Caribbean

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Title:
Caribbean
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Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Cristobal High School
Publisher:
Yearbook House
Place of Publication:
Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00093680:00021


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Foreword

S a record of the school
activities during 1933 and
1934, the Caribbean Staff
of 1934 presents to the student
body, the faculty, and the gen-
eral public, this year's Annual.


I I


I I


(A Z? t"













THE CARIBBEAN


CRISTOBAL. CANAL ZONE. 1934
PUBLISHED BY THE CRI-TOBAL HIGH SCHOOL








Editorial
Richard Reinhold '34


One often hears discussions on how
much better the world of today is. It is
probably one of the most erroneous
opinions when it is applied to recent
graduates from the institutions of educa-
tion.
I have, many a time, heard elder per-
sons say, "If I had the opportunity to
start out in the world as you now are
what a wonderful chance I would have to
gain success with all the advantages of-
fered." Then I think to myself. Just
what advantages can he be talking about?
At present, the world has less to offer
to a young person than it has in the past.
After you are through with school, it
is an impossibility to get a job for some
little time to come. Sometimes it is
months, sometimes the months roll into
a year. Even then there is nothing in
many cases.
It is strange that a student who grad-
uates at the head of her class cannot find
anything to do. Even after taking a post-
graduate course, keeping up the high
standards, she is unable to get something
that will give her some spending money
of her own. I imagine that at times she
gets rather disgusted and then wonders
why she worked so hard in her school
years when she could have had a much
better time if she hivd not worked so
dliu .- nli .
A coilcge education I is Inow become a
dream to the ordinary high school grad-
uate. Can a young person who has had
his eye on .I..i iI hle was sure to ob-
tain and then sudd5nliy see it snatched
away hav e much faith in what th.; world
has to offer? IHw does he know that all
the goals wiHl not b- moved farth 'r away


just as he is about to reach them? There
is nothing to hope for, for there is no
hope where there is no object.
Yet a college education is not every-
thing for the same condition prevails a-
mong the college graduates. With such
a view in mind it seems odd that anyone
should want to go to college. It would
mean a loss of money which determines so
much and time which seems to mean
nothing now-a-days insofar as so much of
it is wasted.
To say that the goal is too high is
somewhat erroneous. In the past, you
could buy more with a dollar; the cost of
living was not so high; and, there were
not as many obligations to be met. Peo-
pie are even willing to work for as much as
was paid in the old days but they cannot
find anyplace to work. To be willing to
work and yet not being able to work can
be condoned in regard to the would be
worker, but to have work to do and to
refuse to do it can never be pardoned.
When a person has nothing to do. he
worries about things that, ordinarily, he
would hardiv think of. but when the case
is just the opposite, one has no time to
think of trivial things and as a result is
much happier. I honestly believe that
the people who have never had anything
and who never will are the most content-
ed. They have no worries as they have
nothing to worry about and they have no
regrets as they have not done anything
which they cannot do anytime they
wish.
Things are bound to change but it
is very improper to s':.y that they are
chazuging for the better, for you don't
know.


Vol. XVII


No. 1


































De ication

E, the Class of 1954, dedicate this,
the seventeenth volume of "The
Caribbean" to our advisor, whose
helpful advice and unceasing in-
terest in our welfare has been primarily
responsible for our success,
MRS. PHYLLIS SPENCER

































CARIBBEAN STAFF


Business Jlanager .......
iAsrt. Business Ilanager
A',rSt. Busrinerss managerr
Azrst. Busriness .laniager.

Circulation Jlanager..... .
J,rsi. Circulation ,lJanager
A.rst. Circulaiun llanager
AIrrt. Circulatioa n Ilanaqer

Literary Editor
.Iost. Literary Editor.
Lrst. Literary Editr ....
AIrt. Literary Editcr. ..
/It,. LileraI/ Editor ..


RICHARD REINHOLD
JOHN PALM

WILLIAM STONE
HENRY SANCHEZ
JULIO DOMINGUEZ
JAMES DAYS

ELIZABETH HAYES
RUTH WIKINGSTAD
WILLIAM HILL
ROBERT REPPA


BETTY STETLER
ANNA REILLY
KATHLEEN GOODENOUGH
SMARGARET HOLLINGSHEAD
KATHLEEN PHILIPS


ERNEST WOOD


Bo,' Spirt Editor
Afrrt. Bo.r' Sp/crt Editor.

GirlS' Spo./ Editor
,lr.r. Girlr' Sport Editor


School Aotex.


FRANK WASHABAUGH
ROBERT NEELY

BEVERLEY MARCUSE
MARGARET BARNARD


MIAYNO BLISS

ROBERT MOLTEN
JOHN O'NEIL

BLOSSOM LAM


Joke ldihor
,lrl. ,Joke I'dd1hr


Editor.
AI t. Editor


Art Editor































C. H. S. FACULTY


Our faculty this year is one of the best
ever. Most of the teachers are old-timers,
and they're still keeping up good records.
The new teachers have made a good be-
ginning, also.
Mr. Franks, our popular and efficient
principal, inaugurated several new, pro-
gressive movements along with the new
school. Our Student Association was one.
He has ably superintended all activities
and classes, and taken part in the sports.
The Sophomore's sponsor, and teacher
of history, Mr. R. C. Hackett is keeping
up his reputation for giving homework.
He's a good teacher, though, and many
students reluctantly admit that he
"knows his stuff."
Under 'Irs. Phyllis Spencer and lMiss
Mary E. Mloore, the languages. Spanish,
French and Latin, are prospering. Be-
sides the regular routine, Mrs. Spencer
sponsors the Junior-Senior Dramatic
Club, the Effe Kube Klub, the National
Thespians, the Spanish Club, and the
Liga Panamericana. lMiss \Moore has
been sponsoring a much improved "Trade
Wind." also.
The witty mathematics professor, Mr.
Ever, is still with us. Taking care of
the NMath classes doesn't seem too much
work either. He's also the sponsor of
the Freshman class and the Caribbean.
Mr. Miller is new this year. but he has
certainly made a hit with both sexes.
The boys admire his athletic ability,
and the girls his great personal charm.
He helps Mr. Vinton teach science, and
Mr. lMeyer teach mathematics.
The Household Arts Department and
the Cafeteria prospered under the capable


hands of Aliss Ferne Bowman. She re-
placedl 31iss Anderson, who surprised
everyone by getting married last summer.
Let's hope Miss Bowman doesn't. We
need her here.
Mlr. K. W. Vinton is directing the
Science Department, which seems to be
doing very well, as there have been no
explosions as yet. He also directs athle-
tics and has done no mean part in arous-
ing a good school spirit.
The English Section has become more
interesting this year under Miss Liter
and Miss Brown. lMiss Liter is new, but
she's certainly made a "hit," in spite of
contracts. The first and second year
Engl;sh classes, and the Library are
cared for by ,Miss Brown, a quiet and
capable teacher.
Miss Patterson is turning out some
"snappy" stenographers this year. All
that aimless clicking heard upstairs at
the first of the year has developed into
rhythmic typing, thanks to lMiss Pat-
terson's patient instruction.
We owe the Art work in the Caribbean
to Mrs. MlcDnakl's talented pupils.
It's a surprise to discover we have s)
much talent in our school, but we can de-
pend on IMrs. MlcDon id to bring it out.
One of the popular courses offered is
music, under \liss Einer's gifted hands.
She has certainly done great things with
the fine material she's had to work with.
Last, but not to say the least, we reach
Mr. Fringer's Mlanual Arts classes. This
is as popular with the boys as Household
Arts is with the girls. Some promising
mechanics leave his machine-shop les-
sons.























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am m A I


.Xam\ e---FRANK J. \\'.AIIA.\ASt. (i, J .
J.1, we r'e him- "RIesponsible"
BIriip/ace -C.atin C. Z.
P'ai imne- Swimming.
/ 7 1'i A'i II, 't' iIpr ..'if -"Let m e e pla in."
1. /, '/i//i.c- Cla..ss Pre:ident 4; Student \Association Pre.i-
lent 4; Debating Clui Pre:ideint 4; Math Club Secre-
tary-Treasurer 4; National Fhepi an, 3; Vice-presi,
dent 4; Swnimming 1, 2: Tennis 2; Neptuine Club 1;
Varsity Club 1, 2, -, 4; B. A. A. 1, 2, 3: Tuml .lin 3,
4: Spi.mnis Clii! 3. 4; LII I-na.meru.iana 4; Effe
Kube Klub 1, 2: D!)rtmimk' Clultb 5, 4; Orchiestra 1. 2,
3: Glee Clubl 1. 2, 3, 4: "Bell, of Be.auijolais. 1:
"Gased" 2; "lHot Copy" 3'; "One Thing A ter Ai oti-
er' 3; "Happy Landing," 4; "- head of De tnY." 4







A''i7 --i D(lH()Irul t ,_.\Er' l., R tu s.
7)1e (i I I ( ~ ) T 1 F [I i
. I,- e' ee he, "Cov.
B/i'///d.plce Colon. Rep. of Plinini.
Paii.'ine eTa.iing with idnia.
]'i t' o .e prt.'w.ri "Oih, oJ "
.Idi,,/le' ie KIul;, Kilu 1, 2: Spatnish Club 2, 3., 4;
Trade \Wind S3all 4; Class Vice-pire ident 4; Delate
Club Trea lrer -14.










A',me-CA..Tm(N LFON II(Mlhi\1.
. J '. ,,('e hi'II "A m 'i lt1 III(I s.
Birthpla'e- Reading, Pennsylvania.
Pa.,tiine-Sports.
.Icliitie,-Clee Clul I, 2: Orcliestra 1, 3; Band ,3; Drama-
tic Clul 3: Class Secretary 4; Trade Wind Printer 4;
National Thesp.ian 4: Efle Kutie Kli, 1, 2; Carnival
1: "Bells o'i Bciuolai."' I; "IRed Lamp" 2; ";Happiy
L.adin:;." 4; hire.uld ol I.)De,;inv" 4.










111Me -M Al ];ot '( rri' c \ [in .
.,'" ii' e h' ', n n- i"\ insme."
Birihplae-Mt. Verno'n, New York.
'P.lime- Eating.
/I, orile ex(','pre'--'; -"''Not really!
./ 3, 4; L.iga Panamericana 4: Class Trea.,_re- 4; Trei
Wind Stal 1 4.















Name-JOSE DO.INADOR BAZAN.
.is we ree him-"Amiable."
Birthplace-Colon, Rep. of Panama.
Pastime-Sports and reading.
Favorite expression--"Play in your position!"
Activilies-Soccer 3, 4; Captain 4; Varsity Club 3, 4; Vice-
President 4; Track 4.











Namze-RAYMOND ARTHUR BEJARANO.
As we see him-"Trmperamental."
Birthplace-Cristobal. C. Z.
Pastime-Sports and dancing.
Favorite expression-"Let's go for a walk?"
Activities.-Soccer 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Secretary
4; Tennis 1, 2, 3. 4; Basketball 3, 4; Handball 2. 4:
Track 3, 4: B. A. A. 1, 2, 3: A. D. T. Club 3.










Nanme-BLANCH VIOLET BELDEN.
i.A we ,ee her-"Sympathetic."
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Pastime-Reading.
Favorite expre.rsion-"I almost died!"
Activities-Glee Club 2, 3; Effe Kube Klub 1, 2; Dramatic
Club 4; 0. G. A. 4; Supper Club 4; Trade Wind Staff
4; "Bells of Beaujolais" I.









.Vame,-CHtARIFS EDarIn Bl',LULN.
.,ls we see him-"Likable."
Birthplace-Ancon. C. Z.
Pa'slime-Visiding hospitals.
IFavorile exprex.rionl-"Say, ::hrimp, how about a date?"
Iclivrlier--Effe Kube Klub 1, 2: "Gassed" I; Carnival
1, 2; "Bells of Beaujolais" 1; Spanish Club 2, 3, 4;
Liga Panamericana 3, 4; Dramatic Club 3 4; "One
Thing After Another" 3; National Thespians 4; 0. G.
A. 4; Trade Wind Stalf 4; "Hlappy Landings" 4.













-Vane -MA-EIAl LE: IIANNE BLIS.
.l. wie see her--"Charming."
Birthplace-Cristobal, C. Z.
Pa'ltine'-DaI)ncing.
FIa,,,orile .p,'e.,.xpre,-"All right, now!"
.Jliitdier--"Bells of Beaujolais" 1 ; Volley ball 1, 4; Tennis
1, 2, 3; Bowling 1, 2. 3, 4: Effe Kube Klub !, 2;
Dramatic: Club 3, 4; Cla,, Treasurer 1, 2, 3; Student
Council 4: Secretary Student Association 4; School
Notes for Caribbean 4: Trade Wind Staff 4: "Thread
of Destiny" 4







N.deX -ST'I.I.A V. BU(.t;s.
.1." ,,e .'ee her-"Graceful."
,Brlhplace-Ancon. C. Z.
PaItlinme-Dancing and music.
,,Wor/e expre".crion-"Hotcha!" "Oh. boy!"
.lliie. ''-"Bells of Beaujolais" I; Effte Kube Klub 1, 2;
Supper Club 1 2: "Yellow Tickets" 2; Glee Club 1, 2,
3; Basket ball 1. 2. 3, 4; Volley ball 1, 3, 4; Dramatic
Club 3. 4: Spanish Club 4; President of O. G. A. 4:
Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Trade Wind
Staff 4: Carnival 1. 4; "Thread of Destiny" 4.










aine -JuD BIRIGI'OT.
.I. we see he:'-"Petite."
Birthplace- Coronado, California.
PaI'lime-Squeaking down the hall.
E'a'lordle expressiion-"What excuse shall I give?"












ain,;c--COLIN DEARBORN CA.IPIE LI.
S,,'e 'see him -"Dependable."
Birhplace-Cooperstown, NeSw York.
I~Pad.ime--Reading and tennis.
I'i'co/rile expre,,1i, o-"Ha! Ha! Ha!"
.I11cilie,- Effe Kube Klub 1, 2; President 2; "Red Lamp"
1: Freshman Class Secretary 1: Dramatic Club 3, 4;
Debate Club 4; Mlath Club 4: La Pas 3, 4; Liga
Panamericana 4; Trade Wind 3: Editor 4; Tennis 3, 4.













.\V~ime-NOR.MA A;GNE DAviS.
.I. w.e Tee her-"Cheerful".
Bilhplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Parlimc-Dancing.
IFaoriie exprersion-"I don't believe it."
.Ili ,iies-Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Effe Kube Klub 2; Supper
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 0. G. A. Vice-president 4; Dramatic
Club 4; "Bell; of Beauiolais" I; Volley ball 1; Trade
Wind Staff 4; "Thread of Des'i.iv" 4.










.\;i,7e--EILuFN RrITr DONOVAN.
J.r e ree her-"Poised."
Bir/hplice-Cristobal, C. Z.
Pa.ritime-Reading.
Ila,'orile expre.sion-"How should I know?"
.Jli'ilies-Supper Club 3, 4; Volley b:ll 3. 4: Dramatic
Club 4; O. G. A. 4; La Pas 4.











.YA,oene-FRtEWleRICK AsiOrrN E'l:ON.
JI 'e see him-"Alert."
Bir/ihphle- Cristobal, C. 7.
Pa.iime-Mlaking a boat.
Iawordite exprex.rion-"Ohl! Oh"
,-tliiier-Glee Club 1, 2: Athletic Association 2 3;
Orchestra 3; Band 3; Varsity Clul, ., 4: Basel.all 3,
4: Trade Wind Staff 4.










.~aie R6uTII ERi.iz mTuiii E (;OI.I .
.r 'e 'ee her-"Friendly.'
I:.' .".. . R. .d.;,.. Pennsylvania.
'Pasime Playing the piano.
F',iorile exp.re,,ion, "!s that nice?"
Jlirilie., Carnival 1: Operetta 1; (lee Club 3; "Hot
Copy" 3; 0. G; A. 4; Atlleiik Association 1: Office
girl 4; Trade W'ind Staff 4: "Thread of De.Oinv" 4.
















. /n e--- G i( > t; F]R { ': Ii\'.\',:t ,Z.
-Ir we .,' e him -'V'ell-mannered.
Brihpl/,ae-i Colon. Rep. to Panama.
Pa.-ii.--Sn iminm i lg.

. i .ile ,- i.c!..ll 4: Tennis 4:; .asket hall 4.











,nic .\-ANN: VI'rnN G\lh:(
.1., 'e .rec Ihe'-"Comely.
BirIhpla,- -Colon, Rep. of Panama.
IFavoritc 'exrei.,i'- -Sayv, who?"
P',.i/inc--Swimming and 1io lo ics.
Jliitie. --Glee Club 1, 2; CG \. A. A. 1. 2, 3; EIfe Kune Klub
1. 2: IJr.-Sr. Dramatic Clu) 3. 4; National Thespiiins
3. 4; President 4; "Hot Copy" 3': "Thread of Destinyv
4; Supper Clu, 1. 2. 3. 4.








A "< 7 -DI R-I'!I % \ii G iItiN,
..-we .,c ee i/in- -"Amicadi le'
Bir/hplae- Colon. Rep. of Painama.
Pa,'li/ne-Drivin, a c'air.
F,'a ,(r;l'e ev7/re'.,''i; --"- I'll ite.
.Iicl,'ier- Glee Cluli 1. 2, 3; Band 3; Caribbean Staftf 3;
Carnival 1. 4: Sp.miil Cluhl, 1. 2, 3. 4: Liga Panameri-
cana 5. 4; "B'ell of I',lauiijoldi 1: "Hot Cop'v" 3;
"lHappy aiding ," 4; Efl'e Kiile Klul 1, 2; Dramatic
Clul 3, 4: Athletic A:, ociation 1. 2, 3; "Gassed" 1;
.Math Clul, 4; Delaite Clul, 4; Carniv.:l Committee 4.










A'ine-VIRGINIA .MA HANNA.
./.x we ee her-"Nonchalant."
Birfhplce--Ricland, Maine.
'i-./ime-Reading and movies.
''n;,i//le .expie.ri,,d --" 'Vell. no--!'ll tell you. It was like
this-"











.\ame--OLUs ELIZABETH HAYEs.
.Ir wie see her-"Popular."
Birihplace-Cristobal, C. Z.
Pa.dime-Sports and dancing.
FI',orile expression'-"What?-- Not necessarily!"
Activities-Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Effe Kube Klub 1, 2;
Glee Club 2; Athletic Association 1, 2, 3; Treasurer 1;
Secretary 3; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Vice-president 2, 3;
President 4; Class Vice-president 1, 2, 3; Dramatic
Club 3, 4; La Pas 2, 3, 4: Secretary 4; Caribbean
Staff 3, 4; "Bells of Beaujolais" 1; Carnival Com-
mittee 4; Golf 2; Volley ball 1, 2, 3, 4: Basket ball 1, 2,
3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3; Tennis 1, 3, 4: A. D. T. Club 3;
Bowling 1, 2, 3, 4.






Nalne--MlARY VIRGINIA HEARNE.
.-s uwe see her-"Original."
Birthplace-Colon, Rep of Panama.
Paslime-Making puns.
Faizorite expression-"Well, now-after all!"
Acti',iiesr-Glee Club 1, 2; "Bells of Beaujolais" 1; Effe
Kube Klub 1, 2: President 2; Supper Club 1, 2, 4: La
Pas 4; Trade Wind Staff 4: Dramatic Club President
4; Caribbean Staff 4: "Thread of De3tiny" 4.












Vame-SHIRLEY JANE HILL.
Isr ,we see her-"Sweet."
Birthplace-Ada, Ohio.
Pastime-" Billy."
'Faorile exprexssion-"Naughty! Naughty!"












.aume--MAXIsE A. Ho.F' ,I \N.
Birthplace-Painesville, Ohio.
.Ix we see her--"Affectionate."
',vorile expression-Do you know what?
1Pas1ire -Dancing.
Jcliities -Dramatic Club 4; Effe Kube Klub 1, 2; Ath-
letic Club 1, 2, 4; Supper Club 1. 2, 4; Spanish Club
4; (lee Club 3; Trade Wind 4.















A t2me-VICTORIA MAY HOILO\VF.I.
J. we .see her-"Pleasant."
Rir!hpl /ce-Ancon, C. Z.
El7,rite e.vpre.sion-"Well, I'll be ---!"
.Iclnilier-Baseball 1, 2. 3; Bowling 1, 2, 3, 4: Supper
Club 1; frade Wind Staff 4: Varsivy Club 3. 4:
unior-Senior Dramatic Club 3 4.











.ante-WILLIAM IRVIN; Hot LOwFti.-
.,s 'e see him-"Uncontrollable."
BitRlhpLace-Ancon, C. Z.
Paihi'me-Swimming.
I')wor/l e.\pr'e.-'liion--Fu n huh?"
.Ici'iltier-Sxwimming 1. 2; Socc 53. 4: B A. A. 1. 2. 3;
Orchestra 2. 3: A. D. T. 3: Debate Club 2; Tennis 4:
Basketball 4; Track 3, 4.











.a7nme--ETHEL HUNTOoo;.
.I." ,'e ee her--"Blushable."
Bitihplace-Ancon. C. Z.
P~sline-Doing homework.
F'a,,r,,-ie exprecssio-"Do 1!"
clti/itie -Effe Kube Klub 2: Supper Club 1, 2, 3: lunior-
Senior Dramatic Club 3: 0. G. A. 4: Spanish Club 3.












Vame-GoRDON HrTCHNxs, JR.
.Jr .ie ree him-"Scholarly.'
Pa.time-Swimming and tennis.
Birthplace -Cristobal, C. Z.
Fliorile expresrion-' Sho! Sho!"
Iciiities-Debate Club 4; Mathematics Club 4; Senior
Carnival Committee 4.















\'ame--BLOSSOMl E. LAM.
.tr u e .ee her-"Tranquil."
Birthplace-Colon, Rep. of Panama.
Pafrime--Reading and typing.
Fa,,rite exprerfion-"I don't know."
ctfivities-Glee Club 2; 0. G. A. Club 4; Caribbean Staff
4.












.Xai;e--HElIL LOUISEi LEACH.
tI.s w'e fee her-"Unaffected."
Birthplace-Boston. Mass.
Parime-Drawing and tennis.
la,orile e.vpre..ion-"Oh, it is not!"
.1ti,'itie.--Effe Kuhe Klub :1 Athletic Associalion; La
Pas 3, 4; (. G. A. Club 4: Booling 4; Tennis 4: Art
Editor of Trade Wind 4.












.\ome-GRANT LE1MMON.
J.r we fee him-"Shrewd."
Birthplace-Fort Stevens, Oregon.
Pastine-Swimming and golfing.
Favorite expre.rrfinm-"Don't get in an uproar!"
Icliities-Mathematics Club 4; Science Club 4.












.Vame-DAVID J. L, vY.
.l.r we ,ee him "Self-contained."
Birh/iplace-Colon, Rep. Panama.
Pa.rime -Postage Stamps.
ai'eori!e expre.wi.nm -"Now. in Gatun ctecterar'"
,cli,'iliei-Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 2, 3; Dramatic
Club 4: YMiathematics Club1 4.














A'('amc-JIEANNF LE:VI .
wr ,e .ee* het'--"Dramatic."
i '//h/--lace n;\ono., C. Z.
Paij.imc-Swimmin .
/ia,' i/e expa e,'.,-i --"\Vh ,o' c'"
.,'i,7ie.r-Effe Kube IKh il, Treasure I; ".Revoll" I;
Glee Clul I: "Bells of c;iiiiolais" I; Athletic Asso-
ciation 5; Mlath Club 4: Tr,,le W\iind Staff 4; a Pa' 4.












\-llmll---G.oiA .\l<;l1.)lA M\NNX.
.1.r 'e ee hec--"Sincere."
Bir pla/,e -Anco,. C. Z.
'. linc- Re,, 'iW,'ri'e ex rci, -"Vell- ,h.tl do Y\'i tli:nk?














Vline-- o(:i [i. LN ls 31.\'Mx:.
.I, w'e /ee him--"Teo;sahle."
BI,'rih/,place-Ancon. C. C. Z
,Pax/iie-Boat buiklilng.
17,orie e.'pr ''eri, A "ll hl'
I./i 'i'/ic-Intcrcla.ss i'Track 4.











X.Vaie-BrV a.:lV JANICE: AiARC'L:.
.1, ,'e her,- Jovial."
Bitihphzce -Colon, Rep. of Panama.
l',.lime-Being with Bob.
a'., ..ie expre..'in- "\VWell, after all- 'iv not0'!
.Ii' ilic.i-At-thletic .As.ociatiol 2. 3: (lee Clul, 2. 5:
Dramatic Clu!I 3, 4: Treasurer of National Thespians
4: Spanisuhl Club 4; Caribblan Staff 4: Supper Cluh
2, 3. 4; Varityv Clubl 4: "One Thhing After Another"
5: "Thread of' De.ltiny" 4.















Vame--ROBERT MOLTEN.
A.s we see hir--"Droll."
Birthplace-Jacksonville, Florida.
Parime-Fishing.
Favorite expression-"Nuts!"
Activities--Joke Fditor of Caribbean Staff 4; Track 4;
"Thread of Destiny" 4.











N ame-EDNA MINA M'.ELLER.
,As we see her-"Flirtatious."
Birthplace-Westerleigh, Staten Island, N. Y.
Pastime-Talking with Dorothy Roos.
Favorite expression-"Just a minute!"
,Actiitiies-Super Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Effe Kube Klub 1, 2;
Glee Club 2, 3; Orchestra 3; Dramatic Club 3; Debate
Club Secretary.4.







.Vame-ALICE RUTH PICKETT.
.As we see her--"Composed."
Birthplace-Panama, Rep. of Panama.
Pastime-Reading.
Favorite expression-"Oh, dear!"
Activities-Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Effe Kube Klub 1, 2; Secre-
tary 2; "Red Lamp" 2; Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Secre-
tary 3; Athletic Aseociation 1, 2, 3; Varsity Club 2,
3. 4; Volley ball 1, 2, 4; Golf I; Spanish Club 3, 4;
Treasurer 4; Liga Panamericana 3, 4; Dramatic Club
3, 4; Caribbean Staff 3, 4; "Happy Landings" 4;
National Thespians 3, 4; Secretary4; Orchestra 3, 4;
Neptune Club 1; Trade Wind Staff 3.








Name-VIOLET SYLVIA RANDALL.
As, we see her-"Queenly."
Birthplace- Athens. Pa.
Parstime-Dancing.
Favorite expression-"Don't be silly!"
Activitier-Super Club 1, 2 3; "Bells of Beaujolais" I;
Glee Club 1; Dramatic Club 4: O. G. A. 4.














.Va me--RICHARI ME,.VII.LE REINHOLD.
.,I '" e,( him, -"Efficient."
Bir',hplace-Ancon. C. Z.
Patim'e--Extra curricular activities.
.//tiitire'---Effe Kube Klub 1, 2; Vice-president 1: "Red
Lamp" 1; Class President 2, 3; Caribbean Staff 1. 2,
3; Editor-in-chief 4: Math Club 4: Spanish Club 2.
3, 4: Liga Panamericana 3. 4; Trade Wind Editor 3:
Carnival Committee 4; Debate Club 4.










.n cme-tli-.\"RY E. SNtCn :z.
. ,, c ',c hi', "W killing.
Bir'plilace --Colon. Rep. of Panama.
I'a.rlim,,-Music and reading.
I a',,ri/fe eapi'e,',ion'-"Certainly."
.I/,icii'C,c-Glee Club 2; Spanish Club 2, 3, 4; Vice-Presi-
dent 4: Liga Panamericana 3, 4; President 4; Assistant
Business Manager of Caribbean 3, 4.











Na.\',e- A~N\, RGRITE TtII'RiSE SILELER.
. I*Ee 'ee "er -"Sensible."
Birfhplace -New London, Conn.
'Pa.lne -n Swimming.
I','orile expre.,,cn,r'i-"Ah me! I.fe is but a passing shad-
ow!"
Iltiluiies -Spanish Club 3, 4.











.\,7me;--Ro()RT \VARREIN SI.ocurl.
./.r w,'e .'ce hNim-"Immaculate."
Birthplae-Washington, D. C.
/'Pai T( r -Thinling of the future.
/'aIwri/ ec.vx'ir'teion".,-"Hurry up!"
.I'li/(ic.,-- B. A.. 1, 2, 3; Student Council Senior Repre-
sentative 4: High School Band 3; Tennis 1, 2; "Thread
of Destiny;; 4; Math Club 4.















X',ae-CIIARLES SU.MNER Soc'Tr.
.1.r we ,re him-"Easy going."
Birthplace-Philadelphia, Pa.
Pagim.ne-Watching Clulbhose shows.
IFaorile exp're,rfion-"\Whassa matta you?"
.Icliilic,--Effe Kube Klub 1. 2: Spanish Club 3, 4;
"Gassed" 2; Assembly Committee 4; "Happy Land-
ings" 4: "Thread of Destiny" 4.








Nome-BiE'TTY ANN STETLER.
.a, 'e .ee her-"Witty."
Birhlplace-Colon. Rep. of Panama.
Pas.iiec-Sports and dancing.
.Iclirilie.c-Volley ball, Basket ball, and Bowling 1, 2, 3,
4; Baseball 1, 2, 3; Tennis 3, 4: Golf 2: Varsity Club
2, 3. 4; Class Secretary 3; Effe Kube Klub 1. 2; Dra-
matic Club 3, 4; Secretary 4; Glee Club 1; Supper
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; President 4; La Pas 3. 4; Carnival
Committee Chairman 4; Student Council 4; A. D. T.
Club.







.ame-Wi\LLiA.I FRANCIS STONE.
,,r we rce himn-"Fluent."
Bi'rhplace--Ancon, C. Z.
Pastimee-Golfing.
Favorite expre.ssion-"'I'll bet you!"
.1cti'itie.r-Carnival 1; Athletic Association 1, 2, 3; Or-
chestra 1, 3; Band 3; Baseball 3, 4; Varsity Club 4;
La Pas 4; Math Club President 4; Dramatic Club 3,
4; Effe Kube Klub 1, 2; National Thespians 3, 4;
Caribbean Staff Business Manager 4; "One Thing
After Another" 3; "lIappy Landings" 3.









iame; Ri iIl Sw\.
.I, wre .ee her "Attractive."
Birthplace -H onululu, Hlawai.
Pa.flime -Riiding Fort Sherman boats.
FI'a,,rile expre.r'ion, "After all!"
.h/i,'i/iex lunior-Scnior Dramatic Club 4; "Thread of
Destiny" 4.

















X,,imo RBIERI IL. XiFRiZ
.1.. ,we see /iio-"Nautical.'
Bid lplfahc ,Xrooo, C. Z.
IPa 'i: 'oie-Sa ii]nf
I o~il e~fett~to 'hixcime timbers!',


tame -SIDtsY F. IWAI-\TON.
.Is 'e .r'Ce h/il,-"Reserved."
Birhplace --Douglas, Arizona.
Pas1,41ie-Boating
.Ic,'ile .--Class football 2; Swimming 3; Manager Track
Team 4; Basketball 4; Mathematics Club 4; Debate
Club 4; Science Club 4.










a.ne-WI'L.LIAM RAY WHEELER.
I r e see him-"Virile."
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Paii.lie- Loving Shirley.
I'-Fa /rile expre.sion -"No, really."
.Ici'ies-Carnival 1; lFreshman Athletic Director 1;
Athletic Association 1, 2, 3: Treasurer 3; Swimming I ;
Effe Kube Klub 1. 2: Soccer 2, 3, 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4;
Basketball 2, 3. 4; "Bells of Beaujolais" 1; Golf 2;
Track 3. 4; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; President 4.










aine;--LOUISE J. WHIII)EN.
.Is wee eeher-"Good natured"
Birthplae-Palmetto. Florida.
Earile e .pressi,,-,' Maybe."
IPatrtime-Mlotorcy-cle riding.
-I/ctiLcfer-Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4: "Happy Landings" 4;
"Thread of Destiny" 4; Dramatic Club 4.















Naine-EDIsoN \ AI.TER WIRTZ.
.1r we see him,-"Athletic.'
Birthplace-Cristobal, C. Z.
Patlime-Looking for something 1o do!
Faorile exprei,,l--"I don't know."
JIclitie-le-Athletic Association 1, 2; A. D. T. Club 3;
Soccer 2, 3, 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4.











~'ame-ALEIANDRO L. WON(;.
.b, w'e .ee him-"Good-natured."
Birthplawe-Colon. Rep. of Panama.
Partime-Reading.
E worite e.xprex.i:mII--"Sure!"
.clicciies-Orchestra 2; Glee Club 2: La Pas 2, 3. 4; Liga
Panamericana 3, 4.










.ame-A.rlCE ELAIN .m Woon.
. we ree her-"Refined."
Bilrhplace-Cristobal, C. Z.
Pas.rime-Reading.
lKorit'' e.xpre riioi,2-"\'What do you think?"
.dici'ie.--Effe Kube KIlu 1, 2; Athletic Association 1, 2,
"Bells of Beaujoais" 1; Glee Club 2, 3; Spanish Club
2, 3, 4; Liga Panamericana 3, 4; Dramatic Club 3, 4;
Supper Club 3 4; 'ice-President 4; National The:-
pians 4; Trade Wind Staff 4; "Thread of De;tinv" 4.









.\ame-El 7 .N Er: I.y ,\' WO, JR.
.1 wee .,ee hi'n --"Casual."
1Iirhpliace Century, Florida.
P'a rime-Pllotography..
Ianrile expre 'ion "So what?"
.J/i'iie.,- Class Art Editor I, 2; Caribbean Art Editor
3, 4; Carilbbe:.i Ih)itographer 3, 4; Carnival Com-
mittee 4.










CLASS HISTORY
By .Jeanne Lew,' "'>4


The sailors of the S. S. Class of '54,
having signed on from many States of
the Union as weli as the Canal Zone,
proved to be the most worthy crew that
had ever set out on the ocean of C. H. S.
from Port Freshman.
With Captains Spencer and Hackett
as weii as Frst Mlate Barnett at the helm,
this class exhibited pep and desire for
accomplDshment unrlxaicd by any pre-
\ious Freshman class. The unsullied
main sails of the ship during the entire
ovyage were Athletics. IDramatics and
Social Activities. Thi ship's colors were
scarlet and white; the flowers, red and
white rwoes; the mascot, a dachshund,
Freida: and last but not east, the crew's
motto, whi. h theyv ii\ed up to for the
entire toir years was "One for all and all
for one."
It was -F Freshman girl who won the
popularity contest. The "Freshman
Hop" ': .s the most successtui Idance of
the year.
"With this u nparaiieied sailing record
for a start, the S. S. Class of '54 arrived
at Port Sophomore. y any ch nges were
made in the crew, most noticeable of
which was the absence of Captain Hack-
ett, leaving only Captain Spencer and
the new first mate, Richard Reinhold, to
man the ship. The crew did splendid
world on this leg of the voyage, serving an
outstanding luncheon and making the


Soph Leap Year Dance a most unique
and enjoyable affair. This year each
sailor received a class pin.
Having arrived at Port Junior, the
crew of the S. S. Class of '34 did not set
out discouraged as do most crews on this
leg of the voyage for although they knew
this was the "stormy weather region,"
they also knew Captain Spencer and
First-M.ate Reinhold would steer them
safely through. During the first half of
the journey, they had assembled all neces-
sary equipment to weather the storm.
%lMore luncheons and a card party were
given providing funds so that when the
good ship arrived at Port Senior, the
sought for goal was won-each one had a
beautiful ring and the Junior-Senior Ban-
quet had been the best ever.
When First-Mlate Washabaugh steered
away from Port Senior the crew became
sad for they were on the last leg of the
voyage. They would soon be at the last
port, Commencement, saying good-bye
to each other and the dear old ocean,
C. H. S., forever! That beloved ocean
which had carried them for four years;
had helped them always, although they
had sometimes failed to do their best.
Small wonder they were sad in retro-
spect' Despite this, they put out a won-
derful annual, something from their
hearts, a legacy for the school they had
loved so well.


CLASS WILL


We, the class of '34, transcending in
superiority, super-excelience, and super-
eminence, any other class hitherto e-
jected through the portals of Cristobal
High School generously bestow upon
individuals of the succeeding class, their
heirs and their assigns forever, these
small favors and remembrances.
JOSE BAZAN, his kick (in soccer) and
his colorful car to Jack Dwyer.
BLANCHE BELDEN, her qualifica-


tions to participate in beauty contests to
Leta Deakins.
RAY BEJARANO, his habit of pat-
ing pals on the back to Herbert Phillips.
MIABELLE BLISS, her teasable na-
ture to Eileen Ford.
CHARLES BELDEN, his outspoken
speech to James Lobdell.
STELLA BOGGS, her ability to direct
Spanish Club programs to Charlotte Ran-
dall.








COLIN CAMPBELL, his unique "ha-
ha" to Ralph Davis.
JUDY BRIDGET, her Ecuadorian
sandals to Aileen O'Connell.
FRED EBDON, his intent expression
to Jack Long.
NORMA DAVIS and HELEN
LEACH, their Old Cristobalishness"
to Olga Roe.
GEORGE FERNANDEZ, his ability
to dissect insects to Eleanor Mullane.
VIOLET RANDALL and EILEEN
DONOVAN, their interest in commercial
subjects to Blossom Ensminger.
JERRY GORIN, his jitney-service to
Malcolm Duey.
RUTH EGOLF, her supervision of the
Gatun Bus to Annie Laurie Turberville.
ANNE GIBSON, her famous sun-burn
to Margaret Barnard.
BILLY HOLLOWELL, his fondness
for Miss Liter to Alan Jaques.
VIRGINIA HANNA, her preference
for Freshmen to John O'Neil.
CARLTON HORINE and GRANT
LEMMON, their scientific ability to
Theodore Albritton.
ELIZABETH HAYES, her appetite
to Lillian Marden.
GORDON HUTCHINS, his precision
to Lloyd Alberga.
MARY HEARNE and MARGUER-
ITE WINN, their blonde and empty
heads to Anna Reilly.
DAVID LEVY, his fiddle to John
Palm.
JOHN and GLORIA MANNIX, their
ambitious nature to Claude Berger.
SHIRLEY HILL and BEVERLEY
MARCUSE, their dinner parties to Mi-
riam Swam.
ROBERT MOLTEN, his drawl to
Mary Ruth Reidell.
MAXINE HOFFMAN, her fairy-
likeness to Bill Elliot.
RICHARD REINHOLD, his enthu-
siasm for banquets to Edgar Borden.
VICTORIA HOLLOWELL, her wavy
locks to Robert Neely.
HENRY SANCHEZ and ALEJAN-
DRO WONG, their gentlemanly manners
to William Dougherty.
ETHEL HUNTOON, her individual-
ism to Paul Gregory.
WARREN SLOCUM, his thoughtful
wink to Billy Beers.
BLOSSOM LAM, her Household Arts
training to Alice MacSparren.


CHARLES SOUTH, his job at the
movies to David Marshall.
JEANNE LEWIS, her nose for news
to Ernest Jaramillo.
BILLY STONE, his white tuxedo to
James Reynardos.
EDNA MUELLER, her mascara to
Ruth Wickingstad.
FRANK WASHABAUGH, his con-
tagious laugh to Max Sanders.
RUTH PICKETT, her job as assembly
pianist to Jack Egoscue.
ROBERT WERTZ, his fondness for
sailboats to William Wirtz.
DOROTHY ROOS, her wad of chew-
ing gum to Jane Huntoon.
SIDNEY WHARTON, his job as
storekeeper in the Chemistry Lab. to
Robert King.
MARGUERITE SEIBLER, her regal
photograph for the Caribbean to Bert
Asensio.
RAY WHEELER, his blase expression
to George Poole.
BETTY STETLER, her job as school
reporter to Kathleen Goodenough.
EDISON WIRTZ, his ability to vamp
new English substitute teachers to Charles
Vincent.
RUTH SWAN, her movie star re-
semblance to Mary Ann Carruthers.
ERNEST WOOD, his camera to Irl
Sanders.
LOUISE WHIDDEN, her blackface
parts in plays to Charles Heim.
ALICE WOOD, her popularity with
the Sophs to Paul Beard.
To the grief-stricken Faculty we bestow
our heartyfelt sympathy in their hour of
desolation caused by the aching void
which appeared at our departure.
To you, on-coming classes, we pass
the flowing torch of knowledge and bid
you carry on.
Subscribed and sworn to, on this fif-
teenth day of June in the year of our
Lord nineteen hundred and thirty-four;
signed by the members of the Senior
Class, consisting of fifty-six varieties; in
the presence of these witnesses:

JIM NASIUM
CAFFY TERIA
ANDDY TORIUM


(Seal)
B. U. N. K.










CLASS PROPHECY


eW' York Ci/.1/, Otober 28,
1946 .111 nembert of the 1954
gradualina cla (/oi C'ri.tobal /ltHgh
School, Cri dabal, Canal ZIone,
are reuerfed t ccrrep.rond inn'e-
,datel/ ,lwith .Jlr. Flrederick .. Eb-
dcn, 1907 Rier.rtide Dri'e, .ew,
Y}'rk Ci/.q. 3lr. Ebid(n ir plan
Snin. a cla:r reunion w/hi'c/h w/1/
lake place aboard ehi yacht I cr a
,ho.rt crutie n etine next ine.nh.
.1// cla..,inaate are asked AI conm-
ltnlatliCe itlh .1lr. E.hdon a.r h&
lhe po.r.hibilit/ /, their attending j
the reunion.

This was the notice which appeared in
the "World Telegram" steadily for sev-
eral weeks. I happened upon it one day
and received quite a shock. As I wqs in
New York at the time I went at once to
Fred's apartment to investigate.
It was nothing unusual at the time for
Fred Ebdon's name to be in the New
York papers for he had recently become
one of the most wealthy men in the city.
A year previous he had conducted an
expedition to Panama to do some ex-
tensive work among the ruins of Fort
San Lorenzo and Old Panama. There he
discovered gold which the pirate .M1. ,in.
was supposed to have hidden centuries
ago. Because of his discovery and his
newly acquired wealth, he had leaped
into prominence over night.
I saw Fred at his apartment and he
told me that he wanted the whole class
on a cruise in November if possible and
was using this means of gathering them
in New York.
"Can you come, do you suppose?"
"Can a hungry man eat, do you sup-
pose? You bet."
Then we proceeded to talk over old
times and recall every one we could re-
member. He had a copy of the "Carib-
bean" and what a laugh we had over
those pictures! When we were trying to
remember where some of the others were,
he said, "There are plenty of our class-
mates right here in New York. Let's try
to find a few. Did you know that Dick
Reinhold is editor-in-chief of the 'World
Telegram' now? Let's go see him first."
At the newspaper offices we were ad-
mitted almost immediately to the editor's
room where we saw Dick sitting behind
a formidable pile of books and papers.
He acted just the same as he did when


he was editor of the 1934 "Caribbean,"
even though he did have the reputation
of being the most hard-boiled of city
editors!
He and Fred had discussed the reunion
before and were expecting answers to the
advertisement soon. In the meantime he
suggested that we go see some of our
gang who were in New York. Helen
Leach and Gloria \lannix were both
working on the "New York Sun." Helen
was an advertisement writer and Gloria
edited the paper's "Column to the Love-
lorn."
Both were delighted to see us but could
not come on the cruise. They sent us to
see Ruth Egolf who was private secretary
to the president of an insurance firm, and
head of a whole army of stenographers.
It recalled our senior year when Ruth was
office girl for ,Mr. Franks.
Ruth told us that Frank Washabaugh
had just come to New York and had
started a firm of his own. He had suf-
fered so much from sunburn all his life
(especially on the Zone) that he had
finally invented a sunburn remover. Ruth
gave us his address and we hurried to the
Washabaugh Sunburn Remover Company
and caught Frank beforehe left for dinner.
By this time we had met so many of the
old-timers that we were all approaching
a state of hysteria. Frank took us to
dinner at a fashionable hotel where we
reminisced over every course. When we
left, Fred made an appointment for us
to meet him at his apartment later in the
evening. He said he wanted to take us
to a show and seemed very excited about
it for some unknown reason.
The reason became known when he
took us to the opening night of Earl
Carroll's "Vanities." Stella Boggs was
its star and the popular dance team of
Ruth Swan and Charles South were
featured.
Within four weeks of the time the
reunion notice first appeared in the
"World Telegram," answers had come
from as many of the classmates as could
be expected. Twenty replied that they
would be in New York at the appointed
time; many others sent their regrets; and
there were a few among the missing.
It was Fred's plan to get Warren
Slocum, now captain of the S. S. "Euro-
pa," to pilot the yacht on the cruise while
his vessel was in dry-dock for repairs.
Captain Slocum appeared in Dick's office








one morning looking very swanky in a
blue uniform and gold braid. In spite of
all the glitter he was the same fellow and
accepted the offer gladly.
November fifteenth was the day ap-
pointed for those going on the cruise to
meet at the Ambassador Hotel. All
morning long they appeared and what an
uproarious time we had!
The first to arrive was Professor Camp-
bell who absent-mindedly rode past our
floor three times in the elevator before
he remembered to get off! Colin was now
teaching in Cooperstown University and
looked even more scholarly than his
position required. The next arrival was
Doctor Charles Belden. He looked so
efficient and business-like that one would
never guess that he was going on a pleas-
ure trip. Charles was now head of the
Belden Medical Clinic in the slums of
Brooklyn. After him came Beverley
Marcuse, Norma Davis and John Man-
nix. Beverley owned and managed a
prosperous night club, and was assisted
by John and Norma in the business.
By noon time Fred's apartment sound-
ed like a true Bedlam. Every one talked
at once except one slim, blonde, woman
I saw in a corner behind the piano. Not
being able to picture any of my former
cohorts in a silent role, I strolled over to
investigate. Her back was turned, her
head lowered, and not a sound came from
her. I coughed--nothing happened. I
coughed again and again. I had visions
of a sore throat and stopped coughing to
tap her shoulder. She raised her head in
a startled fashion and looked at me. I
recognized her at once and said, "Hello,
Sister!" I got no farther however because
she didn't even speak to me! Here was
Elizabeth Hayes staring at me with cold
eyes and turning disdainfully away.
I fled from her chilly presence back to
the crowd and sought out Jane Hill to
tell me the reason for Elizabeth's strange
behaviour. She was only too willing to
relate the whole story. Poor Elizabeth
had been disappointed in love and was so
disillusioned and bitter toward everybody
that she had fled into the country. She
lived alone somewhere in the wilds of
Vermont and pondered on a new kind of
philosophy which she was following.
Jane said, "It took a great deal of
persuasion to get her to come here. I
guess she remembers her happy life at
C. H. S. and is attempting to recapture
some of it. It's a sad story don't you
think?" I heartily agreed with her.
Ex\crv.,nc was preparing now to leave
for the dock and go aboard the "Frieda."
(Fred had named his yacht "Frieda" be-
cause our class mascot when we high
school freshmen had been Mayno Bliss's


dachshund of that name). When we
arrived there Warren received us on the
yacht. We were scheduled to sail at
two o'clock. A few minutes before the
hour we were all gathered along the rail
when a tall figure in many furs came
flying down the dock. After her came a
taxi-driver, a news boy, and a U.S. Cus-
toms Inspector, all carrying suitcases and
hand bags.
It was Jeanne Lewis without a doubt.
Maybe she was a famous actress now
but she hadn't changed much. What
an entrance! No one but an actress could
catch a boat with a sour-faced taxi driver,
a rowdy news boy, and a hardened old
Customs Inspector carrying her bags!
There were more glad cries of welcome
then. Now that the "Frieda" was leaving
the dock under Captain Slocum's able
guidance the crowd began chattering
again, "And do you remember the time
--" This continued all afternoon as we
left New York. It was not until after
dinner that we all got together and talked
things over in any sort of order and sanity.
All twenty of us gathered on the deck and
Warren acted as master of ceremonies.
He suggested that we conduct our gather-
ing in an orderly fashion with one person
on the floor at a time. We all agreed to
that and somebody remarked, "Let's
make it nice and orderly like our class
meetings used to be. eh?" But we knew
better and voted for order!
Warren began the discussion. "I can
tell you of Bob Wertz because he is in my
line of work. Right now he is skipper of
the S. S. 'Americana' which belongs to a
steamship company in competition with
my own. I see him occasionally; we're
friendly enemies. He hasn't changed at
all and is the best liked skipper of all the
ships his company owns."
We all talked about that a while until
the captain called us to order. "N.'w it'
Mlary's turn to talk."
Mary Hearne wore the most fashion-
able clothes of all the women-and why
not? She was a fashion designer and had
her own shops in both New York and
Paris called "The Hearnd Shoppe." She
told about Eileen Donovan who modeled
and helped her design the styles. Ethel
Huntoon had her own department which
made fancy costumes and specialized in
"Mi Pollera" outfits! To such an extent
had Panamanian customs spread! In
"The Hearn6 Shoppe" there was also
another of the 1934 girls. Violet Randall
was head of the semi-made clothes de-
partment which did a flourishing busi-
ness.
Then I)r. Belden, Charles to us, told
us all the home news. Jos6 Bazan was
the fire chief in Colon and he still kept








up the tradition of having Spanish club
dances at the Bomba, but why shouldn't
he? Nlarguretie Siebier had taken Mrs.
Spencer's place teaching Spanish. Our
beloved sponsor was living in Spain at
the time and was quite an authoress. Her
"MAemoiors" had lust been published and
we were all anxious to get a copy. Two
other classmates had developed into
teachers. Blossom Laim was a second
lMiss Patterson and was just as able a
teacher. George Fernandez was a pro-
fessor in the Bioloogy Department at the
Junior College. His school-day fondness
for dissecting bugs had carried him ;r
in that iine of work.
"Now tell us about your work, Alice,"
we begged, as she was next in the circle.
She had invented a fat-removilng clreamn
called "Wood's Wonder Worker." What
an unusual location for Alice to choose
She told us about Edna Mlueller and
Dorothy Roos who had factories side by
side in jersey City. Edna oriainated the
"AIueller Alake-up Concern." and D)ot
was the proud inventor of a new type of
chewing gum that would snap with very
little effort on the part of the chewer'
Soon everybody began talking at once
about our old classmates, but I finally
managed to gather scraps of news about
most of them.
Edison Wirtz was explorwin in the wilds
of Ecuador and Peru, and had not been
in the United States for several years.
We all knew that Blanche Beiden was aI
movie star for we had seen hlir on tlhe
screen many times. Her friends said her
fame had not changed her personality, as
is so often the case. Likewise we all knew
of Billy Wheeler, for anytime one would
open a magazine Bill's face would appear.
adorning some collar advertisement. Sid-
ney \lWharton was an Army officer nowx
stationed in Hawaii.
We all noticed the change in Maynol
Bliss. She was now\x head matron in a
home for Aged and Decr-epit Punsters.
She pulled at our heartstrings when she
toid of the pitiful cases she had in her
care. I'm afraid she did not enjrlo tlhe
noise anid Ihul-bub of tile trip and often
I saw a ilogingl look in her eyes as if she
were wishing to be baclk in her home,
surrounded by her wards. She also told
us of the splendid work Virgina Hanna
was doing as a social worker among the
poor and needy.
Jane Hill was enthusiastic about her
career in architecture. She had actually
drawn plans for some of the buildings at
the latest Worid's Fair quite an under-
taking, and we were very proud of ]her.
She said Ernest Wood often helped her
out, although his photography shop kept
him busy most of the time.


Ruth Pickett, head librarian at the
Congressional Library in Washington,
told us of Anne Gibson's position as presi-
dent of the General Federation of W\om-
en's Clubs, and of Louise Whidden's
ability to give readings in negro dialect.
She toid us little tid-bits about the life
of Senator Hutchins (you remember Gor-
don, don't you)? He and Ruth were fast
friends and from what I heard their re-
aitionship was closer than that of friends
ler.'y Gorin was a Greyhound Bus
Line ofticiai and he certainly looked the
part. He had ir- his neighbors in Phila-
delphia, Grant Lemmon and David Levy.
Grant was the delight of chemistry stu-
dents, for he had invented some play-
thine lor every classroom s that the
students might have something to occupy
their mind during class sessions. David
had in his possession the "most marvel-
lous stamp collection in the workd" and
he spent his time improving it.
In one corner two gentlemen were
talking earnestly. On closer inspection,
they proved to be Billy Stone and Bob
Aloiten. Billy then expounded to us his
famous theory that it was perfectiv nat-
ural for a roiling stone to gather moss.
We wondered why Billy was such a re-
ciuse and Bob told us that it was because
his belief in women was shattered. He
had married Alarguerite Winn and ev-
idently all had not gone well. Marguerite
had thr'Ce or four husbands before she
finally married Frank and turned out to
be a model wife. We chatted with Bob
for awhile. He showed us the book he
was reading. I1 was "Rob Roy," and
ihe had finally reached page 467. He
said that he was very much interested in
English Literature now. As we remember
his enthusiasm in English twelve we
didn't doubt his statement.
The last night on board we had a big
time Bev Alarcuse had ,brought her
night club) performers "en masse. Her
right hand man, Johnny Alannix, who
was also the dance director, had been
practicing with the dancers all week in
order to present a super-fine performance.
Johnny sure had a way with the women!
He'd work those girls morning, noon and
night and make 'em like it' However, no
one meant anything to him !but No,'ma
Davis. She was their star performer-
and could that girl sing the blues.
That night was one of the happiest in
our life. Bev went from tale to tale
making everybody feel at horm, aitho it
didn't take much encouragement. Fred
beamed with satisfaction to think that
his plan should work so perfectly, and
everyone forgot his or her position, social
status, or career and pretended they were
kids back in good C. H. S. again.








After the party Fred told us why we
were going to Marseille on our cruise.
Miss Maxine Hoffman and Count Ray-
mond Bejarano were to be married at
Bordeaux, and Fred had received an
invitation for us all to attend. The
wedding would take place in the Hollo-
well Holy Temple, of which Reverend
William Irving Hollowel! was pastor;
Miss Victoria Hollowell, assistant; and
Miss Judy Bridget, Sunday School Su-
perintendent.
Fred also told of the former class mem-
bers who were in Europe at the time.
Henry Sanchez and Alejandro Wong were
doing the gypsy act playing their guitars
at various European towns.
No one ever knew why Better Stetler
happened to be any place at any particu-
lar time. She was a mystery woman. At
first she was suspected of being allied
with a band of Paris crooks; then she was
reputed to belong to a detective agency;
now it was not known why she happened
to be at Bordeaux- unless it was to take
part in the National Bridge Tournament
which was being played there!
Carlton Horine was on his way to a
Berlin Science laboratory. He had com-
pounded a famous "Horine Gas" (pro-
nounced Horeen, as in chlorine), which
was supposed to be very poisonous, and
was carrying samples to other chemists.
The gas was said to have strange effects
on people who breathed it.

The next morning the "Frieda" docked
at Marseille. We immediately left for
Bordeaux by train, and arrived the next
day. We were met by the prospective
bride and groom and all the others at
the station who conducted us to a hotel
where we rested until time for the wedding
at four o'clock.
We all drove out to the Hollowell Holy
Temple, founded by the Reverend Wil-
liam Hollowell. (Who would have sus-
pected the makeup of a minister in the
Billy H.,llowell of our school days)? We
were ushered into the Temple by Miss
Victoria and Miss Judy, both looking
very solemn and pious. For a few mo-
ments we chatted of the wedding. The
courtship had been a sudden one, we
were told, and no one knew much about
it.
I noticed Carlton talking to Jeanne
Lewis. He looked most dejected and
haggard, I thought, and Jeanne looked
disturbed. Soon the minister entered
looking almost funereal in black clothes,
and took his correct place.
The wedding march was struck up,
and the Count Bejarano entered attired
in the full dress uniform of his newly
acquired nobility. Down the aisle came


Maxine in the loveliest of all bridal
gowns. She looked determined and pale
rather than radiant with happiness as
brides should appear. As she approached,
I saw the expression on the waiting bride-
groom's face change until he was frown-
ing hard and flashes were coming from
his dark eyes. (How often we had seen
Ray's expressions change so quickly in
the days of '34).
As the bride came nearer she looked
defiant, and Ray seemed on the verge of
exploding- which he did:
"How long is that bridal train?" he
asked. His voice was low and menacing,
and each word sounded like a bomb shell.
"Twenty eight feet," came the answer
from the bride.
We were all astounded and gaped in
wonder at these unusual pre-nuptial re-
marks. However, the worst was vet to
come.
"Didn't I tell you it had to be thirty
feet?"
"Yes, but it's my own wedding gown
and you've had your way long enough,"
and the bride broke into tears.
Then Count Bejarano raged and tore
his hair, and finally shouted, "I'll marry
no woman who can't obey my wishes
even on our wedding day. I'm through
with women forever!"
He stalked out of the church. Reverend
Hollowell dropped both his book and his
jaw. The bride remained defiant and we,
spectators, stood in silence. Never had
such a spectacle been presented at. a
wedding'
Suddenly the dramatic voice of Jeanne
Lewis rang out in the stillness, "I have
the solution to this dilemma. Carlton
Horine has confessed to me that he loves
Maxine and she loves him, so why not
continue the ceremony?"
Both of the lovers looked gloriously
happy at this sudden turn of events and
Carlton hastened up the aisle to Maxine's
side. The pastor beamed as his hopes of
continuing the marriage returned, and
he began.
When the time came to exchange rings,
the groom fumbled helplessly through all
his pockets searching for a ring he did not
possess. As he drew a handkerchief from
one pocket something dropped to the
floor with a smash. Clouds of smoke and
penetrating fumes arose and filled the
room, and Carlton shouted, "It's my
poison gas!
Then I became dizzy and the room
began to whirl. Strange things began to
happen-I saw the bride, the groom, and
the minister lump up and down and skip
off! I saw Captain Slocum and the
philosopher, Elizabeth Hayes, flitting








between the pews, and John Nlannix and
Alejandro Wong playing leap frog' Then
some people rushed in and took us all
away from the church.

News Item:
Bordeaux, Nov. 26, 1946.-The Hol-
lowell Holy Temple was the scene of a
strange occurrence yesterday afternoon.
During the wedding service of Miss
Maxine Hoffman and the Count Ray-
mond Bejarano, passers-by heard loud
shouts and saw the Count dash wildly
from the church. Some minutes later
more strange sounds were heard com-
ing from the interior of the Temple.
A group of citizens entered to inves-
ticate the matter and beheld a most
extraordinary sight. All the wedding
guests were acting as though they were
drunk or insane. The bride, the groom,
and the minister were playing tag.
Other men and women were running
about shouting, and one party of them
were playing "hide-and-go-seek." All


seemed to be adults of approximately
thirty years of age.
The police were called and decided
to take the party to the hospital instead
of jail. All continued their strange
behaviour for three hours when the
hysteria showed signs of disappearing.
A gentleman named Horine recovered
first and explained that they were
suffering a temporary insanity result-
ing from having inhaled his "Horine
Gas" when he accidentally dropped a
bottle of it.
The entire party recovered con-
sciousness within a few hours and were
released from the hospital. They are
all Americans and came here on a
pleasure trip. They plan to leave
Bordeaux today and return to America
immediately.
(Editor's Note:-These fantastic pro-
phecies are results of the vivid imagina-
tions of three girl members of the class
of '54 and really ought not be held re-
sponsible).


SENIOR CLASS POEM
BD Gloria annix '54


The time has come when we, Seniors,
Must venture forth from school
And enter into the wide world,
Exchanging book for tool.

In nineteen-thirty we were Frosh.
A timid group, I fear.
And now, throughout these four short years
Our school has grown quite dear.

We thought they were quite wrong to shave
The hair clear off our boys
And treat us all real rough, as though
We were but little toys.

Yet when in nineteen-thirty one
The Sophomore class were we,
We pounced upon the little Frosh,
And tortured them with glee.

And then in nineteen-thirty two
We joined the Junior ranks
And viewed with condenscending smile,
The Sophomores' childish pranks.


In nineteen-thirty three we stepped
Into the Senior class.
And though we studied very hard
The time did quickly pass.

We've clubs and dances-parties, too,
And lots of other things.
And now upon some sixty hands
There glow the Senior rings.

We've had an added glory to
Our one remaining year.
We have a school that's grand and new
We're proud of it down here.

Mrs. Spencer's been our sponsor for
Our whole High School career.
She's helped us pass up every class,
And stood for us each year.

And now, we've finished high school years
We'll scatter far away.
We hope that we will meet again.
And, perchance, we may.


-7





















I IF -
I! ^












(ILA 5 IE


I
































Siidiil. Leji Io Rh( :--William Elliot, John Palm, Ralph Davis. Theodore Albritton, Richard
,lolten, C. lMunoves. Paul Beard, James Renardez. Robert Neely, William
Beers.
Si/tinl. Left to RtighI:-Edgar Borden, Jack Egoscue, Maxwell Sanders, William Wirtz, !rl Sanders,
David MIarshall, Charles Vincent, Ernest Jaramillo.
IFront Rou', Lef/ to Rith!:--Claude Berger, Bertram Asensio, Lloyd Alberga, Paul Gregory, John
O Neil, Herbert PMillips, William Dougherty.


Juniors


Stanin,,i,, Left Io Ri,/hl:-Blosom Ensminger. Eillen O Connel, Miriam Swan, Mary Ruth Riedel.
Mary Ann Carruthers. Anna Reilly.
Sittig, Left toi llIt: -Margaret Barnard. Ruth Wikingstad, Olga Roe. Leta Deakins. Annie
Laurie Tuberville, Alice Mac Sparren, Elinor Mullane.

U I 1 --WLI"iWr.4. I P I


30













JUNIOR CLASS
Bli Ralph Da,,l,, 5


This vear the lunio Class of '35 has
been very active in sponsoring and partic-
ipating in school events.
The first class meeting was held on
October 11, 1953 in the school library,
for the purpose of electing class officers.
The meeting was conducted by our former
sponsor, lMiss Moore. Officers were
elected as follows:
President William Beers
Vice-President Robert Neelv
Secretary Ruth Wikingstad
Treasurer Kathleen Goodenough
The Junior Class had second choice for
electing a class advisor and they were
very fortunate in being able to have Mr.
millerr as their sponsor. He has proved to
be one of the most capable of the class
advisors. His handling of the Carnival
stage show has shown that.
On Wednesday, October thirteenth, a
special meetinL was called in order to
elect one boy and one girl from the class
as representatives to the Student Coun-
cil. Miriam Swan and Paul Beard were
chosen as representatives.
The third meeting held by the Junior
Class was to elect class helpers and ex-
tras. Discussions were held about choos-
ing the class ring and whether expenses
for the annual banquet could be met. As
those two problems have always been
the important items in the Juniors' sched-
ule, they required a great deal of ponder-
ing.
We decided to hold a candy sale on
December twentieth to help raise the
necessary funds for our banquet. The
sale was conducted by boys selected friom
the class.
On January seventeenth, we held our
second candy sale which was managed by
the girls. The proceeds were much greater
than those from the first sale.
The Junior play, "Happy Landings,"
was presented to the public in the school
auditorium on the fifteenth of December.
The play, sponsored by \Miss Kimbro, was
quite a success. The students as well as
the director are to be complimented on
the splendid performance. Approximate-
ly $75.00 was taken in as profit on the
matinee and evening performance. This


sumt was added to the class treasury.
The Junior dance was held in the school
gymnasium on February ninth. The
dance was made a success those mem-
bers who worked so diligently in decorat-
ing the gym in a most unique manner.
Both boys and girls contributed greatly
in making the dance unusual and attrac-
tive. The lights were dimmed and the
rafters were decorated with crepe paper.
In the corner where the orchestra played,
there was a large. yellow, crescent moon
hung with the word "JUNIORS" on it.
The pleasant atmosphere and the music
both combined to make the whole evening
a happy one.
Soccer season started with more turn-
outs from the Junior Class than from any
other class in the high school. The boys
who finally made the varsity team were
for the most part Juniors.
The girls from the class took a great
deal of interest in volleyball fighting hard
to maintain the high standards of their
class.
Baseball received renewed enthusiasm
from the boys in the class. A large turn-
out was expected from every class and
they were not disappointed in the turn-
outs from the Junior class. Although the
Juniors lost the class championship, they
showed school spirit in every game.
The Junior girls showed their possibili-
ties in basketball. They attacked this
sport with a keen and vigorous zeal.
The juniors took quite a part in the
tennis and track meets. The Junior ten-
nis champion was Jack Egoscue who will
represent us in the high school tourna-
ment. In the interclass track meet, the
Juniors came first with the highest num-
ber of points. The best boys in track
represented their respective classes and
it seems that the Juniors showed their
outstanding abilities in this sport.
During the coming year, the Junior
class will continue to act as a group and
intends to uphold the fine spirit shown in
school activities. As a class, the Juniors
have stood together in maintaining true
sportsmanship and this loyalty will see
them nwin still greater distinction next
year.
































Statiini L::// /t Rilh!: -Edward Durham, Robert Mlarsh, Patrick Bates, Royce Lewis, Theodore
Aanstoos, Armando Gasperi, Samuel Roe, Charles Mead.
Sit/iiig. L,:if to Riltf:. -lolhn Szivo\ George Mlarcuse, Wendell Cotton, Julio Dominguez, lames
Days, Howard Will, James Lothrop, Joseph Retally.
Ilv>on Ro''. L,:ji lt Ri/bth:- Matthew O'Hearn, Robert Moot. William Hill, Robert Anderson,
William Hanna, Edward Curtis, Alphues Baldwin.





Sophomores



Stf, iin,. !,fi! t Rio/it: -Alice Hobart, Cecilia Kalender. Hope Hollowell, Doris Ebdon. Elizabeth
Collins, Evelyn Dwyer, Mary Griffin, Agnes Reinke, leanette Hyler,
Hope Schaeffer, Virginia Sanders.
Sitini., LI // i Ri/hil: Margaret Hollingshead, Elizabeth AMurray. Betty Stevens. Muriel Hanna,
(Mr. R. C. Hackett, advisor). Edith Wikran. Jane Starke, Nora Hewitt,
\'irgina Thomas.
Fi),o Ro 1 Left to RiIt:l: Viola Tuck. Olga Dominguez, Lydia Gravatt, Elva Estenfoz, Rachel
Cuesta, M\uriel Mullane, Dorothy Hoecker, Mary Goulet.
















SOPHOMORE ACTIVITIES


On October 11. 1933, the present
Sophomore Class held its first meeting
in the library which was assigned to them
for the entire year. The purpose of this
meeting, as customary, was to elect class
officers and a sponsor for the present year.
Mr. Hackett, who had been our advisor
for the previous school year, acted as
chairman of the election.
Since Mr. Hackett had proved himself
to be such a capable advisor the first year,
the class re-elected him unanimously.
Following this election and after a close
contest the class officers were chosen as
follows:
President .... \\ENDEI.L COTTON
Vice-President.. .JAMES DAYs
Secretary . VIRGINIA SANDERS
Extra Officer.. EDWARD Dt'RHAM
Another meeting was held on October
thirty first after the Students' Associa-
tion was organized and its officers elected.
The purpose of this class meeting was to
elect two representatives to the Executive
Council. The representatives were elected
as follows: Ioris Ebdon, girl representa-
tive; and Howard Will, boy representa-
tive.
At the regular December meeting the
class made plans for the Sophomore
Dance. It was the annual class dance and
was formal. It was given in the high
school gymnasium the night of January
5, 1954. James Days and his committee
made elaborate plans for the evening
which were all carried out perfectly.
The gymnasium was righly decorated
with palm branches along the walls and
bamboo leaves enveloping the sky blue
lights. This gave the atmosphere a cool
and pleasing tone. The spacious gym-
nasium seemed to be an earthly Eden.
Excellent and melodious music was
furnished by "Barlow and his Jazz Aristo-
crats." This orchestra was a novelty
which added much pep to the dancing.
At intervals during the dance, some of
the Sophomores did their share by serving
punch to the thirsty guests.


One of the specialties was the prize
waltz. The couple who showed the most
grace and skill at waltzing proved to be
Elizabeth Hayes, a Senior, and John Will,
a Sophomore. As a prize each of them
received a package of one hundred pen-
nies!
There was no doubt at midnight as to
hosts. Everyone had a good time be-
cause of the excellent spirit of the dance.
The Sophomores sporting spirit seemed
to be quite low this year. Although the
class possesses many talented sportsmen
and sportswomen, our record has not
been very good.
In the Inter-class Soccer series the
Sophomores began by defeating the
Juniors. This good fortune did not last
for long however, because the Freshmen
proved to be invincible.
Again in the Inter-class Baseball series
the Sophomores won their first game
against the Seniors and were defeated
by the Freshmen.
In the tennis tournament which Mr.
Hackett managed, the Sophomores'
champion was William Hill. In the semi-
finals for the school championship he was
defeated by Pressley, the Freshman
champion.
The Sophomore girls upheld the honor
of their class in the basket ball tourna-
ment for girls. They defeated the Fresh-
man team and the Junior team to win
the series.
We hope that next year the class spirit
will be higher in athletics and that more
enthusiasm will be displayed.
The class of '36 as a whole has had
plenty of cooperation in all the class and
school activities. Its officers have proved
capable in managing the class functions.
If this class continues during the next
two years with the excellent record of its
last two, it will undoubtedly leave an
enviable reputation when it graduates in
1936.
































S" ... Left to Right:-Stanley Donaldson, Montford Tawes, Carlisle Christensen, Robert
Ruley, Robert Rutherford, James Van Dyke, Joseph Coffin, William
Abendroth.
Sitiin, Lejt to Right:-John McLain, Frank Alberga, Jack Clay, Horace Sallas, James Coman,
William Raby, Robert Pulgar, Robert Reppa.
Fl nt Row, Left to Rilht:-Burton Hood, Lawerance Will, Theodore Purvis, John Bozeman, Archi-
bald Gibson, Russel Justice, Marvin Keenan, Vernon Clark.





Freshmen





Standing, Lejl to Right:-Doris Collings, Betty Ellis, Jaceline Briscoe, Mary Darley, Louise Sei-
bold, Kathleen Ecker.
Silli'ng, Left to Righit:-Rubv Lvew, Kathleen Phillips. Helen Carrol, Charlotte Levy. Virginia
Fehn, Ellen Kelty, Thelma Miller, Maxine Blunden.
Front Row, I.eft to Right: -Winifred Koller, Grace Hodges, Esther Neely, Anna Patchett, Ruth
Bowman.
































J~L~) ~-i ..-.


,Si/ondin Lejl to) Rtii'ht: Joseph Attia, Joseph M\artin. Fred Wertz, Lemuel Pressely. William
Turville. Albert Christain, Donald Cornell. Roderick Cuthbertson. lames
Hogan.
Si/!in,, Litl !o Riilah!:-Phillip Houghton. Carlos Funes, William Wood, William Dickinson, James
Christian, Anthony Refcoflki. Herbert Gottesman, Roland Clemens.
Front Row,, Left 1t RiAht:-Clianey Moore. William Scoot. Stanley Dougherty. Charles Washa-
baugi, Henry laramillo.






Freshmen






Sti, ,lita, Lef/ to Ri, Itl: -Theda Stokes. Yolanda Sallas, Netta Potts, Josephine Stumpf, Olive
Aanstoos, Rae Hill.
,Sitin,. Left to Ri,,ht: lessie Halstead. lean Walsh. Betty McClearY. Bobbie Durham. Macel
Goulet. Ruth Moody, Anita Boggs. Rita Kotalich.
'Front RIo,,, Le/t to RI'at: -Betty Hatauss. Iucile Lyew. Gladys Pescod. Lillian Chase. Aura Hun-
toon. Eleanor Stumpf.


~ks
i:



















FRESHMAN ACTIVITIES


The class of '37 held its first meeting in
the auditorium on October 11, 1933.
The auditorium has continued to be the
monthly meeting place of the Freshmen
for the entire year.
The first meeting was sponsored by
Mr. Franks for the purpose of electing
our class officers and sponsor. The
popular Mr. Meyer was elected sponsor
unanimously. We next elected officers
which are as follows:
President....... HENRY JARAMILLO
Vice-President .PHILIP RIEDEL
Secretary........ KATHLEENI PIILLIPS
Treasurer....... BETTY MCCLEARY
The next class meeting was a brief one
which lasted only two minutes. At it we
elected our class representatives for the
Executive Council. Macel Goulet was
elected the girl representative and James
Hogan the boy. When James Hogan
resigned later, James Christian was elect-
ed to fill his place.
The Freshmen have had two candy
sales in the school hall and both have
been quite successful. The first candy
sale, with Macel Goulet as chairman,
brought twelve dollars profit. Lillian
Chase had charge of the second at which
a profit of approximately fifteen dollars
was made. All class members were asked
to bring candy for the sales. Those who
did not do so were charged twenty-five
cents as their share toward the class fund.
In athletics this year the Freshmen
have ranked very high. The boys espec-
ially have shown excellent team-work and
cooperation in upholding the class of '37.
The Freshmen boys won the Interclass
Soccer Championshi; in the series which


was played at the end of the regular soc-
cer season with Balboa. In baseball the
Freshmen also came out on top by winning
the Inter-class Baseball Championship.
Among other things the Frosh defeated
the C. H. S. faculty in a baseball game.
The Freshmen girls cannot boast of
such success in athletics as the boys can.
In the Interclass Basketball Series for
girls they were unable to defeat the
Sophomore girls. A number of Freshmen
girls turned out for Varsity practice in
different sports and a few earned letters.
The most recent class activity was the
Freshman Hop which was given in the
gymnasium the night of April sixth from
eight to twelve o'clock. This class was
the first to have the "M., ,nilitj Ser-
enaders" and all their style for a school
dance. The dimly lighted gym was dec-
orated with balloons of many colors
hanging from the ceiling, and palm leaves
adorned the walls. The prize waltz was
won by Junior Will and Grace Belden.
All in all the class has reason to be proud
of its first entertainment for its school-
mates.
Other activities in which the Freshmen
participate are the Freshman Chorus and
the Effe Kube Klub. Many of the Frosh
members of the club have done outstand-
ing work in dramatics this year. We can
also biast of two high honor students,
Jacqueline Briscoe and Louise de la Ossa.
The class of '37 numbers approximately
ninety students, the largest entering class
the high school has ever had. If the class
continues doing the type of work it has
done during its first year, it will be a very
successful one as classes go.












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LITERARY



BEST SHORT STORY

"AFRAID"
Byi .lrinam Swanl 'i55


Every time Doctor Levin mounted the
six broad stone steps to the entrance of
the Communist Hospital of M!oscow, a
thing which he did every morning except
Sunday, at nine o'clock- he went through
the same emotional crisis, a fear which
he always had with him, so deep in his
own soul that he could not shake it off.
At the top of the six steps stood a
guard, a young soldier in a long dirty-
looking military coat with a high astrak-
han cap. He wore a look of indifference
and boredom, and seldom answered Doc-
tor Levin's polite "Good morning. Com-
rade."
In his worst dreams Doctor Levin had
seen this gray looking guard barring the
entrance to the hospital, and not letting
him in, hurling him back into misery,
cramming his wife and himself into one
small room with hardly anything to eat.
Once past the guard, in the safety of
the wide hall of the hospital, Doctor
Levin felt himself of again, and his self-
confidence and energy were restored to
him. He loved the uniforms, the smell
of antiseptics, the cleanness, and the lives
of waiting patients huddled on the bench-
es. He was very alert and set about doing
his morning tasks: one operation sched-
uled for this morning and three for this
afternoon. So much depended on him,
and he felt that he was prepared for any-
thing asked of him. He was very highly
regarded in Mloscow as one of the best
surgeons.
Doctor Levin was back in his office
after the first operation when the head
nurse entered.
"Commissar Lubov just phoned. He
is bringing his mother over at once for
an emergency operation."
When he heard "Commissar Lubov,"
Doctor Levin turned pale. He had helped
him when he was down and out. had
given him the job he now held, and had
made him self-confident again. He knew
the case would be hard to fight because
the mother was old, but he would fight
with all his might and power.
Comrade Lubov, walking beside the
stretcher bearing his mother, was a young
man of medium height. At a first glance


a person could tell by his keen dark eyes
that he was a very energetic man, and he
had a reputation of getting what he want-
ed from his subordinates.
Lubov remained in the hall outside
after his mother had been wheeled into
the operating room. As he washed and
dried his hands. Doctor Levin could hear
his steps nervously going up to the end
of the hall and back again, pausing now
and then at the door of the operating
room. This unnecessary noise disturbed
the doctor's usual calmness and made
him nervous and anxious.
The patient had stopped breathing.
When all attempts to revive the still form
on the operating table had failed Doctor
Levin dismissed the nurses and his at-
tendants. The only thing left now to do
was to notify the son. Of course, he
would want a last look at his mother's
face before they took her away.
Doctor Levin pulled the sheet up to the
old woman's chin. It was horrible how
her dead face seemed to mock him, to
make it all the harder for him to tell the
commissar. Her blue lips kept saying,
"M-y son, Commissar Lubov, is out there
Hear him walking up and down? You.
afraid to tell him that I am dead-me,
his mother-you're afraid for yourself.
Go and face him. He despises fail-ure."
The steps of the son neared the door of
the operating room and the doctor's legs
gave a funny twitch. Then he opened the
door.
"Well, doctor?"
Doctor Levin kept his eyes on a button
of the Commissar's coat.
"Your mother is old. It is a difficult
case.
"Yes, yes, I know she is old. She is in
vour hands, Doctor." And the son re-
sumed his walk down the corridor.
Doctor Levin slid back into the op-
erating room. His weak limbs carried
him to the nearest seat. He put his hands
to his head and moaned; then he brought
them down again and looked at them.
Nev-'r to perform another operation was
to him a torture to think of, and yet was
it not true? He had always been afraid
of this and now that it had happened-








what was he to do? The only thing left
was to tell the Commissar--but how?
Could he face poverty again? He knew
that his wife could not.
The steps in the hall continued their
monotonous pace. Doctor Levin came
back to the present with a start. His eyes
lifted to the still figure on the table. He
glanced at his watch-eleven twenty
five. Trembling, he got up, opened the
door, and stepped outside. The son stood
facing the door, barely four feet away.
Doctor Levin hastily shut the door be-
hind him. How much could Lubov have
seen? The Commissar waited.
"I fear I have to tell you--"
The son still said nothing.
"--there are complications. She may
not pull through."


"This is your work, Doctor. Do your
best."
Doctor Levin went back into the op-
erating room. Could he stand it-that
pacing up and down, up and down? He
waited until the footsteps were approach-
ing again, then he stepped outside.
"Well, doctor?"
"I am sorry. Your mother has passed
away.
He looked the son straight in the face.
The son spoke.
"Dead? Well, it is a good thing. She
did not believe in Communism."
Doctor Levin reached mechanically for
his handkerchief, wiped it across his per-
spiring forehead, and returned the wet
ball to his pocket.


SECOND BEST SHORT STORY

THE TRIP OF THE LUNA
By Tom Russell '36


In 1929 during the month of October
some strange ethereal disturbance put a
stop to all radio reception for a period of
about fifty-three minutes. This caused
much talk and controversy among our
most eminent scientists and authorities
on radio. Dr. L. B. Martin stated that
there was a chance that it was caused by
some planet of the solar system trying to
communicate with the world. Another
man, an astronomer, claimed that it
could have been caused by two bodies
colliding in space. Also the theory was
advanced that possibly some nation of
the world, in preparing for war, had built
a machine to create static, and thus
drown out all communications of the
enemy.
Really there are only two people who
know the source of the disturbance. John
Dowdy, who has now passed into the
great beyond, and I. Although John was
not known to be a scientist, he possessed
one of the most brilliant minds in the
world. My statement will no doubt prove
itself in what is to follow.
John's home and workshop was located
about sixty miles from San Diego on the
peak of Cyuamaca M.1 .illtain This place
was ideally located for his project. It
was the third highest peak in this coun-
try, and was a good distance from any
large amount of civilization; a railroad
line passed within six miles of his estab-
lishment.


Now to explain the project of which I
spoke. In the early part of 1927, John
was struck with the idea of building a
rocket ship that would travel to the moon.
After much study and concentration
plans were involved for the "Luna," as
this was the title to be bestowed upon
the first intersteller space ship. But with
complete plans made there were still
other difficulties to be faced. First, the
job of constructing the "Luna," and
second, the astronomical data required
in order to make contact with the moon
and not to go travelling on into space.
This was where I came in. Being a teach-
er of astronomy in Ohio University, and
also a very close friend of John's, it was
I who was chosen to figure out the line
of flight that would be required to con-
tact the moon. Also I was to help in any
material construction when my knowl-
edge was sufficient.
After placing various orders with nu-
merous different firms, John and I left
for our rendezvous in the mountains.
Here was when the railroad line came
into play. All the metal parts for the
body, the tools required, the necessary
instruments, and all other needed sup-
plies could be deposited at a small station
by the train and from there be taken by
a light truck to our workshop.
For almost two years we stayed in the
mountains except for occasional short
trips to the city. Even though the "Lu-








na" was completed in September of 1929,
the trip could not start until October as
the moon was not at declination, which
was necessary to coincide with our line
of flight.
Early on the morning of October 18,
1929, John and I threw open the roof
doors of the shed that housed the "Luna"
and revealed its shiny metal hull to the
elements for the first time. John bid me
a fond farewell, stepped into the "Luna,"
locked himself in with the airtight doors,
seated himself at the controls and at ex-
actiy nine o'clock pressed an inoffensive
black button and sailed off into the great
beyond. The leaving was not spectacular,
but it was very impressive.
Immediately upon John's departure I
hurried to the house and seated myself at
the controls of the radio and patiently
waited for John's messages. I had not to
wait long before I was rewarded. The
message was in our own code so I could
only take it down and translate it later.
In exactly fifty-three minutes after the
first message all communication stopped.
Hurriedly I set about translating the
message and at the same time offered up
prayers that all was going well. So that
you can better understand what hap-
pened I will give you the message as I
received it.
"Everything is functioning per.
fectly so far. Was knocked off of my
feet at first but nothing resulted
from the jar. Am out of the atmos-
phere already and traveling at the
rate of about sixty miles per second
(216,000 miles per hour)."
A period of seven minutes elapsed here
between messages.
"Still going strong. Speed has
reached the expected velocity of one


hundred and seventy miles per sec-
ond (612,000 miles per hour). Air
conditioning plant functioning per-
fectly. Earth looks like an oversize
moon. Will report any new event."
A period of nine and one-half minutes
elapsed here between messages.
"F;rl.. last of my rockets three
minutes ago and am losing speed
surprisingly fast. Speed now less
than one hundred miles per second
(360,000 miles per hour). Earth and
moon are approximately same size
to the eve now. Discovered one tub:
of oxygen empty. (This would limit
the endurance of his supply to one
hour of breathing). Probably es-
caped during the night."
A period of thirty and one-half minutes
has elapsed here between messages.
"Am caught between gravitational
pull of earth and moon. My speed
slowed down so much that the "Lu-
na's" inertia will not carry me past
this zenith. 'lMy oxygen should be ex-
hausted in just about two minutes.
The "Luna" will drift in an orbit
around the earth forever. Please in-
form the public of my quest and car-
ry on for me. Be sure to carry enough
rockets to propel you all of the way
to the moon. Goodbye and good-
luck. John Dowdy."
Thus ended the message, thus ended a
noble man, and thus ends my story. In
the near future I hope to start construc-
tion on the "Luna II" and try my luck
at shooting the moon.
Very few people connected the disap-
pearance of John Dowdy with the pecu-
liar static heard on the morning of Octo-
ber 18, but the true explanation revels
that the connection was very great.


BEST ESSAY

SIX FOOT TWO IS RATHER HIGH
Bi/ T.m Ruxsell '36


I have attained the rather unusual
height of six feet two inches at a rather
early age and already I have noticed that
quite a few disadvantages and discom-
forts accompanying this distinguishing
feature.
Always, through thick and thin, and
from the age of two to ninety-two, more
and better things are expected of a big
person. When I lack the nerve to do a


certain thing (namely, to dive from the
highest platform on the diving tower) I
often hear this remark; "You're a big
fellow, let's see you do it." Then too,
you are distinguished as a big baby; not
just a baby but a big baby.
\\hen it comes to going to the movies
most of the kids my age get in free. But
do I? I'll tell the world, and anyone else
who wants to know, that I don't. I either








pay to get in or I don't get in. But, why
shouldn't I pay? I'm a big fellow.
If anything on a high shelf is wanted
or if mother desires to hang a picture on
a hook that is just out of her reach, why
then she looks for me, and I'm elected to
do the dirty work. This, too, happens
because I'm a big fellow and I can reach
it a little more easily then she can.
Every person is subject to some kidding
about his or her build. A short person is
known as a runt. A beautiful girl is
kidded about her Coca Cola bottle shape.
Anyone with lovely white teeth is known
as having that Pepsodent smile. Regard-
less of these facts I maintain that a tall
person is ridiculed more than others are.
A tall person is the sole target of certain
remarks that cannot be directed against
anyone else. No one would think of ask-
ing a short person the absurd question,
"How's the weather up there?" No one
would accuse me of having a "board-
ing house reach" just because I had white
teeth. Neither do I believe that anyone
but a tall person is subject to remarks
from the person sitting behind him in the
movies to the effect that some tall bird
has to sit in front of him every time he
goes to the show. Besides these cases I am
known as "Skinny" or "Stepladder" or
"Slim" or "Lankey" or any other name
convenient to the offenders vocabulary.
Besides the fact that when I eat I must
carry my food farther from the table to
my mouth I am at a loss to know where
to put my feet. If I put them under the
table somebody is certain to kick my
shins and if I put them on my chair I
receive a bawling out from my family.
What on earth am I to do with them?
I certainly can't put them in my pockets.
Also the steps on the stairs are too close
together for a fellow with long legs, but
I can't do anything about that either.


My mother is a short lady and usually
rolls the seat in the car forward when she
drives it. Then when father (who is tall
also) or I want to use the car we are
forced to roll the seat back again before
trying to drive. That is, we are forced to
roll it back if we don't desire a serious
case of driver's cramp. Then too, how,
in the name of kingdom come, could I
ever drive an Austin. That is something
to think about anyway.
Another place where long legs distract
from one's comfort is in bed. My feet
just insist on sticking out from under the
covers. In the winter they freeze and
on the Isthmus these Panamanian sand-
flies make a meal on them. True enough
I can tuck the covers in at the foot of the
bed but that cramps my feet.
In the case that I should want to be
inconspicuous in a crowd how could I do
it? At a circus someone once remarked
to me, that all he had to do was to look
above the crowd and when he saw my
head why he would know where I was
located.
There are other faults too numerous to
begin to mention. I can't dance comforta-
bly with short women. Their hair tickles
my nose and I am at a loss as to whether
to stoop over to their height or to carry
them. I am continually bumping my
head on objects that really should have
been built higher up. I can't wear my
father's pants because they are too short
for me. I almost break my back bending
over these drinking fountains around the
school. I have studied the matter quite
thoroughly and in view of the fact that I
shall be tall for the rest of my life I'm
going to stop thinking of the disadvan-
tages and start thinking of the advan-
tages of being tall. That is, at least until
someone invents a machine to shorten
people.


THE LUXURY OF BULLETIN BOARDS
By Colin Campbell '34


Last year, no it was the year before
last, a long, long time ago when C. H. S.
students first became enraptured in the
speculations of our new Cristobal High
School. Then it was that our principal
would stand before the assembly, and
thrill it by describing, enumerating, and
emphasizing each luxury of our paradise
to be. First, there was the huge gym-
nasium, then the grand auditorium, then
the spacious library, then the complete
laboratories, and then--then, to our utter
amazement, the luxury of bulletin boards.


We were, at that time, using one rough
board made of unsandpapered, wooden
planks which were painted green. Stren-
uous effort was needed to push a thumb
tack in that bulletin board. Naturally,
we could hardly understand it when we
heard of the elaborate affairs we would
soon to able to post notices on, because
it seemed so unnecessary.
The years passed. Finally our hopes
budded, we entered the new school. First
to be seen were the bulletin boards (at
least a sample of them, there were twelve








more). They looked unique. No more
struggling fights with a thumb tack. In
fact the first time I tried one, I pushed
too hard much to my regret. The frame
of the new bulletin boards was made of
the smoothest, shining wood with the
grain just bursting forth. In the center
of the boards was soft tan cork. Over the
cork was a clean glass cover with a lock
to go with it. A lock! A lock! I thought
I'd swear "a lock" the time I had to get
in one. You see, there are fourteen bul-
letin boards, fourteen different locks, and
fourteen .odd keys. The keys were not
numbered in anything less than a million
or so, and which to which had not yet
been recorded. I had to try each key to
see if it would fit (what patience it took,
it wasn't like the old green board). Why
the keys are different, I don't know ex-
cept that it's a good test for the temper.
and schools are near relatives of all kinds
of tests.
The second time I tried to put a notice
on a bulletin board, something had hap-
pened. An association had been organ-
ized. I never learned it's name but it's
something like "The Society for the Bet-
ter Mianagement of Bulletin Boards."
Then and there, I received doses of their


rules and by-laws. It was an organization
consisting of several persons who would
judge all notices for their neatness and
correctness before being posted on the
boards. Furthermore, they alone should
have the honor of opening the bulletin
boards (alas, the fourteen different keys).
After the surprising information, I hand-
ed over my notice wondering at all that
little scrap of paper would now have to go
through. This unusual society must be
like other societies I have known, it's
entirely too complex, for my notice, re-
written, was placed on the wrong bulletin
board after the notice was of no use.
Later during the year, however, the ef-
ficiency of the society was improved.
Fourteen bulletin boards show that
human civilization is becoming too com-
plex. It's too difficult to see every board
every day. I miss many of the notices.
I never used to with just one board. The
bulletin boards are still difficult to get
anything placed on quickly. I long for
the old bulletin board with no glass cover.
I am the odd person who would enjoy
seeing the fourteen polished, glass cov-
ered, corked back, locked new bulletin
boards exchanged for the old, hard, green
one with it's scared face.


A FRESHMAN'S HEAD
By CarlIon Horine '54


Having read Mr. Addison's account of
his dissection of a coquette's heart, it
occurred to me that I might make some
interesting discoveries with a Freshman's
head; so I proceeded at once to obtain
the head and the necessary tools for the
dissection.
This particular head for some reason
unknown to me, had no hair, or the hair
it had possessed had been shaved off. It
also smelled of onions and was painted a
very brilliant red.
Having skinned the head I attempted
to cut away the skull. Here I met with
an unexpected delay. I found the skull
was made of harder bone than my dis-
secting tools could penetrate, and there-
fore had to buy some better tools, not
ordinarily used in dissecting.
As soon as the first opening in the skull
was made it astonished me to hear a loud
hissing noise. I found it to be a rapid in-
take of air into the cavity. When the
skull was slashed open, I saw that the
brain was extremely small, probably un-
der-developed.


As I had been a student of anatomy,
I quickly discovered that the spinal cord
did not have nearly as many nerves as it
usually does. For those not learned in
the science of anatomy, I may say here
that the spinal cord is the part of the
nervous system which controls the in-
voluntary actions, such as taking one's
hand off a hot stove.
But by far the most surprising dis-
covery was a channel through the head
from ear to ear. After noticing this re-
markable feature, I obtained the heads
of pupils in grades lower than freshmen
and found that this channel gradually
increased with age until it became its
largest in a freshman's head. Also on
examining a sophomore's, junior's and
senior's head I found this channel grad-
ually decreased until it became entirely
closed in the senior's.
Like Mr. Addison, I put the freshman's
head in a furnace but the head, being of
very hard material, neither burned nor
disappeared.












POETRY


MAN!
Charle, E. Be/den '34

When the darkness ruled the land,
Then the earth was sea and sand,
Full of creatures, swimming things,
Scaly creatures, birds with wings.

When the darkness turned to light,
Slowly, surely changed the sight.
From the water, earth did appear
Growing, rising, year by year.

From these slimy, crawling, creatures,
Man appeared. Man whose features,
Changed, until they came to be
Those of the Twentieth Century.

Working, toiling, planting, seeking.
Man kept striving, never flinching.
Hardships, hunger, lack of rest,
Man kept rising, towards the best.

Man has toiled since the Ages,
Marking, writing History's pages.
Working man has made nations,
For the coming generations.

Man makes houses out of steel.
Man controls the air and field,
Flying creatures made by hand,
Metal creatures, made by man.

Man is Master, Man is King
Of all the earth, and living thing.
He has changed, has made the land
Fit to live in- fit for Manl





OOOOH ?
By Gloria Alannix '34

"Ma foi," the jolly Frenchman cried.
"You are petite, my girl!
Your eyes, they 'ave a rolling look,
Your hair, 'tis natural curl?"

"Si!" exclaims the Spanish girl
And turns her back on Jean.
"I theenk you are too mooch a fresh,
As I 'ave ever seen!"

"Querido," whispers Rose then
As she turns back to Jaclk,
"My sailor boy, I mees you mooch,
I'm very glad you're back!"
"Oh, yeah? Says you!" lie snarls at her,
"An' wotta 'bout Pedro?
And Thomas, John, and LoupeL Joe?
And Karl, and iRodrigo?"


APRIL
By Innie Laurie Turberville '35

Dogwood and violets neathh cool scented pines,
Find me laying in a hammock in tropical
climes-

Trade-winds gently swish the silky palm fronds,
Frangipani and orchids send fragrance from
ponds,

But for dogwood and violets and "Old Caroline,"
I'm yearning and sighing for your spring-
time-

For the chirp of the robin in the snowball boughs,
And the whistle of Ivey as he brings home
the cows,
For the gee and the haw of Joe when he ploughs.

I'm longing in longitude eighty and latitude nine,
For dogwood and violets and "Old Caroline."


TROPICS
By Gloria Alannix '34

The curling, twisting river flows
Beside a winding lane.
'Tis shadowed o'er by palm trees tall
And filled by falling rain.

And jungle trees of tropic lands
Frame its shaggy sides,
While a huge and hoary 'gator
'Neath the shadows, hides.

The shining sun is bright and warm
Upon the water's edge.
And droning beeh and flies alight
'Neath the dampish hedge.

And like the native sluggish blood,
The tepid rivers flow.
They're warm until the evening falls
And cool night breezes blow.


THE DANCE OF THE ELVES
By Gloria Alanix '34

Lightly and swiftly danced the Elves
Round mossy rocks and flowery dells.
On the lily's broad pad
They softly trod
To the tune of lightly dropping pods.

They laughed, a tinkling elfin laugh,
As they twirled in the moon-beams' silvery path
To the time of bluebells' music gay,
As in the breeze they gently sway.

The sky grew light with coming dawn,
The fairy night was long since gone;
The Elves gave one last glorious twirl,
And were gone in a lightning mystic swirl.



































STUDENT COUNCIL


STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
B ,/, nna Reill/ '"-5

One of the most recent and the most important innovations for C.H.S. this year was the organization of
the Students' Association. Never before has the school attempted such an organization and it proved to
be very successful. At the beginning of the school term, our principal, Mr. Franks, appointed Mr R. C.
Hackett as sponsor, and Mr. K. Vinton, Athletics Director, and Mrs. P. Spencer, Director of Extra-Cur-
ricular Activities, as the additional faculty members of the organization.
The purpose of the association is to put the school activities on a better financial basis by giving the
students seven things for the price of four.
Each student was required to pay three dollars and fifty cents, for which amount he received the fol-
lowing benefits:
1. Admission to all regularly scheduled athletic contests of Cristobal High School.
2. Admission to the four class dances.
5. Admission to the Senior play.
4. One copy of the "Carilbean."
5. One subscription to the "Trade Wind."
6. Membership in one high school club.
7. Class dues for one year.


ART CLUB

































TRADE WIND STAFF


If these items were taken up individually instead of collectively, they would cost at least six dollars.
The first business in the organizing of the club was to elect the officers. The nominations were re-
stricted as follows: The president must be a senior, and the vice-president a junior. The results of the elec-
tion were: Frank Washabaugh. president: William Beers, vice-president; Mabelle Bliss, secretary; and
Anna Reilly, treasurer.
It was decided to form an Executive Council to carry on the minute affairs of the Association. The
Council was to consist of the three faculty members, the four officers of the Association, and a boy and girl
representative from each class. Therefore, the next necessity was to elect the class representatives. They
were: Freshman, Macel Goulet and James Christian; Sophomore, Doris Ebdon and Howard Will: Junior.
Miriam Swan and Paul Beard; and Senior, Betty Stetler and Warren Slocum.
At the first meeting of the Executive Council, many plans were made and many ideas settled. The
most important business was the naming of the Association. After much discussion the name, "Students'
Association," was chosen.
The first activity of the organization was a dance given on December 22, in the gym. All members of
the Students' Association were admitted free.
The financial affairs of the Association were not settled until the beginning of the second semester.
After much controversy among the members of the Council, the money collected for dues was apportioned.
Each person's dues of three and one half dollars was divided as follows: Caribbean _.$1.50, Trade Wind....
.60c., Class.. 65c., Athletics .40c., Executive Council ..35c. The Executive Council fund was to be for


LA PAS



































JUNIOR-SENIOR DRAMATIC CLUB


all the clubs. As a result, the Caribbean received $321.00, Trade Wind, $95.20, Class of '34, $34-77, Class of
'35, $26.98. Class of '36, $31.53. Class of '37, $52.32. Athletics (Varsity Clubs), $96.80. and Executive
Council, $96.40.
Soon after the money had been apportioned and the financial side of the club was well under way,
Anna Reilly resigned her position as treasurer. The Council elected Miriam Swan to take her place.
In order to raise more money for the Caribbean and the Trade Wind, the Executive Council decided
to have a Student Carnival. A committee was appointed with Betty Stetler as chairman.
During the year there were 262 members of the Association; 80 Freshmen. 48 Soplhomores, 41 Juniors,
53 Seniors and 10 Teachers.
As a whole, the organization proved to be very successful, and it is hoped that it will be able to offer
even more advantages to the students in the years to come.


ART CLUB
Bv Helen Leach '34

The Art Club was organized in October. 1933. and is the only club of its kind ever organized in Cris-
tobal High School. It is sponsored by M~\rs. N\MacDonald, the art teacher.


FFFE KUBE KLUB


45





























BOYS GLEE CLUB


This club was organized for the purpose of providing the time, place, materials and instructions for
those who have not taken Art as a subject, and to give the pupils a chance to choose their work. There are
no qualifications for membership except interest in Art.
The first project was the cutting of linoleum blocks for posters to be used for the different activities
of the school. After this, different ones chose to make bracelets and book-ends. Others made book-marks,
book-covers, and other things useful in school.
Even though this is a new club, it has proved highly successful and is very well liked by the members.
The club consists of twelve members and the following officers:


President........
Vice President.
Secretary.........


STANFORD STONE
JESSIE HALSTEAD
HEI.EN LEACH


THE TRADE WIND
By W;,n. Beers '55

EDITORIAL STAFF
Editor, William Beers; Assistant Editor, Margaret Hollingshead;


Make-Up Editor, Miriam Swam;


GIRLS GLEE CLUB


we4A



































ORCHESTRA A


Girls Sport Editor. Mary Goulet; Feature and Humor Editor, Marguerite Winn; Art Editor and Stencil
Proof Reader, Helen Leach; I. H. Editor. Dorothy IMacSparran; Typists, Robert Peterson. Leta Deakins,
Edna Mlueller. Jeanne Lewis; Reporters. Armando Gasperi, Muriel Hanna, Viola Tuck. Edith Wikran;
Advisor, Miss Mary Elizabeth Moore.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager. Teddy Aanstoos; Circulating Manager, Dorothy Roos: Mimeo Printers, Robert
King, Stanley Donaldson, Sam Roe. John McLain. James Coman. William Abendroth and Montford Tawes.

Last year the Caribbean Staff introduced into Cristobal High School, the "C. I. S." This periodical
was a bi-monthly publication, which used the Italian Steamship Line's mimeograph machine for the
printing.
This year we have purchased our own mimeograph machine and have changed the name to "Trade
Wind." For the first half of the school year we issued the paper weekly, but with the change of semesters.
we returned to bi-monthly publication.
Our work does not consist solely of publishing a school newspaper: we print a Spanish periodical, "El
Faro." for the Junior High School Spanish classes, dance programs, tickets and many other similar items.
And by this means (along with the advertisements and our allotment from the Student Association) we
hope to complete payment for the mimeograph machine within the next two years.



FRESHMAN CHORUS


































0. G. A.


LA PAS
By, Erne.rt Jaramillo '55

La Pas is a Spanish club that has existed in Cristobal High School since 1930, when it was organized
by Mrs. Phyllis Spencer. Mrs- Spencer has been the able sponsor of the club to the present day.
The object of this club is to make greater the friendship between the Latin and North Americans. To
achieve this, the club has social meetings at which prominent men of Colon are guests. At these meetings
the members are asked to speak only in Spanish so that they may practice the language.
Membership in this club, unlike the other clubs in school, is based on scholarship. In order to become a
member of this club, a student must attain a grade of "90" or above, and must be a student of second year
Spanish. If he is a student of third or fourth year Spanish, he need attain that grade for only one period of
six weeks, while the student of second year Spanish has to acquire this grade for a period of twelve weeks.
Whenever a student has obtained the required grade for membership, he receives an invitation from the
club to become a member.
During the past year, La Pas has taken part in a number of functions. Henry Sanchez and Alejandro
Wong have always been willing to play their guitars for club entertainments and have been called upon
frequently. Early in January the club, through the kindness of Comandante Walker, gave a dance at the
"Bomba" in Colon for members and their guests.



NATIONAL THESPIANS









At the first meeting after the initiation of a new group of members into the club, the program is pro-
vided by the newcomers. An excellent entertainment was given by the group that entered in December.
Under the direction of Stella Boggs, a series of Carnival scenes supposedly taken in the interior of Panama
were shown. The actors were dressed in native costumes and all dialogue was in Spanish. They were first
seen going to the Fair, and then at the dance where all were dancing the Tamborito. As a specialty Stella
Boggs and Catalina Ecker danced a Rumba which was received with much applause. The entire program
was most original and cleverly arranged.
The night of this program was also Mrs. Spencer's birthday which wll be an occasion to remember.
As a compliment to Mrs. Spencer, I\ anhoe Seixas and the members of his orchestra came to the school and
played for the dancing on the program. After the entertainment, the entire club adjourned to the home
of Wendell Cotton for refreshments which his mother and Mrs. Spencer had thoughtfully provided.
As birthday tokens the new members presented Mrs. Spencer with a huge bouquet of flowers and a
lovely garnet pin from the whole club. This evening was the most enjoyable one within the memory of all
the members of La Pas.
The existence of the Spanish Club and its high standards give to the Spanish students an object toward
which they may bend their efforts, knowing that much good will come from it. La Pas has not only helped
to create a feeling of good will between the Spanish and English speaking people of the Zone, but it has been
a decided boost to Cristobal High School.


JUNIOR-SENIOR DRAMATIC CLUB
By Ruth Pickett '34

The purpose of the Junior-Senior Dramatic Club is to improve the dramatic ability of the members
of the Junior and Senior classes, and to sponsor the two principal plays of the year: the Junior Play and
the Senior Play.
The Junior Play this year was "Happy Landings" which was presented on December 15. It was the
story of a well-known aviator, Michael Pemberton, who was being followed by a vicious character intent
on killing him. A great deal of excitement occurred when Michael arrived at the Stockpooles for a per-
formance at the fair; when he falls in love with Barbara, the young girl; and when he trades places with his
friend, Percival Courtwright. The play was fast moving and humorous, the comedy being furnished by
Washington Jones and Juliet, two colored folks. Skofsky, the Russian radical, and Mademoiselle Fifi, the
French girl who caused so much trouble among the men involved. Those who took part in the play were:
Juliet, the colored maid, Louise Wfhidden; Her boyfriend, Frank Was.habaugh; Mrs. Stackpoole. Ruth
Pickett; Her husband. Billy Stone; Her daughter, .Iargaret Barnard, Miss Sabrina, Mary Ruth Riedel and
Miss Brisby, Olga Roe, Ladies of the Literary Society; Mlle. Fifi, Charlotte Randall; Percival Courtwright,
Carlton Horine; Michael Pemberton, Charles South; Spotty. his mechanic and co-pilot, Jerry Gorin; and
Skofsky, the Russian, Charles Belden.
The Business Staff was composed of the following:
Director, .fiss G. If. Kimbro; Business Manager, Beerley .Jfarcure; Assistant Business Manager. Betty
Seller; Stage Manager. Ediar Borden, Assistant Stage Manager. Colin Campbell; Lights Director, Anna
Reilly; Property Director, Elizabeth Hayes; Make-up Director, .lary Hearne; and Prompter, Kathleen
Goodenouqh.
There are about thirty-five members in the club and most of them have had some dramatic experience.
This year at one of the meetings a short one-act play called "A Dispatch Goes Home" was given for club
members. The players were Mary Hearne, Charles Heim. John O'Neill and Edgar Borden. The director
was Beverley Marcuse. At one of the student assemblies a short dialogue called "Yes and No" was put on.
The playerswere Judy Bridget, the girl, and Frank Washabaugh, the boy. Alice Wood directed the per-
formance.
As its share of the Visitation Day program on January 12, a short play entitled "At The Ferry" was
presented with Alice Wood and Frank Washabaugh as the parents, and Charles Washabaugh (a member
of the Effe Kube Klub) as the inquisitive son.
Again the Dramatic Club took part in a program. Among the entertainments for the Junior College
Party, March second, there was a pantomime, "Holding the Sack." with Charlotte Randall, Mary Ruth
Riedel, Billy Stone, Jerry Gorin and Carlton Horine in the lead. In both of the last programs mentioned
there were mob scenes in which all the club members took part. They deserve much credit for the success of
the performances.
The officers of the club are:
President, Mlary Hearne; Vice-President, Ruth Pickett; and Secretary, Betty Steller.
Our Sponsor was Miss Kimbro, but when she left in January the club was taken over by Mrs. Spencer.
As the last and most impressive program in the club's schedule came "The Thread of Destiny," the
Senior play, which was successfully presented on May 18.
This was a combination of humor, pathos and drama, delightfully enacted by the members of the
Senior Class. The story of the play concerned the effects of the Civil War on the Montgomery family, show-
ing both the northern and southern side of the question.
The characters were as follows:
Fanny, Louise Whidden; George Washington. Richard Reinhold; Betty Montgomery. tabelle Bliss;
Edith Sherman, Ruth Pickett; Mrs. Montgomery, Be'erley J.arcuse; Colonel Montgomery, IWarren Slocum;
Virginia Montgomery. Ruth Swan; Beverley Montgomery, Charles South; Sally Ann Fairfax. Alice W'ood;
Laura Lee Fairfax. Blanche Belden, Tom Randolph, Robert JMolten; Martha. Edna .Jueller; Susan, Norma
Davis; Jane, Violet Randall; John M. Morton, Carlton Horine; Marcella, Mlaxine Hoffman: Marion, Eliza-
beth Haye.; Madge Young, Anne Gibson; Mammy Dinah, Ruth Egolf; Peyton Bailey, Frank Washabaugh:
Uncle Billy, Colin Campbell; Louise Lawton, ,llary Hearne. Ralph Francis. Charles Belden; Union Scot,
Jerry Gorin; Miss Melissy, Eileen Dono,,an; and Assistant Director, Bett Steller.
Understudies:
Fanny, Ruth Wikingstad: Betty Montgomery, Kathleen Goodenough: Edith Sherman, ilary Ruth
Riedel; Mrs. Montgomery, .Mary .Ann Carruthers; Virginia Montgomery, A.nnie Laurie Turberville; Madge
Young, Charlotte Randall; Louise Lawton, Elinor iullane; and Miss Melissy, Olga Roe.
This was the first time in C. H. S. that there were any understudies in plays presented.
All in all, the Junior-Senior Dramatic Club had a most successful year and had the pleasure of being the
first to make use of the large stage in the auditorium with much satisfaction.









THE EFFE KUBE KLUB
By iMary Grijfin '36
When Mrs. Spencer came to Cristobal High School four years ago, she started the Effe Kube Klub.
It was extremely successful for two years, but last year there was no club. This year Mrs. Spencer reor-
ganized the club with an entirely new group of students from the Sophomore and Freshman classes.
Meetings are held every other Thursday in the auditorium with the president, James Days, presiding.
Other officers are: Betty McCleary, vice-president; Evelyn Dwyer, secretary; and Kathleen Phillips,
treasurer. The club has a membership of approximately fifty students.
The club made its debut before the public on the first program held in the auditorium this school year.
Several members presented pantomimes which were directed by the club sponsor, Mrs. Spencer. They were:
"At the Dentist" with Betty McClearv and Ruth Moody; "At the Photographer" with Lydia Gravatt,
Doris Ebdon, Vernon Clarke, Lois Heim, Betty Hauss. Charles Washabaugh and Anita Boggs; "Mr.
Goof's Day Off" with Mary Darley, Mary Griffin, Helen Carroll, Catalina Ecker, Muriel Mullane, Lois
Heim, Evelyn Dwyer, Edward Hoffman and Robert Reppa; and a short pantomime given by Olive Aan-
stoos. Several of these pantomimes were repeated for the parents on Visitors' Day.
At Christmas. the club presented a one act Christmas play called "Beggars Can't be Choosers." The
cast included Bobbie Durham, Kathleen Phillips, Ruth Moody, Olive Aanrtoos, Lilian Chase, Betty
McCleary, Jacqueline Briscoe, Agnes Reinke, Roderick Cuthbertson and Charles Washabaugh. Mrs.
Spencer directed the play and Mary Griffin was prompter.
One of Mrs. Spencer's plans for the year was to have members direct some of the one act plays. The
person chosen to direct the play had to be able to read each part in the play to Mrs. Spencer and if he
showed sufficient ability, our sponsor left him in charge of directing the play. The first play of this type
presented to the public this year was "Reverend Peter Brice. Bachelor." The members in the cast were
Doris Ebdon, Jeannette Hvler. Lydia Gravatt, Evelyn Dwyer, Lois Heim, Catalina Ecker and Louise de
la Ossa. The play was directed by Mary Griffin.
A one act play was presented to the audience which attended the Junior College Party, and was re-
peated for the benefit of the lower classmen on March 22, during the eighth period. The cast included
Lydia Gravatt, Edward Hoffman, Mary Darley, Vernon Clarke. Helen Carroll and Frank Alberga. Mrs.
Spencer directed the play and Maxine Blunden was prompter.
"Freezing a Mother-in-Law," a screamingly funny farce, was presented the evening of April 14. The
plot was very unusual with some decidedly embarrassing moments.


HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC DEPARTMENT
By Lillian Chase '37
Until this year, we have had only two musical organizations in our high school; but, for 1934, we had
the Freshman Chorus added to our Glee Club and Orchestra.
The Glee Club, which numbers seventeen members, gave two programs during the first half of the
year. With the aid of the orchestra they were both very successful. One was held at the Y. M. C. A. and
the other in our own grand auditorium for the Cristobal Woman's Club.
The Freshman Chorus was organized by the Freshman in October. Only members of the Freshman
Class can belong, and almost the entire class joined it. The chorus did not appear before the public with
any musical offerings, but held programs for the club's entertainment every other week which were enjoyed
by all the members.
We all agree, however, that if it had not been for the aid and patience of our sponsor, Miss Mildred
Elner, the activities of the Music Department would not have gone off as smoothly and as successfully as
they did.

ORDER OF GREGG ARTISTS
By Stella Bolg7q '34
The O. G. A. Club (Order of Gregg Artists) was organized by our commercial teacher, Miss Patterson,
for the advanced shorthand class. The purpose of it was to encourage more practice and to recognize our
acquirement of skill in the study of shorthand and typing.
At our first meeting, we decided to have only a president and vice-president. Stella Boggs was elected
president, and Norma Davis, vice-president. Meetings were held during the eighth period every Tuesday.
In these the story of shorthand was given, and we practiced for different tests.
The club subscribed to the "Gregg Writer," a monthly magazine for secretaries, stenographers and
typists. From these magazines we received practice in the writing and typing tests which we sent in, paying
a fee of a few cents.
Several of the students have been awarded certificates and pins of the Order of Gregg Artists.


NATIONAL THESPIANS
By Anne Gib,ron '34
To become a National Thespian is the goal towards which all the members of the Junior-Senior Drama-
tic Club are working.
The National Thespians were introduced into this school three years ago, and each year more interest
has been shown in it.
This year we have studied the rise of the Drama starting with the Italian Drama, continuing through
the French, Spanish and English Drama.
The National Thespians have sponsored the Junior and the Senior plays this year, both of which were
great successes.
There were two groups initiated into our club this year, adding many new members to our roll.
The officers for this year are: Anne Gibson, President; Frank Washabaugh, Vice-President; Ruth
Pickett, Secretary; Beverly Marcuse, Treasurer.



































'PHOTO CLUB


PHOTO CLUB
BY 1'0la T7fk '1,

The Photo club was organized with .\r. Miller as sponsor, and consisted of thirteen members. Ralph
Davis was elected President; William fill, Treasurer: and Viola Tuck, Secretary. With the aid of an expert
photographer, the club members were intrIoduced into the use of a camera, and other technique of printing
and developing. The administration furnished a minimum quantity of equipment and the club was given
a dark room of its own. Some of the boys proceeded to construct, with the aid of Mr. Fringer, an automa-
tic printer, a washing tank, and other dark room necessities.
The club. after several months of experiments, solicited films and negatives from the students and
began actual work. Pictures of various student organizations. interclass class teams. and students were
taken and the prints sold to the students. Additional equipment has been bought from time to time until
the dark room has taken on a professional aspect. The next item under consideration will be the construc-
tion of an enlarging camera.
The club has been reduced in Inumbler in order that fewer and more interested members may conduct
the increasing amount of work.
This club is interesting. educational and vocational. It is also purely a student activity with only
occasional suggestions tir improleement ,b the sponsor.



I.\TH CLUB

































DEBATE CLUB


THE MATHEMATICS CLUB
By William F. Slone '34
The Mathematics Club was organized this year under the sponsorship of Mr. Meyer for the purpose
of considering mathematical problems of common interest. Meetings were held on the first Monday of
every month. Once a month the Mathematics Club put some interesting problems in the Trade IWin'd,
with the answers .,I ', .. i.- in the next issue. The problems were of such a nature that they could be solved
by the majority ot the student body. The officers were: William F. Stone, President: Richard Reinhold,
Vice-President: Frank J. Washabaugh, Secretary-

THE DEBATE CLUB
By Edna Mlueller '34
The Debate Club sponsored by Mr. Hackett had, at the time of disbanding, twenty members. The
officers were; Frank Washabaugh President; Wm. Daugherty, Vice President; Edna Mueller, Secretary;
and Dorothy Roos, Treasurer. Besides these the members were: Theodore Aanstoos, Jack Dwver. Armando
Gasperi, Jerry Gorin, Gordon Hutchins, Allen Jacques, Olga Dominguez. Rachel Cuesta, John Palm, Robert
Peterson, Phil Reidell, Richard Reinhold. Sidney Wharton, Tom Russell and Colin Campbell.
The meetings were held every third and fourth Monday of the month. At these meetings a debate



SCIENCE CLUB























4



































SUPPER CLUB




was generally given in which the chairman, judges, and time-keeper were appointed from the club.
The Executive Committee generally meet the week before the meeting to plan for the meeting.
The only public appearance of the Debate Club was a debate given in the auditorium on the topic
"Resolved that Capital Punishment Should Be Abolished." Tom Russell was the chairman and intro-
duced the speakers. The affirmative speakers were: Frank 'Washabaugh, lerry Gorin. iohn Palm, and Phillip
Reidell as alternate. The negative speakers were: Gordon Hutchins. Allen Jacques. Richard Reinhold, and
Theodore Aanstoos, alternate.
The judges for the debate were: Mrs. C. A. Hearne, Reverend C. I.. Morgan, and Judge E. I. P.
Tatleman. Their decision was in favor of the affirmative who maintained that capital punishment should
lie abolished.
The Debate Club climaxed its career by having an all day picnic at Finlavson's Farm in Galun Lake,
Saturday, March 24th.

SCIENCE CLUB
Bu I rendell CoHlon '3

Among the many clubs which xere organized this school year was the Science Club, sponsored ,by Mr.
Vinton. Its membership was composed of students of the Sophomore, junior, and Senior classes, and Fresh-




BOYS LETTER CLUB


I ------1` ---------~

































GIRLS LETTER CLCB


men who had a "B" average in science. The purpose of the club was to carry on such experiments as might
help the students who were especially interested in science. A few experiments were performed and other
plans were formulated which could not be put into effect because of the revision in the eighth period sched-
ule.
The officers of the Science Club were: Wendell Cotton, President; William Hanna, Vice President;
Ernest Jaramillo, Secretary; and Phillip Riedel, Treasurer.

SUPPER CLUB
By 'Inta P ... '55

The Supper Club is an organization composed entirely of high school girls. Since the Girl Reserve
movement began in 1921, all Supper Clubs were under the direction of the Y. W. C. A. However, at the
end of June, 1933, the Y. W. C. A. clubs of the Isthmus were stopped because of lack of financial support.
Therefore the Supper Club this year has been entirely carried on.and supervised by the girls and their ad-
visors, Mrs. Spencer, Margaret Davis and Margaret Hayes.
A very active program has been carried out by all the members of the club. The first event was a very
delightful tea which was given for the mothers of Supper Club girls and alumnae of the Supper Club on
Thursday, November 9.
Before Thanksgiving, a fruit cake raffle was held which proved to be a huge financial success. Another
was held before Christmas, but was not as successful as the first.
On December 9. a Cookie Day was held. The girls canvassed the town with baskets of home-made
cookies and sold quite a number of the delicious cookies to the residents of Colon.
Immediately after the first basketball game of the inter-school series on April 13, the Publicity Com-
mittee of the club sponsored a dance in the gym. The big dance of the year. however, was not given until
May 11.
When the Students' Association held a carnival the Supper Club took part in it by managing one of
the many refreshment booths.
As in years before the girls planned to send a girl to the National Girl Reserve Conference at Kiski,
Pennsylvania. Some thought the hopes of the girls to be too high in this matter but they proved that the
Supper Club can do what it first sets out to do.
The officers for the year 1933-1934 were: Betty Stetler, President: Alice Wood, Vice-President; Anna
Reilly, Secretary, and Ruth Wilingstad, Treasurer.

VARSITY CLUB
Bi, Bill// If heeler -4
Since the abandonment of the Athletic Association, the Varsity Club has taken over the athletic
responsibilities of the school. It is composed of boys and girls who have taken prominent part in certain
of the sports and have fulfilled the necessary requirements.
The eligibility rules of the club were raised this year, making it harder for a boy or girl athlete to become
a member. In spite of this, the number of members in the Varsity Club have increased. This fact appar-
ently proves that more athletes are being developed each year in Cristobal High School and that the burden
of upholding athletics does not rest on the shoulders of just a few, as has been the case in past years.
This year the club ha s taken over the management of all athletic events at which a large number of
light school students attend. The Freshman-Sophomore Field Day, which was an organized initiation of
tile "scobies," wa. handled efficiently by the Varsity Club members.
To raise fulds for purchasing athletic equipment, the Varsity Club held a dance in the gymnasium








the night of March 23rd. "Solo Bassett and His Boys" furnished the dance music. The gym was appro-
priately decorated with sports supplies. On one of the baskets was a foot-ball dummy, over the other
baskets baseball bats were crossed, and hanging from the rafters were baseball and boxing gloves. The
atmosphere was extremely athletic and everyone enjoyed the dancing.
Mr. Vinton is the advisor of the Boys' Varsity and Miss Bailev. of the Girls' Varsity. The boy officers
are:
Bill Wheeler, President; Joe Bazan, Vice President; Max Sanders, Treasurer: Robert Neely, Secretary.
The officers of the Girls' Varsity Club are:
Elizabeth Hayes, President; Mabelle Bliss. Secretary; Betty Stetler, Social Chairman.


VISITATION DAY
B y Kalhkleen Goodenni/,ih 'Ti

The annual Visitation Day was held in the afternoon and evening of January 12. This year a change
was made from the full week program of last year to a single day of visitation in order that tliose who were
employed during the day could attend the evening session.
To facilitate passing in the corridors, location of rooms, and to avoid confusion, a committee was chosen
consisting of two students from each class. The responsibility of the publicity and organization of this day
was given to the heads of the TRADE WIND Staff. William Beers and Anna Reilly.
At 7:30 o'clock after the regular classes, an assembly program was held in the auditorium. The purpose
of this program was to explain and demonstrate the activities of various extra-curricular organizations in
the Junior and Senior High Schools. Its success was due largely to the High School Orchestra, the Effe
Kube Klub, Mr. Miller's Tumblers, the Spanish Club, and the Junior-Senior Dramatic Club.
An informal dance was held in the gym following the Assembly Program. It was sponsored by the
Caribbean Staff and was a grand success.
When a count was made of the number attending, it was found that 328 had signed the registration
slips. This exceeded last year's attendance by almost 100. The fact that registration ceased before the
eighth period, and that the building is so open would indicate that there were many more visitors who did
not sign.
On the whole, Visitation Day this year was a huge success, and we take this opportunity to thank the
parents for their cooperation.









SCHOOL NOTES
Alabeie B/Ir '54


Sept. 26. "School days, school days,
dear old"-oh, oh,
ancient ditty! But
-F" then again maybe
this year shall be
x overflowing with
T dear old golden rule
Sayss" Because we
have a "bee-voo-
tee-full" new High
School Bldg! 'n everything that goes with
it.
Sept. 27. Are we lucky? Yes! Due
to the fact that we have two new teachers
and they both appear to be very con-
genial. Miss Ferne Bowman is our new
Household Arts teacher and she will also
take charge of the cafeteria. Yum-yum-
my! Mr. Paul Miller is our new teacher
of Science and Algebra. Altho' he taught
in Balboa last year, he is a "new num-
ber" to us.
Sept. 28. Watta' day??? Each class


endured for only 15 minutes then school
was out. Now that's ideal methinks. But
the 15 minute-plan was used solely for
today to acquaint us students with our
new surroundings.

Sept. 29. Initiation? The Freshmen,
better-known as "scobies," combatted
the Sophomores at Kokonut Park this
P.M. Sueh fun: But,--the "scobles"
weren't so easy to defeat this year.
Guess that's a merry "ha-ha" on the
Sophs.
Sept. 30. lust to prove that there
were no ill feelings, the upper Classmen
favored the "scobies" with a dance which
was held at the new spacious gymnasium.
Altho the initiated combatants were
somewhat minus their usual vim, vigor
and vitality, they each and every one of
them appeared to have enjoyed a happy
evening.
Oct. 1. No more foolishness -sup-
posedlv! School is now in session! All

55








students have adorned themselves with
their best behaviors, attempting to make
a favorable impression-especially on the
new teachers.
Oct. 4. The assembly held today was
conducted by the students. Anna Reilly
told of a new plan to be organized into
the school, the Student Association, try-
ing to cut down the expenses of the social
activities of the school. Colin Campbell
gave a talk in regard to the school news-
paper, the duties of the staff, and the
new mimeograph machine.
Oct. 5. The two dramatic clubs held
their first meeting today. The Jr.-Sr.
Dramatic Club under the able instruction
of Miss Kimbro had some of the former
Thespians of last year and also a large
number of new dramatic club members.
The Effe Kube Klub has Mrs. Spencer
as its advisor. Over fifty little freshmen
and sophomores have joined the club.
Maybe these little scobies will show some
talent, who knows?

The Girls' Supper Club held its first
meeting today in the new cafeteria. Since
it was a new place of meeting, no doubt
curiosity caused the large attendance.


Oct. 9. Our first


newspaper for this
school year was
distributed today.
What a paper! You
should have read it!
Great productions
and startling news
is expected from
these two staffs in
the future judging
from their first ef-
fort.


Oct. 11. Today all classes held the
election of officers. A new leaf must have
been turned over or something has hap-
pened. Nearly all classes elected entirely
new officers-new building, new envi-
ronment, new ambitions-sounds exhiler-
ating!
Oct. 12. Note the memorable date!
Columbus Day! but it doesn't mean any-
thing to our school, not even a holiday.
Oct. 13. The Spanish club, "La Pas"
held another one of its formal meetings
on board a real Spanish ship. It was the
S. S. Mlagallanes and everyone seemed to
have a good time.
Oct. 19. Two pantomimes were given
in the auditorium today by the Effe Kube
Klub. The lower classmen are beginning
early and show much talent. The Jr.-Sr.
Dramatic Club better get busy if they
want to retain their laurels.


Oct. 20. A pep rally was held today
in the auditorium in preparation for the
soccer game tomorrow at Cristobal.
Charles Heim, Bobby Durham and Bert
Asencio, the cheer leaders, certainly
demonstrated a lot of pep.
Oct. 21. Kokonut Park was the scene
of the first soccer
^ game of the term
between C. H. S.
and the Junior Col-
lege. The Junior
College won 2-0,
but they had to put
up a big fight for it.

Oct. 24. A new club was formed to-
day, the Order of Gregg Artists, under
the sponsorship of Miss Patterson, in
order to try to teach the advanced short-
hand students more about shorthand and
typing.
Oct. 25. In the assembly today there
was much discussion, for Mr. Franks gave
a talk to all aspiring athletes. Many find
themselves ineligible since white slips
have been sent out. Mr. Miller gave a
talk on the spirit of athletic contests.
"Without spirit you can do nothing, but
with spirit you can do everything." Just
ask him, he'll tell you. Mr. Hackett
spoke of the election of officers for the
new Executive Council.
It would surprise you to see the
abundance of humor and wit displayed
by the faculty itself which caused the
students to smile as they left the audito-
rium.
Oct. 26. The men of the faculty de-
feated the high school girls in an exciting
volley ball game. The girls were probably
astounded by the powerful physiques and
ability displayed by our men of the
faculty.
Oct. 27. We have another day of
which to take note. Navy Day! Does
that mean anything in our school? Noth-
ing at all except that maybe it explains
why so many students are absent from
school. The sub base and air station at
Coco Solo offered free dives and hops to
as many as could be accomodated during
the day. Come early and avoid the rush
seemed to have been the motto to many
C.H.S. students.
Oct. 28. The girls volley ball team
as well as the boys soccer team ventured
to the Pacific side to conquer Balboa, but
neither team was able to do so.
The boys lost 4-0 and the Balboa girls
took all three games away from our
valiant athletes.








Oct. 30. Today the Spanish Club
held an important meeting concerning
the initiation of new members.
The Letter Club held a Halloween Par-
ty at the New Cristobal Clubhouse and
what a party it was1 Just ask somebody
who was there.

Oct. 31. What a day this turned out
to be --You'd think
S / / Franklin D. Roose-
/,. velt himself was
here to visit us, but
he wasn't. How-
Sever the formal in-
"2" auguration of offi-
cers and represent-
S atives of the Gen-
eral Student Body
would remind you of a session in Con-
gress. Judge Tatelman and Reverend
Cecil L. Morgan were the honored guests
at this meeting. Reverend Morgan gave
our newly elected president, Frank Wash-
abaugh, the oath of office. It's quite an
honor to be chosen first president in our
new school building.

Nov. 1. Several of the clubs enter-
tained jointly in the assembly today.
Two Spanish Club members, Henry
Sanchez and Alejandro Wong with their
guitars gave us several selections of
Hawaiian music-the sort that lulls one
to dream of sandy beaches and moon-
light nights.
The Effe Kube Klub offered five very
clever pantomimes. The Jr.-Sr. Dramatic
Club had better wake up and do things
if they don't want to be downed by the
lower classmen.

Nov. 2. Girls volley ball team had
another game against the men of the
faculty. This time they weren't beaten
so badly. They weren't quite so overcome
by those swell physiques this time.

Nov. 3. Another day for notation.
Panamanian Independence Day, and this
time we have a holiday. All day.

Nov. 4. Cristobal seems to be having
hard luck this year. The boys soccer
team played against Balboa at Kokonut
Park but were unable to come out con-
querors. The final score being 2-0 and
we had the goose egg.
The girls volley ball also had the same
luck, but their game was the best one
held this year for it was full of excitement
the score being tied several times during
the game.

Nov. 6. For more than two hours the


- - -


Executive Council
of the Student As-
sociation discussed
important topics at
the meeting today,
selecting the name
of the organization
and making plans
for the future.


Nov. 8. The Ex. Council held a gen-
eral meeting for the whole student body
today in the auditorium. The Constitu-
tion was read to the students to see if
they approved. Ask some of them about
it, they wouldn't even be able to tell what
happened for there were so many sleepy
heads.

Nov. 9. More class meetings today.
They're all planning great things to be
done, each class striving to out-do the
other, it would seem.
Supper Club had another delicious
meal served in the cafeteria. About forty
girls attended, maybe it's because Betty
Stetler is the president this year.

Nov. 10. The Caribbean Staff held
a formal dance in the gym. Every body
attended and had a keen time since
"Bilgray's" orchestra furnished the mu-
sic.

Nov. 11. Junior College defeats the
Cristobal boys soccer team again at
Balboa by one point. It's too bad we
couldn't have had that one point instead
of Balboa.
The same story goes for the girls volley
ball team. We are good losers though and
that's something.

Nov. 13. Soccer league games started
today with the Jrs. versus the Varsity
team. In spite of two extra quarters the
score remained tie.

Nov. 14. The Srs. didn't make a very
good showing today in the soccer league.
Out of the whole Sr. class only one boy
turned out to play against the Sophs so
naturally the Srs. lost by default. Our
faithful Sr. deserves a medal.

Nov. 15. Report cards were given out
today. Quite a few
0o" o',\\ students made the
.oh\ n honor roll and sad
S to relate several
/-77 others were made
30 ineligible for athle-
tics. The next six
weeks will probably
bring them back on
Sthe team again.
Let's hope so for several of our best
players were laid off, as 'twere.







Rev. C. L. Morgan was the speaker for
the assembly today and gave a talk on
the "Past Generation." His talk was aided
by several humorous remarks which were
greatly enjoyed by the students. The
more serious parts will, no doubt, be a
help to us all.
Nov. 16. The Ex. Council held a
meeting at Frank Washabaugh's house
in order to revise the Constitution. The
meeting was long but delicious refresh-
ments were served which made a happy
ending to reward our labor.
Nov. 17. New Spanish club members
were initiated tonight and an interesting
program and refreshments were served
too.
The Supper Club girls gave a tea today
in the cafeteria for their mothers. Betty
Stetler, president of the club, Mrs. Spen-
cer, advisor, and Mrs. C. A. Hearne, past
advisor, all spoke of different phases of
the clubs activities and aims.
Nov. 18. Girls volley ball team still
has the same story, they came in second,
but the boys have a different tale to tell
this time. Don't get excited, for we only
won by default since the Jr. College didn't
appear on the scene to play us.
Nov. 20. The freshmen team won the
championship for the Soccer league when
they defeated the faculty today.
Nov. 22. Ex. Council held a meeting
in the assembly today for the whole
student body and they also held another
meeting after school. These Ex. Council
meetings must be something of great
importance for they have them so fre-
quently.
Nov. 27. At the editorial staff meet-
ing of our school paper, "Trade Wind"
everyone seemed to have a long face.
The reason for that being that Mr.
Franks told them a thing or two about
last week's edition of the paper. His
remarks were not very favorable, but
doubtless his criticism of the paper was
for our benefit.

Nov. 29. The Seniors held a most
successful dance in
S ~ the gym. Every-
__ thing, from the
=1 snappy music to
the slippery borax
brought forth noth-
ing but praise-ar-
tistic decorations in
Sred and white, the
Senior class colors,
were used in profusion. Since it is
Thanksgiving tomorrow everyone will be
able to sleep late the morning after. Ain't
that sumpin' to be thankful for?


Nov. 30. Not a fatal tragedy, but
just a tragedy occurred today when
Charles Bath dislocated his knee in the
football game at Kokonut Park. The
game was supposed to have been played
by Juniors and Seniors, but proved to
have P. G.'s, Junior College students,
outsiders, and what-have-you on the
teams. The game was just an appetizer
for the Thanksgiving turkey to follow.
Nov. 31. Friday, a day of vacation.
and are the kids taking advantage of it.
Picnics and sunbrun, parties and sleepy
heads and everything that goes with it.
Dec. 4. After a three-and-a-half day
vacation we kids don't feel much like
attending school today, but most every-
one is here, the majority of us being red
as a beet or brown as an Indian.
Dec. 6. "Should Capital Punishment
Be Abolished" was the topic of the debate
presented today in the auditorium. It
was the first of its kind given and was
a very creditable performance.
The Ex. Council held another meeting
today and invited Mr. Franks as a guest.
What a meeting that was. You should
have heard it!
Dec. 7. The Jrs. were defeated by
those sophisticated Seniors in a game of
football to the tune of 18-0. The ground
was real muddy so maybe that is the
Jrs. excuse for not winning.
Dec. 8. Supper Club had a box lunch
instead of a regular supper at their meet-
ing this P. M. in the cafeteria.
Today was the last day to pay your
Student Association dues. Too bad for
those who have not already paid, for that
extra fifty cents might come in handy
sometime.
Dec. 9. Peddling cookies just before
Christmas proved to be quite successful
to the Supper Club for all their cookies
were sold long before the morning was
over.
Dec. 11. Caribbean staff meeting to-
day. They seem to be keeping all in-
formation to themselves, but from the
mysterious actions-compiling the 1934
annual seems to be very serious business.
Dec. 13. At the class meetings today,
the Juniors and Seniors met together in
order to discuss plans for the Banquet.
The Juniors are low on funds and unless
money comes in from some source the
Seniors will be out of luck for their antici-
pated banquet. We might have a "de-
pression" bread line at least!
Dec. 14. The Jr.-Sr. Dramatic club
held its dress rehearsal for the play "Hap-
py Landings" to be presented tomorrow
-from the laughs we heard thru the
windows, it must be good.








Dec. 15. "Happy Landings" mat-
inee and evening performance proved to
be most successful. The play had many
humorous spots and there was also much
fast moving action which made the play
more interesting-I told you so.
Dec. 20. All afternoon classes were
cut short and we had an assembly pro-
gram which began at 1:45. Our own
Thomas Rankin '33 now president of his
class at the Jr. College and Mr. Spalding,
principal of the Jr. College enlightened
us as to the important features of the
Jr. College. The rest of the assembly
period was turned in to a Xmas program.
"The International Christmas Program
Broadcast" was the main feature and
was very cleverly done with James Days
acting as radio announcer.
That nite the Spanish club, "La Pas"
held their formal initiation of 22 new
members. Eats and a good program with
Ducruet as their speaker made a most
pleasant evening.
Dec. 21. Another form of Xmas en-
tertainment was the play "Beggars Can't
Be Choosers" presented by the Effe Kube
Klub today in the auditorium. It was a
great opening for the Xmas season.
Dec. 22. Out Xmas dance was a great
event. It is more blessed to give than to
receive so this was a free dance for all
S. A. members. Entertainment was far-
nished by Stella Boggs and Cathleen
Ecker who did the native Spanish Po-
Ilera dance in costume.
Report cards given out today. Can
you imagine it, just before Xmas, of all
days. Hope it wont influence old Santa
Claus. School is closed until January 2,
1934. Hurrah!
Dec. 23. Another defeat for Cristobal
when the boy's handball team lost to the
Fleet Air Base. Practicing for both base-
ball and handball, the boys were unable
to keep up the good work in both so that's
probably why they dropped down in
handball intending to star in baseball-
(good intentions anyway).
Dec. 2-1. 'Twas the nite before Xmas
And all thru the
.- house
Not a creature was
stirring
Not even a mouse.
Is that true in
your case or did
you stay up to cele-
brate Xmas Eve?
Surely all of you
were good little boys and girls and
went to bed early waiting for Santa Claus
to come down the chimney to fill your
stocking.


Dec. 25. Christmas! Of all things, it
didn't rain! Did Santa Claus bring you
what you asked for? Me too-
Dec. 28. C.H.S. has two rivals of
Richard Haliburton
,- and Johnny Weise-
muller; Malcolm
Duey and Billy
Hollowell set out
to swim to Pedro
Miguel. They got
as far as Darien
today-saw two
alligators enroute-
going other way-coildnot stop-lucky,
eh what?-
Dec. 30. Our marathon swimmers
reached their destination at noon today.
The only visible rewards for their achieve-
ment are a lovely sunburn and cramped
muscles. What won't one endure for
fame!!
Dec. 31. New Year's Eve! Were you
amongst those celebrating the gala event?
Jan. 1. The beginning of a New Year!
How about those good resolutions! And
are you suffering the effects of the morn-
ing after the nite before?
Jan. 2. After a long ten days vaca-
tion, students return to settle down to
work once more.
Jan. 3. Mrs. Spencer uttered forth a
lecture in the auditorium on a new sub-
ject. They're fast becoming strict con-
cerning invitations to school dances. 'S
too bad.
Jan. 5. Sophomores held an elab-
orate dance in the gym. Congratulations
extended to you for your success.
Jan. 6. First baseball game at Bal-
boa, but we have a sad story to relate.
C. H. S. came in second 6-3. Better luck
next time.
Jan. 10. We are honored by having
Dr. Harold Wilson of C. Z. Junior Col-
lege speak to upper classmen. Are we
upper classmen luky?
Jan. 11. Seniors held an important
meeting. Preparations for Commence-
ment have already begun. Believe it or
not, we Seniors "Commence" in a very
few months.
Jan. 12. Visitation Day for many


I I


parents and guests.
Much entertain-
ment in their honor
also informal dance
in gym afterwards
-that entertain-
ment for the stu-
dents' pleasure.








Jan. 13. Note the date- 13th! Thus
C. H. S. lost the baseball game. Boo
Hoo!!

Jan. 14. Effe Kube Klub entertained
with a one-act play. Dr. Flowers of Jun-
ior College talked in the auditorium after-
wards. A very intellectual afternoon was
spent by all who were present.

Jan. 15. Supper Club entertained a
la Italy which means we had Italian
spaghetti no less. And oh! what a job
eating the long slippery strings,-but it
proved well worth the job 'cause it tasted
so yummy!

Jan. 20. C. H. S. whitewashed the
Junior College in baseball 15-1-Can you
imagine it? Hurray! for C. H. S.! Plus
a few extra "rah rah rahs!"
Mr. Hackett chaperoned a large party
to Fort Lorenzo. Oh! the sore feet and
sun-burned backs!
Spanish Club held a dance at Bomba
with many prominent officials attending.
You should have seen the effects the
punch (supposedly) had on several stu-
dents.
Jan. 24. Dr. Moody of the Junior
College spoke to upper classmen. Just
ask a Junior or Senior how they enjoyed
it, or what they learned? I dare you!

Jan. 25. National Thespians held ini-
tiation and a buffet supper in the audito-
rium. Many new members joined and
displayed a great deal of talent at initia-
tion. What this younger generation can't
do? Woe is me!

Jan. 26. C. H. S. was again honored,
by having Dr. L. Aker speak in audito-
rium. He must be quite an important
man 'cause all the periods were shortened
and that's a certain sign of importancey."

Jan. 27. What an unlucky day for
C. H. S. The boys lost to B. H. S. in
baseball and the girls came in second in
basketball. Tough, uh! but better luck
next time.

Jan. 29. Big Handball Tournament
today. Faculty and varsity played, but
faculty won. Good for the teachers, but
not so good for the students. Admission
was clih.arI. and cheering, refereeing,
and umpiring also by teachers!

Feb. 1. ul;-'. .c,.r exams today. Oh
what tests! Results will be heard later.
Until then we shall all shake in the knees
with fright.
Feb. 2. More tests. Too late for any


more cramming, ye
students of C.H.S.
INo CIHEAM nG
Feb. 3. C. H. S.
seems to be having
bad luck this year.
The girls lost a hard
fought game of bas-
Sketball to B. H. S.
__-_ by only one basket.
How tragic! The
boys also lost in baseball. Miss Fortune
(misfortune) surely must be fond of us.
Feb. 5. What mannequins we have
in C. H. S. The elementary H. H. A.
class displayed their hand-made dresses
in the auditorium today. And do they
fit. (Just like Mae West)!
Feb. 7. Dr. Akin gave a talk today on
T. B. Just to be sure no one has it or is
susceptible, tests are to be given later.
Feb. 8. Dr. Van Zant talked on
"Motoring Thru' Europe." It was in-
tensely interesting for he related many
different incidents of the difficulty in
getting schools started here and there
about Europe.
Feb. 9. Juniors held a very successful
dance. All credit
goes to the boys of
the class, for all
decorating, pro-
grams, and the
whole dance in gen-
eral was done by
them. Three hearty
cheers to the Junior
.. boys, Rah, Rah,
Rah!.
Feb. 10. The dance had an excellent
effect on the boys, for they beat B. H. S.
in baseball. But, confidentily the girls
"couldn't take it" for B. H. S. white-
washed them in basketball.

Feb. 13. The Elementary H. H. A.
class scores another triumph. They
entertained their parents and some teach-
ers with a delightful Valentine Tea. Oh!
these heart-shaped sandwiches and cook-
ies to suit one's heart's desire! Yum,
yummy!!!
Feb. 14. Another Junior College prof
speaks. This time, it's none other than
Prof. Carson. His speech proved to be
very interesting, in fact quite a discussion
followed.
Feb. 15. Spanish Club held a formal
initiation at school. Delicious "eats"
and several games and a lotta' fun were
enjoyed by all.
Feb. 21. C. H. S. was doubly honored








by the Pacific Side. Dr. Meadowcraft
delivered an exceedingly interesting talk.
The Stringed Quartette from Balboa fa-
vored us with a lovely musical program
which was greatly appreciated by all.
Feb. 24. Watta' day? In other words
what a day for the Inter-class track meet
at Fort Davis. Guess who won? None
other than the Seniors, Hurrahl Hurrah'
Hurrah! And may I add a few "hot-
chas?"
Feb. 27. This Biology class might be
well known soon. What do they do but
discover a very ancient fossil while on
one of their field trips. And what's more
Mr. Vinton intends to take the newly
discovered fossil to Columbia University.
Mar. 2. Now it's C. H. S.'s turn to
score another triumph. We staged a very
successful program and party for the
benefit of parents and guests to meet the
Junior College faculty-even if we do
admit it ourselves.
Mar. 5. Today is the 1st day of
registration for those students who are
compelled to listen to lectures on dif-
ferent subjects and courses. Aren't we
Seniors lucky to get out of it all?
Mar. 6. Mr. \lever, lMiss Moore and
ir. Vinton each gave a lecture on their
respective subjects for those registering
for next year. They were very worth-
while lectures too.
Mar. 7. What a dramatist we have in
our Rev. C. I. Morgan! Portraying the
first act of 2Macbeth is no easy job, but
he did it to perfection-the three winds
(ghosts) especially. He recited humorous
readings afterwards and were they amus-
ing? You should have been there!
Mar. 9. What a school! Now we only
have four activities and a student
can only belong to one, according to what
iMr. Franks announced today. Sour
grapes. I only want to belong to one
anyway.
Alar. 15. Effe Kube Kliub, offers en-
tertainment-"Sauce for the Goslings."
A very appropriate play with a good
moral. Let's hope a majority of the stu-
dents secure the benefit of it.
MNar. 16. Dr. Weiiman lectured with
moving picture illustrations 'n every-
thing on child psychology. Only girls at-
tended, except for the camera man.
Mar. 17. Hurray: Whoopee: etc.
C. H. S. defeated B. H. S. in track meet
47-35. What a man Beard'!! Breaking
two records and tying a third. Ask the
track members how they enjoyed the
party afterwards?


Mar. 23. Varsity Club held a very
unique dance, decorating the gym with
baseball bats, basketballs, baseball catch-
ers, boxing gloves, etc. Anybody who
happened to feel in the mood for a fight
had plenty of ammunition for inspira-
tions.


AMar. 24. Debate


Club starts their
Easter Vacation by
having picnic at
Finlayson's Farm.
What a wonder
some kinds aren't
more bow-legged
than they are?
"Horses, Horses!
Crazy over Horses,
Horses!"


Mar. 27. Just another day of Easter
Vacation. Hardly anybody's in town
now, students, teachers, even janitors
are out vacationing. You guess where.
April 2. Again the H. H. A. class
scores another triumph. A visit to the
Cold Storage plant, eating samples of
ice cream, cookies, etc. and then enjoying
a delicious luncheon at Miss Bowman's,
(their teacher's) house. These H. H. A.
classes. What they wont do.
Apr. 6. What a shame a certain some-
body was caught smoking at one of the
former dances so that he was prohibited
to come to the Frosh dance tonight.
Alaybe he'll learn not to disobey rules.
Apr. 7. DeMolays gave a big dance
and card party at the Masonic Temple
this P. M. Many students attended and
tripped the light fantastic to their hearts
content.
Apr. 12. Again we take note of H. H.
A. class. An art display, illustrated, show-
ing how decoratively one can dress the
dinner table, for elaborate or for simple
dinners, luncheons and teas. Mrs. Mac-
Donald's illustrated lecture proved very
interesting and very instructive to all.

Apr. 13. C. H. S. defeats B. H. S. in
basketball game tonight. Are we good or
are we good? Just ask us.
Supper Club held an informal dance
in the gym afterwards. Both the B. H. S.
and the C. H. S. basketball teams were
allowed in free of charge. Now, are we
Supper Club girls Scotch? No!
Apr. 14. C. H. S. came in second in
tennis meet. Too much nite life I sup-
pose. Oh well we can't win everything-
Basketball and tennis, so we pick on
basketball.
Free entertainment in gym tonight for
all patrons and friends of the school. A
pageant, play and pantomime was the








program which proved to be intensely
amusing.
Apr. 15. It seems that a certain quar-
tette broke a rule and are now suspended
from anymore basketball games. These
people that will break rules.
April 17. Play practice has begun to
start to commence in earnest. The First
Act of "Thread of Destiny" is being re-
hearsed this week. These people and
their southern (supposedly) drawl.
Apr. 18. A pep rally at noon today,
but not even that would make our coach
take back his resignation. Let's hope
some one can make him change his mind
again.


Apr. 21. Ah!


The Carnival! What
a night. Having it
in the school was
something different
from the past, but
was it keen?. Just
ask me.
Apr. 27. Another
basketball game.
We'll win this
series yet.


Apr. 30. The last day of April and
what a day it is! First it rains and then
it pours. But this afternoon is grand.
Sunshine here and sunshine there. A
perfect day for hooky.
May 4. Today marks the end of the
fifth six weeks. Just think Seniors only
one more six weeks period and we're out.
Oh! boy just to think of it.
How do you think the Sophs tell the
end of the six weeks. No other way than
by giving a very original barn dance in
the gym. What a dance! All the hay,
and those chickens! Weren't those farm-
ers and farmerettes cute, though?
May 7. A Blue Monday! Honest
Injun, today actually is a Blue Monday;
in fact a black and blue Monday. By
that I mean- the sky and the clouds and
the hearts all appear so dismal.
May 9. What a shame-?? and ??
must have had a fight or a quarrel last
night. Just look at them stare daggers at
each other. Come on now, "Kiss and
make up."
May 11. Another basketball game.
Hurray!-What a game. I couldn't see
half of the game on account of those
marvelous "Johnny Weisemuller" and
"Atlas" physiques. They just dazzle you
You can't watch the game and physiques
too, so I picked ? What do you think?
Of course, the physiques.


May 14.
ing today.
praying for
Caribbean.


Caribbean Staff held a meet-
Thinking and hoping and
the bestest results for the


May 16. Well it took a whole week
but ?? and ?? finally did "kiss and make
up." Did you notice the smiles today in
place of those dagger stares of last week?
May 18. Ah! "Thread of Destiny"
at last after weeks
of practice. Boy.
was it ever a hit!
These southern
belles aren't so bad
after all, are they?
SA May 21. Don't
you just hate these
Monday. Just
think another four
more days before we can take a vacation
for two days again. Friday are some-
thing to look forward to anyway.
May 25. Well, Friday has at last
arrived. Aren't you glad? No more
school now till Monday. Two whole days
of leisure. Ah! just to think of it.
May 30. In the middle of the week
and we have a holiday. There's no epede-
mic dr anything, but it's Memorial Day.
Thus we have a holiday.
June 1. The 1st of June and what a
day. A perfect day
with a perfect end-
ing. The Junior-
Senior Banquet was
This evening with a
S I big dance at the
SHotel Washington
Sand everything.
Even though these
Juniors did keep us
Seniors in suspense, they certainly did
everything in fine style. Thank you, even
for the mysteries.
June 5. Now's the time to begin
cramming in earnest. Just a couple of
more days and you'll be out of luck.
June 7. Tests today and oh-am I
glad I'm a Senior and I don't have those
to worry me anymore. It's swell to be a
Senior. Just wait till you're one. You'll
agree with me.
June 10. Baccalaureate Services to-
day at Christ
Church by the Sea.
Didn't the Seniors
look nice in their
Pastel shaded dress-
Ses and the boys in
their flannel pants
r and blue coats. You
g didn't realize the
Seniors had so








many good-looking kids, did you? How
ever, it's not always that clothes make
the man."
June 11. Ah1 The Caribbeans came
out today. Aren't they keen? I'll guaran-
tee they're much better than you ex-
pected, huh?
June 13. Just think Seniors, only two
more days and then no more. Isn't it a
funny feeling?

June 14. Practicing marching up to
the stage surely is a queer sensation.
Fooling around today is alright, but to-
morrow nite, you'd better not even crack
a smile or else-that is until after the
graduation ceremony is over.


June 15. At last the final day has
come. I'm so nerv-
ous my teeth are
chattering. How-
ever, receiving your
diploma isn't so
bad. Your knees
Squiver a little, but
that's all. The
S speeches, music, di-
plomas, flowers and
everything was also lovely. However,
I'm glad it only happens once.
Wasn't it fun at the dance in the gym?
I hope you had as good a time as I did.
Well, now I bid thee farewell and best
of luck to the rest of my classmates of the
class of '34.


. I. U' N I


1930
RALPH S. CRUM, (address unknown).
MAVIS E. THIRLWALL, Cristobal, C. Z.
RAE BLISS, Cristobal, C. Z.
THOMAS I,. COLEY, Jr., (address un-
known).
DELLA J. RAYMOND, Cristobal, C. Z.
EVELYN E. GANZEMULLER (Mrs. H.)
Fenton, Madden Dam, C. Z.
ALICE E. CENTER (Mrs. Jack) Cor-
rigan, Balboa, C. Z.
MR. "WILLIAM NEWMAN, Memphis,
Tenn.
PAULINE HERMAN, (address unknown).
ELSIE B. BIRKELAND, 50 Nevens Street
Brooklyn, N. Y.
VICTOR MELENDEZ, Colon R. de P.
ELEANOR Al. FITZGERALD (Mrs. G.)
Robinson, Balboa, C. Z.
FRANCES M. DAYS, Gatun, C. Z.
FRANCISCO WONG, Box 1734, Cristobal,
C. Z.
M. VIRGINIA EBERENZ, Cristobal, C. Z.
ELSIE DARLEY, Cristobal, C. Z.
E. BEVERLY TURNER, Cristobal, C. Z.
J. VIRGINIA STEVENSON, Cristobal,
C. Z.
WALTER WIKINGSTAD, Duke College,
Durham, N. C.
ESTAFANIA G. WHEELER, Utica Memo-
rial Hospital, Utica, N. Y.
RICHARD C. SERGEANT, (address un-
known).
JAMES CAMPBELL, Jr., Georgia Tech.
Atlanta, Ga.
RITA TERESA JOYCE, St. Joseph's Col-
lege, Philadelphia, Pa.
ARTHUR MUNDBERG, Cristobal, C. Z.


PHOEBE O'DONNELL, Balboa, C. Z.
OIVIND ARNESON, Kristiansund, Nor-
way.
ROSE T. CORRIGAN, NEWARK, N. J.
MARIA C. STEWART (Mrs. O.) F-brega,
Panama City.
NEHLS G. JANSEN, (address unknown).

1931
CARLOS BOGART RANKIN, Wittinberg
College, Meyers Hall, Springfield, Ohio.
VELMA HALL, Cristobal, C. Z.
RUTH DUVALL, 2974 Colerian Avenue,
Cincinnati, Ohio.
MARION NEELY, Cristobal, C. Z.
THOMAS PESCOD, Cristobal, C. Z.
WILLIAM BAILEY, Cristobal, C. Z.
ERNEST BERGER, Cristobal, C. Z.
CELESTE CLARK, (Mrs. B.) Powell,
Balboa, C. Z.
CRAWFORD J. CAMPBELL. Emery Uni-
versity, Oxford, Ga.
EDWARD CONKLING, Gatun, C. Z.
MARGARET M. DAVIS, Cristobal, C. Z.
VINNIE ELSON, Box 575, College Sta-
tion, Pullman, Washington.
RUSSELL ELWELL, Duke University,
N. C.
FABIAN ENGLANDER, (address un-
known).
CLARA FRISK, Box 728, Leanington,
Ontario, Canada.
BURTON HACKETT, Cristobal, C. Z.
JOHN KELLY, (address unknown).
MARIA KLEEFKENS, Cristobal, C. Z.
DEMETRA LEWIS, Balboa C. Z.
PERCIVAL LYEW, Box 1099, Cristobal,
C. Z.








KENNETH MAURER, Balboa, C. Z.
EUGENIA N3. McLAIN, Cristobal, C. Z.
RONALD PHILLPOTTS, New York City.
BETTINA POWERS, Fort Hancock, N. J.
ANNA RYAN, 468 East State Street,
Trenton, N. J.
ALOHA SLOCUM, Cristobal, C. Z.
DOROTHY WIRTZ, Cristobal, C. Z.
GEORGE WERTZ, Cristobal, C. Z.
BEN WILLIAMS, Cristobal, C. Z.
BARBARA WEICK, France Field, C. Z.
RAYMOND WILL, Cristobal, C. Z.
RICHARD WOOD, Cristobal, C. Z.
ALICE J. GORMELY, Cristobal, C. Z.
FRANK GRIESINGER, Georgia Tech, At-
lanta, Ga.
EVELYN WRIGHT, (address unknown).
JAMES HAYDEN, (address unknown).
VERONA C. HERMAN, University of
Texas, Austin, Texas.
ROGER M. HOWE, Purdue University,
Lafayette, Ind.
CARL KARIGR, Gatun, C. Z.
THELMA KING, 27 Broadway Terrace,
New York City.
ALVIN A. LYEW, Colon, R. de P.
MARGARET MI.RACHI, Colon, R. de P.
ELWIN NEAL, Cristobal, C. Z.
JAMES WOOD, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.
ELSIE NEELY, CRISTOBAL, C. Z.
BENJAMIN ROBERTS, 701 UNION Street,
Union College, Schnectady, N. Y.
JANET ROBINSON, Box 1334, William
and Mary College, Williamsburg, Va.
HERMAN Roos, Jr., Gatun, C. Z.
BRUCE SANDERS, Cristobal, C. Z.
JESSIE SINCLAIR, (address unknown).
BETTY STAHLER, (address unknown).
ROBERT STEVENSON, Cristobal, C. Z.
INEZ THEOKTISTO, Colon, R. de P.
ALICIA THIRLWALL, Cristobal, C. Z.
JESSIE VANE, Fort Sherman, C. Z.
NELL WARDLAW, Newcomb College,
Josephine Louise House, New Orleans,
La.
PERRY WASHABAUGH, Cristobal, C. Z.
"Best wishes for a better "Caribbean"
and best wishes to you all for continued
success.
EDWIN WEISMAN, Purdue University,
Lafayette, Ind.
MALCOLM WHEELER, Cristobal, C. Z.
ELIZABETH WIRTZ, Cristobal, C. Z.

1932
RANDOLPH M. WIKINGSTAD, Cristobal,
C. Z.
ALBIN B. FORSSTROM, (address un-
known).
ELEANOR M. REINHOLD, Tampa, Fla.
HOWARD U. KEENAN, Purdue Univer-
sity, Lafayette, Ind.
RICHARD BETTEIN, Fort Randolph, C.
Z.
GLADYS BLISS, Cristobal, C. Z.


ALLENYE MRTLE DEAKINS, Gatun, C.Z.
MARY C. DEANS, Cristobal, C. Z.
JOHN DELANEY, (address unknown).
DONA V. EATON, Barnard College,
Hewitt Hall, New York City.
"Best wishes and all the luck in the
world to the class of 1934."
JOSEPH EBDON, Gatun, C. Z.
IARRY C. EGOLF, Gatun, C. Z.
VIVIAN G. ELMGREN, (address un-
known).
HOWARD S. ENGELKE, Cristobal, C. Z.
MARIE ENSRUD, (address unknown).
JOSE ANTONIO FERNANDEZ, Colon, R.
de P.,
1933
HAROLD AGNEW, (address unknown).
WEBSTER BEARD, Balboa, C. Z.
HOWARD BERRY, Severn School, Sever-
na Park, Md.
CLIFTON BROWN, University of Ten-
nesee, Knoxville, Tenn.
ROBERT BROWN, University of Ten-
nesee, Knoxville, Tenn.
JESUS DAVID, Gatun, C. Z.
ERNEST DE LA OSSA, Columbia Uni-
versity, New York, N. Y.
PARKER HANNA, Cristobal, C. Z.
ROBERT HANNA, Cristobal, C. Z.
OSCAR HEILBRON, Colon, R. de P.
CHARLES HOWE, Perdue University,
Lafayette, Ind.
WILLIAM KEENAN, Perdue University,
Lafayette, Ind.
LOUIE KLEEFKINS, Cristobal, C. Z.
HENRY LEE, Cristobal, C. Z.
HAROLD LOCKWOOD, Cincinnatti, Phio.
JOHN LOTHROP, Los Angeles, California
MANDI MARCHOSKY, Cristobal, C. Z.
CHRIS OHLSCHLAGER, Cristobal, C. Z.
JACK PATERSON, Cristobal, C. Z.
CHARLIE PESCOD, Cristobal, C. Z.
ERNEST REINHOLD, Cristobal, C. Z.
HARVEY SMITH, Canal Zone Junior
College, Balboa, C. Z.
JAMES WERGIN, Perdue University, La-
fayette, Ind.
HELEN AANSTOOS, Cristobal, C. Z.
THELMA ALBRITTON, Cristobal, C. Z.
DOROTHY BIRKELAND, Cristobal, C. Z.
JANE BRETCH, Cristobal, C. Z.
VELTA FOLEY (Mrs. C. Sharp), Cristo-
bal, C. Z.
MOLLY GRUBER, Sweet Briar, Va.
HELEN HAMMOND, University of Cin-
cinnatti, Ohio.
MARY MELENDEZ, Colon, R. de P.
MILDRED OWEN, Hammond, La.
MARTHA POTTS, Cristobal. C. Z.
NORINE RAKOVSKY, Cristobal, C. Z.
EDNA THIRWALL, Cristobal, C. Z.
FLORENCE THORNTON (Mrs. Jordan),
Cristobal, C. Z.
MAY WEGNER (address unknown).
THOMAS RANKIN, Canal Zone Junior
College, Balboa, C. Z.






























Fo- a





. . . .
6__ AV ME{)t- ol I A-
i 'L ...l .




















































65
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. .. .. .. .. .. .. .



L 4L

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65


































SOCCER


SOCCER

This year the soccer team had to step down from the pedestal of supremacy that they had
gained last year. One of the reasons for their not being able to retain the pedestal was because of
almost all new material with which to work.
The team was able to claim victory in the minor games they played but when it came to the
more important games they just couldn't gain the sought-after goal.
There seemed to be a lacking of teamwork which would enable the team to crash through
the defensive of the opponents.
The first soccer tilt went to Balboa on October 28 at the Balboa stadium with a rather one
sided score of 4 to 0. The first part of the game moved rather sluggishly due to a muddy field,
however, Balboa in the second quarter managed to chalk up one goal. The game had little to
offer in the way of excitement in the third quarter and much less to the Cristobal fans in the fourth
as it was in this quarter that Balboa obtained three goals. The Balboa team showed some ex-
cellect pass work.
The second game, played at Kokonut Park on November 4, did not bring the championship
any closer to Cristobal. The home team appeared with a much improved defensive but the for-
ward line was still weak. The game was lively throughl-out with both teams striving hard to be
victorious. Balboa edged in two goals, one in the third quarter and one in the fourth. The victory


BASEBALL


































TENNIS


for Balboa gave them the much desired championship replacing Crictobal on the pedestal of
supremacy.
The line ups for the teams are:
B ui .BA POSITIONS CRISTOBAL
Sutherland Goalkeeper Neely
W\empe Left Fullback Bazan
Brown Right Fullback Wheeler
Chaftin Center Halfback Hanna
Durfree Left Halfback Renardez
Reiber Right Wing Berger
Gornell Inter Right Bejarano
Walker Center Forward Alberga
IMorales Inter Left Hill
.ipinsky Left Wing Richardson
Corville Wirtz
W\e were no more successful against the Junior College than we were against Balboa. Cristo-
hal lost the lirst game to the tune 2-). The first goal made in the second quarter was pushed
through the goJl posts by Rankin's well trained toe. Both teams put up a hard fight and the
players deserve credit for their splendid performance.


TRACK









On Saturday, November 11, the Junior College again defeated Cristobal with a 1-0 score at
the Balboa Stadium. There was no scoring in the first half, and in the third quarter, Rankin put
his well educated toe to work thus gaining the only goal of the game.


BASEBALL
Once more Balboa succeeded in taking the baseball laurels. The task seemed rather easy as
Balboa took four of the five games played.
It seems that in this sport also Cristobal lost quite a few good men and had none with which
to replace them. Due to the steady coaching of Mr. Miller, the boys managed to display a credit-
able showing for new material.
Balboa won the first game by the score 6-3. Although Max Sanders, sturdy southpaw for
Cristobal, pitched a good game, we were unable to win as he had no backing from the rest of the
team. Balboa took advantage of the situation and chalked up six runs.
Failure in the first game could not be attributed to the fact that the team was not on its home
field for it lost the second game which was played at the Mount Hope Stadium. The game was
one of many errors on both sides and the game ended with the score 8-7 in favor of the visitors.
There was a lapse of two weeks between the second and third games. Balboa won this game
with a margin of only three runs. The Cristobal team showed much improvement and managed
to get five runs, however, Balboa received eight to win the game.
Once more the Cristobal boys showed a decided improvement. In the fourth game Balboa
won bh a margin of only one run, the final score being 6-5. Sanders pitched a splendid game and
Healy put up a good backstop.
The last game was quite a surprise as the Cristobal boys obtained ten runs while the Balboa
boys only received four. Our boys revealed a hidden ability as they practically ran around Balboa
in circles.
Cristobal played one game with the Junior College. The score was rather lop-sided, fifteen
to one in favor of Cristobal.
Box SCORE
NAME AB H E R A PO
Alberga ................... .....- ..... .- 17 10 0 7 0 4
W ills ..................... ........ .. ......... 21 6 1 2 7 6
Neelv .. ....-- ---..... .. .... 9 1 5 1 5 10
B eard ................................... 21 9 1 5 1 1
Sanders, M .... .... ........ ...-......- 22 4 1 1 28 37
C urtiss.... ..... .. ..................................... 19 2 4 4 5 3
W heeler.. ... ................................. 11 1 1 0 0 3
W irtz ...... .. ........ ... 9 1 3 3 1 20
Stone ..... .............. .... .......... ... .. 9 1 1 0 3 6
Peterson .. ............................. 8 1 1 1 0 0
Sanders, I ........................................ 11 3 0 0 0 19
H ana, .... .................................... 5 0 0 0 0 19
Fernandez ... ..................... 3 1 2 0 0 0
Durham ......................... ......... 1 0 0 0 0 0
E bdon ... ..... .. ............................. 1 0 0 0 0 0
King, R ............................. ........... 8 0 I 0 2 19


TRACK
In the largest and most record breaking track meet ever held between Balboa, our dear old
Alma Mater came out of the scramble on top with a score of 47 points while Balboa had but 36.
The meet was full of excitement to the spectators as well as to the participants.
Paul Beard not only managed to pile up a neat sum of paints for the home team but also
broke two previous records and tied one as well.
"Little George" Tarflinger of Balboa took second place among the honored. He walked off
with thirteen points and two new records.
Five inter-school records were broken, three by Cristobal and two by Balboa. Beard broke
the 100 and 220 yard dashes and Hollowell, the 880. Tarflinger broke his own record of last year
by putting the shot 42 feet and throwing the discuss 100 feet and one half inch.
Of the ten first places Cristobal took six and shut out Balboa in the 220 yard dash by taking
all three places. The Cristobal relay team came in first in the 880 but were disqualified.
Spirit ran high in both teams and as a result they managed to break five previous records.
The following is the results of the meet:
i50 d,/. DaI.rh-Time: 5.6 seconds
1. Beard (C)
2. Alberga (C)
3. Stevenson (B)

Broad Jumnp--Diance: 17' 5"
1. Kromer (B)
2. Novev (B)
3. Borden (C)
220 yd. Darh-Time: 21.8 .recond. (.New Record)
1. Beard (C)
2. Alberga (C)
3. Bazan (C)






































/llPh Jmp-lleitghl: i' 5' 2"
1. Bath (C)
2. Tarflinger (B)
3. Kromer (B)
10) y./. D)ash-Time: '). )9 second ( .Ve Rec.rdj)
1. Beard (C)
2. Alberga (C)
3. Stevenson (B)
Shor! Put-D11'iance: 42' 10" (-.Ne. Record)
1. Tarflinger (B)
2. Bejarano (C)
3. Kromer (B)
Di'cuF Throw-Dirstance: 100' 32" (-Ve,, Record)
1. Tarflinger (B)
2. Duey (C)
3. Brown (B)
SXO yd. Dash-Time: 2 oin. 16.6 sec. (.Ve Record)
1. Hollowell (C)
2. Reitser (B)
3. Quiteno (B)
JIle!e. Relay-Time: 51.4 .recond,.
Won by Cristobal:
Marsh, Wheeler, Borden, Molten
8'O yd. Rela4--Time: I min. 41.4 rec.
Won by Balboa:
Chaffing, Mac Cartney, Morales, Kromer.



TENNIS
Balboa again won the tennis tournament which was played at Fort Davis on Saturday the
fourteenth. Cristobal won one match while Balboa was victorious by winning four. AlthoLtsh
the Cristobal boys have not had much practice they showed up pretty well against Balboa. Each
boy fought hard. Wood and Egoscue were the oniy Cristobal boys who won their match which
was the second doubles. The results of the meet are:
No. 1 Singles: HENDRICKSON (B) defeated BE)ARANO (C). 6-3. 6-4.
No. 2 Singles: DONOVAN (B) defeated PRESLEY (C), 6-4. 1-6. 6-1.
No. 3 Singles: Mc Cartney (B) defeated HOaGlHT:N (C), 6-1, 6-1.
ARROYO HILL
No. 1 Doubles: and (B) defeated and (C), 6-3, 6-3.
Ledfors REALLY
ECO.CL'E SPINELLA
No. 2 Doubles: and (C) defeated and (13), 6-4, 8-6.
WOOD LOCKWOOD









BASKETBALL
The first game in the basketball series was held in the Cristobal High School gymnasium on
Friday evening the 13th of April.
The brilliant passwork on the part of the Cristobal team made the game very lively and
interesting. The home team also derived a great deal of inspiration from the student body with
their many new cheers.
In the first quarter, both teams started off with a bang, and terminated with the score 5 to 4
in favor of Balboa. The second quarter was full of fouls committed by both teams. However, the
score was a tie when the gong sounded. The home team showed fresh spirit in the third quarter
and managed to take the lead which it held until the end of the game. The final score was 23 to
16 in favor of Cristobal.

By holding its own in the first two periods and displaying a fast breaking and baffling attack
in the second half, the Balboa quintet swamped the Cristobal group 34 to 21 in the second game
of the the series between the two schools. Balboa's victory evened the inter-school series, each
team having one win and one loss.
The game opened with Jack Sutherland, Balboa, scoring one point on a foul shot. Cristobal
came back strong after Sutherland scored and rang up two field goals in rapid succession. The
first quarter ended with the Gold Coasters on the long end of a seven to six score.
The second quarter, which was the slowest of the game, saw neither team do any very heavy
scoring. Both teams roughed up considerably, and fouls were frequent. Balboa outplayed the
Gold Coasters in most respects during this period, and the whistle for the half found the home team
leading 14 to 11.
Balboa's attack in the last half was featured by the excellent shooting of Walter Friday who
sank three field goals. Cristobal's defeat is partly due to the loss of its star center, Charles Bath,
who had to be taken from the game in the first quarter.

Cristobal took the lead in the series by winning the third game with the rather close score of
25-23.
The first quarter was very lively and snappy with both teams showing a fine game of ball.
The quarter ended with the score 10 to 4 in favor of Cristobal.
Balboa sank the ball in the basket many times but the sharp shooting and pass work of the
home team enabled them to keep the lead.
The last quarter was very exciting for the players and spectators as well. With both teams
fighting hard, with but a few more minutes in which to play. and with the score tied, a foul was
called on a Balboa player. The shot was made good by the Cristobal player.

The fourth game in the series was played in Balboa. The Balboa basketeers managed to
chalk up another victory.
Both teams managed to present a boring exhibition in the first quarter.
The quintet of Balboa players seemed to run around the Cristobal players scoring quite
heavily all during the game.
The victory of the Balboans has brought about a dead-lock in the series. However we hope
that the Cristobal boys will come out on top.
The following are the Cristobal players:
Neely, Will, M. Sanders, I. Sanders, Bejarano, Alberga, Wheeler, Hanna, Beard, Bath,
Hollowell, Wharton. Russel, Horine.



GIRLS' SPORTS
By Beerle// Mrarcie,,e '54
This year our volley ball did not meet with the success which we anticipated. The inter-
school contest was won by Balboa who captured three out of five of the scheduled contests. Each
contest consisted of three games lasting over a period of twenty minutes each.
Several of the Cristobal girls did outstanding work. The downfall was due to lack of team
work. Although many of the best players will be lost through graduation, the new material shows
promise of developing into a team which should offer plenty opposition to Balboa.
DATE CRISTOBAL BALBOA PLAYED i AT
Oct. 28 16 24 Balboa
12 16
16 22
Nov. 4 15 26 Cristobal
22 16
19 21
Nov. 11 11 28 Balboa
12 18
13 23
Nov. 18 13 31 Cristobal
17 22
10 28
Nov. 25 14 30 Balboa
17 18
8 15
Starting this year official rules were adopted.



































VOLLEY- A LL


BASKETBALL
The results of the basketball season proveA dis.strous for Cristobal Ba.lba having won all
three games of the series.
After suftfeing defeat in the ope ing game. Cri ioal displayed a much improved team in
the second conteIt and ii dalfea.ted o.il aier ila sIreauoals little bv Billb) 25-21. The thi'd
game of the series was a walk-aiwav Ifr Ball: wholn white-'.v.shel Crist Aoi l lb a 19-0 sare.
The prospe.'tq fir net "Cear c.' i e mi llv i tio this yea,'s lo\er cla- :ne1, a l the future lo I ks
brighter for Clri bal.
DATE CIsI,)I ]AII\ Pl\ D .AT
Jan. 27 b 17 Balboa
Feb. 3 21 23 Cristobal
Feb. 10 0 19 Balboa
All basketball games were ci:luctec according to official rules.

Due to lack of enthusiasm there wais no inter-slhooil inmloor balsel:bll contest.
Because the Annual goes to press before the girls tennis tournament, no account ol the meet
can be put in the book.


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1 '51,

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HUMOR
By Robert llolten '34


A colored preacher was trying to im-
press upon his congregation the terrors
of hell.
"Bredern and Sistern," he called, "has
any of you all ever been to Bumingham,
Alabama whar the big steel wuks is?"
"Ah been thar Pasun," said one.
"Is you been in the mills and is you
see the hot steel as it comes out of de
fuhness?"
"Yas Preachuh, a seen it."
'"Well, den you knows how hot dat
stuff is. Ah wants to tell all you sinners
dat when dat stuff comes from dem
funaces it's hot. It's hot, it's white siz-
zling hot, in fact none of you can go near
it without getting all shriveled to a crisp.
Well, Bredern and Sistern, in Hell dey
uses dat stuff fo ice cream."


1lan (in theater): "Say, you, howja
like ter tell me where the smoking' room
is, hey, kid?"
Girl Usher (sweetly): "Go right down
this hall and turn to your right. You
will see a sign that says 'Gentlemen.'
Don't pay any attention to it. Just go
right in."


Silence is said to be safe but a great
deal of trouble comes from the still.


"Waiter," said the diner waiting for
his dinner, "have you ever been to the
zoo?"
"No, sir."
"Well, go some time you would enjoy
seeing the turtles whizzing by."


IFertz (feeling swell): "Do you know
Tyke Cotton?"
Sid (not feeling any more): "What's
his name?"
Wert:: "Who?"


Watchman: "Young man, do you in-
tend to kiss this poor innocent girl?"
Young man: "Oh, no!"
Waatchman: "Then hold this lantern."


Anna Reilly is so sure of herself she
does crossword puzzles with a pen.


A little girl was put in an upper berth
of a pullman for the first time. She kept
crying until her mother told her not to
be afraid, because God would watch over
her. "Mother, are you there?" "Yes."
"Father, are you there?" "Yes." A fellow
passenger lost all patience at this point
and shouted: "We are all here! Your
father and mother and brothers and sis-
ters and aunts and uncles and cousins.
All here! Now go to sleep." Pause, then
softly: "Mama!" "Yes." "Was that
God?"


A mountainer, who had been convicted
of being a quick trigger feudist was lan-
guishing in jail. His friends were trying
to get him a pardon, while the opposite
clan was pulling the strings against him
and spreading all sorts of slender about
him. Finally, moved to action he wrote:
"Deer Guvner, if you-all has heered all
I heered you-all heered, you-all has
heered a lie."


Jack: "Do you know at what age a
baby begins to think?"
Joe: "Certainly, mine began to think
I ought to walk the floor with it at night
the first week it was at home."


"How is that clock you won at the
fair?"
"Swell, it does an hour in less than
forty-five minutes."


.1r. Hackett: "Give me three proofs
the earth is round."
Bill Hollowell: "The book says so,
you say so, and ma says so."


JMinister: "And what does you moth-
er do for you when you have been a good
girl?"
ilary Ann: "She lets me stay home
from church."


Things have reached the point where
banks should have special doors for
patrons so they can come and go without
disturbing the busy bandits.







Mr. Seiler was giving the class some
advice on the benefits of physical train-
ing.
Said he: "Ten years ago I was a
walking monument to careless living, a
broken down, disgraceful appearing spec-
imen of humanity an all together worth-
less creature, to myself and to the com-
munity. What do you suppose has
brought this change in me?" He paused
for a moment to throw out his chest and
see the effect of his words. Then the
poor Frosh demanded: "What change?"


When the foreman stated the jury nas
unable to reach a verdict the judge said
he would have t .elve suppers sent in,
upon which the foreman said: "May it
please your honor, make it eleven suppers
and a bale of hay."


"Hey, Conductor," yelled the traveller
on the Panama Railroad, "That was my
station, why didn't you stop there?"
"We don't stop there any more," ex-
plained the conductor, "The engineer is
mad at the station agent."


She: "Would you leave home for
me?"
He: "I would leave a baseball game
in the ninth inning with the score tied
for you."

"I'm going to town with you this after-
noon, James," said the soldier's wife.
"I want to do a little shopping while the
bargains are still on."
"I understand your plans," responded
her husband. "The drive is to be followed
by a counter attack."


"Did you hear Miss Crooner's voice
on the radio last night?"
"Yes I listened very carefully."
"Do you think her voice ought to be
cultivated?"
"N. I think it should have been har-
vested years ago."


"Rufus, did you go to the lodge meet-
ing last night?"
"N.. sir, we had to postpone it. The
Grand All-Powerful Invincible Most
Supreme Unconquerable Potentate got
beat up by his wife."


Sufferer: "I have a terrible toothache,
could you suggest some kind of relief?"
Friend: "I had a toothache myself
last week and I went and my loving wife
kissed me and consoled me and in a few
minutes the pain was all gone. Why
don't you try the same sort of thing?"
Sufferer: "I think I will. Is your wife
home now?"


Dizzy Beers: Look me over, Dad,
nifty scenery. What? I'll say. Solomon
in all his glory was not arrayed like
this."
His Pop: "No I reckon not. Solomon
was a wise man."


Constituent: "Senator, you promised
me a job and now you say there are no
jobs."
Senator: "No, there are no jobs at
present but I think I can get you ap-
pointed to a commission to investigate
why there are no jobs."


Captain: "You are charged with being
drunk. Have you anything to say for
yourself?"
Sailor: "Sir, I have never been drunk
in my life, and never intend to be-it
always makes me feel so bad next morn-
ing."


Doctor: "That man owes me 200
dollars for services and he not only re-
fuses to pay but he doesn't even worry
over it."


Said the young questioner of the fami-
ly: "Dad, am I made of dust?"
Poor Pa: "You emphatically are not,
otherwise you would dry up sometimes."


Little Boy: "Mother, do cows and
bees go to heaven?"
.llother: "Why Sonny, what a strange
question! Why?"
Little Boy: "Because if they don't all
the milk and honey the preacher said
was up there is all canned goods and I'm
tired of all such things."


Raining cats and dogs is very bad in-
deed, but hailing street cars could be
disastrous.








In darkest Africa two natives watched
a leopard chasing a large fat man.
Said one, "Can you spot the winner?"
The reply came quickly, "The winner
is spotted."


Teacher: "If a man has more than
one wife it is called polygamy.
What is it called if you have but one
wife?"
Bohby lert:: "Monotony."



Lord Wiffleby, during his first visit to
the court cf King Louis XIV of France
had his close resemblance to the king
brought to his and the king's attention
by one of the ladies-in-waiting. The king
was very surprised at the likeness and
after remarking on the fact several times
asked Lord Wiffleby if his mother had
ever visited his father's court. Lord
Wifflebv immediately answered with
"No, but my father did."



Joe: What would you do if that good
looking salesman waited on you while you
were buying ui derwear?
Co-ed: 1 think I would have a fit.



Jack: Well, I see the ladies are finally
giving in.
John: Giving in-how?
Jack: Well, I saw a sign out in town
this afternoon that said, Ladie/ Ready-
to-W'ear Clothes!


Wife reading aloud from newspaper:
"Wealthy man leaves $500,000 to noman
who refused to marry him twenty years
ago.
HuI.qanid; That's what I'd call grati-
tude.


A man entered a hotel, placed his over-
coat on a rack and pinned a card to it on
which was written: "This overcoat be-
longs to a champion prizefighter. Back
in ten minutes."
When he returned the overcoat was
gone, but the card was still there. To it
had been added: "Overcoat taken by
champion long distance runner. Won't
be back at all."


.lr. Hackett: "And what happened in
1776?"
Frorh: "1776? I can't even remember
what happened last night."



.llr. V'inton: "Do you think paper
can be used to keep people warm".
Charlie Hiem: "I should say so. That
last report card I took home kept the
family hot for a week."



.lr. Hackett: "What were the last
words of Webster?"
Ifarren: "Zymotex, Zyrian, Zythem
and Zythepsary from the 1930 edition."



.llotoridl: I'm sorry I ran over your
hen. Would a dollar make it right?
Farmer: Well, better make it two. I
have a rooster that was mighty fond of
that hen and the shock might kill him,
too.


When you see a dog leading a man, you
know that that man is blind- but when
you see a man leading a dog, you know
that that man is leading a dog's life.


"Can you imagine it! I know of a
chorus girl who made a millionaire out of
a man she married in only a few months."
"Was he a poor man when she married
him?"
"No, he was a multi-millionaire!"



.71r,. Xewllwed: Have you any nice
slumps this morning?
Butcher: Slumps? What are they?
.7Jr,. Newl/!wed: I don't know, but
my husband used to talk about slumps
in the market, so I thought I'd try one.



Old Lady (on platform): Which plat-
form for the New York train?
Po rer: Turn to the left and you'll be
right.
Old Laadi: Don't be impertinent, my
man.
Porter: All right then, turn to your
right and you'll be left.







On a certain Sunday morning the pas-
tor of a Negro congregation noticed that
an old face had reappeared among his
flock, and after the sermon made it a
point to welcome the supposedly repent-
ant backslider.
"This is the first time I have seen you
at church for a long time," he said. "I'm
sho'ly glad to see you here."
"Ah done had to come," explained
Rastus. "Ah needs strengthening I'se
got a job white .ashin' a chicken coop an'
building' a fence around' a water-melon
patch."


Small Boe (bragging): My daddy is
traffic commissioner, and when he drives
his car he doesn't have to pay any atten-
tion to traffic rules.
His Friend: That's nc thing. My father
is a truck driver.


Customer: Have you a book called
"Man, the Master of Women?"
Hard-boiled Salesgirl: Fiction depart-
ment the other side, sir.



Race Track Gambler (to his friend who
has just lost his bankroll): Say, I know
a guy who puts everything he makes cn
the horses and yet he is never broke.
Friend: How can that be?
Race Track Gambler: He is a harness
manufacturer.


Raorutr: What yo' wukkin' at now?
lo.re: Ah is a blacksmith in a cafe-
teria.
Rafstu..: What yc' mean?
,louse: Ah shoos flies!


"Why is Mabel so angry? The pa-
pers gave a full account of her wedding."
"Yes, but they put in that Miss Ogle
was married to the well-known collector
of antiques."



Diner: "Have you any wild duck?"
WIailer: "No, sir, but we can take a
tame one and irritate it for you."


"You see that girl? She's just got
$200,000 for a short love story."
"Good heavens that's a lot of money
for a short story. Did she sell the cinema
rights?"
"No, she sold it to a jury."


The meaning of the word "collision"
was being explained by the teacher of the
class of small boys and girls.
"A collision," she said, "is when tvo
things come together unexpectedly."
Immediately a small boy jumped up
and said: "Please, teacher, we've had a
collision at our home."
"Whatever do you mean?"
"Well, mother's just had twins."



"Dad," said son, "do you think they
will ever find a substitute for gasoline?,'
"They have one now, son, and I wish
you'd give it a trial."
"Huh?" queried son incredulously.
"I've never heard of it. What is it any-
way?"
"Shoe leather," explained Dad.



Two students were uncertainly flivver-
ing their way home.
"Bill," says Henry, "I wancha be very
careful. Firs' thing ya know you'll have
us in a ditch."
"Me?" said Bill, astonished, "Why, I
thought you was driving."



He: I like your form.
She: Must we go all over that again?


Elderly Gentleman: (bewildered at elab-
orate wedding: "Are you the bride-
groom, young man?"
Wedding Guest: "No sir, I am not I
was eliminated in the semifinals.



"What's yon?" asked Donald, newly
arrived in Canada.
"That is a moose."
"Weel, if yon's a wee bit moose, show
me one of your old rats!"








Teacher: I'm surprised at you, Sam-
my Wicks, that you cannot tell me when
Columbus discovered America! What
does the chapter heading of the week's
lesson say?
Sammy: Columbus, 1492.
Teacher: Well, isn't that plain e-
nough? Did you ever see it before?
Sammy: Yes'm- but I always thought
it was his telephone number.


Jim: "Say, Mike, I heard you were
sick last week."
like; "Yes, I was, I had the new
disease called 'clothing sickness."'
Jilm "What on earth is that?"
like: "Well, I had a coat on my
tongue and my breath came in short
pants."


"What's this, honey?" said Mrs. Young-
bridge's husband as he speared a slab
from the dish.
"Lucifer cake, dear."
"I thought you said you were going
to make angel cake."
"I was, but it fell."



Doctor: "I would advise you, madam,
to take frequent baths, get plenty of
fresh air, and dress in cool gowns."
Patients' Husband (later): "What did
the doctor say?"
lli/e: "He said I ought to go to Palm
Beach, and then to the mountains. Also,
that I must get some new light gowns at
once.


"We don't care what you think: we
want to know what you know," shouted
the lawyer.
"Well, I may as well get off the stand
then," said the witness. "I can't talk
without thinking. I ain't no lawyer."



Willie: "Pa, does bigamy mean that
a man has one wife too many?"
Pa: "Not necessarily, son. A man
can have one wife too many and not be
a bigamist."
Jla: "Willie, you come upstairs with
me and I'll teach you to keep your mouth
shut!"


Projesor: I say, your tubular air
container has lost its rotundity.
Jlotorist: What--
Professor: The cylinder apparatus
which supports your vehicle is no longer
inflated.
.1dtorist.: But -
Profe.sor: The elastic fabric surround-
ing the circular frame whose successive
revolutions bear you onward in space has
not retained its pristine roundness.
Small Boy: Hey, mister, you got a
flat tire!


Policeman (to injured pedestrian):
"You say he didn't blow his horn, eh?
Are you a married man?"
"No, sir- this is the worst thing that
ever happened to me."




"Say Joe, what's the penalty for biga-
my?"
"Two mother-in-laws."



.M1other: "Come, Bobbie, don't be a
little savage, kiss the lady."
Bobbie: "N., she's a naughty lady.
If I kiss her she may give me a slap just
as she did papa."



First Gambler (at race track): "Say
do you know that Lady Godiva was the
greatest gambler who ever lived?"
Second Gambler: "What, that dame?
How come?"
First Gambler: "She put every thing
she had on a horse, didn't she?"



"Daddy said there was not another
woman in the world like you, Aunt Mar-
jorie."
"That was very flattering of him."
"Yes. He said it was a good thing,
too."



"He's always been a perfect gentleman
with me."
"Yes, he bores me, too."








"What was that doctor treating you
for, old top?"
"Well, from the size of his bills, I
should say a s ollen fortune."


Shopper: "Where can I get some silk
covering for my settee?"
Flour Walker: "Next aisle and to your
left for the lingerie department, lady."



Before you print a kiss on a girl's lips,
be sure she likes your type.


"What caused the explosion at your
house?"
"Powder on my coat sleeve."



"Why ain't you working carrying' these
bricks?"
"I ain't feeling well, I'm all a-tremble."
"Oh, are you, well then just get busy
with that sand sieve."



Laady (to tramp): Did you notice that
pile of wood?
Tramp: Yes'm, I seen it.
Lada/: You should mind your gram-
mar. You mean you saw it.
Tramp: No'm. You saw me see it,
but you haven't seen me saw it.



"Sam, do you solemnly swear to tell
the truth, and nothing but the truth?"
"Ah does, sir."
"Sam, what have you got to say for
yourself?"
"Well, Jedge, wif all dem limitations
you has jes put on me, Ah don't believe
Ah has anything at all to say."



The story has it that once upon a time
a man seeing a woman standing in a street
car with many bundles in her arms, got
up and offered her his seat.
The woman promptly fainted.
When she came to, she thanked the
man.
Then he fainted!


Waiter: "How did you find the steak
sir?"
Patron: "I looked under a mushroom
and there it was!"




"Rastus, ah sees de love light in yo'
eyes.
"Dat ain't love light honey. Ah's
hungry."


A mugwump is a bird that sits on the
fence with its mug on one side and its
wump on the other.



A colored messenger unceremoniously
invaded the private office of J. P. Mor-
gan, according to a current yarn.
"Do you know to whom you are talk-
ing?" the financier demanded.
"No, boss."
"I'm Morgan of J. P. Morgan & Co.,
sir.
"Does yo' knows who yo' is undress-
in'?" asked the trespasser.
"I neither know nor care," snapped the
money king.
"Well, I'se de coon ob Kuhn, Loeb &
Co."


Three blood transfusions were neces-
sary to save a lady patient's life at a hos-
pital. A brawny young Scotchman of-
fered his blood. The patient gave him
$50.00 for the first pint, $25.00 for the
second pint-but the third time she had
so much Scotch blood in her she only
thanked him.


Ima Dodo wonders why it is the stork
gets blamed for a lot of things that some
other bird is responsible for.



"There," said the plumber, laying out
his tools, "in spite of all the silly jokes
about us, we've not forgotten a single
thing. My mate's here with me, we've
not got to go back for anything and --"
"You've come to the wrong address,"
said the maid.








Some of the depression sufferers are
like the darkey who had been playing
poker.
He said: "Tell you, boys, I dun los' a
heap o' money las' night."
"How much, Mose?"
"A hundred and eighty-seben dollahs
an' fohteen cents."
"Gollv! dat wuz a heap o' money."
"Yas, siree, and de nust of it wuz, de,
fohteen cents wuz cash."



If''le: Darling, the new maid has
burned the bacon and eggs. Wouldn't you
be satisfied with a couple of kisses for
breakfast?
Hubb.: Sure. Bring her in.



His wife determined to cure him of his
bad ways and, with the aid of a sheet and
an electric torch, transformed herself into
a very fair imitation of a ghost. Then she
went to the drunkard and shook him.
"Whas that?" murmured the toper.
"Satan," came the reply in a sepulchral
tone.
"Shake hands, old horsh, I married
your sister."



A general and a colonel were walking
down the street. They met many pri-
vates, and each time the colonel would
salute he would mutter, "The same to
you.
The general's curiosity soon got the
better of him, and he asked:
"Why do you always say that?"
The colonel answered:
"I was once a private and I know what
they are thinking."



Head Clerk: I am very sorry to hear
of your partner's death. Would you like
me to take his place?
managerr: Very much, if you can get
the undertaker to arrange it.



The prim old lady was given the first
glass of beer she ever had. After sipping
it for a moment she looked up with a
puzzled air.
"How odd," she murmured. "It tastes
just like the medicine my husband has
been taking for the last twelve years."


Xurre: I think he's regaining con-
sciousness, doctor- he tried to blo.v the
foam off his medicine.



Fi'rr Sale.nan : My wife dreamt last
night that she was married to a million-
aire.
Second DiDtto: That's nothing, my wife
thinks that even in the daytime.



The editor in one of our neighboring
towns quite unintentionally hit upon a
novel scheme to increase circulation. lle
placed the following paragraph on the
front page of his weekly anesthetic:
"While returning to our residence late
one night last week, we noticed a certain
well-known citizen leaving the house of a
socially prominent lady whose husband
happened to be out of town. He was
leaving by the back door and in his hurry,
did not seem to recognize us. As the
gentleman is not a subscriber to the
IJeek/l Banner, we earnestly request that
he forward $6.00 at his earliest conven-
ience, so that he can keep abreast of the
times and take advantage of the excep-
tional offers made by our advertisers."
The next morning's mail brought 57
new subscribers.



"Don't you love driving on a moon-
light night like this?"
"Yeah, but I thought I'd wait till we
got further out in the country."



"What time do you get up in the sum-
mer.
"As soon as the first rays of sun come in
at my window."
"Splendid! Then you, too, like to go
out while the dew is still fresh on the
grass.
"No, not exactly. My room faces the
West."


He was rather shy, and after she had
thrown her arms around him for bringing
her a bouquet, he stood up and started
to leave.
"I'm sorry if I've offended you," she
said.
"No offense," he replied. "I'm going
for more flowers."








At a band concert in the Phillipines the
band was playing the "Merry Widow
Waltz."
A chinese turned to a compatriot and
asked, "How callum that piece music?"
The second replied, "Callum, "He
Dead, She Glad."



I cranka da car,
Bawt she won't run.
Theese automobile
She's a sawn of a gown.
Shea stop in da middle
Of da street ups town,
I took in da carburetor
Bawt shesa no drown.
I pusha da clutch,
Shaka da wheel,
Knocka da brake
Da horn, it I feel.
I look in da tank
Wot I see-yas
Sawn of a gawn
Shesa out a da gas.



Optician: Weak eyes, have you? Well
how many lines can you read on that
chart?
Patient: What chart?



As Shakespeare once said, "Bowlegs
may not be few, but they're far between "



A TOAST
Here's to you-
May God bless and keep you.
I wish I could afford to.



WIije: Honey, if I only had money,
I would never cease traveling.
Husband: How much do you need?



Said one Indian to another upon seeing
a white man riding a bicycle: "Heap lazy
paleface, runs sitting down."



When asked how he compiled his dic-
tionary the lexicographer remarked it was
like a quarrel with one's wife-one word
led to another.


Stern School Teacher: What is a relief
map?
School boy: My girl's face after look-
ing at yours all day.



Judge (in dentist chair): Do you
swear that you will pull the tooth, the
whole tooth, and nothing but the booth?



Daughter: But, daddy, why do you
object to my becoming engaged? Is it
because of my youth?
Daddy: Yes, he's hopeless.



"Can your girl keep a secret?"
"You said it. We were engaged 3 weeks
before she told me."



Storekeeper: Look here, young man.
I will show you what we consider the
real thing in men's hose.
Customer: The real thing doesn't come
come in men's hose.



He: I can't see what keeps the co'eds
from freezing.
She: You're not supposed to, mister!



"I bet you come from a burg where all
the hicks congregate at the post office for
their mail."
"What's a post office?"



Kind old man: "And do you kno '
why Santa didn't bring you a doll for
Christmas."
Doll faced Child: "Yes, damn it, I
trumped fathers ace in the Christmas eve
bridge game."



"Daddy, who was Hamlet?"
"Bring me the Bible, you young know-
nothing, and I will show you."













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IN APPRECIATION TO
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A gentleman from the middle west
tells us about a tin roof that was blown
off a country store and rolled into a com-
pact bundle. The owner having a sense
of humor wrapped it up with bailing wire
and sent it to Henry Ford. In due time
the answer arrived saving: "It will cost
you $8.50 to have your car repaired, but
for Heaven's sake tell us what hit it."







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x: x
Wishing the Graduates
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ELITE
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x 53 Front St. Colon, R. P.
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II NN.'XXX%,, X.;V,,XXXXNNXXXXXXXSXXSXNNN NXI




Full Text

PAGE 5

ForeworJ filS "record o f t h e acbnbes dUl'lI1g 19jj a nd 1 93-1, t h e Caribb ea n Staff of 1 93-1 pr ese nt s t o th e student b od.", th e f aculty, a nd th e ge ne r a l publi c thi s year 's Annu a l.

PAGE 6

TI-fE CARIBBEAN Vol. XVII CRI S TOBAC. CANA L ZONE 193, 1 No.1 PUBLISHED BY THE CRIST08AL HIGH SC H O O L E ditorial R ichard Rr:lnh olt! ]-/ O n e ofh :1l h ea l'S di scllss ion s o n h ow mu c h be t l eI' the \\'orl d pI' lodav is. It i $ p r o b a b iy o n e ('If the most -erroneolls o pin i o n s wh e n it i s a p pi i e d to r ecent g radu a tes fro m the in stitutio n s o f educat i on. I 11<1\'c man:\' a ti m e heard e ld e r p erSOilS say, I f I h a d th e o ppurtunity t o star! out i n the w odd a s V U LI n n w arL' what a w onde rful c h a n ce I h a \'c t o ga in Sliccess w i t h all the (l(kantagcs off e r e d The n I think t o m ysel f Jus t what a dvantages can h e b e t alking a b out? A t prese n t. t h e w orl d h as l ess t o o ffer t o a young pe rson tha n it has in the past. A fte r you are throu g h with sc h ool. it i s a n impossibi lit y t o get a job for so m::: little t im e t o com e. Som etimes i t i s m onths, sometimes t h e months r oii inio a year Evcn t hcn t here is n othing in Illa n y cases. I t i s s t n wge t h a t a student w h o grad u a tes at the head or c lass canno t fi nd a nythin g to do. E ve n afkl" t al { in g a p ostgradu a t e course, I {ceping up the hi g h standard s s h e i s u n al, i c ( 0 get so m ething tha t \\'i ll t;i vc hel" SOin c spen d ing m o ney of her own I im a,;ine that a t t imes s h e gets rather d i sg usted a n d t h en \\'o nders w h v she worked S f > h a l d i n h ei' s:-11001 vcar s w h e n s h e COL Ie! ha\'c Ind a muc h 'lx:ttcr ti m e if s h:.! Iud no t worked so d i l ig<:::ntly. \ colleg c i s IHl\\' b ... a drcam to the ()l'(.Iiwl ry high scho;)1 graduatc. C:1Il it ,\'0\.111::; r..:rS')!l w h o 11'1<; had h is eye on som cthin:; hI: \\'<\'5 SU"C to ohtdin a n d t hen sudd..:nl" i t STl'l tclH:d
PAGE 7

. I ------DeJicalion I E ( hc C lass of 1 9.')J d e d i cate ( hIS. l 1 the se\cn(ccn t h \ o luill e 0 1 "Th e I V Callhbea n I t o O U I ac h I S U I w h ose help ful ach Ice :ln d u llcc
PAGE 8

E'ditor d f r/. F.di/or Btl,rtl/c, M .lIonager /I,r,r!. 131M/lieu .lIana,qer d ,r,rl. BIt,r/llc,r.r .IlanG.ger I ,r,d. B/l.I'/lIe.r,i .!Jal/agel' Cir c ulnli uJI .J/ollag e r L '!.r,,,I. Circ .da/ioll lI allag e r i'lr.rt. Circulali&1I .llalla. g el' L /r,rI. C;,eulal/c.ll I lalla. g e l' !.;I erm:/I Edilor -/.r.rI. 1 ,/le n":I/ Edile r / / ,1', -/, /' er(ll:lj /:.{fil v r ,.-/.'-.1'/. "til'I'm:l! Edilc r dr,r/. ,"teraf:l/ / !r/ Editor !3("Ij.r' Spc..r/ Edliol' d,r,rI. /3o .'/,: Sperl G'/"rlr ..)" pod "'" dilor Girl,f' Spo r! !';dilor S c hool \ 'ole"r J oke ""d d o,. ./ oke Fd il(it' CA R IBBEAN S TAFF RICII.\IW R E INIIOLD JOHN PAUl \VILLlAN STONE HENRY SANCHEZ JULIO D O I\\lNGU EZ J Ai'IES 0.-\ Y S ELIZABETH HAYES RuTH \VIK INGSTAD \\'ILLlA.\\ HILL ROBERT REPPA BETTY STETLER ANNA REILLY KATHLEEN G OODENOUC H ,'\.\nCARET HOLLINGSHEAD KATHLEE N PHILIPS ERNES T \\'0::)0 FRA:-.1K \VASHABAUGII ROBERT NEELY BrYEllLEY I'L\IKUSE lARGARET BAIlNAIlD ROBEIH J l o L'rEN JOHN O'NEIL

PAGE 9

C. H S. FACULTY O u r facti!!\, this v eal' i s o n e of the b es t evcr. j \ l os t the t 'eac hcrs arc oid-timers. and they're s till ke e pin g up good record s. The n e w tcach c l 's han' made a good b:?ginning al so. j\\r. Franks o u r p opular etH el effic i en t principal. inaugurat e d se\ e rai n cw, prog r ess ive movem ents alon g with the !lew sc hool. Our Student Ac:.sociation was o n e H e has ably s uperint ende d ali act i \' ities and classes. and take n p a rt in the sport s. The Soph o m o r e s s p 0l1S0r, and t CHc her of hi s t o ry. ) \11'. R C. H a c k e tt i s k eeping up hi s reputation [ 0 1 g ivin g h n m c w oric He's a good tcacher. t h o u g h a n d m a n y stud ents reluctantl v admit that h e "kno \\' s hi s stuff." Unde r l\hs. Phylli s S p e n ce;' and j\\iss j"al',v E. )\1001'1: the la n g u ages, Spani s h, Fl 'e n c h and Latin. al'e prosperin g. Bes ides the regular l'Outine. I\\rS Spence r s p o n so r s the ,lIni ,IJ'-Se n i o r Dramatic C lu b. the Effe I\ube 1"lub, the Nation a l Thespians the Spani s h C iub. and t h e Liga Paname ri ca n a. ,\\iss ,\\oore has s p o nsOlin g a muc h improved "Trade \Vind," al s o. T h e witty math e matics professor, \11'. j\\eyer. i s s till with u s. T a kin g car e of ( h e j \ lath classes doesn't see m too m u c h work eith(;::r. H e s alst) the s p o n so ] o f the Freshma n cia ss and the Caribbean. j\h. ) \ lille l i s new this v ear. but h e has ce rtain Iv made a h it \\ : ith b oth sexes. The admire hi s athletic abilitv. and the' g irl s hi s g ) 'ea l p f'I'so n al c han;l. H e h elps j \1],. Vinton t e a c h sc i e n ce and ,\\1'. ,\\eyer teach math e m<>.ti es. The H o u se h ol d A rt s Depart m e n t and the C,lfeteria p rospe l 'ed unc le. the h a nd s of ,\ 1 is s Fern e B owman. S h e re placed .\ti ss l\nderson, w h o surpl'i se d everyone by getting married i as t summe r. L et's h o p e \1iss B o wm a n doesn't. \Ve need h e r I lfr e. j 'lr. K \V Vinto n i s directin g the S c i e n ce D e partme n t. w hi c h io b e d o in::, very w ell. a s the r e have b ee n n o ex plosions as yet. H e also dil'eds atllleti cs and has d o n e n o m ea n p a rt i n arousin g a good schoo l spil it. The Eng-lis h Section has b eco m e more interesting this year under Lit e r a nd ,\\iss Bro wn. \ liss Lit e r i s n c w, but s ht.:' s certainly m a d e a "hit, in s pit e ()f cont racts, The fir s l and second veal' En:rl;s h ciasses, and the I ,ibra r v ;He 1'1)1' b y ,\liss Bro wn, a quid and capabic teacher. 1\\iS5 Patterson i s tll r nin g so m e s napp y this year. \II that ai ml es" cl i c kin g h ea rd ups t a irs a t t h e fir s t of the year has developed int o rhythmi c typing, thanks (0 ,\liss Pait et'so n' s patienf instl'llc t i on. \\'e I'we the Art work in t h e Caribhean to ) \ ll's. j \ l c D m ald's talented pupils. It's a s u r p r ise tIl dis..:o\ 'cr WC' Sl) muc h t;den t in our b ut w e ca n dep e nd lin [\\Jos. to lU' in!l' it nut. One of the p opular o f/cred i s mus ic, unde r j\\iss Elne r 's gifted h a nd s. She h a s certainly done gre
PAGE 10

6

PAGE 13

. \(lJ/lC-F!tI"I'; / \\'I"llllIIU:11. / I t /.,' ,,'to .c",' hilll '1 .... ('<.1'<)11 ... ; 1 1 .. Ni,/h,,/lIt't' C . ttm, C. % I'""illl" S"iIIlUlin,;;. ".1'/11 .. ,"''-", Lcl m c l"\1'1.1in I."iili t '.c-eL ..... Pro.: iri.::-n: 4. S! laicn t : \ ...... o(-I. lli,,11 P I'c,i ( k' n l 4 : D d : i llg Cilli. p,c id c n l 4: \L.dl CIllh S{ ert:: t{lryTre .... l1rel" 4 : :\, li<'I1.d 3 ; \ ';c\.'pl'c i den t 4 ; S"lmming I. 1'(,11111" :!; :\CpltiIl C Cluh I ; C l lIh I. 2.:>.4: B .. \ \ 1,2.3: r Ulll l ,lill!,: .'i. 4 : C l ul ,), 4; I.ig . P.III"I OIN; I,ln,l 4 Fife i'\ u l)l.' I'iul. I.:!; !)r,l m,l : i .. e lu!> :-;.4; O n 1)(: ... 11'.1 I. 2. 3; Cleo.:: Club I. 2 . "i. 4: "H("II 0 1 Hc;tlljol..i ..... I : '"C..l ... :!: '"Iloi Cnl'.'" .); '"O lle T h illg ,\lIN \110:1 1 -cr" 3: '"11.1['1'.'" 4 : '" I hl"e,lli of Dc liIlY_" 4 \,/,,/,, [)(11!11111\ .\\lFIII 1<,uI" . 1., ,,'t" II<' "COl:' Nil Ih,,1 ,,( C
PAGE 14

,\'al/l..-Ios O O ,\\lNAOI)II B \ZAN, I ,,t Nt him "A mi ; lble Birth "/
PAGE 15

It: 1'\1:-'E Btl .... ./.f n'c' JU Ii.:r "Ch"rming:' B id"plaCt' -Cri ... tolMI. C. Z <,\'I)I'r',.-,r/rNl -':\][ right. IIOII'!" / d i,ili.:,r Bel l ... of BCllu; o ini ... I : V o lle\' L r ,l! I .J: Tenni s I. 2, 3: BOlding I, 3, .J: Effe 'Kube Klul ) 1. 2: Cluh.'5. .J: CI.,,>'j T reasurer I, 2.3: Student Coulll'il 4 ; Se cre!ar\' Student A!>'Sociali o n .J: Schoo l :\'ote ... lor -I: Trade Wind S t ; IH -I: "Thread of D e .. tiIlY" 04 \'arllt-STEI.I, I \'. Bones. I.r n'<'.r<'( h,.,.-"(:rilcc fuL lJidhpltlu-l\nc oll, C Z d,rlifllo'-D,tll c ing a nd Il)lI ... i c. l 'iI.'{wil .. exprt'.r.riIJI/"llotcha!" "Ob. Loy!" .1.'li"ili(.f'BcJl ... of Beau;obi ... J ; Elle I{ubc Klult I ? S lipper CluJ.,!, 2 : Y ellow Tidl.et s 2; G l ee C l ub 1.2. 3; Ra"lk e t h,d! ),2.3, -I: V olley bal l I 3,4: Dnlln.tlic Clll J 3,04 : Sp: tni s h C l u J .J: P re s ident o f O G.:\. -I: T e n ni"l 1,2,3, -I; Van,ity C lub 2. 3 -l; Trade Wind Sl r.n -l; Carni"al I. .J: "Thread of D estiny" 4 X ,III/(. l l 'U) 13 I< [!)G ET . / r ,,'c' ,fa hu-" P etite Bid"plllu-Coronado, C a l il'orni:, P,uJillll'-Sque;;king dOlI II the h a ll. .. \'pru.r/IJ,,-'\\' hnl e-.:cu ... e s hall I g i \ 'e?" \"nllC O I I'\1 O F IRIiORN C I '\PIWLI. I,r ,,'{' .rt'<' Itim D epE'ndable. Ihrlhplau Coopers t o \\ n, l\'C\\ 'orl,. (/,rfinlt! -Reading : tnd lenni .... Fn "IJI'ilo!
PAGE 16

StlllI/' \nNF' 1)\\'1<'; . I.r ... ,fl!( lur"Chccrful" lJidhplrll"(--Aneon, C Z Pa,rfillllD a rwing. Fa.'oriit: don't I ,die\' e it." Idi'ifiu-Glee Club I. 2, I : n c Kuhe KIIII) 2: SU!'I'C I Club I 2,3. -I; O C A \,i, c-l'l"co.:idenl -I; 1)":lnlal i c Cluh -I; "Bell..; of B e: nri ol..i ,'" 1 : Volley Iall I : Tl' :lIl e \\,ind SI:df -I: '"T !rrc:.d of D c,! i .y'" -I. Same Ell FF" RITA DONO\'\ . 1 h'e .ra h .. .. Poised' lJirlhI'J .U'I: Cri sto!':.1. C Z P a.rlim.: nc;\ding. .. ,\'prrr.rio/l "J-!o\\, I know'! I di"ilirr Suppc, Club S -I: V olley I,;,]! 3. -I: 1) .. : ,n1:l:iC" Club -I; 0 G A -I; L a P a -I {\0.;11 1'0'>; E 'l)o,>; . I.r ,,'r .r .... him-":\!ert." lJirtltpJa("<' C .. io.:toh;,1. C 7 P f rll"'<'.l\la
PAGE 17

\ ,,/1/ ,' GFOH(:E F I'!{-": \ :,\'01/. /.r,,'e .r,,: 1'111; "\\'d l tll,lllll('rl'II' Birr/",I.ltt' C o loll. I { e ll fli P,H'.lI11,1 .. ,\',II-".r.,11i1 "1)11"" I,t' .illy." /di'i I .... ll ,.,!1 4. T<:l1l1i" -I. B"" I cl I . dl 4 ,"""", -,\ """1' \"!nO"K\ (:111 .... /1" . 1 " . .(.',' II,., Cnnl(,r\. U '/th,da,,. C o l o n. J{(.p . 1 P :llldtlld. /-"'I,nlt ".\'1"'.\( ,'1011 "S.I,\.IIIH'!" / '",r/,,,,,,-Sllillllllin g ,Hili nUll il,,, . ld/"ilil:' CrlccClul,r ,:!:C \ .\.r,2,3:Erte l\ul>:'I":JuJ, r 2; f r.,Sr. D r;Hll,dil Crill, .1, 4 : ;\':llion:.1 Thc"pi: Hl" 3, -I: 4 : 11 0 1 C opy' .J: "'TII"<:',Id 01 4 ; SIIPPl'I' CI IiI r :!, ,1. t Y"",., 11-1t!\\I\ 1f Gill/I' / .r,,',.'(""/II ',\mil,lld.: U'III"d,I ... Col o n. t P.il l.lIn, .. I ,i/l,.,,.ih ('I'pler.r /:II; "I'll t ,;h: ,""1" ;,,.:0 -G!('c Clul, r, :!. ,): I I."H I ,1: C ;'I' ibl'(':I!l St.d r .1: Carlli",'! I. 4 CIIII I.:! .l. -I: Li!;.l P :lll,ltllf'ri(";lIla .3. 4 : "1)( ,11, n l I : "Ilot Copy" 3; "linppy L", dill G "-I: Ftll-1\lul, r.:!; I)r,IIl) ;,li(' C l ul. ,1, 4 ; .\ilddil' \ ,.,(wi.ll i o n J. :!, ,); "C.lo.:"cd" I : ,\Llth Chd, 4; C IIII. 4 : C,l"ni, ; 1 CC'llIrnitlee 4 . Y""/I"-\'lIlGI"j\ ,\1\) 11\,,,\. /.r ,,'t' ,ra lu-,---' Xolldlnt..llt.' /)i""I'/""" Rickl an,1. ,\\.Iine I' "r!im,' m ,,, ie ... F l1'orlll: ,..rp,. ... r ... ;v" "\\'1.'11. 110 I'll t. "11 Y"" II \\.1' liI,e I I

PAGE 18

. \'/IIIt'-OI-L"S ELIZAIH.TIt H .\\ /.1 U't' .r .... h"",' ... -"Popular.' Birlhplact' Cri s tob.,tl. C. Z. P(I.rlilll("-Spor i s ,tIld dancing. .. .rpr .. ,ui o/l\\' hat'!-!\ot nc cess ari l y!" .-Idi,iJiuSll p per C l u b I. 2. 3, I ; E ffc J\ube J\luL I 2; Glee C lu b 2 : ; \thleti c A ssociation I. 2. 3; T rea sUl-el I ; Secretar y 3; Varsity C lu b 2, 3. 4; 2.3: P.-es ide nt 4 ; C l a ss I 2, 3; Or: tln at i c Clu h :), 4 : L;'I P a s 2. 3. 4 ; Secret.t.-y 4: C,Il -ibbean S iaff 3. 4 : of Beau jo lai s t ; Carni," ,!! Com mittee -'; Volle y b;'ll l 1,2,3. -': B a s ket ball I 2, 3,4 : B a s e b all I. 2, 3 : I. 3, -': A O T C illb 3: Bow l ing I 2. 3. 4 \'tlmc.'-j\ \ARY V'RG I NIA HEARNE. I J ,,'" .r ..... Iler--"Original." BirJh p / t/ct'Co ) o n Rep of P(I.fJimt'-l\laking p un s. /-'(/"11",1 .. t.'xprt'r.riol/ \\'e ll. n ow ilf te.-.lil!" .h-li.ili .... --G l ee Club I. 2: B ells of I3cau;obis I : H:ube J\lub l. 2; Pre s i dent 2: Supper C lu b I 2. 4 ; L a P a s 4 : Trade Wind Staff 4 : O ra m.:dic C lub Prc<;i denl 4: Cnrib bean S taff 4 : "Thre n d of D e 3 tillY" 4 \ 'amc'-SItIRtEY I \NE Hltt. /.r .. .fa ht'I'--"Sweet.' Birlhp/au-Ada. Ohi o. PMlime-'Billy." I-i ,, 'oril .. t',\pf"l'r riOlI-'Naughtyl N:III.\!:hly!' \"'IIIU .\\AXlt\E A Hon.', \N_ IJirlhp/IIN P ; .in es\'ill e. Oh io. I r ...... r(1' Iter "Affectionate." l 'II1'fJrilc 'xprc.r.r l oll 0 0 yOIl kllOw w h .t'! Oanc ing. Idi"ilia Dram [ .ti c Clull .t ; J(uk 1-;:1111 1 I. 2 : 1 \lbIcti e Club I. 2 .t : Supper C luh I. 2, .t : Sp lli.,1. CllIl, -'; Glee C lub 3; Tr::.d e \\'ind -I 1 2

PAGE 19

Snme\'lCTORI \ ,'L\y J-IOIIO\\EU, I r ,,'C ,rct' 8irthpltla-}\ I\("on, C Z FII,'m'lle e,\'II'e.f.rioll"\\'eIL I 'll -!" .kli, ilier B"sclw ll I 2. 3: HOI,lin g I 2. 3, 4 : S u p per C i llb I : rr"de Wind Sbff 1 ; C lu" J unior-Scniol' Dr:101: ,ti c C llih 3 "L Sl1mt'-\\-ILLI \ \1 IR\'l:""'; 1-101 LOWELl .. h we "ra him Un co n trollable,," B irlhplt/{'"(' \ 'lcon. C Z P,ulimr-S\\ im ming. ... lpre.rn"O/l-Fl, ny, huh?" .leli'''iliu Swimmins !. 2 ; SOCC( 1. 4 ; B !\. A. I 2.3 ; Orc hc<:.tr:' 2. 3; A. O T 3; D eI';lte Club 2 ; Tenni s 4 : B asketball 4 ; T r; ch: 3. 4 S,/ll/e-ETllFL Hl':-:TOO::" I.r ,,'C .ra hrl""Blu .. habl c,," Birlhplaa--,\ m oll, C. Z h o mework" ,:,,".JI"ile e.\1ue.rri",, D o I!" I di"ilier -Effe I'llhe "Iuh 2 ; Suppe r Cluh I 2. 3: J uni orSenior D ra m a ii c Club 3: O G / \ 4 ; Spani s h C lu b 3 \-,Jme-G ORDO:-: Ht'TCl ll:-;<;, J R /J ,,'f .r(!(! him -"S("h o larl :,"'" and tennis. 8irlhpi'l'ceCl'i-;tobd. C. Z F(II'orile expl"eJ.r;oll' Shot Sho!" Idi,}iliu-Dehatc Club 4 : ,\\athcm a ti("s C lub 4 ; Senior C a rni va l Committee 4 1 3

PAGE 20

E I A.\\. .I.r ,,'r. ,ree hu--" Tranquit." IJiri/'plact:--Colon. of P aflam.1. PrI.rlimr.-Reading :wd typing. FIJI'.nlle e.\{>rr.,r,rion" I don't know." Idi,ifiuG lee Cl ub 2; O G A Club -l: C ; lfil,l.e:111 Staff 4 LOl[" E I.E \ el!. I,r h'': ,ru; h er-"Unaffccied." Birthplacr. Bo."t on, \ ass. P n.rlilll('"Orawing tenni s. Fa.'oril(' e.rpre.r,ri",, -"Oh. it i." 1I0t!" kli"I"tie.r -Effc K u b c Kllll, J ; Athletic h."Oliollion: I.a P : I S 3. -l; n G A CI.d -'; B mding -l; T e nni ... -l: ,ht Editor of Tr: ,d e \ \'ind -' . \'(IIIIe-G n '\:-
PAGE 21

1 .1':\\1 I,f ,,'I! lin' D r,'nl., l i "." li'rlhpla,'t-.\ ncon, C 1.. 1',/,',.,.11 .. ('.\'",<,r,r/III/ "\rlm'/ ./cii'ii' .. r-Elfe K ullc 1\lul. 1' ... .',,"111'('1" J : Rc,,,I[" J : G lee crill I : "Bell" of 11(',' II;o l"i,," I : \ ...... 1'. Cidlioll ."; \l.llh Chll, 4 ; Tr." I .. .' \\'il1d SI,1l J 1 : I 01 Pol'" 4 . \',/1//1' GUlitil \ \(:11111.\\ 11"7\;1'\ I,r ,,',' .ree 1I(.,,-'Si'H .crL' Ihrlll,dl1l'" Al1e'l lI, C 7., I' ,"',II/e \\rilillg .Inti uili.I11c!:C, ,",I,',,,'t.: ,x/N,"i,. I "\\'dl "" II ti" 'tHI lili:d;!" \',1111<' JO!lX F,II .... LI" \ \ I .... 'd'\ . 1 ,,'t' ,re,' lIi'lI .. T e ..... ,,!"c .. Uidh"Ii/{"
PAGE 22

Snmt'-ROBEnT I'\OLTEN. A t .j't' JU J,'m--'Orol l Bir/hp/nrc--F loli na. Plu/lmt':-Fis hing fn"orilt' /di"iliuJ o k e Fnitor of Carih h c n n Sldff 4. Tl :,d. 4: "Thread of De,>tiny" -I. Snlllt'-EoNA j \I....-A .'l .'ELI .t::R. A J wt' Jt'C hu-"Flirt nt i o u s. Birlhpln a -Wes t er J eig h S t a t en I s land, N Y Pn.rl'mt'-T alking with D orothy R oos. FOl l()r i lt' t'.rprt'uioll" J ust H m i n ute!" .-fell i'iliu-Super Cluh I 2, 3, 4 : Effe I,uhe ].;;[lIb I. G l ee Clli h 2. 3: Orchestr:oALI .. AJ wt' .ft't' ht'r-"Queenly." Birlhp/aa-Athens. P a. Pn.rlime -Dancing. FtrI'lJrilt'-e.TpruJiol1 Don't be s illy!" Acli"ifiuSu per Club I 2, 3; R ells of B e.1ujo l:li!>" I ; G lee C lub I : Dramatic Cluh 4 : O G 1 \ 4 1 6

PAGE 23

X ,lIllC RlLJt,\Htl \ \EL\tLU= Rt::I"lltOt D . J,.-,,'C .ra hilll Effi c i e n!. /) irlhp/(/I"C A ncon, C Z Jnrl/mc E xtr; l ("llrri cula!" 1 ct i \ ities . /rfif '(!;c.r E ffe 1\1ub !. 2 ; Vicep r es ide n t r : R ed L a mp" J ; Cbss P!"esidcnt 2, 3 ; C:tribbeall Staff !. 2. 3: Editor-i n-chief -I; ,\\:tth C l u b -I; Sp:tn i s h C l u b 2, 3 -I; P t m ltn eric'IIl.1 3. -I; T r ade \\' ind Editol' 3 : C"1'l1i\"al C omrnilt(,c -I; O cl);lt e C lub -I . \/llIIt J I ";,,t{y E S \xCtt EZ . 1 ,r"c. r .... l/i",-\\ illi ng." n;rlhplo("{ C o l o n. R e p o f P:tlla m a. and rC.1
PAGE 24

,\'/lIl/C -CII,\I{LlcS SC,\INI';H SOl'TII, ,/.; "'C ,ra Illm Easy going." Blrlhpf,lre -Phil .. dclphin, Pa, Pa,r/l:lle -\\';\tchin g C lubhollsc show s Fa,'/J/'Ilc C \'pl'c,r,rlvI/ "\\'hassa malta yOII?" ,lcli"/Ilc r -Effc l\l1ue I\tub I. 2: Sp; n ish 01111 3, -4: "G"ssed" 2: Assemilly Committec 4 ; I;IPPY L :llld, ings 4; "Thread of Destiny" 4 ,\'amc-I3I';TT\' ANN STEI'LI::I{. ,h ,,'C""CC hCI'"\\,itty." R ep. of P a n :IOM, Pa,tlllllc-Sports and d a ncing, lcll"lllu-Vol lcy b 11. Basket ba ll. and l3owli1l5 I 2, 3, 4 ; Ba seball J. 2, 3: T e nni s 3,4: Golf2: Vill'si t y C luu 2, ,), 4 : C I ",.s Se c retar." 3: Effe i(ube 1\lu\" I 2; 01'<1' malic Clu\" ,3, 4: Secretary 4; Glee Club I: Supper C lu\" I, 2, ,), -I: President 4: L .. PaS 3, 4: Carni\'al Committee Chairman 4 : Stud e nt Council 4: A. 0 T. Club, .\'(/II/ e \\'u LJ \ ,\\ FluNels 5'1'0:-:1-:, 1.1 w e .rce him-"FltlC'1IC" Blrthplace Allenn, C Z. P'1.flimc -Golfing. Ffl"orile cxprcuivlI" !'11 bet yon!" .ldiiitie.r -Carni\'1 1 I : l\tlllelic I 2, 3: 01" ches tr;1 1,3: nand 3; Basc\xtll 3, 4: V,lr s it," CllIh-l; L a Pas -I: Math C luh Pre s ident 4 ; Dranwtic Club 3, 4 ; E ffc Kube 1\11111 I 2: Nation ,1i T h e spians 3. 4: C;Lribl,en n Stall' Bu siness ,\\an'Lgcl -I: "On c Thing Aftcr Anolhcr" ,); I l app,\' 3 .raJllc I II S\\'\'\! . I r w c ,rcc JlLor -""ttl';t("ti\ c n/d/',!/(/{'c-llollululll,I I ,I\\;, ii !Jfl.r l '/I/c-R idin g FOl'l I)IICI"II1:111 1.0at .... F ll,,'rllc (Wprc.r,r l{}11 ""rtcr' all!" k l l l,ll/c,r /ullior 'Scnior C l ull -I; "Tltre'L\1 <11' D c ... till,\''' .1. 1 8

PAGE 25

.\"'/JIII' R OlltR1' I \\'E Wn:, I,r ,,'e. JU /'im -"N;l utic;JI," I Jillhp/ac<: ,\ncon, C. Z /'flr/i',uS:liling ( ',l'f,r,.,r.r;"tI-"Shi\e/ me l i ml .crs!', .\"rllllt' -SIII"l' F \\'IIAlno:\'. ,/.r h'l' ,ra !Ji/ll R e servcd, BirlhplaC<' DOllg:l a,>,. \rizon.1. I'/I,r/lmi'-B o . ting . /tfl,//,, ( rooth .. .!1 2: Swimm i n g 3; '\;-tn ;Jger T ra c k TC;lln ol; Ba ... lletDalJ ol; ,'\, .thcmatics C lul 4 ; Debate crul ) ol; Scie n ce C l ull ol . \'IIf1/(' -\\'1I11 \ ,'1 R A Y \\'flEEI FR, 1 ,,',' .ra hi/JI Viril e I Jirlhp/fll'o' \ llCOll, C. Z, /'II,rlilll<' I ,Q\'ing Shir ley, 1 '/1""r lle l"'l"v,r.r;,III'AO, re.11I y ,kli"iliuC ;!rll;, .. 1 I : F re s h m ln AthletiC' Direc t o r I ; Athletic ,h ... ociation 1,2.:;: Treasurer 3 : Swimming I : Efre I\ubc l';:luh 1.2: Soccer 2,3, ol: B a ... e b;;d l 2, 3, 4 : Baskethall 2,3,4 : "/3ells of Be a ujol a is" I ; CoIf 2 : T raei. ,3. 4 : V ; l r ... ;t." Cluh 2, 3, 4 : P re<;;dent 4 \'(/meLOll<,t : I \\'HII)OE:\', I,r "'t' ,ree IUI'-"Cood natured, Bidhp(auP ,dlnetlo, Flori da I ;/,'o,.;k j'rpre,.,r/Oll,' ,'layhe, l 'II, r f/fIIl' .'10torcycle riding, let/"ilier-Supper Club I 2, 3. 4 ; Happ y L a ndings" 4 ; T itre,.t! 01 4; Dr"m a ti c Club 4 1 9

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X llme-E l)rso:s-\\'ALTI-: H \\'trnz. l.r 'I'C .rc,,' him-'Athlctie." C. Z Pa,rlillil-Looking f o r so m ething 1 0 rio! F,l"ur ile e.\"pl"e,r.ri,1II' / d on't k n o w l cli"ilie,r--Athl e t i e A ssoc i;"lti oll I 2; A O T Cluh 3: 3. -I: B;"lseL a l12, S -I; V, l r s i t y 3. -I. Xame-Ar.E]M>10t{O L. \\'ON" h lI'e ,ree h i m -"Goo d n :dun: d Birfhp/!:("e-C o l oll. Rep. of P ;Lrlalll;"l, Pfulilllc-R e;"ldiL11;. F m'urilc c \.orcr,r;:J/I' S ul'c!' hii" iliaO r c heslr; 1 2: G l e(' L a Pas::!, 3. -I: l .i g. 1 3. -I . \'/111/(-;\1.1(' [LA I N I': \\'OOD, I lI'e .rtc fJirlhp/o("("-CIio::l o L a l C. Z Pn.r,'imeR cild in g. /':'L'O,.;t,. c.\',,, ('r.ri o ll "\\,h:,1 do yuu I hi n l
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C LASS HISTORY II T h e sailo l 's of th e S. S. Class of '3-1, ha\ in!! on fro m man y States of t h e a s well as t h e Can:l.i 70l1e proycd tn he th e most wndh y C I'CW that had c,'<:r sc i o u t on t h e OCC.ll1 nrc. H S. [,'om P o d Fr<.:shman. \\lith CClptains Spencer Had,eli as \\' I..'il [I S F, 'sl ,'blc Barnelt at t h e helm. this Cirl<;g t:xhihikd PCI)
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COLIN CAj\IPBELL, hi s unique ha ha t o R a lph Dav i s J UDY BRIDGET, h e r E c u a d o r i a n sanda l s to Aile e n O C onne ll. FRED EBDON, his int ent expressio n t o Jack L o n g. NOR"I A DAVI S a n d HELEN LEACH. t h e ir .. O l d Cris t obalishne s s t o O lga R oe. GEORGE FERNANDEZ. hi s abi lity t o d i ssect insects t o E l ea n o r Mullan e. VIOLET RANDALL a n d EILEEN DONOVAN, th eir int e l'cst in c0l11merci a l subj ects t o Blossom En s min g e r JERRY GORIN. his jit n e yse n ice t o I l alcolm Ducy_ RUTH EGOLF, h e r s u p c n i s i o n o f th e G a tun Bu s t o Anni e L a uri e Turbe r v ill e ANNE G I BSON, h e r f a m olls sun-burn t o j \ \ a r g ar e t Barnard. BILLY HOLLOWELL. hi s f o n d n e s s f o r Miss Lit er t o Ala n J aq u es VIRGINIA HANNA. h e r p e f e r e nc e f o r Freshm e n t o J ohn O'N eil. CARLTON HORINE and G RANT LEJ\1/\10N, t h eir sc i e ntifi c t o Th eod o r e Alb r itt o n ELIZABETH HAYES, h e r appe tit e t o Lillian J'1arden. GORDON HUTCHINS. hi s prec i s i o n to Lloyd A l b e r ga. j'1ARY HEARNE a n d MARGUERITE W INN, the i r bl o nd e a nd empty h eads t o An n a R e ill y DAVID LEVY hi s fidd l e t o J ohn Palm. J O H N a nd G L ORIA j \ I ANNI X t h e ir ambitio u s natur e to C l aud e B e rger. SHIRLEY H I LL a n d BEVERLEY MARCUSE, their dinne r p arties t o Miria m Swa m. ROBERT MOLTEN. hi s draw l t o ,\ja r y Ruth R e i d e l!. MAXINE HOFF, \ IAN, h e r f a ir y lik e n ess t o Bill Elli o t. RICHARD REIN HOLD. hi s enthus i as m f o r b a nquet s t o Edgar B O I d e n V I CTORI A H OLLOWELL. h e r wav v l oc k s t o R o b e rt Neel y HENRY SANCHEZ a nd A L E J A N DRO \VONG, th eir ge ntl e manl y m anne r s t o \Villi a m D o ugh e rty. E T H E L H UNTOON. he<' ind i v iduali s m t o P aul Gregory. WARREN S LOCUj \1. his th o u g htful w ink t o B ill y B ee r s. BLOSS O I LAM. h e r H o u se h old A r t s tra inin g t o Alice M acSpc'll'rc n 2 2 C HARLES SO UTH. h i s j o b a t the movies to Da\'id j\\al's h a ll. JEANNE LE\ V I S, h e r n ose f o r n e w s t o E l ncst Jar ami llo B I LL Y STONE, hi s w hit e tu x e do t o J ames Rcynal'd os EDNA \ WELLER, h e r m asca r a t o Ruth \Vi ckingst a d. FRAN K WASHABAU G H. hi s c o n t<'tgi o u s l a u g h t o j \ l a x S ande r s. RUTH PICKETT. h e r j o b as a ssembly pia ni s t t o J a c k E gosc u e. ROBERT WERTZ h i s fondn ess for sa ilb oa t s t o \Villi am \Virtz. DOROTHY ROOS. h e r wad o f c h ew ing g um t o J a n e H untoon SIDNEY WHARTON h i s j o b as s t o r e k eeper in th e C h e mi stry L a b t o R o b e d Kin g. MARGUERITE S E I RLIc R. h e r eg al p h o togr a p h [ o r t h e Caribb ea n t o R ert A se n s i o. RA Y \VI [EELER h i s b lase ex pr ess i o n t o George P ocle. BETTY STETLER, h e r job as sc h oo l r e p orte r t o I
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C L ASS PROPHEC Y r<'II' r orl..: C ihl, O r / a h a 28 1 9-16 / 1// /JIcmh;,., I 0 / Ihe 1 9 ;.; .fJf'flr/u o!ill/l CI{lLU o j Cf"I: .. / o bal !/,:q h S c hool. C "' :rloba/, e rllla! Z O lle. a rt;' f'/"j uc,I / e d 1 0 ,'I1/1/1C { h a l ell! II' /I! .fir. Fr e d eriL'/...-.. J 8/1. dt;n 190 7 R i,' cI', fld e f) r;,c X C H r e t'k C ;/y. .II,.. : .. p/all 11t 'I1,q n cla .""r ('{'UII/OII w ll/'eli I{'ill l a k e place ah (urd hiL'> ynclt! .fer a r/ u ,r/ c FlII>e ,rulidillli.' lit""! II nlllh. dll cln,f,rmale,r are a .d.:ed II,) (.1; /11 -/JIIIII/cal e ((,i ll! ,1/,.. RldclI a , t e I/Ie po,, .fihdd.ll t/ thei,. attend/' l l l l lIlt' l'elll1/'OIl, This was the notice whi c h in { h e "\\'orld T e legl : lI11" s t e a dil y f c w se\ e r al w ee k s. I h appenccI upc m it-o n e day a n d r ecci"c d q ui t e a s h o c k A s I w % in N e w '1"01'1< a t t h e tim e I w e nt-at o n c e t o Fred' s a p a rt m e nt t o ill\ 'C'sti gaie, I t wa s n o t hin g unus u a l a t ti m e f o r F r e d Ebdon's n a m e t o h e in the New Y o rk pape r s for h e h ad r ecently h eco m e fin e o f t h e m os t w ea l t h m e n in th e citv A yea r p l c \ i o u s h e c o nd uct-e d e xpi di t i o n t o P a n a m a t o d o so m e e x l e n s i \'e W O I \ { a m o n g t h e ruin s o f Fori San L o r e n zo a n d Ol d Panama. The r e h e d i sco \-er e d go ld w hi c h th e p ir a t e I \ l o r ga n, wa s supp ose d t o ha\-e hidde n centuries a g o, B ecau se o f h i s d i sco v ery a n d hi s n e w l y a c q uir e d w e a lth, h e h ad l e a p e d i nt o pro m i n e n ce o v e r n i g h t I sa w F r e d a t his a partm e n t a n d h e t o l d m e that h e w a nt e d th e w h o l e cl a ss o n a c ruise in N o v embe r if p oss i b l e a n d wa s u s in g this m e a n s o f gath e l in g th e m N e w ).'od e "Ca n y o u c o m e do y o u supp ose? -Can a hung r y m a n eal, d o y o u sup p ose? Y o u b eL" The n w e procee d e d t o t a lk o \ e r o l d tim es a n d r ecall e \-er v o n e w e c o uld I-C m embe r H e had a o f th e "Cal'i b b e an" a n d w h a t a l a u g h we hHd O \ -CIt h ose pi c t u r es! \Vh e n w e w e l e t l y in g t o r e m embe r w h e r e so m e o f the oth e r s we r e h e s a i d, "The r e a r e ple nt y o f our cla ss mates I i g ht-h e r e in N e w Y o rk L et's tl'Y to find a few_ Di d y ou Jwow th a t Di c k R e inh o l d i s e d i t o rin c hi e f o f t h e \V o rl d T clc g y a n 1 n o w ? L et's go se e him fir st." }\ t t h e n e w s pa p e r o ffic es w e we r e ad m it-te d al m os t imm c d i a telv t o th e e d it-or s roo m w h e r e w e sa\\" Di c k sitting b ehind a f ormidable p i le o f L oo k s and p a p e r s H e act-ed j u s t t h e sa m e a s h e did w h e n 23 h e w a s e d it o r of thc 193..1, C a r i b b ean," e \ c n tho u g h h e d id ha\' c th e r e pu t a t i on o f b e in g t h e m o s t h a rd b oile d o r city e dito r s H e and Fred had di sc u sse d th e r eunio n he f o r e a n d w e r e expe ct i n g t o t h e ad\' e rti se m e nt so o n In th e m e a nt i m e h e s u gge s ted tha t w e g o s e e so m e of our g a n g w h o were in N e w Y ork. H e l e n L c a c h (Inc! G l oria ,\\a nni x w e l 'c b o th w O I l { in g o n the N e w Y o r k S un_" H e l e n w a s a n a d v e rti s e m e nt-wr it e r a n d G l o ria edited the p a p er's C o lumn t o th e L o v e l o rn." B o t h w e r e delightc d t o see u s but-could n o t c o m e o n t h e c rui se They se n t u s t o s ee Rut h E g olf w h o was private sec r etary t o t h e pres id e n t o f a n in sura n ce firm a n d h ead of a w h o l e arm y of s t e n og raph el's I t r e c alled our s enio r v e al' w h e n Ruth was office g irl f o r [\\r, Rut h t o l d u s th at-Fl'ank \V a s h a b :l.l1g h h a d ju s t co m e t o N e w Y o r k a n d h a d s t a d e d a fir m o f his own H e h a d s uff e r e d so mu c h fr o m s : _JI1bu ril all his l i f e (espec i ally o n th e Zo n e ) t hat h e h ad finall y in v entcd a s un burn r eI110 \ 'e l'. Rut h ga \ e u s hi s address a n d w e hurri e d t o t h e \Vash a b a u g h Sunburn R e m o v e r C ompa n,Y and caug ht Fra nk b e f o r e h e l eft-f o r d inn el', B y this t-ime w e had m e t so m a n y o f the o l d-time r s that w e we r e all approachin g a si"a t e of hyst eria, Fl'a nk tool { LIS t o dinne l a t a fashi o n able h o t e l w h e r e w e r eminisc e d o v e r e \ 'e r v coul' s e \ V h e n w e l eft-. Fl' e d made a n appointme nt f o r u s t o m e e t him at his a partm e nt-l a t e r in t h e eve nin g, H e s a id h e wa nt e d t o tak e u s t o a s h o w and se e m e d \-er y excit e d abo ut it f o r s o m e unknown reason The r e a so n b ec a m e kn o wn wh e n h e t-oo k u s t o the ope nin g nig h t o f Earl Can o il' s Va nit ies_" Stella B oggs wa s its s t"r a n d the p o pu lar dance t e a m or Ruth Swan and C h a r les S outh wel 'e feature d \ Vithin f our w ee k s o f t h e t im e th e r e uni o n noti ce fil' sl" appeare d in the "\Vorld T e l e g r a m, a n s w e r s h a d com e fr o m a s Illanv of the cla ss m a t es a s cou l d b e e x p ected_-T w e nt y r e p li e d t hat they would b e in N e w YOI'k a t the app o in t-cd t-ime; many othel's se n t the i r regrets: a n d the r e w e r c a f e w a m o n g t h e missin g It was F r ed's pl a n t o ge t \ Van' e n S l o cum, n o w ca pt ai n of t h e S, S. "Eul'o pa," to pil o t t-h e yacht-o n t h e c ru i se w hile hi s \' es s e l wa s in d r y -d oc k 1'0 1 I'e pai r s Captain S l oc um appea red i n Di c k s office

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o n e m orning looking very s w a nk y i n a blu e uniform and go l d brai d. I n s p i t e of a ll the glitter h e was the sa m e f ellow a nd accepted the o ffer gladly. NO"ember fifteenth was the clay ap p ointed for those going o n t h e cruise t o m ee t at t h e Ambassador Hotel. All m orning lo n g they appeared a nd w h a t an upl 'oa r i o us t i m e we h ad! The first t o o a r riv e was P l'Ofesso r Camp. b ell who a bs ent.mi nded l y r ode pas t O U I fl oo r three times i n t h e elevator befo!"e h e I'emember e d t o get ofr! Col i n wa s n o w teach ing in Coope!"stown U ni ve r sity and loo ked even m o re sc h olarlv t h a n h i s p os i tion requir ed. T h e n ex t' al'l"i"al was Doctor C harl es Beld e n. H e loo\
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up t h e (rat/ili o n of having Spanish cl u h dances nt thc B omba but \\' 1 1\' s h o ul dn'( he'? ,'\al'gurdie Sieblcl' had 'taken ,\\rs. S p e ncer's place tcach i n g Spanis h Our h elm'cd sponsor was li\ in g in Spnin at the time and \\'as q u i I e a n :luthol'ess, H e[' '\em oio [ 's had just b ee n published and we WC['C all a nxiou s t o get a copy, Two oth e r classm a tes had dc\'eloped into teach e r s. Blossom L tltll \\'as a second \1iss P :ltlcrson and was jus t as a h le n teach e r George F ernandez \\' [ s a professor in the Bi f'logy J)c p a l'lment at the Junio r Coll ege, His sch ool-d:1Y fo ndness for dissectin g bugs had carried him :[" in thflt lin e o f \\'OriL ":-\0\\ lell u s about \'IIUI' work. \ lice we bea!!cd. as s h e was next in thc c irck, S h e h;:1 im'ente d a fat -re mlwin!.! cr.;>am called "\"\Jod's \\'on dcl' \\'hat an u nlls u:l1 \ocatin n f tlr \ iice tt) chnosl': She told u s about Edna .\luelh:r :lnd Dorot/l\' Rons who h a d factories sidc I)\" s id e in l e r 's!:'y City. Edna ",\lucller ;\ktkc-u p Cnllccl"Il," and Dot was the proud in\' ento, of a nc\\ type of c hewin g gum that \\ 'o u ld snap \\ith \ 'ery lit tie effnrt o n the pari or thc Snon e\crybndy b(:g;ill talking eli .. ,bout OUt oid classmatL's, but I fin:lll\' managed 1 0 gather sCI'np s nf nl'\\, .1.bm;1 most of the m Edisoll \\,irt7. was L,,'\pln r in g in t he: wilds of E c u a d n r tln d P e n t a n d had not been in the L T niled S t a t es fill' s('n:'r:ll \'I;'a['S, \V e all k n c\\' t hai Blanch" Belde n .1. mmi e s t.1.r r(l[ we l wei seen h-.:r nn the screen man\' ti mes. Her f ri ends said h e r f a m e had c h a nged her pcrsnncti ity, as i s so orten tht:" case. Li\:wise \\c ail k n e\\' of Bilh' \\' heeler, for :lI1\'time onc would n p e n a' m.1.gn7.in e Bill's f:;ce WOUld ['('adine:, It was "Rob Rm',"
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After the p a rty Fre d t o ld u s wh y wc w e r e goin g t o j\larseill e o n our cruise, j\\iss j\\axine Hoffman a n d Count Rav m ond Bejar a n o w e l'e to b e marrie d Bordeau x and Fred h ad r ccei"e d an in\'ita ti o n f o r u s all to attend The wedding w o uld tak e place in t h e H ollo well H o l y T emple, of w hi c h Re,'er e n d \ Villi a m Ir\' in g H ollo w ell was past o r : .\liss Victori a H o ll owe ll. assi s t
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between t h e p ews :l.ne! l ohn .\lannix a n d Alejandro \\'OI1f! playin g l eap frog The n so m e pe ople r u s hed in and t oo l < LIS :1.11 away fro m th e churc h News I t e m : B o : ,dea ux, No\'. 26, 19-16.-Thc Hoi l owell H o ly T emple was t-h e sce n e of
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:29

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.\landill.!. L,jllo R I:"M: -\\' ; lIi arn Elliot. John Palm. R;dph Theodo re A lbritton. Rich;1ld .\ \ o llen. C. ,\ \Ulloye 5 P i lll! Reard. l a m e," R en;udez. R obert ::\ lely. \\' illi : lln Be el'.'S. Si!lill/I. [,"/110 N I:"hI: -Edgar BOl'den. l ack E gosnu:!. ,\\axwclJ S;lIIders, W i lliam \\,il'tz. !rl Sanders D ,niel \ h r h a !l. Charl e s V i ncent. Erne,;;t Jal'amillo. {'ruJl I R,;,,. / ,ejf 1 0 NI:"M' -Cblld e Berger. Bertr.11ll Lloyd A l herg;t. P,ml Gregory. J ohn o :\Ieil. H erbert P I,; ]lip.>. \\'i lli a m D o u ghedy. Juniors Sla"J;,, !,. r. ... /III) Nt:, /hI: Blo",som En"minger. EiBen 0 COllnel. ,\\iriam 5\\, :111. \ \ary Rut h Riedcl. .\\ary : \ nn Carruthcl's. Anna Reilly, Sillill/I. to Rf :,,'t/: \ lnl'garet Barnard. Rulh \\' ikingstad. O l g a Roe. Leta D eaK i n s .. Laurie Tubcnille. Alice ,\Inc 5pl'll'l'c n. Eli'lOr ,\ \ ulla:H". 30

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IL'N IOR C LASS n,lI N II/Jlh ,j This Y": U the lutli .lr of '.3:l h as h cc n \ 'CI'y
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Sldl,,/ill.'!. {',:/ilo H,:,/'d : Edw "l' d Durh;'lm. Robert ,\\ar.;;h. P a t r i c k B ate;; Royce L ewis T heoJore i\"llstuo!'<. ,\rmando Samuel Charl es j\\e :ld. S/f/illi/. I.e:f lte. H,:,!h/: J o h n S-.r.i\'(lS George J\\a''ClIse, \\'cudell C ottOIl, J uli o D omi1l311CZ, / .. mes 0 .'"1'0, H ow;It' d \\' ill. ; lIncs L othro p Jo.;cph Retall.\. Fr')l1/ H O ll', I":/l/,, H,:"ht: .\\.ttt h c\\' Q'H e'IIII. R o l'cd .\loot, \\'ill; ;1111 Hill. R o l)cd l\nde rsQIl. \\';11;;1111 1I;1I1n:1, Edw{.rd Curtis Alphucs Baldwin, Sophomores SlrIII
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SOPH O \ \ORE ACTI V I T IF:S On Octohc l II, 1 933. the ()resent Sop h o more Cl ass h eld its fil'sf me eting in the Jibl'ary wh i ch was a ss i g ned t o them 1'01' the enl ire year. The purpose of t hi s meeting, as cust o m a rv, wa s to dec t class
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Sla"dlll.lf, I,e/I 10 R I :lfht: S I ;lIl lcy D onal d son j\ \ ontford T a\\'c s Carlis l e C hris tcn<;cn. R obcl'( Rllley. RoLt"rl Rulhel'for d. J 'Llnes V,1ll Dyke. Joseph Cortin. Williill1l ;\hendro l h 51;!!,.".,; Le/llo R/:"h/ : John J\\cL ain. Frank Albelga. Jack CI;ht: -Burton I-Iood L a\\'cran c e Will. Theodore Pun i s J o hn B o ze man. ArchiL ,!\d Gibson. Russe l Jus ti ce. j\ 'lan in Keenan, V e rnon C lark. Freshmen SI,well".'!, l ,e}llo UI!Jht : D or i s Colling s Belty Elli s J a c e lin e BI i scoe M a r y D arley. L Ollis e Sei b o l d. Kath l een Ecker. Sill/II!/. I,ep la R,:,,!If:-R llby Ly e\\', IC:thleen Philli p s H e l en Carrol. Clwrlotle L c \ y Vir g inia Fehn. Ellen K e lly. The lma j \ \ iller, J\\axine Blunden. Fro lll H o,, f ... p t v RI:qht : Winifred I
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SIan Ii"!,, /,,:111<1 NI:"M: l o ... eph ,\lti.l, \ \. rl in. F red We r t)';, L emuel Prc:>sc l : \ ; Willi;J.il1 Tun ill c .. \II X'rt Chri ... I.,in. D O I I.dd COl'lleil. Cuthbertso n l a m es Ilog,1I1 Sill,,,,,, RI:,dd:P hillip H o ughion. Func .... Wi!li;1.111 Wood. W illiam James Chris ti : 'Il .\ntbony R ereor .. ki. I I ('r h ef t Gotte"Ill,Hl. R ola nd Cle m ens. F/'tHiI Nolo', 1 ,<'-jll,) \ t oore. Willi a m Scoo t. 5t,mlt',\' D o u gbcd.", Charles Wasl1;1. b .... u g h I l ellr." J ; r"rnillo. f reshmen Slallcli"!, 1,,,-jI /0 R I:"h/: T heel, Y o land Sail" .... :\<:11., P ott .. J osephine Stumpf. Qli,'c \ ,II1 ... too .... R;J.c Ilill. It .. ... ;e Il. d"tc" d JC.III \\',,1 ... 1.. B ett." .\\eCle,IIY. Bobl,ie DlIrh;J.l1l. ,\bee l Gould. Ruth .\\00",'" .. \ nit., B ogg ... Rit" '';;ot.di el.. 1',,>111 Nolo'. I.dl (,' Ri"Id:-Bett\' 1I.1lI"::" Lu .... ile L ve\\. CI. .d." ... P e scot!. L i lii;J.1l Aura HUIl-. toon, Ele.,nor Stumpf. 35

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FRES H \ \ AN A C TI\' I T IF.S The cla ss of '37 h eld its fir s t m eeting i n the auditor ium o n Octob e r 11, 1 933. T h e auclito l 'ium has continued to bt' the month l y mectin g place of the Fres hm c n for the entir e year. The first m eeting wa s sponsored by j\\r. Frank s for the purpose of electi n g '.lur clas s officers and s p o n sor. The ()o pu la r .\1.-. / \ leYI:"I wa s e lect e d spon so r un a nim o u s ly. \V e next elected office r s w hi c h are as f ollo ws: Pres id e nt . Ht-::NRY JARA.\11L1.0 Vic e-Preside n t PHIliP RIt-::OEL Sec r etary ...... KATHLEENI PJlI LLiI'S Treasure r BET' I Y i\kCu:ARY The next class meetin g wa s a brief o n e w h i c h lasted only two mi n ut es. At it w e e lE'ctcd our class representati ve s f o r thE' E xec utive C o un c il. b 1 ace l G oulet was elected t h e g irl r eprese ntat-i ve a nd Jamcs H ogan the b oy. \Vhe n J a m es H oga n r esig n c d later James Christian was e lc ct e d t o Gil hi s p l ace. The Fres hm e n have had two candy sa les in the sc hool h al! and bot-h have bee n quite s u cccss fui. The f1l'st candy sa l e with J\\acel Goule t as chairm a n b r o u ght t wel \ 'c dollars profit. l.i llian C h ase had c harge o f thc second at which a pro fit of approxi matel y fiftee n d.)llars was m ade. :\11 class m embe r s wer e asked to bring candy f o r the sa l es. Th0se w h o did not d o so were charge d t wcnt y-five cents as ( h e ir s h a r e toward the clas s fund. I n a thleti cs this VeAl' th e Fres hm e n have I 'a n l < ed very hi g h. T h c boys es p cc iallv have s h ow n excel l e n t tca m-work and in upho l ding the class of '37. The F re s hm en b uvs won the Interclass S occe r Champi o n s hi i n th e se r i es w h i c h wetS playe d at t h e end of t h e r egubr soc ce l seaso n w i t h B a l b oa, I n basehall Ihe F r c shmen al so came Ollt o n tvp by winning the I nte r dass Ba se b all Championsh ip. Among oth'r t hin gs the Fresh t h e C. H S. faculty in a baseball ga m c. The Freshme n g irl s cann o t b oast o f s u c h s u ccess in athlctics as thc bov s can. I n the Inter cl ass Bas k etball Se;ies [01' g irl s they werc unablc f o defeat Sopho more g irl s. A numbe r of Fr es hm e n g irl s tLU' ned out for practicc i n d if f e r e nt S P O l'ts amI a fe\\" earn ed let t ers. The most I 'e ce n t class acti\ i t v was thc r reshman H o p whic h was in t h e gymnasium the ni g ht of Apri l s i.\.th f l 'om e i ght t-o twe lve o'clock. This class was th e Grst t o ha\'e t h c J \ \ oonli g hl Scr enad e r s a n d all thei r s tvl e fOI" a sc h o3l dance. The dim l y gym was dcc'OI'at-ed w i t h b a li oo n s of mall v co l o r s h a n ging from t -he ceilin g and palm Ica\ 'cs adorn e d t h e walls. The pri ze waltz was won by } uni o r \ Vill a nd Grace B e ld c n All in all t h e class has reason to be proud of it s first en t ertainment for it s sc h ool m ates. Other adi v i ti es in w hi c h thc Fres hm e n p a l'ti c ipate are the Fres h m a n Chorlls and the Effe Kube Klub. j \ lanv o f the Frosh m embe r s of the club have donc ing w o rk in dramatics this year. \Ve can a l so b.Jas t of two hi
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LITERARY

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,", LITER,\RY BE S T S H O RT S TOR Y "AFRAID" By .llt' r,"am SWflll 35 E\,crv time Dncto[ L e yin m ounted the s i x s t o n e step s to the entrance' of the Communist I-Iospit.-:!l of ,\f osco \\', a thing which h e d id morning except Sunda\', a t nin e o'c1o cl, h c \\'ent-thro u g h the sa'me e motion al crisis. a fear he always h a d with him, so deep in his o wn so ul that h e could not s h a k e it off. At the t o p of the six steps stood a guar d. a young soldier in a long didylookin g military coat with a high astrakh a n cap. H e wore a loo k of indiffe rence and boredom. and seldo m a n swered D oc tor Levin's pol ite "Good m o rning. Comrade," I n his worst dreams Doct or L e\' ;n h ad this u rnv l oo kin g guard barrin g t h e cntrc lllcc to t h e hospital. and n o t -letting him in. hurling him bac k into mi sery, h i s wife a n d himself int o o n e s m all with hardl y a nythin g t o eat. Once past t h e g u ard, in (h e safety o f the w id e h all of the hospital. Doctor Lc\'in felt himself of again. and hi s selfconfidence a nd cnergy were restored to him. H e lo\' e d the uni for m s, the s m ell of antiseptics the cleanness. a nd the li\ 'cS of wait ing patients hudd led o n thc bench es. H c wa \'CI'y alert and set about d oing hi s IYlorning tasks: o n e o perat' ion scheduled for this morning and three fOl this afternoon. So much depend ed o n him. and h e f e lt that h e was p rcpared for anything asked of him, H e was \ 'e l'y hi g hl y r ef,a rded in j'losco\\" as o n c of the best s lll'cieo n s D octor L('\ in \\"as hac k in hi s (lfllec aftel the fir s t operation \\"hen the heCld nurse ente r e d. "Commissar Lubo\' just phoned. H e i s b rin g in g h i s m other O\'CI at o n ce for an e m e r ge ncy oper ation," \Vhe n h e heard "CommissClr tubo\'," Doctor Le\'in turned pale, H e had helped him w h e n h e was do\\"n and oul, had gi\'cn him the job h e no\\" h e l d. and had made him selfconfi d ent again, H e kne\\' the case wo u ld bc hard to fight because t h e m other wa s (lId but h e would fight with all hi s mi!:ht a nd lJo\\'cr. Comrade Lubo \ walking beside the stretch e r bearin g hi s m other, was ClY(lUng man of m edium h e i g h t. At a first ,")i a pcr so n could t el l b y h i s k ec n dark e'ycs that h e was a \'crv e n e r ge ti c l11"n, and h c had a reputation what h e wante d /'l'On1 hi s subo rdinates. Lulxw rcmained in the h all outside after hi s m othe r had b ee n \\'hceled into the opel'aling I 'oo m As h e washed a n d dried hi s h ands. Dodo r L C\' in could hear h is s t e p s n e n 'o u s l y go in g up t o the end of thc hall a nd back again. pausing now a nd then at the cloor o f ( h c o pt"rating room This unneccssa r v n o ise disturbed the doctor' s u s u a l cal;nness and made him nen'ou s and a n x i o u s, The patie n t h a d stopped breathing. \ \ hen all attempts to re\"i\"c t h e s till f01'111 o n the o perating tablc had fail e d Doct o r Le\'in di s mi ssed t h e nurses a nd hi s att cndants. The o nl y thing l eft-now t o d o wa s t o n otify t h c so n Of course. h e w o uld want a la s t look at hi s mot-hcr's face before thcy took h e r away. D oc tor L e\ in pulled the s h cc t up t o thc o ld woman's chin. I t was horriblc how her dead face see m ed t o mock him, t o make it all t h e h a rder fo r him t o t e ll ( h e commissar. Her blu e lips kcpt sayin g "_'}\" son, Commissar Lubo\-, i s out therc him walking up a n d down? Y o u afraid to t ell him tha t I am ncad m e, hi s m othc r -vou'I 'e afraid for vour se lf. G o a n d face him. H e despises {ai l-u re," Thc steps of the so n neCll'cd ( h e doo r o f the operating rool11 a nd the doctor's l egs ga\"e a funn,\" twitch. The n h e opened the d oor. "\Veli. doctor ? Doctor Le\"in I(ept hi s eyes o n a butto n of the Commiss"r's coat. Y o llr m othe r i s o ld. I t i s a d iffic ult case." Yes, \'es, I kn ow s h c i s o ld She i s in \'Olll" hcu; ds, D o ct o r And thc so n I'C S limed hi s walk down the corridor, Doctor Leyin sl id back into thc operatine: I 'oom. H is weak limbs carried him the nearest SCClt. H e put his h a nds to hi s head a n d moaned: then h e bro u g h t them down again a nd lookcd a l the m i\'C\-.! t' 10 p erf;; rm a n other oper a ti o n was to him a toriure to think of, and \'ct was it not true? H e had always bee;l afraid of this and now that it h a d h appe n ed -

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what was h e t o do? The o nl y thing left was t o t e ll t h e Commissar-but h ow? Coul d h e fac e pO\ 'erty again? H e knew tha t hi s wif e co ul d not. The s t e p s in the h all continue d t h e i r m o noton o u s p ace. D octo r L evin came back t o the p r esent wit'h a stad. Hi s e'yes l i fted t o the s till fig ur e o n the ( a bl e. H e g la nced at h i s watcheleve n twenty 6,"e. Tre mbling, h e go t up. o p e n e d the d oor, a n d stepped outside The so n s tood facing the door, b a r e l y f our f ee t away. Doctor L e vin hastil y shut t h e door be hin d him H o w mll c h co ul d Lubo\' have see n ? The Commissa r w a i t e d ; 1 fear I h iwe t o t ell vou--" The so n s till said n othi ng. "--t here a r e c o mpl i cat io ns. She may n o t pull thro u g h," "This i s your worlc D octor. D o your b es t. D oc t o r Levin we n t hack into the op ending r oo m Cou ld h e stand it t h a t pacing U l ) <'Inc! down. up and d own? H e wa ited until the foo t s t c p s w c r c approach in g agai n t h e n h e stepped o ut s ide. "We ll, docto r ?" r sorry. Y OUI' m other has passe d a way. H e loo k ed the so n stra i!rh t in t h e face. The son s p o k e. -"Dead ? \V e ll. i t i s a good t hing, She did n o t b e lie ve in C ommunis m." Doctor L e v i n reach ed m ec h anically f o r hi s handl{ c r c hi ef, w ip ed it across hi s per spirin g fOleh eaci. and returned t h e wet ball to h s poc k e t. SE C OND BEST S I [ORT S TORY THE TRW OF TilE L UN A B y Tom RUJ"J"ell 36 In 1 929 during the month of Octobe r so m e s t r a n ge ethereal d i st urba nce put a stop t o a ll radio reception f o r a period of about fiftvthree minutes, This cau sed much talk and controversy a m o n g Ollr most e min e n t sc ienti s t s and auth o rities o n radio Dr. L. B j\\art-in stat-ed that the r e was a c h a nce tha t it was caused by so m e p l a n e t of the so l a[' s'ys t e m tryi.ng to communicate wit h the w o rld, Anoth e r man, a n astr o n o m er, claim e d that iI cou ld have b ee n cau se d b y t wo b o d ies collidin g in s p ace. A l so t h e theo r y was advanced t hat possibl y so m e natio n of th e wodel, in p r e p a [ 'ing f()[ wa r h a d built a machine to c reat e stati c. a nd thus d r ow n o u! <'III communicat i o n s of the e n e my. R eally there are o n ly two p eo pl e w h o lmow the <;our ce of t h e di s tlll' ba n ce. J o hn D ow d y w h o has n ow p asse d int o t h e great beyo nd and J Alt h o u g h J o hn was not known to be a sc i e nti s t. h e p ossesse d onc o f the most bri lli a nt minds i n the w o r l d. 1 \ \ Y statem e n t will n o doubt p r O\'e itself in w h a t is to follow. J o hn's h o m e a nd wor l{sh o p W<'IS loca t ed about s ixty m i l es f!"Om Sa n Oicgo o n t h c pca l ( ofCyuamaca J \lountain. Thi s pla ce wa s ideally l oca t ed for h i s pl"Ojcct. It wa s t h e third h ig h es t p ea l ( in thi s coun try. and was a go o d dist.-:lIlce fr o m a n y la[ g c amoun t of c i \ ilization; a [ 'aill"Oad line pass ed wit hin s i x miles of his estab li shment, 38 N ow t o expla in t h e pro j cct o f whic h 1 s p o k e. In the early PMt o f 1 927 J o hn was struc k with the i dea o f building a r oc ket ship tha t wo uld trave l t o the m oo n. Afte r much study a nd co n centration plans wer e in\"olv;d f o r the "Luna," as this was t h e title t o be bes(-oweo upo n the flx:::.t inte r s t elle r space s h i p. But w ith co mplete p lans made t h e [ 'e wer e still ot h c [ difficult i es to be face d. F i r s t, the j o b o f co n structing t h c '-'Luna," and seco n d. th e data r equi r e d in order t o make contact w ith t h e m oo n <'In ei n o t t o go tra e!li n g o n int o space. This was w here I came i n B ein!; a teach e r o f astronomy in Ohi o U ni" e r sity, and <'lIsa a \"ery close frie n d of J o hn 's. it was I w h o was c ho se n t o figure out t h e lin e o f flight t hat w o uld b e r equi['e d t o co n t ac t the m oo n Al so I wa s t o h e lp in a n y material co n struct-io n w h e n m y \ Olowl e d ge was s u ffic ie n t-. Aft e r placin g vario u s o rd c l 's with nu merous diffe r c n t firm s, J o hn and I left for o u r rendezvou s in t h e m ountains, H e [ 'c \Vas w h e n the r"ilroad lin e cam e i nt o play. Al l the m e t,,1 pads f o r th e body, the tool s r equi['e d the n ecessa ry ins t ru m e nt s a n d all o th c r n ee d e d s up pli es co uld b e d e po site d at-a s mall s tati o n b y th e t['ain a nd f [ 'o m t h e re o e taken b y a light truck to o ur wor!ts h op. For al most two ye.us we stayed in the m ountains exce pt for occas io nal s hort tri ps t o the c ity. E \'cn th o u g h the "Lu

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n a was complet e d in S e pt -embe r o f 1 929. th e trip c o u ld n o t start until Octo b e r a s t h e moon was n ot a t d eclinati o n w hi c h wa s n ecess o f empty. ( T h i s w o uld limit the e n d urance o f his supply t o o n e h oUl' o f breath i n g ) PI' O b ; t\ l i y es ca p e d dUl' in g th e ni ght." A p e l i o d o f thirty a n d o n eha l f minute" h a s e l a p sed h e r e b e t w ee n m essages "Am cau!!ht b etwee n e:ra\'ita t i o n a l pull of cartl 1 a nd j \ \ y s p ee d s l o wed d o wn so muc h t-h a t the Lu n a s in e rt i a w ill n o t carry m e past thi s z enith. ,\\y oxygen s h o uld b e ex h a u s ted in j u st-a b out-two minutes. The "Luna" will dl'if( in a n o rbi t arOlil1d th e eart h f o r e \'er. Pl e a se in form th e public o f m y ques t and carryan f O I m e, B e sUl'e t o c arry e n o u g h rodie t s t o pro p e l I you all o f the w a y t o t h e m oo n G oodbye a n d goocl lu c i e J o hn D owdy." Thus e n d e d t-h e m essage t-hus e n d e d a nobl e man, a n d thus ends mv s torv. I n the n c a r f uture 1 h o p e to t i o n o n the ('Lun a II a n d try Illy l uck a t s h ooting t h e m oo n. V e l Y f e w people connecte d the di sa p pearance o f J ohn D o wd y wit h t h e peClI liar static heard o n t h e m orning o f O c t o b el' I R butt h e !-I' u e expl anatio n r e \'e! s that t h e connectio n w a s v c r,)' g r ea t BEST ESSAY S I X F OOT '1'11'0 I S R A T H ER H I G H iJ y 1"(,11/ ';6 I ha\' e atta in e d the I 'athe r unus u a l h e i g h t o f s i x fee t two in c h es a t
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pay t o get in o r r don't get in. But. w h y s h ould n't I pay? I'm a b i g f ellow. If a n ything o n a hig h shelf i s wa n t e d o r i f m othe r d esi['es to h
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more) They i noitcd unique. No mOl'e s h u ggling fights w i t h a t humb tacle I n fact-the firs t tim e I tri ed o n c, I p u shed too h a rd much t o m: v re g r et. The frame of the n e w bull e tin bo a rd s was m a d e of th e s m oot h es t. s hinin g wood w ith t h e g rain jus t bursting forth In t h e cente r o f the boards was so ft tan corl e Over t h e cOI I < was a clea n g la ss CO\'er with a l oc k to go wit h it. A l o ck A loc k I t h o u g h t I"d swear ,(a l o clt" t h e tim e I had to get in o n e. Y o u see, the l 'e a r e f ou rteen b ulletin b oa rd s f o u rt ee n different locks. and fourtcen o ldd k evs. The k evs were not numbere d in a nythin g less th'an a mil l ion o r so. and whic h to whic h h a d n o t vet been re co rd e d. I had to trv each k e\; to see if i t wo ul d fit (wh a t patie n ce it it wasn't lil
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POETRY I 1 M AN! CIIflr/a H B ,,!de.1I '5-1 \\' hen the d a rllll css ruled t h e land. Then the eart h WilS S Cot and sand. F ull of c re;:llures. swi m m ing thi n gs Scal y c reatures, birds wilh w in gs. Wh e n the c brl'llcss t umed t o ligh t S lo\d y surely c h a n ged the s i g ht-. F ro m t h e w a t c r crtdh di d ;Jppe;lr G r owi n g ris in g year by year. F r o m the s e s l im y cra w l i ng. c rcalul'cs, !'lan a p p e a re d j \ 'ian w h ose fc;dures, C h a nged. until t hey came t o he T h ose of t h e T we n ti e t h C entury. Workin g, t o ilin g, p lan t i n g, see kin g, Man k e p t s t r i in g. nc,' c r flin c hin g. Hard s hi p s. hunger. la c k of r es t, Man k e p t r i s in g, toward s the be st. I \ \ a n has t oile d si nce the Age.;, j \1 arking. wri t i n g H i s t o l 'Y's p ages. \\' orking man ha s nlild c n ; tl i o n s F o r the com i n g J l a n m a kes h o u ses o ut of stee l. M a n contro l s t h e a i r ; me! tide!, F y in g c reatures m.;l.d e b y ban(1. J let .. 1 c r ea t ures made b y m a n M a n i s Mast e r Man i s I,-i n g Of .. II the earth, ,Hld li" i ng thing, H e h .. s c h a n ge d has m:'lde the ] :'lnd F it t o li vc i n -fit for M :l.Il1 OOOOH B y Gloria ;I/fllllli,, ',j" J \la foi," t he jolly Frc n c hm a n crie d Y o u .. r c petite. m y g irl! Y our eycs, they H \ C a r o l l i n g l ook, Your ha ir, 't i s n: ll u r a l c u rl?" "511" exclai m s t hc Spanis h g ir l And tUfIlS h e r b a c k 011 )e:lIl. [ t heen k j 'OU ar'e t oo m oo c h ,:I f r 'cs h A s I 'a\' e c\'cr see n!" "Querido." thell A s she turns t o Jack 1 \ '), s.,il o r hoy. I you moo c h I'm ve r y glad you're ba c k!" "Oh, yc" h? Say ... you!" h e :-onar l s :Lt h er, "An' wo tl:! 'hou t P e d r o'! And T h omiLs l o h n, "nel L o u pe J oc'! And le'l'l and R o dri go'!" A P RIL O og\\'ood a n d \ i o l e t s 'neath coo l sce'lte d p ine s Find m e la y i n g i n a h ,'\m mock in t ropi ca l climes'-T r a d e-w inds gently swis h the s ill,y pal m f ron ds. Frang i p a n i and o r chids se n d fragrance fr o m p onds But for dogw oo d and \ i o lets a n d fli es a l i g h t 'Neilth the d
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A:-t IV I -t I E

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STl,'DENT COUNCIL STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION B.I{ .ll1l1a 'J5 One of the most recent .. nd the most importnnt innO \'ati olls for C H S this year was the org:l.Ilization of the Students \ssoci .. tion. N C\'er before ha s the nttempted slic h an organiz;Jtion [md it l)I'oved to \ ricular ;\cti\ i tic.:;, a s the additiona l L'lculiy m e mbers of the organization T h e purpos e of the associ[dion i s to put the school activities 011 a better finan c i ; d h;ll; i s by g i\ in g the student s things for the pl icc of four. Eac h student W:1S rcquil'c d t o pay three d o lla r ... :11ll1 fifty cent.:;, for whi c h a m ount he rc cci\'ed tir e 1 0 1 -lowin g bene/i ts; I . \dmissi o n t o all re gu larly .:;cheduled :11 hletic contes t s of Cristobal H i g h School 2 Admiss i on to the fo u r cia.:;.:; dallccs. ) Admis<;ion to the Senior p l"y. -I. One copy of the "Cnrihbcan." 5. Onc subscription to the "Tr"dc \\'i n d r, M embership in O lle hig h school cluL. 7. Cbss d ucs f o r one ye;\r. \RT C LCB 43

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TRADE WIND STAFF If these i tems were taken up i n di \'idually in stead of colledi,e ly. t hey wo uld co s t :lt l eas t s i x dolbrs. The fir s t business in the organizin g of the club W:lS t o elect the office rs. T he n omina tions were I'Cstricted as fo11o\\'s: Thc president mus t be a se ni or, a nd t h e v i cep re s id ent a junior. The rc.."ult s of the election were: Frank Was hilbau g h, president; \Villi a m Bcers vice-president; M,.belle Bli ss, secretary: [Old A nna Reilly, treasurer. I t wa s dec ided to form an Exec lIt i ,'c Counc i l t o carn on thc minute affair!: of t h e A ssoc i ,dio n T h e Counc i l wa s to co n s ist of the three f[lcllity m embers, the four officel' s of the A ssoc iati o n, and a boy and girl r epresentati"e from each cl ass. Therefore, the next necessity was t o e l e c t the class representati, cs. They were : Fres h man, l \ '\acel G o ulet ,Ind James Christian ; Sophomore. Dori s Ebdon ami H o ward \Vill ; Juni o r Miriam Swan and Pnul Beard: and Se n i or, Bet t y Ste t ler and W nrren Slo c u m At t h e first mee t ing of the E xecuti\'e C ounc il, many plans w ere m ade and /TI:lny ide, l s settl ed. T h e most importan t business wa s t h e naming of the A ssociation. } \fter muc h discu ss ion the name, "Students Assoc i a tion," wa s c hosen The first activ it y of the organization wa s a dance g i ven on D ecembe r 22, in the gym ;\11 m embe r s of the Students A ssociation wCI'e admitted free The financia l affairs of the j \ ssociation were not settled until the beginning of the seco nd se mester. .60c .. Class .. 6 5c. Athletics AO c. Executi\'e C ounc i l 35c The E xecu ti ve C ouncil fund wa s to b e for LA PAS 44

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JL'NIOH-Sl-:Nlon DIU,'\ATIC all the clulo s, \ s a re"'lllt, t h c C,lrihbe,LI1 l c cci"cd $321, 00, Tradc Wi nd, $95 ,20, of '3-1, $3-1'77, Class of '35, $26,98, 01 '36, $31.:),). of '37. $ 5 2 32. ( V .Lr, it." C lubs ) $96 80, and E xecuti,' e Counc il. $96.-10, Soo n after th(' m Ol1e." had been apportioned ,md the linall c i al ide of the dub wa s wcll uncl e r W;I.", \ nna R eill. her I}() ... ition trC:L<;urcr, The Council e leded .'\iri,Lm Sw,'n to 1;lke her pla ce In order t o rai se mOI' e monev for the Carihhean and the Trade \\'ind, the E xecu ti c Council d e c ided t o ha"e a Studcnt Carni,.,I. A \ a:. appointed with B e tt y Stetl er.1 Duri n g th e yc,11' there \\'ere m e ml .cr:. of t h e \ s s o c i;ltion: 8(1 Fre ... hlll c n -II Juniors, f).) Senior s a nd IU TC.1ch c l 's. As a w h o l c. ol'g ani z;lt i o n pro"cd t o I.e 'CI'y :. lI C CCSSflll. ,Ind it i ... th,lt it willi,\! ;,l>lc t o offer c\'el1 more ach anl.l gc ... to tli(' "tudent" in th(' yc, l r:. t o c o m e .IIlT C LUB The \ I'i Cluh \\,1 organized in OctolJer. 1 933, and i s the only clul> 01 it" kind el' c r o r ganized in Cri s toL,d Hi gh S c hooL I t i" "',Xln:.ored IJY \:Lc D om, ld the drt IC.lc h e r EFn: I';:L OE r ';:LL O 45

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BOYS' CLt;B This dub w : n. orS'lni7.ed f o r the purpose of pro\ iclin g thc time place. rnntCl'i. d s n nd i n structi o n s for those who IHI\'e n o t taken Art as a subjcc t, and t o g i \'e the pupil" a dWllce to c h oose their wo r k. There are n o qu;,\ l i fic.1tio n s for membership except interest in Art. The first project was the cutting of lin o leum bl od;:s for post e r s t o be used for the different acti\ ities of the school. ;\fter this. different ones c hose t o make br:,cdet s and book-e nd s. Others made book-marks. book-co\'ers, and other things useful in sc h ool. Even tho u g h thi s i s a new dub, it has pro\'ed hig hl y sllccc"sfu l uld i s \ 'ery ",elllikcd by the m e mhers. The dub con s i s t s of t\\'e h e m embers uHi the f ollowin g ofl icers: Pres id ent. Vice Presi d ent Secr etary THE TRADE W INO B.'/ 11"11/. Bur" 'jj EDI T O R I A L STAFF STANFOIH) STONE f;SS I I:: HALSTEAD HELf::>O: L f:,\C1I Editor, W illia m Be e r s: Assi s t;'\nt Editor, j \ largaret H o l l i ngsh eild: ;\bJ;:c-U p Editor .. \\il'iam Swam : Gllns' CLEF CLL'i3 46

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OHCIII::STIU Sport Editor. ,'\:iry Gou!>t : Feature n nd H lllllor Editor .. 'l.lrg u(!rit e \\'i nn ; !\rt Edito r and Stencil Proof Re.1der. I Jden Leach ; I II Editor. D orothy .'\nc Spnrr,lIl ; T ."pi ... t .... Rob('rt L e t a De! lkin ". Edna ."ue l lcr, Jeanne L ewi,,; Report cl''', A rmando G a .. pcri, lurid IIann! V i o l a T uck. Edith \\,ikl'a n ; t \ { h i sor. .'tar., Eli za l ,eth l oore. BUSI NESS ST ,I!'!' B u siness j'bna ger, Teddy Aan" toos; Ci r eubting ,'1anager. D o ro tlly R oos: .'lil11eo Printers Robert K i n g, St;"1nley D o n a l d so n. S;II11 R oc, J o hn c L a in. Coman, \ \ 'ill i :1111 f\hcndroth and Montford 1'awcs, wa s t p r intin g. Tlli .. ycar \\c 1I:.\c purc hascd our 0\\'11 l11imeograph machin e and 11;"1\' e c h allsed i h e name t o T r acie \ \ i n d For the hal f of the sch oo l wc i ss u c d the p 'lI)c r \\'cekly but with thc changc of se mestcIs \\'e r ehlrnc d t o bi -monthly publication. Our 1I'0 rk docs n o t co n s i", of publ i shing a school newspaper ; II'C print a S p anis h p e riodi ca l, "EJ F a r o. for the Juni o r I-li g h Sc h oo l c1a., ... cs, d:ln cc prog r ; lm." .1nd many other s irnili.u items. And by this means (alon g with thc .. and our allotme nt fro m the Student A ssociatio n ) we h ope t o co m p let e paym('nt for the mimcogrnph machin e within the ne x t 11\0 y>ars. C I IOHCS

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O. G. A L A P AS 13.11 JnmmilltJ ';5 L a Pas i s a Spanish club that h a s existed i n Crislob.1 1 H igh S c hoo l since 1 930. when it wa:: org.1nized by \ \ r s. Phylli s Spencer. t \ \ r s' Spell<:er has been the abl e spon so r of the club to the prese nt day. The object of I his clllb is to nwke greater the fr iendshi p between the Latin and i\orth Americans. T o a c h ie"c t his. the cl u b has soc i a l meetin gs .1t which prominent m en of Colon :Ire guest s. At these the m e mbers arc asked t o speak o nl y in S p a n i s h so t hat they may p ractice the langua ge. ) \ l e mbership i n t hi!> cl u b. unl i ke t h e other clubs i n school. i s based all sc h o lars hip. I n order to beco m e a member of t h i s club. 11 s t udent mus t att'l in a grad e of "90" or a ho\e. ,mel mus t be I student of seco n d year Spani s h I f he i s a student of third o r fourth year Sp:lni s h. he need :111 ;lin that gr;lde for o n l y one pcriotl of s i x weeks. while the student of secon d year Spanis h h a s to lc(luire I h is g rade for'l period of twe"-e weeks. \ \ 'hene\'er a student has obtai ned the required g rade for membership. he 1\n im italion fro m the club t o beco m e a mem ber. During the pas t year. L a P1\S h a s taken part in a n umber of functions. Henry Sanchez and } \ iejanciro \ \'ong ha\'c a lways been willing to p la y t h ei r guitars for cl u b entertai n ments and ha\'c been ca lled upo n f requen t l y E.. r/y i n 1.1nll
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At the first meeting after the ini! iation of a new group of into the club, the progr.1 m i s pro ided b,,-" the newcomcrs. An cx ccllent cntert'linment was gi"en by thc group tlwt entered in Deccm ber. Under thc direc tion of Stella B oggs, a scrie s of Carni"al scenes supposedly taken in thc interior of were s h o\\'n. The actors were dressed in nati"e and all dialogue \\',IS ill They were seen going to the F air, and then at the wherc all were danc in g the Tambo. ito. A s iL s pec i .!t y Ste lla B oggs and Catal ina EclH'r danced L Rumba whi c h wa s recei"ed with muc h applause. The entire prog ram was most original ilnd de,e ly arranged. The nig ht of this program was illso : \ \ r s. Spencer's birthday w hi c h wlJ be an occilsion to remcmber. A s il co m p l i ment to J \ \ r s. Spcncer. I anhoe Seixas ilnd the members of hi s o r c hcstra cam e to thc sc h oo l and played for the dancing on the program. }\fter thc entertainment-. the cntire club ildjourned t o thc home of Wendell CoHon for refreshments \\'hich hi s mother ilnd :\ \ r s. Spencer had thoughtfully pro, ided. As birthday tokens the new members prcsented 1\\rS. Spence r with a huge bouquet of flow e r s and a 10\ 'ely garnet pin fro m the whol c club. This e"enin g was the mos t enjoyable one within the memory of all thc members of La Pas. The e:..istcnce of the Spanish C lub and it s hi g h standards g i"e to the Sp.1l1ish students an oLject toward which they may bend their cffo.-ls. knowi ng Ilwt Illuch good will COIllC from it. L a Pas has not only helped !O Eng l i s h s p enlting people of (he Zone, but it has been JUNIOR-SE:>II OR DRA.\\ATIC CLUn B.v Ruth Pickdl 'J.j The purpose of the Junior-Senior Dramatic Club i s to impro,'c the ability of thc members of the Junior ilnel Senior classes. ilnd to spon so r the two princ ipal pbys of the year: the Junior Play and the Senior Pby. The Junior Play this year was Happy L .1nding s which wa s prcscnted on December 1 5 I t wa s the story of a wel l-known al'iator, b \ ichae l P emberto n. who was bein g followed by vic ious c haril cter intent on killing him f \ deal of exci tement occurred when Mi c hael OHri"ed a t the Stoc!( poo[es for a performance at the fair: when he f .. d[ s in 10"e with Barbara. the young g i rl: and when h e tracle s p l a ces with h i s friend, Perci,,, 1 Courtwright. The play was fast mO" in g and humorous. the co medy being furni s hed by Was hington Jones Juliet. two colored fol k s. Skofsky the RU'ls ian radic. 11. and .\\ademoisellc Fili the French girl who caused so muc h trouble a mong thc m en in,o h e d. T h ose who took part in the p lay were: Juliet. the co lored maid. lOlli.u. Her boyfriend, Frtlllk {(' (ulwbtlltph: I\\rs. Stil ckpoole, Rulh Pickdt: Her husband, Bil(v Slolle: Her daughter, I! argard Barnard: ,\tiss 5.1brina. I/ar.'l Rll lh and Miss Brisby, O/fla I.adies of the Litcrary Soc iety: Mlle. Fifi. Ral/ dall: Pcrci"al Courtwright. Carllon lJ or i ne; j\l ichacl Pemberton, Charlu jimllt; Spotty. his m e chanic and copilot. Jen:v G or ill: and Skofsky the Russ i"ll, CI/flrle.r Beld!!ll. The Bu s ine ss Staff wa s co m posed of the folloll'ing: Director -"fi u G. I Kimbro: Bu s in ess b t ,1I1ager, Ilfarcu.re: A ss i stant Bli s ine ss M an.1ger, Bell.V Sidler; Stage j \ \ :mager, Edflur B ordw. A ss i sbnt Stage Manager. Coli/l Camphd/: Li ghts D ire c tor .... 111 II a Property Dir('cior. Rfi:abdh /layu; 1\1"ke-lip Director, .lfm:y and Prompter, KalMulI GoodwOlI.9h. There are about thirty-five members in the club and mos t of them ha"e had some dramatic cxperience. was Beyerley j\1"rcusc. At one of the student assemblies a s hort dialogue called Yes and No" was put on. The players were Judy Bridget. the girl. and Frank \\'ashabaugh. the bo.y. Alice Wood directed the performance. A s its s hare of the Vis itati o n Day program on January 1 2. a s hort play entitl ed "At The Ferry" was presented with Alice Wood a n d Frank a s the parents a n d Charl e s \Va s habaugh (a member of thc EfCe Kube J([ uL ) as the inqui sitive SOil. Riedel. Billy Stone, Jerry Gorin and Carlton Horine in the le.1d. I n both of the la s t programs mcntioned there were mob scenes in whi c h alilhe club members took part. They deserve muc h credit for the sllccess of thc performances. The officers of the club Me: Pres ident, I/ (lrv /learne: Vice-President, Rldh Picl.:dl: and SecretarY, Bdlv Sldla. Our Sponsor Miss Kimbro, but when s h e left in Janllary the cl u b wa s taken over by Mrs. Spence r. As the last and most im pressi e program in the dub's schedul e ca m e "The Thread of D esti n y," thc Senior play. which was successfully prescnted on May 1 8. This wa s a of humor, pathos i'lnd drama, delightful[y e nacted by the members of thc Senior Class. The s tory of the play conce rned the effects of the Ci\i[ War on the Montgomery fami ly, ing both the northern and southern s ide of the ques tion. The character s were as follows: Fanny, Louiu If'hiddw: George Washington. Rirlwrd Rei/lh old; Beth' Montgomer,'-' Bliu; . Laura L ee Fairfax. Blall che Tom Randolph. Roberl j\\artha, Ed'!a .Jfueller: Slisan, V orma Dan.t; Jane. I'iolel Randall ; John ,\\. ,\torton. endlon j \ l arce[la .1/a.\inl: H oJ/mall; ,\\arion, EIi:a belh Ha.ve.r: f\tadgc Y Ollng, \ \ a mmy Dinah. R ulli E:qolj: Peyton Bai[ey. Frmd ... Wn.thahal/gh: Uncle Bill,).-, Colin Camphdl: L ouise Lawton . I!MY R a lph F riln c is, Chl,r!a Uni o n Scot. JUf".V Gori,, ; Miss j \ t elissy, Eilun /}on o"al/; a n d A ss istant Director, Bd(V SIdler. U nder studies: Fanny, RI/lh IFikillg.rlad: Betty N o ntgomerl'. Kathleen G oodwolI.ali: Edith Sherman, ,l/af".V Rulh Riedel; Mrs. btontgom er:r. ,1/t1f:y .//ltl CarmlheN: Virginia l \ lontgomery, 11/1l1e Lalll 'le Tllrhen'Ilfe ; j \ tadge Y ou n g. Charlolle Randall : Louise Lawton, Elill or .llulftllle: and / t i ss I\\elissy, OlplI Roe. T his was the fir s t time in C H S. that there were any under'ltudies in pli'lYs presented. All in all. the Junior-Sen ior Dramatic C lub had a most successful year and h:\d the plea sure of being thc first to make u se of the large stage in the auditorium with much sati sfaction. 49

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THE EFFE UBE "LUB B.IJ .lInt:l! 56 \\'hen ,'\is. Spencer cam e t o Cristobal H i g h School four vears ago, s h e started the Effe Kube ](lub. It was extremely s uccessful for two -,"C;'Irs, but la s t year there no clllb. This year J\' l r s Spencer reorganized the club with an entirely [Jew group of students from the Sophomore and Freshman cla ss e s. j\\cetings a r e h e ld c\"cry other Thmsday in the auditorium with the president. James 0,1,)'5, presi d ing. Other officel's are: Betty j\kCleary. "ice-president: E\ e!Yll Dwyer, secretary: and K'Lthleen Phillip1<. trensurer. The club has'l membership of .1.pproximatcly fifty students. The club made its debut befo r e the publi c on the {jrs t pro g ram h eld in the auditorium t his sc hoo l year. Sc\'cr,d m embers presented pantomimes whi c h were directed b y the club s p o nsor. l l r s. Spencer. They "At the Denti st" with Betty !\\CCleary and Ruth I\\oody: j\t the Photographer" with Lydi a Grav,IH Doris Ebeloll. Vernon Cia ril e, L o i s Heim. BeHy H a u ss Charles \V,ashabaugh a n d Anita Boggs: "j\' l r. .. staas, Se\'eral of these pantomimes were repeated f o r the pilrents o n V i s itors' Day. ;\t Christmas. the club presented .. one act Christmas play called "Beggars Can't be Chooser s. The cast in clude d Bobbie Durham. 1\.1thleen Phillips Ruth Moody. Oli\' e Aa ndoos. Lilian Chas e. Betty j\lcCleary. Jacqueline BI'iscoe. Agnes Reinke. Roderic k Cuthbertson and Charle s Washabaugh. [\'\rs, Spencer directed the play and )\'\ary Griffin was prompter. One of 1 rs. Spencer' s plans for the year wa s t o hil\ e member s direct som e of the one act plays. The person c ho s e n to direct the p i a." had to be abl e to read each p"r1 in the play to Mrs, Spencer and if he s howed s uffi cient abilty. our s p o nsor left him in charge of directing the play. The fir s t p i a." of this type presented to the public this yeM W,1S "Reverend P e ter Brice. Bachelor." T he membe r s in the cast were Doris Ebdo n. Jeannette Hyler. Lydia Gr,watt. E\' elyn Dwyer, L ois H eim, C.'ttalina Ecker and Louise de 130 Ossa, The pby was dit'ected h y I \ \ ar." Griffin. A one act play wa s prescntcd to thc audience whi c h ,dtended the Junior Col lege Party, and was repeated for the benefit 01 the lower c b ssmen on 1\'1Ollsol'ed the Jll niol' and the Selliot plays this year, both of w h i c h we r c g reat <;uC'cesse s T h e r e were t wo groups in iti"tcd into Ollr dull this ycar, .. tiding mallY new m embers to our roll The officer<; f o r this year :'Lr e : Anne Gibs on. President: Frank \Vashabilugh, Vice-Prcsident: Ruth Pi c k ell, l3e\'erl y j\\al' cll!>e, T rea!'>urer. 5 0

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P I IOTO PII OTO CLuB Thc P ho t o duh w ; \ s organi z e d with ,'lr. ,\tiller as s p o n sor. ;"Ind of thirtecn m c mbers. R a lph Oal i s \\";"IS eleded P rc s id ent; Willi a m Il ill. TJ"(::d sure r ; tind \ 'i o b Tuc k Sec-reLlry. With the of tin e;>;pert photographer. the clul, Illeml,c l ... \\"CI '(' into the I $e of.! c a l n e ra. and other t e chnique of printing ,me! deleloping. The ... lr,dio!1 flll"ni::.h e d a minimum quantity o f equipmt!nt and the cluh \\";"IS 8 il 'en a d : lrl room o f it.:; o\\"n S OI11(, o f the h O I's procee d e d t o \\"ith the aid of \\t. FringC!'. ,"Ill aulo lll:l ti c printer. : 1 wa s hin g t : m!1. .mel other d u lt r oo m necessiti es. T he cluj,. after ... e verdl m onth ... o f "olic it e d film .lnd n eg:llil' c s fr'OI11 the s tudents "lid be gan a ctua l w o rk Pi('\ure'" ot 1 ,IIi o u ... ... tndent org niz a ti QII" in{cl cl,ll>s d : ,,,,, t e:lIu s and students \Iere taken alld the Iwint "old t o the ... tudent .... \dditio n ;.J equipme n t has been b o u ght fr o m timc t o time until the dark r oo m h a ... t d,en Oil a l)I"ofe"'l>i o n d a ... p::-ct. T h e ne x t it e m under con sideration \\"ill be the construc ti o n o f an enbrg in c. lIner.! T he club ha s een I 'cduce d ill lI11Ill],e r in orele r th,"I! few e r ;Inc! m o r 'c intere ... { e d memherl> m;II conduct the illc r e; l s in g ;1I110 u n l o f I\o r k. This club il> illt e re ... till g. educati on,1i dnd l oc,dio n ; l!. It i s .:\!"o purely a l>tlld ent "eli"ity with only occ;"Is i o n;"lll>llggC"!:>ti o n s 0 r irllp l 'o I CI11C"llt I,y the ... poll!:>or . \\.\TI! CLCI3 5 1

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nEB.\ T E C LUB THE j \ \ ATHE! \ \ A T ICS CLU B 13.'1 "",1/,(111/ F. S/oll e 'J'; The J\\athematics Clu b waS orBa n ized t hi s year under the sponso rship of .\\r .. \\eyer for the purpose of ("onsiderin g m athe-mati c:1I probl e m s o f common interest. \ lectin gs were he ld o n the l irst j \ \ o nday of every m o n t h O n ce a m o nth t h e b\athe m a tics Club put so m e nteresting probl e m ill t he 7'rnde 11"";11.1, with the al l s wers appearin g i n the n cx t iss u e. The p rohle m s \\"er e or s uch a lli d c nt ; Fr;tnk Secretary' THE DEB!ITE C L U B 13.'1 Hdlltl .lIlull!!,. 'J'; T he O cl xtte C lub sponsored by \ \ r Hackett h t td a t the t ime of twenty members. The oflicers \\crc; Frr lllk \\';ls klhrHlg h Pres ide nt : \\'IT'. D a u g herty. V i(""e P rc<;ident: Edna ,\lu eller. Se cretary: a n d D oroth\" R oo.;. T rea s urer. Be s idc!> these t h e m e m be r s were : T heod o re I r i c k D\\"\'er f\rmando Gas peri, l e : ry Gorin, Gordon Hutch i n s Allen Jacqu es. O l ga D o minguez. R n c he l C u e .... ta. lohn P ;d m Robert P e terson, P hi l R e i d el!. R i c hard R e i n h o l d Sidney Wha rton. T o m R w;;"ell a n d C olin Campbell. The meetin gs were hel d e\'c ry third and f o urth \ \o!lcby of the m o n t h At these meetings a deb
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SCPPER CLCI3 wtl<; ge n e r "lly g il e n in \\hic h the chairma n. ;,nd time-I ,cepe r w e rc appointed from the cluh. T h e E xecutil(' C Olllmittee ge n e rnli y Ille e t the wee k the meeting t o phn f OI" the m eeting. The oilly puhlic appea r a n c e of the Debate Club w : ,..;; n dehate g i"en in the auditorium 011 the to p i c "Heso h 'e d that C.1pit a ] Puni shment Sho uld Be Abolis hed T o m Hu..;;<.;,,11 wa s the c h a irm a n and intro-Theo d o r e A"ll::-.toO<';. alternate. The judge ... for tllc del)a!e \\,el e : .\\r s. C A H earllc. Rel' e rend C I .. ,\ \org ;,Il. ; ,lId Judg e E I P Tlleil" d c c i s i r m \\'; ,<.; in 1':1.\'01" of the :\Ili\'[l1: lIi\ c w h o rn;lillt:lin e:i til;\! capital p lli s hnl('llt hc ahol ish e d The Oo,;l,;l l e cruh clim :l.\ed i l s by Ilal ing .III all day pi c ni c at Filll" \S011S F';lI'lll ill G"tllil L ; d c. Satllrday . \ l.ll"cll 24th. SCIENCE C L UB .\mo n g the-m a n y d u l,,> II hi c h o r ganize d t hi ... school y",1r \\a<; th" Sc i e n c e C l uh. ,>, m n ... ore-d h y \ \ r Vint o n It s Ille rllh e r ... hip \ \ : 1<'; cc>mposc d of stude nt s of t he SOph oIllD r e. J uni ol", lIld Senio r :11'.1 .. h -BO Y S LETTER eLl': B 53

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LETTER CLCB men who had a "13" ;wera ge in s .... ien ce. T he pUl'pose nft he club was 10 carryon s u c h experiments:ls might help the students who wcrc cspeci :llly interested in scie n ce. A few experiments were performed a n d other plans were form u lated w h i c h co uld n o t be put into effect bec;lllse of the rc\ i s ion in the eighth period sc hed ule T he officers of the Science Club \\"crc: Wendell Cotion. P re sident: William Hanna, Vice P re s ide nt; Ernes t Jaramillo, SeCl'e1:iry; and Phillip R iedel. TIca s l!r er. SUPPER CLUB 8.'1 .dlllla Reilly 'J) The Suppcr Club is 111 orgl nlzrttlOn compc>s e d eltll e h 0 1 Ilig h s c hool gill" Sin c e the G irl R esef\'c mO\'cment b eg:l n in 1921 .,lI Supper C lubs \\e, e u ndel the e ill e cbon 01 t h e Y \V. C A. H owe\cr. at the end of J une. 1933. the Y. \V C } \ clubs (If the I sthmus \\e l e stopped becau"e of lack of support T helcf o re the S upper C lub tl l i s year ha s been e ntirely ca n i ed Oil ;mel supen' i s e d by the g irl s and thei r ad\ isors. j \ \ r s. Spencer, ':\\argiHel D .. l.\ i s :lnd ,\\argaret Hayes. } \ \' er.\ acti\' e program has b ee n carri ed out by
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the night of M al'c h 2,)nl. "Sol o D a ssett ,'Hld H i s Boys" fllrn i s hcd the dance nw ... i c. The gym \\,:IS appropritilel y decorated w ith s port s supplies. On one of the ha s l (c t s W;i S a lool btdl dummy. O\'er the other ba skets h;,sehall h;)IS lien,' tlnc! hang in g from the raftcr" w('fC l, a:.cI .. dl ;)l1d ho x in g T hc atmosphcre wa s extrcmel y ;Ith lctic ;)nd e\'eryone enjoyed thc (bllc i ng-. j\\ r Vinton i s the ;uh isor of the Boys' V ilrs ity :tnd Miss B t lile.\'. of the Girls' Varsity_ The h o y oHicer-.. l3ill \\'heeler. President: Joe l3:tz:tl1. Vicc P rc sident; j\b:-. Sanders Trcas uI'cr; Rohert i\'cch, The of/icers of the G i r l s Varsih' Club are: Elizilbcth Hayes. P resi d e nt: Bli ss, SCCTetary: Belty Stetlcr, Soci;rl Chaillllan. V I SIT/\TIO:'\ D A Y The annual Day wa held in the afternoon and c\' cni n g of J :L1ll1ar." I::!. This YC; lr ;1 c h : .ngc made f l 'o m thc full wce k plogr;.m ofbst ye:tr to:t s in g le cI; I Y of I'isi l ;.tioll in orcle r th;.t who wc.e employed during the cI;1Y could :"te n d the el'e ning sess ion T o faci lit:tt e p;1ss in g in the cOITidors. locati o n of rooms ; Ind t o ;1\'oiJ confu s ion.;1 co nUllittee 11':1'> c ho,en ('o n s i s ting of tl\' O students from each cI:t s s T h e re3ponsibility of the plthlicity Ind org:.niz;1tioll of day was g il'en t o the heads of the TRADE \\'1:'\0 Statf. "'il/iam Beers ;1nd Anna Reilly. ;\t 7:30 o'cloc k after the regul:tr cla sses ;In a:,sembly progr;lI11 wa s held in the auditorium. T he pUI'j)o:>e of thi s progr.'l m was to explai n and d e monstrat e the ilc t i\ ities of \'arious ex t ra-C'ltr r i CIIl: lr org:lnization s in the Junior :tncl Senior Hi g h School s. I t s s uccess was due largely to the H igh S c h oo l Orc he s tr:t. the E ffe J{l1be J{lu b. Mr. Miller's Tumhlers the Sp.'llli s h Cluh. ;1nd the Junior-Senior Dramatic C ll1L. An informal dance W;1S held in the gym foll o win g the A ss e m hly P rogram I t \\'as s p nn:,o red by the C"rihbe;1Il St:lff and w s ;1 gr;1nd s ucceso;;. \Vh e n a count \\' ,'I S made of the number .lttending it 11';1.:, I Ollne! that 328 h .. d s i g ned the l'cg i s tl';1t i o n s l i p s T hi s exceeded la s t ye;1.r s attencbnce by al most 100 The fa c t that regis{ J 'ation ce a se d befor e the eighth period. ;1Tld th:tt the building i s s o open would indicate tlwt there were nwny more \ i sitors who did not s ign On t h e whole. Visitatio n Day thisye:tr wa s a huge s u ccess : .nel w e lake thi:. opportunity t o thanl, the parents for their cooperation. 1:= SCHOOL NOTES .IJaht:/,t: 811' ..... ]-/ :-;=---Sept. 26. "Sc h oo l days, sc h oo l days, .------=-, dear o!d"o h, o h t h at's enuf of that a n c i e nt dit tv! But t h e n again L mayb e th i s year s h all b e o \'erflowing w i t h dear old golden rul e da vs.' B ecause we h a L \ e a "Lee-voo n e w Hi:; h Sch oo l Bldg! 'n ('\ 'erything that goes wit h it. Sept 27. Are we lu c ky? Y es Due to t h e fact t hat w e ha\,('-two n ew teachers and they b oth a ppeal' t o b e \ e r y con ge nial. J \ \ i ss F e rn e B ow man i s aliI' new H o u se h o l d Ads teach e r and s h e will a lso tak e c h a r ge of t h e cafe t e ria Yum-yum my! [ \ 1.. P a u l [ \ \ilb i s our n e w t-each elof Sc i e nce a n d A lgebra. Alth0' h e tau g h t in B a lboa last veal' h e i s a "new nUnlb e l'" t o us. S ept. 28. \VaHa' day??? Each class 55 endured for onlv I S minutes the n sc h ool was out. Now that's id calmd hinl
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stu dents have adorn e d the m se l ves with the i r bes t be h a \ i o r s. attempting t o m a k e a favor abl e impress i o n es p ec i ally o n the n ew t eac h e r s. O c t. -I. The assembl y h e ld t oday wa s conduc t e d b y the students Ann a R e ill y t old o f a n ew pl a n t o be o r ganize d into the sc h ool. the Student A ssoc i a ti o n, try in g to c ut d ow n the ex p e n ses o f the soc i a l acti\ iti es o f the sc h ool. Colin Campbell ga v e a t a lk in r egard t o the sc h oo l n ews p a p e r. the d uties o f the s taff. and the n e w mim eog r aph mac hin e. O cL 5 The two dramatic clubs h eld the ir first m ee tin g t o d ay. The Jr.-Sr. Dra mati c Club unde r th e abl e instructi o n o f J 'liss Kimbro h a d so m e o f the f o rm e r Thes pi a n s of last year a nd a l so a l a r ge numbe r o f n ew dramatic club m embe r s The Effe Ku be Klub h as 'Irs Sp e n ce r a s it s adv i sor. O ve r fift y littl e fr es hmen and so ph o m o r es have j oine d the club. Mayb e these little sco bi es will s h o w so m e tal e nt, who kn o w s ? The G;rl s' Supp e r Club h ele! ;t s Grs t m ee tin g today in the n ew cafe t eria. Sin ce i t was a n e w pl ace o f m ee tin g, n o d oubt c uri os ity cau se d the large atte nd a n ce. O ct. 9 Our fir s t n e w spape r f o r thi s schoo l year w as di stribute d t oday. h a t a p a p e r Y o u s h o uld h a \ 'e read itl Grea t p r oductio n s a nd s t a rtlin g n e w s i s expec t ed fr o m these two s t affs in the future judging f r o m th e ir fir s t ef-f ort. Od. II T o da y all cla sses h e l d t h e electio n o f officers. A n ew l ea f mus t h a \ 'e been t urn ed O \ 'el' o r so m ething h as h
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Oct. ')0. T oday the Spanis h Cl u b h e l d an impo rt-an t m eeting co nc e rn ing the i n i t iatio n o f n e w m embe rs. The L ette r Club h eld a H allow ee n Partv at t h e N e w Cri s t o bal Cl u b h ollse a n d a party it wa sl Jll s t ask so m e bnd.y who was t h e r e. Oct. 31. \\' hat a dav th i s turne d out to' b e--Yo u'd t h ink Fran ldin D. R oos r \ 'elt himse lf wa s here t o v i s i t u s but h e wasnt. H owe 'e r the forma l in a u g uratio n of ofhcer s a n d r eprese n ta t i es o f t h e Gcw e r al Studen t B ody would r e m i nd VOLI of a sess i o n in C o n g r ess. J u d ge and R e"ere nd Cecil L. j \ \organ were the h o n o r ed guests at t h i s m ee ti n g. R e \ 'e r e nd j \ \ o r ga n ga \ 'e aliI' newl y e lected pres i d e nt-. Frank \\'ash aball g h t h e oa t h o f office. It's quite ;111 h o nor t o b e c h ose n Grst-p l'esident in OUI' n e w sc ho o l buildin g, Nov. I Sevcl'al o f t h e clubs e n t e r t ained j o in!l." i n t h e assembl y today. Two Span i s h C lub me m bel's H enry Sanch ez and Al ejandro \ Von g w i t h the ir g u i t a r s ga \ e u s sever al select i o n s of Hawai ian m u s i c -the so ri t h a t lull s o n e to drea m of sa ndv b eac h es and m oo n-light ni ghts -The Effe Kube Klub offe r ed five VCI'\' clever pan t o mi m es The J I '.-S r Club had bette r wake u p and do things if t hey d on't \\'ant to be d o wn ed b y the l o w e r cl ass m en. Nov. 2, Girl s volley b all team had a n o t h er game a g a i n s t t h e m e n of t h e fac u lty. This time they weren't beat e n so badly. They weren't quite so ove rc o m e by th ose s w ell physiCJu es th i s t -ime, No\'. 3. A n o t h e r dav for n o t a t ion. Panamanian I nd e pe n de n 'ce Day, a nd t h i s tim e we have a h o l iday. All day, Nov. -1-. Cristobal see m s t o be having hard lu c k t h i s year The boys socce r team played against Bal b oa at K o k onut P a r k but w e r e un a bl e t o co m e out con querol 's. T h e final SCOI 'e b e i n g 2-0 a n d w e had t h e goose egg. The g irls volley h a l l also h a d t h e sa m e lu c k b u t t h e ir game was t h e b es t o n e held this year for it wa s full o f exc it e m ent t h e sco l 'e being ti e d seve ral t i m es dtll"in g the ga m e Nov. 6. Fo r more t h a n two hours the 5 7 .-===:;::;-,","n Executive Cou n cil o f the S t udent A s sociatio n discussed Nov. 8. The Ex. Counci l h eld a gen e r a l m eeting for the whole stud ent b ody todav in t h e a udit o rium. The Constitution 'was read to t h e stud e nt s to se e if t h ey approved. A s k so m e of t h e m about it. thev wou ldn' t e\' e n b e abl e to t ell whatfor t here were s o m a ny s leepy h eads. Ncw. 9. J \ \ore class meetin gs toda.v. T he.v're all pla nnin g grea t thin gs to be d o n e, each cla ss s trivi n g t o out-do the a t h er. it would see m Supper Club had anoth e r del i c iou s meal se r ved i n th e cafeteri a. About forty girls a tt e n d ed maybe it's beca u se B e t t y Stetler i s the pl' cs i d e nf t h i s ycar. Nov. 10. The Caribbean Staff h eld a f orma l dance in t h e Kym Eve l'Y b o d y atte nd e d and had a kee n time since ':Bi l gray's o r c h estra furni s h e d th e m u S I C Nov. II. J u ni o r College d efea t s th e Cris t o b a l boys socce r team a ga in at Balboa b y aile p oint. It's t oo bad we could n't ha\'e h a d t hat o n e p o i n t i nstead of Balboa. T h e sa m e stor y goes for t h e girls \ oiley bali t e a m \ V e a l e good lose l 's t h o ugh and t hat's so methille:' No\ 1.3. Soccer leagu e ga m es start eel today wit h t h e Jrs. ve r s u s t h e Varsi t y team. I n spite o f two extra qua rt -ers the sco r e r e m aine d t i e. Nov. J-l. The Srs. d idn't-make a ve r v good s h o wi n g today in t h e s o cce r Out of t h e wh o l e S r cla ss o nlv o n e bov t u rn ed o u t to pla y agai n st Soph s n aturallv t h e 51'S. l os t bv d e f a ult. O u r fait hful SI'. d ese r ves a No,' IS. R e p ort card s w e r e g i ve n o ut todav. Ouite a few made the h o n o r r oll a nd sad to r e l a t e seve r al othe r s were m a d e inel i g ibl e f o r ath le{-i cs. T h e n ext six weeks will probably bl'ing t hem back on t h e team agai n L et's h o p e so fOl' se 'el'a l of our playel 's were la i d off, as '{-wer e,

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Re\ C L j\lo rgan wa s t h e speake r f o r t h e assembly t o day a nd gave a talk o n the "Past Generati o n." H i s talk was a i ded bv se\'eral humorou s r e mark s w hi c h we r e e njoyed by t h e students, The more serio u s parts w ill. n o d o ubt, be a help to u s a ll. Nov. 1 6. The Ex. Counc i l h e l d a m eet in g at Fra nk \Va shabaug h's h o u se in o rd e r to revi se t h e Constitutio n. The meetin g was lo n g but d e li c io u s r efres h m e n t s wer e se n 'e d w hi c h made a h appy e n d in g t o r ewa r d our labor. Nov. 17. New S p a ni s h d u b m embe r s \\el 'e initi a t ed t o ni g h t a n d a n inte restin g program and refr es hm e nts w e r e se r vecl too. The SUPPf'1' Club g ir l s gave a tea today in the caf e t eria f o r t h e ir m o t h ers. B etty Stetler, president of the dub, 1\1rS. Spen. ce l ', ad\"isor, and / \\.-s. C A. Hearn e. past advisor all s p o k e of diffe r ent phases o f the dubs acti v iti es a nd aims. No\". 1 8. Girls \ 'olley ball team s till has t h e sa m e s t o r y they cam e in seco nd, but t h e boys have a diffe r e n t tale t o t e ll t h i s t i m e. Don't ge t exc i t e d, f ol' we o nl y WOIl b y d e fault since th e Jr Coll ege didn't appear o n the sce n e t o play u s. N o \ 20. The f l 'es hm e n team won t h e c h a mpi o n ship for the Socce r l eagu e w h e n th ey d e f ea t e d the facu l t y t o d ay. N ov. 22. Ex. C o un c i l h e l d a m eeti n g in the assembly t oday f o r t h e wh o le student b o d y a n d they a lso h e ld a n othe r meetin g a ft e r sc h ool. These Ex. Council m eetings mu s t be so meth i n g o f great importance f o r t hey have t h e m so fr e quently. No\,. 27. At t h e ed itoria l staff m eet ing of o u r sc hool pape r, "Trade \Vind" e \'eryone see m ed t o h a \' e a l o n g face. The r easo n f o r t -hat-being t -hat-I \ \.. F ra nk s t o l d the m a t hing o r two abou t last w ee k' s editio n o f t h e p a p e r. His I 'emarks w e r e n o t ve r y favorabl e but do u bt l ess hi s cri tici s m o f the p a p e r wa s for o u r b e n e fit. No\,. 29. The Sen i o r s h eld a most s u ccess ful dance in the gym. E ve r y t h ing fr o m t h e s napp y mu s i c tn the slippe,'y borax bro u g h t f orth noth i n g b ut pra i se -art i s ti c d eco r a ti o n s in r e d a nd white, the Senior c lass co lors. were u se d in profus i on. Sinc e it i s Thnnksgi\"ing tomolTow everyon e will be a b l e to s l ee p l a t e t h e m O l'llin g nfter. Ain't that sllmpin' t o be thankful f o r? 5 8 Nov. 30. Not a fatal tragedy, but j u st-a tragedy occurre d today w h e n C h a r les B ath d i s locatecl hi s kn ee in the football ga me at K oko nut Park The ga m e was supposed to have b ee n p layed b y Juni o r s a n d Sen io r s, but prove d t o have P G.'s, Junior College stud ents. outs id e r s, a nd w hat-have-you o n the teams. The ga m e was just a n appe t iz e r f o r t h e Thanksgi v in g turkey to follow, Nov. 31. Friday, a nay of vacati o n a nd a l 'e the kids taking advantage of i t. Pi c nics a nd sunbrun, p arties a nd s l eepy heads a nd everything t hat goes with it. D ec. 4. Afte r a three anda -h a lf day vacat i o n we kid s don't f ee l mu c h like attendin g sc h oo l t oday, but most ever y o n e i s h e re, the majority of u s b e in g r e d as a b ee t or b r ow n as a n Indian. D ec. 6. "Sh o uld Capital Pun i shment B e Abolis h ed" was t h e t o p ic o f t h e d ebate presented t oday in the auditorium. I t was the fir s t o f its kind g i ve n a nd was a ve r y creditabl e p erformance. The Ex. Coun cil h e l d a noth e r m eeting today and invited J\lr. Fra n ks as a g uest. \ V h at" a meetinsr that was. Y o u shoul d have h eard i t D ec. 7. The J r s. we r e d efea t e d b y t h ose sophisticated Seniors in a ga m e o f football to the tune o f 1 8-0. The g r o un d wa s real muddy so maybe that is the J r s, exc u se f o r n o t winning. D ec. 8. S up per C l u b h ad a box l un c h in s tead o f a r eg ol a r suppe r a t the ir m eetin g this P M. in t h e cafeteri a. T oday was the last day t o pay y our Student A ssoc iati o n d u es Too b a d for those who have not already p aid, f o r that extra fifty cent s mi ght co m e in handy so m e tim e. D ec, 9. P eddl ing coo kies j ust b e fore C h r i stmas pro\"ed t o b e q uite s u ccess ful t o t h e Suppe r Club f o r a ll t h e ir cook ies were so l d l o n g b e f o r e the m orning was over D ec It. Caribbea n staff meeting today. They see m to b e k e e pin g all in formc:ati o n to the m sel \'es. but-frolll the m 'ys t eriolls action s co mpilin g the 1 93-1 annua l see m s to b e ver y se r iolls bu s i n ess D ec 1 3. At t h e cla ss meetings t o day. the Junio r s and S e ni o r s met t ogethe r in o rd e r to discu ss p la n s f o r the Banque t The Junio r s are Iowan funds a nd unl ess m o n ey co m es in from so m e source t h e Se ni ol's w ill b e out of lu c k f o r t h e ir anticip a t e J b anque t. \Ve mi ght ha\'e a "de press i on" bread l i n e at l e a s t D ec. I t, The Jr.Sr. Dra m a ti c club h e l d it s dress r e hear sa l f o r the play Happ y L a ndings" t o b e prese n t e d t o m orrow f r o m the la u g h s we h ea rd thru the win d o w s it-mu st-b e good.

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D ec. 1 5. '-' Happy Landings" m a l in ee a nd e v e nin g p erform a nce pro\'ccI t o b e m os t s uccessful. The play had m any humorolls s p o t s a n d the r e wa s al so muc h fast m oving actio n whi c h made the play m()r c inte r es tin g I t o l d y o u so, D ec. 20. A II aft ernoo n classes we r e c ut s hort and w e h a d an assembly p l'C g r a m whi c h began at I :-15. Our own T h omas R a nl t in '33 now preside nt of hi s class at-t h e }", C ollege a nd I'lr. S p a l din g, prin c ip a l o f the Jr. C ollege t' nli g ht e n e d liS as t o the impodant features of t h e Jr. College. The r es t of the assembly p e ri o d wa s tUl'Ile d in t o a X ma s prog r a m. "Th" Internatio n a l Christmas Pro!!rnm Bro adcast" wa s the m a in feature a nel was 'cr \' cleverl\' d o n e w i t h lames O a \'::. actin g radio ;1Il1l0 Uncer. Th'at nite the Spani s h club, "La Pas" h e l d t heir formal initiation of 22 n ew m embers. EClts a nd a goo d program with Ducru e t a s th eir s peaker made a m os t pleasant evenin g D ec 2 1 Anothe r form o f Xmas en t e rt A inm e nt W<1S the p lay "Be.s-gars Can't B e C hoosers" prese nt e d by t h e Effe J{lIb e Killb t odav in th e a uditOl'i u m It was a g reat f o r t h e Xmas seaso n D ec. 22. Out X mas dance wa s a gl'eat even t It-i s ,nore blesse d t o o rri v e t h a n to 'ece i v e so thi s wa s a fr ee d7.nce for all S. A. m embe rs. Entertainm ent wa s fdr n i s h e d by Stell a B oggs and Cathleen Eckel' w h o did the nati \ 'e Spanis h P v lIe r a dan ce in costume. R e p o rt cards gi\' e n o u t today. Can y o u imagin e it. jus t befol'e X mas, o f all days. H o p e i t wo nt influe n ce o l d Santa Claus. Sch ool i s closed until J a nu ary 2, I q3 L HUfl' a h D ec. 23. A n 0the r d e feat-f o r Cristob a l w h e n t h e b ov s handball team l os t t o t h e Fleet Ai r P ractici n g f o r b o th ba se a n d handba ll. th e hvvs w e r e unahle (II k ee p lip th e good work i'n both so that's pl'o b ably \\'h y they dropped down in Iwndb all i nt endin g to star in baseball (goo d in t e n tion s anyway) D ec. 2 ,1. 'Twa s t-h e n it e h e f ol'e Xmas And the Not a creCltur e wa s ;.,: Not l., ---* ., . I s t h a t t u e vou r case o r dId c-:--' :VOll s tay up t o ccle-bratc Xmas E\'e? Surek all o f vo u w e r e good lit tl e boys a i d s 'an d w e n t t o bed early wait i' ; g fo, C l a u s to com e d o wn t h e chimnev t o fill your 59 D ec. 25. Chrlstmas1 Of all thmgs, Ii d idn't rainl D.d Santa C l a u s brin g y o u what-you asl{ed for? I\\e tooD ec, 28. C. H S. has two rivals o f ,---""""',----.., Ri c hard H al i bu, t o n ......a n d J ohnny \\le i se-mulie r : J\\alcolm Olley and Bill,)' H ollowell se t o u t t o swim t o Pedro \ \ ig u el. They go t as far a s D ari e n t odavsa w two '-"0-___ -==--' a lliga t o l's e n ro uiL'go in g oth e r way-col1ldno t s t o p -luc k y e h ",hat? -Dec. 30. Our m a r athon swimme r s reach e d theil' destina ti o n at n oon todav, The o nl v v i s ibl e rewards f o r the i r ach i c \ ;e m e n t a;'e a lo\'el y sunburn a nd cl'amped mus cle s. \Vhat w on't o n e e ndure f o r fame!! D ec. 3 1 New Y e cu,'s Eve! \\le r e vo u amo ngst those ce lebr a tin g the ga l a Jan, I The beginning o f a N ew Y cad H o w aoout those good r esolutio n sl And are you suffl?rin g t h e e ffects o f the m orn in g aft-e r the nile bcfOl'e ? J a n .:? Aft e a lon g t e n days \ aca t i o n students 'eturn to settl e d o wn 1"0 w or\{ o nce m o r c. Jan. 3. j\\rs. S p e ncer lIlt-e r e d f odh a lecture in the a u dit orium o n a n e w s u bject. They'" c fast becoming stri ct con cerning imitat i o n s to sc h oo l d a n ces. S too b ad. J a n 5. S ophomores held a n el ab orate dance in the gym Con gratulatio n s extended t o you f ol' .yolll' J a n h. Firs t ba se ball ga m e a t Bal b oa, but w e have a sad stor v to rela t e, C. H S. ca m e in seco n d 6-3. Bettcr lu c k n ex t tim e J a n 10 \V e a r e h o n o r e d b y h;win g Dr. Harold \Vil so n o f C. Z. J uni o Col l ege s pea k t o uppC cla ss m e n A r e we upper c1as s m e n luky? Jan. II. Seniors h eld a n impodant meeting, Prcpa"ati o n s f o r Comm e n ce m ent ha\'e already begun B e lie\'e it 01' n o t, we Seniors "Comme nc e in a \'ery f e w m o nths. Jan. 1 2 Vis itatio n Om' fc)f' man v ,----------.. and I \ \ u c h e nt ertain m e n t in the ir h o n o al so info rm a l dance in g.ym afte rwards -that e nt e rti-lin m en1" for the stu,--"ow.:"",""'''''''''''' d ents' pleasure,

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Jan. 1 3. N o t e the date1 3th! Thus C. H S. l os t the b ase b all ga m e. B ov H oo!! Jan. 1-1. Effc Kub e Killb ent ertained wit h a o n e -a c t play. 01'. Fl o w e r s o f )uni O l'College talk e d in the audito r ium afte r wClrds. A vcr" intel lectu a l :lfternoon wa s spen t b y all were present-. J a n 1 5. Supper Club entert a ined a l a Ita lv wh ich mean s w e had Ital i a n s pagh etti n o l ess. And o h l what a job eatin g the l o n g s lipp e r y strings -but it proved well worth t h e joh 'cau se it tasted so yummy! J a n 20. C H S. w hitewash e d t h e Junio r College in base ball 1 5I -Can you imag in e it ? Hurray! for C. t-1. S.! PhiS a f e w extra "rah r a h rahs1 j\lr. Hack ett-c haperon e d a l a l 'ge party t o F o rt I.o r e n zo. Oh! the sor e f ee t and sun-burne d backs! Spa ni s h C lu b h e ld a dance at B omba with m a n y promine n t offic i als at tending. Y o u s h ould have see n the effccts the punc h ( supposed l y ) had o n sevcral studen ts. J a n 2-1. Dr. J \ loody of the Junior C ollege s p o k e t o upper c1ass m e n. 'ust ask a Junio r o r Seni o r how they e n joyed it. o r w h a t t hey l e a rn e d ? I dare you J a n 25. National Thes pi a n s h e ld initiatio n and a buffet supper in t h e audito rium. j\lany n ew m e m be r s joined and di s played a g reat d ea l of t a l e n t at initia ti o n. \Vh a t t hi s younge r ge n e r a t i o n can't d o? \ Voe i s m e! J a n 26. C. H. S. was again h o n o r ed, by havin g Dr. L. Ak e r s peak in a uditorium. H e mus t b e qui t e a n important m a n 'ca u se ;"til t h e p eriods we r e s h o rt e n e d and that's a certa in s i g n o f "importancy." J a n 27. \Vhal a n unluc k v da" for c. H S. The bovs lost t o B H S. ;n baseball a nd the g irl s cam e in second i n basketba ll. T o u gh. uh but bette r lu ck next t im e. J a n 29. B i g H a ndball Tourna m e n t today. Facult y a ncl val 's ity played, but facu lt y WOI1. G oo d f o r t h e teac h e r s. b u t n o t s o good for t h e stude nt s Admi ss i o n wa s charged. and c h ee rin g refere e ing, and ullllJirin g al so b'y t C e t c hers! F e b. 1 j\\id-year exam s to(\ay. Oh w h a t t es t s! R e s ult s w ill be heard l a t er. Until the n we s hal l all s h a l
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bv (h e Pacific S i de. Dr .. \ \ead n w c r aft an cxc-cedi n'!i\' interest in'! talk. The Stringed fr o m Balboa f cl\'0 r ed u s with a !o"eiy mus ic a l program w hi(' h was grc!ltly appreciated by all. F e h. \VaU a'da ? I n other words w h (lt a cia\' fol' tho:: track mcd a t Fort D c H i s Guess wh o won? None th a n th e S e niors; HUl'r a h ; H UrI'ah1 Hurra h l And Illav I m id a f e w "ho t c hasT' F c b. 27. T hi s Bi n\ogy class mi ght b e w el! kno wn soon. \\I h a t tlo th ev d o but d i scove r a c r\, anc i e nt f oss i l whilc o n o n e o f th eil' fie ld trips. And wh at's morc J\lr. Vinto n intends t o tal{e the newl \' di sco e r ed f ossil t o Columbia /\1<11'. 2. N o\\' it's C. H. S.'s turn t o sco r e a n nthc!' triumph. \V e s taged a very s uccessful program a nd p ady for the b e n efit o f parent s and g u es t s t o meet th e J lInior ColJege fac ult y c e n if we d o admit it oUI'sehes. j \ \ ar. 5. T o dav i s the 1st da" of regi stra ti o n for those students a r c compel l ed to lis t e n to l ectures on dif f e r ent subjects a nd course,,>. Aren't wc Seniors i ucl
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progr?1l1 w hi c h prm ed t o b e int e n se l y a mu s lll g. Apr. IS. I t see m s that a ce rt -ain quar t e t t c bro k e a rul e a nd a r e n o w s u s p e nd e d fro m a n y m o r e ba s k etball ga m es These p eo pl e thatwill break rul es. Ap ril 1 7. Play practi ce has beg un t o s t a d to comme nce in earn es t The Firs t Act o f "Thread o f D es tin y i s b e in g r e hear se d t hi s wee k. These p eo p le a nd t h e ir southe rn (suppose dly) d r a wl. Apr. 18. A p e p rall y a t noo n today, but n o t even thatw o ulll make our c o a c h tak e back hi s r esignatio n L et's h o p e som.e o n e can m a k e him c h a n ge hi s mind agam Apr 21. Ah The Carniva l \Vh a t ,---"7""----, a ni ght. Havin g it in th e sc h oo l wa s so m e t hin g diffe r ent frolll t h e past-. but was it keen ? Just a s k m e. Apr 2 7 Ano th e r bas k e t ball gam e W e ll t his se r ies yet Apr .. 30. The l a s t d a y o f April and what a day it i s Fir s t it rain s a nd the n it p ours. But this afte rn oo n i s g r a nd. Suns hin e h e r e a nd s un s hine the r e. A pcrfect-day f o r h oo ky. j \ lay L T o day marks the e nd o f the fifth s i x wee k s. Ju s t think Se niors o nl y o n e m o r e s i x weeh p e l i od we're o ut. Oh! boy iu s t t o think o f it. H o w d o you think the S o ph s t ell the e nd o f th e six w e ek s No o t h e r wa y than b y g i ving a ve r y orig in a l b a rn dance in the gym \Vhat a dancC?! All the hay, a nd those c hi c k e ns! \Ve r e n 't-those farm e r s a n d f a rm e reHes cute tho u g h ? j\lay 7. A Blu e J\10 nd ay! H o n es t I nju n, today act-u ally i s a Blu e i \ l o nday; i n fact-a bla c k a nd blu e IVlonday B y t h a t I m ean-the s k y a nd th e cl o ud s and t h e h ea d s all appeal' so di s mal. j \lay 9. \Vh a t ash a me-?? and?? llluSt havC' h a d a fight or a quarre l la s t ni g h t. Jus t loo k a t th c m s t a r e daggel's a t each othe r Com e o n n ow, "({iss a nd m a k e u p j \ la'y II. An othe r basl
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Illa n y good.looking Itid s did 'yo u ? How ever it's n o t a lwavs that-clothes m;:ti w the m a n J lin e II, Ah 1 The Caribbeans cam e Ollt t o day. Aren't thcy keen ? I'll g uaran tee thev'rc muc h b e tl e r tha n VOLI p ected,' huh? June 1.1. Jus t thin\< S e n; o r s o nl y t wo m o r e davs and the n n o Illo r e. I s n t it a funny fune 1-1. Practi c in g m a r ching u p t o the s tage surely i s a q ueer sensati o n Foolin g around t oday i s al ri g h t. but to m orro \\' !lit e, ,yo u d better n o t e 'e n c rack a smile o r e l se -tha t i s until after the g r adua t io n cerem o n y i s o\cr. June 1 5. A t last the fin a l day has co m e. I'm so n er\ o u s m v teet h <1I'e c hat te;ing, However. I'ecei in g you I' d ipl o m a isn't so bad. Y o u r 101ces q ui" e r a lit t l e. but th a t' s a ll. The s peech es, Illu sic. d i p l o mas. flowcl' s and e\'crything \ \ 'as a lso lo\' c\ \ Howevel. I'm g lad it-o n ly happen s on ce. \Vasn'{-it fun at the d a nce in the gym'! I h o p e you h a d as p:oocl a time as I d id. \Vell. no\\' I b id thee far e w e ll a n d b est o f lu c k to the res t o r m \ classmates of the class ()r '3-1. 1====,= ALU M N I 1 1930 RALPH S CRL'i' \ ( a d d ress unIHl()'Vn ) j\lA\'I S E THIRLWALL. C I i s t o b al. C Z. R",: BLISS. Cc ; s t o b al. C. Z TJlO,\\AS L. COLEY, J r., (address unknown ). DELLA J RADIO"". Cc ;stobal. C. Z. E n::LYN E. G.\NZE. \\uLLER (j\\rs. H ) F ento n j\\add e n D a m, C. Z A LICE E. H ENTEIl (,'hs. J ac k ) Cor ; gan. B a lb oa C. 7.. j \ \ n. \\'I LLlA.\1 NE"''''_AN. j \ \ c m p h i s T enn. PAULINE HEHj\\AN, ( address unknown ) E L S I E B. BIRKELAND, 50 Neven s Stl 'eel' Brookl v n, N. Y VIC'I:OR M E LENDI-:Z. Col o n R de P E LEANon 1\1. F ITZGEIULD (i \lls. G .) Robin s.) n, B alboa. C. Z. FRANCES j\\. DAYS. G atun. C. Z. FHANCISCO \VONG. Box 173-1, C ri s t o b al. C. Z j\\. VlIlGI N I A C ri s t o b al. C. Z. EL S I E DARLEY. C I i s t o b al. C. Z. E BEVERLY T lillNER Cri s tohal. C. Z 1 VIRGINIA Sn:vENSON, Cristobal. C. Z. \\'ALT E R \VI K INGSTAD, Duke College, Durham, N C G \VIIEELE H Utic a j\\e m o r i a l Hospital. U tica, N. Y RICI-IAHD C SEnGEANT, (addl'css un known ) JAi'IES CA,\\PBELL. J r .. G eo r g i a Tech Atlanta Ga. RITA TEHESA St. Joseph's College. Phila d elphia. Pa. ARTHUR j\\t;NDBEllG. C I is t o b al. C. Z 63 : PIIOEBE O'OONNELL. B alboa, C. Z. OI\'IND ARNESON. I\r isti a n sund, Nor wav. T CORIHG1 \N. NE\vARI' : N. J J \ \AIHA C. STEWAHT (j\\rs. 0 ) Pana lll 1 Citv. NEIILS G JANSEN. (address unknown ) 1931 CAHLOS BOGART R \NKIN. \Vittinbe rr College. [ \ \eyers H a ll. Springfield. VEL.\IA HALL, Cristobal. C. Z. RUTII DUVALL, 2c)7-l Col c r ia n A\ cllue. C in c innati. O h io. ,\\AHlON NEELY. Cristobal. C. Z. TIIO, 'IAS PEscon. C ri s t o b al. C. Z. \VILLlAr-\ BAILEY, C ri s t o b al. C, Z. EnNES'!' BEHGEIl. C ri s t o b a l C. Z. CELESTE CLAHI\, (j \\rs. B ) P owell. B a l boa. C. z CnA\VF'OHD J CA.\IPBI-:LL. Emery Uni-versit y O xford, Ga. EDWARD CONIi:L1NG. G atun, C. Z. j \ \ARGAIlET M 0 .. \\'15. C: i s t v b al. C. Z. VINNIE ELSON, B ox 575, College S ta-t i o n Pullma n. \Vash ina:to n RUSSELL ELWELL. T )uke U ni\'crsitv. N.C. FAI1IAN ENGLANDEIl, (address un kn ow n ) CLAllA F H ISK, Box 728, Lcaningt o n OnU u 'io Canada. BL:IlTON HACI"ETT, C ri s tobal. C. Z. J OliN KELLY. (address unkno\\'n ) j\\"\IlI A KLEEF'I\ENS, C ri s tobal. C. Z. D l::METHA LEWIS. B alboa C. Z. PI-:RCIVAL LYEW. B ox 1 0 99. CI'istob31. C. Z.

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KENNETH l \ \AURER. B a lboa. C Z EUGENIA 1\1. 1\\cLAIN, C ri s t obal. C. Z. RONALD PHILLPOTTS, New Y ork Cit'y. BETTINA POWERS, F o r t H a ncock, N. J ANNA RYAN, -168 East-State Street-. Trenton, N. J ALOHA SLOCUM, Cri s tobal, C. Z. DOROTHY \VIRTZ, Cri s tobal, C Z. GEORGE WERTZ, Cristobal C. Z. BEN \VILLIANS, Cristobal. C. Z B..I,RBARA \\'EICK, France Fi e ld C Z. RXY,\iOND \VILL, C ri s tobal. C. Z. RICHARD WOOD, Cristobal. C. Z. II LICE I GOR tEL Y, C ri s t o b e.l, C Z. FRANK GRIESINGER, Georgi a Tech, At-lanta, Ga. EVELYN \VRIGH'I, (address unknown ) J.\-"1ES H.AYDEN, (address unknown ) VERONA C HERNAN. U niversity of Texas, Austin, T ex a s ROGER M HOWE. Purd u e U niver s ity, Lafayetle, Ind. CAnL K ARlcn, Gat-un C. Z. THEL.'iA KING, 27 Broadway T errace, New York C it y ALVIN A. LYEW, Colon, R de P. l\lARGARET l \ l l .RACHI, Colon, R. d e P ELWIN NEAL, Cristobal, C Z. I AMES WOOD, CRISTOBAl .. C Z. ELSIE NEELY, CHISTOBAL, C. Z BENJAj \ U N ROBERTS 701 UNION Street. U nion College, Schnect-a d y N. Y. JANET ROBINSON, B ox 133-1, \Villi a m a n d ) \1ary College, \VilJi a msburg Va. HERMAN RODS, Jr., Gatun, C Z. BRliCE SANDERS, Cristobal. C. Z. JESSIE S INCLAIR, (address unknown ) BETTY STAI ILER. (address unknown) ROBERT STEVENSON, C ri s t obal, C. Z. [NEZ THEOKTISTO, Colon, R. d e P. ALICIA TI-JIRLWALL. C ristobal, C. Z. JESSIE VANE, F ort S herm an, C Z. NELL \ V A llDLAW, Newcomb Coll ege. Josephine L o uie H o use, New Orleans, La. PERHY \ VASHABAVGI -I. Cri s t obal, C Z. Best w i s hes for a better "Caribbean" and bes,t, w i s hes t o you a ll for continued success. EDWIN \VE IS[\'iAN, Purdue Unive r s ity, LafayeHe, Ind. .\ {ALCOLN \VI-IEELEH. C ri s t o b al. C. Z. EU7ABETI-I \ VlIlTZ. Cri s t obal, C Z. 1 932 RANDOLPII j\\. \VIKINGSTAD. C ri s tobal C. Z } \ LBIN B. POllSSTIlO[\I, unknown ) ELEANOR 1 \1. R E INIIOLO, T ampa, Fla. HOW}\llD U. KEENAN, Purdu e U ni ve r sity. Lafa'yette. Ind. R I CIIAIW B TTEIN. P O I t R a ndolph, C. Z. GLADYS BLISS, Cris tobal, C. Z. 64 ALLENYE j \ \RTLE DEAKINS, Gatun, C.Z. I AR" C. DEANS, Cri stobal, C. Z. JOHN D E LANEY, (address unlmown ) DONA V EATON, Barnard College, Hewitt H a ll. New York Cily. "Best wishes and all the lu c k in the world t o the class o f 1 934." JOSEPH EBDON, Gatun, C. Z. fIARRY C EGOLF, G atlin, C Z. VIV IAN G EL[\lGREN, (address known ) HOWARD S. ENGELKE, Cri st-o b al, C. Z MARIE ENSRUD, (address unknown ). JOSE A NTONIO F E R:"lANDEZ. Colon. R de P .. 1 933 HAROL D AGNEW. (address unknown ) WEBSTER BEARD, B alboa C. Z HOWARD BEHH) Severn School, Sever-na Park, Md. CLIFTO N BHOWN, U niver s ity o f T e nnesee, Knoxvill e, T enn. ROBERT BROWN. Universitv of T en-nesee, Knoxville. T enn. IESUS DAVID, Gatlin, C. Z ERNEST DE LA OSSA. Columbia U ni -versity New Y o rk, N. Y. PARKER HANNA, Cristobal C. Z. ROBERT HANNA, Cristobal. C. Z. OSCAR HEILBRO N Colon, R de P CHARLES HOWE, P e r d u e U niver s ity, L a fayette. [nd. \VILLIAM KEENAN, P erdue U niver sity, L a fayette, Ind. LOUIE I
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lIlJ'hLEfICI

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-; ... I : -. , ----. I iN 6 5

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SOCCFI1 SOCCEIl Thi:. year the :.occer t eoccer t ilt Ilent to B idboa o n O c;ob,-', at the Balboa ... t a diulll wit h ; r ;dhel' one ... ided ... col'e of -4 to O T h e (i ..... 1 IJolri of t he gilllle rll\J\'ed ra t her ... llIggishly due t o a muddy fidel. B..Jboa in the !-.econd om c ex. cellee t work. The l>econd game. p l,I\'cd at I\:okonut Park on :\'ol'el11l,cl' 4. did not bring the c h ; Hllpiolll>h i p :'11." closer to Cri"tob;d The home t ea m appe:lred \\ith :r much irnpro,'cd d efcllsil'e In. t the for. Ili ll'd line Wi!'" till lI'e:d c The S:UlIC li,'el." tb,oughou t with both tcnllls stri,-ing h:lnl t o he ictori o us. /3:dhoa e d ge d iu 1110 goa l s one in t h e thi.lI ql1:Hkr ;:.nd one in lhe fourth. The l'ictol'Y BASFB.\I.L 66

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lor B a l boa g.nc them t h e IUlU, 1i desired ch:nnpio n ship repbc i n g Crictob.d o n t h e pedc!>t ;tI ur "'lIp rl'llla Cy. T he line up ... for the te,un!> 13\1110'\ Su llied I II { 1 \rempe 131'0 \\,11 Ch.tftill Durirec R e i hcl' Gnrudl \\nwle'> l ,ipin,l(y Conill c P O SITIONS Go;dkeeper Lett F ullim c k R i g ht Fu!lhac k Center Il. d fhac k L eft Il al! 1'; l cl> R i g h t Win g Inter R i ght Cente r F orward Lert Lelt Wing CR15 T O[)A L .. l v l3az:; n \rhec ler H a nna R ell, lrdez B e rger Bejaran o Alberg-a H ill R i c h.ll'(lsoII \\'i d z \ \ \:! \\('Ie 110 more ",ucce ... ful .IS ; ill t t h e Junior C o l lege lhau we were I ga i n ... t [ h lhoa. C r i s to' I.:d ills t the til ... t g .lm e 10 the tUll e 2-0. T h\! fir ... t goa l m. lde ill t h e s e c o lld quarter IVa .. JHls hed Ihrou h the o. d p o ... l by R.IIII,in s I\ell trained loe. B o t h team s pil I up I hard fight and the pb. \ ('r!> de'>cl'\c (' reciit for t h eir ,pl e ndid p erform .lllcc. 67

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On Saturday. November II. the Junior College again defeated Cri:dobal with a 1 -0 score at the Balboa Stadium. There was no scoring in the fir s t half. and in the third quarter. Rankin put his well educated toe to work thus gaining the only goal of the ga me. BASEBALL Once m o re Balboa succeeded in taking the baseball laurels. The tas\{ seemed r .. i1her ea';y a s Balboa took four o f the 11\' e gilmcs p layed. It seems that in this sport (li s o Cristobal lost quite a few good men and had none with which t o replac e them. Due to the s tead.)' coachin g of Mr. j\ liller. the boys managed to display a creditable s h o wing for n e w material. B(liboa won the fir s t game by the score 6-3. Althou g h I \ax Sande rs. sturdy southpaw for Cris t obal. p itched a good game. we we r e unable to w in as he had no backing from the re s l of the team. Balboa took ad\'antage of the situation and chalk ed up six runs. Failure i n the first game could not be attributed to the fact t hat t h e team was not on its home field for it lost the s e cond game whi c h wa s played at the Mount Hope Stadium. The game was one of many errors on both s ides a nd the game ended w ith the score fI.-7 in favor of the \ i s itors There W(lS a laps e of two weeks between the sec o n d a n d third g(lmes. Balboa won t h is game with a margin of only three runs. The Cristobal team s howed much i mprovement and managed to get five runs howe\e r B ,dboa received e ight to win the ga m e. Onc e more the Cristobal boy s showed a dec ided impro\emenl. In the fourth game Balboa Wall b: a Illil:-gin o f only one run. the fIna l score being 6-5. Sanders p it ched a s p lendid game and Healy put up H good backstop. The la s t game was quite a surpris e a s the Cristobal boy s obtained ten runs while the Balboa boys only re ceived fou r Our Lay s re\'ealed a hidden ability a s they practically ran around Balboa in c ircles. Cristobal p layed one game with the Junior Collcge The score wa s rather lops ided. fifteen t o o n e in fa\ 'or of Cristob, d Box SCORE :"l A:-lF. PO Alberg a 1 7 10 7 4 Will s .... 21 6 2 6 Neel,' 9 1 1 5 10 Be .lrcL ....... 21 9 5 1 1 Sande r s M. 22 4 1 28 37 Curtis s 19 4 :; Wheelcr: 11 0 :; Wirtz 9 :; :; 20 Stone 9 1 0 :; 6 8 1 1 0 0 Sanders I 11 :; 0 0 0 1 9 Hana \\'. 5 0 0 0 0 19 Fernandez :; 1 2 0 0 0 Durham 1 0 0 0 0 0 Ebdon 1 0 0 0 0 0 Kin g R 8 0 1 0 2 1 9 TRACK J n th e I u'g cs t ,ll1d m os t re cord breaking track meet e\'er hel d B alboa. our dear old Al m a Mater came o ut of the scramble on top with ,\ s core of 47 p')ints whi l e Balboa had but 36. The meet wa s full of e xcitement to the spectators a s well a s to the participants. Paul B ea rd n o t onl y m a nag e d to pi l e up a n e l t sum of p o ints for the home tea m but a l s o broke two pre\ ioll s re cords and tied one a s well. "Little Geo r ge" Tarrtinger of Balboa took s e c ond pla c e among the honored. He walked off with thirteen p oints and two ncl\' re co rd s Five inter -sch o o l r ecords were broken. three by Cri stobal and two by Ba l boa. Beard hroke the 100 and 220 yard and H ollowe ll. the 880. Tarflinger broke h i s own re cord of last year b y putting the shot 42 feet and throwing t h e di sc u s s 100 fee t and one half in c h. Of the ten fir s t pla ces C r i stobal too k six and s hllt o u t Balbo a in the 220 yard das h by taking all three pla c es. The re lay team came in fir s t in the 880 but were di squalified Spirit ran hig h in lJoth tea m s and a s a re s u l t they managed to hreall fi\'e pre\ iou s re cords The follow in g i s thc result s of the meet: j O yd. f)a.rh Tilllr:: j.6.reco lI//.r t. Beard ( C ) 2 i\ Iberga ( C ) 3 Stc\'enson ( B ) BrQad J I/II/p -Di.r!al/cr:: J i j I 1 \ r a m e r ( B ) 2. NO\ 'e y ( B ) .1. Bardell ( C ) 220 yd. Dll.rh Tillie: 2 J .J' .((.rolld.r (.\"e Hecord) I B eard ( C ) ') Alberga ( C ) 3 B azan e C ) 68

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IIi!lh J I IIIIJ,-IIa:9h1: j jl/ I. n .llh ( C l 2 T ,lrflinger (11\ 3 l'l'omc r ( n ) l{J.ly.l. lhuhTim(, : 9 .'I.fU'( 'lIIlr ('\ '''' N,.,.."..I) ]. B e : u'd ( C ) ? A lbe r g:l ( C ) 3 (13) S;', ,,/ I-'II I -/)/ . I(I/lc(,: -12 1 {(}N ( V e ,, /l' e ('l >l'J ) 3 I\I'Olller ( B ) /Ji.{t'/f( Th"ow-Dirl(/lIa: 100']1 '!.. (,\ (,,,. R t coJrd) ]. Tarflin ger (13) ') Du ey ( C ) 3 BrowJl ( B ) 8StI.'Id, f),ult-Till/(': 2 ",/",1 6 .6 f tC, (Xc',,' R e ctJr.l) I. H o ll o wcll ( C ) 2 Reitsc r ( B ) 3 Quiteno (13) .1I .. .I,1el/ R .. ltlv-Tillle: 5 1 .J u f ,,d.r \\'011 b\' Cri stobal: / \\ar s h. \\'hee l er. Borden, j \ l nlte n S \'(I.vd Re/(I.t,-Tim .. : 1",/", -11,-1 ,fa, \\'on b \' Bal boa : 'Chaffing, !\lilc C : u tncy, J\\or:dc$ l'rOnler. TENN I S wa s the se c o n d doubles The res u lt s o f t h e m e e t ( Ir e : No I S in g l e s : ( B ) No 2 Singles : DONOVAN ( 8 ) nefc(ltcd 1':0. 3 Sin Q l c s : ,\\c Carlney ( 8 ) defeated :\0. I Doubl e s : A RR O Y O and L edfor s ( B ) defeated \NO H oeCllTEs H ILL a n d R E T ,\LLY S P I NELLA ( e l 6,64 ( C l 6 .. 1, 6 6 ]. ( e l 6. 6 ( e l 6.6. 3 No 2 D o uhl e s : : lIld ( C ) defeated and (ill 6 -1. 8. WOOD LOC1 WOOO 69

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BASKETB.\I.L The fir s t ga m e in the baskctball sc ri es W.1S held i n the Cri-:tobal H igh S c h oo l gymna ... ium on F r iday e\' e nin g the ].'')th of ;\pril. The bri lliant pa ss w o rk o n the PMt of the Cristobal te;)m made the g; lln e \' C I Y l i \ eI.v and intere'lting. The hom c team a l so clcri\ 'e d ;) great de;d of in spiration from the student h ody with the i r man v new chee rs. I n first quarter. b oth t ea m s s t;)rtecl off with;) b;mg-. ;ll1d terminate d with the sco re:l to 4 in fa\"o r o f Balboa. The secon d quarter was full of fOlil s committed by h oth teams, I-Iowe\'er. thc 1 6 in [a\'or of Cristob'll. By h o ld i n g its own in the lir s t t\\' o periods and fas t b reaking ;)nd b.1lTlin g ;)lIaci< in thc second half. the B :.Jboa quinte t swamped the Cri s tohal g r oup 34 t o 21 in the second g. 'lm e o f the the sel ie s betwee n the two school s. 13:l.IOO;Is ietor\" e\' ('ned the int er-sc h oo l sCIies ea c h team ha"ing one win and OIlC l oss. fir st quarter ended wit h the Gold C o a s t el's on the lOllg end of it t o s i x s("ore. The second !"Juarter. w h ich wa s the s lowest of t h e gt lm c. !'aw n e i t he:-team do any "er y h ea Y .. l eading l-t t o II Balboa's allack in the last h;)l f was featmcd I w the cxcellent shooting of Walte r F r i d;)." w h o sank three field goals. Cris tobal's defeat is partly ()ue t o the l o!'s of its sial' ce nt er. Charles Bath, who had t o be L : lken from the g: lIu e in the fir s t ... Cris t obal took the lead in the series hy winning the third gam e with the r ; lt hel' close score o f 25-23. The first quarte r \\';)s ,'ery li"ely and snappy with b oth t ea m s showing a line g; llll e o f ball. The quarter ended with the score 10 to -t in fa\' o r of Cris t o x.!. Balboa s..1nk the ban in the ha sket m any ti m es but the s h arp shootin g ;111(1 work of the h o m e t ea m e nabled t h e m t o keep the lead. The I .. s t quarter wa s vcry exciting for t h e players :\1Id spectntors as we ll. With bot h t eams fighting hnrd. with but :1 few m o r e minutes whi c h to pby. :lnd w ith the score tied. a fou l was cnlled o n a B a l boa player. The s h o t WOIS m ade good hy the Cristob:il playc r. The f ourlh game in the seri e s \\';)S played in B :dboa. The [blooa ba!'kcl ee r s Ill;)nageci t o chalk up another \ i cto[ y B oth team s managed to p r ese nt a borin g e:\hibition in the fir s t q uarier. The quintet of B a lbo" pbyers seemed to l"lm aroun d the C ris t oh,,1 p byers scor ing quite h ea \ i!y ;)11 during the ga m e. The \ i ctor." of the B a l bo;)n s has brought :Ibout ;I deadlock in the se rie s. I I o\\'e\'e r we hope th;)t the Cristob.11 boys w ill co m e o ut on top. The follow in g arc the Cristo\1.11 players: Neely. Will. M Sanders. I S;)ndcr s r1e;ar;lllo. A l h erg: l \\ h celer. Hanml. J3eard. B ath, I i ollowcll. Wharton. Ru ss ei. !-Io l in e. G IRlS SPORTS #'1 Br ,erle.ll "I1/,cu.'e 'j-l Thi s our \"oltey ball did not meet w iil! t h e M ICCCSS wh i c h we anti c ip:lt e d The i n t ersch oo l contes t W:lS \\'o n h y I .hlboa who C;lptured thrc( -OIlt of fi"e of the sch eduled Eac h co ntest or three Ia ... i ing O,'er;"\ peri o d of twenty minutes each \"or f 'l pro mi se of d C \' e topin g int o a te:lln which s h o uld offer ple nt y opp os i t ion to Balhoa. D An: Cll J ,, -rOLM J Oel .28 1 6 1 2 1 6 No, -t 1 5 22 1 9 No\. II II J 2 J 3 No\, 1 8 1 3 1 7 10 No\,. 25 14 1 7 8 St:lrting this year offi c ial ru l e ... we r e 'Idopted. 70 I3AI. I IO \ 2-4 22 26 1 6 2 1 2 8 I R 23 :'>t ')" 28 :iO I R I S P L ,\\'FIl AT Balbo:1

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\OLI.FY-!ULL Il.ISKETIl I LI. Thc rc,uit of the bn .. ke:h.dl se;t<.;lIl pron:.i di,;,,(I",)II tor Cri ... to!"1. B .dh:)a 11,1\ ing won .tll t l1lcc g. III1 C<: oj the "eric;. Arter "ufiering dc-f,-al in t h e OJ)::" ling C Ii,to l",1 t\j'I,I.Lyed ., mu c b irnpro\'ed le.11ll ill the "ccol,,1 CO:ltC';, .Ind I\,L'; d fc IL:d 011,' dfi..:r it l",itl e In B lllnl ::!31 The third g;ulI c of the seric" 1\.1" tl II. dk;LII.LY f nl' n "II.;).L who \\,hiie..I. ,,,h td Cri ... ['.1 a 19 ".:,we. ye: u ("l"1.;i"t III 1.:1.' of tili, ye,' r ... l o w er d "" m z ) a lt! the futllr..' 1 0 CHISI\II\\I B\lIIO\ PI.\YED.\ r J :LIl.27 (, 1 7 H ;dho;, F c h 3 2 1 ::!:) Cri"toL.tl F c b 1 0 () 1 9 I), Ll\)o., D ue t o 1.lc k of c 'llhu"i.,,,rn thc.c \1., ... no intcr-s .. honl indoor ha ... c l d l ('onks!. B e e,HI'>c the \ nnu,tI SOC" to p re.. ... [,don.' the ,;;irl ... 1t'lIni, tnt lln.tm c n!. no "eCOlm! 01 the med cnn b e put i n the 10(\\));;. BASI,!-:TB \I.L 7 1

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HUMOR By R ober l .lIolten 'J. A col o red preacher was trying t o impress upo n hi s congregati o n the terrors o f hell. ,; Aredern and Si s tern, h e calle d "has a n y of you all evel bee n t o Buming h a m, Alabama \\ har the big s teel wuks is?" "Ah been thai PaslIn, said o n e -'15 you b ee n in the mill s and i s you see the h o t -steel as it com es out o f de fulln ess? ('Yas Prcachuh, a see n it:' "'Ve il. d e n vou kno\\s h ow hot clat stuff i s. Ah t o t ell a ll VOll sinners d a ( \\hen dat stuff comes' fr o m cle m funaces it's h o t. res hot it s white s i zz lin g h o t. in fact none o f you can go near it without gcttin all s hri ve led to a c risp \Ve ll. Br e d c rn and Sis tern. in H ell d ey lIses clat stuff f a ice cream." .11011 ( in theater): "Say, you, h o wj a lik e fer t e ll m e ",h e r e t h e s m o kin room is, hey, kid ? Girl U.rher (sweet-Iy ) : "Go right dow n this h all and turn t o your ri ght. You will see a s i g n that says 'Gentlemen .' D on't pay any attentio n to it. Jus t go ri ght in Silence i s sa id t o b e saf e but a g reat deal of tro ubl e com es from the s till. "\"a it er,"' sa id the din e r \\aiting for hi s ;' have you ever been t o the zoo? "No. s ir'" "\Ve ll. go som e time you would enjoy see in g the turtles \\hizz in g by." Ired: (feeling swell) : d D o you kno\\' T y ke Cotton?" Sid ( n o t f ee lin g a n y m o r e ) : \Vhat's his n ame?" lIVe d:: ('\Vh o? If/alchmall.' "Young m a n, d o you in t e nd t o ki ss this poor inn ocent girl?" Y ou ll g mall: "Oh, no!" Iralell/nall.' ';The n h o ld this lante rn." Anna Reill y is so sure o f h e r self she d oes c r oss\\ o rd pu zz l es with a pen. 73 A little g irl wa s put in an upper berth o f a pu llman f o r the fir s t time, She k ept c rying unt il her m othe r told h e r n o t to be a fraid, bec a u se God \Voultd watc h over h e r "t\'\oth e r, are you the re?" "Yes." "Father, a reyou the r e? "Yes." A fellow passe n ge r lost all patience at this point and s h outed: "\Ve a r e a ll here! Y o u r fath e r and m other a nd brothers and s i s t e r s and aunts a nd uncl es and cousins All h e r el Now go to s leep." Pause, the n softly: "l"\ama1" ;'Yes." \ Vas that God ? A m ountaine r, w h o had been convicted of being a quic k trigge r feudist \\'as languishing in jail. His friends were trying to g e t him a pardo n, w hil e the opposite clan was pulling the strings against him and spreading aU sorts of slander about him Fin ally, moved to action h e wrote: ''Deer Guvne r, if you-all has h eered all r h ee r e d you-all h eered, you-all has h ee r e d a lie." J ack: "Do you know at what age a baby beg ;n s t o th;nk ? J(jc: "Certainl y min e began t o think I o u g ht t o walk the fl oo r \\ ith it at night the fir s t \\eek it was at home." How i s that clock you won at the fair?" "S\\ell. it d oes a n hour in less than o rt y -(i\ 'e minutes." .11r. IIm :kdf: "Give me t h r ee proofs the earth i s round. Bill H ollo
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j\\r. Seile r was g ivin g the class so m e o n the b e n efits of physical train-m g. Said he.: T e n years ago I was a \\alkin g m onument t o car e less livin g. a broke n do" n, disgraceful appearin g s p ec ime n o f huma nity an a l l t ogethe r worthless creature. t o mvself and t o t h e co mmunity. \Vhat d o you suppose has brought this c h a n ge in me?" He pause d fo r a m o m ent t o thrO\' out hi s c hest and see the e ffe c t of hi s \\ol 'ds. The n the poor Fros h d e m a nd ed: ';\\' hat change? \Vh er' the for e m a n stat e d the j ur y \\as unable t o reach a e rdict the judge said h e \\oul d have t.\"e1ve suppe r s sent in. upo n \\"hic h the for eman sa id: ;;['\<\ a y it p lease your h o n o r, make it e leven suppe r s and a bal e of hay." "Hey, Conductor," yelle d the tra,ell e r o n the P a n a m a R a i lr oa d, "That \\"as m y s t a t i o n wh y didn't you s t o p t h e re?" "\Ve d on't-stop the r e any m o re, explained the conductor, "The e ngineer i s mad at-the s tatio n agent." She : \ V o uld you leave ho m e f o r me?" fIe : '" \\ o uld leave a base b all gam e in the inning \\"ith the sco r e tied f o r you ''I'm going t o t o\, n w i t h you t hi s aft-er n oo n, J a m es," sai d the sol di e r's wife. I \\"ant t o do a little s hopping \\ hil e t h e b a rgains are s till on. " J unde r stand your plans," r esponde d h e r hu s b;md. "Th e d l i ve i s t o b e f o ll o w e d by a counte l attack UDid you hear J \ \ i ss C roon er's vOice o n t h e radi o last-ni g h t?" Yes I lis t e n ed ve l y cal'efu lly." 0 0 you t hink h e r o ice ought t o b e culti,a t ed?" "No I think it s h o uld have been h a r ve s t e d year s ago." "Rufus, d i d you go t o the lodge meet ing la s t nig ht?" "No s ir, \\c h a d to postpo n e it. The Grand AIJ-Po\\el'ful I nvin c i b l e .I\'\os l Supre m e U nconque rabl e Potenta t e got heat up by his ife." 74 Su//e rer: I have a terrible toothac h e. cou l d you s uggest som e kind of re l i ef?" Friend: I had a toot h ac h e myself last \, ee k and I went and m y lo v ing \\ ife ki sse d m e and co nsoled m e and i n a f e w minutes the pain \\as all gone. \Vh y d on't you try t h e sa m e sort of t h ing?" I t h ink 1 will. I s your wife h o m e no\\"?" Di.:.:.'/ Beer .!: Look m e over, Dad, nift y sce n e ry. \Vhat? I'll say. Sol o m o n in all hi s g lory wa s not arrayed l i l(e this." Hi.! Pop: ';No I reckon not. Sol o mon was a wise man. Con.rtituellt: "Senator, you pro mise d me a job and no w you say there are n o jobs." S e llat or: "No, t h e r e are n o jobs at present but 1 think I can get you app o inted too a co m mis s i o n t o investi ga t e w h y t h e r e are n o jobs." Captain: "You are charged with b e in g drunk. Have you anyth in g to say f o r yoursel f ?,' Sailor: "Si r, I have never been drunk in my lif e and never inte nd to b e -it m a k es m e f ee l so bad n ex t m o rn mg f)u:lor: i That man o wes m e 200 d o llar s f o r se rv i ces and h e not only r e fuses to pay but h e d oes n't even w orry ove r it." Sai d the young ques t ioner of the fam i ly: "Dad. am I made of dusH" P oor Po: "Yo u emphaticaJ!y are n o t, ot hen, i se you wo uld dry up so m etimes." {,illl e B oy: J \ '\ o t h e r, d o co \ s and b ees go t o hea ve n ? .lIo/her: \Vhy Sonny, w h a t a stran ge questi on! \Vhy?" { ,iltle noy: "Because if they d on't a ll the mil k a nd h o ney t h e preacher said was up the r e i s all cann e d goods and I'm tire d o f all s u c h things. Raining cat s and d ogs i s ,ery bad in d eed bu t hCliling s tl' ee t car s cou l d b e disastcl"Ou s.

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In darkes t Africa h,o nati,'es watched a leopard c hasin g a large fat m a n Said o n e "Can you s pot t h e w inner?'" The r e pl y cam e q:..Iic k ly, "The ,\ inn e r is spolte d." 1'':(I('he,.: I f a man has more tha n o n e \\ ife it i s calle d p o lygamy, \\' h a t i s it calle d if you have but o n e w i f e?'" Bo/Jby I re,.I:: j \ l o n o t o ny L ord \Viffl eb'y, during hi s f irst vis it t o t h c court c f I \ i n g L ouis X I V of Fra nce h a d hi s close r ese m b l a nce t o the I
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On a certa in Sunday m orning the past o r o f a Negro congregatio n noti ce d t hat a n old face h a d "eappear e d among hi s flock, and after t h e sermo n m a d e it a p o int t o wel co m e the suppose dl y r e p enta nt ba c k s lid e r. "Thi s i s t h e fir s t time I have see n you at churc h for a l o n g time," h e sa id ''I'm s h o 'ly g la d t o see you h e r e." "Ah d o n e had to com e. ex pl a in e d Rastus. "A h n eeds strength e n in' I'se got a j o h white. \ ashin' a c hi c k e n coo p an' bu ildin' a f e n ce a r oun' a watN-m e l o n patc h Small B c y (bragging ) : M y d addy i s traffi c co mmi ss ior,er, and \\ h e n h e drives hi s car h e doesn't have to pay a n y a U e n t io n t o traffi c rul es. f/i,f Fr iend: That's n (thing. 1'1y fathe r i s a truck dri ve r CU,f{c mer: Have you a boo k called 1 \1 a n, the 1 \ast e r of \Vo m e n?" liard-boiled Salug,'r!: Fiction depart. m e n t the oth e r side sir. R ace 'l' m e k Gambler (t-o hi s f"ie nd \\ h o has j u s t l os t hi s bankroll) : Sa y I kn ow a g u y w h o puts ever ything h e makes e n the h orses a nd yeth e i s never b roke. F riend: H ow can that b e? Race Tra c k Gambler: H e i s a h a rn ess manufacture r Ra.rlu,,: \Vhat yo' wukki n at n o\\? .I1o"e: A h i s a blacksmith in a caf e t eria. Ra,r/u.r: \Vhat yc.' mean ? .!"'.re: Ah s h oos flies! \Vh y i s J \ \abe l so angry? The pa pe r s gave a full account of h e r wedding. " Y es but th ey put i n tha t J \1i ss O g l e w ns married t o t h e \\ell-kn o\\n collector o f antiques." D iner: rave you a n y \\ i ld du c k?" if/ aileI': "No, s ir but we can t a k e a ta m e o n e a n d irrit a t e it f o r you." 76 Y o u see that g irl ? She s jus t got $200,000 for a s h ort love story." "Good heaven s that's a lot o f m o ney f o r a s hort stor y Did s h e sell the c in ema r i ghts?" "No, s h e sold it t o a jury." The m ea nill'; of the wo rd "collis io n \\as b eing ex pl a in e d by the t eac h e r of t h e class of s mall b oys and girl s. "A colli s ion," she said, "is w h e n (:, \ 0 thi n gs co m e t o g ethe r un e xp ec t e dly." Immediate l y a s mall bo y jumpe d up a nd said: Pl ease, teac h er, wc've had a collis io n at o ur h o me." "\Vhatever d o you mean?" "\Vell, m other's just had t w ins." "Dad," said son, "do you think they w ill ever find a substitute for gasoline?: "They have o n e n ow, son and I \\ i s h y ou'd give it a trial." "Huh?" queried son in c redulo u s ly. "I'v e never heard of it. \Vh a t i s it a n y way? "Sh oe leath er," ex pl a ined D a d T wo stud ents were unce rt-ainl y flivv e r in g t h eir way h o m e. "Bill," says H enry, I wanc h a b e very car e ful. Firs thing ya know you'll ha\'e u s in a ditch." J'1e?" Sc:'"lid Bill. ast onis hed, \Vhy, r thought you was driving. lie: I lik e your form. She: l \ '\ust-we go all over that agai n ? G e nlfeman: ( bewi l d e r e d at-e laborate wedding: you the bride g r oo m youn g m a n ? / f/eddill.9 GllUI. "No s ir, 1 am n o t \ \ a s eliminate d in the sem ifin a l s. \Vh at-'s yon?" asked D o n a ld, newl y arrive d in Canada. "That i s a m oose." "\Veel, i f yon's a wee bit m oose, s h ow m e one o f your old rat-s!"

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Tetll.h,r: I'm surprise d at you. Samm y \ Vicks. that you cannot t ell m e w h e n Columbus di scove r e d A meri cal \ Vhat does t h e c hapt e r h ea din g of the week's lesso n say? Samm.lf: Columbus, 1-192. Teacher: \ Vell. isn't that plain e n o u g h ? Did you ever see it before? Samm.ll: Y es' m but I ah,"ays tho u ght it was hi s telep h one number. Jim: "Sa\', J \1ik e. I h ea rd you \\"er e s i c k last \\"ee'k." Il ike; "Yes I \\"as, I had (-he n ew di sease calle d 'clothing s i c kn ess.'" Jim : \Vhat o n e arth i s that?" II ike: "\Vell, r had a coat o n m y t-ongu e a n d m y b reath cam e in s hort pants." "\Vhat's thI s. h o ne,,?" saI d 1\<\rs Y o un gbridge's h u sband h e spear e d a s lab fr o m the di s h "Luci fer cak e. dear," I t "hough t y o u sa i d you we r e goin g t o make a ngel cake." I was, but it f ell," D oc/or: I ,, o uld advise you, madam t o tai{c frequent baths, get plenty of f r es h a ir, a nd dress in coo l gow n s. P alicllt'J Hu,rbal/d ( later): \Vhat d i d the doctor say?" 1(' lle: H e said I ought to go t o P a lm Beach. a nd ( h e n to the m ountain s. A lso, that get so me n ew lig h t gowns at o n ce, "\Ve don't car e w hat you think: we want to \mo\\" ,, hat you kn o\\', s h outed the la\\yer "\Vell. I may as well get-off t h e stand the n," said t h e witne ss I can't t a lk without t h in l{in g, I ain't n o lawyer," IF/llie; "Pa, d oes bigam,v m ea n t hat a m a n has o n c w ife too many?" Pa: "Not n ecessa ril y so n A man can ha\'e o n e wife too man" and not be a b igami st." lI a: \\lilli e you com e upstairs with m e a n d I 'll (-each you to keep you r m outh shut 1" 77 Pro je.r ror: 1 say, your t ubular all' container has lost-its rotunditv. l l olol'i.rl: \Vhat -Proju.rol': The cylind e r appar atus w hi c h supports your "ehi cle i s no l o nger inflated, But-Pro/c',f,ror: The e la s ti c fabric su n-ound in g the c i l 'c u l a r fram e w h ose success i, 'e revolufi o n s bea r you onward in s pa ce has n o t r etained its pri s tin e r oundness, Small BC:IJ: H ey mi st-cr, you got -a flat til'c! POI/celllall (to injured pedestrian ) : "You sav h e didn't blo\\' hi s h o rn, e h ? Arc you "a married m a n ? "No, s ir this is the \\ o rst thing that e\'er h appened to me." "Say J oe, \\" hal's t h e p enalty for biga mv?" "'T wo moth c l 'in-la\\s. /I (}lher: "Com e, B o b bie, do n't b e a litt l e s.:\\'age, k i ss the lady," Bobbie: No, s he's a naught y lad y I f I kiss her s h e may gi \ e m e a slap just as s h e did papa." Fir .rl Gambll!r (at race track) : "Say d o vou kn o\\' t h a t L a d y Godi\'a \\as t h e gre;tcst ga m b l e r w h o ever li\'ed?" Sl!r olld Gambler: "\Vhat, t hat dam e'! H o\\' co me?" Fir.rl Gambler: "Sh e put e\'cry thing s h e had o n a h o r se didn't s h e? "Daddv sa i d t h e r e was n o t a n othe r il; t h e world l i ke you, Aunt [ \ \ a r Jone. "That \\as ,'cry flattering of him," "Y ('s. H e sa id it \\ "as a good thing, t oo. "Hc's a lways becn a per fect gentleman wit h me," "Yes, h e bores m e, too."

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" \Vhat \ \ a s t hat d oc t o r t r eating .v0 U f or. old t op?" "\Ve ll. f r o m the s ize o f his b ill s I s h o ul d sa y il s \ olle n fortune Sh()pp er : "\\'h e r e can I g e t som e s i lk c O \ erin g f o r my settee?" F l of ,,.lralf...:er : '-'Next-a i s l e a nd t o v our 1E!rt-for lingerie d c p a rt m c pt l a dy." B efo l 'e y o u print-a kiss o n a g irl' s lip s b e S llr e s hl! l i k es you r t y p-e. \Vh a t cau se d t h e ex pl o s io n a t your h o u s e ? " Po" d el' o n m y coa t-s lee\ e. "\\'h v a in t v o u \\ orkin', carrvin' the s e bric k s ?'" I ain' t f ee ling well. I'm all a -t r e mbl e. "Oh, are you, ell t h e n jus t get-bu sy \\it-h tha t sand s ieve." L ad.ll ( t o tra m p ) : Did y ou n o ti ce t hat pil e o f \\ oo d ? T ra mp: Yes'm, I see n it. J.ad,ll: Y o u s h o uld mind your gramm a r Y o u mean you saw it. T ra mp: N o 'm Y o u s<:1.W m e se e i t. but you h a \ en't see n m e saw it-. Sa m, d o you sol e mnl y s\\ear t o t ell the trllth, a nd n othing but t-h e truth?" 'Ah d o c s s i l ... "Sam \\ hat-h a \ c you g o t t o s a y f ol' y o ur sc lr'!" "\\'c ll, } e d g e \\ if all cle m limi t a ti o n s you h a s j es put o n m e A h d o n '(-b elie ve' A h has a n.vt hi n g a t all t-o s ay," The s t o r y h a s it t h a t o n c e u p o n a tim e a mall see in g a oman s tandin g in a stre e t I.:al \\ ith m a n y b un d l es in h e r .II'm s g o t up a nd o ff e r e d h e r hi s seat. The \ ',oman p r o m p t l y faint e d \\'h e n s h e came' t o s h e tha nk e d the man. The n h e fain t e d! 78 If/ aite,.: "How did you find t h e s teak s ir?" P a / r ull: "I look e d unde r a mus lll' o o m a nd t-he r e it was! "Rastus a h s ees d e l m e light in yo' eyes. "Oat ain't -Jove lig h t h o ney. A h s hung r y A m u gwump i s a bird t hat s it-s o n the f e nce ,, jt h i t s mu g on o n e s id e a nd it-s \\ 'ump o n the othe r. A colo r e d me sse n ge r uncer e m o ni ousl y in\'a d e d t h e private orice o f J P t'lor gan, according t o a current y a rn D o you kn ow t o w h o m you a r e t a lk ing?" the fin a n c i e r d e m a nd ed. "No, b oss. ".! m M o r g an o f ) P M o r g a n & C o . S ir, "Does yo' kno\\ s w h o yo' i s undress in'?,' a s k e d the t r es pa sse r. ""[ n eith e r kn o w nor care," s n appe d the m o ney kin g, "\Vell. I'se d e coo n ob Kuhn, L oe b & Co." Three bl oo d tra n sfus i o n s w e r e n eces sary t o s a ve a l a d y patient's lif e at-a h os p i t al. A b r a wn y young Scotchm a n off e r e d hi s blood. The p a ti ent ga\'e h im $5 0 .00 for th e firs t pint $25.00 f o r th e seco nd pint-but-the t-hi r d time s h e had so mu c h Sc ot-c h bl oo d in h e r s h e only t hanke d him U I m a D o d o w o nd e r s wilv it i s t h e s t or:( get-s b l a m e d f o r a l o t o f t'h in gs that -som e othe r bird i s r es p o n s ible f o r "The r e said the plumb e r, laying ou t his t oo l s "in s p it e o f all the s illy j okes a b o ut u s, we v e n o t f o r gotte n a s in g le lhing, 1\'1.,)' m a te's h e r e \\ ith m e \\ e've n o t go t t o g o back f o r anythi n g and "You ve c o m e t o the w r o n g said the m aid.

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Some of the d epress ion suffe r e r s a r c lik e the darke ." \\ h o had been playin g p o k e r H e said: "Tell you, b o y s I dun los' a heap 0 money las' nighl." "Ho\\ mu c h l V \ ose? "A hundre d and e i g hty-sc b e n d olla h s an' f oht-eell ce nt s, "Gollv! dat wuz a hcap 0' m o ncy," "Yas s ir ee a n d d e \\ u s t o f it \\' U Z de. f ohteen cent s \\ liZ cash," ""tie: Darlin g th e n e\\ m a id has burned the bacon and eggs;, \V ouldn't you be sa ti s/le d with a couple of kisses f o r b l 'ea kfa s t'? /lllbb.lf: Sure, Brin g her in Hi s \\ if e d e t e rmined t o CUI'C him o f hi s b a d wavs a nd, wit h th e aid o f a s h ee t a n d a n e lectric t o r c h, trans f ormed h e r sel f int o a ,'CI Y f a ir imitatio n o f a g host. The n s h e \\enl to th e drunl {ard a nd s h oo k him "\Vhas that? mUI'I1lIIl'ed t h e t o p e r, "Satan," c a m e the r eply in a se pul c h ral t o n e, '-'Shake h ands h, o ld h o r s h, I marrie d yOlll' s i ster, A ge neral and a col o nel \\"en .. wal kin g do\\ n the strce t They m e t many pri, oates, and each tim c the colonel \\o uld hc wo uld mutte r, "Th e sa m e t o vou . T h e ge n eral's c uri osity sou n got t h e b ette r of him, and h e as\ {ed: "\VI1\" d o O U al\\a\'s s a\" tha t'!" The I \\as o n ce a pri\'at e a n d I know wh a t t h e y are thinking," /lend Clcr/...:: I a m \ 'erv s O""V to h e a l o f your pa.-tnc l"s dealh lik e m e to tilk e his pla ce'? .lIal/a/l!!r: V e r y muc h, if you can ge t the unde d a k e r t o a rrange it. The prim o ld lady I\a s g i \ 'e n the fir s t g la ss of b ee r s h e c\'e r had, Aft e r s ippin g it f o r a m o m e nt s h e l ool,e d up jt h a puzzled air. "Ho\\ odd," s h e murmure d I t tas tes j u s t lil w the m e d i c in e m y hu s hilnd has b ee n t a kin g f o r the last" t\\"e1ve year s. .Yurg: I i hll1k l egall1l11g con sc i o u s n ess do:: t o r h e tned 1 0 h lo, t h e foam o ff his m e di c in e, Fir"" Sn/(!.rmoll: I\\V 'life drea m t last n!ght th .. t s h e was t o a milli o n -a u'c, Se c ond !hl/o: That's nolhinl.!. Ill" i f e thinks tha t c ,'en in the d aytim'C, T h e edito r in one of our n c il!hbo rinc: f o\\ns quit e unintentio n a lly upon n o ,'cl sc h e m e to inCl"ease c ir cula ti o n fI e placed the 1'0110\\ in g parag raph on the f r o nt pa ge of hi s wcddy anestheti c: "\\'hile l clul"Il inc: to OUI" I 'cs id c nce late o n e ni ght last \\"e"-'k,, \\e nc..tiecd a ce rti.lin \\e ll-kn o\\' n c iti ze n Ica\ in g the h o u se of a soc ially pro m in e nt lady \\ h ose hu s b a n d h appe n e d t o b e o ut of t o'., n I f e was l ea"ing by t h e back door and in h i s hurry, d id n o t S{!CIll t o I 'ccognize liS, A s t h e !entl cman i s n o t a subsc l ib c r t o the /Janner, \\ e ea .... l cs tl y I 'eques t that h e f o rward $6.00 ; l.l hi s eal -liest connC' ll i e n ce so that-h e c:tIl keep abrcast o f the times and t a l { c ad\':lntage o f t h e excepti o nal o ff e r s made hy O U I ad,'e .-ti scl"s," The n cx t m orning s mail hl' ou ght 37 n e\\" subscribe r s, "Do n't you love c h 'i"ing o n a m oo n l i ght nig h t l ik e this'?" "Yeah, b ut I tholle-ht I'd \\ait till \\'1..' got-f u dit('r o ut in th e .... eQUlltl'\ ', 79 "\Vha! tim e do you get-lip in the Slimm e r ? "As soon as the /Il s t ravs o f sun com e in a t my \\indo\\," "Splendid The n \'Oll, too, lih' t o tW out \\ hil e the dCI\" j's s till f r es h o n til e g ra ss. " N o n o t exactlv J \ \ Y l'O(l!l1 faces Ih ( \V est." 1 f c 'las .-athe r s h v, and aftcl s h e had thro\\ n h e r a rm s h im for b rin g in g h e r a bou q u e t, h e s t oo d up a nd started t o I cave. "I'm sOl'l" y if I 'v e o ff e nded you," s h e sa id "No o ffen se." I 'e pli e d, I m go in g f o r more flo \\ ers,

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At a band concert in the Phillipin es the b a nd was playi n g the "Me rr y \ Vidow W a lt z." A chinese turne d t o a compatri o t and as ked H ow callum that pi ece mus ic?" The second r e pli e d. "Callum. "He D ead. Sh e G l a d ." I cranka da car, Baw t she won'ta run Theese auto mibil e S h e 's a sawn o f a gown. Sh ea stop ; n do m;dd l e Of da s t r ee t ups t ow n, 1 t oo k in da c a rburetor Bawt shesa no drow n J pu s ha da clut ch. Shaka da wheel. Knocka da br a k e Da horn ;( J feel. J look ;n da tank \ Vot J see -yas Sawn o f a gawn Sh esa out a d a gas. Optici an: \ Veak eyes, have you ? \ V e l l hmv m a n y l i n es can you r ea d o n that c hart? Patie nt: What chart-? A s Shakespea r e once said Bo\d egs may n o t b e f ew. but they're f a r b e t we n." A TOAST H e r e s t o you l \1ay G o d b l ess and k ee p you I wis h I could afford to. If/fie: H o n ey, if ( o n l y had m o n ey. I wo u l d n eve r ce a se trave l in g. HUJballd : H ow muc h do you n ee d ? Said one I ndian t o anoth e r upo n sce inE! a w hite man ridin g a bic y cl e: "Hea p la2.Y pal eface runs sitting d ow n." \ V h e n asked h ow h e compil e d hi s di et i onary the l ex i cographe r r e m a rk e d it was lik e a quarrel wit h o ne's w if e o n e \vore l l ed t o anothe r Ste rn School T eacher: \Vhat i s a r elie f map? Sclu,o/ hoy: My g irl' s face after l ookin g at yours all day. Judge ( in dentist c hair) : D o you swea r that you will pull the t oo th. the \\ h o l e t ooth, a nd n othing but the b ooth? Dau g ht e r: But, daddy, why d o you o bject t o m y be coming engage d ? I s it becaus e o f m y youth? D addy: Yes. h e's h o p e l ess. "Can your gir l keep a sec r et?" Y o u s aid it. \V e wer e e n gage d 3 weeks b efore s h e t o ld m c. Storek eepe r: L oo k h e r e. young m a n will s h ow you what we co n s id e r the r ea l thi n g in men's ho se. C futomer: The r ea l thin g d oes n t com e come in men's h ose. H e: r ca n t see w hat k ee p s the co' e d s fr o m freezing. She: You'r e not suppose d to. mi s t er! ( be t you com e fr o m a burg w h e re all the hi c k s con g r ega t e at the p os t office for their m a il." "\\' hat's a post office?" [(illd old mall: "And d o you kn o \ why Santa didn't brin g you a d oll f o r Chri stmas." Do;l faced C hild, "Yes damn ;1. I trumpe d fathers ace in the C hristm as eve bridge gam e. " D addy. w h o w a s H a ml etT' "Bring m e the Bibl e, you young kn ow n othing. and I w ill s h ow you." 80

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IN APPRECIATION TO OUR ADVERTISERS E w i s h to express ou r most since r e thani {s t o the in d i idll a l s and firm s w h o have contr i-bute d toward m a kin g Ollr annual a s uccess. I I I I I I THE PANAMA HOSPITAL PANAMA CITY, R o f P 8 1

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COMPANIA PANAM[NA D[ fUmZA Y LUZ PANAMA COLON x .:.::.::.::.::.:;.::.::.::.::.:: .::.::.::.::.: :.::.::.::.::.::-::. : : .::.::.::-::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::-::-::.::.::.::.::.::.::-::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:: .::.::.::-::-::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::-::.::-:. : .::.::.::.::.:: .::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:: ::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:;.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:. INOCENCIO GALINDO, Jr. 7 th AND BOLI VAR STREETS COLON Jobber and C ommission ffierchan t .. Real Esta te Broker and Jlqent .:.::.::.::-::.:;.::-::.::.::. : ; .::.::. ::.: : .::.: : .::.::.:x:::::::::::::::::::: : :::::::. 82 A genile m a n fr o m the middl e ",est t ells u s abouta tin r oo f thai" w a s blown o ff a country s t o r e and r olled into a com pact-bundle, The o n n c r having a se n se of humor wrappe d it up 'ith bailing wire and se n t it to H enry F o rd. I n due t im e t h e a n S \\ 'e r arri\'ed sayin g : "It-,, i ll cost you $8.50 t o ha\'e your car r epaired, but f o r Heaven s sa\{c I elilis w hat hit it." :.::.::.: :-::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:: .::.::.::.::.::.::.::.: :.::.: :.::.::.::.::.: :.::.::.::.::.::-::.:. !j! Wishing the Graduates x x All Succ ess Thr o u g h Life ELITE ;:! 53 Front St. C o lon R. P. :.: :.: :.: :.::.::.::.: :.: : : :.::.: :.: :.: : .::. ::.: : : :.: : : :.::.::.: ;.:

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OF mJ."\j CRISTOBAL C Z BALBOA. C. Z. Phone Cris tob. d 1 7tH Phon e R alho a I 06:i -:.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::. ::.::.::.::.:: .::.:: .::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.;:.::.::.::.::.::.: : : :.::.::. ::.: : .::. : : ::.::-::.::.::.::. ::.:;.;;.:: .::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:. .llurph.ll: "\\ h at's thai in y our p oc ket'!" Pal ( i n h i s pcr) : "Dyna mit e, I 'm wait in!! for C a sc \ '. En"n' timc h e meets m e h e m e 'o n (he and b r..:-ak s m e pipe, :\' l.'xt t i lll\'" il..: dn\..s i t this d y n n mite wi ll blo" hi s hand orr." O ld S"//ti r: 1' ('s m;l.m, tha t ... a mallO -Hal', l ad,,: "Iro\\ int e restin!!, a nd \\ I ud's t h a t l itt!\o' 011(' iu s t in ,')"'a/l: "TIMt's jus t a tug," f.fllft/: "Oh \ 'I.:'S. O f course. a tug o f \\at'. J'n: he-ar c l o f thel11." .:'::' ; '::'::'::'::'::'::':: '::':: '::'::':: '::-::'::' ::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::. : : .::.::-::.::.::. ::.: : : :.:: '::.::.::.::.::.:: .::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::-: :.::.::.::.::.::. ::.::.::.::.::.:: ::.::.::. : : : :.:. I I :-: X Johll: "Call I !!d a 1'00111 1'01 thn;..:?' Ih,,'/..: ('10-/...:: "Jl a \'c yuu a tirn'!" J o h n : "J)ll I l oo k !ih, an I ndi a n'!" I t's a rUlIlIY thin!:; b ut you 11\.. .. \ ..: 1 h..::t r o r it \ \I..'tii t erra nl.:':lll fly o r st) m c typ\.. o r \\l,\.:\,il putting t hl: n o p on thl.;! blink. b.07S 130Ll\.\R .\VE, -t:?<) 8 3

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.:::-::-::-::-::-:;.::-::-::::::-::: : ::-::-::::!:-::::::-::-:x:::-::::::-::-::::-::-::-:::::::::x:-::::-:x:-::-:x:::-::::::-::::-::-::-::-::-::-::::-::::::-::-:xx:-:x:-::-::-:x. x x IMPROVED EQ UIPMEN T MODERN METHODS EFFI C IENT SE R V ICE x x x x JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY x x Broadw a y near F o lk s Rive r PHONE COLON R. d e P COLON. 21 CRlS T OBAL. C. z P. O BOX 5061 _::x:-::: : ::::-:::: ::-:::::::::::::::::x:-::::-:x:-:::::: :x:::::::-::::-::-:x: : :-::::-::::::::-:x:-:::>::-::-:: : : :::x::::::x:-:xx:-:xx:-::-::-:x:-::.;:-::-:_ Fro,,h: \ V h a t k ee p s t h e m oo n f r o m dro ppi n g? f l llo/he r X u l. I t mus t b e t h e h ea m s." Dt'J'ga. r/ed [, ad.l/: "Does y our m othe r know vou s m o k e? L/lde 130.1/: "Does your husban d kno \ you s p ea k t o stra n ge m e n o n t h e stree t?" :,:: ,::-:::: ::.;:.;::x :::-:!.;:-:: :!::.;:::::.;x: : : ::';:-::';:'::-::'::'::': : '::'::';:':.11 I I :-: 7 .03 7 1l, \ L fl O \ A VE.. COLON R P :) B. F O R S M E A T 8 4 l'o' \ a kin g love i s !il
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xxx:<>:x:-:x:-::::-::-::-::-::::::::-::::::::-:::x:::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::-::.::.::.::-::.::.::.::-::.::.:>::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::-::.::.::.:. x x i i x x i United cArtists Corporation....., B dX.\"OU\CES F ORTH CO./!n G dTTRdCTlO \ S !:! r.::. ANNA STEN dPPlURJ.Y G n 8 "NANA" : x x a -x x ELIZABETH BERGNER B fIPPRdRJ \G I.\" B "CATHERINE, THE GREAT" x x B Suppo rt e d by DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS Jr. x x .1/ol/u.'r : '" s ee that ,vOli a r e go in g around wit h that 'you n g s p endthrift aga in I h ope yOll d on'ti n t e n d to marr y him." .Iim y dllll: "Ohl I wou ldn' t think of marrying a s p e ndthrift. b ut I cedain I." e n jo'y go in g p laces with o ne." "A r e 'you t h e edit o r o r t h e "T" ad c \Vind.'? D emande d a hu ge hu s ky b rut e 'It all d e p ends," a n s w e r e d B illy B ee r s D o y o u want a s u b sc riptio n o r make a kick?" I I 7 .112 Bolivar Street P. O. Box 446 C o l o n R. P. T el. 1 87 .:-::-::.:;.::-::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::-::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::-:-X X I crhe ::::'::::'::SPildl I X l X B B B 85

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I THE UNION LABEL I THE Ul'iI Ol'i I .ABEI. II',IS INTR O D UCED IN 187. I N T H E II'HITE LABEL OF i ... :.: . :! .. .. : AND OF REASOl'i ,IBL E HOURS, THE ASSU RANCE THAT CHILD OR PRI SON LABOR El'iTERED IN!Q2!:IE:J'B.QD UC T Al'iD THA T THE OF THE .:.: :.::.::.::.: :.:: .::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::. ::.::,::,::,::,:: ,::, ::,::,::,::':::::: :::::::11 Greatest Discovery in Fountain Pen History YOU ,\lAY NOT BELIEVE IT UNTIL YOU S E E IT. BU T THE P ,\RI\ER VACU,\\I \ T!C HOLDS !O2( ( ,\lORE I N K WITHOUT ANY I NCR E ASE I N SIZE. l'iEII IRIDESCEl'iT.-B A RREL ( Lcilk P roof N o n -B"c;l!t,I I ,lc ) SET NEW FASHION. I I ." j \ l\:\IT\CI T l u:ns RVI'IH'sli"n\rlVES C l l I S TOJ} A I .. C 7.. j : .:.::.::-::.::. ::.::-:: ::.::.::-::.::.::.::.::-:: .::. ::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:. 86 C OI1l}I'C.MlJlflll.' "Petc Smith said h e vot-e d for m e a nd wants a j ob. If/i/f'.' 1 [0\'; can s u c h a bon c h ea d as t h a t h old down a jlih." \Vh e n I t old him I Ime\\' doze n s o f p eople in ( h is t o w n \\ h o nc\'er h ea rd o f him, in s t e a d o f bein g hurt h e h a d th e audacity to ask m e for a list-of t h eil' n a m e s a n d addresses. '! CHONG KEE ESTABLIS HED lSSS CHINESE SILKS an d HAND EMBROIDERED GOODS and all kinds of orienta l fine arts PANAMA CITY Cent ro) Avenue N o. 39 .:.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:: .::.::. : :.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::-::-::-::.:-

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.:.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:: ::.::.::.::.::.::.:: .::.::.::.::. : : .::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::. ::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::-::.::.::.:. Jl H otel in and seruice of the Panama Can al. !:! x x --:.::.:--yoif '" Swimming'" UJater Sports l:l cr arpon Fishing x x crhe lJear Aroun d JAmES E. LEUJlS P O. A ddress :.: Manager CRISTOBAL, CAnAL ZONE :.: x x Ballker ( in co u ntr,Y) : I s Ihft!th e hil'cd m a n ? F anne r : Oh, n o that i s th e \ i cc Presid c nt-in c h a l'gL' o f thc C(l\\S," .1/,.. 1",'/11011: T h cre i s a fOl'eign coupl e \i\' i n g ne.\.t door no\\ and th e y simply t orme nt-Ill y \ \ ife," .111', flackdl: "'f0\ \ i s t hat?" ,1/,., / '/,,11111: "Th ey al\\ays quat'1'c\ ilne! s h e can't und e r stand a \\ o rt! t hL',\' say," l:l J. v. BEVERHOUDT l:i COLON. R : P !:! B B !:! R c. A. Victor Radios -K odaks !:! H eadquarte r s for Sp o rting Good s !:! 1'001 T ables, and Billiard Suppli es !:! !:! Pho n e 77 x x 87 .:.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:: .. ::.::.::.::.::.::. ::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:. permanent and nervous fatigu e becomes c h ronic, have your eyes examined. If you need g lasses. you w ill b e surprised to find what a comfort they are when accurat e l y and becomingly fitted t o YOU Have y o ur eyes examined PANAMA COLON : : : :.: OptometriSts :.: ::: 23 Cent r a l & OptiCians 9,034 Front ;:; :.: A venue New Y ork :::'treet :.:

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x :-: x :-: x :-: x x x x Two Bottles I I x f x -0 -I x x Distinction I Cascade Gingerale ]wt Tbe Tbillg To C e l e brat e Tbose Graduatioll Parties! The Panama Coca-Col a B ottling Company .11,. .. ll iller: J d r op p e d a n iclde ill fr ont of a blin d b egga r ,vesterday to see if h e "ou l d pick i t up." .11,.. F lYlllk.r: \V ell did h e? .11,. .. llillrJ,.: "No" h e sa id, j \ \ a k e a quarter, boss, and I'll f o r get my se l f." Judge: "\Vha t d o you m ea n thi s m a n i s charge d ith ca rryin g co n gea l e d wca po ns?" Cop: "\Vell. Y our H onor, h e soc k ed t h i s o t h e r f ellow o n the head ,, iih a pi ece o f i ce. COLOMBIAN LINE WEEKLY SA TLING S TO: x X KI1\GSTON J ama ica. PORT-AU-PRINCE, H a iti NE W YORK, N e w Y ork I LUXURIOUS. COMFORTABLE. FA S T PASSENGER EXPRESS STEAMERS I E 88

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1:1 Fox FILM CORPORATION x x I I x x I I J obll Bol e s Sally Eilers J allle s DIt1I11 iii i.:: .. comiog o",,,,"cli.:; ,d",w" io"odio :::.i:; : : Carolilla "lllfr. Skilc b " 1 alII S/Iz a/lll e" "Da1J1a Hare m >: .:.::. ::.::.:: .::.::.::.::.::.:: : : .::. : : .::.::.::. : : .:;.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::-::.::. :;.::.::.::.:. COMPLIMEN T S I I -:. ::.::. ::.::-::-::.::.::.::.::.::.::. : :.::.::. : :.::.::..::.::.::.::.::.:: .::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:-89 S,'ltu : "Yo u say Chicag o i s a regul a r beehi" e? Enoc h : Y es I kn ow I go t s i un g there, Pa: "1'11"\ n o t at all p l eased with the r e p o rt t h e teach e r made o n y our conduct." L-Jteck: "I knew vou oulcln't be but the teach e r made i t o u t j u s t -the same. Ju s t lik e a \\o m a n ain't it ?

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.:.: : .::-::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::. : :.::.::. ::.::.:: : :-::.::-::.::. ::.::.::.::.::.: : .::.: : : : .::.::.::.::.: : .::.::.::.::.:: .::.::.::.::. : :.::.::.::.::.: : ::.:: : : .::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:: .::-::.::.: : : : .::.::.::.: I SHOP I PROMPT ST EAMSHIPS DAY P HONE FREE DELIVERY N i G H T P HONE COLON 3 1 I GATUN 3 4 5 -:.::.::. : : : :.:: ::.: : .::.::. ::.:: .::.::.::.::. : : ::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::. : : ::.::. ::.::.::.: : ::.: :.:: : :.:: .::.::.::. ::.::.:: .::.::.::.:: .::-:: .::.::. ::.::.::.::. : :.::.::.::.::.:: .::. ::.::.::.::.::.:. C o mplim e nts o f <..-'. A FRIE N D =-., "No\\ sa i d t h e s p e ak e r w h o h a d been se l ecte d t o s t arf" t h e ne\\ driv e, 1 a m n of" going t o tall, v e r y l o n g b u t if you c an ju s t ge t w h a t 1 say in your h e a d you'll ha,-e t h e h o l e th i n g i n a nu t s h e n." ( Eel. Note ) : T h e d e m o n s trati o n th a t f ollo\\e d t h a t p a r t was so ,-ocifel'o u s i h a t t h e r es t o f t h e s p eec h was ina u dib l e HOTEL TIVOLI A CO, \IFORTABLE, RE S T FU L HOTEL IDEALLY L OCA TED WITH \ I A G N I F ICEN T V IEW O F T H E PACIFIC O CEAN. \ IOST P I C T U R E S Q U E SCE NERY TilE CE:-: T E R O F SOC I A L LIF E C L OSE T O EV E R Y O F I KTERES T O N TilE P AC I F I C SIDE OF THE C \ NA L ZONE. W \. T j \\CC O I U 1 ACJ<, \ \:i11 .... g cr. 9 0 P O ADDRESS / \ NCON CANA L Z ON E

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.:.::.:: .::.::.::.::.:;.::.:: .::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.;:.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:: .::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::. : : .::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:. iiI P ortraits iii FOR REMEMBRANCE iii I I I Banquets, large \\'hen buying photographs l ook f or this e m blem. groups, e tc: .. I,. The Ph o tograph e r s I n t c rn a ti o n a l As soc iation o f . N P America s tand s f O l' good c r afts m a nship a n d bet-1 ew ICtureS ( e r busi n ess princ iple s, TOII.l/ ( t o hi s moth e r as s h e puts up his lunch): "Say, I \ \ om, put in some cf t h a t c h eese I had yesterday, It's good s tuff." -" o lli l''': ''I'm sorry dear but i t i s all gon e. T Oil.'!: "That's t o u g h, ; \ lr, Fra nk s said if I bro u g ht c h eese like lhat t o sc hool todav h e \\ould ha\'e t o l e t th e \\ho l e sc h ool out." .:.: : .::.:: ::.::.::.::.::.:;.::.::.:;.: :.::.::.::.::.::.;:.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:. I I ;.; POBo x COt.ON Ph one 3tO :.: 9 1 .11. .1.1 COOLES T ROO, I S I:>: T O"':-/ I .:.!.l:! DOlVLIN ADOR BAZAN :f:i COLO);, R P o : P noNE 221 p O. B ox 550, C owt-:,

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aXXXXX>:XX:-:X:::-:X:':XX:-:XXXXX:-:XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXxxx:-:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx. x x x x Colon Import 6 Export Ltd. P O. R P JOBBERS AND J\1ERC HANTS -l'-1ANUFACTURERS' AGENTS X DEALERS in GENERAL MER C HANDISE and NAT IVE PRODUcrS X C o lon, Republic of Panama a Branch Retail Stores I PLAYA Ot\l\tA PORVENI R eARTI and Trading Stations SANTA ISABEL PUPIL NARGANA ISLE OF P I NES .... a:-:xx:::.:XX:-::::-::-::-::-::-::::-::-::-:X::XXXXXX:-:XX:-::-::-::-::';XXXXX:-:XXX:-::'::-:XX:-::':XX:-::-::-: >:Xx:-:xxxx:-:XX:-::-:XXX:':. a:-::::-:X:-::';XXX:-:::X:-::-:XX:-::-::-:X:-:X:-::-:X:-:XXxx:-:xxxa Radio Service Inc. P H 10 x Sales and Se r vice x x x 6 .0 1 0 FRONT STREET T e l ep h one 500 B COLON, R P X \Vh e n asked the q uesti o n, H \Vh o wants to go to heaven all the Sunday sc h oo l cl ass but one littl e g irl r a i se d hi s h a nd s. \Vh e n as k ed \vhy n o t s h e r e pli ed, in tears, I can t go. My famil y i s m ov in g t o D etro i t n ex t wee k and I have to go wit h the m." Judge: I und e rstand you pre f e r charges a ga inst t hi s m a n. Plain/ i)}: "No s ir I prefer cash. that i s w h y I brought him h e re." Q I StanJarJ & Steaffis1ir I COmpanl,J X L X X X X X X X X X X X X X B. V ACCARO LINE X X X X X X X X Q Wish everq success to the y raduating Class of 1934. x x x x Q .xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:o:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx :-:xxxxxxxxx:-:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxw 92

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B x x B BUREAU OF CLUBS :-: x ana PLAYGROUNDS B x ... :-: x x x B T H E RECREAT I ONA L AND SUBS ISTENCE D I V I S ION O F T H E PAN' \ J \ A CANAL HAS FOR T H E CONVENIENCE OF T H E UNI TED S T ATES GOVERN. M E N T EMPLOYEES AND THE I R F A U LIES I N BALBOA ANCON, PEDRO M IGUEL GA TUN, AND CR I S T OBA L ATHLETI C F IELDS, PLA Y G ROUNDS, TENNI S COURTS, GYJ"NASIUMS, SWI M J \ l ING P OO L S, B OW LI NG ALLEYS. B ILLI A R D R OO M S R EAD-INC R OOMS. REST AU RANT AND SOD A FOUNT A I N S ER V I CE, SOUND b \ O T ION PI C T URES, AND OTHER GE:-IERA L COM ,'\uNITY ACT I V ITIES .ll/u .lIoore: "Yest e r day I gave a poor m a n a d olla r a nd i o l d him to co m e b ac k t o day," .lIr. Frank.f.' "Th a t was \ 'ery good (,f ,vo u r suppose you considered him like b read c ast upo n wat e rs.'J .lJi u .lloore: "That is a \ "cry goo d defin i t i o n H e ca m e bac k t his mo rn i n g well soa k e d." I I I i :-::-:;.::::::-:x: :::::x;.:x:-::::::-:;.:x:.;:.;::;.:;.:::;.::.::-::-::.::.::.::.;:-:. 9 3 KODAK PANAMA LTD. OFFE R S A COMPL E T E LI N E OF KODAK PRODU(JS Koddk Pdndmd ltd. III Cent r a l Avenue Pana m a City .;.::-::-:x:-::-::-:xx:-::::-:;.::-::::-::.;::x;.:x:-::-:;.::-::::-::.;:.:;.:;.::-::.;;x:.

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I I ;:; I I C lerk ( in Panam a Railroa d office) : "An o t h e r far m e r i s s u in g LI S o n account o f h i s co\\ s G el/ern l .J/al/ager: I s uppose t h e hain k ille d a co upl e C l e r k : ' N o h e s ays the tTai n goes so s l ow t hat t h e passen ge r s m i l k f h e cows a s { hey go b y "It i s a n ill w ind t hat bl ows nobo d y a n y g o o d," remarked the s trange l i n K a n s a s "Y u p." a g r ee d Farm e r C o rnt-ass l c '(S in ce t h e l a s t tornado I h a ve an exha barn and t e n m o r e h ogs Sid \ V h arto n I 'c m a rl, s t hat t h e s t r e n gth o f b ee r i s go in g u p b y h o p s. G O(}9.Ij: \ V hat i s c h aos?" ,lIr,J. l\rl/o .\': I t i s o n e of t h ose t hings 1-h e y are a lways brin g in g o r d c l o u t or." .1JaI:V / /111/: t \ V hat d u y o u cun s i d e r t h e b es t -app d i ze r f o r a m e a l? Bill: "The absen ce o f t h e pri ce." .:-::.::.::.:: ::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:: : : .::.::.::.: :.::.::. : :.::.::.::. ::.::.:: .::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:: .::. ::.::.::.::. : :.::.::.::.::.::.::. ::.::.:: .::.::.:: ::.::.::.::.::.: : ::.::.::. ::.::. : :.::.:: ::.:II I I X X I I X X X X X '0' 9 4

PAGE 113

:.::.::.::.::.:: .::.::-::-: : ::.::. : : ::.::. : : .::.::.:: : : .::.::.::.: :.::.::.::.::. ::.::.:: .::.: :.:: .:. Co, lid. I B B -:.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::. : :.::.::.::.::.::.::. : : : : : : : :.::. ::.: : : : .::.:: .::.::.::.::.::.::. ::.; : : -Paul: 1 \ !O\'c f o r vou i s l i k e the d ee p blue 13obblJ: "You r e iellinl.! m e and I t a l c it' \\ ii h t h e corresponding a m o u ni of s a iL" Boarder: ';Thisch icl, c n certainl v les t h e palate." Land Lady: I m g la d y o u lil,e my cook i ng." Boar der: ( ( didn 't m ca n the coo l ,i n g, T was r efe r i n g t o t h e fcat h e r s you left o n it-." FOR \ \ 'EDDli\'C IN\.'ITA TIONS. IKG AND CARDS, CllR I ST_ \ \ AS C }\RDS, SEASOi\"t\ L AND BUS I KESS STATIONERY. BR I DGE SETS T A YLOR T ALLIE S OR S\'STE. \ \ T A L LIE S EVER Y PLA "YOU R-O\\' i\"-PA RTNER. PROGR ESSIVE BRI D G E SE T S FOR EITH ER AUC TI ON O R CO:'>lT RACT BR IDGE W I T H T H E NE\\ I N T ERK"ATION-A L CODE 01' SCO R I NG. ::: : : : EVERY T ALLY I NSTEAD OF 1 \ \ E R E K"U,\\ ;.; I """:::0:::':::'::::::: "'"' I I -;.: : ::.::.::. ::.: : .::. : :.::. : :-::. ::.::.:: .::. ::.::.::.::.:: .::.::.:: .::.::.::.:: : : .::.::.:: : : .::. : : NEW CHINA I I CARVED IVORY l : W I CKER FURNI TURE 95 .l/olll!!!' (to d f W g h kl') : \Vhat d i d t hat youn g occ u lti s t say abo ut' you r eyes w h e n you asl ,ccl him t o loo k a t the m ? Do yOll I Ul\c t o o ,,"car g l asses'?" Judl/: I [c sa id thev were t h e most beautifu l eves h e had see n but I t h i n k h e f o rgot a b o u t t h e g la sses. /Jil/ I/ol/ow,//: Y es terdav I fell oft a 30-foot l adder." .Ila/co/1II DUe'II: "Gee! I (' s a ,, o nd e r vou \\" e r en'( l t iilecl. Bil/: "Oh, n o o n l y fell o ff t h e seco n d rung, Gittens OJ7.d Taylor f o r -Exclusive Su iti ngs ana Car e f u l Tail oring Telephone 291

PAGE 114

x x x x a a x c:.J x a a Compliments of :. x x x x I J. x <6j :. x x Q .x:.;x:-::::::.;xxx:-::-:x:-:::x:-::::-:::x;.:::x:-:x:-:x:-:x:-::-::::: .:..::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::-::.::.::.::.::-::-::.::.::.::.::.::-::-::.::.::.:-I I F LOR S H E IM S H OES and PERFUME, X B BST Q UALITY A RTICLES Clo ,./ a: "He r e i s a path e ti c litt I e p oe m ha ve jus t writ t e n and w h e n I s h o w e d it t o the t e a c h e r s h e actu al'ly c ri e d over it. Bill Beer J : N o w you jus t t a k e tha t little p oe m right b a cl < t o your teach e r a n d pro mi se h e r you w ill n e v e r \\Tit e s u c h a pathetic pi ece o f p oe t r y a g a in." :::::-:x::xxx:-::::-::-:x:-::-:x::xx:-:::::xxx:::-::-:::::x:-:x:::-::-::-:xx::::::::x:::!!::::::-:::x:::::-::::-:::::::::x:::-::-::::-: :::-::-::-:: -:. I I Q ; X X X X X X g oromplhnrntl1 of I I & Qtn. I X X X Q X X Yo Y. X X X X 96

PAGE 115

.x:-:x::x:-::-::-::-:x:-:: ::-::-:x:::::-::-::-:xxx:-::-::-::::-::::::-:x: ::-:. P hone 126 P. O. Bo x 58 f:l Arcia 's Dairy Milk Crea m Ch i c k e n s c..)c) :.: and F r e s h Eggs. : : B 2nd. &" Bol i vsr A ve. Col on. R. P B X X X:-::-:: ::-::::-::-::::,::,::,::-::,::,:: ,::,::,::,::,::.::-::.::.::. : : .::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.: Touri,fl: \ V h a t w ill :vou r co rn c r o p .vi e l d t h i s year ?" Farmer: "ft s h ould be about s ixty gallo n s to th e acre." Before Buying Y o u r Panama Hats, Aig rettes and S o u venirs v i s i t our S t o r e w h ere you w i ll fin d t h e Lowest Prices L1 T own FROOT STREET, 51 COLON, R p FR A N C I SCO LOBAT O {\' l o ney E xc h a n g e The p r i so ner threw t h e m aga z i n e a cross the cel! in disg u st-. mutte r i ng, "Nothin g i n it but" co n t inu ed s t o ri es a n d ['m to be h un g day aft e T t o m o r r ow. .:::::::-::-::-::-::::::::::::-:x:::::::::::-::-:x::: ::-::::.::::.::::-::.::. ::.:. H H ::: .Jle n.r San o III Corpore San o ::: I E., i::.:::. I The French Bakery . :: Bo li\'ar f h 'en ue, 8.103 : P h o n e :-::-::-::::-::-:x:-:::::x:::-:::::: :: ::-::::::::::-::::-::-::-::::-::::::-::..:x. 97 COMPLIMENTS if Colon Cleaning Pressing Club P h o n e COLON 1 5 P O Box C R I S T OBA L 1 575 Irile: "No\\' dear, h e r e i s the doctor t o see vou," Rich'mall ( i n delirium ) : "Send h im away at o n ce a nd get t h e u ndertak e r '{ou know I neve r d eal w i t h middl e m en," .:. : : .::. ::-::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.: : .::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.: :.:: .::.::.::.::-::.::.::.:>::.:. B :< m argari t a B eaut1J Shoppe :< I I "J' m so r r\', b u t t"h ecoffee isexhaust cd," the h o u se l a n d lady. Y es." co mm e n t ed t h e board e r I' ve n o t i ced for so m e t im e it h as bee n get tin g "eaker." B B General Hardware f6 F i sh i ng T ackles COLON amI PANAMA 9th &' Front Street 93 Central Avenue

PAGE 116

x X x X x x g COMPLIMENTS OF x x x x THE ATLANTIC NITE CLUB x x TWO COMPLETE REVUES NIGHTLY x x B EMPERATRIZ RENGIFO, Prop. HAPPY MATHES, Mgr. B ::: ii:-::-::-::-::.::-::-::.::-::.::-:xx:-:xx:::.::::::-::.;:-::-::-::::::-::-:xx::::x: :xx:<:-::..:x:..:xxxxxxxxx:-:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:..:x:..::..:. x x Compliments of X X X X X X X X J. HOKIM, Prop. X X Teacher: "If a g r oup o f sheep i s called a fl oc k, and a group o f cattle is called a herd, w h a t i s a quantity of camels?" Charlie Il/em: "A carion." 98 Policeman: HDon't you know you s h o uld give h alf t h e road to a wo m an driver?" Poor .l71olori.sl: H I a l ways do w h e n I find out w hat half s he wants." Uncle: aCom e Percy, let's go to the h o use." Percy: H \V ait a minute, I want to see the end of this little br oo k go by," Golj e r (?): W ell caddie. how do you like my ga me?" Caddie: "Its 0. I e but [ s till prefe r golf."


r







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VtJ/,/'-






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r ^ 'y-^^ J





xi.HYLER



/^i^^



Foreipor



J



A



S a record of the school
activities during 1933 and
1934. the Caribbean Staff
of 1934 presents to the student
body, the facultv, and the gen-
eral public, this year's Annual.



THE CARIBBEAN



Vol. XVII



CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE, 1934



No. 1



PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL



Editorial



Richard Reinhold >-/



One otlcn liL-ars discussmns on how
much better the world of today is. It is
probably one of the most erroneous
opinions when it is applied to recent
graduates from the institutions of educa-
tion.

I have, many a time, heard elder per-
sons say, "If I had the opportunity to
start out in the world as you now are
what a wonderful chance I would have to
gain success with all the advantages of-
fered." Then I think to myself. lust
what advantages can he be talking about?

At present, the world has less to offer
to a young person than it has in the past.

After you are through with school, it
is an impossibility to get a job for some
little time to come. Sometimes it is
months, sometimes the months roll into
a year. Even then there is nothing in
many cases.

It is strange that a student who grad-
uates at the heat! of her class cannot find
anything to do. Even after taking a post-
graduate course, keeping up the high
stantlards, she is unable to get something
that will give her some spending money
(il her own. I imagine that at times she
gets rather disgusted i'.nd then wonders
why she worked so hard in her school
years when she coiiid have had a much
better time if she had not worked so
diligently.

A college education is now bjcome a
dream to the ordinary high school grad-
uate. Can a young person who has had
his eye on smnething he was sure to ob-
tain and tiien suddenly see it snatched
away have much faith in what the world
has to offer? How doss he know that all
tiie goals will not bj moved larthvr away



just as he is about to reach them? There
is nothing to hops for, for there is no
hope where there is no object.

Yet a college education is not every-
thing for the same condition prevails a-
mong the college graduates. \\'ith such
a view m mind it seems odd that anyone
should want to go to college. It would
mean a loss of money which determines so
much and time which seems to mean
nothing now-a-days insofar as so much of
it is wasted.

To say that the goal is too high is
somewhat erroneous. In the past, you
could buy more with a dollar; the cost of
living was not so high; and. there were
not as many obligations to be met. Peo-
ple arc even willing to work tor as much as
was paid in the old days but they cannot
find anyplace to work. To bs willing to
work and yet not being able to work can
be condoned in regard to the would be
worker, but to have work to do and to
refuse to do it can never be pardoned.

\^'hen a person has nothing to do. he
worries about things that, ordinarily, he
wolIcI hardly think of. but when the case
is just the opposite, one has no time to
think ot trivial things and as a result is
much happier. I honestly believe that
the people who have never had anything
and who never will are the most content-
ed. They have no worries as they have
nothing to worry about and they have no
regrets as they have not done anythini;
which th^y ciniiot
wish.

filings are bounc
is very improper to



do anvtime thev



ciip.nging for
know.



to
S:'.y
l!ie b.-lter,



it



change but
thi'.t tliLy iu-c
tor vou don't




J



Dedicdtion




E, the Class of 1954, dedicate this,
the seventeenth volume of "The
Caribbean" to our advisor, whose
helpful ad\ice and unceasing in-
terest in our weltare has been primarily
responsible tor our success,

MRS. PHYLLIS Spencer



f l^^l^




CARIBBEAN STAFF



Editor

J.f.vt. Editor



Bu.rine.r..r Jlanaijer

^Js.rt. Business Jlanaqer
^isst. Business Manager.
Asst. Business .Uanager



Circulatu n Jlanager

Asst. Circulation .Uanager.
As,d. Circulation .Uanager
Asst. Circulation .llanatjer



Lilerarii Editor

.Isst. Literari/ I'.ditor.
Asst. Literarx/ J'lditi.r-
Asst. Literari) Editor.
Asst. Literary Luiitor.



Art Editor

Boi/.i' Spirt Editor

Asst. Lioi/.f' Spirt Editor

G'trl.r' Spo:i I'.ditor

Asst. dirls' Sport /Editor

School .\ otes

./,>kr Editor

Asst. .fokr Editor



RiCH.VRD ReINHOLD

John Palm

William Stone
Henry Sanchez
Julio Dominguez
James Days

Elizabeth Hayes
Rl'th Wikingstad
William Hill
Robert Reppa

Betty Stetler
Anna Reilly
Kathleen Goodenough
Margaret Hollingshead
Kathleen Philips

Ernest Wood

Frank \\'ashabal'gh
Robert Neely

Beverley Marcuse
Margaret Barnard

Mayno Bliss

Robert Molten
John O'Neil



I'l/pist



Blossom Lam









,%^,



.^^l




C. H. S. FACULTY



Our faculty this year is one of the best
ever. Alost of the teachers are oirl-timers,
and they're still keeping up good records.
The new teachers have made a good hs-
gmnuig, also.

Mr. Franks, our popular and efficient
principal, inaugurated several new, pro-
gressive mo\ements along with the new
school. Our Student .Association was one.
He has ably superintended all actnities
and classes, and taken part in the sports.

The Sophomore's sponsor, and teacher
of history, Mr. R. C. Hackett is keeping
up his reputation for giving homework.
He's a good teacher, though, and many
students reluctantly admit (hat he
"knows his stulf.

Under Mrs. Phyllis Spencer and Miss
j^lary E. Moore, the languages, Spanish,
French and Latin, are prospering. Be-
sides the regular routine, Mrs. Spencer
sponsors the Juni.)r-Senior Dramatic
Club, the Effe Kube Klub, the National
Thespians, the Spanish Club, and the
Liga Panamericana. .^liss Moore has
been sponsoring a much improved "Trade
Wind," also.

The witty mathematics professor, Air.
Meyer, is stili with us. Taking care of
the A'ath classes doesn't seem too much
work either. He's also the sponsor of
the Freshman class and the Caribbean.

Mr. Miller is new this year, but he has
certainly made a hit with both se.xes.
The boys admire his athletic ability,
and the girls his great personal charm.
He helps Air. \'inton teach science, and
Mr. Meyer teach mathema.ties.

The Household Arts Department and
the Cafeteria prospered under the capable



hands of Miss Ferne Bowman. She re-
placed Miss Anderson, who surprised
everyone by getting married last summer.
Let's hope Miss Bowman doesn't. W'e
need her here.

Mr. K. W. Vinton is directing the
Science Department, which seems to be
doing very well, as there have been no
explosions as yet. He also directs athle-
tics and has done no mean part in arous-
ing a good school spirit.

The English Section has become more
interesting this year under Aliss Liter
and Miss Brown. Miss Liter is new. but
she's certainly made a "hit, in spite of
contracts. The first and secoinl year
Engl'sh classes, and the Library are
cared for by Aliss Brown, a quiet and
capable teacher.

Aliss Patterson is turning v^ut some
"snappy" stenographers this year. All
that aimless clicking heard upstairs at
the first of the year has developed into
rhythmic typing, thanks to Aliss Pat-
terson's patient instruction.

W'e owe the Art work in the Caribbean
to Airs. AlcDonald's talented pupils.
It's a surprise to tlisjover we have so
much talent in our school, but we can de-
pend on Airs. AlcDonaid to bring it out.

One of the popular courses offered is
music, under Aliss Einer's gifted hands.
She has certainly done great things with
the fine material she's had to work with.

Last, but not to say the least, we reach
Air. Fringer's A'anual Arts classes. This
is as popular with the boys as Household
Arts is with the girls. Some promising
mechanics leave his machine-shop les-
sons.




SENIORS



.WiDie Frank J. W'AsnAriAi'iiii, Jr.

-/.' w'e ,<- him "Respnnsihie."

H'vihplace Gaiiin, C. Z.

I'a.tiinie Sulmniiiig.

Fai'ortte e,\pre,f.f[:>n "Let mc explain."

.Irli.'ttie.t Class Preiident 4; Sliident Association Pre^i-
Hent 4: Debating Club Pre:ident 4; Math Club Secre-
tarv-Treasurer 4; National Thespians 3: Vice-presi-
dent 4; Swimming 1, 2; Tennis 2; Neptune Club 1;
Varsity Club 1, 2, .3, 4; B. A. A. 1, 2, 3; Tumbling 3.
4; Spanish Club 3, 4: Liga Piinamericana 4; Kite
Kube Klub 1, 2; Dramatic Club 3. 4; Orchestra 1. 2,
3: Glee Club I, 2. 3. 4: "Belk of Bcaujolais" 1:
"Gassed" 2; "Hoi Cop.v"3; "One Thing After Anolh-
er"3; "Happy Landings" 4; "Thread ol Deitiny." 4.



J^^ ^P



.\ai)ie Dorothy Amrija Rons.

.Is ii'e see her "Coy."

Birthplace Colon, Rep. of Panama.

Pa.nime Talking witli Edna.

b'm'orile expression "Oh, gosh!"

.IciiAtUsYAie Kubo Klub 1, 2: Spanish Clul. 2, 3, 4:

Trade Wind Staff 4; Class Vice-prer.ldeni 4; Debate

Club Treasurer 4.



\ame Carlton Lkon Horixe.

,1s ur see him "Ambitious."

Birthplace Reading. Pennsylvania.

Pastime Sports.

./ctirilirsCAee Club 1, 2; Orchestra 1. 3; Band 3: Drama-
tic Club 3: Class Secretary 4; Trade Wind Printer 4;
National Thespian 4: Effe Kube Klub 1. 2: Carnival
1: "Bells of Beaiuolais" 1: "Red Lamp" 2; "H.ippy
Landings" 4; "Thread of De.^liny" 4.



^



Xame MARnuiiRiTE Wix.n.

./' u't' see tier "Winsome."

Birthplace Alt. \'ernon. New YorU.

Pastime Eating.

Fai'orite expression "Not n^ally!"

.yc//,7V/f,r Supper Clab 2. 4; Efft Kube Klub 2: La Pas

3, 4; Liga Panamericana 4; Class Treasurer 4; Trade

Wind Stafl' 4.



lilMi.^



Xame JosE DoMlNADoR Bazan.
.:/.' ur seg hint "Amiable."
Birthplace Colon. Rep. of Panama.
Pastime Sports and reading.
Fa^'orite expression "Play in your position!"
.icti^'ilies Soccer 5. 4: Capiain 4; Varjily Club 5. 4: Vii e"
President 4; Track 4.



** ^^S"



Xame Rav.mond Arthur Beiarano.

.Is \>.'e see him "Temperamental."

Birthplace Cristobal, C. Z.

Pastime Sports and dancing.

Fa^'orite expression "Let's go tor a walk.'"

.Jctii'ities Soccer 2, 3. 4; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Secretary
4: Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4; Handball 2. 4:
Track 3, 4; B. A. A. 1, 2, 3: A. D. T. Ciub 3.



Xame Blanche Violet Belden.

.is u'f see her "Sympathetic."

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Pastime Reading.

FaMrite expression "I almost died!"

.Jrti,'iliesG\ee Club 2, 3; Ell'e Kube Klub 1, 2; Dramatic

Club 4: O. G. A. 4: Supper Club 4; Trade Wind Staff

4; "Bells oi Beaiijolais" I.



^^



V-



Xame Charles Edgar Bi-lukn.

./s we see him "Likable."

Birthplace Ancon. C. Z.

Pastime \'isiiing hospitals.

Fai'orite expression "Say, ;;hrimp, how about a date?"

Jcti.'ilie'Efi'e Kube Klub I, 2: "Cjasscd" l:Ccunival

1, 2; "Bells of Beaujolais" I; Spanish did) 2, 3, 4;

Liga Panamericana 3, 4; Dramatic Club 3 4; "One

Thing Alter Another" 3; National Thespians 4; O. ("i.

A. 4; Trade W'inil Sl.df 4; "Happy L.mdlngs" 4.



r/ >



Xtjini Mabf:i i.E Ikanne Bliss.

./.r ii'f ^ee her "Charming."

Birthplace Cristobal, C. Z.

Pastime Dancing.

Fa^'orite expression ".VU right, now!"

Actii'ities "Bells of Beaujolais" 1 ; Volley bal



1,4: Tennis



1, 2, 5; Bowling 1, 2, 3, 4: Effe Kube Klub !. 2;
Dramalir Club Z, 4; Class Treasurer 1, 2, 3; Student
Council 4; Secretary Student Association 4; School
.Notes tor Caribbean 4; Trade Wind Statf 4; "Thread
ot Destinv" 4



e ^\






\iime Stella V. Boggs.
Js iir see her "Graceful."
Hirthplace Ancon, C. Z.
Pastime Dancing and music.
Fai'orite expression "Hotcha!"
.-/rtirities "Bells of Beaujolais"



"Oh, boy!"
1; Effe Kube Klub 1,



Supper Club 1, 2; "Yellow Tickets" 2; Glee Club 1, 2.
3; BasUet ball I, 2, 3. 4; Volley ball 1, 3, 4; Dramatic
Club 3, 4; Spanish Club 4; President of O. G. A. 4;
Tennis I, 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 2, 3. 4: Trade Wind
Staff 4; Carnival 1, 4; "Thread of Destinv" 4.



^ ^



N^iime~)vD\' Briugkt.

//r u'c see her "Petite."

Huihplace 'Coronado. Calitornia.

Pasiime Squeaking down the hall.

Fdi'orile expression "What excuse shall T give?



^ fi*



XameQohi^ Dkarborn Campbell.

.is Ki'e see him "Dependable."

Birthplace Cooperstown, New York.

Ptislime Reading and tennis.

ta\'orile expression "Ha! Ha! Ha!"

Jtiiri/ies~Eile Kube Khib I. 2; President 2; "Red Lamp"
1; Freshman Class Secretary I; Dramatic Club 3. 4:
Debate Club 4; Math Club 4: La Pas 3, 4; Liga
Panamericana 4; Trade Wind 3; Editor 4; Tennis 3, 4.



Willie Norma Agnks Davis.
/.r >fe .ree her "Clieei'liil".

lUrlliplace Ancon, C. Z.

Pastime Dancing.

l'a\'ortie e.yprcfsuin "I ddn't lielle\'e it."

.Icli'tiles Glee Club 1. 2, 7i; EtTe Kube Klub 2; Supper
Club I, 2. 3, 4; O. G. A. Vice-president 4; Dramatic
Club 4: "Belh of Beauinlais" 1; Volley ball I; Trade
Wind Staff 4: Thread of Des'.l.iv" 4.



^ ^



Xniiie EiLF.EN Rita Donovan.
./r we see her "Poi.sed."
/i//7/(/i/:; PiisUiiie Reading.

I'a^'oriie expression "How should I Unc

.Iclii'tlies Supper Club 3, 4; Volley b;

Club 4; O. G. A. 4: La Pas 4.



^ ^ f



3, 4; Dr



Xame Frkdkrick Ashton Erdon.
./.r {{'e see htm "Alert."
Birthplace Cristobal. C. Z.
Pastime Making a boat.
luuvrile expression "Oh! Oh"
Irlh'ilies Glee Club 1. 2; Athletic Association 2

Orchestra 5: Band 3; Varsity Club 3, 4; Baseball

4; Trade Wind Staff 4.



f ^^



\',iiiir Ki III Ei.izAiiKiii Ecoi.i'.
/.<" ur see her "l^'riendly."
liirthplnre Reading, Pennsylvania.
/'(;.r///Hf- Playing the piano.
/iiiuirite expression "!s that nice'.'"
Iiti-.'ities Carnival 1; Operetta 1; ("dee Club 3;
Co|)y" 3: O. (">. A. 4; Alhlelii Association 1;
girl 4; Tr.idc Wind Sl.dl 4; "riiread of Destiny



"Hot
Office
" 4.



1(1



Xame Georc.e Fernandkz.

-/.r n*e ,fcd /im; "W'ell-mannered."

lUiihplijce Colon, Rep. oi Panama.

Pas Unit Suimniing.

I'acortte expression "Don't be silly."

./W/vV/>r Barcball 4; Tennis 4: Basket ball 4.



Xamc Anne Veronk'a Gib.son.

As u't* see her "Cornel \'."

Birlhplare Colon, Rep. oi Panama.

/iwon/e express/on "Savs who?"

I'asiime Swimming and movies.

Jc/iW/ies Glee Club I. 2; G. A. A. I. 2, 3: Elfe Kiil.e Ivlub
1, 2; Jr.-Sr. Dramatic Club .1, 4; National Thespians
3, 4: President 4; "Hot Co|n" 3; "Thread ol' Destiny"
4: Su|ipcr Ciidi J, 2, 3. 4.



/^^;,



-^ ^j



.Xil/ne J e R E.M 1 ..\ H Go 1( I N

,/.r ur see him "Amicable."

Birihptare Colon, Rep. oi Panama.

/\is/inie Driving n cai'.

/'ij^'ori/e express/or, "I'll bite."

./ Carnival 1, 4: Spanish Club I. 2, 3. 4: Liga Panameri-
cana 3, 4; "BclK of Bcaujol.iis" 1: "Hot Copy" 3;
"Happy Landing," 4; Effe Kobe Klub 1, 2; Dramatic
Club 3. 4; Athletic Association 1, 2, 3: "Gassed" I;
.^lath Club 4; Debate CUib 4; Cnrnix:.! Cimimittee 4.



Xame VlRGINI.V M.XY H..\NN.\.

.Is n'e see her "Nonchalant."
Birlhpliice Rickland, iMaine.
PasUme Readnig anti mo\'ics.
/jx'iin/e expression "Well, no
this"



It uas liU.



11



.\iiin Olls Elizabf.th Hayks.

.:/. ii-e see her "Popular."

Rirlhplace Cristobal, C. Z.

Pasltme Sports and dancing.

Fax'onte expression "What? Not necessaril\!"

./f//,77/Vj- Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Kite Kube Klub I, li
Glee Club 2: Athletic Association I, 2, 3; Treasurer 1
Secretary 3; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4: Vice-president 2, 3
President 4; Class Vice-president I, 2. 3; Dramatic
Club 3, 4; La Pas 2, 3. 4; Secretary 4: Caribbean
Staff 5, 4: "Bells of Beaujolais" 1; Carnival Com-
mittee 4: Golf 3; Volley ball I. 2, 3, 4; Basket ball 1, 2.
3. 4: Baseball I, 2. 3; Tennis 1, 3, 4; A. D. T. Club 3;
Bowling 1, 2, 3, 4.



I rrf.



.Wi/ne Mary Virginia Hi:arne.

.Is u'f see her "Original."

Birlfiplace Colon, Rep of Panama.

Pastime Making puns.

Fai'ortte expression "Well, now atter ;i!l!"

.Jc/iii/ies Glee Club 1. 2: "Bells of Beauiolais" 1; Efle
Kube Klub 1,2; President 2: Supper Club I, 2, 4; La
Pas 4; Trade Wind Staff 4; Dramatic Club President
4; Caribbean Staff 4: "Thread of Destiny" 4.



\a/ne Shiri.ky L\ne Hill.
./s iiv see her "Sweet."
Birthplace Ada, Ohio,
Pastime "Billy."
Fat'orite expression "Naughty!



Naughty!"



Xante Maxine A. Hon MAN,

Jiirth place Painesville, Ohio.

,'/.i" n'c see her "AHectioniite."

Favorite expression Do you know what?

Pastime Dancing.

./f/AvV/ej- -Dramatic Club 4: Efic Kubu Klub I, 2; .\lh

letic Club I, 2, 4; Supper Club 1, 2, 4; Spanish Clnl,

4; Glee Club 3; Trade Wind 4.



12



Xiime Victoria May Holloweli..
,/r ii'f ^vee her "Pleasant."
Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Fa^'ortle expression "Well, I'll be

.-Jc/ifi/ier Baseball I, 2. 5; Rowling I, 2. 5. 4; Supper

Club I: Trade Wind Staff 4; V.-.rsliy Club 7,. '.:

lunior-Senior Dramatic Club 5 4.



fsw'



Xij/ne \\'iLLiAM Irving Hoi lowei.l.

^^s ur .ree htm "Uncontrollable."

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Past I me Swi m m i ng

Fa^'orde expression "Fu x\y, huh?"

ActiK'ities Swimming 1. 2; Soccf >. 4; B A. A. I. 2. 3;

Orchestra 2. 5; A. D. T. 5: Deb;.tc Clul^ 2; Tennis 4;

Basketball 4; Track 3. 4.



^ 1^



Same Ethel Huntoo:;.

./r we see het "Blushable."

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.
Pastime Doing homework.
lawrite expression "Do I!"
A-//.7V<>r Effe Kiibe Kliib 2
Senior Dramatic Club 3:



Supper Club 1, 2, 3; Junior-
O. G. A. 4: Spanish Club 3.



X



\anie Gordon Hctchins, Jr.
As we see him "Scholarly."
Pastime Swimming and tennis.
Birthplace Cristobal, C. Z.
Fawrite expression Sho! Sho!

Ictii'ilies Debate Club 4; Mathematics Club 4; Senior
Carni\al Committee 4.



.\iii?!c Blossom F,. I, am.
.y,r i.r ,ree her "Tranquil."
Birthplace Colon. Rep. of Panama.
Padime Reading and typing.
l'ii<:irite e.rpre,r,rion "I don't know."

./,//>/// Glee Cluh 2; O. G. A. Ch,l. 4; C.ulM.can Stall
4.



^ #5*



Xiifne Hei.kn Lolise Leach.

./.< n't- .ree her "Unaffected."

Birlhpliice Boston. Mass.

Pa.'liine Drawing and tennis.

/'luvri/e e.vpre.rjion "Oil, it is not!"

.Iclwitie.r Effe Kulic Klub I: Atliletic- Association: I, a

Pas 3. 4: O. G. A. Clnli 4; Bouliny 4; Tennis 4: Art

Editor of Traile Wind 4.



--^ ^'



Xnnie Grant Le.m.mon'.

./r u'f ,tee him "Shrewd."

litrlhptace Fort Ste\ens, Oregon.

Pii'ltme Swimming and golfing.

i'lT.'orile expression "Don't get in an uproar!"

.Idi'ltles Mathematics Cluh 4; Science Club 4.



Xame David J. Levy.
./.r ur see him "Scll-coMiaincd."
lUrthiilace Colon, Rep. Panama.
I'ltstlme Postage St.imps.

l-,i,'nrl!e expression "Now, in Gatun etcetera!"
. A //,7V(>.r Orchestra 1. 2, 3, 4: Glee Chih 2, 3: Dramatic
Cliil. 4; Mathematics Cluh 4.



14



<^



Name Jeannii Lewi-..

^/.r u'e see her "Dramatic."

Birlhplace Ancon. C. Z.

Pastime Swimming.

Farorde expression "Who? Ale'"

.Icii.'ilies Effe Kulie Kliili Trejisujer
Glee Cluli 1: "Bells of Reaiijolais"
ciation 3: Ma(h Clnh 4: Tia.le Wind



I: "Revolt" 1;
1 ; Athletic As,so-
Starr4;I,a Pas 4.



^C^



X.iiuc Gloui.a M.agd.m .\ Manni.\.

Is u'^ see her "Sincere."

Birthplace Ancon, C. 7,.

Pastime Reading, writing and .nil limclic.

luiwrite expression "Well 'vli.it do \ou lliiak



V



4ii



\,ime John Fi!.\ncis M.wnix.
^/,f u'e see him "Tcasable."
Birthplace Ancon. C. Z.
Pastime Boat building.
ba^'oriie expression "Hidi!"
.hii'iticf Intercla.ss Track 4.



Xame Bf.veri.ev J.wice AI.vrcuse.

As ice see her "Jovial."

Birthplace Colon, Rep. of Panama.

Pastime Being with Bob.

Fai-orite expression "Well, after all why not?"

./ctii'ities Athletic Association 2, .3; Glee Clnb 2. 3;
Dramatic Club 3, 4: Treasurer of National Thespians
4: Spanish Club 4; Caribbean Staff 4; Supper Club
2, 3. 4; \'.u- il.v Club 4: "One Thiiit' After Another"
3; "Thread of Deslinv 4.



.\,inie Robert x^Iolten.
^/,r we set him "Droll."
Birthplace Jacksonville, Florida.
Pastime Fishing.
Fa^'ortte expression "Nuts!"

Jc/ii'i/ies]oke Felitor of Caribbean Sl.ili' 4; Ti.ilU 4;
"Thread of Destinv 4.



<



Xame EnNA Mina iM^'eller.

.4s ur see her "Flirtatious."

Birthplace W'esterleigh, Staten Island, N. Y.

Pastime Talking with Dorothy Roos.

Fai'orite expression "(ust a minute!"

Jcti.u/iesSuper Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Effe Kube Klub 1. 2,

Glee Club 2. 5; Orchestra 3; Dramatic Club 3; Debate

Club Secretary. 4.



-^ /f*



Xame Alice Ruth Pickett.

.Is we see hei "Composed."

Birthplace Panama, Rep. of Panama.

Pastime Reading.

Facortte expression "Oh, dear!"

Jcti.'ilies Glee Club I, 2, 3; Effe Kube Klub 1,2; Secre-
tary 2; "Red Lamp" 2; Supper Club 1, 2. 3, 4: Secre-
tary 3; Athletic Aseociation 1, 2, 3; Varsity Club 2,
3. 4; Volley ball 1, 2, 4: Golf 1; Spanish Club 3, 4;
Treasurer 4: Liga Panamericana 3. 4; Dramatic Club
3. 4; Caribbean Staff 3. 4; "Happy Landings" 4:
National Thespians 3, 4: Secretarv4; Orchestra 3, 4;
Neptune Club I ; Trade Wind Staff 3.



>



A'ame Violet Sylvia Randall.
.Is we see her "Queenly."
Birthplace Athens. Pa.
Pastime Dancing.

Famrite expre.tsion "Don't be silly!"

.Iclivities Super Club I, 2, 3; "Bells of Reaujolais" 1;
Glee Club 1 ; Dramatic Club 4; O. G. A. 4.



jt\ 4^



16



>



Xiime Richard Mei.vii.le Reinhold.

,Is ii'i" .'cc liim "Efficient."

Ihriliptace Ancon, C. Z.

Pastime E.xtra curricular activities.

./iii\'ilie.r Effe Kube Klub 1, 2; Vice-president I: "Red

Lamp 1; Class President 2, 3; Caribbean Statt 1. 2.

3; Editor-in-chief 4; Math Club 4; Spanish Club 2.

3, 4; Liga Panamericana 3. 4; Trade Wind Etlitor 3:

Carnival Committee 4; Debate Club 4.



*T*



.\tiiiie Hk.s'RV E. S.anchez.

,/.r ur -ree hint "Willing."

Birthplace Colon, Rep. of Panama.

Pa.rliine Music and reading.

Fa^'oriie expression "Certainly.

Jcli.'ilies Glee Club 2; Spanish Club 2, 3, 4; Vice-Presi-
dent 4: Liga Panamericana 3. 4; President 4; Assistant
Business Manager ot Caribbean 3, 4.



*% T^



Xame Marguerite Therese Siebler.
./.r ii'C see her "Sensible."
HirlhpLice New London, Conn.
Pastime Swimming.

Faforitc e.vpressioii "Ah me! Life is but a passing shad-
ow!"
./ctifities Spanish Club 3, 4.



Xanie Robert Warren Slocu.m.

.Is u'e see him "Immaculate."

Birthplace Washington, D. C.

/\istime Thinking of the iuture.

/'arorite expression "Hurry up!"

Jctifilics B. A. A. I, 2, 3; Student Council Senior Repre-
sentative 4: High School Band 3: Tennis 1,2; "Thread
of Destinv;; 4; Math Club 4.



17



Xiime Charles Su.mnkr South.

x/.r ii'e ,ree him "Easy going."

Birll,pl.iccVh\\aAQ\p\m. Pa.

Pa-'tune W'atLliing Cluliliousc sliows.

/',uvri/f e.xpre.t.tion "Whassa malla vou?"

././/,///<.. El'fc Kube Klub 1. 2; Spaiiisli Clul. .3, 4;

"Gassed" 2; .Assemlil.v Committee 4; "Hap|\v Laiui-

ings 4; "Thread ol Deslinv" 4.



^!



1



Xiime BiiTTV Ann Stktlei!.

.Is we see her "Witty."

Birthplace Colon. Rep. of Panama.

PasliDic Sports and dancing.

.Idiiulies Volley ball. Basket ball, and Bowling I, 2, 5,
4: Baseball 1. 2, 3; Tennis 3, 4: Golf 2; Varsity Club
2. 3. 4: Class Secretary 3: Effe Kube Klub 1.2; Dra-
matic Club 3, 4; Secretary 4; Glee Club 1: Supper
Club I. 2, 3. 4; President 4: La Pas 3. 4: Carnival
Committee Cliairm.ui 4; Student Council 4: A. D. T.
Club.



^^i



\,ime \Vii-M,\.Ni Fr.\nc[S Stonk.

./,r we see him "Fluent."

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Pastime Golfing.

Fawnte expression "I'll bet you!"

JrliAlies Carnival 1; Athletic Association I, 2, 3; Or-
chestra 1, 3; Band 3: Baseball 3, 4: Varsity Club 4;
ba Pas 4; Math Club President 4; Dramatic Club 3,
4: Effe Kube Klub 1,2; National Thespians 3, 4:
Caribbean Staff Business Manager 4; "One Thing
Alter .Another" 3; "Happy L.indlngs" 3.



-% *.



\'iime Rl III Swam.
./' we see her "Attra lUrlhplare llonululu. Ilauali.
Paslinic Rilling Fort Sherm.iii boats.
laivrilc expression -" Mier all!"

./(//iv/Zr.'- --(unior-Scnlor Dr.im.ilic Club 4; "Thrcid
Dcsllnv" 4.



^ />>.






18



^r^. mm



Xiinie Robert L. Wertz.

.Js we see him "Nautical."

Birthplace Ancoii, C. Z.

Pa.rllme Sailing.

Ftworlte expression "Shner me lirnl'cis!'.



5fc i?T



Xante Sidney F. Whauton.

.is we see him "Reser\ecl."

Birthplace Douglas, Arizona.

Pa sit me Boating.

.hiifites Class football 2; Swimming 3; Manager Track

Team 4; Basketball 4: Mathematics Club 4; Debate

Club 4; Science Club 4.



fTi:



Xaitie William Ray Wheeler.

,/r we see him "Virile."

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Pastime Loving Shirley.

Parorite expression "No. really."

Activities Carnival 1 ; Freshman Athletic Director 1
Athletic Association 1, 2, 3; Treasurer 3; Swimming 1
Effe Kube Klub 1. 2; Soccer 2, 3. 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4
Basketball 2, 3, 4; "Bells of Beauiolais" 1; Golf 2
Track 3, 4; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; President 4.



Xame Louise J. Whidden.
ds we see her "Good natured."
Birthplace Palmetto. Florida.
Favorite expression .'Maybe.'
Pastime Motorcycle riding.

Jctifities Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4: "Happy Landings" 4:
"Thread of Destinv 4: Dramatic Club 4.



19



\,ime EuisoN Walter W'jrtz.
J.r n'e see him "Athletic."
Birthplace Cristobal, C. Z.
Pijsltnte Looking for something lo do!
Favorite expre^cion "I don't know."
.IclU'iliej^ Athletic Association I, 2: A.



D. T. Clul. 5;



Soccer 2, 5, 4: Basehnll 2, .". 4: X'arsitv Club '.



tJ hK^'



Xame Alejandro L. Wong.
-Ar w'e see him "Good-natured."
Birlhptr.re Colon. Rep. of Panama.
Pas lime Reading.
/'ai'orile expressun "Sure!"
./rlifiiies Orchestra 2: Glee Club 2; La Pas '.
Pananiericana 3, 4.



5, 4: Lig.i



Xame Alice Elaine Wood.

.Ar ii'e see hei "Refine. I."

Birthplace Cristobal. C. Z.

Pastime Reading.

I'ai'ortte expretsinn "What do _\'ou think?"

.Jclii'ities Et'f'e Kube Klub I, 2; Athletic Association 1. 2.
"Bells of Beaujoais" 1 ; Glee Club 2, 3; Spanish Club
2. 3, 4; Liga Panamericana 3, 4; Dramatic Club .3, 4;
Supper Club 5 4; Vice-President 4; National Thc::-
jiians 4; Trade Wind Stall' 4; "Thread of Dejtiny" 4.



^ #^



V- V,



\ame Ernest Lynn Wood, Jr.

./.r a-e see him "Casual."

litrtliplace Centurv, Moriila.

Pa 'lime Photogra]jh\-.

iavorile expression "So uh.il?"

.Ictiinlies Class Art Editor I. 2: Caribbean Art Editor

3. 4: Caribbe.in F'h-)togr.iplier 3, 4; Carnival Com-

mitfee 4



^ ^w.



20



The sailors of the S. S. Class of ,34,
ha\ ing signed on trom many States of
the Union as well as the Canal Zt)ne.
proved to be the most worthy crew that
had ever set out on the ocean of C. H. S.
from Port Freshman.

With Captains Spencer and Hackett
as well as Frst Mate Rarnett at the helm,
this class exhibited pep and desire for
accomplishment unrivaled by any pre-
\ious Freshman class. The unsullied
main sails of the ship during the entire
\ oyage were Alhietics, Dramatics and
Social Activities. The ship's colors were
scarlet and white; the flowers, red and
white roses; the mascot, a dachshund,
Freida : and last but not least, the crew's
motto which they lived up to for the
entire four years was "One for all and all
for one."

It wfiS a Freshman girl who won the
popularity contest. The "Freshman
Hop" was the most successful dance of
the year.

"With this unparalleled sailing record
for a start, the S. S. Class of '34 arrived
at Port Sophomore. Alany changes were
made in the crew, most noticeable of
which was the absence of Caj)tain Hack-
ett, leav'ing only Captain Spencer and
the new first mate, Richard Reinhold, to
man the ship. The crew did splendid
work on this leg ol the voyage, serving an
outstanding luncheon and making the



Soph Leap Year Dance a most unique
and enjoyable affair. This year each
sailor received a class pin.

Having arrived at Port Junior, the
crew of the S. S. Class of '34 did not set
out discouraged as tio most crews on this
leg of the voyage for although they knew
this was the "stormy weather region,
they also knew Captain Spencer and
First-.^late Reinhold would steer them
sateiy through. During the first half of
the journey, they had assembled all neces-
sary equipment to weather the storm.
More luncheons and a card party were
given providing funds so that when the
good ship arrived at Port Senior, the
sought tor goal was won each one had a
beautiful ring and the Junior-Senior Ban-
quet had been the best ever.

When First-Mate Washabaugh steered
away from Port Senior the crew became
sad for they were on the Hst leg of the
voyage. They would soon be at the last
port, Commencement, saying good-bye
to each other and the dear old ocean,
C. H. S., forever! That beloved ocean
which had carried them for four years;
had helped them always, although they
had sometimes failed to do their best.
Small wonder they were sad in retro-
spect' Despite this, they put out a won-
derful annual, something from their
hearts, a legacy for the school they had
loved so well.




We, the class of '54, transcending in
superiority, super-excellence, and super-
eminence, any other class hitherto e-
jected through the portals of Cristobal
High School generously bestow upon
individuals of the succeeding class, their
heirs antl their assigns forever, these
small favors and remembrances.

JOSE BAZAN, his kick (in soccer) and
his colorful car to Jack Dwyer.

BLANCHE BELDEN, her qualifica-



tions to participate in beauty contests to
Leta Deakins.

RAY BEJARANO, his habit of pat-
ing pals on the back to Herbert Phillips.

MABELLE BLISS, her teasable na-
ture to Eileen Ford.

CHARLES BELDEN, his outspoken
speech to James Lobdell.

STELLA BOGGS, her ability to direct
Spanish Club programs to Charlotte Ran-
dall.



21



COLIN CAMPBELL, his unique "ha-
ha" to Ralph Davis.

JUDY BRIDGET, her Ecuadorian
sandals to Aileen O'Connell.

FRED EBDON, his intent expression
to Jack Long.

NORMA DAVIS and HELEN
LEACH, their Old Cristobalishness"
to Olga Roe.

GEORGE FERNANDEZ, his ability
to dissect insects to Eleanor Mullane.

VIOLET RANDALL and EILEEN
DONOVAN, their interest in commercial
subjects to Blossom Ensminger.

JERRY GORIN, his Jitney-service to
Malcolm Duey.

RUTH EGOLF, her supervision of the
Gatun Bus to Annie Laurie Turberville.

ANNE GIBSON, her famous sun-burn
to Margaret Barnard.

BILLY HOLLOWELL, his fondness
for Miss Liter to Alan Jaques.

VIRGINIA HANNA, her preference
for Freshmen to John O'Neil.

CARLTON HORINE and GRANT
LEAL\\ON, their scientific ability to
Theodore Albritton.

ELIZABETH HAYES, her appetite
to Lillian Marden.

GORDON HUTCH INS, his precision
to Lloyd Alberga.

MARY HEARNE and MARGUER-
ITE WINN, their blonde and empty
heads to Anna Reilly.

DAVID LEVY, his fiddle to John
Palm.

JOHN and GLORIA MANNIX, their
ambitious nature to Claude Berger.

SHIRLEY HILL and BEVERLEY
MARCUSE, their dinner parties to Mi-
riam Swam.

ROBERT MOLTEN, his drawl to
Mary Ruth Reidell.

MAXINE HOFFMAN, her fairy-
likeness to Bill Elliot.

RICHARD REINHOLD. his enthu-
siasm for ban(]uets to Edgar Borden.

VICTORIA HOLLOWELL, her wavy
locks to Robert Neely.

HENRY SANCHEZ and ALEJAN-
DRO WONG, their gentlemanly manners
to William Dougherty.

ETHEL HUNT(X)N, her individual-
ism to Paul Gregory.

WARREN SLOCUM, his thoughtful
wink to Billy Beers.

BLOSSOM LAM, her Household Arts
training to Alice MacSparivn.



CHARLES SOUTH, his job at the
movies to David Marshall.

JEANNE LE\\TS, her nose for news
to Ernest Jaramillo.

BILLY STONE, his white tu.xedo to
James Reynardos.

EDNA 'MUELLER, her mascara to
Ruth Wickingstad.

FRANK WASHABAUGH, his con-
tagious laugh to Max Sanders.

RUTH PICKETT, her job as assembly
pianist to lack Egoscue.

ROBERT \^'ERTZ, his fondness for
sailboats to \\Mliam Wirtz.

DOROTHY ROOS, her wail of chew-
ing gum to Jane Huntoon.

SIDNEY WHARTON, his job as
storekeeper in the Chemistry Lab. to
Robert King.

MARGUERITE SEIBLER, her regal
photograph for the Caribbean to Hert
Asensio.

RAY WHEELER, his blase expression
to George Poole.

BETTY STETLER, her job as school
reporter to Kathleen Goodenough.

EDISON WIRTZ, his ability to vamp
new English substitute teachers to Charles
\'incent.

RUTH SWAN, her movie star re-
semblance to Mary Ann Carruthers.

ERNEST WOOD, his camera to Irl
Sanders.

LOUISE WHIDDEN, her blackface
parts in plays to Charles Heim.

ALICE \VOOD, her popularity ulth
the Sophs to Paul Beard.

To the grief-stricken Faculty we bestow
our heartyfelt smpathy in their hour of
desolation caused by the aching void
which appeared at our departure.

To you, on-coming classes, we pass
the flowing torch of knowledge and bid
you carry on.

Suliscribed and sworn to, on this fif-
teenth day of .June in the year of our
Lord nineteen hundred and thirty-four;
signed by the members of the Senior
Class, consisting of fifty-six varieties: in
the presence of these witnesses:

JIM NASIUM
CAFFY TERIA
ANDDY TORIUM



(Seal)
B. U. N. K.



22




Aeu' York Cili/, (hioher 2,S,
1946 All members of the I9'>4
Oraduatinp class of Cristobal High
Scliool, Cristobal, Canal Zone,
are requested to icrrespvnd imme-
diatelt/ with .11 r. Frederick A. Eb-
den, 1907 Rn-erside Drn'e. 3t'n'
Ycrf; Citi/. Jlr. Ebdc.n is plan
ninfl a class reunion which will
take place aboard his i/acht jcr a
short cruise scmeiime next month.
All classmates are asked to com-
municate with Jlr. Ebdon as to
tlie possihilit)/ of their attending
the reunion.

This was the notice which appsared in
the "World Telegram" steadily for sev-
eral weeks. I happened upon it one day
and received quite a shock. As I was in
New York at the time I went at once to
Fred's apartment to investigate.

It was nothing unusual at the time for
Fred Ebdon's name to be in the New
York papers for he had recently become
one of the most wealthy men in the city.
A year previous he had conducted an
expiditlon to Panama to do some ex-
tensive work among the ruins of Fort
San Lorenzo and Old Panama. There he
discovered gold which the pirate Morgan,
was supposed to have hidden centuries
ago. Because of his discovery and his
newly acquired wealth, he had leaped
into prominence over night.

I saw Fred at his apartment and he
told me that he wanted the whole class
on a cruise in November it possible and
was using this means of gathering them
in New York.

"Can you come, do you suppose?

"Can a hungry man eat, do you sup-
pose? You bet."

Then we proceeded to talk over old
times and recall every one we could re-
member. He had a copy of the "Carib-
bean" and what a laugh we had over
those pictures! When we were trying to
remember where some of the others were,
he said, "There are plenty of our class-
mates right here in New York. Let s try
to find a few. Did you know that Dick
Reinhold is editor-in-chief ot the 'World
Telegram' now? Let's go see him first.

At the newspaper offices we were ad-
mitted almost immediately to the editor's
room where we saw Dick sitting behind
a formidable pile of books and papers.
He acted just the same as he did when



he was editor ot the 1934 "Caribbean,
even though he did have the reputation
of being the most hard-boiled ot city
editors!

He and Fred had discussed the reunion
before and were expecting answers to the
ad\ ertisement soon. In the meantime he
suggested that we go see some ot our
gang who were in New York. Helen
Leach and Gloria Alanni.x were both
working on the "New York Sun. Helen
was an advertisement writer and Gloria
edited the paper's "Column to the Love-
lorn.

Both were delighted to see us but could
not come on the cruise. They sent us to
see Ruth Egolt who was private secretary
to the president ot an insurance firm, and
head of a whole army ot stenographers.
It recalled our senior year when Ruth was
office girl for Mr. Franks.

Ruth told us that Frank Washabaugh
had just come to New York and hatl
started a firm of his own. He had suf-
fered so much from sunburn all his lite
(especially on the Zone) that he had
final ly invented a sunburn remover. Ruth
gave us his address and we hurried to the
Washabaugh Sunburn Remover Company
and caught Frank beforehe left for dinner.

By this time we had met so many of the
old-timers that we were all approaching
a state of hysteria. Frank took us to
dinner at a fashionable hotel where we
reminisced over every course. When we
left, Fred made an appointment for us
to meet him at his apartment later in the
evening. He said he wanted to take us
to a show and seemed very excited about
it for some unknown reason.

The reason became known when he
took us to the opening night of Earl
Carroll's "Vanities. Stella Boggs was
its star and the popular dance team of
Ruth Swan and Charles South were
featured.

Within four weeks of the time the
reunion notice first appeared in the
"World Telegram," answers had come
from as many of the classmates as could
be expected. Twenty replied that they
would be in New York at the appointed
time; many others sent their regrets; and
there were a tew among the missing.

It was Fred's plan to get Warren
Slocum, now captain of the S. S. "Euro-
pa," to pilot the yacht on the cruise while
his vessel was in dry-dock for repairs.
Captain Slocum appeared in Dick's office



23



one morning looking very swanky in a
blue uniform and gold braid. In spite of
all the glitter he was the same fellow and
accepted the offer gladly.

November fifteenth was the day ap-
pointed for those going on the cruise to
meet at the Ambassador Hotel. All
morning long they appeared and what an
uproarious time we had!

The first to arrive was Professor Camp-
bell who absent-mmdedly rode past our
floor three times in the elevator before
he remembered to get off! Colin was now
teaching in Cooperstown University and
looked even more scholarly than his
position requiretl. The next arrival was
Doctor Charles Belden. He looked so
efficient and business-like that one would
never guess that he was going on a pleas-
ure trip. Charles was now head of the
Belden Medical Clinic in the slums of
Brooklyn. After him came Beverley
Marcuse, Norma Davis and John Alan-
nix. Beverley owned and managed a
prosperous night club, and was assisted
by John and Norma in the business.

By noon time Fred's apartment sound-
ed like a true Bedlam. Every one talked
at once except one slim, blonde, woman
I saw in a corner behind the piano. Not
being able to picture any of my former
cohorts in a silent role, I strolled over to
investigate. Her back was turned, her
head lowered, and not a sound came from
her. I coughed nothing happened. I
coughed again and again. I had visions
of a sore throat and stopped coughing to
tap her shoulder. She raised her head in
a startled fashion and looked at me. I
recognized her at once and said, "Hello,
Sister!" I got no farther however because
she didn't even speak to me! Here was
Elizabeth Hayes staring at me with cold
eyes and turning disdainfully away.

I fled from her chilly presence back to
the crowd and sought out Jane Hill to
tell me the reason for Elizabeth's strange
behaviour. She was only too willing to
relate the whole story. Poor Elizabeth
had been disappointetl in lo\e and was so
disillusioned and bitter (owartl everybody
that she had tletl into the country. She
lived alone somewhere in the wilds of
\'ermont and pondered on a new kind of
philosophy which she was following.

Jane said, "It took a great deal of
persuasion to get her to come here. I
guess she remembers her happy life at
C. H. S. and is attempting to recapture
some of it. It's a sad story don't you
think?" I heartily agreed with her.

E\eryone was preparing now to leave
for the dock and go alxiard the "Frieda.
(I'red had named his yacht "I'rieda be-
cause our class mascot when we high
school freshmen had been Alavnci Bliss's



dachshuml of that name). When we
arrived there Warren received us on the
yacht. We were scheduled to sail at
two o'clock. A few minutes before the
hour we were all gathered along the rail
when a tail figure in many furs came
flying down the dock. After her came a
taxi-driver, a news boy, and a U.S. Cus-
toms Inspector, all carrying suitcases and
hand bags.

It was Jeanne Lewis without a doubt.
Maybe she was a famous actress now
but she hadn't changed much. \\'hat
an entrance! No one but an actress could
catch a boat with a sour-faced taxi driver,
a rowdy news boy, and a hardened old
Customs Inspector carrying her bags!

rhere were more glad cries of welcome
then. Now that the "Frieda" was leaving
the dock under Captain Slocum's able
guidance the crowd began chattering
again, "And do you remember the time

" This continued all afternoon as we

left New York. It was not until after
dinner that we all got together and talked
things over in any sort of order and sanity.
All twenty of us gatheretl on the deck and
Warren acted as master of ceremonies.
He suggested that we conduct our gather-
ing in an orderly fashion with one person
on the floor at a time. We all agreed to
that and somebody remarked, "Let's
make it nice a.nd orderly like our class
meetings used to be, eh?" But we knew
better and voted for order!

Warren began the discussion. "I can
tell you of Bob Wertz because he is in my
line of work. Right now he is skipper of
the S. S. 'Americana' which belongs to a
steamship company in competition with
my own. I see him occasionally; were
friendly enemies. He hasn't changed at
all and is the best liked skipper of all the
ships his company owns.

We all talked about that a while until
the captain called us to order. "Now it'
i^Iary's turn to talk.'

Mary Hearne wore the most fashion-
able clothes of all the women and why
not? She was a fashion designer and had
her own shops in both New York and
Paris calleil "The Hearne Shoppe." She
told about Eileen Donovan who modeled
and helpeil her design the styles. Ethel
Huntoon hati her own department which
made fancy costumes and specializetl in
"Ali Pollera outfits! To such an extent
had Panamanian customs spread! In
"The Hearne Shoppe" there was also
another of the 1934 girls. Violet Randall
was heail of the semi-made clothes de-
partment which did a flourishing busi-
ness.

Then Dr. Belden, Charles to us, told
us all the home news. Jose Bazan was
the lire chief in Colon and he still kept



24



up the tradition of having Spanish club
dances at the Bomba, but why shouliln't
he? Marguretie Siebier had taken Mrs.
Spencer's place teaching Spanish. Our
beio\eti sponsor was ii\ing In Spain at
the time and was quite an authoress. Her
"Memoiors" had just been published and
we were all an.xious to get a copy. Two
other classmates hatl developed into
teachers. Blossom Lam was a second
Miss Patterson and was just as able a
teacher. George Fernandez was a pro-
fessor in the Biology Department at the
Junior College. His school-d.ay fondness
for dissecting bugs had carried him 'ir
in that line of work.

"Now tell us about your work, Alice,"
we begged, as she was ne.xt in the circle.
She had invented a fat-removing cream
called "Wood's \\'onder Worker." \\'hat
an unusual vocation for Alice to choose:
She told us about Edna .\Iueller antl
Dorothy Roos who had factories side by
side in Jersey City. Edna originateil the
"Mueller Make-up Concern," and Dot
was the proud in\'entor of a new type of
chewing gum that would snap with very
little effort on the part of the chewer!

Soon everybody began talking at once
about our old classmates, but I finally
managed to gather scraps of news about
most of them.

Edison \\'irtz was e.xploring in the wikis
of Ecuador and Peru, and had not been
m the L'nited States for several years.
\\'e all knew that Blanche Belden was a
movie star for we had seen her on the
screen many times. Her friends said her
fame had not changed her personality, as
is so often the case. Likewise we all knew
of Billy Wheeler, for anyfime one wouUi
open a magazine Bill's face would appear,
adorning some collar atlvertisement. Sitl-
ney Wharton was an Army officer now
stationed in Hawaii.

We all noticed the change in Ahiyno
Bliss. She was now heail matron in a
home for Aged and Decrepit Punsters.
She pulled at our heartstrings when she
told of the pitiful cases she hatl in her
care. I'm afraid she cllti not enjoy (he
noise and hub-bub of the trip and often
I saw a longing look in her eyes as if she
were wishing to be back in her home,
surrounded by her wards. She also told
us of the splendid work Virgina Hanna
was doing as a social worker among (he
poor and needy.

Jane Hill was enthusiastic about her
career in architecture. She had actually
drawn plans for some of the buildings at
the latest World's Fair quite an under-
taking, and we were very proud of her.
She saitl Ernest Wood often helped her
out, although his photography shop kept
him busv most of the time.



Ruth Pickett, head librarian at the
Congressional Library in NA'ashington,
told us of .Anne Gibson's position as presi-
dent of the General Federation of V\'om-
en's Clubs, antl of Louise Whidden's
ability to give reatlings In negro dialect.
She told us ilttie tid-blts about the life
of Senator Hutchins (you remember Gor-
don, don't you)? He and Ruth were fast
friends and from what I heard their re-
lationship was closer than that of friends!

Jerry Gorin was a Greyhound Bus
Ivine official and he cer(ainly looked fhe
part. He had for his neighbors in Phila-
delphia, Grant Lemmon and Da\itl Levy.
Grant was the delight of chemistry stu-
dents, for he had indented some play-
things lor every classroom so that the
students might ha\e something to occupy
their mind during class sessions. David
had In his possession the "most marvel-
lous stamp collection in the worki" and
he spent his time Impro\ing it.

Jn one corner two gentlemen were
talking earnestly. On closer inspection,
they proved to be Billy Stone anil Bob
Molten. Billy then expounded to us his
famous theory that it was perfectly nat-
ural for a rolling stone to gather moss.
\\'e wondered why Billy was such a re-
cluse and Bob told us that it was because
his belief in women was shattered. He
had married .^larguerlte Winn and ev-
idently ail had not gone well. Marguerite
had three or four husbands before she
finally married Frank and turned out to
be a model wife. We chatted with Bob
for awhile. He showed us the book he
was reading. I( was "Rob Roy," and
he had finally reached page 467. He
said that he was very much interested In
English Literature now. As we remember
his enthusiasm in English twelve we
didn't doubt his statement.

The last night on board we hail a big-
time: Bev i^larcuse had brought her
night club performers "en masse." Her
right hand man, Johnny Mannix, who
was also the dance director, hatl been
practicing with the dancers ail week in
ortler to present a super-fine performance.
Johnny sure had a way n-Ith the women!
He'd work those girls morning, noon anti
night and make 'em like it! However, no
one meant anything to him but Norma
Davis. She was their star performer
and could that girl sing the blues.

That night was one of the happiest In
our life. Bev went from table to table
making everybody feel at hom, altho it
didn't take much encouragement. Fred
beamed with satisfaction to think that
his plan shoultl work so perfectK-, and
everyone forgot his or her position, social
status, or career and pretended they were
kkls back in good C. H. S. again.



25



<)



After the party Fred told us wliv we
were going to Marseille on our cruise.
Miss Maxine Hoffman and Count Ray-
mond Bejarano were to be married at
Bordeaux, and Fred had received an
mvitation for us all to attend. The
wedding would take place in the Hollo-
well Holy Temple, of which Reverend
\\Mliam Irving HoUowei! was pastor;
Miss \'ictoria Hollowell, assistant; and
.^hss Judy Bridget, Sunday School Su-
perintendent.

Fred also told of the former class mem-
bers who were in Europe at the time.
Henry Sanchez and Alejandro Wong were
doing the gypsy act playing their guitars
at various European towns.

No one ever knew why Better Stetler
happened to be any place at any particu-
lar time. She was a mystery woman. At
first she was suspected of being allied
with a band of Paris crooks; then she was
reputed to belong to a detective agencv;
now it was not known why she happened
to be at Bordeaux unless it was to take
part in the National Bridge Tournament
which was being played there!

Carlton Honne was on his wav to a
Berlin Science laboratory. He had com-
pounded a famous "Horine Gas" (pro-
nounced Horeen, as in chlorine), which
was supposed to be very poisonous, and
was carrying samples to other chemists.
The gas was said to have strange effects
on people who breathed it.



The next morning the "Frieda" docked
at Marseille. We immediately left for
Bordeaux by train, and arrived the next
day. We were met by the prospective
bride and groom and ail the others at
the station who contiucted us to a hotel
w-here we rested until time for the wedding
at four o'clock.

\\'e all drove out to the Hollowell Holy
Temple, founded by the Re\erend Wi\-
liam Hollowell. (Who would have sus-
pected the makeup of a minister in the
Billy H,)llowell of our school days)? We
were ushered into the Temple by Miss
\'ictoria and Miss Jutly, both looking
very solemn and pious. For a few mo-
ments we chatted of the wedding. The
courtship had been a sudden one, we
were told, and no one knew much about
if.

1 noticed Carlton talking to Jeanne
Lewis. He looked most tlejected and
haggard, I thought, and Jeanne looked
disturbed. Soon the minister entered
looking almost funereal in black clothes,
and took his correct place.

The wedding march was struck up,
and the Count Bejarano entered attired
in the full dress uniform of his newly
acfjuircd nobility. Down the aisle came



Maxinc in the loveliest of all britlal
gowns. She looked determined and pale
rather than radiant with happiness as
brides should appear. As she approached,
I saw the expression on the waiting britle-
groom's lace change until he was frown-
ing hard and flashes were coming from
his dark eyes, flow often we had seen
Ray's expressions change so (juickly in
the days ot '54).

As the bride came nearer she looked
defiant, and Ray seemed on the verge of
exploding -which he did:

"How long is that bridal train?" he
asked. His voice was low and menacing,
and each word sounded like a bomb shell.

"Twenty eight feet," came the answer
from the bride.

We were all astounded and gaped in
wonder at these unusual pre-nuptial re-
marks. However, (he worst was yet to
come.

"Didn't I tell vou it had to be thirlv
feet?"

"Yes, but it's my own wedding gown
and you've had your way long enough,
and the bride broke into tears.

Then Count Bejarano raged and tore
his hair, and finally shouted, "I'll marry
no woman who can't obey my wishes
even on our wedding day. I'm through
with women iorever:

He stalked out of the church. Reverend
Hollowell dropped both his book and his
jaw. The bride remained defiant and we,
spectators, stood in silence. Never had
such a spectacle been presented at a
wedding:

Suddenly the dramatic voice of Jeanne
Lewis rang out in the stillness, "I have
the solution to this dilemma. Carlton
Horine has confessed to me that he loves
Maxine and she loves him, so why not
continue the ceremony?"

Both of the lovers looked gloriously
happy at this sudtlen turn of events and
Carlton hastened up tiie aisle to Maxine's
sitle. The pastor beamed as his hopes of
continuing the marriage returned, anil
he began.

When the time came to e.xchange rings,
the groom fumbled helplessly through all
his pockets searching for a ring he did not
possess. As he drew a handkerclii^f from
one pocket something dropped to the
floor with a smash. Clouds of smoke and
penetrating fumes arose and filled the
room, and Carlton shouted, "It's my
poison gas!"

Then I became dizzy and the room
began to whirl. Strange things began to
happen I saw the bride, the groom, and
the minister lump up and down antl skip
off! I saw Captain Slocum and the
philosopher, Elizabeth Hayes, flitting



26



between the pews, and John Mannix and
Alejandro Wong playing leap frog: Then
some people rushed in and took us all
away from the church.

News Item:

Bordeaux, Nov. 26, 1946.^ The Hol-
lowell Holy Temple was the scene of a
strange occurence yesterday afternoon.
During the wedding service of Miss
Maxine Hotlman and the Count Ray-
montl Bejarano, passers-by heard loud
shouts and saw the Count dash wildly
from the church. Some minutes later
more strange sounds were heard com-
ing from the interior of the Temple.

A group of citizens entered to inves-
ticate the matter and beheld a most
extraordinary sight. All the wedding
guests were acting as though they were
drunk or insane. The bride, the groom,
and the minister were playing tag.
Other men and women were running
about shouting, and one party of them
were playing "hide-and-go-seek." Ail



seemed to be adults ot approximately
thirty years of age.

The police were called and decided
to take the party to the hospital instead
ot jail. All continued (heir strange
behaviour for three hours when the
hysteria showed signs of disappearing.
A gentleman named Horine recovered
first and explained that they were
suffering a temporary insanity result-
ing from having inhaled his "Horine
Gas" when he accidentally tiropped a
bottle of it.

The entire party recovered con-
sciousness within a tew hours and were
released from the hospital. They are
all Americans and came here on a
pleasure trip. They plan to leave
Bordeaux today and return to America
immediately.

(Editor's Note: These fantastic pro-
phecies are results of the vivid imagina-
tions of three girl members of the class
of '34 and really ought not be held re-
sponsible).



SENIOR CLASS P0E.^1
Bu Gloria JJanni.v '34



The time has come when we, Seniors,
Must venture forth from school
And enter into the wide world,
E.xchanging book for tool.

In nineteen-thirty we were Frosh.

A timid group, I fear.

And now, throughout these four short years

Our school has grown quite dear.

^^'e thought they were quite wrong to shave
The hair clear off our boys
And treat us all real rough, as though
We were but little toys.

Yet when in nineteen-thirty one
The Sophomore class were we.
We pounceil upon the litfle Frosh,
And torturetl them with glee.

And then in nineteen-! hirty two

We joined the Junior ranks

And viewed with condenscentling smile.

The Sophomores' childish pranks.



In nineteen-thirty three we stepped
Into the Senior class.
And though we studied very hard
The time did quickly pass.

\\'e've clubs and dances parties, too.
And lots of other things.
And now upon some sixty hands
There glow the Senior rings.

We've had an added glory to

Our one remaining year.

We have a school that's grand and new

We're proud of it down here.

Airs. Spencer's been our sponsor for
Our whole High School career.
She's helped us pass up every class.
And stood for us each year.



higl



And now, we've finishec
We'll scatter far away.
We hope that we will meet again
And, perchance, we may.



1 scnooi vears



^



27



1








CIIASSIES




29








snim'i^^vf^



Sicuuiiih?. Lcji to Rii/id: William Elliot. John Palm, Ralph Daxis, Theodore Albritton, Richard
Molten. C. .^lunoves, Paul Beard. James Renardez, Robert Xeely. Willi im
Beers.

SiUin.i. f.efl to Rinht: Edgar Borden. lack Egosciie. Ma.xwell Sanders, William Wirtz. !rl Sanders.
David Alarshall, Charles Vincent. Ernest Jaramillo.

I'ront Rou\ Left to Rujh!: Claude Berger. Bertram Asensio. Llovd /Mberea. Paul Gregory. John
n Xcil, Herbert Phillips, William Dousihertv.



Jun



lors



Stciihhmi. I.i'jt to Ri/ilii: Blossom Ensminger. Eillen O Connel. .^liriam .Swan, .^lary Ruth Rieilcl.
jMary Ann Carruthers, Anna Reilly.

Siltlitii. I.i-Jt to Hi./hl: Margaret Barnard. Ruth Wikingstad, Olga Roe, Leta Deakins, .\nnie
Laurie Tuberville, Alice .^lac Sparren, Elinor Mullane.




50



TUN TOR CLASS

/)(/ III I nil Dari'.r )i



I his year (lie liiniv>r Class of '55 lias
lieen \ erv active in sponsoring and partic-
ipating in school events.

The first class meeting was hekl on
October 11, 1955 in the school lihrarv,
lor the purposj of electing class olficers.
The meeting was conducted by our former
sponsor, Miss Moore. Officers were
elected as follows:

President William Beers

\'ice-Presidon( Robert Neely
Secretary Ruth W'ikingstad

Treasurer Kathleen Goodenough

The Tunior Class had second choice for
electing a class advisor and they were
very fortunate in being able to have Mr.
^'iller as their sponsor. He has proved to
be one of the most capable of the class
aiK'isors. His handling of the Carnival
stage show has shown that.

On Wednesday, October thirteenth, a
special meetin5 was called in order to
elect one boy and one girl from the class
as representatives to the Student Coun-
cil. Miriam Swan and Paul Beard were
chosen as representatives.

The third meeting held by the Junior
Class was to elect class helpers and ex-
tras. Discussions were held about choos-
ing the class ring and whether expenses
tor (he annual banquet could be met. As
those two problems ha\e always been
the Important items in the luniors' sched-
ule, they re(]uired a great tleal of ponder-
ing.

We decided to hold a candy sale on
December twentieth to help raise the
necessary funds for our banquet. The
sale was conducted by boys selected from
the class.

On January seventeenth, we held our
second cantly sale which was managetl by
the girls. The proceeds were much greater
than those from the first sale.

The Junior play, "Happy Tjandings,"
was presented to the public in the school
auilitorium on the fifteenth of December.
1 he play, sponsoretl by Miss Ivimbro, was
(|uite a success. The students as well as
the director are to be complimented on
the splendid performance. Approximate-
ly ^75.00 was taken in as profit on the
matinee and evening performance. This



sum was addeil to the class treasury.

The Junior dance was held in the school
gymnasium on February ninth. The
dance was made a success those mem-
bers who worked so diligently in decorat-
ing the gym in a most unique manner.
Both boys and girls contributed greatly
in making the dance unusual and attrac-
tive. The lights were dimmed and the
ra'ters were decorated with crepe paper.
In the corner where the orchestra played,
there was a large, yellow, crescent moon
hung with the word "JUNIORS" on it.
The pleasant atmosphere and the music
both conbined to make the whole evening
a happy one.

Soccer season started with more turn-
outs from the Junior Class than from any
other class m the high school. The boys
who finally made the varsity team were
for the most part Juniors.

The girls from the class took a great
deal of interest in volleyball fighting hard
to maintain the high standards of their
class.

Baseball received renewed enthusiasm
from the boys in the class. A large turn-
out was expected from every class and
they were not disappointed in the turn-
outs from the Junior class. Although the
Juniors lost the class championship, they
showed school spirit In every game.

The Junior girls showed their possibili-
ties in basketball. They attacked this
sport with a keen and vigorous zeal.

The Juniors took quite a part in the
tennis and track meets. The Junior ten-
nis champion was Tack Egoscue who will
represent us in the high school tourna-
ment. In the interclass track meet, the
Juniors came first with the highest num-
ber of points. The best boys in track
represented their respective classes and
it seems that the Juniors showed their
outstanding abilities in this sport.

During the coming year, the Junior
class will continue to act as a group and
intends to uphold the fine spirit shown in
school activities. .'\s a class, the Juniors
have stood together in maintaining true
sportsmanship and this loyalty will see
them win still greater distinction next
vear.



31




ShinJaiii, L:Ji lo Ri,}h(: Edward Durham, Robert Marsh, Palrlck Bates, Royce I^ewis, Theodore
Aanstoos, Armando Gasperi, SaniLicl Rol^, Ciiarles Alead.

Sif/i/it/, f.cfl lo Rii//i(: ]o\\n Szivos, George Alarcuse, Wendell Cotton, Juho Dominguez, James
Days, Howard Will, James Lothrop, Joseph Retally.

/'ron( Roa\ Mi in Hn/hl: Matthew O'Hearn, Rohei-t Moot. William Hill. Robert Anderson.
\\'ilham Hanna, Edwartl Curtis. Alphues Baldwin.



Sophomores



S/,uiJii},i: T.'jf! to Ri/ihl: -Alice Hohart, Cecilia Kalentler, Hope Hollouell, Doris Ehdon, Elizabeth
Collins. E\elyn Dwver, Alarv GiMtfin. Agnes Reinke, Jeanette Hvler,
Hone Schaetfer, Virginia Sanders.

Siliinti, Lcjl 1:1 Rii/hl: Margaret Hollingshead. Elizabeth Alurray. Belly Stevens. Muriel Hanna.
(Mr. R. C. Hackett. advisor). Edith W'ikran. )ane Starke, Nora Hewitt.
\'lrginla Thomas.

iron! Rou\ I.cji lo Rio/il: Viola Tuck. Olga Dominguez. Lydia Gravatl. Elva Estenoz. Rachel
Cuesta. Muriel MuUane. Dorothy Hoecker, Mary Goulet.



I





m



f^ *?






5*1- !; nr- 1




§:if 1



I- -'








32



SOPHOMORE ACTIVITIES



On October 11, 19.33, the present
Sophomore Class held its first meeting
in the library which was assigned to them
for the entire year. The purpose of this
meeting, as customary, was to elect class
officers and a sponsor for the present year.
Mr. Hackett, who had been our advisor
for the previous school year, acted as
chairman of the election.

Since Mr. Hackett had proved himself
to be such a capable advisor the first year,
the class re-elected him unanimously.
Following this election and after a close
contest the class officers were chosen as
follows:

President Wendell Cotton

Vice-President J.AMES Days

Secretary Virginia Sanders

E.xtra Officer.. Edward Durham

Another meeting was held on October
thirty first after the Stuilents' Associa-
tion was organized ant! its officers elected.
The purpose of this class meeting was to
elect two representatives to the E.xecutive
Council. The representatives were elected
as follow.s: Doris Ebdon, girl representa-
tive; and Howard Will, boy representa-
tive.

At the regular December meeting the
class made plans for the Sophomore
Dance. It was the annua! class dance and
was formal. It was given in the high
school gymnasium the night of January
5, 1934. James Days and his committee
made elaborate plans for the evening
which were all carried out perfectly.

The gymnasium was righly decorated
with palm branches along the walls and
bamboo leaves enveloping the sky blue
lights. This gave the atmosphere a cool
and pleasing tone. The spacious gym-
nasium seemed to be an earthly Eden.

E.xcellent and melodious music was
furnished by "Barlow and his Jazz Aristo-
crats." This orchestra was a novelty
which added much pep to the dancing.
At intervals during the dance, some of
the Sophomores did their .share by serving
punch to the thirsty guests.



One of the specialties was the prize
waltz. The couple who showed the most
grace and skill at waltzing proved to be
Elizabeth Hayes, a Senior, and John Will,
a Sophomore. As a prize each of them
received a package of one hundred pen-
nies!

There was no doubt at midnight as to
hosts. Everyone had a good time be-
cause of the excellent spirit of the dance.

The Sophomores sporting spirit seemed
to be quite low this year. Although the
class possesses many talentetl sportsmen
and sportswomen, our record has not
been very good.

In the Inter-class Soccer series the
Sophomores began by defeating the
Juniors. This good fortune did not last
for long however, because the Freshmen
proved to be invincible.

Again in the Inter-class Baseball series
the Sophomores won their first game
against the Seniors and were defeated
by the Freshmen.

In the tennis tournament which A\r.
Hackett managed, the Sophomores'
champion was \\'illiam Hill. In the semi-
finals for the school championship he was
defeated by Pressley, the Freshman
champion.

The Sophomore girls upheld the honor
of their class in the basket ball tourna-
ment for girls. They defeated the Fresh-
man team and the Junior team to win
the series.

We hope that next year the class spirit
will be higher in athletics and that more
enthusiasm will be displayed.

The class of '36 as a whole has had
plenty of cooperation in all the class and
school activities. Its officers have proved
capable in managing the class functions.
If this class continues tlunng (he next
two years with the excellent record of its
last two, it will undoubtedly leave an
enviable reputation when it a;ratlu ates in
1936.



33




S/iiih/iii,/. f.fjl A) Rii/hl: -Stanley Donaldson, Montford Tawes, Carlisle Christensen. Robert
Rulev. Robert Rutherford, James \'an DyUe, Joseph Collin, William
Abendroth.

Si!,'iii,i. F,efl lo RiiiM: John Mcl^ain. F"rank Alberga, Jack Clay, Horace Sallas, James Coman.
W'dliam Raby, RoLiert Pulgar, Robert Reppa.

Front Rin^\ Left lo Rifllit: Burton Hood. Jjauerance Will, Theodore Purvis, John Bozeman, Archi-
bald Gibson, Russel Justice, Mar\-in Iveenan, \'ernon ClarU.



reshmen



StiinJinij, Ll'JI lo Bitfhl: Dons Collings, Betty Kills. Jaceline Briscoe. Mary Darley. Louise Sei-
bold. Kathleen Ecker.

Siiftn<;, I.cjl !o RiolU: Ruby Lyew, Kathleen PInllips, Helen Carrol, Charlotte Levy, Vn-gniia
Kehn, Ellen Kelty. Thelma Miller, Maxine Blunden.

Fronl RiHK', f.cjl lo Ritihl: -W'iniiVed KoUer, Grace Hodges. Esther Neely, Anna Patchett. Ruth
Ii<>\\ man.




^iiiiiiliwiriiii'B'l








Ac// A) Riiiht: Joseph Attia, loseph Martin. Fred W'ertz, Lemuel Pressely, William
Tur\-i!le. Albert Christain, Donald Cornell. Roderick Cutlibertson. lames
Hogan.

SiUin.j, Lcjl to Riolil: Phillip Houghton, Carlos Funes, William Wood, William Dickinson, James
Christian. Anthony Refcoiski, Herbert Gottesman, Roland Clemens.

Front Iioii% Left to Riolil: Chanev i^loore. William Scoot, Stanley Dougherty. Charles Washa-
baugh, Henry Jaramdlo.



Freshmen



Staiuiiiiii, Lcfl to Ri,/lil: Theda Stokes. Yolanda Sallas. Xetta Potts, Josephine Stumpf, Olive
Aanstoos, Rae Hill.

Siltino, Left to /?(};/;/. Jessie Halstead, Jean Walsh, Betty McCleary. Bobbie Durham, .^lacel
Goulet. Ruth Moody, Anita Boggs, Rita Kotalich.

Front /?i)i>', L^efl to /?/,//)/. Betty Hauss, Lucile Lyew, Gladys Pescod, Lillian Chase, Aura Hun-
toon, Eleanor Stumpt.




35



FRESHAIAN ACTIVITIES



The class ot '37 held its first meeting in
the auditorium on (October II, 1933.
The auditorium has continued to be the
monthly meeting place of the Freshmen
for the entire year.

The first meeting was sponsored by
Air. Franks for the purpose of electing
v)ur class officers and sponsor. The
popular y\r. Meyer was elected sponsor
unanimously. We ne.\t elected officers
which are as follows:

President Henry Jaramili.o

\^ice-President Philip Riedel

Secretary Kathleen! Phillips

Treasurer Bet'LY McCleary

1 he ne.xt class meeting was a brief one
which lasted only two minutes. At it we
elected our class rej)resentatives for the
Executive Council. Alacel Goulet was
elected the girl representative and lames
Hogan the boy. When James Hogan
resigned later, James Christian was elect-
ed to fill his place.

The Freshmen have had two candy
sales in the school hall and both have
been quite successful. The first candy
sale, with Macel Goulet as chairman,
brought twelve dollars profit. Lillian
Chase had charge of the second at which
a profit of approximately fifteen dollars
was made. .Ml class members were asked
to bring candy for the sales. Those who
did not do so were charged twenty-five
cents as their share toward the class fund.

In athletics this year (he Freshmen
ha\e ranked very high. The boys espec-
ially have shown excellent team-work and
cooperation in upholding the class of '37.
The Freshmen boys won the Interclass
Soccer Championshii, in the series which



was played at the end of fhe regular soc-
cer season with Balboa. In baseball the
Freshmen also came out on t,)p by \\ inning
the Inter-class Baseball Championship.
.Among other things the Frosh defeated
the C. H. S. faculty In a baseball game.

The Freshmen girls cannot boast of
such success in athletics as the boys can.
In the Interclass Basketball Series for
girls they were unable to defeat the
Sophomore girls. A number of Freshmen
girls turned out for Varsity practice in
different sports and a few earned letters.

The most recent class activity was the
Freshman Hop which was given in the
gymnasium the night of April sixth from
eight to twelve o'clock. This class was
the first to haie the "Moonlight Ser-
enaders" and all their style for a school
dance. The dimly lighted gym was dec-
orated with balloons of many colors
hanging from the ceiling, and palm leaves
adorned the walls. The prize waltz was
won by Junior Will and Grace Belden.
All in all the class has reason to be proud
of its first entertainment for its school-
mates.

Other activities in which the Freshmen
participate are the Freshman Ciiorus and
tiie Effe Kubc Klub. Many of the Frosh
members of the club have done outstand-
ing work in dramatics this year. We can
also bjast of two high honor students,
Jacqueline Briscoe and Louise de la Ossa.

The class of '57 numbers approximately
ninety students, the largest entering class
the high school has ever had. If the class
continues doing the type of work it has
done during its first year, it will be a very
successful one as classes go.



36



H^ JS CTl




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LITCRARY



5

2


LITERARY


'^ B

1

5



BEST SHORT STORY



"AFRAID"

Bi/ Jliriam Swan '55



Every time Doctor Levin mounted the
six broad stone steps to the entrance of
the Communist Hospital of Moscow, a
thing which he did every morning except
Sunday, at nine o'clock he went through
the same emotional crisis, a fear which
he always had with him, so deep in his
own soul that he could not shake it off.

At the top of the six steps stood a
guard, a young soldier in a long dirty-
looking military coat with a high astrak-
han cap. He wore a look ot indifference
and boredom, and seldom answered Doc-
tor Levin's polite "Good morning. Com-
rade.

In his worst dreams Doctor Levin had
seen this gray looking guard barring the
entrance to the hospital, and not letting
him in, hurling him back into misery,
cramming his wife and himself into one
small room with hardly anything to eat.
Once past the guard, in the safety of
the wide hall of the hospital. Doctor
Levin felt himself of again, and his self-
confidence and energy were restored to
him. He loved the uniforms, the smell
of antiseptics, the cleanness, and the lives
of waiting patients huddled on the bench-
es. He was very alert and set about doing
his morning tasks: one operation sched-
uled for this morning and three for this
afternoon. So much depended on him,
and he felt that he was prepared for any-
thing asked of him. He was very highly
regarded in Moscow- as one of the best
surgeons.

Doctor Levin was back in his office
after the first operation when the head
nurse entered.

"Commissar Lubov just phoned. He
is bringing his mother over at once for
an emergency operation.

When he heard "Commissar Lubov,"
Doctor Levin turned pale. He had helped
him when he was down and out, had
given him the job he now held, and had
made him self-confident again. He knew
the case would be hard to fight because
the mother was old, but he would fight
with all his mitht and power.

Comrade Lubov, walking beside the
stretcher bearing his mother, was a young
man of medium height. At a first glance



a person could tell by his keen dark eyes
that he was a very energetic man, and he
had a reputation of getting what he want-
ed from his subordinates.

Lubov remained in the hall outside
after his mother had been wheeled into
the operating room. As he washed and
dried his hands. Doctor Levin could hear
his steps nervously going up to the end
of the hall and back again, pausing now
and then at the door of the operating
room. This unnecessary noise disturbed
the doctor's usual calmness and made
him nervous and anxious.

The patient hatl stopped breathing.
\\'hen all attempts to revive the still form
on the operating table had iailed Doctor
Levin dismissed the nurses and his at-
tendants. The only thing left now to do
was to notify the son. Of course, he
would want a last look at his mother's
face before they took her away.

Doctor Levin pulled the sheet up to the
old woman's chin. It was horrible how
her dead face seemed to mock him, to
make it all the harder for him to tell the
commissar. Her blue lips kept saying,
".^K' son. Commissar Lubov, is out there
Hear him walking up and down? You.
afraid to tell him that I am dead me,
his mother you're afraid for yourself.
Go and face him. He despises fail-ure."

The steps of the son neared the door of
the operating room and the doctor s legs
gave a funny twitch. Then he opened the
door.

"Well, doctor?"

Doctor Levin kept his eyes on a button
of the Commissar's coat.

"Your mother is old. It is a case."

"Yes, yes, I know she is old. She is in
your hands. Doctor." And the son re-
sumed his walk down the corridor.

Doctor Levin slid back into the op-
erating room. His weak limbs carried
him to the nearest seat. He put his hands
to his head and moaned ; then he brought
them down again and looked at them.
Never to perform another operation was
to him a torture to think of, and yet was
it not true? He had always been afraid
of this and now that it had happened



37



what was he to do? The only thing left
was to tell the Commissar but how?
Could he face poverty again? He knew
that his wife could not.

The steps in the hall continued their
monotonous pace. Doctor Levin came
back to the present with a start. His eyes
lifted to the still figure on the table. He
glanced at his watch eleven twenty
five. Trembling, he got up, opened the
door, and stepped outside. The son stood
facing the door, barely four feet away.
Doctor Levin hastily shut the door be-
hind him. How much could Lubov have
seen? The Commissar waited.

"I fear I have to tell you

The son still said nothmg.

" there are complications. She may

not pull through."



"This is your work. Doctor. Do your
best."

Doctor Levin went back into the op-
erating room. Could he stand it that
pacing up and down, up and down? He
waited until the footsteps were approach-
ing again, then he stepped outside.

^"Well, doctor?"

"I am sorry. Your mother has passed
away."

He looked the son straight in the face.
The son spoke.

'T)ead? Well, it is a good thing. She
did not believe in Communism."

Doctor Levin reached mechanically for
his handkerchief, wiped it across his per-
spiring forehead, and returned the wet
ball to his pocket.



SECOND BEST SHORT STORY

THE TRIP OF THE LUNA

/)(/ Tom Rii.fsi'll '36



In 1929 during the month of October
some strange ethereal disturbance put a
stop to all radio reception for a period of
about fifty-three minutes. This caused
much talk and controversy among our
most eminent scientists and authorities
on radio. Dr. L. B. Martin stated that
there was a chance that it was caused by
some planet of the solar system trying to
communicate with the world. Another
man, an astronomer, claimed that it
could have been caused by two bodies
colliding in space. Also the theory was
advanced that possibly some nation of
the world, in preparing for war, hatl built
a machine to create static, and thus
drown out all communications of the
enemy.

Really there are only two people who
knfiw the source of the disturbance. John
Dowdy, who has now passed into the
great beyond, and I. Although John was
not known to be a scientist, he possessed
one of the most brilliant minds in the
world. Aly statement will no doubt prove
itself in what is to follow.

John's home and workshop was located
about sixty miles from San Diego on the
jjeak of Cyuamara Mountain. This place
was ideally located for his project. It
was the third highest peak in this coun-
try, and was a good distance from any
large amount of civilization; a railroad
line passed within six miles of his estab-
lishment.



Now to explain the project of which I
spoke. In the early part of 1927, John
was struck with the idea of building a
rocket ship that would travel to the moon.
After much study and concentration
plans were involved for the "Luna," as
this was the title to be bestowed upon
the first intersteller space ship. But with
complete plans made there were still
other difficulties to be faced. First, the
job of constructing the "Luna," and
second, the a.'-tronomical data re(]uired
in order to make contact with the moon
and not to go travelling on into space.
This was where I came in. Being a teach-
er of astronomy in Ohio University, and
also a very close friend of John's, it was
I who was chosen to figure out the line
of flight that would be required to con-
tact the moon. Also I was to help in any
material construction when mv knowl-
etlge was sufficient.

After placing various onlers wi(h nu-
merous different firms, John and I left
for our rendezvous in the mountains.
Here was when the railroad line came
into play. All the metal parts for the
body, the tools retiuired, the necessary
instruments, and all other neetletl sup-
plies could be deposited at a small station
by the train and from there be taken by
a light truck to our workshop.

For almost two years we stayed in the
mountains except for occasional short
trips (o the city. Even though the "Lu-



38



na" was completed in September of 1929,
the trip could not start until October as
the moon was not at declination, which
was necessarv to coincide with our line
of flight.

Early on the morning of October 18,
1929, John and I threw open the roof
doors of the shed that housed the "Luna"
and revealed its shiny metal hull to the
elements for the first time. John bid me
a foiul farewell, stepped into the "Luna,"
locked himself in with the airtight doors,
seated himself at the controls ami at ex-
actly nine o'clock pressed an inoffensive
black button and sailed off into the great
beyond. The leaving was not spectacular,
but it was very impressive.

Immediately upon John's departure I
hurried to the house and seated myself at
the controls of the radio and patiently
waited for John's messages. I had not to
wait long before I was rewardetl. The
message was in our own code so I could
only take it down and translate it later.
In exactly fifty-three minutes after the
first message all communication stopped.
Hurriedly I set about translating the
message antl at the same time offered up
prayers that all was going well. So that
you can better understantl what hap-
pened I will give you the message as I
received it.

"Everything is functioning per
fecth' so far. Was knocked off of my
feet at first but nothing resulted
from the jar. Am out of the atmos-
phere already and traveling at the
rate of about sixty miles per second
(216,000 miles per hour)."

A period of seven minutes elapsed here
between messages.

"Still going strong. Speed has
reachetl the expected velocity of one



hundred and seventy miles per sec-
ond (612,000 miles per hour). Air
conditioning plant functioning per-
fectly. Earth looks like an oversize
moon. Will report any new event.
A period of nine and one-half minutes
elapsed here between messages.

"Fired last of my rockets three
minutes ago and am losing speed
surprisingly fast. Speed now less
than one huntlred miles per second
(560,000 miles per hour). Earth and
moon are appro.ximatelv same size
to the eye now. Discovered one tub?
of oxygen empty. (This would limit
the endurance of his supply to one
hour of breathing). Probably es-
caped during the night.
A period of thirty and one-half minutes
has elapsed here between messages.

"Am caught between gravitational
pull of earth and moon. My speed
slowed down so much that the "Lu-
na's inertia will not carry me past
this zenith. My oxygen should be ex-
hausted in just about two minutes.
The "Luna will drift in an orbit
around the earth forever. Please in-
form the public of my quest and car-
ry on for me. Be sure to carry enough
rockets to propell you all of the way
to the moon. Goodbye and good-
luck. John Dowdy."
Thus ended the message, thus ended a
noble man, and thus ends my story. In
the near future I hope to start construc-
tion on the "Luna 11" and try my luck
at shooting the moon.

Very few people connected the disap-
pearance of John Dowdy with the pecu-
liar static heard on the morning of Octo-
ber 18, but the true explanation revels
that the connection was verv great.



BEST ESSAY



SIX FOOT TWO IS RATHER HIGH

1)1/ Tani Rus.re/I '6



I have attaineil the rather unusual
height of six feet two inches at a rather
early age and already I ha\'e noticed that
quite a few disadvantages and discom-
forts accompanying this distinguishing
feature.

Always, through thick and thin, and
from the age of two to ninety-two, more
and better things are expected of a big
person. When I lack the nerve to do a



certain thing (namely, to dive from the
highest platform on the diving tower) I
often hear this remark; "You're a big
fellow, let's see you do it." Then too,
you are distinguished as a big baby; not
just a baby but a big baby.

When it comes to going to the movies
most of the kids my age get in free. But
do I? I'll tell the world, and anyone else
who wants to know, that I don't. I either



39



pav to get in or I don't get in. But, why
shouldn't I pay? I'm a big fellow.

It anything on a high shelt is wanted
or il niotiier tlesires to hang a picture on
a hook that is just out ot her reach, why
then she looks for me, and I'm elected to
do the dirty work. This, too, happens
because I'm a big fellow and I can reach
it a little more easily then she can.

Every person is subject to some kidding
about his or her build. A short person is
known as a runt. A beautiful girl is
kidded about her Coca Cola bottle shape.
Anyone with lovely white teeth is known
as having that Pepsodent smile. Regard-
less of these facts I maintain that a tall
person is ridiculed more than others are.
A tall person is the sole target of certain
remarks that cannot be directed against
anyone else. No one would think of ask-
ing a short person the absurd question,
"How's the weather up there? No one
would accuse me of having a "board-
ing house reach" just because I had white
teeth. Neither do I believe that anyone
but a tall person is subject to remarks
from the person sitting behind him in the
movies to the effect that some tall bird
has to sit in front of him every time he
goes to the show. Besides these cases I am
known as "Skinny or "Stepladder" or
"Slim" or "Lankey" or any other name
convenient to the offenders vocabulary.

Besides the fact that when I eat I must
carry my food farther from the table to
my mouth I am at a loss to know where
to put my feet. If I put them under the
table somebody is certain to kick my
shins and if I put them on my chair I
receive a bawling out from my family.
What on earth am I to do with them?
I certainly can't put them in my pockets.
Also the steps on the stairs are too close
together for a fellow with long legs, but
I can't do anything about that either.



y\y mother is a short lady and usually
rolls the seat in the car forward when she
drives it. Then when father (who is tall
also) or I want to use the car we are
forced to rii!l the scat back again before
trying to drive. That is. we are forced to
roll it back if we don't tlesire a serious
case of driver's cramp. Then too, how,
in the name of kingdom come, could I
ever drive an Austin. That is something
to think about anyway.

Another place where long legs distract
from one's comfort is in bed. My feet
just insist on sticking out from under the
covers. In the winter they freeze and
on the Isthmus these Panamanian sand-
flies make a meal on them. True enough
I can tuck the covers in at the foot of the
bed but that cramps my fee(

In the case that I should want to be
inconspicuous in a crowd how could I do
it? At a circus someone once remarked
to me, that all he had to do was to look
above the crowd and when he saw my
head why he would know where I was
located.

There are other faults too numerous to
begin to mention. I can't dance comforta-
bly with short women. Their hair tickles
my nose and I am at a loss as to whether
to stoop over to their height or to carry
them. I am continually bumping my
head on objects that really should have
been built higher up. I can't wear my
father's pants because they are too short
for me. I almost break my back bending
over these drinking fountains around the
school. I have studieil the matter quite
thoroughly and in \'iew of the fact that I
shall be tall for the rest ot my life I'm
going to stop thinking of the disadvan-
tages and start thinking of the advan-
tages of being tall. That is, at least until
someone invents a machine to shorten
people.



THE LUXURY OF BULLETIN BOARDS

B_i/ Colin Campbell '34



Last year, no it was the year before
last, a long, long time ago when C. H. S.
students first became enraptured in the
speculations of our new Cristobal High
School. Then it was that our principal
would stand before the assembly, and
thrill il by describing, enumerating, and
emphasizing each lu.xury of our paradise
to be. First, there was the huge gym-
nasium, then the grand auditorium, then
the spacious library, (hen (he complete
labora(f)ries, and (hen (hen, (o our utter
amazement, the lu.xury of bulletin boards.



We were, at that time, using one rough
board maile of unsantlpapered, wt)oden
planks which were painted green. Stren-
uous effort was needed to push a thumb
tack in that bulletin board. Naturally,
we could hardly understand it when we
heard of the elaborate affairs we would
soon to able to post notices on, because
it seemed so unnecessary.

The years passed. Finally our hopes
butkleil, we entered the new school. First
to be seen were the bulletin boards (at
least a sample of them, there were twelve



40



more). They looked unique. No more
struggling fights with a thumb tack. In
fact the first time I tried one, I pushed
too hard much to my regret. The frame
of the new bulletin boards was made of
the smoothest, shming wciod with the
grain just bursting forth. In the center
of the boards was soft tan cork. Over the
cork was a clean glass cover with a lock
to go with it. A lock! A lock! I thought
I'd swear "a lock" the time I had to get
in one. You see, there are fourteen bul-
letin boards, fourteen different locks, and
fourteen odd keys. The keys were not
numbered in anything less than a million
or so, and which to which had not yet
been recorded. I had to try each key to
see if it would fit (what patience it took,
it wasn't like the old green board). Why
the keys are different, I don't know e.\-
cept that it's a good test for the temper,
and schools are near relatives of all kinds
of tests.

The second time I tried to put a notice
on a bulletin board, something had hap-
pened. An association had been organ-
ized. I never learned it's name but it's
something like "The Society for the Bet-
ter Management of Bulletin Boards.
Then and there. I received closes ot their



rules and by-laws. It was an organization
consisting of several persons who would
judge all notices for their neatness and
correctness before being posted on the
boards. Furthermore, they alone should
have the honor of opening the bulletin
boards (alas, the fourteen different keys).
After the surprising information, I hand-
ed o\er my notice wondering at all that
little scrap of paper would now have to go
through. This unusual society must be
like other societies I have known, it's
entirely too complex, for my notice, re-
written, was placed on the wrong bulletin
board after the notice was of no use.
Later during the year, however, the ef-
ficiency of the society was improved.

Fourteen bulletin boards show that
human civilization is becoming too com-
plex. It's too difficult to see every board
every day. I miss many of the notices.
I never used to with just one board. The
bulletin boards are still difficult to get
anything placed on quickly. I long for
the old bulletin board with no glass cover.
I am the odd person who would enjoy
seeing the fourteen polished, glass cov-
ered, corked back, locked new bulletin
boards exchanged for the old, hard, green
one with it's scared face.



A FRESHMAN'S HEAD

Bi/ Carllon Horine ^4



Ha\ing read Mr. Addison's account of
his dissection of a coquette's heart, it
occurred to me that I might make some
interesting discoveries with a Freshman's
head ; so I proceeded at once to obtain
the head and the necessary tools for the
dissection.

This particular head for some reason
unknown to me, had no hair, or the hair
it had possessed had been shaved off. It
also smelletl of onions and was painted a
very brilliant red.

Having skinned the head I attempted
to cut away the skull. Here I met with
an unexpected delay. I found the skull
was made of harder bone than my dis-
secting tools coultl penetrate, and there-
fore hail to buy some better tools, not
ordinarily used in dissecting.

As soon as the first opening in the skull
was made it astonished me to hear a loud
hissing noise. I found it to be a rapid in-
take of air into the cavity. When the
skull was slashed open, I saw that the
brain was extremely small, probably un-
der-developed.



As I had been a student of anatomy,
I quickly discovered that the spinal cord
did not have nearly as many nerves as it
usually does. For those not learned in
the science ot anatomy, I may say here
that the spinal cord is the part of the
nervous system which controls the in-
voluntary actions, such as taking one's
hand off a hot stove.

But by far the most surprising dis-
covery was a channel through the head
from ear to ear. After noticing this re-
markable feature, I obtained the heads
of pupils in grades lower than freshmen
and found that this channel gradually
increased with age until it became its
largest in a freshman's head. Also on
e.xamining a sophomore's, junior's and
senior's head I found this channel grad-
ually decreased until it became entirely
closed in the senior's.

Like Mr. Addison, I put the freshman's
head in a furnace but the head, being of
very hard material, neither burned nor
disappeared.



41



1


i^^m




MANl

Charles ]:, BrIJen "^4



When the darkness ruled the land,
Then the earth was sea and sand,
Full of creatures, swimming things,
Scaly creatures, birds with wings.

When the darkness turned to light,
Slouly, surely changed the sight.
From the water, earth did appear
Growing, rising, year by year.

From these slimy, crawling, creatures,
Man appeared. Man whose features.
Changed, until they came to be
Those of the Twentieth Century.

Working, toiling, plantmg, seeking,
Man kept striving, never flinching.
Hardships, hunger, lack ot rest,
Alan kept rising, towards the best.

Man has toiled since the Ages,
Alarking, wntmg History's pages.
Working man has made nations.
For the coming generations.

Man makes houses out ol steel.
Man controls the air and field,
Flying creatures made by hand.
Metal creatures, made by man.

Man is Master, Man is King
Of all the earth, and living thing.
He has changed, has made the land
Fit to live in fit for Man'



OOOOH ?

Bi/ Gloria J/an/n.v '>4



"Ma ioi," tlic jolly I'^encimTan cried.
"You are petite, my girl!
Your eyes, they *ave a rolling look.
Your hair, 'tis natural curl?"

"Si!" exclaims the Spanish girl
And turns her back on Jean.
"I theenk you are too mooch a iVcsh,
As I 'ave ever seen!"

"Querulo," whispers Rose then
As she turns back to Jack,
"Aly sailor boy, I mees you mooch,
I'm very glad you're back!"

"Oh, yeah? Saysyou!" he snarls at her,
"An' wotta 'bout Pedro?
And Thomas, John, and Loupe Joe?
And Karl, and Rodrigo?"



APRIL

Bt/ .Innie T.anrie TurherK'ille 'T5



Dogwood and violets 'neath cool scented pines,
Find me laying in a hammock in tropical
climes

Trade-winds gently swish the silky palm fronds,
Frangipani and orchids send fragrance from
ponds.

But for dogwood and violets and "Old Caroline,"
I'm yearning and sighing for your spring-
time

For the chirp of the robin in the snowball boughs.
And the whistle of Ivey as he brings home
the cows.
For the gee and the haw of Joe when he ploughs.

I'm longing in longitude eighty and latitude nine.
For dogwood and violets and "Old Caroline."



TROPICS



Bx, do



Jlannt.x ?/



The curling, twisting river flows
Beside a winding lane.
'Tis shadowed o'er by palm trees tall
And illled by tailing rain.

And jungle trees of tropic lands
Frame its shaggy sides.
While a huge and hoary 'gator
'Neath the shadows, hides.

The shining sun is bright and warm
Upon the water's edge.
And droning bees and flies alight
'Neath the dampish hedge.

And like the native sluggish blood.
The tepid rivers flow.
They're warm until the evening tails
And cool night breezes blow*.



THE DANCE OF THE ELVES

B_i/ Gloria Jlannix > -/



Lightly and swiltly danced the Elves

Round mossy rocks and flowery dells.

On the lily's broad pad

They softly trod

To the tune of lightly dropping pods.



They lauglied. a tinkling elfin laugh.

As they twirled In the moon-beams' silvery path

To the time of bluebells' music gay.

As in the breeze they gently sway.



The sky grew light with coming dawn,
The fairy night was long since gone;
The Elves gave one last glorious twirl.
And were gone In a lightning mystic swirl.



42




jx-ttvitity



il




STUUENT COUN'CIL



STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Bi/ Anna Reilli/ ''i



One of the most recent and the most Important innovations for C.H.S. this year was the organization of
the Students' Association. Never before has the school attempted such an organization and it proved to
lie very/ successful. At the beginning of the school term, our principal. Mr. Franks appointed >lr K^ L.
HacUett as sponsor, and Mr. K. Vinton. Athletics Director, and Mrs. P. Spencer, Director ol h.xtra-Lur-
ricular Activities, as the additional faculty members of the organization.

The purpose of the association is to put the school activities on a better financial basis by giving the
students seven things for the price of four.

Each student was required to pay three dollars and hfty cents, for which amount he received the fol-
lowing benefits:



Admission to all regularly scheduled athletic contests of Cristobal High School.

Admission to the four class dances.

Admission to the Senior play.

One copy of the "Caribbean."

One subscription to the "Trade Wind."

Membership in one high school club.

Class dues for one year.



.\RT CLUB




¥~~ff









45




TRADE WIND STAFF



It these items were taken up incli\*iclually instead ot collectively, they would cost at least six dollars.

The first business in the organizing of the club was to elect the oHicers. The nominations were re-
stricted as follows: The president must be a senior, and the vice-jiresident a junior. The results of the elec-
tion were: Frank W'asliabaugh. president: William Beers, vice-president: Mabelle Bliss, secretary: and
Anna Reilly. treasurer.

It was decided to form an E.\ecuti\-e Council to carry on the minute attairs ot the .Association. The
Council was to consist of the three faculty members, the four ollicers ol the Association, and a boy and girl
representati\'e from each class. Therefore, the ne.xt necessity was to elect the class representatnes. They
were: Freshman, Alacel Goulet and James Christian: Sophomore. Dons Ebdon anti Howard \\^ill: Junior.
Aliriam Swan and Paul Beard: and Senior. Betty Stetler ami Warren Slocum.

At the first meeting ot the Executive Council, many plans were made and many ideas settled. The
most important business was the naming of the Association. .After much discussion the name, "Students'
Association." was chosen.

The first activity of the organization was a dance given on December 22. in the gym. -All members of
the Students' Association were admitted free.

The financial affairs of the Association were not settled vintil the beginning of the second semester.
After much controversy among the members of the Council, the money collected tor dues was apportioned.
Each person's dues of three and one half dollars was divided as follows: Caribbean $1.50. Trade Wind ..
-60c.. Class---. 65c.. Athletics .40c.. Executi\'e Council 55c. The E.xecutn'e Council fund was to be for



LA PAS








Zl ^^-..^^'j'^



znM



44




JL'NIOR-SENIOR DRAMATIC CLLB



all the clubs. As a result, the Caribbean received $321.00. Trade Wind. $95.20. Class of '34. $3477, Class of
'35, $26.98. Class of '36. $31. .S3. Class of '37, $.52.52. Athletics (Varsitv Clubs I. $06.80, and E.xecutlve
Council, ,$96.40.

Soon after the money had been ap[iortloned and the iinancial side ot the club was well under way.
;\nna Reilly resigned her jiosition as treasurer. Tlie Council elected Miriam Swan to take her place.

In order to raise more money for the Caribbean and the Trade Wind, tlie E.\ecutive Council decided
to have a Student Carnival. A committee was appointed with Betty Stetler as chairman.

During the \'ear there were 262 members ot the Association; 80 Freslimen, 48 Sophomores, 41 Juniors.
53 Seniors and 10 Teachers.

As a whole, tlie organization pro\-ed to be \-ery successful, and it is hoped that it will be able to otter
e\'en more advantages to the students in the years to come.



ART CLUB
Bu Helen Leach '54



The Art Club was organized in October. 1933. and is the only club of its kind ever organized in Cris-
tobal High School. It is sponsored by Mrs. ^^lacDonald, the art teacher.



EFFE IvUBE KLUB




45




BOYS GLEE CLUU



This club was organized for the purpose of providing the time, place, materials and instructions for
those who have not taUen Art as a subject, and to gi\e the jiupils a chance to choose their work. There are
no qualifications tor membership except interest m Art.

The tirst project was the cutting of linoleum blocks for posters to be used for the different activities
of the school. After this, different ones chose to make bracelets and book-ends. Others made book-marks,
book-co\'ers. and other things usetul in school.

Even though this is a new club, it has proved highly successful and is very well liked by the members.
The club consists of twelve members and the following officers:

President... - St.anford Stone

Vice President Jessie H.\lstead

Secretary -. Helen Leach

THE TRADE WIND
Bi/ If III. Beers 'Ji

EDITORIAL STAFF

Editor, William Beers; Assistant Editor, Margaret Hollingshead; Make-Up Editor, Miriam Swam;



GIRLS GLEF CLUB










46




ORCHESTRA



Girls Sport Editor. Alary Goulet ; Feature and Humor Editor, Marguente Winn; Art Editor and Stencil
Proof Reader, Helen Leach; |. H. Editor, Dorothy AlacSparran; Typists, Robert Peterson. Leta Deakins,
Edna iMueller, Jeanne Lewis; Reporters, Armando Gaspen, Muriel Hanna, Viola Tuck. Edith W'ikran;
Advisor, Aliss Alary Elizabeth Aloore.

BUSINESS STAFF
Business Alanager. Teddy Aanstoos; Circulating Alanager, Dorothy Roos; Alimeo Printers, Robert
King, Stanley Donaldson. Sam Roe. John AlcLain, James Coman. W'dham Abendroth and Alontlord Tawes.



Last year the Caribbean Staff introduced into Cristobal High School, the "C. H. S. This periodical
was a bi-monthly publication, which used the Italian Steamship Line's mimeograph machine lor the
printing.

This year we have purchased our own mimeograph machine and ha\e changetl the name to "Trade
Wind." For the first hall ol the school year we issued the paper weekly, but with the change of semesters,
we returned to bi-monthly publication.

Our work does not consist solely ot publishing a school newspaper; we print a Spanish periodical. "El
Faro." for the Junior High School Spanish classes, dance programs, tickets and many other similiar items.
And by this means (along with the advertisements and our allotment from the Student Association) we
hope to complete payment for the mimeograph machine within the next two years.



FRESHMAN CHORUS






V -r



'^



^ ,








Hit. i' i* f^ ^'^^^' <£#*"* ^






WT,




47




O. G. A.



LA PAS



Bv Ernest Jaramltto 'j i



La Pas is a Spanish club that has existed in Cristobal High School since 1930, when it was organized
bv Mrs. Phyllis Spencer. Mrs' Spencer has been the able sponsor of the club to the present day.

The object of this club is to make greater the friendship between tiic Latin and North Americans. To
achieve this, the club has social meetings at which prominent men of Colon are guests. At these meetings
the members are asked to speak only in Spanish so that they may practice the language.

iMembership in this club, unlike the other clubs in school, is based on scholarship. In order to become a
member of this club, a student must attain a grade of "90" or above, and must be a student ot second year
Spanish. If he is a student of third or fourth year Spanish, he need attain that grade for only one periotl ol
si.\ weeks, while the student of second year Spanish has to acquire this grade lor a period ot twelve weeks.
Whenever a student has obtained the required grade for membership, he receives an invitation from the
club to become a member.

During the past year. La Pas has taken part in a number of functions. Henry Sanchez and Aleiandro
Wong have always been willing to play their guitars for club entertainments and have been called upon
Irequently. Early in January the club, through the kindness of Comandantc Walker, gave a dance at the
"Bomba" in Colon for members and their guests.



NATION.M THKSPI.ANS




4.S



At the first meeting after the initiation of a new group ot members into the cluli. the program is pro-
vided b_v the newcomers. An excellent entertainment was gi\'en hy the group that entered in December.
Under the direction of Stella Boggs, a series of Carnn'al scenes supposedly taken in the interior of Panama
were shown. The actors were dressed in nati\-e costumes and all dialogue was in Spanish. They were first
seen going to the Fair, and then at the dance where all were dancing the Tamborito. As a specialty Stella
Boggs and Catalina Ecker danced a Rumba which was received with much applause. The entire program
was most original and cle\'erly arranged.

The night of this program was also Mrs. Spencer's birthday which wll be an occasion to remember.
As a compliment to Mrs. Spencer, I\ anhoe Sei.xas and the members of his orchestra came to the school and
played for the dancing on the program. After the entertainment, the entire club adjourned to the home
of Wendell Cotton for refreshments which his mother and ^^Irs. Spencer had thoughtfully provided.

As birthday tokens the new members presented Mrs. Spencer with a huge bouquet of flowers and a
lovely garnet pin from the whole club. This e\'ening was the most enjoyable one within the memory of all
the members of La Pas.

The existence of the Spanish Club and its high standards give to the Spanish students an object toward
which they may bend their efforts, knowing that much good will come from it. La Pas has not only helped
to create a feeling of good will between the Spanish and English speaking people of the Zone, but it has been
a decided boost to Cristobal High School.

JUNIOR-SENIOR DRAMATIC CLUB
Bm Ruth Pickelt ">4



The purpose of the Junior-Senior Dramatic Club is to improve the dramatic ability of the members
of the Junior and Senior classes, and to sponsor the two principal plays of the year: the lunior Play and
the Senior Play.

The Junior Play this year was "Happy Landings" which was presented on December 15. It was the
story of a well-known aviator, Michael Pemberton, who was being followed by a vicious character intent
on killing him. A great deal of excitement occurred when .Michael arrived at the Stockpooles for a per-
formance at the fair; when he falls in love with Barbara, the young girl; and when he trades places with his
friend, Percival Courtwright. The play was fast moving and humorous, the comedy being furnished by
Washington Jones and Juliet, two colored folks, Skofsky, the Russian radical, and .Nlademoiselle Fifi. the
French girl who caused so much trouble among the men involved. Those who took part in the play were;

Juliet, the colored maid, T.ouire lf'/u\JJen: Her boyfriend, Fmnk Jf'ii.tlicihniiflh: Mrs. Stackpoole. Riilli
Pickett: Her husband, Billu Stciiie: Her daughter, Margaret Barnard: Miss Sabrina. Mary Ruth Riedel a.x\A
Miss Brisby. Olfia Roe, Ladies of the Literary Society; ,^Ille. Fifi, Charlotte Randall: Percival Courtwright,
Carlton Marine: Michael Pemberton, Charles South: Spotty, his mechanic and co-pilot, Jerry Gorin: and
Skofsky, the Russian, Charles Belden.

The Business Staff was composed of the following;
Director, Jliss G. M. Kimhro: Business Manager, Be^'erley Jlarcuse: Assistant Business Manager, Bettt/
Stetler: Stage Manager, lidijar Borden: Assistant Stage Manager, Colin Campbell: Lights Director^ Anna
Reilli/; Property Director, F.lizaheth Hai/e.r: Make-up Director, Jtaru Ilearne: and Prompter, Kathleen
Goodenouoh.

There are about thirty-five members in the club and most of them have had some dramatic experience.
This year at one of the meetings a short one-act play called "A Dispatch Goes Home" was given for club
members. The players were .Nlary Hearne. Charles Heim, John O'Neill and Edgar Borden. The director
was Beverley Marcuse. ,-\t one of the student assemblies a short dialogue called "Yes and No" was put on.
The players were Judy Bridget, the girl, and F"rank Washabaugh, the boy. Alice Wood directed the per-
formance.

As its share of the Visitation Day program on January 12. a short play entitled "At The Ferry" was
presented with Alice Wood and Frank Washabaugh as the parents, and Charles Washabaugh (a member
of the Effe Kube Klub) as the inquisitive son.

Again the Dramatic Club took part in a program. .Imong the entertainments for the Junior College
Party. March second, there was a pantomime, "Holding the Sack," with Charlotte Randall. Mary Ruth
Riedel, Billy Stone, Jerry Gorin and Carlton Horine in the lead. In both of the last programs mentioned
there were mob scenes in which all the club members took part. They deserve much credit for the success of
the performances.

The officers of the club are :

President, Mary Hearne: Vice-President, Ruth Pickett: and Secretarv, Betty Stetler.

Our Sponsor was Miss Kimbro, but when she left in January the club was taken over by Mrs. Spencer.

As the last and most impressive program in the club's schedule came "The Thread of Destiny," the
Senior play, which was successfully presented on May 18.

This was a combination of humor, pathos and drama, delightfully enacted by the members of the
Senior Class. The story of the play concerned the effects of the Civil War on the Montgomery family, show-
ing both the northern and southern side of the question.

The characters were as follows:

Fanny. I,oui.'t W hidden: George Washington. Richard Reinhold: Betty Montgomery, Mahelle Bliss;
Edith Sherman, Ruth Pickett: .^Irs. Montgomery, Bererley Jlarcuse: Colonel Montgomery, fHirren Slocum:
Virginia Montgomery, Ruth Stium: Beverley Montgomery, Charles South: Sally Ann Fairfax. Jlice IT ood:
Laura Lee Fairfax. Blanche Belden. Tom Randolph. Robert Jlolten: .^lartha. Edna JIueller: Susan, Norma
Dai-is: lane, J'iolet Randall: John y\. .^lorton, Carlton Horine: .Vlarcella, .JIa.xine HoJJman: .^Iarion, Eliza-
beth Hayes: Madge Young. ./(?;if (7//i.ri)/i,- yXa-mmyXimah, Ruth Egol I: Peyton Bailey. Frank Washabaugh;
Uncle Billy, Colin Campbell: Louise Lawton, Jtary Hearne: Ralph Francis, Charles Belden; Union Scot,
Jerry Gorin; Miss Melissy, Eileen Donoran; and Assistant Director, Betty Stetler.

Understudies:

Fanny, Ruth IVikingstad: Betty .^lontgomery, Kathleen Goodenough: Edith Sherman, JIary Ruth
Riedel: Mrs. Montgomery. JIary .Inn Carruthers; Virginia Montgomery. .Innte Laurie Turbercille; Madge
Young. Charlotte Randall: Louise Lawton. FJinor Jlullane: and .'^liss Melissy. Olga Roe.

This was the first time in C. H. S. that there were any understudies in plays presented.

All in all. the Junior-Senior Dramatic Club had a most successful year and had the pleasure of being the
first to make use of the large stage in the auditorium with much satisfaction.



49



THE EFFE KUBE KLUB

Bi/ JIan/ Griffin '->6



When Mis. Spencer came to Cristobal High School lour years ago, she started the Efi'e Kube Klub.
It was extremely successful for two years, but last year there was no club. This year Mrs. Spencer reor-
ganized the club with an entirely new group ot students from the Sophomore and Freshman classes.

Meetings are held every other Thursday in the auditorium with the president. James Days, presiding.
Other officers are: Betty McCleary. vice-president; E\ elyn Dwyer, secretary; and Kathleen Phillips,
treasurer. The club has a membershiji of appro.^imately fifty students.

The club made its debut before the public on the first program held in the auditorium this school year.
Several members presented pantomimes which were directed by the club sponsor, Mrs. Spencer. Thev were:
".\t the Dentist" with Betty .^lcCleary and Ruth .^loody; "At the Photographer" with Lydia Gravatt,
Doris Ebdon, Vernon Clarke, Lois Heim, Betty Hauss, Charles W'ashabaugh and ;\nita Boggs; "Mr.
Goof's Day Off" with Mary Darley. Mary Griffin, Helen Carroll, Catalina Ecker, Muriel Mullane, Lois
Heim, Exelyn Dwyer. Edward Hoffman and Robert Reppa ; and a short pantomime given by Olive Aan-
stoos. Several of these pantomimes were repeated for the parents on Visitors' Day.

At Christmas, the club presented a one act Christmas play called "Beggars Can't be Chooser;
cast included Bobbie Durham, Kathleen Phillips, Ruth Moody, Olive Aanstoos, Lilian Chase,
.^IcCleary, Jacqueline Briscoe. Agnes Reinke. Roderick Cuthbertson and Charles W'ashabaugh.
Spencer directed the play and iMary Griffin was prompter.

One of Mrs. Spencer's plans for the year was to have members direct some of the one act plays. The
person chosen to direct the play had to be able to read each part in the play to .^lrs. Spencer and if he
showed sufficient abilty. our sponsor left him in charge of directing the play. The first play of this type
presented to the public this year was "Reverend Peter Brice. Bachelor." The members in the cast were
Doris Ebdon. Jeannette Hyler, Lydia Gravatt, Evelyn Dwyer, I^ols Heim, Catalina Ecker and Louise de
la Ossa. The play was directed by Mary Griflin.

A one act play was presented to the audience which attended the Junior College Party, and was re-
peated for the benefit of the lower classmen on March 22. during the eighth period. The cast included
Lydia Gravatt. Edward Hoffman, Mary Darley, Vernon Clarke, Helen Carroll and Frank Alberga. Mrs.
Spencer directed the play and Aia.\ine Blunden was prompter.

"Freezing a Mother-in-Law." a screamingly funny farce, was presented the evening of Ajiril 14. The
plot was very unusual with some decidedly embarrassing moments.



' The
Bettv

Mrs.



HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC DEPARTMENT

Bi/ Lillian Chase '37



)ut. for 1934. we had



Lentil this year, we ha\-e had only two musical organizations in our high school
the F"reshman Chorus added to our Glee Club and Orchestra.

The (dee Club, which numbers seventeen members, gave two programs during the first half of the
year. With the aid ot the orchestra they were both very successful. One was held at the Y. .^1. C. .\. and
the other in our own grand auditorium for the Cristobal Woman's Club.

The I'^reshman Chorus was organized by the Freshman in October. Only members of the Freshman
Class can belong, and almost the entire class joined it. The chorus did not appear before the public with
any musical offerings, but held programs for the club's entertainment e\'ery other week which were enjoyed
b\' all the members.

We all agree, howe'ver. that if it hati not been tor the aid and patience of our sponsor. Miss Mildred
EIner. the acti\-ities of the Music Department would not have gone off as smoothly and as successfully as
they did.

ORDER OF GREGG ARTISTS
Bxi Slella Bofljis '34

The O. G. A. Club (Order of Gregg Artists) was organized by our commercial teacher, xMiss Patterson,
lor the advanced shorthand class. The purpose of it was to encourage more practice and to recognize our
acquirement of skill in the study of shorthand and typing.

At our first meeting, we decided to ha\e only a president and Aice-president. Stella Boggs was elected
president, and Norma Da\'is, vice-president. Aleetings were held during the eighth period every Tuesday.
In these the story of shorthand was given, and we prarticetl tor different tests.

The club suliscrlbed to the "Gregg Writer." a monthly magazine for secretaries, stenographers and
typists. I'rom these magazines we received practice in the writing and typing tests which we sent in, paying
a fee ol a few cents.

Several of the students have been awarded certificates and pins of the Order of Gregg Artists.



NATIONAL THESPIANS
By Anne Gibson '34



To become a National Thespian is the goal towards which all the members of the Junior-Senior Drama-
tic Club .'ire working.

I he .X.'ition.'d Thesjiians were introduced into this school three years ago, and each year more interest
has been shfiwn m it.

This year we have studied the rise of the Drama starting with the Italian Drama, continuing through
the French. Spanish and English Drama.

The National Thes|)ians ha\'e sponsored flie Junior .-ind the Senior plays this year, both of which were
great successes.

There were two groups Initiated into our club this year, adding many new members to our roll.

The officers for this year are: Anne Gibson, President; Frank Washabaugh, Vice-President ; Ruth
I'ickett, Secretary; Beverly Marcusc, Treasurer.



50




^

##^;-



O

^







PJIOTO CLUB



PHOTO CLUB

Bi/ J'ioia Tucl^ '36



The Photo club was organized with Mr. Miller as sponsor, and consisted of thirteen members. Ralph
Davis was elected President; William Hill, Treasurer; and Viola Tuck, Secretary. W'ith the aid ot an expert
photographer, the club members were introduced into the use ot a camera, and other technique ot printing
and developing. The admmistration furnished a minimum quantity ot equipment and the club was given
a dark room ot its own. Some ot the boys proceeded to construct, with the aid of iMr. Fringer, an automa-
tic printer, a washing tank, and other dark room necessities.

The club, atter several months ot experiments, solicited films and negatives from the students and
began actual work. Pictures ot various student organizations, interclass class teams, and students were
taken and the prints sold to the students. Additional equipment has been bought from time to time until
the dark room has taken on a professional aspect. The next item under consideration will be the construc-
tion of an enlarging camera.

The club has been reduced in number in order that fewer and more interested members may conduct
the increasing amount ot work.

This club IS Hiteresting, educational and vocational. It is also purely a student activity with only
occasional suggestions for impro\ement by the sponsor.



MATH CLUB











>^'^



51









l^.'S'- v^-







DEBATE CLUf,



THE MATHEMATICS CLUB

Bi/ IT'itliam /'. S/one )-/



Tlie Mathematics Club was organized this year under the sponsorslilp of Mr. Mever lor tiie purpose
ot ronsideriiig mathematical problems of common interest. Meetings were held on the first Monday of
every montli. Once a rnonth the Mathematics Club put some nteresting problems in the Tra,Je IT'imi,
with the answers apjiearing in the next issue. The problems were of such a nature that thev could be solved
b.v the majority of the student body. The officers were: William F. Stone, President: Richard Reinhold.
Vice-President: Frank J. W'ashabaugh, Secretary'

THE DEBATE CLUB
Bi/ Edna Jlueller '34



The Debate Club sponsored by Mr. Hackett had, at the time of dlsl)andins. twenty members. The
officers were: Frank W'ashabaugh President: W'm. Daugherty, Vice President: Edna Mueller. Secretary:
and Dorothy Rons, Treasurer. Besides these the members were: Theodore Aanstoos, Jack Dwyer. Armando
Gasperi, Ferry Gorin, Gordon Hutchins. Allen Jacques, Olga Dominsuez. Rachel Cuesta, JohnPalm, Robert
Peterson, Phil Reidell. Richard Reinhold. Sidney Wharton, Tom Russell .ind Colin Campbell.

The meetings were held every third and fourth Monday of the month. At these meetings a debate



SCIENCE CLUB




MMiiittiiMtiiiiMii



52



i








i



SUPPER CLUB



vviis generally given in which the chairman, judges, and time-keeper were appointed from the clul).

The Execiiti\e Committee genera]l\- meet the week before the meeting to plan for the meeting.

The only public appearance ol the Debate Club was a debate gi\en in the auditorium on the topic
"Resolved that Capital Punishment Should Be Abolished." Tom Russell was the chairman and intro-
duced the speakers. The affirmative speakers were: Frank Washabaugh, lerrv Gorin. John Palm, and Phillip
Reidell as alternate. The negative speakers were: Gordon Hutchins, Allen facques, Richard Reinhold, and
Theodore Aanstoos, alternate.

The judges for the debate were: Mrs. C. A. Hearne, Re\erend C. 1.. Morgan, and Judge E. I. P.
Tatleman. Their decision was in favor of the aflirmative who maintained that capital |umlshment should
be abolished.

The Debate Club clima.xed its career bv ha\ ing an all dav picnic at F"inlavson's Farm in Gatun I^ake,
Saturday, March 24th.

SCIENCE CLUB
Bu U'endell Cotton 'j6



Among the many clubs which were organized this school year was the Science Club, spon.sored by Mr.
Vinton. Its membership was composed of students of the Sophomore, Junior, and Senior classes, and Fre.sh-



BOYS LETTER CLUB








^





53








GIRLS LETTER CLUB



men wlio had a "B" average in science. The purpose of the club was to carry on such experiments as might
help the students who were especially Interested in science. A tew experiments were performed and other
plans were formulated which could not be put into effect because of the revision in the eighth period sched-
ule.

The officers of the Science Club were: Wendell Cotton, President; William Hanna, Vice President;
Ernest faramillo, Secretary; and Phillip Riedel. Treasurer.

SUPPER CLUB
Bu Anna Reillu 'j'



The Supper Club is an organization composed entirely ot high school girls. Since the Girl Reserve
movement began in 1921, all Supper Clubs were under the direction of the Y. W. C. A. However, at the
end of June, 1933. the Y. W. C. .A. clubs of the Isthmus were stopped because ot lack of financial support.
Therefore the Supper Club this year has been entirely carried on, and super\'ised by the girls and their ad-
visors, i^lrs. Spencer, Margaret Davis and Margaret Hayes.

A very active program has been carried out by all the members of the club. The first event was a very
delightful tea which was given for the mothers of Supper Club girls and alumnae of the Supper Club on
Thursday, Xo\'ember 9.

Before Thanksgiving, a fruit cake raffle was held which proved to be a huge financial success. Another
was held before Christmas, but was not as successful as the first.

On December 9, a Cookie Day was held. The girls can\'assed the town with baskets ot home-made
cookies and sold quite a number of the delicious cookies to the residents of Colon.

Immediately after the first basketball game of the inter-school series on .April 13, the Publicity Com-
mittee of the club sponsored a dance in the gvm. The big dance ol the \'ear. howe\'er. was not sn'en until

yuy II.

When the Students' Association held a carnival the Supper Club took part in it by managing one of
the many retreshment booths.

As in years before the girls planned to send a girl to the National Girl Reserve Conference at Kiski,
Pennsylvania. Some thought the hopes of the girls to be too high in this matter but they proved that the
Supper Club can do what it first sets out to do.

The officers for the year 1933-1934 were: Betty Stetler, President; Alice Wood. Vice-President; Anna
Reilly. Secretary, and Ruth Wikingstad, Treasurer.

V\RS1TY CLUB

B,/ Bill,/ If heeler }4



Since (he abandonment of the .Athletic Association, the Varsity Club has taken over the athletic
responsibilities of the school. If is composed of boys and girls who have taken prominent part in certain
of the sports and have fulfilled (he neces.sary requirements.

The eligibility rules of (he club were raised this year, making it harder for a boy or girl athlete to become
.1 member. In spite of (his. the number of members In the Varsity Club have increased. This tact appar-
ently pro\ cs (liaf more :ithle(es are being developed each year in Cristobal High School and that the burden
ol ii|)holding athletics doc. not rest on the shoulders of just a few, as has been the case in past years.

This year the club has taken over the management of all athletic events at which a large number of
high school students a((end. The Freshman-Sophomore field Day, which was an organized initiation of
(he "scobies," wa. handled efficiendy by the Varsity Club members.

To raise funds for purchasing athletic equipment, (he VarsKy Club held a dance in the gymnasium



54



the night of March 23rcl. "Solo Bassett and His Boys" lurnishecl the dance music. The gym was appro-
priately decorated with sports supplies. On one of the baskets was a foot-ball dummy, over the other
baskets baseball bats were crossed, and hanging from the rafters were baseball and boxing glo^-es. The
atmosphere was e.\tremely athletic and everyone enjoyed the dancing.

Mr. Vinton is the advisor ot the Boys' Varsity and Miss Bailey, of the Girls' Varsity. The boy otiicers
are:

Bill Wheeler, President; Joe Bazan, \'ice President; Max Sanders, Treasurer; Robert Neely, Secretary.

The officers of the Girls' \'arsity Club are:

Elizabeth Hayes, President; Mabelle Bliss, Secretary; Bettv Stetler, Social Chairman.



VISITATION DAY

Bi/ Kalhleen Goodenotiiih Ti



The annual Visitation Day was held in the afternoon and evening ot January 12. This year a change
was made trom the lull week program of last year to a single day of visitation in order tiiat those who were
employed during the tlay could attend the e^ening session.

To facilitate passing in the corridors, location of rooms, and to a\'Oid confusion, a committee was chosen
consisting of two students from each class. The responsibility of the publicity and organization of tliis day
was given to the heads of the TRADE WIND Staff. William Beers and Anna Reilly.

At 7:30 o'clock after the regular classes, an assembly program was held in the auditorium. The purpose
of this program was to explain and demonstrate the activities of various extra-curricular organizations in
the Junior and Senior High Schools. Its success was due largely to the High School Orchestra, the Eife
Kube Klub, Air. Miller's Tumblers, the Spanish Club, and the Junior-Senior Dramatic Club.

An informal dance was held in the gym following the Assembly Program. It was sponsored by the
Carilibean Staff and was a grand success.

When a count was made of the number attending, it was found that 528 had signed the registration
slips. This exceeded last year's attendance by almost 100. The fact that registration ceased before the
eighth period, and that the building Is so open would indicate that there were many more visitors who did
not sign.

On the whole. Visitation Day this year was a huge success, and we take this opportunity to thank the
parents for their cooperation.



SCHOOL NOTES

JlabeLe BLiss '34



Sept. 26.




School days, school days,
dear old" oh, oh,
that's enuf of that
ancient ditty! But
then again maybe
this year shall be
iverilowing with
dear old golden rule
days. Because we
have a "bee-yoo-
tee-full" new High

School Bldg! n everything that t;oes with

it. ^

Sept. 27. Are we lucky? Yes! Due
to the fact that we have two new teachers
and they both appear to be very con-
genial. Miss Feme Bowman is our new
Household Arts teacher and she will also
take charge ot the cafeteria. Yum-yum-
my! Mr. Paul Miller is our new teacher
of Science and Algebra. Altho' he taught
in Balboa last year, he is a "new num-
ber" to us.

Sept. 28. Watta' day??? Each class



endured for only 15 minutes then school
was out. Now that's ideal methinks. But
the 15 minute-plan was used solely for
today to acquaint us students with our
new surroundings.

Sept. 29. Initiation; The Freshmen,
better-known as "scobies, combatted
the Sophomores at Kokonut Park this

P.M. Sueh fun! But, the "scobies"

weren't so easy to defeat this year.
Guess that's a merry "ha-ha on the
Sophs.

Sept. 50. lust to prove that there
were no ill feelings, the upper Classmen
favored the "scobies" with a dance which
was held at the new spacious gymnasium.
Altho the initiated combatants were
somewhat minus their usual vim, vigor
and vitality, they each and every one of
them appeared to have enjoyed a happy
evening.

Oct. 1. No more foolishness sup-
posedly! School is now In session! All



55



1^1



students have adorned themselves with
their best behaviors, attempting to make
a favorable impression especially on the
new teachers.

Oct. 4. The assembly held today was
conducted by the students. Anna Reilly
told of a new plan to be organized into
the school, the Student Association, try-
ing to cut down the e.xpenses of the social
activities of the school. Colin Campbell
gave a talk in regard to the school news-
paper, the duties of the staff, and the
new mimeograph machine.

Oct. 5. The two dramatic clubs held
their first meeting today. The Jr.-Sr.
Dramatic Club under the able instruction
of Miss Kimbro had some of the former
Thespians of last year and also a large
number of new dramatic club members.

The Effe Kube Klub has Mrs. Spencer
as its advisor. Over fifty little freshmen
and sophomores have joined the club.
Maybe these little scobies will show some
talent, who knows?

The Girls' Supper Club held its first
meeting today in the new cafeteria. Since
it was a new place of meeting, no doubt
curiosity caused the large attendance.

Oct. 9. Our first newspaper for this
school year was
distributed today.
\\'hat a paper] You
should have read it!
Great productions
and startling news
IS expected from
these two staffs in
the future judging
from their first ef-
fort.

Oct. 11. Today all classes held the
election of officers. A new leaf must have
been turned over or something has hap-
pened. Nearly all classes elected entirely
new officers new builtling, new envi-
ronment, new ambitions sounds cxhiler-
ating!

Oct. 12. Note the memorable date!
Columbus Day! but it doesn't mean any-
thing to our school, not even a holiday.

Oct. 13. The Spanish club, "La Pas
held another one of its formal meetings
on board a real Spanish ship. It was the
S. S. Alagallanes and everyone seemed to
have a good lime.

Oct. 19. Two pantomimes were given
in the auditorium today by the Effe Kube
Klub. The lower classmen are beginning
early and show much talent. Ihe Jr.-Sr.
Dramatic Club better get busy it they
want to retain their laurels.





Oct. 20. A pep rally was held today
in the auditorium in preparation for the
soccer game tomorrow at Cristobal.
Charles Heim, Bobby Durham and Bert
Asencio, the cheer leaders, certainly
demonstrated a lot of pep.

Oct. 21. Kokonut Park was the scene
of the first soccer
game of the term
between C. H. S.
and the Junior C'4-
lege. The Junior
College won 2-0,
but they had to put
up a big fight for it.

Oct. 24. A new club was formed to-
day, the Order of Gregg Artists, under
the sponsorship of Miss Patterson, in
order to try to teach the advanced short-
hand students more about shorthand and
typing.

Oct. 25. In the assembly today there
was much discussion, for Air. Franks gave
a talk to all aspiring athletes. Many find
themselves ineligible since white slips
have been sent out. Mr. Miller gave a
talk on the spirit of athletic contests.
"Without spirit you can do nothing, but
with spirit you can do everything." Just
ask him, he'll tell you. Mr. Hackett
spoke of the election of officers for the
new Executive Council.

It would surprise you to see the
abundance of humor and wit displayed
by the faculty itself which caused the
students to smile as they left the audito-



Oct. 26. The men of the faculty de-
feated the high school girls in an exciting
volley ball game. The girls were probably
astounded by the powerful physiques and
ability displayed by our men of the
faculty.

Oct. 27. We have another day of
which to take note. Navy Day! Does
that mean anything in our school? Noth-
ing at all except that maybe it explains
why so many students are absent from
school. The sub base and air station at
Coco Solo offered free dives and hops to
as many as could be accomodated during
the day. Come early and avoid the rush
seemed to have been the motto to many
C.H.S. students

Oct. 28. The girls volley ball team
as well as the boys soccer team ventured
(o the Pacific side to conquer Balboa, but
neither team was able to do so.

Ihe boys lost 4-0 and the Balboa girls
took all three games away from our
\aliant athletes.



56



Oct. oO. Today the Spanish Chib
held an important meeting concernmg
the initiation of new members.

The Letter Club held a Halloween Par-
ty at the New Cristobal Clubhouse antl
what a party it was' Just ask somebody
who was there.

Oct. 51. \Miat a day this turned out
to be- You'd think
Franklin D. Roose-
velt himself was
here to visit us, but
he wasn't. How-
ever the formal in-
auguration of offi-
cers and represent-
atives of the Gen-
eral Student Body
you of a session in Con-
Tatelman and Reverend
Cecil L. Alorgan were the honored guests
at this meeting. Reverend .^lorgan gave
our newly elected president, Frank Wash-
abaugh, the oath of office. It's quite an
honor to be chosen first president in our
new school building.




wouk
gress.



remmd
Judge




E.xecutive Council
of the Student As-
sociation discussed
important topics at
the meeting today,
selecting the name
of the organization
and making plans
for the future.



Nov. 8. The E.x. Council held a gen-
eral meeting for the whole student body
totlay in the auditorium. The Constitu-
tion was read to the students to see if
they approved. Ask some of them about
it, they wouldn't even be able to tell what
happened for there were so many sleepy
heads.

Nov. 9. More class meetings today.
They're all planning great things to be
done, each class striving to out-do the
other, it would seem.

Supper Club had another delicious
meal served in the cafeteria. About forty
girls attended, maybe it's because Betty
Stetler is the president this year.



Nov. 1. Several of the clubs enter-
tained jointly in the assembly today.
Two Spanish Club members, Henry
Sanchez and Alejandro Wong with their
guitars gave us several selections of
Hawaiian music the sort that lulls one
to dream of sandy beaches and moon-
light nights.

The Effe Kube Klub offered five very
clever pantomimes. The Jr.-Sr. Dramatic
Club had better wake up and do things
if they don't want to be downed by the
lower classmen.

Nov. 2. Girls volley ball team had
another game against the men of the
faculty. This time they weren't beaten
so badly. They weren't quite so overcome
by those swell physiques this time.

Nov. 3. Another day for notation.
Panamanian Independence Day, and this
time we have a holiday. All day.

Nov. 4. Cristobal seems to be having
hard luck this year. The boys soccer
team played against Balboa at Kokonut
Park but were unable to come out con-
querors. The final score being 2-0 and
we had the goose egg.

The girls volley ball also had the same
luck, but their game was the best one
held this year for it was full of excitement
the score being tied several times during
the game.

Nov. 6. For more than two hours the



a formal dance in the gym. Every body
attended and had a keen time since
"Bilgray's orchestra furnished the mu-
sic.

Nov. 11. Junior College defeats the
Cristobal boys soccer team again at
Balboa by one point. It's too bad we
couldn't have had that one point instead
of Balboa.

The same story goes for the girls volley
ball team. We are good losers though and
that's somethinj,.

Nov. 1.3. Soccer league games started
today with the Jrs. versus the Varsity
team. In spite of two e.xtra quarters the
score remained tie.

Nov. 14. The Srs. didn't make a very
good showing today in the soccer league.
Out of the whole Sr. class only one boy
turned out to play against the Sophs so
naturally the Srs. lost by default. Our
faithful Sr. deserves a medal.



Nc



15.




Report cards were given out
today. Quite a few
students made the
honor roll and sad
^^ to relate several
others were made
ineligible for athle-
tics. The ne.xt six
weeks will probably
bring them back on
the team again,
several of our best



Let's hope so for

players were laid off, as 'twere



57



Rev. C. L. Morgan was the speaker for
the assembly today and gave a talk on
the "Past Generation. His talk was aided
by several humorous remarks which were
greatly enjoyed by the students. The
more serious parts will, no doubt, be a
help to us all.

Nov. 16. The E.\. Council held a
meeting at Frank W'ashabaugh's house
in order to revise the Constitution. The
meeting was long but delicious refresh-
ments were served which made a happy
ending to reward our labor.

Nov. 17. New Spanish club members
were initiated tonight and an interesting
program and refreshments were served
too.

The Supper Club girls gave a tea today
in the cafeteria for their mothers. Betty
Stetler, president of the club, Mrs. Spen-
cer, advisor, and Mrs. C. A. Hearne, past
advisor, all spoke of different phases of
the clubs activities and aims.

Nov. 18. Girls volley ball team still
has the same story, they came in second,
but the boys have a dilterent tale to tell
this time. Don't get e.xcited, for we only
won by default since the ]r. College didn't
appear on the scene to play us.

Nov. 20. The freshmen team won the
championship tor the Soccer league when
they defeatetl the faculty today.

Nov. 22. Ex. Council held a meeting
in the assembly today for the whole
student body and they also held another
meeting after school. These E.x. Council
meetings must be something of great
importance for they have them so fre-
cjuently.

Nov. 27. At the editorial staff meet-
ing of our school paper, "Trade Wind
everyone seemed to have a long face.
The reason for that being that iMr.
Franks told them a thing or two about
last week's edition of the paper. His
remarks were not very favorable, but
doubtless his criticism of the paper was
tor our benefit.

Nov. 29. The Seniors held a most
successful dance in
the gym. Every-
thing, from the
snappy music to
the slippery borax
brought forth noth-
ing but praise ar-
tistic decorations in
red and white, the
Senior class colors,
were usctl in j)rofusion. Since it is
Thanksgiving tomorrow everyone will be
able to sleep late the morning after. Ain't
that sumpin' to be thankful lor'.'




Nov. 30. Not a fatal tragedy, but
just a tragedy occurred today when
Charles Bath dislocated his knee in the
football game at Kokonut Park. The
game was supposed to have been played
by Juniors and Seniors, but proved to
have P. G.'s, Junior College students,
outsiders, and what-have-you on the
teams. The game was just an appetizer
tor the Thanksgiving turkey to follow.

Nov. 31. Friday, a day of vacation,
and are the kids taking advantage of it.
Picnics and sunbrun, parties and sleepy
heads and everything that goes with it.

Dec. 4. After a three-and-a-half day
vacation we kids don't feel much like
attending school today, but most every-
one Is here, the majority of us being red
as a beet or brown as an Indian.

Dec. 6. "Should Capital Punishment
Be Abolished" was the topic of the debate
presented today in the auditorium. It
was the first of its kind given and was
a very creditable performance.

The Ex. Council held another meeting
today and invited Mr. Franks as a guest.
What a meeting that was. You should
have heard It!

Dec. 7. The Jrs. were defeated by
those sophisticated Seniors in a game of
football to the tune of 18-0. The ground
was real muddy so maybe that is the
Jrs. excuse for not winning.

Dec. 8. Supper Club had a box lunch
instead of a regular supper at their meet-
ing this P. M. in the cafeteria.

Today was the last day to pay your
Student Association dues. Too bad for
those who have not already paid, for that
extra fifty cents might come in handy
sometime.

Dec. 9. Peddling cookies just before
Christmas proved to be quite successful
to the Supper Club for all their cookies
were sold long before the morning was
over.

Dec. 11. Caribbean staff meeting to-
day. They seem to be keeping all in-
formation to themselves, but from the
mysterious actions compiling the 1934
annual seems to be very serious business.

Dec. 13. At the class meetings today,
the Juniors and Seniors met together in
order to discuss plans for the Bancjuet.
The Juniors are low on funds and unless
money comes In from some source the
Seniors will be out of luck for their antici-
patetl banquet. We might have a "de-
pression" bread line at least'

Dec. 14. The Jr.-Sr. Dramatic club
held Its dress rehearsal for the play "Hap-
py Landings to be presented tomorrow
from the laughs we heard thru the
windows, it must be good.



58



Dec. 15. "Happy Landings" mat-
inee and evening performance proved to
be most successful. The play had many
humorous spots and there was also much
fast mo\ mg action which made the play
more mterestmg I told you so.

Dec. 20. All afternoon classes were
cut short and wc had an assembly pro-
gram which began at 1 :45. Our own
Thomas Rankm '3o now president of his
class at the Jr. College and j^lr. -Spalding,
principal of the Jr. College enlightened
us as to the important features of the
Jr. College. The rest of the assembly
period was turned in to a Xmas program.
"The International Christmas Program
Broadcast" was the main feature and
was very cleverly done with James Days
acting as radio announcer.

That nite the Spanish club, "La Pas"
iield their formal initiation of 22 new
members. Eats and a good program with
Ducruet as their speaker made a most
pleasant evening.

Dec. 21. .'\nother form of Xmas en-
tertainment was the play "Beggars Can't
Be Choosers" presented by the Effe Kube
Klub today in the auditorium. It was a
great opening for the Xmas season.

Dec. 22. Out X'^mas dance was a great
event. It is more blessed to give than to
receive so this was a free dance for all
S. A. members. Entertainment was fur-
nished by Stella Boggs and Cathleen
Ecker who did the native Spanish Po-
liera dance in costume.

Report cards given out today. Can
you imagine it, just before Xmas, of all
days. Hope it wont influence old Santa
Claus. School is closed until January 2,
1934. Hurrah!

Dec. 23. Another defeat for Cristobal
when the boy's handball team lost to the
Fleet Air Base. Practicing for both base-
ball and handball, the boys were unable
to keep up the good work in both so that's
probably why they dropped down in
handball intending to star in baseball
(good intentions anyway).

Dec. 24. 'Twas the nite before Xmas
And all thru the

house
Not a creature was

stirring
Not even a mouse.

Is that true in
your case or did
you stay up to cele-
brate Xmas Eve?
Surely all of you
were good little boys and girls and
went to bed early waiting for Santa Claus
to come down the chimney to fill your
stocking.





Dec. 25. Christmas! Of all things, it
didn't rain! Did Santa Claus bring you
what you asked for? Ale too

Dec. 28. C.H.S. has two rivals of
Richard Haliburton
and Johnny \\'eise-
muller; Malcolm
Duey and Billy
Hollowell set out
to swim to Pedro
-^liguel. They got
as far as Darien
today saw two
alligators enroute

going other way couldnot stop lucky,

eh what?

Dec. 30. Our marathon swimmers
reached their destination at noon today.
The only visible rewards for their achieve-
ment are a lovely sunburn and cramped
muscles. What won't one endure for
fame!!

Dec. 31. New Year's Eve! Were you
amongst those celebrating the gala event?

Jan. 1. The beginning of a New Year!
How about those good resolutions! And
are you suffering the effects of the morn-
ing after the nite before?



h



After a long ten days vaca-



tion, students return to settle down to
work once more.

Jan. 3. Mrs. Spencer uttered forth a
lecture in the auditorium on a new sub-
ject. They're fast becoming strict con-
cerning invitations t too bad.

Jan. 5. Sophomores held an elab-
orate dance in the gym. Congratulations
extended to you for your success.

Jan. 6. First baseball game at Bal-
boa, but we have a sad story to relate.
C. H. S. came in second 6-3. Better luck
next time.

Jan. 10. We are honored by having
Dr. Harold Wilson of C. Z. Junior Col-
lege speak to upper classmen. Are we
upper classmen luky?

Jan. 11. Seniors held an important
meeting. Preparations for Commence-
ment have already begun. Believe it or
not, we Seniors "Commence" in a very
few months.

Jan. 12. Visitation Day for many
parents and guests,
.^luch entertain-
ment in their honor
also informal dance
in gym afterwards
that entertain-
ment for the stu-
dents' pleasure.




59



Ian. 15. Note the date 15th! Thus
C. H. S. lost the baseball game. Boo
Hoo!!

Tan. 14. EfTe Kube Klub entertained
w ith a one-act play. Dr. Flowers of Jun-
ior College talked in the auditorium after-
wards. A very intellectual afternoon was
spent by all who were present.

Ian. 15. Supper Club entertained a
la Italy which means we had Italian
spaghetti no less. And oh: what a job
eating the long slippery strings, but it
proved well worth the job 'cause it tasted
so yummy!

Ian. 20. C. H. S. whitewashed the
Junior College in baseball 15-1 Can you
imagine it? Hurray! for C. H. S.! Plus
a tew e.xtra "rah rah rahs'"

Air. Hackett chaperoned a large party
to Fort Lorenzo. Oh! the sore feet and
sun-burned backs!

Spanish Club held a tlance at Bomba
with many prominent officials attending.
^ ou should have seen the effects the
punch (supposedly) had on several stu-
dents.

Ian. 24. Dr. iMoody of the Junior
College spoke to upper classmen. Just
ask a Junior or Senior how they enjoyed
it, or what they learned? I dare you!

Ian. 25. National Thespians held ini-
tiation and a buffet supper in the audito-
rium. Many new members joined and
displayed a great deal of talent at initia-
tion. What this younger generation can't
tlo? Woe is me!

Ian. 26. C. H. S. was again honored,
by having Dr. L. Aker speak in audito-
rium. He must be quite an important
man cause all the periods were shortened
and that's a certain sign of "importancy.

Jan. 27. What an unluckv dav for
C. H. S. The boys lost to B. H.'S. in
baseball and the girls came in second in
basketball. Tough, uh! but better luck
next time.

Jan. 29. Big Handball Tournament
today. Faculty and varsity played, but
faculty won. Gooil for the teachers, but
not so good for the students. Admission
was charged, and cheering, refereeing,
and umpiring also by teachers!



Feb. 1. Mid-year e.xams today. Oh
what tests! Results will be heard later.
L'ntil then we shall all shake in (he knees
with trighl.

Feb. 2. More tests. Too late for any




more cramming, ye
students of C.H.S.

Feb. ,3. C. H. S.
seems to be having
bad luck this year.
The girls lost a hard
fought game of b".s-
ketball to B. H. S.
by only one basket.
How tragic' The
boys also lost in baseball. Miss F^ortune
(misfortune) surely must be fond nf us.

Feb. 5. What mannequins we have
in C. H. S. The elementary H. H. A.
class displayed their hand-made dresses
in the auditorium today. .And do they
fit. (lust like Mae West)!

Feb. 7. Dr. Akin gave a talk today on
T. B. lust to be sure no one has it or is
susceptible, tests are to be given later.

_^ Feb. 8. Dr. Van Zant talked on
"Motoring Thru' Europe." It was in-
tensely interesting for he related many
different incidents of the difficulty in
getting sch,)ols started here and there
about Europe.



Feb. 9.




luniors held a very successful
dance. All credit
^^^^[|^ goes to the boys of
^^ ^^'~- the class, for all
decorating, pro-
grams, and the
whole dance in gen-
eral was done by
them. Three hearty
cheers to the lunior
boys, Rah, Rah,
Rah!.



Feb. 10. The dance had an excellent
effect on the boys, for they beat B. H. S.
in baseball. But. confidently the girls
"couldn't take it" for B. H. S. white-
washed them in basketball.

Feb. 15. The Elementary H. H. A.
class scores another triumph. They
entertained their parents and some teach-
ers with a delightful \'alentine Tea. Oh!
these heart-shaped sandwiches and cook-
ies to suit one's heart's desire: Yum,
yummy!!!

Feb. 14. Another lunior College prof
speaks. This time, it's none other than
Prof. Carson. His speech pro\ed to Lie
very interesting, in fact (]uite a discussion
followeil.

Feb. 15. Spanish Club held a formal
initiation at school. Delicious "eats"
and several games and a lulta' iun were
enjoyed by all.

l"el). 21. C.H.S. was tloLiblv honored



60



by the Pacific Side. Dr. Meadowcraft
deli\ered an exceedingly interesting talk.
The Stringed Quartette fnim Balboa fa-
vfired us with a lovely musical program
which was greatly appreciated by all.

Feb. 24. Watta' day? In other words
what a day for the Inter-class track meet
at Fort Davis. Guess who won? None
other than the Seniors" Hurrah"; Hurrah'
Hurrah; And may I add a few "hot-
chas?"

Feb. 27. This Biology class might be
well known soon, ^^'hat do they do but
discover a very ancient fossil while on
one of their field trips. And what's more
Mr. Vinton intends to take the newly
discovered fossil to Columbia University.

Mar. 2. Now it's C. H. S.'s turn to
score another triumph. We staged a very
successful program and party for the
benefit of parents and guests to meet the
Junior College faculty even if we do
admit it ourselves.

Mar. 5. Today is the 1st day of
registration for those students who are
compelled to listen to lectures on dif-
ferent subjects and courses. Aren't we
Seniors lucky to get out of it all?

iMar. 6. ^'r. Meyer, Miss Moore and
Mr. Vinton each gave a lecture on their
respective subjects for those registering
for ne.xt year. They were very worth-
while lectures too.

Mar. 7. What a dramatist we have in
our Rev. C. L. Morgan! Portraying the
first act of Macbeth is no easy job, but
he did it to perfection the three winds
(ghosts) expecially. He recited humorous
readings afterwards and were they amus-
ing? You should have been there!

Mar. 9. What a school! Now we only-
have four activities e.nd a student
can only belong to one, according to what
Mr. Franks announced today. Sour
grapes, I only want to belong to one
anyway.

Mar. 15. Effe Kube Klub. offers en-
tertainment "Sauce for the Goslings.
A very appropriate play with a good
moral. Let's hope a maiority of the stu-
dents secure the benefit or it.

A'ar. 16. Dr. Weiiman lectured with
moving picture illustrations n every-
thing on child psychology. Only girls at-
tended, except for the camera man.

j^lar. 17. Hurray; Whoopee; etc.
C. H. S. defeated B. H. S. in track meet
47-55. What a man Beard;;; Breaking
two records and tying a third. Ask the
track members how they enjoyed the
party afterwards?



Mar. 23. Varsity Club held a very
unique dance, decorating the gym with
baseball bats, basketballs, baseball catch-
ers, boxing gloves, etc. Anybody who
happened to feel in the mood for a fight
had plenty of ammunition for inspira-
tions.



Mar. 24.




Debate Club starts their
Easter Vacation by
having picnic at
Finlayson's Farm.
What a wonder
some kinds aren't
more bow-legged
than they are?
"Horses, Horses!
Crazy over Horses,
Horses;

Mar. 27. Just another day of Easter
Vacation. Hardly anybody^'s in town
now, students, teachers, even janitors'
are out \acationing. You guess where.

April 2. Again the H. H. A. class
scores another triumph. A visit to the
Cold Storage plant, eating samples of
ice cream, cookies, etc. and then enjoying
a delicious luncheon at .^liss Bowman's,
(their teacher's) house. These H. H. A.
classes. What they wont do.

Apr. 6. What a shame a certain some-
body was caught smoking at one of the
former dances so that he was prohibited
to come to the Frosh dance tonight.
Maybe he'll learn not fo disobey rules.

Apr. 7. DeMolays gave a big dance
and card party at the Masonic Temple
this P. M. Many students attended and
tripped the light fantastic to their hearts
content.

Apr. 12. Again we take note of H. H.
A. class. An art display, illustrated, show-
ing how decoratively one can dress the
dinner table, for elaborate or for simple
dinners, luncheons and teas. Mrs. Mac-
Donald's illustratetl lecture proved very
interesting and very instructive to all.

Apr. 15. C. H. S. defeats B. H. S. in
basketball game tonight. Are we good or
are we good? Just ask us.

Supper Club held an informal dance
in the gym afterwards. Both the B. H. S.
and the C. H. S. basketball teams were
allowed in free of charge. Now, are we
Supper Club girls Scotch? No!

Apr. 14. C. H. S. came in second in
tennis meet. Too much nite life I sup-
pose. Oh well we can't win everything
Basketball and tennis, so we pick on
basketball.

Free entertainment in gym tonight for
all patrons and friends of the school. A
pageant, play and pantomime was the



61




program which proved to be intensely
amusing.

Apr. 15. It seems that a certain quar-
tette broke a rule and are now suspended
from anymore basketball games. These
people that will break rules.

April 17. Play practice has begun to
start to commence in earnest. The First
.Act ot "Thread of Destiny" is being re-
hearsed this week. These people and
their southern (supposedly) drawl.

Apr. 18. A pep rally at noon today,
but not even that would make our coach
take back his resignation. Let's hope
some one can make him change his mind
agam.

Apr. 21. Ah! The Carnival! What
a night. Having it
in the school was
something different
from the past, but
was it keen?. Just
ask me.

Apr. 27. Another
basketball game.
We'll win this
series yet.

Apr. 30. The last day of April and
what a day It is! First it rains and then
it pours. But this afternoon is grand.
Sunshine here and sunshine there. A
perfect day for hooky.

Alay 4. Totlay marks the end of the
fifth si.x weeks. Just think Seniors only
one more si.x weeks period and we're out.
Oh! boy just to think of it.

How do you think the Sophs tell the
end of the six weeks. No other way than
by giving a very original barn dance in
the gym. What a dance! All the hay,
and those chickens! \\'eren't those farm-
ers and farmerettes cute, though?

i^5ay 7. A Blue Monday! Honest
Injun, today actually is a Blue i^londay;
in fact a black and blue Alonday. By
(hat I mean the sky anti the clouds and
the hearts all appear so dismal.

May 9. What a shame ?? and ??
must have had a fight or a quarrel last
night. Just look at them stare daggers at
each other. Come on now, "Kiss and
make up.

.^lay 11. Another basketball game.
Hurray! What a game. I couldn't see
hall of the game on account of those
mar\elous "Johnny Weisemullcr and
"Atlas" phys:f|ucs. They just dazzle you
\()U can't watch the game and physiques
too, so I picked ? What do you think?
Of course, the physi(|ues.




May 14. Caribbean Staff held a meet-
ing today. Thinking and hoping and
praying for the bestest results for the
Caribbean.

May 16. Well it took a whole week
but ?? and ?? finally did "kiss and make
up. Did you notice the smiles today in
place of those dagger stares of last week?

May 18. Ah! "Thread of Destiny"
at last after weeks
of practice. Boy.
was it e\er a hit!
These southern

belles aren't so bad
after all, are they?

May 21. Don't
you just hate these
M o n d a y s Just
think another four
more days before we can take a vacation
for two days again. Fridays are some-
thing to look forward to anyway.

A\ay 25. Well, Friday has at last
arrived. Aren't you glad? No more
school now till Monday. Two whole days
of leisure. Ah' just to think of it.

May 30. In the middle of the week
and we have a holiday. There's no epede-
mic dr anything, but it's Memorial Day.
Thus we have a holiday.

June 1. The 1st of June and what a
day. A perfect day
with a perfect end-
ing. The Junior-
Senior Banquet was
this evening with a
big dance at the
Hotel Washington
and everything.

Even though these
Juniors did keep us
Seniors in suspense, they certainly did
everything in fine style. Thank you, even
for the mysteries.

June 5. Now's the time to begin
cramming in earnest. Just a couple of
more days and you'll be out of luck.

June 7. Tests today and oh am I
glad I'm a Senior and I don't have those
to worry me anymore. It's swell to be a
Senior. Just wait till you're one. You'll
agree with me.

June 10. Baccalaureate Services to-
day at Christ
Church by the Sea.
Didn't the Seniors
look nice in their
pastel shadeil dress-
es anil the boys in
their flannel pants
and blue coats. You
didn't realize the
Seniors hatl so





62



many good-looking kids, did vou? How



June 15.



ever, it's not alwavs that
the man.



:loth



es make



June 11. Ah' The Caribbeans came
out today. Aren't they keen? I'll guaran-
tee they're much better than you e.\-
pected, huh?

June 15. Just think Seniors, only two
more days and then no more. Isn't it a
funny feeling?

Tune 14. Practicing marching up to
the stage surely is a queer sensation.
Fooling around today is alright, but to-
morrow nite, you'd better not even crack
a smile or else that is until after the
graduation ceremony is over.



the final day has
come. I'm so nerv-
ous my teeth are
chattering. How-
ever, receivmgyour
tliploma isn't so
bad. Your knees
quiver a little, but
that's all. The
speeches, music, di-
plomas, flowers and

everythmg was also lovely-. However,

I'm glad it only happens once.

Wasn't it fun at the dance in the gym?

I hope you had as good a time as I did.
Well, now I bid thee farewell and best

of luck to the rest of my classmates of the

class of '34.





1930

Ralph S. Crum, (address unknown).

Mavis E. Thirlwall, Cristobal, C. Z.

Rae Bliss, Cristobal, C. Z.

Thomas L. Coley, Jr., (address un-
known).

Della J. Raymond, Cristobal, C. Z.

Evelyn E. Ganzemuller (Mrs. H.)
Fenton, Madden Dam, C. Z.

Alice E. Henter (Mrs. Jack) Cor-
rigan, Balboa, C. Z.

Mr. Willi.\.\i New.m.\n, Memphis,
Tenn.

Pauline Herman, (address unknown).

Elsie B. Birkeland, 50 Nevens Street
Brooklyn, N. Y.

Victor Melendez, Colon R. de P.

Eleanor M. Fitzgerald (Mrs. G.)
Robinson. Balboa, C. Z.

Frances M. Days, Gatun, C. Z.

Francisco Wong, Bo.\ 1734, Cristobal,
C. Z.

M. Virginia Eberenz, Cristobal, C. Z.

Elsie Darley, Cristobal, C. Z.

E. Beverly Turner, Cristobal, C. Z.

J. Virginia Stevenson, Cristobal,
C. Z.

Walter Wikingstad, Duke Collee:e,
Durham, N. C.

Estafania G. Wheeler, Utica Memo-
rial Hospital, Utica, N. Y.

Richard C. Sergeant, (address un-
known).

James Campbell, Jr., Georgia Tech.
Atlanta, Ga.

Rita Teresa Joyce, St. Joseph's Col-
lege, Philadelphia, Pa.

Arthur Mundberg, Cristobal, C. Z.



Phoebe O'Donnell, Balboa, C. Z.

Oivind Arneson, Kristiansund, Nor-
way.

Rose T. Corrigan, Newark, N. J.

Maria C. Stewart (Mrs. O.) F-,brega,
Panama City.

NehlsG. Jansen, (address unknown).

1951

Carlos Bogart Rankin, Wittinberg
College, Meyers Hall, Springfield, Ohio.

Vel.ma Hall, Cristobal, C. Z.

Ruth Duvall, 2974 Colerian Avenue,
Cincinnati, Ohio.

A5ARION Neely. Cristobal, C. Z.

Thomas Pescod, Cristobal, C. Z.

W'illiam Bailey', Cristobal, C. Z.

Ernest Berger, Cristobal, C. Z.

Celeste Clark, (Mrs. B.) Powell,
Balboa, C. Z.

Crawford J. Ca.mpbell. Emery Uni-
versity, Oxford, Ga.

Edward Conkling, Gatun, C. Z.

Margaret M. Davis. Cristobal, C. Z.

Vinnie Elson, Bo.x 575, College Sta-
tion, Pullman, Washington.

Russell Elwell, Duke Universitv,
N. C.

Fabian Engl.ander. (address un-
known )

Clara Frisk, Bo.x 728, Leanington,
Ontario, Canada.

Burton Hackett, Cristobal, C. Z.

John Kelly, (address unknown).

Maria Kleefkens, Cristobal, C. Z.

Demetra Lewis, Balboa C. Z.

Percival Lyew, Bo.x 1099, Cristobal,
C. Z.



63



Kenneth Maurer, Balboa, C. Z.
Eugenia M. McLain. Cristobal, C. Z.
Ronald Phillpotts, New York City.
Bettina Powers, Fort Hancock, N.f.
Anna Ryan, 468 East State Street,
Trenton, N. J.

Aloha Slocum, Cristobal, C. Z.
Dorothy Wirtz, Cristobal, C. Z.
George Wertz, Cristobal, C. Z.
Ben Williams, Cristobal, C. Z.
Barbara Weick, France Field, C. Z.
Raymond Will, Cristobal, C. Z.
Richard Wood, Cristobal, C. Z.
Alice J. Gormely, Cristobal, C. Z.

Frank Griesinger. Georgia Tech, At-
lanta, Ga.

Evelyn Wright, (address unknown).
James Hayden, (address unknown).
Verona C. Her.man, University of
Te.xas, Austin, Te.xas.

Roger M. Howe, Purdue University,
Lafayette, Ind.

Carl Karicr, Gatun, C. Z.

Thelma King, 27 Broadway Terrace,
New York City.

Alvin a. Lyew, Colon, R. de P.

Margaret Mi.rachi, Colon, R. de P.

Elwin Neal, Cristobal, C. Z.

James Wood, Cristobal, C. Z.

Elsie Neely, Cristobal, C. Z.

Benjamin Roberts, 701 Union Street,
Union College, Schnectady, N. Y.

Janet Robinson, Box 1534, William
and Mary College, Williamsburg, Va.

Herm.\n Roos, Jr., Gatun, C. Z.

Bruce Sanders, Cristobal, C. Z.

Jessie Sinclair, (address unknown).

Betty Stahler, (address unknown).

Robert Stevenson, Cristobal, C. Z.

Inez Theoktisto, Colon, R. de P.

Alicia Thirlwall, Cristobal, C. Z.

Jessie Vane, Fort Sherman, C. Z.

Nell Wardlaw, Newcomb College,
Josephine Louise House, New Orleans,
La.

Perry Washabaugh, Cristobal, C. Z.

"Best wishes for a better "Caribbean"
and best wishes to yon all for continued
success."

Edwin Weisman, Purdue University,
Lafayette, Ind.

Malcolm Wheeler, Cristobal, C. Z.

Elizabeth Wirtz, Cristobal, C. Z.

1952
R.ANDOLPH M. Wikingstad, Cristobal,

c. z.

Albin B. Forsstro.m, (address un-
known).

Eleanor M. Rkinhold, Tampa, Fla.

Howard U. Keenan, Purdue Univer-
sity, Lafayette, Ind.

Richard Bettein, Fort Randolph, C.

Gladys Bliss, Cristobal, C. Z.



Allenye Mrtle Deakins, Gatun, C.Z.

Mary C. Deans, Cristobal, C. Z.

John Delaney, (address unknown).

Dona V. Eaton, Barnard College,
Hewitt Hall, New York City.

"Best wishes and all the luck in the
world to the class of 1954."

Joseph Ebdon, Gatun, C. Z.

Harry C. Egolf, Gatun, C. Z.

Vivian G. Elmgren, (address un-
known).

Howard S. Engelke, Cristobal, C. Z.

Marie Ensrud, (address unknown).

Jose Antonio Fernandez, Colon, R.
de p.,

1933

Harold Agnew, (address unknown).

Webster Beard, Balboa, C. Z.

Howard Berry, Severn School, Sever-
na Park, Md.

Clifton Brown, University of Ten-
nesee, Knoxville, Tenn.

Robert Brown, University of Ten-
nesee, Knoxville, Tenn.
Jesus David, Gatun, C. Z.

Ernest de la Ossa, Columbia Uni-
versity, New York, N. Y.

Parker Hanna, Cristobal, C. Z.
Robert Hanna, Cristobal, C. Z.
Oscar Heilbron, Colon, R. de P.

Charles Howe, Perdue University,
Lafayette, Ind.

^^'ILL1A.M Keenan, Perdue University,
Lafayette, Ind.

Louie Kleefkins, Cristobal, C. Z.

Henry Lee, Cristobal, C. Z.

Harold Lockwood, Cincinnatti, Phio.

John Lothrop, Los Angeles, California

Mandi Marchosky, Cristobal, C. Z.

Chris Ohlschlager, Cristobal, C. Z.

Jack Paterson, Cristobal, C. Z.

Charlie Pescod, Cristobal, C. Z.

Ernest Reinhold, Cristobal, C. Z.

Harvey Smith, Canal Zone Junior
College, Balboa, C. Z.

James \\'ergin. Perdue University, La-
fayette, Ind.

Helen Aanstoos, Cristobal, C. Z.

Thelma Albritton, Cristobal, C. Z.

Dorothy Birkeland, Cristobal, C. Z.

Jane Bretch, Cristobal, C. Z.

Velta Foley (Airs. C. Sharp), Cristo-
bal, C. Z.

Molly Gruber, Sweet Briar, Xr.

Helen Hammond, LTniversity of Cin-
cinnatti, Ohio.

Mary Melendez, Colon, R. de P.

Mildred Owen, Hammontl, La.

AL\RTHA Potts, Cristobal, C. Z.

NoRINE Rakovsky, Cristobal, C. Z.

Edna Thirwall, Cristobal, C. Z.

Florence Thornton (Mrs. Jordan),
Cristobal, C. Z.

AL\Y Wegner (address unknown).

Thomas Rankin, Canal Zone Junior
College, Balboa, C. Z.



64




Ti>niLETii:s



i




65




SOCCER



SOCCER



This year the soccer team had to step down from the pedestal of supremacy that they had
gained last year. One of the reasons for their not being ahle to retain the pedestal uas because of
almost all new material with which to work.

The team was able to claim victory in the minor games they played but when it came to the
more important games they just couldn't gain the sought-after goal.

There seemed to be a lacking of tean:iwork which would enable the team to crash tlirough
the defensive of tlie opponents.

The first soccer tilt went to Balboa on October 28 at the Balboa stadium with a ratlier one
sided score ot 4 to 0. The first part of the game moved rather sluggishly due to a muddy field,
however, Balboa in the second quarter managed to chalk up one goal. The game had little to
offer in the way of excitement in the third quarter and much less to the Cristobal fans in the fourth
as it was in this quarter that Balboa obtained three goals. The Balboa team showed some ex-
cellcct pass worlt.

The second game, played at Kokonut Park on November 4, did not bring the championship
any closer to Cristobal. The home team appeared with a much improved defensive but the for-
ward line was still weak. The game was lively through-out with both teams stri\ing hard to be
victorious. Balboa edged in two goals, one in the third quarter and one In the fourth. The victory



BASFBALL




66




TENNIS



mucli desired championship replacing Crictobal on the pedestal of



lor Balboa gave them the
supremacy-

The line ups for the teams are:
Balboa

Sutherland

W'empe

Brown

Chaflin

Diu'tree

Reiher

Gomel!

WalUer

Alorales

Lipinsky

Corxille

We were no more successful against the Junior College than we were against Balboa,
bal lost the first game to the tune 2-0. The first goal made in the second quarter was
through the goal posts by Rankin's well trained toe. Both teams put u]i a hard fight
players deserve credit for their splendid performance.



Positions
Goalkee]ier
Left Fullback
Right Fullback
Center Halfback
Left Halfback
Right \ying
Inter Right
Center Forward
Inter Left
Left Wing



Cristobal

Neely

Bazan

Wheeler

Hanna

Renardez

Berger

Bejarano

Alberga

Hill

Richardson

Wirtz



Cristo'
pushed
and the



THACIv




On Saturday. Xovemher 11, the Junior College again defeated Cristobal with a 1-0 score at
the Balboa Stadium. There was no scoring in the first half, and in the third quarter, Rankin put
his well educated toe to work thus gaining the only goal of the game.



BASEBALL

Once more Balboa succeeded in taking the baseball laurels. The task seemed rather easy as
Balboa took four of the live games played.

It seems that in this sport also Cristobal lost quite a tew good men and had none with which
to replace them. Due to the steady coaching oi Mr. Miller, the boys managed to display a credit-
able showing tor new material.

Balboa won the first game by the score 6-5. Although Max Sanders, sturdy southpaw for
Cristobal, pitched a good game, we were unable to win as he had no backing from the rest of the
team. Balboa took ad\'antage of the situation and chalked up six runs.

Failure in the first game could not be attributed to the fact that the team was not on its home
field lor it lost the second game which was played at the Mount Hope Stadium. The game was
one of many errors on both sides and the game ended with the score S-7 in iavor of the \'isitors.

There w-as a lapse ot two weeks between the second and third games. Balboa won this game
with a margin of only three runs. The Cristobal team showed much impro\'ement and managed
to get fi\'e runs. howe\er. Balboa recei^ed eight to win the game.

Once more the Cristobal boys showed a decided improvement. In the fourth game Balboa
won b\ a margin of only one run, the final score being 6-5. Sanders pitched a splendid game and
Healy put up a good backstop.

The last game was quite a surprise as the Cristobal boys obtained ten runs while the Balboa
boys only received tour. Our boys revealed a hidden ability as they practically ran around Balboa
in circles.

Cristobal played one game with the Junior College. The score was rather lop-sided, fifteen
to one in ta\'or of Cristobal.

Box Score
Name ab h e r a po

Alberga 17 10 7 4

Wills 21 6 1 2 7 6

Neelv ....: q 1 5 I 5 10

Bearil 21 9 1 5 1 1

Sanders, M... 22 4 1 1 28 ,37

Curtiss.. 10 2 4 4 5 3

Wheeler 11 I 10 3

Wirtz .. 9 1 3 3 1 20

Stone __ 9 110 3 6

Peterson..._ .'. 8 1110

Sanders, I...._ II 3 19

Hana, W 5 19

Fernandez 3 12

Durham 10

Ebdon 10

King, R. 8 1 2 19



TRACK

In the largest and most record breaking track meet e\'er held between Balboa, our dear old
Alma Mater came out of the scramble on top with a .score of 47 points while Balboa had but 36.
The meet was full of excitement to the spectators as well as to the participants.

Paul Beard not only managed to pile up a neat sum ot pDints for the home team but also
broke two pre\'ious records and tied one as well.

"Little George" Tarf linger of Balboa took second place among the honored. He walked off
with thirteen points and two new records.

F'i\'e inter-school records were broken, three by Cristobal and two by Balboa. Beard broke
the 100 and 220 yard dashes and Hollowell. the 880. Tarllinger broke his own record ot last year
by putting the shot 42 feet and throwing the discuss 100 feet and one half inch.

Of the ten first places Cristobal took six and shut out Balboa in the 220 yard dash by taking
all three places. The Cristobal relay team came in first in the 880 but were disqualified.

Spirit ran high in both teams and as a result they managed to break five previous records.

The following is the results of the meet:

tO i/'i. Ihi.rli Time: >. 6 seconds

1. Beard (C)

2. Alberga (C)

3. Stevenson (B)



Hroaii Jump Dtslance:
1.
2.
3.



220 ,/d. DashTu



Kromer (B)
No vey ( B )
Borden (C)

21. !i seconds (.Vu' Record)
Beard (C)
Alberga (C)
Bazan (C)



68




1. Badi (C)

2. Tarflinger (B)

3. Kromer (B)

lO.Uli. Dash Time: ^.''seconds {Ne,,' Rec.
1. Beard (C)

2. Alberga (C)

3. Stevenson (B)

Short Pal Dislance: 42' 10" (ye,,' Record)

1. Tartlinirer (B)

2. Bejarano (C )

3. Kromer (B)

Discat ThroMDi'iance: 100' 5' 2" {Xe,,' Record)

1. Tarflinger (B)

2. Duev (C)

3. Brown (B)

8S0 lid. DashTime: 2 min. Ih.b sec. (.V<-u' Record)

1. Hollowell (C)

2. Reitser (B)

3. Qulteno (B)

Mediexj Rehi\/ Time: 51.4 seconds

Won bv Cristobal:

iMarsh. Wheeler, Borden, Alolten

S'SOj/d. Relai/ Time: I min. 41. 4. tec.
Won by Balboa:

Chatting. Mac Cartney, Morales, Kromer.



TENNIS

Balboa again won the tennis tournament which was played at I'^ort Da\'
fourteenth. Cristobal won one match while Balboa was \'ictorioiis by winni
the Cristobal bo\'s ha\'e not had much practice they showetl up pretty well a;;,
boy lought hard. Wood and Egoscue were the only Cristobal bo\'S who won



was the second doubles.

No. 1 Singles:
No. 2 Singles:
No. 3 Sincles:



No. 1 Doubles:



No. 2 Doubles:



The results of thi

Hendrickson
Donovan
Ale Cartney

Arroyo

and
Ledfors

Ecccup.

and
Woou



meet are:

defeated
defeated
defeated



(B)
(B)

(B)



( B I defeated



(C)



defeated



Bei.-\r.\no
Presley

HoUGIlTEN

Hill
and

RET.-iLLY

Spinell.4
and

LOCKU'OOU



(C),
(C),
(C),

(Ci,



(B)



Is on Sat
ng tour,
linst Bal
their ma

6-3. 6
6-4, 1
6-1, 6



urda\- the
Although
oa. Each

(ch which

4.

6, 6-1.

!.



6-3, 6-3.



6-4, S-6.



69



BASKETBALL

The first game in the basketball series was held in the Cristolial High School gymnasium on
Friday evening the 13th ot April.

The brilliant passwork on the part of the Cristobal team made the game very lively and
interesting. The home team also derived a great deal oi inspiration from the student body with
their many new cheers.

In the first quarter, both teams started off with a bang, and terminated with the score S to 4
in fa\or of Balboa. The second quarter was full of fouls committed by both teams. However, the
score was a tie when the gong sounded. The home team showed fresh spirit in the third quarter
and managed to take the lead which it held until the end of the game. The final score was 23 to
16 in tavor ot Cristobal.



By holding its own in the first two periods and displaying a fast breaking and baffling attack
in the second half the Balboa quintet swamped the Cristobal group 34 to 21 in the second game
of the the series between the two schools. Balboa's victory evened the inter-school series, each
team ha\'ing one win and one loss.

The game opened with lack Sutherland, Balboa, scoring one point on a foul shot. Cristobal
came back strong after Sutherland scored and rang up two field goals in rapid succession. The
first quarter ended with the Gold Coasters on the long end ot a seven to six score.

The second quarter, which was the slowest of the game, saw neither team do any very heavy
scoring. Both teams roughed up considerably, and fouls were frequent. Balboa outplayed the
Gold Coasters in most respects during this period, and the whistle for the half found the home team
leading 14 to 11.

Balboa's attack in the last half was featured by the e.xcellent shooting of Walter Friday who
sank three field goals. Cristobal's defeat is partly ^ue to the loss of its star center, Charles Bath,
who had to be taken from the game in the first quarter.



Cristobal took the lead in the series bv winnins the third game with the rather close score of
25-23.

The first quarter was very lively and snappy with both teams showing a fine game ot ball.
The quarter ended with the score 10 to 4 in favor of Cristobal.

Balboa sank the ball in the basket many times but the sharp shooting and pass work of the
home team enabled them to keep the lead.

The last quarter was very exciting for the players and spectators as well. With both teams
fighting hard, with but a few more minutes in which to play, and with the score tied, a foul was
called on a Balboa player. The shot was made good by the Cristobal player.



The fourth game in the series was played in Balboa. The Balboa basketeers managed to
chalk up another victory.

Both teams managed to present a boring exhibition in the first quarter.

The quintet of Balboa players seemed to run around the Cristobal players scoring quite
heavily all during the game.

The victory of the Balboans has brought about a dead-lock in the series. However we hope
that the Cristobal boys will come out on top.

The following are the Cristobal players;

Neelv. Will. M. Sanders, L Sanders, Beiarano, Albcrga, Wheeler, Hanna, Beard, Bath,
Hollowell, Wharton, Russel, Horine.



GIRLS' SPORTS

Bi/ Becerlen Jlarcii.re '34

This year our volley ball did not meet with the success which we anticipated. The inter-
school contest was won liy Balboa who captured three out of five of the scheduled contests. Each
contest consisted of three games lasting over a period ot twenty minutes each.

Several of the Cristobal girls did outstanding work. The downfall was due to lack of team
work. Although many of the liest players will be lost through gratluation, the new material shows
promise of developing into a team which should offer plenty 0]iposltion to Balboa.



D.'iTE Cristobal

Oct. 28 16

12
16

Nov. 4 15

Nov. 11 11

12
13

Nov. 18 13

17

10

Nov. 25 14

17

8

Starting this year official rules were



Bai.bha
24
16
22
26
16
21
28
18
23
31
22
28
30
18
15



Pi.AVF.i) At
Balboa

Cristobal

Balboa

Cristobal

Balboa



:idopfed.



70




\OLLEY-HALL



BASKETBALL

The results of the basketball season prove:! disastrous tor Cristobal, Balboa liaA-mg won all
three games ol the series.

After suffering defeat in the ope.iing game. Cristobal displayed a murh improved team in
the second contest and was defeated oalv after a strenuous battle by Balboa, 23-21. The third
game ot the series was a walk-away for Balboa who white-washed Cristobal by a 19-0 score.

The prospects for nest year consist mostly of this year's lower classmen, and the future lo.iks
brighter lor Cristobal.

Date Cristob.\l B.\lbo.\ Played At

Jan. 27 6 17 Balboa

Feb. 3 21 23 Cristobal

Feb. 10 19 Balboa
All basketball games were contlucted according to official rules.



Due to lack of efithusiasm there was no inter-school indoor baseball contest.
Because the Annual goes to press before the girls tennis toin-nament, no accoimt ol the meet
can be put in the book.



BASKETBM.I.









'i:'-



71




72



m^



HUMOR

By Robert Molten



A colored preacher was trying to im-
press upon his congregation the terrors
of hell.

"Bredern and Sistern," he called, "has
any of you all ever been to Bumingham,
Alabama whar the big steel \\ uks is?"

"Ah been thar Pasun," said one.

"Is you been in the mills and is you
see the hot steel as it comes out of de
fuhness?"

"Yas Preachuh, a seen it."

"Well, den you knows how hot dat
stuff is. Ah wants to tell all you sinners
dat when dat stuff comes from dem
funaces it's hot. It's hot, it's white siz-
zling hot, in fact none of you can go near
it without gettin all shriveled to a crisp.
Well. Bredern and Sistern. in Hell dey
uses dat stuff fo ice cream."



.Ilan (in theater): "Say. you, howja
like ter tell me where the smokin' room
is. hey, kid?

Girl C.r/ier (sweetly): "Go right down
this hall and turn to your right. You
will see a sign that says 'Gentlemen.'
Don't pay any attention to it. Just go
right in."



Silence is said to be safe but a great
deal of trouble comes from the still.



"Waiter," said the diner waiting for
his dinner, "have you ever been to the

o,,

zoo.'

"No, sir."

"Well, go some time you would enjoy
seeing the turtles whizzing by."



If'ertz (feeling swell)
Tyke Cotton?"

Sid (not feeling any more)



"Do you know
"What's



lis name :



Jrertz: "Who?"



ir'atchman: "Young man, do you in-
tend to kiss this poor innocent girl?"
Young man: "Oh, nol
JFatclwian: "Then hold this lantern."



Anna Reilly is so sure of herself she
does crossword puzzles with a pen.



A little girl was put in an upper berth
of a puUman for the first time. She kept
crying until her mother told her not to
be afraid, because God woul'd watch over
her. "Mother, are you there?" "Yes."
"Father, are you there?" "Yes." A fellow
passenger lost all patience at this point
and shouted: "We are all here! Your
father and mother and brothers and sis-
ters and aunts and uncles and cousins.
All here! Now go to sleep." Pause, then
softlv: "Mama!" "Yes." "Was that
God?"



A mountainer, who had been convicted
of being a quick trigger feudist was lan-
guishing in jail. His friends were trying
to get him a pardon, while the opposite
clan was pulling the strings against him
and spreading all sorts of slknder about
him. Finally, moved to action he wrote:
"Deer Guvner, if you-all has heered all
I heered you-all heered, you-all has
heered a lie."



Jack: "Do you know at what age a
baby begins to think?"

Joe: "Certainly, mine began to think
I ought to walk the floor with it at night
the first week it was at home.



"How is that clock you won at the
fair?"

"Swell, it does an hour in less than
fortv-five minutes."



Jlr. Hackett: "Give me three proofs
the earth is round."

Bill Hollou-ell: "The book says so,
3'ou say so, and ma says so."



Jlinister: "And what does you moth-
er do for you when you have been a good
girl?"

Marii Ann: "She lets me stay home
from church."



Things have reached the point where
banks should have special doors for
patrons so they can come and go without
disturbing the busy bandits.



73



y\r. Seller was giving the class some
advice on the benefits of physical train-
ing.

Sanj he: "Ten years ago I was a
walking monument to careless living, a
broken tk)>\n, chsgracelul appearing spec-
imen of humanity an all together worth-
less creature, to myself and to the com-
munity. What do you suppose has
brought this change in me?" He paused
tor a moment to throw out his chest and
see the eftect of his v.ords. Then the
poor Frosh demanded: "What change?"



When the foreman stated the jury was
unable to reach a verdict the jucige said
he would have t.\elve suppers sent in,
upon which the foreman said: "May it
please your honor, make it eleven suppers
and a bale of hav."



"Hey, Conductor," yelled the traveller
on the Panama Railroad, "That was my
station, why didn't you stop there?"

"V\'e don't stop there any more, ex-
plained the conductor, "The engineer is
mad at the station agent.



She: "Would



!e



fo



He: "I would leave a baseball game
in the ninth inning with the score tied
for you."



"I'm going to town with you this after-
noon, James," said the soldier's wife.
"I want to do a little shopping while the
bargains are still on."

"I understand your plans," responded
her husband. "The drive is to be followed
1)V a counter attack.



"Did you hear Aliss Crooner's voice
on the radio last night?"

"Yes I listened very carefully.

"Do you think her voice ought to be
cultivated?"

"No I think it should have been har-
vested years aeo.



"Rufus, did you go (o the lodge meet-
ing last night?

"No sir, we had to postpone it. 'i'he
Grand All-Powerful Invincible Most
Supreme Unconejuerable Potentate got
beat up by his wife."



Sujjerer: "I have a terrible toothache,
could you suggest some kind of relief?"

Friend: "I had a toothache myself
last w eek and I w ent and my loving w ife
kissed me and consoled me and in a few
minutes the pain was all gone. \\'hy
don't you try the same sort of thing?"

Sujjerer: "I think I will. Is your wife
home now?"



Dizzi/ Beers: Look me over. Dad,
nifty scenery. What? I'll say. Solomon
in all his glory was not arrayed like
this."

Hi.' Pop: "No I reckon not. Solomon
was a wise man.



Const'tluenl: "Senator, you promised
me a job and now you say there are no
;obs."

Senator: "No, there are no jobs at
present but I think I can get you ap-
pointed to a commission to investigate
why there are no jobs.



Captain : "You are charged with being
drunk. Have you anything to say for
yourself?

Sailor: "Sir, I have never been drunk
in my lite, and never intend to be it
always makes me feel so bad ne.xt morn-
ing."



Doctor: "That man owes me 200
dollars for services and he not only re-
fuses to pay but he doesn't even worry
over it."



Said the young questioner of the fami-
ly: "Dad, am I made of dust?"

Poor Pa: "You emphatically are not,
otherwise you would tlrv up sometimes."



Little Bo}/: "Mother, do cows and
bees go to heaven?

Jlcther: "Why Sonny, what a strange
question! Why?

Little Boi/: "Because if they don't all
the milk and honey the preacher said
was up there is all canned goods and I'm
tired of all such things.



Raining cats and dogs is very bad in-
deed, but hailing street cars could be
disasterous.



74



In darkest Africa two natives watched
a leopard chasing a large fat man.

Said one, "Can you spot the winner?"
The reply came quickly, "The winner
is spotted.



Teacher: "If a man has more than
one wife it is called polygamy.

What is it called if you have but one
wife?"

Bobby Werlz: "j^lonotony."



Jlr. Hackett: "And what happened in
1776?"

Frosli: "\77b'l I can't even remember
what happened last night."



Jlr. rinton: "Do you think paper
can be used to keep people warm".

Charlie Hiem: "I should say so. That
last report card I took home kept the
familv hot for a week.'



Lord Wiffleby, during his first visit to
the court cf King Louis XIV of France
had his close resemblance to the king
brought to his and the king's attention
by one of the ladies-in-waiting. The king
was very surprised at the likeness and
after remarking on the fact several times
asked Lord \\ iffieby if his mother had
ever visited his father's court. Lord
Wiffleby immediately answered with
"No, but mv father did.



Joe: What would you do if that good
looking salesman waited on you w hile you
were buying ui dervvear?

Co-ed: 1 think I would have a tit.



Jack: Well, I see the ladies are finally
giving in.

John: Giving in how?

Jack: Well, I saw a sign out in town
this afternoon that said, Ladies' Readi/-
to-lT'ear Clothes!



Jlr. Hacketl: "What were the last
words of Webster?"

Warren: "Zymotex, Zyrian. Zythem
and Zythepsary from the 1950 edition.



.Uolori.rt: I'm sorry I ran over your
hen. Would a dollar make it right?

Farmer: Well, better make it two. I
have a rooster that was mighty fond of
that hen and the shock might kill him,
too.



When you see a dog leading a man, you
know that that man is blind' but when
you see a man leading a dog, you know
that that man is leading a dog's life.



"Can you imagine it! I know of a
chorus girl who made a millionaire out of
a man she married in only a few months.

"Was he a poor man when she married



hir



'No, he was a multi-millionaire



irfil



Wife reading aloud trom newspaper:
"We.Tlthv man leaves $500,000 to woman
who refused to marrv him tuentv vears



ago.

Huspand:
tude.



That's what I'd call grati-



.11 rs. Xeu'h/u-ed : Have you any nice
slumps this morning?

Butcher: Slumps? What are they?

Jlr.f. Xeu'lt/iivd: I don't know, but
my husband used to talk about slumps
in the market, so I thought I'd try one.



A man entered a hotel, placed his over-
coat on a rack and pinned a card to it on
which was written: "This overcoat be-
longs to a champion prizefighter. Back
in ten minutes.

When he returned the overcoat was
gone, but the card was still there. To it
had been added: "Overcoat taken by
champion long distance runner. Won't
be back at all."



Old Ladi/ (on platform): Which plat-
form for the New York train?

Pos\er: Turn to the left and you'll be
right.

Old Ladi/: Don't be impertinent, my
man.

Porter: All right then, turn to your
right and you'll be left.



75



On a certain Sunday morning the pas-
tor of a Negro congregation noticed that
an old face had reappeared among his
tlock, and after the sermon made it a
point to welcome the supposedly repent-
ant backslider.

"This is the first time 1 have seen you
at church for a long time," he said. "I'm
sho'ly glad to see you here."

"Ah done had to come," explained
Rastus. "Ah needs strengthenin'. I'se
got a job white .\ashin' a chicken coop an'
buildin' a fence aroun' a water-melon
patch."



Smnll Bill (bragging): My daddy is
traffic commissioiier, and when he drives
his car he doesn't have to pay any atten-
tion to traffic rules.

His Friend: That's nothing. My father
IS a truck driver.



Custciner: Have you a book
"Man, the Master of Women?"



died



Hard-hoiled Salesflirl: Fiction depart-
ment the other side, sir.



"You see that girl? She's just got
$200,000 for a short love story."

"Good heavens that's a lot of money
lor a short story. Did she sell the cinema
rights?"

"No, she sold it to a jury."



The meaning of the word "collision"
was being explained by the teacher of the
class of small boys and girls.

"A collision," she said, "is when tvvo
things come together unexpectedly."

Immediately a small boy jumped up
and said: "Please, teacher, we've had a
collision at our home."

"Whatever do you mean?
"Well, mother's just had twins."



"Dad," said son, "do you think they
will ever find a substitute for gasoline?/

"They have one now, son, and I wish
you'd give it a trial."

"Huh?" queried son incredulously.
"I've never heard of it. What is it any-
way?"

"Shoe leather," explained Dad.



Race Track Gambler (to his friend \\ ho
has )ust lost his bankroll): Say, I know
a guy who puts everything he makes en
the horses and yet he is never broke.

Friend: How can that be?

Race Frack (iainhler: He is a harness
manufacturer.



Two students were uncertainly flivver-
ing their way home.

"Bill," says Henry, "I wancha be very
careful. Firs' thing ya know you'll have
us in a ditch."

"Me?" said Bill, astonished, "Why. I
thought you was driving."



Rastus: What yo' wukkin' at now?

.Jlose: Ah is a blacksmith in a cafe-
teria.

Rastus: What yc' mean?
.I/(:fe: Ah shoos tlies!



"Why IS Alabel so angry? The pa-
pers gave a full account of her wedding.

"Yes, but they put in that Miss Ogle
was married to the well-known collector
of antiques."



Ihne



"H;i



ave vou anv wild due



k?"



If'ailer: "No, sir, but we can take a
tame one and irritate it for you."



He: I like your form.

She: Must we go all over that again?



FAderlii Gentleman: (bewildered at elab-
orate wedding: "Are you the bride-
groom, young man?"

W edding Guesl: "No sir, 1 am not' I
was eliminated in the semifinals.



"What's yon?" asked Donald, newly
arrived in Canada.

"That is a moose."

"Weel, if yon's a wee bit moose, show
me one of your old rats!



76



Teacher: I'm surprised at you, Sam-
my Wicks, that you cannot tell me when
Columbus discovered America! What
does the chapter headmg of the week's
lesson say?

Samnii/: Columbus. 14'52.

Teacher: Well, isn't that plain e-
nough? Did you ever see it before?

Samim/: Yes'm' but I always thought
it was his telephone number.



Jim: "Say, Mike. I heard you were
sick last week.

Jlike: "Yes, I was, I had the new
disease called 'clothing sickness.

Jim: "What on earth is that?
JJike: "Well, I had a coat on my

tongue and my breath came in short

pants."



"\\'hat's this, honey?" said Airs. Young-
bridge's husband as he speared a slab
from the dish.

"Lucifer cake, dear.

"I thought you said you were going
to make angel cake.
"I was, but it fell."



Professor: I say, your tubular air
container has lost its rotunditv.
JlotorLd: What

Professor: The cylinder apparatus
which supports your vehicle is no longer
inflated.

Jlolorist: But^

Professor: The elastic fabric surround-
ing the circular frame whose successive
revolutions bear you onward in space has
not retained its pristine roundness.

Small Bci/: Hey, mister, vou got a
flat tire!



Policeman (to mjured pedestrian):
"You say he didn't blow his horn, eh?
Are you a married man?"

"No, sir' this is the worst thing that
ever happened to me."



"Sav Joe, what's the penalty for biga-
,y?""
"Two mother-in-laws.



Doctor: "I would advise you, madam,
to take frequent baths, get plenty of
fresh air, and dress in cool gowns.

Patient's Husband (later): "What did
the doctor say?"

IVife: "He said I ought to go to Palm
Beach, and then to the mountains. Also,
that I must get some new light gowns at
once."



"We don't care what you think: we
want to know what you know, shouted
the lawyer.

"\\'ell. I may as well get off the stand
then," said the witness. "I can't talk
without thinking. I ain't no lawyer."



IVillie: "Pa, does bigamy mean that
a man has one wife too many?"

Pa: "Not necessarily, son. A man
can have one wife too many and not be
a bigamist.

Jla: "Willie, you come upstairs with
me and I'll teach vou to keep vour mouth
shut!



Jl other: "Come, Bobbie, don't be a
little savage, kiss the lady."

Bohhie: "No, she's a naughty lady.
It I kiss her she may give me a slap just
as she did papa."



First Gambler (at race track): "Say
do you know that Lady Godiva was the
greatest gambler who ever lived?"

Second Gambler: "What, that dame?



H.



ow come



7"



First Gambler: "She put every thing
she had on a horse, didn't she?



"Daddy said there was not another
woman in the world like you. Aunt iMar-
jorie."

"That was very flattering of him."
"Yes. He said it was a good thing,
too.



"He's always been a perfect gentleman
with me.

"Yes, he bores me, too."



77



"What was that doctor treating vou



If alter: "Hou did vou find the steak



for. old top?" sir?"

"Well, from the size of his bills, I Pti/rmi : "I looked under a mushroom

should sav a s.\ollen fortune." and there it was!"



S/iopper: "\\'here can I get some silk
covering for mv settee?"

Floor Walker: "Next aisle and to your
left for the lingerie department, lady."



"Rastus, ah sees de love light in yo'
eyes."

"Dat ain't love light honey. Ah's
hungry."



Before you print a kiss on a girl s lips,
be sure she likes your type.



"What caused the e.xplosion at your
house?"

"Powder on mv coat sleeve."



"Why ain't you workin', carryin' these

bricks?"

"I ain't feeling well, I'm all a-tremble."
"Oh, are you, well then just get busy

with that sand sieve."



Lad}/ (to tramp): Did you notice that
pile of wood?

Tramp: Yes'm, I seen it.

Ladii: You should mind your gram-
mar. You mean you saw it.

Tramp: No'm. You saw me see it,
but vou haven't seen me saw it.



"Sam, do you solemnly swear to tell
the truth, and nothing but the truth?"
"Ah does, sir.

"Sam, what have you got to say for
yourself?

"Well. Jedge, w if all dem limitations
you has jes put on me, Ah don't believe
.\h has anything at all to say."



A mugwump is a bird that sits on the
fence with its mug on one side and its
wump on the other.



A colored messenger unceremoniously
invaded the private office of J. P. Mor-
gan, according to a current yarn.

"Do you know to whom you are talk-
ing?" the financier demanded.

"No, boss.

"I'm Morgan of J. P. Alorgan & Co.,
sir.

"Does yo' knows who yo' is undress
in'?" asked the trespasser.

"I neither know nor care, snapped the
money king.

"Well, I'se de coon ob Kulin, Loeb &
Co."



Three blood transfusions were neces-
sary to save a lady patient's life at a hos-
pital. A brawny young Scotchman of-
fered his blood. The patient gave him
$50.00 for the first pint, $25.00 for the
second pint but the third time she had
so much Scotch blood in her she only
thanked him.



Ima Dodo wonders why it is the stork
gets blamed for a lot of things that some
other bird is responsible tor.



The story has it that once upon a time
a man seeing a woman standing in a street
car with many bundles in her arms, got
up and offered her his seat.

The woman promptly fainted.

When she came to, she thanked the
man.

Then he fainted!



"There," said the plumber, laying out
his tools, "in spite of all the silly jokes
about us, we've not forgotten a single
thing. My mate's here with me, we've
not got to go back for anything and

"You've come to the wrong address,'
said the maid.



78



Some of the depression sufferers are
like the darkey \\ho had been playing
poker.

He said: "Tell you, boys, I dun los' a
heap o' money las' night."

"Ho^\ much, Mose?"

"A hundred and eighty-seben dollahs
an' tohteen cents.

"Golly! dat wuz a heap o' money."
'Yas, siree, and de wust of it wuz, do
fohteen cents wuz cash."



Nun<-e: I think he's regaining con-
sciousness, doctor' he tried to islo.v the
foam off his medicine.



I' ir.fi Sale.i'man : My w ite dreamt last
night that she was married to a million-
aire.

Second Ditta: That's nothing, my wife
thinks that even in the daytime.



Wije: Darling, the new maid has
burned the bacon and eggs. Wouldn't you
be satisfied with a couple of kisses for
breakfast?

Ilubhx/: Sure. Bring her in.



His w ife determined to cure him of his
bad ways and, with the aid of a sheet and
an electric torch, transformed herself into
a very fair imitation of a ghost. Then she
went to the drunkard and shook him.

"VV'has that?" murmured the toper.

"Satan," came the reply in a sepulchral
tone.

"Shake handsh, old horsh, I married
your sister.



The editor in one of our neighboring
towns quite unintentionally hit upon a
novel sche'me to increase circulation, fie
placed the following paragraph on the
front page of his weekly anesthetic:

"While returning to our residence late
one night last week, we noticed a certain
well-known citizen leaving the house of a
socially prominent lady whose husband
happened to be out of town. He was
leaving by the back door and in his hurry,
did not seem to recognize us. As the
gentleman is not a subscriber to the
Weekhi Banner, we earnestly request that
he forward $6.00 at his earliest conven-
ience, so that he can keep abreast of the
times and take advantage of the excep-
tional otters made by our advertisers."

The next morning's mail brought 57
new subscribers.



A general and a colonel were walking
down the street. They met many pri-
vates, and each time the colonel would
salute he would mutter, "The same to
you."

The general's curiosity soon got the
better of him, and he asked:

"Why do you always say that?"

The colonel answ ered :

"I was once a private and I know what
thev are thinkina;.



Head Clerk: I am very sorry to hear
of your partner's death. \\ Ould you like
me to take his place?

Jlanaijer: \ery much, if you can get
the undertaker to arrange it.



"Don't you love driving on a moon-
light night like this?"

"Yeah, but I thought I'd wait till we
got further out in the country."



"What time do you get up in the sum-
mer?

"As soon as the first rays of sun come in
at my window."

"Splendid! Then you, too, like to go
out while the dew is still fresh on the
grass."

"No, not exactlv. Mv room faces the
West."



The prim old lady was given the first
glass of beer she ever had. After sipping
it for a moment she looked up with a
puzzled air.

"How odd, she murmured. "It tastes
just like the medicine my husband has
been taking for the last twelve years.



He was rather shy, and after she had
throw n her arms around him for bringing
her a bouquet, he stood up and started
to leave.

"I'm sorry if I've offended you," she
said.

"No offense," he replied, "I'm going
for more flowers."



79



At a band concert in the Phillipines the
band was plavine; the "Alerrv Widow
Waltz."

A Chinese turned to a compatriot and
asked, "How callum that piece music?"

The second replied. "Callum, "He
Dead, She Glad."



Stern School Teacher: What is a relief
map?

School hoxi: My girl's face after look-
ing at yours all day.



I cranka da car,
Bavvt she won'ta run.
Theese automibile
She's a sawn of a gow n.
Shea stop in da middle
Of da street ups town,
I took in da carburetor
Baw t shesa no drown.
I pusha da clutch,
Shaka da wheel,
Knocka da brake
Da horn, it I feel.
I look in da tank
V^'ot I see-yas
Sawn of a gawn
Shesa out a da gas.



Judge (in dentist chair): Do you
swear that you will pull the tooth, the
whole tooth, and nothing but the booth?



Daughter: But, daddy, why do you
object to my becoming engaged? Is it
because of my youth?



Daddy: Yes, he's hopeless.



"Can your girl keep a secret?

"You said it. We were engaged 3 weeks
before she told me."



Optician: Weak eyes, have you? Well
how many lines can you read on that
chart?

Patient: What chart?



Storekeeper: Look here, young man.
I will show you what we consider the
real thing in men's hose.

Cu.domer: The real thing doesn't come
come in men's hose.



As Shakespeare once said, "Bowlegs
may not be few, but they're far betwen."



A TOAST

Here's to you

May God bless and keep you.

I wish I could afford to.



IT'ije: Honey, if I only had money,
I would never cease traveling.

Husband: How much do you need?



Said one Indian to another upon seeing
a white man riding a bicycle: "Heap lazy
paleface, runs sitting down.



He: I can't see what keeps the coeds
from freezing.

She: You're not supposed to, mister!



"I bet you come from a burg where all
the hicks congregate at the post office for
their mail.



"What's a post office?"



Kind old man: "And do you kno.\'
why Santa didn't bring you a doll for
Christmas."

Doll faced Child: "Yes, damn it, I
trumped fathers ace in the Christmas eve
bridge game.



When asked how he compiled his dic-
tionary the le.xicographer remarked it was
like a quarrel with one's wife one word
led to another.



"Daddy, who was Hamlet?"

"Bring me the Bible, you young know-
nothing, and I will show you.



80




smmm



IN APPRECIATION TO
OUR ADVERTISERS




m



E wish to express our
most sincere tlianks to
t li e 1 n d 1 \' 1 d u a I s an d
! firms V ho have contri-



l)uted toward making our an-
nual a success.



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xxxxx;



XXXXXXXXXXMXXXXXHXXXHXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX''" """"" ^' "







THE PANAMA HOSPITAL

PANAMA CITY, R. of P.



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81



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..V.'..'..\.\.%.-.,%,-.^.AA



(OMPANiA mmm de mm r m



PANAMA



COLON



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XXXI"



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7th AND BOLI\'AR STREETS



COLON



'S^.



Jobber and Commission
ttlerchant

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:; Real Estate broker and

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A gentleman from the middle west
tells us about a tin root that \\as blow n
off a country store and rolled into a com-
pact bundle. The owner having a sense
of humor w rapped it up w ith bailing wire
and sent it to flenry Ford. In due time
the answer arrived saying: "It will cost
you $8.50 to have your car repaired, but
for Heaven's sake tell us what hit it.'



IXXXXX"'"''ys"vvvvvvv."."vwwvxxXXX



X iij Wishing the Graduates



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All Success Through Life J?

ELITE



Colon, R. P. ^

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X X 53 Front St.
: iiixxx'.y.-ixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

82



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COMPLIMENTS OF



CRISTOBAL, C. Z.

Phone Cristobal 1781



BALBOA. C. Z.

Phone Balboa



1065



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.:



Jlurplti/: "W'liat's that in voiir pock-
et?"

Pat (in whisper): "Dynamite. I'm
waiting for Casey. Every time he meets
me he slaps me on the chest and breaks
me pipe. Next time he does it this dyna-
mite will blow his hand off."



Old Sailor: "Yes mam, thats a man-
o-\\ar.

Ladii: "How interesting, and what's
that little one iust in front."

Sail: "That's just a tug."

r.adi/: "Oh yes. Of course, a tug-of-
war. I've heard of them."



kkj-:kxkk>:kh:-:x:-::-:x:-

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(Tompltmruts nf

Dr. Urrii JJrtrr

3r. a'arl i£. g'atfiin'i









John: "Can I get a room for three?',

Desk Clerk: "Have you a reserva-
tion?"

John: "Do I look like an Indian?



It's a funny thing but you never hear
of a Mediterranean tly or some type of
\\eevii putiinn the spinach crop on the
blink.



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ANTONIO TAGAROPULOS



Wholesale ancf Retail Grocer




MAINSTORE:

2.J76 BOIJVAR AVF,.

PHONE 490



BRANCH STORES:
6.073 BOLIVAR AVE. PHONE 429
4.011 9x11. STREET. PHONE 616.
2.026 BOLIVAR STREET 699.



83



:kxxkx.xxkkkxx:-::-::-:x:-:x:-:kxxxkxk:-:kxxk:-:x:-::-



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^ IMPROVED EQUIPMENT

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X PHONE.

g COLON, 21

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:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx



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MODERN METHODS |

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EFFICIENT SERVICE

JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY

Broadway, near Folks River
COLON, R. de P.



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:xxx:-



CRISTOBAL. C. Z. g

P. O BOX 5061 X

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{XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXM



Frosh: "\\'hat keeps the moon from
dropping?"

Another }> ul. "It must be the beams."



Alaking love is hke making pie. All
you need is crust and plenty of apple-
sauce.



HX



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:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx j

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COMPLIMENTS OF

GRADE AND HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS



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BXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX'



Dtspuxted f.adi/: "Does your mother
know you smoke?"

Little Boi/: "Does your husband know
you speak to strange men on the street?"



Rai/: "Aren't we supposed to be the
cream of the class?"

Jlr. .llei/er: "You are, but you are a
trifle thick."



XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXb
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xxxxxxxxxxxx>



SELLER'S LOTUS HONEY
FOR The EYES

Agent For

Republic of Panama & Canal Zone
J. J. ECKER Jr.

7.037 BALBOA AVE.. - COLON, R. P.
FOR SALE AT ALL DRUG STORES



C. CASULLO



:xy.m

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JEWELLER AND WATCHMAKER ^

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:xxxi



P. O. Bex 615

Phone 225

CRISTOBAL, C. Z.

9.036 Front Street. Cdon. R. P.



IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXZ'^XXXH



84



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:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx;




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United oArtists Corporation^

JXXOUXCES FORTHCcnilXG .ITrRJCTIOXS

ANNA STEN

APPEARIXG IX

"NANA"

ancf

ELIZABETH BERGNER

APPEARIXG IX

''CATHERINE, THE GREAT'

Supported by DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS Jr.



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Jlollier: "I see that you are going
around with that young spendthrift a-
gain. I hope you don't intend to marry
him."

Jlary Ann: "Oh! I wouldn't think
of marrying a spendthrift, but I certain-
I3' enjoy going places with one."



"Are you the editor of the 'Trade
Wind,'? Demanded a huge husky brute.

"It all depends," answered Billy Beers,
"Do vou want a subscription or make a
kick?"

IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXKXHX:'

tMILIO I. WONO & BROS.



:xxxxi



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Perfumery, Fancy Dry Goods x
and General Merchandise x

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7.112 Bolivar Street
P. O. Box 446 Colon, R. P.

ixxxxxxxxxxi-ixxxxxxxxxxx;



Tel. 187



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Compliments of



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Q'he Sdmdritdn Hos




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xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxi



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THE UNION LABEL



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:xxxxx:-



;kkk?:k:'



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T



HE UNION LABEL WAS INTRODUCED IN 1874 IN THE WHITE LABEL OF
J_ THE SAN FRANCISCO CIGAR MAKERS. BRIEFLY SUMMARIZED, THE
AIMS AND PURPOSES OF THE UNION LABEL ARE: THE ASSURANCE OF
PAYMENT OF REASONABLE WAGES. AND OF A STEADILY IMPROVING WAGE,
AND OF REASONABLE HOURS: THE ASSURANCE THAT CHILD OR PRISON LABOR
HAS NOT ENTERED INTO THE PRODUCT: AND THAT THE CONDITIONS OF THE
WORKERS ARE SAFER AS TO LIFE AND LIMB THAN ARE THE SURROUNDINGS

OF NON-UNION WORKERS.



PANAMA METAL TRADES COUNCIL



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Greatest Discovery
in Fountain Pen History

YOU MAY NOT BELIEVE IT
UNTIL YOU SEE IT. BUT THE
.NEW PARKER VACUMATIC
HOLDS 102', MORE INK WITH-
OUT ANY INCREASE IN SIZE.

NEW IRIDESCENT. BARREL

(Lcali-Prool, Non-Breakalile)
SET NEW FASHION.

REVERSIBLE GOLD POINT




I



arker



'AC V MATH



Kelso-Jordan Sales Company

: Manufacturers Rei'rkskntativks

^ CRISTOBAL, C Z.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:-



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Conpres.fDian: "Pete Smith said he
voted for me and wants a job."

JFife: "How can such a bonehead as
(liat hold down a )ob."



"When I told him I knew dozens of
people in this town who never heard of
him, instead of being hurt he had the
audacity to ask me for a list of their
names and addresses."



CHONG KEE

ESTABLISHED 1S8S



CHINESE SILKS and HAND
EMBROIDERED GOODS

and all kinds of oriental fine arts



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X PANAMA CITY X

X X

X Central Avenue No. 39 ;^

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxii



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:y.y.y.y.y.y.y.>:y.:



S H H H



Rote! IDdshington

llneqU'iled for Situation and Comfort



t-t r* H



y.K-



J[ Hotel in keeping ipilh the dignity, spirit and seruice
of the Panama Canal.



-XX-



Qolf



Sipimming ^ IL'dler Sports
QTdrpon Fishing.



The Ijear Jlround



x JAITIES E. LEMS

X Manaqer.



P. O. ./Address:
CRISTOBAL, CARAL ZONE



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Banker (in country): "Is that the
hired man?"

Farmer: "Oh, no, that is the \Ice-
President m charec of the cous.



.///. I'lntoii: "There is a foreign coup-
le hving next door nort and ihey simply
torment mv wife."

.///. Hacketl: "How is that?"
.Ur. J'inlon: "They aK\ays quarrel
and she can't understand a word they
say."



J. V. BEVERHOUDT |

COLON, R: P. X



cxkkhmm:-



R. C. A. Victor Radios Kodaks

Headquarters for Sporting Goods

Pool Tables, ane^ Billiard Supplies

Phone 77



Before eye-strain wrinkles become
permanent and nervous fatigue
becomes chronic, have your
eyes examined. If you need
glasses, you will be sur-
prised to find -what a
comfort they are
when accurately
and becomingly
fitted to
YOU

Have jour ejes examined



SCADRONnFTICAin
PANAMA I I R;8-""<: I Optometrists
23 Central I & Opticians. I I
Avenue %^New York^BT



COLON

1 9,034 Front

Street



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:xxxxxxx



87



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i #11 ii\ ^



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Two Bottles



-of-

Distinction





Cascade
Gingerale



Just The Thing To Celebrate Those Giadmitioii T^arties!

The Manama Coca-Cola Bottling Company
T'ANAMA COLON



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:xxxxxxx



Jlr. Jliller: "I dropped a nickle in
front of a blind beggar yesterday to see
if he would pick it up."

.Ur. Franks: "Well did he?"
.///. Jliller: "No" he said, "Make
a quarter, boss, and I'll forget myself."



Judge: "\\'hat dc you mean this man
IS charged with carrying congealed weap-
ons?"

Cop: "Well, Your flonor, he socked
this other fellow on the head w ith a piece
of ice."



xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:

COhOUmAN LINE

WEEKLY SAILINGS TO:



"":>:



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^ KINGSTON, Jamaica. PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti g

NEW YORK, New York i



LUXURIOUS, COMFORTABLE, FAST PASSENGER EXPRESS STEAMERS

EXCELLENT CUISINE

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXKXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX:'

88



IKXKKXKHX:



Fox Film Corporation



Janet Giiynor
Will Rogers
George O'Brien

John Boles



:xxx:-:xxxxxxxKx:-:x:-:xxx:-::-::-:xx:-:xxxxHxxxxxxxxxM

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PRESENTS

Heather Angel
Claire Trevor
Lilian Harrey
Sally Eilers

IN



Spencer Tracy
Adiriatn Jordan
Warner Baxter
James Dunn



coming outstanding releases, including:
"Carolina'' "Air Sk itch" "I am Suzanne" 'T>aricl Harem" a
"Sleepers East" "I Be lie) e in You"



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X ^''SltvPtt'ft P/jct' "T Fi/^Ii/n
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IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXl'CXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX^-IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXl



"Fox Follies, Ftc



xxxxxxxxxxx:
i":






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COMPLIMENTS

OF



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I The Cristobal Colon Beauty Stioppes x

X X

X MADAME ETHEL Cristobal 178b x



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xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx"



S/liis: "You say Chicago is a regular
beehive?"

Enoch: "Yes, I know. I got stung
there."



Ptj: "I'm not at all pleased \\ith the
report the teacher made on your con-
duct."

xiteck: "I knew you wouldn't be but
the teacher made it out just the same.
Just like a woman ain't it?



XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXMXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX;*



UNITED FRUIT COISIPANY

GRJil.VT WHITE FLEET

FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER STEAMERS



g NEW YORK
K NEW ORLEANS
X SAN FRANCISCO
ji PORT LIMON
Vi CARTAGENA



WEEKLY SAILINGS TO:

TELA
89



rxxxx:-



KINGSTON

LOS ANGELES

PTO. COLOMBIA

SANTA MARTA

HA\^ANA

:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx



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y.:


C^ATUN QARDENS pLOWER SHOP



9th and Fro7H Street. Colon, R. P



DAY PHONE:

COLON 311



FLOWERS of BETTER QUALITY
SERVICE THAT EXCELS

PROMPT DELIV^ERY TO ALL HOSPITALS. HOTELS. AND STEAMSHIPS

FREE DELIVERY






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NIGHT PHONE jj

GATUN 345 X
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Compliments of

A FRIEND ^



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'XXXXXXXXXX!



"Now ," said the speaker \vho had been
selected to start the new drive. "I am
not going to talk verv long but if you
can just get what I say in your head
you'll have the whole thing in a nut-
shell."

(Ed. Note):

The demonstration that followed that
part was so vociferous that the rest of
the speech was inaudible.



xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

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:xxxxi




HOTEL TIVOLI

A COMFORTABLE, RESTFUL HOTEL, IDEALLY LOCATED WITH >L\GNIFICEXT

VIEW OF THE PACIFIC OCEAN.



MOST PICTURESQUE SCENERY



THE CENTER OF SOCIAL LIFE. CLOSE TO EVERY POINT OF INTEREST ON
THE PACIFIC SIDE OF THE CANAI. ZONE.



W.M. T. McCOR.MACK,
Manager.

ixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:



P. O. ADDRESS
ANCON, CANAL ZONE



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90



:xxxxB



Portraits

Miniatures

Enlargements

Flashlight

Commercial
Photographs

of all types.

Architectural

Legal

Banquets, large
groups, etc:

New Pictures



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FOR REMEMBRANCE j

Your portrait of today will be just as j;:

priceless in years to come, will recall ::

happy memories just as vividly as do ;

those wonderful photographs of by- 1^

gone days. Make an appointment for x

a new portrait today, S

FINLAYSON'S STUDIO |

7,018 FRONT ST. COLON, R. P. i;!

PHONE 9 j^

MEMBEK :]:

,-^/^^^^-i. When buying photographs look for this emblem. X

The Photographers' International Association of i||

America stands for good craftsmanship and bet- ^^

ter business principles. !!




'.^A.'



Tom/ (to his mother as she puts up his
lunch) : "Say, Mom, put in some cf that
cheese I had yesterday. It's good stuff."

Jlotlier: "I'm sorry dear but it is all
gone."

Ton}/: "That's tough. Mr. Franks
said if I brought cheese like that to school
today he would have to let the whole
school out."



xxxxxHX^



S. CHELLANOY

AGENT FOR;

Pan -American Life Insurance Co.

of New Orleans La., LI. S. A.

CThe Franklin Insurance Co.

of New York LI. S. A.



P. O. Bon 458

xxxxxxxxx:-



8.053 Balboa Auenue
COLON



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I ASTOR Hotel



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Phone 310



OPPOSITE THE PANAMA R.MLROAD
STATION.

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COOLEST ROO>LS IN TOWN
OCEAN VIEW

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THE BEST LOCATED HOTEL IN THE CITY

#
EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN PLAN



A LA CARTE SERVICE



DOMINADOR BAZAN

COLON. R. P.

Phone 221
P. O. Box 550, Colon.
P. O. Bo.x 2052, Cristobal, C. Z.



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Cable Address: IMPCO
A. B.C. 5th & 6th Ed.
Bentlev's



Colon Import & Exporl Company, Ltd.



Box 342

COLON, R.



JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS - MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS

DEALERS m GENERAL MERCHANDISE and NATIVE PRODUCTS

Colon, Republic of Panama



Branch Retail Stores

and Trading Stations



PLAYA DAMA
SANTA ISABEL



PORVENIR

PUPILE

ISLE OF PINES



CARTI
NARGANA



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Radio Service Inc.

DISTRIBUTORS

PHILCO RADIO

Sales and Service



6.010 FRONT STREET

Telephone 500

COLON, R. P.



When asked the question, "Who wants
to go to heaven," all the Sunday school
class but one little girl raised his hands.
When asked whv not she replied, in tears,
"I can't go. Aly family is moving to
Detroit next ueek and I have to go with
them."



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prefer



Judge: "I understand
charges against this man."

Plaintiff: "No sir, I prefer cash, that
is why I brought him here."



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Stdncldrd Fruit &. Steams

Company



Vaccaro Line



IPish evevq success to the Qradudtinq Class of 1934.



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BUREAU OF CLUBS

^^!^PL AY GROUNDS



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HE RECREATIONAL AND SUBSISTENCE DIVISION OF THE PANAMA
CANAL HAS FOR THE CONVENIENCE OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERN-
MENT EMPLOYEES AND THEIR FAMILIES IN BALBOA, ANCON, PEDRO MIGUEL,
GATUN, AND CRISTOBAL ATHLETIC FIELDS, PLAYGROUNDS, TENNIS COURTS,
GYMNASIUMS, SWIMMING POOLS, BOWLING ALLEYS, BILLIARD ROOMS, READ-
ING ROOMS, RESTAURANT AND SODA FOUNTAIN SERVICE, SOUND MOTION
PICTURES, AND OTHER GENERAL COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES.



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Jliss Jloore: "Yesterday I gave a
poor man a dollar and told him to come
back today."

Jlr. Franks: "That was very good cf
you. I suppose you considered him like
bread cast upon waters."

Jltss Jloore: "That is a very good
definition. He came back this morning
well soaked.



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COMPLIMENTS OF



MAX BILGRAY





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KODAK PANAMA LTD. I

OFFERS
A COMPLETE LINE OF

KODAK PRODUCTS



Kodak Panama ltd.

Ill Central Avenue
Panama City



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Salazar's Drug Stor[

Colon, R. P.



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9038 Front St.
Pone 336



11.160 Bolivar St.

Pone 35



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TUNG HING



X GENERAL FANCY GOODS



CORNER 9th BOLIVAR
P. O. Box 554 Tel. 575



COLON



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Dresses and Hats
from PARIS

ARBOIX

ANTONIO'S

Front & 9 Street
COLON, R. P.

Hand Embroidered Linens.

English Luggage Hand Bags.

Paris Novelties.

Perfumery.

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Clerk (in Panama Railroad office) :
"Another farmer is suing us on account
of his cows.

General Jlanaijer: "I suppose the
train killed a couple."

Clerk: "No, he says the train goes so
slow that the passengers milk the cows
as they go by."



"It is an ill wind that blows nobody
any good," remarked the stranger in
Kansas.

"Yup," agreed Farmer Corntassle,
"Since the last tornado I have an extra
barn and ten more hogs."



Sid ^^'harton remarks that the strength
of beer is going up by hops.



Goo(ji/: "\\'hat is chaos?"
Jhv. Kno.w "It is one of those things
they are always bringing order out of."



JIari/ linn: "What do you consulcr
the best appetizer for a meal?"

Bill: "The absence of the price."



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(CmtijtlimrnlH nf

D. B. Dirkfrium. B. B. S>.
iC. H. (Eroiitl. D. i. ^.



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COMPLIMENTS OF

llfTiepicao Trading Co, Ltd.

COLON, R. P.



Paul: "Mv love for you is like the
deep blue sea.

Bohln/ : "You're telling me, and I
take it \\ ith the corresponding amount of
salt."



Boarder: "This chicken certainlv tick-
les the palate."

Land Lady: "I'm glad you like my
cooking."

Boarder: "I didn't mean the cooking,
I was referina; to the feathers vou left on
it."



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The Chinese Silh Store

NEW CHINA



We carry Genuine Chinese and
Japanese SILKS and Curiosities.

LINENS
SILK MATERIALS

SHAWLS

CARVED IVORY

WICKER FURNITURE

VASES

PERFUMES

JEWELRY



FRONT STREET

COLON



CENTRAL AVE.
PANAMA



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l)R WEDDING INVITATIONS. VISIT-
ING AND BUSINESS CARDS, CHRIST-
MAS CARDS, SEASONAL AND
BUSINESS STATIONERY.

BRIDGE SETS



TAYLOR TALLIES OR SYSTE,^l TALLIES
EVERY-PLAYER-YOUR-OWN-PARTNER,
PROGRESSIVE BRIDGE SETS
FOR EITHER AUCTION OR CONTRACT
BRIDGE WITH THE NEW INTERNATION-
AL CODE OF SCORING.

IT IS THE ONLY PROGRESSIVE BRIDGE

SET USING NAME OF CHARACTERS ON

EVERY TALLY INSTEAD OF MERE NUM

BERS OR COMBINATIONS.



PARTY DECORATIONS PLAYING CARDS



Dove L. Prather



Telephone: 1405-C C.\rr St. P. O. Box
Balboa 2780 514, Balboa



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Jlolher (to daughter): "What did
that young occultist say about your eyes
when you asked him to look at them?
Do you have to w ear glasses?"

Judy: "He said they were the most
lieautilul eyes he had ever seen but I
think he forgot about the glasses.



Bin Hollo.s-ell:
a 50-foot ladder.

JJa/ro/ni Duel/:
vou weren't killed.

Bill: "Oh_,^ no,
second rung."



'Yesterday I fell off
"Gee! It's a wonder
I only fell off the



Gittens oMcr Taylor

for C-'^'O
Exclusive Suifings
ancf
Careful Tailoring



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lOth Street, Colon



Telephone 291

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Compliments of



J. L. Sdlds & Co.



5.076 Boliuar Auenue



COLON, R. P.



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FRENCH BAZAAR I



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COLON, R p.



NOVELTIES FOR GIFTS

ELIZABETH ARDEN

FLORSHEIM SHOES and PERFUMES

BEST QUALITY ARTICLES



Gloria: "Here is a pathetic little poem
I have just written and when I showed
it to the teacher she actually cried over
it."

Bill Beers: "Now you just take that
little poem right back to your teacher
and promise her you will never write
such a pathetic piece of poetry again."



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(EnmpltmrnlB of



^Xdx $c ilfprali OIn.



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my.



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Phone 126



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p. O. Box 58 i



Arcia's Dairy

Milk, Cream. Chickens C-^y^^
and Fresh Eggs.



2nd. &' Bolivar Ave.



Colon. R. P.



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of

Colon Cleaning & Pressing Club



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Phone
COLON 15



p. O. Box
CRISTOBAL 1575



Tourist: "What will your corn crop
yield this year?"

Farmer: "It should be about si.xty
gallons to the acre."



JFife: "Now dear, here is the doctor
to see you."

Rich nuin (in delirium): "Send him
away at once and get the undertaker.
You know I never deal u ith middlemen.



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X Before Buying Your

X Panama Hats, Aigrettes and ^



wxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxb

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Souvenirs

visit our Store where you will
find the

Lowest Prices In Town

FROOT STREET, 57 -- COLON, R. P.

FRANCISCO LOBATO Money Exchange



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Ttlarqarita Beautij Shoppe

MARGARET J. WILL

Permaneiit Waving Our Specialty

We Make You More Lovely



Corner 8th & G St.
Phone 169



New Cristobal
Colon, R. P.



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The prisoner threw the magazine a-
cross the cell in disgust, muttering,
"Nothing in it but continued stories
and I'm to be hung day after tomorrow."



"I'm sorry, but the coffee is exhausted,"
said the boarding house landlady.

"Yes," commented the boarder, "I've
noticed for some time It has been getting
weaker."



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Mens Sana In Corpore Sano



Eat More Sun-Maid
Raisin Bread.

The French Bakery

Bolivar Avenue, 8.105
Phone 546



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Chang & Go, Lid. i

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COLON aif

9th. er Front Street



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PANAMA

93 Central Avenue

xxxxxxi-iz-rxxxxxx'



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COMPLIMENTS OF

The Atlantic Nite Club

TWO COMPLETE REVUES NIGHTLY
EMPERATRIZ RENGIFO, Prop, HAPPY MATHES, Mgr.



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Compliments of ^

CONEY ISLAND |

HOTDOG STAND i



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J. HOKIM, Prop.



^



Policeman: "Don't you know you
should give half the road to a woman
driver?"

Poor Jlotorlst: "I always do when I
find out what half she wants."



Uncle: "Come Percy, let's go to the
house."

Percy: "Wait a minute, I want to
see the end of this little brook go by."



Teacher: "If a group of sheep is called
a flock, and a group of cattle is called a
herd, what is a quantity of camels?"

Charlie litem: "A carton.



lik



Go!/er(l): "Well caddie, how do you



?"



e mv game
Caddie: "It's O. K. but I still prefer
golf."




98



BTAR a H-CRALO C(5, PANAMA



" >! -T.- ^^iT^t^^^^^r




vi'HYLER