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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Foreword
 Dedication
 Faculty
 Seniors
 Juniors
 Sophomores
 Freshmen
 Trade Wind
 Advertising
 Back Matter
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Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries



http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1940cris



CARIBBEAN
1940



Published by the
Student Association




Cristobal High School
Cristobal, Canal Zone



In Appreciation



Our sincere gratirude goes to all who have contributed
their creative ability, time, and money for the successful com-
pletion of this yearbook.

CARIBBEAN STAFF




Foreword



Laden with these memories of C. H. S., like a ship, we
sail across distant horizons to our respective destinies, hopeful
of exchanging our cargoes of learning for the spiritual and
material wealths of the world.




Miss Bess McVey Liter



Dedication



Dear Miss Liter,

Because you have devoted so much time and effort to our
well-being, have so willingly imparted priceless knowledge to
strengthen the foundation for our future, and have succeeded
in being both teacher and friend to us, we, the seniors of 1940,
dedicate this book of memories to you as a token of our appre-
ciation.



Seniors of 1940




DOROTHY BRENNAN

Editor in Chief





JEAN BADGLEY

Ass't. Editor



P J EVANCOE

Sponsor



The

Faculty Dept Mary Taylor

Will Dorothy Anderson

Sarah Casey

Business Managers Paul Gorin

Byne Bunting



Staff



Prophecy



Class History



Peggy Bailey
Jean Badgley
Byne Bunting



Jean Badgley

Dorothy Anderson




1st Row L. to R. Dorothy Anderson, Peggy Bailey, Sarah Casey.
.2nd Row L. to R. Dan Gower, Shirley Jennings, Mary Taylor.
3rd Row L. to R. Byne Bunting, Paul Gorin, Rose M. Stroop.




Mr. Ben Williams

Superintendent of Schools




Mr. Lawrence Johnson
Asst. Superintendent




Dr. George Howard
Ant. to Superintendent



Principal's Message

Caribbean 1940

Between the covers of this book are the
mirrored memories of the past year's pleasant
associations. Among the pages you will find
much to cherish, for herein is the story of the
many worthwhile things which you yourselves
have accomplished. Your splendid achieve-
ments have brought much honor to yourselves
and credit to this institution. May your future
years prove even more replete with successes
and with ever-present happiness.

Cecil L. Rice.
Principal.




Mr. Cecil L. Rice

Principal of Cristobal High



Faculty



Miss Hallie Beavers

Teacher of Mathematics and Household

Arts.
Degrees A.B.. Women's College. V. N. C.
M A.. Duke University. North
Carolina.
Before entering C. H. S. Durham High

School. North Carolina.
Activities Cafeteria cashier.
Co-sponsor of Freshman Class.



Mr. Paul L. Beck

Teacher of American Problems, Mathe-
matics.

Degrees A.B.. Findlay College, Ohio.
M.A.. Michigan University.

Before entering C. H. S. Emerson High
School, Lakewood, Ohio.

Activities Sponsor of Dramatic Club
and National Thespians.



Miss Jeanne Brown

Teacher of English 10. Librarian.
Degrees A.B., University of Missouri.
M.A., University of Missouri.
Before entering C. H. S. Balboa High

School. Balboa, Canal Zone.
Activities Sponsor of Sophomore Class.



Mr. Forrest K. Bryan

Teacher of Mechanical Drawing, Mathe-
matics, Woodwork.
Degrees B.S., Teachers College. Kansas.
M.S.. Colorado College of Edu-
cation, Greeley, Colorado.
Before entering C. H. S. Training School

Pittsburg. Kansas.
Activities Co-sponsor of Junior Class.



Mr. Paul J. Evancoe

Teacher of Journalism, U. S. History.
Degrees A.B., Lebanon Valley College.
Pennsylvania.

M.A.. Duke University, North
Carolina.
Before entering C. H. S. Ephrata High

School. Ephrata. Pennsylvania.
Activities Trade Wind and Caribbean
Publications-




Mr. Noel Gibson

Teacher of Woodwork and Metal Shop.
Degrees B.S., Bradley Polytechnical In-
stitute.
Before entering C. H. S. Balboa High

School, Balboa. C. Z.
Activities Co-sponsor of Sophomore

Class, Athletics Assistant.



Miss Doris Griffin

Teacher of Household Arts.

Degrees A.B.. Judson College, Marion.

Alabama.
Before entering C. H. S. Murphy High

School, Mobile, Alabama.
Activities Co-sponsor of Senior Class.

Cafeteria Manager.



Mr. Ted Hotz

Teacher of Algebra. Counselor, Solid
Geometry, Trigonometry. Physics.

Degrees A.B.. Heidelberg, Ohio.
M.A., Ohio State.

Before entering C. H. S. Newport High
School. Newport. Kentucky.

Activities Student Council.



Miss Bess M. Liter

Teacher of English 11, 12.

Degrees A.B.. West Virginia University.
M.A., West Virginia University.

Before entering C. H. S. Thurston Pre-
paratory School, Pittsburg, Pennsyl-
vania.

Activities Sponsor of Junior Class.



Miss Mary Elizabeth Moore

Teacher of French 10, Latin 9, Spanish
9 and 10.

Degrees A.B., West Virginia.

M.A., Columbia University.

Before entering C. H. S. Follansbee High
School. Follansbee. West Virginia.

Activities Co-sponsor of Student Coun-
cil.



Miss Helen T. Patterson

Teacher of Shorthand, Typing. Business

Training.
Degrees B.S., Montana State.
Before entering C. H. S. Mandan High

School, Mandan, North Dakota.
Activities School Accountant.



Mrs. Phyllis Spencer

Teacher of Spanish 10. 11. 12. Commer-
cial Spanish, World History.
Degrees A.B., Coe College,

A.M.. University of Iowa.
Diploma de Suficiencia. Univ-
ersity of Madrid.
Before coming" to C. H. S. N. C. C. W. of

Greensboro. North Carolina.
Activities Spanish Club (La Pasi.



Mr. Kenneth Vinton

Teacher of Chemistry and Biology.
Degrees B.A., Ripon College, Wisconsin.

M.A., Columbia University.
Before entering C. H. S. Beloit High

School, Beloit, Wisconsin.
Activities Sponsor of Senior Class.
Biology Club.
Photo Club.



Mr. Byron A. Wilson

Teacher of Spanish 10, English 9.

Degrees B.M., Otterbein College. Ohio.
A.B.. University of Arizona.
M.A., Middlebury College, Ver-
mont.

Before entering C. H. S. St. David High
School, St. David. Arizona.

Activities Sponsor of Freshman Class.



Miss Mary Worrell

Teacher of Art and Speech.

Degrees B.S.. University of Missouri.

M.S., Northwestern University.
Before entering C. H. S. Mexico High
School, Mexico, Missouri.



Mr. Carl Maedl

Teacher of General Science.

Degrees B.E., State Teachers College.
Moorhead, Minnesota.

Before entering C. H. S. Sauk Rapids
High School. Sauk Rapids, Minne-
sota.




Dr. George Eugene

Director of School Health.
Degrees A.B., Cornell University.

M.D.. Long Isalnd College Hos-
pital.
Before entering C. H. S. Surgeon U. S.
Public Health Service, Physician New
York State Compensation Fund, Sur-
geon U. S. Coast Guard on North
Atlantic Iceberg Patrol.



Mr. Oswald E. Jorstad

Teacher of Glee Club, Orchestra, Band.
Degrees B.A., Concordia College, Moor-
head, Minnesota.
B.M., Concordia Conservatory
of Music, Fargo, North Dakota.
Before entering C. H. S. High School,

Valley City, North Dakota.
Activities Junior and Senior High
School Bands. Orchestra Choirs, and
Glee Clubs. Music and Christmas
Festivals.



Mrs. Eileen O Brien

Assistant Director of Physical Education.
Degrees A.B., Claremont Colleges.

Claremont, California.
Eefore entering C. H. S. Balboa High

School, Balboa, Canal Zone.
Activities Junior High School Sports.

Acting Local Director of Girl Scouts.



Mr. Howard Neff. Jr.

Director of Physical Education.
Degrees B.S., University of Pennsyl-
vania.

M.A., Columbia University.
Before entering C. H. S. Director of
Health and Physical Education. Hav-
erford, Pennsylvania.
Activities Sports.



Mr. John S. Pettingill

Teacher of Physical Education.
Degrees B.S., University of Notre Dame.
Graduate work at Columbia
University.
Before coming to C. H. S. Public Schools
of Niagara Falls, New York. Educa-
tional Adviser CCC in New York.



Miss Ruth Wikingstad

Office Secretary.

Was graduated from C. H. S. in 1935.

Worked at the Pacific Steam Navigation
Company from August. 1935 to Feb-
ruary 1937.

Worked with the School Division, Balboa
from February 1937 until October,
1937.

Then transferred to C. H. S.



FAREWELL GRADIATES

TEACHERS, CLASSMATES, PARENTS, AND FRIENDS:

In our program tonight we have tried to give you a glimpse of our achievements dur-
ing our school careers. To some of our listeners we may seem unprepared to shoulder life's
responsibilities; so immature emotionally and mentally that we cannot fully grasp the import
of the obligations and privileges of that larger society which we are entering tonight; so
inexperienced that we know nothing of life or how to face the situations that may confront
us. Others may say that we profess to know it all just because we are being graduated, be-
cause we are receiving our diplomas.

We fully realize our deficiences and are acutely aware of our unpreparedness to meet
all the obligations and to accept all the privileges of society. We possess, however, certain
fundamental knowledge that will help us to learn to become more useful citizens.

During our school lives we have learned more than the principles of English, mathe-
matics, or science we have also lerned the principles of living a useful life. We have ac-
quired a sense of civic duty and a sense of moral responsibility. We have also acquired the
determination and courage that will enable us to meet life fairly and squarely.

Although we lack experience we have a firm foundation upon which to build a liffi
of happiness and beauty. We have learned to follow the directions that will guide us up
the roads of higher learning and higher mental and moral development.

"We live in deeds, not years; in thoughts, not breaths;

In feelings, not in figures on a dial.

We should count time by heart throbs.

He most lives who thinks most, feels noblest, acts the best."

We wish sincerely to thank you, our parents, for all you have done to make our school
lives profitable, secure, and happy. It is difficult to express our appreciation for your sacri-
fices, your sympathy, and your encouragement of our efforts in the past.

Many of us have ambitions toward careers that will necessitate further years of train-
ing. We shall need your encouragement and support even more in the future than we
have in the past. We realize that we are not ready to enter life alone and unguided. We
wish to ask for the continuance of your interest, your encouragement, and your counsel.

To you, our teachers, we wish to express our gratitude for your guidance and help in
preparing us for the life we are about to en:er. You have taught us more than a funda-
mental knowledge of the subject matter upon which we may base our further learning;
you have taught us to respect integrity, nobility of character, and the rights of others. You
have been patient and kind. We will never forget what you have taught us and will always
try to live up to your expectations of us, and to the ideals you have set for us by precept
and example.

To you, our friends in the community, and to the civic organizations, we wish to ex-
press our appreciation for your cooperation and friendly encouragement during our school
careers. You have done much to make our school days more pleasant. We shall always be
grateful.

Classmates, my last word is to you. We have come a long way together, but now our
paths must part. During our years in school we have worked and played together through
good times and bad. As we go our separate ways in life, may the experiences and friendships
that we have shared here with each other always remain as cherished memories. May our
future lives reflect those noble qualities we have acquired through our fine associations and
our training, and may we all be a real credit to our homes, our school, and our community.

It is difficult for us to leave for our associations here have been long and pleasant.

Perhaps in the words of the poet we can best say "Till We Meet Again."

"We've been long together

Thru pleasant, thru cloudy weather

Tis hard to part when friends are dear:

Perhaps will cost a sigh a tear;

Then steal away, give little warning.

Choose thine own time.

Say not good night but in some brighter clime

Bid me good morning!

Peggy Bailey.



CLASS HISTORY

September 18, 1936
Dear Granny.

I'm in bed, gettin' better from the freshman-sophomore brawl. What a day!! We had inter class competitif races
( if that is the way yoo spel it), and inspite of our size, we won. Will write again as soon as I'm better.

Love and kizzes.
Frosh

January 17, 19t 7
Dear Granry.

Thanks yoo so much for the swell Christmas stuff yoo sent me. I'm now a real genuwine freshman. Mr. Beck is our
class sponsor and he sure i: a swell man. Whitney Brayton is the class president, John Frensley, the vice-president.
Bobbie Styles, the secretary, and Bobby Fernandez is the treazurer. Our two clas: representatives are Elfrida Flores and
Arthur Farrell. Got to close now snd study for exam: and are they going to be hard.

Love.
Frosh

June 10. 1937
Dear Granny,

Oh, I've had such a swell time this year. In May we had our class picknick and all went over to Shimmy Beach.
Gee, it was fun hot dogs, soda pop 'n pickles! Skool gets out tomorrow and then yippeeeeeeeee! : ! Three whole
months of vacation.

Love,
Frosh

September 19. 193 7
Dear Grandma,

School started here on the seventeenth of this month with the usual annual "brawl". We weren't so lucky this
year. We lost. Miss Liter is our class sponsor and we elected Karl Marohl as president. Joe Nitto is our vice-president
and Ann Washington is the secretary. Our two class representatives are Bobby Fernandez and Bobbie Styles.

Boy, do we have a swell bunch of athletes this yeat! Jack Halliburton and Whitney Brayton sure are going to help
us when the track meet rolls around in April.

We're planning a school carnival and our class is going to run four booths. They are the coin booth, the penny-
game, balloon game, and the duck game.

All my love.
Soph

June 15. 1938
Dear Grandma,

You know, I'm a movie star now. When we had our class picnic, which was at Shimmy Beach again. A Grantl.mi
Rice "Sportlight" photographer went along and we were lusky in having movies made of us. Isn't that sweil?
Last March 18, we had our class dance in the gym.

Well, the end of school is here again. Just got my report card and I passed with "flying colors." You now have
a grandchild who is a full fledged junior. It sure feels swell to be one.

Adio -,
Soph

_, Tune 15. 1939

Dear Gram

As the last semester of my junior year draws to a clo:e, I thought I should write you and let you know what
happened.

Our class officers were Bob Fernandez, president; Ann Washington, vice president; Rose Margaret Stroop, secre-
tary; Eddie Greene and Georgianna Carnright, clas^ represen tatives.

For our first activity, we had a picnic at Cristobal Gun Club. Went snipe hunting; I caught a plaid one.

The Gypsy Rover" was our operetta this year. It was one of the most successful operettas we ever had.

One of the biggest events of the year was the carnival. Our class had several booths, and took in a lot of money
for the school. Our carnival queen was Jean Grabhorn.

When Easter came, we had our second vacation of this school year. It seems as if ( I didn't say like because Miss
Liter told us to day "as if") vacations are too far apart. Speaking of Miss Liter, she helped us publish an essay annual.

The Junior-Senior Banquet was on June 2. We all enjoyed that event. We had a lovely dinner and a dance at the
Washington Hotel. We'll have another one next year.

Now school is out, and I have only one more year in high school. Just think, next year I'll be a senior!

Love,
Junior

June 16. 1940
Dear Grandmother,

Commencement is over, I have been graduated, and I am now facing the world, its problems and complications.

Leaving Cristobal High School makes me feel rather queer. I've been going here for four long years and it seems
somewhat like home.

A formal dance started our senior year just right. As I sat back and watched the students dancing, I thought of the
way the seniors looked, so different from the freshmen they were four years ago.

The Balboa Junior College presented the highly amusing play "What A Life' in our auditorium.

The girls of the class showed their athletic ability by defeating Balboa in volley-ball and basketball. This is the first
time in many years, but the girls really played like star-performers.

As seniors, we studied health under the guidance of Dr. Eugene. We went to the Cristobal Clubhouse to witness an
army first aid moving picture.

Then came the worry met by all graduating classes, that of commencement. We had a graduating committee
of sixteen honor students, who worked with Mr. Rice and Mr. Vinton.

Sunday before graduation, Baccalaureate was held in the auditorium. A certain feeling of solemnity passed over
the group as it received the blessings.

On June 14, we were graduated. The whole class was so-o-o nervous! The exercise was beautiful. The girls wore
long white gowns and the boys wore dark suits. It was the most impresive and most memorable action of our twelve
years of school.

Love,

Senior









Albrirton, Carrie Eugenia

Panama

ACTIVITIES: La Pa* flub 2-3. Carnival
1-2. Tennis 2.

PLANS: Leaving for States.

"Sbt km .i manner full of gra< e,
Toeethei with a smiling fa


Anderson, Dorothy Elizabeth
Colon, R p

ACTIVITIES: Basketball 3. Dtamatics 2-4.
La Pas 2-1-4, Trade Wind 4. Caribbean
4 Glee Club 2-3-4. Volley ball 3. Tennis
3. Bweball 3.

PLANS: Going to college.

"Her merry ways, her sparkling iniJi;
Her ready wit, make life worth white.




Attia. Isaac Albert

Aleppo, Syria

ACTIVITIES: Swimming 2-3-4. Opereia 1.

PLANS: Going to Business College.

"Business is good you'll hear him say;

1 In n, res, Better service the smiling :i a-.."




Badgley, Jean Elynor

Colon. R. P

A< TIV1TIES: La Pas 2-3-4. Trade Wind 4,
( anbbean 4. Varsity 3-4. Basketball 2-3-4.
Volleyball 1-2-3-4. Soccer 1-2-3, Softball
-) Tennis 2-3-4.

PLANS: Balboa Junior Collect.

"Vail ,,f fun the livelong day

Joking .tin! laughing htr cares auay"




Bailey, Josephine Margaret

Honolulu, Hawaii

ACTIVITIES: Caribbean 4. Dramatic 4

PLANS: Going to College,

"A classmate every one admites,

I Ur line it for knowledge netvr lirej."




Brennan, Dorothy Frances

Sr Louis, Missouri

ACTIVITIES Glee Club 3. Trade Wind -I,

i ,ir ili| .in i

PLANS Business School.

"A truer friend it hard to find:

S:n, tu in hi.iri and t ! in mind







Brown, Mary Patricia

Waterloo, Iowa

ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 1-2.

PLANS' Going to college.

'Her laughter and giggles are heard all day
For she believes in the "smiling way."





Bunting, Mary Byne

Fort Williams, Maine

ACTIVITIES: Trade Wind 3-4. Glee Club 3.
Caribbean 3-4.

PLANS: Going to college.

"Here's a girl, not only a beauty

Bnl one always willing to do her duly.'



Carles. Andres
Colon. R. p.

ACTIVITIES: Soccer 1-2-3-4. Baseball 1-2-3.
Football 1-2-3. Basketball 1-2-3-4. Track
2-3-4, La Pas i. Glee Club I.

PLANS: Studying Law.

"Ready, willing and able to work
in his studies he never did shirk."



Carnright, Georgiana

Saugerties. New York

ACTIVITIES: Softball 1-2-4. Swimming 1-
2-i-4 Volleyball 1-2-3-4. Basketball 1-2-
3-4 Tennis 1-2-3-4, Soccer 1-22-3. Dra-
matics 1-2-3, Varsity 2-3-4, Glee Club 1-
2-3-4. Photo Club 4.

"Her winning Smile, her graceful charm
Would ail your fears at once disarm."



Casey, Sarah Frances

Montgomery, Alabama

ACTIVITIES: Dramatics 2 3, Trade Wind i,
Caribbean 3, Sports 2-3.

PLANS: Study Journalism

"Sarah is as tweet as a song

For that we'll remember her long."




Coffin, James Henry
Cris'.obal, C Z.

ACTIVITIES Foocball 1-2-3-4, Soccer 1-2-5-
4 Baseball 1-2-3-4, Warerpolo 4. Dro.ua-
lie Club 4.

PLANS: Working.

"Ml bopet are as high ai hn legs art long.
\\"l % it orry abort! trouble, he's tinging .< tong.'



Farrell. Arthur William P.

Ancon, Csnal Zone

A< T1V1TIES Baseball 1-2-3-4. Football l-J-
J-4. Basketball 1-2-3-4, Soccer 1-2-3-4.
Water Polo 1 Varsity 2-3-4, Tennis I -J.
La Pas 2

FLANS Apprentice.

"Jolly and certain of his Hand,
He'll '-it fun in any land



Fernandez, Robert Anthony

Hous on. Texas

ACTIVITIES: Basketball 1-2-3-4, Baseball t-
2. Sixcer 1-2-3-'!, Football 1-2-3-4.

PLANS: Texas A & M.

"He n ell that's good and great:

lit i< the master uj bn la *>



Cosaraquis, James
Colon. R p

ACTIVITIES: Soccer 2-3--1. Football 2-3-4.
Baseball 2-3-4. Track 2-3-4, Basketball 2



PLANS Parks" Air College



"A kind end steadfast mind bits he.
He takes hn problems teriousl)




Crouch, Lois Catherine

Dunbar. West Virginia

ACTIVITIES: Volleyball 1-3-4, Basketbr.:i T
Softball 1-4, Swimming 1-3-4. Soccer 1
Glee Club 1,

FLANS: St. Mary's Academy.

"An 'ingenue' lba:'j what tee call bet

For nothing on earth could tier appall bar."



Drenan, Evelyn

Richmond. Virginia

ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 1-2-3. Voileyball 1-
2-3.

PLANS: College,

"Hers was a beauty d.gmfied.
Enforced With brann a\ well 01 pridl



Egger, Thomas Joseph

Fl m i ra New York

ACTIVITIES: Basketball 3-4, Soccer 2-3.

PLANS: Canal Zone Employee.

"We'll remember htm as a piayUil bow
W hn tilled our unrld ufb laughter and jo\






Flores, Elfrida Label



ACTIVITIES: Class representative 1. Carnrval
1-2-4. La Fas 3. Soccer 1. Tennis 2. Dra
matic Club 1



FLANS: Stenographer



",-| tu eel and loya! \'it >;J

Who makes brains and beauty blend



French, Merwin Andrew

Birmingham, Alabama

ACTIVITIES: Sports 1-2-3-4, Ttade Wind
3-4. Caribbean 3. Dramatics 2-3-4 ai
nival 2-3-4, La Fl-.. 2

PLANS: Junior College,

"His future be bo.'ds in the palm of bn l:*nd
The n orld that he In fj in is bis to com-
mand."



Grabhorn, Jean Pauline

Milwaukee. Wisconsin

ACTIVITIES: La Pas 2-3. Glee Club 1-2,
Volleyball 1-2-3-4. Baske ball 1-2-3, Sor-
cer 1-2, Tennis 2.

PLANS: Undecided.

"She is a comrade, loyal ami if i.e.
Sharing your troubles ami joys with yon




Greene, Albert Edward

Greenfield. Massachusetts

ACTIVITIES Thespian 2-3-1, Sports ]-2->-
i La Pas 2, Dramatic Club 1-2. Varsity
Club 4.

PLANS: West Point or Bradley Tech

"A bold and gallant knight .-
//;. manner laden with i hivalry










Holmelin, Jean E.

New Yurk City

ACTIVITIES: Volleyball 1-2-5-4, Ba*ke ball
1-2-3-4, Soccet 1-2-3, Softball 1-4, La Pas
2 i-4

FLANS: Scudder Business School

"Jean's merry, laughing, carefree hays

II Hi ti,r >i ",/mJ hi of our high school aa\i."



Hunt, Mary Elaine
Colon, R. P

ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 1, La Fas 2-5-4,
Basketball 1-2, Soccer 1-2. Volleyball 1-2.
Tennis 1.

PLANS: College.

"Mary's faithful, true, a',d kit d
A nicer girl a bard to find



Jennings, Shirley Jaclin

Manchester. New Hampshire

ACTIVITIES: Trade Wind 4. Caribbean -1,
Glee Club 1-2-3. B-cketball 1-2. Swim-
ming 5, Spanish Club 2.

FLANS: Step liens College.

"Shirley's jokes ar.d her flaming hair
\'alc lis Icrgtl our trouble and care."



K.uifer, Jane Bernice

New Orleans, Louisiana

At T1V1TIFS: Glee Hub 1-2-3-4. La Pas 2-
3-4. Operetta -2 -3 i. Basketball 1-2-3-4.
Volleyball 1-2-3-4. Soccer 1-2-3. Softball 1.

PLANS: College.

"Jant n friendly, kind, and true

Always ready in laugh uilh you."



Krause, Georgeanna Hope
Colon, R p.



At TIVITIES: Orthlstti
4. Trade Wind I



FLANS: Study of hatp.



2-3-4, Glee Club 2-



"Gifted h.iif,,,' with nimble hand,
Soulful '::,,,, ,l,i understands



Lyew, M. Alexander
Colon. R. p.

ACTIVITIES: Football 1-2 Basketball 1-2-
i Baseball I, Waterpolo 2-3-4, S net
2 s Tennis 2s. Swimming 2-3 4

PLANS: Work

'\../ voi too gay.

II, trod the even, middli way.'









Nitto. Ethel Teresa

New York City

ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 2-3-4. La Pas 2.
Dfamt.:ic Club 2-3-4. Carnival 1-2 4,
Volleyball 2.

"Alu ays lull ol jokes and laughwr.
Her memory u ill long live alter."



Nitto, Jo;eph Frank

New York City

ACTIVITIES: Football 1-2-3-4, Baseball 1-
2-3-4, Eatketball 1-2-3-4. Track 3-4.

PLANS: Work on the Zone.

"Hij spirit is at fearless as
An eagle on the wing



Posce. Madeline Margaret

Norresrown. Pennsylvania

ACTIVITIES: Carnival 4. Tenms 2

PLANS: Secretarial.

"Gentle ol nature, humble of heart,
Forever striving to jtillsll her part."



Randies. Ruth Catherine

San Antonio. Texas

ACTIVITIES: Li- Pas 3. Spoils 2-3-4, Glee
Club 2-3-4, Dramatic Club 3-4.

PLANS: Nurse or Ttaveling Companion.

"Tall and charming, and you'll find
Equally graceful of speech and mind."



Raymond, Jean Frances

Colon. R F

At TIVITIES: Volleyball 1-2-3-4. Baikcths.ll

1-2-3-4, Soccer 1-2 -3 Tennis 2-3-4, La

Pas 2-3-4, Or;retta 3, Glee Club 1-2-3.
Varsiry < lab 2 I

PLANS: California State College at Berkeley

"Tall and graceful as the palm
Ever tweet, ttrene and taint."




Salas, Harold Robert
New York City

ACTIVITIES: Soccer 1-2-3-4. Baseball 1-2.
Baskerb.:! 1-2. Photo Club 3.

PLANS: Civil Engineering (Columbia I

"Noble of mind, keen of though!.

I,t d truthful uorld he a'.uays fought."




Skinner. Stanford Joyner

Cristobal. C Z

ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 1-2-3-4. Band J-4.
Orches ra 4. Trade Wind 4. Dramatic
Club 1-2-3-4. Carnival 2-3-4

PLANS: Srudy law.

"// handiotne ii as handsome doei.
A fairer UJ then niter teas."




Smith, Spencer B.

Chatranooga, Tennessee

AC T1V1T1ES: Biology Club 2. Phoio Club 4.
Chemistry Stock Room 4.

PLANS: Universiry of Tennessee.

"T*/j lad ii destined to be gnat.
A man of science that's his fae."



Stokes. Montford Marshall

Colon, R P.

ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 3, Wa-er Put.- I
2-3-4, Swimming 1-2-3-4. Track 3-4. Var
siry Club 3-4, Soccer 1-2-3-4. Football 1-
2-3-4. Carnival 2-3-4, Basketball 2

PLANS: Sheet Metal Worker.

"The uorld wet taken in hit stride;
Nor ttirntd he ba.k tor time not tide."



Stroop, Rose Margaret

Kansas City. M.ssouri

ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 1-2-34. Dramatic
Club [-2-3-4, Volleyball 2-3, Banquet
Committee. La Pas 3. Archery 3. Tennis 3,
Basketball 3. Trade Wind 4. Caribbean 4.

PLANS: Work.

"Smiling lipi. twinkling eyes
And a beauty that never dies.' 1






Stroop, Carolyn Mae

Sa-cramento. California

ACTIVITIES: Dramatic Club 1-2-3-4, Car-
nival 1-2-3-4, Glee Club 1-2-4.

HANS: Blackstone College. Virginia.

"A girl uith beauties very ran
Bewitching eyes and raten har."




Styles, Bobbie Mae

Ancon. Canal Zone

ACTIVITIES: Volleyball 1-2-3-4, Soccer 1-
2-3. Tennis 3. Jr.-Sr. Banque: Co-nmiite:
3, Student Association Treasurer 4, Car-
nival 1-2-3-4.

FLANS: Office Work.

"Happy, carefree, aluayj fray
Bobbie phases our cares away.



Taylor, Mary Alice

Fresno. California

ACTIVITIES: Dramatics 4. Trade V. ind I
Caribbean 4, Basketball 4.

PLANS: Business Course in Junior College

"Bubbling oler with latiglyer and mirth,
You can't find another like h.r on this tarlh.'



Wertz. Gladys L.

Colon. R. P

ACTIVITIES: Volleyball 1-2-3-4. Soccer 1-
2-3 Softball 1-4. Baketball 1-2-3 V t
siry 3-4.

FLANS: Work.

"A uinsome smile, laughing broun eyes,
.''..kcs this girl abote others rise."



White, Anna Frances

Red Hill, Virginia

ACTIVITIES: Dramatic Club 1-23-4. Glee
Club 1-2-3-4. Supper Club 2. La F_> 2

FLANS: Beauty Culture School.

"A charming personality
Sprinkled with vivacity"



Willett. Harold R

Roberta, Kentucky

ACTIVITIES: Baseball 1-2-3-4, Football 1-
2-3-4, Basketball 1-2-3-4, Track 5-4, Sue
cei 4, Glee Club 2, Varsity Club 2-3-4

PLANS: Bradley Tech.

"With his backbone and brain he can take

bis place.
In the sport of life and win ain ra. e.








R


L


Wolf, Dorothy Emma

Colon, R. P.




*


1


ACTIVITIES: GlM Club 1-2-3-4, S ct


r 1-2




i, Basketball 1-2-3, Volle\hall 1


-2-3-4




t


Drarait CJub 1-2, Carnival 1-2 3-


. Jr.


a\W i


r


Sr Banqucr Committee




^i


F


PLANS: College.





"Sin/pi* and sweet in all her ways,
She'll be happy the rest o) bet days




Collins, Ernmett Algerine

Dudley, Georgia

SPF.CIAL SCHOOL ACTIVITIES: Waterpolo
4. Swimming i. Dramatic Club 4, Car-
nival -t.

PLANS* Lcarnership

"Joking and laughing all the day long
To bun lilt is just a sweet, merry song."





Contreras, MJreya

San Jose, Costa Rica

PLANS: Undecided.

"A Latin beauty with a v. ay
That made us all forever gay'"





Herman, John Edward

Pensacola, Florida

R.O.T.C.



ACTIVITIES: Trade Wind
PLANS: V S. Navy.



"A carefree heart, wo

Never j fr prim Hi J la



by ike sea:
am a deg-ee.'



House, Helen Le Brun

Newport News. Virgin:-'

ACTIVITIES: Field Hockey 1-2. Basketball
3, Dramatics

"Sentences fail when one word is complete;
Descriptive of Helen is the one word- "sweet."



Gorin. Paul

Boston, Massachuse rs

ACTIVITIES: Rifle Club 2. Trade Wind 3-4,
Caribbean J- t

FLANS: Work

"/I little work, ami mostly play
Mixed together make a happy day"



Davis, Luther Edward

Elizabeth City. North Carolina



PLANS: Work,



"A quiet lad. with manners in reserve

A lift lull oj merit, may he always deiefPt



Mansfield, William Joseph

Omaha. Nebraska

SPE< IAL ACTIVITIES: Football 1-2-3-4.
Easkttball 1-2-3-4, Baseball 1-2-3.

TLANS: Schcol in the Stares.

"Likt a tireless swimmer

Ely will reach the shares of success."



Marquard, Edward George

Colon. Republic of Panama

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES: Dramatic Club 1-2-
- t Soccer 1-2-3. Football 1-2-3-4. Base-
ball 1-2-3-4. Basketball 1-2-3-4

"He'll be successful in atiy land

For hi holds his future well in hand.''



Parrish, Dorothy Lorraine

Bremen, Georgia

SPECIAL A< T1VITIES: Glee Club 3
"Dot possessed not only prettiness,

Bm ,i t cry in id u iitines r,



Thomas, Hugh M.
( olon, R. P.

w nvn s Soccei L-2, Football I I
Waurpolo I, Basketball 1, Softball 4.

PLANS University of Cincinnati.

". i ',, 6T f til \milt pleasant u ord,
Mirth over ts, be preferred.




Palmer, John Stanley

Colon, Republic of Panama

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 1-2-3

PLANS: Apprenticeship

"Learning to live happily,
He lives to work joyfully



Crandall, Jack E.

Brighton, Massachusetts
PLANS: Work.

"No towers oj achievement crown

the hill
Unless the mind /j guided by a u ill



Oswald, Peggy

Phoenix. Arizona

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 4.

PLANS: Business School.

"Laughter and friendship, two of her

traits.
Will linger in the minds of all her

classmates."




Patchett, Robert McCullough

Washington. D C.

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES Wsr.erpolo
1-2-3-4, Swimming 1-2-s-l. Foot-
ball 4.

PLANS: P. R R. iob.

"A helping hand he '11 a!u ay I U nj:
A carefree lad, bus a rt-l. line friend."



Thomas, Richard Ernest

Boston. Massachusetts

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES: Baseball 3.
Track 3, Dramatic Club 1.

PLANS: Work.



"Very tjitiet and unassuming

Weighty plain hit mind n hr,




1. Bobbie Styles

2. R. M. Stroop

3. Georgiana Carnright

4. Madeline Posse

5. Georgeanna Krause

6. Jean Holmelin




7. Anna White

8. Jean Grabhorn

9. Lois Crouch

10. Dorothy Wolf

1 1. Jean Badgley

12. Carolyn Stroop

13. Jean Raymond





Prophecy



Good afternoon, everybody. This is your radio
reporter, ARTHUR FARRELL, speaking from the
grounds of the 1950 World's Fair.

We have celebrated visitors here who will say
a few words to you. Our first is a little lady don't
be bashful, just step right up and speak into the
microphone. What is your name? "Miss MADELINE
POSSE." And what is your occupation? "I'm the
secretary of Mr. WILLIAM MANSFIELD, president
of the Tenth National Bank." And, how do you like
secretarial work? "I like it quite well, especially
since I've been using the new keyless typewriter,
invented by ELFRIDA FLORES and CARRIE
ALBRITTON." Thank you.

Here, ladies and gentleman, is Senator ED-
WARD MARQUARD and his two body guards,
ISAAC ATTIA and RICHARD THOMAS. Senator,
would you please say a few words? "Hello, ma!"
And what is your latest project, senator? "I'm now
sponsoring an expedition to South America under
the leadership of SPENCER SMITH with the
eminent scientists WILLIAM TORBERT. BOBBIE
STYLES, and PATRICIA BROWN, who will at-
tempt to secure rubber suitable for rubberized safety
pins." Thank you. Senator.

Rushing by ars four promising athletes, LOIS
CROUCH, diving champ, GEORGIANA CARN-
RIGHT, national swimming star, JEAN RAY-
MOND, winner of tennis medals, and JAMES
COSARAQUIS, cyclone track-man.

While we're here, let's look in on the Married
Women's Convention. The subject of discussion is,
"What this world needs is a good five-cent husband."
Chairman of the Committee is Mrs. David Jones,
the former PEGGY OSWALD. Speaker of the day
is Mrs. Jack Egozcue, formerly ETHEL NITTO The
lady who now has the floor is Mrs. HELEN HOUSE
Carter.

Over here, we have a distinguished looking
group of visitors; we thought you folks might be
interested as they are the representatives of Panama
for the fair. They are Senors ANDRE CARLES and
HAROLD SALAS, also Senorita MIREYA CON-
TRERAS.

Walking along the Mid-Way, we see District
Attorney, STANFORD SKINNER. He and his
guards, PAUL GORIN and DOROTHY PARISH,
are protecting the jewels of MARY HARTMAN,
JEAN GRABHORN, and EVELYN DRENAN,
which are being exhibited in the Diamond Room
of the Glass Building designed by ALGERINE
COLLINS and JOHN PALMER.

Something tells me that approaching is a
quartet of sea going gentlemen. Would you please
step up and say a few words? What is your name?
"Mr. ROBERT FERNANDEZ." And is this your
staff, or crew, or whatever you call it? "Aye, it is."
Would you mind ? "No, not at all. ALLEN
LYEW, radio operator, JOHN HERMAN, first
mate, and MONTFORD STOKES, chief engineer."
Have you any present sailing plans? "Yes, we are
going to follow the tide when it goes out to see
where the water goes.



Prop he cy

Approaching from the Arts and Science Build-
ing are the two Sombel's Prize winners, JEAN
BADGELY and DOROTHY ANDERSON, who
wrote the amazing novel "Bums along Willow
Creek." Speaking of prize winners, there is JAMES
COFFIN, winner of the title, "America's Little
Brother." He is escorting the two ladies just men-
tioned.

Let's go into the House Contrivance Building.
Here is Miss SHIRLEY JENNINGS, head of the
department, who is now working on a reducing diet
of cake and ice cream. Over to our left we see some
young ladies demonstrating queer gadgets. Pardon
me, Miss. May I ask the names of the young ladies?
"Why, yes. They are CAROLYN STROOP, ANNA
WHITE, LORRAINE GOODWIN, and I am
GLADYS WERTZ." Now, may I ask what those
are? "Well, Carolyn is demonstrating a new splash
less egg-beater, Anna is exhibiting wrathless grape
dessert, Lorraine is frying bacon in an inverted fry-
ing pan which prevents the grease from popping,
and I am using the new perfumed dishwater to take
away the drugery of washing dishes.

Now, to be young again and visit the Fair
kindergarten. If it isn't too much trouble, would
you inform me the subject taught to the youngsters?
"We are now teaching 'How to be financially inde-
pendent!' or, 'The principles of safe-cracking'." And,
who are the teachers? "Miss DOROTHY WOLF,
Miss JEAN HOLMELIN, and Miss MARY HUNT,"
Thanks so much.

The theater seems to be doing nice business
with the new play, "Little Ado About Something,"
written by the famous playwright SARAH CASEY.
This is a novel type of play with one actor, EDDIE
GREENE, and twenty-five actresses, among whom
are such well-known names as RUTH RANDLES.
BYNE BUNTING, and JANE KAUFER. The play
is to be produced by that productive producer JACK
CRANDALL. For the afternoon performance, Miss
GEORGIANA KRAUSE, famed harpist, is going
to give a recital.

Here are three gay visitors. What are your
names, please? I'm ROSE MARGARET STROOP."
I'm PEGGY BAILEY.' "I'm DOROTHY BREN-
NAN." What is your vocational field? "We are
cartoonists." Oh, Yes! You're the ones responsible
for the cartoon "Olive Oop, or Popeye, way back
when."

I now see before me the owners of the Ditch
Digging Deluxe Inc. May I present Messrs, MER-
WIN FRENCH. ROBERT PATCHETT, and
LUTHER DAVIS. Gentlemen, what is the service
offered by your company? "Our intention is to
elevate ditches to the highest standards of artful
construction."

I see my time is flying, but before I go, I want
to remind you not to forget the exhibition baseball
game being played here this afternoon. The teams
are JOE NITTO'S St. Louis Hounds vs HAROLD
WILLETT'S New York Hankies. The game will
be broadcast over this station by THOMAS EGGER
and HUGH THOMAS.

Good afternoon folks. Keep an eye out for the
future.





Class Will



LORRAINE GOODWIN and MADELINE POSSE bequeath their quiet lady-like manners to ROSEMARY DIGNAM.

JUDITH FERRI, and ARLENE HOFFMAN.
JOHN HERMAN leaves his he-man figure to BOB BARTRON.

BYNE BUNTING leaves her fair skin and blonde treses to OPAL HOLGERSON and JUSTINA PEREZ.
SPENCER SMITH and JIMMY COFFIN will their "Empire State" height to LEE DOYLE and JACK BRAYTON.
DOT PARRISH leaves her witty jokes to EDITH SANDERS.
RUTH RANDLES bequeaths her sun-tan to MADELINE BOZEMAN.
JOE NITTO leaves his track shoes to EDDIE WHEELER.
PAUL GORIN wills his scholastic honors to DELBERT HARRIS.
"BUNKY MARQUARD leaves his cave-man qualities to FRANK SCOTT.
CAROLYN STROOP gives her torch-singing to BETSY MACMILLAN.
EVELYN DRENAN leaves her sophisticated shyness to GRACIE MARCUSE.
ELFRIDA FLORES bequeaths her steady boy friend to MURIEL STEWART
GEORG1ANA KRAUSE wills her harp playing to TOMMY MCGUINNESS.
HAROLD SALAS leaves his "ways" with Miss Liter to MARVIN ODOM.

DOROTHY ANDERSON bestows her eating ability upon BARBARA BATH and KEITH CAMPBELL.
PEGGY OSWALD leaves her scarlet lipstick to EVA JEAN DOYLE.
PEGGY BAILEY wills her studiousness to HENRY BUTCHER.
LUTHER DAVIS leaves his position as girls' chauffeur to JOHN PUCCI.
HUGH "BUDDY" THOMAS wills his claw-like nails to RAYMOND PLUMMER.
PAT BROWN bequeaths her knee-length dresses to MARY LOU MESSER.
MARY HARTMAN leaves her perfect daily attendance to THERESA HERN.
JANE KAUFER leaves her glamorous eye lashes to LOUISE GORMELY.
M1REYA CONTRERAS' Latin beauty to DALE PRICE.
ETHEL NITTO wills her giggle to FRANCES DAVENPORT.
BOBBIE STYLES bequeaths her erect pouure to EUGENIA MAE HUFF.
DOROTHY BRENNAN wills her delicate voice to ELSIE CHASE.

HELEN HOUSE leaves her hurried ways to FANNIE MARIE ELDRIDGE and RITA GOULET.
GEORGIANNA CARNRIGHTS modest ways to PEGGY MCCLEARY and EVELYN SHIRLEY.
EDDIE GREENE bequeaths his naps to CLYDE RULEY.

BOBBY FERNANDEZ leaves his trips home for breakfast to CHARLES PIERCE.

MONTFORD STOKES wills his swimming honors to WILLIAM PETERSON and ROBERT WILLIAMS.
ANDRES CARLES and HAROLD WILLET leave their scholastic standing to FRANK CAIN. ROBERT HARRIS, and

JOHN GILDER.
ALGERINE COLLINS bequeaths his laugh to MARVIN SALMON.

SARAH CASEY wills her unique fingernail polish colors to EDITH DIXON and MARJORIE GILDER.
ROSE MARGARET STROOP leaves her snoods to KATHRYN PHILLIPS.
MERWIN FRENCH'S fairness to GILBERT CHASE and HAROLD DUNLAP.
LOIS CROUCH bequeaths her streamlined figure to CARL ENDER.
ARTHUR FARRELL'S manly physique to STEWART POOL and DAN GOWER.
CARRIE ALBRITTONS exquisite manners to VIRGINIA NAYLOR.
STANFORD SKINNER leaves his ability to meet deadlines to RICHARD EGOLF.
JACK CRANDALL'S curly locks to HARRY KELLY.

JOHN PALMER wills the sole right to drive the car to school to LOUIS PALMER.
WILLIAM TORBERT leaves his fast ways to WAYNE NELL1S.

ANNA WHITE wills her Victorian qualities to RACHEL YOHROS and MARY SCHIAVO.
JEAN RAYMOND wills her tennis racket to EMILY HORINE.

JAMES COSARAQUIS and JEAN BADGLEY bestow their typing ability upon MABLE LYEW.
RICHARD THOMAS leaves his tall tales to JIM WALSH and NEIL MAGNER.
TOMMY EGGER bequeaths his "speed" to HAROLD ROSE.
GLADYS WERTZ and JEAN HOLMELIN bestow their athletic powers upon WILLIERE CALLOWAY and IRENE

STADE.
ISSAC ATTIA wills his dramatic voice to HOMER McCARTY.
BILLY MANSFIELD bequeaths his seriousness to LEO CON LEY and RUSSEL TIDD.
MARY HUNT bequeaths her ability to maintain silence in study halls to MARIAN SNYDER.
SHIRLEY JENNINGS and DOROTHY WOLF leave everything they have in common to LAURENA KELLER.
ALLEN LYEW wills his short-hand ambitions to GEORGE HERMAN and GEORGE ESTENOZ.
BOB PATCHETT leaves his five-year plan in C. H. S. to the rmarrest senior to-be.
KARL MAROHL bequeaths his brilliant history orations to CORDELIA BARRAUGH.

The SENIOR CLASS of 1940 wills to the JUNIOR CLASS the health lectures, the iron grills, Mr. Vinton's prize
biology specimens, the S. A. presidency. Senior Week, the front seats in the auditorium, the cute Freshman boys, Miss
Liter's Senior English assignments, and all the nebulous dreams of greatness.



Hall of



PRETTIEST GIRL
HELEN HOUSE



MOST POPULAR BOY
BOBBY FERNANDEZ



BEST GIRL ATHLETE

GEORGIANA CARNRIGHT



MOST STUDIOUS BOY
ANDRES CARLES



WITTIEST GIRL

DOROTHY ANDERSON



BEST DRESSED BOY
STANFORD SKINNER




Fame

BEST LOOKING BOY
EDDIE GREENE



MOST POPULAR GIRL

GEORGIANA CARNRIGHT



BEST BOY ATHLETE
HAROLD WILLETT



MOST STUDIOUS GIRL
PEGGY BAILEY



WITTIEST BOY
KARL MAROHL



BEST DRESSED GIRL
DOROTHY WOLF




Eugenia Huff
Grade Marcusc
Louis Palmer
Dale Price
Mary Si hiiMi



C herine Jusrice
Homer McCarry
Jusrina Perez
Gioconda Pucci
Frank Scort



Laurena Keller
Peggy McCleary
William Petterson
John Pucci
Evelyn Shirky



Harry Kelly
Tommy McGuinness
Kathryn Phillips
Harold Rose
Marian Snyder



Mabel Lyew
Ma-ry Messer
Charles Pierce
Clyde Ruley
Irene Slade



Eddie Wheeler



Jl-mes Walsh



Roberr Williams



Btrsy MacMillan
Virginia Naylor
Ray Plummer
Marvin Salmon
Muriel Srewart



Rachel Vohros



Neil Magner
Marvin Odom
Sruarr Pool
Edith Sanders
Russell Tidd



Juniors



NAME

Bub Bartron

Barbara Bath
Frank Baxter
Madeline Bczeman
Jack Brayton
Henry Butcher
Frank Cain
Willieree Callaway
Keith Campbell
Gilbert Chase
Leo Conley
Frances Davenport
Rosemary Dignam
Edith Dixon
Eva Jean Doyle
Lee Doyle
Harold Dunlap



Favorite Character

Robin Hood

Mickey Rooney

Pinnochio

Andy Hardy

G I.

Donald Duck

Shirley Jennings

Hamlet (Yeahli

Superman

Mortimer Snurd

Wimpy

Andy Hardy

Doug Fairbanks Jr.

Cleo

Andy Hardy

Mickey Rooney

La Verne Hosier



Usual Occupation

Arguing with Miss

Liter
Schooling
Stamp Collecting
Swimming
Riding
Swimming
Smooching
Not listening
Walking out of classes
Professional loafer
Doing homework

Chewing gum
Bothering people
Eating

Delivering papers
Study & Study



NAME
Richard Egolf

Fannie Marie

Eldridge
Carl Ender
George Estenoz
Fabian Forero
Judith Ferri
John Gilder
Marjorie Gilder
Louise Gormely
Margaret Goulet

Dan Gower

Delbert Harris

Rcbert Harris
George Herman
Arlene Hoffman



Favorite Character

Lefty Grove
Baby Snooks

Good Humor
F. D. Roosevelt
Marie Antoinette
Simon Legree
Figaro, the kitten
Baby Snooks
Miss Liter

Lana Turner

Noodles Nelson

Judy Garland
Harry Pope



Usual Occupation

Getting in trouble



Trying to stay in

English
Working
Resting

Sleeping and eating
Walking
Swimming

Trying to laugh at
Fannie's jokes
Resting up to go to
work
Stamp or coin collect-
ing
Going out at night
Whistling




Bob Bartron
W illieree Callaway
Eva Jean Doyle
F*b:an Fortro
Dilbcrt Harris;



Barbara Bzr.h
Keith Campbell
Lee Doyle
Judith Ferri
Robert Harris



Frank Baxter
Gilbert Chase
Harold Djn'ap
John Gilder
George Herman



Madeline Bozeman
Leo Conley
Richard Egolf
M&jorie Gilder
Arlene Hoffman



lack Brayton
Frances Davenport
Fqnr-ie F'dridte
Louise Gormely
George Hoffman



Henry Butcher
Rostrrary Dignarr
Carl Ender
Margaret Goulei
Opal H:lgerson



Frank Cain
Edirh D!xon
George Ei enoz
Dan Gower
Emily Horine



J un



i o r s



NAME



Favorite Character Usual Occupation



George Hoffman

Opal Holgerson Bette Davis

Emily Horine "Alfalfa"

Eugenia Mae Huff Rhett Butler



Catherine Justice

Laurena Keller
Harry Kelly
Mabel Lyew
Betsy MacMillan
Neil Magner

Gracie Marcuse
Homer McCarty
Peggy McCleary



Spencer Tracy

Scarlett O'Hara
Little Black Sambo
Linda Darnell

Confucius & Ann
Rutherford

Confucius
Charlie McCarthy
Cleo. the goldfish



Tommy McGuinness N. W.
Mary Lou Messer

Virginia Naylor Orson Welles

Marvin Odom Wallace Beery



Louis Palmer
Justina Perez
William Peterson

Kathryn Phillips



Rata

Deanna Durbin

Polonius

Scarlett O'Hara



Loafing & Talking
Gossiping

Anything but home-
work
Mr. Vinton says gig-
gling and talking
Dancing
Loafing

Sports and reading
Reading & Riding
Photography & Sail-
ing



Driving

Doing homework at
the last minute
Study-ditto-ditto

Conversing

Reading and movie
going
Trying to Type
Going to the movies
Swimming & Model
Building
Going to school



NAME

Charles Pierce
Ray Plummer

Stewart Pool
Dale Price
Gioconda Pucci
John Pucci
Harold Rcse
Clyde Ruley
Marvin Salmon
Edith Sanders
Mary Schiavo
Frank Scott
Evelyn Shirley
Marian Snyder
Irene Stade
Muriel Stewart

Russell Tidd
Eddie Wheeler
James Walsh
Robert Williams
Rachel Yohros



Elsie Chase
Wayne Nellis



Favorite Character Usual Occupation



Porky Pig



Judy Garland
The Thin Man
Confucius
Snake
Artie Shaw

Spanky
Wilbur
Philo Vance
Donald Duck
Baby Sandy
Ernie

Donald Duck
A no-homework

teacher

G. Carnright
Donald Duck
Confucius
William Powell

(No Pictures i

9 9



"Pop" Hotz



Eating

Assistant Driver in

Patchett's car

Playing Baseball

Talking

Chewing gum

Driving my car

Dance Band Leader

Eating

Eating & Loafing

Golf

Writing mysteries

Anything

Doing homework

Walking my kid sister

Just thinking

Doing homework

Going to the show
Checking the B's
Chewing gum
Loafing
Reading



Ushering

Eating & Sleeping




L. 10 R. BACK ROW. R. Baumbach, B. Brown. V- Huff. B. J Foulkes. B Green. V. MacMillan, E. Siapf, A. Preslar. M. A. Seibold. P. Lim. M Zitzewitz, B. Shultz, N.

Manner. L. Martin, A. Wong.

L. to R, MIDDLE ROW: M. Posse. M. Considine, K. Hunt. M. Kins, M. MetzRer, A Randall, V. Keenan. M. Bramin. H Hauss, A. Williams, R, A. Wheeler, J Brcnnan.

L. to R. FRONT ROW; P Butler. M. Anderson. D, Marquard, G. Butler. G. Lesser. E Marquad. D. Kirkham, P Rosales, B. Williams.



Sophomore Girls



NAME

Anderson, Mary

Baumbach, Ruth

Bramin, Mildred
Brennan. Doris

Brennan, Josephine

Brown, Beverley
Butler, Georgia

Butler, Philippe
Foulkes, Betty Jane

Greene, Betty

Hunt, Kathleen
Keenan, Virginia

King, Marian

Kirkham, Dorothy

Leeser, Gloria
Lim, Avielle P.



Motto

True happiness comes
by helping others.

Be kind to dumb ani-
mals.

To enjoy life.

If at first you don't
succeed quit!

Treat someone
else's home as if
it were your own.

Live and let live,
die and let die.

Say what you
mean, and mean
what you say.

Don't worry it
may never happen

When you're in
a hurry, take
your time.

A stitch in time
saves nine.



Don't give up.

You're only
young once.

Practice what
you preach.

When someone's
waiting, take
your time.

The best things come
in small packages

Live and let live.



Favorite Pastime

Going to movies.

Riding in a car.

Drinking cokes
Playing monopoly.

Going to the movies.

Playing the accordion
Reading.

Reading.
Telling jokes.

Going with a certain
young man.

Swimming and tennis

Golfing.

Swimming and golf.

Reading.

Swimming and P. K.



Making cookies and
candy-



NAME

MacMillan, Virginia

Magner, Nancy
Marquard, Dorothy

Marquard, Eleanor

Martin, Lauretta
Metzger, Marjean
Posse, Mary

Randall, Arleen

Rosales, Philipa

Seibold. Mary Ann
Shea, Betty

Stapf, Edith
Wheeler, Rhoda Ann

Williams, Ann

Wong, Augusta
Zitzewitz, Marguerite



Motto

Live and be merry,
for tomorrow you
may die.

Be a good sport.

Treat others as they
treat you.

Do unto others as you Reading,
would have them do
unto you.



Favorite Pastime

Reading.

Movies and Sports.
Going riding.



Patience is a virtue.

Be prepared.

Be kind to dumb ani-
mals.

If first you don't suc-
ceed try and try
again.

Do unto others as you
would have done
unto you.

Be prepared.

If at first you don't
succeed, try, try
again.

Life is what you make
it.

Believe half of what
you see, and none
of what you hear.

If you don't succeed,
try and keep on
trying-



Reading and walking

Music.

Movies.

Reading.

Learning new songs.

Sports.
Bicycling.



Listening to Baby
Snooks

"Mack".



Teh diene"



Sketching.
Reading.




L. to R. BACK ROW: R Taws. A. Belden, D Collins, W. Stroop. A. G.leren. E. Appin. M. Picado. A Aanstoos. E Putney. J. Pescod. B. Stage, A. Palmer. A. Randies.

\V Krausman.
L to R MIDDLE ROW: A. Terwilleger. K, McClcarev. W. Reeves, F. Hooper. W. Lowe, E Ingram, A, Enriquez. R French, E. Eder. E. Coaies, R. Huggett, J. Cain,

T. Detrick,
L, to R FRONT ROW: H. Pescod, B. Styles. C. Sasso. F. Enriquez. G. Glaze. L. R. Lesser. P. Karst. J. Fernandez, T. Lawson. S. Barbet, C. Brennen.



Sophomore Boys



NAME

Aanstoos, Anthony

Appin, Edward
Belden, Adolph

Brennan, Charles
Cain, James

Coats, Ellis
Cole, Jerry

Collins, Derrell
Sasso, Colman
Detrick, Tommy
Fernandez, Jimmy
Enriquez, Franklin

French, Robert
Furey, James

Glaze, Glyn



Motto

Never do the same
thing a second time.

Silence is golden.

Everything is possible
if you try.

Now or never.

A clean neck never
hurt anyone.



Look at the other fel-
low's paper he's
always right.

Try anything once-



You only live once.

If there is anyone
that can do it, I
can!



Never get another
broken collar bone.

Live while you can,
and learn every-
thing while you live.



Favorite Pastime

Sleeping and eating.

Playing a harmonica.
Swimming-Reading.

Playing sports.
Stepping out.

Sports, Movies.
Shooting the bull.

Hunting and Fishing.
Baseball.
Chewing gum.
Studying.
Nature study-
Golf.
Hunting.

A certain girl.



1 NAME

Hollowell, David

Hooper, Frank
Huggett, Ralph

Ingram, Elvin

Kaufer, Teddy
Lawson, Tad
Leeser, LeRoi

Maker, Bryan

McCleary, Kirt

Palmer, Arthur

Pescod, Hugh
Pescod, Jimmy
Stroop, Warren

Terwilliger, Albert
Putney, Edward



Motto

Do tomorrow what
you can put off to-
day.

Pleasure before work.

Do unto others as
they would like to
do to you.



Never threaten to do Camping,
something do it.



Favorite Pastime

Sleeping.

Model building.
Fooling around.



Don't be a sucker!

Confucius Say

Thou shalt not squeal
or rat on others.

Always wait until the Basketball,
last minute.



Sleeping.

Monkey Business.
Two-timing.



White man stay
white.

Always do the best
you can.

Do it now.

Never do today what
you can do the next
day in class.

Those who go swim-
ming must get wet.

Silence is golden.



Everything.

Music-Reading-
Swimming.

Baseball.
Doing nothing-
Studying and Read-
ing.

Fishing-Sailing-
Hunting.

Reading.




BACK ROW. L 10 R : A. Frcdric'rs. K. Haywood. B. Wilson. A. Crandall. R Palmer. S. Herrr.c.i. D. Yancz. D. Brown.

MIDDLE ROW: Barbara Kopirski, V. Hambleron. C. Nicro. I. Enksni. P. Casey. E. M. H:win. A. Ulseih. B. Gare. G. Anderson. D. J Campen.

FRONT ROW' D Harrison. G. Ingram, G. Rubio. E. M. Callaway. B. Facdol, M. Holmelin, L Smithies.



F r e s h m en Girl s



NAME

Anderson, Gladys
Brown, Doris
Callaway, Eula May
Campem, Evelyn
Casey, Patricia
Crandall, Ada
Eggleston, Irene
Facdcl, Blanca
Gage, Betty
Hambleton, Vonna
Harrison, Dorothy
Haywood, Kathryn
Hern, Delia
Holmelin, Muriel



AMBITION

Undertaker

Be beautiful

Beauty operator

Commercial artist

Secretary

Surgeon

None

Secretary

Aviatrix

Secretary

Autographs

Secretary

Dietician



HOBBY

Stamp collecting

Saving nicknames

Collecting

Photography

Flirting

Photography

Photography

Reading

Photography

Fun

None



Sports



NAME


AMBITION


HOBBY


Herman, He'en


Secretary


None


Ingram, Gloria


Secretary


Scrap book


Koperski, Barbara


Secretary


Sleeping


Nitto, Charlotte


Model


Tyronne Power


Palmer, Ruth


Doctor


Drawing


Rubio, Gladys


To see the world


Cracking gum


Shultz, Betty






Smithies, Barbara
Lucille




Philateling


Starn, Anna Mae


Stenographer






Ulseth, Alice


Air Hostess


Movie stars


Ward, Jean


Secretary


Flirting


Wilson, Elizabeth


Dancer


Dancing


Yanez, Digna


Secretary






BACK ROW: H Chennalloy. O. Heilbron. G Smmpf. A Davenport, j. Haywood. R Frick, L Wilkes, J Miller, D Miller. N. Hooper, W. Real. J Woiir J Campcri J

Byrd. B. Srroop
MIDDLE ROW: R. Davis. C Denron, E Prudhsm, D Green. A Diaz. E Sullivan. D Myers. W- Griffin. R. Simon, A Muschen. J Walktr. T Harrison
ERONT ROW: J. Calabria. B. Merzger. A Lim. R. Grabhorn. D. Hendricks. T. Siewart, W While, T. Gregory, J Peners C Coars N Taylor J Coffee B Parker

Billy Knox.



F r e s h men Boy s



NAME
Bronn, Carl
Byrd, Jesse Lee
Calabria, Jose Luis
Campen, Jack

Chenalloy, Herbert
Coffey, James
Coats, Lawrence
Davis, Robert
Davenport, Albert
Denron, Chester
Diaz, Arthur
Forsman, Charles

Foster, Elton
Frick, Robert
Grabhorn, Rudy
Green, Richard
Gregory, Thomas
Griffin, George
Harrigan, Thomas
Haywood, John
Heilbron, Oswald
Hendrick, Donald
Hooper, Nathan



AMBITION

Aviator
Golfer



Newsreel
photographer

Pharmacist



HOBBY

Swimming
Playing golf
Drawing



Ship Captain

Doctor

Army aviator

Mech. Engineer

Mech. Engineer

To have a beautiful
girl

Aviation

Aviation

Work

Doctor

Veterinary

Medicine

Scientist

Aviator

Mech. Engineer

Microscopist

Electrical engineer



Reading

Stamps

Bicycling

Model airplanes

Sports

Swimming

Loafing

Lindbergh

Stamps

Model airplanes

Fishing

Sports

Boy scout work

Reading

Animals

Stamps

Sailing



Building



NAME

Keller, Lou
Kelleher, Maurice
Kerr, Arthur
Knox, Bill
Lim, Alex
Lindstrom, Frank
Metzger, Issac
Miller, Donald

Miller, John
Muschett, Alfred
Nesbitt, William
Parker, Bobby
Petters, James
Prudham, Ernest
Real, William
Simons, Raymond
Stewart, Thomas
Stroop, Buddy
Stumpf, George
Sullivan, Frank
Taylor, Norman
Walker, Johnnie
Wilkes, Leo



AMBITION



Aviator

Foreman

Electrician

Accountant

Aviation

Electrical engineer

Mech. Drawing
teacher

West Point

Aviator

Singer

Captain of boat

Chemical engineer

Baseball

Army Dentist



Geologist

Aviator

Elec. Engineer

Lawyer

Radio announcer

Naval Academy

Aereonautical
engineer



HOBBY

None

Model airplanes

Riding

None

Dancing

Engines

Electricity

Swimming

Bicycle

Swimming

Archery



Chemistry
Baseball

Stamp collecting
Stamp collecting
Collecting rocks



Carving wood

Reading

Radio

Sports

Chemistry



T
r

a

d

e



W



n
d



Join
The

S. A.




Vol.


IV No. I



dwji\jd



Pay
Your
Dues



CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



Friday, Oct. 6, 1939



Students at Interlochen




i 1939-40 CROP OF
FROSH INITIATED
BY ANNUAL BRAWL



S. A. President



L. to R. Mr. O. E. Jorstad, John Woodward, Harold Rose
and Virginia Keenan.

C. H. S. Students Attend Interlochen,
Render Severed World Fair Concerts



Seven weeks of musical train-
ing and recreation at Inter-
lochen, Michigan and five days
at the New York World's Fair
distinguished the vacations of
Virginia Keenan, Harold Rose,
and John Woodward.

At Interlochen, Virginia, af-
fectionately called "Panama",
played the trombone in the
eighty-piece band and sang in
the sixty-voice glee club. Be-
sides, she acted as bugler for
her camp.

Both Harold and John play-
ed clarinets.

The faculty of renowned mu-
sicians conducted band and
orchestra on broadcasts or con-
certs.

Interlochen fronts two lakes.
It is 150 miles north of Grand
Rapids and is fifteen miles
south of Traverse City and ad-
joins Interlochen State Park of
over 500 acres. The camp was
founded to give high school
boys and girls opportunities to
study symphonic works while I



enjoying healthy outdoor life.
Some of America's greatest con-
ductors college students, teach-
ers, and other adults interested
in music, radio work, drama,
painting, and drawing also at-
tend. At least 300 people studied
at the camp during the past
summer. The camp enjoyed one
day of travel to the New York
World's Fair on a special train.
Arriving at the Fair, they ren-
dered concerts at the Temple of
Religion, French Pavilion, Court
of Peace, Goodrich Arena, New
York Building, and then made
a special visit to the French
liner Normandie.

During the five day visit at
the Fair, ten concerts were given
under the following conductors:
Guy Fraser Harrison, A. R. Mc-
Allister, Dr. Howard Hanson.
Vladimir Bakaleinikoff, Lorin
Maazel-9 year old protege of Ba-
kaleinikoff, Lucien Caillett and
Earnest La Prade.

Among the pieces played at
(Continued on Page 4)



The annual freshman-sopho-
more brawl initiated this year's
crop of freshmen into C. H. S.,
Friday. September 15th, in 'a
series of contests at Kokonut
Park.

Following the individual
class meetings, which ended at
1:30 P.M., the freshmen as-
-^ sembled in front of the school
to prepare for the first event
pulling a car laden with C. H.
S. Varsity Club members from
school to the field.

A Panamanian policeman,
who was on duty, stopped the
procession before it had moved
two hundred feet, saying that
it was unlawful to overload an
automobile. The freshmen
breathed a sigh of relief when
the policeman entered, sat in
the back seat, and instructed
the driver to head for the Co-
lon Police Station. Later, after
proper explanations about the
car-pulling tradition, the boys
were released.

In the meantime, the fresh-
men journeyed toward the
Point, unshackled, but herded
by the sophs. As soon as all ar-
rived and assembled, the con-
tests began.

(Continued on Page 4)




UPPER CLASSMEN
ELECT OFFICERS



Joe Nitto Elected
Senior President



Leopold Alexander

Sings In Auditorium

Mr. Leopold Alexander, bass
baritone, concert singer and
oratorian. honored the students
of Cristobal High School, Wed-
nesday afternoon with an hour
of classical music in the audito-
rium. He was accompanied on
the piano by Mrs. Helen C.
Baker. The selections were as
follows:

1. The Creation, Oratorio by,
Hayden.

2. O Solo Mio High School
Orchestra.

3. Drink to Me Only With
Thine Eyes, by Johnston

4. Open the Gates, by Knapp.

5. The Wanderer- by Schu-
bert (Sung in German).

6. Who is Sylvia?, by Schubert,
(Continued on Page 4)



F. K. Bryan Co-Designs
Home Craft Footstool

F. K. Bryan, teacher here of
mechanical drawing, is co-
author of an article, MODERN
FOOTSTOOL, appearing in the
October-November issue of Pop-
ular HOME CRAFT.
Complete drawings with meas-
urements and materials accom-
pany the finished picture of the
footstool.

Aside from the necessary bent
and welded metal for the
rectangular framework that
makes the legs, the ingredients
are inexpensive. The seat is
made of muslin, cotton, burlap,
Spanish moss upon a wooden
base.

This project involves metal-
work, upholstery, finishing, and
woodwork.



The senior class president,
vice-president, secretary, treas-
urer, and one Student Associa-
tion representative were elect-
ed at the senior class meeting
that was held in the Audito-
rium at 2:20 P.M. Friday.

Mr. Kenneth Vinton, class
sponsor, acted as chairman. He
opened the meeting by naming
the candidates for presidency.
Joseph Nitto was chosen senior
class president from three can-
didates.

Joe Nitto presided as the
election went on with Bobbie
Styles, Dorothy Wolf, and
Arthur Farrell official counters.

Carolyn Stroop was elected
vice-president; Anna White,
secretary; Rose Margaret
Stroop, treasurer; and Georgia-
na Carnright, girl representa-
tive of the Student Association.

No senior applications for
boy representative were re-
ceived; so Eddie Green and
Stanford Skinner were nomin-
ated for that position, but the
meeting adjourned at three
o'clock before electing the
Student Association candidate.



BOBBY FERNANDEZ

Students congratulate Bobby
Fernandez upon winning the
election for the presidency of
the Student Association.

Only students who signed
pledge blanks were allowed to
vote. A plurality elected mem-
bers to each office.

Bobby has been attending the
Canal Zone schools since enter-
ing the first grade.

His high school record has
been a successful one. In his
Freshman Year he was the
class treasurer. During his
sophomore year he was class re-
presentative. While his junior
year saw him as the president of
the class and vice-president of
the Student association, he per-
formed the duties of the pre-
sident before the year was
through.

Showing his appreciation
Bobby said, "I wish to thank the
student body for electing me to
the office of president of the
Student Association. I will do
my best to continue to be
worthy of your trust in me."

"I realized this is the highest
office a student may reach in
high school and consequently I
will put my best effort into the
duties of my office.

"The Student Association is
for the good of its members and
I will see that our money is
spent where it will do the most
good to the greatest numbers of
students."

"If the student bo-iv will come
half; the council will be more
than willing to come their half,
and by cooperating this will be
the greatest year the Student
Association has ever had."



SYMPATHIES

The faculty and students
extend their sincere sym-
pathies to Warren Koehler,
freshman, and members of
his home in their recent
bereavement.



Page 4



TRADE WIND



October 6, 1939.



RomeoS and Juliets Miss Doris Griffin



Aspiring Romeos and Juliets
of C. H. S. met in the cafeteria,
Wednesday. September 27. Un-
der the guidance of Mr. Paul
Beck sponsor of the Dramatics
Club, many plans for the com-
ing year were made.

On Thursday, October 12, a
play, "Jerry Joins In," will be
given. This is a novel play in
which no charactor says more
than one word at a time.

For November, plans have
bean made for two one-act
Dlays. One concerns "The Nine
Lives of Emily" and the other
is "Spreading the News."

One three act play, "Captain
Applejack," will be given in
December.

Other plays too, will be given
during the school year, from
time to time.

The election of officers was
discussed and it was decided
that meetings will be held each
Wednesday, the eighth period in
the cafeteria.

All students interested in dra-
matics are urged to attend the
meetings.




Bronzed Grilles
Beautify C. H. S.



Iron grilles painted bronze
now adorn the outer arches of
C. H. S. Their design and
strength harmonize with the
architectural beauty of the
many arched corridors.

Last year, after the plans were
drawn at the architect's office
in Balboa and approved by Mr,
Ben Williams, Supt. of Schools,
the iron-gratings were ordered
and constructed in the States.

Prior to the opening of this
school term, workmen were still
assembling its many parts and
anchoring them into the sides
and floors of this building.

For the first few weeks of the
school's opening, painters were
covering the red-leaded iron
work with bronze paint.

Now, with the installation and
painting completed, students
agree that the grilles serve
their purpose well in beautifying
the building and excluding
night prowlers, both man and
beast from the surroundings.



SCHEDULE FOR SOCCER IS
COMPLETED



The soccer season started
Wednesday. September 27, with
Ed Wheeler's team and Jim
Pescod's team playing a 1 to 1
tie. before a crowd of rooters.

Soccer season will end Oct. 9.
During this time, each team will
play three games.

Mr. Neff, gym instructor, will
supervise the coming soccer
league contests.

The captains for the various
teams are:
Team 1 Ed Wheeler.
Team 2 Jim Pescod.
Team 3 Montford Stokes
Team 4 John McGann
The Schedule for the coming
season is:

Teams
Wednesday Sept. 27 1-2
Thursday Sept. 28 3-4
Monday Oct. 2 1-3



C. H. S. STUDENTS

(Continued from Page 1)

these concerts were: Bakaleini-
koff-March de Concert. Duorak-
Symphony No. 5 (New World i;
Band pieces included, Duorak
Seovanic Dance No. 1 Elgar Sea
Pictures and other selections.

Mr. O. E. Jorstad. C. H. S. music
director visited these students
at Interlochen last summer. He
had recommended these three
students at the beginning of the
last school year.



Miss Griffin Neiv
Home Ec Teacher



Arriving in Colon this past
August on the "Ulua," was Miss
Doris Griffin, the new house-
hold arts teacher who is taking
the place of Miss Lucille Pepoon,
who is now teaching at the Uni-
versity of New Hampshire.

For the past three years Miss
Griffin has been teaching at the
Murphy High School in Mo-
bile, Alabama having 3500 stud-
ents and 115 teachers. Miss
Griffin was graduated from Jud-
son College in Marion, Ala-
bama- and later attended the
University of Alabama for spe-
cial training.

She has traveled throughout
Europe. Several summers ago,
she visited in Honolulu, enjoy-
ing the climate to the extent
that she decided to travel more
in the tropical climate and
countries, and found Panama
to be most enjoyable. Putting
in her application for the posi-
tion of teacher on the Canal
Zone, she was pleased to be no-
tified that she was accepted and
soon made ready to sail for
Cristobal High School.

We all want to welcome her
to our school and hope this
coming year she will be very
happy with us, and hope she
will be here for many years to
come.

Wednesday Oct. 4 2-4
Thursday Oct. 5 1-4
Monday Oct. 9 2-4

CONTINENTAL NEWS

Kingsley Vannier, news stud-
ent, has a cure for his insomnia.
He takes his news book to bed
to study every night and just
can't keep awake.

"The Guide", Hood River,
Oregon.



Scadron Optical
Company

MAKE SURE YOUR EYES

ARE GOOD.

Panama Colon

23 Central Ave. 9084



193940 CROP
(Continued from Page 1)

The first event of the pro-
gram was the boy's peanut race,
in which the second-year-men
won. Following that, was the
girl's peanut race. Again, the
sophomores took first place.

The coconut tree climbing
race for the boys was the third
event. The freshmen took first
place, through the skillful
climbing of Bill Nesbitt, who
shinnied up the tree twice in
order to score for his team.

The girl's tug-of-war follow-
ed. The sophomores were an-
nounced victors though the
freshmen girls appeared to be
the winners at first after pul-
ling their opponents across the
line. The judges announced the
freshmen were disqualified,
when outsiders helped on the
rope. The boys subdued the un-
der classmen in the tug-of-war.

In the banana eating contest,
Virginia Keenan took first place
for the soph girls. The fresh-
men boys won the banana eat-
ing event by a mouthful.

The flour fight was a free-
for-all, with boys and girls en-
tered.

Cage-ball followed the flour
fight. The frosh girls won this
event.

The program ended with the
second-year-men winning the
sack rush, which was one of the
day's main features. After these
events, all hostilities between
the classes ceased.



Freshmen Elect
Dick Green Pres.



The newest-arrivals to the
high school elected Dick Green
president of the freshman class.
Eula May Calloway is vice-pre-
sident; Gladys Rubio, secretary;
Gloria Ingram and Albert Da-
venport, representatives.

The meeting was held in
Room 203 and conducted un-
der the sponsorship of Miss
Beavers and Mr. Wilson.



FROSH-SOPH DANCE
OPENS SCHOOL YEAR



The Freshman Sophomore
dance, sponsored by the Stud-
ent Association, took place Fri-
day evening, September fifteen,
form 8:00 to 10:00, on the open-
ing day of school. This get-
together social event was in-
formal. Approximately, one hun-
dred fifty students and guests
danced to the strains of Jimmie
Rose's Cotillion Club orchestra.
The undecorated Gym resounded
with a clatter of merriment. Al-
most as many alumni attended
as did Freshmen. Several single
and married teachers with their
wives enjoyed the merriment of
the evening.



LEOPOLD ALEXANDER

(Continued from Page 1

7. Aufenthalt, by Schubert
I Sung in German).

8. Lotus Flower, by Schubert
High School Orchestra.

9. On the Road to Mandalay,
by Kipling.

10. Sweet Mystery of Life
(Encore).



FRESHMEN SUPPLIES

(Continued from Page 2)

F.: Well, I want a pencil.

S. L.: What size and type?

F.: A blue one. And I want
an eraser.

S. L.: Gum or hard rubber?

F.: Gum? Oh, you mean the
eraser. Which one is the largest?

All went well until the sum-
ming up of the items.

F.: It seems to me that that's

1 all. But I keep feeling as if I

forgot something. Hummmm-

one! Yes-that! Have it well.

guess that's all.

S. L.: That will be fifty-six
cents. Your commissary book
please?

F.: Darn! I knew I forgot
something.



Compliments of
The
Panama Railroad

AND

Panama Railroad
Steamship Line



WE SUGGEST THAT OUR
STUDENT FRIENDS



DRINK
ORANGE CRUSH

PHONE 680



Bottled By

Antonio Tagaropulos

& BROS.



PAY YOUR
S. A. DUES



UfflDlfgllND



PAY YOUR
S. A. DUES



VOL IV No. II



CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



FRIDAY, Oct. 13, 1939



Student Association
Officers Take Oath
In Special Assembly

The installation of new Stud-
ent Association officers im-
pressed the high school stud-
ents during the second period,
Friday morning, October 6.

Reverend Morgan, introduced
by Mr. Hotz, complimented the
present generation on its cap-
ability for self-representation.
He cautioned the students to
give attention to the teachers'
decisions, because they possess
much more experience and
knowledge than the students.

Following his talk. Reverend
Morgan administered the oath
of office for president to Bobby
Fernandez. Bobby pledged him-
self to further the welfare of
the S. A. and C. H. S.

The Student Council members
then took the oath to uphold
the positions given them. They
answered in one group instead
of taking the oath individually.

Something new, but rather
necessary for the cooperation of
the whole school, was intro-
duced this year. The members
of the S. A. in the audience
stood and gave their promises
to work with and for their re-
presentatives. This adds a feel-
ing of complete coordination to
the Student Association.

To add to the cooperative
feeling, which at this time
seemed to have settled over the
entire assembly, Mr. Jorstad led
the singing of the Loyalty Song.
It was later remarked that the
song seemed to express more
school spirit than any other
happening since the opening of
school. After the singing, Miss
Moore presented the Student
Council members to Mr. Rice.

Mr. Rice made several favor-
able comments on the work done
last year by the representatives.
He expressed the hope that all
would work together this year.
With his best wishes to all, Mr.
Rice then closed the session.



Jacqueline Wahle
Leaves For States



"Aloha Jackie!" At six
o'clock Tuesday morning, Jac-
queline Wahle, C. H. S. graduate
of 1939, set sail on the U. S. A.
T. Hunter Liggett for her new
station. Fort Monroe, Virginia.

"Jackie", as she was called,
entered Cristobal High School
in 1937 and was graduated as
an honor student in the class
of '39.

She was a member of the
Trade Wind and Caribbean
staffs her third year in high
school and was assistant editor
of the Trade Wind and editor
of the Caribbean when a senior.
(Continued on page 4)



Student Association




Standing L. to R.: Miss B. Moore. A. Davenport, V. Keenan. D. Hariris. G. Camright, S. Skinner, G. Marcuse. K. McCleary. G Ingram,
Mr. T Hon.

Front L. to R : B. Styles, E. Wheeler. R Fernandez. R. A. Wheeler.



Columbus Day Celebrated 447 Years
After Discovery Of The New World



Christopher Columbus sight-
ed the American shores for the
first time 447 years ago, Oct. 12
His fleet of three small ships,
the "Pinta", "Nina", and "San-
ta Maria" set sail on August 3
from the seaport of Palos, in
southern Spain to explore and
discover a shorter route, by
sailing westward, to the East
Indies.

After many days at sea,
searching in vain for land,
disheartened men saw bits of
driftwood with carvings on them
probably made by man. A
broken branch of a thorn tree
and flocks of birds known to
stay near shore gave the 88
members of the crew new cour-
age.

At two o'clock, on the morn-
ing of Friday, October 12, a
sailor aboard the "Ninn", the



smallest of the three vessels,
announced the appearance of
what later proved to be the
New World. The land sighted
was an island which Columbus
named San Salvador. After
cruising about among the West
Indies and discovering the is-
lands of Haiti and Cuba, which
he thought were islands of Ja-
pan, Columbu-, returned trium-
phantly to Spain.

In honor of this great Disco-
verer, October 12 has been de-
clared an important holiday
among American nations as well
as Spain and Portugal.

Colon celebrates this day with
services at Columbus' statue
located on Broadway between
third and fourth streets. Par-
ades and gaiety entertain the
crowds.



C.H.S. Commemorates Discoverer's Day
With Program Of Plays And Singing



In observance of Columbus
Day, a program was given the
eighth period in the auditorium
of C. H. S. Plays were present-
ed by both the Junior and
Senior High School Dramatic
Clubs. The program was as fol-
lows;

1. "Jerry Joins In" present-
ed by the High School Dra-
matic Club under Mr. Paul
Beck.



CAST

Betty Helen House

Judy Hertha Hauss

Jerry James Cain

Cook Edith Stapf

Salesman Niel Magner

Harold Kirt McCleary

Prompter .... Mar jean Metzger

2. Talk given by Arlene Ran-
dal.

3. Selection played by Orches-
tra.

(Continued on Page 4)



New Students Are
Welcomed To C.H.S.
From Many Places

Every year new students come
to C. H. S. Some of them arrive
from distant places. We old
timers of C. H. S. welcome these
new comers and extend hearty
greetings to them with the hope
that they will enjoy the present
school year. These new students
according to grades in high
school are as follows:
Freshmen Boys

James Coffey Canton, Mass.

Alexander Lim Puerto Ar-
muelles, R. P.

Raymond Simons Colon, R.
P.

John Walker Washington.
D. C.

Freshmen Girls

Elizabeth Browder Alamo
Heights, Texas.

(Continued on page 4)



SOCCER HOP GETS
STUDENT PRAISES

The first soccer hop of this
school year took place at the
Cristobal Playshed. Friday, Oct.
6, from 8:00 to 10:30 P.M. Mr.
Howard Neff supervised the
activities. Music for the dancers
was furnished by an electric
phonograph. A wide variety of
selections was played.

In the future, Mr. Neff hopes
to have such a dance twice a
month if a large crowd war-
rants it. Those interested in
this enjoyable pastime are urged
to attend.



Page 4



TRADE WIND



October 6, 1939.



CARNRIGHT SCORES
51-22 WIN OVER
RAYMOND'S TEAM



Pescod's Team



In the first game of the girls'
intramural volleyball league,
Georgiana Carnright's team won
over Jean Raymond's, 51-22, in
the gymnasium, Tuesday afier-
noon.

The game opened with Von-
na Hambelton making 13 conse-
cutive points; and by the end
of the first half, the victors had
easy running. Those who played
were:

TEAM No. 1 TEAM No. 2

Georgiana Ornritilit, Jean Raymond
captain captain

Ruth Ba-umbach Beverley Brown

Vonna Hambelton Audrey Frederic
Kathryn Heywood Dorothy Harrison

Frances Poda Barbara Koperski

Gladys Rubio Virginia Keenan

Marican Metzger
Gioconda Pucci

Kathryn Heywood of Team 1
scored 22 points, and Virginia
Keenan of Team 2 tallied 8
points.

Lois Crouch's team defeated
Bobbie Styles' in the second
game, 39-30. These teams were
more evenly matched, and com-
petition proved keener. The
players were:

TEAM No. 3 TEAM No. 4

Bobbie Styles. Lois Crouch,

captain captain

Edith Dixon Rosemary Dignam

Jean Grabhorn Blanca Faedal

Opal Holgerson Jane Kaufer

Philips Rosales Mable Lyew

Marion Snyder Fcelyn Shirley

Jean Grabhorn of Team 3
made 8 points, and Jane Kaufer,
of Team 4 gained 14 points.




D. A. R. Offer Prize To
High History Student

Again, the Daughters of the
American Revolution offer a
prize of $5.00 cash to the stud-
ent in C. H. S. who makes the
highast grade in American
History during 1939-40 term.

The letter to Mr. Rice was
written by Mrs. A. Clyde Ellis,
Corresponding Secretary of the
D. A. R. The body of the letter
is this: "We hope that this will
prove to be an incentive for the
boys and girls to develop a
deeper interest in the history
of our glorious country and in
the ideals and principles of our
government. By this means we
may help in obtaining a high
standard of patriotism and
citizenship among the youth of
today."

The letter is, at present, on
the bulletin-board in Mr. Evan-
coe's room.

Lonny Hughes won the prize
last year. Who will win this
time?



Scadron Optical
Company

MAKE SURE TOUR EYES
ARE GOOD.

Panama Colon



23 Central Ave.



9084



Back Row L. to R.: M. Picado R. Rulev, H. Wiilett, J Haywood, J. Briggs. Front
Row L. to R.: T. Gregory. M. Kelleher. J. Pescod, C. Coats. H Pescod.



26^ NFW RROOKS TN NEW students ape

aSOD I'NJtaW 1SKUUJYS 111 WELCOMED TO c.HS.

C. H. S. LIBRARY from many places



The library of Cristobal High
now has about 3,000 books.
Since school began, approxim-
ately 265 new books have been
received in the library.

Daily in that little office be-
hind the library, Miss Jeanne
Brown and her helpers work
busily varnishing, sorting, num-
bering, and filing the new books.
A few of the assistants are Tom
Frensley, T. Burd and R. Hug-
gett, who help Miss Brown daily,
and they say that they enjoy
this interesting work.

Many new sets of Encyclo-
pedias Britanica, Compton's
Pictured Encyclopaedia, and
World Book Encyclopaedia have
been recently received. There
are forty different magazines
there. A few of the most pop-
ular are:

American Boy; Occupational Index; Amer-
ican Girl; Popular Home Crafr; American
Magazine; Popular Science Arlantic Monthly;
Practical Home Economics; Current Hisrory;
Panama Canal Record; Journal of Chem. E;
Reader's Digest; English Journal; Saturday
Review; Good Housekeeping; Scholastic;

Gregg Writer; Scouting; Harper's; Theatre
Arcs; Hygeia; Narure; Industrial Arts: Jacob's
Orchestra Monthly; Jacob's Band Monthly;
McCall Fashion; National Geographic.

The assistants are:

1st PERIOD 4th PERIOD

C. Albritton J. Ferri
R. M Stroop 6th PERIOD

2nd PERIOD J Huggett

R Harris R E e lf
E Ulxoa 7th PERIOD

F. M. Eldndge

3rd PERIOD V. MacMillan
J. Kaufer Sth PERIOD

S. Skinner A. Preslar



JACQUELINE WAHLE
LEAVES FOR STATES



I Continued tforp Hade One)

Jackie was popular among
both the teachers and students,
and will be greatly missed by
all.

SWIMMING BREVITIES



(Continued from Page 3)

tion there will be a league of
inter-class water polo teams.

There are plans to award
trophies to the outstanding girl
and boy swimmers of Senior and
Junior High schools. The deter-
mination of this award will be
made by a point system. Further
details will be found in the next



(Continued from Page One)

Vonna Hambelton Balboa, C.
Z.

Alice Ulseth Fort Snelling,
Minn.

Sophomore Boys

Antonio Enriquez Balboa,

c. z.

Franklin Enriquez Balboa,

c. z.

Adolph Gillgren San Pedjo,
Calif.

Glyn Glaze Balboa, C. Z.

Ralph Justice Anniston,
Ala.

Wade Krausman Agency,
Iowa.

Sophomore Girls

Georgia Butler Fulton, Ken-
tucky.

Phillipi Butler Fulton, Kg.

Catherine Justice Anniston,
Ala.

Junior Boys

Keith Campbell Hemp, N. C.

Marvin Odom Charlston, S.C.

Louis Palmer Hemp, N. C.

Robert Thompson Fort
Leavenworth, Kansas.

Russell Tidd Providence, R. I.

Louis Truis Balboa, C. Z.
Junior Girls

Isabelle Angels Henderson,
Ky.

Judith Ferri Holly Springs,
Miss.

Grace Marcuse Colon, R. P.

Dale Price Washington, C. Z.

Rachell Yohros Balboa, C. Z.
Senior Boys

John Herman San Diego,
Calif.

Senior Girls

Patricia Brown Waterloo,
Iowa.

Lorraine Goodwin Long
Beach. Calif.

Mary Hartman Ethreveport),
La.

Helen House Fort Leaven-
worth, Kansas.

Peggy Oswald San Diego,
Calif.

Shirley Jennings Hershey,
Penn.



DOYLE'S TEAM
DOWNS STADE'S
WINNING 32-16



issue of the Trade Wind.

All boys interested in diving
see Mr. Pettingill.



Eva Jean Doyle's team scored
a victory over Irene Stade's team
32-16, Thursday afternoon in
the gymnasium. The first half
of the game was in Irene Stade's
favor, but the tables were turn-
ed in the second half due to the
exceptional serving of Rhoda
Ann Wheeler. The players were:

TEAM No. 5 TEAM No. 6

Eva Jean Doyle. Irene Slade,

captain captain

Louise Gormely Frances Davenport

Kathryn Phillips Fannie Mane lildrige

Rhoda Ann Wheeler Rita Gouiet
Mary Ann Seibold Edna May Hewitt

Eula May Callaway
Barbara Williams

Rhoda Ann Wheeler, of team
5; tallied 16 points, and Barbara
Williams of Team 6 scored 7.

In the second game of the
day. Williere Callaway's girls
chalked a victory over Nancy
Magner's, 32-16. From the first
half, Williere Callaway's team
got off to a good start and led by
many points.

The players were:

TEAM No. 7 TEAM No. 8

Williere Callaway, Nancy Magner.

captain captain

Jean Badgley Pauline Lim

Hertha Hauss Ann Williams

Teresa Hern Kathleen Hunt

Linda Appin Margaret Considine

Gloria Leeser Mary Anderson

Justina Perez Gloria Ingram

Gladys Wertz Eugenia Huff

Nancy Magner of Team 8 re-
gistered 7 points, and Jean Bad-
gley of Team 7 earned 15 points.



CHS COMMEMORATES
DISCOVERS DAY



tConnnued from Page One I

4. "At the Spanish" present-
ed by the Jr. High Dramatic
Club under the supervision
of Miss C. Ayecock

CAST
King Ferdinand. ...Pedro Mulse-
bosch
Queen Isabella. ...Frances Preslar

Archbishop of Granada Paul

Meeks

Luis St. Angel John Hall

Marchioness of Moya. .Margaret

Williams

Friar Jaun Perez. .Herbert Stern

Christopher Columbus Martin

Cain
Page Doris Raymond

5. Selection played by Orches-
tra.



Bureau of Clubs
and Playgrounds

Spencer Tracy

in

Stanley and Livingston

With

Richard Greene

CRISTOBAL

SUN-MON



GATUN



FRI.



PAY YOUR
S. A. DUES



IMHifilMD



COME To The

ATHLETIC

GAMES



VOL. IV No. Ill



CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



FRIDAY, Oct. 27 1939



CIVIC COUNCIL'S
SPECIAL PROGRAM
GREETS TEACHERS



Hallowe'en's Origin and Customs Date
To Ancient Roman and Druid's Rites



Mr. Ernest Cotton, President
of the Cristobal Civic Council,
opened the program of welcome
to the new and old teachers of
Cristobal junior and senior
high, Tuesday, 8 P. M October
17, in the Cristobal High audi-
torium.

Dr. Howard gave a very inter-
esting and appropiate talk suit-
able to the occasion. The key-
note of Dr. Howard's address
was the self-satisfied smugness
of students with 70% passing
grades. He wondered what might
be the condition of world and
domestic affairs if our en-
gineers, doctors, architects,
writers, were satisfied to pro-
duce faulty bridges, half-cured
patients, unsound buildings, in-
complete poems and stories. He
stressed the necessity for em-
phasizing the need for more
perfection in one's daily work,
be it what it may.

Jack Egoscue, a graduate of
C. H. S., played a piano solo
which was accepted with a
great deal of applause by the
audience. Mr. Rice gave a few
words followed by another piano
solo by Jack.

All the teachers and their
wives, headed by Mr. Rice, then
formed a receiving line which
encouraged personal acquaint-
ance between the teachers and
parents. The crowd moved on
into the cafateria where re-
freshments were served consist-
ing of punch, cookies, cakes,
mints, and nuts.

The affair was said to be a
complete success.



The last night of October is
universally celebrated as "All
Hallow Even," or "Hallowe'en"
because it precedes "All Saints.'
Day." Some people have nick-
named it "Nutcracker Night,"
and "Snapapple Night."

This night and its customs
are closely connected with the
old belief that ghosts, witches,
goblins, and all sorts of un-
canny supernatural creatures
of darkness are abroad on this,
their yearly carnival.

This holiday has been in-
herited from pagan times. It
is in part a survival of the
ancient Britons' autumn festi-
val in honor of the Sun-god.
The Druids lit bonfires to this
god, thanking him for the fine
harvest.

Our Hallowe'en owes part of
its origin to the ancient Ro-
man festival in honor of Po-
mona, the goddess of fruits
and gardens.

The fruits of Pomona are
still remembered in our cele-
bration of Hallowe'en today;



in "bobbin" for apples, burn-
ing nuts on the hearth, sow-
ing hempseed, pulling cabbages
blindfolded.

Although it was originally
inspired by serious religious
convictions, this holiday has
been lightened and jollified
until now it is the most frivo-
lous and sportive of all the
year's celebrations.

In England, it is customary
to dive or "duck" for apples
on Hallowe'en. One of the
superstitions connected with
this custom is for the maiden,
who succeeds in getting the
apple, to sleep with it under
her pillow, and she will surely
dream of her future husband.
Another superstition says she
must eat the apple while
combing her hair in front of a
mirror at midnight, and her
future husband will appear
looking over her shoulder into
the mirror

The black cat, being the
traditional companion of witch-

( Continued on Page Four)



JUNIOR SWIMMERS
WIN MOST EVENTS
IN FIRST MEET



Black Christ Festival Celebrated
At Portobello Again on October 21



Metal-Wood Shop
Has 440 Books



It is doubtful if many students
realize just how many new
books there are in the workshop.
Mr. N. Gibson announced that
there were 440 books in all with
14 more expected very soon.

Of the 123 magazines on file,
8 are current running magazines
and only 2 are furnished by C.
H. S.

In the files are 40 catalogues
and 16 advertising pamphlets.
The books old, new, and
coming deal with machine
shop work, automobile me-
chanics, pottery, wood-working,
sheet metal forging, pattern
making, metal spinning, weld-
ing, blacksmithing, steel struct-
ures, elementary electricity, cold
metal work and artistic metal-
work, wood finishing, glass glaz-
ing, and diesel engine opera-
tion.

The boys have access to these

(Continued on Page Four)



Portobelo, one of the most
historic towns of the Isthmus
of Panama, celebrated the tra-
ditional "Feast of the Black
Christ" again on October 21.
About 1000 persons attended.
Each year many people from
all points in the Republic at-
tend the rite. Services are
held from early morning until
very late at night. The cele-
bration is not entirely a show-
ing of religion, but also of the
recreations of the olden days,
dancing and picnicing.
The town is situated 21 miles
I from Colon and the average
i sailing time is slightly less
than three hours by launch
from the main land. Legends
are slightly varied concerning
the "Black Christ," but the
most authentic is that the
image was to be taken from



South America by ancient
Spaniards to the King of
Spain. The ship carrying it
was tossed about in a terrible
storm and in order to decrease
the weight of the cargo, nu-
merous articles were thrown
over-board, among them the
statue. As the sailors were un-
successful in reloading it, it
was left ashore. The second
story says that the image was
being carried from South Am-
erica and on the course the
ship stopped at Portobelo.
Each time they would try to
leave, a violent storm arose.
Superstitious sailors believed
that it had some divine mean-
ing; so the "Black Christ"
was left on shore.

The signal for the proces-
sion to start was the firing of

(Continued on Page Fouf)



The Junior Class of CHS.
splashed their way to victory
in the first swimming meet
of the school year on Friday,
October 20.

The Seniors were a close
second, two points behind the
winners

The high point boy swim-
mer was William Peterson.
Junior with a first in the 100
Yard Free Style and a second
in the 50 Yard Dash against
Montford Stokes.

The high point girl swimmer
was Rosemary Dignam, Junior
with first places in the 50
Yard Free Style, 60 Yard
Breast Stroke and the Div-
ing event

LIST OF EVENTS

50 YD. FREE STYLE GIRLS

1. R. Dignam (55 sec.)

2. S. Callaway

3. R Goulet

50 YD FREE STYLE BOYS

1. M. Stoke; (26.2)

2. W. Peterson

3. J. McGann

60 YD. BREAST STROKE GIRLS

1. R. Dignam

2. R. Goulet

60 YD BREAST STROKE BOYS

1. B. Metzger

2. A. Collins

3. C. Brennan

100 YD. FREE STYLE GIRLS

1. G. Carnrighr

2. A. M, Crandall

100 YD FREE STYLE BOYS

1. W. Peterson

2. C. Brennan

3. I Attia

100 YD. BACKSTROKE GIRLS

1. G. Carnright

2. R. Goulet

100 YD. BACKSTROKE BOYS

1 R. Patchett

2. R. Williams

3. F. Sullivan

DIVING GIRLS
I R. Dignam

DIVING BOYS

1 J. McGann

2. C. Btennan

3. L. Doyle

90 YD. MEDLEY RELAY (1:25.5)

1. Senior Team: Collins, Patchett. Stokes

2. Freshman Team:. Metzger. Sullivan,

MiUer
120 YD FREE STYLE RELAY (1:65)

1. Senior Team: Stokes, Collins. Patchett

2. Freshman Team: Miller, Sullivan,

Snoop, Srumpf



Outstanding Students To Receive Award



For honor, courage, scholar-
ships, leadership, and service,
the two outstanding students
of C.H.S. a boy and a girl,
receive a medal and a certi-
ficate. This award Is given
annually by Elbert S. Waid
Post No. 2, American Legion,
Cristobal, C. Z.

Besides received the medal
and certificate, the students'
names are engraved on a
bronze plaque. This plaque is



hanging in the library. The
following students have won
the award thus far:

GIRLS
H M. Hammond
Betry Steder
M. Hellingshead
Mary Goulet

Marjorie Anderson 1Qs7
Marion Mclnryre 19>8
Charlotte Raymond 19 s9



BOYS

1933 Ernest De la Rosa

Colin Campbell

William B r<

William Hill

Rowland Clemens

John Finlason

Luis Finlason



1914
1935
1936



.Everyone wonders who will
be selected from this year's
graduating class. It's an ho-
nor worth working for.



INDEPENDENCE OF
PANAMA OBSERVED



On November 3, 1903, the
small republic of Panama be-
gan its bloodless revolution a-
gainst the Colombian govern-
ment. The cause of the revolt
was that the Colombian Senate
refused to ratify a treaty con-
firming the transfer to the
United States of the French
Canal Company.

Independence was declared
in Panama City and on Jan-
uary 15, 1904, the present Con-
stitution of the Republic was
drawn up. The revolution was
brought to a quick finish
though, with the aid and in-
fluence of the United States.



Page 2



TRADE WIND



October 27, 1939



Published every Friday by the
Journalism Class of Cristobal
High School, Cristobal, C. Z.

EJuor-in-ihief Byne Burning

il Editoi Dorothy Brennen

News Editor Dorothy Anderson

Business and Circulation Manager.. Paul Conn

Social Sarah Casey

Sports Richard Egolf

/tJTJ £..--.*...> )

Echange Editor ShirUy Joining,

Special Writers Msr> Harmon

Rose Margan Ssroup

John Hi rman

Georgeanna Krauie

..'' Skinner

Bats? MacMiilan

Sponsor Mr. P. J. Eun.oe

Policy: To INTEREST STUDENTS IN
STUDENT ACTIVITY.



DICTIONARIITIS



Pupils in C. H. S. seem
ruefully afflicted with gram-
matical inertia, a disease not
uncommon to other educational
institutions.

The symptons of the afflict-
ed are mispronunciations, mis-
spellings, misimdertood words,
faulty sentence structures, and
poor thought organizations.

Recognizing the ailment, one
seems prudent to recommend
the cure. The doses of the spe-
cial medicine "Dictionariitis"
are to be prescribed according
to the patient's needs.

With the conscientious pur-
suit of the cure over a lengthy
period of time, C. H. S. can hope
to produce individuals, gram-
matically sound instead of
veneered with surface book
learning.



70% EQUALS

What would happen if en-
gineers built 70% perfect brid-
ges? If doctors operated in all
cases with 70% cures? If new
automobiles were only 70% ef-
ficient? If buildings were 70%
safe? Or a football team were
satisfied with a 70 % training.

And yet here is a rather nice
school with students in it, who
are satisfied with a 70% grade.
C average. Yes, average, but is
that all you are? Are you willing
to say "Yes, I'm just ordinary"?
Most students aren't. They think
they are just a little better, but
there they are getting a 70%
grade and doing nothing about
it.

How far will that "C" get them
when they graduate? Admit-
tedly, you can dig a ditch with
very little education. What
would an editor do if a report-
er gave him a story only 70%
done? Our world couldn't go
on at that rate. Those stu-
dents who are making "C"
could do better. Why don't
they?



Billy Joe: You said the com-
position I handed in was both
good and original and yet you
gave me a zero.

Mr. Sample: Well, the part
that was good was not origin-
al and the part that was ori-
ginal was no good.

Roosevelt Echo, Pittsburgh,
Kansas



Alumni Notes



Marcel Goulet '37-attending
Junior College. Balboa.

Fhilip Briscoe '38-employed
with the Department Engineers,
Fort De Lesseps.

Donald Brayton '37-employ-
ed at the Yard Office. P. R. R.

Louis Finlayson '38-employed
at the Texas Oil Co.

Warren Lam '38:-attending
Junior College. Balboa.

Laurel "Hig" Highley '38-em-
ployed at the Pedro Miguel com-
missary.

Rose Marie Wolf '38-attend-
ing Meridith college, North Ca-
rolina.

fommy Ashton '39-employed
at the Texas Oil Co.

Zona Boggs '39-attending
Blackstone college, Blackstone,
Virginia, and incidentally, is the
roommate of

Jane Bevington '39-also at-
tending Blackstone college.

Bill Ebdon '39-attending
Georgia Tech. Atlanta Georgia.

Virginia Willett '30 attend-
ing St. Mary's.

John Berude '38-attending
M. I. T., Cambridge, Mass.

Anne Carpenter '38-attend-
ing University of Alabama.

Charlotte Raymond '38-at-
tending Pomona College, Clare-
mont, California.

Jjean Green '39-attending San
Diego State College.

Janet Nesbitt '39-attending
Junior College, Balboa.
...Marjorie Yost '38-married.

Fern limine '39-a Science
Freshman attending Iowa State.
Her pet name there is "Pana-
ma." Girls marvel at her collec-
tion of athletic medals and
belongings reminiscent of the
Canal.

Bert G. Tydeman '39-is at-
tending Renseelaer Polytechnic
Institute, Troy, New York.

Jerry Gorin '34-is attending
Harvard Law School, in Cam-
bridge, Massachusetts.

Charles T. Reeves '39- is at-
tending Bordentown Military
Institute, Bordentown, New Jer-
sey.

Marilou Anthony '39-is to
attend Cedar Crest, in Allen-
town, Pennsylvania.

Alma Bramin '39-is to be
married November 4 to Robert
Brown-'33.

Gene Stade '37-is employed
at the Electrical Division in
Cristobal.

Sam Frier '39-is attending
Harvard University, Cambridge,
Massachusetts.

Ruth Swan '33-has returned
to Fort Sherman, after graduat-
ing from the University of Ala-
bama. Her sister, Miriam, also a
graduate of Alabama is married
and lives in Tennessee.

Jack LaLonde '39-now re-
sides in Washington, D. C.

Carroll Gallion former editor
of Trade Wind and Carribean is
now living in Washington. She
has transferred from Sophie-
Newcomb, in New Orleans, to
George Washington University,
in Washington.

Bill Hunt is in the Army
School at Fortress Monroe. In a
competitive exam twenty stud-
ents were chosen out of 70. Bill
ranked 7th.



Versatile Verses



THE SUN CAME

The sun came up in splendor.
The birds began to sing.
I rushed to get my clothes on,
For fear the bell would ring.

The air was filled with sunshine,
The sky was very blue.
I fell downstairs to breakfast.
Without my other shoe.

The sun kept up its shining.
The time was drawing night:
For school bells to start ringing,
When dark clouds floated by!

The sky began to sprinkle.
The drops began to grow.
Then rain came down in

buckets!
The wind began to blow!

The school bell started ringing.
Regardless of the rain.
I had to go to classes,
To cultivate my brain.

I plunged into that downpour,
And all the way I ran.
I got to school on time, though,
That's more than others can!

My clothes were damp and

sticky,
My hair was plastered flat.
I went into my classroom,
And in my chair I sat!

While gazing out the window,
Oh! much to my surprise!
The sun came back in splendor,
Out of those dark gray skies.

I think that was a mean trick
For the sun to play on me,
'Cause while I sit here dripping,
He's dry, as dry can be!

Dot and Jean.



Jupiter Pluvius

Shades of Jupiter Pluvius!
Everyone knew that it rained
in Cristobal last week, but no
one dreamed that the deluge
could create 265 new "brooks"
in the C. H. S. Library. Yet, it
must have been true, because
there it was in black and white
on the fourth page of the last
edition of the TRADE WIND!

After providing themselves
with life-preservers, several of
the more venturesome students
cautiously approached the li-
brary. Ready to sink or swim,
they burst into the room only
to find it as "dry" as ever. The
nearest thing to water that was
discovered, was Tennyson's
"Song of the Brook", which
upon investigation was found
still to be "going on forever."

The deluge is over: in fact, it
never began. The warning "All's
clear" is sounded. Come to the
library and quench your thirst
for new knowledge in the read-
ing of 265 new books, not bab-
bling brooks.



Continental News

Abraham Lincoln High School
writes that this is the eleventh
season of "Columbia's American
School of the Air." These pro-
grams, designed to supplement
and utilize the school teachers'
work in classrooms, are heard
Mondays through Friday during
the entire school year. The series
will be produced on the stage in
the auditorium of a different
high school each week.

*

A Kiss Gramatically.

1. A kiss is a pronoun be-
cause she stands for it.

2. It is masculine and femi-
nine common gender.

3. It is plural because one calls
for another.

4. It is singular because there
is nothing else like it.

5. It can be conjugated but
not defined.

6. It is an adverb because it
can not be compared.

7. It is a phrase expressing
feelings.

Austin Pioneer.

*

Dinner Guest: Will you pass
the nuts?

Absent minded Professor:
Yes, I suppose so, but I really
should flunk them.

Austin Pioneer.

* *

By these signs you shall know
them



Blackouts

The enlightened Twentieth
Century! How superior we are
to the cave-men of the Dark
Ages! Why, they worshipped
stones, feared lightning, slew
one another for paltry reasons,
practiced brutality on one an-
other, and enslaved their under-
lings. But those are things of the
past. We don't believe in doing
such things any more. How su-
perior we are!

In prehistoric times, when a
shadow flitted by his doorway,
this aborogine retreated into
the darkness of his cave for
protection. Yet we, the people
are accredited with being the
most highly civilized in the
world, are forced to revert to
these cave-man principles to
avoid our enemies.

Yes, we also retreat into the
darkness. But we do it in a
modernized and mechanized
manner. A siren is blown, traf-
fic is stopped. People run for
bomb-proof shelters, and the
city is plunged into darkness.
How superior we are!



Sophomore: You can't tell him
a thing. He is no longer a Fresh-
man and therefore wise in the
way of things and stuff. Likes
loud ties and blonds.

Junior: You can't tell him a
thing. He is no longer a sopho-
more and therefore wise in the
ways of things and stuff. No ties
but is deep in a bee youtiful
romance.

Senior: You can't tell him a
thing. He was jilted.

Freshman: You can't tell him
a thing. He's a freshman and
his pants are starting to meet
his shoe tops half way. Doesn't
know what he likes but is per-
fectly willing to learn.

Boston University.
* *

According to the Parrakeet,
"Headed for Eden" a comedy in
three acts by Sidney Duvall,
will be presented at the Balboa
club house on Thursday, Nov-
ember, 16.



October 27, 1939



TRADE WIND



Page 3



Athlete Feats



The question these days around
C H. S. is, can a captain of a cham-
pionship soccer team be the cap-
tain of a championship football
team during the same school year?
This question will be answered on
the afternoon of November 30,

when the football season closes.

* *

The football season this year
will be one of the longest in the
history of the school.

In the first football game of
the season between Notre Dame
and Carnie Tech, "Chuck"
Forsman and "Pus" Brayton
tried to kiss each other running
head-on. The result ill broad
daylight; "Chucks" nose cut,
bleeding; "Puss" almost broke
his nose. As if this weren't
enough, "Backward" Haywood
kissed the ground following a
fall, rose wobbly and punch
drunk.

* *

This is the way this writer thinks
the freshmen star athletes ivill look
to the world in 1914:

"Chuck" Forsman as the triple-
threat athlete in all sports.

Albert Davenport as "Chuck's"
most feared opponent in Athletics.

Arthur Randies master athlete
anxious to play professional basket-
hall and football after graduating
from C. H. S.

Johnny "Backward" Haywood
destined to score the winning
point for his opponents in the
annual Rose Bowl game.

* *

Some people are wondering
these days why Edward Wheeler
named his football team Con-
nie Tech.

* *

Playing the first game of the
football season, Connie Tech de-
feated Notre Dame 12-0 with Ed.
Greene and Captain Ed. Wheeler
contributing 6 points each to their
teams' score.

* # #

In the third quarter, Wheeler
advanced behind stone-wall de-
fense, Mr. N. Gibson, the referee.
He dodged players and was fol-
lowed dog-like by Wheeler run-
ning with the ball behind Gib-
son's back.

* *

During the game on Thurs-
day, Mr. Hotz and Mr. Neff had
to hold several conferences on
the field as to the Canal Zone
rules.



SPORTS NEWS



Quote found on inside cover
of junior English book: "Most
people get a kick out of life
except when it comes from
behind them."

Latest slanguage
watch pocket engine
tooth brush mouth broom
tempost moonlight-on-a-
stick
umbrella house-in-hand
comb hair rake
Parrakeet, Balboa High, Bal-
boa.



Connie Tech Defeats
\ISotre Dame In First.
Game Of Season

Connie Tech won the first
football game of the season on
Wednesday, October 18, when
they defeated Notre Dame, 13-0.

The first half of this battle
was very much of a kicking duel
between Captains Ed. Wheeler
and Jim Pescod of Connie Tech
and Notre Dame, respectively,
with neither team crossing the
opponent's goal line.

The teams opened the third
quarter with both teams using
the aerial attack mixed with a
great deal of power plays. The
aerial attack was not clicking
for neither team successfully,
because of the wet ball. In the
middle of this quarter, Ed.
Greene intercepted a long Notre
Dame pass and ran fifty yards
for a touchdown, making the
score 6-0, in favor of Connie
Tech. The try for point after
touchdown failed.

Both teams then settled down
to straight end runs with an
occasional line plunge. It was
on an end run thlat Wheeler
ran wide to score the last
touchdown of the game, making
the score 12-0, in favor of
Connie Tech.



Football Schedule
Plans Five Teams
For 1939 Season



Fordham Downs Navy
On Short Pass 6-0



Fordham moved into a tie for
first place with Carnie Tech in
the C. H. S. intra-mural touch-
football league, when they nosed
out the powerful Navy team by
the close score of 6-0, on Thurs-
day afternoon, October 19.

Within one minute of the
kick-off, Captain Harold "Reds"
Willett threw a twenty yard pass
to Louis Palmer who ran the
ball the remaining ten yards for
the only score of the game. As
the teams lined up for the try
for point after touchdown, "Reds"
was back. The pass from center
for the extra point was low and
the Navy line rushed through
giving him little if any chance
to drop-kick the point.

Each team fought very evenly
for the remaining quarters of
the game, but neither could
cross the other's goal line,
though Navy had the ball down
on Fordham's twenty yard line
with about 2 minutes to play in
the last quarter. Navy tried to
complete three consecutive pas-
ses, but two were knocked
down and the other was wide of
the receiver.

Referee Mr. T. Hotz.

Umpire Mr. H. Neff.



EVTER.ISTHMIAN
SCHEDULE



The schedule for the 1939-1940
Girls Inter-Isthmian Sports has
been made out. It is as follows:

Sat. Dec. 2. 1939 Volleyball At Cristobal
Sat. Feb. 10, 1940 Basketball At Balboa
Sat. April, 13, 1940 Softball At Ctistobal
Sat. May 25, 1940 Tennis At Balboa
B. Bailey, Director.



Mr. H. Neff called a meeting
of the boys' Varsity Club on Fri-
day, October 13, in order to pick
the football teams for the com-
ing season. The captains were
picked on Friday by the boys
that signed up for football on
Thursday and Friday. The re-
sults of the election for captains
are as follows:

Names Votes

E. Wheeler 40

H. Willert 13

A Farrell 1 1

M'. Stokes 9

J. Pescod 6

B. Mansfield 1

C. Ruley 1
E. Greene 1
B. Fernandez 1
J. Nino 1

Five of the 91 signers did not
vote. The teams were picked at
3:00 P. M. on Friday and they
are:

NOTRE DAME CONNIE EACH

Jimmy Pescod, Edward Wheeler,

Capt. Capt.

Brayton. Jack Anstoos. Anthony

Burd. Tommy Coats, Clarence

Cala-brin. Jose Doyfe. Lee

Frick. Robert Ender, Carl

Haywood, Joha Fernandez. Bobby

Harris. Robert Forsman. Chuck

Heilbrown. Oswald Greene, Eddie

Hoffman. George Ks-ufer, Teddy

Ingtam, Elvin Kenealy. James

Muschett, Alfred Krausman, Wade

McGann, John Nesbirr. Bill

Pescod. Hugh Parker. Bobby

Prudhom, Ernest Pierce Charles

Pucci, John Picado, Mike

Sasso, Colman Starn, Wm.

Styles, Bruce Stroop. Warren

Wong. Julio Williams, Robert

NAVY FORDHAM

Montford Stokes Hal Willett,
Capt. Capt.

Dunlap, Harold Brennan. Charles

Eder, Edward Campbell. Keith

Furery, James Chenslloy. Herbert

Gilder, John Coats. Ellis

Glaze. Glyn Coffin. Jim

Harris. Delbert Collins. D

Huggett, Rs-lph Davenpott. A. E.

Kelleher, Bud Derrick, Tom

McCleary, Kirt Diaz. Arthur

Patchett, Bob Frensley, Tom

Randies, Arthur Gregory. Tom

Thomas. Buddy Hooper. Frank

Trius, Louis Maher. Bryan

Stewart. Thomas Marohl. Karl

Sullivan, Frank Nino, Joe

Walsh. Jim Slim. Alex

White. Wilbur Rose. Harold
Stroop. Buddy
TROJANS
Arthur Farrell, Capt. Jusuce. Ralph

Baxter, Frank Koeler, Warren

Briggs. John Leeser, LeRoi

Cain. James Magner. Niel

Craw, George Mansfield, Billy

Ennquez. Franklin Marquard. Edward

Gillren, Adolf Murphy, Bob

Hollowell, David Pool. Stewart

Hooper, Nathen Salmon. Marvin



HAROLD WILLETT
ELECTED HEAD OF
VARSITY CLUB



Harold Willett was elected the
president of the boys' Varsity
Club on Friday, October 13. He
has taken a prominent part in
basketball, soccer, football, base-
ball, and track events during
his high school career. Cristo-
balites rank him as one of the
top athletes of C. H. S.

The other officers elected are:
Eddie Wheeler, vice president;
Eddie Greene, secretary; and
Jimmy Pescod, treasurer. With
these boys as the Varsity Club
o f ficers, all C. H. S. expects to
see many games with scores on
top.

It was announced that all
boys playing football have a
chance to receive a reward, pro-
vided their team wins the great-
est number of games.

The Varsity Club has decid-
ed that it will have its first
dance in November. The dance
will be held in the Playshed and
the admission will be ten cents.



Compliments of
The
Panama Railroad

AND

Panama Railroad
Steamship Line



Carnwright, Magner
Defeat Teams Of
Crouch And Doyle

Lois Crouch's team bowed in
defeat to Georgiana Carnright's
team, 61-23, on Thursday. The
winning team got off to a
whirl wind start early in the
game, and kept up their lead
until the final victory.

Those who played are:

TEAM No. 1 TEAM No. 4

Georgiana Carnright. Lois Crouch,

Capt. Capt.

Madeline Bozeman Rosemary Dignam

Vonna Hambelton Blanca Faedal

Ka-thryn Heywood Jane Kaufer

Jean Holmelin Mable Lyew

Evelyn Shirley

Jean Holmelin of Team 1 scor-
ed 21 points, and Rosemary Dig-
nam of Team 4 made 9.

In the second game of the day,
Nancy Magner's team ran over
Eva Jean Doyle's girls, scoring
51-24.

The players were:

TEAM No. 5 TEAM No. a

Eva Jean Doyle, Nancy Magner.

Capr. Capt.

Louise Gormely Mary Anderson

Peggy McCleary Margaret Considfne

Kathryn Phillips Eugenia Mae Huff

Rhodai Ann Wheeler Gloria Ingram
Pauline Lim
Ann Williams



See our new

XMAS
SPECIAL

At

Finlaysorv's
Studio

Front St. Colon, R. P.



Page 4



TRADE WIND



October 27, 1939



Conscience Speaks

(Inspiration fron "The Tell-Tale
Heart" by Poe)

I am mad. Yes, that's what
they say. They do not know me.
No, I am not mad. I just have
an over-acuteness of the senses.
Madmen could not do the things
I do. They couldn't plan or
think as I do. No, for they are
not so brilliant as I am. I know!
I am very wise! Oh, yes, I know,
I know everything. I plan every
movement for every second. I
forget nothing, not even the
slightest detail.

Tonight. I am nervous, very
nervous. I usually feel nervous
before going to work. Yes. to-
night I am going to work. But
wait, I shall tell you about it.

There were many who bother-
ed me, yes, many the man
who stared so much! The lady,
so beautiful! The children, so
happy! The old woman, so quiet!
I can't stand that kind of hap-
piness! They do not know what
real happiness is. They do not
know the feeling of hearing a
last moan, or being in the same
room with death. Yes, I know,
I am omniscient. Oh yes, very.

Once, they had suspected and
arrested me. Yes, but not be-
cause I failed. Oh, no! Because
I let them. They could never
have done it unless I permitted
it. I wanted to see the gleam in
their eyes, the cowards! Some-
times, they freed me, imprison-
ed, or punished me, even
threatened death. That didn't
stop me. Nothing does. I have a
strong will power, a very intel-
ligent mind. I am a demon, yes,
and a demon never dies. A de-
mon always exists, always.

Now the time draws nearer. I
plan this carefully, very care-
fully. I never fail. There are
many, many as I said
strangled, murdered, entombed
alive. I know many more ways,
but it is impossible to tell you
all of them.

I near the house. Yes, it is
night. I like to work at night.
It is so quiet then. I enter the
back door, quietly, very quietly.
I walk up the stairs. The house
in in darkness, a thick darkness,
just as I like. I keep pushing
forward steadily, steadily. I
reach that room, her room! I
chuckle as I see her lying in her
bed, so quiet, so still. How little
she suspects what is going to
happen. I am proud of myself.
Why shouldn't I be? No one had
ever caught me in the act yet.

I do it, just as I planned. I
creep slowly, slowly. I am just
two feet away from her bed.
Then, I spring right upon her.
I do my best to strangle her. It
is not the best way to do away
with her, but she never leaves
the house, so I could never en-
tomb her.

Something is wrong! No moan!
No favorite sound! No agony
that makes music in my ears.
Something is very wrong! I
slink away. No, I am not scared,
I am disappointed. She was al-
ready dead.

Mary Schiavo.



Cam right, Callaway
Teams Defeat
Doyle and Crouch



Georgiana Carnright's team
.v:ored their third consecutive
win in volleyball Tuesday, in
the gym, when they defeated
Eva Jean Doyle's team 37-32.

The players were:



TEAM No. 5
Eva Jean Doyle.

Capt.
Louise Gormerly
Dorothy Marquard
Peggy McCleary
Kathryn Phillips
Ma.-y Ann Seibold
Rhoda Aon Wheeler



TEAM No. 1
Georgiana Carnright,

Capt.
Riith Ba-jmbach
Madeline Bozeman
Kadiryn Heywood
Vunna HambelroQ
.lean Holmelin
Frances Poda
Gladys Rubio



Madeline Bozeman of Team 1
made 9 points, and Rhoda Ann
Wheeler of Team 5 gained 13.
* *

Willieree Callaway's team
easily defeated Lois Crouch's
team, 59-8. By the end of the
first half, the score was 25-0 in
Willieree's favor. The whole
game was a pushover.

Those who played were:



TEAM No. 4
Lois Crouch.
Capt
Rosemary Dignana
Jane Kaufer
Blanca Faedal
Mable Lyew
Evelyn Shirley
Dtgna Yanez



TEAM No. 7
\\ ill.eree Callaway.

Capt.
Linda Appntl
Hcrtha Hauss
Gloria Leeser
Alice Mcllvaine
Gladys Werrz
Jean Badgley



Columbus Day
Assembly Amuses
All C. H. S.



Amusing! No, that isn't the
word, and neither is sensational.
So you supply the adjective des-
cribing the auditorium session
held October 12. Anyway every-
one agrees on one thing and
that is he liked it.

Making its first appearance
of the year, the band played
"March Activity" by Bennet. Mr.
Jorstad was complimented on
results he and the members of
the band have accomplished
since the beginning of school.

Then Mr. Beck appeared from
behind the curtain with a merry,
but subtle, "Hello." He had a
gleam in his eye. The reason
wasn't a secret. The high school
Dramatics Club had prepared a
play called, "Jerry Joins In."

The boys and girls put forth
a lot of effort for this play, and.
in the opinion of the audience,
their work was successful. J
Everyone enjoyed the play. I
Especially, Kirt Mc Cleary's I
bashfulness in the part of Har-
old, the lover; and Helen House's
blushing. Helen is new in C. H.
S. and everyone admires her for
entering into school activities.

A verbal orchid also goes to
Hertha Hauss, as Judy; James
Cain, as Jerry; Edith Stapf, as
the cook; and Neil Magner, as
the Salesman. Keep an eye on
these boys and girls, for they j



HALLOWEEN'S ORIGIN AND
CUSTOMS DATE TO ANCIENT
ROMAN AND DRUIDS' RITES



(Continued from Page One)



es, is ever present at Hal-
lowe'en. The pumpkin is sim-
ply a symbol of the harvest.
Stealing gates, buggies, chairs,
etc. popular Hallowe'en pranks
until recently, was a relic of
the time when gates and gate-
posts disappeared and were
said to have been stolen by
spirits. According to the tradi-
tion., everything connected
with Hallowe'en smacks of the
supernatural.



BLACK CHRIST FESTIVAL

CELEBRATED AT PORTOBEL-

LO AGAIN ON OCTOBER 21



(Conrinued from Page One)



a cannon. It took three hours
to walk 5 city blocks in the
lengthy procession. Sixty men
placed the statue on a huge
platform and those persons be-
lieved they receive some di-
vine blessings. Around the
image were placed favors such
as jewelry, money, and other
valuable gifts. The bearers
take three steps sidewise, for-
ward; then two steps sidewise,
backwards.

During the remainder of the
year after the celebration, the
image is kept in a glass-sov-
ered niche in the church.

show promising signs of become
excellent actors.

Again the band came to the
center of attention by playing
"Project' also by Bennet. The
whole assembly seemed to enjoy
the number.

Junior High didn't fail to
make a worthy showing. The
capability of the actors in the
Junior High will not be question-
ed now, for they gave a per-
formance on Columbus Day,
called "At The Spanish Court."
They pleased all who saw them.
Every member of the high school
says to them, "Good work, keep
it up."

Following Mr. Rice's remarks
about the actors' performance,
audience appreciation, and
students' conduct, the gathering
was dismissed with the hopes
for similar assemblies in the
near future.



Scadron Optical
Company

MAKE SURE YOUR EYES

ARE GOOD.

Panama Colon

23 Central Ave. 9084



TROJANS TIE FOR
FIRST PLACE ON
FARRELL'S PASS



The Trojans went into a tie
for first place in the intra-
mural football league on Mon-
day when they defeated Con-
nie Tech before a large crowd
of students.

The game was scoreless un-
til the last play had to be re-
peated. Captain "Boss" Farrell
of the Trojans then passed
the ball to Bob "Punchy" Mur-
phy for the only touchdown
of the day. The game was
officially over when the try
for an extra point was made.
This was completed making
the score 7-0 in the Trojan's
favor

THE LEAGUE STANDINNG



Fordham ......

Trojans

Connie Tech

Navy

Notre Dame



G W L T Per.

1 1 1 000
110 1.000

2 110 .500
10 10 .000
10 10 .000



METAL-WOOD SHOP
HAS 440 BOOKS



(Continued from Page One)



books at any time. They go to
the library, or read in the shop
about the work they are doing.
The books are arranged in sec-
tions and numbered.

The office is to be changed.
New shelves will be put in to
hold the new books. The cut
glass windows will be changed
to clear glass.

Mr. Gibson asked, "Why don't
the girls take workshop? They do
in other schools. I would like to
have them enroll."



Little Willie: (to cat purring
contently on hearth) "All right,
you dumb-bell, if you're going
to park there, turn off your
engine.

Hilltopper, Jamaica, New
York.



Bureau of Clubs
and Playgrounds

Joan Blondell

in

Good Girls Go to Paris

with

Melvin Douglas

CRISTOBAL

SUN-MON



GATUN



FRI.



FOR


ALL


PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK TRY


NATERS

10th St. Colon
364


F0T0






Colon Theatre Bldg.
Phone



PAY

S. A. DUES

TODAY



H!I1H§)IJI>




VOL. IV No. IV.



CRISTOBAL HIGH SCH OOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



FRIDAY. Nov. 10, 1939



65 CHS STUDENTS
MAKE FIRST SIX
WEEK HONOR ROLL



I wish to congratulate the
student body as a whole on
the splendid quality of work
being done, as indicated by
the report cards which came
out last Monday. Because of
the competition, especial ho-
nor should be given to those
who averaged a B or above.

Our hardest workers are our
happiest students. It is a de-
light to see students happy
with the satisfaction of a job
well done!

A survey of the marks earn-
ed last six weeks shows a to-
tal of 62 C H S Students on
the B honor roll. This total is
21 per cent of the 300 stu-
dents in C.H.S.. a figure
which indicates that a very
high quality of work is being
done. Many other students
missed the honor roll by being
low in only one subject.

The seniors lead all classes
with a total of 31 per cent of
their members on the B honor
roll! Congratulations, Seniors,
on your fine work! The Sopho-
mores are a close second with
28 per cent on the B honor
roll, the Juniors have 13 per
cent, and the Freshmen 12y 2
per cent.

Cecil L. Rice,
Principal.



HONOR ROLL

1st Six Weeks

1939-1940

BOYS 9TH GIRLS 9th

All "As"

Wong Julio



Bs
Coats, Clatence
Denton, Chestet
Millet, Donald



Bs
Casey. Patticia
Eggleston, Itene
Hicks, Hazel
Kopetski. Batbara
Rubio, Gladys
Ward, Jean



10th B's 10th B's

Aanstoos. Anthony Appin. Linda

Belden, Adolph Btennan. Dotis

Entiquez, Antonio Butlet. Geotgia

Hoopet. Ftank Butlet, Phillipe

(Continued on Page Thtee)



Seniors Plan Dance



The senior Class held its third
meeting, Thursday, November 2,
in the Cafeteria.

The meeting was called to
discuss plans for the senior
dance, which will be held on
November 22. Committees were
appointed for the various du-
ties. Arthur Farrell is in charge
of the orchestra. Georgiana
Carnright and Gladys Wertz
were selected for the decorat-
ing. Dorothy Anderson and El-
frida Flores are on the guest
committee. Anna white and
Bobby Fernandez were chosen
to take care of the programing.
Rose Margaret Stroop was ask-
ed to select ten people to be in
the receiving lirte.



First World War Armistice To Be
Celebrated Among War Allies Nov. 11



On the morning of November
11. 1918, one minute before ele-
ven o'clock, the deafening roar
of cannon and the rattling
"put-put-put'' cf countless ma-
chine guns still shook the bat-
tle front. After that hour,
deathly stillness hovered over
the scene. Occasionally the
cheerful song of little birds
could be heard. The armistice
with Germany, which had been
signed early that morning to
end the awful world War, had
gone into effect.

Since then. London and prac-
tically the whole British Em-
pire has observed a two min-
utes' silence on this day every
year in honor of the heroic
dead.

In the United States, Novem-
ber 11 is a legal holiday in 23
states. In others, it is observed
by the Governor's proclama-
tion. Everywhere appropriate
ceremonies mark the occasion.
These consist of parades and
other demonstrations by war



veterans and patriotic citizens.

The Allied countries in World
War I included the United
States. Serbia. Russia, France,
Belgium. Montenegro. Japan,
Portugal, san Marino. Rouma-
nia, Greece. Panama. Cuba,
Siam, Liberia, China, Brazil,
Guatemala. Nicaragua. Haiti,
Honduras. This was a total of
21 countries.

Some interesting facts about
World war I. The United States
declared war on Germany on
April 6. 1917 and fought for one
year, seventh months, and five
days. The countries which de-
clared war following the United
States declaration are as fol-
lows:

1. Panama declared wat on Aptil 7. 1917
and fought one yeat, seven months and five
days, t

2 Cuba declated wat on Aptil 7, 1017
and fought one yeat, seven months, and tout
days.

; ^:;m declated wat on July 11. 19I" 7
and fought one yeat thtee months and twen-
ty days

4 Libetia declated wat on Aug. 4, 191" 7
and fought one yeat thtee months and eight



dE s



(Continued on Page 3)



G-MAN GLEASON Assembly Held In
GIVES TALK ON Honor Of Panama
F. B. I. WORK Independence Day



The Junior High School or
chestra made its initial appear- j
ance, Friday, October 27, at an
assembly held in honor of Theo- [
dcre Roosevelt. "School Parade" j
was the opening number played
by the orchestra.

A program was presented by
some of the Junior High boys
and girls in commemoration of
Rcosevelt's birthday. The per-
formance consisted of a talk on
the life of Theodore Roosevelt
by Corrine Dunn, a cleverly
arranged acrostic. Roosevelt's
message to American Boys by
Paul Meeks, a poem by Norma
Nell Finley, and Roosevelt's fi-
nal message by Mary Ruth Da-
vis.

Under the leadership of Mr.
Jorstad and with the accom-
paniment of the Junior High or-
chestra the entire assembly
sang "The Battle Hymn of the
Republic" and "The Star-Span-
gled Banner.''

Mr. Rice resumed the morn-
ing's program with the intro-
duction of the guest speaker,
Mr. Roger F. Gieason. who is in
charge of the Federal Bureau of
Investigation within the Canal
Zone.

Organization of the F. B. I.
began in 1908. Mr. John Edgar
Hoover assumed leadership of

(Continued on Page Thtee)



Commander Luis J. A. Du-
Cruet and Mr. Julio A. Salas
were the honored guests at the
assembly of the Cristobal Ju-
nior-Senior High School, Thurs-
day afternoon. The assembly
commemorated National Inde-
pendence Day of the Republic
of Panama.

Miss Betty Retally, and a
group of dancers, were guest
artists. The dancers, in costume,
performed the tamborito. The
following participated in the
dances: Belen Salazar. Suzana
Jaen, Zenia Barria, Velma Aro-
semena, Gloria Bird, Azucena
Bedard, Shirley Passlaigue,
George Estenoz, Azoel Rios, Ro-
malo Emiliani. Sonny Celis. Fre-
derick Lam played the accom-
paniment for the tamborito and
for the chorus singing. The boys
taking part in the program are
from the St. Joseph's College,
and the girls from St. Mary's
Academy.

The program was planned by
Mrs. Phyllis Spencer who work-
ed with Cristobal High School
pupils, citizens of Panama. She
was aided by Miss Catita Ecker.

The assembly was held on
November 2 because November 3
is a holiday for the Canal Zone
Schools.

The complete program was as

(Continued on Page Thtee)



C. H. S. ACTORS
TO PRESENT TWO
ONE-ACT PLAYS



The Nine Lives of Emily' 1 and
"Spreading the News," will bs
presented in the C. H. S. audi-
torium on November 17. at 8:00
p. m. Under the direction and
counsel of Mr. Paul Beck, C. H.
S. actors and actresses are
working hard on these two one-
act plays.

"Spreading the News" is a de-
lightful Irish comedy by Lady
Gregory, who is, according to
George Bernard Shaw, 'the
greatest living Irishwoman.' She
is well qualified to write Irish
folk plays because she is a well-
known visitor in the cottages of
the peasants where she gathers
folklore and observes folkways.
She was influential in buildng
up the Abbey Theatre in Dublin,
the purpose of which, she says,
was to establish an Irish drama
which would have a 'firm base
in reality and an apex of beau-
ty'. Her own plays have both.
She is said to be the most pop-
ular dramatist of any national
theatre and one of the leading
dramatists of the time. In Ire-
land her plays are produced
more frequently than those of
any other playwright in the re-
pertoire of the Abbey Theatre.
She has, in the words of an
Irish critic, 'produced the great-
est laughs to the greatest num-
ber'. When she visited the Uni-
ted States with the Abbey Play-
ers in 1911, that group gave a
great impetus to our little-thea-
tre movement.

"The Nine Lives of Emily" is a
tale of a scheming, attention
loving girl who dotes upon get-
ting men to propose to her by
making them think they have
saved her life.

Many committees composed
of members of the C. H. S. dra-
matics club are working hard to
make these plays a success.



Junior Class Rings

Marvin Salmon reports that
the committee consisting of
Marvin Salmon, chairman; Mu-
riel Stewart, Mable Lyew, Irene
Stade, "Chic" Pierce, and Dan
Gower has received offers from
six different companies to sup-
ply class rings. They have been
asked to send models which
should be here by the third
week of November. Since the
rings so far have not been sa-
tisfactory, the committee is
waiting for more offers.

Miss Liter has given invalu-
able help to the members of the
committee.



Page 2



TRADE WIND



FRIDAY, Nov. 10, 1939



TIWDEglltf)

Published by the Journalism Class of
Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.

Editor-in-chief Dorothy Anderson

Assistant Editor Jean Badgjey.

News Editor Byne Bunting

Copy Reader Dorothy Brennan.

Business and Circulation Manager Paul
Gorin.

Social Sarah Casey.

Sports Richard Egolf. Jean Badgley.

Exchange Editor Shirley Jennings.

Special Writers Mary Harman, Rose
Margaret Stroop. John Herman, Georgeanna
Krause. Stanford Skinner, Betsy MacMillan.

Sponsor Mr. P. J. Evancoe.



Policy:



To INTEREST STUDENTS IN
STUDENT ACTIVITY.



ALL THE BRAINS



Why doesn't the Trade Wind
have a write-up about our par-
ty? Gosh! My poem is as good
as that. That story I wrote is
a humdinget.

Such remarks as these have
been heard echoing throughout
the halls of C. H. S. and some-
thing can and will be done
about it.

The journalism class is com-
posed of only thirteen members.
It is almost impossible for these
few to know everything that is
happening. So why don't you
hand in your contributions or
inform the staff of student hap-
penings.

If you have a poem, a story,
a bit of news Or even a funny
joke, give it to some member of
the Trade Wind staff and it
will be looked over by the copy-
reader.

The Trade wind will be serv-
ing the interests of C. H. S.
more fully if all of us contri-
bute the products of our talents
toward its s-uccess.



Bothering Animals

How would you like to be
picked up, thrown around, and
pestered until you are hopeless-
ly fatigued? How would you like
to be poked with a stick and
tortured until you hated the
sight of people? How do you
think the animals In the patio
feel about our bothering them.

The animals in the patio were
put there to serve the purposes
of Mr. Vinton's science classes.
For years, Mr. Vinton has been
bringing animals to the High
School, and has been keeping
them healthfully alive for expe-
rimental purposes. He puts
them into the wide, open spaces
of the patio for healthful sun-
shine and natural environment
among the tropical foliage.

If our curiosity is to be use-
ful, let's examine and feed the
little "beasties'' in the labora-
tory with Mr. Vinton's guidance
and consent.



Versatile Verses What Would Happen If



OH, ME!

This week I got a big surprise.
A big surprise. I said.
I looked at my report card,
And wished that I were dead.

They gave me "F" in algebra.
In gym, another one.
I got a "D" in Chemistry.
Please hand me down my gun!

This morning I don't feel so

well.
Report cards should be back.
But mine has not been taken

home
For fear I'll get a "whack".



Prof. Warr: I am going to
speak on liars today. How many
of you read the twenty-fifth
chapter of the text?

Nearly every student raised
his hand.

Prof, warr: Good. You are
the group to whom I wish
to speak. There is no twenty-
fifth chapter.



CHATTER BOX



Now I lay me down to rest
Before I take tomorrow's test
If I should die before I wake
Thank gosh, I'll have no tests
to take.

Have you noticed the happy
looking faces of the senior girls?
Don't think that the reason is
report cards, no! Henry Butch-
er is back.



Thinking of report cards re-
minds us "Death, where is thy
sling/"



If one were to watch Paul
Gorin rushing thru the halls
during the seventh and eighth
periods one would be firmly
convinced that Paul was work-
ing hard on journalism. But the
journalism class has its own
convictions. You bet!



Our senior English classes
just "read and read." Now ALL
they have to do is to make Miss
Liter know so.

Definition of an upperclassman:
Sophomore: Anyone who isn't a
Freshman.

Junior: The higher half of school.
Senior: Seniors of course.

Freshman: Who cares?



Mr. Jorstad let the music
groups hold "jam sessions" of
swing music.

Boys took over the cooking
and sewing classes.

Grade Marcuse lost her "poi-
sonality

Miss Moore forgot to ask for
homework.

Art. Farrell stopped being the
"glamor pants" for C. H. S.

Girls at Cristobal High were
not allowed to comb their hair
and powder their faces.

The water fountains were
taken cut and with them our
excuse to leave the room.

Paul Gorin had to walk to
and from school.

All the Senior book reviews
were in on time.

Shirley Jennings couldn't do
her French homework at noon.

Chewing gum were sold in the
cafeteria.

There were no errors in the
TRADE WIND.



CONTINENTAL NEWS



"Hollywood Extra"
Is New Operetta
For Easter Season



Mr. Beck is wondering if a
certain senior, whose initials are
Eddie Greene, would like to
take American problems first
period or if he is interested in
better housing conditions.



Closing with a piece of infor-
mation:

Should auld acquaintance be
forgot

Or letters aged with time.

That Arthur F. to Shirley
wrote,

In a different state of mind?



Juniors Plan Picnic



The junior class held a meet-
ing in room 203 to decide where
they will have their Dicnic.
Among the places suggested
were, Gatun Lake, Fleet Air
Base, and the Point. It was
finally decided that the pic-
nic would be held on the
Point with dancing in the
Playshed afterwards. The exact
date has not been decided yet.



From the high school in El
Paso, Texas, comes the novel
idea of students taking the
teachers' places, for a day, and
the parents attending the class-
es, having first made out a
schedule. Teachers were com-
pelled to eat in the cafeteria,
while students impersonated
them in the faculty lunch room,
and received all their privileges.
Austin Pioneer

* *

Cop: "How did you get up in
that tree?"

Tramp: "Ain't you got no
sense? I sat on it when it was
an acorn.''
Western Military Academy

* *

Jamaica, N. Y.'s newspaper
the Hilltopper was rated first
among the high school papers,
receiving 855 points out of a
possible 1000, thereby attaining
the highest rating offered in
this contest. The editorial staff
was commended for its work by
an official comment.

The Hilltopper

* *

Some one's wise advice about
women:
If she looks young, she's old.
If she looks old, she's young.
If she looks back, follow her.
The Hilltopper

*

This year mining extension
studv in the Territory enters
its fifth year, and because of
the increased appropriation pro-
vided by the Legislature, its pro-
gram for the year is wider in
scope than ever.

College, Alaska

* *

Little Audrey was riding in a
taxi cab along mountain roads.
The taxi was swinging around
curves at 60 miles an hour.
Then the driver yelled:

"Look out. Little Audrey, we're
going over the cliff." But Little
Audry just laughed and laugh-
ed because she knew the cab
was yellow.

College, Alaska



The new operetta for this
year, "Hollywood Extra", has
just been received by Mr. Jor-
stad. The music is written by
Charles Wakefield Cachman and
the libretto by George Murray
Brown. "The music for this
operetta," stated Mr. Jorstad,
"is quite modern. It has two
acts, the first taking place in
Hopetown, Maine, and the sec-
ond in Hollywood with an Al-
gerian set. The operetta will
feature a male quartet of
Northwest Mounted Police, a
marching song of the Foreign
Legion, besides many other solos
and duets."

Three baritones, three so-
pranos, one alto, one bass, and
two speaking parts make up the
leads in the cast. The choruses
will sing in part music. Dances
will also be featured as well as
the orchestra which Mr. Jorstad
plans to have play throughout
the operetta.



Art Classes Construct
Miniature Stage Sets

"Art classes are coordinating
their projects this year with
Dramatic Club activities," an-
nounces Miss Mary Worrell.

The Elementary Group has
completed posters for the two
one-act plays, "Spreading the
News" and "The Nine Lives of
Emily".

Various Advanced Class stu-
dents have done posters, minia-
ture stage sets, and miniatures
of the characters in the plays.
These are on display in the
Household Arts showcase win-
dow.

Gioconda Pucci and Dorothy
Anderson constructed tiny fig-
ures of the characters from "The
Nine Lives of Emily,'' from bits
of cork, paper, and pipe clean-
ers.

The soap figures of charact-
ers in "Spreading the News"
were carved by Buddy Randies.



Mock Convention to Be
Given in Balboa, May 3



A Mock Democratic National
Nominating Convention will b?
held in the Playshed at Balboa,
May 3, 1940.

The purpose of the affair will
be to dramatize the actual work-
ings of a national nominating
convention, and to present to
the students and the public
some discussions of American
public affairs.

This convention is to be stag-
ed by the International Rela-
tions Club of the Canal Zone
junior College with the assist-
ance of students from Balboa
High School and Cristobal
High School.

Further details will be pub-
lished before the event.



FRIDAY, Nov. 10, 1939



TRADE WIND



Page 3



Athlete Feats



The students of C. H. S.
should feel very indebted to
Mr. T. Hotz, Mr. N. Gibson,
and Mr. H. Neff for their
willingness to give up golf
three times a week to officiate
in the C. H. S. intra -mural
touch-football league.

Here is a Believe-It-Or-Not.
In the third quarter of the
Notre Dame Fordham game,
Johnny Hayward intercepted a
pass thrown by "Reds" Willett
who on the next play, inter-
cepted a pass heaved by Hay-
wood. Johnny then intercepted
another Willett pass on the very
next play.

The Trojan-Navy teams played
in a rainstorm that had started a-
bout an hour before game time and
continued throughout contest, mak-
ing it impossible to get the full
details of the fray. It was, however,
known that the game was a score-
less tie with Art Farrell of the Tro-
jans the outstanding player.



One of the highlights of the
Navy-Trojan game was Pool's
snagging the only completed
forward pass toward the end
of the fourth quarter when
the ball was wet and hard to
hold.



SPORTS NEWS



Notre Dame Wins On
First Period Pass



The playshed received the
new fencing equipment that
was ordered by Mr. H. Neff,
Fhysical Education teacher.
The equipment is: ten masks,
ten new type French foils
with new bell type guards, and
six extra foil blades. All the
blades are mad.e of the best
tempered steel



C. H. S. lost one of their most out-
standing athletes when Warren
Koehler left to make his home in
New Jersey. We are all very sorry
to see him go.

65 CHS STUDENTS
MAKE FIRST SIX
WEEK HONOR ROLL



(Continued from Page One)



BOYS

B's
Kaufer. Teddy
Pescod. Hugh
Sasso, Colman
Sta-ggs, Buddy
Styles, Bruce



GIRLS
lOih Bs

Considine, Margaret
Foulkes. Betty Jane
Hauss, Hertha
Keenan. Virginia
MacMillan. Virginia
Martin, Lauretta
Metzger, Marjean
Rosales. Philipa
Seibold. Mary Ann
Stapf, Edith
Wheeler, Rhoda Ann
Wong. Augusta
Zitzewitz, Marguerite



11th B's
Gilder, John
Hartis. Delberr
Perce, Charles
Thompson, Robert



12th B's
Carles, Andres
Fernandez, Robert
Salas, Hatold



11th B's
Callaway, Willieree
Casey. Sarah
Doyle. Eva Jean
Gilder, Marjorie
McCleary, Peggy
Schiavo, Mary

12th All "A's"
Bailey, Peggy
flores, Elfreida

12th B's

Anderson, Dorothy
Badgley, Jean
Btennan, Dorothy
Bunting, Byne
Grabhorn. Jean
House, Helen
Hunt. Mafy
Kaufer, Jane
Posse, Madeline
Raymond. Jean
Wolf, Dorothy



Notre Dame moved into a tie
for second place with Connie
Tech on Wednesday afternoon.
October 25, when they defeated
Navy on a first period touch-
down pass.

Navy kicked off to Notre
Dame. The ball was run back to
the Navy's own forty-five yd.
line. Johnny Haywood then
threw a long thirty-five yard
pass to Hugh Pescod who ran
the remaining ten yards un-
touched. This put Notre Dame
out in front 6-0 within two min-
utes of the kick off. The try f or
extra point was incomplete.

After this touchdown, Notre
Dame played defensive football,
with captain Pescod kicking out
of danger repeatedly. Navy did
not give up. They "sailed" into
Notre Dame territory through-
out the remaining quarters, but
each time Notre Dame's second-
ary would knock down fourth
down passes to take possession
of the bali.



Callaway Defeats
Carnright 37-36

Willieree Callaway's team
tanks first in volleyball after
defeating Georgiana Cam-
right's players 37-36, on Thurs-
day, October 26.

Willieree was ahead by 7
points at the end of the first
half; but in the second, Geor-
giana's team almost caught up
with her. Throughout the
whole game there was hard
fighting on both sides of the
net, with the finest display of
passing ever seen this year.

High scorers were Vonna
Hambleton of TEAM 1 with
9 points, and Jean Badgley of
TEAM 7 with 9 points.



Styles' Team Defeats
Doyle's; Scores 44-43

Bobbie Styles' team chalked
up their first win Tuesday, Oct.
31, when they surprised every-
body by downing Eva Jean
Doyle's, scoring 44-43.

Eva Jean's players led in the
first half 25-18. but the tables
were turned in the next rally of
play, giving Bobbie the game.

Marion Snyder of TEAM 3
scored 18 points, and Rhoda Ann
Wheeler of TEAM 5 made 13
points



Herman and Prudhom
Lead C. H. S. Shooters
In Postal Rifle Match



The Canal Zone Junior Rifle
Club held their second compe-
titive match of the school year,
Saturday afternoon, November
4, on the small bore range at
Fort Davis.

The club shot their postal
match with the Wheeling,
West Virginia Club during the
afternoon. The high five in
this match were:



G. Herman


194 x 200


E. Prudhom


194 x 200


G. Milter


1

>.. Conley


19? x 200


B. 11.:/.. r


188 x 200



The contestants also had
the National Bi-Weekly Match
and these scores are:

G. Miller 194 X 200

L. Conley 191 x 200

J. Mcllrane 189 X "200

E. Prudholm 1S9 x 200

B. Maher 188 X 200



RAYMONDS TEAM
BEATS CALLAWAY



Jean Raymond's team scored
an easy win over Willieree Cal-
laway's players, 30-11, Tuesday
Oct. 31.

The score was 15-3 by the end
of the first half. While the
other team stood there in a
daze, Jean's team, quickly fin-
ished their victory.

Jean Badgley o' TEAM 7
made 5 points, and Virginia
Keenan of TEAM 2 tallied 13.



Stade Wins Victory
Over Styles, 34-16

Irene Stade's team registered
their first victory Thursday,
November 2, when they beat
Bobbie Styles' players, 34-16.

Irene took the lead early in
the game, and her players tal-
lied points until final victory

Rita Goulet was high scorer
with 14 points. Bobbie Styles
of the opposing team scored 6.



Scadron Optical
Company

MAKE SURE YOUR EYES
ARE GOOD.



Panama

23 Central Ave.



Colon
9084



COFFIN INTERCEPTS
FARRELL'S PASSES
TO DOWN TROJANS



Fordham gained first place in
the C. H. S. intramural touch-
football league on Thursday,
October 26, when they defeated
the Trojans 12-0, before a large
crowd of high school students
and faculty members.

All the scoring was done in
the first quarter. The first
touchdown was made when Cap-
tain "Reds" willett scored on
an off tackle play, after "Shor-
ty" Coffin had intercepted a
Trojan pass on the Trojans'
three yard line on the preced-
ing play. Later in the same
quarter, "Shorty" intercepted
another Trojan pass on the
Trojans' thirty-yard line. "Reds''
then passed the ball to Joe Nit-
to on the five yard line from
where Joe crossed for a touch-
down

The teams then settled down,
playing one of the brainiest
football games of this season.
Late in the third quarter the
Trojans threw a real scare into
the league leaders when they
started a touchdown march
downfield that was stopped af-
ter it had advanced about twen-
ty-two yards by the interception
of a forward pass.

The Fordham team then kick-
ed out of danger giving the Tro-
jans the ball to start the last
quarter, when the minute was
up the Trojans then took up
where they left off before the
interception of the pass. This
march also fell short but the
Trojans had advanced twenty-
seven yards. Then Fordham
held them for four downs, tak-
ing possession of the ball,
which they brought out of dan-
ger on power plays alone. The
game ended with both teams
digging in.



Compliments of
The
Panama Railroad

AND

Panama Railroad
Steamship Line



FOR ALL PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK TRY NATERS F0T0



Colon Theatre Eldg. 10th St. Colon
Phone 364



Page 4



TRADE WIND



FRIDAY, Nov. 10, 1939



Magnerites Down
Stadeit.es 35-29



Edging ahead in the last few
minutes of play. Nancy Mag-
ner's team overpowered Irene
Stade'.s 35-29, in the current vol-
leyball tournament. Tuesday af-
ternoon in the gym.

Irene's team was ahead by 3
points at the end of the first
half, but conditions changed in
the next round of play, leading
to Nancy's victory.

Members of the winning team
were: Nancy Magner, CAPTAIN;
Eugenia Mae Huff. Gloria In-
gram. Eleanor Marquard, Pau-
line Lim, and Ann Williams.

Those on the opposing team
we're: Irene Stade, CAPTAIN;
Frances Davenport, Eula Mae
Callaway, and Rita Goulet.

Frances Davenport of TEAM
6 was high scorer with 9 points.
Nancy Magner and Ann Wil-
liams Of TEAM 8 made 9 points
each.



ASSEMBLY HELD IN
HONOR OF PANAMA
INDEPENDENCE DAY



(Continued from Page One)



follows :

1. Military Escort, High School
Band

2. -Perfidia" and "La Casita",
John McGann

3. Address in Spanish, Com-
mander Ducruet

4. History of Panama, Harold
Salas

5. Vocal trio, "Alia en el Ran-
cho Grande"By Azucena Bedard.
Thelma Finlayson, Melida Ho-
ward

6. "La Patria", a poem, in
Spanish and English by Miss
Betty Retally

7. "La vereda Tropical,'' Miss
Leonia Lam

8. Tamborito, The Chorus

9. Panamian National An-
them, High School Band.



FIRST WORLD WAR ARMIS
TICE TO BE CELEBATED
AMONG WAR ALLIES NOV. 11



(Continued from Page One)



Carnright Overcomes
Magner's Team 33-27

Georgiana Carnright's team
now ties for first place in the
volleyball tournament by de-
feating Nancy Magner's team,
33-27, in the second game Thurs-
day, in the high school gym.

Georgiana led in the first
half, but in the second, Nancy
caught up with her. The last
few minutes of play decided
this well-fought game.

Ann Williams of TEAM 8 was
high scorer with 7 points, and
Vonna Hambelton of TEAM 1
with 11 points.



G-MAN GLEASON
GIVES TALK ON
F. B. I. WORK



(Continued from Page One)



5. Chioa declared war on Aug. 14. 1917
and foughr one year two months and twenty-
eight days.

6. Brazil declared war on Oct. 6. 1917
and fought one year and twenty-six days.

7 Guatemala 1 declared war on April 21.
1918 and fought six months and twenty-one
days

8. Nicaragua declared war on May 6, 1918
and fought six months and five days

9. Haiti dcclatcd war on July 12. 1918
and fought thtee month and thirty days.

10. Honduras dcclatcd war on July 19.
1918 and fought three months and twenry-
three days.

When the United States declared war Con-
gress stated "that the state of war between
the United States and the Imperial German
Government which has been thrust upon the
[Jailed States is hereby formally declared

Russia surrendered to Centra!
Powers Dec 16. 1917 and Rou-
mania May 6, 1918.

Bulgaria surrendered to the
Allies Sept. 29, 1918; Turkey
Oct. 30, 1918; Austria-Hungary
Nov. 3, 1918; Germany Nov. 11,
1918. Thus the war to end all
wars came to an end.



this organization in 1924. and
is still its head.

Mr. Gleason (G-Man to most
of us) gave the chief require-
ments of applicants for service
in the F. B. I. They are. gradua-
tion from a recognized law
school, with two years of suc-
cessful practice at the bar, and
a satisfactory school record, the
latter must show a good char-
acter and high intelligence. Ex-
cellent health is essential.

After acceptance of the ap-
plicant, he enters into training.
The first step is the handling
of guns. The second is study in
the crime laboratory. The third
is finger printing technique.
About 12.000,000 finger prints
are contained in the latter de-
partment. The next step is work
in a field office on actual cases.

Three types of cases taken by
the F. B. I. were described by
Mr. Gleason. They are kidnap-
ing, bank robbery, and checking
of fugitives. Any of these jobs is
dangerous and requires a good
deal of knowledge and exper-
ienced judgment.

"The Test" a fitting and
thoughtful poem, was read by
Mr. Gleason. Afterwards, he an-
swered questions asked by the
pupils in the assembly.

Mr. Rice extended the thanks
of the school to Mr. Gleason.
The assembly was then dismiss-
ed and students went to their
third period classes, stimulated
with the inspiration of the pro-
gram.



Teacher: Define Reputation.

Boy: Reputation is what men
think of you; Character is what
God knows you are.



Girls' Varsity Club
Holds Spook Party

Ouch, I bumped my head!
Eek, what was that Oh, let me
go! I can't see a thing! Hey, I'm
falling! Eek!! Gosh! Yeeow!

These cries and remarks were
heard at the start of the Girls'
Varsity Party in the Kindergar-
ten Building. Wednesday, Octo-
ber 25. from 7:30 to 10:00 p. m.

The guests were blindfolded
and led on a diversified and
precarious route through the
darkened building to the "grave-
yard." Epitaphs on the tomb-
stones were read by gruesome
candlelight with wild gushes of
laughter.

Traditional Hallowe'en games
were played with the following
winners: superstition, Ann Wil-
liams; Marshmallow String,
Rhcda Ann Wheeler; Musical
Chairs. Mary Anderson. For-
tune-telling by candle-light was
another thrilling event of the
evening.

Refreshments were served af-
ter a rally of music and song
around "Old Faithful" the
"grand" piano.

Miss Barbara Bailey, club
sponsor, and Miss Gladys Wertz,
club president, presided over
the affair. The members ana
the guests who attended were
Georgiana Carnright, Rhoda
Ann Wheeler, Dorothy Ander-
son, Eula Mae Callaway, Mary
Anderson, Fannie Marie Eld-
ridge, Anna White, carol Stroop,
Rita Goulet, Virginia Keenan,
Opal Holgerson, Gioconda Puc-
ci, Jean Raymond, Mable Lyew.
Ruth Baumbach. Jean Badgley,
Gloria Leeser, Gloria Ingram.
Bobbie Styles. Lois Crouch. Eva
Jean Doyle. Willieree Callaway,
and Ann Williams.



Crouch Resists Doyle
In Close Game, 29-28

Lois Crouch's players suc-
ceeded in defeating Eva Jean
Doyle's team, Tuesday, Novem-
ber 2, by one point in the last
few minutes of play, 29-28.

The first half was Doyle's by
3 points, but Crouch's team
turned back the tide. The
whole game was filled with
excitement as each team tal-
lied point for point.

Jane Kaufer scored 13
points for her team, and Eva
Jean Doyle gained 8.



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PANAMA



RAYMOND DEFEATS
CROUCH'S TEAM IN
VOLLEYBALL 45-20



Jean Raymond's strong vol-
leyball team uprooted Lois
Crouch's team 45-20. in the
high school gym Tuesday after-
noon. Oct. 24.

Jean's team took the lead ear-
ly in the game, and finished
with a fine showing of volley-
ball.

These on the winning team
were: Jean Raymond. CAPTAIN;
Josephine Brennan. Virginia
Keenan, Marjean Metzget, and
Gioconda Pucei.

Their opponents were: Lois
Crouch. CAPTAIN: Rosemary
Dignam, Blanca Faedal, Jane
Kaufer, and Digna Yanez.

Virginia Keenan of TEAM 2
scored 14 points, and Jane Kau-
fer of TEAM 4 tallied 7.



Notre Dame Ties Ford-
ham For First Place In
Intra-mural League



Notre Dame moved into a tie
for first place with Forciham in
the intra-mural football league
when they defeated Fordham 7-
6 on Wednesday, November 1.

Notre Dame received the kick
off on their own 3C- yd. line.
Their first play was good for 4
yds., but on the next play they
received a 15 yd. penalty giving
them second down and 21 yds.
to go. Pescod then made a wide
end-run that was good for 19
yds. They failed to make the
remaining yardage giving Ford-
ham the ball. Willett then car-
ried the ball on every play but
three, until he scored a touch-
down from the one yd. line
through left tackle.

When the second quarter op-
ened, Notre Dame started their
touchdown march that could
not be stopped by Fordham.
Notre Dame took the ball down
to 2 yd. Line from where Jim
Pescod scored. Haywood then
passed to Hoffman making the
score 7-6 in favor of Notre Dame.
They then took the defensive
for the remainder of the game.



Bureau of Clubs
and Playgrounds

Mickey Rooney

in

"Andy Hardy Gets
Spring Fever"

CRISTOBAL

SUN-MON



GATUN



FRI.




TRBDCiMUD



Bring Your
Red Cross
Donations



Vol. rv No. 5



CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



Wednesday, Not. 22, 1939



CHS CELEBRATES
ARMISTICE DAY IN
NOV. 10 ASSEMBLY



Mr. Fred de V. Sill, a member
of the National Executive Com-
mittee of the American Legion,
delivered an address to the Jr.-
Sr. High School assembly Fri-
day morning, November 10, in
commemoration of Armis t i c e
Day. His topic was "The Signific-
ance of Armistice Day."

Mr. Sill, now director of Ad-
measurement on the Canal Zone,
served overseas during the last
World War and is well informed
on European alliances. Regard-
ing the present conflict, Mr. Sill's
contacts with other national
leaders in the American Legion
give him a unique knowledge of
American attitudes.

Mr. Sam Deavours, popular
baritone soloist, was the guest
artist for the assembly. Mrs.
Phyllis Jorstad played the ac-
companiment for Mr. Deavours.

The complete program was as
follows:

1. Morgan's High School March
High School Orchestra Di-
rected by Mr. Jorstad.

2. "Smiles".

"There's a Long Long Trail a-
Winding" sung by Assembly-
Directed by Mr. Jorstad.

3. Presentation of Colors Boy
Scouts.

Pledge of Allegiance Assem-
bly.

4. "Significance of Armis t i c e
Day" Mr. Fred de V. Sill, an
address.

5. Sam Deavours singing accom-
panied by Mrs. Jorstad.
"Tell me Tonight"
"Wagon Wheels"

(Continued on Page 4)



Pedagogues Win
Volleyball Game



C. H. S. volleyball girls, all-
stars, challenged four faculty
members preparatory to their
annual game against Balboa
High.

At the beginning, the girls
sent across several cannon-ball
serves that tallied scores against
the pedagogues. Then Rice, Vin-
ton, Maedl, and Evancoe rallied
their strengths to win decisively,
three games out of three. The
second game was most exciting
of all. The girls had 20 points
to the teachers' 5.

Vinton's screwball serve, Rice's
hammering net strokes, Maedl's
elastic reach, and Evancoe's set-
ups won the game 22-20.

Principal competitors among
the girls were: Georgiana Carn-
wright, Edith Dixon, Vonna
Hambleton, Katherine Haywood,
Jean Holmelin, Virginia Keenan,
Nancy Magner, and Jean Ray-
mond.



Spreading the News




Left to Right Peggy Bailey, Anna White. James Cain. Joe Nitto, Alfted Muschett, Geotge
Hoffman, Eva Doyle, Algerine Collins. Thomas Gtegory.



President F. D, Roosevelt Proclaims
New Thanksgiving Day, November 23



As everyone knows or should
know, Thanksgiving is just a-
round the corner. It began in
the year 1621 when the Pilgrims
were thankful for the bountiful
harvest they had had after a se-
vere winter that took its death
toll and left few survivors. Then,
it became an annual occurrence.
The Massachusetts Bay Colony
in 1630 and Connecticut in 1639
began to observe the day of
Thanksgiving with appropriate
church services and humble
thankfulness. Later, President
Lincoln appointed the last
Thursday of November as
Thanksgiving Day. Every presi-
dent has followed his example
until President F. D. Roosevelt



in 1939 changed the date to
November 23. The New England
States intend to keep November
i 30 as Thanksgiving in defiance
of the presidential proclamation.

Americans in Panama will
carry on the traditional Thanks-
giving, spreading their tables
with local and imported foods
such as Argentinean turkey, Pa-
namanian fruits, states frozen
vegetables, nuts, and other deli-
cacies.

For holiday pastimes, many
will fish; play golf, baseball,
tennis; hike in the jungle; swim;
tour the interior of Panama by
car; visit friends locally or on
the other side of the Canal.



American Red Cross Campaign Asks
C. H. S. Students for Financial Aid



"War is raging in Europe. The
resources of these countries will
soon be drained because of en-
ormous casualties in battle and
the ravages of war. Already
the American Red Cross has ap-
propriated $1,000,000 for emer-
gency war relief in Europe. This
means that all chapters affiliat-
ed with the national organiza-
tion will have to make extra-
ordinary efforts to raise funds
in addition to local require-
ments, in order to help the na-
tional organization in its work,"
wrote Mrs. Bessie Ridley, wife
of the president of the Canal
Zone Chapter of the American
Red Cross.

The President of the United
States, in a statement issued
October 12, regarding the Red
Cross and European relief, stat-
ed in part: "It is traditional
that the American people should

(Continued on Page 4)



Girls' Varsity Of CHS
Elects Wertz Captain

The Girls' Varsity Club met
for the first time this year at
3:10, Monday with Miss Bar-
bara Bailey, the club sponsor,
in her office in the Kinder-
garten building.

The purpose of the meeting
was to elect officers for the
1939-40 year. Those elected were:
Gladys Wertz, president; Jean
Badgley, secretary, and Geor-
giana Carnright, treasurer.

Georgiana Carnright was
chosen chairman of the Sports
Committee for the volleyball
season, and Jane Kaufer was
appointed chairman of Social
Activities for October.

It was decided that the Var-
sity Club would hold its meet-
ings every Monday of this year.



DRAMATICS CLUB
PRESENTED TWO
ONE-ACT PLAYS

Peggy Bailey, as the defensive
Irish wife of the unfortunate
Bartley Fallon, and Dorothy An-
derson, as the social climbing
mother of two pampered daugh-
ters, took honors in the two one-
act plays presented Friday even-
ing, November 17, in the Cris-
tobal High School auditorium.

Muriel Stewart, as the impe-
tuous go-getter Natalie, Eva Jean
Doyle, as the deaf, gossip-mon-
gering apple seller, and James
Cain as the stooped old man,
performed their parts with out-
standing skill.

Acting well as supporting
characters were Kirt McCleary,
Carolyn Stroop, Anna White
with the stage newcomers Bobby
Fernandez, Ada Crandall, Eddie
Wheeler, James Coffin, Joe Nitto,
George Hoffman, Algerine Col-
lens, and Thomas Gregory the
last three mentioned were par-
ticularly good because they stay-
ed in character throughout the
play.

The Senior High School
launched its 1939-40 dramatic
program successfully with "The
Nine Lives of Emily" and
"Spreading the News" under the
direction of Mr. Paul L. Beck.

"The Nine Lives of Emily"

(Continued on Page 41



American Legion To
Purchase Uniforms



Baseball is being promoted in
the Cristobal High School. The
American Legion is entering a
Cristobal Ail-Star team again
in the Twilight league. They are
paying the twenty-five dollar
franchise and buying fifteen new
uniforms for the members of the
squad.

Anybody who signed up to play
intermural baseball is eligible to
try out for the team. The try-
outs will start as soon as the
football season ends. The squad
will consist of fifteen players.

If the outside teams in the
league need more players, they
may accept high school students
that wish to play. This will give
the boys a chance to play that
did not make the high school
team.

Games will be played on the
point every Tuesday, Friday and
Saturday. The baseball diamond
has been moved to where the
Softball field was. The Bureau of
Clubs and Playgrounds has im-
proved the field and provided a
high backstop. Left and center
fields have more space than
formerly. Right field remains
about the same. Bleachers have
been repaired and added to ac-
commodate larger crowds.



Page 2



TRADE WIND



Wednesday, Nov. 22, 1939



Mill



III



The Nine Lives of Emily



Published by the Journalism Class of
Cristobal High School, Cristobal. C. Z.

Editor-in-chief Dorothy Anderson
Assistant Editor Jean Badgley.
News Editor Byne Bunting
Con' Reader Dorothy Brennan.
Business and Circulation Manager Paul
Gorin.

Social Sarah Casey
Sports Richard Egolf. Jean Badgley
Exchange Editor Shirley Jennings
Special Writers Mary Hartman. Rose
Margaret Stroop. John Herman. Georgeanna
Krause. Stanford Skinner, BeLsy MacMiUan
Sponsor Mr. P. J. Evancoe.
Policy: To INTEREST STUDENTS IN
STUDENT ACTIVITY.



Thanksgiving Day



Thanksgiving is one of Amer-
ica's most cherished holidays.

Free from war menaces, blessed
with economic security, political
liberty, social freedom, and religi-
ous tolerance: we face another
Thanksgiving Day, cheerfully and
hopefully.

Our United States Government
is still "of the people, by the peo-
ple, and for the people."

To appreciate this marvelous
heritage better, let's take time out
to meditate upon our good fortune,
giving praise to the bountiful Al-
mighty for benefits past, present,
and to come.

Then, let's resolve to perpetuate
this priceless heritage through our
right living, loving, learning, think-
ing, working, and serving the
noblest ideals of "life, liberty, and
the pursuit of happiness" that they
may be practiced on this earth.
P. J. E.

Personal Responsibility

A play is to be produced! A
game is to be won! A picnic is
to be enjoyed! But the actors feel
indisposed; the players are irres-
ponsibly absent; and the picnic
committee forgers about it! What
a fine state of affairs! Don't laugh!
These things have happened to C
H. S.

Recently, members of the plays,
which were to be produced last
week, did not feel inclined to at-
tend play practice. The plays had
to be postponed. Responsibility was
placed in them and they failed to
see the importance of their obliga-
tions.

Sometimes, an absence is excus-
able. Severe illness, a serious ac-
cident, an unavoidable disaster may
account for a justifiable non-at-
tendance, but in the words of old
troopers: "The show must go on!"

Affairs must move on with res-
ponsible, conscientious, dependable
people. When you accept a trust,
fulfill your obligations faithfully
and well!



A lady bought one pound of
cottage cheese at the grocery
store. When she got home she
found a splinter in it and took
it back to the grocer.

"I found a splinter in this
cheese," she said.

"Well, what did you expect,
the whole house?"




'THE LOSS OF LOVES LABOR"



Left to Right Kirt McClean



el Stewart, Bobby Fernandez. Dorothy Anderson.



Roving Reporter

Lest Admiral Byrd forget any
last minute essentials for his
South Pole Trip, C. H. S. people
think he should include:

Dorothy Anderson: An ice pick.

Mr. Rice: A group of eskimos and reindeer
from Alaska, who are American citi-
zens, for colonization.

Dorothy Brennan: Paint for the pole.

Bobby Ferns-ndez: Long winter underwear.

Mr. Jorstad: Canned music and reading mat-
ter for recreation.

Mary Hartman: Me.

Mr. Evancoe: A heavy anchor to keep Little
America from floating away.

Mi-rjorie Gilder: Ice cream.

Miss Liter: An electric heating pad.

Standford Skinner: An extra pair of keys
for the snow plow.
Paul Gorin: Red Flannels.

Dorothy Parish: The Gas House Gang.

Marvin Salmon: Plenty to eat.

Shirley Jennings: A few Buicks.

Mr. Beck: Methods of recreation for the men.

Ruth Randies: A bathing suit.

Spencer Smith: A boa constrictor to keep
him warm.

Eddie Wheeler: A floor show.

Kirt McCleary: A few secretaries from around
here.

Peggy Baily: A can opener.

Mr. Hotz: Refrigeratots. in case he runs
out of ice.

Helen House: Long Socks.

Frank Scott: A pair of roller skates. j"q case
the weather changes.

Frank Cain: A pump for flat tires.

Ruth Wickingstad: A boat,

Marilou Messer: His wife.

Glady Wertz: Matches.

Richard Egolf: Football equipment.

Anna White: Artie Shaw's band.

Joe Nitto: Me for cabin boy.

Chick Pierce: Ear muffs.

Fannie Eldridge: A couple of nickelodeons.

Arthur Farrcll: Some snow.

Doris Brennan: A pet penguin for an in-
terpreter.

Madeline Posse: A furnace.

Dale Price: Rubbers.



SOCIAL NEWS

Alice Mcllvaine spent the week-end of
November 1 1 in Balboa.

Arlene Hoffman and Tommy Aihton were
an overwhelming success as special attrac-
tions at the Elks' Chanty Bail given Friday
night, November 10, at BHgray's Garden.

These two jt'tterbtrgs also honored the
guests of the Cotillion Club Dance at the
Washington Hotel on Saturday, November
1 1 with one of their clever routines.

An Armistice's Eve Dance was given Fri-
day. November 10. at the Strangers' Club by
the American Legion.

Kirt MiCleary was host at a dinner party
fof .i small group of fmnds at his home
on Friday. November 10. The occasion was
his birthday. Soon Kirt will experience his
first shave.

Shirley Jennings was the guest of Chi-
quita Henry in Balboa over the week-end.

(rj, t Marcuse spent the weekend in Bal-
boa with Andre Jerome,

Rose Margaret Stroop. Anna White. Louise

Gormcly. Buddy Stroop, joe Nitto. and

Buddy Randies were the guests of Mr. and

Mrs Srronp at ihe Cotillion Club Dance on

November I 1

Mcru m and Bob French returned on Nov-

-. from a stay of three months in the

States.

Mars Schiavo entertained informally at a
dancing party at her home at Fort Davis, on
Saturday night. November 11, Her miesc
were: Virginia MacMillan. Alice I'heih, Kitty



C. H. S. CALENDAR 1939-40



Jan.



Apr.



May



10 Armistice Day Assembly

17 Two one-act plays "Nine lives
of Emily" and "Spreading the
Neus"

17 C. H. S. at Junior College
Football

22 Thanksgiving Assembly

22 Senior Dame

23-26 Thanksgiving Holidays
1 High School Swim Meet
2 B. H. S. at C. H, S. Girls'
Volleyball

\<>End of Second Six Weeks

15 Three-act Play "Captain Apple-
jack '

21 Christmas Pageant and Music

22 Student Association Christmas
Dance

23 Jan. 1 Christmas Holidays
5 High School Swim Meet

1 9 Sophomore Dance

26 Stunt Night
2 End of Third Six Weeks
2 High School Swim Meet
9 Carnival

10 Water Polo Balboa at Cristobal

10 C. H. S. at B. H. S. -Girls' Bas-
ketball

21 Assembly in honor of Washing-
ton

2 2 Washington 's Birthday

24 Balboa at Cristobal Softball
and Baseball
1 High School Operetta

15 End of Fourth Six Weeks

15 Balboa at Cristobal Track
Meet

1 5 Freshmen Dance

16-24 Easter Holidays
5 Two one-act Plays

13 B. H. S. at C. H. S Girls'
Softball

20 Balboa at Cristobal Swim
Meet
I Physical Education Demonstra-
tion
yEnd of Fifth Six Weekt

6- 1 Music Festival

17 Junior-Senior Banquet

17 Junior College at C. H. S.
Basketball

24 C. H, S. at B. H. S. Basket-
ball

24 Three-act Play 'Smiling Through'

25 C. H. S. at B. H, S. Girls'
Tennis

yO Memorial Day Holiday and Swim
Meet

31 Style Show
7 Class Night
9 Baccalaureate

1 0- 1 2 Final Examination

I 4 Commencement

14 Commencement Dance



LOCKERS

Clang! Bang! Boom! No, these
aren't the feared sounds of war.
Students are busy before class hours
opening and closing their personal
belongings in the hall lockers.

Three weeks ago these steel lock-
ers were located in the different
home-rooms. Pupils passing in and
out lost time and disturbed others
in their hurried entrances and
exits.

Everyone agrees, Mr. Rice made
a good move in having the lockers
along the center corridor walls. The
noises disturb fewer people and the
lockers are more convenient to all
concerned.



Justice. Eddy Eder. Bill Real. Dick Justice
and Eddie Greene.



Gatl was in love, because it was spring,
and the new swimming instructor had wink-
ed at her. Unintentionally, of course, but
try to tell Gait that. She floated around the
halls at school with that vacant, dazed look
which she thought was exotic, but which
looked to me, frankly, like she wasn 7 all
there. Ht-r jaw was dropped open, her chew-
ing gum suspended in mid-air.

The first I knew of it was last Monday,
whtn 1 wa< religiously cramming for a his-
tory exam. Suddenly she descended on m$
with a mighty shove, for Gail was no tylpb.

"Gir.ny." she hissed confidentially in m*
ear. "I'm in love."

My re mark of, ' What, again?" Pa < sed
unnoticed. She tins that far gone*

"Well, who is the vie / mean, tht>
lucky man, this time?" I asked, feeling it
to be my duty, since she was so eager to
be pumped.

"Gtnny, have YOU seen the new swim-
ming instructor?"

1 I. ad, and he struck me as being the
kind of a person who would apologize to
a post for bun; ping into it. Not that he
didn't have a marvelous physique.

-That worn down bundle of S. A.?"
ask'd. scornfully.

"Realty, Gtnny," her voice dripped sweet-
ly. "You're TOO awful. Why. ALL the girls
think he's loo de-evine."

"That's enough for me. He just doesn't
even count anymore."

1 suppose you would call Gail my bosom
friend, but there are times when I would
love to throttle her, and one of the times
is when she is in love. Her assets are a
pretty figure and lots of purple lipstick, and
she looks supreme in a bathing suit. Maybe
that's why she picked on the swimming
instructor. Well, anyhow, Willy and I had
been tangled up in one of her love affairs
before, and that was enough to lea^h us a
lesson.

Gail and I were strolling the halls, try
ing to learn MY history, when Willy popped
out from behind a post.

"Hi, yon blond eyeful," he greeted Gail,
but ignored me momentarily. It's an old
habit of his. "Say, Gtnny. Did you know
that people have more fun than anybody ?

I looked disgusted. "Old Faithful. You're
always spouting."

Gail said, as is her custom when things
get too fast for her to follow, "Really, Willi.
You're too childish."

It wasn't till in Social Problems class
that 1 got to tell Willy, in snatches, about
Gail's new love. "Splatter Puss." which is
our pet name for our Social Problems leath-
er, kept his eye on Willy and me, for he
must have sensed I was dying to tell Wil.y
"Alt About It." His face had that puckerea
expression, as if he had fust eaten a persinf
mon. / guess he must have been older than
God. He had a certain wariness about Willy
and me whenever we put our beads to-
gether, so I began writing notes on a paper
in front of me, and Willy stretched his ne(&
to read them. I heard the voice of Splatter-
Puss drone on in the background, and 1
felt secure. Suddenly it stopped, and, in tb*
silence of expectancy, I realized he had just
addressed the question to me. My heart
stuck somewhere in my throat, and I was
sinking for the third time. In the back
of my mind 1 blamed it all on Gail. I saw
his pen dip in the red ink, and his hand
moved slowly as he wrote something in The
Book. I thought, ironically, of the Greet
Recorder.

Then 1 didn't see Willy for a few days.
One morning, as I opened the door to walk
out, I stumbled over something, and there
was Willy propped up against the wall.

"Hi. Angel Puss!" he landed a fraternal
thump between my shoulder blades that sent
me flying into next week.

"Hi. Little Sir Ego!" I replied, while
catching my breath, for Willy bad neter
heard of modesty.

"What's the newest slant on the newest
crush?" he asked.

Then 1 launched into a detailed explanat-
ion of what 1 had seen at the last swim-
ming lesson. "Really, Willy, it's too fee-
ble." 1 said, giving an imitation of Gait.
"You should see Gail splashing around in
the water trying to kick, while her 'big
moment' holds her up by the chin. You
know as well as I do that Gail is the best
sutmmer in our crowd."

"Except for me." Willy could not resist
adding to his own praise and glory.

"Honestly, Willy. Some day you're going
to land in the hospital with a dislocated
shoulder from patting yourself on the back."

Willy fust grinned smugly. Nothing can
down his bouyant spirits. Suddenly he look-
ed stricken.

"Hey, do you know that 1 flunked that
last history exam flatter than a centipede
with fallen arches."

Now it was my turn to laugh. "Cheer
up. glamour pants. Remember thai the mighty
oak once came from a nut like yon."

During the lunch hour 1 saw U "illy fraH
litally motioning. He whispered hoarsely,
"Sirrah, a word with you." I Willy had just
read Mat beth, and had not gotten over its
effect yd. I

My eyes popped for a minute, but I
recovered quukly and replaced them. A blow
never tame more suddenly.

"Guess what?" he gloated. "The swim-
n;ing instructor*} wife came in on this morn-
ing's boat."

"No!" Gail's bubble of dreams Popped,
(Continued on Page 4)



Wednesday, Nov. 22, 1939



TRADE WIND



Page S



C.H.S. Beats J. C.
On Second Period
Line Plunge 6-0



Winning All-Star Team



Statistics of the Game
J.C.

First Downs 2

Yds. Gained Rushing 19

No. of Forward Passes Attempted 9
No. cf Forward Passes Completed 2

Yds, Gained Passing 30

No. of Forward Passes Intercepred

By

Distance of Punts 60

Avetage Distance of Punrs 30

No. of Penalties 1

No. of Yds. Lost Penalties 1

Showing ability to score when
the opportunity presented itself
as well as having harder and
faster running backs and supe-
rior blocking, C. H. S. defeated
the Junior College at the Point.
Friday, November 17. Almost
three hundred spectators looked
on in good football weather. The
score was 6-0.

C. H. S. won the toss and chose
to defend the west goal The
Junior College kicked off- The
High School received the ball
and on the first play of the game
their star player, Bob Bartron,
was hurt carrying the ball on a
line plunge. Bob fumbled the
pigskin, and the College team
recovered the oval on their own
30-yd. line.

The College tried two line
plays gaining 8 yards. "Reds"
Willett intercepted a College
pass on his own 25-yd. line. The
School attempted a line plunge
that netted them 5 yards on the
play. Art Farrell completed a
pass to Wheeler on the 40-yd.
line giving the winners a first
down. After two line plays had
failed plus a 15-yd. penalty, Bar-
tron went back to the 25-yd.
line and kicked to Walbridge on
the College's 25-yd. stripe. The
first quarter ended as the Junior
College punted the pigskin to
Cristobal.

The teams changed goals to
open the second period. The
High School returned the punt
and the College attempted to
kick out of danger, but the pass
from center was high and the
College kicker had to run all the
way back to the goal posts to
recover the ball. The man could
not get under way, because Ralph
Justice had gotten through the




Front Row 1. to r. C. Pierce. R, Patchett, J. Nitto. E. Wheeler, H. Rose. G. Hoffman.

B, Mansfield, E, Marquard. H. Dunlap. J. Pescod. C. Forsman, W. Krausman, G
Marohl, T. Frensley,

Basrk Row 1. to r. H. Willett. L. Palmer. A. Randall, M. Srokes. B, Bartrom, J. Hay.
wood, E, Greene, J. McGann. M. Salmon. L, Conley. R. Williams. T. McGuinness.

C. Ruley. R. Fernandez, A. Farrell. R. Justice.



line and tagged him outside of
the end zone.

The referee ruled the two
points did not count, because the
oval had rolled out of the end
zone. The ball was brought back
to the 2D-yd. line, with the Col-
lege in possession of the ball
On the next play another bad
pass from the center was re-
covered by Johnny Haywood of
C. H. S., on the College's 4-yd.
line.

The High School took the ball
to the 2 ft. line on a power play
and a penalty of half the dis-
tance to the goal line. Bartron
carried the pigskin over the goal
line from here with the only
score of the game. The try for
extra point was blocked. The
half soon ended with the boys
from the Gold Coast in posses-
sion of the ball.

C. H. S. kicked to the Junior
College to start the second half.
J. C. attempted two line plays
that only gave them one yard.
After this they threw two passes,
but these were knocked down, so
they decided to give up the ball
to the school boys after they
had kicked. C. H. S. kicked back
to the College boys after a few
plays had failed to net them a
yard.

The teams switched goals to
start the last quarter. This seem-
ed to be a good omen for the



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Phone 321 10 & G St.



Scadron Optical
Company

MAKE SURE YOUR EYES

ARE GOOD.

Panama Colon

23 Central Ave. 9084



College boys as the school boys
took too much time in their
huddle, followed by a success-
ful recovery of a C. H. S. fumble
by Jim Wood, on the 20-yd. line.

The Junior College changed to
an aerial attack, but to no avail.
They threw four passes, two of
them were completed, but the
receivers couldn't get started
downfield, because of the swift-
ness of Cristobal's secondary in
covering all ends and backs. The
game ended, before the College
boys could score, leaving C. H. S.
ahead 6-0.



CARNRIGHT DEFEATS
STYLES' TEAM, 38-11

Georgiana Carnright easily
overthrew Bobbie Styles' players
38-11, in the second volleyball
game. Tuesday, November 14.

Bobbie had only 3 players.
Georgiana showed her good
sporstmanship by playing only 3
at a time against the oppon-
ents. Bobbie's team did well un-
der the onslaught of Georgiana's
superior team and frequent sub-
stitutes.

Georgiana Carnright tallied 9
points for her team. Opal Hol-
gerson of Team 3 gained 7 points.

Callaway Scores Win
Over Styles, 39-29

Willieree Callaway's team was
victorious again in overcoming
Bobbie Styles' players, 39-29,
Thursday afternoon, November
16, in the high school gym.

The winners started scoring
heavily in the first half. In the
second, Bobbie's team gained
many points, but not enough to
overtake the far-advanced op-
posing team.

Justina Perez of Team 7 gain-
ed 10 points. Bobbie Styles of
Team 3 scored 15 points.



Phillips the Radio you will
eventually buy

Julio A. Salas

Distributor

5006 Front St.
Tel. 537 Colon



The most cherished

present for

Christmas

is a

BOOK

Get it from

Beverhoudts

Front Street
Colon, R. P.



Silks Linens Novelties
Panama Hats

I. L. Maduro Jr.

Perfumes

Colon, R. P.
No. 1 Front Street
Phone 888 Box 407



A. MEYER

Watchmaker

Repairs all kinds

of watches



10th Street,

Colon, R. P.



Bureau of Clubs
and Playgrounds

Barbara Stanwyck
in

"GOLDEN BOY"

CRISTOBAL

SUN-MON



GATUN

FRI.



FOR ALL PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK TRY WATERS FOTO



Colon Theatre Bldg. 10th St. Colon
Phone 364



Page 4



TRADE WIND



Wednesday, Nov, 22, 1939



DRAMATICS CLUB
PRESENTED TWO
ONE-ACT PLAYS



(Continued from Page One)



concerns the troubles of the so-
cially elect in dealing with their
match-seeking daughter. The
cast in the order of their ap-
pearances are:

Mrs. Reade Dorothy Anderson

Natalie Muriel Stewart

Mr. Reade Bobby Fernandez

Laura Ada Crandall

Douglas Everett Kirt McCleary

Emily Carol Stroop

Tom Wells Eddie Wheeler

"Spreading The News" con-
cerns the simple, homely, peas-
ant, people. While those of this
play live in Ireland, yet their
type lives in every village in the
land. In this play Lady Gregory
has written a classic of its kind.

Bartley Fallon Alfred Muschettt

Mts. Fallon Peggy Bailey

Jack Smith George Hoffman

Shawn Early James Cain

Tim Casey Algerine Collins

James Ryan Thomas Gregory

Mrs. Txrpey Eva Jean Doyle

Mrs Tulley Anna Frances White

A Policeman Joe Muldoon-James Coffin

A Removable Magistrate Joe Nitto

The plays were staged and directed by
Mr. Paul L. Beck. The committees were:

STAGING:

CARPENTERS
Homer McCarthy Mr. Forest K. Bryan

Bunky Marquard in charge

Alfred Muschett Sonny Culpepper

Arthur Diaz Allen Btown

Teddy Brown
STAGE CREW
Marvin Salmon Merwtn French

Jimmy Fernandez
SCENERY DESIGN
Dorothy Archibald Muriel Stewart
MODELS AND POSTERS
Art Class under the direction of Miss
Mary Wotrell.

LIGHTS AND PROPERTIES

Frank Scott

PROMPTORS

Marjean Metzger Atleen Randall

Judith Ferri

PROGRAMS

Muriel Stewart

MAKE-UP

Frances Davenport Ruth Randies

USHERS:
Henha Hauss Helen House

Barbara Koperski Georgia Butler

Phillippe Butler
MUSIC:
C. H. S. Orchestra
Directot Mr. O. E. Jorstad

C. H. S. conveys its thanks to
the following: Mrs. C. M. An-
derson, Mr. Pruner, and The
Mindi Dairy for properties lent
the actors.



AMERICAN RED CROSS CAM-
PAIGN ASKS CHS. STU-
DENTS FOR FINANCIAL AID

(Continued from Page One)

wish after promising in full
measure for the support of our
necessary charitable endeavors
at home, to extend material aid
to the helpless victims of war
abroad."

Your help is needed! Every
penny given to the Red Cross
is used to aid the disabled. Much
of the money helps millions of
unfortunate people yearly by
feeding the hungry, aiding the
helpless, comforting the injured
and housing the homeless. The
Red Cross drive is on! Deny
yourself the little pleasures to
swell the funds which will carry
on worthy work. Won't you bring
as much as you can and join
the Annual Red Cross Roll Call
today?

The home-room teachers will
receive your contribution. They
have given. Have you?



THE LOSS OF LOVE'S LABOR



t Continued Irom Page Two)



but with that announcement there arose
something sweet in my heart.

"Yes." ll'///v verified his statement em-
phatically. "And not only that, they have
two little complications."

"We had belter break the news gently."
I sad. as would a judge in pronouncing a
verdict.

Weil, 1 thought Gail would never get
over it. as would my black eye. which had
been aiqnired accidentally, ol course when
Gal's blow landed on me instead of Willy.
I guess that was a natural reaction to Willi
unraclful remark ol, "Some other cat got
htm first." but

1 didn't see Gail for almost a week, and
I was thinking maybe she had pined away,
when 1 saw her coming down the hall.
Even from afar, I immediately recognized
the symptoms with a pang,

"Gmny," she cooed. "That new boy has
the most SOULFUL eyes."

MARJOR1E GILDER.



Seniors To Give
Dance Tonight

Tonight, the annual Senior
Class dance will be held in the
Gym from 8:00 P. M. to 12:00
P. M.

Because of the efforts of the
several committees, this dance
promises to be an enjoyable suc-
cess, with much fun and some
hilarity.

The decorating committee,
headed by Georgiana Carnright
and Gladys Wertz, received
many favorable comments for
their work.

The program committees, of
which Anna White and Bobby
Fernandez are chairmen, pro-
cured programs with the color
combinations of blue and buff
to harmonize with the atmos-
phere in the Gym.

Arthur Farrell procured the
services of the Gold-Coast Me-
lodians to play some lively tunes
to the still livelier dancing of
the various students, teachers,
alumni, and guests.

Those on the Receiving Com-
mittee are Carolyn Stroop, Rose
Margaret Stroop, Anna White.
Ethel Nitto, Georgiana Carn-
right, Bobbie Styles, Joe Nitto,
Tommy Egger, "Reds" Willett,
Bobby Fernandez, Eddie Greene
and Stanford Skinner.



Raymond Overthrows
Stade; Scores 36-15

Jean Raymond's players chalk-
ed up their sixth win in the
current volleyball tournament
by defeating Irene Stade's team
36-15, on Wednesday, November
15. This was a postponed game.

Jean's team started scoring
early in the game. At the end
of the first half the score was
14-9, in their favor. Jean Ray-
mond and Virginia Keenan were
outstanding in their play, with
the rest of the team behind
them.

Fannie Marie Eldridge scored
5 points. Jean Raymond gained
13 points for her team.



CHS CELEBRATES
ARMISTICE DAY IN
NOV. 10 ASSEMBLY



Many a man who knows there
is room at the top sits down to
wait for an elevator.



Raymond Ties With
Magner; Wins 39-35

Scoring in the last few minutes
of play, Jean Raymond's team
succeeded in defeating Nancy
Magner's team 39-35, Tuesday,
November 14.

During the game, the referee
blew the whistle when one of
Magner's players stepped off the
court to play a ball. The point
was temporarily given to the
opposing team. At the end of
the game the score was 29-30,
and the temporary point made
it a tie. In the extra five min-
utes of play, the game went to
Jean Raymond by four points.

Virginia Keenan of Team 2
was high scorer with 12 points.
Nancy Magner of Team 3 scored
8 points.



(Continued from Page One)

"Give a Man a Horse He Can

Ride"

"Big Brown Bear".

Mr. Rice Announcements

and dismissal of assembly.



Premsing & Sons

Perfumes Oriental Goods

18 Front St.
Colon, R. P.



"RCA Victor Radio"

"The Only Radio For The
Tropics"

Be Sure and Get
a Demonstration

AT THE

"Radio Center"

American Trading Co.,

Phone 40 Colon



Flower of India

31 Front Street

We specialize in Oriental
Goods and French Perfumes



Traffic Officer: "Soon as you
came around that curve, I said
to myself, 'Fifty-five at least'."

Woman Driver: "Why, officer,
that isn't so! It's this hat that
makes me look so old'!"



Come and See the

New 1940

CHEVROLETS

At

Smoot-Beeson S. A.
Ltd.

16th & Broadway

Phone 800 Colon



J. H. Stilson & Sons, Ltd.

HARDWARE AND PAINTS
PICTURE FRAMING



Telephone 253



Front Street



Colon, R. P.



BUY YOUR FAVORITE CANDY
AT

Antonio Tagaropulos Stores

MAIN STORE

Bolivar and 13th Streets Phones 499 and 496



Hotel Washington

Unequalled for Situation
and Comfort

COLON, R. P.



A Hotel in Keeping with

the Dignity, Spirit and

Service of the Panama

Canal.

D. J. HENDRICK,
Manager.



P. O. Address:
CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



Compliments of

The

Panama Railroad
AND

Panama Railroad

Steamship Line



Beat

Balboa

Boys



IWH§UI\ID




Vol IV No. 6



CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



Friday, Dec. 1, 1939



THANKSGIVING EVE
SENIOR DANCE IN
GYM SUCCESSFUL



Under a bell-shaped canopy
of many colored streamers, the
Senior Class Dance stepped into
full swing to the harmonious
music of the Gold Coast Melo-
dians on Wednesday evening,
Nov. 22. in the High School gym-
nasium.

The gymnasium was gayly de-
corated with palm leaves,
streamers, Japanese lanterns,
and colorful balloons. A long re-
ceiving line greeted the guests
as they came in and each was
given a program card.

One of the high spots of the
evening was the releasing of bal-
loons and their floating down
to the grasping dancers.

Another high spot was the
Prize Waltz. About fifteen cou-
ples entered the event and sway-
ed gently to the soft music.
Couples were eliminated slowly
until two couples remained. They
were Georgiana Carnright with
Eddie Greene, and Rhoda Ann
Wheeler with Art Farrell. The
W h e e 1 e r-Farrell team finally
were chosen as the best. Later
Sugar Callaway with Carl Ma-

( Continued on Page 4 )



Advanced Household Arts Class




Juniors Decide

On Class Ring













Peggy McCleary
Gcorgeanna Krause
Helen Hicks



Helen House
Doris Brennan
Blanche Facdol



W'illieree Ollaway
Shirley Jennings
Kathryne Justice



Grace Marcuse
Dorothy Anderson
Irene Eggleston



Maguerite Zitzwitz
Miss Doris Griffin, instructor



Household Arts Classes Begin Their
Experimental Study of Cooking Foods



Class rings, the perennial to-
pic, has been occupying the at-
tention of the Junior Class for
a week or more.

On Wednesday, November 29,
in the various Junior English
Classes, the sample class rings
were inspected and voted upon.
The rings were supplied by the
following companies from the
United States: Lowe and Camp-
bell, Stephen Lane Folger. Inc.,
Herff-Jones, and The Bastain
Brothers. The selection of rings
was carefully made by the ring
committee consisting of: Marvin
Salmon, chairman: Muriel Ste-
wart, Mabel Lyew, Charles Pierce
and Dan Gower.

Before the students were per-
mitted to cast their ballots, the
ring committee narrowed the
choice down to nine rings.

When the votes were counted
in the eighth period, No. 3
ring was found to have the
most votes. The price of this ring
for the boys is ten dollars and
fifty cents; for the girls, nine
dollars and fifty cents. It will
have the Canal Zone seal.

The orders for this ring will
be placed immediately and it is
hoped that they will arrive in
five or six weeks. The money will
be collected in the next few
weeks.



"Oh, I forgot to bring my
apron, so now I can't cook in
our lab today," wailed one of
the forgetful girls on what is
considered a very important day
in the Household Arts classes.

The forty advanced and
twenty elementary girls are pro-
gressing rapidly and learning
much under Miss Griffin's cook-
ing instructions. They have
learned, so far, how to make
delicious biscuits and muffins,
after several attempts, that seem



funny as the girls look back on
them. The first labs were so
terribly important and serious
that everything turned out un-
successfully. Biscuits were over-
done to an extent of semi-black-
out, muffins were over-done to
an almost raw standpoint (if
they be truthful), or hard
enough to bounce. Most of the
girls had delicious products.
Nevertheless all the "would-be"
cooks were proud of all their

( Continued on Page 4 )



Students Agree That The

Americas Should Stay Neutral



"If the country goes to war,
I'll go to the city," says one
student. But, what are the
thoughts of all the other stu-
dents concerning the present
day conflict between warring
nations.

Every student agrees on one
thing America should stay
out of this war if it is at all
possible. There are numerous
reasons for this decision.

Those whose fathers are in the
service of armed forces certainly
say a silent prayer that Amer-
ica remains neutral.

A few of the students realize
that if the nation enters a war,
and additional forces are need-
ed, they would be ineligible for
enlistment.



As a body the students fear
the "set back" the disadvant-
ages, the unavoidable depression
which follow every war. Such a
long period of time has not
elapsed from the last war that
its lessons are so soon forgotton
nor its suffering cease to be felt
entirely.

Many pupils know they would
be required to leave school, and
discontinue their higher educa-
tion, which they feel has just
begun. This is a very high price
to pay for affairs which fail to
be settled peacefully.

But, if America should go to
war, will the students be willing
and capable of defending her?
We think they will, but may the
day never come which will put
them to this test.



Jr. High To Present
Operetta "Toymaker"
About December 15

"The Toymaker", a Christmas
operetta by Treharne. will be
given by the Cristobal Junior
High School on Friday evening,
December 15, in the Cristobal
High School auditorium.

"The Toymaker" is a beauti-
ful story of a poor toymaker
who wins a princess by creating
a toy that charms her small
brother.

The operetta lends itself to
beautiful costuming and delight-
ful acting. Live toys and ladies
and gentlemen of the king's
court make up the choruses.

The eighth grade glee club
will present the operetta under
the direction of Mr. O. E. Jor-
stad, director of music in Cris-
tobal Senior High School. Mrs.
Phyllis Jorstad will accompany
the soloists.

Miss Claud Aycock, and Mr.
Paul Beck, dramatic coaches,
will assist with the speaking
parts, with the staging, and with
the costuming.

The twenty-five piece Junior
High School Orchestra will play
the overtures and accompany
the choruses.

Mr. Jorstad stated that he had
several voices of unusual excel-
lence in the Junior High this
year. Roger Fort will take the
leading boy's part, that of the
Toymaker.

Roger has a soprano voice of
excellent quality. He has sung
solo soprano for the noted boys'

(Continued on Page 4)



Page 2



TRADE WIND



Friday, Dec. 1, 1939



Mill



HI



Elementary Household Arts Class



Published by the Journalism Class ol
Cristobal High School, Cristobal. C. Z.

Editor-in-chief Dorothy Anderson
ml Editor Jean Badgley.

News Editor Byne Bunting

Copy Reader Dorothy Brennan.

Business and Circulation Manager Paul
Gorin.

Social Sarah (

Sports Richard Egolf. Jean Badgley.

Extliange Editor Shirley Jennings

Special Writers Mary Hartman. Rose
Margaret Stroop. John Herman, Georgeanna
Krause. Stanford Skinner, Betsy MacMiIlan.

Sponsor Mr. P. J. Evancoe.

Policy: To INTEREST STUDENTS IN
STUDENT ACTIVITY.



Night Noises

Night school students and in-
structors for several weeks have
been annoyed and distressed by
the unholy howls, toots, blasts,
screams, yells and shouts of
people who prowl the premises
Of C. H. S.

During play practice, orches-
tra rehearsals, or gymnasium
work-outs, some people forget
that their hilarious conduct irri-
tates and interrupts the classes
of adults intent upon learning.

It must be realized that the
evening adult students PAY for
the privilege of coming to our
school and learning under our
teachers, so without accusing
any one individual, we are ask-
ing the ones concerned to please
cooperate. Stay away from school
when you have no business here;
when you do have legitimate
work to perform after regular
school-hours come quietly, work
noiselessly, and leave silently.



Better Be Good



"To be, or not to be that is
the question."

This is the thought that en-
ters many a mind at this time
of year, when Christmas is just
around the corner. To be good,
or to be ordinary.

Exclamations such as, "Isn't
that pretty. Somebody would
surely like that," or "Whoever
gets that will certainly be
happy!", are very frequent.

With Christmas presents al-
ready on display and gifts being
selected subconsciously and con-
sciously, the problem among
school children is to infer their
desires without appearing anxi-
ous or too straight forward.

Of course, everyone is trying
to be on his good behaviour and
create this impression on his
parents mind. But, can it be
done? We know many are try-
ing!




Eula May Calloway
Patsey Casey
Ada CrS'.ndall
Audrey Frederick



Vonria Hambleron
Dorothy Harrison
Kathryn Hayward
Helen Herman
Delia Hern



Edna May Hewitt
Muriel Holmelin
Gloria Ingram
Pat Kenealy



Charlotte Nitto
Bs-.-bara Koperski
Frances Poda
Lucile Smithies
Anna May Starn



Jean Ward
Betty Wilson
Digna Yanez
Miss Doris Griffin.



Chatter-Box



Father was lecturing his young
son: "When I married your
mother I had never kissed an-
other girl will you be able to
say as much to your children?"

Son: "Yes, father, but not with
such a straight face as yours,"



First Clerk: "I'd like to sell
you a set of Encyclopedia that I
got as a gift."

Second Clerk: "No sale. I know
more than any Encyclopedia."

First Clerk: "I admit that. But
I thought you'd get a thrill go-
ing through it and picking nut
the mistakes."



A mule has two legs behind,
And two he has before.
We stand behind before we find,
What the two behind are for.

* *

Speaking of feet and things,
(poor silk stockings t there seems
to have been a certain sopho-
more who won a waltz minus
her shoes.

Roller skating is a popular
sport, but we didn't think that
Eddie Eder would go all the way
from Cristobal to Ft. Davis on
the things. Of course, there was

a reason!

*

We hear this told of a C. H. S.
graduate, a bride when the thing
happened. She entered the din-
ing room with the chicken nice-
ly arranged on a tray, "Well,
darling," she said, "how do you
like it? This is my first chicken
you know." The groom beamed
I proudly, "Why, it's beautiful,
| dear, and I must say you did a
nice job of stuffing it." "But,
darling," she answered, "this
chicken wasn't hollow."

A warning to all boys! Have
you smelled the aromas (?)
swimming around from the H.
H. A. room?

* *

Wherever goes Muriel Stuart
there go the senior boys also.

Gregg might have thought he
simplified writing but he should
see what some pupils are doing
to his shorthand and to think,
they're only beginners. MY, My.

After Willett supposedly pulled
false teeth, chewing gum, mud.
weeds, a submarine, etc. out of
Farrell's mouth, he revived the
poor lad after a fictitious drown-
ing. It's a miracle when you stop
to think it all took place on the
stage for health class.



Versatile Verses



"PANAMA"

* *

They call this the land of

"manana",
But I don't believe that it's true.
The teachers are always so hasty,
For homework that I didn't do.

They call this the "Land of

Sunshine"
And if that old saying is right!
What is it that comes down in

buckets
All morning, all noon, and all

night?

They call this the "Land of the
Flowers"

But really you know that's not
so.

Unless you could call the Hi-
biscus,

The rarest of flowers that grow.

They call this the "Land of the

Moonlight,"
With palm trees so stately and

tall.
When raining we do have the

palm trees,
But the moon never shows up

at all.



Roving Reporter



Let's Play More

Many of the students of C. H.
S. don't seem to find anything
to do after school hours. But
there are many things to do.

For instance, as many of you
already know Mr. Neff just re-
ceived complete fencing equip-
ment to develop muscle, speed,
and accuracy. Archery is also of-
fered. This sport is highly de-
lightful requiring skill and
steadiness. Badminton is becom-
ing more popular, even more so
than ping-pong.

All of these games and re-
creations can be enjoyed at the
Playshed from 8:45 in the morn-



What Does C. H. S. Need Most?
Dot Brennan Afternoon rest

periods.
Fanny Eldridge More boys and

a pep squad.
Paul Gorin More school spirit.
Stan Skinner More school

money.
Miss Moore Better co-opera-
tion in the school groups.
Gracie Marcuse An R. C. A.

radio.
Neil Manger More 'ferns'.
Marvin Odom Guinea pigs in

classes, students in patio.
Miss Liter More peace and

quiet!
"Chic" Pierce Refreshments

between classes.
John Herman Mystery stories

for text books!
Bob Bartron Wine, women,

and song.
Leo Conley Girls at football
goal posts to urge boys on to

victory!
Eddie Greene Dances at noon

hour.
Jean Holmelin Shorter school
hours.



Who Is She?



Auburn hair, grey eyes, and
wears dark red nail polish.

Her subjects are French, typ-
ing, household arts, and journal-
ism. She spends her noon hour
studying her French.

Among her favorite pastimes
are seeing movies and making
puns. She came from Balboa.
Canal Zone. Know her?



ing till 12:00 noon and after
lunch from 1:00 to 4:45 P. M.
Plenty of time to practice up
and get lots of exercise and
amusement.

Remember the ideals of a good
education! A sound mind in a
sound body.



Friday, Dec. 1, 1939



TRADE WIND



Page 3



Athlete Feats



The C. H. S. Varsity eleven
played the U. S. S. Tattnall foot-
ball team on Friday, November
24 in a gruelling football con-
test, which ended in a tie.

* *

Regular football season sched-
uled to close next week, will con-
tinue at least three weeks to
take care of the many postponed
games.

* *

The standing of the C. H. S.
Football League up to Tuesday
morning, November 28:

TEAM G. W. L. T. Pet.

fordham 5 3 11 .600

Notre Dame 5 3 11 .600

Connie Tech 4 13 .250

Trojans 5 113 .200

Navy 5 13 1 .200

* *

The Varsity travels to Balboa
on Friday to play the Balboa
High School team in their an-
nual classic. B. H. S. has a good
team, but so do we.

The C. H. S. girls' volleyball
team will play the B. H. S. girls'
team Saturday morning at 9:00.
Some star players are: Virginia
"Reds" Keenan, Georgiana Cam-
right, and Jean Raymond.

* *

Mr. Pettingill. swimming in-
structor, has called off the Dec-
ember 1 inter-class swimming-
meet, because of the C. H. S.-
B. H. S. football game.

* *

The Varsity held their daily
workout on Tuesday. They held
a scrimmage with the second
team, and almost lost. The sec-
ond team had a "wonder" back-
field consisting of Mr. Hotz and
Mr. Gibson. The second team
was ahead 6-3 until the closing
minutes of the game when the
Varsity interrupted a pass to
win the game, 9-6.

* *

A picked team from Cristobal
played a sand-lot team from
Gatun on Saturday, November
24 at the point and won 21-6.
Frensley and Collins were the
outstanding players for the
home-team, while Glaze starred
for the Gatunites.



TROJANS, FORDHAM
PLAY SCORELESS
FOOTBALL GAME



"Why are your socks on wrong

side out?"
"My feet were hot, so I turned

the hose on them."

Margray



"RCA Victor Radio"

"The Only Radio For The
Tropics"

Be Sure and Get
a Demonstration

AT THE

"Radio Center"

American Trading Co.,

Phone 40 Colon



Statistics of Game

T. F.

No. of First Downs 2 1

Yds. Gained Rushing 18 10

No. of Passes Attempted 14 14

No. of Passes Completed 1 2

No. of Interceptions 27 34

Yds. Gained Passing 82 95

Distance of Punts 3 4

The Trojans and Fordham
elevens played a scoreless tie on
Monday, November 20, to give
Fordham the edge in their two
game series.

Both teams resorted chiefly to
the air for gains. Justice inter-
cepted one of Willett's passes on
his own 10-yd. line, but the Tro-
jans' attack bogged down. Later
in the game, Palmer intercepted
one of Farrell's passes on his
18-yd. line. The Fordham team
was unable to score from here,
leaving the score 0-0 at the end
of the game.

Volleyball Girls

End Tournament

In 3-Team Tie



Volleyball is over, finally and
at last, and all we have to say
is, "All good things must come
to an end."

Three teams were tied for first
place, namely those of Geor-
giana Carnright, Jean Raymond,
and Willieree Callaway.

These teams battled it out,
and the final standing is:



TEAM


G


W


L


Georgiana Carnright


9


8


I


Jean Raymond


8


6


2


Willieree Calla*way


8


6


2


Nancy Magner


7


4


3


Lois Crouch


7


3


4


Eva Jean Doyle


7


1


6


Irene Stade


7


1


6


Bobbie Styles


7


1


t,



Carnright's Team
Wins Girls' Volley
Ball Tournament

Georgiana Carnright's team
won the girls' volleyball tourna-
ment Tuesday, November 21,
when they took two games; one
against Willieree Callaway, and
the other against Jean Ray-
mond.

The first game was a close
one. Georgiana was ahead for
the first few minutes, and then
Willieree caught up with her.
Both teams scored point for
point as they fought their hard-
est. The score was 21-18. This
game was played for 21 points,
instead of the regular time
limit.

High scorers were: Jean Bad-
gley of Team 7 with 5 points,
and Madeline Bozeman of Team
1 with 13 points.

Carnright vs Raymond

Georgiana's team took the
lead early in the second game
against Jean Raymond's team.
But with superior serving and
good passing, Jean's team tied
with her at 20-all. Because of
this duce score, it was necessary
for one team to make two con-
secutive points. Each team tried
its best, but finally Ruth Baum-
bach, of Carnright's team, suc-
ceeded in scoring the two need-
ed points. This made the score
24-21.

Jean Raymond scored 9 points
for her team. Kathryn Heywood
and Madeline Bozeman of Team
1 tallied 6 points each.

Miss Barbara Bailey, physical
instructor refereed, the game.



CALLAWAY'S TEAM
DOWNS DOYLE'S
IN WALK AWAY



Willieree Callaway's team
went into a tie for first place
in the girls volleyball tourna-
ment by defeating Eva Jean
Doyle's team 41-9, Thursday,
November 17.

The game went to Callaway
from the very start, the score
of the first half being 16-2. In
this easy victory Willieree play-
ed only five men at a time
against her four opponents.

Mary Ann Seibold of Team 5
scored 3 points. Willieree Cal-
laway of Team 7 registered 15.



CONTINENTAL NEWS



Mary gazed out of the window.
"I'm afraid it's going to rain."

T. Kidd looked outside.

"Thanks a lot, but I don't think

it will be bad enough for that."

Rouge Recorder.



Compliments of

The

Panama Railroad
and

Panama Railroad

Steamship Line



Scadron Optical
Company

MAKE SURE YOUR EYES
ARE GOOD.



Panama

23 Central Ave.



Colon

9084



The dramatics club of River
Rouge High School in Michigan
had quite an amusing time on
Oct. 24 when they spoke their
lines of a play called "Silver
Lining" on a recording machine.
Other students spoke their
names. Thus they were able to
tell just how they sound to the
audience.

Rouge Recorder.



Bureau of Clubs
and Playgrounds



Joan Crawford

Norma Shearer

Rosalind Russell

in

THE WOMEN

CRISTOBAL

SUN-MON



GATUN



FRI.



BUY YOUR FAVORITE CANDY



AT



Antonio Tagaropulos Stores

MAIN STORE

Bolivar and 13th Streets Phones 499 and 496



FOR ALL PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK TRY NATERS F0T0



Colon Theatre Bldg. 10th St. Colon
Phone 364



Page 4



TRADE WIND



Friday, Dec. 1, 1939



C. H. S. Pupils Prefer
Studying In Library

Where do you like to study
best?

A recent questionalre submit-
ted to all high school students
showed that 155 pupils prefer-
red to do their studying in their
homerooms; 105 liked the lib-
rary; 2 selected room 203; and
25 students had no preference
about study places.

Some of the reasons given for
preferring the library were that
there is more room to study be-
cause of the large tables, the
reference books needed are han-
dier in the library, and there
is more light on rainy days.

Reasons for choosing home-
rooms are: they are quieter and
not so many people run in and
out to cause disturbances, mak-
ing it easier to concentrate.

Students do not like room 203
for study halls because it is so
large and crowed.



Trojans Down Navy
14-6 In Thrilling
Game, November 27



GIRLS PICK ALL-
STARS TO PLAY
BALBOA TEAM



JR HIGH PRESENTS
OPERETTA "TOYMAKER"
ABOUT DECEIVffiER 15

(Continued from Page pne)



choir in the Christ's Episcopal
Church of New York City. He
has appeared in public several
times since enrolling in Cris-
tobal Junior High School last
September.

Ada Lee Sullivan, soprano so-
loist, will sing the part of the
princess. She sang the "Indian
Love Song" in the Junior High
Class Day pageant last June and
has made several other public
appearances as a soloist.

Supporting the Toymaker and
the Princess is a cast of stu-
dents who are all experienced
in dramatics, having previously
appeared in several Junior High
productions. Patricia Snyder and
Doris Raymond will play the
parts of The Best Doll and The
Rag Doll. Martin Cain will act
The Clown; Paul Meeks the
Wooden Soldier with which the
Toymaker wins the Princess;
Lois Hohmann, the Mother of
the Toymaker; Heber Sterns, the
Herald; Peter Hulsebosch, the
Emperor; and John Hall, the
Prince.

There are nineteen songs, each
a very beautiful melody, in the
operetta. The Toymaker will
charm the older folks and de-
light all children. Seat reserva-
tions may be made at the Cris-
tobal High School office after
December 10.



On Monday afternoon, Nov-
ember 27, the Trojans, captain-
ed by Art Farrell. beat the Navy
by eight points. The final score
being 14-6.

After making three first downs
in the first quarter, the Tro-
jans made the first touchdown
of the game. Justice, right half-
back for the team, went over
from the two yard line. On the
next play he went around right
end for the extra point. The
quarter ended with the score
7-0.

In the second stanza Justice
threw a pass intended for Mans-
field, but was intercepted by
Thomas of the Navy. Three plays
later, Marquard grabbed the pass
that was meant for Stokes. The
Trojans then fought their way
down to the eleven yard stripe.
The Navy, clamping down, held
them for three plays; then Far-
rell heaved a pass to Chase who
caught it in the end zone. For
the conversion of the extra
point, Salmon caught a pass
thrown by Justice. This made
the score 14-0.

On the kick-off at the half,
Stokes received the ball on his
ten yard line and went all the
way down to the Trojans' forty-
five. After two completed passes
and a first down, the ball was
resting on the thirty yard line.
Eder then threw a pass to Stokes
who went on over the goal line
for six points. They failed to
make the extra point. The Navy
did not threaten any more that
period, and the quarter ended
14-0.

Navy threatened to shorten
the Trojans' lead in the last
quarter" with an aerial attack,
but could not quite make the
grade. When they got to the
eight yard stripe, the Trojans
tightened their defense and the
game ended soon after this. The
final score was 14-6 with the
Trojans winning.



As the girls' volleyball season
draws to a close, the All-stars
have been chosen to play against
the Balboa team in December
1939.

The All-stars were selected by
Miss Barbara Bailey, physical
instructor, from among twenty-
two candidates that were chosen
by the team captains.

The All-stars are: Georgiana
Carnright, Jean Holmelin, Vonna
Hambelton, Kathryn Heywood,
Virginia Keenan, Jean Raymond.
Edith Dixon, Nancy Magner. The
substitutes are: Hertha Hauss,
Bobbie Styles, and Rhoda Ann
Wheeler.

The girls have been practic-
ing against the faculty in sev-
eral games. There is reason to
believe that Cristobal will give
Balboa strong opposition in the
fourth-coming volleyball game.



HOUSEHOLD ARTS CLASSES
BEGIN THEIR EXPERIMENT-
AL STUDY OF COOKING FOODS



THANKSGIVING EVE
SENIOR DANCE IN
GYM SUCCESSFUL



(Continued from Page One)



rohl was the lucky couple in the
Spot Dance.

The music was very enjoyable
in the beautifully decorated gym
lined with palm fronds along its
sides. The whole Senior Dance
can be rated as "one of the
best."



(Continued from Page One)

masterpieces.

One couple, while preparing
some cupcakes, had already
started pouring the batter into
the pans, when the surprising
thought occurred that there was
no baking powder in the mix-
ture. A little chagrined, they
scraped out the pans and added
the needed ingredient. To their
amazement and everyone else's,
the cakes were excellent, despite
the omission though it is pre-
sumed that mistake will not
happen again, by those girls, at
least.

Can you picture twenty boys,
all with their dainty aprons,
making cakes? Miss Griffin tells
that she had just such a class
in the practice school in Ma-
rion, Alabama, and the plan
worked out splendidly. The boys
were extremely interested in the
subject and seemed to take to
it quite naturally.

The delightful salads, sand-
wiches, and desserts bought and
eaten in the cafeteria are pre-
pared by the cafeteria manage-
ment class prune whips, apple
and cherry pies, chocolate cup-
cakes, gingerbread and all other
mouth watering foods, every bit
as good as Mother can make.

Combining all these wonder-
ful foods together into one
meal, all the H. H. A. classes will
sometime in the future give
what promises to be a dinner fit
for a king, to be enjoyed by the
girls and their teachers.



Byne Bunting, popular mem-
ber of the Journalism Class, is
seriously ill at the Colon Hos-
pital.



National Mattress
Factory

OF COLON

Phone 321 10 & G St.



1940 CHEVROLET

FIRST AGAIN

EYE IT! TRY IT!

BUY IT!



Smoot-Beeson, S. A.

16 & Broadway
Phone 800 Colon, R. P.



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A Hotel in Keeping with

the Dignity, Spirit and

Service of the Panama

Canal.

D. J. HENDRICK,

Manager.



P. O. Address:
CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



Cristobal High School's loss
will be Balboa's gain when Patsy
and Jimmy Kenealy move over
there this week-end.



REX

THEATRE
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in

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Support The
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TOMSMND



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vol rv No. 7



CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



Friday, December 8, 1939



Special "Pep" Meet
Spurs All-Stars
Toward Victories

"What on earth is all that
racket coming from the high
school?" queried the residents
around C. H. S. last Thursday.
Finally, the light shone thru, for
with all the yelling and clap-
ping it was unquestionably a
pep assembly.

The high school orchestra
played two opening numbers for
the assembly. A thunderous ap-
plause broke forth as the Var-
sity Clubs came marching down
the isles and took their places j
on the stage. "Ladies and gen-
tlemen" "Reds" Willett took the
stage and made a talk about the
football game to be played
against Balboa the following
day. Did we win? Well All
joking aside, it was a good
game. C. H. S. is proud of them.

Gladys Wertz spoke briefly of
the games previously lost by our
girls' volley ball teams to the
Balboa girls. She asserted the
team would stand a better
chance of winning the coming
game if more support were
given.

An introduction of the girls'
volleyball team was made by
Georgiana Carnright, captain. A
similar introduction of the foot-
ball team was made by Eddie
Wheeler, captain.

Three cheer leaders, Virginia
Keenan, "Sugar" Callaway, and
John McGann seemed to have
had a little trouble in getting
the assembly "READY." When
they became successful, they led
the singing "Here's to Cristobal",
the locomotive call, the victory

(Continued on Page 4)



MORNING CHEMISTRY CLASS




Mabfl Lyew
Majorie Gilder



Charles Pierce
Carl Ender



James Cosaraquis
Keith Campbell



Peggy Bailey
Bob Harris



John Gilder
Dan Gower



Homer McCarthy John Frcnsley
Spencer Smith Tom McGuinness

Wayne Nellis



Student Experimenters Mix Study And
Practice To Learn Nature's Secrets



Varsity Club Dance
Features Jitterbugs



If by any chance, you should
see a great number of chemis-
try students dashing about
frantically during the next
month or so, think nothing of
it. They will be harmless. The
fact is that they are searching
for materials for their theses
that are due sometime after
Christmas.

C. H. S. chemists are perform-
ing various experiments. Because
Mr. Vinton allows each indivi-
dual to travel as rapidly as he
can or desires, hardly any two
are on the same experiment at



"Let's jitterbug" was the cry
of both the Balboa and Cris-
tobal students attending the
Varsity Club Dance last Friday,
December 1, from 8:00 to 11:00
P. M. in the Cristobal Playshed.

The Cotillion Club Orchestra
played swing music until the
payshed vibrated with the
movements of rhythmic feet.

Many active jitterbugs were
swinging high but Tommy Ash-
ton and Arlene Hoffman took
the honors for their talented
dancing and novel steps.

High spot of the evening
was the "Tag Dance". Partners
changed many times with oth-
ers throughout this number.
This novelty was so enjoyable
that the performers asked for
encores.

Sport clothes predominated.
Everyone had a "swell" time.



the same time. Nearly everyone,
by now, has completed experi-
ments on the distillation of wa-
ter, electrolysis of water, proper-
ties of hydrogen, study of a Bun-
sen flame, formation of oxides,
heating of metals in the air, and
the decomposition of a com-
pound when heating a metal in
air.

Mr. Vinton plans to take both
chemistry classes on trips to
the gas plant, limestone depo-
sits, to Mount Hope's water pu-
rification plant, and to th3

(Continued on Page 4)



Four CHS Faculty Members Go Fishing
In Pacific Waters With Balboa Friends



"There isn't a bloomin' fish
in the whole Pacific." exclaimed
Messrs. Rice, Jorstad. Beck, and
Evancoe to their hosts Neil
Branstetter and Francis Birn-
baumer as they continued troll-
ing the waters lapping the shores
of Taboga, Taboguilla, and ad-
joining islands.

Finishing their lunches, they
continued trolling when Rice ex-
claimed, "I gotta bite." "Where
asked the others?" "On my line.
Where do you suppose. Slow her
down. I feel a pull. It must be
a big one."

Branstetter's boat slowed down
and soon the fish was visible be-
low the surface near the stern.
"Yank 'er aboard with the fish
net," advised Branstetter. Before



his suggestion could be follow-
ed, Evancoe had speared the
gar and had the hook almost
dislodged from his mouth.

"Measures about 18 inches,"
agreed Beck as lines went over-
board again.

"Stop! Got another bite." And
in came another fish, a corbina
about about five pounds.

About the time Rice had land-
ad his sixth fish, Jorstad yelled,
"I'm snagged, stop." But to his
surprise he reeled in a gar on
his line. Bigger than Rice's by
six inches.

The other fishermen consoled
themselves with good bites but
no fish. The fishing ended in a
hasty journey to reach the Bal-

( Continued on Page 4)



A. Belden Wins Red
Cross Poster Contest

"A JUST CAUSE IS THE RED
CROSS". This is the slogan
that appeared on Adolph Bald-
en's winning art poster in the
contest sponsored by the Cris-
tobal Women's Club.

After careful study and dis-
cussion on the part of the
judges, who were Mrs. J. L.
Byrd, Mrs. M. H. Walsh, and
Mrs. Frederick Grunewald, A-
dolph's poster was selected as
the one being most appropriate.
It was done in one color, show-
ing a nurse and a doctor side
by side.

Muriel Stewart took second
prize with a poster done in red,
white, blue and black. It con-
sisted of a row of crosses, one
behind the other, mounted on
the world. The slogan "Help Us
Carry On" covered the top nf
the page.

Honorable mentions were giv-
en the following contestants
for their fine work: Dale
Price, Gioconda Pucci, Dorothy
(Continued on page 4)



CHS "Jives" Win

Baihoa Contest



The popularity of Cristobal's
jitterbugs, Arlene Hoffman and
Tommy Ashton, has spread to
Balboa. Last Saturday, they went
over to enter the Jitterbug Con-
test at the Atlas Garden where
they won first place. Eugenia
Mae Huff. Tommy Egger, Do-
rothy Parrish, Earl Kramer, and
Bob Downie went along to lend
them moral support.



Page 2



TRADE WIND



Friday, December 8, 1939



lFH)E§IJt)

Published by the Journalism Class of
Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.

Editor-in-chief Dorothy Anderson

Assistant Editor Jean Badgley.

News Editor Byne Bunting

Copy Reader Dorothy Brennan.

Business and Circulation Manager Paul
Gorin.

Social Sarah Casey.

Sports Richard Egolf, Jean Badgley.

Exchange Editor Shirley Jennings.

Special Writers Maa Hartman, Rose
Margarer Stroop, John HfrTnan. Georgeanna
Krause, Stanfofd Skinner, Betsy MacMillan.

Sponsor Mr. P. J, Evancoe.

Policy: To INTEREST STUDENTS IN
STUDENT ACTIVITY.



AFTERNOON CHEMISTRY CLASS



Respect For Property

Did you ever start to read a
book and find some of the pages
missing? Did you ever try to
write on a desk and find holes
and gashes in it? Sure you have
and you didn't like it.

Why is it that students don't
have more respect for school
property? Would you tear the
pages out of your own books or
cut gashes in vour home fur-
niture? Why do you do it
here? A little more respect from
some of the students of C. H. S.
would save unnecessary wear
and tear on educational equip-
ment that eventually is paid for
by our parents or ourselves.

Appreciative students use but
don't abuse their educational
privileges.



Enthusiasm Plus

Have we got it? Certainly we
have. What? Enthusiasm!!! It's
needed at all games. Cheering
lets your team know you're be-
hind them and appreciate their
efforts to win.

Despite the fact that C. H. S.
is doing splendidly in sports this
year, it is woefully noticeable
what disinterestedness exists.
Why can't we have larger cheer-
ing sections, and attend all the
games? In the future games, lets
get out there and show what
enthusiasm C. H. S. can produce
to help win all scholastic or ath-
letic events.



REVERSED



curious be must you doubt No
rhyme this about know To
carefully listen you should But
time in out find soon You'll

told you're what exactly do Now

day as plain as all It's

round way wrong poem this read

Just
away right, it get You'll



1940 CHEVROLET

FIRST AGAIN

EYE IT! TRY IT!

BUY IT!

Smoot-Beeson, S. A.

16 & Broadway
Phone 800 Colon, R. P.




Edith Dixon
Edith Sanders



William Peters.
Ftank Baxter



Lorraine Goodwin
Ruisell Tidd



Ruth Randies
Patricia Brown



Mr. K. Vinton, instructor



SONGS AND WHO



Meet the Beat of my Heart .... Henry Butcher
I Poured My Heart into a Song .... Mr. Jorstad

I Wonder Who's Kitting Her Now .....

Muriel Stewart

My Prayer Bob Barlron

Heaven Can Wait Georgtana Carnrighl

God Blest America Mr. Evancoe

Shabby Old Cabby Bob Patchetfs Car

We Can Live on Love .... Marvin and Peggy

Hurrah For Spinach.' Atist Griffin

Chew, Chew, Chew Your Bubblegum

Dot Parrish

And The Angels Sing Glee Clubs

It's a Hundred To One .... Six-Weeks Exams
Day In, Day Out Homework



"Nice dog, what is he?"
"Part collie and part bull."
"What part is bull?"
"The part I paid $100 for."

* *

"Why do you date Jane?
She can't dance!"

"No, but boy, can she inter-
mission!"

# # #

Did you see Balboa's cheering
squad? It really was something.
Why can't we have one like it?



"RCA Victor Radio"

"The Only Radio For The
Tropics"

Be Sure and Get
a Demonstration

AT THE

"Radio Center"

American Trading Co.,

Phone 40 Colon



Chatter-Box



Mr. Vinton: Homer, what is
H2S04?

McCarthy: Uh-just a minute,
er,-uh, I've got it right on the
tip of my tongue.

Mr. Vinton: Well, then spit it
out. It's Sulphuric Acid!

*

Does Bob Bartron know that he
has an ardent admirer named Mary?

* #

Wedding-bells to Isabelle An-
gel. Here's wishing you happi-
ness always!

* *

Found in an autograph book
When Cupid shoots his arrow.
I hope he Mrs. you.

* *

Is Jane really "that way" about
a certain young journalist,: Ask her
and find out/



Chemistry Notes

When Mr. Evancoe went into
the chemistry room to take some
pictures, imagine his surprise
(and feelings) when he attempt-
ed to remove hot apparatus. Re-
sult: One sizzled index finger.

Spencer Smith does experi-
menting with a smoke gun. More
fun!

Pat Brown and Dorothy Archi-
bald tested two different un-
known substances. Results: Still
unknown!

Mr. Vinton reports: that the
Sterilamp, lent to the class by
the Commissary, has. not been
very effective in killing bac-
teria.



Silks Linens Novelties
Panama Hats

I. L. Maduro Jr.

Perfumes

Colon, R. P.
No. 1 Front Street
Phone 888 Box 407



REX

THEATRE
SAT. SUN. MON.



10



11



Spencer Nancy
Tracy Kelly
Richard Greene
in

STANLEY and
LIVINGSTONE



J. H. Stilson & Sons, Ltd.

. HARDWARE AND PAINTS
PICTURE FRAMING



Telephone 253



Front Street



Colon, R. P.



FOR ALL PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK TRY NATERS F0T0



Colon Theatre Bldg. 10th St. Colon
Phone 364



Friday, December 8, 1939



TRADE WIND



Page 3



C. H. S. Volleyball Girls Beat Balboa



Football Boys Tie Balboa 6-6



Farrell, Bartron
Star As C. H. S.
Ties B. H. S. 6-6



Statistics of Game

Number of Firsr Downs 2 2

Yds. Gained Rushing 31 IS

No. of Forward Passes Attempted 14 10

No. of Forward Passes Completed 4 3

Yds. Gained Passing 54 57

No. of Forward Passes Intercepted

By 1 3

Distance of Punts 250 390

Average Distance of Punts 46 48.75

No. of Penalties 3 2

Yds. Penalties 25 10

C. H. S. threw a wet blanket
over a smouldering B. H. S.
aerial bombardment, deflected
several last ditch plays, and in-
tercepted passes to tie them 6-6
on Friday, December 1, in their
annual Football classic, between
the two schools, at Rassberry
Park, Balboa.

The underdog C. H. S. team
kept the Balboans between the
2J yard lines for the most part
of the contest; impressive affair
from the standpoint of the
many spectators who witnessed
the battle.

C.H.S. rceeived the kick-off,
but could not advance the ball
so "Bob" Bartron kicked from
under his goal-posts. The kick
was downed on Balboa's 13 yard
line. The Pacific Siders started
an extensive drive that wasn't
stopped until Jimmy Pescod in-
tercepted the forward pass. The
quarter ended with the ball in
the Gold Coasters' possession.

Reyes Scores For Balboa

Early in the second period C.
H.S. attempted a field goal, but
it was blocked by Joe Young.
From here the two teams en-
gaged in a punting duel with
Balboa gaining the advantage.
After each team had punted
twice, Balboa's captain Howard
Moore completed a long forward
pass to Rafael Reyes, who took
the ball over his shoulder on
the run on Cristobal's 15 yd.
line, and crossed the last stripe
untackled for 6 points.

Cristobal Scores

Cristobal scored late in the
fourth quarter after Bartron's
long kick got away from Vernon
Seeley, Balboa's safety man, on
his 20 yd. line. Cristobal used a
spread play with the linemen
about five yds. apart and Art
Farrell went back to pass. In-
stead of passing, "Boss" ran the
ball around his left end, but
was touched on Balboa's 4 yd.
stripe. On the next play, Ed
Wheeler gained two yards
through center. Then C.H.S.
used the spread again with Far-
rell back. Again, Art ran the
(Continued on page 4)



WINNING GIRLS VOLLEYBALL TEAM




L. ro R. Back: V. Hambleton, R. Wheeler, J.
L. to R. Front: K. Haywood. H. Hauss, G.



Raymond, N. Magner. J. Holmelin, B. Styles.
Carnright (Cape), V. Keenan, E. Dixon.



NOTRE DAME WINS
FROM NAVY 18-6



The Notre Dame team bom-
barded and sank Navy in foot-
ball 18-6, on a soggy field. The
rain lasted most of the game,
but both teams made headway
with the slippery ball.

Notre Dame pulled a sleeper
play in the first quarter on the
Navy 10 yd. line. Pucci was on
the receiving end of the pass.
He caught it on the 4 yd. line
and scampered across the final
stripe untouched. The try for
extra point failed, but Notre
Dame was leading 6-0.

Stokes, captain of the Navy
team, broke away in the second
quarter and went 32 yards for a
touchdown. He ran wide around
right end. The conversion failed
so the score remainded 6-6.

During the third quarter, both
teams used aerial attacks with
(Continued on page 4)



Bureau of Clubs
and Playgrounds

Wallace Beery

in

"THUNDER AFLOAT"

CRISTOBAL

SUN-MON



GATUN



FRI.



Varsity Picks
Neiv Members



The C. H. S. Varsity Club held
a meeting on Tuesday, Decem-
ber 5 at 2:15 in the playshed to
pick the Varsity Football Team.
The new members will be in-
itiated into the Varsity Club
some time next week. The team
that was picked is:

Ends Forsman, Pescod

Tackles Greene, Justice

Guards Marohl, Hoffman

Center Dunlap

Backs Bartron, Wheeler,

Farrell, Willett

The new members are: C.
Forsman, R. Justice, K. Marohl,
G. Hoffman, H. Dunlap, and B.
Bartron.



The most cherished

present for

Christmas

is a

BOOK

Get it from

BEVERHOUDT'S

Front Street
Colon, R. P.



Flower of India

31 Front Street

We specialize in Oriental

Goods and French Perfumes



TWO CONSECUTIVE
WINS 21-15, 21-19
GIVE CHS VICTORY



After twelve years of volley-
ball defeats, Cristobal High
finally emerged victor over Bal-
boa. The Cristobal All-star girls
did it won two consecutive
games, 21-15; 21-19.

At the Cristobal Playshed,
Saturday December 2, at 9:00
A.M., Jean Raymond started
the ball rolling, or rather,
zooming across the net in the
first game. Balboa's girls re-
turned it with as much force,
and the struggle for victory was
begun. The two teams played
neck to neck for the first few
points. Then, Jean Holmelin
scored five points in a row,
putting Cristobal decisively in
the lead. From there on, the C.
H.S. girls kept up this advant-
age until final victory.

Balboa was out for revenge
in the second game and it
seemed as if they would get It,
too. They led the attack at first,
scoring point after point, while
keeping Cristobal in the back-
ground. The score was 19-11, in
favor of Balboa, when the Cris-
tobal All-stars took command
of the game. They played vol-
leyball with renewed vigor and
did not permit Balboa another
point for the rest of the game.
Cristobal tallied ten consecutive
points to total the winning
21-19.

Both teams played hard and
well. Jean Holmelin's serving,
Nancy Magner's spikes, Vonna
Hambelton's fine recoveries on
those long-distance outside
balls, Jean Raymond's cross-
corner shots, Virginia Keenan's
overhead serves, Kathryn Hey-
wood's and Georgiana Cam-
right's net-playing, Edith Dix-
on's effortless and noiseless
serves, and the general coopera-
tion of the whole team won this
record-breaking victory.

Only one Cristobal substitute
was used, Rhoda Ann Wheeler.
Balboa's volleyball girls had an
excellent team. They showed
some fine passing and good re-
covery on the low shots. Vera
Howell, Phydellis Walbridge,
and Peggy Brugge were the ex-
ceptional servers for that side.

Balboa also brought their
cheering squad with them when
they came to play us Saturday.
The squad members were dress-
ed in red sweaters and white
skirts. There were two boys
who flip-flopped, cartwheeled,
and somersaulted during the
game. New songs and new yells
were heard by the crowds.

Both volleyball teams played
barefooted because the floor was
slippery. Although all the play-
( Continued on page 4)



Page 4



TRADE WIND



Friday, December 8, 1939



Athlete Feats



This issue of Athlete Feats
is dedicated to all C. H. S.
players who took part in the
annual boys' football game and
the girls' volleyball game with
Balboa.

Georgiana Carnright Cap-
tain of the winning C. H. S.
volleyball team.

Edward Wheeler Captain
of Cristobal's Varsity team that
tied Balboa 66.

-Reds" Willett who played
the Quarterback position for C.
H. S., and did a darned good
job of it.

Rhoda Ann Wheeler The
girl that scored the winning
point of the first game for C.
H. S.

"Bob" Bartron The boy
that outkicked Balboa's best
and kept the Gold Coasters in
the game until they received a
break.

"Reds" Keenan The girl
that scored the winning point
during the second and deciding
game for her school, giving
them the C. Z. Championship.

"Chuck" Forsman The End
that gave Ealboa more head-
aches than they bargained for,
by going down under Bartron's
punts to keep Balboa's safety
men from getting under way.

Jean Holmelin High point
volleyball player for C. H. S.

J. Nitto, E. Greene, J. Pescod,
T. Frensley, R. Justice, and G.
Hoffman These boys were a
tower of strength for Cristobal
by getting through B. H. S.'s
line to break up all their plays.

J. Raymond, E. Dixon, K.
Haywood, N. Magner, V. Ham-
bleton These girls performed
faultlessly against Balboa's best.

Art Farrell The hero of
the football game, scored the
tying touchdown.

Harold Dunlap Center,
passed the ball on every play,
with unerring, bullet-like ac-
curacy.



A. BELDEN WINS

(Continued from Page One)

Anderson, Arthur Randies. Jesse
Byrd, and Buddy Stroop.

The contest was under the
direction of Miss Mary Worrell,
art teacher.



GIRLS' BASKETBALL
SEASON BEGINS
WITH NEW TEAMS

Girls' basketball season start-
ed Tuesday, December 5, in the
Cristobal gymnasium with prac-
tice games. Mrs. E. O'Brien was
in charge of the girls who came
out to play. She is the new sub-
stitute teacher who is taking
Miss Bailey's place in after-
school sports. This year, the girls
will play nine-court basketball
instead of regular basketball.

The teams are:

Team No. 1 Team No. 1

Color: dark blue Color: rust

G Carnright. capt. V. Keenan, capt.

J Badgley L. Appjn

J Brennan R Goulet

L. Crouch G. Leeser

J. Ferri P L ra

A Fredericks D. Mitquatd

K Heywood M Metzget

J Holmelin J- Raymond

M. Lyew p Resales

D. Price

Team No. 2 Team No. 5

Color: light blue Color: green

G Wertz, capt. V. Hambekon. capr.

R. Baumbach B. Faedal

M. Bozeman D. Harrison

\\ ( allaway O. Holgerson

F. Davenport G Ingram

E. Dixon B Koperski

H. Hauss E. M. Callaway

R. Randies A. Randall

I. Stade B. Styles

Team No. 3 D. Yanes

Color: red Team No. 6

R A Wheeler, capt. Color: maroon

F. M. Eldridge N. Magner. capt.
M. A Hewitt M. Andetson

E. Marquard M. Considine

P. McCleary B. Green

C. Nitto E. M. Huff

P. Oswald J. Perez

G. Pucci M. A. Seibold

G. Rubio M. Snyder
E. J. Doyle A. Williams

STUDENT EXPERIMENTERS

(Continued ftom Pace One)

mountains to collect minerals.

Students in the two chemis-
try sections are Peggy Bailey,
Keith Campbell, Leo Conley,
James Cosaraquis, Carl Ender,
John Frensley, John Gilder,
Robert Harris, Mable Lyew,
Homer McCarty, Tom McGui-
ness, Charles Pierce, Marvin
Salmon, Eddie Wheeler, Edward
Marquard, Robert Bartron,
Wayne Nellis, Ruth Randies,
Virginia Naylor, Clyde Ruley.
Marion Snyder, William Peter-
son, Harold Rose, Frank Baxter,
Russell Tidd, Edith Dixon,
Frank Cain, Lorraine Goodwin,
Joe Nitto, Edith Sanders, Al-
gerine Collins, Pat Brown, Do-
rothy Archibald.

Spencer Smith as student and



NOTRE DAME WINS
(Continued from page 3)

Notre Dame having an edge. In
the last minutes, they were push-
ing the Navy closer to the goal
line.

The fourth canto opened with
Navy kicking. Notre Dame block-
ed the punt and recovered it on
the six inch line. Haywood, on
the next play, went through
tackle for the touchdown. The
score at the end of the quarter
was 12-6 with Navy driving hard
to overcome the lead.

Hoffman, in the closing min-
utes, received the ball and went
through the opposing team
snake-hipping his way 15 yards
to a touchdown, leaving tacklers
in the mud. The conversion fail-
ed. Final score, Notre Dame 18,
Navy 6.



FOUR FACULTY MEMBERS

(Continued ftom Page One)

boa Boat Club dock in time to
catch the returning 5 o'clock
train for Colon, Sunday, Dec-
ember 2.



PHILD7S the RADIO you will
eventually buy

Julio A. Salas

Distributor

5006 Front St.
Tel. 537 Colon



FOOTBALL BOYS

(Continued from page 3)

ball around left end, but this
time scored tying the game 6-6.
The try for extra point was
blocked.

Balboa took to the air aftei
the Gold Coasters kicked off.
Balboa's left end, Reyes, caught
two passes before Cristobal's
quarterback "Reds" Willett, In-
tercepted a pass on his 15 yd.
line. Willett then showed his
brilliant ability as a good field
general by using running plays
until the game ended.

C.H.S. depended mostly on
Bob Bartron, "Reds" Willett,
and both the ends, while Seely,
Rafael, and H. Moore were Bal-
boa's mainstays. The starting
line-up was:

CRISTOBAL (6)



SPECIAL "PEP" MEET

( Continued from Page One)

cry, and the singing of "High
! Ho", the assembly soon led the
leaders. A cheer followed for
Georgiana, another for Eddie,
and another for the team. The
assembly sang the Cristobal
"Beer Barrel Song" with their
whole hearts, oh yes! with
their voices too.

Willett closed the session by
giving his thanks to the cheer
| leaders and for the good spirit
shown by the assembly.



CHS. ALL-STAR

(Continued from page 3)

ers slid around, it was the Bal-
boa players who fell oftenest
during the game.

Mr. Cecil L. Rice refereed the
game. Miss Ruth Wikingstad
and Mr. T. F. Hotz were official
linesmen. Miss Dorothy Rector
kept score and Ellis Coats work-
ed the electrical scoreboard.

The Cristobal High School
Band pepped things up under
the direction of Mr. O. E. Jor-
stad, music director.

The C.H.S. All-stars thank the
Women's Club and the Faculty
for practicing with them and
getting their team ready for
this victory. They feel especially
grateful to Mr. Vinton for teach"
ing them his cross-corner place-
ments.



Pescod

Justice

Frenslev

Dunlap

Hoffman

Greene

Fnrsman

Willett

Farrell

Bartron)

Wheeler



L.E.

LT.

IG.

C

RG.

R.T.

RE.

O.

I..H.B.

F.B.

R.H.B.



BALBOA 16)
R. Reyes
G. Young
Davis
Burkle
J. Youne
Stoner
E. Moote
H. Moore
Michaelson
McGlade
Seeley



stockman performs valuable ser-
vice for his classmates.



Compliments of
The
Panama Railroad

AND

Panama Railroad
Steamship Line



National Mattress
Factory

OF COLON

Phone 321 10 & G St.



Hotel Washington

Unequalled for Situation
and Comfort

COLON, R. P.



A Hotel in Keeping with

the Dignity, Spirit and

Service of the Panama

Canal.

D. J. HENDRICK,

Manager.



P. O. Address:
CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



CRISTOBAL
Georgiana Carnright
Fdith Dixon
Vonna Hambetton
Kathtyn Hevwood
Jean Holmelin
Virginia Keenan
Nancy Magnet
Jean Raymond
Rhoda Ann \Vhe:ler
Hertha Hauss
Bobbie Sryles



BALBOA
Shirley Dyer
Peggy Brugge
Vera Howell
Mary Jane Phillips
Berry Sutherland
Louise Rathgcbrr
Floise Ramey
Phydellis Walbridge
Jane Tarkins
Jean Lucy
Fster Miller
Doris Clurier



Scadron Optical
Company

MAKE SURE YOUR EYES
ARE GOOD.



Panama Colon

23 Central Ave. 9084



See our new

XMAS
SPECIAL

At

Finlayson's
Studio

Front St. Colon, R. P.



Patronize
Jr.-High
Operetta



TLTOLSPJINLD



Advertise

Xmas
Pageant



Vol. rv No. 8



CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



Friday, December 15, 1939



Special Assembly
Features Three
Guest Artists



A pre-Christmas surprise as-
sembly was held Tuesday, the
fourth period, in the audito-
rium.

"Caliph of Bagdad", taken
from the background of a light
Persian opera, about 1800, was
played by the High School or-
chestra, under the direction of
Mr. O, E. Jorstad.

Doctor Howard, with all the
Negro accents he could muster,
read "How Come Christmas", a
rollicking Negro Christmas story
by Roarke Bradford By the ap-
plause of the assembly, it was
rollicking and very enjoyable.

The guest artists on the pro-
gram were Mr. Warner Goldman
and Mr. Heinz Heilborn from
Bresla, Germany. Mr. Goldman,
playing the violin and Mr. Heil-
born, playing the accordion, ren-
dered musical entertainment
previously in Europe.

The two talented artists are,
at the time, playing music night-
ly at the Carlton Hotel, in
Colon.

Mr. Goldman and Mr. Heil-
born played several beautiful
duets, which were "Tales from
the Vienna Woods" by Johann
Strauss, Jocelyn's "Berceuse,"
and Mr. Goldman played a vio-
lin solo "Sarabondi" by Bohm,
accompanied by Mr. Heilborn at
the piano. Mr. Heilborn also gave
an accordion solo entitled "Czar-
das" by Meyer. As an encore,
the artists played a tango, "Se-
renade In the Night" with which
we are all familiar.



Christmas Pageant
To Be Broadcasted
Over Local Stations



Second and Third Period Biology




N.


Magnet


F


Fntiquez


C.


Brenncn


M


M<


sser


J


1 crnand


z






Subold


J.


Futey


T.


Frcnsley


u


Mn


rphy


(..









D.


Marquatd


V




E.


Ingram


1


l.ra


ndall


L.


Martin






H


Haass


P.


Bullet


M


Mctzger


M.


Bramin


M


. K. Vi


Hon.


instructor



Biology Classes Dissect Many Plants,
Animals In Laboratory Experiments



CHS will be on the air! Plans
have been made to broadcast
the annual Christmas pageant,
December 21, over our local ra-
dio stations, HP5K and HOK of
Colon, Republic of Panama.

Approximately 220 students of
both the Junior and Senior
High School will participate in
the program. The pageant will
start at 8:00 P. M., Thursday
evening, in front of the school.
Stands, benches, and chairs will
be furnished for the anticipated
2000 spectators.

Mr. Cecil Rice is in charge of
the tableaux that are to be pre-
sented in the arches of the sec-
ond story. Floodlights will il-
luminate the scenes. The glee
clubs will sing appropriate songs
for each tableau.

The open starlit sky will be
the setting for this religious
program.



"Yum! Yum! I like 'em alive, j
fur and all." said beaming boa
as he gulped another bat into
his elastic tummy. Boas refuse j
to eat ordinary fresh meat, so
they have live food. Small vam-
pire bats are caught by Mr.
Vinton and a group of boys
about a mile away in the jun-
gles.

One of these small bats is put
into a snake's cage at meal-
time. The snake lies motionless
until its victim is within a few
inches of his head. Then with
lightning-like speed, it strikes,
twines its body around the strug-
gling bat, and squeezes the life
out of it. Then, the meal be-
gins. Letting its strangled vic-



tim loose, the snake twists and
turns the bat, then unhinges its
elastic mouth to swallow the bat
head first. It is an amazing
sight to watch the bat go down
the snake's thin neck. You can
see where the bones in the bat's
wings stick out and present a
very peculiar bulging sight in
the snake's anatomy.

One of the favorite boas is
Oscar. He likes nothing better
than to twist himself around a
student's arm or neck, in a
friendly manner, of course, to
absorb personal warmth.

In a private, segregated cage
is another boa ten feet long.
Students show great interest in

(Continued on Page 4)



MRS. SPENCER IS
HOSTESS FOR LA
PAS CLUB SUPPER



Mrs. Phyllis Spencer sponsor-
ed a delightful buffet supper in
the cafeteria, Friday evening at
six o'clock, in honor of the old
members of the Spanish Club,
La PAS.

After supper, a short informal
meeting was held to discuss the
year's program. The Spanish
Club plans to have its first for-
mal meeting in early January,
when new members will be in-
itiated into the club. A Valen-
tine costume party, a Bombero
Concert, and a Spanish play are
the highlights of the year,
crowned with a dance at La
Bomba, the roof of the Colon

(Continued on Page 4)



Tropical Hurricane
Brings Odd Sea-Life

Much strange life was found
in the sea-weed that was blown
upon the beach, last week, near
C. H. S. by a tropical hurricane.
Several trigger fish, pipe fish,
turtles, and crabs were found.

The trigger fish has many lit-
tle finger-like protuberances all
over its body and is protectively
colored greenish-yellow to re-
semble sea-weed. It has peculiar
fins resembling feet and is able
to live on or under water.

The pipe fish is about six
inches long thin and cylindri-
cal. It wriggles through dense
weed growth.

Several small sea turtles about

(Continued on Page 4)



| Arthur Randies Gets
I W / ood Carving Honors



"Oh's!" and "ah's!" have been
very frequent lately as students
pass by the museum displays of
plaques and carvings at the head
of the rear stairs. Arthur Ran-
dies is the Sophomore artist
responsible for all this clever
art.

He began many years ago with
soap carvings, then worked on
wood. His specialties are plaques
and statues of famous men.

Arthur declares that some
pieces of his work were done
over-night, while others were
extended over a period of weeks.
He uses only five simple wood-
carving tools to accomplish the
results which win the spectators'
admiration.



Photo Club Meets;
Officers Selected



At the recent meeting of the
Photo Club, Dan Gower was
elected president, and John Gil-
der secretary and treasurer.

It was decided that the Photo
Club would meet every Friday
at 3:00 P. M. in Room 103.

All the necessities for suc-
cessful photography are to be
found in Cristobal High School.
An dhlarger, box printers, all
equipment for dark rooms, che-
micals, printing paper, and a
Graflex camera make up the
equipment.

Students who are deeply in-
terested in photography are
urged to join.



Page 2



TRADE WIND



Friday, December 15, 1939



TITO6§UIND



Published by the Journalism Class of
Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.

Editor-in-chief Dorothy Anderson

Ai
News Editor Byne Bunting

Copy Reader Dorothy Brennan.

Business and Circulation Manage! Paul
Gorin.

Social Sarah Casey.

Sports Richard Egolf, Jean Badgley.

Exchange Editor Shirley Jennings

Special Writers Mary Hartman. Rose
Margaret Stroop. John Herman, Georgeanna
Krause. Stanford Skinner, Betsy MacMillan.

Sponsor Mr. P. J. Evancoe.

Policy: To INTEREST STUDENTS IN
STUDENT ACTIVITY.



Spirit of Giving
# # #

With Christmas just around
the corner, everyone's thoughts
turn to the subject of gifts. Most
students are wondering what
they will receive instead of what
they will give. This attitude is
entirely wrong. It is much bet-
ter "to give than to receive."
If we follow this rule we will
get much more out of Christmas
and will be far happier.

Realizing that most of us are
financially limited, we still can
give of those finer things, far
more valuable than money. We
should bear in mind what Emer-
son said in his essay on "Gifts",
"The gift, to be true, must be
the flowing of the giver unto
me, correspondent to my flow-
ing unto him." Emerson also
maintained that "The only gift
is a portion of thyself." Both of
these prove the point that "the
gift without the giver is bare."
Emerson said to let love guide
you in selecting your gifts. If
you do this you will surely ob-
serve Christmas with the true
spirit.



First and Second Period Biology




K. Justice
A Presler
W. Stroop
L. Bergman



T Bergman
R French
K. Hunt
M. Considine



E Stapf

A. Palmer

E Appin

G Butler



A. Enriquez
\Y Reeves
W. Lowe
F. Hooper



E Eder

D. Hallowell

L. Lesser

Mr K. Vinton, instructor



Continental Neics



Some Folks

* *

Some folks are like raindrops
They're all wet thru and thru
And others are like hat-bands
Light and narrow too.

Some folks are like lolly-pops
Or "suckers" as you like,
And some folks are like alley-
cats
Because they prowl at night.

Some folks are like street cars

They always have a line

And some folks are like Mary's

lamb
They always lag behind.

Some folks are like golf balls
They're always in the hole.
And some folks are like ice cream
Always freezing cold.

Some folks are like apologies
They're just a poor excuse
And others are like playing cards
The insignificant duce.

Some folks are like onions

They're always in a stew

And some are like a dog's hind

leg

Yes, just as crooked too.

Some folks are like dishrags

Wrinkled, limp, and worn

And some are like a last dead

rose
Withered and forlorn.



Here are some real daffyni-
tions taken from the Bear Facts
of the Galdewater High School
paper:

Winter summer with a cold.
Dentist a man who bores you

to tears.
Worm caterpillar with a shave.
Dent, a bump inside out.
Popcorn corn gone crazy with

the heat.
Coc'oanut person crazy about

cocoa.
Dog when it's hot you eat it;

when it's cold, it barks.
Butter a goat.
Sing-Sing a duet.

* *

Tamalpais News comes forth
with this:

"Name?" queried the immi-
gration official.

"Sneeze," replied the Chinese
proudly.

The official looked hard at
him. "Is that your Chinese
name?" he asked.

"No. 'Melican name," said the
oriental blandly.

"Then let's have your native
name."

"Ah Choo."

* *

Vallejo High School was well
represented at the Press con-
ference of Central California
Scholastic Press Association at
Stanford College. Their paper
"Red and White" rated high in
the criticism.



Chatter-Box



Three blind mice,
See how they run.
They all ran after the farmer's
wife

The rats!

* *

Did you hear that George Mc-
Lain thought that a mushroom
was a place to make love?

* *

Bare feet and bow ties! What
a combination. Oh well, there's
nothing like originality when it

comes to the Boy's Varsity.

* *

M. Odem: How do you spell
charity?

K. Campbell: R-E-D C-R-O-S-S.

* *

There is a smiling face no
longer seen in the cafeteria?
Know who it is?

* *

"Spose" you're all acquainted
with the royal order of F. O. O.
L.'s. Appropriate as the name is,
it seems a funny thing that they
publicize the fact. How about it?



Versatile Verses



Those Little Things

Students had better start being

real good.
Helping by doing all things that

they should;
Wash all the dishes and make

Mamma glad
To have you around her, or else,

you'll be sad.

Bring Dad his slippers when he's

tired out
You'll be rewarded for that,

there's no doubt.
Polish the car and help Mom

with the work
Christmas is coming, so better

not shirk.



Movies and Who

# 4

The Wizard of Oz Mr. Rice.
Man About Town Joe Nitto.
The Women H. H. A. Classes
Dust Be My Destiny Paul Gorin.



Some folks are like sewing ma-
chines

They reap just what they sew

And some folks are like peanut
shells

Because they're cracked, you
know.

Some folks are like rotten eggs
O.K. until they're "broke"
And some folks are like cigar-
ettes
Their first blaze ends in smoke!
By Carolyn Stroop.



From the Paseo Press, Paseo
High comes this true march of
time:

Freshman: Mother, may I go
out? What time shall I come
in?

Sophomore: Mother, may I go
out?

Junior: I'm going out, Maw;
I'll be in early.

Senior: Goodbye, Maw; I'll
bring the milk in.
* *

Public speaking project is
launched for the junior class ?t
the Western Military Academy
Shrapnel, in order to develop
skill in platform ability. Once a
week they will meet and each
student must be prepared with
a four minute talk called "For
Your Information." Their re-
views will be based upon articles
in current magazines, not en-
cyclopedias. The student is sup-



posed to digest the articles and
give a live report upon his sub-
ject.



A bachelor is a boy who didn't
have a car when he was in high
school.

*

C. H. S. scores again! Janet
Nesbitt and Anibal Galindo, C.
H. S. alumni, are the ping pong
champions of the Canal Zone
Junior College. Janet defeated
Helen Dryden, a sophomore, in
the finals in the Balboa Play-
shed. Anibal overthrew Paul
Welch, a B. H. S. graduate.



Baa, baa, black sheep,
Have you any wool?
Certainly, certainly.
What do you think I am, a
' silk worm?



Friday, December 15, 1939



TRADE WIND



Page 3



Athlete Feats



The football teams have com-
pleted their long schedule and
Fordham. led by Captain Harold
"Reds" Willett, has emerged vic-
torious.



SPORTS NEWS



Fordham and Connie



A team of Cristobal boys play-
ed a squad from Balboa on Sat-
urday, in water polo. Balboa won
only after playing 20 minutes of
the regular time plus twenty J battled to a
seconds. At the end of this time
the score was tied and the teams
agreed to play three minutes
more. So in this time Balboa
scored two points to win the
battle.



Fordham, Connie Tech C.H.S. SWIMMERS
Battle To Scoreless WILL COMPETE IN
Deadlock, November 6 WASHINGTON POOL



Tech A11 students are urged to en-
Wed- ter swimming events to qualify



FORDHAM DEFEATS
CONNIE TECH 6-0



nesday. November 6. Fordham, for permanent records and spe-
in the first quarter, tried hard cUl.tam m the swim meet
to score. Nitto ran the ball to published below to be held at
the 25 yd. line for a first down. the Hotel Washington, Friday,
Palmer failed December 22 under the super-
vision of Mr. Neff and Mr. Pet-



The strong right arm of Ha-
rold "Rosie" Rose, Fordham's
blocking back, helped defeat
Connie Tech 6-0. The game was I *f or t he third first down of the



Two plays later

to get the pass thrown to him

in the end zone. After the next j tingill

play, Connie Tech took over and

kicked out of trouble.

In the second quarter, Fors-
man caught a pass and went 10
yds. for a first down. On the
same play, Fordham was pena-
lized 15 yds. for holding. Three
plays later, Wheeler ran the ball



played at the Point on Wednes- second quarter. Fordham then



day, December 6.

With less than a minute to
go, the lad faded back to his
own 45 yd. line, wriggled away
from two tacklers and uncorked
a mighty heave into Joe Nitto's
arms on the opponents' 35 yd.
line. Joe eluded several would-
be tacklers and out-ran Connie
Tech's safety-man for the win-
ning point of the game. The try
for extra point failed, leaving
the score 6-0.

All afternoon, the teams had
alternated with long punts,
waiting for a fumble. Connie
Tech took the ball down to
Fordham's 18 yd. line, but the
opponents held for downs. After
two line plays had failed, Lee
"Man-mountain" Doyle pulled a
sleeper play with Captain "Reds"
Willett and went 52 yards be-
fore Ed Wheeler touched him
from behind. Connie Tech in-
tercepted a pass to stop Ford-
ham until the latter scored the
last minute touchdown.



settled down and held them,
later taking the ball on the 22-
yd. stripe. Willett punted the
ball 48 yds. into Connie Tech's
territory. The quarter ended
with both teams struggling in j
mid-field with neither making I
any headway.

In the third and fourth quart-
ers, both teams featured punts,
each waiting for a lucky break.
The game ended before either
one got a chance to make a
score.



Navy Downs Connie
Tech In Last Game



1. 50 yd. free style boys Junior High.
2. 50 yd. free style girls Junior High.
3. 50 yd. free style boys Senior High.
4. 50 yd. free style girls Senior High.
5, 50 yd. breast stroke boys Junior High.
6. 50 yd. breast stroke girls Junior H^gh
7. 100 yd. breast stroke boys Senior High
8. 100 yd. breast stroke girls Senior High.
9. 50 yd. back stroke boys Junior High.
10. 50 yd. back stroke girls Junior High.
11. 100 yd. back stroke boys Senior High.
12. 100 yd. bs-ck stroke girls Senior High,
13. 100 yd. free style boys Senior High.
14 100 yd. free style girls Senior High
15. Medley relay 90 yd. boys Junior High
( 3 to a team 1. back stroke; 2. breast
stroke; 3. free style).
16. Medley relay 90 yd. girls Junior High
(3 to a ttam 1. back stroke; 2. breast
stroke; 3. free style)
17. Medley rehvy 90 yd. boys Senior High
( 3 to a team. 1. back stroke; 2. breast
stroke; 3- free style).
18. Medley relay 90 yd. girls Senior High
( 3 to a team 1. back stroke; 2. breast
stroke; 3. free style)
19. Fancy diving Junior High boys and
girls. Required dives: Plain front, plain
back, and front jack, and three optional
dives.
20. Fancy diving Senior High boys and
girls. Three required acid four optional.
The three required dives are: plain fronr,
back jack, and plain jack.



Season


Standings




Team


G. W. L.


Pet.


Fordham


8 6 2


.775


Trojans


8 5.5 2.5


.688


Notre Dame


8 4.5 3.5


.563


Navy


8 2 5 5.5


.313


Connie Tech


8 1.5 6.5


.188



Lee Whittington of the Glade-
water High School, Gladewater,
Texas, won $25 at the Lions'
National Convention last sum-
mer and a trip to Cuba next
summer as a baton champion.
The Bear Facts



J. Nitto, C. Brennan
Score Touchdowns As
Fordham Wins League

Fordham occupied second
place for the most part of the
current season, then swamped
the first-place Notre Dame team,
by the score of 12-0, thereby
clinching the 1939 intra-mural
touch-football league. The game
was played at the Point, Thurs-
day, December 7.

These two teams have strug-
gled all season for the leader-
ship of the league. This issue
was not decided until Joe Nitto
and Charles Brennan scored
touchdowns in the first and sec-
ond quarters, respectively.

Joe's touchdown came soon
after the kick-off, on a plunge
through the right side of the
line. Nitto shook himself loose
for his touchdown-run from his
own 45 yd. line, and out-ran
Johnny Haywood, Notre Dame's
safety-man.

Brennan's touchdown came in
the middle of the second quart-
er when captain Harold "Reds"
Willett kicked from his 48 yard
line. Brennan went down under
the kick. When the ball rolled
away from captain Jimmy Pes-
cod, Notre Dame's safety-man,
Brennan recovered it in the
other team's end-zone, scoring
six points for Fordham.

Notre Dame did get into scor-
ing territory, when John Pucci,
their right end, pulled a sleeper
play with Haywood that was
good for 35 yards, but they could
not score, the game ending 12-0
in favor of Fordham.



Trojans Move Up As
Connie Tech Falls



Harold scored, changing it to
13-0 with Navy ahead. The try
for point failed as the horn blew
An inspired Navy team drove | ending the game,
through rain and mud on Mon-



The strong Trojan team mov-
ed into third place when they
defeated Connie Tech, 14-6 j g" am e d Undisputed possession of



day, December 11, to outclass
Connie Tech, 13-0, in the last
game of the current season.

The contest played Navy in
fourth place, while Connie Tech



pushing the Tech team into a
tie for last place with Navy.
The game was played on Tues-
day, December 5, at the Point.

The Trojans, captained by
Ralph Justice, scored all their
points in the first quarter when
Justice ran wide around the left
end for the first touchdown.
Then he completed a pass to
Gilbert Chase to make the score
7-0. A few minutes later, the
acting captain threw a pass to
David Hollowell over the center
of the line to change the score
to 13-0. They completed the
extra point after touchdown
with a pass from Justice to
Salmon.

This completed the scoring
until the fourth quarter, when
Ed. Wheeler, Connie Tech's cap-
tain, shook himself loose for a
55 yard touchdown run. The
final score read 14-6 in favor
of the Trojans.



the cellar

Navy scored in the first quart-
er after Harold "Lobo" Dunlap
intercepted a Connie Tech pass
to put the ball on Tech's 1 yd.

1 line. Dunlap then circled left
end for the touchdown. Harold
completed a pass to Edward
Eder for the point, thus making
the score 7-0 in favor of Navy.
Neither team could score until

j Navy clinched the fray with a
touchdown in the last two min-

! utes of play. Hugh "Buddy"
Thomas, Navy back, completed
a long 35 yd. pass to Dunlap on
the 10 yd. strip, from where



RCA Victor Radio"

"The Only Radio For The
Tropics"

Be Sure and Get
a Demonstration

AT THE

"Radio Center"

American Trading Co.,



Phone 40



Colon



National Mattress
Factory

OF COLON

Phone 321 10 & G St.



Bureau of Clubs
and Playgrounds

Richard Greene

in

HERE I AM A STRANGER

CRISTOBAL

SUN-MON



GATUN

FRI.



FOR ALL PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK TRY NATERS F0T0



Colon Theatre



Bldg. 10th St. Colon
Phone 364



Page 4



TRADE WIND



Friday, December 15, 1939



WARMTH

The American ship "Henry
M. Stanton", moved slowly
through the thickening fog. At
intervals, regularly timed, her
de
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093680/00027
 Material Information
Title: Caribbean
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Cristobal High School
Publisher: Yearbook House
Place of Publication: Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date: 1940
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00093680:00027

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
    Foreword
        Page 6
    Dedication
        Page 7
    Faculty
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Seniors
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Juniors
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Sophomores
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Freshmen
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Trade Wind
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
    Advertising
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
    Back Matter
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
    Back Cover
        Page 119
        Page 120
Full Text






























Published by the
Student Association


~luv;,


ass.4; i ..


Cristobal High School























In Appreciation


Our sincere gratitude goes to all


who have contributed


their creative ability, time, and money for the successful com-
pletion of this yearbook.


CARIBBEAN STAFF


Foreword


Laden with these memories of C. H. S., like a ship, we
sail across distant horizons to our respective destinies, hopeful


of exchanging our cargoes of
material wealths of the world.


learning for the spiritual and













































Miss Bess McVey Liter






Dedication


Dear Miss Liter,


Because you have devoted


so much time and effort to our


well-being, have so willingly imparted priceless knowledge to
strengthen the foundation for our future, and have succeeded


in being both teacher and friend to us,


we, the seniors of 1940,


dedicate this book of memories to you as a token of our appre-
ciation.


Seniors


of 1940





















DOROTHY BRENNAN
Editor in Chief


JEAN BADGLEY
Ass't. Editor


P. J. EVANCOE
Sponsor


The


Sta


ff


Faculty


Taylor


Prophecy


Anderson


Sarah


Business


Casey


Managers ....................... Paul Gorin
Byne Bunting


.................................. Peggy


Bailey


Jean Badgley
Byne Bunting

Jian Badgley


Dorothy Anderson


a Sr .zI1 ~ II


History ............................


Dept ................... .......... Mary


Will ............................... Dorothy





























Mr. Ben Williams
Superintendent of Schools


Mr. Lawrence Johnson
Asst. Superintendent


Dr. George Howard
AJ.t. to Superintendent


[Li 1< ~
tQ<~


Principal's


Message


Caribbean 1940


Between the covers of


this book are the


mirrored memories of the past year's pleasant
a trrrn #nnr~r' A r.r tr r, a i-i. crac I'M- inn il nl I fl


*~:::* ":
;".
, ;
,**
:















culty


Miss Hallie Beavers
Teacher of Mathematics and Household
Arts.
Degrees-A.B., Women's College, V. N. C.
MA., Duke University, North
Carolina.
Before entering C. H. S.-Durham High
School, North Carolina.
Activities-Cafeteria cashier.
Co-sponsor of Freshman Class.


a-
rr


Mr. Noel Gibson
Teacher of Woodwork and Metal Shop.
Degrees-B.S., Bradley Polytechnical In-
stitute.
Before entering C. H. S.-Balboa High
School, Balboa, C. Z.
Activities Co-sponsor of Sophomore
Class, Athletics Assistant.


Mr. Paul L. Beck
Teacher of American Problems, Mathe-
matics.
Degrees-A.B., Findlay College. Ohio.
M.A., Michigan University.
Before entering C. H. S.-Emerson High
School, Lakewood, Ohio.
Activities-Sponsor of Dramatic Club
and National Thespians.


Miss Jeanne Brown
Teacher of English 10, Librarian.
Degrees-A.B., University of Missouri.
M.A., University of Missouri.
Before entering C. H. S.-Balboa High
School, Balboa, Canal Zone.
Activities-Sponsor of Sophomore Class.







Mr. Forrest K. Bryan


Teacher of Mechanical Dr:
matics, Woodwork.
Degrees-B.S., Teachers C(
M.S, Colorado C
cation, Greeley,
Before entering C. H. S.-T
Pittsburg, Kansas.
Activities--Co-sponsor of


awing, Mathe-
)llege, Kansas.
college of Edu-
Colorado.
raining School


Junior


Class.


'4<.<


Miss Doris Griffin


Teacher of Household Arts.
Degrees-A.B., Judson College, Marion,
Alabama.
Before entering C. H. S.-Murphy High
School, Mobile, Alabama.
Activities-Co-sponsor of Senior Class.
Cafeteria Manager.


Mr. Ted Hotz
Teacher of Algebra, Counselor, Solid
Geometry, Trigonometry, Physics.
Degrees-A.B., Heidelberg. Ohio.
M.A., Ohio State.
Before entering C. H. S.-Newport High
School, Newport, Kentucky.
Activities-Student Council.






Miss Bess M. Liter
Teacher of English 11, 12.
Degrees-A.B., West Virginia University.
M.A., West Virginia University.
Before entering C. H. S.-Thurston Pre-
paratory School, Pittsburg, Pennsyl-
vania.
Activities-Sponsor of Junior Class.


Mr. Paul


J. Evancoe


As; ,,, Clff'rt~P Pih~n kab rfnr












Miss Helen T. Patterson
Teacher of Shorthand, Typing, Business
Training.
Degrees-B.S., Montana State.
Before entering C. H. S.-Mandan High
School, Mandan, North Dakota.
Activities-School Accountant.


Mrs. Phyllis Spencer


Teacher of Spanish 10, 11, 12, Commer-
cial Spanish, World History.
Degrees-A.B., Coe College,
A.M., University of Iowa.
Diploma de Suficiencia, Univ-
ersity of Madrid.
Before coming to C. H. S.-N. C. C. W. of
Greensboro, North Carolina.
Activities-Spanish Club (La Pas).


Mr. Kenneth


Vinton


Teacher of Chemistry and Biology.
Degrees-B.A., Ripon College, Wisconsin.
M.A., Columbia University.
Before entering C. H. S.-Beloit High
School, Beloit, Wisconsin.
Activities-Sponsor of Senior Class.
Biology Club.
Photo Club.


~r -1~


L~eii


Dr. George Eugene
Director of School Health.
Degrees-A.B., Cornell University.
M.D,, Long Isaind College Hos-
pital.
Before entering C. H. S.-Surgeon U. S.
Public Health Service, Physician New
York State Compensation Fund, Sur-
geon U. S. Coast Guard on Narth
Atlantic Iceberg Patrol.




Mr. Oswald E. Jorstad
Teacher of Glee Club, Orchestra, Band.
Degrees-B.A.. Concordia College, Moor-
head, Minnesota.
B.M., Concordia Conservatory
of Music, Fargo, North Dakota.
Before entering C. H. S.-High School,
Valley City, North Dakota.
Activities Junior and Senior High
School Bands, Orchestra Choirs, and
Glee Clubs, Music and Christmas
Festivals.





Mrs. Eileen O'Brien
Assistant Director of Physical Education.
Degrees-A.B., Claremont Colleges.
Claremont, California.
Before entering C. H. S.-Balboa High
School, Balboa, Canal Zone.
Activities-Junior High School Sports.
Acting Local Director of Girl Scouts.


- ~c ,,,,,,,,,.


Wilson


Teacher of Spanish 10, English 9.
Degrees-B.M., Otterbein College, Ohio.
A.B., University of Arizona.
M.A., Middlebury College, Ver-
mont.
Before entering C. H. S.-St. David High
School, St. David, Arizona.
Activities-Sponsor of Freshman Class.


Is


Mr. Howard Neff, Jr.
Director of Physical Education.
Degrees-B.S., University of Pennsyl-
vania.
M.A., Columbia University.
Before entering C. H. S. Director of
Health and Physical Education, Hav-
erford, Pennsylvania.
Activities-Sports.


Mr. John


Miss Mary Worrell
Teacher of Art and Speech.
Degrees--B.S., University of Missouri.
M.S., Northwestern University.
Before entering C. H. S.-Mexico High
School, Mexico, Missouri.


S. Pettingil


Teacher of Physical Education.
Degrees-B.S., University of Notre Dame.
Graduate work at Columbia
University.
Before coming to C. H. S.-Public Schools
of Niagara Falls, New York. Educa-
tional Adviser CCC in New York.


Mr. Byron A.


I









FAREWELL


GRADUATES


TEACHERS,


CLASSMATES,


PARENTS,


AND


FRIENDS:


In our program tonight we have tried to


give


glimpse of our achievements dur-


ing our school careers.


To some of our listen


ers we may seem


unprepared to shoulder life's


responsibilities; so immature emotionally and mentally that we cannot fully grasp the import
of the obligations and privileges of that larger society which we are entering tonight; so
inexperienced that we know nothing of life or how to face the situations that may confront


us. Others may say that we profess to know it all


cause we


just because we are being graduated, be-


are receiving our diplomas.


We fully realize our deficiencies and


are acutely aware of our unpreparedness to meet


all the obligations and to accept all the privileges of society.


We possess, however, certain


fundamental knowledge that will help us to learn to become more useful citizens.


During our school lives we have


learned more than the principles of English, mache-


matics, or science-we have also learned the principles of living
quired a sense of civic duty and a sense of moral responsibility.


a useful


life. We have


We have also acquired the


determination and courage that will enable
Although we lack experience we have


of happiness and beauty.


us to meet life fairly and squarely.
a firm foundation upon which to build


We have learned to follow the directions that


a hIe


will guide us up


the roads of higher learning and higher mental and moral development.


"We live in deeds, not


years;


in thoughts, not breaths;


In feelings, not in figures on, a dial.
We should count time by heart throbs.
He most lives who thinks most, feels noblest, acts the best."
We wish sincerely to thank you, our parents, for all you have done to make our school


lives profitable,


secure,


and happy. It is difficult to express our appreciation for your sacri-


fices, your sympathy, and your encouragement of our efforts in the past.


Many


us have ambitions toward careers that will necessitate further years of train-


We shall need your encouragement and support even


more in


the future


have in the past.


We realize that we are not ready to enter life alone and unguided.


wish to ask for the continuance of your interest, your encouragement, and your counsel.


To you, our teachers, we wish to


preparing us for the life we


express


are about to en:e


our gratitude for your guidance and help in
er. You have taught us more than a funda-


mental


knowledge of


the subject matter


upon which we may base our further learning;


you have taught us to respect integrity, nobility of character, and the rights of others. You
have been patient and kind. We will never forget what you have taught us and will always
try to live up to your expectations of us, and to the ideals you have set for us by precept
and example.


To you, our friends in the community, and to the civic organizations,


we wish to ex-


press our appreciation for your cooperation and friendly encouragement during our school


careers.


You have done much to make our school days more pleasant.


shall always be


grateful.


Classmates, my last word is to you. W
paths must part. During our years in school


good times and bad. As


have come a long


way together, but now our


we have worked and played together through


we go our separate ways in life, may the experiences and friendships


that we have shared here with each other always remain as cherished memories. May our
future lives reflect those noble qualities we have acquired through our fine associations and
our training, and may we all be a real credit to our homes, our school, and our community.
It is difficult for us to leave for our associations here have been long and pleasant.








CLASS


HISTORY


September 18.


Dear Granny.
I'm in bed, getting


(if that is the


better from the freshman-sophomo


way yoo spel


inspite


our size,


we


re brawl.


What


won. Will write


a day!!


We had


again as soon as


inter class competitif
I'm better.
Love and kizzes.
Frosh


january


Dear Granny,
Thanks yoo so much
class sponsor and he sure


Bobbie
Arthur


for the swell Christmas stuff


i a swell man.


Styles, the secretary, and Bobby
Farrell. Got to close now and s


Whitney Brayton is


Fernandez is the trea


:tudy for


exam:


sent me. I'm now a real genuine freshman. Mr.


the class president,


:urer. O0


and are they


John Frensley,


ur two class representatives
going to be hard.


are Elfrid


Vi
Ia


Beck is
Ice-presl
Flores


Frosh


une 10, 1937


Dear Granny,
Oh, I've had


Gee, it


was fun-


such a swell time this year. In May
-hot dogs, soda pop 'n pickles! Skc


we hid
iol sets


our class picknick and all


out tomorrow


and then


went over to
yippeeeeeeeee!e!!


Shimmy


Beach.


Three whole


months of vacation.


Love,
Frosh
September 19,


Dear Grandma,
School started here
year. We lost. Miss Litei


on the seventeenth of
r is our class sponsor


this month with the
and we elected Karl I


usual annual "brawl".


Marohl


as press


and Ann Washington is the secretary. Our two class representatives are Bobby Fe


Boy, do we have a swell bunch of athletes this year!


us when the track meet rolls around in April.
We're planning a school carnival and our class


game, balloon game,


and the duck


Jack Halliburton and Wh


to run four


booths.


is going


game.


ident. Joe


We weren't so lucky this
Nitto is our vice-president


rnandez and Bobbie Styles.
itney Brayton sure are going


are the coin booth,

All my love,
Soph


to help

e penny


June 15,


Dear Grandma,
You know, I'm
Rice "Sportlight" ph
Last March 18,
Well, the end
a grandchild who is


a movie star


now. When


we had


photographer went along and w
we had our class dance in the


our


e were
gym.
got my
feels sw


of school is here again.
a full fledged junior. It


class picnic,


lu:ky in having

report card and


ell to


which w
movies

I passe


s at Shimmy Beach again. A


made of us. Is

d with "flying


1938

3rantlan]


,n't that swell?


colors.


" You


now have


be one.


Adio-


Dear Gram- Tune


15. 1939


As the last semester of
happened.
Our class officers were


my junior


Bob Fernandez,


draws


to a dclo


president;


tary; Eddie Greene and Georgianna Carnright, class represent
For our first activity, we had a picnic at Cristobal Gun
"The Gypsy Rover" was our operetta this year. It was


:e, I thought

Washington,
tatives.


I should


write you


vice president;


and let you know


Rose Margaret Stroop,


u~har


secre-


Club. Went snipe hunting; I caught a plaid one.


one of the


most successful operettas we ever had.


One of the biggest events of the year was the carnival. Our class had several booths, and took in a lot of money
for the school. Our carnival queen was Jean Grabhorn.


When


Easter came, we had our second vacation of this school year. It seems as if (I


Liter told us to day "as
The Junior-Senior


Washington Hotel.
Now school is


We'l
out,


if") vacations are too far apart. Spe
Banquet was on June 2. We all en
I have another one next year.
and I have only one more year in


making
joyed


didn't say


like becau-e


of Miss Liter, she helped us publish an essay annual.


that event.


high school. Just


We had

think,


a lovely dinner and a dance at the


next year


I'll be a senior!
Love,
Junior


16, 1940


Dear Grandmother,
C-


commencement is ovel
Leaving Cristobal High


41


been graduated, and I


am now faci


School makes me feel rather queer. I've been


ng the
going


world,


Its pro


here for four


and complications.


years


and it seems


somewhatt like home.
f I | 1 *


A ,,I V I I I I I I I I 1. I -


races


t
g


at


^
















Albritton, Carrie Eugenia
Panama


ACTIVITIES-


La Pas Club


2-3. Carnival


1-2, Tennis 2.


PLANS:

"She has
ToUiet'lh


Leaving for States.

a manner dll o0
with a smiling fa


Brown, Mary Patricia
Waterloo, Iowa


ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 1-2.


PLANS


Going


to college.


laughter and giggle are heard
she bltetes in the "smiling w


Anderson


, Dorothy Elizabeth
Colon, R, P.


ACTIVITIES:


Basketball


La Pas 2-34. Trade


3, Dramatics ?-4.
Wind 4. Caribbean


4. Glee Club 2-5-4, Volley ball
3, Baseball 3.


3. Tennis


PLANS:

IHer rEad
Her rtead


Going to

rrIy tays,
y wif, m


college.


her sparkling


;* ":.i~b<'V


smdw.


ake life worth whilt'.


Bunting, Mary B)
Fort Williams, Maine


ACTIVITIES: Trade Wind
Caribbean 3-4.


PLANS:

"Here's
Bui one


3-4. Glee Club 3,


to college.


not only a beauty
willing to do her


di,' v~.


Aleppo,


ACTIVITIES:


PLANS:


Goini


Swimming 2

to Business


-3-4, Opere:ta


College.
him its
smiling


Caries. Andres
Colon, R. P.


ACTIVITIES: Soccer 1-2--44.
Football 1-2-3. Basketball


2-3-4. La Pas 4,


Baseball 1-2-3.
1-2-3-4, Track


Glee Club 4.


PLANS: Studying Law.


ACTIVITIES: La


Jean Elynor


Colon. R. P.


Pas 2-3-4. Trade Wind


( aribbean 4, Vr:sity 3-4. Basketball 23-


Volleyball
4, Tennis


1-2-3-4.,
3-r.


Soccer I-2-3. Softball


PLANS: Balboa


Junior College.


n the livelong
lavighing htr


nau ay ,


Carnright,
Saugeries.


Georgiana
New York


ACTIVITIES: Sofiball 1-2-4, Swimming 1-
2-3-4. Volleyball 1-2-3-4, Basketball 1-2-
3-4, Tennis 1-2-3-4, Soccer 1-22-3, Dra-
matics 1-2-,. Varsity 2-3-4. Glee Club 1-
2-3-4. Photo Club 4.


wintnfnlg
' all yonr


her graceful
at once ditar


cheun
pgfl


Bailey, Josephine Margaret
Honolulu, Hawaii


ACTIVITIES: Caribbean


PLANS: Going


~1d1Hg~ift


4. Dramaur<


to College.

r'eryonte aamitns.


pier,,r isa>.


- --


ao.


araS h Frances


pl day


Attia. Isaac Albert


i good
,. BRiuer


Badgley,


willing and able


studies he never did shirk."


to work


a/sciei ftvr kno~l'iedg


^..1


----














Farrell, Arthur William P.
Ancon, Cnal Zone


ACTIVITIES: Easeba
4-4, Basketball
Water Polo 1. V
La Pas 2,

PLANS: ADcrentice.


cd certain o
Et htn in '


1-23-4,r


Foor~baii


1-2-3-4. Soccer 1.2-
arsity 2-3-4, Tennis


i hn stand,
my land '


Coffin, James Henry
Crisobal. C. Z


ACTIVITIES: Football 1-2-3-4,
4, Baseball l-2--4, Warerp(
tic Club 4.


PLANS:


Soccer 1-2-3-
o 4, Drs.na


Working.


are as high
abour trouble,


Fernandez, Robert Anthony


as his legs are
he's singing a


Hous on.

At TIVITIES: Basketball
2, Soccer 1-2-3-4. F


Texas


1-2-3-4,
xotball 1-


Baseball 1-


PLANS: Texas


A& M.


a *. :*
"*'.'* ** ^ \ '


ACTIVITIES
Baseball


PLANS:


4l! that's good amrd
the master of hit Ia


Cosaraquis, James
Colon, R. P.

S: Soccer 2-3-4, Footbail 2-A-4,
2-3-4, Track 2-3-4. Basketball 2


Air College.


sicadf as:
prohienrr


Flores,


mind has he.
ierionly."


Elfrida


Costa Rica


A( TIVITIES:


Cl,


1-2-4. La Pas
marti Club I


ass representative
,. Soccer I, Tet


7, Carnival
nnis 2, Dr


PLANS:


Sltnographer.


I friend
and beauty


Crouch, Lois Catherine


Dunbar,


ACTIVITIES: Volleyball


Softball 1-4,
Glee Club 1.


West Virginia


1-3-4. Basketb,"l I.
g 1-3-1. Soccer 1.


Swimmin


PLANS:


St. Mary's Academy.


ninsoen
n obhing


tha:'i what


ne al hr ,


French


Merwin Andrew


Birmingham, Alabama


ACTIVITIES&


Sports


Lanbbean
2- ,-4, La


I -2-;-4,


3, Dramancs
PF; 2.


Trade 'mWind
2-3-4. Car


Junior College,


Richmond.


ACTIVITIES:
2-3.


Virginia


Glee Club 1-2-., Volleyball


future he hods in the palm of his ktnd
uorld that he lites en is hA to otm-
mand."










Grabhorn, Jean Pauline


PLANS: College.


dignified.
as well a


pridci"'


Milwaukee,


\Xisconsin


ACTIVITIES" La


Volleyball


1-2-3.


Pas 2-3, Glee
-4. Baske ball


Club -2J.
1-2-3, Sor-


cer 1-2. Tennis 2.

PLANS: Undecided.


a comrade, I
oTr iroltble


ff4 t
u-nJh


ILabel


Ii,


Ut aes bnd
make; bh


bhtnJ '


on earth Atond erer appall


Drenan, Evelyn


s ,
r. IL *
"
3\e
'

L "


Enfrced


Egger, Thomas Joseph


TMen VYrl-


r


'" ri


ol


*',


Flm;n















Holmelin, Jean E.
New York City


ACTIVITIES:


L2-i-4.
2-3-4,


Volleyball 1-2--4. Baseball


Soccer


1I2-i, Softball l.4, La Pta


PLANS: Scudde, Business School.


metrry, Iaighing,
r remind s f a o


i~4Yl~t t at a
'ar high si~hoen


Nitto, Ethel Teresa
New York City


ACTIVITIES: Glee Club


Drarn:ic Club
Volleyball 2.


2-3-4, Carnival


1! 54.2


"Aluays
Her me


lull of jokes
mory will long


Jonlh t,,
after,"


Hunt, Mary Elaine
Colon. R. P.


ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 1. La Pas 2
Basketball 1-2, Soccer 1-2. Volleyball
Tennis 1,


PLANS: College.


and kir~d.
* frnd.'


New York City

ACTIVITIES: Football 1-2-3-4.


2-3-4, Ea'ketball


1-2-3-4,,


Blasball I


Track 3-4,


PLANS:


\'rk on the


Jennings, Shirley


Mlanchester,


New Hampshire


ACTIVITIES: Trade Wind
Glee Club 1-2-3. Baket
ming A, Spanish Club 2.

PLANS: Site hens College.


"Shiries
A'ake XIS


4. Caribb:an
!ball 1-2. Sw


Posse, Madeline Margaret


Norre~sowa.


Pennsylvania


ACTIVITIES: Carnival 4, Tennis


S'rcuaaial,


Kaufer,


Jane Bernice


re, humble of
to ful/ilt her


New Orleans. Louisiana


ACTIVITIES: Gkle Club 1-2-A-4, La Pas
,-4. Operetta 1 2- -4. Baskerb.l 1.2-4,


Volleyball


Soccer 1-2-3. Softball 1.


PLANS: College.


it fri ndly, kind
s ready to la/gh


and true
utib yao."


Randles, Ruth Catherine


San Antonio

ACTIVITIES: la Pas 3,


Krause, Georgeanna Hope
Colon, R, P.


ACTIVITIES: Orcht ira
4. Trade Wind 4


Glee Club


Texas


Sports 2-3-4,


Club 2-3-4. Dramatic Club 3-4.

PLANS: Nurse or Traveling Companion.

"Tall and charming, and you'll find
Equally graceful of speech and mind."










Raymond, Jean Frances


r~, n 1


"Jean',


ali ."


I


Nitto, Joseph Frank


"Hit spirit s
An eagle on


her flaming
trouble and


2-3-4,


PLANS: Study of harp.

"GClted harp,,it n h Timble hand,
San/llu mtnu thve understrds."


:*;:~?
:
,,:,,


1


,


234, LPnt


I















Stroop, Carolyn Mae
Sacramentoo Cahfornra


ACTIVITIES: Dramatic Club


l-2A-4,,


nival 1-2-3-4, Glee Club 1-2-4.


PLANS: Blackstone College


"A girl u
B, ,tinhsng


sib brorsc, scrr


r, Virg-n a.
fr.F:


Salas, Harold Robert
New York City


ACTIVITIES: Soccer 1-2-3-4. Baseball 1-2,
Basketb&l 1-2, Photo Club 3.
PLANS: Civil Engineering (Columbia U.).


"Noble of mind, keen of
For a truthful world he


thought,
aIuays Jfolght."


L :*.

kL-


Styles, Bobbie Mae
Ancon. Canal Zone


ACTIVITIES: Volleyball


1-2-3-4.


2-3. Tennis 3. Jr -Sr. Banque:


(


3 Student Association Trasasrer
nival 1-2-3-4.
FLANS: Office Work.


"Happy, carefree,
Bobbte bhases our


Soccer 1-
omnmiter:
4. Car-


alit id5 pa


Skinner, Stanford Joyner
Cristobd., C. Z.
ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 1-2-3-4. Band -..,.
Orchestra 4, Trade Wind 4. Dramatic
Club 1-2-3-4, Carnival 2-3-4.


PLANS: Study law,


h handsome is
fairer lad there


Taylor, Mary


as htdsrnn'e
ntte r iat '


Fresno, Californ a


ACTIVITIES: Dramatics 4, Trade Wind
Caribbean 4. Basketball 4.


PLANS:

38ttbhlingl
IOUs $4? ,


Smith, Spencer B.
Chattanooga, Tennessee
ACTIVITIES: Biology Club 2, Photo Club 4.
Chemistry Stock Room 4.
PLANS: University of Tennessee.


"This lad is destined
A man of science-


t


to be great.
bars his fae."


Business Course in


over with


find another Ike h&r









Wertz, Gladys
Colon. R. P.


Junior


C dlege


ACTIVITIES: Volleyball


1-2-3-


2-3, Softball 1-4. Btketball
sity 3-4.


4. Soccer
I-2-A-4, V


PLANS: Work.


income smile, laughing brou n
this girl abo c others rse. .


Stokes, Montford Marshall
Colon, R. P.
ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 3. Wie r Pol:. 1
2-3-4. Swimming 1-2-5-4. Track 3-4, Var
siry Club 3-4, Soccer 1-2-3-4. Football 1-
2-3-4, Carnival 2-3-4, Basketball 2.


PLANS: Sheet Metal Worker.


White, Anna Frances


A
V
I I:~~t:;
1<
I,


world uwas taken
turned he back ft


in hir Itride;
*r time nor thde."


Red Hill,


Virginia


ACTIVITIES: Dramatic Club 1-2 -4,


Club 1-2-3-4,


Supper Club 2, La Pa*


PLANS: B auty Culture School
"'A charming perwsnaliy
Sprinkled uihb risaidt."


Stroop, Rose Margaret
Kansas City. Missouri


?4&2lr ha ,.


Alice


laugh 'r and mirth,


L.


i












Wolf, Dorothy Emma
Colon, R. P.


Collins, Emmett Algerine


ACTIVITIES: C
3. Basketball
Drzra ic Clu
Sr. Banquet


Il


ke (lub 1-2-4-1. Soccer 1-2-
1-2-3 Volleyball 1-2-3-4,


Dudley,


Georgia


SPECIAL SCHOOL ACTIVITIES:


b 1-2, Carnival I-2-3-4. Jr .-
Committee,


4, Swimming


\WVat


4. Dramatic Club 4,


PLANS: College.


"St,nrple


PLANS: Lcarnership


sweret in all her u


Shell be P-appy the resi











Contreras,
San Jose, C


PLANS:

"A IUlin
'hdt Lat,'
Thaot ,,aa


vi hr


laughing
is junt a


Mireya
osta Rica


ElizcSerh


Unldcded.


PLANS:


City, North Carolina


Work.


"A quiet lad.
A life t//ll of


may he always deserve."


Herman, Jo
Pensacola.


ACTIVITIES:

PLANS- II
"A carefree A
N ror imnpri


Mansfield,


hn Edward
Florida


Trade Wind 4. RQO.T C.


S. Navy.


talrt,
out4J


Ncwpnr


ACTIVITIES:
Draratics


n1on by the rea;
lo earn a dfer-se.













Helen Le Brun
t News. Virgin:2


Field Hockey


William


Joseph


Omaha, Nebraska


SPECIAL
Eask:tball
FLANS: Sd
"Li ke a tin


ACTIVITIES: Football
1-2-3-4, Baseball 1-2-


1-2-3.4.


Icol in the Srexs.
less sUwimmer


E: y will rta.h :he h.bve, of success."











Marquard, Edward George
Colon, Republic of Panama

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES: Dramatic Club 1-2-
3-1. Soccer 1.2-3. Football 1-2--4, Base-
ball 1-2-2-4. Basketball 1-2-3-i


1-, askerball


"ISenitnll e


ttl'ern one word~
Utc,;rr ph dthe on i


Cor~l~
ISwleet.'


"He'll be
For he h1


ce sful
his lut


in any land
ure well in


Gorin
Boston. M


ACTIVITIES" Rifle Club
Caribbean ,5-i.
FLANS: Work


Parrish, Dorothy Lorraine


Iassachuse


2., Trade Wind 3 4


Breme

SPECIAL ACTIVITY.
"Dot poiem td not
Bint a t ry rntid u


n, Georgia

ES: Glee Club 3.
only prttiness.
i'ttnesl .


"A httle work, and
Mixed together make


maonly play
a happy day.


:tpoIO
Car-


all the day long
swedt, merry Jsog."


Davis, Luther Edward


Is-s


hand,."


;~".;:~?B~:,
" n
^ ^^,~W~e~

L"~i~


3,


"~'"""~3s%













Patchett, Robert McCullough
Washington. D. C


Crandall, Jack E.


Brighton,


Massachusetts


SPECIAL


PLANS: Work.
"No rowers of athbieement


the hill
Utslej the mind


is guided by


ACTIVITIES


1-2-3-4, Swimming


ball 4.
PLANS:


'*pit


W\' errolo


1-2.-.i


P. R. R. ob.


"A helping land
A rcrefrte led, but


het' a'nuay lend:
a r!., true friend."


Oswald, Peggy


Phoenix.


Arizona


Thomas, Richard Ernest
Boston, Massachusetts


SPECIAL ACTIVITIES:


Glee Club 4.


SPECIAL ACTIVITIES:


Track 3,


Dram~,ac


Baseball


Club 1.


PLANS: Busines
"Laughter and f
traits.
Will linger in
classmatess"


School.


rwndzhip,


IrW of


the minds of


PLANS:
"Very q
IWeghty


all her


Work


hnl ,nran,,s s r udg


ll :




I -
Vi


1. Bobbie Styles


2. R. M. Stroop


3. Georgiana Carnright


4. Madeline Posse


-


7. Anna White


8. Jean Grabhorn


Lois Crouch


Dorothy Wolf


Jean Badgley


Georgeanna Krause


Jean Holmelin


12. Carolyn Stroop


Jean Raymond


s








Prophecy


Good afternoon, everybody. This is your radio
reporter, ARTHUR FARRELL, speaking from the
grounds of the 1950 World's Fair.
We have celebrated visitors here who will say
a few words to you. Our first is a little lady-don't


be bashful,


just step right up and speak into the


microphone. What is your name? "Miss MADELINE


POSSE."
secretary


And what is your occupation?


"I'm the


of Mr. WILLIAM MANSFIELD, president


of the Tenth National Bank." And, how do you like


secretarial


work?


"I like it quite well, especially


since I've been using the new keyless typewriter,
invented by ELFRIDA FLORES and CARRIE
ALBRITTON." Thank you.


ladies and


gentleman,


is Senator


WARD MARQUARD and his two body


guards,


ISAAC ATTIA and RICHARD THOMAS. Senator,
would you please say a few words? "Hello, ma!"
And what is your latest project, senator? "I'm now
sponsoring an expedition to South America under


the leadership


of SPENCER


SMITH


with the


eminent scientists WILLIAM TORBERT, BOBBIE


STYLES, and PATRICIA BROWN,


who will at-


tempt to secure rubber suitable for rubberized safety
pins." Thank you, Senator.


Rushing by


are four promising athletes, LOIS


CROUCH, diving champ,


GEORGIANA CARN-


RIGHT,
MOND,


national
winner


swimming


tennis


star, JEAN


medals,


RAY-


and JAMES


COSARAQUIS, cyclone track-man.
While we're here, let's look in on the Married
Women's Convention. The subject of discussion is,
"What this world needs is a good five-cent husband."


Chairman of the Committee


is Mrs. David


Jones,


the former PEGGY OSWALD. Speaker of the day
is Mrs. Jack Egozcue, formerly ETHEL NITTO. The


lady who now has the floor
Carter.


Mrs. HELEN HOUSE


we have a distinguished


looking


group of visitors; we thought you folks might be
interested as they are the representatives of Panama
for the fair. They are Senors ANDRE CARLES and
HAROLD SALAS, also Senorita MIREYA CON-
TRERAS.


Attor


Walking along the Mid-Way,
ney, STANFORD SKINNER.


we see


District


He and his


guards, PAUL GORIN and DOROTHY PARISH,
are protecting the jewels of MARY HARTMAN,
JEAN GRABHORN, and EVELYN DRENAN,
which are being exhibited in the Diamond Room


of the Glass Building designed
COLLINS and JOHN PALMER.


ALGERINE


P t .. *


m


" '


II








Prophecy


Approaching from the Arts and


ing are tne
BADGELY


two Sombel's


and DOROTHY


Science
winners ,


ANDERSON


Build-
JEAN
, who


wrote


amazing


novel


"Bums


along


Willow


Creek." Speaking of prize winners, there is JAMES


COFFIN,


winner


of the title,


"America's


Little


Brother.


" He is escorting the two ladies just men-


tioned.
Let's go into the House Contrivance Building.


Here is Miss SHIRLEY


JENNINGS, head of the


department, who is now working on a reducing diet
of cake and ice cream. Over to our left we see some
young ladies demonstrating queer gadgets. Pardon
me, Miss. May I ask the names of the young ladies?
"Why, yes. They are CAROLYN STROOP, ANNA


WHITE,


LORRAINE


GOODWIN,


and I


GLADYS WERTZ." Now, may I ask what those
are? "Well, Carolyn is demonstrating a new splash
less egg-beater, Anna is exhibiting wrathless grape
dessert, Lorraine is frying bacon in an inverted fry-
ing pan which prevents the grease from popping,
and I am using the new perfumed dishwater to take


away


the drugery of washing dishes.
Now, to be young again and visit the Fair


kindergarten. If it isn't too much trouble,


would


you inform me the subject taught to the youngsters?
"We are now teaching 'How to be financially inde-


pendent!'


or, 'The principles of safe-cracking'.


who are the teachers? "Miss DOROTHY WOLF,
Miss JEAN HOLMELIN, and Miss MARY HUNT,"
Thanks so much.
The theater seems to be doing nice business
with the new play, "Little Ado About Something,"
written by the famous playwright SARAH CASEY.
This is a novel type of play with one actor, EDDIE
GREENE, and twenty-five actresses, among whom
are such well-known names as RUTH RANDLES,
BYNE BUNTING, and JANE KAUFER. The play
is to be produced by that productive producer JACK
CRANDALL. For the afternoon performance, Miss
GEORGIANA KRAUSE, famed harpist, is going


to give


a recital.


Here are three gay visitors. What are your
names, please? I'm ROSE MARGARET STROOP."
"I'm PEGGY BAILEY.' "I'm DOROTHY BREN-


NAN.


cartoons


What is your
ts." Oh, Yes!


vocational field?


You're the


are


ones responsible


for the cartoon


"Olive Oop, or Popeye,


way back


when."
I now see before me the owners of the Ditch
Digging Deluxe Inc. May I present Messrs, MER-
WIN FRENCH, ROBERT PATCHETT, and


LUTHER DAVIS. Gentlemen, what is the


service


w


J


_II,_. i I.. .._.... _. _.. ~_..1 tin














Class


LORRAINE GOODW1N and MADELINE POSSE bequea
JUDITH FERRI, and ARLENE HOFFMAN.
JOHN HERMAN leaves his he-man figure to BOB BAR
BYNE BUNTING leaves her fair skin and blonde tre:ses to
SPENCER SMITH and JIMMY COFFIN will their "Empi
DOT PARRISH leaves her witty jokes to EDITH SAND
RUTH RANDLES bequeaths her sun-tan to MADELINE
JOE NITTO leaves his track shoes to EDDIE WHEELER.
PAUL GORIN wills his scholastic honors to DELBERT HA
"'BUNKY" MARQUARD leaves his cave-man qualities to
CAROLYN STROOP gives her torch-singing to BETSY MA
EVELYN DRENAN leaves her sophisticated shyness to GR


Will


th their quiet lady-like manners to ROSEMARY DIGNAM,

TRON.
OPAL HOLGERSON and JUSTINA PEREZ.
re State" height to LEE DOYLE and JACK BRAYTON.
ERS.
BOZEMAN.

RRIS.
FRANK SCOTT.
CMILLAN.
ACIE MARCUSE.


ELFRIDA FLORES bequeaths her steady boy friend to MURIEL STEWART.
GEORGIANA KRAUSE wills her harp playing to TOMMY MCGUINNESS.
HAROLD SALAS leaves his "ways" with Miss Liter to MARVIN ODOM.
DOROTHY ANDERSON bestows her eating ability upon BARBARA BATH and K.
PEGGY OSWALD leaves her scarlet lipstick to EVA JEAN DOYLE.
PEGGY BAILEY wills her studiousness to HENRY BUTCHER.
LUTHER DAVIS leaves his position as girls' chauffeur to JOHN PUCCI.
HUGH "BUDDY" THOMAS wills his claw-like nails to RAYMOND PLUMMER.
PAT BROWN bequeaths her knee-length dresses to MARY LOU MESSER.
MARY HARTMAN leaves her perfect daily attendance to THERESA HERN.
JANE KAUFER leaves her glamorous eye lashes to LOUISE GORMELY.
MIREYA CONTRERAS' Latin beauty to DALE PRICE.
ETHEL NITTO wills her giggle to FRANCES DAVENPORT.
BOBBIE STYLES bequeaths her erect posture to EUGENIA MAE HUFF.
DOROTHY BRENNAN wills her delicate voice to ELSIE CHASE.
HELEN HOUSE leaves her hurried ways to FANNIE MARIE ELDRIDGE and RITA
GEORGIANNA CARNRIGHT'S modest ways to PEGGY MCCLEARY and EVELYIN
EDDIE GREENE bequeaths his naps to CLYDE RULEY.
BOBBY FERNANDEZ leaves his trips home for breakfast to CHARLES PIERCE.


EITH CAMPBELL.


4 GOULET.
SHIRLEY.


MONTFORD STOKES wills his swimming honors to WILLIAM PETERSON and ROBERT
ANDRES CARLES and HAROLD WILLET leave their scholastic standing to FRANK CAIN,
JOHN GILDER.
ALGERINE COLLINS bequeaths his laugh to MARVIN SALMON.
SARAH CASEY wills her unique fingernail polish colors to EDITH DIXON and MARJOR
ROSE MARGARET STROOP leaves her snoods to KATHRYN PHILLIPS.
MERWIN FRENCH'S fairness to GILBERT CHASE and HAROLD DUNLAP.
LOIS CROUCH bequeaths her streamlined figure to CARL ENDER.
ARTHUR FARRELL'S manly physique to STEWART POOL and DAN GOWER.
CARRIE ALBRITTON'S exquisite manners to VIRGINIA NAYLOR.
STANFORD SKINNER leaves his ability to meet deadlines to RICHARD EGOLF.


WILLIAMS.
ROBERT HARRIS, and


LIE GILDER.


JACK CRANDALL'S curly locks to HARRY KELLY.
JOHN PALMER wills the sole right to drive the car to school to LOUIS PALMER.
WILLIAM TORBERT leaves his fast ways to WAYNE NELLIS.
ANNA WHITE wills her Victorian qualities to RACHEL YOHROS and MARY SCHIAVO.
JEAN RAYMOND wills her tennis racket to EMILY HORINE.


JAMES COSARAQUIS and JEAN BADGLEY bestow their typing ability upon MABLSL LYtW.
RICHARD THOMAS leaves his tall tales to JIM WALSH and NEIL MAGNER.
TOMMY EGGER bequeaths his "speed" to HAROLD ROSE.
GLADYS WERTZ and JEAN HOLMELIN bestow their athletic powers upon WILLIERE CALLOWAY and II
STADE.
ISSAC ATTIA wills his dramatic voice to HOMER McCARTY.
BILLY MANSFIELD bequeaths his seriousness to LEO CONLEY and RUSSEL TIDD.
MARY HUNT bequeaths her ability to maintain silence in study halls to MARIAN SNYDER.
SHIRLEY JENNINGS and DOROTHY WOLF leave everything they have in common to LAURENA KELLER.
ALLEN LYEW wills his short-hand ambitions to GEORGE HERMAN and GEORGE ESTENOZ.
BOB PATCHETT leaves his five-year plan in C. H. S. to the smartest senior to-be.


IENE








Hall


of


Fame


BEST LOOKING BOY
EDDIE GREENE


PRETTIEST GIRL
HELEN HOUSE






MOST POPULAR BOY
BOBBY FERNANDEZ








BEST GIRL ATHLETE
GEORGIANA CARNRIGHT







MOST STUDIOUS BOY
ANDRES CARLES







WITTIEST GIRL


MOST POPULAR GIRL


GEORGIANA CARNRIGHT








BEST BOY ATHLETE
HAROLD WILLETT







MOST STUDIOUS GIRL
PEGGY BAILEY


< WITTIEST BOY


DOROTHY


ANDERSON


KARL MAROHL
















































































Eugenia Huff
GraCie Marcus


C, herine


Justice


Homer McCarty


Justina P
Cioonda


Mary Schiavo


'rezr
Pucci


Frank Scott


laurena


Keller


Peggy McCleary
William Petnerson
John Pucci
Evelyn Shirley
FAdde Wheeler


Harry Kelly
Tommy McGuinness


JIanes


Kathryn


Phillips


Harold Rose
Marian Sn der
Walsh


Mabel Lyew
Mary Messer
(I arles Pierce
Clyde Ruley
Irene Stade


Robert ''lim


Betsy MacMillan


Virginia


Naylor


Ray Plummer


Marvin


Neil Magner
Marvin Odom
Stuart Pool
Edith Sanders
Russell Tidd


Salmon


Muriel Stewart


Rachel Yohros


Junior


Favorite Character


Bob Bartron

Barbara Bath
Frank Baxter


Robin Hood


Mickey


Rooney


Pinnochi


Usual Occupation

Arguing with Miss
Liter


Schooling
Stamp Collecting


NAME


Richard Egolf
Fannie Marie
Eldridge


Favorite Character


Grove
Snooks


Carl Ender


Usual Occupation


Getting


Trvina


in trouble


to stave in


NAME


*V






























































Bob Banrtron
Williree Callaway
Eva Jean Doyle
Fabian Forero
Ddlbert Harris


Barbara BE:h
Keith Campbell
Lee Dayle
Judirh Ferri
Robert Harris


Mladeine


Frank Eaxter
Gilbert Chase
Harold Dan!ap
John Gilder
George Herman


Boweman


Lho Conley
Richard Egolf
Me;orie Gilder
Arlene Hoffman


lack Br
Frances


U>orge


ay ton
Davenport
Fidridge
Gormely
Hoffman


Henry B rcher
Rostrrary D;gnam
Carl Ender
Margaret Goulet
Opal H:lgerson


Frank C(in
Edith D:xon
George Es enor
Dan Gower
Emily Horine


Junior


NAME


George Hoffman
Opal Holgerson
Emily Horine
Eugenia Mae Huff

Catherine Justice

Laurena Keller
Harry Kelly
Mabel Lyew
Betsy MacMillan


Neil Magner


Favorite Character


Bette


Davis


"Alfalfa"
Rhett Butler


Spencer

Scarlett


Tracy

O'Hara


Little Black


Sambo


Linda Darnell


Confucius


Rutherford


& Ann


Usual Occupation


Loafing


Gossiping
Anything


& Talking


but home-
work


Mr. Vinton says gig-
gling and talking
Dancing
Loafing


Sports
Reading


Photography


& Sail-
ing


NAME
Charles Pierce
Ray Plummer

Stewart Pool
Dale Price
Gioconda Pucci
John Pucci
Harold Rose
Clyde Ruley
Marvin Salmon


Edith


Sanders


Mary Schiavo
Frank Scott


Favorite Character


Porky


Usual Occupation
Eating


Assistant
Patchett's


Judy Garland
The Thin Man


Confucius
Snake
Artie Shaw


Spanky
Wilbur
Philo Vance
Donald Duck


Playing
Talking
Chewing


B


Driver
car
baseball


gum


Driving my car


Dance
Eating
Eating
Golf


Writing


Band


& Loafing


mysteries


Anything


and reading
g & Riding


Leader















































L. to R. BACK ROW: R. Baumbach, B. Brown, V. Huff. B. J. Foulkes, B, Green. V. MacMillan. E. Stapf, A. Preslar, M. A. Seibold. P. Lim. M. Zitzewirz.
MaRner. L. Martin, A. Wong.


L ro R. MIDDLE ROW:
L. to R. FRONT ROW:


M. Posse.


Considine


P. Butler, M. Anderson,


Hunt, Mi King, M. Metzger.


Marquard,


A. Randall.


G. Buder. G. Lesser. E Marquad,


V. Keenan,


M. Bramin.


D. Kirkham. P.


uss, A. Williams,
Williams.


R. A. Wheeler,


B. Shultz, ]
J. Brennan.


Sophomore


Girls


Motto


Anderson, Mary

Baumbach, Ruth

Bramin, Mildred
Brennan. Doris

Brennan, Josephine


Brown, Beverley

Butler, Georgia


Butler, Philippe

Foulkes, Betty Jane


Greene, Betty


don't


Favorite Pastime


True happiness comes
by helping others.


Be kind to dumb
mals.


To enjoy


If at first you
succeed-quit!
Treat someone
else's home as


it were your own.
Live and let live,
die and let die.
Say what you
mean, and mean
what you say.
Don't worry-it
may never happen-
When you're in
a hurry, take
your time.
A stitch in time
saves nine.


Going

Riding


to movies.


a car.


Drinking cokes.


Playing


monopoly.


Going to the movies.


Playing


Reading.


Reading.


Telling


jokes.


Going with a


young man.


certain


NAME


MacMillan,


Virginia


Magner, Nancy
Marquard, Dorothy

Marquard, Eleanor


Martin, Lauretta
Metzger, Marjean


Posse,


Mary


Randall, Arleen


Rosales, Philipa


Seibold, Mary Ann


Shea,


Motto


Live and be merry,
for tomorrow you
may die.


a good sport.


Treat others as they
treat you.
Do unto others as you
would have them do
unto you.

Patience is a virtue.
Be prepared.


Be kind to dumb
mals.


If first you
ceed try
again.


don't


ani-


suc-


Movies
Going


Reading.


Reading
Music.
Movies.


Reading.


and try


Do unto others as you
would h a v e done
unto you.


Be prepared.


If at first
imrrppr.


you


don't


Learning


Sports.
Bicycling.


try t r V


NAME


Favorite Pastime


Reading,


and Sports.
riding.


the accordion


and walking


Betty


new songs.

















































L. to R. BACK ROW:
W. Krausmaan
L. to R. MIDDLE ROW
T. Derrick.


L. to R. FRONT


R. Taws. A. Belden, D Collins. W. Stroop. A. Gilgren. E. Appin. M. Picado. A. Aansroos. E. Putney. J. Pescod. B, Staggs, A. Palmer,


:I,


A. Terwilleger. K.


ROW: H. Pescod.


McClearev.


B. Styles, C. Sasso,


W. Reeves,

F. Enriquez.


F. Hooper.

G. Glaze. L,


W. Lowe, E. Ingrain


R. Lesser.


P. Karsr, J.


A. Enriquez.

Fernandez, T


R, Frenc

Lawson.


E. Eder. E. Coates.


S. Barber,


Huggei


A. Randles.

tr. J. Cain,


C, Brennen.


Sophomore


Boys


Motto


Aanstoos, Anthony

Appin, Edward
Belden, Adolph

Brennan, Charles
Cain. James


Coats, Ellis


Cole, Jerry


Collins, Derrell


Sasso,


Never do the same
thing a second time.


Silence


is golden


Favorite Pastime


Sleeping

Playing


and eating.

a harmonica.


Everything is possible Swimming-Reading.
if you try.
Now or never. Playing sports.


A clean


neck


hurt anyone.


never


Stepping out.


Sports,


Movies.


Look at the other fel- Shooting the bull.
low's paper he's
always right.


Try anything


once.


Colman


Detrick, Tommy
Fernandez, Jimmy
Enriquez, Franklin


You only live
If there is
that can
can!


-t n -t--.


once.


Hunting and Fishing.


Baseball.
Chewing
Studying.


gum.


NAME
Hollowell, David


Hooper, Frank
Huggett, Ralph


Ingram, Elvin

Kaufer, Teddy
Lawson, Tad
Leeser, LeRoi

Maker, Bryan

McCleary, Kirt

Palmer, Arthur

Pescod, Hugh
Pescod, Jimmy


Motto


Favorite Pastime


Do tomorrow what Sleeping.
you can put off to-


Pleasure before work.
Do unto others as
they would like to
do to you.
Never threaten to do
something-do it.
Don't be a sucker!


Confucius


Model building.
Fooling around.


Camping.

Sleeping.
Monkey Business.


Thou shalt not squeal Two-timing.
or rat on others.


Basketball.

Everything.


Always wait until the
last minute.


White man
white.
Always do
you can.
Do it now.


Doing nothing.
T-_------ *.-.... ...,t. ..4* t# A,,-4 n,,n n A


nan


NAME


anyone Nature study.
do it, I

flnl


the best Music-Reading-
Swimming.
Baseball.


h
*



















































ro R.: A. FredricOW. K. Haywood. B. Wilson, A. Crandall. R, Palmer. S. Herrn., D. Yanez. D. Brown.


MIDDLE
FRONT


ROW: Barbara


Kotvtr!ki,


ROW: D. Harrison.


V. Hambleton. C. Nitro.


Ing:am,


I, EgRlcsron, P.


G. Rubio, E. M. Callaway,


B. Facdol.


Casey.


E. M. H:witt,


M. Hol melin.


A. Ulsech, B. Gage. G. Anderson,


D. J. Campen.


L. Smithies.


Fre


hmen


Girl


NAME
Anderson,


Glays


Brown, Doris
Callaway, Eula May
Campem, Evelyn


Casey,


Patricia


AMBITION
Undertaker
Be beautiful


Beauty


HOBBY


Stamp
Saving


operator


Commercial
Secretary
Surgeon
None
Secretary
Aviatrix
Secretary
Autographs


Crandall, Ada
Eggleston, Irene
Facdcl, Blanca


Gage,


Hambleton, Vonna
Harrison, Dorothy
Haywood, Kathryn


Hern


Holmelin, Muriel Dietician


artist


collecting
nicknames


Collecting
Photography
Flirting
Photography
Photography
Reading
Photography
Fun
None


Secretary


NAME


Herman, He!en
Ingram, Gloria
Koperski, Barbara


Nitto


Charlotte


Palmer, Ruth
Rubio, Gladys
Shultz, Betty


Smithies, Barbara
Lucille
Starn, Anna Mae
Ulseth, Alice
Ward, Jean
Wilson, Elizabeth


Yanez,


Sports


Digna


AMBITION
Secretary
Secretary
Secretary


Model
Doctor


see the world


Stenographer
Air Hostess
Secretary
Dancer


Scrap


Movie


Secretary


HOBBY
None


Betty


book


Sleeping
Tyronne
Drawing
Cracking


Della


Power


gum


Philateling


stars


Flirting
Dancing


BACK ROW, 1



















































BACK ROW:
Byrd.


H. Chennalloy, O. Heilbron, G. Stumpf, A. Davenportr. J. Haywood, R, Frick. L. Wilkes. J. Miller. D. Miller. N. Hooper, W. Real. J Wong, J Campen, J.
B. Stroo:


MIDDLE
FRONT


ROW: R. Davis, C.


Calabria,


Denton, E
B. Mertger.


Prudk~n,


D. Green. A Diaz.


A. Lim, R, Grabhorn,


F Sullivan,


D. Hendricks.


D, Myers, W. Griffin.


R. Simon,


A. Muschetc. J


J. Peters,


Walktr.


T. Harrisonn


C. Coats, N. Taylor.


J. Coffee, B. Parker.


freshmen


Boys


NAME


AMBITION


HOBBY


NAME


AMBITION


HOBBY


Bronn, Carl


Byrd,


Jesse


Calabria, Jose Luis
Campen, Jack

Chenalloy, Herbert
Coffey, James
Coats, Lawrence
Davis, Robert
Davenport, Albert
Denron, Chester
Diaz, Arthur
Forsman, Charles

Foster, Elton
Frick, Robert


Aviator
Golfer


Swimming
Playing golf


Drawing


Newsreel
photographer
Pharmacist


Ship Captain


Doctor


Army avi
Mech. En
Mech. En
To have
girl
Aviation
Aviation


g
g8


Itor
gineer
-ineer


Reading
Stamps
Bicycling


Model


airplanes


Sports
Swimming
Loafing


Keller, Lou


Kelleher, Maurice
Kerr, Arthur
Knox, Bill
Lim, Alex
Lindstrom, Frank


Metzger,


Issac


Miller, Donald

Miller, John
Muschett, Alfred
Nesbitt, William
Parker, Bobby
Letters, James
Prudham, Ernest
- - ....X


Aviator


Foreman
Electrician
Accountant
Aviation
Electrical engineer


Mech.


Drawing


teacher


West


Point


Aviator
Singer
Captain


None
Model


Riding
None
Dancing
Engines
Electricity
Swimming

Bicycle
Swimming
Archery


of boat


Chemical engineer
Baseball
- -- 4., -


T. Siewart.


\W, White, T. Gregory.


airplanes


a beautiful Lindbergh

Stamps
Model airplanes


Chemistry
Baseball


nl~..... .~11~.1!....




T
r
a
d
e

W
1

d







a

4,
4 4


YoL IV No. I


CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.


Friday, Oct. 6, 1939


I. to I---Mr. 0. E. Jorstad, John
and Virginia Keenan.


C. H.
Render


Students


Several


Seven weeks of
ing and recreation
lochen, Michigan
at the New York
distinguished the
S"g nia Keenan,
.ad John Woodw
S. Interlochen,


music
S at
and fi
World
vacati
Haroli
ard.
Virgi]


Sfctionately called "Pi
p $ed the trombone i
e' ity-piece band and
Sthi sixty-voice glee clu
"tdes she acted as bui
"el camp.
Both Harold and Job
ed clarinets.
The faculty of renown
clelans conducted band
orchestra on broadcasts
certs.
Interlochen fronts tw
It is 150 miles north of
Rapids and is fifteen
south of Traverse City s
jins Interlochen Sate
over 500 acres. The cal
founded to give high
bos and girls opportun
study symphonies works


y-
Leopold
Sings In


Alexander
Auditorium


Mr. Leopold Alexander, bass
baritone, concert singer and
ostorian; honored the students
of Cristobal High Scffi*l. Wed-


Attend I
worldd Fair


Woodward, Harold Rose


nterlochen,
Concerts


Stramin- enjoying nealtny outdoor mie.
Inter- Some of America's greatest con-
ive days doctors, college students, teach-
i's Fair ers, and other adults interested
ons of in music, radio work, drama,
i Rose, painting, and drawing also at-
tend. At least 300 people studied
nia, af- at the camp during the past
anama", summer. The camp enjoyed one
n the day of travel to the New York
sang in World's Fair on a special train.
b. Be- Arriving at the Fair, they ren-
gler for dered concerts at the Temple of
Religion, French Pavilion, Court
n play- of Peace, Goodrich Arena, New
York Building, and then made
Led mu- a special visit to the French
I and liner Normandie.
or con- During the five day visit at
the Fair, ten concerts were given
o lakes. under the following conductors:
f Grand Guy Fraser Harrison, A. R. Mc-
miles Allister, Dr. Howard Hanson.
and ad- Vladimir Bakaleinikoff, Lorin
Park of Maazel-9 year old protege of Ba-
mp was kaleinikoff, Lucien Caillett and
school Earnest La Prade,
ties to Among the pieces played at
while (Continued on Page 4)


F. K. Bryan Co-Designs
Home Craft Footstool
F. K. Bryan, teacher here of
mechanical drawing, is co-
author of an article, MODERN
FOOTSTOOL. annearinm in ths


1939-40 CROP OF

FROSH INITIATED

BY ANNUAL BRAWL

The annual freshman-sopho-
more brawl initiated this year's
crop of freshmen into C. H. S.,
Friday, September 15th, in 'a
series of contests at Kokonut
Park.
Following the individual
class meetings, which ended at
1:30 P.M., the freshmen as-
sembled in front of the school
to prepare for the first event -
pulling a car laden with C. H.
S. Varsity Club members from
school to the field.


A Panamanian
who was on duty,
procession before it
two hundred feet,
it was unlawful to
automobile. The
breathed a sigh of


policeman,
stopped the
had moved
saying that
overload an
freshmen
relief when


the policeman entered, sat in
the back seat, and instructed
the driver to head for the Co-
lon Police Station. Later, after
proper explanations about the
car-pulling tradition, the boys
were released.
In the meantime, the fresh-
men journeyed toward the
Point, unshackled, but herded
by the sophs. As soon as all ar-
rived and assembled, the con-
tests began.
(Continued on Page 4)


UPPER


CLASSMEN


ELECT OFFICERS

Joe Nitto Elected
Senior President
The senior class president,
vice-president, secretary, treas-
urer, and one Student Associa-
tion representative were elect-
ed at the senior class meeting
that was held in the Audito-
rium at 2:20 P.M. Friday.
Mr. Kenneth Vinton, class
sponsor, acted as chairman. He
opened the meeting by naming
the candidates for presidency.
Joseph Nitto was chosen senior
class president from three can-
didates.
Joe Nitto presided as the


President


BOBBY FERNANDEZ


Students congratulate Bobby
Fernandez upon winning the
election for the presidency of
the Student Association.
Only students who signed
pledge blanks were allowed to
vote. A plurality elected mem-
bers to each office.
Bobby has been attending the
Canal Zone schools since enter-
ing the first grade.
His high school record has
been a successful one. In his
Freshman Year he was the
class treasurer. During his
sophomore year he was class re-
presentative. While his junior
year saw him as the president of
the class and vice-president of
the Student association, he per-
formed the duties of the pre-
sident before the year was
through.
Showing his appreciation
Bobby said, "I wish to thank the
student body for electing me to
the office of president of the
Student Association. I will do
my best to continue to be
worthy of your trust in me."
"I realized this is the highest
office a student may reach in
high school and consequently I
will put my best effort into the
duties of my office.
"The Student Association is
for the good of its members and
I will see that our money is
spent where it will do the most
good to the greatest numbers of


--*-"-*-J s; I" -- -
T h ~e ***

A.


Students at Interlochen


Yo ur

Dues


i" : ::; "


r J *?.


* *


a rrl 1 r il a





TRADE WIND


Romneos and Juliets

Aspiring Romeos and Juliets
of C. H. S. met in the cafeteria,
Wednesday, September 27. Un-
der the guidance of Mr. Paul
Beck sponsor of the Dramatics
Club, many plans for the com-
ing year were made.


On Thursday, October
play, "Jerry Joins In," wil
given. This is a novel plh
Which no character says
than one word at a time.
For November, plans
been made for two on
Dlays. One concerns "The
Lives of Emily" and the
is "Spreading the News."
One three act plaY. "Ca


12, a
1 be
ay in
more
have
e-act
Nine
other
ntain


Applejack," will be given in
December.
Other plays too, will be given
during the school year, from
time to time.
The election of officers was
discussed and it was decided
that meetings will be held each
Wednesday, the eighth period in
the cafeteria
All students interested in dra-
matics are urged to attend the
meetings.


Bronzed


Grilles


Beautify C. H. S.

Iran grilles painted bronze
now adorn the outer arches of
C. H. S. Their design and
strength harmonize with the
architectural beauty of the
many arched corridors.
Last year, after the plans were
drawn at the architect's office
in Balboa and approved by Mr.
Ben Williams, Supt. of Schools,
the iron-gratings were ordered
and constructed in the States.
Prior to the opening of this
school term, workmen were still
assembling its many parts and
anchoring them into the sides
and floors of this building.
For the first few weeks of the
school's opening, painters were
covering the red-leaded iron
work with bronze paint.
Now, with the installation and
painting completed, students
agree that the grilles serve
their purpose well in beautifying
the building and excluding
night prowlers, both man and
beast from the surroundings.

SCHEDULE FOR SOCCER IS
COMPLETED
The soccer season started
Wednesday. September 27, with
Ed Wheeler's team and Jim
Pescod's team playing a 1 to 1
tie, before a crowd of rooters.
Soccer season will end Oct. 9.
7t ^..4n w 41bhfIn 44-n d^A A fl +antn Tmnll


Miss


-7. *t
* . . .




Miss


Doris


Griffin


p .
.v. -


Griffin


Home Ec


New


Teacher


Arriving in Colon this past
August on the "Ulua," was Miss
Doris Griffin, the new house-
hold arts teacher who is taking
the place of Miss Lucille Pepoon,
who is now teaching at the Uni-
versity of New Hampshire.
For the past three years Miss
Griffin has been teaching at the
Murphy High School in Mo-
bile, Alabama having 3500 stud-
ents and 115 teachers. Miss
Griffin was graduated from Jud-
son College in Marion, Ala-
bama, and later attended the
University of Alabama for spe-
cial training.
She has traveled throughout
Europe. Several summers ago,
she visited in Honolulu, enjoy-
ing the climate to the extent
that she decided to travel more
in the tropical climate and
countries, and found Panama
to be most enjoyable. Putting
in her application for the posi-
tion of teacher on the Canal
Zone, she was pleased to be no-
tified that she was accepted and
soon made ready to sail for
Cristobal High School.
We all want to welcome her
to our school and hope this
coming year she will be very
happy with us, and hope she
will be here for many years to
come.


Wednesday Oct.
Thursday Oct.
Monday Oct.


CONTINENTAL NEWS
Kingsley Vannier, news stud-
ent, has a cure for his insomnia.
He takes his news book to bed
to study every night and just
can't keep awake.
"The Guide", Hood River,
flrran a n


C. I
(Conti
these con
kof -Marc
Symphony.
Band pie
Seova n ec
Pictures
Mr O,. E
director v
at Interlo
had record
students a


B. S. STUDENTS
nued from Page .
certs were Bakailefi-
h de Concert. Duorak-
y No. 5 (Nrew Wrl);
ces included, Duorak
Dance No. 1 Elgar Sea
ana othet selections.
.Jorstad, C0H. S. music
visited these students
Ichen last summer. He
mmended these three
it the beginning of the


last school year.


1939-40 CROP
(Continued from Page 1)
The first event of the pro-
* gram was the boy's peanut race,
im which the second-year-men
won. Following that, ws the
girl's peanut race. Again, the
sophomores took first place.
The coconut tree climbing
race for the boys was the third
event. The freshmen took first
place, through the skillful
climbing of Bill Nesbitt, who
shinnied up the tree twice in
order to score for his team.
The girl's tug-of-war follow-
ed. The sophomores were an-
nounced victors though the
freshmen girls appeared to be
the winners at first after pul-
ling their opponents across the
line. The judges announced the
freshmen were disqualified,
when outsiders helped on the
rope. The boys subdued the un-
der classmen in the tug-of-war.
In the banana eating contest,
Virginia Keenan took first place
for the soph girls. The fresh-
men boys won the banana eat-
ing event by a mouthful.
The flour fight was a free-
for-all, with boys and girls en-
tered.
Cage-ball followed the flour
fight. The frosh girls won this
event.
The program ended with the
second-year-men winning the
sack rush, which was one of the
day's main features. After these
events, all hostilities between
the classes ceased.

LEOPOLD ALEXANDER
(Continued from Page 1
7. Aufenthalt, by Schubert
(Sung in German).
8. Lotus Flower, by Schubert
High School Orchestra.
9. On the Road to Mandalay,
by Kipling.
10. Sweet Mystery of Life
(Encore).


Fresh

Dick


Page 4


president of the freshmian clss.
Eula Mg~aCalloay s vi
sident; Gladys uo,
Gloria Ingram and A
venport, representative,
The meeting iwsnhel i
Room 203 and conducted un-
der the sponsorship dr T
Beavers and Mr. Wilson.

FROSH--SOP
OPENS SCHOOL YEAR
The Freshman Sophomore
dance, sponsored by the Stud-
ent Association took place Fri-
day evening, QSepteni..Bi ..
form 8-00 to 10:00, on the open-
ing day of school. ii
together social event was in-
formal. Appr
dred fifty students and guests
danced to the strains of Jimmie
Rose's Cotillion luIIt!
The uniecorated |
with ,a clatter of m
most as many alumni attended
as did Freshmen. Several single
and married teachers with their
wives enjoyed the
the evening.

FRESHMEN SUPPLIES


(Continued from Pa
F.: Well, I want a
S. L.: What size and
F.: A blue one. And
an eraser.
S. L.: Gum or hard


pencil.
type?
I want

rubber?


F.: Gum? Oh you mean the
eraser. Which one is th e
All went well until
ming up of the item;
P.: It seems to me that that's
all. But I keep feeling as if I
forgot something. Hummmm-
one! Yes-that! Have it wall.
guess that's all.
S. L.: That will be
cents. Your commissary &kk
please?
F.: Darn I knew I knew Ior
something E A B



WE SUJGGESTS WAT OU


men Elect

Green Pres.
nees3 ^^aq^ t^ the


Compliments


STUDENT FIEN






ll& l~lti Ij iJ l i :;
RANGE :CRUSH'


C


- -








PAY


YOUR

.iDUES
,


PAY


YOUR

DUES


VOL V-No. U


CRISTOBAL HIGH SCH OOL, CRISTOBAL, C.


FREDAY. Oct. 13, 1939


Student Association

Officers Take Oath

In Special Assembly

The installation of new Stud-
ent Association officers im-
pressed the high school stud-
ents during the second period,
Friday morning, October 6.
Reverend Morgan, introduced
by Mr. Hotz, complimented the
present generation on its cap-
ability for self-representation.
He cautioned the students to
give attention to the teachers'
decisions, because they possess
much more experience and
knowledge than the students.
Following his talk, Reverend
Morgan administered the oath
of office for president to Bobby
Fernandez. Bobby pledged him-
self to further the welfare of
the 8. A. and C. H. S.
The Student Council members
then took the oath to uphold
the positions given them. They
answered in one group instead
of taking the oath individually.
Something new, but rather
necessary for the cooperation of
the whole school, was intro-
duced this year. The members
of the S. A. in the audience
stood and gave their promises
to work with and for their re-
presentatives. This adds a feel-
ing of complete coordination to
the Student Association.
To add to the cooperative
feeling, which at this time
seemed to have settled over the
entire assembly, Mr. Jorstad led
the singing of the Loyalty Song.
It was later remarked that the
song seemed to express more
school spirit than any other
happening since the opening of
school. After the singing, Miss
Moore presented the Student
Council members to Mr. Rice.
Mr. Rice made several favor-
able comments on the work done
last year by the representatives.
He expressed the hope that all
would work together this year.
With his best wishes to all, Mr.
Rice then closed the session.


Jacqueline


Wahle


Leaves For States
.llr n 1 nlr. nl l IJ ,v


Srandmno L 10 R
MI T Honl
From L. m R

Columbus


MrN. B Moore A. Daverporn. V. Keenan. D


B Sryln. E


Day


After Discovery Of The New


Christopher Columbus sight-
ed the American shores for the


first time 447


years


His fleet of three
the "'Pinta", "Niia'
ta Maria" set sail
from the seaport
southern Spain to
discover a shorter


sailing
Indies.
After


westward,


man


ago. Oct. 12
small ships,
, and "San-
on August 3
of Palos, in
explore and
route, by
to the East


y days


at sea,


searching in vain for land.
disheartened men saw bits of
driftwood with carvings on them
probably made by man. A
broken branch of a thorn tree
and flocks of birds known to
stay near shore gave the 88
members of the crew new cour-
age.
At two o'clock, on the morn-
ing of Friday, October 12, a
sailor aboard the "Nifn", the


CI-JQ


CInmmamn- ,Ia.


sma
ann
whE
Nei
was
nan
crui
Ind
lanm
he
pan
pha


Wheeler. R


Fernanldez


Association


Harrs,. G Carni l. S SLrnner. G Macus.-e, K McCJean. G. Inynm.


R A Wheeler


New


Students Are


Welcomed To C.H.S.

From Many Places

Every year new students come
to C. H. S. Some of them arrive
from distant places. We old
timers of C. H. S welcome these
new comers and extend hearty
greetings to them with the hope
that they will enjoy the present
school year. These new students
according to grades in high
school are as follows:
Freshmen Boys
James Coffey-Canton, Mass.
Alexander Lim-Puerto Ar-
muelles, R. P.
Raymond Simons-Colon, R.


Walker-Washington,


Freshmen Girls
beth Browder Al
s, Texas.
onlinued on page 4)


amo


lOP GETS


World


illest of the three vessels.
bounced the appearance of
it later proved to be the
v World. The land sighted
an island which Columbus
ned San Salvador. After
ising about among the West
ies and discovering the is-
ds of Haiti and Cuba, which
thought were islands of Ja-
r. Columbu: returned triumn-
ntly to Spain.


In honor of this great Disco-
verer, October 12 has been de-
clared an important holiday
among American nations as well
as Spain and Portugal.


Colon celebrates this day with I John
services at Columbus' statue D C.
located on Broadway between
third and fourth streets. Par- Eliza
ades and gaiety entertain the Height
crowds. (C


rlrenu. iFara a I u,


SOCCER I


Student


Celebrated 447 Years


ji:


1




#:, "V


Page 4


TRADE WIND


October 6, 1939.


CARNRIGHT SCORES
- - --- a.. aI- -


si-a2


WIN


UVIEK


RAYMOND'S TEAM

In the first game of the girls'
intramural volleyball league,
Georgiana Carnright's team won
over Jean Raymond's, 51-22, in
the gymnasium, Tuesday alter-
noon.
The game opened with Von-
na Hambelton making 13 conse-
cutive points: and by the end
of the first half, the victors had
easy running. Those who played


were:
TEAM No I
Geoigiana Carnzi t,.
capralo
Ruth Bamrbach
Vonna Hambelhon
Kathryn Hi wuod
Frances Pin
Gladys Ruboa


TEAM No
Jran kaymornd
caprlin
BntrJry Blrown
Audrey Frederic
Doroihy Harrison
Bnrbara K,;perrik
Vjrg.r.n Krc.l-n
lar ,an Merzger
Gloconda Pucci


th i Beywood of" Team 1
scored 22 points, and Virginia
Ked>
Lois Crouch's team defeated
BobbMb in the second
egaMie S These teams were
more *t i23ilhed, and coi-
peiti toved keener. The
player were: ,
SM 3 "TEAM No. 4
Bohbie-Swis. This Crouch,
Spaptain
Edl~i, i roseimair D a
Jan ralIn Blanca -Pfdal
qM HlneaB Jane ICafer
Philipa Rals Mable Lew
Marin Snyder ]elyn Shidrey
Jean Grabhorn of Team 3
made 8 points, and Jane Kaufer,
of Team 4 gained 14 points.

D. A. R. Offer Prize To


High History


Student.


Again, the Daughters of the
American Revolution offer a
prise of $5.00 cash to the stud-
ent in C, H. S. who makes the
height grade in American
History during 1939-40 term.
The letter to Mr. Rice was
written by Mrs. A. Clyde Ellis,
Corresponding Secretary of the
D. A. R. The body of the letter
i this: "'We hope that this will
prove to be an incentive for the
boys and girls to develop a
deeper interest in the history
of our glorious country and in
the ideals and principles of our
government. By this means we
may help in obtaining a high
standard of patriotism and
citizenship among the youth of
today."
The ettE Is, at present, on
the bklleti -board in Mr. Evan-
one's r o4-
Loanny Hughes won the prize
last year. Who will win this


Pescod's


Ron


'Teenm s i
.4 '1
_-U-_ :


Bsck P.c. L re. R M. P;cado R RJe H W'ijen. J Ha.ornd j. Brupr. Front


ro R


265 NEW


I Glrei.,r


M Kelleher.


BROOKS
LIBRARY


The library of Cristobal High
now has about 3,000 books.
Since school began, approxim-
ately 265 new books have been
received in the library.
Daily in that little office be-
hind the library, Miss Jeanne
Brown and her helpers work
busily varnishing, sorting, num-
bering, and filing the new books,
A few of the assistants are Tom
Frensley, T. Burd and R. Hug-
gett, who help Miss Brown daily,.
and they say that they enjoy
this interesting work.
Many new sets of Encyclo-
pedias Britanica, Compton's
Pictured Encyclopaedia, and
World Book Encyclopaedia have
been recently received. There
are forty different magazines
there. A few of the most pop-
ular are:
Amercan Boy; Occup~onal Index Amer-
ican Gir; Popular C raf American
Maaine; Popular Science Alantic Monthly.
Practical Home Economics; Current History.
Panama Canal Record; journal of Che. E
Readers Diest; Enlish Journal; Saturday
Review; Good Housek ing; Scholutc;
Gresg Writer; Scoutinu Harper's; Theatre
Arts; Hygci Nature; Industrial Arts Jacobs
Ochesra Monthly; Jacobs Band Monthly;
McCall Fashio; Nationa Geographic.
he assistants are:
Ist PERIOD 4th PERIOD
C. Albriucan 1 erd
A, Stroop i PERIOD
2nd PERIOD R. Haggme
R. Harris K Ejolf
E, Dixon 7d PERIOD
Dlxon. P.M. Eldridse
3sd PERIOD V. MacMintan
,l auer 8h PERIOD
. Skinner A, Preslar

JACQUELINE WARTL
LEAVES FOR STATES


Cor~lS H Pen.


, NEW STUDENTS A RE
WELCOMED TO C .H S.
FROM MANY PLACES
I LorDrnued nrom age Unre
Vonna Hambelton-Balboa, C.


Alice
Mmn..


Ulseth-Fort


Sophomore Boys
Antonio Enriquez -
Z,
Franklin Enriquez -


Snelllng.


Balboa,

Balboa.


, z.
Adolph GOllgren San Pero.
Calif.
Glyn Glaze Balboa. C. Z.
Ralph Justice Anniston,
Ala.
Wade Krasman Agency,
Towa."
Sophomore Girls
Georgia Butler-Fulton, Ken-
tucky.
Phillipi Butler-Fulton. Kg.
Catherine Justice-Anniston,
Ala.
Junior Boys
Keith Campbell-Hemp. N. C.
Marvin Odom-Charlston, SC.
Louis Palmer-Hemp, N. C.
Robert Thompson Port
Leavenworth, Kansas.
Russell Tidd-Providence, R. 1.
Louis Truis-Balboa, C Z.
Junior Girls
Isabelle Angels-Henderson,


KIY.
Judith


Ferri-Holly


Springs,


Miss
Grace Marcuse-Colon, R. P.
Dale Price-Washington, C. Z.
Rachell Yohros--Balboa, C. Z.
Senior Boys
John Herman-San DieEo.


Calif.


DOYLE'S TEAM

DOWNS STADE'S


WINNING


32-16


Eva Jean Doyle's team seared
a victory over Irene Stade's team
32-16, Thursday afternoon in
the gymnasium. The first halt
of the game was in Irene Btade's
favor, but the tables were turn-
ed in the second half due to the
exceptional serving of Rhoda
Ann Wheeler. The players were:
TEAM No 5 TEAM No. 6
Fva Jean Doavyle. Irene sde.
Cpa~ln cal.Dain
Louc Gormely Frances Davenport
Kahren Philips Fanue MaliT EBldiige
Phoda Ann 'Whelez Rima Goulen
ME'T AnD Seibold Edna May Hcwij
Eula May Callaway
Barbara Williams
Rhoda Ann Wheeler, of team
5; tallied 16 points, and Barbara

In (he seCm game o t
day. Wilhere Callaway's girls
chalked a victory over Nancy
Magner's, 32-16. From the first
half, Williere Callaway's team
got off to a good start and led by
many points.
The players were:
TEAM No 7 TEAM No. 8
lllirrer Callahay, Nanry M guner.
clapean capluiD
Jean Badpley Pauline Lir *
Heriha Hauss Ann Williams
Teresa HeIn Kahlreeo Hunt
Ljnd. Appin Maarzuri Considioc
Gloiia Lerser Mary Anderrson
lusrna Perez Glora Ingramn
Gladvy Wern Eugenia Huff
Nancy Magner of Team 8 re-
gistered 7 points, and Jean Bad-
gley of Team 7 earned 15 points.


C. H S. COMMEMORATES
DISCOVER'S DAY
-
IConurnued flo m Par Or
4. "At the Spanish" present-
ed by the Jr. High Dramatic
Club under the supervision
of MISS Q
CAST
King Ferdinand. Pedro Mulse-


Queen Isabella..
Archbishop of

Luis St. Angel
Marchioness of


bosch
.Frances Preslar
Granada.. ...Paul
Meeks
........ John Hall
Moya..Margaret
Williams


Friar Jaun Perez. Herbert Stern
Christopher Columbus......Martin
Cain
Page .. ... Doris Raymond
5. Selection played by Orches-
tra.


Bureau of Clubs
ann Plvnwrrnnn.a


--


.


-- -- w,-


I















CRISTOBAL m..GH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.


FRIDAY, Oct. 27 1939


CIVIC COUNCIL'S

SPECIAL PROGRAM

GREETS TEACHERS

Mr. Ernest Cotton, President
of the Cristobal Civic Council.
opened the program of welcome
to the new and old teachers o,
Cristobal junior and senior
high, Tuesday. 8 P. M., October
17, in the Cristobal High audi-
torium.
Dr. Howard gave a very Inter.
testing and appropriate talk suit-
able to the occasion. The key-
note of Dr. Howard's address
was the self-satisfied smugness
ol students with 70% passing
grades. He wondered what might
be the condition of world and
domestic affairs Lf our en-
gineers. doctors, architects.
writers, were satisfied to pro-
duce faulty bridges, half-cured
patients, unsound buildings, in-
complete poems and stories. He
stressed the necessity for em-
phasizing the need for more
perfection in one's daily work.
be it what it may.
Jack Egoscue, a graduate of
C. H. S., played a piano solo


which
great
audien
words
solo by
AU
wives,


was accepted with a
deal of applause by the
ce. Mr. Rice gave a few
followed by another piano


* Jack.
the teachers
headed by Mr


formed a receiving
encouraged personal
ance between the te
parents. The crowd
into the cafeteria


and their
Rice, then
line which
acquaint-
achers and
moved on
where re-


freshbments were served consist-
ing of punch, cookies, cakes,
mints, and nuts.
The affair was said to be a
complete success.


Metal-Wood


Shop


Books


It is doubtful if many students
realize just how many new
books there are in the workshop.
Mr. N. Gibson announced that
there were 440 books in all with
14 more expected very soon.
Of the 123 magazines on file,
8 are current running magazines
-~j j- .1 n.I ii na 4.. f -' I nt-tn .1 M Ut*


Hallowe'en's Origin and Customs Date


Ancient


Roman


The last night of October is
universally celebrated as "All
Hallow Even." or **Hallowe'en"
because, it precedes "All Saints
Day, Somne people have nick-
named it "Nutcracker Night."
and ;' SnaNpple .Nlght."
This night and its customs
are closely "oniected with the
old beif that ghosts, witches,
goblths, and all sorts of in-
canny supernatural creatures
of darkness are abroad on this,
their yearly carnival,
This holiday has been in-
herited from pagan times. It
is in part a survival of the
ancient Britons' autumn festi-
val in honor of the Sun-god.
The Druids lit bonfires to this
god, thanking him for the fine
harvest.
Our Hallowe'en owes ptrt of
its origin to the ancient Ro-
man festival in honor of Po-
mona. the goddess of fruits
and gardens.
The fruits of Pomona are
still remembered in our cele-
bratuon of Hallowe'en today;


Black


Christ


Porlobello


Portobelo. one of
historic towns of th
of Panama. celebrate
ditional "Feast of
Christ" again on 0O
About 1000 persons


Each ye
all points
tend the
held from
very late
bration is
ing of rel


ar many
in the


p1
HA


Festival


and


Druid's


Rites


in *bobbin" for apples, burn-
ing nuts on the hearth, sow-
ing hempseed, pulling cabbages
blindfolded. .
.Although it was originally
inspired by serious religious
convictions, this holiday has
been, lightened and jollified
until now it is the most frivo-
lous and sportive of all the
year's celebrations.
In England, it is customary
to dive or "duck" for apples
on Hallowe'en. One of the
superstitions connected with
this custom is for the maiden,
who succeeds in getting the
apple, to sleep with it under
her pillow, and she will surely
dream of her future husband.
Another superstition says she
must eat the apple while
combing her hair in front of a
mirror at midnight, and her
future husband will appear
looking over her shoulder into
the mirror.
The black cat, being the
traditional companion of witTh-
(Conaoned on Page Four)


Celebrated


Again on October 21


the most
e Isthmus
d the tra-
the Black
october 21.
attended,
people from
public at-


rite Services are
early morning until
at night. The cele-
not entirely a show-
gion, but also of the


recreations of
dancing and p
The town is ;
from Colon ai
sailing time
than three hb
from the main
are slightly va
the "Black Cl
most authentic


the olden days.


icing
uated
the
sligh
rs by
land.
ed co
ist,"
s th


21 m
aver:
itly
lauw
Legel
ncern
but


1CI

Sit
Ind
'U,

ril
hr
I


L, I~n


South America by ancient
Spaniards to the King of
Spain. The ship carrying it
was tossed about in a terrible
storm and in order to decrease
the weight of the cargo, nu-
merous articles were thrown
over-board, among them the
statue. As the sailors were un-
successful in reloading it, it
was left ashore. The second
story says that the image was
being carried from South Am-
erica and on the course the
ship stopped at Portobelo.
Each time they would try to
leave, a violent storm arose.
Superstitious sailors believed
that it had some divine mean-
dng; so the "Black Christ"
was left on shore.
The signal for the proces-
sion to start was the firing of
(GContnued on Pat Four)


JUNIOR


SWIMMERS


WIN MOST EVENTS


MEET


The Junior Class of C.H.S.
splashed their way to victory
in the first swimming meet
of the school year on Friday,
October 20.
The Seniors were a close
second, two points behind the
winners.
The high point boy swim-
mer was William Peterson,
Junior with a first in the 100
Yard Free Style and a second
in the 50 Yard Dash against
Montford Stokes.
The high point girl swimmer
was Rosemary Dignam, Junior
with first places in the 50
Yard Free Style, 60 Yard
Breast Stroke and the Div-
ing event.


LIST OF EVENTS


50 YD. FREE
R. Dignam
S. Callaway
R. Goulet
50 YD. FREE
M. Stokes
W. peterson
iJ MDGann
0 YD. BREAST


STYLE-Gm3LS
(35 sec-)

STYLE-BOYS
(26.2)

STROKE-GIRLS


1. R. Dignam
2. R. Goulet
60 YD. BREAST STROKE-BOYS
1. B: Meg er
2. A. Collins
3. C, Brenana
o00 YD. FREE STYLE-GIRLS
1. G. Carorighr
2. A. M. Candall
100 YD. FREE STYLE-BOYS
1. W. Peterson
2, C. Brennan
3. ,I. Aidas
100 YD. BACKSTROIOKE--GIRS
1. G. Camright
2. R. Gouleb
3. S. Callaway
100 YD. BACKSTROKE-BOYS
1. R. Parcherl
2. R. Williams
3. F. Sullivan
DIVING---GILS
1. B.. D.igna
DIVING-BOYS
I. J. McGann
2. C Brennan
3. L. Doyle
90 YD. MEDLEYY RELAY (:25
1. Senior Team: Collins, fatchett, Stokes
2. Freshman Team* Merzcer, Sullivlan
Miler
120 YD. FREE STYLE RELAY (1:65)
1. Senior Team: Stokes, Collins, Patchli
2. Freshman Team: Miller, Sullivan,
Seoop. Snmpf

INDEPENDENCE OF

PANAMA OBSERVED

On November 3, 1993, the


PAY YOUR

S. A. DUES


iva


COME To The
ATHLETIC
GAMES


FIRST


Has


?


I


*---


_I_


Impo~ mar irl irr irrc~l iruul






lage B


TRADE WIND


October 27, 1939


Publ htd every Friday by the
JournMagn Class of Cristobal
High School, Cristobal, C. Z.
MjintEiteo .-. .. .. Dn is Bus' &no
Noe t Editor .. .. ...... Dorothy B~Aw

N ewsM loi d i e
Echange K11 (or ... .. Shiw J ent
a Wds .o .. S.. EMay HanSn
Rosn Mangast Sownf,
Jobs HUnman
GafesETST Krase
a Sord Shin

Moicq: To INTEREST STUDENTS IN


STUDENT ACTIVITY.


DUONARTIS

Pupils in C. H. S. seem
ruidlly afflicted with gram-
maticalo inertia, a disease not
itzemmron to other educational
Insttutions
he .srptons of the afflit-
Sare mispronunciations, mis-
,^ misundertood words,
S tene strctres, and
i ought organiaions.,
eg--ing the ailment, one
seems prudent to recommend
the cure. The doses of the spe-
cial medicine "Dictionarjitis".
art be t e prescribed according
to the tiet's needs.
I the co ientious pur-
suit of the cure over a lengthy
eo of tie, C. H. S. can hope
Produce individuals, gram-
matlcay sound instead of
veneered with surface book
learning,


70% EQUALS

What would happen if en-
gineers built 70% perfect brid-
ges? If doctors operated in all
cases with ?0% cures? If new
atomobfles were only 70% ef-
fdlilet If buildings were 71%
safe? Orxa football team were
satisfied with a 20 % training.
And, yet here as a rather nice
school with students in it, who
are satisfied with a 70% grade.
C-average. Yes, average, but is
that all you are? Are you willing
to say AYes, I'm just ordinary"?
Mot tents rent. They think
they are just a little better, but
thee they are getting a 70%
gade and doing nothing about
it
SwAIthat OV'A getthem
wieM they graduate? Adntt-
tedly, you can dig a dltclj with
ouldn edit do a report-
er gave him a story only 70%


Alumni


Notes


Versatle


Verses..


Marcel Goulet---'37-attending
Junior College, Balboa .
Philip Bscal;3t-employed
with the Department Engineers,
Fort De tesseps.
Donald Braylon-- 37-employ-
ed at t~e Yard Office. P R. R.
Lou Finlayson-'38-employed
at the Texas Oil Co.
Warren Lam-'33-attending
Junior College, Balboa.
JLaurel "Hig" Highley-'38-em-
ployed at the Pedro Miguel com-
missary.
Rose Marie Wolf-'38-attend-
ing Meridith college, North Ca-
rolina.
tommy Ashton-'39- employed
at the Texas Oil Co.
Zona Boggs '39-attending
Blackstone college, Blackstone.
Virginia, and incidentally, is the
roommate of
Jane Bevington-'39-alsp at-
tending Blackstone college.
Bill Ebdon -- 39-attending
Georgia Tech, Atlanta Georgia.
Virginia Wiett--'30 attend-
ing St. Mary's.
John Bernde-'38T-attending
M. I. T., Cambridge, Mass.
SAnne Carpenter- 8-attend-
ing University of Alabama.
Charlotte Raymond--38-at-
tending Pomona College, Clare-
mont, California.
Jean Green--- 9-attending San
Diego State College.
Janet Nesbitt--'9-attendlng
Junior College, Balboa.
...Marjorie Yost-'38-married.
Fern Horine-'39-a Science
Freshman attending Iowa State.
Her pet name there is 'Tana-
ma." Girls marvel at her collec-
tion of athletic medals and
belongings reminiscent of the
Canal.
Bert G. Tydeman-39-is at-
tending Renseelaer Polytechnic
Institute, Troy, New York.
Jerry Gorin-'34-is attending
Harvard Law School, in Cam-
bridge, Massachusetts,
Charles T. Reeves-'39- is at-
tending Bordentown MilJtary
Institute, Bordentown, New Jer-
sey.
Marilon Anthony-39-is to
attend Cedar Crest, in Allen-
town, Pennsylvania.
Alma Bramin-'39-is to be
married November 4 to Robert
Brown-'33.
Gene Stade-'37-is employed
at the Electrical Diision in
Cristobal.
Sam Frier--'9-is attending
Harvard University, Cambridge,
Massachusetts.
Ruth Swan-'33-has returned
to Fort Sherma.n ter graduat-
inm from the TTni

THE SUN CAME
The StUZ fa m1 ir~ in ndor,
The birds began to sing.
I rushed to get my clothes on.
For fear the bell would ring.

The air was filled with sunshine,
The sky was very blue.
I fell downstairs to breakfast,
Without my other shoe.

The sun kept up its shining,
The tunime was drawing nght:
For school bells to start ringing.
When dark clouds floated by'

The sky began to sprinkle,
The drops began Lo grow.
Then rain came down in
buckets!
The wind began to blow!

The school bell started ringing,
Regardless of the rain.
I had to go to classes,
To cultivate my brain.

I plunged into that downpour,
And all the way I ran.
I got to school on time, though,
That's more than others can!

My clothes were damp and
sticky,
My hair was plastered flat.
I went into my classroom.
And in my chair I sat!!

While gazing out the window,
Oh! much to my surprise!
The sun came back in splendor,
Out of those dark gray skies.

I think that was a mean trick
For the sun to play on me,
'Cause while I sit here dripping.
He's dry, as dry can be!
.- Dot and Jean.

Continental News

Abraham Lincoln High School
writes that this is the eleventh
season of "Columbia's American
School of the Air." These pro-
grams, designed to supplement
and utilize the school teachers'
work in classrooms, are heard
Monday through Friday during
the entire school year. The series
will be produced on the stage in
the auditorium of a different
high school each week.
* *
A Kiss Gramatically.
1. A kiss is a pronoun be-
cause she stands for it.
2. It is masculine and femi-
nine common gender.
3. It is plural because one calls
for another.
4. It is singular because there
ito nnthinae ale. im It


:::
:E ,,::: """ CEj
,E: B
8,.


Jupiter Pluvius

Shades of Jupiiter Pluvius!

in Cristobal last week, but no
one dreamed that the deluge
could create 265 new "brooks"
in the C. H. S. Library. Yet, it
must have been true, because
there it was in black and white
on the fourth page of the last
edition of the TRADE WIND!
After providing themselves
with life-preservers, several, of
the more venturesome students
cautiously approached the li-
brary. Ready to sink or swim,
they burst into the room only
to find it as "dry" as ever. The
nearest thing to water that was
discovered, was Tennyson's
"Song of the Brook", which
upon investigation was found
still to be "going on forever."
The deluge is over: in fact, it
never began. The warning "All's
clear" is sounded. Come to the
library and quench your thirst
for new knowledge in the read-
ing of 265 new books, not bab-
bling brooks.

Blackouts -
The enlightened Twentieth
Century! How superior we are
to the cave-men of the Dark
Ages! Why, they worshipped
stones, feared lightning, stew
one another for paltry reasons,
practiced brutality on one an-
other, and enslaved their under-
lings. But those are things of the
past. We don't believe in doing
such things any more. How su-
perior we are!
In prehistoric times, when a
shadow flitted by his doorway,
this aborogine retreated into
the darkness of his cave for
protection. Yet we, the people
are accredited with being the
most highly civilized in the
world, are forced to revert to
these cave-man principles to
avoid our enemies.
Yes, we also retreat into the
darkness. But we do it In a
modernized and mechanied
manner. A siren is blown, traf-
fic is stopped. People rmn for
bomb-proof shelters, and the
city is plunged into darkness.
How superior we are! .. .

Sophomore: You can't teil m
a thing. He is no longer a Fresh-
man and therefore wise in the
way of th1n
loud ties and blonds.
Junior: You can't tell him a
thing. He is no longer a sopho-
more and therefore wise in the
ways of things and stuff. No ties
hut ic driP n in a hi -vnntlfull






October 27, 1939


TRADE WIND


Page 3


Athlete Feats

The question these days arounai
C. FH. S. is, can a captain of a cham-
pionship soccer team be the cap.


tain of a championship


football


during the same school year?.
question wfll be answered on
afternoon of November 30,


when the football
6 6


season closes.
6


The football season this year
will be one of the longest in the
history of the school.
a a
In the first football game of
the season between Notre Dame
and Carnie Tech, "Chuck"
Forsman and "Pus" Brayton
tried to kiss each other running
heacj-on. The result ht broad
daylight; "Chucks" nose cut,
bleeding; "Puss" almost broke
his nose. As if this weren't


enough, "Backward
kissed the ground
fall, rose wobbly
drunk.


" Haywood
following a
and punch


S a *
This is the way this writer thinks
the freshmen rar athletes will look
to the world in 1914:
"Chcdk" Poriman as the triple
threat athlete in all sports.
Albert Davenport as "Chack's"
mort feared opponent in Athletics.
Arthur Randles master athlete


anxiour to play professional basket-
ball and football after gradsuing
from C. H. S.
Johnny "Backward" Haywoodd


destined to score the
point for his opponent s
assual Rose Boen game.


--i -e
winning
is the


Some people are wondering
these days why Edward Wheeler
named his football team Con-
nie Tech.
* *
Playing the first game of the
football season, Connie Tech de-
feared Notre Dame 12-0 with Ed.
Greene and Captain Ed. Wheeler
contributing 6 points each to their
leams' score.
*
In the third quarter, Wheeler
advanced behind stone-wail de-
fense, Mr. N. Gibson, the referee.
He dodged players and was fol-
lowed dog-like by Wheeler run-
ning with the ball behind Gib-
son's back.
S *
During the game on Thurs-
day, Mr. Hotz and Mr. Neff had
to hold several conferences on
the field as to the Canal Zone
rules.


Connie
Noire
Game


*Tech
Dame
Of Se


Defeats
In First


?a(on


Nonrv
i-0


Football Schedule


Plans Five


1Q39


Connie Tech won the first .
football game of the season on M, H Ni
Wednesday, October 18. when of he by
they defeated Notre Dame. 13-0. daf Otbeb
The first half of this battle
'the football
was very much of a kicking duel ..


between Captains Ed. W
and Jim Pescod of Connie
and Notre Dame. respect
with neither team cross
opponent's goal line.
The teams opened the
quarter with both teams


wheeler
Tech
;tively.
ig the

third
using


the aerial attack mixed with a
great deal of power plays. The
aerial attack was not clJcking
for neither team successfully.
because of the wet ball. In the
middle of this quarter, Ed.
Greene intercepted a long Notre
Dame pass and ran fifty yards
for a touchdown, making the
score 6-0, in favor of Connie
Tech. The try for point after
touchdown failed.
Both teams then settled down
to straight end runs with an
occasional line plunge. It was


an end
wide


run that
to score


Wheeler
the last,


touchdown of the game. making
the score 12-0, in favor of
Connie Tech.


Fordham
On Short


____ *
Fordham moved into a tie for
first place with Carnme Tech in
the C. H. 8. intra-mural touch-
football league, when they nosed
out the powerful Navy team by
the close score of 6-0, on Thurs-
day afternoon, October 19.
Within one minute of the
kick-off, Captain Harold "Reds"
Willett threw a twenty yard pass
to Louis Palmer who ran the
ball the remaining ten yards for
the only score of the game. As
the teams lined up for the try
for point after touchdown, "Reds"
was back. The pass from center
for the extra point was low and
the Navy line rushed through
giving him UtUe if any chance
to drop-kick the point.
Each team fought very evenly
for the remaining quarters of
the game, but neither could
cross the other's goal line,
though Navy bad the ball down
on Fordham's twenty yard line
with about 2 minutes to play in
the last quarter. Navy tried to
complete Lhree consecutive nas-


,


Teams

Season


eff called a meeting
Varsity Club on Fra-
r 13. in order to picK


teams
rr\-


n g ~e~son Th -
picked on Friday
that signed up fo
Thursday and Fr
suits of the electito
are as follows:


Theie,
Far ill I
I c,lke
Mar,.st. ld
Gre.ne
FcrnanJ',
Nina
re of the
The tea
P. M. o0


NOTiRE DAME
Imm frescod.
Capt.
Bienon J aik
bfd Tommy
Caizbn Ic-e
FrbK Rc.bertr
Hjwoud. Jobm
Hai, s. Robel
Herlbrrwn O-' aid
I Hoffmja Getu.ge
Ir.giam Elvin
Mu chen, Alfrud
M&."'p., John
Pe'cod Hulh,
Prudhom E.tresr
Pulti. John
Sa.oO. Cltlm.a
S rlf. Brace
Wong JuLlo
NAVY
Mondord Siokes
Capt.
Dunlap. Hold
Edt, Ed ladd
Furer,, James
Gilde John
Glaze GCl
H3a rlsi Dclb erf
Huiaen. R.lJph
Keilrhe, Bbd
McCitar. Kur
Parch rr Bob
Rindle' Aith r
Thomrni:. adBdy
Trlu., LouIs
Stewarr, rhomas
Sulihan Frank
ialdh Jim
IWh r. Walbit~


Arrthu Farrell, C.
Burrer Frank
Brign John
Cain. J une:
Craw, George
Enr.quez Fnkji.n
Gallrn Adoll
HollUodll. Dai.d
Hoper. Nathen


for the corm-
captains were
by the boys
)r football on
iday' The re-
n for captaLns


I,
II
9


91 signer
ns were
Friday


rs did not
picked at
and they


CONNIE EACH
Edu.rd XrbeTcr,
Ljpi
Ann.ro iArihoriy
(Okis Cli ence
EDrodt I,
Do ie Lee
Endcr (_.t l
Ftrnandea BSbby
Fir man. Chuck
Gretne Edde
l.laer Teddy
Kianan. Wade
NeFbhn Bdil
Puke, Bobby
Pierce Charic'
P.cado. Ihke
StaiN E m.
Suo.up. 't'anren
'a IiJami, Rober,
FORDHAM
HJ r ijlnr.
Brtnnin Challes
Campbell rnth
Cher.ailos. HPIbert
LoGI5. Ell,
C(otfn Jjm
CoLlins D
Dasenporr A E.
Dretrik Torm
Dlaz Anhir
Frenslyy. Tom
Gregory Trni
HNcper Frank
hlher Bran
Mr ohb Karl
Nino Hoe
Slim. Alex
Rote. Harold
Snoop. Buddy
, Jusure. Ralph
Koeles. Warren
Lrer, teRm
Manetr NlR
Marieid. Bily
MaNquard Edwad
Murphy Bob
Pool, Sre..an
Salmron. Marna


HAROLD WIL
M xxx xxifAv:* *vDy"
KKK F KKKK KK KKK K


VARSITfY


CLUB


Crouch


And


Doyle


Lois Crouch's team bowed in
defeat to Georgiana Carnright's
team, 61-23, on Thursday The
winning team got off I to a
whirl wind start early In the
game, and kept up their lead
until the final victory.
Those who played re:
TE SNo r l No. 4
Georgiana Caniigk, lois Oouch,
Cap. Capt .
Madeline zman Rosemary Diam
Vohoa Haumbelon Blaonc Faedal
Kathryn Heywood Jane Kaufnt
Jeano Holmdin Mahale Lyw
O.O l eyh Shirley
Jean Holmelin of Team 1 seor-
ed 21 points, and osemar Dig-
nam Tamm 4 madE 9.
In the second game ofthle day,
Nancy Magner's team ran over
Evas Jean Doyle's girls, scoring
51-24.
The bavers were:


TEAM No. 5
Eva Jean Dwylt
aniise Gpt.
PEagy Qitel
Peagy McClearY
Kathxyn PhNIi tie
Rhoda m Wheeler


TflA No. t;I


Euni Mae Ijuft

Ann ~Williams


Downs


Pt's'


Compliments o


See ulr mlw


rueI ta


tim FUW


..- --.v=


* =


""


Harold Willett was elected the
president of the boys* Varsity
Club on Friday, October 13. He
has taken a prominent part in
basketball, soccer, football, base-
ball, and track events during
his high school career. Cristo-
balites rank him as one of the
top athletes of C. H. S.
The other officers elected are:
Eddie Wheeler, vice president;
Eddie Greene, secretary; and
Jimmy Pescod, treasurer. With
these boys as the, Varsity Club
officers, all C. H. 8. expects to
see many games with dres on
top.
It was announced t.. all
boys playing football have a
chance to receive a reward, pro-
vided their team wins the great-
est number of game,
The Varsity Club has decid-
ed that it will have its first
dance in November. The dance
will be held in the Playshed and
the admission will be ten cents.

Carnwrght, Magner

Defeat Teams Of


!






Page 4


TRADE WIND


Conscience Speaks

(Inspiration iron "The Tell-Tale
Heart" by Poe)
I am mad. Yes, that's what
they say. They do not know me.
No, I am not mad. I just have
an over-acuteness of the senses.
Madmen could not do the things
I do. They couldn't plan or
think as I do. No, for they are
not so brilliant as I am. I know!
I am very wise! Oh, yes, I know,
I know everything. I plan every
movement for every second. I
forget nothing, not even the
slightest detail.
Tonight, I am nervous, very
nervous. I usually feel nervous
before going to work. Yes, to-
night I am going to work. But
wait, I shall tell you about it.
There were many who bother-
ed me, yes, many the man
who stared so much! The lady,
so beautiful! The children, so
happy! The old woman, so quiet!
I cant stand that kind of hap-
piness! They do not know what
real happiness is. They do not
know the feeling of hearing a
last moan, or being in the same
room with death. Yes, I know,
I am omniscient. Oh yes, very.
Once, they had suspected and
arrested me. Yes, but not be-
cause I failed. Oh, no! Because
I let them. They could never*
have done it unless I permitted
it. I wanted to see the gleam in
their eyes, the cowards! Some-
times, they freed*me, imprison-
ed, or punished me, even
threatened death. That didn't
stop me. Nothing does. I have a
strong will power, a very intel-
ligent mind. I am a demon, yes,
and a demon never dies. A de-
mon always exists, always.
Now the time draws nearer. I
plan this carefully, very care-
fully. I never fail. There are
many, many as I said -
strangled, murdered, entombed
alive. I know many more ways,
but it is impossible to tell you
all of them.
I near the house. Yes, it is
night. I like to work at night.
It is so quiet then. I enter the
back door, quietly, very quietly.
I walk up the stairs. The house
in in darkness, a thick darkness,
just as I like. I keep pushing
forward steadily, steadily. I
reach that room, her room! I
chuckle as I see her lying in her
bed, so quiet, so still. How little
she suspects what is going to
happen. I am proud of myself.
Why shouldn't I be? No one had
ever caught me in the act yet.
*v ^ ax a*-- ^ T -t _ a *


Carnrgl, Call
Teams Defeat
Doyle and Crouch

Georgiana Carnright's team
jzored their tirrd consecutive
win in volleyball Tuesday, in
the gym, when they defeated
Eva Jean Doyle's team 37-32.


The players
TEAM No. 1
Georgian Cararight,
Capt,
Raoh Ba mbach
Madeline Bozeman
Karhryn Hfeywood
Vonna Hambehlon
Jean Holmelin
Frances Poda
Gladys Rubio


were:
TEAM No. 5
Eva Jean Doyle,
S Capt.
Louise Gormerly
Dorothy Marqnard
Peggy McCleary
Kadhryn Phillips
Mary Ann Seibold
Rhoda Ann Wheeler


Madeline Bozeman of Team 1
made 9 points, and Rhoda Ann
Wheeler of Team 5 gained 13.

Willieree Callaway's team
easily defeated Lois Crouch's
team, 59-8. By the end of the
first half, the score was 25-0 in
Willieree's favor. The whole
game was a pushover.
Those who played were:


TEAM No. 4
Lois Crouch.
Capt
Rosemary Digoam
Jane Kaufer
Btanca Faedal
Mable Lyew
Evelyn Shirley
Digna Yanez


Columbus


TEAM No. 7
Willieree Callaway,
Linda Appran
Hercha Hauss
Gloria Leeser
Alice Mcllvaine
Gladys Wertz
Jean Badgley


Day


Assembly Amuses

All C. H. S.

Amusing! No, that isn't the
word, and neither is sensational.
So you supply the adjective des-
cribing the auditorium session
*held October 12. Anyway every-
one agrees on one thing and
that is he liked it.
Making its first appearance
of the year, the band played
"March Activity" by Bennet. Mr.
Jorstad was complimented on
results he and the members of
the band have accomplished
since the beginning of school.
Then Mr. Beck appeared from
behind the curtain with a merry,
but subtle, "Hello." He had a
gleam in his eye. The reason
wasn't a secret. The high school
Dramatics Club had prepared a
play called, "Jerry Joins In."
The boys and girls put forth
a lot of effort for this play, and,
in the opinion of the audience,
their work was successful.
Everyone enjoyed the play.
Especially, Kirt Mc Cleary's
bashfulness in the part of Har-
old, the lover; and Helen House's
hliihin T. Wtlpn is nsw in f. .


HALLOWE'EE'ErS


ORIGIN


AND


CUSTOMS DATE TO ANCIENT
ROMAN AND DRUIDS' RITES
(QCoantined irej*, Pale (Me)
es, Is ever present at Hal-
lowe'en. The pumpkin is sim-
ply a symbol of the harvest.
Stealing gates, buggies, chairs,
etc, popular Hallowe'en pranks
until recently, was a relic of
the time when gates and gate-
posts disappeared and were
said to have been stolen by
spirits. According to the trad.
tion,, everything connected
with Hallowe'en smacks of the
supernatural.

BLACK CHRIST FESTIVAL
CELEBRATED AT PORTOBEL-
LO AGAIN ON OCTOBER 21
(Continued from Page One)
a cannon. It took three hours
to walk 5 city blocks in the
lengthy procession. Sixty men
placed the statue on a huge
platform and those persons be-
lieved they receive some di-
vine blessings. Around the
image were placed favors such
as jewelry, money, and other
valuable gifts. The bearers
take three steps sidewise, for-
ward; then two steps sidewise,
backwards.
During the remainder of the
year after the celebration, the
image is kept in a glass-sov-
ered niche in the church.

show promising signs of become
excellent actors.
Again the band came to the
center of attention by playing
"Project' also by Bennet. The
whole assembly seemed to enjoy
the number.
Junior High didn't fail to
make a worthy showing. The
capability of the actors in the
Junior High will not be question-
ed now, for they gave a per-
formance on Columbus Day,
called "At The Spanish Court."
They pleased all who saw them.
Every member of the high school
says to them, "Good work, keep
it up."
Following Mr. Rice's remarks
about the actors' performance,
audience appreciation, and
students' conduct, the gathering
was dismissed with the hopes
for similar assemblies in the
near future.


II


TROJANS TIE FOR

FIRST PLACE ON



The Trojans tto
for first place in hpe t
mural iotbaJll league :


y3 when they
e Tech before
students.
The game was
I the last play
sated. Captain
the Trojans
ie ball to Bob


.4


phy for
of the
officially
for an |
This w
the score
favor.


THE


F.,rdham
Cualmle Tech
N'ue Dune


defeated Con-
a large crowd

scoreless un-
had to be re-
"Boss" Farrell
then passed
'Punchy" Mar-


the only touchdown
day. The game was
over when the try
xtra point was made.
L3 com pleted making
e 70 in the Trojan's

LEAGUE STANDING


I Il
I I,
2
I i~
Ii


L T Pa.
0 0 1.000
o 0 1.000
I 0 .500
1 0 000
1 0 .000


METAL-WOOD SH d
HAS 440 BOOKS
(Contmued lt n. :
books at any time. They go to
the bbrary, or read in the shop
about the work they are doing.
The books are arrg__
tions and num bered, : i J
The office is to be changed.
New shelves will be put in to
hold the new books The cut
glass windows will be changed
to clear glass.
Mr. Gibson asked, "Why don't
the girls take workshop? They do
in other schools. I would t
have them enroll.'


Little Wdllie: 'to eat purring
contently on hearth) "All right,
you dumb-bell, if you're going
to park there, turn off your
engine.
Rilltonner. Jamaica. New


York.


JI,


rik~i~~iii "i


F..


Scadron Optical

Company


Bureau


and Playgrounds

Joan monmea

Good Girls S to a
'wi ii th""

f fii~ IwlttS.: U A


IEi ""Bi


:"k,


C._;

::
:::
,
ri
~


:


W .


ot C~u~


:""
a"














VOL. IV No. IV.


CRISTOBAL HIGH SCH


OOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.


FRIDAY, Nov. 10, 1939


65 ClS STUDENTS
MAKE FIRST SIX

WEEK HONOR ROLL

IT wih to congratulate the
student body as a whole on
the splendid quality of work
beag done, as indicated by
the report cards which came
oiit last Monday. Because of
the competition, especial ho-
nor should be given to those
who averaged a B or above.
Our hardest workers are our
happiest students. It is a de-
ligf to see students happy
with the satisfaction of a job
well done!
A survey of the marks earn-
ed last six weeks shows a to-
tal of 62 G H S Students on
the B honor roll. This total is
21 per cent of the 300 stu-
dents in C.H.S., a figure
whiTh indicates that a very
high quality of work is being
duke. Many other students
missed the honor roll by being
low in only one subject.
The seniors lead all classes
with total of 31 per cent of
their members on the B honor
roWl Congratulations, Seniors,
on your fine work! The Sopho-
mores are a close second with
28 per cent on the B honor
roll, the Juniors have 13 per
cent, and the Freshmen 12Z
per cent.
Cecil L. Rice,
Principal.
HONOR ROLL
Ist Six Weeks
1939-1940
BOYS 9"H GIRLS 9th
All "'AtV
Woos JEulio


Bs
Cans, Clarence
Detaon Chester
Miler Donald

10h -B's -
As tlo Anrhony
*|odp, Frank
(Condoned c


Bs
Casey Patricia
Eggleston, Irene
Hicks, Hazel
operski, Barbara
Rubio, Gladys
Ward, Jesan
10th B's
Appin. Uinda
Broeaan, Doris
SBdtler. Georgia
Buder, Phillipe
n Page Three)


Seniors Plan Dance

Th senior Class held its third
meeting, Turisday, November 2,
She. Cafeteria.


First


World


Celebrated


War A

Among


On the morning of November
11, 1918, one minute before ele-
ven o'clock, the deafening roar
of cannon and the rattling
"put-put-put"' of countless ma-
chine guns still shook the bat-
tle front. After that hour,
deathly stillness hovered over
the scene. Occasionally the
cheerful song of little birds
could be heard. The armistice
with Germany, which had been
signed early that morning to
end the awful World War, had
gone into effect.
Since then, London and prac-
tically the whole British Em-
pire has observed a two min-
utes' silence on this day every
year in honor of the heroic
dead.
In the United States, Novem-
ber 11 is a legal holiday in 23
states. In others, it is observed
by the Governor's proclama-
tion. Everywhere appropriate
ceremonies mark the occasion.
These consist of parades and


other demonstrations


G-MAN

GIVES


war


GLEASON


TALK


ON


WORK


The Junior High Sdhool or-
chestra made its initial appear-
ance, Friday, October 27, at an
a~ssmblsy held in honor of Theo-
dore Roosevelt. "School Parade"
was the opening number played
by the orchestra.
A program was presented by
some of the Junior High boys
and girls in commemoration of
Roosevelt's birthday. The per-
fonrmance consisted of a talk on
the life of Theodore Roossevelt
by Corrine Dunn, a cleverly
arranged acrostic, Roossvelt's
message to American Boys by
Paul ,Meeks, a poem by Norma
Nell Finley, and Roosevelt's fi-
nal message by Mary Ruth Da-
des.
Under the leadership of Mr.


Lrmistice T

War Allies


Nov.


veterans and patriotic citizens.
The Allied countries in Wo'rld


War I included the
States, Serbia, Russia,
Belgium, Montenegro,
Portugal, San Marine,
nia, Greece, Panama
Siam, Liberia, Ohina
Guatemala, Nicaragua,
Honduras. This was a


United
France,
Japan,
Rouma-
, Cuba,
, Brazil,
Haiti,
total of


21 countries.
Some interesting facts about
World War I. The United States
declared war on Germany on
April 6, 1917 and fought for one
year, seventh months, and five
days. The countries which de-
clared war following the United
States declaration are as fol-
lows:
1. Panama declared war on April 7. 1917
and fought one year, seven months and five
days,.
2. Cuba declared war on April 7, 1917
and fought one year, seven months, ,nd four
days,
3, Siam declared war on July 11. 1917
and fought one year three months and twen-
ty days.
4, Liberia declared war on Aug. 4, 1917
and fought one year three monods and eight
(Continued on Page 3)


Assembly

Honor Of


Held In

Panama


Independence Day

Commander Luis J. A. Du-
cdruet and Mr. Julio A. Salas
were the honored guests at the
assembly of the Cristobal Ju-
nior-Senior High School, Thurs-
day afternoon. The assembly
commemorated National Inde-
pendenoe Day of the Republic
of Panama.
Miss Betty Retally, and' a
group of dancers, were guest
artists. The dancers, in costume,
performed the tamborito. The
following participated in the
dances: Belen Salazar, Suzana
Jaen, Zenia Barria, Velma Aro-
semena, Gloria Bird, Azucena
Bedard, Shirley Passlaigue,
George Estenoz, Aaoel Rios, Ro-
malo Emliani, Sonny Cells. Fre-
derick Lam played the accom-
__-__4-_ r-_j JAt St- _ -- *J.. - : 3


ACTORS


TO PRESENT TWO


ONE-ACT


PLAYS


"The Nine Lives of Emily'" and
"Spreading the News," will be
presented in the C. H. S. audi-
torium on November 17, at 8:00
p. m. Under the direction and
counsel of Mr. Paul Beck, C. H.
S. actors and actresses are
working hard on these two one-
act plays.
"Spreading the News" is a de-
lightful Irish comedy by Lady
Gregory, who is, according to
George Bernard Shaw, 'the
greatest living Irishwoman.' She
is well qualified to write Irish
folk plays because she is a well-
known visitor in the cottages of
the peasants where she gathers
folklore and observes folkways.
She was influential in building
up the Abbey Theatre in Dublin,
the purpose of which, she says,
was to establish an Irish drama
which would have a 'firm base
in reality and an apex of beau-
by'. Her own plays have both.
She is said to be the most pop-
ular dramatist of any national
theatre and one of the leading
dramatists of the time. In Ire-
land her plays are produced
more frequently than those of
any other playwright in the re-
pertoire of the Abbey Theatre.
She has, in the words of an
Irish critic, 'produced the great-
est laughs to the greatest num-
ber'. When she visited the .Uni-
ted States with the Abbey Play-
ers in 1911, that group gave a
great impetus to our little-thea-
tre movement.
"The Nine Lives of Emily" is a


tale of a scheming,
loving girl who dotes
ting men to propose
making them think
saved her life.
Many committees
of members of the C.


attention
upon get-
to her by
they have

composed
H. S. dra-


matics club are working hard to
make these plays a success.


Junior Class Rings

Marvin Sl tmon rnortA .hn*.


PAY
S. A. DUES
so@


PAY
and
SAVE







TRADE


C -


PNbishtad by the Journalism CIass
Crinib High School, Cristobal. C. .
Editrr~nchief -- Dorohy Aderso
Aint isi Edt Jean Badge .
News Editor Bne Buning
opy Badera -- Daorohy Brennan.
uiness andl acculado Manger Paul
Scdal Sah Casey,
Sports Richard Egolf. Jean Badlcy.
Exchaige EdiKto Shirley Je.najo
Speil WriH May Huon, o
Margaretso John 3nnerma. Gogeauna
SSa d Skier, MacMillan
Sponr Mr. P. J. Evancoe.
PIblcy To TEREST STUDENTS IN
STUDENT ACTIVITY.


ALL


THE BRAINS


Why doesn't the Trade Wind
have a write-up about our par-
ly? Gosh! My poem is as good
as that. That story I wrote is
a hnumdinger.
Such remarks as these have
been heard echoing throughout
the halls of C. H. S. and some-
thing can and will be done
about it.
e journalism class is corn-
esed of on y thirteen members.
It is almost impossible for these
Sto w everything that s
having. so why don't you
hand in your contributions or
intfor the staff of student hap-

If you have a poem, a story,
a bit of news or even a funny
joke, give it to some member of
the Trade Wind staff and it
will be looked over by the copy-
reader.
The Trade Wind will b serv-
ing the interests of C. H. S.
more fully if all of us contri-
bute the products of our talents
toward its success.

Bothering Animals

How would you like to be
picked up, thrown around, and
petered until you are hopeless-
ly fatigued? How would you like
to be poked with a stick and
tortured until you hated the
sight of people? How do you
think the animals in the patio
feel about our bothering them.
The animals in the patio were
put there to serve the purposes
of Mr. Vinton' science classes.
For years, Mr. Vinton has been
bringing aatmas to the High
School, and has been keeping
them healthfully alive for expe-
rinental purposes. He puts
them into the wide, open spaces
of the patio for healthful sun-
shine and natural environment
nWn. Hnn a. 4t/a 4,.n/rdnrt n P^' I #n w In no


1141


nation:
Should auld acquaintance be
forgot
Or letters aged with time,


WIND FRIDAY, Nov. 10, 1939

What Would Happen If "Hollywood Extra"


nllND


Versati Verses

-OH, ME;


This week I got a big surprise.
A big surprise, I said.
I looked at my report card,
And wished that I were dead.
They gave me "F" in algebra.
In gym, another one.
I got a "I' in Chemistry.
Please hand me down my gun!
This morning I don't feel so
well.
Report cards should be back,
But mine has not been taken
home
For fear I'll get a "whack".

CHATTER BOX

Now I lay me down to rest
Before I take tomorrow's test
If I should die before I wake
Thank gosh, Ill have no tests
to take.
Have you noticed the happy
looking faces of the senior girls?
Don't think that the reason is
report cards, no! Henny Buth-
er is back.

Thinking of report cards re-
minds us--"Death, where is thy
stingy
If one were to watch Paul
Gorin rushing thru the halls
during the seventh and eighth
periods one would be firmly
convinced that Paul was work-
ing hard on journalism. But the
journalism class has its own
convictions. You bet!
Our senior English classes
just '"read and read." NOW AI
they have to do is to make Miss
Liter know so.

Definition of an upperclassman:
Sophomore: Anyone who isn't a
Freshman.
Junior: The higher half of school.
Senior: Seniors of course.
Freshman: Who cares?
Mr. Beck is wondering if a
certain senior, whose initials are
Eddie Greene, would like to
take American problems first
period or if he is interested in
better housing conditions.
Closing with a piece of infor-


CONTINENTAL


NEWS


rom the high school in El
Paso, Texas, comes the novel
idea of students taking the
teachers' places, for a day, and
the parents attending the class-
es, having first made out a
schedule. Teachers were com-
pelled to eat in the cafeteria.
while students inupersona ted
them in the faculty lunch room,
and received all their privileges.
-Austin Pioneer-

Cop: "H1w did you get up in
that tree?"
Tramp: 4An't you got no
sense? I sat on it when it was
an acorn."
-Western Military Academy-

Jamaica, N. Yfs newspaper
the Hilltopper was rated first
among the high school papers,
receiving 855 points out of a
possible I000, thereby attaining
the highest rating offered in
this contest. The editorial staff
was coannended for its work by
an official comment.
--he Hilltopper-

Some one's wise advice about.
women:
If she looks young, she's old.
IM she looks old, she's young.
If she looks back, .Illow her.


This year mrining ettbnsion
studiv in the Territory enters
its fifth year, and because of


Mr Jorstad let th-e music
groups hold "jam sessions" of
swing music.
Boys took over the cooking
and sewing classes.
Grace MarcLuse lost her "poi-
sonality"
Miss Moore forgot to ask for
homework.
Art. Farrell stopped being the
"glamor pants" for C. H. S.
Girls at Cristobal High were
not allowed to comb their hair
and powder their faces.
The water fountains were
taken cuut and with them our
excuse to leave the room.
Paul Gorin had to walk to


Classes


Construct


Miniature Stage Sets

"Art classes are coordinating
their projects this year with
Dramatic Club activities," an-
nounces Miss Mary Worrall.
Th3 Elementary Group has


completed
one-act pl;
News" and
Tsntly"'


poster
ays,
"The


Various Advan
dents have done
ture stage sets,
of the character
These are on d
Household Arts
dow.


s for the two
"Sprea~ding the
Nine Lives of

ced Class stu-
posters, minia-
and miniatures
s in the plays.
display in the
showcase win-


Gioconda Pucci and Dorothy
Anderson constructed tiny fig-
ures of the characters from "The
Nine Lives of Emily,' from bits
of cork. paper, and pipe clean-

The soap figures of eharact-


ers in
were ca

Mock


GCiven

A Mo
Nomina
held in


"Spreading the News"
rved by Buddy Randles.

Convention to ie
in Bdflboa, 1i e
ck Democratic National
ting Convention will be
the Playshed at Balboa,


RageS


laE


and from school.
Al the senior book reviews
were in on time.
Shrly Jennings couldn't do
her French homework at noon.
Chewing gum were sold in the
cafeteria.
There were no errors in the
TRADE WThf.


Is New Operetta

For Easter Season

The new operetta for this
year, "'HoEL-a
just been received by Mr. Jor-
stad. The music is written by
Charles Wakefield Cachman and
the libretto by George Murray
Brown. "The music for this
operetta," stated Mr. Jorstad,
"Ls quite modern. It has two
acts. the first taking place in
Hopetown. Maine, and the sec-
ond in Hollywood with an Al-
gerian set. The operetta will
feature a male quartet of
Northwest Mounted Police, a
marching .sc. dhew
Legion, besides many other solos
and duets."
Three baritones, three so-
pranos, one alto, one bass, and
two speaking parts make up the
Jeads in the cast. The choruses
will sing in part music. Dances
will also be featured as well as
the orchestra which Mr. Jorstad
plans to have play throughout
the operetta






TRADE


WIND


Page 3


Athlete Feats

The students of C. H. S.

and Mr. Hot, Mr N Gison,
and Mr. H. Neff for their


willingness to give
three times a week to
Im the C. H. S. nt
touch-football league.
hiere is a Heleve-Tt
In the third quarter
Notre Dame Fordtam


up golf
officiate
ranmural

*Or-Not.
of the
game,


Johnny Hayward intercepted a
pass thrown by "Reds" Willett
who on the next play, inter-
cepted a pass heaved by Hay-
wood. Johnny then intercepted
another Willett pass on the very

The Trojan-Navy teams played
th daed a-
bbe fee game time a
othro contest, mak-
47&o l to get the d
details of the fray. i was, however,

ls ise usth An Farell of the Tro.

o highlights of the
. i~ran game was Pool's
She. only completed
pas toward the end
of the fourth quarter when
w.. las wet and hard to
hold,

ycaled received the
en uipmequipnment that


Wrench fois
e bl type guards, and
slixal il blades. All the
ae of the best

C H. S. lost one of their most out
r hltes' whes Wasfr^
Mt4 is AKe home in
eu' Jersey. e are all very sorry


STUDENTS
MAKE FIRS SIX




Klulee. Teddy Cons.dine. Mariei
Pescod Hugh Yowkes. Berrn Jane
Sa~o Colman Haus.. Herha
Sugr s, Buddy Keran %'ugirn'a
Sryles. Bruce MacMdan. I'rrgC


W heer. Rhoda Ann
Woos. Aucas!.
Zc rw.a, Margutnre
..ii.h -


Notre Dame


Wins On


First Period Pass
Notre Dame moved into a ti
or second place with Connie
Tech on Wednesday afternoon,
October 25, when they defeated
Navy bn a first period touah-
down pass.


Navy kicked
Dane. The ball
the Navys own
line. Johnnr
threw a long
pass to Hugh :
the remaining


off to Notre
was run back to
forty-five yd.
Haywood then
thirty-five yard
Peseod who ran
ten yards un-


touched. This put Notre Dame
out in front 6-0 within two min-
utes of the kick off. The try for
extra point was incomplete.
After this touchdown, Notre
Dame played defensive football,
with captain iPescod kicking out
of danger repeatedly. Navy did
not give np. They "sailed" into
Notre Dame territory through-
out the remaining quarters, but
each time Notre Dame's second-
ary would knock down fourth
down passes to take possession
of the ball.


Callaway


Defeats


Carnright 37-36


Willieree Callaway's tea
ranks first in volleyball aft
defeating Georgiana Car
right's players 37-36, on Thu:
day, October 26.
Willieree was ahead by
points at the end of the fi
half; but in the second, Gei
giana's team almost caught
with her. Throughout t
whole game there was ha
fighting on both sides of t
net, with the finest display
passing ever seen this year.


im
;er
n--
rs-


7
rst
or-


High scorers were Vonna
Hambleton of TEAM 1 with
9 points, and Jean Badgley of
TEAM 7 with 9 points.


Styles' Team Defeats

Doyle's; Scores 44-43

Bobble Styles' team chalked
up their first win TuesdOay, Oet.
31, when they surprised every-
body by downing Eva Jean
Doyle's, sEoring 44-43.
T .. -- l- -. -i ..- lT4e ; .& *Ln


Herman and
Lead C. H. S.


Postal


RUf


Prudhom
Shooters
le Match


The Canal Zone Junior Rifle
Club held their second compe-
titive match of the school year,
Saturday afternoon, November
4, on the small bore range at
Fort Davis.
The club shot their postal
match with the Wheeling,
West Virginia Club during the
afternoon. The high five in
this match were:
G. Herman 194 x 200
E. Prdho m 194 x 200
G. Miller 193 x 200
.. Coey 193 x 200
B. Maler 188 x 200
The contestants also had
the National Bi-Weekly Match
and these scores are:
G. Miler 194 x 200
L. Coney 191 x 200
. Mlclvaine 189 x 200
E. Prndbotrl 189 x 200
B. Maher 188 x 200

RAYMOND'S TEAM


BEATS


CALLAWAY


Jean Raymond's team scored
am easy win over Willieree Cal-
laways players, 30-11, Tuesday
Oct. 31.
The score was 15-3 by the end
of the first half. While the
other team stood there in a
daze, Jean's team, quickly fin-
ished their victory.
Jean Badgley o' TAM 72
made 5 points, and Virginia
Keenan of ITAMI 2 tallied 13.

Stade Wins Victory

Over Styles, 34-16

Irene Stade's team registered
their first victory Thursday,
November 2, when they beat
Bobbie Styles' players, 34-16.
Irene took the lead early in
the game, and her players tal-
lied points until final victory.
Rita Goulet was high scorer
with 14 points. Bobbie Styles
of the opposing team scored 6.


COFFIN INTERCEPTS

FARREUI'S PASSES

TO DOWN TROJANS


Fordham gained first place in
the C. H. S. intramural touch-
football league on Thursday,
October 26, when they defeated
the Trojans 12-0, before a large
crowd of high school students
and faculty members.
All the scoring was done in
the first quarter. The first
touchdown was made when Cap-
tain "Reds" Willett scored on
an off tackle play, after Shor-
ty" Coffin had intercepted a
Trojan pass on the Trojans'
three yard line on the preced-
ing plaJ.. Later in the same
quarter, "Shorty" intercepted
another Trojan pass on the
Trojans' thirtty-yard line. '"Reds'
then passed the ball to Joe Nit-
to on the five yard line from
where Joe crossed for a touch-
down.
The teams then settled down,
playing one of the brainiest
football games of this season.
Late in the third quarstr the
Trojans threw al scare into
the league leaders when they
started a touchdown march
downfield that was stopped al-
ter it had advanced about twen-
ty-two yards by the interception
of a forward pass.
The Fordham team then kick-
ed out of danger giving the Tro-
jans the ball to start the last
quarter. When the minute was
ip the Trojans then took up
where they left off before the
interception of the pass. This
march also fell short but the
Trojans had advanced twenty-
seven yards. Then Fordham
held them for four downs, tak-
ing possession of the ball
which they brought out of dan-
ger on power plays alone. The
game ended with both teams
digging in.


Scadron Optical

Company


I.


Compliments of

The

Panama Railroad

AND -


*~ _


i' F " I


I l .






TRADE


Magnerites Down

Stadeites 35-29

Edging ahead in the last few
minutes of play, Nancy Mag-
ner's team overpowered Ireane
Stade's 35-29, in the current vol-
leyball tournament, Tuesday af-
ternoan m the gym.
Irene's team was ahead by 3
points at the end of the first
half, but conditions chanrd in
the next round of play, leading
to Nancy's vctory..
Members of the winning team
were: Nancy Magner, OAPT~AiN ;
Eugenia Mac Huff, Gloria In-
gra, Eienor Marquard, Pau-
line lam, and Ann Williams.
Those on the opposing team
were: Irene Stade, CAPTAIN;
Frances Dawenport, Eula Mae
Callaway, and Rita Goulet.
Frances Davcnporto of EAM
Swas high scorer with 9 points.
Nancy Magner and Ann Wil-
liams of TEM 8 made 9 points
each,.


ASSEMBLY HELD IN
HONOR OF PANAMA
INDEPENDENCE DAY
(Continued from Page One)


follows:
1. Military Escort,
Band1
2. "Perfidia" and
John McCann
3. Address in Sp
mander Ducruet


High School

"La Casita",

anish, Com-


4. History of Panama, Harold
Salas
5. Vocal trio, "Alla en el Ran-
cho Grande"By Azucena Bedard,
Thelma Finlayson, Melida Ho-
ward
6. "La Patria", a poem, in
Spanish and English-by Miss
Betty Retally
7. "La Vereda Tropical,'" Miss
Leonia Lam
8. Tamborito, The Chorus
9. Panamian National An-
them, High School Band.


FIRST WORLD WAR ARMIS-
TICE TO BE CELEBRATED
AMONG WAR ALLIES NOV. 11
(Continued from Page One)

5. Chioa declared war on Aug. 14, 1917
and fouight one year two months and twenty-
eight days.
6. Brail declared war on Oct. 6, 1917
and fought one year and twenty-six days.
7. Guamala declared war on April 21.
1918 and fought six months and twenty-one
8. Nicaragua declared war on May 6 1918
and fought six months and five days.


Carnright Overcomes


Magner's


Team 33-27


SGorgiana Carnright's team
now ties for first place in the
volleyball tournament by de-
feating Nancy Magner's team,
33-27, in the second game Thurs-


day, in the high
Georgiana led
half, but in the
caught up with
few minutes o:
this well-fought
Ann Williams
high scorer witl
Vonna Hambalto
with 11 points.


school gym.
in the first
second, Nancy
Sheer. The last
f play decided
game.
of DAIvM 8 was
i 7 points, and
in of TEAM 1I


G-MAN GLEASON
GIVES TALK ON
F. B. I. WORK
(Continued from Page


this organization in 1924, and
is still its head.
Mrr. Gleason (G-Man to most
of us) gave the chief require-
ments of applicants for service
in the F. B. I. They are, gradua-
tion from a recognized law
school, with two years of suc-
eassful practice at the bar, and
a satisfactory school record, the
latter must show a good char-
acter and high intelligence. Ex-
oellent health is essential.
After acceptance of the ap-
plicant, he enters into training.
The first step is the handling
of guns. The second is study in
the crime laboratory. The third
is finger printing technique.
About 12,000,000 finger prints
are contained in the latter de-
partment. The next step is work
in a field office on actual cases.
Three types of cases taken by
the F. B. I. were described by
Mr. Gleason. They are kidnap-
ing, bank robbery, and checking
of fugitives. Any of these jobs is
dangerous and requires a goed
deal of knowledge and exper-
ienced judgment.
"The Test" a fitting and
thoughtful poem, was read by
Mr. Gleason. Afterwards, he an-
swered questions asked by the
pupils in the assembly.
iMr. Rice extended the thanks
of the school to Mr. Gleason.
The assembly was then dismiss-
ed and students went to their
third period classes, stimulated
with the inspiration of the pro-
gram.

Teacher: Define Reputation.
Boy: Reputation is what men
think of you: Character is what


WIND

GirWl


FRIA W, No 10, Io


Varsity


Holds Spook Party

Ouch, I bumped my head!
Eek, what was that Oh, let me
go! I can't see a thing! Hey, I'm


falling! Eek!! Gosh


Yeeow!


These cries and remarks were
heard at the start of the Girls'
Varsity Party in the Kindergar-
ten Building, Wednesday Octo-
her 25, from 7:30 to 10:00: p. m.
The guests were blihdlded
and led on a diversfi an
precarious route through the
darkened building to the "grave-
yard." Epitaphs on the tomb-
stones were read by gruesome
candlelight with wild gushes of
laughter.
Traditional Hallowe'en games
were played with the following
winners: superstition, Ann Wil-
liams; Marshmallow String,
Rhcda Ann Wheeler; Musical
Chairs, Mary Anderson. Wor-
tune-telling by candle-light was
another thrilling event of the
evening.
Befreshments were served af-
ter a rally of music and song
around "Old Faithful'" the
"grand" piano.
Miss Barbara Bailey, club
sponsor, and Miss Gladys Wertz,
club president, presided over
the affair. The members and
the guests who attended were
Georgiana Carnright, Rhoda
Ann Wheeler, Dorothy Ander-
son, Eula Mae Callaway, Mary
Anderson, Fannie Marie Eld-
ridge, Anna White, Carol Stroop,
Rita Goulet, Virginia Keenan,
Opal Holgerson, Gioconda Pue-
ci, Jean Raymond, Mable Lyew,
Ruth Baumbach, Jean Badgley,
Gloria Leeser, Gloria Ingram,
Bobbie Styles, Lois Crouch, Eva
Jean Doyle, Willieree Callaway,
and Ann Williams.


Crouch Resists Doyle

In Close Game, 29-28

Lois Crouch's players suc-
ceeded in defeating Eva Jean
Doyle's team, Tuesday, Novem-
ber 2, by one point in the last
few minutes of play, 29-28.
The first half was Doyle's by
3 points, but Crouch's team
turned back the tide. The
whole game was filled with
excitement as each team tal-
lied point for point.
Jane Kaufer scored 13
points for her team, and Eva


RYMOND 1
!ls Imi

VOLLEYBAl


45-20


Jean Raymond's strof volt
leyball team -prootd ralE
Crouch's team 45-20, to .
high school gym Tuesday aiLer-
noon, Oct. 24. ""lai
Tean's b'a.m took the lead ear-
ly in the game, and finish d
with a fine showing of vol.ey-

Those on the winning
were: Jean Raymond,
Josephine Brmnnan. Virgtnia
Keenan, Marjean Metrz. and
Gioconda rPu 'i.
Their opponents wre
Crouch, CA'PTADN; Rosemary
Dignam, Blanead
Kauler, and Digna Yn
Virginia Keenan aof
scored 14 points, and Jane
fer of TEAM 4 tallied 7.


Notre Dame Ties FordI
ham For First PlaMe M
Intra-mural Leag ue

Notre Dame moved into
for first plahe with Fr dl
the intra-mnral football I
when they defeated Forth i
6 on WedneSiday, November
Notre Dame received tthe Hi
off on their own 3D d,!
Their first play was good N
yds., but on the next plain they
received a 15 yd. penalty g
them second down and. 21 d.:
to go. Peseed then made a def
end-run that was good for 19
yds. They failed to make the
remaining yardage giving or~
ham the ball. Willett then t-
ried the ball on every plag bu
three, until he scored a toauc-
down from the one yd. inW
through lft tackle.
When the second quarter -
ened, Notre Dame started th
touchdown march that
not be stopped by Fotrlda.
Notre Dame took the ball down
to 2 yd. Line from whem Jim
Pesed scored. Haywoad th
passed to Hoffman mafning t~
score 7-6 in favor of Notre Dane.
They then took the def*ensia
for the remainder of the gams


Page 4


Bureau of Clubs

and Playgrounds








Bring


Your


Red Cross
Donations


Vol, IVP1Yo.5


CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL. CRISTOBAL, C.


Wednesday. Nov. 22. 1939


CHS CELEBRATES

ARMISTICE DAY IN

NOV. 10 ASSEMBLY

Mr. Fred de V. Sill, a member
of the National Executive Com-
mittee of the American Legion,
delivered an address to the Jr.-
Sr. High School assembly Fri-
day morning, November 10, in
commemoration of Armis t ic e
Day. His topic was "The Signific-
ance of Armistice Day."
Mr. Sill, now director of Ad-
measurement on the Canal Zone,
served overseas during the last
World War and is well informed
on European alliances. Regard-
ing the present conflict, Mr. Sill's
contacts with other national
leaders in the American Legion
give him a unique knowledge of
American attitudes.
Mr. Sam Deavours, popular
baritone soloist, was the guest
artist for the assembly. Mrs.
Phyllis Jorstad played the ac-
companiment for Mr. Deavours.
The complete program was as
follows:
1. Morgan's High School March
-High School Orchestra,--Di-
aected by Mr. Jorstad.
2. "Smiles"-.
"There's a Long Long Trail a-
Winding"-aung by Assembly-
Directed by Mr. Jorstad.
3. Presentation of Colors Boy
Scouts.
Pledge of Allegiance-Assem-
bly.
4. "Significance of Armis t i c e
Day"-Mr. Fred de V. Sill, an
address.
5. Sam Deavours singing accom-
panied by Mrs. Jorstad.
"Tell me Tonight"
"Wagon Wheels"
(Condnuerd o Page 41


Pedagogues Win
Volleyball Game


C. H. S. volleyball girls, all-
stars, challenged four faculty
members preparatory to their
annual game against Balboa
High.
At the beginning, the girls
sent across several cannon-ball
serves that tallied scores against
the nedaRonees. Then Rice Vin-


Spreading ihe News


LefI ro Right-Prg Ba.'Iy Anna %' hire. Jine C'..n Joe Njn, A.ih.ced Mu.'chei Geo.rge
Holfmnn. E- Doyle. Alerinne Collihw. Th.orna Grepon.


President


New


Roosevelt


Thanksgiving


As everyone knows or should
know. Thanksgiving is just a-
round the corner It began in
the year 1621 when the Pilgrims
were thankful for the bountiful
harvest they had had after a se-
vere winter that took its death
toll and left few survivors. Then,
it became an annual occurrence.
The Massachusetts Bay Colony
in 1630 and Connecticut in 1639
began to observe the day of
Thanksgiving with appropriate


church services
thankfulness. Lal
Lincoln appoir
Thursday of No
Thanksgiving Day
dent has followed
until President F.

American


L
1


er, P
ted t


humble
resident
he last


Day,


Proclaims

November


in 1939 changed the date to
November 23 The New England
States intend to keep November
30 as Thanksgiving in defiance
of the presidential proclamation.
Americans in Panama will
carry on the traditional Thanks-
giving, spreading lhe:r tables
with local and imported foods
such as Argentinean turkey, Pa-
namanian fruits, states frozen
vegetables, nuts. and other deli-
cacies.
For holiday pastimes, many


fish; play golf, b


baseball,


v e m be r as tennis: hike in the jungle, swim;
. Every presi- tour the intenor of Panama by
his example- car; visit friends locally or on
. D Roosevelt the other side of the Canal.


Red


Cross


C. H. S. Students fo

'War is raging in Europe. The
resources of these countries will
soon be drained because of en-
ormous casualties in battle and
the ravages of war. Already
the American Red Cross has ap-
propriated $1,000.000 for emer-
gency war relief in Europe. This
means that all chapters affiliat-


Campaign


Asks


Financial Aid


Varsity Of CHS


Girls'
Elects


Wertz


Captain


The Girls' Varsity Club met
for the first time this year at
3:10, Monday with Miss Bar-
bara Bailey, the club sponsor,


DRAMATICS


H
Id
rec
Yh
;hi


CLUB


PRESENTED TWO
ONE-ACT PLAYS


Peggy
Irish w
Bartley
derson,
mother


ters, took honors in the two one-
act plays presented Friday even-
ing. November 17, 'n the Cris-
tobal High School auditorium.
Muriel Stewart. as the impe-
tuous go-getter Natalie, Eva Jean
Doyle as the deaf. gossip-mon-
gerng apple seller, and James
Cain as the stooped old man,
performed their parts with out-


standing
Act i n
character
Carolyn
with the
Fernande
Vheejer,


George
lens. at
last thi
ticulari
ed in c
play.
The
launched
program
Nine
"Spreac
directlco
"The


American Legion To

Purchase Uniforms

Baseball is being promoted In
the Cristobal High School. The
American Legion is entering a
Cristobal All-Star team again
in the Twilight league. They arE
paying the twenty-five dollar
franchise and buying fifteen new
uniforms for the members of the
squad.
Anybody who signed up to play
intermural baseball is eligible to
try out for the team. The try-
outs will start as soon as the
football season ends. The squad
will consist of fifteen players.
If the outside teams in the
league need more players, they
W f* J* * J*-- L :---L----------------__*


Senior
Dance
Tonight


iley. as the defensive
of the unfortunate
Ion. and Dorothy An-
the social climbing
wo pampered daugh-


skill.
g well as supporting
s were Kirt McCleary,
Stroop, Anna White
stage newcomers Bobby
z, Ada Crandall. Eddie
James Coffin. Joe Nitto,
loffman, Algenne Col-
Thomas Gregory-the
e mentioned were par-
good becausE they stay-
aracter throughout the


Senior High School
?d its 1939-40 dramatic
n successfully with "'The
Lives of Emily" and
ling the News" under the
n of Mr. Paul L. Beck.
Nine LiveS of Emily"
I Conlunaed on Page


""" ":""" :E
















Pubished by the
Qistobal Hugh S~hOOI,


Editor-
A9SiSts
News
Cops
BJusine


in-chief Dorothy Anderson
mt Editor Jean Badgley.
Editor Byne Bunting
Reader Dorothy Brennan,


ssan~d


Circulation


Mwoager


Goain.
Social -
Sports --
Exchange
Special W


Ma-gCt,
Krause. A
Sponsor


St


-- Paul


Sarah Casey.
Richard Eto., Jean Badgicy.
Editor Shirley Jennings.
riderss Mary Hartman, Rose
oop, John Herman, Georgeanna
ford Skinner. Betsy MacMillan.


- MI


r. P. J.


EvanolPc.


Policy: To INTEREST STUDENTS
STUDENT ACTIVITY.


ie rom war menaces,
economic security,


social freedom,


States


* Amer-
Lys.
blessed
political


to Right-Kin


and religi-


Government


1o appreciate thts marvelous
heritage better, let's take time out
to meditate upon our good fortune,
giving praise to the bountiful Al-
mighty for benefits past, present,
nd to come.
Then, let's resolve to perpetuate
this priceless heritage through our
right living, loving, learning, think-


committee toi
a fine state of


are irres-
the icnicc


McClcary.


Muriel Stewart. Bobby


ai nyra forget any
essentials for his
rip, C. H. S. people


Dorothy
Mr. Rice


Anderson:
: A group


from Alaska,


ice pick.


of eskimos
who are A


zens, for colonizati


Dorothy Brennan:
Bobby Fernandez:
Mr, Jorstad: Cant


ter for


Paint
Long


mI


recreation.


Mary Hartman:
Mr. Evancoe: A


heavy


America from
Marjorie Gilder: Ice


Miss Liter:


Standaord


loat


Ao electric


Skinner:


for the snow plow
Paul Gorin: Red Eta
orothv Parish: The Ga


Marvin


Salmon:


Plenty


Shirley Jennings:
Mr. Beck: Methods
Ruth Randies: A h
Spencer Smith: A
him warm.
Eddie Wheeler: A
Kirt McCleary: A f


here.
Peggy Baily:
Mr. Hotz:


A fei
of ri
,athir
i


and reindeer


Lmerican


on.
t for the pole.
winter underwear
music and reading mat-


anchor to keep Lilrde
:ing away.

heating pad.
extra pair of keys

nnels.
is House Gang.
tO eat.
w Bucks.
creation for the men.
ig suit.
- _. i


boa contractor


10 KCCp


floor show.
ew secretaries from around


can opener.


Refrigerators.


ouM of ice.
Helen House: Long
Frank Scott: A nair


the weather chanj
Frank Cain: A pump
Ruth Wickingstad: A


in case he


t roller skates, in
fes
for fla tires.


Marilou Messer: His wife.
Glady Wenz: Marches.
Richard Egolf: Football equipment.
Anna White: Artie Shaw's band.


Joe Ninto:
Chick Pier
aannie Eld


Me for cabin
ce: Ear muffs,


ridge:


Arthur Farrell:
Doris Brennan:


A couple


of nickelodeons.


per penguin


Erntandez,


Dorothy


Androc,


Nov. 10-Armistice Day Assembly
17-Two one-a t plays-"Nine


of Emily" and "Spread
News"
17-C. H. S. at 1Juir Co
Football
22-Tnsgitg Assembly
22-Senior Dace
23-26--Tbhanksgivig Holidatys
1-High Scoo School Swim Mee
2-B. H. S. at C. H S.-
Volleyball


15- End of
15-Three-ac


Second Six


21-Christmas
22-Student
Dance


Mg


-Girls'


Weeks


Play "Captain


gPagelt a
Association


2 3--J. 1-Christmas
5-High School Swim
19-Sophomore Danme
26--Stuns Night
2-End of Third Six
2-High School Swi
9-Carniv4


rtd Musri
C hrist ma


Holidays


Weeks


10--Water Polo-Balboa at Cristoba
10-C. H. S. at B. H. S.-Girj' Bar-
ketbalt


21-Assembly ina
ton
22--Washington's


honor of Washing-


Binbday


24-Balboa at C visobdt


- SobbeD


and Bareball
1-High School Operetta
15-End of Fourthb Sx Weeks
15-Balboa at Criscobld --
M1eet
15-Freshmen Dance


16-24-Easter
5-Two on


13-B. H.
Softball
20-Balboa
Meet
1-Physicda


Holidays
e-act PlayI
. at C.

at Crisso

Education


H. GCis'.
bd -- Swim

I Demonstra-

Weeks


3-End of Fifth Six
6-10-Music Festial
17-Junior-Sneior Ban
17--unior College i


21%
banl


looked to mae fr v
ter- Fr* irJpw u ad

The /r i'. Ien k.
(t hC n / 1.i a t.1iy


at tn/. l niitra oalU. of uotr,.e, bu
to r.ll GCa JrA. The f(lratd imdvnd bee
J ,r ,bool ,,6b fihj a.a'.r. d..d look
" ihb hei. t U.tj yl txons. bai hbch


pJ) kit
31j'.pd


Sr as i


1i n.J .pr
ol ii abt tarAlod.,


ai.!


SkAd.li)


I *JF~ifIEI


s be dr ie..sl e


Ml'O1 ubo, e. Jor GCai oj,


abe tvlr vedlj cu1ud .i'j


m a T Sla a
r mnarr of. "'Ubt cag,.'P"


I.ai Itsl
'p ibt
ii rlir4'
'IRac


YOU


ii,,, she


'or abr
V A* -.r
'so)Ip
6l rrIn


ir ft
I.,:! .1
L fLI


h~ 'Youu'
ft f -.s
tbhfk he's
'Thafl,


fr/sc.~
Jonr a.,


uii C hinl


she looh


Irnrrls.jor I

orie: and
G.toI ,3J
ing to Sfe
out fromf b
"Hj, yop
but 4~orgd
habi of hbis
that a eoe
T looked
alwys > out

ge too 0 r r I
You'r, flo
It was.'s
that I ,mQa a


our pes nnh
er, teq'v hi
must k.a,.
aAU AIAC.t
expression.
msen, fI A'"


r


*I. la U -


Ilr"it air kin Mal
r lo li~ Ior.Jd 4alogire ID


lHi


I


don


TOO OLIN)
tooAsap


enough


rf.'ice dr.pDcd


I&A.! ALL 6.?
Ifl "
;'wat


.4/ CGa


ieY bosch..


swh II rb0*Mrr


II Il ilea He', ,iise
.Ird ior of parpl/e prick


.spr itm
S,&e prjl


da 6a hicg
d ,n she


CUl an~ ho t. ffdi


Jul MIybe
,,j" I b A" u '*tw


Son o on Ae.r lose afla..a


the


YI t Ir'c~(~ il irlr,lqtbls
V hi btos W as if
W If.e.tiI


..
henr
'usaI


'1.r
inof%*


a br iffn ,'t ::u:. jifny
oir e, ro Jfol., Rea,. IPall.
> t* .f " ." S "*::: :!M<<3 .!.< !


tdl UI


L~,e ''SpljJrr


tie Jp
ridJ
heedS
I, Ft
.sj ji b


5j;:d Probknal~z


in mas es, .64w.
' P,.j.' rshuh us


cur Sbaa)J Psaleims
in Ii Uf i and e ,
I hJJ dynrg o sellJ
hi Iafan had thes d
P b IdJ. eaten a


Ah r-iM.I


te th


.hav bee, oldn iha
. arinejr bour IPw
inn InVl on a IIr

I ri coinaap


I,teibed


hus weA


til *.id it he,. I Odinj ufetofSpau
p'*ss dlre ws onB isth A ksr,
IdsII secure,) SiJi i it io~jJl~1if


silence of


i rpe~


IJC)


d


I rjrjJrrt
-n 0a Wra
m- abrii


II j


Ihr d

ft 1 jif
b se bah
Gi Iff i*ei


tred ,k. and haj baud
iea ,lomerbrmg r The
one.lly, of she Great


LOSS OF LOVE'S LABOR"

Sa itora lo j e ist f uM jprwig.
n. j iL nIaplfIrlg kjIjraiOf h.a Wiuijt*


f-a. Rwe'.
'C--. I mean, ib.
I Auedl. I ra.q s'
Irc Lr Ji JGr fJfr


It all i~
Iuj.#) ThJM 'i
ro be r'; lll


Ce


I 4u1il or a per air
a ~I I .s bir'p
did., ,l tar a niar


ask18 .reofrnfn11i
"""aQl*Jj Glro',i


INr1 rI Nor t.iJ e
i phT irlfr.


S, .)I 4*'


geve tCidfll .j'i."rorI.
I *tiepoF. t && t~uII


h'l. rbnl .r 11 r 'i


God, He ad u trlasen
aa me wbenwe. we
gnlben, if 1' Lej n i
in Ilips ol me and I',


addressed tshe gun
stuck Jomewhere in
sinking Jo. th. 'A


0my mind I bie.i.a as afd 0o


hbir je drp Js the
mlowed /on aS he
Book. I though. r
Recorded.
Thn. I didn't ree
One nr'vou'r, al I oJ
o~t, I ,trm-bl.d 1o r
'was W,.) p' apf.ld .,

thsfar-p htr i.r f. e sk


irln, fl,
percdi Mt


I


I


nl


Ahje


Srlopr


Ir ~irrl BUlrn bCrdlr


. hr


rowes-


,onlJ


rhtn I


I-


led t


a


D(


I f


ul~~rN
Pn/~


- -r


'"


fr


r


*I


1


1


eseI






~jadov2 nfl


TRADE


WIND


Page 3


CjHS; Beats J. C *

On Second Period

Line Plunge 6-0


linr
Yds.
No
No
Yds
No
By
Dur
Aver
No.
No


Statistics of the Game
Jr
Downs .. .... ?
Gained Ru'hing .. 19
of Forward Prr Arrempwd 9
cr Forward Prae! Complerrd 2l
Glaned Pan.D .r0
of Forward Pm& Int-rcerpwd


D]C.
ate
of
ol


of Punts . _
Dorance of Pun ....
PenainC .- -
Yd Lst Penalne? .-


0


C')!
.1j


Showing ability to score when
teo opportunity presented itself
s well as having harder and
Zfter running backs and supe-
r baking, C. H. S. defeated
tiJkuio College at the Point,
Ka&y, November 17. Almost
tes hundred spectators looked
a good football weather. The
Soe was 6-0.
; L BS. won the toss and chose
1t Aefend the west goal The
ioer College kicked off. The
Hgh School received the ball
anon the first play of the game
their star player, Bob Bartrn,
was hurt carrying the ball on a
loeu plunge. Bob fumbled the
gskln, and the College team
a)oyred the oval on their own
1-yd line.
The College tried two line
pl gaining 8 yards. "Reds"
Will et intercepted a College
pas on his own 25-yd. line. The
3iwl ,attempted a line plunge
that netted them 5 yards on the
pla, ~At arrell completed a
pas to Wheeler on the 40-yd.
Ine g1i'ng the winners a first
dwt. After two line plays had
ied plus a 15-yd. penalty, Bar-
to went back to the 25-yd.
]ineand kicked to Walbridge on
thp college's 25-yd stripe. The
fstt quarter ended as the Junior
College punted the pigskin to

The teams changed goals to
e the second period. The
idxh School returned the punt
d4 the College attempted to
kick out Of daner, but the pass
from center was high and the
College kicker had to run all the
" bak tof the goal posts to
rthe "bll. The man could
geunderway, because Ralph
Jeihce had gotten through the


Winning AU-Star Team


Front Row 1. to r.i-C. Pierce, R. Parchett, J. Nito, E. Wheeler, H. Rose, G. Hoiman.
B. Mansfield. E. Marquard, H. Dunlap, J. Pescod, C. Forsman, W. Krausman, C.
Marohl, T. Frensley.
Bck Row 1. to r.-H. Willett, L. Palmer. A. Randall. M. Stokes, B. Bartrom. J. Hay-
Wood, B. Greene, J. McGann, M. Salmon, L. Conley. R. Williams. T. McGuinness
C. Ruley, R. Fernandez, A. Farrell, R. Justice.


line and tagged him outside of
the ead zone.
The referee ruled the twu
points did not count, because the
oval had rolled out of the end
zone. The ball was brought back
to the e-yd. line, with the Col-
lege in possession of the ball
On the next play another bad
pass from the center was re-
covered by Johnny Haywood of
C. H. S., a the College's 4-yyd
line.
The High School took the ball
to the 2 ft. lne on a power play
and a penalty of half the dis-
tance to the goal line. Bartron
carried the pigskin over the goal
line from here with the only
score of the game. The try for
extra point was blocked. The
half soon ended with the boys
from the Gold Coast in posses-
sion of the ball.
C. H. S. kicked to the Junior
College to start the second half.
J. C. attempted two line plays
that only gave them one yard.
After this they threw two passes,
but these were knocked down, so
they decided to give up the ball
to the school boys after they
had kicked. C. H. S. kicked back
to the College boys after a few
plays had failed to net them a
yard.
The teams switched goals to
start the last quarter. This seem-
ed to be a good omen for the


College boys as the school boys
took too much time in their
huddle, followed by a success-
i ful recovery of a C. H. S. fumble
by Jim Wood, on the 20-yd. line.
The Junior College changed to
an aerial attack, but to no avail.
They threw four passes, two of
them were completed, but the
receivers couldn't get started
downfield, because of the swift-
ness of Cristobal's secondary in
covering all ends and backs. The
game ended, before the College
boys could score, leaving C. H. S.
ahead 6-f.


The most cherished
present for
Christmas
is a
BOOK


Get it from

Beverhoudts

Front Street
Colon, R. P.


flu


CARNRIGHT DEFEATS
STYLES' TEAM, 38-11
Georgiana Carnright easily
overthrew Bobbie Styles' players
38-11, in the second volleyball
game, Tuesday, November 14.
Bobbie had only 3 players.
Georgiana sho wed her good
sporstmanship by playing only 3
at a time against the oppon-
ents. Bobbie's team did well un-
der the onslaught of Georgiana's
superior team and frequent sub-
stitutes.
Georgiana Carnright tallied 9
points for her team. Opal Hol-
gerson of Team 3 gained 7 points.


Callaway


Scores


Win


Over Styles, 39-29
Willieree Callaway's team was
victorious again in overcoming
Bobbie Styles' players, 39-29,
Thursday afternoon, November
16, in the high school gym.
The winners started scoring
heavily in the first half. In the
second, Bobbie's team gained
many points, but not enough to
overtake the far-advanced op-
posing team.
Justina Perez of Team 7 gain-
ed 10 points. Bobbie Styles of
Team 3 scored 15 points.


Bureau of


Clubs


and Playgrounds


Barbara


Stanwyck


in

"GOLDEN BOY"

mnvrwrnvn A T


A. MEYER


Watchmaker

Repairs all kinds

of watches

*

10th Street,


Colon, B. P.


::Natioal Mattress
Factory
OF 321 10 &OL ON
Phone 321 10 & G St.


E S


Phillips the Radio you will
eventually buy

Ittli A Qlllae


Silks Linens Novelties
Panama Hats

I. L. Maduro Jr.


.


. 1


..,,


.......







Page 4


t rn:


TRADE


WIND


Wednesday. NoMx. .. 193


DRAMATICS CLUB
PRESENTED TWO
ONE-ACT PLAYS
(Coninued from Page


ODdeI


concerns the troubles of the so-
aly elect in dealing with their
match-seeking daughter. The
cast in the order of their ap-
pearances are:
Mn Read .... . Doroth Anderson
Nianlir . . Mm I Ste rt


MrI Rade
Laura ... ........
DoumIu Evern
Tom a ells ..


Bobbv Fetrandez
Ada Crandall
.... Kin -fcCieary
.... Carol Suoop
....... .. Eddr WhVeeler


"Spreading The News" con-
cerns the simple, homely, peas-
ant, people. While those of this
play live in Ireland. yet their
type lives in every village in the
land. In this play Lady Gregory


has wrttLen.


a classic


of its kind.


MSacb...h Pegy Babil y
Jai ando .,,.... .4. GeoarIM M osmch
"Tim Case . Aigrne Collins
Jain R~lo Thomas Grctrori
Mr; "T.Irpe~ .. F Jein Dorle
Mrs. Tulle ... Anna Franncr. ~hw
A Policeman Joe MJdoon Jamei Coffin
A I inev ldaste .. .*l. Jan UNto
ltys wN rwe mse ad directed by
Mre P Xl BeA the commitees were:
it ot a

BuakF Marquard in chu gr
Alfrd Muachkn Scnn v Culpepper
trn 4ilen Stnd

MSac %arrain French
Jinmmy Fernandez
SCENERY DESIGN
Dorothy Arhdibald Murel Stewarr
MODELS AND POSTERS
Art Qly s under the direcon of Miss
ilay Wotrr lL
LIGHTS AND PROPERTIES
Prank Scott
PROMPTORS
Marian Mt ispser Aeen Randall
Jsaidh I iFri
PROGRAMS
riell" Sewt
Prances Davenpo Rth Raodles
USHERS;
xribsa Heass Helen House
arbara Koperski Georgia Buder
C. aI $. OrchesB
D-kIr---l 0. E, Jorsed
c: onveys its thanks to
the flowing: Mrs. C. An-
derson, Mr. Pruner, and The
Mfdi Dairy for properties lent
the actors.


I "RCA-Victor


Radio"


The Only Radio For The1


AMERICAN RED CROSS CAM-
PAIGN ASKS C H.S. STU-
DENTS FOR FINANCIAL AID
(Couinued from Page One)
wish after promising in full
measure for the support of our
necessary charitable endeavors
at home, to extend material aid


to the helple,
abroad."
Your help
penny given
Is used to aid
of the money
unfortunate
feeding the h


victims


of war


is needed! Every
to the Red Cross
the disabled. Much
helps millions of
people yearly by
hungry, aiding the


helpless, comforting the injured
and housing the homeless. The
Red Cross drive is on! Deny
yourself the little pleasures to
swell the funds which will carry
on worthy work. Won't you bring
as much as you can and join
the Annual Red Cross Roll Call
today?
The home-room teachers will
receive your contribution. They
have given. Have you?

TBE LOSS OF LOVE'S LABOR
I Cotnuned rm m Page Two

something see in 'fa hert.J
aabi r "Anl not only th iea hoa.ie
rI.o ,il IP,,d : ,r .pl Oouoj
'"i e bld beitt b~at ,he nesws gens..."
Stdea as wsuid a $M is tproounem.. a
eil, I sbouht Gaii woud never et
over is, as tuni my ck eye, which Ia
hen I c4*ed-acaidentilly, of cowrsee-when
Gal's blo lanIded on me instead of Willy.
1 uecs that was a natural re ctio to Wie) ys
*Maeifv remark ofa, "Sone other cat gw
him firs* "t," ..... I
1 didn't see Gail for most a week, ad
I was ihbking anybe she had psed away,
when I aw her coming down she ha.
Even from afar immediately recognized
she synpsoms with a fang.
"Ginna" she cboed. "That new boy has
thess ot SOULFUL ees."
MARJORIE GllDER,
CBS CELEBRATES
ARMISTICE DAY IN
NOV. 10 ASSEMBLY
(Continued from Page One)
"Give a Man a Horse He Can
Ride"
"Big Brown Bear".
6. Mr. Rice Announcements
Sand dismissal of assembly.


Stilson


Seniors


To Give


Dance Tonight ..,


Tonight, the annual Serfor
Class dance will be held in the
Gym from 8:00 P. M. to 12:00
P. M.
Because of the efforts of the
sevt e mal m ttees, tl dane
promises to be an enjoyable suc-
cess, with much fun and some
hilarity.
The decorating committee.
headed by Georgiana Carnright


and
many
their
The
which
Ferna
cured
combi
to ha
phere


Gladys Werts, received
favorable comments for
work.
program committees, of
Anna White and Bobby
ndez are chairmen, pro-
programs with the color
nations of blue and buff
krmonize with the atmos-
in the Gym.


Arthur Farrell procured the
services of the Gold-Coast Me-
lodians to play some lvely tunes
to the still lJvelier dancing of
the various students, teachers,
alumni, and guests.
Those on the Receiving Com-
mittee are Carolyn Stroop, Rose
Margaret Stroop, Anna White.
Ethel Natto, Georgiana Cam-
right, Bobbie Styles, Joe Nitto,
Tommy Egger. "Reds" Willett,
Bobby Fernandez, Eddie Greene
and Stanford Skinner.

Many a man who knows there
is room at the top sits down to
wait for an elevator.


Traffic Officer: "Soon as you
came around that curve, I said
to myself, Fifty-five at least'."
Woman Driver: "Why, officer.
that isn't so! It's this hat that
makes me look so old'!"


Sons, Ltd.


Raymond
Stud.; &c


:c


Overthrows
ires 36-15


-
Jean Raymond's players chalk-
ed up their sixth win in the
current volleyball tournament
by defeating Irene Stade's team
36-15, on Wednesday, November
15:
Jean's team started scorti
early in the game. At the .end
of the first half the .sedre 'iss
14-9, in their favor. Jean Rai -
mond and Virginia Keenafin e
outstanding in their play, with
the rest of the team behind
them.
Fannie Marie Eldridge scored
5 points. Jean Raymond gained
13 points for her team.


Raymond
Magner;


Ties With:;
Wins 39-35.,


Scoring in the last few minute
of play, Jean Raymond's..tem
succeeded in defeating Naaqy
Magner's team 39-35, Tuesday,
November 14.
During the game, the referee
blew the whistle when ones-of
Magner's players stepped off the
court to play a ball. The* point
was temporarily given to the
opposingA tLear. .~
the game the score was 29-30,
and the temporary point made
it a tie. In the extra five min-
utes of play, the game went to
Jean Raymond by four points.
Virginia Keenan of Team 2
was high scorer with 12 points.
Nancy Magner of Team 3 scored
8 points.


Hotel Washington


for Situation
Comfort


COLON, LR P.


A Hotel in Keeping with
the Dignity, Spirit and
Service of the Panama
Canal.
D. J. HENDRICK,
Manager.


P. O. Address:
CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE


Unequalled
and


Preming & Sons
lerfumes Orlental Goods
IS FronSt.
Colon, R. P.


Come and See the
New 1940
CHEVROLETS
At

Smoot-Beeson S. A.
Ltd.
16th & Broadway
Phone 800 Colon


Flower of India
31 Front Street
We specialize in Oriental
Goods and French Perfumes


HARDWARE AND PAINTS
PICTURE FRAMING
Front Street


ss


i .


are


nr,, on













Vol. IV No. 6


CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.


Friday, Dee. 1, 1939


THANKSGIVING EVE
SENIOR DANCE IN
GYM SUCCESSFUL

Under a bell-shaped canopy
ot. any colored streamers. the
Senior Class Dance stepped into
full swing to the harmonious
music of the Gold Coast Melo-
darn orw Wednesday evening,
Nov. 22. in the High School gym-
nasium.
The gymnasium was gayly de-
corated with palm leaves,
streamers, Japanese lanterns.
and colorful balloons. A long re-
ceiving line greeted the guests
ill lW came in and each was
a %program card.
of the high spots of the
evening was the releasing of bal-
loons and their floating down
a ~ ring" dancers.
tiber" high spot was the
Prize Waltz. About fifteen coa-
red the event and sway-
ed gently to the soft music.
Iwre eliminated slowly
unil Two couples remained. They
1 Georgian a Carnrlght with
Eddie Greene, and Rhoda Ann
Wheeler with Art Farrell. The
W elewr-FatreU team finally
e the best. Later
ay with Carl Ma-
^onydm ie 4)

Juniors Decide

OsRing

ql rngs, the perennial to-
pi. has been occupying the at-
tention of the Junior Class for

SWadnesd, November 29,
|1pnqs Junior English
tne pipmle class rings
|I;"i j eetede and voted upon.
S.gs were supplied by the
following companies from the
"aesa iwse and Camp-
bell, Stephen Lane Folger. Inc.,
jJon0es, and The Bastain
Brothers. The selection of rings
.iBttl~t -made *by the ring
committee consisting of: Marvin
Salmon, chairman, Muriel Ste-
Mabe Iyew, Charles Pierce
and Dan Gower.
Before the students were per-
..... S... .-


Advanced Household Arts Class


Pegg McCgeary
Georgeona Krause
Helen Hicks


Hen House Willieree Calaway Grace Marcuse
Doris Brennan Shirley Jennings Dorothy Anderson
Blanche Facdol Kathryne Justice Irene Eggleston


Household Arts Classes Begin Their

Experimental Study of Cooking Foods


"Oh, I forgot to bring my
apron, so now I can't cook in
our lab today," wailed one of
the forgetful girls on what is
considered a very important day
in the Household Arts classes.
The forty advanced and
twenty elementary girls are pro-
gressing rapidly and learning
much under Miss Griffin's cook-
ing instructions. They have
learned, so far, how to make
delicious biscuits and muffins,
after several attempts, that seem


Students


Agree


funny as the girls look back on
them. The first labs were so
terribly important and serious
that everything turned out un-
successfully. Biscuits were over-
done to an extent of semi-black-
out, muffins were over-done to
an almost raw standpoint (if
they be truthful), or hard
enough to bounce. Most of the
gir 1 s had delicious products.
Nevertheless all the "would-be"
cooks were proud of all their


(Continued on


That


Page 4)


The


Americas Should Stay


"If the country goes to war,
I'll go to the city," says one
student. But, what are the
thoughts of all the other stu-
dents concerning the present
.4~~ Jf* S L t J .... - - ---^ ----~


Neutral


As a body the students fear
the "set back" the disadvant-
ages, the unavoidable depression
which follow every war. Such a
long period of time has not
nlnnraA hnn f+Fint Tin 11f. irn r ho


Maguerite Zitzwirz
Miss Doris Griffin, instructor


Jr. High To Present
Operetta "Toymaker"

About December 15
"The Toymaker", a Christmas
operetta by Treharne. will be
given by the Cristobal Junior
High School on Friday evening,
December 15. in the Cristobal
High School auditorium.
"The Toymaker" is a beauti-
ful story of a poor toymaker
who wins a princess by creating
a toy that charms her small
brother.
The operetta lends itself to
beautiful costuming and delight-
ful acting. Live toys and ladies
and gentlemen of the king's
court make up the choruses.
The eighth grade glee club
will present the operetta under
the direction of Mr. O. E. Jor-
stad, director of music in Cris-
tobal Senior High School. Mrs.
Phyllis Jorstad will accompany
the soloists.
Miss Claud Aycock, and Mr.
Paul Beck, dramatic coaches,
*willn rnc4t wo*t mi h flor o na lin


Balboa


Beat
Balboa
Girls


~:a,:, ~ca ,a: ,::::-::


#""







Page 2


TRADE


WIND Friday, Dec. 1, 139


Publbshcd b, I
Cr.i'r.bl High Sdh
Edlirr Is chirf -
A1i uni EdlLr
New, Ed-'.r -
Lor Rrsder --
Bulire. -. nd C.r
Gorn.
Siciil Sarnh
Spllti Richai
Lblhange [drEJr.
Spci.aiJ riler'
Mluajre SUtcop I
Krausr Suanjud -
SponjOl Mr.
Puolir To INT
STnDE?.


Elementary


he" jurnjiI.m Lisn ol
col Cj.frob.i. C Z
Donroihs Ander',n
- ,len Badle.
Bne Bdni.n.
[jorr'nfh Brcnnr.,
rulion i..a "tr Paul

rd [rolf. Jein B.adin
- >hurlce *Icinrn
- Manr HaiLur... Ro
osln Hcrmj,. Goigezanr. i
iSknner Bcs\ MNcMlianr
P J Ei, nc,,
ERBET SnTJDE JFs IN
NT ACTIVITY


Nighl Noises

Night school students and in-
structors for several weeks have
been annoyed and distressed by
the unholy howls. toots, blasts,
screams, yells and shouts of
people who prowl the premises
of C H. S.
During play practice, orches-
tra rehearsals, or gymnasium
work-outs, some people forget
that their hilarious conduct irri-
tates and interrupts the classes
of adults intent upon learning.
It must be realized that the
ewe g adult students PAY for
the privilege of coming to our
school and learning under our
teachers, so without accusing
4 one individual, we are ask-
aig the ones concerned to please
cooperate. Stay away from school
when you have no business here;
When you do have legitimate
work to perform after regular
sefool-hours come quietly, work
noiselessly, and leave silently.

Better Be Good

"To be, or not to be-that is
the question."
This is the thought that en-
ters many a mind at this time
of year, when Christmas is just
around the corner. To be good,
or to be ordinary.
Exclamations such as, "Isn't
that pretty. Somebody would
surely like that," or "Whoever
gets that will certainly be
happy!", are very frequent.
With Christmas presents al-
ready on display and gifts being
selected subconsciously and con-
sciuosly, the problem among
school children is to infer their
desires without appearing anxi-
ous or too straight forward.
Of course, everyone is trying
to be on his good behaviour and
create this impression on his
parents mind. But, can it be
done? We know many are try-
Ing!


EuI rlie M_-. llju
F.L, w 'aC l
Ai rrl idJ II
Au d'ry FrrdeidrL


Household Arts Class


1-,.a Ha.ibl.on Ejr.i IaJr Ho.rr L.hi'rI ye1 N'tr. Jean Ward
D,,u.h, Hai' ru Ir ~al H eI H'rlIn Eb.. as K.irpenkl Berry W'lson
kjrhrm.-. Hr xld Gir, ingra. Fnrncre Pndi Di&na Yanez


Helen Herr.in
Della Hern


A mule has two legs behind,
And two he has before.
We stand behind before we find,
What the two behind are for.

Speaking of feet and things,
(poor silk stockings) there seems
to have been a certain sopho-
more who won a waltz-minus
her shoes.
.Roller skating is a popular
sport, but we didn't think that
Eddle Eder would go all the way
from Cristobal to Ft. Davis on
the things. Of course, there was
a reason!
We hear this told of a C. H. S.
graduate, a bride when the thing
happened. She entered the din-
ing room with the chicken nice-
ly arranged on a tray, "Well,
darling," she said, "how do you
like it? This is my first chicken
you know." The groom beamed
proudly, "Why, it's beautiful,
dear, and I must say you did a
nice job of stuffing it." "But,
darling," she answered, "this
chicken wasn't hollow."

A warning to all boys! Have
you smelled the aromas (?)
swimming around from the H.
H. A. room?
'4 '4_i


'ar KerjraJj


Versatile


Lucle Smlthuie
Anna May Srain


Verses


PANAMAA"
at.1


They call this the land of
marianaa",
But I don't believe that it's true
The teachersare always so hasty,
For homework that I didn't do.


They call this the "'
Sunshine"
And if that old saying
What is it that comes
buckets
All morning, all noon,
night?


Land


is right!
down in

and all


They call this the "Land of
Flowers"
But really you know that's
so.
Unless you could call the
biscus,
The rarest of flowers that g

They call this the "Land of
Moonlight."
With palm trees so stately
tall.
When raining we do have
palm trees,
But the moon never show


not

Hi-


row.

the

and


the

SUD


at all.


Let's Play


More


Misi Doris Griffio. intrrctor


Roving


Reporter


What Does C. H. S. Need Most?
Dot Brennan Afternoon rest
periods.
Fanny Eldridge More boys and
a pep squad.
Paul Gorin More school spirit.
Stan Skinner More school
money.
Miss Moore Better co-opera-
tion in the school groups.
Gracie Marcuse An R. C. A.
radio.
Ned Manger More 'ferns'.
Marvin Odom Guinea pigs in
classes, students in patio.
Miss Liter More peace and
quiet!
"Chic" Pierce Refreshments
between classes.
John Herman Mystery stories


for text books'
Bob Bartron Wine, women,
and song.
Leo Conley Girls at football
goal posts to urge boys on to
victory!
Eddie Greene Dances at noon
hour.
Jean Holmelin Shorter school
hours.


Who


Is She?-


Auburn hair, grey eyes, and
wears dark red nail polish.


)


~---






Whiday, Dee. 1,; 199


TRADE


WIND


Page 3


Athlete Feats .

The C. H. S. Varsity eleven
played the U. S. S. Tattnali foot-
be.l team on Friday, November
S:'lt "a, gruelling football con-
test, which ended in a tie.
*
'..reg:dar football season sched-
ild .to dose nert week, will eon-
thanUe:,tL least three weeks to
take care of the'many postponed
:: i: *
The standing of the C. H. S
Football League up to Tuesday
morning, November 28:
TIAM G. W. L. T. Pa.
Fordha 5 3 1 1 .600
Nqme Dume 5 5 1 I .600
nie "erh 4 1 3 0 .2)0
Im 5 1 I 5 .?00
5 1 3 1 .2u0
.. t *
"hth Varsity travels to Balboa
S Friday to play the Balboa
h .redhool team in their an-
nw clamsic. B. H. S. has a good
tati-but so do we.

The C. H. S. girls' volleyball
team will play the B. H. S girls'
team Saturday morning at 9:00.
Some star players are: Virginia
"Reds" Keenan, Georgiana Carn-
right, and Jean Raymond.
a *
Mr. Pettingill, swimming in-
structor, has called oft the Dec-
ember I inter-class swimming-
meet, because of the C. H. S.-
B. H. S. football game.
*
The Varsity held their daily
workout on Tuesday. They held
a scrimmage with the second
team, and almost lost. The sec-
ond team had a "wonder" back-
field consisting of Mr. Hotz and
Mr. Gibson. The second team
was ahead 6-3 until the closing
minutes of the game when the
Varsity interrupted a pass to
win the game, 9-6.

A picked team from Cristabal
played a sand-lot team from
Gatun on Saturday, November
24 at the point and won 21-6.
FPrensley and Collins were the
outstanding players for the
home-team, while Glaze starred
for the Gatunites.

"Why are your socks on wrong
side out?"
"My feet were hot, so I turned
the hose on them."
-Margray


TROJANS, FORDHAM I Carnright's Team

PLAY SCORELESS Wins Girls' Volley

FOOTBALL GAME Ball Tournament


Statistics of Game


No. of First Downs
Yds. Gained Rushing
No. of Passes Attempt
No. of Passes Comple
No. of Interceptions
Yds. Gained Passing
Distance of Punts


The Trojans and Fordham
elevens played a scoreless tie on
Monday, November 20, to give
Fordham the edge in their two
game series.
Both teams resorted chiefly to
the air for gains. Justice inter-
cepted one of WzlIett's passes on
his own 10-yd. line, but the Tro-
jans' attack bogged down. Later
in the game, Palmer intercepted
one of Farrell's passes on his
18-yd. line. The Fordham team
was unable to score from here.
leaving the score 0-0 at the end
of the game.


Volleyball


Girl


End Tournament


In 3-Team


n


Volleyball is over, finally and
at last, and all we have to say
is, "All good things must come
to an end." f
Three teams were tied for first a
place, namely those of Geor- V
giana Carnright. Jean Raymond,
and Willieree Callaway.
These teams battled it out,
and the final standing is:
TEAM C L
Geogu arii Criaioi th I
Jean Raymond 8 6 2
Nancy Mdgnrr 7 i
Isis Crih cl 4
Ei JearIn Dole 7 I
Irene Sade 7 I 6
Bobbir Srlp 7 I


Georgiana Carnright's team
won the girls' volleyball toourna-
ment Tuesday, November 21.
when they took two games: one
against Willieree Callaway. and
the other against Jean Ray-
mond.


The first game wa:
one. Georgiana was
the first few minutes,
Willeree caught up
Both teams scored
point as they fought t
est. The score was 2
game was played for
instead of the regi


s a close
ahead for
and then
with her
point for
heir hard-
1-18. This
21 points.
ular time


Limit.
High scorers were: Jean Bad-
gley of Team 7 with 5 points.
and Madehne Bozeman of Team
1 with 13 points.
Carnright vs Raymond
Georgiana's team took the
lead early in the second game
against Jean Raymond's team.
But with superior serving and
good passing. Jean's team tied
with her at 20-al] Because of
this duce score, it was necessary
for one team to make two con-
secutive points Each team tried
its best. but finally Ruth Baum-
bach, of Carnright's team, suc-
ceeded in scoring the two need-


d points.


This made the


4-21.
Jean Raymond scored
c'r her team. Kathryn
nd Madeline Bozeman
tallied 6 points each.
Miss Barbara Bailey,
istructor refereed, the


BUY Y


score


9 points
Heywood
of Team


physical
ame.


CALLAWAY'S TEAM

DOWNS DOYLE'S

IN WALK AWAY


SWilli
went I


Callaw
a tie fo


in the girls
ment by del
Doyle's team
November 17


volley
featlin
41-9


ay's
r first


team
place


11 tourna-
Eva Jean
Thursday,


The game went to Callaway
from the very start, the score
of the first half being 16-2. In
this easy victory Wilieree play-
ed only five men at a time
against her four opponents.
Mary Ann Seibold of Team 5
scored 3 points. Wilberee Cal-
laway of Team 7 registered 15.


CONTINENTAL


NEWS


Mary gazed out of the window.
"I'm afraid it's going to rain."
T. KJdd looked outside.
S"Thanks a lot, but I don't think
it will be bad enough for that."
-Rouge Recorder.

The dramatics club of River
Rouge High School in Michigan
had quite an amusing time on
Oct. 24 when they spoke their
lines of a play called "Silver
Lining" on a recording machine.
Other students spoke their
names Thus they were able to
tell just how they sound to the
audience.
-Rouge Recorder.


Bureau of


Clubs


THE


WOMEN


CRISTOBAL
SUN-MON

GATUN
FRL


OUR FAVORITE CANDY

AT


,'I'


and Playgrounds

Joan Crawford
Norma Shearer
Rosalind Russell
in -


Scadron Optical

Company

MAKE SURE YOUR EYES
ARE GOOD.


Panama
23 Central Ave.


:"",,::E ji"E ij:
"""::::
:: ,,jB,,, ::







Pate I


'NE~XEEEi"


TRADE


WIND Friday, Dec. 1, 1939


- -- ,,,,,, - -- ~ ~"AflB:


C. H. S. Pupils Prefer

Studying In Library

Where do you like to study
best?
A recent questionnaire submit-
ted to all high school students
showed that 155 pupils prefer-
red to do their studying in their
homerooms; 105 liked the lib-
rary;. 2 selected room 203; and
25 students had no preference
about study places.
Some of the reasons given for
preferring the library were that
there is more room to study be-
cause of the large tables, the
reference books needed are han-
dier in the library, and there
is more light on rainy days.
Reasons for choosing home-
rooms are: they are quieter and
not so many people run in and
out to cause disturbances, mak-
ing it easier to concentrate.
Students do not like room 203
for study halls because it is so
large and crowed.


JRL. HIGH PRESENTS
OPERETTA "TOYMAKER"
ABOUT DECEMBER 15
dCoanued faom Pare QO)

choir in the Christ's Episcopal
Church of New York City. He
has appeared in public several
times since enrolling in Cris-
tobal Junior High School last
September.
Ada Lee Sullivan, soprano so-
loist, will sing the part of th(
princess. She sang the "Indiar
Love Song" in the Junior Higk:
Class Day pageant last June ant
has made several other public
appearances as a soloist.
Supporting the Toymaker anm
the Princess is a cast of stu
dents who are all experience
in dramatics, having previous:
appeared in several Junior Higl
productions. Patricia Snyder anm
Doris Raymond will play th'
parts of The Best Doll and Th
Rag Doll. Martin Cain will ac
The Clown; Paul Meenks th
Wooden Soldier with which th
Toy mak er wins the Princess
Lois Hohmann, the Mother c
the Toymaker; Heber Sterns, th
Herald; Peter Hulsebosch, th
Emperor; and John Hall, th
Prince,
There are nineteen songs, eact
a very beautiful melody, in th
operetta. The Toymaker wi
charm the older folks and de
light all children. Seat reserve
tions may be made at the Cri
A *t|n Tf.lSn Cdnlhawan l suff*ni n fte


Trojas Down Navy

14-6 in Thrilling

Game, November 27

On Monday afternoon, Nov-
ember 27. the Trojans, captain-
ed by Art Farrell, beat the Navy
by Peirht points. The final score


being 14-6.
After making three
in the first quarter
janS made the first
of the game. Justice,
back for the team.


first downs


from the two yard line. 0
next play he went around
end for the extra point.
quarter ended with the


Tro-
down
hall-
over
n the
right
The
score


7-0.
In the second stanza Justice
threw a pass intended for Mans-
field, but was intercepted by
Thomas of the Navy. Three plays
later, Marquard grabbed the pass
that was meant for Stokes. The
Trojans then fought their way
down to the eleven yard stripe.
The Navy, clamping down, held
them for three plays; then Far-
rell heaved a pass to Chase who
caught it in the end zone. Fbi
the conversion of the extra
point, Salmon caught a pass
thrown by Justice. This made
the score 14-0.
On the kick-off at the half,
Stokes received the ball on his
ten yard line and went all the
way down to the Trojans' forty-
five. After two completed passes
and a first down, the ball was
resting on the thirty yard line.
Eder then threw a pass to Stokes
who went on over the goal line
for six points. They failed to
make the extra point. The Navy
did not threaten any more that
period, and the quarter ended
14-0.
Navy threatened to shorten
the Trojans' lead in the last
quarter' with an aerial attack,
but could not quite make the
grade. When they got to the
eight yard stripe, the Trojans
tightened their defense and the
game ended soon after this. The
final score was 14-6 with the
Trojans winning.


GIRLS


STARS T(

BALBOA


PICK ALL-


) PLAY

TEAM


As the girls' volleyball season
draws to a close, the All-stars
have been chosen to play against
the Balboa team in December
1939.
The All-stars were selected by
Miss Barbara Bailey, physical
instructor, from among twenty-
two candidates that were chosen
by the team captains.
The All-stars are:(eaorgtina
Carnright, Jean Holmein., Vonna
Hambelton, Kathryn Heywood,
Virginia Keenan, Jean Raymond.
Edith Dixon. Nancy Magner. The
substitutes are: Hertha Hauss,
Bobbie Styles, and Rhoda Ann
Wheeler.
The girls have been practic-
ing against the faculty in sev-
eral games. There is reason to
believe that Cristobal will give
Balboa strong opposition in the
fourth-coming volleyball game.


THANKSGIVING EVE
SENIOR DANCE IN
GYM SUCCESSFUL
(Continued from Page One)
rohl was the lucky couple in the
Spot Dance.
The music was very enjoyable.
in the beautifully decorated gym
lined with palm fronds along its
sides. The whole Senior Dance
can be rated as "one of the
best."


Byne Bunting, popular mem-
ber of the Journalism Class, is
seriously ill at the Colon Hos-
pital.


HOUSEHOLD ARTS CLASSES
BEGIN THEIR EXPERIMENT-
AL STUDY OF COOKING FOODS
t Conrnued torn Pa On,)
.....,- o-
masterpieces.
One couple, while preparing
some cupcakes, had al read y
started pouring the batter into
the pans, when the surprising
thought occurred that there was
no baking powder in the mix-
ture. A little chagrined, they
scraped out the pans and added
the needed ingredient. To their
amazement and everyone else's,
the cakes were excellent, despite
the omission though it isre-
sumed at
happen again, by those girls, at
least.
Can you picture twenty boys,
all with their dainty aprons,


making cakes? Miss Grilfin tells
that she had Just such a class
in the practice school in Ma-
rion, Alabama, and the plan
worked out splendidly. The boys
were extremely interested in the
subject and seemed to take to
it quite natural.-
The delightful salads, sand-
wiches, and desserts bought and
eaten in the cafeteria are pre-
pared by the cafeteria manage-
ment class-prune whips, apple
and cherry pies, chocolate cup-
cakes, gingerbread and all other


mouth watering
as good as Mot
Combining a
ful foods tol
meal, all the H
sometime in
what promises
for a king, to I
girls and their


g foods, every bit
bher can make
Ill these wonder-
gether into one
. H. A. classes will
the future give
to be a dinner fit
be enjoyed by the
teadMsjp


Cristobal High School's loss
will be Balboa's gain when Patsy
and Jimmy Keneal oe e




REX


THEEAZl ;


SAT. 81

2


3


Barbara Adolphe
Stanwyck Menjou
William oldenlI
mn r

C 0 LD M

BOY
"^^^^^^ i^L^ ^L ^^^^^^ x xxxxxxxx


National Mattress
Factory
OF COLON
Phone 321 10 & 0 St.


Hotel Washington

Unequalled for Situation
and Comfort
OOLON, B. P.


A Hotel in Keeping with
the Dignity, Spirit and
Service of the Panama
Canal.
D. J. HENDRICK,
Manager.


P. O. Address:
CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE


new


our


***s


""E"EE, "
E ,r


a


I


* -


I


*


,,,




Iii F iii~


vot. IV No. I


CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.


Friday. December 8, 1939


Special Pep" Meet

Spurs Al-Stars

Toward Victories

"What on earth is all that
racket coming from the high
school?" queried the residents
around C. H. S. last Thursday.
Finally, the light shone thru, for
with all the yelling and clap-
ping it was unquestionably a
pep assembly.
The high school orchestra
pliaed two opening numbers for
the assembly. A thunderous ap-
plause broke forth as the Var-
sity Clubs came marching down
the isles and took their places
on the stage. "Ladies and gen-
tlemen"-"Reds" WWiett took the
stage and made a talk about the
football game to be played
against Balboa the following
day. Did we win? Well-! All
joking aside, it was a good
game. C H. H. Ss proud of them.
Gladys Wertz spoke briefly of
the games previously lost by our
girls' volley ball teams to the
Balboa girls. She asserted the
team would stand a better
chance of winning the coming
game if more support were
given.
An Introduction of the girls'
volleyball team was made by
Georgiana Carnright. captain. A
similar introduction of the foot-
ball team was made by Eddie
Wheeler, captain. . .
Three cheer leaders, Virginia
Keenan, "Sugar" Callaway. and
John McGann seemed to have
had a little trouble In getting
the assembly "READY." When
they became successful, they led
the singing "Here's to Cristobal",
the locomotive call, the victory
(Conrinued on Pasge 4)

arsilty Club Dance

Features Jitterbugs

"Let's jitterbug" was the cry
of both the Balboa and Cris-
tobal students attending the
Varsity Club Dance last Friday.
December 1, from 8:00 to 11:00
P. M. in the Cristobal Playshed.
The Cotillion Club Orchestra


41'a


Mabll Lyew
Majorie Gilder


Charge; Pierce
Carl Ender


the same time. Nearly ev
Dy now, has completed
ments on the distillation
ter, electrolysis of water,
ties of hydrogen, study of
sen flame, formation of
heating of metals in the
the decomposition of
pound when heating a mx


I Continued on


CLASS


limes Cc:.ariqus Peggy Bailey John G.lder Ho'n.eT MC a.,',
Kenid Cmnpbell Bob Harris Din Gowe! Spnrcer S.T,rh


Student Experimenters Mix Study


Practice


If by any chance, you should
see a great number of chemis-
try students dashing about
frantically during the next
month or so, think nothing of
it. They will be harmless. The
fact is that they are searching
for materials for their theses
that are due sometime after
Christmas.
C. H S. chemists are perform-
ing various experiments. Because
Mr. Vinton allows each indivi-
dual to travel as rapidly as he
can or desires, hardly any twn
are on the same experiment at


Ann


A. Be
Cross


pIden


Posier


J,-.hn Frlmlny
"Tom McC uinnns
\1 inne Nellh


Wins


Contest


"A JUST CAUSE IS THE RED
CROSS". This is the slogan
that appeared on Adolph Bald-
en's winning art poster in the
contest sponsored by the Cris-
tobal Women's Club.
After careful study and dis-
cussion on the part of the
judges, who were Mrs. J. L.
Byrd, Mrs. M. H. Walsh, and
Mrs. Frederick Grunewald, A-
dolph's poster was selected as
the one being most appropriate.
It was done in one color, show-
ing a nurse and a doctor side
by side.


Muriel Stewart
prize with a poster
white, blue and bl
sisted of a row of


took secc
done in r
ack. It ci
crosses, I


Ind
red,
on-
one


behind the other, mounted on
the world. The slogan "Help Us
Carry On" covered the top of
the page.
Honorable mentions were giv-
en the following contestants
for their fine work: Dale
Drina fl nniAf n C fmni narnthw


eryone,
erperi-
of wa-
proper-
a Bun-
oxides.
air, and
I oom-
ietal in


air.
Mr. Vinton plans to take both
chemistry classes on trips to
the gas plant, limestone depo-
sits, to Mount Hope's water pu-
rification plant, and to the


Par 4I


Four CHS Faculty Members Go Fishing

In Pacific Waters With Balboa Friends


"There isn't a bloomin' fish'
in the whole Pacific." exclaimed
Messrs. Rice. Jorstad, Beck. and
TvPnPnnp tn their hnst.s Neil


his suggestion could be follow-
ed, Evancoe had speared the
gar and had the hook almost
dislndred frnm his mouth


Support Th

.ed Cra.s


Support


Red Cross


MORNING CHEMISTRY


To Learn Nature's Secrets


_


..11:1






Page 2


TRADE


WIND


Friday, December 8, 1939


Published by the Journalism Class of
Cristobal High School. Cristobal, C. Z.
Editor-in-chif Dorothy Anderson
Assistant Editor Jean Badgley.
News Editor Byne Bunting
Copy Reader Dorothy Brennan.
Business and Circulation Manager Paul
Gorin.
Social Sarah Casey.
Sports Richard Egoilf Jean Badgley.
Exchange Editor Shirley Jennings.
Special Writers MaI Harcman. Rose
Margaret Stroop John EHnan. Georgeanna
Krause, Sranford Skinner Betsy MacMillan.
Sponsor Mr. P. J. Evancoe,
Policy: To INTEREST STUDENTS IN
STUDENT ACTIVITY.


Respect


Property


Did you ever start to read a
book and find some of the pages
missing? Did you ever try to
write on a desk and find holes
and gashes in it? Sure you have
and you didn't like it.
Why is it that students don't
have more respect for school
property? Would you tear the
pages out of your own books or
cut gashes in your home fur-
niture? Why do you do it
here? A little more respect from
some of the students of C H. S.
would save unnecessary wear
and tear on educational equip-
ment that eventually is paid for
by our parents or ourselves.
Appreciative students use but
don't abuse their educational
privileges.


Enthusiasm Plus
-
Have we got it? Certainly we
have. What? Enthusiasm!!! It's
needed at all games. Cheering
lets your team know you're be-
hind them and appreciate their
efforts to win.
Despite the fact that C H. S.
is doing splendidly in sports this
year, it is woefully noticeable
what disinterestedness exists.
Why can't we have larger cheer-
ing sections, anad ae all the
games? In the future games, lets
get out there and show what
enthusiasm C. H. S. can produce
to help win all scholastic or ath-
letic events.


REVERSED

curious be must you doubt No
rhyme this about know To
carefully listen you should But
time in out find soon You'll

told you're what exactly do Now
day as plain as all It's
round way wrong poem this read


AFTERNOON


CHEMISTRY


CLASS


Edith Dixon William Peterson iLorraine Goodwn ith Randles Mr K V nwon in.ructor
Edith Sanders Frank Baxter Russell Tidd Patricia Brown


SONGS AND WHO
Meet the Beat of my Heart ... Henry Butcher
1 Poured My Hear into a Song .... Mr. Jorstad
I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now ........ ..
Muriel Stewar:
My Prayer .. ............................... Bob Ba ron
He an Can Wait Georgiana Cabrnrigt
God Bless America .............. AMr. Evancoe
Shbabb O Cabby ...... Bob Patch's Car
We Can Live on Loe .... Mrn and Peggy
Hrrh For Spinach! .............. Miss Griffin
Chew, w, Chew, Chew Your Bubblegum ........
Dot Parrish
And The Angehl Sing ............ Glee Clubs
It's a Hundred To One .... Six-Weeks Exams
Day n, Day Out ...................... Homework

"Nice dog, what is he?"
"Part collie and part bull."
"What part is bull?"
"The part I paid $100 for."

"Why do you date Jane? -
She can't dance!"
"No, but boy, can she inter-
mission!"

Did you see Balboa's cheering
squad? It really was something.
Why can't we have one like it?


"RCA-Victor


Radio"


"The Only Radio For The
Tropics"

Be Sure and Get
a Demonstration

AT THE


Chatter-Box


Mr. Vinton: Homer, what is
H2S04?
McCarthy: Uh-just a minute,
er,-uh, I've got it right on the
tip of my tongue.
Mr. Vinton: Well, then spit it
out. It's Sulphuric Acid!

Does Bob Bartron know that he
has an ardent admirer named Mary?

Wedding-bells to Isabelle An-
gel. Here's Wishing you happi-
ness always!

Found in an autograph book--
When Cupid shoots his arrow,
I hope he Mrs. you.

"Is Jane really "that way" about
a certain young journalisti Ask her
and find out!


Chemrit Nnhii Ik
When Mr. X aBEan
the chemistry roo t
pictures, imagine his surprise
(and feelings) 'whenshe ~eat9L
ed to remove hot apparatus. e-
sult: One sizzled
Spencer Smith AI
meeting with a smoke gun. More
fun!
Pat Brown and
bald tested two
known substances. Results Still
unknown!
Mr. Vinton reportsiathe
Sterilamp, lent to tIe i bYi
the Commissary, has. not been
very effective ita ilBip
teria.


TB RAE RU




i pene r Nat;


Rfrhsrd Green ; .e "
- iii- --- i

~UI~lAY ait


I
1,


LIVINGS TON


*Iu *1*


SAl


Silks Linens Novelties
Panama Hats

I. L. Maduro Jr.

Perfumes

Colon, R. P.
No. 1 Front Street
Phone 888 Box 407


.


S
1


ST,!





Friday December 8, 1939


TRADE


WIND


Page 3


iris


.S.


eat


alboa


Football

Farrell, Bartron
Star As C. H. S.
Ties B. H. S. 6-6


Statistics of


Boys


Game


Nnmbez of First Downs ... 2
Yds. Giamed Rushin ......... 31
No. of Fowwad Passes Anempred 14
No. of Porwa.d Pass Conmpieied 4
Yds. Gamed Passin ....... g4
No. of Fozwazd Passe! lanucepied
By ... .......... . .. I
Dance of Puon .. ........ .20
Averal Disance of Punts .. 46
No. i Penues ..... ..
Yds. Pen t ..........


C.!!.


S. threw a wet blanket


over a smouldering B H. S
Sbormbardment, deflected
~ie last ditch plys, and in-
tMdepted passes to tie them 6-6
... aFriday, December 1, i their
anl otball classic, between
schools, *at Rassberry
1&derdbg c H. S. team
Ie B'alboan between the
d Iies for the most part
of the contest; impressive affair
frm the standpoit of the
Stators who witnessed
.HO.a rcetetved the kck-off,
bu ou inot advance the ball
S artron kicked from
nder his goal-posts. The. kick
i on a~sboa's: 13 yard
The P.acifi Siders started
n exztenstve drive that wasn't
sto pped untilJimy. Peacod, in-
~t&eepte* the forward pass. The
quarter lende with the ball in
the Gold Coasters' possession.
Rl Ii^Scores Nor Balboa
ray 4in. the second period C.
Sasttempted a field goal, but
; atf ;oded by Joe Young.
i ro eire" the two teams en-
I flge in a punting duel with
Blo I gaining tif advantage.
e eh teaml had punted
ctain Howard
Moortq iopleted a long forward
pSi to Rafael Reyes, who tbok
the ball over his shoulder on
. tbhe run on Cristobal's 15 yd.
line, and crossed the last stripe
ppinta.

CLstoba" scored late in the


Tie


Balboa


WINNING GIRLS


6-6


VOLLEY BALL


TEAM


~~E~s~.1!k rw'.. 'Fc7,a tr',. >rrr -


L. to R. Back: V. Hambleron, R. Wheeler, J. Raymond, N. Magner. J. Holmelin, B. Styles.
L. to R. Front: K. Haywood, H. Hauss, G. Carnright (Capt.), V. Keenan, E. Dixon.


NOTRE DAME WINS
FROM NAVY 18-6

The Notre Dame team bom-
barded and sank Navy in foot-
ball 18-6, on a soggy field. The
rain lasted most of the game,
but both teams made headway
with the slippery ball.
Notre Dame pulled a sleeper
play in the first quarter on the
Navy 10 yd, line. Pucci was on
the receiving end of the pass.
He caught it on the 4 yd. line
and scampered across the final
stripe untouched. The try for
extra point failed, but Notre
Dame was leading 6-0.
Stokes, captain of the Navy
team, broke away in the second
quarter and went 32 yards for a
touchdown. He ran wide around
right end. The conversion failed
so the score remained 6-6.
During the third quarter, both
teams used aerial attacks with
(Continued on page 4)


Varsity

New M


Picks


embers


The C. H. S. Varsity Club held
a meeting on Tuesday, Decem-
ber 5 at 2:15 in the playshed to
pick the Varsity Football Team.
The new members will be in-
itiated into the Varsity Club
some time next week. The team
that was picked is:
Ends .................. Forsman, Pescod
Tackles ................ Greene, Justice
Guards ............ Marohl, Hoffman
Center .................................. Dunlap
Backs ............ Bartron, Wheeler,
Farrell, Willett
The new members are: C.
Forsman, R. Justice, K. Marohl,
G. Hoffman, H. Dunlap, and B.
Bartron.


TWO CONSECUTIVE
WINS 21-15, 21-19
GIVE CHS VICTORY

After twelve years of volley-
ball defeats, Cristobal High
finally emerged victor over Bal-
boa, The Cristobal All-star girls


did it won two
games, 21-15; 21-19.
At the Cristoba]
Saturday December
A.M., Jean Raymo
the ball rolling,
zooming across the
first game. Balboa'


turned
and the
begun.
neck to
points.
scored
putting


consecutive
Playshed,
2, at 9:00
nd started
or rather,
net in the


it with as much force,
struggle for victory was
The two teams played
neck for the first few
Then, Jean Holmelin
five points in a row,
Cristobal decisively in


the lead. From there on, the C.
HS. girls kept up this advant-
age until final victory.
Balboa was out for revenge
in the second game and it
seemed as if they would get it,
too. They led the attack at first,
scoring point after point, while
keeping Cristobal in the back-
ground. The scori was 19-11, In
favor of Balboa, when the Cris-
tobal All-stars took command
of the game. They played vol-
leyball with renewed vigor and
did not permit Balboa another
point for the rest of the game.
Cristobal tallied ten consecutive
points to total the winning
21-19.
Both teams played hard and
well. Jean Holmelin's serving,
Nancy Magner's spikes, Vonna
Hambelton's fine recoveries on
those long-distance outside
balls, Jean Raymond's cross-
corner shots, Virginia Keenan's
overhead serves, Kathryn Hey-
wood's and Georgiana Cam-
right's net-playing, Edith Dix-
on's effortless and noiseless
serves, and the general coopera-
tion of the whole team won this
record-breaking victory.
Only one Cristobal substitute
was used, Rhoda Ann Wheeler.
Balboa's volleyball girls had an
excellent team. They showed
some fine passing and good re-
covery on the low shots. Vera
Howell, Phydellis Walbridge,


Jo"i"E


Bureau of Clubs
and Playgrounds


The most cherished
present for
Christmas
isa
BOOK
Get it from







Page 4


TRADE


WIND


Friday, Doemsbr 493


Athlete Feats

This issue of Athlete Feats
is dedicated to all C. H. S.
players who took part in the
annual boys' football game and
the girls' volleyball game with
Balboa
Georgiana Carnrlght Cap-
tain of the winning C. H. S.
volleyball team.
Edward Wheeler Captain
of Cristobal's Varsity team that
tied Balboa -6.
"Reds" Willett who played
the Quarterback position for C.
H. S.. and did a darned good
job of it.
Rhoda Ann Wheeler The
girl that scored the winning
point of the first game for C.
H. S.
"Bob" Bartron The boy
that outkicked Balboa's best
and kept the Gold Coasters in
the game until they received a
break.
"Reds" Keenan The girl
that scored the winning point
during the second and deciding
game for her school, giving
them the C. Z. Championship.
"Chuck" Forsman The End
that gave Balboa more head-
aches than they bargained for,
by going down under Bartron's
pts_ tp t ep D)boa's safety
ah t retiring under 'way lk
Jean Holmnelin High point
nileybdi. pibyer for C. ES. S

T. Frensley. R Justice, and G.
Hoffman These boys were a
tower of strength for Cristobal
by getting through B. H. S.'s
line to break up all their plays.
J. Raymond, E. Dixon, K.
V. Ham-
i 'Th ia s performed
faultlessly against Balboa's best
Art Farrell The hero of
the football game, scored the
tying touchdown.
Harold Ifunlap Center.
passed the ball on every play,
with unerring, bullet-like ac-


A.

Aderslx, Arthur Randles. Jesse
Byrd, and Buddy Stroop.
The tsote was nidder the
iblt> MisTary Worreli.
art teacher.

FOUR FACULTY MEMBERS
(Conrinued firom Page One)
boa Boat Club dock in time to
catch the returning 5 o'clock
fmrain Mfr ninn Sunday. DP-


GIRLS' BASKETBALL

SEASON BEGINS

WITH NEW TEAMS

Girls' bas etball season start-
ed Tuesday, December 5, in the
Cristobal gymnasium with prac-
tice games. Mrs. E. O'Brien was
in charge of the girls who came
out to play. She is the new sub-
stitute teacher who is taking
Miss Bailey's place in after-
school sports. This year, the girls
will play nine-court basketball
instead of regular basketball.
The teams are:
7Te No. I Tw Ho. 4
Coloi dark blue Color. rusn
G Carighi. cap!. V. Kenan. cap.
J B5ad4ry L. Appin
J Brenna K Goule-
L. Crouch .G Lu el
Jm fern ,o Le
A Fredericks D. Mequard
K. Hreoo Md RMererd
J Holsuclia J. Rzymand
M Lyew P. Roales
D. Price
Tsaw No. 2 Tram No. 5
Coloa. lishr blue Colar veen
G erniz, apt. V. Hsjabeloo. cap.
R Baumbarh B. Fedal
M. Bczen,. D. Hain iWo
C., Claowny 0. Hom enon
F Dvnenpon C lngirn
E Dixon B Koperski
H Hausj E. I Cailleway
R. Randles A Randall
L Suide B Styles
Trs., NL'. D. Yanes
Colc: red Tfn NoM. 6
R. A Wheeler. ap. Cola, noon
F. M. Eldridge N Magncr cat.
M A He-l n M. Andenion I
E Marquard NI Coanidjoc
P McClcar B Green
C. Ninrro E. M. Huf
P. Owald J Peabd
G0 Pucc, M. A Seibald
G. RBhto M Sntde
EJ. Pt pIe A W illiam

STUDENT EXPERIMENTERS- -
(Conrinued from Pas Onci
mountains to collect minerals.


Students in the two
try sections are Peggy
Keith Campbell, Leo
James Cosaraquis, Carl
John Frensley, John
Robert Harris. Mablf
Homer acCarty. Tomn
ness, Charles Pierce.


chemis-
Bailey,
Conley.
Ender,
Gilder,
. Lyew,
McGui-
Marvia


Salmon, Eddie Wheeler, Edward
Marquard, Robert Bartron,
Wayne Nellis, Ruth Randles,
Virginia Naylor. Clyde Ruley,
Marion Snyder, William Peter-
son, Harold Rose, Frank Baxter,
Russell Tidd, Edith Dixon,
Frank Cain. Lorraine Goodwin,
Joe Nitto, Edith Sanders, Al-
gerine Collins. Pat Brown, Do-
rothy Archibald.


Speneer Smith


as student and


NOTRE DAMN WIN' ,
(Continued from p6 3)?
NOtre lalmb hawing ar pdge. D
the laaiC31,cuteBlhear pii^
ing the av easer to'he u
line.
The fourth canto opened with
Navy kicking. Notre Dame block-
ed the punt and recovered it on
the six inch line. Haywood, on
the next play, went through
tackle for the toucbdown. The
score at the end of the quarter
was 12-6 with Navy driving hard
to overcome the lead.
Hoffman, in the closing min-
utes, received the ball and went
through the opposing team
snake-hipping his way 15 yards
to a touchdown, leaving tacklers
in the mud. The conversion fail-
ed. Final score, Notre Dame 18,
Navy 6.


FOOTBALL BOYS- .
(Continued from page 3)
ball around left end, but this
time scored tying the game 6-6.
The try for extra point was
blocked.


Balboa took to the


air after


the Gold Coasters kicked off.
Balboa's left end, Reyes, caught
two passes before Cristobal's
quarterback "Reds" Wllett, ,In-
tercepted a pass on his 15 yd.
line. Willett then showed his 1
brilliant ability as a good field
general by using running plays
until the game ended.
C.H.S. depended mostly o01
Bob Bartron. "Reds" WiUett,
and both the ends. while Seely,I
Rafael. and H. Moore were Bal-1
boa's mainstays. The starting
line-up was:


CBnITOBAI
Pe-nd
JUstu
Frendme
Dunlap
HoHffm
Grene
Fnreman
idllen
FPrrill
Bahriror
Whccler


BALBOA 4t
R. Rteci
C Youne
BuRkle
I. Yount
Stoner
F More
H. Macge
M~chaelsan
McGlrdr
Sctly
Mt-hdre
GrcJr


stockman performs valuable ser-
vice for his classmates..


S1 .


SIAL 'PEP" MET
; ^ (Conridned (rmgaur:T.Dnc)
trip and the singig, of "High
.le r the

Georgiana, .a.,flbu .JfEddi
and another or the a ie
assembly :sang tb" .Ct..
"Beer Barrel SttktW.
whole hearts, ohjepl wi
their voicUltdb .. i....
Willett closedAe ap gsB
giving his "ii:i:H
lead, mancd etlor.


OC.B.S. ALL-STArs. .."lrB
(Contpeinuti n
er n slid around, it he "eW.
boa players wio he .
during the game r .
Mr. Cecil L. Ride itea
game. Miss. r -tor :
and Mr T. fofa weme
Uinesmen. Miss Dil
kept score and Ellis CO
ed the electrical 5
The Cristobal High School
Band pepped things up under
the direction of Mr. 0. N. Jar-
stad, music director.
The C.H.S. All-stars thank the
Women's Club and the Ihacult
for practicing with them *and'
getting their team ready for
this victory. They feel especially
grateful to Mr. Vinton for teach-
ing them his cross-corner plae-
ments.


mrISTOBAL.
Fdih Diron
Vnnna Hambelwon
Karhrvn Herwood
Jean Holmelin

Jean Raymond
Rhoda Ann Whetler
Herrhd Hul s
Bobbie Sryle,


BALBOA
Shuljy Dyer
PecT Brune
Vera Howell
Mary Jane Phillim
Herr Surhlerland


Phydellis Walhridae
Jane Taricns.
Jean Lucy
F.ter Miller
Doris Ourier


Scadron Optical




MAKE SURE YOUR EYES
ARE GOOD.


1 Panama
23 Central Ave.


Colon


newI


urns~ in


our


National Mattress
Factory
OF COLON
Phone 321 10 & G St.


Compliments of


Hotel Washington

Unequalled for Situation
. a


''';' i''''' i"'''''""''''' "~;;; I ii iq~
IEE": I~E: if
I""": i~EE: Ej~ IEE, :BEE,,6EEEBI


.


i













CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.


Friday, December 15, 1939


peciaI Assembly
Features Three
Guest Artists

A pre-Christmas surprise as-
sembly was held Tuesday, the
fbuthth fpriod. in the audito-
rium.
"Caliph of Bagdad", taken
from the background of a light
alan opera, about 1800, was
played by the High School Or-
O l.unTder the direction of
r.O, E. Jorstad.
Doctor Howard. with all the
egfro accents he could muster,
read "How Come ChrisLmas", a
llikdmg Negro Christmas story
by Roarke Bradford By the ap-
plause of the assembly, it was
rollicking and very enjoyable.
The guest artists on the pro-
gram were Mr. Warner Goldman
and Mr. Heinz Heilborn from
Bresla, Germany. Mr. Goldman,
playing the violin and Mr. Heil-
born, playing the accordion, ren-


dered mu
The two
at the tlme
ly at thi
Mr. Goi
born play
duets, whi


si ca 1 entertainment
in Europe.
talented artists are,
i, playing music night-
e Carlton Hotel, in
dman and Mr. Hell-
red several beautiful
ch were "Tales from


the Vienna Woods" by Johann
Strauas, Jocelyn's "Berceuse,"
and Mr. Goldman played a vio-
lin solo "Sarabondi" by Bohm,
accompanied by Mr. Heilborn at
the piano. Mr. Heilborn also gave
an accordion solo entitled "Czar-
las" by Meyer. As an encore,
the artists played a tango, "Se-
renade In the Night" with which
we are all failar.

Christmas Pageant

To Be Broadcasted
Over Local Stations

CHS will be on the air! Plans
awe been. made to broadcast
the annual Christmas pageant,
December 21,. over our local ra-
dio stations, HP5K and HOK of
SOb:l, Reptublic of Panama.
Appro mately 220 students of
both the and Senior


Second and Third Period Biology


N, Magne
M. Seibold
D. Marquard
H. Hauss


F. Enriquez C. Brennen M. Messer
J, Furey T. Frensley R. Murphy
V. Keenao E. Ingran J Crandall
P. Butler M. Mctzger M. Brain


Biology Classes Dissect Many


Animals


Laboratory


"Yum! Yum! I like 'em alive,
fur and all," said beaming boa
as he gulped another bat into
his tLr eat ordinary fresh meat, so
they have live food. Small vam-
pire bats are caught by Mr.
Vinton and a group of boys
about a mile away in the jun-
gles.
One of these small bats is put
into a snake's cage at meal-
time. The snake lies motionless
until its victim is within a few
inches of his head. Then with
lightning-like speed, it strikes,
twines its body around the strug-
gling bat, and squeezes the life
out of it. Then, the meal be-
gins. Letting its strangled vic-


Tropical
Brings


O3


Hurricane
dd Sea-Life


Much strange life was found
In the sea-weed that was blown
nnnnw thai ht~afrnh lael 17nofr mnp


Plants,


Experiments


tim loose, the snake twists and
turns the bat, then unhinges its
elastic mouth to swallow the bat
head first. It is an amazing
sight to watch the bat go down
the snake's thin neck. You can
see where the bones in the bat's
wings stick out and present a
very peculiar bulging sight in
the snake's anatomy.
One of the favorite boas is
Oscar. He likes nothing better
than to twist himself around a
student's arm or neck, in a
friendly manner, of course, to
absorb personal warmth.
In a private, segregated cage
is another boa ten feet long.
Students show great interest in
(Continued on Pae 4)
Arthur Randles Gets
Wood Carving Honors
"Oh's!" and "ah's!" have been
very frequent lately as students
pass by the museum displays of


J, Fernandz
G, Hoffman
L. Martin
Mr. K. Vinton. instructor


MRS. SPENCER IS
HOSTESS FOR LA
PAS CLUB SUPPER
Mrs. Phyllis Spencer sponsor-
ed a delightful buffet supper in
the cafeteria, Friday evening at
six o'clock, in honor of the old
members of the Spanish Club,
La PAS
After supper, a short informal
meeting was held to discuss the
year's program. The Spanish
Club plans to have its first for-
mal meeting in early January,
when new members will be in-
itiated into the club. A Valen-
tine costume party, a Bombero
Concert, and a Spanish play are
the highlights of the year,
crowned with a dance at La
Bomba, the roof of the Colon
(Continued on Page 4)

Photo Club Meets;
Officers Selected
At the recent meeting of the
T& .4..- ,-fl-1-t T - J - ___ __


Patrr~z
'a.Tr.-Jig~u


Advertise
Xmas
Pageant
a






Page 2


TRADE


WIND


Friday, Depember 15, 1939


First and Second Period Biology


Published by the Journaism Class of
Cristobl High School, Cristobal, C. Z.
Edoitr-in-chief Dorothy Anderson
Asistant Editor Jean Badgley.
News Editor Byne Bunting
Copy Reader Dorothy Brennan.
Business and Circulation Masnager Paul
Gorin.
Social Sarah Casey.
Sports Richard Egolf, Jean Badgley.
Exchange Editor Shirley Jennings.
Special Writers Mary Haruman, Rose
Margaret Stroop, John Herman, Georgeanna
Krause, Stanford Skinner. Betsy MacMillan.
Sponsor Mr. P. J. Evancoe.
Policy: To INTEREST STUDENTS IN
STUDENT ACTIVITY.


Spirit of Giving

With Christmas just around
the corner, everyone's thoughts
turn to the subject of gifts. Most
students are wondering what
they will receive instead of what
they will give. This attitude is
entirely wrong. It is much bet-
ter "to give than to receive."
If we follow this rule we will
get much more out of Christmas
and will be far happier.
Realizing that most of us are
financially limited, we still can
give of those finer things, far
more valuable than money. We
should bear in mind what Emer-
son said in his essay on "Gifts",
"The gift, to be true, must be
the flowing of the giver unto
me, correspondent to my flow-
ing unto him." Emerson also
maintained that "The only gift
is a portion of thyself." Both of
these prove the point that "the
gift without the giver is bare."
Emerson said to let love guide
you in selecting your gifts. If
you do this you will surely ob-
serve Christmas with the true
spirit.

Some Folks

Some folks are like raindrops
They're all wet thru and thru
And others are like hat-bands
Light and narrow too.

Some folks are like lolly-pops
Or "suckers" as you like,
And some folks are like alley-
cats
Because they prowl at night,

Some folks are like street cars
They always have a line
And some folks are like Mary's
lamb
They always lag behind.

Some folks are like golf balls
They're always in the hole.
And some folks are like ice cream
Always freezing cold.


K. Justice J. Bergmn E, Stapf A. Enriquez
A, Presler R, French A. Palmer W. Reeves
W. Stroop K. Huon E. Appin W. Lowe
L. Bergman M. Considine G. Buder F. Hooper


Continental


News


Here are some real daffyni-
tions taken from the Bear Facts
of the Galdewater High School
paper:
Winter-summer with a cold.
Dentist-a man who bores you
to tears.
Worm--caterpillar with a shave.
Dent-a bump inside out.
Popcorn-corn gone crazy with
the heat.
Codoanut-person crazy about
cocoa.
Dog-when it's hot you eat it;
when it's cold, it barks.
Butter-a goat.
Sing-Sing-a duet.
* *


Tamalpais News comes
with this:
"Name?" queried the


forth

immi-


gration official.
"Sneeze," replied the Chinese
proudly.
The official looked hard at
him. "Is that your Chinese
name?" he asked.
"No. 'Melican name," said the
oriental blandly.


"Then let's have your native
name."
"Ah Choo."

Vallejo High School was well
represented at the Press con-
ference of Central California
Scholastic Press Association at
Stanford College. Their paper


SChatter-Box

Three blind mice,
See how they run.
They all ran after the farmer's
wife-
The rats!

Did you hear that George Mc-
Lain thought that a mushroom
was a place to make love?

Bare feet and bow ties! What
a combination. Oh well,-there's
nothing like originality when it
comes to the Boy's Varsity.

M. Odem: How do you S11l
charity?
K. Campbell: R-E-D C-R-O-S-S.
S* *t


There is a
longer seen in
Know who it is'
S.


smiling face no
the cafeteria?
?
* *


Versatile


Those Little Things


Students had better start being
real good.
Helping by doing all things that
they should;
Wash all the dishes and make
Mamma glad
To have you around her, or else,
you'll be sad

Bring Dad his slippers when het
tired out
You'll be rewarded for that, -
there's no doubt.
Polish the car and help Mbm
with the work
Christmas is coming, so better
not shirk.


Movies


Who


"Spose" you're all acquainted * *
with the royal order of F. O. 0. The Wizard of Oz-Mr. Rice.
L.'s. Appropriate as the name is, Man About Town--Joe Nitto.
it seems a funny thing that they The Women-H. H. A. Classes
publicize the fact. How about it? Dust Be My Destiny-Paul Gorin.


From the Paseo Press, Paseo
High comes this true march of
time:
Freshman: Mother, may I go
out? What time shall I come
in?
Sophomore: Mother, may I go
out?


posed to digest the articles and
give a live report upon his sub-
ject.


A bachelor is a boy who didn't
have a car when he was in high
school.
-a k


E. Eder
D. Hallowell
LM. Iesscr
Mr. K. Vinton. instunror


Verses






Friday, December 15, 1939


Athlete


Feats


The football teams have com-
pleted, their long schedule and
Fordham, led by Captain Harold
"Reds" Wilett, has emerged vic-
torious.
A team of Cristobal boys play-
ed a squad from Balboa on Sat-
urday,m water polo. Balboa won
only aftet playing 20 minutes of
the regular lime plus twenty
seconds. At the end of this time
the score was tied and the teams
agreed to play three minutes
more. So in this time Balboa
scored two points to win the
battle.

FORDHAM DEFEATS

CONNIE TECH 6-0

The strong right arm of Ha-
rold "Rosie" Rose, Fordham's
blocking back, helped defeat
Connie Tech 6-0. The game was
played at the Point on Wednes-
day, December 6.
With less than a minute to
go, the lad faded back to his
own 45 yd. line, wriggled away
from two tacklers and uncorked
a mighty heave into Joe Nitto's
arms on the opponents' 35 yd.
line. Joe eluded several would-
be tacklers and out-ran Connie
Tech's safety-man for the win-
ning point of the game. The try
for extra point failed, leaving
the score 6-0.
All afternoon, the teams had
alternated with long punts,
waiting for a fumble. Connie
Tech took the ball down to
Fordham's 18 yd. line, but the
opponents held for downs. After
two line plays had failed, Lee
"Man-mountain" Doyle pulled a
sleeper play with Captain "Reds"
Willett and went 52 yards be-
fore Ed Wheeler touched him
from behind. Connie Tech in-
tercepted a pass to stop Ford-
ham until the latter scored the
last minute touchdown.


Trojans Move
Connie Tech


Up As
Falls


The strong Trojan team mov-
ed into third place when they
defeated Connie Tech, 14-6
pushing the Tech team into a
tie for last place with Navy.
The game was played on Tues-
day, December 5, at the Point.
The Trojans, captained by
Ralph Justice, scored all their
points in the first quarter when
Justice ran wide around the left
end for the first touchdown.
Then he completed a pass to


TRADE


WIND


-U'
.14
-J


Fordham, Connie Tech C.H.S. SWIMMERS

Battle To Scoreless WILL COMPETE IN

Deadlock, November 6 WASHINGTON POOL


Fordham and Connie Tech
battled to a scoreless tie Wed-
nesday, November 6. Fordham,
in the first quarter, tried hard
to score, Nitto ran the ball to
the 25 yd. line for a first down.
Two plays later, Palmer failed
to get the pass thrown to him
in the end zone. After the next
play, Connie Tech took over and
kicked out of trouble.
In the second quarter, Fors-
man caught a pass and went 10
yds. for a first down. On the
same play, Fordham was pena-
lized 15 yds. for holding. Three
plays later, Wheeler ran the ball
for the third first down of the
second quarter. Fordham then
settled down and held them,
later taking the ball on the 22-
yd. stripe. Willett punted the
ball 48 yds. into Connie Tech's
territory. The quarter ended
with both teams struggling in
mid-field with neither making
any headway.
In the third and fourth quart-
ers, both teams featured punts,
each waiting for a lucky break.
The game ended before either
one got a chance to make a
score.

Navy Downs Connie

Tech In Last Game


Season Standings
Team G. W. L.
Fordham 8 6 2
Trojans 8 5.5 2.5
Notre Dame 8 4.5 3.5
Navy 8 2.5 5.5
Connie Tech 8 1.5 6.5


An inspired Navy team drove
through rain and mud on Mon-
day, December 11, to outclass
Connie Tech, 13-0, in the last
game of the current season.
The contest played Navy in
fourth place, while Connie Tech
gained undisputed possession of
the cellar.
Navy scored in the first quart-
er after Harold "Lobo" Dunlap
intercepted a Connie Tech pass
to put the ball on Tech's 1 yd.
line. Dunlap then circled left
end for the touchdown. Harold
completed a pass to Edward
Eder for the point, thus making
4. t. nn -n IT fl e4'.. a, .* C IT .


All students are urged to en-
ter swimming events to qualify
for permanent records and spe-
cial honors in the swim meet
published below to be held at
the Hotel Washington, Friday,
December 22 under the super-
vision of Mr. Neff and Mr. Pet-
tingill.
1.-50O ydJ free scyle boys. Junior High.
2.-50 yd. free style girls Junior High.
3-o50 yd. free style boys Senior High.
4,--50 yd free style girls Senior High.
5.-50 yd. breast stroke boys Junior High.
6.-50 yd, breasE stroke girls Junior High.
7.--o0 yd. breast stroke boys Senior Hgh.
8.-100 yd. breast stroke girls Senior High.
9.-50 yd. back stroke boys Junior High.
10.-50 yd, back stroke girls Junior Hi.h.
11.-100 yd back stroke boys Senior High.
12.-100 yd. back stroke girls Senior High.
13.-o100 yd free style boys Senior High.
14.-100 yd. free style girls Senior High.
15.-Medley relay 90 yd. boys Junior High
(3 to a team 1. back stroke; 2. breast
stroke; 3. free stle) i
16--Medle ay relay 90 is Junior Hya
(3 to a team 1. back stroke; 2. breast
stroke; 3. free style)-
17-Medley relay 90 yd. boys Senior High
(3 to a ream. 1. back stroke; 2. breast
stroke; 3. free style).
18.-Medley relsy 90 yd. girls Senior High
(3 to a team 1. back utoke; 2. breast
stroke; 3. free style).
19.-Fancy diving Junior High boys and


girls, Required dives: Plain front, plain
back, and front jack, and three optional
dives.
20.-Fancy diving Senior High boys and
girls. Three required and four optional.
The three required dives are: plain front,


back jack,


Lee
water
Texas,
Nation
mer a


and plain jack.


Whittington of the Glade-
High School, Gladewater,
won $25 at the Lions'
lal Convention last sum-
Lnd a trip to Cuba next


Pet. summer as a baton champion.
.775 -The Bear Facts
.688 --
.563 Harold scored, changing it to
.313 13-0 with Navy ahead. The try
.188 for point failed as the horn blew
__ 1 Jl _ -


ending the game.


I


"RCA---Victor


Radio"


"The Only Radio For The
Tropics"

Be Sure and Get
a Demonstration

AT THE

"Radio Center"


Page 3


J. Nitto, C. Brennan

Score Touchdowns As

Fordham Wins League

Fordham occupied second
place for the most part of the
current season, then swamped
the first-place Notre Dame team,
by the score of 12-0, thereby
clinching the 1939 intra-mural
touch-football league. The game
was played at the Point, Thurs-
day, December 7.
These two teams have strug-
gled all season for the leader-
ship of the league. This issue
was not decided until Joe Nitto
and Charles Brennan s c o r e d
touchdowns in the first and sec-
ond quarters, respectively.
Joe's touchdown came soon
after the kick-off, on a plunge
through the right side of the
line. Nitto shook himself loose
for his touchdown-run from his
own 45 yd. line, and out-ran
Johnny Haywood, Notre Dame's
safety-man.
Brennan's touchdown came in
the middle of the second quart-
er when captain Harold "Reds"
Willett kicked from his 48 yard
line. Brennan went down under
the kick. When the ball rolled
away from captain Jimmy Pes-
cod, Notre Dame's safety-man,
Brennan recovered it in the
other team's end-zone, scoring
six points for Fordham.
Notre Dame did get into scor,-
ing territory, when John Pucci,
their right end, pulled a sleeper
play with Haywood that was
good for 35 yards, but they could
not score, the game ending 12-0
in favor of Fordham.


SI I


Bureau


Clubs


and Playgrounds

Richard Greene
in
HERE I AM A STRANGER

CRISTOBAL
SUN-MON


National Mattress
Factory
OF COLON
Phone 321 10 & G St.







sae 4 TRADE


WIND


Friday,December 15, 199


WARMTH

The American ship "Henry
M. Stanton", moved slowly
through the thickening fog. At
Intervals, regularly timed, her
deep-throated fog horn blared
Into the murky night. It seem-
ed to echo and re-echo against
the smothering curtain about
the ship.
In the wheelhouse the qua-
termaster wearily gripped the
spokes of the wheel, and blink-
ed into the lighted binnacle. A
dim shadow on the starboard
bridge wing indicated the pre-
sence of Michael Halloran, third
mate of the "Stanton". Michael
Halloran was a young mailn,
newly out of the training school
of the Bureau of Navigation.
The third mate's berth on the
"Stanton" was his first deep-
water trip. It was a good deal
different out at sea in a pea
soup fog and the intense cold of
the North Atlantic compared to
the comfort and safety of the
training ship, which was moor-
ed at the cadet's pier, nine
months out of the year.
Out on the bridge wing, the
shadow came to life, and mov-
ed rapidly toward the wheel-
house. Briskly opening the
wheelhouse door, the mate step-
ped inside. He turned and clos-
ed the door immediately, for it
was intensely cold outside.
Halloran was heavily clothed,
and his face was ruddy from
the frosty air. He drew off his
mittens and rubbed his face
with his nubbed hands.
He glanced into the binnacle
at the compass, hanging in
gimbals. It rolled slowly, front
side to side, with the motion
of the ship.
The young mate thought of
his father, who was perhaps
not far from the position of
the "Stanton". His father was
captain of a small fishing
smack, and it was to his father
that Michael Halloran owed his
having gone through a govern-
ment training school instead of
having to work up from a sea-
man. They were nearing the
American coast, at a point not
far north of the fishing grounds.
Halloran strode into the chart-
room, adjoining the wheelhouse,
and made a pretense of study-
ing the charts. In reality he
was trying to get warm. He
should have been back on the
bridge wine listening for the


After what seemed to him a
short time, he resumed his sta-
tion on the bridge wing. The
patent ftog horn of the "Stan-
ton" sounded into the night.
After a short time, Halloran
became aware of a ringing
sound. Was it in his ears? Sud-
denly it dawned on him. It was
the warning signal used by fish-
ing boats in a fog. Almost as
quickly as he realized this, a
cry came from the bows of the
"Stanton" where the watch was
made up of two seamen.
"Fishing schooner! Dead
ahead!"
The mate's eyes perceived the
grey shadow of the schooner's
mains'l. He umped to the en-
gine-room telegraphed and sig-
nalled: "Stop engines".
The throb of the engines
ceased, and the ship lost way
rapidly. The mate bolted


through
the spa
the hel
hard o
The
closely
having
of the
wheelhi
set foo
there
against
ered th
The
fast. rF


t the 4
ikes of
msman
ver.


door, and seizing
the wheel, he and
threw the wheel


mate of the "Stanton".
followed by the captain
been roused by the cries
lookout plunged into the
house. Hardly had they
it on the bridge when
was a sound of steel
wood, and a jolt shiv-
re hull of the "Stanton".
fishing schooner sank
ew of its crew had time


to leap into the icy seas in the
hopes of being picked up by the
freighter.
When the last survivor of the
fishing vessel was aboard the
"Stanton", an account of the
men was taken by the mate of
the sunken vessel.
"How many are missing?" in-
quired the captain of the
"Stanton".
"Two deck hands, the cooK
and Captain Halloran, sir," re-
turned the mate of the sunken
vessel.
James Walsh


With her cheek against my
shoulder,
Here she is and here I am;
Easy could my arms enfold her
Lovers? No, a subway jam.
-The Tiger


BIOLOGY CLASSES DISSECT
MANY MWL& S, ANIMAlS
LABORATORY EERMENT
(Continued from Pa One)
watching Mr. Vinton feed this
big snake. Liking live rabbits,
rats, guinea pigs, chickens, or
other delicious rarebits, lacking
these, this large boa is force-
fully fed chunks of raw meat
by Mr. Vinton. He has to pry
open the snake's mouth, put the
meat in, and then force it down
with a sort of ram, Last year,
this snake had 42 young dnes.
Recently, students found some
eggs for the praying mantis.
Great interest has been found
in watching the eggs hatch.
Under a microscope, these small
insects appear with hammer-
like heads and are a rather
transparent green when newly
hatched. When three inches
long, they become a green grass
color. The name "praying" fits
it well because its fore arms or
legs are held in a prayer-like
position.
Smoky, C. H. S.'s famous
jungle frog, has been tn the
Biology Laboratory four years.
A very long article with many
pictures was published in the
National Geographic Magazine
of May, 1938. It concerned
Smoky's 48 hour meal of a snake.
The biology laboratory this
year has 18 new microscopes for
student use, as well as one new
set of binoculars. For study, the
students often use slides, for
these Mr. Vinton has a micro-
scopic projector and stereop-
ticon.
Sophomores predominate in
this interesting study, although
there are a few juniors. There
are about 47 students in the two
classes.
Each year, students of the
Biology classes are required to
have special projects. Many stu-
dents delight in making valuable
collections.
One of the most interesting
and unique projects is that of
Jimmy Fernandez. He finds
great interest in testing tropical
poisons. For testing purposes, he
uses bats. One of his recent ex-
periments was to extract the
sap of the ordinary oleander
and inject it into a bat. The
victim died within three min-
utes. He is testing many plants
and their effects in the same
manner.


MRS. SPENCER IS HOSTESS
FOR L PAS CLUB SUPPER
(Condned m Page One)
Fire Station.
Those who attended the aeet-
Ing were:
Mr. Cecil L. Rice, with Norma
Jean and Robert Rice; I. John
R. Hammond; the Mi:s D-
rothy Anderson, Marjorie Gild-
er, Peggy McCleary, JeanB
gley, Alice Mclvaine, Era
Doyle, Evelyn ShirleyP
Rosales, Opal
Hunt, Gioconda Puci,
Marie Eldridge; and the M
Gilbert Chase, Jerry C1oe, Ro-
bert Harris, Neil ?gnerj, and
William Peterson.
TROPICAL HUI f
BRINGS ODD -I
(Conaonued froma e
three inches long weretn
the weeds, too, it
known whether they
local or distant h
The Sargaso Sea is alm
mid-way between here and Af-
rica. Its length and density ae
dependent on the wind and
ocean currents. The zat is
known as the Gulf Weed and is
recognized by the small ber-
like bulbs which float it In the
water. This particular weed a-
rival probably took six moths
on its journey here.
Biology is one of the most a-
teresting subjects offered to C.
H. S. students. It is very d1-
ferent and often proves very
profitable.


our flew


XMAS

SPECIAL

At

Finlayson s

Studio

Front St. Colon, B. P.


Compliments


THEATRE


Hotel Washington

Unequalled for Situation
.- S.. f__J


OtT


W




















2 I~39


hostesses


ovel tidbits, musm, delight-
nversations and visits fea-
the Christmas t.ea, the hrst
success of Miss Griffin's
hold Arts classes.
Tuesday afternoon at 3.15.,
e school cafeteria, guests


began arriving
the receiving


guests


greeted


were escorted


musicians und
of Franklin


are: isv
Franklin


~rsiquez-FI


Metzger -. Fi
Magner-Cello;


"Valse",


"Chanson


were dis-

the string
of high]
er the di- I
Enriquez.
orchestra
le-piano;
rst violin;
iLohn: Billy
* -.-, "-- .


arjean Metz-
y Gregory -

played were
Herald WalLz".
Trisle".


praise-


way for three weeks.
( Cauinued on Paue 4'


Proposition:-
bananas?


Given


Facts:-


Do snakes

1. Snakes


in Panama.
2. Sometimes
nana trees.


3. Snakes


can open their
enough to swallow


pl r C' f0
i'U] [ -L r '


':1 'rrli ~


Pr Y)~rar'


1',1 the Cris-


'rn De-


[*.'i..;l H .2_n Fi h.l .,: I 'n 1
cenibr 2"I I 3. P Il T


*'rn U'w3. uijinder the d'rfetion


1Mr O .C Jor tld
n.3: 3- : I c -flo-


p r02 r A i


U r CC'nw


-I 2a~.


Quartet


2 ?ac 'n i.


Schooli


nIlla


Candle I
HI"h School


Sbi Go)u-
Orclhestra


hr Pro.'D e..on
Girls' Glee C


3 "It Came Upon


ias wrrr Ipoper t r,


bomJge


to Chbnrm,
'C o0 i, 70


Jf


Ct i .) 1'.I ;'c.:r .Jth-r III


li'e dvil


util. It.ie b.i';


Jeiri.


.


J/o us hr J'c.'s i/j ,t- ,,I
0o A' the :tc.i:hiies .ii2/1


Ft "h/i


pe~rional I.
/Or'. lr 4IL
e'u lr'lnIIt;


lUS I1


rt r'er'iatc


Iro cv f/e pmr
1ovIjcr' ucu r e
rlrp.ecpe


Ol.r a "i. gf:ffl


II t ',z


SIl' t


IL ifleS 1'.'t
1 o,,ir go.
thi! glJid,
i',ir (clljiA


He ih'h'o


another e; u as I .,t c lo ed


Doi juno wbejsl .1
obr/xi do iaor, )en.
No of/icr r ernst


)e


l~ LJII.t


cn:.A~i


n~clr FI)


.:tleitr t/ .E li';of


v. 'ouJ'


#ri lie, i


:t'o thi,'u


time shall I call for
y I have this dance'
'ou like a gingerale9
I open the car door.


year


given


Association,
idea of the


dance


to assume


n-n an I *


*k^ n k, n rut i' n a


.:. JilJ t.I.C*l I
-^ I'11,# {I'.'rft' I


di ~Cr~it 4ir
'xt/ ,It


'a1Pp


/,.-.' rip
I. *.


1.jp/ rJ,:,.J
.,z/lg,,J.:C


'!,r


*,", Clear"
a.: buned


flUl PJU


t ir,!L .an:..d!at


wirh descant.
iarls' Glee


4 Can:itque de
or Hilh School


Noel"
MXIE dC


are Rir!mnen


MIxr'd


5l c'V~Cl I i 1. .2! bIb


I iLIII,


:.',kt i/ti,


6, rr"~ I/,,


IJn.E- fJ'r


,r/f I, l fie 'l '/r


La


' r iT rt
P1 tne r/ f


'h id., ll u I n te


Obr a/tar;l'


?fl!'II tf de.


u i. )


rl':


throng6.' id I


ot telloz ,/oP.


IlIIii' jt


S)ffI't" j I ril ofj


"Jarrlt


pine! Jill


CECIL RICE.


operetta


three


presented


ber 1
School


reacted b
dialogue
Claude
School
ctq'i nn 1


acts by Treharne.


FPriday
by Lhe


in the


was


night. Decenm-


CHS auditor
I scores were
O E Jorstad.


Aycock, Ji
Spanish t
htti \Vr Dnill


1 b f1 1


by M Iss
Hign


Litt
' l rl


ChoruLs.
6. Chrittma


Lanced


rus


M I:ed


- Solo


Chorus
Again


High School


r Lullaby" Ad-
Hi,:h School Cho-
sung by Georgia


"Today There is
- 'Now The Day is
Combined Elementary
vanced MiLxed High
Choruses.
8 Christmas Table


Carols


Ringing"
Over" -
and Ad-
School


accompanied


by combined


choruses


asSembl,' by,' HiTh School
Schestra


Ii "0 Come


All Ye Faithiul"


Kin gs


of Orient


Are"


S41


Angels


15. 'Silent


orchestra.
I "Ornj.=l :;? ..o


each


Plre i


pr,-iects


C. z.


-a m l-


~____





r:l i;fb.ll


I r'


I illi ii) Hi".'


..


r~l;ll


prolehrr~~l~


5. 1


I I


I


f


I




,B "::~v>
,,1,,Ca9 <"::,U ;::


rage 4


TRADE


TWIND


Friday Dec


22 1939.


Barnyard


Distress


Accidents n
the afternoon
The smells 1
fully strong!
cackled, no d


Sill happen, even
of December 13.
were there. PQwer -
aut no chickens


lucks


horses neighed, nor
moo. No! Nothing
of the barnyard


103 except
About t


quacked, no
did any cows
characteristic


around


the smell.
his time,


room


Whew!


were mixing some odorless


quids.


The acidental scent drift-


ed to them


as they


ing their odorless
gether.


"Is this smell


didn't
seconds
wrong?
Then,
stank!


smell


were pour-
liquids to-


ours?
s way


Gosh, it
a few


ago! Did we mix things


Oh, Mr.


Vin-ton! '"


the awful


truth!


Even your best friends


will tell you Bob Harris, who
is being broken in by Spencer
Smith for his job next year as


stock-room manager,


was wan-


during around in the stock-room


CHREISAS MUSIC


SINGING


FEATURED


TAEBflEX


BYr VHs
I2XCli nr


carol through once unaccompa-


nied by
joined
singing
C1+?S 'm t t:d/
smg i*- i gf


singin g,
the glee


The audience
clubs, in the


of the carols.


The hlalowin~
proglw~n: 0 Anddl
nutclj C, C~wrih
Lirr, J. DnkF


Adnlrnai


Badet, Li
i. Foulkts,
bEolwn U


Magnet.
C Niuo,
G, Rubir


WYrhcreder


:tsOt~~, iB. I,%ath. Ben
E, (lhalSe 1$v~f, Dn*,t
NI. Elrdadc, 3, Fan, t
le, it, Hann, 0, W~rt
KelkcM'Lcr, MJrw A. Me


C, Nlarcusc rir, V, NI1, i
4, DP~i~S),aPrdsh, 0X, Prce N, 5t
1cX ~dE, Stade, i, StarCSr
rre. S. ifliams 0, Wolf,' o
G FirW (Ate Club~ A. Wdiiamsrra


M. Anderron. L Appin. M Br-
t.wo, J, Brneor, G. Butler. P.
1. Callow. M. Considine, B
B Greene, H. Hlausrs V Hamm-
HlnL EN, .M Hewi H, Hicks,
lin K Hun, G: Ingram, V.


Mt, Kjing B, Kopteeski A. LiEm
L. Marto, D. Marquard, M, Me'
R, Palmer, A. Randoll. P, Ros
, A, M. Storm, A. Ulseth. R,
of the Elemenouar Glee Club:


Aa^ntoos, D. Colti
J. Furcy. G. Glae
W, Griffin, D.
Kerr, T, LIwsonj
J, Mcllvaine, W.
Nesbit, B Fark.er.


ns, C, Brennan A
t R. Grabhorn. D.
Hendrick,. E. Ingr


E. Lee.


A. tim,


W. Lowe,


MetzgerI, A. Nuschetc,
H, Pescod. Ptteers


Rel, B. Str-oor of the Boys Elementary Glee
Club; 1. Atria F. Cain, A. Carries, L. Doyle.
A. nriquez, G. Hermrn, F, Enriquez, W.
Krusman, K. Marohl, H. McCarthy, J. M-
Gann, T. McGuinnes B. Murphy. F. Scott.
S, Skinner, E, Walsh+ E, Wheeler, R. Jd,
tie, of rte Advanced Boys' Glee Club and


when he picked up a bottle of E. J. Doyle. F. Enriquez. B. Facdol, Judith
Cf^'wr0r3rv , ^t-f te K ~ Jperrif Thomas Gregory, Herha IHaus; Donald
COH COOH, in other words bu- Hendricks Frank Hooper, Virginit Keenan,
tyric acid. Spencer accidentally Gcorgiana Krause, Tad Lawson, Nancy Mbag
bumped Bob Crash! Sizzles! Nl agne Marjeen eager William
bumped Bo. Crash! SiZzles! Nsbil. Bobby Parker. Harold Rose,. Gladys


What smells! The two girl expe-


rimenters


thinking


mixed the awful smelling stuff
ran out of the room and refused
to come back.
Without calling for the emer-
gency de-contamination squads,


the laboratory


was


restored


later to its original scentful at-
mosphere and learning now goes
on.


HOUSEHOLD ARTS
GIRLS GIVE FIRST
TEA, DECEMBER 19

(Condtned from Page One)

cooking and baking began Mon-


morning


during


Rub jo,


M~rvin


alinoi


Thomas Stewart, Robert


of the High School orchestra,


Those raking


t. Sutnford Skinner,
Williams, John Miller


i the tableaux


Angel,:
Ruth Bozeman, Ellen Senay, Jean O'Hayer,
Mary Pierce. Susie Fahnstock. Peggy Getnyo,
Erika Zitzewitz, Mary Farnshorth, Melida Ho
ward, Norma Jean Finley.
SShepb rd:
Robert Marquad. Jack Reilly, Gerald Stroop,
Dwight Gadberry, Herschel Hamrnic, M lini
Cilpcepper


itobrtr itice


Mary-Mary White
Joseph-Elmer Brown
Directed by Mrs. R. H. Wiles.


TOYMAKER
BY JUNIOR


GIVEN
HIGH


Pat Connerly.


MERITS OVATION
(Continued from Page One)

Emperor finally bestows his
daughter's hand upon the Toy-


regular maker,


'Household Arts periods.
Miss Griffin planned the foods


and beverages
classes prepare
exclamations a


but ha
them.
Innouncei


Excited


thel


various cooking and baking sue-
cesses.
With the singing of Christmas
carols, the social tea terminated.


ever after,
Roger a


and they


Wa r-l'Polo


Schedule


The lnV -P':'I L,:.1
dule ha b,.': 1, 'i, .1 e


Pettingill


'cli


i b


L'crr- !iIj.. I I 6


team will play nine games m
ing its opponents three th
The schedule is:


dOAYDAT
Tures Dec.


T"f r


4rtlitr itr


t93--


i,.' ,


Turcs, Dec. 2G-ti vt 3-22130 r
'Cues, Ott. '26-2 ttr 4-3:00 ; Hr
~& D&, 9- 3 tt, 4-1:00C pt II
%un Jn,2-~2 vsr 3-:0
mes Ja~ -rI vs. 4-4:00 r~1;
Fri. Jnt 5-1 vs.3-:30 ,
Fri. In 5-22 v aV4tl Cl t..)11" ~
tIesr, Jan. 3\rc 9-r3Up vi .-40p
Tiler si, 3~.9iIr vs 2- 00
FTi a5, J2- an. IG---2 4-i3 pin
Tures. Jn, 16-12 vs 3400.m
Fri. jan, 19--1 vs. 2-3:30 p, ni.
fri. Jan. 19)-3 vs. 4-4:00B p, in
SATURlDAY F;EBRUARY 10, 194i0--
Clria~ vs. lazbc atr~ Cristabalr
SATURDAY FFA3IWARY 17,, 1940-
Cristobal vs. 13i.lboa n Thilboa.


SATURDAY FEiDRUAR


METAL


24, I190-


Balboa (Place to he decided )
Stokes, C apami
P chet ,Captaina
Wheeler, Captain
McGaton Captan.


WOOD


SHOPS


TO SHOW PROJECTS
IConrinued trom Nge ne)


given
the


t-11 .
11"


LEAP YEAR DANCE TO
BE GIVEN JAN. 6 BY
STL'DEN 1' ASSOCIATION

hI ii r:. l ir rhear .snrti as."

the mie :y f':'r ther e .-sentials.


\ h' hat tn ti |p' el .soi '.**ill


'I h ir. rri~ ~ii I


: .m:c


teel like


c) brig bor


hei pa l!'ei :Will prrnbably be one
CIT'i of en l 'Tr j i fillU
rn Iit if ijl:eI'l Li the proper


Nt '11 1,"I v.di t1 his reversed


p~lni bie


r irlile oUt during the


,ainie bLi[ al.-o the ".'eek be-
i:I,' The r iris will be expected


perform


acts t.ha
,oried tl o


dropped


all thi chivalrous


the boys have been


Sdo. for inst:
on of water


dance, the
at the


picking up carelessly


books


standing


when


a boy enters the room. and ol-


fer him her sea,"


b3ate f


courtesies

There will be a separate meet-
ing for the boys and one Qr.
the girls Tuesday,. January sec-
ond where the activity of the
week .'.'ll be discussed Mr. Rice.
Bobby Fernandez, and Eddie
Wheeler alil be in charge of
the girls' meeting. Mr Holt and
R A Wheeler will be in charge
of the boys' meeting.


as presents to people in c'OMMTr-t


respective


homes.


These fieceracina


projects are:
Twin Beds .......................... ........ L .eeser
Fruit Bowl, Coffee Table .............. R Davis
Cocktail Tables ......................... H+ Dumlap
Boat s,, .................................... R. Willi s
Table ,,,. .......................... ..l ..*...... T E gger
End Table ............................... A. Par
Cabinet ................................... E, GrenG
Table ..................................... W+ Kranusma
Sanding Cabinet End Table ........ R. Murphy
Carved Table La p .................... A, ndle


Bedside Table


Strain


Mary H. "What does the little
train say besides toot toot and
chbo ehoo?"


Paul G. "Well gosh


I don't


know."
Mary H. "Pitch a little, -itch


happily a little


as the saying goes.


nd Ada Lee,


whom


we have already had the plea-


sure
twice
parts


of hearing


before,


as beautifully


in their


as lovers and the future


looks bright +for
coming operettas.


these


two in


woo, woo."


Q-.cr.F-re


I Tr .- '.t i
SEc *riiun


.1 hr. csn
*i MS Irn.u
K .1II'-qr
A Da.tnporr. *chairman .
R .~ hekler
C i. -fhtr,. cha iumn
S Skn.urre


.lr H. rt
As, hnr ls er
R A 'O'hecier
B SrIle,


us ~ ~ I -.as L at


Eugene rsegg,


Hotel Washington

Uneqialled for Situation
and Comfort


Compliments o


Or;ni


Kclnm,


w.


u uirv


am,


"















Vol. IV No. 10


CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.


Friday, Jan. 12, 1940


Second Period Honor

Roll Distinguishes

3 Girls and One Boy


Congratulati
boy and the
made the all "
past semester.
ber of student
"B" honor roll
likely that tl
better this coi
riod.


BOYS
All "A' '
rO3, Jslc.
-B S-
Chrn.lop Hwhtei
Caabra, Cl tei
Dmtn Cbeitr
Green R.scbad
GCnf. Th bomn
Hooper, Naln


Aelloor Akl0%,@
B/di, Adolph
Ede. Edmd
deiqr. AnSed
HaoP.r Fanir
Raa.l/ Tedd,
"Rwadles Arth6r
* $s. f& u.


m


Barr.,,u. Rob i
Puyr, Ch. arle



Cril, Adre
Pant!. Arm ,
Pewa, Robert
SJj. Ha'old


Ions
th
*A"
Th
ts
an
hey
mrn


s to the
ree girls
honor roll
ere are a n
who made
d it seems
will do i
ig marking


HONOR ROLL
2nd S i W'eek
19 .9 'i9U
9TH


GFRLS

P...*, PBA'rIL
A' p*rat RB ..
It od ira


TOTE


BamnbE'b Rmia
Brlnjrn O.n,
Buflr.* PbJhpe
CosjJmn ar'jref
Folike,. BHt,) 1a.p
e er. Vi'. jf. .i

A'ag.mn. N.j..t
i.ell ffer Lillrc
FR~' 'r e PF ,p j


H3M. Mi .




Do-l/s- fs
RDor r. erJa
Gflddn. AlVlrre
Af1ctluln Eitaherh

A.! 'A'3
il~dfO Dbtt2M)

-B'S-

Crbb.iir, Ic

Rnwonlj Jet4


Student Council

Dance Success


The Leap Ye
Saturday evenii
12:00 P. M. inm
hi sr' *lt ac .4...


ar dance,
ig from 8
the Gym,
* 4. .


held
:00 to
was a
,,_ _^ _


C. H. S.


Christmas Pageant


^jr
.-
i-^ :.


Girls


Learn


How


With One Easy


"I won't! I don't believe in
I .a p Year anyway!' "Oh--I'm
eomng to ask him, he's so cute."
These were the mutterings and
declarations which came from
the girls at the meeting which
preceded the Leap Year dance.
This meeting was held for
the express purpose of changing
the sweeter half of school into
perfect gentlemen. Did they ike
it"' Well, the dance was a suc-
cess.
"You must escort the boys to
and from the dance." said Bobby.
That part wasn't so hard, nor
was the fact that the girls asked


Be Gentlemen


Lesson


for the dances but, the revolt
surged within the little ladies
when they heard that they had
to pay for all expenses. This
brought the loudest protest
which mingled with the boy's
hearty approval (heard in the
cafeteria).
Mr. Rice, Bobby Fernandez,
and Eddie Wheeler gave the
girls their instructions and left
the auditorium in a safe and
healthy condition n spite of it
all,
Rhoda Wheeler read the girls'
proposals to the assembled boys
in the cafeteria.


Infantile Paralysis Benefit Program
To Be Given At 8:00 O'clock Tonight


To aid the. anal Zone Infan-
tile Paralysis Campaign, an un-
usual program of vocal and in-
strumental music will be pre-
sented in the Cnstabal High
School auditorium, Friday even-
ing, January 12, at 8 o'clock
The local committee respon-
sible for this entertainment is
composed of: Mr. C E. Raymond.


chairman; Mrs. R. K. Knox, Mr.
A. A. Albright, Mrs. R. A. Koper-
ski, Mrs. Alan Dodd, Mr. O. E.
Jorstad Mr. R. G. Noe, Warrant
Ol'ficer W F. Raymond
On the Atlantic side Mr. E.
Cotton ischarge of the gen-
eral committee while Governor
C S Ridley is officiating over
the entire Canal Zone


S. A. Meml


* Trade

1940 Y


hers Vote

Winds


earbook


"Do you want pictures in the
Trade Wind and no Trade Winds
in the Caribbean or do you
want no pictures in the Trade
Wind and Trade Winds in the
Caribbean?" This is the question
Mr. Cecil L. Rice asked the Stu-
dent Association members at
the special meeting held Mon-
day, January 8, at 2:30 P. M. in
the auditorium.
The vote results were 137 to
78 in favor of having Trade
Winds in the Caribbean, C. HI.
S. yearbook.
Mr. Rice opened the assembly
with a few words telling the
purpose of the meeting.
Bobbie Styles, Student Ass-
clation treasurer, read the fin-
ancial status of the organiza-
tion and the budget for the com-
ing year.
Mr. Rice described previous
issues of Cristobal yearbooks.
The 1938 yearbook had special
sections devoted to the faculty,
the seniors, the underclassmen,
sports, various clubs, and the
general school school activities.
He told of last year's plan of
including every issue of the
Trade Wind in the Caribbean.
This plan provided more pic-
tures preserved the T r ade
Winds, and made the best re-
cord of school activities.
As a result of this meeting,
the 1940 Caribbean will contain
material similar to the 1938 is-
sue, plus the Trade Winds. The
yearbook cover will be dark
blue, ordered from the States.
The Caribbean staff will glad-
ly accept any suggestions made
by the student body to improve
the Caribbean.

Civic Council and

S. A. Plan Carnival

Plans for the annual carnival
were discussed in the Civic and
Student Council meeting, held in
the C. H. S. Tuesday evening. It
was decided that each class
would have three booths for sev-
.fL-hi - - _ 1 ,


HS Queen
CHS Queen


Practice
Stur
Stunts


Assembly


I


__


:i~"iE"::::,~jj: E""
I~,







Page 2


TRADE


WIND


Friday, Jan. 12, 1940


by the Journalism Class
High School, Cristobal, C.


Editor-in-chief .......................... Jean Bad ey
ssis editor ................ D o y Brennan
News Editor ................... Dorothy Anderson
Copyreader ............................ Byne Bunting
Business and Circulation Manager Paul Gorin
Social ....................... ................ Sara Casey
Sports ................ Dick aEgo, Mary Hartman
Extbange Editor ................ Shirley Jennings
Spectai Writers .......... Rose M argara Sroop
Johl Herman
Stanford Skinner
Georgeanna Krause
Betsy MAacMiiafn
Sponsor ............................ Mr. P. 1. Evanco
Policy: To INTEREST STUDENTS IN
STUDENT ACTIVITY

Help Paralysis Victims

If everyone of us realized the
dire need for contributions to
combat infantile paralysis, then
maybe, we would more readily
take advantage of the oppor-
tunities offered to help this
cause and enjoy ourselves at the
same time.
These opportunities are pre-
senting themselves in the forms
of a mass band concert, an in-
strumental and vocal concert,
championship boxing bouts and
the President's Ball. By patron-
izing these events we not only
entertain ourselves but add to
the health and happiness of
others who have been stricken
by this dreadful menace. We
contribute more willingly when
We stop to think how fortunate
we are to have full use of all our
mental and physical faculties.
It was really President Roose-
velt, afflicted by paralysis him-
self, who popularized this move-
ment for fellow sufferers and
awoke the people of the United
States to the critical situation
existing in their midst.
This war on infantile paralysis
is unlike any other war in that
it is not enlisting patriots to
kill, but to save and bring relief
from an awful scourge that re-
spects no ages or peoples. By


H. H. A. Girls' Christmas Tea


Chatter-Box


Lorraine Goodwin. Barbara Williams, Shirley Jeannings, Dorothy Marquad., Mary
Anderson, Irene Stade, Miss Griffin, Eula Mae Callaway. Pauline Lim, Ann Williams,
Philips Rosales, Ruth Baumbach, Patricia Casey, Eleanor Marquard, Muriel Holmelin,
Blanca Facdol, Digna Yanez, Frances Davenport, Sue Herman, Grace Marcuse, Gloria In-
gram, Gloria Leeser. Nancy Magnet, Mary -Lou Messer, Beny Jane Foulkes, Helen House.
Dororhy Harrison, Josephine Brennan.


Grace


Notes


New music for the groups:
The Elementary Glee Clubs are
working on "Jeannie, with the
Light Brown Hair" by Foster. "A
Song of Joy" by Bornichum
which uses two trumpets to
heighten its effectiveness. "Wat-
er Boy" a familiar negro work
song with the melody sung by
the bases. The humorous "Man
of Wilmington" by Holliday and
the well known "Kye Song of
Saint Bride" by Clokey.

The advanced boys have start-
ed work on such male chorus
classics as the "Bellman" by
Forsyth, "Old Uncle Moon" by
Scott, "Boosting the Old High
School" by Moore and "Lord of
the Living Harvest" by Arcadelt.
Much of this new music will be
heard in the music festival next
May.


The advanced glees have really
"gone Hollywood" since work


donating to this cause, you be- was begun on their annual oper-
come a soldier whose aid will etta which this year is "Holly-
help transform crippled bodies wood Extra" by Treharne.
into healthier and happier hu- * *
man beings. The band boasts of two new


Resolution Results

With the New Year here, re-
solutions are the "talk of the
hour" among the students. Many
of the promises and good inten-
tions have been kept, but of
course, it's only natural that
some have been broken. Results
of the New Year's resolutions
are as follows:


Continental


News


Last night I held a little hand,
So dainty and so sweet.
I thought my heart would surely
burst
So wildly did it beat.

No other hand e'er held so tight,
Could greater gladness bring
Than the one I held last night
It was Four Aces and a King.
The Hilltopper, N. Y.

North High School recently
gave one of its most top-ranking
performances, namely The e
Mikado. Every seat in the audi-
torium was sold netting the
school over six hundred dollars.
North High School, Ohio.

Have you ever had that cop-
ped up feeling as if you were in
a very small cell?
Have you ever felt that closed
in suffocating feeling? Have you
ever found yourself talking when
there was actually no one pre-
sent for you to talk to?
Then, why in the heck didn't
you get out of that telephone
booth?
The Hilltopper, N. Y.
S* 4*


members in one week. They are Students from Vallejo High
Claude Campbell who plays a School attended a Press Con-
snare drum and Anthony Aan- iference renresentine their school


stoos who is beginning the study
of the Tuba.
* *
Elvin Engram has just receiv-
ed a brand new shiny tenor saxo-
phone. This instrument com-
pletes the sax section of the band
which consists of a baritone
tenor and 2 altos.
(Continued on FPae 3)


I -------r- -V ----- -


paper and yearbook. They learn-
ed that their paper was very
good and was showing progress
in a fine way. The Students re-
ceived many helpful suggestions
concerning their paper.
Vallejo High School, Cal.

A few years ago your Unc
f i ?~ -. --- - ... ..- ---- ..


Published
Cristobal


don't feel


so good myself.
* *


Did you know that the Cris-
tobal High baseball team hash!t
lost a game (this year)?

Oh yes! Before we forget -
We'll spend the other half day
of school Monday afternoon!

girl, said, "Why don't you have
more jokes and less dirt?"
Your Unc Spectre answered,
"Girls love fur coats, and a fur
,.....,J- rkif~rj in4- k1-r.S nt in4A '3 f


Notice! There will be only a.
half day of school Monday
morning!

Brief description of the
Christmans program: They put
the angels behind bars but, when
Mr. Jorstad smiled, the angels
sang.

Why did Betsy want to work
alone with Hank Skinner on the
history of the class?

He made sure she was con-
fortable, then he cupped her
dainty little chin in his hands,
lifted her face to meet his gaze,
studied her parted lips, and said
softly, "I'm afraid I'll have to
pull that tooth." And I thought
dentists were unromantic!
* *
This is told on an Engli&
teacher who, while correcting
sentence structure papers, look-
ed up and said, "I can stand the
fools who never learn rules but
this modern slang gets me
down."

Really, we just have the most-
est sweetest boys in our school.
Didn't you think they looked
perfectly adorable with their
orchids, roses and ah-choo! Par-
don me; I have hay-fever.

Our whole journalism class
will make you a little bet that
you can't strike a match on a
cake of soap.

Senior: "Did'ja ever take
chloroform?"
Freshman: "No, who teaches
it?"
*
Women have lots of faults
While men have only two--
Every thing they ever say,
And every thing they do.

All the important people are
gone Washington's gone,
Franklin's gone, and by golly, I


11~F


-


i







Fridy, an. 13, 1940


TRADE


WIND


Page 3


Rcving Reporter
FAVORITE QUOTATIONS
Mr. Rice-My favorite quotations
vary greatly with, my moods.
Sometimes I soar with Shelly's
"Skylark" dance with Words-
worth's "Daffodils," or ride on
Masefield's "Ship." Sometime
my mood matches Milton's "t1
Penseroso." One of my favo-
rite "all mood" quotations is:
In, men whom men condemn
asill
I find so much of goodness still-
In men whom men pronounce
divine
I find so much of sin and blot-
I do not dare to draw a line
Between the two-where God
has not."

Miss Liter-"Heard melodies
are sweet, but those unheard are
sweeter."
(To whistling boys in the halls).

Miss Beavers "Work while
you work and play while you
play For that is the way to be
happy and gay."

Mr. Jorstad--"Anybody can do
anything he wants to do if he
wants to bad enough."

Mr. Neff-"A job worth doing is
worth doing well."
John Herman--"Why don't you
practice what you preach."
Mr. Beck--"Nil Desperandum."
Peggy Oswald-"When do we
eat?"
Alice Ulseth-"Where do we go
from here?"
Judy Ferri--"Live, laugh, and
love-for tomorrow we die."
Delbert Harris "What'll you
have."
Dorothy Parrishn-Eat, Drink,
and be merry-for tomorrow
we die."
Arthur Palmer-"Oh, whats the
use?"
Dale Price-"There's no doubt
about it."
Willerie Calloway--'So what."
Jack Gilder-"Blame it on Wil-
bur "
Carl Ender-"Babaloo."

CIfVI COUNCIL AND
S. A. PLAN CARNIVAL
(Continaued from Page 1)
is urged to compete in some spe-
cial entertainments that may
win a worthwhile prize and
maybe an offer to Hollywood in
1950.
"Choosing the queen this year
will be more difficult than in
other years said Mr. Vinton, as
there are so many pretty girls
eligible for the honor. Twenty
five ballots will be necessary


INFANTILE PARALYSIS BENEFIT PROGRAM
TO BE GIVEN AT 8:00 O'CLOCK TONIGHT
(Continued from Page 1)
, "Prelude n C Minor ...... ........... .................................... Rachmanio
Gaylord S. Briggs, Organist
A. "The S 3tar" ...................................... ..... .... ...................... .................................... Ro ers
B. "When I have Sung y ongs" ............. .......................................................... Charles
Norma Raymond Mezzo Soprano
Mrs. Alan Dodd Accompjanist
A "Homing" ....... .............................................................................................. Del iego
8 "Sn i o N d r he So .. .................... ............................................... .............. .. .... Breil
Warrant Officer W. F. Raymond, U. S. A. -- Trombone
Mrs. Frank Linnell, Accompanist
A. "Etude Opus 10-No. 12 ............................................................................ Chopin
B. "Rom ance" ................................................... ... .............................. ................. Sibelius
Mrs. Robert G. Noe, Pianist
A. The Two Grenadiers ............................................................ ................... Schumann
B. "Danny Boy" ........................................ ..................... Irish Folk Tune


Sam Devers Baritone
Norma Raymond A cckmpamist


. "In Moonli ..... ...................................................... ......................
B. "Grand Offeroire No. 1" ................................................................................
Gaylord S. Briggs Organisi


STUDENT COUNCIL
DANCE SUCCESS


( Continued from Page 1)
between dances.
Music for dancing was furn-
ished by Jimmy Day's orchestra.
The rules of the dance were
as follows:
1. Dance is formal to the nth
degree.
2. Girls must ask boys for dates.
3. Girls must ask boys for
dances.
4. Girls must finance the even-
ing's entertainment.
5. Girls must escort boys into
the dance hall.
7. Girls must see that the boys
get to and from the dance
safely.
7. Girls must see that the dance
program for their partner is
complete.
8. Girls must return her partner
to his escort at the end of
each dance of course, the
girl may escort her partner
around the halls provided he
doesn't object too strenuously.


GRACE NOTES
(Continued from Page 2)
Nancy Magner's new clarinet
will probably be here hext week.

The C. H. S. Band played at
the opening of the baseball sea-
son last Saturday at the Mt.
Hope baseball park. They also
played for the baseball game be-
tween C. H. S. and the Civil Af-
fairs at the C. H. S. ball park
last Monday, Jan. 8.

Nancy Xdagner was blest with
two cello pupils lately. They are
Tommy Stuart and Shirley Mc-
Connell.


The CHS of


the Future


The C. H. S. of the future
Will be one big paradise,
Where the teachers all are le-
nient
And the students are already
wise.


They won't pi
ability
But they'll pice
looks.
There won't be
homework,
There won't be
books.


rooms
tioned


ck teachers for

r them for their

such a word as

such a thing as


will be air-condi-


I


And the periods ten minutes
long.
The other thirty-five minutes
Will be spent with "men,
Women, and song."


Boy's Life Is Easy
As Leap Year Comes

The worm turns!-Yes it's the
boy's chance to lead a life of
ease now, for 1940 brings with
it, Leap Year.
Relax boys. The girls will carry
your books for you. Would like
some water? Don't be bothered;
they'll hold the fountain on. You
don't even have to bend over
to pick up your books, pens, and
pencils. The weaker sex can do


it-and besides,
their figures.


good for


Now, when it comes to dates,
let the girl wait in the parlor
and talk to your parents. After
all, remember the time she made
you wait three-quarters of an
hour?
When other girls ask you for
a dance, give them the "cold
shoulder": tell them you're sorry,
but you have no open dances. It
won't be the first time that's
been done.
Ah yes! Remember to order
everything on the menu and let
the girl realize how it feels to
have to scrimp in order to pay
for the check.
Beg and plead with her not
to take you home so early and
then let her get "in bad" with
your folks when she brings you
home at 2:00. Don't forget the
night she did that to you and
made you so embarrassed!!
Leap Year-isn't it wonderful,
boys?


There'll be no such place as the
"office" Man dies!
Where bad girls and boys are Man turns to dust!
sent. Dust grows grass!
But there will be a big social Horse eats grass!
room Moral:-Never kick a
Where gay hours will be spent. for who knows but that it
be one of your relatives.


There's no doubt
future,


that in the


C. H. S. will rank as the best;
The place where you can go to
school,
And catch up on your rest.
By Fannie Marie Eldridge.


Scadron Optical

Company

MAKE SURE YOUR EYES
ARE GOOD.


Panama
23 Central Ave.


Colon
9084


horse,
might


Hotel Washington

Unequalled for Situation
a-J 4 ii s n..


,,,







Page 4


TRADE


WIND


Friday, Jan. 12 1e


Athlete Feats


Well, here we are back to work
after two weeks ot rest. We hope
to have just as good a baseball
team, if not better, than C. H. S.
has ever had in the history of
the school. Some of the players
from last year's Varsity team
are: "Jimmy" Pescod, second
baseman; Tommy "Bean-ball"
McGuinness, pitcher; "R e d s"
Willett, third baseman; Hugh
Pescod, outfielder; Art Farrell,
shortstop; and Ed Wheeler, out-
fielder. With all these players
left we should be successful this
year.

The intramural water-polo
league got under way during
Xmas vacation, but there haven't
been many players out for any
of the teams. At the rate the
attendance is diminishing, in
the next few years there will be
a league of only two teams. Come
out, signed-up, and score some
points. Athlete Feats will get
your name in the paper if you do
one of the following: score at
least one point, play a good de-
fensive game, or play a good of-
fensive game in the last week of
water-polo.

During Christmas vacation
"Mike" Ryba and John Stopa of
the Rochester baseball team in
the International League have
held a baseball school for those
boys 'who wanted and could
spare the time to go out for
their valuable advice. The Cris-
tobal High School students are
mighty thankful for the advice
and hints these two men have
given to the boys. These boys
who turned out during this pe-
riod will represent the High
School and the American Legion
in the Atlantic Twilight League
this year. CHS wishes to retain
these two men as coaches
throughout their stay in Pan-
ama.

Balboa High School has noth-
ing on us when it comes to get-
ting baseball players on a Canal
Zone league ball club, because
Jimmy Pescod, "Reds" Willett,
and Tommy McGuinness are
signed up on the Cristobal team.
Pescod made his season's debut
on Saturday afternoon, January
6, at Mount Hope when he play-
ed against the Colon team as the
two ball clubs raised the curtain
for 1940. The other boys will get
*t t -.I_.; a_-_~f_ 1n a a-t ,Jt- 4n~ 41- T't ar an~f


Patchett's


Beats


Squad


Stokes'


Thrilling Battle

Patchett's water-polo squad
gained a firmer hold upon first
place in the Cristobal High
School water-polo league when
they defeated the second place
Stokes' team, Friday, morning,
December 29 at the Washington
Hotel swimming pool 5-1.
Captain "Bob" Patchett open-


ed the
the first
half. "J
winners,
of the
minutes
making


scoring with a goal in
few minutes of the first
ack" Plummer, of the
scored the second point
game with only a few
to play in the first half,
the score 2-0.


Montford Stokes scored the
first point of the second half to
put his team into the ball game,
only to see Patchett score three
consecutive points to cinch the
game for his team and end the
scoring for the game. The final
score was 5-1 in favor of Pat-
chett's team.


Stokes


Two


First Places As

Frosh COD Meet


The Freshme n swimmers
churned their way to victory on
Friday afternoon, December 22,
1939 by scoring a first plane,
four second places, and two
third places for a total of 19
points. The Junior swimmers
were runners-up scoring 13
points. The seniors and Sopho-
mores finished third and fourth,
respectively, with 10 and 6
points. Montford Stokes, senior,
scored the most points of any
other swimmer in the meet by
taking two first places for a total
of 10 points.
The main purpose for this
meet was to establish a set of
records. The times of these
events were very slow, because
of the condition of swimmers,
Following are the events, win-
ners, and their time:


. 1.


FREE STYLE, BOYS
Stokes
Pewerson
Miller
FREE STYLE, GIRLS
Callaway
Wil1on


Carnright Players

Defeat Combined

Basketeers 22-2
Georgiana Carnright captain
of team I starred in a runaway
game against the combined
teams of Vonna Hambleton and
Nancy Magner.
The game swung into action
as soon as the whistle blew. Al-
though the ball first went to
the hands of the combined
teams, it was soon captured by
the opponents and forwarded to
Carnright, who put it through
the hoop. Next she put two free
shots in the basket. She follow-
ed this up with another field
goal.
The cheering had scarcely
ceased when Kathryn Heyward
scored two more points for the
winning team. Mary Hartman,
of the same team, followed with
scoring two more points.
At the half, the score was 10-0
in favor of Carnright's team.
In the second half, Dale Price
deftly put the ball in the hoop
giving the winning team 2 more
points. Vonna Hambleton, cap-
tain of one of the combined
teams, then scored with a field,
the only 2 points made by the
losers. Following this the ball
made quick progress to Jean
Holmelin, who added another 2
points to the winner's score.
Jean Badgley followed suit with
a neat toss and Mary Hart-
man added the final 2 points,
making the score 22-2 in favor


Stilson


Len iy Ltcuuilness
Win From MGaann

'Bob" Patchett wa -pr
team gained unTisputed pos-
sion of first place in the C
intramural waterooI
when they downed John Mc-
Gann's team 4-2. Tuesday after-
noon, December 26 at ,the
ington pool.
Tommy McGuinness
ed his pitching arm and
three points m the second half
to win the game for his
Acting captain, Buddy
also scored a point for Pat
team, during the first aS
John McGann scored points in
the first half, but his team did
not win. His men came closer to
beating Patchett's
other opponent so far. T
score was 4-2.

of Georgiana Carnrightj
ber 1 team.
Mary Anderson of .X
team showed great skillU whbe
trying to guard two tall
on the opposite team.
TEAM 1 COMBINED)
Georgiana Carnrightb, 5 6
n Badley capt. Vonna amb
Mary Hatman Ma Ad
M ,le Lyaew Sunr ll
Dale Price Anrn wfflitmn i
Jean Holmefin Blanca fTc d
Katheryn Hayward Diguna Yai,


Flower of India
31 Front Street
We specialized in Oriental
Goods and French Forhtesm
Geogiaa Gimcght Sac.ri.|iZ


Sons, Ltd.


HARDWARE AND PAINTS
PICTURE FRAMING
Front Street
Telephone 253


1I|


Colon, R.


Wins


Compliments of

The

Panama Railroad

AND -


Knipaar At liihft'':::'r
Bureau of C&la

and Playgrundis


Jean Arthur
James Stewart
in
"MR. SMITH GOES
WASHINGTON"

CRISTO AL


,,, :~'",,,,

,"E~
P, ;:r


II















Vet IV No. 11


Glee Club Casts

Begin Practice On

"Holywood Extra"

General voice try-outs, in all
ie glee-club departments, were
ld last week for parts in the
new operetta to be given March
15.
1Mr, Jorstad, director of the
4eretta, has submitted the fol-
Iowing names of students as
having made a good showing for
ittmselves in the try-outs for
leading parts: Laurena Keller,
Marin Snyder, Georgia Butler,
Marjean Metzger, Mary Schiavo,
reae Stade Elsie Chase, Caro-
lyn Stroop, Barbara Kopersti,
~thony Aanstoos, Glenn Glaze,
Bill Real, Eddie Wheeler, George
1&ermn, Stanford Skinner, Wade
Krausman and John McGann.
The east will be made from this
list.
The final selections will be
a~de rom the students having;
-a good singing voice, the abil-
ty to act, dance the wilgness
to work hard and fitting the

Mr. Bryan and Mr. Beck will
be in charge of the work of
faoding an entire new stage-set
fer tthe operetta. The set will be
an Algerian street scene on the
et Hollywood.
The following teachers have
been placed in charge of the
various phases of the produe-

S W orrell .......,................. Art
s r ffin .......,,........ Costumes
Aiss beavers
Miss Aycock ..................... Dances
Mr. Beck .. ............ Dramatics
Mr. Evancoe ........ Publicity
Orchestra rehearsals will be-
gin immediately upon the ar-
rival of the musical score. Mr.
Jerstad pw~sises that "Holly-
Wood Extra" will be one of the
year's best musicals, with the
CLonlrnued on P*jc 2)

Organ Recital Given

By Gaylord Briggs


Gaylord
the Masonic
gave a surp
the Junior


Briggs. organist at


stobal,
tal for
High


Temple in Cri
nse organ reci
and Senior


"Temporariamente, soy uh
- novicio er, felicisimo del
.club er-ah-exclusivisimo, La
Pas, de la escuela gee, I
forgot!!"


During the week of January
15, these words were repeated on
bended knees and in supplicat-
ing tones by the 27 new initiates
for membership in the La Pas
Club under the direction of Mrs.
Phyllis Spencer.
Girls as men, boys as house-
wives, and students with stools
and suitcases paraded the halls
as part of the four-day initia-
tion. It came to a close with the
formal ceremony in the gymna-
sium and the serving of refresh-
ments in the cafeteria on Thurs-
day evening, Jantvary 18.
The "old members" who took
part in the secret rituals were:
Gilbert Chase, Marjorie Gilder,
Philipa Rosales, Robert Harris,
and Jean Badgley. They were


CARNIVAL PLANS

MADE BY COUNCIL

In the meeting of members of
the Cristobal Civic Council and
C. H. S. Student Council, which
met in the school building Jan-
uary 23, further plans for the
coming joint carnival were dis-
cussed. The Carnival nights are
February 9 and 10.
As an added attraction on the
Friday program, the high school
baseball squad will play an in-
tra-mural game between the
DOSCEP and REDS. This game
will begin at 4:40 P. M. Feb. 9.
Saturday, Feb. 10, a game is
being considered between the
high school and some Navy
team. Also on this same even-
ing, a special dinner for twenty-
five cents is for sale to all com-
ers. This meal will consist of
Boston baked beans, potato
salad or cole slaw, rolls and but-
ter and coffee.
Games of skill will feature
most of the entertainment.
Among the amusements will be
special booths administered by
different groups. The Seniors:
balloon game, coin booth, and
uenny rame: the Juniors: horse


assisted
Fannie


by William Peterson,
Marie Eldridge, Jerry


Cole, Eugenia Mae Huff Alice
McIlvaine, and Neil Magner, who
acted as guides.
The new members are: Frank
Cain, Andres Caries, Muriel Ste-
wart, Marguerite Zitzewitz, Julio
Wong, Anthony Aanstoos, Ed-
ward Appin, Linda Appin Bev-
erly Brown, Keith Campbell,
Margaret Considine, Ellis Coats,
Edward Eder, Glyn Glaze, Ralph
Huggett, Virginia Keenan, Gloria
Leeser, Alexander Lim Pauline
Lim, Nancy Magner, Marjean
Metzger, Mary Ann Seibold,
Buddy Staggs, Edith Stapf,
Bruce Styles, Rhoda Ann Wheel-
er, and Ann Williams.
In order to be a member of
this club, a "B" average has to
be obtained and kept up. An
"inner-circle" consisting of last


year's most faithful members,
controls the club's activities,
Guided by Mrs. Spencer.


MOCK CONVENTION

WILL BE MAY 3RD.

Plans for the Mock Conven-
tion to be held May 3, in the
Balboa Playshed, are now being
made by the various commit-
tees. In order to obtain low prices
for each student who attends
from C. H. S., it is urged that
students interested take part as
delegates from C. H. S. to re-
present ten states. There will be
a total of about 200 delegates
present.
Each state will cast the num-
ber of votes it has in the real
convention regardless of the
number of actual student dele-
gates present. These delegates
will have seats designated for
them. Each state will have a
chairman, a vice-chairman, and
a standard bearer.
The principal duty of the
chairman will be to poll his state
delegation when a ballot is an-
nounced and then cast his state's
vote as a unit when his state
name is called. The vice-chair-
man acts under the chairman in
assisting him and takes his place
if he is absent. The standard
bearer holds aloft thruout the


Friday, January 26, 1940


STUDENT ACTORS

WILL PERFORM


STUNT NIGHT


Student entertainers on the
Stunt Night program will be
divided into two classes, group
and individual performances.
The event begins at 7:30 P. M.
Friday, Jan. 26.
Admission for this nights per-
formance will be free to S. A.
members only, non-members ten
cents and adults twenty-five
cents.
A Carnival Stage Show Com-
mittee ,will select winners eli-
gible for the Carnival perform-
ances of February 9 and 10. Win-
ners will be given prizes.
The group stunts are:
C. H. S. O:chest
Mr. O, E, Jostad, Director
1. "Whistling Rufus---Guiar and Banio
Claude and Kenneth Campbed


2.


3-
Virg
John
4.

5.
Eva
and
6.


1.
2.


Skit ..................... Nor a N Finly
Ellen Senay
Dorwi Raymdiw
Marian Justice
.oonlight Serernade ........... ........
Keith Campbell, Mike Picad,
ini Kenan, Kinrt McCleary. Harold Rose,
ny McGann, and Stanford Skinner.
Violin and Guitar ..............................
Antonio and Franklin Enrique
Skit-"And the Thunder Crashed" ...
Kirn AIcClr y. Jaes Fernandez,
J]m Droyle, James Cain, H erthi Heus
Doris Brown.
Songs- "Wishing"--"Harbor. Lighs" n .
Wslerige Calloway and Lmarena Keller
INDIVIDUAL STUNTS


Ha,
Pup


walian


Dance


mpet Show


3S Tap and
Satan Takes


Acrobatic
a Holiday


Bernice


Doris Brown


Dan'.-orin
"" ,...Coriwe


Dann


Vocal Solo---"South of the Border" .
Job, McCGalano


Woodshop Receives

Two New Machines

Mr. N. E. Gibson, woodshop
and metal shop instructor, has
just received a new Porter Cable,
floor type, heavy duty, belt sand-
er for the woodworking depart-
ment. This machine will speed
up and improve woodwork con-
siderablv. The Canal MechPnin.nl


CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.

27 New Members Initiated Into La Pas


Tonight
is
Stunt Night






Page 2


TRADE


WIND


Friday, January 19fl


Published by the Journalism Class of
Crisiobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.
Editorin-chief ............................ Jean 8aley
Assistant Edtor ............... Dorothy Brenwa
News Editor .................... Dorothy Andtron
Copyreader ............. n....e......e... Byn Bsesn
Business and Circulation Manager Ppa Gorin
Social .................................. Saah CCaey
SporD ................ Dik Egolf, Mary HUtman~
Exchange Editor ................ Shir ey Jenn
Speci Wrters .......... Rose Mageare Srop
John Herman
Stanford Skinner
Georgea nae Krase
Besy MacMalem
Sponsor ............................. M r. P. J. Es a oe
Poiky: To INTEREST STUDENTS IN
STUDENT ACTIVITY


Choose


Your
* *


Queen


Eureka! It's voting time again.
Not for President of the United
States, not for a Representative,
not for a Senator, but for the
C. H. S. carnival queen!
Votes are pouring into the
ballot box in Mr. Evancoe's room.
There is still time for more no-
minations, so get together with
your friends and put your favo-


rite girl friend's name
ballot. Experience the


on me
thrill of


seeing her crowned queen!
Voting will be continued
throughout both nights of Feb-
ruary 9 and 10 in the C. H. S.
auditorium. Votes will cost one
cent each. Everyone should help
to make this event successful. It
is not too early to start soliciting
votes for your candidate or to
commence saving your pennies
to make your choice the winner.
Ballots will be accepted until
January 29. Vote now and avoid
the rush.

What a Change

You talked me out of shorts and
slacks
And ribbons in my hair,
Because you said you liked girls
With a more sophisticated air.

For you, I now wear velvet gowns
And dance away the night,
But please, dear, talk me soon
into
A veil of bridal white.
Gioconda Pucci


My Sister


I have a little sister,
She's as cute as she can be,
At least that's what she seems
to think
The way she talks to me.
She wears my stockings,
She uses my rouge,
She puts on my dresses
And ruins my shoes
Anr whc n n T f.n n nonlrd hmr


~RDB~LhllN


One student mn C. H. S. to an-
other:
First: What do you think of a
fellow who gets up in the middle
of the night to go horseback
riding?
Second: He's crazy-who is he?
First: Paul Revere.

A delegation from Austin High
School made a good will tour to
Mexico, visiting Juarez and rural
schools. The tour was made on
the invitation of the Consul
General of Mexico who directed
the group.
-Austin Pioneer.


Northern Hi's Light comes
"Scatterbrain" with a "Quota o"
There was a young man from
Dakotah,
Who bought a new car with a
motah,
But as he foreboded,
The darn thing exploded,
Now Dakotah is minus a votah-
P. S. Now we unquota.


Conversation
day after New
Lady: How
morning?
Voice: Fine!
Lady: I'm sc
I have the wro
-1


on the telephone
Year's Eve--
do you feel this


,rry then, I gue
Ing number.
ramalpais News


-
CARNIVAL PLANS
MADE BY COUNCIL
(Continued From Page 1)
and events.


The
mise
ment
All


ss


committees in charge pro-
a wider variety of amuse-
s and fun.
students and townsoeoule


VERSATILE VERSES

TO GIRLS


Continental News

From Lake Geneva, Wiscon-
sin, comes the monthly "Log
Book" of North-western Military
and Naval Academy, which now
claims the distinction of having
a Scotch Kiltie Band the only
one of its kind in a military
School anywhere-They actually
have bagpipes, too.

Western Union College in Le-
mars, Iowa uses these defini-
tions:
Bachelor-A man who has lost
the opportunity of making some-
body miserable.
Courtship-A man pursuing a
woman until she catches him.
Modern Girl-A vision in the
evening and a sight in the morn-
ing.
Puppy Love-The beginning of
a dog's life.


quite five

are awfully

that runs


better,


For those who are about
feet two,
I guess there's nothing for
to do.
'Cause men just love the
that size
They'll come to you if you
wise.


Now when it comes to five
four;
There is no one who could
for more.
You're not too tall, you're
too short.
You're exactly right for bo3
court.


For five foot
O.K.
There's lots of
bay.
Throw out yoi
"hold-tight'
There's so mar
can hook.


sixers--y


five

you

girls
Sact


feet


not

's to


u'll be


big fish in the

ir line with a
" look.
iv tall ones vou


Supposing you get up to five feet
eight.
Better "catch a man" and do
not wait.
For if you add another inch,
Be assured it won't be a cinch.

If you are over five feet ten,
You'd better shrink and start
again.
There's just one place for you to
sing-
In Barnum and Bailey's circus
ring!


The Little Oscar
ft


One of the little snakes in the
Biology class, a South American
boa constrictor, whose name is
Oscar, seems to be the pal of all
of the Biology students. Every
morning the first one in the
room goes to the cage and gets
the snake. He wraps around the
student's arms and is very
friendly. Oscar never bites or
tries to harm anyone. During the
class, he lies in the lap of one
of the pupils and is very quiet.
Very often he is put on the table
and slides slowly along, exciting
everyone.
Oscar is a South American va-
rietv of the boa constrictor his


To girls who aren't
feet tall,
And think that they
small,
Remember a saying
like this,
The shorter, the
easier to kiss.


i -


Students


Quitaate


New students were attending
classes at C. H. S. for the wet
Noisy, talkative, they somethes
were very mirth-provoking ~ih
their staccoto dialects.
In English, after the teaMer
had finished hee roll cal one
day, the students started to read
Macbeth, with these interrnp-
tions:
Don: "What is amiss?"
Outsider: "My paint and brush;
Hand dem down to me!"
Lady M.: Help me hence, ho!
Outsider: "Hey! Pull that rope
tighter.
Mal: "Why do we hold our *on-
gues-?"
Outsider: Hold it, I'm smiiitg
down."
Second Murderer: A light. a
light!"
Outsider: It's too light. Pain it
darker.
Third Murderer: Who did atrike
out the light?
Outsider: Ah didn't do &at Mjtt!
Ah missed an' nearly killed
myself dead.
First Murderer: Well, lets away
and see how much is done.
Outsider: "Hey boy! D-a-a-a-
Darn Mon. Yuh aia't done
nothing' yit!"
Thus the studies continue


I


Roving Reporter

What quality should the ClS
carnival queen have?
Marvin Odom She should be
pretty.
Harold Dunlap She'd better be
from Fort Davis and gie
away free kisses.
Richard Egolf She shobid
have a good personality
Willieree Callaway She oag%
to be a good dancer. ^L
Marvin Salmon She shpd
have a cute physiognoiU
Carl Ender She's got to hate
it.S"
Jack Brayton She'd better k*
like my gal and the i
have something.
Elvin Ingram She should have
a good shape.
Bob Bartron She should be
well proportioned, have poe,
possess a good personaity,
have crystal blue eyes, and
be good looking.
Rhoda Ann Wheeler-She shold
be popular.
Virginia MacMillan -- Oo-la-.
Ruth Wikingstad CHARM.
Mary Lou Messer She should
not be conceited.
Mary Schiavo She'd better be
good.
Stanford Skinner "Oomph,"


)






Friday, January 26, 1940


TRADE


WIND


Page 3


C.H.S. BALL TEAM C. H. S. Intramural

DOWNS COPS 10-4 League Made Up Of

The C. H. S.baseball team won Four 15-Men Teams
their first Twilight League game


on January 16, when
ed the strong Police
The school boys
run lead in the fi
They scored four m'
the second, while
were scoreless in th
ing and only tallied
second, thus making


they down-
team 10-4.
took a two
rst inning.
ore runs in
the "cops"
e first inn-
one in the


g the


score


6-1,
During these innings Ec
Hugh Pescod, Willett, and i
Guinness swung the bats for
stars. Hughes was the only I
iceman to get a hit in these 1
innings.
The "cops" added a run in
third and two in the sixth.
The high school scored f
runs in the fifth inning for
final score, 10-4.
Willett and McGuinness
the hitters for the school.
two boys both got triples.
the police, Sutherland got
double out of three attempt


School
AB R
4 1
4 1
1 0
4 1
3 0
2 1
2 0
2 0
1 2
1 0
3 2
1 0
4 2


Pescod, H. cf
Eder, rf
Marquad, rf
Pescod, J., 2b
Willett, ss.
Wheeler, c
Bartron lb
Nitto, lb
Haywood, 3b
Justice, 3b
Forsman, If
Pool, If
McGuinness, p

Total
Po

Sutherland, ss
Clark, p
Peer, 2b
Wheeler, B. cf
Hughes, 3b
Grimes, If
Drake, Ib
Cunningham, c
Kerr, c
Stewart, rf


Total


MOCK CONVENE
WIlL BE MAY 31


32 10 10 21


lice
AB
3
3
2
2
3
2


3 0 0 8 0
0 0 0 1 0
3 0 0 5 0
3 1 0 0 0

25 4 3 21 9

FION
RD


(Contianued From. Page 1)
convention will be broadcast on
a local station and it is possible
that a commercial newsreel con-
cern may photograph some of
the highlights of the convention
for regular distribution to theat-
Prn ih th* flnitf.d St RatiFs


For the second


time in the


history of C. H. S., the intra-
mural teams have been chosen
by mutual agreement of the
captains, who were elected by
the boys that had signed up for
baseball. All four teams were
made as equal in power as could
be expected.
Any boy showing ability will
be given a chance on the twilight
league team that represents the


high school. This team
Balboa in their annual
Each team is made
players. The r os t e


the "Macks":
Tommy McGuinness,


will play
contest.
up of 15f
rs are:

Captain;


Mar q uar d, Bartron, Baxtor,
Stroop Hollowell, Hoffman, Ste-
wart, Justice, Walsh, Krausman,
Leeser, Kelly, and Egolf.
"Reds":
Harold Willett, Captain; Pru-
dom, Kaufer, Forsman, Bray-
ton Pool, Enriques, Brennan,
Kerr, Coffin. Nesbit, Terwilliger,
French, and Tawes.
"S. O. B.":
Edward Wheeler, Captain; Ca-
labria, Kelleher, French, Mc-
Cleary, Nitto Glaze. H. Pescod,
Doyle, Ender, White, Haywood,
Furey, Pucci, and Cain.
"Docsep":
Jim m i e Pescod, Captain;
Mansfield, Campbell, S a s s o
Chase, Dunlap, Stroop, Sim-
mons, G r e g o r y, Cosaraquis
Pierce, Palmer, Eder, and Mus-
chett.


United Fruit Downs

High School Squad


The High School went down
in defeat, January 10, when the
United Fruit collected 9 hits and
made 6 runs off the combined
efforts of McGuinness and Poole.
The High School hit safely 4
times, but only got one run.
The United Fruit scored first
when in the last of the fourth,
they made 4 runs. They collected
a triple, two doubles, a single,
and two walks. They didn't score
again until the last half of the
sixth when they got two more
runs. After two outs, Hale, left
fielder, walked. Socko, next up,
hit safely advancing Hale to
third. H ot z, following hitter.
knocked Hale in and Socko
came in on a passed ball. The
inning ended with Coman fly-
*. -1 in* ,........ -


Carnright's Girls Junior Picnic To
Down Combined Teams Be On February


Fast action featured the last
intramural girl's basketball game
between Georgiana Carnright's
cohorts and a combination of
players from teams 4 and 6. The
highest scorers were Georgiana
with 4 points and Mary Hart-
man with three. Other scorers
for the same team were: Jean
Badgley, Kathryn Haywood and
Jean Holmelin. For the combin-
ed teams the scorers were: Eula
Mae Callaway, Philipa Rosales,
and Ann Williams.
At the half in this exciting
game, the score was 7 to 4 in
favor of Carnright's team.
After the intermission the
score began to move quickly up-
ward and after ten minutes ol
fast action the game ended with
a final score of 13-6, thus mak-
ing the No. 1 team winners of
the contest.
The players were:


-ian Badgley
Mary Hadr man
Josephine Brennan
Mabel Leyn
K2:herine Haywood
Dale Price
Georgiana Carnighr,
Captain


Nancy Magner
Eula Mae Callaway
Ri:a Goulet
Fannie Mxrie Eldridge
Pauline Lim
Arlene Randall
Ann Williams


Freshmen Choose

Carnival Helpers


Thursday afternoon, January
11, the Freshman class held a
meeting in 203. The purpose of
the meeting was to choose Car-
nival committees for the dif-
ferent booths.
On the Pop-Gun game, Betty
Wilson Muriel Holmelin, Bud
Stroop, Thomas Gregory, Tho-
mas Stewart, Eula Calloway,
Barbara Koperski, Charles Fors-
man, Vonna Hambleton, Wheel-
er Griffin, Charlotte Nitto, and
Betty Gage are taking different
shifts during the evening.
Those on the Barrel game are
Bobby Parker, Bill Nesbitt Do-
nald Hendricks, Ruth Palmer,
Leo Wilkes, Gladys Anderson,
Arthur Diaz, and Arthur Kerr.
On the Dice game committee
are Clarence Coats, Tom Harri-
son, Maurice Kelleher, Bill Nes-
bitt, Frank Sullivan Blanca Fac-
dol, Raymond Simons, Jim Pet-
ters, Alfred Muschett and Ernest
Prudhom.


The junior class picnic is now
scheduled for February 2 as the
result of the class meeting of
January 12 1940. The assess-
ment is 25c. per person. In ad-
dition to that, the names of the
guests-to-be will be collected by
the guest committee. Then they
will be turned into the office for
Mr. Rice's approval.
The committees planning the
picnic are as follows:


EST COMI
DavenpOrt,
c&,:rman
(a;llo'nay
Mc!Cleary
Pucci
Rose
Sco.r


M ITTEE


FOOD COMMITTEE
I. Stade chairman
E, 3. Doyle
M. Gilder
M, Schiivo
M. Snyder


ENTERTAINMENT
COMMITTEE
C. Pierce, chairman
D. Gower
A. Hoffman
G. Marcuse
M. Stcwart


CLEAN UP
COMMITTEE
Ender. chairman
Brayron
Doyle
Egolf
W&Esh


TIME AND PLACE
COMMITTEE
F. Cain, chairman
J. Glder
E. M. Huff
D. Harris
A, Mcltvaine


Silks Linens Novelties
Panama Hats

I. L. Maduro Jr.

Perfumes

Colon, R. P.
No. 1 Front Street
Phone 888 Box 407


PHILIPS the RADIO you will
eventually buy

Julio A. Salas
Distributor

5006 Front St.
Tel. 537 Colon


THEATRE


Compliments


*'


"


9






Page 4


TRADE


WIND


Friday, January 26, 1940


High School Wins
Second Game; Dc


t>AK r


In


Elks 10-7, Jan. 21

Winning their second game of
the year by the score of 10-7, the
Cristobal High School Twilight
team downed the Elks, January
21, in an exciting game. The
contest was called at the end
of the fifth inning on account
of darkness.
The High School threatened
to score every inning except the
second. The first frame they had
the bases loaded but failed to
score.
Jimmy Pescod, after two outs
had been made in the third
stanza started the rally with a
single to leftfield. Willett, next
batter got on base by an error
made by the third baseman. Pes-
cod came in on a passed ball
for the first score, Willett going
to third. Eder then hit the ball
to the shortstop and beat it out
for a hit. Willett scored on the
play. The inning soon ended, the
High School making 2 hits, get-
ting 2 runs.
Meyers, rightfielder for the
Elks, hit to leftfield to start the
last half of the third inning go-
ing. Farrell then hit the ball
into centerfield sending Meyers
to third. Abreu, pitcher for the
Elks, hit the ball, but was on,
by an error committed by the
first baseman, Meyers and Far-
rell scoring.
The High School made 4 hits
and 4 runs in the first half of
the fourth. Bartron started it off
with a single Hoffman followed
with another in the same place.
Hugh Pescod then came through
with a double, scoring both men.
Forsman walked and Jimmy
Pescod laid down a bunt ad-
vancing both men. Eder, the
pitcher, then hit a double that
scored two more players. This
made the score 6-2 with the
High School on the long end.
The Elks started their part of
the inning with a double into
right field. The next man slash-
ed a triple to the same place,
scoring Stewart. Eder then set-
tled down, and the inning end-
ed without any further scor-
ing.
Nitto, substituting for Bartron,
opened the inning by getting a


ru n i 1i w


Basketball Girls

To Play Balboa

All stars! -Twenty girls were
thrilled when their names were
among the candidates for the
all-star team, that will play B.
H. S. at Balboa, February 10.
For the next three weeks, these
girls will practice hard and long
to prove their worthiness of be-
ing one of the twelve best who
will journey to Balboa.
The stars will be chosen for
their athletic ability, sportsman-
ship, and dependability. The
captain will be chosen by the
team for her ability as a leader,
her dependability, and her abil-
ity to take as well as give orders.
Those chosen to be in the final
try-outs are:


Virginia Keenin
Rhoda Ann Wheeler
Nancy Magner
Georgians Carnright
Vonns Hambelton
Gladys Wertz
Hula Mac Calloway
Gloria Ingram
Katheryn Hayward
Jran Holmeln


Jcan Badgley
Dale Price
Mary H:rtman
Ann Williams
Eleanor Marquard
Dorothy Marquard
Parline Lim
Jean Raymond
Ruth Baumbach
Williere Calloway


free pass to first. He went to
third on two passed balls, scor-
ed when Hoffman came through
with a single to leftfield. Hugh
Pescod hit to the second base-
man but was put out at first.
Forsman then smashed a triple
to rightfield sending Hoffman
across the plate. Jimmy Pescod,
following hitter, hit the second
triple of the inning to right
field scoring behind Forsman
after the shortstop had made
an error. The High School made
4 runs making the score 10-3.
Attempting a rally in the last
half of the fifth the Elks scored
4 runs. They tried hard to over-
come the lead that the High
School had made, but the effort
was futile. The final score -
High School 10 Elks 7.


Hotel


Washington


Unequalled for Situation
and Comfort
COLON, R. P.


A Hotel in Keeping with
the Dignity, Spirit and
Service of the Panama
Canal.


HIGH SCHOOL NINE

DROPS CONTEST TO

CIVIL AFFAIRS, 3-2
****11 - _
The High School, after mow-
ing the Civil Affairs down for
five innings, was defeated 3-2,
in the last half of the seventh.
The game was played Thursday,
January 18. The game was ori-
ginally scheduled for the first
one of the season, but was post-
poned.,
The Civil Affairs got only 4
hits off McGeinness in 7 inn-1
ings. Only one of the three runs
that the Civil Affairs made was
earned. The other two were
made on errors. The High School
earned both of their runs.
The first score came in the
fifth fr ame when Holmein
worked the pitcher for a walk.
He went to second on a passed
ball. Al Days, next up, hit to the
pitcher, Holmelin was out on a
throw to third. Tetterton follow-
ed hitting a s le to center
field, but trying to stretch it
into a double was put out at
second. Brown then hit another
single in the same place scor-
ing Days. The inning ended with
Cotton flying out to Eder.
The High School didn't get
started until the seventh frame
when Wheeler opened the inn-
ing with a walk. After Wheeler
went to third on a passed ball,
Justice hit the ball into left.
field scoring him. McGuinness
then flied out to the shortstop
for the first out. Hugh Pescod
made the second out when hr
was thrown out at first. Justice
had gone to third on the last
two plays. E der then came


Athlete Feats

The C H. 8 girls' All-Star
squad has been holding secret
practices for the past two weeks.
*The girls whose names were
posted on the bulletin board wiml
be picked to make up this all-
star team after the present
squad is cut down. Athlete Feats
pick these girls to stay on the
t ea m: Georgiana Carnright.
"Reds" Keenan, Vonna Hamble-
ton, and "Nan" Wheeler. These
girls have shown their ability in
the past to qualify them for any
high school girls' basketball
team.


The
team
game
they
The t
Vance


C. H. S
won their
Tuesday.
defeated
ea m was
, ex- New


twfllgh
r first
January
the Pol
coached
York


t league
baseball
16, when
ice 10-4.
I by Joe
'Yankee"


pitcher It must. have given the
boys an inspiration to have such
a distinguished man in the
rmnn~ilk rE- knu


nnnn~bl LN.I.


The high sc
of hitting pitt
opposing pitce
every time tU
These two bo
McGuiness a
Both boys an
.500. Keep it
needs your hi

through with


hit. Jimmy
final out wh
shortstop,
The Civil
game after
broke under t
three errors
score. Final s
-H-igh Sehotb


:hool ha
hers, w.
hers he;
aey corn
)ys are
nd "At-
e hitting
up, boys
tUto.


,s a couple
ho give all
irt failure
.e to bat.
"Control"
em ",E4er,
Swell over
i!


Pescod made the
en he fied t e

Affairs won
the High School
he strain and made
letting tW
crte Civil
12.
* *< j^lr ^l?
la, Sil~lA frit^I!


Bureau of Clubs

and Playgroun


Drums


Aloni


withat
Claudttt t
and
Henry Fonda


GATUN
FRIL


ill SI.


4E:


For
Distinctive
Gifts

STATIONERY,
MAGAZINES.
BOOKS

Go to

BEVERHOUDT'S


SEE OUR GRADUATION


BEl


,















t V N 1 CORISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z. Friday, February 9, 191U


Collections of butterflies,
ensets, leaves, birds,
nasp and woods were among
the many first semester projects
turned ln to Mr. Vinton, biology
instructor.
Onithe whole, this year's pro-
jelia were better than last years.
iore 'A's' were given than ever
bef*oe but there weren't as
m py outstanding ones," stated
Mrr Vinton.
One of the most unique and
$idivdual projects turned in was
fke Ant Colony" by Arleen
Randall. It consisted of a glass
cae lled with dirt. Red leaf-
cutting ants were put into this
adtheydug tunnels, chambers,
aMd passageways. These were
iibl to the outsider as the
case was :transparent. Arleen fed
e ants on bread, syrup, and

Another interesting project
was that of Le Roi Leeser. He
colted the heads and feet of
tirds, and mounted

m n preserved specimens,
ontd shel, and insects were
also ox display during the sev-
er days oa the exhibition.
BIolgy projects are turned in
every semester by the students.
They are collected and seienti-
f ly named at home, with the
aid of authoritative books.
VH -


features


cII And

QCandidates

I dop4- ose assembly
presented to the
sAsoiation members
7aon, January 25,
at 2'15, in the Auditoriumn
The Cristobal High School or-
ra, NI by Mr. O. E. Jorstad,
ed interesting and novel se-
l n Their music was var-
icldng an idyll, a minuet,
tz, an operatic piece, and
Candidates for Carnival
a nat 5, nt.m a 4u itor,


METAL SHOP


Collins, E
Cosarquis, J.
Gilgreen, A,
Herman, J.


Marquar d. E.
Marohil K.
Nhxo, J3
Ruley, C.
Wilteu, H.


Davis, L.
Bu cher. H.
ggcar, T.
Honfiran, <
Mansfield.,


Palmer J.
Patcherr, B.
Plummer, R.
Stokcs, M.
Wiltiams, RK


Truis. J.
Torbert, W.
Thomas. H.


Metal and Wood Shops Feature Special


First Semester' s


Work


Projects During

Boys in the metal shop, a
the preliminary first six-we
were assigned the following
quired projects; two to be Ir
on the lathe, two on the fc
and two with sheet metal. An
completing these, the boys n
hammers, clamps, screw drii
dust pans, ash trays, smol
'stands, lamps, chisels and ce
er punches.
The metal shop is locate(
the North-east corner of C
S. in room 132. It is equij
with two long tables and a si
one. The two long tables arE
cated at the sides of the sb
Over fifteen different
chines are here. The most


American People Mindful Of Lincoln's


Birthday Celebrated February


Abraham Lincoln, the six-
teenth President of the United
States, was bor in a Kentucky
log cabin, February 12, 1809.
To the average high school
student, his life is inspirational
with examples of action based
upon kindness and consideration


Attend the
fi4:W Sjww -
KK K K KK K. *K K K" v/


Invite Your
Friends to the
Carnival
Fri, & Sat.


portant ones are: two South
Bend lathes, a power drill, a
blacksmith's forge, a power
hack-saw, a forming machine
and a folding machine.
Adjoining the metal shop is
the spacious wood shop. Here
the boys work with native maho-
gany, cedar and cocobola, pop-
lar, cypress, fir, ash, white pine,
redwood, white oak, and balsa.
Some of the projects complet-
ed by the students from these
materials are: end tables, kitch-
en cabinets, magazine racks,
hand-carved lamps, bread
boards, smoking stands, twin
beds, coffee tables, flower stands,
(Continued on Page 3)


hanon, Lincoln was faced with
momentous decisions that fin-
ally had to be settled by the Ci-
vil War.
The preservation of the Union
was uppermost in his mind. Lat-
er, January 1, 1863, he issued the
Emancipation Proclamation dur-


C. H. S. CARNIVAL

TO BE ACTIVITY

OF THIS WEEKEND

Games, excitement, fun! These
will be the features of the joint
carnival sponsored by the Cris-
tobal Civic Council and the C.
H. S. Student Council Friday and
Saturday nights, February 9 and
10.
The different classes will be
in charge of the various booths.
Seniors penny game, coin
booth, and the balloon game.
Juniors horse racing, bingo
in the Scout Shack, and bottle
breaking.
Sophomores bombing, dart
game, and archery.
Freshmen barrel game, pop
gun booth, and dice game.
Voting for the Carnival Queen
will take place in the playshed,
both evenings. Dancing will be
enjoyed there both evenings al-
so.
The food booths will be run
by the Household Arts Girls. A
special twenty-five cent dinner
will be served consisting of
Boston baked beans, potato sa-
lad or cole slaw, rolls and butter
and coffee.
Two stunt nights will be held,
one on Friday night and the
other on Saturday night. The
winners of the Friday night show
will perform on Saturday night
for the final prize. The admis-
sion is Friday night 15c and 30c;
Saturday, 20c and 40e.
The final attraction of the
carnival will be the election and
crowning of the queen Saturday
night. After her coronation, the
queen will preside cver the car-
nival for the remainder of the
evening.


JUNIOR PICNIC

IS SUCCESSFUL

Neither rain nor the mysteri-
ous disappearance of about one
third of the ice cream marred
the fun of the Junior Pienicers
who gathered on Friday, Feb. 2,
from 7:00 to 11:00 P. M. in the
cafeteria to eat and later to play


;r r,r ,,







TRADE


TmO HIEDA
Published by the Journalism Class of
Cristoba High School, Cristobal, C. Z
-
Editor-n-chief ............ ......... Jean Badgly
Assistant Editor ............... Doroty Brennan
News Ediror ........... Dorothy Andron
Copyreader a ...:.:........ BSyn Buf ^ in
Business and Circulation Manager Paul Gor
Social ....................................... Sa C
Sports ............ Dick Egolj, Msay Hrtiman
Exchange Editor ............... Shirl Jenings
Specia Writers .......... Ros Martre Stroop
John Hermoan
Staanord Skitner
GCorgenEna Krmase
B&rSy MacMilton
Sponsor ... ................ Mr. J. EtMr. P. Easoe
Policy: To INTEREST STUDENTS IN
STUDENT ACTIVITY


That's Why!

Because students need recreation
after semester exams! because the
S. A. needs money! Because we like
good clean fun where everybody
has a grand time! that's why
the Carnival is sponwroed annually
by the Cristobal High School and
the Civic Council.
The Carnival will be held to-


night and tomorrow
ly in the school itself
the grounds, in the
and in the playshed.
The Student A Ars


nigh,
f bu
Field

ciati


t, not on-
t also on
'd House,

on needs


money to finance their schedule
for the year 1940. This schedule
includes dances, club activities,
and sport activities besides the pub-
lication of the Trade Wind and
the Caribbean.
This Carnival has been planned
for YOU, the student body. There-
fore, YOU should attend it. Bring
your friends and relatives along.
They, too, will want to play games,
win prizes, and have lots of fun.
Remember, YOU will derive the
benefit of it.


New


Leaf


"A new semester, a new start."
Many students have decided to
turn over a new leaf and begin
school studies anew, and are de-
termined to do so.
Many students have been mak-
ing it a habit to appear in classes
with no homework. There is no
need for that, for if the teach-
ers thought it was too hard to
do the homework, they wouldn't
assign it, but a few of the stu-
dents don't stop to think of that,
Another fault is the detention
hall. There is also no reason for
that. If one wouldn't stop in
the halls and talk with another,
when one knows how much time
n P n a a An A ^j4 n n jt fl^ a Ihjw a^ an nfl-i -*_


Burd, T,
Conley, L.
Cole, J.
Csmpen. J.
Forsman, (


(Elementary Group)
Long, D
saher, B.
McGann, J.
Prudhom, E.
Taylor, N


WIND


(Advanced
Davis, L
Dunlap, H.
Egger, T.
Greene, E.
Krausman, W.


Helen House Leads
i r a _


Group)
Leeser,v L.
Murphy,
Randles,
Siam, B.
Williams.


Grace Notes
4 *


In Hyueen Loniest William Real and Dick Green
are doing a fine job at catalog-
Helen House still leads the ing and filling the octavo num-
race for carnival queen with 50 bers in the school library.
votes followed closely by Mary *


Lou Messer with 48 points.
This time the prospective


queens rank


as follows:


Helen House ....... ...................... 50
Mary Lou Messer ........................ 43
Rose Margaret Stroop ............ 36
Frances Davenport ................ 31
Georgiana Carnwright ............ 30
Dale Price ................................ 28
Alice Ulseth ................................ 28
Rhoda Ann Wheeler ................ 27
Sihrley Jennings ........................ 27
Dorothy Wolf ............................ 25
The ballot box is in Mr. Evan-
coe's room. The ballots from the
Trade Wind will be accepted in
the race for carnival queen.


Valentine


Will you be mine,
Dear Valentine?
For you I pine.
Boy, what a line!
St. Valentine's Day is to be ce-
lebrated next Wednesday, the 14.
On this occasion many secret love
affairs are brought into "the light"
through the means of valentines.
Many is the love-sick girl or boy
whose heart is enlightened by this
small token of affection.
Then again, there's the people
who want revenge, and send their
nflmn* fi d fln .. : r n f *lnnn


Plans are being made to award
medals to the winners who will
be picked by prominent local
musicians. High school musicians
are now busy selecting their
numbers and the event looks
promising.

Anthony Aanstoos has been
making excellent progress on the
tuba, according to Mr. Jorstad,
and we shall hear his solid bass
tones in the band very soon.

Claude and Kenneth Campbell,
who played the winning num-
bers on Stunt Night on their
guitar and banjo, are also play-
ing band and orchestra instru-
ments. Claude is playing the
snare drum and Kenneth the
viola.

Doris Raymond has decided to
study the flute the second se-
mester. She is a valuable mem-
ber in both orchestra and band.

Mr. Jorstad would like more
unchanged voices for his Elem-
entary Boy's Choir. He has re-
ceived some very fine music
and work will start on it as soon
as the operetta is finished.
* *
The band and orchestra will
be considerably larger next year,


nnntl r ham a


Friday, Fdbrais 93,34



Chatter-Box
KKKI K


I know now wedonP i ha + Wo iI
've written the reason too, look-
"Anything we'll ever want to know
We can always find in a book
(Ain't it the truth?) .

Recognize this?
"All the world is a 'stoofleb

Seen somewhere-
Drama in 3 acts *l1
Act I-Captain Cook
Act II-Captain Cook a
cannibals.
Act III-Captain Cooked

Says the bell boy--"The iA+
was here again today
that everyone in the a
afraid to fight him "
Elevator boy---Send him to t.
Ill take him up."

Advice to girls-Just beus
boy says he will call yeosin tp
no sign that he'll give you a& rhb

One of our big athletes:
home sick in bed. The ddort
him he had a high fevet.
"What am I doing, Do
asked.
"A hundred and two."
"Not bad. What's the Wtbf
record?"


Dr: Eugene
boy, "Have you
Senior: "No
you a cigarette.


(examini&
any scars l.od
Sir, bht I can e
" -K


Freshman girl: What dset T
do? I can't stand my boy ein
any longer.
Senior girl: Stop tryi o
Let him fall.

What did some senior y
write as plans after graduatki
Who wishes that all the n
would wear bells around"
necks so she could find
Who said "If this is exam .f
it hasn't a thing on me,
weak too?" What senior awakeas
at two in the mornings to sa
the alarm for six, then goes bat
to sleep? Who wants to sread
more of this silly column?

Humm-mm-mm-ra-m Good-bye,
now.


Ha!! A Scandat!

Ah, scandal!! Nice and fJulity
*RT^ cai s-i-,- T --S- __ s-- . A-tf8'


Page 2


WOOD SHOP


Turn


nt;)k ;Itvtinr hirrh







FMiay, February 9, 19644


Page 3


TRADE


Mrs. F. K. Bryan

Delivers Lecture On

Flower Arrangement

"Flower Arrangement" was the
title of the instructive lecture
given by Mrs. Forrest K. Bryan
in the art room, Friday after-
noon, February 2.
"Vases and pottery must be
consistent with the flowers you
choose," stated Mrs. Bryan. "Two
great mistakes in flower ar-
rangement are massing of flo-
wers and over-decorated vases."
The purpose of this lecture
was to give the students some
knowledge of flower decoration
so that they may enter in the
Atlantic Side Flower Show, spon-
sored by the Ladies' Aid Society,
which will be held at the Cristo-
bal Union Church on February
20.


Entries may be classified as
line arrangements, Japanese or
modernistic; mass arrangements
for dining tables; mass arrange-
ments for buffets; kitchen ar-
rangements; miniatures; wild
plant and weed arrangements;
potted plants; et cetera.
Flower arrangements will be
judged for their distinction, re-
lation of flowers to container,
color, harmony, proportion, and
perfection of arrangement.


Winners Selected By

Stunt Night Audience

Preliminary stunt night was
held in the Cristobal High School
auditorium, February 26, to de-
termine the winners of the high
school. Carolyn Sandsbury earn-
ed first prize in the solo group,
singing "South of the Border,"
Johnny McGann came in sec-
ond singing the same song, Betty
Burd did a hula dance and won
third prize.
In the groups, Claude and
Kenneth Campbell won first
prize playing a banjo duet, the
Moonlight Serenaders, an or-
chestra composed of high school
students came in second play-
ing "My Reverie," and Mr. Beek's
group have a very amusing co-
medie in pantomime which
earned third place.
Mr. Jack Randal, who is plan-
ning the final stunt night for
February 9-10, says this is to de-
cide the winner of the Canal
Zone amateur championship,


CHS Dramatists To

Present Two Plays

Imagine King Arthur having
tea parties at the round table
and the magician, Merlin doing
Card tricks!!


1/4 of a credit.


For work,


minutes or over in the shop
students get 1/16 credit. At
end of the semester these <
dits are added and that is
credit the student receives.
work not completed the first
mester can be made up du
the second but most of the I


ring
3oys


hand in their full credits of
work.
During the second semester
they will learn how to sharpen
and take care of the tools, be-
sides making more skilled pro-
jects.


MACKS, REDS PLAY

3-3 TIE IN EXTRA

INNING CONTEST

The Macks and the Reds met
on Monday, February 5, for the
leadership of the C. H, S. intra-
mural baseball league. The game
ended in a 3-3 tie. Although the
teams played an extra inning,
the game was not completed, be-
cause of the 4:15 closing rule.
The Reds scored all of their
runs in the third inning when
Coffin walked. Tawes struck out,
but Kaufer hit to right field. He
took second when one of Mc-
Guinness' curves eluded his sec-
ond catcher of the game. Coffin
took third on the play. Brennan
then hit a hard roller to Bar-
tron, Mack's first baseman, but
*he ball hit a stone and bounced
over his head. Coffin and Kaufer
scored on the play. Brennan
took second on the throw in from
the right fielder, Tom Dietrick.
Pool the next man up was out
on strikes. Brennan then scored
on Forsman's roller to the second
baseman who threw the ball over
the first baseman's head. This
completed the scoring for the
Reds.
The Macks scored two runs in


It really happens in the Dra-
matic Club's new play, "Idlings
of the King." King Arthur ap-
pears young and handsome in-
stead of old and bewhiskered.
Merlin, the magician, is, as usual,
mysterious, while Guinivere, the
queen is disgusted. This delight-
ful unhistoric burlesque in one
act promises to be the greatest
laugh of the season.
"Sparklin' ", another one-act
farce to be given at the same
time, is a hill-billy love affair.
The troubles they have getting
down to the point can mostly be
blamed on a tobacco-chlewing
granny.
Both of these delightful plays
will be given in the C. H. S. au-
ditorium at 8:00 p. m. on March
1.
The try-outs were held Mon-
day and Tuesday afternoons in
Mr. Beck's room.


METAL AND WOOD SHOPS
FEATURE SPECIAL PROJECTS
DURING FIRST SEMESTER'
(Continued from Page 1)

chairs and sewing-machine ca-
binets.
Mr. Gibson is trying out a new
system in grading the students.
For each of their projects the
students receive 1/16 of a credit.
If the project is exceptionally
good, he will receive 1/8 or even


inning and one in
The two runs were
second inning and
the third. The two
second came when
started the inning
3 left field and tgok


second on a wild pitch by Wil-
lett. The next batter was walked
to give the Reds a possible dou-
ble play, but the two men on
second and first completed a
double steal and scored on a
wild pitch, with Hoffman up.
The Macks third and the last
run came in the third inning
when Justice hit to center field
and stole second and third while
Willett was pitching to McGuin-
ness. McGuinness then walked.
Justice scored on a wild pitch
and McGuinness took second.
With the winning run on second
base, all the batters could do
was hit a line drive to the pitch-
er.
Kaufer, Brennan, and Pool
were the only Reds batters to
get hits, while Justice got two
hits and McGuinness collected
one in one official time at bat.
McGuinness struck out 11 Reds
batsmen and walked only one.
Willett struck out four Macks


Civil Affairs Down

Cristobal High In

Close Battle, 5-3

Civil Affairs twilight league
team nosed out C. H. S. 5-3 on
Thursday, February 1.
The Civil Affair boys started
off by scoring three runs in the
first stanza. Tetterton hit an in-
field ball. He ran home on Nel-
ly's two bagger. John Brown's
infield out advanced him to
third. McCoughll was walked and
stole second. Ray Will singled to
center-field and brought in
Neely and McCoughll.
The Affair's team added an-
other run in the third. Tetter-
Ston reached first on Bartron's
error on Haywood's throw. "Tett"
stole second and scored on
Neely's second hit of the game.
C. H. S. put themselves into
the ball game in the fourth inn-
ing. Eder opened the inning by
getting on first when Tetterton
let the ball go through his
hands.
Jimmy Pescod singled sending
Eder to third base. Pescod took
second when Willett was walked.
This filled the bases.
Hoffman bunted, but Eder
was caught going home, making
the first out of the inning. With
the bases loaded Wheeler work-
ed for a walk forcing in Pescod
making the score 4-3. Willett,
Hoffman and Wheeler died on
the bases when both Justice and
Nitto struck out.
The Civil team added their
last run in the fifth inning on
two walks and a single by R.
Will scoring Neely.
Wheeler was the batting star
of C. H. S. with a single in one
official time at bat.


'U


THEATRE


Compliments


The


Panama Railroad


and


Panama Railroad

Steamship Line


WIND


the second
the third.
made in the
the other in
runs in the
McGuinness
with a hit ti


1







Page 4


TRADE


WIND


Friday, February 9, 1940


ATHLETE FEATS

The girls' all-star basketball
game against the B. H. S. team
is postponed until February 17.
The date of the game was for-
merly February 10, but was de-
layed, because of the C, H. S.
annual carnival. The game wil.
be played at the Balboa Play-
shed.


We have in


midst a golfer


Jan-
the
Golf
mus.
the
she
the
dif-
,eds"
cho-


who traveled to Balboa on
uary 27 and qualified for
match play of the Ladies
Championship of the Isth
This same girl returned to
Pacific Side, but this time
met defeat. If she enters


match next


year it will be


ferent story. This
Keenan, the Canal
plastic champion.


a
"B


The supposedly weak "Docsep"
mtra-mural team defeated the
"Macks" in the biggest upset of
the current season on Thurs-
day, February 1. The final score
was 11-2 in favor of Docsep.
Captain Pescod was the main
reason for the defeat, because of
his stellar pitching. Nice going
Jim, some day you'll be as good
as Charlie.
The girls all-stars basketball
game against the Balboa team
is postponed until February 17.
The date of the game was for-
merly February 10, but the game
had to be postponed, because of
the C. H. S. annual carnival.
The game will be played at the
Balboa Playshed.
The latest statistics to be re-
leased of the Atlantic Twilight
League show the High School
has the best fielding average,
but it also has the worst batting
average.


So WS


Macks Start Race

By Downing Reds

In Close Battle

Tommy McGuinness' "Macks"
won the baseball game of the
C.H.S. intra-mural league on
Monday, January 22, when they
played Hal Willett's "Reds." The
final score was 4-3.
The "Macks" didn't win the
game until Willett tried to steal
home while Bartron, "Macks"
pitcher, was winding up. The
only thing that stopped him
from doing this was Bartron's
quick thinking in throwing the
ball to his catcher.
Bob Bartron, Cristobal's triple
threat fullback, hurled an ex-
cellent game for the "Macks?."
He held the hard hitting "Reds"
to one hit during the short three
inning game. Bob struck-out
five, but he walked four. These
account for the amount of clouts
that the losers made.
"Lumbago" Pool hurled a
steady game for the "Reds." He
allowed six hits and struck-out
six batters.
"Reds" Willett spoiled Bob's
no-hit-no-run game, when he
singled to left field, bringing in
Pool and Forsman.
Marquard and Justice were
the hitters for the "Macks", each
getting two hits out of two at-
tempts.
MACKS
ABR HPOA E
Hoffman, ss. 2 0 0 0 0
Mazquad, rf. 2 I 2 0 0 0
Jus:ice, 3b 2 1 2 0 0 0
Kelly. 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0
McGuinness, Ib 1 0 0 2 0 1
Bartron, p. l 0 0 0 1 0
Kruasman, If. 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Egolf, c. 2 1 1 7 0 0
Baxter, 2b 1 0 0 0 I 0
Hollowell. 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0
Leeser, cf. 1 1I 0 0


Total


Kaufer, If.
Brennan, Ib
Pool, p
Forsman, ss,
Willeti, c.
Brayton, 3b
Enrique. 2b
Coffin, cf.
Terwilliger, rf.
Total


14 4 6 9 2 1


REDS
AB
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
0
0


10 3 1 9 3 5


S. manl Ez UN *k -I I I


C H. S. Successful

In Ping Pong Finals

Against Balboa J. C.

Another victory for Orlstobal
High School! Balboa College
came to Cristobal last Saturday
for the annual finals m te ping
pong tournament. T Junior
College was defeated i thzte
successive games ani wan, dine
before a small crowd,
The longest and most eating
set was between Paul Welsh of
B. J. C. and Mick Picado of C.
H. S. In the first game of this
set Welsh defeated Picado 23-21,
in the next two Picado was the
victor, and the fourth game went
back to Welsh. The last and de-
ciding game of the set was tied
at 20-20 and Welsh gained the
necessary 2 points before his op-
ponent.
The other sets were won with
three straight winning games
for C. H. S. The final results of
the games were:
B. H.S. C.H.S.


A. Galindo
16
16
10
Jimmy Ridge
11
9
10
Paul WelPsh
23
11
19
21
27

Janet Nesbit
12
16
16


R. Simion
21
21
21
Colmen Sasso
21
21
21
Mick Pieado
21
21
21
16

Virginia Keenan
21
21
21


High

Civil


C, B, o:
battled to a
in the Atlai


SVie ME
for the
touched I
evern in
struck o
gave two'
had McG
He yielded
seven rann
In the


They scored four runs and took
the lead of 6-2. but with one out
in the last half of the eighth,
the game had to be called be-
cause of darkness and the score,
of course, reverted to the pre-
vious inning.

Days, 3b I 0 t 0 0 3
Teernon, d. 4 1 C
Neei 0 0 8 5 0
Andr ts. Ib 2 0 1 6 0 0
R, ll ?b 0 1 3 0 2
E. Sandnt I f. 1 0 0 ? 0 0
H. Will, I : 1 |
Hometi, r 2 0 I 0 0 0
Mayp p


School

Affairs
,~a E *M'iM !!:K'


and the Civil Affairs
2 ?-2 tie, January 27,
ntzc Twilight League,

vii Arfairs and was
Five hits during the
igs lihe worked. He


Ci

nfl,


ut eight batters and
walks. The High School
uinness on the mound
d but ve hitse i
ings.
eighth, however, the


Total

H. Pescod, d
Eder ri
J. Pcc j ?b
Wille I
Forsman, If.
Glaze, ss,
Haywood, ib
Bartr..r. Itb
McGunne.. I
Total


ASSEMBLY FEATURE |
(Conminued Froau
e. "Cuckoo Waltz,
3. Mr. Hotz--talk on
idea of Carnival,
4. Ed Wheeler-plans
carnival.
5. Mr. Hotz stun
thoughts.
6. Bob Fernandez---tat q
contest, candidates. plans
coronation.
7. Mr. Rice--ta k on location
Carnival, and advertisement


Ln"b.
"r


V:


Ties

2-2


HIGH SCHOOL

'. 0 ? 0 0 0
2 iI U 0 3 0
IU 0 4 0 0
000


26 3 5 '


PHILIPS the RADIO you will
eventually buy


Julio A. Salas
Distributor

5006 Front St.
Tel. 537 Colon


SEE OUR GRADUATION


Hotel Washington

Unequalled for Situation
and Comfort
COLON, R. P.


A Hotel in Keeping with
the Dignity, Spirit and,
Service of the Panama
Canal.


Bureau of

and Playgroun

TYRONE on l


"DAYTIME "FE

LINDA DARNELL


I


Its,


Cilllj


Aifairs


lLR'~6(


to town,"


. ,














Vol. IV-No. 13 CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z. Friday, February 23, 1940


ACCORDION PLAYER

GETS FIRST PLACE
IN AMATEUR SHOWS


Enie And Tommy


Win Second


m-- -
Prize winners in the amateur
Stunt Night, programs furnished
unexpected thrills for the car-
*litatrs, It was with
much difficulty the judges de-
cided the winners ot the contest
on Friday night to appear again
the following night, for the final
tiihosse the Canal
Zone Amateur champion.
Earl Bowery won Iirst prize in
the first show, singing "Song of
Songs," and Sam Deavours was
p steoa show, close
I.hd enm were Elna Abbot.
who charmed the audience with
her splendid accordion playing,
S't.. Louis Blues,"
Arlene and Tommy did a new
and clever arrangement of their
jitLerbug dance which won the
usual applause.
bq 0 .Mts in a .spon-
aneous performance not pre-
planned, Earl Kramier imitated
a lady taking a bath to such
perfection and caused so much
hilarity, he was asked to do his
i pantomime of Charlie
Lae at a baby,
stn at! the troubles
one expects.
ABb uyof4ted first on
4gbt gf Saturday
t s giving, her the
eof amateur champion of
eeZone; 4ene and


Three Students Make

All "A '" On First
sinte r Honor Ron

Three students distinguished
themselves on the first semester
honor r-.tll. by making straight
"A" report cards. They are: Julio
Wong, freshman: Peggy Bailey
and Elfrrda Flores, seniors. Those
on the "B" honor roll are:

l Der.on. Cthieetr FgsTeon Trene
Mdiler. Donald Waid Jan
Real. Wdlliam


Aamnsroo Anrhoun


10TH
Hau:~. He'lrh


r'. :. i,


Queen Rhhda Ann. Behind
On herr xight; Robert Fernandez,
Bobby Wheeler.
Queens Court: Middle row:
Frot row: L. o R Dale Price,
ShideI Jtnnings.


the throne,
President of
1, to R. 3
Mazy Lou


W. Vinton, Senior
A. On her left, the


Daveaport
Rose M.


class sponsor.
crown bearerI


and Georsiana Carnrigh
Stroop, Alice Ulseth, and


1940 Marks 162 Public Celebration


To Honor "Father


Let's go back to February.
1778, in Valley Forge. That's the
band of the 4th Continental
Artillery you hear playing.
They're celebrating the birth-
day of General Washington.
They tell us that this is the first
time it has been celebrated by
anyone outside of his family and
circle of personal friends.
Several years have elapsed
and we find a slight controversy
between New York City, and
Richmond, Virginia as to which
c ity celebrated Washington's
birthday first. You may judge
for yourself though, as New York
celebrated the affair on February
22, 1783, while Richmond held a
meeting in his honor on Feb-
ruary 11, 1782.
In 1790, during Washington's
first year as president, Congress


Dramatic Club


Enact


Two


Farces


"I don't usually chaw, but I
will. Tm a regular fella, I am."
says Orry in the Dramatic Club's
new play "Sparkin."
This delightful play which


His Country"


adjourned, extending its best
wishes to him, the "Father of
the Country". There were times,
after this, when his birthday
was celebrated, and there were
times when political influence
opposed such "an idolatious af-
fair." General observance of
February 22, as a holiday, did
not take place until 1796.
After Washington's death, De-
cember 14, 1799, Congress adopt-
ed the resolution that February
22 would be observed through-
out the country "with exercises
intended to express the popular
esteem for the first President.
February 22 is now a legal
holiday in every state in the
Union, the District of Columbia,
the Canal Zone and other pos-
sessions of the United States.


Mrs. Corwith Gives


Washington Day


Talk


.~- ---
Mrs. William Corwith, Nat-
ional President of the American
Legion Auxiliary, was guest
speaker on the assembly pro-


gram in honor of
ldvHrrftbo dnniuusrr rTl


the 208th
nf rflnruw


Queen Rhoda and her Court


CHS vs BHS
Ball Games
Saturday


Attend School
Plays 0*
March 1


CIVIC COUNCIL-CHS

CARNIVAL TAKES IN

TOTAL SUM OF $1200

Queen Contest Nets Most
A regular midway was the
center of the festivities of the
annual carnival given the nights
of February 9 and. 19 by the
Cristobal Civic Council and Cris-
tobal High School. Along this
midway were constructed many
game booths run by the various
classes.
The main interest on the mid-
way was the throne for the Car-
nival Queen before which was
held the annual queen contest
with its many beautiful candi-
dates.
Also included as part of the
entertainment were the floor
shows, the dancing in the play-
shed, bingo in the Scout Shack,
and the food and soft drink
booths under the Field House.
It is estimated that the re-
ceipts totalled $1200 for the two
nights. From this, Ca H. S. will
receive 75% of the net profits.
The Junior High will receive 12%
of this amount. The expenses
are estimated at $400. The money
will be used for Student Asso-
ciation activities.
The queen contest took in
about $270; the stage show, $145;
foods, $150; soft drinks, $160;
and the games accounted for
the balance.
The Sophomore Class booths
netted the most incomes; the
dart game netted about $70; the
archery game, $32. The Junior
High bean bag game took in
(Continued on Page 4)

Student Lettering

Exhibit On Display

Merints High raise

Hand-lettering hearkens back
to the days of the mones who
with painstaking care printed
the books and reading matter of
their time. Except in the fields
of art and mechanical drafting,
science and invention have re-
placed hands methods. The
draftsman of today is expected to






PageS


TRADE


WIND


Frily, Febrmary, 10


'HI


Published by e Journalism Class of
Criscobal High School Crismobal, C. Z
Edior i......................... 5*hui J nings
Asstan Editor ................ Dorothy Ennan
News Edir .................... Doroty Anderso
Co l~texlte .... ..-............ Byqre Bnr
Business and Ciulaton Manager PauS Gorig
social .................. ..... ........ swas cate
Spoin ................ D . go A l Hnum
EJxchar Editor ................ Shey Jeanings
Special Writers .......... Rose Marge S~roo
Jonb Herman
Stanford Skinnr
G;orgeanna Krase
Beay MaEcMlll
Sponsor ............................ Mr. P. Evancoe
Policy: To INTEREST STUDENTS IN
STUDENT ACTIVITY


THANKS GIRLS

The Carnival is over. What a
time we all had! The thanks of the
student body and faculty are mak-
ing the rounds. However, special
mention should be made of the
Queen Contestants.
Nine popular, pretty, good sports-
women appeared during the two
Carnival nights before inside and
outside spectators to be cheered
and admired. Several of them knew
that they would not be the lucky
QUEEN; however, they did their
part to enliven the whole carnival
with their presence dressed so in-
vitingly to entice votes from the
lookers-on..
Girls, with good sportswoman-
ship like yours, CHS will always
realize its goals. Again, Girls, we
al say, "Thanks!"


Guess Who!
*
The subject of my character
sketch suggests a man who
sometime blushes and falters
because of his position as the
center of attraction in directing
a crowd.
He has a natural grace in the
rhythmic movement of his s
hands; a typical singing mast-
er! A characteristic mannerism
of his, when singing, is to give
many small jerks of the head,
as if trying to shake out a long
and tangled mane; when in
reality he wears an army hair-
cut. I believe this :s a form of
self-consciousness caused by the
fact that he has a slight trace
of accent in his speech--almost
a lisp-as if his tongue takes
up a little too much space in
his mouth.
It is a matter of vanity to


Grace Notes

"Rosie" has just ordered a
brand new tenpr sax which he
intends to use in the "Mobn-
light Serenaders," an orchestra
composed of high school musi-
cians.
* *
Two men came in from Coco
Solo on their day off and sat
in the band. Wm. Sorrel, tuba
player, and Frank St. Pierre,
Snare drummer. Wm. Sorrel stu-
died for two years under Herbert
Clarke, who was at one time
tuba player in Sousa's band.
* *


Mr. Jorstad
the following
Quartette: F.
Enriquez on
Doyle on the
Magner on the
*


has just
for the
Hooper
violins, E
Viola, an
cello.



picked
String
and F.
va Jean
i Nancy


Music has just been secured
for a French woodwind quin-
tette: This unusual combination
consists of the flute, oboe, bas-
son, French horn, and the clar-
inet.

The High School ensemble or-
chestra has had a busy month.
On the evening of the 20th they
helped the American Legion
Auxiliary entertain their nat-
ional president. On the 22nd they
broadcasted 15 minutes of music
on The American Legion pro-
gram. The week before they
played for the flower show. This,
group is sponsored by Mr. Enri-
quez, the father of two of our
high school musicians, Franklin
and Antonio.

Eight school musicians have
secured new solos and are pre-
paring them for a solo and en-
semble contest which is sched-
uled for April.

Dorothy Anderson was finally
chosen by Mr. Jorstad and Mr.
Beck for the comedy part of
Aunt Hanna in the Operetta,
"Hollywood Extra."


Chatter-Box


During math period I roamed
the halls
Enjoying the scenery and such
Then I met the math teacher
face to face
And Dame Nature lost her touch.

The army children are at it
again. This time one little boy
shocked the chaplain by asking
if the fish the Lord divided
___ _ .- t.-. _- -_ --. -- - i


Continental News

C. H. 6. sympathies go to
FAfIRFy D H fTES: Jasteia
of suffering rrm eods and
grippe in the Canal Zone, we
have an epidemic of strong sun-
shine that induces perennial
laziness, commonly known (as
"tropicaitis."

The editorial appearlnw in the
January 19 issue of THE POLAR-
IS by Tong Ton Yee w ms our
commendation "Theefore, we,
being the strongest nation on
earth, should work. autiongy
and energetic ally fur an
lasting peae., and establish a
new world oijer under which all
men can live happily without
fear of aggression or starva-
tion."
EXAMSII!!
Why worry over exam?
You have two alternatives,
Your teacher is either easy or
hard.
If he is easy, you have noth-
ing to worry about. If he is
hard, you have two alternatives;
either you study hard or you
bluff. If you study hard, you
don't have to worry. If you bluff,
you have two alternatives, either
your bluff works or it doesn't.
If it works, you have nothing to
worry about. If it doesn't work,
you have two alternatives, eith-
er you are conditioned, or you
flunk. If you are conditioned,
you needn't worry any longer--
so why worry???
The Polaris.

Western Military Academy Ca-
dets were honored by a demon-
stration of Jiu Jitsu points given
by Mr. Earl Conrad, well known
world wrestler.
-Shrapnel, Illinois.

He deftly sought my lips.
My hands he did unfold,
And he broke the silence with-
"Shall the filling be silver or
gold?
-Tanalpais News, Clifornia.

Ephrata High School has an
Institute of Student Opinion in
order to find out how the stu-
dents feel about various high
school happenings and changes.

Here lies the body of Dentist De
Mille.
It's the biggest cavity he'll ever
fill!!


gained by freshmen at end of
first semester. Also funny-
amount of confidence lost by se-
n'nrr. nf ri~n 44 m 1/ -in.'a


C TO REPRESENT

EIGHT STATES AT

MOCK CONVENTION

In a letter from Sf. 0lle "
Hackett, of the ca-i1 Zone i.
nior College, co0peringe
mock convention ofa the
cratic Party to be hrld in Balboa
on May 3, Mr. Evancoe received
the following infori"atid i
A total number of 5Ofxil*i
included in the convention l
Actual Democratic
as McNutt, Farle i
Garner, and possibly R"de
will be placed before Mtld
vention by the student "n
ing delegates.
After all the nominating"
seconding speeches are com-
pleted, the student delegates will
vote for whichever candidate
they choose. The i C
each state will cast the entire
vote of his state alter he ascer-
tains how his "delegates" want
to vote.
It is probable that the ~ a -
date who wins the mock-nomi-
nation will be notified by cable
in the United States.
Introductory speectiesi w#V
delivered by some eminent adults
of the Canal Zone,
C. HI S. has been assigned
eight states and two territories
(Arkansas, Colorado, Connecti-
cut, Kansas, Louisiana, Mary-
land, Mississippi. Washington,
Hawaii, and the District q g ai
lumbia) to represent. This will
be a total of 73 delegate
eluding chairmen, vie
men, standard bearers,
gates; all to be chosen r r
dependability by Mr.
All chosen students
to use passes or pay their
fare over and must arrange lox
their subsistence aI. ld 1f
Balboa over the night of Way
The students chosen to make
the nominating speeches a
the seconding speeches will be
helped by Mr. Evasnoe. iti w
ing their speeches. The cni4-
dates to be nominated will be
made known by Mr. Hacktt
Any surplus of delegates hfett
C. H. 8. will be used to fill empty.
seats for B. H. S., B, J.H. :S.,~
C. Z. J. C.


A copy of the "Order if Pro-
cedure" telling exactly what vl
happen and who says what at
when, will be sent over by Mt
Hackett along with some printed
bulletin board publicity, seating
plans, and possibly celluloid Con-
vention buttons.


I






Friday, february 23,1940


TRADE


WIND


Page 3


ATHLETE FEATS

C. H.,S girls, invaded B. H. S.
on day and etneikee vic-
torious, in their annual basket-
ball game. The final score was
15-12. The game was just as
close as the score shows it to
have been. The outstanding
players for C. H. S. were Geor-
gilaa Carnright4 Mary Hartman,
and Gladys Wertz.

The C. H. S. water-polo team
also travelled to B. H. S. to play
the annual game. The game was
played Saturday morning, Sat-
urday 1. The boys were not as
fortunate as the girls. They came
home on the tail end of a 6-4
score, but better luck next time
boys. *

The boys Varsity Club have
made a public challenge to the
girls Varsity Club for a volley-
ball: game. The girls have ac-
cepted
The boys are doing what many
think a bad mistake, and are
going to give the girls a 10 point
handicap. The game is to be
played at the Cristobal play-
shed, Saturday night, February
24, nd is scheduled to begin at
:30 P. * *

The intra-mural season has
come to an end. The "Macks"
headed by Tommy McGuinness,
finished in first place, and if
the Varsity Club votes for them,
the members playing in at least
75% of. the games will get gold
baseballs

This coming week-end C. H.
S. will play host to B. H. S. for
the annual baseball and soft-
ball games. The first named will
be played at Mount Hope ball
park aMd the latter will be play-
ed at the Point. Both games
will start at 9:00 A. M.


STUDENT LETTERING EXHI
HIT ON DISPLAY MERITS
HIGH PRAISE

(Continued from Page 1)

two laboratory periods per week
for eighteen weeks.
The members of the class are:


Josen Caads
DCrCI CoIat

CbAr Dor
Chs Ftersma


Oswald Kefon
Loas Kel/er


Frank Lnkdrom
Diahd Long
Doald Miller
Alfred MAlscdhent
Mariw (Mor
Louis Palier
HMold Rose
WillP t Stars
Georg Snmp
Leo Wilkes .


pOCSEP; front row L to
Dunlap. BsHk row: A,
G. Chase, and L. Palm


r.: A. Davenport. Eder,
Muschec, J. Cosarquis, T.


DRAMATIC CLUB TO
ENACT TWO FARCES
t .onmnuita tgtjj ag.t Oi
In the other play "Idlings of
the King," the noble King Ar-
thur (James Cain) tries to play
a saxaphone, nuch to the dis-
gust of his Queen Guinivere
(Mary Hartman).. Merlin, the
magician, (James Fernandez) is
a sly, trickster and Modred the
villain (Thomas Gregory) is a|
terror, with his terrific villain-
ous laugh, while Lancelot (An-
thony Aanstoos) fears disaster
and a page (Thomas Stewart) is
forever in awe.
This unhistorical burlesque
promises to be one of the sea-
son's biggest laughs when it and
"Sparkin" are presented in the
C. H. S. auditorium on March 1,
at 8:00.
"Sparkin"' is to be produced
by permission of S. French and
Company, and Idlings of the
King by permission of Long-
mans, Green and Company.

MRS. CORWITH GIVES
WASHINGTON DAY TALK
(Continued from *age One)
The program was as follows:
1. Pomp and Chivalry ........ Selection by High
School Orchestra
2. Oh Danny Boy ............... Vocal Solto by
Georgia Budler-Accompanied by
Mr. Byron Wilson
3. Harp Solos ........ By Georgeanna Krause
A Study in Glissando ........ Dedicated to
Mr. Paul J Evancoe
Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young
Charms
March of the Marionettes
4. Salur d'Amour ................ Violin Solo by
Franklin Eriquez--
Accompanied by Mr. Wilson
5. Les Adieux .................. String Ensemble


J. Pescod,
Gregory, W


capt., C,
. Srroop,


Ar


,w .


Sasso. H.
R. Simon,


High School Squad

Beaten By Elk Nine

The Elks, who have been hold-
ing down the cellar position of
the Atlantic twilight league have
finally come to life, and are now
playing heads up ball. After an
easy win over the Police nine,
the Elks followed with a 13-6 win
over the High School.
The High School scored six
runs in the fifth inning. How-
ever, the heavy slugging of the
Elks, led by Thompson and Bou-
rinski, refused to be stopped. The
Elks hit safely 14 times off the
combined efforts of the four
pitchers the High School used.
Harmon, the Elks ace southpaw,
allowed only six lits.
The box score:
ELKS
AB R H PO A E


Edwards, If
Williams, 2b
Thompson, c
Bourinski, 3b
Owens, ss
Bock. lb
Stewart, rf
I. Das, rf
Conar. cI
Harmon, p
Total


H. Pescod, i
J. Pescod,
Eder,p
Davenport, I
Poole, p
Nirto, lb
Bartron, lb.
Forsman, If
Willett, c
Glaze, ss
Haywood, 3!
Hoffman, rf


Total


32 13 14 18


6 3


HIGH SCHOOL
AB R
;f 3 0
2b 1 1
1 0
00'
2 1
0 0
P 3 0
3 0
3 1
3 1
b 2 1
3 1


24 6 6 18 11


Docsep Team Second Best


Pescod, H.
Pescod, J.
Eder, rf
Forsman,
Bartron, I
Hoffman,
McGuinne
Willett, sr
Justice. 1
Glaze, 3b
Wheeler.
Prudhom,
Total

Parker, If
Owens, 3
Williams.
Thompson
Strewart, c
Christian.
Smith, rf
Yost, cf
Bleakly, s
Cotter, 31
Harmon,


HIGH SCHOOL
AB R
AB a
.. rf 1
, 2b 4 0
3 1
f 1 0
b 3 2
If, rf 4 1
ss, p 2 1
s3 0
b 1 0
20
c 2 O
c 1 0
29 6
ELKS
2 0
2b 4 1
c 2 1
1 0
lb 3 0
2 1
2 1
ss 0 0
3 2
p 3 O


1118 11


25 6 7 18 8 4


Friday 7:30
Boys Varsity challenging
Girls Varsity Volleyball teams.
Dance follows game. Ten cents
admission.

For the correct pronunciation
of the word "rural"-see Dot.
Parrish.


Bureau of


Clubs


and Playgrounds


High School Ties

Elks 6-6 In Fast

Game Friday, Feb. 7

A six-day tie ended the ball
game between the Elks and High
School, Friday, Feb. 7. The School
started the scoring when they
made 4 runs in the first inning.
The Elks scored 2 runs in the
third stanza, and earned 3 in
the fourth inning. The School
made another tally 'n the fourth,
tying the game up. The Elks
broke this tie in the fifth, when
Williams, the second baseman,
hit a triple and scored on the
next play. The students, again
tied up the game, when Mc-
Guinness walked, went to sec-
ond on a passed ball, and then
scored on an error made by the
first baseman.
The Scholars tried hard in
their half of the sixth to break
up the game, but failed when
Harmon, Elks pitcher, after the
bases had been loaded, struck
the last two men out.
McGuinness, High School ace,
was touched for only 7 hits dur-
ing the game. C. H. S. hit safely
11 times off the hurling of Har-
mon, Elks pitcher. The box score.


Hotel Washington

Unequalled for Situation
and Comfort


SEE OUR GRADUATION







fage 4


TRADE


WIND


Macks Cinch Intra-

Mural Pennant By

Defeating Docsep

The classy fielding "Macks"
put the clincher on the C. H. S
intra-mural baseball league on
Thursday, February 15, when they
defeated the runner-up "Docsep"
team in a close 2-1 game.
From the first pitch to the
last, the game was distinctly a
pitchers' battle with "Mack" Mc-
Guinness opposing Jim Pescod of
the "Doesep" squad
The "Macks" touched Pescod
for four hits, including a triple
in the first inning by Justice
scoring Ruley, who had singled.
A double by MeGuinness scored
Justice.
The "Docseps" got three hits
from the "Macks." None of these
hits merited extra-bases. "Doc-
sep's" one run was unearned.
Cosaraquis singled to right field.
On the first pitch to Dunlap, the
next batter, "Cosa" stole second.
In his eagerness to catch the
runner, the "Mack's" catcher
over-threw second base. The ball
rolled through Ruley's legs giv-
ing "Cosa" time to score. The
game ended with a score of 2-1.
Box score:
MACKS


Ruley, cf
Juice. 3b
Hoffman, ss
Marqniuard, If
McGui ness p
Hollowell. rf
Egolf, c
Kelly, 2b
Bartron, lib


Total


' Cosaraqis,
Dunlop, lb
Stroop, 3b
Eder. 2b
Ssso, ss
Simons, if
Palmer, c
ChI, If


15 2 4 12 9


"DOCSEPS"
AB
2
2
2
2
2
2
0
I
0


Total 13 1 3 12
Sumary: Three base hits; Justice, Tv
base hits; McGuinuess. errors: Ruley a
Egolf. Base on balls, McGuinness,
Pescod, 0. Struck out by: McGuinness
Pescod, 5. Official scorer: Jim Coffin.


United Fruit Whips

C. H. S. Squad 13-1
-. .
The league leading Unite d
Fruit team handed the C. H. S.
baseball squad a severe shelack-
ing Friday, Feb. 17 when they
scored a 13-1 victory.
The United Fruit Company
scored every inning except the
last. they made five runs in the


In ermural Champ'ons


C I -
.. . .


THE MACKS; front row 1. to r."
Hodfman, and R. Justice. Back
and W. Kausra o t A

ACCOBMON 4PLAVER
GETS FIR P4ACE"
IN AMATEUR SHOWS


E. Marquad, B.
row: H. Kelly,


(Continued From Page 1)
Tommy were chosen second, and
Earl Bowery won third prize.
Contestants for the Queen
contest were introduced twice
each night during intermission,
so that everyone could be ac-
quainted with them.
As an added attraction, Harry
Kuhns, professional "scrap iron"
swallower, performed many un-
usual feats that seemed to be
almost impossible to all those
present. He not only chewed,
with apparently some enjoyment,
a razor blade, but he took a light
bulb and swallowed that also.
On his bare back he lay on a,
board of nails. Two people stood
on his body as additional
weights. He arose triumphantly,
apparently unhurt but showing
the nail imprints upon his tough
skin. ,

CIVIC COUNCI-CBHS
CARNIVAL TAKES IN [
TOTAL SUM OF $1200
t.Conrinud from taue Onefl
about $48, and the Juniors'
bottle bursting game turned in
about $46.
The Carnival Committee of
the Cristobal Civic Council was
headed by Mr. L. Burgess, and
included Mr. W. D. Williams,
president of the Civic Council;
Mr. R. L. Sullivan, Mr. W. Fuller,
Mr. F. Wertz, Mr. J. Egozque,
Mr. F. Baumbach, Mrs. R. Knox,
Mr. K. W. Vinton, Mr. J. Ran-
dall, and Mr. H. Neff.
Eddy Wheeler was the chair-
man of the Student Council
Committee. He was aided by


Jarttron. T. McGuiness,
D. Hollowell, D. Egolf,


captm G.
C Ruley,


H. PESCOD SPOILS

J. PESCOD'S NO-

HIT NO-RUN GAME

The strong Doesep intra-mnral
baseball team went into a three
way tie with the Macks and the
Reds for first place in the C.
H. S. mitra-mural league, when
they defeated the lowly 8. 0. B.
squad, on Wednesday, February
7 by the score of 5-0.
Jimmy Pesiod was the main-
stay of the Docsep team. Jim
pitched a one hit ball game to.
score the first shut-out game of
the current season. Jimmy also
connected for a single in his
one official time-at-bat. On the
mound, he struck out three op-
posing batsmen and walked two,
but the main reason for the
shut-out was the poor base run-
ning of the 8. 0. B. players.
Captain Wheeler of the losers
was caught off second by out-
fielder Cosaraquis. Eddie had


1


walked and late
Another incidc
Lee Doyle was
home in the fi


r stole second,
nt occurred when
caught sliding
rst inning after


he had walked and stole
ond. With Pueei at bat,
left second with the pitac
when the ball got by the
sep catcher Lee tried to
but was tagged by Pescod
was sliding home.


sec-
Doyle
h and


The winners scored one run
in the first inning.
After Cosaraquis and Stroop
had grounded out, Palmer walk-
ed. When he stole second, catch-
er Doyle attempted to catch him,
but the ball rolled away from


THREE STUDENTS MAKE
ALL "A'S" ON FIRST
SEMESTER HONOR ROLL
* nflrnu r1 *Il .i r.g, one I
Three seniors, one sophomore,
and one freshman made all "A's"
, on the final six-weeks honor roll
of the past semester.
9TH


BOYS
*''uug Julio


c;ilabria

Gwen B
Hslopcr
Itl~r I t


Jote
HrI-ren
,Her rr
N chard
Bulm
Li Sma


Ain:rc-. Anthony
Hooper. Frarn
Hajgru-. RTed
jriedlr Anhiar
SrIc.. Bruce


Burou. Robhc
Harris Dirbert
Kty, Hn rr
Pfer Ciarrne


GIRLS
CaI Paks
Ward Jean






IOTH
AUl ''1C'
Brennan, Dors
B'der, Philhpe
Foulae Beny Jane
Haus, Hertia
Hanii KiLadia
Kwr,.an. Virgnia
Lim. Pauline
MacMillan. Virniqa
i irn. Lauretm
Meczer. Matr n
Rocais Phlipls
Srapf Ednh
\Wonu AugusmA
Zzevwa. Marguemri
11TH
Eldrndg Fannie Marie
GIder Maruori
NIcUe.' Pegg
Sinders Edith
Schiavo, Mary


Andres


Fernandez Ro car
SlJz. Harol B'i
Anden n Dorothv
Badpley. Jen
Brerinjn Dorothy

Grabhorn Jen
Houac, Helen

Posse Madeline
Ravmorid Jean
Wolf. Dorotby
the game on ice. Although there
was only one hit in this inning,
there were two errors by catcher
Doyle. ";
J. Pesaod and Eder were the
only Doesep batters to get hits,
while H. Pescods Single 4iBe
second inning was the or.
O. B. hit of the game. The final
score Was 5-0.


:AT. UN. S.* M1a, t O
25 88

Basil Eathbone
I^IA Qu~ii ^mjlllnS .


S N,


24


f4?C~ .dh
&ilrr PrM; "~
Flon Ulrldl


:"








Operetta
March 15


Vol. IV-No. 14
N
KK KK KKKKK KKKK K


~s SERIES OF
LECTURES

OOEOUS TO ThIS
t a series of health
ada 1d Febxuary 20
adoring at 8:45 in the
Auditorium. The speaker that
imormTihg~g" was Col. C. C. Odom,
ri dent of the Corozal
Hospital.
The subject of h!s talk was
Mental Hygiene. The class w
told how patients were admit-
ted to this hospital and how,
after treatment, they were re-
is. Td~ace to be
mentally ill, said Col Odom.
ozal Hospilal. in 1914 up
to 1933, admitted not only men-
taly sick rom Canal Zone, but


ner s eto enter the hospital
ou pun have an order from
et t dgie. The capacity
thed opital is 350 people, and
ft are soldiers, marine
ird people and tran-
~ar e now 154 male
pmtentas n i '9 s idales. Last
oyer 193, atits were admitted
an tisharged, 85 of
whl were military personnel.
e il o a home for the
ol fols dt re are 73 males
and 9 females.
COURSE OF HEALTH LICflJE'S
1 Menral HvplrI I C Ca Oraom-

i1 ir lh Officer.
March 5
Adnniat; Pawnr Medicines
Ham, Mhucf hBod o
4 Trapic. and the t I nManc br
Eutene. School Phsc hir March 26
5 MaIarn--Dr. P Cu/r. AsurlI,
dl'k Sik-Cept. W. IL P

SSilar Dental Cintic
8 Bacterna and hrolozow (. ,nmng D.ee--
L,. Col W E.l Cc. AAiran De .*ia.
"amaf lseB suited, 85 of
n. d Xtlcshb Dr. G. frge e:
a siian Aprl 30
theau Ummadrmaed Areas -
andIY 9Ass. r Chil Heath
IT PMrcw., Medtine-Col M C sr'Oero
Chlef HeIlh O'iier May 14
Thre heR aUoterv ro etch ,Teacue n 3 5
iT 40 mlnnuit an Pie an. r Mends are in.
Ea Pen. Sch d Holds

-- tJ-D S P C r> rai


I, to r.-Kin McCley, Eva Jean Doyle

CHS Dramatic Club

Scores Again With

Two One-Act Plays

The C. IL S. Dramatic Cluit
under the direction of Mr. Paul
Beck scored two more successes
Ample proof of this was the pre-
sentation of the two one-act
plays, "Sparkin'" and "The


Idlings of the
were presented
Auditorium on
March 1, at 8 o
The first play,
an amusing bit
tics centered
(Hertha Hauss)


Kings"* These
in the C. H. &.
Friday night,
'clock.
"Sparkin' ", was
of bill billy an-
abbut Le ss y
and her new


beau, Orry Sparks (Kirt Mc-
Cleary) with due interference
from "chocolate drap" loving,
old Granny (Eva Jean Doyle)
who just wouldn't listen to
Lessy's mom, Susan (Dorothy
Anderson).
"The Idlings of the King," an
historical burlesque, concern-
ed the musically inclined King
Arthur (James Cain) who saved
his country from his arch-
(Continued on Page 3)


Dorothy Anderson, and Hertha Hauss.


Biology Club Seeks

Bats But Returns

Mudful And Batless

Not myriads of bats but oodles
of mud rewarded the toilsome
Biology Club members on their
evening trip to and from the bat
cave, about a mile and a half
from the Cristobal Gun Club.
Leaving the school building at
5:00 P. M. Tuesday, Feb. 27, the
club started toward the bat cave
with uncertain weather over-
head and muddy pitfalls beneath
their feet.
Arriving at the Gun Club
about 5:30, the students and Mr.
Vinton, with a cage, net, knives
flashlight, and a gun started
walking, or better still, started
sloshing their way toward the
cave. Some of the boys and girls
were up to their knees in mud
while others would fall back-
ward sitting in puddles. Some of
the girls had on white slacks
and white shoes.
At one section of the pipe-line
from Gatun Lake to Colon, part-


(Contnued on I


'ate 3)


Jungle Sloth Reputed Laziest Animal
Tries To Enroll In Mathematics Class


When an animal thirsts, es-
pecially for book larnin', he's
apt to do almost anything.
Last week, while free on the


onlookers.
Hanging there, he listened in-
tently to the lively discussions
which slowed down since he had


Friday, March 8, 1940


"Spardn"


Hannah Hilltop

Corporal Benson
Rita Lupa ........
Marty Williams


Metzger
.............. Dorothy
Anderson
.. Wade Krausmra
Barbara Koperski
........ Glyn Glaze


Harold de Bunker ... Neil Magnet
Isaac Goldenrod .......... Isaac Attia
CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL ORCHESTRA
P. Endq.,e Pra k Hooper, D. Hendicks,
IV. Metzger, H, Rose, T. Gregory, N. AMalr,
M. Samon, IF. Pish, R. rins, T. La-
soS, A. Mnsche, V. Kewn.
(Continued on Page 3)
~- -
Capt. Adams Speaks
On Air Enerinnces


Track Meet
CHS vs BHS
and CZJC
March 16


CrISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.


HOLLYWOOD EXTRA

TO STAR S. SKINNER

AND G. BUTLER

TO BE SHOWN MARCH 15
Singing her way to a movie
contract, Georgia Butler portrays
the heart-aches and triumphs of
a small town girl in Hollywood.
This is the plot upon which
"Hollywood Extra," the two-act.
operetta that is to be present-
ed March 15th, in the High
School Auditorium, is based.
Georgia Butler, as Irene May-
nard, from Hopetown, Maine,
wins a "talkie contest," singing
a song written by Bob Wilcox, a
childhood friend. Her "Uncle
Abner," who is engaged to Han-
nah Hilltop, consents to let her
go to Hollywood in spite of the
many protests put up by Han-
nah. Success min Hollywood, as
Irene finds out is difficult, and
she is put among the "extras."
Before long, Abner decides to
pay Irene a visit. Hannah, in
order to keep an eye on her hus-
band-to-be, trails Abner, accom-
panied by Bob Wilcox. Bob is
subconsciously in love with Irene.
After struggles and hardships,
success finally comes to Irene
and the operetta ends with a
triple wedding.
Approximately 125 students
take part in the operetta, in-
cluding the orchestra, choruses.
and leads. The cast is as fol-
lows:
Uncle Abner Maynard ...... George
Hernma
Irene .................... Georgia Butler
Bob Wilcox ........ Stanford Skinner
Deborah Wilcox ............ Marjean


mir ii*


. I






rag.:Z


TRADE


WIND


#rdy ad H, XVI).


Published by the Journalism Class of
Cristobal High School, Cistobal, C. Z.
Editor ...... .... ...................... S irley Jiennings
Assisant Editor ................ Dorohy Brennan
News Editor ................... Dorothy Anderson
Copyreadcr ............................ Byn Bunting
Business and Circulation Manager Paul Gorin
Social ........................................ Sarah Csey
Sports ...... Merwin French, Dick Eol, Mary
Hrtmman
Exchange Editor ................ Shirley jenning
Special Wriers .......... Rose Mrgart Strp
John Herman
Stanford Skinner
Georgeanna Krause
Betsy McMsillat
Sponsor ................ .... Mr. P. J. Evanco
Policy: To INTEREST STUDENTS IN
sTUDENT ACTIVITY

Assembly Conduct

C. H. S. is a wonderful school
and all of her students should
be proud of her. But, the ques-
tion is, are they willing to make
a few sacrifices to make he
better. Are they willing to fore-
go some of their pet thoughtless
disturbances to keep up her good
reputation?
Take assembly for instance.
With a few mischief-makers in
the crowd, the whole assembly
is disrupted. All students know
how easily that silly snickering
runs through the student gath-
erings. Hoots, whistles, and loud
noises only mark C. H. S. as an
unruly and unmannerly school.
Furthermore, boisterous displays
disturb speakers, actors, or who-
ever is on the stage.
Student proctors have been
enforcing politeness among the
students during the assemblies.
Though the assemblies are en-
joyable, increased appreciation,
cooperation, and self-restraint
will improve the general tone of
C. H. S. assemblies.

Guess Who!

(1) She puts no great restraint
on herself when teaching stu-
dents who are slow in getting the
technique of typing. She rolls
her eyes heavenward as if in-
voking Divinity to witness the
degree of martyrdom she is
called upon to suffer. By the
very nature of her work, she is
a living model of the efficient
secretary the "GIRLS" of her
class hope someday to become.
Her eagle-eyes can detect typo-
graphical errors that are prac-
tically invisible to student vi-
sion, and she can raise more
"cain" over a misplaced comma
than most people would over an
amputated leg.

(2) He has regular and evenly
balanced features; the kind that
* i ** ** .^ i


L. to r.: T. Burd, E. Eder. A. Preslart R. French, W.
bca constrictorr constriacor) 10 feet long, Mr.


Chatter-Box

I used to think I knew I knew;
But now I must confess:
The more I thought I knew I
knew .
I know I know the less.

When Miss Griffin (discussing
a good meal) said, "The more
chicken the better." Gracie look-
ed up and sighed. "Uh-huh."

Husband: "If I find I can't
make it home to dinner tonight,
I'll send you a note."
Wife: "Never mind, I founid it
last night in your pocket."

Not mentioning any names,
but what keeps the junior boys
from departing with their class
rings-maybe they don't fit-
huh?

When you hear a pupil always
dropping his text books in class,
you can bet he wants to drop
the subject.
**
There is a certain boy, whose
last name might be McGuinness,
had better increase his pace,
somebody is beating his time.

I heard:
The guy is old,
He's underpaid,
His voice is weak,
His hair is grayed,
His brow is furrowed,
The hard worked creature,
His steps are feeble-
The guy's a teacher.

What gal, better known as
Pee-Wee, seems to know all the
new boys that come to school?
...... J,.. s. r.k fn.w ~ ibi. w 'h A A


Reeves, A. Terwviliger,
K. Vinton.


A. Rsadles,


Boas Like Live

Struggling Meat

About a year ago Mr. Buttsof
Gatun captured a boa constric-
tor near Gatun Lake and brought
it to Mr. Vinton, biology and
chemistry teacher. Since then it
has become one of the prized
exhibitions in his living collec-
tion and is a favorite fascina-
tion to all the students.
The ten foot snake refuses to
eat anything but live food, so
it is necessary to force feed it
every two weeks. This food con-
sists of good meaty beef, three
pounds at a time, cut into small
chunks. Mr. Vinton mentioned
the fact that it even made him
a little envious to see a good pot
roast served to his reptile charge.
In the first few months in C.
H. S this boa gave birth to forty
two little snakes, which were ap-
proximately twenty-one inches
long when first seeing the light
of day.
Ordinarily, boas crave live
meat and do get bats, mice, rats,
rabbits, or guinea pigs. Lacking
these at times, the biology class
feeds him by holding his writh-
ing body and forcing food into
his large, white, ominous mouth.
Incidentally. this boa has about
fifty teeth about a half an inch
long. Sometimes he wiggles loose
and bites the hand that feeds
him.


Meaning
* *


Easter


Easter should mea me more to all
of us than a temporary breathing
spell from intellectual labors dur-
ing the ten days from March 16 to
March 24 this vear.


Force Feeding A Boa


Gives Headlh Talk

Dr,. JJ.. lllngton, Health O-
ficer, Panama, gave an inteesE
ing talk to the health
Tuesday, March 5, on "eConl-"
ous Diseases .and
tion."
Contagious is a word seldom
used by the health department
"Communicable" replaces it. ,
seases that are eotagio
caused by living organ isi.
of the organisms may be
under the microscope, hti
are so tiny, that they must be
studied in groups.
common kinds are
molds and yeasts, and worms.
Three things must hap
fore there can be a -C~
tagious disease: f0eas
tible individuals, avenia
for disease. Diseases are carried
by people, plants, antai:
other carriers, but disephre
transmitted to others iltiai.
same manner in which it left
the person having the
In other words, if the gei ofc
a disease are in the nose of a
person they will be cef ri
the nose of a susceptible pers
causing him to have the dise a
The health department b
done several things to prevnt
diseases in the Canal Zone. U:
have improved sanitation, pre
vented contamination of wter,
milk, and food. They have eda-
cated the public to know the
dangers and take bbpebr *
cautions-
Isolation in hospitals is ad-
vised for individuals who ha e
contagious diseases. This aasVies
the proper treatment of the p-
tient and prevents further carE
ing of the disease.
Innoculation and vaccinataon
have been of inestimable va i
to the public. It is up to each.
person to know and observe e4
proper rules of health in order
to insure healthier and happier
lives.

When Jeanette MacDohkild
ited El Paso, Texas on a concert
tour, a reporter from the "Auain
Pioneer" was fortunate enUtigif
to get a very interesting iter-
view. She (the reporter) 1nd
that Miss MacDonald prefers
light classical music to grand
opera. Debussy is her favorite
modern composer.

tfiirpnlta talin lni rN nmn





Friday, March 8, 1840


TRADE


WIND


Page 3


J B All TEAM
INTA CONTEST

With four hits, two walks, a
bunt, and the help of two errors
committed by the Civil Affairs,
the Cristobal High Baseball team
tied up a 6-0 score in the last
inunig of a. game Friday, March
1.
e May, Civil Affairs' hurler,
alloig o o one hit up to the
sixtb had the C. H. S. squad
buffaloed. Getting their eye on
the ball in the last frame, the
students knocked May out of the
box, Holmelin, relief pitcher,
came jin and put out the rally
by sending the next two men
back to the dugout.
Andrews, first baseman for
the Civil Affairs, was the big
gun of the game knocking out
a home run and two singles in
as many trips to the plate.
TCIVI AFFAIRS AB R H PO A E
McCtogh 3b 5 I 0 0 1 0
A on, rf I 0 0 0 0 0
Tettenrto, ss 2 1 1 0 1 1
NeIel. c 2 2 0 8 0 2
W. VCo., If I 1 1 o 0 0
Andrews, lb 3 1 3 9 0 0
R. WiU, 2f 3 0 0 0 2 1
E. Sanders, cf 2 0 1 -0
Hodmeidi s, rf, p 3 0 0 0 1 0
May. p, rf 3 0 0 0 1 0
Tbal 23 6 6 18 6 4
HIGH SCHOOL AB R H PO A E
H. Pescod. d 3 1 0 3 0 0
Baruon I p 1 1 0 2 2
J Pescod, 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0
.de. rf 3 0 0 1 0 0
Wil, c 2 0 0 4 0 2
Wheeler, c 0 0 5 1 0'
Glaze, ss 4 1 1 0 1 0
Forman, if 2 1 rooo1 0 0 0
Haood 3b 1 0 0 0 1
Poole, p 0 0 0 O o
Hoffman, lb 3 2 3 00


Tomlt


25 6 5 18 5 3


LA PAS CLUB HOLDS
GAY COSTUME PARTY
4 Conrmnumd rom fae O(ne*
group. Games were played, fol-
lowed by refreshments. A cos-
tume contest was held, and the
winners were: prettiest, Edith
Stapf and Tad Lawson; funniest,
Bobbie Styles and Neil Magner;
most unique, Fannie Marie El-
dridge and Bruce Styles.
The judges were Mr. and Mrs.
Hammond, Miss J. Brown, Miss
H- Patterson, and Mrs. Wilford.
-
"HOLLYWOOD EXTRA"
TO STAR S. SKINNER
AND G. BUTLER
(Continued Prom Page 1)
ELE~MBTARY BOYS' Gl! CLUB
A; Astoos,. C. Brennan, D. Coins, A.
Di, Purf, R. Grhboar, D. Geene, W.
GriffM, D. Henddck, E. lngram, A. Kerr,
T. JaLawson, E. Le4, A,. Lim W. Lowe, W.
Afeertg )arJbt, B. Parker, H. Pesiad,
i. Peaseri V. Red, B. Stroop.
ADVANCED BOYS' GLEE CLUB
P,' C4, As. Cn le L Doye A. Briq,
F,. Enrivez, G. Hemn, S. Justice, H.
McCanr, I. MeGCan, T. MAcGunes, P.
Scort
ADVANCED GIRZL GLEE C R. FKAh .1 Fn..san. C". f'Cnr.hht I


CAPT. ADAMS SPEAKS
ON AIR EXPERIENCES

I tCnrilJ trut. VPag. One I
He flew 2,200 miles to Panama
form the United States. The to-
tal cost of the trip was around
$33 about 12 cents a mile. He
paid goodwill money to petty
officials at each stop he made.
Capt. Adams said that women
were usually better aviators than
men for the first six hours in
the air, but men advanced and
even excelled after training be-
yond that time.
The officer finished his lec-
ture by explaining fundamentals
of flying and his model air-
plane. Numerous questions were
asked which showed the inter-
est of the General Science classes
in aviation. Everyone thorough-
ly enjoyed this surprise talk.

WHEELER, BARTRON
HIGH POINT MEN
IN FRIDAY'S MEET
(Continued from Page 4)
| 1. Nino
2. Justice
3. Nellis
220 Yard Low Hurdles-Finals, ume 28.1
sec.
1. Pucci
2. Sroop
3. Cosarquis
220 Yard Dash-Finals, time 26.2
1. Wheeler
2. S:okes
3. Eder
440 Yard Relay-Finals, rime 54.2
1. Junior Team, Wheeler, Dunliap,
Pucci, and Barrton)
2. Freshmen Team, (Stewart Prudom,
Coates, C., and Haywood)
FIELD EVENTS
High Jump
h. Dunlap
2. Picado Haywood
Discus-Distance 90' 1 w"
1. McGann
2. Greene
3. Justice
Shot Put-Distance 48'" V" '
1. Bartron
2. McGana
3. Willert
Pole Vaulr--Heighr. 7' 6"
1. Willett
2. Cosaraquis
3. Stewart
Broad Jump-Distance, 138 5* '
1. Wheeler
2. Cosaraquis
3. Dunlsp
Javelin-Distance, 156' 4"
1. Bartron
2. MGuinness
3. Greene
CHS DRAMATIC CLUB
SCORES AGAIN WITH
TWO ONE-ACT PLAYS
(Contnued from Page 1)
enemy, Sir Modred (Thomas
Gregory) by playing his saxa-
phone. Others who contributed
their talents to this play were
Mary Hartman, James Fernan-
dez, Anthony Aanstoos, and
Thomas Stewart.
r /a


-C-


United Fruit Downs

Student Squad 10-0

The league leading United
Fruit team severely trounced
C. H. S. March 5 when they shut
them out 10-0.
SHigh School used two pitchers
in the contest, Eder and Bar-
tron. Eder was touched for seven
safeties, while Bartron was hit
six times. Gibson and Didier
hurled for the United Fruiters.
Gibson worked the first two
innings allowing no hits. Didier
pitched the remaining stanzas.
His offerings were knocked only
three times-
The Fruit squad played air-
tight ball making no errors while
the High School erred four
times.
Hugh and Jimmy Pescod got
the only hits the High School
made. Hugh hit safely twice,
Jimmy once.


On the United Fruit nine Eb-
don hit three out of four times,
while Hale and Dockery hit two1
for three.
HIGH SCHOOL AB R H PO A F
H, Pescod f 2 0 2 4 0 O
McGuinness, rf. lb 2 0 0 3 0 0
Eder, p, rf 2 0 0 0 0 0
Wheeler ,d 1 0 0 0 0 0
J. Pescod,2b 3 0 1 4 1 0
Willett c 3 0 0 4 1 0
Glaze, ss 3 0 0 0 3 0
Bar:ron. Ib. p 2 0 0 1 1 1
Forsman, if 1 0 0 1 1 1
Prudhom, If 1 0 0 0 0 0
Haywood, 3b 0 0 0 0 0
Justice, 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0


Totd
UNITED E
Hale, rf
Hotz, 2b
Wilt, cf
Highly, 2b.
Kromer. If
Ebdon, lb
Kirby, c
Dockery, ss
D. Eberinz,
Gibson, p
Didier, p


Total


31 10 13 18 5 0


BIOLOGY CLUB SEEKS
BATS BUT RETURNS
MUDFUL AND BATLESS
I(Conznued fron $ige One)
ly obscured by tropical foliage,
streamed a geyser about twenty
feet high, so strong that rocks
thrown into it would be shot
skyward.
When the party arrived at the
cave, wet and muddy. Mr. Vinton
built a fire while the students
gathered wood. There was only
a small box of marshmellows to
go around to sixteen people-
After dark, the bat-hunters
decided to enter the cave. With
flashlights, they walked along
the pipe-line to the regular try-
sting place of bats. To Mr. Vin-
ton's surprise there were no bats.
Disappointed, tired, and ant-
bitten, the party returned
through the pitch dark jungle


night stumbling in spite of
flashlights.
Returning over a different but
muddy trail, the party reached
the cars about 8:30 P. M.
Those attending the trip were:
Charles Brennan. Mary Ann Sei-
bold, Elvin Ingram, Eleanor
Marquard, Josephine Brennan,
Margaret Considine, Kathleen
Hunt, Amelia Preslar, Beverly
Brown, Edward Eder, Albert Ter-
williger, Robert French, Frank
Hooper, Betty Greene, John Her-
man, reporter, and Mr. Vinton.

A school magazine is being
planned by editors of Austin
Pioneer. It is an annual and is


called


"Amateur Scribe."
-Austin Pioneer.


She: Do you know why I re-
fused you?
He: I can't think.
She: You guessed it.
Roosevelt Echo
Pittsburgh, Kansas


Hotel


Washington


Unequalled for Situation
and Comfort
COLON, R. P.


A Hotel in Keeping with
the Dignity, Spirit and
Service of the Panama
Canal.
D. J. HENDRICK.
Manager.


P. O. Address:
CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE


SEE OUR GRADUATION

PHOTOS


at


FINLAYSON'S

STUDIO

Front St.
Colon, R. P.


THEATRE


I _







rage 4


BHS Defeats CHS

Baseball Nine 1-0

In 7-Inning Game

Balboa High School won the
Cana Zone Inter-scholastic
baseball championship, when
they defeated Cristobal High
School, Saturday morning at
9:15. The game was played on
wet grounds at the Point. The
score at the end of the seven
inning game was 1-0.
Balboa touched Tommy Me-
Guinness, C. H- S. moundsman,
for two hits in the first inning,
but they were unable to score,
because of C. H. S. defensive
power.
Jimmy Pescod, C. H. S. sec-
ond-baseman, got the first Cris-
tobal hit off Joe Burgoon, B. H.
S. pitcher, in the first inning,
bit to no avail. Jim tried to
stretch his hit into a double,
when second base was left un-
covered, on a throw from Geprge
Skinner, Balboa's center-fielder,
to Norman Anderson, the first
baseman of the same team.
Skinner got the third hit off
"Mack." This came in the second
inning. They again failed to
score as "Mack" began to bear
down. C. H. S. got two men on
base in this same mminning. Due
to the good pitching of Burgoon,
they were unable to score.
Balboa was held hitless until
the fourth inning, when Howard
Moore worked McGuinness for a
walk, and"later scored when Lin-
ney dealt the fatal blow, a triple
over Hugh Pescod's head in
center-field.
C. H. S. threatened to score
in both the sixth and seventh
innings but each time Burgoon
would bear down and either
strike a man out or else make
him hit to the infield for an
easy out.
The closest that C. H. S. came
to scoring was m the seventh,
with two outs. McGuinness was
issued a free trip to first base.
"Leppy" McGlade, Bal boa' s
catcher, let one of Burgoon's
pitches get away from him, and
McGuinness went all the way to
third. Jimmy Pescod, consider-
ed one of the heaviest hitters,
if not the heaviest, in C. H. S.,
came to bat with the tying run
on third. But Jim in his anxiety
to bat in the run struck out on


five pitched balls to end
game. The box score:
CRISTOBAL
AB R H PO
H, Pesdo d 4 0 0 1
McGuinness, p 2 0 1 0
J. Pescod, 2h 4 0 1 I
Edn. f ^ 0 9 99


TRADE


WIND


Winning Girls Basketball Team


Front row: Left to riht--V. Hambleon, R.
Haywood, D. Price.
Back row: Left to right-R Baumbach, G.
Magnet, K. Bndies, MK Hartman.


CHS DOWNS ELKS

11-2 IN CONTEST

AT KOKONUT PARK

The C. H. S baseball squad
won their first game of the sec-
ond half February 27, when they
beat the Elks' nine, 11-2, in an
erratic two-hit game pitched by
McGuinness.
McGuinness allowed only two
hits during the entire game and
donated six walks The school
boys collected nine hits and four
walks off Harmon, fastball pitch-
er for the Elks.
The Antlers scored their two
runs in the first inning after
McGuinness walked three men
and the High School made two
errors.
The first school score came in
the second inning with MeGuin-
ness on second and Forsman on
first. Glaze got the first hit of
the game by banging out a triple,
scoring two runs. The final scores
came with the help of eight hits,
three walks, and four errors.
The batting star of the game
was Eder, getting two doubles
and a single in four trips to the
plate.


H. Pescod, t
Barrron, Ib
J. Pescod, 2
Eder, rf
Wile:t, c
McGuinness
Forsman. d
-. ,* -


HIGH SCHOOL
AI R H PO A


A. Wheeler, G. Wa rC.


A. Williams,


Cararight, X Raymond, J. Holmelin, N.


GIRLS' SOFTBALL

SCHEDULE GIVEN

Girls' softball is in full swing
After practicing for one week
the girls are ready for the intra-
mural games. A large number of
girls have come out for the sport.
Following is the schedule for the


contests:
March 5
I-Styles vs
3-Wetz vs
March 7
5-Homelin
I1-Styles vs
March 12
2--Carright
5-Homelin
March 14
4-Wheeler


2-Carnright
4-Wheeler
vs 6 Hambleton
3-Wertz
vs 4-Wheeler
vs 1-Styles
vs 5-Homelin


6--Hambleton vs 3-Wenr
March 19
1-Styles vs 4-Wheeler
2-Carnright vs 6--Hambl
March 21
3-Wenrz vs 2-Caroright
I-Styles vs 6-Hambleton
From April 2 to April 8
practice. Good luck, girls,


~ton


will be all-star


ELKS
AB RH I PO A E
Tyner, rf 0 1 0 0 0
Smith. rf 2 0 0 0 0 0
Parker, If 1 1 0 2 0 0
Owens, ss 3 0 0 1 1 2
Thompson, c 2 0 0 4 0 1
Christian, -b 2 0 0 7 O 0
Edwards, 3b 2 0 1 1 2 1
Potter. 2b 2 0 1 2 2 0
Yost, cf 3 0 0 0 1
Harmon, p 2 0 0 1 3 1
Total 19 2 2 8 8 66


1% f A~ I f n I*- -


iflu


tt&jiBt.


WHEELER BAg ON

HIGH POINT MEN

IN FRIDAY'S MEET

The Junior class t-rab i
field team scored a dedisime -
tory over other classes on
March 1, in the C. HIL S
track and field meet, he at
the Pomn,
Of the twelve fnat events, the
Juniors took eight first places
three second places, and three
third places. Their tea
won the 440 yard relay.
the J:tnlors a total of 57 points.
The Seniors were second with
three i ist places, six second
places, and four t
This gave them a
points. The Sop
"Sco bies" d*
points repeiV
Captain Ed.
"Bob" Bartron, Junors, were
tied for high point
boys won three first
ran on the winning relay team.
This gave them a At0ttj
points each. Joe Ntto, Senior
captain, won the 440
and the 880 yard run
ond highest total of
The results are:
100 Yard Dash--Fi Has Tsl
1 Brian
I 3 Eder
TOo Yard Dash-second Hsc

3. MAuschett
200 Yard Low Hurdles-Fist
28s7 ttf
I, Pucai
2. Snoop
220 Yard Low Hurdles, -Sex ine
1. Cosaraquis
2. Hofman
3. Brennan
440 Yard Dach-Finals~, time 40

3. Coos, E.
100 Yard Dash-Pnss rime 1
2. Pucci
3. Smkes
120 Yard High Hurdles-hFl0b S


1. Wheeler
2. Wiett
3. Stoop
880 Yard Run-
(Contit


Bun

and


31


C


n


-Finals, time
2ued on Pge 5.;ii0


B Ua
4

~auofCd

Playground

Ackey Rooney""

E HARDY'S "1 .
with
Lewis Stone
'ecilia Parker

fsnnMarn i i.


,


rr :









April
xx x .. .._

Fool!



Vol iV-No. 15


SPAS HONORED

WITH BOMBERO

BAND CONCERT

S"fECLI GUESTS INVITED
The CHS Spanish Club, La
PA was honored Wednesday
aght, March 27 with a band
diinert by the Bombero Band
ot Colon, under the direction of
rit, arlbs Molina.
flrothy Anderson, Jean Badg-
ley and Gilbert Chase acted as
.1kb hostesses and host, giving
Sd, the welcoming ad-
ress and announced the selec-
tqna to be played.,
Mr. Ducret, Commander of


CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.


Principals in


Left to Right-


the Bmberos, spoke in Spanish, G Herman,
Sw words preceding the con-
.Ie program for the evening lHOLLYW
Sas follows: MERITS


Mascagnts
Grand American Fansia ............... Toba
caprico ; cracteristico "Moraima" ....
Espinosa
C etLb Mnaeo e ...................... Pa ere
alse Capicho "Aleres Camaradas" ...........


aion Napoliana "Marechiare"


Volisecdt
anln Tnrt


01eara "El Baebero De Sevilla" ... Rossini
Sa Spangled manner ....................................
Hfama National De Panama ........................
Special guests at the affair
were "Mr. Ducret, ad Mr. Sa-
lazar, Mr. and Mrs. Rice, Mr. and
Mrs. Jorstad with the members
of the CBS band, Dr. Carlos Ca-
(Continued on Pae 3)

Prices Fishing Trip

Off Perlas Islands

Ends In Gala Feast

fDlinner is served." This was
b -eall for which the faculty
Uasands and wives anxiously
w l the home of Mr. and
Mrs.C, E. Rice, on Monday even-
in March 4., he reason for
*tpit anxiety: Sizzling fish
SRavishing smells of fried
r snapper and browned cor-

S r the guests had finished
a and wre enjoying them-
selves at various games, an ur-
1 call foro help came from
Mr. V nton. A thief, who had


"Hollywood Extra"


Special Assembly

Called to Award

Medals and Honors

FIFTY SIX ATHLETES
PRESENT
Outstanding athletes in foot-
ball, baseball, soccer, and track
received awards in a special
assembly held March 21, 1940.
The program was opened with
music played by the high school
orchestra.
"Red" Willett, speaker and
president of the Varsity Club,
introduced the team captains
who awarded certificates to
their teammates. The captains
are Montford Stokes, soccer;
Tommy McGuinness, baseball;
and "Red" Willett, football.
"Red" then introduced Mr. Neff
who gave a talk on the track
meet.
Those receiving certificates
were:


Kransman. S. Sklinner, G. Glaze, M. Metzaer. G. Burier. D. Anderson
B. Koperski. and N, Magner.

OOD EXTRA Panama Jungles

APPLAUSE Lure Students


The final night of the oper-
etta, "Hollywood Extra," per-
formed before a full capacity
auditorium, exceeded the ex-
pectations of the actors, direc-
tors, and audience, March 15.
Fine performances were given
by the leading characters with
the chorus es commendable
groups, for the background.
For the years past, the ad-
vanced glee clubs gave the oper-
ettas, -but this year, the ad-
vanced glee clubs combined with
the elementary glee clubs, each
performing in separate acts,
with gratifying results.
The music was furnished by
the high school orchestra. Mr.
Jorstad's tireless efforts reveal-
ed surprising progress with his
pupils in this musical event.
George Herman, as Uncle


(Condtiued


on Page 3)


"There's gold in them thar'
hills!" Rumors spread like wild
fire! March 13, school was dis-
missed! Cars collected! The gold
rush was on. The historical Yu-
kon gold strike was dwarfed by
local bustling. The claim-rush-
ers and spectators drove madly
through Colon toward the hint-
erlands near Gatun Lake, where
great quantities of the desired
substance were supposedly lo-
cated.
Clanging! Swinging buckets!
Swaggering boots! Wild optim-
ism with visions of quick for-
tunes punctuated the hilarious
conversations and singing.
Frantic panning! Wild yells!
"Gold! Gold! We've found gold!"
The amount of gold discovered
was estimated to be approxim-
ately 3,000,000 devalued German


(Continued on


Page 3)


At last in C. H. S., night class-
es in gum-chewing! The enroll-
ments in these classes are
mounting rapidly. So rapidly, in
fact, that it may be necessary
to use the auditorium for a
classroom.
Desiring to make Cristobal


up to all of these qualifications,
he will receive a diploma of ef-
ficiency which will entitle the
graduate to the useless art of
wishful thinking, distasteful liv-
ing, and neglible accomplish-
ments.
At the present the only thine


April 1st, 1940


Capt M. Stoke,
James Cosaraquis
Eddie Greene
Joe Nirm
Colman Sasso
Earl Davenport
Harold Rose
Keith Campbell
Delbert Harris
Capt. Hal Wilen..
Keith Campbell
H. Chemuallog
Ellis Coans
Jim Coffin
D. collins
( Condn


Soccer
Anthony Aanstoos
Frank Lindstrom
Tom Harrison
Jose Calabria
Bob Prick
Nathan Hooper
Chester Dencon
Jimmy Kenealy
Football
Earl Davenport
Tom Fresley
Tom Deirich
Arthur Diaz
Tom Gregory
led on Page 4)


Juniors Meet To

Evaluate Credits

For Graduation

Credits and units for gradua-
tion were the subjects discussed
during the Junior Class meeting
in room 203, Wednesday after-
noon, March 6.
In the four year course of
high school, a pupil should have
at least 16 credits in two major
and one minor subject. A major
unit is obtained by taking the
same type of subject three or
four years. A minor is a two
year course in some study field.
A college preparatory course


April
Fool!


Gum -Chewing Technique New CHS Course






Page S


TRADE


WIND


April 1st, 1940


by the Journalism Class
High School, Cristobal, C.


Editor .................... .......... Shirley Jen ings
Assistant Editor ............... Dorothy Brennan
News Editor .............. Dorothy Anderson
Copyreder ............................ Byne Bunting
Business and Circulation Manager Paul Gonn
So.ia.l ,......... .... ....................... Sarah Casey
Sports ...... Merwin Frech, Dik Egolf, Ary
Hartman
Exchange Editor ................ Shirley Jenning
Special Writers .......... Rose Margaret Sroop
John Herman
Stanford Skinner
Georgeanna Krause
Betsy MacMillan
Sponsor ........................... Mr. P. J. Evaneoe
Policy: To INTEREST STUDENTS IN
STUDENT ACTIVITY


April Fool

"Your face is dirty." "Tie that
left shcde string." "Mr. Smith
wants you on the telephone."
"There's a fly in your soup."
"They announced that the war
is over today!'"
April Fool! Be on your guard.
The jokers will get you if you
don't watch out today!

Principal's Message
To The Pupils

Quite often a student comes
to the office with the complaint
that one of the faculty is "pick-
ing" on him, or "riding" him
unfairly.
It is true that some pupils get
more scoldings than others, but
in the judgment of the faculty
-not unfairly. Teachers do not
like to scold any more than pu-
pils like to receive scoldings; it
is mutually upsetting.
As a faculty, it is our profes-
sional duty not only to give you
knowledge that will fit you for
a place in society, but also to
help your parents instill in you
those attributes of personality
and character that are accept-
able and desirable in society. If,
unfortunately, you have acquir-
ed undesirable attributes of per-
sonality, then increased atten-
tion, and perhaps, what may
seem to you, undue amounts of
scoldings or other punishments
may be your lot.
Such measures are of ten
taken to show you that undesir-
able actions and attitudes ex-
hibited in school will cause un-
pleasant situations and reac-
tions against an offender in any
society. They are not directed
against you because you are
Susie Smith, or John Jones, or
the son of Mrs. White or daugh-
ter of Mr. Brown. Your punish-
ment was P ivpn imnper

Cast of "Hollywood Extra"


Left to Right-
Standing, 1st rot--R. Parker, G. Glaze, C. Brennan, I
Srroorp W. Griffin. A. Aansroos, D. Collins. A. Kerr
H. Pescod. and A. Lint
2nd row,-M. Merger, G, Butler, V. Keensn, N. Magner. S.
A. Williams, A, Randall, P. Lim, M. Holmelin, P. Buder,
3rd row,-K. Hunt, M. King, S. Callaway, P. Ross*les G.
Brennan. D. Marquard, M. Considine, and M. Anderson.


entire behavior,


as well


as your


knowledge, is of the utmost im-
portance to us, personally and
professionally. Personally we are
delighted to see you grow into
fine young men and young wo-
men because we are interested
in you as persons; professional-
ly, it is a matter of pride to
turn out products of superior
quality.
You harbor no resentment
against your mother when she
tries to show you the error of
your ways, even with punish-
ment. You harbor no resent-
ment against the doctor who
removes a thorn from your foot
to make you whole again. The
thorn he removes may require
harsh measures; it may hurt
when he extracts it. The longer
the thorn stays in the flesh the
deeper it will be imbedded, and
the more severe may be the


treatment. You may
doctor's efforts to rei
thorn. The doctor may
hold you down to for
moval, but he is not
on you. Nor does tU
harbor ill will against
matter how you might
sisted his efforts in
the cause of your unh


No,


resist the
move the
r have to
rce a re-
"picking"
ie doctor
t you no
have re-
removing
happiness.


student, you are not be-


ing "picked on." No teacher "has
it in for you." Bad habits are
like thorns and their removal
may be painful.
When your anger cools after
your next punishment, either at
home or at school, try to make.
a fair analysis of your actions
that resulted in the punish-
ment. Really and truly, now,
t rn 'mI lnn,,in "*nlrnAr,. nt, *


. Peters, B.
A. Muschett,


Nesbitt, R.
B. Metzger,


Herman, R. Baumbach,
C. Nitto, M. Zitzewiz.
Rubio, E. Marquard. J.


Roving Reporter

What have you enjoyed most
in your school career?

Fannie Marie Eldridge-Teasmg
Miss Liter.
Virginia MacMillan--The dif-
ferent schools.
Georgiana Carnright-Sports.


Joe Nitto-Slinging a li
Marvin Odom-Going h
lunch at C. H. S.
Bill Peterson--Listening
Liter.
Bob Bartron-My vaca
Balboa.


ne.
tome for

to Miss


ttlon


Glyn Glaze--Being liked by a
certain girl.
Jackie Weckerling-Operettas.
Shirley Jennings-Waiting for
the week end.
Dorothy Anderson-Being one
of Miss Liter's students.
Byne Bunting-My first two
years.
Stanford Skinner-Miss Liter.
Betsy MacMillan--So far, this
year in Cristobal.
Eddie Greene High School
plays.
Rose Margaret Stroop School
life, etc.......
John Herman-Walking around
after lunch.


M L. L. Messer Writes

Mr. Rice received a letter from
Mary Lou Messer, former student
here in Cristobal High School.
Mary Lou says she's "freezing
to death" and misses the Pan-
ama sunshine,


Jutl


I senior + 1 card + 1 too many
"F's = 0 diplomas.
Once upon a midnight dreary
while I studied weak and wery.
For tomorrow's exams wer#
coming, sooner than they came
before.
First book closing, second
waiting, while I sat there, maid
debating
Recalling many useless ques-
tions,
Thinking, there should be no
more
"What's the sense of this" I
muttered, dropping books
upon the floor
"For my sleep, I do adore."
It is said, "There's no fool like
an old fool" What worries
us most, is the way they
mean that to be taken.


GRACE NOTES


Jorstad


has announced


that the operetta was so well.
received, he has conceived an
idea that will put the Student
Association financially back on
its feet. His intentions are .to
present a new operetta each
week in competition with the
movies.

The Pied Piper of Hamlin has
gone modern in the form of our
A-i flute blower, Marjean Metz-
ger. The difference is that when
Marjean pipes, her following Is
not mice, but men!

Aanstoos has sworn up *anit
down that he is going to switch
to picolo when his career as a
bass player ended suddenly with
his blowing out the pressure
gauge on his tuba.

Butch Enriquez has finally


mRo~


Published
tristobal


Chatter-Box

"No more vacation
Gone is rest
I wonder if
"School days are best."
One of our juniors awoke
Easter morning and went hunt-
ing for eggs. He found 'em in
a carton in the ice box.
Recipe for missing exam days
2 eggs a little aim
1 wak 1 to 2 throws
1 policeman 30 days
Who would have thunk iti
What with so many engage-
ments among our senior girls,
the graduating committee is se-
riously thinking of having the
orchestra play "Lohengrens'
for their entrance.
Algebra


I







April 1st, 1940


TRADE


WIND


Page 3


News


Some signs of Americanism
according to the C. E. Byrd High
School of Shreveport, La. are:
1. Our land of the free, where
the people rule, not a dic-
tator.
2. Our being able to get expe-
rience out of books, not
trenches.
3. Our constitution, which can
be amended, not suspended.
4. Our summer camps, not con-
eentration camps.
5. Our drives against paralysis,
not fellowmen.
6. Our people wearing Mardi
Gras masks, not gas masks.
7. Our freedom of speech, press,
and worship, not censorship.
* *
The seniors of Jamaica High
School, Jamaica, New York heard
a lecture that will be of use to
them after they graduate. The
subject of the talk was, "Jobs
and How to Get Them."

SHORT STORY
Grandfather had a farm,
father had a garden, son had a
can opener,
-The Polaris, N. H. S.
Columbus, Ohio.

One student of Hood River
Tigh School, Hood River, Oregon
has the right idea. In an article
submitted by her to her school
paper, THE GUIDE, she states,
"The question of whether the
seniors should be given the sole
privilege of leaving the audito-
rium first, should not even be
debated." Take heed, you lower
classmen.

THE VERNACULAR
When some big Prune,
The son of a Nut
Marries a Lemon
And the Pear
Have a Peach of a daughter
How in the name of sense
Can you believe in Heredity?
-Hi-News
Winona, Minn,


A regular course of religious
education in high schools of the
City of Pittsburgh has been ap-
proved by the Board of Educa-
tion. Religious classes will be
installed in every curriculum by
next September,
--John Harris Post
Harrisburg, Penn.

Confucius say:
To keep chap off lip, slap face.
He who lives on hill is not on
lnnnl


Continental


yards.
Romantic-What t
people have.
Noose-The events
paper.
Budget-Try to mo
tried to budget.
Gold-You get it V


he Roman


of a


news-


ve it; as, he

vhen you go


out in the rain without your
rubbers.
Blackmail-A negro boy.
Foregave-To give beforehand.
-Austin Pioneer, A..S.
El Paso, Texas.


Teacher: "What is geometry?"'
Student: "The little acorn
grew and grew, and woke up one
day and said 'Ge-om-e-try!"
-Shrapnel, W.M.A.
Alton, Illinois.

A safety class in driving is be-
ing held at Austin High School,
El Paso, Texas. Each six weeks
a new class is given safety in-
structions. The classes drive for
one period, three days a week
for six weeks on the drill field
in the rear of the school. This
course enables the students to
pass examinations in order to
receive a state driving license.

Each graduating student of
the Hood River High School,
Hood River, Oregon will be given
ten graduation announcements
by the school board. If any stu-
dent wishes more than ten, he
.will have to buy the extra ones
he needs.


Teacher: "Conjugate the v


-- I


RICE'S FISHING TRIP
OFF PERLAS ISLANDS
ENDS IN GALA FEAST


(C.ontinue tIrW agct


foot launch owned by


One)


a memr-


PANAMA JUNGLES
LURE STUDENTS
Cloentnued tmrOm Ie at One

marks. Their searching had not
been in vain, the trip was suc-
cessful.
A tense situation was com-
manded by Homer when a fatal-
ly poisonous snake was about to
attack one of the gold diggers!!
No one dared to move except
the hero of this dramatic epi-
sode. Thrusting his hypnotic
eyes within a fang's length of
the menacing reptile, Homer
whispered magic formulas in
breathless succession that
sounded like subdued steam
whistles in distress.
Frozen stiff with fright, the
reptile was carried harmlessly
back to C. H. S. to become an-
other of the biology specimens.


(Continued from rtge


One)


lero, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Ham-
mond, and Mrs. A. Fernandez.
Parents and guests of the club
members were also present.
Nine new members were in-
itiated into the La PAS club be-
fore the concert. They are,
Edward Appin Robert French
George EstenozGeorge Herman
Teddy Kaufer Geor Herman
Arleen Randall Elvin Ingram
Tad Lawson Warren Stroop
After the refreshments of ice
cream, frozen strawberries, and
cookies in the cafeteria, the club
members collectively expressed
their appreciation with cheers
for the band members and the
director.
---

HOLLYWOOD EXTRA
MERITS APPLAUSE
(Continued from Page 1)

Abner, and Dorothy Anderson,
as Aunt Hanna, were outstand-
ingly good acting their parts
with convincing results.
Stanford Skinner and Geor-
gia Butler, as the young lovers
merited much applause. Mar-
jean Metzger, as Debby, the
"Hollywood struck" younger
sister of Stanford Skinner, act-
ed with much vivacity and mis-
chievous humor.
On the whole, everyone felt
that the performance was one
of the most successful so far.


A miser
money so
it.


a man who saves
widow may spend


France Field Wins

Track-Field Meet

The France Field track and
field team outpointed the strong


C. H. S. squad
tune of 62-51.
6 first places, b
8 second and 8
Bob Bartron
took three first
from behind in


March 9, to the
They took only
ut they captured
third places.
, C. H. S. star,
places, and came
the 440 Yard Re-


ber of the Yacht Club. The party
caught about 265 pounds of cor-
bina and red snapper.
While Dr. Swanson was try-
ing to land a big fish, he lost
Mr. Rice-s reel ant rod. So Mr.
Rice purchased a better one.
Fish? No, fishing tackle.


LA PAS HONORED
WITH BOMBEIRO
BAND CONCERT


Bureau


Clubs


and Playgrounds


THE BLUEBIRD
with
SHIRLEY TEMPLE


rIqTAR AI


I


lay to win that event for his
team.
Steele was France Field's ace,
taking first places in the 220
Yard Dash and the 880 Yard
Run.
The summary:
TRACK EVENTS
100 Yard Dash, time 10.7 sec
1. Bartron, B.
2. Eddy F.
3. LaFl'eur, F.
120 Yard High Hurdles, time 18 sec.
1. Wheeler, E.
2. Willett, H.
3 Rice,. P.
220 Yard Dash, time 23.4 sec.
1. Steele, F.
2. Stasiak, F.
3. Stokes, C.
200 Yard Low Hurdles, time 25.6 sec.
1. Dunlap, H.
2. Puals, F.
3. Rice, F.
440 Yard Dash, time 56 sec.
1. Lenze, F.
2. Eddy, F.
3. Nitro, C.
880 Yard Run, time 2 mmin. 9.7 sec
1. Steele. F.
2. Morley, F.
3. Cox
440 Yard Relay, time 48.1 sec.
1. C.H.S.; Wheeler, Pucci, Stokes and
Bartron.
FIELD EVENTS
Shot Put, distance 437T
1. Bartron, B.
2. McGann. J.
3. Dube, F.
Pole Vault, height 9'9"
1. Gould, F.
2. Willett, H.
3. Eddy, F.
Discuss, distance 113'6'
1. Bartron, B.
2. Hetesko, F.
3. Greene, E.
Running Broad Jump, distance 20' I"
1, Johnson, F.
2. LaFleur, F.
3. Dunlap, H.
High Jump, height 5'5"
1. Dunlap, H.
2. Nellis, W.
3. Johnson, F.
Javelin, distance, 145'11"
1. Frame, F.
2. LaFleur, F,
3. Batdorff, F.


PHILIPS the RADIO you will
eventually buy


T..1, A 1. .


r


. I .








rage


TRADE


WIND


Apr'tI, 118*@


Athlete Feats


The C. H. S. baseball team can
hbe thankful for one thing. That
is the fine pitching and hitting
turned in by Tommy McGuinness,
in a recent game against the all-
star Canal Zone league team. Tom
pitched hitless ball and also col-
lected four hits in as many times-
at-bat, facing Max Sanders, C. H.
S. Alumni
*s s *
The annual C. H. S. tennis
tournament was scheduled to
start sometime last week and
the winners of the finals will
meet the Balboa High School
champs in April.
* *
A scoop; Bob Bartron and Hal
illett broke the worlds records
for the Shot Put and the Pole
Vault, respectively, in a recent
track and field meet held at the
Panamanian Olympic Stadium.


Georgiana Carnright's girls'
softball team drew nearer to the
championship on Tues d a y,
March 25, when they won a for-
felt from Gladys Wertz's squad,
while the second place Bobbie
Styles' "Reds" were winning 28-
9 from Rhoda Ann Wheeler's
""Dames." Neither of the first
two teams could gain on one or
the other, because of them both
winning.

Talking about softball. At a re-
cent game Bobbie Styles, heavy
hitting outfielder of the "Reds,"
went to bat jix official ames and
each time she hit a home-run, Two
of these came with the bases load-
ed. Oh Yeah!

SPECIAL ASSEMBLY
CALLED TO AWARD
MEDALS AND HONORS
(Continued from Page One)


Frank Hooper
Bryan Maker
Karl Marohl
Joe Niuo


Alex Limr
Harold Rose
Buddy Sroop


Capt. Tommy McGuiness, Baseball
George Hoffman L. Lesser
Bob Bartron N. Kelly
R. Justice D. Hallowell
Bunk Marquad E. Baxter
R Egol! Buddy Stroop
J. Walsh Tommy Stewart
W. Krausman
Those receiving medals for track e
Name No. of
Bob Bartron 3
Eddie Wheeler 3
Joe Nirto 2
"Red" Willet 1
John Pucci


Vents
H4ead~s


B. H. S. DEFEATS

C. H. S. AS C. H. S.

BREAKS RECORDS


The highly favored Balboa
High School Track and Field
team travelled to Cristobal and


defeated their ancient
Cristobal High School, on
16, at the Point. The in
won eight first places,
second places and five
places for a total of 70V/2
C. H. S. won three first


all of these making ne
cords.
The first record was
when Bob Bartron thr
Shot Put 42 feet inch.
Harold Dunlap, not to
done by his teammate,
the 200 Yard Low Hurdles


rivals,
March
vaders
seven
third
points.
places.


w re-.

broken
ew the

be out
broke
in the


impressive time of 26.1 seconds.
Bartron then walked over to
the Discus pit and established a
new Canal Zone Scholastic re-
cord in this event with a throw
of 112 feet 6 inches. On his last
throw Bob threw the Discus 127
feet 1/2 inches to break his own
record.
Bartron was high point man
of the meet with a third in the
100 Yard Dash and two first
places. Harry Skinner was high
point runner for B. H. S. win-
ning the 100 Yard Dash and the
220 Yard Dash. He was anchor
man on the winners' relay
team which won this event.


120 Yard
1.
2.
3.
440 Yard
1.
2.
3.
100 Yard
1.
2.
3.
"200 Yar
1.
2.

3.
880 Yard

1.
2.
220 Yard
I,
2.
3.f
440 Yard
1I


TRACK EVENTS
High Hurdles, timre 17.1
Tapia, B.
GE nes, B.
Willeit, C.
Dash, time 57.2 sec.
H. Moore, B.
NicO, C,
Moone. B,
Dash,. ime 10.2 sec.
Skinner, B.
Leaver, B.
Batron, C.
d Low Hurdles, time 26.
Dunlap. C.
Ryan, B.
Baldwin. B.
Run, time 2:23 sec.
E. Moore. B.
Fitzgerald, B.
Ninro, C,
Dash, rime 24.6 sec.
Skinner, B.
Leaver, B.
Stokes, C.
Relay, time 47.7 sec.
Balboa
FIELD EVENTS
r, distance 42'"
Barutron. C,
McGann. C.
Meyers, B.
t. height 9"4"
Burke, B.


I sec,


C. H. S. Beats C. A.

As Bartron Wins

A fighting C. H. S. Atlantic
Twilight League baseball team
trounced the now fourth place
Civil Affairs squad, on Thurs-
day, March 14, allowing them-
selves to move into third place
one-half game behind the
"Cops".
The winners were never be-
hind after they had scored four
runs in the first inning. They
added a run in the fourth; and
put the game on "ice" in the
sixth stanza when they scored
five runs, including a triple by
Jimmy Pescod, to make their
total 10 compare to the 5 that
the C. A. team scored during th1
game.
C. H. S. not only out-scored
the Civils, but out-hit and out-
fielded them. Out-hitting them
8-6. Arthur Cotton's losers made
7 errors while the students


played perfect
HIGH


H. Pescod,
Glaze, ss
J. Pescod,
Eder. 3b
Bartron, p
McGuinness,
Nirro, lb
Prudom. c
Forsman, If
Pool. rf
Doyle, rf


Total


Alberga. cf
Andrews, lb
W. Cotton,
Sanders, ss.
McCullough,
Will, 3b
TecEerton, ss
DeLeon, If
May. p
A. Cotton,. f
Days, rf, 3b


Total


ball. Box
SCHOOL
AB R H
2 I 0
3 1 1
4 2 2
4 2 0
4 1 3
2 0 1
0 1 0
3 0 0
4 0 1
1 1 0
1 1 0


score:


IU U I)


28 10 8 18 7 0


CIVIL AFFA
AB
3
3
rf 3
2b 3
I
1
2
3
0
1


23 5 6 18 8 7


Broad Jump, distance 20' "
1. Reyes, B,
2. Cosaraquis, C.
3. Hutchings, B.
*Discus, distance 127'T1"
I. Bartron, C.
2. Greene, C.
3. Burkle, B.
High Jump, height 5 '6(W
1. Burgoon, B.
2. Towery, B.
3. Dunlap, C.
4. Jones. B.
*New Canal Scholastic Records.


N:


Total

H. Pescod.
McGuinness,
Eder,. i
G. Pescod,
Wilet,. c
Glaze, ss
Hoffman, 1
Haywood.
Poole, If


Total


18' 4s~i ~iS


HIGH SCHOOL
AB R
[ 3 a
3 0
b 20
2 0
b 1
21
2 0


fr;
on

''I aI


19 2 45ri_.


Me hate him, me hate eal
Me wish him would die
Him tell I, him love Ibte
Darn him, him lie.
Chico Red and Gld


S


THEATRE


MOkiir~


Marlene Dietrich
in


DESTROYY RIDES AG
with


James Stewart


Hotel Washington

Unequalled for Situation
S .... A- -A


SEE OUR GRADUATION
--n-a


.


POLICE WIN OVER

HIGH SCHOOL 4-2

The Cristohal Police outplay-
ed the High School 4-2 in a ball
game March 11 at Kokonut
Park. The game was caled i"
the fifth inning because of rain
Third baseman, Mike
took over the mound d
the police and hurled

McGuinness, of the
School squad couldn't
the ball, walking severatlm
and permitting others toS scre
on wild pitches. The sore

J. Eberenz If 2 2
Howetl cf 2 o0 t : o0
Sutherland, ss 2 1 1
Hughes, 3b 3 00:
Greene. 1 2 O i -^ -: O
Ra. Turner. Ib, C 2 0
Peer. 2b 2 ., 0 o0
Drake, rf 2 0 I"SE, H
Edimondson, c I 5 0
Ru. Turner, lb 0 0 |- 1. -PN 00


*"


II -* ^ *- -














Vol IV--No. 16 CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z. April 12, 1940


Two Seniors, Sophs,

One Freshman Rate

On "A" Honor Roll
With only two more report
card periods to go, the 4th six
weeks' period finds two seniors,
two sophomores, and one fresh-
man on the "A" Honor Roll. This
is an indication that C. H. S.
students have let down on their
studying.
Honor Roll
4th Six Weeks
1939-1940
9th Grade
BOYS GIRLS
All "A's" Campen, Dolly Jean
Wor&g Julio Eggleston, Irene


Calabria, Jose
Campen, John
Demon, Chester
Green, Richard
Hooper, Nathan
Miller, Donald
Real, William


10th Grade
Aanstoos, Anthony Agl A's"
Kaufer, Teddy Brennan, Doris
Randles, Arthur Rosales. Phili
r- / *,


aasso, ozIman
Syles, Bruce


Continued


Butler, Phillipe
Foulkes, Betty Jane
Hauss, Hertha
Hunt, Kathleen
Keenan, Virginia
MacMillan, Virginia
Magner,. Nancy
Martin, Lauretta
Metger, Mariean
Seibold, Mary Ann
Srapf, Edith
Wong, Augusta
Zitzewitz, Margueriw
on Page 3)


Beck, Worrell Star

In "Little Theater"
Characterizations
"Don't do as I do, do as I
say!"
This familiar quotation was
not applicable last Saturday
night, April 6, to Mr. Paul Beck
and Miss Mary Worrell, drama-
tic coaches of C. H. S. when they
appeared on the stage of the
newly organized "Little Thea-
tre."
Mr. Beck played the part of
Death in Heywood Broun's skit
"Death Says It Isn't So." In this
play, Heywood Broun portrays
T"1ta'r.l- nt n inuw a~'r1f1 -/na nn rb.. .4


Dramatics Club


_-I-- 1


Left to Right; Lying-Jimmy Fernandez, Thomas Stewart.
Front Row-Thomas Gregory. Ruth Randles, Frances Davenport, Eva Jean Doyle. Marjean Metzger, Ada Crandall.
Back of Gregory--Algerire Collins.
Second RofR-Mr. P. L Beck, Sponsor; Homer McCarry, Judith Ferri. Dorothy Anderson, Edi:h Stapf, Mary Hartman.
Back Row--James Cain, Alfred Muschett, Anthony Aanstoos, Arthur Diaz.


Jorstad's


Music


Seniors


Groups to Perform On


Week Of I

Mr. Jorstad, re
importance of
bands, orchestras,
in relation to the
of America, plans
ticular emphasis
of music during 2


lay


5-11


recognizing the
High School
and glee clubs
musical future
to place par-
on all phases
National Music


Week, May 5 to 11.
On Wednesday, May 7 at a
high school assembly, there will
be a program featuring the 35-
piece High School band in a con-
cert interspersed by instrument.
tal solos by the Cristobal High
musicians. There will also be a
series of selections by the Elem-
entary Advanced Glee clubs.
On Thursday, May 8, the Ju-
nior High School Orchestra will
present a program which has for
its theme the life and music of
Stephen Foster, featuring his
songs of universal appeal, such


Hear


Talk


"Apprenticeships


And Learnerships"
In his talk to the senior class
on "Apprenticeships and Learn-
erships" Wednesday, April 3, Dr.
J. C. Swanson told of the ad-
vantages of getting a job with
the Canal today compared to
those of six or seven years ago.
Up until six years ago, in
order to obtain a job with the
Panama Canal, a person either
had to be called from the States
or have had previous experience.
It was almost impossible for a
boy or girl just graduating from
high school to get a job because
he had no experience.
Today a boy or girl who has
just finished high school may
put in an application for work
with the Personal Bureau and
then take the examination that
is given the last of June for an
apprenticeship. To take this


Beck's Dramatic

Groups Presented

Successful Plays

With the giving of the plays
Sparkin' and Idlings of the
King, the Dramatic Club year
drew to a close, March first. Dur-
ing the past seven months many
successful plays were enacted in
the C. H. S. auditorium.
Mr. Beck, the dramatics teach-
er, who has been here for the
last four years is directly res-
ponsible for their successes and
popularity. Credit goes to Mr.
Bryan for designing the scenery
for the productions so ably.
Honorable mentions are given
James Cain, Eva Jean Doyle,
Kirt McCleary, and Dorothy An-
derson for their splendid per-
formances this year.
Mr. Beck is planning to pro-
duce "Capt. Applejack," "June
Mad,'" and "My Lady's Lace"
next year.
A. lictt nif thn rtivc nrrcpntnfr.


Attend Balboa
Democratic
Convention
May 3rd


Advertise
Music Week
May 5-11


M







lage R


TRADE


WIND


PFriday, April I2, 1940


Published by the Journalism Class of
(ristobal High School, Criscobal, C. Z.
Editor ............................ Dorothy Anderson
Assistant Editor ............... Shirley inningss
News Editor ........................ Seara Catey
Copy Reader ................... Dorothy Br
Business and Circulaion Manager Paul Gorm
Social Editor .......... .......... By. Byuanis
Spom rs ditors ........................... Dick F ol
Merwin French
Jen B&dgley
Exchrnge Editor ................ Betsy MacMita
Special Writers ...................... Jobh Herman
St.aford Skinner
Georgn a Krvust
Mary Schinvo
Mary Hart ma
Policy: To INTEREST STUDENTS IN
STUDENT ACTIVITY

MUSIC WEEK
** *
Starting May 5 to May 11 is
"music week", planned to im-
press upon the public, especially
upon fathers and mothers, the
part that music plays in the
lives of school students every
day.
Mr. Jorstad has received the
complete cooperation from both
the Junior and Senior High
School in his efforts to produce
three programs.
Quoting from Mr. Brisbane,
famous deceased journalist,
"The three greatest musicians
that have appeared on earth, all
of the German race, were Bee-
thoven, Bach, and Wagner. As
far above all the others in mu-
sic as Shakespeare is above the
rest in literature, stands Bee-
thoven. Behind him stands Bach
whose name means "the brook,"
and who, because of his genius,
Beethoven said, should have
been named the "ocean." Wag-
ner is, of course, known for his
magnificent operas.
A musical people is a true re-
flection of its civilization. Tom-
toms outside a village make one
automatically think of savages,
but the sounds of a violin, piano,
guitar, or trained human voice
say "Civilization is here."
"Music gives the human emo-
tions their highest, noblest,
most perfect expression. Music
is the only mental stimulant,
except happiness, that knows no
harmful reactions. Music is the
language of the soul, the high-
est expression yet attained of
human feeling and genius."
With all these thoughts in
mind, everyone will appreciate
the programs put on by the
Cristobal High and Junior High
School glee clubs and orchestra,
to give more thought to music.
"Pasina th- RAik"
'"Pnsainnr the Rak"


Biology Club


to R. Top-B. Brown, M. Considine, W. Snroop, E. Swapf, R. French. V. Keenan. L. Ma in, M. Sibold, J. Futy, .
A. Randall, E. Ingram. H. HSass, M. Bramin, D. Hollowell. K. Vinton.
to R. Center-L. Lesser, C. Brennan, P. Karst, J. Fernandez, F. Enriquez. S. Barber. A. Enriquez, F. Hooper, E. Aipia,
to R. Lower-K. Hunt, . Mirzcer J. Brennan, E. Marquard, P. Budler, M. Anderson, G. Budter


Continental


News


Congratulations to the Hill-
topper of Jamaica High, Jam-
aica, New York, which received
for the fifth consecutive time
the Medalist ranking at the six-
teenth annual convention of the
Columbia Scholastic Press Asso-
ciation.

The Guide staff of Hood River
High School have put up a sign
in their office which reads
"Constructive criticism gladly
accepted, but be sure it is con-
structive." This sign expresses
the feelings of the staff. They
are ready to accept criticism
which will improve the paper
but sarcasm will not do the re-
ceiver any good nor will it be-
nefit the person who expresses
himself sarcastically.
-The Guide
Hood River High
Hood River, Oregon

The senior class of the C. E.
Byrd High School is presenting
as their senior play the same
comedy, "What a Life", that the
Junior College enacted in the
Cristobal High School audito-
rium February 16.

him. has to offer some excuse?


We Know-Do


1. Why was the
China built?
2. Where did
Games begin?
3. Who invaded
and when?
4. On what day


Great Wall of


Olympic


Great Britain


did the


assas-


sination of Julius Caesar take
place?
5. Name a famous city which
was totally destroyed by a
certain volcano in Italy?
6. When was the first Crusade?
7. When was the printing press
invented?
8. Who discovered the Pacific
Ocean and what famous city
is named for him?
9. Who was the first sailor to
circumnavigate the world?
10. What great church leader
led the Protestant Revolt?
11. Who discovered the Missis-
sippi?
12. When was slavery introduced
in America?
13. Name two famous catastro-
phes which occurred in the
city of London?
14. When was the signing of the
Declaration of Indepen-
dence?
15. By whom, when and where
was the first American flag
made?
16. Who invented the cotton


Fresh Plan Pin

The Freshman class has de-
cided that this coming iy
April 12 will be the mos t-
able date for their piaic tote
held on the Point, the i fft
so many other popular p le
Each student and guest awi
be required to pay twenty-flve
cents for the privilege of atend-
ing the annual outing.
Various committee chairmen
have been chosen: J. Ward, iod
Committee; G. Rubleo, Un
tainment Committee; J. Petis
Guest Committee; N. Taybr
Clean-Up Committee,
Also they o lan to
ditional money from eve1rybp
go to the movies.
The Freshman Dance he
given sometime in May,
This meeting was held he
eighth period on April 59.

Singer Bites C
*
One day when I was a
three years old, I wanted top
our phonograph. We had som
very valuable records of tfaes
opera stars singing equally ftM-
ous operas.
Mother had told me not to
touch any of the records ont
Which the unsurpassed vole







day, April 12, 1940


Thespians Of C. H. S.

To Initiate Members

The National Thespians of C.
IL S., started in 1981, have been
under the successive directions
of it, Knox, Mrs. Spencer, Miss
WorreD, and now Mr. Beck.
On April 25 the new members,
James ain, Dorothy Anderson,
Eva Jean Doyle, Gioconda
Pucci, Kirt McCleary, Alfred
Musehett, Arthur Diaz, and
Stanford Skinner, will be initiat-
ed by President Eddy Greene,
Vice-President Homer McCarty
and Muriel Stewart.
Qualifications for entry are: a
major role m one long play or
two major roles in one-act plays;
minor speaking parts in three
long plays, or four one act plays
may also be accepted if the act-
ing is outstanding. Other pos-
sible qualifications may be pre-
vious work backstage on scen-
ery, painting, electrical work,
stage, or business managing.
Next year this group is plan-
ning to produce three-act plays
in place of the one-act plays as
in the past.

ANS ErWS TO WE KNOW-
DO YOU?


I
I,


(Conionued trom page Two)
I. It was built to keep out the
ancient invaders of the Chin-
Sese people.
2 Tie first Olympic Games be-
gan in Olympia, Greece, 776
B.C.
3. Julius Caesar in the year 55-
54 B C.
4. March 15, 44 B., C.
5. City of Pompeii on August
24, 79 A. D. by Mt. Vesuvius.
6. 1096-1099.
7. The year 1440.
8. Vasco Nunez de Balboa, Sept.
26, 1513, Balboa, Canal Zone.
9. Ferdinand Magellan, with
five vessels and 275 men.
Sept. 20, 1519, to July, 1522.
10. Martin Luther in Germany
in June 1524-1525.
11. De Soto, 1541.
12. August 1619.
13. The great plague Dec. 1664-
1666 and the great fire in

L4. ly 4, 1776.
15. By Betsy Ross, Arch Street,
Philadelphia, Penn.
16. Eli Whitney, 1793.
17. In Dec. 1812.
18 The blowing up of the bat-
tleship Maine in Havana
Harbor Feb. 15, 1898.
19. Wright Bros. on Dec. 17, 1903.


San


Blas


TRADE

Trip


Meeting at the Yacht Club
wharf, Thursday morning, March
21, Mr. Rice with his family and
friends climbed aboard Mr.
Parker's SEA HORSE and head-
ed through the Colon break-
water toward the San Bias Is-
lands.
Following the coast closely,
the boat passengers experienced
the results of sea-sickness for
several hours until arriving at
Porvenir, the Panamanian cus-
toms stop.
Mooring the boat, the party
walked on terra firma, glad to
be away from the rocking ocean.
With a good night's rest, the
party motored toward the island
of Carti where they went ashore
to examine the quaint thatched
huts with their colorful Indian
inhabitants.
Amused by the pretended
shyness of the island women who
hid their dusky faces from the
sight of cameras, the visitors of-
fered various small coins until
the Indian women posed without
their feigned fears.
Besides swimming, boating,
hunting for lobsters and shells,
exploring, and meeting interest-
ing experiences, the party had
the fun of cooking the King
fish, baracuda, bonita, several of
which were caught while trolling
in the San Bias waters.
Mr. Rice still retained top ho-
nors for catching the most fish
but he also gets the medal for
getting snagged oftenest and
losing the most tackle.
Others of the faculty on this
trip were: Miss Ayecock, Mr.
Evancoe and wife, accompanied
by friends of the Rices in the
party.
The pleasure trip ended East-
er Sunday, at the Strangers Club
at 4:00 P. M.


Fifty Couples Attend

:Varsity Club Dance

Last Friday evening, April 5,
the Varsity Club boys gave an
Informal dance in the Gym.
The admission was ten cents
per person, and at least fifty
couples attended.
The music was furnished by
Rosie's Orchestra, who played
popular tunes as "Careless", "In
a Little Dutch Garden", "I'm Fit
to be Tied", "The Creaking Old
Mill On The Creek," and others.
The dance lasted until 11:00
P. M.


WIND


Sophs


Page 3


Plan


Picnic


The sophomore class is plan-
ning a picnic to be held Satur-
day, April 20 at the Cristobal
Gun Club.
Each member may bring as
many guests as he wants pro-
viding he pays a quarter for
each person that he invites.
The picnic starts at five o'-
clock. Games will be played until
dark. After refreshments are
served the group will sing songs
around the fire.

BECK'S DRAMATIC
GROUPS PRESENTED
SUCCESSFUL PLAYS


One)


man, James Cain, Alfred Mus-
chett, E. J. Doyle. This was a
delightful Irish comedy by Lady
Gregory, who is, according to G.
B. Shaw, "the greatest living
Irishwoman."
And "The Thunder Crashed"
-a play in pantomime Kirt
McCleary, Hertha Hauss, Doris
Brown.
"Sparkin," Kirt McCleary, E.
J. Doyle, Hertha Hauss, and
Dorothy Anderson portrays the
difficulties of a poor country boy
"a courting' ".
"Idlings of the King" James
Cain, Mary Hartman, James
Fernandez, Thomas Gregory,
Anthony Aanstoos, Thomas Ste-
wart; an unhistorical burlesque
concerning the musically mind-
ed King Arthur who saved his
country from his arch enemy by
playing his saxophone.


As one toe said to the other:
"Shh, I think there's a heel fol-
lowing us."
Also as one eye said to the
other eye: "We can't go on this
way, there's something between
us that smells."
-Jamaica Hilltopper
Jamaica, New York


JORSTAD'S MUSIC
GROUPS TO PERFORM
WEEK OF MAY 5-11
(Continued from Page One)
principles of democracy; that it
is of the people, for the people,
and by the people. As such it is
destined to continue and to
grow, unless enthusiasts should
unwisely apply pressure to its
promotion and thus cause reac-
tion, or selfish interests to gain
control and thus subvert its pur-
poses. Because the observance
rests on such a broad founda-
tion of public interest and has
so universally received the moral
support of musicians, educators,
civic leaders and government
officials, this danger is remote.

SENIORS HEAR TALK
ON "APPRENTICESHIPS
AND LEARNERSHIPS"
(Conrmnued from Page One)

get booklets on these subjects
from Mr. Hotz.
There will be an examination
for service register Saturday,
April 27th. This test is open to
either boys or girls who will be
eighteen before December 1,
1940.

TWO SENIORS. SOPHS,
ONE FRESHMAN RATE
ON "A" HONOR ROLL


(Continued from ^wer


One)


llth Grade
Harris, Delbert Eldridge, Fannie Matie
Kelly. Harry Gilder. Marjorie
Pierce, Charles Horine, Emily
Sanders, Edith
12th Grade
Ania, Iaac All "A's"
Greene. Eddie Bailey, Peggy
Salas. Harold iKauer, Jane
Anderson, Dorothy
Badgeicy. Jean
Cagey, Sarah
Crouch. Lois
Flores, Efrida
Grabhorn, Jean
Hun. Mary
Posse, Madeline
Raymond, Jean
Wolf, Dorothy


Bureau


of Clubs


and Playgrounds

Eleanor Powell
in
BROADWAY MELODY OF
1940
with
Fred Astaire


*II


(Ctonnucj trju- Vasge


Hotel Washington

Unequalled for Situation
and Comfort
COLON, B. P.


A Hotel in Keeping with
the Dignity, Spirit and
Service of the Panama
Canal.


I


=







&'aget


TRADE


WIND


Friday, April 12, 1940


Athlete Feats


Orchids to Georgiana Carn-
right's softball team for win-
ning the C. H. S. intra-mural
girl's softball league for the
1940 season.

For the last few weeks, the
boy's gym classes have been
learning and scrimmaging bas-
ketball. This is an indication
that the C. H. S. intra-mural
basketball league will soon get
under full steam. The league
was scheduled to open on Thurs-
day, April 11. The teams are
picked. From all indications of
the strength of each squad, the
league should have some crack
games. Your correspondent fore-
casts that Harold Dunlap's team
will be ahea 1 when the curtains
fall.

Roses to the C. H. S. Twilight
league hardball award for their
finishing the second half in sec-
ond place. This year's team was
sponsored by the American Le-
gion. The latter paid for our
school's uniforms, and they are
appreciated.


Clarence


Coats,


Sooky


to you,


defeated that tall, well-built
athlete, Bob Bartron in their
quarter final tennis match.
Sooky lost the first set to Bob
8-6, but came back in the last
two sets to win 6-3 and 6-0. It
looked as though this would
make Sooky champ, but as all
athletes do, he went into a
slump when he played his semi-
final match and lost to Paul
Karst.

The swimming meet that was
scheduled to be held April 5 had
to be called off, because there
were no students to participate
in the meet. If this is the way
you, the students of C. H. S., are
going to be, next year the Ath-
letic Department of the school
is likely to exclude swimming
from its program.


Twilight League Team


Front Row; L. t
Standing; Left to
Justice.


o R.: J, Niuo, A.
Right. C. Brennan
J. Haywood.


C.H.S. BASKETBALL

HEADS PICK FIVES

FOR COMING SEASON

The captains of the intra-
mural basketbaL league of C.H.
S. held a meeting in the Cris-
tobal Playshed on Monday after-
noon, at 3:00 o'clock to pick their
respective teams for the coming
season.
The captains of the teams are
Tommy McGuinness, Harold
Dunlap, Johnny Haywood, Joe
Nitto, Eddie Wheeler, Glynn
Glaze, Harold Willett, and Jim-
my Pescod.

Dunlap's squad will be favor-
ed to win, with Wheeler's five
fighting to displace them. The
teams are:


T. McGuinnesn
(Capt.)
F. Baxter
H. Rose
R. Egolf
C. Ruley
N. Magner
B. Maher
D. Green
L. Leeser
O. Heilbrom


Ninto


(Capt)
Nesbitt
Tidd
Coats
Brayron
Pierce
Kerr
Gower
Prudom


H. Dunlap
(Capt)
D. Hollowell
N, Taylor
K, McCleaty
R. Justice
W, Krausman
W. White
D. Harris
J. Pucci

E. Wheller
(Cape.)
E. Ingrarm
C. Ender
H. Thomas
B. Bartron
J. Coffey
B, Sragps
M. Salmon
A. Randles
'r r._.-


Davenporr, E. Eder, G. Glaze, C. Forsman, S. Pool, J.
E. Marquard, E. Prudom, E. Wheeler, T. McGuinness,


Pescod, H. Pescod,
G. Hoffman, B. Bartron, H


Wllerr R.


An editorial in the Polaris, BASKETBALL BOYS
North High School, states that
the students going to and from SELECT CAPTAINS
classrooms through the halls wil all i ll
make life safer if they: .FR FOW RA
1. Stay on their own side of FOR NEW SEASON


the hall.
2. Take the corners
wheels.
3. Do not speed in I
4. Do not stop in ha:
5. Do not stop m
stairs to talk. Maybe 1
C. H. S. halls would t
the students would 1
these rules.


G. Glaze
(Capt.)
S, Pool
C. Forsman
R Simons
H. Kelly
A. Diaz
C. Brown
C. Sasso
P. Karsi
F. Enriquel
1. Pescod t
(Capt.)
R. French
J. McGann
M. Picado
G. Estenox
B. W. Styles
A. Aanstoos
L. Doyle
J. Gilder
D. Long


on four


halls.
Uls to talk.
middle of
Aife in the
re safer if
ive up to


H. Willett
(Ctpt.)
R. Prick
A. Muschetr
B. Parker
R. Davis
L. Conley
W. Stroop
E. Davenport
A. Carries
3. Coffin
J. Haywood
(Capt.)
T. Kaufer
W. Real
E. Marquad
C. Brennan
C. Coats
L. Keller
J. Walsh
T. Stewart
A. Lim


A meeting of all C. H. S8 boys
who plan to play intra-mltral
basketball this coming season
was held on Thursday afternoon
at 2:45, April 4, to pick the cap-
tains for the league. The meet-
ing was held in the Cafeteria,
with Mr. Howard Neff, Physical
Ed. teacher, presiding.
Eddie Wheeler received the
greatest number of votes,
Each boy was allowed to name
three boys as captains. There
were 77 future basketball stars
that cast their votes. The first
10 boys receiving the highest
number of votes were:


NAME
E. Wheeler
H. Willetc
T. McGuinness
J. Pescod
H. Dunlap
J, Haywood
J. Nitto
R. Justice
G. Glaze
B. Bartron


PHILIPS the RADIO you will
eventually buy


Julio A. Salas


Distributor


5006 Front St.
Tel. 537 Colon


S,


SEE OUR GRADUATION

PHOTOS















Vol. IV No. 17 CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z. April 26, 1940


S ecial H. S. Music a 910
T^^kl~l 1- ^ Wl1C!^ l Q'17 U II
.t~l VJIID lol Td 7X


C. H. S. Advanced Glee Club


Elementary Glee Club


right: M. Snyder, M. Schiavo. J. Kaufer. B. Williams, E. Horine,
Oswald, C. Stroop, E. Chase, D. Brennan


Middle row-left to right: E. Nino, I. Stade, V. MacMillmn, J.
M. Lyew, Mr. Jorstad. 0. Holgerson, F. Davenport, D.
Stapf, V. Keenan, accompanist.


Back row-left to right: L Doyle, F, Enriquez,
G. EsTenos, T. McGuinness, R. Justice, G.
H, McCay. F. Cain. L Atria.


A. Enriquez,
Herman, W.


Ferri B. Bath. D. Price.
Wolf, D. Anderson, E.


A. Carlos,
Krausman,


Skinner,
Magner.


Front row-i- to r.: B. Shea. G. Rubio, B. Huff, D. K
drick, C. Brennan, Mr. 0. E. Jorsrad, P. Collins, J.
C. Nito., M. Anderson.
Middle row-1. to r.: M. Metzger, K. Hunt, A. Ulseth, P.
S. Herman, A. Rsndal W. Griffen, W. Nesbit, B.
R. Parker, A. Lim. T. Lawson, J. Furey, B. Green,
Callaway.
Back row--. to r.: G. Buder, M. Holmelin, G. Ingra.
Hauss, V. Hambleton, J. Brennan, D. Marquard, R
Williams, G. Glaze, H. Pescod, A. Aanstoos, E. I
W. Real, B. J. Foulkes, N. Magnet, E. Marquard. M


irkham. W. Metzger, D. Hea-
Petrers, R. Miller, B. Brown,


Rosales,
Stroop,
P. Liam,


Butler, R.
Green, R.
Zitzewitz,


m, M. King, M. Bramin, H.
. Baumback, R. Wheeler, A.
gram, A. Muschect A. Diaz,
[. Considine, B. Koperski,


C. H. S. Observes National Music

Week With Grand Musical "Fest"


All Music Groups Participating


Cristobal High School will
observe National Music Week
this year with two programs
which will feature all the out-
standing talent of the Music
Department. More than one
hundred and fifty pupils will
be under the direction of Mr.
O. E. Jorstad, head of the
Music Department.
Preparations have been un-
der way for this musical festi-
val for more than a month
and Mr. Jorstad believes that
the selections will display all
the musical talent of C.H.S.
advantageously.
IN.ational Music Week official-
ly begins May 5, and ends the
11th by proclamation of the
President.
T2e program on Thursday
wtrn. 0 4I. wn.nnirta11r mr fthi


Descriptive, A Fox Hunt -
Elwood McKinley.
The Origin and Meaning of
National Music Week Edith
Staph.
Cornet Solo, The Message --
Brooks.
Tad Lawson, Katherine Ray-
mond Piano.
-H.S. Elementary Girls' Glee
Club--
The Kerry Dance S. L.
Molloy.
Clarinet Solo, Shower of Gold


- P. Bouillon
Thomas Gregory,
Jorstad Piano.
-Combined H.S.
Clubs-
Old Uncle Moon
Scott.


Mrs. 0. E.


- Charles


Flute Solo, Moment Musical
i r.-._s -_ me-A- T ^.*. ^v TTI


APPRENTICE-LEARN ER PROGRAM HAS

AIDED NUMEROUS C. H. S. STUDENTS

Many Are Now Permanent P. C. Employees


Because of the extensive Ap-
prentice-Learner Program, fifty-
two C. H. S. graduates are now
working for the Panama Canal
or Panama Railroad as appren-
tices and learners. Twenty-two
have received their appoint-
ments since January, 1939.

During 1939 twenty C. H. S.
graduates were promoted from
apprenticeships or learnerships


NAME
Booth, George J.
Homelin, Gustaf W., Jr.
Parker, Richard E.
Marohl, Arthur E.
Wallace, Stuart
Stumpf, Alfred J.
Stade, Richard E.
Parker, Donald
Wertz, Fred I., Jr.


DIVISION
Mechanical Division
Municipal Engineeri
Division
Receiving & Forward
Agency
Constructing Quarte
master
Commissary Divisior
Electrical Division
Electrical Division
Fuel Oil Handling
Panama Railroad


into occupations for which they
had been in training. These peo-
ple are now permanent em-
ployees of the Panama Canal.
They will have excellent oppor-
tunities for advancement be-
cause of their training.
The following Cristobal High
School graduates of 1938 and
1939 are now working for The
Panama Canal as apprentices or
learners:
OCCUPATION
Blacksmith Apprentice
inO Operating Engineer Learner
king Operator, Steam Engineer Learner
r- Painter Apprentice


Plant


Clerical Learner
Telephone Switchman Appre
Wireman Apprentice
Guager & Cribtender Learner
Railroad Engineer Learner


notice


Attend
Music
Programs
May 9-10


Patronize
MocK Convention
Balboa
May 3rd.


Front row-left to
X 3 Doyle, P.







TRADE


n~~


.WIND


April 2, 1940


uhiRSB


Published by the Journalism Class of
(siteob4l High School. Cistbal, C. Z
Editor ........................... D iro y And *'
Asistant Editor ..... .S.......... S ry Je ,-I.
News Editor ........................... Sarah C .
Copy Reader ................... Dorohy Brenia
&Busness and Crcula.ion MIanager Paul G* .1
Social Editr ....................... ... Byne Bn ,n .
Sports .ditors ............................ Dik E.
?Merri Frt- !'
bchng .. dio ............ Bestsy MacMi* .
Special Writes ..................... John Herm
Stanford Skit t
Mary Sch-; '
.Mar Harr,'..n
Policy: To INTEREST STUDENTS I.
STUDENT ACTIVITY

National Music Week
The keynote of the observance
of music week this year which
begins May 5 is "Support group
aCtivities." It is a theme to be
kept in mind all the year around,
for it is by group activities that
the appreciation and humaniz-
ing influences of music may be
impressed most on the com-
munity.
President Roosevelt, in a pro-
clamation, urges the people of
America to cultivate to the ut-
most their appreciation of good


music. It is
To go th
enjoy good
unfortunate
iUfe without
and so mi;
good books


wise advice.
rough life unable to
music is almost as
i as to go through
being able to read,
ss the enjoyment of
or the information


of newspapers.
Another objective is that of
encouraging the making of mu-
sic, for within recent years there
seems to have been a lamentable
decline in the eagerness to pro-
duce good music.
Go to hear good music during
music week and resolve to bring
good music into your home.


It Might Have


Been


Worse


How would y
school from
probably what


ou like to
tents?
would


happened if the
reached across Br
YNew Cristobal. All
Zone quarters would
destroyed. Maybe
would have had to :
emergency first aid


go to
That's
have
Shad
'ay to
Canal
e been
school
as an


station for


the homeless and injured.
Possibly fate decreed that
the wind on this fatal night
of April 13 should not veer.
As a consequence, very few
white inhabitants of Colon or
fe- in., inpnr hnnfictrcitPp WArP


Advanced Boy's Glee Club


STANDING: Virginia Keenan, N. Magner, J. "McGana, F. Scotn T. McGuinness,
Justice, G. Herman, W. Krausman, Mr. Jorstad.
KNEELING: S. Skinner. A. Enriquez, 1. Ama, H. McCarty, E. Enrquez, L., Doyle.


Continental News

Rumors are trouble-breeders-
breakers of friend-ship dis-
turbers of business. They harm
the person at whom they are
directed-and the one who starts
them. (Rumors are never the
truth.)
Confucius say:
Hug is energy gone to waist.
Hushmoney makes loudest talk.
Soulmate often turn out to be
big heel.
Amazing how cold cash warms
girl's heart.
Only time women listen is when
money talk.
Young man who is like open
book will soon be on shelf.
Man judged by company he keep
-woman judged by how late
she keep company.
Famous men get heads on dol-
lars but women rather get
hands on them,
Absence makes heart grow fond-
er, but presents bring better
results.
-The Rouge Recorder
River Rouge, Michigan

My love has fled,
He done me dirt.
How was me to know
Him was a flirt?

To those in love
Let I forbid
Lest they be doed
Like I been did.
-Columbia Hi-Life

Patron: "Look here, Mister; ]
ordered a chicken pie, and there
isn't a single piece of chicken
in it."


Peggy Brown's Letter
Excerpts from a letter to Mr.
Rice from Peggy Brown '39, at-
tending Asbury College in Wil-
more, Kentucky:
"We college kids really owe a
lot to our teachers back home,.
only we don't realize how we
should dig while we are there
and show them to their faces
that we appreciate them. We
have to wait until we get away
before their fine qualities come
out in their pupils."
"Maybe Mrs. Spencer would
like to hear that her pupil is
making good in college in Span-
ish. I made an "A" in Conver-
sation Spanish last quarter."
"Another teacher I have learn-
ed to appreciate is Miss Patter-
son. Just the thought if she
hadn't made us study, wherein
the world would I be now? Prob-
ably in Asbury College, but dry-
ing dishes or waiting on tables
to work my way through, where-
as I have a job as a professor's
secretary and also the Method-
ist minister's secretary."


A girl who doesn't love to wear
A lot of junk to match her hair.
But girls like that are loved by
me
For who in the heck would kiss
a tree!
-Austin Pioneer
El Paso, Texas

The acapella choir of the Byrd
High School, Shreveport, La.
combined with the advanced
mixed chorus sang in the an-
nual spring concert presented
by the Byrd vocal department
the 17th of May. Among the se-
..~~~~ :


Junior-Senior
:Banquet Plans
Marjorie Gltder, hairman Of
the Theme and Decoration
Committee for the JintSor
n or Banquet, reports that B
theme of the affair will be te,
Pan Americn Exposition. t
theme is parti.u.arly appropri-
;te as this year is the 50th
anniversary of the union.
Charles Pierce will
master from t.he Junior class;
harry Kelly and Eva Jean
Doyle will be- the two speakers
from the class.
It is hoped. that Judge Buk
Gardner of Balboa will find it
convenient at this late date to
accept an invitation to be
guest speaker at thebC Ufaifiet.
The following committees
have been chosen a
and Theme Committee: Mar-
jorie Gilder, EdIt. Ba -
mily Hormnne, Virginia Naylor,
Keith Campbell, H II ~ Eddie Wheeler, John Pucci,
Frank Scott, and ao a
Puei. s'
Dance Committee:
McGuinness, Harold
Eugenia Mae Huff, Nrfises
Davenport, Bob Ba r
Muriel Stewart.
Food Comite: Mr
mon, Irene Stade, E" flVKa
Doyle, Mary Sehtavo, lank
Cain, and Harry Kelyr

Foreign Lett

Mauy interesting letters have
been received by the students
of Cristobal" High iphal
through the efforts of DA.
Sven V. Knudaen, the dlrse
of boys and girls of all natlns,
an organization of letter writ-
ers.
Some of the letters have been
received from students ip She
United States. They have ask-
ed several questions he
more than hint of how ~te
really is known concerning the
Isthmus and its resident
Peggy Bailey received a let
ter from a girl in Pennwi"
nia who wanted to knoww i Peg-
gy had heard of Valley Fore.
She also asked if Peggyiped
near the Canal.
It is really surprising 4o
students down here how ittle


the States'
bout life in
should we
know the
these and
tions if we
the proper
Recently


residents knon a
Panama., But, how
expect then to
proper answers o
other similar qi-
do not. give ftem
informatim.l
a number of letters


1






April 26, 1940


TRADE WIND


Page 3


oc


democratic


convention


C. H. S. Band


Stnding--left to riaht: R. Davis. T. Stewa
riquez, E. J. Doyle, Mr. 0. E. Jorsua
A. Palmer, V. Keenan, A. Muscheit. J.
Seated-left to right: N. Magner, T. Kay
Me:zger, M. Metzger, H. Hutcher, L.
Magner, T. Lawson, S. Skinner. R. Eric
Not in the picmrre: M. Picado, R. Williams,


rt, H. Rowe. R.
ad, A. Aanstoos,
Byrd.
fer, M. Smith. 3
Smithies, J. Fury.
:k, W. Reeves. K.


Tawes, E. Ingram, A. En
C. Campbell, F. Enriquez.


H. Rose, TI.
D. Hendrick,
McCleary.


L. Purdom, A. Terwilliger.


Gregory.
J. Cole,


Standing L. to R.:
E, Jorstad.
Seated L. to R.: 1
N. Magner. I
E. J. Doyle,


M, Salmon. G. Krause, V. Keenan. A. Muschett,


Metzger,
Hooper.
Hauss,


Not in Picture: J. Miller, R.


H. Rose, T.
F. Enriquez,
B. Facdol, T.


Gregory, D.
T. Stewart,
Lawson, S.


Hendrick, W.
M. Magner.
Skinner.


H. Butcher, Mr. O.


MerzRer,
J. Ferri,


R. Parker.
G. Rubio.


Wliliams.


CONVENTION


WILL BE HELD IN


BALBOA


PLAYSHED


The Democratic Mock Con-
vention which is to be held in
the Balboa Playshed, May 3,
was planned by the Joint
Committee of International Re-
lations Club of the Junior Col-
lege and the Social Science
Class of Baiboa High School.
Actual Democratic aspirants
for nominations are MacNutt,
Garner, Wheeler, Farley, and
possibly Roose elt.
After nominations and sec-


ending of
may vote
that they
is by the
chairmen
vote. It
candidate


speeches the students
for the candidates
prefer. The voting
states and only state
may cast an audible
is probable that the
who secures a mock


nomination will be notified by
cable.
Two or three well-known Ca-
nal Zone officials will deliver
brief addresses before the con-
vention gets under way.
Delegates of both C.H.S.,
D.H.S., and the Junior College
will be mixed in order to pre.,
'ent rivalry. The Balboa Ju-
nior High students will be'
standard bearers. The conven-
tion at the shortest will last
more than twn hnhrnr


Special Panama Railroad Car Will

Take CHS Delegations to Balboa


Bailey


Nominating,


Paul


M. Salmon, Seconding Burton


About one hundred students
from C.H.S have signed up to
attend the Mock Convention
at Balboa. Friday May 3. A
special coach will take the
students who will pay $1 for
a round trip ticket to Balboa
and back to Colon. Arrange-
ments for return on the 5 p.m.
train on Saturday May 4 have
been under consideration.
Aside from the two special
speakers, Peggy Bailey who is
nominating Paul V. McNutt
and Marvin Salmon who is
seconding Burton Wheeler's no-
mination, delegations of stu-
dents from C.H.S. will repre-
sent the states of Arkansas,
Colorado, Connecticut Kansas,
Louisiana, Maryland, Mississip-
pi, Washington, the territory
of Hawaii and the District of
Columbia.
The convention will begin at
7 p.m. in the Balboa Playshed.
Students from the Canal Zone
Junior College and Balboa
High School will represent most
of the states with a mixture of
some C.H.S. students among


McNutt;
Wheeler


ing ten state and territorial of-
ficers and the two speakers ac-
companied by Mr. Paul Evan-
coe will leave on the 11 a.m.
train to go to Balboa to re-
hearse the preliminaries of the
convention which will take
place two days later. The par-
ty will include Thomas Mc-
Guiness, Emily Horine, Frank
Scott, Russel Tidd, Bob Bar-
tron, Charles Pierce, Robert
Williams, RobeIt Harris, Frank
Cain and Judith Ferri.
Lists of state and territorial
officers from C.H.S. are as
follows: From Arkansas --
Thomas McGuinness (chair-
man), Edith Dixon (vice-chair-
man), Ruth Randles, Grace
Marcuse, Sarah Casey, George
Estenoz, Carl Ender, and Ho-
mer McCarthy, from Colorado
- Emily Hormie (chairman),
Frances Davenport (vice-chair-
man), Irene Stade, Virginia
Keenan, Eddie Wheeler; from
Connecticut Frank Scott
(chairman), Barbara Bath
(vice-chairman), Elsie Chase,
Raymond Plunimier, Eugenia


Mock (

Subject

By Bal


Convention


boa


Talk

Group


In an assembly held April 16,
for the purpose of discussing the
Mock Convention, two Junior
College students and a senior
girl from Balboa High School
came to give the delegates some
further information.
Margaret Meigs stated in her
speech that the Mock Conven-
tion would be held May 3, at 7:00
o'clock in the Balboa playshed.
"The purpose of the convention
is to acquaint the people of the
Canal Zone who do not take an
active part in politics with what
actually happens in the United
States at the same time. In the
real convention, the number of
representatives and senators is
doubled. Because of lack of space
the actual number, 1100, has
been cut in half, however this
does not affect the votes allot-
ed to each state.
Most important parts have
been given to the Junior Col-
lege.
Anita Stilson, senior at B. H.
S., told of the fun all partici-
pants had in the last conven-
tions voting for the candidate


C. H. S. Orchestra


MOCK


*I







Page 4


TRADE WIND


April ~ 194


Colon


Fire


Destroys


27


Blocks


April


13


-E - j :


Looking Down from 13th Street


Looking Up Broadway
---------------- -----."" ^ *"t


Col. Williams Heads
Emergency Work In

Re-settlement Plans
-- -
Colonel Roger Williams of
Fort DeLesseps has been placed
in charge of the Army hous-
ing and food equipment. Under
him have been placed army of-
ficers from various posts on
the Atlantic Side of the Isth-
mus. To Colonel Williams must
go the credit of making the
Army's work so efficient.


The entire


tent section


been made into
divisions. These
ed on Broadway,


thref
are
nei


gray's Garden and just
of Silver City. The
named is for government
ployees only and its
tants number sbcut 300
are 400 or more tents
at the present time. Ea
accomodates 8 persons.


Food supplies a
by the Railroad
and paid for by tb
The cost of the


e main
locat.
ar Biil
outside
latter-
nt em-
inhabi-
. There
in use
Lch tent


re furnished
Commissary
,e Red Cross.
food up to


Wednesday, thL 17th, was
It was, on an average,
per day but is rapidly de
ing to about $500 per
Four thousand people


served daily, with
and children evenly
at the two feedings
and 5 p.m.
Average food for
nes beef stew !
rice; tea or coffee;


$4000.
$1000
creas-
day.
are
adults
buted,
a.m.


adults va-
3r codfish:
milk and


sugar. For the children there
is orange or tomato juice;
mntmpt l nr evranm of wheat:


FIRE


NOTES


--- C. H. S Reporter


Looking for all the world like he was about to save all his new
a forlorn cactus in a desert, a sewing machines, the authorities
small book-store stands un- came and told him not to do so
harmed in the midst of blocks because the flames wouldn't
of charred ruins that were once reach that far; unfortunately,
tall tenement buildings. This they did.
store is situated at the corner The local Boy Scouts have
of 8th and D streets. The stun- rendered a valuable service to
ned owner of the little shop ex- many anxious parents by their
plains his good fortune as a system of finding lost children.
miracle. Because of the valuable help
. .. they were lending at the Amer-
The above incident s only one ican Legion home, many Girl
of many strange stories, all of Scouts were temporarily releas-
which are d about the a m .......
which are centered about the ed from school. Their work con-
disastrous fire in Colon, which sister in caring for lost children
began April 13, at about 5:30 until their parents were locat-
P. IvM. and burned until 2 A. M. ed.
April 14. Late Monday, small t ... Tr
blazes were still going in the re- Although the American Trad-
*n fConam J Un UIt lC Cld


mains.
Many cruel surprises greet
visitors to the tragic scenes. To
take care of the 10,000 home-
less victims, the U. S. Army has
erected tents as temporary
homes along Broadway, in the
ball park near Bilgray's Garden
ard on the outskirts of Silver
City. The army also has the
task of providing food and me-
dical care for the unfortunates.
Witnesses say that the Canal
tugs succeeded in stopping the
inferno on Front Street.
Scattered around Colon are
numerous U. S. "G. I" cans as
necessary sanitary precautions.
A tailor who owns a small shop
on the corner of 11th and D
knows the irony of fate. When

prevent undue crowding. All
tent squads are relieved every
twn rtiav at 1:30 n.m.


I*"g pUiiJOany3 J us arey escap-l s;0tj-
ed the blaze, during the excite-
ment of the catastrophe it was
looted by some unscrupulous
hoodlums who darted away with
about 40 radios and some fish-
ing reels after they had suc-
ceeded in breaking the show-
case.
The Panama Bazaar was es-
pecially lucky to have escaped
the conflagration which started
in the same area where the Ba-
zaar is located.


On the whole, the tent dwel-
lers seem to be taking their ill-
fortune calmly. Walking down
Broadway, one sees groups of
them deeply engrossed inm games
of cards and dominoes. Others
are seen wandering d a z e d,
through the ruins seeking preci-
ous belongings.
Armed guards watched over


BLAZING FLAME

DESTROY 24 CITY
BLOCKS IN COLON

People here have heard of the
ruins of Pompeii-the San Fa&-
cisco earthquake-the Oltag,
fire.--Now they may add to tb0I
list of horrid occurrences t
Colon fire.
Beginning at 6th and Amador
Ouerrero Streets about 5:45 P.
M. Saturday evening, April 13,
the fire spread so rapidly that
an hour or so later it was nee.s-
sary to call. in troops from the
U. S. Army Posts and Naval Sta-
tions, firemen from Cristobal,
Balboa, and Panama City to aid
the Colon bombers in their
battle against the roaring
flames.
After fighting the blaze all
night it was finally smothered
around 2 A. M. Sunday morning
dawned on Colon with thousands
of people homeless as a result
of the blazing inferno that swept
the city from 6th to 13th Street
mostly between Bolivar, Amador
Guerrero and Broadway.
Many people are left wi
nothing but the clothes on their
backs, some chairs, a bed, or a
table that they were able to
rescue.
Where once stood rambling
tenement houses, stores, tast
bars now lie heaps of smolder-
ing ashes. In some places, thb
frames of building' are left
standing, a lone reminder of the
fact that once a home or per-
haps a store occupied that space,
All un and down Broadway


*
I






April 2, 1940


TRADE


WIND


Page 5


Ire to Right: Thomas Gregory, Eva Jean
Frank Hooper, Nancy Magner, Mariean


Doyle, Franklin Enriquez,
Metzger.


William Meazger,


String Quartet


aI


-.- ^ F. *
I ** I
*-r 4 .-
^ff, r.^ ^
- 1 ^ .-.. _*1.; ,


Left to Right: Frank Hooper, Franklin Enriquez, Nancy


Magner, Eva Jean Doyle.


C.H.S. Observes National
Music Week With
Grand Musical "Fest"
It onmDeo *rth tage 1

Trumpets Tad Lawson &
Stanford Skinner.
Ding Dong Merrily, (1588) --
Sc. K. Davis.
Friday May 10, 1940
-The C.H.S. Orchestra--
Grand March, Pomp and
Chivalry Charles J. Bo-
berts.
Overture, The Calif of Bag-
dad F. Boieldieu.
Intermezzo from l'Arlesienne
- Georges Bizet.
Handel Suite G. F. Han-
del.
A. March from Sonata No.
IX.
B. Minuet from Sonata No.
IV.
C. Lascia Ch'io Pianga from
Rinaldo.
D. Bourree.
Selections from the light o-
pera The Merry Widow -
Franz Lehar.
The Origin and Purpose of
National Music Week Edith
Staph.
-Advanced Girls Clee Club-
By the Bend of the River -
Edward Hemstreet.
Violin Solo, Rondino based
on a theme by Beethoven -
Arr. Kreisler.
Franklin Enriuez, Mrs. O.
ED Jorstad r- PIano.
.-Elementary Girls' Glee Club--
The Kerry Dance S. IL.
Molloy.
Clarinet Solo, Predulio and
Balletto I. Ricci.
Harold Rose, Mrs. 0. E.
Jorstad Piano.
Harp Solos -
A. Angelus L. Renie'
........


Special Panama Railroad
Car Will Take CHS
Delegations to Balboa
(Continued from Page 3)

French, Bob Patchett; from
Mississippi Robert Williams
(chairman), Dale Price (vice-
chairman), Luther Davis, Neil
Magner, Sh.rley Jennings,
Keith CampbeL, Andres Caries,
Stanford Skinner; from Wash.
ington Robert Harris (chair-
man), Rita Goulet (vice-chair-
man), Dan Gov.er, Williere Cal-
laway, Lee Doyle, Jane Kaufer;
from the District of Columbia
Frank Cain (chairman, Ma-
rion Snyder (vice-chairman);
from Hawaii Judith Ferri
(chairman). Evelyn Shirley
(vice-chairman); substitutes -
Mary A. Seaoold, A. Kerr,
Charlotte Nitto, Mary Hunt.
and Mary Posse.
All delegates will receive cel-
luloid lapel pins.

BLAZING FLAMES
DESTROY 24 CITY
BLOCKS IN COLON
(Continued from Page 4)
on which to recline, but also be-
cause of the many looters who
are running around making a
holiday out of a disaster.
Not since the 1915 fire has
,Colon experienced anything so
devastating, and it is doubtful
if that disaster was as destruc-
tive as this one.
The flames covered 24 city
blocks destroying 293 buildings.
Some of the building were dyn-
amited in order to keep the fire
from spreading any more than
it already had.
The major problem facing the
Panamanian government today
is tn take carei of the victims of


Apprentice-Learner Program
Has Aided Numerous
C. H. S. Students
(Continued from Page One)
He was appointed Operator,
Steam Engineer Learner with
the Receiving and Forwarding
Agency soon after graduation.
He was assigned to the Coaling
Plant in Cristobal. He has al-
ways received very high grades
in both his school work and
shop work.
This is not the first time a
Cristobal High School student
has headed the Apprentice-
Learner rating list. Ralph Davis
(C. H. S. 1935) headed the list
on the previous grading period.
Ralph has since then been pro-
moted to the position of con-


doctor with the
road. He is doing
in this capacity.
All apprentices
are graded every
During their first
ceive ratings every
Grades are recei'
work, mechanical


Panama Rail-
excellent work

and learners
six months.
year they re-
three months.
ved on school
or job profi-


ckency, intelligence displayed,
interest shown in work, and
conduct.
Another interesting aspect of
the Apprentice-Learner Program
is that, unlike similar programs
in other localities, the people
here who receive appointments
as apprentices and learners also
receive substantial salaries dur-
ing their training periods.


I


the fire. The U. S. Army will
feed the people and house them
in tents for a period of ten days.
After that, the burden may fall
solely upon the shoulders of the
Panamanian government.
Various American and Pan-


Athlete Feats

The Cristobal High School
intra-mural league is well un-
der-way with Ed. Wheeler's
"Tennessee" and Dunlap's "His
State" squads fighting for the
leadership of the first half.

Congratulations Eddie Eder
for winning the most valuable
player award of the A.T.L.
Same goes to tile whole C.H.S.
squad for winning the "Big'"
good sportsmanship trophy.

Two weeks ago the C.H.S.
girls' softball squad met B.H.S.
team and were defeated by the
score of 2510. Special mention
goes to Vonna Hambleton for
her fine pitching and splendid
hitting.

After the first week of bas-
ketball, my pick for an all
star team is:


FIRST TEAM
Haywood
Justice
McGuiuness
Wheeler
Willett


SECOND
Glaze
Brayton
Pescod
Dunlap
Forsman


TEAM


Alabama Beat By

Tennessee 49-18

The Tennessee quintet chalk-
ed up their second victory of
the season, April 17, trouncing
Penn State 49-18. High scorers
for the game were Eddie Greene


and
made
sank
Ten
game
being
sters


Buddy Thomas. Greene
15 points while Thomas
7 baskets.
nessee played a superior
of basketball never once
challenged by the hoop-
from Pennsylvania.
DIT1mr Cr-rA


Small Ensemble


|






Page 6


TRADE


WIND


April 2 1940


NOTRE DAME WHIPS

PENN STATE 31-29;

TENN. BEATS ALA.

Playing the first game of the
present hoop league, Johnny
Haywood, captain of the Notre
Dame five, outscored McGuin-
ness's Penn State in an over-
time game, Thursday, April 11.
Tied 29-29 at the end of the
fourth quarter, Notre Dame
scored two points in the extra
period, to win 31-29.
McGuinness and Haywood
were high scorerers for their
teams, both having tallied 12
points.
Notre Dame was behind only
once. That was during the first
period when the score was 8-9.
Rocketing ahead in the second
quarter, Haywood led 18-10.
Closing the gap in the third
stanza, Penn State scored 7
points to Notre Dame's 4, mak-
ing the score 17-22. When the
fourth quarter ended and smoke
had cleared, the score was tied.
Playing an extra period of not
longer then three minutes, the
first team to score a basket was
to be the winner of the game.
At the jump, Real, center for
Notre Dame, knocked the ball
to Haywood. Running for their
basket, the team sank the ball
before a minute had been play-
ed.
Marquard, guard for Notre
Dame, made a spectacular bas-
ket in the second quarter. Shoot-
ing from behind the backboard,
unable to see the basket, Mar-
quard shot by instinct making
two points.
Tennessee Drubs Alabama 41-13
Eddie Wheeler, head of the
Tennessee quintet, rang up their
first victory of the season, sev-
erely trouncing Alabama 41-13.
Alabama, led by Glyn Glaze, had
very poor team work, and was
out-played and out-maneuvered
every step of the game. The boys
from Tennessee were in good
form shooting from all angles,
and handling the ball well.

The Austin Pioneer of the
Austin High School, El Paso,
Texas put out a swell April Fool's
edition. All foolish, nothing seri-
ous in the paper.


Bureau


Clubs


and Playgrounds


Boys Varsity Club


-- -.ta..


Front row-1. to r
Wheeler, J, P<
Back row--1, to r.
Glaze, R Just

California


.-C. Forsman IK Marohl,
escod, H. Dunlop, H. Neff,
-J. McGann, J. Nitto, B.
ice, M. Stokes, H. Pescod.


Wins


From Pittsburg

The California "Aggies" open-
ed their season April 15, by nos-
ing-out the Pittsburg "Panth-
ers", in the second overtime
game of the current season. The
final score was 31-29, with Cap-
tain Jim Pescod scoring the
winning points.
The "Aggies" had a 9 point
advantage at the end of the
first half, but Carlos Andres and
Jim Coffin scored 22 points, be-
tween them, while their team-
mates held the winners to 6
points. At the end of the sched-
uled game, the scoreboard read,
29-29. The teams then had a 3
minute rest period. Play was
then resumed. Pescod soon sank
the basket that ended the game,


31-29 in favor of the
California (

Pescod, rf
Styles, If
French, If
Picado, c
Estenoz, rg
Aanstoos, rg
Gilder, Ig
McGann, Ig

Total ;
Pittsburgh (
Andres, rf

Parker, If
Stroop, If
Coffin, c
Muschett, rg
Willett, ig


"Aggies.


1 31


E. Marquard, E. Greene, H. Willest, E.
coach,
Banrron, T. McGuinness. J. Haywood. G.


Notre


Dame


Alabamans


Beats

34-32


League Standings
April 20
TEAM G W L Pa.
Tennessee 2 2 0 1.000
Notre Dame 2 2 0 1.000
California 2 2 0 1.000
Ohio State 2 2 0 1.000
Pi.sburg 2 0 2 .000
Alabama 2 0 2 2 00
Harvard 2 0 2 .000
Peon State 2 0 2 .000
Notre Dame, led by Captain
Haywood, nosed-out Alabama,
April 17, by the close score of
34-32. The game was close all
the time. There was never more
than 3 points difference in the
score.
The first period ended 10-10.
Haywood made 8 of his team's
10 points. Simon was the losers'
point maker during this quart-
er. The second and third quart-
ers also ended in ties, 18-18 and
28-28, respectively.
Haywood then made 6 tallies,
while his mates were holding
the opposition to 4 points.
Captain Haywood scored 28
points, to become high scorer for
his squad, and Simon was high
pointer for the losers.
NOTE DAME (34)
FG FT TP
Brennan, rf 0 0 0
Kaufer, rf 0 0 0
Walsh, rf 0 0 0
Haywood, If 14 0 28
Real, c 0 0 0
Marquad, rg 2 0 4
Fernandez, l I1 0 2


Total


u u U --
0 0 0 ALABAMA (32)
4 0 0 Forsman, rf 2 0
0 0 0 Simon. If 7 0
Kelly, c 2 0
o 1 7 Sasso, rg 1
... .. Glaze, ig 4 0


Dunlap Basketeers

Trounce Nitto's

Team; Score 47-17

Dunlaps' basketball quintet
won their initial game, when
they opened their schedule
against Nitto's squad, defeating
the latter team 47-17 in the C.
H. S. gym on Monday, April 15.
The winners held a four point
lead over the losers at the end
of the first period. As the sec-
ond period opened, it was evi-
dent that the Dunlap's were too
strong for the opposition. Dur-
ing this quarter the Duap's
used a three man. defense.
"Dick" Justice and "Dave' Sal-
lowell made all of the wners'
points during this period the
half ended 29-12 in favor oAthe
winners.
As the second half of the rout
got under full steam the lead-
ers had three substitutes in the
fray. Captain Nitto then scored
five points in the first five ain-
utes of the quarter, while his
team-mates held the opposition
scoreless. This was a sign aor
the first squad to re-enter the
battle and thus put the game
on ice.
Joe Nitto was high point man
for his team, while Justice was
high pointer for the winners.


Dunlap


Justice, rf
Harris, rf
Krausman,
Mcleary, 1
Hollowell, (
White, rg
Dunlap, rg
Pucci, Ig

Total


7 47


Nitto (12)


W~BTF


Brayton, rf
Coats, If
Nitto, c
Prudom, c
Pierce, rg
Nesbitt, Ig
Tidd, Ig
Gower, ig

Total


B n


THEATRE


r~














VO l IV.--No. 18 C&RISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL, CRISTOBAL, C. Z. MAY 10, 1948


Spanish


I,....~ A:
S -r~


"La Pas"


Club


Original


C.H.S. La


Members


cst row; B. Stages, A. Lyew, B. Fernandez, G. Herman, T. Lawson, R. Huggect.
2nd row; W. Peterson. A. Lim, G. eeser, M. Metzner.
3rdl row; R. A Wheeler. A. Wheeler Willias, A. Randall G. Puc, J. Perez, Holgerson
F. Davenwor, E. E Dole. P. Lim. P. Rosdes,
4th row; B. Bath. M. Considine, J. Badgley, E Sapf, I. Stade, K. Phillips, M. Stewart,
L. Gormely, Holmein. M. Ztzewitz.
5:h row; F. Eldridse, Po McCar. F. Cain, E. Huff. E. Shirley, V. Keenan.
6ih row; Mrs. P. Spencer, N. Lyew, J. Kaufer, J. Raymond, D. Anderson, M. Hunt, B.
Styles, V. Naylor, N. Magner, E Eder, E. Coares, B. Styles, G. Glaze, A. Perslar,
F. Ferrero, J, Wong, E. Appin, K. McCleay.
7th rm: J. Cain, A. Aansoos. B. Harris.


P. V. McNutt Selected

By Mock Democratic

Balboa Convention

NOMINATED BY P. BAILEY
Paul Vories McNutt emerged
as the winner of the Mock De-
mocratic National Nominating
Convention, which was held in
the Balboa Playshed on Friday,
May 3rd from 7:00 p. m. to 10:20
p. m. About 500 students from
Balboa High, Balboa Junior Col-
lege, Balboa Junior High, and


Cristobal High School
in the convention as
committee members,
etc. The bleachers of
shed were crowded to
capacity.
The convention was
students of the Canal


took part
speakers,
delegates,
the play-
their full

staged by
Zone Ju-


nior College and Balboa High
School International Relations
Club under the direction of Mr.
n n yr. ..l....t rrtn n..*.nn- t....


Handel's "Messiah"
Presented by Balboa


Community


Singers


"The Messiah" by Handel,
presented before an auditorium
capacity crowd of over six hun-
dred people, was said to be the
best musical presentation ever
given at C. H. S. The majestic
numbers were so well rendered
that every person in the audi-
ence was inspired by them.
This is the first attempt here
to present a program, given by
the Community Chorus and Or-
chestra from the Pacific Side
under the able direction of Mr.
Neil V. Branstetter.
The soloists were Mr. Paul H.
Warner, tenor; Mrs. Delphine
Claughsey, soprano; Miss Ines
Nelson, alto; and Mr. Milton R.
Smith, bass. The program was
accompanied by Miss Helen C.
Baker,
The guest speakers of the pro-
--_ - r.. -.-.


front Row:
Dona
Back Row:
Robert


R.-William
Herman Roos.


Keenan, Eleanor


L. to R.-Percy Lyew, Inez
Marshall, Alice Gormeley.


FOUR DIVISIONS
OF SPANISH NOW
TAUGHT IN CHS
The influence of Spanish les-
sons and culture, under the di-
rection of Mrs. Phyllis Spencer,
has long been a valuable credit
to Cristobal High School.
There are four distinct divi-
sions in the advanced study of
the Spanish language in this
school. The Spanish 10 classes,
taught by Miss Moore, Mr. Wil-
son, and Mrs. Spencer, are a
continuation of ninth grade
Spanish, consisting of simple
translations and a considerable
amount of grammar work.
In the Spanish 11 class, how-
ever, more literature is offered,
and a wider study of grammar
is made. Many interesting books
from outstanding modern Span-
ish authors are read in Spanish
and translated orally. The cul-
minating achievement of this
OrnhVln Tftc o +1,a flraa n nit O


Reinhold, Margaret


Theokrisro, Frank


Davis. Mary Deans,


Merrhi, Helen Marie Hammond.


Tenth Anniversary

Is Celebrated This

Year By LA PAS Club

This year is being celebrated
by the "La Pas" Spanish Club
as its tenth anniversary. The
club celebrated its tenth birth-
day on October 28, its tenth


Bombero Band
27, its tenth
on January 18,
tenth annual
Spanish on Ap:
ing plans for
reception and


Concert on March
formal initiation
has celebrated its
three-act play in
ril 26, and is mak-
its tenth annual
ball in May.


B esid es these traditional
events, the club has carried on
several other social and educa-
tional activities throughout the
year.
The "La Pas" Spanish Club
was first organized by Mrs. Phyl-
lis Spencer, its present sponsor,
on October 28, 1930. Twelve high
rnlnk'ino Mnnnk 1 )rtruinnn nuin


THANKS BALBOA
FOR
YOUR
"MESSIAH


MUSIC PROGRAM
TONIGHT
IN
AUDITORIUM












Published by the Journalism Class
(.ristobal High School Criscobal, C.


Editor ........................... Dorohy Andersdon
Asistan Editor ................ S r.le-y Cnnslgs
News Editor ........................ $s CGdy
Copy Reader .............. Dorothy Brennan
Business and Circula:ion Manager Padl Gor
Social Editor ,........................ Byne Bnnttn
Sorts Edito rs .. ................ Dick" Ego
Merwin French
Jeas Badgley
Exchange Editor .............. Betsy Ma la
Special Writers ................... John HermanJ
Stanford Skinner
Georgina Krnsn
Mary Schiavo
Mars Hartman
Policy: To INTEREST STUDENTS IN
STUDENT ACTIVITY


Bouquets to
Conventionites

CHS is proud of the student
delegation which attended the
Democratic Mock Convention at
Balboa. On the train, everyone
enjoyed himself with songs,
harmless jokes, and enthusias-
tic conversation. No rowdyism
marred the general conduct of
the conventioners. Across the
Isthmus on the train the stu-
dents sang school songs and
gave school cheers. In Balboa
they hurried from the station
to go to various homes before
the meeting at the Playshed at
seven o'clock.
In the convention, each mem-
ber took his part so well that the
adult audience and spectators
marveled at the student speak-
ers and participants. Everyone
felt a spiritual elation and gra-
titude for "our American way of
government" as con tr asted
against those of the world's dis-
illusioned and dispossessed coun-
tries. Having eliminated all
school rivalry, everyone cooper-
ated to make the convention a
success.


Luck,


Roth


Two and a half years of faith-
ful, cheerful, and willing ser-
vices at C. H. S.! Know that your
efforts and accomplishments on
our behalf leave more than
pleasant memories. Everyone
here asks about your welfare,
and expresses sincere wishes for
your happiness and success in
the new work you have under-
taken.


Caribbean News

The first group of Caribbean
nrnnfts wpro rwpPiv4rA ln~t WiV.-


TRA DE WIN D AV... .. 1. Ti


Brochure of Miro's
r Poems to be Printed


Spanish


Class


Among the many activities
under the direction of Mrs.
Spencer, there is one that de-
serves special mention.
A brochure on the poems of
the late Ricardo Miro, Poet Lau-
reate of Panama, (1883-1940) is
being edited by the Spanish 12
class. Since literature is stressed
in fourth year Spanish, this
brochure is a fitting accomplish-
ment.
In this booklet are compiled
the majority of Miro's more
popular works. Their transla-
tions into English as well as the
original in Spanish make up the
contents. One of the best known
poems, through which Ricardo
Miro gained the title of Poet
Laureate, is "Patria." The fol-
lowing two verses taken from
"Patria" are examples of the
translations by the Spanish
class.
My Fatherland is a memory-a memory of
my life,
Bound by powerful ties of love, enwrapped
in in n and strife.
The rustling of the pam trees, the music
I knew so well,
The garden now is flowerless: the leaves lie
where they fell.
Oh, Fatherland you are tiny; so tiny that
you blend
Completely with the shadows that our waving
flag does send.
Perhaps it was God's will that you should
thus so tiny be,
That in my heart, oh Fatherland, I may
always carry thee!
(Translated by D. Anderson and J. Badgley)
This collection has been writ-
ten in memory of Miro, with the
approval of his son, Ricardo
Miro. It is expected to be com-
pleted within three weeks. Co-
pies will be given to each mem-
ber of the class, besides Pana-
manian and American friends
who are interested in its con-
tents from the literary stand-
point.


Whirl


The Mock Convention in Bal-
boa, Friday night, beckoned
many Cristobal High students to
the other side for the weekend.
Stanford Skinner was the
guest of Bill Logdon in Balboa.
Paul Gorin spent the weekend
with his uncle at Bella Vista.
Sarah Casey stayed with "Bee
Bee" Dunavan at Albrook Field.
Georgiana Krause was the
overnight guest of Mrs. A. V.
Mitchell of Balboa.
Jean Holmelin spent Friday
I nieht with hbr amnt M r. Tp.ovrm,-


entered the portals of C. H. S.
to fill the vacancy left by the
departure of Miss Ruth Wiking-
stad for the other side.
Miss Cotton and her brother
are entirely local products. She
was born here and has attended
each and every phase of the
public school -on the Atlantic
Side. Miss Cotton graduated
from C. H. S. in 1938.
Shortly afterwards, she left
this side to attend the Balboa
Junior College where she was a
student for one and a half years.
At the end of her first year in
college, she took her Civil Ser-
vice examinations. The exami-
nations were given in the C. H.
S. typing room. Not long after-
wards, she learned that she had


made the high
Her first jo
Cristobal Store
was employed
clerk.


B
list
pos


grade of 92.
ib .was with the
House where she
as a secretary-


before Miss Wikingstad left, a
was sent to Mr. Rice naming
sible replacements. Miss Cot-
's name did not appear on
list but Mr. Rice asked for
. Her job was a Grade 1 and
was allowed, like others, to


go ahead if she could. The high
schools, being Grade 2 jobs, were
the next step. Miss Cotton took
this job.
She was heard to say, "I only
hope I will be able to live up to
Euthie's reputation."
When interviewed Mr. Rice
said, "I've had my eye on Bea
ever since she left college and
entered Civil Service work. I
know, beyond a doubt, of her
steadiness and dependability. I
also know that her work will be
as satisfactory as Ruthie's and
I only hope that all students
will be patient with her while
she becomes entirely accustomed
to her new position."


Students


Convention


Ride


Boarding the train headed for
Balboa to the Mock Convention,
Friday, May 3, were about 100
C. H. S. students or rather
ninety-eight until right up until
the minute the train started to
move. At that moment two tardy
students rushed into the sta-
tion, tore through the gates, and
jumped on the platform of the
sDecial just as it was nulline out.


Bea Cotton Returns
As C.H.S. Secretary

Miss Beatrice Cotton has


The casr of "The Devil Stone'
Josie-Lucy Ann Parkinson
Edward-Conrad Horine
Ellen-Ellen Senay
Ha ie--Mary Pierce
Jim-Claude Campbell
Terry-Deward Aanscoos


includes:


"Not Quite Such a Goose" de-
picts the typical Junior High boy
who loves nothing in the world
better than baseball and who
will not comb his hair nor even
look at girls. He is sure that he
would never be such a Goose
as his sister's sweetheart.
Little does he realize what
Fate has in store for him just a
brief half hour after making his
bold statements. The pretty Ha-
zel Henderson, his sister's chum,
arrives for a visit and the whole
world changes for Albert.
'"Not Quite Such a Goose" promises ta
be a highly interesting and well-acted play.
Characters are:
Mrs. Bell ...................... Margaret Williams
Albert Bell ........................ Herschel Hamr
Sylvia Bell ......................... Patsy Snader
Philip Fick .................... Howard Pundquist
Hazel Henderson ................. Irma PaNtbhr
The Junior High Orchestra under the di-
rection of 0. E. Jorstad wil play the over"
tare and during intermission,
The production staff consists of the ftl-
lowing:
Stage Manager ................ Guillermo Bdard
Stage Crew ..........................Rafael Briciw
Sound Effec:s ....................... Holls C i
Costumes ............................. Marian Justice
Make up ........................ Nora Nell Finley
Doris Raymond
Properties ........................... Ruth Boszegan
Corine Dunn
Harriet alc
rwan,. i ...


Page 2


re-


Good


Social


Junior High Will

Show "Devil Stone",

"Not Such A Goose"

Two one act plays, "The Devil
Stone" by Anne Coulter Martens,
and "Not Quite Such a Goose'
by Elizabeth Gale will be direct-
ed by Miss Claude Aycock, head
of the dramatic club of Oris-
tobal Junior High School. Both
of these plays will be presented,
on Thursday evening, May 16,
the Cristobal Junior High School.
"The Devil Stone" is a mys-
tery thriller in which Josie, a,
girl of fifteen, sprains her ankle
and misses a. birthday theater
party to which she has lopked
forward for weeks. The arrival
of the Devil Stone from the
orient as a birthday gift froa
her uncle is but the beginning
of a very eventful evening for
Josie.
Josie's craving for thrills It
more than satisfied before the
evening is over. Miss Aycock as-
serts, "The characters are well
cast for their respective parts
and the play promises to hold
the audience breathless with ex-
citement."


"I"RAD~


Bf IND


II fPdll


Train








MAY 10, 1940


TRADE


WIND


Page 3


CHATTER BOX I

Anna White decided to find
out if her shade of lipstick look-
ed better on a blonde or a bru-
nette. Anna being of the darker
side--Bob Bartron was the near-
est blonde. Was his face red!

Time and tide wait for no
man. Santa and "Blackie" wait-
ed for no time nor tide. He's
been here some two weeks.

Dick Justice asks for dates by
the degree. First-he asked
Byne to go out after the ban-
quet. Second-he finally asked
her to attend the banquet with
him.
*
Ask Paul how he likes the in-
side of the Balboa Police Sta-


tion, he was only
last Saturday.


there


twice


Have Leo Conley and Bunky


Marquard gone on
against sleep? Also, pl
form us if their campaii
ed by remaining in a
position from Thursday
until Sunday night.


a strike
lease in-
gn start-
vertical
morning


Can you imagine:
Betsy MacMillan doing the
rhumba with George Estenoz?

Seems that Mary Anderson is
now quite contented. Cause of
contentment Leo Conley.

The dream of a junior girl
_H -


went crasn wnen eorge
man asked hcr sister to
tend the banquet with him.

P. V. McNUTT SELECTED
BY MOCK DEMOCRATIC
BALBOA CONVENTION


(Continued from Page


seconding
Wheeler.


speech of Burton K.


Senator Clark of Mississippi
was the unanimous choice of the
assembly as the Democratic no-
mination for vice-president.


Bits of humor


injected


various intervals during the
course of the evening, such as
one delegate being unseated and
carried off the floor by two
bouncers, added much interest to
the convention, and invoked
considerable laughter from the
audience.


Staged by students of
Canal Zone Junior College, B
boa High School, Cristobal H


TENTH ANNIVERSARY
IS CELEBRATED THIS
YEAR BY LA PAS CLUB
(Continued from Page One)
The first officers were Mary
Dean, President; Margaret Da-
vis, Vice-President; Elea nor
Reinhold. Secretary: Dona Eat-


on, Treasurer.


The ritual committee was
Herman Roos, Alice Gormely,
Inez Theoktistos, and William
Keenan. The Constitution and
By-Laws Committee was Percy
Lyew, Frank Merritt and Robert
Marshall.
The organization of the club,
the constitution, insignia, colors,
motto and ritual drawn up by
the charter members have been
little changed during the ten
years of its existence.
The name La PAS was chosen,
the letters P. A. S. being the
initials of the secret name of


FOUR DIVISIONS
OF SPANISH NOW
TAUGHT IN C. H. S-
(Continued from Pa'ge


HANDEL'S "MESSIAH"
PRESENTED BY BALBOA
COMMUNITY SINGERS


(Continued from Page


are done in the outside business its magnificence, that when the
world. Many alumni who took Hallelujah Chorus was being
this course are now employed | played he stood up. The crowd
because of their knowledge of immediately stood up in respect
Commercial Spanish. to their king. Fiom then on, it
Literature is the chief aim of has been customary for the
the Spanish 12 class, and it is audience to stand during that
taught in the form of reading number.
and translating, with a little
grammar and dictation. This Plans have been made to have
year the class is editing a book- an organization similar to the
let of some of the verses of Pacific Side chorus here on the
Ricardo Miro, Poet Laureate of Gold Coast. The two choruses
Panama, with translation made may combine to present a pro-
by members of the class, gram similar to Handel's "Mes-
siah." These preparations are
being anticipated with great


THE SOCIAL WHIRL


(Continued from Page


the club. College. Friday night Mr. Evan-
The impressive installation of coe attended the Convention,
officers, still used by the club, and Saturday he played golf at
was first conducted by Mrs. the Panama Golf Club with Mr.
Spencer, and the initiation of Zierten, Mr. Lyons, Mr. Marker
new members was first held on and Mr. McNair.
November 4, 1930 in the old Flor-
ence Hotel at the corner of 10th Arlene Hoffman and Tommy
and Front Streets in Colon. won second place jitterbugging


Guest speakers at the first in-
stallation were the Governor of
the Province of Colon and the
Principal of Cristobal H i g h
School, Mr. William Sawyers.
During the past ten years four
hundred thirty two pupils have
been members of the La Pas
Club. Membership in the club is
considered one of the highest


er- i honors a student of Spanish can
at- attain during his high school


career. Only students of ad-
vanced Spanish, 10th and above,
who maintain a B average are
eligible to join the club. The de-
sirability of membership is a
great incentive for improvement
in Spanish. Students from Span-
ish classes of any of the Spanish
teachers are eligible to join.
Each year an average of one
hundred friends, Panamanian
and Canal Zone residents, the
high school band and orchestra,
and the Bombero Band are
guests of the club at its various
functions.
Four outstanding events each
year that have become tradi-
tional are the initiation and in-
stallation ceremonies, the an-


nual Bombero Band Concert, the
three-act Spanish play, and the
formal dance and reception near
the close of the school term. The
formal dance and reception is
held each year on the roof gar-
Annm- nf\.f 4 +t.n Canantfii4^ C4 -tv


in an amateur contest at the
Atlas Beer Garden, Friday night.

Mary Anderson entertained
with a buffet supper Saturday
night on the anniversary of her
sixteenth birthday. Among those
attending were: Leo Connelly,
Bunky Marquard, Mary Posse,
Dorothy and Eleanor Marquard,
Paul Gorin, Montford Stokes,
Georgia and Phillipe Butler,


Mrs. Spencer attel
ional Convention
Clubs held at Dalli
Spencer was one
cipal speakers on
program, and the
various forums. I


ided the Nat- XLIV.
of Spanish
is, Texas. Mrs. XLV.
of the prin- XLVII.
the opening
girls spoke at XLVIII
3etty Jo and L1Il.


Martha Paige were featured in
a tamborita dance in beautiful
Pollera costumes at the ball
given the last night of the con-


vention.
The club has been very


suc-


cessful in carrying out its two
fold purposes which are to give
students of the Spanish lan-
guage opportunity to use the
language in a practical way, and
to give them an avenue for ac-
quaintance with their Panama-
nian neighbors. A great deal has
been done through the activities
of the club to promote friendly
relations between Panamanian
citizens and officials and the
rn,,n1 Ennn tnnil 7a hmrr TniOi +hpir


pleasure by


everyone.


The program is


as follows:


PART THE FIRST
I. Overture
11. RECITATIVE accompanied Tenor)
Comfort ye my people
III, AIR (Tenor)
Every valley shall be exalted
IV. CHORUS
And the glory of the Lord
VIII. RECITATIVE (Alto)
Behold a virgin shall conceive
IX. AIR (Aito) and CHORUS
O thou that tellest good tidings to
Zion
XII. CHORUS
For unto us a child is born
XIII PASTORAL SYMPHONY
XVlI CHORUS
Glory to God
XVIII. AIR (Soprano)
Refoice greasy, 0 daughter of Zion
XIX. RECITATIVE (Alto)
Then shall the eyes of the blind be
opened
XX. AIR (Alto)
He shall feed His flock like a shep-
herd
PART THE SECOND
XXII. CHORUS
Behold the Lamb of God
XXIV. CHORUS


Surely he hath borne our griefs
AIR (Bass)
Why do the nations so furiously rage
CHORUS
Hallelujah!
PART THE THIRD
AIR (Soprano)
I know tht my Redeemer liveth
RECITATIVE accompanied (Bass)
Behold I tell you a mystery
AIR (Bass)
The trumpet shall sound
CHORUS
Worthy is the Lamb


Greene,


Betty


Foulkes, Merwin French, Harold
Salas, Ada Crandall, Le Roi Les-
ser, Bobby Patchett, Harold
Rose, Gioconda Pucci, Josephine
Brennan, Keith Campbell, Nancy
Magner, Ruth Baumbach, Eva
Jean Doyle, Lee Doyle, Anthony
Aanstoos, Glyn Glaze, Ann Wil-
liams and others.


_I ~_


- I







Page 4


TRADE


WIND


MAY 10, 1940


Tennessee Wins

From Harvard 41-12


League Stand ii
of the I
Ohio Sate
Tennessee
Notre Dame
California
Pitsburgh
Nenn State
Hmwrd
Alabama .
Led by their


ng At The
First Half
W. L.
4 0
4 0
3 1
2 2
2 2
I 3
0 4
o 4
Sophomore


tain, Ed. Wheeler, Tennessee
closed their first half schedule
with a lop-sided win over the
lowly Harvard men, Monday,
April 29, when they won 41-12.
While the losers tried to bottle
up Ed- Greene, Wheeler was
shattering their defense with
long shots that didn't touch the
metal hoop. The black haired
flash was all over the floor at
once, making every shot count,
while Greene was pulling the
lawyers out from the basket.
Jack Brayton, Harvard's run-
ning guard, sank 2 field goals
and a charity toss to become
high point man for the losers
with a total of 5 points.
Wheeler was Tennessee's high
point man with 14 ringers.


Wheeler,
Randles.
Greene,
Salmon,
Barron,


TENNESSEE
PG
7
3
3
2
4


5 41


Nine,x
Coales.
Nesbin,
&taflon.
Gower,
Deitrick,


HARVARD
FG
I
2
0
0
0
a


Pennsylvania Five

Downs Navy 28-27

Penn State, headed by Tommy
McGuinness, beat Pescod's Navy
quintet 28-27, Wed., May 1. Un-
able to break up the defense
system Penn State put into ef-
fect in the last quarter, the
Navy hoopsters were defeated.
Penn State was trailing the
first half of the game, by 5
points, the score being 14-9-
Tightening their defenses and
going on a scoring spree, Penn
State led 22-18 at the end of
the third quarter.
Stalling for time by freezing
the ball, the Penn five out-
maneuvered the Navy squad,
finishing the game one point in


' t.


8 12


LAJ


Ohio State Downs

Pittsburg Quintet;

Final Score 42-18

Ohio State won their second
straight game, April 18, when
they defeated Pittsburgh 42-18.
Winning this game put them in
a three-way tie for first place.
The winners paced by "Dick"
Justice, took an 8-6 lead in the
first stanza. With the game so
close, Captain Dunlap entered
the game in order to pull away
from their opponents so that
they were assured of victory, so
at the end of the second quarter
the score was 21-6.
Jim Coffin and Captain Hal
Willett each made a basket to
pull within 11 points, but the
whole Ohio State team began to
feed Justice so that he made 8
points to increase their lead to
34-10 at the end of the third
period,
The fourth quarter was a re-
petition of the first as both
teams scored 8 for the winners
and 6 for the losers.

The high point men for the
losers were Coffin and Willett
with 5 points.


PITTSBURGH
Carlos, rf
Davenport, If
Coffin, c
Willert, rg
Parker. rg
Stroop, Is


Totals


OHIO STATE
Jusrtice. rg
Cosaraquis, if
Whice, If
Harris, c
Hollowell. rg
Pucci. Ig
Dunlap, Ig


4 18


FG
14
2
0
o0
2
a0
2


Total


7 42


-
JR. HIGH WILL
SHOW "DEVIL STONE"
"NOT SUCH A GOOSE"


(Coninued from Page
(Conciued from Page


Prompters ................................ Elsie Sterns
Margaret elden
These two plays will culminate
a successful year's program,
which includes several one act
plays for assemble, an operetta,
participation in the Christmas
Pageant, National Music Week,
and in several other public ner-


OHIO TIES RIVAL

TENNESSEE TEAM

FOR FIRST HALF
-
Ohio State swamped Alabama
54-18, on Monday, April 29, in
the C. H. S. gym. Ohio State were
never headed from the time that
"Dick" Justice, their star player,
and high point of the loop scor-
ed their first field goal until the
final whistle blew.
Ohio State took an early 4
point lead in the first quarter.
The quarter ended with the
scoreboard reading 8-4 in favor
of State. Those 8 points were
the least amount of points that
the winners have ever been in
one quarter. This can be credit-
ed to the fine guarding of Cap-
tain Glaze and "Stew" Pool.
As the second period got un-
derway, the winners seemed to
get their second wind, and they
really started to move, for at the
end of the half they led 18-8.
The leading scorers during this
half were Justice and "Dave"
Hollowell.
These same two players scor-
ed 14 of their team's 18 points
between them, during the third
quarter.
The winners scored 18 points
in the first four minutes of the
quarter and took the offensive
in the last half.
The outstanding players for
Ohio State were Justice and


Hollowell who
between them.
played a very
the defensive.
The high score
were Raymond
"Toastmaster" ]
4 points respect


ALABAI


Glaze, rf
Forsmnan, I
Kelly, c
Sasso, c
Simons, rg
Pool, Ig
Karst, Ig
Total


Kramsman
Justice, if
Hollowell.
Harris, c
White, c
Dunlap, c
Cosraquis,
Pucci, Ig


scored 36 points
"Sugar" Dunlap
steady game on

*ers for the losers
Simon and Harry
Kelly with 8 and
tively.
MA (18)
FG FTr PF Pts.
1 1 0 3
0 1 0 1
2 0 0 4
0 0 0 0
4 O 1 8
1 0 2 2
0 a 0 0


8
a
OHIO STATE
CG
rif I
II
if 7
1
0
4
2


3 18


E


CGrles, rf
Muschett. f
Coffin, c
Parker, If
Davenport,
Wilert. rg
Sutroop, rg
Total


Brayron, rf
Dierriech. xf
Coates, If
Nino. c
Gower, rg
Nesbir, rg
Tidd, lg


PG FS
3 1
7 0
0 a
2 0
4 1
2 0
18 2
PITTSBU.GH
PG FS
a0
0 0
4 0
1 0
o 0
0 0


Total 6 1 1 13 9

Ohio Downs Calif. 70-13
In the second game of the
day, Dunlap's Ohio quintet star-
ed 70 points against Pescod's
Californians 12, to continue their
winning streak to three games.
Justice, right forward, sank 16
baskets for California scoring 32
points to further his lead in to-
tal points made. The box scores:


J. Pescod. rf
Aans:oos, If
French, If
Gilder. If
Doyle. If
Picado. c
McGann
Estnoz, Ig
Total


Justice, rf
Hallowell, If
McCleary, If
Haris, c
CosaraqUis, Ig
Duolap, Ig
Kausman. Ig
White, Ig
Total


CALIFORNIA
FG FS
3 0
o 0
o0
o 0
1 0
a 0
o0 0
2 0
6 0
OHIO
PG o
16 0
4 0
1 0
2 1
4 0
5 0
2 1
0 0
34 2


12


70


Bureau of cubs

and Playgrounds


~...


HARVARD DEFEATS

PfTSBURGH FIVE

Lanky "String offin" made 7
baskets Wednesday, April 24 to
be high scorer in a game between
Wilett's Harvard hoopsters and
Nitto's Pittsburgh five, in whith
Harvard won 38 to 13.
A fast quarter ended with
both teams fighting for the lead,
Willett having the edge 108.
Tightening their defense, IHar-
vard held Pittsburgh scoreless
for the next.two periods as their
chalked up 32 points. In the
last quarter both teams scored.
Willett making 6 points and
Nitto scoring 5, the final score
being 38 to 13.