Caribbean

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Title:
Caribbean
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Serial
Language:
English
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Cristobal High School
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Yearbook House
Place of Publication:
Kansas City, Missouri
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Subjects / Keywords:
Canal Zone
Yearbook
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serial   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00093680:00023


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II .
4a A L~


The Class of 1936.


We, the Caribbean staff dedicate this magazine

to the class of nineteen hundred and thirty-six with

the hope that it will refresh their memories of the

happy days spent in Cristobal High School.









THE CARIBBEAN

VOL. XIX CRISTOBAL, CANAL Z.ONE No. 3
PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL
JUNE 12, 1935.












Table of Contents

Page
I. D EDICATION ..........-.. ......... .... ...............-- ... 1

II. SENIORS ------- ...-........--- -. ..-.... .--------.. -

III. SENIOR CLAFS LEADERS ....... ..................... - 17

IV. THE COMMENCEMENT COMMITTEE AND THEIR WORK...... ........... 18

V V ALEDICTORY ......... ........... ....- ....... .. -.... -.. -...-. ---.......---- --. 20

VI. SALUTATORY ........-. -- ------ ..-........... -- ---...... ........... - 21

VII. COMMENCE\1ENT SPEECHES .............. ------.. --- ------- - ------ 22

VIII. SENIOR FUTURES ....................................................--.--... .. 24

IX CLASS H ISTORY.. ...... .......-...-.. ... ..... .. ... -. 25

X. CLASS PROPHECY .-..-...... ............-........ ....-- 26

X I. CLASS W ILL ... . ....... ......... ...... ... ... ...... 27

X II. AT tHI.E ICS . .. ....... .......-- ---....-.....- -. .. -..... -----_ 28





IORS










"A man he seems of cheerful yesterdays
And confident tomorrows."

Name-THEODORE ARNOLD AANSTOOS, JR.
Birthplace-Stanford, Connecticut.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-October, 1926.
Activities--Photo Club 2; Trade Wind Staff 2, 3, 5; Car-
nival Committee 2, 4; Caribbean Staff 3, 4; Jr.-Sr.
Dramatic Club 3; Effe Kube Klub 4; National
Thespians 3, 4; Math Club 3; Slide Rule Club 4;
Pyramid Team 4; Class Treasurer 4.







"One who never turned his back but marched
straight forward."

Name-FRANK A. ANDERSON. JR.
Birthplace-Brooklyn, N. Y.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-October, 1924.
Activitie.s-Soccer 3, 4; Basketball 4; Trade Wind Staff
3, 4; Caribbean Staff 3, 4; Carnival Committee 3,
4; Pyramid Team 4; Football 4; Water Polo 4.









"Plain without pomp, and rich without a show."

Name-ROBERT O. ANDERSON
Birthplace-Camden, New Jersey.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-December, 1929.
Activities-Glee Club I; Art Club 1; Photo Club 3, 4;
Trade Wind Staff 4; Slide Rule Club 4; Soccer 4;
Baseball 4.











"Thy modesty's a candle to thy merit."

Name-MAY APPELL
Birthplace-St. Nazaire, France.
Dale Entered C. Z. Schools-March, 1934.
Activitie--Trade Wind Staff 4; Caribbean Staff 4; Basket-
ball 4; Volley Ball 4; Tennis 4; Bowling 4.









"For manners are not idle, but the fruit
Of loyal nature and of noble mind."

Name--AARON PAUL BARNETT
Birthplace-Colon R. P.
Dale Entered C. Z. Schoolr--October, 1924.
dctilitex--Orchestra 1, 3. 4; Glee Club 1, 3; La Pas 3, 4;
Caribbean Staff 3, 4; La Pas Vice President 4; Bas-
ketball 4; Effe Kube Klub 4; Soccer 4.








"A man of hope and forward-looking mind."

Name-WENDELL GLAWSON COTTON
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. School--October, 1924.
,ctliVities-Class President 1, 2; Athletic Association 1;
Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2. 3, 4; Baseball 1.
2, 3, 4; Track 2; Swimming 2; Varsity Club 3, 4;
La Pas 2,3,4; Science Club 3; President ScienceClub
3; Carnival Committee 3; Varsity Club Vice Pres-
ident 4; Student Association President 4; Football 4.









"To those who know thee not, no words can paint,
And those who know thee, know all words are faint!"
Name--ROSEMARY LOGAN COX
Birthplace-Savannah, Georgia.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-September, 1935.
Acitiites-Glee Club 4; Caribbean Staff 4; Trade Wind
Staff 4.










"A rosebud set with little wilful thorns,
And sweet as English air could make her, she."

Name--RACHEL MA. CUESTA
Birthplace-Camaguey, Cuba.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools -October, 1928.
AJctiities-Athletic Associationl; Debate Club 2; Trade
Wind Staff 2, 4; La Pas 3, 4; Caribbean Staff 4.













"Look not thou down but up!"

Name-WARD JACKSON DAVIES, JR.
Birthplace-Philadelphia, Pa.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-May, 1934.
Actiities-Trade Wind Staff 4: Basketball 4: Football 4.








"0, blest with temper whose unclouded ray
Can make tomorrow cheerful as today!"

Name-JAMES MATHEW DAYS
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-October, 1924.
1Acltilies-Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Athletic Association I; Class
Vice President 2; Cheer Leader 3, 4; Carnival Com-
mittee 3, 4; Orchestra 3, 4; Band 3, 4; Jr.-Sr. Dra-
matic Club 3; Class Representative 3; Effe Kube
Klub 4; Basketball 4; Soccer 4; Baseball 4; Pyra-
mid Team 4; Leader's Club 4; Slide Rule Club 4;
Slide Rule Club President 4; Football 4.






"Good sense which only is the gift of Heaven,
And though no science, fairly worth the seven."

Name-JULIO DOMINGUEZ, JR.
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. School--October, 1930.
Activities-Athletic Association 1; Math Club 2; Photo
Club 2; Caribbean Staff 2; Track 3; Soccer 3, 4;
Basketball 4: Pyramid Team 4; Baseball 4; Foot-
ball 4.








"A face with gladness overspread!
Soft smiles, by human kindness bred!"

Name-OLGA MARY DOMINGUEZ
Birthplace-Havana, Cuba.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools--October, 1930.
lctiitie--Athletic Association 1; Debate Club 2; Carni-
val Committee 3, 4; La Pas 3, 4; Trade Wind Staff
4; Caribbean Staff 4










"With his eves in flood with laughter."

anme- EDWARD A. DURHAM
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Dale Entered C. Z. School.--October, 1923.
.ctlitlies-Glee Club 1; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 3.
4; Jr.-Sr. Dramatic Club 3; Class President 3:
Track 3; Soccer 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4; Water Polo
4; Pyramid Team 4: Band 4: Football 4; Effe Kube
Klub 4.









"Queen rose of the rosebud garden of gir's"
,ame- EVELYN DWYER
Bir/hplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools -October, 1925.
Acli'itie.s-Effe Kube Klub 1; La Pas 2, 3; Class Rep-
resentative 3; Class Vice President 4









"A daughter of the gods, divinely tall
And most divinely fair."

.Yame--DORIS ANN EBDON
Birhplace-Colon, R. P.
Dale Entered C. Z. School,-October, 1924.
.icliities-Class Secretary 1; Glee Club 1; Class Rep-
resentative 2; Effe Kube Klub 2; La Pas 2, 3, 4;
La Pas Secretary 3: Basketball 3: Carnival Com-
mittee 4.









"Hang sorrow! care will kill a cat,
And therefore let's be merry."

,anie- MICHAEL A. FERNANDEZ, JR.
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-September, 1934.
.ictiitile.r-Soccer 3, 4; Trade Wind Staff 3, 4: Carnival
Committee 3. 4; Caribbean Staff 4.











"I have been so great a lover."

amne--ARMANDO J. GASPERI
Birthplace-La Guayra, Venezuela.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-October, 1924.
Activities--Athletic Association 1; Debate Club 2; Photo
Club 2; Math Club 2; Trade Wind Staff 2, 3, 4;
Basketball 3; Track 3; Soccer 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4;
Pyramid Team 4; Slide Rule Club 4; Football 4.








"And still they wondered and the wonder grew
That one small head should carry all it knew."

Name-MARY GERTRUDE GOULET
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Dale Entered C. Z. Schools-September, 1930.
Activities-Athletic Association 1; Trade Wind Staff 2, 3,
4; La Pas 2, 3, 4; Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Swimming
1; Basketball 2, 4; Volley Ball 4; Caribbean Staff
3, 4; Bowling 4.








"She moves a goddess, and she looks a queen."

Name-GRAYCE LYDIA GRAVATT
Birthplace-Brooklyn, N. Y.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools--September, 1927.
Activities-Glee Club 1; Art Club 1; Supper Club 1, 2, 3;
La Pas 2, 3, 4; Effe Kube Klub 2, 3; Carnival Com-
mittee 2, 3, 4; National Thespians 3, 4; President
National Thespians 4.






"Eyes so transparent,
That through them one sees the soul."

Name-MARY EUGENIA GRIFFIN
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Dale Entered C. Z. Schools-October, 1923.
Activities-Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Athletic Association 1;
Trade Wind Staff 2, 3, 4; Effe Kube Klub 2, 4;
Jr.-Sr. Dramatic Club 3; Class Secretary-Treasurer
3; Class Representative 4; Glee Club 4; Caribbean
Staff 4; Basketball 4; Volley Ball 4; Bowling 4.













"Brevity is the soul of wit."

Name--PHILIP A. HALE
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools--October, 1925.
Activities-Basketball 4.










"Whose little body lodged a mighty mind."

Name-WILLIAM G. HILL
Birthplace-San Jose, Costa Rica.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-October, 1924.
Actidities--Athletic Association 1; Caribbean Staff 1, 2;
La Pas 1, 2, 3; Swimming 1, 2; Tennis 1, 2, 3; De-
bate Club 2; Math Club 2; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4;
Carnival Committee 3; La Pas President 3; Soccer
3, 4; Baseball 3, 4.










"The fair, the chaste, and unexpressive she."

Name-DOROTHY LOUISE HOECKER
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Date Entered C. Z. School.-September, 1931.
Activities-Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2; Jr.-Sr.
Dramatic Club 3; Carnival Committee 4; Trade
Wind Staff 4; La Pas 2, 3, 4.








"Health is the vital principle of bliss
And exercise, of health."

Name--HOPE HOLLOWELL
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-October, 1923.
Acti,,ities-Glee Club 1; Swimming 1; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4;
Girl's Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4; Bowl-
ing 3, 4; Trade Wind Staff 4; Volley Ball 4.


,,











"The mildest manners and the gentlest heart."

Name-JOSEPHINE JEANNETTE HYLER
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-September, 1931.
Activities--Glee Club 1; Art Club 2; La Pas 2, 3, 4; Effe
Kube Klub 2, 4; Carnival Committee 3, 4.













"Gentle of speech, beneficent of mind."

Name-CLAIRE A. KOESTER
Birthplace-Sanford, Maine.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-March, 1935.













"Silence is the mother of truth."

Name-RUBY VERONICA LYEW
Birthplace-Colon R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-September, 1932.
Activities-Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Supper Club 2, 3, 4.











"Dark eyes-eternal soul of pride!
Deep life in all that's true!"

Name-ALICE MIRIAM MACSPARRAN
Birthplace-Washington, D. C.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-October. 1923.
Acti'ities-Supper Club 2, 4.











"A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance."

Name--GEORGE EDWIN MARCUSE
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schoolc-October, 1925.
Jdctiiie.r-Track 2, 3; Trade Wind Staff 3, 4; Caribbean
Staff 3, 4; Carnival Committee 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4:
Soccer 3, 4; Football 4.









"No man is wiser for his Learning
Wit and Wisdom are b.irn with a man."

Name-CHRISTOPHER ROY MATCHETT
Birthplace-Belize, British Honduras.
Dale Entered C. Z. S,'hool.--March, 1935.
.c-i,,'itier--La Pas 4; Slide Rule Club 4; Pyramid Team 4,
Trade Wind Staff 4; Caribbean Staff 4; Soccer 4:
Basketball 4; Water Polo 4; Football 4.











"She is a winsome wee thing,
She is a handsome wee thing."

.\;ae-FRANCES MILLER
Birthplace-Dallas, Texas.
Date Entered C. Z. Schoo.r--April, 1935.












"Grace was in all her steps, heaven in her eye,
In every gesture dignity and love."

Same- MURIEL RITA MULLANE
Birthplace-Colon R. P.
Dale Entered C. Z. Schools-October, 1923.
Actiitieis-Effe Kube Klub 1; Supper Club 1, 2; Glee
Club 4.



















(I-


"Life's a pleasant institution,
Let us take it as it comes."
Name-ROBERT A. MOOT
Birthplace-East Rutherford, N. J.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-October, 1928.
Activities-La Pas 2, 3; Science Club 3; Jr.-Sr. Dramatic
Club 3; Photo Club 4; Slide Rule Club 4; Pep Club
4; Football 4.









"Just at the age twixtt boy and youth,
When thought is speech and speech is truth."
Name-CHARLEY PAUL MURPHREY
Birthplace-Medford, Massachusetts.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-May, 1930.
Activities-Baseball 4; Effe Kube Klub 4; Pep Club 4.











"The sweetest thing that ever grew
Beside a human door."
Name-FRANCES HELEN PATCHETT
Birthplace-Washington, D. C.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools--October, 1926.
Activities-Supper Club 4.









"And thy deep eyes, amid the gloom,
Slide like jewels in a shroud."
Name-LOUISE MAY POTTER
Birthplace-Lexington, Missouri.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-September, 1934.
Activities-Tennis 3, 4; Volley Ball 4; Archery 4; Pep
Club 4; Bowling 4.


! &A u











"A lovely being, scarcely formed or molded,
A ros2 with all it's sweetest leaves vet folded."
Xame--VIRGINIA LEE SANDERS
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. School--October, 1923.
Activitie,--Class Vice President 1; La Pas 2, 3; Carnival
Committee 3; Class Secretary 2, 4.










"So swe't the blush of bashfulness
E'en pity scarce could wish it less"
Name-HOPE J. SCHAEFER
Birthplace--Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools--April, 1924.
Acti'itiers-Trade Wind Staff 3; Supper Club 4; Pep Club 4











"'My heart is like a singing bird."
Same--NANCY JANE STARKE
Birthplace-Cincinnati, Ohio.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools--October, 1925.
,Actiities-Athletic Association 1; Art Club 2; La Pas
2, 3, 4; Letter Club 3, 4; Bowling 3; La Pas Officer
3, 4; Baseball 4.








"Her calm simplicity of grace."
Name-VIRGINIA MARY STRONG
Birthplace-Fort Monroe, Virginia.
Date Entered C. Z. School--February, 1935.
ActiLities-Basketball 4; Volley Ball 4; Archery 4; Ten-
nis 4; Bowling 4.


.?A


F-"... -1~lj












"In each cheek appears a pretty dimple."

Name-EULA MAE PLATH
Birthplace-Ackley, Iowa.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-February, 1931.
Activities-Supper Club 3, 4; Basketball 4; Volley Ball 4;
La Pas 4; Bowling 4; Archery 4; Pep Club 4.











"Her actions were modest and her words discreet."

Name--AGNES M. E. REINKE
Birthplace-Cclon R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools--October, 1924.
Activities-Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Effe Kube Klub 2; Jr.-
Sr. Dramatic Club 3; La Pas 3. 4.








"I stand on my attainment."

Name--OSEPH RETTALLY
Birthplace-Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-September, 1932.
Ac'i'itier-Athletic Association 1; Science Club 2: Tennis
2, 3; Soccer 2, 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4; Trade Win]
Staff 3, 4; Band 3, 4; Varsity Club 3, 4; Varsity
Club Treasurer 3; La Pas 3, 4; Slide Rule Club 4,
Leader's Club 4; Pyramid Team 4: Caribbean Staff
4; Baseball 4; Football 4.









"And violets, transformed to eyes,
Enshrine a saul within their blue."

.Vame-ANNE DE L. RHEA
Birthplace-Quincy, Massachusetts.
Date Entered C. Z. School--September, 1934.
Activitier-Caribbean Staff 4.











"T'is well to be merry and wise,
T'is well to be honest and true."

.ame-LOUIS BERT ST. PETER
Birthplace-Philadelphia, Pa.
)ale Entered C. Z. SclhoL--September, 1935.
.Ictliities- Slide Rule Club 4; Caribbean Staff 4.












"All the heart and the soul and the sense
forever in joy."

Xame--ARTHUR HERBERT TAGLAND
Birthplace-New York, N. Y.
Date Entered C. Z. School--September, 1935.
.Icthiiies--Slide Rule Club 4.










"It is good to lengthen to the last a sunny mood."

.ame--ELEONORE AGNES TAIMAN

Birthplace-Troy, N. Y.
Date Entered C. Z. Sch.oolr-October, 1924.
,lcti, itiej--Pep Club 4: Trade Wind Staff 4; Caribbean
Staff 4.









"And her sunny locks
Hang on her temples like golden fleece."

Name- VIRGINIA F. THOMAS
Bithplace-Colon R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schoolt--October, 1924.
Aiclt,'iies-Effe Kube Klub 1; Volley Ball 2, 3, 4; Basket-
ball 2, 3, 4; Baseball 3: Trade Wind Staff 3: Glee
Club 4.















3d_



\


"Then on! then on! where duty leads,
My course be onward still."
Name--DONALD HYDE TOWNSHEND
Birthplace-Philadelphia, Pa.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-October, 1924.
.Acivities--Track 1, 2, 3; Orchestra 2; Band 2, 3, 4; Soc-
cer 3, 4; Jr.-Sr. Dramatic Club 3; Science Club 3;
National Thespians 3, 4; Photo Club 3, 4; Photo
Club Business Manager 3, 4; Class Representative
4; Slide Rule Club 4; Slide Rule Club Vice Pres-
ident 4; Pep Club 4; Football 4.





"Jolly good natured, full of fun,
If you want a real friend here's one."
Name-WILLIAM HOWARD WILL
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Date Entered C. Z. School--October, 1924.
,lcti'ities-Class Representative 2; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4;
Baseball 2, 3, 4; Soccer 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4;
Tumbling 2, 3; Water Polo 4; Pyramid Team 4;
President Varsity Club 4; Football 4.






"Today, whatever may annoy,
The word for me is Joy, just simple Joy."
Name-JOHN F. PARSONS-WILL
Birthplace-Tampa, Florida.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-October, 1929.
Activities-B. A. A. 1, 2; Slide Rule Club 4; Baseball 4.


'7j




f
----

















** 1Y
2-s.


From left to right: Wendell Cotton, President
of the Student Association, with the Senior
Representative, Mary Griffin and Donald
Townshend.











-n ,^ -


C:






I


ma~


The Senior Class Officers.
















0i





41


The Commencement Committee.


In conformity with the custom which has been establis-
hed at Cristobal High School of breaking entirely away
from the standardized commencement, the committee
of this year's class (composed of the fifteen ranking stu-
dents) decided upon th2 type of exercise which was given
as being the most unusual and effective vehicle for pre-
senting the ideals they wished emphasized.
Responsibility for the general planning of the affair
was given to William Hill, who did brilliant work both
in writing the original script and supervising the staging.
All members of the committee participated, however,
both in working out the details and in trimming the general
idea down to the financial and personal limitations within
which it was necessary to work.
Aside from minor changes necessary to make the parts
conform to the general plot, the speeches were conceived
and written by the students giving them. Alteration or


wholesale revision of speeches by faculty members was
held to a minimum, because it was felt that the entire
play would be more effective if it truly represented the
thinking of the students themselves.
The committee, however, fully appreciates the many
wise and helpful suggestions of the faculty sponsors, Mr.
Franks, Mr. Vinton, and Mr. Sullivan, and their interest
in devoting valuable time toward making our commen-
cement a success.

While we realize that a.much more impressive exercise
could have been given ha4' we had more time. unlimited
finance, and a group of highly trained actors from which
to recruit our talent, it is our hope that we have succeeded
in our two main objectives, effectiveness of presentation
and originality.

THE COMMITTEE






COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES
of the
Cristobal High School
Class of '36
Cristobal High School Auditorium
Friday Evening June 12 1936
Eight O'clock

PROGRAM


Overture.


. "Mossic" .


In vocation .........................
Salutatory........ ..... ......
Everystudent, an allegorical play .....
Aeolian Trio .. ...... "The Al

Valedictory Address................
"M elody in F"..............

Presentation of Awards and Diplomas.


Benediction...
Recessional...


p-Maid's Dream".......



High School Orches


"M'arch of the Peasants"... .


Music Directed by
Miss Mildred Elner.
Music Supervisor. Cristobal High School


.... ....... Seredy
High School Orchestra
.......... Reverend Jackson
.............. .........Olga Domingue
... . .... Seniors
.. .... ...... ... .. .......... Labitzky
Paul Barnett, Georgianna Krause, Robert Hanson
................... ..... ......... .. M ary G oulet
............... ..................... Rubenstein
tra
.. .... ........... M ilford Franks
Principal, Cristobal High School
... ........ Reverend Morgan
.. .... .. ....... . . ....... .. ... W eber
(from "Der Freishutz") ..... High School Orchestra
Program Directed by
Mr. Richard L. Sullivan,
Instructor, Cristobal High School.


EVERYSTUDENT

For inspiration in planning this year's commencement the committee went back to that period, rich in scholastic
traditions, when students wandered back and forth among the universities of Europe seeking knowledge which was
often buried beneath the shroud of monasticism-th Middle Ages.
The play is typical of the period as are the monks' gowns worn by the players, the latter being replicas of the
universal student costume of that day from which the modern, traditional graduation gown is descended.
The speeches are modelled upon the familiar drama of the Middle Ages, the allegory, the actors representing qua-
lities rather than persons.
The presentation is planned, written, and interpreted by members of the senior class.
CAST
Class of 1936 (Valedictorian)... .. ... .. ..Mary Goulet
Public Opinion. . . ... ..Arthur Tagland
Faith.......... ..... ...... ... ..........Dorothy Hoecker
Perseverance.. ................. ......... ..... .. .... W ard Davies
Honesty..... . .. . Julio Dominguez
Courage. ... ......... .. .. Robert Moot
Ambition ............. ... .... .. Lydia Gravatt
Appreciation
Books..... .. ... Louise Potter
Painting..... .... Jeanette Hyler
Sculpture.. .... Mary Griffin
Music. ... . . ... Evelyn Dwyer
Special Mention
Stage lighting properties ... ............... .William Hill
Faculty advisors: Mr. Franks Mr. Vinton Mr. Sullivan.
Costumes designed and made by girls of the advanced class in Household Arts supervised by Miss Bowman.
NOTE
Ambition's dance "The Swan" is interpreted to the accompaniment of "Le Cygne "Saint-Saens; Charlotte Levy.
at the piano. Cristopher Matchett, Paul Barnett, Jim Days and Joseph Retally deserve special commendation for
giving up their places of honor with the graduates on the stage in order to play with the orchestra.











































Valedictory

BY MARY GERTRUDE GOULET


Members of the faculty, fellow classmates, parents and
friends:
It is with a feeling of joy that we are here tonight-
of joy for the time which we have so long anticipated, has
come. This is our commencement day.
Only those can fully appreciate our happiness who have
passed through the changes of school life, when study
was not always a pleasure, who have undergone the strain
of examinations, and performed those various duties
which have at times seemed so difficult.

We have told you tonight of the virtue we shall need
to go through life, and even though we are young, we
have had experiences during our school days in which
these traits were needed.

We have been blamed as well as praised by our teachers
and fellow students, so we should know a little about how
we shall be judged in the world by public opinion. We
had to have ambition to reach our present goal. Faith,
perseverance, and honesty were needed to guide us on
our way, no matter what our trials were. All of us have
had courses in some art, so we can partially appreciate it.
In courage we-were never lacking, therefore we feel con-
fident of success.


For being able t > attain this goal we owe a great debt
of gratitude to our parents. Can we ever repay them for
the sacrifices they have made? From our infancy they
have watched our progress and guided our inclinations.
We may show our appreciation for their efforts by carry-
ing out the examples set by them.
Besides our parents, we have our teachers whom we
must thank for their zeal and assistance through our
courses of study. No matter how undeserving we were
they were always ready to give advice and help when
needed.
And now, to you. Undergraduates, I wish to say a word.
We are leaving this building and you are to remain until
your time of parting will come. At that time, you, too,
will understand what it means to leave your companions.
Thus, we say adieu, and hope that you will be as proud
and as confident at your graduation as we are.
My classmates, I have bidden others farewell in your
name but farewell I cannot say to you. We are going into
the world together, and although land and water may lie
between us, we shall always be one in our memory. We
shall all have a common purpose-never to be a discredit
to our Alma Mater and to live to be good, upright citi-
zens,









































Salutatory
By OrGA DO.iNGL(EZ


It is with great joy that we gather here tonight for we
are to achieve that goal for which we have worked twelve
long years-we are receive to our diplomas.

We have labored hard and steadily. Many were the
times when we felt that we could get no further and that
we couldn't keep on working. But just at those critical
moments an encouraging remark from one of those guar-
dians who have taken it upon themselves to show us the
way through these dangerous years, gave us spirit to
keep on struggling, and finally we have come out victorias.

Almost four years ago we entered high school as inex-
perienced freshmen. We looked upon the sophomores as
almost our equals, the juniors as upporclassmen, but
those mighty seniors as being very dignified and old. We
thought that it would be years before we would be in
their places. The time seemed so remote that we didn't
give a bit of thought to it. And now, before we have even
time to realize it, four years have passed and we are about
to give our place to another senior class.

Mingled with the happiness and joy of tonight is a bit
of sadness. Now that we graduate each one will go his
way. Perhaps we won't see these familiar friends with
which we have spent so many years, these friends with
whom we have worked and played so many times. We
will also miss our teachers, for whom we have come to
have great affection, even though, at times, we thought
they were cruel for giving us so much work to do.

No more will we walk these corridors, our arms loaded
with books, making short visits with friends we encounter
as we pass from our various classes. When we step from
the stage tonight it will be as graduates of Cristobal High


School. In the gymnasium just about an hour from now
we will be dancing as alumni of our school.

Next year, those of us who stay on the Isthmus may,
perhaps, come to school to visit, but we will feel very
different from what we do now. Every day when we came
to school we felt that it was something of a home, for we
spent a great deal of our time in it. Next year we will
feel as strangers. We will see now faces, new teachers
perhaps, whom we do not know.

In the years to come we will look back upon this happy
night and realize that it was the closing chapter of the
best and happiest volume of our lives. Even though, at
times, school may have seemed boresome, we are compe-
lled to admit that these carefree years, free from responsi-
bilities and worries, were happy ones. We might not think
so now, but when we are out in the world, working for
our existence along with the rest, we will realize it.

As we leave the stage we will be taking a great step
into that life in which, upon now, we have been largely
spectators. But, before receiving our diplomas, which
are in themselves only passports into that life, let us pause
for a moment and think of things that are to come. When
we step into real life we may find ourselves lost. Certainly
we will find that there are many qualities which we will
need to develop if we are to achieve success.

This year, in order to get away from the old, formal
type of commencement, we thought it best to present our
ideas in a new and novel form, which straggely enough
is also an old and familiar form. It is the type of play in
which each actor writes his own part. We sincerely hope
that you will enjoy it.







FAITH
Dorothy Hoecker.


I am Faith, Ambition's greatest helper-the substance
of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen. I
am your constant companion. I have bee I with you ever
since you entered school, and I will continue to be with
you throughout life.
You need me, for I give you strength when you are
low in spirit. Think not only of Faith in God, and in the
spiritual world. That is only part. When you were a
child you had faith in your parents. As you grew older
it became more a part of you. Now you have faith in
your friends and teachers.
You must also have faith in yourself, and in your future.
You must feel that you can master any problem that will
arise during your journey through life. Without me you
could not have gotten this far. You must let me be your
companion throughout life. Honesty, perseverance
ambition, and courage are necessary, but without me
they are of little value.
Consider the great deeds man has done. It was faith
which enabled to do such great things. Think of the
engineers, and ponder upon the great deeds they have
done. They make the grades of a great highway easy
of ascent, they plan the curves and straight stretches.
They plan tunnels so carefully that workmen beginning
on opposite sides of a mountain meet in the middle at an
exact, preconceived spot-all visualized and thought out


before work was begun. I gave those men strength and
foresight.

There are many things beyond your understanding,
but stay with me and all will end well. You know the
way you came, you know the way you go, and the rock
rock upon which you stand is not to be laughed into dust.
Let them laugh who will, but as for you-simply believe.
You have gotten this far with me by your side, and you
will march on to greater victories if you stay near me.
Listen to the words of the poet Riser:
Faith is not merely praying
Upon your knees at night;
Faith is not merely straying,
Though darkness to the light.

Faith is not merely waiting
For glory that may be,
Faith is not merely hating
The sinful ecstacy.

Faith is the brave endeavor
The splendid enterprise,
The strength to serve, whatever
Conditions may arise.

Remain steadfast in faith, for without me Ambition
could never have the strength to go on.












NESTY


Julio Dominguez


I am Honesty, most necessary of all Ambition's helpers.
Wealth and fame mean nothing at all if you have not
been honest in acquiring them.

Many well-known men in America and all over the
world have become famous and wealthy. These men were
ambitious, but they were also honest at all times in their
dealings with others. Their honesty made them well-loved
and respected by all.

Maybe you may think that ambition is so powerful
that it does not need the help of honesty; that an ambi-
tious man can achieve success even without the aid of
honesty. You are wrong. It may be that for a time he
may be carefree and happy, but sooner or later his disho-
nesty will be discovered. Ambition cannot help him
then.

Ambition has helped you during your school career.
You were ambitious to get good grades. You studied


hard and sometimes denied a show or a party in order to
achieve what you were aiming for. But, were you not also
helped along by honesty? It was honesty that urged you
on to greater efforts in order that you would not have to
resort to unfair methods in getting a passing grade when
one of your teachers suddenly gave you a test.

We must not forget the greatest merit a man can possess
to judge others with honesty. Never judge a friend, or
as far as that goes, anybody without honesty. Do not
be critical to an extreme. No one was born perfect. Every-
one of us has his little faults which has can overcome.
Always be honest with your companions and give them
a chance. Don't forget that you too are judged and criti-
cized by others.

Always remember to be honest, for without honesty
Ambition becomes avarice or greed, without it she is a
fickle jade and loses her beauty and power in men's eyes.












PERSEVERANCE
Ward Davies

I am a slow, plodding fellow, but I'm Ambition's grea-
test helper in spite of what the other say. Patience is
my mother, and my father is Strength. I guess we're
a slow family all around.
Lots of other qualities run away from me and hurry by,
but I just keep on plodding and I find I usually pass the
in the end.
Someone's always comparing me to the tortoise in the
old race between the Hare and the Tortoise, but I don't
mind. He won the race, you remember?
You've heard that water can wear away stone? Well.
it's true. And that's the way I go about things. I just
keep on and on at a thing until it's finished, and in the
end I get lots more done than most.
Abition's such a flighty quality that she's always
running off and leaving me, but I always have to help
her in the long run. Without me she would never have
the strength to carry on.










COURAGE

Robert Moot

You will need the courage strong men have when they
face violent death with a smile on their lips.
-You will need the courage to face doubt and despair.
-and the courage to stand by your beliefs even though
Public Opinion himself were against you.
-You will need the quiet courage it takes to bear up
patiently under hardships and sorrow.
-and the stubborn courage to risk all on a venture,
and failing in it, to smile and start anew.
-You will need mother courage and the courage of
fathers, and the courage to fight for good causes even
against hopeless odds.
-You will need the courage to face the facts of life
not as you wish them, but as they are-and the courage
to wait and hope while one you love lies in the shadow
of death's door.
-Ah there are many ways in which I can help you.
Methinks you will be in sore need of me if you intend to
defy Public Opinion and prosper in it. It takes courage
to do that.
































Seniors Who Expect to Attend College


Senior Futures


Seniors usually find themselves asked the question
"What are you going to do?" or "What college are you
going to?" Some have already made up their minds (or
had them made up for them). Others, not so fortunate
have to face an uncertain future. The senior class of
1936 seems to have high ideals-journalists, nurses, army
officers, navy officers, dietitians, and business officials,
to mention a few.
Both, Theodore Aanstoos and Donald Townshend
plan to enter the Webb Institute of Naval Architecture,
at Bronx, New York City.
The three who intend to be nurses are Claire Koester,
Agnes Reinke, and Dorothy Hoecker. Claire is planning
to attend the Reading Hospital in Reading, Pennsylvania;
Agnes, the Pasadena Junior College prior to further trai-
ning, and, Dorothy, the University of Southern Califor-
nia.
Ward Davies hopes to go to West Point, but before
entering that institution, he is going to Colombia Prep
School in Washington, D. C.
Mary Goulet will go to the Canal Zone Junior Collegs to
study business administration. The following year she
hopes to go to the University of Texas at Austin.


Annapolis is the goal of Louir St. Petery and Arthur
Tagland. Louis is expecting to go to Penn State Univer-
sity for one year in preparation for Annapolis. He
will major in electrical engineering, Arthur is going to
attend Severn which is in Marylaud before entering
Annapolis.
Rosemary Cox is the future journalist. Her ambition
fs to go to State College San Diego, California.
The dietition is Eula May Plath who will major in
home economies in the Southern Methodist University
at Dallas, Texas.
May Appel and Louise Snyder are preparing for bu-
siness careers. May is going to a business college "some-
where in Kanssa," and Louise is planning on the William
and Mary College in Virginia.
Another senior expecting to finish up a business earcer
is William Hill, who has chosen the University of Califor-
nia as his goal.
What the future really has iu store for these ambitious
graduates, of course, remains to be seen. Perhaps five,
ten or fifteen years from now, the rest of us will be proud
to say, "We went to school with them and knew them
when they struggled through history assignments and
English notebooks" Who can tell?


'i'i






A-----


(Clas Mishtory
bvy Mary Griffin '36


In the fall of 1932, sixty-seven very green freshmen
entered the portals of learning of C. H. S. To these begin-
ners fell the honor of being the last freshman class to
start out on the road to success in the old Cristobal High
building. As freshmen we were a marvelous class, even
though our position in the school was most lowly. We
has as our class advisor Mr. Hackett, who certainly aided
in starting the inexperienced people that we were on the
correct road. Wendell Cotton was elected our class
president, while Doris Ebdon, Chita Murray and Virginia
Sanders were the other officers. Eddie Curtis made his-
tory for our class by getting on the Boy's Varsity Club.
Hope Hollowell represented the girls of the class by getting
on the Girl's Varsity. Many freshmen joined the Athletic
Association. Our Freshman Dance was a Novelty Dance
given at the Washington Hotel on May fifth. The dance
was carried out as a radio program, and everyone enjoyed
the entertainment. Upperclassmen even broke down and
admitted that it was a grand affair.
Into a brand new school and into the more sedate life
of sophomores, we entered our second year of high school
with high spirits and full of pep. "Mope" was again
elected our president, and Mr. Hackett, again, our advisor.
Other officers were Jimmy Days, Virginia Sanders and
Edward Durham. As the Students' Association was
installed that year, Doris Ebdon and Howard Will were
our representatives. On January fifth we gave our annual
class dance and as it was the first of that year. It was most
successful. The number of members in our class decreased
slightly that year, but the number of boys representing
our class in athletics increased. Will Curtis, Hill, Ri-
chardson, Hanna, Durham and Rettally were among the
sophs in the lime light in '34.
With our third year of high school arriving, there arrived
also that grand feeling of being an upperclassman. For
the third time, Wendell was elected president, but as he
had been president twice before, he was ineligible. Eddie


Durham was then elected president and the other officers
were Doris Ebdon and Mary Griffin. Evelyn Dwyer and
Jimmy Days were class representatives. Mr. Meyer was
our class advisor. Our junior year was very eventful.
We received our class rings and we gave the best Junior-
Senior Banquet ever given. (At least we thought so.)
Mary Goulet was toastmistress and she did very well in
making the affair one to be remembered. Evelyn Dwyer
was elected the Queen of C. H. S., thus adding more
laurels to the illustrious class of '36. Many juniors were
active in dramatics and a few became National Thespians.
In sports we showed a fighting spirit. More girls took
part in '36 than before, and the boys were out in all their
glory.
In the fall of 1935 fifty dignified persons entered the
portals of C. H. S., and, although they had worked hard to
to attain their dignified air, in their hearts they regretted
to think that it would be their last year. The class again
elected Wendell as their leader and Mr. Vinton as their
sponsor. As "Mope" was elected the president of the
Students's Association, he resigned as class president and
Paul Barnett was elected. Doris Ebdon, Virginia Sanders
and Teddy Aanstoos were elected as the other officers
and Mary Griffin and Dcnald Townshend were elected
class representatives. The first class dance of the year
was given by the senior class on Thanksgiving Eve. Every-
one agreed that it was a wonderful dance. Without Mary
Goulet as their editor the "Trade Wind" and "Garibbean"
would never have been as excellent as they were. Frances
Patchett helped to keep the standards of the class of
1936 up by being elected Queen of C. H. S. at the high
school carnival. The girls of our class won the volley
ball and bowling athletic banquet, and the boys gave a
good fight, although they did not come out on top.
As the end of school draws near, many persons are sad,
for some classmates will go away forever, but the class
of 1936 will have many fond memories to cherish, and
they will always be proud of C. H. S.


25


z











by Rosemary Cox '36


A PAGE FROM THE DIARY OF A STRUGGLING REPORTER


June 2, 1946--Cloverdale, Virginia.
Today I was given a very interesting assignment and
one which I enjoyed a great deal. I covered the wedding
of the famous beauty and belle of the class of 1936, my
friend, Miss Anne Rhea, to Lieut. Michael John Eason
of the United States Navy.
The wedding took place in St. John's Church by the
Sea, at five thirty o'clock in the afternoon. When I en-
tered the church I noticed that a good many of my former
classmates in Cristobal High School were present. I sat
down by the wellknown physician, Armando Gasperi, who,
I've been told, empties the pockets of the rich in Texas
only to put the money back into those of the poor.
The ushers were Jimmy Days, Charlie Murphrey, Ward
Davies, Teddy Aanstoos, Donald Townshend and William
Hill. Jimmy and Charlie are entertainers on the Chase
and Sanborn Coffee Hour on the radio. I listen to them
every Sunday night. Armando informed me that Ward
is now a Captain in the Army. His brilliant service in
Europe brought him his position. Teddy is Make-up
Editor for the New York Times; Donald is running the
Ford Agency for the Canal Zone, while William owns the
Wax Museum in New York.
He had no time to tell me more for the music began.
I thought at first that the ceremony had begun, but it was
only Muriel Mullane, the songster of our class, accompa-
nied by the famous violin player, Paul Barnett. Paul took
New York by storm last year. Muriel has just returned
from Europe where she had been training her voice. Great
things are expected of her.
Just as Muriel finished her song, "Oh Promise Me,"
my dear friend, Mary Goulet, entered and sat down be-
side me. She recently was made Dean of a very fashion-
able school for young ladies which bears her name. She
told me that Hope Hollowell is Physical Director in her
school, and that Jeannette Hyler had charge of the music
department, while Virginia Thomas is teaching history
there.
We both looked around then to see whom else we could
spy. The famous New York playbcy, Eddie Durham,
was sitting quite meekly by the side of his newest fiancee.
Georgia's newly elected senator, Wendell Cotton, but just
plain "Mope" to me, wassitting near by as were also
Junior Will, now taking Clark Cable's place on the screen;
Lydia Gravatt, the beautiful classical dancer; and Robert
Anderson, who just recently completed a contract for
the construction of some very important bridges for the
Russian government. Christopher Matchett, the prom-
inent English author and playwright, I was later informed,
had left a very entertaining game hunt in Africa to be
present.
Evelyn Dwyer, a fashionable young matron of Philadel-
phia's society sat beside her wealthy husband.
Arthur Tagland, a brand new Lieutenant in the Navy
and Louis St. Petery, Professor of History at Columbia
were sitting together. I was told that Louis also writes
articles for "Current History." Dorothy Hoecker, mak-
ing good in the field of interior decorating waved to me
from across the aisle, where she was talking to Agnes


Reinke, an authority on cooking, who test recipes for
Good Housekeeping's culinary department.
Just then the wedding march began, and all eyes, in-
cluding mine, were turned toward the rear of the church.
First came two beautiful little flower girls. One certainly
favored her mother, Mary Griffin. The other was the
daughter of Eula Mae Plath.
Following them were the six bridesmaids: Doris Eb-
don, Virginia Sanders, Hope Schaefer, Eleonore Taiman,
May Appell and Rachel Cuesta. Doris is familiar to
most Americans since her face or figure appears in prac-
tically every magazine published in the United States.
She is the most photographed model in New York city.
Virginia Sanders and Hope Schaefer are both doing well
in social service work. Eleonore Taiman makes quite a
large salary as a stenographer. May Appell runs a large
beauty establishment in Washington, while Rachel has
an advertising bureau.
Frances Miller wa maid of honor. I've been told that
wedding bells will be ringing for her also in the near fu-
ture, and again the Navy bring home the bacon.
Anne certainly made a lovely bride. She walked to the
altar on the arm of Mr. Vinton, our class sponsor. He
gave her away since her father was unable to attend.
The groom met his bride at the altar. He was accom-
panied by his best man, Robert Moot, millionaire. I
have not yet found out where Bob got his millions.
I felt rather faint when I recognized the minister as
none other than Mike Fernandez.
The ceremony was soon over and Mary and I started
out to get a cab. We hoped to arrive early at the hotel
where the reception was to be held. In our haste, we
bumped into Alice MacSparran. She is married to a dare-
devil aviator, but I do not know his name.
We finally got to the reception and found besides the
people we had seen before, Howard Will, Claire Koester,
Ruby Lyew, George Marcuse, Julio Dominguez, his sister
Olga, and Frank Anderson. Howard recently won the
Olympic swimming meet; Claire has a nursing school;
Ruby Lyew specializes in oriental roles on the screen;
George Marcuse runs the American Trading Company in
Colon; Julio Dominguez has quite a good reputation as
a scientist; Olga is the wife of the Cuban president; and
Frank is a well-paid electrician.
Anne received telegrams from Joseph Rettally, Pres-
ident of Panama, and Louise Potter, the great dramatist,
explaining their absence.
Anne and her husband sailed at twelve for Europe.
All of their guests went to the ship to see them off. On
the way, I stopped to cast my vote for Frances Patchett
as Miss Virginia.
Arriving at the dock, we met Jane Starke and Virginia
Strong who were both hostesses on the ship and we per-
suaded them to join the party. Jane said, in answer to
our questions, that Philip Hale was on an exploring trip in
the Arctic regions.
So, all members of our class being accounted for, we
stood on the dock, or rather those who were able stood,
and we gave three rousing cheers for good old C. H. S.










CLASS WILL
by James Day '36 and Charles Murphrey '36


We, the Seniors of 1956, in sane and sound mind, do solemnly bequeath the following honors and unusual talents
only under the circumstances that you, the Juniors of 1936, shall strive to acquire and carry out the talent or honor
bequeathed you.


MAY APPELL
ROSEMARY Cox
RACHEL CUESTA
OLGA DOMINGUEZ
EvELYN DWYER
DORIS EBDEN
MARY GOULET
LYDIA GRAVATT
MARY GRIFFIN
DOROTHY HOECKER
HOPE HOLLOWELL
JFANNSTTE HYLER
CLAIRE KOESTER
RUBY LYEW
ALICE MIACSPARRAN
Frances Miller
MURIEL MULLANE
FRANCES PATCHETT
LOUISE POTTER
EULA MAE PLATH
AGNES REINKE
ANNE RHEA
VIRGINIA SANDERS
HOPE SCHAEFER
NANCY JANE STARKE
VIRGINIA STRONG
VIRGINIA THOMAS
THEODORE AANSTOOS
FRANK ANDERSON
ROBERT ANDERSON
PAUL BARNETT
WENDUELL COTTON
WARD DAVIES
JIMMY DAYS
JULIO DOMINGUEZ
EDDIE DURHAM
MIKE FERNANDEZ
ARMANDO GASPERI
PETE HALE
WILLIAM HILL
CHRISTOPHER MATCHETT
GEORGE MARCUSE
ROBERT MOOT
CHARLES MURPHREY
JOE RETTALLY
LOuIs ST. PETER
and
ARTHUR TAGLAND
DONALD TOWNSHEND
HOWARD WILL
JUNIOR WILL


BEQUEATHS
Her willingness to work
Her nice ways
Her honor rating
Her office work
Hei scholastic standing
Her stately poise
Her job on the Caribbean Staff
Her graceful dancing
Her loyalty to the South
Her conservative ways
Her ability in sports
Her shyness
Her willingness to learn
Her high school career
Her fiery hair
Her cheerful ways
Her golden voice
Her crown and float
Her stage fright
Her timid voice
Her politeness
Her talent in art
Her place in the office
Her bashfulness
Her lovely suntan
Her modesty
Her personality
His passenger car service
His football physique
His way with the female sex
His place in the "Hill Billies"
His leadership
His quiet disposition
His chairmanship
His Spanish
His base horn
His "Clark Gable" looks
His modest ways
His shortstop position
His scholastic standing
His height
His lead soldiers
His graceful pompadour
His virility
His membership in "Leader's Club"
Their ability to work
together

His interest in school
His outstanding playing in baseball
His dancing ability


TO
Betty Brooks and Marie Geoghegan
Maxine Blunden
Mary Elizabeth Kelly
Yolanda Salas and Goldwyn Grabhorn
Marjorie Anderson and Betty Hauss
Olive Aanstoos
Carroll Gallion or Jean Walsh
Ruth Moody and Anita Boggs
Nora Hewitt and Mary Downey
Eleanore Stumpf and Josephine Stumpf
Esther Neely and Kathleen Phillips
Ruth Lull and Margaret Macintyre
Jacqueline Briscoe
Dora Lvew and Lucille Lyew
Helen McMahon
Grace Herman and Flora Herman
Virginia Hartman and Ellen Kelty
Jean Crouch or Anne Campbell
Louise Seibold
Jean Nelson
Charlotte Levy and Grade Hodges
Dorothy Craig
Mary Darley and Louise de la Ossa
Catita Ecker and Helen Carroll
Rhea Koester
Winifred Koehler and Elizabeth Haywood
Netta Potts and Macel Goulet
La Verne Rose
Marvin Keenan
Vernon Clark and William Dickinson
Jack Dignam
Cheney Moore
Charles Washabaugh
J. H. Houghton
Herbert Gottesman
Edward Hoffman
Frank Alberga
Douglas Smith
Jimmy Coman and Jack Clay
Rowland Clemens
Jimmy Christian and Billy Wood
Joe Coffin and Stanford Stone
Robert Byrd
David Coffey
James Greene
Harlan Crouche
and
Robert Ruley
Harry Reeder
Laurel Highley
Don Cornell


This Will is drawn to a close and is legally witnessed on this, the twelfth day of June in the year of our Lord.
of our Lord, nineteen hundred and thirty-six.
Luke Warm, Lawyer
Witnessed by:
Howe M. 1. Dooin
Donja B. Leevitt


Ni







-*9 ..I


' e. '" ^' 'i- ^

^;I ^ L


The Champion Bowling Team.


iRah, iRah, iRah, Seniors' Despite the fact that the
senior class contains comparatively few boys, the accom-
plishments of its teams and, more especially, those of
individual members are nothing less than outstanding.
The senior star, Howard Will, is second only to Henry
Jaramillo in athletic prowess. Although he is an all-
around athlete, he gained his greatest number of points
complement in baseball. Not far behind him is "Mope"
Cotton, also an all-round athlete. His bulk is the com-
plement of Will's litheness, as was often proved during
the football tournament.
Another sportsman of merit is Joseph Rettally, whose
specialities are basketball, soccer, and tennis.
Eddie Durham, whose long legs and able catching
ability made him the dread of the opposing football team,
is also an excellent baseball player.
Robert Anderson, Jimmie Days, and Julio Dominguez


specialize in football, baseball, and soccer respectively,
though each did creditably in other sports.
Among the fair sex the senior showing was even better.
Hope Hollowell probably the champion girl athlete of the
school, led the senior volley-ball and bowling teams to
victory. Virginia Strong, another brilliant all-rounder,
was especially valuable in basketball and tennis. Virginia
Thomas and Mary Goulet, the latter captain of the bas-
ketball team, are other high-ranking senior sports-girls.
Without doubt Louise Snyder is one of the best tennis
players in the school and Jane Starkey one of the star
bowlers. Among those who deserve honorable mention
for their sportsmanship are May Appell, Mary Griffin, and
Eula Mae Plath.
It was not apparent in the first estimates of the athletic
strength of the senior class, but it is found to contain
some of the finest material in the school.


The Captains of the Baseball Teams.


,7.,
Wi 2"=



















drop,









W. 4-


The Captains of the Football Teams.








TOUCH FOOTBALL


Following the dummy tournament the freshmen were
given 30 points handicap, the seniors and sophomores,
7, and the juniors, none. The following captains were
elected:
Senior Frank Anderson
Junior Laurel Highley
Sophomore Archie Byrnes
Freshman Alfred Stumph
On April 24, the sophomores opened the season by
defeating the freshmen by 22 points making the final score
45 to 23. The sophomores slowly but surely cut down
the freshmen's lead until they were ahead. Suddenly
Henry "Kiki" Jaramillo received the ball on his ninety
yard line and ran, with Ed. Sullivan as interference, for
a touchdown, demoralizing the freshmen's spirit.
In the second game, the juniors started their victorious
campaign by defeating the seniors, 12-9. In the second
quarter the juniors got their first touchdown, but the
extra point was not made. In the second quarter, the
seniors advanced to the juniors' ten yard line where Jimmy
Christian intercepted a pass behind his goal line giving
the seniors two more points. In the third quarter the
juniors made another touchdown and so the game ended,
12-9.
The seniors were defeated again by the sophomores by
one touchdown. Frank Anderson, in spite of this football


ability, could not stop "Kiki" Jaramillo and Ed Sullivan.
The final score was 6-0.
The freshmen forfeited their next game te the seniors.

They put out a team against the juniors, however, but
when Highley made a touchdown on the kickoff the final
result was known. It was 46-30.

In the last game, the juniors narrowly nosed out a
victory over the sophomores. The sophomores held their
lead of 7 points through the first half. The juniors, howe-
ver, in the third quarter advanced the ball to and over
the line with Keenancarring the ball. Highley made the
extra point tying the score. It was not until the last
quarter that the winning run was made. Highley took
it around the end for the touchdown and again converted
the point making the score, 14-7. The sophomores had
been holding their own until the juniors started using
William Wood and Jimmy Christian as pass receivers and
line plunges. The juniors won the season by this game.
The final standings were:


Class
Juniors
Sophomores
Seniors
Freshmen


Won


Lost
0
1

3
a


Standing
1000
666
333
000


S*


'J~* 014

-.-- Z.












F


The Champion Football Team.


On May 28, the athletic awards were presented to
twentythree high school boys. A point system was
arranged by Mr. Vinton and Mr. Seller. The boys on
this list who were not already members of the Varsity
Club were initiated into it on May 29. The boys were
ranked as follows:

Name Points

1. Henry Jaramillo......... ......... 416
2. Howard Wills................... 409
3. Wendell Cotton.. ................... 399
4. David Potts...................... 372
5. Cheney Moore........... ......... 369
6. Jack Clay......... ....... 369
7. Edward Sullivan................... 369
8. William Wood.. ...... ......... 368
9. James Christian.................. 365
10. Laure Highley.................... 365
11. William Hoverter............. .... 356
12. John Finlason.................. 352
13. Joseph Rettally.................... 350
14. Archie Byrns. ................. .. 320
15. Robert Ruley...... ... .......... 316
16. Edward Durham.................. 310
17. Vernon Moore.................... 309
18. Roland Clemens.................... 299
19. Frank Robles .................. 299
20. Douglas Smith.................... 292
21. Donald Parke.................... 287
22. Frank Anderson ... ..... .... 274
23. James Days . ...... .. 269







































The Captains of the Bowling Teams.


BOWLING


The following girls were elected captains for the inter-
class bowling tournament:


Senior
Junior
Sophomores
Freshman


Hope Hollowell
Esther Neely
Emma Jean Starke
Fern Horine


In the first game of the bowling tournament. April 16,
at 2:30 at the Old Cristobal Clubhouse, the juniors defeat-
ed the freshmen by a total pinfall of 66 points.

Esther Neely, Captain of the junior team, was high-
pointer with a score of 8... Fern Horine, captain of the
freshmen team, was highscorer with 80 points.

In the second game of the bowling tournament, April
18, at 9:00 A. N. the seniors downed the sophomores by
a total pinfall of 41 points. Hope Hollowell, captain of
the senior team, had the high score of 91 and Emma Jean
Starke, captain of the sophomores, had the high score
of 89.

On Monday afternoon, April 20, the sophomores and
freshmen clashed. Flora Bath with a score of 87 was high
scorer and Helen Wikinstad with 87, was high scorer for
the sophomores. The sophomores downed the freshmen
by a total pinfall of 51 pins.

Thursday afternoon, Apri' 23, :he seniors and juniors


came together. It was a hard-fought and close game,
but the seniors' experience was too much for the juniors
who went down in defeat by a total pinfall of 43 pins.

High scorers for the juniors and seniors wer Macel Goulet,
92, and Virginia Thomas, 87.

In the next game the sophomores downed the juniors
by a total of 13 pins. The high scorers were Esther Neely
and Flora Bath.

The seniors proved their right to be called champions
by winning every game they played by an overwhelming
score.

In the last game the seniors defeated the freshmen by
a total pinfal of 82. The high scorers for this game were
Helen Wikinstad, 84, and Hope Hollowell, captain of the
seniors, 88.


The highest
as follows:

Seniors
Juniors


average for the bowling tournament were


Hope Hollewell.....
Esther Neely......


Sophomores Emma Jean Starke.......
Flora Bath.......
Freshmen Fern Horine.......
Helen Wikinstad......





























































































33






IN UNION THERE IS STRENGTH

WORKERS WILL RECEIVE THE FULL SHARE OF WHAT
THEY PRODUCE WHEN THEY ORGANIZE AND
BUY THEIR OWN UNION-MADE GOODS

Ill
COMPLIMENTS OF

THE CENTRAL LABOR UNION
andc
THE METAL TRADES COUNCIL
OF THE
CANAL ZONE





I' "B "_ 111,.


THE PANAMA HOSPITAL
PFAN.1MA CITY. P,. cf P.







Hotel


Uneaualled
C


LUashin ton
for Situation and Comfort
OLON. R. P.


A Hotel in keeping with the dignity, spirit and service of
CThe Panama Canal.


Qolf Swimming Udater Sports
crarpon Fishing
CThe year )Around


JAMES E. LEUIS
manager


P. O. Address
CRISTOBAL. CANAL ZONE


BUREAU


CLUBS


PLAYGROUNDS


RECREATION,


SUBSISTENCE


and


ENTERTAINMENT


~


I












COMPLIMENTS OF


The Panama Railroad

anaf


Panama Railroad


lonur (risB. 211 l


Steamship


Line


COMPLIMENTS
OF


MAX BILGRAY




Buy Your Drug Needs at
Salazdr Drug Stores
COLON, R.P.
WE MAKE RAPID DELIVERIES AND ALSO
HAVE A MODERN SODA FOUNTAIN.
Remember
SALAZAR
PHONE 336 OR 35 COLON, R. P.


I I,


LL
COMPANIA PANAMENA
DE FUERZA Y LUZ
PANAMA COLON

sil


Qoamplimntrit of


fflanby


iarrnirrBEAUTIrt
BEAUTICIAN


__
I


I


lotrpl Wallaington


ernnyt Parlnr







COMPLIMENTS OF

DOCIA M. HODGES

^? Qn JI QL 4
MEMBER FLORIST
TELEGRAPH DELIVERY ASSOCIATE 1C N



ALWAYS REMEMBER
A man is judged in life
by two things, His friends
and His clothes.
'The ATmerican Bdzaar
HABERDASHERS & TAILORS
TO MEN OF GOOD TASTE
COLON AND PANAMA


THE CHINESE SILK STORE
NEW CHINA
We carry genuine Chinese and Japa-
nese silks and curiosities, linens, silk
materials, shawls, wicker furniture,
vases, perfumes and jewelry.


FRONT STREET
COLON


CENTRAL AVENUE
PANAIMA


AMERICAN TRADING COMPANY, LTO

COLON






Just received a complete line of GLASSWARE
and HOUSEHOLD ARTICLES. A Call will
convince you of our extremely LOW PRICES.


Phone 40, Colon


Box 330, Colon


HAVE YOUR JEWELRY REPAIRED
AT-
"LA ESMERALDA"
JEWELRY ,AND WATCHES
REPAIRED
PASQUALE PALADINO
Boi.IVAR AVENUE No. 1700
P. O. Box 266 COLON, R. or P.


'11







Dresses and Hats
from Paris


ARBOIX
ANTONIO'S
Front & 9th. Streets
COLON, R. P.

Hand Embroidered Linens.
English Luggage Hand Bags.
Paris Novelties.

PERFUMERY



Marqanta Beauty Shoppe
MARGARET J. WILL

Permanent Waving Our Specialty
WE MAKE YOU
MORE LOVELY
Corner 8th &"G" Sts' New Cristobal
Phone 169 COLON, R.P.



TUNG HING
GENERAL FANCY GOODS
CORNER 91H. & BOLIVAR STREETS

P. O Box 354 Tel. 575
COLON, R. P.


COMPLIMENTS OF


D. CHELLARAM
The most reputable dealers on the
Isthmus, where you will find
wonderful bargains.
No. 47 FRONT STREET COLON, R. P.



COMPLIMENTS OF

Swiss Jewelry

CHARLES FERRET
OPPOSITE CRISTOBAL COMMISSARY




Inocencio Galindo, Jr.
7th and Bolivar Streets

COLON

I
JOBBER and WHOLESALE
MERCHANT

I
REAL ESTATE BROKER
AND
AGENT







KODAK PANAMA

LTD.

Offers a complete line of

KODAKS

PILOT RADIOS

X-RAY & MEDICAL APPARATUS

MICROSCOPES
BINOCULARS


11 CENTRAL
PANAMA


AVENUE
CITY


RITZ
The Most Delicious Cracker
NATIONAL BISCUIT COMPANY PRODUCT
JULIO A. SALAS
DISTRIBUTOR
P. O. BOX 204 COLON, R.P.



ldrtinez & Companq
THE ONLY MANUFACTURER IN
THIS COUNTRY OF
ALLIGATOR SKINS
Inquire Our Prices and Save Your
Money by buying directly from us
BOX 904 PANAMA
9,034 FRO'N ST. No. 120 Ci-ENTRA Avi:.
COLON PANAMA


E. R. BREWER & CO., Inc.

(25 :

ALL KIN)S OF NOVELTIES
AND NOTIONS.

Boivar Street C(L')N. R. P.



FRED SANDERS
SOUVENIR & NOVELTY STORE
45 l.' IvT STREET, COLON, R.P.


BOLIVIAN SILVER
SNAKE, LIZARD i) ALLIGATOR NOVELTIES
ARTICLES MADE OF BUTTERFLY WINGS




Before eve-strain wrinkles become
permanent ad nervous fatigue
becomes chronic, have your
eyes examined. If you need
glasses, you will be sur-
prised to find what a
comfort they are
when accurately
and becomingly
fi t ted to
Y 0 UL


Have your eyes examined


























CASA


JAPONESA


Y. AMANO & COMPANY


THE STORE THAT SELLS AT THE LOWEST
REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
47 and 102 Central Ave.


THE ROYAL BANK


of


PRICES IN THE

Panama City, R. P.


CANADA


Incorporated 1869.


COLON BRANCH
Corner 11th 6& Bolivar Sts,


PANAMA BRANCH
Santa Ana Plaza


40


complimentss of


ESTABLECIDO EN 1849
-i qrr ~ tti.






CABLE ADDRESS "IMPCO" P.O. Box 342, COLON, R. P.
A.B.C. 5TH. & 6TH. EDITION
BENTLEY'S
COLON IMPORT EXPORT COMPANY, Ltd.
JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS

DEALERS IN GENERAL MERCHANDISE AND NATIVE PRODUCE
COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
Branch Retail Stores PLAYA DAMA PORVENIR CARTI
and Trading Stations SANTA ISABEL ISLES OF PINES NARGANA


Tomplimitn of

Dr. ~IIrn t ripr

Br. (arl IE. Oaffori


HOTEL TIVOLI

A comfortable restful Hotel, ideally located with magnificent view
of the Pacific ocean.

The center of social life, close to every point of interest
on the Pacific side of the Canal Zone.
WM. T. McCORMACK, P. 0. ADDRESS.
Manager ANCON, CANAL ZONE.





















COMPLIMENTS OF

C. B. FENTON & COMPANY, Inc.


CRISTOBAL, C. Z.
Phone Cristobal 1781


BALBOA, C. Z.
Phone Balboa 1066


FRENCH BAZAAR
PALOMERAS <& PUCCI, LTD.
COLON
WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF EUROPEAN NOVELTIES
Petit Point Bags and Compacts Chronium Ash Trays and Stands Butterfly Wing Boudoir Sets
Manicure Sets Crystal Liquor Sets and many other items too numerous to mention.
JANE REYNOLDS' MODEL SILK DRESSES
ARTICLES OF HIGH QUALITY "KAYSER" HOSIERY LIMITED PRICES


mdddme Ldvercnedu
DRESSMAKER

Tel. Colon 706-J Box 703, Cris.


IMPROVED EQUIPMENT MODERN METHODS EFFICIENT SERVICE


JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY
Broadway, near Folks' River
COLON, R. P.
PHONE CRISTOBAL, C. Z.
COLON, 21 0 BOX 5061


11







SANTONIO TAGAROPULOS

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
Re"6 GROCER
BRANCH STORES


MAIN STORE
12.176 BOLIVAR AVENUE
PHONE 499.


6,075 BOLIVAR AVENUE, PHONE 429
4.011 9TH STREET, PHONE 616
2,026 BOLIVAR STREET, 699


C. CASULLO
-J JE'ELLER
nand
WATCHMAKER
P. O. BOX 615
Phone 225 9,056 Front St.
CRISTOBAL, C.Z. COLON. R. P.





MEET ME

AT


ALEX'S CAFE






MIYAKO
THE NEW ONE PRICE STORE
EVERYTHING GUARANTEED
ORIENTAL ART DRY GOODS
GLASSWARE SOUVENIRS
NOVELTIES SILKS MI YA K O TOYS, Etc.
106 CENTRAL AVENUE PANAMA CITY







RADIO PICTURES

of PANAMA, INC.

RKO

w& -

PATHE NEWS



MARCH OF TIME



RKO PICTURES


PHONE COLON 800


Box 5003,
CRISTOBAL, C. Z.


SMOOT-BEESON, S.A.
BUICK LA SALLE
CADILLAC CHEVROLET
DISTRIBUTORS


S. L. BISHOP
Manager


16TH AND MELENDEZ AVE.
COLON, R.P.


CTwo bottles

of Distinction.


IS ALWAYS
REFRESHING


-F.


PANAMA COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO., INC.
PANAMA COLON
Tel. 65 Tel. 84


COMPLIMENTS OF

ROBERT WILCOX & Co.
COLON
REPUBLIC OF PANAMA


I





tII


I!


~Li~







Atlantic Photo Service
6,012 Front Street

COLON, R. P.
Phone Ro. 134


Art & Commercial
Photographers

,Appointments for sittings can be made
several days in advance.


We like babies and we
photograph them
perfect




Mavis up-to-date Beauty Shoppe
COLON THEATRE BUILDING
10th STREET and BROADWAY, COLON, R. P.
PHONE 548

Jlli Branches of Beauty Culture
P. O. Box 1845 CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



PHONE 211 P. 0. Box 219

"A. P." BAZAAR
a The Republic Store
7.085 BOLIVAR ST. BETWEEN 7 & 8TH. ST.
COLON. R. P.
Colon's most up-to-date Store offers you the
finest line of dry goods:- Notions, Novelties,
Shoes and Hosiery at prices that defy compe-
tition. Visit us and convince yourself.


Colon Motors, Inc.



Coming -.......This Month
,-UQ "Lincoln Zephyr"
The lad 'wd in Jlulomnobile design.
Box 209 Colon Phone 492



Gittens &cTaylor
FOR

Exclusive Suitings
ana Careful Tailoring

10th Street COLON Telephone 291


JOHN T.


McCANN


Plumbing & Supply Co.
Established 1910


ESTIMATES ON ALL KINDS
-OF-

SANITARY, BUILDING
and' SHIP PLUMBING

IMPORTERS

GUARANTEED MATERIALS
EXPERT WORKMANSHIP


Telephone
Colon 14


P. 0. Box 5031
Cristobal. C.Z.


L *11







Portraits

Miniatures

Enlargements

Flashlights

Commercial
Photographs
of all types.

Architectural

Legal

Banquets,
Large Groups, etc.

New Pictures


FOR REMEMBRANCE

Your portrait of today will be just as priceless
in years to come, will recall happy memories
just as vividly as do those wonderful photo-
graphs of bygone days. Make an appoint-
ment for a new portrait today.


FINLAYSON'S


STUDIO


7,018 FRONT STREET COLON, R.P.
PHONE 9
IER
SWhen buying Photographs look for this emblem.
The Photographers' International Association of
America stands for good craftsmanship and bet-
, ter business principles.


French Drug Store
No. 21 Front Street
COLON
Republic of Panama


V. DELGADO M., Proprietor



Hemstitching Pleating,
Button Covering,
Ruffling, etc.

MRS. A. R. LEE
OVER THE ROY.L BANK OF CANADA
Tel. 233, Colon llth & Bolivar St.


I1 ..


COMPLIMENTS OF

J. J. ECKER, JR.
Balboa St., 7,037- COLON Phone 381

FIRE INSURANCE
COMMISSION BUSINESS


COMPLIMENTS OF

LUIs ANGELINI


Panama City


Telephone 887


ii.-



















Compliments of


Samdritan


Hos ital


J. V. BEVERHOUDT
COLON, R. P.
R. C.A. RADIOS
With Magic Brain, Magic Eye, & Metal Tuba5
-ALSO-
Kodaks Baseball Sapplies Stationery
States Papers Tennis Rackets
Whiteman's Candies and
Latest Magazines.


The

Standard Fruit & Steams ip

Com a dn


0


VACCARO


LINE


lVish every success to the Qraduatinq
Class of 1936.


COMPLIMENTS OF
National Mattress Factory
MANUFACTURERS OF HIGH GRADE
MATTRESSES AND BEDDING

14TH STREET. COLON, R. P.
PHONE 321 P. 0. Box 2024
COLON CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



COMPLIMENTS OF

PACKARD
DODGE
DE SOTO


crTe


!I


--






























e 4a f,6 c a rrn nU Va -o































































11W~srr BlAK C HtKAW 45. -r raJ~rfgq*';;








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Full Text
CR I 5TOBAL




HIGH



SCHOOL




f~



3



? -ft







.J







The Class of 1936.



We, the Caribbean staff dedicate this magazine
to the class of nineteen hundred and thirty-six with
the hope that it will refresh their memories of the
happy days spent in Cristobal High School.



THE CARIBBEAN

VOL. XIX CRISTOBAL, CANAL Z.ONE No. 3



PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL



JUNE 12, 1935.



Table of Contents



Page

I. Dedication 1

II. Seniors 3

III. Senior Clajs Leaders 17

IV. The Commencement Committee and their Work........ 18

V. Valedictory .. 20

VI. Salutatory ... 21

VII. Commencement Speeches 22

VIII. Senior Futures.. ... .. 24

IX. Class History 25

X. Class Prophecy 26

XI. Class Will 27

XII. Athletics 28



SENIORS






"A man he seems of cheerful yesterdays
And confident tomorrows."

Xame THEODORE ARNOLD AANSTOOS. JR.

Birthplace Stanford, Connecticut.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1926.

Activities Photo Club 2; Trade Wind Staff 2, 3, 5; Car-

niyal Committee 2, 4; Caribbean Staff 3. 4; Jr.-Sr.

Dramatic Club 3; Effe Kube Klub 4; National

Thespians 3, 4; Math Club 3; Slide Rule Club 4;

Pyramid Team 4; Class Treasurer 4.




"One who never turned his back but marched
straight forward."

Name FRANK A. ANDERSON. JR.

Birthplace Brooklyn, N. Y.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1924.

Activities Soccer 3, 4; Basketball 4; Trade Wind Staff

3, 4; Caribbean Staff 3, 4; Carnival Committee 3.

4; Pyramid Team 4; Football 4; Water Polo 4.





"Plain without pomp, and rich without a show."

Same ROBERT O. ANDERSON

Birthplace Camden, New Jersey.

Dale Entered C. Z. Schools -December, 1929.

Activities Glee Club 1; Art Club 1; Photo Club 5, 4;

Trade Wind Staff 4; Slide Rule Club 4; Soccer 4;

Baseball 4.



"Thy modesty's a candle to thy merit."

Name MAY APPELL
Birthplace St. Nazaire, France.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools March, 1934.
Activities Trade Wind Staff 4; Caribbean Staff 4; Basket-
ball 4; Volley Ball 4; Tennis 4; Bowling 4.



"For manners are not idle, but the fruit
Ot loyal nature and of noble mind."

Name AARON PAUL BARNETT

Birthplace Colon R. P.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1924.

Activities Orchestra 1, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 3; La Pas 3, 4;
Caribbean Staff 3, 4; La Pas Vice President 4; Bas-
ketball 4; Effe Kube Klub 4; Soccer 4.



'A man of hope and forward-looking mind."

Xante WENDELL GLAWSON COTTON

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1924.

Activities Class President 1, 2; Athletic Association 1;
Soccer I, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1,
2, 3, 4; Track 2; Swimming 2; Varsity Club 3, 4;
La Pas 2,3,4 ; Science Club 3 ; President Science Club
3; Carnival Committee 3; Varsity Club Vice Pres-
ident 4; Student Association President 4; Football 4.




"To those who know thee not, no words can paint,
And those who know thee, know all words are faint!"

Xante ROSEMARY LOGAN COX

Birthplace Savannah, Georgia.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools September, 1935.

Activities Glee Club 4; Caribbean Staff 4; Trade Wind
Staff 4.



"A rosebud set with little wilful thorns,
And sweet as English air could make her, she."

Name -RACHEL M. CUESTA
Birthplace Camaguey, Cuba.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1928.
Activities Athletic Associationl ; Debate Club 2; Trade
Wind Staff 2, 4; La Pas 3, 4; Caribbean Staff 4.





"Look not thou down but up!"

Name WARD JACKSON DAVIES. JR.

Birthplace Philadelphia, Pa.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools May, 1934.

Activities Trade Wind Staff 4: Basketball 4; Football 4.



"O, blest with temper whose unclouded ray
Can make tomorrow cheerful as today!"

Name JAMES MATHEW DAYS

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1924.

Activities Glee Club 1. 2, 3; Athletic Association 1; Class
Vice President 2; Cheer Leader 3, 4; Carnival Com-
mittee 3, 4; Orchestra 3, 4; Band 3, 4; Jr.-Sr. Dra-
matic Club 3: Class Representative 3; Ette Kube
Klub 4; Basketball 4; Soccer 4; Baseball 4; Pyra-
mid Team 4; Leader's Club 4; Slide Rule Club 4;
Slide Rule Club President 4; Football 4.




"Good sense which only is the giit ot Heaven,
And though no science, fairly worth the seven."

Name JULIO DOMINGUEZ, )R.

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Date Entered C. /.. Schools October, 1930.

Activities Athletic Association 1; Math Club 2; Photo
Club 2; Caribbean Staff 2; Track 3; Soccer 3, 4;
Basketball 4; Pyramid Team 4; Baseball 4; Foot-
ball 4.




"A face with gladness overspread!
Soft smiles, by human kindness bred!"

Name- OLGA MARY DOMINGUEZ

Birthplace Havana, Cuba.

Dale Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1930.

Activities Athletic Association 1; Debate Club 2; Carni-
val Committee 3, 4; La Pas 3, 4; Trade Wind Staff
4; Caribbean Staff 4



With I



us eves i



n flc



with laughter-'



Name EDWARD A. DURHAM

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Dale Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1023.

Activities Glee Club 1; Baseball 2. 3. 4: Varsity Club 3.

4; Jr.-Sr. Dramatic Club 3; Class President 3;

Track 5; Soccer 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4; Water Polo

4; Pyramid Team 4: Band 4; Football 4; Kite Kube

Klub 4.




"Queen rose of the rosebud garden ol gir's'

Name EVELYN DWYER

Birthplace. Colon, R. P.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1925.

Activities Effe Kube Klub 1; La Pas 2, 3; Class Rep
resentative 3; Class Vice President 4




"A daughter of the gods, divinely tall
And most divinely tair."

Name DORIS ANN EBDON

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1024.

Activities Class Secretary 1; Glee Club 1; Class Rep-
resentative 2; Erie Kube Klub 2; La Pas 2, 3, 4;
La Pas Secretary 3: Basketball 3: Carnival Com-
mittee 4.



"Hang sorrow! care will kill a cat.
And therefore let's be merry."

Name MICHAEL A. FERNANDEZ. JR

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools September, 1934.
Activities Soccer 3, 4; Trade Wind Staff 3.
Committee 3. 4: Caribbean Stall -1.



4; Car





"I have been so great a lover."

Name ARMANDO J. GASPERI

Birthplace La Guayra, Venezuela.

Date Entered C. Z. Schoo Is October, 1924.

Activities Athletic Association 1; Debate Club 2; Photo

Club 2; Math Club 2; Trade Wind Staff 2, 3. 4;

Basketball 3; Track 3; Soccer 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4;

Pyramid Team 4; Slide Rule Club 4; Football 4.




"And still they wondered and the wonder grew
That one small head should carry all it knew."

Name MARY GERTRUDE GOULET

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools September, 1930.

Activities Athletic Association 1 ; Trade Wind Staff 2, 3,
4; La Pas 2, 3, 4; Supper Club 1. 2. 3, 4: Swimming
1; Basketball 2. 4; Volley Ball 4; Caribbean Staff
3, 4; Bowling 4.





"She moves a goddess, and she looks a queen"

Same GRAYCE LYDIA GRAVATT

Bi>Mp/,i Brooklyn, X. Y.

Dale Entered C. Z. Schools September, 1927.

Activities G\es Club 1; Art Club 1; Supper Club 1, 2. 3;
La Pas 2, 3, 4; Effe Kube Klub 2, 3; Carnival Com-
mittee 2, 3, 4; National Thespians 3, 4; President
National Thespians 4.



"Eyes so transparent.
That through them one sees the soul."

Name MARY EUGENIA GRIFFIN

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Dale Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1923.

Activities Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4: Athletic Association 1 ;
Trade Wind Staff 2, 3, 4; Effe Kube Klub 2, 4;
Ir.-Sr. Dramatic Club 3; Class Secretary-Treasurer
3; Class Representative 4; Glee Club 4; Caribbean
Staff 4; Basketball 4; Volley Ball 4; Bowling 4.



"Brevity is the soul ot wit."

Name PHILIP A. HALE

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1925.

Activities Basketball 4.




"Whose little body lodged a mighty mind."

Name WILLIAM G. HILL

Birthplace San Jose, Costa Rica.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1924.

Activities Athletic Association 1; Caribbean Staff 1, 2;
La Pas 1, 2, 3; Swimming 1, 2; Tennis 1. 2, 3; De-
bate Club 2; Math Club 2; Varsity Club 2, 3. 4;
Carnival Committee 3; La Pas President 3; Soccer
3, 4; Baseball 3, 4.




IV /



"The fair, the chaste, and unexpressive she."

Same DOROTHY LOUISE HOECKER

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools September, 1931.

Activities Supper Club 1, 2, 3. 4: Basketball 2; Jr.-Sr.

Dramatic Club 3; Carnival Committee 4; Trade

Wind Staff 4; La Pas 2, 3, 4.




"Health is the vital principle of bliss
And exercise, of health."

Same HOPE HOLLOWELL

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1923.

Activities Glee Club 1; Swimming 1; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4;
Girl's Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4; Bowl-
ing 3, 4; Trade Wind Staff 4; Vollev Ball 4.





"The mildest manners and the gentlest heart."

Xame JOSEPHINE JEANNETTE HYLER
Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools September, 1931.
Activities Glee Club 1; Art Club 2; La Pas 2, 3, 4; Effe
Kube Klub 2, 4; Carnival Committee 3, 4.




"Gentle ol speech, beneficent oi mind."

Xame CLAIRE A. KOESTER

Birthplace Sanford, Maine.

Dale Entered C. Z. Schools March, 1935.



"Silence is the mother of truth."

Xame RUBY VERONICA LYEW
Birthplace Colon R. P.

Dale Entered C. Z. Schools September, 1932.
Activities Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Supper Club 2, 3, 4



"Dark eves eternal soul of pride!
Deep life in all that's true!"

Name ALICE MIRIAM MACSPARRAN

Birthplace Washington, D. C.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1923.

Activities Supper Club 2, 4.



lO



"A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance."

Name -GEORGE EDWIN MARCUSE

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Dale Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1925.

Activities Track 2, 3; Trade Wind Staff 3. 4; Caribbean

Staff 3, 4; Carnival Committee 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4;

Soccer 3, 4; Football 4



"No man is wiser for his Learning
Wit and Wisdom are bnrn with a man."

Name -CHRISTOPHER ROY MATCHETT

Birthplace Belize, British Honduras.

Dale Entered C. Z. Schools March, 1935.

Activities La Pas 4; Slide Rule Club 4; Pyramid Team 4,
Trade Wind Staff 4; Caribbean Staff 4; Soccer 4:
Basketball 4: Water Polo 4; Football 4.




"She is a winsome wee thing,
She is a handsome wee thing."

Name FRANCES MILLER

Birthplace Dallas, Texas.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools April, 1935.




"Grace was in all her steps, heaven in her eye,
In every gesture dignity and love."

Xame MURIEL RITA MULLANE
Birthplace Colon R. P.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1923.
Activities Effe Kube Klub 1; Supper Club 1. 2; Glee
Club 4.




1 1




"Life's a pleasant institution,
Let us take it as it comes.''

Name ROBERT A. MOOT

Birthplace East Rutherford, N. J.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1928.

Activities La Pas 2, 3; Science Club 3; Jr.-Sr. Dramatic

Club 3; Photo Club 4; Slide Rule Club 4; Pep Club

4; Football 4.




"lust at the age 'twixt boy and youth,
When thought is speech and speech is truth."

Name CHARLEY PAUL MURPHREY

Birthplace Medford, Massachusetts.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools May, 1930.

Activities Baseball 4; Effe Kube Klub 4; Pep Club 4.




"The sweetest thing that ever grew
Beside a human door."

A'tfmf^FRANCES HELEN PATCHETT
Birthplace Washington, D. C.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1926.
Activities Supper Club 4.



I




"And thy deep eyes, amid the gloom,
Slide like jewels in a shroud."

Name LOOSE MAY POTTER
Birthplace Lexington, Missouri.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools September, 1934.
Activities Tennis 3, 4; Volley Ball 4; Archery 4; Pep
Club 4; Bowling 4.



12



"A lovely being, scarcely formed or molded,
A ros2 with all it's sweetest leaves yet folded."

Name VIRGINIA LEE SANDERS
Birthplace Colon, R. P.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1923.
Activities Class Vice President 1; La Pas 2, 3; Carniv,
Committee 3; Class Secretary 2, 4.



"So swe?t the blush of bashfulness
E'en pity scarce could wish it less

Xame HOPE J. SCHAEFER

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools April, 1924.

Activities Trade Wind Staff 3; Supper Club 4; Pep Club 4




"My heart is like a singing bird."

Xame NANCY JANE STARKE

Built place Cincinnati, Ohio.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1925.

Activities Athletic Association 1; Art Club 2; La Pas

2, 3, 4; Letter Club 3, 4; Bowling 3; La Pas Officer

3, 4; Baseball 4.




"Her calm simplicity of grace."

Xame VIRGINIA MARY STRONG

Birthplace Fort Monroe, Virginia.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools February, 1935.

Activities Basketball 4; Volley Ball 4; Archery 4: Ten-
nis 4; Bowling 4.




13




"In each cheek appears a pretty dimple."

Name EULA MAE PLATH

Birthplace Ackley, Iowa.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools February, 1931.
Activities Supper Club 3, 4; Basketball 4; Volley Ball 4;
La Pas 4; Bowling 4; Archery 4; Pep Club 4.




"Her actions were modest and her words discreet."

Name AGNES M. E. REINKE
Birthplace Colon R. P.

Date Entered C. /.. Schools October, 1924.
Activities Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Effe Kube Klub 2; Jr.-
Sr. Dramatic Club 3; La Pas 3, 4.




"I stand on my attainment."

Name JOSEPH RETTALLY

Birthplace Colon, R. P.

Dale Entered C. Z. Schools September, 1932.

Activities Athletic Association 1; Science Club 2; Tennis
2, 3; Soccer 2, 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4; Trade Wind
Staff 3, 4; Band 3, 4; Varsity Club 3. 4; Varsity
Club Treasurer 3; La Pas 3, 4; Slide Rule Club 4,
Leader's Club 4; Pyramid Team 4: Caribbean Staff
4; Baseball 4; Football 4.



"And violets, transformed to eyes,
Enshrine a soul within their blue."

Name ANNE DE L. RHEA

Birthplace Quincy Massachusetts.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools September, 1954.

Activities Caribbean Staff 4.



14



"T'is well to be merry and wise,
T'is well to He honest and true."

Name LOUIS BERT ST. PETERY
Birthplace Philadelphia, Pa.
Pale Entered C. Z. Schools September, 1035.
Activities Slide Rule Club 4; Caribbean Staff 4.




"All the heart and the sold and the sense
forever in joy."

Name ARTHUR HERBERT TAGLAND
Birthplace New York, N. Y.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools September, 1935.
Activities Slide Rule Club 4.



"It is good to lengthen to the last a sunny mood."
Name ELEONORE AGNES TAIMAN
Birthplace Troy, N. Y.
Dale Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1924.

Activities Pep Club 4; Trade Wind Staff 4; Caribbean
Staff 4.




"And her sunny locks
Hang on her temples like golden fleece."

Name VIRGINIA F. THOMAS

Birthplace Colon R. P.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1924.

Activities Effe Kube Klub 1; Volley Ball 2, 5. 4; Basket-
ball 2. 3, 4; Baseball 3: Trade Wind Staff 3; Glee
Club 4.




15



"Then on! then on! where duty leads,
Aly course be onward still."

Name DONALD HYDE TOWNSHEND

Birthplace Philadelphia, Pa.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1924.

Activities Track 1, 2, 3; Orchestra 2; Band 2, 5, 4; Soc-
cer 3, 4; Jr.-Sr. Dramatic Club 3; Science Club 3;
National Thespians 5, 4; Photo Club 3, 4; Photo
Club Business Manager 3, 4; Class Representative
4; Slide Rule Club 4; Slide Rule Club Vice Pres-
ident 4; Pep Club 4; Football 4.



"Jolly good naturcd, full of fun,
If you want a real friend here's one."

Name WILLIAM HOWARD WILL

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1924.

Activities Class Representative 2; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4
Baseball 2, 3, 4: Soccer 2, 3, 4: Basketball 2, 3, 4
Tumbling 2, 3; Water Polo 4; Pyramid Team 4
President Varsity Club 4; Football 4.



"Today, whatever may annoy.
The word for me is Joy, just simple Joy."

Name JOHN F. PARSONS-WILL

Birthplace Tampa, Florida.

Date Entered C. Z. Schools October, 1929.

Activities^. A. A. 1, 2; Slide Rule Club 4; Baseball



T6




JL ^ 2'i w^



From left to right: Wendell Cotton, President
of the Student Association, with the Senior
Representative, Mary Griffin and Donald
Townshend.




-



Q
£*






L^ra -*^g



The Senior Class Officers.
17




A



P\



i i n rv







/ I




The Commencement Committee.



In conformity with the custom which has been establis-
hed at Cristobal High School of breaking entirely away
from the standardized commencement, the committee
of this year's class (composed of the fifteen ranking stu-
dents) decided upon th? type of exercise which was given
as being the most unusual and effective vehicle for pre-
senting the ideals they wished emphasized.

Responsibility for the general planning of the affair
was given to William Hill, who did brilliant work both
in writing the original script and supervising the staging.
All members of the committee participated, however,
both in working out the details and in trimming the general
idea down to the financial and personal limitations within
which it was necessary to work.

Aside from minor changes necessary to make the parts
conform to the general plot, the speeches were conceived
and written by the students giving them. Alteration or



wholesale revision of speeches by faculty members was
held to a minimum, because it was felt that the entire
play would be more effective if it truly represented the
thinking of the students themselves.

The committee, however, fully appreciates the many
wise and helpful suggestions of the faculty sponsors. Mr.
Franks, Mr. Vinton, and Mr. Sullivan, and their interest
in devoting valuable time toward making our commen-
cement a success.

While we realize that a much more impressive exercise
could have been given had we had more time, unlimited
finance, and a group of highly trained actors from which
to recruit our talent, it is our hope that we have succeeded
in our two main objectives, effectiveness of presentation
and originality.

THE COMMITTEE



18



COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES

of the

Cristobal High School

Class of '36

Cristobal High School Auditorium

Friday Evening June 12 Io6

Eight O'clock

PROGRAM

Overture "Mossic" Sercdv

High School Orchestra

Invocation Reverend Jackson

Salutatory Olga Domingue

Everystudent, an allegorical play Seniors

Aeolian Trio "The Alp-Maid's Dream" Labitzkv

Paul Barnett, Georgianna Krause, Robert Hanson

Valedictory Address Mary Goulet

"Melody in F" Rubenstein

High School Orchestra

Presentation of Awards and Diplomas Milford Franks

Principal, Cristobal High School

Benediction Reverend Morgan

Recessional "March ot the Peasants" Weber

(from "Der Freishutz") High School Orchestra

Music Directed by Program Directed by

Miss Mildred Elner, Mr. Richard L. Sullivan,

Music Supervisor, Cristobal High School Instructor, Cristobal High School.



EVERYSTUDENT

For inspiration in planning this year's commencement the committee went back to that period, rich in scholastic
traditions, when students wandered back and forth among the universities of Europe seeking knowledge which was
otten buried beneath the shroud of monasticism th Aliddle Ages.

The play is typical of the period as are the monks' gowns worn by the players, the latter being replicas of the
universal student costume of that day from which the modern, traditional graduation gown is descended.

The speeches are modelled upon the familiar drama of the Middle Ages, the allegory, the actors representing qua-
lities rather than persons.

The presentation is planned, written, and interpreted by members ot the senior class.

CAST

Class of 1936 (Valedictorian) .Mary Goulet

Public Opinion Arthur Tagland

Faith Dorothy Hoecker

Perseverance ... Ward Davies

Honesty Julio Dominguez

Courage Robert Moot

Ambition Lydia Gravatt

Appreciation

Books Louise Potter

Painting Jeanette Hyler

Sculpture Mary Griffin

Music Evelyn Dwyer

Special Mention

Stage lighting properties William Hill

Faculty advisors: Mr. Franks Mr. Vinton Mr. Sullivan.

Costumes designed and made by girls of the advanced class in Household Arts supervised by Miss Bowman.

NOTE

Ambition's dance "The Swan" is interpreted to the accompaniment ot "Le Cygne "Saint-Saens: Charlotte Levy,
at the piano. Cristopher Matchett, Paul Barnett, Jim Days and Joseph Retally deserve special commendation for
giving up their places of honor with the graduates on the stage in order to play with the orchestra-

19




Valedictory

By Mary Gertrude Goulet



Members of the faculty, fellow classmates, parents and
friends:

It Is with a feeling of joy that we are here tonight
ol joy lor the time which we have so long anticipated, has
come. This is our commencement day.

Only those can fully appreciate our happiness who have
passed through the changes of school life, when study
was not always a pleasure, who have undergone the strain
of examinations, and performed those various duties
which have at times seemed so difficult.

We have told you tonight of the virtue we shall need
to go through life, and even though we are young, we
have had experiences during our school days in which
these traits were needed.

We have been blamed as well as praised by our teachers
and fellow students, so we should know a little about how
we shall be judged in the world by public opinion. We
had to have ambition to reach our present goal. Faith,
perseverance, and honesty were needed to guide us on
our way, no matter what our trials were. All of us have
had courses in some art, so we can partially appreciate it.
In courage we were never lacking, therefore we feel con-
fident of success.



For being able t i attain this goal we owe a great debt
of gratitude to our parents. Can we ever repay them for
the sacrifices they have made? From our infancy they
have watched our progress and guided our inclinations.
We may show our appreciation for their efforts by carry-
ing out the examples set by them.

Besides our parents, we have our teachers whom we
must thank for their zeal and assistance through our
courses of study. Xo matter how undeserving we were
they were always ready to give advice and help when
needed.

And now, to you, Undergraduates, I wish to say a word.
We are leaving this building and you are to remain until
your time of parting will come. At that time, you, too,
will understand what it means to leave your companions.
Thus, we say adieu, and hope that you will be as proud
and as confident at your graduation as we are.

My classmates, I have bidden others farewell in your
name but farewell I cannot say to you. We are going into
the world together, and although land and water may lie
between us, we shall always be one in our memory. We
shall all have a common purpose never to be a discredit
to our Alma Mater and to live to be good, upright citi-
zens.



20




Salutatory

By Olga DomiNGuez



It is with great joy that we gather here tonight for we
are to achieve that goal for which we have worked twelve
long years we are receive to our diplomas.

We have labored hard and steadily. Many were the
times when we felt that we could get no further anil that
we couldn't keep on working. But just at those critical
moments an encouraging remark from one ot those guar-
dians who have taken it upon themselves to show us the
way through these dangerous years, gave us spirit to
keep on struggling, and finally we have come out victorias.

Almost four years ago we entered high school as inex-
perienced freshmen. We looked upon the sophomores as
almost our equals, the juniors as upporclassmen, but
those mighty seniors as being very dignified and old. We
thought that it would be years before we would be in
their places. The time seemed so remote that we didn't
give a bit of thought to it. And now, before we have even
time to realize it, tour years have passed and we are about
to give our place to another senior class.

Mingled with the happiness and joy of tonight is a bit
of sadness. Now that we graduate each one will go his
way. Perhaps we won't see these familiar friends with
which we have spent so many years, these friends with
whom we have worked and played so many times. We
will also miss our teachers, for whom we have come to
have great affection, even though, at times, we thought
they were cruel tor giving us so much work to do.

No more will we walk these corridors, our arms loaded
with books, making short visits with friends we encounter
as we pass from our various classes. When we step from
the stage tonight it will be as graduates of Cristobal High



School. In the gymnasium just about an hour from now
we will be dancing as alumni of our school.

Next year, those of us who stay on the Isthmus may,
perhaps, come to school to visit, but we will teel very
different from what we do now. Every day when we came
to school we felt that it was something of a home, for we
spent a great deal of our time in it. Next year we will
feel as strangers. We will see now faces, new teachers
perhaps, whom we do not know.

In the years to come we will look back upon this happy
night and realize that it was the closing chapter ot the
best and happiest volume ot our lives. Even though, at
times, school may have seemed boresome, we are compe-
lled to admit that these carefree years, free from responsi-
bilities and worries, were happy ones. We might not think
so now, but when we are out in the world, working for
our existence along with the rest, we will realize it.

As we leave the stage we will be taking a great step
into that life in which, upon now, we have been largely
spectators. But, before receiving our diplomas, which
are in themselves only passports into that lite, let us pause
for a moment and think of things that are to come. When
we step into real life we may find ourselves lost. Certainly
we will find that there are many qualities which we will
need to develop if we are to achieve success.

This year, in order to get away from the old, formal
type of commencement, we thought it best to present our
ideas in a new and novel form, which straggely enough
is also an old and familiar form. It is the type of play in
which each actor writes his own part. We sincerely hope
that you will enjoy it.



21



FAITH

Dorothv Hoecker.



I am Faith, Ambition's greatest helper the substance
of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen. I
am your constant companion. I have bee i with you ever
since you entered school, and I will continue to be with
you throughout life.

You need me, for I give you strength when you are
low in spirit. Think not only of Faith in God, and in the
spiritual world. That is only part. When you were a
child you had faith in your parents. As you grew older
it became more a part of you. Now you have faith in
your friends and teachers.

You must also have faith in yourself, and in your future.
You must feel that you can master any problem that will
arise during your journey through life. Without me you
could not have gotten this far. You must let me be your
companion throughout life. Honesty, perseverance
ambition, and courage are necessary, but without me
they are of little value.

Consider the great deeds man has done. It was faith
which enabled to do such great things. Think of the
engineers, and ponder upon the great deeds they have
done. They make the grades of a great highway easy
of ascent, they plan the curves and straight stretches.
They plan tunnels so carefully that workmen beginning
on opposite sides of a mountain meet in the middle at an
exact, preconceived spot all visualized and thought out



before work was begun. I gave those men strength and
foresight.

There are many things beyond your understanding,
but stay with me and all will end well. You know the
way you came, you know the way you go, and the rock
rock upon which you stand is not to be laughed into dust.
Let them laugh who will, but as for you simply believe.
You have gotten this far with me by your side, and you
will march on to greter victories if you stay near me.
Listen to the words ot the poet Riser:

Faith is not merely praying

Upon your knees at night:
Faith is not merely straying,

Thiough darkness to the light.

Faith is not merely waiting

For glory that may be,
Faith is not merely hating

The sinful ecstacy.

Faith is the brave endeavor

The splendid enterprise,
The strength to serve, whatever

Conditions may arise.

Remain steadfast in faith, for without me Ambition
could never have the strength to go on.



HONESTY
Julio Dominguez



I am Honesty, most necessary of all Ambition's helpers-
Wealth and fame mean nothing at all if you have not
been honest in acquiring them.

Many well-known men in America and all over the
world have become famous and wealthy. These men were
ambitious, but they were also honest at all times in their
dealings with others. Their honesty made them well-loved
and respected by all.

Maybe you may think that ambition is so powerful
that it does not need the help of honesty; that an ambi-
tious man can achieve success even without the aid of
honesty. You are wrong. It may be that for a time he
mav be carefree and happy, but sooner or later his disho-
nesty will be discovered. Ambition cannot help him
then.

Ambition has helped you during your school career.
You were ambitious to get good grades. You studied



hard and sometimes denied a show or a party in order to
achive what you were aiming for. But. were you not also
helped along by honesty? It was honesty that urged you
on to greater efforts in order that you would not have to
resort to unfair methods in getting a passing grade when
one of your teachers suddenly gave you a test.

We must not forget the greatest merit a man can possess
to judge others with honesty. Never judge a friend, or
as far as that goes, anybody without honesty. Do not
be critical to an extreme. No one was born perfect. Every-
one of us has his little faults which has can overcome.
Always be honest with your companions and give them
a chance. Don't forget that you too are judged and criti-
cized by others.

Always remember to be honest, for without honesty
Ambition becomes avarice or greed, without it she is a
tickle jade and loses her beauty and power in men's eyes.



22



PERSEVERANCE

Ward Davies

1 am a slow, plodding fellow, but I'm Ambition's grea-
test helper in spite of what the other say. Patience is
my mother, and my father is Strength. I guess we're
a slow family all around.

Lots of other qualities run away from me and hurry by,
but I just keep on plodding and I find I usually pass the
in the end.

Someone's always comparing me to the tortoise in the
old race between the Hare and the Tortoise, but I don't
mind. He won the race, you remember?

You've heard that water can wear away stone? Well,
it's true. And that's the way I go about things. I just
keep on and on at a thing until it's finished, and in the
end I get lots more done than most.

Abition's such a flighty quality that she's always
running off and leaving me. but I always have to help
her in the long run. Without me she would never have
the strength to carry on.



,^5U_?



COURAGE

Robert Moot

You will need the courage strong men have when they
face violent death with a smile on their lips.

You will need the courage to face doubt and despair-

and the courage to stand by your beliefs even though
Public Opinion himself were against you.

You will need the quiet courage it takes to bear up
patiently under hardships and sorrow.

and the stubborn courage to risk all on a venture,
and failing in it, to smile and start anew.

You will need mother courage and the courage of
fathers, and the courage to light for good causes even
against hopeless odds.

You will need the courage to face the facts of life
not as you wish them, but as they are and the courage
to wait and hope while one you love lies in the shadow
of death's door.

Ah there are many ways in which I can help you.

Methinksyou will be in sore need of me if you intend to
defy Public Opinion and prosper in it. It takes courage
to do that.



23








VI \ i



- **.*:-. -<*




Site!? 3^



Seniors Who Expect to Attend College



Senior Futures



Seniors usually find themselves asked the question
"What are you going to do?" or "What college are you
going to?" Some have already made up their minds (or
had them made up for them). Others, not so fortunate
have to face an uncertain future. The senior class of
1936 seems to have high ideals journalists, nurses, army
officers, navy officers, dietitians, and business officials,
to mention a tew.

Both, Theodore Aanstoos and Donald Townshend
plan to enter the Webb Institute of Naval Architecture,
at Bronx, New York City.

The three who intend to be nurses are Claire Koester,
Agnes Reinke. and Dorothy Hoecker. Claire is planning
to attend the Reading Hospital in Reading, Pennsylvania;
Agnes, the Pasadena Junior College prior to further trai-
ning, and, Dorothy, the University of Southern Califor-
nia.

Ward Davies hopes to go to West Point, but before
entering that institution, he is going to Colombia Prep
School in Washington, D. C.

Alary Goulet will go to the Canal Zone Junior Collegs to
study business administration. The following year she
hopes to go to the University of Texas at Austin.



Annapolis is the goal of Louir St. Petery and Arthur
Tagland. Louis is expeeting to go to Penn State Univer-
sity tor one year in preparation for Annapolis. He
will major in electrical engineering, Arthur is going to
attend Severn which is in Alarylaud before entering
Annapolis.

Rosemary Cox is the future journalist. Her ambition
fs to go to State College San Diego, California.

The dietition is Eula May Plath who will major in
home economies in the Southern Alethodist University
at Dallas, Texas.

Alay Appel and I^ouise Snyder are preparing for bu-
siness careers. Alay is going to a bussiness college "some-
where in Kanssa," and Louise is planning on the William
and Alary College in Virginia.

Another senior expecting to finish up a business earcer
is William Hill, who has chosen the University of Califor-
nia as his goal.

What the future really has iu store for these ambitious
graduates, of course, remains to be seen. Perhaps five,
ten or fifteen years f'om now, the rest of us will be proud
to say, "We went to school with them and knew them
when they struggled throught history assignments and
English uotebooks" Who can tell?



24



(Elass History

bv Mary Griffin '36



In the fall of 1932, sixty-seven very green freshmen
entered the portals of learning of C. H. S. To these begin-
ners fell the honor of being the last freshman class to
start out on the road to success in the old Cristobal High
building. As freshmen we were a marvelous class, even
though our position in the school was most lowly. We
has as our class advisor Mr. Hackett, who certainly aided
in starting the inexperienced people that we were on the
correct road. Wendell Cotton was elected our class
president, while Doris Ebdon, Chita Murray and Virginia
Sanders were the other officers. Eddie Curtis made his-
tory for our class by getting on the Boy's Varsity Club.
Hope Hollowell represented the girls of the class by getting
on the Girl's Varsity. Many freshmen joined the Athletic
Association. Our Freshman Dance was a Novelty Dance
given at the Washington Hotel on May fifth. The dance
was carried out as a radio program, and everyone enjoyed
the entertainment. Upperclassmen even broke down and
admitted that it was a grand aftair.

Into a brand new school and into the more sedate life
of sophomores, we entered our second year of high school
with high spirits and full of pep. "Mope" was again
elected our president, and Mr. Hackett, again, our advisor.
Other officers were Jimmy Days, Virginia Sanders and
Edward Durham. As the Students' Association was
installed that year, Doris Ebdon and Howard Will were
oui representatives. On January fifth we gave our annual
class dance and as it was the first of that year. It was most
successful. The number of members in our class decreased
slightly that year, but the number ot boys representing
our class in athletics increased. Will Curtis, Hill. Ri-
chardson, Hanna, Durham and Rettally were among the
sophs in the lime light in '34.

With our third year of high school arriving, there arrived
also that grand feeling of being an upperclassman. For
the third time, Wendell was elected president, but as he
had been president twice before, he was ineligible. Eddie



Durham was then elected president and the other officers
were Doris Ebdon and Alary Griffin. Evelyn Dwyer and
Jimmy Days were class representatives. Mr. Meyer was
our class advisor. Our junior year was very eventful.
We received our class rings and we gave the best Junior-
Senior Banquet ever given. (At least we thought so.)
Mary Goulet was toastmistress and she did very well in
making the affair one to be remembered. Evelyn Dwyer
was elected the Queen ot C. H. S., thus adding more
laurels to the illustrious class of '36. Many juniors were
active in dramatics and a few became National Thespians.
In sports we showed a fighting spirit. More girls took
part in '36 than before, and the boys were out in all their
glory.

In the fall of 1935 fifty dignified persons entered the
portals of C. H. S., and, although they had worked hard to
to attain their dignified air, in their hearts they regretted
to think that it would be their last year. The class again
elected Wendell as their leader and Mr. Vinton as their
sponsor. As "Mope" was elected the president of the
Students's Association, he resigned as class president and
Paul Barnett was elected. Doris Ebdon, Virginia Sanders
and Teddy Aanstoos were elected as the other officers
and Mary Griffin and Dcnald Townshend were elected
class representatives. The first class dance of the year
was given by the senior class on Thanksgiving Eve. Every-
one agreed that it was a wonderful dance. Without Mary
Goulet as their editor the "Trade Wind" and "Garibbean"
would never have been as excellent as they were. Frances
Patchett helped to keep the standards of the class of
1936 up by being elected Queen of C. H. S. at the high
school carnival. The girls of our class won the volley-
ball and bowling athletic banquet, and the boys gave a
good fight, although they did not come out on top.

As the end of school draws near, many persons are sad,
for some classmates will go away forever, but the class
of 1936 will have many fond memories to cherish, and
they will always be proud ot C. H. S.



25



e

e


(ElasB flrnphrry

by Rosemary Cox '.36


s



A PAGE FROM THE DIARY OF A STRUGGLING REPORTER



June 2, 1946 Cloverdale, Virginia.

Today I was given a very interesting assignment and
one which I enjoyed a great deal. I covered the wedding
of the famous beauty and belle of the class of 1936, my
triend. Miss Anne Rhea, to Lieut. Michael John Eason
of the United States Navy.

The wedding took place in St. John's Church by the
Sea. at five thirty o'clock in the afternoon. When I en-
tered the church I noticed that a good many ot my former
classmates in Cristobal High School were present. I sat
down by the wellknown physician, Armando Gasperi, who,
I've been told, empties the pockets of the rich in Texas
only to put the money back into those of the poor.

The ushers were Jimmy Days. Charlie Murphrey, Ward
Davies, Teddy Aanstoos, Donald Townshend and William
Hill. Jimmy and Charlie are entertainers on the Chase
and Sanborn Cotlee Hour on the radio. I listen to them
every Sunday night. Armando informed me that Ward
is now a Captain in the Army. His brilliant service in
Europe brought him his position. Teddy is Make-up
Editor for the New York Times; Donald is running the
Ford Agency for the Canal Zone, while William owns the
Wax Aluseum in New York.

He had no time to tell me more for the music began.
I thought at first that the ceremony had begun, but it was
only Muriel Mullane, the songster of our class, accompa-
nied by the famous violin player, Paul Barnett. Paul took
New York by storm last year. Muriel has just returned
from Europe where she had been training her voice. Great
things are expected of her.

Just as Muriel finished her song, "Oh Promise Me,"
my dear triend, Mary Goulet, entered and sat down be-
side me. She recently was made Dean ot a very fashion-
able school for young ladies which bears her name. She
told me that Hope Hollowell is Physical Director in her
school, and that Jeannette Hyler had charge of the music
department, while Virginia Thomas is teaching history
there.

We both looked around then to see whom else we could
spy. The famous New York playboy, Eddie Durham,
was sitting quite meekly by the side ot his newest fiancee.
Georgia's newly elected senator, Wendell Cotton, but just
plain "Mope" to me. wassitting near by as were also
Junior Will, now taking Clark Cable's place on the screen;
Lydia Gravatt, the beautiful classical dancer; and Robert
Anderson, who just recently completed a contract for
the construction of some very important bridges tor the
Russian government. Christopher Matchett, the prom-
inent English author and playwright, I was later informed,
had left a very entertaining game hunt in Africa to be
present.

Evelyn Dwyer, a fashionable young matron of Philadel-
phia's society sat beside her wealthy husband.

Arthur Tagland, a brand new Lieutenant in the Navy
and Louis St. Petery, Professor of History at Columbia
were sitting together. I was told that Louis also writes
articles for "Current History." Dorothy Hoecker, mak-
ing good in the field of interior decorating waved to me
from across the aisle, where she was talking to Agnes



Reinke, an authority on cooking, who test srecipes for
Good Housekeeping's culinary department.

Just then the wedding march began, and all eyes, in-
cluding mine, were turned toward the rear of the church.
First came two beautiful little flower girls. One certainly
favored her mother, Mary Griffin. The other was the
daughter of Eula Mae Plath.

Following them were the six bridesmaids: Doris Eb-
don, Virginia Sanders, Hope Schaefer, Eleonore Taiman,
May Appell and Rachel Cuesta. Doris is familiar to
most Americans since her face or figure appears in prac-
tically every magazine published in the United States.
She is the most photographed model in New York city.
Virginia Sanders and Hope Schaefer are both doing well
in social service work. Eleonore Taiman makes cpjite a
large salary as a stenographer. May Appell runs a large
beauty establishment in Washington, while Rachel has
an advertising bureau.

Frances Miller wa maid of honor. I've been told that
wedding bells will be ringing for her also in the near fu-
ture, and again the Navy bring home the bacon.

Anne certainly made a lovely bride. She walked to the
altar on the arm of Mr. Vinton, our class sponsor. He
gave her away since her father was unable to attend.

The groom met his bride at the altar. He was accom-
panied by his best man, Robert Moot, millionaire. I
have not yet found out where Bob got his millions.

I felt rather faint when I recognized the minister as
none other than Mike Fernandez.

The ceremony was soon over and Mary and I started
out to get a cab. We hoped to arrive early at the hotel
where the reception was to be held. In our haste, we
bumped into .Alice MacSparran. She is married to a dare-
devil aviator, but I do not know his name.

We finally got to the reception and found besides the
people we had seen before, Howard Will, Claire Koester,
Ruby Lyew, George Marcuse, Julio Dominguez, his sister
Olga, and Frank Anderson. Howard recently won the
Olympic swimming meet; Claire has a nursing school;
Ruby Lyew specializes in oriental roles on the screen;
George Marcuse runs the American Trading Company in
Colon; Julio Dominguez has quite a good reputation as
a scientist; Olga is the wife of the Cuban president; and
Frank is a well-paid electrician.

Anne received telegrams from Joseph Rettally, Pres-
ident of Panama, and Louise Potter, the great dramatist,
explaining their absence.

Anne and her husband sailed at twelve for Europe.
All of their guests went to the ship to see them off. On
the way, I stopped to cast my vote for Frances Patchett
as Miss Virginia.

Arriving at the dock, we met lane Starke and Virginia
Strong who were both hostesses on the ship and we per-
suaded them to join the party. Jane said, in answer to
our questions, that Philip Hale was on an exploring trip in
the Arctic regions.

So, all members of our class being accounted tor, we
stood on the dock, or rather those who were able stood,
and we gave three rousing cheers for good old C. H. S.



26



fc.



CLASS WILL

by James Day '36 and Charles Murphrey '36



=3



We, the Seniors of 1956, in sane and sound mind, do solemnly bequeath the following honors and unsual talents
only under the circumstances that you, the Juniors of 1936, shall strive to acquire and carry out the talent or honot
bequeathed you.



May Appell
Rosemary Cox
Rachel Cuesta
Olga Dominguez
Evelyn Dwyer
Doris Ebden
Mary Goulet
Lydia Gravatt
Mary Griffin
Dorothy Hoecker
Hope Hollowell
Jfannftte Hylfr
Claire Koester
Ruby Lyew
Alice MacSparran
Frances iMiller
Muriel Mullane
Frances Patchett
Louise Potter
Eula Mae Plath
Agnes Reinke
Anne Rhea
Virginia Sanders
Hope Schaefer
Nancy' Jane Starke
Virginia Strong
Virginia Thomas
Theodore Aanstoos
Frank Anderson
Robert Anderson
Paul Barnett
Wendell Cotton
Ward Davies
Jimmy Days
Julio Dominguez
Eddie Durham
Mike Fernandez
Armando Gasperi
Pete Hale
William Hill
Christopher Matchett
George Marcuse
Robert Moot
Charles Murphrey
Joe Rettally
Louis St. Peterv

and
Arthur Tagland
Donald Townshend
Howard Will
Junior Will



BEQUEATHS
Her willingness to work
Her nice ways
Her honor rating
Her office work
Hei scholastic standing
Her stately poise
Her job on the Caribbean Staff
Her graceful dancing
Her loyalty to the South
Her conservative ways
Her ability in sports
Her shyness
Hei willingness to learn
Her high school career
Her fiery hair
Her cheerful ways
Her golden voice
Her crown and float
Her stage fright
Her timid voice
Her politeness
Her talent in art
Her place in the office
Her bashfulness
Her lovely suntan
Her modesty
Her personality
His passenger car service
His football physique
His way with the female sex
His place in the "Hill Billies"
His leadership
His quiet disposition
His chairmanship
His Spanish
His base horn
His "Clark Gable" looks
His modest ways
His shortstop position
His scholastic standing
His height
His lead soldiers
His graceful pompadour
His virility

His membership in "Leader's Club"
Their ability to work
together



His interest in school
His outstanding playing in baseball
His dancing ability
This Will is drawn to a close and is legally witnessed on this
of our Lord, nineteen hundred and thirty-six.



27



TO

Betty Brooks and Marie Geoghegan

Maxine Blunden

Maiy Elizabeth Kelly

Yolanda Salas and Goldwyn Grabhorn

Marjorie Anderson and Betty Hauss

Olive Aanstoos

Carroll Gallion or Jean Walsh

Ruth Moody and Anita Boggs

Nora Hewitt and Mary Downey

Eleanore Stump! and Josephine Stumpt

Esther Neely and Ivathleen Phillips

Ruth Iviill and Margaret Macintyre

Jacqueline Briscoe

Dora Lyew and Lucille Lyew

Flelen McMahon

Grace Herman and Flora Herman

Virginia Hartman and Ellen Kelty

Jean Crouch or Anne Campbell

Ivouise Seibold

Jean Nelson

Charlotte Levy and Grade Hodges

Dorothy Craig

Mary Darley and Louise de la Ossa

Catita Ecker and Helen Carroll

Rhea Ivoester

Winifred Koehler and Elizabeth Haywood

Netta Potts and Macel Goulet

La Verne Rose

Marvin Keenan

Vernon Clark and William Dickinson

Jack Dignam

Cheney Moore

Charles Washabaugh

J. H. Houghton

Herbert Gottesman

Edward Hoffman

Frank Alberga

Douglas Smith

Jimmy Coman and Jack Clay

Rowland Clemens

Jimmy Christian and Billy Wood

Joe Coffin and Stanford Stone

Robert By id

David Coffey

James Greene

Harlan Crouche

and
Robert Ruley
Harry Reeder
Laurel Highley
Don Cornell
the twelfth day of



une in the vear of our Lord,



I^uke Warm, Lawyer

Witnessed by:

Howe M. I. Dooin
Donja B. Leevitt



1









The Champion Bowling Team.



;Rah, ;Rah, jRah, Seniors' Despite the fact that the
senior class contains comparatively few boys, the accom-
plishments of its teams and, more especially, those of
individual members are nothing less than outstanding.

The senior star, Howard Will, is second only to Henry
Jaramillo in athletic prowess. Although he is an all-
around athlete, he gained his greatest number of points
complement in baseball. Not far behind him is "Mope"
Cotton, also an all-round athlete. His bulk is the com-
plement of Will's litheness, as was often proved during
the football tournament.

Another sportsman of merit is Joseph Rettally, whose
specialities are basketball, soccer, and tennis.

Eddie Durham, whose long legs and able catching
ability made him the dread of the opposing football team,
is also an excellent baseball player.



Robert Anderson, Jimmie Days, and Julio Dominguez

The Captains of the Baseball Teams.



specialize in football, baseball, and soccer respectively,
though each did creditably in other sports.

Among the fair sex the senior showing was even better.
Hope Hollowell probably the champion girl athlete of the
school, led the senior volley-ball and bowling teams to
victory. Virginia Strong, another brilliant all-rounder,
was especially valuable in basketball and tennis. Virginia
Thomas and Mary Goulet, the latter captain of the bas-
ketball team, are other high-ranking senior sports-girls.
Without doubt Louise Snyder is one of the best tennis
players in the school and Jane Starkey one of the star
bowlers. Among those who deserve honorable mention
for their sportsmanship are May Appell, Mary Griffin, and
Eula Mae Plath.

It was not apparent in the first estimates of the athletic
strength of the senior class, but it is found to contain
some of the finest material in the school.




28




The Captains of the Football Teams



TOUCH FOOTBALL



Following the dummy tournament the freshmen were
given 30 points handicap, the seniors and sophomores,
7, and the juniors, none. The following captains were
elected:

Senior Frank Anderson

Junior Laurel Highley

Sophomore Archie Byrnes

Freshman Alfred Stumph

On April 24, the sophomores opened the season by
defeating the freshmen by 22 points making the final score
45 to 23. The sophomores slowly but surely cut down
the freshmen's lead until they were ahead. Suddenly
Henry "Kiki" Jaramillo received the ball on his ninety
yard line and ran, with Ed. Sullivan as interferance, for
a touchdown, demoralizing the ireshmen's spirit.

In the second game, the juniors started their victorious
campaign by defeating the seniors, 12-9. In the second
quarter the juniors got their first touchdown, but the
extra point was not made. In the second quarter, the
seniors advanced to the juniors' ten yard line where Jimmy
Christian intercepted a pass behind his goal line giving
the seniors two more points. In the third quarter the
juniors made another touchdown and so the game ended,
12-9.

The seniors were defeated again by the sophomores by
one touchdown. Frank Anderson, in spite of this football



ability, could not stop "Kiki" Jaramillo and Ed Sullivan.
The final score was 6-0.

The freshmen forfeited their next game te the seniors.

They put out a team against the juniors, however, but
when Highley made a touchdown on the kickoff the final
result was known. It was 46-30.

In the last game, the juniors narrowly nosed out a
victory over the sophomores. The sophomores held their
lead of 7 points through the first half. The juniors, howe-
ver, in the third quarter advanced the ball to and over
the line with Keenancarring the ball. Highley made the
extra point tying the score. It was not until the last
quarter that the winning run was made. Highley took
it around the end for the touchdown and again converted
the point making the score, 14-7. The sophomores had
been holding their own until the juniors started using
William Wood and Jimmy Christian as pass receivers and
line plunges. The juniors won the season by this game-
The final standings were:



Class


Won


Lost


St


anding


Juniors


3







1000


Sophomores


2


1




666


Seniors


1


2




333


Freshmen





3




000



29











The Champion Football Team.



On May 28, the athletic awards were presented to
twentythree high school boys. A point system was
arranged by Mr. Vinton and Mr. Seiler. The boys on
this list who were not already members of the Varsity
Club were initiated into it on May 29. The boys were
ranked as follows:



3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.



Na



Points



Henry Jaramillo 416

Howard Wills 409

Wendell Cotton 399

David Potts 372

Cheney Moore 369

Jack Clay 369

Edward Sullivan 369

William Wood 368

James Christian 365

Laure Highley 365

William Hoverter '. 356

John Finlason 352

Joseph Rettally 350

Archie Byrns 320

Robert Ruley 316

Edward Durham 310

Vernon Moore 309

Roland Clemens 299

Frank Robles 299

Douglas Smith 292

Donald Parke 287

Frank Anderson 274

James Days 269



30




The Captains of the Bowling Teams.



BOWLING



The following girls were elected captains for the inter-
class bowling tournament:



Senior
Junior
Sophomores
Freshman



Hope Hollowell
Esther Neely
Emma Jean Starke
Fern Horinc



In the first game of the bowling tournament, April 16.
at 2:30 at the Old Cristobal Clubhouse, the juniors defeat-
ed the freshmen by a total pintail ol 66 points.

Esther Neely, Captain of the junior team, was high-
pointer with a score of 8... Fern Horine, captain of the
freshmen team, was highscorer with 80 points.

In the second game of the bowling tournament, April
18, at 9:00 A. N. the seniors downed the sophomores by
a total pinfall of 41 points. Hope Hollowell, captain of
the senior team, had the high score of 91 and Emma Jean
Starke, captain of the sophomores, had the high score
of 89.

On Monday afternoon, April 20, the sophomores and
freshmen clashed. Flora Bath with a score of 87 was high
scorer and Helen Wikinstad with 87, was high scorer tor
the sophomores. The sophomores downed the freshmen
by a total pinfall ot 51 pins.

Thursday afternoon, Apri' 25, he seniors and juniors



came together. It was a hard-fought and close game,
but the seniors' experience was too much for the juniors
who went down in defeat by a total pintail of 45 pins.

High scorers for the juniors and seniors wer Macel Goulet,
92, and Virginia Thomas, 87.

In the next game the sophomores downed the juniors
by a total of 15 pins. The high scorers were Esther Neely
and Flora Bath.

The seniors proved their right to be called champions
by winning every game they played by an overwhelming
score.

In the last game the seniors defeated the freshmen by
a total pinfal of 82. The high scorers for this game were
Helen Wikinstad, 84, and Hope Hollowell, captain of the
seniors, 88.

The highest average for the bowling tournament were
as follows:

Seniors Hope Hollewell 87 J^

Juniors Esther Neely 86

Sophomores Emma Jean Starke 85

Flora Bath 85

Freshmen Fern Horine 80

Helen Wikinstad 80



31



33



IN UNION THERE IS STRENGTH

WORKERS WILL RECEIVE THE FULL SHARE OF WHAT

THEY PRODUCE WHEN THEY ORGANIZE AND

BUY THEIR OWN UNION-MADE GOODS



II



COMPLIMENTS OF



THE CENTRAL LABOR UNION

ancf
THE METAL TRADES COUNCIL



OF THE
CANAL ZONE



THE PANAMA HOSPITAL

Panama City, R. of P.




34



Hotel U/dshinqton



Uneaualled for Situation and Comfort

Colon, r. p.



A Hotel in keeping unth the dignitu, spirit and seruice of

Cfhe Panama Canal.



Qolf Swimming Heater Sports
^Tarpon Fishing

The l]ear Ground
JAMES E. LEID1S P. O. Address

manager CRISTOBAL. CANAL ZONE



Bureau of Clubs

and

Playgrounds



Recreation, Subsistence

and

Entertainment



35



COMPLIMENTS OF



The Panama Railroad

ancf

Panama Railroad Steamship Line




CompaNia Pan amen a



DE FUERZA Y LU






PANAMA



COLON



(Enmpltmtutfl nf

llrrntrp Btolrt fflonih]



BEAUTICIAN



Hntrl iHaaliingtnn

Irnulg Parlor piinnr- CrtB. 21 1 B



COMPLIMENTS

OF

MAX BILGRAY



Buy Your Drug Needs at

Salazar Drug Stores

COLON, R. P.



WE MAKE RAPID DELIVERIES AND ALSO
HAVE A MODERN SODA FOUNTAIN.



Remember

SALAZAR



PHONE 336 OR 35



COLON, R. P.



36



COMPLIMENTS OF

DOCIA M. HODGES

MEMBER FLORIST
TELEGRAH DELIVERY ASSOCI AT 1 ON



THE CHINESE SILK STORE

NEW CHINA

We carry genuine Chinese and Japa-
nese silks and curiosities, linens, silk
materials, shawls, wicker furniture,
vases, perfumes and jewelry.



FRONT STREET
COLON



CENTRAL AVENUE

PANAMA



ALWAYS REMEMBER

A man is judged in life

by two things, His friends

and His clothes.

(The American Bazaar

HABERDASHERS & TAILORS
TO -MEN OF GOOD TASTE

COLON and PANAMA



Have your Jewelry repaired

"La Esmeralda"

JEWELRY .AND WATCHES
REPAIRED



PASOUALE PALADIXO

Bolivar Avexue No. 1700
P. O. Box 266 COLON, R. of P.



AMERICAN TRADING COMPANY, Lli

COLON



Just received a complete line of GLASSWARE
and HOUSEHOLD ARTICLES. A Call will
convince you of our extremely LOW PRICKS.



Phone 40, Colon



Box 330, Colon



37



Dresses and Hats
from Paris

ARBOIX

ANTONIO'S

Front & 9th. Streets
COLON, R. P.



Hand Embroidered Linens.

Eng'ish Luggage Hand Bags.

Paris Novelties.



Perfumery



COMPLIMENTS OF

D. Chellaram

The most reputable dealers on the

Isthmus, where you will find

wonderiul bargains.



No. 47 Front Street



Colon. R. P.



COMPLIMENTS OF



Swiss Jewelry



Charles ferret



OPPOSITE CRISTOBAL COMMISSARY



Margarita beauty Shoppe

Margaret ]. Will



Permanent Waving Our Specialty

WE MAKE YOU
MORE LOVELY



Corner 8th &""G" Sts'
Phone 169



New Cristobal
COLON. R.P.



TUNG HING

GENERAL FANCY GOODS

Corner 9. & Bolivar Streets



P. O Box 354 Tel. 575

COLON, R. P.



Inocencio Galindo, Jr.



7th and Bolivar Streets



COLON



JOBBER and WHOLESALE
MERCHANT



REAL ESTATE BROKER

AND

AGENT



38



KODAK PANAMA
Ltd.

Offers a complete line of

KODAKS
PILOT RADIOS

X-RAY & MEDICAL APPARATUS

MICROSCOPES
BINOCULARS



1 1 1 Central Avenue
PANAMA CITY



ER.


BREWER

STORK


CfCO.,


Inc.


ALL


KINDS OF NOVELTIES




AND NOTIONS.




Bolivar Street


COLON,


R. P.



FRED SANDERS

SOUVENIR & NOVELTY STORE
45 Front Street, COLON, R. P.



BOLIVIAN SILVER
SNAKE, LIZARD.:- ALLIGATOR NOVELTIES
ARTICLES MADE OF BUTTERFLY WINGS



RITZ



The Most Delicious Cracker

NATIONAL BISCUIT COMPANY PRODUCT

JULIO A. SALAS

DISTRIBUTOR
P. O. BOX 204 COLON, R P.



LTLdrtmeZ &l Compani]

THE ONLY MANUFACTURER IN
THIS COUNTRY OF

ALLIGATOR SKINS



Inquire Our Prices and Save Your

Money by buying directly from us

BOX 904 PANAMA



9,034 Front St.
COLON



120 Central Ave.
PANAMA



Before eye-strain wrinkles become
permanent and nervous fatigue
becomes chronic, have your
eyes examined. If you need
glasses, you will be sur-
prised to find what a
comfort they are
when accurately
and becomingly
fitted to
YOU

Have your eyes examined

CAORON OPTICAL HOMY



5



PANAMA

25 Central
Avenue



Registered
Optometrists I
&' Optician's.

Npu' York



COLON

| 9,034 Fiont
Street



39



(Enmpltmmta of

GSTABLECiDO EN 1849



CASA JAPONESA

Y. AMANO & COMPANY



THE STORE THAT SELLS AT THE LOWEST PRICES IN THE
REPUBLIC OF PANAMA

47 and 102 Central Ave. Panama City, R. P.



THE ROYAL BANK of CANADA

Incorporated 1869.



COLON BRANCH PANAMA BRANCH

Corner 11th 6f Bolivar Sts, Santa Ana Plaza



40



Cable Address "IMPCO"

A. B.C. 5th. a 6th. Edition
Bentleys



P. O. Box 342, Colon. R. P.



COLON IMPORT ^EXPORT COMPANY, Ltd-



JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS



DEALERS IN GENERAL MERCHANDISE AND NATIVE PRODUCE

COLON*. REPUBLIC OF PANAMA

Branch Retail Stores I PLAYA DAMA PORVENIR CARTI

and Trading Stations \ SANTA ISABEL ISLES OF PINES NARGANA



(CompliuinitB of

Sr. Urrtt f rirr




HOTEL TIVOLI

A comfortable restful Hotel, ideally located with magnificent view

of the Pacific ocean.



lhe center of social life, close to every point of interest
on the Pacific side of the Canal Zone.



WM. T. McCORMACK,

Manager



P. O. ADDRESS:
ANCON, CANAL ZONE.



41



French Bazaar

Palomeras fe Pucci, Ltd.
COLON

WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF EUROPEAN NOVELTIES

Petit Point Bags and Compacts Chronium Ash Trays and Stands Butterfly Wing Boudoir Sets

Manicure Sets Crystal Liquor Sets and many other items too numerous to mention.



ARTICLES OF HIGH QUALITY



JANE REYNOLDS' MODEL SILK DRESSES
"Kayser" Hosiery



LIMITED PRICES



COMPLIMENTS OF



C. B. FENTON & COMPANY, Inc.



CRISTOBAL, C. Z.

Phone Cristobal 1781



BALBOA. C. Z.

Phone Balboa 1066



ITldcldme Lduerqnedu

DRESSMAKER J



Tel. Colon 706-J



dox 703, Cris.



IMPROVED EQUIPMENT MODERN METHODS EFFICIENT SERVICE



JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY



Broadway, near Folks River
COLON, R.P.



PHONE
COLON, 21



CRISTOBAL, C. Z.
P. O BOX 5061



42




Antonio Tagaropulos



MAIN STORE



12.176 BOLIVAR AVENUE
PHONE 499.



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
GROCER

BRANCH STORES

6.075 BOLIVAR AVENUE. PHONE 429

4.01 1 9TH STREET. PHONE 616

2.026 BOLIVAR STREET. 699





C. CASULLO

I E W E L L E R

and
W A T C H M AKER

P. O. BOX 615



Phone 225
CRISTOBAL.C.Z.



9.036 Front St.
COLON. R. P.




MEET ME

AT

Alex's Cafe





MIYAKO




ORIENTAL

GLASS 1
NOVELTIES


THE NEW OXE PEJICE STOI

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED


RE

DRY GOODS
SOUVENIRS
T>YS, Etc.


ARE ^r
WARE
- SILKS M I YA K O 1

106 CENTRAL AVENUE PANAMA CITY



43



Radio Pictures
of Panama, Inc.



RKO



winp

PICTJUHtS



Pathe News



March of Time



RKO Pictures



Colon son



Box 5005,
Cristobal, C. Z.



SMOOT-BEESON, S.A.

BUICK LA SALLE

CADILLAC CHEVROLET
DISTRIBUTORS



S. L. Bishop

Manager



I6th and Melendez Ave.
COLON, R.P.



COMPLIMENTS OF

ROBERT WILCOX & Co.

COLON
Republic of Panama




cTipo Bottles



of Distinction.




IS ALWAYS
REFRESHING



(hbcude

Dinger ait



PANAMA COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO., INC.



PANAMA

Tel. 65



COLON

Tel. 84



44



Atlantic Photo Service

6.012 Front Street



COLON, R. P.

Phone Ilo. 134



Art &. Commercial
Photographers

Appointments for sittings can be made
seueral daus in aduance.



VJe like Babies and we

photograph them

perfect



Mavis up-to-date Beauty Shoppe

COLON THEATRE BUILDING
10th STREET and BROADWAY, COLON. R. P.
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PAGE 2

C R' 5 T 0 BA L t .." .: '" . .. t

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HIGH SCHOOL .. ; ". .. -, ",. , \

PAGE 5

The C l ass of 1 936. \Vet the Caribb ea n s t a ff d e d i ca t e t h i s m ag a z in e t o th e cl ass o f nin e t ee n hu nd r e d and thi rt y s i x with the h o p e t hat i t w ill r e fr es h th e i r m o m o rie s o f t h e h appy d ays s pe n t in Cris t o b a l Hi g h S c h ool.

PAGE 6

THE CARIBBEAN VOL. XIX CRISTOBAL. CANAL Z.ONE PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL JUNE 12, 1 936. Tabl e of C ontents I D E U1CAT10N I I SEN 1 0 H S ... III. SENIOR eLM' S LEAOEH S .. V. V ,\LEDICTORY V I S ,\LUT,\TORY . VIII. SE: N 1 0lt F U T URE:S .. I X. CLASS H I S TORY X C \SS PnOPI1EC Y XI. CLAS S \V1 L L .. __ X I I. AnlLETI CS. 2 1 7 1 8 20 2 1 22 24 25 2 6 27 28 No.3

PAGE 7

SENIORS 3

PAGE 8

" A ma n h e seems o f cheerf u l yesterdays A n d c o nfide n t tom o r rows." Nam T H EODORE A R NOLD AAN S TOOS, JR Birlhp l aa. Sta n f o rd C onnecticut. Dal e Enlere d C. Z ScllOolJOcto b e r 1 926 ,,1di,ili e.r--Ph o to C lu b 2: T r a d e Wind Staff 2,3,5: C a r ni" a l C ommittee 2, 4 : C aribbea n Staff 3 4 : Jr.-Sr. Dra m a ti c Club 3 : Effe Ku be K lub 4 : Nati o na l Thespi a n s 3 4 : Math C l u b 3 : S lide Ru l e C l ub 4: P yrAm id Tea m 4 : C l a ss T r e a s u rer 4 "One who n eve r turn e d hi s b ac k but marc h ad stra i sht r o rwa r d Name -FRAN I ( A. A NDERSON, J R Birl h place Brooldy n, N Y Dale Elli ered C. Z. Sc hoof.rOct o b er, 1 92 4 /lcli ilie.rSocce r 3. 4 : Bas\ (ctball 4: Trade Wind Staff 3 4 ; Caribbe'1.I1 S t aff 3, 4 ; Carn i \'al C o mm itte e 3 4 ; P y r a mid T ea m 4 ; F ootball 4 ; W a t e r P o l o 4 "Pla in w i t h ou t p o m p a n d ric h w i t hout a show." -,"\lame -ROBERT O AN DERSON Birlhpfaa.-C a m de n New J e r sey. D ale Enlered C. Z ScllOol.rD ecember, 1 929. /lel ii'ili a G lee C lub I : A rt C l ub I : P hot o C l ub 3. 4; T rad e W incl Starr 4; Slid e R u l e C lu b 4: S occ e r 4 : B ase b all 4 "Thy m odes t y s a c a n d l e t o lhy m er i t Kame -MAY APPELL B irlhplaa. S t Naz.1.ir e F ra n ce. D ale En l ered C Z. School.rM arc h 1 9 3 4. Acl i i l i a -T rad e Wincl Staff 4 ; C a r i b bea n Staff 4 : Bask e t billl 4 ; Volley B all 4 ; Tenni s 4 : Bow l in g 4 4

PAGE 9

" F o r m a nn e r s are n o t id l e. but t h e fruit Of 1 0y. "t1n ature a n d of n o b l e m ind." Nallle AARON P AU L B A RNETT Birlhplace Co l o n R P Da/e Elliered C. Z S c hool.rOct o b er. 1 92 .... I'Icli.,i/iuOrc h e s tr a 1,3 .... ; G l ee C lub I. 3 ; L a Pas 3 4 ; C.uibbea n St aff 3 -t; L a Pa s V i c e P r esidcnt "'; B as ke t b all 4 ; Effe KlIb e I\lub 4 ; Soccer -to A man of hope a n d f o r w a r dl ooking mind. .Vame -WENO ELL C LAWSON COTTON B irthplaceC o l on R P Dal e E lliered C. Z Sc hoo/.rOct o ber. 1 92 .... deli" iliaClass P rc s i d e nt I. 2 ; Athle ti c A ssoc i a ti o n I So c ce r I 2. 3. 4 : B a s k etbal l 1.2.3 .... ; Ba se b all I 2.3.4 : Tra c k 2 : S w imming 2; V a r s it y C lub 3. -t: L a P a s 2.3 4 : S c i e n ce Cill b 3 : P r es id e nt Sc i cliceClub 3 : C a rni a l C o mmittee 3 ; V a r s it y C lub V i ce P res i d ent 4: Stude n t A ssoc i a ti o n President 4 ; F ootb:!!I .... T o t ho se wh o k n o w thee n o t n o word s ca n paint. And tho s e w h o Imo\\' t h ee know a ll worels rlr e faint1 .vallie -ROSEM ARY L OGA N COX B if'l h pln c e-Sa \ n na h Ceo r g i a D a / e /i'll/ued C. Z Sc/wul.rS e p t e m b e r 1 9 3 5. d eli iliuG lee Club 4 ; Caribbea n Staff 4 ; T I 'aele W i nd S t a ff 4 "A ro sebud set with littl e wilf u l t horn s A n d sw ee t as Eng l i s h a ir could make h er. s he." V alllt' -RAC H E L M CUES T A Bir / hpla u -Cam a gtle y Cub a Of/I e I.'. :II/au t c. Z S c hvo/.rOct o ber. 1 9 28. I eti il i u -Athle ti c A ssoc i t t i o n l : D e b a t e Clu b 2: Tra d e W i n d S taff 2,4 : L a Pas 3, "'; Caribbe: ul S taff .... 5

PAGE 10

" L oo k not tho u down but up! JACKSON DAVIES, JR Birthplace-Philadelphia, Pa. D"If:. E llierul C. Z. Sch o ols-I\ by, 1 934 .-idi,ilia-Trade Wind S taff 4: B : lshtball 4: F ootball 4 "0. b l es t wit h t e mper w ho se uncl o ud ed ra." C a n make t o morrow cheerful as t o day!" raouJAMES / \\ATHE\\' D r\YS IJirlhplace-}\nco n C Z. 1)"le Entered C Z. ScllOols -October, 192-1. deli.iliaG l ee C lu b I 2, 3; Athl et i c Assoc iation I ; Class Vice Preside nt 2; Chee r L ea d er 3.4 : Carni"al Committee 3, 4 ; Orc h estra 3, 4 ; Band 3, 4 ; Jr.-Sr. D ramatic C lub .:l; Class Representative 3 ; Effe K u b e Klub 4 ; B l sketball 4; Soccer 4 ; B aseball 4; Pyramid T eam 4; Leader's C lub 4 : Slide Rule Club 4 ; Slide Rule Club President 4 ; F ootball 4 "Good se n se w hich onl y i s th e g ift of Heaven, ./-\nd though n o scie n ce, fair l y wort h the seve n." 'vallie JULiO DO /\\IN GUEZ, JR Birlhplace -Colo n R P /)1I1i. E,,/ert'd C. Z. Schools-October 1 930. ddil'iliu-Athlc tic Assoc i a ti o n I ; / \ 1ath Club 2; Pho t o Club 2; Caribbea n Staff 2; Track 3 ; Soccer 3 4 ; Bashtball 4 : Pyra mid T ea m 4 : B aseball 4 : Football 4 "A f ace wit h g ladness o\'e r sprea d Soft s mil es. by human Itindn ess bred!" MARY OO/ \\INGUEZ Birlliplfla H a\ a na, Cuba. /)a/e EI/fr:.red C. Z. Schools -Octobcr, 1 930 ... J d i .i/ i u -Athletic A ssoc i a tion I ; D e h a t e Club 2; C a rni va l Committce 3, ..J; L a Pas 3, 4 ; Trade Wind S taff 4; C,IIibbe:w S t aff 4 6

PAGE 11

"With hi s eyes i n ftooe! with laughter. Sallie -EDWARD A. D URHA!\ \ Birtltp/aCl!A n con, C. Z. Dnle Elllt:red C. Z. Sc/lOolJ"-Octob er. 1 923 . I cli"ilia G lee CluL I : R asehall 2, 3, -I: V:tr s ity Cluh 3, 4 ; J r .-S r Dra m a ti c C lu b 3; Class President 3: T rack 3: Soccer 3,4: I:bshetball 3 4: W a ter P o l o 4: P yramid T ea m 4: Band -I: FootiJ:t!i-l: E ffe K uLe 1(lub -I, "Quccn rose of the r oselHlC1 g:lrJcn of gil'::-" .\",/IIIt'-EVELYN D\\,YEn Bir/hp/n('e C o l on. R P Dalt: HI/facd C. Z. SchvolJ" -OctoLer, 192::', .icli,iti a E ffc Kube Iub I : L a Pas 2, 3: Class R ep. l 'ese ntati\'e 3: Cbss Vice Preside nt -I "1-\ daught er of the gods, t all And m os t dil in ely bir. .\"a ille D O RI S Ai\""N Birthplace C o l on, R. P Dnle F;I/!t:rul C. Z. Schuo/,r-October, 1 92-1. ddi"itia-Cbss Secretary I : G l ee Club I : Class R ep. resentative 2: EHe Ku be Klub 2: L a P as 2 3 -I; L a Pas Sec r etary 3: Baskethall Carnil'a l Com m ittee 4 "Hang so rr ow! care will hill a ca t And therefore l et's be meny." j\'nlllt' \\lC HAEL A. FERNANDEZ, JR. BirlhplaCl! Co\on, R. p Dale Elllaed C. Z .)c.'/'oo!,rSep l c mbcr, 1 93-1. dcli"iliaSoccc l 3 4: T. 'ade \\'inc! Staff 3, -I: Carni\' a l C ommittee 3, -I: Ca rih bc3n Staff t 7

PAGE 12

" I have been so grea t a lover." Name A RJ\t\ANDO }, GA SPER I Birthplace L a Guayra, Venezue l a. Dale Elliered C. Z. SchoolJ-October, 1 924. deliril ie.r-Athl et i c Associa ti on I ; D eba t e Club 2: Pho t o Club 2: Math Club 2; Trade Wind Staff 2.3,4; Basketball 3: Track ;); Soccer 3 4: Baseba ll 3, 4; P y r a mi d Team 4; S l ide Rul e Club 4: Football 4 "And s till they wond ered a n d t h e wonder g r ew That one s mall h ead shou l d carryall it kn e w N"a u -MARY GERTRUDE GOULET BirlhplaceAncon, C. Z. Dale Elllered C l. School.r September. 1 930. deli.,ilia-Athletic Assoc iation I ; Trade Wind Staff 2,3, 4 ; La Pas 2. 3, 4: Supper C l ub I. 2. 3. 4; Swi mmi n g I ; Bask etball 2, 4 ; Volley Ball 4 ; Caribbean Staff 3, 4; Bowling 4. "She mO\' es a goddess, and she l ooks a queen." .Yame G RAYCE LYDI A G R AVATT Birthp/ace -Brook lyn. N. Y. Dale Elltered C l. Schoo/.r -September, 1 927. /Idi.,ilia G l ee Club J : Ar t Club J ; Supper Club 1. 2, 3; L a Pas 2. 3, 4; E ffe Kube K lub 2, 3; Carni va l C o m mittee 2.3.4; Nat i o n a l Thesp i a n s 3,4; P r e sident Nati o n a l Thes'pians 4. "Eyes so t ra nsparen t. That thro u g h them one sees t h e sou l. Name -MARY EUGENI A GRIFFI N Birthplace Co l on, R P Dale Elltered C l. Schoo/,rOctober. 1 923. delil' iliaSupper C lu b 1. 2, 3, 4; A thl e t i c Assoc i atio n I; 8 Trade Wind Staff 2, 3, 4 ; Effe Kube I
PAGE 13

" Brc v it y i s the sou l of w it." .\'am e -PHILIP A. HALE BirfliplllCt'-Ancon, C Z. D il/e En/ud C. Z. Sdwol.r October. 1 925 . delll'iliaBa s k e t ball 4 Wh ose little body l odged a mi g ht y min d. Same WILLIAM C HILL BirlltplauSan J ose, Costa R i ca. Da/.: Ell/ad C. Z School.rOctobcr, 1 924 . /eli"ifi u -Athl e ti c A ssoc i a ti o n I ; Caribbea n S t a f f 1. 2 ; L a Pas 1. 2. 3; Swimming I, 2; T e nni s I. 2, 3; De bate Club 2: j\hth C lub 2; Var s ity C l ub 2, 3, 4 ; C a rni"al Committee 3; L a Pas P resident 3; Soccer 3, 4 ; Baseball 3, 4 "Th e f a ir, the c h as te, a nd un express i"e s he." .I'nm DOROTHY LOUI SE H OECKER B irthplace A neon, C Z D n l e E,l Iued C. Z. Sl.'/'ool.r-Sepfember, 1 931. d eli"it i a -Supper Club I. 2, 3 4 ; Basl te t ball 2: J r.-Sr. Dra m a ti c C l ub 3; Carni,'al C ommittee 4; Tra de Wind Staff 4 ; La Pas 2, 3, 4 H ealth i s the "it a l princip l e of bliss And exerc i se, of he3lth. SnllltH OPE HOLLOWELL Blrlhplnre-Anco n C Z D ale Entered C. Z School.r Octob el', 1 923. deli,.iti a G l ee C l ub I ; Swi mmin g I ; I 2. 3, ; Girl's Va r si t y C l ub 2, 3, 4 ; Basketball 3, 4 ; Bow l ing 3,4: T ra d e Wind S taff 4 ; V olley Ball 4 '-9

PAGE 14

"The mildest manners and the gentles t he a rt. \ ame -JOSEPHII E JEANNETTE HYLER Birlh p /aceCo l o n R. P. Dalt! E'llert!" C. Z. ScllOolsSeptemher, 1 93 1 d el i.ili u G l ee Club I ; Art Club 2 ; L a Pas 2. 3, 4 : Effe Kub e Klub 2, 4; Carnival C o mmitte e 3,4 "Gentle or speec h. beneficent of mind. .VallleCLAIRE A. KOESTER Birlhplau-Sanford. l\\a in e. Dal e E'l/auf C. Z Schooh March. 1 935. "Silence is the mother of truth." \aml!RUBY VERONICA LYE\\, Birlhp/auCo l o n R P. D ale EII/ l!/wf C Z. Schools Sept e m ber, 1 932 . -Jeli.ili a Glee Club I 2, 3 4 ; Supper Club 2, 3. 4 "Darlt eyes-eternal sou l of pride Deep l ife in a ll that's true!" .\'ame-ALICE M IRI A I \ \ MACSPI\RRAN Birlhpll1u Wa s hin g ton, D. C. D al .. EI/lt!red C. Z. Sclwol.r-Odober 1 923. Aeli.iliaSupper Club 2 4 10

PAGE 15

"A m en'." h ea d m a k ct h a c h eerfu l countenance." .\"allleG E O R G E EDWI N MARCUSE Birl hpla u Co l on. R P D ale Entered C. Z St/'oo/.rOcto h er. 1 925. / cli.iliu Tl';lcic 2, 3; T rade W i nd Staff 3 -4: C ,ri Lbean Staff 3. -4: Car ni va l C ommittee 3, -4; B ase b all 3, -4: Soccer 3. -4; F notb;:dl -4. "No m a n i s w iser ror hi s Learnin g \\'it a n d \ \ i s do m :lrc 1 3rn w i t h a I1nn:' \On"" CHRI S T OPHER ROY \ \ A T CHETT Sir/hp/ace B e l ize, Br i t i s h H ondur:ls. /J11/e RI/ler ed C. Z 1 935 . I .-li,ili". r L a P :1s -I: S l ide Rul c C l ub-l: P\' r : ,m i d Te:lm 4. T rade \\'ind S taff 4 ; C:lri b be;ln 4 : Socce r 4 : Bask e thtllt 4 : W a ter P o l o 4 ; Football 4 "Sh e i s a win so m e wee thi ng, S h e i s a ha n d so m e wee t hi n g. I l l LL E R B i rlhp/.taD allas. T e ... :ls. /Jal" Entued C. Z S c hool s April. 1 935. "Gr:lcc was in a ll hcr s t eps. h C3\'c n in h er eye. I n every gesture d i g nit.Y and l o \ e. .\"allu M U R I E L RI T A j \ l U LLANE Birthp/flu Co l o n R P D ale E nt"red C. Z Schools October, 1 923 Idi,iliuEffe l\u be 1 < l u b I ; Supper Club I. "l. G l ee Clu b 4 11

PAGE 16

"Life's a p leasant in stitutio n L e t u s take it as i t co mes." Name ROBE R T A. MOO T Birthplace E as t Rutherf o r d, N. J D ale Enleral C. Z. Sc hool..rO ctober, ] 928. f i efi viliaL a Pas 2, 3: Sc i e n ce C lub 3; J r .-S r Dram a t i c C l u b 3: Photo C lub 4; S l i de Rule C lub 4 ; Pep C lub 4 : Foo t ball 4 "Just at the age t w i x t boy a nd youth, W h e n tho u ght i s speec h a n d speec h i s truth." Name C H ARLEY P A U L MURPHREY Birl h place -Medford Mass..1.chusetts. D ate Elltered C Z. School.r -May, 1930 Liefi"iliu B aseball 4 ; E ffe Kube K lub 4 : P e p C lub 4 "The swee test thing tha t ever g r ew B eside a huma n d oo r." .VarneFR ANCES H E LE N P A T CHETT Birthplace -Washin g t o n D C D ate Elltered C. Z. School.r Oct obe r 1 9 26 liefh'iliuS upper Club 4 .. A n d thy deep eyes, a mid the g l oo m S l ide li ke jewel s in a shroud." .VarneLOUI SE M A Y P OTTER Birthp laceL ex in gton, 1\1isSOUl'i. Dale EII/ered C Z. ScllOol.rSep l embe r 1 9 34 ddil.itie.r T e n n i s 3, 4 ; Volley B all 4; A r c h e r y 4 ; P e p C l u b 4; Bow lin g 4. 12

PAGE 17

" A Jo\ e l y bei ng, scarce l y formed or m o l ded, A with all it's swe etest l ea\'es yet f o l dcd \'aouV IRGI N I A LEE SANDERS Birthplace C o l o n R P. I)nle Elltered C. Z ..)cllOol.rOctobe r 1 923 I'Idi,li/l u Cla ss V ice Prc s ident I : L a Pas 2. 3: Carni \ a l Co mmittee 3: Class Sec r e tary 2. -I. "So the b l u s h of ba s hfu l ness E 'e n pity sca rce co ul d wis h i t 'I '"nm
PAGE 18

"In each c h ee k appears a prett. y dim p le." .Vame-EULA b\AE PLATH B i rthplace A ck l ey. I owa. D al e Elllered C Z. Sc/lOoI..rF c b r u ary 1 931. L 1dililic..r S lipp e r C lu b 3. 4 : Basl tetLall4: Volley 8 a1l4 ; L a Pas 4 ; B ow lin g 4 : A I 'c h e r y 1 ; P e p Club 4 H er :lct i o n s wer e m odes t and her words di s c ree t. 1 \ a lll e -AGNl' : S M E REI NKE Birlh, J / "ce C c l oll R P D al e C. Z SdlO o l,rU ctobe r 1 92 4 /!t.li, ilit'J'Su p per CluL I. 2. 3 4 ; Effe I
PAGE 19

"T'is well to be merry a n d wise, T 'is \\'ell to he h o ncst a n d true. .VallleLOU I S BERT ST. PETEHY BirthplacePhila delphia. P i L Dale Ell/ere" C. Z. SC!lOol.rScplemher, 1935 . I cli,ilia S lide Hu l e C l ut, 4: CariLbean Staff 4 ,\11 the heart and the so1L1 a n d the forevcr in joy. \'alll e ARTHUR I -IERBERT TAGLANlJ Bir/hpll1ce'Nc\\' York, 1'\. Y Dale F :I!/ercd c. Z. Schov/..rScp t eml1er, 193 5 . f elil,ifiu Slide Rul e CluL .1. I t i s g':lod t o J.::ng t h e n t o th e las t a sunn y mood .\"alllt, E LEOi\ORE AGN ES TJ\I I'lAN l3;rlhplacr.-Troy, N. Y Daf e T:/I/crcd C. Z. ScllJlI/.rOct(lber, t 9:! 4 . !cli, ifiN Per Clul, .1: Trade \\'i n d S t a ff 4 ; CaribLean Staff .1. "And h e r s u nn, l o c h s I -bng on h er temples l ik e Golden fleece . V allle VIRG I N I A F TJ-I0 1 lAS Birthplace Colon R P. Daf e I::I!/crcd C. Z. SchtJoh -October. 1924 Jcl;"i1ic.JEffe I\.ub c Klub I ; V o lle\" Ball 2, 3. 4 ; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Ba se h all 3: Trade Wind Staff 3: Glee C l ub 4. 15

PAGE 20

"The n on! then on! where duty l eads. J"\ y course be o n ward s t ill." Yamt-DONALD HYDE TOW NSHEN D BirlhplaaPhil ade lphia. Pa. Dalt Enltrcd C. Z. ScllOOI..r-OdoLer. 1 924 . .-felll.iliu -Trac k I. 2, 3: Orchestra 2: Band 2, 3. 4; So c cer 3,4; Jr.-Sr. Dramatic Club 3: S c i e n ce C l ub 3; National Thespians 3, 4; Pho t o C l ub 3, 4; Photo C l ub Busi n ess M a n age r 3, 4; C l ass R ep r esenta ti \ 'e ; S l ide Ru l e Club 4 : S lide Rule Club Vice P resident 4 ; Pcp Cluu 4; Football 4. J olly soad natured, full of fun If .yoll want a rea l friend herc's o nc." .Vame-WILLl A J \ HOWARD W I L L Birfhp/aaA n con, C. Z. V ,lle Ellfact! C. Z ScllOol..rOctober, 1 924. ,",('IilliliaC l ass Hcpl c sentatin 2: Vars it y Club 2, 3, 4 : l3aszball 2, 3. 4: S o ccer 2. 3. 4: Baskctb:t11 2. 3, 4 : T u m b l in g 2. 3 : W a t er Pol o 4: Pyramid T ea m 4: President Varsity C lub 4 ; Football 4. Today. w h a te"er may anno-,". The wor d for me is Joy. just simp l e Joy. Name J O H N F. PARSONS-WILL Birthplace -Tampa, Fl o r ida. D ale Elli cred C Z ScllOO/JOctober, 1 929. Ael/.,/fi u B. A A 1.2; S li de Rule Club 4: Baseball :1. !6

PAGE 21

Fro m l eft t o right: Wendell Cotion, Pr cside nt of the Student A ssoc i;l.tion, with the Senior Reprcscntati\ c. j\\.lry Gl'iffi n and D o n ald T o\\ n s hcnd The Senior Cla ss Officers. 17

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The Commencement Committee. In conformity with the cust o m which has bee n established at Cristoba l Hi g h Schoo l of breaking entirel y away from the standardize d commencement, the committee of this year's class (co mpo se d of the fift ee n rankin g students) d ecided lIpon th,:: type of exercise w hi c h was gi ve n as bcing the m os t unus u a l and cffective \ chicle for presentin g the ideals they wished emphasized. R esponsi bilit y for the gen era l p l a nnin g of the affair was g ivcn t o W illi a m Hill. w h o did bl'illiant work both in writin g the orig in a l script and supenisin g the s tagin g. All m c m be r s of the committee pa rti cipated. h owever. both in wor!ting ou t the dctnils a nd in trimmi n g the gencr t! idea down t o the fina n c i a l and pe r so n a l limitati o n s within w h ich it was nc cessa r y t o work. Aside from min o r chan ges ne cessary t o m a k e the part s co n form to the genera l plo t the speec h es were conc e i ve d and written by the students g i ving the m Al terati on or wholesa l e re\ ision of speeches by facu l t y m embers was h e l d to a minimum. because it was felt that the entire pla y wou l d be more effective if it huly r epresented the thinking of the students themse lves. The committee. however, fully a ppreci ates the many w i se and helpfu l suggestions of the faculty sponso rs. Mr. Franks, Mr Vinton, and 1'1r. Sulli va n. and their interest in dcvoting valuabl e time toward makin g our commencement a success. \Vhil e we realize tha t a .muc h m o re impress i ve exercise cou l d have been given had" we h a d more time, unlimited finance. and a group of hi g hl y trained actors from which t o recruit our talent. it is our h ope that wc h w c succeeded in our tw o main objectiv es, effectiveness of presentation and ori,sinality. THE COb1MITTEE 18

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O,crture i n voc;l. li o n .. Sa l u t a tory .. j \ \ossic" Eycrystudcnt, a n a llegorical pby CO" I "'IEl'CE" 1 EN T EXERCI SES o f the Cri s tobal Hi gh School Cla ss of '.36 Cristobal H igh Sc h oo l Auditorium Friday E,' cning June 12 1 936 Eight O'clock PROGRA.' I Sercdy J-I i g h School Orches! .... RC\' c rcnd ..... Olga Domingue Aeo l ian Trio "The AlpI \ laid's Dream". Se ni ors Lahitzky P au l B arnett. Georgiann
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Vale dictory ,\le mber s of the fac ulty, fellow class m a t es, parents and (ri ends: It is w ith a f e el in g of joy tha t we are her e t o nigh t of joy for t h e tim e w hi c h we ha\'c so l o n g a n t i c i pa t ed, has co m e. This i s our comme n ce m ent dilY_ Only those can f ull y appreci a t e o u r happin ess who have passed through the chan ges of sch oo l life, w h e n study was n o t a lways a p leasure. w h o ha\'c undergon e the stra i n of examinati o n s nnd performed those variou s duties whic h have a t times see m ed so d i fficu lt We h a\'c to ld you tonight of the \ 'irtue we s h all need to go t h ro ugh l ife, a n d even though we are you ng. we ha\'c h a d experi e n ces during our schoo l days in whic h t hese trait s were nee d ed. We have been b l a m ed as well as p raised by our tcachers and fellow student s so we s h ou l d !mow a littl e abou t how we shall be judged i n the wor l d by public opinion. We had to ha"e a mbition t o reac h o u r present goa l. F ai t h, persc,crancc. a n d h o nesty were n eeded t o gu ide us on our way. no matter w hat our trial s werc. All of u s have had courses in so me arl. so we ca n partially appreciate it. I n cou rage we were never l ack i ng, thererore we reel con fident of s u ccess. For bei n g abl e t ) atta i n thi s goa l w e owe a g r ea t d ebt of gl'at itude to o u r paren ts. C a n we ever repay the m for the sacri fices they ha e m a d e? F ro m our inra ncy they ha"e wa tched aliI' prog l 'ess a n d g uided our inclin a ti o ns. \Ve may s h o w our appreciati o n for the ir efforts b y ca rry in g out the exam p l es se t b y t h e m. B es i des aliI' pal'e n ts, we have our teach e r! w hom w e must. t ha n k for the i r zea l a n d ass i sbnce through our co u rses of study. r\o matter h ow undese r v in g we were they wcre a lways rcady t o g i ve advice and h e lp w hen n eede d A nd n ow. t o you. U ndergradu a t es, I wis h t o say a w o r d W e are leaving this bu ildin g a nd you a r e t o re m a in unt.i1 your t im e of parti ng .will co m e. At tha t time .. you. t oo will un de rstand w h a t i t m ea n s to lea\ 'e you r compa ni o n s. Thus, we say adi eu, and hope tha t you w ill b e as pro u d a n d as co n fident at your gradu atio n as we a r e. M y class mates, I ha"e bidden others farew ell in .your n a m e but farewell I ca nn o t say t o you \Ve are go i n g into the wodd together. a nd al t h o u g h l a n d a n d ''''t t e r may l i e between us. we s h all a lways be o n e in our m e m o ry. \Ve shall all have a com m o n purpose-never t o be a d i sc r e di t t o o u r 1\!I11<\ Mil t e r {wd to li"e t o be good, upr ight c iti zens, 20

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Salutatory It i s wit h g reat j o y tha t we g:lther hCl'c tOllight for we are to ac h ic\ 'c that goal fOJ' whi c h we ha\" c worked lweh 'c l o n g yearswe arc l'ccei,'c t o Qlll' dipl o m as. We h :wc I nhored hard .. n
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F AITH Dorothy H oec k er. I am Faith, A m bitio n 's grea t es t helper-the subst a n ce o f things hoped for the e\' i dence o f things n o t se e n I am your constant co m pa ni o n I have bee 1 with you e ver since you entered school. and I w ill c ontinue to be with 'you throughout l ife, Y o u nee d me, for I g i \ e you streng t h when you are l o w in s p i r it. Think n o t o nl y of F a i t h in G od, a n d in t he s p i r itua l wor l d T h a t is o n ly pa rt. \Vhen you were a c h i l d y o u had fai t h i n your p arents. A s you grew o lder it be ca m e m o r e a part of y ou. No w .yOli have f aith in your fr i ends a nd te 3c hc r s Y o u mll s t a l so ha ve f a ith in you r s e lf. and in .your future Y o u mu s t f e el th:l.t you ca n maste r any pro b l e m t ha t will ari se during y our j ourne y thro ugh l ife. W it hout m e y o u co u l d n o t have g otte n t h i s far. Y o u mus t let me be y o u r compa ni o n thro u g h out life. H o n es ty, per se veran ce ambition, a n d co urage are n ecessary. but without m e the y are o f littl e a ille. C o n sider the g re a t deeds man has d o n e It was fait h w hi c h ena b l e d t o d o s u c h g r ea t thin gs Thinlt of the e n g i n ee r s a nd p o n d e r upo n t h e g r e a t deed s the y h a \ e don e. They make the g r a d es of a grea t highway easy of asce nt. they pla n the cur\' es and s t r a i g h t stre t c he s The y p l a n t un n el s so carefully tha t work m e n hegi n n i n g o n oppos ite s ides o f a m ou nt ain meet ill t h e m idd l e a t a n e x a c t. p re co n cei v e d s p o t 111 i s u alized a n d tho u g h t ou t befor e wor k was begun. I gave those m e n strength a n d for e sight. Ther e are m a n y things b eyo nd your understanding, b u t s tay with m e a n d a U will e n d we ll. Y o u know the way you cam e, y ou know the way you g o a n d the rock r ock u po n w hi c h you s t a n d is n o t t o b e l a u ghed into d u st. L e t them l a u g h w h o w ill but as br yousi m p l y beli eve. Y ou have gotte n thi s far w i t h m e by Jo' our s i de, a nd you will m a r c h o n t o g r e t e r victori es i f you s tay near m e Lis t e n t o the words of the poe t R i se r : F aith i s n o t merely prayi ng Upo n y o u r k ne es at n i ght: F aith i s n o t m e rel y s t raying T h lough darkm ss t o the lig h t. Faith is n o t m ere l y waiti n g For g l o r y tha t may be, F a i t h i s n o t m ere l y h a t i n g Thc s in f u l ecs t a c y F aith i s t h e brave end eavor T h e s plend i d ent er p ri s e, T h e s t ren gth t o servc wh a t e \ 'er C o n d it i o n s may ari se. R e main s teadfas t i n faith. for witho u t m e Am bition could nC\' er have the s t re n gth to g o o n H ON E S TY J ul i o D o mi nguez I a m Honesty, mos t n e c e s s ary of all A m bitio n 's h e l pers. W ealth and f a m e mean no t h i ng a t all if you ha"e n o t bee n h o nc s t in acquirin g the m j \ \ a n y well-kn ow n m e n i n A m e r i c a and all o e r the w o r l d h a c b eco m e fam o u s a nd wea l t hy. T h ese m e n wer e ambi t i o us, but they wer e a l so h o n est at all tim es i n the i r dea lin gs w ith o t hers T h e i r h o nes t y made them well-lo ved and respecte d b.y all. \ \ayb e you may thi nl, t ha t a m bi t ion i s so p owerfu l t h lt it d oes n o t n ee d the h elp of h one s ty: t h a t a n a m b i t i olls m a n ca n achi e\'e s uc cess e v e n witho u t the a i d of h o n e s ty. Y o u a r e w ro n g, It m a y be t h a t for a tim e h e may b e ca r efre e a nd h : q)py, hut soo n e r o r lat e r hi s dis h o n es t y will be d i scovcred Ambiti o n ca n n o t h e lp h i m the n j \mbiti o n has helpe d y OlI during you r sc h oo l ca r ee r Y o u were ambit i olls t o ge t goo d g r a d es Y o u s t ud i ed 22 hard : m d so m etimes d e n ied a s h ow or a party in o rd e r t o achi ve w h a t you wer e a imin g f or. But. wer e you n o t a l so h e l pe d a l o n g by h o n es ty? It was h o n e s t y tha t urge d you o n t o grea t e r effo rt s i n order t h a t y O u w o uld n o t have t o r e so r t t o unfair m e t ho d s i n g etting a passin g grad e w h e n one o f y o u r tea c h e r s s u d d e nl y g a \ c you ':1 t est. We m us t no t forge t t h e g r ea test merit a m a n ca n poss e ss t o judge others w i t h h o nesty. N e ver judge a friend o r as far as t h a t goes, a nybody withou t h o n es ty. D o no t be criticnl t o an e x t re me. No one was bor n perfect. E ve ryo n e of LIS has hi s l ittle faults w h i c h h a s ca n o verco m e. A lways b e h o n cs t w ith your compa ni o n s a nd g i ve the m a c h a n ce Don't forget tha t y o u too a r e judge d and cr iti cized by a t h e r s. Alw a y s r e m e mber t o be ho n c s t f o r without h o n es t y Am biti o n be co m e s ava r i ce or g r e ed, without i t s h e is a fickl e j a de a nd l oses her be a u t y a n d power in m e n s eyes.

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PERSEVERANCE Ward D avies I am a s l ow, plodding fellow but I 'm Ambition's grea te s t hel pe r in spi t e of what the other say. Pati ence is my mother. and m y father is Strength. I guess we're a s l ow famil y a ll around. L ots of other qual itie s run :IW<\." from m e a n d hurry by. but I j u s t keep o n plodding and I filld I u s unlly pnss the in the end. S o me o n c s a lw:lYs co mpari n g m e t o the t o rt o i se in the o l d race between the -fare and the T o rt o i se. but J d o n't mind. H e won the r nee, you r e m emher? Y O U'\c h eard tha t watCf can wcar aw"y s l o ne? \\'e ll it's truc. And thOll' s the way I go nbout things. I j ust keep on and o n at thing unti l it's f i ni shed, a n d in the en d I ge t l o t s m o r e do n e than most. Abiti o n's s u c h a fli ghty quality thn! s he's a l ways running off a nd l e,k\' in g m c, but I .. Iways h"\' e t o hel p her in the long ru n \ \ ith ou t m e s h e wo uld ne\'er ha\' e the stre n gth t o ca rry o n COURAGE R obe rt \ \ oo t Y o u will n eed the cour .. ge stro n g men h,wc \\' he n they face \'i o lcnt de .. th with a s mil c o n thc ir lips. You w ill n eed the couragc t o [ I ce doubt and despair .. nd the courage to stand by your beliefs C\'en tho u gh Public Opinion him self wer c ag .. ins t you. Y o u will n eed the quie t couragc it t al{cs t o be .. r up patientl y under Iwrdshi ps .. nd so rr ow. a nd the stubbo rn cou r age t o r i s k all o n a \ 'cnture, a nd failin g in it, t o s mi l e .. nel start : knc\\,. Y o u will nc c d m other co u rnge and the cour:kge of fathers, nnd thc cou r age t o light for good causes eve n agains t h opeless o d ds. You \\'ill need the courage t o f ace the facts of life not as you wish the m, but as they area n d the courage t o wai t and hope \\' hil e one you lo\'e lies in the shadow of death's d oo r A h there are m a n y ways in w hi c h I ca n help you. j\\ethinks you will bc in sore necd of me if you i ntend t o defy Public Opini o n a n d prosper in it. It takes COllr:kge t o do that. 23

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Senior s Who E x p ect t o Attend College Senior Futures Seniors usually fin d themse h 'e s asked the q u est i on "What are .... o u going t o do? or "What college are you going to?" So m e have a lready made up theil' minds (or had them made up f o r them) Others. not so fortunate ha\' e t o an uncertain future. T he se nior cl ass of 1 936 see m s t o h a \ 'e high ide a l s -journalis t s nurses army officer s navy officers. dietitians, a n d business officia l s to mention a few. B oth, T heodore Aanst oos and Donal d T ow nshend plan to enter the Webb Institute cf Architecture, at Bro n x I'ew York C i ty. The three who inten d to be nurses are C I :lire Koe s ter. Agnes R e inke. and Dorothy H oe c ker. C laire is planni ng t o attend the R eading Hospital in Re ading, P e nnsylv ania; Agnes. the Pa5.0'lciena Junior C ollege prior to further t rai ning. a nd. D orothy, the Uni"er sity of Southern C alifo r n i a. Ward Dav i es hopes to go to We s t Point. but before entering that in stitution. h e i s go ing t o C o l o m bia Prep Schoo l in Wa shingto n. D. C J\
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QIiass l l Itstor!J by Mary Griffin '36 [ n the fall of 1 932. s i xty-sc\'c n \ 'cry green fre s hm e n e nt cl'cd the portal s of learnin g of C H S T o th ese beginIle r s fell the honor of bein g the last fr eshman cl ass t o s t a rt ou t o n the road t o s u ccess i n the old Cri s t o b a l Hi g h building. As fre shmen w e were a marvelous cla ss even tho ugh our position in the sc h oo l was m ost lowly. W e ha s a s our class advisor J l r Hackett. who certainl y ai ded in starting the inexp er ienced peopl e tha t we were on the co rrect r oad. Wend ell C otion w;ts e lect e d our clas s preside nt, whi l e D o ri s Ehdon, Chila Murray and Vir g ini a Sanders were the ot h e r officC I 's. Eddie Curtis ma de hi s t o r y for our cl ass by getting o n the Boy's VaI 'sity Cl u b. H o p e H ollowell r eprese nt ed the g ir l s of the c l ass b Y getting o n the Girl 's Vars ity. Many fre s h m e n j oine d the Athleti c A ssoc i a ti o n Ou r Freshman D lll ce was a NO"e lt y Dance gi"en at the Washin g t o n H o t el o n j \ \ay fifth The d a n ce was carried out as a ,md everyone e njoyed the enterta inment. even bl'Ok e down and admitted tha t it was a g rand affa i r. Into a brand new sc h oo l .. nd i nt o the more sedat e lif e of s ophomores. we entered OUI' seco n d ye;ll" of h i g h sc h oo l with high spir i ts a nd full o f pep j \' \ope" was aga i n elected our presiden t ,"'Ind Mr. l-iaclwtt. nga in. our
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QIlallll Jrop11rrg I b y R ose m a r.Y C ox ',')0 A P AGE FRO V \ T H E DI A R Y OF A STRUGGLING REPORTER June 2 1 9 4 6 -CI0'I:erdal e V i rg ini a. Today I was g i \ 'cn a very inte r esting assi gnment and one which I enjoyed a g reat d eal. T coyered the wedding of t he fam ous beauty a n d b e ll e of t h e cla ss of 1 9 3 6 m y frie n d, Miss A n n e Rhea, t o L i eut. M i c h a el J o h n E aso n of the United S tates Navy T he weddi n g too k p l ace i n S t. J o hn's Church by t he Sea. at five thi rty 0 cl oc k in the a ftern oo n Whe n I en t e red the c h u r c h I n o t i ce d that a goo d m a n y of m y f o rm e r class m a t es i n Cristobal Hi gh Sc h oo l w e r e p r esent. I sa t dow n b y t h e w ellknown physi c i an, Arm a n do G aspe ri w h o I c h ee n t o l d. e m p ties t h e poc k et.s of the r i c h in Texas only t o put t h e m o ney b ad< i ) ltO t h ose of t h e poo r T h e u s h e r s were Jimm y Days, C h a rl i e !\-\urphrey, W ard Davi es T eddy Aa n s t oos Donal d T ow n s h e nd and Will i a m H i ll. Jimmy and C h a rli e are e n t ertainers o n the Chase and San born C offee H o u r o n the raeLi o. I lis t e n t o the m enr y S u n day n i ght. Arm a nd o infor m ed m e tha t W a r d i s n ow a Capt a in in the Ar m ,\'. H i s brilli :lllt serv i ce in Europe bro u ght him hi s pos iti o n T e ddy i s Make-u p E d it o r for the New York Times; D o n a l d i s runni n g the Ford A ge ncy for the C 'l.na i Z o n e, w hile William ow n s the \ Vax Museum i n New York. H e had no time t o t e ll m e more for the mus i c bega n I tho u gh t a t first tha t t h e ce r e m o n y h a d begun, but it W'I.S o nl y M uri e l [ ,",lIllan e the so n gs t er o f o u r cl nss acco m pa n ied by the fam o u s v i o lin p layer P a ul Barnett. P a u l t oo l New York by s t o rm last year l '-1mici has jll s t r eturne d fro m Euro p e w h ere s h e had bee n t raining her vo i ce. Gre", t things a r e expec t e d of her. J us t as M uriel fini s h e d h el' so n g. "'Oil Pro m i se M e m y dear f ri e nd. M a r y Goulet. ente re d and sa t d ow n b e side m e. S h e rece n t l y was m a d e D en n of a ve r y fash i o nabl e sc h oo l for young l adies w h i c h bears h e r n a m e. S h e tol d m e tha t H ope H ollowell i s Physi c a l Director in her sc h oo l a n d tha t Jeann ette H y l e r h :ld c h a r ge of the mus i c departme n t. w hil e V i rg i n i;:l. Tho m<'ts i s t eac h in g hi s t o r y the r e. W e both l ooke d a r ound the n t o see w h o m e l se w e co u l d spy. The f a m o u s New Y o rk p ltlyoc.v. E ddie Durha m, was s itting quite meekl y b y the s i d e of h is newes t fian cee. Georg i a s new l y elected se nator W e nd e ll Cotton, b u t jll s t p l;'lin J\olope" t o m e wass itting near b y as were ;'lIsa Jun i o r W ill now t a k i n g C l arI, C .1.bl es pl ace o n the scree n ; L ydia G ra\'att, t he beaut if ul class i ca l d a n ce r; a n d R o bert A nderso n who jus t re centl y co m p l e t e d a co ntract for t h e constr uc ti on of some ver y im portant b r idges for the Russ ian govern m e n t. Chris topher J \' l a t c h ett, t h e p r o m ine n t E n g l ish author and p laywri ght, J was l a t e r in for m ed, had left a v er y ent e rtai ning ga m e hun t in Afri ca t o b e present. E v el y n D wy er, a fas hionabl e y o u ng m "ltron of Phil a d el p h ia's soc i e t y sa t be s ide h e r wea lt h y h u sband Arthur T a g l a nd. bran d new Lieut e nant i n the Navy a n d L ou i s S1. P etery Pro f esso r of H i s tory a t Col um b i a were sitting t oge t her I W'I S l a i d t ha t Lo ui s a l so wri t e s a rt icles f o r C u rr e n t Hi s t o ry." Doro th y H oecker, m a k in g goo d in t he field of in t e r i o r de c o r d in g wa v ed t o m e from
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CLASS WILL by James Day '.36 and Charles Murphrey '36 We, the Seniors of 1956 i n sane and sound mind, do solemnly bequeath the following honors and unsual talents only under the circumstances that you, the Ju n iors of 1936, shall stri"e t o acquire and carry out the talent or hanOI bequeathed you. l\t1.n ApPELL ROSI':.\IARY Cox RACIt EL CUESTA OLGA DO,\\lNGUEZ EVeLYN DWYER DORIS EnDEN J \ARY GO U U ;T LYDIA GnAVATT MAR Y GRIFF I N DOROTHY HOECKI':R HOPE HOLl.OWELL HYLFR CLAIRt : R UBY LYE"'V A LICE F rances Miller M URIEL ML:L.L.ANE FRANCES PATCII E. 1'1' LOUISE POTTER E ul..' \ MAE P L ,HI! ACNF..S R E INKF_ VmCINIA S ,\NDeIB HoPF_ SCII/ \Ef'ER N \N CY VmCI:-1IA STRONG VII WINIA 1'II O"I"S AANSTOOS FRANK ANDE.RSON ROBERT ANDE.RSON PAUl. BARNI';TT WfJ,NDELt. COTTO=--WARD DAVIES JI.\I.\IY DAYS JUl.I O DO,\IINGL:EZ EDDIE DURHA,\\ MIKE. FI':RNANOI':Z AR,\IANDO GASPF..RI PETE. HALE \VII .LEA" I HIL[. CIIRI S TOPHl::a MAT C l lETl' GEoac t : )\I\.4.RCUSE ROUERT MOOT CHARLES M URPIIRh.Y JOE RETTALLY L oUIS Sl'. PETERV and BEQUEATHS Her w illingness t o work Her nice ways Her h o nor rating H e r office work H e l scholastic s tanding Her st.1. tely poise Her job on the CariL Lf.'an Staff Her graceful dancing l eI' I O,"fl.lty to the South Her conseryative w.1.ys Her abilit .r in sports Her shyness H e! willingness to learn Her high school c='Ireel I Ier fiery hair Her cheerful ways Her go lden voice Her clown and floa t H e r stage frigh t Her timid \'oice H e l politeness Her blent i n [ll't Her pbce in the office I l e I bash fulness I l eI' lo,c l y sunbn Her modesty Her person:.tity His passengel' car sen' ice I l is football ph:.,-sique -'is ",a\' with the female sex H is pl;ce in the H ill Billies Hi s leadership H i s quiet disposition H is chairmanship His Spanish His base horn H is "Clark Gable" looks His m odest ways Hi s shortstop position His sc holasti c standing His height Hi s lead soldiers Hi s graceful pomp;:lclour Hi s v i rility His membership in "Leader's Club" Their ability to work together TO Bett." Brooks and ,'larie Geoghegan ,\!\axin e Blunden l l a l y ElizaLeth K e llj' Y ol;nda S: das and Goldwyn Grabhorn Marjorie Anderson i'lnd Betty iallSS 01 i \ e A:nl s toos Carfoll G :dlion or Je:l.Il W;lIsh Ruth l \oodv :lIld Anita Boggs Nora Iewit't [lnd Mary Downe:.' E l e.lIlore Stumpf and Josephine Stumpf E sther Neelv ,lIlel Kathleen Phillips R uth Lull a:,,1 j'\argaret ,\\acintyre Jacqueline Briscoe D or;l Lye\\' and Lucilk Ly(w Helen b\cl \ahon Grace Herman and Fl ora Herman Virgi n ia Hartman and Ellen Kelty Jean Crollch or Anne Campbell Loui se Seibold Jean Nelson Charlotte Lcvy and Grade I lodges DOl'Mhy Craig Mal'\' Dar!e \ and Louisc de b Ossa Catita E ch'r and Helen C[llT olI Rhea Koester Winifred Koehler and Elizabeth Haywood Netta Potts and Mace! Goulet L a Verne Rose b lanin I\cenan Vernon Clark and William Dickinso n Jack Dignam Chene\' l \ \oorc Washabaugh J 1-1. Houghton Herbert Gottesman Edward Hoffman Frank A lberga Douglas Smith Jimmy Coman and Jack Cby H ow land C l emens Jimmy Christ ian :lI1d Bill y \\'ood J oe Coffin a n d Sbnfol'd Ston c Robel" Byrd Da vic! Coffey James Greene H a rlan Crouche and ARTlIUR TAGLA:-.'D Robert Ruley DONALD T OWNSII&.:\!O Hi s interest in school Harry Reeder HOWARD WILL His outstanding playing in baseball Laurel H ighle.", }U=--IOR WIL L His dancing ability D o n Cornell This Will is drawn t o a close and is legally witnessed on this. the twelrth day of June in the year of our Lord, of our Lord. nineteen hundred and thirtysix. 27 Luke \\'arm, Lawyer Witnessed by: Howe ,'\. I. Dooin D onja B Leevitt

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The Champi::l:l B o w lin g T eam. jRah. j Rah. j R a h. Seniors! Despite the fnet that t he se nio]' class conbins co mparati ve ly few b o y s the accomp lishments of its teams and, m o r e espec i a lly. those of individual m embe r s are nothing l ess than outstanding. The sen ior star Howard Will. is second on l v t o Henry Jarnmillo i n athleti c p rowess. Altho ugh i s an a liaround nthlete. he ga in e d his greatest number of po ints co m p l e m ent in baseball. Not f:II' behind him i s "Mope Cotton. a l so an all-rou nd ('lthle t e. Hi s bulk i s the comple m e n t of Will" s lithe n ess. as wns often proved d u r i ng the football tournament. A n other sport s m a n of merit i s J osep h R e ttally. whose spec i ali ti es a r e basl;:e t ba ll. s occer. and tennis. Eddie Durha m. whose l o n g l egs nnd abl e ca t ching ability made hi m the drend of the opposi n g foot b all te;:\m is a l so all excellent b ase b all p layer. Robert Anderso n Jimmie O.'l."s. a n d J uli o D ominguez spec i alize in football. baseball. and soccer respectively, tho u g h each did cred itabl y i n other sports. A m o n g the fail' sex the senior s h ow in g was e \ 'e n better. Hope H ollowell probably the champion girl athlete of the sc h ool. led the sc nior ,"olleyb all an d bow l in g te a m s t o yictory. Vi]'ginia Stro ng. another b rill i.'lnt a ll-rounder, was espec i ally va luable in basketbnll nnd t e nni s. Vir g inia Thomas and Mary Goul e t, the bUer captain of the b as ke t ball te.'lm. are other high-rankin g senior sport s-g ir ls. Without doubt L ou i se Snyder is o n e of the b es t tenni s players in the sc hool and Janc St-arkc y one of the s tar bow l ers. A mong those w h o dcscf\' e honorabl e m e n tion for their sportsman sh ip are May Appell. J\
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T he C;q)taill::' of the Fo o t oall T ea m s. TOUCH FOOTBALL Follow i n g th e dummy lournilm e n t the freshmen were gi\' c n 30 points handicap, the se ni o l 's iln d sopho m o r es 7, and the juni ors, none. T h e follo\\'ing captains were e lected: Se nior Frank Andel 'son J u nior Laurel Hi g h l ey Sophomore Ar c hie Byrnes F I'esh man Alfred Stumph On April 24, the soph o mores opened lhe seaso n by defeating the freshmen by 22 points makin g the lin a l score 45 to 23 T he soph o m o re s s l o\\'ly Lut s urel y cut down the fresh men's lead until they were a head. Suddenly Henry Ki],,;i" Jarilmill o r ece i\ 'cd the ball on his ninety yard l ine a n d ran. with Ed. Sulli\'an as interferan ce, f o r a touc h d o wn, demoralizing the fresh men's spi lit. I n t h e second ga m e the juniors s t
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T he Champion Football Team. O n May 28, the < Ithletic ,lwa rds were prcse ntcd t o twentyth ree hi g h sc h oo l boys. A point syst e m was arranged b y Mr. V i nton 'l.nd Mr. Sei l e r The boys o n thi s lis t w h o wer e no t a lready m e mbers of t h e V a r s i t y C lub were i ni tiated into i t o n j\1a y 29. The b oys were r a n ked as follows: Name P oints I. Henr.Y Jaram illo .. 4 1 6 2_ Howard Wills .... 409 3_ We n dell Cotto n .. 399 4 D n id Potts ... 3i2 0_ C h eney J \ \ oorc ... 369 6_ Jack C lay. 369 7_ Edward Sulliyan .. 369 8_ Will iam Wood .. 368 9_ James Christian .. 365 10_ Laure Hi ghley .. 365 II. William H oYerte r .. 356 12_ J ohn Fi nl aso n 352 1 3. J osep h Rettally. 3 5 0 14_ Arc hi e Byrns. 3 2 0 15_ Rober t R u ley. 3 1 6 16_ Edwar d Durh am . 310 17_ Vern o n J \ \ oo r c . 309 18_ R ola n d C lemens . 299 19_ Frank Robl es .. 299 20 Douglas Smith .. 292 21. Don ald P ;trke .. 287 22 Fran k Anderso n 274 23. James D 'l.)s 269 3 0

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The Cap t a in s of the B o wling T ea ms. BOIIL1KG The follow in g girls w ere elected c' q ) t!lins for t h e interclas s b o wling tourn a m e n t : Senior Ju nior Sophomores Fres hm a n H ope H ollow ell Esthet' i\ee1y Emma J ea n Stnrke F ern H ori n c I n the fit'st ga me of the b ow lin g t ournamen t, .\pril 1 6, at 2:30 at the Old Cri s t ovn l Clubhouse the juniors defea t ed the fres hm en by a total pinfall of 66 points, E sther Nee ly, Captain of the junio r t eam, was high p ointer with a score of 8 .. F ern H ot'i ne, capta in of thc fres hmen t ea m, W,lS h ighscoret' with 80 points. In the seco nd game of the bow l ing t o ut'nament. April 1 8 a t 9:00 A. N. the se ni oJ's downed the so ph o m ores by a t o t a l pinfall of -l [ poi nts. H ope H ollow ell. captain of th e s eniOl' team. h a d the hig h sco r e of 9 [ a nd Emnw J ea n Sta r l ,e, capta in of the s oph o m o r es the hig h score of 89. On l \ \ o nday afternoon, A pril 20. thc SOpholllOl'es a nd fresh men dashed. Flora Bath with a SCOre of 87 was high scorer and H e l e n Wikin s t a d with 87. was hi g h scorer for the so ph o more s The sop h otllOJ'es downed the freshmcn b y a total pin fall of 5 1 pin s Thmsday afternoon. 1 3 h e sen iors a n d j uni ors 31 t ogethe r I t was a h atd-fought and dose g!lme. but the se ni o l'S' experience was t oo mu c h for the juniors w h o went down in defeat by a total pinbll of -l3 pins. Hi g h scorers fol' the jun i o['s a nd se nior s wet' l\laceJ Goulet, 92, and Virgin i a Tho mas, 87 I n the n ex t ga m e the sophom o r es downed the juniors Lya t obl of 1 3 pins. The hig h sco r ers were E stllet' Neely and Fl o t 'a I:hth, The se nior s pro\' ed the ir right t o be ca lled by winning e\'ery ga m e they played by an o\'erwhelmin g In the last game the se nior s defeated the fresh men by a total pinfa l of 8 2 The hig h score r s for this ga m e were H e len \\' ikin s t a d. 84. a nd H ope H ollowell. captain of th e sen iOfs. 88 T he hi g h es t ;l\ 'erage for the bowling t out'llament were as f ollo w s: Seniors Hope Iiolle \\'ell. 87L'2' Juni ors E sthct'i\eel y 86 Sophom ot'es Emma J ea n StarJtc .. 8.t, Flor Bath . 8 5 F resh men F el'll H o rin e., 8 0 H elen \\'ikins ta d. 80

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33

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IN UNION THERE IS STRENGTH WOR K ERS W I LL RECE[VE T H E FULL SHARE OF W H AT T H EY PRODUCE W HEN T H EY ORGAN [ ZE AN D BUY T H E IR O WN UN I ON MADE GOODS I I I COMPLlMENTS OF THE CENTRAL LABOR UNION and THE METAL TRADES COUNCIL OF T H E CANAL ZONE THE PANAMA HOSPIT A L PANA"1A C ITY. R o f P 3 4

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Hot ?!""oO J ton COLON. R. P A Hotel in keeping with the dignitlj spirit and service of Cfhe Pana m a Canal. C]olf ... Swimming ... UJater Sports q arpon Fishing JAMES E. LEUJIS manager crhe lJed r .Around P O .Ad d ress CRISTOBAL. C."INAL ZONE BUREAU if CLUBS and PLAYGROUNDS RECREATION, SUBSISTENCE andENTERTAINMENT 35

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COMPLIMENTS OF The Panama Railroad and Panan13 Railroad Steamship Line COMPLIMENTS OF DE F UERZA Y Luz MAX BILGRAY PANAMA COLON Buy Your Drug N e ed s a t <1!l1l11plill1l'l1tll nf Salazar Drug Stores llJtoirt BEAUTICIAN liEIu5i !il1gtol1 tBrnlltll f,lurll1r ([riB 2 1 1 6 36 COLO N, R P WE MAKE RAPID DELIVERIES AND ALSO HAV E A MODERN SODA FOUNTAIN. R e m ember SALAZAR PHONE 336 OR 35 C O LON. R P

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COMPLIMENTS OF MEM BER FLORI ST TELEGRAH DELIVERY ASSOCIAT leN A L WAYS REMEMBER A man i s judged i n li f e by two things. 1-1 i s friends and H i s clothes qhe .American Ba zaar H AB ERDA S H E R S & TAI1.0RS TO ,'lEN O F GOO D TAST E COLON AN D PANAM A T H E CHINESE SILK STORE NEW CHINA \.Ve carry genuine C hinese and J apa nese s ilk s and curiositi es, linens, s ilk materi a l s s hawl s wi c ker furniture, vases, p erfumes and jewelry FRON T STR EET CO L ON CEKTRAL AVENUE P r\;.,'A.\ \:\ H AVE YOUR JEWELRY REPA IRED -AT-" L A ESMERALDA" JEWELRY .AN D W ATCHES REPA IRED PA SOUA L E P A LADINO AVE:-:UE N o 1 700 P. O. Bo, 266 COLON, R Of P AM E RIG ANT R A 0 I N G GO M PA N Y, COLO N III Ju s t r eceive d a complete li n e of GLASSWARE and HOUSEHOLD ARTICLES. A Call ,,,,ill convince you of our extre m e l y LOW PRI CES P ho n e 40, Co l o n Box 330 Colon 37

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Dresses and Hats from Paris ARBOIX ANTON 10'S Front & 9 t h Streets COLON, R P. H and Embroidered Lin e ns. Engl ish Luggage Hand Bags. P aris N o \elt i es. PERFUMERY Margdnta BeautlJ Shoppe j\' IARGARET ) WILL Permanent Wavin g Our Specialty WE MAKE YOU MORE LOVELY Cl'rner 8th /i{' 'G" Sts Phone 169 New Cristobal COLON. R.P. TUNG HING G ENE R A L FAN CY GOO D S CORNER 9,,". & BOLIVAR STREETS P. 0 Box 354 Tel. 575 COLON, R P. 38 COM PLIME NTS OF D. CHELLARAM The m os t reputable dealers o n the I st h mus, where you will find wonderf u l bar ga ins. No. -17 FRONT STREET COLON. R P COMPLIMENTS OF Swiss] ewelry CHARLES FERRET O PPO SITE CRISTOBAL CO I'\!'\ISS ARY Inocencio Galindo, Jr. 7th and Bolivar Streets COLON JOBBER and WHOLESALE 1'lERCHANT REAL ESTATE BROKER AND AGENT

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KODAK PANAJlfA LTD. Offers a compl e t e line of KODAKS PILOT RADIOS X-RA Y & MFDIC tlL APPARATUS jV\JCROSCOPES BINOCULA R S III CENTRAL AVENUE PANAMA CiTY RITZ Th e Most D elicious Cracker NIITIO'lAL BISCUIT CO.'II'. I:'JY PROD U C T JULIO A SALAS DISTRIBUTOR POBOX 204 C O LON, R P martinez & ComponL] THE ONL Y I ANU FACT U RER 1'1 TH I S C OUN TRY OF ALLIGATOR SKINS In q uir e O u r Prices and Save Y our M o n ey b y buying d i re ctly f!'OIll u s BOX 904 1', 1)\. 1 1,1 9.03-1 F R O:-lT ST. ;0\0. 1 20 CE:-':THAL .-\n:. COL O'l P A:\A.\\;\ 39 E. R. BRErVER f5 CO, Inc. {2S;;' ; .......... AL L I\:I:\'DS O F NOVELTlES Al'\D i'\OTI00:S. Bo' i a r Str ee t Cow". R. P FRED SANDERS S O UVENIR & NOV ELTY STORE FRO:'JT STREET. COLON R P BOI.II'I.I'I SIL VF.R SN .II;E. LlZ I R D [ ; ILI.I G .ITO R NOVELTIES ART I CLES .'\,1010 OF B UT T ERFLY II'I:'JGS B e f o r e eyes inl.in \\,I'in ldes become permane:lt a lle1 ncn' O U S f a t i g lie hecom es c h r o n i c h cH'e y our eyes ex," m ined I f y o u n ee d glasses, you will h e SlIrpri se d t o r,nd \\'h a t comfort th e y are when acclI ['a (ely and bec o min gly Cille u (. \ YOU H ave YOUT eyes examined SGADRON OPTIGAL PANA.\\t\ COLO:\ 25 C e nh:l. 1 & O p t;"'H" h. 9.05-l Flont ;\ve n ui' ;-":1"'" l"r w k

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Olompittnrntl of CASA J APONESA Y. AMANO & COMPANY THE STOR E THAT SELLS AT THE LOWEST PRICES I N THE REPU BLI C OF PANAMA 47 a nd 102 C entra l Ave. Panama Ci t y R P. THE ROYAL BANK if CANADA I ncorporated 1 869 T COLON BRANCH PANAMA BRANCH Corner 11t h Ii{ B olivar S t s S a nt a A n a Pla z a 40

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CABLE ADDRESS "IMPCO" A .B.C. 5TH. & 6TH. EDITION BENTLEY' S p 0, Box 342. COLON, R p COLON IMPORT &,EXPORT COMPANY. Ltd. JOBBERS AND CO, \ \]\\ISSION MERCHANTS MANUFACTURERS' AGENT S DEALERS I N GENERAL MERCHANDI SE AND NATIVE PRODUCE COLON, REPUBLI C OF PA;..rA I \ l A Branch Reta il Stores J PLAYA DAM/\ PORVENIR and Trading Stations) SANT A ISABEL ISLES OF P INES C!llllltplimrnta llf lIIr. 1!I1'rn ,ril'r lIIr. alarl tE. affllrll HOTEL TIVOLI CARTI NARGANA A comfortabl e restful Hotel, id eally l oca t e d with m agnificen t v I ew o f the Pacific ocea n The c ente r o f soc i a l life, close to eve r y point of interest o n t h e P acific s id e o f t h e Canal Zon e. \Vb l T 1\\cCORI\lACK, j\lanager 41 P O ADDRESS; AN CON, C .. \:-I'AJ.

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BAZAAR PALO:VIERAS & PUCCI, LTD. GOLON WE HAVE JUST RECEIVE D A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF EUROPEAN NOVELTIES Petit P oint Bags and Compacts Chronium Ash Trays and Stands -Butterfl y Wing Boudoir Sets i"lanicure Sets -Crystal Liquor Set s -and many other items too numerous to mention JA NE REY NOLDS' MODEL S ILK DRESSES ARTIC L ES OF HIGH QUALITY KAYSER HOSIERY LIMITED PRICE S COMPLIMENTS OF C. B. FENTON & COMPANY, Inc. CR ISTOBAL C Z. Pho ne Cri s tobal 1781 madame Lauerqneau DRESSMAKER J Tel. C o l on 7013-J Box 703, Cris. BALBO A C Z Ph one B a l boa 1 066 IMPROVED EQ UIPMENT MODERN METHODS EFFICIENT SERV ICE JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY PHONE COLON,21 Broadway near Folks Riv e r COLON, R.P. 4 2 CRlSTOBAL. C. z P O BOX 5061

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ANTONIO T AGAROPULOS WHOLESALE AND RETAIL GROCER BRANCH S TORES MAIN STORE 12, 176 BOLIV A R A V E NUE PHO N E 499. 6,075 B OLIVAR A V ENUE, PHONE 429 4 0 1 1 9TH S TREE T PHONE 616 2.026 B OLlVAR S T REET, 699 c. CASULLO J E W ELLE R and W A T C HMAK E R P O. BOX 615 Phone 225 C il [ S TOJ3AL. c.z. 9.036 F r ont St. CO L OX. R P MEET M E A T ALEX' S CAFE l\II Y THE NEW Ol'\E P RICE STORE E \ E R Y 'l'HI.:s"U OR IENT A L ART G LASSW A R E NOVELTIES SILKS l\IIYAK O J06 CENTRAL AVENUE PANAI I A C ITY 4 3 DRY GOODS SOUVEl\"IRS TOYS. Etc.

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RADIO PICTURES Q/'PANAMA, INC. illll!!.W 'Ji{f .... .. PATHE NEWS MARCH OF TIME R K 0 PICTURES P"ONE COLON 800 B ox 5003. CRISTOBAL, C Z. SMOOT-BEESON, S.A. BUICK LA SALLE CADILLAC CHEVROLET DISTRIBUTORS S. L. BISHOP 1 6TII A:-
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Atlantic Photo Service 6,012 Front S treet COLON, R P P ho n e no. 1 3 4 Art & Commercial Photographers .Appointments for s ittin g s c a n be made se veral daqs in advanc e. UJe like B abies and IDe photograph them perfect Mavis Beauty Shoppe COLO;o.: THEATRE I3UILDING 10th STREET and BROADII'.I Y COLO;"\,. R P. PI IO:\E .Ali Branches of Beautq Culture P. O Box 1 8-15 CRI STOBA L C Z. PHONE 2 11 P O Box 219 "A. P," BAZAAR Repub lic Store 7.085 BOLIVAR ST. BETWEEN 7 &-8TH. ST. COLON. R P Colon's most up.to .datc Store offers you the finest line of dry good s :-Notions, No\clties. Sh02S and Hos iery at prices that defy c ompe -titio n Visit us and coo"ince yourself. 45 Colon Motors, Inc. Coming ...... This Month 'T!!j}e "Linc oln Zephyr" Tile la.rI ,<,ord ill l lIloli/obitr de.rig" Box 209 Colon ,Pho n e -192 Gittens Q(Cf aylor FOR vb Exclusive Suitings ana Careful Tailorin g 10th Shee t COLON T e l e ph o n e 291 JOHN T. McCANN Plumbin g &'Supp l y Co. E sta bh s h ed 1 910 ESTIMATES ON ALL K INDS -OF-SANITARY, BUILDING am' SHIP PLUMBING IMPORTERS GUARANTE E D MATERI ALS EXPERT \'QORKMANSHIP Colon t.J P. O. Box 503 1 Cristobal. C .Z.

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P ortrait s Min iatures En l arg e m ents Flashli ghts FOR REMEMBRANCE Y our p o r t rai t o f t oday will b e jus t as pri cele s s in y ea r s t o co m e w ill recall happy m e m or i es j u s t as v i v id l y as d o tho s e w o nderful pho t o gra ph s of b y go n e d ays. b'lak e an appointm en t f o r a n e w p ortra i t t o day. C omme r c ial P h o togr a phs o f all t y pes. FINLAYSON'S S TUDI O Architec tu r a l 7 0 1 8 FRONT STR EE T -COLON, R.P L ega l PHONE 9 B a n q u e ts, Wh e n buy i n g P h o t og r aphs l oo k f o r this e mb l e m L a rge Groups, e tc. N e w P i ctures The Ph o t og r a p h e rs' T n t ernatio n a l A ssoc i a t i o n o f Am e r i ca s tand s f o r goo d cra ft smans h ip and b ett e r b u s i n ess p r i n ci p l es F rench Drug Store No. 2 1 Fror. t Street COLON Republic 01 Panama V. DELGA DO M., Pro pri e t o r H e m stitc bin g P l e a tin g Bu tton Covering, Rlifflin g e tc. MRS. A. R LEE OVER THE ROY'L BANK OF CANADA T el. 2 33 Col o n 11th & Bo l iva r S t 4 6 COMPLIMENTS 0 J. J. ECKER, JR. B a lboa St .. 7 0:)7 -COLON P h one 3 8 1 FIRE I NSU RANCE COMM ISSIO N BUSI NESS COM PLIMEl'T S O F L UIS ANGE L I N I T elep h o n e 88 7 P a n a m a City

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J. V. BEVERHOUDT COLON, R P R. C A RADIOS W,th Magic Broin, Magic Eye, Metal Twba!= -ALSO-Kodaks Boseball Sapplies -Stationer y States Papers T ennis Rackets Whiteman s Candies and Latest Magozin es. Comptments of qle S dmaritdn !-lOSF'ta i COMPLI i'lENTS OF National Mattress Factory MANUFACTURERS O F HIGH GRADE MATTRESSES AND BEDDING 14TH STREET COLON. R P PH ONE 321 COLO N P O. Box 2024 CRISTOBAL, C Z COMPLIMENTS OF PACKARD DODGE DE SOTO 1 Stan dard The 1 Fruit & Steamshir COmfdnl] o "ACCARO LINE liJish eve rlj s uccess t o Ihe yraduatinJ Class of 1936. 47

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07; C/' r,) . /11 e {Jo'lJl'JnOjrt'J'i/ :::z 11J:J{ O'}'l 0/' the ? J?vutlnc(" fl!af / J't-af'/ (/'r > ('(.lui ((,:"u1,,; Jucrf>JJ ( 0 /he fXJ"ru/aa(;u/I ("ClaJ..! 0/' / .'.136. 48

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C R 1ST 0 BA L

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HIGH-SCHOOL ....

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. THE STAR & HERALD Co. -PANAMA