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PCANAL
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Foreu;or



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THE Caribbean Staff of 1955
presents this year's Annual
to the student body, the
faculty anci the general public
with the hope that it will re-
fresh the memories oi those con-
cerned of the happy days spent
in school.




Dedicdlion



E, the Class ot 1935, dedicate this,
the eighteenth edition of "The Ca-
ribbean, to our advisor. We hope
that it will be a suitable way of
showing our untold appreciation
to him who devoted his time to the inte-
rests of the class.




MR. HARRY FRINGER





C. H. S. FACULTY



C. II. S. has at its head a principal
who has done very much for our school
and has made it a school from which \\e
are very proud to graduate. The tact
(hat the Student Association has been
such a great success is due to Mr. Frank's
strenuous efforts to make us realize what
a real high school needs, "school spirit."

The Language Departments, French,
Latin, and Spanish are prospering under
the teachings of Mrs. Phyllis Spencer and
Miss Mary E. Aloore. Mrs. Spencer also
sponsors the Junior-Senior Dramatic
Club, the National Thespians, anil the
Spanish Club. Miss Aloore, in addition
to supervising the mimeograph depart-
ment of (he Trade Wind, was also the
supervisor of the Carnival.

Miss Patterson, .\ho is at the head of
the three commercial classes, is also the
chairman of the assembly committee.
The assemblies have shov\n great im-
provement this year under her guidance.

Although this is only Miss Liter's
second year with us, as Flnglish teacher,
the students are very fond of her, and
they do not seem to mind the contracts
that she assigns so freely.

Aliss Broi\n, who teaches Freshmen
and Sophomore English, has also under-
taken the tlifficult tasks of handling
the library, and she has had great success
in accomplishing her purpose.

Mr. Meyer, in addition to teaching
his elementary and advanced mathema-
tics classes, is sponsoring the Junior
class this year and is also sponsoring the
Caribbean.

The Household Arts Department this
year has been under the guidance of
Aliss Feme Bowman. The cafeteria has
been a success this year again, due to
her capability and efficiency.

Not only does Mr. Vinton, our science



teacher, turn out great scientists, but
also A- 1 athletes. He has besn very
successful in arousing the spirit of the
boys when it ct>mes to athletics.

This year. Instead of "charts and
maps ", Mr. Hackett's favorlie pass word
Is "notebooks are due such-and-such a
date." But the students themselves have
to admit that when one finishes one
of Air. Hacke(('s subjects, thsy kno,\
"lots more ongoing out than when they
entered the class he sees to that. Mr.
Hackett also sponsors the "Trade Wind."
Miss Bailey and Miss Smart should
be given, much credit for turning out
some very good athletes as well as lim-
bering the girls up by the point system
that they have put into effect this year
concerning the work of the girls.

The High School Orchestra, the Boys'
Glee Club, and the Girls' Glee Club have
proven to be very successful this year,
but it was only because of Miss Elner's
co-operation and hard \\ork that pushed
them on to victory.

Mr. Seller seems to be workins the
boys quite hard this year, but maybe
that's what the^' need. Regardless of what
IS said, most of the boys seem to enjoy
doing such hard rtork (as some call It).

In Mr. Fnnger's departments, we
find that Instead of Mr. Fringer handling
all 5 departments alone, he has an assis-
tant, Mr. SIminskI, who Is new this year.
The departments under the management
of these men, are prospering very well.
iMr. Fringer is also the sponsor of the
Senior class. Mr SImlnski Is the Spon-
sor of the Sophomore class.

Our other mathematics and science
professor Is Mr. Miller who teaches
Algebra 9 and General Science. He is
also the advisor of the Photo Club and
the Chairman of the Student Council.









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.\iiine FosEPii Bertram Asensio

Throiiflh Our Ej/e.i- A merry heart doeth good like medicine

/).,/ Entered C. Z. School/ October. 1922

liirilipUue Plainsfield. Xew lerse.v.

Jrliri/ies Varsity Club 4; Ir. Sr. Dramatic Club 4:

Track 4: Band 5. 4: Glee Club 1. 2. 3; Carnival

Committee 4; B. A. A. 1, 2.



Xonie Margaret E. Barnard

Throuflh Our Ei/es A peppy little piece ol humanity.
Dole Entered C. Z. 5r/;<7o/.r September. 1922.
Birthplace Brooklyn. N. Y.

./clii'ilie.r Glee Club 1. 2: National Thespians 3,
Supper Club 1, 2, 3. 4; Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club



Caribbean Staff 2. 3. 4;
Happy Landings 3.



Extra 3; Student Council 4;



\,inie Paul R. Beard

Throuffh Oar Ei/es Could swell the soul to rage or

soft desire.
Oale Entered C. Z. Sclwol.r Dctober, 1933.
liirlhplace Norfolk, Virginia.
.Ictii'tlie.c Student Council 3; Varsity Club 3, 4:



kindle



Track



, 4, Basket b:
Tittee 3, 4.



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Xame WiLi.iA.M Howard Beers

Through Our Eyes The heart to conceive, the umlerstan-
ding to direct, or the hand to execute.

Ihite Entered C. Z. Schools -October 1922.

liirlhplnce Birmingham, Alabama

.IriiAlies Trade Wind, Editor 3; ("dee Club 1; La
Pas2.3, 4; B. A. A. 1, 2, President 3; Vice-President
S. A. and Student Council 3. Red Headed Step-
Cliild 4. Soul "I Aruie Rutledge 4; Carnival Com-
mittee 3, 4.



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\,ime Ci.Ai i)K E. Bi;i;i:k

Throiitih Our i'.t/e.t Wise to resolve ;irul p.illeiit to pci-

torm.
Dale Entered C. Z. School.' October, lOlil
lUrlhplnce Norfolk. Va.
./,/i\-i/i,:t Varsity Clul) 1. 2, 5, 4; Soccer 2. 5: li.isclMll

Manage: 4: Soccer Manager 4.



\',///;<' I. Kdgak Borden

I'hriHi.ili Our lu/e.'- An honest man's llie noblest worli ol

(iod.

Pule Eniered C. Z. Scliool.r- September, I92>.

Birthplace Panama, R. de P.

././/./// Varsitv 4; Soccer Manager 5: Track 2, 3, 4; Car-
nival 3. 4; Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club 3, 4; Editor 4;
C.lee Club 2; Band 2: Orchestra 2; "The So.il d
Aim Rutledge" 4.



A'
Throuijh Our I'li^e,' With eyes that looked into the v er\
soul.

Pate Eniered C. Z. A/iDo/.r- October. 1928.

/J/V//;/)/,7C<' Corsicana, Te.\as.

.Iclicllie.! Varsity Club 2. 3. 4; Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club
3; A. D. f. 2: G. A. A. 2; Basketball 2. 3. 4
Volley Ball 2. 3. 4; Baseball 2. 4; Tennis 2. 4
Bowling 2. 3. 4; Photo Club 4; Science Club 4
Supper Club 2. 3, 4; Treasurer 4.



.V,;m<' Ralph Lester Davis

Throitiih Our Ei/e,r Better to die a thou.sand deaths th.ui
wound my honor.

Dole Eniered C. Z. A-/i<..>/.. October, 1922

Birlhpltice Cristobal. C. Z.

./c//.7'/(C.r Trade Wind 3; Glee Club 1: Caribbean
Stall" 4: Photo Club 3. 4: Science Club 4: F.3. club
2: B. A. A. 1. 2: Tr.'de Wind Staff 3.







.Viiinf Leta Deakins

Thnniflli Our I\ve.r Plav up. play up, and plav tlie game.

Da/e EnlereJ C. Z. 5<-/(0()/.r September. 1923.

BirlhpLice St. Joseph. Missouri.

./,//,7V/f.r Glee Club 2: Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club .3. 4.

Orchestra 1: "The Soul of .\nne Rutleilge 4; Traile

Wind 3, 4.



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Same Gl'Y W. De B.ardeleben

Through Our y?v>^.r Be silent and safe silence never

betravs you.
A;/(f Entered C. 7.. Schools Januarv, 1935.
BirtlipLice .^lacon, Georgia.



Xante WlLLIA.M E. DouoHERfv

Through Our Ei/e.' \Mio knows nothing base, fears

nothing known.
Dale Enlered C. Z. A77i)/.r -November, 1932.
liirlhfilare Philadelphia, Pa.
././/.(V/V.f-Debate Club 3: Varsity Club 3, 4: Soccer

3. 4; Track 3; Trade Wind 4.



.V(j/nd Mai.co.vi p. Duey

Thnnuih Our Ei/e.rDn well and right, and let the world

sink.
/Kile Enlered C. Z. .SWi,w/.r -October. 1921.
liirlhptare yWiim't, Fla.
,/(7/i'///V.r Varsity Chib I, 2, 3. 4: Carnival 4; Chairman

h: Golf 1; B. A. A. 1, 2; Track 3, 4; Soccer 5,

2; Swimming I.



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Xiinie -DoKOi'iiY Ri'Tii Dunn

'riinniiih Our lu/e' A maiden never l)i>l
:uul nuicl.
D.ili- EnlereJ C. '/.. .SV/;,>,)/.r -Oclolier. 1923.
Hirihi>lace SlarUville. Mass.
.Icli-ifus I.a Pas. 2, 3. 4: Supper Cl.ili I, 2. 3. 4; (".lee

Civil. 1. 2-




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Name JdiiN W. Dwyick

Tlintiiiili Our I\i/e.r Courleous lie was .iml willing to lie

ol ser\'ice.
/>,;/< Entered C. Z. Scliooh -O^U-^Wr 1921.
Jiir/lipliice- Boston, Mass.
./,//,v/a'.r Debate Club 3; La Pas 4; Trade Wind 4;

Interclass Baseball, Soccer. Basketlial! 3, 4.



Xiiine Jack B. Egozcue.

'J'lir,ni,//i Our A^.r Music is well said to be the speech of

angels.
/hih- Entered C. Z. A'/woAr October, 1922.
hu ihplace Cristobal, C. Z.
.Utiydies Track 4; Tennis 3, 4; Caribbean StalTl 2, 4:

B, A. A. 1, 2; Carnival Committee 3, 4; Trade Wind

3, 4.



Same Eil-KEN Ford

Throuqii Our Eyes Right brisk was she, and full of spirit.
Dale Entered C. Z. Schools September, 1932.
Birthplace I^areilo, Texas.

,/<.'/,///<.. Varsitv Club 2. 3. 4; Art Club 2,3; Baseball
2: Vnll;v li.ill 3: La Pas 3, 4.








Xtinif Kathleen Marik Goodenougm

Throtttjh Our Et/e.f She smiled and the shadows departed.

Diile Filtered C. Z. Schools September, 1950.

Btrlhptijce Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Jc/iiilie.' Glee Clul> 1. 2: Supper Club 1, 2, 3. 4: |r.
Sr. Dramatic Club 3: F3 Club 1, 2: 'Red Headed
Stepchild" 4. Class Treasurer 3: Caribbean Stall
2, 3, 4; Trade wind 3: Happy Landings 3.



.Vij/Hf Pall R. Gregory.

T/iroiu)h Our Ei/e.r The force ot his own merit makes his

way.
Dale Entered C. Z. A/wo/,. October 1923.
Birthplace Cheney. Kansas
.y<'/(.7//^,r Glee Club 1, 2: Science Club 4; Photo Club 3.



Xaine John R. Ha.m.mond.

Throuflh Our Eijes And gladly would he learn, and gladly

teach.
Dale Entered C. Z. Schools Octoher. 1922.
Birthplace Cristobal, C. Z.
./(//i'///c,r -Orchestra 1, 2: La Pas 2, 4; Trade Wind 4;

Track 4; Carnival Committee 4; F3 1.



Xante Edwin Hanna

Thraufih Our Ex/es I profess not talking, only this: let

each man do his best.
Date Entered C. Z. SchoolsOctober, 1932.
ftirthplaceNew York, N. Y.
.IcliiHties Varsity Club 3, 4; Vice President 4; Track

3, Manager 4; Baseball 4; Soccer 3, 4; Carni\al

Committee 3, 4: Trade Wind, 3; Fiaskciball 3,

Man.iger 4;



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.V,j/t' Charles K. Hkim.

I'hrouith Our Rxfe.t A true irieiul, anil a real sport.

Ihile liiilered C Z. tSV/ioo/.r No\eml>cr. 1923

JUrthplaie -\yA\.'An\-A, Ky.

.Iciii'ilie.t GIeeClul)2; Pul)licil,v Chairman 4; Carnival
Committee 3, 4; Varsity Club 3; Cheer Leader
I. 2, 3, 4; B. A. A. I, 2. Jr. Sr. Dramatic Cluh 3, 4.




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.Winie -M.ARGARKT Ktiuci. Holi.incshead
Throiii/li Our /','vf.r Still climbing alter knowledge inlinite.
/Ai/<- Entered C. Z. Sclwoh -April, 1931.
liirlhplace San Francisco. Cal.

.Iclifitie.r La Pas 3. 4; Trade Wind 3: Caribbean
Staff I, 2. 3, 4; Class Secretary 4.



Winie Jane Isabel Huntoon

Through Our Eyes With heart and hanti both open and

free.
Ihile Filtered C. Z. &/ioo/,r October, 1926.
liirlhplace Ancon C. Z.
.Iitit'i/ie.t Supper Club 1, 2.



Xante Allen Jacques

Through Our Ei/e,r High erected thoughts seated in a

heart of courtesy.
Ihile Filtered C. Z. A/w,>/.i October, 1922.
Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.
.Iclit'itie.' Debate Club 1, 2, 3: Science Club 1; Vice

President 4; Carnival Committee 4; Trade Wind

4; Caribbean Staff 4.





II




.y.ime Robert \V. King.

1 hroufih Our Ei/es Patience is a necessary ingredient of

genius.
IhiU Entered C. Z. Schools October. 1922
Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.
./
.". 4: "The Soul of Anne Rutledge .S, 4; Carnival

5. 4; B. A. A. 1. 2.



X




.\iime George V. Lane.

Through Our Eyes He is a man; take him all lor all.
Dole Entered C. Z. >SV/(i.<>/.r October. 1934
Birthplace Charleston, S. C.

JclifitiesRed Headed Stepchild 4: Student Council 4;
Trade Wind 4; Interclass Track 4.



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Xame Mildred Frances Leach

Throuflh Our Ei/es A cheerful life is what the muses love,

a soaring spirit is their prime delight.
/><2te Entered C. Z. Schools September, 1934.
Birthplace Portsmouth. Va.
./clirities Trade Wind 4.



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Xame^VMAI. H. Leach.

Through Our Eyes A happy soul that all the way to

heaven hath a summer's day.
Dale Entered C. Z. &/(Oo/.r Sept., 1934.
/i/>//ip/(7 -Portsmouth, Va.
.Ictwities Track 4; Varsity Club 4: Carnival Commitle 4.



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\
I'hiiHiiili Our l\i/e.t\s mei'rv as llic ilav is long.
D.ilc EiUcid C. '/.. ScliooLf~Ocin\>ci: 1927.
Hiithfilair Panama. R. dc P.

.Iilit'ilic.t Science Cliili ") ; ()]vlics(ra I: dice
1. 2: inlcrclass soccer I.



\aiiic 1)a\ 111 IVivii A\.\nsiiAi.i.
riiroutili Our I'.ijcf Hap)\v am 1

Why aren't they .'ill contciitc.l liKe mc
Dale EnUred C. /.. ."sV'i,n./.i Seplemher, 1929
liirlliplice Cristobal, C. Z.



Cliil



li'om caie I'm Irec!



.V<;/)/c Ra>\on B. Mouynes

Throiu/h Our Ei/es Life is not lile at all without delight.

/)a/e Eitlered C. Z. Schools September, 1955.

/iirl/ipliice Panama, R. de P.

./r/fV/V/V..- Interclass Basketball 4; Photo Chib 4.





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Xiiiiie Elinor Mullane

/'hrout/h Our Ej/es Full ol sweet inditicrence.

/>,i/e EnUred C. Z. Schools OcioXxr, 1922.

Htrlhptace Colon. R. de P.

.Iclirilies Glee Club 1, 2. 5; Supper Club 2. 5: |r. Sr.
Dramatic Club 5; Trade Wind 5; "Red Heailed
Stepchild" 4; G. A. A. 1. 2; La Pas 4.




13




.\ame Robert James Xeely

Throttflh Our AycJ' Turning to mlrtli. all tilings ol eartli,

as only lx>v-liood can.
Dale EnlereJ C. Z. A7;tw/,r September. 1022.
BirthpLice Germantown Pa.
,/
5: Baseball 2. 3. 4; Sorrpr >. 4; Track 4: Swimming

3: Varsity Club 2, 3. 4 Secretary 3; Carnival

3. 4.



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Xiimc Dolores Palmer

Through Our Ei/e-t Thou who hast the fatal gift of Beaut.\
Dale Enlered C. Z. Schools February, 1935.
Birthplace Yorktown, Va.



Xaine John A. PAL.^l.

I hrough Our I'.iies A man ol hope and forward looking

mind.
Dale Enlered C. Z. SchooL' October, 1922.
Birthplace Cristobal, C. Z.
.Iclifilies Orchestra 3: Debate Club 3; Caribbean

Staff, 3; Editor in Chief 4 Inter class Soccer and

Baseball 3, 4.



Xante Rokert G. Peterson

through Our l'',i/es Principle is ever my motto, no

e.Npediency.
Dale Enlered C. Z. Schools Ociaher 1922.,.
Birlhplace Cristobal, C. Z.
./(//'(/(V.r Debate Club 3; Varsity Club 3; Treasurer

4; Baseball 3, 4.



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.\ ,////, Rimi'.m I. PiriHHsoN
I hr,tu,ili Our l\ye.r Red hair radiates suiisliine.
Ihile F.ntereii C. /.. .V,-//,w/.i- October. 1927.
liiiiliplnce Aiicon. C. 7,.

././/.(V/V.r Soccer 4; Swimming 4; Photo ChiK 4:
P.is 4: Varsilv Ciiil) 4.




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.\'i7/;(c--Hi:RBt;RT La.\\<>ni Phillips

Thniu/ili Our Zl'y^.r Honor is the reward ol \ Irtne.

Il.ile Entered C. Z. &Aoo/jSeptember. 1925.

Htrlli place Faclison, Tennessee.

Jr/irilie.r La Pas 3, 4; Orchestra 5; Intercl.iss Basel
3, 4.



Willie -GeoRGK D.WH) PllOLE

Throiuili Our Eyes Sipeak but little and well, irvoii would

be esteemed a man ol' merit.
/),;/i- Entered C. Z. A/foo/r October, 1921.
lurlliplace Newport News, Va.
./,liriti\:rB. A. A. 1, 2; Carnival Committee 4.




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.\,IIIIC ClL.\RLOTTK Lk.ATHA R.^ND.ALL

Tlmnifili Our Ei/e.cT"\s true she dressed with modern
grace.

/Kile Entered C. Z. Scliools October, 1929.

/iirllipliire Savre, Pa.

./,//,///<. I r. Sr. Dramatic Club 3, 4; La Pas, 3. 4;

"Happy Landings" 3; "Red Headed Stepchild 4;

National Thespians 4.




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Xiiiiie- Anna Ski.ina Rku.i.i

Tlirintith (hir I''j/c.f The reward lor iMies iliitv is llie pciwer
to liillil another.

n.iU Jui/eieJ C. Z. &-/i,>o/,r March. 1926.

birthplace Ancoii, C. Z.

ActwUie.r Glee Cluli 1.5; La Pas 2. 5. 4; Supper Club
1. 2: President 4; Ir. Sr. Dramatic Clul> .3; Trade
Wind 5; Caribbean StalT 1. 2 5. 4; S. \. Treasurer
3. Pi'csitlent 4; Class President 4; Happv Landings
Stall 3: A. D. T. Club 2; Carnival Commiltee 4.





.\'iiwr~' IalMC RliYNARULS

riirottiih Otir liyes Speech is gre.il, but silence is j:reatcr.

Dale linlered C. Z. Schools September. 1933.

Hiiihplace Panama, R. de P.

.IctL'ilicr Varsity Club 3. 4: Soccer 3, 4.



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XiiniC y\.\n\ Rl Ml RiKLlKL

i'hroitiih Our Kiies \ regular girl, ami (he best (1

OaU Enlered C. Z. Schools September. 1933.

fiirlhplace Indianapolis. Indiana.

-/tii\'iltes Varsity Club 3. 4; |r. Sr. Draniiitic Club
3. 4: Xat'l. Thesj>ians 3, 4: Tratlc Wind 4; Ca-
I'dibean 4: Ilajipy Landnigs .3: Rcil Headetl Step-
cliild 4: "Corn Fed Babies" 4: "The Soul ol Anne
Rutledge", 4.



Xaiiie Ol.ciA RoK

'/'hroui/h Our /{i/e.f An ounce oi mirlii is worth .i pouiul
of sorrow.

IhiU luitcrcii C. Z. Schools -i)cU-,\K-r. 1924.

/iiflhplacc Cristobal, C. Z.

./(//.///V.r -Varsity Club 2; Jr. Sr. I )r.iTii.illc Club 3;
N.ition.il Thcs|>ians 3, 4; Art Club 3; Cilce Club
I, 2: Supiier Club 1, 2, 3, 4; La Pas 4: Hapjiy
L.Muhngs 3; Red Ileatled Stepchild 4: Caribbean
Stall 4; "The Soul of Anne Rutledge" 4: Baseball 2.



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Xiiiih- T(iN> K. RissKr.i.

'J'/ir,iiii/li Our I'.i/c.< I will iiii( rotrcal .i siiigk- Imli- t
will l)c heartl.

n.iU- Eixkred C. Z. A/dio/.r-Novcml.cT. 1031.

liirlhplace Omaha, NchrasUa.

Jili'itie.i- Dclialc Cliil> J; Oiclicstra 1, 3, 4: Baiiil 4:
lazz Orclicstia 4; Caiihlican Stal'l^; (i Sr. Diani^i-
(Ic Club 4; Varsltv Clul. 4; I.a Pas 4; BasUctliall
3, 4; Carnival CdmmiUcc 3, 4; Stiuicnt Council
4; \'ico Picsitlcnt 4; Inlcrclass sports 4.



.\'(//i- !m. K()i;ki( Sanhkus

'I'hnniiih (>ur l\i/e.' have yrcat Jjcains lor nilghl.v

things to come.
n.ilc Entered C. Z. Scliooh Scptcmhcr. l')28.
/)'//7/;/i/(7rc (ilasgow, Ky.
./,//,7ViV,.-Varsity Chih 3, 4: (ilcc Chih h l'.ascl),ill

3, 4; BasUetl.all 2, 3, 4.



Xiiiiii- .^\A\u|;l.l. Siii;i.UK.\' Sanukrs

Tliroii
are or are not understood.
Dale Entered C. Z. Schools -Octohev 1922.
lUrtlipLice Ancon, C. Z.
./..-- Baseball. 1. 2, 3. 4; Caribbean .SlalT4; Bas-

Uetball 3.t4; Soccer 3, 4; Varsity Chib 1. 2, 3. 4;

Treasurer 5: President 4.



.VfiweANNiK Laurie Tukhkuvili.k

Tliroiiiih Our Ei/e,r I have a heart with room lor c\ery ;o\-.

Date Entered C. Z. Scliool.r January. l')23.

Hlrlltplace Washington, D. C.

./cli\'ilies Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club 3, 4; National Thespiani
4; La Pas 2, 3, 4; Glee Clul) 1, 2; Caribbean
StatT 4: Student Council 3: Carnival Committee
4: Red Headed Stepchild 4; Corn Fed Babies 4;
The Soul oi .Anne liutledge 4.






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Willie Rl Til MakIK W'iKlNGSTAl)

riiioiitih Our J''i/e.' A tender heart; a will IiiIIcmMc.

n,i/f F.nlerci C. Z. &-/io<)/,r October. 1022.

Biilhplace Cristobal, C. Z.

.Ictit'ities Varsity Club 1. 2. j. 4: Glee Club 1: La
Paz 2. 3; Supper Club 2, .1. 4; |r. Sr. Dramatic
Club 3: Baseball 1. 2. 3: Basketball I, 2. 3, 4;
Student Council 4; Sec v 4: Class Sec'v 2. 3; Cari-
bbean Stall 3. 4: G. \. A. 1. 2: A. 6. T. Club 2.



.V(;//;c John F. Parsons-VV'ili.

Thrciuflh Our Eyes As large as Hie ami twice as natural.

Dale Entered C. Z. Schools September, 1928.

IMrlhplace Miami, Fla.

.Llinllcs-'P,. A. A. 1. 2.



Xaiiie WiM.iA.M WiRTZ, Jr.

Ttiroutjh Our Eyes -Thus 1 steer my bark, and sail on

e\*en keel with gentle gale.
Dale Entered C. Z. Schools Ocioher. 1922.
lUrlhplace Cristobal, Canal Zone.
.Irlu'tltes Trade Wind 3, 4: Carni\-iil 3, 4: Soccer 2,

3, 4: Junior Play 3. 4: "The Soul oT Anne Rutledge

4; Dance Committee 3. 4: Tumbling 3: B. A. A.
1 7



.Wriic .\nTiirR AIkrrh.i. Oi.in Smuii
Ihroufih Our Eiics -The silent countenance ollcu speal
Da'e Enlerci C. Z. iSV/ic?!)/.!- October, 1934.
lilrlhiiliice Barrc, Vt.




.Willie loilN Tara

I'hrounh Our Eiies .All (li.i( .i man h

his lUc.
Dale Entered C Z. Schools l.niu.uv.
liirlhpliicc Long Island, N. Y.
Aclioilics Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club 4;

ledge" inlerclass Track 4.



:llh w ill he i^l\e Inr
l9.3.'->.



Sniil ol A I



Kul-



18



CLASS HISTORY

Margarcl Barnard 'i




Afd'i- lour years of pulling togotln-'r,
the Class ol '5o is about to bring its
long apiircnticesliip to a closu.

All its inciiib^rs arc iuil-lIotlgL'cl work-
iiun. n'i'(l\- to be liuTied out into the
unknown regions ot a turbulent world.
As in e\ervthing else, llisy face this
witlidut thnching and are prepared lor
ill'' best or worst.

In our first year ol filling our positions
we represented the most scoffetl at clasj
in the school the "Scobies".

Much to the surpris of our colleagues
v.e pui across a Depression Dance that
was a great success. Ol course this
would ha\e been more tlilTicult witlioul
the guidance of Miss lirown, the teacher
that stayed such a short whil':- and that
was missed for the longest.

The good humor of the class was hard
to lose with Bert .Asencio cutting up all
(he time. You remember, he was noted
as the wittiest boy back in '52.

So the first year of the apprenticeship
pass'^d antl tho' we had been brought
liown a few pegs as Frosh, we planned to
reach the top in the ne.\t few years

In our Sophomore year athletics were
approached rather gingerly both by
boys and girls; Lloyd, Alax, )ohnny
Paris, and Robert Xeely all kept \.\\> the
pace set by their older brothers with
admirable persistence. Ruthie, Marga-
ret Ri'inhold, and Mary .Ann all helped
th" girls to do their part.

After bnkc sales and candy sales the
April Fool Dance was given. The novelty
number helpad this to be one of the
biggest hits of the year.

.Vs Juniors we seem 'd to cr::;;'! into



(he limelight. I he Junior play, "Happy
Landings," was well received. Tiie
.\nnual dance was greatly enjo^'ed.

Kverybody seemed to have something
to do and the year passed quickly ending
with the biggest event of the year for
us the Junior-Senior Banquet.

As Seniors, we felt our pr.'stige grow.
Others of our classmates who were less
fortunate had gradually been allowed
to wander from the flock. However,
new ones had taken their places and the
class went on.

The weekly new.'ipap ;r wis at its best
iiniler its editor, Edgar Bortlen. The
annual work was coming along rapuily.

The Senior D.ince was already a
thing of the past and final e.xams were
glaring us in the face. We gloomily
ga\-e them thought, at the recollection
that they were the last we would ever
take at Cristobal High School.

The Jr. Sr. Banquet arrived and the
Juniors made it an event that will be
long remembered.

As Baccalaureate and Commencement
rapidly approached, we were suddenly
caught up In a wild rush of preparations.

At Commencement we sat (juietly
and thought back of all the wonilertul
times that we have witnesseil. It is rather
hard to believe that they are over and
with a sigh we try to pierce the future.

May all the classes that follow try
to come through obstacles as we have
tried. It's a long, hard pull but worth
everything that Is put Into it, and the
recompense is a life that has begun with
helping hands on all sides a life with a
eood start.



CLASS WILL

Allen Jacques and F.dwin Hanna




\Vc, the Class of '5.T about to graduate
from Cristobal High School real'ze the
stupidity of expecting the Jun'ors to
co-operate with the Faculty as we did,
and to rightly carry the title of Seniors.
However, as we are about to pass on -nto
the Wide beyond, we cannot be choosers.

As a whole we bequeath to the Faculty



our appreciation for the work and time
they have spent on us to impart to us
the knowledge that we now have.

Individually we make the follow. ng
bequests:

MAX SANDERS bequeaths his abili-
ty to do things with the least amount ot
effort to Howard Wills.






19






>




MARGARET BARNARD and KATH-
LEEN GOODENOUGH leave their
ability to "yes. yes" their way through
English to Lvdia Gravatt and Nora
Hewitt.

OLGA ROE leaves her shortness to
Edith Wikran and Elizabeth Collins.

BERT ASENSIO and CHARLIE
HEL^l leave to Paul Barnett and James
Days their cheer leading and ab l.ly to
run spec:als.

JACK DWYER leaves his beard to
\\'ard Davies.

JACK LONG leaves his ability to fish

and tell fish stories to Donald Townshend.

WILLIAM WIRTZ leaves his ability

to build floating boats to John Dignam.

JACK EGOZCUE leaves his piano

playing to Theodore Aanstoos.

PAUL BEARD bequeaths his ability
to get black eyes to Robert Wirtz.

\^'ILL1AM"BEERS wills his modesty
to Julio Dominguez.

CLAUDE BERGER leaves his ability
to fake injury in gym class to William
Hanna.

EDGAR BORDEN bequeaths hs
ability to get something for nothing to
Edward Durham.

RALPH DAVIS wills his photograph'c
abihty to Mike Fernandez.

MARY ANN CARRUTHERS her
irresistible qualities to Aluriel Hanna
and Evelyn Dwyer.

BUD LEACH his boxing ability to
Joseph Retally.

MARGARET HOLLINGSHEAD
leaves her literary abihty to Mary Goulet
and Mary Griffin.

RUTH WIKINGSTAD her steno-
grapher's job in the office to Hope Hollo-
well.

ELEANOR MULLANE leaves her
calmness to Rachel Cuesta and Olga
Dominguez.

ANNA REILLY leaves her presiden-
cies to Doris Ebdon.

CHARLOTTE RANDALL wills her
dramatic abihty (o Virginia Thomas.

WILLIAM DOUGHERTY leaves h's
rcvercndship in English class to Wendell
Cotton.

EDWIN HANNA sadly bequeaths
his first class junk car to Edward Curtis.
MARY RUTH RIEDEL leaves her
masculine walk to May Appel.

JAIME REYNARDUS leaves his
soccer shoes to William Hill.

JOHN HAMMOND leaves hs evenly
dislributcil weight (o Charles Mead.

MALCOLM DUEY wills his "shine"
shirts to Frank Anderson.



HERBERT PHILLIPS and PAUL
GREGORY leave (heir statuesque physi-
ques to Armando Gasper

ROBERT NEELY leaves h's hollow
kg to Paul Farrar.

JOHN PALM leaves his ability to
collect late parts of the Caribbean to
Donald Townshend.

GEORGE LANE wills h's abilitv to
be abseni from school to Alice Hobart.

JOHN TARA gladly wills h's Senior
Class spirt to May Appel.

MILDRED LEACH leaves her long
engagements to Elva Estenoz.

DOLORES PALMER bequeaths her
winning smile to Louise Snyder.

GUY DE BARDELEBEN passes on
his ability to resist girls to Williajn Hanna

JOHN PARSONS-WILL leaves his
ten o'clock good-nights to Wendell
Cotton.

DAVID MARSHALL his love for
Engl'sh and History to Agnes Reinke.



ROBERT G. PETERSON



his



great love to Edward Curtis.

IRL SANDERS wills his ability to
forget to remember assignments to Do-
rothy Hoecker.

RAMON MOUYNES, his abl'ty to
sit out dances to Paul Barneft.

ROBERT KING wills his parties at
the point to Paul Farrar.

TOM RUSSELL leaves h"s camera
build to Howard Wills.

ARTHUR SMITH leaves his long
experiences in school to Martha Rogers.

LETA DEAKINS, her typewr'ter to
Jane Starke.

DOROTHY DUNN and JANE HUN-
TOON leave their exclusiveness to Fran-
ces Patchett and Ruby Lyew.

EILEEN FORD, her wad of gum to
Eula Mae Piath.

ANNIE L. TURBERVILLE leaves
her easy way of doing hard work ,n
Chemistry to Virginia Sanders.

ROBERT J. PETERSON wills his
chemistry stock room ;ob to Robert
Moot.

ALLEN JACQUES bequeaths his gos-
sip getting ability to Virginia Thomas.



Signed,



Senior Class of 1935.



WITNESSES
Chris Tobal
Montv Lirio



20




CLASS PROPHECY

III/ .Innie /.lUiri'r Tuhi-n'ilh-





Author's Note: VVh-.-n I was given
the task to ioretell ih^- future of the
Class of 1955, Seniors of Cristobal High
School, 1 knew that 1 was not the
"seventh son of ii seventh son and re-
garilless ol how much 1 tr^ed dr.;aming
dreams and seeing visions, the future
remained a blank. 1 then decided to
consult one m a position to know our
past as well as predict our future.
However, he informed me that his
sentiments were sim iar io what Antony
had saiil of Caesar. This remark of his
grieved me as 1 know how tond of pr^is'?
we are. 1 left his office feeling blu- imd
discouraged. My thoughts turnxl to
whaf "okl t.niers" say: "We stand
suspendeil between Monkey Hill and
Corozal". 1 felt so depressed, especially
when I recalled all the home work 1
had to do. That home work was th
last clear thought 1 recall until 1 awake-
neil (his morning in a slranue bare room.



I ielL stilf and could hardly rise from
the queer steel cot on which 1 fountl
nwself. 1 tried to call louilly but my
voice was hoarse and strange. Immeti la-
tely an old man came to my room and
spoke to me. 1 asked him, "who are
you.'" In a creakng voice, he replied
patiently, "1 am Dr. Allen Jactjues,
in charge of the inmates of Corozal."
"Corozal!" 1 exclaimed. "Who am 1?"
i faintly inquired. "You are the lassie
with the Scottish name", he answered
trying to b? cheerful. "Oh, Allen, where
are the others the other bays and girls
of our class of 1935?" He looked serious
and said, "Thos? who are not here at
Corozal rest b-neath the palms at"
Monkey Hill". This, my dear old lady,
'h" continued," is (he year 1999."
"What!" 1 gasped, "Am 1 crazy or are
you crazy.'" H'." repl.ed, "Calm yourself,
antl I will take you to read their epitaphs.








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21






Here Lies

Maycir Ramon Bernardo Mouvnes

Born in Colon,

Li\ ed in Colon,

Died in Colon.

Jack Bernard Egozcue M. S.
Sleep undisturbed within the peaceful
shr:ne.

Till fngels wake thee \v!lh a note l:ke
thine.



Here Lies
Judge Paul Raymond Gregory
He so loved his fellowmen that he was
never able to condemn any.



Here lies Madame Olga Roe
She devoted her life to the science of
crmi:nology.

Was (he first to discover 6 markings on
the gun of public enemy No. L



Eileen "Totsy" Ford
Dead she is not, but departed
artist never dies.



for til



Here Lies

Arthur Merril Olin Smith

On leaving Dartmouth in 1959, he vowed

never to stay in one job more than one

year at the time. He lived up to his vow.

But now has settled down. for a

brief moment.

Here under the sod

Robert Warren King

Known as a speaker from coast to coast.

Published se\eral books on governmental

problems of housing "stall fed cattle".



Here lies Mary Ruth Riedel
In her last plunge, she swam her way
to Glory.

She still holds the woild's di\;ng Cham-
pionship Title

In Memory Of

Dr. David Hoyd Mar.shall

who

.Ascended into the stratosphere '.n a vast

g!ol)e of his own in\ention, prepared for

a life's journey. He never descended.



Here lies Coach Paul Robert Beard and

wife.
T'was sung how they were lo\ely :n

the.r lives.
Anil their ileaths had not divitled been.



Erected to the Memory of Edwin Hanna,
Chief Of Cristobal Fire Department,

By his grateful wife, Hannah.
He left his hose, his Hannah and his Love;
To s;ng Hosannah ;n the realms Above.



Commander John Fletcher Parsons-\\Ml

His sails are furled, his work .s done

But on earth he had his fun.



Dr. Herbert Lamont Phillips, D. M. D.,

D. D. S.
When on this tomb you gaze with gravity.
Cheer up! I'm filling my last cavit^'.



Here Lies

Charlotte Leatha Randall

In Hollywood society she was

One among many triangles.



Here Lies



M;



.xwell Shell


len Sanders


Giants


1940


Red So.x


1942


Cardinals


1945


Yankees


1945


Colon


1950



Here Lies
George V. Lane
He possessed ih-; glorious lacuUy
making mon^y out of anvlhng
anvlh ng!



Here Lies

Jane Isabel Huntoon

A worthy matron of unspotted life,

A loving mother, and obedient wife,

A friendly ne ghbor, kindly to poor.

Whom (ifl slv led and clothed \\;th he''

sloi'e.

Here Lies Lieutenant William Howard

Beers
Whose motto in life was to ha\e ;in
uncork'ng good time.



22



Here lies Robert Goethals Peterson;

reader, it male thou art.

Look to thy purse; it teniale, to ll\v heart



Reciuiescat
Mali. At last lie sleeps alone.



Commander Tom Kelly Russell, U. S. N.

He joined the Navy to let the world

see him.



Here lies Kathleen Marie Goodenoiigh
Took her M. A. ilegree at the Canal
Zone Ir. College

She died fightmg for shorti'r hours tor
school chiklren.



Here lies Widow W'ikingstad,
1 he Turf has drunk a willow's tear.
Three of her husbands slumber near.



Here' lies William Klmer Dougherty

God works a wonder now and then.
He, (hough a l.iwver, was an honest man.



Here Lies Dorothy Ruth Dunn for
siiortness called Dolly,
\yho wrote like an angel, and talked
like poor F'ollv.



At last at rest is John Asery Long
He's done-a-catching cod.
And gone to meet his God.




Here lies the remains of

William W'lrtz, Brickmaker,

in hope that his clay will be remoulded

in a workmanlike manner, tar superior to

his former perishable materials.



Here below lies George David Poole

He lived well, and wisely made his will;

He plaved, and loved, and ate, ind drank

his fill.



Here lies the remains of Claude Edward
Berger, merchant.

In the morning when sober,

In the evening when mellow

He was what's known as

A mightv fine fellow.



Here Lies Charles Henry Rath
Born a man, a grocer died.



Hon. Charles Frederick Heim,
He was a good politician who stood for
what he thougbi: ithers would fall for.



Here Lies
iMargaret E. Barnard
She was an old-tashoned woman who
darned her husband's socks. And she
leaves a daughter who socks her darned
husband.



John William Dwyer
Here lies old 55 percent
The more he made the more he lent
The more he got, the more he craved
The more he made the more he shaved.
Great Heavens! Should such a soul be
saved ?



Here Lies Reverend Irl Roger Sanders
In arguing, too, the parson own'd his

skill
But even tho' vancjuished he could
argue still.



Major Joseph Bert Asensio

Here lies only a shell

The nut is gone.



Requiescat
John Andrew Palm
His own inventions are monuments
enough.

Tis well said that in Chemistry, he
knew his stuff.



In memoriain

Dolores \'irginia Palmer

She lived to write and wrote to live.



Here Lies Ralph Lester Davis,
Statesman, yet friend to truth; of soul
sincere.
In action faithful, and in honor clear.



Here Lies Leta Deakins

and

Eleanor Mullane,

Good pilots who died with the crash of

their plane.



1 o the memory of
R(^bert James Neely
Full many a life he saved
With his undaunted crew;
He put his trust in Providence,
And cared not how it blew.





25









Here lies, in a horizontal position

The outside case ot

Robert Tack Peterson, watch-maker.

He departed this lite wound-up

In hopes of being taken m hand by his

Maker,

And oi being thoroughly cleaned, repaired

And set a-going in the world to come.



Here lies
Guy Watkin De Bardeleben
He lived alone and died so too!
To live and die was all he had to do.
Maintained a poet's dignity and ease,
Saw his friends, and read what books
he pleased.

John Nathaniel Tara was an actor-man,

Old New York's pride and boast,

In all the light and spritely parts,

Especially the ghost.



Here Lies

Mary Ann Carruthers

She kept at true humor's mark

The social flow of pleasure's tide;

She never made a brow look dark.

Nor caused a tear, but when she died.



In memory of Anna Selina Reilly
Student ot psychology, biology and
eugen :cs.

Her last words were those of an old
Irish proverb:

"1 was well: I wished to be better: 1
took medicine and died.



John Rudolph Hammond
A man who could buikl a church, as one
may sa^-.

By s(|u;nting at a sheet of paper.

Here Lies Margaret Ethel Hollingshead,

Ph. p.
Was editor of the Efficiency Magazine.

Won the Pulitzer Prize in 1945
Recognized as one of America's outstan-
ding writers on "preparedness."



Here Lies Urial (Bud) Leach
He combined business with pleasure in
seeing the world through a porthole.



Here lies James Edgar Borden
He devoted his lite to writing for Ballyhoo
Leaves a wife and twelve children to
mourn his loss.



Here Lies Mildred Frances Leach
She was a good wife who worshiped her
husband by placing burnt offerings
before iiiiii three times a day.




24




25







SlanditiQ, left to rinlit: Joseph Retally, Ward Davies, Mike Fernandez, Robert Moot, Armando
Gasperl, Theodore Aanstoos, Howard Wdl, Charles Mead.

Si/tini/, teji to rinht: Robert Wirtz, Juho Dommguez, Donald Townshend. Christopher Matchctt,
Edward Durham. Wendell Cotton, Robert Anderson, Willicim Hanna.
Frank Anderson.

Front roiC, ti'Jt to /A/A/; Edward Curtis, Paul Farrar. William Hitl, Paul Barnett, George Marcuse,
James Days, John Dlgnam.



Juniors



Sliindiiiij, lejl lo riiihl: Hope Hollouell. Elizabeth Collins, L.vdia Gravatt, Alice Hobart, Nora
Hewitt. Eleanor Taiman, Naomi Keepers, Louise Snyder, Dorothy
Hoecker, Hope Schaeifer.

Sillinih Ifjl In rijihl: Mary Griffin, Mary Goulet, Jane Starke, Olga Dominguez, Jeannette
Hyler, Evelyn Dwyer, Edith Wikran, Muriel Hanna, Virginia Thomas.

I'ronl row, lejl lo rii/li/: May Appel, Ruby Lyew, Rachel Cuesta, Elva Estenoz, Agnes Reinlie'
Frances Patchett, Virginia Sanders.










I



26



lUNIOR AC r I VI I" IKS

III/ h.ililli II ik/iin



Tlie Iiinior Class tliisvcar lias ajipi-ar-'d
in flic liiiR'liiiiil quilo lrc<]iiciul,v.

Tlieir first class meeting was held, wilh
Air. Meyers as sponsor, to elcti (Ikii'
officers for the year. Wendell Collun
was elected unanimously hut held the office before he was ineligihle.
file oKicers fiiiallv elected were:



KnwAKi) DuRn.VM^
Doris Ebdon
Mary Griffin.



President

\ ice PresiileiU

Secretarv- Ireasurer



.\t the next meeting the Junior Carni-
val Committee was electcil. lames Days
was votetl chairman ot the Committee,
with several capable members ol the
class aiding him. The booths that they
managed were Skill, Halloon breaking,
and Dart throwing. These booths took
in a Kood portion ot the c\enines pro-
tits.

Class rings were pu( in the capable
hands ol Donald fownsheiul who handli il
the ordering with satisfaction In all
concerned.

At the third meeting the plans ior the
Jumor-Senior banquet were made. Two
committees were chosen; an arrange-
ment committee wiith Kddie Durham as
chairman and an entertainment commi-
ttee with James Days as chairman.
These two committees handled all the
iletails of the banquet very capably and
prnduced a charming affair.

Quite a talented group of actors have
sprung up this year probably ilue (o
expiricnces in the KtfV' l\ul)e Kluli.



which is an undergratluaie dramatic
sociiiy. kewaril for their efforts in
iheir first two years was membership
in the Junior-Senior Dram;itic Club.
I'his club h;is put forth se\eral altracti\e
jjliiys making good use of the Junior
actors. The hivhest Dramatic society
is the National Thespians. To be a
member in this club you have to work
\ ery hard. The Junior class is proud
tluit three of its class are in this club.

The Junior girls can bj exhibited as
good examples of figliting spirit. In the
Intel-class sports the Junior girls won
the basket-ball series after a hard fight
though they lost tlie volley-ball series.
The varsity Baseball team can thank
the Junior class for a lot of its fighting
spirit. There were quite a few on the
\arsity team, and this helped the girls,
and the team in more ways than one.

The Junior boys did not do as well as
the girls in interclass sports. They turned
out very well in number though. In
baseball and soccer they hail the number
but not the ability. There were several
Junior boys on the X'arsity baseball team
though. The track turnout as far as the
Junior boys were concerned was not very
good.

After considering the tortures of the
first two years in High School we consider
our next to last year in school very
eventful and happy. As a whole the
class of '.36 hope that the Sophomores
may feel ihe same wuy when they liavc
achr.'\ed ihi- nrun'S ol Juniors.






27






> ^





S/aiiJiiiii, U'jl lo rl(]hl: Vernon Clark, Carlisle Christensen, Philip Riedel, Roland Clemens,
Laurel Highlev, Fred Wertz, Stanford Stone, Joseph Hemmer, Philip
Houghton, William Dickinson, Robert Ruly, Cheney Aloore.

Si/lt'iiij, tefl lo liiilil: Donald Cornell, Edward Holiman, fack Clay, Edward Bretch, Joseph
Coflin, John McLain, Mar\in Keenan, Herbert Ashton, Charles Washa-
baugh.

Fronl ro\\\ U'fl In riolil: Robert Hanson, LaVerne Rose, Herbert Gottesman, Douglas Smith.
Harry Reetler, John Bozeman, Anthony Relcoiski, James Christian.
David Coltey, James Coman.



Sophomores



Staiuiiiuu Icjl lo /;}//;/. Dora Lyew. Lily Pescod, Netta Potts, Mary Elizabeth Kelly, Elizabeth
Heywood, Anna Patchett, Carroll Gallion, Esther Neely, Louise Seibold
Ruth Bauman, Flora Herman, Grace Herman. Jactjueline Briscoe, Ellen
lielty, Dorothy Craig, Jean Walsh, Virginia Fehn, Eleanor Stumpf.

Silliiu/, lejl lo //i//;/.- -Blanche Howe, iMaxine Blunden, jMary Darley, Charlotte Levy, Aura
Huntoon, Oln-e Aanstoos, Helen Carrol, Marie Geoghegan, Virginia Hart-
man, Winifred Koeler, Grace Hodges.

Front roa\ IcJl lo rinlil: Mary Dignam, Rita Kotalik, Macel Goulct, Kathleen Phillips, Ruth
Moody, Anita Boggs, Rhea Mae Ivoester, Mildred Braswcll. Gdadys
Pescod, Goldwvn Grablioi-n, Lucille Lvew.



IIL^j.j J*,




ifrfifir -A






gJRC^i!


!l* ? i i




Si





28



SDPIIOMORF. At riXIKS



I 111' Siipliiimoii- Class In-Ill lis iirst
iiu'olinii DTI ( )i.'k)l)i.'r 14. 1934, in tlic
Ci'li'tciia. wliicli was ticslgnatctl £is their
nn^L'iini; placi' for the entire year. Mr.
Siniinski had l)L'en assignetl to supervise
tiiis first meetintr. and the class voted
that he should continue to Kiok after
their interests diiiini; the vear. Later
events ha\ e proven that the choice was
an excellent one. as he has very graciously
assisli'd the class in all of its activities.

Alter the sponsor hatl bejn chosen,
the business of electing officers for the
class was taken up. An election of of-
ficers was iielil. l)iit the persons chosen
to fill the (lilleniil jiosilions were found
to he ineliL;il)k' insnuich as they had
been officers the past yi'ar, and according
to a new ruling in Cristobal High School,
a person cannot hold any oflice for
two consecutne years. It was decided
that the class would elect new officers
at its next meeting which was scheduled
for November l()."l934.

At this second class meeting the busi-
ness of electing officers was ^igain conside-
reil. After a very close raa for the
various offices (he results of the elections
were n^corded as follows:

President Cheney A\oore

\'ice President luKvard Hoffman



Secretary
Treasurer



Blanche Howe
Esther Xeelv



At this same meeting we took up the
task of choosing our representatives in
the Executive Council. The two students
to look .Titer our interests in the Student
Ass(X-iation were Macel Goulet and
Philip Riedel.

.\t this same meeting the class decided
that thi^v woulil hold their Class Dance
on February 1*. 1935.

The Class colors were chosen, and
after many in decided that their colors were to be
BLUE and WHITE.

This year the Sophomore Class was
proud to be the bearers of that title,
because we cooperated so well with the
plans laid for the Carnival. The Class
was given certain things to do by the
Carnival Committee, and the class as a
whole did their part in making tli"
Carnival a success.



In atlileliis (lie S not e to the fact that hanilicaps were placed
on each class giving the Freshmen a
greater ailvantage over the rest of the
classes. However, we cannot complain
too much because the Seniors hail none
at all and the Juniors had a very small
one.

1 he girls liowi \er. showed tli boys
up and ran with the inter-class Volley
Ball series. But they admit th 'v don't
think they woulil have won li unless
they hail practiceil as haril and smcendy
as they did. Again th!,- Sophomore girls
shoni' in Basketball, i'liey were on the
winning leuii with the S.-niors. .^lany
girls loiiiul it pays to support you:' class
in athletics because it gets you m trim
for \'arsity sports. Many girls e;irneil
iher Varsity Letters bjcaus'j th :y prac-
ticed hard in the interclass sports.

As scheiluled at our si'Cond class
meeting tile Sophomores helil their ilancc
in the gymnasium on February 2nd.

The "High Hat Orchestra" lurnished
the music for the dance that began at
eight o'clock and endeil at tweKe as
usual. The gym was beautifully ilecora-
teil with palm leaves that were placed
around the walls in a very pretty style.

The class colors of Blue and While were
effectively ilraped from the ceiling and
this added all the more to the beauty
of the place. Above the orchestra hung
a lighted sign with the class n;ime in
Blue anil \\'hite. Everyone who alten-
iled had a vi'ry enjoyable time as was
apparant when tlie punch ran out after
about the eighth dance.

The class participates in m my other
activities among which arc i.hc EFFE
KL'BE KLUB which is a dramatic
club, and LA P.\S which is a Social
Spanish Club.

The class of '37 is very proud and for-
tunate in having two of its roster on the
high honor list. These two sludenls,
girls by the way, are Kathleen Pliillijjs,
ami Jacqualine Briscoe.

The number now in the class is aproxi-
matelv 90 to 100 students.




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29










Slaiu/iii<;, lejl to liiilit: Lee Kelso, John Hiison, Daniel Meehan, W'illiam Fuller, Milton Dunn,
James Smith. Walter i^luelle^. William Emerson, Carlos Chase.

Siltiiui. lejl to //,//;/. -Sandt'ortl Hvler. Howard Springer, John Berude. Claud Lvon. George
Black. William Scarborough. Albert Hendricks. Warren Butcher. Harold
Blackwell.

Front /wf, Icji to rii'it: William Hunt. Peter Ender. Emiro Borden. Charles Scheafter. Paul
Venable. Robert Thomas.



Freshmdn



SiiinJiiui, tc/t to n'.ilil: lean Compo. Rutli Wood, Kathleen O'Hearn. \'irginia Daniels, .^largarct
Wood, Rose Marie Wolt Edith Da\ies. Lilian Hobart, j^larjorie Bassler.

Siliiiu/, left to //,;/!/. Muriel Howe. Virginia Lyons. Mary Ann Cain, Ruth Anderson, Geraldinc
Wirtz, lulia Hartman, Ray Dewey, Thelma Calloway.




50




SUiiiiliiiti, tell /(> riiilil: Wmikhi .^\iii)ii-, k.ilpli I. earn. |oc Roggenltiini|i. Kilw.inl Siilliv.iii, Asa
l?llllin.K. Ihiicild Allirlldin, |(iliii I'iiilaysoii. ('.ale Alliolil, William Cliii-
[liilfliam.

Silliiui, Ifjl lo riiihl: Kilwaiil KgDzciic. Wllllani O'Coiiiioi'. Tluimas Aslilon. David I^)tts. Milton
Siuitlcrs. DdiiaKl I*arkcr, William I I(>\'ci"tcr. William {''orsstrom, Monroe
Richardson.

I'roiil lOiC. Icjtlo (/(//)/.- David Bruce, Vic'.or A\a\-. I'airl Cole. Herliert Hcliner. h'raiilt Turlicrvillc
Kred Haiiss.



Freshman



SitJiiiitnif, b^JI io riohl:- Alice Stctlcr. Saia Williams, Norma Bales. Alice Curtis. liealrice Cotton.
Anna Kotalik, Riilli McCaiits, Kmma Jean Starke, Louise Zimmerman,
Theresa Cioulet.

Stf/i/u/, U'Jl to ruihi: Kllen Roc, Katlierine I)oniicll\, .^larjorie Yost. Helen Blum. Grace BeKlen,
Phyllis Hylcr, loscpiiine Dunn. Ann Corrigan, Betty Clay, Lola Belden,



(



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}






31




FRESHMAN ACTIViriES
B}/ Phoebe Taylor





(' "' /







The Class of '58 held its first meeting
in the auditorium which was assigned
to he their meeting place for the ensuing
year. This meet ing was called in order
to elect a sponsor, and the class officers
for the year, iMr. Franks the Principal
of the school was elected almost unani-
mously as sponsor. The class officers
were elected and the results of the elec-
tions were as follows:

President Willia.m Scarborough

Vice-President... Bea Cotton

Secretary Edward McCarthy

Treasurer P.vtty Symington

After a short time Edward McCarthy
resigned his position as Class Secretary
and Warren Butcher was elected to carry
on the duties of the Secretary.

At the second meeting which was held
about one month after the first we elected
our representatives to the E.xecutive
Council. Our elections resulted with
Dorothy Kno.x elected girl representative
and John Finlayson as boy representa-
tive.

The Carnival might not have been
the success that it was if it hadn't been
for the cooperation that the Freshman
Class gave it. The Freshman class
Carnival Committee made a good show-
ing, and was well spoken of by Mr.
Franks in the assembly. The booths
that were made by and attended by the
Freshman Class were the shooting galle-
ry, ring tossing, and ball throwing.

The Freshman Class made a good
showing in (he interclass sports. This



cannot be attributed to the ability of the
players though because we had the largest
handicap ol the four classes. In soccer,
which was the first sport of the year,
the Freshman team had a thirty point
handicap, this made it possible to win
the inter-class series because the other
teanTs could not overcome such a lead.
The stars of the Freshman team were
Peter Ender, center half-back, and Har-
tly Martin, goaley.

The handicap given to the Freshman
in baseball was no( enough for the team
to place more than a good last. We can
however say we died fighting.

The Freshman Class held their dance
on March 29, 1955 in the school gymna-
sium. This dance was considered one of
the best of the whole year. The gym was
very elaborately decorated with p;dm
fronds along the walls, and sire.^m5rs
of purple, gold and blue the school and
class colors radiating from the center of
the ceiling. This dance was unusual in
that the feature of the evening was an
acrobatic dance by Emily Horine. The
prsigrammes were espscially attractive
in that they had an aerial view of the
school printed on them.

The Class of '38 is very thankful for
the aid given by its Sponsor, Mr. Franks
in guiding them throughout the year.
The Class aided in all activities in the
school. It is the largest entering class
the school has ever e.xperienced, num-
bering about one hundred and twenty
students in all.



32




33







STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION

B,, Tom R.vell

Entering into its second year of activity, tlie C. H. S. Students' Association has proven itsell to lie one
of the finest things ever introduced into the school. Last vear the Association received its start and did
exceedingly well. This year it has profited from its mistakes of last year and can be considered almost
perfect.

The purpose of the Association to put the school on a firm financial plan by eliminating all unnecessary
expenses during the year.

To belong to the Association each student was charged three dollars and fifty cents, ior which he recei-
ved the following benefits:

Admission to all regularly scheduled athletic contests of Cristobal Higli School.

Admission to four class dances and all other dances given.

Admission to all school plays.

One copy ot the "Caribbean."

A years subscription to the "Trade Wind".

i^\embership in certain high school clubs.

Atlmlssion to Junior-Senior banquet.

ob\-ious.



The advantages of this system are ver
dollars on activities.



Th.



irreatest of which is a saving of liom live to



The first business of the year was to elect officers. This was done by a secret ballot cast by all members
of the Association. The candidates were nominated by a body consisting of the four class advisors and the
officers of each class The nominations were restricted follows: The president must be a senior, and the
vice-president a junior. The other offices were not restricted.



The results (ji the elections were as follows:

President

\'lce President

Secretary

Treasurer



.'\nN..\ RiCILl.Y

. .To\\ Russell

Rl'TII WlKINGSTAl)

Katih-ken Phillips



the
aiu:



The K;;ecutive Council which is the acting body of the Association was then formed. U consisted of
three faculty members of the association: Paul Miller -Sponsor, K. W. Vinton Athletic Director.
.Milford I'ranUs -Extra-Ciirrlcular Activities Director; the four student officers, and two repre-
sentatives from each class (one boy and one girl). The representatives were as follows: Seniors Margarte
Barnard and W'm. Dougherty: juniors: Evelyn Dwyer anil lames Days: Sophomores Macel Cioulet
and Phil Rledel; I'rcshmcn -Dorothy Knox and John l'"lnlasoii. >\eetlngs were held by this body every
two weeUs to carry on business and to O. I^. expenditures ot monej.

The third dance of the year was sponsored by this organization. It was a Barn Dance aiul was one
o) the most successful of the year.

One of the largest actl\'itles of the year was organized and run by the association. This was the C. H.
S. carnival held on Kebruarv 9. Over four hundred dollars clear profit was taken in at this function and
this was added to the general student fund.

During the year there were onjy nine persons in the entire Senior High School that did not become
members. Over one hundied junior high school students also joined the asoclation.

S[)ecial provisions were made by the Executive Council allowing Alumni to join the association so
that they could attend athletic events and dances. The price exleiulcd to the alumni was two dollars and
fifty cents. Howver for this amount they did not reccnc a copy of the "Caribbean."



54









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CAKIlMiEAN S'l'M'K



HJilor.

/>(tiiin:';f Uanutjcr.f

Circiiltition Jlanuficr.

aI,<,i/. Circultilior. .Uan:i
I.ilcr.ini Kdilor

As, Assl. TAlcrani Killer
//,r.r/. LUcrarfi Kdilor
.!,i\ii. Lilcrarxi Kdilor

Arl. Kdilor

A.v.fl. Arl. Kdilor
A,f.d. Arl. Kdilor

Pliolo
Boi/.(' Sporls Kdilor



Tirli' Snorl.f Kdilor



0'u/>i.il'-



loilN 1'al.m

Jamks Days, I'all Baknktt

William Bekrs
Frank Anoilhson

Makgaukt Hollingsiikad
Anna Rkilly
Margaret Bornard
Kathleen Goodenough
Annie Laurie Turberville

Iack Ego 'CUE
Si ANFORi) Stone
William Scarborough

Ralph Davis

loM Russell

Mary Ruin Riedel

f Ruth Wikingstah,

I Olc;a roe

[ Maxwell Sanders.







TRy^DE WIND








THE "TRADE WIND"

By ^InioiMO Rtiniirez



The TRADE WIND started its third year in good hishioii i
animated liv the one ambition to put out a good paper every



n October with an enthusiastic stalt
Friday. As the year progressed and
the home-work piles up many Members of the Staff, quietly resigned from the Paper's roster. But new
members were secured, and the old ones carried on valiantly, so that the paper never missed an issue.
Particular credit goes to the hard working and exacting editor in keeping the stalt on its toes.

The staff arranged several social events in the course of the year. A picnic-swimming party at Sliimmi
Beach was much enjoyed. Members of the TRADE WIND editorial stall also had a conterence with the
members of the PARRAKEET of Balboa and visited the office of the PANAMA AMERICAN.

A "depression" dance was sponsored by the TRADE WIND stall on March 9, which was considered
one of the jolliest of this year's Terpsichorean frolics. This fittingly climaxed the social activities of the
paper lor the year.



L..\ P.vi











I



36



I, A PAZ
/>!/ Jlitri/ (I'liuUi

I.;i P.iz !s .1 S[);inls!i iliil> in Ciistoli.il High School, org.inizcil liv Mrs, I'iiyllis S|icikcm- in I'^aO. The
luirpoM' (il (his chill is In iiKilic yrc^ilcr liiciulshiii liclwccii (he Niirlh jiiil l.aliii Aiiuricaiis as well as to
sliulv the Spanish language. I'lomincnt men ol Colon are guests .it the social meetings.

To become a member ol this club, a student must attain a greailc ol "90" or above, and must be a
student of second veai- Spanish. 1 1 he is a student of third or fourth year Spanish, he need iitlain that grade
for only one period of si.\ weeks, while the student of second .year Spanish hns to acquire this grade lor a
period ol tweUe weelts.

During the past year. La Paz held several Joint meeting with the club. P.iiuis. Panus is .1 Club compo-
setl of Spanish women who are le.'U'ning Knglish. Games were played which rctiuired Spanish ,'is well .'is
Knglish to be spoken.

,\t one meeting, the Homb^ro's Band pl.iyed selections, ol Sp iiiish music which were gre.itly cnjo.yed.

The ollicers lor the .vear were:

President CATAl.tNK KcKKIi

\'ice President .^VAi((;.\ni;r I1()I.i.in<;siii:ai)

Secretary I). IClilioN

Treasurer .\. 1.. Tl'HliKriVII.I K

.Ayudador W. ColTDN"

C'diuUictor N. Sl'AliKIC.



IIMOls' SI'XIDR DRVMATIC CI, CI*,





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lUNMOR-SENlOR nRA.N\.\TIC CI.UB.

lifl .11,111/ (il ijjin.

In Cristobal High School one ol the most active clubs is the junior-Senior Dramatic Club. The
members ol this club are tirst taught dramatics in the Efle Kube Kluband when they become upper classmen
they join the club with some previous experience.

There are about twenty three members in the club this year. Alary Ruth Riedel is the president:
Kathleen Ciootlenough, vice President and .^lary (irlllin. secretary and treasurer. The club meets every
Wednesday with .^\rs. Spencer, our sponsor.

In December, a lively three act comedy was presented in the auditorium. "The Red-headed Stepchild
was the comedy ol a western girl who was brought to Chicago to live with her father, her step-mother,
her hali-lirother anil sister. Because she tlid n ilisliked by them. But beciuse she won the alleclions ol her step-sister's ll:ince she was more disliked.
The end was a happy one with every one liking each other, .^lary Ruth Riedel was amu.siiig and delight-
ful as Bess, the western stepchild. ()thcrs in the play were Thecxlore, .Aansfoos. Lydia Ciravatt. Donald
Townsheiul. Olga Roe, George bane, Kathleen Goodenough. Rol)ert .^lool. Charlotte. R.indall. .^largaret
Barnartl, Klinor .^lullane and .\iinie b.iurie Tuberrville. .^Irs. Spencer ilirectetl the play.

.As it was tieculetl to h.'i\-c juniors and Seniors in both the plays that the Club presented during the
year, there was no Senior play this year. "The Soul ol .\nn Rutledge was presented by members of the
Junior-Senior Dramatic Club .-tssisted by three members ol the Elie Kube Kliib. It was the lo\e story ot
.Abraham Lincoln and .\nn Rutledge. The pl.i.v was tender and sweet, though it contained much humor
anil cometly. .\nn Rutletlge was playetl by .\nnie Laurie Tubcr\ille. and William Beers was excellent as
.Abe Lincoln. Others in the cast were: "Olc Bar", Chiirles Heim: "Buck Thompson," |ohiiT,-ira: "lack
.Armstrong." James Coman: )oe Kclscy," Edgar Borden: "Kit Parsons, Rol>ert .^\oot : "Windy Batts,"
Douglas ,^lali>ne: "Clary," Donald Townshcnd : "James Rutledge" Robert King, "Rev. Peter Cartwright.
Charles Washabaugh: "Nance Cameron," Elinor .^\ullane: ".^\rs. Benson." Lydia (ira\-att: ".^liss
jukes," .Agnes Rcinkc: ".^Irs Rutledge." .^lary Grillin: ".^Irs. Cameron," l^eta Deakins, "iMrs Kelsev".
Dorothy Hoecker: ".Aunt Sally Green," Olga Roe; .^Irs. Silencer, our Sponsor, directed the play.




J/





THE PiDTO CiAT-!




THE PHOTO CLUB

B:/ Rlp/i A;.'/..'

The Photo Club has been a pari of the school's activities for the last two years. This year the club was
started on its second term with the election of oi'ficers as follows: Ralph Davis, President, Bet Cotton.
Treasurer, Robert Peterson, Sec'y, Olher members of the club are Jerry Carol. Billy Hulf and Don-
£ild Townshend.

The club has been fortunate enough to have Mr. Miller as its advisor for both years. The Club has
been limited to only those students who have given the time and interst needed in such work.

Professional photographers have taken an interest in the Club and have given equipment and acKice
toward improving its methods.

This year the Club has taken on a Professional aspfect by the addition of an enlargcr made by one of
the members and a Grafle.x Camera furnished by the administration. The work done by the members has
consisted of developing, printing, enlarging, retouching, and sepia tn.iing. Pictures are developed and
printed for the students at a cost which just enable-! ilie Club to pay ihe _e.-;penses. There is no profit. It
is all an educational project.



SUPPER CLUB





1^1 ^




SL'PPKK CI.L'M

/(v Jliii'V (iottUt

Tlic C.lrl Reserve Suiiper Cliil> is ;in orgiinization to vvlilcl) ;iii.v lilgli sclioi>l ylil ni.i.v lielong.

Ill lime. M'-M. the Y. W. C. A. cliil)S of the isthmus ilishaiuleil leaving the cluli to eiirry on without
supervision. Therelore, the Supper Cluli was carrieil on during the veir l<)5.'^- 1').'54 l>v the girls with the
help of .^Irs. Spencer ami Miss Margaret Davis.

When the I').i4 school vear liegan. the .American Legion .\u.\iliarv. Klliert S. Waiil. Unit No. 2 ilccideil
to sponsor the clul.. .^Irs M. I.. Phillips anil .^\rs. C'l. (). Kolle were m.ule sponsors.

The meetings of this association are held every second Kriday ol the month. Supper is always served
l>y one of the committees lielore the liusiness meeting.

The lollowinggirlsweretheolVicer.iforthe year 10.^4-10.1:'): .Anna keilly. President; Kn'.h \ViUinssl:id.
N'ice- President: .\lary ("loidet. Secretary; and Kathleen Phillips. Tre;isnrer.



HDYS" 1-ETTEK VLVW




TIIK V.ARSITY CLUB
till JI,i.\\\'ell Siiiiiier.t

The Varsity Clul> is an honorary Alldetic Clul). In order to become a member ol' this cinli a hoy
must lirst have earned a letter in at lea'st one s|X)rt in school. However, to liecomc a member in lull standing-,
and be eligible to hold ol'licc. he must receive the Varsity Club initiation.

The eliKibilitv rules lor earning a letter were raised this year. Un al)Out 2:")' of the cames with lialboa in Baseball. HasUetball. anil Soccer, or earn at least two points in
"track. Under the present rules, the reipiirements are raised to 2|5 ol the total innings in Haseball. or .')
points in track.

The Varsitv Club is not only a letter earning club, but it enters into many of the activities ot the school.

.At the beeinning of the school year, the Varsity Club was given the responsibility of taking charge
of t!)c Fiesliman-Sophomore initiation, which was done very efficiently.

When a'.hletic awards were made this year the Varsity Club put on a pantomime. Every hoy in the
Varsitv Club took pari In this |>antomime. T!ie purpose was to make an appropriate jiresentation of ath-
letic swe;iters to the memliers oi' the club who had earned one or more letters during the year.

Manv c:)nsidered tliis one of the l>est events of the school year, fn this pantomime, the boys enacted
all of the'sporls and athletic activities of a school year. They wore the uniforms and used the e.pnpmenl
which corresponded to each sport. Afcer this Program the boys were awarded white sweaters with .i
gold letter C on the front of them by N\r. Vinton, the sponsor of the club.

The last thing which was sponf.oied by the Varsity Club was a dance. This dance was held in the C.
H. S. "vrn. The gvm was decorated very" effectively with different sporting equipment placed about the
evm. and the school colors in the form of pajwr. strung about t!ie gym.

The oflicers of the club are as follows:

Mr. Kknnktii W. Vintov Sponsor

Maxwkm. Sandkhs President

Edwin H.\nna \ ice-Presidenl



Howard \\'ii.i
Ri)1ii:rt Pktkrsun



Secret:iry
Treasurer





At this writing one of the most interesting ac'.isities of the club has not yet taken place, that is. the
Varsitv Club initiation and banquet. This initiation has become a traditional event ol the club, which



serves as .i fitting climax to the year's athletic activities.






GIRLS' LETTER CLUB






HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC DEPARTMENT
Ih/ rin/li:.< llfiter

Tlie musical organizations at Cristobal High School fiirnisii a means of musical culture lor those who
wish to join; and pleasure, not tor members alone, but also tor those who may listen to the \'arious produc-
tions.

During the past year two very successful activities were organized: the String Ensemble antl the girls'
Double Quartette. The String Ensemble has played at many of the Union Church programs. Visitation
Day, at the annual W'omens' Cl'.ib program and Commencement. Tiic Doul>le Quartette has sung at the
Union Church, assembly programs, Visitation day and Commencement. Tliey gave a delightful operetta.
"The Nifty Shop with the help of Miss Bowman and many of the glee Club girls.

The girls' and boys' Glee Clubs have been working also. They sang at the assembly programs Visita-
tion Day and the annual Womens' Club program. Together, both glee clubs gave a gypsy operetta "Cho-
nita.



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB




40




(.i!KL>i DOL lii.l-. (JL-\1< i 1-: 1




St.iiuiiiui / ii,)lll. Tlicresii Caiili.-(. Ann.i Kot.ilili. Miss Fliu-r. Ri.lli R.uini.ui. Mc.ilricc-
Cotton.

Siltiiiii lejl lo liiihl. Aim ill llowc. Joscpliinc nimn. Plivllis IIvIlt. Olive Aanstons.



Slandiitii lejl lo rliihl. Donaiil Cornell, Tom Russell. Cliristoplier M;itclictt. .\s;i Bullock,
.^lontlortl Tawcs, De Jan, .^Ir. Swanson.

Sllllni) Icll lo rifilil. Grovcr Cn-av att. Rolieil Thomas. William Dlclitnson. Joseph Roggcnkamp.
\'ictor .^la\'. AnthonN' I^eicotski, X'ernon Clark, William I'uller.



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41





ORCHESTRA



////A^




Slii/u/iiiii left lo ri;]hl. Charlotte Levy. Robert Hanson, Asa BullocU, Tom Russell. Paul Bar
nett. Stanford Stone, Miss Elner.

Sittiiui left lo rii]hl. Elva Estenoz. Ruth Bauman, Phyllis Hvler, William Fuller, Charles Reeves,
Sam Freir.



Sliiiullitii left io I i.ihl. William Forstrom, Gale ArnoUl, Victor May, Lee Kelso, John Bozeman,
Asa BullocU, John Finlayson, Paul Barpett, Vernon ClarU.

Sillii Elner, David Potts, William Fuller, Robert Thomas.




BOYS' GLEE CLUB





SCIKNCK CLU!?




TIk'sc ncu nicnilicrs, were
ve.ir llic club had 18 active



Tin-: SCIENCE CI.LB
liii J):iiii)/i/ Toii'nshcnd

The Science Cluli, Is an orgnnizaiioii as voung as the school itself. !t was startc i"-r.il:ers Ircm the Biology Class, the Cicneral Science Class and "B" students ol Elementary Science.
Iliis year tile Club admitted to Its loMs. toin* members Irom the Physics class
Ralph Davis. Robert Mont. Beriram Asensio and Donald Townshend. Tli
members; all boys.

The club became very ambitious .ind built a headquarters in the jungle, right ne:;t to part of Galun
Lake. The trail to the sl-.ack. is very primativc .ind lalfcs real life and spirit to hike to the shack. The
trail is about a miles long, and very bad in places. The spot where the headcpiarteis is located, was picked
because ol its good loc.ition near mountains, livers, lakes, fossil-beds, wild life, etc. The club does real
biology work. The members tuin in reports ol information found during the days work.

There are .sc\eral groups in the club. Each group has some Individual thing to study. Some study
plant life, animal life, rocks and fossils, and how plants and animals help each other. U is all \ cry interesting
an



NATIONAL THRESPJANS





4.3




THE NATIONAL THESPIANS
B,, OLni Roc

The National Thespians is an honorary dramatic society which takes only students who have done the
required amount of worii lor ehgibihtv. To be quaUtied lor mambershlp. a student must have satistactory
scholarship in High School work, must have played with merit the major role of one long I'lay, two major
roles in one-act plays, or minor roles in three long plays.

This year the National Thespians Club has been quite successful. At the beginning of the year there
were only three members. At the first initiation live new members who had tullilled the requirements were
initiated into the club.

There is one meeting a month, each member taking his turn at entertaining the club.

The National Thespians sponsored the Jr. Sr. Dram:itic Club plays and gave one ol their own, "Cjr.i
Fed Babies" on \'isitation Day.

The oflicers of the Club are:

Sponsor Mrs. Spencer
President M.ary Ruth Riedei.
Secretary Annie Laurie Turberville
Noble Promoter MARCfiRET Barnard.





i ^>^




VISITATION DAY

By Jlaronrei IloHinijshead

This vear Visitation Day was untler t!ie direction ot Margaret Hollingsheatl. witli Etlgar Borden
assisting her. There were tourteen committee members to aid them by directing the visitors and keeping
the halls quiet during chisses.

There were about 260 visitors altogether, 192 ot them being parents. They were all evidently interested
in the classes, ior there was a very small percentage ot visitors in the hall at any time during the day.

Classes were held from one o'clock until eight, with one hour, 4:45 to 5:45, for supper. There were a
lew deviations Irom the regular Friday schedule, the object being to have as full a schedule as possible tor
the visitors' benefit. All classes were expected to be run as usual, without any special programs, since the
object ot the day was to give the parents a true view oi school lite.

During the eighth period a special jirogram was put on in the auditorium. The Girl's Double Quartet
and the stringed ensemble, under Miss EIner's direction rendered several numbers, and the National
Thespians, umlcr Mrs. Spencer's direction, gave a play "Corn Fed Babies", a highly amusing and clever
protluction.



SCHOOL NOTES

Tni Anna S. Re illy ? 5



m



-u



Sept. 20. Read'n', wrltln', 'rithmetic"
sounds silly but it's beginning again.
Two new teachers have joined our flock,
Mr. Floyd feffres for Jr. Hi School and
Mr. Edward R. Siminski for Sr. Hi.

Sept. 21. Wouldn't it be grand and
glorious '.i every day could be like this
onei' (Jnly 15 minutes for each class!!!
CHS sure does believe in bigger (and
better) teachers when they exhibit Mr.
Siminski!!

You'd tlrnk the Frosh would have won
the Frosh-Soph Scrap with the'r great
number, but the Sophs proved to be a
little bigger than they were in the line
of batUe!!

Sept. 24. I>ook around for serious
faces and you can't fine a one except



maybe a few teachers. Everyone starts
in earnest today or are supposed to.
Students start eating in Cafeteria ioday
hope they don't eat too much.

Sept. 25. We have a "New Deal" in
athletics this year. A little complicated
but on the whole it sounds pleasing.

Sept. 26. Assembly this morning.
Mr. Franks told us of the more numerous
advantages of becoming a member of
the SA -sounds good. Imagine twelve
dances instead of 4 during the year!!!

Sept. 27. Boys' Vars.ty Club meets
today. They are going to get sweaters
this year or so they have been told.
Different advisors for activities announ-
ced today oh well! "Variety is the
spice of life" as the old saying goes.



44



Sep. 28. The first "bailc del ano"
an informal one given in honor of the
the Frosh and Sojilis. We all enjovet!
it too!!!

Oct. 2. Iiitorclass soccer practice be-
gins today looks hopelid lor all the
classes. Mrs. D. j^l. Melcntlcz ot the
Star and Herald gave a vcrv interesting
talU on newspaper work to members ol
the seventh period class of English 12.

Oct. 5. Gvm!! What a pitiful word!
Girls' gym classes began today we
didn't do much though. Miss Connie
Smart is going to assist Miss Bailey in
handling all ol us girls -nice, eh what.'.'?

First class meetings of the year today
also. Senior class seems to have quieted
down quite a bit in the past few moiitlis.

Oct. 4. Since Mr. "Vic" Seiler has
left our dear old school for a vaction,
Mr. Lockridge of Pctiro Miguel began
instruction in tiie boys' gym classes
today.

Oct. 5. Two visitors to our dear
"alma mater today. A Miss Jacobs ot
New ^ ork City, and .^Ir. Davis ot Co-
lorado. First Supper Club meeting hciil
in Cafeteria with Airs. Spencer anil Mr.
and Mrs. Franks as guests.

Oct. 8. Mr. Siminski, the Goliath of
CHS, returned from a visit to Balboa
with a challenge from the manly group
of BHS to a game of basketball. It is
rumored that Cristobal corpulents resent
criticisms of old age and are therefore
planning on the assured victory why
not .'?;'?

A drive for 100% membership in the
SA began today. The future of the
Association looks bright.

Oct. 9. Mr. Hackett, Editorial spon-
sor of our school newspaper, announces
his intention of a weekly publication,
instead of bi-weekly as it was during the
last few months of last school year.
Photo Club, organized by Mr. Miller,
last year, had its first meeting of this
year in his room at 5 o'clock,

Oct. 10. \\'hat a list of members on
the "Trade \\'ind" staff. Hope that
means the newspaper is getting better
all the time. Nominations Committee
for officers of SA met today to do their
duly -Students urged by Mr. Miller to
liay dues for SA.

Oct. 11. Two new positions in the
activities of CHS have been created.
Chairman of the school Publicity Com-
mittee and Chairman of the Art Com-
mittee for publications and bulletin
board service. Edgar Bortlen anil jack
Egozcue now fill the offices.

Oct. 12. ]r. Sr. Dramatic Club meets
to elect officers and plan year's activities
First publication of "Trade Wind" for
this year came out today.

Saw school calendar today onli/ 176
da^-s of school t>/i/i/.'?.'*



Oct. 15. Election of SA officers post-
poned from Tuesdav the 16th to Tliurs-
ilay the IStii.

Plans are being made to have a band
in CHS hope we do.

Oct. 16. Carnival has been postponed
from Nov. 10th until after Jan. 1. -Au-
ditorium's being used for too many
things besiiles revue practice.

Frosh-Soph Dramatic Club Iv.-lil first
meeting of the year in the sponsor's
room, sponsor Aliss Liter, officers were
elected.

Oct. 17. At the assembly this mor-
ning, Mr. Miller did the two candidates
for president of S.\ a dirty trick he
called on them to make an ex-tempora-
ncous (is that right?) speech speech
and were they scared- -oh boy???

Oct. 18. A big day in CHS -elec-
tion of officers of the SA boy were the
polls crowded there wasn't even stand-
ing room!!!

Oct. 19. \\'e had a very prominent
man and interesting speaker at the
assembly this P. M. a Mr. Joseph I.
Scott. He spoke on "The Spirit of
.\merica."

Oct. 22. First games of interclass
soccer series played Seniors beat Frosii
and Jrs. and Sophs tied.

Oct. 24. Varsity team for girls' volley
ball has been picked out hope they win
from Balboa.

Oct. 25. Game between girls' V^arsity
volley ball team anil Faculty Men post-
poned to Nov. 2 the men have tr) get
in shape so the girls won't beat them!

Oct. 26. Navy Day tomorrow so we
hail a Navy Da3- program in assembly
today too bad it had to fall on a Satur-
day now no one can skip school to go
out to Coco Solo. Oh well! such is life.

Senior class Halloween Dance tonight,
and did we have fun?'"' Somebody will
ha\e to go a long way to make any other
dance better than that one.

Oct. 29. Well the "Scobies" have
won the interclass soccer series shows
how good the upperclassmen are!!!!
Seniors came second isn't that just
lovely.

Oct. 50. Installation of officers of
SA it's too bail that it's all over cause
it was so nice. Reverend Cecil L. Mor-
gan administered the oath of office to the
president, Anna Reilly. The S.\ sponsor,
Mr. Miller, administered the oath to
the members of the Executive Council.

Oct. 51. Mr. Hackett, our loving
history professor, is giving different
tests in his American Problems class
these days. Since the big discussion
these past few days about the article
in the Literary Digest on "too much
homework," Air. Hackett has determi-
ned to find out just how fast the average
Senior can read. It turns out that he







^c:




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11^


/-


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^w^


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j^^


5^


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-- jH


IffLsety




45






(the Senior) can read 29 pages an hour.

Nov. 2. We have 5 cheer leaders this
year -nstead of 5. Charlie Heim, head
cheer leader, of course, conducted a pep
rally, the first of the season. When he
quoted .\be Lincoln, uc were naturally
dumbfounded!!!

Mr. Franks had the first Executive
Counc-1 meeting at his home. After
three hours of serious business, delcous
refreshments were served. Hope all the
meetings have refreshments as an ending.

The girls got beat by the faculty n
volley ball what a pity!

Nov. 5. No school today but darn
It's Saturday just another holiday we
get cheated out of.

Nov. 5. A second v'ctory for the
faculty men over the grls' volley ball
team you'll have to do something
about that, girls!!!

Nov. 6 Up to date we have 323
students "n CHS seems like we're get-
ting bigger and better every year.

Nov. 9. Another of C. Heim's pep
rallys this one was in preparation for
the two games tomorrow the first :n
the :nter-school series.

Assembly Committee held its bi-
weekly assembly today in commemora-
tion of Armistice Day.

Report cards! What pitiful words.
Nevertheless, there are three "A"
students, 2 Seniors and a Soph. All girls,
and whadda ya think of that???

Nov. 10. Girls won 2 out of 3 in volley
ball three cheers. The boys didn't do
so well, but will next time.

Nov. 12. Preliminary list of "Carib-
bean" staff announced. Looks pretty
good for the annual of 1935.

Nov. 13. Ye Editor of the "Trade
Wind," Billy Beers, has resigned his
position and is now replaced by Edgar
Borden, former Associate Editor.

Nov. 14. First meeting of "La PAS"
today. Big things coming off m the
next year!

Jr. College soccer team beat our boys



tods



-1.



Nov. 15. Rehearsals of Jr. Sr. Play,
"The Red-Headed Stepchild," are in
full sw'ng. \^'ll be produced m the
early days of Dec.

Nov. 16. More class meeting. Never
heard so much discuss'on of Senior
privileges in my life.

Nov. 17. Choo-choo First "special"
of CHS to Balboa for the soccer gamfi.
In all the rain and slosh the boys lost.
The grls did too, but we still have hope
for the future.

Nov. 20. Informal nt'at'on of n w
"La PAS" members starts today. Th^y
all look so cute w'th r bbons in their hr'r
and the r clothes on backward.

Nov. 21. "La PAS" installed officers
at noon today in Mrs. Spencer's room.

Nov. 22. Executive Council meeting



at the home of the president, Anna
Reilly. More refreshments served!'!

Nov. 23. Jr. Sr. Play postponed
from Dec. 7 to Dec. 14 because of Thanks-
giving hobdays next week.

Nov. 24. The gals from BHS won
the volley ball series this AM. The boys
of CHS won the third and last soccer
game, but it doesn't give us the seres
cause we lost the first two game. Formal
"La PAS" initiation in the Audtorum
tonight a program and refreshments
w'll follow.

Nov. 27. New point system was
published today the other had to be
revised by the Executive Council.

Nov. 28. First Barn Dance ever held
in CHS was given hy the Executive
Council tonight and a big success it
was!!! Voices are already clamormg for
another affair of its kind.

Dec. 3. Interclass baseball practice
starts today. Student coaches and
managers for the class teams are among
the new features of the second interclass
sport of the year.

Dec. 5. Interclass basketball practice
for girls starts today. Games will be
played in a week or two.

Dec. 6. President Anna Reilly and
vice president Tom Russell of the SA
accompanied Mr. Franks to Balboa HS
today, where all three gave lengthy
talks on the advantages of the SA m a
school. BHS seems to be in favor of
starting one too, and just wants some
info about it.

Dec. 7. We sure learned a few things
about the Chinese today. Father Joseph
McGinn gave a talk on China and held
ever3'one's undivided attention for 45
minutes whxh is unusual m CHS.

Dec. 10.' That Jr. Sr. Play, "The
Red-Headed Stepchild," seems to be
coming along fifie and promises to make
at least one evening entertaining for
students of CHS.

Dec. 11. Dummy tournament for
boys' interclass baseball starts today
despite the exceedingly slushy weather
we've been having.

Dec. 14. The big play comes off
tonight. We all await it with eagerness.

Dec. 15. More laughing was heard in
th; Aud'torium last night than ever was
heard before. That play sure was good.

Dec. 17. Today is the beginn'ng of a
series of early morning assembl es. From
now until we have a 5 minute ass'^mbly
every morning before 8 o'clock.

Class meetings once again. If the
Seniors keep it up, th-jy may have a
model class in a few years.

Dec. 18. That was some talk liulh
W'lringstad gave this AM on G'rls'
Athletics. Wouldn't be surprised if sh"
was called on for more pep talks.

Dec. 21. Recognition Service of the
Supper Club held tonight.



46



The sup|x-r .iikI Imsincss nn-rling lul-
lowed.

Hoys' V'arsil.v Club presi-nted a most
unusual and intiTi-slinu |)n>iirani (oiiigli(.
Alli r till' program, Mr. X'iiilon fiiwr lln'
l)o_vs llieir swoai< rs, on wliich iliu li;Ucr
C liail b'on sfwod. \\'vv<- (li 'V (hov
(ickU-d!!!



lai



llaiipy Ni'w \'



l,ui)ks



like a prosptTous one lor il';ar olil CHS.
W'e have a nunib-r of new stud''nis wilh
us today lor (hi- r.-maiiuler of the year.

Jan. 5. Honor roll came out today.
The same (href girls were on this ".A
honor roll as were on ih-" last on''. Who
saul ihe gn-ls are dumb look to ni- iiie-
(he boys aren't (oo hot.

N'arsily baseball team starts practice
tixiay. About 25 arc trying lor the
team- not bail. Hope we win ihc lirst,
second, and last games this year (there
are only 3)!!!

Supper Club had a fruit cake rallle
today- boy those cakes looked good.

Jan. 4. What a lot of sleepy eyes
seems more- like a blue .^lontlay than a
Friday one good thing about Krlilay
is that you ilon't have to get up early the
ne.\t morning.

Jan. 7. Anodier visitor in CHS,
Professor T. C. TrueblootI of the Unix er-
sity of Michigan. The Prof, (inter.is-
(ing chap) spoke to the assenible'd stu-
dents on ihe seven triumphs ol public
speaking.

Jan. 8. Carnival Committee lu.-kl
their long-promised meeting today
now serious work on th'- Carnival begins.

Jan. 9. Inlormal initiation of the
second l)atch ot candidati.'S lor "I^a I'as'
started today. All iln-s',- little girls look
M.ry swe'..i m their hair ribbons.

Jan. It), .\noiher one of those nice
long E.\ecuti\e Council meetings was
held at the home of the vice-president,
Tt-m Russell, last e\-tning.

Jan. 11. The Supp:.r Club Mother
and Dauglu(.'r Tea this .dcernoon. Hope
they don't get sick with all that cake
around.

Jan. 11'. What a special !!! However,
it was the besi one we've had in the way
of behavior. The only thing that spoiled
the day was tlie loss t)l the baseball
game, but we're gonna win the other
two.

Jan. 1-4. Class meetings again today.
The Seniors are getting noisy again-
they'd better take it easy.

)an. 15. The girls' gym classes s;sm
to be working very hard at those gym
tests ih -y're having.

Jan. lb. Formal initiation of "La
Pas" new members tonight.

Jan. 18. A pep rally for 15 minut'-s
this P. M. to give the student body
some pep for tomorroxv's games.

Jan. 19. Double victory over Balboa!
Won the basketball and baseball games



iiist like rolling off a log boy oh b.iy
Balboa hid a "spjciil" but it di'.hi'i do
them any goc didn'f help them win th'; games. N'arsi-
ly Club had a danc; tonight too! BUS.
studi nts w.-re guests and e\.Tyonj s:.--
nvd to h:i\e a gooil time.

I.iii. 21. Candiilates for (|U.-.-n of
CI IS have been posti-d in Miss Moore's
room. Looks good for little Miss New
Cristobal, Kvtflyn Dvvy.r.

Jan. 50. K.xams (omovrow ami th.-
Pi-isident's ball at (he Slrang-rs' Club
tonight. Whit a time to have exams
some ]i..'ople are \ery thoughtless.

Jan. 51. I>;)ng faces anil very sleepy
eyes are S'.'.'n ;dl ov> r s;'hoo! today. I
can guarantee they diiln't los any sleep
over these lovely liour exams tho.

Feb. 1. Just imagine whai school
will be like whv-n we have no exams the
Seniors are sure lucky to have only two
such ilays ahead of (hem then they can
sit b:ick anil laugh at ease. Thank
gootlness today is (he las( il'ay of exams
even the teachers look worn out.

I'eb. 6. Another interesting visitor
a( our school today. Mrs. I"'rances
Ilaun, W'orthy A\atron of the East ;rn
Star, gave a \ery inter.-sting talk.

I^'eb. 7. I^'idac Fssay Contest announ-
ceil today. "Homework" Hackett expo-
unds on it in every one of his classes.

Feb. 9. Big day for old CHS. Stu-
dent Carnival is in full swing and seems
to be biggest anil best yet. I^-;('s hope
it is anyway.

Feb. 11. More breaks for students of
our Alma Mater. Ice cream left over
fi-oni (he Carnival was given away (o
all this afternoon. \\'ha( a mess outside
that Cafeteria door!!!

Feb. 15. Another assembly. Mr
Franks talked about six weeks' grades
and the Carnival.

Feb. 16. Mr. Vintcm's Natural Histo-
ry Club had another jungle-fii-ld trip
totlay.

Feb. 18. ;\ssembly this morning to
p; p the stuilents anil runners up lor the
l)ig track meet ne.xt week.

Feb. 20. The girls are constantly
1) -ing urged to show up for baseball.
Not much pep shown for this sport.

lA-b. 25. Big Washington Swim Meet
today. Phil Ri< del is doing himself proud

Feb. 25. The CHS. ^pitcher, >Ux
Sanil(_Ts, has been doing line on the
Colon team this season. He pitched on
the 22nd, striking ten men out and
allowing only 5 bits. Pre((y good for
him what''

Feb. 26. Miss Patterson surely tlid
squelch some of the unruly-ass, -mbly-
b'.;ha\iors in our school, but they needed
it.

March. 1. More report cards today.

The same three girls are on the "A'
Honor Roll.






47






March, o. Miss CHS, Evelyn Dwyer,
had a lovely float in (he Colon Carnival
today thanks to Iidwin Hanna and
Alien Jacques.

March. 6. Seniors won the Interclass
track meet. Sophomores came second.

.^larch. 9. Balboa won the track
meet today what a pity. The "Trade
Wind" is giving a "Depression Dance"
tonight quite appropiate, don't you
think :-

March. 22. Visitation Day turned
out very nicely today. Guy stayed at
home 'cause he was afraid of all the
visitors.) The committee arranged

evervthing very well.

M'^arch. 23. Phil Riedel broke 5
swimming records oi the Canal Zone to-
day. Good luck to you, Phil.

March. 50. Frosh's first dance tonight
Such spifiy programs and unique decora-
tions. It probably is the best dance of
the year for its decorations and programs.

April. 1. Interclass basketball tourna-
ment starts today. Watch out tor the
Seniors!!!

April. 2. That "Caribbean" staff
sure is sledging away at then- wt)rk.
Looks like a good year for CHS.

April. 5. Just one more week of
school 'til Easter vacation what a
break!

April. 8. The well-known Achnied
Abdullah gave a talk in the Autlitorium
this P. Al. He interested the students
c]uite a lot with his unique bracelet.

April. 9. The first CHS operetta in
years was given tonight by the Girls'
Glee Club and the Household Arts
classes. It was called "The Nifty Shop"
and nifty it was. A special invitation
affair and the girls deserve credit.

April. 10. It seems that the Seniors
won the interclass basketball series by
a landslide. They are scheduled to play
the Faculty tomorrow.

April. 11. Hooray for the Seniors
CHS. How they beat the Faculty with
a score of 37-27 what a game!

April. 12. Today amrks the end of
school lor 9 whole days-are we glad?



April. 22. The students of CHS
truly miss the company of one of the'
sweetest girls who ever attended our
school, Josephine Dunn. We extend
our sincerest sympathy to her sister,
Dorothy; brother, Milton; ami to hsr
parents in their bereavement.

April. 25. The Supper Club Dance
tonight. Promises to be an unusual
affair.

May. 5. The first interschool bas-
ketball game of the season tonight
hope it's successful.

May. 6. Today works the beginning
of Senior week. Let's all have one grand
time lor a change!!!

May. 10. Another one of those inters-
school basketball games. You should
have seen those boys travel on that floor.
What a fast game!

May. 11. "The Soul of Anne Rutled-
ge" turned out to be a very sweet period
play. The students enjoyed it immen-
sely.

May. 18. Executive Council Dance
is planned to spring a surprise tonight

May. 31. The night of the last basket-
ball game of the series. School is slowly
but surely coming to an end for the year.

June. 3. Just think today begins the
last month of school. Boy that sounds
good!

June. 7. The Jr. Sr. Banquet was a
huge success! The Seniors look a little
low these days looks as tho they don't
want to finish school after all.

June. 9. Baccalaurate Service in the
Christ Church was quite impressive.
The Seniors surely do need to be blessed
now.

June. 12. "Caribbeans" come out
today: The- Seniors will ha\e "writers',
cramps pretty soon.

June. 15. Exams! They spoil all the
fun of the last days of school -everyone
says so.

June. 14. The Big Day Commencnt!
Glad as I am to get out of school I feel
like crying anti I know many more do too
Here's wishing you lots of luck, Seniors!!!




ALUMNI

Ini Kathleen Goodenougli



=S



^va



1951

Caklos B. Rankin, Cristobal, Canal
Zone.

V'ELMA Hall, Cristobal, C. Z.

Ruth Duvall, 2974 Colerian A\< luu-,
Cmcinnati, Ohio.

Marion NiiELV, Cristobal, C. Z.



Thomas Picscon, Cristobal, C. Z.
William Bailey, Cristobal, C. Z.
Ernest Berger, Tri State Indiana.

Celeste Clark, (Mrs. B.) Powell,
iialboa, C. Z.

Crawford J. Campbell, Yale L^niver-
sity. New Haven, Conn.



4S



EnwARD CONKLINO, Cristobal. C. Z.

Maucaret M. Davis, Cristobal. C. Z.

ViNNIE Klson, Box 57'), Collego Sta-
tion. Pullman. Washington.

Russell Elwell. Duke L'nivcrsitv.
N. C.

Taiuan Knc.lander, (address un-
Unown).

Clara Krlsk. Box 71'S Lianingdm.
Ontiirio, Canaila.

Burton Hackett, Cristobal, C. Z.

John Kelly. (aiKlrL'ss unknown I.

Marl\ Kleefkens, (Mrs.) l-'razcr,
Cristobal, C. Z.

De.\\etra Lewis, (adihvss unknown).

I'ekcival [-YEW, Cristobal, C. Z.

Kenneth .^\.\^HKR, Balboa. C. Z.

Eugenia ,^l. McI-ain, Cristobal, C. Z.

Ronald Piiilli'otts, New York City.

Bettina Powers, Fort Hancock, .\.|.

.Anna Ryan, 648 East State Street,
Trenton, N. |.

Aloha Slocu.m, Cristobal, C. Z.

Dorothy W'irtz, Cristobal, C. Z.

George Wertz, Cristobal, C. Z.

Ben Williams, Cristobal, C. Z.

Barh.VRA WeiCK, France I'iekl, C. Z.
Mrs. Graham.

Raymond Will, Cristobal, C. Z.

Richard Wood, Cristobal, C. Z.

.\lice J. GoR.MELY, Cristobal. C. Z.

Frank Griesingkr, Georgia Tech.
.\tlanta Ga.

E\ELYN Wright, (acklress unknown).

Ia.mks Hayden. New York Nautical
School. New York City.

Verona C. Her.man, UniversitA' of
Te.xiis, Austin, Te.xas.

Roger M. Howe, Purdue University,
Lafayette, Ind.

Carl Kariger, Higgins Trade School,
Los .Angeles, Cal.

Thel.MA King, 27 Broadway Terrace,
New York City.

Alvin a. Lyew, Colon, R. de P.

Margaret Mizrachi, Colon, R. de !'.

Elwin Neal, Canal Zone )unior
College, Balboa, C. Z.

Ia.mes Wood, Cristobal, C. Z.

Elsie Neely, Cristobal, C. Z.

Bknia.min Roberts, Uniim College,
Schenectady. N. Y.

Janet Robinson, William and .^lary
College, \\ illiamsburg, Va.

Her.\ian Roos, Jr., Gatun, C. Z.
Jessie Sinclair, (address unknown).
Betty Stahler, (address unknown).
Robert Stevenson, Cristobal, C. Z.
Alicia Thirlwall, Denver, Colorado.
Jessie V.\ne, Compeville, Washington.



Nell \\'ardlaw, Cristobal, C. Z.
I'eRRY W,\SIIAnAUGH, Cristobal, C. Z.
Edwin Weis.MAN, Purdue University,
Lafayette, Ind.

Elizabeth Wiriz, Cristobal, C. Z.

1952

Randolph M. Wikingstad, Cristobal,
C. Z.

Albin li. I"ORSSTRO.\l, Rhode Island,
State University.

Eleanor M. Reinhold, 'iampa, Fla.

Bruce Sanders, Cristobal, C. Z.

Inez Theoktisto, Colon, R. de P.

Malcol.m Wheeler, 4 Pleasant View
PIkv. Whitesboro, N. Y.

lIow.VKD Kekn.\N, Purdiir Uni\ersity,
Lafayette, Ind.

RlCH.VRD Bet1I;1N, I-"nrl Randolph,

c. z.

Gladys Bliss, Cristobal, C. Z.

-Allenye Deakins, (Mrs. R.) Walkei-,
Cjatun, C. Z.

Mary C. Deans, Cristobal, C. Z.

John Delaney, Colon, R. de P.

Dona V. Eaton, Barnard College,
New York City.

Joseph EbdOaV, Canal Zone lunior
College, Balboa, C. Z.

Harry' C. Egolf, Canal Zone lunioi-
College, Balboa, C. Z.

\'i\iAN G. Elmgren, (address un-
known).

Howard S. Engelke, Cristobal, C. Z.

Marie Ensrud, Fort Davis, C. Z.

Jose Antonio Fernandez, Colon, R.
de P.

1933

Harold Agnew, (address unknown).

Webster Beard, Balboa, C. Z.

Howard Berry, Severn School, Se-
verna Park. Md.

Clifton Brown, Cristobal, C. Z.

Robert Brown, University of Ten-
nesee, Kno.wille, Tenn.

Jesus David, Gatun, C. Z.

Ernest De La Ossa, Columbia Uni-
versity, New York, N. A

Parker Hanna, Cristobal, C. Z.

Robert Hanna, Cristobal, C. Z.

Oscar Heilbron, Colon, R. de P.

Charles Howe, Purdue University,
Lafayette, Ind.

WiLLIA.Nl Keenan, Purdue University,
Lafayette, Ind.

Louie Kleefkins, Cristobal, C. Z.

Henry Lee, Cristobal, C. Z.

Harold Lockwood, Cincinnatti, Ohio.

John Lothrop, Los Angeles, California




49




z///;^^





Mandi >\archosky, Cristobal. C. Z.

Chris Ohlschlager, Cristolial, C. Z.

Jack Paterson, Canal Zone Junior
College. Balboa, C. Z.

Charlie Pescod, Cristobal, C. Z.

Ernest Reinholu, Cristobal, C. Z.

Harn'ey Smith, Canal Zone Junior
Ci)llcge, Balboa, C. Z.

James \\'ergin, Purdue University,
I^afayette, Ind.

Helen Aanstoos, Cristobal, C. Z.

Thelma Albritton, Cristobal, C. Z.

Dorothy Birkeland, Cristobal. C. Z.

Jane Bretch, (Mrs. W. G.) Tisdale,
Coco Solo, C. Z.

Velta Foley (Mrs. C. Sharp), Cris-
tobal, C. Z.

Molly Gruber, Sweet Briar, \'a.

Helen Hammond. University of Cin-
cinnatti. Ohio.

Mary Melendez. Colon. R. dc P.

Mildred Owen, Hammond, La.

Martha Potts, (Mrs.) Griffiths. Cris-
tobal, C. Z.

NoRlNE Rakovsky. Cristobal, C. Z.

Edna Thirwall, Cristobal, C. Z.

Elizabeth Thornton, (Mrs. Jordan),
Cristobal, C. Z.

Arthur Vane, Ct)upeville, Washing-
ton.

May Wegner, Cristobal, C. Z.

Thomas Rankin. Cristobal. C. Z.

1954

Frank Washabaugh Jr.. Lehigh Uni-
versity, Bethlehem, Penn.

Dorothy Roos. Gatun, C. Z.

Carlton Horine, California School
ol Technology, Pasedena, Cal.

Marguerite Winn, I^ittlefield Dor-
nr.tory. University of Texas, Austin,
Texas.

Jose Bazan, Canal Zone Junior Co-
llege, Balboa, C. Z.

Ray.mond Bejakano (address un-
known).

xMabelle Bliss, Miami, Florida.

Stella Boggs, Cristobal, C. Z.

Charles Belden, Cristobal, C. Z.

Blanche Belden, Cristobal, C. Z.

Judy Bridget, France Field, C. Z.

Colin Campbell, Matthews Hall,
Harvard, Boston, Mss.

Norma Davis, Cristobal, C. Z.

Eileen Donovan, Cristobal C. Z.

Fi(ei) Ebdon, Gatun, C. Z.

Ruth Egolf, Gatun, C. Z.

George Fernandez, Colon. R. de I'.

Anne Gibson, Cristobal, C. Z.

Jeremiah Gorin, I3ukc University,
Durham, N. C.



X'iRGINIA HaNNA. Cristobal. C. Z.

Elizabeth Hayes, Canal Zone lun'or
College, Balboa, C. Z.

Mary \'irginia Hearne, Littlefleki
Dormitory, University of Texas, Aust"n,
Texas.

Shirley Jane Hill, 820 JX'troit Slreef
Denver, Colorado.

Maxine Hoffman Cristobal, C. Z.

Victoria Hollowell, (Mrs. C.) Ses-
sions. Auburn N. Y.

W'illia.m Hollow'HLL. Arkansas Stale,
lonesboro. Arkansas.

Ethel Huntoon, Goddard Seminary,
Barre, Vermont.

Gordon HuTCHiNs, Jr. Pomfret School
Poritrei, Connecticut.

Blossom Lam, Colon, R. de P.

Helen Leach, Cristobal, C. Z.

Grant Lemmon, University of Nebras-
ka, Omaha Neb.

David Levy, East Hall, Rice Institute,
Houston, Texas.

Jeanne Lewis, College of New Ro-
chelle, N. Y.

Gloria Mannix, University of Texas,
Austin, Texas.

John Mannix, University of Texas,
Austin, Texas.

Beverley Marcuse, Shrcveport La.

Robert Molton, University of Vir-
ginia, Charlottesville. Va.

Edna Mueller. 55 Ridge A^ jnue,
Passaic. N. J.

Ruth Pickett. Can;il Zone lunior
College, Balboa, C. Z.

\'lOLET R.ANDALL. Cristobal. C. Z.

Richard Reinhold. Akron Oh'o.

Henry E. Sanchez, Colon, R. de P.

Marguerite Siebler. I'ort Shi-rman,
C. Z.

Robert Warren Slocum, Smith Hall,
University of Virginia, Charlottesville,

Charles South, Cristobal C. Z.

Betty Ann Stetler. I^elaml Stanford
University, California.

William Stone. University of Southern
California, Los Angeles.

Ruth Swan, Mississippi College for
Women.

Robert Wertz, Cristobal, C. Z.

Sidney F. NX'harton (adtlress un-
known).

William Ray \\'heeler (Cristobal
C. Z.

Louise Whidden. Balboa. C. Z.

Edison Wirtz, Cristobal, C. Z.

Alejandro L. Wong, Colon, R. ik- P.

Alice Wood, West Minister Street,
Syracuse, New York.

Ernest Wood Jr., Cristobal, C. Z.



.50




52





SOCCKK




SOCCER

VARSI rV-l$.\I.B().\

Although the Cristohal Sliulent BixK- gave the soccer team what was prohalilv the best support it
has ever had. the bovs were unable to come through with a championship.

Six varsity men were left from last year, but due to some of the new material being pretty green and
in the short time devoted to varsity practice could not learn enough to i>u!l the team through to victorv.

The first tilt went to Ralboa on November 10 at KoUonul Park by a score of 4 to I Cristobal
started the game very strongly having the ball in Balboa's territory during the entire first cpiartei. It
was during this quarter that Cristobal made its only tally when Durham put a beautiful one past Balboa's
goalkeejier. In the seconil (juarler the Cristobal defense worked very poorly and Balboa scored three
goals, the scorers being Moore, Navarro, and .Michelson. !n the third perioti Balboa scored again on a
penalty kick by Captain Durfree.

The second game on November 17, at Balboa, was accompanied by a special train from Cristobal.
However, as it was raining at game time only a few of those who went over attended the game. Regardless
of this show of enthusiasm Balboa lianilled the Cristobal "Redmcn" a 7 to drubbing. The game was
playeil in a sea of mud and ne;ther team was able to ilo much more than push the ball up and down the
field, .\lthough the score does not indicate it ".Mope Cotton played a superb game at goalguard for the
Cristobal warriors. Time anil again he turned away thre.ils anil but for his playing the score wouhl. no
doubt, have l>een much more in B.ilboa's lavor.

The championship lost. Cristobal came out from under cover ami took the thir game was closely combatteil all the way through and the result in doubt until the final whistle had blown.

Outstanding among those red warriors who fought so bravely for victorv were such names as Ilanna.
Hill. Bonlen. Neely. Reynartlus (Captam). Dougherty. Curtis and Coffey.

The defensive combination of Hanna. Coffey, and Neely turneil play after play away from the
"rcdmens" goal .anil ileserx'e much creilit.

Ballioa had a stronger team, but C. H. S. m.iile them fight lor victory.



JUNIOR COM.RGE

The C. II. S. "icdmcn were also unsuccessful against the lunior College aggregation losing l>oth
games to them. Ihe respective scores were .'> io I and j to 0. As yet Cristobal has not beaten the lunlor
College as it also lost both games last year.

The following ware C. H. S. players: Reynardus ( Ca|>tain). Cotton. Neely, Duey. Knder. I'ern.indez.
Curtis. E. Hanna. H. Wills. Borden. Hill. Dougherty, R. I. Peterson, Retally. Coffey, and Durham.

INTERCLASS

In accordance with the new system of sports Inaugurated this year, interclass soccer was playeil l>cfore
varsity. As strange as it m;iy seem e\'ery class enjo\-eil a very large turnout, '.for once)

:V ilimimy series was run off at first to iletermnie the strength of each team. The I'reshmen anil the
Sophi>mores were given h.-inilicaps because of their weakness.

The regular schedule was then played, and so well were the handicaps figured that It resulted In a four
way tie. Because of this playoffs hiiil to be held. The Seniors ilefeateil the Iiniiors 2 to 1 anil the Sopho-
mores succumbed to the I'Veshmen ."^ to 1 In the final game the Seniors were unable to overcome the ha mil
cap that the little fellows had, and the Freshmen liecame the soccer champions of 1954.







BASEBALL



0/4^





BASEBALL-VARSITY

This year the dear old Alma Mater flashed a bit ot her old torm and walked off with all of the baseball
laurels.

After losing the first game to Balboa, the boys irom the Gold Coast tightened tlown, and led bv the
strong pitching arm oi Max Sanders, lought their way through to victory in the remaining two games.

1st Ga.vie

On Saturday. January 12. in one oi the most interesting high school games seen on the Isthmus in the
past few years. Balboa managed to take Cristobal into camp by the close score ol 7 to 5.

A satisfied, but disappointed, crowd ot C. H. S. rooters, saw our boys out-hit Balboa 8 to 7 and yet
lost by two runs. Foiu" errors, all made by our infield, were the main cause of this. Balboa also matle
four errors, but the breaks were evidently with them.

The game was featured by the mar\'elous })itching oi Ma.x Santlers. who struck out no less ttian 14
would be hitters.

"Pablo" Beartl and Howard Will were Cristobal's outstanding batters: Paul getting 3 beautiful hits
and Howard collecting two.

Corrigan and Friday starred for Balboa; Corrigan striking out 9 C. H. S. batters and Friday leading
his team with two hits.

2nd Ga.mk

However, a week later at Mount Hope, Balboa High School accompanied by 150 students and their
high school band, journeyed to Cristobal to taste defeat, 4 to 1 before the strong pitctiing oi Max "Lefty"
Sanders, who limited the Paciiic siders to one run and tour .scattered hits. Hearne and Parmerlee also
pitched high class ball, allowing Cristobal only six hits.

The game was attended by approximately 900 tans who were treateil to a high grade of baseball by
the future stars from Cristobal and Balboa high schools.

Cristobal scored one run in the second inning; another brace in the iourlh and Iheir las! tally in the
sixth, every man but M. Sanders, E. Duriiam. and E. Hanna getting one hit.

Balboa scored its lone tally in the fifth inning due to a walk, two singles and one error.

Ed Hanna made one of the most spectacular catches seen in a long time at the Mount Hope park
when he went to the left iield ience in the eighth inning to spear Friday's lusty bid tor an extra base hit.

Max Sanders starred for Cristobal again, tanning out 15 batters and allowing only i'our hits.

Foster led the Balboa ofiensive with two hits.

It is interesting to note that Balboa used 15 different players in its attempt to slop the boys irom the
Gold Coast.

3rd Ga.mk

On January 26, at Balboa, after staging a great uphill battle the Cristobal team nosed out Balboa
High, () to .5. to clinch the Interscholastic baseball series.

Balboa had eiiioyed a ') to 1 lead up to the sixth inning when the Gold Coasters started their determi-
ned drive which leil to the championship. The Pacific Siders were iield scoreless after the fourth inning
as the Cristob.il Boys tightened uji their defense and Max Sanders ianned eleven oi the opposition.

Two runs scoretl in the eighth inning knotted the score ami a passed ball in the ninth enabletl the
Atl;intic Siders to bring the winning run across the jihile.

Cristobal scored its first run in the opening Inning; Balboa tallied twice In their half of the first,
again In the seconil. again In the third, anil their filth and last run in the fourth; then, as Hearne began to
lire, the C. H. S. boys scored in the sixth, tied the .score In the eighth and won the old ball game in the
ninth when Beard scored the winning run-
Now to hand out a little credit where it belongs. I'irsl we wish to praise our new coach for turning
out .'I winner In Ills first year. Three cheers for Air. Siinlnskl. Also Air. Miller credit as he really got the bo\'S oil to their start with his fine coaching of last year.

However, we doubt it it would ha\'e been possible to turn out such a winner without the assistance ot
such persons as Max .Sanders and "Pablo Beard. In three games Alax tanned a total oi 40 batters which
seems to be some .sort of a record lor the Isthmus. "Pabln led the C. H. S. oltensive with 6 hits and also
had more stolen b.ises to his credit than anvone else.



54







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One person who liatl nothing lo ilo with the team tlcsei ves a great deal of credit also. To Charlie
Heim goes a neat hit o! praise tor promoting the spirit ant) enthusiasm necessar;^' to run two special trains
lo Balhoa. Also his assistant aiui siile-UicU. Bert Asenclo, rates a lot of praise for helping the same general
cause.



N'a.mi:
Curtis
Will

IkMI.I

S^m.Uis. .\\
1 )urlKini
ILinii.i. K
H.lMna. W
NV-cl.v
Saiulcrs. 1
IVlcrs(n
Kiny
Cut ton



IN TKRCI-ASS liASKISAl.l.

Alter getting oil ton a vcrv poor start liecause ol liail woatliur, iiiltrclass liaseliail stttleil ilowii to
wliat looked like a hattle lietwecii the luiiiors ami the Seniors.

It was iniposslltle to run a tluniniy tournament because oi rain liut imlging Irom practice sessions liotli
the I'rosh ami tlie Sophs were given a haiulicap ol ten runs ami alter the lirst game it looUcil like thes-
needed liltecu.

In the lirst game the Seniors took the Sophomores over the bumps lo a score ol IS to II ( the handicap
included. 1 Christian and Asliton were unahle to hohl down A\ax Sanders, Irl Sanders ami Paul Heard who
collected lour. lour, and three hits respect ivel.v out ol lour times at liat. However the condiination ol .^\ax
Saiulers and Paul Beard held the Sophs lo two hits. .^\a.\ striking out seven and Paul ten.

In the second game the lunlors just manageil to overcome the hamlic.iii oi the h'rosh to heat them II
to II. Curtis was the leading plaver lor the luniors striking tmt ten men and getting three hits. .^\i
Carlhy ami .^lartin led the l""rosli. .^IcCarthv' striking out eight men and .^lartin gelling l\\t> hits.

In the thirtl game the Seniors just nosed out the l''rosh beating them 14 to 1.3. He.'inl .md Irl Sanders
starred again lor the Seniors while Martin again led the Freshmen with two hits.

Then the luniors took a close g;ime Irom the Sophomores ctmiing out on the top side of a 14 to I."
score. Curtis pitched a one hit game with Keenan getting thai single blow. Sullivan and Curtis led llie
Juniors at the bat each getting two hits. Curtis struck out tourteeii men to become the days outstanding
star.

In the game to deciile who kept the cellar position the I'icsliman throughly whipped the Sophs (> to 4.
McCarthy pitchetl a line game lor the h'reshmen allowing only three liits. .^lartin w.-is again the outstan-
ding batter collecting two more hits.

In the ilnal big game to decide the champs ol 1^)5;') Ihe Seniors giul>' tripped the luniors ;intl walked
oil with the bunting. Paul Hcartl ami Irl Sanders combineil to jiitch a no-hit. no run game aiitl Claude Mer-
ger led the way to an 18 to victory by gathering three hits.

The outstanding players oi this series were: lor the Seniors. Paul I>eartl and Irl Sanders who both
batted over SO' ami combined to pitch some wonderiul games: lor the luniors Curtis and Sulliv.in played
the best games. lust beiore the last game Curtis injured a linger and it was due lo his ab.;ence that the ju-
niors altribute their loss to the Ssniori: lor t!ie Sophomore^ Ashton ami Christian were outslaiiding. Ash-
ton leading his team at the bat and Chii.^tian pitching some nice games: lor the I'reshmen the outstand-
ing man was .^lartin who led his team by a large tlistanc* in batting and who playcil a line game alield.





BASKETBALL





oo







BASKETBALL VARSITY

With the track season completed and Interchiss basketball laurels carried off In- the Senior Class,
that final flashing spot has descended upon old C. H. S. Basketball is the outstanding sport of the vear and
this vear promises to be up among some of the best that Cristobal has seen.

Due to the fact that the material for this annual of ours must all be turned in some weeks beiore the
season is completed, we will give you summaries of the games as played for as long a period as possible.

The season began with Coach Vinton selecting the following men from the various class teams as
members of the varsity squad: M. Sanders (Captain), R. Neelv, T. Russell, I. Sanders, H. Will, W.
Hanna, W Cotton. J. Christian, W. Wood, R. Clemens, ]. Clay, E. Hoffman.
Sub Base:

.After a week of strenuous practice the team began a series of practice games. The first ol these was
with a team of Sailors from the Submarine Base. Score: C. H. S. 39 S. B. 28
Fleet Air Base :

The second was w ith the Fleet Air Base live, whose team ranked second place in the Service League
last vear In a verv close and hard fought game the C. H. S. basketeers managed to chalk up a one point
victory. Score: C". H. S. 22 -F. A. B. 21

Gatun: i r-' i

Later on in the week the "Purple and Gold) of the old Alma Mater defeated the Gatun Basket Chuckers
bv the same score (22-21 ) in another hotly contested altair.
Junior College I:

On April 29. the hrst league game with the Junior College Boys got underway and when the final
whistle was blown the Cristobalites were well out in front. After trailing their older opponents up until
the final period was on its way, the C. H. S. dribblers began to click and forged quickly ahead to win by
a 22-15 score.

The Silver sider's first quarter attack was quite spectacular, whith Captain Joe Ebdon, '35, constantly
being where the ball happened to be. His blocking and guarding was excellent, and sorrow reigned among
his colleagues when he was forced from the game on personal fouls.

The Junior College courtmen ran up si.\ points in the first period. Ebdon opened the scoring with
a beautiful one-hand-push shot from the left side of the court. Close upon its heels Brown followed with
two more double deckers. It was after there that Captain "Ma.\" Sanders made the lone tally for C. II. S.
with his charity chuck.

In the second quarter Junior College held its five point lead. "Max" again scored a foul shot, and later
took the ball down the floor to twist one in from under the basket. For Junior College Brown made his
third field goal of the day and Crook scored a foul shot and a field goal.

In the third quarter Brown, acting captain, was at a loss without Ebdon, and consequently J. C. was
held scorless. Nevertheless the College played an almost airtight defense and if it were not lor two foul
shots \.e would have been held to two points made when Russell reached high above everyone else's heads
to tip one in from off of the backboard.

The Last quarter was all Cristobal's. Twelve points in all, they made during this period. The only
College player to find the basket was Lopez playing in place of Walling who made two swishes from a good
distance out.
Balboa I:

On Mav Z. the Cristobal team tasted its first defeat of the season at the hands of Balboa High. It
is agreed upon by most people who saw the game that the Gold Coast boys outplayed the Balboa five by
far but that they had no basket appeal, as a very small percent of their shots would go in. The onlv Cris-
tobal plaver who could make anv headway was "Bob" Neely who made points as follows: H. Will
1, T.Russell, 2, 1. Sanders I, M. Sanders 2."

Tonneson, tall Balboa center, led his team on to victory by scoring 10 points followed by W. Friday
who made 4 points.

It is Interesting to note that C. H. S. made eight of its points via the foul throw route.
Junior College II:

On Mav 6, the Junior College quintet again invaded the C. H. S. gym to play the second of their
three game series. This time they were more fortunate than before, defeating the C. H. S. five by a 35-23
margin.

Captain Ebdon, '33, hit his well known stride and led his team to victory by scoring 19 points.

C. H. S., altho on the short end of the score, played a much Improved floor game over their last perlor-
mance. Outstanding players were Neely and the two Sanders who made 7, 6 and 6 points respectively.

Brown, of Junior College, although overshadowed by his team mate, Ebdon, made eight points towards
the College's \'ictory.

Each plaver of the College's starting team contributed at least one basket to their 35 points.
Balboa II:

For the second consecutive time this vear Balboa has taken Cristobal's measure; this time to a score
of 39-23.

The Cristobal team played like a bunch of rookies from tlie sticks while Balboa passed and shot lilie
a group of professionids.

The only player who showed any class for C. H. S. was "Max" Sanders who scored 9 points.

"Max worked mighty hard but received no support from his teammates. Both Russell and I. Sanders
had bad cases of the butterflngers and seemed unable to hold on to the ball.

Balboa played a beautiful game in the person of Walter Friday who succeeded in scoring 23 points,
as many as the whole C. H. S. team combined could chalk up.

Tonneson, Balboa's center, w ho starreil in the first game was unable to get past Russell this time howe-
ver and was relieved shortly after the half by Kromer wlio was unable to score any points either.

This game gives Balboa a 2 to O advantage over Cristobal in a five game series. It C. H. S. cannot
win the next game the season will come to an eand with Balboa having gone undefeated.

INTERCLASS BASKETBALL

I'Dr the third consecutive time this year the Senior Class outplayed their ojiponents to win, this lime,
the Inlcrclass Basketball League. Only once during the entire series did the Senior team suffer a loss.
This was at the hands of the Sophomore team, who, with the help of a 15 point handicap managed to win
by .'I mere two points.

The Seniors deserve a great de.il of credit for wlnnuig ;is they had a terrific handicaji to o\'ercome in
every game they played. The handlcaj)s were as follows: Seninrs 0; Juniors 10; Sophomores 15;
Freshmen 30,



56



A liriel sunimarv ol the games liillows:

In tlie first ganii- the Seniors ran up 40 piiiiils while the Frosli were making If); the game thus ended
with a score of 46-4*).

The Juniors, although they showed line spirit throughout the league, never clicked and lor this reason
lost their lirst game to the Sophs 2H-'2\>.

In the next game the Seniors proved tlial their eves and teamwork were improving 1>\' running up
57 points, while the Siinlis ran up the highest numl>er ol points, with the exception of the Seniors, of any
team 30 in all. I''in,n score 57-45.

The next game was a seesaw allair with the (uniors deleating the rrosh liy the close score of 47-45.

The lillli g.ime y the Sophs wluii they ileleatuil their great rixals, the I'Vosh.
with a 3(>-5() scoi'e. I h,'it same <\iiy the non-lunctioniiig liiiiiors lost their game to the Senior.-i liy a 55-lil
score.

On the next day the Seniors set up the high score for the series l)y deleating the I'rosh 73-4().

The jiMiiors again came into the lime-light when they romped home with a 35-31 victory Sojilis anil the next day they ilefeated the I'rosh l>y a score of 42-37.

In tlie next game the Seniors met their only defeat at the hands of the Sophs who held them to 35
pomts while they piled up 37 lor ihemseKes. This game somewhat reneweil interest in the league as
another Senior defeat wouhl have lied the league.

rhc final games proved very interesting. The I'rosh surprised evervliody liy winning their only victo-
ry l>y defeating the Sophs L'()-l.'5, and in the deciiling game of the series the Seniors ilefeated the I uniors 35-22



Seniors
Juniors
Sophs
I'^rosh



I'"iNAi. Stanuinc. ok I.eaguk
Won Lost



.883
.500
.500
.167



A briel summary ol the performance of the Senior team follows:



M. S.WDKRS
R. Ni-i:i.Y
T. RrssELi.
I. Sanders
E. Hanna
P. Beard
E. Borden



Posilii

P.
V.
C.
C.

C.
I-'.



Total
Toinls

61

70
52
43
51



I'ouls
Committeil



Foul

Shots



16



7
24





h'ouls
Made

3
6
2
3
8
2




VARSITY TRACK

In what was believed woulil lie a close meet, lielore the event, Ballioa walked away with the annual
Track and Field meet which was held at the Ballioa Stadium, on Saturday, .^l.irch 9.

Paul Heard. Cristobal siirint man and one of the best that pulled on a spiked shoe on the Isthmus,
establishetl a new mark of 5.4 in the 5()-varil dash. .'\ few minutes later he came back to tie his own record
of 9.9 in the 100 yd. ilasli.

Quir.tcro and Kromer were Balboa's outstanding men in the meet. Quintero tied the SSO yard run
of 2:16.6. lack Kromer. Captain of the Balboa team was high point man for the winners with firsts in the
broati jump and high jump and a third in the discus throw. Evers also scored heavily for Balboa winning
the shot put anti discus e\'ents.

Beard was the outstanding individual performer of the meet. In addition to his easy victories in the
50 and lOO-yard events, he was .inclior m.in on the winning relay team.

Bearil's 5.4 in the :')0-yd. dash not onlv beat the local school record by two tenths of a second but
equaled the national inter-.scholastic recoril.

Complete results ol the meet follow:



i(' i/i7rii liiLtli Time >.-/ .rec.


AVu' Record


Beard


(C)


Price


(B)


Poole


(B)


100 mrJ Jaih Tlme ').') sec.


Tied Record


Beard


(C)


Borden


(C)


Aloorc


(B)


220 uarJ dash Time 2) sec.




Rice


(B)


Borden


(C)


Lipzinski


(B)


SSO i/nrii run Time 2 min. 16.6 .rec. Tied Record


Quintero
Huff


(B)


(B)


Edwards


(B)



Aledley Retay Time i2.2 .rec.

Won bv Ballx)a. Winning team Poole,
Rice, I'errarl, iMoore.

SSO i/i7rd re/iiv Time 1 min. 42.3 .rec.

Won by Cristobal, Winning team,
Borden, Neely. Egozcue, Beard.




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57




Runiiiiui Broad Jump Di'lance 20/1. j\^ In.




Kromer


(B)


Gormerly


(B)


Egozcue


(C)


.S7/,)/ Pid -DiHancc ~^S Jf. 5 in




Evers


(B)


Leacli


(C)


Vincent


(B)


Riinnino Utah J ump- Hetiihl ;>


//. 4 in.


Kromer


(B)


Christian


(C)


ErlcUson


(B)


Discus ThroiC -Distance ^)4 jl.


'/ in.


Evers


(B)


Leach


(C)


Kromer


(Bl



INTERCLASS TRACK

This vear the Senior class repeated its victory ol last vear to run away with the meet even after the
other teams received a total ol 85 ponits in handicaps.

The Juniors were very poorly represented in the meet: the Freshmen had only two men to enter any
of the e\'ents: the Sojihomores were well representetl : as u'ere the Seniors.

No records were broUen but the returns were iairly gootl. Arthur Smith Ijroke the high jumji record
but because he was a Hxe year man his marU cannot be counted as a record.

Following is a summary of the results ol the meet in the order in which they took place. Haiulicajis
were given as follows: Frosh 35, Sophs 25, Juniors 25, Seniors O. The scoring was tabulated on a basis
ol lour places counting in which 1st 5 points, 2ntl 5 jioints, 5rd 2 points, 4th I point.

.S7;,./ I'ul Di.tlnnce 55' 11"

1. B. Leach Sr.

2. G. Marcuse Jr.

3. J. Hammond Sr.

4. R. Rule\ Soph.
Di.tcii.i- Tliroii' -Di.rliince 'ly' 5"

1. M. Duev Sr.

2. P. Beard Sr.

3. A. Refcofski Soph.

4. E Durham Jr.
Rttnnino Hrotiti .Jump Dislance V>' 4"

1. J. Martin -Frosh

2. J. Egozcue Sr.

3. W. Wood' Soph.

4. J. Houghton Soph.

Hi.ili .lump Ileliilil y It"

1. A. Smith -Sr.

2. C. Bath Sr.

3. J. Christian Soph.

4. E. Durham Jr.




5(' .1/


d. Do.rh -Time 5.H .tec.

1. E. Borden- -Sr.

2. E. Hanna- Sr.

3. \i. Asensio Sr.






4. \V. Scarborough


Frosh.


100


i/i/. D,}.r/i Time ll.j ,rec.

1. E. Borden Sr.

2. E. Hanna Sr.
.3. B. Asensio Sr.







4. W Scarborough


Frosh.


200


)/./. Dii.rli Time 22.1 .cec.

1. P. Beard Sr.

2. E. Borden- Sr.

3. A. Jacques Sr.

4. I. Clay- Soph.




1-2


,////( h'uii Time 2 min-41 .rer
1. W. Wood -Sopl


.




2. J. Christum So


ph.




3. J. Tara Sr.






4. J. Egozcue Sr.




H.SO


t/J. fWlttij Time 2 min 2 .ver.






!. Asensio, Egozcue, JacpK




2. Soph.






3. Juniors






4. No entry




440


i/.l. Heiwi Time 5 5 .renuul.r.






1. Ncely, J;ic|iu's,


Tara, M




2. Sophs.






3. Juniors.






4. No entry.




in,


// lUhl I'lfliil Si'iUe.






1 Seniors. 60


loiiits




2. Sophs. 48


xjints




3. I'rosh. 42


joints




4 Juniors 34


joints.



Hcanl -Sr



58



{".IKI.S' SPORTS
lif, Marn Rlh RUM

VOI.I.KY IJAI.I,

SiiiiutliiTig iK-u III till' w;iv 1)1 sports w.is iiiUlcil tills vcar. Tlic liilcTcliiss games wcTi- plavcil ln-liirc
varsilv piacliiv liigaii, I'll In- i-lc|^llili' lor varsitv a yirl liail to lie on liiT class team.

Intorclass jj;anK*s were lielil on Oetolier Iweiilv loiirtli in tlie gvni. The elasses were tll\iiletl into two
teams: I'leslimen anil juniors on one: Seniors anil Sophomores on the other. Two games were plavi'il
with the Seniors ami Snpliomiiies \ iilorlous in lioth, the siores lieiiig ()-^l anil N-21.

1' roin the stars partieipating in these games the varsitv was picked.

li.M.UOA vs. CRISTOH.M.

The series started in Cristolial where we took the lead. In the second set of games Crislolial was liadly
licatcn at M.illi'ia. The third set was plaveil in CrisloU;il, where oiilv one game was pl.ised. This game
was won liv liallui.i ihereliv giving her the series.

SCOUF.S

OaiK, I'i AVKll AT ll\lllil\ CiiivrniiAi.

1\ II

Nov. 10 II, 21

Cristohal ll> 21

Nov. 17 1!1 ir>

Ralhoa 21 8

:i 8

Nov. 24

Cristobal 21 II

This \ear lor tlie (list lime games were pla.vetl with the liinior College. This liroke (he monotonv ol
jilaving the s;inK' (e.im .ill the lime, .ind it Is hoped that this will hi.- contiiined In I'litnre vears.

SCORKS

DatK, Pl.AVKll AT Jl'NIOU Ct)l.r.K<;K CmsTOIlAl.

Oct. 27 21 14

Crislolial 2.'^ 21

Nov. 24 21 11

CristoUil 14 16

I.'. 12

Ciirls winning their letters in N'ollev IJall are: Marv Ann Carruthers. Ruth W ikingstad, Alaiv Kiilli

I^icdcl, Tlielma Purvis, Virginia Thomas, Blanche Howe, Gladys Pescod, and Jacqueline Briscoe.



?



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BASKETBALL

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Intcivlass liasketliall started with a "liang" this vcar. Almost all classes had very good turnouts.
The girls started practicing Decemlier 10. They carried on laithlully right through the Christmas holidays
and into January.

On lanuary the lirst game was iielil Itelween the Sophomores anil I'^reshmen, anil the linal score was
17-0 in lavor ol the Sophomores. In this game the Krcshmen put up a hard luit loosing light.

January 10, the play oil was helil lictween the L'pperclassmen and the victorious Sophomores. The
score of this game was 14 to 10. thus making the Sophomores the school champions.

Interschool liasUet liall began lanuary 10, In Cristolial. The llrst game was the closest of the series.
This was a well played anil hard lought game. The second game in Ballioa was a "walkaway" lor Ballioa:
while In the third, which was held in our gym, was a "|iush over" lor Cristolial.

Daii: Bai.iio\ CjdsTDiiAi. Pr.AYKi) at

Jan. 1') 2K 31 Crislolial

Jan. 2(> 50 12 Ballioa

Keli. 2 13 M Crislolial

Girls gelling letters m li.-tsket liall were: Olive ,\anstoos. Ruth \\*lklngstad, .^\arv .\nn Carruthers,
I lope llollowell, Doris Kliilon, and Bl.inche Howe.






59







G? PIN Ci ti Qf-^






Mo7o 5Hii"



fRoSH V-'- SofH^



^ /^^i\C ^^>/i I




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1\^



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QaM% CVo-i>H(=



fog Wi\ ft -^\WUY Goal FfLLW.-






ftufAo/Tr




60









61



IN APPRECIATION TO OUR
ADVERTISERS




|E wish to extend t)ur
most sincere thanks to
those individuals and
firms who ha\c contri-
buted so greatlv toward ma-
king our annual a success.

\\\* want also tor the readers
to realize that without the aid
ot these people "The Caribbean"
would not have been possible.
So when you intend to purchase
something patronize our ad^"er-
tisers.



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THE PANAMA HOSPITAL



PANAMA CITY, R.e/^I'



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62




FOLLOW THE REST



GET ACCi:STC)MED TO THE BEST



Chesterfield

They Satisfy!



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CO.Wl'LliWLNTS



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OI IHh



National Mattress
Factory



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loin: I'm- iliaiiiii'il my miiul.
/)///. I" nil.'. 1 liopu this one works.

.\ ci\'oti.f Pii.r.irnt/i'r (on maiden I light):
I l-licic- l-l-tell me when you're going
(() lii(i|i-llie Ioo|5 again.

I'ilol: Well, I don't al\\a3'S know.

Where's voin- hrother, Johnnie?
Ic'limiif: Aw he's in ihe hou.se piaving
a liuet. I linished w\\ jiart first.



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"George", saiil the teachi'r, "is there
any connecting link between the animal
and vcgetalile kingdoms.'"

"^ es, ma am. said George promptly
"hash!"

Sailor (on lookout duty): llello,
oificer.

Officer: What's the matter'.' What do
you see?

Sailor: There's something aii''ail. sir,
apti it has red and green lights. I think
it must be a drug store.



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BEFORE BUYING

YOLIR

PANAMA HATS

AIGRETTES o^/cT SOUVENIRS

Visit our Store where you will find the
Lowest Prices in Town

FRONT STREET, COLON NO. 57



FRANCISCO F. LOBATO
MONEY EXCHANGE



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1



Compliments of



Q'he Sdmdritdn Hospitd



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63



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Two Bottles

of

Distinction




(huade



GINGER Al



Just The Thing 'To Celeb/'iite Those
G radii ati)t^ Paftiesf



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The Panama Coca-Cola Bottling Company |

PANAMA ^ COLON



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Lnu'i/er. Where were you on the night
of January 17?

Lu/pril. With a couple of friends.

Lawiier. Thieves, probably?

Culprit. Yes, they are la\\yers, both
of them.



Ill': Would you like to go to the school
play?

She: I'd lo\e to.

lie: \\'ell, be sure to buy your ticket
irom me.



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Antonio Tagaropulos fi




WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
GROCER




Main Stork :

12,176 Bol.lVAH AVKNUE

Phonic 499.



Branch Stores:

6,07.') HoMVAR AvicNUE. Phonk 429
4,011 9x11. Strket, PnoNp.; 616
2,026 Poi.ivAR Strekt, 699

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LUCKY STRIKE



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TUNG HING

GENF.RAi. 1 \.\CY GOODS



CORNER Oiii. AND BOLIVAR
STREETS



;)/o



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I P.O. Box 554 Td.

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p. O. Bex 554

COLON, R. p.



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lollnr: Son, wliv arc you so far
liL'liinci ill vdur sdulics?

i.S"f)/i,' So llial I niav pursin.' (Iirm,
lather.



////. W'lial liavc you gol in (lie l)ag?
loin: .^larl>lcs if you guess liow
maiiv I II mve v


Don (lo reporter). Young man, yuii
can put It in your paper tliai my secret
of health and long life is to eat some
garlic every day.

Rep. Why do you refer to it as a
secret?



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% J. V. BEVERHOUDT



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COLON, k. p.
Phone 77



R.C.A. Victor Radios Kodaks
Hcad(]uarters for Sporting Goods
Pool rallies, and Billiartl Supplies



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Y)resses and Hats
from Paris

ARBOIX

ANTON lO'S

I'runt ami Utli. .Streets
COLON, R. p.



I lami I'.nihroidcrcd lumens.

Knjiiish Luggage Hand FJags.

Pans Noxelties.



PERFUMERY



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F/iOSff. SOP ft SCRAP










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scHooc e^s






66



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C. CASULLO

JEWKLLER
WATCHMAKER

p. O, BOX 615



Phone 225
:ristobai.. c.y.



9.036 Front Si.
COLON. K. P.

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Kodak Panama I

LTD. i

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OFFKRS A CO.Ml'LETE x

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LINK OF S



KODAK

PRODUCTS



KODAK PANAMA L'"

1 I 1 Central Avenue

PANAMA err Y



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/'. I'lccid. I )ai'ling, 1 ilmil (liiiik voii
mijrlit (<) give meals l<> all (lie tr itnp.-.
wii'-n (Ivv call here.

" liithhiv" I kiiiiu l)ut _vi>ii kii().\ i( is
such a great satisfaction to me to see a
man eat a meal vvithout lindiiig fault
V. ilh the cooking.



.Iiinlic: W'iiicli one oC you children
ate those grapes I had in the cuphoard?
No use dei\ving it I saw tile seeds and
sknis on the lioor.

U illic: It wasn't mi-, ,\untie, cause
I aie the seeds, skins and all.



Dori.f K. front ciij/. Is I his a rest I id
place'.'

Art//iv. W (-ll. it useil to l)e, lielore so
many city people began coming here for
a rest.



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COMPLIMENTS OF |

C B. FENTON & COMPANY, Inc.



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CRISTOBAL, C. Z.

Phone Cristcbal 1781



BALBOA, C.Z.

Phone Balboa 1066



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I The American Federation of Labor |



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HE American Federattqn of Labor has been improving

WORKING CONDITIONS THROUGHOUT THE COUNTRY FOR MORE



THAN FIFTY YEARS AND IS STILL STRIVING CONSTANTLY TO SECURE
ADEQUATE LABOR LAWS, INCREASED COMPENSATION, AND MORE
FAVORABLE WORKING CONDITIONS. EACH AND EVERY WAGE EARN-
ER SHOULD BECOME A MEMBER OF THIS GREAT ORGANIZATION
WHICH IS CEASELESSLY STRIVING TO SECURE BETTER WORKING
CONDITIONS FOR OUR MILLIONS OF WAGE EARNERS.



COMPLIMENTS OF

METAL TRADES COUNCIL

CANAL ZONE



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You're s<; lazy vou won't laugh a\ hen
you hear a funn^' ;oke.

Huh, that's nothin. You're so dog-
goned lazy that you won't ache when you
have a pain.



Jlr. Hackell. What makes you (hink
they had cars m 1492 Ifoward'.'

Iloii'iird. Well I read where Colomhus
went 2,000 miles on a Galleon.



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COMPLIMENTS OF

MAX BILGRAY



v.v.v.v.Kv:y.v.y.v.v.v.v.y.v

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Margarita Beauty
S h o p p e

Margaret J. Wiu,

i^ermanent Waving Our Specialty

WE MAKE YOU
MORE LOVELY



Corner 8tK &'"G" St8.
Phone 169



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yMy.yMy/y/yMyry/y/y/y/jiVMy/y/AyMy.yMyMy/jf/yrAyrAy.Ky.



New Cribtobal
COLON. R, P.



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.///'. I'lank.f. llo,\ did you come (o
iiiakr ihis hoys' paper 101%. Don't
vou know that nolhinii can lie more
p_-rfect than 100%.

.Ui.t.r (Jiiinii. Yl'h, l)ul tins hoy ans-
i\ereil one (|iieslion we did not ask.



b8



IMPROVED EQUIPMENT



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MODERN METHODS x



EFFICIENT SERVICE



JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY

Broadway, near Folks River
COLON. R. P.



PHONE
COLON, 21



CRISTOBAL, C.
P O. BOX 506 J



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Wishin g the Gr aduates

All Success Through Life

ELITE



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//c,v. Silvia's luisl)an(J has been a siif-
f'cri.T for VL-ars, liasn't he?

AW. I don't knoi\. I in a long have
tliev l)ccn niarricci.



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The Chinese Silk Store

NEW CHINA

Wc carry Genuine Chinese and
Japanese SILKS and Curiosities.

LINKNS
SILK MATERIALS

SHAWLS

CARVED IVORY

WICKER FURNITURE

VASES

PERFUMES

JEWELRY



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FRONT STREET

COLON



CENTRAL AVE.

PANAMA



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:xx>:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx::xxxxxyxxxxxx>



(Cnmplimrnta of

Sr. Urni Jlrirr



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Portraits

Miniatures

Enlargements

Flashlights

Commercial
Photographs

of all types.

Architectural

Legal

Banquets,

Large Groups, etc.



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New Pictures b



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FOR REMEMBRANCE

Your portrait ot today will be just as
priceless in years to come, will recall
happy memories just as vividly as do
those wonderful photographs of by-
gone days. Make an appointment
lor a new portrait today.

FINLAYSON'S STUDIO

7.018 FRONT ST. COLON, R. P.

PHONE 9



\\'hen buying Photographs look for this emblem.
The Photographers' International Association of
America stands for good craftsmanship and bet-
ter business principles.




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.A^..:^.,:^..



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Guest: Look here, hin\ long do I
have to wait for that half-portion of
duck I ordered?

IVailer: Till somebody else orders
the other half, sir; we can't go out antl
shoot half a duck!



Saklni (to Ruth M.) The stork thai
brought you sh(iul(r\e been arrested for
smuggling tlope.



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POK Wedding Invitations, Visit-
ing and Business Cards, Christ-
mas Cards, Seasonal and Business
Stationery,

Dove L. Prather

1405-C Carr St.



X



Telephone:
Dfilbou 2780



P. O. Box 514
Balboii, C. Z.



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Before eye-strain wrinkles become
permanent and nervous fatigue
becomes chronic, have your
eyes examined. If you need
glasses, you will be sur-
prised to find what a
comfort they are
when accurately
and becomi.igly
fitted to
YOU



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H.



a-ve you)- eyes examined



SCADRONnPTICALp
PANAMA 1 1;^;:-,;-;:::; I
23 Central I 0,.il..s. I
Avenue \^ New York \^



I



COLON

|9.034 Frocit

Slreet



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70,



xxknxxxx:-:xhxxxxx:-::-:x:-:hk:-:x:-::-:k>::-:xxxxxx:-:x>:x:-:x:-:xxv:-:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:-:x:-:xxx

I UNITED FRUIT COMPANY J

I GREAT WHITE FLEET |

S FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER STEAMERS i-i

X X

X NEW YORK WRPk-r V SAIT I\]r'^ TO KINGSTON' x

X NEW ORLEANS WEEkLY SAILINGS TO: i.QS ANGELES |

X SAN FRANCLSCO PTO. COLOMiilA x

X PORT LIMON SANTA iMARIA ;:

X CARTAGENA TELA HAVANA x

X X

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

.IJi.f.r I.ilt'r. Tlicv claim that i\hLTi
women atloptcil shorter skirls it rcihiccil
the numl)fr ol strrct car accidents ;i()
per cepi.

./iiniii.r llcnni. WoiiUhi'l it h- tine
it such accidents could bj prevented
entirely?



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X COMPLIMENTS OF x

9 X

^ Bureau o/' Clubs &" Playgrounds |

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X Recreation. Entertainment x

S /- X

g t2//a 5J

X Subsistence. x
xxxxxxx.xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Dip. Waiter, its' l)een Iialf an hour
since I ordered that turtle soup.

Dap (Waiter). Yes, hut vou knoA
how turtle's are.



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c?4 .


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jj WEEKVX SAILINGS Ti ) X

E KINGSTON PORT-AU-PRINCE NEW YORK

X Jamaica Haiti New York x

X X

X Luxurious, Comfortable, Fast Passenger E>:press Steamers x

JJ Excellent Cuisine g

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71



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crLe

Stancldrd Fruit &. Steams

Companij



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Vaccaro Line

IDish evevi] success to the Qraduatina
Class of 1935. -



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.///'. Sei/er. Now, have you learnetl
enough about the art ot seltclefense for
one clay'.'

"Ahe" /Inder-wn (very much mauled)
I should say I have and I uouki
like to ask If I can take the rest of the
lessons bv mail.



Tick. Why don't you get an aleinist
to examine your son?

lock. No, sir. An American doctor
is good enough lor me.



I'ir.'i Cln.r.f Scout: Name four animals
belonging to the cat family.

Tenderfoot: The father cat, the mo-
ther cat, and the two little kittenr.



M in.rtrel (with poor voice): I ivish
I were in Di.xie.

Guest: I ha\e no objections.



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" Cobl.. Address -IMPCO- P: O. Box 342. COLON. R P

ABC. 5ih. & IHh. Edition



Colon Import ^Export Company, Ltd.

JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS



DEALERS IN GENERAL MERCHANDISE a.^/^^^NAT'.VE PRODUCE

Colon Republic of Pfinuina

Branch Retail Stores
o//^/ Trading Stations

;xxxxxxxxxxx:-xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx



PLAYA DAMA
SANTA ISABEL



PORVENIR

PIIILIE

ISLES Ol- PINES



CARTI

NARGANA



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Cn.\\I>|.|.\lK.\TS OF

The Carlton Hot



EL



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XXX



Fir.f/ Sliiiicnl: 1 dropped Solid Cico-
metrv.

Second Sltnifiil: Make much noise?



Second Clii.r.r: There is tine (jiieer
thiny .ilxuil a ship.

S,-,] Seoul: W'liat is it?

Second Cla.f.t: Well, tiie time to lei!
htm many knots she can make is when
she isn't tieil up.



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Inocencio Lralindo, Jr.

7th and Bolivar Streets

COLON



JOBBER AND COMMISSION
MKRCIIAXT



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RKAL F.ST.VTH liROKKR

AND

A G K X 1



R.P.



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Salazar s Drug Store

COLON,



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9,038

Front Street
Phone 336



11,160

Bolivar Street
Phone 35



B. Beers (Proposing). Thcv sav tiiat
ihat when people live together they get
to look like each other.

/,. Porter. In that case von can consider
mv refusal final.



A young lady was seeing her first
laseball game. She saiii, "Isn't that
pitcher great? lie hits their hats no
matter where thev iiolil them!"



Teacher: Tommy, translate "Re.\
Fugit."

Tomnui: The King flees.

Teacher: \ ou should use "has" in
translating the perfect tense.

I omnui: 'fhe king has fleas.



(CnmpltmpntB of



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:xxxxx:



4^



$bix &.




xxxxxx

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Xil: I Fou do the freslimcn Ueep
those Dinky Little Caps on?

//'//. \'acuum beneath holds 'em.

A i\y WAS walking with her daught-
er over the head of a very bald man.

"IJoi\ things change, vay dear," she
.said. "When I was your age this was
only a foot-path.



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COMPLIMENTS OF



Bestfit



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EZ Corte Ingles

LINEN AND WOOLEN
SUITS



COLON
PANAMA



KINGSTON
CURACAO



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74



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B xMjIK/ X

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?? Compania Panamena de Fuerza y Luz %

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i$ PANAMA COLON S



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Il i( wci'i' mil loi' (Ins liiili' viTS".

I lurr (I In- ,1 idkc llcrr. Iin limes ;////,, v i i
^^|.^^^. ''' llarkcll. Aoa, Jaiiius, lake the
glol).' and piiinl out Australia.

Q n-ii T 1 I r I II (James does so).
>)ay, nill, il vou had \\\v dcillars in

\()nr pocket, ulial uoiiid \cui lliinli'.' Now, Jack. i\ Ik ) discovered .Australia?

HiH: I'd lliink I had simv (ichcr Jack I, on ih |inini\' did.
lellort s pants on.



^:XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXKX

i oAv MOUDRY'S FLOWER SHOP ,,cht I

X PHONE COLON 311 Mrs. ESTELLA MOUDRY PHONE GAT. 345 S

X 'i* g

g Oldest Reliable Atlantic Side Florist 5



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p. O. Box 225, Gatun X

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X Member F.T.D. Association X

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X FUNERAL DESIGNS

S WEDDING BOUQUETS COLON R de P FLOWERS AND g

5 STE\MER BOUQUETS ^, J c DECORATIONS X

X HOSPITAL BOUQUETS '"' '"'"'^ '"'^""'^ ^"- FOR ALL OCCASIONS 5

X '^

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5 (InmjilimriitH iif x

§ X

g D. Ifl. Dirkrrfiuii. D. D. ^. ?c

E £. H- (Crnml. D.D.g-. \

X 11. t- IflnrriH, D.g.g-. x

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xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxKXKj.rxxxxxxKr-c-xxKXKx:': ;::::: xxxxxxxxx;-:kkxx:-:xxxxxx:-:xx:-:xxxx:-:x>:x:-



The Panama Railroad

ancf

Panama Railroad Steamship Line



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,///. Ilackell (To applicant for jt)!))
Can vou ante shorthand?

Ilo^'.'iird 11. Yes sir but it takes me
longer.

]). Jliir.rlhill 1 didn't sec you in churcli
Sunday.

.//. DiK'i/ I presume nn( ; 1 (ook up
the collection.

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(CnmpUutrutH at"
llrruirp Hiolpt iMiinJjg

BEAUTICIAN



New Aj'si.'iani: No, madam, we
haven't had any for some time.

Jealous Jlanager (overhearing): (Mi.
yes we have it, madam; I will just go
into the warehouse and find it for you.
(Aside to Assistant): Never refuse
anything, semi out for it!

//.! the lady iir/;/ out laui/hini/ the luana-
(](! demanded: "What did she say?

A.r.rirlanl: She said \\c haven' ihatl
anv rain latelv.



"Boohoo! Boohoo! wailetl little
Jolinny.

"Why, what's the matter, dear?" his
mother asked comfortingly.

"Boohoo ei p-picture fell on papa's
toes."

"Well dear, that's too had, hut you
mustn't cry ahout il, yiui knou, said
the mother.

"I didn't, ivailed Johnny. "I laughetl
lioohoo! Boohoo!



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77



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Gittens &'' Taylor

FOR C^V)

Exclusive Suitings

Careful Tailoring



lOth Street Coloi.



Telephone 291



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Julie H. I wouldn't marry the best
man on earth.

Junior If. All right. Ihen take me
anil voii won't be runnint; any risk.



.///. t'rafik.'-. \\'hal line 1.I0 you e.\p 'ct
\'(Uir l)oy to go into?

.///'. lIoui]l)lo-i. I've decitleci (o make
a la.Nver of him. He just likes (o get
into a quarrol and mix in oth"r people's
business, and I figure he may as well
get paitl for it.



The Nag: You're going lo drive me
out of my mind.

The ^ark: That ain't no drive, my
dear, that's a putt.



Cigarelle Jlan (to purchaser of cigaret-
tes). Before I agree to your terms I'll
see vou in (hale)



.Ur. Sii/iiii,:-ki. There is nothing so
bad as wasted talent, is there?

J/r. Jejjrles. No For instance, just
suppose we could organize all the cut-
worms and use them as lawnmowers.

Judfle: Was your friend in the habit
of talking to himself?

JT'ilne.f.f: To tell the truth. Judge,
I never was with him when he was
alone.



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HOTEL TIVOLI

A comfortable restful Hotel, ideally located with magnificent view

of the Pacific ocean.



The center of social life, close to every point of interest
on the Pacific side of the Canal Zone.



WM. T. McCORMACK

Mtinjger



P. O. ADDRESS;
ANCON. CANAL ZONE



78



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Hotel IPdshington

Unequaled for Silualion and Comjorl



COLON. R. P.



A Hotel in keeping luith the diqnilg, spirit and seruice
of the Panamd Canal.



Qolf Siuimminq lUdter Sports
QTdrpon Fishinij

criie IJear Jlround



JAMES t LEMS



P.O. Address;

CRISTOBAL. CANAL 70NE



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/.!/ Sti/iii()n: I suppose you arc going
East this summer'.'

2 lui Salmon : I'll go Hast it I can.



I'm getting tliin, saiil .^Irs. I'isii, I lose
a pound a day.

You don't fool me, her papouse replied
Your scales give you aweigh!



"Pal, I wish I knew where 1 will be
when I am liomii (o tlie, said .^like.

'Why'.'" askcxrPat.

"Because," replied Mike, "I woukl
never go there."

The president of the local gas company
was making a stirring address.

"Think of the good the gas company
has done," he cried. "If I were permitted
a pun, I should sav, 'honor the Liuht
Brigade."

.\n(l a customer immeiliately shouted.
"Oh what a charge lliey made."



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Mens Sano In Q^.orporc Sano

Fiat More Sun-Maid
Raisin Bread

The French Bakery

Bolivar Avenue, 8,105
Phone 346
COLON, R. P.



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ALWAYS REMEMBER

A man is judjjed in life

by two things. His friends

and His clothes.

Tlie American Bazaar

HABERDASHERS & TAILORS
TO MEX OF GOOD TASTE.

IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX



79



Autugraph Jlagr



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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093680/00022
 Material Information
Title: Caribbean
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Cristobal High School
Publisher: Yearbook House
Place of Publication: Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date: 1935
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00093680:00022

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Foreword
        Page 1
    Dedication
        Page 2
    Faculty
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Seniors
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Juniors
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Sophomores
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Freshmen
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Activities
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    School notes
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Alumni
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Sports
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Advertising
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Back Cover
        Page 81
        Page 82
Full Text






















Foreword

THE Caribbean Staff of 1935
presents this year's Annual
to the student body, the
faculty and the general public
with the hope that it will re-
fresh the memories of those con-
cerned of the happy days spent
in school.


































Dedication

ilJ.xj E, the Class of 1935, dedicate this,
the eighteenth edition of "The Ca-
I |ribbean, to our advisor. We hope
!, that it will be a suitable way of
''' showing our untold appreciation
to him who devoted his time to the inte-
rests of the class.
MR. HARRY FRINGER



























C. H. S. FACULTY


C. H. S. has at its head a principal
who has done very much for our school
and has made it a school from which rwe
are very proud to graduate. The fact
that the Student Association has been
such a great success is due to Mr. Frank's
strenuous efforts to make us realize what
a real high school needs, "school spirit."
The Language Departments, French,
Latin, and Spanish are prospering under
the teachings of Mrs. Phyllis Sp ncer and
Miss Mary E. Moore. Mrs. Spencer also
sponsors the Junior-Senior Dramatic
Club, the National Thespians, and the
Spanish Club. Miss Moore, in addition
to supervising the mimeograph depart-
ment of the Trade Wind, was also the
supervisor of the Carnival.
Miss Patterson, -ho is at the head of
the three commercial classes, is also the
chairman of the assembly committee.
The assemblies have shoan great im-
provement this year under her guidance.
Although this is only Miss Liter's
second year with us, as English teacher,
the students are very fond of her, and
they do not seem to mind the contracts
that she assigns so freely.
Miss BrowAn, who teaches Freshmen
and Sophomore English, has also under-
taken the difficult tasks of handling
the library, and she has had great success
in accomplishing her purpose.
Mr. Meyer, in addition to teaching
his elementary and advanced mathema-
tics classes, is sponsoring the Junior
class this year and is also sponsoring the
Caribbean.
The Household Arts Department this
year has been under the guidance of
Miss Ferne Bowman. The cafeteria has
been a success this year again, due to
her capability and efficiency.
Not only does Mr. Vinton, our science


teacher, turn out great scientists, but
also A-I athletes. He has been very
successful in arousing the spirit of the
boys when it comes to athletics.
This year, instead of "charts and
maps", Mr. Hackett's favorite pass word
is "notebooks are due such-and-such a
date." But the students themselves have
to admit that when one finishes one
of Mr. Hackett's subjects, they knowv
"lots" more on going out than when they
entered the class -he sees to that. Mr.
Hackett also sponsors the "Trade Wind."
Miss Bailey and Miss Smart should
be given much credit for turning out
some very good athletes as well as lim-
bering the girls up by the point system
that they have put into effect this year
concerning the ,work of the girls.
The High School Orchestra, the Boys'
Glee Club, and the Girls' Glee Club have
proven to be very successful this year,
but it was only because of Miss Elner's
co-operation and hard ,york that pushed
them on to victory.
Mr. Seller seems to be working the
boys quite hard this year, but maybe
that's what they need. Regardless of what
is said, most of the boys seem to enjoy
doing such hard work (as some call it).
In Mr. Fringer's departments, we
find that instead of Mr. Fringer handling
all 3 departments alone, he has an assis-
tant, Mr. Siminski, who is new this year.
The departments under the management
of these men, are prospering very well.
Mr. Fringer is also the sponsor of the
Senior class. Mr Siminski is the Spon-
sor of the Sophomore class.
Our other mathematics and science
professor is Mr. Miller who teaches
Algebra 9 and General Science. He is
also the advisor of the Photo Club and
the Chairman of the Student Council.


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.,lnaHe--OSEPH BERTRAM ASENSIO
Through Our Eye.r-A merry heart doeth good like medicine
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-October, 1922
Birthplace-Plainsfield, New Jersey.
.Ilti,'iie. -Varsity Club 4; Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club 4;
Track 4; Band 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Carnival
Committee 4; B. A. A. 1, 2.









Xale--MARGARET E. BARNARD
Through Our IK)/e-A peppy little piece of humanity.
Date Entered C. Z. Schoolr-September, 1922.
Birthplace-Brooklyn, N. Y.
.Ictiitie.r-Glee Club 1, 2; National Thespians 3, 4;
Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club 3;
Caribbean Staff 2, 3, 4; Extra 3; Student Council 4;
Happy Landings 3.









Name-PAUL R. BEARD
ThrouIIh Our Fve,--Could swell the soul to rage or kindle
soft desire.
Dale Entered C. Z. Schools-October, 1933.
Birthplace-Norfolk, Virginia.
.Iliriiie.r-Student Council 3; Varsity Club 3, 4; Track
3, 4, Basketball 3, 4. Baseball 3, 4; Carnival Com-
mittee 3, 4.








.Vane-- W'II.rIAM HOWARD BEERS
Tlhrai;hl Our (ve---The heart to conceive, the understan-
ding to direct, or the hand to execute.
Dale A.ilered C. Z. School -October 1922.
Birthplare Blirmingham, Alabama
Jriiilie. Trade Wind, Editor 3; Glee Club 1; La
Pas 2, 3. 4; B. A. A. 1, 2, President 3; Vice-President
S. A. and Student Council 3. Red Headed Step-
Child 4. Soul of Anne Rutledge 4; Carnival Com-
mittee 3, 4.















.Vmne CLAi'DF E. EBi-i;cie:
Thllrugh Our 'i/e.r Wise to resolve and patient to per-
tornm.
Date Fnlered C. Z. School,. -October, 1921
BI i/,, Norfolk, Va.
.kcliilie. Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 2, 3: Baseball
Manager 4; Soccer Manager 4.









.ame-J. EDGAR BORDEN
Through Our I./e,r An honest man's the noblest work of
God.
Date Entered C. Z. School/--September, 1926.
Birthplace Panama, R. de P.
.Illic'ilie.r-Baseball Manager 3; Basketball Manager 3;
Varsity 4: Soccer Manager 3: Track 2, 3, 4; Car-
nival 3, 4: Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club 3, 4; Editor 4:
Glee Club 2; Band 2: Orchestra 2: "The Soul of
Ann Rutledge" 4.









rame-M-ARYi ANN CARRUTHERS.
Thlroiugh Our ],i1/e.--With eyes that looked into the very
soul.
Dale Elntered C Z. Shool- October, 1928.
Birthplace -Corsicana, Texas.
.Icliitie.r Varsity Club 2, 3, 4: Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club
3; A. D. T. 2: G. A. A. 2; Basketball 2, 3, 4;
Volley Ball 2, 3, 4; Baseball 2. 4: Tennis 2, 4;
Bowling 2, 3, 4; Photo Club 4: Science Club 4;
Supper Club 2. 3, 4: Treasurer 4.










X.tne-RALPt LESTER DAvis
Through Our Eye,r-Better to die a thousand deaths than
wound my honor.
Dale enteredd C. Z. School.r October, 1922
Birthplace-Cristobal, C. Z.
.ctliit.ie. -Trade Wind 3: Glee Club 1: Caribbean
Staff4; Photo Club 3. 4; Science Club 4; F3, club
2; B. A. A. 1, 2; Tr;ade Wind Staff S.


n
















Name-LETA DEAKINS
Through Our Ey'es--Play up, play up, and play the game.
Date Entered C. Z. Schoolr-September, 1923.
Birthplace-St. Joseph, Missouri.
.Jctlilite,r-Glee Club 2; Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club 3, 4;
Orchestra 1; "The Soul of Anne Rutledge 4: Trade
Wind 3, 4.











Namne-GuY W. DE BARDELEBEN
Through Our Eve.r-Be silent and safe-silence never
betrays you.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-January, 1935.
Birthplace-Macon, Georgia.













Name-WILLIAM E. DOUGHERTY
Through Our Eyver-Who knows nothing base, fears
nothing known.
Dale Entered C. Z. Schoot--November, 1932.
Birthplace-Philadelphia, Pa.
cltiitier-Debate Club 3; Varsity Club 3, 4; Soccer
3. 4; Track 3; Trade Wind 4.










Name--M .ALCOM P. DuEy
Through Our E1/er--Do well and right, and let the world
sink.
Dale Enlered C. Z. Shrool .r-October, 1921.
Birthplate- Miami, Fla.
rli,,ilie.r--Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Carnival 4; Chairman
5; Golf 1: B. A. 1, 2; Track 3, 4; Soccer 5,
2; Swimming 1.


---3C-'





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.aNie DIoIto'ii y RrTII DUNN
Throiuii Our I'l/e. A maiden never bold in spirit, still
and quiet.
Dale Entered C. Z. S/hool.--October, 1923.
Birlhplace Starkville, Mass.
Jcli.ilies La Pas. 2, 3, 4: Supper Club 1, 2, 3., 4; (lee
Club 1, 2.









.Valne -JOHN \\. DWYER
Through Our vl/e.r -Cnurteous he was andl willing to be
of service.
Dale Enlered C. Z. Sc/iool.rOctober, 1921.
Birthplace Boston, Mass.
Aclrlnilier-- Debate Club 3; La Pas 4; Trade Wind 4;
Interclass Baseball, Soccer. Basketball 3, 4.









Name-JACK B. EGOZCUE.
Through Our E ,es-Music is well said to be the speech of
angels.
Dale Enlered C. Z. Schools--October, 1922.
Birthplace-Cristobal, C. Z.
,-lri.,itie.r-Track 4: Tennis 3, 4; Caribbean Staff 1, 2, 4;
B, A. A. 1, 2; Carnival Committee 3, 4; Trade Wind
3., 4.









.Vame- -ElILEEN FORD
Throu.qh Our E1i/e.r-Right brisk was she, and full of spirit.
Dale Enitered C. Z. Schoolsr-September. 1932.
Birthplace -Laredo, Texas.
,-r'I ilie'"--Varsity Club 2, 3. 4; Art Club 2, 3: Baseball
2; Voll.y ball 3; La Pas 3, 4.


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Xat'e--KATHLEEN MARIE GOODENOUGH
Through Our Eye.r-She smiled and the shadows departed.
S Dale Entered C. Z. School--September, 1930.
Birthplace-Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
ctivilie.r-Glee Club 1, 2; Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Jr.
Sr. Dramatic Club 3; F3 Club 1, 2; "Red Headed
Stepchild" 4. Class Treasurer 3; Caribbean Staff
S2, 3, 4; Trade wind 3; Happy Landings 3.










-Namee-PAUL R. GREGORY.
Through Our Eye--The force of his own merit makes his
way.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-October 1923.
Birthplace-Cheney, Kansas
Aclvitiepr--Glee Club 1, 2; Science Club 4; Photo Club 3.












Name-JOHN R. HAMMOND.
Through Our Eyes-And gladly would he learn, and gladly
teach.
Date Entered C. Z. Schoolr-October, 1922.
F Birthplace-Cristobal, C. Z.
IActivities-Orchestra 1, 2; La Pas 2, 4; Trade Wind 4;
Track 4; Carnival Committee 4; F3 1.









Name-EDWIN HANNA
Through Our Evee-I profess not talking, only this: let
each man do his best.
Dale Entered C. Z. School--October, 1932.
Birthplace-New York, N. Y.
lActliilies-Varsity Club 3, 4; Vice President 4; Track
3, Manager 4; Baseball 4; Soccer 3, 4; Carnival
Committee 3, 4: Trade Wind. 3; Basketball 3,
Manager 4;













Name-CHARLES F. HEI.M.
Through Our Eie.--A true friend, and a real sport.
Dale Entered C. Z. School November, 1923
Birthplace-Latania, Ky.
,fIliitie.r -Glee Club 2; Publicity Chairman 4; Carnival
Committee 3, 4; Varsity Club 3; Cheer Leader
1, 2, 3, 4; B. A. A. 1, 2. Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club 3, 4.











.ame-MARGARETE ETH IEL HOLLINSHIEAD
Through Our E'es--Still climbing after knowledge infinite.
Date Entered C. Z. School lr-April, 1931.
Birthplace-San Francisco, Cal.
,lctivitie--La Pas 3, 4; Trade Wind 3; Caribbean
Staff 1, 2. 3, 4; Class Secretary 4.












Xame-JANE ISABEL HUNTOON
Through Our Eyve.-With heart and hand both open and
free.
Date Entered C. Z. School.r-October, 1926.
Birthplace-Ancon C. Z.
,Aclivilte. -Supper Club 1, 2.










Name-ALLEN JACQUES
Through Our Ees--High erected thoughts seated in a
heart of courtesy.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-October, 1922.
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
,ctivilies-Debate Club 1, 2, 3; Science Club 1; Vice
President 4; Carnival Committee 4; Trade Wind
4; Caribbean Staff 4.


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Name-ROBERT W. KING.
Through Our yev--Patience is a necessary ingredient of
genius.
Date Entered C. Z. Schoolr-October, 1922
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
cltivitie.r-Trade Wind 3, 4; Varsity Club 3, 4; Baseball
3, 4; "The Soul of Anne Rutledge 3, 4; Carnival
3, 4; B. A. A. 1, 2.









Name-GEORGE V. LANE.
Through Our Eyes-He is a man; take him all for all.
Date Entered C. Z. Schoola-October, 1934
Birthplace-Charleston, S. C.
Ictivities-Red Headed Stepchild 4; Student Council 4;
Trade Wind 4; Interclass Track 4.












Name-MILDRED FRANCES LEACH
Through Our Eve,--A cheerful life is what the muses love,
a soaring spirit is their prime delight.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-September, 1934.
Birthplace-Portsmouth, Va.
lcti,,itie,-Trade Wind 4.










Name-URIAI. H. LEACH.
Through Our Eves-A happy soul that all the way to
heaven hath a summer's day.
Date Entered C. Z. School.--Sept., 1934.
Birthplace--Portsmouth, Va.
Activities -Track 4; Varsity Club 4; Carnival Committe 4.













.Vane JOHN AVilERY LONG
Through Our Eyc.e As mer\r as the day is long.
Date En/crd C. Z. Schools -October, 1927.
Birthplace -Panlama, R. de P.
.Jtli'itic.r-Science Club 3; Orchestra I: (Glee Club
1, 2; interclass soccer I.












.Vane- AVII) BOYD M1ARSIIALI.
Through Our E'e.-r-Happy am 1; from care I'mln ree!
Whyv aren't they all contented like me?
Dalc Entlered C. Z. S'chool.r-September, 1929
Bir/hpl'ice Cristobal. C. Z.














.\ame-RAM.ON B. NMoCYNE
Through Our EIves-Life is not life at all witliout delight.
Date Entered C. Z. School,-September, 1933.
Birthplace-Panama, R. de P.
Lctil.'iie.r-Interclass Basketball 4; Photo Club 4.












ante-ELINOR MCULIANE
Through Our ALEyr-Full of sweet iindiffcrencc.
Dale Enlered C. Z. School -October, 1922.
Birthplace-Colon, R. de P.
,Icli'itier-Glee Club 1. 2, 3: Supper Club 2. 3: Jr. Sr.
Dramatic Club 3; Trade Wind 3; "Red Headed
Stepchild" 4; G. A. 1. 2; La Pas 4.


OMI













Xame-ROBERT IAMES NEELY
Through Our Eyer--Turning to mirth, all things of earth,
as only boy-hood can.
Date Entered C. Z. Schoolf--September, 1922.
Birthplace-Germantown Pa.
,Iclilitie.-Trade Wind 3; Glee Clubs 2, 3; Photo 1Club
3; Baseball2,3,4; Sorcer 3, 4; Track 4; Swimming
3; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4 Secretary 3; Carnival
3.4.












Name-DOLORES PALMER
Through Our Eye--Thou who hast the fatal gift of Beauty
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-February, 1935.
Birthplace-Yorktown, Va.










Vamne-JOHN A. PALM.
Through Our Eyes-A man of hope and forward-looking
mind.
Date Entered C.'Z. Schools-October, 1922.
Birhplace-Cristobal, C. Z.
lIctivities-Orchestra 3; Debate Club 3; Caribbean
Staff, 3; Editor in Chief 4 Inter class Soccer and
Baseball 3, 4.










Name -ROBsERT G. PETERSON
Through Our IEes--Principle is ever my motto, no
expediency.
Dale Entered C. Z. Schoor--October, 1922.. -
Birthplace-Cristobal, C. Z.
Ictliritiets-Debate Club 3; Varsity Club 3; Treasurer
4; Baseball 3, 4.


3 ,I











.ame lou-RO.1Er J. ] PEr-ERSON
Throlih Our Il/e,,.-Red hair radiates sunshine.
Dale Entered C. Z. S-aooll -October, 1927.
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
./clicie.'--Soccer 4: Swimming 4; Photo Club 4: La
Pas 4; Varsity Club 4.









Name-HI:RBERT LAMONT PHILI.IPS
Throuilh O1ur Eve,--Honor is the reward of virtue.
Dale Ealered C. Z. Schools-September, 1925.
Birthplace -Jackson, Tennessee.
.dcli,'lies-La Pas 3, 4; Orchestra 3; Interclass Baseball
3, 4.









Vame-GEORGE DAVID POOL.E
Through Our Eve.--Speak but little and well, if you would
be esteemed a man of merit.
Dale Entered C. Z. School--October, 1921.
Birlhplace-Newport News, Va.
Jclicilie--B. A. A. 1, 2; Carnival Committee 4.









'aaeI-CHARLOTTE LEATHA RANDALL
Through Our il/ey-T'is true she dressed %with modern
grace.
Dale Entered C. Z. School-,-October, 1929.
Birthplace-Sayre, Pa.
.ctl/rilies-Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club 3, 4; La Pas, 3, 4;
"Happy Landings" 3; "Red Headed Stepchild" 4;
National Thespians 4.


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.\Yame- ANNA SEI.|NA REILLY
Throumqh Our 1Ere,--The reward for ones duty is the power
to fulill another.
Dale Entered C. 7. Schoolt-March, 1926.
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
.IJltliiiex,-Glee Club 1, 3; La Pas 2, 3, 4; Supper Club
1, 2; President 4: Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club 3; Trade
Wind 3; Caribbean Staff 1, 2, 3, 4; S. A. Treasurer
3, President 4; Class President 4; Happy Landings
Staff 3; A. D. T. Club 2; Carnival Committee 4.











aulmc-JAlMlE REYNARDUS
Through Our yere--Speech is great, but silence is greater.
Dale Enlered C. Z. School'-September, 1933.
Birthplace-Panama, R. de P.
.lcliililer-Varsity Club 3, 4; Soccer 3, 4.










.Vauc -MARY RUTrI RIEDEL
Throuljh Our Eye,- A regular girl, and the best of pals.
Dale Entered C. Z. Schoolr-September, 1933.
Birthplace-Indianapolis, Indiana.
,Ihtiitie.--Varsity Club 3, 4; Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club
3, 4; Nat'l. Thespians 3, 4; Trade Wind 4; Ca-
ribbean 4; Happy Landings 3; Red Headed Step-
child 4; "Corn Fed Babies" 4; "The Soul of Anne
Rutledge", 4.








.Vlne OI.GA RoE:
/I ..O.., Our 1/eer-An ounce of mirth is worth a pound
of sorrow.
Dale Entered C. Z. Srhoolr-October, 1924.
Birl hplare Cristobal, C. Z.
,Ir'tiliie. Varsity Club 2; Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club 3;
National Thespians 3, 4; Art Club 3; Glee Club
I, 2; Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4; La Pas 4; Happy
Landings 3; Red Headed Stepchild 4; Caribbean
Staff 4; "The Soul of Anne Rutledge"4; Baseball 2.


I 1












aiiie-Tom K. Rrtssi. i.
Throilih Our l/'." I will not retreat a single inch I
will be heard.
Date Enlered C. Z. School, November, 1931.
Birthplace Omaha, Nebraska.
Jctijilie., Debate Club 3; Orchestra 1, 3,. 4; Band 4;
Jazz Orchestra 4; Caribban Stalf4: Ir Sr. Dram-.
tic Club 4; Varsity Club 4; La Pas 4: Baskctla.ll
3, 4; Carnival Committee 3, 4; Student Council
4; Vice President 4: Intcrclass sports 4.









.atme- HI. l]()tv:u SANI)'Hns
TItiriough Our /ei'., I have great dreams for mighty
things to come.
Date Efincred C. Z. Sciho;i. September, 1928.
Bir/hplarce Glasgow, Ky.
J.licitile, Varsity Clul 3. 4; Glece Clul> I; Bascl,,ill
3, 4; tBasktbiall 2, 3. 4.











. ae-i 1AXw\ViI SIELI)EN SAN[sIi11
Through Our ,1/e.r- For brevity is very good, whether iwe
are or are not understood.
Date Enlered C. Z. Schoo,--October, 1922.
Birlhplace-Ancon, C. Z.
.Icliilie- Baseball, 1, 2. 3, 4; Caribbean StalT 4: Ba'.-
ketball 3,q4; Soccer 3, 4; Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4;
Treasurer 3; President 4.










X.Vie-ANNIIi: LAItRIE TRio :RIA.: /
Th/rouih Our c Ie.-- I have a heart with room for every joy.
Date En,,ered C. Z. Achool-/.January. 1923.
Bir/hplace-Washington. D. C.
.Iclti*iics-- Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club 3, 4; National Thespiani
4; La Pas 2, 3, 4: Glee Clul) 1, 2; Caribbean
Staff 4: Student Council 3; Carnival Committee
4; Red Headed Stepchild 4: Corn Fed Babies 4:
The Soul of Anne Rutledge 4.













,ne--RUri laIE VIKINGSTAI)
Through Our El.yes-A tender heart; a will inflexible.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-October, 1922.
Birthplace-Cristobal, C. Z.
.lcli,,ities-Varsity Club 1, 2. 3, 4; Glee Club 1; La
Paz 2. 3; Supper Club 2, 3, 4; Jr. Sr. Dramatic
Club 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4;
Student Council 4; Sec'y 4; Class Sec'y 2, 3; Cari-
bbean Staff 3, 4; G. A. A. 1, 2; A. D. T. Club 2.












Vamne--JOHN F. PARSONS-WILL
Through Our E ye.r-As large as life and twice as natural.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools-September, 1928.
Birthplace-Miami, Fla.
Aclicities--B. A. A. I, 2.











NVae--WlIL]ALI WIRTZ, JR.
Through Our E'ver--Thus I steer my bark, and sail on
even keel with gentle gale.
Date Entered C. Z. Schools--October, 1922.
Birthplace-Cristobal, Canal Zone.
lcti,,ities--Trade Wind 3, 4; Carnival 3, 4; Soccer 2,
3, 4; Junior Play 3, 4; "The Soul of Anne Rutledge
4; Dance Committee 3, 4; Tumbling'3; B. A. A.
1, 2.





:VNae -A RTHUR MERRILI OI.N SwMITH
Through Our 1,vle.r -The silent countenance olten speak.
Da'e Entere:l C. Z. Schoolr--October, 1934.
Birthplace-Barre, Vt.


Name--JOHN TARA
Through Our lEer--All that a man hath will he give for
his life.
Dale Entered C. Z. Schooltr January, 1935.
Birthplace Long Island, N. Y.
Jiciitie.s- Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club 4; "Soul of Anne Rut-
ledge" interclass Track 4.








CLASS HISTORY


After four years of pulling together,
the Class of '35 is about to bringe its
long apprenticeship to a close.
All its members are full-fledged work-
men, ready to be turned out into the
unknown regions of a turbulent world.
As in everything else, they face this
without flinching and are prepared ifor
the best or worst.
In our first year of filling our positions
we represented the most scoffed at clas-
in the school the "Scobies".
Much to the surprise of our colleagues
we put across a Depression Dance that
was a great success. Of course this
would have been more difficult without
the guidance of Miss Brown, the teacher
that stayed such a short while and that
was missed for the longest.
The good humor of the class was hard
to lose with Bert Asencio cutting up all
the time. You remember, he was noted
as the wittiest boy back in '32.
So the first year of the apprenticeship
passed and tho' we had been brought
down a few pegs as Frosh, we planned to
reach the top in the next few years
In our Sophomore year athletics were
approached rather gingerly both by
boys and girls; kloyd, Max, Johnny
Paris, and Robert Neely all kept up the
pac-' s"t by their older brothers with
admirable persistence. Ruthie, M\arga-
ret Reinhold, and Mary Ann all helped
the girls to do their part.
Aftl.r b:,k sales and candy sales the
April Fool Dance was given. The novelty
number helped this to be one of the
biggest hits of the year.
As Juniors we se~mrn"d to c:-::,;s into


lhe limelight. The Junior I)pay, "Happy
Landings," was well received. Theb
Annual dance was greatly enjoyed.
Everybody se mel to have something
to do and th' year passed quickly ending
with the biggest event of th; yea- for
Lu the Junior-Senior Ban'quet.
As S -niors, we felt our prestige grow.
()Othrs of our classmates who were less
fortunatllr- had gradually be-'n allowed
to wander from th- flock. However,
-new ones had taken their places and thli
class went on.
Ti: weekly newspap -r was at its best
under its editor, Edgar Borden. Tlhe
annual work was coming along rapidly.
The Senior Dance was already a
thing of the past and final exams were
glaring us in the face. We gloomily
gave them thought, at the recollection
that they were the last we would ever
take at Cristobal High School.
The Jr. Sr. Banquet arrived and the
Juniors made it an event that will be
long remembered.
As Baccalaureate and Commencement
rapidly approached, we were suddenly
caught up in a wild rush of preparations.
At Commencement we sat quietly
and thought back of all the wonderful
times that we have witnessed. It is rather
hard to believe that they are over and
with a sigh we try to pierce the future.
May all the classes that follow try
to come through obstacles as we have
tried. It's a long, hard pull but worth
everything that is put into it, and the
recompense is a life that has begun with
helping hands on all sides- -a life with a
good start.


CLASS WILL
/b.
.Allen Jacque. antd Edwin' Hamia


We, the Class of '35 about to graduate
from Cristobal High School reaFze the
stupidity of expecting the Jun'ors to
co-operate with the Faculty as we did,
and to rightly carry the title of Seniors.
However, as we are about to pass on into
the wide beyond, we cannot be choosers.
As a whole we bequeath to the Faculty


our appreciation for the work and time
they have spent on us to impart to us
the knowledge that we now have.
Individually we make the following
bequests:
MAX SANDERS bequeaths his abil'-
tv to do things with the least amount of
effort to Howard Wills.





























I I


MARGARET BARNARD and KATH-
LEEN GOODENOUGH leave their
ability to "yes, yes" their way through
English to Lydia Gravatt and Nora
Hewitt.
OLGA ROE leaves her shortness to
Edith Wikran and Elizabeth Collins.
BERT ASENSIO and CHARLIE
HEIM leave to Paul Barnett and James
Days their cheer leading and ability to
run specials.
JACK DWYER leaves his beard to
Ward Davies.
JACK LONG leaves his ability to fish
and tell fish stories to Donald Townshend.
WILLIAM WIRTZ leaves his ability
to build floating boats to John Dignam.
JACK EGOZCUE leaves his piano
playing to Theodore Aanstoos.
PAUL BEARD bequeaths his ability
to get black eyes to Robert Wirtz.
WILLIAM BEERS wills his modesty
to Julio Dominguez.
CLAUDE BERGER leaves his ability
to fake injury in gym class to William
Hanna.
EDGAR BORDEN bequeaths his
ability to get something for nothing to
Edward Durham.
RALPH DAVIS wills his photographic
ability to Mike Fernandez.
MARY ANN CARRUTHERS her
irresistible qualities to Muriel Hanna
and Evelyn Dwyer.
BUD LEACH his boxing ability to
Joseph Retally.
MARGARET HOLL1NGSHEAD
leaves her literary ability to Mary Goulet
and Mary Griffin.
RUTH WIKINGSTAD her steno-
grapher's job in the office to Hope Hollo-
well.
ELEANOR MULLANE leaves her
calmness to Rachel Cuesta and Olga
Dominguez.
ANNA REILLY leaves her presiden-
cies to Doris Ebdon.
CHARLOTTE RANDALL wills her
dramatic ability to Virginia Thomas.
WILLIAM DOUGHERTY leaves his
reverendship in English class to Wendell
Cotton.
EDWIN HANNA sadly bequeaths
his first class junk car to Edward Curtis.
MARY RUTH RIEDEL leaves her
masculine walk to May Appel.
JAIME REYNARDUS leaves his
soccer shoes to William Hill.
JOHN HAMMOND leaves his evenly
distributed weight to Charles Mead.
MALCOLM DUEY wills his "shine"
shirts to Frank Anderson.


VWITNESSESS
Chris Tobal
Monty Lirio


HERBERT PHILLIPS and PAUL
GREGORY leave their statuesque physi-
ques to Armando Gasperi.
ROBERT NEELY leaves his hollow
leg to Paul Farrar.
JOHN PALM leaves his ability to
collect late parts of the Caribbean to
Donald Townshend.
GEORGE LANE wills his ability to
be absent from school to Alice Hobart.
JOHN TARA gladly wills his Senior
Class spirit to May Appel.
MILDRED LEACH leaves her long
engagements to Elva Estenoz.
DOLORES PALMER bequeaths her
winning smile to Louise Snyder.
GUY DE BARDELEBEN passes on
his ability to resist girls to William Hanna
JOHN PARSONS-WILL leaves his
ten o'clock good-nights to Wendell
Cotton.
DAVID MARSHALL his love for
English and History to Agnes Reinke.
ROBERT G. PETERSON wills his
great love to Edward Curtis.
IRL SANDERS wills his ability to
forget to remember assignments to Do-
rothy Hoecker.
RAMON MOUYNES, his ability to
sit out dances to Paul Barnett.
ROBERT KING wills his parties at
the point to Paul Farrar.
TOM RUSSELL leaves his camera
build to Howard Wills.
ARTHUR SMITH leaves his long
experiences in school to Martha Rogers.
LETA DEAKINS, her typewriter to
Jane Starke.
DOROTHY DUNN and JANE HUN-
TOON leave their exclusiveness to Fran-
ces Patchett and Ruby Lyew.
EILEEN FORD, her wad of gum to
Eula Mae Plath.
ANNIE L. TURBERVILLE leaves
her easy way of doing hard work in
Chemistry to Virginia Sanders.
ROBERT J. PETERSON wills his
chemistry stock room job to Robert
Moot.
ALLEN JACQUES bequeaths his gos-
sip getting ability to Virginia Thomas.


Signed,
Senior Class of 1935.








CLASS PROPHECY
Bti ., mie Laurie "I'uli,,'r'ill/


Author's Note: W'h"n 1 was g'ven
the task to foretell ith future, of the
Class of 1935, Seniors of Cristobal High
School, 1 knew that 1 was not the
"seventh son of a seventh son" and re-
gardless of how much 1 tr:ed dr. aming
dreams and seeing v;s:ons, the future
remained a blank. 1 then decided to
consult one ;n a position to know our
past as well as predict our future.
However, he informed me that his
sentiments were similar to what Antony
had sa:d of Caesar. Th s remark of h:s
grieved me as I know hew fond of pre -s,
we are. I left his office i":l ng bL- ;:nd
discouraged. lMy thoughts iurn'd to
what "old tmners" say: "We stand
suspended between Monkev H ll and
Corozal". 1 felt so depressed, esp.'c allv
when 1 recalled all the home work 1
had to do. That home work was I th
last clear thought 1 recall until i aw.ake-
ned this morning in a strange bare room.


I felt stiff and could hardly rise from
the queer steel cot on which I found
myself. I tried to call loudly but mv
voice was hoarse and strange. Immedia-
tely an old man came to my room and
spoke to me. I asked him, "who are
you?" In a creaking voice, he replied
patiently, "1 am Dr. Allen Jacques,
in charge of the inmates of Corozal."
"Corozal!" I exclaimed. "Who am 1?"
i faintly inquired. "You are the lassie
w:th t(h; Scott:sh name", he answered
tryng to b ch'-::rful. "Oh, Allen, where
are the oth-rs the other b1oys and girls
of our class of 1935 He looked serious
and s:' d, ."Thos- who are not here at
Corozfl rest 1 -neath tha palms at"
Monkr y Hill". This, my d(ar old lady,
''h: contenucd," :s the year 1999."
"What!" 1 gasped, "Am 1 crazy or are
you crazy H'e rcpl:ed, "Calm yourself,
and I wll take you to read their epitaphs.









"MONKEY HILL"


Here Lies
Mayor Ramon Bernardo Mouynes
Born in Colon,
Lived in Colon,
Died in Colon.

Jack Bernard Egozcue M. S.
Sleep undisturbed within the peaceful
shrine,
Till angels wake thee with a note like
thine.

Here Lies
Judge Paul Raymond Gregory
He so loved his fellowmen that he was
never able to condemn any.


Here lies Madame Olga Roe
She devoted her life to the science of
criminology.
Was the first to discover 6 markings on
the gun of public enemy No. 1.


Eileen "Totsy" Ford
Dead she is not, but departed
artist never dies.


.for the


Here Lies
Arthur Merril Olin Smith
On leaving Dartmouth in 1939, he vowed
never to stay in one job more than one
year at the time. He lived up to his vow.
But now has settled down.. -for a
brief moment.

Here under the sod
Robert Warren King
Known as a speaker from coast to coast.
Published several books on governmental
problems of housing "stall fed cattle".


Here lies Mary Ruth Riedel
In her last plunge, she swam her way
to Glory.
She still holds the world's diving Chanm-
pionship Title

In Memory Of
Dr. David I,, 1l Marshall
who
Ascended into the stratosphere in a vast
globe of his own invention, prepared for
a life's journey. He never descended.


Here lies Coach Paul Robert Beard and
wife.
T'was sung how they were lovely in
their lives,
And their deaths had not divided been.


Erected to the Memory of EdwIn Hanna,
Chief Of Cristobal Fire Department,
By his grateful wife, Hannah.
He left his hose, his Hannah and his Love;
To sing Hosannah in the realms Above.


Commander John Fletcher Parsons-Will
His sails are furled, his work is done
But on earth he had his fun.


Dr. Herbert Lamont Phillips, D. M. D.,
D. D. S.
When on this tomb you gaze with gravity,
Cheer up! I'm filling my last cavity.


Here Lies
Charlotte Leatha Randall
In Hollywood society she was
One among many triangles.


Here Lies
Maxwell Shelden Sanders
Giants 1940
Red Sox 1942
Cardinals 1943
Yankees 1945
Colon 1950


Here Lies
George V. Lane
He possessed thL glorious faculty of
making money out of anything .
anything!

Here Lies
Jane Isabel Huntoon
A worthy matron of unspotted life,
A loving mother, and obedient wife,
A friendly neighbor, kindly to poor,
Whom oft she fed and clothed with her'
store.

Here Lies Lieutenant William Howard
Beers
Whose motto in life was to have an
uncorking good time.


A-bfr


I


I --L j






Here lies Robert Goethals Peterson;
reader, if male thou art,
Look to thy purse; if female, to thy heart


Requiescat
Malcolm Pearl Duey, Esq.,
At last he sleeps alone.


Commander Tom Kelly Russell, U. S. N.
He joined the Navy to let the world
see himn.


Here lies Kathleen Marie Goodenough
Took her M. A. degree at the Canal
Zone Jr. College
She died fighting for shorter hours for
school children.

Here lies the remains of
William Wirtz, Brickmaker,
in hope that his clay will be remoulded
in a workmanlike manner, far superior to
his former perishable materials.


Here below lies George David Poole
He lived well, and wisely made his will;
He played, and loved, and ate, and drank
his fill.


Here lies the remains of Claude Edward
Berger, merchant.
In the morning when sober,
In the evening when mellow
He was what's known as
A mighty fine fellow.


Here Lies Charles Henry Bath
Born a man, a grocer died.


Hon. Charles Frederick Helm,
He was a good politician who stood for
what he thought: others would fall for.


Here Lies
Margaret E. Barnard
She was an old-fashoned woman who
darned her husband's socks, And she
leaves a daughter who socks her darned
husband.

John William Dwyer
Here lies old 33 percent
The more he made the more he lent
The more he got, the more he craved
The more he made the more he shaved.
Great Heavens! Should such a soul be
saved ?


Here lies Widow Wikingstad,
The Turf has drunk a widow's tear.
Three of her husbands slumber near.


Here lies William Elmer Dougherty
God works a wonder now and then,
He, though a lawyer, was an honest man.


Here Lies Dorothy Ruth Dunn for
shortness called Dolly,
Who wrote like an angel, and talked
like poor Polly.


At last at rest is John Avery Long
He's done-a-catching cod.
And gone to meet his God.


Here Lies Reverend Irl Roger Sanders
In arguing, too, the parson own'd his
skill
But even tho' vanquished he could
argue still.

Major Joseph Bert Asensio
Here lies only a shell
The nut is gone.


Requiescat
John Andrew Palm
His own inventions are monuments
enough.
Tis well said that in Chemistry, he
knew his stuff.

In memorial
Dolores Virginia Palmer
She lived to write and wrote to live.


Here Lies Ralph Lester Davis,
Statesman, yet friend to truth; of soul
sincere,
In action faithful, and in honor clear.


Here Lies Leta Deakins
and
Eleanor Mullane,
Good pilots who died with the crash of
their plane.

To the memory of
Robert James Neely
Full many a life he saved
With his undaunted crew;
He put his trust in Providence,
And cared not how it blew.


/


I, -
S I 55


L







Here lies, in a horizontal position
The outside case of
Robert Jack Peterson, watch-maker.
He departed this life wound-up
In hopes of being taken in hand by his
Maker,
And of being thoroughly cleaned, repaired
And set a-going in the world to come.

Here lies
Guy Watkin De Bardeleben
He lived alone and died so tool
To live and die was all he had to do.
Maintained a poet's dignity and ease,
Saw his friends, and read what books
he pleased.

John Nathaniel Tara was an actor-man,
Old New York's pride and boast,
In all the light and spritely parts,
Especially the ghost.

John Rudolph Hammond
A man who could build a church, as one
may say,
By squinting at a sheet of paper.

Here Lies Margaret Ethel Hollingshead,
Ph. D.
Was editor of the Efficiency Magazine.
Won the Pulitzer Prize in 1945
Recognized as one of America's outstan-
ding writers on "preparedness."


Here Lies
Mary Ann Carruthers
She kept at true humor's mark
The social flow of pleasure's tide;
She never made a brow look dark,
Nor caused a tear, but when she died.


In memory of Anna Selina Reilly
Student of psychology, biology and
eugenics.
Her last words were those of an old
Irish proverb:
"1 was well: 1 wished to be better: I
took medicine and died."


Here Lies Urial (Bud) Leach
He combined business with 'pleasure in
seeing the world through a porthole.


Here lies James Edgar Borden
He devoted his life to writing for Ballyhoo
Leaves a wife and twelve children to
mourn his loss.


Here Lies Mildred Frances Leach
She was a good wife who worshiped her
husband by placing burnt offerings
before him three limes a day.


I7-














































- --


7T17



-~i/iZ7AL


__ __


3
--- ---------------


L
----------- -~i3
---
-~F-r
-1-


L-


_ _


_L~

~
~
~
~

























Standing, left to right:-Joseph Retally, Ward Davies, Mike Fernandez, Robert Moot, Armando
Gasperi, Theodore Aanstoos, Howard Will, Charles Mead.
Sitting, lejf to right:-Robert Wirtz, Julio Dominguez, Donald Townshend, Christopher Matchett,
Edward Durham, Wendell Cotton, Robert Anderson, William Hanna,
Frank Anderson.
Front row, lejl to ri ht:-Edward Curtis, Paul Farrar. William Hill, Paul Barnett, George Marcuse,
James Days, John Dignam.




Juniors




Standing, le/t to riht:--Hope Hollowell, Elizabeth Collins, Lydia Gravatt, Alice Hobart, Nora
Hewitt, Eleanor Taiman, Naomi Keepers, Louise Snyder, Dorothy
Hoecker, Hope Schaeffer.
Silting, lejl lo riqlgh:-Mary Griffin, Mary Goulet, Jane Starke, Olga Dominguez, Jeannette
Hyler, Evelyn Dwyer, Edith Wikran, Muriel Hanna, Virginia Thomas.
Front row, leIj to right:-May Appel, Ruby Lyew, Rachel Cuesta, Elva Estenoz, Agnes Reinke'
Frances Patchett, Virginia Sanders.


1 -1



















JUNIORk AC'l'l\'l''llS


The Junior Class this year has appeared
in the limelight quite frequently.
Their first class meeting was held, with
Mr. Meyers as sponsor, to elect their
officers for the year. Wendell Cotton
was elected unanimously but as he had
held the office before he was ineligible.
The officers finally elected were:


EDWARD DURHAM..
DORIS EBDON......
MARY GRIFFIN...


President
Vice President
Secretary-Treasurer


At the next meeting the Junior Carni-
val Committee was elected. James Days
was voted chairman of the Committee,
with several capable members of the
class aiding him. The booths that they
managed were Skill, Balloon breaking,
and Dart throwing. These booths took
in a good portion of the evenings pro-
fits.
Class rings were put in the capable
hands of Donald Townshend who handled
the ordering with satisfaction to all
concerned.
At the third meeting the plans for the
Junior-Senior banquet were made. Two
committees were chosen; an arrange-
ment committee with Eddie Iurham as
chairman and an entertainment commi-
ttee with James Days as chairman.
These two committees handled all the
details of the banquet very capably and
produced a charming affair.
Quite a talented group of actors have
sprung up this year probably due to
experiences in the Effe Kube Klub,


which is an undIergradua t dIramatic
socicev. Reward for their efforts in
their first two years was membership
in the Junior-Senior Dramatic Club.
This club hias put forth several attractive
plays making good use ofi the Junior
actors. The I: hI.-' Dramatic society
is the National I hespians. To be a
member in this club you have to work
very hard. The Junior class is proud
that three of its class are in this club.
The Junior girls can bz exhibited as
good examples of fighting spirit. In the
Interclass sports the Junior girls won
the basket-ball series after a hard fight
though they lost the volley-ball series.
The varsity Baseball team can thank
the Junior class for a lot of its fighting
spirit. There were quite a few on the
varsity team, and this helped the girls,
and the team in more ways than one.
The Junior boys did not do as well as
the girls in interclass sports. They turned
out very well in number though. In
baseball and soccer they had the number
but not the ability. There were several
Junior boys on the Varsity baseball team
though. The track turnout as far as the
Junior boys were concerned was not very
good.
After considering ilt tortures of the
first two years in High School we consider
our next to last year in school very
eventful and happy. As a whole the
class of '36i Ihope th i; the Sophomores
Imay feel the s.ame way when tlr.y h ave
aclhi, ed Ihe n-,' s of Juniors.



























Standing, le/t to riqht:-Vernon Clark, Carlisle Christensen, Philip Riedel, Roland Clemens,
Laurel Highley, Fred Wertz, Stanford Stone, Joseph Hemmer, Philip
Houghton, William Dickinson, Robert Ruly, Cheney Moore.
Siltinq, leJt to ri,)l/:-Donald Cornell, Edward Hoffman, Jack Clay, Edward Bretch, Joseph
Coffin, John McLain, Marvin Keenan, Herbert Ashton, Charles Washa-
baugh.
Front row, lejl lo ritlh:--Robert Hanson, LaVerne Rose, Herbert Gottesman, Douglas Smith,
Harry Reeder, John Bozeman, Anthony Refcofski, James Christian.
David Coffey, James Coman.



Sophomores



Standing, le// to rihtl:-Dora Lyew, Lily Pescod, Netta Potts, Mary Elizabeth Kelly, Elizabeth
Heywood, Anna Patchett, Carroll Gallion, Esther Neely, Louise Seibold
Ruth Bauman, Flora Herman, Grace Herman, Jacqueline Briscoe, Ellen
Kelty, Dorothy Craig, Jean Walsh, Virginia Fehn, Eleanor Stumpf.
Silling, leJl to r/'hl:-Blanche Howe, Maxine Blunden, Mary Darley, Charlotte Levy, Aura
Huntoon, Olive Aanstoos, Helen Carrol, Marie Geoghegan, Virginia Hart-
man, Winifred Koeler, Grace Hodges.
Front row, lejl to rilhtl:-Mary Dignam, Rita Kotalik, Macel Goulet, Kathleen Phillips, Ruth
Moody, Anita Boggs, Rhea Mae Koester, Mildred Braswell, Gladys
Pescod, Goldwyn Grabhorn, Lucille Lyew.


I I












SOPIHO)M(ORE ACTIVIES
Ig/ Edtwar/ l'reltch


The Sophioior' Class held its first
meeting on October 14. 1934. in the
Cafeteria, which was designated as their
rnw':ing place for (he etnlire year. Mr.
Siminski had be:n assigned to supervise
this first meeting, and the class voted
that he should continue to look after
their interests during the wear. Later
events have proven that the choice was
an excellent one, as he has very graciously
assisted the class in all of its activities.
After the sponsor had be-en chosen,
the business of electing officers for the
class was taken up. An election of of-
ficers was held, but the persons chosen
to fill thet different positions were found
to be ineligible insinuch as they had
been officers the past year, and according
to a new ruling in C:istobal HiIgh School,
a person cannot hold any office for
two consecutive years. It was decided
that the class would elect new officers
at its next meeting which was scheduled
for November li. 1934.
At this second class meeting the busi-
ness of electing oftlicers was again conside-
red. After a very close: rac. for the
various offices the results of the elections
were recorded as follows:
President Cheney Moore
Vice President Edward tHoflfan
Secretary Blanche Howel
Treasurer Esther Neely
At this same meeting w. took up the
task of choosing our representatives in
the Executive Council. Th'i two students
to look after our interests in the Student
Association w\'ere Nlacel Goulet and
Philip Riedel.
At this same meeting the class decided
that they would hold their Class Dance
on February 2, 193.5.
The Class colors were chosen, and
after many individual debates the class
decided that their colors were to be
BLUE and WHITE.
This year the Sophomore Class was
proud to be the bearers of that title,
because we cooperated so well with thel
plans laid for the Carnival. The Class
was given certain things to do by the
Carnival Committee, and the class as a
whole did their part in making thil
Carnival a success.


In athletics the Soplhomore boys did
not equal their standard of last y'ar due
to the fact that handicaps were placed
on each class giving the Freshmnen a
greater advantage over the rest of the
classes. However, xwe cannot complain
too much because tili' Seniors had tnone
at all and tie Juniors had a very small
one.
The girls howx.ver, showed tilb boys
iup and rain with the inter-class Volley
Ball series. But they admit th:ly don't
think they would have won it unless
they had practiced as hard and sincerely
as they did. Again thi- Sophomore girls
shone in Basketball. Thly were on the
winning team with thl' S-eniors. Many
girls found it pays to support you: class
in athletics because it gets you iln (trim
for Varsity sports. 'lany girls e':l'ned
their Varsity Laett:'s b caus tllh vy prac-
ticed hard in the interclass sports.
As scheduled at our second class
meeting lie Sophomores held their dance
in the gyllmnasium on February 2nd.
The "High Hat Orchestra" furnished
the music for tile dance that began at
eight o'clock and ended at tw,:lve as
usual. The gym was beautifully decora-
ted with palm leaves that were placed
around the walls in a very pretty style.
The class colors of Blue and White were
effectively draped from the ceiling and
this added all the more to the lbeauty
of the place. Above the orchestra hung
a lighted sign with the class name in
Blue and \\ lit, Everyone who atten-
ded had a very enjoyable time as was
apparent when thle punch ran out after
about the eighth dance.
The class participates in ni'ry other
activities among which are the EFFE
KUBE KLUB which is a dramatic
club, and LA PAS which is a Social
Spanish Club.
The class of '57 is very proud and for-
tunate in having two of its roster on the
high honor list. These: two students,
girls Iy the way, are Kathleen Phillips,
and Jacqualine Briscoe.
The number now in the class is aproxi-
mately 90 to 100 students.
























Slandinief le o ,triht.:-Lee Kelso, John Huson, Daniel Meehan, William Fuller, Milton Dunn,
James Smith, Walter Mueller, William Emerson, Carlos Chase.
.c | Silting, tlej lo rihtl:-Sandford Hyler, Howard Springer, John Berude, Claud. Lyon, George
Black, William Scarborough, Albert Hendricks, Warren Butcher, Harold
l Blackwell.
Iron./ ro, lejl to right:-William Hunt, Peter Ender, Emiro Borden, Charles Scheaffer, Paul
S Venable, Robert Thomas.





Freshman





S.' ... /c//l o ria/l: Jean Compo, Ruth Wood, Kathleen O'Hearn, Virginia Daniels, Margaret
Wood, Rose Marie Wolf Edith Davies, Lilian Hobart, Marjorie Bassler.
Sitting, lelf lo right:-Muriel Howe, Virginia Lyons, Mary Ann Cain, Ruth Anderson, Geraldine
Wirtz, Julia Hartman, Ray Dewey, Thelma Calloway.


^n *^jt.IYI































,tanli ,i, It/f/ IA rti/tI: Vernon .Moore, Ralph L.earn. Ioe Roggcnkaimp. KEwiarI l Sullivan, Asa
Bullock, lHlarold Albritton, John ]'inlayson. (Gale Arnoldl. William Cun-
nilghami.
,yi/llin, /k/I // riail: EdwKvard Egozcuc, \\'Wlliani O'CoMnor. Tlom.s A.\shton. D)avid Potts. \lilton
Santders, Donald Pa'rkcr, \\'llia I lom cetcr, William Forsstrom, Monroe
Richardson.
I/ 'm r ', It,/// o Drill" David Brucc. Victor .a.i.v, Paul Cole. I ertLiert liclhntr. Frank Turli,crville
Fred I aiuss.






Freshman






Standli.u l/-l//to rid/it: Alice Stetler, Sa;ia \Will;iams Nornma Illes. Alice Curtis, Ilcatrice Cotton,
Anna Kotalik, Rluth McCants, Emma lean Starike, ILouise Zimmerman,
Theresa Goulet.
S/lina. ij/I/ o riuhtl: EIllen Roc. Katherine I)onnclly, .Aarjorie Yost. IIelen IIlum. Grace Hellen.
Phyllis Ilyler. Joseplhiie Dunn. Aiinn Corurianl Hetty Clay, Lola Behlen.



















FRESHMAN ACTIVITIES
By Phoebe Taylor


I /


cannot be attributed to the ability of the
players though because we had the largest
handicap of the four classes. In soccer,
which was the first sport of the year,
the Freshman team had a thirty point
handicap, this made it possible to win
the inter-class series because the other
teams could not overcome such a lead.
The stars of the Freshman team were
Peter Ender, center half-back, and Har-
tly Martin, goaley.
The handicap given to the Freshman
in baseball was not enough for the team
to place more than a good last. We can
however say we died fighting.
The Freshman Class held their dance
on March 29, 1935 in the school gymna-
sium. This dance was considered one of
the best of the whole year. The gym was
very elaborately decorated with palm
fronds along the walls, and streamers
of purple, gold and blue the school and
class colors radiating from the center of
the ceiling. This dance was unusual in
that the feature of the evening was an
acrobatic dance by Emily Horine. The
programmes were especially attractive
in that they had an aerial view of the
school printed on them.
The Class of '38 is very thankful for
the aid given by its Sponsor, Mr. Franks
in guiding them throughout the year.
The Class aided in all activities in the
school. It is the largest entering class
the school has ever experienced, num-
bering about one hundred and twenty
students in all.


The Class of '38 held its first meeting
in the auditorium which was assigned
to be their meeting place for the ensuing
year. This meeting was called in order
to elect a sponsor, and the class officers
for the year, Mr. Franks the Principal
of the school was elected almost unani-
mously as sponsor. The class officers
were elected and the results of the elec-
tions were as follows:
President-- -..... WILLIAM SCARBOROUGH
Vice-President...BEA COTTON
Secretary.-.. .. EDWARD MCCARTHY
Treasurer........ PATTY SYMINGTON
After a short time Edward McCarthy
resigned his position as Class Secretary
and Warren Butcher was elected to carry
on the duties of the Secretary.
At the second meeting which was held
about one month after the first we elected
our representatives to the Executive
Council. Our elections resulted with
Dorothy Knox elected girl representative
and John Finlayson as boy representa-
tive.
The Carnival might not have been
the success that it was if it hadn't been
for the cooperation that the Freshman
Class gave it. The Freshman class
Carnival Committee made a good show-
ing, and was well spoken of by Mr.
Franks in the assembly. The booths
that were made by and attended by the
Freshman Class were the shooting galle-
ry, ring tossing, and ball throwing.
The Freshman Class made a good
showing in the interclass sports. This





































































































~L-







-----~-------" --~-


































STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
By Tom Ruioell

Entering into its second year of activity, the C. H. S. Students' Association has proven itself to be one
of the finest things ever introduced into the school. Last year the Association received its start and did
exceedingly well. This year it has profited from its mistakes of last year and can be considered almost
perfect.
The purpose of the Association to put the school on a firm financial plan by eliminating all unnecessary
expenses during the year.
To belong to the Association each student was charged three dollars and fifty cents, for which he recei-
ved the following benefits:
1. Admission to all regularly scheduled athletic contests of Cristobal High School.
2. Admission to four class dances and all other dances given.
3. Admission to all school plays.
4. One copy of the "Caribbean."
5. A years subscription to the "Trade Wind".
6. Membership in certain high school clubs.
7. Admission to Junior-Senior banquet.
The advantages of this system are very obvious. The greatest of which is a saving of from five to
six dollars on activities.
The first business of the year was to elect officers. This was done by a secret ballot cast by all members
of the Association. The candidates were nominated by a body consisting of the four class advisors and the
officers of each class. The nominations were restricted follows: The president must be a senior, and the
vice-president a junior. The other offices were not restricted.
The results of the elections were as follows:
President ................... .ANNA REILLY
Vice President .. ............... ... ............ ........... ...To RUSSELL
Secretary.......... ...... RUTH WIKINGSTAD
Treasurer. .. ................................... ... KATHLEEN PIIILLIPS
The E:ecutive Council which is the acting body of the Association was then formed. It consisted of
the three faculty members of the association: Paul Miller--Sponsor, K. W. Vinton-Athletic Director,
and Milford Franks -Extra-Curricular Activities Director; the four student officers, and two repre-
sentatives from each class (one boy and one girl). 'The representatives were as follows: Seniors-Margarte
Barnard and Wm. Dougherty; Juniors: Evelyn Dwyer and James Days; Sophomores-Macel Goulet
and Phil Riedel; Freshmen-Dorothy Knox and John Finlason. Meetings were held by this body every
two weeks to carry on business and to O. K. expenditures of money.
The third dance of the year was sponsored by this organization. It was a Barn Dance and was one
of the most successful of the year.
One ot the largest activities of the year was organized and run by the association. This was the C. H.
S. carnival held on February 9. Over four hundred dollars clear profit was taken in at this function and
this was added to the general student fund.
During the year there were only nine persons in the entire Senior High School that did not become
members. Over one hundred junior high school students also joined the association.
Special provisions were made by the Executive Council allowing Alumni to join the association so
that :lthr could attend athletic events and dances. The price extended to the alumni was two dollars and
fifty cents. IHowver for this amount they did not receive a copy of the "Caribbean."


I






































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i. !.r/. f. l ,tr! i/ / or I ../ I.Ii/cr il / 1' P 10


Sl .c. I dI I/1or
N/,.,/. .r/. o:b,//Et,,o







ID 'l, ,,,,S' rt>.,s /I',/t,7,


JOHN PALM


JAMES I)AYS, PAUL BANE.TT


W'ILLIAM BEERS
FRANK ANDERSON


2MARGAREHT H-OLLINGS: I li)
ANNA REILLY
MIARGARET BIORNARD
KATIILEEN GOO)DENOU(; I
ANNIE LAURIE TURBERVILILE


IACK EL.o UE
STA.NFORD STONE-
WILLIAM ScARBOROLUG


R.ALIPI IAVIS


Tom RussE.I.L


AIXRY R'TiI RIEDEL


RUl'TI WII IN(;STA),
() (;.\ ROE
31AXWELL SANDERS.


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I ]


TRADE WIND


THE "TRADE WIND"
By JAnIonio Ramirez

The TRADE WIND started its third year in good fashion in October with an enthusiastic staff
animated by the one ambition to put out a good paper every Friday. As the year progressed and
the home-work piles up many Members of the Staff, quietly resigned from the Paper's roster. But new
members were secured, and the old ones carried on valiantly, so that the paper never missed an issue.
Particular credit goes to the hard working and exacting editor in keeping the staff on its toes.
The staff arranged several social events in the course of the year. A picnic-swimming party at Shimmi
Beach was much enjoyed. Members of the TRADE WIND editorial staff also had a conference with the
members of the PARRAKEET of Balboa and visited the office of the PANAMA AMERICAN.
A "depression" dance was sponsored by the TRADE WIND staff on March 9, which was considered
one of the jolliest of this year's Terpsichorean frolics. This fittingly climaxed the social activities of the
paper for the year.


LA PAZ








L.\ PAZ
Ih .li.,!l 6, ,,-1

La Paz is aI Spanish club in Crisodtbal Iligh Sch)ool. org;anizd Cby ivMrs Phy llis Spencer in 1I90. The
purpose of tins cluk is to make greater ifedship betwe vn (he North ,,, Latin A\nmcrans .s well as to
.ttludy the Spanish language. Prominent men oi Colon are ieit.'.s ;it thn' social meetings.
To become a member of this club, a student must attain a grade oit 9))" or above, and must be a
student of second year Spanish. 11 lie is a student oli third o'r fourth iyear Spanish. lit neCd attain that gr.lk'
for onl one pe inhld ol six weeks. while tlhe student oil sec:od eair Scpai ish lij is I t acqIuir this iraile foir a
period of twelve weeks.
During the I)past year. [,Ia ]Pa hed sev\ C id (illt ImIeetiw:N with I lie cluh. PaI us. )Pat s i a Cluh compo-
sedt of Spanish women who ,tre leaniiii~ 'iiiglish. ( ames were pla.iYd which iequtired Spanish as well as
English lto lie spokel.ii
At one mn etitg, tlie l.Ititiuh:''s lIand pilaYed s"ielvciolis. of Stp 'ish music wliKi1hi' W\ rv e ti enij, etd.
The OiHiltert lor the year were:
President C.VI'AI! : l ut'lIi
\'ice President M. l\i;iso.r h, H <;. i- \,
Secretary I). Im. F.Im
T'reastire" I\.. T' Iu ii\ I
A thid lor 'W. Cii l\
Conl uctclr N. SI \IKi,:.


IL'NIOR SENIOR I)R..MATIC CL('I



























JUNIOR-SENIOR 1)RAMIATIC CLUB.
Al, .1u Grj I in.

In Cristohail Ilgh School one o te st tie l i the st active clubs is the unior-Senor Dramatic Club. The
members ot this club are tirst taught dramatics in t he tEfie Kube llub and whenc they become upper classmen
they join the club with some previous experience.
There are about twenty three members in the club this year. M1arv Ruth Riedel is the president:
Kathleen Goodenough, vice President and Mary (Griflin. secretary and tCreasurer. The club meets every
\ednesday with M.rs. Spencer. our sponsor.
In )December. a lively three act comedy wais ireseCnted in the auditorium. "' he Red-headied Stepchild
was the comedy of a western girl w lio was brought to Chicago to live wihll heir father. her step-mother.
her hallf-broither and sister. Because she did not lit in the social litf of her relatives tie irl was heartily
disliked tby them. But ibecaLuse she won the iafleciios ot her step-sister's fiance she was more dislikel.
The end was a Ihappy one with every C oe liking each other. .lary Ruth Rieel w\as amusing and delight-
ful as Bess. thie western stepchild. Others in the play were Theiodore.. .ianstoos. Lydia lik raatt. Dotnalh
Townshend. Olga Roe, George Lane. Kathleen (ioodeinou'gh. Robert 1Moot, Charlotte. Randall, M.argaret
Bararrd. [Elinor M.lull ane amd Aue Laulie TIuberrville. M.'rs. Spencer directed the play.
As it was decided to have luniors and Seniors in both thle plays that the Clut presented during the
year, there was no Senior play this year. 'T he Soul oft .\n llRutiedle" was presented v members o- i the
lunionr-Senitor Dr)tamatic Club assisted by three members of the flle Kube KIlub. It \wasI the love story ot"
Abraham Lincoln .and A nn Rutledg e Thle play xwas tender and sweet. l...... :1 contained llmuch humor
and comedy. Ann Rutledge was played Iy Annie Laurie Tuberiil'l. an i 1 'A\ .Ih.in Beers was excellent ias
Abe Lincoln. Others in tlhe cast Xwere: "Ole lBar". Charles leim: "Buck Thompson." lohn Tara; "lack
A rmstrong." lames Coman: loe Kelsey." Edgal'ir BorLden; "lKit Pars ons R~obert 1 oot: "Windy i atts.'
Douglas )Malone: "Clary." Donald Townslhend; ames Rutledge" Rob!ert King. "Rev. Peter Cartwright,
Charles \\'ashahaughi: "Nance Cameron." Elinor .huilalne: "M.rs. Ilenson," Lydia Gravatt: "Miss
1ukes." A'gles Reinke: ".Irs Rutltedge." .1Iary (Griill: "M.rs. Cameron." I.eta D)eakis. ".1rs Kelsey".
Dorothy lloecler: "Aunt Sally (Green." Olga Roe: .Mrs. Spencer, our Sliponor, directed the plav.


1
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THE PHOTO C(LUI


14f~


I --LW


THE PHOTO CLUB
By Ralph Davi.r

The Photo Club has been a part of the school's activities for the last two years. This year the club was
started on its second term with the election of officers as follows; Ralph Davis, President, Bet Cotton,
Treasurer, Robert Peterson, Sec'y, Other members of the club are Jerry Carol, Billy Huff and Don-
ald Townshend.
The club has been fortunate enough to have Mr. Miller as its advisor for both years. The Club has
been limited to only those students who have given the time and interest needed in such work.
Professional photographers have taken an interest in the Club and have given equipment and advice
toward improving its methods.
This year the Club has taken on a Professional aspect by the addition of an enlarger made by one of
the members and a Graflex Camera furnished by the administration. The work done by the members has
consisted of developing, printing, enlarging, retouching, and sepia toning, Pictures are developed and
printed for the students at a cost which just enables the Club to pay the expenses. There is no profit. It
is all an educational project.




SUPPER CLUB









4







SUPPER CLUB
IBfY .11,1ny (.l.de

The Girl Reserve Supper Cluh is .io organization to which any high school gI l lmay Ibelong.
In june. 1355. the Y. W\. C. A. clubs of the isthmus disInded Icving the club to ci,rry oiii willhout
super isio. Therelore, the Supper Club was carried on during the yeuir 1955-1954 hy the 'grls with the
help of 'Mrs. Spencer anl Miss lMargaret Dav is.
When the 1934 school year began, thle American Legion Auxiliar,. Elblert S. Waid. L'nit No. 2 decided
to sponsor the clilu. Mrs II. I.. Phillips and Mrs. G. (. KIole were miIde sponsuos.
The meetiins of this association ariie hict ever. sec,,il Frhl.i ol thle imoith. Supper is always s.r've
blY one of the committees ilefore the businesss Illeetin.
Th'i fillowiniggiriIs were the fllic.', ; for tile )c 4-1 : I194 19ly t : .\i RI Pr el t Ru't \\'iniii: .l,
Vice-President: .Mary (;oullt. Sci'et:.ov: 'uld Kathlee, Phillips. Treaisurcr.


Io)YS' ,LETTER; ('l'l












!! j 1 C I















TIE VARSITY CLUIB
I/ .ll.v,.*ell Sanders

The VarsIit Clui is ian honoraryv Athletic Club. In order to become a member of this clubt a bov
must list have crnlcd ai letter iin at least one sport in school. However, to become a nmemitler iin fuillll stL.ninl
aind be eligible to hohl otlice. hle must receive the Varsity Club initiation.
The eligibility rules for earning ia letter were raised this year. Under the former rules, one had to play
about 25', of the games with I ,alloa in Baseball. Basketball. and Soccer, or earn at least two points in
track. Under the present rules, the requirements are raised to 215 of the total innings in Base,all. or 5
points in track.
Thie Varsity Club is not only a letter earning club. bu it enters into many of the activities of the school.
At the beginning ot the sc',ool year. the Varsity Club was given the responsibility of taking charge
of the Freshman -Sophomore initia'ion, which was done very efficiently.
When a':ilelic awards wcere made this year the Varsity Club put on a pantomim Exe y boy in tlth
Varsitv Club took parl, in this pantomime. The purpose was to make an appropr;ra preseniatlion 1o atlh-
letic sweaters to the members ,' te clu!lb :.\ 0o h:ad ecarnled onreor ore le:tcrs during tlhe e:a.
SMIan cnishile'ed itis one of the best. events of the school year. In this panitomime. tihe bo,.s enacted
all of the spr'ts and athletic activtiies of a school year. They wore the uniforms and used the equipment
which correslpoded to each sport. After this Proglram the boxs were awarded whl; te sw aters with a
gold letter Con the tront ofithem hy Mr. Vinton., le sponsor of' te club.
The last thiing which was spoliored by thde Varsity Club \was; a dance. This' ida rc w\.s hili in the C.
II. S. gvm. The gi m was dcciOrated %erv el activelyy with difikrent spor:tig qtlllipmnent pl :ced alIout thit
gym. and tle s:'lcol colors in the lorm of pai'er, str1'un ; about the gymn.
The iof lictr'. of ith. club, a ar s follows:
MKt. K iNNiTi, W. V\i'i.T,' Sponsor
S.i l.\ v n Ii SAritI-'nt I'Predelnt
E',w i \\ I s .\ Viice- Preslncti
ollwAl W,.t Secretary
Rdhr.RT Peti-;r lIN Trciasurcr
At this '.,ritilg one of the most l.terCslinIg ;i \i.iCts of the cluh has not yet taken place. Ihat is, the
Varsity Club initiatlion ,ald hanlquet. This ini.iition has become a tr.uhliton.;l event ti the club!. whi'hl
serves as letting climax to to the year's athletic activities.































GIRLS' LETTER CLUB






HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC DEPARTMENT
By Phylli/ H fIler

The musical organizations at Cristobal High School furnish a means of musical culture for those who
wish to join; and pleasure, not for members alone, but also for those who may listen to the various prbduc-
I tions.
-- During the past year two very successful activities were organized: the String Ensemble and the girls'
Double Quartette. The String Ensemble has played at many of the Union Church programs, Visitation
S Day, at the annual Womens' Club program and Commencement. The Double Quartette has sung at the
Union Church, assembly programs, Visitation day and Commencement. They gave a delightful operetta.
"The Nifty Shop" with the help of Miss Bowman and many of the glee Club girls.
flt/ The girls' and boys' Glee Clubs have been working also. They sang at the assembly programs Visita-
tion Day and the annual Womens' Club program. Together, both glee clubs gave a gypsy operetta "Cho-
nita."


GIRLS' GLEE CLUB
































GIRLS' I)DOL'UB QU.XRTk'ET'


S.landin/o l, / hI rifhl. Theresa Giaulet. Anna Kotalik, .11iss Fhwl'. Ru1l1 MI m>an. Ikatrice
Cotton.
,Sillipnll l/ / o rila .Mlurice II'owv. loscphinc l)unnl Pi liJis Ilyleh,. ()lixc Aansto.,s.













StI nditih; /0i /t ri thi. Donald Corncll. Tom Russell, Christopher M.atchett. Asa I ullock,
mlontlor(u Tawes. De Jan .Mr. Sanson.
Slin/i /// li ri'hL. Grover (Gra\vatt. Rolbert Thomas. \Williaim Dicltnson, foseph (Roggcnl Victor lay. Anthony RlefdIfski, Vernon Clark. \illiam Fuller.


IANI)























ORCHESTRA


Standing left to riht. Charlotte Levy, Robert Hanson, Asa Bullock, Tom Russell, Paul Bar
nett, Stanford Stone, Miss Elner.
Sitting lejt to right. Elva Estenoz, Ruth Bauman, Phyllis Hyler, William Fuller, Charles Reeves,
Sam Freir.








Standing. lejt to right. William Forstrom, Gale Arnold, Victor May, Lee Kelso, John Bozeman,
Asa Bullock, John Finlayson, Paul BarQett, Vernon Clark.
Sitting left to right. Peter Ender, Fred Hauss, William Hoverter, Charles Washabaugh, Miss
Elner, David Potts, William Fuller, Robert Thomas.


BOYS' GLEE CLUB


I


(/
1// i


d,-v
























SO'iN( E;.C LL


TI IIS CIENCIE CLUB

TheC Sciece~. Cilil. ix: olozitt.t.tiloit as x ou ast. 'Ile Sichxiool its.,.li I %%asx staltetv (lltIng 19.54 w'ith
clf itcnm Oie I 1h-,- Claxss. lfil (Gcnteral 5 itttlcte Clastspl and T l"ucitx s l(Flcr~lletllar Science

Ralpil D; Ji(Cx 'S kok .illr'i M llsW. Al tclist" :old Dilolllald TeT'mils helC TIII, vear the clk lb had IS actively
Ile!i cix: all I-Ys. mx
1 ft C~Itlm 1)j i c \.mt mxv thliitttix u tJ Imd imill leticdqjttolCrs inl die jitml~ei i' gilt nt.'.t ittJ) i ]) 1[" Of tIWIi


La xkeini. Theit Xtttiini to t xftt i fS itty tittttMltem aind ic cal t ]tie andOX Spri "oIet ies h





I.\ i ONIS. 11 TII wESre'IN lS


I
I -


I
(g


Is





























--I


THE NATIONAL THESPIANS
By Olga Roe

The National Thespians is an honorary dramatic society which takes only students who have done the
required amount of work for eligibility. To be qualified for membership, a student must have satisfactory
scholarship in High School work, must have played with merit the major role of one long play, two major
roles in one-act plays, or minor roles in three long plays.
This year the National Thespians Club has been quite successful. At the beginning of the year there
were only three members. At the first initiation five new members who had fulfilled the requirements were
initiated into the club.
There is one meeting a month, each member taking his turn at entertaining the club.
The National Thespians sponsored the Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club plays and gave one of their own, "C3r.
Fed Babies" on Visitation Day.
The officers of the Club are:
Sponsor-Mrs. SPENCER
President-MARY RUTH RIEDEL
Secretary-ANNIE LAURIE TURBERVILLE
Noble Promoter-MARGARET BARNARD.





VISITATION DAY
By Margaret Hollilngshead

This year Visitation Day was under the direction of Margaret Hollingshead, with Edgar Borden
assisting her. There were fourteen committee members to aid them by directing the visitors and keeping
the halls quiet during classes.
There were about 260 visitors altogether, 192 of them being parents. They were all evidently interested
in the classes, for there was a very small percentage of visitors in the hall at any time during the day.
Classes were held from one o'clock until eight, with one hour, 4:45 to 5:45, for supper. There were a
few deviations from the regular Friday schedule, the object being to have as full a schedule as possible for
the visitors' benefit. All classes were expected to be run as usual, without any special programs, since the
object of the day was to give the parents a true view of school life.
During the eighth period a special program was put on in the auditorium. The Girl's Double Quartet
and the stringed ensemble, under Miss Elner's direction rendered several numbers, and the National
Thespians, under Mrs. Spencer's direction, gave a play "Corn Fed Babies", a highly amusing and clever
production.


SCHOOL NOTES
Bi/ Anna S. Reilly '35


Sept. 20. Readin', writing 'rithmetic"
sounds silly but it's beginning again.
Two new teachers have joined our flock,
Mr. Floyd Jeffries for Jr. Hi School and
Mr. Edward R. Siminski for Sr. Hi.
Sept. 21. Wouldn't it be grand and
glorious if every day could be like this
one? Only 15 minutes for each class!!!
CHS sure does believe in bigger (and
better) teachers when they exhibit Mr.
Siminski!!
You'd think the Frosh would have won
the Frosh-Soph Scrap with their great
number, but the Sophs proved to be a
little bigger than they were in the line
of battle!!
Sept. 24. Look around for serious
faces and you can't fine a one -except


maybe a few teachers. Everyone starts
in earnest today-- or are supposed to.
Students start eating in Cafeteria today
hope they don't eat too much.
Sept. 25. We have a "New Deal" in
athletics this year. A little complicated
but on the whole it sounds pleasing.
Sept. 26. Assembly this morning.
Mr. Franks told us of the more numerous
advantages of becoming a member of
the SA--sounds good. Imagine twelve
dances instead of 4 during the year!!!
Sept. 27. Boys' Varsity Club meets
today. They are going to get sweaters
this year--or so they have been told.
Different advisors for activities announ-
ced today--oh well! "Variety is the
spice of life" as the old saying goes.


1







Sep. 28. The first baileye del ano"
an informal one given in honor of the
the Frosh and Sophs. We all enjoyed
it too!!!
Oct. 2. Interclass soccer practice be-
gins today looks hopeful for all the
classes. Mrs. I). M. Melendez of the
Star and Herald gave a very interesting
talk on newspaper work to members of
the seventh period class of English 12.
Oct. 3. Gym!! What a pitiful word!
Girls' gym classes began today -- we
didn't do much though. Miss Connie
Smart is g,.in- to assist Miss Bailey in
handling all of us girls nice, eh what ??
First class meetings of the year today
also. Senior class seems to have quieted
down quite a bit in the past few months.
Oct. 4. Since Mr. "Vie" Seiler has
left our dear old school for a action,
Mr. Lockridge of Pedro Migucl began
instruction in the boys' gym classes
today.
Oct. 5. Two visitors to our dear
"alma mater" today. A Miss Jacobs of
New York City, and Mr. Davis of Co-
lorado. First Supper Club meeting held
in Cafeteria with Mrs. Spencer and Mr.
and Mrs. Franks as Ll-L-(
Oct. 8. Mr. Siminski, the Goliath of
CHS, returned from a visit to Balboa
with a challenge from the manly group
of BHS to a game of basketball. It is
rumored that Cristobal corpulents resent
criticisms of old age and are therefore
planning on the assured victory- -why
not???
A drive for 100% membership in the
SA began today. The future of the
Association looks bright.
Oct. 9. Mr. Hackett, Editorial spon-
sor of our school newspaper, announces
his intention of a weekly publication,
instead of bi-weekly as it was during the
last few months of last school year.
Photo Club, organized by Mr. Miller,
last year, had its first meeting of this
year in his room at 3 o'clock,
Oct. 10. What a list of members on
the "Trade Wind" staff. Hope that
means the newspaper is elltin_ better
all the time. Nominations Committee
for officers of SA met today to do their
duty--Students urged by Mr. Miller to
pay dues for SA.
Oct. 11. Two new positions in the
activities of CHS have been created,
Chairman of the school Publicity Com-
mittee and Chairman of the Art Com-
mittee for publications and bulletin
board service. Edgar Borden and lack
Egozcue now fill the offices.
Oct. 12. Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club meets
to elect officers and plan year's activities
First publication of "Trade Wind" for
this year came out today.
Saw school calendar today- onil 176
days of school-onl? ?


Oct. 15. Election of SA officers post-
poned from Tuesday the 16th to Thurs-
day the 18th.
Plans are being made to have a band
in CHS hope we do.
Oct. 16. Carnival has been postponed
from Nov. 10th until after Jan. 1. Au-
ditorium's being used for too many
things besides revue practice.
Frosh-Soph Dramatic Club held first
meeting of the year in the sponsor's
room, sponsor Miss Liter, officers were
elected.
Oct. 17. At the assembly this mor-
ning, Mr. Miller did the two candidates
for president of SA a dirty trick -he
called on them to make an ex-tempora-
neous (is that right?) speech speech
and were they scared- oh boy???
Oct. 18. A big day in CHS -elec-
tion of officers of the SA boy were the
polls crowded-- there wasn't even stand-
ing rooml!
Oct. 19. We had a very prominent
man and interesting speaker at the
assembly this P. M.--a Mr. Joseph I.
Scott. He spoke on "The Spirit of
America."
Oct. 22. First games of interclass
soccer series played -Seniors beat Frosh
and Jrs. and Sophs tied.
Oct. 24. Varsity team for girls' volley
ball has been picked out hope they win
from Balboa.
Oct. 25. Game between girls' Varsity
volley ball team and Faculty Men post-
poned to Nov. 2-the men have to get
in shape so the girls won't beat them!
Oct. 26. Navy Day tomorrow so we
had a Navy Day program in assembly
today--too bad it had to fall on a Satur-
day-now no one can skip school to go
out to Coco Solo. Oh well! such is life.
Senior class Halloween Dance tonight,
and did we have fun??? Somebody will
have to go a long way to make any other
dance better than that one.
Oct. 29. Well the "Scobies" have
won the interclass soccer series -shows
how good the upperclassmen are!!!!
Seniors came second-isn't that just
lovely.
Oct. 30. Installation of officers of
SA- -it's too bad that it's all over cause
it was so nice. Reverend Cecil L. Mor-
gan administered the oath of office to the
president, Anna Reilly. The SA sponsor,
Mr. Miller, administered the oath to
the members of the Executive Council.
Oct. 31. Mr. Hackett, our loving
history professor, is giving different
tests in his American Problems class
these days. Since the big discussion
these past few days about the article
in the Literary Digest on "too much
homework," Mr. Hackett has determi-
ned to find out just how fast the average
Senior can read. It turns out that he







(the Senior) can read 29 pages an hour.
Nov. 2. We have 5 cheer leaders this
year instead of 3. Charlie Helm, head
cheer leader, of course, conducted a pep
rally, the first of the season. When he
quoted Abe Lincoln, we were naturally
dumbfounded!!!
Mr. Franks had the first Executive
Council meeting at his home. After
three hours of serious business, delicious
refreshments were served. Hope all the
meetings have refreshments as an ending.
The girls got beat by the faculty in
volley ball--what a pity!
Nov. 3. No school today--but darn
It's Saturday--just another holiday we
get cheated out of.
Nov. 5. A second victory for the
faculty men over the girls' volley ball
team-you'll have to do something
about that, girls!!!
Nov. 6--Up to date we have 323
students in CHS-seems like we're get-
ting bigger and better every year.
Nov. 9. Another of C. Heim's pep
rallys--this one was in preparation for
the two games tomorrow-the first in
the nter-school series.
Assembly Committee held its bi-
weekly assembly today in commemora-
tion of Armistice Day.
Report cards! What pitiful words.
Nevertheless, there are three "A"
students, 2 Seniors and a Soph. All girls,
and whadda ya think of that???
Nov. 10. Grls won 2 out of 3 in volley
ball--three cheers. The boys didn't do
so well, but will next time.
Nov. 12. Preliminary list of "Carib-
bean" staff announced. Looks pretty
good for the annual of 1935.
Nov. 13. Ye Editor of the "Trade
Wind," Billy Beers, has resigned his
position and is now replaced by Edgar
Borden, former Associate Editor.
Nov. 14. First meeting of "La PAS"
today. Big things coming off in the
next year!
Jr. College soccer team beat our boys
today, 2-1.
Nov. 15. Rehearsals of Jr. Sr. Play,
"The Red-Headed Stepchild," are n
full swing. Will be produced in the
early days of Dec.
Nov. 16. More class meeting. Never
heard so much discussion of Senior
privileges in my life.
Nov. 17. Choo-choo -F'rst "special"
of CHS to Balboa for the soccer game.
In all the rain and slosh the boys lost.
The e'rl, did too, but we still have hope
for the future.
Nov. 20. Informal 'n't'at'on of n'.w
"La PAS" members starts today. Tlvy
all look so cute with ribbons in the.r hr'r
and the r clothes on backward.
Nov. 21. "La PAS" installed officers
at noon today in Mrs. Spencer's room.
Nov. 22. Executive Council meeting


at the home of the president, Anna
Reilly. More refreshments served!!!
Nov. 23. Jr.-Sr. Play postponed
from Dec. 7 to Dec. 14 because of Thanks-
giving holidays next week.
Nov. 24. The gals from BHS won
the volley ball series this AM. The boys
of CHS won the third and last soccer
game, but it doesn't give us the series
cause we lost the first two game. Formal
"La PAS" initiation in the Auditorium
tonight--a program and refreshments
will follow.
Nov. 27. New point system was
published today--the other had to be
revised by the Executive Council.
Nov. 28. First Barn Dance ever held
in CHS was given by the Executive
Council tonight and a big success it
was!!! Voices are already clamoring for
another affair of its kind.
Dec. 3. Interclass baseball practice
starts today. Student coaches and
managers for the class teams are among
the new features of the second interclass
sport of the year.
Dec. 5. Interclass basketball practice
for girls starts today. Games will be
played in a week or two.
Dec. 6. President Anna Reilly and
vice president Tom Russell of the SA
accompanied Mr. Franks to Balboa HS
today, where all three gave lengthy
talks on the advantages of the SA in a
school. BHS seems to be in favor of
starting one too, and just wants some
info about it.
Dec. 7. We sure learned a few things
about the Chinese today. Father Joseph
McGinn gave a talk on China and held
everyone's undivided attention for 45
minutes--which is unusual in CHS.
Dec. 10. That Jr. Sr. Play, "The
Red-Headed Stepchild," seems to be
coming along fihe and promises to make
at least one evening entertaining for
students of CHS.
Dec. 11. Dummy tournament for
boys' interclass baseball starts today
despite the exceedingly slushy weather
we've been having.
Dec. 14. The big play comes off
tonight. We all await it with eagerness.
Dec. 15. More laughing was heard in
h Auditorium last night than ever was
heard before. That play sure was good.
Dec. 17. Today is the beginning of a
series of early morning assemblies. From
now until--we have a 5 minute assembly
every morning before 8 o'clock.
Class meetings once again. If the
Seniors keep it up, they may have a
model class ;n a few years.
Dec. 18. That was some talk Ruth
W '! 'n--..,l gave this AM on Girls'
Athletics. Wouldn't be surprised if she
was called on for more pep talks.
Dec. 21. Recognition Service of the
Supper Club held tonight.







TIIhC suppTr il' bush li'ss mS'' llin ll-
Imv.d.
Boys' Varsity Club pivs-nic d a most
unusual and intow Ai\ r ih ll program. Mr. V\inton i \> il'
lb vs lltheir sWt ai is, s0'l which ih l'ilrT
C had I; -.n s.,vd. WNrN- th .v th,.y

jan. 2. Ilappy N,.w '', ,r!! l.ooks
like a pr'osp rom is 0n10' tc 1a'r ll 'I IS.
We\' ha1\,' a 1ni ml of IInr'w s itldi'nis w\ilh
(is indav fl>r ih0 r.' i h i i Jan. 5. l1onor r oll c ani i o luti todl '.
The' s illio thll', ir \vr, c t- n til s0 "A"
hon 1or ro s .ll as '.' o tl' Ih lst on,... \\ilho
said tlie iils ar, ltI hli looki t in m11 lik-
the hiovs arUil't tIioo hot.
\Varsity basbi0a1l 1tam starts lpir'clt'c
todaii .\bout 2,: ari tryin' tor thl
(r;'ntl not 1;bad. Hlop- wv win ill n lirsi.
second, :anld Ilst aIli)i's this yVear (th'r
atre only 3)!!!
Suipper Clu had a fruit cakelt raffle
today. boy" thlos t caks lonokt'od ood.
Jan. 4. \Wh'lat a lot of' sicpy ,yes
seems mnore like a blu .1ii Molday dhai a
Friday one good thing ;aillt l'riday
is that ou. don't lha; to I t (uIp tarly' t'he
next morning.
Jan. 7. .\noh'hir xisior in CIIS,
Professor T.. C. ITriueloiod of t(hl L'ni\ .,r-
sity of Mlichitanl. The Prof. (int'r.'s-
ling chap) sptok to ilh ass-'mil,'d stu-
dents on ithe se\el tlriuiinlphs Il o public
speaking.
Jaii. 8. C(.onilal Conlnitt'e held
their iong.-promisud mieeiing today
now serious work on th-l C:rnival b,)..ins.
Jan. 9. Informal inioia io of ilhe
second hlaich of candhidats illw "La Pas'
slaricd today. .\l i hes" liti l- A iris look
very sw'c-i in their hair ribbons.
Jan. 10. .\Anolhr on otf ilihos.' nice
long ExecutiL,\ Council InelhinlTs 'was
held a i the homni o t' ,- vic e-pre'.idlit
Tom Russell, last ,',, nin0 .
Jan. 11. TheI Supp r Club M.lother
and D)aughivr !"'a ihis a 'icrnoonm. hFop '
they don't pot> sick will all thai cak
around.
1an. 12. \\hal : sp.'cii!!! Hol \.: 'r,
it was thoi bIOs on1e V,.'.'i had ill ti" way
of behavior. Th only thingil thlot spoiled
the day was' ihll loss of th' :ts'b.Hl
g mllt, but w''i'e onllli; will th,: ooih'"r
two.
Jan. 14. Class nm<'tings aging hod'ay.
The S 'nirs arm-': L oinl noisy ag4,in-
they'd better takl it 'asy.
Jan. 13. The girls' gym class- "s s 'Iln
to wb working very hard a(t tlcsl, -,-im
tests lh -v're having.
)an. 16. Formal iniiiiatiion of "L.
P 's" n:\v l 'en)mb'rs toniilIt.
Jan. 18. .\ p p rally for 17) mlin "ti this P. M). to give the student lbdy
some pep for tomorrow's gallmes.
Jan. 19. Double victory over Balboa!
Won the basketball and baseball games


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March. 5. Miss CHS, Evelyn Dwyer,
had a lovely float in the Colon Carnival
today-thanks to Edwin Hanna and
Allen Jacques.
March. 6. Seniors won the interclass
track meet. Sophomores came second.
March. 9. Balboa won the track
meet today--what a pity. The "Trade
Wind" is giving a "Depression Dance"
tonight-quite appropriate, don't you
think ?
March. 22. Visitation Day turned
out very nicely today. Guy stayed at
home 'cause he was afraid of all the
visitors.) The committee arranged
everything very well.
March. 23. Phil Riedel broke 5
swimming records of the Canal Zone to-
day. Good luck to you, Phil.
March. 30. Frosh's first dance tonight
Such spiffy programs and unique decora-
tions. It probably is the best dance of
the year for its decorations and programs.
April. 1. Interclass basketball tourna-
ment starts today. Watch out for the
Seniors!!!
April. 2. That "Caribbean" staff
sure is sledging away at their work.
Looks like a good year for CHS.
April. 5. Just one more week of
school 'til Easter vacation-what a
break!
April. 8. The well-known Achmed
Abdullah gave a talk in the Auditorium
this P. M. He interested the students
quite a lot with his unique bracelet.
April. 9. The first CHS operetta in
years was given tonight by the Girls'
Glee Club and the Household Arts
classes. It was called "The Nifty Shop"
and nifty it was. A special invitation
affair and the girls deserve credit.
April. 10. It seems that the Seniors
won the interclass basketball series by
a landslide. They are scheduled to play
the Faculty tomorrow.
April. 11. Hooray for the Seniors
CHS. How they beat the Faculty with
a score of 37-27-what a game!
April. 12. Today amrks the end of
school for 9 whole days--are we glad?


April. 22. The students of CHS
truly miss the company of one of the'
sweetest girls who ever attended our
school, Josephine Dunn. We extend
our sincerest sympathy to her sister,
Dorothy; brother, Milton; and to her
parents in their bereavement.
April. 25. The Supper Club Dance
tonight. Promises to be an unusual
affair.
May. 3. The first interschool bas-
ketball game of the season tonight-
hope it's successful.
May. 6. Today works the beginning
of Senior week. Let's all have one grand
time for a change!!!
May. 10. Another one of those inters-
school basketball games. You should
have seen those boys travel on that floor.
What a fast game!
May. 11. "The Soul of Anne Rutled-
ge" turned out to be a very sweet period
play. The students enjoyed it immen-
sely.
May. 18. Executive Council Dance
is planned to spring a surprise tonight
May. 31. The night of the last basket-
ball game of the series. School is slowly
but surely coming to an end for the year.
June. 3. Just think--today begins the
last month of school. Boy that sounds
good!
June. 7. The Jr. Sr. Banquet was a
huge success! The Seniors look a little
low these days--looks as tho they don't
want to finish school after all.
June. 9. Baccalaurate Service in the
Christ Church was quite impressive.
The Seniors surely do need to be blessed
now.
June. 12. "Caribbeans" come out
today: TheSeniors will have "writers',
cramps pretty soon.
June. 13. Exams! They spoil all the
fun of the last days of school--everyone
says so.
June. 14. The Big Day-Commencnt!
Glad as I am to get out of school I feel
like crying and I know many more do too
Here's wishing you lots of luck, Seniors!!!


ALUMNI
By. Kathleen Goodenough


1931
CARLOS B. RANKIN, Cristobal, Canal
Zone.
VELMA HALL, Cristobal, C. Z.
RUTH DUVALL, 2974 Colerian Avenue,
Cincinnati, Ohio.
MARION NEELY, Cristobal, C. Z.


THOMAS PESCOD, Cristobal, C. Z.
WILLIAM BAILEY, Cristobal, C. Z.
ERNEST BERGER, Tri State Indiana.
CELESTE CLARK, (Mrs. B.) Powell,
Balboa, C. Z.
CRAWFORD J. CAMPBELL, Yale Univer-
sity, New Haven, Conn.


I-I







ED)ARD CONKLIN(, Cristobal, C. Z.
MAARGARET M. DAVIS, Cristobal, C. Z.
VINNIE ELSON, Box 575, College Sta-
tion, Pullman, Washington.
RUSSELL ELWvELL. Duke University,
N. C.
FABIAN ENiIGAN)DR, (ad press ln-
known).
C.AR\A RISKI, Box 728 Leaninglon,
Ontario, Canada.
BURTON IIACKETT, Cristobal, C. Z.
JOHN KELLY, (address Lunkno wn).
MIRIA KtLEEFKIE'NS, (Mrs.) Frazer,
Cristobal, C. Z.
1)'i. IH'RA L.EIWIS, (address Unknlown).
PEl.RCIAL LYI.aW, Cristobal, C. Z.
KENNETH lMA\RERl, Balboa, C. Z.
IK'UCENIA M. .iMCiLAIN, Cristobal, C. Z.
RONALD PIilLLIPOTuTS, New York City.
BETTINA POW\.RS, Fort Hancock, N.J.
ANNA RYAN, 648 East State Street,
Trenton, N. J.
ALOI1A SLOCL'M,. Cristobal, C. Z.
IDOOTHY W\VIRT, Cristobal, C. Z.
GEIOR(; \'VEuRTZ, Cristobal, C. Z.


Mrs. Graham.
RAYM:OND WILL, Cristobal, C. Z.
RICHARD WOOD, Cristobal, C. Z.
ALICE J. GORMELY, Cristobal, C. Z.
FRANK GRIESINGER, (Gor g a Tech,
Atlanta Ga.
EVELYN VRIGHIIT, (address unknown).
JA.MES HAYDEN, New York Nautical
School, New York City.
VERONA C. HERMAN, University of
Texas, Austin, Texas.
RoGEIR M. HOWE, Purdue University,
l.afayette, Ind.
CARL KARIGER, Higgins Trade School,
Los Angeles, Cal.
TIIELMA KING, 27 Broadwav Terrace,
New York City.
ALVIN A. LYEW, Colon, R. de P.
MARGARET MIIZRACIIl, Colon, R. de P.
ELWIN NEAL, Canal Zone Junior
Clkl-ge. Balboa, C. Z.
JAMES WOOD, Cristobal, C. Z.
ELSIE NEELY, Cristobal, C. Z.
BENJAMIN ROBERTS, Union College,
Schenectady, N. Y.
JANET ROBINSON, William and Mary
College, Williamsburg, Va.
HERMAN Roos, JR., Gatun, C. Z.
JESSIE SINCLA.IR, (address unknown).
BETTY STAtEIIIR, (address unknown).
ROBERT STEVENSON, Cristobal, C. Z.
ALICIA TillRL\VA LL, Denver, Colorado.
JESSIE VANE, Compeville, Washington.


NEi-.LL 'A VRDLAW, Cristobal, C. Z.
PERRY WAV.suHABAGH, Cristobal, C. Z.
EDI)WIN 'VEIS.MAN, Purdue University,
Laflaye tte, Ind.
Ei.zATitEri WIVRTZ, Cristolbal, C. Z.

1952

R1ND)OLIPH M. WIKINGSJ'TAD, Cristobal,
C. Z.
ALBIN B. FORSSTROM, Rhode Islandl,
State University.
ELEANOR M1. REINHIOLD, Tampa, Fla.
BRI'CE S.\NDERS, Cristobal, C. Z.
INEZ 'I'll EOKTISTO, Colon, R. dec P.
MALCOLM H' EEt.ER, 4 Pleasant View
Place, Whiteslboro, N. Y.
HOw\AIR KEEN.N, PurdueL Uni\er.sity,
Lafaivette, Ind.
RICIARD BETTEIN, Fort Randolph,
C. Z.
GL.AmDY BlI.ss, Cristobal, C. Z.
ALLENYE DEAKINS, (hMrs. R.) Walker,
Gatun, C. Z.
MARY C. DEANS, Cristobal, C. Z.
JOHN DELANEY, Colon, R. dIe P.
DONA V. EATON, Barnard College,
New York City.
JOSEPH' EBI)ON, Canal Zone Junior
College, Balboa, C. Z.
HARRY C. EGOLF, Canal Zone Junior
College, Balboa, C. Z.
VIVIAN G. ELj(;GREN, (address un-
known).
HOWARD S. EINGELKE, Cristobal, C. Z.
MARIE ENSRUD, Fort Davis, C. Z.
JOSE ANTONIO FERNANDEZ, Colon, R.
de P.
1953

HAROLD AGNEW, (address unknown).
WEBSTER BEARD, Balboa, C. Z.
HOWARD BERRY, Severn School, Se-
verna Park. Md.
CLIFTON BROWN, Cristobal, C. Z.
ROBERT BROWN, University of Ten-
nesee, Knoxville, Tenn.
JESUS D\AVD, Gatun, C. Z.
ERNEST DE LA OSSA, Columlia Uni-
versity, New York, N. Y.
PARKER HANNA, Cristobal, C. Z.
ROBERT HANNA, Cristobal, C. Z.
OSCAR HEILBRON, Colon, R. de P.
CIARLES HowE, Purdue University,
Lafayette, Ind.
WILLIAM KEENAN, Purdue University,
Lafayette, Ind.
LOUIE KLEEFKINS, Cristobal. C. Z.
HENRY LEE. Cristobal, C. Z.
HAROLD LOCKWOOD, Ciincinnatti, Ohio.
JOHN LOTIIROP, Los Angeles, California


49 -







MANDI MARCHOSKY, Cristobal, C. Z.
CHRIS OHLSCHLAGER, Cristobal, C. Z.
JACK PATERSON, Canal Zone Junior
College, Balboa, C. Z.
CHARLIE PESCOD, Cristobal, C. Z.
ERNEST REINHOLD, Cristobal, C. Z.
HARVEY SMITH, Canal Zone Junior
College, Balboa, C. Z.
JAMES WVERGIN, Purdue University,
Lafayette, Ind.
HELEN AANSTOOS, Cristobal, C. Z.
THELMA ALBRITTON, Cristobal, C. Z.
DOROTHY BIRKELAND, Cristobal, C. Z.
JANE BRETCH, (Mrs. W. G.) Tisdale,
Coco Solo, C. Z.
VELTA FOLEY (Mrs. C. Sharp), Cris-
tobal, C. Z.
MOLLY GRUBER, Sweet Briar, Va.
HELEN HAMMOND, University of Cin-
cinnatti, Ohio.
MARY MELENDEZ, Colon, R. de P.
MILDRED OWEN, Hammond, La.
MARTHA POTTS, (Mrs.) Griffiths, Cris-
tobal, C. Z.
NORINE RAKOVSKY, Cristobal, C. Z.
EDNA THIRWALL, Cristobal, C. Z.
ELIZABETH THORNTON, (Mrs. Jordan),
Cristobal, C. Z.
ARTHUR VANE, Coupeville, Washing-
ton.
MAY WEGNER, Cristobal, C. Z.
THOMAS RANKIN, Cristobal, C. Z.

1934
FRANK WASHABAUGH JR., Lehigh Uni-
versity, Bethlehem, Penn.
DOROTHY Roos, Gatun, C. Z.
CARLTON HORINE, California School
of Technology, Pasedena, Cal.
MARGUERITE WINN, Littlefield Dor-
mitory, University of Texas, Austin,
Texas.
JOSE BAZAN, Canal Zone Junior Co-
llege, Balboa, C. Z.
RAYMOND BEJARANO (address un-
known).
MABELLE BLISS, Miami, Florida.
STELLA BOGGS, Cristobal, C. Z.
CHARLES BELDEN, Cristobal, C. Z.
BLANCHE BELDEN, Cristobal, C. Z.
JUDY BRIDGET, France Field, C. Z.
COLIN CAMPBELL, Matthews Hall,
Harvard, Boston, Mss.
NoW:.\ DAVIS, Cristobal, C. Z.
EILEEN DONOVAN, Cristobal C. Z.
FRED EBI)ON, Gatun, C. Z.
lRUTh o EGOLF, Gatun, C. Z.
GEORGE FERNANDEZ, Colon, R. de P.
ANNE GIBSON, Cristobal, C. Z.
JEREMIAH GRIN, Duke University,
Durham, N. C.


VIRGINIA H.\NN.N. Cristobal, C. Z.
ELIZABETH HAYES, Canal Zone Junior
College, Balboa, C. Z.
MARY VIRGINIA HEARNE, Littlefield
Dormitory, University of Texas, Austin,
Texas.
SHIRLEY JANE HILL, 820 Detroit Street,
Denver, Colorado.
MAXINE HOFFMAN Cristobal, C. Z.
VICTORIA HOLLOWELL, (Mrs. C.) Ses-
sions, Auburn N. Y.
WILLIAM HOLLOWELL, Arkansas State,
Jonesboro, Arkansas.
ETHEL HUNTOON, Goddard Seminary,
Barre, Vermont.
GORDON HUTCHINS, Jr. Pomfret School
Pomfrei, Connecticut.
BLOSSOM LAM, Colon, R. de P.
HELEN LEACH, Cristobal, C. Z.
GRANT LEMMON, University of Nebras-
ka, Omaha Neb.
DAVID LEVY, East Hall, Rice Institute,
Houston, Texas.
JEANNE LEWIS, College of New Ro-
chelle, N. Y.
GLORIA MANNIX, University of Texas,
Austin, Texas.
JOHN MANNIX, University of Texas,
Austin, Texas.
BEVERLEY MARCUSE, Shreveport La.
ROBERT MOLTON, University of Vir-
ginia, Charlottesville, Va.
EDNA MUELLER, 55 Ridge Avenue,
Passaic, N. J.
RUTH PICKETT, Canal Zone Junior
College, Balboa, C. Z.
VIOLET RANDALL, Cristobal, C. Z.
RICHARD REINHOLD, Akron Ohio.
HENRY E. SANCHEZ, Colon, R. de P.
MARGUERITE SIEBLER, Fort Sherman,
C. Z.
ROBERT WARREN SLOCUM, Smith Hall,
University of Virginia, Charlottesville,
CHARLES SOUTH, Cristobal C. Z.
BETTY ANN STETLER, Leland Stanford
University, California.
WILLIAM STONE, University of Southern
California, Los Angeles.
RUTH SWAN, Mississippi College for
Women.
ROBERT WERTZ, Cristobal, C. Z.
SIDNEY F. WHARTON (address un-
known).
WILLIAM RAY WHEELER (Cristobal
C. Z.
LOUISE HIDDEN, Balboa, C. Z.
EDISON WIRTZ, Cristobal, C. Z.
ALEJANDRO L. WONG, Colon, R. de P.
ALICE WOOD, West Minister Street,
Syracuse, New York.
ERNEST WOOD JR., Cristobal, C. Z.


'II


4 1


L.__ ......__








































































































i











I I































SOCCER



SO )CCER

VARSITY-BA.LB()OA

Although the Crisiobal Student Bodyl gave the soccer team what was probably tile best support it --
has ever had, the boys were unable to come through with a championship.
Six varsity men were left from last year. Iut diue to some of the new material being pretty green andl
in the short time devoted to varsity practice could not learn enough to pull the teami through to victory.
The first tilt went to Ballhoa on November 10 at Kolonut Park by a score of 4 to 1. Crisloiial
started tile game very strongly having the hall in Balboa's territory luring the entire first quarter. It -
was during this quarter that Cristolbal lladle its only tally when DurhliaZm put a ieautiftul one past Balboa's /S
goalkeeper. In the second quarter (he Cristobal defense worked very poorly and Bialioa scored three
goals, the scorers being Moore. Navarro. and Michelson. In the third period Bilboa scored again on a
penalty kick by Capiain l )lurfree. -Tf
The second game on November 17. at Bialboa, was accompanied by ai special train from Cristoba l.
However, as it was raining at game time only a few of those who went over attended the game. Regardless
of this show of enthusiasm Balhoa handled the Cristobal "Redmen" a 7 to 0 drubbing. The game was /',
played in a sea of mud and neither team was able to do much more than push thle ball up and( down the
field. Although thie score does not indicate it "MAoper" Cotton play ed a superb ga me at goalguard for tlhe t e
Cristobal warriors. Time and again le turned away threats and but for his playing the score would, no
doubt, have leen much more in H alboa's favor. "
The chlmni nionshil lost, Cristolal came out from under cover and took tile third game I to 0. The
game was closely combatted all tile way through and tile result in doubt until the final whistle had blown.
Outstanding among those red warriors who fought so bravely for victory were such names a;s lannia,
iHill. Borden Neely. Renardus (Captain), IDougLhertv. Curtis and Cotffey. f
The defensive combination of tHanna, Colley, and Neely turned plav after play away from the
redmenls" goal and deserve much credit.
Balboa had ai stronger team, m iut C. II. S. made them fight t or victor-y.


JUNIOR COLLEGE

The C. II. S. "redmen" were also unsuccessful against the junior College aggregation losing both
names to them. The respective scores were 3 it I anld to 0. As yet Cristoh~I has not beaten the lunior
College as it also lost both games last year.
'Tle tfollowing ware C. 11. S. players: ReynarCdus Ca tain i. Cotton. Neely. I)uey, Ender, Fernandez,
Curtis, F. Hianna. II. Wills, Borden, Hill. Dougherty, R. 1. PeteCrson. Retally,i Coffey. and D)urham.


INTERCLASS

In accordance with the new system of sports inaugurated this year, interclass soccer ias played beflelre
varsitv. As strange as it may seem every class enjoyed a very large turnout. *. or once i
A dummy series was run of at first to determine the strength of each team. The Freshmen and the
Sophomores were given handicaps because of their weakness.
The regular schedule was then played, and so well wer e the handicaps figured that it resulted in a ouir
way tie. Because of this playol'ls h ad to lie Iehl.I The Seniors defeated tile juniors 2 to I andi the Sophlo-
mores succumbed to ile Freshmen 5 to 1. In the linal game tlie Seniors were unable to overcome tlie handi- -- "-
cap that the little fellows had, and the Freshmen became the soccer champions of 1954.

53






























BASEBALL


BASEBALL-VARSITY
This year the dear old Alma Mater flashed a bit of her old form and walked off with all of the baseball
laurels.
After losing the first game to Balboa, the boys from the Gold Coast tightened down, and led by the
strong pitching arm of Max Sanders, fought their way through to victory in the remaining two games.
1ST GAME
On Saturday, January 12, in one of the most interesting high school games seen on the Isthmus in the
past few years, Balboa managed to take Cristobal into camp by the close score of 7 to 5.
A satisfied, but disappointed, crowd of C. H. S. rooters, saw our boys out-hit Balboa 8 to 7 and yet
lost by two runs. Four errors, all made by our infield, were the main cause of this. Balboa also made
four errors, but the breaks were evidently with them.
The game was featured by the marvelous pitching of Max Sanders, who struck out no less than 14
would be hitters.
"Pablo" Beard and Howard Will were Cristobal's outstanding batters; Paul getting 3 beautiful hits
and Howard collecting two.
Corrigan and Friday starred for Balboa; Corrigan striking out 9 C. H. S. batters and Friday leading
his team with two hits.
2ND GAME
However, a week later at Mount Hope, Balboa High School accompanied by 150 students and their
high school band, journeyed to Cristobal to taste defeat, 4 to 1 before the strong pitching of Max "Lefty"
Sanders, who limited the Pacific siders to one run and four scattered hits. Hearne and Parmerlee also
pitched high class ball, allowing Cristobal only six hits.
The game was attended by approximately 900 fans who were treated to a high grade of baseball by
the future stars from Cristobal and Balboa high schools.
Cristobal scored one run in the second inning; another brace in the fourth and their last tally in the
sixth, every man but M. Sanders, E. Durham, and E. Hanna getting one hit.
Balboa scored its lone tally in the fifth inning due to a walk, two singles and one error.
Ed Hanna made one of the most spectacular catches seen in a long time at the Mount Hope park
when he went to the left field fence in the eighth inning to spear Friday's lusty bid for an extra base hit.
Max Sanders starred for Cristobal again, fanning out 15 batters and allowing only four hits.
Foster led the Balboa offensive with two hits.
It is interesting to note that Balboa used 15 different players in its attempt to stop the boys from the
Gold Coast.
3RD GAME
On January 26, at Balboa, after staging a great uphill battle the Cristobal team nosed out Balboa
High, 6 to 5, to clinch the Interscholastic baseball series.
Balboa had enjoyed a 5 to 1 lead up to the sixth inning when the Gold Coasters started their determi-
ned drive which led to the championship. The Pacific Siders were held scoreless after the fourth inning
as the Cristobal Boys tightened up their defense and Max Sanders fanned eleven of the opposition.
Two runs scored in the eighth inning knotted the score and a passed ball in the ninth enabled the
Atlantic Siders to bring the winning run across the plate.
Cristobal scored its first run in the opening inning; Balboa tallied twice in their half of the first,
again in the second, again in the third, and their fifth and last run in the fourth; then, as Hearne began to
tire, the C. H. S. boys scored in the sixth, tied the score in the eighth and won the old ball game in the
ninth when Beard scored the winning run.
Now to hand out a little credit where it belongs. First we wish to praise our new coach for turning
out a winner in his first year. Three cheers for Mr. Siminski. Also Mr. Miller deserves a good deal of
credit as he really got the boys off to their start with his fine coaching of last year.
However, we doubt if it would have been possible to turn out such a winner without the assistance of
such persons as Max Sanders and "Pablo" Beard. In three games Max fanned a total of 40 batters which
seems to be some sort of a record for the Isthinus. "Pablo" led the C. H. S. offensive with 6 hits and also
had more stolen bases to his credit than anyone else.


I-1


I, 4







One person who had nothing to (do with the team deserves ;a great deal of credit also. To Charlie
Helm goes a neat bit of praise for promoting tlie spirit andii enthusiasm necessary to run two special trains
to Ball oi. Also his assistant and side-kick, Bert Asenclo, rates at lot of praise for helping the same general
Ca ulse.
BOX SCORE
N AM ill A I II I'll S, I. I.II. e \ I I : l ll:I
Curtis 12 2 2 0 5 1 1 t7 .750
Will 14 2 3 4 1 1 1 .214 .875
Beard .1 5 16 3 5 i 1 1 .402 1 I)01)
Sanders. .M 12 I 4 1 0 2 1) .33 1 0(10
Durham 12 2 1 0 I 2 I) 085 I .000
Hanna. E 12 3 1 1 2 1 085 1 000(1
Ilanna, W 6 5 2 2 I 1 2 1..35 714
Neelv II 1 2 42 I 1 18 I2 1.000
Sanders. 1 12 0 2 21 1 5 5 107 9)2)
Peterson 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1)00 000
CK;o. 0 0 0 0 0 )) 000 000
Col ton 0 0 0 I) 0 0 0 (00l 1(00(

I NTERCIASS BASEIIAILL
After getting off too a very poor start Ibecause ofl had weather, ilterclass baseball settled down to
what looked like a battle between the juniors and tlie Seniors.
It was impossible to run a dummy tournament because of rain but judging firomll practice sessions both
the Frosh and the Sophs were given a hamldicap of ten runs and after thle first game it looked like they
needed fifteen.
In the first game thlie Seniors took tlihe Sopthoimores over ithe blimps to a score of 18 to I I (tlie handicap
included.) Christian and Aslhton were unable to hold down .~lax Saiilers, Irl Sinders aml Paul Be.rdl who
collected four, four. aind three hits respectively out of four times at hlat. However the combinailtiioiln of Max
Sanders and Paul Beard held the Soplis to two hits, Max striking out seven and Paul ten.
In tie second game the luniors just managed to overcome the handicap oft the l"Frosh to beat them 12
to 11. Curtis was tlie leading player for the Juniors striking out ten men and getting three hits. ,1lc-
Carthy lnd Martin led the Frosh, M.cCarthy striking out eight men and M.lartin getting two hits.
In the third game the Seniors just nosed out the lFrosh beating them 14 to 153. heard and Irl Sanders
starred again lor the Seniors while Martin again led the Freshmen with two hits.
Then tie juniors took a close game Irom the Sophomores coming out on tlie top side of a 14 to 13
score. Curtis pitched a one hit game with Keenani getting that single blow. Sullivan and Curtis led the
Juniors at tihe bat each getting two lilts. Curtis struck out fourteen men to become the days outstanding
star.
In the game to decide who kept the cellar position the hieshman thoroughly whipped the Sophs 6 to 4.
McCarthy pitched a lne game for the Freshmen allowing tonly thrce hits. Martin was again the outstan-
ding batter collecting two more hits.
In tlie final big game to decide thle champs of 19)35 the Seniors gaily tripped the Juniors and walked
off with the buntinlhg. Paul Beard andt I rl Sanders combined to pitch a no-hit, no riun game and Claude Ber-
ger led the way to an 18 to 0 victory by gathering three hits.
The outstanding p)laers of this series were: for the Seniors, Paul Peard and Irl Sanders who both
batted over 80' 1 atnd combined to pitch some wonderl'ul games: for thie Juniors Curtis antd Sullivan played
the besit l Joust ber tie he last game Curltis injured a fingei and it was due to his ah.ence that the Ju-
niors attriflute their loss to the Senio:rs': for the Sopho!,iat:':c .'!shto:I amld Christian were outstanding, Ash-
ton leading his team at the bat and ChiiAliall pitching some nice games: for the Freshmen thie outstand-
ing ian was Martin whoi led his team by a large distance: in batting a:id who played a hue game afiheld



BASKETBALL



'\ ^. .RL^^_



































I I


BASKETBALL-VARSITY
With the track season completed and Interclass basketball laurels carried off by the Senior Class,
that final flashing spot has descended upon old C. H. S. Basketball is the outstanding sport of the year and
this year promises to be up among some of the best that Cristobal has seen.
Due to the fact that the material for this annual of ours must all be turned in some weeks before the
season is completed, we will give you summaries of the games as played for as long a period as possible.
The season began with Coach Vinton selecting the following men from the various class teams as
members of the varsity squad: M. Sanders (Captain), R. Neely, T. Russell, I. Sanders, H. Will, W.
Hanna, W. Cotton, J. Christian, W. Wood, R. Clemens, J. Clay, E. Hoffman.
Sub Base:
After a week of strenuous practice the team began a series of practice games. The first of these was
with a team of Sailors from the Submarine Base. Score: C. H. S. 39-S. B. 28
Fleet Air Base:
The second was with the Fleet Air Base five, whose team ranked second place in the Service League
last vear. In a very close and hard fought game the C. H. S. basketeers managed to chalk up a one point
victory. Score: C. H. S. 22-F. A. B. 21
Gatun:
Later on in the week the "Purple and Gold) of the old Alma Mater defeated the Gatun Basket Chuckers
by the same score (22-21) in another hotly contested affair.
Junior College I:
On April 29, the first league game with the Junior College Boys got underway and when the final
whistle was blown the Cristobalites were well out in front. After trailing their older opponents up until
the final period was on its way, the C. H. S. dribblers began to click and forged quickly ahead to win by
a 22-15 score.
The Silver sider's first quarter attack was quite spectacular, with Captain Joe Ebdon, '33, constantly
being where the ball happened to be. His blocking and guarding was excellent, and sorrow reigned among
his colleagues when he was forced from the game on personal fouls.
The Junior College courtmen ran up six points in the first period. Ebdon opened the scoring with
a beautiful one-hand-push shot from the left side of the court. Close upon its heels Brown followed with
two more double deckers. It was after there that Captain "Max" Sanders made the lone tally for C. H. S.
with his charity chuck.
In the second quarter Junior College held its five point lead. "Max" again scored a foul shot, and later
took the ball down the floor to twist one in from under the basket. For Junior College Brown made his
third field goal of the day and Crook scored a foul shot and a field goal.
In the third quarter Brown, acting captain, was at a loss without Ebdon, and consequently J. C. was
held scoreless. Nevertheless the College played an almost airtight defense and if it were not for two foul
shots we would have been held to two points made when Russell reached high above everyone else's heads
to tip one in from off of the backboard.
The Last quarter was all Cristobal's. Twelve points in all, they made during this period. The only
College player to find the basket was Lopez playing in place of Walling who made two swishes from a good
distance out.
Balboa I:
On May 3, the Cristobal team tasted its first defeat of the season at the hands of Balboa High. It
is agreed upon by most people who saw the game that the Gold Coast boys outplayed the Balboa five by
far but that they had no basket appeal, as a very small percent of their shots would go in. The only Cris-
tobal player who could make any headway was "Bob" Neely who made points as follows: H. Will
1, T.Russell, 2, I. Sanders 1, M. Sanders 2.
Tonneson, tall Balboa center, led his team on to victory by scoring 10 points followed by W. Friday
who made 4 points.
It is interesting to note that C. H. S. made eight of its points via the foul throw route.
Junior College II:
On May 6, the Junior College quintet again invaded the C. H. S. gym to play the second of their
three game series. This time they were more fortunate than before, defeating the C. H. S. five by a 35-23
margin.
Captain Ebdon, '33, hit his well known stride and led his team to victory by scoring 19 points.
C. H. S., altho on the short end of the score, played a much improved floor game over their last perfor-
mance. Outstanding players were Neely and the two Sanders who made 7, 6 and 6 points respectively.
Brown, of Junior College, although overshadowed by his team mate, Ebdon, made eight points towards
the College's victory.
Each player of the College's starting team contributed at least one basket to their 35 points.
Balboa II:
For the second consecutive time this year Balboa has taken Cristobal's measure; this time to a score
of 39-23.
The Cristobal team played like a bunch of rookies from the sticks while Balboa passed and shot like
a group of professionals.
The only player who showed any class for C. H. S. was "Max" Sanders who scored 9 points.
"Max" worked mighty hard but received no support from his teammates. Both Russell and I. Sanders
had bad cases of the butterfingers and seemed unable to hold on to the ball.
Balboa played a beautiful game in the person of Walter Friday who succeeded in scoring 23 points,
as many as the whole C. H. S. team combined could chalk up.
Tonneson, Balboa's center, who starred in the first game was unable to get past Russell this time howe-
ver and was relieved shortly after the half by Kromer who was unable to score any points either.
This game gives Balboa a 2 to O advantage over Cristobal in a five game series. If C. H. S. cannot
win the next game the season will come to an eand with Balboa having gone undefeated.

INTERCLASS BASKETBALL
For the third consecutive time this year the Senior Class outplayed their opponents to win, this time,
the Interclass Basketball League. Only once during the entire series did the Senior team suffer a loss.
This was at the hands of the Sophomore team, who, with the help of a 15 point handicap managed to win
by a mere two points.
The Seniors deserve a great deal of credit for winning as they had a terrific handicap to overcome in
every game they played. The handicaps were as follows: Seniors 0; Juniors 10; Sophomores 15;
Freshmen 30.








A brief summary ol tile games follows:
In the first game tie Seniors 1ran up 4 ( points while the I:F'oshl w.ere n maikiwi 1I;: the g.lan ltuis CIende
with a score of 4(0-45.
The llniors, a.lthiugh they should line S#firi '1l ...i .. 1 .I the clague. ne'e r c liked .ani ir this reason
lost their first game to the Slphs 28-22.
In t he next game thie Seniors proved that their eyes amnl tleamli orli w ere iuproNing liv rug il i
57 points, while the Solphs raI up thie highest lilinder o(t points, willt tlie e.cceptilo of tilt Senlior,. of a1.\
team 3(1n i all. I'.al score `7-45.
The next game was a seesaw allair with th luniors dleathing the mrsh biy the chose score oA 47-4.
The lift game of tlie series was iO, lib the Sophs when thliy diletcteil tleir great ri\als.. thie Ilrsli.
with a 36-30 score. That same day thl noii-fuii tiing Iuniors lost lthieir gaie to thle Senior, a .3)-21
score.
()On the next day thel Seniors set up thle high score fr thli series 1iy iletetinig hlie 1r5sh 75-41.
The Aniors again came into the line-light nw hen they rompel home with 5-i31 it try over tlhe
Sophs ami thle nx.t .Ay they dlefatel the lrosA Qh a scre olW 42-.37.
In the next game the Scniors met tllheir ronly ,delcat at the hands of the Snophs who Ield them to 35
points while they piled lup 347 lor themselves. This game somewhat renewed interest in the league as
another Senior deieat would have tied the league.
TIhe lhnal games pravd very interesting. IThe MArosh surprised e\ erybody hIy ininhg their nolix ikto-
r by defeathng the Sophs 2-2., and in thie deciding game of the series the Seniors defeated the linnors ".3i 22

F'ilN u iS 11 I.I- \M rI


Seniors
Juliors 3

ASIMI I


1`,.11


I )111'. [11e11 ShotiMad


11. SANDFWii
R. Niv-vi i
'T. Ri Ssri'
1. SAN1'-aiies
E. lbsiNx
P1. Brliii
1~ISIMIMN


VARSITY TRACK

In what was believed woull lbe a close meet. ,before the event, Balibo walked away with tile annual
Track and Ficld meet which iwas held at tile Blalboa1 Stadium. on Saturldav. March 9.
Paul Heard, Cristobal sprint man and one (of the best that pulled on a spiked shoe on the Isthmus,
established a newn mark of 1.4 in (te ()sardI dash. A few minutes later ie came back to tie his own record
of .9 in the 100 yd. ashi.
Quintcro aml lKromer were Ialboa's outstanding men in (he meet. Quintero tied the 880 yard rulln
of 2:1l6.. lack Kromecr. Captain ol'the Balboa team was high point man lor the winners with firsts in the
broad jump and high jli iump a1n a third in tle discus throw. Evers also scored heavily for IBlbloa winning
the shot put and discus events.
Beard was thle outstanding ing ldividual pierlrmer of the meet. In addition to Ihis easy victories in lie
50 ain 100 -yard events, he was anchor man mo the winning relay team.
Beard's 5.4 in thle 5(0-yd. dash not onlm beat the local school record by two tenths ol a second but
equaled the national inter-scholastic record.
Complete results of tlle nmeett follow:


P'rtice
IPooIle


Timell 9.9 --c,


loore~

Rice
Bomwll c


.A',,,w Reri
(C)
(B)
(c)
lidt Re''d.,
(CJ
(C)

(1)

(C)
( B


SYt~Iyard run Tim~,,e 2 mt'ii. 16.6 sec. Tie~l Rer.,,nl
Quiintero i1 Ai
11utff 11)
/iil Sul it l 3)


WnbBabaWinn team Poole,
Rut e. Icerralri. Moorc.


,W /,A ,/ r ,'ylay Tim, It min. 42. ; .,','.
\\'on by Cristolal. Winning team,
Iordcn, Neely. Egozcue. IBeard.


/ildyard i4l.,/`



22dyard


.lle,dtly Reh/l







Running Broad Jump-Disdance 20/1. 354 in.
Kromer (B)
Gormerly (B)
Egozcue (C)
Shot Putl-Distance 58 Jl. 5 in.
Evers (B)
Leach (C)
Vincent (B)
Running Hiqh Jump-Height 5 I. 4 in.
Kromer (B)
Christian (C)
Erickson (B)
D)ircu.r Thra,,-Didance 94 fl. 31 in.
Evers (B)
Leach (C)
Kromer (B)

INTERCLASS TRACK
This year the Senior class repeated its victory of last year to run away with the meet even after the
other teams received a total of 85 points in handicaps.
The Juniors were very poorly represented in the meet; the Freshmen had only two men to enter any
of the events; the Sophomores were well represented; as were the Seniors.
No records were broken but the returns were fairly good. Arthur Smith broke the high jump record
but because he was a five year man his mark cannot be counted as a record.
Following is a summary of the results of the meet in the order in which they took place. Handicaps
were given as follows: Frosh 35, Sophs 25, Juniors 25, Seniors O. The scoring was tabulated on a basis
of four places counting in which Ist-5 points, 2nd-3 points, 3rd-2 points, 4th-1 point.


Shot Put-Distance 35' 11"
1. B. Leach-Sr.
2. G. Marcuse-Jr.
3. J. Hammond-Sr.
4. R. Ruley-Soph.
DiscuIF Throw--Distance 95' 5"
1. M. Duey-Sr.
2. P. Beard-Sr.
3. A. Refcofski-Soph.
4. E. Durham-Jr.
Running Broad Jump-Disance 19' 4"
1. J. Martin-Frosh
2. J. Egozcue-Sr.
3. W. Wood-Soph.
4. J. Houghton-Soph.
Hih Jump-Height 5' 6"
1. A. Smith-Sr.
2. C. Bath-Sr.
3. J. Christian-Soph.
4. E. Durham-Jr.
50 yd. Da.rlh-Time 5.8 .ee.
1. E. Borden-Sr.
2. E. Hanna-Sr.
3. B. Asensio-Sr.
4. W. Scarborough-Fros
100 yd. Dash-Time 11.5 see.
1. E. Borden-Sr.
2. E. Hanna-Sr.
3. B. Asensio-Sr.
4. W. Scarborough-Fros
200 1d. Dahi--Time 22.1 fec.
1. P. Beard-Sr.
2. E. Borden-Sr.
3. A. Jacques-Sr.
4. J. Clay-Soph.
1-2 /Mile Run- -Time 2 min-41 .ec.
1. W. Wood-Soph.
2. J. Christian- Soph.
3. J. Tara-Sr.
4. J. Egozcue-Sr.
'811 1/d. Relay -Time 2 miin 2 .ee.
Asensio, Egozcue, Jacc
2. Soph.
3. Juniors
4. No entry
440 i.i. Rela -Time 55 .,erond.r.
1. Neelv, Jacquies, Tarla,
2. Sophs.
3. Juniors.
4. No entry.
Final and T'o/al Score.
1. Seniors. 69 points
2. Sophs. 48 points
3. Frosh. 42 points
4. Juniors 34 points.


h.



h.










blues, Beard--Sr.


l anna Sis.


!I


31I








GIRLS, SPORTS

V'OLLEY ih\.M.l
Scilictillgii cit ill the way ii sports \\as atillei thi s Year. liiter IIIlAss games irt* played lelite
5 aisit v plrdtt~ice loaal To lie eleLJIle I'lN ,wii'v a eullithld to lie ioil hle las~os tvailo
I6iterl-clss gaill es %nite litlil it1 ( )i tiolwe InejiltY iir I'M11 M lie gs ii. Thle tlissc, niri- dIit ilel iitii
teaiims: UI'eshllelue~i alii Ioiiols oil otoe: Sviiuirs all. Sitlutgllres oil til tentliii 'Ilii 'laios stite putIi
Wsith t~ile SeohtrS .Iii S01liilii 111'1S N tiiittiis 1'i holl, tilt sciires 0-ut'( 1 am1d -t21.

BALBiOA \ CRISTOBALi
I'llt 't'iws staiiticl ill ('.intioI.l XIlew we took the hoJ. In thet sel i1 set oi pgaiics C( istkll vas 1'.14
I ieaieii at Bal.,I~i Thei ilthil set Nsat jilt orl ii Cl' Ptofhi .1. old i o lilt, itti' oaoo' ss..s \ sth 11ox al

S0 )RES


D)ATi.rl I APl \ ) 11
Nov. 10
Cristo;al
Nov. 17
Balboa


I i lit
(LI
21I
21I


SII
21
"I
1.71


Nov. 24
Cistobal 2 I II
This year for the first time games were playeil with the Junior College. This hrluke the monotony do
playing thle same (cll all the ti'm. anld i is hoped that this will he contiliuiedM ill future years.
SC( )ORES
DATE. P]I.A-: iAT | S'I Cl.lu1 C'ISTOCin
Oct. 27 21 14
Cristoblal 23 21
Nov. 24 21 1
Cristolibl 14 I,
15 12
(;rls winning their letters in Volley all are: Marv Ann Carruthers, Ruth \'ikingstiad. Mlary Rutll
Riedel, Thelma Purvis, Virginia Thiomas, Blanche Howe, Gladyss Pescod, and lacq(ueline Briscoe.


BASKETBALL.
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Interclass basketball started w ith a "bang" this vear. Almost all classes had very good turnouts.
The girls started practicing December 10. Thev carriel on t'aithully right through the Christmas holidays
a d into ;lainui ry.
)On liiiIianu 9 tie first game was held between the Sophomores and IFreshmen, andl the final score was
17-0 in favor of thIe Sophomores. In this game te Freshmen ]put up a hard but loosing light.
January 10, the play olf was Ieldl betw een the ULppercllassmen alnd the victorious Sophomores. The
score of this game wais 14 to 10. thus making the Sophomores the school chanmions.
Interschool basket ball began lmanuay 19, in Cristobal. The list game was the closest of the series.
This was a well played and hard fought game. The second game in Balboa was a ".walkawaY" fo'r Balbia:
while in the third, iwhic'h Nwas held in oiir gmlin. wais a "push over" tor Cristlbhal.
D).\1"1 li s \ CBI OI\ \S Pit,.\ : A 1
lan. 1) 28? 31 Cristolbal
Jan. 2o .0 12 Iailaboa
Feb. 2 15 34 Cistolal
Girls getting letters in basket hall were: Olive \anstoos. Ruth 'ilkingstadl. Mary .\IAl Carrnthers.
Ilope I ollowell. Io),iis E'ldon, and Blanche Ilohe.


\




\'













































O}I











IN APPRECIATION TO OUR
ADVERTISERS


E wish to extend our
mIost sincere thanks to
Those individuals and
._ lrms who have contri-
buted so greatly toward ma- I
king our annual a success.
We want also for the readers
to realize that without the aid
of these people "The Caribbean"
would not have been possible.
So when you intend to purchase
something patronize our adver-
tisers.






X X





xX

X --




x
X X





X X
X X

x x




. THE PANAMA HOSPITAL X
PANAMA CITY, R.x
Xp
X 1x





X %WXXX








XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
x / x x
/i 4 FOLLOW THE REST

,x x, GET ACCi.STOMED TO THE BEST x
X: X X
X X X

X'X
S' Chesterfield
XX
They Satisfy!
7X X_,-." 'x e a Sx


^^:X: ;'X-:):::X::X;:S:K:>::%X :>XXX
K X

X COMPLIMENTS x
X .
OF o -HE X


. National Mattress |
x


Factory
x a

X K



"G'org,.", said the teacher, "is there
ainy connecting link letacen the animal






O(/icer: \hat's tlh matter? \hat do
VOtl s.e?
Satilo/r: There's soinethinel ah'ad, sir,
a d it has red and green lights. I think
it Ilm tS be) a drug store.



X X
BEFORE BUYING K
a --YOUR--
X x











:I PANAMA HATS
x AIGRETTES a{ SOUVENIRS x
x x
SVisit our Store where you will find the
x. Lowest Prices in Town W
y. FRONT STREET. COLON-NO. 57
X X









S FRANCISCO F. LOBATO :
X MONEY EXCHANGE






K X
XXXXXXXXXXX XXXXX-XX.XIXX:XKXXXX"XXXXX"


Ton,: I've changed nlimy mind.
/il//: Fine. I hope this one works.

.er/'ou' Pa.. i lnget'r (on maIl den flight):
11-here- t-t-tell me \%hen you're going
to loop-the hlopl again.
I'>iol: \\ell, I lon't always know.

Where's your Ibrother, Johnnie?
,Joh/l/iit': A \w, he's in the house playing
a duet. I finished my part first.



XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXVXXXXXYXXX"XXXXXXXXXX
x X
X x
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X X
X X
X "I

x
X X

x
x
X x
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X X

: X
X X
:s X
7" X


:,I X


x cTe Samadritan Hos itAd
I: X
X
X X
x x
X X
X X
X
X X
X
X X
NXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXKXXXX







XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX X X XXXXXX
X X
X X
X X



Two Bottles


of
K I'

x x
x x

X
X









X Graduating Parties!
x x
x x







I The Panama Coca-Cola Bottling Company|
x x

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
XXGraduting XParties
Th aaaCc-oaBtln opn XX
-COLON


Lawyer. Where were you on the night
of January 17?
Culprit. With a couple of friends.
Lawyer. Thieves, probably?
Culprit. Yes, they are lawyers, both
of them.


le: Would you like to go to the school
play?
She: I'd love to.
He: Well, be sure to buy your ticket
from me.


*,v**Y Y Y M X:.C X X X X X X X XXYYY YYY YYY


ANTONIO TAGAROI


q WHOLESALE AND RET}
GROCER


MAIN STORE:
12,176 BOLIVAR AVENUE
PHONE 499.


BRANCH
6,075
4,011
2,02f


X

PULOS
x
x
x
AIL
UL
X
X
H STORES: X
5 BOIAVAR AVENUE, PHONE 429 X
I 9'rn. STREET, PHONE 616
6 BOLIVAR STREET, 699 X
X


xXXX~XXXX xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxXXXXXXXXXX


C C fm I fI IIJJlE I I I IIII W I I .. ............I IIIm I .......







XXXXXXXX;4KXXXXXXXXXXKK K 4KK K ::'4:-XXX:::XXX:XXXXX:.:XXX XXXX:
X X
X X
X X

C( COMPIMP11NTS ()!' x
X X


LUCKY STRIKE
x X
X .X
X X
X


X :
X
STUNG HING v
X X

GENERAL FANCY GOODS

: A
S CORNER 9i);. AND) i)1.JV.R :
SST 1I' i:


SP. 0. Box 554 Tel. 75 7
X X
x
x COLON, R. P. x
X
X X
X X






/'il (to reporter'. Yoing man). vYu
canl put it in your pap.'r lthai my s(.cret
of health an loIg life is to cat sonm'
garlic ever day.
Re'p. \\hy dct you refer lo it as a
secret?
sc'rc '?






x ::

J. V. BEVERHOUDT
s X4
COLON, R. P.


X x
. R.C.A. Victor Radios Kodaks I
x Headquarters for Sporting Goods x
X x
X Pool Tal)ecs, and Billiard Supplies
X X
X X
xxx xx xx :-:x:4 ::1K :-:," ;,: :.:;4::::: ",::4::-:': 4 : : :x : : 'x : x


Iihl.r,.: Son, M]iv arc you so far
Iblhln in your stullcs?
So,,I.' So that I many pursue thVn-m
la tI her.

li/l: \What haI-c you got in the hIag?.
Io;,m: lMa rble s ii you guess ho\
i:imiy 1 II 've you all tkiclve of 'cm




: : :*::; :.-::.::.:::: :::-:: ::-:::; : X :AXXxx x:x:4:4 XX
X X
X
X X
X Dresses and Hats

Srom Paris



SARBOIX

! A N TONI O'S x
: x
-5 x
X
X X

COLON, R. P.
:"X
X

x land Eiml-oi;dred Lincns. x
X x
x I.nmish Iuggaec I land lBa-s.
: Parns Novelties. x
X X
y x

X. PERFUMERY
X. .
xxx x











'I
I If -


I?,,I


4, I.


"rt


- I


B g`
yl~


r ,1







XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXKXXXXXXXXXXXXX;XXXXXXX XXXXX XXy.XKKXXXXXXX
x x
X X
SC. CASULLO ,

x JEWELLER ".X. '
x

WV/ATCH M AK ER x:
-- P. O BOX 615
Phone 225 9.036 Front St X
Si- = CRISTOBAI.. C.Z. COLON. It. 1'

,XKKK .KK:...K>:K K .::.: :.:X: . ..:::. .:. . . . ..::: :::":: :::::X.:


M X
X

V KODAK PANAMA

x LTD I:


x OFFERS A COMPLETE
x x

XX
x IINE ()F F



iKODAK
* X


PRODUCTS
X
X X

x
X X

X KODAK PANAMA L
X x
x X
Ill Central Avenue -

I PANAA1A CITY X
X X
X X
X x
x ::::::.: ::-::-: ::".: x :-: .":-:::.: x: ::< K: ::.: :x:::< x:xxx::K


1i1-1 (II. x call here.
I Im(~ knu on. 'I It,
SnCh11 a Igiet sit isiV1cfWtit 10 t me to) sCt a
iliaf) eM t a meall f tnn indint. fitl~t
ith itli :tlc kng.


Witi' whichh onev 'd \.u t. hihiaI(r.
mvit thost grapews Ihdnth cIIliltaidii')tl
Not use tldTetvvnt it I szaa\ tile s.-eds ;tId
skinus ont the flootr.
Iih:It a\~sn t fnlt, A\untie, catIsL
I ,tie the Se'(ds Skills mid IIal.


Ih' A.C bP,., fi 'It Is ills it ac'tfili
place"'

Ilafit' citY people hI tcmX"tt Ct~li h gh I her i h
a irest.


X iX
X X
X x
x COMPLIMENTS OF
X X


X X
X X
x CRISTOBAL, C. Z. BALBOA, C. Z.
X Phone Cristcbal 1781 lPhone Balboa 10r6 6
X X
X x
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx








XXXXXXXX XXxxXXXXXXXXXXXXXX XX XXXXxxxXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX XXXx
X x


: THE AMERICAN FEDERATION of LABOR I
# Xx
Sx
x x
x x
# IHE AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR HAS BEEN IMPROVING X
S- WORKING CONDITIONS THROUGHOUT THE COUNTRY FOR MORE X
A x
x THAN FIFTY YEARS AND IS STILL STRIVING CONSTANTLY TO SECURE X
xx
X ADEQUATE LABOR LAWS, INCREASED COMPENSATION, AND MORE X
X X
X FAVORABLE WORKING CONDITIONS. EACH AND EVERY WAGE EARN- X
x x
X ER SHOULD BECOME A MEMBER OF THIS GREAT ORGANIZATION x
x X
x WHICH IS CEASELESSLY STRIVING TO SECURE BETTER WORKING x
x x
K x
x
X CONDITIONS FOR OUR MILLIONS OF WAGE EARNERS. #
X X
x x
xx
x x
xx
x x
COMPLIMENTS OF x

METAL TRADES COUNCIL
x CANAL ZONE x
x x
xx xxxX :xXX:XXX:X X XX'X X XXXXXx X xxXX X'*' xvX


You're so lazy you won't laugh when
you hear a funny joke.
Huh, that's nothing. You're so dog-
goned lazy that you won't ache when you
have a pain.

.lr. Hackett. What makes you think
they had cars in 1492 Howard?
Howard. Well I read where Colombus
went 2,000 miles on a Galleon.



x x
x
Margarita Beauty
X
V Shoppe
MARGARET J. WILL
X X
x
Permanent Waving Our Specialty
x WE MAKE YOU x
x x
j MORE LOVELY x
x x
X Corner 8th &"G" Sts.. New Cristobal
X Phone 169 COLON, R. P.
x X
XXX%%%XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX


XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
X X
x x
x
x X
X x
X X
y X
X X
( COMPLIMENTS OF
x x

I MAX BILGRAY |
x
x x
x x
K~ x
x x


KKKKMKKXXXXXKXXXXX;KKKXXX X KXXXKXXX


Jlr. Fraank.. H.o. did you come to
make this boys' paper 101%. Don't
you know that nothing can be more
p-rfect than 100%.
,lJlx Quinn. Yes, but this boy ans-
wered one question we did not ask.








XXXXXX X XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX.X.XXX..XX... . .. xxXxxxxx
X X
X IMPROVED EQUIPMENT MODERN METHODS
x EFFICIENT SERVICE
x x
xx
JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY
x jX
Broadway, near Folks' River
x x
x COLON, R. P.
x x
X PHONE CRISTOBAL. C Z. X
x COLON, 21 po. u\X 06l
x X
Xxxxxxxxxxxxx x..*... ~ q~x. .. .. :: .N~ ..... A*:xx~xx~x


XXXXXXXXXXXXX:XXXXXXX? XXXXX:jNX XXXXXXXX
X X

SWishing the Graduates
x
x x
All Success Through Life

x x


X X
x x


x 53 Front St. Colon, R. P.
x V
K s
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX-XXXXXXXXXXXXX




/le.. Silvia's husland has been a suf-
ferer for years, hasn't he?
Ra1/. I don't knno. IHo, long have
they been married.


XKKXKXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXKXXXX

X The Chinese Silk Store x
X

SNEW CHINA

SWe carry Genuine Chinese and x
Japanese SILKS and Curiosities.

LINENS
x SILK MATERIALS
x
CARVED IVORY
WICKER FURNITURE
VASES
PERFUMES x
JEWELRY x

x x
FRONT STREET CENTRAL AVE.
x :
x COLON PANAMA x
x --
y.KK.:KKKKK.:KKKKKK:-:-:-::->:KK>:KKKK:K:


X :.
X I
X X
X :s

X CTlplimi nts uf X
x X





X X
Dr. Vern Prier


x X
x XXXX r. (Xar XX. XXffXrb xx
x x
xx
x x
x x










Portraits

Miniatures

Enlargements

Flashlights

Commercial
Photographs
of all types.

Architectural

Legal

Banquets,
Large Groups, etc.

New Pictures


FOR REMEMBRANCE


Your portrait of today will be just as
priceless in years to come, will recall
happy memories just as vividly as do
those wonderful photographs of by-
gone days. Make an appointment
for a new portrait today.


FINLAYSON'S STUDIO
7,018 FRONT ST. COLON, R. P.
PHONE 9
MEMBER
EMBIl When buying Photographs look for this emblem.
i, The Photographers' International Association of
America stands for good craftsmanship and bet-
S ter business principles.


Guef: Look here, how long do I
have to wait for that half-portion of
duck I ordered?
IFaiter: Till somebody else orders
the other half, sir; we can't go out and
shoot half a duck!


Satchy (to Ruth M.) The stork that
brought you should've been arrested for
smuggling dope.



X x
V -
S OR wedding Invitations, Visit-
X ing and Business Cards,Christ- x
mas Cards, Seasonal and Business
.x Stationery, x
N x
x x
Dove L. Prather
X
S1405-C Carr St. x
x Telephone: P. 0. Box 514 x
X Balboa 2780 Balboa, C. Z. x
x x
NNXXX%%%%XXXXNXNN XXXNXXXXXX


XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXxx
x x
x X
SBefore eye-strain wrinkles become
x permanent and nervous fatigue X
x
X becomes chronic, have your x
eyes examined. If you need
X glasses, you will be sur-
x prised to find what a x
comfort they are
x x
X when accurately
Sand becomingly
fitted to
x YOU
x x
x x
x x
S Have your eyes examined
x x

CADRON PTICAL COMPANY
. x

X PANAMA Registered COLON
Optometrlst3
S 23 Central & Opticans. 9,034 Front X
Avenue New York Street
X X
X ?
X X
XXXKXXXXXXXXXXXKXXXXXXKKKXXXXKXXXXXX


XXSXSXSXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX


XxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxXxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx








xxxx5;>xKK"x"X"xxxxx x-:< xx:x- : :.'-:-:xxxx::.. :.: : .-: >:x.x:.: :.; ;.: : xxx :x : Xxxxx".xxxxxxx: KK KX:-.:;xx
X X

UNITED FRUIT COMPANY |
xc x
X X
K GREAT WHITE FLEET
K FAisr FREfI(;GHT ANDI PASSENGEI'R ST-A.4 Rs x
X X
NEW YRK x
NEW YORKWEEKLY SAILINGS TO: KINGSTON
x NEW ORLANSEEKLY SAILII.S NGLS x
x SAN FRANCISCO PTO. COLOMIA\ :
x PORT LIMON SANTA MARTA x
x
x CART.\GEN.. TI.i.A IIAVANA :.
x xi
XXXX=XXXx= =XXX::-:x:-:x:-:=X:x:-:^::-:= :.:::X :-::-:x:x: xxx>:/:.-:xxx-x:/::-::-:;:.:-:x:.XXX :-x:XX .XXxXXXxx


.lr / .rI, l.l*/, lThe claim i hat l 1 .-
\.nI<'In ,li,1]ptil.'i sllort'r skirts it r di'Ctced
ti' n111r111 ) (d1' c l slrelt car a cI( d nlls )1)
I11 I i.'ID .
cn / H / i W ouldlln't it If fi -
if lich ; ,b','.it s clUh l p:.v,. ta l
.*I'i i1 ,y'.''NO


X x :X : x:x:: :x ::.::XX:.:::::::::.::X:- :::<::::::::::.::: :.::.::.::: : .:xx:: ::.X :.:.x:X :.x :..:-::.:xx: X X
X X






ccaBureau tonubs Entertainmentygroun
P X
X X









i Rec reaction Entertainment





xH x


Luxurious frtaSubsi, Fst Psene.r Eprss Steamers
EIxce (Waitr) es li; y i kno,.
lnE\ x llrttl's arc.








X X
SX
sc X
sc X
< X
SX
x Luxurious, Coifortk', Fast PAUssenger Evprss Steamers

HcExcellent Cuisine :':s
XXXXXxxxx:xxxxx:-: :<:-::::::-:x:.xxx:-:x:5:x:-:SXXxxxxSxxSxx^xxxxxxxxx x:









X X
X X
X X
X X

x x




| Standard Fruit &. Steams lip

x I
x x
x 3X
x x

x x
x x








U Wish every success to the Graduatinq x
Sr Class of 1935.
X x
x 1K




14 14K
K11111x1 4 1x4111X4444111111111444444R4444x1X111N444444N44444


li1r. Seiler. Now, have you learned
enough about the art of selfdefense for
one day?
"Abe" Anderson (very much mauled)
-I should say I have and I would
like to ask if I can take the rest of the
lessons by mail.

Tick. Why don't you get an aleinist
to examine your son?
Tock. No, sir. An American doctor
is good enough for me.


First Cla&r Scout: Name four animals
belonging to the cat family.
Tenderfoot: The father cat, the mo-
ther cat, and the two little kittens.


llinstrel (with poor voice): I wish
I were in Dixie.
Gue.r: I have no objections.


K X
S Cable Address "IMPCO" P: O. Box 342. COLON. R.P. K
K A.B.C. 5,h, & ith. Edition K
Colon Import & Export Company, Ltd.
1 JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS K
,3 MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS x

x DEALERS IN GENERAL MERCHANDISE anc NAT!VE PRODUCE
X Colon Republic of Panama
Brunch Retail Stores f PLAYA DAMA PORVENIR CARTI X
F BSANTA ISABEL PUILLE NARGANA X
Said Trading Stations ISLES OF PINES
FXXFxFFxFx:.x.xxxxx.xxF: xFK X.KKK.. X14FKK:KKXXFXKKKXXXXXXXXKXKXXXKKKKKKXKK








XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXyXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
X X
X X
X X
X X
X X
X X
X X
()X1 ICOMPL11ENTS OF x
x x
X X
X x



x x
X TXHE CARLTON HOTEL
x x
x x
x x



XXXXXXXXXXXXXXxXxxxxxxxxxxxx:xxXXxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx


Fitr.: Shudent: I dropped Solid G(eo-
met y..
Second Sludeln: Make much noise?


Second Cl/a..: There is one queer
thing alout a ship.
Sea Scout: \hat is it?
Second, C(/.r.: \\ell, the time to tell
hok\ many knots she can make is when
she isn't tied up.



XXKXXKXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX:S:XXKKXX KKK





7th and Bolivar Streets


COLON
X X'




X X
X X


x x
7th and Bolivar Streets X



x x
SOBER ANCOL CO SSION X
X X
x x
X X


x AI N x



X E NT X
x x
M x
x x


x x


x x
x N NI x
x X
x x

X x
x x
x x
x Xxxxx.'x .x ...xxxxx xxx
x 'C


Salazar's Drug Store x
:< x
|x COLON, R. P.

j' x
x x

S 9,038 11,160
x Front Street Bolivar Street x
x x
Phone 336 Phone 35
x x
x X







B. B'eerr (Pl..p*.ii They say that
that \hen people live together they get
to look like each other.
I.. Porter. In that case you can consider
my refusal final.


A young lady was seeing her first
)aselall game. She said, "Isn't that
pitcher great? lie hits their bats no
matter where they hold them!"


Teacher:
Fugit."


Tommy, translate "Rex


lT;o/n,: The King flees.
T''ach'r: You should use "has" in
translating the perfect tense.
T7omnum: The king has fleas.






















W V $J3

QJomplimpnts of

eSTA.LECIDO EN 1849


Nil: How do the freshmen keep
those Dinky Little Caps on?
lit: Vacuum beneath holds 'em.

A fly was walking with her daught-
er over the head of a very bald man.
"How things change, my dear," she
said. "When I was your age this was
only a foot-path."


E


COMPLIMENTS OF x x
x x x





I BESTFIT i
x x
x x x
x COMPLIMENTS OF x x



X X X
x X X PANIC


xxxXXXy


C:44:X:4:4:4:4:X:4:444:4*4:4::4:4:v4:44:4


Corte


[NEN AND


SUIT


ON
AMA


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Ingles
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VOOLEN x

'S x

KINGSTON X
CURACAO


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Compania Panamena de Fuerza y Luz
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SPANAMA COLON
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If it \\er not for tlihis lililh v.rs .
Thicre'd I Ie a joke hsrc., len lin1s 1. l,'i 1 v i ies, ake i
\vOse.* -hd,, and poinl out Australia.

,(Jam:.'s does so).
Say, 1Bill, if you hai lfive' dollars i1
your p pocket, lhat \ouhl you think? NXn,, iack, ,vho discovery A\ustralia?
u'///: I'd think 1 had sn, oth r .Jack l.in.. Jimmy did.
Melo,,'s pants on.



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I v MOUDRY'S FLOWER SHOP ,GH I
: HONE CON 311 Mrs. ESTELLA MOULIRY PHONE GAT 34

X Oldest R liable Atlantic Side Florist X
x kMember F.T.D. Association K
X P. O. Box 225, Gatun
X X
X X















h \WEDDING BOUQUeETS COLON, R. de P. FLOWvES AND
' STE MER. HOUQUETS DECORATIONS
S HOSPITAL BOUQUETS Cth, and Front S as. FOR ALL OCCASIONS
( (EniiiiiS mrnS SO ).



























E.. r ul. pa t on.
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X DAY MOUD Y i' tnFL Wtii SHOP NIGHT XXc
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X I. CO. BTrkrrA UPB. . (;A. X
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The Panama Railroad Steamship Line



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.1lr. Hackett (To applicant for job)
Can you rite shorthand?
lHoward Ir'. Yes sir-but it takes me
longer.


D. .lar.rhall I didn't see you in church
Sunday.
31. Duey I presume not; I took up
the collection.


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(iomplinltut of


PFrnite lIiolDPt ifi00b
BEAUTICIAN

Iaotel Wa~lthigtoln


plarlar hoatte Cria, 211G


eauty


New As.islant: No, madam, we
haven't had any for some time.
Jealous ilanager (overhearing): Oh.
yes we have it, madam; I will just go
into the warehouse and find it for you.
(Aside lo Assistant): Never refuse
anything, send out for it!
Als the lady went out laughing the mana-
ger demanded: "What did she say?"
Azli'istant: She said we haven' thad
any rain lately.



"Boohool Boohoo!" wailed little
Johnny.
"Why, what's the matter, dear?" his
mother asked comfortingly.
"Boohoo-er--p-picture fell on papa's
toes."
"Well dear, that's too bad, but you
mustn't cry about ii, you know," said
the mother.
"I didn't," wailed Johnny. "I laughed
Boohoo! Boohoo!"


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Gittens &'Taylor
x
I FOR OI
X x
Exclusive Suitings
x x

Careful Tailoring
x x
x 10th Street Colon. Telephone 291 x
XXXXXXXKKKXXXXKXXX SKXXX SKX:XXXKXSXXX-




The Nag: You're going to drive me
out of my mind.
The N-ark: That ain't no drive, my
dear, that's a putt.

C(qareltte .Jan (to purchaser of cigaret-
tes). Before I agree to your terms--I'll
see you in (hale)


Julie H. I wouldn't marry the best
man on earth.
Junior W. All right. Then take me
and you won't be running any risk.



.I7r. Franks. What line do you expect
your boy to go into?
.Ilr. Iloug/don. I've decided to make
a la.Nyer of him. He just likes to get
into a quarrel and mix in other people's
business, and I figure he may as well
get paid for it.


J1r. Simini'ki. There is nothing so
bad as wasted talent, is there?
.7lr. Jejfries. No For instance, just
suppose we could organize all the cut-
worms and use them as lawnmowers.
Judge: Was your friend in the habit
of talking to himself?
Iitnesr: To tell the truth, Judge,
I never was with him when he was
alone.


HOTEL TIVOLI

A comfortable restful Hotel, ideally located with magnificent view
of the Pacific ocean.

The center of social life. close to every point of interest
on the Pacific side of the Canal Zone.


WM. T. McCORMACK
Manager


P. O. ADDRESS:
ANCON, CANAL ZONE


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X X
:q X





X Unequaled for Silition and ConiS Oi
X


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~Ilneqv~dcd fhor Sluea ion and Co oll :
X
y. COLON. R.P. :.



X X

x x
.: A:Hotel in keeping eith the dignity spirt and service x

:o the Panama Canal. :d


X A.


x x
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X :;
~c _arpon Fishiny :

x c'the year Ar1ound S
x
yx x
X X
X I
X? iia:ni:ei- CrISTOBAI- CANAl. 7ONE


I.l Salhnm: I suppose y0ou are going
Elast (his suminer?
2nd Sa/bn,)i I'll go East if I can.


I'm getting thin. said ,Mrs. Fish. I lt sc
a potnd a da+y.
Yout don't fool me, her plapotuse replied
Your scales give you aciugh!




... ..*...*. ..*.*...*.*/**....**.....
X :,
X' Mcns Sano In Corpore Sano X
X :.
Eat More Sun-Maid
Raisin Bread
X .
ST he French Bakery
X Bolivar Avenue, 8,105
Phone 346 x
J COLON, R. P.
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"Pat, I wish I knew,\ where I %ill I).,
whc'n I ;im doling to die," said M1ike.
"Why?" asked Pat.
"B'cause," replied NIlike, "I would d
IIev\"e gco thcre."

I'Thle president oIf the local gas company
\\as Imalking a stirring address.
"Th'ink of the good the gas company
has donc," he cried. "''I I k ere permit t'e
a )pun. I should say, honorr the Lnght
llrigade."
.\nd at custonelcr immediately shouted.
"O(h \\hat a charge th(-y made."


:-:: :: ::S: x:S::::::-:::-::-:y.:-:: : ::-::x :::x : X X
" ALWAYS REMEMBER I
X5 X
S A man is judged in life
S by two things, His friends X
and His clothes. X

The American Bazaar
S HABERDASHERS & TAILORS
X: TO MEN OF GOOD TASTE.

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Aututoapim jl ati


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S'FR &1-4"EALD- PAAM