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Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries



http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1946cris



CARIBBEAN



A



1946



LOIS HOUSEHOLDER MISS BESS M. LITER

Editor Sponsor




To all those who work to maintain permanent peace and freedom
in our country we dedicate this book.

"The fiercest agonies have shortest reign; and after dreams of
horror, comes again the welcome morning with its rays of Peace.

Bryant





"The shy is that beautiful old parchment

in which the sun and the moon keep their diary."

Alfred Kreymborc




MR. T. F. HOTZ

Principal



On August 15. 1943. the present head of C.H.S. was called out of a test in aero-
dynamics to receive a cable announcing his promotion to Principal. This former
teacher of Math. Physics and Pre-Flight Aeronautics had flown to Northport. Minne-
sota, to perfect his knowledge of flying. Immediately, he dropped this work, flew
back to the Isthmus and took over the arduous task of running a war-time school at
the crossroads of the world.

Under his guiding hand, the affairs of C.H.S. run along smoothly. He has
unselfishly given his all to serve the students and the community. He and the entire
faculty work hard to realize the aim of the school of training students to take their
place in our changing society, able to become adapted to it socially, personally and
economically.

His success in these plans was proved last year when the school was rated
superior by the evaluating committee.





Before our very versatile counselor acquired his present job, in 1943, he was
a teacher of history. Now his job is to act as adviser as well as teach mathematics.
His extra-curricular activities are to act as sponsor of the Dramatics Club and of the
C.H.S. Chapter of the National Thespian Society.

Many new improvements have been instituted in his department. A list is kept
of all graduates of C.H.S. showing their activities after they leave high school. Another
list is kept of the reasons why students withdraw from high school. The class
standing is kept for all four classes instead of onlv the senior class. The idea of
sending forms to the parents showing progress or lack of progress and the possibility
of graduation was adopted. New students entering C.H.S. can become more easily
acquainted with the school with the aid of a mimeographed handbook about the school.
The progress of each student is charted so that this information can be easily found.

Mr. Beck has unselfishlv worked to straighten out difficulties of students as to
their courses and has helped those who are planning to enter college by supplying in-
formation about various schools.

The seniors are very grateful for his guidance and help during their years in
Cristobal High School.



Counselor
MR. P. L. BECK






L~.j HE FIRST peace time graduating class of Cristobal High School since World War II began has
. some very interesting facts in its historv. Its members were born in several different Countries;
they have traveled in many more Countries; they have visited all the States of the Union and many
members of their immediate families have seen service in the war.

The specific facts are as follows the average age, as of June first. 1946. for the girls, is seven-
teen years and eleven months for the boys, eighteen years and two months. The oldest senior is
twenty years old and the youngest is sixteen years and six months. They have attended an average
of three schools from grades one to eight, an average of 1.5 schools during their High School years.
One senior attended seven different grade schools and two seniors attended four different high schools.
They were born in Countries such as Poland, Austria, Columbia, Costa Rica. Panama, and the United
States. Twenty-seven were born in the United States and fifteen in Panama or the Canal Zone. Fourteen
different States claim members of this Class. Three members were born in California. Louisiana.
New York, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania each; two each in Illinois, Florida and Missouri, and one
each in Colorado. Georgia, Maryland, Michigan, Texas, Ohio, and Oklahoma. Their travels have taken
these students to thirty-one different Countries. Thirty-nine students have visited the United States
and on an average have traveled through eleven different States. Twenty-nine have traveled in Haiti,
sixteen in Costa Rica, and twelve in Mexico. The Far East has not been visited by any member of
the Class, while several have been residents of European Countries.

The Class of 1946 has been exceptionally active in school activities. Among the boys, seventeen
have participated for almost three years with the All-Star football team, thirteen for almost three years




in basketball, thirteen for almost three years in Softball. Nine are credited with almost four years
of baseball, eleven with three years in track, and two in tennis. For the girls, sixteen have participated
for three years each in volley ball, fourteen for three years in basketball, twelve for three years in soft-
ball, four for two years in tennis, and five for three years in archery.

The National Honor Society claims nine members. Quill and Scroll has ten members; Thes-
pians, eight members; Science Club, twelve; La P.A.S.. twenty-five; and the Dramatic Club, fifteen.
Other minor Clubs, such as the Varsity. Camera. Model Air Plane. Dolphin. Music, and French have
also claimed their share of active seniors. One member of the Senior Class has served on the Student
Council for four years; twelve others have seen service in the Council. One member of the Class has
been an officer of the class for three years; seventeen others have served as Class Officers, thirty-four
have been in the Glee Club, eleven in the Orchestra, and seven in the Band.

The members of the various families represented in the Class have contributed their share to the
Armed Forces; sixteen brothers served in the Navy and two fathers served in the Navy. The Seabees
claimed one brother, the Army two, and the Army Air Corps one.

The Class of 1946 also ranked well in scholastic attainments. Grade point averages are figured
on a basis of four for each A. three for each B. two for each C. and one for each D. The grade point
average for the class is 2.309. which means that the Class is slightlv above average in scholastic ability.

The above statistics are an indication of the many activities in which the Class of 1946 participat-
ed. Such a record presages an active life for its members in conmiunity and world-wide affairs.




SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS

President Gay Thomas

Vice-President Denis Venning

Secretary Carolyn Manager

Treasurer Noel Gibson

Sponsor
Mrs. Betty Moore Sweet




The senior class of 1945-46 first entered the portals of Cristobal High School as such on September 4,
1945. This was their big day. the one thev had dreamed about for years and now it had arrived. The class
had changed greatly from the one that had entered the same building in 1942. Many new members had
been added and manv old ones lost. One of the newest and most unique additions this year was Charles
Perry, a young sailor, who. while serving his country, also completed his high school education and gradu-
ated with the class.

The first big event of the year was the S.A. elections held in October: Jeannie vs. Gay. The fair lady
won and took over the throne.

The next highlight of the year was the big football games with Balboa High School and Canal Zone
Junior College. Cristobal High won both of them, and many seniors, such as Gibson. McPheters. Maale.
and the Thomases, were the stars.

In December the senior Christmas Dance was a huge success. The center of the floor was decorated
with a snowman, and a large mural depicting old Saint Nick at his jolliest was drawn on the wall of the
Gym. Many other yule-tide decorations added to the festive scene and Christmas was real and merry in
spite of the tropical temperature.

"Black gold has been struck in the senior class" was the word around the school in January. The
Senior Talent Assembly was held at that time. This event had long been plaimed for. and many heretofore
hidden qualities appeared during its rehearsals. Among its numbers were found the "Harry James of C.H.S."
in Gay Thomas: Sinatra, in Bob Coulthard; Horowitz, in Norman Shade; Ginny Sinims. in Marilyn Metz-
ger and many more. The culmination of the program was a jousting scene in the Court of King Coulthard
between Prince Venning and Baron Lowe, an exciting event that captured the attention of all.

The last event, but by far. not the least, in which the seniors "gave their full measure" was that of senior
week. This was their last activity as a group. From then on they would be on their own. out in the world
to make their way. It was a farewell partv but a happy party. For years afterward they would look back
on those days with kind memories.




Carolyn Magner

August 20. 1928

Ancon, Canal Zone
Student Council, Secretary 2. Class
Officer, Secretary 4. Student Repre-
sentative 4. National Honor Society 4.
Quill and Scroll 4. Trade Wind Staff
4. Caribbean Staff 4. La P.A.S. 2. 4.
Cipos 4. Band 1. Orchestra 2. Glee
Club 1, 2. 4. Varsity Club 2, 4. Cheer-
leader 4. Victory Corps 1, 2. VoUev-
ball 1. 2, 4. Softball 1. 2. 4. Basket-
ball 1, 2, 4. Archery 1, 2.



Theliiia Puoci

February 17. 1928
Colon, R. de P.
Class Officer, President 3. La P.A.S.

2, 3, 4. Cipos 3, 4. Forum Club 3. 4.
\ ictory Corps 1, 2. Glee Club 1. V'ars-
ity Club 1, 2. 3, 4. Secretary-Treas-
urer 3. President 4. Cheerleader 3, 4.
\ ollevball 1. 2. .3, 4. All Stars 1, 2,

3, 4. Softball 1, 2, 3. 4. All Stars
1, 2. 3, 4. Basketball 1. 2. 3. 4. All
Stars 1. 2. 3. 4. Archerv 1. 2. 3. 4.



Norma Jean Kuller

November 5, 1928

Ancon. Canal Zone
S. A. Officer. President 4. Treasurer
2, 3. Class Representative 1. Quill
and Scroll 4. Trade Wind Staff 4.
Caribbean Staff 4. Dramatic Club 1.
Torrid Zone Wizards 1. Dolphins 2.
Operetto 1. Cheer Leader 3. 4. Junior
Senior Banquet Committee. Varsity
Club 2. 3. 4. Vice-President 3. Treas-
urer 4. \'ictorv Corps 1, 2. Glee Club
1. 4. Vollevball 1. 2. 3, 4. All Stars
1, 2, 3. 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. All
Stars 1, 2, 3. 4. Softball, 1. 2, 3, 4. All
Stars 1, 2, 3, 4. Archery 1. 2, 3, 4.
All Stars 1. 2. 3. 4. Swimming 1. 2.




Kenneth Rov Lowe

September 22. 1928

Zolfo Springs, Florida
Torrid Zone Wizards 1. Glee Club 1.
Victory Corps 1. Football 1, 3, 4. All
Stars 4. Baseball 1. 3. 4. Softball 1.
3, 4. Basketball 1, 3. 4. Swimming
1. 2. 4. Water Polo 1.



Hilton Robert McPheters

June 17, 1928

Taunton, Massachusetts
Hi-Y Club 4. President 4. Football
1, 2, 3. 4. All Stars 1. 2, 3. 4. Baseball
1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars 1, 2, 3, 4. Basket-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars 1. 2. 3, 4.
Track 1. 2. 3. 4. All Stars 1. 2. 3. '1.




Constance Miller

March 26, 1928
Perry, New York
Glee Club 4.



Robert Warren Snellings

August 29. 1928
Columbia, Missouri

Student Representative 4.

La P.A.S. 2, 3, 4. Glee Club

1, 2, 3, 4. Operetta 1. Vic-
tory Corps 1, 2. Football 3,
4. Softball 2, 3, 4. All Stars

2. Baseball 2. 3, 4. Basket-
ball 3. Track 3.



Dorothy Ann Engler

October 19, 1928
Sharonee, Oklahoma
Student Representative 4.
La P.A.S. 4. Forum Club
4. Thespians 4. Dramatic
Club 3, 4. Secretary 4. Vic-
tory Corps 1, 2. Glee Club
1, 2, 3. Vollevball 1, 2, 3, 4.
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.



Charles Leo Perry-
April 23, 1927
Dayton, Ohio.




Eleanor Janet Fowler

August 16, 1928

Benton Harbor, Michigan
National Honor Society 3, 4.
Quill and Scroll 4. Thes-
pians 3, 4. Trade Wind
Staff 4. Caribbean Staff 4.



(Carolina Bringas

November 6, 1927

Colon, R. de P.
La P.A.S. 1, 2. Victory
Corps 1, 2. Glee Club 1, 2,
3, 4. Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4.
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. All
Stars 1, 2, 3. 4. Softball 1,
2, 3. Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4.
.All Stars 1, 2, 3. Swimming
3.



Marilyn Mary Metzger

March 3], 1928
Panama City, Panama
Thespians 2, 3, 4. La P.A.S.
2, 3, 4. Torrid Zone Wiz-
ards 2, 3, 4. Glee Club 3, 4.
Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Dra-
matic Club 1, 2, 3. 4. Model
Air Plane Club 2. Dolphin
Club 2. Victory Corps 1. 2.
Music .Appreciation 2.
Trade Wind Staff 4. Car-
ibbean Staff 4. .Aquabelle

2. Orchestra 1, 2. Volley-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4. Softball 1, 2,

3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.
.Archery 3. Tennis 4. Swim-
ming 1, 2, 3, 4.



Helene P. Marsh

May 10, 1928

Los Angeles. California
La P.A.S. 2, 3, 4. Torrid
Zone Wizards 1, 2. Glee
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Operetta 1.
\'ictory Corps 1, 2.



Pagoual Roberto Rosania

June 19, 1926
Colon, R. de P.
Glee Chib 2, 3. 4. Orchestra

1, 2, 3. i. Victory Corps 1.

2. Football I. 2, 3, 4. Soft-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4. Baseball 1,
2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.



Barbara Elizabeth Lawsoii

December 27, 1928
West Palm Beach, Florida
Thespians 3, 4. Vice-Presi-
dent 4. Dramatic Club 3, 4.
Varsity Club 3, 4. Vice-
President 4. Victory Corps
1, 2. Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4.
All Stars 1, 2. 3. Basketball
1. 2, 3. 4. All Stars 1, 2. 3.
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars
1, 2, 3. Swimming 1, 2.



Mary Constance Leach

April 20, 1928
Lynn, Massachusetts
La P.A.S. 4. Dramatic Club
4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Victory
Corps 1, 2. Volleyball 1, 2.
Softball 1, 2. Swimming 1,
2, 3.



Betty Ruth Kuhrt

September 21, 1928
Ancon, Canal Zone
La P.A.S. 2, 3, 4. Dramatic
Club 4. Camera Club 4.
Varsity Club 3, 4. Trade
Wind Staff 4. Caribbean
Staff 4. Band 2, 3. Orches
tra 2, 3. Glee Club 1, 2. 3
Operetta 1. Victory Corps 1
2. Volleyball 1, 2. 3, 4. Soft
ball 2, 3, 4. All Stars 2. 3
Basketball 3, 4. All Stars 3
4. Archery 3, 4.




Stephen Gracie, Jr.

September 5, 1927
Somerville, .Massachusetts
Football 1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars
4. Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. Base-
ball 1, 2, 3. 4. Victory Corps
1, 2.



William Albert Pretto

March 16, 1928

Colon, R. de P.
La P.A.S. 1, 2, 3, 4. Forum
Club 3, 4. Dramatic Club

1, 2. Victory Corps 1, 2.
Football 1, 2. 3, 4. All
Stars 2, 3, 4. Baseball 1, 2.
3, 4. Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. All
Stars 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1,

2. 3, 4. Track 1. 2, 3, 4.



Kenneth Paul Campbell

November 1, 1927

Morrisville, Pennsylvania
Student Representative 1.
Thespian 4. La P.A.S. 1, 2,
3. Dramatic Club 4. Vic-
tory Corps 1, 2. Junior Sen-
ior Banquet Master of Cere-
monies 3. Football 1, 2, 3, 4.
S..ftball 1, 2, 3. 4. Basket-
ball 1, 2, 3. Baseball 1, 2. 3.



Jacqueline C. Carlin

October 5, 1928

Long Island City, N. Y.
La P.A.S. 3, 4. Trade Wind
Staff 3, 4. Caribbean Staff
4. Glee Club 1. Victory
Corps 1, 2. Volleyball 1, 2,
3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. Varsity
Club 3, 4.



Top



Bottom



Anita Kala Berley

October 6, 1928

New York City, New York
Trade Wind Staff 4. Camera Cliil) 1. Pan-American Chib
2. Science Club 1.



Do



aid Va



Nail



July 18. 1927

San Diego, California
Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3. 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Football
1, 2, 3, 4. Softball 1, 2. Baseball 1, 2. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.
Track 1, 2, 3, 4.



Thelnia Marie Thomas

November 4. 1926

Cnlon, R. cie P.
Varsity Club 2. Volleyball
Swimming 1.



3. S(.ftball 1. Basketball 3.



Norman Charles Slade

January 2, 1929

Bogalusa. Louisiana
La P.A.S. 2, 3, 4. President 4. Cipos 3. 4. Torrid Zone
Wizards 3. 4. Music Club 3. Victory Corps 1. 2. Junior
Senior Banquet Committee 4. Food Committee 3. F.nter-
tainment Commiltee 4. P.A.S.F. 3, 4. Band 1.



Ardithanne Gertrude Boyle

September 25. 1928

Sayre, Pennsylvania
National Honor Society 3, 4. President 4. Qnill and Scroll
3, 4. S.A. Cabinet 4. La P.A.S. 2, 3, 4. Cipos 3, 4. Co-
President 4. Trade Wind Staff 3, 4. Caribbean Staff 3, 4.
Torrid Zone Wizards 2, 3, 4. Varsity Club 3, 4. Volleyball
2, 3, 4. Softball 2, 3, 4. All Stars 3. Basketball 2, 3, 4.
All Stars 2, 3. Victory Corps 1, 2. Junior Senior Banquet
Committee Speaker 3. P.A.S.F. 3, 4. Music Appreciation 2.



John Thomas Styles

April 23. 1928
Ancon. Canal Zone
La P.A.S. 2, 3. Football 1, 2, 3, 4.



Marie Theresa Ariek

November 19, 1928

Cristobal, Canal .Zone
La P.A.S. 2, 3, 4. Forum Club 4. Dramatic Chdi 1. Victory
Corps 1, 2. Band 1. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Operetta 1.
Junior Senior Banquet Committee 3. Volleyball I. 2.



Charles A. Thomas

December 4, 1928

Riverside, California
Student Representative 3. Class Officer, Vice-President 1.
Band 1, 2. Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4. Victory Corps 1, 2. Junior
Senior Banquet Committee. Boxing 3.





Top

Grover Cleveland Collins

August 10, 1927

Dudley, Georgia
Torrid Zone Wizards 2. Footliall 1, 2, 3. 4. Baskctliall
1, 2, 3, 4. Track 2, 3. Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. Swimming 2.



Bolliim

Lois Liirille Hamilton

November 18. 1928
Colorado

La P.A.S. 3, 4. \'ictory Club 2. Volleyball 1.



Robert S. Coulthard

June 10, 1928

Panama Hospital, R. de P.
Thespians 3, 4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Football 1, 2, 3, 4.
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars 2. Baseball 1, 2. 3, 4. Basket-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars 2. Track 1, 2, 3, 4. Swimminn
1, 2. 3.



Gustavo Lucio Rosania

January 18, 1928
Colon, R. de P.

Class Officer, Vice-President 3. La P.A.S. 2, 4. Trade
Wind Staff 3, 4. Caribbean Staff 4. Victory Corps 1, 2.
Junior Senior Banquet Committee. Football 1, 2, 3, 4.
All Stars 1. 2. Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars 1. 2, 3, 4.
Baseball 1, 2. 3, 4. All stars 1. 2. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.
All Stars 1, 2, 3, 4. Track 1, 2, .3, 4. All Stars 1, 2, 3, 4.
Swimming 1. 2, 4. Water Polo 1. Boxing 3.



Nancy Joan Gilder

November 2, 1928
Colon, R. de P.

Class Officer, Treasurei 2. La P.A.S. 2, 3, 4. Varsitv
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Victory Corps 1, 2. Glee Club 1. Basket-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4. Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4. Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4.
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4.



Geraldine Blohm

May 16, 1928
Chicago, Illinois

Trade W ind Staff 4. .\mericanism Club 1, 2, 3. French
Club 2. 3. Student Council 2, 3.



Eleanor Lou Williams

October 24, 1928

Barranco Bermeja, Colombia
S. A. Officer, Treasurer 4. Class Officer, President 2.
Secretary 1, 3. La P.A.S. 1, 2, 3, 4. Dolphins 2, 3. Var-
sity Club 1, 2. 3. 4. Vollevball 1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars 1. 2,
3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3. AJl Stars 1, 2, 3. Softball 1, .2, 3.
All Stars 1. 2. 3. Tennis 1. 2. Swimming 1. 2. 3. 4. Vic-
tory Corps 1, 2.



Shirley Ann Beasley

June 3, 1928

Corpus Christi, Texas



Joan Tweedy

July 7. 1928
Glendale, California



Fred Balhea Hill. Jr.

September 2. 1928

Colon. R. (le P.
Student Representative 4. Band 1. 2. Orchestra
Football 1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars 1, 2, 3. 4. Baseball 1.
All Stars 1, 2, 3. 4. Softball 1. 2. 3. 4. All Stars 1.
Swimming 1. 2. 3. 4. Track 1, 2. 3. 4. Boxing 1.
Corps 1, 2. Basketball 1. 2. 3. 4.



1, 2, 3.

2, 3. 4.
2. 3. 4.
Victory





Dorit Berger

February 16. 1928

Vienna, Austria
La P.A.S. 2. 3, 4. Forum Club 4.
Trade Wind Staff 3. 4. Co-Editor 4.
Caribbean Staff 3. Music Club 3. Vic-
tory Corps 1, 2. Quill and Scroll 3. 4.



Alfred Frank Maale

October 28, 1926

New Orleans, Louisiana
Football 1. 2. 3, 4. All Stars 1. 2. 3, 4.
Basketball 1. 2. 3. 4. All Stars 2, 3,
4. Softball 1. 2, 3. 4. All Stars 2. 3. 4.
Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars 2. 3. 4.
Track 1, 2, 3, 4.



Wo Picture

Catherine Virginia Fisher

January 14, 1927
Washinffton. Pennsylvania




Lois Catharine Householder

April 4, 1928

York, Pennsylvania
Thespians 3, 4. Quill and Scroll 3, 4.
President 4. Vice-President 3. Dra-
matic Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Torrid Zone
Wizards 2. 3, 4. President 2. 3. Vice-
President 4. Trade Wind Staff 3. 4.
Business Manager 4. Caribbean Staff
3. 4. Editor 4. Business Manager 4.
Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Glee Club
1. 2. Operetta 1. Volleyball 1, 2. 3. 4.
Basketball 1. 2, 3. 4. All Stars 1.
Softball 1. 2, 3. All Stars 1. Archery
1. 2, 3, 4. All Stars 1. 2, 3, 4. Victory
Corps 1, 2.



\\ einier Frank Heite

October 22. 1928

Elkton, Maryland
Thespian 2. 3, 4. President 4. La P.A.S. 2, 3, 4. Dramatic
Chib 1. 2. 3. 4. Glee Club 3. Victory Corps 1. 2. Orchestra
1. 2. 3, 4. Best Thespian 1944-45, 1945-46. Football 1. 2.



ISarbara Mae Millard

November 16, 1929

Oneonta, New York
Caribbean Staff 3, 4. Trade Wind Staff 3, 4. Quill and
Scroll 4. Dramatic Club 3, 4. Torrid Zone Wizards 3, 4.
Basketball 3, 4.




Rosila Lvnn Czernik

June 2, 1928

Lodz, Poland
National Honor Society 3, 4. Secretary 4. Class Officer,
Treasurer 1. Quill and Scroll 3, 4. President 4. La P.A s'
1, 2, 3, 4. Cipos 3. 4. P.A.S.F. Trade Wind Staff 2, 3, 4.
Editor 4. Business Manager 2, 3. Caribbean Staff 2. 3, 4.
Business Manager 2. 3. Torrid Zone Wizards 2, 3, 4.
Secretary-Treasurer 2. Glee Chil) 1. Softball 1. Volleyball
1. Victory Corps 1, 2.

Gay Thomas

July 3, 1928

Monroe, Louisiana
S.A. Officer. Vice-Presideni 3. Class Officer. President 1,
4. Honor Society 3, 4. La P.A.S. 2. 3. 4. Cipos 3. 4. Vic-
tory Corps 1. 2. Band 1. Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4. Football

1, 3. 4. Baseball 1. 2, 3, 4. Softball 1. 2, 3, 4. Track

2, 3, 4. Basketball 1. 2, 3, 4.




Noel Elfa Gibson. Jr.

January 15. 1928
Peoria. Illinois

Class Officer, Treasurer 2, 3, 4. Dra-
matic Club 1. 3. 4. Model Airplane
Club 1, 2. President 2. Band 1. Or-
chestra 2, 3. 4. Glee Club 4. Secre-
tary 4. Trade Wind Staff 4. Carib-
bean Staff 4. Hy-Y Club 4. Junior
Senior Banquet Committee. Victory
Corps 1, 2. Football 1. 2. 3, 4. All
Stars 1. 3. 4. Softball 1, 2. 3. 4. Ml
Stars I, 2, 3, 4. Baseball 1. 2. 3, 4. -Vll
Stars 1. 2. 3. 4. Track 1. 2. 3. 4. Basket-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars 1, 2. 3, 4. Swim-
ming 1, 2, 3. All Sports .Award 1944-
45, 1945-46.



Adda Lynn Nail

October 14. 1928

San Diego, California
La P.A.S. 2, 3, 4. Dramatic Club
Corps 1, 2. Volleyball 1. 2. 3, 4.
1. 2, 3, 4. Softball 1. 2, 3, 4.



Dorothy Lee Grey

December 16, 1927
Colon Hospital, Canal Zone
National Honor Society 4. La P.A.S.

2. 3, 4. Cipos 4. Torrid Zone Wizards

3, 4. Operetta 1. Glee Club 1, 2. 3. 4.
Secretary 4. Volleyball 1. Softball 1.



Denis Shannon Venning

April 10. 1928
Giscome. B. C, Canada

Class Officer. Vice-President 4. Na-
tional Honor Society 4. Football 3, 4.
All Stars 4. Baseball 2, 3. 4. Soft-
ball 2, 3, 4. All Stars 2, 3, 4. Track
2, 4. Basketball 3, 4.



No Picture
Gerald D. Stroop

November 30, 1926
.Ancon, Canal Zone

Student Representative 1. Glee

Club 1. 2. 3. Dolphin Club 2.



4. Glee Club 1. Victory
All Stars 3. Basketball



Eddie Leroy Pipkin

March 16. 1928

Joplin. Missouri
Football 3. 4. All Stars 3, 4.
Basketball 3, 4.



Softball 3. 4. Baseball 3. 4.




JUNIORS



JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS

President Jean McNair

Vice-President James Dorsey

Secretary Betty Watts

Treasurer Pete Foster

Sponsor
Miss Adamary Anderson




Three down, and one to go! Three of the most enjoyable, and important years of our lives lie behind
us. The Junior year, in many ways, has been best of all. Memories we will cherish, as a class and as
individuals stem from it.

The Junior class which entered Cristobal High School last September was very different from the
Freshman class which commenced high school there, in 1943. Many old members had left. New faces had
appeared, and kept appearing throughout the year. In spite of a changing gioup. we were able to keep up
our standards of achievement as the year shows and we have reason to be proud of the class of '47.

Versatility, while not a test of excellence, is one test of a good class and the Juniors have had a good
class. Some starred on the diamond and gridiron, while others excelled in music, art, science, and photo-
graphy. Five are Thespians, and are among the most talented C.H.S. Thespians, at that. In addition to
many regular members in La P.A.S., ten Juniors ruled as Cipos. To lop the list, three received the highest mark
of approval Cristobal High School can bestow membership in the National Honor Society.

We are proud, too. of the big events of the year which we planned and executed: the Junior Talent As-
sembly, and the Junior-Senior Banquet and Prom. The work we spent on them we consider well spent. We
will remember them as high-lights of our school career.



JUNIORS





J



\--






EDMA TOMPKINS BARTIEY WOLFENSTElK






LEE BROV/N JOHN BUCKLEy




MERCEDES CHONG JAMES ROE NANCV BABCOCK GERALDO CADAVA




BEVERW REEVES RUTH MUCKLE JOAN HAND5HAW ZELMACAMP&ELL ARLINE LINCOLN HELEK DlAl



JUNIORS











RICHARD CHAMBERS ALICE REMTHALL GEORGE SCHULTE HEDY KELLMAH RlCHARIi SWERRINGEN JEAN M^NftlR



rif










JANESW7DER LUIS HOOPER MARILEWESE ARBEy RKHARDTAVLOR ANHR MftE COTTRELL RICHARD SCHE1DE66









KENNETH 5ETHER JUDITH HRYAS

1^ ^




RRVLEHE JASPER



ELSIE KENNEDy JACK PESCOD







ROBERT KNOOP PEGCy M'lLVAINE KORBERt KELLER HARRIET KEENAH RlCWftRO TAYLOR HRRRIETTE HAMNA



JUNIORS





WALTER TEMPLIH FAY HOWARD ALVtN KEKNEOy aADYS SCHULTE PETE FOSTER MARJORIE HfiRRlK6T0f




D



1

BftRBRRft WEBSTER OSCAR FLORES




REED M<^ILVAINE PEGGY V/iLKES





HELEN CULPEPPER RICHARD NITTO PAT BENHY RICHARD DECASTRO MURIELTATELMAH HERBERT BI6HAM




aftMESDORS EY JEftH &OLES RICHRRDPIKCUS GLORift BORNEFELD SAM BLACKBURN RMDREE WiTlOCK




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Cristobal High and How It Grew

J '^^HILE the Canal Zone schools are generally similar to the better type schools of the United States,
'yj- there are many ways in which they are unique. One of these unique features of the Canal Zone
schools is their history. Nowhere will one probably find a school whose early history was one of such or-
ganization and re-organization, location and re-location as was true of Cristobal High School during con-
struction days and before the permanent organization for the Canal Zone was set up. Not until the opening
of the school year in October. 1917. when the present elementary school building on Colon Beach was first
occupied after its completion, did a degree of permanence so necessary to progress begin. From 1917 to
September 1933 that building was Cristobal High School. Of course there were attached several frame build-
ings to be used for shop and domestic science courses. These have since been torn down. In September 1933
this present fine building was occupied. Hence the class of 1933 was the first to graduate from it.

For those with a little of the pioneering spirit in them, it may be well to point out a few facts before
October 1917. The first high school classes were organized in October, 1907 at Cristobal and Culebra not
a high school, mind you, just high school classes. In January. 1909. a two-year high school was set up
at Cristobal. This was changed to a four-year high school at the opening of school the very next term
namely October. 1909. In 1910 the school was transferred to Gatun and in 1912 it was transferred to Ancon.
When the permanent organization of the Canal was set up in 1914 the school remained at Ancon with a
branch in Cristobal where two years' work was offered. Plans were immediately made however that resulted
in the first permanent high school on the Atlantic side in 1917 on Colon Beach.

Just prior to World War II. the school's enrollment had reached 331. When Service families were sent
out of the combat zone, the number of students here was greatly reduced. Courses were changed to meet the
war needs, and all activities were bent toward helping to win this great conflict.

An important course. Aeronautics, was inaugurated. The Auto-Mechanics class speeded up its work in
an effort to make its members ready for wartime jobs. Physics placed more emphasis on electricitv tiian
in former years, and Chemistry classes made their own chemicals which were no longer available because
of the war. Household Arts taught greater economy in the home. Radio Code prepared its students for
further usefulness in that field at a later date. An airplane club was organized to produce model planes of
all kinds, later turned over to the Army and Navy to be used in teaching pilots and crews to recognize enemy
and frifiidlv airiraft.




C. H. S Returns to the Three R's

I "^ ITH the cessation of hostilities last August, C.H.S. returned to normal again, and the school life of
'/{I. yester-year was resumed by its students. Almost forgotten were the grim war years, with their stacks
of sand bags which for thirty months disfigured the beautiful front entrance of the building: the smudge-
faced girls in cover-alls who were shop students: the gas mask drills: the talk of Link trainers and aero-
nautics: the bandage-makers who worked feverishly in the librarv after school hours: the local fire-chiefs
and their student fire-fighters: the Phvsics class which became Electricity : the Morse Code which disturbed
the quiet of the halls.

The tenseness and uncertainty of the past few years was gone. Students once again planned college
careers. Others decided upon jobs from which they hoped not to be called away.

Courses were planned accordingly. No longer was Aeronautics taught in the school. Except for regrets
that no more were there trips to France Field where students fondly imagined that they were flying a plane
(for a few minutes), boys and girls tackled Trig with the same enthusiasm formerly given to aeroplanes.

Physics became Physics again, and the college-bound buckled down to learn what it was all about.

This high school offers four courses: College Preparation. General, Conmiercial. and Apprentice-
Learner. Many students from this school are enrolled in large universities and colleges in the States. If
a student doesn't wish to continue his schooling, he may take an Apprentice-Learner course to prepare him-
self for a job with the Panama Canal.

These courses are so well planned and so well arranged that students finishing here may enter the Canal
Zone Junior College, or many universities and colleges in the U.S.A. without an entrance examination, or they
may enter the commercial world on the Zone with a good job. or they may become apprentices or learners
with the Canal Zone. After four years' preliminary training with the Canal, these latter students may join
the ranks of the Canal Zone workers at an excellent rate of pay.

RATED AS SUPERIOR BY EVALUATORS

For the first time in the history of C.H.S. the work of the school has been evaluated by a visiting com-
mittee representing the Middle States Association of Secondary Schools. The report of that committee is
objective evidence that this school is offering an educational program comparing favorably with that offered
by the better schools of the U.S.A. The final judgement is that Cristobal High School is a superior institution
of learning. The school is proud of its rating, and especially so because in addition to holding firmly to its
scholastic standing, C.H.S. fosters all the extra-curricular activities normally found in a much larger school.




MISS MOORE

Latin 9, 10

French 9, 10

Spanish 9




LATIN 10




MRS. SPENCER

Spanish 10. 11. 12

Commercial Spani^li



FRENCH 9




Latin

Spanish

French




SPANISH 11



- ^^9



4








^



MISS BROWN
English 10



English




MR. EVANCOE
English 9




ENGLISH 11




MISS LITER
English 11
English 12




GLEE CLUB AND DIRECTOR MR. JORSTAD




MUSIC



The Music Department, directed by Mr. O. E.
Jorstad, is one of the most outstanding in C.H.S.
The activities included in it are the impressive
Christmas festival, the Easter concert, and the de-
lightful Spring Music festival. Performances were
given by the Glee Club, this year, at the Caribe
Theater, the Bolivar U.S.O., and the Naval Hospital.
The Glee Club also sang in many assemblies and
gave a Fred Waring program. Not an assembly
passed without music by our talented students.



ANNUAL CHRISTMAS FESTIVAL TABLEAU





---^iti^^^9






CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL ORCHESTRA



DEPARTMENT



Mr. Joistad says that even though his Glee Club
is singing first class songs, this year, they are only
laying a foundation for a better term next year. A
vocal class was started for more technical training
and beginners were given special attention.

Although a large percentage of the C.H.S. pupils
are in this department, we are looking forward to
even larger groups next year since the Army and
Navy families are beginning to return.




GLEE CLUB AND ACCOMPANIST. MARY JANE SALMON




HISTORY



SCIENCE




AMERICAN PROBLEMS




MISS ANDERSON

(/. S. History

Modern World History

Ancient History



MR. EVANCOE
American Problems



UNITED STATES HISTORY








PHYSICS







^%^.



1^'



:#



/




MR. MAEDL

Biology
General Science



MR. BRIANS

Chemistry
Physics



GENERAL SCIENCE




COMMERCIAL

The Commercial section of the school is headed by Miss Helen Patter-
son who teaches shorthand, advanced typing, elementary typing, business
mathematics and English.

Students usually take these courses if they plan to pursue a business
career or attend business college. The shorthand class this year included
eight seniors. The advanced typing class began with fifteen students, but
eight of these graduated mid-term so only seven remained for the last
semester. Fifty students were enrolled in the elementary typing class.



I





BUSINESS ENGLISH



OFFICE



MISS PATTERSON
Business English

Elementary Typing

Advanced Typing

Shorthand



The countless bulletins, filing jobs, and errands necessary to carry on a successful school office are
the duties that fall into the capable hands of Miss Beverly Ruoff, the school secretary. She is assisted in
her duties by a group of students who take office practice as a course to supplement text books in preparation
for their future business careers. These girls learn to cut stencils, mimeograph, file, type, and issue books
and equipment to the teachers and students.

The students in office practice, this year, were nine seniors: Thelma Thomas, Adda Lynn Nail, Lois
Householder, Dorothy Grey, Carolyn Magner, Constance Miller, Thelma Pucci. and Carolina Bringas; and
two juniors: Peggy Mcllvaine and Arline Lincoln.

This year Mr. Beck was helped with his work as Counselor by
another group of embryo-secretaries. They were Hedy Kellman. Jackie
Pescod and Helen Culpepper. In addition to their filing for several
periods a week, they also worked with Mr. Beck to compile a list of
boys and girls from C.H.S. who served in the armed forces.




Secretary



wk ^l



n,, 13 im irw'wmr ,. 'i^TrW





PUBLISHED Bt-WEEia'

CLASS OF OUSTO

CRISTOi



CMemberj



Edltor-hj-CWef
Assistant Editons

Feature Writers

Photographers

Sports Editor

Sports Writers

Busiaesf Staff

Business Manager
Treasurer



Rosita Cze
D. Berger,
H. Marsh, i
J. KuUer
H. Keenan
A. Whitlocl
J. Bnckley,
H. McPheti
A. Whitloci
J. KuUer, <
Czemik, D,
Lois House
J. Kuller, s















fe^f^









b<



Art




ADVANCED ART




Arts



MR. GIBSON

Mechanical Drmmng

Machine Shop

MACHINE SHOP




i^ K lii



MISS WORRELL
Art



Industria




MR. ANDERSON
W oodwork



ELEMENTARY WOOD WORK




Athletics



Mathematics



An outstanding liigliliglit for many of the high school stu-
dents is their participation in Heahh Education.

It has been said, "In learning to play together we can belter
learn to work together."

The health education program for this year includes a little
of every sport played after school to give the students super-
vised practice in each sport. Exercises are given to strengthen
'ip muscles, straighten the shoulders, and lielp the boys to attain



"the built-up look" and aid the girl
they dislike so much.



those extra pountls



The aims of sports and health education in school could be
placed under the five following points: (1) Self development
of individuals; (2) Increase the sensitivity controls of the body;
(3) Build the powers and skills of the body; (4) Heighten
interest, attitudes and sportsmanship through sports; <5)
Appreciation and proper care of the body.

And why all this? Basically to provide the leadership and
facilities that will afford an opportunity for the individual or
group to act in situations which are physically wholesome,
mentally stimulating, and socially sound.




M1S.S STAISNEY MR. PALI MBO

Cirh' Gynt Boys' Gym

SECOND PERIOD GY.\I CLASS




ALGEBRA 9




MR. BECK

Elementary Alsebra



MR. HOTZ

Trigonometry



MISS BEAVERS

Plane Geometry

Solid Geometry

Elementary Algebra

Advanced Algebra



PLANE GEOMETRY






The Library



The library of C.H.S. is the most beautiful and most restful room in the building.
It overlooks sparkling Limon Bay, from which refreshing breezes gently caress the
weary students. The large tables are placed so that they take advantage of the best
lighting facilities of the room. The shelves that line the spacious room contain litera-
ture ranging from fiction to the best reference materials. Magazines and periodicals of
yesterday and today are also on hand, filed according to their date of publication.

Miss Jeanne Brown, our well-trained librarian, deserves much praise for her
tireless efforts in running the library and helping students find supplementary matter,
besides teaching several classes in Sophomore English.

Miss Brown is assisted by student librarians, who give up their study halls to
learn the principles of library work. Although no scholastic credit is given in this
field, many students wish to participate in this very necessary activity.




Miss Brown's assistants this year are
Marilyn Metzger. Philip Sanders. Merle
Simons, Jimmy Roe. Eddie Mills, Beverly
Reeves, Dorit Archbold, Billy Hill. Terrv
Melancon. Beulah Simons. Muriel Jor-
dan, and Kenneth Lowe.

It is their task to check in aiul theck
out books, help other students find
materials for class work, check atten-
dance, send out slips for over-due books,
and put back on the shelves books which
come in during the dav. This is a very
efficient group and if they received no
credit elsewhere, their reward is a better
acquaintance with good books.




LIBRARIANS



MISS BROWN AND STUDIOUS PUPILS





Cafeteria



Miss Sally McLimans, supervisor of the excellent Cristobal High
School Cafeteria, serves lunches to about three hundred hungry students
everv school dav.

Reports from students say that the food has been good, wholesome
and reasonably priced.

Miss McLimans is assisted by seven students who take a course in
cafeteria. These students learn to take care of each individual operation




The student assistants are: Lee Brown, Peggy Wilkes, Harriet Hanna,
Zelma Campbell. Joan Handshaw, Edna Tompkins, and Anna Cottrell



in running a successful cafeteria, ro-
tating duties each week. Some of the
duties include being cashier, being
in charge of salads or desserts and
dishing out food.

Miss Hallie Beavers assists the
cafeteria staff by being a steady
cashier in the "hot food line."

The heavy work in the cafeteria is
done by a cook, Violet, a cook's assis-
tant and dishwasher. Carmen, a maid,
Enid, and a pastry-maker, Lillian.




CTIVITIES




s

T

U
D
E

N
T

C


U
N
C
I
L




For the third time in the history of the school, a girl has been
chosen for president of the Student Association. Jeannie Kuller de-
feated Gay Thomas after a hotly contested election which showed
the excellent sportsmanship of both of the candidates. Days before
the election, both parties used posters, signs, and other propaganda
methods such as Jeannie's swimming party and Gav"s informal dance
to persuade students to vote for them.

This year the Students' Association was very successful in af-
fording a great deal of enjoyment to the school body. Among the
activities sponsored by this organization were: The Trade Wind.
Caribbean, athletic contests, musical programs, honor study hall.
dramatic productions, class picnics, dances, Sports awards, and
the Junior-Senior Banquet. Besides these activities, two additional
dances and a school Carnival float were revived for the first time
since Pearl Harbor.








%^..






THE STUDENT COUNCIL

First Row: E. Allgaier, J. Hellum>, M. Styles, G. Schulte. A. Lincoln. E. William.-. E. Juller.

J. Boles, 0. Flores. Second Row: A. Newhard. B. Snellings, J. Kuller, J. Rowc.

Miss Patterson, D. Thomas



JEAN KULLER
GLADYS SCHULTE



4.





ARLINE LINCOLN
ELEANOR WILLIAMS



Miss Helen Patleison. who LeLame the Student Council Adviser
this year, left her job of school treasurer in the capable hands of
Miss Hallie Beavers. A large portion of the Councirs success may
be attributed to Miss Patterson's untiring efforts and hard work with
this group.

A president's cabinet is a special body of students chosen per-
sonally by the President to relieve the many duties of that office.
This small body consists of Arline Lincoln. Director of Budget and
Finance: Gay Thomas. Director of Citizenship Activities: Carolyn
Magner. Director of Public Relations: Ardith Boyle. Chairman of
Constitutional Revision Committee.

The Student Council representatives were as follows: Fred Hill.
Robert Snellings. Jean Boles. Oscar Flores. James Roe. Eleanor Kull-
er. Jeanine Heliums. Marjorie Styles. Edward AUgaier. .-Vnn Newhard.
Jacqueline Whitlock.



/^. iH ^M




T
H
E



C
A
B
I

N
E
T



THE CABINET
A. Boyle. C. Maiuiger. J. KiiUer, G. Thomas. A. Lincoln



? Muckle. /?. Boyle J. Fowler



^




Sckulte




O.Grey



MATIDNAL^
HONOR society;




E.Williams G.Thomas /J. Lincoln





Z). Vennint



National Honor Society



The aim of the National Honor Society is to make good citizenship in high schools
a matter of distinction. Its members must have the outstanding qualities of character,
service, leadership, and scholarship. These qualities developed in school should make
a better citizen of the graduate and he, in turn, will contribute more to his country.

The Caribbean Chapter is only four years old. but already its influence is being
felt. It is hoped that with the passing years this chapter's contribution to the Americas
will be very great.



.^



f 1

&. Mi Hard




PDNAIKJNAI



QUILL



Quill and Scrol



SCROLL



AT



The International organization of Quill and Scroll, which was launched in 1926 by a group of high school
advisers, is an honor society for the members of the "Fourth Estate" in high schools all over the world.

The purpose of this group is to raise the standards of high school journalism and to stimulate interest
in journalistic endeavors.

The Cristobal High School Chapter of the National Quill and Scroll was organized in the school last
year with twelve charter members.

New members were added at lovely formal candlelight initiations twice during this school year. The
members of this chapter at present are Rosita Czernik. Dorit Berger. Helene Marsh. Jeannie Kuller, Lois
Householder, Ardith Boyle, Carolyn Magner, Patsy Benny. Harriet Keenan, Barbara Millard. Janet Fowler,
Marilyn Metzger. Jean McNair. Beverly Reeves. Ruth Muckle. and Alice Benthall.





La



SPANISH



The inner circle of La P.A.S. is known
as the Cipos. This group acts as officers
of the Spanish Chib and it is the bkck-
bone of social activities which the club
sponsors.

To become one of this organization a
student must first be a member of La
P.A.S. he must show interest in affairs
and prove that he is ready and willing to
give a hand in the woik. He must also be
outstanding in his Spanish class.

Norman Slade was chosen president
of the Cipos for the year 1945-46, and
was presented with a lovely pin by Mrs.
Spencer, who will allow him to keep this





^mmmM



up





pin if he has fulfilled the ideals of
thai position throughout his term
as president.

This year's Cipos are Ardith
Boyle, Rene Osorio. Gay Thomas,
Alice Benthall, Hedy Kellman,
Judy Havas, Muriel Tatleman,
Carolyn Magner, Dorothy Grey,
Richard de Castro, Patsy Benny,
George Schulte, Richard Pincus.
Norman Slade and Raymond
Kani.

La P.A.S., Honorary Spanish
Club of Cristobal High School was
founded in 1931 by Mrs. Phyllis
Spencer, who is still supervisor
of the organization. The purpose
of the club is to promote a great-
er interest in Spanish and to



p. A. S



CLUB





improve relations between the United States
and the Republic of Panama.

New members are brought into the club
after the end of first and second six weeks'
periods, provided the student has achieved a
"B" or better average in Spanish classes. The
initiates undergo a vivid initiation to test their
good sportsmanship, a thiiT; which is essential
to membership.

The initiation ceremonies are held in the
high school gymnasium, with Cipos to act as
the installation officers. The meaning of the
letters La P.A.S. is revealed to the new mem-
bers when they are taken into the group.

Among the activities of this organization
were a dance, a formal luncheon at the Wash-
ington Hotel, and participation of several



members in the Spanish Literary and
Music Festival which was held at the
Caribe Theater in honor of Mrs. Jimenez,
the wife of the President of the Republic
of Panama.

The fame of La P.A.S. is steadily
increasing and the club has a fine repu-
tation. Its sixty-some members have a
great deal of pride in their organization
and take a keen interest in carrying out
the club's program.

Mrs. Phyllis Spencer, sponsor and
founder of La P.A.S., was presented with
the second annual Inter-American Under-
standing Award, which is granted to the
Isthmian resident who has done the most in
fostering understanding between the peoples of
the Americas. She was chosen because of her
splendid organizing of Spanish and English
clubs, her many years as a Spanish teacher in
Cristobal High School, and her translations of
the works of Latin-American poets.





Torrid Zone
Wizards




MR. MAEDL



The Torrid Zone Wizards has been a part of Cristobal High School since
1942. when this club was founded. The great importance of this organization
lies in the fact that it is affiliated with the Science Clubs of America.

To be eligible for membership in this important group one must possess
two very essential qualifications:

1. High scholastic standing

2. An active interest in science

The club benefits the student, in one way. by serving as an opportunity to develop life-long friends
through its activities. Membership in the Wizards provides an incentive for scientific thought and the solving
of perplexities arising from all phases of this vast, explorable field.

Through the untiring efforts and good sound advice of Mr. Maedl. the sponsor of the Torrid Zone
Wizards, this organization has grown until it has achieved a fine degree of success.

The officers upon whose shoulders rests the responsibility of safeguarding and upholding the club's
ideals are: President. Patsy Benny; Vice-President, Lois Householder; Secretary. Edward Corbett. and
Treasurer. Ruth Muckle.

The amount of activity which a club portrays is the characteristic that either makes it or breaks it!

The science club members went on several delightful and interesting excursions during the year. The
first was to Gatun Locks where the members received the rare opportunity of having the intricate machinery
of the locks explained to them. The most interesting part of the excursion was the examination of the control
tower. It contains a miniature of the locks showing the progress of a ship from its entrance into the locks to its
safely conducted exit.

The slaughter house was extremely interesting, because no matter how often we see meat on our tables
we rarely stop to think about what took place before it finally reached us in its present state. The answer to
ihis practical question was reached, not by plowing through dozens of text books, but by actually seeing
the processes involved.

There are three additional places located here in the Canal Zone that the Wizards in all probability will
have a chance to view.

The first is a trip to San Rita Mountains where the science club has never been as long as it has been
in existence. This is the main reason why Mr. Maedl. after exploring through the mountains proposed it
as an ideal outing for the club.



Riitli Miirkle and Herbert Bicliaii



Eddie Corbett and Pedro Nieves



San



Blackburn. Phillip Sanders and
Dick DeCastro




Joyce Malcolm and Dorothy Grey



Rene Osorio and David Serko



Barbara Millard and Alice Bentliall



Bill McLaughlin



Every science student learns about the principle of buoyancy. This will be
recalled when they go down into a submarine for their excursion in order to
apply the principle of buoyancy.

A trip will be made to Summit Gardens, the most cultivate^ experimental
gardens on the Isthmus. The Wizards will have an opportunity to see hundreds
of different kinds of plants that are grown in this tropical climate. A lecture
will be given by an official from the United States Department of Agriculture
on this topic.

More than enough has been said about the knowledge that these activities
will give to the club members, but it would be a grave error not to say that the
purpose of these excurisons is to give real pleasure.

The Hurricane is the monthly publication of the Torrid Zone Wizards. Its
editor is Marilyn Metzger who is ably assisted by the club members. The Hur-
ricane was begun this year and has a fine outlook for the future. The majoritv
of articles deal with the different topics taken up in the General Science. Biology.
Chemistry and Physics classes.

There are five aims of this fine organization which each member endeavors
to live up to with the best of his ability.

1. To increase our knowledge of science.

To learn to perfect our skills in science.

To give service in our community and nation.



2.
3.
4.
5.



To understand the importance of science in our lives.

To help carry out the program of science clubs of America.




Phylis Fisher and Marilyn Metzger



Betty Bougan and Paisy Benny



Sofia Papadapolous



Ardilh Boyle and Norman Slade




c



amera



Club



The Cristobal High School Camera Club, under the super-
vision of Mr. Carl F. Maedl, has spent many extra hours
improving their picture-taking technique, developing, print-
ing and enlarging.

A new field developed by this group during the school
year was the photographing of microscopic animals through
a microscope. This proved to be a very interesting pastime.

A member of this club was the official photographer for
the Caribbean, while several other members assisted by taking
shots of school scenes.





The members of the club include:
Jenny Korenbrot, Denia Wong,
Nancy Donaldson, Lois Lee, Saul
Frier. Jose Colina, William Koren-
jrot, Eddie Johnston, Howard Mun-
ro, Eddie Allgaier, David Serko.
Victor Mason, and Andree Whitlock.




LETTERS
UICIKEl



SPONSORED 57
NATIONAL THESPIAN
TROUPE 2/7
CRISTOBAL HIGH

St riOOL





THESPIANS



The National Thespian Society is an honor society for
members of the Dramatic Club who have excelled in such
phases of work as acting, costuming, make-up, stage design-
ing and construction, and student direction.

Troupe 217 of the National Thespian Society was or-
ganized in Cristobal High School in 1928 by a group of
teachers who felt that a greater impetus could be given to
the study of educational dramatics by an association of
directors, teachers and students actively interested in high
school dramatics. While the new organization was estab-
lished along the same lines typical of honor societies in
general, its founders were specific in their demand that it
be an active, progressive, and forward-looking society in its
field. It was made clear that the honor of membership was
to be conferred upon High School students not so much for the reason that they met the eligibility require-
ments, but more for what these students promised, under oath, to achieve in dramatics after they became
members.

The two latest Thespian productions this year, were "Snafu" and "Captain Applejack," both of which
were considered above the amateur class by the public.

The Thespians feel they owe their successes to their sponsor, Mr. Paul L. Beck, who is a highly trained
specialist in this field, and it was chiefly through his untiring efforts that these two productions were so
successfully managed.




OFFICERS




NATIONAL
THESPIAN SOCIETY



DRAMATIC
CLUB



Cristobal High School aims to stimulate
an interest in dramatics as a source of lasting
satisfaction and as a preparation for more com-
plete living. Students actively engaged, learn to
develop qualities of cooperation, self-confidence
and poise through the medium of dramatic
productions.

The Dramatic Club, sponsored by Mr. Paul




Beck and whose officers are Jean Boles,

Marjorie Harrington and Reed Mcllvaine, is the source

from which the Thespians are selected. During the

school year this group presented several assemblies and

_ ^ ,!, ^^^ *^ '^^ ^^ most outstanding of these included the skits:

^Tj^ -"nS^^'^^^^^B "Yes Means No" and "The Kuntry Skuel."




OFFICERS



These skits not only entertained the student body,
but also gave the participants an opportunity to over-
come any stage-fright before they participated in public
productions. It also helps them along the path to be-
coming Thespians, the goal of every member.
DRAMATIC CLUB




mmMsiiS^SiimdSSSSK^Sk




CH.S. Hall



Best All-Round
Jeannie and Fred



Best Dressed
Thelma and Hilton




Most Likely to Succeed
Gay and Rosita



Most Talented
Rosita and Frank



o



f F



ame




Most Studious
Ardith and Norman



Most Popular
Jeannie and Fred




Best Dancers
Lynn and Bob




Hall of Fame



Most Popular Couple
Barbara and Kenneth




Friendliest
Jeannie and Fred



Best Looking
Janet and Hilton




Wittiest
Thelma and Harold




/



Footba



To think of physical education at Cristobal High School is to speak of the aims and objec-
tives to be taught so as to attain maximum performance during the school years, and in addition,
to provide the "carry-over" values so necessary for the better life in the future.

Our major aim in this field, then, is to educate the individual through a multiplicity of
motor activities which, of the greatest import, tends to focus the place of that person in his inter-
relationship in the society, and only of incident brings forth a proficiency in a variety of skills.

Football is the leading sport of this school, the season lasting from the opening of school
through November. This is followed by softball. baseball, track, and basketball. Swimming,
archery and tennis are minor sports at the present.

The Cristobal High School Tigers completed one of the most successful seasons in recent
years by virtue of three straight triumphs over the Alumni, the Junior College and Balboa High.

After trampling the Alumni 28-0 in the opening prep game, the Tigers were just able to
squeeze by the Junior College 2-0. The only score in the game came late in the fourth quarter.
A thirty-yard dash by halfback Hilton McPheters, and two passes carried the ball to the College
five-yard line. Then Captain Gibson faded to pass again, but Standefer, College captain and quar-
terback, intercepted the ball on his own one-yard line, and he was hit for a safety as he stepped
back into his own end zone.

The Balboa game was a dull and listlessly played affair for the first three quarters. But
then the game suddenly exploded in all its fury in the final period. A beautiful kick by Noel
Gibson pushed Balboa to their own five-yard stripe. The Pacific siders attempted to punt the
ball out of danger, but Gay Thomas, racing in from his right end position, threw himself in front
of the ball, blocking the kick. In the ensuing mad scramble for the pigskin, little Ed Pipkin finally
fell on the ball in the Raider end zone for a Cristobal touchdown. Captain Gibson then sent the
ball end over end through the uprights for the seventh point. But Balboa would not give up.
With the ball on the Tigei- thirty-yard line, Lou Dedeaux, Raider passing star, faded to pass.





Jack Baldwin, speedy wing back, who had slipped through the secondary, took the ball on the dead
run and raced the remaining yards unmolested for a touchdown. Dedeaux split the uprights for
the extra point, and the game was all tied up, 7-7.

On the first play from scrimmage following the Balboa kickoff Gibson faded to pass. Stand-
ing on his own ten, he sighted Hilton McPheters racing down the sidelines, and cocked his arm to
throw. It was a long, high fifty-yard pass, and McPheters leaped high in the air in an attempt to
outjump two Raider backs in the fight for the ball. The ball bounced off his shoulder, but he
managed to hold on to the leather as he fell to earth on the nineteen. Again Gibson faded, this
time hitting Jackie Haywood as he raced through the secondary for the second, and game-clinch-
ing, touchdown. The extra point was blocked, but it didn't matter, and Cristobal High came out
on the long end of the score, 13-7.

The "B" Leaguers again did what is getting to be a regular habit, beating Balboa. The
score was only 7-0, but the plucky eleven outplayed the heavier Balboa aggregation most of the
game on a rain-soaked Strode Field.

The lone T.D. came in the third quarter, when George Egolf connected with Lanky Flores
in the end zone for a touchdown. Egolf then place-kicked the extra point to give both the "A"
and "B" teams a clean slate in the grid battles with Balboa High.



Softb




After blowing Balboa High School right out of their own ball park, 20-0,
the Cristobal High School Tigers just managed to squeeze by the Junior College,'
3-2; but. never-the-less, they captured the Isthmian Interscholastic softball
championship under the able direction of Coach Luke Palumbo.

,, if,'' H^'^r'H ? ^'' ^'^u"' ui ^- '^^'"'''- '""^ J'^'^ Haywood, and with Big Jim Fernandez or.
tne mound, the L.H.b. ten was unbeatable.

The Balboa game is indescribable, as the Cristobal runners dented the plate time and again, until
they fairly drove ,1 into the earth, but the College game was a thriller. With the score tied at two al and
one out in the last half of the seventh. Noel Gibson lashed a solid single to center for Cristobal. The next
batter. Gay Thomas knocked one off the second baseman's glove, which rolled to the outfield. The short-
fieJder, Robinson, hobbled the ball and Gibson made the turn at third. Robinson then threw the ball home
tor no apparent reason, and when the sphere took a bad bounce over the catcher's head. Gibson crossed
the plate with the winning marker.

m. J-^^ 7" 'r'?"*" ^^'^Lt^''\^t^ '^' ^^'^^ "^" Leaguers. Apparently the Pacific siders were still
smarting from last years 19-0 football score debacle and refused to even pick up a bat. Here's hoping that
the Balboa A Leaguers who also lost by "three touchdowns" this year, don't follow their example next year



Baseb



aseDaii

on th?'RhmIis"'^^ School's hard-hitting baseball team continued to reign as one of the classiest nines

Boasting several Atlantic Twilight League Stars in the line-up. the roster was packed with power from
stem to stern. The steady Buckeye Swearingen was behind the plate. G. G. Thomas on first, Gibby Gibson.
Lou Hooper on third, and the speedy McPheters at short. The outer garden was well taken care of by Al
Maale in left, Jackie Haywood ,n center, and little Smiley Cadava in right. Billy Pretto. on the mound,
more than handled the pitching chores.

The "B" League nine also was one of the strongest squads ever put forth by the smaller lads. Stars of
the nine were: Jerry Stringer Jack Pescod. Lanky Flores. Buddy Thomas. Bob Gibson, Larry Horine, Sonny
lemphn. Tom Dorgan, Pinky Pincus, George Egolf, and Freddy Templin.




Basketb



a



Cristobal's 1946 basketball edition which battled the Balboa Red Raiders
and the Junior College was an all-veteran court five.

The Tigers' two classy forwards. Gay Thomas and Gustavo Rosania were
back at the forward posts. Noel Gibson returned at center, and star guard Jack
Haywood was still in the back court, along with Al Maale and McPheters.
Ready to step in on a moment's notice should the regulars weaken were Lou
Hooper, Buck Swearingen. Jim Fernandez, and Dick Chambers. With this array of talent to call on the
squad was literally unbeatable. '

The "B" Leaguers, edged out by Balboa last year for their only loss, were back at full strength this year
and primed for revenge. Those expected to vie for the starting roles were Jack Pescod. George Egolf. Lanky
Hores, Jerry Stringer, Bobby Gibson, and Pedro Nieves.



X.



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GIRLS' SPORTS



^



I





MISS STIASNY



This year, girls' sports were highly successful, not only because of the large number of
victories over Balboa, and the Junior College, but because of the large percentage of girls who
participated in each sport.

These sports are planned for all girls and nothing is more gratifying to a coach than to see
a good percentage of the girls come out. The larger the group, the better chance there is of de-
veloping a good all-star team. This was proved over and over again when the C.H.S. All-Stars
won all but one of their games.

The "A" league record is exceptional: the girls have won all their games. The record for the
"B" league is very good also: they have won all but one game.

Despite these good records, the other big thing the girls were striving for was good sports-
manship. It means just as much or more to a girl to be known as a "square dealer" as to be known
as a good "athlete." To know how to play a game fairly, with endurance and teamwork is what
the girls learned from volleyball, basketball, Softball, tennis, swimming, and archery.




"A" League Volleyball

The '"A" league All-Star girls
started their most successful year when
the)' chalked up two victories. Both
Balboa High and the Junior College,
howed down to a strong C.H.S. team.
The All-Stars won two out of three
games against Balboa High and two
out of three games against the Junior
College. The teamwork and coopera-
tion among our girls was superior and
played a great part in their winning
so many of their games.



VOLLEYBALL



"B" League Volleyball

The "B" league All-Stars con-
tinued Cristobal's victories by out-play-
ing and out-scoring the Balboa girls
in two hotly contested games. Their
smooth passing and coordination plus
their fast serving were the decisive
factors in their victory over their
opponents.




"A" League Basketball

This year, Cristobal High School
turned out the best "A" league basket-
ball team that they have had in many
years. Practices were long and hard,
but the reward was received when the
team defeated both Balboa and the
Junior College. Due thanks should be
given to Miss Agnes Stiasny for her
patience and guidance in this and all
other sports that she has taught the girls
while she has been here, at C.H.S.




BASKETBALL




"B" League Basketball

The "B" league's luck was turned
when the All-Star Basketball team was
defeated by Balboa. Our team had
very good support; forwards and
guards worked together smoothly, only
to be defeated by a superior Balboa
team.




Girls' Varsity Club



The Girls' Varsity Club is an athletic organization, the purpose of which is to promote a
greater interest in girls' sports and to teach good sportsmanship.

Invitations to enter the cluh are extended to those girls who make two of the All-Star teams
each year, or who are among the ten highest in the point system.

The initiation is usually preceded by a banquet at the Hotel Washington and followed by a
swimming party at the Bolivar U.S.O. Club.






t^^f^"




This year's members of the Varsity Club were Thelma Pucci,
President; Barbara Lawson, Vice-President; Carolyn Magner,
Secretary; Jeannie Kuller, Treasurer; Carolina Bringas, Lois
Householder, Betty Kuhrt, Marjorie Styles, Marilyn Metzger,
Norma Nail, Eleanor "Kuller, Ardith Boyle, Nancy Gilder, Lee
Brown, Barbara Brown, Bobby Williams, Eleanor Williams, Helen
Culpepper, Harriet Keenan, Patsy Leach, Peggy Mcllvaine, Jacque-
line Carlin, Thelma Thomas, and Arline Lincoln.

The new members just entering this year were: Lila Hill,
Mary Aleguas, Phylis Fisher, Ann Newhard, Barbara Fritz, Vilma
Bejarano. Merle Simons, and Jackie Whitlock.



4>



MISS STIASNY



Seniors Victorious
in Swimming Meet



Piling up a coiiinianding 15 point lead over
their nearest rival, the sophomores, the senior
class swimming team splashed to victory with
four firsts, three seconds and three thirds, in
the annual inter-class swim meet held at the
Washington Hotel Pool recently.

Final tallies gave the seniors 32 points, the
sophomores 17; a one point edge over the
juniors who finished third with 16 markers.
The non-acquatic freshmen finished a poor
last with a grand total of one.

The meet, which got underway at 1 :45,
began with the seniors immediately piling up
six points in the sixty yard free style event as
Fred Hill raced to victory in 32.2 seconds.
Ken Lowe, also a senior, finished second, and
Tom Gregg of the junior class swam in third
place.

Lee Brown captured the girls' 60 yard free
style in the fast time of 48.8 seconds. Eleanor
Williams, senior, finished a close second in a
thrilling finish. It was in this race that the
freshmen picked up their lone marker as Lila
Hill grabbed a third.

Bartley Wolfenstein, junior, Dick Scheid-
egg, junior, and Fred Hill, senior, finished
one two three in the boys' back stroke in
49 seconds flat. In the same event for the girls,
Nancy Gilder and Marilyn Metzger finished
one two, with sophomore Bobby Williams
splashing in third place. Soph Charlie Harri-
son, in excellent form, captured the breast
stroke event, followed closely by Jack Taylor
and Kenny Lowe. The time for the dash was
49.4 seconds. Marilyn Metzger put a good



deal of water between herself and Kera Laney
in the girls' breast stroke to win handily.

In the boys' relay the junior class team
composed of Tom Gregg, Dick Scheidegg,
Bart Wolfenstein, and Geraldo Cadava scored
an easy win over the seniors, led by Frank
Heite, Ken Lowe, Fred Hill and Gus Rosania.

The senior girls' relay team of Nancy
Gilder, Eleanor Williams, Marilyn Metzger,
and Thelma Pucci won a forfeit victory.

Results of the Meet:

60-yard Free Style Boys; Time 32.2
First Fred Hill, Senior; Second Tom Gregg,
Junior; Third Alfred Maale, Senior.

60-yard Back Stroke Boys; Time 49.
First Bart Wolfenstein, Sophomore; Second
Dick Scheidegg, Junior; Third Fred Hill,
Senior.

60-yard Back Stroke Girls; Time 53.8
First Nancy Gilder, Senior; Second Marilyn
Metzger, Senior; Third Bobby Williams,
Sophomore.

60-yard Breast Stroke Boys; Time 49.4
First Charlie Harrison, Sophomore; Second
Jack Taylor, Sophomore; Third Ken Lowe,

Senior.

60-yard Breast Stroke Girls; Time 54.9
First Marilyn Metzger, Senior; Second Kera
Laney, Sophomore.

Boys' Relay; Time 2:46.6 First Juniors,
( Tom Gregg, Dick Scheidegg, Bart Wolfen-
stein, Geraldo Cadava); Second Seniors,
(Frank Heite. Ken Lowe, Fred Hill. Gus
Rosania )

Girls' Relay; won by forefeit Seniors
(Nancy Gilder, Eleanor Williams, Marilyn
Metzgei-, Thelma Purci. )



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Boys' Class Wi



The following Senior boys, being of unsound mind and in the full loss of their facilities,
do bestow and bequeath the following objects to their unlucky successors, the Juniors.

EDDIE PIPKIN his success at heart smashing to "Buckeye" (Dick) Swearingen, so he will

have a greater success with the fairer sex.
GUS ROSANIA his rug-cutting to Richard Nitto and Oscar Flores.
KENNETH LOWE his ability to win at cards to Kenneth Sether.
HILTON McPHETERS his "good looks" to anyone who doesn't use a mirror.
ROBERT COULTARD all his old lines of flattery to Herbert Bigham.
FRANK HEITE his grease paint and footlights to Arline Lincoln.
FREDDY HILL his girl (Peggy Mcllvaine) in the gentle care of the C.H.S. boys.
NORMAN SLADE his musical talent to Robert Knoop.

GERALD STROOP his various techniques and talents to anyone who needs them.
NOEL GIBSON the ups and downs of his school career to his brother, Robert Gibson.
WILLIAM PRETTO his pitching ability to Jackie Pescod.
GAY THOMAS his ability to play the cornet to Dorn Thomas.

CHARLES THOMAS some of his extra pounds to any lanky Junior, especially Sammy
Blackburn.

ALFRED MAALE his ability to go steady to Tommy Dorgan.

ROBERT ROSANIA his title of the "Best Dancer" to the Junior who thinks he is good enough.

STEPHEN GRACIE his ability to catch the Old Cristobal school bus to Jimmy Roe.

BOBBY SNELLINGS would will English 12 to someone, but doesn't know anyone who wants it.

KENNETH CAMPBELL will will to any Junior his book entitled, "How to Avoid the Snares
of Going Steady."

BUD NALL would will his good looks, but he hasn't found anyone who needs them.




Girls' Class Will



The gills of Cristobal High School, being of a flighty mind and unsound reason, do here
bequeath the following things to the benighted underclassmen. If any person whosoever wishes
to claim these inheritances, he must do so quickly, or the woman's prerogative may be exercised
and the inheritances changed.

CAROLINA BRINGAS her twenty-nine word a minute in typing to Elsie Kennedy.
THELMA THOMAS her shorthand patience to her successors.
BETTY KUHRT her Bajan accent to Jean McNair.
ARDITH BOYLE her perfect attendance record for four years to any underclassman who can

do as well.
BARBARA LAWSON her sailing ability to Mr. Evancoe.
MARILYN METZGER the secret of her red hair to Harriet Hanna.
THELMA PUCCI her ability to get to school on time every morning to Alice Benthall.
BARBARA MILLARD her press card to any one who is hunting for a story.
JANET FOWLER all her Service Men friends to her successor, Andree Whitlock.
ELEANOR WILLIAMS her tennis racket to Vilma Bejarano.
DOROTHY GREY the Honor Society to any future prospects.
JEANNIE KULLER the presidency of the S.A. to George Schulte and fiuth Muckle. (Those

Juniors are too frail for one to carry the load. )
CONNIE MILLER her beauty to all the Junior Girls.
LOIS HOUSEHOLDER all her journalistic endeavors to Harriet Keenan.
CAROLYN MAGNER her lovely voice to Judy Havas.
LUCILLE HAMILTON all her "A's" from Miss Patterson to Patsy Benny.
ADDA LYNN NALL the art of bagging a man to any person in need.
SHIRLEY BEASLEY school life in general to any Freshman who can stand the strain.
NANCY GILDER to any Junior the art of getting by.
MARIE ARICK her experience at job getting to any ambitious class-mate.
DOROTHY ENGLER her well proportioned features to Norma Nail.
ROSITA CZERNIK the halls and laurels of C.H.S. to future generations.
DORIT BERGER her graceful typing technique to Jean Boles.




The Staff



The Caribbean staff of the Journalism department has presented you with its best efforts in this copy of
the year book. It has been produced with the sweat and tears, if not the blood, of all its members.

Because the school schedule was arranged so as to allow only two periods per day for writing both the
paper and the year book, the members of the Journalism classes have worked two hundred hours'^over-time
to produce the Trade Wind and Caribbean.

To add to their troubles as writers, the same group had to raise the funds to pay for publishing their
efforts because there was no faculty member available to act as business adviser.

The two small classes took stock of all assets, however, and decided that over-time work and the wear-
ing out of shoe-leather might do the trick, and they put their collective shoulders to the wheel and went to
, work. They carried unfinished articles home, they visited many potential advertisers, they collected bills,
and they used reams of paper and much ink. Things were going along well when January rolled around'

Copious tears were shed at the semester's end when the staff lost five "old-timers" by graduation and
several others by schedule changes. Only three students with previous training in Journalism remained.

Nothing daunted, the classes worked on helped by an infusion of new junior blood and the Caribbean
finally went to press with all dummies, montages and writing done with meticulous care.

If your copy has not reached you as soon as you would have liked, remember the time was always too
short for the job and all work had to make a round-trip to the U.S.A.

We are indebted to the Southern Engraving Company and the St. Petersburg Printing Company, Inc.,
both of St. Petersburg, Florida, for the excellence of the engraving and printing.

The excellent pictures used were taken by Allison's Studio, of Colon.

Anyway, we hope your pleasure in the Caribbean is as great as ours has been in the making of it.

The Staff




COMPLIMENTS OF




THE HERFFJOiS (HIHPili



Manufacturers of



Class Rings : Comiiiencement Invitations
Medals and Trophies



E. A. LEWIS, Representative



Box
2792




Ancon, Canal Zone



Sevenfy-eight



n

Compliments of V ^^vbc,,*^



ALLISON
PHOTO




SERVICE



We have your negative on file if you

wish to have some more copies

or color tints made.




7lh and Bolivar Streets, Colon



Seventy-nine



Serve at your Next Party



s
p

u

R




C

o

L
A



The famous "CANADA DRY'' favorite. It should
be offered to your guests with a sense of pride

CANADA DRY, Inc.



Panama Tel. 594 432 31



Colon Tel. 600 122



Eighty



Congratulations . Class of 46



SMART




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of the Latest Styles



Panama



Colon



Best JFishes to the Class of '46

KODAK, PANAMA, LTD.

FILM SUPPLIES
CAMERAS

PRINTING MATERIALS
FILM COLORED GUIDES
FLASH-GUNS




Arboix Building Colon

No. 98 Central Avenue, Panama



Eighty-one



Go-4ft/pj44ftQHii ol tUe



UNITED FRUIT
COMPANY



Great White Fleet

Returns to serve the Americas



Ojjices

Uiiiled Fruit Building Century Club

Cristobal Panama City

Phone 2121 Phone 523 524



Eighty-two



c c



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JEWELER

Mido" Multifort
v^ruen owiss
Watches

All Guaranteed



45
FRONT ST.




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ALSO FINE JEWELRY




f%



Fotogratia

CHARLES



Victor A. Charles



No. 18 - J Street

Panama




OUR

STUDENT

COUNCIL

of the



STUDENT'S ASSOCIATION

OF CRISTOBAL HIGH

SCHOOL

Wishes

"SUCCESS TO OUR SUCCESSORS"
in the coming year




THE BESTFIT CO.



Manufacturers of



MEN'S and YOUNG MEN'S

CLOTHES



Opposite the Commissary



Colon



Eighty-three




58



COLON




FRONT STREET



BOX 127



Large Selection of
Perfumes

PANAMA HATS ALLIGATOR BAGS
JEWELRY WATCHES



FRONT
STREET




COLON



Come to



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Distributors



COLON MOTORS

Consult Us before Deciding on
Your NEW CAR



Panama




Colon



Eighty-four



JOHN SURANY

Agents for

Remington-Rand, Inc.
W. A. Shaeffer Pen Co.



Magazines, Books, Office and

Photo Supplies, Games,

Novelties, Sporting Goods,

Greeting Cards



Front
Street




Colon




JULIO A. SALAS

DISTRIBUTOR

PHILIPS RADIOS
DECCA RECORDS



3006 Front Street

Phone 537 Box 1104

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MOTTA'S



The LABEL that
Signifies QUALITY



Colon



Eighty-five



Lola Cheeseman

Jljzautu i^lioh.



MERLE NORMAN
COSMETICS



Q








^




Best Wishes to
the Class of '46



^^(77



HOLLYWOOD
BAZAR



Bolivar Avenue Colon



Compliments
of




Sears, Roebuck

and Company



Represented on the Isthmus

by

AGENCIA SEARS

Tivoli Avenue, opposite Ancon Post Office



For that Best Dressed
Look

PARAMOUNT
STORE

llth STREET, COLON




^a








Eighty-six




^^'^w



Congratulations
Class of '46



Purchase at the



BAZAR ESPANOL



PANAMA CITY



PANAMA



FLORIDA SHOE
STORE

for QUALITY plus VARIETY



COLON







4>



The Central Labor Union

and the Parent Body

The A. F. of L.

Wish to reaffirm that their interest and resources are
supporting education, noiv, as always.



Eighty-seven



CARLTON DRUG
STORE



Clean, Modern,
Up-to-date Drugs, Patent
Medicines, Toilet Articles



10 Street and Federieo Bovd Ave.



X)




\\



Phone 25S



Colon




0^

SEZ-



Visit Colon s most popular

and antique store that

sells only Panama Hats.



ALDAO
PANAMA HAT



19



Box 521 Phone 168

Front Street, Colon

Eighty-eight




JUST FOR MOM

Bombay Bazar

Sole Distributors of

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Earrings

Place Card Holders
Center Pieces
Pins



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Compliments of



French Bazar



HUERTEMATTE AND CO.



Central Avenue



Panama





Courtesy of



ALMACENES

5 and 10 cts., S. A.



44 CENTRAL AVE.

Box 962 PHONE 2871

PANAMA



J. MIZRACH



COLON



Jeweler, Watch Maker

and Expert Diamond

Setter

Satisfaction Guaranteed



Front
Street




Phone
345



HOTEL WASHINGTON

Unequalled for Location and Comfort

A hotel in keeping with the dignity, spirit, and comfort of
THE PANAMA CANAL



Golf :: Swimming :: Water Sports
I arpon Fisning



Eighty-nine






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Slighting your friends
because of bad eye-sight
may cause unhappiness.



SCADRONS



10 Tivoli Ave.
Panama



43 Front Si.
Colon




Let us supply you

with the best athletic equipment

available



Cia. Henripuez, S. A.



Box 459



Bolivar 7100
COLON



Phone 10



Compliments
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2}(?




Compliments
of




W. W. GOULD



INSURANCE



Second Floor. Masonic Temple
Phone 3-1456
Box 2098 Cristobal, C. Z.



Ninety



CONGRATULATIONS

AND

BEST WISHES TO THE

CLASS OF '46



Margarita, Florist



Masonic Temple, Colon





Congratulations
Class of '46



DR. VERN PRIER



Masonic Temple




CRISTOBAL
BEAUTY SHOP

French Braiding

Scalp Treatments

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Any Style of Hair- Do
CRISTOBAL CLUBHOUSE



A Gift Suggestion



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from

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Ninety-one




Good Luck to the
Class of '46

PINOCHO



74 CENTRAL AVE.



PANAMA



Phone 102



Box 164



ALMACENES

"UNIDOS"

Y. B. DE Diaz, Prop.

Barber and Beauty Shop
Supplies




Agents for

"WILDROOT"

FRONT STREET. COLON



^a ^ l/icioxia



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Jewelry

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Colon



Cl 1 It

GO TO


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W. KARDONSKI


for the things you need


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TO Men of Good Taste



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Panama



Front Street
Colon



M>^




Clima Ideal, S.A.

Isthmian Weather Control Corp.



COLON




PANAMA



Distributors

INTERNATIONAL
GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY

SOCONY-VACUUM OIL
COMPANY




Congratulations /



TO THE CLASS OF "46



Corte Ingles



PANAMA



Special Attention

Given to

Linen Suits




Phone
226



YOUR VALET



EXCELSIOR



Phone

226



Melendez Ave. between 14 & 15 Streets



DRY CLEANERS



Office 10th Street



Colon Theater Bldg.



Ninetv-three




Compliments
of



Ulony Cby, S. R

GENERAL HARDWARE



We Specialize in Glass for

Windshields, Doors, etc.,

for Any Make of Car



PHnania
Phone 303



Colon
Phone 1193



jjmm

Io)[||^^l



XiXUM^




ovedades /\ntonio

for

YOUR WARDROBE

AND ITS ACCESSORIES



COLON



RAMON

JIMENEZ

Official Walch Inspector P. R. R.

For the Best Service

Call for
HAMILTON WATCHES



Phone
1855




Box
831



COLON




ALMACEN

ELECTRICO

Jose Jaen J. y Cia.. Ltda.

Electrical Appliances

Refrigerators

Hardware



Phone 33



P. O. Box 33



Cole



Ninety-four



NATIONAL

Mattress Factory

*

Melendez Avenue

between 10 and 11 Streets

COLON

*

''Best in Rest"



vv r^




Box 187






CMLnK,
ALL



Phone 412



The Best STORE
for Your PURCHASES

Mueblera Oolon



Distributors of the
Famous WESTINGHOUSE Products

COLON




MADURITO

I. L. MADURO. JR.

Famous Perfumes

Schiaparelli

Anticipation



100 CENTRAL AVE., PANAMA

17 FRONT .STREET, COLON



"Tweed'
Gabilla



Salut
Miracle



CASA FEOLI



lOth Street



No. 6013



Colon

GOLD AND SILVER
JEWELRY



Novelties
Souvenirs
Curiosities




Ninety -five



23

Eastern Bazaar

VERHOMAL AND KHUBEHAND




French Perfume

Linens

Silk Goods

Curios

Best Lingerie



Box 518 Front Street



Colon



Be^t
tfi£. CCaii. of '46

CflRLTOO fiOIR

inth Street. Colon



"Rest in Peace'




i^asdi It astiich



DUTY-FREE-STORE



Sole Agents for

GORHAM STERLING



COME IN AND SEE US



Panama




Colon




JjCt us supply your
medical needs

Sdlazar
Drug Store

Colon



Ninety -six



fiflDio mm

Home of the Famous
RCA Victor Radios,
VicTROLAS, Records



Come in and play the Latest ''Hits"



Bolivar Ave.




Colon




Ipazar Iriab



>ana



W. SERKO, Prop.



Ready-made clothes and

articles for men, women,

and children.

Box 1054 Phone 1154-L

11th Street, Colon



Compliments
of the




drage



G

Atlantico

STUDEBAKER

Cars and Trucks

Parts and Accessories



I5lh St. and Melendez Ave.



Phone 923



Colon



Agents for Panama

Tagaropulos,

S.A.




Colon, R. He P.



Ninety-seven






. CALL .
ANYTIME AT THE

PARIS
BAZAAR



FRONT STREET



COLON




A beautiful jewel is
a lasting remembrance



PANAMA



Don't Worry

An ALLIGATOR BAG,
BELT, or SHOES

IS SURE TO PLEASE

Alligator Store



Front St.




Colon




Compliments
of the



Gold



en



cissor^



CENTRAL AVENUE, PANAMA



Ninety-eight



Box 78



Phone 2257



Bazar X

LADIES HOSIERY
IS OUR SPECIALTY



PANAMA





r w



/^rVf




Doesnt it look Comfortable

See us about your
FURNITURE

MUEBERIA
ACHURRA



PANAMA



Looking for
A GIFT



Visit




The Mm Art and
iiitt Shop



MRS. H. SHAW, Prop.



45 Front Street



Phone 113



Colon



Hermanos Wright
S. A.



Successors of the

CENTRAL AMERICAN

PLl MBING SUPPLY CO.



Congratulations
Class of '46



Box 108

Colon






Ninety-nine




iiiograpks



I^y^idographs





STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093680/00032
 Material Information
Title: Caribbean
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Cristobal High School
Publisher: Yearbook House
Place of Publication: Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date: 1946
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00093680:00032

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
    Dedication
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Seniors
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Juniors
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Academics
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Activities
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Sports
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Advertising
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
    Back Matter
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
    Back Cover
        Page 107
        Page 108
Full Text

















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2010 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries


























1946


LOIS


HOUSEHOLDER


MISS


BESS


LITER


Editor


ponsor










































those


who work to maintain perman


ent peace and freedom


in our


country


dedicate this book.


"The fiercest agonies


have shortest


reign;


and after dreams of


horror, comes again the


welcome morning


with its rays of Peace.


BRYANT






























































































































































xx*



x' xx."


x.'h r















o^i -
'$2
**";* .
S N. t .1


MR. T. F.


HOTZ


Principal







On August 15, 1943, the present head of C.H.S. was called out of a test in aero-


dynamics to receive a cable


announcing his promotion to Principal.


This former


teacher of Math, Physics and Pre-Flight Aeronautics had flown to Northport, Minne-


sota, to perfect his knowledge of flying.


Immediately, he dropped this work, flew


back to the Isthmus and took over the arduous task of running a war-time school at
the crossroads of the world.


Under his guiding hand, the affairs of C.H.S. run


along smoothly.


He has


unselfishly given his all to serve the students and the community.


He and the entire


faculty work hard to realize the aim of the school of training students to take their
place in our changing society, able to become adapted to it socially, personally and
economically.


His success in these


plans


was proved last


year when the school


was rated


superior by the evaluating committee.


* ^'. ^-tjHSla :'^.^nn,




















Before our very versatile counselor acquired his present job, in 1943, he was


a teacher of history.


Now his job is to act as adviser as well as teach mathematics.


His extra-curricular activities are to act as sponsor of the Dramatics Club and of the
C.H.S. Chapter of the National Thespian Society.


Many new improvements have been instituted in his department.


A list is kept


of all graduates of C.H.S. showing their activities after they leave high school.


Another


list is kept of


the reasons


students


withdraw


high school.


The class


standing is kept for all four classes instead of only the senior class.


The idea of


sending forms to the parents showing progress or lack of progress and the possibility


of graduation was adopted.


New students entering C.H.S. can become more easily


acquainted with the school with the aid of a mimeographed handbook about the school.
The progress of each student is charted so that this information can be easily found.


Mr. Beck has unselfishly worked to straighten out


difficulties of students as to


their courses and has helped those who are planning to enter college by supplying in-
formation about various schools.

The seniors are very grateful for his guidance and help during their years in
Cristobal High School.


Counselor
MR. P. L. BECK


"h
B - * -
xfl~fqrSB'^ l W ^- B- r*f


I




4

















































HE FIRST peace time graduating class of Cristobal
some very interesting facts in its history. Its n


School since


World War


II began has


members were born in several different Countries;


they have traveled in many more Countries; they have visited all the States of the Union and many
members of their immediate families have seen service in the war.
The specific facts are as follows-the average age, as of June first, 1946, for the girls, is seven-


teen years and eleven months-for the boys, eighteen


years and two months.


twenty years old and the youngest is sixteen years and six months.


They have


The oldest senior is
attended an average


of three schools from grades one to eight, an average of 1.5 schools during their High School years.


One senior attended seven different grade schools and two seniors attended four different high schools.
They were born in Countries such as Poland, Austria, Columbia, Costa Rica, Panama, and the United


States.


Twenty-seven were born in the United States and fifteen in Panama or the Canal Zone. Fourteen


different States claim members of this Class.


Three members were born in California, Louisiana,


New York, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania each; two each in Illinois, Florida and Missouri, and one


each in Colorado, Georgia, Maryland, Michigan, Texas, Ohio, and Oklahoma.


Their travels have taken


these students to thirty-one different Countries.


Thirty-nine students have visited the


United States

















































in basketball, thirteen for almost three years in softball.


Nine are credited with almost four years


of baseball, eleven with three years in track, and two in tennis. For the girls, sixteen have participated
for three years each in volley ball, fourteen for three years in basketball, twelve for three years in soft-
ball, four for two years in tennis, and five for three years in archery.


The National


Honor


Society


claims nine


plans, eight members; Science Club, twelve;


members.


Quill and Scroll has ten members;


Thes-


La P.A.S., twenty-five; and the Dramatic Club, fifteen.


Other minor Clubs, such as the Varsity, Camera, Model Air Plane, Dolphin, Music, and French have


also claimed their share of active seniors.


One member of the Senior Class has served on the Student


Council for four years; twelve others have seen service in the Coun


One member of the Class has


been an officer of the class for three years; seventeen others have served as Class Officers, thirty-four
have been in the Glee Club, eleven in the Orchestra, and seven in the Band.
The members of the various families represented in the Class have contributed their share to the


Armed Forces; sixteen brothers served in the Navy and two fathers served in the Navy.
claimed one brother, the Army two, and the Army Air Corps one.


The Seabees


ThFI JC ntQ nf 104 ;n n rl!aCn wanlr~roll in cr nlactr,-' lattoinnnt flrna nnvnF- nrnrnac nra 4































SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS


President


............-..G..A.Y.--.....GAY


THOMAS


Vice-President .................... DENIS VENNING


Secretary ...
Treasurer ....


-...CAROLYN MANAGER
. _... NOEL GIBSON


Sponsor
MRS. BETTY MOORE SWEET


. in
.*' -i l '


The senior class
1945. This was their
had changed greatly
been added and many
Perry, a young sailor,
ated with the class.


of 1945-46 first entered the portals of Cristobal High School as such on September 4,
big day, the one they had dreamed about for years and now it had arrived. The class
from the one that had entered the same building in 1942. Many new members had
old ones lost. One of the newest and most unique additions this year was Charles
who, while serving his country, also completed his high school education and gradu-


The first big event of the year was the S.A. elections held in October; Jeannie vs. Gay.
won and took over the throne.


The fair lady


The next highlight of the year was the big football games with Balboa High School and Canal Zone
Junior College. Cristobal High won both of them, and many seniors, such as Gibson, McPheters, Maale,
and the Thomases, were the stars.
In December the senior Christmas Dance was a huge success. The center of the floor was decorated
with a snowman, and a large mural depicting old Saint Nick at his jolliest was drawn on the wall of the
Gym. Many other yule-tide decorations added to the festive scene and Christmas was real and merry in
spite of the tropical temperature.


"Black gold has been struck in the senior class" was the word around the school in Janu
Senior Talent Assembly was held at that time. This event had long been planned for, and many
hidden qualities appeared during its rehearsals. Among its numbers were found the "Harry James
in Gay Thomas; Sinatra, in Bob Coulthard; Horowitz, in Norman Shade; Ginny Simms, in Mar
JWA M -r 4 -J WW.,, i L -w- w*rAl c, ,, -, .. E ,-, _. ,- J- , : ^-- ^ -L-^ ^_ - --- ^ --* w. ,^rhj k -* *t 1t /tITf1*r T M 1*J


lary. The
heretofore
of C.H.S."
ilyn Metz-
f".-. I,l K.n..


i.'









* 4 *.

**-
m
' * "1
,'^


Carolyn Magner


August 20, 1928
Ancon, Canal Zone


Thelma Pucci


February 17, 1!
Colon, R. de P.


Norma Jean Kuller
November 5, 1928
Ancon, Canal Zone


Student Council, Secretary 2. Class
Officer, Secretary 4. Student Repre-
sentative 4. National Honor Society 4.
Quill and Scroll 4. Trade Wind Staff
4. Caribbean Staff 4. La P.A.S. 2, 4.
Cipos 4. Band 1. Orchestra 2. Glee
Club 1, 2, 4. Varsity Club 2, 4. Cheer-
leader 4. Victory Corps 1, 2. Volley-
ball 1, 2, 4. Softball 1, 2, 4. Basket-


ball 1,


Class Officer, President 3. La P.A.S.
2, 3, 4. Cipos 3, 4. Forum Club 3. 4.
Victory Corps 1. 2. Glee Club 1. Vars-
ity Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Secretary-Treas-
urer 3. President 4. Cheerleader 3, 4.


Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4.


All Stars 1. 2,


3, 4. Softball 1, 2, 3, 4.
1, 2. 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2.
Stars 1. 2. 3, 4. Archery 1.


All Stars
3. 4. 4All
2. 3. 4.


4. Archery 1, 2.


S. A. Officer. President 4. Treasurer
2, 3. Class Representative 1. Quill
and Scroll 4. Trade Wind Staff 4.
Caribbean Staff 4. Dramatic Club 1.
Torrid Zone Wizards 1. Dolphins 2.
Operetto 1. Cheer Leader 3. 4. Junior
Senior Banquet Committee. Varsity
Club 2, 3, 3, 4. Vice-President 3. Treas-
urer 4. Victory Corps 1, 2. Glee Club
1, 4. 4Vollevyball 1. 2, 3, 4. All Stars
1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2. 3. 4. All


Stars 1,


2, 3. 4. Softball.


,3,4. All


Stars 1,
All Stars


Archery 1. 2, 3,
. Swimming 1, 2.


Kenneth Roy Lowe


September
Zolfo SDriJ


n


22, 1928
as. Florida


Torrid Zone Wizards 1. Glee Club 1.
Victory Corps 1. Football 1, 3, 4. All
Stars 4. Baseball 1, 3, 4. Softball 1.
3, 4. Basketball 1, 3. 4. Swimming
1. 2. 4. Water Polo 1.


Hilton Robert MePheters
June 17, 1928
Taunton, Massachusetts
Hi-Y Club 4. President 4. Football
1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars 1, 2, 3, 4. Baseball
1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars 1, 2, 3, 4. Basket-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars 1, 2, 3, 4.
Track 1. 2, 3, 4. All Stars 1, 2. 3, 4.















Constance Miller
March 26, 1928
Perry, New York
Glee Club 4.












Robert Warren Snellings
August 29, 1928
Columbia, Missouri
Student Representative 4.
La P.A.S. 2, 3, 4. Glee Club
1, 2, 3, 4. Operetta 1. Vic-
tory Corps 1, 2. Football 3,
4. Softball 2, 3, 4. All Stars
2. Baseball 2, 3, 4. Basket-
ball 3. Track 3.










Dorothy Ann Engler
October 19, 1928
Sharonee, Oklahoma
Student Representative 4.
La P.A.S. 4. Forum Club
4. Thespians 4. Dramatic
Club 3, 4. Secretary 4. Vic-
tory Corps 1, 2. Glee Club
1, 2, 3. Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4.
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.


Eleanor Janet Fowler
August 16, 1928
Benton Harbor, Michigan
National Honor Society 3, 4.
Quill and Scroll 4. Thes-
pians 3, 4. Trade Wind
Staff 4. Caribbean Staff 4.








Carolina Bringas
November 6, 1927
Colon, R. de P.
La P.A.S. 1, 2. Victory
Corps 1, 2. Glee Club 1, 2,
3, 4. Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4.
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. All
Stars 1, 2, 3, 4. Softball 1,
2, 3. Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4.
All Stars 1, 2, 3. Swimming
3.





Marilyn Mary Metzger
March 31, 1928
Panama City, Panama
Thespians 2, 3, 4. La P.A.S.
2, 3, 4. Torrid Zone Wiz-
ards 2, 3, 4. Glee Club 3, 4.
Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Dra-
matic Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Model
Air Plane Club 2. Dolphin
Club 2. Victory Corps 1, 2.
Music Appreciation 2.
Trade Wind Staff 4. Car-
ibbean Staff 4. Aquabelle
2. Orchestra 1, 2. Volley-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4. Softball 1, 2,
3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.
Archery 3. Tennis 4. Swim-
ming 1, 2, 3, 4.


Charles Leo Perry
April 23, 1927
Dayton, Ohio.


Helene P. Marsh
May 10, 1928
Los Angeles, California
La P.A.S. 2, 3, 4. Torrid
Zone Wizards 1, 2. Glee
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Operetta 1.
ViE;rtnr nrnQ 1 9












Pascual Roberto Rosania
June 19, 1926
Colon, R. de P.
Glee Club 2, 3, 4. Orchestra
1, 2, 3, 4. Victory Corps 1,
2. Football 1. 2, 3, 4. Soft-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4. Baseball 1,
2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.


Stephen Gracie, Jr.


September
Somerville,
Football 1, 2,
4. Softball 1,
ball 1, 2, 3, 4.
1, 2.


5, 1927
Massachusetts


All Stars
4. Base-
ry Corps


Barbara Elizabeth Lawson
December 27, 1928
West Palm Beach, Florida
Thespians 3, 4. Vice-Presi-
dent 4. Dramatic Club 3, 4.
Varsity Club 3, 4. Vice-
President 4. Victory Corps
1, 2. Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4.
All Stars 1, 2, 3. Basketball
1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars 1, 2. 3.
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars
1, 2, 3. Swimming 1, 2.


William Albert Pretto
March 16, 1928
Colon, R. de P.
La P.A.S. 1, 2, 3, 4. Forum
Club 3. 4. Dramatic Club
1, 2. Victory Corps 1, 2.
Football 1, 2, 3, 4. All
Stars 2, 3, 4. Baseball 1, 2,
3, 4. Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. All
Stars 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1,
2, 3, 4. Track 1, 2, 3, 4.


* ---J


Mary Constance Leach
April 20, 1928
Lynn, Massachusetts
La P.A.S. 4. Dramatic Club
4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3. Victory
Corps 1, 2. Volleyball 1, 2.
Softball 1, 2. Swimming 1,
2, 3.


N


Kenneth Paul Campbell
November 1, 1927
Morrisville, Pennsylvania
Student Representative 1.
Thespian 4. La P.A.S. 1, 2,
3. Dramatic Club 4. Vic-
tory Corps 1, 2. Junior Sen-
ior Banquet Master of Cere-
monies 3. Football 1, 2, 3, 4.
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. Basket-
ball 1, 2, 3. Baseball 1, 2, 3.









Jacqueline C. Carlin
October 5, 1928
Long Island City, N. Y.
La P.A.S. 3, 4. Trade Wind
Staff 3, 4. Caribbean Staff
4. Glee Club 1. Victory
Corps 1, 2. Volleyball 1, 2,
3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.
Snfthnll 1 . i A Varsity


Betty Ruth Kuhrt


September 21, 1928
Ancon, Canal Zone
La P.A.S. 2, 3, 4. Dramatic
Club 4. Camera Club 4.
Varsity Club 3, 4. Trade
Wind Staff 4. Caribbean
Staff 4. Band 2, 3. Orches-
tra 2, 3. Glee Club 1, 2, 3.
Operetta 1. Victory Corps 1,
2. Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4. Soft-
ball 2, 3, 4. All Stars 2, 3.
Basketball 3, 4. All Stars 3,








Bottom


Anita Kala Berlev


October 6,
New York


Donald Vare Nall


July 18, 1927
San Diego, California


New York


Sraude Wiind Staff 4. Camera
2. Science Club 1.


Club 1.


Pan-American


Dramatic Club 1, 2,
1, 2, 3, 4. Softball 1,
Track 1, 2, 3, 4.


4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Football
Baseball 1, 2. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.


Thelma Marie Thomas


Ardithanne Gertrude Boyle


November 4, 1926
(:olon, R. de P.


Varsity Club
Swimming 1.


Volleyball


Norman Charles Slade
January 2, 1929
Bogalusa, Louisiana


La P.A.S.
Wizards 3.
Senior Bar
tainment C


2,3, 4.
4. Misi
quet Cuo
ommittet


President 4.
it Club 3. Vi
mmittee 4. F,
e 4. P.A.S.F.


3. Softball 1.


Basketball


Cipos 3, 4. To
dcory Corps 1.
ood Committee
3, 4. Band 1.


September 25, 1928
Sayre, Pennsylvania
National Honor Scciety 3,
3, 4. S.A. Cabinet 4. La
President 4. Trade Wind
Torrid Zone Wizards 2, 3,
2, 3, 4. Softball 2, 3, 4.
All Stars 2, 3. Victory Co
Committee Speaker 3. P.A


d Zone
Junior
Enter-


4. President 4. Quill and Scroll
P.A.S. 2, 3, 4. Cipos 3, 4. Co-
Staff 3, 4. Caribbean Staff 3, 4.
4. Varsity Club 3, 4. Volleyball
All Stars 3. Basketball 2, 3, 4.
rps 1, 2. Junior Senior Banquet
.S.F. 3, 4. Music Appreciation 2.


John Thomas Styles
April 23. 1928
Ancon, Canal Zone


La P.A.S.


Football 1,


Marie Theresa Arick
November 19, 1928
Cristobal, C(anal Zone


La P.A
Corp4
Junir


.S. 2, 3, 4. Forum Club 4. Drar
1, 2. Band I. Glee Club 1,
Senior Banquet Committee 3.


: Club 4.
, 4. Op
llcyball


Victory
eretta 1.
1. 2.|


Charles A. Thomas
December 4, 1928
Riverside, California
Student Representative
Band 1, 2. Orchestra 1,
Senior Banquet Commit


Class Officer, Vice-President 1.
3, 4. Victory Corps 1, 2. Junior
,. Boxing 3.

















































Bottomn


Grover Cleveland Collins


August 10, 1927
Dudley, Georgia
Torrid Zone Wizards
1, 2, 3, 4. Track 2, 3.


Lois Lucille Hamilton
November 18. 1928
Colorado


Football 1.
ftball 1, 2, 3,


3. 4. Bask
Swimming


La P.A.S.


Victory Cliub


Volleyball 1.


Gustavo Lucio Rosania


Robert S. Coulthard
June 10, 1928
Panama Hospital, R. de P.


Thespians
Softball 1,
ball 1, 2,
1, 2, 3,


4. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Football 1, 2, 3, 4.
3, 4. All Stars 2. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. Basket-
4. All Stars 2. Track 1, 2, 3, 4. Swimming


January 18, 1928
Colon, R. de P.


Class Officer,
Wind Staff 3,
Junior Senior
All Stars 1, 2.
Baseball 1, 2,
All Stars 1, 2,
Swimming 1, 2,


Vice-President 3. L
4. Caribbean Staff 1
Banquet Committee.
Softball 1, 2, 3, 4.
3, 4. All stars 1, 2.
3, 4. Track 1, 2, 3, 4
4. Water Polo 1. 1


L


P.A.S. 2, 4.
. Victory Corps
Football 1, 2,
All Stars 1, 2,
Basketball 1, 2,
. All Stars 1, 2,
boxing 3.


Nancy Joan Gilder
November 2, 1928
Colon, R. de P.


Class Officer,
Club 1, 2, 3, 4.
ball 1, 2, 3, 4.
Softball 1, 2, 3


Treasurer 2. La P.
Victory Corps 1, 2.
Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4.
. 4.


A.S. 2, 3, 4.
Glee Club 1.
Swimming 1


Varsity
Basket-
,2, 3, 4.


Eleanor Lou Williams


October 24, 1928
Barranco Bermeja, Colombia
S. A. Officer, Treasurer 4. Class Officer, President 2.
Secretary 1, 3. La P.A.S. 1, 2, 3, 4. Dolphins 2, 3. Var-
sity Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars 1, 2,
3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3. All Stars 1, 2, 3. Softball 1, 2, 3.
All Stars 1, 2, 3. Tennis 1, 2. Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4. Vic-
C.* -. '-.











Joan Tweedy
July 7, 1928
Glendale, California


Fred Bathea Hill, Jr.
September 2, 1928
Colon, R. de P.
Student Representative 4. Band 1, 2.
Football 1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars 1, 2, 3. 4.
All Stars 1, 2, 3. 4. Softball 1, 2, 3, 4.
Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4. Track 1, 2, 3, 4.
Corps 1, 2. Basketball 1. 2. 3, 4.


Dorit Berger
February 16, 19-
Vienna, Austria
La P.A.S. 2, 3, 4
Trade Wind Staff
Caribbean Staff 3.
tory Corps 1, 2. Q


. Forum Club 4.
3, 4. Co-Editor 4.
Music Club 3. Vic-
uill and Scroll 3, 4.


Orchestra 1, 2, 3.
Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4.
All Stars 1. 2. 3, 4.
Boxing 1. Victory


Alfred Frank Maale Lois Catharine Householder


October 28, 1926
New Orleans, Louisiana


Football 1.
Basketball
4. Softball
Baseball 1,
Track 1. 2,


3, 4. All Stars 1,
2, 3, 4. All Sta
2, 3. 4. All Stars
3, 4. All Stars
4.


I'o Pictufre
Catherine Virginia Fisher
January 14, 1927
Washington, Pennsylvania


April 4, 1928
York, Pennsylvania


Thespians 3,
President 4.
matic Club
Wizards 2, 3,
President 4.
Business Mai
3. 4. Editor


Varsity Club
1, 2. Operett
Basketball 1
Softball 1, 2,
1,2,3,4. Al
Corps 1, 2.


4. Quill and Scroll 3, 4.
Vice-President 3. Dra-
1, 2, 3, 4. Torrid Zone
4. President 2, 3. Vice-
Trade Wind Staff 3, 4.
nager 4. Caribbean Staff
4. Business Manager 4.
> 1, 2, 3, 4. Glee Club
:a 1. Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4.
, 2, 3, 4. All Stars 1.
3. All Stars 1. Archery
l Stars 1, 2, 3, 4. Victory


Weimner Frank Heite
October 22. 1928
Elkton, Maryland
Thespian 2, 3, 4. President 4. La P.
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Glee Club 3. Victory
1. 2, 3. 4. Best Thespian 1944-45, 1


A.S. 2,
Corps
945-46.


Dramatic
Orchestra
tball 1. 2.


Barbara Mae Millard
November 16, 1929


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Rosita Lynn Czernik
June 2, 1928
Lodz, Poland


National Honor Society 3, 4.
Treasurer 1. Quill and Scroll 3
1. 2, 3, 4. Cipes 3. 4. P.A.S.F
Editor 4. Business Manager 2.
Business Manager 2, 3. Ton
Secretary-Treasurer 2. Glee Cl
1. Victory Corps 1. 2.


Secretary 4. Class Officer,
L, 4. President 4. La P.A.S.
. Trade Wind Staff 2, 3, 4.
3. Caribbean Staff 2, 3, 4.
*id Zone Wizards 2, 3, 4.
ub 1. Softball 1. Volleyball


Gay Thomas
July 3, 1928
Monroe, Louisiana
S.A. Officer. Vice-President 3. Class Officer, President 1,
4. Honor Society 3, 4. La P.A.S. 2, 3, 4. Cipos 3, 4. Vic-
tory Corps 1. 2. Band 1. Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4. Football
1, 3. 4. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. Track
2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4.













I
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Noel Elfa Gibson, Jr.
January 15, 1928
Peoria, Illinois


Class Officer, Treasurer 2, 3, 4. Dra-
matic Club 1, 3. 4. Model Airplane
Club 1, 2. President 2. Band 1. Or-
chestra 2, 3, 4. Glee Club 4. Secre-
tary 4. Trade Wind Staff 4. Carib-
bean Staff 4. Hy-Y Club 4. Junior
Senior Banquet Committee. Victory
Corps 1, 2. Football 1, 2, 3, 4. All
Stars 1, 3, 4. Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. All
Stars 1, 2, 3, 4. Baseball 1, 2. 3. 4. 411
Stars 1, 2, 3, 4. Track 1, 2, 3, 4. Basket-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4. All Stars 1, 2, 3, 4. Swim-
ming 1, 2, 3. All Sports Award 1944-
45, 1945-46.


Adda Lynn Nail
October 14, 1928
San Diego, California


La P.A.S. 2, 3, 4. Dramati
Corps 1, 2. Vollevball] 1,
1, 2, 3, 4. Softball 1, 2, 3,


Dorothy Lee Grey
December 16, 1927
Colon Hospital, Canal Zone
National Honor Society 4. La P.A.S.
2, 3, 4. Cipos 4. Torrid Zone Wizards
3, 4. Operetta 1. Glee Club 1, 2. 3, 4.
Secretary 4. Volleyball 1. Softball 1.


Denis Shannon Venning
April 10, 1928
Giscome. B. C., Canada


Class Officer, Vice-President 4. Na-
tional Honor Society 4. Football 3, 4.
All Stars 4. Baseball 2, 3, 4. Soft-
ball 2, 3, 4. All Stars 2, 3, 4. Track
2, 4. Basketball 3, 4.


No Picture
Gerald D. Stroop
November 30, 1926
Ancon, Canal Zone
Student Representative 1. Glee
Club 1, 2, 3. Dolphin Club 2.


Club 4. Glee Club 1. Victory
3, 4. All Stars 3. Basketball


Eddie Leroy Pipkil
Marrh 16 199R
































JUNIOR CLASS


OFFICERS


President ....-..---..-.......-JEAN McNAIR
Vice-President .....-......-....J...JAMES DORSEY
Secretary ..---........................ BETTY WATTS
Treasurer ............ .. . ....... PETE FOSTER
Sponsor


Miss ADAMARY


ANDERSON


Three down, and one to go!


Three of the most enjoyable, and important


years


of our lives lie behind


The Junior year, in many ways, has been best of


all. Memories we will cherish,


as a class and as


individuals stem from it.


The Junior class which entered Cristobal High


School


last September


was very


different


Freshman class which commenced high school there, in 1943.


Many old members had left.


New faces had


appeared, and kept appearing throughout the


year.


In spite of a changing group


, we


were able to keep up


our standards of achievement as the year shows and we have reason to be proud of the class of


Versatility,


class.


while not a test of excellence, is one test of a good class and the Juniors have had a good


Some starred on the diamond and gridiron, while others excelled in music, art, science, and photo-


graphy.


Five are


Thespians, and are among the most


talented C.H.S.


Thespians, at that.


In addition to


many regular members in La P.A.S., ten Juniors ruled


as Cipos.


To top the list, three received the highest mark


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JAMES ROE


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Cristoba


High


and


How


Grew


SHILE the Canal Zone schools are generally similar to the better type schools of the United States,


there are many ways in which they are unique.


schools is their history.


One of these unique features of the Canal Zone


Nowhere will one probably find a school whose early history was one of such or-


ganization and re-organization, locati


on and re-location as was true of Cristobal High School during con-


struction days and before the permanent organization for the Canal Zone was set up.


Not until the opening


of the school year in October, 1917, when the present elementary school building on Colon Beach was first


occupied after its completion, did a degree of permanence so necessary to progress begin.


From


September 1933 that building was Cristobal High School. Of course there were attached several frame build-


to be used for shop and domestic science courses.


These have since been torn down.


In September 1933


this present fine building was occupied.


Hence the class of 1933 was the first to graduate from it.


For those with a little of the pioneering spirit in them, it may be well to point out a few facts before


October 1917.


The first high school classes were organized in October, 1907 at Cristobal and Culebra-not


a high school, mind you, just high school classes.


at Cristobal.


This


namely October, 1909.


In January, 1909, a two-year high school was set up


was changed to a four-year high school at the opening of school the very next term-


In 1910 the school was transferred to Gatun and in 1912 it was transferred to Ancon.


When the permanent organization of the Canal was


set up in 1914 the school remained at Ancon with a


branch in Cristobal where two years


work was offered.


Plans were immediately made however that resulted


in the first permanent high school on the Atlantic side


in 1917 on Colon Beach.


Just prior to World War II, the school's enrollment had reached 331.
out of the combat zone, the number of students here was greatly reduced.


war needs, and all activities were bent toward helping

An important course, Aeronautics, was inaugura
an effort to make its members ready for wartime jol


When Service


families were sent


Courses were changed to meet the


to win this great conflict.

ted. The Auto-Mechanics class speeded up its work in
3s. Physics placed more emphasis on electricity than


in former years, and Chemistry classes made their own chemicals which were no longer available because


of the war.


Household Arts taught greater economy in the home.


Radio Code


prepared


its students for


further usefulness in that field at a later date.


An airplane club was organized to produce model planes of


all kinds, later turned over to the Army and Navy to be used in teaching pilots and crews to recognize enemy




















Returns


the


Three


R's


ITH the cessation of hostilities last August, C.H.S.
yester-year was resumed by its students. Almost f


returned to normal again, and the school life of
forgotten were the grim war years, with their stacks


of sand bags which for thirty months disfigured the beautiful front entrance of the building; the smudge-
faced girls in cover-alls who were shop students; the gas mask drills; the talk of Link trainers and aero-
nautics; the bandage-makers who worked feverishly in the library after school hours; the local fire-chiefs
and their student fire-fighters; the Physics class which became Electricity: the Morse Code which disturbed
the quiet of the halls.


The tenseness and uncertainty of the past few years was gone.


careers.


Students once again planned college


Others decided upon jobs from which they hoped not to be called away.


Courses were planned accordingly. No longer was Aeronautics taught in the school. Except for regrets
that no more were there trips to France Field where students fondly imagined that they were flying a plane
(for a few minutes), boys and girls tackled Trig with the same enthusiasm formerly given to aeroplanes.

Physics became Physics again, and the college-bound buckled down to learn what it was all about.


This
Learner.


high school offers four courses: College Preparation, General, Commercial, and Apprentice-
Many students from this school are enrolled in large universities and colleges in the States. If


a student doesn't wish to continue his schooling, he may take an Apprentice-Learner course to prepare him-
self for a job with the Panama Canal.

These courses are so well planned and so well arranged that students finishing here may enter the Canal
Zone Junior College, or many universities and colleges in the U.S.A. without an entrance examination, or they
may enter the commercial world on the Zone with a good job, or they may become apprentices or learners


with the Canal Zone.


After four years'


preliminary training with the


Canal, these latter students may join


the ranks of the Canal Zone workers at an excellent rate of pay.


, RATED


AS SUPERIOR


BY EVALUATORS


For the first time in the history of C.H.S. the work of the school has been evaluated by a visiting com-


mittee representing the Middle States Association of Secondary Schools.


The report of that committee is


objective evidence that this school is offering an educational program comparing favorably with that offered
by the better schools of the U.S.A. The final judgement is that Cristobal High School is a superior institution


of learning.


The school is proud of its rating, and especially so because in addition to holding firmly to its



























MISS MOORE
Latin 9, 10
French 9, 10
Spanish 9


FRENCH 9


Lat


Span


French


LATIN 10


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Eng


MISS BROWN


English 10


MR. EVANCOE


English 9


ENGLISH 11


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GLEE CLUB AND DIRECTOR MR. JORSTAD


MUS


The Music Department, directed by Mr. O. E.
Jorstad, is one of the most outstanding in C.H.S.


activities


included


in it


are the


impressive


Christmas festival, the Easter concert, and the de-
lightful Spring Music festival. Performances were


given


by the Glee Club,


this year,


at the Caribe


Theater, the Bolivar U.S.O., and the Naval Hospital.
The Glee Club also sang in many assemblies and


a Fred


Waring program.


Not an


assembly


passed without music by our talented students.




ANNU AL CHRISTMAS FESTIVAL TABLEAU




























CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL ORCHESTRA







DEPART ENT


Mr. Jorstad says that even though his Glee Club
is singing first class songs, this year, they are only
laying a foundation for a better term next year. A
vocal class was started for more technical training
and beginners were given special attention.

Although a large percentage of the C.H.S. pupils
are in this department, we are looking forward to
even larger groups next year since the Army and
Navy families are beginning to return.


GLEE CLUB AND ACCOMPANIST. MARY JANEE


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SALMON


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HISTORY


SC


ENCE


AMERICAN PROBLEMS


MISS ANDERSON


'ory
History


MR. EVANCOE


American


Problems


History


UNITED STATES HISTORY


PHYSICS


I-


MR. MAEDL
Biology


General


Science


.-"'


MR. BRIANS
Chemistry
Physics


GENERAL SCIENCE


U. S. Hist
Modern World


Ancient








COMMERCE


AL


The Commercial section of the school is headed by Miss Helen Patter-
son who teaches shorthand, advanced typing, elementary typing, business
mathematics and English.
Students usually take these courses if they plan to pursue a business


career or attend business college. The shortly
eight seniors. The advanced typing class beg
eight of these graduated mid-term so only


semester.


land class this year included
gan with fifteen students, but
seven remained for the last


Fifty students were enrolled in the elementary typing class.


MISS PATTERSON
Business English
Elementary Typing
Advanced Typing
Shorthand






034


fl-a


BUSINESS ENGLISH


OFF


CE


The countless bulletins, filing jobs, and errands necessary to carry on a successful school office are


the duties that fall into the capable hands of Miss Beverly Ruoff, the school secretary.


She is assisted in


her duties by a group of students who take office pract


for their future business careers.


ice as


a course to supplement text books in preparation


These girls learn to cut stencils, mimeograph, file, type,


and issue books


and equipment to the teachers and students.


The students in office practice, this year, were nine seniors:


Thelma


Thomas, Adda Lynn Nail, Lois


Householder, Dorothy Grey, Carolyn Magner, Constance Miller, Thelma Pucci. and Carolina Bringas
two juniors: Peggy McIlvaine and Arline Lincoln.
This year Mr. Beck was helped with his work as Counselor by ,-HL


another group of embryo-secretaries.
Pescod and Helen Culpepper. In a


They were Hedy Kellman, Jackie
addition to their filing for several


periods a week, they also worked with Mr. Beck to compile a list of
boys and girls from C.H.S. who served in the armed forces.


_ _ _-


















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A rt


MISS WORRELL
Art


ADVANCED ART


ncustr


Arts


MR. GIBSON
Mechanical Drawi
Machine Shop)


MR. ANDERSON
Woodwork


MACHINE SHOP


ELEMENTARY WOOD WORK


"**1










Athletics


An outstanding highlight for many of the high school stu-
dents is their participation in Health Education.
It has been said, "In learning to play together we can better
learn to work together."
The health education program for this year includes a little
of every sport played after school to give the students super-
vised practice in each sport. Exercises are given to strengthen
the muscles, straighten the shoulders, and help the boys to attain
"the built-up look" and aid the girls to lose those extra pounds
they dislike so much.
The aims of sports and health education in school could be
placed under the five following points: (1) Self development
of individuals; (2) Increase the sensitivity controls of the body;
(3) Build the powers and skills of the body; (4) Heighten
interest, attitudes and sportsmanship through sports; (5)
Appreciation and proper care of the body.
And why all this? Basically to provide the leadership and
facilities that will afford an opportunity for the individual or
group to act in situations which are physically wholesome,
mentally stimulating, and socially sound.


MISS STAISNEY
Girls' Gym


MR. PALUMBO
Boys' Gym


MR.
Elementary


BECK
ry Algebra


MISS
Plane
Solid


MR. HOTZ
Trigonometry


BEAVERS
Geometry
Geometry


SECOND PERIOD GYM CLASS


PLANE GEOMETRY


--a- ~-. I t7


Mathemat


ALGEBRA 9


r^a^i


Elementary Algebra
Advanced Algebra


i n jnr.--R


















The


The library of C.H.S.


library


is the most beautiful and most restful room in the building.


It overlooks sparkling Limon Bay, from whioh refreshing breezes gently caress the


weary students.


The large tables are placed so that they take advantage of the best


lighting facilities of the room.


The shelves that line the spacious room contain litera-


ture ranging from fiction to the best reference materials. Magazines and periodicals of
yesterday and today are also on hand, filed according to their date of publication.


Miss Jeanne Brown, our well-trained librarian, deserves much


praise for her


tireless efforts in running the library and helping students find supplementary matter,
besides teaching several classes in Sophomore English.


Miss Brown is assisted by student librarians,
learn the principles of library work. Although n


who give up their study halls to
o scholastic credit is given in this


field, many students wish to participate in this very necessary activity.











Miss Brown's assistants this year are
Marilyn Metzger, Philip Sanders, Merle
Simons, Jimmy Roe, Eddie Mills, Beverly
Reeves, Dorit Archbold, Billy Hill, Terry
Melancon, Beulah Simons, Muriel Jor-
dan, and Kenneth Lowe.
It is their task to check in and check


out books,


materials for class


other
work,


students
check


find
atten-


dance, send out slips for over-due books,
and put back on the shelves books which


come in during the day.


This is a very


efficient group and if they received no
credit elsewhere, their reward is a better
acquaintance with good books.


LIBRARIANS











MISS BROWN AND STUDIOUS PUPILS









Cafeter


Miss Sally McLimans, supervisor of the excellent Cristobal High
School Cafeteria, serves lunches to about three hundred hungry students
every school day.
Reports from students say that the food has been good, wholesome
and reasonably priced.
Miss McLimans is assisted by seven students who take a course in


cafeteria.


These students learn to take care of each individual operation


The student assistants are: Lee Brown, Peggy Wilkes, Harriet Hanna,
Zelma Campbell. Joan Handshaw, Edna Tompkins, and Anna Cottrell







in running a successful cafeteria, ro-


stating duties each week.


Some of the


duties


include


being


cashier,


being


in charge of salads or desserts and
dishing out food.


Miss
cafeteria


Hallie
staff


Beavers


being


assists


a steady
















































































I


I


J



















For the third time in the history of the school, a girl has been


chosen for president of the Student Association.


feated Gay


Jeannie Kuller de-


Thomas after a hotly contested election which showed


the excellent sportsmanship of both of the candidates.


Days before


the election, both parties used posters, signs, and other propaganda
methods such as Jeannie's swimming party and Gay's informal dance
to persuade students to vote for them.


- - -- -


This year the Students'


Association was very successful


in af-


fording a great deal of enjoyment to the school body.


Among the


activities sponsored by this organization
Caribbean, athletic contests, musical pro


dramatic


productions,


picnics,


were:


The Trade


)grams, honor study


dances,


awards


Wind,
hall,
. and


the Junior-Senior Banquet.


Besides these activities, two additional


dances and a school Carnival float were revived for the first time


since Pearl Harbor.


JEAN KULLER


GLADYS SCHULTE


I .. t -.il %. 1 y. ,.- wlmill 161



















Miss Helen Patterson, who became the Student Council Adviser
this year, left her job of school treasurer in the capable hands of


Miss Hallie Beavers.


A large portion of the Council's su


access


be attributed to Miss Patterson's untiring efforts and hard work with
this group.


A president's cabinet


is a special body of students chosen per-


sonally by the President to relieve the many duties of that office.
This small body consists of Arline Lincoln, Director of Budget and


Finance; Gay


Thomas. Director of Citizenship


Activities;


Carolyn


Magner, Director of Public Relations;


Ardith


Boyle. Chairman of


AIRLINE LINCOLN
ELEANOR WILLIAMS


Constitutional Revision Committee.
The Student Council representatives were as follows: Fred Hill,
Robert Snellings, Jean Boles, Oscar Flores, James Roe, Eleanor Kull-
er, Jeanine Hellums, Marjorie Styles, Edward Allgaier, Ann Newhard,
Jacqueline Whitlock.


IIAP




D,4 l fl rr


. Boyke


Williams


S. iwfrkr


SG. ftmos


Ainsco


SchulAe


National


Honor


Socie


A Vennin





* Milled
A. Miller


. Grey


The aim of the National Honor Society is to make good citizenship in high schools
a matter of distinction. Its members must have the outstanding qualities of character,
service, leadership, and scholarship. These qualities developed in school should make
a better citizen of the graduate and he, in turn, will contribute more to his country.
The Caribbean Chapter is only four years old, but already its influence is being
felt. It is hoped that with the passing years this chapter's contribution to the Americas
will be very great.


C. Megnd


VHuack/e


. m












Q u


and


Scro


The International organization of Quill and Scroll, which was launched in 1926 by a group of high school


advisers, is an honor society for the members of the


"Fourth Estate" in high schools all over the world.


The purpose of this group is to raise the standards of high school journalism and to stimulate interest
in journalistic endeavors.
The Cristobal High School Chapter of the National Quill and Scroll was organized in the school last
year with twelve charter members.
New members were added at lovely formal candlelight initiations twice during this school year. The
members of this chapter at present are Rosita Czernik, Dorit Berger, Helene Marsh, Jeannie Kuller, Lois
Householder, Ardith Boyle, Carolyn Magner, Patsy Benny. Harriet Keenan, Barbara Millard, Janet Fowler,


Marilyn Metzger, Jean McNair, Beverlv


Reeves, Ruth Muckle, and Alice Benthall.


4


TN ItlRNAnONAL











SPANISH


The inner circle of La P.A.S. is known


as the Cipos.


This group acts as officers


of the Spanish Club and it is the back-


bone of


social activities


which the club


sponsors.
To become one of this organization a


student


must


a member


P.A.S., he must show


interest in affairs


and prove that he is ready and willing to


give a hand in the work.


He must also be


outstanding in his Spanish class.
Norman Slade was chosen president


of the Cipos for the year


1945-46, and


was presented with a lovely pin by Mrs.
Spencer, who will allow him to keep this


pin if he has


fulfilled the ideals of


that position throughout his term
as president.
This year's Cipos are Ardith
Boyle, Rene Osorio, Gay Thomas,


Alice E
Judy H
Carolyn


lenthall
[avas,


Hedy


Muriel


Magner,


Kellman,
Tatleman,


Dorothy Grey,


Richard de Castro, Patsy Benny,


George Schulte,


Richard Pincus,


Norman


Slade and


Raymond


Kam.
La P.A.S., Honorary Spanish
Club of Cristobal High School was
founded in 1931 by Mrs. Phyllis











CLUB


member
Music


in the


Festival


Spanish


which


Literary


was held


at the


Caribe Theater in honor of Mrs. Jimenez,
the wife of the President of the Republic
of Panama.


The fame


of La


P.A.S.


is steadily


increasing and the club has a fine repu-


tation.


Its sixty-some


members


great deal of pride in their organization
and take a keen interest in carrying out
the club's program.


Phyllis


Spencer,


sponsor


founder of La P.A.S., was presented with
the second annual Inter-American Under-


standing Award,


which is granted to the


improve


relations


between


United States


and the Republic of Panama.


Isthmian resident who has done the most in
fostering understanding between the peoples of


the Americas.


She was chosen because of her


New members are brought into the club
after the end of first and second six weeks'
periods, provided the student has achieved a


or better average in Spanish classes.


splendid organizing of Spanish and


English


clubs, her many years as a Spanish teacher in
Cristobal High School, and her translations of
the works of Latin-American poets.


initiates undergo a vivid initiation to test their
good sportsmanship, a thing which is essential
to membership.
The initiation ceremonies are held in the


high school gymnasium,
the installation officers.


with Cipos to act as
The meaning of the


letters La P.A.S. is revealed to the new mem-
bers when they are taken into the group.









Torrid Zone

Wizards




AThe Torrid Zone Wizards has been a part of Cristobal High School since
I *1942, when this club was founded. The great importance of this organization
lies in the fact that it is affiliated with the Science Clubs of America.
iTo be eligible for membership in this important group one must possess
two very essential qualifications:
MR. MAEDL
1. High scholastic standing
2. An active interest in science
The club benefits the student, in one way, by serving as an opportunity to develop life-long friends
through its activities. Membership in the Wizards provides an incentive for scientific thought and the solving
of perplexities arising from all phases of this vast, explorable field.
Through the untiring efforts and good sound advice of Mr. Maedl, the sponsor of the Torrid Zone
Wizards, this organization has grown until it has achieved a fine degree of success.
The officers upon whose shoulders rests the responsibility of safeguarding and upholding the club's
ideals are: President, Patsy Benny; Vice-President, Lois Householder; Secretary, Edward Corbett, and
Treasurer, Ruth Muckle.
The amount of activity which a club portrays is the characteristic that either makes it or breaks it!
The science club members went on several delightful and interesting excursions during the year. The
first was to Gatun Locks where the members received the rare opportunity of having the intricate machinery
of the locks explained to them. The most interesting part of the excursion was the examination of the control
tower. It contains a miniature of the locks showing the progress of a ship from its entrance into the locks to its
safely conducted exit.
The slaughter house was extremely interesting, because no matter how often we see meat on our tables
we rarely stop to think about what took place before it finally reached us in its present state. The answer to
this practical question was reached, not by plowing through dozens of text books, but by actually seeing
the processes involved.
There are three additional places located here in the Canal Zone that the Wizards in all probability will
have a chance to view.
The first is a trip to San Rita Mountains where the science club has never been as long as it has been
in existence. This is the main reason why Mr. Maedl, after exploring through the mountains proposed it
as an ideal outing for the club.


SSam Blackburn, Phillip Sanders and
Ruth Muckle and Herbert Bigham Eddie Corbett and Pedro Nieves Dick DeCastro








V'
f


Joyce Malcolm and Dorothy Grey Rene Osorio and David Serko






Every science student learns about the principle of buoyancy. This will be
recalled when they go down into a submarine for their excursion in order to
apply the principle of buoyancy.
A trip will be made to Summit Gardens, the most cultivated experimental
gardens on the Isthmus. The Wizards will have an opportunity to see hundreds
of different kinds of plants that are grown in this tropical climate. A lecture
will be given by an official from the United States Department of Agriculture
on this topic.
More than enough has been said about the knowledge that these activities
will give to the club members, but it would be a grave error not to say that the
purpose of these excurisons is to give real pleasure.
The Hurricane is the monthly publication of the Torrid Zone Wizards. Its
editor is Marilyn Metzger who is ably assisted by the club members. The Hur-
ricane was begun this year and has a fine outlook for the future. The majority
of articles deal with the different topics taken up in the General Science, Biology,
Chemistry an'd Physics classes.
There are five aims of this fine organization which each member endeavors
to live up to with the best of his ability.


Barbara Millard and Alice Benthall


Bill McLaughlin


To increase our knowledge of science.
To learn to perfect our skills in science.
To give service in our community and nation.
To understand the importance of science in our lives.
To help carry out the program of science clubs of America.


Phylis Fisher and Marilyn Metzger


Betty Bougan and Patsy Benny


Sofia Papadapolonus


Ardith Boyle and Norman Slade







camera


ub


The Cristobal High School Camera Club, under the super-


vision of Mr.


Carl F. Maedl, has spent many


extra


improving their picture-taking technique, developing,


hours
print-


ing and enlarging.
A new field developed by this group during the school
year was the photographing of microscopic animals through


a microscope.


This proved to be a very interesting pastime.


A member of this club was the official photographer for
the Caribbean, while several other members assisted by taking
shots of school scenes.


The members of the club include:


Jenny
Nancy


Korenbrot,
Donaldson,


Denia


Wong,
. Saul


Frier, Jose Colina,


William Koren-





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TROUPE


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Tt-ES PIAN


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SCHOOL L


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THESPIANS


The National Thespian Society is an honor society for
members of the Dramatic Club who have excelled in such
phases of work as acting, costuming, make-up, stage design-
ing and construction, and student direction.
Troupe 217 of the National Thespian Society was or-
ganized in Cristobal High School in 1928 by a group of
teachers who felt that a greater impetus could be given to


the study


of educational


dramatics


an association


directors, teachers and students actively interested in high


school dramatics.


While the new organization was estab-


lished along the same lines typical


of honor societies in


general, its founders were specific in their demand that it
be an active, progressive, and forward-looking society in its


field.


It was made clear that the honor of membership was


OFFICERS


to be conferred upon High School students not so much for the reason that they met the eligibility require-
ments, but more for what these students promised, under oath, to achieve in dramatics after they became
members.


The two latest Thespian productions this year, were "Snafu" and "Captain Applejack,
were considered above the amateur class by the public.


" both of which


The Thespians feel they owe their successes to their sponsor, Mr. Paul L. Beck, who is a highly trained
specialist in this field, and it was chiefly through his untiring efforts that these two productions were so
successfully managed.


NAT


ONAL








DRAMAT


CLUB


Cristobal


High


School


alms


^'. H^,...- -. i .-. .
m-



irll ;.44


to stimulate


,c..
' M -


an interest in dramatics as a source of lasting
satisfaction and as a preparation for more com-
plete living. Students actively engaged, learn to
develop qualities of cooperation, self-confidence


poise


through


medium


of dramatic


productions.

The Dramatic Club, sponsored by Mr. Paul


Beck


whose


officers


are Jean


Boles,


.' .
**'~.


'- .s. *, ,


i 4
I *
* :: ^j. '


Marjorie Harrington and Reed McIlvaine, is the


from


which


Thespians


are selected.


source


During the


school year this group presented several assemblies and
two of the most outstanding of these included the skits:


"Yes Means No"


and "The Kuntry Skuel."


These skits not only entertained the student body,
but also gave the participants an opportunity to over-
come any stage-fright before they participated in public


productions.


It also helps them along the path to be-


coming Thespians, the goal of every member.


OFFICERS


DRAMATIC CLUB


U-












. Ha


'.^W^. ;


Best All-Round
JEANNIE AND FRED







Best Dressed
THELMA AND HILTON







Most Likely to SuN, red


GAY AND RO-SIT







Fame


of



































JEANNIE AND FRED


Best Looking
JANET AND HILTON























D~



)1














To think of physical education at Cristoba


High School is to speak of the aims and objec-


tives to be taught so as to attain maximum performance during the school years, and in addition,


to provide the


carry-over"


values so necessary for the better life in the future.


Our major aim in this field, then, is to educate the individual


through a


multiplicity


motor activities which, of the greatest import, tends to focus the place of that person in his inter-
relationship in the society, and only of incident brings forth a proficiency in a variety of skills.

Football is the leading sport of this school, the season lasting from the opening of school


through November.


This is followed by softball,


baseball,


track,


basketball.


Swimming,


archery and tennis are minor sports at the present.

The Cristobal High School Tigers completed one of the most successful seasons in recent
years by virtue of three straight triumphs over the Alumni, the Junior College and Balboa High.


After trampling the Alumni 28-0 in the opening prep game,


Tigers


were


just able


squeeze by the Junior College 2-0.


The only score in the game came late in the fourth quarter.


A thirty-yard dash by halfback Hilton McPheters, and two passes carried the ball to the College
five-yard line. Then Captain Gibson faded to pass again, but Standefer, College captain and quar-


terback, intercepted the ball on his


own one-yard line, and he was hit for a safety as he stepped


back into his own end zone.


then the game suddenly exploded in all its fury in the final period.


Gibson pushed Balboa to their own five-yard stripe.


ball out of danger, but Gay


A beautiful kick by Noel


The Pacific siders attempted to punt the


of the ball, blocking the kick. In the ensuing mad scramble for the pigskin, little Ed Pipkin finally


fell on the ball in the Raider end zone for a Cristobal touchdown.


Captain Gibson then sent the


ball end over end through the uprights for the seventh


point.


But Balboa


would


With the ball on the


Tiger thirty-yard line, Lou Dedeaux, Raider passing star, faded to pass.


The Balboa game was a dul


and listlessly played affair for the first three quarters.


Thomas, racing in from his right end position, threw himself in front






































Jack Baldwin, speedy wing back, who had slipped through the secondary, took the ball on the dead


run and raced the remaining yards unmolested for a touchdown.


Dedeaux split the uprights for


the extra point, and the game was all tied up,


On the first play from scrimmage following the Balboa kickoff Gibson faded to pass. Stand-
ing on his own ten, he sighted Hilton McPheters racing down the sidelines, and cocked his arm to


throw.


It was a long, high fifty-yard pass, and McPheters leaped high in the air in an attempt to


outjump two Raider backs in the fight for the ball.


The ball bounced off his shoulder, but he


managed to hold 6n to the leather as he fell to earth on the nineteen.


Again Gibson faded, this


time hitting Jackie Haywood as he raced through the secondary for the second, and game-clinch-


ing, touchdown.


The extra point was blocked, but it didn't matter, and Cristobal High came out


on the long end of the score, 13-7.


The "B" Leaguers again did what is getting to


regular


habit,


beating


Balboa.


score was only 7-0, but the plucky eleven outplayed the heavier Balboa aggregation most of the
game on a rain-soaked Strode Field.











After blowing Balboa High School right out of their own ball park, 20-0,
the Cristobal High School Tigers just managed to squeeze by the Junior College,
3-2; but, never-the-less, they captured the Isthmian Interscholastic softball
championship under the able direction of Coach Luke Palumbo.
Led by such stars as Noel Gibson, G. G. Thomas, and Jack Haywood, and with Big Jim Fernandez on
the mound, the C.H.S. ten was unbeatable.
The Balboa game is indescribable, as the Cristobal runners dented the plate time and again, until
they fairly drove it into the earth, but the College game was a thriller. With the score tied at two all, and
one out in the last half of the seventh, Noel Gibson lashed a solid single to center for Cristobal. The next
batter, Gay Thomas, knocked one off the second baseman's glove, which rolled to the outfield. The short-
fielder, Robinson, bobbled the ball and Gibson made the turn at third. Robinson then threw the ball home
for no apparent reason, and when the sphere took a bad bounce over the catcher's head, Gibson crossed
the plate with the winning marker.
The "B" League boys did not play the Balboa "B" Leaguers. Apparently the Pacific siders were still
smarting from last year's 19-0 football score debacle and refused to even pick up a bat. Here's hoping that
the Balboa "A" Leaguers who also lost by "three touchdowns" this year, don't follow their example next year.




Base all
Cristobal High School's hard-hitting baseball team continued to reign as one of the classiest nines
on the Isthmus.
Boasting several Atlantic Twilight League Stars in the line-up, the roster was packed with power from
stem to stern. The steady Buckeye Swearingen was behind the plate, G. G. Thomas on first, Gibby Gibson,
Lou Hooper on third, and the speedy McPheters at short. The outer garden was well taken care of by Al
Maale in left, Jackie Haywood in center, and little Smiley Cadava in right. Billy Pretto, on the mound,
more than handled the pitching chores.
The "B" League nine also was one of the strongest squads ever put forth by the smaller lads. Stars of
the nine were: Jerry Stringer, Jack Pescod, Lanky Flores, Buddy Thomas, Bob Gibson, Larry Horine, Sonny
Templin, Tom Dorgan, Pinky Pincus, George Egolf, and Freddy Templin.







^ Baskeball

Cristobal's 1946 basketball edition which battled the Balboa Red Raiders
and the Junior College was an all-veteran court five.
The Tigers' two classy forwards, Gay Thomas and Gustavo Rosania were
back at the forward posts. Noel Gibson returned at center, and star guard Jack
Haywood was still in the back court, along with Al Maale and McPheters.
Ready to step in on a moment's notice should the regulars weaken were Lou
S- - w-. -.. .l . P 1 11 1




























































































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MISS STIASNY


This year, girls'


sports were highly successful, not only


because of the large number of


victories over Balboa, and the Junior College, but because of the large percentage of girls who
participated in each sport.

These sports are planned for all girls and nothing is more gratifying to a coach than to see


a good percentage of the girls come out.
veloping a good all-star team. This was


The larger the group, the better chance there is of de-
proved over and over again when the C.H.S. All-Stars


won all but one of their games.


The "A" league record is exceptional: the girls have won all their games.


The record for the


"B" league is very good also: they have won all but one game.

Despite these good records, the other bie thine the eirls were striving for was eood sDorts-


i S.


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"A"


League


Volleyball


The "A"
started their m
they chalked
Balboa High
bowed down t
The All-Stars


league All-Star girls
ost successful year when
up two victories. Both
and the Junior College
o a strong C.H.S. team.
won two out of three


games against Balboa High and two
out of three games against the Junior
College. The teamwork and coopera-
tion among our girls was superior and
played a great part in their winning
so many of their games.


0


League


Volleyball


The "B" league All-Stars con-
tinued Cristobal's victories by out-play-
ing and out-scoring the Balboa girls
in two hotly contested games. Their
smooth passing and coordination plus
their fast serving were the decisive
factors in their victory over their


LLEYBALL


"B"








"A"


League


Basketball


This year, Cristc
turned out the best "
ball team that they i
years. Practices wei
but the reward was ]
team defeated both
Junior College. Due
given to Miss Agne,


)bal High School


eagL


lave had
e long a
received
Balboa
thanks
s Stiasnm


patience and guidance in th


te basket-
in many
mnd hard,
when the
and the
should be
y for her
s and all


other sports that she has taught the girls
while she has been here, at C.H.S.


BAS


KETBALL


League


Basketball


The "B" league's luck was turned
when the All-Star Basketball team was
defeated by Balboa. Our team had
very good support; forwards and
guards worked together smoothly, only
to be defeated by a superior Balboa
team.


A"






























Gi


Varsity


ub


The Girls' Varsity Club is an athletic organization,


the purpose of


which


is to


promote a


greater interest in girls'


sports and to teach good sportsmanship.


Invitations to enter the club are extended to those girls who make two of the All-Star teams
each year, or who are among the ten highest in the point system.

The initiation is usually preceded by a banquet at the Hotel Washington and followed by a


swimming party


at the


Bolivar U.S.O.


Club.


This year's members of the Varsity Club were Thelma Pucci,


President;
Secretary;
Householde:
Norma Nal


Barbara
Jeannie
r, Betty
1, Eleanc


Lawson,
Kuller,
Kuhrt,


Vice-President


Treasurer;
Marjorie


Carolyn


Carolina


Styles,


'Kuller, Ardith Boyle,


Magner,


Bringas,


Marilyn


Metzger,


Nancy Gilder,


Brown, Barbara Brown, Bobby Williams, Eleanor Williams, Helen
Culpepper, Harriet Keenan, Patsy Leach, Peggy McIlvaine, Jacque-
line Carlin, Thelma Thomas, and Arline Lincoln.


'
'* ':. '* *f


The new members


just entering this year were:


Mary Aleguas, Phylis Fisher, Ann Newhard, Barbara Fritz,


Bejarano, Merle Simons, and Jackie


rWI M


t Hill,
Vilma


Whitlock.


Vr,


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Sen


ors


Sw


ctor


mm


ng


ous


Meet


point lead over


their nearest rival, the sophomores, the senior
class swimming team splashed to victory with
four firsts, three seconds and three thirds, in
the annual inter-class swim meet held at the
Washington Hotel Pool recently.


deal of water between herself and Kera Laney
in the girls' breast stroke to win handily.


In the boys'


composed


relay the


Gregg,


junior class team


Dick


Scheidegg,


Bart Wolfenstein, and Geraldo Cadava scored


an easy win


over the


seniors, led by


Frank


Final tallies gave the seniors 32 points, the


Heite, Ken Lowe, Fred Hill and Gus Rosania.


sophomores


a one point


edge


over


senior


girls'


relay


team


Nancy


juniors who finished third


16 markers.


Gilder,


Eleanor


Williams, Marilyn Metzger,


non-acquatic


freshmen


finished


a poor


and Thelma Pucci won a forfeit victory.


last with a grand total of one.


Results of the Meet:


The meet,


which got


underway


at 1:45,


began with the seniors immediately piling up
six points in the sixty yard free style event as


Fred


Hill raced


to victory


in 32.2


seconds.


Ken Lowe, also a senior, finished second, and
Tom Gregg of the junior class swam in third
place.
Lee Brown captured the girls' 60 yard free


60-yard


Style


Boys;


Time 32.2-


First Fred Hill, Senior; Second Tom Gregg,


Junior;


Third Alfred Maale, Senior.


60-yard


First
Dick


Back


Stroke


Wolfenstein,


Scheidegg,


Junior


Boys;


Time 49.-


Sophomore;


Third


Senior.


60-yard Back Stroke Girls;


Second
1 Hill,


First Nancy Gilder, Senior; Second Marilyn


style in the fast time of 48.8 seconds.


Eleanor


Metzger,


Senior;


Third


Bobby


Williams,


Williams, senior, finished a close second in a


thrilling finish.


It was


in this


race that the


freshmen picked up their lone marker as Lila
Hill grabbed a third.


Sophomore.
60-yard Breast Stroke Boys; Time 49.4-


First
Jack


Charlie
Taylor,


Harrison,
Sophomore


Sophomore;
; Third Ke


Second
n Lowe,


Bartley Wolfenstein, junior, Dick Scheid-


junior,


and Fred


senior,


one-two--three in the boys


finished


back stroke in


49 seconds flat. In the same event for the girls,


Nancy Gilder and


one-two,


Marilyn Metzger finished


sophomore


splashing in third place.


Bobby


Williams


Soph Charlie Harri-


Senior.
60-yard Breast Stroke Girls; Time 54.9-
First Marilyn Metzger, Senior; Second Kera
Laney, Sophomore.
Boys' Relay; Time 2:46.6--First Juniors,


stein, I
(Frank


Gregg,
;eraldo
Heite,


Dick Scheidegg,


Cadava)


LowI


Second
e, Fred


t Wolfen-
Seniors,
Hill, Gus


* 1l 1 -


Piling up a commanding 1


Free


Time 53.8-


n *


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Boys


ass


Wil


The following Senior boys, being of unsound mind and in the full loss of their facilities,
do bestow and bequeath the following objects to their unlucky successors, the Juniors.


EDDIE PIPKIN-his success at heart smashin


to "Buckeye"


(Dick)


Swearingen, so he will


have a greater success with the fairer


sex.


GUS ROSANIA-his rug-cutting to Richard Nitto and Oscar Flores.
KENNETH LOWE-his ability to win at cards to Kenneth Sether.


HILTON McPHETERS-his


"'good looks


" to anyone who doesn't use a mirror.


ROBERT COULTARD-all his old lines of flattery to Herbert Bigham.
FRANK HEITE-his grease paint and footlights to Arline Lincoln.


FREDDY HILL-his girl


(Peggy McIlvaine)


in the gentle care of the C.H.S. boys.


NORMAN SLADE-his musical talent to Robert Knoop.
GERALD STROOP-his various techniques and talents to anyone who needs them.
NOEL GIBSON-the ups and downs of his school career to his brother, Robert Gibson.
WILLIAM PRETTO-his pitching ability to Jackie Pescod.


GAY THOMAS-his ability to


play the cornet to Dorn Thomas.


CHARLES


THOMAS-some


extra


pounds


any lanky


Junior, especially


Sammy


Blackburn.


ALFRED MAALE--his ability to go steady to


Tommy Dorgan.


ROBERT ROSANIA-his title of the


"Best Dancer


" to the Junior who thinks he is good enough.


STEPHEN GRACIE--his ability to catch the Old Cristobal school bus to Jimmy Roe.
BOBBY SNELLINGS-would will English 12 to someone, but doesn't know anyone who wants it.


KENNETH CAMPBELL-will will to any


Junior his book entitled,


"How to Avoid the Snares


of Going Steady."
BUD NALL-would will his good looks, but he hasn't found anyone who needs them.


C







ass


WI


The girls of Cristobal High School, being of a flighty m
bequeath the following things to the benighted underclassmen.


ind and unsound reason,


do here


If any person whosoever wishes


to claim these inheritances, he must do so quickly, or the woman's prerogative may be exercised
and the inheritances changed.
CAROLINA BRINGAS-her twenty-nine word a minute in typing to Elsie Kennedy.


THELMA


THOMAS-her shorthand patience to her successors.


BETTY KUHRT-her Bajan accent to Jean McNair.
ARDITH BOYLE-her perfect attendance record for four years to any underclassman who can
do as well.
BARBARA LAWSON-her sailing ability to Mr. Evancoe.
MARILYN METZGER-the secret of her red hair to Harriet Hanna.
THELMA PUCCI-her ability to get to school on time every morning to Alice Benthall.
BARBARA MILLARD-her press card to any one who is hunting for a story.
JANET FOWLER-all her Service Men friends to her successor, Andree Whitlock.
ELEANOR WILLIAMS-her tennis racket to Vilma Bejarano.
DOROTHY GREY-the Honor Society to any future prospects.


JEANNIE KULLER-the presidency of the S.A.


to George Schulte and Jiuth Muckle.


(Those


Juniors are too frail for one to carry the load.)
CONNIE MILLER-her beauty to all the Junior Girls.
LOIS HOUSEHOLDER-all her journalistic endeavors to Harriet Keenan.


CAROLYN MAGNER-her lovely voice to Jud


Havas.


LUCILLE HAMILTON-all her


"A's"


from M


Patterson to Patsy Benny.


ADDA LYNN NALL-the art of bagging a man to any person in need.
SHIRLEY BEASLEY-school life in general to any Freshman who can stand the strain.
NANCY GILDER-to any Junior the art of getting by.
MARIE ARICK-her experience at job getting to any ambitious class-mate.
DOROTHY ENGLER-her well proportioned features to Norma Nail.
ROSITA CZERNIK-the halls and laurels of C.H.S. to future generations.
DORIT BERGER-her graceful typing technique to Jean Boles.


Gi


C








The


Staff


The Caribbean staff of the Journalism department has presented you with its best efforts in this copy of


the year book.


It has been produced with the sweat and tears, if not the blood, of all its members.


Because the school schedule was arranged so as to allow only two periods per day for writing both the
paper and the year book, the members of the Journalism classes have worked two hundred hours over-time
to produce the Trade Wind and Caribbean.
To add to their troubles as writers, the same group had to raise the funds to pay for publishing their
efforts because there was no faculty member available to act as business adviser.
The two small classes took stock of all assets, however, and decided that over-time work and the wear-
ing out of shoe-leather might do the trick, and they put their collective shoulders to the wheel and went to


work.


They carried unfinished articles home, they visited many potential advertisers, they collected


and they used reams of paper and much ink.


Things were going along well when January rolled around.


Copious tears were shed at the semester's end when the staff lost five "old-timers


' by graduation and


several others


by schedule changes.


Only three students with previous training in Journalism remained.


Nothing daunted, the classes worked on helped by an infusion of new junior blood and the Caribbean
finally went to press with all dummies, montages and writing done with meticulous care.
If your copy has not reached you as soon as you would have liked, remember the time was always too
short for the job and all work had to make a round-trip to the U.S.A.
We are indebted to the Southern Engraving Company and the St. Petersburg Printing Company, Inc.,
both of St. Petersburg, Florida, for the excellence of the engraving and printing.


The excellent pictures


used were taken by Allison


's Studio, of Colon.


Anyway, we hope your pleasure in the Caribbean is as great as ours has been in the making of it.

-THE STAFF
















.<



--S









COMPLIMENTS OF


Manufacturers of


Class Rings


Commencement Invitations


Medals and Trophies


E. A. LEWIS, Representative


Ancon, Canal Zone


2792


I


JONES


C(


4PA












Compliments of


have


wish


your


have


negative


some


you


more copies


or color tints


made.


7th and Bolivar Streets, Colon


II









Serve


at


ur


Next


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t I


A,


LA


The famous


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It should


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guests


a sense


A


pride


In


c.


A N


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+6 :.



I


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Congratulations

SMA


High


Class


qualities


46


and Exclusive Models


of the Latest Styles


PANAMA


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Best


Wishes to the Class of '46


KODAK,


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LTD.


FILM SUPPLIES
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PRINTING MATERIALS
FILM COLORED GUIDES
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Phone


Phone 523


-524


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Wishes


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in the coming year


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VICTOR A.


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DISTRIBUTOR


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*

5006 Front Street


Phone


Box 1104


COLON


I


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Best Wishes to
the Class of '46



HOLLYWOOD


BA


AR


*


Compliments ""
ofSears,



e1S oebUCk


Lola Cheeseman






MERLE NORMAN
COSMETICS


company


*
Represented on the Isthmus
by
AGENCIA SEARS
Tivoli Avenue, opposite Ancon Post Office


and


For that Best Dressed
Look


PARAMOUNT

STORE

llth STREET, COLON


*







Purchase at the

FLORIDA SHOE


STORE


for QUALITY


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COLON


The


Central


and


the


Labor


Parent


Body


The


A.


.of


Wish


to reaffirm that their


interest


resources


supporting


education, now,


as always.


Congratulations
Class of '46


BAZAR ESPANOL




PANAMA CITY -:- PANAMA


on


v^h;


I*








CARLTON


DRUG


STORE

4


Clean


, Modern,


Up-to-date Drugs,


icines,


10 Street


Patent


Toilet Artic


and Federico Boyd


Vt
A


Phone


Colon


SUST


FOR MOM


Bombay

Sole Distributo
COALPORT C


Candlesticks
Earrings


Place Card Holders
Center Pieces
Pins

FRONT STREET, COLON


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most popular


ue store
anama


that
Hats.


ALDAO

PANAMA HA


19


Bazar


rs of
HINA


Visit


and antiqi


onlr P


i












Courtesy

ALMAC


EN


and


ES
A.


44 CENTRAL AVE.


Box 962


PHONE 2871


PANAMA


HOTEL


w


ASHINGT


ON


Unequalled for Location and Comfort

A hotel in keeping with the dignity, spirit, and comfort of


THE PANAMA


CANAL


Golf


Swimming


Water


Sports


i. I .


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Compliments
of


Front Street, Colon


I


OVEDADESm


VENTURA











C IpiJSTOBAL


BEAU TY


SHOP


French Braiding
Scalp Treatments
Permanents
Any Style of Hair-Do


CRISTOBAL CLUBHOUSE


CONGRATULATIONS
CLASS OF '46


PRIER


*


Gift Suggestion


CUBAN


from


BAZAR


FRANCIS


COLON


U I


DR.


ANS


VERN















Good Luck to the


Class of '46



P4 CENTRAL NOC


74 CENTRAL AVE. PANAMA


Phone 102


Box 164


ALMACENE


"UN


DOS"


Y. B.


DE DI


PROP.


BARBER AND BEAUTY SHOP


-- Su


PPLIES


W. KARDONSKI
for the things you need


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HABERDASHERS


AND


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TO MEN OF GOOD TASTE


Central Avenue


Panama


Front


Street


Colon


-A..


Congratulations


THE


CLASS


Ingles


PANAMA


Cim
Isthmian




COLON


a


Id ea


Weather Contl


rol Corp.




PANAMA


Distributors

INTERNATIONAL
GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY


Special Attention

Given to

Linen Suits




YOUR

PHONE
226 EXCEL
MELENDEZ AVE. BET

DRY CL


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WEEN 14


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226
& 15 STREETS


LEANER


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orte


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Official Watch Inspector P


FOR THE BEST


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CALL FOR


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1855


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Refrigerators
Hardware


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Melendez Avenue
between 10 and 11 Streets
COLON


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Box 187


Phone 412


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Colon


Distributors of the


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famous


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100 CENTRAL


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17 FRONT STREET,


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Col


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COLON


FEOLI
No. 6013


AND SILVER


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St


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SOUVENIRS


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23


VERHOMAL AND KHUBEHAND



SFrench Perfume
," Linens
Silk Goods
Curios
Best Lingerie


Box 518


FRONT STREET


2Et
ifie t


'i/ia'


Ztas of


10th Street, Colon

*

"Rest in Peace"


Eastern


Bazaar


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Let us supply your
medical needs


Salazar

'run tnre


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HOT L




































































































































































































































































I*










ANYTIME


..CALL..

AT THE


FRONT


STREET


COLON


Compliments
of the



Golden


Sci


O


rs


I


A


-AZAA