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PCANAL
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Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries



http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1944cris



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1944



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One



# #> # Dedication + # <#







Mr T F. HOTZ



Two



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^Y^E/ the members of the publications staff, do dedicate
VAx this, our year book, to Mr. T. F. Hotz, our former
Mathematics and Physics teacher, and now, our Principal,
because he has worked long and faithfully toward those
goals which are the final aims of Cristobal High School
speedy Victory and permanent peace.



KS*-



-vli




Three



Administrator



The schools in the Canal Zone are an important part of the great educational system
of the United States and, in a measure, form a strong link in welding the three Americas
together.

The curricula of the Isthmian schools are much like those of the better systems in the
United States, and the Zone high schools are members of the Middle States Association
of Secondary Schools and Colleges, the accrediting agency which determines standards,
thus making it sure that graduates may enter college.

Their administrators and teachers are highly trained, having been drawn from out-
standing colleges and universities of the United States.

The destinies of the many graded schools, two high schools, and the junior college
are guided by the gentlemen whose pictures are shown on this page. Mr. Ben Williams,
the Superintendent of the Canal Zone Schools, is a graduate of Mercer University and
Columbia University. Mr. Lawrence Johnson, Assistant Superintendent, received his
training at the North Dakota State Teachers College, the University of Washington, and
Stanford University. Mr. Roger Collinge, Assistant to the Superintendent, did his under-
graduate work at Lawrence College, Ripon, Wisconsin, and received his Master's
Degree from the University of Wisconsin.



Mr. Roger Collinge
Ass't to Supt.



Mr. Ben Williams

Supt. of C. Z. Schools



Mr. Lawrence Johnson

Ass't Supt. of Schools




Four




C. H. S.



Cristobal High School is situated on Limon Bay at the end of Washington Drive, a
very pretty, scenic avenue following around Colon Beach. The school is surrounded by
a number of tropical palm trees and flowers which add much to the beauty of the campus.
The building is constructed in the Spanish style of architecture which is very fitting for
the climate and Latin-American atmosphere

Like many other high schools in the United States, C. H. S. has a large cafeteria, a
football and baseball field, playground, gym, and also the regular indoor gymnasium. It
has also a lovely auditorium, seating over 500 people, and well equipped cooking and
sewing rooms for the girls, and well equipped metal and woodworking classroom for
the mechanically inclined boys.

Cristobal High School is one of which the citizens of the Atlantic side should be
justly proud.

Five




The Faculty



ABE ABRAMOWITZ

Boys' Physical Education
Intramural Sports

B. S., Long Island University

M. A., Teacher's College, Columbia University



JOSEPHINE BANICHAR

Girls' Physical Education

B. S., State Teacher's College, Pennsylvania
Further Study in Columbia University





C F. ANDERSON

B. S., Kansas State Teacher's College



HALLIE BEAVERS

Mathematics
Cafeteria Cashier

A. B., Women's College, University of North Carolina

M A., Duke University

Further Study in Columbia University




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PAUL BECK

U. S. History
Sponsor, Thespians
Sponsor, Dramatics
Counselor

Occupational Information
Mathematics

B. A., Findlay College

M. A., University of Michigan

Further Study in Columbia University



The Faculty



RAYBURN L. BRIANS

Physics
Mathematics

B. S., University of Idaho
M. S., University of Idaho





JEANNE E. BROWN

English
Librarian

Stephens College

B. A., University of Missouri

M. A., University of Missouri

Librarian's Certificate, University of Washington



PAUL J. EVANCOE

English

American Problems

Radio

Columbia University

Loomis Radio School, Washington, D. C.

A. B., Lebanon Valley

M. A., Duke University

Further Study in Duke University





BESS M. LITER

English
Journalism

Randolph-Macon Women's College
B. A., West Virginia University
M. A., West Virginia University
Columbia University
Further Study in New York University



NOEL GIBSON

Woodwork
Metal Shop

B. S., Bradley Polytechnical Institute




Seven




The Faculty



CLIFFORD HAUBERG



History
Modern



History



B. A., University of Minnesota
M. A., University of Minnesota
Further Study in University of Minnesota



SOPHIE McLIMANS

Household Arts

B. S., University of Wyoming
University of California





OSWALD E. JORSTAD

Instrumental Music
Vocal Music
Music Appreciation

B. A., Concordia College, Moorhead, Minnesota
B. M., Concordia Conservatory of Music, Fargo,
North Dakota



MARY ELIZABETH MOORE

Languages

A. B., University of West Virginia
M. A., Columbia University
Further Study in University of Mexico





CARL MAEDL

General Science
B. E., State Teacher's College, Moorhead, Minnesota



Eight



The Faculty



LUKE PALUMBO

Physical Education
B. S., State Teacher's College, Maryville, Missouri





HELEN T. PATTERSON

Shorthand

Typing

Business Training

B. S., Moorhead State College
Further study in University of California




PHYLLIS SPENCER

Spanish

B. S., University of Missouri
M. S., Northwestern University



CARLA R. FRENCH

Secretary to Mr. Hotz
Office Practice



Balboa High School

Canal Zone Junior College f^

I



MARY WORRELL



B S., University of Missouri
M. S., Northwestern University





JAURfl






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In September 1943 the three small classes in Journalism faced the most difficult year
for this department in the existence of Cristobal High School. These 16 pupils starting
from scratch, with no previous experience with publications were confronted with the
publishing of a newspaper and an annual, and no funds except for a gift from the Student
Association for the "Caribbean." Not only were they expected to produce the paper
and year-book, using a conjurer's magic to bring in the necessary money, but they had to
further the war effort by giving the various agencies around school due publicity and
advertising.

These students approached their great task with enthusiasm and courage, and they
feel that their efforts have been crowned with success.

Under the guidance of Mr. C. F. Anderson, business sponsor, Rosita Czemick, the
business manager, has done excellently from a financial point of view, selling over a
thousand dollars' worth of advertisements. Fifty percent of the cost of the year book will
be paid from these funds. The "Trade Wind." has paid for itself with a small surplus left
over.







w '



J



Ten



(\Lisn




At the end of the first semester, the Journalism staff lost three valuable members,
Esther Trew, Margaret Williams, and Donald Hoffman. Susie Fahnestock, Joan Ellis, Lois
Stapf, and Jean Welton made up this loss when they were added to the staff at the begin-
ning of the second semester.

The staff has worked whole-heartedly to help win the war, trying to show that their
pens may not be mightier than swords, but pretty good at that.

The staff is composed of the following: Mr. C. F. Anderson, Business Sponsor, Miss
Bess Liter, Sponsor and Teacher of Journalism, Shirley McConnell, Editor-in-Chief, Janet
Dagnall, Peggy Belden, and Mickie McCoy, Associate Editors. Make-up Editor, Mar-
garet Davis. Rosita Czernick, Business Manager. Jean Welton, Oscar Bilyeu, Susie Fahne-
stock, Robert Turner, Elaine Sullivan, Majorie Lindstrom, John Hall, Joan Ellis, Charlene
Heliums, Ethel Coulter, Lois Stapf, and Patrick Gormely, Reporters. The staff photographers
are Garven Moumblow and Howarth Rowe.







Eleven



s

T

U
D
E

N

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C
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The election of the Student Council was marked this year by a very serious campaign
for the presidency, as three leading students of C. H. S. "hawked their wares" and laid
bare the skeletons of the others' closets. Ed Aanstoos emerged victorious and took office
as the eleventh president of this organization.

The Student Association is governed by Parliamentary Procedure, a thing which
enables the student body to practice Democracy in preparation for the good citizenship
in later life. The Student Council is the governing body of this organization which regu-
lates the school activities and strives to better the school through its great influence.

This democratic agency is composed of two representatives of each class, a president,
a vice-president, a secretary, and a treasurer. Candidates for the last four offices are
nominated the preceding year by the officers of the eighth grade, the Student Council
members, and the Faculty Advisors, and are elected by the popular vote of the student
body, in October of the following school year.

In spite of the decreased population of C. H. S., the lack of funds, and the greater
expenses, the Student Association maintained its usual activities, such as: sponsor of the
Victory Corps, "Trade Wind," the "Caribbean," athletic events, musical programs, dra-
matic productions, class picnics and dances, sports and music awards, and the Junior-
Senior Banquet.



Twelve




Much of the success of the activities of the Student
Association is because of the efficient guidance of the Sponsor,
Mr. Clifford Hauberg. Giving much of his spare time, he was
able to help the Student Council carry out its difficult and heavy
schedule.



r

H
E



A cabinet of five members was formed this year as a catalistic agency in facilitating
the workings of the executive council. These members were chosen by the president from
a group of active and outstanding pupils of the student body and approved by the Student
Council and the faculty advisors.

These electees are the executive heads of the departments, and collectively as a
group they aid the President in departmental affairs.

Those composing the President's Cabinet are: William Fisher, Chairman of Budget and
Finance,- Elaine Sullivan, Coordinator of Activities,- Irma Patchett, Chairman of Public
Relations,- Ada Lee Sullivan, Chairman of the Department of Laws and Justice,- and Shir-
ley McConnell, Chairman of the Bureau of Standards and Scholarship.




c

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Thirte




v$



Seniors



Fourteen




Fifteen




FRED WHIPPLE President

JIM GILDER Vice President

PEGGY BELDEN Secretary

BOB KEENAN .... Representative
IRMA PATCHETT Representative
MICKIE McCOY Treasurer

Senior Class Officers





Sixteen



1 944



EDWARD AANSTOOS



General



Colon, Republic of Panama



Student Association President 4; Soccer 1, Swimming 1, 2 3,- Water Polo
1,2; Orchestra 1; Glee Club 1 ,- Baseball 4; Softball 4; Victory Corps 3, 4;
Dramatic Club 2, 3; Junior President, La P. A. S. 3, Thespian President 4,
Football 3, 4; Basketball 3.

"His talk was like a stream which runs with
rapid change from rock to roses.''




MARGARET BELDEN



-ommercial



Colon, Republic of Panama



Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 3, Varsity 3, 4; Dramatics 1, 2 ; Journal-
ism 4, Victory Corps 3, 4; Senior Class Secretary 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3.

"Hang sorrow! Care will kill a cat, and therefore let's be merry."



GEORGE BARBER

Allentown, Pennsylvania

Sports 1, 2, 3, 4, Music 1, 2, 3 ; Victory Corps 3, 4.
"I did not come to learn; I came to laugh'



General



VEDAS BARKER Commercial

Tampa, Florida

Basketball 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, Victory Corps 3, 4.
"Silence gives the proper grace to women



Seventeen





ANNA MARIE CHASE



C.H.S.



Colon, Republic of Panama



Commercial



Varsity Club; La P. A. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Class Representative 1 ,
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Victory Corps 3, 4.



'She was our queen, our rose, our star



OSCAR BILYEU



Academic



Panama, Republic of Panama



Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4, Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3,
4 ; Thespians 2, 3, 4; La P. A. S. 4,- Biology Club 2,- Student Council 1, 2, 3;
Journalism 4; Glee Club 1 2; Band 1 2, 3,. 4; Orchestra 1 2, 3, 4; Victory
Corps 4,- Dramatics 1 2, 3, 4; Class Representative 1 President of Sopho-
more Class 2; Junior Class Representative.



MARY MARGARET DAVIS



Commercial



Amory, Mississippi

Basketball 2, 3, Volleyball 2, 4, Journalism 3, 4; Glee Club 2, 3, Victory
Corps 3, 4, Tennis 2; Archery 3.

"She is pretty to walk with, and witty to talk with, and
pleasant, too, to think on'



JAMES GILDER



Academic




Colon, Republic of Panama

Football 1, 3; "A" League Manager 4, La P. A. S. 2, 3, Class Office 4
Victory Corps 3, 4; Dramatics 2, 4.

"Happy am I and from care I am free!"



Eighteen



1944



THOMAS HARRISON General

Ancon, Canal Zone

Water Pole 3, Softball 3, Basketball 3, Victory Corps 3, 4.
'Always there to lend a hand where the situation might demand"



SHIRLEY McCONNELL



Academic



Cristobal, Canal Zone



Honor Society 3, 4; La P. A. S. 4, Dramatics 4, Student Association 4,-
Editor of "Trade Wind," 4, "Caribbean" 4; Victory Corps 3, 4; Librar-
ian 4, Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1 2, 4, Operetta 1, 2, 3, 4;
Inter-American Discussion Club 2, Photo Club 2.

"A great mind hidden in a small being"





PATRICIA KENNEDY

Kemmerer, Wyoming

La P. A. S. 4, Music Appreciation 4, Honor Society 4.
"From her shall read the perfect ways of honor"



Academic



ROBERT KEENAN



Palmyra, New Jersey



Academic



Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4, Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Swimming 2, 3; Water Polo 2, 3,-
Track 2, 3, A, Softball 2, 3, 4, Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 3, 4, Dramatic
Club 2, 3; Thespians 3, 4, Student Representative 4,- Victory Corps 3, 4;
La P. A. S. 2; Junior-Senior Banquet Committee 3.

"A dimple in the chin, a devil within."




Nineteen




C.H.S.



CATHERINE LUTRO

Manhattan, New York

La P. A. S. 2, Victory Corps 3, 4.
"Those who jest with good taste are called witty"



Commercial







EUSEBIO LEE



Academic



Colon, Republic of Panama



Football 4, Basketball 1 ; Orchestra 1, 2; Band 1, 2, 3, Victory Corps 3, 4,
Glee Club 1, 2, 3.

'I am not in the role of common men"



MARJORIE LINDSTROM



General




Volleyball 1, 4 ; Basketball 2, 4; Softball 1, A, Varsity Club 2, A, La P. A.
S. 2; Journalism Staff 4; Glee Club 1, 4, Victory Corps 3, 4.

"And her sunny locks hang on her temples like a golden fleece"




MICKIE McCOY



Academic



Long Beach, California



Volleyball 2, 3, 4, Basketball 2, 3; Softball 1, 2, 3,- Swimming 1, 2, 4,
Tennis 1, 3, 4; Varsity Club 3, 4; Cheer Leader 2, 4, Dramatic Club 3,
Student Representative 3; Class Officer 2, A, Glee Club 1, 2, Band 2, 3;
Operetta 1 ; Journalism 4; Victory Corps 3, 4. _Jk^~

^SHe dances through life with never a care v ^-.

3^



Twenty




JEAN SMITH



1944



New York, New York

Victory Corps 3, 4,- Glee Club 1.



"The beauty of the heavens is the stars,
the beauty of a woman is her hair"




ELAINE SULLIVAN



Academic



Ancon, Canal Zone



Volleyball 1, A, Softball 3, 4, Archery 3, Dramatic Club 2, 4, Thespians
3, 4; La P. A. S. 2, 4, Glee Club 1, 3, Journalism Staff 4, Class Secretary
2, 3, Victory Corps 3, 4,- Band 2, 3.

If there be any kindness I can show,

or any good thing I can do, let me do it now'"



ROBERT SULLIVAN



Academic



Perry, New York



La P. A. S. 1, 2, 3, 4, Student Representative 4, Journalism 3, Orchestra
1,2, 3, 4, Glee Club 1, 2, 3, Victory Corps 3, 4, Librarian 4, Mcdel Air-
plane Club 3.

"He is the mirror of all courtesy"



ADA LEE SULLIVAN



Academic



Denver, Colorado



Dramatics 1, 2, 3, 4,- Thespians 3, 4 ; Representative 2; Vice President 3,
Journalism Staff 3,- Secretary of Freshman Class 1 Sophomore Class Repre-
sentative 2; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, Band 1, 2, 3, Victory Corps 3, 4.

"Three things I could do without freckles, curiosity, and doubt"





Twenty one




YOLANDA REVESZ



CHS.



David, Panama



Volleyball 1; Biology Club 2; Victory Corps 3, 4, La P. A. S. Club .4.



Her loveliness I never knew until she smiles at me'



Academic



~



ROBERT TURNER



Academic



Bell, California



Football 2, 3, 4, Softball 2, 3, 4, Basketball 3, 4, Baseball 4; Track 4;
Victory Corps 3.

"I'll be merry and free
I'll be sad for nae body"



GRACE THOMAS



Commercial



Colon, Republic of Panama



Volleyball 1,2, 3, 4,- Softball 1,2, 3, 4, Swimming 1, 2, 3, Basketball 3, 4;

Tennis 3.



T have a heart with room for every |oy




ESTHER TREW



Commercial



East Greenville, Pennsylvania



Hockey 1, 2, 3,- Basketball 1,2, 3, Track 1 ; Glee Club 2, 3; Ping-Pong 1,
2, Volleyball 1, 2 ; Shuffle Board 1, 2,- Dancing Club 2 ; Mechanics Club
1; Varsity Club 1, 2 ; Victory Corps 4.



A peppy little piece of humanity''



Twenty two



JEAN WELTON



1944



Hayti, Missouri



Commercial



Volleyball 1; Basketball 1, Journalism Staff 4, Glee Club 1, 2,
Orchestra 1, Victory Corps 4.



'Her eyes are sapphires set in snov



EDWARD WELCH



Ancon, Canal Zone

Baseball 1; Football 2, 4, Victor/ Corps 3, 4.
"A little bit goes a long way"



Academic



J




MARGARET WILLIAMS



Ancon, Canal Zone



Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4, Softball 1, 2, 3, Basketball 1, 2, 3 ; La P. A. S. 2, 3,
4, Varsity 1, 2, 3, 4, Journalism 4, Music 1, 2; Victory Corps 3, 4, Cheer-
leader 2, 4.

"Golden hair like sunlight streaming"



FRED WHIPPLE



Academic



Medford, Oregon

Football 3, 4 ; Baseball 3, 4; Softball 1, 2, 3, 4, Track 4, Swimming 2, 3, 4,
Basketball 3, 4 ; Senior Class President 4; Music 1, 2, 3; Victory Corps 3, 4.

"Some men are born to be great"



Twenty three




ERMIN WILLETT



C.H.S.



Roberta. Kentucky



Con



Volleyball 1, 2, 3,4, Basketball 1, 2, 3; Softball 1; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4,
La P. A. S. 3, 4; Victory Corps 3, 4; Dramatics 1.

"A maiden's crown of joy is her silken rippling hair"





RAFAEL BRINGAS Academic

Colon, Republic of Panama

"This is the happiest of mortals, for he is above everthing he possesses"



IRMA PATCHETT



General



Ancon, Canal Zone



Volleyball 1, 3, 4, Swimming 1, 2; Swimming Club President 4; Southern
Cross President 1; Softball 1, 3, 4; Tennis 3, Glee Club 1,- Victory Corps 3,
4; Class Representative 4; Varsity Club 3, 4; Model Airplane Club Sec-
retary 4; Dramatic Club 1, 2, 4; Victory Corps 3, 4, Student Association 4.

"Her irrepressible gayety is the cause of her popularity"



FRANCIS CONOVER



Academic



lift



New Orleans, Louisiana



Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Softball 1, 2, 3, 4, Basketball 1, 2,
3, 4, Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 2, 3, 4; La P. A. S. 3, 4, Swimming 2; Victory
Corps 3, 4, Junior Senior Banquet Committee 3,- Water Polo 1.

"Men of few words are the best men"



Twenty four



1944



VICENTE VALLE



Academic



'Wisdom is better than rubies'




JAMES KELLY



Academic



New York, New York



Inter-American Discussion Club 2, 3; Victory Corps 3, 4; Torrid Zone
Wizards 4.

A large head of hair makes the handsome more graceful"



ROGER FORT Academic

Staten Island, New York

Sports 3, 4, La P. A. S. 2, 3,- Glee Club 1, 3, Victory Corps 3, 4.
"God is proud of those who are tall"



RUTH BOZEMAN



Academic



Ancon, Canal Zone



'Youd'd swear when her delicate feet in the dance twinkle
round, that her steps are light and her home is the air.'





'\



V



hti



Twenty five



C.H.S.




CLAUDE CAMPBELL Academic

Mortisville, Pennsylvania

"In all my travels I never mel with any one Scotchman but what was a man of sense'



JANET DAGNALL Academic

Colon, Republic of Panama



3, 4, National
'Trade Wind:"



Tennis 3, 4, Volleyball 2; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, La P. A. S
Honor Society 3, 4; Victor/ Corps 3, 4, Assistant Editor
"Caribbean" Staff 4.

V

"As sweet as English air could make her"



JOHN HALL Vocational

Cartago, Costa Rica

Football 1,2, 3, 4, Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Softball 1, 2, 3, 4, Soccer 1,- Track
1, 2, 3, Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Water Polo 1, 2, Student Council Represen-
tative 1,- Journalism 3, 4; Victory Corps 3, 4.

"Suppress me if you can'

ANITA MARGULIS Academic

Habana, Cuba

Volleyball 2, 3, 4 ; Swimming A, Bowling 4; Archery 4, Glee Club 3, 4 ;
Dramatic Club 2, 3 ; Tennis 2, Victory Corps 3.

"Kind words and few are a woman's ornament"



Twenty six



JACK SCHULTE



1944



St. Louis, Missouri

'Born for success he seemed'



t



CONRAD HORINE



Reading, Pennsylvania



Academic



Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, Baseball 3, 4, Softball 1, 2, 3, 4, Track
2, 3, 4,- Basketball 2, 3, 4, Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4, Dramatic 1; Photo Club
1 2, Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4,- Model Airplane Club 3.

His hair was of good color; an excellent color; your chestnut
was ever the only color.''




Twenty :



Class Will

\Y/E, the Senior Class of 1944, being sound of mind and body, do hereby make the
following bequests:

To the Juniors we leave all our hopes and aspirations, trusting that you will come
nearer to attaining them than we did

We regretfully leave our joys and a few sorrows to the Sophs because we can't
take them with us.

To the Frosh we leave our great wisdom, hoping that it will take you far !

The following Seniors specifically designated certain Juniors as the recipients of
special bequests:

Eddie Welch wishes to hand down his height to Bud Nail.

Bob Turner wills his curly hair to Peggy Baggot.

Robert Sullivan gives his prof-like appearance to Lucien Skeels.

Ada Lee Sullivan leaves her freckles to Joan Ellis.

Eddie Aanstoos wills his crop of corn to Henry Thornton.

Peg Belden bequeaths her graveyard chuckle to Dot Spencer.

Tommy Harrison passes on his muscles to Jackie Reilly.

James Kelley his memories of CHS to Norrine Terry.

Jonet Dagnall passes her "Southern drawl to Sue Fahnestock.

Catherine Lutro gladly gives her shorthand notes to Lois Kridle.

Ermin Willett wills her flashy socks and red-headed temper to Johnny O'Brien.

George Barber passes his coyness on to all the girls of the Junior Class.

Oscar Bilyeu reluctantly leaves his girl friends to Hugh Hale.

Jim Gilder wills Miss Liter to Mildred Gill.

Megs Davis leaves her poise and "poisonality" to all the girls in the Junior Class.

Mickie McCoy bequeaths her successful "Around Hi" column to whoever wants it.

To all other Juniors not specifically designated above, we leave wishes for happiness
and good luck

Twenty eight




k




Twenty nine




Thirty




Thirty one



EL" VIM/

Jl Am. If r



HHI



Sophomores




Thirty two



Freshmen




Thirty three








Mr. Oswald Jorstad



Miss Mary Elizcbeth Moore



Thirty four



The National Honor Society



it



*

*



F



Shirley McCor.nell




HE SECOND anniversary of the
National Honor Society in C.H.S.
was celebrated this spring, when
four new members were initiated
into this organization. This very high
award is granted only twice yearly
to those students who are outstanding
in Scholarship, Leadership, Service,
and Character. Five percent of the
second semester
Juniors and 15 per-
cent of all Seniors
are eligible for
membership.




Patricia Kennedy



The aim of the National Honor
Society is to make good citizenship in
high schools a mattef of distinction. It is
a fellowship based on high ideals and
a sense of civic obligation which has Susie FahnestocK

shown, even in the short time of its
existence, evidence of raising the standards of citizenship
throughout the land.

Of the 2,677 chapters of the National Honor Society,
C. H. S. is very proud to have the only chapter here on
the Canal Zone.

Miss Mary Elizabeth Moore is the sponsor of the
Caribbean Chapter of the National Honor Society. Miss
Moore, Miss Liter, and Mr. Jorstad form the governing board of this chapter.

The members are Janet Dagnall, Shirley McConnell, Patricia Kennedy,
Susie Fahnestock, William Fisher, and Joy Randall.




William Fishe-




Thirty five



Joy Randall




Music has always played an important part in the
development of the cultural life at Cristobal High
School. The many student musical organizations, under
the direction of Mr. O. E. Jorstad, produced several
fine programs thoughout the year.



The High School Orchestra, com-
posed of 26 members, appears many
times during its nine-month season in
concerts, assemblies, and other school
and community functions.





Twice weekly Mr. Jorstad con-
ducts a Music Appreciation Class
for those who seek a fuller compre-
hension of the music masters. About
10 members meet to listen to records,
make notebooks, and make reports
on the various composers and compo-
sitions



Thirty si:



The Mixed Chorus is composed of
over 55 students. Several programs
which have become delightful tra-
ditions are presented each year by
the Glee Club.




3|Mijkl£l




Music for pep assemblies and big
games is furnished by the C. H. S.
Band, which adds life and spirit to
every occasion with its jolly tunes.



The combined efforts of all this department present
to the public their annual Thanksgiving and Easter
Programs, and Operetta, a National Music Week
Concert, and an annual Christmas Pageant.



Thirty seven




WHAT'S IN A NAME?




Thirty eight



CRISTOBAL High School aims to stimulate an interest in dramatics as a source of
lasting satisfaction and as a preparation for more complete living. Students
actively engaged learn to develop qualities of cooperation, self-confidence, and poise
through the medium of dramatic production.

The Dramatic Club and Thespian Group were organized, this year, into a Victory
Players' Club for the purpose of more direct contribution to the war effort.

The production of high school plays has become one of the oustanding student activ-
ities. Throughout this school year several one-act plays were staged by C. H. S. players




Dramatic Club and Thespians 1944

for the student body and faculty. "Sparkin','' the biggest hit, was presented on eight
different U. S. O. trips to the outposts. The big production of the year "Charley's Aunt,"
was termed one of the most successful comedies that the dramatic department has ever
produced.

The aim of every good dramatic club member is to be elected as a member of the
National Thespian Society. Of the several hundred such organizations in the U. S. A.
and possessions, C. H. S. is proud to have one of the troupes in this school.



Thirty nine





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The La Pas Club, sponsored by Mrs. Phyllis Spencer, is a well known organization here, whose
purpose is to promote a greater interest in Spanish and a better relationship between the United
States and the Republic of Panama. Membership in this club is strictly honorary, and it is open only
to those students attaining a 90 or better average in Spanish.



Forty




Library

One of the branches of Cristobal High of which the students are most proud is the
finely-equipped library.

This large, breezy room, facing the blue waters of Limon Bay, is an up-to-date library
containing approximately 5,000 books whose total value is $7,875.

This library, under the supervision of Miss Jeanne Brown, ably assisted by high school
students who receive no scholastic credit for their work, is used on the average, by 2,000
students who come to read and to check out books

The library is run on the Dewey-decimal system, a system which greatly simplifies
the finding of books

In this fine collection of books may be found reference books on any of the subjects
taught in C. H. S., besides a good selection of fiction, magazines, and the latest periodi-
cals.




Forty one



War Activities



The third year of the war found a badly crippled Cristobal High School, suffering
from loss of pupils and loss of teachers, doggedly carrying on the regular curriculum plus
new courses and activities directly related to the great conflict.

A very important course, Aeronautics, began its second year with a group of serious
air-minded boys whose sole vocabulary now consisted of terms unintelligible to the lay-
man. Auto-Mechanics continued the excellent work of last year, and its members worked
long and hard in full realization of what the future might hold for them and the value of
this preparation for war jobs. The Airplane Club's display, this year, was interesting,
and it showed a model of practically every kind of plane now in service. This group of
future spotters'' and fliers were very serious about their work.

Physics placed more emphasis on electricity than in former years. Chemistry classes
made their own chemicals which were no longer available because of the war. The use
of all kinds of gases was stressed and remedies learned for victims who might have the
unfortunate experience of being gassed in war. Household Arts taught greater economy
in buying and serving foods and new war dishes. The Radio Code class worked dili-
gently in sending messages in preparation for the day when they may send out the happy
signal three dots and a dash!



Forty-two




Forty three



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In January 1943, Cristobal High School whole-heartedly joined and supported the
new wartime organization, the Victory Corps. This organization has been the center of
school activity for the past two school years. "The cardinal objective of the Victory Corps
is to impart information which will directly aid those who enter the war service as active
participants." Sponsored by the Student Association under the guidance of Mr. Clifford
Hauberg, the organization has been highly successful.

Any high school student who meets the requirements may be accepted for general
membership in the Victory Corps. As a general member he may join a special division, as
follows:

Air Service Division

Land Service Division

Sea Service Division

Production Service Divison

Community Service Divison

Beside the important pre-induction courses (aeronautics, mechanics, radio, mathemat-
ics, and shop) which give specific training to the youth who plans to enter the service,
the C. H. S. Victory Corps has sponsored activities which have provided worthwhile
war service to the school and community.

Forty four



^ pfSl'^l"!




Typists for Victory aid the school, Civilian Defense, and the U. S. O. A., in volunteer-
ing their services to their community in a very small, but necessary way.

War posters, cartoons, and drawings were gladly contributed by the Art Classes as
they strove to stimulate interest by announcing War Bond Rallies, Red Cross Drives, Civil-
ian Defense projects, and Victory Corps activities.

The Music Department enthusiastically offered its time to the school, community,
and war time organizations for encouraging the war effort.

One-act plays and skits were presented to army and navy personnel by the Victory
Players' Club as their share in "boosting" the morale of the armed forces.

Journalism classes, through publicity and cooperation in the "Trade Wind, helped
in making many war projects and drives a success.

All other departments did their bit through their tireless efforts of promoting the
highest type of citizenship in the school and community.

Approximately 100,000 magazines were collected bv C. H. S. students to distribute
to service men on ships in transit and in the outposts. At Christmas time, over 250 Christ-
mas gifts were given to servicemen to make the holiday season more pleasant for them.

Drives for the collection of scrap iron and nonferrous metals were made.

In addition to these activities the Victory Corps has also sponsored and helped other
worthwhile drives.

Forty five




Pre- Flight



In view of existing wartime conditions and the an-
ticipated expansion of the aviation industry after the
war, last year, the Division of Schools, inaugurated
the first courses for the study of Aeronautics ever
offered for the Senior boys of the Canal Zone. Accord-
ingly, Cristobal High School enrolled a number of beys
in this class with Mr. T. F. Hotz as instructor.

This group spends much time in the classrocm, where
the boys are given a thorough study of the aviation
traffic rules, airplane maintenance and structure, radio
range communication, navigation, aerodynamics, and
meteorology. This preflight course facilitates entrance
of the boys to aviation schools of the Army and Naval
Air Corps.

All over the United States similar courses are being
offered in high schools, but few of them are as fortu-





Forty six



Aeronautics





note as we in having first-hand experience at the Army
and Navy flying fields.

The cooperative instruction of the service personnel
is of vital importance to the success of the class.

Every Tuesday, the Aeronautics Class of C. H. S.
alternatingly makes trips to the Naval Air Station and
France Field where they have the opportunity to listen
to lectures, tour through shops, inspect planes and
their parts, watch parachutes being packed, study
navigation, and are given a chance to maneuver the
Link Trainer. Members of the service give lectures
concerning aviation to the students, and show movies
and other visual aids to augment the study program.

The course of study in preflight aeronautics has been
so planned that a student may receive sufficient knowl-
edge and information to insure a good foundation in
the fundamentals of cviation while still in high school.



Forty seven




Science Classes

All the courses in science are taught in their relation to each other and to human
life. They aim to give the student mastery of the fundamental knowledge in the different
fields and a scientific attitude toward the problems of life.

Biology classes studied plants and animals with more attention given to the local
environment. Also, experiments in nutrition took place during the last semester. Frequent
field trips and excursions to nearby points added interest to the studies of natural and
physical sciences




Particular attention was paid by
the Chemistry class to the relation
of this science to the war effort.
The pre-war outline was followed
as closely as possible, except in
such cases as making their own
chemicals and substituting available
chemicals for others in various ex-
periments



Physics classes placed emphasis on the necessity
of this branch of science in daily life. Electricity was
stressed the second semester, as a pre-induction course
for boys planning to enter the service.



Forty eight




The Canal Zone Wizards

The Torrid Zone Wizards are a peppy group of science students organized two
years ago. The club is made up of pupils from the General Science and Biology classes
who are proud to belong to a national organization whose aims are: (1) to increase their
knowledge of science; (2) to learn to perfect their skills in science,- (3) to give service
in their community and nation,- (4) to understand the importance of science in their lives,-
(5) to help carry out the program of science clubs of America.

During the year, several overnight trips to Barro Colorado Island, in Gafun Lake,
have been made. The trips, being both educational and pleasure trips, were sponsored
by Mr. Maedl, who is also the sponsor of the club.

At Barro Colorado




Forty nine




The Cafeteria



Our large and pleasant cafeteria where approximately 300 hungry students and
teachers eat, every school day, still serves adequate lunches, but at a cost known only
to Miss Sophie McLimans and her staff. The "cost" is not financial, either, although high
prices add to the general worry. The most serious obstacle for the cafeteria to overcome
is the shortage of certain foods, at certain times, which makes it difficult to serve the well-
balanced meals necessary for growing boys and girls.

Miss Hal I ie Beavers has served most efficiently as the cashier in the high school cafe-
teria and in keeping track cf the funds.

Miss McLimans has managed to survive this ordeal, and the noon-day rush still goes
en. In spite of the depleted enrollment in the school, the cafeteria is always filled, and
boys and girls consume quantities of hot foods, milk, ice cream, cakes, and soda pop
every day.

When roast beef is on the menu, about 40 pounds of beef and 100 pounds of potatoes
are served,- 12 dozen hamburger sandwiches, in addition to many other kinds, are made,
several days per week,- 150 pounds of turkey are roasted for the Thanksgiving and
Christmas "specials."

Three colored maids do the cooking, and a class in Cafeteria assist and learn such
valuable home-making essentials as planning meals, costs, how to use left-overs, and how
to serve attractive foods in spite of war-time shortages.

Fifty




to be used



The Model

Airplane Club

The special Army and
Navy bombers and pursuit
planes are a familiar sight
around C. H. S. These war
planes are constructed by the
Airplane Club in the form of
miniature models, and built to
a surprising exactness. This
club, sponored by Mr. N. E.
Gibson, has accomplished a
great deal this year, for the
war effort, because the com-
pleted model planes are
n teaching pilots and crews how to recog-



turned over to the Army and Navy
nize enemy and friendly aircraft.

In 1942, shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the Model Airplane Club was
organized, and has 23 old and new members with 15 active students this year. Many
interesting talks have been given by servicemen who have seen actual combat on Gua-
dalcanal, Midway, Hawaiian Islands, and other fighting areas, and these men have
complimented the Club and explained to the members just how they are helping with
their model planes constructed by themselves.

The officers, of course, are an important part of the Club, and these leaders are:
Noel Gibson, President; Paul Kinney, Vice President,- Irma Patchett, Secretary, and
Marilyn Metzger, Treasurer.

At the end of the school term, awards are given for the student who has built the
most models. This is a gold trophy. For the students who have completed three models,
an emblem is given, and for every additional plane, war stamps are awarded.

The students in the Model Airplane Club have certainly added a feather to Cristo-
bal High School's cap and are complimented for their excellent work and patriotic con-
tributions ... of model planes.






m








Fifty on




...



Fifty two



ON THE CAMPUS



Girls' Physical
Education




Fifty thre



Our Aims and Objectives




JO BANICHAR



To think of physical education at Cristobal High School is to speak of the aims.and
objectives to be taught so as to attain maximum performance during the school years, and
in addition, to provide the "carry-over" values so necessary for the better life in the
future.

These principles are to be held as self-evident, because the varied activities of
modern health education strive to emphasize correct body balance and bring into reality
Dr. J. F. Williams' theory, "Live Now."

Our major aim in this field, then, is to educate the individual through a multiplicity
of motor activities which, of the greatest import, tends to focus the place of that person
in her interrelationship in the society, and only of incident brings forth a proficiency in a
variety of skills.

Keeping in view the concept of the unity of the organism, our subservient aims may
well be:

1. Self-development of that individual.

2 Increase in the sensitivity-controls of the body.

3 Appreciation of the body and its proper care.

4 Building of bodily powers and skills.

5 Heightening of the interests and attitudes in sports.

6 Favoring the growth of the students as a social being by providing proper

situations in the environments.

And why all this? Basically, to provide the leadership and facilities that will afford
an opportunity for the individual or group to act in situations which are physically whole-
some, mentally stimulating, and socially sound.

Fifty four



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Aquabelles



One of the greatest events of this year was the sensational water show held at the
Hotel Washington Pool, on December 3. This marked the second anniversary of the war,
and all profits obtained by the aquatic show went toward the National War Fund.

The aquabelles added much to the success of the water show when they went into
their intricate formations thus churning the pool's cool green waters into a foaming froth
by the beautiful coordination of their arm and leg maneuvers.

This water show augurs well for the future of this progressive-minded group of
C. H. S., and should add luster to the blue and gold.

Fifty five



ALL-



The "A" league all-star volleyball
team of this year was in great form
for the season, and took Balboa High
School in the annual game.

These girls were strong on the
court, and played together as a near-
ly perfect team. Cristobal High
School, as well as the girls, feels that
this year was one of the best in this
particular sport.









Cristobal High School turned out
the best "A" league basketball team
that they have had in the past five
years. Although very few girls went
out for this sport, those who did
worked hard and earnestly to whip
together an all-star team which beat
Balboa. The practices were long and
hard, but these girls had that old
"will to win" spirit and plenty of
good sportsmanship.



When the softball season comes to
a close it is a sad day for the girls
of C. H. S. because it is the last major
sport of the school year. All who par-
ticipated in this sport in 1944, played
it with fast moving skill and agility.
The girls were well trained after in-
tramurals, and long practice periods
with excellent coaching.

Two teams were formed for each
league and many hard-fought games
were played on the home diamond in
preparation for the big tilt with Bal-
boa.




Fifty six



STARS




The B league team played ex-
ceptionally well in volleyball and
beat the Balboa "B's" easily, in the
final game of the season. Practices
were hard and long, but the reward
was received, and due thanks should
be given to Miss Jo Banichar for her
patience and guidance in all the in-
tramural sports and physical educa-
tion which she has taught the girls, in
the short time that she has been here,
at C. H. S.



The "B league basketball team
of Cristobal High School were skill-
ful in their maneuvering and abilities
on the court in the final victory against
Balboa, and their playing was very
clean-cut and fair.

The "B' league has progressed
greatly in athletics, and they will
soon be the up and coming "A"
leaguers to wave the banners of the
blue and gold higher.



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The improvement in softball shown
by the B league was definitely
brought out to the best advantage
this year. Most of the games ran with
smooth coordination, both mentally
and physically, and all girls played
together making a wonderful net-
work.

This year has been an ideal one
for C. H. S. Every sport, every team,
and every game was enjoyed by the
spectators was well as the girls who
participated in them.



Fifty seven




The Varsity Club



The Varsity Club of C. H. S. represents the athletes and sportsgirls of the high school.
In order to become a member of this exclusive club, a girl must make two all-star teams
in the same year, or be one of the ten highest in the point system.

During the year, these girls have plenty of fun together and the Barn Dance they gave
in March was their biggest success.






Fifty eight



Cheer Leaders




With a "C" with a "C," with a "C-R-l You couldn't miss them at the football

games in their costumes of blue and gold leading the pep-squad, and cheering the
spirited crowds and noble players on to VICTORY. Yes talking about the cheerleaders
who else?

Certainly no football game is ever complete without their peppy efforts to bolster
morale and urge the team on to bigger and better scores.




Fifty nine



Minors







Sixty



INTRAMURAL SPORTS

and




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ALL-STAR BOYS

Sixty one




Football All-



Balboa - 8
Cristobal - o



Sixty two



Stars - 1943-1944







C. Z. Jr. Col. 6

Cristobal 6



Sixty thr



All- Star Games



Holding a strong Junior College eleven to a 6-6 tie and losing a heartbreaking
struggle to Balboa High School 8-0, our football stalwarts still enjoyed a good season
and did themselves and their coach proud by their "hustle" and "drive" in both affairs.
Out-manned in material three to one, less experienced and badly out-weighed in both
line and backfield, C. H. S. more than made up these deficiencies by aggressive play,
with observers agreeing that Captain Jim Kane and his "gang" out-did their opponents in
the two struggles.

Traveling to Balboa on November 9, the Purple and Gold went down togallant defeat
although out-playing the enemy in every department of the game. Getting six first-downs
to Balboa's three, out-kicking them 39 to 38 yards per "boot" and out-gaining them in
yardage 96 to 35, C. H. S., nevertheless, went down as Balboa capitalized on two
"breaks on the wet gridiron, scoring a safety in the first half and a touchdown in the
second.

Twice in the latter half did C. H. S. march down the field into the scoring area only
to lose the ball to Balboa's stiff defense and the clock's running out.

The following week saw one of the greatest games ever witnessed on the Zone,
when C. H. S. and the Junior College clashed to a 6-6 tie. Cristobal's going ahead on
a pass from Haywood to Bilyeu in the first half, did not, however, dishearten the "Col-
lege." Deep in Cristobal territory Tom Gregory, a former C. H. S. "great", intercepted
a pass and ran 12 twelve yards to score the tying points. The final quarter had the ball
moving back and forth at mid-field, with neither getting very far because of the stressing
of defense there the battle ended.



TEAM ROSTER:

J. Kane, (Captain), T. Harrison, R. Atwood, A. Maale, C. Thomas, R. Fort, F. Conover, C. Campbell, J. Smith,
B. Badders, H. West, A. Simonson, R. Keenan, O. Bilyeu, J. Kutch, L. Haywood, M. Weich, P. Kinney.



Sixty four



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Sixly five



"i?" League Intra murals and All- Stars



Standing

Minnesota Gophers
Notre Dame U.
Michigan Wolverines



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INDER the very capable leadership of John Kinney the "Gophers" took eight con-
^-^ secutive games, and for the first time in many seasons of intramural participation,
a football team went through its season with "nary" a defeat to mar its clean slate.
Passing, running, and kicking, Captain Kinney played the part of a great quarterback
throughout the entire schedule, and time and time again, by his inspiring play, lifted
his team to victory. Adding mightily to his efforts were: Jack Haywood, Gus Rosania,
Bill Foster, Dick Swearingen, and Joe Hunt.

Striving hard all the way" and making it a good fight, the "Fighting Irish" and the
Wolverines lost no glory whatever in defeat. Captains Benny Kuller and Luis Hooper
led their charges in fine style in every game, and they and their cohorts do rate more
than a word of praise for the efforts and abilities they shewed on the football turf.
Such boys as the following were especially outstanding: Ken Campbell, Wilfred Acosta,
George Schulte, Bill Pretto, Jimmy Rowe, Fred Hill, Jack Reilly, and Don McKay.

Coming from behind the "B" All-Stars showed their mettle in the closing minutes of
the game against their perennial rivals to score on a pass from Kinney to Hooper to end
a final game 6-6. Playing a great defensive battle against the red-shirted boys of Balboa,
CHS could not be denied and once in pay-dirt pushed over the tying tally

With only minutes to go, CHS. took the ball over, and marched down the field
only to have the "gun" go off with the pigskin on Balboa's 18-yard line.



TEAM ROSTER



J. KINNEY (Captain)
J. ROWE
D. SWEARINGEN
G. SCHULTE



P. FOSTER
G. ROSANIA
M. BRANDL
B. KULLER



J. HUNT
K. CAMPBELL
B. PRETTO
B. FOSTER



L. HOOPER
D. McKAY
F. HILL
W. ACOSTA



Sixty six



^z\mfr,







Sixty jeven




Interscholastic Cha m pious



Following an intensely fought intramural program the all-star baseball team of
CHS was chosen to do battle with two opponents,- namely, Balboa High and Canal
Zone Junior College. Picked to lead the squad was one, well-worthy of the honor,
Frank Conover, leading catcher of the after-school season. For two weeks "the boys"
practiced and "hustled" on Strode Field with all faults being corrected under the able
direction of the coach. The squad was soon ready and entered in the contests with supreme
confidence of emerging the victors.

Defeating the opposition 3-2; 2-1, the "Purple and Gold" took the Isthmian crown
with the team playing good "ball." Highlights of the battles were many with "Don"
Hoffman being outstanding because of his masterful hurling while the receiving of Captain
Conover was also of great note. The infield, too, is not be be neglected as they were
instrumental to a great degree in holding the Junior College to a one-hitter.

From an expert point of view the games were won by "heads-up" base-running
as the Windy City outfit took full advantage of the few weaknesses of the other clubs
and forced the "breaks" of the game to react in their favor.

The banner of C H S rules securely in the high-school baseball heavens because
of the spunk and will to win" of this squad of 1944 which changed from a mediocre
team into one of the best ever seen on the Isthmus. With material being what it is, the
Zone crown should remain in our halls for some years to come.




Sixty eight








i




O SPEAK of boy's All-Star

sports makes us think of Mr.
Ted Hotz, principal of C H S, who
has proved to be a great boon for
the morale of our various teams.

Becoming headmaster here has in no way diminished or lessened the interest of this
three-letter man in the field of athletics. His mere presence alone in the dugouts at the
baseball and softball games added to the spirit of the players. He, as well as Coach
Abramowitz and Coach Palumbo, must be thanked for their contribution to a fairly suc-
cessful scholastic record.



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Sixty nine







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Seventy




Freshman- Sophomore Brawl



Seventy one



mE, the Staff, have given you the "Caribbean" of 1944 the most cooperative
project of the year.

We have worked long and hard at planning and arranging the pages, writing de-
scriptions of the school work, making "montages" and last, but by no means least, soliciting
advertising. This is all necessary and important, but much of our effort would have gone
for naught had it not been for help given us.

Mr. Hotz, our principal, laid a good deal of the ground-work last October, and all
during the year he has been both helpful and encouraging.

Mr. Frank Moumblow spent several days with us taking excellent pictures of indi-
viduals, groups, and activities. These, and many others taken by Howath Rowe and
Garvyn Moumblow were made into steel cuts by the Star and Herald Engraving Com-
pany, and later appeared in the book,- pen and ink work was done by Noel Gibson,
Junior, and Alfred Maale. The cover was planned by Irma Patchett. Coach Abramowitz
gave us help from his great experience in this field in planning the sports pages and in
writing accounts of activites in this department.

All teachers, in all departments, helped by their advice, patience, and understand-
ing.

When the work in C H S was finished, the "Caribbean" was taken to the Panama
Canal Press for printing. Because Mr. Aanstoos and his staff are patrons and friends of
the school, they gave personal interest and expert skill to the "Caribbean" of 1944, to
make it our best year book.

We hope ycu like it !

THE STAFF




Seventy two



Patronize Our Friends,
the Advertisers Whose
Help Has Made This
Book Possible . .



Seventy-three



SyiCTORY
BUY




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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093680/00031
 Material Information
Title: Caribbean
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Cristobal High School
Publisher: Yearbook House
Place of Publication: Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date: 1944
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00093680:00031

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Dedication
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Faculty
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Seniors
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Juniors
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Sophomores
        Page 32
    Freshmen
        Page 33
    Clubs
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Sports
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Advertising
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Back Matter
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Back Cover
        Page 99
        Page 100
Full Text






































































































































































































































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E, the members of the publications staEf, do dedicate
siht o u r e a r b o o k t o M r T F H otz o u r fo r mer


Mathematics and Physics teacher, and now,


because he has worked


our Principal,


ong and faithfully toward those


goals which are the Fina aims of Cristoba


High


school


. . . speedy Victory and permanent peace.


-c63!r


JCU \^ VVl I \^ \^/ Illl 1 / ** ^^ 1 *' "


P


t I JI VU ^,


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tdmbinistrators

The schools in the Canal Zone are an important part of the great educational system


of the United States and, in a measure, form a strong link in
together.


welding the three Americas


The curricula of the


Isthmian schools are much like those


of the better


stems in the


United States, and the Zone high schools are members of the


Middle States Association


of Secondary Schools and


lieges, the accrediting agency


which determines standards,


thus making it sure that graduates may enter college.


Their administrators and teachers are high
standing colleges and universities of the United


The destinies of the many graded schools,


y trained, having been drawn from out-
States.


high schools, and the junior col


are guided by the gentlemen whose pictures are shown on this page. Mr. Ben Williams,
the Superintendent of the Canal Zone Schools, is a graduate of Mercer University and


Columbia University. Mr. Lawrence


Johnson, Assistant Superintendent,


received his


training at the North Dakota State Teachers College, the University of Washington, and


Stanford University. Mr. Roger Collinge, Assistant to the


graduate work at Lawrence College, Ripon,


Wisconsin


superintendent, did his under-
, and received his Master's


Degree from


he University of Wisconsin.


Mr. Roger Col
Ass't to Supt.


linge


Mr. Ben Williams


Supt. of


Mr. Lawrence Johnson
Ass't Supt. of Schools


C. Z. Schools


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Cristobal High School is situated on Limon Bay at the end of Washington Drive, a
very pretty, scenic avenue following around Colon Beach. The school is surrounded by
a number of tropical palm trees and Flowers which add much to the beauty of the campus.
The building is constructed in the Spanish style of architecture which is very fitting for
the climate and Latin-American atmosphere

Like many other high schools in the United States, C. H. S. has a large cafeteria, a


, playground, gym, and also the regular indoor gymnasium. It


has also a lovely auditorium, seating over 500 people, and


sew


well equipped cooking and
woodworking classroom for


the mechanically inclined boys.

Cristobal High School is one of which the citizens of the Atlantic side should be
justly proud.


r: 1


.:::-r :fi ti


football and baseball field


ing rooms for the girls, and well equipped metal and












The Faculty




BE ABRAMOWITZ

Boys' Physical Education
Intramural Sports

S., Long Island University
. A., Teacher's College, Columbia University


EPHINE


BANICHAR


Girls' Physical Education


B. S., State Teacher's College, Pennsylvania
Further Study in Columbia University


W H^S ^^H
*^^m^'^Vt
si^w^^
^a-' .Alwoj-
*'-'-
*** .*ilA.'^l.-
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F. ANDERS


B. S., Kansas State Teacher's College


HALLIE


BEAVERS


Women


's College,


University


Mathematics
Cafeteria Cashier

: North Carolina


M. A., Duke University
Further Study in Columbia University


4 ?
1_...,, "" iS n


PAUL


BECK


U. S. History
Sponsor, Thespians
Sponsor, Dramatics
Counselor


" 4- A
--. .X


F
-^n











Faculty


RAYBURN


L. BRIANS


Physics
Mathematics


B. S., University of Idaho
M. S., University of Idaho


JEANNE


E. BR


OWN


English
Librarian


Stephens


College


B. A., University of Missouri
M. A., University of Missouri
Librarian's Certificate, University of Washington


PAUL


EVANCOE


English
American Problems
Radio


Columbia University
Loomis Radio School, Washington, D.
A. B., Lebanon Valley
M. A., Duke University
Further Study in Duke University


Aa


S M. LITER
English
Journalism


Randolph-Macon


Women


s Coll


B. A., West Virginia University


M. A.,


Virginia University


Columbia University
Further Study in New York University


NOEL


GIBSON


Woodwork
k A r I "I


The


m











The Faculty


CLIFFORD HAUBERG
History
Modern History
B. A., University of Minnesota
M. A., University of Minnesota
Further Study in University of Minnesota


SOPHIE


Mc LIMANS


Household Arts
B. S., University of Wyoming
University of California


OSWALD


JORSTAD


Instrumental Music
Vocal Music
Music Appreciation


B. A., Concordia College,


B. M., Concordia C
North Dakota


Moorhead, Minnesota


onservatory of Music,


ELIZABETH
guages


MOORE


A. B., University of West Virginia
M. A., Columbia University
Further Study in University of Mexico


CARL


MAEDL


General


Science










The


Faculty


-m t '.


LUKE


PALUMBO


Physical Education

B. S., State Teacher's College, Maryville, Missouri


HELEN


r +


PATTERSON


Shorthand
Typing
Business Training


Moorhead State


College


Further study in University of Cahfornia


CARLA


FRENCH


Secretary to Mr. Hotz
Office Practice

Balboa High School
Canal Zone Junior College


I[- .
iMfa


PHYLLIS


SPENCER


Spanish


B. S., University of Misso


M. S., Northwestern University


MARY


WORRELL


Art

B. S., University of Missouri
M. S., Northwestern University


SQi


~






































In September 1943 th
his department in the


e


three small classes in Journalism faced the most difficult year


existence of Cristobal High School. These 16 pupils-starting


from scratch, with no previous experience with publications-were confronted with the
publishing of a newspaper and an annual, and no funds except fora gift from the Student


Association for the


"Caribbean.


" Not only were they expected to produce the paper


and year-book, using a conjurer's magic to bring in the necessary money, but they had to
further the war effort by giving the various agencies around school due publicity and
advertising.
These students approached their great task with enthusiasm and courage, and they
feel that their efforts have been crowned with success.


Under the guidance of Mr. C. F. Anderson, business sponsor
business manager, has done excellently from a financial point o


r, Rosita Czernick, the
f view, selling over a


thousand dollars' worth of advertisements. Fifty percent of the cost of the year book will


be paid from these funds. The
over.


"Trade Wind." has paid for itself with a small surplus left























r ir


'S i


0: j
i ;7*i4'^


At the end of the first semester, the


Journalism


staff lost three valuable members,


Esther Trew, Margaret Williams, and Donald Hoffman. Susie
Stapf, and Jean Welton made up this loss when they were ad'
ning of the second semester.


Fahnestock, Joan Ellis, Lois
ded to the staff at the begin-


The staff has worked whole-heartedly to help win the war, trying to show that their


pens may not be mightier than swords, but pretty good at that.
The staff is composed of the following: Mr. C. F. Anderson,


Business Sponsor, Miss


Bess Liter, Sponsor and Teacher of Journalism, Shirley McConnell, Editor-in-Chief, Janet
Dagnall, Peggy Belden, and Mickie McCoy, Associate Editors. Make-up Editor, Mar-
garet Davis. Rosita Czernick, Business Manager. Jean Welton, Oscar Bilyeu, Susie Fahne-
stock, Robert Turner, Elaine Sullivan, Majorie Lindstrom, John Hall, Joan Ellis, Charlene
Hellums, Ethel Coulter, Lois StapF, and Patrick Gormely, Reporters. The staff photographers
are Garven Moumblow and Howarth Rowe.


, 9'


4~,


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I lih y

































The election of the Student Council was marked this year by a very serious campaign


For the presidency, as three leading students of C. H.


"hawked their wares


and laid


bare the skeletons


of the others


' closets. Ed Aanstoos em


erged victorious and took office


as the el


event president of this organization.


The Student


Association


is governed


by Parliamentary Procedure, a


thing


which


enables the student body to practice Democracy in preparation for the g


ood citizenship


in later


Student


uncil is the governing body of this


organization which regu-


tes the sch


activities and strives to better the school through its great influence.


This democratic agency is composed of two representatives o


F each class, a president,


a vice-president, a secretary, and a treasurer.
nominated the preceding year by the officers


Candidates for the
of the eighth grade,


members, and the Faculty Advisors, and are elected by the
body, in October of the following school year.


In spite of the decreased population of C. H. S.,
expenses, the Student Association maintained its usua


last four


offices


are


the Student Counci


popular vote of the


ack of funds, and the


activities, such as: spon


Sc


student


greater
or of the


Victory Corps,


*Trade Wind,"


"Caribbean,


athletic events, musical programs,


matic productions, class picnics and dances, sports and music awards, and the
Senior Banquet.


Junior-











Much


success


activities


of the


Student


Association is because of the efficient guidance of the Sponsor,
Mr. Clifford Hauberg. Giving much of his spare time, he was
able to help the Student Council carry out its difficult and heavy
schedule.


A cabinet of five members was formed this year as a catalistic agency in facilitating
the workings of the executive council. These members were chosen by the president from
a group of active and outstanding pupils of the student body and approved by the Student
Council and the faculty advisors.

These electees are the executive heads of the departments, and collectively as a
group they aid the President in departmental affairs.

Those composing the President's Cabinet are: William Fisher, Chairman of Budget and
Finance; Elaine Sullivan, Coordinator of Activities; Irma Patchett, Chairman of Public
Relations; Ada Lee Sullivan, Chairman of the Department of Laws and Justice; and Shir-
ley McConnell, Chairman of the Bureau of Standards and Scholarship.



S
























ag
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Se n ors




















































































































































































m
































I


FRED WHIPPLE
JIM GILDER .


. . Vice


President
President


PEGGY BELDEN
BOB KEENAN
IRMA PATCHETT
MICKIE McCOY .


. . . Secretary
* . Representative
Representative
S. . . Treasurer


Senior


Class


Officers


Sixteen


:' :





















EDWARD


AANSTOOS


General


Colon, Republic of Panama


Student


Association


President 4;


Soccer


1, 2; Orchestra 1; Glee Club 1 Baseball


Swimming 1
Softball 4; \


Water


victoryy Corps 3,


Dramatic
Football


Club 2, 3; Junior President;
3, 4; Basketball 3.


La P. A. S. 3;


espian


President


"His talk was like a stream which


ange


MARGARET BELDEN


from rock


Colon, Republic


to roses.


Commercial


Panama


Volleyball 1,
ism 4; Victory


, 4; Basketball


orps 3,


Senior


3; Varsity
Class Se


3, 4; D
cretary


ramatics


I, 2; Journal-
Club 1, 2, 3.


"Hang


sorrow!


will kill


a cat,


and therefore


merry.


GEORGE BARBER


General


Allentown, Pennsy:vania


Sports


, 2, 3, 4; Music


"I did not


come


, 2, 3; Victory


to learn;


came


to laugh'


VEDAS BARKER


Commercial


Tampa, Florida


Basketball 4;


, 2, 3; Victory


nfrrnt1f- Ar ffl \Ainmon





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ANNA MARIE CHASE


Commercial


Colon, Republic of Panama


Varsity


Club; La P.


A. S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman


Representative


Club 1


Victo


ry Corps


was our queen,


our rose,


our star


OSCAR BILYEU


Academic


Panama, Republic of Panama


Track 1, 2, 3,
4; Thespians
Journalism 4;
Corps 4; Dran
more Class 2;


4; Baseball
K, 3, 4; La P.


Glee Club 1,


natics 1,
: Junior


S2,
Cl


1, 2, 3, 4; Basket


S. 4, Biology'
2; Band 1, 2, 3,


ball 1, 2, 3, 4 F
Club 2i Student
4; Orchestra 1,


3, 4; Class Representative


ass


Football 1


Council 1,2,3;
2, 3, 4; Victory


1: President


of Sopho-


resentative.


MARY MARGARET DAVIS


Commercial


Amory, Mississippi


Basketball


2, 3; Volleyball 2, 4; Journalism


Club 2,


3; Victory


2; Archery


pretty to walk
pleasan


with, and witt
t, too, to think


talk with,nand


JAMES GILDER


Academic


Colon, Republic of Panama


Football 1
Victory C


,3; "A" Le


ague


Manager 4;


A. S. 2, 3i


Class


Office 4:


4; Dramatics


ennis


, 2, 3,


II


I




















THOMAS HARRISON


General


Ancon, Canal Zone


Water


Polo 3;


Softball


"Always there to lend


Basketball


a hand where


3; Victory


A.

j I

2
'A


* >


the situation might demand"


SHIRLEY


McCONNELL


Academic


Cristobal, Canal Zone


Honor


Society


; La P. A. S.


4, Dramatics


Student


ssociatio


Editor of "Trade Wind,"
ian 4; Orchestra 1, 2,


4, "Caribbean"


Club 1


4; Victory


, 2, 4; Operetta


s 3. 4. Librar-


,2, 3, 4;


nter-A


merican


discussion

A great


Club 2;


Photo


mind hidden


Club 2


a small b


PATRICIA KENNEDY


Academic


Kemmerer, Wyoming


La P. A. S. 4: Music


Appreciation


4, Honor


Society


"From her


shall read the perfect


ways


of honor


ROBERT KEENAN


Academic


Palmyra, New Jersey


Baseball
Track 2,


1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball
3, 4; Softball 2, 3, 4


1, 2, 3, 4; S
; Football 1,


Nimmin


Water


ennis


Polo 2, 3;


3, 4, Dramatic


Club 2, 3; Thespians 3, 4; Student Representative 4;


La P. A. S. 2; Junior-Senior Banquet


Victory Corps 3,


Committee


m



















CATHERINE LUTRO


Commercial


Manhattan, New York


La P. A. S.


"Those


2; Victory


who jest with good taste


Corps


are called witt


EUSEBIO LEE


Academic


Colon, Republic of Panama


Football 4; Basketball 1; Orchestra 1, 2; Band 1
Glee Club 1. 2. 3.


Victory Corps 3, 4i


"I am not in the role of common men


MARJORIE LINDSTROM


volleyball 1, 4; Basketball
2; Journalism Staff 4, Gle


"And her sunny locks hang


2, 4; Softball 1, 4; Varsity
e Club 1, 4; Victory Corps


on her temples like


Club 2, 4; La P.


a golden


General




A.


fleece


MICKIE McCOY


Academic


Long Beach, California


Volleyball
Tennis 1, 3


2, 3, 4; Basketball
S4; Varsity Club 3


Student Representative 3,
Operetta 1; Journalism 4;


Softball 1


, 4; Cheer Lead


:lass Officer 2,
Victory Corps


, 2, 3; Swimming 1, 2, 4;
er 2, 4; Dramatic Club 3;
Wlee Club 1, 2; Band 2, 3;


c1. ffi -4


I:C.-.


Fnrn


-Jf *-.*-n



















JEAN SMITH


General


New York, New York


Victory


"The beauty of the


the beaut


heavens is the


woman


is her hai


ELAINE SULLIVAN


ncon,


Academic


Canal Zone


Volleyball 1,
3. 4: La P. A.


Softball


4; Glee


3, 4; Archery


Club 1


dramatic


2, 4; Thespians


,3; Journalism Staff 4; Class


Secrete


; Victory


orps 3, 4; Band 2, 3.


If there be an
or any good t


I can show,
do, let me c


jo it nowl"


ROBERT SULLIVAN


Academic


Perry, New York


La P. A. S. 1, 2, 3, 4;
1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club
Diane Club 3.


Student


Representative


,2, 3; Victory


, Journ


3, 4; Librarian


m 3; Orchestra
4: Mcdel A ir-


is the mirror of


all courtesy


ADA LEE SULLIVAN


Academic


Denver, Colorado


Dramatics


1, 2, 3, 4; Th


espians


; Representative


Vice President


Journalism Staff 3; Secretary


sentative


"Three things


of Freshman


Band 1


Class 1, Sophomore
S2, 3; Victory Corps


I could do without-freckles,


curiosity.


Class Repre-


and doubt



















YOLANDA REVESZ


Academic


David, Panama


Volleyball 1


Biology Club


2; Victory


3, 4; Lq P.


Club A.


"Her loveliness


never


knew until she smiles at me


ROBERT TURNER


Academic


Bell, California


Football
Victory


2, 3, 4; Softball
Corps 3.


2, 3, 4; Basketball


3, 4; Baseball 4; T


rack 4;


"I'll be merry and free
I'll be sad for nae-body"


GRACE THOMAS


Commercial


Colon, Republic of Panama


Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Softball 1, 2,
Tennis 3.


3, 4; Swimming 1,


2, 3; Basketball


"'I have a heart with room for


every


ESTHER


TREW


Commercial


East Greenville, Pennsylvania


Hockey 1, 2, 3; Ba
2; Volleyball 1, 2
1; Varsity Club 1,


basketball 1


, 2, 3; Track 1; Glee


; Shuffle Board 1, 2; Dancing


2; Victory


Club 2, 3; Ping-Pong 1,


Club 2; Mechanics Club


Corps 4.


"A DePDp little piece of humanity'


-I j
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t.
C*




















JEAN WELTON


Commercial


Hayti, Missouri


Volleyball
Orchestra 1


1; Basketball
; Victory Corr


Journalism


Staff 4;


are sapphires


set in


snow A


EDWARD WELCH


Academic


Ancon, Canal Zone


Baseball


Football


2, 4; Victory


"A little bit


goes


a long


General


Ancon, Canal Zone


Volleyball 1
4; Varsity 1,
leader 2. 4.


2, 3, 4;


Softball


, 4, Journalism


Basketball


4; Music 1, 2; Victory


La P. A.
rps 3, 4,


5. 2, 3,
Cheer-


"Golden hair like sunlight streaming


FRED WHIPPLE


Academic


'
- --U


Medford, Oregon


-e


football


3, 4; B


aseboll


4; Softball 1


2, 3, 4; Trac


; Swimming


Basketball 3, 4; Senior


lass President 4; Music


1,2, 3; Victory Corps


"Her


eyes


MARGARET WILLIAMS


, 2, 3;



















ERMIN WILLETT


Commercial


Roberta, Kentucky


Volleyball 1,
La P. A. S. 3


2, 3, 4, Basketball 1


; Victory


"A maiden


s crown


2, 3; Softball 1;


Club 1


, 2, 3, 4;


,4, Dramatics 1.


is her silken rippling hair"


RAFAEL BRINGS


Academic


Colon, Republic of Panama


is the happiest of mortals, for he


is above


everything he


possesses


IRMA PATCHETT


General


Ancon, Canal Zone


Volleyball 1,
Cross Presiden


3, 4; Swimming 1, 2; Swimming Club President 4; Southern
t 1 ; Softball 1, 3, 4;Tennis 3, Glee Club 1; Victory Corps 3,


Repres


tentative 4;


Varsity Club 3, 4; Model Airplane Club Sec-


retary


4; Dramatic Club 1,


2, 4; Victory Corps 3,


4; Student Associatio9


"Her


irrepressible


gayety


is the


cause


FRANCIS CONOVER


Academic


Orleans, Louisiana


Football 1, 2,3, 4; Baseball 1,
3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 2,


2, 3, 4i Softball
3, 4; La P. A. S.


4: Basketball


3, 4; Swimming


2; Victory


3, 4; Junior


Senior


Banquet Committee


Water


Polo 1.


popu


T c^1


I I


11 I



















VICENTE VALLE


Academic


"Wisdom is better


rubies


JAMES KELLY


Academic


New York. New York


Inter-Am


erican


Discussion Club


, 3; Victory


3, 4; Torrid Zone


Wizards 4


head of


makes the


handsome


more grace


ROGER FORT


Academic


Staten Island. New York


Sports


4, La P.


A. S. 2, 3;


, 3i Victory


"God


are tall"


RUTH BOZEMAN


Academic


Ancon, Canal


"Youd'd


swear


round, that her


when her delicate feet in the


steps


are light and her


dance


home


twinkle


is the air.


large




















CLAUDE CAMPBELL


Academic


Morrisville, Pennsylvania


"In all my travels


never


met with


one Scotchman but what


was a man of sense


JANET DAGNALL


Academic


Colon, Republic of Panama


Tennis


, 4; Volleyball


Honor Society
"Caribbean"


3, 4; Victory
Staff 4.


sweet


Club 1, 2, 3, 4, La P. A. S
ros 3, 4; Assistant Editor


as English


air could make


. 3, 4; National
"Trade Wind:"


he&L<


JOHN


HALL


Vocational


Cartago,


Costa


Football
1, 2, 3;


tative


II


Basketba
; Journal


4; Baseball 1,
II 1, 2, 3, 4; 3 V
ism 3 4; Victo


2, 3, 4; Softball 1,


waterr


ry


"Suppress


Polo 1,


-orps 3, 4.


me if you


Track
resen-


can


ANITA MARGULIS


Academic


Habana, Cuba


Volleyba
Dramatic


Il


2, 3, 4;


Club 2,


;wimmi
Tennis


ng 4; Bowling 4;


2; Victory


Archery 4;


Club 3


Corps 3.


1I I


1


, 2, 3,


II *


^














( ** 4


JACK SCHULTE


Academic


r


St. Louis, Missouri


"Born for success he seemed"


CONRAD HORINE


Academic


Reading, Pennsylvania


Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1,
2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4;


Baseball


Swimming 1,


3, 4, Softball 1,


2, 3, 4;


Dramatic


2, 3, 4; Track
. Photo Club


, 2, 3, 4; Model Airplane


Club 3.


"His hair was of


an excellent


your


chestnut


was ever the


color.











Class


Will


Senior Class
wing bequests:


1944,


being


sound


mind and body, do hereb


make the


Juniors


nearer to attaining


we leave


hem than


II our hopes and aspirations,
we did


trusting


come


regretful


eave


our Ioys


and a few


sorrows


because


we can t


ake them


with us.


To the Frosh


we leave


our great


wisdom


, hoping that


spec


Following
bequests:


niors specific


design


certain


Juniors


he recipients of


Eddie Welch


wishes


to hand down his height to


Bud Nail.


Bob Turner


wills his


to Peggy Baggot.


Robert Sullivan gives


his prof-like app


earance


to Lucien Skeels.


Ada Lee Sullivan leaves


eckles


to Joan Ell


Eddie Aanstoos


wills his


crop of corn


to Henry Thornton.


Peg Belden bequeaths


graveya


chuckle


to Dot Spencer.


Tommy Harrison


passes


on his


music


to Jackie Reilly.


James Kelley his memories


to Norrine Terry.


Janet Dagnall


passes


Catherine Lutro g

Ermin Willett wil


"Southern drawl"


y gives


Is her flashy


to Sue Fahnestock.


shorthand notes to Lois


Kridle.


socks and red-headed temper


to Johnny O'Brien.


George Barber

Oscar Bilyeu r


passes


uctant


coyness


eaves


on to all


irl friends


Junior Class.


to Hugh Hale.


Jim Gilder


wills Miss


to Mildred Gill.


Megs Davis leaves


her poise


poiso


in the Junior Class.


Mickie McCoy bequeaths her su


access


"Around Hi


column


over


wants


I


I I


III


I




















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Sophomores


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Freshmen


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Miss Bess Liter


nftaLBa.


Mr. Oswald Jorstad


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_ t _


National


Honor


Society


l~A
E z


Janet Dognall


SECOND


National Honor


anniversary


society in C. H.S.


celebrated


Shirley McConnell


new


members


spring,
were ir


when


initiated


into this organization.


This very high


awa rd
to those


is granted only twice


yearly


students who are outstanding


scholarship, Leadership, Service,


Character.


Five percent


of the


seco


semester


Patricia Kennedy


Juniors and 15 per-


niors


gible for


membership.


The aim of the Nationa


Honor


Society is to make good citizenship in
high schools a matter of distinction. It is
a fellowship based on high ideals and


a sense o


civic obligation which has


Susie FahnestcK


shown, even


in the short time


existence, evidence of raising the


throughout


standards of citizenship


the land.


Of the 2,677 chapters of the National Honor Society,


C. H.


is very proud to have the


only chapter here on


the Canal Zone.


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Music has always played an important part in the


development


cultural


at Cristobal


High


School.


The many student musical organizations, under


the direction of Mr.


O. E.


Jorstad, produced several


Fine programs throughout the year.


The High School


posed of


orchestra, com-


members, appears many


times during its nine-month season in
concerts, assemblies, and other school
and community functions.


Twice


ducts


weekly


a Music


Jorstad


Appreciation


con-
Class


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The Mixed Chorus is composed of


over 55 students.


veral programs


which have become delightful tra-
ditions are presented each year by
the Glee Club.


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Music for pep assemblies and big


games is furnished by the


Band, which adds life and spirit to
every occasion with its iolly tunes.


The combined efforts of all this department present
to the public their annual Thanksgiving and Easter


Pr mn r mc nnr ( c rn,+t-,i ,-ri Ir,-it-rnr-i I A, ,irer


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WHAT'S IN


A NAME?


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RISTOBAL High School aims to stimulate an interest in dramatics as a source of


lasting satisfaction


as a


preparation


more


complete living.


Students


actively engaged learn to develop qualities of cooperation, self-confidence, and poise
through the medium of dramatic production.


The Dramatic Club and Thespian Group


were


organized, this year, into a Victory


Players' Club for the purpose of more direct contribution to the war effort.

The production of high school plays has become one of the outstanding student activ-
ities. Throughout this school year several one-act plays were staged by C. H. S. players


Dramatic Club and Thespians 1944


for the student


body and faculty.


"Sparkin',


the biggest hit, was presented on eight


different U.


. trips to


the outposts.


The big production of th


e year


"Charley


was termed one of the most successful comedies


that the dramatic department has


ever


produced.


The aim of


every good dramatic club member is to be elected as a member of the


National Thespian Society. Of the several


and possessions,


hundred such organizations in the U.


C. H. S. is proud to have one of the troupes in this school.







































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Library


One of the branches of Cristobal High of which the students are most proud is the
Finely-equipped library.


This large, breezy room, facing the blue waters
containing approximately 5,000 books whose total


of Limon Bay, is an up-to-date library
value is $7,875.


This library, under the supervision of Miss Jeanne Brown, ably assisted by high school
students who receive no scholastic credit for their work, is used on the average, by 2,000
students who come to read and to check out books


The library is run on the Dewey-decimal
the finding of books


In th
taught in
cals.


system, a system which greatly simplifies


Fine collection of books may be found reference books on any of the subjects
. H. S., besides a good selection of Fiction, magazines, and the latest periodi-


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Fr;


Activities


The third year of the war found a badly crippled Cristobal High School, suffering
from loss of pupils and loss of teachers, doggedly carrying on the regular curriculum plus
new courses and activities directly related to the great conflict.


very important course, Aeronautics, began its second year with a group of serious


air-minded boys whose sole


vocabulary now consisted of terms unintelligible


to the lay-


man. Auto-Mechanics


long and hard in


continued the excellent work of last year, and its members worked


realization of what the Future might hold for them and the value


this preparation for war jobs. The A
and it showed a model of practically


airplane Club's display, this year, was interesting,


every


kind of plane now in service. This group of


future


spotters


and Fliers were very serious about their work.


Physics placed more emphasis on electricity than in former years. Chemistry classes
made their own chemicals which were no longer available because of the war. The use


all kinds of gases was stressed and remedies learned for victims who


might have the


unfortunate experience of being gassed in war. Household Arts taught greater economy
in buying and serving Foods and new war dishes. The Radio Code class worked dili-
gently in sending messages in preparation for the day when they may send out the happy
signal-three dots and a dash!


















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January


ristoba


High


Sch


new wartime organization, the Victory C
school activity for the past two school year


tool whole-heartedly jo
:orps. This organization
s. "The cardinal object


ined
has
ve o


and


supported the


been the center of
F the Victory Corps


is to impart information which will directly aid those who enter the war service as active
participants." Sponsored by the Student Association under the guidance of Mr. Clifford
Hauberg, the organization has been highly successful.


Any high school


membership
follows:


student


n the Victory


t who meets the requirements may be accepted for general
orps. As a general member he may join a special division, as


Air Service Division
Land Service Division
Sea Service Division
Production Service Divison
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a-n r Cnini'-


Typists


serve


ctory aid th scho
to their community


ian Defen


n a very small, but


and the


in volunteer-


necessary way.


War posters, cartoons, and drawings


were gladly contributed by the


Art Classes


strove to stimulate interest by announcing War Bond Rallies, Red Cross


ion Defense projects, and


Civil-


victory Corps activities.


The Music Department enthusiastically offered its time to the school, community,
and war time organizations for encouraging the war effort.


One-act plays and skits


Players


were


lub as their share in


presented to army and navy personnel b


'boosting


victory


the morale of the armed forces.


Journalism classes, through publicity and cooperation in the


"Trade Wind,


helped


in making many war projects and drives a


success.


All other departments did their bit through their tireless efforts of promoting the
highest type of citizenship in the school and community.


Aonroximately 100,000 magazines


were


collected bv C. H.


students to distribute


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it.
.
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In view of existing


ticipated


expansion


wartime conditions and the an-
of the aviation industry after the


, last year


the Division


courses


of Schools,


study


inaugurated


Aeronautics


ever


offered for the Senior boys of the Canal Zone. Accord-


ingly, Cristobal
in this class wit[


High School enrolled a number of boys
1 Mr. T. F. Hotz as instructor.


This group spends much time in the classroom, where


he boys are given a thorough study of the


aviation


traffic rules, airplane maintenance


e and


structure


radio


range communication,


navigation, aerodynamics, and


meteorology.


This preflight course facilitate


es entrance


of the boys to aviation schools of the Army and Naval
Air Corps.

All over the United States similar courses are being
offered in high schools, but few of them are as fortu-













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AeCronautics


nate as


we in having First-hand experience at the Army


and Navy flying Fields.
The cooperative instru
is of vital importance to


action of the service personnel


success


of the


class.


Every Tuesday, the Aeronautics Class of C. H. S.
alternatingly makes trips to the Naval Air Station and
France Field where they have the opportunity to listen


to lectures
their parts


/ tour through shops, insp
, watch parachutes being


ect planes
packed,


and
study


navigation, and are given a chance to maneuver the


Link Trainer.


Members of the


service


give lectures


concerning aviation to the students, and show movies
and other visual aids to augment the study program.
The course of study in preflight aeronautics has been


so planned that a student may


edge


receive


and information to insure a aood


sufficient knowl-


foundation in


the fundamentals of aviation while still


n high


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Science


All the courses in science are


Classes


taught in their relation to each other and to human


They aim


elds and a


to give


scie


ntific


the student mastery of the fundamental knowledge
attitude toward the problems of life.


he different


Biology classes


studied plants and animals with more attention given to the


ronment. Also


, experiments in nutrition took place during the last


semester. Frequen


rips and excursions to nearby points added interest to


physical


the studies of natural and


sciences


Particular attention was paid by
e Chemistry class to the relation


to the


war


outline was
s possible,


effort.
owed


except


making


their


substituting ava


micals for others


in various


own
able
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The Canal


Zone Wizards


The Torrid


Zone


Wizards are a peppy group


science students organized two


years ago. The club is made up of pupils from the General
who are proud to belong to a national organization whose


Science


and Biology classes


aims are: (1) to


increase their


knowledge of


science;


(2) to learn to perfect their skills in


science;


(3) to give


in their community and nation; (4) to understand the importance of science


service


in their lives;


(5) to help carry out the program of science clubs of America.


During the year,


have b
by Mr.


,een made.
Maedl, w


sever


overnight trips to Barro


Colorado


trips, being both educational and pleasure


is also


island
trips,


atun Lake,


were


sponso


sponsor of the club


At Barro Colorado


MIikdPZIllif ,,,WMi i




























The


Ca


eteria


Our large and pleasant cafeteria where approxi


mately


00 hungry students and


teachers eat,


every school day,


still serves


adequate


unches, but at a cost known only


to Miss Sophie McLimans and her staff.


is not Financial, either, although high


prices add to the general worry. The most serious obstacle for the cafeteria to overcome
is the shortage of certain foods, at certain times, which makes it difficult to serve the well-
balanced meals necessary for growing boys and girls.
Miss Hallie Beavers has served most efficiently as the cashier in the high school cafe-
teria and in keeping track of the funds.


Miss McLimans has managed to survive


this ordeal, and the noon-day rush still goes


on. In spite


of the depleted enrollment in the


school, the cafeteria is always Filled, and


boys and girls consume quantities of hot foods, milk, ice cream, cakes, and soda pop
every day.


When roast beef is on the


menu, about 40 pounds of beef and 100 pounds of potatoes


are served; 12 dozen hamburger sandwiches,


in addition to many other kinds, are made,


several days per week;


150 pounds of turkey are roasted for the


Thanksgiving and


Christmas


specials.


Three colored maids do the cooking, and a class in CaFeteria assist and learn such
valuable home-making essentials as planning meals, costs, how to use left-overs, and how
/ f










The


i1lod!


HI ) plln Cl/b


e special
bombers


planes
around


Arm
and


are a familiar


pursuit


sight


These war


nes are constructed by the


Airplane Club in the form of
miniature models, and built to


a surprising


exactness.


club, sponsored by Mr. N. E.
Gibson, has accomplished a


great


deal this


war effort, beca


year, for the
use the com-


pleted


model


turned over to the


rmy and Nayv


to be used in teaching pilots and crews how


to recog


nize enemy and friendly aircraft.
In 1942, shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the Model Airplane


Club


was


organized, and has


old and new members with


15 active students this year. Many


interesting talks have been given by servicemen who have


seen


actual combat on Gua-


dalcanal, Midway, Hawaiian Islands, and


other fighting areas, and these men have


complimented the Club and explained to the members just how they are helping with
their model planes constructed by themselves.
The officers, of course, are an important part of the Club, and these leaders are:


Noel Gibson, President; Paul Kinney,
Marilyn Metzger, Treasurer.


ice President;


rma Patchett, Secretary, and


At the end of the school term, awards are given for the student who has built the
most models. This is a gold trophy. For the students who have completed three models,


an emblem is given, and for every additional plane, war stamps are awarded.
The students in the Model Airplane Club have certainly added a feather to


bal High


tions


s cap and are complimented for their excellent work and patriot
of model planes.


risto-
con-


pla


nes


are


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Girls'


Phy sical


Educationl


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Our


Aims


and


Objectives


BANICHAR


To think of physical education at Cristobal High School is to speak of the aims and
objectives to be taught so as to attain maximum performance during the school years, and


in addition, to provide the
future.


carry-over


values so necessary for the better life in the


These principles are to be held as self-evident, because the


varied activities of


modern health education strive to emphasize correct body balance and bring into reality


J. F. Williams' theory,


"Live Now.


Our major aim in this field, then, is to educate the individual through a multiplicity
of motor activities which, of the greatest import, tends to focus the place of that person
in her interrelationship in the society, and only of incident brings forth a proficiency in a
variety of skills.
Keeping in view the concept of the unity of the organism, our subservient aims may
well be:


1. Self-development of that individual.
2 Increase in the sensitivity-controls of the body.
3 Appreciation of the body and its proper care.
4 Building of bodily powers and skills.
5 Heightening of the interests and attitudes in sports.


And


6 Favoring the growth of the students as a social being by providing proper
situations in the environments.
why all this? Basically, to provide the leadership and Facilities that will afford


an opportunity for the individual or group to act in situations which are physically whole-
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Aqua bell es


One of the greatest


events of this year was the sensational water show held at the


Hotel Washington Pool, on December 3


This marked the second anniversary of the war,


and all profits obtained by the aquatic show went toward the National War Fund.
T I I II I I I l i .


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ALL-


The "A" league all-star volleyball
team of this year was in great form
for the season, and took Balboa High
School in the annual game.


These


were


strong


court, and played together as a near-
ly perfect team. Cristobal High
School, as well as the girls, feels that
this year was one of the best in this
particular sport.


Cristobal


the best


"A'


that they ha


High School turned out
'league basketball team
ve had in the past Five


years. Although very Few girls went


sport,


those


who


worked hard and earnestly to whip
together an all-star team which beat
Balboa. The practices were long and
hard. but these airls had that old


4 ,I
will
good


When th


win"


spirit


plenty


sportsmanship.


e softball season comes to


a close it is a sad day For the girls
of C. H. S. because it is the last major
sport of the school year. All who par-


ticipated in this sport in


1944, played


it with fast moving skill and agility.
The girls were well trained after in-
tramurals, and long practice periods
with excellent coaching.
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STARS


The 'B" league
ceptionally wel
beat the Balboa
Final game of the


Steam played


in vol eyba


B's"


easily,


were hard and long, but the reward
was received, and due thanks should
be given to Miss Jo Banichar for her
patience and guidance in all the in-
tramural sports and physical educa-
tion which she has taught the girls, in
the short time that she has been here,


n


ex-
and
the


Practices


atC. H


The "B" league basketball team
of Cristobal High School were skill-
Ful in their maneuvering and abilities
on the court in the Final victory against
Balboa, and their playing was very
clean-cut and fair.


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The
greatly


soon


3B league
n athletics


up and


has progressed
and they will


coming


leaguers to wave the banners
blue and gold higher.


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improvement in softball shown


league


was definitely


brought out to the best advantage
this year. Most of the games ran with


smooth


coordination,


both mentally


and physically, and all girls played


together making a


'S 4


wonderful


work.
TI 1


season.


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Varsit


arsity


represents


the ath


sportsgir


school.


order to become


in the


same year,


a member


or be


one


of the


is exclusive
en highest


ub, a gir


must


make


all-star


teams


in the point system.


During the year


these girls


have


un together and the Barn Dance they gave


in March was their biggest


success.


ir~









Cheer


Leaders


With a


with a


"C I 1
I-


with a


"C-R-I-


You could


miss them at the football


games in their costumes of blue and gold leading the


spirited crowds and noble players on to
- who else?


VICTORY. Y


es-


pep-squad, and cheering the
talking about the cheerleaders


Certainly no Football game is


ever


complete without


their peppy


efforts to bolster


morale and urge the team on to bigger and better


scores.


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INTRAMURAL

and


SPORTS


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Football


All-


ac4


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Stars


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All-Star


Games


Holding a strong Junior Co


liege


struggle to Balboa High School 8-0,


even to a 6-6 tie and losing a heartbreaking


our football


stalwarts still enjoyed a good season


and did themselves and their coach proud by their


"hustle


"drive


in both affairs.


Out-manned in material three to one, less experienced and badly out-weighed in both


line and backfield,


more than made up these


deficiency


es by aggressive


play,


with observers agreeing


hat Captain


Jim Kane and his


gang


out-did


heir opponents in


struggles.


Traveling to Balboa on N


ovember 9,


he Purple and Gold we


nt down to gallant d


defeat


although out-playing


he en


emy in


ever


y department


of the game.


Getting si


x first-downs


to Balboa's


three, out-kicking them


39 to


38y


ards per


"boot


and out-gaining them in


yardage
"breaks'
second.


to 35


he wet gridiron,


never


rtheless,


went


scoring a safety in


down as Balboa capitalized on two


he firs


half and a touchdown


in the


Twice


in the


matter half did


march down the field into the scoring area only


to lose


the bal


to Balboa's stiff defense


and the


clock's running out.


The following week saw


one of the greatest games ever witnessed on the


when


and the


Junior College clashed to a 6-6 tie. Cristobal'


s going ahead on


a pass from Haywood to Bilyeu in the First half, did not, however, dishearten the


"Col-


lege.


Deep in Cristobal territory


Tom Gregory, a former C. H


great


, intercepted


a pass and ran


12 twelve yards to


score


the tying points.


The Final quarter had the ball


moving back and forth at mid-fi


with neither getting very far because


stressing


defense-there


battle


ended.


TEAM ROSTER:


J. Kane, (Captain), T. Harrison, R. Atwood,


Maale,


C. Thomas, R. Fort, F. Conover,


C. Campbell,


J. Smith,


B. Badders, H. West, A. Simonson, R. Keenan, O. Bilyeu, J. Kutch, L. Haywood, M. Weich, P. Kinney.


two






Leaguers


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o"B


League


Intramurals


and


All- Stars


Standing
Minnesota Gophers
Notre Dame U.
Michigan Wolverines


NDER the very capable leadership of John Kinney the


"Gophers


took eight con-


secutive


games, and for the first


ime in many seasons of intramural participation,


a football team went through its season with


a defeat to mar its clean slate.


Passing, running, and kicking, Captain Kinney played the part of a great quarterback
throughout the entire schedule, and time and time again, by his inspiring play, lifted


his team to victory


. Adding mightily to his efforts were:


Jack Haywood, Gus Rosania,


Bill Foster, Dick Swearingen, and


Joe Hunt.


Striving hard "


"Wolverines


all the way


and making it a good fight, the


"Fighting Irish''


and the


" lost no glory whatever in defeat. Captains Benny Kuller and Luis Hooper


led their charges in fine style in every game, and they and their cohorts do rate more
than a word of praise for the efforts and abilities they showed on the Football turf.
Such boys as the following were especially outstanding: Ken Campbell, Wilfred Acosta,
George Schulte, Bill Pretto, Jimmy Rowe, Fred Hill, Jack Reilly, and Don McKay.


Coming from behind the


All-Stars showed their mettle in the closing minutes of


the game against their perennial rivals to score on a pass from Kinney to Hooper to end
a final game 6-6. Playing a great defensive battle against the red-shirted boys of Balboa,


CH


could not be denied and once in pay-dirt pushed over the tying tally


With only minutes to go, C


took the ball over, and marched down the Field


only to have the


go off with the pigskin on Balboa


s 18-yard


TEAM ROSTER


J. KINNEY (Captain)
J. ROWE
D. SWEARINGEN


P. FOSTER
G. ROSANIA
M. BRANDL


J. HUNT
K. CAMPBELL
B. PRETTY


L. HOOPER
D. McKAY
F. HILL










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Interscholastic


Champions


Following an intensely fought intramural program the all-star baseball team of


C H S was chosen to do battle with


Zone


wo opponents; namely, Balboa High and Canal


Junior College. Picked to lead the squad was one, well-worthy of the honor,


Frank Conover, leading catcher of the after-school season. For two weeks


"the boys


practiced and "hustled"


on Strode Field with al


faults being corrected under the able


direction of the coach. The squad was soon ready and entered in the contests with supreme
confidence of emerging the victors.


Defeating the opposition 3-2; 2-1,


"Purple and Gold"'


took the Isthmian crown


with the team playing good "ball." Highlights of the battles were many with


"Don


Hoffman being outstanding because of his masterful hurling while the receiving of Captain
Conover was also of great note. The infield, too, is not be be neglected as they were
instrumental to a great degree in holding the Junior College to a one-hitter.


From an expert point of view the games were


won by


"heads-up


base-running


as the Windy City outfit took full advantage of the few weaknesses of the other clubs


and forced the


"breaks


" of the game to react in their favor.


The banner of C H


rules securely in the high-school baseball heavens because


of the spunk and


"will to win


of this squad of 1944 which changed from a mediocre


team into one of the best


ever seen on the Isthmus. With material being what it is, the


Zone crown should remain in our halls for some years to come.







-'C^


/


&


-._IJ


'*
~~ 1 -


s:- ,


- H' A


*1


lawij^


FX


F&


O SPEAK of boy's All-Star
sports makes us think of Mr.


tr


tw "' -
3.4.
A
*- elfi w~ ^ S tg~ii B
. -..E ;a.; iSi *irSE


i .


I


Ted Hotz, principal of C H


has proved to be a great boon for
the morale of our various teams.

Becoming headmaster here has in no


way diminished or lessened


three-letter man in the Field of athletics. His mere p


baseball and softball games added to the spirit of the players. He, as well as


alone in the dugouts at the


Abramowitz and Coach Palumbo, must be thanked for their contribution to a fairly suc-

cessful scholastic record.


v^ &~t.


< ^*^^ .


II 1


presence


~~: hi


the interest o


coach


























*




.


+

/4,~
2 : :
^. x*'' x' ^


x .. x xx xx x x xx x1x

.. - < xx .:7+.1 w:" x. .C;"""; .: .
***xxx x k x x *xx >


*


9,
- I
A r 4

rf Efx~W


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II1


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I/V 'V'


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rrld wsU -"liC A ewl ,-


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I


^kjj ^F s ^ i
fiL*^,


^cc







the Staff, have given you the


"Caribbean


of 1944-the most cooperative


project of the year.
We have worked long and hard at planning and arranging the pages, writing de-


scriptions of the school work, making


montages


and last, but by no means least, soliciting


advertising. This is all necessary and important, but much of our effort would have gone
for naught had it not been for help given us.
Mr. Hotz, our principal, laid a good deal of the ground-work last October, and all
during the year he has been both helpful and encouraging.
Mr. Frank Moumblow spent several days with us taking excellent pictures of indi-


viduals, groups, and activities.


These, and many others taken by Howath Rowe and


Garvyn Moumblow were made into steel cuts by the Star and Herald Engraving Com-
pany, and later appeared in the book; pen and ink work was done by Noel Gibson,
Junior, and Alfred Maale. The cover was planned by Irma Patchett. Coach Abramowitz
gave us help from his great experience in this Field in planning the sports pages and in
writing accounts of activities in this department.
All teachers, in all departments, helped by their advice, patience, and understand-


When the work in C H S was Finished, the


"Caribbean


was taken to the Panama


Canal Press For printing. Because Mr. Aanstoos and his staff are patrons and friends of


the school, they gave persona
make it our best year book.


interest and expert skill to the


"Caribbean


" of 1944, to


hope you like it


THE STAFF


a -



















Patronize Our Friends,
the Advertisers Whose


Help


Has


Made


This


Book Possible










VICTORY
BUY
UTATED
BONDS


anrer!


ecret h


o erpP


oR EtS ,MP R
V^C
1 U.-
I^


rTvXE
0v.Srl


'.S
rCE^s
,S^^s~~T
LS^G LA:~


rout


I ) )


iSTAMPS


T \O


1


p


I


SO '


gO


Ceate'


p ^/^


Cotn^01"


r


Sou'












Compliments


The


Panama


Coca-Cola


Bottling


Panama


Colon


Compliments


HODDAKAH,


PAfnAmA,


LTD.


No. 98 Centra


Arboix


Panama


Colon































P/mN IMER IC/A AMIRWA/IS SYSTEM
Worldcs ltnclcrd for Air r
Trcrnsporlation r


I















Robert Wilcox & Co., Inc.

General Commission Merchants



Agents -

THE HOME INSURANCE CO.

OF NEW YORK


FIRE INSURANCE


Box 115 Colon

Phone 48 Colon


COMPLIMENTS OF THE


MIAMI SHOP

Front Street, Colon


DELICIOUS SANDWICHES
SODAS and SUNDAES
BLUE PLATE SPECIALS
served daily





"Where all the Gang Meets"


. .< ,^ -^-. ^


iwtA ~'


SOCIAL


or BUSINESS


printing


message


conveys


is representative


present


tion of the


written wo


THE PANAMA


AMERICAN


Job Printing Dept.


PROMPT SERVICE


* ACCURACY


* GOOD LAYOUT


Weddi


nvitations


mmerci


ess and So


al Printin


cial Stationery
of all Types


r -


finest


-T















Compliments


We


have


same


qua


here


Panama


Colon


Opposite the
Commissary



























The


label


that

ialit


.
siti es


AMOUNT


STORE


GENTLEMEN


CHILDREN


alboa


YOUR


Phone
226
Federico
I


EXCELS


Boyd

DRY


Special


Office


between


Colon


VALET


OR


Phone
226


14 & 15 Sts.


CLEANERS


attention given


10 St.


to linen


Colon


Theater


Agents for


Panama


TAGAROPULOS


Colon, Rep. de Panama


ore




















COMPLIMENTS
OF


CIA. UNIDA
DUQUE


DE


"A"


Avenue


No.


Panama City




















Compliments of


VESTAL


MORRIS


I

56



P. O. Box


. GODHUMAL


FRONT STREET
COLON, R. P.


Colon, R. P


55 Front Street


Colon


Panama


A

Remember that SEVILLA
means distinction


C entra


Rm


rlcan


Plum in


Supply


Co.


Panama


Colon


every


success


raduatin


Class


1944


& Central


venue


Peru No.


r1 i


56



Phone 495
Colon. R. P


r i













RADIO CENTER

Distributors of


R.C.A.
Genera


Victor Products


Electric Products


Stationery,
Office Supplies,
Books


CONGRATULATIONS


CLASS


Congratulations


Class of


BAZAR


ESPANOL


Panama


Panama


Co


The


Int national


Ba


aar


Panama


olon












Compliments of


THE


MPORT


Colon


Tel. 420 Colon


PANAMA


EXPORT


Panama

,R. P.


THE


MEN


Colon


BESTFIT
Manufacturers


and YOUNG MEN


CLOTHES


1 1th Street


Compliments of


The


Swiss


Jewelry


Store


Perret


Opposite


ommissary


Colon


ngratu at


ons


THE


CEnTRRL


LABOR


Un


on


Balboa


one












Compliments of
MADURITOS


Ladies Wear
Silk Stockings
Sport Wear
Perfumes


Phone 888


Colon


Compliments of


FRENCH


BAZAR


Colon, R. P.


ALMACEN
Jose Jaen J.


Electrica


ELECTRIC
y Cia. Ltda.
Appliances


Refrigerators
Hardware


Phone 333


P. O. Box 33


Colon, R. P.


MI


REACH


JEWELER


WATCHMAKER


EXPERT


MOND


ENGRAVER


SETTER


SATISFACTION


GUARANTEED


Front


next to


French


Bazar


Phone


345


Colon













ompliments


THE /
"H


MER


aber


ashers


to Men
Panama


and Tailors


Taste


Colon


iments


THE


NEW


CRISTOBAL


GARAGE


pliments of


RLTON


MARGARITA


Shaw


Masonic


TEL


FLORIST


lams


Temple


CASULLO


WATCHMAKER and


45-a Front Street


"MIDO" MU
SUPER
AUTOMATIC


JEWELER


Colon


ILTIFORT


WATCH


The Lasting Gift for


Carlton


Drug


10th Street


Federico


Clean, Modi
Patent Med


ernm


Store


and
I Ave.


, Up-to-date Drugs,


cines


Cream


PAY US


Sodas


A VISIT














AUT


elena


PREPAR


Rubenstein


PARIS BA:
COLON


If you are looking for


GIFT


don't forget to pay us a visit


The


Native


Art


Gift Shop


Prop. MRS. H. SHAW
Colon 45 Front Street


UNITED


FRUIT


COMP


ANY


GREAT
SERVE]


WHITE


THE


AMERICAS


Offices


UNITED


FRUIT


BUILDING


CENTURY
PANAMA


CRISTOBAL


CLUB
CITY


Phone


2121


Panama


I'


FLEET











JOHN SUR


Front Street


MAGAZINES,
PHOTO S
NOVELTIES,


Agents


Colon


BOOKS, 0
SUPPLIES G
SPORTING


Remington


OFFICE


AND


AMES,
GOODS


Rand,


W. A. Shaeffer


Congratulations
Class of '44

Gorin's Mattress Factory


P. GORIN, Manager,


6071 Boliva:


See Gorin's


"CHS" '40


Av enue


for the


"BEST IN REST"

Manufacturers of the highest
grade of bedding


HOTEL


WASHInGTOn


SUnequalled for Location and Comfort


A Hotel in keeping with the dignity,


spirit and comfort of


THE


PANAMA


CANAL


Golf


Swimming


UJater


Sports


Tarpon


Fishing









Congratulations


CRISTOBAL


Graduating


HIGH


Class


SCHOOL


1944


NEW


YORK


FOTO


STUDIO


Front


Street


Colon,


Compliments


THE


HERFF


-JONES


COMP


ANY


Manufacturers


Class


Rings


- Commencement


Invitations


- Medals and


Trophies


LEWIS,


Representative


'h -Inn


A














National


Mattress


Factory


Melendez


Avenue


Between 10th and 11th Streets
Colon, R. P.


Wong


Genera


We Special


Windsh


Chang,


Hardware


n Glass


Doors


For any make of car


Colon


Panama


Phone 303


Phone 1193


ments


novEDRDFE


Front


VENTURA


Street








Compliments of


THE


SAmARRTAn


HOSP


TAL


Colon


THE 1943
STUDENT


1944


COUNCIL


of the


STUDEnT'S


ASSOCIATION


OF


CRISTOBAL


HIGH


SCHOOL
would like to take this space to wish


"SUCCESS


TO


OUR


SUCCESSORS"














AUTOGRAPHS






































I









AUTOGRAPHS










j**** 5



&0&



^ifeW



&$fc ^



BO






.oasts




Seventy-four



Compliments of




The Panama Coca-Cola Bottling Co.

Panama Col<



Compliments of



HODflK, pflnflma LTD.



No. 98 Central five.
Panama City



Rrboix Building
Colon



Seventy-five



IT
PAYS



PAJSt /IMEtlEC/tV AIRWAYS SYSTEM
r Hbrkfj Standard for Air
^&r Transportation W



TO FLY



Seventy si



Robert Wilcox & Co., Inc.


COMPLIMENTS OF THE


General Commission Merchants


MIAMI SHOP




Front Street, Colon


Agents




THE HOME INSURANCE CO.
OF NEW YORK


DELICIOUS SANDWICHES
SODAS and SUNDAES

BLUE PLATE SPECIALS




served daily


FIRE INSURANCE




Box 115 Colon




Phone 48 Colon


Where all the Gang Meets"



A BUDtifct -''^B&ifv^ 4




SOCIAL



or BUSINESS



The printing that conveys you
message is representative of you.
Get the finest presentation of the
written word at

THE PANAMA AMERICAN

i~~4g Job Printing Dept.



PROMPT SERVICE ACCURACY GOOD LAYOUT

Wedding Invitations Business and Social Stationery Calling Cards
Commercial Printing of all Types

THE PANAMA AMERICAN

JOB PRINTING DEPARTMENT
"H" St., Panama City Box 1 34 Phone No. 7




Seventy-seven



Compliments of



#



#



We have the same quality here
as in Panama



Colon Opposite the

Commissary



Seventy-eight



iflKk




The label that signifies
Vitality



Now More



PARAMOUNT STORE

GENTLEMEN'S SUITS
CHILDREN'S WEAR



11st. Balboa Ave.



Colon



YOUR VALET

m ne EXCELSIOR ""SK

Federico Boyd Ave. between 14 & 15 Sts.

DRY CLEANERS



Special attention given to linen suits
Office 10 St. Colon Theater Bldg.




in new
bigger
bottles



Orange-
CrUSh

CARBONATED BEVERAGE



Agenls for Panama

TAGAROPULOS

S. A.



Colon, Rep. de Panama



Seventy-nine



COMPLIMENTS
OF

CIA. UNIDA DE
DUQUE

"A" Avenue No. 18

Panama City



Eighty



Compliments of



Dr. VESTAL MORRIS



I. GODHUMAL

rz FRONT STREET -x

30 COLON, R. P. >0



P. O. Box 510
Colon, R. P.



Phone 495
Colon, R. P.



55 Front Street
Colon, Panama



Remember that SE VILLA
means distinction



Central American Plumbing Supply Co.

Panama and Colon



Wish every success to the Graduating
Class of 1944



COLON

3rd St. & Central Ave.

Phone 4

P. O. Box 108



PANAMA

Avenue Peru No. 9

Phone 249

P. O. Box 724



MR 1299 10



Eighty one



RADIO CENTER


Congratulations




Class of '44


Distributors of




( /) R.C.A. Victor Products





( /) General Electric Products




( /) Stationery,


BAZAR ESPANOL


Office Supplies,




Books





CONGRATULATIONS, CLASS '44


Panama
City Panama



Compliments of



The International Bazaar



Pan



ama



Colon



Eighty i no





THE BESTFIT Co.




Manufacturers of


Compliments of


MEN'S and YOUNG MEN'S


THE PANAMA


CLOTHES


IMPORT & EXPORT


Colon, R. P. 1 1th Street




Compliments of


Colon Panama


The Swiss Jewelry Store


Tel. 420 Colon, R. P.


Charles Perret




Opposite




the Commissary Colon



Congratulations
Class of '44



th6 anTRRL labor union



Balboa Heights



Canal Zone



Eighty three



Compliments of

MADURITOS

Ladies Wear
Silk Stockings
Sport Wear
Perfumes

Phone 888 Colon


Compliments of

FRENCH BAZAR

Colon, R. P.


ALMACEN ELECTRICO

Jose Jaen J. y Cia. Ltda.

Electrical Appliances

Refrigerators

Hardware

Phone 333 P. O. Box 33
Colon, R. P.


J. miZRACHI

JEWELER WATCHMAKER ENGRAVER
& EXPERT DIAMOND SETTER

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED

Front St. Rext to French Bazar
Phone 345 Colon



Eighty four



Compliments of

THE AMERICAN BAZAR

"Haberdashers and Tailors

to Men of Good Taste"

Panama Colon



Compliments of

THE NEW CRISTOBAL
GARAGE




C. CASULLO

WATCHMAKER and JEWELER
No. 45-a Front Street, Colon, R. P.



"MIDO" MULTIFORT
SUPER
AUTOMATIC WATCH

The Lasting Gift for
Graduation



Compliments of

CARLTON HOTEL

Colon, R. P.



MARGARITA FLORIST

Shaw & Williams

Masonic Temple



Carlton Dru3 Store

10th Street and
Federico Boyd Ave.



Clean, Modern, Up-to-date Drugs,
Patent Medicines, Toilet Articles



Ice Cream, Sodas, etc.



PAY US A VISIT

Phone 255 Colon, R. P.



Eighty five



BGAUTY PREPARATIONS

from

Helena Rubenstein



PARIS BAZAR

COLON



If you are looking for

A GIFT

don't forget to pay us a visit

The Native Art & Gift Shop



Prop. MRS. H. SHAW

Colon 45 Front Street



UNITED FRUIT COMPANY

GREAT WHITE FLEET

SERVES THE AMERICAS



Offices

UNITED FRUIT Co. BUILDING

CRISTOBAL



CENTURY CLUB
PANAMA CITY



Phone 21 21
1753



Panama 523
524



Eighty si:



JOHN SURANY


Congratulations




Class of '44


Front Street Colon






Gorin's Mattress Factory


MAGAZINES, BOOKS, OFFICE AND


P. GORIN, Manager, "CHS" "40


PHOTO SUPPLIES, GAMES,


6071 Boliva.' Av=nue


NOVELTIES, SPORTING GOODS






See Gorin s for the




"BEST IN REST"


Agents for Remington Rand, Inc.,




W. A. Shaeffer Pen Co.


Manufacturers of the highest




grade of bedding



HOT6L WfiSHinGTOn

Unequalled for Location and Comfort
A Hotel in keeping with the dignity, spirit and comfort of

THE PANAMA CANAL

Golf Swimming UJater Sports
Tarpon fishing



Eighty seven



Congratulations to the Graduating Class

CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL
1944

NEW YORK FOTO STUDIO



Front Street Colon, R. P.

Compliments of

THE HERFF- JONES COMPANY

Manufacturers of
Class Rings Commencement Invitations Medals and Trophies

E. A. LEWIS, Representative

Box 3792 Ancon, C. Z.



Eighty eight



National Mattress


Wong Chang, S. A.

General Hardware


factory


We Specialize in Glass for


Melendez Avenue


Windshields, Doors, etc.




For any make of car


Between 1 0th and 1 1 th Streets




Colon, R. P.


Colon Panama




Phone 303 Phone 1193


Compliments or


nOVDFIDS VmTURA


Front Street Colon



MR 129Q 11



Eighty nine



Compliments of

thg sflmflRiTfln

HOSPITAL

Colon Tel.

THE 1943 to 1944
STUDENT COUNCIL

of the

STUDOT'S ASSOCIATIOn

OF CRISTOBAL HIGH

SCHOOL

would like to take this space to wish

"SUCCESS TO OUR SUCCESSORS"

in the coming year of 1944-45



Ninety



AUTOGRAPHS



Ninety one



AUTOGRAPHS



Ninety two



AUTOGRAPHS



Ninety three



AUTOGRAPHS



Ninety four



AUTOGRAPHS



Ninety five




Ninety six



MR 12W Panama Canal 5-12-44 350 books




^ ^ \ v