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PCANAL

1937



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Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries



http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1937cris



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WE, THE CARIBBEAN STAFF OF 1937,
DEDICATE THIS BOOK TO OUR

FACULTY




Few high schools in the United States and
dependencies have as well trained teaching
staffs as those on the Isthmus.

The teachers in Cristobal High are not only
well trained in subject matter, but they have
had the broadening' advantages of travel in Eu-
rope, South America and the homeland. They
are people of varied interests and talents and
because they are versatile, they are able to
bring much of concomitant learning to their
pupils. The teachers of Cristobal High School
continue their education throughout the summer
months, receiving various degrees in the sub-
jects which interest them most in some of the
finest colleges in the United States.

In the language department of Cristobal High
the students receive excellent supervision and
training under various capable teachers.

Miss Liter teaches Junior and Senior Eng-
lish. She has been a teacher at Cristobal for
four years, and has received her B. A. and
Master's degree from West Virginia University.
Thus far, she has procured two-thirds of a Ph. D.
from the New York University.

Miss Moore, teacher of Modern Languages
teaches French and Latin to the students of
Cristobal High School. Miss Moore, who has
been with us for twelve years, has received her
B. A degree from West Virginia University, and



her M. A. degree from Teachers College.

A new teacher to us is Miss Cresto, who
teaches Spanish 9 and English 10 and 9. She
also, like the two teachers mentioned above,
has received her B. A. and M. A. degrees.

Miss Brown instructs the English 9 and 10
classes, and supervises the Library. She has
been teaching on the Canal Zone for six years,
and has received her B. A. and M. A. degrees
from the University of Missouri.

Our advanced Spanish teacher is Mrs. Spen-
cer. She has been instructing in Cristobal High
for seven years and has received her B. A. de-
gree from Coe College, and her M. A. degree
from Iowa University, and has earned some
credits on her Ph. D.

Another teacher who is new to us is Mr.
Franklin, who is instructor of General Mathe-
matics, General Metal Shop and Elementary
and Advanced Mechanical Drawing. He has ob-
tained his B. S. in Education.

Mr. Stickler, who is also a new member of
the teaching staff, teaches Biology, General
Science, Elementary Algebra and has received
his B. S. and M. S. degrees.

To instruct the pupils of Cristobal High in
the intricacies of science we are fortunate to
have Mr. Vinton. He has been a member of the
Facultv for seven years and teaches Physics,



Chemistry and Algebra. Mr. Vinton has two de-
grees; his B. A. and M. A. degrees.

For business training Miss Patterson is in
charge. She teaches Advanced and Elementary
Shorthand, Typing and Business Training. Miss
Patterson has received her B. S. degree and has
taught in Cristobal for seven years.

Mr. Batalden, who has been teaching in the
Canal Zone for two years has received his B. S.
degree and teaches Woodwork 8, 9, and 10.

In charge of the Household Arts department
is Miss Pope. She has two degrees: her B. S.
and M. A. This is her first year as a teacher on
the Canal Zone Staff.

Mr. Seiler and Miss Bailey are the two gym-
nasium instructors who have charge of the Phy-
sical Education Classes.

Another teacher new to us is Miss Worrell,
who teaches Art and is in charge of Dramatics.
She has received her B. S. and M. S. degree,



and has had summer work beyond her Master's
degree.

Last but not least is Miss Elner, who has
taught in Cristobal High School for seven years.
She has received her B. M. degree and teaches
Music and English.

Mr. Sullivan, one of our most versatile teach-
ers, teaches two major subjects, English 11 and
U. S. History. He has been on the Cristobal
High School Faculty for two years and also has
charge of the Speech class, the High School
Band and Orchestra and the Junior High School
Band. He has two degrees: the B. A. and the
M. A. from the University of Denver.

In the Mathematics department the students
receive the best of training under Miss Beavers.
She has been on the Cristobal High School Fa-
culty for six years and teaches Plane and Solid
Geometry, Trigonometry and Algebra 11. Miss
Beavers has received her M. A. degree and her
B. A. degree from Duke.




Our principal, Mr. Milford Franks, now on
vacation in states, has been with us six year?,
and in that time, our schooi has grown in size
and has increased, immeasurably, in the quality
of its work, in the number of its activities, and
in its importance to the community. Mr. Franks
received his A. B. from Whitman, and then
crossed the continent to take his Master's and
to complete the work for his Ph. D. at Teachers'



College, Columbia University.

Upon his departure for his holidays, he left
C. H. S. in the excellent hands of Mr. Sigurd
Esser, who holds degrees from North Dakota
and Minnesota. Although he has been here a
short time, Mr. Esser is well known to us, be-
cause he is the assistant principal of Balboa
High. With him, our school is drawing to the
close of a very successful and happy year.




Caribbean Staff



Editor-in-Chief Carroll Gallion

Associate Editor Mary Darley

Sports Editor James Coman

Staff Artists Marie Christian

Flora June Southard

Staff Photographers Robert Byd

Asa Bullock

Literary Board Macel Goulet

Kathleen O'Hearn

Betty McCleary

Jack O'Hearn

Charlotte McMahon

Erin DeBardelehen

Marion Macintyre

Marjone Yost

Jean Walsh

Grace Hodges

Typists Goldwyn Grabhorn

Eleanore Stumjif
Winifred Koehler




















Sk




OLIVE AANSTOOS

Quotation "Her mirth the world required;
She bathed it in smiles of glee."

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1927.

Activities Basketball 1, 2, 3; Soccer 4; Base-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4; Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Ten-
nis 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Drama-
tic Club 1, 2, 3; National Thespians 3,
4; Archery 3; Swimming 2; Trade Wind
4; Visitation Week 4; Carnival 1, 2, 3,
4; Girls Double Quartet 2, 3; Freshman
Chorus; Varsity 2. 3, 4.

Pet Expression "Be still my fluttering heart."

College Expected to Enter Alveine Dance
School, N. Y.



MARJORIE ANDERSON

Quotation "'Come my best friends, my booki,
and lead me on."

Birthplace Whiting, Indiana.

Date entered C. Z. schools 1934.

Activities Trade Wind 3, 4; Effe Kube Klub
3, 4; La Pas 3, 4; Photo Club 4; Chair-
man Visitation Week Committee 4; Glee
Club 3; Pan-American Student Forum 4.

Pet Expression "Piffle!"




MAXINE BLUNDEN

Quotation "A sunbeam in a winter's day."

Birthplace Santa Ana, California.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1926.

Activities La Pas 2, 3; Effe Kube Klub 1, 2:
Freshman Chorus.

Pet Expression "I don't know."

College Expected to Enter Junior College, Bal-
boa, C. Z.




ANITA BOGGS

Quotation "She has a voice of gladness, and a
smile an eloquence of beauty."

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1924.

Activities Basketball 1, 2, 3. 4; Soccer 4; Vol-
leyball 2, 4; Glee Club 1, 3; Freshman
Chorus.

Pet Expression "I really mean it."

College Expected to Enter Duke University.




JOHN BOZEMAN

Quotation "What is this life if full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare?"

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1928.

Activities National Thespians 3, 4; Tumbling
2; Art Club 1; Photo Club 2; Caribbean
2. 3. 4; Effe Kube Club 2; Carnival 1,
2, 3, 4.
ain't got besides brains?"

Pet Expression "What have I got that yen

College Expected to Enter Texas University.








MILDRED BRASWELL

Quotation "Kail to thee, blythe spirit!"

Birthplace Mansfield, Ga.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools Feb, 1935.

Activities Glee Club 2, 3; Basketball 3; Ten-
nis 3; La Pas 3, 4; Biology Club 3; Car-
nival 3.

Pet Expression "Yes."

College Expected to Enter Stanford Univer-
sity, California.



DONALD BRAYTON

Quotation "I dare do all that would become

a man."
Birthplace Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1928.
Activities Trade Wind 4; Basketball 4; Varsity

Club 4.
Pet Expressions "I rode a horse once."
College Expected to Enter Texas University.



JACQUELINE BRISCOE

Quotation "Good without pretense. Blest with
plain reason, and with sober sense."

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1927.

Activities Carnival Committee 2-4; Glee Club
1, 2, 3; La Pas 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club
1, 2, 3, 4; National Thespians 4; Visita-
tion Week Committee 1, 4; Commence-
ment Committee 4; Varsity Club 3, 4!
Volleyball 2, 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4; Base-
ball 4; Bowling 3, 4; Tennis 3, 4; Soc-
cer 4.

Pet Expression "Aw, Heck!"

College Expected to Enter University of Mary-
land.



BETTY BROOKS

Quotation "Nothing is so rich as honesty."

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities La Pas 3; Basketball 3, 4; Volley-
ball 3, 4; Tennis 3, 4; Bowling 4; Base-
ball 4; Carnival 3, 4; Commencement
Committee 4; Varsity 4.

College Expected to Enter Simmon's College,
Boston, Mass.



WILLIAM ROBERT BYRD

Quotation "True as steel, sincere and inde-
pendent."

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1922.

Activities Photo Club 3, 4; Slide Rule 3; Trade
Wind 3, 4; Caribbean 3, 4; Carnival 4.

Pet Expression "I want to be alown."

College Expected to Enter Boeing School of
Aeronatics.



HELEN CARROLL

Quotation "For she is such a smart little craft,
Such a neat little, sweet little craft."

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1928.

Activities Effe Kube Club 1, 2, 3; Thespians 3, 4;
La Pas 2, 3, 4; Student Forum 4; Carnival
4; Visitation Week 3, 4.

Pet Expression I wouldn't Know, and not know-
ing, I wouldn't say.

College Expected to Enter Colegio de Sion, Costa
Rica.



JIMMY CHRISTIAN

Quotation Heroes themselves had fallen behind

Whene'er he went before.
Birthplace Boston, Mass.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3 1;
Football 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Track

1, 2; Swimming 1. 2. 3, 4; Water Polo
3, 4; Dramatic Club 4; Science Club

2, 3; Photo Club 2, 4; Sec. Varsity Club

3, 4; Class Representative 1; Carnival
Committee 2, 3.

Pet Expression "Hi ya, toots!"

College Expected to Enter Georgia Tech.



VERNON CLARK

Quotation "A merry heart doeth good like a
medicine."

Birthplace Utica, New York.

Date entered C. Z. Schools 1928.

Activities Effe Kube Klub 1, 2, 3; National
Thespians 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer
3; Baseball 3; Boys' Glee Club 1, 2; Fresh-
man chorus; Orchestra 1, 2; Carnival
3, 4.

Pet expression "That's more better."

College expetced to Enter Pratt Institute of
Science and Technology.



JACK CLAY

Quotation "In all labour there is profit."

Birthplace Marshalltown, Iowa.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1924.

Activities Basketball 1, 2, 3. 4; Baseball 1 2
3; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 3, 4; Water
Polo 3, 4; Track 2; Pres. Varsity Club 4:
Science Club 3.

Pet Expression "Success".

College Expected to Enter Iowa State College.



ROWLAND CLEMENS

Quotation "Sport went hand in hand with
Science".

Birthplace Vermilion, South Dakota

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 1 2
3, 4; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 3; Base"-'
ball 1, 2, 3; Track 1, 2; Photo Club 4;
Pres. Photo Club 4; Class Vice-Pres ?:
Student Rspresentative 4; Commencement
Committee 4; Science Club 2.

College Expected to Enter University of Wis-
consin.






DAVID COFFEY

Quotation "Write me as one that loves his

fellowmen."
Birthplace Colon, R. P.
Bate Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities Dramatics 3; Carnival Committee 4;

Senior Week Committee 4.
Pet Expression 'So what?"



JOE COFFIN

Quotation "A soul as full of worth, as void

of pride."
Birthplace Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities Trade Wind 4; Photo Club 3 4" Effe
Kube Klub 1, 4; Biologv Club 2; Soccer
1, 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4; Football 3, 4; Bas-
ketball 3, 4; Water Polo 4.



JAMES COMAN

Quotation "Is this that haughty, gallant gav
Lothario?"

Birthplace Colon, R. p.

Date entered C. Z. schools 1926.

Activities Trade Wind 1, 2. 3, 4; La Pas 2, 3 4"
Effe Kube Klub 1, 2, 3; National The-
spian 3, 4; President Student Associa-
tion 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 3 4-
Football 3, 4; Caribbean 3, 4; Carnival
Committee 2, 3; Visitation Week Com-
mittee 2, 3, 4; Pep Club 3; Golf 4- Ope-
retta 3.

Pet expression "Well, ain't I sorry?"

College Expected to Enter University of Texas.



HARLAN CROUCH

Quotation "Every man has not the like talenc

Birthplace Colon R. P.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1924

Activities Swimming 1, 2, 3. 4; Football 3 4
Basketball 3, 4; Track 1, 2; Water Polo
1. 2, 3; Baseball 4; Soccer 12 3 4-
Science Club 1; Glee Club 1.

Pet expression "Patooie."

College Expected to Enter Balboa Jr. College




JEAN CROUCH

Quotation "And grace that won who saw her."

Birthplace Nitro, W. Va.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities La Pas 2, 3; Volley Ball 2, 3; Ten-
nis 3. 4; Baseball 3, 4; Soccer 4; Bowline
2, 3, 4.

Pet Expression "Oh!"



MARY DARLEY

Quotation "So young, so fair.

Good without effort, great without foe."

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Date entered C. Z. schools 1926.

Activities Effe Kube Klub 1, 2, 3; National
Thespians 3, 4; Visitation Week Com-
mittee 3, 4; Trade Wind 3, 4; Caribbean
3. 4; Basketball 3; Volleyball 3; Bowling
3; Archery 3; Commencement Commit-
tee 4; Treas. Photo Club 4; Carnival 4.

Pet expression "Honest IiijUn?"

College Expected to Enter Great Ormond
Street Hospital, London.



LOUISE DE LA OSSA

Quotation "Oh, she was as good as she was

fair."
Birthplace New Orleans, La.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities Carnival 1, 2, 3; Visitation Week
1, 4; Freshman Chorus 1; La Pas 2, 3;
Effe Kube Klub 1, 2. 3; Photo Club 1.

Pet Expression "Aw. honey!"

College Expected to Enter University of South-
ern California.



WILLIAM LAWRANCE DICKINSON

Quotation "A silent shy, peaceloving man,
He seemed no fiery partisan."

Birthplace Wassau, Wisconsin.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1926.

Activities Band 1, 2, 3. 4; Orchestra 1, 2; Fresh-
men Chorus 1; Soccer 3.

College Expected to Enter Georgia Tech





JACK DIGNAM

Quotation "I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul."

Birthplace Pittsburgh, Pa.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1933.

Activities Trade Wind 4; Carnival 4; Class
President 4; Dramatic Club 3. 4; Foot-
ball 4; Pep Club 3,4; Cheerleader 2, 3, 4.

Pet Expression "A little less quiet please."

College Expected to Enter Ohio State College,
Athens, Ohio.



MARY DIGNAM

Quotation "Much mirth and no madness,

All good and no badness."
Birthplace Pittsburgh, Pa.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1933.

Activities Basketball 2, 3, 4; Baseball 2, 1'
Soccer 4; Tennis 2 ,3, 4; Varsity 3, 4 :
Supper Club 3; Volleyball 2, 3, 4; Bowline
3; Trade Wind 4; Caribbean 4; Car-
nival 4.

Pet Expression "Dear me!"








STANLEY DONALDSON

Quotation "He never mocks,

For mockery is the fume of little hearts.'

Birthplace Lima, Ohio.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1928.

Activities Glee Club 1, Freshman Chorus; Trade
Wind 1. 2; Soccer 1; Carnival Commit-
tee 1; Biology Club 2.

Pet Expression "Aw Heck!"

College Expected to Enter Cleveland School of
Aeronautics.



CATITA ECKER

Quotation "As merry as the day is long."

Birthplace Panama, R. P.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities Effe Kube Klub 1, 2, 3; National
Thispians 3, 4; La Pas 1, 2, 3; Basket-
ball 1, 2; Res. La Pas 2, 3;

Pet Expression "Listen, my child"



ELIZABETH KAYWOOD

Quotation "Those dove's eyes which can mate
gods forsworn."

Birthplace Mobile, Alabama.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools Dec. 1934.

Activities Basketball 3, 4; Volleyball 3, 4:
Baseball 4; Soccer 4; Bowling 3; Tennis
4; Varsity 3, 4; Trade Wind 4; Carib-
bean 4.

Pet Expression "You know ".



JEANNE EGGLESTON

Quotation Lest arts.

Birth- lace Colon, R. P.

Date Entered C. Z, Schools 1927.

Activities Effe Kube Club 3, 4; La Pas 3, 4; Pan

American Student Forum 4; Trade Wind 3;

Visitation Week 4; Thespians 4 : Volleyball

3, 4.
Pet Expression "But definitely."
College Expected to Enter Tallahasee Women's

College.




RAYCELIA FRY

Quotation "A little lady doth often harbor a
great soul."

Birthplace Natchez, Miss.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1936.

Activities Commencement Committee 4; Visi-
tation Week 4; Carnival 4; Dramatic
Club 4.

Pet Expression "Oh, my goo'ness!"

College Expected to Enter Rath Matlock's Stu-
dio of Dancing, San Antonio, Texas.



CARROLL GALLION

Quotation "Born like Caesar to write and act

great deeds."
Birthplace New Ibehia, Louisiana.
Date entered C. Z. Schools 1934.
Activities Trade Wind 2, 3, 4; Caribbean 3, 4:

Editor in Chief of Publications 4; Photo

Club 4.
Pet expression "Oh, worry, worry!"
College expected to Enter H. S. Newcomb, New

Orleans, La.



MARIE GEOGHEGAN

Quotation "Each morning sees some task begin

Each evening sees it close."
Birthplace Washington, D. C.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1934.

for Secretary, Washington, D. C.
Pet Expression "Heavens!"
College Expected to Enter Washington School

for Secretaries, Washington, D. C.





HERBERT GOTTESMAN

Quotation "Good humour is the heart of the
soul."

Birthplace Vienna, Austria.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1933.

Activities Science Club 1, 2; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4;
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2; Swim-
ming 3, 4; Class Treas. 4; Trade Wind 4;
Caribbean 4.

Pet Expression "Same one."



MACEL GOULET

Quotation "Mighty hearts are held in slender
chains."

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Bate entered C. Z. schools 1930.

Activities La Pas 2, 3, 4; Effe Kube Klub 1,
3, 4; National Thespian 4; Trade Wind
3, 4; Caribbean 3, 4; Student Represen-
tative 1, 2, 3; Commencement Commit-
tee 4; Carnival 1, 2, 3; Visitation Week
Committee 2, 4; Freshman chorus; Glee
Club 2, 3; Sec'y Girl's Varsity Club 4;
Volleyball 1, 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4; Bowl-
ing 3, 4.

Pet expression "Funny? I thought I'd die!"

College expected to enter Junior College, Bal-
boa, C. Z.





GOLDWYN GRABHORN

Quotation "The mildest manners and the
gentlest heart."

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Bate Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities Trade Wind 4; Carnival 2; Carib-
bean 4.

Pet Expression "I'm not sure look it up."

College Expected to Enter Women's State Col-
lege, Florida.





JAMES GREENE

Quotation "He is the prince of good fellows.''
Birthplace San Antonio, Texas.
Date entered C. Z. Schools 1926.
Activities La Pas 4; Football 4; Soccer 4;
Baseball 4; Basketball 4.



HENRY FREDERICK GRIMM

Quotation "Life is just a jest, and all things
show it."

Birthplace Monroe, Va.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1936.

Activities Football 4; Baseball 4; La Pas 4;
Commencement Committee 4.

Pet Expression "Woe is me!"

College Expected to Enter Polytechnical Insti-
tute.



BETTY HAUSS

Quotation "She's all that's honest, honorable,
and fair,

And when the virtues died they made
her heir."

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Date entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities Freshman Chorus; Carnival 1. 2, 3,
4; Effe Kube Klub 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club
2, 3, 4; Trade Wind 4; La Pas 3, 4.
Commencent Committee 4; Visitation
Week Committee 4.

Pet Expression "For Heaven's Sakes!"

College Expected to Enter Los Angeles Hos-
pital.



NORA HEWIT

Quotation "Her large blue eyes, fair locks and

snowy hands."
Birthplace Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1924.

Activities Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 4; Bas-
ketball 1, 2. 3; Baseball 1, 2.
Pet Expression "True, true."




GRACE HODGES

Quotation "The red gold cataract of her

streaming hair."
Birthplace Colon R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.
Activities La Pas 3, 4; Pan American Student

Forum 4; Class Treas 3; Freshman

Chorus; Effe Kube 4; Trade Wind 2;

Caribbean 4.
Pet Expression "I don't believe it!"
College Expected to Enter Texas University.



EDWARD FRANK HOFFMAN

Quotation "For may we search before we find
a heart so manly and so kind."

Birthplace Elyria, Ohio.

Date Enered C. Z. Schools 1927.

Activities Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3,
4; Football 3, 4; Swimming 4; Band 2,
3, 4; Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Thespians
3, 4; Varsity 4.

Pet Expression "Hiyah!"



LEONARD GARRETT HUFF

Quotation "There is no difficulty for him

that wills."
Birthplace Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1920.
Activities Glee Club 1, 2; Debating Club 2:

Dramatic 1, 2; Carnival 4; Senior Dance

4.
Pet Expression "Don't be a greeper."
College Expected to Enter Junior College.



MARVIN KEENAN

Quotation "Not slothful in business; fervent

in spirit."
Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1927.
Activities Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3;

Basketball 1. 2, 3. 4; Soccer 4; La Pas 2.
Pet Expression "Aw common', Hula!"
College Expected to Enter Purdue University,

Indiana.



WINIFRED KOEHLER

Quotation "The old. old story fair and young."
Birthplace Weehuwken, New Jersey.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools April 1927.
Activities La Pas 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1; Car-
nival 2, 4; Trade Wind 1, 4; Caribbean 4.
Pet Expression "May I have an ice-cube?"
College Expected to Enter Business College,
New Jersey.




RITA KOTALIK

Quotation "She is the mirror of all courtesy."

Birthplace Portsmouth, Va.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1931.

Activities Basketball 1. 2, 3. 4: Varsity Club
1, 4; Letter Club 1; Effe Kube Club 3, 4;
Volleyball 1, 3, 4; Bowling 4; Soccer 4;
Glee Club 3, 4; Visitation Week Commit-
tee 4; Supper Club 2, 3, 4.

Pet Expression "Oh, Gee Whiz."





CHARLOTTE LEVY

Quotation "She is the best of all musicians."

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities Glee Club accompanist 1, 2, 3, 4;
Orchestra Accompanist 1, 2, 3, 4; Fresh-
man Chorus 1; Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, 4;
Commencement Committee 4; Visitation
Week Committee 4; Trade Wind 4; La
Pas 2, 3, 4; Pan-American Student Fo-
rum 4.

College Expected to Enter Eastman's School of
Music, Rochester, New York.



RUTH LULL

Quotation "And gay without frivolity."
Birthplace Clairmont, New Hampshire.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools Dec. 1934.
Activities Slide Rule Club 3; La Pas 4; Soccer

4; Volleyball 4; Tennis 3, 4; Trade

Wind 4.
Pet Expression "Such is life!"



DORA LYEW

Quotation "Lo, one who loved true honour

more than fame."
Birthplace Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1932.
Activities Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman

Chorus; Effe Kube Klub 1; Basketball 3;

La Pas 2, 3, 4: Volleyball 2.
Pet Expression"! don't care."



LUCILLE LYEW

Quotation "Silence best speaks the mind."

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1933.

Activities Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman
Chorus 1; Effe Kube Club 1; La Pas 2,
3, 4; Basketball 3; Volleyball 3.

Pet Expression "Oh Gee!"




MARGARET MACINTYRE

Quotation "Modesty is beautiful in a woman.'
Birthplace Ardgour, Argyllshire, Scotland.
Date entered C. Z. Schools Dec. 1935.
Activities At^hery 3.
Fet expression "Takes too much effort."



BETTY LEE McCLEARY

Quotation "Grace was in all her steps! Heaven
in her eyes. In every gesture dignity
and love.

Birthplace Erie, Kansas.

Bate Entered C. Z. School 1932.

Activities La Pas 1, 2, 4; Dramatic Club 1, 2.
3; Pres. 1; National Thespians 4; Trade
Wind 4; Caribbean 4; Pan-American Stu-
dent Forum 4; Effe Kube Club 1; Class
Treas. 1; Visitation Committee 2, 4; Car-
nival Committee 2, 4; Chairman Sr. Week
Committee.

Pet Expression "True! True!"

College Expected to Enter Mississippi Syno-
dical College.



=5*^



JOHN MCLAIX

Quotation "The fields his study, Nature was
his book."

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Bate Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities Photo Club 3, 4; Science Club 2, 1;
Sccer 4; Trade Wind 2.

College Expected to Enter Springfield Teach-
ers' College, Mass.



RUTH MOOBY

Quotation "Wit to persuade and beauty to
delight."

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Bate Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities Effe Kube 1, 2, 3; National Thes-
pians 3, 4; Pres. Natl. Thespians 4; La
Pas 1, 2, 3; Freshman Chorus; Class
Seer. 3; Carnival 1. 2, 3.

Pet Expression "Oh, Gee."

College Expected to Enter Harter's School of
Dance, Washington.



ESTHER LAWN NEELY

Quotation "A dancing shape, an image gay."

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Bate Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3,
4; Bowling 2, 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4; Biology
Club 4; Pres. Girl's Varsity 4; Class
Treas. 2; Class Sect. 4; Carnival 1, 2, 3,
4; Tennis 4; Sr. Week Committee 4; La
Pas 2, 3, 4; Student Forum 4; Pres. Effe
Kube 2; Vice Pres. Effe Kubbe 4; Fresh-
man Chorus 1; Glee Club 1, 2.

Pet Expression "General Electric!"



RUTH JEAN NELSON

Quotation "Her very frowns are fairer far
Than the smiles of other maidens are."

Birthplace Wichita Falls, Texas.

Bate Entered C. Z. Schools 1935.

Activities Trade Wind 3; Caribbean 3.

Pet Expression "On the other hand, take
spinach."

College Expected to Enter Illinois State.




MARGARET OWEN

Quotation "Her glossy hair was clustered o'er a
brow Bright with intelligence and fair and
smooth."

Birthplace Colon, R. P.
Bate Entered C. Z. Schools 1931.
Pet Expression "O gosh!"




KATHLEEN PHILLIPS

Quotation "Good things are wrapped in small
parcels."

Birthplace Florence, Alabama.

Bate Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities Class Secretary 1; Effe Kube Klub
1, 2, 3, 4; Pres. Dramatic Club 4; Basket-
ball 1. 2, 3, 4; Soccer 4; Student Repre-
sentative 4; Class President 3; Com-
mencement Committee 4; Bowling 2;
Carnival 1, 4.

Pet Expression "Oh, so what?"





NETTA POTTS

Quotation "Who mixed reason with pleasure,

and wisdom with mirth."
Birthplace River Rouge. Michigan.
Bate Entered C. Z. Schools 1926.
Activities Freshman Chorus; Varsity Club 2,

3, 4; Carnival 1, 2, 3, 4.
College Expected to Enter Business College,

San Francisco.



ROBERT RULEY

Quotation "I love the sea; she is my fellow-
creature."
Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.
Bate Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities Baseball 1. 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2.
3, 4; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 3, 4; Ten-
nis 4; Track 1, 2; Pyramid Team 3, 4:
Tumbling 1, 4.

Pet Expression "Come about!"



DAVIB SAVAGE

Quotation "And Nature compromised betwixt

Good fellow and recluse."
Birthplace Battle Creek, Michigan.
Bate Entered C. Z. Schools 1936.
Activities Baseball 4.
Pet Expression "Nuts to you!"



16



LOUISE SIEBOLD

Quotation "So unaffected, so composed a
mind; So firm, yet soft; so strong, yet
so refined."

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities La Pas 2, 3, 4; Volleyball 3, 4; Arch-
ery 3; Freshman Chorus 1; Trade Wind
1, 2; Commencement Committee 4; Car-
nival 2, 3, 4; Pan-American Student Fo-
rum 4.

Pet Expression "Darnit!"

College Expected to Enter Iowa State College,
Ames, Iowa.



LESLIE STEVENS

Quotation "Dignity doth fitly adorn her per-
sonage."

Birthplace Istanbul, Turkey.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools April 1936.

Activities Commencement Committee 4.

Pet Expression "Oh, what a wit!"

College Expected to Enter Junior College, Bal-
boa, C. Z.



STANFORD STONE

Quotation "For the merry love to fiddle,
And the merry love to dance."

Birthplace Tampa, Florida.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1924.

Activities Pres. Art Club 2; Football 4; Ten-
nis 4; Orchestra 1, 2; Trade Wind 3;
Caribbean 2.

Pet Expression "Naturally!"



ELEANORE STUMPF

Quotation "For she was jes' the quiet kind

Whose natures never vary."
Birthplace Philadelphia, Pa.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools Feb. 1933.
Activities La Pas 4; Trade Wind 4; Caribbean

4; Glee Club 1; Dramatic Club 4.
Pet Expression "You don't mind; do you?"




JOSEPHINE STUMPF

Quotation "I love her for her smile, her look
Her way of speaking gently."

Birthplace Willowgrow, New Jersey.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1924.

Activities Freshman Chorus; Glee Club 1, 2, 3,
4; La Pas 1, 2, 3, 4; Trade Wind 3;' Car-
nival 1, 2, 3. 4.

Pet Expression "Caramba!"









MONTFORD TAWES

Quotation "It seemed when nature him began.
She meant to show all that might be
in man.''

Birthplace Crisfield, Maryland.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities Effe Kube Klub 4; National Thes-
pians 4; Swimming 1, 2, 4; Science Club
1; Band 1, 2, 4; Orchestra 4; Trade
Wind 1, 2, 4; Caribbean 4; Water Polo 4.

Pet Expression "Oh. knock it off."

College Expected to Enter State College, Pa.



JEAN WALSH

Quotation "But to see her was to love her."

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1926.

Activities La Pas 2, 3, 4; Effe Kube Klub 2 r
3; National Thespians 3. 4; Caribbean 4;
Trade Wind 3, 4; Class Vice-Pres. 4;
Commencement Commute 4; Senior Week
Committee 4; Baccalaureate 4; Visita-
tion Week 4; Art Club 1; President Pan-
American Student Forum 4; Carnival ?.

College Expected to Enter University of Cali-
fornia.



CHARLES WASHABAUGH

Quotation "For though he is a wit, he is no
fool."

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Bate Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.

Activities Pres. Freshman Chorus; Dramatic
Club 1, 2. 3; Thespians 3. 4; Glee Club
1, 2, 3; Water Polo 3, 4; Soccer 4; Car-
nival 1, 2, 3, 4; Leader's Club 3; Science
Club 1, 2. 3; Trade Wind 3.

Pet Expression "Same thing."

College Expected to Enter Springfield, Mass.



WILLIAM WOOD

Quotation "His limbs were cast in manly

mould,

For hardy sports or contest bold."
Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.
Activities Soccer 1, 2. 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3; Track

1, 2; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Tennis 1, 2;

Swimming 3; Water Polo 3; Football 3,

4; Treas. of Varsity Club 4; Art Club 1;

Science Club 2.
Pet Expression "So what?"



ELSIE WOODRUFF

Quotation Her glossy hair was cluster'd o'er

a brow

Bright with intelligence and fair and

smooth.
Birthplace Colon.
Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.
Activities Baseball 4; Tennis 4; Volleyball 4;

Bowling 4.
Pet Expression Oh, my goodness!"



18



ANNE GALLAGHER

Quotation "A heart with room for every joy.'
Birthplace Lynn, Mass.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1936.
Pet Expression "Aw. Gee!"
College Expected to Enter University of Cali-
fornia.



BRANDON L. ELKINS

Quotation "For now he's free to sing and play,
Over the hills and far away."

Birthplace

Date Entered C. Z. Schools Feb. 5, 1936.

Activities Baseball 1, 2; Varsity 1, 2; Squad
3, 4; Basketball 1, 2; Varsity 1, 2; Soc-
cer 3. 4.

Pet Expression "So What ".



YOLANDA SALAS

Quotation "Soft as her clime and sunny as

her eyes."
Birthplace Havana, Cuba.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1925.
Activities La Pas 3, 4; Freshman Chorus; Glee

Club 1; Trade Wind 4; Carnival 1, 3.
Pet Expression "You don't say!"



LAVERNE ROSE

Quotation I am now past the craggy paths

of study."
Birthplace Butler, Pa.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools 1928.
Activities Carnival Committee 4.
Pet Expression "No breeze!"



Ed: WM



little ballerina, Raycelia Frye, was
invited, but Mr. Washabaugh tells
me that a tour of dancing' before all
the crowns and dictators of the
world may prevent her joining them.
Also there's another scientist that
attractive lady in the red hat. It's
Louise Seibold, the biologist, who
has just discovered a new germ. The
lady just getting out of that taxi is
Jacqueline Brtscoe, the founder of
"The Modern Kitchen," the last
word in home economics. There is
Eddie Hoffman, editor of the Pan-
ama American, maybe he can give
us a little more information about
the cruise.
(They walk over to him).

Pardon me, Mr. Hoffman, I'm from
the Times. Would you tell me a lit
tie about your plans for the trip?

er, no but here comes Jimmy Co-
man he's just going as far as Cris-
tobal with us. He just got word
that at last he has been appointed
assistant manager of the Commis-
sary. Say, Jimmy, tell this fellow a
bit about our fellow passengers will



Anything to
oblige. Let s
consulting ei
Electric, is s
ness that he



oblige, anything to
see. Garrett Huff, the
gineer of the General
i important to his busi-

could not get away.



Herbert Gottesman is now owner of
the thirteen largest companies on
the Isthmus, and is running for pres-
ident, so he probably won't get here.
Esther Neely planned to go, but
when she was appointed as chairman
for the Olympics she had to go to
Russia instead. Kathleen Phillies,
the lawyer and authority on Mar-
shall law, is already aboard, and is
overjoyed at finding three people
smaller than she is. Robert Byrd
will probably be late ss he is at the
airport watching Maxine Blundin
attempt to break her own altitude
record in a plane that he designed.
Here's a taxi with well, it's La
Vern Rose! He owns the checker
taxi cab company. The man with
him is Stanly Donaldson, the chief
of the F. B. I. That's all I know
about except Macel Goulet is com-
ing aboard in Panama and is to go all
the way to Costa Rica. It's her first
trip out of the Isthmus. And well,
here's Helen Carroll, the star of



"Why Not?", the current broadway
hit. She can tell you more than I can.

Well, now let me think. Jeanne Eg-
gleston is already aboard you know
the political organizer and leader
because I'm supposed to meet her
there, and Jimmy Green was
coming until he did not get out in
time when the Chemical Warfare
lab blew up. Then Joe Coffin, the
coach at Purdue or Penn. State or
some place couldn't get away, and
Billy Dickerson is too engrossed in
the proposed canal from the Great
Lakes to Alaska to go anywhere.
Rita Katalik, the world titleholder
in tennis, is in England, but will
join us there after the Davis Cup
matches are played. While we are
in England we'll stop by and see
Mary Darley. Her husband is head
of Great Ormond Street Hospital,
and was knighted a few sea-
sons ago. Mildred Braswell and her
millionaire husband, her third, are
making a cruise too, on the Lutzen-
berg the newest dirigible. Then
Anita Boggs, who's married to some
wealthy Costa Rican, has invited us
to visit her for a while. Marie Goe-
hegan, she's Mother Superior of
The Convent of the Sacred Heart in
tome place-or-other. wrote to Charlie
wishing us all the best of luck. Betty
Hauss is taking a long deserved
vacation from the De Foe Hospital
where she is head nurse. Margaret
Maclntyre, who just received the
Nobel prize for her marvelous work
in the advancement of the S. P. C.
A. is aboard with her pets and ca-
naries. Peter Grimm, the comic strip
artist, is going along for inspiration,
he says. Mary Diqnam, the Olympic
champion is in Russia now. Netta
Potts is the organization manager
of the Red Cross, and has not made
up her mind whether she should go
or not. as the Ohio may flood. Ruth
Lull, the owner of the famous Dog-
wood Kennels is coming. Catita
Ecker and Jean Crouch, the adver-
tising models, are taking the cruise
during their vacation. Louise De La
Ossa, winner of the Title, Miss
South America has just opened her
Charm School with Elizabeth Hay-
wood. David Savage, the new
"Bring-em-back-alive" fellow is get-
ting on in Africa. Leslie Stephens,
the translator for the Asme Import



22



and Export Co. Inc., is coming so
we can be sure to be able to be
understood even by the Turks. Jean
Walsh, who painted that portrait of
the President, is in Paris studying.
and we'll pick her up there. Jean
Nelson is married to the Ambassa-
dor to Holland, so she can't come.
Rita Laurie is married to the pitcher
for the Colon Baseball Team. Nora
Hewitt has installed her 'House for
Beauty" aboard, and we all plan to
take advantage of it. Yolanda Salas.
manager of the "National Social Bu-
reau" can't come because its the
middle of the season. Eleanor
Stumfih is private secretary to the
President cf Standard Oil' of New
Jersey, and couldn't get away.
Eleanor Taiman is going as far as
Paris as she is a buyer for Wanna-
makers. Anne Galleger s married to
the commanding officer of the Asia-
tic Fleet, so she can't make the trip.
Josephine Stumfif is society-editor
for the Herald-Tribune. Ttfarjorie
Anderson is going too. She s the



President of "Phi Beta Kapi Fra-
ternity." But here's Margie Owen.
the head of the Owens and Walker
interior decorators. I guess we d bet-
ter go on up.

Reporter: Thank you Miss Carroll.

Bystander: Look the captain has given orders
for the gang plank to be removed.

Reporter: That's Robert Ruley, he was trans-
ferred from the Queen Elizabeth for
the trip.

Bystander: Here comes a taxi. Who is the wo-
man in it? She seems to want to
get aboard.

Reporter: They are putting the gang plank
back, and that s Carroll Galhon, the
writer of the best sellers for 1945-

1946-1947-1948-1949. She would be

late!

Bystander: Well, there they go. I'll bet they
have a good time.

Reporter: Yeah, and have I got a scoop!



C. H. S.



CLASS



Bv MACEL G 01 LET



We, the worthy and esteemed class of nine- Laurel Highley.

teen hundred and thirty seven, realizing the Maiy Dignam Her ability to argue, right or

futility of expecting the ineffectual class of wrong, to Kathleen O'Hearn.

nineteen hundred and thirty eight to uphold Stanley Donaldson His suntan to Merlin Mul-

the high moral worth and aesdemic distinctions cahy snd Keneth Hodson.

that we have established during our too shor+ Catalina Ecker and Elizabeth Haywood Then-
sojourn here in your midst, do hereby sadly sparkling eyes to Alice Hanson and Mary
bequeath the following':

To the faculty, our most heartfe



that they must henceforth be deprived of the
dash of spice that we have been in the scholas-
tic stew.

Individually we sorrowfully bequeath the suc-
ceeding assets:
Olive Aanstcos Her impersonations to Con

stance Coleman.
Marjorie Anderson Her oratory to Carol Byrd.
Maxine Blunden Her shy ways to Margaret

Geene.
Anita Boggs Her tap shoes to Marjor



Stumpf.
,-mpathies Je = nne Eggleston Her ability to have a good

picture taken to Norma Uhlig'.
Brandon Elkins His golfing ability to John

Beiude and Donald Detwiler.
Rayce'ia Fry Her graceful dancing' to Frank

Mover.
Anne Gallagher Her small size to Thelma

Miller.



Yost.
Vir-



Mildred Braswell Her flippant wa
ginia Marchman.

Johnny Bozeman His many trips to Fort Sher-
man to Frank Martin.

Jack Clay His quiet ways to Billy Forsstrom.^

Donald Brayton His friendliness to "Tex"
Jackson and Ralph Learn.

Jacqueline Briscoe Her giggle to Lucy Detrick.

Bettv Brooks Her class spirit to Anna Pat-



ch*



to Fred Hav
ibility to Ar



Robert Byrd His candid can
Helen Carrol! Her dramat

Kotal.k.
Jimmy Christian His long arms and legs to

Carlos Chase.
Vernon Clark His place as electrician to Billy

Egger.
Rowland Clemens His basketball ability to

Paul Cole.
David Coffey His "Tarzanic" build to Paul

Venable.
Joe Coffin His shoes to Billy Fuller and Billy

Hoverter because there is ample room for

both.
Jimmy Coman His sunglasses, comb, and

egotism to Billy Scarborough and Albert

Hendricks.
Harlan Crouch His appetite to Claude Lyon

and Billy Hunt.

Jeanne Crouch and Margaret Owens Their

dimples to Thelma Calloway and Erin De

Bardeleben.
Mr.rv Darley Her English sccent to Dotty

Laurie.
Louise Dt La Ossa Her wavy hair to Bettv

Ciay.
Billy Dickinson His bashfulnesa to Rodney

Brawell and Anibal Galindo.
Jsck Dignam His five years in C. H. S. to




WILL



and JAMES COMAN

N




Carroll Gallion Her ability to talk five min-
utes without taking a breath to Catherine
Paxton.

Marie Geohegan and Elsie Woodruff Their
sweet ways to Mary Ann Cain.

Herbert Gottesman His ability to do things
with the least amount of effort to Fred
Wertz and David Potts.

Goldwyn Grabhorn and Eleanore Stumpf
Their positions as "Trade Wind" typists to
Dorothy Brayton.

James Greene The color of his name to
George Black.

Peter Grimm His fairy tales to Anthony Ref-
cofski and Clyde Linton.

Bettv Hauss Her place on the "Hayfever Spe-
cial" to Ray Duey.



i Hewitt Her nice disposition to Louise

Zimmerman.
Gr^ce Hodges and Macel Goulet Their nose

for news to Dottv Hale and Ann Carpenter.
Eddie Hoffman His" harmonica to Asa Bullock.
Garrett Huff His optimistic outlook on life to

John Huson and John Muse.
Marvin Keenan His left fieid position to Vern

Terry.
Rita Laurie and Josephine Stumpf Their

blonde tresses to Grace Beldon.
Charlotte Levy Her piano to Rose Marie Wolf.
Ruth Lull Her sailor hat to Martha Moyer.
Dora and Lucille Lvew Their small size to

Flora Bath and Marie Christian.
Margaret Maclntyre Her green eyes to Isabel

Peterson.
Betty McCleary Her dignity to Ann Corrigan

and Anne Shirlev.
Ruth Moody and Winifred Koehler Their

typn< speed to Sarah William.
John McLain His trips to the jungle to Gale

Arnold and Milton Dunn.
Jean Nelson and Rita Kotalik Their easy way

of taking things to Ruth and Margaret

Wood.
Esther Neely Her little black book of 31

names and addresses to Theresa Goulett.
Kathleen Phillips Her smiiing expression to

Bea Cotton.
Netta Potts Her happy go lucky nature to

Virginia Tracv.
La Verne Rose His ability to keep the old

Dodge running to Teddy McGann and

Donald Parker.
Robert Ru'ey His steadiness to Francis Rich

and Howard Wh.tt.
I olanda Salas and Eleanore Taiman Theiv

office positions to Patsy Coffey and Ruth

Anderson.
David Savage His ability to get along with

Miss L-ter to Andrew La Pointe and Glad-
stone Cooney.
Louise Siebold Her ability to be seen and not

heard to Msrion Mclntyre.
Leslie Stevens Her braid to Mary Louise

Warren.
Stanford Stone His twin girlfriends to Eddie

McCarthy and Tohn Finlayson.
Montford Tawes His military training to Dick

Hocrn.
Jean Walsh Her artistic ability to Dorothy

McSpferren.
Charles Washabaugh His ability to tie him-
self in knots to Victor May.
William Wood His short chubbiness to "lanky"

Ed Egozcue.

Signed :
/. Emma Bushman,

So. M. I. Too



25




BEST ^f , J* *''lM/jfA '> M i ^ MAN AND

L AROUND A' "y^^J%'(|j ''^* *> A\\ WOMAN HATER

iLiiii

SS! HALL -OF -FAME Wffiwm

-/i. ^? r: ^IM "'-- /.. ? .. < "VifV ~ £$*$

§f7 V* JfY Best looking hoy James Christian S^-jf i/7A

^ /-** ^ 4^f Wittiest bey Charles W ashahai,/: f^j?
BEST LOOKING MOST POPULAR

COUPLE





BEST DRESSED

Best dressed boy James Cornan

Best dressed girl Betty McCleary

Best athletic boy Bill WooJ

Best athletic girl Mary Dignam

O Most industrious girl Carroll Gall ion

Most industrious boy Robert Byrd

h \ > Most bashful girl .... Goliwyn Grabhorn
m\ Most bashful bey .... William Dickinson

k

l Ii Best dancer boy James Christian

' ; j Best dancer girl Raycelia Fry




BEST ATHLETIC



BEST DANCERS



MOST
INDUSTRIOUS






STANDING

Left to Right: Kathleen Phillif
Wahh; Betty Hauss; C

KNEELING

Left to Right: Jacqueline Bris
Brooks; Marjorie Ander



s; Macel Goulet; Ro



Mary Darley; Carroll Galli.



old; Raycelia Fry; Betty



COMMENCEMENT



Dark suits, white dresses, proud students,
prouder parents, excited chatter, nervous glances
and strained smiles; the perfect setting for
Commencement. On June 11, the auditorium
was the scene of the realization of the dreams
of the class of '37.

The commencement exercises were planned
and carried out by the fifteen seniors who had
the highest scholastic ranking in the class. The
exercises opened with a selection by the high
school orchestra, followed by the invocation by-
Reverend W. Jackson, and the salutatory ad-
dress ny Mery Darley. Then there was another
musical selection and a debate by the highest
ranking seniors, excluding the valedictorian,
and the salutatonan ; a musical selection, and
the valedictory address by Marjorie Anderson.



After a violin selection of Franz Liszt, the pre-
sentation of awards was made, preceding the
presentation of the class and diplomas. The
given by Reverend Ralph C.



benediction was given by

Deibert, and the Seniors made their last sic

walk, as students, down the aisle.

There was a dance held in the gymnasium for
everyone who wished to attend, and from nine
to twelve the Seniors were hosts for a crowd of
about four hundred parents and students. Every
Senior seemed to have a definite pursuit to
dance the last dance with the girl with whom
he had danced first as a Freshman. The Com-
mencement dance, for sentimental reasons, al-
ways seems to be the most popular.

The Senior class came that night, danced and
left, no longer students, but alumni.


















a





STAND
Left to



(



Dark suits,
prouder parents
and strained si
Commencement
was trie scene i
of the class of

The commenc
and carried out
the highest sch'
exercises opene
school orchestr;
Reverend W. j
dress Dy Mary
musical selectic
ranking senior,
and the salutat
the valedictory



1934




nding: Mary Louise Warren, Margaret Greene,

leben, Ann Corrigan, Flora Ba.h, Marie Chri;

Wood. Margaret Wood, Anna Kotalik, and Lou
eling: Constance Colman, Marjorie Yost, Marie

Patchttt, Ellen Roe, Alice Stetler, Alice MacSv;

Handshaw.
ing: Grace Belden, Rose Marie Wolfe, Thelma

Hale, Alice Han?, Mary Stumpf, Patsy Coffey



ck, Bea Cotton, Dorothy



Junior Class



By K. O'HEARNE



The first meeting of the Junior Class was
held to elect the officers for the year. William
Scarborough was elected president. Nini Stevens
was elected vice-president, but as she was soon
to be transferred to the States, there was an-
other election at which Virginia Marchman was
chosen. We have as our Secretary, the verv
able and popular, Theresa Goulet, as Treasurer
Anne Shirley, and ss our sponsor, Mr. Franklin.

At the next meeting the Junior Carnival Com-
mittee was chosen. William Hunt was elected
chairman of the committee, with a group of
students aiding him. The booths which were
selected were: Dart throwing, the Dice game,
the Pin game and the Ring game. On the whole
the Junior Class came over very well in the
Carnival.

At a special meeting the class rings were
chosen and the ordering of these was left to
Willi-m Forstrom, who attended to this verv





Activities



The plans for the Junior-Senior banquet and
Junior prom were made at the next meeting.
The committees were chosen for arranging thr
entertainment and the date of the banquet. The
committee heads were: John Finlayson and Bea
Cotton, who, with the help of several students,
handled everything 1 splendidly, and the affair
was a big success.

At the meeting held on March 4. it was de-
eded that the Juniors would have another pic-
nic, and it was also stated that all money for
the class rings had to be in on or before March 8.

The class of '38 had a very eventful year,
and we all hope that the Juniors of next year
will enjoy their next to list year in school as
much as the "Class of '38".



Back


row.


standing


John


McGa


nn, Hani


bal


Calindo. Williiir


Egger, Vi<


tor May


Vem


Terry


, GaU Ar-


no'd.


Albei


t Collins


Willi


am Hi


iff, Laure:


High






Tex


Jackson, Vincent


Conr


d, Fr


ank Mar-


tin,


Kennet


h Hcason,


and


Asa Bi


illock.


Second


row.


standing:


F.ed


Haus


s, Pa a 1


Cole,


Claud


e Linton,


John


Muse,


Paul Ven-


able.


Gladstone Co-




Sam


D.-tvou.-,


Dona


!d Parker, Wil-


liam


Hunt


, Eugene


Ead<


!, Charles Chase,


Jack


Corhan


i, 3 nd Ed-


ward


McCa,


.hy.




Mtrlm Mulcahy, Lnar.
les Schaefer, Claude
Lvon, Eddie Egozque,
William Hoverter,
William Scarborough,
John Perude, Ralph
Learn, John Huson,
Dcnald Detwiller, Ri-
chard Horn.



1938



Sophomore




£*&



Sitting:

victor Dougherty, Bert Tagland, Billy Griffin
Thomas Ashton, Thomas Egger, John Casaroqj

Kneeling:

Dick Parker, Richard Wood, Charles Reeves,
Robert Koperski, Orrin Appin, William Sorum,

Standing:

James Smith, Howard Cox, Phillip Briscoe, Ho
Thomas Butler, Frank Peterson, George Booth
Woodrcw Torbit, Raymond Walker, Joe Snyder,

The Sophomore Class of 1936-37 at their first
meeting elected the following officers:

Alfred Stumpf President

Billy Ebdon Vice-President

Virginia Thornton Secretary

Beverly Moody Treasurer

Mrs. Spencer was appointed class sponsor,
Peggy Brown and Bayard Colyear were elected
as class representatives.

The second class meeting was held for the
purpose of discussing the carnival. Beverly Ar-
nold was chairman of the committee. Those who
helped decorate and take care of the booths



l, Roy
i, Alfr


Phillip
ed Sum


s. Buddy P

pf, R.iph. 1


Pretto,


Robert Downie,
Oscar Bejarano.


Dick


Barnett,
Donald


Richard F
on, Buddy


tzgerald
Bloxom.


Frank


Robles,


Jward
, Lou
, Mau


Melker,
s Fin!a
ice Bag


Arthur M
on, Willian
iman, Billy


3roie, Grover
, Wood, Billy
James.


Gravatt,
Ebdon,



were Betty Jo Hamilton, June Hart, Charlotte
McMahon, Jane Bevington, Junior Homelin,
Frsnk Robles, Rafael' Pretto and Tommy Ash-
ton. At thi same meeting the sophomore class
dance business was taken up. A committee was
formed with Louis Finlayson as chairman. Bev-
erly Moody, Charlotte McMahon, June Hart,
Betty Jo Hamilton, Charlotte Elkms, Jane Bev-
ington, Beverly Arnold, Feme Horine, Alfred
Stumpf ant Thomas Butler completed the com-
mittee.

During the first half of the athletic season
the sophomores were the winning teams. Soccei




Activities




Ire
Dai

Ma
Ste


le Laurie, Charlotte McMahon, Peggv Be
othy Belhea, Zona Boggs Helen Wikins
rtin. Jemsini?. Hclgerscn, M^riorie Tuttle
n, Charlotte Elkins, Blanche Muse.


ad,'
V


Carol
Cons
rginia


U


Carp
c e Ir


Mary


Betty
Edith
Ann


Cassidy, Je
Frederick-
McDonald,


an Green
Cynthia
Margare


O'ga Fenandez, Beverly Arnold. May Ella L
Ida Reynolds, Juanita Sadler, Margaret Plum


zv


n. Alma


Bram


in, Ja


net N


sbit


Sh


rley


Brayton


ng:

June Hart. Jane Bevi

Hewitt, Mary Plumm




Hua


Willi


on


Vivian Co


trell.


Bev<


rly


Moody, Hele-r



was introduced as one of the major sports r oi
girls and trie sophomore girls won the tourr.a
ment with high honors as they were undefeated
The members of the team were Zona Boggs
Fern Hcrine, June Hart, Charlotte McMahon
Edith Fredericks, Janet Newbit, Ida Reynolds
Jane Bevington, and Beverly Arnold. The boy
added to this victory by winning the football,
soccer and water polo tournaments. Joe Snyder
led his team to victory in football while Frank
Robles captained the soccer team to a success-
ful victory. Vincent Butler was captain of the



.-ater-polo



He and Bavard Colyear were
high point men. To celebrate this victory and
the others, the teams held three sport parties.
The first party was a Halloween party, the
second a dance, and the last was a grand splash
party at the Submarine Base.

This class has had the satisfaction of having
members in every organized club in high school.

With such an ambitious and energetic group
of sophomores, our year has been the most
successful and joyful, and we hope that out-
class will always carry on in this way.




ininMriiw



33




FROM LEFT TO RIGHT STANDING UP
lliam Tarburt, 2. John King, 3. Whitney Brayton, 4. Billy Mansfield, 5. Allen Lyew,
avage, 7. John Palmer, 8. Buddy Wallace, 9. Eddie Carroll, 10. Eddie Greene,
homas, 12. Robert Fernandez, 13. Billy Townsend, 14. Carl Marolhl, IS. Eddie G
rthur Farrell, 17. Mr. Beck.

KNEELING-LEFT TO RIGHT
ig, 3. Jack Lergenmiller, 4. George Herman. 5. Stanford Skinr,
Us, 8. Merwin French. 9. Eddie Marquand, 10. Spencer Smith,
lomas, 13. Robert Thomas, 14. John Tukowski.
SITTING-LEFT TO RIGHT
Mitto. 3. Robert Murray, 4. Henry Butcher. 5. Ardes Carles



6. William
1. Richard



1. Mon'.ford Stoke



Coffin, 7. Ja

12. Gerald Kelly.



C'H t



Fred Dickey, 9. Bill Gaines, 10. Wi



Palme



Carlo



Freshman Activities



By J. O'HEARNE

The Freshman class of 1937 was ushered in
as usual by the initiation on September 18. Ever,
though we lost, we lost in good spirit and al!
went well after that. On October 1, we held our
first meeting of the school year in Room 203.



These officers were as follows:
President: Whitney Bravton.
Vice Pres: John Frensly.
Secretary: Bobbie Styles.
Treasurer: Bobby Fernandez.
In sports this year the Freshr



;d oat



The purpose of the meeting', which was opened and made fairly good teams coming up to second
by Mr. Paul Beck, our class sponsor, was to place in baseball and progressed moderately in
elect our class officers for the cominrf term. other sports.




34




On March 5, the Freshman class held another In the Carnival this year the Freshman Class



meeting, the purpose of which was to plan foi
our class dance. This dance was held on April
10, 1937 in the Gymnasium, which was very
effectively decorated for the occasion. The
dance was a big success and well attended.

In May, following' the dance, the Freshman
class turned out for our first outing of the year.
This outing was neld at Shimmy Beach, and
was a big 1 success.



took quite a part, running' four amusement
booths. These four booths, brought in about a
total of $73 profit, which, for our first year, was
not too bad.

The class of '40 can boast of having' some
very studious members, as was revealed on
one six weeks report. Of the four students on
the "A" honor roll al! were Freshman.



Cat!.,

Tere<
Ethel

Jane



Freshmen Girls



Cutting, Jean Badgely,



Nitto. Mary Jane Philli
Stevens, Ro-e Margare
a Stumpf, Babbie Styles

Frances White, Marjon



Mary Hunt. Ja
is, Martha Peteri,.,..,
Stroop. Caroline Si



White, Dorothy Wclf



Butler. Georgiana Carnwright, Phalba Christian,
Olga Fernandez, Elfrida Flores, Jean Grabhorn,
! Kaufer, Georgiana Krause, Dolores La Point.
Alice Raymond, Jean Raymond, Nancy Shedd,
Helen Strosberg, Marjorie Strosberg,
npson, Marjorie Wegner, Gladys Wertz.











VISITATION- WEEK



bored papas.
more worried



Fond mamas .
teachers... much more worried students...
wrinkled Committee ribbons... Msrjorie rush-
ing around... ushers looking and feeling im-
portant. . Mrs. Jones wondering why her
Bobby didn't raise his hand like the other
pupils. . the ushers assigned to the front
table trying 1 to keep all the papers from blow-
ing away... parents wandering around the



ational Educa
member of th
competition. Th



:>n Week" by Grace Hodges

Speech Class selected through

members of the girl's gym



classes displayed their ability in
and the boy's gym classes staged a tumbling
act. Wednesday there was a "double-duty"
assembly both for Armistice Day and the
visitors. A representative from the Speech
C!ess spoke on the meaning of Armistice. A




school halls... anxious looks on pupils' faces
...Miss Worrell busy making posters for bul-
letin boards. . assemblies. .

Does any of that above bring back me-
mories of that hectic yet pleasant week? The
plans for the Visitation Day to be held as
has been the custom in C. H. S. for many
years that of having the event take place
in the afternoon ?nd evening of one day were
changed to cover National Education Week.
This week, beginning Monday November 9,
1936, was set aside by President Franklin D.
Roosevelt to be observed throughout the United
States as National Education Week to preserve
and foster further knowledge.

Each year Mr. Franks has chosen some out-
standing student for the honor of heading the
Visitation Committee. This year the chosen
one was Marjorie Anderson. Under her com-
petent guidance a program was worked out
for the week. On Monday's assembly there
was a five minute talk on "The Purpose of



pageant on Education was put on by the
Junior High School under the direction of
Mrs. Bozeman. And then Mr. Sullivan led
the audience in the mass-singing of the old
wartime favorites. Thursday morning the Girls'
Glee Club under Miss Elner presented a
very clever and colorful operetta "'Marjorie
Goes Modern."

Friday's assembly was the fitting climax
to the week. First Marjorie Anderson spoke
on what the Visitation Committee tried to do
during the week, and then Mr. Williams, the
Superintendent cf Schools, gave a short ad-
dress. Mr. Leignadier, the Mayor of Colon,
gave a delightful speech in Spanish, and one
in English. After the speakers, the Dramatic
Cub gave a one-act comedy called "Poor
Aubrey".

Following this week of excitement it was
difficult for most students to settle back in
the daily round the common task but this
was soon accomplished.
























Kathleen Phil-
strom and Bea
rd Colyear and
en by Arthur

Representatives
,J i;f e s t ort s,
ways be count-
e capable of.
lent Body who
were the reci-
tivity schedule.
1 year. Septem-
any enjoyable
banquets, sev-
, operettas, the
r week, and a
1 school picnic,
es. Association
Wind, and the

last meeting'
ourned after a
objems.



VI



Fond mamas
teachers . im
wrinkled Comm
ing around ...
pcrtant. . Mrs
Bobby didn't r
pupils. . trie
table trying to
mg away ... p



school halls .
. .Miss Worrel
letin boards. .

Does any of
mories of that 1
plans for the
has been the c
years that of
in the afternoon
changed to cov
This week, beg
1936, was set a
Roosevelt to be
States as Nation
and foster furth

Each year Mr
standing student
Visitation Comr
one was Marj'oi
petent guidance
for the week.
was a five min




Student Association Activities



tames L,oman



The Student Council officers were elected on
October 16, 1936, beginning one of the most
successful years in it's history. A heated rivalry
among- the eligible students resulted in the
inauguration of James Coman, as president,
Wm. Scarborough, vice president, Luis Finlay-
son, secretary, and John Finlayson, treasurer.
This is the first time in the history of C. H. S.'s
Student Association that all the officers have
been masculine.

The Inauguration Ceremonies were held on
the 23rd of October, the week following the
ejection. Ac a general assembly, in the audito-
rium, the student leaders, for the year were
Installed with Reverend Cecil L. Morgan offi-
ciating. The new members of the Student Coun-
cil were introduced for the first time as lead-
ers of the Student Body. The faculty members
are: Mr. Vinton, Director of Activities; Mr.
Sieler, Director of Athletics; and Miss Moore,
Student Spansor. The student officers need no
introduction.

The class representatives, who are equally
well known, consist of hard working, conscienti-
ous students. The Senior class is ably repre-



sented by Roland Clemens and Kathleen Phil-
lips, the Junior by William Forrstrom and Bca
Cotton, the Sophomores by Bayard Colyear and
Peggy Brown, and the Freshmen by Arthur
Farrell and Elfrida Flores.

This able body of Student Representatives
is active in every field of school life shorts,
dramatics, scholastics and can always be count-
ed on to do the best that they are capable of.

The large number of the Student Body who
joined the Association this year were the reci-
pients of a thoroughly enjoyed activity schedule.
This schedule of the fiscal school year. Septem-
ber 18, to June 11, included many enjoyable
dances, athletic and varsity club banquets, sev-
eral one act and three act plays, operettas, the
carnival Thespian parties. Senior week, and a
new innovation to C. H. S., an all school picnic.
In addition to all these activities. Association
members also received the Trade Wind, and the
Caribbean.

The Student Council held its last meeting'
of the year on May 31, and adjourned after a
brief discussion of the year's problems.



3?





PHOTO CLUB



'Not to produce quantity but quality," was the
aim of the photo club in its third year. The
officers elected to lead the aspiring' young
group of photographers for the year 36-37 were
carefully chosen president, Rolsnd Clemens,
vice-president, Edward McCarthy, secretary,
Marjone Anderson, treasurer, Mary Darley.

Mr. Kenneth W. Vinton was selected to suc-
ceed Mr. Paul E. Miller acting in the capacity
of advisor.

Revolutionary changes have been brough
about in the club with the addition of a "tro-
pic developer", which does away with the eld
method cf cooling and Panchromatic, a very sen-
s:t:ve film has replaced the old venchrome type.
This together with the fact that the solutions
used are now standardized make it possible to
take pictures in the morning and have them
finished ;.nd returned in the afternoon.

The members have been active in printing
and developing pictures for publication in the
"Trade Wind" as well as well as many of the
snapshots that appear in the "Caribbean".

Despite the fact that the club is a nev.
comer, great strides in progress are being made
and it is attracting the interest of more stu-
dents each year.











La Pas

By J. WALSH



At the beginning of the school year, Mrs.
Spencer reorganized the Spanish club "La
Pas." The only things that the "La Pas" club,
this year had in common with the "La Pas"
club last year, are the name, sponsor and
high scholarship requirements.

In place of the usual president, vice-pres-
ident, et cetera, a host and hostess chosen
by Mrs. Spencer presided at each meeting,
assisted by an assistant host and hostess,
chosen by the host and hostess. For each
meeting there were different hosts picked
from the highest students in Mrs. Spencer's
Spanish classes who were members of the
club.

The requirements of the club were also
changed. Heretofore, it has been the custom
for Spanish pupils to be invited to the club
after receiving two successive six weeks'
average of ninety or above. Some students
reasoned that once they were in the club they
could slacken up on the work. But they soon
let go of that idea when the system was
changed that in order to be admitted into
each of the meetings, the student must get a
written invitation beforehand; and this invita-
tion was not issued unless the pupil's average
is ninety or above.



On December 14th, the first meeting which
was held at the Carlton Hotel, was presided
over by host Claud Lyons and hostess Mar-
jorie Anderson. The guests of honor were Al-
calde Fernandez-Parnlla and Mr. Franks. Both
of these men gave interesting talks in Spanish.

The second meeting had as host and hos-
tess Bill Hoverter and Jean Walsh. For this
occasion Governor Humberto Leignadier, his
wife and little son, and Mr. and Mrs. Franks
were the guests of honor.

Louise Seibold and James Coman were in
charge of the third formal meeting, which
took place in the High School auditorium. It
was perhaps the most interesting program,
because the Colon Bomberos played many se-
lections and Mrs. Sally MacLaughlin sang
some Spanish songs. The guests this time
were Commandant and Mrs. Ducret, Mr. Es-
ser. and the Cristobal High School Band.

For the fourth and last formal meeting on
April 26, Helen Carroll and Bill Forssrrom
were in charge. Mrs. Spencer gave a fascinat-
ing illustrated talk on her travels through
South America, especially Peru and Chile.




i# it



KARNIVAL



Biggest and best ever was the carnival of
1937. Never before were there such crowds
having so much fun.

Under the capable direction of Miss Moore
the total intake from the booths was $1198,
of which about $700 was profit. Hearty rivalry
was carried on between the classes as they
vied with each other for first place. This
coveted position was taken by the Senior
Class which sponsored among 1 other booths
the bingo tables.

For the first time the Science Exhibit was
divided into two sections. The mechanical
and chemical division was sponsored by Mr.
Vinton. The Biology exhibit was sponsored by
Mr. Stickler. Both of these booths drew large
crowds.

The gym, a scene of most condensed hilar-
ity, was attractively divided into booths. Two
of these were operated by the Junior High
School who received valuable training for fu-
ture years.

Among the best if not the most attractive
of all were the food booths. Hot dogs, cakes,
candy, and cookies, were sold by Miss Pope's
Household Arts Classes. Ice cream and pop
were supplied to thirsty customers by Mr.
Batalden and the "Wood work boys."

From behind rows of palms floated melo-
dious strains from Ray Cox and his orchestra
playing for the Trade Wind dance. This feature



_ ___ ^i * *







T
A
G
E



K APERS



proved one of the most pop lar of the even-
nig. Toward the latter part of the evening
the dance floor was graced by the presence of
Queen Gladys I of the Lion's Club and her
court.

Following the custom of previous years a
contest was held to determine who would be
Queen of the Carnival and ride the C. H. S.
float in the Colon Carnival. This contest was
won by the popular freshman, Alva Fernandez.

The stage show, always one of the biggest
attractions, was superb. There were dances by
Betty McCleary, Victor May, Olive Aanstoos,
the Boggs sisters, Emilie Horine, Theresa
Goulet, the Plummet twins: and C. H. S.
Songbirds, Hua Willison, Caroline Stroop, and
Marie Christian, did their bits to add to the
general enjoyment of the audience. A quartet
of cowboys singing Western songs was very
popular. C. H. S. outdid itself in making
a short skit, "The Worm Turns" written by
Mr. Sullivan with James Coman in the title
role supported by Olive Aanstoos and Billy
Forsstrom. Jack Dignam made a charming
Master of Ceremonies supported by bis
"stooge", Helen Carroll.

The program was ended by a beautiful
ballet arranged by Miss Jacques lead by Ray-
celia Fry with a chorus of cellophane-wrapped
teauties.

Three performances were presented.





H

W





LEFT TO RIGHT:

Standing Olive Aanstoos; Jacqueline Briscoe; En

Kneeling Esther Neely; Betty Brooks.



Jean Starke; Rita Kotalik.



Girls' Varsity Club



The girls' Varsity Club is composed of girls
who have earned the highest awards in athle-
tics. Usually they have been members of teams
participating in each sport offered on the
school program.

The Club sponsored by the girls' athletic
director, meets monthly in the Student Coun-
cil room in the High School. The members
of the club discuss problems occuring in girls'
sports, also methods of rating and general
policies to be adopted during tournaments.

This year the club has twelve members.
They are girls who earned pins last year or
letters in sports while under class men. Next
year's membership will be augmented by the
new girls who earn awards this year. Present
officers of the club are:

Esther Neely President.

Mary Dignam Vice President.

The insignia of the club is a
cap decorated with the letter "C"
edged with purple. The awards, this year are
white wool pullover sweaters with an old
English "C" in gold, edged with purple. These



^hite felt
in yellow



are awarded to the ten girls having earned
the highest number of points in Athletics
during this school year. The next ten on the
list receive their class numerals.

Occasionally, the Varsity Club has a social
evening. In January a swimming party fol-
lowed by a beach supper was held at the
swimming pool at the Submarine Base. In
April a progressive dinner party was given.
Beginning with the first course at the home
of Emma Jean Starke, in Old Cristobal, con-
tinuing with the main course at Betty Brook's
home in New Cristobal and terminating with
the dessert course followed by games and
other entertainment at the Goulet home on
Colon Beach.

The members of the club being mostly Se-
niors attended the first Athletic Banquet. This
was tendered by the Student Association to
the winning teams in boys and girls sports
for the months of October, November and
December. Another banquet was held in May
for winning teams in the second term sports.




Varsity Club

All sporting activities in Cristobal High
School and Junior High are organized and
sponsored by the Varsity Club. The members
are also obliged to work out all the rules gov-
erning sports, pass on all individuals who wish
to participate in athletics, and establish the
point system for membership in the organiza-
tion. The club is active socially in that it spon-
sors athletic banquet throughout the year.

At the first meeting held the following offi-
cers were nominated and elected:

President J ac k Clay

Vice President John Finlayson

Secretary James Christian

Treasurer William G. Wood

Mr. Seder was appointed to act as advisoi
and sponsor.

The social season began with a banquet held
at the Hotel Carlton for the boys, victors in
football and soccer, and the girls, victors in
soccer and volley ball. The final event of the
vear was the varsity initiation for new mem-
bers and the banquet in their honor.

Thus, with a successful and memorable year
concluded another chapter has been completed
in the history of the Cristobal High School
Varsity Club.







' .*w-* '-*.



.



T/?e Girls' Glee Club

The Glee Clubs of C. H. S. Have always
been the finest organizations of our school. Thev
have each year presented musical programs that
added high spots to the school's activities.

Each girl serving" in the Club receives a
half credit, known as the activity credit, for a
year's work. This organization is composed
mostly of Freshmen and Sophomore girls.

This year, following tradition, the club has
contributed freely toward the entertainment
of the student body. Their first presentation
was a short operetta, "Margie Goes Modern,"
given as a regular assembly program for the
school during Visitation Week. This program
told the story of a girl who won a fortune
by trying modern art.

On December twenty-second the Girls' Glee
Club combined with the Boys' Glee Club and
the Dramatic Club in presenting "The Nativ-
ity. This lovely Christmas pageant was thor-
oughly enjoyed by students and guests.

On the twelfth of March "The Fays of the
Floating Island", a cantata by Paul Bliss was
presented to the complete enjoyment cf the
audience. Also a few members of the club
cooperated with the Boys' Glee Club in pre-
senting "H. M. S. Pinafore".

The combined clubs took part in the joint
festival in Balboa on April ninth. This excep-
tional group also contributed to the success of
Baccalaureate Service and the Commencement
program.

Charlotte Levy, the school pianist, deserves
special commendation because of her faith-
fulness and cooreration with the Glee Clubs
for the last four years.




The Boys' Glee Club



Like the Girls' Glee Club, this organization
is made up of mostly Freshmen and Sopho-
mores, each receiving a half credit for a year s
work.

This excellent group has presented most of
its program with the Girls' Glee Club this
year. Their first contribution was the Christ-
mas program at which time they took part



The N;



as shepherds and Magi



On the twelfth of March, assisted by
members of the Girls' Glee Club, they pre-
sented "H. M. S. Pinafore," an operetta by Gil-
bert and Sullivan. Also accompanied by the
girls they presented an annual Woman's Club
program on the seventeenth of March.

The entire Glee Club participated in a joint
music festival held in Balboa on April ninth.

Also this organization will take part in the
Baccalaureate service and Commencement pro-
gram.

Each member deserves much credit for the
fine work they are doing and the pleasure
they have afforded the student body and the
community.




Band



One of the most useful activities in C. H.
S. is our band which is under the capable
direction of Mr. Sullivan. The band is larger
and better this year than ever before. Also
this year marks the most activities in which
this organization has participated. It has play-
ed at all dramatic club programs and has
been affiliated with the Glee Clubs in their
programs.

The Band was entertained by the La Pas
club at one of its meetings where they heard
the Bombero's Band play.

The Band took an active part in the Music
Festival on April ninth and the annual Car-
nival. They also played several numbers at
the Baccalaureate Service and the Commence-
ment program.

The Junior High Band is organized in order
that its members may be able to step into
the vacant places in the C. H. S. group left
there by the graduation of some and the
departure of others.




Dramatic Club

M. MACINTYRE



This year the Dramatic Club was sponsored
by new faculty members. Miss Mary Worrell
and Mr. Paul Beck. Mrs. Spencer,' long the
director of dramatics in Cristobal High, re-
signed in order to spend more time with her
Spanish Club. The vacancy was adequately
filled by Miss Worrell, Grade School super-
visor of Art, and Art instructor for Cristobal
Junior and Senior High: and her assistant,
Mr. Beck, History instructor. The officers of the
year were Kathleen Phillips, president, Esther
Neely, vice-president, Theresa Goulet, secre-



act plays, "Bargains", and
directed bv Miss Worrell,



sented three on
'"Red Carnations
and Mr. Beck.

On February 16, the dramatic club present-
ed two more one-act plays and the lonesome
cowboys with Dixie Lee gave us some music
and dancing, straight from their native west.
1 he piavs were ""A Marriage Proposal" direct-
ed by Miss Worrell, and "A Dispatch Goes
Home" directed by Mr. Beck.

The final culmination of the year's work in
dramatics was the three-act play given on



tarv. and Bill Scarborough, treasurer. Much April 30. Only the cream of the



credit is due to Miss Worrell and Mr. Beck
for making 1 actors of many of our students,
and for making successes of all our plays.

The Dramatic Club and Thespians have
cooperated to present many successful plays.



Their first public performs

year was on Friday afternoon of Visitation
Week. The play, "Poor Aubrey", was enjoyed
so much by all, that another program was
given by request on the evening of November
24. The next day the success was repeated
at the Little Theatre at Balboa.

On December 10, the dramatic group pre-



actresses were selected for this play, an ex-
ceedingly clever comedy called The Patsy."
The leading part of Patricia Harrington was
taken by Constance Coleman, her sister Grace
by Betty McCleary, her mother, Mrs. William
Harrington by Olive Aanstoos, her father Bill
of the school Harrington by Anthony Refcofski, Billy Cald-



well, Grace's fiance, by Montford Tawes,
Tony Anderson, the boy Pat loves, by Jimmy
Ccman, Sadie Buchanan, a friend, by Marion
Maclntyre, Francis Patrick O'Flaherty, one of
Pat's friends, by George Booth and "Trip"
Busty, driver, manager, and owner of a taxi
by Charlie Washabaugh.



However, the dramatic club did more than
act in plays. When the cast of "He", a play
presented over here by the Balboa High dra-
matic club, came over they had a luncheon
party for them in the cafeteria. On March
30, they held a public meeting, attended by
their parents, at which their sponsors pre-
sented a program consisting' of three readings
from "John Brown's Body" by S. V. Benet
and a skit by Miss Worrell, and a talk on
the development of the drama by Mr. Beck.
At Christmas time and at a spring program
on March 12, the dramatic club, under the
direction of Mr. Beck, helped Miss Elner
with the acting and makeup and lighting for
Her programs,



The dramatic club wishes to thank Mr.
Sullivan and the orchestra for the music they
provided between plays, and acts; Miss Pope
and her household arts classes for making
possible their parties and for assistance in
costuming, Mr. Batalden and his "shop" boys
for constructing the stage props, and Miss
L.ter and the Trade Wind Staff for publicity.

At the beginning of the year 73 students
signed up for dramatic work. Eight of these
were initiated into the National Thespians
on May 7. They were Jacqueline Briscoe,
Constance Coleman, Jeanne Eggleston, Billy
Forsstrom. Theresa Goulet, Marion Macintyre,
Kathleen Phillips, and Montford Tawes.




Thespi



This year the National Thespians, a Drama-
tic Honorary fraternity, was sponsored by Miss
Mary Worrell and Mr. Paul Beck.

At a meeting held early in the year Macel
Goulet and Betty McCleary were initiated into
the society, making a total of twelve members.

During the year Dramatic Club members
strived to make the necessary requirements for



tans



entrance. By the middle of February eight stu-
dents were eligible for the fraternity.

Ruth Moody acted as President and Catalina
Ecker acted as Secretary-Treasurer.

This year the Thespians worked with the
Dramatic Club members so all social func-
tions were held with the Dramatic Club.



- SKULE-DAZE



By C. GALLION



Sefitembe,

18. Students. . noise. . harried teachers. ..
greetings... a new kind of schedule... new
and younger faces. . new teachers. . shake
well finished product: First day of school. In
the afternoon the traditional Frosh-Soph Rush
with Senior boys near to bursting with their
importance as overseers (Picture)... In the
evening the dance to make the Freshmen feel
at home in High School.

21. We heard the Trade Wind may be a
printed paper this year.

29. The library opened today... librarians
are being busy cataloging three hundred new
books .

30. Girls' Gym started today.

October

7. Mr. Beck, new history teacher arrived
today.

3. Trade Wind Staff announced today by
Carroll Gallion, Editor-in-chief . Short assem-
bly in morning... Mr. Seller announced foot-
ball first sport of year. . Miss Rechter said
girls' sports start off with soccer. . Mr. Miller
announced swimming class for credit for both
girls and boys. . In afternoon classes met to
elect officers for coming year. .

7. Tryouts today for Glee Club production
"Margie Goes Modern" Results kept secret.

14. Junior Steam Rollers flatten Senior



Crimson Tide

holds first m-

15._p ep

held in auditi



i football,
ing.

gram for
im Open



Trade Wind Staff



of our system. . Robei

head Business Staff of Publicati

16. Election held for Stud
officers results counted after
torium Jimmy Coman elected

19. Marjorie Anderson ann<
Visitation Week committee for

20. Mr. Miller's swimming
today with a big turn out.



Student Association
forum for discussion
Bvrd announced to



snt Association
school in audi-
President,
mnced to head

this year.

classes started



22. National Thespians Miss Worrell and
Mr. Beck sponsors.

23. During eighth period the officers of the
Student Association were installed Reverend
Morgan administered the oath and gave ad-
dress... Girl's Varsity held first meeting of
year Esther Neely elected President.

30. Today the electors of the Democratic
party of C. H. S. went to Balboa Playshed to
attend the dramatization of the inauguration of
the President of United States.

31. Soph girls' soccer team entertained the
Soph boys' football team with a Hallowe'en
party.
November

9. The first six weeks period ended report
cards given out. . First day of Visitation Week
. .Pyramid team and members of Speech Class
featured on assembly program.

10. More parents in the classes ushers try-
ing to find the right classes to send fond parents
into. . Miss Patterson's typing class showed in
auditorium how they typed to music.

11. Armistice Day program featuring group
singing and speeches.

12. With no apologies to Modern Art, Glee
Club presents operetta, "Margie Goes Modern.

13. Friday in spite of superstitions. . Visi-
tation Week came to an end successfully...
Program eighth period Dramatic Club presents
"Poor Aubrey" Address in Spanish by Mr.
Leignadier, the Mayer of Colon.

14. C. H. S. football team defeated friendly
rival B. H. S. at Kokonut Park.

19. Soph boys win football championship on
handicap.

20. Senior dznee soft music hot music
soft lights fun for all .

23. Girls' Varsity meets choose for em-
blem, white felt skull caps with Old English C
in purple and gold. .

24. Dramatic Club meets... Soph girls win
soccer championship.




25. C. H. S. welcomes new addition to fa-
culty circle Mr. Stickler, father of Ann Joy-
leen. .

27. Mary Darley and Marjorie Anderson at-
tempt an interview with Lloyd George get an
interesting' report from his secretary...

28. Soph athletes girls and boys celebrate
championship at Coco Solo with swimming
party.

December

10. Student Council met Bob Erikson, Pre-
sident of Balboa Association, guest Household
Arts Classes served refreshments... In even-
ing' Dramatic Club presented triple killing'. .

12. Senior boys entertain for Senior girls'
soccer team, but girls didn't know it Junior
girls made up party

14. La Pas met Carlton Hotel first meet-
ing of year. .

18. Banquet for winning athletes in soccer,
girls and boys volleyball, girls football, boys.

22. Glee Clubs and Dramatic Club Nativity
presented.

23. Student Association dance .... Merry
Christmas to all

January

4. Happy New Year!... Everybody's back
after vacation. .

5. Soph boys swim off with waterpolo cham-
pionship. .

8. C. H. S. played and won first game of
Twilight League... Class meetings Carnival
plans well under way. .

15. Advanced Home Ec. give luncheon...
Balboa Little Theatre, "He" in C. H. S. Audi-
torium C. H. S. Dramatic Club gave Balboa
players a luncheon in cafeteria.

16. Junior Class held picnic at Shimmy
Beach eats drinks sand sunburn .

22. Advanced Home Ec. give second of se-
ries of lunches.

25. La Pas meets at Carlton... groans
moans headaches exams start.

February

5. Hot dogs! Ice-cream! Three shots for a
nickle Ten cents a dance... A bevy of cello-
phane wrapped beauties Carnival!!

12. Worry, Worry ! Caribbean work starts.
Mr. Miller begins dancing classes.

13. B. H. S. beats C. H. S. in Baseball.

14. Alumni of today and tomorrow get to-
gether at Shimmy Beach for a St. Valentine's
day picnic.

16 Dramatic club plays...

17. Glee clubs entertain Woman's Club. .

19. Music and dancing with the Sophomores
as hosts .

20. Golf tournament opens. .

27. Mr. Stickler organizes Biology club. .
Field trip to Bat Cave.



March

3. Sample announcements for Seniors arrive
...Carnival returns come in... Hall of Fame
started.

5. Class meetings Skipper's Club frustrated.

12. Junior High School gives music pro-
gram. . The Fays of Floating Island presented
by Girls' Glee Club. . H. M. S. Pinafore, pre-
sented by Boys' Glee Club.

15. La Pas holds a meeting. . Mr. Franks
leaves for States... Mr. Esser assumes prin-
cipal-ship.

17. Woman's Club programme Bobby Jac-
ques announces her engagement to Lieutenant
Gabel.

18. Charlotte Levy broadcasts over H P 5 K
and HP50 "The Voice of the Victor."

21. Water Carnival at Gatun.

20-28. Easter vacation The last "breather"
before June.

30. Dramatic club meets.

Afril

1. Cyclone hits Canal Zone C. H. S. wiped
out (what do you think).

9. Music Festival in Balboa playshed.

10. Freshman entertain for first time very
successful dance.

14. Pan American Student Forum meets.

26. Spanish club holds meeting.

30. Senior Play presented in auditorium
"The Patsy".

May

1. May day program games and fun. .
5. Varsity Club initiates new members.
8. Eight new Thespians receive initiation. ..
14. Juniors Seniors speeches music

dancing fun Junior-Senior Banquet.
28. Recognition day assembly... Written

awards sweaters and letters given to those who
so deserve .

June

6. Baccalaureate service held in C. H. S.
auditorium. .

7. Senior exams groans worried looks

satisfied expressions?

8. More exams class night will history
prophecy and "antics"

9. And still exams In evening seniors have
hayride and swimming party.

10. Afternoon seniors rehearse for com-
mencement night seniors boat ride.

11. At last it's here Reports being given
out Caribbean being autographed An assem-
bly to bid farewell to those leaving

Night commencement music by band and
glee clubs awards medals books and pins
Debate by Seniors speeches then diplomas...
and the alumni file out. Dance in gym.

13. And so teachers and students leave for
the States and to C. H. S. we bid a fond
adieu.




Biology Club



Among the many interesting' activities of-
fered this year in Cristobal High School, was
the Biology Club, which was organized by Mr.
Stickler, the science and biology instructor of
Cristobal.

The club was organized to give the stu-
dents a better knowledge of plant life, animal
life, and the earth itself, from actual experi-
ence. The club was open to all biology stu-
dents, both boys and girls, who were inter-
ested and who made the required standard
grade of C

On Saturday, February 27, the club hiked
to "Bat Caves", a trip that was enjoyed by
the whole group.

On April 3, the Club journeyed over to
Panama City from where they went out to the
Old Panama Zoo. Here they were conducted
through the Zoo by Dr. March, who willingly
answered all questions asked.

A hike to "Pot Holes", on the head waters
of the Coco Solo river, furnished the third
outing of the club. Many students participated
in this to make it another successful outing.
During May the club held its fourth meeting,
which was in the form of a social affair.

We wish to congratulate Mr. Stickler for
introducing this new activity and hope that it
will be continued again next year.





TRADE WIND




'Only a newspaper! Quick read, quick lost.
Who sums the treasure that it carries hence?
Torn, trampled under feet, who counts thy cost.
Star-eyed intelligence?

The Journalist.

Twelve times during- the school year, the staff
of this paper has given the students of C. H. S.
a Trade Wind. Twelve times this group has
mopped a collective brow, heaved a collective
sigh, and given a collective once-over to the
final result, murmuring with a sort of apologetic
pride, "a poor sheet, perhaps, but our own."

Few of those outside of the high school
"fourth estate" realized the amount of time and
work which the members of the staff give to
publications. More than four hundred hours
vanished from the lives of the Editor-in-Chief,
Carroll Gallion, of the senior Assistant-Editor,
Mary Darley, and of the Business Manager, Ro-




£n



bert ByrJ, Marion Maclntyre, the junior-Assist-
ant Editor spent some at work and gone without
lunch, at times, that the paper might not be late.
Joe Coffin walked many miles with Robert Byrd
soliciting advertising from the merchants on
both sides of the Isthmus and lost from his life,
forever, several hundred hours. Billy Fuller,
serving as apprenticeship on the business end
of the paper and writing articles, occasionally,
learned that it takes more perspiration than any-
thing else to put out a school paper. Two faith-
ful typists, Goldwyn Grabhorn and Eleanore
Stumpf, typed the journalistic efforts of the staff
cheerfully and most efficiently, and without their
help the rest of the staff would not have been
able to do their work.

All of the other members of the Trade Wind
staff worked hard and cheerfully wrote and
rewrote that the paper might have their best ef-
forts.












1 change in the
the first of the
e\v innovation in
n popularity and
bail as the most






diron experience
arising how well
msive and defen-
is were. Football
season, drawing'
All teams were
evenly matched
lght breathtaking




to the midst of
nselves drenched
ely defeated the
ie championship
season, and cap-
:pt through their
ks by their tra-
i, and by the Se-

the Seniors how-
;nce created by
ie previous year,
mating' only the
d a g-ood iob as
arry the load of
operation,

cellent football,
were runners-np
p; Highley, theii
ence of mind in
called.

by inexperience,
t position when
vay, but showed
nd a willingness
eal for his team,
n the losing' end,
reling' prevailing

Schools clashed
game on Novem-
C. H. S. by the
was turned in by
ley, and Wood,
fing starred time



Only a newspa
Who sums the
Torn, trampled
Star-eyed intell



Twelve times
of this paper ha
a Trade Wind,
mopped a colle
sigh, and giver
final result, mu)
pride, a poor s

Few of those
"fourth estate"
work which the
publications. M
vanished from
Carroll Gallion,
Mary Darley, ar

r




~



52




n



Football



By J. COMAN



Because of a
atkletic schedul
many sports thi



luch des
football <
fear. Thi
C. H. S. is rapidly gainin
ranks with baseball and ba;
popular sports.

,-ear of



ired change in the
I'as the first of the
> new innovation in
i in popularity and
ketbail as the most



diron experience
prising how well



With only one
under their belt;
planned and well versed in offensive and defen-
sive tactics the different teams were. Football
had an interesting and exciting season, drawing'
large crowds to every game. All teams were
championship caliber, and so evenly matched
that every game was a hard fought breathtaking
contest of skill and brawn.

The Sophomores stepped into the midst of
ihe football reign, and got themselves drenched
in limelisht when thev decisively defeated the
Junior "Steamrollers" in the championship



game. The
tained b\



good season, anc



Sophs had
Joe Snyder swept through thei
schedule with but two setbacks by their tra-
ditional enemies the Freshmen, and by the Se-
nior "Crimson Tide".

The same cannot be said of the Seniors how-
ever, who through overconf idence created by
their sensational playing of the previous year,
ended up in third place, defeating only the
Freshmen. Eddie Hoffman did a ^ood iob as
captain but was unable to carry the load of
eleven men. Football needs cooperation.



ing



football.



v inexperience,

position when

ay, but snowed



The Juniors, ph
throughout the whole season, were runners-up
for the inter-class championship; Highley, then
captain, showing a good presence of mind in
the varied assortment of plays called.

The Frosh, handicapped
found themselves in the 1
the football smoke cleared
a surprising amount of pep and a willingness
to learn. Farrell did a good deal for his team,
bolstering their spirits when on the losing end,
and keeping a cheerful feeling prevailing
throughout.

Cristobal and Balboa High Schools clashed
in a bitterly contested all-star game on Novem-
ber 14, resulting in a win by C. H. S. by the
score of 13 0. An excellent game was turned in by
Scarborough, Christian, Highley, and Wood,
who through heads-up ball playing starred time
and again.



*





.




Still bubbling with enthusiasm over football
and the keen competition that they had encoun-
tered, all of C. H. S. sport enthusiasts reported
on December 9, for the first soccer practice of
the year. Doing very little other than electing
captains, and assigning regular berths on the
team, they departed, only to return a week later
to see the Sophs defeat the freshmen.

The seniors, greatly handicapped by the loss
of Billy Wood, fought like veritable demons to
stem the tide of misfortune that had followed
them all year. But bad breaks plus bad weather
kept them in an inescapable rut from which
they could only eke out third place. "Herbie"
Gottesman, captain showed time and again the
qualities for which a captain is chosen cour-
age, skill, and common sense. What success the
seniors had is due to him.

"Davy" Potts led his junior "Steamrollers"
to another second place in the sport limelight,
losing out only at the last minute to the fight-
ing Sophs. The juniors had a great team, but
they, too, received a good deal more than their
share of bad luck.

The Sophs, whom everyone believed to be
but a flash in the pan, surprised everybody, in-
cluding themselves, when they not only defeated
the juniors but eked out enough wins over the
seniors and the freshmen to capture the title of
"Champs". Congratulation, Captain.

The Frosh, once again the victims of inex-
perience, found themselves in the cellar posi-
tion. Through no fault of their own, however,
for their captain led them through a schedule
of hard fought games, and they were in there
every minute fighting like their namesake, "The
Fighting Irish."



W '%



<4




^J?,







54



Baseball



When the call came for baseball on January
4, the largest crowd of young hopefuls reported
that C. H. S. has ever witnessed. Such spirit
promised an interesting season, and the spec-
tators were by no means, disappointed.

The Seniors once again suffered ignominous
defeats by their opponents, and captained by
Jimmy Coman, once more found themselves in
third place when the season ended. There vvasn t
a very good showing' of class spif't on the part
of the Seniors for they played most of their
games with only seven men present an insuf-
ficient number to play against such strong teams
as there were in the league. This was evidenced
when the Seniors won only three of their
scheduled six a percentage of 500.

The Juniors at last lived up to their promise
and took the baseball championship by a large
margin. Eddie McCarthy played his men well
and gave everyone who turned out a chance at
the opposition, (the Juniors, unlike the
Seniors, had enough men for two teams). The
"Steamrollers" had little or no opposition and
swept through their schedule without a defeat.

The Sophomores continued the fine work
that they started at the beginning of the year
and fought their way into second place. With
George Booth leading them, they played a fine
brand of baseball winning four out of six to
obtain a percentage of 666.

The Freshmen through no fault of their own,
or lack of spirit, lost all but two of their games,
to give them a percentage of 333. Whitney
Brayton led his "Fighting Irish" well, and if
the Sophomores of next year have as capable
a leader thev will definitely threaten the base-
ball moguls of C. H. S.





Water Polo



Splash! Kerplop! Water Polo was on, and
December 27 saw the first two games of the
season the Frosh vs the Sophomores and the
Juniors vs the Seniors. The Sophs and Se-
niors climbed from the pool, puffing and
blowing' but victorious.

Water Polo had an extremely successful
season, and excitement was at fever pitch,
resulting in good natured razzing and duck-
ing. Mr. Miller officiated at all games and
did an excellent job.

The Seniors emerged from their third place
rut and although favored to win lost out by
a narrow margin to the Sophomores in the
championship game. Gottesman was high scor-
er for the Seniors, and proved himself worthy
of the title "Captain", his team losing only
one game, but that a costly one.

The Juniors found themselves in an un-
familiar position in the team rankings when
the splash had subsided. Through no fault
of their own, however, for they p'ayed a
hard, fast, game, and showed no inclination
to give up, no matter how far behind they
were trailing. They had a percentage of 333,
winning only from the Frosh. George Black
did a good deal to keep the spirit of good
sportsmanship prevailing.

The Sophomores captured for themselves
another championship, and they certainly de-
served it, for they went through their schedule
without a defeat. They had a fine turn-out
and Bayard Colyear and Captain Vincent
Butler starred again and again. They went to
Balboa to play the Pacific interclass champions
but lost by the overwhelming score of 4-0.
The team presented no excuses, and the only
comment made was that Balboa had the bet-
ter team. That is sportsmanship.

It was the old familiar story in the case
of the Freshmen, who lost every game, and
found themselves in last place again. Even
the very fine playing of Captain Eddie Cor-
rigan was not enough to stem the flow of
defeat and they hadn't a single grain of vic-
tory to flavor their losses.



\ -'





A H






Basketball

By JAMES COMAN

(W-hoops, boys, w-hoops) Basketball started
with a bang when on the first day the Seniors
trounced the Juniors, and the second Junior
team mopped up on the Sophs.

The Seniors settled down to serious playing
in this last of sports, and won their schedule,
but the Seniors had two entries in the basket-
ball race. The graduating' class, because of lack
of athletes, evidently, had but one team but
what a team! Captained by Roland Clemens,
they swept through a series of hard games with-
out a single set-back.

I he Juniors fastened another second place
under their belts, when each of their teams lost
but a single game to the Seniors. Johnnie Fin-
layson and Billy Hovrter were captains, and held
their respective teams through their schedule
without a set-back of spirit and pep. Both teams
were model examples of good sports.

the Sophomores were not so lucky in basket-
ball, and the best they could do was a third
place. Buddy Stumpf led one team, while his co-
leader was Luis Finlayson. The Sophs seem to
have the ability to chose good captains, but the
lack of good basketball material cannot be off-
set by a good leader.

The Frosh teams did not win enough games
to drag them out of the cellar position, but not
through lack of trying. Farrell and Marquard
were elected to lead them, and weren't in the
class of poor leaders, either. The Frosh lost all
but one game. Their main draw back this year
has been the lack of experience, but ne
thev promise to be a threat to th
guls of C. H. S.

Balboa sent a representative "5" to Cristobal
to attempt to take the basketball flag back to
the Pacific side, but lost to C. H. S. by the
tight score of 51 to 48.



ear
sporting mo-



lllf
If







m v i



- \>



Girls Sports



Charlotte
The girls were very active in athletics this
year. Along with the regular athletic schedule,
soccer was introduced as a major sport. This
proved to be the most popular among the girls,
as there were more girls who attended practices
and took an active part in soccer than in any
other sport. This was an interclass game, the
Sophomores emerging as the champion team.
The other class teams fought hard and ener-
getically, but were not to be winners as the
Sophomores proved to them by not losing 1 one
game. The Junior class came second in this
sport while the Seniors and Freshmen emerged
to third and fourth place respectively.

Volleyball was a different story. The Senior
girls would not stand for being defeated in this
sport and proving that they had the strongest
and fittest team. Thus the Seniors won the



McMahon '39

volleyball tournament. The Juniors emerged
second. Sophomores third, and the Freshmen
fourth.

The Juniors took first place in the softbal'
and bowling tournaments, which were the first
two sports of the second semester. Other sports
played during this semester were tennis, basket-
ball, and badminton, the latter being introduced
into the line of sports by Miss Bailey, our very
able gym instructor.

On the whole there was a good showing of
girls representing all of the classes. There were
more spectators attending this velar's girls
athletic tournaments than in any other year
heretofore. We hope that girls sports will con-
tinue to be as popular as they are now and that
we shall have many more bigger and better
times playing on the various teams.




>'



V



Hi



* U












_. ^i rfii miMWHW




NO MORE PEN

NO MORE BOOKS.






















LINE
AL




OP

JS, INC.
mON CO.



ACTORY
[PANY







APPRECIATION






Those


, besides the staff, who have b




responsi


ble


for the successful printed


"Tr


ade


Wind",


are


our faithful and co-operat


ive


ad-


vertisers. They put their money and fa


th i


nto


our new


ven


ture and as for their confidence


we


owe them a


wealth of appreciation.







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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093680/00024
 Material Information
Title: Caribbean
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Cristobal High School
Publisher: Yearbook House
Place of Publication: Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date: 1937
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00093680:00024

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
        Front Matter 3
        Front Matter 4
    Foreword
        Page 1
    Dedication
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Seniors
        Section 1
        Section 2
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Classes
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Juniors
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Sophomores
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Freshmen
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Activites
        Section 1
        Section 2
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
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        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Sports
        Section 1
        Section 2
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Advertising
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Matter
        Page 65
        Page 70
    Back Cover
        Page 71
        Page 72
Full Text









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Forrlctorb










WE, THE CARIBBEAN STAFF OF 1937,

DEDICATE THIS BOOK TO OUR


FACULTY


Few high schools in the United States and
dependencies have as well trained teaching
staffs as those on the Isthmus.
The teachers in Cristobal High are not only
well trained in subject matter, but they have
had the broadening advantages of travel in Eu-
rope, South America and the homeland. They
are people of varied interests and talents and
because they are versatile, they are able to
bring much of concomitant learning to their
pupils. The teachers of Cristobal High School
continue their education throughout the summer
months, receiving various degrees in the sub-
jects which interest them most in some of the
finest colleges in the United States.
In the language department of Cristobal High
the students receive excellent supervision and
training under various capable teachers.
Miss Liter teaches Junior and Senior Eng-
lish. She has been a teacher at Cristobal for
four years, and has received her B. A. and
Master's degree from West Virginia University.
Thus far, she has procured two-thirds of a Ph. D.
from the New York University.
Miss Moore, teacher of Modern Languages
teaches French and Latin to the students of
Cristobal High School. Miss Moore, who has
been with us for twelve years, has received her
B. A degree from West Virginia University, and


her M. A. degree from Teachers College.
A new teacher to us is Miss Cresto, who
teaches Spanish 9 and English 10 and 9. She
also, like the two teachers mentioned above,
has received her B. A. and M. A. degrees.
Miss Brown instructs the English 9 and 10
classes, and supervises the Library. She has
been teaching on the Canal Zone for six years,
and has received her B. A. and M. A. degrees
from the University of Missouri.
Our advanced Spanish teacher is Mrs. Spen-
cer. She has been instructing in Cristobal High
for seven years and has received her B. A. de-
gree from Coe College, and her M. A. degree
from Iowa University, and has earned some
credits on her Ph. D.
Another teacher who is new to us is Mr.
Franklin, who is instructor of General Mathe-
matics, General Metal Shop and Elementary
and Advanced Mechanical Drawing. He has ob-
tained his B. S. in Education.
Mr. Stickler, who is also a new member of
the teaching staff, teaches Biology, General
Science, Elementary Algebra and has received
his B. S. and M. S. degrees.
To instruct the pupils of Cristobal High in
the intricacies of science we are fortunate to
have Mr. Vinton. He has been a member of the
Faculty for seven years and teaches Physics,









Chemistry and Algebra. Mr. Vinton has two de-
grees; his B. A. and M. A. degrees.
For business training Miss Patterson is in
charge. She teaches Advanced and Elementary
Shorthand, Typing and Business Training. Miss
Patterson has received her B. S. degree and has
taught in Cristobal for seven years.
Mr. Batalden, who has been teaching in the
Canal Zone for two years has received his B. S.
degree and teaches Woodwork 8, 9, and 10.
In charge of the Household Arts department
is Miss Pope. She has two degrees: her B. S.
and M. A. This is her first year as a teacher on
the Canal Zone Staff.
Mr. Seller and Miss Bailey are the two gvm-
nasium instructors who have charge of the Phy-
sical Education Classes.
Another teacher new to us is Miss Worrell,
who teaches Art and is in charge of Dramatics.
She has received her B. S. and M. S. degree,


and has had summer work beyond her Master's
degree.
Last but not least is Miss Elner, who has
taught in Cristobal High School for seven years.
She has received her B. M. degree and teaches
Music and English.
Mr. Sullivan, one of our most versatile teach
ers, teaches two major subjects, English 11 and
U. S. History. He has been on the Cristobal
High School Faculty for two years and also has
charge of the Speech class, the High School
Band and Orchestra and the Junior High School
Band. He has two degrees: the B. A. and the
M. A. from the University of Denver.
In the Mathematics department the students
receive the best of training under Miss Beavers.
She has been on the Cristobal High School Fa-
culty for six years and teaches Plane and Solid
Geometry, Trigonometry and Algebra 11. Miss
Beavers has received her M. A. degree and her
B. A. degree from Duke.


Our principal, Mr. Milford Franks, now on
vacation in states, has been with us six years,
and in that time, our school has grown in size
and has increased, immeasurably, in the quality
of its work, in the number of its activities, and
in its importance to the community. Mr. Franks
received his A. B. from Whitman, and then
crossed the continent to take his Master's and
to complete the work for his Ph. D. at Teachers'


College, Columbia University.
Upon his departure for his holidays, he left
C. H. S. in the excellent hands of Mr. Sigurd
Esser, who holds degrees from North Dakota
and Minnesota. Although he has been here a
short time, Mr. Esser is well known to us, be-
cause he is the assistant principal of Balboa
High. With him, our school is drawing to the
close of a very successful and happy year.






































Caribbean Staff




Editor-in-Chief ............... Carroll Gall;on
Associate Editor ................ Mary Darley
Sports Editor ................ James Coman
Staff Artists ................ Mar;e Christ;an
Flora June Southard
Staff Photographers ............. Robert Byrd
Asa Bullock
Literary Board ................ Macel Goulet
Kathleen O'Hearn
Betty McCleary
Jack O'Hearn
Charlotte McMahon
Erin DeBardeleben
Marion Macintyre
Marjor;e Yost
Jean Walsh
Grace Hodges
Typists .................. Goldwyn Grabhorn
Eleanore Stumbf
Winifred Koehler









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OLIVE AANSTOOS
Quotation-"Her mirth the world required;
She bathed it in smiles of glee."
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1927.
Activities-Basketball 1, 2, 3; Soccer 4; Base-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4; Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Ten-
nis 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Drama-
tic Club 1, 2, 3; National Thespians 3,
4; Archery 3; Swimming 2; Trade Wind
4; Visitation Week 4; Carnival 1, 2, 3,
4; Girls Double Quartet 2, 3; Freshman
Chorus; Varsity 2, 3, 4.
Pet Expression-"Be still my fluttering heart."
College Expected to Enter-Alveine Dance
School, N. Y.


MARJORIE ANDERSON
Quotation-"Come my best friends, my book,
and lead me on."
Birthplace-Whiting, Indiana.
Date entered C. Z. schools-1934.
Activities-Trade Wind 3, 4; Effe Kube Klub
3, 4; La Pas 3, 4; Photo Club 4; Chair-
man Visitation Week Committee 4; Glee
Club 3; Pan-American Student Forum 4.
Pet Expression-"Piffle!"





311 XI\ BLUNDEN
Quotation-"A sunbeam in a winter's day."
Eirthplace-Santa Ana, California.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1926.
Activities-La Pas 2. 3; Effe Kube Klub 1, 2:
Freshman Chorus.
Pet Expression-"I don't know."
College Expected to Enter-Junior College, Bal-
boa, C. Z.





ANITA BOGGS
Quotation-"She has a voice of gladness, and a
smile an eloquence of beauty."
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1924.
Activities-Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 4; Vol-
leyball 2, 4; Glee Club 1, 3; Freshman
Chorus.
Pet Expression-"I really mean it."
College Expected to Enter-Duke University.


JOHN BOZEMAN
Quotation-"What is this life if full of care,
Wa have no time to stand and stare?"
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1928.
Activities-National Thespians 3, 4; Tumbling
2; Art Club 1; Photo Club 2; Caribbean
2, 3, 4; Effe Kube Club 2; Carnival 1,
2, 3, 4.
ain't got besides brains?"
Pet Expression-"What have I got that you
College Expected to Enter-Texas University.


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MILDRED BRASWELL
Quotation-"Hail to thee, blythe spirit!"
Birthplace-Mansfield, Ga.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-Feb. 1935.
Activities-Glee Club 2, 3; Basketball 3; Ten-
nis 3; La Pas 3, 4; Biology Club 3; Car-
nival 3.
Pet Expressfion-"Yes."
College Expected to Enter-Stanford Univer-
sity, California.




DONALD BRAYTON
Quotation-"I dare do all that would become
a man."
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1928.
Activities-Trade Wind 4; Basketball 4; Varsity
Club 4.
Pet Expressions-"I rode a horse once."
College Expected to Enter-Texas University.



JACQUELINE BRISCOE
Quotation-"Good without pretense. Blest with
plain reason, and with sober sense."
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1927.
Activities-Carnival Committee 2-4; Glee Club
1, 2, 3; La Pas 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club
1, 2, 3, 4; National Thespians 4; Visita-.
tion Week Committee 1, 4; Commence-
ment Committee 4; Varsity Club 3, 4!
Volleyball 2, 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4; Base-
ball 4; Bowling 3, 4; Tennis 3, 4; Soc-
cer 4.
Pet Expression-"Aw, Heck!"
College Expected to Enter-University of Mary-
land.



BETTY BROOKS
Quotation-"Nothing is so rich as honesty."
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-La Pas 3; Basketball 3, 4; Volley-
ball 3, 4; Tennis 3, 4; Bowling 4; Base-
ball 4; Carnival 3, 4; Commencement
Committee 4; Varsity 4.
College Expected to Enter-Simmon's College,
Boston, Mass.



WILLIAM ROBERT BYRD
Quotation-"True as steel, sincere and inde-
pendent."
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1922.
Activities-Photo Club 3, 4; Slide Rule 3; Trade
Wind 3, 4; Caribbean 3, 4; Carnival 4.
Pet Expression-"I want to be alown."
College Expected to Enter-Boeing School of
Aeronatics.









HELEN CARROLL
Quotation-"For she is such a smart little craft,
Such a neat little, sweet little craft."
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1928.
Activities-Effe Kube Club 1, 2, 3; Thespians 3, 4;
La Pas 2, 3, 4; Student Forum 4; Carnival
4; Visitation Week 3, 4.
Pet Expression-I wouldn't Know, and not know-
ing, I wouldn't say.
College Expected to Enter-Colegio de Sion, Costa
Rica.


JIMMY CHRISTIAN
Quotation-Heroes themselves had fallen behind
Whene'er he went before.
Birthplace-Boston, Mass.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3 1;
Football 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Track
1, 2; Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4; Water Pulo
3, 4; Dramatic Club 4; Science Clul
2, 3; Photo Club 2, 4; Sec. Varsity Club
3, 4; Class Representative 1; Carnival
Committee 2, 3.
Pet Expression-"Hi ya, toots!"
College Expected to Enter-Georgia Tech.

VERNON CLARK
Quotation-"A merry heart doeth good like a
medicine."
Birthplace-Utica, New York.
Date entered C. Z. Schools-1928.
Activities-Effe Kube Klub 1, 2, 3; National
Thespians 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer
3; Baseball 3; Boys' Glee Club 1, 2: Fresh-
man chorus; Orchestra 1, 2; Carnival
3, 4.
Pet expression-"That's more better."
College expetced to Enter-Pratt Institute of
Science and Technology.



JACK CLAY
Quotation-"In all labour there is profit."
Birthplace-Marshalltown, Iowa.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1924.
Activities-Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2,
3; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 3, 4; Water
Polo 3, 4; Track 2; Pres. Varsity Club 4:
Science Club 3.
Pet Expression-"Success".
College Expected to Enter-Iowa State C:.i .'l



ROWLAND CLEMENS
Quotation-"Sport went hand in hand with
Science".
Birthplace-Vermilion, South Dakota.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 1, 2,
3, 4; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 3; Base-
ball 1, 2, 3; Track 1, 2; Photo Club 4:
Pres. Photo Club 4; Class Vice-Pres. ?:
Student Representative 4; Commencement
Committee 4; Science Club 2.
College Expected to Enter-University of Wis--
consin.









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6s.


DAVID COFFEY
Quotation-"Write me as one that loves his
fellowmen."
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Dramatics 3; Carnival Committee 4;
Senior Week Committee 4.
Pet Expression-"So what?"





JOE COFFIN
Quotation-"A soul as full of worth, as void
of pride."
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Trade Wind 4; Photo Club 3, 4; Effe
Kube Klub 1, 4; Biology Club 2; Soccer
1, 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4; Football 3, 4; Bas-
ketball 3, 4; Water Polo 4.



JAMES COMAN
Quotation-"Is this that haughty, gallant gay
Lothario?"
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date entered C. Z. schools-1926.
Activities-Trade Wind 1, 2, 3, 4; La Pas 2, 3, 4;
Effe Kube Klub 1, 2, 3; National The-
spian 3, 4; President Student Associa-
tion 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 3, 4;
Football 3, 4; Caribbean 3, 4; Carnival
Committee 2, 3; Visitation Week Com-
mittee 2, 3, 4; Pep Club 3; Golf 4; Ope-
retta 3.
Pet expression-"Well, ain't I sorry?"
College Expected to Enter-University of Texas.



HARLAN CROUCH
Quotation-"Every man has not the like talent."
Birthplace-Colon R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1924.
Activities-Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 3, 4;
Basketball 3, 4; Track 1, 2; Water Polo
1, 2, 3; Baseball 4; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4;
Science Club 1; Glee Club 1.
Pet expression-"Patooie."
College Expected to Enter-Balboa Jr. College.




JEAN CROUCH
Quotation-"And grace that won who saw her."
Birthplace-Nitro, W. Va.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-La Pas 2, 3; Volley Ball 2, 3; Ten-
nis 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4; Soccer 4; Bowling
2, 3, 4.
Pet Expression-"Oh!"


- 0_,







MARY DARLEY
Quotation-"So young, so fair,
Good without effort, great without foe.'
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date entered C. Z. schools-1926.
Activities-Effe Kube Klub 1, 2, 3; National
Thespians 3, 4: Visitation Week Com-
mittee 3, 4; Trade Wind 3, 4; Caribbean
3, 4; Basketball 3; Volleyball 3; Bowling
3; Archery 3; Commencement Commit-
tee 4; Treas. Photo Club 4; Carnival 4.
Pet expression-"Honest Injun?"
College Expected to Enter-Great Ormond
Street Hospital, London.


LOUISE DE LA OSSA
Quotation-"Oh, she was as good as she was
fair."
Birthplace-New Orleans, La.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Carnival 1, 2, 3; Visitation Week
1, 4; Freshman Chorus 1; La Pas 2, 3;
Effe Kube Klub 1, 2. 3; Photo Club 1.
Pet Expression-"Aw. honey!"
College Expected to Enter-University of South-
ern California.





WILLIAM LAWRANCE DICKINSON
Quotation-"A silent shy, peaceloving man,
He seemed no fiery partisan."
Birthplace-Wassau, Wisconsin.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1926.
Activities--Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 1, 2; Fresh-
men Chorus 1; Soccer 3.
College Expected to Enter-Georgia Tech.





JACK DIGNAM
Quotation-"I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul."
Birthplace-Pittsburgh, Pa.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1933.
Activities-Trade Wind 4; Carnival 4; Class
President 4; Dramatic Club 3, 4; Foot-
ball 4; Pep Club 3,4; Cheerleader 2, 3, 4.
Pet Expression-"A little less quiet please."
College Expected to Enter-Ohio State College.
Athens, Ohio.




MARY DIGNAM
Quotation-"Much mirth and no madness,
All good and no badness."
Birthplace-Pittsburgh, Pa.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1933.
Activities-Basketball 2, 3, 4; Baseball 2, 1;
Soccer 4; Tennis 2 ,3, 4; Varsity 3. 4:
Supper Club 3; Volleyball 2, 3, 4; Bowling
3; Trade Wind 4; Caribbean 4; Car-
nival 4.
Pet Expression-"Dear me!"


I~









STANLEY DONALDSON
Quotation-"He never mocks,
For mockery is the fume of little hearts.'
Birthplace-Lima, Ohio.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1928.
Activities-Glee Club 1, Freshman Chorus; Trade
Wind 1, 2; Soccer 1; Carnival Commit-
tee 1; Biology Club 2.
Pet Expression-"Aw Heck!"
College Expected to Enter-Cleveland School of
Aeronautics.





CATITA ECKER
Quotation-"As merry as the day is long."
Birthplace-Panama, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Effe Kube Klub 1, 2, 3; National
Thespians 3, 4; La Pas 1, 2, 3; Basket-
ball 1, 2; Res. La Pas 2, 3;
Pet Expression-"Listen, my child-"





ELIZABETH HAYWOOD
Quotation-"Those dove's eyes which can make
gods forsworn."
Birthplace-Mobile, Alabama.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-Dec. 1934.
Activities-Basketball 3, 4; Volleyball 3, 4;
Baseball 4; Soccer 4; Bowling 3; Tennis
4; Varsity 3, 4; Trade Wind 4; Carib-
bean 4.
Pet Expression-"You know-".



JEANNE EGGLESTON
Quotation-Lest arts.
Birth-lace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1927.
Activities-Effe Kube Club 3, 4; La Pas 3, 4; Pan
American Student Forum 4; Trade Wind 3;
Visitation Week 4; Thespians 4: Volleyball
3, 4.
Pet Expression-"But definitely."
College Expected to Enter-Tallahasee Women's
College.




RAYCELIA FRY
Quotation-"A little lady doth often harbor a
great soul."
Birthplace-Natchez, Miss.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1936.
Activities-Commencement Committee 4; Visi-
tation Week 4; Carnival 4; Dramatic
Club 4.
Pet Expression-"Oh, my goo'ness!"
College Expected to Enter-Ruth Matlock's Stu-
dio of Dancing, San Antonio, Texas.









CARROLL GALLION
Quotation-"Born like Caesar to write and act
great deeds."
Birthplace-New Ibehia, Louisiana.
Date entered C. Z. Schools-1934.
Activities-Trade Wind 2, 3, 4; Caribbean 3, 4;
Editor in Chief of Publications 4; Photo
Club 4.
Pet expression-"Oh, worry, worry!"
College expected to Enter-H. S. Newcomb, New
Orleans, La.




MARIE GEOGHEGAN
Quotation-"Each morning sees some task begin
Each evening sees it close."
Birthplace-Washington, D. C.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1934.
for Secretary, i l- ii-t.:. D. C.
Pet Expression-"Heavens!"
College Expected to Enter-Washington School
for Secretaries, Washington, D. C.




HERBERT GOTTESMAN
Quotation-"Good humour is the heart of the
soul."
Birthplace-Vienna, Austria.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1933.
Activities-Science Club 1, 2; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4;
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2; Swim-
ming 3, 4; Class Treas. 4; Trade Wind 4:
Caribbean 4.
Pet Expression-"Same one."


MACEL GOULET
Quotation-"Mighty hearts are held in slender
chains."
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Date entered C. Z. schools-1930.
Activities-La Pas 2, 3, 4; Effe Kube Klub 1,
3, 4; National Thespian 4; Trade Wind
3, 4; Caribbean 3, 4; Student Represen-
tative 1, 2, 3; Commencement Commit-
tee 4; Carnival 1, 2, 3; Visitation Week
Committee 2, 4; Freshman chorus; Glee
Club 2, 3; Sec'y Girl's Varsity Club 4;
Volleyball 1, 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4; Bowl-
ing 3, 4.
Pet expression-"Funny? I thought I'd die!"
College expected to enter-Junior College, Bal-
boa, C. Z.

GOLDWYN GRABHORN

Quotation-"The mildest manners and the
gentlest heart."
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Trade Wind 4; Carnival 2; Carib-
bean 4.
Pet Expression-"I'm not sure-look it up."
College Expected to Enter-Women's State Col-
lege, Florida.











JAMES GREENE
Quotation-"He is the prince of good fellows."
Birthplace-San Antonio, Texas.
Date entered C. Z. Schools-1926.
Activities-La Pas 4; Football 4; Soccer 4;
Baseball 4; Basketball 4.






HENRY FREDERICK GRIMM
Quotation-"Life is just a jest, and all things
show it."
Birthplace-Monroe, Va.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1936.
Activities-Football 4; Baseball 4; La Pas 4;
Commencement Committee 4.
Pet Expression-"Woe is me!"
College Expected to Enter-Polytechnical Insti--
tute.


BETTY HAUSS
Quotation-"She's all that's honest, honorable,
and fair,
And when the virtues died they made
her heir."
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Freshman Chorus; Carnival 1. 2, 3,
4; Effe Kube Klub 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club
2, 3, 4; Trade Wind 4; La Pas 3, 4.
Commencent Committee 4; Visitation
Week Committee 4.
Pet Expression-"For Heaven's Sakes!"
College Expected to Enter-Los Angeles Hos-
pital.



NORA HEWIT
Quotation-"Her large blue eyes, fair locks and
snowy hands."
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1924.
Activities-Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 4; Bas-
ketball 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1, 2.
Pet Expression-"True, true."




GRACE HODGES
Quotation-"The red gold cataract of her
streaming hair."
Birthplace-Colon R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-La Pas 3, 4; Pan American Student
Forum 4; Class Treas 3; Freshman
Chorus; Effe Kube 4; Trade Wind 3;
Caribbean 4.
Pet Expression-"I don't believe it!"
College Expected to Enter-Texas University.








EDWARD FRANK HOFFMAN
Quotation-"For may we search before we find
a heart so manly and so kind."
Birthplace-Elyria, Ohio.
Date Enered C. Z. Schools-1927.
Activities-Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3,
4; Football 3, 4; Swimming 4; Band 2,
3, 4; Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Thespia s
3, 4; Varsity 4.
Pet Expression-"'Hiyah!"





LEONARD GARRETT HUFF
Quotation-"There is no difficulty for him
that wills."
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1920.
Activities-Glee Club 1, 2; Debating Club 2:
Dramatic 1, 2; Carnival 4; Senior Dance
4.
Pet Expression-"Don't be a greeper."
College Expected to Enter-Junior College.





MARVIN KEENAN
Quotation-"Not slothful in business; fervent
in spirit."
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1927.
Activities-Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3;
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 4; La Pas 2.
Pet Expression-"Aw common', Hula!"
College Expected to Enter-Purdue University,
Indiana.





WINIFRED KOEHLER
Quotation-"The old, old story-fair and young."
Birthplace-Weehawken. New Jersey.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-April 1927.
Activities-La Pas 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1; Car-
nival 2, 4; Trade Wind 1, 4; Caribbean 4.
Pet Expression-"May I have an ice-cube?"
College Expected to Enter-Business College,
New Jersey.




RITA KOTALIK
Quotation-"She is the mirror of all courtesy."
Birthplace-Portsmouth, Va.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1931.
Activities-Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club
1, 4; Letter Club 1; Effe Kube Club 3, 4;
Volleyball 1, 3, 4; Bowling 4; Soccer 4;
Glee Club 3, 4; Visitation Week Commit-
tee 4; Supper Club 2, 3, 4.
Pet Expression-"Oh, Gee Whiz."


."1 ''_ --


hub








CHARLOTTE LEVY
Quotation-"She is the best of all musicians."
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Glee Club accompanist 1, 2, 3, 4;
Orchestra Accompanist 1, 2, 3, 4; Fresh-
man Chorus 1; Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, 4;
Commencement Committee 4; Visitation
Week Committee 4; Trade Wind 4; La
Pas 2, 3, 4; Pan-American Student Fo-
rum 4.
College Expected to Enter-Eastman's School of
Music, Rochester, New York.




RUTH LULL
Quotation-"And gay without frivolity."
Birthplace-Clairmont, New Hampshire.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-Dec. 1934.
Activities-Slide Rule Club 3; La Pas 4; Soccer
4; Volleyball 4; Tennis 3, 4; Trade
Wind 4.
Pet Expression-"Such is life!"






DORA LYEW
Quotation-"Lo, one who loved true honour
more than fame."
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1932.
Activities-Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman
Chorus; Effe Kube Klub 1; Basketball 3;
La Pas 2, 3, 4; Volleyball 2.
Pet Expression-"I don't care."






LUCILLE LYEW
Quotation-"Silence best speaks the mind."
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1933.
Activities-Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman
Chorus 1; Effe Kube Club 1; La Pas 2,
3, 4; Basketball 3; Volleyball 3.
Pet Expression-"Oh Gee!"







MARGARET MACINTYRE
Quotation-"Modesty is beautiful in a woman."
Birthplace-Ardgour, Argyllshire, Scotland.
Date entered C. Z. Schools-Dec. 1935.
Activities-Atchery 3.
Pet expression--"Takes too much effort."








BETTY LEE McCLEARY
Quotation-"Grace was in all her steps! Heaven
in her eyes. In every gesture dignity
and love.
Birthplace-Erie, Kansas.
Date Entered C. Z. School-1932.
Activities-La Pas 1, 2, 4; Dramatic Club 1, 2.
3; Pres. 1; National Thespians 4; Trade
Wind 4; Caribbean 4; Pan-American Stu-
dent Forum 4; Effe Kube Club 1; Class
Treas. 1; Visitation Committee 2, 4; Car-
nival Committee 2, 4; Chairman Sr. Week
Committee.
Pet Expression-"True! True!"
College Expected to Enter-Mississippi Syno-
dical College.


JOHN MCLAIN
Quotation-"The fields his study, Nature was
his book."
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Photo Club 3, 4; Science Club 2, 4;
Sccer 4; Trade Wind 2.
College Expected to Enter-Springfield Teach-
ers' College, Mass.




RUTH MOODY
Quotation-"Wit to persuade and beauty to
delight."
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Effe Kube 1, 2, 3; National Thes-
plans 3, 4; Pres. Natl. Thespians 4; La
Pas 1, 2, 3; Freshman Chorus; Class
Seer. 3; Carnival 1, 2, 3.
Pet Expression-"Oh, Gee."
College Expected to Enter-Harter's School of
Dance, Washington.


ESTHER LAWN NEELY
Quotation-"A dancing shape, an image gay."
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3,
4; Bowling 2, 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4; Biology
Club 4; Pres. Girl's Varsity 4; Class
Treas. 2; Class Sect. 4; Carnival 1, 2, 3,
4; Tennis 4; Sr. Week Committee 4; La
Pas 2, 3, 4; Student Forum 4; Pres. Effe
Kube 2; Vice Pres. Effe Kubbe 4; Fresh-
man Chorus 1; Glee Club 1, 2.
Pet Expression-"General Electric!"




RUTH JEAN NELSON
Quotation-"Her very frowns are fairer far
Than the smiles of other maidens are."
Birthplace-Wichita Falls, Texas.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1935.
Activities-Trade Wind 3; Caribbean 3.
Pet Expression-"On the other hand, take
spinach."
College Expected to Enter-Illinois State.











MARGARET OWEN
Quotation-"Her glossy hair was cluster'd o'er a
brow Bright with intelligence and fair and
smooth."
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1931.
Pet Expression-"O gosh!"






KATHLEEN PHILLIPS
Quotation-"Good things are wrapped in small
parcels."
Birthplace-Florence, Alabama.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Class Secretary 1; Effe Kube Klub
1, 2, 3, 4; Pres. Dramatic Club 4; Basket-
ball 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 4; Student Repre-
sentative 4; Class President 3; Com-
mencement Committee 4; Bowling 2;
Carnival 1, 4.
Pet Expression-"Oh, so what?"




NETTA POTTS
Quotation-"Who mixed reason with pleasure,
and wisdom with mirth."
Birthplace-River Rouge, Michigan.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1926.
Activities-Freshman Chorus; Varsity Club 2,
3, 4; Carnival 1, 2, 3, 4.
College Expected to Enter-Business College,
San Francisco.





ROBERT RULEY
Quotation-"I love the sea; she is my fellow-
creature."
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2,
3, 4; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 3, 4; Ten-
nis 4; Track 1, 2; Pyramid Team 3, 4;
Tumbling 1, 4.
Pet Expression-"Come about!"






DAVID SAVAGE
Quotation-"And Nature compromised betwixt
Good fellow and recluse."
Birthplace-Battle Creek, Michigan.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1936.
Activities-Baseball 4.
Pet Expression-"Nuts to you!"


I







LOUISE SIEBOLD
Quotation-"So unaffected, so composed a
mind; So firm, yet soft; so strong, yet
so refined."
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-La Pas 2, 3, 4; Volleyball 3, 4; Arch-
ery 3; Freshman Chorus 1; Trade Wind
1, 2; Commencement Committee 4; Car-
nival 2, 3, 4; Pan-American Student Fo-
rum 4.
Pet Expression-"Darnit!"
College Expected to Enter-Iowa State College,
Ames, Iowa.



LESLIE STEVENS
Quotation-"Dignity doth fitly adorn her per-
sonage."
Birthplace-Istanbul, Turkey.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-April 1936.
Activities-Commencement Committee 4.
Pet Expression-"Oh, what a wit!"
College Expected to Enter-Junior College, Bal-
boa, C. Z.





STANFORD STONE
Quotation-"For the merry love to fiddle,
And the merry love to dance."
Birthplace-Tampa, Florida.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1924. '. i
Activities-Pres. Art Club 2; Football 4; Ten-
nis 4; Orchestra 1, 2; Trade Wind 3;
Caribbean 2.
Pet Expression-"Naturally!"





ELEANORE STUMPF
Quotation-"For she was jes' the quiet kind
Whose natures never vary."
Birthplace-Philadelphia, Pa.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-Feb. 1933.
Activities-La Pas 4; Trade Wind 4; Caribbean
4; Glee Club 1; Dramatic Club 4.
Pet Expression-"You don't mind; do you?"





JOSEPHINE STUMPF
Quotation-"I love her for her smile, her look--
Her way of speaking gently."
Birthplace-Willowgrow, New Jersey.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1924.
Activities-Freshman Chorus; Glee Club 1, 2, 3,
4; La Pas 1, 2, 3, 4; Trade Wind 3; Car-
nival 1, 2, 3, 4.
Pet Expression-"Caramba!"










MONTFORD TAWES
Quotation-"It seemed when nature him began,
She meant to show all that might be
in man."
Birthplace-Crisfield, Maryland.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Effe Kube Klub 4; National Thes-
pians 4; Swimming 1, 2, 4; Science Club
1; Band 1, 2, 4; Orchestra 4; Trade
Wind 1, 2, 4; Caribbean 4; Water Polo 4.
Pet Expression-"Oh, knock it off."
College Expected to Enter-State College, Pa.


JEAN WALSH
Quotation-"But to see her was to love her."
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1926.
Activities-La Pas 2, 3, 4; Effe Kube Klub 2,
3; National Thespians 3, 4; Caribbean 4;
Trade Wind 3, 4; Class Vice-Pres. 4;
Commencement Committe 4; Senior Week
Committee 4; Baccalaureate 4; Visita-
tion Week 4; Art Club 1; President Pan-
American Student Forum 4; Carnival 3.
College Expected to Enter-University of Cali-
fornia.


CHARLES WASHABAUGH
Quotation-"For though he is a wit, he is no
fool."
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Pres. Freshman Chorus; Dramatic
Club 1, 2. 3; Thespians 3, 4; Glee Club
1, 2, 3; Water Polo 3, 4; Soccer 4; Car-
nival 1, 2, 3, 4; Leader's Club 3; Science
Club 1, 2, 3; Trade Wind 3.
Pet Expression-"Same thing."
College Expected to Enter-Springfield, Mass.


WILLIAM WOOD
Quotation-"His limbs were cast in manly
mould,
For hardy sports or contest bold."
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Soccer 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3; Track
1, 2; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Tennis 1, 2;
Swimming 3; Water Polo 3; Football 3,
4; Treas. of Varsity Club 4; Art Club 1;
Science Club 2.
Pet Expression-"So what?"



ELSIE WOODRUFF
Quotation-Her glossy hair was cluster'd o'er
a brow
Bright with intelligence and fair and
smooth.
Birthplace-Colon.
Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-Baseball 4; Tennis 4; Volleyball 4;
Bowling 4.
Pet Expression-Oh, my goodness!"






















ANNE GALLAGHER
Quotation-"A heart with room for every joy."
Birthplace-Lynn, Mass.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1936.
Pet Expression-"Aw, Gee!"
College Expected to Enter-University of Cali-
fornia.




BRANDON L. ELKINS
Quotation-"For now he's free to sing and play,
Over the hills and far away."
Birthplace-
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-Feb. 5, 1936.
Activities-Baseball 1, 2; Varsity 1, 2; Squad
3, 4; Basketball 1, 2; Varsity 1, 2; Soc-
cer 3, 4.
Pet Expression-"So What".




YOLANDA SALAS
Quotation-"Soft as her clime and sunny as
her eyes."
Birthplace-Havana, Cuba.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1925.
Activities-La Pas 3, 4; Freshman Chorus; Glee
Club 1; Trade Wind 4; Carnival 1, 3.
Pet Expression-"You don't say!"




LAVERNE ROSE
Quotation-"I am now past the craggy paths
of study."
Birthplace-Butler, Pa.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-1928.
Activities-Carnival Committee 4.
Pet Expression-"No breeze!"









little ballerina, Raycelia Frye, was
invited, but Mr. Washabaugh tells
me that a tour of dancing before all
the crowns and dictators of the
world may prevent her joining them.
Also there's another scientist-that
attractive lady in the red hat. It's
Louise Seibold, the biologist, who
has just discovered a new germ. The
lady just getting out of that taxi is
Jacqueline Briscoe, the founder of
"The Modern Kitchen," the last
word in home economics. There is
Eddie Hoffman, editor of the Pan-
ama American, maybe he can give
us a little more information about
the cruise.
(They walk over to him).
Reporter: Pardon me, Mr. Hoffman, I'm from
the Times. Would you tell me a lit-
tle about your plans for the trip?
Ed: Why-er, no but here comes Jimmy Co-
man he's just going as far as Cris-
tobal with us. He just got word
that at last he has been appointed
assistant manager of the Commis-
sary. Say, Jimmy, tell this fellow a
bit about our fellow passengers will
you?
Jimmy: Anything to oblige, anything to
oblige. Let's see. Garrett Huff, the
consulting engineer of the General
Electric, is so important to his busi-
ness that he could not get away.
Herbert Gottesman is now owner of
the thirteen largest companies on
the Isthmus, and is running for pres-
ident, so he probably won't get here.
Esther Neely planned to go, but
when she was appointed as chairman
for the Olympics she had to go to
Russia instead. Kathleen Phill;i s,
the lawyer and authority on Mar-
shall law, is already aboard, and is
overjoyed at finding three people
smaller than she is. Robert Byrd
will probably be late as he is at the
airport watching Maxine Blundin
attempt to break her own altitude
record in a plane that he designed.
Here's a taxi with-well, it's La
Vern Rose! He owns the checker
taxi cab company. The man with
him is Stanly Donaldson, the chief
of the F. B. I. That's all I know
about except Macel Goulet is com-
ing aboard in Panama and is to go all
the way to Costa Rica. It's her first
trip out of the Isthmus. And-well.
here's Helen Carroll, the star of


Helen:


"Why Not?", the current broadway
hit. She can tell you more than I can.
Well, now let me think. Jeanne Eg-
gleston is already aboard-you know
the political organizer and leader-
because I'm supposed to meet her
there, and Jimmy Green was
coming until he did not get out in
time when the Chemical Warfare
lab blew up. Then Joe Coffin, the
coach at Purdue or Penn. State or
some place couldn't get away, and
Billy Dickerson is too engrossed in
the proposed canal from the Great
Lakes to Alaska to go anywhere.
Rita Katalik, the world titleholder
in tennis, is in England, but will
join us there after the Davis Cup
matches are played. While we are
in England we'll stop by and see
Mary Darley. Her husband is head
of Great Ormond Street Hospital,
and was knighted a few sea-
sons ago. Mildred Braswell and her
millionaire husband, her third, are
making a cruise too, on the Lutzen-
berg-the newest dirigible. Then
Anita Boggs, who's married to some
wealthy Costa Rican, has invited us
to visit her for a while. Marie Goe-
hegan, she's Mother Superior ot
The Convent of the Sacred Heart in
Eome place-or-other. wrote to Charlie
wishing us all the best of luck. Betty
Hauss is taking a long deserved
vacation from the De Foe Hospital
where she is head nurse. Margarei
MacIntyre, who just received the
Nobel prize for her marvelous work
in the advancement of the S. P. C.
A. is aboard with her pets and ca-
naries. Peter Grimm, the comic strip
artist, is going along for inspiration,
he says. Mary Diqnam, the Olympic
champion is in Russia now. Netta
Potts is the organization manager
of the Red Cross, and has not made
up her mind whether she should go
or not. as the Ohio may flood. Ruth
Lull, the owner of the famous Dog-
wood Kennels is coming. Catita
Ecker and Jean Crouch, the adver-
tising models, are taking the cruise
during their vacation. Louise De La
Ossa, win n e r of the Title, Miss
South America has just opened her
Charm School with Elizabeth Hay-
wood. David Savage, the new
"Bring-em-back-alive" fellow is get-
ting on in Africa. Leslie Ste6hens,
the translator for the Asme Import









and Export Co. Inc., is coming so
we can be sure to be able to be
understood even by the Turks. Jean
Walsh, who painted that portrait of
the President, is in Paris studying,
and we'll pick her up there. Jean
Nelson is married to the Ambassa- Re
dor to Holland, so she can't come.
R;ta Laurie is married to the pitcher By
for the Colon Baseball Team. Nora
Hewitt has installed her "House for Re
Beauty" aboard, and we all plan to,
take advantage of it. Yolanda Salas,
manager of the "'\ri,.'n l Social Bu-
reau" can't come because its the By
middle of the season. Eleanor
Stumih is private secretary to the
President cf Standard Oil of New
Jersey, and couldn't get aw av. Re
Eleanor Taiman is going as far as
Paris as she is a buyer for Wanna-
makers. Anne Galleger's married to
the commanding officer of the Asia-
tic Fleet, so she can't make the trip. By
Josefihne Stumjf is society-editor
for the Herald-Tribune. Marjorie
Anderson is going too. She's the Re






C. H.


President of "Phi Beta Kapi Fra-
ternity." But here's Margie Owen,
the head of the Owens and Walker
interior decorators. I guess we'd bet-
ter go on up.

porter: Thank you Miss Carroll.

stander: Look the captain has given orders
for the gang plank to be removed.

porter: That's Robert Ruley, he was trans-
ferred from the Queen Elizabeth for
the trip.
stander: Here comes a taxi. Who is the wo-
man in it? She seems to want to
get aboard.
porter: They are putting the gang plank
back, and that's Carroll Gallion, the
writer of the best sellers for 1945-
1946-1947-1948-1949. She would be
late!
stander: Well, there they go. I'll bet they
have a good time.
porter: Yeah, and have I got a scoop!






S.







CLASS
By MACEL GOULET


We, the worthy and esteemed class of nine-
teen hundred and thirty seven, realizing the
futility of expecting the ineffectual class of
nineteen hundred and thirty eight to uphold
the high moral worth and academic distinctions
that we have established during our too short
sojourn here in your midst, do hereby sadly
bequeath the following:
To the faculty, our most heartfelt sympathies
that they must henceforth be deprived of the
dash of spice that we have been in the scholas-
tic stew.
Individually we sorrowfully bequeath the suc-
ceeding assets:
Olive Aanstoos-Her impersonations to Con-
stance Coleman.
Marjorie Anderson-Her oratory to Carol Byrd.
Maxine Blunden-Her shy ways to Margaret
Geene.
Anita Boggs-Her tap shoes to Marjorie Yost.
Mildred Braswell-Her flippant ways to Vir-
ginia Marchman.
Johnny Bozeman-His many trips to Fort Sher-
man to Frank Martin.
Jack Clay-His quiet ways to Billy Forsstrom.
Donald Brayton-His friendliness to "Tex"
Jackson and Ralph Learn.
Jacqueline Briscoe-Her giggle to Lucy Detrick.
Betty Brooks-Her class spirit to Anna Pat-
chett.
Robert Byrd-His candid camera to Fred Hauss.
Helen Carrol!-Her dramatic ability to Anna
Kotalik.
Jimmy Christian-His long arms and legs to
Carlos Chase.
Vernon Clark-His place as electrician to Billy
Egger.
Rowland Clemens-His basketball ability to
Paul Cole.
David Coffey-His "Tarzanic" build to Paul
Venable.
Joe Coffin-His shoes to Billy Fuller and Billy
Hoverter because there is ample room for
both.
Jimmy Coman-His sunglasses, comb, and
egotism to Billy Scarborough and Albert
Hendricks.
Harlan Crouch-His appetite to Claude Lyon
and Billy Hunt.
Jeanne Crouch and Margaret Owens Their
dimples to Thelma Calloway and Erin De
Bardeleben.
Mary Darley-Her English accent to Dotty
Laurie.
Louise De La Ossa-Her wavy hair to Betty
Clay.
Billy Dickinson-His bashfulness to Rodney
Brawell and Anibal Galindo.
Jack Dignam-His five years in C. H. S. to


Laurel Highley.
Mary Dignam-Her ability to argue, right or
wrong, to Kathleen O'Hearn.
Stanley Donaldson-His suntan to Merlin Mul-
cahy and Keneth Hodson.
Catalina Ecker and Elizabeth Haywood-Their
sparkling eyes to Alice Hanson and Mary
Stumpf.
Jeanne Eggleston-Her ability to have a good
picture taken to Norma Uhlig.
Brandon Elkins-His golfing ability to John
Berude and Donald Detwiler.
Rayce'ia Fry-Her graceful dancing to Frank
Moyer.
Anne Gallagher-Her small size to Thelma
Miller.







WILL

and JAMES COMAN


Carroll Gallion-Her ability to talk five min-
utes without taking a breath to Catherine
Paxton.
Marie Geohegan and Elsie Woodruff Their
sweet ways to Mary Ann Cain.
Herbert Gottesman-His ability to do things
with the least amount of effort to Fred
Wertz and David Potts.
Goldwyn Grabhorn and Eleanore Stumpf -
Their positions as "Trade Wind" typists to
Dorothy Brayton.
James Greene-The color of his name to
George Black.
Peter Grimm-His fairy tales to Anthony Ref.
cofski and Clyde Linton.
Betty Hauss--Her place on the "Hayfever Spe.
cial" to Ray D'uey.


Nora Hewitt-Her nice disposition to Louise
Zimmerman.
Grrce Hodges and Macel Goulet-Their nose
for news to Dotty Hale and Ann Carpenter.
Fddie Hoffman-His harmonica to Asa Bullock.
Garrett Huff-His optimistic outlook on life to
John Huson and John Muse.
Marvin Keenan-His left field position to Vern
Terry.
Rita Laurie and Josephine Stumpf Their
blonde tresses to Grace Beldon.
Charlotte Levy-Her piano to Rose Marie Wolf.
Ruth Lull-Her sailor hat to Martha Moyer.
Dora and Lucille Lyew-Their small size to
Flora Bath and Marie Christian.
Margaret MacIntyre-Her green eyes to Isabel
Peterson.
Betty McClearv-Her dignity to Ann Corrigan
and Anne Shirley.
Ruth Moody and Winifred Koehler Their
typ: n speed to Sarah William.
John McLain-His trips to the jungle to Gale
Arnold and Milton Dunn.
Jean Nelson and Rita Kotalik-Their easy way
of taking things to Ruth and Margaret
Wood.
Esther Neely-Her little black book of 31
names and addresses to Theresa Goulett.
Kathleen Phillips-Her smiling expression to
Bea Cotton.
Netta Potts-Her happy go lucky nature to
Virginia Tracy.
La Verne Rose-His ability to keep the o3A
Dodg'e running to Teddy McGann and
Donald Parker.
Robert Ruley-H;, steadiness to Francis Rich
and Howard Whitt.
Yolanda Salas and Eleanore Taiman Their
office positions to Patsy Coffey and Ruth
Anderson.
David Savage-His ability to get along' with
Miss L;ter to Andrew La Pointe and Glad-
stone Cooney.
Louise Siebold-Her ability to be seen and not
heard to Marion McIntyre.
Leslie Stevens-Her braid to Mary Louise
Warren.
Stanford Stone-His twin girlfriends to Eddie
McCarthy and Tohn Finlayson.
Montford Tawes-His military training to Dick
Hocrn.
Jean Walsh-Her artistic ability to Dorothy
McSparren.
Charles Washabaugh-His ability to tie him-
self in knots to Victor May.
William Wood-His short chubbiness to "lanky"
Ed Egozcue.
Signed:
I. Emma Bushman,
So. M. I. Too















BEST MAN AND
ALL AROUND WOMAN HATER










HALL OF FAME

S Best all around girl ........ Esther Neely
Best all around boy ..... James Christ;an
Prettiest girl ............ Leslie Stevens
Best looking boy ........ James Chr stian
Wittiest boy ....... Charles WashabaughJ
Wittiest girl .............. Mary D;gnam
Most studious giy ....Marjorle Anderson
S Moat studious by ..... Rowland Clenmens
Most popular couple ...... Macel Goulet (
and Jimmy Coman I
Woman hater ................ Jack Clay
Man hater .............. Charlotte Levy

BEST LOOKING MOST POPULAR
COUPLE








MOST
WITTIEST STUDIOUS

~a rsr~z~i19



























BEST DRESSED

Best dressed boy ......... James Coman
%Li' Best dressed girl ........ Betty McCleary

Best athletic boy ............ BIl W ood
Best athletic girl ......... Mary Dignam

Most industrious girl Carroll Gal ;'on
Most industrious boy ....... Robert Byrd 1

I S Most bashful girl .... Goldwyn Grabhorn
Most basl ful bcy .... William D;ckinson

SBest dancer boy ........ James Christian
. B 1 1 Best dancer girl ........... Raycel;a Fry
BEST ATHLETIC BEST DANCERS










MOST- 1MOST
INDUSTRIOUS BASHFUL





































STANDING
Left to Right: Kathleen Phillips; Leslie Stevens; Macel Goulet; Rowland Clemens; Peter Grimm; Jean
Walsh; Betty Hauss; Charlotte Levy.
KNEELING
Left to Right: Jacqueline Briscoe; Mary Darley; Carroll Gallion; Louise Siebold; Raycelia Fry; Betty
Brooks; Marjorie Anderson.


* COMMENCEMENT.


Dark suits, white dresses, proud students,
prouder parents, excited chatter, nervous glances
and strained smiles; the perfect setting for
Commencement. On June 11, the auditorium
was the scene of the realization of the dreams
of the class of '37.
The commencement exercises were planned
and carried out by the fifteen seniors who had
the highest scholastic ranking in the class. The
exercises opened with a selection by the high
school orchestra, followed by the invocation by
Reverend "W. Jackson, and the salutatory ad-
dress by Mary Darley. Then there was another
musical selection and a debate by the highest
ranking seniors, excluding the valedictorian,
and the salutatorian; a musical selection, and
the valedictory address by Marjorie Anderson.


After a violin selection of Franz Liszt, the pre-
sentation of awards was made, preceding the
presentation of the class and diplomas. The
benediction was given by Reverend Ralph C.
Deibert, and the Seniors made their last slow
walk, as students, down the aisle.
There was a dance held in the gymnasium for
everyone who wished to attend, and from nine
to twelve the Seniors were hosts for a crowd of
about four hundred parents and students. Every
Senior seemed to have a definite pursuit-to
dance the last dance with the girl with whom
he had danced first as a Freshman. The Com-
mencement dance, for sentimental reasons, al-
ways seems to be the most popular.
The Senior class came that night, danced and
left, no longer students, but alumni.




0


0
0


a


iIf


ed
%e,








1934
























Standing: Mary Louise Warren, Margaret Greene, Mary Ann Cain, Anne Shirley, Erin DeBarde-
leben, Ann Corrigan, Flora Bath, Marie Christian. Kathleen O'Hearn, Isabell peterson, Ruth
Wood, Margaret Wood, Anna Kotalik, and Louise Zimmerman.
Kneeling: Constance Colman, Marjorie Yost, Marion Macintyre, Carol Byrd, Sarah Williams, Anna
Patchett, Ellen Roe, Alice Stetler, Alice MacSparran, Ruth Anderson, Rau Duey and Katherine
Handshaw.
Sitting: Grace Belden, Rose Marie Wolfe, Thelma Calloway, Lucy Dietrick, Bea Cotton, Dorothy
Hale, Alice Hanson, Mary Stumpf, Patsy Coffey and Betty Clay.



Junior Class

By K. O'HEARNE N.

The first meeting of the Junior Class was .
held to elect the officers for the year. William
Scarborough was elected president. Nini Stevens
was elected vice-president, but as she was soon
to be transferred to the States, there was an-
other election at which Virginia Marchman was '
chosen. We have as our Secretary, the vervy
able and popular, Theresa Goulet, as Treasurer
Anne Shirley, and as our sponsor, Mr. Franklin.
At the next meeting the Junior Carnival Corn- -
mittee was chosen. William Hunt was elected
chairman of the committee, with a group of
students aiding him. The booths which were
selected were: Dart throwing, the Dice game, C
the Pin game and the Ring game. On the whole
the Junior Class came over very well in the
Carnival.
At a special meeting the class rings were a -
chosen and the ordering of these was left to
William Forstrom, who attended to this very,- B,,'
well.














Activities




The plans for the Junior-Senior banquet and
Junior prom were made at the next meeting.
The committees were chosen for arranging the
entertainment and the date of the banquet. The
committee heads were: John Finlayson and Bea
Cotton, who, with the help of several students,
handled everything splendidly, and the affair
w.as a big success.

At the meeting held on March 4. it was de-
cided that the Juniors would have another pic-
nic, and it was also stated that all money for
the class rings had to be in on or before March 8.

The class of '38 had a very eventful year,
and we all hope that the Juniors of next year
will enjoy their next to last year in school as
much as the "Class of '38".


Back row, standing:
John McGann, Hani-
bal Galindo, William
Egger, Victor May,
Vern Terry, Gale Ar-
no'd, Albert Collins,
William Huff. Laurel
Highley, Mi:tn Dunn,
Tex Jackson, Vincent
Conrid, Frank Mar-
tin, Kenneth Hcdlsn,
and Asa Bullock.
Second row, standing:
Fred Hauss, P a u
Cole, Claude Linton,
John Muse, Paul Ven-
able, Gladstone Co-
cney, Sam Deavours,
Donald Parker, Wil-
liam Hunt, Eugen-
Stade, Charles Chase,
Jack Gorham, 3nd Ed-
ward McCar hy.


Third row, standing-
Merlin Mulcany, Lnar-
les Schaceer, Claude
Lyon, Eddie Egozque,
Will in Hoverter,
William Scarborough,
John Perude, Ralph
Learn, John Huson,
Dcnald Detwil!er, Ri-
chard Horn.
Fourth row, standing:
Billy Butler, Erne-to
E tencz, Francis Rich,
Anthony Ketcofski,
William Forsstrom,
Albert Hendricks, Mr.
Fr nklin, George
Black, David Potts,
John Finlason, Wil-
liam Fuller, and An-
drew LaPointe.


1938









Sophomore


.. sa > .. ,, '







Sitting:
victor Dougherty, Bert Tagland, Billy Griffin, Roy Phillips, Buddy Parsons, Robert Downie,
Thomas Ashton, Thomas Egger, John Casaroqui, Alfred S:umpf, Rapheal Pretto, Oscar Bejarano.
Kneeling:
Dick Parker, Richard Wood, Charles Reeves, Dick Barnett, Richard Fitzgerald, Frank Robles,
Robert Koperski, Orrin Appin, William Sorum, James Donaldson, Buddy Bloxom.
Standing:
James Smith, Howard Cox, Phillip Briscoe, Howard Melker, Arthur Marole, Grover Gravatt,
Thomas Butler, Frank Peterson, George Booth, Louis Finlason, William Wood, Billy Ebdon,
Woodrcw Torbit, Raymond Walker, Joe Snyder, Maurice Bagilman, Billy James.


The Sophomore Class of 1936-37 at their first
meeting elected the following officers:
Alfred Stumpf .................... President
Billy Ebdon ..................... Vice-President
Virginia Thornton ................. Secretary
Beverly M oody ................... Treasurer
Mrs. Spencer was appointed class sponsor,
Peggy Brown and Bayard Colyear were elected
as class representatives.
The second class meeting was held for the
purpose of discussing the carnival. Beverly Ar-
nold was chairman of the committee. Those who
helped decorate and take care of the booths


were Betty Jo Hamilton, June Hart, Charlotte
McMahon, Jane Bevington, Junior Homelin,
Frank Robles, Rafael'Pretto and Tommy Ash-
ton. At the same meeting the sophomore class
dance business was taken up. A committee was
formed with Louis Finlayson as chairman. Bev-
erly Moody, Charlotte McMahon, June Hart,
Betty Jo Hamilton, Charlotte Elkins, Jane Bev-
ington, Beverly Arnold, Ferne Horine, Alfred
Stumpf and Thomas Butler completed the com-
mittee.
During the first half of the athletic season
the sophomores were the winning teams. Soccer


.4 : l i









Activities


Standing:
Irene Laurie, Charlotte McMahon, Peggy B own, Caroline Carpenter, Betty Cassidy, Jean Green,
Dorothy Bethea. Zona Boggs. Helen Wikinstad, Constance Irvine Edith Fredericks, Cynthia
Martin. Jemsini, Hclgerson, Mariorie Tuttle, Virgini3 Uhlig, Mary Ann McDonald, Margaret
Stein, Charlotte Elkins, Blanche Muse.
Kneeling:
O'ga Fe-nandez, Beverly Arnold. May Ella Lawson, Alma Bramin, Janet Nesbit, Shirley Brayton,
Ida Reynolds, Juanita Sad!er, Margaret Plummer.
Sitting:
June Hart, Jane Bevington, Athelia Butcher, Hua Willison, Vivian Cottrell, Beverly Moody, Helen
Hewitt, Mary Plummer.


was introduced as one of the major sports for
girls and the sophomore girls won the tourna-
ment with high honors as they were undefeated.
The members of the team were Zona BoSgs,
Fern Horine, June Hart, Charlotte McMahon.
Edith Fredericks, Janet Newbit, Ida Reynolds,
Jane Bevington, and Beverly Arnold. The boys
added to this victory by winning the football,
soccer and water polo tournaments. Joe Snyder
led his team to victory in football while Frank
Robles captained the soccer team to a success-
ful victory. Vincent Butler was captain of the


water-polo team. He and Bavard Colyear were
high point men. To celebrate this victory and
the others, the teams held three sport parties.
The first party was a Halloween party, the
second a dance, and the last was a grand splash
party at the Submarine Base.
This class has had the satisfaction of having
members in every organized club in high school.
With such an ambitious and energetic group
of sophomores, our year has been the most
successful and joyful, and we hope that our
class will always carry on in this way.




































FROM LEFT TO RIGHT STANDING UP
1. William Tarburt, 2. John King, 3. Whitney Brayton, 4. Billy Mansfield, 5. Alien Lyew, 6. William
Savage, 7. John Palmer, 8. Buddy Wallace, 9. Eddie Carroll, 10. Eddie Greene, 11. Richard
Thomas, 12. Robert Fernandez, 13. Billy Townsend, 14. Carl Marolhl, 15. Eddie Carrigan, S6.
Arthur Farrell, 17. Mr. Beck.
KNEELING-LEFT TO RIGHT
1. Jack Pryor, 2. Frank King, 3. Jack Lergenmiller, 4. George Herman. 5. Stanford Skinner, 6. John
Frensley, 7. Harold Sallas, 8. Merwin French. 9. Eddie Marquand, 10. Spencer Smith, 11. Francis
Mayville, 12. Buddy Thomas, 13. Robert Thomas, 14. John Tukowski.
SITTING-LEFT TO RIGHT
1. Mon'ford Stokes, 2. Joe Mitto, 3. Robert iviurray, 4. Henry Butcher, 5. Ardes Caries, 6. Jimmy
Coffin, 7. Jack O'Hearne, 8. Fred Dickey, 9. Bill Gaines, 10. Wilbur Palmer, 11. Carlos Herrera,
12. Gerald Kelly.


Freshman Activities
By J. O'HEARNE


The Freshman class of 1937 was ushered in
as usual by the initiation on September 18. Ever.
though we lost, we lost in good spirit and all
went well after that. On October 1, we held our
first meeting of the school year in Room 203.
The purpose of the meeting, which was opened
by Mr. Paul Beck, our class sponsor, was to
elect our class officers for the coming term.


These officers were as follows:
President: Whitney Brayton.
Vice Pres: John Frensly.
Secretary: Bobbie Styles.
Treasurer: Bobby Fernandez.
In sports this year the Freshmen turned out
and made fairly good teams coming up to second
place in baseball and progressed moderately in
other sports.


4' ;
4*~


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On March 5, the Freshman class held another
meeting, the purpose of which was to plan foi
our class dance. This dance was held on April
10, 1937 in the Gymnasium, which was very
effectively decorated for the occasion. The
dance was a big success and well attended.
In May, following the dance, the Freshman
class turned out for our first outing of the year.
This outing was held at Shimmy Beach, and
was a big success.


In the Carnival this year the Freshman Class
took ouite a part, running four amusement
booths. These four booths, brought in about a
total of $73 profit, which, for our first year, was
not too bad.
The class of '40 can boast of having some
very studious members, as was revealed on
one six weeks report. Of the four students on
the "A" honor roll all were Freshman.


Freshmen Girls

Carrie Albritton, Rosalie Cutting, Jean Badgely, Anne Butler. Georgiana Carnwright, Phalba Christian,
Catherine Cowen, Lois Crouch, Alva Fernandez. Olga Fernandez, Elfrida Flores, Jean Grabhorn,
Teresa Hern. Jean Holmelin, Mary Hunt. Jane Kaufer, Georgiana Krause, Dolores La Point,
Ethel Nitto. Mary Jane Phillips, Martha Peterson, Alice Raymond, Jean Raymond, Nancy Shedd,
Jane Stevens, Rose Margaret Stroop, Caroline Stroop, Helen Strosberg, Marjorie Strosberg,
Irmina Stumpf, Bobbie Styles, Ruth Tagland. Lucille Thompson, Marjorie Wegner, Gladys Wertz,
Anna Frances White, Marjorie White, Dorothy Welf.









VISITATION* WEEK


Fond mamas. . bored papas... worried
teachers... much more worried students...
wrinkled Committee ribbons... Marjorie rush-
ing around... ushers looking and feeling im-
portant. . Mrs. Jones wondering why her
Bobby didn't raise his hand like the other
pupils. .. the ushers assigned to the front
table trying to keep all the papers from blow-
ing away... parents wandering around the


school halls.. anxious looks on pupils' faces
... Miss Worrell busy making posters for bul-
letin boards. . assemblies...
Does any of that above bring back me-
mories of that hectic yet pleasant week? The
plans for the Visitation Day to be held as
has been the custom in C. H. S. for many
years-that of having the event take place
in the afternoon Pnd evening of one day-were
changed to cover National Education Week.
This week, beginning Monday November 9,
1936, was set aside by President Franklin D.
Roosevelt to be observed throughout the United
States as National Education Week to preserve
and foster further knowledge.
Each year Mr. Franks has chosen some out-
standing student for the honor of heading the
Visitation Committee. This year the chosen
one was Marjorie Anderson. Under her com-
petent guidance a program was worked out
for the week. On Monday's assembly there
was a five minute talk on "The Purpose of


National Education Week" by Grace Hodges
a member of the Speech Class selected through
a competition. The members of the girl's gym
classes displayed their ability in a clog dance,
and the boy's gym classes staged a tumbling
act. Wednesday there was a "double-duty"
assembly-both for Armistice Day and the
visitors. A representative from the Sreech
C!ss spoke on the meaning of Armistice. A


pageant on Education was put on by the
Junior High School under the direction of
Mrs. Bozeman. And then Mr. Sullivan led
the audience in the mass-singing of the old
wartime favorites. Thursday morning the Girls'
Glee Club under Miss Elner presented a
very clever and colorful operetta "'Marjorie
Goes Modern."
Friday's assembly was the fitting climax
to the week. First Marjorie Anderson spoke
on what the Visitation Committee tried to do
during the week, and then Mr. Williams, the
Superintendent of Schools, gave a short ad-
dress. Mr. Leignadier, the Mayor of Colon,
gave a delightful speech in Spanish, and one
in English. After the speakers, the Dramatic
Club gave a one-act comedy called "Poor
Aubrey".
Following this week of excitement it was
difficult for most students to settle back in
the daily round the common task-but this
was soon accomplished.














































Kathleen Phil-
strom and Bea
rd Colyear and
Sen by Arthur

Zei resentat;ves
,1 life--s orts,
ways be count-
Se capable of.
lent Body who
were the recl-
Stivity schedule.
Year. Septe.m-
any enjoyable
banquets, sev-
operettas, the
r week, and a
I school picnic.
es, Association
Wind, and the

Last meeting
turned after a
oblems.









VI

Fond mamas
teachers. . m
wrinkled Comm
ing around...
pcrtant... Mrs
Bobby didn't r
pupils. . the
table trying to
ing away... r



I






















school halls...
. Miss Worrel
letin boards...
Does any of
mories of that I
plans for the I
has been the c
years-that of
in the afternoon
changed to cov
This week, be
1936, was set a
Roosevelt to be
States as Nation
and foster fourth
Each year Mr
standing student
Visitation Comr
one was Marjoi
petent guidance
for the week.
was a five min






































Student Association Activities


-James Coman


The Student Council officers were elected on
October 16, 1936, beginning one of the most
successful years in it's history. A heated rivalry
among the eligible students resulted in the
inauguration of James Coman, as president,
Wm. Scarborough, vice president, Luis Finlay-
son, secretary, and John Finlayson, treasurer.
This is the first time in the history of C. H. S.'s
Student Association that all the officers have
been masculine.
The Inauguration Ceremonies were held on
the 23rd of October, the week following the
election. Ac a general assembly, in the audito-
rium, the student leaders, for the year were
installed with Reverend Cecil L. Morgan offi-
ilating. The new members of the Student Coun-
cil were introduced for the first time as lead-
ers of the Student Body. The faculty members
are: Mr. Vinton, Director of Activities: Mr.
Sieler, Director of Athletics: and Miss Moore,
Student Sponsor. The student officers need no
introduction.
The class representatives, who are equally
well known, consist of hard working, conscienti-
ous students. The Senior class is ably repre-


sented by Roland Clemens and Kathleen Phil-
lips, the Junior by William Forrstrom and Bea
Cotton, the Sophomores by Bayard Colyear and
Peggy Brown, and the Freshmen by Arthur
Farrell and Elfrida Flores.
This able body of Student Refresentatives
is active in every field of school life--sorts,
dramatics, scholastic and can always be count-
ed on to do the best that they are capable of.
The large number of the Student Body who
joined the Association this year were the reci-
pilnts of a thoroughly enjoyed activity schedule.
This schedule of the fiscal school year. Septem-
ber 18, to June 11, included many enjoyable
dances, athletic and varsity club banquets, sev-
eral one act and three act plays, operettas, the
carnival Thespian parties, Senior week, and a
new innovation to C. H. S., an all school picnic.
In addition to all these activities, Association
members also received the Trade Wind, and the
Caribbean.
The Student Council held its last meeting
of the year on May 31, and adjourned after a
brief discussion of the year's problems.






































PHOTO CLUB

S "Not to produce quantity but quality," was the
Sam of the photo club in its third year. The
officers elected to lead the aspiring young
group of photographers for the year 36-37 were r'.-.
Scarefully chosen president, Roland Clemens,
vice-president, Edward McCarthy, secretary,
Marjorie Anderson, treasurer, Mary Darley.
Mr. Kenneth W. Vinton was selected to suc-
ceed Mr. Paul E. Miller acting in the capacity -
of advisor.
Revolutionary changes have been brought
about in the club with the addition of a "tro-
pic developer", which does away with the old
method of cooling and Panchromatic, a very sen-
s t ve film has replaced the old verichrome type.
This together with the fact that the solutions
used are now standardized make it possible to
take pictures in the morning and have them
finished and returned in the afternoon.
-63 The members have been active in printing
j- and developing pictures for publication in the A .
"Trade Wind" as well as well as many of the
Eqnapshots that appear in the "Caribbean".
Despite the fact that the club is a new
comer, great strides in progress are being made
and it is attracting the interest of more stu-
dents each year.


-~ .-7

-I


































La Pas
By J. WALSH


At the beginning of the school year, Mrs.
Spencer reorganized the Spanish club "La
Pas." The only things that the "La Pas" club.
this year had in common with the "La Pas"
club last year, are the name, sponsor and
high scholarship requirements.
In place of the usual president, vice-pres-
ident, et cetera, a host and hostess chosen
by Mrs. Spencer presided at each meeting,
assisted by an assistant host and hostess,
chosen by the host and hostess. For each
meeting there were different hosts picked
from the highest students in Mrs. Spencer's
Spanish classes who were members of the
club.
The requirements of the club were also
changed. Heretofore, it has been the custom
for Spanish pupils to be invited to the club
after receiving two successive six weeks'
average of ninety or above. Some students
reasoned that once they were in the club they
could slacken up on the work. But they soon
let go of that idea when the system was
changed that in order to be admitted into
each of the meetings, the student must get a
written invitation beforehand; and this invita-
tion was not issued unless the pupil's average
is ninety or above.


On December 14th, the first meeting which
was held at the Carlton Hotel, was presided
over by host Claud Lyons and hostess Mar-
jorie Anderson. The guests of honor were Al-
calde Fernandez-Parrilla and Mr. Franks. Both
of these men gave interesting talks in Spanish.
The second meeting had as host and hos-
tess Bill Hoverter and Jean Walsh. For this
occasion Governor Humberto Leignadier, his
wife and little son, and Mr. and Mrs. Franks
were the guests of honor.
Louise Seibold and James Coman were in
charge of the third formal meeting, which
took place in the High School auditorium. It
was perhaps the most interesting program,
because the Colon Bomberos played many se-
lections and Mrs. Sally MacLaughlin sang
some Spanish songs. The guests this time
were Commandant and Mrs. Ducret, Mr. Es-
ser. and the Cristobal High School Band.
For the fourth and last formal meeting on
April 26, Helen Carroll and Bill Forsstrom
were in charge. Mrs. Spencer gave a fascinat-
ing illustrated talk on her travels through
South America, especially Peru and Chile.







KARNIVAL

Biggest and best ever was the carnival of
1937. Never before were there such crowds
having so much fun.
Under the capable direction of Miss Moore
the total intake from the booths was $1196,
of which about $700 was profit. Hearty rivalry
was carried on between the classes as they
vied with each other for first place. This
coveted position was taken by the Senior
Class which sponsored among other booths
the bingo tables.
For the first time the Science Exhibit was
divided into two sections. The mechanical
and chemical division was sponsored by Mr.
Vinton. The Biology exhibit was sponsored by
Mr. Stickler. Both of these booths drew large
crowds.
The gym, a scene of most condensed hilar-
ity, was attractively divided into booths. Two
of these were operated by the Junior High
School who received valuable training for fu-
ture years.
Among the best if not the most attractive
of all were the food booths. Hot dogs, cakes,
candy, and cookies, were sold by Miss Pope's
Household Arts Classes. Ice cream and pop
were supplied to thirsty customers by Mr.
Batalden and the "Wood work boys."
From behind rows of palms floated melo-
dious strains from Ray Cox and his orchestra
playing for the Trade Wind dance. This feature



S

T

A

G

!, I l E








KAPERS

proved one of the most pop lar of the even-
nig. Toward the latter part of the evening
the dance floor was graced by the presence of
Queen Gladys I of the Lion's Club and her .
court, '
Following the custom of previous years a r
contest was held to determine who would be
Queen of the Carnival and ride the C. H. S. i
float in the Colon Carnival. This contest was
won by the popular freshman, Alva Fernandez. '
The stage show, always one of the biggest
attractions, was superb. There were dances by
Betty McCleary, Victor May, Olive Aanstoos,
the Boggs sisters, Emilie Horine, Theresa
Goulet, the Plummer twins: and C. H. S.
Songbirds, Hua Willison, Caroline Stroop, and
Marie Christian, did their bits to add to the
general enjoyment of the audience. A quartet
of cowboys singing Western songs was very
popular. C. H. S. outdid itself in making
a short skit, "The Worm Turns" written b6 v V
Mr. Sullivan with James Coman in the title ]
role supported by Olive Aanstoos and Billy
Forsstrom. Jack Dignam made a charming
Master of Ceremonies supported by his '
"stooge", Helen Carroll.
The program was ended by a beautiful
ballet arranged by Miss Jacques lead by Ray- i
celia Fry with a chorus of cellophane-wrapped
beauties.
Three performances were presented.





SI














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+++, __ -"--- .



































LEFT TO RIGHT:
Standing-Olive Aanstoos; Jacqueline Briscoe; Emma Jean Starke; Rita Kotalik.
Kneeling-Esther Neely; Betty Brooks.


Girls' Varsity Club


The girls' Varsity Club is composed of girls
who have earned the highest awards in athle-
tics. Usually they have been members of teams
participating in each sport offered on the
school program.
The Club sponsored by the girls' athletic
director, meets monthly in the Student Coun-
cil room in the High School. The members
of the club discuss problems occurring in girls'
sports, also methods of rating and general
policies to be adopted during tournaments.
This year the club has twelve member j.
They are girls who earned pins last year or
letters in sports while under class men. Next
year's membership will be augmented by the
new girls who earn awards this year. Present
officers of the club are:
Esther Neely-President.
Mary Dignam-Vice President.
The insignia of the club is a white felt
cap decorated with the letter "C" in yellow
edged with purple. The awards, this year are
white wool pullover sweaters with an old
English "C" in gold, edged with purple. These


are awarded to the ten girls having earned
the highest number of points in Athletics
during this school year. The next ten on the
list receive their class numerals.
Occasionally, the Varsity Club has a social
evening. In January a swimming party fol-
lowed by a beach supper was held at the
swimming pool at the Submarine Base. In
April a progressive dinner party was given.
Beginning with the first course at the home
of Emma Jean Starke, in Old Cristobal, con-
tinuing with the main course at Betty Brook's
home in New Cristobal and terminating with
the dessert course followed by games and
other entertainment at the Goulet home on
Colon Beach.
The members of the club being mostly Se-
niors attended the first Athletic Banquet. This
was tendered by the Student Association to
the winning teams in boys and girls sports
for the months of October, November and
December. Another banquet was held in May
for winning teams in the second term sports.








































Varsity Club

All sporting activities in Cristobal High
School and Junior High are organized and
sponsored by the Varsity Club. The members
are also obliged to work out all the rules gov-
erning sports, pass on all individuals who wish
to participate in athletics, and establish the
point system for membership in the organiza-
tion. The club is active socially in that it spon-
sors athletic banquet throughout the year.
At the first meeting held the following offi-
cers were nominated and elected:
President ....................... Jack Clay
Vice President .......... John Finlayson
Secretary .... ............ James Christian
Treasurer ................ William G. Wood
Mr. Seller was appointed to act as advisor
and sponsor.
The social season began with a banquet held
at the Hotel Carlton for the boys, victors in
football and soccer, and the girls, victors in
soccer and volley ball. The final event of the
year was the varsity initiation for new mem-
bers and the banquet in their honor.
Thus, with a successful and memorable year
concluded another chapter has been completed
in the history of the Cristobal High School
Varsity Club.

































The Girls' Glee Club


The Glee Clubs of C. H. S. have always
been the finest organizations of our school. They
have each year presented musical programs that
added high spots to the school's activities.
Each girl serving in the Club receives a
half credit, known as the activity credit, for a
year's work. This organization is composed
mostly of Freshmen and Sophomore girls.
This year, following tradition, the club has
contributed freely toward the entertainment
of the student body. Their first presentation
was a short operetta, "Margie Goes Modern,"
given as a regular assembly program for the
school during Visitation Week. This program
told the story of a girl who won a fortune
by trying modern art.
On December twenty-second the Girls' Glee
Club combined with the Boys' Glee Club and
the Dramatic Club in presenting "The Nativ-
ity." This lovely Christmas pageant was thor-
oughly enjoyed by students and guests.
On the twelfth of March "The Fays of the
Floating Island", a cantata by Paul Bliss was
presented to the complete enjoyment cf the
audience. Also a few members of the club
cooperated with the Boys' Glee Club in pre-
senting "H. M. S. Pinafore".
The combined clubs took part in the joint
festival in Balboa on April ninth. This excep-
tional group also contributed to the success of
Baccalaureate Service and the Commencement
program.
Charlotte Levy, the school pianist, deserves
special commendation because of her faith-
fulness and cooperation with the Glee Clubs
for the last four years.





































The Boys' Glee Club


Like the Girls' Glee Club, this organization
is made up of mostly Freshmen and Sopho-
mores, each receiving a half credit for a year's
work.
This excellent group has presented most of
its program with the Girls' Glee Club this
year. Their first contribution was the Christ-
mas program at which time they took part
in "The Nativity" as shepherds and Magi.
On the twelfth of March, assisted by
members of the Girls' Glee Club, they pre-
sented "H. M. S. Pinafore," an operetta by Gil-
bert and Sullivan. Also accompanied by the
girls they presented an annual Woman's Club
program on the seventeenth of March.
The entire Glee Club participated in a joint
music festival held in Balboa on April ninth.
Also this organization will take part in the
Baccalaureate service and Commencement pro-
gram.
Each member deserves much credit for the
fine work they are doing and the pleasure
they have afforded the student body and the
community.








































Band


One of the most useful activities in C. H.
S. is our band which is under the capable
direction of Mr. Sullivan. The band is larger
and better this year than ever before. Also
this year marks the most activities in which
this organization has participated. It has play-
ed at all dramatic club programs and has
been affiliated with the Glee Clubs in their
programs.
The Band was entertained by the La Pas
club at one of its meetings where they heard
the Bombero's Band play.
The Band took an active part in the Music
Festival on April ninth and the annual Car-
nival. They also played several numbers at
the Baccalaureate Service and the Commence-
ment program.
The Junior High Band is organized in order
that its members may be able to step into
the vacant places in the C. H. S. group left
there by the graduation of some and the
departure of others.















I

aMm


Dramatic Club
M. MACINTYRE


This year the Dramatic Club was sponsored
by new faculty members, Miss Mary Worrell
and Mr. Paul Beck. Mrs. Spencer, long the
director of dramatics in Cristobal High, re-
signed in order to spend more time with her
Spanish Club. The vacancy was adequately
filled by Miss Worrell, Grade School super-
visor of Art, and Art instructor for Cristobal
Junior and Senior High: and her assistant,
Mr. Beck, History instructor. The officers of the
year were Kathleen Phillips, president, Esther
Neely, vice-president. Theresa Goulet, secre-
tary. and Bill Scarborough, treasurer. Much
credit is due to Miss Worrell and Mr. Beck
for making actors of many of our students,
and for making successes of all our plays.

The Dramatic Club and Thespians have
cooperated to present many successful plays.
Their first public performance of the school
year was on Friday afternoon of Visitation
Week. The play, "Poor Aubrey", was enjoyed
so much by all, that another program was
given by request on the evening of November
24. The next day the success was repeated
at the Little Theatre at Balboa.
On December 10, the dramatic group pre-


sented three one-act plays, "Bargains", and
"Red Carnations", directed by Miss Worrell,
and Mr. Beck.
On February 16, the dramatic club present-
ed two more one-act plays and the lonesome
cowboys with Dixie Lee gave us some music
and dancing, straight from their native west.
' he plays were '"A Marriage Proposal" direct-
ed by Miss Worrell, and "A Dispatch Goes
Home" directed by Mr. Beck.
The final culmination of the year's work in
dramatics was the three-act play given on
April 30. Only the cream of the actors and
actresses were selected for this play, an ex-
ceedingly clever comedy called "The Patsy."
The leading part of Patricia Harrington was
taken by Constance Coleman, her sister Grace
by Betty McCleary, her mother, Mrs. William
Harrington by Olive Aanstoos, her father Bill
Harrington by Anthony Refcofski, Billy Cald-
well, Grace's fiance, by Montford Tawes,
Tony Anderson, the boy Pat loves, by Jimmy
Coman, Sadie Buchanan, a friend, by Marion
MacIntyre, Francis Patrick O'Flaherty, one of
Pat's friends, by George Booth and "Trip"
Busty, driver, manager, and owner of a taxi
by Charlie Washabaugh.


WLiAh3:
11 f 4 Bi
---- ^ m ^ _. __ .







However, the dramatic club did more than
act in plays. When the cast of "Ile", a play
presented over here by the Balboa High dra-
matic club, came over they had a luncheon
party for them in the cafeteria. On March
30, they held a public meeting, attended by
their parents, at which their sponsors pre-
sented a program consisting of three readings
from "John Brown's Body" by S. V. Benet
and a skit by Miss Worrell, and a talk on
the development of the drama by Mr. Beck.
At Christmas time and at a spring program
on March 12, the dramatic club, under the
direction of Mr. Beck, helped Miss Elner
with the acting and makeup and lighting for
her programs.


The dramatic club wishes to thank Mr.
Sullivan and the orchestra for the music they
provided between plays, and acts; Miss Pope
and her household arts classes for making
possible their parties and for assistance in
costuming, Mr. Batalden. and his "shop" boys
for constructing the stage props, and Miss
Liter and the Trade Wind Staff for publicity.
At the beginning of the year 73 students
signed up for dramatic work. Eight of these
were initiated into the National Thespians
on May 7. They were Jacqueline Briscoe,
Constance Coleman, Jeanne Eggleston, Billy
Forsstrom, Theresa Goulet, Marion Macintyre,
Kathleen Phillips, and Montford Tawes.


Thespians


This year the National Thespians, a Drama-
tic Honorary fraternity, was sponsored by Miss
Mary Worrell and Mr. Paul Beck.
At a meeting held early in the year Macel
Goulet and Betty McCleary were initiated into
the society, making a total of twelve members.
During the year Dramatic Club members
strived to make the necessary requirements for


entrance. By the middle of February eight stu-
dents were eligible for the fraternity.
Ruth Moody acted as President and Catalina
Ecker acted as Secretary-Treasurer.
This year the Thespians worked with the
Dramatic Club members so all social func-
tions were held with the Dramatic Club.










- SKULE *DAZE -
By C. GALLION


Sebtember-
18.-Students... noise... harried teachers...
greetings... a new kind of schedule.., new
and younger faces . new teachers. . shake
well-finished product: First day of school. In
the afternoon the traditional Frosh-Soph Rush
with Senior boys near to bursting with their
importance as overseers (Picture)... In the
evening the dance to make the Freshmen feel
at home in High School.
21.-We heard the Trade Wind may be a
printed paper this year.
29.-The library opened today... librarians
are being busy cataloging three hundred new
books. ..
30.-Girls' Gym started today.
October-
7.-Mr. Beck, new history teacher arrived
today.
3.-Trade Wind Staff announced today by
Carroll Gallion, Editor-in-chief.. Short assem-
bly in morning... Mr. Seller announced foot-
ball first sport of year. . Miss Rechter said
girls' sports start off with soccer... Mr. Miller
announced swimming class for credit for both
girls and boys... In afternoon classes met to
elect officers for coming year ...
7.-Tryouts today for Glee Club production
"Margie Goes Modern"-Results kept secret.
14.-Junior Steam Rollers flatten Senior
Crimson Tide in football... Trade Wind Staff
holds first meeting.
15.-Pep program for Student Association
held in auditorium-Open forum for discussion
of our system. . Robert Byrd announced to
head Business Staff of Publications.
16.-Election held for Student Association
officers-results counted after school in audi-
torium-Jimmy Coman elected President.
19.-Marjorie Anderson announced to head
Visitation Week committee for this year.
20.-Mr. Miller's swimming classes started
today with a big turn out.


22.-National Thespians-Miss Worrell and
Mr. Beck sponsors.
23.-During eighth period the officers of the
Student Association were installed -Reverend
Morgan administered the oath and gave ad-
dress... Girl's Varsity held first meeting of
year-Esther Neely elected President.
30.-Today the electors of the Democratic
party of C. H. S. went to Balboa Playshed to
attend the dramatization of the inauguration of
the President of United States.
31.-Scph girls' soccer team entertained the
Soph boys' football team with a Hallowe en
party.
November-
9.-The first six weeks period ended-report
cards given out . First day of Visitation Week
...Pyramid team and members of Speech Class
featured on assembly program.
10.-More parents in the classes-ushers try-
ing to find the right classes to send fond parents
into... Miss Patterson's typing class showed in
auditorium how they typed to music.
11.-Armistice Day-program featuring group
singing and speeches.
12.-With no apologies to Modern Art, Glee
Club presents operetta, "Margie Goes Modern."
13.-Friday-in spite of superstitions... Visi-
tation Week came to an end successfully...
Program eighth period-Dramatic Club presents
"Poor Aubrey"-Address in Spanish by Mr.
Leignadier, the Maycr of Colon.
14.-C. H. S. football team defeated friendly
rival B. H. S. at Kokonut Park.
19.-Soph boys win football championship on
handicap.
20.-Senior d2nce-soft music-hot music-
soft lights-fun for all ...
23.-Girls' Varsity meets-choose for em-
blem, white felt skull caps with Old English C
in purple and gold...
24.-Dramatic Club meets... Soph girls win
soccer championship.









25.-C. H. S. welcomes new addition to fa-
culty circle-Mr. Stickler, father of Ann Joy-
leen. ..
27.-Mary Darley and Marjorie Anderson at-
tempt an interview with Lloyd George-get an
interesting report from his secretary...
28.-Soph athletes-girls and boys-celebrate
championship at Coco Solo with swimming
party.
December-
10.-Student Council met-Bob Brikson, Pre-
sident of Balboa Association, guest-Household
Arts Classes served refreshments... In even-
ing Dramatic Club presented triple killing...
12.-Senior boys entertain for Senior girls'
soccer team, but girls didn't know it-Junior
girls made up party-.
14.-La Pas met-Carlton Hotel-first meet-
ing of year...
18.-Banquet for winning athletes in soccer,
girls and boys-volleyball, girls-football, boys.
22.-Glee Clubs and Dramatic Club-Nativity
presented.
23-Student Association dance.... Merry
Christmas to all!
January-
4.-Happy New Year!... Everybody's back
after vacation...
5.-Soph boys swim off with waterpolo cham-
pionship. ..
8.-C. H. S. played and won first game of
Twilight League... Class meetings-Carnival
plans well under way...
15.-Advanced Home Ec. give luncheon...
Balboa Little Theatre, "Ile" in C. H. S. Audi-
torium-C. H. S. Dramatic Club gave Balboa
players a luncheon in cafeteria.
16.-Junior Class held picnic at Shimmy
Beach-eats-drinks-sand-sunburn .
22.-Advanced Home Ec. give second of se-
ries of lunches.
25.-La Pas meets at Carlton... groans -
moans-headaches-exams start.
February-
5.-Hot dogs! Ice-cream! Three shots for a
nickle-Ten cents a dance. . A bevy of cello-
phane wrapped beauties-Carnival!!
12.-Worry, Worry!-Caribbean work starts.
Mr. Miller begins dancing classes.
13.-B. H. S. beats C. H. S. in Baseball.
14.-Alumni of today and tomorrow get to-
gether at Shimmy Beach for a St. Valentine's
day picnic.
16-Dramatic club plays...
17.-Glee clubs entertain Woman's Club...
19.-Music and dancing with the Sophomores
as hosts...
20.-Golf tournament opens...
27.-Mr. Stickler organizes Biology club...
Field trip to Bat Cave.


March-
3.-Sample announcements for Seniors arrive
...Carnival returns come in... Hall of Fame
started.
5.-Class meetings-Skipper's Club frustrated.
12.-Junior High School gives music pro-
gram... The Fays of Floating Island presented
by Girls' Glee Club... H. M. S. Pinafore, pre-
sented by Boys' Glee Club.
15.-La Pas holds a meeting... Mr. Franks
leaves for States... Mr. Esser assumes prin-
cipal-ship.
17.-Woman's Club programme-Bobby Jac-
ques announces her engagement to Lieutenant
Gabel.
18.-Charlotte Levy broadcasts over H P 5 K
and HP50 "The Voice of the Victor."
21.-Water Carnival at Gatun.
20-28.-Easter vacation-The last "breather"
before June.
30.-Dramatic club meets.
Ahr;7--
1.-Cyclone hits Canal Zone-C. H. S. wiped
out (what do you think).
9.-Music Festival in Balboa playshed.
10.-Freshman entertain for first time-very
successful dance.
14.-Pan American Student Forum meets.
26.-Spanish club holds meeting.
30.-Senior Play presented in auditorium
"The Patsy"-.
May-
1.-May day program-games and fun...
5.-Varsity Club initiates new members.
8.-Eight new Thespians receive initiation...
14.-Juniors Seniors speeches music
- dancing fun Junior-Senior Banquet.
28.-Recognition day assembly... Written
awards-sweaters and letters given to those who
so deserve...
June-
6.-Baccalaureate service held in C. H. S.
auditorium.. .
7.-Senior exams-groans worried looks -
- satisfied expressions?
8.-More exams-class night-will-history
-prophecy-and "antics"-.
9.-And still exams-In evening seniors have
hayride and swimming party.
10.-Afternoon seniors rehearse for corn
mencement night-seniors-boat ride.
11.-At last it's here-Reports being given.
out-Caribbean being autographed-An assem-
bly to bid farewell to those leaving-.
Night-commencement-music by band and
glee clubs-awards-medals-books and pins-
Debate by Seniors-speeches-then diplomas...
and the alumni file out. Dance in gym.
13.-And so teachers and students leave for
the States-and to C. H. S. we bid a fond
adieu.






















Biology Club

Among the many interesting' activities of-
fered this year in Cristobal High School, was
the Biology Club, which was organized by Mr.
Stickler, the science and biology instructor of
Cristobal.
The club was organized to give the stu-
dents a better knowledge of plant life, animal
life, and the earth itself, from actual experi-
ence. The club was open to all biology stu-
dents, both boys and girls, who were inter-
ested and who made the required standard
grade of `C".
On Saturday, February 27, the club hiked
to "Bat Caves", a trip that was enjoyed by
the whole group.
On April 3, the Club journeyed over to
Panama City from where they went out to the
Old Panama Zoo. Here they were conducted
through the Zoo by Dr. March, who willingly
answered all questions asked.
A hike to "Pot Holes", on the head waters
of the Coco Solo river, furnished the third
outing of the club. Many students participated
in this to make it another successful outing.
During May the club held its fourth meeting,
which was in the form of a social affair.
We wish to congratulate Mr. Stickler for
introducing this new activity and hope that it
will be continued again next year.








TRADE WIND*


"Only a newspaper! Quick read, quick lost,
Who sums the treasure that it carries hence?
Torn, trampled under feet, who counts thy cost,
Star-eyed intelligence?
The Journalist.
Twelve times during the school year, the staff
of this paper has given the students of C. H. S.
a Trade Wind. Twelve times this group has
mopped a collective brow, heaved a collective
sigh, and given a collective once-over to the
final result, murmuring with a sort of apologetic
pride, "a poor sheet, perhaps, but our own."
Few of those outside of the high school
"fourth estate" realized the amount of time and
work which the members of the staff give to
publications. More than four hundred hours
vanished from the lives of the Editor-in-Chief,
Carroll Gallion, of the senior Assistant-Editor,
Mary Darley, and of the Business Manager, Ro-


bert Byri. Marion Maclntyre, the junior-Assist-
ant Editor spent some at work and gone without
lunch, at times, that the paper might not be late.
Joe Coffin walked many miles with Robert Byrd
soliciting advertising from the merchants on
both sides of the Isthmus and lost from his life,
forever, several hundred hours. Billy Fuller,
serving as apprenticeship on the business end
of the paper and writing articles, occasionally,
learned that it takes more perspiration than any-
thing else to put out a school paper. Two faith-
ful typists, Goldwyn Grabhorn and Eleanore
Stumpf, typed the journalistic efforts of the staff
cheerfully and most efficiently, and without their
help the rest of the staff would not have been
able to do their work.
All of the other members of the Trade Wind
staff worked hard and cheerfully wrote and
rewrote that the paper might have their best ef-
forts.









-i
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1%7-
ac~J~















I change in the
the first of the
ew innovation in
a popularity and
:bail as the most

Siron experience
,rising how well
'nsive and defen-
is were. Football
season, drawing
All teams were
O evenly matched
eight breathtaking

to the midst of
nselves drenched
ely defeated the
@ e championship
season, and cap-
pt through their
ks-by their tra-
t, and by the Se-

the Seniors how-
Ince created by
ie previous year,
Sating only the
d a oood iob Ps
carry the load of
0 operation.
cellent football,
were runners-up
p; High!ey, the'i
"l nce of mind in
'9 called.
. by inexperience,
St position when
,, ,A4.i, ,vay, but showed
nd a willingness
eal for his team,
i n the losing end,
.. I "Ci g-eling prevailing


Schools clashed
game on Novem-
S C. H. S. by the
was turned in by
": ley, and Wood,
Sing starred time


































"Only a newspa
Who sums the
Torn, trampled
Star-eyed intell

Twelve times
of this paper ha
a Trade Wind.
mopped a colle
sigh, and giver
final result, mui
pride, "a poor s
Few of thosa
"fourth estate"
work which the
publications. M
vanished from
Carroll Gallion,
Mary Darley, ar










S .....









Football


By J. COMAN

Because of a much desired change in the
athletic schedule, football was the first of the
many sports this year. This new innovation in
SC. H. S. is rapidly gaining in popularity and
ranks with baseball and basketball as the most
popular sports.
With only one year of gridiron experience
under their belts it was surprising how well
planned and well versed in offensive and defen-
sive tactics the different teams were. Football
had an interesting and exciting season, drawing
large crowds to every game. All teams were
Championship caliber, and so evenly matched
that every game was a hard fought breathtaking
contest of skill and brawn.
SThe Sophomores stepped into the midst of
the football reign, and got themselves drenched
in limelight when they decisively defeated the
Junior "Steamrollers" in the championship
game. The Sophs had a good season, and cap-
tained by Joe Snyder swept through their
schedule with but two setbacks-by their tra-

L_ V nior "Crimson Tide".
-. .The same cannot be said of the Seniors how-
S.ever, who through overconfidence created by
S, their sensational playing of the previous year,
S'-, ended up in third place, defeating only the
.' .. Freshmen. Eddie Hoffman did a oood lob as
S. captain but was unable to carry the load of
Eleven men. Football needs cooperation.
The Juniors, playing excellent football,
S- throughout the whole season, were runners-up
for the inter-class championship; High!ey, then
captain, showing a good presence of mind in
the varied assortment of plays called.
f W The Frosh, handicapped by inexperience,
found themselves in the last position when
the football smoke cleared away, but showed
_-__ B a surprising amount of pep and a willingness
," to learn. Farrell did a good deal for his team,
S. bolstering their spirits when on the losing end,
S. '*and keeping a cheerful feeling prevailing
throughout.
Cristobal and Balboa High Schools clashed
in a bitterly contested all-star game on Novem.
r ber 14, resulting in a win by C. H. S. by the
I: I score of 13 0. An excellent game was turned in by
Scarborough, Christian, Highley, and Wood,
|, ,... who through heads-up ball playing starred time
' 'l and again.


/ *-. 5,3
































I- S I
q);~i~


Soccer
Still bubbling with enthusiasm over football
and the keen competition that they had encoun-
tered, all of C. H. S. sport enthusiasts reported
on December 9, for the first soccer practice of
the year. Doing very little other than electing
captains, and assigning regular berths on the
team, they departed, only to return a week later
to see the Sophs defeat the freshmen.
The seniors, greatly handicapped by the loss
of Billy Wood, fought like veritable demons to
stem the tide of misfortune that had followed
them all year. But bad breaks plus bad weather
kept them in an inescapable rut from which
they could only eke out third place. "Herbie"
Gottesman, captain showed time and again the
qualities for which a captain is chosen-cour-
age, skill, and common sense. What success the
seniors had is due to him.
"Davy" Potts led his junior "Steamrollers"
to another second place in the sport limelight,
losing out only at the last minute to the fight-
ing Sophs. The juniors had a great team, but
they, too, received a good deal more than their
share of bad luck.
The Sophs, whom everyone believed to be
but a flash in the pan, surprised everybody, in-
cluding themselves, when they not only defeated
the juniors but eked out enough wins over the
seniors and the freshmen to capture the title of
"Champs". Congratulation, Captain.
The Frosh, once again the victims of inex-
perience, found themselves in the cellar posi-
tion. Through no fault of their own, however.
for their captain led them through a schedule
of hard fought games, and they were in there
every minute fighting like their namesake, "The
Fighting Irish."

1^-IBBPP


a a


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Baseball


When the call came for baseball on January
4, tbe largest crowd of young hopefuls reported
that C. H. S. has ever witnessed. Such spirit
promised an interesting season, and the spec-
tators were by no means, disappointed.
The Seniors once again suffered ignominous
defeats by their opponents, and captained by
Jimmy Coman, once more found themselves in
third place when the season ended. There wasn't
a very good showing of class spirit on the part
of the Seniors for they played most of their
games with only seven men present-an insuf-
ficient number to play against such strong teams
as there were in the league. This was evidenced
when the Seniors won only three of their
scheduled six-a percentage of 500.
The Juniors at last lived up to their promise
and took the baseball championship by a large
margin. Eddie McCarthy played his men well
and gave everyone who turned out a chance at
the opposition, (the Juniors, unlike the
Seniors, had enough men for two teams). The
"Steamrollers" had little or no opposition and
swept through their schedule without a defeat.
The Sophomores continued the fine work
that they started at the beginning of the year
and fought their way into second place. With
George Booth leading them, they played a fine
brand of baseball winning four out of six to
obtain a percentage of 666.
The Freshmen through no fault of their own,
or lack of spirit, lost all but two of their games,
to give them a percentage of 333. Whitney
Brayton led his "Fighting Irish" well, and if
the Sophomores of next year have as capable
a leader they will definitely threaten the base-
ball moguls of C. H. S.


-
.,*
~ ~
~'...~.I~CL







Water Polo


Splash! Kerplop!-Water Polo was on, and
December 27 saw the first two games of the
season-the Frosh vs the Sophomores and the
Juniors vs the Seniors. The Sophs and Se-
niors climbed from the pool, puffing and
blowing but victorious.
Water Polo had an extremely successful
season, and excitement was at fever pitch,
resulting in good natured razzing and duck-
ing. Mr. Miller officiated at all games and
did an excellent job.
The Seniors emerged from their third place
rut and although favored to win lost out by
a narrow margin to the Sophomores in the
championship game. Gottesman was high scor-
er for the Seniors, and proved himself worthy
of the title "Captain", his team losing only
one game, but that a costly one.
The Juniors found themselves in an un-
familiar position in the team rankings when
the splash had subsided. Through no fault
of their own, however, for they played a
hard, fast, game, and showed no inclination
to give up, no matter how far behind they
were trailing. They had a percentage of 333,
winning only from the Frosh. George Black
did a good deal to keep the spirit of good
sportsmanship prevailing.
The Sophomores captured for themselves
another championship, and they certainly de-
served it, for they went through their schedule
without a defeat. They had a fine turn-out
and Bayard Colyear and Captain Vincent
Butler starred again and again. They went to
Balboa to play the Pacific interclass champions
but lost by the overwhelming score of 4-0.
The team presented no excuses, and the only
comment made was that Balboa had the bet-
ter team. That is sportsmanship.
It was the old familiar story in the case
of the Freshmen, who lost every game, and
found themselves in last place again. Even
the very fine playing of Captain Eddie Cor-
rigan was not enough to stem the flow of
defeat and they hadn't a single grain of vic-
tory to flavor their losses.






Basketball
By JAMES COMAN
(W-hoops, boys, w-hoops) Basketball started
with a bang when on the first day the Seniors
trounced the Juniors, and the second Junior
team mopped up on the Sophs.
The Seniors settled down to serious playing
in this last of sports, and won their schedule,
but the Seniors had two entries in the basket-
ball race. The graduating class, because of lack
of athletes, evidently, had but one team-but
what a team! Captained by Roland Clemens,
they swept through a series of hard games with-
out a single set-back.
The Juniors fastened another second place
under their belts, when each of their teams lost
but a single game-to the Seniors. Johnnie Fin-
layson and Billy Hovrter were captains, and held
their respective teams through their schedule
without a set-back of spirit and pep. Both teams
were model examples of good sports.
The Sophomores were not so lucky in basket-
ball, and the best they could do was a third
place. Buddy Stumpf led one team, while his co-
leader was Luis Finlayson. The Sophs seem to
have the ability to chose good captains, but the
lack of good basketball material cannot be off-
set by a good leader.
The Frosh teams did not win enough games
to drag them out of the cellar position, but not
through lack of trying. Farrell and Marquard
were elected to lead them, and weren't in the
class of poor leaders, either. The Frosh lost all
but one game. Their main draw back this year
has been the lack of experience, but next year
they promise to be a threat to the sporting mo-
guls of C. H. S.
Balboa sent a representative "5" to Cristoba!
to attempt to take the basketball flag back to
the Pacific side, but lost to C. H. S. by the
tight score of 51 to 48.


j


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H4i a


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Girls Sports

-Charlotte McMahon '39


The girls were very active in athletics this
year. Along with the regular athletic schedule,
soccer was introduced as a major sport. This
proved to be the most popular among the girls,
as there were more girls who attended practices
and took an active part in soccer than in any
other sport. This was an interclass game, the
Sophomores emerging as the champion team.
The other class teams fought hard and ener-
getically, but were not to be winners as the
Sophomores proved to them by not losing one
game. The Junior class came second in this
sport while the Seniors and Freshmen emerged
to third and fourth place respectively.
Volleyball was a different story. The Senior
girls would not stand for being defeated in this
sport and proving that they had the strongest
and fittest team. Thus the Seniors won the


volleyball tournament. The Juniors emerged
second, Sophomores third, and the Freshmen
fourth.
The Juniors took first place in the softball
and bowling tournaments, which were the first
two sports of the second semester. Other sports
played during this semester were tennis, basket-
ball, and badminton, the latter being introduced
into the line of sports by Miss Bailey, our very
able gym instructor.
On the whole there was a good showing of
girls representing all of the classes. There were
more spectators attending this year's girls
athletic tournaments than in any other year
heretofore. We hope that girls sports will con-
tinue to be as popular as they are now and that
we shall have many more bigger and better
times playing on the various teams.













II


rib-a

Sft









































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COMMISSARY DIVISION, P.R.R.
DUTCH'S PLACE
EASTERN PALACE
C. B. FENTON
FINLAYSON'S PHOTO STUDIO
FRANKS BARBER SHOP
FRENCH BAZAAR
FRENCH DRUG STORE
INOCENCIO GALINDO JR.


GITTEN & TAYLORS
HAMBURG-AMERICAN LINE
GRAND HOTEL IMPERIAL
ITALIAN LINE
RAMON JIMENEZ M.
MME. LAVERGNEAU
A. R. LEE
MADURO'S
MARGARITA FLORIST
MARTINEZ & CO.
J. V. MOODY
MOTTA'S
MOUDRY)S FLOWER SHOP
NEW CHINA
NICHOLS CHINESE RUGS, INC.
PACIFIC STEAM NAVIGATION CO.
PANAMA AMERICAN
PANAMA RAILROAD
POWELL'S GARAGE
JULIO A. SALAS
SANDERS & FISCHER
SANITARY MATTRESS FACTORY
SCADRON OPTICAL COMPANY
SMOOT-BEESON, S. A.
STAR & HERALD


APPRECIATION
Those, besides the staff, who have been
responsible for the successful printed "Trade
Wind", are our faithful and co-operative ad-
vertisers. They put their money and faith into
our new venture and as for their confidence we
owe them a wealth of appreciation.













TAMM'S
STERLING'S GARAGE
SWISS JEWELRY
HOTEL TIVOLI


UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
WASHINGTON HOTEL
WILSONS GARAGE
WONG CHANG & CO., LTD.