sciences 2011 FHHS Calls for Prize Submissions 2011 FHHS/JHBS John C. Burnham Early Career Award: e Forum for History of Human Science (an interest group of the History of Science Society) invites submissions for the John C. Burnham Early Career Award for 2011. is award is intended for scholars, including graduate students, who do not hold a tenured position and are not more than seven years past the PhD. Unpublished manuscripts dealing with any aspect of the history of the human sciences are welcome. e winning article will be announced at the annual History of Science Society meeting, 3 November 2011, in Cleveland, and will be submitted to the Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences with FHHS endorsement, to undergo the regular review process. If the article is accepted for publication, the publisher of JHBS will announce the award and issue a US $500 honorarium. e manuscript cannot be submitted to any other journal and still qualify for this award. Email manuscript and curriculum vitae (PDF format) by 15 June 2011, to weidman@fas.harvard.edu 2011 FHHS Article Award: e Forum for History of Human Science awards this prize (a non-monetary honor) for the best recent article on some aspect of the history of the human sciences. e winner will be announced at the annual History of Science Society meeting, 3 November 2011, in Cleveland, and will be publicized in the FHHS Newsletter and in publications of several other organizations (e.g., HSS, Cheiron). Eligible articles must have an imprint date from 2008 to 2010 inclusively. Entries are encouraged from authors in any discipline as long as the publication is related to the history of the human sciences. Deadline: 15 June 2011. Email PDF version of the article to weidman@fas.harvard.edu Further information: http://www.fhhs.org News from Montral During the annual meeting of the History of Science Society in Montral, FHHS met for its business meeting on 6 November 2010, and awarded the following prizes: 2010 FHHS Dissertation Award to Daniel B. Bouk (Colgate University), e Science of Dierence: Developing Tools for Discrimination in the American Life Insurance Industry, 1830, PhD diss., Princeton University, 2009. e 2010 FHHS/JHBS John C. Burnham Early Career Award goes to Laura Stark (Wesleyan University), for her manuscript, e Science of Ethics: Deception, the Resilient Self, and the APA Code of Ethics, 1966 1973, recently published, under the same title, in Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 46:4 (Fall 2010): 337-370. John Carson (University of Michigan) was elected to a two-year term as new chair of FHHS. David K. Robinson (Truman State University) becomes past-chair and promises to continue supporting Forum work. After the business meeting, the Forum and guests enjoyed the FHHS Distinguished Lecture, by Mary S. Morgan (London School of Economics and University of Amsterdam): Recognising Glass Ceilings and Sticky Floors. FHHSs Sponsored Session at HSS convened later on Saturday afternoon: Reexamining the Uneasy Partnership: Economics, the Nation State, and the Public Welfare, 1920s-1980s, with papers by omas A. Stapleford, Tiago Mata, and Mark Solovey, and comment by Sarah Igo.

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12 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter IHPST Newsletter e latest International History and Philosophy of Science Teaching Group newsletter is available on the web at: http://ihpst.net/newsletters/ Situating Science Spring 2011 Situating Science has a very busy spring ahead as it hits the halfway mark of its seven-year project. Please visit its website for the spring newsletter, an update on lectures across Canada, workshops, Call for Situating Science Workshop Proposals, Live Streams of note, and more. Further Information: http://www.situsci.ca Exhibit: THE CHOCOLATE CONNECTION : Hans Sloane & Jamaica From 6 November 2010 to 31 January 2011, the Lloyd Library and Museum hosted the exhibit T C C : Hans Sloane & Jamaica, a rare and unique book exhibit from the librarys collection. e books were paired with an art exhibit by students of the Art Academy of Cincinnati from its class Illustration I, taught by Mark A. omas, Chair of Communication Arts Department, and Professor Troy Brown. omas explains, Students were given the task of producing an illustration that creatively employed chocolate as the central theme while utilizing basic design principles in their compositions. e process involved several levels of exploration beginning with a series of thumbnail sketches, leading to comprehensive visual studies before arriving at a nal direction. Students, upon approval of the nal direction, made choices of style, medium and even scale before executing their nal piece. e result was 24 unique artworks in a variety of media, such as sculptures, paintings, prints, collages, and graphite illustrations. A few artworks are interspersed throughout the book exhibit, including a fanciful sculpture of a cocoa tree sprouting from a chocolate bar and an image of Hans Sloane printed in chocolate syrup. e book exhibit pulled together three seemingly unconnected topics: 17th-century physician Hans Important News for HSS Members On 3 January 2011, the webpages of the journals published by the University of Chicago Press, which includes Isis joined the Current Scholarship Program and are now hosted within the JSTOR domain ( www.jstor.org ). This does not change the publishing arrangements for the HSS, nor does it at all aect members subscriptions; the only change will be that members will access Isis and Osiris at their new online home within the JSTOR website. The look of the online journals for UCP will change as well. With improved readability and organization, weve maintained equivalent functionality while taking advantage of the integration of the JSTOR backle. When society members go to the online journal, they will be asked to create an account within JSTOR and to select a new username and password. Members received e-mail messages in December to inform them about this: a message from UCP about the upcoming change in online access to the journal, and, later in December, a welcome e-mail from JSTOR and an e-mail with information on creating an account and accessing ones member subscription (unfortunately, members who subscribe to multiple Chicago journals received multiple notices). Members current usernames and passwords will remain active on the UCP website ( www.journals.uchicago.edu ) so that they can renew their membership, change their address, check the journal delivery schedule, or claim non-delivery of print issues. Members will be able to change their UCP username and passwords to match their JSTOR usernames and passwords, if they wish to. In addition to these e-mails, members will see information about access on the new Journal webpage. Members who have bookmarked links to the journal will nd those links are automatically redirected to the appropriate page on the new journal webpage within JSTOR. UCPs customer service sta will work closely with JSTORs User Services department to ensure that members access to Isis and Osiris will continue as seamlessly as possible. Please feel free to contact Chicago Press with any questions. For more information about JSTOR, visit www.jstor.org.

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13 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter Sloane, chocolate, and Jamaica. 2010 marked the 350th anniversary of the birth of Sloane (1660), a British physician and naturalist who popularized drinking chocolate and advocated the use of liquid milk chocolate in Britain as a medicinal beverage. Cadbury, the chocolate manufacturer, briey used Sloanes recipe in marketing its own version of the liquid chocolate. Sloane learned about drinking chocolate when he traveled to Jamaica in the late 17th century, but chocolate had been known to the native peoples of South and Central America for centuries, long before Sloanes introduction to it, and the Spanish were the rst to bring chocolate to Europe as a result of their early encounters with those peoples. Because Sloane and chocolate collided on Jamaica, the museum took this opportunity to showcase some works from Lloyds collection on these topics and demonstrate how they interact with each other. e book exhibit featured Sloanes 1696 publication on the botany of Jamaica, which includes, of course, an illustration of the cacao tree. e exhibit also contained several exquisite botanical illustrations of cacao by some of historys master artists, as well as historical information on chocolate before Sloanes introduction to it; and, books on the history of chocolate production and manufacturing. e exhibit also included 19th-century photographs by Curtis Gates Lloyd, one of the librarys founders, from his trip to Jamaica and the West Indies illustrating chocolate plantations and the lives of imported laborers. For more information, call 513-721-3707; or, visit Lloyds website at www.lloydlibrary.org American Historical Review Redesigns Website e American Historical Review has redesigned their website ( http://bit.ly/i8iPVr ), the new look paying homage to the journals signature glossy white cover and accompanying image, which is forty years old this spring. e redesign also oers a more streamlined user experience with added features like a news section. eyve also created a Facebook page ( http://on.fb.me/i85wBq ), where theyll post information about the latest issues and other news from the journal. American Historical Association Releases New Report on Job Market e American Historical Association (AHA) published a report on the job market for historians in the January 2011 issue of Perspectives on History AHA reports that the number of jobs posted with the association fell 29.4 percent during the academic year 2009, from 806 to just 569 openings, the lowest point in 25 years (since the 492 positions posted in 1984). is represents a continuation of negative hiring trends reported by AHA last year. Other ndings include: e 2009 postings mark a decrease from the historical high of 1,059 advertised positions recorded two years ago. e economic crisis has led to hiring freezes at many institutions, with noted dierences between public and private institutions. e outlook for junior faculty opportunities varies by subject eld. Despite recent cutbacks, most history departments over the past decade are still larger than they were ve and ten years ago. e number of faculty nearing retirement age in the next ten years is approaching the lowest level in 30 years. e average number of applicants to PhD programs in history declined slightly in 2009, but remains above the number of students matriculating ve and ten years ago. As of December 1, 2010, job advertisements through the AHA were up 21.4% compared to the previous year, from 421 to 511 positions. e report recommends that history departments assess the limitations of the current academic job market and consider their admissions procedures and the type of training oered to students. e report is available to the general public on the AHA website as of 1 February 2011. Further Information: http://www.nhalliance.org/news/americanhistorical-association-releases-new-repor.shtml

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14 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter Prehistoric Minds: Human Origins As A Cultural Artefact, 1780 Organized and edited by Matthew D. Eddy Published online: February 2011. Published in print: March 2011 On 8 July 2010 the front page of e Guardian newspaper featured an attractive color drawing by the artist John Sibbick. It was titled Meet the Norfolk Relatives and it depicted a pastoral scene of farmers and hunters going about their daily routines. e image, however, was not included to illustrate a gargantuan sum recently paid for an impressionist painting. Nor was it a teaser about a long lost work of art. is drawing was slightly dierent from the kinds that one would normally see on the front of a leading British newspaper. Its subjects were naked. eir bodies were hairy. ey were, in fact, an artists impression of the early humans who lived on the Norfolk coast a million years ago. Like so many newspaper stories, this one engendered interviews on the television, further articles and commentaries on blogs which all sought to discuss the recent nds in light of various disciplinary or ideological agendas. Like today, images related to the antiquity of humankind were used to caricature foreigners in the Victorian press and contemporary forms of scientic periodisation were used to interpret the past. Notably, it was these very similarities that led to the ve essays in this special issue of Notes and Records of the Royal Society For article access, go to http://rsnr.royalsocietypublishing.org/site/misc/ PrehistoricMinds.xhtml Jacques Loeb Centre Workshop: Origin of Life e Jacques Loeb Centre for the History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences will hold its Fourth International and Interdisciplinary Workshop from 13-14 June 2011 at Ben-Gurion University in Beer Sheva. e theme of the workshop is Origin of Life: Scientic, Historical, and Philosophical Perspectives. ere is hardly any topic in biology which has changed its content so drastically in history as that of the origin of life. is include claims of panspermiathe continuity of life in the universe as well as assumptions, rst put forward by Aristotle, then repeated by the Church Fathers and by scientists until through the 19th century, that some forms of life generate spontaneously from non-living material. Since the question of the origin of life is inseparable from that of a particular conception of life, it aects today not only research into astrobiology and synthetic life, but, at least implicitly, most biological research. e workshop will focus on the origin of life on earth. It intends to address the question from a number of dierent scholarly and scientic perspectives, such as biblical studies, classical studies, history and philosophy of science, palaeontology, microbiology, biochemistry, macromolecular chemistry, synthetic biology, and evolutionary biology. We expect this interdisciplinary discussion also to bring forward new insights into the question of what is life. For more information, please contact Rony Armon ( armonr@bgu.ac.il ) or Prof. Ute Deichmann (972-8-6472258). 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the History of Medicine e American Association for the History of Medicine invites submissions in any area of medical history for its 85th annual meeting, to be held in Baltimore, Maryland, 2629 April 2012. e Association welcomes submissions on the history of health and healing; history of medical ideas, practices, and institutions; and histories of illness, disease, and public health. Submissions pertaining to all eras and regions of the world are welcome. In addition to single-paper proposals, the Program Committee accepts abstracts for sessions and for luncheon workshops. Please alert the Program Committee Chair if you are planning a session proposal. Individual papers for these submissions will be judged on their own merits.

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15 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter Presentations are limited to 20 minutes. Individuals wishing to present a paper are not required to be members of AAHM before submitting an abstract, but must join AAHM before presenting and register for the meeting. All papers must represent original work not already published or in press. Because the Bulletin of the History of Medicine is the ocial journal of the AAHM, the Association encourages speakers to make their manuscripts available for consideration for publication by the Bulletin e AAHM uses an online abstract submissions system. We encourage all applicants to use this convenient software. A link for submissions will be posted to the website at http://histmed.org/ If you are unable to submit proposals online, send eight copies of a one-page abstract (350 words maximum) with learning objectives to: Program Committee Chair, Jole Shackelford, Program for the History of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, MMC 506 420 Delaware St. SE Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-624-4416) When proposing a historical argument, state the major claim, summarize the evidence supporting the claim, and state the major conclusion(s). When proposing a narrative, summarize the story, identify the major agents, and specify the conict. New this year is the additional requirement that abstracts include three learning objectives to facilitate approval for CME credit (not included in the 350 word abstract limit). Please provide the following information on the same sheet as the abstract: name, preferred mailing address, work and home telephone numbers, e-mail address, present institutional aliation, and academic degrees. Abstracts must be received by 15 September 2011. We cannot accept e-mailed or faxed proposals. CFPNEW JOURNAL: Journal of Interdisciplinary History of Ideas is open-access, academic, peer-refereed journal, devoted to interdisciplinary history of ideas, focuses on the bonds that connect more general historical study in the eldand special elds such as the history of sciencethat are usually severed in research works, though connected in the real course of intellectual history. e Journal of Interdisciplinary History of Ideas was founded in 2010 with the aim to: a) publish high quality, original, research works by scholars of dierent elds of specialization, based on well-established, as well as on emerging lines of, interdisciplinary historical research; b) promote the study of intellectual history as an intrinsically interdisciplinary object in its genesis; c) provide a publishing space for studies dealing with the history of ideas from a genuinely interdisciplinary research perspective; d) provide a regular forum for discussing issues pertaining to the interdisciplinary approach that characterizes the Journal As an Open Access Journal, the JiHi appears online free of charge. Contributions to the JiHi will be published under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (BY-NC-SA). e JiHi will feature substantive articles, shorter research notes, and surveys. Being an interdisciplinary journal, all submissions will be blind-refereed by three or more peers with dierent competences. e Journal will accept submissions in English and French. Prepare your article in a suitable format (odt, doc, rtf). Format citations according to either the Chicago Author-Date System, or the Chicago Documentary Note Style, or the APA Citation Style. 1. Go to the JIHI website ( http://www.jihi.eu ). 2. Use the REGISTER function to register as Author: Able to submit items to the journal. 3. You should be logged in. Go to USER HOME. 4. Select New Submission. 5. Follow instructions. e Journal is hosted by the University of Turin ( http://www.ojs.unito.it ). e Journal is also documented in print and as such is registered according to the Italian law (Trib. Torino, reg. n. 9, 24-01-11; dir. resp. S. Mammola). Further Information: http://www.jihi.eu

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16 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter My Current Work and Its Possible Implications: A Joint INES/ Prometheans Workshop e International Network for Engineering Studies (INES) and the Prometheans special interest group in the Society for the History of Technology (SHOT) seek 6 minute, 40 second presentations and eager discussion participants for a joint one-day workshop on engineering studies and the history of engineering. e workshop will take place on Wednesday, 2 November 2011 at Cleveland State University in Cleveland, Ohio. It is hosted by Peter Meiksins, Professor of Sociology at Cleveland State. November 2 is the day before the co-located HSS/SHOT/4S meetings begin. anks to sponsorship by Taylor & Francis/ Routledge, publishers of Engineering Studies: Journal of the International Network for Engineering Studies the meeting is free to members of INES and the Prometheans who pre-register. It may include support for breakfast and lunch (more on logistics later). e workshops purpose is to bring researchers in engineering studies and history of engineering together in concise, fast-moving, wide-ranging, and hopefully entertaining discussions of the contents of current research and its possible implications for dierent audiences inside and outside scholarly arenas. e workshops more general goals include deepening scholarly connections among researchers; attracting more researchers to engineering studies and history of engineering; heightening the visibility of this research across the memberships of HSS, SHOT, and 4S; and increasing the extent to which this research makes a dierence beyond scholarly arenas. e workshop will use a PechaKucha approach to presentation and discussion ( www.pecha-kucha.org ). Speakers are free to draw on up to 20 slides for 20 seconds each. ey must stop after their 6 minute 40 second slot expires (even if in mid-sentence). With up to 4 presentations in 45-minute slots every hour, separated by 15-minute breaks and lunch, as many as 24 scholars will present between 9 a.m. and 3:45 p.m. e organizers welcome suggestions for a nal plenary discussion, ending around 5 p.m. To present at the workshop, send a conrming message to the INES Secretary/Treasurer Crystal Harrell ( crcrigge@vt.edu ) by 15 May 2011. Include in the body of the message your name, institutional aliation, title, and 50-100 word abstract of your proposed presentation. Oering to present constitutes registration. e program committee will notify you by June 15 regarding your inclusion in the program. To pre-register, send a message by 15 September 2011 to the same address ( crcrigge@vt.edu ). Include your name, institutional aliation, and membership status in INES and/or the Prometheans. INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDY School of Historical Studies, Opportunities for Scholars 2012 e Institute is an independent private institution founded in 1930 to create a community of scholars focused on intellectual inquiry, free from teaching and other university obligations. Scholars from around the world come to the Institute to pursue their own research. Candidates of any nationality may apply for a single term or a full academic year. Scholars may apply for a stipend, but those with sabbatical funding, other grants, retirement funding or other means are also invited to apply for a non-stipendiary membership. Some short-term visitorships (for less than a full term, and without stipend) are also available on an ad hoc basis. Open to all elds of historical research, the Schools principal interests are the history of western, near eastern and Asian civilizations, with particular emphasis upon Greek and Roman civilization, the history of Europe (medieval, early modern, and modern), the Islamic world, East Asian studies, the history of art, the history of science, philosophy, modern international relations, and music studies. Residence in Princeton during term time is required. e only other obligation of Members is to pursue

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17 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter their own research. e PhD (or equivalent) and substantial publications are required. Information and application forms may be found on the Schools web site, http://www.hs.ias.edu or contact: School of Historical Studies, Institute for Advanced Study Einstein Dr. Princeton, NJ 08540 (E-mail address: mzelazny@ias.edu ) Deadline: 1 November 2011. Further Information: http://www.hs.ias.edu/hsannoun.htm Oregon State University Special Collections Acquires Margaret J. Osler Papers e Oregon State University Libraries Special Collections houses a number of archival and book collections, most of which focus on the history of twentieth-century science and technology ( http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/ specialcollections/index.html ). Special Collections has as its primary mission to preserve and provide access to the Ava Helen and Linus Pauling Papers, however, it has a number of other collections of interest to historians of science. A new collection is a repository for the papers of historians of science ( http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/ specialcollections/coll/historians/index.html ). e most recent acquisition in the Historians of Science Collection is the collected papers and correspondence of Margaret J. Osler, longtime Secretary of the History of Science Society. Research grants of up to $7,500 are available to scholars interested in conducting work in the Oregon State University Libraries Special Collections. Further Information: http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/ specialcollections/residentscholar.pdf NEH Announces Digging Into Data Challenge On 16 March 2011, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) joined seven international research funders in announcing their joint participation in round two of the Digging into Data Challenge, a grant competition designed to spur cutting-edge research in the humanities and social sciences. e rst round of the Digging into Data Challenge sparked enormous interest from the international research community and led to eight cutting-edge projects being funded. Due to the overwhelming popularity of round one, the Digging into Data Challenge announced that four additional funders have joined for round two, enabling this competition to have a worldwide reach into many dierent scholarly and scientic domains. e eight sponsoring funding bodies include the Arts & Humanities Research Council (United Kingdom), the Economic & Social Research Council (United Kingdom), the Institute of Museum and Library Services (United States), the Joint Information Systems Committee (United Kingdom), the National Endowment for the Humanities (United States), the National Science Foundation (United States), the Netherlands Organisation for Scientic Research (Netherlands), and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (Canada). Final applications will be due 16 June 2011. Further information about the competition and the application process can be found at http://www.diggingintodata.org Original Post: http://historycoalition.org/2011/03/16/nehannounces-digging-into-data-challenge/

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18 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter David B. Kitts (1923) David B. Kitts long a member of the History of Science program at the University of Oklahoma, died at Norman, OK on 30 October 2010 at the age of 87. Trained in zoology he earned his PhD at Columbia University (1953), supervised by George Gaylord Simpson Kitts began his career as a geologist and paleontologist. As early as his college years at Penn, he cultivated an interest in the logical and conceptual structure of science, which led him to important and inuential analyses of the foundations of geological and biological thinking. While doing research in vertebrate paleontology at OU, he explored these interests further by teaching a new course, Metageology, and began a long-term aliation with the History of Science program. A collection of his main papers on the underpinnings of geological thought, e Structure of Geology (published in 1977), was a pioneering work in turning attention in twentieth-century philosophy of science to the logical and historical processes in geological reasoning. His research in the philosophy of biology centered rst on the concept of biological species, then on the logical structure of Darwins argument in e Origin of Species a subject he continued to investigate for many years after his retirement in 1988. In this work, as in the philosophy of geology, he closely analyzed historical and contemporary scientic and philosophical texts in order to inform philosophical claims with historical accuracy. In 1966 Kitts was named David Ross Boyd Professor, an appointment recognizing the institutions nest teachers. He divided his instructional time at OU between Geology and History of Science until assuming a full-time appointment in 1978 in the History of Science Department, in which he served as department chair from 1973 to 1979. Over a hundred family members, colleagues and friends gathered in Norman on 5 February 2011 for a memorial tribute to David B. Kitts and a reception hosted by his wife Nancy and his sons Peter and David. Following Ken Taylors opening remarks on Davids life and work, punctuated with stories of his personal qualities and legendary foibles, there followed a dozen short recollections of Davids teaching, writing, eld work, cycling, camping, sculling, and vacation travels. Among these were stories from his history-of-science colleagues and former students Marilyn Ogilvie, Steve Livesey, Liba Taub, Bob Nye, and Mary Jo Nye. e snow drifts beneath the brilliant blue sky of an Oklahoma winter day provided a beautiful setting for celebrating Davids life. Mary Jo Nye, Oregon State University Ken Taylor, University of Oklahoma Alexander M. Ospovat (1923) Alexander Meier Ospovat died 21 December 2010, at Stillwater, Oklahoma. He was a member of the History Department at Oklahoma State University from 1962 until his retirement in 1988. Born in 1923 in Knigsberg, East Prussia, Ospovat spent most of his childhood in Memel, Lithuania. In 1940 his family ed, rst to Mexico, then to the US. Ospovat earned a degree in civil engineering at the University of Oklahoma in 1945. Following several years of employment as an engineer, he returned to school and earned his PhD in 1960. He was the rst to complete the OU doctoral program in history of science. At Oklahoma State Ospovat taught history of science and medicine, and early modern European history. His research focused primarily on the development of geology in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. He is particularly well known for his research on the geological career and thought of Abraham Gottlob Werner (17491817). His was a pioneering voice in revising the negative judgments on Werner that had been taken in most British and IN MEMOR I AM

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19 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter American histories of geology since the time of Charles Lyell. In recognition of his contributions to the history of geology Ospovat received an honorary doctorate from the Bergakademie Freiberg (1990). Ken Taylor, University of Oklahoma Harry M. Marks (1947) Professor Harry M. Marks PhD, 64, died at his home in Baltimore on 25 January 2011. Professor Marks was the Elizabeth Treide & A. McGehee Harvey Professor in the History of Medicine in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He also held joint appointments in e Krieger Schools department of History and Anthropology and in the School of Public Healths Department of Epidemiology. A get-together of friends and colleagues took place at the Institute of the History of Medicine on Feb. 5 from noon to 2 p.m. Rev. Ernan McMullin (1924) Ernan McMullin John Cardinal OHara Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame, died 8 February 2011 at Letterkenny General Hospital in Donegal, Ireland. He was 86 years old. A native of Ballybofey, Donegal, Father McMullin was an internationally prominent scholar in the philosophy of science. He studied physics at the National University of Ireland under the Nobel laureate Erwin Schrdinger and theology at Maynooth College before being ordained a priest in 1949 and receiving his doctorate in philosophy from the University of Louvain in 1954. He joined the Notre Dame faculty the same year, and for the next half century proceeded to explain that decision by praising the then-new president who had recruited him. Father Ted Hesburgh could charm a bird out of a tree, he would say. At Notre Dame, Father McMullin chaired the philosophy department from 1965 to 1972 and served as director of the history and philosophy of science program and of the Reilly Center for Science, Technology and Human Values before retiring in 1994, continuing to teach on the graduate level until 2003. For the last seven years, he lived in both St. Paul, Minn. and Donegal. Ernan McMullin was a good priest, a good philosopher and a good friend to generations of Notre Dame students and teachers, said David Solomon, director of Notre Dames Center for Ethics and Culture. One of the giants of Notre Dame, his thought and personality transformed and dominated the philosophy department for almost half a century. Father McMullin wrote and lectured widely on subjects ranging from the relationship between cosmology and theology to the role of values in understanding science to the impact of Darwinism on Western religious thought. He was also an unrivalled expert on the life of Galileo. e author of some 200 articles in scholarly and popular journals, Father McMullin also published 14 books including e Concept of Matter ; Galileo: Man of Science ; Newton on Matter and Activity ; e Inference at Makes Science ; and e Church and Galileo During his career, Father McMullin held visiting appointments at the University of Minnesota, the University of Cape Town, the University of California at Los Angeles, and Princeton and Yale Universities. He also served on numerous scholarly committees and congresses worldwide and is the only person ever to have been elected president of all the following professional organizations: the American Philosophical Association, the Philosophy of Science Association, the Metaphysical Society of America and the American Catholic Philosophical Association. His numerous awards include honorary degrees from Maynooth, the National University of Ireland, Loyola University in Chicago, Stonehill College, and Notre Dame. Michael O. Garvey, public information and communications, University of Notre Dame

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20 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter Magda Whitrow (1914) Magda Whitrow the editor of the rst Isis Cumulative Bibliography which was published in six volumes from 1971 to 1984, passed away in early February of this year. Her bibliography indexed over 100,000 citations in over ninety annual and semiannual bibliographies. Whitrow recognized the signicant role played by the Isis bibliography in the discipline. Her creation of the cumulative bibliography grew out of a conversation between Whitrow, then a librarian at Imperial College, London, and the editor of Isis at that time, Harry Woolf. Instead of simply indexing the articles in Isis as some people wished, the Society embarked on this cumulation project with grants from the National Science Foundation and the United States Steel Foundation. Whitrow carefully studied George Sartons classication systems and then developed a much more detailed, faceted structure from it as a basis for indexing. e resulting product was original and proved to be extraordinarily useful. Her classication scheme became the basis of indexing for all subsequent cumulative bibliographies, edited by John Neu, and formed the core of Neus indexing scheme for the HSTM database. e Whitrow system turned out to be easily adaptable to the rapidly developing digital database format. By forging this new and much more complex scheme, Whitrow laid the groundwork for bibliographical work in our eld that continues to underlie both print and electronic bibliographies today. Further Information: http://www.libsci.sc.edu/bob/isp/whitrow2.htm Archbishop Jzef Mirosaw yciski (194811) Archbishop Jzef Mirosaw yciski passed suddenly away on 10 February 2011. Archbishop yciski was born on 1 September 1948 in Stara Wie (Poland). He was ordained to the priesthood in 1972, completed PhDs in theology in 1976 at the Pontical Academy of eology (Krakw) and in Philosophy in 1978 at the Academy of Catholic eology (Warsaw); and in 1980 became professor of philosophy at the Pontical Academy of eology (subsequently also Dean of the Faculty of Philosophy). In 1990 he became Bishop of Tarnw, and in 1997 Archbishop of Lublin. He also became professor of philosophy and later Grand Chancellor at the Catholic University of Lublin. In collaboration with Pope John Paul II he organized the ScienceFaith Interdisciplinary Dialogue in Krakw. He published almost 50 books in philosophy of science, relativistic cosmology, and the history of relations between natural sciences and Christian faith, as well as about 350 scientic papers. He was a founder of the journal Philosophy in Science and of the Philosophy in Science Library series. By Fr. Tomasz Trafny

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21 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter Several HSS members are involved in a special issue on transatlantic science policy that was published by Centaurus (edited by Ida Stamhuis) volume 52, issue 4, November 2010 (ocial journal of the European Society for History of Science) on the basis of a HSS session, within a calendar year, possibly a world record! Authors include John Krige, Naomi Oreskes, Ronald Doel, Peter Westwick, and Pnina G. Abir-Am, who also wrote the Introduction. e issue is available at http://wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/cnt Access code cnt30trial Monica H. Green (Arizona State University) has been elected a Fellow of the Medieval Academy of America (MAA), the leading professional organization of medievalists in North America. Ellen Herman has received an ACLS Fellowship for 20112012 for a new project, Autism, Between Rights and Risks. Kenneth M. Ludmerer has been installed as the inaugural Mabel Dorn Reeder Distinguished Professor of the History of Medicine at Washington University. He continues as Professor of History in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and as Professor of Medicine in the School of Medicine. Nancy Nersessian (Georgia Tech) has won the American Philosophical Societys inaugural Patrick Suppes Award in Philosophy of Science. Her new book, Science as Psychology: Sense Making and Identity in Science Practice (co-authors Kareen Malone and Wendy Newstetter) is now available from Cambridge University Press. Kimberly OBrien has graduated from the American Military University with an MA in Global History. Neeraja Sankaran is now Assistant Professor of the History of Science, Technology & Medicine at the Underwood International College of Yonsei University in Seoul, South Korea. Previously she was a visiting Assistant Professor at the American University in Cairo. Conevery Bolton Valencius will join the History Faculty at University of Massachussetts, Boston this Fall. Distinguished Lecture at NSF On 15 March 2011, Peter Galison (Harvard University) participated in the National Science Foundation Distinguished Lecture Series in Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences. He summarizes his address, A Material History of Science , thus: What would it mean to approach the history of physics by taking material objects such as instruments as seriously as the study of nished theories? I would like to follow that path to explore what that approach involves and what it has to oer for history, philosophy, pedagogy, and policy. is track involves studying physics not as a homogeneous discipline but as a discipline composed of coordinated but distinct subcultures. An example from the turn of the 20th century, relativity theory, will consider links between time coordinating technologies (clocks), theoretical physics, and philosophy of science. Another hybrideld instance from the turn of the 21st-century, string theory, will also be considered. I will present MEMBER NEWS

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22 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter the idea of a trading zone between partially overlapping subcultures of modern science. I will end with a discussion of how the idea of trading zones might help us as we face increasingly vexed intersections of scientic and non-scientic cultures, such as our present conundrums about the disposal of nuclear waste. In order to address these concerns, not just to talk about them, I have been increasingly involved with projects to use historical reasoning about material science to open these discussions beyond purely scholarly audiences, which has meant working simultaneously in lm as well as print. Tribute to Clark A. Elliott On 22 January 2011, relatives, friends, and colleagues of Clark A. Elliott long-time Archivist at Harvard University and Librarian of the Burndy Library during many of its years at MIT gathered in Waltham, Massachusetts, to honor him on the occasion of his 70th birthday. Some HSS members may know Clark best as the co-editor of Osiris 14, Commemorative Practices in Science: Historical Perspectives on the Politics of Collective Memory (1999). But many others also recognize him as one of the founders of the Forum for the History of Science in America, and as the long-time editor (and bibliographer) of its Newsletter, News & Views In toasting Clark at the gathering, several archivists and historians of science enjoyed highlighting many of his other accomplishments. ese include, for example, the 1983 report on the Documentation of the History of Post-War Science and Technology in the United States, otherwise known as the JCAST Report, which he edited. NSF had earlier funded the Joint Committee on Archives of Science and Technology to promote preservation of and access to these archives, and that such repositories and collections have grown exponentially since then is due in large part to Clarks report. Clarks other book-length publications include his 1979 Biographical Dictionary of American Science e 17th through the 19th Centuries his 1990 Biographical Index to American Science: e 17th Century to 1920 and his 1996 chronology and research guide to the History of Science in the United States And in the 21st century Clark enabled on-line access to all of these resources, and others, through his website, History of Science in the United States: Research Aids for the 19th Century. As betting someone who has served the Harvard history of science community so well for so many years, Clark has also written extensively on the history of science at the university. After a series of inuential articles, he co-edited Science at Harvard University: Historical Perspectives and published his biography of long-time Harvard librarian and man of science, addeus William Harris (17951856): Nature, Science, and Society in the Life of an American Naturalist To pay further tribute to Clark, many of the historians of science present made donations to the HSS Bibliographers Fund in his honor. ey now urge others who beneted from Clarks lifelong eorts as an archivist, an organizer, a bibliographer, and a scholar to join them by making their own contributions. In all, Clarks achievement embodies a career well worth honoring, and emulating, and recognizing in this manner. (Contributions to the Fund may be made by going to https://www.hssweb.org/donate/ ) Former HSS President, Michael Sokal (left) and Clark Elliott conferring on the occasion of the January tribute in Clarks honor.

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23 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter Sy Mauskopf Celebration By Alan Rocke On 11 December 2010, Duke University organized a celebration marking the retirement of Professor Seymour Mauskopf after 46 years of distinguished teaching in the Department of History. After a buet reception, appreciations were given by Dean of Arts & Sciences Angela ORand, Department Chair William Reddy, and Associate Chair Tom Robisheaux, followed by a tribute from Alan Rocke, of Case Western Reserve University. Among the enthusiastic crowd of about 100 attendees were friends, present and former students, colleagues and former colleagues from Duke and other institutions, children and grandchildren. Two days earlier, Sy had presented a Duke University Valedictory Lecture entitled A Bridge between Cultures: Reections on a Long Career in History of Science at Duke. Sys career has been as distinguished as it has been long. His work has transformed our understanding of several dierent areas of the history of science, including 18th and early 19th century chemistry, the history of parapsychology and marginal sciences, and the history of chemical technology, especially munitions. It was a pleasure for all of us to celebrate with Sy the end of his formal teaching duties, and the inception of emeritus statusthe start of what is sure to prove an important new phase in the career of an outstanding historian, a beloved teacher, and a great friend. History of Science at the AAAS Larry Principe the Drew Professor of the Humanities, Johns Hopkins University, spoke on Revealing the Secrets of Alchemy, at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science on 19 February 2011. In his introduction of Principe, AAAS Section L Chair, Rick Creath, mentioned the irony that Sarton himself ridiculed alchemy as a eld of study, a reection of the pseudo scientic opinion of alchemy in the early 20th century. Principe picked up on this theme and said that Sartons sentiment was echoed by Herbert Buttereld who proclaimed that those who study alchemy historically are tinctured by lunacy. Undeterred by his elders and the shadow of lunacy, Professor Principe proceeded to describe how alchemy ts into the history of chemistry. Chemistry (that is, alchemy), for centuries, did not have a home in the university, and its practice was seen as dirty and smelly. Critics snied at its reputation for being unscrupulous. e split between alchemy and chemistry began around 1700, even though no new logical or experimental refutations of transmutation appeared. Instead, bad chemistry (transmutation) was sequestered as alchemy and its practitioners cast as socially and morally unacceptable. is perception persisted until recently in part because alchemical writings were intentionally vague, lled with metaphor and allegory, making it dicult to understand what alchemists were really doing. In his picture-rich presentation, Principe described part of his endeavor to understand From Left to Right: Alan Rocke, Jo Mauskopf, Sy Mauskopf, and Tom Robisheaux Lawrence Principe delivers the 49th George Sarton Memorial Lecture in the History and Philosophy of Science at the AAAS

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24 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011History of Science Society Newsletter alchemy historically. He compared allegorical public texts of alchemy with the more straightforward private jottings of alchemical practitioners to reveal their ways of writing, thinking, and working. Principe also showed how by decoding texts and, as a chemist, replicating the processes described, he obtained surprising and visually striking results that demonstrate the technical and experimental skills of the alchemists and explain, in part, their continuing devotion to their quest to transmute metals. e Sarton Lecturer is chosen each year by the Executive Committee of the History of Science Society. Begun in 1960, the lecture is supported by Section L (history and philosophy of science) of AAAS and receives special status at the annual meetings. e lecture provides the opportunity for a historian of science to speak to an audience largely comprised of scientists. In addition to the Sarton lecture, there were several sessions at the AAAS that would be of interest to HSS members. Reports on two of these sessions e Challenge of Teaching Evolution in the Islamic World and Celebrating the Centennial of Mme Curies Nobel Prize in Chemistry written by Taner Edis and Pnina Abir-Am respectively, appear on pages 24 and 30.2010 National Humanities Medals AwardedOn March 2, U. S. President Barack Obama presented the 2010 National Humanities Medals to ten individuals honored for their outstanding achievements in history, literature, education, and cultural policy. e medals were presented at a White House ceremony. Earlier in the day, several of the medalists participated in a roundtable discussion, held at the National Endowment for the Humanities headquarters, on the role of the humanities in contemporary culture. e National Humanities Medal honors individuals or groups whose work has deepened the nations understanding of the humanities, broadened citizens engagement with the humanities, or helped preserve and expand Americans access to important resources in the humanities. Among the honorees were the following :en Bernard Bailyn for illuminating the nations early history and pioneering the eld of Atlantic history. Bailyn, who spent his career at Harvard, has won two Pulitzer Prizes, the rst for e Ideological Origins of the American Revolution and the second for Voyagers to the West .en Jacques Barzun for his distinguished career as a scholar, educator, and public intellectual. One of the founders of the eld of cultural history, Barzun taught at Columbia University for ve decades and has written and edited more than thirty books.en Wendell E. Berry for his achievements as a poet, novelist, farmer, and conservationist. e author of more than forty books, Berry has spent his career exploring our relationship with the land and the community.en Stanley Nider Katz for a career devoted to fostering public support for the humanities. As director of the American Council of Learned Societies for more than a decade, he expanded the organizations programs and helped forge ties among libraries, museums, and foundations.The Challenge of Teaching Evolution in the Islamic World, moderated by Eugenie C. Scott, National Center for Science Educationen A Brief History of Islamic Creationism in Turkeyen Taner Edis Truman State Universityen Teaching and Learning About Biological Evolution in the Muslim Worlden Jason R. Wiles, Syracuse University en e Future of Acceptance of Evolution in the Muslim Worlden Salman Hameed Hampshire College e talk on Islamic Creationism in Turkey traced the history of Islamic opposition to Darwinian evolution, with special focus on Turkey, the country

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25 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter that is the source of much Islamic creationism today. Opposition to Darwinian ideas existed in the 19th century Ottoman Empire, but it was limited, since evolution appealed only to a tiny number of Westernizing intellectuals. In the early 20th century Turkish Republic, evolution entered public education, but was only a minor irritant to religious conservatives when compared to other secularist policies. Since the 1980s, however, an increasingly vigorous creationism has appeared in Turkey. It has enjoyed ocial success, penetrating into public education. With the Harun Yahya operation, popular creationism has also found an inuential media presence. Anti-evolutionary ideas also have a strong inuence in the Islamic intellectual high culture today. Jason Wiles pointed out that little is known in the West about how evolution is taught in Islamic societies. His ndings were derived from data collected in several Muslim nations via questionnaires and interviews administered to students, teachers and university scientists, as well as from reviews of ocial curricular documents during a four-year study of Islamic understandings of, and attitudes toward, evolution and the teaching thereof. His work seeks to inform scientists and educators in the West about how Muslims might perceive evolution, thus facilitating a greater understanding of the diversity of Islamic thought on evolution, evolution education, and science in general. Salman Hameed observed that evolution is still a new concept for the majority of Muslims and a serious debate over its religious compatibility has not yet taken place. At the same time, a complex interaction involving evolution, culture and religion is already underway. Evolution is included in the high school curricula of many Muslim countries, although human evolution is often excluded. Creationist movements have gained a foothold in some Muslim countries. Hameed and collaborators have been conducting an interview-survey of Muslim physicians and medical students and in a few Muslim countries, as well as in Muslim Diasporas in the West, including the US. Preliminary results indicate a complex set of ways by which educated Muslims are negotiating the interaction between modern science and religion. Cli Mead Retires from OSU Cli Mead Head of Special Collections for OSU Libraries, has retired eective 1 January 2011 after 24 years of service at OSU Libraries. Meads expertise in special collections administration has resulted in the development and growth of a world-class collection that serves as an outstanding resource not only for the OSU community but also for scholars from across the globe. OSUs Horning Professor of Humanities and Professor of History Emeritus, Mary Jo Nye stated, Special Collections provides an ideal on-campus physical environment for study and research, but, even more signicantly, Cli and his sta have pioneered online website communication of historically valuable documents, photographs, lms, and other resources to the public. He has been a real treasure at OSU whom countless visitors have found to be their engaging and omniscient guide in Special Collections. Professor Mead has led the Special Collections Departments development of outstanding digital resources, especially those that provide in-depth coverage of the life and work of Linus Pauling, the only recipient of two unshared Nobel Prizes. In addition to Professor Meads leadership in developing a truly innovative and world-renowned web presence for displaying the vast resources of the Special Collections department, he has provided exceptional opportunities for OSU students to have rsthand experience working with primary research materials, noted Karyle Butcher, former OSU University Librarian/Press Director. Professor Mead is recognized internationally as the authority on the Ava Helen and Linus Pauling Papers. He has authored several publications, including omas Pynchon: A Bibliography of Primary and Secondary Sources (1989). His most recent book, co-edited with Chris Petersen, is e Pauling Catalogue: Ava Helen and Linus Pauling Papers at Oregon State University (2006). He also has coedited Linus Pauling: Scientist and Peacemaker (2001) and e Pauling Symposium: A Discourse on the Art of Biography (1996). Professor Mead received his Masters of Library Science from Syracuse University

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26 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter School of Information Studies, Syracuse, New York and a BA in English from the Utica College of Syracuse University. Paul Farber, OSU Distinguished Professor Emeritus and Editor, Journal of the History of Biology summed up Professor Meads accomplishments: Cli has that rare combination of intelligence, organization, personality, wit and humor that makes a university collection of papers and books into a Special Collection. He has been at the center of creating this major asset at OSU, one that has large portions available online, and one that brings scholars from around the world to campus. He cannot be replaced, but he has built an institution that will persist. NEW FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM: THE AMERICAN COUNCIL OF LEARNED SOCIETIES PUBLIC FELLOWS The American Council of Learned Societies invites applications for the inaugural competition of its Public Fellows program. The program will place eight recent PhDs in sta positions at partnering agencies in government and the non-prot sector for two years, beginning in some cases as early as September 2011. Fellows will participate in the substantive work of these agencies and receive professional mentoring. Compensation will be commensurate with experience and at the same level as new professional employees of the hosting agency and will include health insurance. This program, made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, aims to demonstrate that the capacities developed in the advanced study of the humanities have wide application, both within and beyond the academy. ACLS seeks applications from recent PhDs who wish to begin careers in administration, management, and public service by choice rather than circumstance. Competitive applicants will have been successful in both academic and extra-academic experiences. APPLICANTS MUST: possess U.S. citizenship or permanent resident status have a PhD in the humanities or humanistic social sciences conferred between January 2008 and March 2011 not have applied to any other ACLS Fellowship programs in the 201011 competition year, including the New Faculty Fellows program Prospective applicants should read through all the positions listed below and be ready to choose one when beginning the online application process. Applicants may apply to only one position. The deadline for submitted applications is Monday, May 16, 3 p.m. EDT and complete applications will include: (1) completed application form; (2) cover letter tailored to a specic position; (3) resume; (4) candidate statement; and (5) one nomination letter. HSS 2011 Join us in Cleveland, Ohio, USA for the 2011 HSS Annual Meeting, a co-located meeting with SHOT and 4S.

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27 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter The only way to apply for these positions is through the ACLS Public Fellows program. Only complete applications, submitted through the ACLS Online Fellowship Application system ( http://ofa.acls.org ) by the deadline will be considered. Submitted applications will undergo ACLS standard rigorous peer review process, which may include interviews by ACLS and by the hosting agency. Reviewers will look for: (a) applicants academic accomplishment and success; (b) demonstrated relationship between past experience and specied position; and (c) commitment to the public and/or non-prot sector. Applicants who advance to the interview stages will need to be available in the timeframe listed below. Interviews: mid to late June Email Notication of application status: early July These dates are subject to revision. Please check back. PARTICIPATING AGENCIES AND POSITIONS Click on the positions to view the PDF of the full description, which includes detailed information on the hosting agency, the position, and requisite qualications. Please do not contact any of these agencies with questions (i.e., on the position, benets, etc,). 1. Association of American Universities (AAU) Policy Analyst http://www.acls.org/uploadedFiles/Fellowships_and_Grants/Competitions/1112_PublicFellowsAAU.pdf 2. Council on Foundations Leadership Development Ocer http://www.acls.org/uploadedFiles/Fellowships_and_Grants/Competitions/1112_PublicFellowsCouncil-on-Foundations.pdf 3. Institute for International Education (IIE) Program Ocer, Scholar Rescue Fund http://www.acls.org/uploadedFiles/Fellowships_and_Grants/Competitions/1112_PublicFellowsIIE.pdf 4. National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE) Program Ocer http://www.acls.org/uploadedFiles/Fellowships_and_Grants/Competitions/1112_PublicFellowsNITLE.pdf 5. New York City Department of Cultural Aairs Cultural Programs Specialist http://www.acls.org/uploadedFiles/Fellowships_and_Grants/Competitions/1112_PublicFellowsNYC-DCLA-Cultural-Programs.pdf Cultural Communications Specialist http://www.acls.org/uploadedFiles/Fellowships_and_Grants/Competitions/1112_PublicFellowsNYC-DCLA-Cultural-Communications.pdf 6. U.S. Department of State two positions, various departments http://www.acls.org/uploadedFiles/Fellowships_and_Grants/Competitions/1112_PublicFellows-USDepartment-of-State.pdf ACLS will eld only questions about the fellowship program itself and not on the positions or the organizations. Please carefully review the program description, the positions, and the sample application before contacting ACLS. Questions about the fellowship program can be directed in writing to fellowships@acls.org (no calls please).

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28 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter A new blue-ribbon commission has been assembled in a bid to put the humanities and social sciences on an equal footing on the public agenda with science, technology, engineering and mathematics. We feel strongly that its time to bring all these disciplines into constructive interplay, Leslie C. Berlowitz, president of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, said during a conference call with reporters ursday morning to announce the formation of the group, which has been dubbed the Commission on the Humanities and Social Sciences. e humanities and social sciences have not been as much on the national agenda. Part of this eort is to show how integrated the two are, she said, referring to those elds connection to the sciences. You cant teach math and science to people who cant read. e commissions 41 members represent a broad range of disciplines and backgrounds, including artists (Emmylou Harris and Chuck Close), college presidents (Drew Gilpin Faust of Harvard University and Donna E. Shalala of the University of Miami), academics (Kwame Anthony Appiah, professor of philosophy at Princeton University, and Gerald Early, professor of modern letters at Washington University in St. Louis), former governors (John Engler of Michigan and Phil Bredesen Jr. of Tennessee), and private sector heavyweights (James McNerney, chairman, president and CEO of Boeing, and John E. Warnock, chairman of Adobe Systems). e groups work will cost about $1 million and has been funded, in part, with start-up money from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. e panel is meant to parallel a similar eort focused on the sciences, which is being undertaken by the National Academies. e results of that report will be a set of recommendations for how various sectors can support research universities in achieving national goals in health, energy, the environment, and security. e Commission on the Humanities and Social Sciences will meet over the next year to 18 months and eventually recommend what its organizers call concrete and actionable plans for those in government, education and philanthropy to strengthen teaching and research in the humanities and social sciences. While similar eorts have been attempted before, such as the Association of American Universities 2004 report, Reinvigorating the Humanities, the work of this commission will dier, says the academy, because its focus will go beyond the AAUs emphasis on research universities (though that report did recommend that colleges form partnerships with K-12 schools and cultural organizations) and on the humanities alone. e commission has been given the job of identifying the top 10 actions to support both sets of disciplines that can be taken by universities, K-12 educational institutions, governments, foundations and donors. e commission came into being as the result of a request from Senators Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Mark Warner (D-Va.), as well as Representatives Tom Petri (R-Wisc.) and David Price (D-N.C.). e goal of the commission, the public ocials wrote, is to maintain national excellence in humanities and social scientic scholarship and education, and to achieve long-term national goals for our intellectual and economic well-being; for a stronger, more vibrant civil society; and for the success of cultural diplomacy in the 21st century. e civic and democratic function of the humanities and social sciences is especially important in American life, said Richard H. Brodhead, president of Duke University, and co-chair of the commission. He described how the Declaration of Independence drew upon humanist thought. In the most literal sense, the country was founded on ideas, he said during ursdays call. And although the humanities focus on the past, he said that a deeper awareness of Yanked from the Margins by Dan Berrett

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29 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter these disciplines is essential to solving tough problems in the present. I regard humanities as the treasure house of ideas, he said. e notion that the humanities and social sciences play an important role in national security has also been articulated before by such gures as David Skorton, Cornell Universitys president (and a member of the commission). When I hear military leaders talking about winning the so-called hearts and minds of people in other countries, the way I translate that is all based on humanistic and social science disciplines, he said in a state of the university address. at requires that we understand the language, the culture, the religion, and the values of those societiesand that is the humanities. At the same time, the humanities and social sciences will have signicant ground to make up if they are to achieve parity with STEM elds, which have received signicant public attention and investment. President Obamas proposed budget for 2012 seeks $100 million to train teachers in these elds over the next decade. e commissions eort to bolster the humanities and social sciences also takes place amid hard times for those disciplines. In recent months, the State University of New York at Albany has called for the closure of three foreign language departments, as well as classics and theater; Howard University will terminate majors in classics, anthropology and other elds in order to place greater emphasis on STEM training and Africana studies; and members of Congress have sought citizen input on which grants, most of them in the social and behavioral sciences, should be cut from the federal research budget. In her remarks on ursday, Berlowitz cited other dire data from the academys humanities indicators, including a 46 percent decline over the past 30 years in the number of humanities degrees conferred as a proportion of all bachelors degrees. In addition, more than half of all students graduating from American high schools in 2006 could not demonstrate basic knowledge of history; over a third lacked basic knowledge of civics, she said. Berlowitz argued that the relative decline of the humanities over the past half-century occurred as higher education became more widely available to larger swaths of the population, many of whom wanted to be sure the investment would pay o in the form of a rst job. Careerism crept into the vocabulary of academe, and business degrees grew to become the most popular major. John W. Rowe, chairman and CEO of Exelon Corporation and co-chair of the committee, said that he sees the results of these trends in the workplace. Many employees have poor writing skills, and demonstrate an ignorance of history and weak knowledge of geography and foreign cultures. ere usually seems to be money thats ndable for the sciences, but the liberal arts are always struggling for resources, he said. But Rowe was also careful not to place the sciences and humanitiesor, for that matter, a practical and liberal educationin opposition to each other. Id never discourage college students from thinking about how to have productive or remunerative employment, he said. I dont think trying to be wise and trying to be useful are in conict. News of the commissions formation met with hearty approval from one advocate for the humanities. Rosemary G. Feal, executive director of the Modern Language Association, found it particularly heartening that the commission was created as a result of a bipartisan request, especially in an environment in which deep cuts have been proposed to the humanities and the arts. But Feal also wondered whether there will be money to ensure that the commissions recommendations will be adopted. e question is not whether this commission will succeedI have no doubt of that, she wrote in an e-mail. Its whether the federal funders will do their part to ensure that the vision of the commission becomes a reality. Full Article Online At: http://www.insidehighered.com/ news/2011/02/18/new_commission_to_advance_ the_cause_of_the_humanities_and_social_science

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30 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter e American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting provides historians of science with a unique opportunity for outreach into the scientic community, as well as into the world at large. e Meeting further provides attendees with an entre into the most recent, even urgent issues of concern on science and society. In a previous issue of the HSS Newsletter Bruce Lewenstein of Cornell University, made a special plea for participation of all STS scholars in AAAS Annual Meetings. [See http://www.hssonline.org/publications/ Newsletter2011/January-aaas.html ] My experience with the 2011 conference could help others decide how best they could contribute to such a gathering. I participated as one of three speakers in a symposium co-organized by Alan J. Rocke, a leading historian of European chemistry at Case Western Reserve University and the outgoing Chairman of Section L. (History & Philosophy of Science), and Penny J. Gilmer, a chemist at Florida State University, leader of the NSF-Advance consortium of ve Florida institutions, and co-editor of an upcoming volume on the signicance of Mme Curies Centennial for science education. She also provided co-sponsorship of the proposed Symposium by AAASs Section C (Chemistry). Our Symposium, Celebrating the Centennial of Mme Curies Nobel Prize in Chemistry greatly beneted from this collaboration between an historian of science and a scientist, most notably in securing an optimal range of complementary speakers: a scientist, a general historian, and a historian of science. Moreover, the panelists covered key themes, including the experimental and theoretical aspects of Mme Curies discoveries; her reception as a woman scientist in America in the 1920s; and the changing patterns of her commemorations throughout the 20th Century. e rst speaker, Patricia (Trish) Baisden, a nuclear chemist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, discussed Mme Curies experimental procedures in discovering radioactivity, polonium, and radium with detailed graphics of the laborious distillation processes. She also displayed many original photos given to her by a former director of the Radium Institute in Paris, while asking intriguing questions such as whether Mme Curie had a sucient experimental basis to claim the discovery of polonium when she did. (Yes, she did! even by current standards) Trish further enlightened us on subtle distinctions between nuclear chemists such as herself and radiochemists, both descendents of Mme Curies discoveries: one branch is more physical and the other more chemical, as bets the progeny of the inter-disciplinary discovery of radioactivity. e second speaker, historian Julie Des Jardins of Baruch College/ CUNY-NYC, spoke on the longlasting American fascination with Mme Curie, ever since her visits to the US to collect donated radium in 1921 and 1929. She emphasized how Mme Curies public image as a woman scientist was adjusted to t gender stereotypes, such as the claim that her science was maternal or that she practiced it primarily for the sake of curing cancer. e impact of such a distorted public image on generations of women scientists is further elaborated in her recent book, e Madame Curie Complex, e Hidden History of Women in Science which builds upon the work of eminent scholars, such as Margaret W. Rossiter, as well as women scientists, most notably Caroline Herzenberg and Ruth Howe. My talk, the third and last, discussed the concept of commemorative practices in science 1 the stimulus 1 As in Commemorative Practices in Science (University of Chicago Press, 2000) which includes a dozen historians of science, many from the US, and twice that number of case studies, edited by Pnina G. Abir-Am and Clark A. Elliott; and La Mise en Memoire de la Science (Paris: Editions des Archives Contem poraines, 1998) edited by Pnina G. Abir-Am, which How Science, Policy, Gender, and History Meet each Other Once a Year Reections on Our Symposium at the AAAS 2011 Meeting by Dr. Pnina G. Abir-Am, Resident Scholar, WSRC Brandeis University, 515 South Street, MS 079, Waltham, MA. 02454 pninaga@brandeis.edu

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31 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter they provide for conducting new research in history of science, and potential ramications for science policy. I began with analyzing new data I have recently collected on Mme Curies commemorations throughout the 20th century, while pointing toward a pattern of increasing globalization. Earlier anniversaries were marked primarily in France and Poland, (her adopted and native countries) culminating with the Curies reburial in the mid1990s in the Pantheon, the graveyard of great French minds, (or as Mona Ozouf put it, LEcole Normale des Morts) in a state-sponsored major event. is symbolic act made Mme Curie the rst woman to be so honored for her own scientic accomplishments. By contrast, in the post-Cold War era, the centennial of the discovery of radioactivity in 1998 became global with major anniversaries being held not only in France and Poland but also in the US and Japan. e latter, perhaps for reasons related to the trauma of the atomic bomb, i.e. some form of applied research in radioactivity, marked the 1998 centennial over a year long program, in half a dozen Japanese cities 2 including the participation of many scientic societies, representing the medical, physical, and chemical sciences. Second, I showcased the work of several historians of science whose research helped dispel the gender stereotypes long shrouding Mme Curies public memory, especially in America. ey included: (in alphabetical order) Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent of the University of Paris who claried the emergence of Mme Curies scientic dynasty with elder daughter Irene and son-in-law Frederic, both using the surname Joliot-Curie, becoming Nobel co-laureates for the discovery of articial radioactivity in 1934, the year of Mme Curies death. I also mentioned Soraya Boudia of the University of Strasbourg, who claried Mme Curies intense preoccupation with includes a majority of French case studies and authors. Contrary to persistent rumors, one book is not a trans lation of the other: 3 out of 12 authors appear in both books but each wrote a dierent paper for the two volumes. 2 Some of those locations became associated with the tsunami of March 2011, most notably Sendai and Yokohama, though many commemorative events were held in Tokyo. metrology as well as her role as lab director who trained a contingent of women scientists; J.L. Davis of University of Kent, UK who established Mme Curies role as leader of a research school including a diverse mix of both French and foreign, women and men scientists; Helena M. Pycior, of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, who claried Mme Curies status as the primary investigator in her collaboration with husband Pierre Curie; and Xavier Roque of the Autonomous University of Barcelona, who established that Mme Curies extensive collaboration with the radium industry was a central part of her identity as a scientist. For reasons of time, I could not dwell on many biographical studies of Mme Curie, works which are already better known since they cater to a wide public. But I did ash a slide from a 1996 French lm in which Mme Curie was played by Isabelle Adjani. Since Trish had previously shown Mme Curies portrayal by Greer Garson in the 1943 American lm based on the rst biography of Mme Curie, (by younger daughter Eve) the audience could thus compare Mme Curies imagery on lm half a century apart. ird, I drew attention to the pertinence of Mme Curies work, life, and career for public debates in our own time on the under-representation of women in science, while oering half a dozen or so lessons. Included among these lessons were: emigration as a condition for pursuing science by wo/men from peripheral countries; diversifying ones collaborative strategies with other scientists, including ones own spouse, so as to preserve ones scientic credit especially when one is a junior scientist, a woman, or a member of some other disadvantaged group; cooperation with industry as a source of nancial independence; and coping with the international ow of research associates, including women, in periods of great social change such as the aftermath of WWI. Last but not least, I drew attention to Mme Curies life as a case study in resourceful balancing of an intense and demanding career with child rearing, again with the help of a highly emotive visual device: a photo of Mme Curie and her children in 1906. I thus emphasized that her daughters were born both before and after the discovery of radioactivity in 1898, (i.e. Irene in 1897 and Eve in 1904) possibly in

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32 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter order to help a century later, when a public debate on the balancing of career and family life by women in science is still raging. e photo thus conveyed that having children does not preclude discoveries and vice versa, that is, discoveries do not preclude women scientists having children. I also asked whether a better familiarity with Mme Curies life by leading gures in public debates regarding the under-representation of women in science could have spared us a year-long spectacle of historically uninformed hypotheses being oated as reasons for this under-representation 3 e session, which unfolded without glitches, (except for failing to get the Skype connection so as to enable co-organizer Penny J. Gilmer, then still recovering from a car accident, to watch us from afar) was attended almost to capacity (~160). Possibly this was so because it was scheduled in a great time slot, the rst full day of the 5-day conference, at 10 a.m. and in an accessible auditorium on the rst oor of the Washington Convention Center. e Nobel allusion in its title may have been responsible for the fair number of men in the audience, since they rarely attend womens topics. Still, my experience with our Symposium went beyond the opportunity it had given me to justify the organizers condence in my ability to contribute to their program. Two unexpected revelations were equally important. e rst had to do with the realization that by oering a unique opportunity to engage with a wider public, the AAAS had reactivated my dormant jocular tendencies. ough I did not specically prepare anything funny, the lively response to my humoristic presentation style 3 The three reasons oated by L Summers in this order were: 1) womens lack of interest to work long hours; 2) womens innate lesser aptitude for science; 3) gender discrimination. The latter was however not only listed as the last and least factor but further described as deriving from socialization, thus implying a normative condition which need not be changed. The debate which became known as the debate that wont go away ( New York Times 5-12-05) is resurfacing periodically, most recently in the Chronicle of Science Education and PNAS both articles on 2-7-11. For details see my Gender and Technoscience: A Historical Perspective, Journal of Technology Management and Innovation 5 (1) 2010, 152-165, also at www.jotmi.org ) which also discusses the wider historical context of that debate. persuaded me that I should engage in such public talks more often. is is a useful lesson, coming as it does not too long before the release of a sure to be controversial book. e second revelation was my grasping of a connection between my topic (how the Curie centennial had been historically observed) and the opportunity to engage in activism by sharing a petition calling upon scientic organizations to practice gender inclusiveness in seeking contributors for ongoing Centennials of Mme Curies Nobel in Chemistry, the rationale for UNESCOs declaration of 2011 as the International Year of Chemistry. Our Symposium may have been rare in having an adequate, perhaps even more than adequate, representation of women speakers and organizers. Organizations other than AAAS appear to have a surprisingly low presence of women scientists and scholars in programs which purport to honor Mme Curie. [For a copy of the petition, please contact the author.] To conclude, the AAAS Symposium in which I agreed to participate despite some initial ambivalence due to the time and eort that such large-scale meetings demand, turned out to be an amazing experience. Our Symposium not only enabled me to combine scholarship and activism in a way I value as being more professional than being an Ivory tower recluse, or alternately serving the public only. ese two are Janus-faced endeavors, and we should not shy away from stepping up to the plate when a rare opportunity arises to combine scholarship with activism for a great cause. Moreover, meeting soul mates among those who came to the podium to express interest in the talk, the petition, or both, further inviting me to speak in their institutions, was absolutely divine. Regretfully, I must cut this short even though the AAAS Annual Meeting included a host of other attractions well beyond our Symposium. In particular, I hope to keep you informed on how the Mme Curie Centennial is unfolding with regard to scientic and historical organizations becoming more aware of the need to include more women scientists and scholars in their programs.

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33 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter Donors List Calendar Year 2010 Donations and In-Kind Support SA R TON CI RC LE ($1000+) Anonymous Estate of Lawrence Badash Miles Davis* Pzer Corporation Nancy G. Siraisi 1, 2 National Science Foundation University of Florida University of Notre Dame PR ESIDENTS CI RC LE ($500+) Margaret W. Rossiter 4 M.K. Webster 8 omas R. Williams 3 BENE F A C TO R S ($200+) Anonymous Anonymous 1 Mitchell G. Ash 7, 8 Jonathan Coopersmith 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 Lenore Feigenbaum 1 Sara S. Gronim 2, 4 Melanie J. Hunter 3, 4, 6, 7 Daniel J. Kevles 2, 3 Leonello Paoloni 1, 2, 4, 7 Otto Sonntag 2 Sherman Suter 2, 7 omas Word 1, 2 It is an honor to recognize and record here our supporters for 2010. Please send corrections to info@hssonline.org Key: 1. General Operating Fund 2. General Endowment Fund 3. Bibliographers Fund 4. Margaret W. Rossiter History of Women in Science Prize 5. Hazen-Polsky Matching Fund (Education Fund) 6. Nathan Reingold Prize 7. Sponsor a Scholar Program 8. 2010 MeetingGraduate Student Fund 9. 2010 MeetingHSS Womens Caucus Breakfast Watson Davis and Helen Miles Davis Prize

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34 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter Donors List Calendar Year 2010 Donations and In-Kind Support PAT R ONS ($100+) Amy K. Ackerberg-Hastings 2, 4 Garland Allen III 8 Nikhil Bhattacharya 1 Ann Blair 3 Carole B. Boyd 1, 4 omas Broman 1 Stephen G. Brush 1, 2, 3 Constance Clark 1 Amy Crumpton 1 Lorraine Daston 3, 7 David Devorkin 1 Margaret Garber 1, 4 Lucille B. Garmon 1, 2, 4 Hannah Gay 1, 3 Elihu Gerson 1 Kristine C. Harper 7 John L. Heilbron 7 Pamela Henson 3, 6 Margaret C. Jacob 1 Kenneth J. Knoespel 1 Frances Coulborn Kohler 1, 3 Robert E. Kohler 1, 3 Sally Gregory Kohlstedt 8, 9 Marcel C. LaFollette 7 Jorge Lazare 4, 7 Steven J. Livesey 3 Carolyn Merchant 4 Lynn Nyhart 1, 9 Christine Petto 4 Michael Robinson 1 James A. Runer 3 Phillips Salman 1 Robert M. Sayre 1, 2 Rivers Singleton 3 Charlene and Michael M. Sokal 2 Lawrence S. Sturman 1, 2 John M. Tucker 1 Neale Watson 8 Karin E. Wetmore 3 Keren H. Wick 1, 3 PA R TNE R S ($50+) Tara Abraham 8 Anonymous 6 Elizabeth Bennett 3 Muriel L. Blaisdell 4, 5 Daniel Bouk 2 Mary Ellen Bowden 1 Carson S. Burrington 2 Luis Campos 8 Erik M. Conway 2 Clark A. Elliott 3 Guy T. Emery 1, 2 Paul Farber 1 Anne Fausto-Sterling 4 Monica H. Green 4 Kenneth G. Hellyar 3 Gabriel Henderson 1, 2, 6 Paul B. Israel 6 Gwen E. Kay 2, 4 Sachiko Kusukawa 1 Jack Lesch 1, 8 Albert C. Lewis 3 George Loudon 2 Arthur M. Lucas 3 Victor K. McElhemy 3 John L. Michel 2, 7 William M. Montgomery 3 Sally E. Newcomb 7 Brian Ogilvie 8 Marilyn Ogilvie 1, 3, 4, 8, 9 Stuart S. Peterfreund 7 Kristin E. Peterson 1 Gregory Radick 1, 3, 6, 8 George M. Rosenstein 3 Jole Shackelford 8 Phillip Sloan 8 Scott Spear 8 Liba Taub 8 Hunter Taylor 3, 5, 7 P. James Wallace 1 Robert S. Westman 1 Charles W. J. Withers 1, 2, 6 Fabio Zanin 1

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35 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter Donors List Calendar Year 2010 Donations and In-Kind Support SUPPO R TE R S Pnina G. Abir-Am 4, 9 Renato Acampora 3 Antonio A.S. de Andrade 1 Toby A. Appel 3 Rima Apple 9 Karl Appuhn 2 Adam J. Apt 1 Grant M. Barkley 1 James R. Bartholomew 1, 3 Francesca Bavuso 3 Kenneth Bertrams 2 Joseph P. Bevak 1 Uldis Blukis 2 Patrick J. Boner 3 Kennard B. Bork 2 William H. Brock 3 Eric Brown 1 Juliet M. Burba 1 Joe D. Burcheld 3 Richard W. Burkhardt 3 Joan Cadden 3 John Carson 8 Adam Caulton 9 Yun-Shiung Chang 1 Raz Chen-Morris 1, 2 Bella C. Chiu 5 S. J. Counce-Nicklas 2 Paul J. Croce 6, 7 Peter Dear 8 Luke Demaitre 1 Dennis Des Chene 2 Dawn Digrius 9 Ruthanna Dyer 9 Kyle M. Ellis 1 Paula Findlen 1 Martha Fleming 4, 9 S. Forgan 1 Michael W. Friedlander 1 Daniel Friedman 1 Janet Garber 1, 4 Catherina Gere 4 Mary Louise Gleason 5 Greg Good 8 Graeme J. Gooday 5, 7 Pamela Gossin 4 Anita Guerrini 8, 9 Karl P. Hall 7 Katherine Haramundanis 1, 3 Victoria A. Harden 1 Joseph E. Harmon 1 Bruce Hevly 3 John N. Howard 1 Jennifer Hubbard 3 Hajime Inaba 3 Benjamin Jack 2 Alan Johnson 1 Ann Johnson 3 Jerey Johnson 4, 8 Susan Jones 8 James Justus 8 Robert O. Kalbach 1 Saskia Klerk 1 Ramunas A. Kondratas 6 Alison Kraft 4 Greg Lampros 1 Cameron Lazaro-Puck 7 Howard M. Lenho 4, 7 Debra Lindsay 9 Kathleen Loh 1 Pamela O. Long 1, 8 Monica M. MacCallum 4 Pamela Mack 9 Edward M. MacKinnon 1 Robert J. Malone 1, 5 Craig Martin 3 Ronald E. Mickens 1 Susan W. Morris 1 Staan Mueller-Wille 8 Edmond Murad 1 Joabh Nascimento 1 Tsunehiko Nomura 3 Maureen OMalley 1 David Orenstein 5 Louise Y. Palmer 1 John L. Parascandola 1 Sharrona Pearl 2 Norman Pearlman 1 Dennis Pilarczyk 1 Alan Pritchard 3 George B. Rabb 1 Karen Rader 9 Gina V. Ramsay 4 Sylwester Ratowt 3 Barbara J. Reeves 4 Marsha L. Richmond 4, 9 Chris Rojas 7 Nils D. Roll-Hansen 1 L. de Rooy 1 Shigeki Saito 1 Helga Satzinger 4 Michael H. Shank 3 April Shelford 2, 6 Ann B. Shteir 4 Ida H. Stamhuis 4, 7 Frank J. Sulloway 3 Klaas Van Berkel 3 Linda E. Voigts 3 Andreas D. Vourtsis 3 Elizabeth A. Williams 2 Doogab Yi 2 Najm al-Din Youse 1 Maria K. Zari 2

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36 History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 History of Science Society Newsletter UPC OM IN G CO N FERE NC ES Other Meetings HSS 2013 Boston, MA, Westin Waterfront Hotel, 21-24 November. 100th Anniversary of Isis HSS 2011 Cleveland, OH, Renaissance Hotel, 3-6 November. Co-located meeting with SHOT and 4S 2012 The 7th British-North American History of Science meeting (hosted by HSS). 10-13 July 2012, Philadelphia, PA. (Sponsored by the American Philosophical Society, the Chemical Heritage Foundation, the University of Pennsylvania, and the Philadelphia Area Center for the History of Science) HSS 2012 San Diego, CA, Sheraton Harbor Island Hotel, 15-18 November. Joint meeting with PSA 2012 American Association for the Advancement of Science 2012 meeting. Vancouver, BC 16-20 February (group discounts available for HSS members)


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NEWSletter
is S So -iet


Table of Contents
Notes from the Inside
News and Inquiries
In Memoriam
Member News
Yanked From the Margins
How Science, Policy, Gender,
and History Meet each Other
Once a Year
Donors List Calendar Year 2010


THE INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF

CHEMISTRY

In honor of the International Year of Chemistry, we have reprinted three
articles A' ,...' .:, (and It Feels So Good) "Palmer the Poisoner, "
and "Through the Looking Glass"- all by James Voelkel, the Curator
of Rare Books at the Chemical Heritage Foundation. These articles first
appeared in Chemical Heritage, the magazine of the Chemical Heritage
Foundation, and we are grateful for permission to reproduce them here.

REUNITED (AND IT FEELS So GOOD)
By James Voelkel
English physician Henry Stubbe (1632-1676) was a man of
strong convictions who did not hesitate to publish them. In fact, his
superabundance of opinions and his inability to leave well enough
alone make his books an excellent illustration of a feature of 17th-
century publishing that 21 st-century readers may not appreciate.


I'' N -


Henry Stubbe's biting critiques ofthe Royal Society, appended together



...Chemical History, CH; Roy G.. Historical Chemical Library, CH
Wi the 17t L t i
Henry Stubbe's biting critiques of the Royal Society, a ppended together
but separated over time, were happily reunited by CHF [Chemical Heritage
Foundation] 338years after publication. Image courtesy of the Othmer Library of
Chemical History, CHF; Roy G. i'. .' Historical Chemical Library, CHF.

In the 17th century some books particularly in England
grew by accretion. The result was complicated books in which
earlier title pages often appear in the middle of a book, causing
headaches for modern collectors and curators as they try to untangle
questions of edition, issue, and state. An unhappy outcome is that
Continued on Page 2







History of Science Society Newsletter


THE INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF

CHEMISTRY
Continued fom Page 1

a later edition is considered defective if it lacks one of its constituent parts. Happily, the Chemical Heritage
Foundation's Othmer Library of Chemical History recently made a defective book whole by reuniting it with
its other parts.
Stubbe combined a prodigious skill in Greek and Latin with a thorough knowledge of history and
mathematics and a great respect for the ancient physicians. One day he heard a man quip that all ancient science
was useless to the physician and did not so much as contribute to the cure of a cut finger. When pressed, the wag
said that this was an opinion of Joseph Glanvill and the other members of the recently founded Royal Society.
Outraged, Stubbe began writing an impassioned screed against the Royal Society.
His first target was Glanvill. After reading Glanvill's Plus Ultra, Or, The Progress and Advancement of
Knowledge Since the Days ofAristotle (1668), Stubbe composed a scathing critique. He titled it A Specimen of
Some Animadversions upon a Book Entitled Plus Ultra, Or, Modern Improvements of Useful Knowledge Written
by Joseph Glanvill, a Member of the Royal Society, which he had printed in the spring of 1670. When the book
arrived, Stubbe decided that his "To the Reader" note did not sufficiently express his outrage and that the title
didn't contain enough vitriol. So he composed a new preface and a zingier title: The Plus Ultra reduced to a Non
Plus: Or, A Specimen ofsome Animadversions upon the Plus Ultra of Mr. Glanvill, wherein sundry Errours of Some
Virtuosi are discovered, the Credit of the Aristotelians in part Re-advanced; and Enquiries ... followed by 12 bullet
points detailing his rebuttal of Glanvill. These additional seven sheets were printed and appended to the front
of the book. A copy of the book in this state found its way to bibliophile Roy G. Neville, whose collection is
housed in the Othmer Library.
In the meantime it had become clear to Stubbe that Thomas Sprat also needed to be taken to task for
his History of the Royal Society (1667). To be sure, both Sprat and Glanvill had been almost giddy in their
unabashed promotion of the Royal Society. Why else publish a laudatory history of a society that was barely
five years old? Stubbe sought to bring them down to earth with another 1670 publication titled Legends no
Histories: Or, A Specimen of some Animadversions upon the History of the Royal Society which, after two long
sentences further elaborating the contents, ended Together With the Plus Ultra of Mr. Joseph Glanvill reduced

SContinued on Page 9


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EDITORIAL POLICIES, ADVERTISING AND SUBMISSIONS
The History of Science Society Newsletter is published in January, April,
July, and October, and sent to all individual members of the Society.
The News/etter is edited and published in the Executive Office. The
format and editorial policies are determined by the Executive Director
in consultation with the Committee on Publications and the Society
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for insertion orders is six weeks prior to the month of publication
and should be sent to the attention of the HSS Executive Office. The
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firm: Six weeks prior to the month of publication. Long items (feature
stories) should be submitted eight weeks prior to the month of
publication. Please send all material to the attention of the executive
office: info@hssonline.org.
2011 by the History of Science Society






History of Science Society Newsletter


INotes from the Inside

NSF Awards HSS Travel Grant
After some months of anxiety regarding the status of the Society's latest application for travel grants for graduate
students, independent scholars, and recent PhDs to attend the annual meetings, I was delighted to learn that
the National Science Foundation has funded this important grant. The anxiety a byproduct of these types
of appeals and the fact that our prior grant had expired was intensified by the talk of severe budget cuts in
the history of science at NSF. That the panel and NSF chose to fund this latest application speaks to the many
supporters and friends we enjoy in the field.

The new grant marks a departure in several ways from earlier travel grants, which have been a vital part of HSS
meetings since the mid 1990s. As an accommodation to the budget crisis in the US, the grant's duration was
reduced from 5 to 3 years (for the 2011, 2012 and 2013 conferences) and, most significantly, only those who
are US citizens or who are attending US schools are eligible. (This is an unfortunate development that we hope
we can correct, in part, by raising money for non-US scholars to attend our conferences.) The biggest change,
though, is the expansion of the grant to include other academic societies. Earlier grant iterations involved 4
Societies: HSS, PSA, SHOT, and 4S. This new version expands the list to 7 societies: HSS, PSA, SHOT, the
American Society for Environmental History (ASEH), the International Society for the History of Philosophy
of Science (HOPOS), the International Society for the History, Philosophy and Social Studies of Biology
(ISHPSSB), and the International Society for the Psychology of Science and Technology (ISPST). (I had hoped
to include the American Association for the History of Medicine but NSF will not fund AAHM in this way.)
The main reason for the expansion was to foster closer ties with these groups, many of which are familiar to our
members. I know the officers and/or presidents of all but one of these organizations and have been impressed
by the work that they do. I was able to meet with officers from PSA, ISHPSSB, and HOPOS in Montreal to
explore some of the collaborative features of the grant and came away from that meeting with a new enthusiasm
for working together. As disciplinary boundaries increasingly blur, this type of collaboration will become all the
more important to the history of science.

Application forms for the travel grants will become available on the HSS website, shortly after the publication
of the preliminary program (only those participating in the program are eligible). Applicants to the other
societies' conferences will need to contact the individual societies for information about their grants. HSS will
provide administrative oversight for all of the grants, including the annual audits, standardization of forms
and procedures, reimbursement of the societies, annual reports, etc. It should be noted, and with emphasis,
that the direct costs associated the administration of these grants are not covered entirely by the grant itself. In
fact, the grants would not be possible without your membership in the HSS and from the generous support of
the Executive Office by Notre Dame. We view such administrative oversight as a courtesy to the profession, a
courtesy that would not be possible without your membership and support.

Thank you for your membership in the HSS.
-Jay Malone, HSS Executive Director







History of Science Society Newsletter


NOTRE DAME'S REILLY CENTER SEEKING RESEARCH ASSISTANT DIRECTOR


The University of Notre Dame's Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values
(http://reilly.nd.edu/) is a privately endowed center that is home to a wide array of educational,
research, and outreach programs. We host a five-year, Arts & Letters/Engineering dual-degree
program, an undergraduate Science, Technology, and Values Program, and a Graduate Program
in History and Philosophy of Science. We sponsor conferences on topics ranging from the
regulation of nanomaterials and the impact of Darwin in the 21st century to the history of
astronomy and Galileo and the Church. A book series, an e-journal, online lectures, and ethics
workshops bring our faculty and students into contact with a broad campus constituency, policy
makers, and the general public. We welcome a diverse group of visiting scholars in the Center. A
rapidly expanding research agenda includes collaborations with scientists and engineers working
on nanotechnology, environmental change, advanced diagnostics and therapeutics, genomics,
and many other topics. Among our own research projects is a multifaceted initiative on the ethics
of emerging weapons technologies.

The Reilly Center now seeks to hire a Research Assistant Director. This Ph.D.-level position will
provide support and direction for the Center's research collaborations and initiatives. We seek an
individual with training and experience in the sciences, engineering, science policy, the history,
philosophy, or sociology of science, or other relevant disciplines and with a serious commitment
to exploring questions about the ethical and societal impacts of science and technology.
Experience in grant writing is essential. Strong leadership potential, communication skills, and
management experience will all be advantages. In addition to coordinating the Center's research
activities, this individual will be expected to produce original research on topics related to the
Reilly Center's mission.

The Research Assistant Director will report to the Reilly Center's incoming Director, Prof. Don
Howard, and will join a team that includes an Assistant Director for Educational Programs, a
Communication and Outreach Coordinator, an Administrative Assistant, and the fifty Notre Dame
faculty who are Reilly Center Fellows. The salary will be commensurate with the candidate's
experience and skill level.

APPLICATION PROCESS:

Please apply online at http://ND.jobs to Job #11131 or visit https://jobs.nd.edu/applicants/
Central?quickFind=56618. For further information about the Reilly Center and its many
programs, please visit our web site: http://reilly.nd.edu. Queries about the Assistant Director
position should be directed to Prof. Don Howard, Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and
Values, 453 Geddes Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, 574-631-7547/1147,
dhowardl@nd.edu.

Interested applicants should submit to the same address: (1) a formal letter of application
outlining one's background, qualifications, and career goals; (2) a curriculum vitae; (3) a 3-4
page statement of research interests and research projects that one would like to pursue; and (4)
contact information for at least three references. The review of applications will begin at the end
of April 2011.

For additional information about working at the University of Notre Dame and various benefits
available to employees, please visit http://hr.nd.edu/why-nd. The University of Notre Dame is
committed to diversity (http://diversity.nd.edu/) in its staff, faculty, and student body. As such, we
strongly encourage applications from members of minority groups, women, veterans, individuals
with disabilities, and others who will enhance our community. The University of Notre Dame, an
international Catholic research university, is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.






History of Science Society Newsletter


NEWS AND INQUIRIES


History of Heart Transplantation
Lecture

On 25 January 2011, Dr. David Cooper presented
a lecture on Christiaan Barnard and the history of
heart transplantation to the C. F. Reynolds Medical
History Society at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr.
Cooper, when he was in Capetown, performed heart
transplants with Barnard, and so has first-hand stories
of the man and his work. This presentation is now
available for viewing online at:
http://mediasite.cidde.pitt.edu/mediasite/Viewer/?
peid=0934815fd4154df984f71032e0fe6ld1

New Open Access to the Isis
Bibliography

By Stephen P. Weldon, HSS Bibliographer
I am pleased to announce two new ways to access
the Isis Bibliography, making large portions of
the bibliography freely available to researchers
worldwide. First, the HSS website now provides
open access copies of the last several published
bibliographies (from 2004 to 2009, reserving
only the most recent volume for subscribing
members). These are all searchable PDF documents
that include all relevant front and back matter as
well as bookmarks for easy navigation within the
document.
Second, the Isis Bibliography data can now be accessed
in database form through WorldCat.org,
a free, open-access database hosted by OCLC.
Currently, this data comprises that from CBs 2000 to
2009. The source of our data is noted in every record
as "ISIS Bibliography of the History of Science;
History of Science, Technology, and Medicine
Database." Since the WorldCat.org database includes
records from resources all over the world, having our
records tagged this way means that anyone pulling up
one of our records will know where it came from, and


will see that the Society has contributed directly to
this worldwide open scholarship initiative.
In addition, a particularly useful filter exists for
historians who seek to look just at the Isis data.
By adding "xisi2" in the keyword search box, in
addition to any other search words, only Isis data
will be returned. All of this makes WorldCat.org
a perfect place for accessing bibliographical data
for individuals who are neither Society members or
who are unaffiliated with a library subscribing to the
HSTM database. Those using WorldCat.org, will
find that it is not as robust a search engine as OCLC's
subscription search engine subject index terms, for
example, are not displayed nor does this database
contain the most recent data; here again, the data
from the most recent year's bibliography is withheld.
The WorldCat.org database, however, offers the
great advantage of providing an open resource for
researchers of all kinds to find peer-reviewed and
scholarly citations.
Those who would like to try this search engine can
go directly to the url: http://www.worldcat.org/
or they can go to the Isis CB website, where I have
included a search box on the front page with a brief
discussion of its use and limitations:
http://www.ou.edu/cas/hsci/isis/website/index.html.

19th Century American Science
Website Announcement

Clark A. Elliott's website on 19th-century American
science has a new URL: http://historyofscienceinthe
unitedstates- 19thcentury.net
Although the content remains the same, the design
and layout are newly refurbished (by Andrew J.
Elliott). The site features aids for research produced
through 2007, including bibliographies of reference
works, books (by subject), and a searchable
chronology of science in the United States, 1790-






History of Science Society Newsletter


1910. Also available on the site is a downloadable
bibliography (in Excel) of books on all periods of
American science (not just the 19th century). This
compilation is taken from the new books section
of the Forum for the History of Science in America
newsletter, News & Views, from 1980 to 2007.

Dissertations in the History of
Science and Technology

The latest group of recent doctoral dissertations
pertaining to the history of science and technology
can be viewed at the following URL:
http://www.hsls.pitt.edu/histmed/dissertations

Colloquium: 50th Anniversary of
Eisenhower's Farewell Address

An afternoon seminar commemorating the 50th
anniversary of President Dwight D. Eisenhower's
Farewell Address took place Tuesday, January 18, in
the AAAS Auditorium in downtown Washington.
AAAS and the Consortium for Science, Policy, and
Outcomes (CSPO) of Arizona State University
cosponsored the seminar. President Eisenhower's
address is mainly remembered for his warning of
the perils of a "military-industrial complex." Less
widely known, but no less important was his
caution, a few sentences later, about "the danger
that public policy could itself become the captive
of a scientific-technological elite." This seminar
explored the historical context and current relevance
of Eisenhower's worries about this scientific-
technological elite. The seminar featured a panel
of veteran science policy observers moderated by
Steve Lagerfeld, editor of The Wilson Quarterly.
Joining Lagerfeld on the panel were: Dan Greenberg,
science journalist and author of several books on
science policy, Gregg Pascal Zachary, author of the
authoritative biography of Vannevar Bush, William
Lanouette, a journalist on science policy and from
1991 to 2006 a senior analyst on energy and science
issues at GAO, and Dan Sarewitz, co-director of
CSPO.
Further Information:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VtIZBcWBcis


CFP: KronoScope: Journal for the
Study of Time

Edited by an international board of scholars and
representing the interdisciplinary investigation
of all subjects related to time and temporality,
the journal is dedicated to the cross-fertilization
of scholarly ideas from the humanities, fine arts,
sciences, medical and social sciences, business and
law, design and technology, and all other innovative
and developing fields exploring the nature of time.
KronoScope invites critical contributions from all
disciplines; we accept submissions on a continuing
basis. Manuscripts of not more than 8000 words, and
using The Chicago Manual ofStyle, may be submitted
electronically to the Managing Editor Dr. C. Clausius
at cclausiu@uwo.ca. We also welcome review articles
as well as creative work pertaining to studies in
temporality. For further submission guidelines, please
visit the Brill website at: http://www.brill.nl/kron
or the International Society for the Study of Time
website at http://www.studyoftime.org/

CFP: Expositions (Villanova
University)

Expositions is an on-line journal where scholars
from various disciplines gather as colleagues to
converse about common texts and questions in
the humanities. We seek to publish two types of
contributions: Articles that either have an inter-
disciplinary character and appeal or are exemplary in
their respective disciplines while being of interest to
those from other disciplines, or notes, insights and
reflections on Teaching the Great Books that benefit
teaching, research, and the life of the academy. These
contributions include: "notes" that reflect upon
or challenge existing scholarship; and, "insights"
that provide intriguing new paths of interpretation
and close analysis of a text and/or that are just too
exuberant, provocative, or risky to fit in an ordinary
article. Word-length will typically be 1,000 to 3,000.
Our next issue will appear in April 2011.
For more information, contact Greg Hoskins
(gregory.hoskins@villanova.edu)
Phone: (610) 519-8100; Fax: (610) 519-5410.






History of Science Society Newsletter


D.C. Art & Science Evening
Rendezvous (DASER)

D.C. Art & Science Evening Rendezvous
(DASER) partnered with Leonardo
(http://www.leonardo.info/), the International
Society for the Arts, Sciences, and Technology, to
present D.C. Art and Science Evening Rendezvous
(DASER), a monthly discussion forum on art
and science projects in the national capital region.
DASERs provided the public with a snapshot of
the cultural environment of the region and fostered
interdisciplinary networking. The monthly series
began on 16 February 2011 at 6 p.m. at the Keck
Center. Historically, the artist has communicated,
educated, and preserved the ideas of science. But
how is the work of scientists, engineers, physicians,
and experts from other disciplines informed by
the creative processes of artists? How do artists use
science and technology to advance the creative and
cultural discourse? In the D.C. metropolitan area,
practitioners from many institutions, including
universities, museums, and embassies are interested
in the ways that various disciplines inform one
another with tangible results. Each DASER featured
presentations by such practitioners along with time
for discussion and socializing.
The February 16 kick-off event included presentations
by Lee Boot, associate director, Imaging Research
Center, University of Maryland, Baltimore County;
Carol Christian, scientist, Space Telescope Science
Institute, Baltimore; Gunalan Nadarajan, vice
provost, Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore;
and Thomas Skalak, vice president for research and
professor of biomedical engineering, University of
Virginia, Charlottesville. Upcoming DASERs are
scheduled on April 21, May 19, June 16, and July
21, 2011. Future speakers include Pamela Jennings of
the Computer & Information Science & Engineering
Department, National Science Foundation,
Arlington, Va., Max Kazemzadeh, assistant professor
of art and media technology, Gallaudet University,
Washington, D.C., and Jane Milosch, director,
WWII-Era Provenance Research Project, Smithsonian
Institution.


Publication of Special Issue of
Atlantic Studies

A recent special issue of Atlantic Studies was dedicated
to science and medicine in the Atlantic world:
"Itineraries of Atlantic science new questions,
new approaches, new directions." This special issue
contains 5 original essays, an editorial introduction,
an interview with Bernard Bailyn, a set of collective
reflections on the 2009 Harvard International
Seminar on Atlantic History, and three book reviews.
Two additional essays, which because of space
constraints were not able to be included in this issue,
are forthcoming in Volume 8.1. For further questions,
contact: Neil Safier neil.safier@ubc.ca Assistant
Professor of History, University of British Columbia,
Vancouver and Co-Editor Atlantic Studies: Literary,
Cultural, and Historical Perspectives.

Further Information:
http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/tides/14788810.asp

"Property and the Biosciences"
Videos Available Online

Videos from the "Intellectual Property and the
Biosciences" symposium, held on 7 July 2010 at
the University of Leeds as part of the White Rose
IPBio Project, are now available for free viewing
and download. The day offered perspectives from a
range of disciplines and domains, including history of
science, social studies of science, legal studies, patent
law and science policy. The speakers were Robert
Cook-Deegan (Duke), Daniel Kevles (Yale), Bronwyn
Parry (Queen Mary), Jane Calvert (Edinburgh),
Aurora Plomer (Sheffield), Antony Taubman (World
Trade Organization), Lady Lisa Markham (Harrison
Goddard Foote, patent attorneys, Leeds) and Rebecca
Eisenberg (Michigan). The symposium marked the
public launch of the White Rose IPBio Project, which
brings together staff and students from across the
White Rose universities (York, Sheffield and Leeds).
The aim is to stimulate better understanding of the
role of intellectual-property arrangements, past and
present, in shaping the biological and biomedical
sciences and their impacts.


- A ri 2 1117






History of Science Society Newsletter


For more information on the project, please contact
Greg Radick at G.M.Radick@leeds.ac.uk To join
the wider IPBio Network, please contact Berris
Charnley at berris@ipbio.org.
Further Information:
http://ipbio.org/WRIPBiomedia.htm

Bioinformatics as an Adaptable
Model for HPS Informatics

AAAS and HSS members Manfred D. Laubichler and
Jane Maienschein argue in AAAS's Scientia blog that
embracing bioinformatics will enable members of the
history and philosophy of science community to carry
out their individual studies while contributing to
collaborative enterprise.
Further Information:
http://membercentral.aaas.org/blogs/scientia/
bioinformatics-adaptable-model-hps-informatics

CFP: Feminism & Psychology
Special Issue

Jeanne Marecek and Nicola Gavey will edit a Special
Issue of Feminism & Psychology: "DSM-5 and Beyond:
A Critical Feminist Dialogue." Psychiatric diagnoses
wield considerable influence in western high-income
countries, helping to shape everyday understandings
of what is normal and what is abnormal. They also
undergird structures of funding for treatment and
shape its very nature. Feminists and others have
pointed to cultural, social and political influences
on the system and practice of psychiatric diagnosis.
They have highlighted ways diagnoses have been
deployed to legitimize patriarchal, racist, colonial,
heteronormative and other regimes of power. Yet
despite such critiques, diagnoses increasingly give
meaning to private experiences and personal identities
and provide a lens through which we view social life.
Not surprisingly then, the impending release of the
DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental
Disorders, 5th Edition), scheduled for May 2013, has
generated overwhelming public interest. This Special
Issue carries forward the tradition of critical feminist
scrutiny of psychiatric diagnosis and of the interplay
between psychiatry and the cultural imaginary. We


call for work concerning psychiatric diagnosis its
history, its uses and misuses in the mental health fields
(especially in regulating masculinities, femininities,
and sexual expression), its deployment in popular
culture and everyday talk and its implications for
feminist theorizing of psychological suffering, feminist
research, and applied feminist practice. Possible topics
include:
* The proliferation of diagnostic categories, as well
as "conceptual bracket creep" (the tendency for
diagnostic criteria to expand over time, so that
more and more everyday experience is deemed
pathological and said to require professional
intervention).
* Conflicts of interest in the psychiatric and
psychological professions that may affect
diagnostic practices; the colonization of psychiatry
by pharmaceutical interests
* Examinations of the epistemological features of
DSM-style diagnoses (e.g., the disease model,
biological reductionism, universalism, and
"categoricalism") and implications for feminist
theory and practice.
* Critical histories of efforts by feminists and
other progressive groups to influence diagnostic
categories and practice. What can we learn from
their successes and failures?
* Critical analyses of how conventional diagnosis
practices inhibit or facilitate feminist and
other critical approaches to research, practice,
psychotherapies, and social action.
We invite articles (up to 8000 words), brief reports
(up to 3000 words), and commentaries (up to
2000 words). (Note that these word limits include
reference lists.) We discourage submissions that focus
on a single diagnostic category, unless the analysis
illuminates broader theoretical, epistemological,
or conceptual concerns. Submissions will be
subject to the usual review process. To discuss a
possible submission or the scope of the issue or
to submit a manuscript, contact Jeanne Marecek
at jmarecel@swarthmore.edu. Closing date for
submissions is 15 November 2011.
Further Information: http://fap.sagepub.com/






History of Science Society Newsletter


THE INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF

CHEMISTRY
Continued fom Page 2


to a Non Plus, rc. He appended this title, 11 other
sheets of front matter, and 127 new pages of text to
the front of The Plus Ultra reduced to a Non Plus.
In 2008 a book dealer advertised a defective copy
of Stubbe's Legends no Histories that was lacking the
Plus Ultra reduced to a Non Plus. Though unappealing
to collectors, for a research library already holding the
other piece of the puzzle, it was kismet. The Othmer
Library purchased the book, reuniting the pieces. As
a bonus, bound in with this defective book was yet
another book, the final part of Stubbe's 1670 string
of rants against the Royal Society, A Censure upon
Certain Passages Contained in the History of the Royal
Society, As being Destructive to the Established Religion
and Church of England.

PALMER THE POISONER
By James Voelkel


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Alfred Swain Taylor, author of A Treatise
on Poisons in Relation to Medical Jurisprudence,
Physiology, and the Practice of Physic, was often
called as an expert witness at trials, including that of
William Palmer.





An estimated 30,000 people gathered outside
Stafford Prison on 14 June 1856 to witness the
hanging of William Palmer, also known as Palmer
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Alfred Swain Taylor, author of A Treatise









the Poisoner. His had been the trial of the century,
gripping the public imagination in Victorian
Britain. The case was so notorious that, to avoid a


prejudiced jury, the trial was moved by a special act
of Parliament from its local jurisdiction to the Old
Bailey in London (which served only to heighten
interest in the case).
After training in medicine, Palmer returned to
his native Rugeley in Staffordshire, married a local
woman, and seemed destined for the quiet life of an
English country doctor. But one element of country
life proved to be his undoing-horses. Within a few
years his obsession with horseracing and betting led
him essentially to abandon his practice. He fell deeply
into debt and-inexplicably-his closest relatives
started dying.
First to die was his mother-in-law, in Palmer's
home in 1849. Palmer's wife inherited a trust that
upon her death would revert to the mother-in-law's
family. Palmer then took out three life insurance
policies on his wife totaling 13,000. Mrs. Palmer
died in September 1854. In January of the following
year, Palmer insured his brother Walter, again for
13,000. Walter died that August. The insurance
companies, now suspicious, refused to pay and
assigned a private detective to the case. Palmer's
now desperate financial state led to another alleged
murder. In November his associate and betting
partner John Parsons Cook won a handsome
sum, then grew strangely ill. Palmer collected the
winnings, and after several days of his ministrations,
Cook too died.
At this point the father of English toxicology,
Alfred Swain Taylor (1806-1880), became involved.
Taylor had written the book on poisons, A Treatise on
Poisons in Relation to MedicalJurisprudence, Physiology,
and the Practice ofPhysic (London, 1844). When an
inquest was called into Cook's suspicious death, the
stomach contents and viscera went to Taylor at Guy's
Hospital in London for chemical analysis.
Taylor was at the height of his career. The
pioneering toxicologist had been Lecturer in Medical


Continued on Page 10






History of Science Society Newsletter


THE INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF

CHEMISTRY


Continued fom Page 9
Jurisprudence at Guy's for 25 years, his Manual
ofMedicalJurisprudence was in its fifth edition,
and he was a seasoned and effective witness for the
prosecution. He became the star witness in the case,
ensuring Palmer's conviction.
Ironically, it was not chemical analysis that sealed
Palmer's fate. Taylor testified that strychnine-which
Palmer had purchased in the days before the murder
but could not account for-was difficult to test for
even in controlled laboratory conditions. Instead
Taylor told the court that the spasms Cook displayed
in his paroxysms of death could occur only in cases of
tetanus and strychnine poisoning. With tetanus ruled
out, Taylor deduced poison.
Even after his conviction Palmer never confessed
to the crime. He went to the gallows saying, "I am
innocent of poisoning Cook by strychnine," an
enigmatic denial that, paired with ambiguous forensic
evidence, has created an enduring mystery.

THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS
By James Voelkel
Among the defining characteristics of the
scientific revolution of the 16th and 17th centuries
were the invention and development of new scientific
instruments. The thermometer and barometer
enabled experimenters to quantify heat and air
pressure. The vacuum pump made it possible to
manipulate the physical environment. And then there
was the creation of the telescope and the microscope,
which expanded the range of human senses.
After the publication of Galileo's spectacular
telescopic observations in 1610, the race was on to
apply the magnification technology to the mundane
world. But microscopes were more difficult to make
and observations depended a great deal on the skill of
the observer wielding what was essentially a glass bead
functioning as a really powerful magnifying glass.
Easily the most skillful user of the single-lens
microscope was Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (1632-


1723). Although
he did not have
a university
education, nor
mastery of Latin-
the language of
science-van
Leeuwenhoek
was nonetheless
a devoted
student of nature
and a talented
microscope maker.
He was responsible for the discovery of blood cells,
spermatozoa, protozoa, and bacteria, among other
things. Despite his modest background, the scientific
world beat a path to his door in Delft, Holland,
and he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of
London in 1680.
At the time, the Royal Society was home to
another of the world's foremost microscopists,
Robert Hooke (1635-1703). Although also from
a modest background, Hooke landed in the center
of English science, making important contributions
in the theory and practice of a number of different
disciplines. His most notable book is Micrographia,
Or Some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies
Made by Magnifying Glasses with Observations and
Inquiries Thereupon (London, 1665).
Hooke had constructed a serviceable compound
microscope, complete with focused light source,
which did not give him as much magnification as
van Leeuwenhoek's, but was far easier to use. He
published a series of observations he conducted
as curator of experiments for the Royal Society,
mostly of natural objects. (Hooke coined the word
cell in its biological sense.) Hooke's research was a
showpiece for the young Royal Society, and his work
was published in Micrographia, in a large folio with
magnificent foldout engravings that remains a much
sought-after landmark of scientific printing.






History of Science Society Newsletter


Soliciting Nomination for 2011
Forum for the History of Science in
America Article Prize

The Forum for the History of Science in America
has begun gathering articles for its 2011 Publication
Prize. Here are the eligibility criteria:
* Any article published in the English language in a
professional journal issue (or chapter in a multi-
authored edited volume) dated 2008, 2009 or
2010 and
* Authored by a scholars) who received a PhD in
2001 or afterward (i.e. recent PhDs and graduate
students are eligible for the article prize),
* On a topic in American Science ("American"
loosely defined to include the western hemisphere,
"science" conservatively defined to exclude articles
focusing on either the "clinical and social history
of medicine" or the "history of technology").
Authors are encouraged to self-nominate. Please
submit pdfs of published articles to David Spanagel:
spanagel@wpi.edu between now and July 31, 2011.

Forum for History of Human
Sciences
2011 FHHS Calls for Prize Submissions
2011 FHHS/JHBS John C. Burnham Early Career
Award: The Forum for History of Human Science
(an interest group of the History of Science Society)
invites submissions for the John C. Burnham Early
Career Award for 2011. This award is intended for
scholars, including graduate students, who do not
hold a tenured position and are not more than seven
years past the PhD. Unpublished manuscripts dealing
with any aspect of the history of the human sciences
are welcome. The winning article will be announced
at the annual History of Science Society meeting, 3-6
November 2011, in Cleveland, and will be submitted
to the Journal of the History of the Behavioral
Sciences with FHHS endorsement, to undergo the
regular review process. If the article is accepted for
publication, the publisher ofJHBS will announce
the award and issue a US $500 honorarium. The
manuscript cannot be submitted to any other journal
and still qualify for this award. Email manuscript and


curriculum vitae (PDF format) by 15 June 2011, to
weidman@fas.harvard.edu.
2011 FHHS Article Award: The Forum for History
of Human Science awards this prize (a non-monetary
honor) for the best recent article on some aspect
of the history of the human sciences. The winner
will be announced at the annual History of Science
Society meeting, 3-6 November 2011, in Cleveland,
and will be publicized in the FHHS Newsletter and
in publications of several other organizations (e.g.,
HSS, Cheiron). Eligible articles must have an imprint
date from 2008 to 2010 inclusively. Entries are
encouraged from authors in any discipline as long as
the publication is related to the history of the human
sciences. Deadline: 15 June 2011. Email PDF version
of the article to weidman@fas.harvard.edu. Further
information: http://www.fhhs.org

News from Montreal
During the annual meeting of the History of Science
Society in Montreal, FHHS met for its business
meeting on 6 November 2010, and awarded the
following prizes: 2010 FHHS Dissertation Award to
Daniel B. Bouk (Colgate University), "The Science of
Difference: Developing Tools for Discrimination in
the American Life Insurance Industry, 1830-1930,"
PhD diss., Princeton University, 2009. The 2010
FHHS/JHBS John C. Burnham Early Career Award
goes to Laura Stark (Wesleyan University), for her
manuscript, "The Science of Ethics: Deception, the
Resilient Self, and the APA Code of Ethics, 1966-
1973," recently published, under the same title, in
Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 46:4
(Fall 2010): 337-370. John Carson (University of
Michigan) was elected to a two-year term as new
chair of FHHS. David K. Robinson (Truman State
University) becomes past-chair and promises to
continue supporting Forum work. After the business
meeting, the Forum and guests enjoyed the FHHS
Distinguished Lecture, by Mary S. Morgan (London
School of Economics and University of Amsterdam):
"Recognising Glass Ceilings and Sticky Floors."
FHHS's Sponsored Session at HSS convened later
on Saturday afternoon: "Reexamining the Uneasy
Partnership: Economics, the Nation State, and
the Public Welfare, 1920s-1980s," with papers
by Thomas A. Stapleford, Tiago Mata, and Mark
Solovey, and comment by Sarah Igo.


- p il2 11






History of Science Society Newsletter


Important News for HSS Members

On 3 January 2011, the webpages of the
journals published by the University of Chicago
Press, which includes Isis, joined the Current
Scholarship Program and are now hosted
within the JSTOR domain (www.jstor.org). This
does not change the publishing arrangements
for the HSS, nor does it at all affect members'
subscriptions; the only change will be that
members will access Isis and Osiris at their
new online home within the JSTOR website.

The look of the online journals for UCP will
change as well. With improved readability and
organization, we've maintained equivalent
functionality while taking advantage of the
integration of the JSTOR backfile.

When society members go to the online
journal, they will be asked to create an account
within JSTOR and to select a new username
and password. Members received e-mail
messages in December to inform them about
this: a message from UCP about the upcoming
change in online access to the journal, and,
later in December, a welcome e-mail from
JSTOR and an e-mail with information on
creating an account and accessing one's
member subscription (unfortunately, members
who subscribe to multiple Chicago journals
received multiple notices).

Members' current usernames and passwords
will remain active on the UCP website
(www.journals.uchicago.edu) so that they
can renew their membership, change their
address, check the journal delivery schedule,
or claim non-delivery of print issues. Members
will be able to change their UCP username and
passwords to match their JSTOR usernames
and passwords, if they wish to.

In addition to these e-mails, members will see
information about access on the new Journal
webpage. Members who have bookmarked
links to the journal will find those links are
automatically redirected to the appropriate
page on the new journal webpage within
JSTOR.

UCP's customer service staff will work closely
with JSTOR's User Services department to
ensure that members' access to Isis and Osiris
will continue as seamlessly as possible. Please
feel free to contact Chicago Press with any
questions. For more information about JSTOR,
visit www.jstor.org.


IHPST Newsletter

The latest International History and Philosophy of
Science Teaching Group newsletter is available on the
web at: http://ihpst.net/newsletters/

Situating Science Spring 2011

Situating Science has a very busy spring ahead as it
hits the halfway mark of its seven-year project. Please
visit its website for the spring newsletter, an update on
lectures across Canada, workshops, Call for Situating
Science Workshop Proposals, Live Streams of note,
and more.
Further Information: http://www.situsci.ca

Exhibit: THE CHOCOLATE CONNECTION:
Hans Sloane & Jamaica

From 6 November 2010 to 31 January 2011, the
Lloyd Library and Museum hosted the exhibit THE
CHOCOLATE CONNECTION: Hans Sloane & Jamaica,
a rare and unique book exhibit from the library's
collection. The books were paired with an art exhibit
by students of the Art Academy of Cincinnati from its
class Illustration I, taught by Mark A. Thomas, Chair
of Communication Arts Department, and Professor
Troy Brown. Thomas explains, "Students were given
the task of producing an illustration that creatively
employed chocolate as the central theme while
utilizing basic design principles in their compositions.
The process involved several levels of exploration
beginning with a series of thumbnail sketches, leading
to comprehensive visual studies before arriving at
a final direction. Students, upon approval of the
final direction, made choices of style, medium and
even scale before executing their final piece." The
result was 24 unique artworks in a variety of media,
such as sculptures, paintings, prints, collages, and
graphite illustrations. A few artworks are interspersed
throughout the book exhibit, including a fanciful
sculpture of a cocoa tree sprouting from a chocolate
bar and an image of Hans Sloane printed in chocolate
syrup.
The book exhibit pulled together three seemingly
unconnected topics: 17th-century physician Hans






History of Science Society Newsletter


Sloane, chocolate, and Jamaica. 2010 marked the
350th anniversary of the birth of Sloane (1660-1753),
a British physician and naturalist who popularized
drinking chocolate and advocated the use of liquid
milk chocolate in Britain as a medicinal beverage.
Cadbury, the chocolate manufacturer, briefly used
Sloane's recipe in marketing its own version of the
liquid chocolate. Sloane learned about drinking
chocolate when he traveled to Jamaica in the late 17th
century, but chocolate had been known to the native
peoples of South and Central America for centuries,
long before Sloane's introduction to it, and the Spanish
were the first to bring chocolate to Europe as a result
of their early encounters with those peoples. Because
Sloane and chocolate collided on Jamaica, the museum
took this opportunity to showcase some works from
Lloyd's collection on these topics and demonstrate
how they interact with each other. The book exhibit
featured Sloane's 1696 publication on the botany of
Jamaica, which includes, of course, an illustration
of the cacao tree. The exhibit also contained several
exquisite botanical illustrations of cacao by some of
history's master artists, as well as historical information
on chocolate before Sloane's introduction to it; and,
books on the history of chocolate production and
manufacturing. The exhibit also included 19th-century
photographs by Curtis Gates Lloyd, one of the library's
founders, from his trip to Jamaica and the West Indies
illustrating chocolate plantations and the lives of
imported laborers.
For more information, call 513-721-3707; or, visit
Lloyd's website at www.lloydlibrary.org

American Historical Review
Redesigns Website
The American Historical Review has redesigned
their website (http://bit.ly/i8iPVr), the new look
paying homage to the journal's signature glossy
white cover and accompanying image, which is forty
years old this spring. The redesign also offers a more
streamlined user experience with added features
like a news section. They've also created a Facebook
page (http://on.fb.me/i85wBq), where they'll post
information about the latest issues and other news
from the journal.


American Historical Association
Releases New Report on Job Market

The American Historical Association (AHA)
published a report on the job market for historians
in the January 2011 issue of Perspectives on History.
AHA reports that the number of jobs posted with the
association fell 29.4 percent during the academic year
2009-10, from 806 to just 569 openings, the lowest
point in 25 years (since the 492 positions posted in
1984-85). This represents a continuation of negative
hiring trends reported by AHA last year.
Other findings include:
* The 2009-10 postings mark a decrease from
the historical high of 1,059 advertised positions
recorded two years ago.
* The economic crisis has led to hiring freezes at
many institutions, with noted differences between
public and private institutions.
* The outlook for junior faculty opportunities
varies by subject field.
* Despite recent cutbacks, most history
departments over the past decade are still larger
than they were five and ten years ago.
* The number of faculty nearing retirement age in
the next ten years is approaching the lowest level
in 30 years.
* The average number of applicants to PhD
programs in history declined slightly in 2009-10,
but remains above the number of students
matriculating five and ten years ago.
* As of December 1, 2010, job advertisements
through the AHA were up 21.4% compared to
the previous year, from 421 to 511 positions.
The report recommends that history departments
assess the limitations of the current academic job
market and consider their admissions procedures and
the type of training offered to students.
The report is available to the general public on the
AHA website as of 1 February 2011.
Further Information:
http://www.nhalliance.org/news/american-
historical-association-releases-new-repor.shtml


* April 2011 13






History of Science Society Newsletter


Prehistoric Minds: Human Origins
As A Cultural Artefact, 1780-2010

Organized and edited by Matthew D. Eddy
Published online: February 2011. Published in print:
March 2011

On 8 July 2010 the front page of The Guardian
newspaper featured an attractive color drawing by the
artist John Sibbick. It was titled "Meet the Norfolk
Relatives" and it depicted a pastoral scene of farmers
and hunters going about their daily routines. The
image, however, was not included to illustrate a
gargantuan sum recently paid for an impressionist
painting. Nor was it a teaser about a long lost work
of art. This drawing was slightly different from the
kinds that one would normally see on the front of a
leading British newspaper. Its subjects were naked.
Their bodies were hairy. They were, in fact, an artist's
impression of the early humans who lived on the
Norfolk coast a million years ago.

Like so many newspaper stories, this one engendered
interviews on the television, further articles and
commentaries on blogs which all sought to discuss
the recent finds in light of various disciplinary or
ideological agendas. Like today, images related to
the antiquity of humankind were used to caricature
foreigners in the Victorian press and contemporary
forms of scientific periodisation were used to interpret
the past. Notably, it was these very similarities that
led to the five essays in this special issue of Notes and
Records of the Royal Society.

For article access, go to
http://rsnr.royalsocietypublishing.org/site/misc/
PrehistoricMinds.xhtml

Jacques Loeb Centre Workshop:
Origin of Life

The Jacques Loeb Centre for the History and
Philosophy of the Life Sciences will hold its Fourth
International and Interdisciplinary Workshop
from 13-14 June 2011 at Ben-Gurion University in
Beer Sheva. The theme of the workshop is "Origin
of Life: Scientific, Historical, and Philosophical
Perspectives." There is hardly any topic in biology


which has changed its content so drastically in history
as that of the origin of life. This include claims of
panspermia-the continuity of life in the universe-
as well as assumptions, first put forward by Aristotle,
then repeated by the Church Fathers and by scientists
until through the 19th century, that some forms of
life generate spontaneously from non-living material.
Since the question of the origin of life is inseparable
from that of a particular conception of life, it affects
today not only research into astrobiology and
synthetic life, but, at least implicitly, most biological
research.

The workshop will focus on the origin of life on
earth. It intends to address the question from
a number of different scholarly and scientific
perspectives, such as biblical studies, classical studies,
history and philosophy of science, palaeontology,
microbiology, biochemistry, macromolecular
chemistry, synthetic biology, and evolutionary
biology. We expect this interdisciplinary discussion
also to bring forward new insights into the question
of what is life.

For more information, please contact Rony Armon
(armonr@bgu.ac.il) or Prof. Ute Deichmann
(972-8-6472258).

2012 Annual Meeting of the
American Association for the
History of Medicine

The American Association for the History of
Medicine invites submissions in any area of medical
history for its 85th annual meeting, to be held
in Baltimore, Maryland, 26-29 April 2012. The
Association welcomes submissions on the history
of health and healing; history of medical ideas,
practices, and institutions; and histories of illness,
disease, and public health. Submissions pertaining
to all eras and regions of the world are welcome.
In addition to single-paper proposals, the Program
Committee accepts abstracts for sessions and for
luncheon workshops. Please alert the Program
Committee Chair if you are planning a session
proposal. Individual papers for these submissions will
be judged on their own merits.






History of Science S(
Presentations are limited to 20 minutes. Individuals
wishing to present a paper are not required to be
members of AAHM before submitting an abstract,
but must join AAHM before presenting and register
for the meeting. All papers must represent original
work not already published or in press. Because
the Bulletin of the History ofMedicine is the official
journal of the AAHM, the Association encourages
speakers to make their manuscripts available for
consideration for publication by the Bulletin.
The AAHM uses an online abstract submissions
system. We encourage all applicants to use this
convenient software. A link for submissions will be
posted to the website at http://histmed.org/
If you are unable to submit proposals online, send
eight copies of a one-page abstract (350 words
maximum) with learning objectives to:
Program Committee Chair, Jole Shackelford,
Program for the History of Medicine, University
of Minnesota Medical School, MMC 506
420 Delaware St. SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
(612-624-4416)
When proposing a historical argument, state the
major claim, summarize the evidence supporting
the claim, and state the major conclusionss. When
proposing a narrative, summarize the story, identify
the major agents, and specify the conflict. New this
year is the additional requirement that abstracts
include three learning objectives to facilitate
approval for CME credit (not included in the 350
word abstract limit). Please provide the following
information on the same sheet as the abstract: name,
preferred mailing address, work and home telephone
numbers, e-mail address, present institutional
affiliation, and academic degrees. Abstracts must be
received by 15 September 2011.

We cannot accept e-mailed or faxed proposals.

CFP-NEW JOURNAL: Journal of
Interdisciplinary History of Ideas
This open-access, academic, peer-refereed journal,
devoted to interdisciplinary history of ideas, focuses
on the bonds that connect more general historical


cityy Newsletter
study in the field-and special fields such as the
history of science-that are usually severed in
research works, though connected in the real course
of intellectual history.
The Journal of Interdisciplinary History ofIdeas was
founded in 2010 with the aim to:
a) publish high quality, original, research works by
scholars of different fields of specialization, based
on well-established, as well as on emerging lines
of, interdisciplinary historical research;
b) promote the study of intellectual history as an
intrinsically interdisciplinary object in its genesis;
c) provide a publishing space for studies dealing
with the history of ideas from a genuinely
interdisciplinary research perspective;
d) provide a regular forum for discussing issues
pertaining to the interdisciplinary approach that
characterizes the Journal.
As an Open Access Journal, the JiHi appears
online free of charge. Contributions to the JiHi
will be published under the Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0 License (BY-NC-SA). The JiHi will
feature substantive articles, shorter research notes,
and surveys. Being an interdisciplinary journal, all
submissions will be blind-refereed by three or more
peers with different competence.
TheJournalwill accept submissions in English and
French. Prepare your article in a suitable format
(odt, doc, rtf). Format citations according to either
the Chicago Author-Date System, or the Chicago
Documentary Note Style, or the APA Citation Style.
1. Go to the JIHI website (http://www.jihi.eu).
2. Use the REGISTER function to register as
"Author: Able to submit items to the journal".
3. You should be logged in. Go to USER HOME.
4. Select New Submission.
5. Follow instructions.
The Journal is hosted by the University of Turin
(http://www.ojs.unito.it). The Journal is also
documented in print and as such is registered
according to the Italian law (Trib. Torino, reg. n. 9,
24-01-11; dir. resp. S. Mammola).
Further Information: http://www.jihi.eu


* April 2011 15






History of Science Society Newsletter


My Current Work and Its Possible
Implications: A Joint INES/
Prometheans Workshop

The International Network for Engineering Studies
(INES) and the Prometheans special interest group
in the Society for the History of Technology (SHOT)
seek 6 minute, 40 second presentations and eager
discussion participants for a joint one-day workshop
on engineering studies and the history of engineering.

The workshop will take place on Wednesday, 2
November 2011 at Cleveland State University in
Cleveland, Ohio. It is hosted by Peter Meiksins,
Professor of Sociology at Cleveland State. November
2 is the day before the co-located HSS/SHOT/4S
meetings begin.

Thanks to sponsorship by Taylor & Francis/
Routledge, publishers of Engineering Studies:Journal
of the International Networkfor Engineering Studies,
the meeting is free to members of INES and the
Prometheans who pre-register. It may include
support for breakfast and lunch (more on logistics
later).

The workshop's purpose is to bring researchers
in engineering studies and history of engineering
together in concise, fast-moving, wide-ranging, and
hopefully entertaining discussions of the contents
of current research and its possible implications
for different audiences inside and outside scholarly
arenas.

The workshop's more general goals include deepening
scholarly connections among researchers; attracting
more researchers to engineering studies and history of
engineering; heightening the visibility of this research
across the memberships of HSS, SHOT, and 4S; and
increasing the extent to which this research makes a
difference beyond scholarly arenas.

The workshop will use a PechaKucha approach to
presentation and discussion (www.pecha-kucha.org).
Speakers are free to draw on up to 20 slides for 20
seconds each. They must stop after their 6 minute 40
second slot expires (even if in mid-sentence).


With up to 4 presentations in 45-minute slots every
hour, separated by 15-minute breaks and lunch, as
many as 24 scholars will present between 9 a.m. and
3:45 p.m. The organizers welcome suggestions for a
final plenary discussion, ending around 5 p.m.

To present at the workshop, send a confirming
message to the INES Secretary/Treasurer Crystal
Harrell (crcrigge@vt.edu) by 15 May 2011. Include
in the body of the message your name, institutional
affiliation, title, and 50-100 word abstract of
your proposed presentation. Offering to present
constitutes registration. The program committee will
notify you by June 15 regarding your inclusion in the
program.

To pre-register, send a message by 15 September 2011
to the same address (crcrigge@vt.edu). Include your
name, institutional affiliation, and membership status
in INES and/or the Prometheans.
INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDY, School
of Historical Studies, Opportunities
for Scholars 2012-2013

The Institute is an independent private institution
founded in 1930 to create a community of scholars
focused on intellectual inquiry, free from teaching
and other university obligations. Scholars from
around the world come to the Institute to pursue
their own research. Candidates of any nationality
may apply for a single term or a full academic
year. Scholars may apply for a stipend, but those
with sabbatical funding, other grants, retirement
funding or other means are also invited to apply for
a non-stipendiary membership. Some short-term
visitorships (for less than a full term, and without
stipend) are also available on an ad hoc basis. Open
to all fields of historical research, the School's
principal interests are the history of western, near
eastern and Asian civilizations, with particular
emphasis upon Greek and Roman civilization, the
history of Europe (medieval, early modern, and
modern), the Islamic world, East Asian studies, the
history of art, the history of science, philosophy,
modern international relations, and music studies.
Residence in Princeton during term time is required.
The only other obligation of Members is to pursue






History of Scienc
their own research. The PhD (or equivalent) and
substantial publications are required. Information
and application forms may be found on the School's
web site, http://www.hs.ias.edu or contact:
School of Historical Studies, Institute for Advanced
Study
Einstein Dr.
Princeton, NJ 08540
(E-mail address: mzelazny@ias.edu)

Deadline: 1 November 2011.
Further Information:
http://www.hs.ias.edu/hsannoun.htm
Oregon State University Special
Collections Acquires Margaret J.
Osler Papers

The Oregon State University Libraries Special
Collections houses a number of archival and book
collections, most of which focus on the history of
twentieth-century science and technology
(http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/
specialcollections/index.html).

Special Collections has as its primary mission to
preserve and provide access to the Ava Helen and
Linus Pauling Papers, however, it has a number of
other collections of interest to historians of science.
A new collection is a repository for the papers of
historians of science
(http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/
specialcollections/coll/historians/index.html).

The most recent acquisition in the Historians of
Science Collection is the collected papers and
correspondence of Margaret J. Osler, longtime
Secretary of the History of Science Society.

Research grants of up to $7,500 are available to
scholars interested in conducting work in the Oregon
State University Libraries Special Collections.


:e Society Newsletter
NEH Announces "Digging Into
Data Challenge"

On 16 March 2011, the National Endowment for
the Humanities (NEH) joined seven international
research funders in announcing their joint
participation in round two of the Digging into Data
Challenge, a grant competition designed to spur
cutting-edge research in the humanities and social
sciences.

The first round of the Digging into Data Challenge
sparked enormous interest from the international
research community and led to eight cutting-edge
projects being funded.

Due to the overwhelming popularity of round one,
the Digging into Data Challenge announced that
four additional funders have joined for round two,
enabling this competition to have a worldwide reach
into many different scholarly and scientific domains.
The eight sponsoring funding bodies include the Arts
& Humanities Research Council (United Kingdom),
the Economic & Social Research Council (United
Kingdom), the Institute of Museum and Library
Services (United States), the Joint Information
Systems Committee (United Kingdom), the
National Endowment for the Humanities (United
States), the National Science Foundation (United
States), the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific
Research (Netherlands), and the Social Sciences and
Humanities Research Council (Canada).

Final applications will be due 16 June 2011.
Further information about the competition
and the application process can be found at
http://www.diggingintodata.org

Original Post:
http://historycoalition.org/2011/03/16/neh-
announces-digging-into-data-challenge/


Further Information:
http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/
specialcollections/residentscholar.pdf


* April 2011 17






History of Science Society Newsletter


David B. Kitts (1923-2010)
David B. Kitts, long a member of the History
of Science program at the University of Oklahoma,
died at Norman, OK on 30 October 2010 at the
age of 87. Trained in zoology he earned his
PhD at Columbia University (1953), supervised by
George Gaylord Simpson Kitts began his career
as a geologist and paleontologist. As early as his
college years at Penn, he cultivated an interest in the
logical and conceptual structure of science, which
led him to important and influential analyses of the
foundations of geological and biological thinking.
While doing research in vertebrate paleontology at
OU, he explored these interests further by teaching
a new course, Metageology, and began a long-term
affiliation with the History of Science program.
A collection of his main papers on the
underpinnings of geological thought, The Structure
of Geology (published in 1977), was a pioneering
work in turning attention in twentieth-century
philosophy of science to the logical and historical
processes in geological reasoning. His research in the
philosophy of biology centered first on the concept
of biological species, then on the logical structure
of Darwin's argument in The Origin ofSpecies, a
subject he continued to investigate for many years
after his retirement in 1988. In this work, as in the
philosophy of geology, he closely analyzed historical
and contemporary scientific and philosophical
texts in order to inform philosophical claims with
historical accuracy. In 1966 Kitts was named David
Ross Boyd Professor, an appointment recognizing
the institution's finest teachers. He divided his
instructional time at OU between Geology and
History of Science until assuming a full-time
appointment in 1978 in the History of Science
Department, in which he served as department
chair from 1973 to 1979. Over a hundred family
members, colleagues and friends gathered in Norman


on 5 February 2011 for a memorial tribute to David
B. Kitts and a reception hosted by his wife Nancy
and his sons Peter and David. Following Ken
Taylor's opening remarks on David's life and work,
punctuated with stories of his personal qualities
and legendary foibles, there followed a dozen short
recollections of David's teaching, writing, field work,
cycling, camping, sculling, and vacation travels.
Among these were stories from his history-of-science
colleagues and former students Marilyn Ogilvie,
Steve Livesey, Liba Taub, Bob Nye, and Mary Jo Nye.
The snow drifts beneath the brilliant blue sky of an
Oklahoma winter day provided a beautiful setting for
celebrating David's life.
Mary Jo Nye, Oregon State University
Ken Taylor, University of Oklahoma

Alexander M. Ospovat (1923-2010)
Alexander Meier Ospovat died 21 December
2010, at Stillwater, Oklahoma. He was a member
of the History Department at Oklahoma State
University from 1962 until his retirement in 1988.
Born in 1923 in K6nigsberg, East Prussia,
Ospovat spent most of his childhood in Memel,
Lithuania. In 1940 his family fled, first to Mexico,
then to the US. Ospovat earned a degree in civil
engineering at the University of Oklahoma in 1945.
Following several years of employment as an engineer,
he returned to school and earned his PhD in 1960.
He was the first to complete the OU doctoral
program in history of science.
At Oklahoma State Ospovat taught history of
science and medicine, and early modern European
history. His research focused primarily on the
development of geology in the eighteenth and early
nineteenth centuries. He is particularly well known
for his research on the geological career and thought
of Abraham Gottlob Werner (1749-1817). His was a
pioneering voice in revising the negative judgments
on Werner that had been taken in most British and






History of Science Society Newsletter


American histories of geology since the time of
Charles Lyell. In recognition of his contributions to
the history of geology Ospovat received an honorary
doctorate from the Bergakademie Freiberg (1990).
Ken Taylor, University of Oklahoma

Harry M. Marks (1947-2011)
Professor Harry M. Marks, PhD, 64, died at
his home in Baltimore on 25 January 2011. Professor
Marks was the Elizabeth Treide & A. McGehee
Harvey Professor in the History of Medicine in
the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He also
held joint appointments in The Krieger School's
department of History and Anthropology and
in the School of Public Health's Department
of Epidemiology. A get-together of friends and
colleagues took place at the Institute of the History of
Medicine on Feb. 5 from noon to 2 p.m.

Rev. Ernan McMullin (1924-2011)


Ernan McMullin, John Cardinal O'Hara
Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the University of
Notre Dame, died 8 February 2011 at Letterkenny
General Hospital in Donegal, Ireland. He was 86
years old. A native of Ballybofey, Donegal, Father
McMullin was an internationally prominent scholar
in the philosophy of science. He studied physics
at the National University of Ireland under the
Nobel laureate Erwin Schrbdinger and theology at
Maynooth College before being ordained a priest in
1949 and receiving his doctorate in philosophy from
the University of Louvain in 1954. He joined the


Notre Dame faculty the same year, and for the next
half century proceeded to explain that decision by
praising the then-new president who had recruited
him. "Father Ted Hesburgh could charm a bird out
of a tree," he would say. At Notre Dame, Father
McMullin chaired the philosophy department from
1965 to 1972 and served as director of the history
and philosophy of science program and of the Reilly
Center for Science, Technology and Human Values
before retiring in 1994, continuing to teach on the
graduate level until 2003. For the last seven years, he
lived in both St. Paul, Minn. and Donegal. "Ernan
McMullin was a good priest, a good philosopher and
a good friend to generations of Notre Dame students
and teachers," said David Solomon, director of Notre
Dame's Center for Ethics and Culture. "One of the
giants of Notre Dame, his thought and personality
transformed and dominated the philosophy
department for almost half a century."
Father McMullin wrote and lectured widely
on subjects ranging from the relationship between
cosmology and theology to the role of values in
understanding science to the impact of Darwinism
on Western religious thought. He was also an
unrivalled expert on the life of Galileo. The author
of some 200 articles in scholarly and popular
journals, Father McMullin also published 14 books
including The Concept of Matter; Galileo: Man of
Science; Newton on Matter and Activity; The Inference
That Makes Science; and The Church and Galileo.
During his career, Father McMullin held visiting
appointments at the University of Minnesota,
the University of Cape Town, the University of
California at Los Angeles, and Princeton and Yale
Universities. He also served on numerous scholarly
committees and congresses worldwide and is the
only person ever to have been elected president of
all the following professional organizations: the
American Philosophical Association, the Philosophy
of Science Association, the Metaphysical Society of
America and the American Catholic Philosophical
Association. His numerous awards include honorary
degrees from Maynooth, the National University
of Ireland, Loyola University in Chicago, Stonehill
College, and Notre Dame.
Michael 0. Garvey, public information and
communications, University ofNotre Dame


* April 2011 19






History of Science Society Newsletter


Magda Whitrow (1914-2011)



4.













Magda Whitrow, the editor of the first Isis
Cumulative Bibliography, which was published in
six volumes from 1971 to 1984, passed away in early
February of this year. Her bibliography indexed over
100,000 citations in over ninety annual and semi-
annual bibliographies.
Whitrow recognized the significant role played
by the Isis bibliography in the discipline. Her
creation of the cumulative bibliography grew out of
a conversation between Whitrow, then a librarian at
Imperial College, London, and the editor of Isis at
that time, Harry Woolf. Instead of simply indexing
the articles in Isis as some people wished, the Society
embarked on this cumulation project with grants
from the National Science Foundation and the
United States Steel Foundation.
Whitrow carefully studied George Sarton's
classification systems and then developed a much
more detailed, faceted structure from it as a basis
for indexing. The resulting product was original
and proved to be extraordinarily useful. Her
classification scheme became the basis of indexing
for all subsequent cumulative bibliographies, edited
by John Neu, and formed the core of Neu's indexing
scheme for the HSTM database. The Whitrow
system turned out to be easily adaptable to the rapidly
developing digital database format.
By forging this new and much more complex scheme,
Whitrow laid the groundwork for bibliographical


work in our field that continues to underlie both print
and electronic bibliographies today.
Further Information:
http://www.libsci.sc.edu/bob/isp/whitrow2.htm

Archbishop J6zef Mirostaw
Zycinski (1948-2011)
Archbishop J6zef Miroslaw Zycidski passed
suddenly away on 10 February 2011. Archbishop
2yciniski was born on 1 September 1948 in Stara
WieS (Poland). He was ordained to the priesthood
in 1972, completed PhD's in theology in 1976
at the Pontifical Academy of Theology (Krak6w)
and in Philosophy in 1978 at the Academy of
Catholic Theology (Warsaw); and in 1980 became
professor of philosophy at the Pontifical Academy of
Theology (subsequently also Dean of the Faculty of
Philosophy). In 1990 he became Bishop of Tarn6w,
and in 1997 Archbishop of Lublin. He also became
professor of philosophy and later Grand Chancellor
at the Catholic University of Lublin. In collaboration
with Pope John Paul II he organized the "Science-
Faith" Interdisciplinary Dialogue in Krak6w. He
published almost 50 books in philosophy of science,
relativistic cosmology, and the history of relations
between natural sciences and Christian faith, as well
as about 350 scientific papers. He was a founder of
the journal Philosophy in Science, and of the Philosophy
in Science Library series.
By Fr. Tomasz Trafny






History of Science Society Newsletter


Several HSS members are involved in a special
issue on transatlantic science policy that was
published by Centaurus, (edited by Ida Stamhuis)
volume 52, issue 4, November 2010 (official
journal of the European Society for History of
Science) on the basis of a HSS session, within a
calendar year, possibly a world record! Authors
include John Krige, Naomi Oreskes, Ronald Doel,
Peter Westwick, and Pnina G. Abir-Am, who also
wrote the Introduction. The issue is available at
http://wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/cnt.
Access code cnt30trial.

Monica H. Green (Arizona State University)
has been elected a Fellow of the Medieval Academy
of America (MAA), the leading professional
organization of medievalists in North America.


Ellen Herman has received an ACLS Fellowship
for 2011-2012 for a new project, "Autism, Between
Rights and Risks."


Kenneth M. Ludmerer has been installed as
the inaugural Mabel Dorn Reeder Distinguished
Professor of the History of Medicine at Washington
University. He continues as Professor of History in
the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and as Professor of
Medicine in the School of Medicine.


Nancy Nersessian (Georgia Tech) has won the
American Philosophical Society's inaugural Patrick
Suppes Award in Philosophy of Science. Her new
book, Science as Psychology: Sense Making and Identity
in Science Practice (co-authors Kareen Malone and
Wendy Newstetter) is now available from Cambridge
University Press.


Kimberly O'Brien has graduated from the
American Military University with an MA in
Global History.


Neeraja Sankaran is now Assistant Professor
of the History of Science, Technology & Medicine
at the Underwood International College of Yonsei
University in Seoul, South Korea. Previously she
was a visiting Assistant Professor at the American
University in Cairo.


Conevery Bolton Valencius will join the
History Faculty at University of Massachussetts,
Boston this Fall.


Distinguished Lecture at NSF

On 15 March 2011, Peter Galison (Harvard
University) participated in the National Science
Foundation Distinguished Lecture Series in Social,
Behavioral and Economic Sciences. He summarizes
his address, "A Material History ofScience," thus:

What would it mean to approach the history
of physics by taking material objects such as
instruments as seriously as the study of finished
theories? I would like to follow that path to
explore what that approach involves and what it
has to offer for history, philosophy, pedagogy, and
policy. This track involves studying physics not
as a homogeneous discipline but as a discipline
composed of coordinated but distinct subcultures.
An example from the turn of the 20th century,
relativity theory, will consider links between time
coordinating technologies (clocks), theoretical
physics, and philosophy of science. Another hybrid-
field instance from the turn of the 21st-century,
string theory, will also be considered. I will present

History of Science Society Newsletter April 2011 21






History of Science Society Newsletter


the idea of a "trading zone" between partially
overlapping subcultures of modern science. I will
end with a discussion of how the idea of trading
zones might help us as we face increasingly vexed
intersections of scientific and non-scientific cultures,
such as our present conundrums about the disposal
of nuclear waste. In order to address these concerns,
not just to talk about them, I have been increasingly
involved with projects to use historical reasoning
about material science to open these discussions
beyond purely scholarly audiences, which has meant
working simultaneously in film as well as print.


Former HSS President, Michael Sokal (left) and Clark Elliott
conferring on the occasion of the January tribute in Clark's honor.

Tribute to Clark A. Elliott

On 22 January 2011, relatives, friends, and
colleagues of Clark A. Elliott long-time Archivist
at Harvard University and Librarian of the Burndy
Library during many of its years at MIT gathered
in Waltham, Massachusetts, to honor him on the
occasion of his 70th birthday. Some HSS members
may know Clark best as the co-editor of Osiris
14, Commemorative Practices in Science: Historical
Perspectives on the Politics of Collective Memory
(1999). But many others also recognize him as one
of the founders of the Forum for the History of
Science in America, and as the long-time editor (and
bibliographer) of its Newsletter, News Views.
In toasting Clark at the gathering, several archivists
and historians of science enjoyed highlighting many
of his other accomplishments. These include, for
example, the 1983 report on the "Documentation of


the History of Post-War Science and Technology in
the United States," otherwise known as the JCAST
Report, which he edited. NSF had earlier funded
the Joint Committee on Archives of Science and
Technology to promote preservation of and access
to these archives, and that such repositories and
collections have grown exponentially since then is due
in large part to Clark's report.

Clark's other book-length publications include his
1979 Biographical Dictionary ofAmerican Science, The
17th through the 19th Centuries, his 1990 Biographical
Index to American Science: The 17th Century to 1920,
and his 1996 chronology and research guide to the
History of Science in the United States. And in the 21st
century Clark enabled on-line access to all of these
resources, and others, through his website, "History
of Science in the United States: Research Aids for
the 19th Century."

As befitting someone who has served the
Harvard history of science community so well for so
many years, Clark has also written extensively on the
history of science at the university. After a series of
influential articles, he co-edited Science at Harvard
University: Historical Perspectives and published his
biography of long-time Harvard librarian and man
of science, Thaddeus William Harris (1795-1856):
Nature, Science, and Society in the Life ofan American
Naturalist.

To pay further tribute to Clark, many of the
historians of science present made donations to
the HSS Bibliographer's Fund in his honor. They
now urge others who benefited from Clark's life-
long efforts as an archivist, an organizer, a
bibliographer, and a scholar to join them by
making their own contributions. In all, Clark's
achievement embodies a career well worth honoring,
and emulating, and recognizing in this manner.
(Contributions to the Fund may be made by going to
https://www.hssweb.org/donate/)






History of Science Society Newsletter
Sy Mauskopf Celebration History of Science at the AAAS
By Alan Rocke -


From Left to Right: Alan Rocke, Jo Mauskopf Sy Mauskopf and
Tom Robisheaux

On 11 December 2010, Duke University
organized a celebration marking the retirement
of Professor Seymour Mauskopf, after 46 years
of distinguished teaching in the Department of
History. After a buffet reception, appreciations
were given by Dean of Arts & Sciences Angela
O'Rand, Department Chair William Reddy,
and Associate Chair Tom Robisheaux, followed
by a tribute from Alan Rocke, of Case Western
Reserve University. Among the enthusiastic crowd
of about 100 attendees were friends, present and
former students, colleagues and former colleagues
from Duke and other institutions, children and
grandchildren. Two days earlier, Sy had presented
a Duke University Valedictory Lecture entitled "A
Bridge between Cultures: Reflections on a Long
Career in History of Science at Duke." Sy's career
has been as distinguished as it has been long. His
work has transformed our understanding of several
different areas of the history of science, including
18th and early 19th century chemistry, the history
of parapsychology and marginal sciences, and
the history of chemical technology, especially
munitions. It was a pleasure for all of us to celebrate
with Sy the end of his formal teaching duties, and
the inception of emeritus status-the start of what is
sure to prove an important new phase in the career
of an outstanding historian, a beloved teacher, and a
great friend.


Lawrence Principe delivers the 49th George Sarton Memorial
Lecture in the History and Philosophy of Science at the AAAS

Larry Principe, the Drew Professor of the
Humanities, Johns Hopkins University, spoke on
"Revealing the Secrets of Alchemy," at the annual
meeting of the American Association for the
Advancement of Science on 19 February 2011. In
his introduction of Principe, AAAS Section L Chair,
Rick Creath, mentioned the irony that Sarton himself
ridiculed alchemy as a field of study, a reflection of
the "pseudo scientific" opinion of alchemy in the
early 20th century. Principe picked up on this theme
and said that Sarton's sentiment was echoed by
Herbert Butterfield who proclaimed that those who
study alchemy historically are tincturedd by lunacy."
Undeterred by his elders and the shadow of lunacy,
Professor Principe proceeded to describe how alchemy
fits into the history of chemistry.

Chemistry (that is, alchemy), for centuries, did
not have a home in the university, and its practice
was seen as dirty and smelly. Critics sniffed at its
reputation for being unscrupulous. The split between
alchemy and chemistry began around 1700, even
though no new logical or experimental refutations of
transmutation appeared. Instead, "bad" chemistry
(transmutation) was sequestered as "alchemy"
and its practitioners cast as socially and morally
unacceptable. This perception persisted until recently
in part because alchemical writings were intentionally
vague, filled with metaphor and allegory, making it
difficult to understand what alchemists were really
doing. In his picture-rich presentation, Principe
described part of his endeavor to understand


SApril 2011 23






History of Science Society Newsletter


alchemy historically. He compared allegorical public
texts of alchemy with the more straightforward
private jottings of alchemical practitioners to reveal
their ways of writing, thinking, and working.
Principe also showed how by decoding texts and,
as a chemist, replicating the processes described, he
obtained surprising and visually striking results that
demonstrate the technical and experimental skills of
the alchemists and explain, in part, their continuing
devotion to their quest to transmute metals.

The Sarton Lecturer is chosen each year by the
Executive Committee of the History of Science
Society. Begun in 1960, the lecture is supported
by Section L (history and philosophy of science)
of AAAS and receives special status at the annual
meetings. The lecture provides the opportunity for
a historian of science to speak to an audience largely
comprised of scientists.


In addition to the Sarton lecture, there were several
sessions at the AAAS that would be of interest
to HSS members. Reports on two of these sessions-
"The Challenge of Teaching Evolution in the Islamic
World" and "Celebrating the Centennial of Mme
Curie's Nobel Prize in Chemistry"- written by
Taner Edis and Pnina Abir-Am respectively, appear
on pages 24 and 30.

2010 National Humanities Medals
Awarded

On March 2, U. S. President Barack Obama
presented the 2010 National Humanities Medals
to ten individuals honored for their outstanding
achievements in history, literature, education, and
cultural policy. The medals were presented at a White
House ceremony. Earlier in the day, several of the
medalists participated in a roundtable discussion,
held at the National Endowment for the Humanities
headquarters, on the role of the humanities in
contemporary culture.

The National Humanities Medal honors
individuals or groups whose work has deepened the
nation's understanding of the humanities, broadened
citizens' engagement with the humanities, or helped


preserve and expand Americans' access to important
resources in the humanities.
Among the honorees were the following :
* Bernard Bailyn for illuminating the nation's
early history and pioneering the field of Atlantic
history. Bailyn, who spent his career at Harvard,
has won two Pulitzer Prizes, the first for The
Ideological Origins of the American Revolution, and
the second for Voyagers to the West.
* Jacques Barzun for his distinguished career as
a scholar, educator, and public intellectual. One
of the founders of the field of cultural history,
Barzun taught at Columbia University for five
decades and has written and edited more than
thirty books.
* Wendell E. Berry for his achievements as a poet,
novelist, farmer, and conservationist. The author
of more than forty books, Berry has spent his
career exploring our relationship with the land
and the community.
* Stanley Nider Katz for a career devoted to
fostering public support for the humanities. As
director of the American Council of Learned
Societies for more than a decade, he expanded
the organization's programs and helped forge ties
among libraries, museums, and foundations.

The Challenge of Teaching Evolution
in the Islamic World, moderated by
Eugenie C. Scott, National Center for
Science Education

* A Brief History ofIslamic Creationism in Turkey
Taner Edis, Truman State University
* Teaching and Learning About Biological Evolution
in the Muslim World
Jason R. Wiles, Syracuse University
* The Future ofAcceptance ofEvolution in the
Muslim World
Salman Hameed, Hampshire College

The talk on Islamic Creationism in Turkey traced
the history of Islamic opposition to Darwinian
evolution, with special focus on Turkey, the country






History of Science Society Newsletter


that is the source of much Islamic creationism
today. Opposition to Darwinian ideas existed in the
19th century Ottoman Empire, but it was limited,
since evolution appealed only to a tiny number of
Westernizing intellectuals. In the early 20th century
Turkish Republic, evolution entered public education,
but was only a minor irritant to religious conservatives
when compared to other secularist policies. Since the
1980s, however, an increasingly vigorous creationism
has appeared in Turkey. It has enjoyed official success,
penetrating into public education. With the "Harun
Yahya" operation, popular creationism has also found
an influential media presence. Anti-evolutionary ideas
also have a strong influence in the Islamic intellectual
high culture today.

Jason Wiles pointed out that little is known in
the West about how evolution is taught in Islamic
societies. His findings were derived from data
collected in several Muslim nations via questionnaires
and interviews administered to students, teachers
and university scientists, as well as from reviews
of official curricular documents during a four-year
study of Islamic understandings of, and attitudes
toward, evolution and the teaching thereof. His work
seeks to inform scientists and educators in the West
about how Muslims might perceive evolution, thus
facilitating a greater understanding of the diversity of
Islamic thought on evolution, evolution education,
and science in general.

Salman Hameed observed that evolution is still
a new concept for the majority of Muslims and a
serious debate over its religious compatibility has
not yet taken place. At the same time, a complex
interaction involving evolution, culture and religion
is already underway. Evolution is included in the high
school curricula of many Muslim countries, although
human evolution is often excluded. Creationist
movements have gained a foothold in some Muslim
countries. Hameed and collaborators have been
conducting an interview-survey of Muslim physicians
and medical students and in a few Muslim countries,
as well as in Muslim Diasporas in the West, including
the US. Preliminary results indicate a complex set of
ways by which educated Muslims are negotiating the
interaction between modern science and religion.


Cliff Mead Retires from OSU

Cliff Mead, Head of Special Collections for OSU
Libraries, has retired effective 1 January 2011 after 24
years of service at OSU Libraries. Mead's expertise
in special collections administration has resulted
in the development and growth of a world-class
collection that serves as an outstanding resource not
only for the OSU community but also for scholars
from across the globe. OSU's Horning Professor
of Humanities and Professor of History Emeritus,
Mary Jo Nye stated, "Special Collections provides an
ideal on-campus physical environment for study and
research, but, even more significantly, Cliff and his
staff have pioneered online website communication of
historically valuable documents, photographs, films,
and other resources to the public. He has been a real
treasure at OSU whom countless visitors have found
to be their engaging and omniscient guide in Special
Collections."

Professor Mead has led the Special Collections
Department's development of outstanding digital
resources, especially those that provide in-depth
coverage of the life and work ofLinus Pauling, the
only recipient of two unshared Nobel Prizes. "In
addition to Professor Mead's leadership in developing
a truly innovative and world-renowned web presence
for displaying the vast resources of the Special
Collections department, he has provided exceptional
opportunities for OSU students to have firsthand
experience working with primary research materials,"
noted Karyle Butcher, former OSU University
Librarian/Press Director.

Professor Mead is recognized internationally as
the authority on the Ava Helen and Linus Pauling
Papers. He has authored several publications,
including Thomas Pynchon: A Bibliography ofPrimary
and Secondary Sources (1989). His most recent
book, co-edited with Chris Petersen, is The Pauling
Catalogue: Ava Helen and Linus Pauling Papers at
Oregon State University (2006). He also has co-
edited Linus Pauling: Scientist and Peacemaker (2001)
and The Pauling Symposium: A Discourse on the Art
ofBiography (1996). Professor Mead received his
Masters of Library Science from Syracuse University


* April 2011 25






History of Science Society Newsletter


School of Information Studies, Syracuse, New York
and a BA in English from the Utica College of
Syracuse University.

Paul Farber, OSU Distinguished Professor
Emeritus and Editor, Journal of the History ofBiology,
summed up Professor Mead's accomplishments:
"Cliff has that rare combination of intelligence,
organization, personality, wit and humor that makes
a university collection of papers and books into a
Special Collection. He has been at the center of
creating this major asset at OSU, one that has large
portions available online, and one that brings scholars
from around the world to campus. He cannot be
replaced, but he has built an institution that will
persist."


HSS 2011


Join us in Cleveland,

Ohio, USA for the 2011

HSS Annual Meeting,

a co-located meeting

with SHOT and 4S.


NEW FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM: THE

AMERICAN COUNCIL OF LEARNED

SOCIETIES' PUBLIC FELLOWS
The American Council of Learned Societies
invites applications for the inaugural competition
of its Public Fellows program. The program
will place eight recent PhDs in staff positions
at partnering agencies in government and
the non-profit sector for two years, beginning
in some cases as early as September 2011.
Fellows will participate in the substantive work
of these agencies and receive professional
mentoring. Compensation will be commensurate
with experience and at the same level as new
professional employees of the hosting agency
and will include health insurance.
This program, made possible by a grant from
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, aims to
demonstrate that the capacities developed in
the advanced study of the humanities have
wide application, both within and beyond the
academy.

ACLS seeks applications from recent PhDs
who wish to begin careers in administration,
management, and public service by choice rather
than circumstance. Competitive applicants will
have been successful in both academic and
extra-academic experiences.

APPLICANTS MUST:
* possess U.S. citizenship or permanent
resident status
* have a PhD in the humanities or humanistic
social sciences conferred between January
2008 and March 2011
* not have applied to any other ACLS
Fellowship programs in the 2010-2011
competition year, including the New Faculty
Fellows program
Prospective applicants should read through
all the positions listed below and be ready
to choose one when beginning the online
application process. Applicants may apply to
only one position. The deadline for submitted
applications is Monday, May 16, 3 p.m. EDT, and
complete applications will include:
(1) completed application form;
(2) cover letter tailored to a specific position;
(3) resume;
(4) candidate statement; and
(5) one nomination letter.







History of Science Society Newsletter


The only way to apply for these positions is through the ACLS Public Fellows program. Only complete
applications, submitted through the ACLS Online Fellowship Application system (http://ofa.acls.org) by
the deadline will be considered.

Submitted applications will undergo ACLS' standard rigorous peer review process, which may include
interviews by ACLS and by the hosting agency. Reviewers will look for:
(a) applicant's academic accomplishment and success;
(b) demonstrated relationship between past experience and specified position; and
(c) commitment to the public and/or non-profit sector. Applicants who advance to the interview stages
will need to be available in the timeframe listed below.

Interviews: mid to late June
Email Notification of application status: early July
These dates are subject to revision. Please check back.

PARTICIPATING AGENCIES AND POSITIONS

Click on the positions to view the PDF of the full description, which includes detailed information on the
hosting agency, the position, and requisite qualifications. Please do not contact any of these agencies
with questions (i.e., on the position, benefits, etc,).

1. Association of American Universities (AAU)
Policy Analyst
http://www.acIs.org/uploadedFiles/FellowshipsandGrants/Competitions/1112_PublicFellows-
AAU.pdf

2. Council on Foundations
Leadership Development Officer
http://www.acIs.org/uploadedFiles/FellowshipsandGrants/Competitions/1112_PublicFellows-
Council-on-Foundations.pdf

3. Institute for International Education (lIE)
Program Officer, Scholar Rescue Fund
http://www.acls.org/uploadedFiles/Fellowshipsand-Grants/Competitions/1112_PubiicFellows-
IIE.pdf

4. National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE)
Program Officer
http://www.acIs.org/uploadedFiles/FellowshipsandGrants/Competitions/1112_PublicFellows-
NITLE.pdf

5. New York City Department of Cultural Affairs
Cultural Programs Specialist
http://www.acIs.org/uploadedFiles/FellowshipsandGrants/Competitions/1112_PublicFellows-
NYC-DCLA-Cultural-Programs.pdf
Cultural Communications Specialist
http://www.acIs.org/uploadedFiles/FellowshipsandGrants/Competitions/1112_PublicFellows-
NYC-DCLA-Cultural-Communications.pdf

6. U.S. Department of State
two positions, various departments
http://www.acIs.org/uploadedFiles/FellowshipsandGrants/Competitions/1112_PublicFellows-US-
Department-of-State.pdf

ACLS will field only questions about the fellowship program itself and not on the positions or the
organizations. Please carefully review the program description, the positions, and the sample application
before contacting ACLS. Questions about the fellowship program can be directed in writing to
fellowships@acls.org (no calls please).


* April 2011 27






History of Science Society Newsletter
Yanked from the Margins

by Dan Berrett


A new blue-ribbon commission has been
assembled in a bid to put the humanities and
social sciences on an equal footing on the public
agenda with science, technology, engineering and
mathematics. "We feel strongly that it's time to bring
all these disciplines into constructive interplay," Leslie
C. Berlowitz, president of the American Academy
of Arts and Sciences, said during a conference call
with reporters Thursday morning to announce the
formation of the group, which has been dubbed the
Commission on the Humanities and Social Sciences.
"The humanities and social sciences have not been as
much on the national agenda. Part of this effort is to
show how integrated the two are," she said, referring
to those fields' connection to the sciences. "You can't
teach math and science to people who can't read."

The commission's 41 members represent a broad
range of disciplines and backgrounds, including
artists (Emmylou Harris and Chuck Close), college
presidents (Drew Gilpin Faust of Harvard University
and Donna E. Shalala of the University of Miami),
academics (Kwame Anthony Appiah, professor of
philosophy at Princeton University, and Gerald Early,
professor of modern letters at Washington University
in St. Louis), former governors (John Engler of
Michigan and Phil Bredesen Jr. of Tennessee), and
private sector heavyweights (James McNerney,
chairman, president and CEO of Boeing, and John E.
Warnock, chairman of Adobe Systems).

The group's work will cost about $1 million
and has been funded, in part, with start-up money
from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The panel
is meant to parallel a similar effort focused on the
sciences, which is being undertaken by the National
Academies. The results of that report will be a set
of recommendations for how various sectors can
support research universities in achieving national
goals in health, energy, the environment, and security.
The Commission on the Humanities and Social


Sciences will meet over the next year to 18 months
and eventually recommend what its organizers call
concrete and actionable plans for those in government,
education and philanthropy to strengthen teaching
and research in the humanities and social sciences.

While similar efforts have been attempted before,
such as the Association of American Universities'
2004 report, "Reinvigorating the Humanities," the
work of this commission will differ, says the academy,
because its focus will go beyond the AAU's emphasis
on research universities (though that report did
recommend that colleges form partnerships with
K-12 schools and cultural organizations) and on the
humanities alone. The commission has been given the
job of identifying the top 10 actions to support both
sets of disciplines that can be taken by universities,
K-12 educational institutions, governments,
foundations and donors.

The commission came into being as the result of
a request from Senators Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.)
and Mark Warner (D-Va.), as well as Representatives
Tom Petri (R-Wisc.) and David Price (D-N.C.). The
goal of the commission, the public officials wrote, is
"to maintain national excellence in humanities and
social scientific scholarship and education, and to
achieve long-term national goals for our intellectual
and economic well-being; for a stronger, more vibrant
civil society; and for the success of cultural diplomacy
in the 21st century."

The civic and democratic function of the
humanities and social sciences is especially important
in American life, said Richard H. Brodhead, president
of Duke University, and co-chair of the commission.
He described how the Declaration of Independence
drew upon humanist thought. "In the most literal
sense, the country was founded on ideas," he said
during Thursday's call. And although the humanities
focus on the past, he said that a deeper awareness of






History of Science Society Newsletter


these disciplines is essential to solving tough problems
in the present. "I regard humanities as the treasure
house of ideas," he said.

The notion that the humanities and social
sciences play an important role in national security
has also been articulated before by such figures
as David Skorton, Cornell University's president
(and a member of the commission). "When I hear
military leaders talking about winning the so-called
hearts and minds of people in other countries,
the way I translate that is all based on humanistic
and social science disciplines," he said in a "state
of the university" address. "That requires that we
understand the language, the culture, the religion,
and the values of those societies-and that is the
humanities."

At the same time, the humanities and social
sciences will have significant ground to make up
if they are to achieve parity with STEM fields,
which have received significant public attention and
investment. President Obama's proposed budget for
2012 seeks $100 million to train teachers in these
fields over the next decade.

The commission's effort to bolster the humanities
and social sciences also takes place amid hard times
for those disciplines. In recent months, the State
University of New York at Albany has called for the
closure of three foreign language departments, as
well as classics and theater; Howard University will
terminate majors in classics, anthropology and other
fields in order to place greater emphasis on STEM
training and Africana studies; and members of
Congress have sought citizen input on which grants,
most of them in the social and behavioral sciences,
should be cut from the federal research budget.

In her remarks on Thursday, Berlowitz cited
other dire data from the academy's humanities
indicators, including a 46 percent decline over the
past 30 years in the number of humanities degrees
conferred as a proportion of all bachelor's degrees. In
addition, more than half of all students graduating
from American high schools in 2006 could not
demonstrate basic knowledge of history; over a third
lacked basic knowledge of civics, she said. Berlowitz


argued that the relative decline of the humanities over
the past half-century occurred as higher education
became more widely available to larger swaths of the
population, many of whom wanted to be sure the
investment would pay off in the form of a first job.
Careerism crept into the vocabulary of academe, and
business degrees grew to become the most popular
major.

John W. Rowe, chairman and CEO of Exelon
Corporation and co-chair of the committee, said that
he sees the results of these trends in the workplace.
Many employees have poor writing skills, and
demonstrate an ignorance of history and weak
knowledge of geography and foreign cultures. "There
usually seems to be money that's findable for the
sciences, but the liberal arts are always struggling
for resources," he said. But Rowe was also careful
not to place the sciences and humanities-or, for
that matter, a practical and liberal education-in
opposition to each other. "I'd never discourage college
students from thinking about how to have productive
or remunerative employment," he said. "I don't
think trying to be wise and trying to be useful are in
conflict."

News of the commission's formation met
with hearty approval from one advocate for the
humanities. Rosemary G. Feal, executive director
of the Modern Language Association, found it
particularly heartening that the commission was
created as a result of a bipartisan request, especially
in an environment in which deep cuts have been
proposed to the humanities and the arts. But Feal
also wondered whether there will be money to
ensure that the commission's recommendations
will be adopted. "The question is not whether this
commission will succeed-I have no doubt of that,"
she wrote in an e-mail. "It's whether the federal
funders will do their part to ensure that the vision of
the commission becomes a reality."

Full Article Online At:
http://www.insidehighered.com/
news/2011/02/18/newcommission to advance_
thecause of the humanitiesandsocialscience


SApril 2011 29






History of Science Society Newsletter
How Science, Policy, Gender, and History Meet each Other Once a Year
Reflections on Our Symposium at the AAAS 2011 Meeting
by Dr. Pnina G. Abir-Am, Resident Scholar, WSRC
Brandeis University, 515 South Street, MS 079, Waltham, MA. 02454
pninaga@brandeis.edu


The American Association for the Advancement of
Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting provides historians
of science with a unique opportunity for outreach into
the scientific community, as well as into the world at
large. The Meeting further provides attendees with
an entree into the most recent, even urgent issues of
concern on "science and society." In a previous issue
of the HSS Newsletter, Bruce Lewenstein of Cornell
University, made a special plea for participation
of all STS scholars in AAAS Annual Meetings.
[See http://www.hssonline.org/publications/
Newsletter2011/January-aaas.html] My experience
with the 2011 conference could help others decide how
best they could contribute to such a gathering.
I participated as one of three speakers in a
symposium co-organized by Alan J. Rocke, a leading
historian of European chemistry at Case Western
Reserve University and the outgoing Chairman of
Section L. (History & Philosophy of Science), and
Penny J. Gilmer, a chemist at Florida State University,
leader of the NSF-Advance consortium of five Florida
institutions, and co-editor of an upcoming volume
on the significance of Mme Curie's Centennial for
science education. She also provided co-sponsorship
of the proposed Symposium by AAAS's Section C
(Chemistry).
Our Symposium, "Celebrating the Centennial
of Mme Curie's Nobel Prize in Chemistry" greatly
benefited from this collaboration between an
historian of science and a scientist, most notably
in securing an optimal range of complementary
speakers: a scientist, a general historian, and
a historian of science. Moreover, the panelists
covered key themes, including the experimental
and theoretical aspects of Mme Curie's discoveries;
her reception as a woman scientist in America
in the 1920s; and the changing patterns of her
commemorations throughout the 20th Century.
The first speaker, Patricia (Trish) Baisden, a nuclear
chemist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory,


discussed Mme Curie's experimental procedures in
discovering radioactivity, polonium, and radium
with detailed graphics of the laborious distillation
processes. She also displayed many original
photos given to her by a former director of the
Radium Institute in Paris, while asking intriguing
questions such as whether Mme Curie had a
sufficient experimental basis to claim the discovery
of polonium when she did. (Yes, she did! even by
current standards) Trish further enlightened us on
subtle distinctions between nuclear chemists such
as herself and radiochemists, both descendentss"
of Mme Curie's discoveries: one branch is more
physical and the other more chemical, as befits
the progeny of the inter-disciplinary discovery of
radioactivity.
The second speaker, historian Julie Des Jardins of
Baruch College/ CUNY-NYC, spoke on the long-
lasting American fascination with Mme Curie, ever
since her visits to the US to collect donated radium
in 1921 and 1929. She emphasized how Mme Curie's
public image as a woman scientist was adjusted to fit
gender stereotypes, such as the claim that her science
was "maternal" or that she practiced it primarily
for the sake of curing cancer. The impact of such
a distorted public image on generations of women
scientists is further elaborated in her recent book,
The Madame Curie Complex, The Hidden History
of Women in Science, which builds upon the work
of eminent scholars, such as Margaret W. Rossiter,
as well as women scientists, most notably Caroline
Herzenberg and Ruth Howe.
My talk, the third and last, discussed the concept
of commemorative practices in science', the stimulus

1 As in Commemorative Practices in Science,
(University of Chicago Press, 2000) which includes
a dozen historians of science, many from the US, and
twice that number of case studies, edited by Pnina G.
Abir-Am and Clark A. Elliott; and La Mise en Memoire
de la Science (Paris: Editions des Archives Contem-
poraines, 1998) edited by Pnina G. Abir-Am, which






History of Science Society Newsletter


they provide for conducting new research in history
of science, and potential ramifications for science
policy. I began with analyzing new data I have
recently collected on Mme Curie's commemorations
throughout the 20th century, while pointing
toward a pattern of increasing globalization. Earlier
anniversaries were marked primarily in France
and Poland, (her adopted and native countries)
culminating with the Curies' reburial in the mid-
1990s in the Pantheon, the graveyard of great French
minds, (or as Mona Ozoufput it, "L'Ecole Normale
des Morts") in a state-sponsored major event. This
symbolic act made Mme Curie the first woman to be
so honored for her own scientific accomplishments.
By contrast, in the post-Cold War era, the
centennial of the discovery of radioactivity in 1998
became global with major anniversaries being held
not only in France and Poland but also in the US and
Japan. The latter, perhaps for reasons related to the
trauma of the atomic bomb, i.e. some form of applied
research in radioactivity, marked the 1998 centennial
over a year long program, in half a dozen Japanese
cities2, including the participation of many scientific
societies, representing the medical, physical, and
chemical sciences.
Second, I showcased the work of several
historians of science whose research helped dispel
the gender stereotypes long shrouding Mme Curie's
public memory, especially in America. They included:
(in alphabetical order) Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent
of the University of Paris who clarified the emergence
of Mme Curie's scientific dynasty with elder daughter
Irene and son-in-law Frederic, both using the
surname Joliot-Curie, becoming Nobel co-laureates
for the discovery of artificial radioactivity in 1934,
the year of Mme Curie's death. I also mentioned
Soraya Boudia of the University of Strasbourg, who
clarified Mme Curie's intense preoccupation with

includes a majority of French case studies and authors.
Contrary to persistent rumors, one book is not a trans-
lation of the other: 3 out of 12 authors appear in both
books but each wrote a different paper for the two
volumes.
2 Some of those locations became associated
with the tsunami of March 2011, most notably Sendai
and Yokohama, though many commemorative events
were held in Tokyo.


metrology as well as her role as lab director who
trained a contingent of women scientists; J.L. Davis
of University of Kent, UK who established Mme
Curie's role as leader of a research school including a
diverse mix of both French and foreign, women and
men scientists; Helena M. Pycior, of the University
of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, who clarified Mme Curie's
status as the primary investigator in her collaboration
with husband Pierre Curie; and Xavier Roque of the
Autonomous University of Barcelona, who established
that Mme Curie's extensive collaboration with the
radium industry was a central part of her identity
as a scientist. For reasons of time, I could not dwell
on many biographical studies of Mme Curie, works
which are already better known since they cater to
a wide public. But I did flash a slide from a 1996
French film in which Mme Curie was played by
Isabelle Adjani. Since Trish had previously shown
Mme Curie's portrayal by Greer Garson in the 1943
American film based on the first biography of Mme
Curie, (by younger daughter Eve) the audience could
thus compare Mme Curie's imagery on film half a
century apart.
Third, I drew attention to the pertinence of Mme
Curie's work, life, and career for public debates in our
own time on the under-representation of women in
science, while offering half a dozen or so "lessons."
Included among these lessons were: emigration as
a condition for pursuing science by women from
peripheral countries; diversifying one's collaborative
strategies with other scientists, including one's own
spouse, so as to preserve one's "scientific credit"
especially when one is a junior scientist, a woman,
or a member of some other disadvantaged group;
cooperation with industry as a source of financial
independence; and coping with the international flow
of research associates, including women, in periods of
great social change such as the aftermath ofWWI.
Last but not least, I drew attention to Mme
Curie's life as a case study in resourceful balancing of
an intense and demanding career with child rearing,
again with the help of a highly emotive visual device:
a photo of Mme Curie and her children in 1906. I
thus emphasized that her daughters were born both
before and after the discovery of radioactivity in
1898, (i.e. Irene in 1897 and Eve in 1904) possibly in

History of Science Society Newsletter Apri 2011 31






History of Science Society Newsletter


order to help a century later, when a public debate on
the balancing of career and family life by women in
science is still raging. The photo thus conveyed that
having children does not preclude discoveries and
vice versa, that is, discoveries do not preclude women
scientists having children. I also asked whether a better
familiarity with Mme Curie's life by leading figures
in public debates regarding the under-representation
of women in science could have spared us a year-long
spectacle of historically uninformed "hypotheses"
being floated as reasons for this under-representation3.
The session, which unfolded without glitches,
(except for failing to get the Skype connection so as
to enable co-organizer Penny J. Gilmer, then still
recovering from a car accident, to watch us from afar)
was attended almost to capacity (-160). Possibly this
was so because it was scheduled in a great time slot,
the first full day of the 5-day conference, at 10 a.m.
and in an accessible auditorium on the first floor
of the Washington Convention Center. The Nobel
allusion in its title may have been responsible for the
fair number of men in the audience, since they rarely
attend "women's topics."
Still, my experience with our Symposium went
beyond the opportunity it had given me to justify
the organizers' confidence in my ability to contribute
to their program. Two unexpected revelations were
equally important. The first had to do with the
realization that by offering a unique opportunity
to engage with a wider public, the AAAS had
reactivated my dormant jocular tendencies. Though
I did not specifically prepare anything funny, the
lively response to my humoristic presentation style

3 The three reasons floated by L Summers in
this order were: 1) women's lack of interest to work
long hours; 2) women's innate lesser aptitude for
science; 3) gender discrimination. The latter was
however not only listed as the last and least factor
but further described as deriving from socialization,
thus implying a normative condition which need not
be changed. The debate which became known as
the debate that "won't go away" (New York Times,
5-12-05) is resurfacing periodically, most recently in
the Chronicle of Science Education, and PNAS, both
articles on 2-7-11. For details see my "Gender and
Technoscience: A Historical Perspective", Journal of
Technology Management and Innovation, 5 (1) 2010,
152-165, also at www.jotmi.org) which also discusses
the wider historical context of that debate.


persuaded me that I should engage in such public
talks more often. This is a useful lesson, coming as
it does not too long before the release of a sure to be
controversial book.
The second revelation was my grasping of
a connection between my topic (how the Curie
centennial had been historically observed) and the
opportunity to engage in activism by sharing a petition
calling upon scientific organizations to practice gender
inclusiveness in seeking contributors for ongoing
Centennials of Mme Curie's Nobel in Chemistry, the
rationale for UNESCO's declaration of 2011 as the
International Year of Chemistry. Our Symposium may
have been rare in having an adequate, perhaps even
more than adequate, representation of women speakers
and organizers. Organizations other than AAAS
appear to have a surprisingly low presence of women
scientists and scholars in programs which purport to
honor Mme Curie. [For a copy of the petition, please
contact the author.]
To conclude, the AAAS Symposium in which I
agreed to participate despite some initial ambivalence
due to the time and effort that such large-scale
meetings demand, turned out to be an amazing
experience. Our Symposium not only enabled me to
combine scholarship and activism in a way I value as
being more professional than being an Ivory tower
recluse, or alternately serving the public "only."
These two are Janus-faced endeavors, and we should
not shy away from stepping up to the plate when
a rare opportunity arises to combine scholarship
with activism for a great cause. Moreover, meeting
soul mates among those who came to the podium
to express interest in the talk, the petition, or both,
further inviting me to speak in their institutions, was
absolutely divine.
Regretfully, I must cut this short even though
the AAAS Annual Meeting included a host of
other "attractions" well beyond our Symposium. In
particular, I hope to keep you informed on how the
Mme Curie Centennial is unfolding with regard to
scientific and historical organizations becoming more
aware of the need to include more women scientists
and scholars in their programs.






History of Science Society Newsletter
Donors List Calendar Year 2010
Donations and In-Kind Support


It is an honor to

recognize and

record here our

supporters for

2010.


Please send corrections to info@hssonline.org


Key:
1. General Operating Fund
2. General Endowment Fund
3. Bibliographer's Fund
4. Margaret W. Rossiter History of Women
in Science Prize
5. Hazen-Polsky Matching Fund
(Education Fund)
6. Nathan Reingold Prize
7. Sponsor a Scholar Program
8. 2010 Meeting-Graduate Student Fund
9. 2010 Meeting-HSS Women's Caucus
Breakfast
Watson Davis and Helen Miles Davis
Prize


SARTON CIRCLE ($1000+)
Anonymous
Estate of Lawrence Badash
Miles Davis*
Pfizer Corporation
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National Science Foundation
University of Florida
University of Notre Dame


PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE ($500+)
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M.K. Webster
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BENEFACTORS ($200+)
Anonymous
Anonymous
Mitchell G. Ash 7 8
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Lenore Feigenbaum
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Daniel J. Kevles 2, 3
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Thomas Word 1,2


- pi 21 33






History of Science Society Newsletter
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PATRONS ($100+)
Amy K. Ackerberg-Hastings2'4
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Constance Clark
Amy Crumpton
Lorraine Daston 3'7
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History of Science Society Newsletter
Donors List Calendar Year 2010
Donations and In-Kind Support





SUPPORTERS


Pnina G. Abir-Am 49
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History of Science Society Newsletter


UPCOMING CONFERENCES


Photo Credits-Cleveland: Scallop Holden, Flickr;San Diego: (The Brit_2),
Flickr; Boston: Sebastian Schlueter (sibbiblue), Flickr; Vancouver: Phillip
Jeffrey (tyfn), Flickr; Philadelphia: michaelwm25, Flickr.


HSS 2011
Cleveland, OH, Renaissance Hotel,
3-6 November. Co-located meeting
with SHOT and 4S



HSS 2012
San Diego, CA, Sheraton Harbor
Island Hotel, 15-18 November. Joint
meeting with PSA



HSS 2013
Boston, MA, Westin Waterfront
Hotel, 21-24 November. 100th
Anniversary of Isis


Other Meetings

2012
American Association for the
Advancement of Science 2012
meeting. Vancouver, BC 16-20
February (group discounts available
for HSS members)


2012
The 7th British-North American
History of Science meeting
(hosted by HSS). 10-13 July 2012,
Philadelphia, PA. (Sponsored by the
American Philosophical Society, the
Chemical Heritage Foundation, the
University of Pennsylvania, and the
Philadelphia Area Center for the
History of Science)




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