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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Title Page
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 Dedication
 Faculty
 Classes
 Seniors
 Juniors
 Sophomores
 Freshmen
 Activites
 Clubs
 Sports
 Advertising
 Back Matter
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PCANAL

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Owner



. 193H




Caribbean



1938

7"/^^ Caribbean

MARION MACINTYRE, Editor-in-Chief
WILLIAM FULLER, Business Manager
C. F. PLUMMER, Sponsor




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CARIBBEAN

NIN E TEEN THIR T Y-EIGH T



Piiblishetl by the

STUDENT ASSOCIATION

Cristobal High School
Cristobal, Canal Zone




CarilUjean
19.i8



Foreivord



This, the 1938 Caribbean, terminates the record
of the four years spent in high school, and also
marks the beginning of the life outside of high
school. With this in mind, the Caribbean staff pre-
sents this year book as a token of the past and as a
salute to the future.



Car hbean
938



The Contents



PAGE

The School 8

The Classes 15

The Events 37

The Work 43

The Sports 57

The People 65



Cari



^b



ean



n38




"Friend to 400"



To Mr. Cecil Rice



the Caribbean staff dedicates its 1938 book, because he

is, in the staff's opinion, the most prominent and popular "kid"
in the school.

Mr. Rice, in one year, has made himself a friend to the
400 students of C.H.S., a popular stage figure, and, with a joke
for anyone, has made himself known as "A swell guy."

Thus we say "To Mr. Rice the Caribbean."



Cari
1



bean
938




iMARlON MACINTYRF.

editor-in-chief



WILLIAM E. FULLER
business manager



The Staff



Eleanor Krushin ki Assistant Editor

Sam Freier Photo Editor

Depcirtnieut Editors

Marjorie Yost The School Dick Hoorn The Classes

Alma Bramin The Pictures Rose Marie Wolf The Work

Bill Forsstrom The Sports Al Hendricks The People

Depart Dient Assistants

Bettye Cassidy, Wylene Pool, Jacqueline Wahle, George Black, Jack
O'Hearn, Jean Green, and Carol Byrd.

And Contributors

Bill Hunt, Bea Cotton, Theresa Goulet, Jack Brayton, Mary Ann Cain, John

Finlason.
Sponsor C. F. Plummer




I
I



Skix



*^



Front Row: Green, Hendricks, Forsstrom, Black, Wolf. O Hearn. Yost. Second Row: Cassidy. Pool. Wahle,
Krushinski. Standing: Freier. Plummer, Bullock, Hoorn.



Caril
1938



eon



Caribb
793?



mn



The Appreciation

and gratitude, of the Caribbean staff, is extended to all who helped to
make the year book an interesting remembrance of high school days.

We extend our thanks to Mr. C. F. Plummer, our tireless journal-
ism teacher; to Mr. Cecil L. Rice, our cooperative principal; Mr. Kenneth
Vinton, who devoted many class hours to taking photographs; to Mr. J.
L. Matthews, mechanical superintendent of the Panama American; to
Mr. Sam Babcock, Babcock Cover Co., Los Angeles; to Mr. Frank
Finlayson, official photographer; to all the other willing workers who
so generously gave time and hard labour for the success of this issue.



Editor

MARJORIE
YOST



THE SCHOOL



Caribbean



193H




A Message



To the Students of Cristobal high school, 1938:

I only trust that thir. beautiful year book, the Caribbean of 1938,
may serve a two-fold purpose.

May it serve to bring back beautiful memories of our high school
days, and may it ever be a reminder to us, in this day of complex ci-
vilization, that we must continue to do our part in so educating our-
selves that we may intelligently live a life that will bring greatest sa-
tisfaction to ourselves and the utmost helpfulness to others.

Cecil L. Rice.
Principal



Cari



jhean
.38



Caribl
19:i



ean

a




Front



Baialden, Spencer, Beck. Bowman. Liter. Vinton. Back row:

HoiE. Franklin.



Worrell, Fatrerson, Stickler. Moore



The Faculty



of C.H.S. has, all-told, thirty degrees, ninery-four years of Cristobal high experience, and
degrees from eighteen universities in eleven states and one foreign country.



Ten of the degrees are A.B.'s, ten M.A.'s, five B.S.'s, two M.S.'s. one B.M., and
one Diploma de Suficiencia. They come from Illinois, Iowa, New York, Kentucky, Ca-
lifornia, Wert Virginia, Colorado, Ohio, Montana, Missouri, North Carolina, and Ma-
drid, Spain.



MISS BARBARA BAILEY:

Entered C.H.S 19^0

Teacher of Girls Gym

Degrees Chicago School

EduCacion
Activiries Sports Director



of Physical



MISS JEANNE BROWN:

Entered C.H.S 1932

Teacher of English 9, 10, Librarian

Degrees A.B,, University of Missouri

Al.A., Uniyersity of Missouri



MR. CALMER BATALDEN:

Entered C.H.S 1935

Teacher of AiJvanced Mechanical

ing. Woodwork 8. 9.
Degrees B.S,, Biadley Institute,



Draw-

10.
Illinois



MISS LOUISE CRESTO:

Entered C.H.S 19^6

Teacher of Spanish 9. 10. English 9

Degrees A.B., Colorado State Teachers

M.A.. Columbia Universirv'



MISS HALLIE BEAVERS:

Entered C.H.S 1937

Teacher of Mathematics. House-hold Arts.

General Business
Degrees A.B.. North Carolina State

M.A., Duke University. North

t arolina



MISS MILDRED ELNER:



Entered CHS 1931

Teacher of Glee

tion.

Degrees BM,.

Activities Boys'

Band



Club. Music Apprecia-
English
Drake L'niversiry. Iowa
and Girls Glee Club"^
and Orchestra



MR. PAUL L. BECK:

Entered C.H.S 1936

Teacher of U.S. History. American Pro*

blems
Degrees A.B., Finiay College. Ohio

M.A Michigan University

Activities Dramatic Club Sponsor

National Thespian Sponsor



MR. GEORGE EVANCHO:

Entered C.H.S 1936

Teacher of General Mathematics

Degrees Ph. B.. Muhlenberg College.

Pennsylvania. Graduate work.
New York Universit>', Lehigh
University'. Pennsylvania, Penn-
sylvania State




Left to right: Flummcr. (-rtstu. Beavers. Brown, Hoiz.



MR. MAX FRANKLIN:

Entered C.H.S..... 1936

Teacher of....." Metal Shop. Elementary Me-
chanical Drawing

Degrees tJ.S,, Bowling Green Univer-
sity. Kentucky

Activities Senior Class Sponsor

MR. TED F. HOTZ:

Entered C.H.S 19^"

Teacher of Algebra. Plane Geometry.

Solid Geometry. Trigonometry.
Degrees A.B.. Heidelberg. Ohio

M.A.. Ohio State
Activities Junior Class Sponsor

Assistant Sports' Coach

MISS BESSIE M. LITER;

Entered C.H.S 19H)

Teacher of English in. II. 12

Degrees A.B.. West Virginia Universit>'

M.A.. West Virginia University
Activities Sophomore Class Sponsor

MISS MARY ELIZABETH MOORE:

Entered C.H.S 1925

Tca:her of French 9, 10, Latin 9. 10,

Spanish 9
Degrees A.B.. >X'est Virginia

M.A.. Columbia University'
Activities Freshman Class Sponsor

MISS HELEN PATTERSON:

Entered C.H.S 1930

Teacher of Shorthand. Typing, Business

Training.

Degrees B.S., Montana State

Activities Student Council Treasurer

MR. VICTOR SEILER:

Entered CHS 19.^0

Teacher of Physical Education

Acti\ ities Sports Director

Student Council Member



MR. C. F. PLTJMMER:

Entered C.H.S 1937

Teacher of

Early Ei,ropean History,

English 11. lournalism
L)egrees A.B.. Occidental College. Ca-

lilt-rnia

M.A.. University of California
Activities Spunsur of Publications

MRS. PHYLLIS SPENCER:

Entered C.H.S 19.^0

Teacher of Spanish 10. U, 12. Com-

meicial Soanish

Degrees A.B,. Iowa Coie College

AM Iowa Cole College
Diploma De Suficiencia. Uni-
versity ot Madrid

A>:tivit'cs La Pas Club Sponsor

Pan-American Student Forum
Snonsor

MR. W. HUGH STICKLER:

Entered CHS 1936

Teacher of Biology. General Science. Al-
gebra 9.

Degrees B.S., Parsons College. Iowa

M.S., Lfniversirv of Iowa

Activities Biology Club Sponsor

Student Council

MR. KENNETH VINTON:

Entered C.H.S 1930

Teacher of Cnemistry, Phvsics

Degrees B.A Rir_.on College. Iowa

M. A. Columbia University
Activities Photo Ciub Sponsor

Student Council Member

MISS MARY WORRELL:

Entered C.H.S 19^6

Teacher of Art, Speech

Degrees B.S.. University of Missouri

M.S.. Northwestern Lrniversit>-.

Illinois
Activities Assistant Dramatic Coach



Caril ^hean
U38




Photo by Franklin



Cari '}bf'(in
1 938



Editor

DICK
HOORN



THE CLASSES



Caribbean



19SH





-^*^



Photos by Byrd, tloorn.



Caril
19^8



eon




Photo by Byrd



Cnrih Henn
1938




BILL HUNT
President



AS FRESHMEN:

The awkward appearance of the class
of '38 when they entered high school
was brought about by the wearing of
shirts and dresses inside out and back-
wards, of wearing shoes on the wrong
feet, and by generoui. applications of
red paint after the manner of the Ame-
rican Indian.

Under the sponsorship of Mr. Milford
Franks, the class elected William Scar-
borough as president.

On March 29 the carnival was held.

AS SOPHOMORES.

Some new faces and many familiar
ones appeared as the class showed great-
er interest in social activities when they
entered :uch clubs as the La Pas, the
Effe Kube Klub, the Trade Wind, glee
club, and the others.

New addition to the school's clubs
was the Pyramid Team.

Two picnics were held under the pre-
sident, John Finlason

AS JUNIORS:

Election this year saw William Scar-



Class uf 1938



borough again in the president's chair,
with Mr. Max Franklin as sponsor.

In the carnival, dart throwing, dice,
pin, and rmg games were sponsored by
the clas:.

Again, two picnics were the yearly
fare.

Class rings were ordered and appear-
ed on student fingers in May.

The junior prom was held under the
direction of Bea Cotton and Bill Fors-
strom

AS SENIORS:

Winning honors in all sports, the
seniors held the position of champs.

The class picnic and dance were suc-
cessfully presented.

With the ordering of announcements
and cards, graduation seemed at last to
appear possible.

Clima.xing the year, the Junior-Senior
banquet was given in May at the Hotel
Washington.

Graduation night marked a "finis in
the career, as high school students, of
the clas: of 38.



Caril
19.



beau
8



Graduates




RUTH M. ANDERSON: Camden,
New Jersey, September 3,
1921. Volleyball. Basketball,
Tennis. 2, 3, 4: Soccer, 3,
4: Baseball, 2; Bowling, 2,
3: Track. 4: Dramatic Club,
3; Spanish Club. 3, 4: Pan-
American Student Forum.
4.



MAURICE BAIGELMAN: Hes-
sen, Germany. March 23,
1920. Glee Club, 1, 2. 3, 4;
Atletics, 1, 2; "Old Spanish
Custom," 1.



GALE A. ARNOLD: Ancon, C. Z..
May 14. 1920. Clee Club. 2. 4:
Effe Kube. 2; Operetta
"Chonita". 2; "An Old Span-
ish Custom". 4.



NORMA BALKS: Newburynort,
Mass.. October 25, 1920.
Spanish Club, 4.



FLORA BATES BATH: Ancon,
C. Z., February 24, 1918.
Glee Club. 1, 2; Operetta
"Cherry Blossom," 2; Carni-
val play, 4.



GRACE BELDEN: Colon Hosni-
tal. R. de P., March 19. 1919.
Glee Club, 1; Athletics, 3. 4.



FRANCES BILISKY: Honolulu,
T. H., December 2t), ly^U.



JAMES CADENHEAD: McKees-
port. Pa.. Aug. 10, 1919.
Sports, 4



JOHN BERUDE: Cristobal, C. Z..
March 4, 1922. Swimming,
Soccer, Water Polo, Basket-
ball, 1, 3, 4; Football, Base-
ball, Tennis, 3, 4; Track, 4,



Lari



bean



Graduates



CIIAHLES BK.\SHEAK:



Fort



Stevens.
1921. La
Student
Baseball
Track. 4



Oregon, August 16,

Pas Pan-American

Forum. Football,

Basketball. Teni:is,



WILLIAM O. BUTLER, JR.: Ft.

Sill. Oklahoma. Oct. 31. 1920.
Baseball. 3: Football. Track.
4; Swimming, 3, 4.



ASA C. BULLOCK, JR.: New

Viirk (m. N. v.. May i. 1919- Band.
Orchestra. C^aniival staRc .show orches-
tra leader. 1. 2. -i. 4; Glee Club. I.
2. -K Caribbean. 3. 4; Trade Wind.
1: Operetta "Chonita'*. I; Operetta
"('herrv Blossoms". 2; Operetta "An
Old Spanish Custom". 4; Plav ''Red
Carnations." 3; Play "Clarence." 4.



MARY ANN CAIN: Colon. R. de
P., July 6, 1920. Supper Club.
1, 2, 3, 4; Volley. 2, 3. 4; La
Pas, 2, 3, 4: Bowling. 1. 2.
3; Pan-American Student
Forum 3. 4: "Chonita" 1:
'Cherry Blossom," 2; Glee
Club. 1, 2.



CAROL BYRD: Colon. R. de P.,
March 23. 1920. Volleyball,
Basketball. Tennis. 1. 2.' 3,
4; Softball. 1, 2, 3; Bowling,
2, 3; Soccer, 4; Track, 4;
Varsity Club, 2, 3, 4.



ANNE CARPENTER: Stockton.
California. December 1, 1920.
La Pas, Volleyball, 4.



RAFAEL CANTON: Managua,
Nicaragua. June 9, 1921.
Athletics. 1, 2, 3, 4.; Glee
Club, 3, 4.



MARIE VICTORIA FLORENCE
CHRISTIAN: Canal Zone.
October 2. 1920. Glee Club.
1, 2. 4; Dramatic Club. 2. 3.
4; Stage Show. 3. 4; Two
Operettas. 2. 4: Caribbean
Artist. 3: Volleyball, 2, 3;
Swimming, 2.



BETTYE CASSIDY: Nogales,
Arizona. August 23. 1921.
Editor Irade Wind, 4; Ca-
ribbean, 4.




Carih he
19i8



an



Graduates




BETTY CLAIRE CLAY:

Marshalltown. Iowa. May 10, 1920.
Swimming, I. 2. }. 4; Bnsketball.
Tennis ^, 4; Bowling. ^. Track, 4;
Volleyball. 2, 3. 4; Softball. 2. 3i La
Pas, 2. 3, 4; Pan-American Student
Forum. Carnival. Trade Wind typist, 4;
Dramatic Club, 3.



GLADSTONE PATRICK COO-
NEY: Panama City, Rep. of
Panama, Jan. 25, 1920. Soc-
cer, Swimming, 4.

PAUL (Coleye) COLE: Colon,
Rep. of Panama, June 25,
1922. Biology Club, 3, 4; La
Pas, 3, 4; Pan-American Stu-
dent Forum, Dramatic Club,
Carnival Stage Show, "The
Other Kitty", 4; Effe Kube,
1.



BEATRICE (Bea) COTTON:

Samaritan Hospital, Colon. R. de P.,
January IH. 1921. Dramatic Club. 1
2; Operettas. 'Chonita,'" 1 and.
'Cherry Blossom," 2; La Pas. 2. 3.
4; Glee Club. 1, 2; Student Council
2. 3. 4; National Thespians. 2. 3, 4;
Stage Show. 3, 4; Student Forum Vice-
Pres., 3, 4; Chairman Jun.-Sen. Ban-
quet, 3.

WILLIAM H. EGGER: Elmira,
N. Y., Aug. 8, 1920. Football,
3, 4; Soccer, Photo Club,
Stage Show, "The Florist
Shop", 4; Baseball, 3; Soft-
ball, 2.



EDWARD EGOZCUE: Colon,
Rep. of Panama, Nov. 9, 1920.
Newspaper, 1; Spanish Club,
Athletics, 2, 3; Biology Club,
2; Pan-American Student
Forum, Glee Club, 3.

ERNESTO E. ESTENOZ: Colon,
Rep. of Panama, Aug. 18,
1919. Athletics, 3, 4; Trade
Wind, 3; Programs, 3.



JOHN (Finny) FINLASON:

Carrago Cosia Rica, Sept. 23, 1919-
Carnival, Baseball, Soccer, Basketball,
1. 2. '). 4; Football. 2. 3. ); Class
President. 2; Glee Club, 1 2; Water
Polo. Treasurer of S. A.. Chairman of
Junior-Senior Banquet, 3; Trade Wind.
1, 2; Pres. of S. A.. 4; Track, 4; La
Pas, 2. 3.

WILLIAM (Fosi) FORSSTROM:

c:ristobai. C, Z. Tunc 22. 1920. Base-
ball, Basketball,' Soccer, 1, 2, 3, 4;
Foorball. 2, 3. 4; Glee Club, 1, 3. 4;
Dramatic CluD. 2. 3; National Thes-
pians, 3. 4; Varsity Club. Caribbean,
4; Biology Club. 2; Stage Show_ 3.. 4;
Student Council, 3; Plays, 1, 2, 3, 4,



Carib bean
U38



Graduates



WILLIAM FULLER: Ancon, C. Z.,
July 27, 1921. Operettas, Glee
Club, Dramatic Club, Or-
chestra, 1, 2, 4: Band, Foot-
ball, Soccer, Basketball, 1, 2,
3, 4; Plays, 3, 4; Trade Wind.
3, 4; Photo Club. 3; Carib-
bean, 4.

JOHN II. UIAZ: Panama City.
Rep. of Panama. March 11.
1920.

GUILLKRMO E. GRAF: Colon.
Rep. of Panama, July 9,
1919. Photo club, 4.

ANIBAL GALINDO: Colon, Rep.
of Panama, April 8, 1921.
Baseball. Basketball. Soccer,
3. 4: Trade Wind, 3; La Pas,
Track, 4.

ALBERT HENDRICKS: New

Bern, North Carolina,
August 19, 1920. Dramatic
Club, 2, 3, 4; Trade Wind,
Football, 2, 4; Track, 1:
Photo Club, 3: Caribbean,
Student Council, 4: Band,
3.

ALICE RUTH HANSON: Los

Angeles, Calif., June 9, 1921.
Glee Club. 1, 2: Spanish
Club, 3, 4; Pan-American
Student Forum, 4; Biology
Club, 2.

WILLIAM HUNT: Ancon, C Z
May 9, 1921. Trade Wind. 2.
3; Caribbean. 2; Biology
Club. 2; Photo Club, 3, 4;
Baseball Mgr., 3; Soccer
Mgr., 4.

RICHARD F. HOORN: Portland,
Me., April 22, 1920. Trade
Wind. Caribbean. 4.

ANNA THERESA KOTALIK:

Elkins Park, Pa.. December
12, 1920. Dramatic Club.
1. 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 1, 4;
Double Quartette, 1: Trade
Wind typist. 4; "The Nifty
Shop, 1; "Chonita," 2; Play,
"The Pampered Darling," 2.



JOHN W. HUSON: Ancon, C. Z.
July 19, 1920.




Cart ihean
1938



Graduates




CLAUDE E. LYONS: Colon. R.
de P., Dec. 13, 1919. La Pas,
2. 3, 4; Pan-American Stu-
dent Forum, 3, 4; Ring
Committee, 3; Sec. and Tres.
of Senior Class, 4; Typist
for Trade Wind, 4.



MARION DOUGLAS MACIN-

TYRE; New Orleans. La., Januar}
21, 1921. Trade Wind, Canb
bean. National Thespians. ^. 4; Dra-
matic Club. 2. t; L:i Pas. Pan-American
Student Forum. Editor Trade VC'ind.
Editor Caribbean, -i; Visitation VC'eek
Ass't Editor Trade Wind, Ji; Tennis
Bowling. 2; Soccer, Softball. 3. 4;
Volleyball. 2, 3.

DOROTHY R. MacSPARRAN:

Colon, R, de P., July 11,
1920. Supper Club, 1, 2, 3;
Glee Club, 2; Volleyball, 3;
Operetta "An Old Spanish
Custom," 4.



LUCY J. MATCHETT: Belize,
British Honduras, January
1, 1922.

THELMA MILLER : Fortress
Monroe, Va., November 12,
1919, Stage Show, Glee Club,
Operetta "An Old Spanish
Custom," 4.

THEODORE (Yorick) McGanir.

Colon, R. de P., March 17,
1920.

BOB FETTERS: Honolulu, Ha-
waii, February 6, 1920.

OLIVER GREGORY PATER-
SON: Wolleston, Mass., No-
vember 2, 1919. Trade Wind,
4; (Other activities in Bal-
boa High school, I



ANTHONY JOHN REFCOFSKI:

Ancon. C. Z,. June 29. 191.S. Base-
ball Water Polo. Basketball. Soccer.
1, 2, 3, 4. ^. Football. 3 4. 5: Track.

1. 5; Effe Kube Club. 1; Dramatic
Club, 4; National Thespians, 4. 5;
Photo Club :>; Science Club, 1; Bio-
logy Club. 2; Slide Rule Club. 3;
Band. 1. 2, 3, 4, 5: Orchestra, I. 3,
4; Pyramid Team, 3. 4; Carnivals 1,

2, 3, 4, 5.



DAVID POTTS: Hampton, Va.,
January 8, 1919. Baseball,
Basketball, Soccer, 1, 2, 3,
4; Football, Varsity Club, 2,
3, 4; Swimming, 2, 3; Water
Polo, 3, 4: Track, 4: Tennis,
3; "Chonita," 1; Christmas
Pageant, 1.



Curii >b
1938



can



Graduates



CHARIJCS H. SCHAKFKR: Co-
lon. R. de P.. December 30.
1920. Trade Wind, 2.



r.MIL C. VENABLE: Durham.
North Carolina, June 5,
1921. Basketball. Soccer. 1.
2, 3, 4; Football. 2, 3, 4;
Baseball. 3. 4; La Pas, 3.

ANNE SHIRLEY: Cristobal, C.
Z.. November 14, 1919. Glee
Club. 1, 2: Trade Wind. 2;
La Pas, 3, 4; Pan-American
Student Forum, 4; Tennis,
Swimming, 1, 2, 3, 4.



MARY LOUISE WARREN: Co-
lon Hospital. R. de P.. Feb-
luary 14, 1921. Athletics, 4.



GENE STADE: Fresno. Califor-
nia, July 15, 1920. Water
Polo. 4.



ROSE MARIE WOLF: Colon. R.
de P.. July 4. 1920. Glee
Club. 1. 2. 3, 4: Biology
Club. 2; Stage Show, Trade
Wind, Caribbean, Carnival
Committee, Swimming, 4:
La Pas, 2, 3: Supper Club,
1, 2, 3, 4.



MARY C. STUMPF: Colon. R. de
P., February 8, 1920. Glee
Club, 2; La Pas. 1. 2. 3. 4;
"Cherry Blossom," 1: Tennis,
3; Supper Club, Pan-Ame-
rican Student Forum, 4.



FRED L. WERTZ JR.: Colon
Hospital. R. de P., April 2.
1918.



VIRGINIA TRACY: Pullman.
Wash.. July 18. 1921. Dra-
matic Club, 3: National
Thespians, 4.



MARJORIE (Muffct) YOST:

La Habra, Calif.. July 25,
1920. Trade Wind, 4; Carib-
bean, 3, 4; Stage Show. 2
3; Glee Club, 1, 2: Soccer, 3.




Caril h
19 \8



van



Graduates



Cnrih bean
19m




GEORGE A. BLACK: New York

City. N. Y.. Dec. 1. 1920. Swimming.
1, 2, S. 4; Soccer. Football, Basketball.
Water Polo. Carnival Committee 2. t.
4; Tennis. 2. 3; Photo Club." 2. 4;
Rifle Club. Dramatic Club Photo
Club President, 4; Trade Wind, Carib-
bean. 4



VINCENT CONRAD: Ancon. C.
Z., June 2, 1921. Science
Club, Photo Club, 2; Foot-
ball, 4.



DOT BRAYTON: Colon, R. de P.,
November 15, 1921. Volley-
ball, Swimming, 1, 2; Bas-
ketball, 2; La Pas, Pan-
American Student Forum,
Trade Wind Typist, 4: Glee
Club, 1.

LUCY I. DETRICK: Colon Hos-
pital, R. de P., February 15,
1920. Dramatic Club, 1, 2,
3, 4; Glee Club, 1, 2, 4;
Volleyball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Soft-
ball, 1, 2, 3; Bowling, 2, 3,
4; Tennis, Soccer, 3, 4.



THELMA CALLAWAY: Whistler,
Alabama, June 26, 1920.
Basketball, Volleyball,
Tennis, Swimming, 1, 2, 3,
4; Bowling, Baseball, 1, 2,
3; Track, Soccer, 4; Glee
Club, 1, 2, 4; "Chonita." 1;
"Cherry Blossom," 2.

JACK GORMAN: New York:
City, N. Y., May 25, 1920.
Football, 4.

PATSY COFFEY: Colon Hosni-
tal, R. de P., January 12,
1921. Dramatic Club, Spanish
Club, 3, 4; Trade Wind Ty-
pist, 4.



THERESA (Ter) GOULET:

Ancon. C. Z,. January "^^ 1 92 1. Stage
Show, Basketball, Vollevball. Soccer.
Swimming, Tennis, Softball, Bowling.
Supper Club, 1, 2 ^, -4; Dramatic
Club. 1. 2. 3: Operettas. 1. 2. 4: Glee
Club, 1 2; Spanish Club. 2; National
Thespians. Caribbean 4.



ALBERT BENJAMIN COLLINS:

Dudley, Georgia, June 5,
1917. Soccer, 1; Glee Club,
Swimming, 4.



Graduates



KENNETH F. IIODSON: Norlh
BtMid, Orcfion. November 4,
1920. Football, Basketball,
Track, 4; Photo Club, 4.



DORIS KUTII HALE: Ancon, C.
Z., July 13, 1920. Swimming,
Tennis, Volleyball, Basket-
ball, 1, 2, 3. 4; Softball, 1,
2, 3, Bowling, 1,2; Soccer, 3;
4: Tiack, 4; Varsity Club. 4.



BILL HOVERTER: Reading

I'tnnsvUjiiia, .i.inu.irv Id. 1922. Basket-
ball, Baseball. Sumr. 1 2, 'i. A: Foot-
ball. Tennis. Varsity Club, 2. 3, 4;
Swimming, Water Polo. 3. A: La Pas.
2 s; Operetta "(^honna." I; "Cherry
Blossom." 2: Glee Club. I, 2: Photo
Club, _ -l; Christmas PaReant, 1, 2.



KATHERINE HANDSIIAVV: Har-
risburg, Penn., November 16,
1920



ANDREW LA POINTE: Minnea-
polis, MiiHi., July 7, 1921.



LOUIS FRED HAUSS JR.: Co-
lon, Rep. of Panama, Nov.
2, 1920. Band, 1, 2, 3, 4;
Football, Soccer, Basketball,
3; Rifle Club, 4; Glee Club,
1.



CLYDE LINTON: Ft. Moultrie,
S. C, January 15, 1920.



LAUREL (HIG) HIGHLEY:

Ludlow, Kentucky, February
8, 1919. Baseball, Basketball,
Soccer, 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity
Club, Football, 2, 3, 4; Swim-
ming, 2, 3, 4; Track 4; Glee
Club, 1.



VICTOR H. MAY JR.: Colon
Hospital, R. de P.. October
22, 1920. Band, Glee Club,
1. 2, 3. 4: Baseball, Basket-
ball, Stageshow, 2, 3, 4; La
Pas. 2, 4; Operettas. "Cho-
nita," "Cherry Blossom."
"Pinafore." 1. 2. 3: Orchestra.
1. 2; Student Forum, 4,




Caril b
19i8



I'd 1 1



Graduates




ANNA E. PATCHETT: Colon
Hospital, R. de P., May 5,
1919. Glee Club, 1; Trade
Wind Typist. 4.



ALFRED (Stumpy) STUMPF:

Philadelphia, Penna.. June
18, 1920. Football, Basket-
ball, Soccer, Dramatic Club,
1, 2, 3; La Pas, Student
Forum, Stage Show, Glee
Club, Christmas Pageant, 2,
3; "Pampered Darling," 2;
Stunt Carnival, "Old
Spanish Custom," 3.



KAY PAXTON: Sulphur, Okla-
homa. January 31, 1920. Or-
chestra, 4.



VERN TERRY: Panama Canal
Zone, May 11, 1920. Basket-
ball, 2, 3, 4.



ISABEL PETERSON: Colon, R.
de P., November 5, 1919. La
Pas, Pan-American Student
Forum. 3. 4: Supper Club,
4; Basketball, i; Tennis, 3.



HOWARD O. WHITT JR.:

Petersburg, Va., June 23,
1920.



J. C. (Smitty) SMITH: Nor-
folk, Va., March 22, 1920.
Baseball, Football, Basket-
ball, Soccer. Water Polo,
Biology Club, 3; Stage show,
4.



LOUISE ELLEN ZIMMERMAN:

Sedro-Wooley, Wash., May
4, 1921. Supper Club. 1. 4;
Effe Kube Club, Glee Club,
"Chonita," 1: Soccer, Volley-
ball, Tennis, 3. 4; La Pas, 4.



Carib
1



tean



9i



Graduates^



FRANK (Pete) BRENNAN:

Philadelphia. Penna., Oct. 2.
1920.



MILTON C. DUNN: Colon Hos-
pital. Rep. of Panama, Dec.
23, 1922.



LUIS LliSHIVIAN S.: St. Clair.
Penna., June 8, 1918.



EDDIE McCarthy; Colon. R.
de P.. Januaiv 23. 1920.
Baseball. 1. 2, 3. 4: Band. 3;
Glee Club, 3. 4; Photo Club,
3; Typist for Trade Wind,
4.



DON PARKER: Colon, R. de P.,

March 28. 1920. Soccer. 1. 2,
3. 4; Baseball. Ba.skctball,
Football, 2, 3. 4; Track,
Var.sity Club, Carnival Com-
mittee, 4; Biology Club, 2.



VIRGINIA SHANNON: Charles-
ton. S. C. Feb. 19, 1922.
Swimming, 4.



MARGARET WOOD: Puerto
Cortez. Honduras. December
1. 1917. Glee Club, 1, 2.



RUTH WOOD: Cartago, Costa
Rica. Anril 7, 1919. Glee
Club, 1, 2.



"g?



m MEMORIAM

JOSEPHINE DUNN, your classmates salute the
memory ot the sincere companionship and friendly
leadership of which they were deprived by an in-
tervening and more powerful call.



Caril beui.
V3fi



In The Hall of Fame



Cari
19



Because she is well-liked by
all for her warm smile and
friendly helpfulness, B E A
COTTON won her place as
MOST POPULAR Senior
girl.



To JOHN FINLASON went
the unique distinction of two
places. For service to the stu-
dent body, he was named
MOST INDUSTRIOUS; for
his winning personality, he
rated MOST POPULAR boy
of his class.



BETTYE CASSIDY, who
managed to carry a tremend-
ous load of books and still
keep her good nature, was
the choice of the students as
MOST STUDIOUS girl.



Acclaimed a regular fellow in
all ways, CHARLES BRAS-
HEAR earned special honors
as MOST STUDIOUS boy
member of the graduation
class.



LUCY DETRICK, whose
ready grin and infectiqus
laugh gave sparkle to many
a dull moment, was accorded
the place for the WITTIEST
girl in her class.



Quick repartee and sharp jests
put AL HENDRICKS eadly
in front in the estimation of
the students as the WIT-
TIEST male graduate.




bean



By Popular Choice




.w^-'V-




DORIS HALF., for an envi-
able record of successfully
participating in ail sports and
still retaining feminine charm,
won the rating of MOST
OUTSTANOINCi CIRL
ATHLliTli.



In tiic language of the sports
world. BILL HOVF.RTER is
a "natural. His prowess in
all sports qualified him as
MOST OUTSTANDING
BOY ATHLETE.



Sweetness and demureness
emphasized DOROTHY
BRAYTON S golden hair-
ed, blue eyed attractiveness,
which ranked her MOST
BEAUTIFUL GIRL.



A certain dignity tempered
by an eng.agmg smile, the
proper setting for his distinc-
tive features, won BOB FET-
TERS the title of MOST
HANDSOME BOY.



In the thick of any fray, al-
ways ready to turn an effi-
cient, dynamic energy to any
one of three tasks on hand.
MARION MACINT^'RE
was the choice ;.s MOST IN-
DUSTOIOUS GIRL.



^V



Cttrib
19



}cnn
?8




i*4i!^^^^'"^^'



The Junior Class



elected George Booth, president; Peggy Brown, vice-
president; Anabel Bassett, secretary; and Jean
Green, treasurer, at their first meeting under sponsor
Mr. Ted F. Hotz.

The next big event took place in January, when
the class embarked for Shimmy Beach and a day in
the sun. The committee that arranged the day's
festivities were: Mr. Cecil L. Rice, Jane Bevington,
George Booth, Jack Hutchings, and Jean Green.
Chaperones of this outing were Mr. and Mrs. Rice,
Mr. and Mrs. Hotz, Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Hauberg,
and Mr and Mrs. Calmer A. Batalden.

Next event was selecting the class
ring in February. The ring committee con-



Cari bbean

ma




H \ '11. ^



One Year To Go

sisted of, Anahcl Bassctt, chairman. Jack Hut-
chings, Jane Bevin,^ton, Ida Reynolds, Tommy
Ashton, Bcity Jo Hamilton, and Helen Wick-
ingstad.

While still in the throes of this excitement, up
came the carnival. The juniors, from their six
booths; the Country Store, Telegraph, Penny Game,
Dice Game. Barrel Booth, and Shooting Gallery,
placed tops in the profits making a total of $157.14.
Chairmen for these booths were: Anabcl Bassett,
Fern Horine, Bill Griffin, Jack Hutchings, and Gus
Holmelin.

To finish the year off. the juniors held the annual
banquet in honor of the seniors to wish them well
in their "embarking upon the waters of life" on
June 3-



Carib



yeim



29|3



\







The Soplioinore Class

officers, elected on Sept. 17, were Carl Marohl, pre-
sident; Joe Nitto, vice president; and Ann Washing-
ton, secretary. Miss Bess M. Liter sponsored the class
for the school year 1937-1938.

At the school carnival on February 4, the class
ran four booths the coin booth, penny game,
balloon game, and the novel duck game. The profits
for the evening totaled $120. The heads of the above
committees respectively were: Mary Hunt. Jack
O'Hearn, Elfrida Flores, and Bobby Fernandez. Jean
Raymond, Bobby Fernandez, and Jack O'Hearn were
placed in charge of all Sophomore carnival activi-
ties.

The next event on the calendar was the annual
outing, this year taking form of a picnic at Shimmy
Beach, Fort Sherman, on Saturday Feb. 12. Miss
Liter and Mrs. W. C. Washington acted as



Caribb ?an

19 a




Tno For Them



chaperons. The oiitirii; was a great success and the
picnickers were fortunate at the time in having
movies made of them by the Granthind Rice "Sport-
light" photographers.

The class was host to the faculty and members
of the Student Association at their dance of March
18. The dance was held in the gym, and the follow-
ing students composed tlie committees: Georgiana
Garnwright, Martha Peterson, Frances Dibble, Carl
Marohl, Joe Nitto, Edward Marquard, and Buddy
Cadenhead, decorating committee; Bobbie Styles,
Dorothy Anderson, Jane Kaufer, Jean Rodgers, re-
freshment committee.

The Sophs, as usual, took part in many sports
and in the Triangular track meet on April 2, were
represented by Jack Halliburton and Whitney
Brayton.



Curil hcaii
938







/*.--*-^-^ '/.-* ) - .-t>''H-^,






The Freshman Class



moved into action soon after entering school this
year with the election of Jack Brayton, president;
Frank Cain vice-president Peggy McCleary, secre-
tary; and Frances Davenport, treasurer.

About three weeks later the class elected as their
representatives, Emily Horine and Eddie Wheeler, to
the student council.

At the carnival the class had three booths. With
these three they contributed materially to the amount
of money brought in by the whole school. They were
Bottle-busting booth, the horse racing booth, and



Carib
19.1







Coining Up



the bow and arrow booth.

Unable to have a class picnic early in the year,
the class retaliated with a dance given in the middle
of May. This dance, the first the class has gi\en,
was formal.

Ranking fairly high in sports, both frosh boys
and girls managed to hold down the position of se-
cond place in the soccer league. Buddy Hutchings
captained the team. Baseball saw the boys in fourth
place, under captain Luis Palmer; football, third.
under Ed Wheeler. Clyde Ruley and John Pucci
headed the basketball teams.



Corihh
1938



oan



The Will



Ruth Anderson

Norma Bales

Flora Bath

Grace Bcldcn

Frances Biliskv

Dorothv Bravion

Carol Bvrd

Mary Ann Cain

Thelma C allaway

Anne C^arpenter

Bettve Cassidv

Marie Christian

Betty C'lay

Patsy Coffey

Bea C^otton

Lucv Detrick

Theresa Goulet

Dottv Hale

Kathcrine Handshaw

Alice Hanson

Anna Koralik

Marion N!acintyre

Dorothv MacSparran

Lucv Matchett

Thelma Miller

Anna Patchrit

Catherine Paxton

Isabel Peterson

Virginia Tracy

Mary Stunipf

Anne Shirley

Mary Louise Warren

Margaret arid Ruth Wood

Marjorie Yost

Louise Zimmerman and

Virginia Sh.umon

Gale Arnold

Kenneth Hodson

Victor May

Maurice Baigelman

Al Hendricks and

George Black

(Charles Brashtar

Frank Brennan

Asa Bullock

William Butler

Rafael Canton

(Charles (.hase

Paul Cole

Albert Collins

Gladstone Cooney

Milton Dunn

William EgRer

Totv Fstcnoz

lohn Frnlason

V\ illiam Forsstrom

OC'illiam Fuller

Anibal Galindo

Jack Gorman

Guillermo Grau

Fred Hauss

Laurel Highley and

Rose Marie Wolf

Dick Hoorn

William Hovcrter

William Hunt

John Huson

Andrew LaPoinie

Vincent Cionrad

C'lyde Linton

Luis Lushman

(!laud Lvon

Edward Mcf arthy

Tlieodnre Mc Gann

Donald Parker

Oliver Paterson

Bob Fetters

David Potts

Anthonv Refcofski

Charles Schaeffer

James Smith

Edward Egozcuc and

Eugene Stade

Alfred Siumpf

Paul Venable and
John Berude

Vern Terry
Fred Wertz
Howard Whiit



by Bea Cotton and John Finlason

Her soccer ability to

Her New England accent to

Her height to

Her beautiful dark tresses to

Her high honors lo

Her good looks to

Her modesry to

Her flowers for teacher to

Her flirting eyes to

Her red hair to

Her position on the Trade Wind staff

Her artistic ability to

Her ability to curl hair to

Her abilitv to talk fast to

Her blonde hair to

Her faintmg spells to

Her apologetic ways to

Her sports ability to

Her chatty personality to

Her fluttering eyes to

Her composure to

Her love for arguing to

Her playfulness to

Her abilitv to write essays to

Her melodious voice to

All her new jokes to

Her manv hours of piano practicing to

Her Spanish accent to

Her whimsical way with boys to

Her way witli Dutchmen to

Her stately poise to

Her truckin' to

Their friendliness to

Her high-pitched voice to

Their long fingernails to



Their height to

His gold tooth to

Their noise in class meetings to

His scholastic ability to

His "Tarzan" physique to

His long standing in the orchestra to

His typing record to

His contrary ways to

His Costa Rica girlfriend to

His many hours of homework to

His hurried exits from each class to

His bashfulness to

His sailor cap to

His auietness to

His flowery descriptions to

His rides in the station wagons to

His loyalty to the girlfriend to

His two timing ways to

His soccer ability to

His West Point ambitions to

His doodling to

His place in the band to

Their lovely smiles to

H is photography to

His athletic standing to

His parliamentary procedure worries to

His inventions to

Their partnership to

His services as chauffeur to

His gentlemanly ways to

His way of bumming rides to

His rac>id srride to

His abilit\' to climb trees to

His car and accessories to

His heart-breaking technique to

His good nature to

His cave-man manner to

His aloofness to

His southern atcent to

Their helpfuT ways to

His large school program to



Ellen Roe

Oran Annin

Betty Jo Hamilton

Mary Louise Arthony

Irene Richardson

Vivian C^ottrell

Frrn Horine

Helen Wikin'_;stad

Buddy Parsons

Jenisinia Holgerson

Wylenc Poole

Arthur Mor
William Ebdon

Peggy Brown

N'lldred Whitt

Gcor;;e Booth

Maryella I,awson

Beverly Arnnl.l

Marianne MacDonald

Zona Boggs

Shirley Brayton

Edith Fredericks

Janet Ncsbitt

Wood row Torbert

Richard Btrncit

Alma Bramin and Sam Freier

Edwin Piburn

(Constance Irvine

Anabel Bassett

Josephine Endcr

Ida Reynf)lds

Robert Thomas

Charles Reeves

Dorothy Bilisky

Veronica Stein



the Gas IIousc"



Their membership

His "carefree"' attitude to

His tales to

His honor roll record to

SIGNED BY THE CLASS OF 1938

WITNESSES:

R. Truckin" Daze
R. Rover Now



Robert Downie

Alice Howell

Margaret and Mary Plummer

Herbert Ashton
J-rank Robles
Dan Butler
Thomas Ashton
Robert Koperski
Grovcr Gravatt
Gilbert Joudry
Richard Fitzgerald
Eugenia Steinhart
Jacqueline Wahle
Gorden Cohen
Jean Green
Jatncs Donaldson
Luis Finlason
Frank Peterson
Warren Lam
Richard Wood
Cynthia Martin
Beverly Moody

Kenneth Edmonds
Wendell Arbouin
William Wood
Carolyn Carpenter
James Defrrcs
CMiarlotte Elkins and
Helen Foraker

Afary Jane Campbell
Buddy Bloxom
Philip Briscoe
Helen Hewitt
Howard Melker
Charlotte Raymond
Bert Tvdeman
Althea Butcher
Billy .lames
Dolores LaPointe
Charles Mayville

Thomas Stein
Harold Blackwell

Jane Bevington and
Irene Laurie

Bill Griffin
Benjamin Yohres
Jack LaLoncj^



Carih bean
IS 38



Editor



ELEANOR
KRUSHINSKI



THE EVENTS



Caribbean



193H



^^' j The Year

J In Word and Plioto



Stcnc: A Kroup of f^raJuatos, class of '^8. itaihtrcd
armiiul a (.aiiiphrt- ai Stnininv bticli one muoiitiKlu
riiKlii a few wicks aiitr lotniiiL-nccnKni.

CharacctTs: Thtrtsa Goulct. BiM Hum. Al IlcnJriiks.
Uill Forsstrom. Bcityc Cassidy. Doicic Hale. Vincent
( onrad. John rinlastni. Gtorgc HIack, Bca ( oittm. Anne
C arpintcr.

Theresa: Bill, this was one grand year, wasn't it.'

Bill Hunt: Yeah! Sure was.

Theresa and Hill in unison: Say, do you remember....
( lauKhftr t

Bill Hutu: Go ahead, what were you about to rc-
iiember.-'

Theresa: Well. I was just thinkin' about the firsc
day of school. How excited and ea^er we were to sec
the new teachers, Mr. Rite....

....and Mr. Hotz and Mr. Plummer.



AI: Say. is this a private line? or can I do some
leineniberiiiK too? ( to lohnnv ) I'll bet you'll never
torget when you were elected S. A. president. Sort of a
laniilv affair, wasn't it.'' With the election of brother
Luis as vicepresident.




ibh



Cnri
19B8



tean



Carib wan
19 i8



In Word



Bea Cotton: What a year this was for the council!

Bill Forssrrom: And don't fotKet the musical parts
of school, glee clubs and opereiias. Remember way back
in October when tliey gave the music emblems to the
undents who had taken part in the musical activities
ot the year before?

Bea Cotton: You had the leading part in the April
operetta "An Old Spanisli Cu.iuin" didn't yuu, Bill?

Dot Hale: And were you good!

Bill Forsstrom: Yes, and dt.nt forget the o'her

operetta this year, '"The Feast of the Little Lanterns.'*

Bea Cotton: (Sighing reniinisccntiy ) Ahh! Wasn't
the Christmas pageant beautiful.

Theresa: I'll never forget the ^fay music festival.

Dotcie Hale: Personally. I prefer dancing
they fun?

Al: Yeah, especially the senior barn dance, Hallowe'en.

John: Oil. I don't know. I had a lot of fun at the
S. A. dance-, at Christmas, didn't you?





And Photo

IV;i: Ami llic frosli an J sopliomurc dances and Bia-
diiaiioii. Ob, buy!

GcorRC Black: No. done fi.tRci graduaiion.

Aiuu- ( arpcniir: And there was ibc danciiiK ai ibc
cirnivjl III never forwet ihal W a-n'l me .a.imal lun
Clrace ISelden was clecled gue.n. lUmeinber^ ^ ou were
awfully dose behind iIiourIi. Dciiye.

Hill Hunt: U was cxcitinR.



lohnnv finlason: I Kucss we all realrze that ihe suc-
less of ihe carnival was due. lo a greal cxiene. 'o tM
efforts of Ihe das committees and the Trade Wind
staff. v the way. when did [he first issue of the Trade
Wind come out.''

Hill Hum: October first, 1 think.

Uetive Cassidy: Thais riRbt.... Gadabout Gertie, alias
Jean Green, certainly kept us up to the minute on tlic
school Rossip.

Theresa: And littul Oswald kept us conscious of our
spclliiiK for the rest of the year. 1 know 1..

Al Hendricks; Jackie Walilc sure had a lot of fun
writm that. And Wy Pools Wise Wy Wonders was
an entertaining column, wasn t it.-*



c



an



}benn



19'iH



In Word



Johnny Finlason: Speaking ot being entcrtaincii. wliar
about rhe plays? The one entitlL-d Tlie Impuituncc of
A Ghost Story'" struck me ys being particularly clever.

Dottie Hale: W'dl. if you must talk about plays. 1
like those three one-acters given early in the year.

George Black: { Beiween yawns) Weren't those iunior
college plays "'Augustus Does his Bit'' and "Happy
Go-Lucky good?

Bill Hunt: Yeah, but 1 liked "Clarence," with Asa
Bullock, best. The Thespians and dramatic club were
good under Mr. Beck. ( AI snickers )

Theresa: What's the matter with you? Are you suf-
fering from an acute sense of humour?

Al Hendiicks: I was laughing at some of those jokes
Mr. Rice told us ia assembly.

Bill Hunt: Will you ever forget the Hallowe'en
assembly? That was fun.... And remembe*' the assen"ibly
at which Mr. Piummer awarded the snapshot prizes?

Beitye Cassidy: Oh. yeesss. That was when Ken
Hudson got his just reward for the pictures he could
have taken, but didn't, with his candid camera.







v-



//,>




Carib tea
19^8



in




And Photo







m.



Vincent C. : Saay. rcmcnibt-r ihosc i>f johnny (he fruR
(lui not ir. the Nutiuiiut GtoKr^iphu wiih Viniun \

.iiiu k f

Uill iMiisviroin; Yiuh, ;nic!....

l)t>t Il.(k-: Vcp Jiilinny \V a i an cxliibit. all riRhi,
but 1 soria liked the Household am exhtbiis, too....
cho''C fashion slxms....

Anne CarpeniLT: ( eating a lioidoK) and the show-
cases full ut f(>ud.... but some rcall/ ftood 'feeds' were
enjoyed at some of those class panics.

Bill I'orssirom: Yeah, and....

Theresa: And remember ihc senior class had a party
n the j^ynt. too. instead of a class picnic.

hill rorsstroni. Yea, and....

Anne C^arpcnier: (to George, who is yawning) You've
been awtuliy guitt. W hat did you like Ix-st.'

George: f yawning) Ihe vacations. I guess! No.
seriously. I ttucss I ciijoytd seeing the senior boys wm
;tll the sports.

Bill I'orsstrom: Thais just v/hat I've been trying to



Bea: ( ignoring him i Hut the junior girls made up
for it by winning swimming, hockey, tennis and....




Cavilthrdu

i9:iH



In Word



Anne Carpenter: What T liked, best in the sport
line wa-i tht tratk meet, April 2. Hi^hley, Hoverter
and you. Bill, starred, I was never so excited in my
life as when it ended wiih CH.S. just > point in
the lead.

Al Hendricks: Something I enjoyed was the Stunt con-
test, janviary 21.

Vince: 111 rake my contests in less strenuous forms;
writing, ptrhaps. The American Legion sponsored two
lissay contests.

Bettye: Some of those htalth lectures were pretty in-
teresting.

Bill Hunt: The outcome of the Hall Of Fame elec-
tion was pretty interesting, too.... 1 think it was nearly
as interesting as learning that graduation was actually
here and who the commencenient committee were.

Anne Carpenter: Not quite. Vince. weren't you thrill-
ed when you learned you weie to be Valedictorian?

Vince: No, only scared.

(quiet reigns)

Tlieresa: Gosli. You know, school wasn't so bad, li
was lots of fun most of this ytur....

George completes last yawn and goes to sleep.

(The End)

1^ "~;




Caril I
19 iH



}pan



Editor



THE WORK



ROSE MARIE
WOLF



Caribbean



193H




Standi nK. Icfi ro riKhr: \\ heeler. Seller, Cotton, Fernatidtz. Laurie. Vinton. Horine. Htndricks, Sty Us. Stickler.
Ashittn. Front: Luis I-inlason, vice-president; Hvelvn Shirl;y. secretary; Beverly Moody. [rasurtr; John Finlason.

president.



The Student Council



witli the two Finlason brothers at tlie helm, has finished its fifth successful year di-
recting school activities.

John and Luis Finlason were elected president and vice-president rerpectively in
a student election held October 1, 1937. Other officers elected were: Evelyn Shirley,
;ecretary, and Beverly Moody, treasurer.

The Finlasons easily won the election, each collecting 138 votes in their fields.
Also running for president were, Bea Cotton, and Bill Forsstrom; for Vice-president,
L. Finlason, Alfred Stumpf, Beverly Arnold; and for secretary, Theresa Goulct, and |ane
Bcvin^ton; for treasurer, Beverly Moody, and Edward Egozcue.

The council representative assembly is composed of two members from each class.

The faculty member: are Mr. Kenneth Vinton, director of activities; Mr. W. Hugh
Stickler, student sponsor; and Mr. Vic Seiler, director of athletics.

A Christmas dance wac given at Christmas time.



Caribb ?r
193 i



Cfiii
1



ithran

.io




GRACE BELDEN

Carnival Queen



The Carnival



held in the gym on the evening of February 4, made $671.97.

The junior class took in more profits than any other from their five booths, with
.1 total of S119.55. Booths were: dice game, penny game, pop gun, barrel game, the
jountry store, and telegraph.

Sophomores ranked second with S98.86. Their booths were: a penny game,
balloon game, duck ringing, and a coin booth.

The freshman class made $90.63, with horse racing, bingo, can but, and bow
and arrow game.

The seniors from their dart game, shooting gallery, dice game, and bombing
planes, earned $66.47.

The stage show, held in the auditorium under the direction of Mr. Paul L.
Deck and Mr. Cecil L. Rice, made $100.35, with the theme, "Shore Leave."

Grace Belden was elected carnival queen with 4375 votes. Bettye Cassidy, a close
second, received 4005 votes. The election made $84.18, and the dance, also under the
Trade Wind, $5.94.

The Hall of Science, under the supervi ion of Mr. W. Hugh Stickler and Mr.
Kenneth W. Vintt)n, made $38.20.

Greatest amount of money, earned by the roda, food, and ice cream booths, was
$143.72. Miss Feme Bowman and Miss Hallic Beavers were in charge of this booth.



C3QBB1AB



"^iS^^?^.^^




Standi,.;, ii.f,



'o rir-h,. .



Po,



Tracv 4.1..



Clarence^



>-.. A.h.r-""' ^'". Mac/^,, ,,,^



''. iiuJiocic.



a four-act comedy by Booth Tarkiiigton, was produced by
the Thespian-, on Mav 6. under the direction of Mr. Paul L.
Beck, Thespian sponsor.

The leading roles were taken by Asa Bullock as
Clarence, and Virginia Tracy as Violet Pinney. Anthony
Refcofrki enacted Mr. Wheeler; Dolores La Pointe. Mrs.
Wheeler; Alice Raymond. Cora Wheeler; Tommy Ashton,
Bobbie Wheeler; Wendell Arbouin. Dinwiddie; Marion
Macintyre. Mrs. Martyn; Sam Freier, Hubert Stem, and
Judith Ferri, Delia.

Miss Mary Worrell supervised the staging with Marion
Macintyre and Anna Frances White in charge of make-up;
Vivian Cottrell. and Sam Freier as prompters; Eleanor
Krushinski, publicity; Marion Macintyre, Jane Bevington,
Dorothy Anderson. Lucy L^ctrick. Theresa Goulet, Marie
Chrirtian, Naomi Bailey, and Bea Cotton as ushers.

The play concerns an ex-soldier who. upon seeking
employment with Mr. Wheeler, inadvertently becomes
enmeshed in the secrets of the family. As a general handy
man of the Wheeler home trying to avoid the advances
of the wife and daughter of his employer, Clarence meets
and falls in love with Cora Wiieelers governess. Miss
Finney. The climax is reached when the family finds out.
through reference to the Who's Who, that Clarence is an
accepted authority of entomology.



Catii
I!









k



m^^









i'-'y



f^:ry^



O

^^-|



vT^-J^



\-^'







thev



also



serve



onW



star"



,d "'



4 *"



77ie Dramatic Club



under the supervision of Mr. Paul L. Beck and Miss Mary Worrell presented several
plays and asristed the National Thespians throughout the year.

On October 29, "The Importance of the Ghost Story" was given; November 2.t,
"The Stranger" and "The Boor," and in March "The Florist Shop" and "The Other
Kitty."

The Club's officers for this year elected May, 1937, were: Al Hendricks, president;
George Black, vice pre:ident, and Theresa Goulet, secretary.



Caribbean



s:i



front,




"^'""-. R.fa






Greene
Bee).-; '""""'n. Trac,,



'""''" Coo,



^wsstrom



77ie ISalional Thespians



were once more an organization independent of the Dramatic Club. Sponsor was Paul
I.. Beck, history teacher, and officers were: Marion Micintyre, President; Bill Forsstrom,
Vice-President; Bea Cotton, Secretary, and Anthony Refcofski, Noble Prompter. Bea
Cotton resigned her office in February and was replaced by Wendell Arbouin.

The Thespians put on three assembly programs, and with assistance of the Dra-
matic Club, six evening programs.

This honor dramatic society took second prize for groups in the stunt carnival in
January, with a playlet based on the cartoon "Alley Oop."

At a formal initiation December 20, in the Student Council room, Philip Briscoe,
Eddie Green, Virginia Tracy, anti Theresa Goulet were admitted.

Tlie next initiation was after the three-act Thespian play "Clarence," when Jane
Bevington, Vivian Cottrell, Anabel Bassett, Lucy Detrick, Sam Freier, Paul Cole, Bobbie
Downie, and Asa Bullock became members.



Caribb ea
19^8




(Uii ibbean
1938



These



follow in



the steps



Don Qu.w:-



La Pas^ The Spanish Club'.



met four times during the year, each "un gran festejo" and was laying tentative plans
for a final "baile" at the Bombero roof at year's end. For this program, Mrs. Phyllis
Spencer, Spanish teacher, was sponsor.

In November, 52 new member:, who had qualified by maintaining a "B average
in Spanish, were initiated at the first gathering of the year. The next, at Christmas
time, was a joint session with PASF, marked by Mr. Cecil L. Rice's talk in Spanish
and a holiday "piiiata." A Bombero band concert and a galaxy of notable guests,
among them Sr. Inocencio Galindo, Governor of Colon; Sr. Pedro Fernandez-Parrilla,
Mayor of Colon; L. J. A. Ducret, Jefe de Bomberos provided the excitement for
third meeting, again with PASF. At the last meeting, a pageant celebrating peace and
goodwill among the nations of America was staged.

At each of the La Pas gatherings two :tudents, the highest ranking in all of the
Spanish classes, were official hosts.




These stand for the unitv of the three Americas.



Van- American Student Forum

president, Betty ]o Hiimilton, was elected third vice-president (if the national organiza-
tion at the Dallas convention, June 14, 1937. Two days before, Mrs. Phyllis Spencer,
Cristobal sponsor, SDoke. in a poUera, about Panama and the Canal Zone. Betty Jo and
her younger sister, Martha, danced the tamborito for the assembly.

Other officers, elected October 13, were Bea Cotton, first vice-president; Josephine
Ender, second vice-president; Luis Finlason, secretary; and Claud Lyon, treasurer. The
organization includes about 50 members.

First initiation held was November 17 at the Washington Hotel. Humberto Leig-
nadier, young son of the governor of the province of Colon, entertained the group with
his poetry recitations. Next was January 1 2, when iO P.A.S.F. members attended the
inauguration at Betty Jo Hamilton's house on Ninth street.

Four times the forum held formal meetings jointly with La Par-. On December 21,
a large Christmas party was held; on March 16, the Bombero Band entertained with
several selections; on April 20, a Union P.igeant was given.



Carii *bean
1)38



Cari
791




Above Boys' Glee Club; below Girls' Glee Club. Both warble sweet notes upon occasion.



The Glee Clubs



first big program was the "Feast of the Little Lanterns", an operetta presented November
12, 1937. The leading roles were taken by Helen Wikingstad, Charlotte Raymond, Mil-
dred Whitt, and Janet Nesbitt, supported by the entire girls' glee club.

"An Old Spanish Custom", given on April 1, was led by Jane Bevington, }3ill
Forrstrom, Cynthia Martin, Tommy Ashton. Jean Green, Victor May, and Charles Reeves.
The chorus was sung by the combined glee clubs.

The entire musical department participated in the music festival held in the gymna-
sium on April 29.

In April S40 was awarded for musical awards.



bean
38




Left (o riKhc AnJtf>on. Ortcn. May. BcvinKtun. ForsMfom, Martin, Bristue, Peterson; below; Ashton, Reeves.



The Big Operetta



"An Old Spanish Custom", presented on April 1, in the high school auditorium, was
the main musical event of the year.

Directed by Miss Mildred F.lner and Mr. Paul Beck; Dill Fors'.trom. Jane Bevington,
Jean Green, and Tommy Ashton took the leading roles.

Several dances were given, the most popular one being "The Dance of the Wooden
Soldiers", directed by Beverly Motxly. The two other girls who tiirccted dances were
Reycelia Fry and Olive Aanstoos.

The operetta had to do with Bill Forsstrom as Don Juan fighting to regain control
of his ranch and, meanwhile, falling in love with Jane Bevington as Billy. Tlie antics
of Jean Green and Tommy Ashton as Maggie and Pat Murphy proved very amusing.

The stage was set to resemble a Spanish rancho, and the characters were appro-
priately costumed.

The complete cast was: Bill Forrstrom, Jane Bevington, Jean Green. Tommy Ash-
ton, Cynthia Martin, Charles Reeves, Victor May, Dorothy Anderson, Martha Peterson,
Philip Briscoe, and Bob Downie.



Carililiean
IS 38




Above The Orchestra; below The Band. Did you ever Pete go 7 wecr, tweet, tweet"?



The Band and Orchestra

under the direction of Miss Mildred Einer, started the year off with a musical assembly
on October 5.

During the year the 22 in the orchestra and the 26 in the band continued to supply
music for assemblies and between acts of plays presented by the Dramatic Club.

The two outstanding musical events in which the orchestra and band participated
were the out door Christmas program on December 23, and the annual Music Festival,
May 3.

Community organizations for which the orchestra and band played were the Cris-
tobal Woman's Club, the Civic Council and the Cristobal Union Church.



Carib lean



19:



8



BETTYE CASSIDV

Editor

C. F. PLUiM.MKK
Adviser

HII.I. I'l'LI.KK

BuMiirss AlaiKiger




The Trade Wind



has been issued once a week, for 36 week;; tliis year, under a new sponsor, C. F. Plummer.

At the beginning of the year. The Trade Wind had as editor Marion Macintyre
and as business manager. Bill Fuller. Bettye Cas'^idy replaced Marion on December 19.
and Oliver Patterson took over as Business Manager on March 12.

Wylene Pool was assistant editor; Jean Green, news editor; William Forsstrom.
sports editor; Ro e Marie Wolf, social editor; Special writers, Albert Hendricks. Dick
Hoorn, Jack O Hearn. I.icqueline Whale, Marjorie Yost, and Eleanor Krushinski. George
Black was circulation manager.







X^



'^' ^-V



SranJing. left lo right; Macinr\Te. Brayton. ("allowav Harchett, Coffey. Kotalik. Clay. Lyon. McCjarthy. Krushinski.
SitcinK: Hendricks, Yost. Pool. VC'olf. Goulet. Hoorn. Patersoa, Wahlc. O'Hcarn. Reclining: Black. Foisbtrora



Caril
19



bcuii
8




Combing the jungle the biologists gather all manner of strange life.



The Biology Club,



under the direction of Mr. W. Hugh Stickler, was reorganized on November 8, Sam
Freier was elected president; Jane Kaufer, vice-president; Jean Raymond, secretary; and
Anne Butler, treasurer at a meeting on December 13.

The club made four big trips during the year. The first was January 15, when 21
students made a trip to the bat caves. Next trip was March 5, when 15 went up to the
Pot holes with Stickler. A couple of weeks later, nine went up the Pina river. Last big
field trip was April 30, when the club went over to the Panama Zoo to observe various
animals.



Carib> tean
19c 8




Standing, left to riRht: Vinton. James, Freier. Grau. Reeves. Hoverter. Hunt. Stickler, rront: Hodson, Black.

Refcofski. E^cr. Downie.



The Photo Club,



organized to sponsor student interest in photography, met
early in November and elected these officers: George
Black, president; Billy Hunt, vice-president; Sam Freier,
Secretary; and William James, treasurer. Sponsors were
Mr. Kiiinctii W. Vinton and Mr. W. Hugh Stickler.

Principal project of the year was the shooting of
group photos and sports shots for the Caribbean, for which
an enlarger and projector were added to equipment on
hand, a speed graflex camera.



Cnribh
19M



1 1'itn



"This is Bill Egger again, folks, and
while Miss Macintyre is looking' at the
latest news reports, we will hear Miss
Theliua Miller singing, "Ah-Che-Chon
-Ya!"

Here I am again, folks with the
latest news flashes just coming up.

Margarite and Ruth Wood, com-
mercial wizards, today prophesized
"prosperity is here to stay."

Flash! Teddy McGann, construct-
ing engineer, has completed the Pan-
can Tower designed by Giiillerino

Grau. Ai-chitect. From this tower, used
for military purposes, one may see
not only the Atlantic and Pacific
Oceans, but also the Arctic and An-
tartic.

Flash! Mary Louis Warren, inter-
nationally famous beauty sailed today
for Costa Rica where she plans to
study Spanish, Spanish customs,
Spanish life, and Latin-American
men.

Flash Legitimate theater actress,
Virginia Traoy, today sailed on the
S. S. United Empress for England,
where she will take the lead in David
Pott's drama, "Night Brings Light."

Flash! Commander in Chief of the
Atlantic Sector at Ft. De Lesseps,
Brig. Gen. Richard F. Hoorii today
announced Clyde Linton, Secretary of
War, orders to start 90 day maneuv-
ers, March 10. Orders were received
on the new Army gas balloon "Char-
les Brashear", named for its de-
signer.

Flash! Mary Anne Cain, professor
of languages, v/as appointed head of
Vassar today.

Flash! For the first time in the
history of the Panama Canal, a wo-
man, Theresa Goulet, was named
General Manager of the Commissary
Division.

Flash! Alfred Stuinpf was today
made executive secretary of the Pan-
ama Canal.

Flash! Catherine Paxton, world re-
nowned Red Cross nurse, is reported
alive but still unsuccessful in her he-
roic attempt to take water to the
Eskimos.

Flash! "Battlin' Pos" Parker today
defeated "Herman Skunk" Fish for



The Prophecy

(Continued from Page 17)

the light weight chanijjion.ship of the
world.

Flash! Interior decorators Carol
Byrd, Alice Hansen, and Belty Clay

announced today the style trends for
houses: "Chairs, tables, and beds
will no longer be seen. You will eat
off shelves and stay out all night".

Flash! Betty Cassidy, editor pub-
lisher of "Chic" reports the circula-
tion has jumped 50% since she chang-
ed the magazine to a men's fashion
weekly.

Flash! Lucy Detricli, head nurse
of Gorgas Hospital, says, "Hay fever
can be cured just stop eating and
breathing for about one week!"

Flash! "Wheat, potatoes, and coin
King", Vern Terry again breaks the
world's lecord for the largest per acre
crop.

Flash! Justice of the peace Paul
Venable revealed today that Miss
Mary Stumpf Vi'as secretly mai'ried
Tuesday to the German ambassador
to Panama. Isabel Peterson and John
Diaz, well-known Colonites, were wit-
nesses.

Flash! Bald men need no longer
be ashamed to appear in public, for
M. Luis Lushman has just succeeded
in perfecting a new hair-growing
machine. In demonstrating his ma-
chine M. Lushman directs his ma-
chine on a concrete pavement and
then cuts the hair on it with a lav.ai-
mower.

Flash! Among Military circles it is
a well know and established fact that
Anne Carpenter is to be married to
General Smythe in the Spring.

Flash! Reported over Pogo-Pogo is
Patsy Coffey on her round-the-world-
solo flight. Miss Coffey started out last
night.

Flash! His Majesty, the King of
England, today Knighted Lucy INIat-
ehett for her work in the field of
Nursing.

Flash! Katherine Handsaw, co

holder, with Anna Katalik, of the Pro-
fessional Typing Cup, published her
book "How to Type 200 Words a Min-
ute" today, in collaboration with Dot
MaeSparren. They have had advance
orders of 10,000 copies.



eon



9.1



Editor



WILLIAM
FORSSTROM



THE SPORTS



Caribbean



193S




BOYS* VARSITY ClUB

Pack Forsscrom. Highlcy. Boorh. Seiler;
(-tnur Hovercer. Potts. L. Finlason;
From J. Finiason. Robles. Homclin.



GIRLS' VASITY CLUB

Pack S's'-k'' Boeis. Bvrd:
Center Horine. Hale. Anderson;
Front Cotton.



The Varsity Clubs,



honor athletic organizations of C.H.S.,
supervised all sports, keeping attendance,
getting referees and scorekeepers.

The girls' club consisted of Bea Cotton,
president; Carol Byrd, secretary-treasurer:
Miss Barbara Bailey, sponsor; and Dot
Hale. Fern Horine, Emma Jean Starke,
Ruth Anderson, and Zona Boggs, mem-
bers.

The Boys' organization consisted of
Jolin Finlason, president; Bill Movcrter,



vice-president; Luis Finlason, treasurer;
David Potts, secretary; Mr. Vic Seiler,
sponsor; and Laurel Highley. Frank Ro-
bles, George Biwth, Gus Homelin, and
Bill For.strom, members. On May 6,
when Mr. Seiler went to the States, Mr.
Ted Hotz, math teacher, took over.

Those eligible to join arc the ten boys
and girls who. at the end of the year,
have accumulated the most points in the
various sports.



Carih
19:18



H'fin




Standing, left to rifiht: Fuller. Estenoz. Egfier, Hendricks, Potts, Forsstrom. Hoverter, Egozcue, Huson.
Front: Hodson, Brashear. Parker, Highley, Refcofski, Black. McCarthy.



baseball, football, and soccer went down
under the powerful and hard playing
of the senior boys of the class of 38.
Bill Forsstrom, Laurel Highley, and
David Potts, captains of the respective
teams, lead the boys to the victories in
the various sports.

Soccer started off tlie year with the
upper classmen winning both the dum-
my league and the regular contest. Cap-
tain Potts was goaly for the champs and
prevented his opponents from scoring a
single goal during the whole season.

Following soccer came the long foot-
ball season with Captain Highley leading
the boys down the field. Hoverter and
Higiiley were both playing in the back-
field and were responsible for the many
runs, kicks, and passes that brought the
seniors out on top. Supported by a heavy
line the senior squad walked all over
their opponents.

The champs then traveled to Balboa



The Boys^ Sports,



and were handed a 6-0 defeat by a com-
bined Pacific side team. A few days later
the junior college gave Cristobal a second
beating on her own field winning over
them 6-0.

Closely following the football came
the baseball season. This was a hard
fought series but once more the '38 men
came out on top. Bill Forsstrom was cap-
tain of this team and together with his
team, played a delayed game at the Balboa
stadium and went home once again de-
feated.

The senior boys worked with each
other and played hard at everything they
tried. This is one of the main reasons of
their winning.

With the tournament finished, a twi-
light league was organized and was
managed by Mr. Al Slocum. The boys
played a good game of ball, but not well
enough to win.



Carib b



pan

93r,










Back lefi lo right: Pesco. Fuller. Berude. Halliburton. Hoverter. Brayion. Front: Hodson. Forsstrom.

Highlev. Rekofski.



Varsity Track

once again, after a period of three
years, was added to the SjX)rts ca-
lendar. Mr. Phil Pesco, new athletic
coach, immediately set to work and
trained the boys at various events.

At least two months of ready practice
in running and jumping was done. And
when the track and field equipment
arrived two more weeks of hard l.ibor
were in store for the boys. Practising al-
most three hours a day. the school ap-
peared to have a winning track team.



Tlie interclass track meet, with the
seniors and freshmen pairing off and the
juniors and sophs combining, showed the
strength of the team. Here the senior-
frosh teams took all honors in the meet.

A week later the triangular track meet
was held at the Cristobal Kokonut grove
with Balboa, Junior college and Cristo-
b.il fighting it out. C.H.S. showed its su-
periority by defeating Balboa by one half
a point. The final scores were: Cristo-
bal, 51, Balboa, 50' 2, Junior college,
39/2.



Caril
79



bean







From, ieti to right: Fuller. Black, Hunt; Center: Stade, Berude. Egozcue;
Back: Estenoz, Forsstrom, Refcofski, Hoverier.



The Senior Submarines



torpedoed their way into first place by defeating the Ju-
niors, 10-0, in the playoff game of the water polo cham-
pionship, January 5, at the Hotel Washington Pool.

The Juniors and Seniors had a large turnout with all
their men trying to win, while the other two classes were
very poor in their showing.

On the Senior team were Bill Hunt, Bill Hoverter,
Bill Fuller, Bill Forsstrom, Gene Stade, Anthony Refcofski,
Ernest Estenoz, Jack Berude and George Black.

On the Junior team were George Booth, Gilbert
Joudry, Frank Robles, Gustav Homelin, Luis Finlayson,
Bud Bloxom, Robert Downie, and Jack Hutching.

On January 19, an all-star team played the Senior
Champs, beating them 9 to 0.



Curl ihoan
li38



Si



^




JUNIOR BOYS- SWIMMING TtAM

Back, left to risht: Booth. Homt-'in.

Baldwin. Hoiz. Front. Joudry, Roblcs.

A:ihtun.



.RNIOR GIRLS SWIMNMNG THAM

Back. Ich to riRht: Brown Reynolds.

Han. i-ront: Horinc. Boggs. Ncsbiti,

Green.



Sivimiiiing

was taken by the [unior class on rcbruaiy 22, at tlie Hotel
Washington Pool,

The total scores, comnutcxl from tiic combined points
made by the classes in the three different swim meets,
were juniors 51, seniors 50, sophs 48, and frosh 26.

The seniors led tlie way until the la't race of the
meet when the juniors came througli, tallying the winning
points.

On April 11, Balboa handed the varsity squad a sink-
ing, beating C.H.S. 61-31.

Coaches for the swim tc.nii were: Seniors, George
Bl.ick. Betty Clay; juniors. I"rank Robles, Zona Boggs;
Sophomores, Eddie Green, Georgianna Carnwright, and
Fresh, W. Baldwin, Peggy McCleary.



Carib bean
Jb35




L'pner, Volley Ball Champs; Lower. Volleyball AU-Stars.



Volleyball



Volleyball srarted the year with
the seniors finishing in the top
bracket, after many upsets and
setbacks. The captains for the
winning teams were Dotty Hale
and Thelma Callaway. The winners
were given a skating party by the
losing teams. Those on the win-
ning teams were: Bea Cotton,
Mary Ann Cain, Carol Byrd, Ruth
Anderson, Grace Belden, Flora
B.itli, Betty Clay, Ann Carpenter.



After the tournament an AU-
Star team was chosen to play
Balboa over there. The visitors were
defeated 21 5, 21 10. Those on
the team were Beverly Moody, act-
ing captain. Fern Horine, Flora,
Bath, Bea Cotton, Dotty Hale,
Thelma Callaway, Jean Homelin
and Jean Green. Substitutes were
Georgiana Carnwright, Betty Clay,
Carol Byrd, and Zona Boggs.



Caiil hcaii




upper. Tennii Champs; Lower. Soccer Winners.



Tennis



which was the next sport was run
off in a round robin tournament.
The members of the class playing
each other first and then the class
winners playing each other. The
class winners were: Anne Shirley,
senior, Jean Green, junior, Jean
Raymond, sophomore, and Irene
Linton, frerhman. The school cham-
pion was Jean Green, with Ann
Shirley runnerup. Tlie doubles
were played in the same manner
with Fern Horine and Zona Boggs,
school champions.



The Soccer

tournament was off to a flying :tart
with the juniors mowing down all
opposition. They were under the
able captainship of Fern Horine,
who was high point scorer for all
classes. The juniors ended the sea-
son witii an undefeated record.
Those on the winning team were:
Fern Horine, captain, Wylene Pool,
Zona Boggs, Jane Bevington, Bev-
erly Arnold, Jean Green, June Hart,
Emma Jean Starke, Marianne Mac-
Donald, Ida Reynolds, Edith Fre-
d ricks, and Janet Nesbitt.



Caribbean



9M



Cari
1



b7



I



ean
38




Above Rifle Club on the range. Below Club Officers, lefr to right: Fuller, Freier, Piburn, Hunt, Reeves.



The Rifle Club

secretary, James Munden; treasurer, Sam
Treier; and range officer. Bill Hunt.

Tlie club's activities included a match
licld against the Chinese Boys' Club, a
skating party in the middle of April,
and shooting against Balboa.

Approximately a hundred medals were
won by the various club members
tiiroughout its existence this year. This
is approximately two medals per person
for the majority and a few more for the
rest.

On May 15th the American Legion
sponsored a Canal Zone junior cham-
pionshi]-) contest at Fort Davis.



was organized in October, at the sugges-
tion of Capt. Laurence Calloway, of the
Cristobal Police, by Mr. Paul E. Miller,
who has supervised its organizations.

Beginning with about 20 members the
club grew until it comprised a group of
almost forty students, all with their own
rifles. Shooting was done at the Cristo-
bal Gim (Jub.

When the group consisted of 25 mem-
bers, a charter was received from the
National Rifle Association. The charter
was preented by Brigadier-General Frank
W. Rowell, C. O. of the Atlantic sector.

The club elected as president, Charles
Reeves; vice-president, Edwin Piburn;



Editor



ALBERT
HENDRICKS



THE PEOPLE



Caribbean



19SH



I



I



TO OVR ADVERTISERS

"THANKS A MILLION"

For )our co-operation in enabling us to put out what we hope is a
bigger and better annual than ever belore.

THE STAFF



56-






Hotel /Washington

UNEQUALED FOR SITUATION AND COMFORT

COLON, R. P.



A Hotel in keeping with the dignity, spirit and service
of the Panama Canal.



GOLF SWIMMING WATER SPORTS
TARPON FISHING



The Year Around



D. J. HENDRICK

Manager



P. O. Address;
Cristobal, Canal Zone



Cari
1



i bean



(



51"



Carib

19:




C. CASULLO

JEWELLER
WATCHMAKER

p. O. BOX 2.S6 COLON



Phone 1855

CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



9,036 Front St.

COLON, R. P.




BE A GAY BLADE.'



Joy is like a summer breeze
Fragrant, light and gay:
Like flowers in a meadow
Like little lambs at play.

Why worry over little things.-'
Why spend the day in care?
If you have some work to do
Then do it with an air.



Inocencio Galindo Jr.

7th and Bolivar Streets

Colon






Jobber and Comniission
Merchant

"^

REAL ESTATE BROKER

and

AGENT



i



tean
8



Keep a smile upon your lips.
And a twinkle in your eye.
You'll find joy is infectious
Why should you moan and sigh?

There s a lot of fun in living
hor today and not to-morrow.
Have your laughter while you may
To-morrow may bring sorroiv.

Don't live a life of useless care
Don't have suppressed desires.
Laugh with joy, forget all care
Who likes to live with sighers?

So keep a smile upon your lips
And a twinkle in your eye.
You'll find joy is infectious
Don't stop to moan and sigh.

Lucy Matchett



IT WAS RIPPING

She stepped upon the diving board,
Her yellow suit a-dripping.
A dainty thing to see was she,
Like an advertisement clipping.
With azure eyes and flaxen hair;
She was the center of attraction
To each and every faction.
Posed to take a dive ivas she.
Ready to dip into the sea.
She shrieked and fell as a Briion cried,
"By Jove, your suit is ripping.''



On Ridltiii to SrJiool
In a School Bus



At exactly rcven-tcii c\civ inorninp, just as
1 :\m not c/////c' through with breakfast, tlic
school bus arrives. After hearing a few very
nasty sounding toots on the horn, I leave the
house with the fond farewells of my parents.

Tor about two blessed minutes there is al-
most complete and absolute silence, for I am
the first on the bus. But after that glimp.e
of paradise, 1 am lost for the rest of the way.

The next stop we take on about eight people.
At once the singing starts, badly off key. That
is kept up, except for intervals of a few short
moments, all of the way to school. The next
stop brings the "brats." Two of them have
especi.illy loud and piercing voices why,
heaven only knows. After a wait of about five
minutes ( "they wouldn't wait that long for
me', everyone complains), the last two girls
come aboard and we are, in truth, off.

Having, unfortunately, neglected to do all
of my lessons the night before, I have my
books open and am trying to study from all
of them at once. Just as I am beginning to
get really warmed up, a foreign sort of article
comes between me and my books. Looking
up, I perceive it to be one of the brats, the
female of the species. After she has taken her
time to unload her: elf from me, and generous-
ly smeared me with the piece of toast that she
is eating, peace again reigns for the space of
a few moments.

"....ARNOLD'S CAMPAIGNS IN NORTH-
ERN NEW ENGLAND Gen. Arnold....' at
this point, a shrill, whining, insect-like voice
penetrates my state of partial coma and I, un-



liefore eye-straiii wrinkles be-

conu- pcrnianenl and iierviius

falisue becomes chronic, have

your c.ves examined. If you

need glasses, you will be

surprised to find what a

romfort they are

when accurately

and becomingly

fitted to

YOU

Have your eyes examined

^CADRON /^PTICAL i^.OMPANY

> I'.W.-XMA I l,R^.^'"cd 1 COLON
^ :. (.L.ural Vy Opt,,mitrisis V^ 9,0^4 Front

Avenue K, Pv'"?' '>"'*

New York



happily, become aware of the fact that the
male pestilence is holding a screaming contest
with himself to see how long he can last.
....They cay his mother dropped him on his
head as a baby

The older girl on the bus helps out the
bus guard, poor befuddled, soul, and manages
quite capably to shut off the steam.

After a relieved sigh from more than one,
school heaves into sight. Immediately every-



~if.




ConijHtfua Pfiuoinrno de Fuorza y Liiz



PAN.\;u.\



C'OLO.N



Cuvih
19:\8



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one stages a sit-down strike and firmly refuses
to get out. This time the bus driver, a burly
sort of creature, takes a hand and off we go
in a hurry.

In the afternoon, when the busses are once
more loaded up, we start for home. Someone
more or less gently informs the guard that a
member has been left behind. Back goes the
bus, and we go with it. Once again we start
and once again we stop, this time a few yards
farther on, to pick up the girl who goes to
the Sister's School.

From then on, it's nip and tuck to keep up
with, or pass, the boy's bus. { It seems that
the "elders thought that perhaps there would
be fewer fights if the boys and girls were se-
parated.) We lose the race this time, but it
was a good fight while it lasted.

One by one the kids disembark, and, at last,
there are only the bus guard and me left. Up
the hill we go; the bus stops and I climb out.
The dogs come running up to greet me as the
bus disappears around the bend.

W-^ylene Pool



ii-



The Only Manufacturers of
Alligator Skins in the Country

Martinez & Co,

120 Central Ave.. PANAMA

9034 Front Street, COLON

GENUINE ALLIGATOR SKIN
GOODS

Box 904, Panama Tel. 1799-J.

Prices That Will Not Hurt
Your Pocketbook.



PANAMA

Moonlight ot? the ivater

Calls lovers to its shore,

Its silv'ry light keeps saying,

"It's you that 1 adore."

Sailboats on the ivater

Add to lovers' delight

As palm trees whisper love songs,

In the magic of the night.

Catherine Paxton



The

STANDARD FRUIT & STEAMSHIP

Company

-^

VACCARO LINE

Wish every success to the Graduating
Class of 1938.



ribl >enn
19i8



THE METAL TRADES COUNCIL

and

THE CENTRAL LABOR VISION

of the

CANAL ZONE

Representative? of the organ'zed labor union workers em-
ployed by the United States Government in the Canal Zone
request that you buy articles that are UNION MADE.
The makers of these articles are fair to their employees,
so why not be fair to the employer.

AFFILIATED WITH THE AMERICAN FEDERATION

OF LABOR



A Shaft oj silver mooiiligbf petietrateci gloom,
A shining, wavering breeze flowed through the

room.
Silhouetted pahn leaves were rustled by the

breeze
And birds of the night called plaintively frovi

trees.
And tvaves on the beach ceaselessly dashed

with might.
All this loveliness of nature. I found at night.
Eleanor Krushinski



The
French Bazaar

The Finest Store In
Colon

FRONT STREET
COLON



Silvery shafts of moonlight
Floating on a crystal sea;
Palm trees softly swaying
Telling my love for thee.

Broken mellow, golden music.
Luscious, languid harmony
Gently wafted through the night
Telling of my love for thee.

Black rocks sad and lonely
Jagged, ragged in the sea:
Whisper how my heart is breaking
For mine thy love will never be.

Lucy Matchett



Cnrib



tean



1933



THE VENDOR

She walks down the street with a tray on her

head.
It tnay he of cookies, it may be of bread:
Around a wide waist a soiled apron of uhite.
That sways as she iialks there, with steps not

so light.

She's a toothless grin on her wrinkled old face.
That nods back and forth ivith the friendliest

grace.
She offers her wares to the passer-by tourist.
Hoping that he won't be one of the poorest.



Around her dark wrists, are numerous bracelets.
Around her short fingers one sees many rings
But as for all that she ivears many trinkets
Yet that isn't one-half of all her things.

Mary Ann Cain



COMPLIMENTS OF

C. B. FENTON

&
COMPANY, Inc.

Cristobal, C. Z. Balboa, C. Z.

Phone Cristobal 17S1 Phone Balboa 1066



JK



f



"FINLAYSON'S" Portraits are Beautiful

Your best expression comes and Goes Like a Flash
It Cant be Caught On a Portrait With a "TIME EXPOSURE"
Exposure must be instantaneous.
Mr. Finlayson catches you off-guard When you least expect it. There is no agony

to go through, you can be perfectly comfortable while the exposures are being made.

THAT'S THE WAY FINLAYSON'S PORTRAITS ARE MADE

Painstaking workmanship completes the pictures

Look over the work of the Finlayson studio to-day.






7018 FRONT STREET



COLON



PHONE No. 9



COLON. R P



FOR FINEST MOTOR PERFORMANCE

Fill up tcith Texaco
Lubricate tvith Marfak

Texaco (Overseas) Lte>.

CRISTOBAL. CANAL ZONE






Cari
1^8



bean



ALWAYS REMEMBEK

A man is judged in life

by two things, His friends

and His clothes.

Tilt' American ISazaar

HABERDASHERS & TAILORS
TO MEN OF GOOD TASTE.



IF/jew the sun in f^or^eous splendor
Rosy tints the eastern sky.
Ami the darkness in surrender
Bids the earth a soft goodby;
When the f^lory of the morning
Clous in shades of every hue
Lighting heaven in the dawning
What is it comes to you?

Inspiration'

Norma Bales



A FRIEND



A friend is one who helps you see
The sunny side of life.
Someone who can make you be
Happy in the greatest strife.

His mere words can lift you
Through sorrow and regret.
His cheering smile can help you do
Things you'll ne'er forget.



As the years have passed away
Leaving you old and tiise.
There'll aluays be one to say
''Your friendship is my greatest prize!



Dorothy Brayton



Coiiiplinients of

JVLIO A, SALAS

Sole Dislrilmlor of
Famous



IMIILirS
RADIOPLAYERS



-if-



Compliments of

Dr. Vera Prier
Dr. Horaec C. Forster



Carih tean
19, 8



^-



E. R. Kuhrig

COLON

Racquets Restrung

Typewriters and Adding Machines
Repaired.

ALSO

Victor Strings,

Slazanger Balls

Dunlop Racquets






COMPLIMENTS OF



Motta >



-4



5*..



M



-if-



Compliments Of

J. \ Beverhoudt

COLON

Novelties, Magazines, Stationery,

Tennis Raquets. Fine Amity

Leather Goods, Butterfly

Work.



SONNET, THE FIRST

What have you stored atvay from tne.
Silent, musty tome of yellow leather}'
Speak! What scribe has drawti you together.^

Your cover is open, Vve set you free,

I wonder whose thoughts, in you, I shall see.
As I look at you, I ponder whether
It ivere better to be wise and clever,

Or follow the spirit of foviality.



O. you came to me from the vast unknown.
And you taught me a strange philosophy
You ask me What is the need for gold?^
When death comes you take not what is your
own,
And our God for heaven demands no fee.
For all are equal who enter His fold

Al Hendricks



Compliments of

D. M. Dickerson, D.D.S.
Dr. C. F. Bruggerman, D.D.S.
V. L. Morris, D.D.S.



Caribi



>ean



19/8



Thanks To



THE END



FATHER
TIME



Caribbean



193H



^





STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093680/00025
 Material Information
Title: Caribbean
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Cristobal High School
Publisher: Yearbook House
Place of Publication: Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date: 1938
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00093680:00025

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Half Title
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
    Foreword
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
    Dedication
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Faculty
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Classes
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Seniors
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Juniors
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Sophomores
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Freshmen
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Activites
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Clubs
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Sports
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Advertising
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Back Matter
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Back Cover
        Page 87
        Page 88
Full Text








Ownerribbea 93

Caribbean 1938



























1938

The CARIBBEAN
MARION MACINTYRE, Editor-in-Chief
WILLIAM FULLER, Business Manager
C. F. PLUMMER, Sponsor


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The

CARIBBEAN
NINETEEN THlIRTY-EIGHT

Published by the
STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Cristobal High School
Cristobal, Canal Zone

ZONE











Caril bean
19 i8

























Foreword


This, the 1938 Caribbean, terminates the record
of the four years spent in high school, and also
marks the beginning of the life outside of high
school. With this in mind, the Caribbean staff pre-
sents this year book as a token of the past and as a
salute to the future.





















Ca bbean
938























The Contents


PAGE

T he School.................................................... 8

The Classes.................... ... ................. 15

The Events............................. .............. 37

The Work................... ................ 43

The Sports.................... ................ 57

The People.................. ................ 65


















Cari bean
1 38




























"Friend to 400"


To Mr. Cecil Rice


........the Caribbean staff dedicates its 1938 book, because he
is, in the staff's opinion, the most prominent and popular "kid"
in the school.

Mr. Rice, in one year, has made himself a friend to the
400 students of C.H.S., a popular stage figure, and, with a joke
for anyone, has made himself known as "A swell guy."

Thus we say "To Mr. Rice the Caribbean."










Car bean
1 ?38







MARION MACINTYRE
editor-in-chief


WILLIAM E. FULLER
business manager




The Staff


Eleanor K rushin ki.............................................................. A assistant Editor
Sam Freier...........................................Photo Editor
Department Editors
Marjorie Yost...........The School Dick Hoorn.............. The Classes
Alma Bramin............The Pictures Rose Marie Wolf........The Work
Bill Forsstrom..............The Sports Al Hendricks..............The People

Department Assistants
Bettye Cassidy, Wylene Pool, Jacqueline Wahle, George Black, Jack
O'Hearn, Jean Green, and Carol Byrd.
And Contributors
Bill Hunt, Bea Cotton, Theresa Goulet, Jack Brayton, Mary Ann Cain, John
Finlason.
Sponsor..................................................................... ... C. F. Plummer









I 4i













Front Row: Green. Hendricks. Forsstrom, Black. Wo!lf O'Hearn. Yost, S-cond Row: Cassdy. Pool. \Wahle,
Krushinski. Standing: Freier. Plumrmer Bullock, Hoorn.
FrntRo : ren.Hedrck. orstom Bac. (''f OHern Y st Scod Row asd.Po.\'he


Caril
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The Appreciation


and gratitude, of the Caribbean staff, is extended to all who helped to
make the year book an interesting remembrance of high school days.

We extend our thanks to Mr. C. F. Plummer, our tireless journal-
ism teacher; to Mr. Cecil L. Rice, our cooperative principal; Mr. Kenneth
Vinton, who devoted many class hours to taking photographs; to Mr. J.
L. Matthews, mechanical superintendent of the Panama American; to
Mr. Sam Babcock, Babcock Cover Co., Los Angeles; to Mr. Frank
Finlayson, official photographer; to all the other willing workers who
so generously gave time and hard labour for the success of this issue.




















Caribb an
1933







































A Message


To the Students of Cristobal high school, 1938:

I only trust that this beautiful year book, the Caribbean of 1938,
may serve a two-fold purpose.

May it serve to bring back beautiful memories of our high school
days, and may it ever be a reminder to us, in this day of complex ci-
vilization, that we must continue to do our part in so educating our-
selves that we may intelligently live a life that will bring greatest sa-
tisfaction to ourselves and the utmost helpfulness to others.

Cecil L. Rice.
Principal





Cari beatl
1 38




































Front row: Batalden. Spencer, Beck. Bowman, Liter. Vinton. Back row: Worrell, Patterson. Stickler, Moore
Hotz. Franklin.



The Faculty


of C.H.S. has, all-told, thirty degrees, ninety-four years of Cristobal high experience, and

degrees from eighteen universities in eleven states and one foreign country.


Ten of the degrees are A.B.'s, ten M.A.'s, five B.S.'s, two M.S.'s. one B.M., and

one Diploma de Suficiencia. They come from Illinois, Iowa, New York, Kentucky, Ca-

lifornia, We:t Virginia, Colorado, Ohio, Montana, Missouri, North Carolina, and Ma-

drid, Spain.


MISS BARBARA BAILEY:
Entered C.H.S.....1930
Teacher of..........Girls Gym
Degrees................Chicago School of Physical
Education
Activities..............Sports Director

MR. CALMER BATALDEN:
Entered C.H.S.....1935
Teacher of.......... Advanced Mechanicnl Draw-
ing, Woodwork 8, 9, 10.
Degrees................ B.S., Biadley Institute, illinois

MISS HALLIE BEAVERS:
Entered C.H.S.....1937
Teacher of.......... Mathematics, House-hold Arts,
General Business
Degrees................A.B., North Carolina State
M.A., Duke University, North
Larolina

MR, PAUL L. BECK:
Entered C.H.S.....1936
Teacher of..........U.S. History, American Pro-
blems
Degrees.............. A.B., Filay College, Ohio
M.A., Michigan University
Activities.............Dramatic Club Sponsor
National Thespian Sponsor


MISS JEANNE BROWN:
Entered C.H.S..... 1932
Teacher of..........English 9. 10, Librarian
Degrees................A.B., University of Missouri
M.A., University of Missouri


MISS LOUISE CRESTO:
Entered C.H.S.....1936
Teacher of.......... Sanish 9, 10, English 9
Degrees................ A.B., Colorado State Teachers
M.A., Columbia University

MISS MILDRED ELNER:
Entered C.H.S.....1931
Teacher of..........Glee Club, Music Apprecia-
tion. English
Degrees................B.M., Drake University. Iowa
Activities.............. Boys' and Girls Glee Clubs
Band and Orchestra

MR. GEORGE EVANCHO:
Entered C.H.S.....1936
Teacher of..........General Mathematics
Degrees.............. Ph. B., Muhlenberg College.
Pennsylvania. Graduate work.
New York University. Lehigh
University, Pennsylvania. Penn-
sylvania State


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Left to right: Plummer Cresto, Beavers. Brown. Hnrtz.


MR. MAX FRANKLIN:

Entered C.H.S..... 1936
Teacher of.......... Metal Shop. Elementary Me-
chanical Drawing
Degrees........... S... S Bowling Green Univer-
sity. Kentucky
Activities.............. Senior lass Sponsor

MR. TED F. HOTZ:

Entered C.H.S..... 1937
Teacher *f P. 1 P l,.e Geometry,
*.-I. ... .-.:T. Trigonometry.
Degrees........ ........ A.B.. I i, t .' Ohio
M A., tII-.. r*e,
Activities..............Juniot Class Sponsor
Assistant Sports' Coach

MISS BESSIE M. LITER:

Entered C.H.S.... 1930
T -. ,.. f F. 1.. 10, 1. 12
L...rt, t h Virginia Universitv
I -. Virginia University
Activities........... Sophomore (lass Sponsor

MISS MARY ELIZABETH MOORE:

Entered C.H.S..... 1925
Teacher of..........French 9. 10, Latin 9, 10.
Spanish 9
Degrees ................A.B. W est Virginia
Ml.A., (olumbia University
Activities........... Freshman Class Sponsor

MISS HELEN PATTERSON:

Entered C HS..... 190
Teacher of..........Shorthand. Typing, Business
1 Itinng.
Degrees ..............B.S., Montana State
Activities............. Student Council Treasurer

MR. VICTOR SELLER:

Entered C.H.S..... 19;0
Teacher of......... Physical Education
Activities..............Sports Director
Student Council Member


MR. C. F. PLTJMMER:

Entered ( HS .... 19j7
Teacher of..........
Early Et,ropean History.
S..1 h 11. Journalism
D. cr... L Occidental College. Ca-
liltrnia
hi A.. Universirv of California
Activities ............. Sponsor of Publications

MRS. PHYLLIS SPENCER:

Entered C.H.S ....1990
Teacher of......... Sansh 10. 11. 12. iCom-
metc.al Suanish
Degrees... ........... A.B Iowa Cote College
A.A h. Iowa Cole College
DLploma De Suficiencia. Uni-
versity of Madrid
Activires .............. La 1as Club Sponsor
Fan-American Student Forum
Soonsor


MR. W. HUGH STICKLER:

Entered (.H.S.... 19,6
Teacher f P. I ., General Science, Al-
Derv t I arson, College, lowa
'1 Universirt of Iowa
Activities.............. Biology Club Soonsor
Student Council


MR. KENNETH VINTON:

Entered C HS .... 19 0
Teacher of ..... ....(.nemistry Phvsics
Degrees............... B.A Rir,on College. Iowa
iMA.. Columbia I university
Activities ....... .. Plhoto Clib Sponsor
Student Cou.ncil Member


MISS MARY WORRELL:

Entered C.H.S..... 19~6
Teacher of.......... Art Sneech
Degrees................ B S,. university of Missouri
h S. Northwestern IUniersity.
Illinois
Activities.............. Assistant Dramatic Coach


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Photo by Franklin


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Edto, THE CLASSES
DICK Caribbean 1938
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SClass of 1938
BILL HUNT
President


AS FRESHMEN:
The awkward appearance of the class
of '38 when they entered high school
was brought about by the wearing of
shirts and dresses inside out and back-
wards, of wearing shoes on the wrong
feet, and by generous applications of
red paint after the manner of the Ame-
rican Indian.
Under the sponsorship of Mr. Milford
Franks, the class elected William Scar-
borough as president.
On March 29 the carnival was held.

AS SOPHOMORES:
Some new faces and many familiar
ones appeared as the class showed great-
er interest in social activities when they
entered such clubs as the La Pas, the
Effe Kube Klub, the Trade Wind, glee
club, and the others. ,
New addition to the school's clubs
was the Pyramid Team.
Two picnics were held under the pre-
sident, John Finlason

AS JUNIORS:
Election this year saw William Scar-


borough again in the president's chair,
with Mr. Max Franklin as sponsor.
In the carnival, dart throwing, dice,
pin, and ring games were sponsored by
the clas:.
Again, two picnics were the yearly
fare.
Class rings were ordered and appear-
ed on student fingers in May.
The junior prom was held under the
direction of Bea Cotton and Bill Fors-
strom

AS SENIORS:
Winning honors in all sports, the
seniors held the position of champs.
The class picnic and dance were suc-
cessfully presented.
With the ordering of announcements
and cards, graduation seemed at last to
appear possible.
Climaxing the year, the Junior-Senior
banquet was given in May at the Hotel
Washington.
Graduation night marked a "finis" in
the career, as high school students, of
the class of '38.


i


Caril
192


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8





Graduates




RUTH M. ANDERSON: Camden,
New Jersey, September 3,
1921. Volleyball, Basketball,
Tennis, 2, 3, 4; Soccer, 3,
4; Baseball, 2; Bowling, 2,
3; Track, 4; Dramatic Club,
3; Spanish Club, 3, 4; Pan-
American Student Forum.
4.



MAURICE BAIGELMAN: Hes-
sen, Germany, March 28,
1920. Glee Club. 1, 2, 3. 4;
Atletics, 1, 2; "Old Spanish
Custom," 1.



GALE A. ARNOLD: Ancon, C. Z.,
May 14, 1920. Clee Club, 2, 4;
Effe Kube. 2; Operetta
"Chonita", 2; "An Old Span-
ish Custom", 4.


NORMA BALES: Newburyport,
Mass., October 25, 1920.
Spanish Club, 4.

FLORA BATES BATH: Ancon,
C. Z., February 24, 1918.
Glee Club, 1, 2; Operetta
"Cherry Blossom," 2; Carni-
val play, 4.



-. GRACE BELDEN: Colon Hosni-
tal, R. de P., March 19. 1919.
Glee Club, 1; Athletics, 3. 4.


FRANCE9 BILISKY: Honolulu,
T. H., December 25, IfzU.



JAMES CADENHEAD: McKees-
port, Pa.., Aug. 10, 1919.
Sports, 4


JOHN BERUDE: Cristobal, C. Z.,
March 4, 1922. Swimming,
Soccer, Water Polo, Basket-
ball, 1, 3, 4; Football, Base-
ball, Tennis, 3, 4; Track, 4,




Lari bean
158





Graduates




CHARLES BRASIIEAR: Fort
Stevens, Oregon, August 16,
1921. La Pas. Pan-American
Student Forum, Football,
Baseball. Basketball, Tennis,
Track, 4.

WILLIAM 0. BUTLER, JR.: Ft.
Sill. Oklahoma, Oct. 31. 1920.
Baseball, 3: Football, Track,
4; Swimming, 3, 4.

ASA C. BULLOCK, JR.: Nw
York Cmr N Y. May ;. 1919 Band.
Orchestra. Carnival Sitai e show orcthIs
ra kadtr. 1, 2, 4; GIce Club. 1,
2 : (a.ribbcan, i: Trade W\ind.
1: Oprertta "Chonita" 1 O(pererct
( hcrrv Blossoms,". 2. Operetta An
l,] 2;: .... I. Custom". 4, Play R.d
.; Play (Idarcnr e,

MARY ANN CAIN: Colon, R. de
P., July 6, 1920. Supper Club,
1. 2, 3, 4; Volley, 2, 3, 4: La
Pas, 2, 3. 4; Bowling. 1, 2,
3: Pan-American Student
Forum 3, 4; "Chonita" 1:
"Cherry Blossom," 2; Glee
Club, 1, 2.

CAROL BYRD: Colon, R. de P.,
March 23, 1920. Volleyball,
Basketball, Tennis, 1, 2, 3,
4; Softball, 1, 2, 3; Bowling,
2, 3; Soccer, 4; Track, 4;
Varsity Club, 2, 3, 4.

ANNE CARPENTER: Stockton,
California, December 1, 1920.
La Pas, Volleyball, 4.

RAFAEL CANTON: Managua,
Nicaragua, June 9, 1921.
Athletics, 1, 2, 3, 4,; Glee
Club, 3, 4.

MARIE VICTORIA FLORENCE
CHRISTIAN: Canal Zone.
October 2, 1920. Glee Club.
1, 2, 4; Dramatic Club, 2, 3.
4; Stage Show, 3, 4: Two
Operettas, 2. 4; Caribbean
Artist, 3: Volleyball, 2, 3;
Swimming, 2.

BETTYE CASSIDY: Nogales,
Arizona, August 23, 1921.
Editor Trade Wind, 4; Ca-
ribbean, 4.


r. .










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Graduates






BETTY CLAIRE CLAY:
Marshalltown, Iowa, May 10 1920.
Swimming, ,. 2, 3, 4; Basketball,
Tennis 3, 4; Bowling, 3. Track, 4;
Volleyball, 2, 3, 4; Softball 2, 3; La
Pas, 2, 3. 4: Pan-American Student
Forum, Carnival. Trade Wind typist, 4;
Dramatic Club, 3.

GLADSTONE PATRICK COO-
N NEY: Panama City, Rep. of
Panama, Jan. 25, 1920. Soc-
cer, Swimming, 4.

PAUL (Coleye) COLE: Colon,
Rep. of Panama, June 25,
1922. Biology Club, 3, 4; La
Pas, 3, 4; Pan-American Stu-
dent Forum, Dramatic Club,
Carnival Stage Show, "The
Other Kitty", 4; Effe Kube,
1.

BEATRICE (Bea) COTTON:
Samaritan Hospital, Colon, R. de P..
January 18, 1921. Dramatic Club, I
2; Operettas, "Chonita," 1, and,
'Cherry Blossom," 2; La Pas, 2, 3,
4; Glee Club. 1. 2; Student Council
2, 3, 4; National Thespians, 2, 3. 4;
Stage Show, 3, 4; Student Forum Vice-
Pres., 3, 4; Chairman Jun.-Sen. Ban-
quet, 3.
WILLIAM H. EGGER: Elmira,
N. Y., Aug. 8, 1920. Football,
3, 4; Soccer, Photo Club,
Stage Show, "The Florist
Shop", 4; Baseball, 3; Soft-
ball, 2.

EDWARD EGOZCUE: Colon,
Rep. of Panama, Nov. 9, 1920.
Newspaper, 1; Spanish Club,
Athletics, 2, 3; Biology Club,
2; Pan-American Student
Forum, Glee Club, 3.

ERNESTO E. ESTENOZ: Colon,
Rep. of Panama, Aug. 18,
1919. Athletics, 3, 4; Trade
Wind, 3; Programs, 3.

JOHN (Finny) FINLASON:
Cartago Costa Rica, Sept. 23, 1919.
Carnival, Baseball, Soccer, Basketball,
1, 2, 3, 4; Football, 2, 3, 4; Class
President, 2; Glee Club, 1 2; Water
Polo, Treasurer of S. A., Chairman of
r.Junior-Senior Banquet, 3; Trade Wind,
1, 2; Pres. of S. A., 4; Track, 4; La
Pas, 2, 3.
WILLIAM (Fosi) FORSSTROM:
Cristobal, C. Z. June 22. 1920. Base-
ball. Basketball, Soccer, 1, 2. 3. 4;
Football, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 1, 3 4;
Dramatic Club, 2, 3; National Thes-
pians, 3, 4; Varsity Club, Caribbean,
4; Biology Club, 2; Stage Show, 3. 4;
Student Council, 3; Plays, 1, 2, 3, 4,






Cari ean
1 8





Graduates


WILLIAM FULLER: Ancon, C. Z.,
July 27, 1921. Operettas, Glee
Club, Dramatic Club, Or-
chestra, 1, 2, 4; Band, Foot-
ball, Soccer, Basketball, 1, 2,
3, 4; Plays, 3, 4; Trade Wind,
3, 4; Photo Club, 3; Carib-
bean, 4.

JOHN H. DIAZ: Panama City,
Rep. of Panama, March 11.
1920.

GUILLERMO E. GRAU: Colon,
Rep. of Panama, July 9,
1919. Photo club, 4.

ANIBAL GALINDO: Colon, Rep.
of Panama, April 8, 1921.
Baseball, Basketball, Soccer,
3, 4; Trade Wind, 3; La Pas,
Track, 4.

ALBERT HENDRICKS: New
Bern, North Carolina,
August 19, 1920. Dramatic
Club, 2, 3, 4; Trade Wind,
Football, 2, 4; Track, 1;
Photo Club, 3; Caribbean,
Student Council, 4; Band,
3.

ALICE RUTH HANSON: Los
Angeles, Calif., June 9, 1921.
Glee Club, 1, 2; Spanish
Club, 3, 4; Pan-American
Student Forum, 4; Biology
Club, 2.

WILLIAM HUNT: Ancon, C. Z.,
May 9, 1921. Trade Wind, 2,
3; Caribbean, 2; Biology
Club, 2; Photo Club, 3, 4;
Baseball Mgr., 3; Soccer
Mgr., 4.

RICHARD F. HOORN: Portland,
Me., April 22, 1920. Trade
Wind, Caribbean, 4.

ANNA TIERESA KOTALIK:
Elkins Park, Pa., December
12, 1920. Dramatic Club,
1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 1, 4;
Double Quartette, 1: Trade
Wind typist, 4; "The Nifty
Shop, 1; "Chonita," 2; Play.
"The Pampered Darling," 2.

JOHN W. HUSON: Ancon, C. Z.,
July 19, 1920.


o




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re






Graduates




CLAUDE E. LYONS: Colon, R.
de P., Dec. 13, 1919. La Pas,
2, 3, 4; Pan-American Stu-
dent Forum, 3, 4; Ring
Committee, 3; Sec. and Tfes.
of Senior Class, 4; Typist
for Trade Wind, 4.

MARION. DOUGLAS MACIN-
TYRE: New Orleans. La.. January
21, 1921. Trade Wind, Carib
bean, National Thesoians, 3, 4; Dra-
maec Club, 2, 3; La Pas. Pan-American
Student Forum, Editor Trade Wind.
Editor Caribbean, 4; Visitation Week
Ass't. Editor Trade Wind, 3; Tennis
Bowling, 2; Soccer, Softball. 3, 4;
Volleyball, 2, 3.

DOROTHY R. MacSPARRAN:
Colon, R. de P., July 11,
1920. Supper Club, 1, 2, 3;
Glee Club, 2; Volleyball, 3;
Il Operetta "An Old Spanish
Custom," 4.

* LUCY J. MATCHETT: Belize,
: British Honduras, January
1, 1922.

THELMA MILLER: Fortress
Monroe, Va., November 12,
S1919. Stage Show, Glee Club,
Operetta "An Old Spanish
Custom," 4.

THEODORE (Yorick) McGann:
Colon, R. de P., March 17,
1920.

BOB LETTERS: Honolulu, Ha-
waii, February 6, 1920.

OLIVER GREGORY PATER-
SON: Wolleston, Mass., No-
vember 2, 1919. Trade Wind,
4; (Other activities in Bal-
boa High school.)

ANTHONY JOHN REFCOFSKI:
Ancon, C. Z., June 29, 1918. Base-
ball Water Polo, Basketball, Soccer.
1. 2, 3, 4, 5. Football, 3 4. 5: Track,
1. 5; Effe Kube Club, 1; Dramatic
Club. 4; National Thespians, 4, 5:
Photo Club 5; Science Club, 1; Bio-
logy Club, 2; Slide Rule Club, 3;
Band, 1, 2. 3, 4, 5: Orchestra. 1, 3,
4; Pyramid Team. 3, 4; Carnivals 1,
2. 3, 4. 5.

DAVID POTTS: Hampton, Va.,
January 8, 1919. Baseball,
Basketball, Soccer, 1, 2, 3,
4; Football, Varsity Club, 2,
3, 4; Swimming, 2, 3; Water
Polo, 3, 4; Track, 4; Tennis,
3; "Chonita," 1; Christmas
Pageant, 1.




Cari bean
198






Graduates



CHARLES H. SCHAEFER: Co-
lon, R. de P., December 30,
1920. Trade Wind, 2.


PAUL C. VENABLE: Durham,
North Carolina, June 5,
1921. Basketball, Soccer, 1,
2, 3, 4; Football, 2, 3, 4;
Baseball, 3, 4; La Pas, 3.

ANNE SHIRLEY: Cristobal, C.
Z., November 14, 1919. Glee
Club, 1, 2; Trade Wind, 2;
La Pas, 3, 4; Pan-American
Student Forum, 4; Tennis,
Swimming, 1, 2, 3, 4.


MARY LOUISE WARREN: Co-
lon Hospital, R. de P., Feb-
iuary 14, 1921. Athletics, 4.


GENE STADE: Fresno, Califor-
nia, July 15, 1920. Water
Polo, 4. oft


ROSE MARIE WOLF: Colon, R.
de P., July 4, 1920. Glee
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Biology
Club, 2; Stage Show, Trade
Wind, Caribbean, Carnival
Committee, Swimming, 4;
La Pas, 2, 3; Supper Club,
1, 2, 3, 4.


MARY C. STUMPF: Colon, R. de
P., February 8, 1920. Glee
Club, 2; La Pas, 1, 2, 3, 4;
"Cherry Blossom," 1; Tennis,
3; Supper Club, Pan-Ame-
rican Student Forum, 4.


FRED L. WERTZ JR.: Colon
Hospital. R. de P., April 2,
1918.


VIRGINIA TRACY: Pullman,
Wash., July 18, 1921. Dra-
matic Club, 3; National
Thespians, 4.


MARJORIE (Muffet) YOST:
La Habra, Calif., July 25,
1920. Trade Wind, 4; Carib-
bean. 3, 4; Stage Show, 2
3; Glee Club, 1, 2; Soccer, 3.




Caril bean
1918





Graduates


itl


. .4


Carib
19


I


bean
18


GEORGE A. BLACK: New York
City. N. Y., Dec. 1, 1920. Swimming.
1, 2, 3. 4; Soccer, Football, Basketball.
Water Polo. Carnival Committee 2, 3,
4; Tennis, 2, 3: Photo Club, 2, 4;
Rifle Club. Dramatic Club Photo
Club President, 4; Trade Wind, Carib-
bean. 4


VINCENT CONRAD: Ancon, C.
Z., June 2, 1921. Science
Club, Photo Club, 2; Foot-
ball, 4.


DOT BRAYTON: Colon, R. de P.,
November 15, 1921. Volley-
ball, Swimming, 1, 2; Bas-
ketball, 2; La Pas, Pan-
American Student Forum,
Trade Wind Typist, 4; Glee
Club, 1.

LUCY I. DETRICK: Colon Hos-
pital, R. de P., February 15,
1920. Dramatic Club, 1, 2,
3, 4; Glee Club, 1, 2, 4;
Volleyball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Soft-
ball, 1, 2, 3; Bowling, 2, 3,
4; Tennis, Soccer, 3, 4.


THELMA CALLAWAY: Whistler,
Alabama, June 26, 1920.
Basketball, V o 11 e y ball,
Tennis, Swimming, 1, 2, 3,
4; Bowling, Baseball, 1, 2,
3; Track, Soccer, 4; Glee
Club, 1, 2, 4; "Chonita," 1;
"Cherry Blossom," 2.

JACK GORMAN: New York:
City, N. Y., May 25, 1920.
Football, 4.

PATSY COFFEY: Colon Hosni-
tal, R. de P., January 12,
1921. Dramatic Club, Spanish
Club, 3, 4; Trade Wind Ty-
pist, 4.


THERESA (Te r) GOULET:
Ancon. C. Z.. January 7. 1921. Stage
Show. Basketball, Volleyball, Soccer,
Swimming, Tennis, Softball, Bowling.
Supper Club. 1, 2 3, 4; Dramatic
Club, 1, 2. 3; Operettas, 1, 2, 4; Glee
Club, 1, 2; Spanish Club. 2; Natidnal
Thespians. Caribbean. 4.

ALBERT BENJAMIN COLLINS:
S Dudley, Georgia, June 5,
1917. Soccer, 1; Glee Club,
Swimming, 4.






Graduates




KENNETH F. HODSON: North
Bend, Oregon, November 4,
1920. Football, Basketball,
Track, 4; Photo Club, 4.

DORIS RUTH HALE: Ancon, C.
Z., July 13, 1920. Swimming,
Tennis, Volleyball, Basket-
ball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Softball, 1,
2, 3, Bowling, 1, 2; Soccer, 3;
4; Tfi.Lck. 4; Varsity Club, 4.


BILL HOVERTER: R eadin
Pennsylvania. January t1,, 1)922. k.k.t-
ball. Baseball. Soccvr. 1 2 3. i.; Foo
ball renm,,. ",.r ,,, Flub. 2, 4. .
..... ILa Pa .
B141s0,0 2: Glee Club, 1. 2; Photo
( lub, ); (hristmas Pae'ant, 1 2. ,

KATHERINE HANDSHAW: Har-
risburg, Penn., November 16,
1920 *A._ ..



ANDREW LA POINTE: Minnea-
polis, Minn., July 7, 1921.


LOUIS FRED HAUSS JR.: Co-
lon, Rep. of Panama, Nov.
2, 1920. Band, 1, 2, 3, 4;
Football, Soccer, Basketball,
3; Rifle Club, 4; Glee Club,
1.



CLYDE LINTON: Ft. Moultrie,
S. C., January 15, 1920.


LAUREL (HIG) HIGHLY:
Ludlow, Kentucky, February
8, 1919. Baseball, Basketball,
Soccer, 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity
Club, Football, 2, 3, 4; Swim-
ming, 2, 3, 4; Track 4; Glee
Club, 1.


VICTOR H. MAY JR.: Colon
Hospital, R. de P., October
22, 1920. Band. Glee Club, "
1, 2, 3. 4; Baseball, Basket-
ball, Stageshow, 2, 3, 4; La
Pas, 2, 4; Operettas, "Cho-
nita," "Cherry Blossom,"
"Pinafore," 1, 2, 3; Orchestra,
1, 2; Student Forum, 4. I






198






Graduates


ANNA E. PATCHETT: Colon
Hospital, R. de P., May 5,
1919. Glee Club, 1; Trade
Wind Typist, 4.


ALFRED (Stumpy) STUMPF:
Philadelphia, Penna., June
18, 1920. Football, Basket-
ball, Soccer, Dramatic Club,
1, 2, 3; La Pas, Student
Forum, Stage Show, Glee
Club, Christmas Pageant, 2,
3; "Pampered Darling," 2;
S t u n t Carnival, "Old
Spanish Custom," 3.

KAY PAXTON: Sulphur, Okla-
homa, January 31, 1920. Or-
chestra, 4.


VERN TERRY: Panama Canal
Zone, May 11, 1920. Basket-
ball, 2, 3, 4.


ISABEL PETERSON: Colon, R.
de P., November 5, 1919. La
Pas, Pan-American Student
Forum, 3, 4: Supper Club,
4; Basketball, 1; Tennis, 3.


HOWARD 0. WHITT JR.:
Petersburg, Va., June 23,
1920.


J. C. (Smitty) SMITH: Nor-
folk, Va., March 22, 1920.
Baseball, Football, Basket-
ball, Soccer, Water Polo,
Biology Club, 3; Stage show,
4.

LOUISE ELLEN ZIMMERMAN:
Sedro-Wooley, Wash., May
4, 1921. Supper Club, 1, 4;
Effe Kube Club, Glee Club,
"Chonita," 1; Soccer, Volley-
ball, Tennis, 3, 4; La Pas, 4.


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$8


Carib
19


L _.r,






Graduates


FRANK (Pete) BRENNAN:
Philadelphia, Penna., Oct. 2.
1920.


MILTON C. DUNN: Colon Hos-
pital, Rep. of Panama, Dec.
23, 1922.


LUIS LUSHMAN S.: St. Clair,
Penna., June 8, 1918.


EDDIE McCARTHY; Colon. R.
de P., January 23, 1920.
Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Band, 3;
Glee Club, 3, 4; Photo Club,
3; Typist for Trade Wind,
4.


DON PARKER: Colon, R. de P..
March 28. 1920. Soccer. 1, 2,
3, 4; Baseball, Basketball,
Football. 2, 3, 4; Track,
Varsity Club, Carnival Com-
mittee. 4; Biology Club, 2.


VIRGINIA SHANNON: Charles-
ton, S. C., Feb. 19, 1922.
Swimmlin,- 4.


MARGARET WOOD: Puerto
Cortez, Honduras, December
1, 1917. Glee Club, 1, 2.


RUTH WOOD: Cartago, Costa
Rica, April 7, 1919. Glee
Club, 1, 2.


IN MEMORIAL

JOSEPHINE DUNN, your classmates salute the
memory of the sincere companionship and friendly
leadership of which they were deprived by an in-
tervening and more powerful call.


Caril
1


be3
.1t


I






In The Hall of Fame


Because she is well-liked by
all for her warm smile and
friendly helpfulness, B EA
COTTON won her place as
MOST POPULAR Senior
girl.



To JOHN FINLASON went
the unique distinction of two
places. For service to the stu-
dent body, he was named
MOST INDUSTRIOUS; for
his winning personality, he
rated MOST POPULAR boy
of his class.


BETTYE CASSIDY, who
managed to carry a tremend-
ous load of books and still
keep her good nature, was s
the choice of the students as
MOST STUDIOUS girl.


Acclaimed a regular fellow in
all ways, CHARLES BRAS-
HEAR earned special honors
as MOST STUDIOUS boy
member of the graduation
class.


LUC Y DETRICK, whose
read y grin and infectious
laugh gave sparkle to many
a dull moment, was accorded
the place for the WITTIEST
girl in her class.



Quick repartee and sharp jests
put AL HENDRICKS easily .;r
in front in the estimation of
the students as the WIT-
TIEST male graduate.







Cari bean
19 8






By Popular Choice




."I)DORIS IIALE, for an envi-
able record of successfully
Sparticipattin in all sports andi
still retaining feminine charm,
wTon the rating of MOST
S' .O. OUTSTANDINGG GIRl.





S cIn the language of the sports
world, BILL HOVERTER is
a "natural". His prowess in
all sports qualified him N as
MOST OUTSTA N IRING
BOY ATHLETE.




Sweerne s and demureness
emphasized DOROTH Y
BRAYTON S golden hair-
ed, blue- eyed attractiveness,
which ranked her MOST
BEAUTIFUL GIRL.




A certain dignity tempered
by an engaging smile, the
proper setting for his distinc-
tive features, won BOB PET-
TERS the title of MOST
HANDSOME BOY.





Sways ready to turn an effi-
cient, dynamic 1c tro' to any
V" one of three tasks on hand,
MARION MACINTYREi
Swas the choice :.s MOST IN-
-, f DUSTRIOUS GIRL.









Caribl erl
19 8




































The Junior Class

elected George Booth, president; Peggy Brown, vice-
president; Anabel Bassett, secretary; and Jean
Green, treasurer, at their first meeting under sponsor
Mr. Ted F. Hotz.
The next big event took place in January, when
the class embarked for Shimmy Beach and a day in
the sun. The committee that arranged the day's
festivities were: Mr. Cecil L. Rice, Jane Bevington,
George Booth, Jack Hutchings, and Jean Green.
Chaperones of this outing were Mr. and Mrs. Rice,
Mr. and Mrs. Hotz, Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Hauberg,
and Mr and Mrs. Calmer A. Batalden.
Next event was selecting the class
ring in February. The ring committee con-





Car bean
133


































One Year To Co


sisted of, Anabel Bassett, chairman, Jack Hut-
chings, Jane Bevington, Ida Reynolds, Tommy
Ashton, Betty Jo Hamilton, and Helen Wick-
ingstad.
While still in the throes of this excitement. up
came the carnival. The juniors, from their six
booths; the Country Store, Telegraph, Penny Game,
Dice Game, Barrel Booth, and Shooting Gallery,
placed tops in the profits making a total of S157.14.
Chairmen for these booths were: Anabel Bassett,
Fern Hurini. Bill Griffin, Jack Hutchings, and Gus
Holmelin.
To finish the year off, the juniors held the annual
banquet in honor of the seniors to wish them well
in their "embarking upon the waters of life" on
June 3.



Carib ,ean
1938


r


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C


:~ .,
''c".' '' ?




























The Sophomore Class

officers, elected on Sept. 17, were Carl Marohl, pre-
sident; Joe Nitto, vice president; and Ann Washing-
ton, secretary. Miss Bess M. Liter sponsored the class
for the school year 1937-1938.
At the school carnival on February 4, the class
ran four booths-the coin booth, penny game,
balloon game, and the novel duck game. The profits
for the evening totaled $120. The heads of the above
committees respectively were: Mary Hunt, Jack
O'Hearn, Elfrida Flores, and Bobby Fernandez. Jean
Raymond, Bobby Fernandez, and Jack O'Hearn were
placed in charge of all Sophomore carnival activi-
ties.
The next event on the calendar was the annual
outing, this year taking form of a picnic at Shimmy
Beach, Fort Sherman, on Saturday Feb. 12. Miss
Liter and Mrs. W. C. Washington acted as












Caribb an
19 8
























Two For Them

chaperons. The outing was a great success and the
picnickers were fortunate at the time in having
movies made of them by the Grantland Rice "Sport-
light" ph ti .raplh rs
The class was host to the faculty and members
of the Student Association at their dance of March
1 The dance was held in the gym, and the follow-
ing students composed the committees: Georgiana
Garnwright, Martha Peterson, Frances Dibble, Carl
Marohl, Joe Nitto, Edward Marquard, and Buddy
Cadenhead, decorating committee. Bobbie Styles,
Dorothy Anderson, Jane Kaufer, Jean Rodgers, re-
freshment committee.
The Sophs, as usual, took part in many sports
and in the Tri.in'..!.r track meet on April 2, were
represented by Jack Halliburton and Whitney
Brayton.








Caril beum
938


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a
~3rjiss~'"'
Y:



































The Freshman Class

moved into action soon after entering school this
year with the election of Jack Brayton, president;
Frank Cain vice-president Peggy McCleary, secre-
tary; and Frances Davenport, treasurer.
About three weeks later the class elected as their
representatives, Emily Horine and Eddie Wheeler, to
the student council.
At the carnival the class had three booths. With
these three they contributed materially to the amount
of money brought in by the whole school. They were
Bottle-busting booth, the horse racing booth, and








Carib ean
1918



































Coming Up

the bow and arrow booth.
Unable to have a class picnic early in the year,
the class retaliated with a dance given in the middle
of May. This dance, the first the class has given,
was formal.
Ranking fairly high in sports, both frosh boys
and girls managed to hold down the position of se-
cond place in the soccer league. Buddy Hutchings
captained the team. Baseball saw the boys in fourth
place, under captain Luis Palmer; football, third,
under Ed Wheeler. Clyde Ruley and John Pucci
headed the basketball teams.








Cari 8ben
1938







The Will



Ruth Anderson
Norma Bales
Flora Bath
Grace Belden
Frances Biliskv
Dorothv Brayton
Carol Byrd
Mary Ann Cain
Thelma Callaway
Anne Carpenter
Bettye Cassidv
Marie Christian
Betty Clay
Patsy Coffey
Bea Cotton
Lucy Derrick
Theresa Goulet
Dotty Hale
Katherine Handshaw
Alice Hanson
Anna Kotalik
Marion Macintyre
Dorothy MacSparran
Lucy Matchett
Thelma Miller
Anna Patchett
Catherine Paxton
Isabel Peterson
Virginia Tracy
Mary Stumpf
Anne Shirley
Mary Louise Warren
Margaret and Ruth Wood
Marjorie Yost
Louise Zimmerman and
Virginia Shannon
Gale Arnold
Kenneth Hodson
Victor May
Maurice Baigelman
Al Hendricks and
George Black
Charles Brashear
Frank Brennan
Asa Bullock
William Butler
Rafael Canton
Charles Chase
Paul Cole
Albert Collins
Gladstone Cooney
Milton Dunn
William Egger
Tory Estenoz
lohn Finlason
William Forssirom
William Fuller
Anibal Galindo
Jack Gorman
Guillermo Grau
Fred Hauss
Laurel Highley and
Rose Marie Wolf
Dick Hoorn
William Hoverter
William Hunt
John Huson
Andrew LaPointe
Vincent Conrad
Clyde Linton
Luis Lushman
Claud Lyon
Edward McCarthy
Theodore Mc Gann
Donald Parker
Oliver Paterson
Bob Petters
David Ports
Anthony Refcofski
Charles Schaeffer
James Smith
Edward Egozcue and
Eugene Stade
Alfred Stumpf
Paul Venable and
John Berude
Vern Terry
Fred Wertz
Howard Whitt


by Bea Cotton and John Finlason
Her soccer ability to
Her New England accent to
Her height to
Her beautiful dark tresses to
Her high honors to
Her good looks to
Her modesty to
Her flowers for teacher to
Her flirting eyes to
Her red hair to
Her position on the Trade Wind staff to
Her artistic ability to
Her ability to curl hair to
Her ability to talk fast to
Her blonde hair to
Her fainting spells to
Her apologetic -ways to
Her sports ability to
Her chatty personality to
Her fluttering eyes to
Her composure to
Her love for arguing to
Her playfulness to
Her ability to write essays to
Her melodious voice to
All her new iokes to
Her many hours of piano practicing to
Her Spanish accent to
Her whimsical way with boys to
Her way with Dutchmen to
Her stately poise to
Her truckin' to
Their friendliness to
Her high-pitched voice to
Their long fingernails to


Their height to

His gold tooth to
Their noise in class meetings to
His scholastic ability to
His "Tarzan" physique to
His long standing in the orchestra to
His typing record to
His contrary ways to
His Costa Rica girlfriend to
His many hours of homework to
His hurried exits from each class to
His bashfulness to
His sailor cap to
His quietness to
His flowery descriptions to
His rides in the station wagons to
His loyalty to the girlfriend to
His two timing ways to
His soccer ability to
His West Point ambitions to
His doodling to
His place in the band to
Their lovely smiles to
His photography to
His athletic standing to
His parliamentary procedure worries to
His inventions to

Their partnership to

His services as chauffeur to
His gentlemanly ways to
His way of bumming rides to
His rapid stride to
His ability to climb trees to
His car and accessories to
His heart-breaking technique to
His good nature to
His cave-man manner to
His aloofness to
His southern accent to
Their helpful ways to
His large school program to

Their membership in the "Gas House" to
His "carefree" attitude to
His tales to
His honor roll record to
SIGNED BY THE CLASS OF 1938

WITNESSES:
R. Truckin' Daze
R. Rover Now


Ellen Roe
Oran Appin
Betty Jo Hamilton
Mary Louise Arthony
Irene Richardson
Vivian Cottrell
Fern Horine
Helen Wikinnstad
Buddy Parsons
Jemsinia Holgerson
Wylene Poole
Arthur Morohl
William Ebdon
Peeev Brown
',Ihlitd Whitt
George Booth
Maryella Lawson
Beverly Arnold
Marianne MacDonald
Zona Boggs
Shirley Brayton
Edith Fredericks
Janet Nesbitt
Woodrow Torbert
Richard Bernett
Alma Bramm and Sam Freier
Edwin Piburn
Constance Irvine
Anabel Bassett
Josephine Ender
Ida Reynolds
Robert Thomas
Charles Reeves
Dorothy Bilisky
Veronica Stein


Robert Downie

Alice Howell
Margaret and Mary Plummer
Herbert Ashton
Frank Robles
Dan Butler
Thomas Ashton
Robert Koperski
Grover Gravatt
Gilbert Joudry
Richard Fitzgerald
Eugenia Steinhart
Jacqueline Wahle
Gorden Cohen
Jean Green
James Donaldson
Luis Finlason
Frank Peterson
Warren Lam
Richard Wood
Cynthia Martin
Beverly Moody
Kenneth Edmonds
Wendell Arbouin
William Wood
Carolyn Carpenter
James Defrees
Charlotte Elkins and
Helen Foraker

Mary Jane Campbell
Buddy Bloxom
Philip Briscoe
Helen Hewitt
Howard Melker
Charlotte Raymond
Bert Tydeman
Alrhea Butcher
Billy James
Dolores LaPointe
Charles Mayville
Thomas Stein
Harold Blackwell
Jane Bevingron and
Irene Laurie
Bill Griffin
Benjamin Yohres
Jack LaLonde


I


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In Word


Anne Carpenter: What I liked, best in the sport
line was the track meet, April 2. Highly, Hoverrer
and you, Bill, starred. I was never so excited in my
life as when it ended with C.H.S. just / point in
the lead.
Al Htnierd ik erie -.;n I eri..r.t.i i e ,ru. .-.
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Editor


ROSE MARIE
WOLF


THE WORK


Caribbean


1938







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St a nding left to right- V' hicdl Setrletr ( tarn,, FL Lr ar,,th I Ir onn ,Ik vr, lk St% I( S~it k It r,
Aisitn I r,mt Lui, FtlI i Fvd) atpcdur ~n Sn shT- N.,rrJr lirs i ty (sar ihr uk-
prtssicri


The Student Council

with the two Finlason brothers at the helm, has finished its fifth successful year di-
recting school activities.

John and Luis Finlason were elected president and vice-president re pectively in
a student election held October 1, 1937. Other officers elected were: Evelyn Shirley,
secretary and Beverly Moody, treasurer.
The Finlasons easily won the election, each collecting 138 votes in their fields.
Also running for president were, Bea Cotton, and Bill Forsstrom; for Vice-president.
L. Finlason, Alfred Stumpf, Beverly Arnold; and for secretary, Theresa Goulet. and Jane
Bi inerLiin for treasurer, Beverly Moody, and Edward Egozcue.
The council representative assembly is composed of two members from each class.

The faculty member; are Mr. Kenneth Vinton. director of activities, Mr. \. Hugh
Stickler, student sponsor; and Mr. Vic Seiler, director of athletics.
A Christmas dance was given at Christmas time.








Carib an
193 ?






















^ GRACE BELDEN
Carnival Queen








The Carnival

held in the gym on the evening of February 4, made $671.97.
The junior class took in more profits than any other from their five booths, with
a total of $119.55. Booths were: dice game, penny game, pop gun, barrel game, the
country store, and telegraph.
Sophomores ranked second with $98.86. Their booths were: a penny game,
balloon game. duck ringing, and a coin booth.
The freshman class made $90.63, with horse racing, bingo, can bu:t, and bow
and arrow game.
The seniors from their dart game, shooting gallery, dice game, and bombing
planes, earned $66.47.
The stage show, held in the auditorium under the direction of Mr. Paul L.
Beck and Mr. Cecil L. Rice, made $100.35, with the theme, "Shore Leave."
Grace Belden was elected carnival queen with 4375 votes. Bettye Cassidy, a close
second, received 4005 votes. The election made $84.18, and the dance, also under the
Trade Wind, $5.94.
The Hall of Science, under the supervi-ion of Mr. W. Hugh Stickler and Mr.
Kenneth W. Vinton, made $38.20.
Greatest amount of money, earned by the moda, food, and ice cream booths, was
$143.72. Miss Ferne Bowman and Miss Hallie Beavers were in charge of this booth.






C.ar'i bean
1 38































Slarld',:,. Ih,...


.. r : A rbou in, La Poi nr e- Rfo k R.
Tra-y '' n"rr. Rf,1ior^re
lra: Ah n, l Bu'k,

Clarence,

a four-act comedy by Booth Tarkington, was produced by
the Thespian; on May 6, under the direction of Mr. Paul L.
Beck, Thespian sponsor.
The leading roles were taken by Asa Bullock as
Clarence, and Virginia Tracy as Violet Pinney. Anthony
Refcofrki enacted Mr. Wheeler; Dolores La Pointe, Mrs.
Wheeler; Alice Raymond. Cora Wheeler; Tommy Ashton,
Bobbie Wheeler; Wendell Arbouin, Dinwiddie; Marion
Macintyre, Mrs. Martyn; Sam Freier, Hubert Stem, and
Judith Ferri, Della.
Miss Mary VWorrell supervised the staging with Marion
Macintyre and Anna Frances White in charge of make-up;
Vivian Cottrell, and Sam Freier as prompters; Eleanor
Krushinski, publicity; Marion Macintyre. Jane Bevington,
Dorothy Anderson, Lucy Detrick, Theresa Goulet, Marie
Chrirtian, Naomi Bailey, and Bea Cotton as ushers.
The play concerns an ex-soldier who, upon seeking
employment with Mr. Wheeler, inadvertently becomes
enmeshed in the secrets of the family. As a general handy
man of the Wheeler home tr innc to avoid the advances
of the wife and daughter of his employer, Clarence meets
and falls in love with Cora Wheeler's governess. Miss
Pinney. The climax is reached when the family finds out.
through reference to the Who's Who, that Clarence is an
accepted authority of entomology.





Corri be'in
1 138


~~kli



a


































The Dramatic Club

under the supervision of Mr. Paul L. Beck and Miss Mary Worrell presented several
plays and assisted the National Thespians throughout the year.

On October 29, "The Importance of the Ghost Story" was given; November 23,
"The Stranger" and "The Boor," and in March "The Florist Shop" and "The Other
Kitty."

The Club's officers for this year elected May, 1937, were: Al Hendricks, president;
George Black, vice president, and Theresa Goulet, secretary.











Cari bean
1i 38

































'rr I crc,.' ;ih,,, 1,,~ 5. th"in,,


j/


The National Thespians

were once more an organization independent of the Dramatic (Club. Sponsor was Paul
L. Beck. history teacher, and officers were: Marion Macintyre. President: Bill Forsstrom,
Vice-President; Bea Cotton. Secretary, and Anthony Refcofski, Noble Prompter. Bea
Cotton resigned her office in February and was replaced by Wendell Arbouin.

The Thespians put on three assembly programs, and with assistance of the Dra-
matic Club, six evening programs.

This honor dramatic society took second prize for groups in the stunt carnival in
January, with a playlet based on the cartoon "Alley Oop."

At a formal initiation December 20, in the Student Council room, Philip Brisco..
Eddie Green, Virginia Tracy, and Theresa Goulet were admitted.

The next initiation was after the three-act Thespian play "Clarence." when Jane
Bevington. Vivian Cottrell. Anabel Bassett, Lucy Derrick, Sam Freier. Paul Cole, Bobbie
Downie. and Asa Bullock became members.






Caribh ean
19 8


"~:' \I,
Ic,


ifia /














~~i42S :


Theb thf


La Pas, The Spanish Club,


met four times during the year, each "un gran festejo" and was laying tentative plans
for a final "baile" at the Bombero roof at year's end. For this program, Mrs. Phyllis
Spencer, Spanish teacher, was sponsor.
In November, 52 new member:, who had qualified by maintaining a "B" average
in Spanish, were initiated at the first gathering of the year. The next, at Christmas
time, was a joint session with PASF, marked by Mr. Cecil L. Rice's talk in Spanish
and a holiday "pifiata." A Bombero band concert and a galaxy of notable guests, -
among them Sr. Inocencio Galindo, Governor of Colon; Sr. Pedro Fernandez-Parrilla,
Mayor of Colon; L. J. A. Ducret, Jefe de Bomberos provided the excitement for
third meeting, again with PASF. At the last meeting, a pageant celebrating peace and
goodwill among the nations of America was staged.
At each of the La Pas gatherings two students, the highest ranking in all of the
Spanish classes, were official hosts.









C" ibber n
1938


































Tht un fo i (4 un i,. tIhc ircc A5nwr-i,'


Pan-American Student Forum

president, Bettv Jo Hlamilton. was elected third vice-president of the 1nationil organiza-
tinn at the Da llas convention, June 1i. 1937. Two days before, Mrs. Phyllis Spencer,
(Cristobal sponsor, spoke, in a pollera, about Panama ind the Canal Zone. Betty Jo and
her younger sister. Martha, danced the tamborito for the assembly.
Other officers, elected October 1;, were Bea Cotton, first vice-president: Josephine
Ender. second vice-president; Luis Finlason, secretary; and (Claud iLyon, treasurer. The
oraniz.tion includes about 50 members.
First initiation held was November 17 at the \Washington lotel. Humberto Leig-
nadier, young son of the governor of the province of (Clon, entertained the group with
his poetrY recitations. Next was January 12. when 10 P.A.S.F. members attended the
inauguration at Betty Jo Hamilton's house on Ninth street.
Four times the forum held formal meetings jointly with La Pa-. On D)ecember 21,
a large (hristmas party was held: on March 16, the Boimbero ,iand entertained with
several selections: on April 20. a Union Pageant was given.









Cari bean
1 38


V-"




































Above-Boys' Glee Club; below-Girls' Glee Club. Both warble sweet notes upon occasion.


The Glee Clubs'

first big program was the "Feast of the Little Lanterns", an operetta presented November
12, 1937. The leading roles were taken by Helen Wikingstad, Charlotte Raymond, Mil-
dred Whitt, and Janet Nesbitt, supported by the entire girls' glee club.
"An Old Spanish Custom", given on April 1, was led by Jane Bevington, Bill
Forrstrom, Cynthia Martin, Tommy Ashton, Jean Green, Victor May, and Charles Reeves.
The chorus was sung by the combined glee clubs.
The entire musical department participated in the music festival held in the gymna-
sium on April 29.
In April $40 was awarded for musical awards.







Cari bean
138










I": *L ?


Left to right: Anderson, Green, May. Bevington. Forsstrom, Martin. Bristoe, Petersn; below: Ashton, Reeves


The Big Operetta

"An Old Spanish Custom", presented on April 1, in the high school auditorium, was
the main musical event of the year.
Directed by Miss Mildred Elner and Mr. Paul Beck; Bill Fors:trom, Jane Bevington,
Jean Green, and Tommy Ashton took the leading roles.
Several dances were given, the most popular one being "The Dance of the Wooden
Soldiers", directed by Beverly Moody. The two other girls who directed dances were
Reycelia Fry and Olive Aanstoos.
The operetta had to do with Bill Forsstrom as Don Juan fiitJint to regain control
of his ranch and, meanwhile, falling in love with Jane Bevington as Billy. The antics
of Jean Green and Tommy Ashton as Maggie and Pat Murphy proved very amusing.
The stage was set to resemble a Spanish rancho, and the characters were appro-
priately costumed.
The complete cast was: Bill Forrstrom, Jane Bevington, Jean Green, Tommy Ash-
ton, Cynthia Martin, Charles Reeves, Victor May, Dorothy Anderson, Martha Peterson,
Philip Briscoe, and Bob Downie.







Caril bean
138


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Above-The Orchestra; below-The Band. Did you ever Pete go "Tweet, tweet, tweet"?


The Band and Orchestra
under the direction of Miss Mildred Elner, started the year off with a musical assembly
on October 5.
During the year the 22 in the orchestra and the 26 in the band continued to supply
music for assemblies and between acts of plays presented by the Dramatic Club.
The two outstanding musical events in which the orchestra and band participated
were the out door Christmas program on December 23, and the annual Music Festival,
May 3.
Community organizations for which the orchestra and band played were the Cris-
tobal Woman's Club, the Civic Council and the Cristobal Union Church,






Carib ean
19! 8











BETTYE CASSIDY
Editor
C. F. PLUMMER
Adviser
BILL FULLER
Business Manager '
I








The Trade Wind

has been issued once a week, for 36 week. this year, under a new sponsor, C. F. Plummer.
At the beginning of the year. The Trade Wl'ind had as editor Marion Macintyre
and as business manager, Bill Fuller. Bettye Cas, idy replaced Marion on December 19.
and Oliver Patterson took over as Business Manager on March 22.
Wylene Pool was assistant editor; Jean Green, news editor; William Forsstrom.
sports editor: Ro-e Marie Wolf, social editor; Specia.l writers. Albert Hendricks. Dick
Hoorn, Jack O'Hearn, Jlacueline W\hale, Marjorie Yost, and Eleanor Krushinski. George
B11 k was circulation manager.





t, 7-1

















Standing left ro rn hit Ma ntire, Brai n i a,. l(I,.h f (otfiv Kuhk ( l a Mt .irfthn Krulhmsk,
SNring Hendrsks. Yot. P*)Il \\ ,If. G m ruil-, iorn ltEcrson \\.il < .ikarn. Red imcn lahik bh.is.rui,


( orill
19,


__I


:8






























Combing the jungle the biologists gather all manner of strange life.


The Biology Club,

under the direction of Mr. W. Hugh Stickler, was reorganized on November 8, Sam
Freier was elected president; Jane Kaufer, vice-president; Jean Raymond, secretary; and
Anne Butler, treasurer at a meeting on December 13.

The club made four big trips during the year. The first was January 15, when 21
students made a trip to the bat caves. Next trip was March 5, when 15 went up to the
Pot holes with Stickler. A couple of weeks later, nine went up the Pina river. Last big
field trip was April 30, when the club went over to the Panama Zoo to observe various
animals.


















Carib ean
198


*2
































A
I..,


*Th..1


Standng. It it right: Vintn., James, Frcier. Grau, Reevsc. Hover ter. Hunt. Srick!er. ]iront: Hudson, Black,
Refcoiki. IE~gr. Downiw.




The Photo Club,

organized to sponsor student interest in photography, met
early in November and elected these officers: George
Black, president; Billy Hunt, vice-president; Sam Freier,
Secretary; and \\ lli.in James, treasurer. Sponsors were
Mr. Kenneth W. Vinton and Mr. W. Hugh Stickler.

Principal project of the year was the -lih.rinL of
group photos and sports shots for the Caribbean, for which
an enlarger and projector were added to equipment on
hand, a speed graflex camera.










Caribt 'an
198














"This is Bill Egger again, folks, and
while Miss Macintyre is looking at the
latest news reports, we will hear Miss
Thelma Miller singing, "Ah-Che-Chon
-Ya!"
-Here I am again, folks with the
latest news flashes just coming up.
Margarite and Ruth Wood, com-
mercial wizards, today prophesized
"prosperity is here to stay."
Flash!--Teddy McGann, construct-
ing engineer, has completed the Pan-
can Tower designed by Guillermo
Grau, Architect. From this tower, used
for military purposes, one may see
not only the Atlantic and Pacific
Oceans, but also the Arctic and An-
tartic.
Flash!-Mary Louis Warren, inter-
nationally famous beauty sailed today
for Costa Rica where she plans to
study Spanish, Spanish customs,
Spanish life, and Latin-American
men.
Flash-Legitimate theater actress,
Virginia Tracy, today sailed on the
S. S. United Empress for England,
where she will take the lead in David
Pott's drama, "Night Brings Light."
Flash!-Commander in Chief of the
Atlantic Sector at Ft. De Lesseps,
Brig. Gen. Richard F. Hoorn today
announced Clyde Linton, Secretary of
War, orders to start 90 day maneuv-
ers, March 10. Orders were received
on the new Army gas balloon "Char-
les Brashear", named for its de-
signer.
Flash!-Mary Anne Cain, professor
of languages, was appointed head of
Vassar today.
Flash!-For the first time in the
history of the Panama Canal, a wo-
man, Theresa Goulet, was named
General Manager of the Commissary
Division.
Flash!-Alfred Stumpf was today
made executive secretary of the Pan-
ama Canal.
Flash!-Catherine Paxton, world re-
nowned Red Cross nurse, is reported
alive but still unsuccessful in her he-
roic attempt to take water to the
Eskimos.
Flash!-"Battlin' Pos" Parker today
defeated "Herian Skunk" Fish for


The Prophecy

(Continued from Page 17)
the light weight championship of the
world.
Flash!-Interior decorators Carol
Byrd, Alice Hansen, and Betty Clay
announced today the style trends for
houses: "Chairs, tables, and beds
will no longer be seen. You will eat
off shelves and stay out all night".
Flash!-Betty Cassidy, editor pub-
lisher of "Chic" reports the circula-
tion has jumped 50% since she chang-
ed the magazine to a men's fashion
weekly.
Flash!-Lucy Detrich, head nurse
of Gorgas Hospital, says, "Hay fever
can be cured-just stop eating and
breathing for about one week!"
Flash!-"Wheat, potatoes, and corn
King", Vern Terry again breaks the
world's record for the largest per acre
crop.
Flash!-Justice of the peace Paul
Venable revealed today that Miss
Mary Stumpf was secretly married
Tuesday to the German ambassador
to Panama. Isabel Peterson and John
Diaz, well-known Colonites, were wit-
nesses.
Flash!-Bald men need no longer
be ashamed to appear in public, for
M. Luis Lushman has just succeeded
in perfecting a new hair-growing
machine. In demonstrating his ma-
chine M. Lushman directs his ma-
chine on a concrete pavement and
then cuts the hair on it with a lawn-
mower.
Flash!-Among Military circles it is
a well know and established fact that
Anne Carpenter is to be married to
General Smythe in the Spring.
Flash!-Reported over Pogo-Pogo is
Patsy Coffey on her round-the-world-
solo flight. Miss Coffey started out last
night.
Flash!-His Majesty, the King of
England, today Knighted Lucy Mat-
chett for her work in the field of
Nursing.
Flash!-Katherine Handsaw, co -
holder, with Anna Katalik, of the Pro-
fessional Typing Cup, published her
book "How to Type 200 Words a Min-
ute" today, in collaboration with Dot
MacSparren. They have had advance
orders of 10,000 copies.


I


Caribi
19.


ean
:8


































OYS" VARSITY (i LiB GIRLS VARSITY ( I.1B
I'.k- Foritron Il hley, Bo h. Svilr: Pa.1,- -S*P k hi,.' Hik rd.
< nt.n r limcrr, Po.t L Finlaon. .(nter--r II m, ii.dl Andrsn:
'iont-, Fminion. Robles, Ihmcln I rnmt ( min


The Varsity Clubs,


honor athletic organizations of C.H.S.,
supervised all sports, keeping attendance,
'.rrii, referees and scorekeepers.

The girls' club consisted of Bea Cotton,
president; Carol Byrd, secretary-treasurer:
Mis; Barbara Bailey, sponsor; and Dot
Hale, Fern Horine, Emma Jean Starke,
Ruth Anderson, and Zona B..-''. mem-
bers.

The Boys organization consisted of
John Finlason, president; Bill Hoverter,


vice-president; Luis Finlason, treasurer;
David Potts, secretary Mr. Vic Seiler,
sponsor: and Laurel Highley, Frank Ro-
bles, George Booth. Gus Homelin, and
Bill For strom, members. On May 6,
when Mr. Seiler went to the States. Mr.
Ted Hotz, math teacher, took over.

Those eligible to join are the ten boys
and girls who, at the end of the year,
have accumulated the most points in the
various sports.


I


Carib
19.


wian
8































Standing, left to right: Fuller. Estenoz. Egger. Hendricks, Ports. Forsstrom. Hoverter, Egozcue, Huson.
Front: Hodson, Brashear. Parker, Highley, Refcofski, Black, McCarthy.





The Boys' Sports,


baseball, football, and soccer went down
under the powerful and hard playing
of the senior boys of the class of '38.
Bill Forsstrom, Laurel Highley, and
David Potts, captains of the respective
teams, lead the boys to the victories in
the various sports.
Soccer started off the year with the
upper classmen winning both the dum-
my league and the regular contest. Cap-
tain Potts was goaly for the champs and
prevented his opponents from scoring a
single goal during the whole season.
Following soccer came the long foot-
ball season with Captain Highley leading
the boys down the field. Hoverter and
Highley were both playing in the back-
field and were responsible for the many
runs, kicks, and passes that brought the
seniors out on top. Supported by a heavy
line the senior squad walked all over
their opponents.
The champs then traveled to Balboa


and were handed a 6-0 defeat by a com-
bined Pacific side team. A few days later
the junior college gave Cristobal a second
beating on her own field winning over
them 6-0.
Closely following the football came
the baseball season. This was a hard
fought series but once more the '38 men
came out on top. Bill Forsstrom was cap-
tain of this team and together with his
team, played a delayed game at the Balboa
stadium and went home once again de-
feated.

The senior boys worked with each
other and played hard at everything they
tried. This is one of the main reasons of
their winning.

With the tournament finished, a twi-
light league was organized and was
managed by Mr. Al Slocum. The boys
played a good game of ball, but not well
enough to win.


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Bak leiftr right: PcA, Fuller. Beruie. Ialliburtin, Hloverier. Braloin Front liodson. :Fo srrm,
Highicy, RHtcikil.





Varsity Track


once again, after a period of three
years, was added to the sports ca-
lendar. Mr. Phil Pesco, new athletic
coach, immediately set to work and
trained the boys at various events.

At least two months of ready practice
in running and jumping was done. And
when the track and field equipment
arrived two more weeks of hard labor
were in store for the boys. Practising al-
most three hours a day, the school ap-
peared to have a winning track team.


The interclass track meet, with the
seniors and freshmen pairing off and the
juniors and sophs combining, showed the
strength of the team. Here the senior-
frosh teams took all honors in the meet.
A week later the :i.mi,1,Ii ir track meet
was held at the Cristobal Kokonut grove
with Balboa, Junior college and Cristo-
bal fighting it out. C.H.S. showed its su-
periority by defeating Balboa by one half
a point. The final scores were: Cristo-
bal. 51, Balboa, 501 2, Junior college.
391 ,.


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Front. left to right: Fuller. Black, Hunt; Center: Stade, Berude. Egozcue;
Back: Estenoz, Forsstrom. Refcofski, Hoverter.




The Senior Submarines

torpedoed their way into first place by defeating the Ju-
niors, 10-0, in the playoff game of the water polo cham-
pionship, January 5, at the Hotel Washington Pool.
The Juniors and Seniors had a large turnout with all
their men trying to win, while the other two classes were
very poor in their showing.
On the Senior team were Bill Hunt, Bill Hoverter,
Bill Fuller, Bill Forsstrom, Gene Stade, Anthony Refcofski,
Ernest Estenoz, Jack Berude and George Black.
On the Junior team were George Booth, Gilbert
Joudry, Frank Robles, Gustav Homelin, Luis Finlayson,
Bud Bloxom, Robert Downie, and Jack Hutching.
On January 19, an all-star team played the Senior
Champs, beating them 9 to 0.






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JUNIOR BOYS' SWIMMING TEAM JI'NIOR GIRIS' S\ IM,'ING TEAM
Ba.k. left to right: Booth. Homelin. Bak, left to right- Brown Reynolds.
Baldwin. lHotz, lront Joudry, Roble ;mrt. I'roni : H-lorint BoIg Nesbrit,
Ashton. Greetn.





Swimming

was taken by the junior class on February 22, at the Hotel
Washington Pool.
The total scores, computed from the combined points
made by the classes in the three different swim meets,
were juniors 51, seniors 50, sophs *i8, and frosh 26.
The seniors led the way until the la-t race of the
meet when the juniors came through, tallying the winning
points.
On April 11, Balboa handed the varsity squad a sink-
ing, beating C.H.S. 61-31.
Coaches for the swim team were: Seniors, George
Black, Betty Clay; Juniors, Frank Robles, Zona Boggs;
Sophomores, Eddie Green, Georgianna Carnwright, and
Frosh, W. Baldwin, Ptuei McCleary.













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Upper, Volley Ball Champs; Lower, Volleyball All-Stars.


Volleyball started the year with
the seniors finishing in the top
bracket, after many upsets and
setbacks. The captains for the
winning teams were Dotty Hale
and Thelma Callaway. The winners
were given a skating party by the
losing teams. Those on the win-
ning teams were: Bea Cotton,
Mary Ann Cain, Carol Byrd, Ruth
Anderson, Grace Belden, Flora
Bath, Betty Clay, Ann Carpenter.


Volleyball

After the tournament an All-
Star team was chosen to play
Balboa over there. The visitors were
defeated 21-5, 21-10. Those on
the team were Beverly Moody, act-
ing captain, Fern Horine, Flora,
Bath, Bea Cotton, Dotty Hale,
Thelma Callaway, Jean Homelin
and Jean Green. Substitutes were
Georgiana Carnwright, Betty Clay,
Carol Byrd, and Zona Boggs.


J.,


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t opcr, iTinm LC,.rur,1, LoNcr. Sttcr %\ ijmer


Tennis


The Soccer


which was the next sport was run
off in a round robin tournament.
The members of the class I-l.'. 1ii
each other first and then the class
winners playing each other. The
class winners were: Anne Shirley,
senior, Jean Green, junior, Jean
Raymond, sophomore, and Irene
Linton, freshman. The school cham-
pion was Jean Green, with Ann
Shirle% runnerup. The doubles
were played in the same manner
with Fern Horine and Zona Boggs,
school champions.


tournament was off to a fI in- Jtart
with the juniors mowing down all
opposition. They were under the
able captainship of Fern Horine,
who was high point scorer for all
classes. The juniors ended the sea-
son with an undefeated record.
Those on the winning team were:
Fern Horine, captain, Wylene Pool,
Zona Boggs, Jane Bevington, Bev-
erly Arnold. Jean Green, June Hart.
Emma Jean Starke, Marianne Mac-
Donald, Ida Reynolds, Edith Fre-
dricks, and Janet Nesbitt.


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Above-Rifle Club on the range. Below-Club Officers, left to right: Fuller, Freier, Piburn, Hunt, Reeves.


was organized in October, at the sugges-
tion of Capt. Laurence Calloway, of the
Cristobal Police, by Mr. Paul E. Miller,
who has supervised its organizations.
Beginning with about 20 members the
club grew until it comprised a group of
almost forty students, all with their own
rifles. Shooting was done at the Cristo-
hal Gun Club.
When the group consisted of 25 mem-
bers, a charter was received from the
National Rifle Association. The charter
was presented by Brigadier-General Frank
W. Rowell, C. O. of the Atlantic sector.
The club elected as president, Charles
Reeves; vice-president, Edwin Piburn;


The Rifle Club

secretary, James Munden; treasurer, Sam
Freier; and range officer, Bill Hunt.
The club's activities included a match
held against the Chinese Boys' Club, a
skating party in the middle of April,
and shooting against Balboa.

Approximately a hundred medals were
won by the various club members
throughout its existence this year. This
is approximately two medals per person
for the majority and a few., iore for the
rest.

On May 15th the American Legion
sponsored a Canal Zone junior cham-
pionship contest at Fort Davis.


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k A-


Hotel JYashington

UNEQUALED FOR SITUATION AND COMFORT

COLON, R. P.


A Hotel in keeping with the dignity, spirit and service
of the Panama Canal.


GOLF SWIMMING WATER SPORTS
TARPON FISHING
The Year Around
D. J. HENDRICK P. 0. Address;
Manager Cristobal, Canal Zone






Carii hean
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BE A GAY BLADE!


Joy is like a summer breeze
Fragrant, light and gay;
Like flowers in a meadow
Like little lambs at play.

Why worry over little things?
Why spend the day in care?
If you have some work to do
Then do it with an air.


Keep a smile upon your lips,
And a twinkle in your eye,
You'll find joy is infectious
Why should you moan and sigh?

There's a lot of fun in living
For today and not to-morrow.
Have your laughter while you may
To-morrow may bring sorrow.

Don't live a life of useless care
Don't have suppressed desires.
Laugh with joy, forget all care
Who likes to live with sighers?

So keep a smile upon your lips
And a twinkle in your eye.
You'll find joy is infectious
Don't stop to moan and sigh.

Lucy Matchett




IT WAS RIPPING
She stepped upon the diving board,
Her yellow suit a-dripping.
A dainty thing to see was she,
Like an advertisement clipping.
With azure eyes and flaxen hair;
She was the center of attraction
To each and every faction.
Posed to take a dive was she,
Ready to dip into the sea.
She shrieked and fell as a Briton cried,
"By Jove, your suit is ripping."


. M


C. CASULLO

JEWELLER
and
WATCHMAKER
P. O. BOX 286 COLON

Phone 1855 9,036 Front St.
CRISTOBAL, C. Z. COLON, R. P.


i


Inocencio Galindo Jr.

7th and Bolivar Streets

Colon

n'o


Jobber and Commission

Merchant




REAL ESTATE BROKER
and
AGENT


I


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:#--W


_ ____ --- ......... ............. .... . ... .


"p ** -* m *









On Riding to School

In a School Bus

At exactly 'even-ten every morning, just as
I am not quite through with breakfast, the
school bus arrives. After hearing a few very
nasty sounding toots on the horn, I leave the
house with the fond farewells of my parents.
For about two blessed minutes there is al-
most complete and absolute silence, for I am
the first on the bus. But after that glimp e
of paradise, I am lost for the rest of the wa;y.
The next stop we take on about eight people.
At once the i-L'in' starts, badly off key. That
is kept up. except for intervals of a few short
moments, all of the way to school. The next
stop brings the "brats." Two of them have
especially loud and piercing voices why,
heaven only know-. After a wait of about five
minutes ("they wouldn't wait that long for
me", everyone complains). the last two girls
come aboard and we are, in truth, off.
Having, unfortunately, neglected to do all
of my lessons the night before, I have my
books open and am trying to study from all
of them at once. Just as I am I, -.In .Ih. to
get really warmed up, a foreign sort of article
comes between me and my books. Looking
up, I perceive it to be one of the brats, the
female of the species. After she has taken her
time to unload herself from me, and generous-
ly smeared me with the piece of toast that she
is eating, peace again reigns for the space of
a few moments.
"....ARNOLD'S CAMPAIGNS IN NORTH-
ERN NI \ I \GLAND Gen. Arnold...." at
this point, a shrill, ',l;ir,. insect-like voice
penetrates my state of partial coma and I. un-


Before eye-strain wrinkles be-
come permanent and nervous
fatigue becomes chronic, have
your eyes examined. If you
need glasses, you will he
surprised to find what a
comfort they are
when accurately
and becomingly
fitted to

Y OU

Hare your clcs cximinlned


CADRON O PTICAL COMPANY
PANAMA j( R'gitercd ,( OI.ON
2^ (.c ril 0; 1 90 i Front
Avenue 'I Sr t
New York




happily, become aware of the fact that the
male pestilence is holding a screaming contest
with himself to see how long he can last.
....They ::av his mother dropped him on his
head as a baby.....
The older girl on the bus helps out the
bus guard, poor befuddled, soul, and manages
quite capably to shut off the steam.
After a relieved sigh from more than one,
school heaves into sight. Immediately every-


Com paiiia Panaimeina de Fuerza y Luz
PANAMA COLON


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one stages a sit-down strike and firmly refuses
to get out. This time the bus driver, a burly
sort of creature, takes a hand and off we go
in a hurry.
In the afternoon, when the busses are once
more loaded up, we start for home. Someone
more or less gently informs the guard that a
member has been left behind. Back goes the
bus, and we go with it. Once again we start
and once again we stop, this time a few yards
farther on, to pick up the girl who goes to
the Sister's School.
From then on, it's nip and tuck to keep up
with, or pass, the boy's bus. (It seems that
the "elders" thought that perhaps there would
be fewer fights if the boys and girls were se-
parated.) We lose the race this time, but it
was a good fight while it lasted.
One by one the kids disembark, and, at last,
there are only the bus guard and me left. Up
the hill we go; the bus stops and I climb out.
The dogs come running up to greet me as the
bus disappears around the bend.


Wylene Pool


The Only Manufacturers of
Alligator Skins in the Country

Martinez & Co.
120 Central Ave.. PANAMA
9034 Front Street. COLON
GENUINE ALLIGATOR SKIN
GOODS
Box 904, Panama Tel. 1799-J.
Prices That Will Not Hurt
Your Pocketbook.


PANAMA
Moonlight on the water
Calls lovers to its shore,
Its silv'ry light keeps saying,
"It's you that I adore."
Sailboats on the water
Add to lovers' delight
As palm trees whisper love songs,
In the magic of the night.
Catherine Paxton


The


STANDARD FRUIT & STEAMSHIP

Company







VACCARO LINE


Wish every success to the Graduating

Class of 1938.


f_____________.---------


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A Shaft of silver moonlight penetrated gloom,
A shining, wavering breeze flowed through the
room.
Silhouetted palm leaves were rustled by the
breeze
And birds of the night called plaintively from
trees.
And waves on the beach ceaselessly dashed
with ",i-/'t,
All this loveliness of nature, I found at night.
Eleanor Krushinski


Silvery shafts of moonlight
Floating on a crystal sea;
Palm trees softly swaying
T. .'.,' my love for thee.


Broken mellow', golden music.
Luscious., l. ,.:.,i.! harmony
Gently wafted through the night
Telling of my love for thee.


Black rocks sad and lonely
Jagged, ragged in the sea:
Whisper how my heart is breaking
For mine thy love -ill never be.

Lucy Alatchett


Carib ean
193


THE METAL TRADES COUNCIL

and

THE CENTRAL LABOR UNION

of the

CANAL ZONE

Representatives of the organized labor union workers em-
ployed by the United States Government in the Canal Zone
request that you buy articles that are UNION MADE.
The makers of these articles are fair to their employees,
so why not be fair to the employer.

AFFILIATED WITH THE AMERICAN FEDERATION
OF LABOR

?_i,


The

French Bazaar

The Finest Store In
Colon
FRONT STREET
COLON









THE VENDOR

She walks down the street with a tray on her
head,
It may be of cookies, it may be of bread:
Around a wide waist a soiled apron of white,
That sways as she walks there, with steps not
so light.

She's a toothless grin on her wrinkled old face,
That nods back and forth with the friendliest
grace.
She offers her wares to the passer-by tourist,
Hoping that he won't be one of the poorest.

Around her dark wrists, are numerous bracelets,
Around her short fingers one sees many rings
But as for all that she wears many trinkets
Yet that isn't one-half of all her things.

Mary Ann Cain


"FINLAYSON'S" Portraits are Beautiful
Your best expression comes and Goes Like a Flash
It Can't be Caught On a Portrait With a "TIME EXPOSURE"
Exposure must be instantaneous.
Mr. Finlayson catches you off-guard-When you least expect it. There is no agony
to go through, you can be perfectly comfortable while the exposures are being made.
THAT'S THE WAY FINLAYSON'S PORTRAITS ARE MADE
Painstaking workmanship completes the pictures-
Look over the work of the Finlayson studio to-day.
7018 FRONT STREET COLON PHONE No. 9 COLON, R. P.




FOR FINEST MOTOR PERFORMANCE

Fill up with Texaco

Lubricate with Marfak


TEXACO (OVERSEAS) LTD.
CRISTOBAL. CANAL ZONE
I________________________________________


COMPLIMENTS OF

C. B. FENTON

&

COMPANY, Inc.
Cristobal, C. Z. Balboa, C. Z.
Phone Cristobal 1781 Phone Balboa 1066


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ALWAYS REMEMBER When the iun in gOrgteous iplcndor
Rosy tints the eastern sky.
A man is judged in life And the darkness in surrender
by two things, His friends Bids the earth a soft goodbye:
and His clothes. When the glory of the nmorninf,
Glous in shades of every hue
e Ae n B Lichting heaven in the dauning
The American Bazaar hat is it comes, to ,yu.
HABERDASHERS & TAILORS Inspiration
TO MEN OF GOOD TASTE. Norma Bales




A FRIEND

A friend is one who helps you see
The sunny side of life. Compliments of
Someone who can make you be
Il.,ppv in the greatest strife.
., JULIO A. SALAS
Hisi mere words can lift you JULIO SALAS
Through sorrow and regret,
His cheering smile can help you do Sole Distributor of
Things you'll ne'er forget.
Famous
As the years have passed away
Leaving you old and wise.
There'll always be one to say PHILIPS
"Your friendship is my greatest prize!
RADIOPLAYERS
Dorothy Brayton






Compliments of

Dr. Vern Prier

Dr. Horace G. Forster









Carib lean
19 ,8








E. R. Kuhrig
COLON
Racquets Restrung
Typewriters and Adding Machines
Repaired.
-ALSO-
Victor Strings,
Slazanger Balls
Dunlop Racquets

A-----~---------y








COMPLIMENTS OF


t 9
Motta S







,.----------


Compliments Of

J. V. Beverhoudt
COLON
Novelties, Magazines, Stationery,
Tennis Raquets, Fine Amity
Leather Goods, Butterfly
Work.



SONNET, THE FIRST

What have you stored away from me,
Silent, musty tome of yellow leather?
Speak! What scribe has drawn you together?
Your cover is open, I've set you free,
I wonder whose thoughts, in you, I shall see.
As I look at you, 1 ponder whether
It were better to be wise and clever,
Or follow the spirit of joviality.


0, you came to me from the vast unknown,
And you taught me a strange philosophy
You ask me-What is the need for gold?-
When death comes you take not what is your
own,
And our God-for heaven-demands no fee,
For -all are equal who enter His fold-.

Al Hendricks


Compliments of

D. M. Dickerson, D.D.S.

Dr. C. F. Bruggerman, D.D.S.

V. L. Morris, D.D.S.


-'K


I.


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