Caribbean

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Caribbean
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Cristobal High School
Publisher:
Yearbook House
Place of Publication:
Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00093680:00020


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

















"AII L---I, I


.." "%.... .. ...... .... "."... ..


Foreword


The Caribbean Staff of 1933 has
had an unusual amount of co-operation
from everyone in producing this year's
Annual, and is proud to present to the
student body, the faculty, and the
General public this representation of its ]
literary and artistic ability, the product
of all the departments of the school.

........................................................... ..... ....

IQ oll i


fll \\


i UI lII Ill IMill III = N


a^











THE CARIBBEAN
Vol. XVI CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE, 1933 No. 1
PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL


Mitarial
Oscar Heilbron '33


Can you imagine Cristobal High School
without any clubs? An institution solely
for the purpose of teaching children their
reading' writing, and 'rithmetic," from
8 a. m. to 3 p. m. without any forms of
extra curricular activities to interest the
students in their school life?
Such was the case during the pioneer
days of C. H. S., during its first years of
operation. However, throughout the
steady progress of the years a notable
advancement in club activities has de-
veloped in the school, from an average
of two or three clubs a year to the present
number of thirteen clubs. Among these
active clubs are represented two national
organizations, the "National Thespians,"
and the "Liga Panamericana," one club
which depends on high scholastic stand-
ing for membership, and various musical
and athletic organizations.
A school club program cannot be suc-
cessful unless there is faculty support and
co-operation. The members of the faculty
of C. H. S. have shown the student body
their interest on behalf of the progress
of the school by contributing much of
their spare time in order that our clubs
might be successful in maintaining the
interest of the students in general. That
the students are interested is easily
proved by the large voluntary member-
ship in each club.
Membership into one or more of our
clubs is an honor towards which every


student should strive. It develops and
stimulates social contacts amongst the
students and teachers. The school life
is made much more enjoyable and the
monotonous routine of everyday classes
is greatly reduced. The many cpportuni-
ties for artificiality which the regular
classes offer between the student body
and the faculty are practically eliminated.
Thus the instructors as well as the stu-
dents gain a better understanding of each
other, which later results as a great aid
in the carrying out of the everyday
classes.
As we look into the future, there is a
far wider scope for extra curricular acti-
vities than ever before. With the new
modernly equipped high school building
with its many facilities for carrying out
club programs, the present active clubs
should be greatly developed and many
new ones organized. The activities room
will provide a place in which to carry.
out club activities, and the fact that
every teacher will have a room
will provide every club with a regular
meeting place. The well-organized assem-
blies which are being planned for the new
auditorium will give each club an oppor-
tunity to show its progress and display
its abilities.
Let's hope that next year with our
expanded facilities we will show our
school spirit by boosting our clubs and
developing these activities one hundred
per cent.


r<


N


L4S


)I


Y



























( II'ii1 nl' 'li 11 11 Ili

W i E, the Class of 1933, dedicate this, the
sixteenth volume of the "Caribbean,"
to the New Cristohal High School. Although
we have never attended it, we know how '
much those who succeed us will appreciate
its modern and complete working facilities.

1, ,ll 5 lll, ,il u 11, 11,11






























CARIBBEAN STAFF


Editor .- ... -- ...- ......
Arst. Editor-........... ....

Business Mlanager............
Asrrt. Business Mlanager ....
Asst. Business lanager...
Asst. Business J1anager -

Circulation .Manager -........-..
Asst. Circulation Mlanager.
Asst. Circulation .lanager.
Astl. Circulation managerr.
Asst. Circulation Mlanager
Asrst. Circulation aii,, a.er

Literary Editor_ .. .........
srst. Literary Editor ....
Asst. Literary Editor .....
dlo'l. Literary Editor...........
IsJst. Literary Editor ...........
A rt Editor ............... ... .......
Ar~l. Art Editor .............
BoI/,' Sporl Editor .............
IAst. Boyr' Sport Editor_ _

Girl,r' Sport Editor ..................
issl. Girls' Sport Editor

IT yp istr ........ .. ... .... .....

Exchange Editor .....
Joke Editor
sst. Joke Editor .....
Schl Note Editor................
AlS,,. School Note, Editor.


Alumni Editor.


OSCAR HEILBRON
RICHARD REINHOLD

ERNEST DE LA OSSA
SCLIFTON BROWN
JERRY GORIN
HENRY SANCHEZ

ELIZABETH HAYES
ROBERT KING
KATHLEEN GOODENOUGI
WILLIAM HILL
ROBERT BROWN
RUTH PICKETT

HELEN HAMMOND
ELIZABETH THORNTON
ELLEN GREENLEAF
ANNA REILLY
MARGARET HOLLINGSHEAD

ERNEST WOOD
JACK EGOZCUE
MANDI MARCHOSKY
LOUIE BARNETT

DOROTHY BIRKELAND
. ARGARET BARNARD
SMILDRED OWEN

SBETTY STETLER


WILLIAM KEENAN
ERNEST JARAMILLO
HELEN AANSTOOS
MABEL BLISS
NORINE RAKOVSKY


F)m




























C. II. S. FACULTY


How often throughout the school year
is the criticism of the teachers, "Toe.
much homework." heard among the
student body? However, in spite of this
and similar uncomplimentary remarks,
the school this year has had one of the
best faculties that has ever taught in a
Canal Zone School. Not only does every
teacher thoroughly understand the sub-
ject which he teaches, but he is also well
acquainted with all of the students under
his guidance.
In addition to an ideal faculty, C. II.
S. has had at its head a principal \xho has
done very much to make C. I. S. a model
school. He has introduced many new
features into school life makuiig it much
more interesting and attractive tc tlhe
students. Among the most important
features which iMr. Franks has intro-
duced into the school is the C. II. S.
newspaper. Let us hope that Mr. Milford
Franks will occupy the principal's desk
at the new high school next year.
The Household Arts D)cpartment this
year has been under I he guidance of Miss
Blanche Anderson. Miss Jeanne Brown
has taken care of the library in addition
to teaching English, Commercial Arith-
metic and Commercial Geography.
In his shop a couple of blocks from the
school Mr. Harry Fringer has :een turn-
ing out "A-l" tradesmen n l Mechancial
Drawing and Manual Arts.
Those strange sounds which escaped
from Room 2 at the beginning of the year
have become melodious vocal and instru-
mental selections marking the progress cf
Miss Mildred Elner's musically inclined


students. Mr. Roger C. lHackett in his
Social Science Iepar mnent is doing great
work in preparing his students to become
ui ri;hl t citizens.
"I think we will memorize forty lines
for Ionmorrw," seems to he the slogan of
our capable English De)partment head,
Miss Gladys Kimbro, who also is sponsor
of the Drama tic Club and Na tion;l Thes-
pii ns.
Much credit should be given to Mrs.
eoy McDonald, head of the Art Depart-
ment, for the success of the art work of
the "Caribbean," and f(or hile beautiful
pieces of \work done by ihe art classes
this year.
Mr. Frederick J. Mever, "1Micky" to
the Seniors, in addition to his cle nentary
and advanced mathnmatic classes, has
sponsored the Senior Class for three years
and this year is sponsoring the "Carib-
bean."
The Language IDepartments, French,
Latin, and Spanish, are under the gui-
dance of Miss lMary. E. Mloore, sponsor
of the Sophomores, and \Mrs. Phyllis
Spencer, who is also sponsoring the
Juniors, the Spanish Clubh. and the Liga
Panimericana.
Miss Helen Patterson is at the head of
the commercial classes, teaching the
many aspiring stenogs how to "push the
Chinese lawn-mowers."
And last but not least is the popular
'Mr. Kenneth Vinton, head of the Science
Department, and sponsor of the Athletic
Association. Students are well acquaint-
ed with Mr. Vinton's many scientific
researches in the school.












Name OSCAR HEILBRON.
Birthplace-Colon, R. de P.
Dale Entered Canal Zone Schoolt--1921.
Favorite Expre..rion-I don't believe it!
dclicilies--Class Alternate 1; Class President 2, 3. 4;
Glee Club 1; "Gypsy Rover" 1; "Bells of Beaujalais"
2; B. A. A. 1; Caribbean Staff, Ass't. Editor 3, Editor
4; Dramatic Club 3; National Thespians 3, 4; Spanish
Club 2, 3, 4, President 3; Liga Panamericana 3;
Staff C. H. S. 4.






Name--ERNEST DE LA OSSA.
Nickname--"Horsy."
Birthplace-Colon, R. de P.
Dale Entered Canal Zone Schools-1925.
Favorite Expression-Let it go.
Activities-Carnival 1, 2; Debating Club 2, 3; President 3;
Spanish Club 2, 3, 4, President 4; Liga Panamericana
4, President 4; B. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club 4;
Caribbean Staff, Ass't. Business Manager 3, Business
Manager 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Golf3; Tennis 3, 4; Class
Vice-President 3, 4; Varsity Club 4; Track 4; Basket-
ball 4; National Thespians 4.




Name--DOROTHY M. BIRKELAND.
Nickname-"Dot."
Birthplace-Brooklyn, New York.
Date Entered Canal Zone School--1920.
Favorite Expression-You telling me!
Actiitiers-Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 3, 4: Cap-
tain 4; Baseball 1, 2; G. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President
1, Secretary 2; Spanish Club 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club
4; "One Thing After Another" 4; Class Treasurer 3;
Class Secretary 4; A. D. T. Club 4; National Thes-
pians 4, Secretary 4; Varsity Club 3. 4: Caribbean
Staff, Girls' Sports 4.


Name--MILDRED L. OWEN.
Nickname-"Milly."
Birthplace-Kansas City, Missouri.
Date Entered Canal Zone Schools-1930.
Favorite Expression-How about some dues?
,Activitier--Spanish Club 2,3, 4, Treasurer 4; Dramatic
Club 4; National Thespians 4; Supper Club 3, 4;
Treasurer 4; Liga Panamericana 4; Basketball 2, 3,
4; Baseball 2, 3; "One Thing After Another" 4; A.
A. 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 3, 4; Class Treasurer 4;
Caribbean Staff 4; Staff; C.H. S. 4.















Name--FREDERICK HARVEY SMITII. JR.
Nickname---"Emma."
Birthplace-Hartford, Connecticut.
Dale Entered Canal Zone Schools-1927.
Favorite Expression-Me and Molly.
d.cli'ities-Swimming 2, 3, 4; Track 4; Class Alternate 3,
4.








4 Name-HELEN C. AANSTOOS
Nicknamne-"Stoosie."
Date Entered Canal Zone Schools-1921
IFavorite Expression-Aw, nuts!
Jclivitier--Supper Club 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Dramatic
Club 3, 4; President 4; National Thespians 3, 4,
President 4; A. A. 3, 4; Glee Club 3, 4; Varsity Club
3, 4; Spanish Club 4; Volleyball 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4;
Baseball 3; "When's Your Birthday" 3; "One Thing
After Another" 4; Caribbean Staff, School Notes
Editor 4.








Name-HAROLD A. AGNEW, JR.
Nickname-"H. A."
Birthplace-New Orleans, Louisiana.
Date Entered Canal Zone Schools-1929.
Favorite Expression-Hot-cha!
ctivilie.r-Baseball 3, 4; B. A. A. 2, 3;











.Vamne-THELMA Louis ALBRITTON
Nickname-"Tillie."
Birthplace-Panama.
Dale Entered Canal Zone School--1928
IFaorile Expression-Ajo!
t/cltviiers-Supper Club 1, 2, 3; Spanish Club 4; Dramatic
1 Club 3, 4: Swimming 3.















.Vame\ ]V HvSTI ;a A. B:EA D.
.ickname- "W\eb."
BIirltpllace- Cristoal l Canal Zone.
Dal EJnlrel t'a nal Zone S/hioot. 1921.
*alorite .'prs.ion "()hOld stuff."
./,cli/i.rie O(rchestr;a 1, 2, 4.


.V'ame-HowAHI) BERRY.
Nickname-" Berry."
Bir/hpltce-Long Beach, California.
Date Entered Canal Zone Scrhools --1932.
Favarit Expres.rin--Aw, Gee]
.Ici*h'lider --Tennis 4.











Vame-J ANP BRH'T'C
Nicknant-" Jane."
Birlhplace-Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Date Entered Canal Zone School--1924
FIaorite E.xpre.r.i--\onWhat a life!
,clivitie--Carnival; Basketball 2; Baseball 2: Golf 2;
Neptune Club 1.











X.ame-EDWARD CLivroN BROWN.
Nickname-"Clif."
Birthplace-Los Angeles. California.
Dale entered Canal Zone School-- 1924.
Favorite lxpre.rsions-Gorblumy.
,Ictl.itie.r-Camera 1, 4; Spanish Club 4; Band 2, 4; Glee
Club 3. 4: Orchestra 2, 3, 4; Track 4.













Name--RoBERT 'VI L I I A '- BROWN.
Nickname-"Bob."
Birthplace-Honolulu, Hawaii.
Date Entered Canal Zone Schoolo-1924.
Favorite Expression-Pow.
Jctivtiiies-Glee Club 3, 4; Orchestra 7, 4; Camera Club
4; Band 4.










Name-JESSE DAVID.
Nickname-" Jay."
Birthplace-Cayey, Porto Rico.
Date Entered Canal Zone Schools-1921.
Favorite Expression.--Alas, poor Yorick! Tish, tish!










Name--VELTA C. FOLEY.
Nickname--"Pineapple Sadie."
Birthplace-Panama City.
Date Entered Canal Zone School--1923.
Favorite Expression-Ooooh! Mama!
Activ'ities-Spanish Club 3, 4; Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4;
A. A. 1; Carnival 2; Dramatic Club 2, 4, Secretary
4; "When's Your Birthday?" 3.


Name-MARY ELSIE GRUBER
Nickname-"Molly"
Birthplace-West Point, New York.
Dale Entered Canal Zone Schools-1932
Favorite Expression-Brother, can you spare a dime?


"I
















A'ame--PAHK:R IANNA.
.Nicknai me- "Spike."
Birthplace-HIancock Point, Maine.
Date Entered Ca.naIl Zone Sc/hoo-l 1920.
l"aworile E.xpreio/'.iotn- Nertz!


Name--RolEwrT HANNA.
Nickname- 'Bob."
Birthplace-Hansett, Maine.
Dale Entered Canal Zone School.b-1921.
I' .orile Exprc.t'ion-Cucca.
.Icli'ilie.r-Swimming 4; Orchestra 4; Band 4; Glee Club
4.









Namne-HEI:N 3MARIE HAMMOND
Nickname--"Teatse"
Birlhplace-Cristobal. Canal Zone.
Date Entered Canal Zone Schools-1921
I'haordie Expresir.on-I don't care.
Ictliitie.r-Spanish Club 2. 3, 4, Secretary 4: Class Secre-
tary 3; Orchestra 3, 4; G. A. A. 1, 2; Liga Panameri-
cana 4; Supper Club 1. Caribbean Staff, Literary
Editor 4.










Name--CIARLES STANIEY HowE.
Nickname-"Charlie."
Birlhplac, -Marblehead. Massachusetts.
Dale Entered Canal Zone Schools- 1924.
FI'a'rile Lxpre.r.rion-HIow ya mean!
.Ictiitie.r-Spanish Club 2, 3, 4; Debating Club 3; Glee
Club 3.








PA

k 96

l


Name-HENRY LEE.
Nickname-"Archie."
Birthplace-Boquete, Panama.
Date Entered Canal Zone Schools-1921.
.'clvillies-Swimming 3; National Thespians 4.


Name-WILLIAM H. KEENAN, JR.
Nickname--Peanuts."
Birthplace-Ancon, Canal Zone.
Dale Entered Canal Zone SchooL--1922.
Favorite Expresxion-I had one too, but the cat licked all
the paint off.
.lcltiities-Glee Club 1; Spanish Club 2, 3, 4, Ayudador
3, 4; Liga Panamericana 4; Caribbean Staff, Ass't.
Circulation Manager 3, Joke Editor 4.






Name-HERMANUS A. KLEEFKENS.
Nickname--"Louie."
Date Entered Canal Zone Schools-1920.
Favorite Expre.sion-Hot-cha!







Name-JOHN LOTHROP.
Nickname--"Johnny."
Birthplace-San Francisco, California.
Date Entered Canal Zone Schootl--1932.
Favorite Expression-"Is my face red?"
Activities-Track 4; Glee Club 4; Dramatic Club 4;
National Thespians 4.


hh,1

01















Aame -i HAROI MrORTIIIR i I.< KVOOI.
.\Xikna.me --Locky.'
Birthplact-,- Milbury. Massachusetts.
Da/e E"'nlered Canal Zone Sctoolt. 1919
FOi,,rih7 EI.Xpres.'ion- I had one but the wheels tell Itf.
fc'i,,iie. B. A. A. 1. 2, 3, 4; Tennis 3, 4; B1asket,all 3,
4; Soccer 3, 4; (lee Club 3: Tracik 4; A. I) T. CIlui 4.









.amei-NATHAN M. MARI'IIOSK)Y.
.ir'ckname--",Maga Nootch, Mandi."
Birthplace--New York City. New York.
Date Entered Canal Zone Shoo/. 1921.
IFaorie k 'xprersiorn-Pretty clever, ch!
.1clivitiex-Baseball 1. 2, 5, 4; Basketball 1. 2. 3, 4; Soccer
1. 2. 3. 4; Handball 1. 2; B. A. A. 1, 2. 3, 4; Spanish
Club 2; Carnival 1, 2; Varsity Club 2, 5, 4; Track
2. 4; Tennis 4; A. D. T. Club 4; Sports Editor, Carib-
bean 4.








.ame-MARY D. MEI. ENDEZ.
Sickname-"Mel. II."
Birthplace-Colon, R. de P.
Date Entered Canal Zone &Shool' 1919.
Iae'orite Expre.f.ion- Aw, your granny!
.Icli-ilies-Supper Club 2. 4: Spanish Club 2. 3. 4. Cor-
responding Secretary 3: Vice President 4; Dramatic
Club 4; Liga Panamericana 4.










iLm-CHRISTIAN I O(ill.S-' iAGER.
\N'cknaftme-"Chris.
Pirllhplacr-Knoxville. Tennessee.
F/torie E.'pre.rtion -You're telling me. Oh. yeah'
Date Entered Canal Zone School, 1932.













Name-JACK FULTON PATERSON.
Nickname-"Pat."
Birlhplace-Arlington, Massachusetts.
Date Entered Canal Zone School--1924.
S Favorite Expression-Darn it. Aw, shoot!
ctlivitiers-Tennis 4; Basketball 4.







Li
.Name-CHARLES REDWARD PESCOD.
Nickname-"Charlie."
Birthplace-Ecuador.
Date Entered Canal Zone Schools-1921.
,ctIivitie.r-Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball
1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4; Golf 1, 2; Handball 1, 2;
Volleyball 1; Track 2, 4; B. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity
Club 3, 4; President 4; Dramatic Club 4; A. D. T.
Club 4.







Name-NOREEN E. RAKOVSKY.
Nickname-"Shorty."
Birthplace-Presburg, Hungary.
Date Entered Canal Zone SchooLr-1923.
Favorite Expression-Oh, Oscar!
Activities--Supper Club 1, 2, 3; Treasurer 3; G. A. A. 1,
2; Glee Club 1; "Gypsy Rover" 1; Spanish Club 2,
3, 4; Dramatic Club 3.








Namne-THOMAS RANKIN.
Nickname-"Tommy."
Birthplace-Ancon, Canal Zone.
Date Entered Canal Zone School--1921.
SFavorite Expre,rion-Forget it.
/Irctlilier-Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Handball 1, 2; Volleyball 1;
Baseball 3, 4; Tennis 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4; Track 4;
B. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, President A. A. 4; Varsity Club
3, 4; Secretary 4; A. D. T. Club 4.
















Nam,' EHN,',! .'1. Ri INInoti ,.
,icbAw, nr Va n.'
IiI/ihpltace--A ocn Ca najl IZjone.
Plat E,,rc eCanal Z1

Ij~iitic0b,0scar!4


.VNn,c---EuIl.InA lrI TtlORNTON.
Birlhplacn-Ancon, Canal Zone.
Date Entered Canal Zone Sc'hoolr--1922.
I;avorite Expre.ssion-Ma;\ ve!
,IJlicilie'.- Spanish Club 3, 4; G. A. A. 1, 2, 3; (Gce Club
3. 4: Dramatic Club 3, 4: National Thespians 3. 4;
Liga Panamericana 4, Secretary 4: Supper Clubl 1;
2. 4: Caribbean Staff 4; Associate Editor C. H. S. 4;
Letter Club 1, 2, Vollel,all Baselall 1.










NXime-ARTHUR B. VANE.
Nicknamne--"Art."
Birthplace--Portland, Maine.
Dal Entered C'anal Zone Schioo)'-1930.
'a,'orike /E.vprerio'in-Nope!













Xane AN \AW EaK. R.
Nickname- "Minnie."
Birthplace -liartllesville. Oklahoma.
Datle Entered Canal Zone Schoolr 1931.
Fai',oriLe lxpre.rion- Oh, for crying out loud!












S Namre-JAMEs R. WERGIN.
Nickname-"Jimmy."
Birthplace-Mobile, Alabama.
Date Entered Canal Zone Schoolr-1931.
Favorite Exprerrion-Swell!
Itivitiesr-Debating Club 3; Spanish Club 3, 4; Dramatic
Club 4; National Thespians 4; "One Thing After
Another" 4.







Name-EDNA LENORE THIRLWALL.
Nickname-"Eddie."
Birthplace-Panama City.
Date Entered Canal Zone Schools-1919.
Favorite Expression-You Brute! Hot-cha!
Activiti-es-Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Spanish
Club 3, 4; Dramatic Club 3, 4.


COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES

The program at commencement was rather novel this year. In addition to
being held in the new high school, the type was a decided change from the tradi-
tional past. The usual outside-speaker plan was supplanted by student speakers
who were chosen upon the following basis: (1) rank in graduating class; (2)
number of years in Cristobal High School; (3) choice by appropriate major
subjects; (4) approximately equal representation of sexes; (5) stage presence,
voice, etc.
The purpose of the change in program was tu give a student program and to
give a type of program which would give the parents and patrons a review of the
work accomplished in the high school. Helen Hammond, as Salutatorian, gave
the introductory address. She was followed by Howard Berry who talked on
"Social Studies Routine." Talks on commercial work, science and mathematics
classes, learning languages and English were made by Mildred Owen, James
Wergin, Oscar Heilbron, and Dorothy Birkeland. Ernest de la Ossa, Valedictorian,
gave the closing address which was followed by present station of awards and diplomas.


SSEVEN SECRET SENIORS










1/,a/'d8 IHi, *O/m


The labors of the class of '33 are about
to draw to a close.
Four years of work, of anxiety, and of
anticipation have stolen quietly away
into the long vista of the past, leaving
us to dwell thoughtfully on the experience
of those by-gone days' with feelings akin
to sadness.
Pleasure and pain, hope and despair,
great expectations, and great disappoint-
ments, have followed each other in rapid
succession through the high school ex-
perience of many, perhaps most, of us.
Yet this is no new thing. It has been ever
thus since the wheels of progress began
to turn, and will be thus till the last
human cry is lost in the wreck of worlds.
As a class we are not remarkable for
any one thing, but for a great many
things.
To a casual reader and one unfamiliar
with our school, the class history will
mean but little; but to the members of
our graduating class it should mean more,
and a historian may feel his work well
done, if at some future period he may
glance at these pigcs and recall with joy
or wistfulness, as the case may be, some
forgotten incident that causes the heart
to swell and a sigh for old high school
days expresses itself.
As we turn to the time of our entrance
to C. H. S., we behold a modest group
of girls and boys eager to begin their high
school days. There was nothing striking
nor characteristic in their appearance tc
distinguish them from other girls and
boys; on the contrary they were for the
most part awkward, gawky children who
had suddenly found themselves called
upon to take the part of sedate young
ladies and gentlemen. However, it is well
worth one's time to follow this group
through its high school career.
A few days after enrollment, we find this
body of students for the most part hard
at work; but of course there were among
usa few who for some reason yet unknown,
thought themselves to be privileged cha-
racters and so we occasionally found an
eraser zooming across our vision, and often


felt the sting of a wad of paper as it left
its nest ing place in a rul ber band.
Then came athletics, and the boys ti-
midly ventured out on the field picturing
themselves as the coining stars of the game
The girls were not to be outdone. They
took up their places in volley-ball and
other sports, and Iloking back to those
days, many a laugh we must have afforded
the upperclassmen in our awkward efforts
to do some outstanding feat in the field of
athletics.
The days seemed to be running a race,
for time and holidays sped by before we
realized that they had even come, and so it
was soon time for our dance, and the Jun-
ior-Senior Banquet which held no interest
what-so-ever for us at that time.
Then the high school which a few weeks
before had been filled with happy laughing
boisterous girls and boys was a deserted
building and another class had gone forth
to seek positions in the world.
The next year, or rather our Sophomore
year, passed in much the same way. We
lost our shyness to some extent and were
little more polished than before. From
this time on we took a prominent part in
everything that was of interest to the
school.
Finally the third year arrived, and new
we were Juniors. We made our debut, so
lo speak, in school affairs and gradually
asserted ourselves among the older high
school students.
Some of the members of the class were
hard at work on the baseball fields; others
having joined one of the literary societies
were busying themselves with debates.
By this time all of us were taking active
parts in school affairs. Many were at
work making plans for the Junior-Senior
Banquet which was to us one of the
swankiest events we had ever known, and
one which proved a big success. And so
another year rolled by.
Summer passed, and once more we
entered the portals of C. II. S. intent on
better work during this, our last session.
Some of our fellow students had fallen and
perished by the wayside, others had gone








away, and new and unfamiliar faces appea-
red to replace them.
It was during our Senior year that the
school decided to issue a bi-weekly news-
paper called "C. H. S. The class of '33
was represented by many of its members
Then along came the mid-year exams,
and lazy weather was right there to accom-
pany them, but we had no time for laziness
for we had undertaken to publish an
annual, and that meant work.
Days, weeks, and months passed swiftly
and the Senior dance, which had been
looked forward to by many, was now a
thing of the past. We were face to face
with final exams, the last we were ever
to take at Cristobal High School.
Again the Junior-Senior Banquet locked
up and to the Juniors we owe thanks for
a lovely banquet and dance, and an en-
joyable time.
As we are about to make our adieu
and step across the threshold into a more
strenuous life of possibilities and realities,
we feel that the mantles we wore as Seniors
will fall upon the shoulders of those worthy


to take our place in C. H. S.
New as our high school careers draw to
an end and Commencement comes to
claim us, it is with a mingling of joy and
sorrow that we view the retrospect, and
often we find ourselves dreaming of the
past joys and pleasant associations and
realize that nothing shall ever obliterate
them from our memory.
Our pathway has not been brightened
with sunshine all of the way, but strewn
with roses wherein a thorn was buried
here and there to prick us as we tred upon
them.
We have found many obstacles along
the way, but remembering that success
comes only to those who endeavor, we
have, by ever putting forth an effort,
risen above them all.
Class of '33, you are now setting sail
on the great sea of life. You are no longer
the children you were, but men and women
Conduct yourselves as such, and may you
reflect honor upon your school, and upon
the teachers who have striven so hard for
your success.


Ql a noa ?11
Helen dansloor '33


We, the Seniors of Cristobal High
School, in the year of Our Lord, one thou-
sand nine hundred thirty-three, being of
sane mind and reason, and being about
to pass from the port of knowledge to the
sea of life beyond declare this our last will
and testament.
To the Faculty, we bequeath our deep
appreciation for the knowledge they have
imparted to us.
To the Juniors, we leave the dignified
position, title and privilege of Senicrs.
Individually we make the following
bequests:
THELMA A.\I.RITTON wills her
shyness to Louie Barnett and David Levy.
MILDRED OWEN bequeaths her
gocd typing speed and grades to Charles
Belden and Victoria IHollowell.
HAROLD AGNEW leaves his great
desire for sea life, and his summer trips,
(working on ships) to the also.desirous
Warren Slocum, Robert Wertz, and Char-
les Gould.


WEBSTER BEARD wills his violin,
and ability to "make it talk" to Rose
Mizrachi.
CRIS OSCHLAGER bequeaths his
blonde tresses to Blossom Lam and Henry
Sanchez.
EDNA THIRLWALL leaves her wit-
tiness to Sydney Wharton and Marguerite
Winn.
HELUEN HAMMOND bequeaths her
curls to Helen Leach.
DOROTHY BIRKELAND wills her
slender figure and her secrets for acqui-
ring it to Ruth Egolfand Ruth Pickett.
HELEN AANSTOOS bequeaths her
dramatic ability to Anne Gibson.
HENRY LEE leaves his ability to
bluff in English 12 to Robert Molten and
may he enjoy this class as well as Henry
does.
CHARLES PESCOD wills his athle-
tic, also, dancing ability to Eileen Dona-
van and Jeanne Lewis; to Freddy Ebdon
he leaves his high athletic standing.


---------








MANDI MARCHOSKY bequeaths his
ability to use his hands while tlilkin- to
M;laLrgiurit. Winn.
WILLIAM KEENAN leaves his (horse)
laugh to Betty Stetler. Ilere's hoping it
will go with her "musical nose."
HARVEY SMITHI wills his love rf
swimriniog and diving to Ar nando Funes.
VELTA FOLEY beq(eaths her love of
flirtive to Jerry Gorin.
R( )OBII I IANNA leaves his one and
only heert to Beverley Marcuse.
ELIZABETH TIIORNTON wills her
eye-bro., pencil to Sis IHayes.
ERNEST REINHOL I) bequeaths the
folder of his diolo na to his brother, Rich-
ard. with hopes that it will preserve his
diplo-ma well.
OSCAR HEI LBR( )N leaves his Senior
class office end Caribbean work to Ellen
Greenleaf and Ernest Wood.
MARY MELENDEZ wills her job as
school news reporter to M,'\ l. i Bliss.
WILLIAM KEENAN bequeeths his
"sax" appeal to Violet Randall.
MAY WEGNER leaves her "blushing"
to Jose Bazan.
1MARTHA POTTS willsher slov rio-
ticn to MIaxine Hoff-ran enabling Ma xine
to talk longer in the halls between classes.
JANE BRETCH bequeaths her quick-
ness in working English hurdles to Ethel
Huntoon and Chester Wirtz.
ARTHUR VANE leaves his ability to
be seen and rot heard to Grant Lemmon
and Blanche Belden.
CHARLES HOWE wills his love of
reading to Stella Boggs.
SIAROLD LOCKWOOD bequeaths I:is
love to tease tc Gloria Malirix vnd L),ura
Neal. for there surely is enough to go
a roud.
TOMM1Y R \NKIN leaves his of ice -is
president cf the Athletic Association to


Ray Wheeler. I lere's hoping they'll run
a few specials in '34.
NO )R I:F.N RAKOVSKY wills her small
physique to George Tarflil ger. Think lhe
needs it?
LOUIE KLEE'FKENS Ibe lueths his
dis.. .e..in nature during class i'eetings
to Betty Stetler and Alciandro Wong.
JO iN LOT I ROP lea ves his "butler"
act to Colin Campbell.
MOLLY GRUBER wills her statelv
appearance to Alice Wood.
CLIFTON BROW)N beque:,ths his
seriousness (around school) to Virginia
Slanna.
ERNEST I)E LA O()' leaves his
willingness to VWillia m Stone.
JACK PATERSON wills his talktive-
ness to Edison Wirtz and John Mannix.
JESSE IAVIID be lueaths his funny
(??) jokes to Evelyn Johnson and Ray
Bea rano.
(GEN EVIEVE BARRY leaves her
"wird blown" to Edm,; Mueller.
EDWIN IHANNA wills his preference
for blondes to Claude Berger.
JAMES WERGIN be lueaths his abili-
ty tc make 100 in the Algebra tests to
Fra n k 'Washe I)b ugh.
ROBERT BROWN leaves his social
standing to Norma I)avis.
PARKER HANNA wills his slick hair
comb to Carlton Horine and Charlie
South.
IORIS BATES bequeaths her height
to Jane Hill.
We, the Senior Cl ;ss, do solemnly
swear that this is our last will and testa-
ment.
Signed.
SENIOR CLASS OF '3355
WITN ESSES:
I. WANT.\r" BJE:
W\\:rOT R. WINEs


CO. IJIYG SA'lv'rON










Helen anoo and idred Owen
Helen Aantoos' "53 and illildred Owen "'33
tff** -- -


The office of Carl Laemelle, the movie
producer, was closed after a busy day,
and Mildred Owen his private secretary,
was caught in the maze of traffic on her
way home. That afternoon Universal
Pictures had signed a contract with the
cinema's most famous star, John Loth-
rop, whom Milly was very much sur-
prised to encounter. She still had her
mind on this unexpected surprise and
her thoughts were so occupied with her
old senior class days, that she was on the
track of the "Golden State Limited"
before she knew it, and the train crashed
into the rear of her car. She was taken to
the John Hopkins Hospital unconscious.
The day before she was to leave the
hospital, a nurse from Ward A, came to
her room. Starting conversation, the
nurse said, "I've been told that you are
a graduate of Cristobal High School on
the Canal Zone."
"Yes," responded Milly, glad of the
opportunity to reminisce, "It was a
grand class, too. I often wonder what's
become of some. of my old classmates."
"I'm going to surprise you," said the
nurse. "Remember Martha Potts? Here
I am."
"Why, Martha, I'd never have known
you!
"I guess not," said Martha. "You see
after graduating I took a course in nurs-
ing, and now I'm working here with
Arthur Vane."
"What's he doing here?"
"Why, he's the head surgeon. Haven't
you heard about the wonderful invention
of his,-the "Limping Devil," a Spanish
author once named it? By a scientific
process, which he alone knows, it will
reveal certain mysteries you would like
solved. Of course, this doesn't mean
detective mysteries."
"Tell me, Martha, could this er-er-er
"Limping Devil" tell me where to find a
person?"
"Nearly always, yes. Whom do you
want to find?"
"My old pal, Stoosie."


Another old acquaintanceship was re-
newed between Milly and Arthur Vane.
The following morning they went to the
laboratory to see the "Limping Devil."
Upon being asked the whereabouts of
Helen Aanstoos it promptly replied,
"Why, she's probably in her office on
Wilshire Boulevard."
"Office!" exclaimed Milly.
"Don't you know she owns the famous
Madame Helena Beauty Salons?"
"And to think I've been going to one
of them for the past two years!"

"By means of a wonderful scientific
discovery cf Arthur Vane's, we can view
our old classmates in their present sur-
roundings regardless of where they are.
It was through this invention that I
found you. We are to be ready at two
this afternoon, and in twenty-four hours
the "Limping Devil" will have shown us
a glimpse of all our classmates of '33."
"What do you mean, Milly?"
"The "Limping Devil" has the power
to go to any far corner of the globe, and
also to see into the most private moments
of anyone's life. Do you remember the
magic carpet in Douglas Fairbanks'
picture "The Thief of Bagdad?" Well,
we, too, are going on a "magic" carpet."

On the carpet gliding over San Diego,
the three, (Milly, Stoosie, and the
"Limping Devil"), found Howard Berry,
the commander of the Naval Base.
On passing through Kansas City, they
discovered that May Wegner was the
matron of an orphanage. She was very
much loved by all the children.
In Chicago, Ernest Reinhold was fol-
lowing the footsteps of the once notori-
ously famous Al Capone, but they found
him more clever than Capone for the law
had not as yet been able to get him within
its grasp.
If Ernest should be caught they were
assured that no sentence would be im-
posed upon him for he had Thomas Ran-
kin, the prominent criminal lawyer,
backing him.








They envied the peace and quiet that
Thelma Albritton enjoyed so much 1on
her plantation in North Carolina. The
girls promised themselves to hold a class
reunion in the nea r future on Thel na's
plan tvation.
They never thought they would find
Henry Lee as Panama's Minister to the
United States, but so it was, for lHenry
\was on the Governing Board of L, tin
American Countries, which was having
a conference in the Plam!nerican Bluilding
in W .\\', bhin tn I). C.
They next viewed with interest an
exciting baseball game in the Yankee
Stadium, where the Army was playing
the Athletics. They' were very much
surprised to see the famous combination
with Charlie Pescod, as pitcher, land
Mandi Marchosky, as catcher, which had
begun during their high school days.
One of the Army's most ardent rooters
was Colonel James Wergin. who was
stationed at Governor's Island. With
him was his wife, the former Miss lane
Bretch. (The two girls wondered if this
romance had budded in '33).
In Woolworth's Five and Ten they
found Noreen Rakovsky, who was "tick-
ling the i ories" to the tunes of the
latest song hits. Beside her ability to
play so well, her attractiveness was the
reason for her high sales average. Fre-
quently she was contracted to play over
the radio.
Visiting one of New York's most
notorious night clubs, Molly was found
to be a congenial hostess, with the witty
Jesse David as master of ceremonies.
This club was popular for its potent
cocktails which were mixed by Chris
Ohischlager. The club was filled with
many of the "Four Hundred" 'who were
dancing to the harmonious music of the
orchestra in which Robert Hanna, Will-
iam Keenan, and Webster Beard formed
an important portion.
Leaving the gay tunes of the night
club, they went to the other extreme
and saw Genevieve Barrvy, who was in
St. Mary's Convent in New Haven,
Connecticut. She had been wearing the
veil fcr five years.
Genevieve \ws not the only classmate
who had gone in for religion, for in
Massachusetts, Charlie Howe was the


Chief Reader of the First Church of
Chl ist Scientist of Boston.
On i lurni'i,.- to New York, they saunt-
cred into the Empire St 'c ltu;hili._. and
found there one of the most fa'oilus
journ lists of tlhe time, Ernest dIe la (ssa.
I le was editor of "Fortune."
Sailing past the Statue of Liberty was
the world's l;'rgest liner, which was de-
signed and constructed under the super-
vision of the Brown Brothers. Clifton
al Robert. T'he ca ltain of this liner
\;,s ILrold Agne\, andl ,o the passenger
list was the na ne, Edwin n Ilana, Senator
from Virginia. who was going abroad
after a long session of Congress in which
he had played a very prominent part.
Crossing the ocean to England where
the Olympics were being held, they found
that Harvey Snith, representing the
United States, had broken all world
records by his fast cr;:\ I stroke.
From here they went to Pairis, and the
headlines of a newspaper told the success-
ful tale of Miss Doris Bates wiho had just
Ieen aw arded the great art prize for her
masterpiece. Doris had devoted her time
to drawing and p itilii..i and apparently
she had been successful.
Also in Paris was Velta Foley, who was
a fashion designer. Velta often visited
Paris to ..lth. r new ideas to combine
with her own clever ones. She was
classed highly with ,Mlax Ree and other
outstanding motion-picture fashion de-
signers.
While still traveling with the "Limping
Ievil," an airplane whizzed by. The
aviator appeared to be a girl -and a girl
it was, as it was none ot her than )orothy
Birkeland, who was then known a s "FIv-
inr Ace Dot." She was piloting an air-
plane on the route from New York to
Norway.
Dorothy wasn't the cnly classmate who
h:Il "taken the air." for it was leIarned
that Oscar Hleilbrn- was at (he head of
the trans-Atlantic fleet cf passenger
planes. Oscar's planes always had a tilled
passenger list. The only thing he didn't
like was the lack of ti'ne for solo flying.
On passing v'er the Netherlands, they
noted with interest that Louie Kleefkens
was the president of the Kleefkens Dyke
Building Company.








"Not a cough in a carload." was lack
Paterson's advertising slogan when try-
ing to sell "Old Golds" to the le'.ders of
the Russian government.
In Tokyo, Elizabeth Thornton was the
wife of the American consul. Her three
daughters were well known in Japan for
their beautiful blonde hair.
While floating over the large banana
plantations in Costa Rica, they were
prcud to find that one of the largest of
these plantations was being managed by
Harold Lockwood, Jr., the manager of
the United Fruit Company plantations
there.
On stopping for a while in Panama Ci-
ty, they were pleased to find that Parker
Hanna was the editor and otner ol the
newspaper which "always told the truth."
regardless of the cost. On his staff was
Panama's Walter Winchell. lary Melen-
dez, whose column was riad with daily
interest. They also visited the Junior


College, where Helen Hammond was the
head of the English department.
On reaching the Gold Coast, they
noticed on the billboards the familiar
name of Edna Thirlall. who was making
a personal appearance tcur on the Isth-
mus. This was the lirst tour of its kind,
and was received with much enthusiasm.
"Eddie" was well known for her ability
to imitate Zazu Pitts. who had been so
popular in '33.
The trip wouldn't be complete if they
hadn't visited their old class advisor,
Mr. Meyer. So over the ne., Cristobal
High Schoul they 'cn:. Mr. Meyer was
up to his old tricks, keeping children
after school, for outside his door were
four children. They looked further into
the matter, when they saw that the
children \were not of high school age, and
what a surprise! These children were
waiting for their "daddy," none other
than our "jMicky" lMeyer.


MOONLIGHT ON THE PACIFIC







































1.,,,' / ,, / .' --(... n1 L nII ..... l n.. lr. .,M Ih.,..I L-n,. ...In. t U-..'i.,n L. ,i (,,.r.. uc.. ,:.-c 'rIhn~er.
iH.. i l .n l .l.,IrL i% t 'rl L..... B. -.itI L l.,,Ik B .i-
., 1 ../ I RK I ... B.,..,.. l,;.h.,r.l R .r.h.l.l1 R. I.c i M -.Itf r.. ll lrs 1 .n. 1, n o r.,l Br. l n- L .l.n
C ..,. 1.i.' F. l I ,n., Fri k 1. ... rr r \\, ...,I











S u i o r







,. B I t rill I.i ...l r *1 t ..ill hil... I r.- I. i.. F ,l.n j, b.r. lr, .' Mle 1 inn, Ellren
C'r,-,nl, ,I \ .h ., 11 .l ..,. Bl ,,-lI. ,1..r .... l., -. \ ...,.
i, .It K .... I I H l. l "str. l,"-, ...1.1 R r.n.1,.It ll ,r.-,,,r1,1, ..,, 1i [.,.,r., .I F.I i M ... ll, r P.,.l- I b h tt,
11I.r Ir. 1. .n. F .I-n I1 ,i.. .1.i. R ,,l h E. : II I). l. .,,-.
, +I I ii \ ,-,_ r. ,ll.,r.. -. 1.. I.. MI ... ,l lh., ,l-,. ., b II .,L I 1, n 1 ., ., .. 1.. B c -0 1.et e, l, n
i ... l11. tI h I 1 1,, t. .. .1 A l I.l.. ,. M r, ,*




















OB Trx oF INt1rls'rs



1. Barnett. Louie
2. Bazan, Joseph
3+ I ..1 ,i. l
4. I -rlI.L-. 1 ,, Ii ,
5. Ih'k'ler .' rl .,
0,. IB,..i r L'.....' I
7. BIt!.. \ L, ..

I I l.. . 11 11 I
9. C .inihlt l FI...
l1 1[i,> \ . n ,
11. 1).,..., .11. F.I sn.
12. n,.,l,'rrt \V'illi ,in
13. F .Id.,n I r-,l
14. F.,,t Ruth
15. I i'.-'. Armnatndo
It. t'l...n.. Anne
17. Gorin. Jerry
18. Gould Cha.rles
10. Greenleaf, Ellen
20. IHanna, ViaIn.
21. Ilaves. FI 1...til.lh
22. I Jll lane
23. IIriui, Carlton
24. Iluirsin s. M;axine
25. lIollowell. Victor.
20. HuntoonI,. I 'lI I
27. lohnson. Exelyn
28. Ki,.., Fred
29. l lam Blossom
30. each., t elen
l31. Lemmon, Gra nt


34. Mannix, Gloria
35 ..iiiin, l John
54. .\l.r -,. Beverhev.
37. hli, .. I. Rose
S3. Molten, Robert
39. Mueller, rfii
40. Ne.l. Laur. a
41 I',, kWtr. Ruth
42. R .ra .11 Violet
43. Reinhold. Dick,
44. Ro s. I)..., lv
45. Sanche., Henry
4(1, ~ .1l, 1k1, ,l :,. -r;
47. Slo.cum, \\ 1 I.
48. Sitiki Ik.,i
49. South. Cl .i '.-
50. S t,...p Doris
11. 1,.In \\ ,lhI .
52. T rfllihi,... ;,'.r.,
5a \\'h i il. .,.h I 'ranki
54. 1\ il, H.. II
55. W inn. \! .... ., IL
tit. Wharta.., sM.hl ,
57. Wheeler, Ray
5S. Wood. \1.,
59. \I i. Chester
60. Wirtz. Edison
61. 1V,.,c \l,.i n.Ir.,
(2 \ ..,I Fr,-l I
63. 1 h, l kn Louise


H'Itiw ro lw 'rri wN



Front seat, IIIth rrw
In that orange car
F;.,. I. street, some pl;ce.
Home xrrsometimes
T ,II.nr, some place
I',t (I Gatun
EnjoYing herself
At your service
With a Ilook
In exile Oh( l Cristolbl.
Typing room
\\ haven't fiu tnr out yet.
Gatun
Librar"
Co.,,ll r lhh R..seC
I l.in, Si.' Ii.i .i,.l i English
I hi h, I .l I. I,
Here and there
Most i in, 1,n.
With t(erald
Surrounded lv the "kids'"
Fort D)a is or Art Class...
junior Home Room .
With somebody
At the wheel olt the carr.
S' ;111111i11 pool
IFort L)e Lesseps
Room 1
\~1... present.
Brdgette Club
In the I,1.' .....in,1
O n the I ...,,,, I.,..
Hotel \ .I.In..l..
Ir., .i -1.. I I ,
\\ .,i., r iIn. I, I it 's all about.,

Often absentt
Sonime lace in schoolI
GIee Club...
Orchestra practice
Taking Cariblbean orders
)Day dreaming
Class meetings
"States"
Spinish Clul>
With lessie V.
In ,bad wiith .Mis IKimlirl
PI 'l I,..
At .a dance
The other Ipl.rce
U. S. II;.,... lass
Two I I ... our hleaids
\Arolunld iand ;about
SeI S nlt do. c
On tile mai to school
in the stunr1 hall
IFni in' around
With the G(ltun girls
\\ ..I ,N. on a boat
In a red I, .' I."
In his ca r
T iI,. movie tickets
\lit li I T nl;u' ,.


HN'niA TuiY R M IIN Us1 Ot



"You Rascal Youl"
"The Gay Caliallero"
"I A.poligize" (English II
"RImona"
"G(ootls"
11*lllInh..h I'm Bum"
S..,l ,I n 1 Dreams"
"St. Louis lues"
,l o. I.-- Interlude"
' 5 r Sue"
"My Silent Love"
"Sidewalks of New York"
"In Mv Hiide.awayn "
"A Great Bun ch io You
"Mauni"
"Sweet Rosie O'Gradv"
"I Can't Gi\e you Anything liut Love, Baby"
"Down on the Farm"
"Trees"
"That Red-headed Woman,
"My Extraordinary Girl"
"Loveable"
"That Sentimental Gentleman from Georgia"
"Little Girl"
"Lazy Dav"
"Ain't Shoe Sweet?"
"Isn't It Romantic"
'Keepin' Out of Mischief"
"At Peace with the W'orhl"
"Hummin' to Myself"
"Was That the fluman Thing To Do"
"The Cop on the Beat"
I'lln. ',.. k M\r. II.nrini, ... iiN
"I'm a I)re-.,iin r \rt,'t \\ \11
"Then C ,nit I, D)awn"
II.... 'm I lDo'n, Hey-hey'"
"Sonny Boy"
"The Cuban Love Song"
"As You Desire Me"
'\Ini... the Moocher"
"It 'ras So li .,. linl"
\I "'Iul'i llr and Roses"
Sii \. I I ,ddle"
"School Days"
"O()n the Shores of \Waikiki"
"She's Iinii That Way''
"Lraugh L'I. .i, Laugh"
"Smile. Darn Ya, Smile"
"Got the Soiuth in Soul"
"Please Don't Talk .Ab'out .\e \Whlen I'm Gone"
Ih, Y,,.IIII I I l l,"
I I1i I illl I'.. t 3M ine"
"I ust a (Giolo"
"Barnacle I'll the Sailor"
1.,_l.>i i..k a Rose"
it I-1. I ,
"I Love Me"
"'I She that \VWay lI able ;and Sweet"
I ii. 1ran ol thle Mountains"
Siin -. ailingg
II ..m... n i,s ;.\'."
"You Tellir \Ie
"I heard" (She Came from Balboa


J1 NNW STATNI I '1











































\. I A | .. I ; I .I. II. I \ . I ,. ,. I I., 1 1 lt \ . l \, I I,, i .. L.. 1.. I 1, li .n I .l . lr.n


i/ *R f *. .. I /.' I I r. . I I... I'.,i... thi. i .. 1 .1,.,. 11 .,,; I 1 FI F.L ll..r, rn

i I .. I r.. II . I 1 . 11.,1
, 1 [ iP. I,. 1 4 \ 1. .II ... t., i i. .I .. 1 ll Ir . i r, 1 I ,. I,.l. .I
L I, ,I, I| .,r. I h II .. .. 1 \ ID I |$ I t..... I..1... I.. I)... If IfI, II I. .L .
.11, .. .. i II lII ..I II .







ii p I ii in a r c -q











1 1. r. .. I.. I li ii.1,,, I I.. ... ..... ':. Ii II It.
I -- \ 1i. ,1. , ... I ... II.... 1.,. 1 ,, R ,n 1, ill ..... ,, .. .... .,,,, I, T lni ., rr
I' .l I I [ I ,,,r., . .i,, r, I i), I .11. .. \1 .. I .















S 1il t 1 1 IEF I)i!


WH\ Il '(F I' \l)


\ 11., I 1.. .1
\ ll I ,I ,,k I I .. ...I .
Asensio. Bertrm+n.
BItra rd ". 'I . ,
athI I 1I. I -.
Beers, Villianl
I tc~in, AhItlred
I ...*.h 1 .
CarruIthIs, 1'arv A\tin,

). idl. .\ elinu
I)av is. Ralph
I)e*a ins. Let.t
l.)ut Fl.al.olI


I '....... la. k

FI .. I ll



I Ic. ... I C1 ,1 ,1


(Greorv, PaIit
Him, Char~ils
Hollowdl, WVilli.im

|*aramill. n' Ist. I
Kini. Rolwhrt

I .. ,, I I
I .1 I .... ... 1 I I

s trde. in hm Il
M1rshhIll. I).u id
ol+.ten. Rich >r.l
ldl l *e. Elino i
\ ,,r R. . t

O 'Neil. IM"n
IP.ilm. )ohn
P.ri., lv li
Peierwiii. R.l...
l'Il,.:. Ii. erle-i
I',... ii rt uot
Prett Da v idl
Pretto. IRi h.: l
1< ... I.I! C hlarh tte
Reillv. \n.na
Reinlu!d. In u >ld Mil.
Ro l

R I .... I .larv



a.,id ,'l' I A. I.


i\.k ...., ..,,l R uth
\\ [. i\ ,lh ,, ,
.Mis* .hixMre-


lt.ik nut Pl,>sli
Where lu dl...sn I helho

I .. ,
Se.( Scout Sll~ cii

PI.a inhet





G.iti '1
Flirt Rlnd i(l,

[.uiil .ra. S i
lCo 'Ill tisstt l t
It Ime
French Cm..l
\'itl PaIht Rian
.sk M.trpi A.lii
At imiiel
Is 1 ', . ... .. i ,
AIn place lut hlme
Ath.ine
Tliii ourt
W I,;,,. .... PoIlI
Fortt sherui n
1sk Nornuis l)ais
(ti Crist.hIl i
Xt Irlnle
With +!unior"
With ikrt
'I I. .1 I, .. A li

With l|hn PlIt
"iet .Air iase
Torpn Clunh
With 1>Charh,+te .i< lawn
.ort Shlrmnian
E e*'>. Here

I ort ilc le h p ,e|


I)t I i .n

Wilh Robert K1;9
Iuktnuli' Pol l
w iIsh 1 .. I,,,


ile ei e son l n
] |onIevm isn .iin-
Wi'h A lice ++n.I lane
With Piill Bthile

,\ h'we
P,) l sl ,,p



Co+, ho,>;>



At hl ,-in -


I+dll ,i .il, t ie \\ .. I li e

I ....

li .I
( ,e i el r< is




I, ... itn
I.
4 I n





, ,Ih



II I ....






-II


*[ , . .



N1





II Il. I Iis I'Si h

'i i i iji ii





I .,i








I 'ti. 1Syjl
I< |


NA\ME


lI Iidm'









































s.t-... .R I --\ilur.,. K.m.rl- Ph.ll .l FlII. R .iL. 11 ,... L ll E l..r L .-l. \I, \r., l. I ,ll,.,n. h1,l Pli~ l
B.,. itrr, i.1. 1 1) -.i ,ic;. R .I...r- 1 M R I, c I-...,
.Si p, l...i I l R l-| n.t L. 1 -h ..,i .l.. r ,t .r Il F.I...r.l l .... Fr., l, ...IR H ..a ., I Il ill. \mih ... B.,l -l li.
I ,In ';!.i, I,.r,.-. 1 ,1 o l .,.a- \\ .11 H R I i rT ,rv. I. 1 1..11

b.i. R <; ..I,, .. I .. RR I ,ph R. l h \I l nl.-, ,l. r, V, lc-l '. Il r.. G .n .1.1 L.. R -..r R,... L i.,l*.
M\ n J.,Ir ,.,rl 1.. .. Lk l 11 r .r ,,ll. .r i .I ,.1 .:.l I.. nkl ..













iFr t i i.ln m



.<.t. r I ., f L lki., I.r,,'r nl le- n 1i. 1 .'L r=.n,. -. ,nl r l,.1 T il. T l 1-. r- (-,, ,.I, I I. .rl Ir E- .. n'i-in 1 -t.r (- r. i ;n

S, ri..' j R i .r.....h. I R .r .. Tr. 1 .rF. ... ..r r. I 1, I ,h I.. I R..- Hr ..L i ,..I M- iF .J .il h. n


. ,.-,, t .. .1 ..l .... / 1./ -1 .. r. .rl F r,,i .. R ,t '..- l. \ .. R .. .- F .l ..r l l.... l'... F li.l. I.'., r.. t ..
H ,,n B l.,.. (.ru L. ur.,M .r.,.l ilr.r., i. ..... .1.,r1, R ... I 1 1 .... .1, I 11 .[l .,n. i,, ... I \ .... [ i.. P-t r...n














FRIN:I 1 N UJIRFC I lIY


N \AI


2. I I ,l.l .. A lphlr u
3. ID ti....n I Paul.
4. I ...,, Grace
5. lIh Il .n1. ITheodore
h. Cotton. ,.1 Lill1
7. Cim.l Rachel .
8. C...H. Edgar
9. I)is, lames
10. )omniguem loulio
11. ,.,i..i,1 Rv- L_.
12. 1 ... .1 11 IK ,,I .
13 I ) ., I .1 ... I
14. I1 .,. I',,h I .
15. I .I i..It 1 .,1.
1b. I" h. I'l Ihl.
17. t ,,.i..1 ,n .... I .
I1. ( ,,..d k I 1.. ,
19. (.r .i I I.1,
2(1. ,r mlmm 'l 1,r,
21. Grmo.manI illian
22. r,,l.I.r n ,,hara
25. 1 .11, I ..
24. Hall, len
25. Ilnnam. Muriel
20. HI.anna. Williamt
27. I ,,,I. Esther
28. I ,l I.hist
29. I1l11 Cha.rles
30. 11h11 Willi om
3 1. II, . .; i ....
32. I.., Im," I I.. .
33 11..11,,I ,. I h I I ., .,
3 4 II..11., ..'I I ..i.,
35 II. t I ...... tr,.
3t>. K mlindir, Cc tilia
57. I .lr .l.m llames
38. I. e, Kulbv
39. 'm. ,i Robert
40. Meald, l Cl. ..L .
41. 1o.t, K ..I..1 t
42. M .... Elizaieth
43. ',l,,ll .... M uriel
44. i R,..,1I,, Fred,.
45. Patchett, Frances
46. Peterson, Doris
47. R,,.niC Antonio
48. II, I, l. gnesl
49. K. t .11 l,,.e|ph
til, llt ,im Im ,n N..I.. m
51. Roe. Sumuel
52. SIlmers., ........

i4. h ,i ll. l .,,i ,
55. mt ,,I., Cirl
6. ,i .. ,l, Nt .r1 I ne
7 ,hn ,,.. .. ,. ....I
5S. Sullivan. Ih, ...
59. .... Fr nlk
hO. Szn os. |ohn

()2 T .., ,,.'l,, ,.. 1 1 ... ,1
65. T ,, I. \...I .
04. \ ,,.. Ivy
5. \\ ill II... ...i
(16. \ ,I1. John
67. \ ,rt, Rolert


N1 moe

Nmh-Iii knows
N~1.111 Ogi hg r

('metingb in Lioullle .
t t11)i tII -
1.1ii ll~ll.-
~It I 1 1. 1L


I )a v diream iier
'reasilig




I .1 ii. I miii
Rm.11~ mmlii.. Ie s






~1110(11 .
It. ItI. lirmtt
Nil -ood'eh
I. miggitig irril






B. -11 g111 i mit








4. trim'. trig utill



-11,~. I~t lit- hott iIlt'll'
II ki. .. 1 k 1
V.1 ..,1~ l. trnsii,











i f]'lm Ill ll ,
li ii. -.111 101 1I C1



tIm . Igrnl L
tt goodei ti














uTr I I I- ti





L(CI)1II: ;nrclltlherl),nl there~


1'u Os CC ( -mPArt AirN


Nu- IeFI-ll~r


SIitiici 11--lither



lid ii, A nnounce r
tlrole'm'mor
Le, ttret-

Circtis Clowni
Cr d1 .1 ,~ icr



1.~irlierlr
,NJ., it N ,I c -
Ct..i I I i rig
F.Ii mcr


Raldio Crooner
G;rniolg I)own


,dioi)l I eacher
11earlt Breaker
D)o, trr
Pruie'm'or
ndc-tro,
Fmarmner'm Wdie

INikimite hill i .Xm

INmlI Slmn% vir
\IolrnI 'Killer
Prii .,te Secretat'.
CmtI,-,"M. I
'I in... *i ~11 mm1.
Neit Report ter


ttiii b Fmthinig


I)miitg1l m I.;Wh le Shi~mnild

'I ii muir.

L it II -it.,. I em'..


I . *i 11 F miii I 1tilmm..


"ii P inter



,till 'Tr..ard


Ki-ii.-!g Nl-mmu
l~retna ii












I


From the time she was old enough to
climb fences, Josephine Barrows was
known all along .\le.ildtIo' Creek as "that
Barrows tom-boy." She got into more
deviltry than all the other Barrows chil-
dren, put together, and trailed her father
all over the ranch Inimiiclkin L his stride,
his voice, and his gestures.
"Best farmer of the bunch!" he was
wont to s;'y of her. When the other girls
began to giggle over their beaus, Jo
would always say: "Dcn't see any sense
of being crazy over boys. What's so
wonderful about 'em? They can't dc
anything I can't!"
There was only one bi-y whom Jo
would even allow to go coasting with
her, and that was Dave Craddick, a
neighbor hoy who lived just down the
road, and it seemed that he was forever
at the Barrows.
Lou Anne and Sue were older than Jo,
but it was lo who took charge of Ithingl~
around the house. She could cook for the
family when she was ten, and yet folks
said: "Fred Barrows did bring up them
six motherless children rnd had 'em el
turn out good, 'cept Jo. She's a; \ild
one.
They didn't know that Fred Barrows
depended more upon Jo than all the
rest. lie didn't know it himself, but
Jo had sensed his dependency when
she was but a child climbing her first
tree, ad lived up to it. She fully believed
that she was not as pretty as Lou Anne
and Sue, in fact, she wasn't pretty at all
to most people, but she did believe that
her father turned to her as he had turned
to her mother, in the days when there
had been a mother-and she got a greater
thrill out of that than the other girls did
out of all their ltt ile pleasures.
One by one the boys and Sue married
and left lMead, ws Creek.


"You're the only 'boy' I've got left,"
Fred Barrow s said to Jo. "Guess I'll have
to send you to Ag' school so you'll be
able to help me run the farm." Jo's
heart had leaped at that, but when she
had finished high school there wxas a bad
year for the crops. Lou Anne had finished
the same year and had planned to go to
college. D)ave was going there too! Jo
had never realized how very, very much
she had been counting on it until now.
It was soon time for Lou Anne and
Dave to leave. Jo had been thinking
about her own little pleasures, of the
sports at school; her work at home,turn-
ing up the sod, seeing the different things
coming up all the time, the smell of the
earth, hearing the purr of the plow and
the little grunts of the horses- it, she
thought, had been fun. And then, too,
were those hikes with Dave! She could
see him now, lean, darkly tanned, gay
eyed, and curly haired. Her eyes smarted,
but she didn't cry. That's Iwhat they said
about her: Jo never cries."
"It'll run into money for us if I go,"
she said to herself. This hlog day finally
came to an end and Jo had fought it out
and Lou Anne never knew there was a
fight.
The day that Lou Anne left, Fred
Barrows said: "Mlvbe. next year we
can make it for the two of you."
Al-,'n in Novenmber, Jo was asked to
take the Iistrict school for the rest of
the year. When asked, however. Jo only
laughed and said: "I wasn't cut out for
school teaching." But that night she
noticed for the first timre how tired and
vwrn her father was bl'eci'niiiln to look
v.hen he said: "I thlutiill Lou Anne had
plenty of clothes to start with. What's
this new dress she's malnting? I've bor-
rowed on the apples already -don't
know where I'm 'oin: to rake up any


Iit rar y



BEST SHORT STORY
"TI E TOM-BOY"
Jane Hill "4







more money!"
And so Jo took the position as teacher
of No. 6, which was near by, and Lou
Anne had her new dress and joined a
sorority. Jo hated teaching. Night after
night she came home sick, tired with the
effort of carrying on the school work
properly, of keeping house, getting the
meals, tending to the various little needs
around the house, and taking the milk
to the station.
Around Christmas,she dressed a hun-
dred chickens and sent them to the city.
She made great plans for Christmas.
Lou Anne and Dave would be home and
the married children were coming too.
She planned a party for Lou Anne-Lou
Anne loved parties. She had a new dress,
rose crepe de chine, for Lou Anne's
present.
However, the night before Lou Anne
was to come home she called to say that
she was going to a house party with some
friends and thus, would not be home.
Jo's own disappointment merged into
pity for her father when she remembered
the hours her father had spent painting
the old bobs for a coasting party.
By Spring vacation, Jo was pretty well
tired out. Lou Anne didn't get home for
this either. One day during the vacation
Dave came over to ask her to go after
arbutus with him, but all the light went
out of that April day when he said: "Kin-
da' thought Lou Anne away like this for
Easter, might like a little package or box
from home."
"Sure she would," Jo had said, but
that night she buried her head in her
arms on the window sill.
School was over at last, but it was a
strange summer that followed. Lou Anne
had a friend there for three weeks, a girl
who only smiled indulgently when she
knew that Jo was trying her best to be
funny and amusing, who came down to
breakfast at ten in the morning. Dave
was there a lot now. He took the girls
everywhere, but Jo seldom went along as
she felt, somehow, out of place with Lou
Anne and her friend in their gay attrac-
tive clothes. She always had a host of
things to do anyway. Lou Anne never
seemed to see that there was anything to
do.
Jo had hoped right up to the time
college opened again that she would be


able to go, but she saw at the end that
there wasn't a chance. But, she did take
the egg money to buy what books she
could on the course. She poured over
them. late into the night after the long
hours of teaching and other numerous
duties. She and her father talked about
a new drainage system for the flats and
they were very close in those long winter
evenings they spent together. They were
making great plans for the spring.
Then one evening Jo came home to
find her Dad very ill. The doctor pro-
nounced it a bad case of pneumonia.
"Heart's bad too," he said, "can you
afford a trained nurse?"
"Of course," she said, though she
wondered how.
The nurse came. Jo would rather have
taken care of him herself, but they must
not take a chance. She hired a substitute
for the school, cooked for the nurse.
tended to the other little things around
the house that needed attention, and
caught her breath a hundred times a day
at the sound of her father's labored
breathing. Several days later the nurse
advised her to send for the rest of the
family.
They all came, and the follow ing day
Dave came back to help. She felt that
he was there for Lou Anne's sake, but
his presence was comforting. He said
that he only wished that there might be
some little thing for him to do as Jo
looked so hurt.
The nurse told them now that it was
but a matter of hours.
"Let me go in," begged Jo.
"It is better that you stay here, I
believe."
They all sat silently waiting. Once
Lou Anne did say to Dave though. "It
was good of you to come Dave.-and
you're missing the Prom."
That Lou Anne could think of the
Prom when death shadowed their house!
Jo though of the letter her father wrote
every Saturday night, no matter how
tired; the scrimping on clothes for the
past two years; and the painting of the
bobs on that first Christmas. How could
she criticize her, Jo, for not crying? "Jo
never cries!" Lou Anne had said.
Then she heard Dave's quiet voice
saying, "I--I've always thought an awful
lot of your father. He was always giving


Pol


h6,


hhN








-whistles anI' hird-houses an lishpoles
he's been good It men."
The other girls were all crying n i .
o looked about at then all anld a, w.ve.
ofsick resent ncnt swepl over her. W\h-t
good did it do t( cry, nomw? Why hadlo't
they conc home more often? D1)ave, onlv
D)ve, understood. D)avc l whi;o htel
sentinlenit hlad tried to tell then so.nle-
thiig real that \;ts in his heuar(. Thelin Jo
sid: "This is thle wiv I alw.vs thinkk ,Io
I)pd. You khiow \w hcr we used to cross
the creek to go to the milk stationn? Well.
I was a kid then, and I)d aould hilvys
drive right do\\n through the creek and
up the banks, to wash the wheels. I sup-
p.se. There waSsn't much w Vater then.
Dad would crook out his clbon and I
would clutch it -so tight. Thenl, once
when I was a little older I asked him
why he did it when he knew driving
through the creek frightened ime so, and
he said: "Because I like to feel your
little hands on my arm." lie always let
us hang en -like-that j-ius because
he loves us and -oh -I'm going to hin
now. I don't care what anybody says
I won't let him go alone!"
She knelt down and gently took her
father's hand in hers and put her cheek
against it.
"Dad, Iad, it's Jo. Don't die Dad,
don't go! You can't go! We're going to
drain the marsh together this sI.ruiL.
we're got;in to be partners, you and I,
)ad! Dad stay with me -there's just
you and mne now-Dad. I won't let you
go!"


All night Ilon slie knelt there. clinging
to Ihis hand, willing that llh r aLi miitl il
yollng strength light Ie i s I .,t .\
giver, that's what lied bieein avI. tl s.
Whistles fislilpics hl ve "(O h, I.(I)d.
don '( go!"
in thle niorlnitn when tihe ldctor caime
site still knelt there.
L"Come, child, get op! Your Ili tr's
better. A lot better;: looks like he hnlgiht
get well. didn'tt think yesterday that
he'd last the night out, I(loks like a mira-
cle!"
lo crept out to tilhe kitchen. Site was
stiff and tired in every muscle, but there-
was a glad song in her thert as she quiet l
began to set tile table fl.r Ibreakfast.
N'oillii_ not even Dave and ,Loiu \linne,
could ever hurt her so again.
Then there was Dave in the kitchen
doorvway, very sober, looking at her.
"He's better, Dave! led's going to get
well!"
She made her way to the door leading
out to the porch. and I)ave's lingers
caught hers as she reached for the door
to steady herself. A slender, boyish
figure, in her little sports dress, she
leaned against him, and Dave put Ills
arm around her.
J'!" Dave was saying humbly, "Jo,
I love you! I love you! I-I guess I
always have, only, I didn't know till
last night, -that you ever wanted any one
to -to lean on! Jo--hy IJo darling.
don't cry!"


SECOND BEST SHORT STORY

"HIlS IAST SONG"
I'.dher'r [Harri.f 'T


In a cozy. two-story home on a chilly
winter's night, a family of six sat in tihe
living room near their heater. I aplpiness
and sadness mingled in the atmosphere,
for the mother sat reading her well-worn
bible with tears in her eyes. T'hec father
lounged in a chair reading the daily
newspaper. The boys. Albert and .delph.
\were playing checkers while Andrew. the
youngest, being only five y ears old, wvas
looking at an ain al picture book. There
xwas a vacant chair near the heater at


which the boys oftenn glanced. E everyone
Vwas silent until Andrew broke the ni,,o<.-
tonll by exclaiming: "M amn. is gramlnal
in heaven now?"
That was a queer topic for drewrw to
Speak of but he was answereCd thus:
"Yes, honev, grandma died, that is,
went to heaven two weeks ago tonight.
Why'?"
"Well, isn't gramnia going to come
an' sit in that chair anymore?
"No. Andrew, but the "(Good Bo'k"








says that she is living in a mansion that
is very pretty now. She isn't going to
come back to us, but we shall go to be
with her when we die, though."
"Is she happy there?" proceeded the
joy of the family.
"Yes."
"Is heaven the land where we'll never
grow old like the song you sing says?"
"Yes, honey."
"Well, will you help me pack up,
'cause I miss gramma so much. I want
to see her now.
The parents looked at each other and
smiled, for just the previous evening they
had planned how Andrew would go to
school the following autumn and they
wouldn't have any "baby."
"No, dear, you don't want to go to
heaven yet," protested his mother, Mrs.
Lattine, "you want to stay with us a
while."
"But I'm going to heaven tomorrow,
'cause I want to be an angel and be wiz
gramma. I'm so happy now."
When he said angel, Mrs. Lattine
looked at his little beaming face which
daily seemed to become more like an
angel's than a child's.
"You're going to stay with us, honey."
So she thought, but fate works in
strange and mysterious ways.
The following morning a sunny-faced
Andrew Lattine was standing on a nine-
inch ledge outside the bannisters of the
front stairs. His arms were wrapped
around the bannisters and he was singing


to his heart's content while his brothers
were playing in the basement beneath.
"Come on and play with Junior, An-
dy!" called Albert.
"All right, this will really be my last
song."
"0 Kay, come on down when you have
finished."
Andrew loved to play the part of a
famous singer, so, of course, he wanted
his concluding number to be the best.
His clear, little voice rang out the words
of the song as clearly as a bell. His voice
sounded like an angel's and his mother
thought of the words he had said the
previous evening, but she took them as
a joke or a childhood fancy.
As he began to climb the bannisters
after his song, there was a creaking sound,
a crash, a scream, and four pattering
footsteps. Andrew had come down, but
not as he was expected to.
"Mother," they shrieked, "he's dead,
he's dead."
Two days later quite a large group of
friends were standing on a green lawn
about a mile long and a mile wide. Here
and there, there were markers to show the
resting place of loved ones. In the midst
of the group was a small casket.Everyone's
head was bowed while fifteen or sixteen
wept silently as the minister prayed.
Andrew's little body was laid beside
his grandmother's, and to this day one
can see the words: "Andrew D. Lattine,
born 1927, died, 1932, has finished his
last song on earth."


BEST ESSAY

"FAVORITE EXPRESSIONS"
Jesse David '3J


Did you ever have a song, a word, or
even an idea take possession of your
mind, and try as you might you could
not get it out of your system? Were you
ever beset by this disease? The "favorite
expression" disease? Notice the effect it
has on your friend-on you.
These expressions are a constant men-
ace, taking control of you like an un-
pleasant and uninvited guest. I am not
referring to the too frequent usage of
certain words; for that is caused by the


lack of a vigorous mind. A person knows
more synonyms for every word he uses
than he cares to spend energy on.
Note the speech of the people you
chance to meet. It is full of "favorite
expressions," which seem to be a part of
their personality. They are a small but
significant group of words. There has
always been a tendency to utter some-
thing whenever the mind cannot grasp
an idea, in order to prevent an embar-
rassing silence. When in doubt, isn't it








rather easy to s.ay something Ifolish,
especially ifone has run out of cigarettes?
-that is, provided, one does smoke.
WVhether you are conscious of it or not,
vou usually do use some pet expression
in situations where intelligent replies do
not form rapidly enough to express your
thoughts adequately and tactfully. These
are the nioments when the expression will
pep out spontaneously. Isn't this much
more bnellicial to both parties, tih'n
giving way to your inner thoughts?
It is very easy to cast away an expres-
sion that troubles you, if there be an
outside influence helping. For example-
one of my friends had the habit of ex-
claiming "stupid" to whatever was said
tohim. If they told him a jolly tale, he
would smile giving the joker a sharp
"stupid" at the same time, that would
either amuse or displease the latter. lHe
would linger on the "s," thus giving it a
hissing sound. This exclamation at-
tracted many a friend, but it soon became
nerve racking, although some were al-
ready using this same expression. It
certainly was contagious. When asked
he could not explain how he had acquired
it, but after using it a few weeks, he
dropped it, not naturally, but a bit
consciously. We do not always value what
cur enemies tell us; however, let some
one whose opinion we do value, suggest
that some idiosyncrasy of speech is an-
noying, and immediately we attempt to
correct the fault. This was the case with
him.
His second famous last words, (they
would have been had he kept them up)
were "Who cares?" When given any'
information whatsoever. "Who: caress?"
would introduce itself, if he had nothing
else to say, and that was very often. lie
was not trying tc be funny or rude. The
mischievous expression would be there
uncalled for. Fortunately we understood
him. We are human, too, or rather, sub-
iect to the same malady. Once we asked
him why he used this remark so often.
It applied, much to our irritation, too
well to suit us. He said that our inform;a-
tion meant nothing to him, therefore the
thing to say was "Who cares?" One of
my friends agreed with him, but nit to
be outdone, adopted the remark "Pilpe
down!" This one did not come so natural


to him. fi r it was a chosen one; but it
counteracted the other's quite effectively.
Fr< m then oil everything was "Pipe
down" lor the last victim.
Judging by the a foresaid remarrks our
fiIrst Ihero must have thought himself an
important persi.nage, giving 'ne the
impression of having a superioriity com-
plex. We knew differently, however. It
was lor the niost part the effect of these
words of1 his cha racter. Ile was sufferilng
fro;n a "favorite expression" complex.
His next one, by the wvy., happened to
be "blah," a suggestions of disgust and
boredom. What could lie uglier? lie
soon gave it up.
Remark after re:nark and exclamation
after exclamation marks many a person's
character. For every occasion there is a
"l.i\ ,ril.e s.ivinfl Another chance friend
would cry "Hi Kid" when meeting some-
one else. The reply would be '"L, or
Low Kid." If close enough, the remark
would be followed by a sharp slap on the
arm or back. IHe received his share of
them too. Pretty soon his classmates
were "Hi Kidding" each other back and
forth, not that it was an original ex-
pression, but it took as firm a hold of
their minds as it did of his. This ex-
pression is not offensive unless it hap-
pens to come from someone you dislike
heartily.
Turning to another victim of this
mania-when passing a person, deep in
his thoughts or unusually quiet, lie would
snap his fingers in his face, cry "C,.me out
of it" followed by a "Pull yourself to-
gether." If the person moved he woald
surely Ie faced with "Control yourself"
or "As you were.' This soon bec:, ne
monotonous. When in school he would
"Tish. tish" his classmates or give the n
the doggish expression "arf!" lie would
do this whenever one of the n was recit-
ing. The effect upon the recitation was
not the best. lie was sure to see to that.
If the first expression did not bring a
laugh, he would exclai'n, low trI,',c!"
IIe usually succeeded in his ai'n-, but
always received the worst of the b:irgai'l
when he recited. This cured him.
.lost expressions originate fr'in ac-
quaintances, movies, articles, and what
not. Try "I declare!" when slightly
astonished; "Eg.,,l" when patting your-








self on the back; "Rawther" when agree-
ing with someone; "Aw nuts!" when
somewhat irritated; "Let's harmonize"
followed by a long "do" when butting
into conversation, getting a girl's goat,
or whenever any circumstances permit
it, either seriously or in fun. The list and
the circumstances are unlimited.
"Favorite expressions" are somewhat
like words-colloquial, of good usage, or
slang. Then there are those that are used
almost universally. Some of these are
"Can you beat that?" "Beats me,"
"Wotta man," "How you sink 'em,"
"Can't take 'em," and "Tell it to the
Marines." Most of these expressions are
modern, but others such as "Go to" and
"Something rotten in the state of Den-
mark," were either known during Shakes-
peare's time or coined by him.
Many a person's presence has been
betrayed by his mode of speech, his
laughter, his voice, or whatever pecu-
liarity he has to contribute. His mode
of speech has the most effect on his


companions, for it determines the quality
of his personality and his environment by
means of these expressions. They de-
termine, in other words, a person's "class"
and "style" to some extent. ~ Who could
be more boresome than the person who
is so grammatically and scientifically ac-
curate in form of speech that it would put
a follower of Hoover to shame for its
dryness, and make you thirsty just to
hear him speak? On the other hand his
opposite could be just as bad, such as
the person who cannot say anything but
"Oh yeah" or "Let it lay" whenever he
is spoken to.
The etiquette of speech should not be
exaggerated, that is, do not be too polite
-relax, without going to the extremes.
Formality, even in important events, is
not always essential. Vividness is the
required quality. Be sure, however, that
if we must imitate, let us imitate those
qualities of the human speech which are
the richest in beauty and the least of-
fensive.


1P ~ 8o~rr-va.8


TWILIGHT IN PANAMA
.Iluriel llullane '36


A little bit of Eden greets me as I
raise my weary eyes from laborious trans-
lation of Spanish to gaze out of my bed-
room window.
Swaying bamboo trees, majestic royal
palms, royal poncianna, a rose garden in
bloom, nodding coconut and papaya
trees, brilliant boganvilla, and coral vines
climbing everywhere-hedges, a riot of
colors, in green, orange, yellow, red, and
br:wn-sleepy hibiscus, closing their
scarlet bells for the night, a white frangi-
pangi tree in full bloom, sending its
sweet essences through the evening air.
Green lawns and a blue, blue sea, with
tiny white sail boats and dignified steam-
ers on its crest.
The retiring sun flashes its glory,
painting pictures upon a tired world, in


opalescent hues against an ethereal blue,
of castles, lakes and rocky sea shores,
peaceful beaches, little islands of purple
hills and golden clouds promising another
world with a golden shore just ahead. A
mirage methinks, perhaps, but it breathes'
hope renewed.
Hundreds of mating golden-yellow
butterflies, like fairy phantoms, float
past. A songbird sends his love call to
some shy mate. One senses the deep
drowsiness of nature, sending all to rest.
The crickets begin their endless chirping,
and the locust his tireless buzzing.
As the last beacon red rays fade from
the sky, sending their glow or warmth
and radiance to a nestling world, I seem
to hear a whisper, "All's right with the
world."









GA''TUN B1U's


TIME 7 a. iIi.
Pl..AC School bus fromn G(a-
(unl to Cristobal.
CHlARACTER High School (;ils.
Phillip, thile chauf-
feur, and a Panama-
nian cop.



Hope: (eating an orange): "Alnnie. you
need a hair cut."
,Anni'e aurte i la.nil iti) up from morn-
ing's paper borrowed froni Philip): "You
tellin' me?"
)Dori,' I' (holding one side of paper):
"I wonder who Gideon Gordon is'?"
(GIOria: "I don't know, but "Willie"
has seen himi somewhere."
Philip. the h.illfci (tying the hood
down on bus with a piece of wire. to stop
the rattle): "Is eve'lrybody her-.?"
Girl. (in chorus): "All except three,
and if they are not here when (lhe scooter
passes, let's leave them."
Mill and M1argy appear.
..lar'til (standing in doorway of bus):
"Well. where do I sit? Where, do I sit?"
.7/ir, (iputini- out hand): "Hlere, sit
ion my thumb."
(irl.t (in chorus): "Philip. let's go,
let's go! The 7:1:' scootter has passed.
Philip starts bus.
D)orij. B. (looking down street): Iold

it! hold it! Here comes duna."
EdIna (fixing pins in her hair): "I'm
all out of breath."
Bus starts aiain rattle, rattle, andl
bumpty bump.
Hope (calling stations): "Chink gar-
dent All off for Chink Garden!"
Girl, (in chorus): "Morning, Iohni."
Philip, speeding up hills and around
curves, slows down as lie enters Fort
Davis.
Girl. (humming): K..I, ev A is out
today."
Bus passes long line of marching sold-
iders.
Girli (breaking into song): "You are
in the army now- you are not behind the
plow."... ( )l lilrs, look li-.J '-te. I and


soldiers warm ). "You'll never get rich Ib
digging a ditch, you're in t(he army now!"
Bus stops at Radli Towers lor Dotris
C., who takes her own time, ;anld is Vetv
quiet.
Girls (lpreteidling imipatience): ,All
right take cyour time., D)lr; ist take
your (time.
'The bus speeds Ion its wi ay. passing
new lines of soldiers and ariimy mtliles.
(jir/.l (gasp fior breath alnd begin the
song all over again. Song sutlenlyv
ceases, each girl grabs her tnose atndl yells):
"Mindl, Mindi!
.I1nie Lauri" (yelling through nose)
"Wanted a great engineer wllto ctan
dam, drain, and ditch M INI)."
.1/ 'Ce (L,.i,.i.l\): "Listen (o the old
)Democrat. lThere slie goes again.
Dori.," /'.: "That's not talking p.lltics.
that's ijst plain sanitary engineering.
Ruth: "Dl)id you hear talout tlhe light
on bus six yesterday?"
GirI. (in choIrus): "Yes, child, anll
there was some hair putllingi.
CL e','a (looking out iof window at
French Canal): "Look at that b,i alli-
gator."
Girlr: "()h, ,no! .\Alnld s.-: thl: pretty
pink heron."
Philip tur, s ius ito one' side a;s I.arge
iguanta runs across road.
.llail.y/i (sniffing): "W hat is tile I',ra-
gr'ant lpert mnc'I.?
(G/oria: ."My pop says thai is thlie I an
I lang tree,"
.liie La rie (reflectivelyv : "lust
think iof all I'll have to tell thiem back
home in Carolina: of tlie sweet smells
and badl smells: the pretty things and
ugly things vwe see on tlhis lbus ride e cry
mnlrning. Some ride, provided ones 'eyes
and ears and nose do not Ilecolmel ilnsen-
sitive."
Philip turns corner at Brolad\3t lThe
Navy bus, and at high school hli boys'
bus are just ahead.
Gir/., (excitedly : '"Quick. Philip, pass
them! Big road hogs! Now's your chance,
pass them!"
Philip speeds up: gets in lead. ()tlher









busses give chase. The noise of clapping
and cheering is suddenly drowned by
the scream of a siren. A motorcycle
policeman pulls up along along side of the
bus, which comes to a quick stop.
Panamanian Cop (putting out hand on
side of bus): "Hey! You! What do you
think this is?" (hands Philip a ticket).
Girls look at each other in wonderment.
Bus starts slowly off.
Girls (breathing a loud sigh of relief):
"Philip, we'll help pay the fine." (Begin
taking up collection).
Hope (Dropping in a coin): "Good-


bye, bottle of pop!"
Alice (Making contribution): "Fare-
well. Clark Gable!"
Gloria: "Buenas noches, Greta Gar-
bo!"
Bus stops at Cristobal High School.
Girls run for shelter.
Ruth (out of breath): "It's raining
cats and dogs."
iJilly: "You mean it's raining pitch-
forks."
Annie Laurie: "Mr. Vinton says it's
raining fish."


END


THE BANANA
David Levy '34

The banana is a tender sweet fruit, a
little smaller than a policeman's billy club.
It comes in bunches, like trouble, and its
use has made it possible for the Italian
race to prosper in America.
The banana can be bought in the Uni-
ted States wherever small change is found
It grows in the tropics and its bearer is a
large plant with extensive leaves that
produces a bunch of bananas hung upside
down and sometimes a tarantula or small
snake thrown in for good measure.
It is picked green and turns yellow and
ripe when kept long enough. It is very
nutritious (this fact is sometimes ques-
tioned) and has been in Africa, breakfast,
lunch, and dinner for some natives ever
since Africa was discovered by Nature.
In the United States the banana is rated
a delicacy and is used principally by tra-
vellers to kill time and small boys for
pleasure and excitement.
With a nickels' worth of bananas, a
small boy can eat himself into a warped
and distended shape and can litter quite
a large section of sidewalks with treache-
rous banana skins. Slipping on a banana
skin is one of the most frustrating things
that can happen to man in this country.
Nothing can floor a man as quickly as an
innocent little banana skin.
America owns millions of acres of banana
plantations in Central America, and em-
ploy large fleets of steamships to bring the
crop home. Some day all the land between


Brownsville and Panama City will be one
huge banana plantation, and Italians will
be able to enjoy the banana in their own
country without immigrating to America
and spending seventy years selling it for
a living.




ARRIVING IN PANAMA
Thelma Purvis '38

As we were slowly drifting into .the
Bay of Lim6n, I felt a sudden pang of
home-sickness. Number eight was the
dock at which the "Ancon" was to dock
in Cristobal. The waters rolled around
the ship. Everyone aboard was packing
to leave, but a few people. Children were
playing about the decks. Before the ship
docked, everyone had to go downstairs
and sign a paper. Cries of "Oh!" and
"Ah!" were filling the room. How could
anyone enjoy this? "Hurry folks," the
man in charge of the papers was calling.
Mother was at the front of the line,
busily singing papers. The ship was
preparing to dcck. Straining my eyes to
see the city that was to be my future
home, I caught sight of a familiar figure.
I uttered a cry of joy, for instead of dirty
docks like Haiti, the city was sanitary.
The ship had docked! People were rushing
down the gangplank to see their loved
ones. People were laughing and greeting
one another; horns blew and I decided I
would like Panama after all.













0


S)iMER SHOWllt'RS


The sky's were getting storimy
One summer day in Mliay,
\\'hen I wtas teedii' clhicke'ns
And slidih,' in thle hav.

The horses started a.lying,
And the cows began to io,.
Anid I heard the chickens crowing,
Anid the doves began to coo.

The skies got black and blacker.
All about was gray and still,
And then there was a crash anid bang
And a loud, loud shrill.


The clouds then burst right open.
And the rain dropped on God's floor,
And me, I made a dash
Straight for our kitchen door.

The rain iust stayed an hour
Outside our com( l home.
And the horses. cows and chicken i
Were a'weathering it all alone.

And now the rain is over.
And the clouds have passed away.
And we kids just keep a praying
It will conic again some day.





DID YOU EVER \VONDIER?
Dori/. Bale., ;4

)id you ever wonder how the clouds were made,
Or how the thorns on bushes got their pointy
blade.
Or how the birds all gather as if they're in a raid,
Did \o)il ever wonder?

Did you ever wonder how tlie birds could sing.
Or how the grass turns green at the approach ot
spring,
Or how the streams ot water to thie ground could
cling.
Did lou ever wonder?

Did youi ever wonder who this creature could be,
Who does these beautiful things for you and mie,
.Mother Nature is the one. don't you think it
must be?
Did vyou ever wonder?


SE"C(O)N) lIEST' PO'EM

"BOt)YS"
Eli' (u etea *j('~j, i4


At times'' I thliiit thes v'e ai %\ 't.1
A1t tinit., I thrill t(lije se niic.
Adsoniit I h1h( t,. Ie is it1I lot,
Anid others nevv r t s I(*C.

'[heY (ease an pli.giic adint tel
itieleil Comire isitli 1 l.at ters ss yet
A\nl fist I si, "I tihate I Iciii.'
Anid dteol, call,(c bei' I 'ealj.t


HISTORICAL ROGER

Listen, nmy students, and you shall hear.
f1 a teacher, whose homework was ia c.. r,
"Make maps, outlines and take notes it this,
And then for tomorrow I want you to list.
The dates of settlements, rebellions and revo-
lutions,
And Iaso you can bring some political solutions.
Which party will win in the next campaign?
Vote for Roosevelt -get beer, wine andl chinam-
pagne."
\\ ho is this teacher that runs sucLh a racket'
None other than our historical Roger C. I lackett!






11 MERICKS
E/*l/ n Greed-'a,/ ;4

A virl ronm Cristobal once said,
'"T.'iight I'll go early to bed,"
She went out to t ie beach,
Now this lesson could tea h,
That the moon goes right straight to tile he.d.

()in hurrying through the .all,
One day I heard somebody call:
"Come back. vou big bium,
You have stolen my gum.
1 left under the desk in stud. hl.d."

Oftt in English our teacher is cross,
Then from class, a Io -'s sure to Ie lost.
But you can't blame her then,
It you realize when,
She is trying to show you "Who's Bis!"





V ortr y







I































b ,tJ ,=* :2.;
I .:


CLASS OFFICERS




CLUB AND CLASS OFFICERS

The class and club officers deserve a great deal of credit for the splendid services they have perform-
ed during the past school year. They can always be relied upon to do their work efficiently and they always
strive to add to the laurels of their organization. It has been through the efforts of these officers that the
many improvements in school life have been carried out with the success that is so apparent.
Every high school student is a member of some class organization. Each class holds a school dance at
some time during the school year. In order to hold these dances money must be raised. For this purpose
candy sales must be held, dues must be collected, and many other duties must be performed. Class of-
ficers are elected for these purposes and generally the classes are financially successful.




CLUB OFFICERS


































BOYS GI EE CLUB


BOYS GLEE CLUB
Rulh Pickell '354

The Boys Glee Club this year, under the supervision of Miss iildred Elner, has greatly improved.
On their meeting days, Mondiay. and Thursday 8th period, they practice 2, 3 and 4 part music. The Club
often sings in public during tlie school vear. This year theyv sang at (ie Christmals ]program ati the Clu.iliuse,
and at the Woman's Club program.
There is mucli to lie learned in a Glee Club a;nd in preparing their programs much pra:ctiing is ne-
cessnryv.

(IRLS (LEE CLUB
RuIh Pick',ll 54

About 25 girls this year enrolled for Glee Club so that the organization is larger i iithan in previous
years. This. like the Boys (lee Club, is under tlie supervision of Miss Mildred Einer. The regular meetings
are Tuesdayi and Friday 8th period. This year the (lee CluiB sang at several social Iunctiions. amon them
were: The Christmas program at the Clubhouse. tlie Ladies' Aid Society of (lie Cristoli Union Clihurh.
and the Womans' Club.


GIRLS CLFE CLUB
































LIGA PANAMERICANA


LIGA PANAMERICANA
Elizabeth Thornton '33
Chapter Nine of the "Liga Panamericana," a national club first organized in the state of Texas, has
the honor of being the first chapter of that club organized outside of the United States. It is sponsored by
Mrs. Spencer.
O This club has grown out of the first Spanish Club ever organized on the Canal Zone. "LA PAS," and
consists of certain qualified members of that club.
The object of the Chapter is to better relationship between Latin and North American countries.
Much has been done to attain this object, and much more is being planned. Important and interesting
among the affairs of the club was the meeting in commemoration of Pan-American day on the evening of
Wednesday, April 19. An interesting program was arranged as follows:
Address of Welcome by President Ernest de la Ossa; Music by Henry Sanchez, Alejandro Wong, and
Julio Pinden; Address in behalf of North America by Mr. Jordan: Address in behalf of Latin America by
Senor Paris, hijo.
Members of the club are:
Active As4ociate
ERNEST DE LA OSSA WILLIAM KEENAN
GLADYS BLISS HENRY SANCHEZ
MILDRED OWEVN MISS DOROTHY CATE
JERRY GORIN CHARLES BELDEN
IHELEN HAMMOND ALCALDE L. J. A. DUCRUET
ALEJANDRO W ONG MR. M. J. FRANKS
ELWIN NEAL MR. R. C. HACKETT
ALICE Woot MR. F. C. JORDAN
RICHARDn RE INHOLD CAPT. JOSE V. DELGADO
ELI.EN Gi.EENLEAF MR. GAYLORD S. BRIGGS
ELIZABIETH TIIORNTON
OScAR HEl BRON




SOPHOMORE DANCE
Anna Reilly '35
One of the biggest hits of the year was the April Fool Dance given by the Sophomores at the Washing-
ton Hotel on Friday, March 31, 1933.
All of the dancers enjoyed the excellent music furnished by Dwyer's orchestra.
The novelty numbers, performed by Bert Asensio, Charles Heim, and Richard Pretto, were thoroughly
enjoyed by everyone.
The prize spot dance was won by Alice Wood and Carlton Horine, who were awarded a vanity case
and a pearl penknife.
Everyone declared that he had enjoyed a wonderful time and we only hope the rest of the Sophomore
Affairs turn out as well.


































SPANISH CLUB


SPANISH CLUB
IIleu fItnam nd ;i

The Spanish Club. known as "l.a Ps." was introduced into C. II. S. .u ti itis. in (t er., l5O.
It is a ,ier exclusive club, only those who have an average of "O9 being clegile hor membership
This club w.as organized by Mlrs. Phyllis Spencer in order to promote .lno interest in tle studl. of
Spanislh. a n to better the relations between Spanish and Elnglish speaking peopIle.
Before a person may eclomne a member, lie must be taking at least second le.r. Sp.alli'h. I.esildes
having the required average. fie is initiated both formally and infornially. Thle Iormnal inii.tatiton is .1 er
impressive ceremony for thle tnew-comers o(if the club.
After each meeting there is always an entertainment t put on Iby either thle Itocnllbers Iho iltned the
cluill at the last meeting, or some ot the old members.
We have been honored by many very distinguished visitors who have i, to aldks.
Eve-ry year "L.a Pas' presents a play. This ,year it .was "Cas.tillos de TIrrcnobl'. a thlre-.ut
comedy. The cast iwas is follows:
)Duke of (cGzmanl Co' i". C \I' I i
.lercedes T. TI I l I i'n .
Susita Il.Il IN A \ 1 .1 )
Cura ..I. I. 1I lI Inn
A\gapito ... ... I NK \.\'.A nl \10 Senor Rodrigo Ci It' iin llno
C(itanla li iB ri S1 In I it
Tio Trompeta li' I \'I 'I'O.
Peri.o, un minzol de Estacion Cl il t i S<' I ill
,\ barnuet was given oin board the Spanish ship "\Magallanes'" matter hih ithe ia.pt..in til he bo.at
entertained for us on dle k. Everyone thoroughly enjoyed the event and ,looki c.i.crll\ orrd to morr things
of this type next year.
Shortly before the end ot the school year, the cllb ga' e ., lb.aquclt tir the ikstAlla.ti n ,t then new
officers. .Many members andl also some who hald graduated %ere there to, nifo' tlie loniun.



SENIOR DANCE
/*; :aiek tilh Thurnt ';

(On the night of Friday the 'th. of Felruary, the ballroom o tIle \\,'-hliill ui Il'ttl .is li1te .tene
of a delightful dance given IN, the Senlior class.
Music was furnished Ih \'elsh's orchestra, and some music at thi.t'
Everyone seemed to lie having a grand time and from thle haste iIn whi hi the piutI hI ditisapp. rcd, d
say it was good punch!
Regardless of the fact that the dance was given a little late in the \c.mr. it turnllcd ot t, 1,c fli.UL
success, as the Fr.eshies can tell Yvou'
































ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION


THE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
Elizabeth Hayes '34

The Athletic Association of Cristobal High School has proved itself to be a bigger and better organi-
zation than in previous years. It is a combination of last year's Boys' Athletic Association and Girls'
Athletic Association, and its main purpose is to arouse and encourage more interest in school athletics and
better sportsmanship in inter-scholastic contests.
The membership fee is one dollar, for which the student receives a card which admits him free of charge
to all inter-scholastic athletic contests.
Much credit for the success of this organization should be given to Mr. Kenneth Vinton, who, as
sponsor of the club, has done very much in behalf of its activities. The officers of the organization are:
THOMAS R.NKIN.. ... ..... .. .... .......... .................... President
GEORGE TARFLINGER .... ............. ... ............. ............ Vice President
ELIZABETH H AYES ......-. .- ..- .........-- ..... ......- ........ .... Secretary
BILLY W HEELER_. .. ...-- -- .. ...- ......-........-..... .....-............. Treasurer



SUPPER CLUB




































BOYS -V R "SIT Y CLUB


BOhYS VARSITY CLUBI


ArnlolI the difftcrot dob ill tI~i, sc ilmd, flic V tciul, is. 4,1C ill %x ,icl In jm-t of (lie~ AtilIutc, ire
reprselsted.

an vuthletic sport ire eligible to ioln. FaIh Ycar a lirge nlilnhlter o* "greeimes are llmitiotctl t" rcptlai thi,,xe
stt dents who gr.dutlte.
The ituicttions t o' tile Va; itxv Citul ire tlise (I .eCtijn.g IjI 'Landati tOt tie rc~lllitchmllclltenI' .iIi ltIlllctc
to earn his credit, in tile spotnrt lie trick ut ttr, i.lrd also t1,01 tile awartd1ing ol ictett v Ill all porn l,
This club hit,-, had great suclt ss in Its,s past tknt ',c lur anld cvcr cN.,var it lillcIc es Ill ize. This ye.,ir
there are twentv-Inur n iemviers reptresetilng tile thi!lcutcr attlietic crnpctitions li hi~ lilt It lir xx huh pair-
ticipattes.
The olfiicers of' tile Vrsit', Club are:
President t cit \ r I II
Treasurer fii i Wmi ivli
Secreta r.taro rimiN R


(tlR.S VARtSI IY CI.LUB


.7- --W-.r~-

































NA.TION.\L THESPIANS


1THI N \TII.N \. THESPPIA\NS SOCIETY


TI I-illlco e nitlnil.li I l I N ,tii.i I Tle.pi in- Qciet' iI the i n.m I enter D'r.ln utic Cluh member.
Tih. ir m ,ii .IliI r. .. ii ii.-. t- I li. r .. ie n in it -h .c l- dr,,m .ti i ,- The cliel .,im ii to dei elop a spirit
of :ti .. i inttllice.t r.t r,. t 1il ilr.i, .ti,' irni .n hih chir.Il tude nt-.
I lur .r i'ip i. In, 'inr- r. Tr -ipe 'I ,,I thi N itinn.al The.pinis \% e ill ,oppreciLtc the interest in dra-
m ..tii i.htl.cli l;. ( 1. G I, KITrIl. ... ni lire I.r. hl i. ,r.iu.,ifl in us .,n',l e ..11 I ino ,te h.ie profited in
ca ilin.- **ut tile .,im ,-- l ii. ti
Tie *-.ict\ i. mn h lrtri.ni. r th., i<.,.r II, ,r I it..,nd n ill 1.e tIr.nl l er 'till n t .\ e ,'c .. a there ire many
Ju i,-r,-. ih.i I..e bec..-nm memleril il. h ti .iid mill c.iri on ti.t i rrl,
Th,; n e ,f i' e pie ienttI- 'nLi thr L- t rnei'. ()n T;hin Alter .\A.ther. ahichl a.1, quite a .success
M .in Thi<..i.,i. i- r~,r ,n Ih lie Se...i pl, H..- t C -p? "
.\ rtgi'l.ir mnCtii, ;i lhe'l tl, tliir Thiir-Ji .it .,:h month...nd oince minth i c [rj'nt d one-act
pl..\ I.r the [)r ,m iti. Chlut
Hil i \ A r.... President
[)D.Rrinr, BiRKLI '.a, Secretarv.





GIRI.S \'\SITY CLUB
I ,,./..,,. ,i/r.-l.' ,, i i

Thi-. lul., i .-r,.niz~el ir tile lm'ii 1-c l lw hi-i in; mn -lpi.nt .1mn.1 the athlete,. Miss Bailey
ori-r.irIizel thii. J ini, l..-t i Ie 1r ind it iu t lr the ,ii I -. hI I' m.le the \',,ir-it\ Te.,m il .ain sort pleased
during tih- eir The emlmein Iire Fli/..etrlh Hute'-. \allIno Bl- [et t Stetler. M\.,rv Ann Carruthers.
Di,rtli Hirlel.inil. t..pc H.Ilh.i.cll Vitlri.., H..Il,mell Eileen Ford. ,1Lii,..ret Reinhold. Mildred Owen.
Helen .1l n'ri.,. .Rithi \\iinil't.id .\ niie G(,l.... Ini .I ()lc. Roe






Till: I RFSIIMIA N I)D NCE


The Irt-.lini Nmcielltm I)IL't. .iti..li % .11.i h tilthi tliriid ill quite .1 u.-- Thlie Fre-hmen 'were
the tir-t il.s. this .I c.'r n pill ,'"i1 ,llim incthnI L itlltr.iit iiIn ti 1 ili nce ntert.'inment
Thie entire iliie 1.1i ..rrir l n it is r uliii [lr Lgr. lm .iin1 i i till m nnler lthe ip e'_t' illn attendance
were entert.,iieil R.ilert Ml i. Li ..t lented nemlber -1 the Freshm:mn cl.ss. took the p.irt nl the radio
annoillm i .i r IThc ie rimr im ini hlilerl .111 unit ,ti-n tl .irious r.idii 'tar.
Beltore the '.mitie %.i-. .iiin et:emll t ..I i.mh;n thle grecin Fre-hmen n this l) -c.illed experiment.
but the I..- ...ilrrir e.I eer.>,ne \ h\'eli turn'- nit ,.. icll m. their I nii.. thIl.- .ti.r lust le i r it to the t h reslimen timr i .iigo d :imlne

































I)D1AMATIC CLUB


IUNIOR-SENIOR I)RA.MATIC CLUBII
.Il/I/rhe O,,,wel ',;
The lunior-Senior Dramatic Club ol Cristolal High School was organized last yea r under te sponsor-
ship of Aliss Gladys Kimbro.
The membership is much larger t(hn last \ear and the talent on the whole is much better. Regular
meetinile are held the lirst, second, and fourth 'rhursdays of each month.
The purpose of the club is to encourage dramatics and to help give tlhe students more co nfience in
themselves.
Every menmlwr is given a chance to be in plays, direct plays, or to have some other position connected
with presenting a play. By .l-,inp, this. e give every member a chance to become a National Thespian,
which is the goal they 1ll aim for.
.\Amii.. iihe many one-act plays presented this year were: "The Red Shade .amp." His One Econo-
my- his \\ lie." and "The Sweetest Story Ever Told."
The officers of this vear were:
HEL.-N A\ANsTOS ..... President
VEI.TA FOLEY... Secretary


SUPPER CLUB
Ruth Pi'kclt 54
The Supper Club, an organization of tile Girl Reserves, is quite the thing this year in school. Their
purpose is "To make tomorrow better than today." There are 40 members. The members of the ca binet are:
President -EDNA Tnil.Vi.Al. '33
V. Pres.h--Ilt N i AA.STOos '33
Secretary -RT rn PtCKrTT '34
Treasurer .M- i i.ti OWEN '35
Social Chairman ELIZABETr t IHAYES '34
Service Chairman -ANNE GIsoN '54
Fellowship Chairman -Ma ~Ei.i.E BL s '54
1Music Chairman- LU.\'lA NE. A '34
Publicity Chairman i-GEN EViVE BA\llT '53
The leader is Miss Dorothy Cate. The activities of the year were: A moving tood sale, conference
at Arraijan, and a swimming party at the New Cristobal point. The Club meets the second Friday of
every month.

"ONE THING AFTER ANOTHER"
l)Ar,/lh Iirkeliandt ?
The first public appearance of the )Dramatic Club this year 'was it thCe Cristobal Clulhouse on .March
10. They presented "One Thing After Another." a three-act comedy, directed hy Miss (;ladys Kimliro.
It met with huge success as iudged by the attendance.
The action of the entire play took place in the living room if the old Lane homestead on the outskirts
of Ardemore. V'rginia. The story of the play was based on a very rich real estate man, who rented the
Lane homestead to a group of actors, who took the parts of a "newly-rich coal miner's family" and "an
aristocratic English family." in order to help Henry Crowell. (the young real estate man t to win the love
of Norman Lane, who at the same time was assuming the part of a social secretary so that she could gather































HIGH SCHOOL .AN[D


m ,ter.,l hlr hcr nn, cl. Tlii',uh tut Ihi v.lI.' pI. 1. there '(c re plenl. l ni uigh- ind it certainIl was com-
pli, ,ted t... th, ,ind. %hen thel .i11 t1,Id ih other ,I ho the.% re ill. mere


Tho,1: e in tl, i'-t ,ere:

H. r' Ca it'..
H, ,.m-, I.\o ol
,1h I. \ I NC I Norm.,i' Aunt i
.1 S'11 frl'-`- 'llTIfL",
RP.i Sn rit-S:i' Tl [I
P,i. I S '. TU -- V11,Tl._r *
1 I. I I T' 7 F ut l.- HI \ I
P .. i :i F ni: T.t l -- H i L
F''o ,il-, i the butler I
Ei r\ ithe m.,id i


Hckln .In, 'Ioo
./jame If ei ,in
I).,Brliu Betklad
I.','rl'i ll;rei, i,
I1.ct GreedIII.il
If lliam Stolne
E,t,,a Thirlh.t l
Frankt If a.ibalu;l

.liI ,/ret Oet'


SENIOR PLAY
f rnei.t 0 ..',; '.3

TI.i el. cr' Senir pl.:. i- entilled Hot Cop~ .n.nd at thle name scmIEe;t- I1 a nec'paper .tory. Both
the [il.t ..inid etting .,rc: ditltrl-rt th.,in tlthe I .In other pl:"a that h.i- been ci. en in C H S. Tr.outs
were held IIIder the 'u'prr\i-ii.n tnl the dr.im.itic coach. i.'1 Kimlbro.
In H.,t Cpt .' Kenneth \W.'de, editor and on ner to the Evening Her.ld. is the central figure of the
pl.I I Mn C0,rtlin. iutice4-Iul Pung itlom:an reporter. pl.~sl opposite Kenneth. S\ Iia Dale and Bill
Gre or: ['l n tt:,lith r .s ', pair ol pepper' .ung reporters. Bud Rice and Pegg.v W'ilson trrv their chest to
outdl the .l.. e p tnr ith their i'-ecr.iclk .indl isn.ppv comeb.cli.. Dudleie Kay is the \ ill3inou city-boss
wh.. rtirrnm- in tihu .nd H.iel \\in'ton.. .lthIu LCh 1 Lieneral nui.,,nce b'ec.u.e o her -ociil aspirations, aids
in lriiiing ,,lu.t ., h ip|ii\ ending: Dr. n)et in. is the lo...Il coihort It DulleY K., and a comedy touch is
lent I.. R iil.dlphI P.lter>. lthe me--en-.er ln..


The ... t,


I i ., \ \'I si .
nill C1111S i '
.Il .. G u, t ; ,, ,



I), ... K
.11\ s i ) .N I

R .I I'I l.l


I rat -I L/I /t .'..l
f).,'rth, B, rkelai.nd
.1/i .,O 01t rop
HIle la/I..'loo.
J.1ae. IWf c-' a

['tnk Ilf',*/lei/.,inli
I./,.I n ;e '...,lI,
fiI.hi Ti,'uAll
If'Hl,,am Ac,.,.nan


,\1 in lrCI' ,l 1 ,1 ilt, ,ttm i li..ir Irn. ii, nore mnust Tc LtnCIen out These were gi en nut after carelin
con l r.itrithmill iThe t.,1i1 I lln .


Stl 1' ..ll 'in cl


I



I


ARTIHL R V\NF

































HlllG SCHOOL. ORCHESTRAX


Prompter B i .. I: . I I s
Ass't. Stage Mgr. CIIARI.:s G 1.1i
Business M\anager CAuI.RT II ,iIN I:
Head Usher... .. Col CAiI'u:l I.
Costumer .. EII. EN G(iniE I -:' A
The main purpose of the Senior play iwas to earn money to aid the publishing of (lie "Caribben.l" .'
this year with the new school audiitorium avaiiliable. the play did have a record attendance. The dpla w-as
presented on tune 10.


C. H. S. BAND
('l/Atot Brown 5
Under the direction of Mr. Joy of Balboat High School, the recently organized band Ithas mlae ci,
progress during the year. Mr. loy teaches a junior band class of six members during the eight period on
Wednesday, and conducts the regular hand of some twenty members on Wednesday afternoon s alter
school. A joint concert with the Balboa High School band has been planned. The good will with which
the students have turned out this year after school hours has been greatly appreciated.


ORCHESTRA
Ridh Pickel 4
The Cristohal High School Orchestra which meets on Wednesdays Sth period, works most diligently
to accomplish all its work in 45 short minutes each week. Due to the scarcity ol instruments. it is iconined
to limited pieces. Among the instruments present, there are: saxophones. clarinets, truimpets. and l iolilns
Miss Mildred lnr super. vpisor of Music in Cristobal. is their leader.
During the year the orchestra played at the Y. .M. C. A. Music Hour. the Womnian's Club. .and the
Commencement exercises.


C. I1. S. NEWSPAPER
Richard, Reinhald i4
The idea of putting out a mimeographed newspaper originated with the "Carill,,ain" stall At a
staff meeting, the suliect of putting out a paper of some sort, to create an interest in s hlool ai tis iticrs x,
discussed. It was finally decided that a mimeographed paper would lie best, f.or, it ;was clheiper, .tnd it the
same time would contain more and better news than a printed paler.
As the school did not own a mliii;nr..LhI machine, the Italian line gra.ioiisly ollered the use Al the
one which they had. There wais tim'thllli lelt Io do. after having obtained the use ot m machine, th a to piut
out the newspaper.
Richard Reinhold uwas chosen to be editor. while Elizaleth Thornton was tio e assistant. The i ollo,-
in were chosen to do miscellaneous iols necessary: Mildred ()Owen Elizab-eth la ives. Betty Stetler. .M ,- i
Bliss, Ruth \ Ikingi..Ii, lessie Vane. Velta Foley. Violet Randall., loie Itaz.n. Icsse i).aidi. I).rtlh
Birkeland and Charles Pescod.
The paper has heen enthusiastically received Iby the students, and has succeeded in -.irry in: ,out il-
purlose, namely, creating an interest in school activities.



























HONOR STUDENTS


HONOR STUDENTS
The two highest ranking students from each class were chosen as honor students. Seniors:
Helen Hammond, Ernest de la Ossa; Juniors: Betty Stetler, William Stone; Sophomores: Anna
Reilly, Ernest Jaramillo; Freshmen: Esther Harris, William Hill.


ac--~-- -- -~-n


rHoolen Aan
Helen Aanstoos '35


Sept. 22. For the first time in the
history of Cristobal High, school opened
during the month of September.
Sept. 23. The Supper Club girls held
their first meeting of the new school year,
and had the pleasure of meeting Miss
Dorothy Cate, the new Y. W. C. A.
Secretary who is also counselor of the
club. Supper was served by members of
the cabinet.
Oct. 6. The Spanish Club, "La Pas",
lost no time in getting together and held
their first business meeting.
Oct. 12. The Freshies celebrated
Columbus Day in a very sweet way by
holding a candy sale in the school. There
was also a debating club meeting.


Oct. 14. The regular monthly meeting
of the Sapper Club was held at the Y. W.
C. A. and supper was served by Mildred
Owen and her able assistants. Miss Cate,
who has worked among the Indians of the
United States and is familiar with their
lives and habits, gave a most interesting
talk on Indian legends.
Oct. 22. The soccer and volleyball
teams clashed in the first game of the
season, C. H. S. coming out victorious.
In the evening the Spanish Club held
a dance at the roof garden of the Colon
Bomba. During the course of the evening,
some of Colon's Panamanian officials
talked to the club members in Spanish.
Another diversion of the evening was a


1








native dance Iyv I'llen Greenleaf. Stella
RBg 'g; MargueriteI and Vi ian Abrahams,
who wer re dresed in costume.
Oct. 28. And upon this evening the
Supper Club girls gave a dance at the
Y. W. C. A. Welsh's orchestra a furnished
the music for a large number of dancers.
The evening was a social success and felll
short 50 of being a financial success.
Oct. 29. The soccer and volleyball
teams crossed Ihe Isthmus to Balbloa
w here two exciting and well-fought games
were played.
Nov. 5. We are not sorry Panama
declared her independence from Colombia
on this day twenty-nine years ..,. as il
gave us a day on w which %we laid aside our
booksand went in search ofentertainment
Nov. 5. The third game of soccer and
volleyball was played in Cristolal.
Nov. 8. New material furnished for
history classes--Franklin I). Roosevelt
elected president of the United States.
Nov. 9. Mly, how those Freshmen do
work. Again today they had a successful
candy sale. Keep it up Frosh!
Nov. 12. C. If. S. and B. II. S. in
soccer and volleyball games in Balboa
After missing the train, the two teams
attended a dance at the Mosque which
was given 1b the Junicrs of B. 11. S. for
the soccer teams.
Nov. 18. Several of the high school
boys (we won't tell on you. fellows) were
seen aboard the "S. S. Toloa" giving
"lA..ichls" Browning the "once over."
Noev. 19. Both the soccer and volley-
ball series were \won by C. 1I. S. Three
Cheers! The A. I). T. club. consisting of
the soccer and volleyball players, had
and enjoyable outing at the Tarpon Club.
Miss Margaret I layes and .Mr. M.ilford
Franks were chaperons.
Nov. 23. The junior class under the
supervision of Mrs. Spencer gave a very
delicious luncheon in the school. A rainyv
day, hungry students and teachers, sufti-
cient money, and plenty of good eats.
helped make a successful day.
Nov. 29. This \\as a record breaking
week for rain; so much water coming
down, the "Old Chagres" necessitated the
i ipning of fourteen spillway gates to.
carry away the flood water.
Dec. 4. Spanish Club meeting.
Dec. 8. December Supper Club meeting
was held at the Y. WV. C.A\. \here all


who attended enjoyed a delicious turkey
dinner served liy \Anne (Gibsonl and her
committee. The progrlamn consisted of
some interesting Christmas legends reiad
IIb members.
Dec. 9. The hard-wo rking luniors
continue to keep their good reputation
and today had a candy sale.
I )Dec. 13. The baseball team lihad a
candy sale, and evr player pl r must have
a I.l nI telephone list, for they had ul more
candy than they cIuld sell in one day.
Dec. 14. The I)ramatic Club had a
meeting .slh 'period at the Y. W. C. A.
; very interesting prograin \was presented
Dec. 15. The "Carribean" staff wlas
selected and the first meeting leld at
noon. Many JIh., I Lies.1 ,. goi ig to Ibe made
in the book and \e hope to make it the
best ever published.
Dec. 22. The Glee Club. under the
direction of Miss Elner, sang a cantata,
"The Child Jesus," for the assembly 8th
period, and between shows repeated this
number at the Cristobal Clubhouse.
Iec. 26. The pennies contributed iby
the school children of tile United States
made possible the trip of "Old Ironsides"
to Canal Zone waters. Taking advantage
ef the holidays our school was well repre-
sented with visitors on this historical ship.
Dec. 27. Mlany of our schoolmates
witnessed the wonderful sight of the
"Constitution"passing through the Gatun
Locks.
Dec. 29. Balloa hasehall team '"took
home the bacon" after winning the first
game of the series. The A. I). T Club
had a hay-ride iourneyinm as far as thle
Atlantic side roads would K.rmit.
Jan. 6. First Spanish Clul, meeting
for the new "mcmlbers-to-be." .t this
time the mysteries of their ccinig initia-
tion were unfolded to them.
lan. 7. The Caribbean stall, baseball
and basketball teams went to Ballboa.
Both games were lost to Balboa.
Jan. 9. Spanish Club infrirnal initia-
tion \was started. All the girls wore big
hair ribbons on which were the Spanish
Club insignia. The xoys wore the same
kind of bows in the firm of neckties.
Jan. 11. Today each (of the Spanish
Club members \went limping around school
wearing two different colored shoes wit h
different sized heels.
lan. 12. The scene was changed today







as the boys wore their shirts backwards,
and the girls wore their dresses backwards.
Jan. 13. Again we see the members
initiated by wearing clashing colors, the
excuse for Billy Wheeler's orange pants.
The January Supper Club meeting was
held at theY. W. C. A. Also, tonight, was
a successful card party, sponsored by the
Junior Class, at the Masonic Temple.
Jan. 14. C. H. S. lost the baseball
series to B. H. S. who also won basketball.
The Liga-Panamericana had a dinner
party aboard the S. S. "Juan Elcano."
Jan. 18. The Seniors had a candy sale.
The formal initiation of the Spanish Club,
"La Pas", was performed at the Y. W. C.
A. After the ceremony, all present enjoyed
a Spanish play "Que Felicidad." Then
there was a short business meeting fol-
lowed by refreshments and dancing.
Jan. 21. The baseball and basketball
teams having to play the games that were
scheduled, went to Balboa. The girls lost
basketball. but the boys were forced to
stay over night on the Pacific side due to
a memorable 16 inning game with the
final score 1-0 with C. H. S. on top.
Jan. 27. Supper Club cabinet meeting
at the Y. W. C. A.
Jan. 28. The girls played basketball
against B. H. S. in Cristobal, and walked
away with the game.
Feb. 2. Need we explain why the
study cramming? If so-you see we're
having mid-year exams today and tc-mo-
rrow.
Feb. 4. The Supper Club girls had
a moving food sale.
Feb. 9. Eighth period there was a
business meeting of the Dramatic Club
at which officers were elected. After
school there was a "La Pas" meeting.
Feb. 10. Several girls left on the noon
train for Thatcher Camp at Arraijan
where they attended the Supper Club
Conference.
Feb. 14. The Girl's Glee Club sang a
group of songs for the Woman's Aid who
were holding a meeting in the Union
Church Hall. In the evening, the Spanish
Club, "La Pas", had a dinner and dance
aboard the S. S. "Magallanes."
Feb. 15. In the school building was
held the Junior Luncheon which was a
big success.
Feb. 16. The Junior class held a pop


and hot-dog sale at noon. They like to be
different, but it helps their treasury.
Feb. 17. The monthly Supper Club
meeting was held at the Y. W. C. A.
Feb. 18. The boys'tennis team played
the opening tournament game in Balboa
and lost.
Feb. 24. The first dance of the year
was given by the Senior class at'the Hotel
Washington. Many attended and enjoyed
themselves.
Feb. 25. The girls, having forfeited
the first baseball game, formed a team and
played Balboa on our home diamond to-
day.What a game--Balboa walked with it.
The tennis match was played on Fort
Davis courts. That, too, was a victory
for Balboa.
Feb. 27. A beautiful American flag
was presented C. H. S. by the D. A. R.
organization. The history of our flag was
read and the different flags were displayed
by Boy Scouts.
Mar. 2. A Dramatic Club Meeting
was held at the Y. W. C. A. A one-act
play called "The Rose Shade Lamp" was
presented.
Mar. 3. Liga-Panamericana meeting
at 7:30 at the Y. W. C. A.
Mar. 4. The Sophomores had a
successful food sale at the Cristobal
commissary.
Mar. 5. There was a Liga-Paname-
ricana meeting held at Mrs. Spencer's
this afternoon.
Mar. 6. The Caribbean staff issued
a newspaper. It was very interesting.
It contained nine pages, and the first
copy was distributed free cf charge. It is
to be published bi-weekly until the end of
the year. The subscription price for the
rest of the year is 15 cents.
All morning classes are being shortened
this week as it is registration week.
Mar. 8. The Senior class had a candy
sale, and for the first time in the history
of the class, they had so much candy that
a sale was necessary the following day.
Mar. 9. Senior Candy Sale. The ad-
vanced shorthand class went through the
P. C. printing press and had the printing
terms, apparatus, etc., explained to them.
Mar. 10. At last the big day came-
the High School Dramatic Club presented
"One Thing After Another" at the Cris-
tobal Clubhouse. Anyone not present








surely did miss a good play!!
Mar. 11. Tlhe Freshmen had a Ibake
sale at Cristolal Conm issary and let Ime
tell you, it was a success!
Mar. 15. The lire alar us rang this
morningdisw issilg classes ir a lew min-l
utes to witness the wlionderl Iu sight of tihe
Navy dirigible "Akrlon" gliding over C. I.
S. It certainly was interesting and remind-
ed many of us of thle ti lie. four years
0I;0. when the "LoIs AIngeles "sailed love
C. I.S.
At three o'clock the (;lee Club "ent lto
the Y. XV. C. A.. here they s!nlg Ifr the
Woman's Club).
Mar. 16. At a i-eetlig of tlihe National
Thespians today, many pvex menil ers w eret
installed.
Mlar. 17. The lunilrs showed the
Irish in them and held a candy sale and no
one \was Scotch in hiel'iii_ make it a
success.
Mar. 18. The Supper Club girls had a
breakfast and s\ immning party this mnorn-
ing at Ko Ko Nut Grove. The inter-schol-
astic track meet was helt at Fort Davis.
Balboa "ran away" with the honors, blut
Cristoal was close behind. At this meet
many records were broken.
Mar. 22. "Red"McKelson of B. II. S
made a wager that C. 1. would not get
over 20 points in the track meet if they
did he would "cat his hat." C. II. S. got
37 points. A general assembly was held
today at x which "Red" performed tile "hat-
eating" act and it wasclever too. Speakers
for the assembly besides "Red" were:
Mr. Franks. Oscar lcilbron. and Mr.
Vinton. x ho also awarded ribbons to Ciis-
tobal's winning track men.
lMar. 23. The program at the )rama-
tic Club meeting today was three short
talks on D)rama and the Stage Today.
Apr. 3. Tils was the tirst day of
visitation \ eek. In past years only one
day was devoted to visitors. but not soi
this year.
Apr. 4. The Supper Club held a card
party at the Y. \V. C.. LA. ovely prizes
were given the iwiorerls aiod there x,'s a
large attendance.
Apr A. Spanish Clu mineeting %;,s
held at the Army antd Naxy Y. M. C. A.
The enterlaininent \\i-s furnished by (he
"new" members. It was a Spanish play
and was very good.


A\pr'. ). The Senior class had another
candyil s.le which was carried ,on .r tNwo
days. IThe Senliort' surely alre w orkin.,
these days!
.\pr. 7. IlTe Illlit class .lad a dance
at tile Playsled. Dwyver's orchliestra
furnislied thie music. I' v 0t'one \ Ias
happy and ihld a good time
A.pr. 8. 'The boyQs played lleir i'st
inlter-sclil1',stic Iaslet-lhall gailme if( tie
season at ;il lbo playslied. ThIe season
\itas started right as C,. II. S. won llthe
fitrt gaie.
.Apr. 9. Thie D),eMolays and tile Slp-
per Club girls hlad a picnic at Shilinly
Beach.
Apr. t19). There iwas a meeting of tile
Athletic .Association, aild arran' Imenl Its
wlere iladet foir a dance after the next
hasketlall game. There was also a Liga
PI Ianl:nericana meeting.
Apr 2.\ A Dramatic C'lub miceetiin
was helt 8th period. "lHot Copy" was
selected to be tlie S-'nior play for this
yea r.
,Apr. 2 'here was a, s,horit pep rally
8th period.
At the Supper Club meeting this a'ter-
noon arrangements were made for thlie
annual lMother and )Daughter Banquet.
The plavyshed \was filled with spectators
to See tile second basketball game.c and as
before Cristobal \won. Tle Athletic
Association had a dance after tie g ill;me.
The music iwas furnished bly tlie Inter-
natiional C(lubl loys, a colored 'orcile'i'ra
that knew. its music!
Apr. 22. Cristi, al girls went to' Bt:l-
lioa to play tennis. l~illhoa wonll tlie
singles and Cristobal won thile tdoulels
M3Iy. 4. Tlle Dramatic Clulb plre-
sented t\wo one-act pl.' ys at the Y \V. C.
A. One of t liese pli'ys ,.as put nill Ib tile
Th'espiails.
May ;5. The Freshman Cl'ss lield a
novelty dance at tile \Washingtoo Hotel.
Dancers x\were dressed itn imnly original.
comical and beautiful costuiins. It w\as
a gala night for all. I ring interitlission
there \were many nove'lty n iumbers since
the scheme' was a radio lbroaidcst station.
May 9. The Girl Reserves hadl tlleir
annual Mlther and Daiughter Iiinqtiet
at the Y. \V. C. A. .\ very inlteestin.
and hitting program was prcsentledL
lune 2. The Senit r Class play, "I It







Copy," was presented to a large audience
in the new high school auditorium after
which the actors and staff had a party.
June 3. The National Thespians had
their last installation at a dinner party.
At the beginning of next year the Na-
tional Thespians group will have a larger
membership than it has had at the be-
ginning of any previous year.
June 9. The Junior-Senior banquet
was a huge success. It was held at the
Washington Hotel and was followed by
a dance in the ball room. The toasts


given at the dinner were 11 very inter-
esting and delivered very well.
June 11. The Baccalaureate Services
were held at the Christ Church by the
Sea. The services were very impressive.
June 16. The big night came at last!
Graduation exercises were held in the
new school auditorium. The girls wore
pretty white evening dresses, and the
boys, dark suits. Junior girls were flower
girls. Several talks were delivered by
various Seniors. Here's luck to you,
Seniors


lumnioreen Rako
B hNoreen Rakovkf "'33


1930
RALPH S. CRUM, (address unknown).
MAVIS E. THIRLWALL, Cristobal, C. Z.
RAE BLISS, 159 South Professor Street,
Oberlin, Ohio.
THOMAS L. COLEY, Jr., (address un-
known).
DELLA J. RAYMOND, Cristobal, C. Z.
EVELYN E. GANZEMULLER (Mrs. H.)
Fenton, Madden Dam, C. Z.
ALICE E. HENTER (Mrs. Jack) Cor-
rigan, Balboa, C. Z.
MR. WILLIAM NEWMAN, Memphis.
Tenn.
PAULINE HERMAN, (address unknown).
ELSIE B. BIRKELAND, 50 Nevens Street
Brooklyn, N. Y.
VICTOR MELENDEZ, Colon R. de P.
ELEANOR M. FITZGERALD (Mrs. G.)
Robinson, Balboa, C. Z.
FRANCES M. DAYS, Gatun, C. Z.
FRANCISCO WONG, Box 1734, Cristobal,
C. Z.
"Best success to the class of '33."
M. VIRGINIA EBERENZ, Cristobal, C. Z.
ELSIE DARLEY, Cristobal, C. Z.
E. BEVERLY TURNER, Cristobal, C. Z.
J. VIRGINIA STEVENSON, Cristobal,
C. Z.
WALTER WIKINGSTAD, Duke College,
Durham, N. C.
ESTAFANIA G. WHEELER, Utica Memo-
rial Hospital, Utica, N. Y.


RICHARD C. SERGEANT, (address un
known).
JAMES CAMPBELL Jr., Georgia Tech.
Atlanta, Ga.
RITA TERESA JOYCE, St. Joseph's Col-
lege, Philadelphia, Pa.
ARTHUR MUNDBERG, Cristobal, C. Z.
PHOEBE O'DONNELL, Balboa, C. Z.
OIVIND ARNESON, Kristiansund, Nor-
way.
ROSE T. CORRIGAN, Newark, N. J.
MARIA C. STEWART (Mrs. O.) FAbrega,
Panama City.
NEHLS G. JANSEN, (address unknown).

1931
CARLOS BOGART RANKIN, Wittinberg
College, Meyers Hall, Springfield, Ohio.
VELMA HALL, Cristobal, C. Z.
RUTH DUVALL, 2974 Colerian Avenue,
Cincinnati, Ohio.
MARION NEELY, Cristobal, C. Z.
THOMAS PESCOD, Cristobal, C. Z.
WILLIAM BAILEY, Cristobal, C. Z.
ERNEST BERGER, Gatun, C. Z.
CELESTE CLARK, (Mrs. B.) Powell,
Balboa, C. Z.
CRAWFORD J. CAMPBELL, Emery Uri-
versity, Oxford, Ga.
EDWARD CONKLING, 4282 Street, San
Diego, Calif.
MARGARET M. DAVIS, Cristobal, C. Z.
"Good Luck and best wishes to the
class of '33."








VINNIE ELSON, Box .57., College Sta-
tion. Pullman. Wahingt(on
RUSSELI, ELWELL, Duke University,
N. C.
FABIAN ENGLANDER, (address un-
known).
CLARA FRISK, Box 728, Leanington,
Optarit, Canada.
BURTON HACKE:TT, Cristolal, C. Z.
JOHN KELLY, (address unknown).
MARIA KLEEFKENS, Cristobal, C. Z.
DEMETRA LEWIS, Balboa C. Z.
PERCIVAL ILYEW, Box 101'1). Cristoaal,
C. Z.
KENNETH MAcUER, Balboa, C. Z.
EUCENIA M. MCLAIN, Cristohal, C. Z.
"My best wishes to the class of '33 and
the best of luck to the CARIBBEAN."
RONALD PHILLPOTTS, New York City.
BETTINA POWERS, Fort Iancock, N. J.
ANNA RYAN, 468 East State Street,
Trenton, N. J.
ALOHA SLOCUM, Cristobal, C. Z.
DOROTHY ~WIRTZ, Cristobal, C. Z.
GEORGE WERTZ, Cristobal, C. Z.
BEN WILLIAMS, Cristobal, C. Z.
BARBARA WEICK, France Field, C. Z.
RAYMOND WILL, Cristobal, C. Z.
RICHARD WOO), Cristobal, C. Z.
PHOEBE O'DONNELL, Balboa, C. Z.
ALICE I. GORMELY, Balboa, C. Z.
FRANK GRIESINGER, Georgia Tech. At-
lanta, Ga.
EVELYN WRIGIIT, (address unknown).
JAMES HAYDEN, (address unknown).
VERONA C. HERMAN, University of
Texas, Austin, Texas.
ROGER M. HOWE, Purdue University,
Lafayette, Ind.
CARL KARIGER, Gatun, C. Z.
THELMA KING, 27 Broadway Terrace,
New York City.
ALVIN A. LYEW, Colon. R. de P.
MARGARET MIIZRACHI, Cc ln, R. de P.
ELWIN NEAL, Cristobal, C. Z.
JAMES WOOD, Cristobal, C. Z.
ELSIE NEELY, Cristobal, C. Z.
BENJAMIN ROBERTS, 701 Union Street,
Union College, Schnectady. N. Y.
JANET ROBINSON, Box 13354, William
and Mary College, Williamsburg, Va.
HERMAN Roos, Jr., Gatun, C. Z.
BRUCE SANDERS, Cristobal, C. Z.
JESSE SINCLAIR, (address unknown).
BETTY STAHLER, (address unknown).
ROBERT STEVENSON, Cristobal, C. Z.


INEZ TIIEOKTISTO, Colon. R. de P.
AL.ICIA TH11.w.IA, Crist(oal, C. Z.
I ESSIE VANE lF:rt Sherman, C. Z.
NEL..IL WARDILA., Newcomb College,
Josephine Louise House, New (rlc.ns,
La.
PEHRRIY W\SIIAHxLG) II, Cristibal, C. Z.
"Best wishes for a better "Cariblbean"
and best wishes to you all for continued
success.
EDWIN WEI.:S.MAN, PNurdue University,
Lalfa ette, Ind.
MALCOLM W'IIIE.ER, Cristobhl, C. Z.
EI.IzAnITiI WI'rz, Cristoal, C. 7.

1952
RANDOLPII M.. X'IKINGSTAsD CrisIobal,
C. Z.
ALBIN B. FoRssrHo.M, (address un-
known).
ELEANOR M. REINIIOID, Cristobal. C.
Z.
IowARD U. KEENAN, PIurdue Univer-
sity, Lafayette, Ind.
"I am having a swell time at Purdue
although it is so different from high
school. The work is hard, but I don't
mind it; I like it.
I often think of my high school days
and wonder how C. IH. S. is getltinl along.
I wish the 'Caribbean of 1933' every
success and may it be the best ever."
RICHARD BETTEIN, Fort Randolph, C.
Z.
GLADYS BLISS, Cristobal, C. Z.
"Best wishes to the Staff for a success-
ful Caribbean."
Best of luck to the Class of '33."
ALLENE MYHTLE I)DEAKINS, Gatun. C. .
"Still a "Gatun-ite." Best wishes for
the success of the 1..55 Caribbean and to
the Class of '33."
MARY C. I)DENS, Cristotal, C. Z.
JOIN DEI.ANIY, (address unknown).
DoNA V. EATON, Barnard College.
Ilewitt I all, New York City.
"Beslt wishes and all the luck in the
world to the class of 191.5 "
JOSEPHi EBDON. Gatun. C. Z.
HARRY C. E(;-OLF, Gatun. C. Z.
VIVIAN G. EI.m(MIN, (address un-
known).
IloWvan S. ENG(..K.., Crii.tobal, C. Z.
MIARIE ENSRLUI) (address unknown).
JOSE ANTONIO FERN.ANDZ, Colon, R.
de P.
























hL


)r'
I

)i;
dl




B




































ATIILETIC LtIAD 'S


SOCCER
For the first time in five years, we ha e been able to take the suprIemaIn in Sotccr from Ial-
boa High School. Our success was due to the perfect teamwork of the players ain thle consistentt
coaching of Mr. V. Seler. W\e won three games out of thlie live game series. winning the first,
third, ailnd the last games. The filtth game played ; our home grounds was the Iest as in tc, am
was sure of victory until the last whistle was blown.
Charlie Pescod. our diminutive iaptailn, conducted the team so that it appeared like a well-
oiled machine on t the lield, helping both the defensive and offensive lines at all times f t(lie game.
Tom Rankin was our scoriSn star. for, with his educALted toes lie helped to make tlie goals wtlhi
they were most necessary. John Paris, subtitutiig for (. Tarflinger, who lh.d to go to the hospi-
tal after the second game, played like a veteran and made some "beautiful" st ops to b lock nma n
of the Balboa onslaughts. Ioe I;azan and Bill Whecler, ou r fulllbacks. played a di.efensx e g.mie that


SOCCER T'E.AM



































BASEBALL TEAM


was very hard to equal even by professionals, and with steady kicks and fighting hearts they got
the hall out of scoring area numerous times.
The other players of the team played with as much enthusiasm and due to their steady fight-
ing our players were able to down our Pacific Side Rivals.
Due credit must be given to our opponents as they played soccer like gentlemen and showed
high sportsmanship for which their coaches must be complimented. Their outstanding players
were De la Peia, who was their scoring power and who was always with the ball; Durfree, at
center half back, who helped his team in taking the ball down the field and getting it away from
their own goal; and Eldermire and Onderonk in the backfield who played a great game and who
gave us a great deal of trouble in getting the ball through for goals.




TENNIS TEAM



































TRACK TEAM


The first game played in Crisltoal was a game o sec-saw. the ball going down one deile of the
lield and back to the other side. Our teamwork aided us in defeating the BIalbi, aggregation. for
we had them puzzled with our passwork. In tihe first quarter. T. Rankin ki-lclt a goal fromn an
angula r position whichl Spechcts could not reach; 1)e la Peia retaliated with a hard kick around tlie
penalty area which was a mite tool hrd flor our goalkeeper to stop. In the second quarter, the
two teams played on even scale, nobody getting near scoring position. The third and fourth
quarters were thrilling from the begiinnig to the end. .larchosky scored a beautifti gl al after
receiving a perfect pass from Pescod, who brought the ball down the entire length of the hield.
De la Peiia again scored, aided h.v his teammates, from in front ofl the goal just out iat reach of
Tarflinger. Pescod came through with a "sizzling" shot from near the center of the lield to make
the winning tallv for our team. Score. -2. The referees who handled the game made the two
teams play snappy and clean soccer and through their refereeing, one of the best cames to Ibe
played in Cristobal was witnessed.



BASKETBALL TEfAM








The second game was one of continuous long kicks in order to get the ball out of the scoring
zone. De la Pefia and J. Salterio would work the ball down the field, and then one of our backs
would get it and send it down the field to one of our players. De la Pefia after working the ball
to the scoring area with Morales booted the ball into the goal just out of reach of Tarflinger's
long arms to make the first score of the game. In the third quarter De la Pefia again booted an-
other point for his team. In this quarter, our team snapped out of its dreams and made a goal.
Pescod and Marchosky worked the ball down the field from the center of the field into the goal.
De la Peia got the ball on a corner kick and with a neat kick tried for the goal. The ball hit
the post and bounced back. With a Slight twist of his head he hit the ball to score a point for Bal-
boa. We came out with blood in our eyes in the last quarter and determined to beat Balboa. We
took the ball on the first play and Rankin made a long pass from the right wing to Pescod who
made our second tally of the game. We kept trying for the third goal, but the Balboans were
determined not to lose this game and just as they were in position to score another time the
whistle blew, ending the game 3-2 in favor of the Balboaites.
In the third game, we had very little difficulty in keeping the Balboans from ;coring more than
one goal as we had possession of the ball most of the time, losing it only when we tried for goalshots.
The first quarter was uneventful, with both teams trying to get the ball in the open without
success. The second and third quarters were a walk-away for our boys, as we dribbled through
their defensive and scored twice with ease. Rankin made a goal from in front of the posts after
our team had brought the ball down the entire length of the field! Wirtz made a nice shot from the
left side of the field, which went through despite the efforts of T. Alley. Walker came in on a
high pass from the center of the field to make the only tally that his teammates were able to gather
in this game. The fourth quarter was slow as we had the ball most of the time and kept passing it
until the final whistle blew. Score, 2-1, in favor of Cristobal.
Balboa evened the score in games when we met them the following Saturday on their grounds
We were held scoreless, although we put up a great fight. We held them to a tie for the first quarter
but Lipzinski, playing inter-left for Balboa, made a goal after receiving a long pass from Moises
de la Pefia. The Balboa booters must have sensed victory after making their first goal and holding
us scoreless for a half. In the third quarter they came out onto the field and made two smashing
goals that could not be handled by J. Paris, our goalkeeper. The last quarter was a rough and
tumble go for the ball. Score, Balboa 3, Cristobal, 0.
The deciding game, played in Cristobal, was one in which we showed our supremacy over
the Balboa soccer team. Each team played with the determination to win or die. Tommy Rankin
played the game of his life, making two shots that could not have been stopped by any Balboa
goalkeeper. Balboa started scoring when Durfree made a short pass to Salterio who put it into
the corner of the goal post out of Paris' reach. Tommy jumped on the next ball and took it down
the opponents'side of the field by himself and made a long shot that was too fast to be handled by
the goalkeeper. In the second quarter, Balboa took the lead when Lipzinski scored a nice goal
after Durfree and Morales brought the ball down the field. Rankin again came into the limelight
after he and Marchosky brought the ball down the field, and made another shot that was too
hot to handle. In the last quarter Pescod chalked up another pointer for us when he made a goal
after receiving a center pass from Rankin. A couple of minutes later,Charlie put the game on ice
by making a foul shot. We had possession of the ball for the rest of the game not being threatened
in any way by our Balboa rivals.
The line ups for the teams are:
Balboa Positions Cristobal
Specht Goalkeeper Tarflinger and Paris
Onderdonk Left Fullback Bazan
Eldermire Right Fullback Wheeler
Clark Right Halfback Bath
Durfree Center Halfback Pescod
Novey Left Halfback Lockwood
De la Pefia Right Wing Rankin
Walker Inter Right Johnston
Salterio Center Forward Marchosky
Lipzinski Inter Left Paris and Eberenz
Morales Left Wing Wirtz


BASEBALL

Despite the fact that the baseball teams of Balboa High and Cristobal High schools were
evenly matched our rivals defeated us in the first three games of a five games series to win the
inter-scholastic championship. The Balboa aggregation used some clever "head work" for which
they must be duly praised. It was through this brand of playing that we met our "Waterloo."
Our second team played the last two games against the Balboa substitutes and downed them
in a fine fashion. The first of these two games was one of the best baseball games ever witnessed
by High School fans. The game went scoreless for sixteen innings, and in this canto our boys









manager to putt acirssthe onkl tally olfthe game. Smile ood ON ilk"s|. tdIW th omneteis
in the coming ey a r.

The lirst game. pl eyed in C6ristbl. 1)De.mber 't aw .s ., Iwl's bh,, ta hwi \lhA ,a,,dI
.1e ule 1 !of i, illo.i against Cha rlie Pet i d. iThe hits li en the. I. ssti l hi ltC ll w a d l i t
tered, b ut the r lboans hand the bh hnlli 1p 'o us t I h t li p11 i, 111l b I 111 n the TlI I i:h LIeC aieC
thus g inningg enough experience to hnst defeat us bI one run
We scored two runs in the second inning w hen .e\ "Ic .almc.loc hl it amn lA\lcd theC I h0.ttles ,
Alle. replaced him .an allowed ius one mr run il the lilth til'l e the .ion Ot our tc i
B dho almso scored twt runs in the second inning getting ltihle lits it, this inniu ThIc put the
g ime nl ice in the inlht ilnin lh enl tche n hi, .mi tl ill m nl ,I ..lti,' a lr lune l e l itt iInl on
tiy .n error. Score o this game w.s ialbeI.e ; Critstoil CIhlie i .nn' Il l ul t- mne w ho
faced him to make Ia new sitrile-ot re h ord for Cristob l Ilihl St hunt

Six runs in tie first Inninig is enough to disctur e a.n tr., W in t our tllms tult a.ll the
l irder t, try tri c t down such a big ie.l hut all in ''.t.. Alth un h 'i i h t i I .a s II I t, 7,.
t.lboal hadl to play first-class haill to keep their leI.u.
Pescod our southpln- hurler, a;llhwed 13 hits, more lthan ldl6.1 l.- hd e"r, dreanwd Ql
getting in the pr ist three years. They' 'i t thi m ,l i uintlhe c their hl .ul. gettine1 six hits ,1 .dIsL six
runs in the first inning.
.\llev relieved .Meade Iwho h.ad hurled for seen innings, doinY lne itli of hldin, uas t> .,
few scattered lilts. These .boys pitched like veterans ;ld kept uts rther p.zzled ith their ,
and slants.
IBy previogrvious agreement of malutI this gamne was called in the eighth inning. Y c ne, r
can tell what may have hiaI|ne d, but the game should have leen lnis.hed out!

Playing a game of nick and tuck. baoth teams were out to win this ga.me, one to t it ] the
series, the thler to stave olf defeat, butl no matter how hard we tried, we were iInxetd 1K.ll, \.IIll
the series by defeating us by a score of 4 to 3.
We scored one run in tle first. one run in thlle fourth. ,Ind our last score w.s mae the sixth
when Wheeler came home on a single I Sanders water re aching list on a lk aI I sealing,
second.
Balboa did its scoring Iy making two runs in the Iourth, anud two runs in lthe eight, when
D)e la Penia walked. Corrigan beat out at sacrifice, a single by Neville. killed the bags and then
.Mleade singled to send )e Ila Peina and Corrigan across with tying and windiW g runs.
Although Charlie Pescod allowed only live hits, they were bunched and I ere hit ist w len
needed. We collected eight hits rom All's pitches.

A pitchers battle that lasted for sixteen innings was the main attraction in this game.
Not until the last out was made was this game finished .as each team hal many men on t.ies
each inning. George Tart'linger and Pete Corrig.an, opposing pitchers, did ltine iob on thle mound
and the best team won.
We scored thlie only tally of the game in the first of the sixteenth inning. Bo, Ncely got on
Ibase when a slow grounder went through Sutherland, short-stop for thle lIBalboaitcs .and
scored when Curtis hit a line drive to left field that Friday could nlot h.andle.
Neelvy. behind thlie at, and Agnew. pl.ayig second b.ne, did some very sn.tppy\ pla.. i .ind
kept the infield peppy throughout the game.
All of the boys that played in this game should lie highly complimentc tor the way thce
played.

Again our second team did what the Varsity toon cuhl not Td lcal liill.o.,I' ThIle Il-
boaites didn't stand a chance of winning thi game. as our second t.eam wanted to show ulp tlhe
Varsity and did!!
tOur oys defeated their rivals 10-. in a very uneventhil gamne. We sr.red one rn, in the
first inning, three runs in the third, four in the fourth, and two more in lthe si\h lialbo., .red
one in the first. three in thle third, twto in the sixth .nd tw, in the cihth inn1 1. to, cd then smonla .
Hllarohl Agnew suffered a fracturled linger in this game while tro ing to s, .o. ulp .a ground I.rill
in the third inning.

Our representatives and their box stores were:

E I>rein .. ss. l." 1 2 ,, I t
Marchosky. C.2 1 37 4 I
.11 bfrga., ct 11 2 2 1 1 l> 1
Pescod. p. 1" 1 2 1 4
Tarflinger. rf. and p. It 5 7 -" 1.1 i
Wheeler. If. 14 .' 4 I I 2 1
W irtz. ll. S 1 1 13 0 I 0
Rankin, .3rd. 1 5 ) '








AB R H PO A E BB
Curtis, 2nd................ ... .... ... 18 2 4 6 8 4 1
Sanders, If.. ............ ... .... 14 0 2 0 0 0 2
Agnew, 2nd...... .......... .-... ..... 8 1 4 4 9 0 0
Paris, rf............... ............- .... 4 0 1 1 0 0 0
Neely, c.................. .................... 10 1 1 18 9 1 0.
Ebdon, Ist............... .... ............ 11 1 0 30 0 0 I
Stone,rf ............... .... .......... 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
De la Ossa, 2nd....... --......-........- 4 0 0 0 3 0 0
Pierce-..............- ..... ..... ....... 7 0 1 3 12 1 0
See you next year, Balboa!


BOYS' TENNIS

Interclass matches, with the New Cristobal Tennis Club and the Coco Solo of icer-, were
featured this year in tennis.
In the first set of matches with Balboa, Balboa somewhat surprisingly took four matches
out of five. Bejarano coming through in the usual C. H. S. style, easily took his match.
RESULTS:
No. 1 Singles: HENDRICKSON (B) defeated PESCOD (C), 4-6, 8-6, 6-4.
No. 2 Singles: BEJARANO (C) defeated FIDANQUE (B), 6-1, 1-6, 6-4.
No. 3 Singles: ARROYO (B) defeated BERRY (C), 6-1, 6-2.
G. NOVEY RANKIN
No. 1 Doubles: (B) defeated (C) 7-5, 2-6, 6-3
R. NOVEY REINHOLD
SPINELLA LOCKWOOD
No. 2 Doubles: (B) defeated (C) 4-6, 6-2, 6-4
MCCARTNEY HILL
The second set of matches was held at Fort Davis, but Balboa's superiority seemed to show
again when Lockwood, Reinhold, Berry and Campbell were the only ones to come with their
matches in the bag.
RESULTS:
No. 1 Singles: HENDRICKSON (B) defeated PESCOD (C), 6-1, 5-7, 6-4.
No. 2 Singles: MORALES (B) defeated BEJARANO (C), 2-6,7-5,6-4.
No. 3 Singles: ARROYO (B) defeated RANKIN (C), 8-10, 6-1, 6-4.
REINHOLD R. NOVEY
No. 1 Doubles: (C) defeated (B) 4-6, 6-2, 6-3
LOCKWOOD G. NOVEY
BERRY MCCARTNEY
No. 2 Doubles: (C) defeated (B) 6-4, 6-0.
CAMPBELL SPINELLA
The last match was forfeited after our team had won the first set, in order that the Balboa
team could make train connections.
The last meet at Balboa featured some rather close and exciting play which the match scores
did not seem to indicate. Bejarano, Number two man, playing against Henrickson, Balboa's
Number one man, took his first set and was well on the way to taking the match before his op-
ponent woke up from his daze.
Lockwood, our number five man, playing against Morales, Balboa's second ranking, also
took his set, slowed down a trifle and then coming back in the third, set the pace until five-all
when he slowed down a trifle to lose 5-7.
RESULTS:
No. 1 Singles: HENRICKSON (B) defeated BEJARANO (C), 7-9, 6-3, 6-2.
No. 2 Singles: MORALES (B) defeated LOCKWOOD (C), 2-6, 6-1, 7-5.
No. 3 Singles: ARROYO (B) defeated REINHOLD (C), 6-3, 6-4.
FIDANQUE ELLIOT
No. 1 Doubles: (B) defeated (C) 601, 6-2
DONAVAN DE LA OSSA
In all events C. H. S. next year will have a smooth working tennis team which will be con-
sistently victorious, the groundwork having been laid this year as shown by the higher rankings
of the newer members obtained this year.
The ranking list:
1. PESCOD 2. BEJARANO 3. RANKIN
4. REINIIOLD 5. LOCKWOOD 6. DE LA OSSA
7. CAMPBELL 8. HILL 9. ELLIOT
10. BERRY 11. MARCHOSKY 12. BATH
. 13. STONE









TR.\CK


t hes Wic 't nIght CItch. sI Cs at s it" Nt tica. tt "s', thit mt, A" it o1 11O A i ct
wc I lo 1. it ,atI IV s ti.c tts'C i It, tIlei It I I s l It Ilt itt Ittli I I till li tint Nearltil S





l Bst l blty ',s? i vo, se r here',taiIt~ a,'Usti A-, i raI I..*IilI v t, ,o i IIl 'svfa ,1cu nlt






















W e I tit ,ldue ."r C c"h




1 I I Illlt Pei't.. (I~





.1 'rl1,il~lc I ~ i


2 \t.ts.titI I
ti't is, t% ilit Ias,,,in- lI'-.ch, drie it "A O t" m.I11h "I A N 6,kw m



























D Lt" tsrs''c e tlin








ihx C'r
the 50 vardsand tile 2111 .ni dash t i" I '. a 11 goo Nit ech ftewwV N








BASKETBALL


Due to the early publication of our annual, it is impossible to give a complete summary of
the basketball series between the Balboa and Cristobal High School.
Judging from the results of the first four games it appears that we will win the championship.
Our team romped all over our rivals, outplaying them, outshooting them, and outsmarting them
in almost every play of the first three games.
We won the first three games played, losing the fourth when we were forced to play with
Pescod out on account of flu. Our team needs to win one more game to cop the series, which
requires four wins out of seven games.
Mr. Kenneth Vinton, our coach, whipped the team into condition in two short weeks and
had it clicking like a group of veteran ball players. He taught the boys some plays that ran our
opposition literally "off their feet." We owe all the success of our fine team to Mr. Vinton, and
to the P. Gs. who helped whip the squad into shape by practicing with them.

Our team is composed of the following players:

C. PESCOD, F.
T. RANKIN, F. (Capt.)
G. TARFLINGER, C.
Aiv. MARCHOSKY, G. & C.
H. LOCKWOOD, G.
B. WHEELER, G
SANDERS, BARNETT, ALBERGA, and HORINE, utility.
Firijt Game:
The Balboa Playshed was the scene of the first cage thriller. Our boys came out the first
quarter with intentions of making our rivals know that we were masters and succeeded very well.
The game opened with surprising speed and kept the same pace until the final whistle finished
the playing.
Though the score was so close, the game was very unbalanced as our boys had the advantage
from the beginning of play when Marchosky sank the first field goal until Wheeler put the ball
through the hoop for the last counter.
Pescod, diminutive forward, was the scoring star with twelve points to his credit. The entire
team showed supremacy over Balboa in passing, shooting and teamwork.
Eskilson, Balboa forward, had our guards puzzled with his type of playing for a quarter or
so, but was soon stopped when we got used to his style.
Tarflinger had a "jinx" on Wood, pivot man for the Pacific siders, and kept him worried
throughout the game.
Lockwood, Wheeler and Marchosky, played stellar games in holding our opponents to the
minimum of shots.
Rankin, Charlie's teammate, aided in bringing the ball down in almost every play. His
shooting was a bit erratic, but he deserves a lot of credit for helping us in winning this game.
The score of this game was 28-24.

Second Game:
Balboa suffered their second defeat at the Cristobal Playshed, after a two weeks lay-off
during Easter vacation. We defeated them to the tune of 32-22.
This game was a rough and tumble exhibition, and fouls were called very often. Marchosky,
SRankin, and Lockwood were all thrown out of the game for four personals. A couple of the Balboa
players also were thrown out for fouls.
We opened with a rapid attack on the enemy goal, and had them puzzled throughout the
game. Pescod, with his clever shifting and dead eye for the basket, kept all the Balboans guessing
as to what was to happen next.
We had the game in the bag from the beginning of play till the end of the game.
Balboa's stars in this game were Novey and Eskilson.

Thirn Game:
We made it three in a row the following Friday night with a 38-27 victory over our opponents.
This game was ragged and slow in comparison with the preceding games, and had it not been
for our sharpshooting at the basket we might have lost.
Balboa's guards were baffled on every play and couldn't stop our boys from scoring.
Wheeler, Lockwood, and Marchosky played a great game at guards, while Tarfllinger also
did his share by getting the ball off the basket numerous times. In our forward department,
Pescod and Rankin couldn't seem to click.
Both Sutherland and Eskilson, of the opposing team, played well, and if the rest of the Pacific
aggregation had played as they did, Balboa High School might have given us some competition
^1 in basketball.










T hil sli ri44. p ~.4 l t 'i l .Jl l. ,1 .. .4 4 I \)Al the 1 i,l ll I...1 1 I,. 1 ,,+ ,.I \\) h ., I (.*.
the two high l it .lhs I', T o.l t.niui .11 i.>th al 44a- w. k. \v \ 4i r..(i, .

I 44.. 441 411a4














4",', 5 4 .tl' 5,





"144'tihc ll tII''1 442.44444 lt' 4 h44 11.r. l 4 I4.t1.' 1, 11.+ 441 1144' th + .4".44. 4 44.4. Il.4+441 ,,44 t ,4 44 +-,' 1. 2 ,41
in lth tra. ns hwrr ur.n .l, in tp..I t h t tihe 11 ... in 1t1. I '. =i iyI t hp tw 1" ..w.
T rhe c or f 4 t44 is u' rli, 22 s 2 t, t.a ll ln I4 1 144, Critl.l4 1( 14. lr(I hmlw n bi ( 1. p l.m1 ,1 li 6I .,,I 1 h












11.44v 4(c.. t.4 I'h.'t11, S1,.'tri.j II,{4t1h \\i 41,I4 41tl .\1,44 .\444 (...~ r 4,'' h 'r. .r 1,41,.44,444... 444,1
.in l i.sL tia.ll game1 pl0 a ed lel > Cri : .LOTi a liills....


the liin lii;hIt I'." CriAm(t'.a al.,l




















1)441t I l. 44l.l I 444 ..4 41 ,L4 4 4 .' .4r. .\t llh, l',1. ".lt .4r4/ 't.. lt I I4I.- l l 11 1, l .\, ., .1 '.4. 4 1
I)..r'a t *'1 444







i4l4I. ( L,. ll' l (()t a 2l" ll4 2i tii
FIRsI G(i (h ii ouu 21





Slie first 4 4 am o ti4 l e tr .i t ] r 1t," -s .1 0iot thll *\ i 1 o 21 .h ll4 l e sa It 1 w ,is pla. el "n (h. w. 4 2t .tl
Crist6AW l. The girls w=.t not onto the flour th "loW"A pep.and pro, ceded tfo -1h1- te I(ll- ".i,
14irl..s il lwe.' ul. t s1. n i4i4jhth i. .i*n 1 toh eTI \..c lli4 1r l.gI 4 h t4h4 p.1leind p Ih.' aw14 l k.4 cu4".v .tik ti.
win t.. e tirst two sets I,\m. t n l. e t ai ke thi e t hl4 i set as most o rt lre |l. c rs 1 4 re tir.. d .ut Tleh
scores wtere 21-19, 2110. .aid I-21. Tile lol inhiy |IIcrS represented Crstoak l: 'li/al lth










)i n c "44444.'4u4'4t .'r .\ 441 4 i 1 11yl. 4I, 4,t44 44 44 44 114n ,u l 4 i l h 1 .1 .h , h 4444444.1 441144 1 r144. -.4414
llavis I p1. t tCi tt S. .t S t lle R th .' Iin st4 t , ar. A44 nn CarrIIIT. r. Ch 4I44. 4Ch4 i.r ,ul
D .ot. Ilirket ; o r siihul st itu lts t roi' ihi" I. ()' \ n. l. r M ildlr 2 1) iill <1I- I I leii .' ml sto s 1,
1Dors Stroo.r





Sit rlN! (Gi mX ('t- ,Oi o il; I 2 1'.
1iThlis Inc \ t.t\ h' p2l2 ed 1 o\C. ia t EI la ,i o44 () to I r 2), 1n ii I ial hota \a" .is t,,n it d i.: t t Id Th e
games lv' re ii ,..t i .l r th t he'1ns s11, cd splindid p hs\ork Th.e s44i4 t lin:-1 i |, s "'d u i e li.e
exception .o, 11len A.Ia lst4o 41oin44 n1 to1 rti. e .ai' .\Wn C r ue rs &i the lt.1 p.. TIhe
scores were 21-10, 21- 4 ',1. i ]. 10-21.
Ti llKD C tiI NoS\ I1 n i5 "o.
On November 5 "o piih* .! .(.! lbol . in .on. our omn lor Int smh o] ch.o or othi "r th, Yir!
dliMl not pl. up lto tIleir sta44 rdi. tIherel, i hI sing t, o sets" on t three. I444I..I I 'a on te IuI I A t o,
se.rl t ith t. h r. t imth tMe wcore ot 22-20 The rline.i, u s th, s ."iie as thle phre in ts hame.
lFort it I \\If N \ i I:TI i 121
The Cristo ml girlsin Krne cld to liolo.i on Nomber 12 "ith !iiesuol t.,lng ..II o hrcv ..u s
IIls Svturd.\ thMe gi!s. shorin:m thiir old 4 if mw h letter and iPh their 1 o0 te rnw u""" *n
and splendid pass torkl. tool the hrst two fr games "iA the t orewo ot 21-lo0.atd 22 2I TIh S st
1 ncit p "as useI .s in the On g.ane oi tlie swmon.
Flv'rin C. ;\ I N r' I t It 1.V
(The 1.st ,one .of thle s "ri h,1 11 4 )l I. t ih C stol.' J on No em4h er P.4 |4 oll t4. ns o vlh d
teriImi. l to in .aiid .' Critol bd ol d t n ed me uhaie ho''.r th4 se ries., hc 4",14 4 d' t4-*4m1u. i *t
tWke the host g.arms, how er. iw nere unbl* to"do so. out W m I did t ake the voiid o ..aun", t '",
Hard tight. Crs( .l'i's sore 0 -, 2114 .\,21A4 la ldlo,'s ,as 21 S11. The r' c ".1 r t1.i4 ply e, d tin hl..I
gm.i Cristl n series l '.ti'it mo h M e \u.l4 l t i'.r Ieen hi.t"1ns


IBASKETI,.\1.1.
Fl.'r G \n I \N 4i\u 7 .
Cris1, WA.1144.4 4inuc t-o tl i ia.. t. |l.a the Nlo .mni. c l tMe -e.. 4 t .4in4 ~ I 1h
dill their ,est .to sto Ip4 1i .. ll t somt chu4 or 4 l her I 4 .'1 i "In dle to.., n 4,4 44 A4ith i Lli. 1 v. i' I
144 ed4 ha.rd .a tried to do1 her pr. t. t1. were ..' al unable 4 to stop 4 .4 i 14 .1 4I n -o. 44 I 4
Crisl lt.a l's line.+ T| T as. l hlows: Ful.. r s. Klh i t1.. lIl.. s. Rutl- h m iknhlt..:,i, .id M, "a v
Reinhold: (tuara s, Millv Oen, Helen Aaousatom.and !kctt% Statlr; Centcer Dot. ['I
(Cait.). Betty Stetler. and Mary Ann Carrnthers.
S-:V"N GA.M ,- I \N R 14.
albo.i comc to Crist al- this Slnrdaiy to platy tle si'o nid gane od thle we ;Anu i, Ti
gymw started out much biclUr than the one belore it!h C A-stoll sh Aio "ni oi ..I N i" .< I
and passwork. Throughout tMe "Khol: v:.une Owu girs jdSt d their tb t. oct"! -ia i I. Iut
tounld it impo sam4 e lin4-up "4.4 used .'l 'e h c k eI Wore.








THIRD GAME-JANUARY 21.
For the third game of the series, Cristobal went to Balboa. On this day Cristobal again tried
its best to win the game but fate was against it again. The game was about the fastest and hardest
played of the season. The regular team played the whole game and it ended with the score of
25-15.
FOURTH GAME-JANUARY 28.
On January 28, Balboa came over to Cristobal bringing most of her substitutes instead of
her regular team and still determined to beat us. However, this time Cristobal fooled her by
taking all the points in the first quarter. Balboa at once put in her two star players but was
still unable to stop the splendid passwork of Cristobal. The game was fast and ended with the
score of 38-9.


INDOOR BASEBALL
Somehow or other, there wasn't much interest shown in the Girls' Indoor Baseball this year
and just a few of the Varsity girls showed up at practice. Miss Bailey and Mr. Franks planned
to drop the sport, but if this had been done it would have made us lose our chance to win the cup.
The gym class came to the rescue, however, and played the baseball schedule, for which much
credit should be given them.
FIRST GAME-FEHRUARY 26.
Balboa came to Cristobal to play the first game of the indoor baseball series on Feb. 26
Both teams worked hard, but Balboa showed the better brand of playing and won by the scor
of 45-5. The following girls represented Cristobal: Margaret Reinhold (Capt.)-c., Eileen Ford-p.,
Victoria Hollowell, 1st Base, Mary Ann Carruthers, 2nd Base, Betty Stetler, 3rd base, Sister
Hayes, s.s., Hope Hollowell, r. f., Ann Gibson, 1. f.. The substitutes were Ruth Wikingstad and
Olga Roe.
SECOND GAME-MARCH 4.
In the second game, which was played in Balboa, fewer errors were made than in the previous
game, and the girls played much better as a whole. But still Cristobal was unable to beat Balboa
and lost 26-12. The same line-up was used as in the first game.
THIRD GAME--MARCH 11.
Balboa won the last game of the series, thereby taking one more sport toward the cup. The
Balboa girls outclassed Cristobal in all the games but this time the girls settled down and Balboa
won by the close score of8-6. This showed that Cristobal really could have had a chance of winning
the past games if more spirit had been shown at the beginning of the season.


GIRLS TENNIS
FIRST MEET:
At the first meet played at Balboa April 22, the Cristobal girls lost two out of the three
matches to Balboa. They lost the 2 singles matches and won the doubles.


VOLLEYBALL TEAM



































IBASKETBALL T'I' \. M


D. Griflin (BIIS) defeated Eliz. IIyaves (CllSI, 4-0(: -0: 7-:..
Vo,,. 2 S,,'tih,..
Edith lBaker (BilS) delcatedl lMaltllc Bliss (CllS), (I-,; 5 -4.

Stetler and \Vickingstad dfclatcl Michaelson ;ir d johalinncs. 1-; (,-5: 0()-2
SNECt iNI) MEET:
At this meet Cristolbal w;s more successful, winning 2 iut oi i m.at lisw It .- il. ld ol
the home courts on April 29. 1955.
.Vo. 2 Sinile,.
Eliz. IHaves (CIIS) defeated Doro thl (riflin I S ltIS 8-t ,.

First set Dle la Pei.a and (iuardia l BIilS i on from \iclkinm-r t .ul Stcllcr i ClIS I
Second set W\ickingst;ud and Stetlur (CIIS won roim lohiimrs, ;nl, M.\i.,nl, II !s


CY.YM CLASS































TENNIS TIE A.'


Third t \\ ;.I, ini..,I ;mnd Sirl ltr ICHS I an Irom i l, Penri and Glu:.rli.-, BHSi. 6-4.
THIRD .\MEET:
Thl- in.l meet t,.i. pl,,.d .1.L- G. 19q3 at Bl,!o;,. ,nd Crlitol,.,l %on .ll three matches from
th.-r ..pp.'ncrt. Thi;. Jec .dei the rouLtome .,I- the .eri f. in CritoL.to l's. l, ir
.\N I S,.:.,..
M. Rli.,s CHS, .%,tn from E. Baker IBHSl. 4-I 6..3: .-4.
V\'. 2 S.,,,., .
E. H..., i ICI 5 ,, .rn ir'om D. Grilling IRHS 4.6. 0.2 b.'2

R \\ l l. nsl .ind B Stetler 'CHSi ion Ir..m R I..h;irine in T hliclhaelsnn IBHSI.
., .1


F.OWLINr TEAM


M:





























JUNIOR~ HIG.11 SCHOL)! FACL1.1 I

E li- OE'ri, A i h S--r,, Mi- B,,H -.L....




THE J UNIOR H-IGII SCIIOOLI


One of the many new features in the
1935 "Caribbean" is a section devoted to
the Junior High School. The suggestion
that this group be given an opportunity
to identify itself with the Senior High
year-book met with a very enthusiastic
response from the students of grades
seven and eight. It was hoped that a
large number of contributions dealing
with the various activities of Junior I igh
would be submitted to the "Caribbean"
staff for publication in this section. Al-
though the amount of material offered
this year was rather smPll, we are not
discouraged, since the students of Junior
High had no previous experience in this
sort of work. With a new building, and
the many facilities offered in cr nnectiI nI
with it, it will be possible for these young-
er students to organize their own clubs,
athletic ior.a'nizations, and class groups,


and we shall welcome the opportunity to
aid them in gaining recognition Iby in-
cluding n rite-ups ;rnd pictures in the
"Caribbean." By lc;ls of these oIrg. ni-
zatisns in the seventh ,ind eighth grades.
it is hoped thlit a large amount lof v;'lui-
ble experience will be gained l y the
students participating. and thlat this
experience will nmake the r rgAniatllzions in
Senior Hligh even more .\-;vlu;al,!e Ihi n
they are at present. With ;ll thle grades
organized, the entire school should ihe
.able to show marked imlpronivcn ent in so
f'.r as ability to) carry l ut \vrious typOes
of school activities is concerned. We are
confident that the junior figh is r.adtly
to demonstrate its eagerness to lat.uch
its school organizations. ;ind their section
should ibe one fl the most interest inI sec-
tions of the 11"4 "C1irilbbiln.'



























EIGHTH GRADE BOYS


EIGHTH GRADE CIRLS


$nnior 7Hig~ %r~torrl




























SEVENTH GI A ( DI I )iYS


SEVENi'! G.ilDE GIRLS


cSjurtinr ~ligl! ~rltoul




























HONOR STUDENTS
Reading left to right: Phillip Reidell, Blanche Howe, Kathieen
Phillips, Robert Reppa, Betty McCleary,
and Bobby Reinhold.



AMERICAN LEGION AWARD


This year the American Legion Post of
Cristobal began the annual policy of
awarding to the boy and girl from the
eighth grade bronze medals for being
outstanding in the class. The outstand-
ing students were nominated in each
homeroom and then voted upon by the
students and the teachers. Robert Reppa
and Kathleen PhilliIs were chosen as
the most outstanding bcy and girl in the
eighth grade class on the following basis:
(20% each).
HONOR: Strength and stability of
character; high standards of
conduct: keep sense of what is
right; adherence tc truth and
conscience, and devotion to du-
ty and practice of clean speech.
COURAGE: Bravery in the face of
opposition and danger, and grit
to stand up for the right and


one's duty.
SCHOLARSHIP: Scholastic attain-
ment; evidence of industry and
application in studies.
LEADERSHIP: Ability to lead and
to accomplish through group
action
SERVICE: Kindliness, unselfishness,
fellowship; protection of the
weak and the promotion of the
interests and welfare of asso-
ciates without hcpe of personal
award.
The school most certainly has Captain
M. W. Basieux to thank for the starting
of this annual affair, of which a similar
type has begun in the high school. At
all times do the school children find Cap-
tain Basieux most thoughtful and co-op"
erative.


PN
6,

1011
hN








"TOURIST ANt) N()NT()L'RIST"
.111ar/ )irlde./ '

"I beg your pardilon." so net lie mur-
muired ias they brushed past .lie. I looked
Iup in time to see three tlouriils dlis;appellI
into a Itndu slop. I foll ted lthei in is
I xwals ihop.I; 1(t get ai present ior 1
friend.
The store was like any tilher I iintu
store you niight enter: gliss shoIi.1'se,.
along the sides and at one endd; rentaltl
carpets tion the iledll flo rs; small, Ili
smoking stands alnd tea-t liles. carvedtl
i ilag iii nenly and highly polished; S:pan-
ish shawls were thrIown careillyk over
chairs; hanging 11l thet walkl were tapes-
tries. In the showcases were amber and
ivory heads, bracelets. c.llings, and
small 1Buddas and other small figures.
Carefully placed on cotton iwool ;an in
small boxes were pieces of lade jewelry
There were also paiailias and killmlonas iof
all colors, 1pi Ikinl purses llad tlliLn-, so)
often found in H indu shops.
The tourist who had pushed past nme
wandered around until site saw .miiIIiiii.
she liked and walked over to it. "Hlow
much is it?" she asked the attendant that
came up to serve her.
tHe thought for a moment and said at
length, 'Filicen dollars."
"That's too much." she protested.
"it's not worth it."
"Well, you're a tourist, yes? So I give
it to you for twelve."
I walked over to the other side of the
room. dol-iiin a stand or two. and picked
up the exact replica of what she had
picked up. "Il\o much?" I askedd a
clerk.
Hie looked at it and said. "Filteen
dollars."
I said as she had dtne. "'lThat's too
much!"
"W'ell." he said, "You not a tourist,
so I give it to you for twelve"


"AT THIE WIIARF"
/Jaticqi'tiie Bri'l'e '/
Let us mingle with these buzzing
bees! Hoarse, lIellowing a;nd screeching
cries of the wearv fishermen rise above
the shifting of nets. docking of crafts,


.'rr '-iiiiln of fish, aniiid I ,ldi dli iLcy ( iCes.
Inctllh are aterirng l1r suit.hlle price's i
shelling their tc'lch.
As sthckly-Ilifill licstiiirl. tomes.
Tioi rd u', clild mostly ill p.'lth ed V: I-
in ts. which give g i Ne,' tl u i;'ll i 'i ir 111
ii n tl l s I h ,i. l t I iii( il t l-ir oi nste lu tIi
liy mst ildrc lit' r sequel sts, wilh ;% I il (|iirliq>i
whk Ill;'t %( pmkli.i'' s iln rct llshl .\litr .I
1riltlhcr I 'ngth V st)rYv it O ( the i;rISllis. ;'Ill
smtrll g.ins rv' Ali/ l frol m Ills 4i1. g hirllls
;it \w rk, ..t his stiig et'.lAio I e\.iiiliien l the
ditlffer t \.iri|eties itl lIsh. A iIllLI th(i-
dlral, gre'y colors (iie I;irri(t ishl si.tin l out
inll ciintr.'l wit its rarc shlilcs. IkiCih
esp)eciAlly ilinteristdti ii the p iri, t fish
SleC'tluse Ill its (c:)I Iss) l if 1'ts l rs. I
ltiuight Ione I Ii r ;a lry. sliaill s n .ll.
'.lssilln thnru h this Co'slim pl lit;ln
crIowit \W' liitered at tile variIouis il obels
that aroused our cur'tisitv.l unill wie lil
o)lbs'erved, to ollir satisf .tt iol n, all tlie
glallour ii ("his colorful scene.


"A SILVERY HIGHWAY"
Y Ilailda I/ar. 77

I think that one of the loveliest sights
that can le seen on the Isthmus is Gatiin
Lake at moonlight. The moinn reflects
on the water splashing and rippling a-
gainst the rocks at the surtiice of the
lake. As you look at it. it gives you the
impression that you are looking at a
broad silvery highway, never coming to
an end. At either side of the lake are
seen the black, irregular shadows of the
trees peeping into() the water. Farther
ihack are the gloomy and irregular imiin-
tains, completing the outline of this pict-
tulresque scene. If yo,(u want to see
somiethm really beautiful go <,ut to
Gatun Lake at moonlight, iand see )iie
".il\. '. I Iighxway."


"I AZIN;G"
.,Jan Ir alh 77
When you think If being a freshman.
vou naturally think it's w olde rhil. Tien
some person brings iup the sutil'et tof
initiation. Your cheerful expression
chngeies. and you mutter under your
breath like "Why did that person ever
have to come an midi"







Before you realize it, the next year
begins, and "Field Day" is just a few
days off. Then the glorious day dawns.
After being made to pull a car, you're
forced to carry signs denouncing your-
self, for instance "We dumb Scobies" cr
"Down with the Freshmen."
Then the fun begins at the field. Or
is it fun?
The Sophomores have planned for a
year to get their revenge, and now here's
their chance, and what a chance!
Sometimes they are successful, or per-
haps it is the other way around. Then
comes the flour fight and you emerge
like a platinum blonde or a person who
has never seen the sun. Next comes the
paddles and you hear, "How in the world
will they ever expect us to sit down for a
week?" Tug-of-war comes and the Soph-
omores give the Freshmen a look like a
thundercloud, and probably your hands
are blistered from pulling, but you keep
thinking, "We've got to beat 'em." So
you stick.
The day is one never to be forgotten,
and it's soon over. You go home most
likely with a good coat of green paint,
lipstick, and rouge applied in streaks and
spots, and somewhere all the illbred
Sophomores have kicked you and you
are blistered in different places from dif-
ferent things.
But a little smile comes to you because
you're thinking, "Oh, won't we take it
out on the green Freshmen next year,
though."


"THE BEWILDERED FRESHMAN"
Ruth .llody '37
After eight long years of steady grind-
ing she has at last reached one of the most
important steps in her life. Entering the
building she stands, "The bewildered
Freshman," with the map of the year in
her hand, not knowing which way to
turn. She sees teachers and pupils hur-
rying and scurrying around her. After
going into the assembly she sees and
hears almost everyone talking at once.
What a babble!
The teacher is speaking-it seems as
though he is listing the rules and regula-
tions of the coming year. He soon realizes


he isn't being heard, and calls for the at-
tention of the pupils. Things soon begin
to get organized and quieted down. Then
the freshman decides she isn't going to
have such a bewildering time after all.


"JAMES, A NEGRO BOY"
.Jariorie I ane '38
My maid has a mischievous boy named
James. She sEys he is "perezoso." He
has a cat named Gatofon. I believe he
named it that because "g to" means cat
in Spanish. Sometimes James goes fishing
and brings back "pescados" as he calls
the fish. I cften pity poor Gatonon, be-
cause he whines so piteously for fish and
his reward is a "yank" of his tail.
I am not at all fond of James nor his
cruel pranks. Sometimes he ties Gatofion
to a pole, places a fish just out of reach,
walks off and laughs to hear Gatoiion
howl for the fish and liberty, then returns
and picks up the fish, walks off and leaves
Gatofion there. Sometimes I set him
free.
James is very heartless. He beats
Gatofion very cruelly at times. I would
like him to know how it is to suffer like
that. I believe James, forone, will never
understand Gatoiion's feelings.


"STUDENT COOPERATION"
Loui.'e de la OJ'a 357
Student cooperation is the backbone of
the whole school system; therefore it will
be necessary to have student cooperation
when we enter the new high school.
The new school has ccst the govern-
ment hundreds of thousands of dollars.
Each student should make it his duty to
refrain from destroying school property,
and see that other students do likewise.
If we start out in the right way, other
classes will follow.
We would not think of destroying some
valuable possession of our own, and since
the new school has been built for the
benefit and use of the students, every
student should take the same care of the
school as though it were his own.
Certain liberties will be offered in the
new school, and if the proper advantage
is taken of them. we will have an ideal
school system.


40 04










1It it mU v r
trllan Ketan'T


An ambassador to France, who did not
speak the language of that country at the
time he took his new post, attended his
first formal luncheon and made a speech,
which was received with native politeness
by the guests who did not understand
English.
After the American had acknowledged
the applause, he sat down and listened to
a Frenchman who made what sounded like
a flowe ry speech in his own language.
Not wishing to be outdone in cordiality
the ambassador at each pause in the dis-
course applauded loudly. This did not
appear to please his wile, who frowned at
at him repeatedly but failed to li ..iuril.
him.
She finally sent a note to the speaker's
table telling him that what he was applau-
ding so generously was a translation of
his own speech.



A boxer in training was asked by a
bystander what he was doing.
On reply ing that he was shadow-L in iiie
the bystander said, "Well, why don't you
hit the shadow?"
"Oh, I'm just %iti iiin for the shadow to
hit first." snapped the boxer.



A country hick once saw a mirror for
sale, and thinking it was a picture of his
son, bought it and hid it up in the. attic.
His wife. knowing that he had something
up there, but not kni'i ,.i- what it was,
went up and searched the attic until she
found it. Then she instantly exclaimed,
"So this is the hag you have been runlliniL
around with lately."



Fortune Teller: "And you are .'roin to
marry a short, s'im, blonde Lirl
Charlie P.: "Can't you be specific-
that description fits all four."


A man was carrying some bananas, andi
when asked where he was g.,in;.l he ans-
wered. "Oh, I am .,'iiiIn out with the
bunch,."



Mlr Hackett has so many wrinkles on
his forehead that he has to screw on his
hat.



An American tourist was sight-seeing
in Rome, and from all appearances, he
wasn't enII.vingi himself any too well.
Suddenly the Luik-r stopped the bus, and
pointed to an ornate fountain on the side
of the road.
"If you throw a coin in there," said he,
'you will never be able to rest until you
come back to Rome."
"Oh, yeah, snorted the American as he
reached for the door handle.
"Where are you going?."asked the guide
"To pull a coin out of that pool," he
snapped, "just to prove that I don't want
to be here even now."



Ernest laramillo. -tr.tllnc to say, was
very slow at arithmetic in the lower
grades, and his teacher had particular
difficulty in making him learn to sub-
tract.
"Look here," she said, patiently, "if
you had eight p.'nnici anti lost three,
how many would you have left?"
laramillo thought for a minute.
"But for vy.'" was his puzzled reply.
"should I lose three pennies?"



Fir.rt .cho/iol/ o.r.cip: "Do you know Bil-
ly Hollowell has three eggs every morn-
ing for his breakfast?"
Second S. G: "Why three ci.s1?"
Flir.r S. G.: "Oh, one for himself and
two for his shirt."


0


r--


lo
''
c









hi


P-.O


DICKSTER'S WEBTIONARY
Atom-the first man.
Beaker-larger
Convection-cake or candy
Induction--method of getting acquaint-
ed.
Jon-heavy metal found in razors.
Manual-common Spanish name.
Molar solution-Listerine
Secant-1 60th of a minute.
Sine-a notice
Tangent-an Ethiopian
Vector-a winner
Volt-to cast a ballot
Cuts-slang term denoting courage
Classes-receptacles for liquid
Chapel-French for hat.
Principal's list-the headman's uneven
walk.
Overcuts-heavy outside garments
worn in winter.
Laboratory-pertaining to Labrador,
a Northern peninsula.
Science-painful ailment of the nose
and forehead.
Quota-two bits.
Boat-meaning two.
Ship-to drink coffee or tea slowly.
Tram-to take your partner's ace.
Gull-one of the female sex.
Shark-to astound or surprise.
Whale-to cry like a baby.
Santa Claus-a myth.
Cheer-something to sit on.
Buoy-One of the male sex.
Shirk-part of wearing apparel.
Coat-to woo some fair young maiden.
Risk-part of the arm.
Bells-things that come in at the first of
the month.
Gards-you know, ye cards.
Holly-to yell
Seals-Frame work of a window.
Snow-a negative adverb.
Sox-the difference between male and
female.
Toys-neckwear.
Tree-a number.
Yule-contraction of you will.
Dictionary of Scientific Terms
Calorie-the third balcony in a theatre.
Element-a large animal in the circus.
Purette-a little bureau.
Centimeter-a bug with a hundred legs.
lagnetl-a bug that lives on dead people
Solute-a gesture directed to an army
officer.


Atom-the first man.
Logarithm-music of the woods.
Antimony-what a divorced guy pays to
his former wife.
Barium-what you do to dead people.
Caesium-the man who conquered all
Gaul.
Copper-a policeman.
Gold-a disease that you get in the winter-
time.
Ion-what the washerwoman uses.
Zinc-something that you wash dishes in.
Inductor-a guy that takes up money in
the street car.


HOLD ON TIGHT
Crowded Clubhouse. (Young lady is
vainly groping for her purse to pay her
ticket.)
Young Mlan: "Pardon me, miss, but
may I not pay your ticket?"
Young Lady: "Sir!"
(Several seconds of groping.)
Young ,an: "I begyour pardon again
young lady, but won't you let me pay
your ticket.?"
Young Lady: "Why, I don't even
even know you, and anyway, I'll have this
purse opened in a minute."
(Continued groping.)
Young lan: "I really must insist on
paying your fare. You've unbottoned my
suspenders three times!"

"Ah, Watson," commented the prospec-
tive Sherlock, "I see you changed your
underwear."
"Marvelous, Holmes how'd you know?"
"Well, you've forgotten to put your
trousers on ..

When you first saw this
You like other suckers
Thought it was a poem,
But we beg to say-
It's not!

Last night I held a little hand,
So pretty and so sweet,
I gazed at it with loving looks,
I fondled it with joy;
No other hand unto my soul,
Can greater solace bring,
Than that one which I held last night..
Four Aces and a King!


I h"




Full Text

PAGE 4



PAGE 7

Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2010 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1933cris

PAGE 8

r

PAGE 9

ForeIDorJ T h c C a r i bb ea n S t ff o f 1 933 has h a d a n unu s u a l o f co o p e r a ti o n f r o m cHry o n c i n prod u cing thi s ycar' s A n nu a l a n d i s pro ud t o prcsc n t t o th e studcnt body, t h c facult y a n d t h c [ill gc n c r a l publ i c this r e p resenta ti o n of i t s [ill n @ H

PAGE 10

THE CARIBBEAN V ol. XVI CANAL ZON E 1933 No.1 PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL O,fcarHeilb r oll 5 J C a n you imagine C ri s t oba l High S c ho o l without a n y clubs? An institutio n so l e l y for the purpose o f tcaching childre n their readin' riting," and 'rithme tic," from 8 a. m t o 3 p m withcut any f o rms o f extrz curric ul a r activ iti es t o inte r est the st u dents in th e ir schoo l life? S u c h w a s the case during the pio n eer d ays o f C H S. during its fir s t year s o f opera ti o n H o wever thro u g h out the ste a d y p rogress c f the a n otab l e a d vance m ent in club acti v iti es has d e v e loped in the schoo l fr o m an average o f two o r three clubs a year t o the pre s ent numbe r o f thirtee n clubs Am o ng these active clubs a r c r e p resente d t wo n a ti onal o r ga ni za ti o n s the "Nati o n a.l Thes pi a ns," a nd the Liga P a n a m e ricana/' o n e club w hi c h d epe nd s o n hi g h s cholasti c s t andin g f o r m ember ship, and vari o u s mu s ical a n d a thle ti c organi za ti o n s A s c h oo l clu b program c anno t b e s u c c ess f ul unl e ss the r e i s faculty support a nd c o -op e r a ti on. The m embe r s o f the faculty o f C H S. h a v e s h ow n the student b o d y t h e ir inte r est o n be h alf o f t h e p r ogress o f t h e sc h oo l by c ontributing mu c h o f t h e i r spare t i me in o rd e r that our clubs m i g h t b e s u cc e ss ful in m ainta inin g the inte r es t o f the stude nts in ge n e r al. That the s t ud ents a r e inter es t e d i s easily p r ove d h y the l a r g e v olunta r y m e m be r s hip i n each clu b. M e m ber s hi p i n to o n e o r mo r e o f our cluhs i s a n h o n o r tow a rds w hi c h ever y 2 student s h o uld strive. It develops a nd s timul a t es soc i a l contacts a m o ngst the students and t eac h e r s. The sc h oo l lif e is m a d e muc h m o r e enjoyabl e a nd the mono t o n o us r outine of ever y day i s g r ea tl y r educe d. The m a n y c.pportuniti e s f o r a rtifi c i ality w hi c h the r egula.r cl asses offe r b e t we e n the student b o d y a nd the faculty a r e practically e limin a t e d Thus the instructo r s as w ell as the s tudents g a in a b ette r unde rstanding of eac h othe r which late r r esults as a g reat a id in the carry in g o u t of the ever y da.y class es A s w e l oo k into the f u ture, the r e i s a far w id e r s cope f o r extra c urri cula r activ itie s t h a n ever b e f o r e. With t h e n ew m o d e rnl y equippe d hi g h sc h oo l building with its m a n y facili t i e s for c arry in g out club programs the prese n t acti ve clubs s h o uld b e greatl y deve l o p e d a n d m a n y n e w o n es o rgani ze d The acti v iti es r oo m will prov id e a place in w hi c h to carry. out club acti v i t i es, a n d the fact tha t ever y t eac her w ill h a ve a r oo m w ill provid e e ve r y clu b w i t h a r e gul a r m eeting pl ace. The w ell-o rgani ze d asse m bli e s whi c h a r e b eing pl cmne d for the n ew a udi t o rium w ill g i ve eac h cl ub a n oppo rtunity t o s hmV' it s p r og r ess a nd displa.y its a biliti es. Let's h o p e that next year with our ex p a nd e d faciliti es we will s h ow our sc h e el spirit b y b oosting our clubs a nd deve loping these a d i v iti es o ne hundre d per cent.

PAGE 12

Edito r f 1.r.rl Edilor .. _ Bu.riIlC.fJ' .llollo, q e r .. f l u l Bu.rillc.r.r l lanGge,.. f /.r.r l Bu.ri/leu .1lanager .. f l u / BUJ'ineJ'J' .lla na gc r .. Circ ulalioll l l onGge,. ,. L/.r .rl Circ u lation .l1anage,. rl.r.rl Cir c ulati o n .llanGger f l.r.rl Circ u latioll 1 1ollfl. qer d,ut. Circ ulalioll .lJ ollo. q e r d u f Circulafioll .llonager Litera".,! Editor ..... dul. Life rar.'! Edilor ,lcroft. L it e rary Editu r !. it erm:l EditG r .. f l u l Lit e rary Rdit o r .-/rl F.dil o r ,-ju l drl R d il o r .. Spo rt F d il o r / I r,JI Bo.lj.r' Spor! E d il o r Girl,; Sperl Fdil or h / Giri/ Spar! Editor 1 :lJIu.rI R.w:h all,ge F di!or J u k e Fditu r J o k e Rdito r S dl:Jo/ .ro le,r Rdih ',. dr.rl S chool .ro l a Editor dl!lllllliEdito r C ARIBBEA N S T AFF OSCAR HEILORON RIC HARD R E I N H O L D ERNEST DE LA O SSA CLIFTON BROWN J E nny G O IH N HENRY SANCII E Z ELIZABETH HAYES ROBERT K,NG KATH LEEN GooDENOUGIl \VILLlA i \ \ HILL ROBERT BROWN RUTH PICKETT HELEN HA"\'\\OND ELIZABETl i THORNTON E LL E N G REENLEAF \ 1'.'NA R E I L L Y 1 '\'\ R GARET H O LLINGSIIEAD ERNEST W OOD J AC K E G O ZC U E b lAND! LOUIE B \RNETT DOROTHY BIR KELAND l'lAR CARET BARNARD 1 \ I LDRED OWEN BETTY STETLEn i,VILLIAN KEENAI\' ERNEST J AIlANILLO HELEN AANSTOOS i'\'\BEL BLISS NORINE R A I(OVSI(Y

PAGE 13

C. J I. S. F ACULTY llo\\' ofte n thro u g h out t h e sc h oo l year i s the c ri t i c i s m of the t eac h e r s "Toe: m u c h h c m c \\ crk," heard a m o n g {h e s t udent b o dy? I [ O\\('\ CI', in s pit e o f and s i mili a r uncom pliJ11c nL:try l 'cl11[1 l k s t h e sc h oo l thi s yea. h : 1 5 h a d o n e o f the be s t faculties ( h at. has evcr bught in a Can a l Zone Sch ool. Not only do cs en.'ry tcach e r t h o l 'o u ghly undc r s l;)nd t h e suhject wh ic h h e tcach es. but h e i s also well acquainted \\ it h all of the s {util:nls untie!' h i s guid'lllc e. rn addit' i o n t o a n idea l f ac ulty. C. II. S has h a d at its head i1 p rin c ip a l h o has done ve r y much t o m ai{c C. II. S. a motkl sch ool. H e has intl'odu ce d many m features into sc heol life making it mu c h m orC' inte re sting a nd < dtl'active ic the students. Amo n g the mos t impo rt ant features w hi c h j \\I'. F l 'a nk s h<1s intro duced into the sc h ool i s the C. I r. S. n c \\ s paper Let u s h o p e that \ \ r j \ \ ill'ord Franks \\' ill occupy t.he principa l' s d cs l < at the new hi g h seho"l n ex t \'e;\I'. The H o u sehold Arts D c p, : rllll ent thi s year has heen undel' 1 h e of ,\\is" Blanc h e Ande rson j\\iss Jc;.nn c Bro w n has ta\
PAGE 14

6

PAGE 17

Same O SCAR I-h:II.ORON'. Birthplt,u--C o l o n R d e P D a l e E"I"re d ClIlla l Zml<' SdlOol.r-1 921. H.\p'e.r.rio,, I d o n t believe it dc/i.die. Class J\lte rn n tt! I : Cl ass Preside nt 2, 3, 4 ; Glec Club 1 ; "Gypsy R ovc r I ; B ells o f Be;nljabi!:>" 2; R A A I : Carihbc:1Il Sta f f A ss' t. I;:ditor 3, Edi to r 4 ; Dr; lm n ti cClub3: N a ti o mll Thesp i ; lns3, 4 ; Spani s h C lub 2, 3 4, Presidc nt 3; Liga P ; m : ull crical}; .): Staff C. H S 4 . Vamr-ERN'sT I)'E L A OS5,\ Nick"ame-"H o r s\'. Birthplace-C o l o n : R dc P D ille HI/fued Ca" a l Z Ofle Sc hool.r-1 9 25. F m or i l e E .l'prN.rioflL c t it go .-lcfi.'iliu-Carn i ;.1 1. 2 ; O e b nting C luh 2, 3: P r e side nt 3: Club 2, 3.4. Pres ident 4; Lig;. Pana m cri c nn:l 4, Pres i d e nt 4; B A I. 2. 3 4 : Drilnwti c Club 4 ; C.'lribbenn St n C f A sst. Bu siness i \ li1n age r?i. Business j \1.'lnager4: B nse b nll2, 3 4 ; G o IL); T c nnis3. 4 : C b ss Vice. Preside nt 3 4 ; V ;lI'sit" Club 4 ; TrOl('k 4 : B .ls k e t bOlIl 4 ; N :.tio n a l 4 Vamt.'--DOROTHY /\1. BIRKEI.Ato:O, V i c kfl a m(--Oo t," Birthplac(--Bro oklyn. N e w V o rlt Dale EI/laed Cafl a l Zml<' S c llOol.r-1 9 2 0 F m orile E.\pruJiol/Y o u t e llin g m e! d clil'i f il".r-V o Ueyb all I. 2,3, 4 ; BOlsk e t b; dl I. 3. 4 : C a p tain 4 ; B as eball I. 2: G A A I. 2,3,4 Vice Pres ident I Secre tary 2: Spa ni s h Club 2 3 4 : Dra m : .li c Club 4 ; "Onc Thing After An other" 4: CI : l ss Tre a sure r 3; C l a ss Se cretary 4 : A D T Club 4 ; Natio n ; d Thes pi a n s 4. Se c r etary 4 ; Varsity Clu b 3 4 ; Cari Lbe;1f1 St"fr. Girls' Sports 4 .\'am(--j\ l ILOREO L OWEN, Xic kllam(--'J\lilly." Birlnp lace-KOlnsas City j\lisso uri Dale. Elliad C all a l ScllOol.r1 930. Fm' orile E.\ pf'l"uio ,, -'How ; Ib out so me dues? Icl il,i lia-Spanis h Club 2 3 4 Treasu re r 4 ; Dr;:. ma t ic Club 4 ; Natio nal Thes pi;lns 4 ; Suppc r Club 3. 4 : Treasure r 4 ; Li ga P a n a meri ca n a 4 ; Baske t ball 2 4 ; B nseball 2, 3 ; O ne Thing A fter A n othe r 4 ; A A 2 3, 4 ; Var sity Club 3, 4 : Cbss Treasurer 4 ; Caribbean Staff 4; Sta ff: C H S 4

PAGE 18

'y(lm __ IIARVt:Y S .\\lTIl J H . Y,cl. : llall/ __ F.mma." Birthp/ac __ Hartford. Connecticut. elllllll ZOl/e Sc//Ool.r-1 927. Fa"Qrde RxprU,r;oll-I\ \ e and I \ \ o ll ,\'. ,-J cli"ili(.r-Swimming 2, 3. -I: Track -I: Class Aitern;lte:l. 4. C. AANSTOOS X icl.:llam __ 'Stoosie.' Dille Elliered CII II a 1 Z Olle Scl1001s1 92 1 F(IIorile E.\/)fc,rJioll-Aw. nu ts! ,-}di"itiu--SlIpper Club 3, -I. Vicc-Pres ident 4; Dramatic Club .). -I: P re s i d ent -I; N;:lti o nal T he spians 3, -I. P re sident -I: A. A. 3. -I; G l ee Club 3. -I; V;lf s itv C lu b 3, -I; Spani s h Club -I; V olle."b;ltl3. -I; Baseball 3; "When's Your Birthd:'l."" 3; "One Thing }\fte r Another" -I; C;lribbeal1 S c h oo l Notes Editor -I .\'alll __ HARO Ll) A AGNEW. J R .\'ic.(-I/(/II/':--" '1. A." Birlhpl(/ce--Ncw Orleans. L o u i s b na. D ale E,llered Callal ZOlle School.r-1 929. Fn,w' i/I! E.\pre,rsillll H ot-c ha l J cli,ilit'.r-lhsebaIl3, -I; B A. A 2,:i; .\'/Im __ TIII::I .. \ I A LouIs !\LRRITTON \ ; c l..llame-' Til l ie Bidh,"m: __ Pan:lma. Dal e R,l/e r u / Cal/al Z,,"e Sdwo/.r 1 928 F(I,'"rile H.\p'N.riollAjo! J cli iti u -Supper C lub I 2.3: Spanish Club 4: Dra matic Club 3 -I; Swimming 3. 8

PAGE 19

X"",( -\\'VU-;TVl t A BEARI), \ 'i,J,.",",u "\\'cb. lJ;rlli,l{(/l.--Cri ... ttlll.,I Canal Zone /Jul .. /:'"ll'I.,,/CIlItIIZ.,,,..Slu,,of.r 1 9:! 1 FfI,'ol'il .. "Old /di"ili .. ,r Orl'ilc ... tr, 1.2. .. VI/III.--llo\\,\RO \';eJ,.IIl1l1l1'' Berry.' /Jir/"pllll'r--Long "each Califor nia Dill .. /:/I/(f" .. d emlill Xo" .. S .. hool.r-19,')2, Ffll'.),.II .. !':xpru,fio ,, A w, Gt:c ./di"i/i,,,r T e nni s-l. X/lIII..-IA1'11-: BltETClt ,\'jr}..-IIf1I11'--" lJirlhpllluPitbuurg h /Jill .. /:',d(l'ol (.(111111 7.111,.. Sclw/J/.r 1 92-1 FfI"orilt j ':,l'pru,r;tlll -\\'hal a I if ... ] /cll";fiu" 13:l!:all 'l. Goll '). :\'CptUIlC Club I X,IIIir-EoWARO CLlt1'ON BROWN . \ '/L'}..-IIfllI/(-Clif." Birlhp/tl('r-Los } \ ngele s. California. J)"f .. ",da .. t! CIIII," ZOIl .. .. E,\prtuiulI.r-Gorblumy. ,/ d;,,"1; .. .r-Camcra I -I: Spanish C lub -I; I hnd 2, -I; Glee Club .l, -I: Orche ... ir3 2. 3, -I; Tr;lck -I. 9

PAGE 20

.Y,1Ine--RoBERT \ V ILLIAM BROWN \ickllame--" B ob." Bir lhplac..--H o n olu lu H awaii. D ale "Iut:d Cannl ZOIlt! School.l'-1 92 4 Pa"orift! dcli" ifir' .l'-G l ee Club 3. 4; O r c h estra :::, 4 ; C a m e r a Clu b "'; Ba n d .... Yame-J E SSE DAVI D . \'Ickllame-"}ay. Birlhplau-Caycy. P o rt o Rico. !Jal e Elllu'ed Callal ZOIll! School.l'--1 92 1 Pm 'oril,. .\pru.fiol/.r-Alas. poor Y orick! Tis h ti s h Vanu .... -VEI.TA C. FOLEY . \ick"ame--'Pi nea ppl e Birlhp/(Icr:-P a n a m a Dalt: F./llered Calla I ZOM ScllOol.r-1 923. Pal'orile M ama! .delll,ilia-Spani s h Clu b 3, 4 : Sl1pper Clu b 1, 2, 3, 4; 1 \ A. I : Carni ,'a l 2; Dra m a ti c Club 2, 4 Secre tOlr s 4; "When's Y our Birthday?" 3. Nallle--I\I\,\RY ELSIE GRUBER ,Vickllame--" j \ \ oll."" Birlhplace--Wes t Po i n t New Y ork. D {/lt! Elllut!d ea,wl ZOIU SCIIOO/.l'--1 932 F ll('orill'. can you spar e a d i me? 10

PAGE 21

,\'II/1/,.-P ,\IIKFII II,\NNl \ '; ,'1.1111"''' Spike.' Point. ,'bine. /)(/11' Elllu("d CIIIIlI Z.m(" S/ hoiJ/.t 1 920 h'.,pr..r.TiOIl Ncrtz! Xamc:--ROOEkT 11, \:-; ;\:,\. lJirtliplauH n n sct t. M.line. /)al(" Elllae'! Cilltl/ Z.mt' .\'t'hoo}/.r-1 92 1 FIIIoril .. E.\pf"<'.r.ri,m -Cucca . /di.iliu,,-S\\"inlln i n g 4 ; Orche.;tra 4 : Band 4 ; G lee C1111. 4 \'ame-HELEN J-IA.'I .'IO!"l) \ -ickn(lml'-'Teatse Birlhplllu-Cri s tobnl C II I Zone. 1)"le F:nl t'red CUIlI/ 201ft Sc/'III,{.r-) 92 1 Fa"o}rilr E,\pre.r.rion I d on't cn re . /di.iliu .. --Spani ... h Club 2.3.4, SecretM.'" 4 ; C I . Secretary 3; Orchestra 3. 4 ; G. A } \ I. 2; Lig,' P:l.Ilamcrican a 4 ; Slipper Club I. C :lribbeall St.lff. Liter;".'" Editor 4 ST,\;\:I FY HOWE. \-ickfllulle-Ch.lrli c. IJirlhp/au-.".lrhlehc: .d, \:a.; ..... c h\l .. /)ale F:nl a .. .1 (tw,,1 Z,)l1(" .\'('lwol,r-) 924 Pal orile H.\pre.r.rif1l,-llo\\ y . me,ln l cli,ili ... r--Sp;lIli ... h Club 2. 3. 4 ; Oeh:ttin s Club 3; Glee Cluh 3 II

PAGE 22

. VallU'-\\'llI.IAM H KEENAN, J R . V ickllafllf!--' Peanuts," Birlhp lact--Anco n C a n a l Z o n e. EII/eral Callal Sc:hool.r--1 9 22, E.\pr.-.r.rioflI h a d on e too, but the cat li c k e d all the pa int off Club I ; Spanis h Club 2 3,4, Ayudador 3 .J; Liga P a n a m ericana .J; Caribbean Staff, A ss't. C i rcubtio n M a n ager J o k e Edito r 4 Safllt"-HER.\IANUS A. KI.EEF'KENS. Sickllame-" L o uie." D ale Callal Zmu ScllOol.r1 92 0 Fa.'orill.' E. \ prl.'.r.rionH o t -c h : t Name-J OliN LOTHROP . \'icktlafllt"-' J ohnny," R irlhplact"-Sa n Fran c i sco, COlla l Zom. School.F-1 932. Fm'orile E. rpru.r/On I s m y face r e d?" Icli.iliu-Trac k .J; G lee Club .J; Dram a ti c C lub 4; Nati o n a l Thes pi alls .J. 'vallul h :NRY L EE:. 1 Vick"amr--"Archi e, Birlhplace-B o( luete. P :l.Ila m a. Oale E,duetl Callal ZOlle School.r-1 921 . Idil.iliu-Swi m mi n g .'; Nati o n a l Thes pi a n s 4 1 2

PAGE 23

.\"'111'(' IhROIO ,\\nR11\IIR L fltI\WO(H) \ 'id,, II/III'(' .. L ock.' nirf"l'lcwr-.\ lilln ry. ,\\;,,, .... (:h,,"'ett<;, /) d r H lllerrd C IIUlI X,I/If Sclw"I., 1 9 1 C) H.\"I"t.r.rioll I h ,.d o n e I,ut t h e Ilh ec\" fc\l nft I di,dir.r B A .. \ I. 2. ,1. -1. T elllli .... ;), -1, B ..... keth.dl .l. 4 : Snccer 3. 4. G l ee C l u!' :;. Tr.l(. k 1 A I) T C luh-1 \'(111/(, :-\ATII,\S ,\\. ,\\ \ R ("lInSI\,' . \ic,(;" "m(, -",\\"g:' N"oot cll, .\\.'lId i IJirl ,IIaa -'Ncw Y o rk City. :-:ell Y o r k D "II' R ltl"('(1 GUIIII ZIlIIl Scho"I.r 1 92 1 F (I"aril(' H .\pru..rio,, Prelty c1e\"er. ell! .I di"ilit,r Ba:-oeb .dll. 2, 3. -1: B. ..... kctIJ,dll. 2 .. 1. -I. Soccer I. 2.3. -1; I-Iandb;dll, 2; n 1\. 1\.1. 2, .l, 4: Spani<;h Club 2 ; C a rni"al 1. 2; \' . r .... ity C lu b 2. 3, 4: Trtlclt 2, -1: T e nni s 4 ; A O T. C l u\) -1; Sport .... Jo:ditor. Carih. b c .. n -1. ,\'nm('"'-,\ \ARY O . \ \ I::I.J:.:NOEZ. \l{'(;"amr--",\\cl. II." R de P D alt R l u t d Canal ZOllt S('llOoI.r 1 9 1 9 F a"arllt E.'rp,.t.r.ri,,"J \w. your gr,"lny! Icll. ,i lluS u p p e r C lub 2. 4; Sp.llli ... C lub 2 . l. -1. Corr es p onding Sec r e t .. r.'" 3: V ice P residen t -I: D r.1m.,t i c Cluh 4 ; L isa P 'll alllc ri ca n 4 Xamr-C'IRI<;TI'-": I O'Il.SUIt \CaR . \'"',(;,,,,",<'"-Ch ri .... ill e. Tenne ..... ee R"'P"(',f,f'"'' You're tclting mc. Oh. ,\c,.h' Drllr F.,dual GII"'/ Z,/II(' Sc!",,,lr 1 3

PAGE 24

F ULTON PATERSON . \ 'ickllamr---Pat." li irlhplacr---Arlington, M assac hu setts. E"I(;r(:d Callal School.r-1 924. Fm'Orill. xpru.rioll-Darn it. Aw. s hoot feli,ilia-Tennis 4; B asketball 4 Xalllt"-CItARLES REDWARD PEseoD. Vickllame-Charlie. Rirfhpillce-E cuador. D ale Callal S c ho o l.r-1 921. ./di,iliuSoccer 1. 2.3.4: B ase ball 1. 2 3,4; Basketball 3. 4 : Tenni s 1 2.3.4: Golr l. 2 : H andbi"ll 2; V olleyballl: Trac k 2. 4 : B A A l. 2. 3, 4: Vars i t.y C lub 3. 4 : Pres ident 4 ; Dramatic Club 4; A. O T Club 4. Name-NOREEN E RAKOVSKY. ,Vicknanu-"Shorty." Birlhp/au-Presburg, Hungary. D ale IIltred Canal S c hool.r-1 923. O scar! .-J elivifie.r-Supper C lub 1. 2 3; T reas u re r 3: G. A A. I, 2: G l ec Club I ; "Gyps y Rovcr" 1 ; Spani s h Cillb 2, 3, 4 ; Dramati c Club 3 . Vame -TIIO;-'IA$ R \NKIN . flirlhp lace -Ancon, Canal Z o n e. /Jale E,llered Calla l School.r-l 921. Fm'orile E:rprluiollF orge t it. felil'iliu-Soccer 1. 2.3,4 ; H andball ) 2; V clleyb ull I ; B aseb;: tll 3. 4 ; Tennis 3, 4 ; Ba s k etball ,),4 : Track 4; B A A 1,2, .), 4, Pres i de nt A J \ 4 ; Va1 sity C l ub 3. 4 ; Secretary 4 ; A. O T C lub 4 1 4

PAGE 25

-,"""'l'-EWNEST ,'1. Ihl-':IIOIII . \'id IIOII/('--" III." 1J;l'Ih,)I,u(,--f\ IICOI I. C.lnat Zone /JI.I, Gwnl 7.,)IIf' I Fa"/lrilr H.II,ra.r;"" Oil.O", c;lr! ldi,II;r.rT cnni ... L \'fllllt"-EI. I1.,\BE'I'11 TIIQRNTQN. Il;rlhplfl('('--;\ncon, Canal Z o n c. J)/1lr E"lrrrd GIII.I!I B.I:-.cball I -,".uII
PAGE 26

Xam __ J A:.tES R WERGIN . \,It'kname-'''immy.'' Birlhplau-j\1.obi l e. A labama. O ,'le Entued Cafla! Zon e ScllOo l.r--1 931. FI1t'o ri/e E:r:pre,uion-Swell .1dll'itit',r-Debating C lub 3; Spani s h 4; DramatiC" Club 4; National Thesp i ... n s 4 ; "On e Thing After Another" 4 . \'nme--E ONA LENORE TUIRI .WALI . ,"ic kflame-"Eddi e.' Birlhpla ce--P ana m a City. Dale Efl/ued Calla I ZOfIt' S c hool.r-1 9 1 9 F ( NOrile E,\'preuion You Brute! Hot,chal Acli viliu-Su ppe r C lub I 2,3, 4 President 4; Spanish C lub 3, 4; Dra mati c C lub 3,4. COMMENCEMENT EXERC I SES The program at comme n ce m ent was rathe r n ove l t hi s year In add i tio n to being h eld in the n ew hi gh sc h oo l the t y p e was a decide d change f r o m the tra di ti o nal pas t The usual outside -sp ea ker plan was suppl ante d by student spea k ers w h o w e r e c h osen upo n the followin g bas i s: (1) r ank in g raduatin g class; ( 2 ) num be r of years in Cristobal Hig h Schocl; (3) c h oice by appr op riate major subj ects ; ( 4 ) approximatel y eCju a l representation of sexes; ( 5 ) s tage presence, voi ce, e tc The purpose of the change in program was t c g i ve a student program and to g i ve a typ e c f p rcgram w hi c h would g i ve the parents a nd patrons a rev i ew of t h e w c rk acco mpli s hed in the hig h sc h ool. Hel e n Hamm o nd as Salutatorian, gav e the introductory address. S h e was f ollowed by H oward B e rr y w h o t alked 011 "Socia l Studies R outine." T a lk s o n cOInmerc i a l work, sc i ence and classes, l ea rnin g l anguages and E n glish were made by M.ildred Owen, J ames \ Vergin, Osca r H eilbron, a nd D o r o thy Birk e l a n d. Ernest de l a Oss a, Valedictorian, gave the closing address whi c h was f ollowe d by presentati on of awa l d s a nd dipl omas. SEVEN SECRET SENIORS 1 6

PAGE 27

OHaaa ]l{iatnry F.li:n hc//t Th orn/o jj The l abors o f the class o f 3 3 a r c a b o ut t o draw ( ('1.1 cl ose. F our ycar s of \\01'1<. o f a n x i e ty. and o f antic i pa ti o n h ; w c s t o l e n quidl." I\\ 'a." int o the l o n g v i s t a o f the pasL I ca vin g u s t o dwell tho u g htrull, v o n t h e expe rie nce o f those bygo n e d a y s' with f ee l in gs a\(in t o sadness. Pleasure a nd p a in. h o p e and desp a ir g r eat e x p e d a li o n s and g r ea t di sappo intm ents h a \' e f ollo w e d each othe r in r apid success i o n thro u g h the high sc h oo l e x p e ri e n ce o f many. perhaps m os t. o f liS. Y e t thi s i s n o n e w thing. I t h a s bee n c \ 'cr thus s in ce the wh ee l s o f prog r ess bega n t o turn, and will b e thus till th e last human c ry i s l os t in the wreck o f w o rld s A s a cl ass ,,'C a r e not remarkable f o r anyo n e thing. but f o r a g r eat many things. T o a casu a l r ea d c r a nd o n c unfamilia r with our sc h ool. the cl ass hi s t o ry will m ca n but little ; but t o thc m embe r s o f our g r aduating class it s h o uld m can m o r e and a hi s t oria n may f ee l hi s work w ell d o n e if a t so m e future p erio d h e may g l a n ce a t these p ages and r ecall with jo'y or wi stfulness as the case m a y be, so m e f o r gotte n incid ent tha t causes the h eart t o s w ell and a s i g h f o r o ld hi g h sc h oo l days expresses it s elf. A s we turn t o the time o f our entrance t o C I -I. S . c beh old a m o d es t g r o up o f gil' l s and bo y s eage r t o h eg in the ir hi g h sc h oo l d a y s. The r e was n othing striking n O I c h a racteris ti c in thc ir appea r a n ce t c dis tin g ui s h the m frOin othe l g irl s and boys: o n the contra ry the y w e r e f o r (h e m os t p a rt a wk\\ a rd gawky childre n ",h o had sudde nly f o un d t h e m sel\'es calle d upo n t o t a k e the p a d o f sc date y o un g l a dies a nd ge ntl e m e n I l owc\,C I ', it i s well w orth o ne's tim e t o f ollow thi s group thro u g h its hi g h sc h oo l ca r eer. A aftc r cnro llm ent, \\e f in d thi s bod y o f students for the m os t p a rt h a rd a t w o rk ; b u t o f course the r e w e r c a m o n g usa few wh o f o r so m e r easo n yet unknown tho u ght the n'seh 'es t o b e pri\'ilege d character s and so we occasi o n a lly f ound a n e raser zoo min g acr oss our \ i s i o n and o ft e n 17 '. f c lt the s tin g of a wa d o f p a pe r I S i t l eft it s nestin g pl ace in a ruhhe r ba nd The n ca m e o:dhtc ti cs iln d the I Joys ti midly \'cnhll'c J out o n the field p i cturi n g the m s el vcs
PAGE 28

away. and n e w and unfam i l ia r fac es appea r e d t o r e place t h e m. It was d u r i n g our S e n i o r y ea r t h a t t h e sch oo l d ecide d t o i ss u e a bi-"ee k l y n e w s p ape r calle d "C. H. S." T h e clas s of '33 was r e p r esente d b y m any o f i ts m embe r s T h e n al o n g ca m e t h e mid.year e x a m s and lazy \\ea t h e l was r i g h i t here to a cco m pa n y the m. but e h a d n o t i m e f o r la z in ess f o r w e h a d u n d erta k e n to p ubli s h a n a n nu a l a n d t h a t m eant wo rk. D a v s \\ee k s, and mo nths p asse d sw i ft:.), a nd t h e Se ni o r d a n c e \\' hi c h h a d been l oo k e d fOI"\\a rd t o b y m a ny, wa s n o w a thi n g o f t h e past. \ V e we r e face to face \\ith fin a l e xams, t h e last w e \\ e r e ever ( 0 t a k e a t Cri s t o b a l H i g h School. A ga i n the Junior-S e n i o r B a n q u e t l o c m e d u p a n d t o t h c J un iors e o w c t h a n ks f O l a l o\"e l y ba nque t and d a n ce a n d .an e n joyab l e t i m e. A s w e a r e about t o m a k e our adie u a n d s t e p 8c r oss the thr es h o ld into a m o r e stre n u o u s lif e o f possi bilities a n d r e a liti e s we f ee l t h a t t.h e n u n ties w e w o r c as S e n i o r s \ \ ill f all u p o n t h e s ho u l d e r s o ft. h ose w orthy t o t.ak e our p lace in C. H S. N e w as our hi g h sc h oo l car e e r s draw to a n end and C omme n ce m ent co m es t o cla im u s, it i s \ \ ith a minglin g of joy a n d s orro w t h a t we v i ew the retr ospect, and o f t e n we find ours el ves dreamin g o f the p ast joys and pleasant assoc i a ti o n s a n d real i z e tha t n oihing s h all eve r oblit e r a t e t h e m f r o m our memor y O u r p athway has n o t bee n brig htened with sunshine all o f t h e way. but strew n with rose s w h e l 'e i n a tho rn was burrie d h e re a n d t h e r e topri c k usas we tre d upo n t h e n .... \\le h f S e n i c r s. Indi\"idu ally w e m a i
PAGE 29

,\\IIR II O SIx .. t o "idet R.nd,all. l\\A Y \VE Gl' ER lea v e s h er "blus h ing" t o J o s e B azc:.n l\l/ \RTIIA "iil s h c r s h ... \ 1 '0-ti(,ll t o I\\(>xin(' Iloff,,'an Cl100hli n g \ \ a x i nc t o nlk l o n ger i n t l'e h ails beb\ccll classes. JANE BRETC II be qu eaths be,. qui c k Iless in working E nglis h hurdl es t o Eth e l Iluntno n ! t hi s i s ollr h 's t "ill a n d t es t a m e nt Sigpcd, SENI O R C L.l SS OF '3 3 II'IT;'\ E SS ES: I \\' \NT\ 1-3J.: I:n II'..:,,",. R W ,>"":S CO'L1:-;G ';T I T I O;'\ 1 9

PAGE 30

The o f fice o f Carl Laem elle, the m ov i e prod u ce r was cl ose d a ft e r a busy day, a nd j\\ildre d O we n hi s privat e sec re t a r y was caught in the m aze o f traffic o n h e r way h o me. That a ft e rn oo n Uni ve r sa l Pictures h a d s i g n e d a contract with the c inem a s most f a m o u s s t a r J o hn L oth. 'o p, who m l '1.ill y was ve r y muc h s ur pri se d to e n counte r S h e s till had h er mind on thi s un ex pected surprise a nd h e r tho u g h ts were so cccu p i e d w i t h h e o l d se ni o r class days, tha t s h e \\ as o n the !rac k of t h e "Go ld e n S tate Lim ited" before s h e kn ew i t, a nd t h e tra i n c rash ed in to t h e rear o f h e r car S h e was t a k e n t o t h e J o hn H opkins H os pital u nco n sc i o u s. The day b efo r e s h e was to leave t h e h ospital, a nurse fro m \Va rd A, cam e t o h e r r oo m Sta rtin g co n versa ti o n, t h e nurse said, "I'v e b ee n t o ld tha t you are a g r adua t e o f Cris t o b a l Hi g h S c h oo l o n the Can a l Zone." "Yes, res p on d e d iI-lilly, g l a d of the o p po r tunity t o r e mini sce, I'lt was a g r a nd class too. I o ft e n wond e r w h a t's beco m e o f so m e o f myoId class mates." HI'm go in g t v surpr i se you," sa i d t h e nurse. R e m e m be r M a r t h a Potts? H e re 1 a m." \Vhy, j\1.artha, I'd n eve r have known you !"
PAGE 31

They e n \'ied the p eace and qui e t that Thclm: Alhritton en joYl : d Illu c h n n h e r plantatio n in Nortll Carolin a. Th\.. gids promised to h ol d it C1mcr i c. m in \\'ilshin g t o n, O C -They next \' ic\\ed \\ ith intl..'rest ,1., exciting hasehall game i n the Y a tlkc(' Stadium, "here the h my "';>$ playing th e Athleti cs. Thc \' \\ere \ 'cr" mu c h surprised t o sec thc famolls comi> ination \\ ith Charlie P escnd as pitc h er, a nd .\\andi ,\\a r c h os ky. as catch e r. \\ hic h h d hegun during t h e i r hi g h sc h ool days. One o f (h e Army's m os t ardent rooters was Colonel J[l111eS \\'e r g in. w h o was st .. ti o n c d at Gm'ernor's I s l a nd \\'itlt him was his wife th e formcr ,\\iss Jane Bretch (The two g irl s \\ondcrcd if this roman ce had budded in ',33). I n \\'oo lw odh's Fin' and T en the found Noreen Rako\'sk y \\h o WtlS ti c k lin g the i\ories" to the tlllle s of the latest song hits. B es id e her ability t o play so \\ell. h e r attr acti\'eness \\as the re"son for h c r hi g h s al es tI \'e ra ge. Frc q u cntly s h e \\as contracted t o play O\'CI' the radi o. Visitin g one o f New Y ork's m os t n o tori G u s ni ght c1uhs, ,\\olly WilS fou nd to h e a co n gen i a l h os t ess, with the \\ith' J esse O;\'\'id as master of ccremonie;. This duh \\ as popular fc, r it s potent coc kt ails \\ hich \\ere Il,ix e d Iw ChriF Ohlschlager The club \\<'s I\ith many of th e "Four Ilundred" \\ho \\Cl'e d a n c in g t o the h a rm o ni o u s Illlls i c of the o r c hestra in \\ hic h R obe rt lia nn a, \\'i ll i a m Keenan, Clnd \\'ebster BCdI'd formed a n import ant porti on. Lea\'in g the gay tunes of the ni!!hl cluh, th ey wen t to the other extre-ml' and saw Gene\' i e\'e B arn', \\' h o \\ as ill S1. ,\\ary' s Convent in ::\'C\\ lla\'en. Connecticut. She had been \\caringth e \' eil f e r fi\'e years. Gepc\'ie\' c \\;>s not the o nl\' classmat e \\ h o h ad gone in f o r for in Charlie was the 21 Chief R ea dCl' of (h e First Churc h 01 Chlis i Sc i ellti,,( of Boston On rc::tul'nin g to Nc\\ Y (u'k, thc" saunt cre d int o till' Er1IpirL' Build 'ing, a nd I \ln d (hc l 'c (lIlC of the mll t farnollo;; jOIlI'll:"lis t s or th e time, Er;1.l.:"t de I .. O S":;H. J Ie cditnl' or" F o rt unc Sailil1g pa"t the St:du c of Liherh' "'
PAGE 32

"Not a c('Iu g h in a carload," was Jack Paterson's adve rti si n g sloga n when trying to sell Old Golds" to the l e2de r s of the Russian gover nm en t In Tokyo. Elizab e th Tho rnt o n was the wife of the American co n s ul. Her three d a u ghte r s \\ere well kn ow n in Japan for t h eir beautiful b l o nd e hair. 'Vhil e floating o\"er t h e l a r ge bapan a plantati o ns in Costa Ri ca. they \\ e re prc ud t o find that o n e of the l a rgest of thes e phmta ti o n s was b eing m anage d b y H a rold Lockwood, Jr" the m a nager of the United Fruit Company plantati o n s there, On s topping for a w hil e in Panama Cit y they were pleased to find that P a rk e r Hann a \\'as the editor a nd owner of the newspaper w hi c h ah\a,vs told the truth." regardless of the cost. On his staff was P an
PAGE 33

LASSE

PAGE 34

..

PAGE 36

s,U",o1. /. I" R.: -Grnnt L ... mmon. Armarulo D 'I\,;, I L",>, Si,I" ... )" \\'harton, J ... rry Gtori". G"tor,e Tarflin!!'l'r, Chester Wirh, Rul",r, Louie llorn"lI. Claud" ikr,,,r S"',,,,,/ R" .. /._ I" R Dlu .... n, Rid,ar. 1 R"i"hol.l. Rol"'rt ;'\oh"o, Saoch"",. n"jAnn", Colin Campb"Il, Fr"d Kno'<. Frank Erncst Wood .'11'''''/'''01. /,_ I" If :-Charl.-s Gould, t\lejnno
PAGE 37

1. R,mel!. Louie BdZ. 1I1, 3 B ej..r"no, Ib," L Bddcl) nlllllChr.:. 5. Clw'lcs h. Berge,. CI.tude i. Blis s, j\\:lyno Sl,d!.1 9. Cilmpbell. Colin. 10 D,lli",1'\nrmll II Dono\i.lll,E.ileen 12. Dougherty, \\'illi;1I11 I.'). Ebdon, I-I. Ego lf. Ruth 1 5. AI'm;lOdo II). Gibson. Anne Ii. Gorin. Jerr\' 1 8. GQu ld, 19. Greenle.d Ellen 20. II,HIIl;" Virgilli" 2 1 1 1 'IVes, Elizabelh 22. J Iifl. },me 23. Horine. C'Hlton 2-1. I-!offnwn, ,\\axine 25. H ollowell. Vidori,l 20. lIuntoon. Ethel 27. Johnson, E,' el."n 28. Knox, Fred 29. L,ull Blossom 30. Lench. I l elen Lemmon. Gr;lnl 3:=!. Len', Dn\' id 33. Le,,:is, 'c,lIlnc 3-1. ,'i.looix. Gloria 35_ ,'Lnn,x, John 36_ ,'brclI::;e, Be\'erley, 37. ,\\izr'1Chi, Rose 38, ,'\ollen. Robert 39. ,'hudler. EdM -10, i'\c;ol. L :lur.1 -II. Pickell, Ruth -12. R'lll cbl1. Violel -13. Reinhold. Di cit H. Roos, Doratl1\' -15. S;tnchez, I l en'r,' -Ih, Seiblcr, -17, Slo::'llm. \\'"rren -IS. Stetler, Belt\ -19 South. Ch:lrie, tIll, Si roup, Doris ;;1. Slone. \ \ ';lIiIOi fi2. T 'lrflinger, 5;'). \ \'inn .. ho. \\'h.lrton, fi;-. \\'he; eler, R:,, \\'ood, Alice' 59. Wirtz, Chester bO Wirtz. Edison bl.. \\'ong .. \lej'lO.irCi b? \\'ooJ, Erne..;t 6.3. \\'hidden, Louise Jl' 'lOR S T. ITr'iTf C'i \\'flERI': 1'0 Ii! FlH ... F'ront ..;c:ti. fifth 1'0\\ [n I h;ll or.l1lgt! C:II' st,eet. some pbcc, Ilomc!;Ollldimes Talldng pllu:c Pil" iC::; G:rtun I !:n)/),I'ing hel'sclf ,\t \'nUl' \\,iih :1 hook In c);ile-Old Cristol);!\. Typing room We hm' en't f(HlIld 0111 "ct Libr.'ll'\' \\jlh Rose Doing Shorth;md in English Uul to Lunch Here nnd there ,'lost ;lln'where \\'ith Ger;.Jd Surrounded the FOT'! D'H is 0': Art I Junior Home Room Wilh somcbo(k r\t the wheel of the Ci.lr. Swimming pool ForI D e Room I A I "'''.''$ presen ( Bridge{{e Club I n the bad.ground On the Gatun hus: Hotcl Washington Unusu;lll\ \ \'onderi;,g \\ ';"t it's ill! "boul.. With Boh O!'ten ;lbsen{ I in sc h ool Orchestr:! practice T;litin g Caribhc<1I1 orders Ony dreaming CLlss "Stnte.:;" Sp,ni .. h Cilib \\'ith les ... ie V [n bad with ,'\is..; l.::imbrQ ,\l :1 dance The other place U. S. Ilistory cbs..; Two feet our heads \rOllnd ilnd . hout Se;1 S:ou{ dodl On the w;rv lo sdmol In the :-.1 u;! \. 110111 FOrll;,,' .lrm-lIln With the G.ltun girl .. \ \ 'orllint; on .. boat In;\ red "k;" "SL Loui s 'Rlues" I ntel'lude" "Sweet Sue" "M\' Silent LO\'e" "Sidew;:dlts or New Yorl," In ,'\v Hiden\\':w" "A Bunch You" "j'bni" "Sweet R osie O'Grad,," r CIll't Gi\'eyou An,vth in g but Love, B:.by" Down on the Farm" "That Redheaded Woman" :: in;1 ry Girl" SCir\i,?1entat Gentlemlln rrom Georgia On,," "A;n;[ Sweet?" I sn'{ It Romantic" "J(eep,n' Out of j'\isch ier "}\t Pe .. ce with [he World" "Hummin' fo I'\"sclf" "\\'ns That the iiumnn Thing To Do" "The Cop on the Beat" PlIlceze. ,\\r. Hemmingwa,\'" J'm a Dreamer, Aren't \\'c All" "Then Came Ihe Dawn" Hey" hey!" "The Cuba"n L o\'e Song" "As You Desire _'ie" "Minnie, the _'\oocher" "It Was So Be':llIliflil" ""\oonlight and Roses" Fit Fiddle" "School D"vs" "On the Shores of \\'lIiltiki" "She's Flinn" Th;" \\'a\''' "L:lUgh, Laug h'" "Smile, Darn Yn, Smile" "Got (he South in ,\1\. Soul" Don't .\bout .'Ie \\'hen 1'111 Gone" Hey. Young Felln" "Th;ri Little Bo\' at ,'\ine" Just a Gigol o"-"Barnncle Bill. the SiJilor" 1 Lo\'c ,'\e" I s She that and S"eet "Oh, .'lan of the ,\\ountains" "Sailin!!,S;lilin" "Hawaiian "You Tellin' S \e !" 1 HeMe!" (She Came from BAlboa )

PAGE 38

\',fI,,',/, /. I,. R It''rI ... rt Phillip, J,."k '"lon Rid."r,1 ,\ I "II<'n, Lon!. Ch"rl", 11.-'111, n"rtram ,h",,,;,,, J"h" \""H::', Ruh"rt N",'!.-', 1',,,,1 li .. /,',n/ R"",S /,m,/""" f .. I" N Ski", ) "Ion p"lm, Burtn" P,,,r,'''' \\'illi1\m \\'irt7., )",k El."r.,,,,, F.lf:or B nrd.'n Fr",,t J"ral1lill". I rl R"h"rt ChHrk, j\\Lllt ,l,n." R"I.,'rt K inlt, S\u;ort T."""h",,,I, S .. .. "I N Sf""'/;"'I, r f" R D ... id P n lin. \\'illi,1m lkn', Th"o,lur, .\Il.rilum, ,\\"",,,11 SMul., .,. \ ... lin" I)""id, Ch"rl", Ilnln. 1 01m It'LlllIllund \ldn',1 n"lti"II, ,\1 "1".1,,, I)""" R; Iph D""i,, r "d, \\',IIi."" 11 .. 11".",11, 1.1",.<1 \11, ... op i1oIltOrl'i S,/I""I, / f{ \\ ,c!;,.rd RI'inh"ld, I ",,,p],io<' II ILtch, \\'ik;tU!,tml, \""i,' Turh"r";J!',, lar..-Carc. I,\rgllnt Hhr,,"rd, I{, thl,,"n ,I""" R.il\.>-. R"e ,""uJi",/, / . ,,' /( \Ii,'" ,'i.lt'Sp"rran, Jan" II"n("on. Ch"rlntt, R n nd"lI, Ill .. ,nil> Fn'millClr, I." ilk Tllr/ling,'r, Eiln'" Furl. Lda )' ... >nn" 1),,\\. I.ill;;,n .'L.d"n 26

PAGE 39

;-..' \,\\F I ,\lhc.'S;!, LI.wd 'J .\1\1I';11on. Tlw"dol'l:! 3 ... \sellsil). 13edl';I!ll. -\, B,1I'I1.u'11. .\\.'q,;;u-.,'( 5. B;llh, Ch,n'les b Becl' '' \\'illi,u11 i Hetteill, .\Idl,t'd BOI'JclI, Edg..r lJ. C .. truthc .. s, ,\\un \1\11 10. Collins, Eli l,d,cI'h II. I),H-id, '''clino I:! I)"\i,,, R,dph 1 3. I)cnl{ins,l.ela 1-1 Due\" ,\\.\1,.-01111 1 5, Dun' n, \)ol'(lth\ 1 6 ()\\ \'er, John' I T Ehe .... mz, J ,\\:!.: 20 Ensminger, Iliossl,m :!l. Furd, Eileen '1') GoodenOlildl, ",.(hlecn 2.) Cregor,\, j5 .. ,,1 2-L 11 . mmnnd. J ohn : 27, 110110\\1.'11. Willi;\m 28, Ilunioon, 1,1111.' :!C} J" rdillilln. Ernest. .It) I'ing Rohed ,")1 I.e 1) 1;'\\, ,,'\'I1Ilne j:! lAng. Jac k .\ \;u:Sparl'an, .\Iin :;4 .\brdclI, Lilli 'lI\ ;5. ,\\. ... sl1 .l1. D .l\id ,lh ,\ \olten. Rich;lnl ,j;' ,\\ulbne, Elinor ,")", \\\lr;l1l'c,\". Ch:II,lcs .;q :\'eeh-, Rot,cl'! -10. ()' (;.Hll..ll, .\iil-u: -1\ t)':\',,ill, 11\1111 4:! P.dm, J ohn 4;1. P_lri ", lohn 44 Peterson, R.)J,. ... r. 45 Phillip' Her\.ert -It.. Pien'l', HIII' l nn 4;P .. eHn, n.H id P .. d{,'. Clwrlnlte sn Reil1,, .\nlla :11 Rciniu)ld, ,\Ltrg,m:l. !):! ROo;',OI!:!1 5i. RO"-1lli . \ in .::el\l 54 Ryfkogci, .\Llr,\ 55. Sanders, I rl ?in, S;uulcor ', .\ b xwell f-t;' Stein. Ed g.n' T"rfiilll.!cr. Ludllc SQ, Tm,""llcond. SlUilrl bO. Turhenille, ,\nnie I... 1.>1 \\ikinl!:st;.ld. Ruth b:! \\'jrt;:, WiIIi.IIll 1.>3 -'lis" \\llOre C ,()"IIO,\\()RE I)IIUTIORY II IIEIH' l'llklll1u! P arll \\'hen: he I.cloll!-\ Sl';I Su)\d Sh;Il:11 -I """de .. !! 1-'01'1 R,'lldoJpll Ibnd p"adiL"l' PI.I\"hld COI'ntlli"s;\n .\1 hlltne FI'Cnl'il C;.n,11 With P aj..,\R",III .hlt .\\;Iry,\n;) .\1 hnme \ .. 1. ,\\;Ig','-lHll'I L'h \".'" 1'1,1l'c--l.u{ homc ,\1 home TI.nni s court \\'"shinel.)" P, )ol F'H'l Shcrm;LO \,,1. :-\nrru,\ I);."i" (lid CIi .. l oU;d \1 home With" Junior" Wi{1! Iled \\',\shincton PUIl\ \\'ilh Cf,:III .... Ul' ;!lul ,\Ii\,c Cri,,(u\MI [iiJr;lr\ \\'ilh ).)hn P ;,h;\ Fleet ,\if l'bsc T 'II'prm CluJ, \\'ith Ch;lrlnll ... :111(1 j'lI1c Fori SllI:rm;lIl En'r\"wherc COI'C; Solo Fnrt lit-L"s',elh :\'0 pi in p Irtind,lr \\',I"hincl'lll Pllnl Dl'Ll'S"'CP Fll'cI .\if n"sc \\'ilh RolK'rl [, illg KflIHlIl'11 P"l'h With D Clu!.!herh Cnl"n Fllr! i)1' i Ile:I\C!1 [;11,.,_\,,' .\\nnl(c\;n dr"IIIl.1 \\'j h .\Iil.e .IIHI IanI,.' \\'ith Bill B-lill'\ \\',1 Itil'!;llll! 1'11',,1 \ t Ii 1llle P .\\1l hUll Ile I. e .... el' .. mo\ Ie !"."t,,,, \\ !Jnme Co ,"\ \t h"Ille $e'\ Sl'illil sh . .. (';.\llIn \1 h .. me Fi"hill:: Rn"m IlflllilY !"'"lllillg ,II tilL' \\ n'llt:; I ill'I.' \"I:PHllg 1\;1 II ,\\ r ,\h',H"" l .. lling Ihllt'ill g Spod" (.\,!nmL'ln Tcnni ... S".';. Sllllt .. P"il1lin/;;" Cnl)];i11!! quiet Ro\\ing Che\\ing gum "'omen!" Re"dilU! C('lting-.\'" ('II in Spanish Le:Il'ning Lal .... "1 Pnl'llLlr Songs 1.;llin? Dieting S"immlllg ,\laking Brig-ht R I.'marl." in CL",,, Blushing nil-,n-\e riding R (',ulini! l'"ing ilL'r I b nd .. to 1'."1; Lo:dinc; \\'riting Slut/yin!! Rlsel,;.!! .\\indill:.! Iler Own Bu"inc"" J-I1I11tin; F'lirlinc:-Tr\'in!!-tll Gl'1 (;eomcin Sports -Stud"illl! SI' 1'.,'< ... b,.II-I' ... nni" C, ;,." to the .\111\ il"S YidiJ 1: Ilis I:ike :\ir!!-I .. lll' In CI""" Ilucs!;nlls Crill.i'!l'..! Pllllillg lip"li,-I; FI11nl1i"l< \rg"lf' t! '-;h,,\\in:... Iii 1\: ..... 1 .. -n;,.!;lIle II 0'01.,.11 ).n( P.\\ing _\II.nl;"I1;11 ('I.., hl"'cl.'r-"."ine S . ilinl! Spllrt" Ki.l-inl! I";:id .. Oul {If S, I.O("1!

PAGE 40

S./I."", L.lv R Antonio Phillip R"".I,,r . :dw"rd Curti<, AI"" ,\rid\. Willi ... lI ill Pnul Barnett, Juli" 1)"",in8""'" Rubert I"oot. Ruhert Rich .. td
PAGE 41

1 .\ril:k. ,\lcx 2. B,dd\\ in .. \["hcllo.; i. B,IInett. P.wi .l, BCj;lI;UlO. Cr;II.:t' 5. Birltcldlld. TIICI)(\ol'c b. Colion. Wendell i Cue ... l.L. Rachel S. Curti ... Edgar 1 6 I I Duminr.;ucl..Olg;1 12. D(l\,deTl. Render 1 3. [)u!'h;lnI. Ed\\"ard [ .t. I)\\\"CI', 1 5. EhJon, Dori' ... l b. ElIi .... Phillip 17. G,"'pcri, .\rnhlndu I S. Goulet, ,\IM\' :!l. GI'O""HlliLII, 22. Gruber, Barlmr;\ 23. 11.111, 1,lIne::; 24. 11.111. le'lIl 25. I I.lnn.l .. \UIiel 2h. 11.11lIlii. William 2i. 111Iri .... E ... t1H!r 2S. lIeim. Lilis 29. IIill. CIMrtes 30. Ilill. \\'illi:\111 31. I Ic\\itt. :'\'or Reporter E"pl;\ininlf Looking Good-ror-nothing V;llllping Ilou .. c\\ife Doing Wh,ll H e Should 5,lilor''i Wife Standing :'\'olhing \ uch Ch.I'iing Fcm,>. ,".l\licuri .. l Ilnu,cltecpinf Furtune. T elllllg C;l\ cnl
PAGE 44

/

PAGE 45

iGttrrary BES T s i io i n STORY "'1'11 10 TO,\ \ -130Y" ./(1111.' lIil/ 'j-/ From the t i llC s h .... \\;'S ol d c .... o u g h (n cl i mb f e nce s. J osep hin e B ; rr ows \\'as known "dong j \ \eadO\\ s Creek "thal B'll'nl\\ s t o m-boy." S he got int o IlHII'C de\ ilt!"," thew all thL' other B .. rro ws childre n put { ("ge t h c a nd ( ""'tied her .. thl.:" all O\"CI' the r a n c h m i miclI1Y se nse of being craz.,v lWeI' hoys. \Vh a t 's so wone! e rful ,,.b oll t e m'! Th!..'." CO:' n 't d l anything I Cin,t '" T hl!l'c \\"C'S only o n e bl .'" w h o ,ll JIl "oul..! e\'cn ,,1\0\\ t o go co<.sting \\ iih her . Il1d tha t was Da\'c C.-addiel;., a ne i ghbor hoy \\ho li\ e d just down (he r oad, .'nd it seemed (h.1I h e \\O's foren:r <'t (he B al"l"o\\s. L o u \ nn e ilnd Sue \\ere older (han 1 0. but it \\;'s 1 0 who look c h ... r ge of things 2rmll'd the h o use. S h e could cook for the f,'mily \\hen s h e \\<'$ ten, .lpd yet fol\{s said: "Fred B a r !'t)\\s did hring up them s i x therless c hildrL 'n ;'p d hc,d '('Ill <,I tUl'll out good, 'cept 10. S he's.' "ild one. The." d idn't knO\\ tha t Fred B;'1'1'( \\'s d e p en ded 1ll(Jl'l' upon I n th .'1) .>11 the rest. lIe didn't kn( l\\ it hi mself. l ,ut 1 0 he'd sensed hi s dept.:ndency \\ hen she \\as hut .' child climl.ing her lirst tree, ?pJ lived ur t o it. She fully hdiend tha t s h e Il(>t as pretty "S Luu .\nnL' and SloC. in filct. s h e "C'l'll'l pretty .. t all t o most pcople. hut did bcliL'\L' th,at her fath e r tllrPl'd 1(1 hL' h .,d turned t o her r:'1(;thcr, ill the dc-ys \\ h e n thcrL' h.,d hecfl a mothL'I' -C>11d s h e got a gn .. .dcr thr ill out o f thcot than the nthcr g i rls did out o f all their little pleasures. One by o n e the :lI1d Sue married and left \ \eadows C reek. 3 1 "YoLI'rc the only 'I)oy' l'n: gol lelt," Fr ed B a rn'"sscid to 1 0. "CUl:SS I 'll h 'H e t o l'en d yuu to Ag' sch oo l Sll you 'll l ie i,hl e t o hL' lp me I 'll n the f;nn." lo's h c. rt hcod I('<'ped .t tha l. IJUt w hen s h e h d f i ni s hed hi g h sc hool tht:re \\.'S a I,nd c lirl y he" ired. Ilel'l'yes SI11<' rtccl, uut s h e di d n ( c ry. TIlC'l's" h t t hl.::..'" said a l)(lU ( h er: 1 0 pcvcr cries, ,. "It'll I'un into Illoncy for tiS if J gn," s h e s(Jid to h c r self. This lep,!; d.,,' li: l.::dly c'/Ille to an end and 0 had fou g h t it nul iln d L o u .\nnc Ill'\'er Iw e\\' ther e \\itS a "ght. The dc'y tlwt LOll .\nne lert, FrL,d B.'1'1'o\\s sa id : ",\\;",11\.:, ne",t yei'" \\'e C:IIl IlwIH.! it 1'01 tl w h\(l of you. .\Iong in Jll \\.'s 'lsitl'd In the schlln! fill' the rest of the YL',al'. \\'hell ?sl {cd, ht l\\e\'er, 1 0 nnly laughed .'nd '" "';Isn't cut out ror se h oul tcic hipg." But th:,t night s h e pntin,d 1'01' the first h Im tired and \ ( I'n h e r l?thl'l' \\ilS beginning lo look \-. hell h e said: ." thought Lou ,\nne had plenty (1f clothes tC' stc>rt \\ ith. \\'hnt's this new dress s he's wanting'! I \ c horrt')\\cd on the apl>les .>lrcfOclyd on't kno\\' where I'm going to rake lip any

PAGE 46

m o re m o ney!" And so 10 took the position as teacher of No.6, w hi c h was n ea r by, and L ou Anne had her n ew dress a nd joine d a so rority. ) 0 h a t e d teaching. Night after night s h e came h ome s i c k, tired with the e ff ort of carry ing o n the sc h oo l work properly, of k eeping hou se. getting the m ea l s. t ending t o the vario u s littl e n ee d s a r o und the h o use and t a kin g the milk t o the station. Ar o und C hristmas, s h e dressed a hundre d chickens a nd sent the m to the c ity. made great pl a n s fa I C hri stmas. L o u Anne a nd Daye would be h o m e a nd the m a rri e d child re n \\' e r e coming too. S h e pl a nned a party for L o u Anne L o u Anne l oved parti es. She had a new dress, rose crepe d e c hine. for L o u Anne's present. H owever, the ni ght before L o u Anne was to co m e h o m e s h e calle d t o say that s h e was go in g to a h o u se party with some fri e nd s and thus, would not be h o m e. 10's ow n disappointment m e r ge d into pit y f o r h e r f ather when s h e remembe re d the hours her father h a d spent painting the old b o b s for a coasting p arty. By Spring vaca1ion,}o was pretty well tired out. L o u Anne didn't get hom e for thi s either. On e day during the vacation Dave came ove r to ask her to go a fter arbutus with him but all the light went outo f1h a t April day w h e n hesaid: "Kinda' tho u ght L o u Anne away lik e thi s for Easter, mi ght lik e a littl e package or box from h o m e "SUI'C s h e would. 1 0 h a d said but that night s h e buried h e r h ead in her a rm s on the w ind ow si ll. Schoo l was over a t last, but it was a stra n ge summer t hat followed. L o u Anne had a fricnd there for three weeks. a girl who only s mil e d indul ge ntl y w h e n s h e kn ew t hat } o was trying h e r best t o b e funny and a mu s in g w h o ca m e d ow n to ureakfast at ten in t h e m o rnin g. Dave was there a lot now. He took the girls everyw h ere, but 1 0 seldom went a l o n g as s h e felt, somehow, out of place with L o u Anne and her friend in their gay attrac t i ve cloth es. She a l ways had a host of things to do any\\ay. L ou Anne never seemed to see that there was a nythin g to d o 1 0 had h oped right up to the time college opened again that s h e would be 32 abl e to go, but she saw a t the e nd that there wasn't a chance. But, s h e did t a k e the egg money to buy what. boo k s s h e co uld on the course. She p o ur e d over t hem l a t e into the night after the long hours o f teaching and oth e r numerous duties. She and h e r f ather talked a.bout a new drainage system for the fla t s and t h ey were very close in those l o n g w inter eve nin gs they spen. t together. They were m a kin g g reat plans f o r the s prin g. Then one even ipg }o ca me h o m e to find h e r D a d ve r y i ll. The d octo r pron o un ce d it a b a d case o f pneumonia. "Heart's bad too." h e said, "can you a ff o rd a trained nurse?" "Of course," s h e sa id. tho u g h s h e wondered h ow. The nurse came. } o woul d rather have t a k e n car e of him h e r se lf, but t hey mu s t not t a k e a c h ance. She hired a s ubstitute f o r t h e sc h ool. coo k ed for the nurse, tended to t h e othe r littl e things around the h o u se that n ee d ed attenti o n, a nd cau ght h e r breath a hundre d times a day a t the sound o f her father's lab o re d breathing. Seve ral days late r the nUl'se advise d h e r t o se nd for the r es t of the family. They all came, a nd the f ollow ing day Dave cam e back t o h e lp She f elt that h e was the r e for L o u Anne's sa k e, but hi s presence was comforting. H e sa id that h e o nl y w i s h e d that there mi ght be so m e littl e thing for him to d o as } o looked so hurt. The nurse told the m n ow that it was but. a m atte r of h ours. "Let m e go in, begged )0. "ft i s betier that you stay h e re, [ oelie\e." They all sat silently wa iting. Once L o u Anne did say to Dave tho ugh. lilt was goo d o f you t.o come D ave, a no you r e mi ss ing t h e Prom. That Lou Anne could thinl{ of the Pro m when death shadowed the ir h o u se! } o though o f the l etter h e r father wrote eve r y Saturday ni ght, n o matter h ow ti red; t h e scrimpin g o n clothes for the past two years; a nd the p a intin g of the bobs on that fir s t Christmas. H ow co uld s h e c riti c i ze h e r 1 0, for n o t c r y in g? J o never cries!" L o u Anne had said. The n s h e hea.rd Dave's quiet vo i ce sa ying, "I--I'\'e a h vays thought an awfu l lot o f your father. H e was a l ways giving

PAGE 47

\\hist\(,Srlll' Ilinlhnus('s all' lis ilptlit.., .... 11I .. heL'l' gOlld til mt' ThL' ntl ll'r g i l l .... wcre ;lil crying: Illl\\. I n lonlH.'d .iU'II! .' t thCll .,11 ;/IHI .1 \\,'\'l.' nl':-;ic\< 1'I. .. SI .'llt m.nt s"L'pl O\L'\' IlL 'l'. \ \ 'h,t g 'nnd did it ti n k cry, nIH "'! \\'hy h .do' tIIL'\' cn llL' hn:nL 11I0 I 'C Ortl..'11 '! I ) ; \l'. IH1!\' D ,I\l' whn S l'n I illl C Il( h i ,t! tril,d in tl,1I tIH .. '.1l ... n. 11 t'thi I 1!.!n.'i.1 th.t \\iI ... i'l hi s hc;lrt. Theil JIl ... ;.id : "Thi:-; i .... the \\ol," I ah\i'y", thin\( of 1) ".1. Y nu l(IIp\\ h e r e w(' used tn eros ... the Cl'cck t n I.!I1 t n the milk \\'cilo I ,,;IS il kid tlK'p. ;In d D ild \\f)l tld ;,J\\i'.\s dri\ e right do\\ n through th e Cl'eL'\{ and up t h e h anks. tn ,\ash the whcl..'ls. 1 :-;uppI 51.'. Thc rt' w,lsn't muc h ,,;'ter the n. Oad \\ould Cl'llnk out hi s c lh o\\ "Ind I would clutc h it -so tight. T h e n, o nce when I was a little o ld e r I tl ... ked him why h e did it ",h e n he kne\\ dri\' in g t l ll'ou g h the Cl'cek frightened m c so. a nd h e silid: I lik e t o feci YOU I littl e hands o n my arm. III.' :dWil,"S let u s h a n g (' n like-that j u s t hec
PAGE 48

s,,"ys t h a t s h e i s li\ i ng in a m a ns i o n tha t is \"er y pretty n ow. S h e i s n t going t o come back to u s b u t we s h a ll go t o b e w i t h h e r w h e n w e die, tho u g h." [ s s h e h a ppy there?" procee d e d t h e joy o f th e family_ " es. d I s heaven the land w h e r e we'll never grow c1d lik e the so n g you s in g s ays?" Y es, h o n ey. " \Vell. w ill you h elp m e pack up, 'cause I mi ss g r amma so muc h 1 want t o see her now The p 2 r ents l oo k e d at each othe r a nd smile d, for j u s t the previ o u s evening they h a d pl anne d how Andrew would go t o sc h o o l the f ollowin g autumn and the y wouldn't have a n y H b a by." "No. d eal' you d on't wan t t o go t o heaven yet," pro t es t e d his m othe r l"\rs. L aUine "you wa n t t o s tay w i t h u s a w hile." "But I'm going to h e a ve n t o m orrow, 'cause I want t o b e a n ange l and be \Vi z gramma. I'm so h appy n ow. Whe n h e said a ngel l'1rs. L attine l oo k e d a t his little beaming face w hi c h d 2ily see med t o beco m e m o r e lik e a n a n ge l' s tha n a c hild' s. "Yo u r e go in g t o stay wit h u s, h o ney." So s h e t h o u ght, bu t fate work s in str a n ge a nd myst e ri o u s w ays. The f ollowin g m orning a sunny f aced Andrew Lattine was s t anding o n a nine in c h l e d ge a u ts id e the b annis t e r s o f the f r ont s t a i r s. His a rm s we r e w r appe d a r ound the banni s t e r s a n d h e w as singing t o hi s heart's conte n t w hil e hi s brothe r s we r e playing in the basem ent b e neath. "Com e o n and play w i t h Junio r And y calle d A lb e rt. "All r i ght, thi s will r eally b e m y l as t so n g. "0 Kay, c o m e o n down w h e n you have Andrew loved t o play t h e p art o f a f a m o u s singe r so, o f course, h e wante d his concludin g numbe r t o b e the b es t. His clear, little vo i ce rang out the w o rd s o f the so n g as clearly a s a b e ll. His vo i ce sounde d lik e a n a n ge l's and his m othe r th o u ght o f th e word s h e had said the prevj o u s e v ening, bu t s h e t oo k the m as a j o k e o r a childhoo d fancy. A s h e began t o climb the b annis t e r s a ft e r his so n g t h e r e was a c reaking s ound, a cras h, a scream, and f our p attering f oots teps. Andrew h a d c o m e dow n but not as h e was ex p ecte d t o. "Mothe r, they shrie k e d "he's dead he's dead. Two days l a t e r quite a l a rge group o f f ri ends we r e standing o n a g r ee n lawn abou t a mil e l o n g a nd a mil e wid e. H e r e and the r e, t h e r e we r e marke r s t o show the resting place o f l o v e d ones. 1n the mids t o f the g r oup w a s a small cask et.Eve ryone's head was b owe d w hil e fift ee n o r s i x t ee n wept s il ently a s t h e minis t e r prayed. Andrew' s little b o d y w a s l a id besid e hi s gr andmothe r s, and t o this day o n e can s e e the words : "Andrew D L attine born 1 9 27 di e d, 1932 has fini s h e d hi s l as t so n g o n ear t h." B E S T ESSAY FAVORITE EXPRESSIONS" Je,f,fC D apid .;; D i d you ever have a song, a w o r d o r even a n i dea p ossess i o n o f y o u. min d, a nd try as you m i ght. y ou c o ald n o t ge t i t o u t o r,vour syst e m? \V e r e yo:J. e v e r bese t I),v t hi s dise(l, se ? The "fav orit e ex p r ess i o n disease'! N o tic e t h e e ff e d i t has o n your fr i e nd o n you. T h ese express i o n s are a c o n s t a n t m e n ace t akin g co ntl'O l o f y o u lik e a n u n p leasant a nd unin v i t e d g u e s t I am not r e f erring t o t h e t oo f r equen.t usag e of certain wor ds; f o r t h a t i s ca u se d by the 34 l acI{ o f a v i g o ro u s mind. A per s o n knows m o r e syn o n y m s f o r ever y w o rd h e uses t h a n h e car e s to spen d e n e rgy o n N ote th e s p e e c h o f the peop l e you c h a n c e t o m ee t. It i s full o f favorite expr ess i o n s w hi c h see m t o b e a p art o f the i r p e rsonality. They a r e a s m all but s i g nifica n t g r oup o f word s. The r e has a lways b ee n a te nd e ncy t o u !"tel' something w h e nev e r t h e mind canno t grasp a n idea, in o rder t o prevent a n embar r ass in g sile n ce. \Vh e n in d oubt, i s n t it

PAGE 49

raflll'l" e. s y t n tlloli s ll, if n n e h s rtln out of l'igan. : lI cs'! th, d i s pnwidcd. nne dill"" smoke, \\' Iwther you i're co n .. c inu .. of it (II' not. ,"l'U do USl' some pd expl' ession in sitwdions "he n .. intdligl'nt I'cplil's d n nnt fnl'm entlllg' h to youl' tlulU ghts ;ldt..'qu;,tl,ly a nd tacti'ully, r l 'hl' se .... "e till' 1l1tlmcnt s \\hl'n thl'l"pn..'ssinn w ill iX'P out spontall('(lu!:dy. Isn't this mu c h mo,'c heIH.'tic i d t o hoth pill'lic s. th" n !;ivipg ", t o YO\lI' i n lier thoughts? I t i s very c,lSY til cnst aWily a n c ... pre s sion tlwt tro uili es you, if there h e an o ut s ide influ e nce h(.'lpin g. F ClI cxamplc o n e o f my friends had the habit o f ex claiming "stupid" t o w h.11c\' c l was said I f they told him II j olly talc. h e w o uld s mil e g i\'ing the j oker a s h nrp "stupid" at thc same tjme, that would ci t her amuse or di splease the laU c r J [ c \\'ould ling e r o n the ;'s." thus g i\'ing it a hissing sound, This exclama ti o n at tracted many a friend, hut it soon IlCcam c n('I "'(' ra c kin g. although som e wCl'e alre ady u s in g this same expression. It certainly \\'ClS contagious. "'he n askcd he could n o t ex pl a in h o\\' h e had acquired it. hllt aftcr u s ing-it a few weeks, h e droppe d it. not naturally. hut a bit co n sc i o u sl,\'. 'e d o n o t a lw ays "alu e what cur e nemies t ell us: h owe e r le t som c o n e whose o pini o n we do \'alue s ugge s t that som e idiosyncrasy o f speech is annoyin g. and immediatcly "e a t te :np( t o correct the f ault. This was the case with him Ilis second fam o u s last \\'o r ( \ s. (the\' \\tlUld h""e heen hl.ld he kept them UI;) "CI'C "\\' h o ca.rcs'!" \\'hen g iv c n any ip!'or nation "hatsoe\'cr, "\\'he GII'CS'!" "mild introduce it self. if h e kd nothing el se ((1 sa.". and that wa s ,ery l,ften lie "r>" n o t tr\'ine: l<. he funny or rude. The hc there u .... Gllied for Ft',rtunatel\' w e unde rshl('d him \ \ 'c are human, o r rather. suh jed tn thc same malady. Once we < s ited him \\'hy he u se d this remark so often. I t applied. muc h t o ('ur il'fil a ti n n too t o suit u s. Ilc said that nul' infl' rm,, ti o n meant n othinc-t o him. the r efnre the thing t o say \\as :-:\\,llO cal 'cs'!" One o f Illy fri e nd s agrced with him, hut III t t o he outdone, a dopted the remark "Pipe d o\\' n!" This onl' did not come so n atural 35 t n h im. f,1' it \ \ .. l ..... 1 c h() .... e n Hill': I ut it ctluntel'acted the utilel"s quite e f fect i vely FI'( III the n Oil ('\ 'erything ...... Pipl' (I.)\\n" for the la ... t i ctim. f ud g in g I ,y the afol'esppens to come fl'o m som eo n e ,\'o u dislike hearlily. Turning t o a n othe r ,ictim of this m a nia-wh e n pass in g a person, deep in hi s thoughts 0 1 unusually quiet. h e wo uld snap hi s fingers in hi s face, c l 'y "e( Ille out of it" followed hy a "Pull youl'sl..'lf ft-gethe r If the perso n nHl\'ed h e would sure l y l, e hced \\'ith "Control ('II' ".\ s ,YOli WCI'i..'." Thi .. l,ecrllt.' monotono u s. \\' h en in sc h oo l h e \\(I ul d "Tis h. ti sh" hi s c\nss:l1
PAGE 50

self on the back: "Rawther" \\ lien agree i ng wit h someone; HAw nuts!" when some\\hat irritated: "Let's harm on i ze ff)lIo\\ed by a l o n g "do" w hen buttin g into conversation. gettin g a g i r l' s goat, or w h e never a n y c ir cumstan ces pCl'Illil it. eithe r seriousl y or in fun. The list a nd t h e circums t a n ces a r e unlin1it ed. "Favorite express i o ns" a r e lik e words colloq ui al. of good us age. or s l"ng. Then the r e a r c t h ose that eire lIsed a lmost unive r sally. SOine of these arc "Can you be?t thaf!" "BCClt s me," \Votta m an," How you s ink 'em." "Can't tak e 'em," a nd "Tell it to the j\\arines." Most of these expressicns are modern, but other s such as "Go to" and "Something rotten in the state of Denmark," were either known during S hakespeare's time or coin ed by him. l \ \any a person's presence has been betrayed by hi s mode of speech hi s laughter, hi s voice. o r whatever peculiarity he has to contribute. Hi s mode of speech h as t h e most effect on hi s compani ons, for it determines the quality of hi s personality a nd hi s envir onment by means of these expr ess ions. They determin e, in other words, a person' s "class" and "style" t o some extent. Who could be more boresome thCln the person who is so grammaticall y and sc ientifically accurate in form of speech that it would put a f ollowe r of Hoover to shame for its dryness. and make you thirsty just to h e? r him speak ? On the other h and his. opposite cculd be just "5 bad, such as lhe person w h o cannot say anything but "Oh yeah or "Let it l ay" whenever h e is spoken t o. The etique t te of speech s h o uld not be exagge rated, that i s. do not be t oo polite r e l ax. without go in g to t h e extremes. Formality, even in important events. i s not a lways essenti al. V i vid n ess is the required quality. Be sure, however, that i f we must imitate, let u s imitate tnose qualities of the human speech w hich a r e t h e richest in beauty and the least of. fensive m1 TWILIGHT I N PANAMA .Il uriel .l1ullolle ';6 A little bit -of Eden greets me as r r;lise my wcary eyes from labol ioll s trans la(irm of Spanish 10 gaze out (.f my bedI'oom \\ indo\\". SWc',Ying bamboo trees. Illiljest i c ro.val p .. tlIllS. roya I poncianna. a r ose gard en in i l loom, nodd in g coco nut-and papaya trecs. bri lli ant boganvill a. and co r al v in es climbing c\erywh ere -hedges a riot of in green. orange. ,Ycllow, r e d. and 1m" n--sleepy hibi scus closing t h e ir scarlet bells for the night. a white frangi pangi trcc in full bloom, sending it s s\\cel essences through the eve nin g a ir Green lu\\n s and a hlu e. b lu e sea. with tiny w hit e siJil boats and dignified Slea rners o n it s cre"t. The retiring sun flashes its glory. painting pictures upon a til'ed \\orl d. in 36 opal esce n t hues against a n ethereal blue, of castl es. lakes and rocky sea s h ores, peaceful beaches, little i s l a nd s of purple hills and golden clouds promising a n othe r wo rld with a go lden s hore j u s t : a head. A mirage methinks pe.,haps hut it breathes h o p e renewed. o f mating goldenyello w butterfli es. lik e fairy phantoms. float past. A songbird sends hi s love call to some s h y ma tc. One senses the deep drowsiness of nature, sendin g all to rest. The c rickets begin their c ndl ess chirping, and the locust his tireless buzzin g. As the last beacon red rays fade from the sky. sendin g their glow or warmth and radiance to a nestling wo rld. I see m to hear a whisper. "All's ri ght with the world."

PAGE 51

G.\TL't'< BUS TI.\1f PL\CI-CIIHUCTI-U i I Sit Sl,.,honl I Ill'" iI' o m C.t. tun til Cs i ... tnll.d Ilig h Sdhlill Cirt.... Phillip, thL' l., h llIl lellr, a nd H Pdfl.:.llllil cnp. ing t \l".'llg": ) ",\nui,,, YOII need a h a ir cut." /""i,. ( glc-tlKing Lip Irnlll nhU'n ing's p.lper horrowL'd from Philip): "Ynu tt'lIin' Illt'?" D 'JI'I.'-J ( h o lding ont.' !'idt' o r papt'r): "I wonder "ho Gidl.!'Ul Gns'dun is'!" (,'/01'1' 0 I d\ln't kiln". but "\\' i llie h.l s ... nn him ... Ollll.'\\' hl.:rt. Phili". the dliWfkul' (tying th", hOlld dpwll nil hl!'" with a pil.ll. III \\i,c. ttl ... tl l p tht'rattlc): I ... c\'t'ryilody hcn .... .. Girl,.-(in chmu ... ): ""II c'\cept thrc"" and if thL',\' :lrL' not h"'rL' ", lwll tli,' "enol I.'!' .... I,.:ls I"'ine tlwlll. .\'illy .1111.1 .\\argy ./J, ,::(/,I/ (qanding in dnorway 0 1 IllIS) : "\\'1.'11. "I""re dn I "il'l \\' h e r.' do J ... i t '!" Ih,( (putting nut hand)' "I Icn,:' ... il n n my thumh. (, 'irt" ( in c hlll 'u",) : "Philip. Id's gil, IId's gn! Thc i: I:l "'C!lokl h.t ... p ...... "d. Philip s t:1rls lill .... /), Iri. H. ( I Ot,killg dn\\11 ... 11'''''1.:1): "fltlld it! h old it! lIerc l'\lm",S Edll .. I." Fd"a pin ... ill h e l h1: .. llld .\l,lI ... : ,\'indi, .'\indi'" / .I1II1It' (ydlin g through Ill ..... "\\'anted i.i greal e nginl. l,.r \\1111 : .. tll dam. drain. a llli ditch ,\\1:\1)1." ./lia ( bughingly)' Li ... t",11 til til .. : 111 .. 1 UCIllIl\:I'<.It. TheI'l.:' ... hl. gIll: ..... l)"l'i ... I . Th.iI .... 1101 t.dl(in::; p .tit il ..... that's just plain ... anitary RIIIII: "Did yilli hCdr .dluul till' light IIIl Ill! .... s i:\ Yl..'stc:I d.IY'!" (;I"rI, .. ( in choruS): .. Yc .... child ... 1111./ ther,, \\'.h stl m ... hair pulling. ( Inol
PAGE 52

busses g i ve chase. The n o i se o f clapping and c h ee rin g i s s udd en l y d r owned by t h e sc rea m o f a s ir e n. A m o t o r c'ycle policema n pulls u p a l o n g a l o n g side of the bus, which co m es to a quick stop. Pallamanian Cop (putting out h a nd o n s ide of bus): ''Hey! Y ou! What do you think this is?" ( hands Philip a ticket). G irl s look at each oth e r in wonderme n t. Bus starts s l ow l y off. GirlJ (breathin g a l o ud s i g h o f relief): "Phili p, we'll h e l p pay t h e fine." ( B egin taki ng up collectio n ). llope ( Droppi n g in a coi n ): "Goodbye, bottle of p o p! /-J/ice (Makin g contributio n): "Fare well. C lark G able Glm'ia: Bu e nas n oches, Greta Gal'bo!" Bu s stops at Cristobal Hi g h School. Girls run for s h elter. Rulh (out of breat h): "Tt's r a inin g cats a n d do gs." .11i1(y: You m ea n it's raining pitc h f o rks." dllllie Laurie: "1"\r. Vint o n says it's r ai nin g fish." END THE BANANA The ba nan a i s a tender swee t fruit, a littl e s m aller f han a policeman's billy club. H comes i n b un c h es, l ike troubl e. a nd it s u se has m a d e i t poss ibl e for the ltalia n r ace t o prosper in America. The bana n a ca n be boug h t in the Uni ted States w h e rever s m all c h a n ge i s found It g r ows in the tropics and its bearer i s a l a ge p l anf w ith ext e n sive l eaves t hat prod uces a bunch of bananas hung upJ"ide down a n d so m e tim es a tarantul a or s mall snak e thrown in f o r goo d measu re. I t i s picked green a nd tUI'l1S yellow and ripe w h en kept l o n g e n o u g h It i s very nutritio u s ( this fact is so metim es ques ti o n e d ) and has bee n in Africa, breakfast. lun c h and dinner for so m e natives ever s i nce Africa was discov ered by Nature. I n the Unite d Sta tes t h e ban a n a is rated a d elicacy and i s us ed pri n cipally by tra vellers to kill t im e and s m all boys fOl' pl easul'c and exc i t e m e n t. \Vith a nic kels' worth of bananas, a small hoy ca n ea t himself into a warpe d and distended s hape a nd can litter quite a large sectio n of sidewa lks with treache rous banana s kins. S l ipping o n a banana s kin is o n e of the most fiustrating things t hat can happen t o man in ( hi s country. Nothing ca n floor a ma n as qu i ckly as a n inn ocent little ban a na s kin America owns millions o f acres of ba nana plantations in Central Amer i ca, and e m ploy large fleets o f s t eamships t o brin g the cro p h ome So m e day all the l a n d between 38 Brownsville a nd Pan a m a C it y will b e o n e huge banana plantation, a nd Italians will be abl e to e njoy the banana in the ir ow n country wit h out im mi g ratin g to f\meric a a nd spe ndin g seventy years se llin g i t for a living. ARRIV I NG I N PANAMA Thelma Purvi.r '38 As we were s l owly driftin g into the Ba'y of Li m6n, I l elt a sudde n pang of h o m e s i c kn ess. Number e i ght was t h e d oc k at w hi ch t h e
PAGE 53

'. BEST POE \ \ /J,II'wlllI/r,";; Till' .. ky', \\l,'n' gctting .. tOflll,' One ".llnmcr d"., in '\\"," \ \ hcll I ,\ . kedin' f \ ml ... lidin' in the h.I," The ..... t.u, tl'd 11.", j"l:>. \ ntl the l'I\\" hC.11I In mnn, Ami I he.lrd the c hicken' Crl)\\inB. .'\ lid the lIo\'c, I.) l'OO. Til,' .. got bln!;'k ,Ind "l.lIcker. t \II . holil \\,., gr. I .' .1Ilt! .. till \nd tlll'n there II.'''' ,I (.'r;, .. 11 ,Hul hang \l1d ,I loud. Inut! .. lIrill. The dumh thell bllr .. right open, \mllhe .... i" dnlPpcd 011 Go.l' ... noo r, And me, I m.ld"., d . ,h Str"i!:>ht for OIlr kit c hen door. The r"in iu ... t ... t .l."e ll.tt1 hour Uu"idc ollr (oml'." hllllIl'. ;\1ll1 the hor .. ('.;, (',)\, ... ,lIld dlickcll .. \\'cre ,,\\c thcrinj; it .111 .dullC'. t \nd no\\ the r in j:!o over, \ nd the cloud .. 1I,I\'c p.,,,..,cd :t\\.I.'", And lIe kid ... ; ..... t keep.I pr, .'"ing I t \1 ill come . g;.i n ... om\.' d.I.'". D I D YOC E\'EIl Did you c,er \1(lIlIle .. hn\\ Ihe dllllll ... \lcn.' Ill . de, Or 111"1\\ the thorn ... nn hu ... he ... tlll ir point." hL.,le. Or hOI\ the hird .... .11 ....... il Ih(",1 '''\.' in .J r.,id. Did ,I tlU e\ er \londer'! Did ."OU CI cr \londer 111)\1 the hir.l ... could .. Or ho\\ Ihc gr.I''' lurn"gflell .It Ihe .Ippru.u.:h 01 Or 110\1 the ... tre.lflh \ll ".Itcr tn Ihe ,:oul,1 cling. Did ,"nu c\ er "onder'! Did ."ou e\ cr Ilonder \I lin thi .. crc.,ture could he. \\'ho dGe ... the ... e he,lIItilul thing .. lor you .Imllllc . \ l nther ="Iture i .. the oni.'. don't ,"ou think it Did .'011 c,er "onder? 39 BEST PClE.\\ 1\OYS l'fI""r;rrr"III,,,/i..J .\t til1le'" r thinll tll\.., 'rc .I\\I-d. ,\t tilllC I thinll till'.' 'rt' lIill ,\1111 '111111.' I lill\. In I .c \lith l o t .. .\lId uthcl ... Ill"t:r t .. ilc TIH :.' tc.I'C .11Il1 pl.llftlC ,lIu l pc .. lcr Theil ('lillie \\ it h II,tt Ie .. .' .. II eel ,\nd 1i ..... 1 I .... 1\. I h"te thcm," .\ml thclI, :Tlu:.' \,." . nt loe 1 1C.lt" 111STOllIC,IL 1l0CF:R I.i:-.lcll. Illy :-.tlllicnt .... 111(1."1"111 .. h,dl he .lr" 01.1 te;u :hc ... "ho ... e h Omel\ll rk ".1'.1 te.lr. ",\ L .ke m.lp"', outlinc ... ,IIHI t.tllC lIote .. (t thi .... :\nd thcn tor tomo .... ol\ I W,lIIt ,\011 lu li .. 1. The dollc ... 1"11 :;ct ticillent-. rehellioll" ,tnd rCI'G' lutin .... .\ml.ll .. o you c.ln I lr in g ",ollle ptl\itic,,\ ... tllu lion ... \\'hid. p.l .. t y \\ill I\in in Ihe ne)"t l-OImp . ign? \'ote for Roo"'e'clt get IlCer "inc . 1It1 "h.lm-p s ne," \\ h o i .. thi .. tc.lchcr Ih.11 rUII ... ",ulh.1 r,u"kci? :-\ OIH: othcr th.ll, (lur hi .. tnril' 1 Roger C 1 1..("kl'tt! LJ.' \ERICI(S FI/ .. /I (irall/roll;..J \ u irl !rom C .. i .. tnl, .t nm'e .. ,.id. "Tonight I'll j,':11 l rl.\ 10 I,cd," Shc \\\"'lIt nll t t n til\.' ='0\\ thi ... le ...... (11I Inuld te.1t \" Th . t Ihe 11\11011 g(IC .. right ... \() the he,HI 011 hurr.' ill through the: h,lll. One d.IY I hl'.lrd ... ,ullchu,l.' ell! "Cume \',Il.:k, .\011 I,ig !olin!, Y{1\1 h,1\ ( ... tlllcn Ill.' gUIll. \ lett ullder Ihl" dc .. k in .. Iud.' h.dL 011' in Engli .. h nur le.ldu'r i ... (m ...... Thcll trolll d ......... 1 lin.' ... "U"l" 10 IIC In .. t But you C.III' hl.'I1lC her thcll. I I you rc .ri .. II hCII, Shc i ... I n .. 11111\ y(lu "\\ho .. Iln ..... '"

PAGE 57

4 1

PAGE 58

CL\SS O FFICEHS C L U B A N D CLASS OFFICERS T h e class a nd clu b off i cers desen'c
PAGE 59

BOY S G LEE CLUB IlOYS GLEE CLU B R ulh Pi,l..:dl ';-/ The B o y .. Gl ec Cluh thi .. under the ... upeni ... i oll o f \ \ ildr c d E lner, II ..... greatl,\ impnl\ ed. On the ir m ceting day ... , \ \ u n d. I .' mll Thu .. .. d a y S th p ('r i n d th ey pI';lc ti cc 2, .3 ;1Ilt! 4 P,Lft Illu ... ic, The Cluh oft e n ... ing: ... ill puhli c dutillg th e ... r h oo l yc; tr Thi .... ,'('ar tltl'Y .... Ing at the Chr i ... tnu ... progr.11ll .It the Clul ,huu"'e, :lml ,LI the \\'olll, Ln':,. Cluh pr og r ,111l. T h ere i ... IUlu 1i t n h e I cal"lleli in ,. Gl ee Cluh and ill prlp ;lIing theit p rngr. lln ... mud. p r,ldil'i g i ... ne('e ...... ,lr.', G I RL S GLEE CLL'1l R ul/, / 'il'i..dl 'j-/ \ h o u t 2;') g irl s thi ... ye; lr (,lIr1l1Ie( 1 for C le(' Club ... o th.LI the o r ga ni z.Llion i ... ttrger t h'lII i n l'lr('\ iou ... Thi .... lik e th e B tl." ... Gl ee Clu\., i ... u n der the ... upcni ... i o n 0 1 .\\i ...... \ \ i ldrcd Eln er. T hl' regul.lr mlct illJ;'" arc Tuc .. cI, t y a nd Friel I .' Hlh p( .. i u d Tlli y e a r the Gl ec CIIIII".lIIg .. t "e\"cr" l .. oci,lllumli'lI1"', ,\llIong them \\ c re: The CIII j .... tnl.t:. p .. of: r lln .It th c CI"I,h o ...... e. the 1.. ldi e ... : \it! S oc id., o f th(' C .. i .... l ol..l, L'lIinn Clwnh. :lIId thc \ \'om ,III'" Cluk

PAGE 60

LI G A P \ N A:'I E RIC_\ N A LlGA P ANAJ\ \ ERICANA Rli:alulh Thorn/oil ';; Chapte r N i n e o f the L i g p nameri ca na." a nation a l cl u b fir s t org anized in the s t a t e o f T exa s, has t h e h o n o r of b e in g t h e firs t chapte r o f t h a t club o r ganize d outs ide of t he Un it e d S t a t e s It i s s pon s ored by j \ l r s. Spen cer. T hi s club has g rOwn o u t o f the fir s t Spanis h C lub ev e r orga ni zed on the Canal Zone. L A P AS, a nd co n<:i s i s of certai n qua l ified m e mbers of t h a t club. T h e o bject of the Chapte r i s t o bette r relat i on s hi p between L a ti n and North Ameri ca n countr i es. b l u c h has Leen d o n e t o atta in thi s o bject, and m u c h m o r e i s b e i n g p l a n ned Importan t a nd inter e sting a m on g the aff:. ir s o f the club w a s the m eeting i n c omme morati o n o f P a n -Am erican day o n t h e evenin g of \ Vedn es d 1Y, f \pril 1 9. An inte re s t i n g program wa s a r ra n g ed a s follow s : Address o f W e l co m e by P r es id ent Ern es t de Ia O ssa; M u s i c by H enry S a n c h ez. A lejcol r l p e n k n ife. . E ve r,von e dcd:: ucd t h d h c h ad e njoyed a w onderful t ime a nd we only hope t h e r e s t of t h e Soph om ore ;lff ir<; turn oul : ,<; w ell.

PAGE 61

::;P.\;-;ISII ClXB S P ,\XI SII Cl.l'lI 11,/0/ II .'lIIm.""I '" Tho.: Sp,.ni" h Clul., kntH\ I' 'LI P ... ," \\:1 .. inlf"ducc d illin C I [ S, ,Il ti, '1/\' 111 (k 1,,1,;,:r, Itl:io I t j,.1 IN, ("\l:III,il(' lluh. 1'111\ IIHhC \,h,) h,I\ C ,Ill :l,cr,lgc nl "90" I' c in g h ... 1I1\'1111'l'r,hil' TI .. ,Iuli \\," ,'rg,l11i/ .. d loy \f'. Ph. IIi, Spcm-cr in order I., pnlllHlll' ,Ill illll'rl',I;" the ,huh 01 SP,llli,h, ,lilt! 1(1 hl'llel' tli{' rel.'liml' Ilcl'\CCIl Sp,!ni,h ,,11\1 Engli,h '1ll" . l lillg pl"'I.ll'. nd'n rc I per"lI' m I h{'CHmC ,. Illeillhcr. he mu, 1 1.(' t.,kill1! . 1 it : ..... 1 'l:l'pnd ,\l .'1" SI'"lIi,h,I,e,ide' h.I' in g the requircd .,\ cr,,!!". II{, i .. illili;ltcd hnth form"lly .Ind inl orl11,.II.' The 1.,nll,.1 initi,.I"", . \ cr.' impn''';'c ct.'remun., fllr the TlC\\-lomcr .. o f the duh . \ller e d, meeting Ihere;" ,t!\\,I.'S ,Ill eniCfl.linmcn! put .111 h.\ eillll'III.\, I11lm\" .. 'r" "h,) I"ineti the club "t the 1. .... 1 mcclillE:, Ilr .... \Ill\' 01 the old mcmhc ..... E,er,' \C.'f "I.., P ..... prc,cn'" ,I pl.I.' Tlti" y(",lr il ..... "C,""lill", de r"rr"'Il"I,le'." .1 Ihree-.Ill coml'th The .. .... 1 \\ ...... 1 fnll,)\\ .. : Duke o f\.II)'.Il1.l11 Su"it,. Cur . .\g.'pitll Sc,i'lf H odrigo Git"Il,1 COIl ... C", ,t TIll I \ IIlIt ... \\'" II \\'IIII\'I1\lllI' F H '"'' \\." II ,U\l I,ll el .. n .... nIHI\\'" 1\1 J\ Sn I flP" 11,'1"""" CII ".1 SHI Til \ 11,111(1111.'1 ",I' nil IKl.lrtl thC' Sp;1I1i,h .. hip .. ,'\.,g-.111 11 ....... .tlcf \\Imll Ihl' "'I'\.lin .. llhe ent('rt, lilled for u" nil d ... ,k. E'cr\"onc Ihorolll.!lth cn;o\ed Ihe ('\('111 ,1I1I1In .. I e.,:.:erh l"fl\,lrol 1 0 mnre Ihin!,': .. oj thi" I ,'pc ne\1 .'e,lr .. Slll lrll.' hclorc the end 01 thc "c-hool .'e;-ar, the dllb g,.,e . I l.IrHllIl'I h.r thl' 11I,1.111.,111l1l fit Ihe lie" ofli(cr .... ,'\'.n.\ ",emltCr .. and . 1,(1 "omc \1 ho h"d \\er(' 11"'re tIl elll'" the relllli"n SE:-; IOR O \ XCE On the lIi!!hl of Frill .. thc :!lth 01 Fehru.lr\". th(' 1".11"""111 "I till' \\ hIlI lOIn II "h \\., .. the lel1e of .. delighl ful cI.IIKe el; loy the Scninr d.l..... . \ II,i l' \\ .... luroi .. hed h 1 \\c l .. h, orcltc,tr." .. nil 'lime mil"" .it 11t.lt' E"crynne .. e('mcd t o he h,1\ .1 cr.lIlt! time ;\l1I1InlOl the h .... le in \\ III, I. the IHUI( Ii Ili',IPI>t' ,red. \\c,1 '.l .... it \\ .... good Illl lll:hl Re gll'Cllc,," n t the 1,ld th.11 the d. l n ce "a, gi,en.1 liltle I.,le III the ."C,'f .1 tllole.1 I'"t I, I.,; ,I S\lcce<;s ,I the C .lIl tell "ou 45

PAGE 62

ATI ILETI C ASSOCIATION THE ATHLETIC j \SSOCIATION Efi;:,lil(::l" II<1YeJ '}-1 The Athldic Assoc i ;ltio n of Cristob a l Hi g h School ha s provcd itself to be a bi gge r < Ind b ette r orga ni za ti o n th;m in prcvious year". I t i s a combination of la s t ye.:.r's Boys' Athlctic A ss o c iation and Girls' At hl c ti c A ssoc iation. and it s main purpose i s to ;'\I'OUSC and c n cour
PAGE 63

BOY'::> \'.\HSITY CLUB IIOYS \'.II .Ic r there arc {wellly,four members rcpl'e ... enlin g the differenl ;lthlctic competition .. in I\hidl nul' .. dll)ol p"r (i('ipl lle:>. The officer:> of the \'.11' .. ;1,1' Cillb .m ... : Prc..<;idcni Trca:-urcr Secret.lr." r.I1l'.S \'.\RSI I'Y eLL'A 47 CII Pt-: ... Bru_ \\'IlFI-:I.FH TO.I\,\\Y R,:>o:r,r:>o:

PAGE 64

NATIONAl. T HESPIANS THE N/\TION/\L THESPIANS S OC IETY // iMn O "'l'II '55 T o beco m e a m ember o f the i\';d i on, d Thespi a n s Soc i e h i s the i lim o f e\'ery Dranwtic Club member. This organiz in attendanc e were enterl:ti ncd. Rober t '\\.Irc h I t. d e nt e d member o f the Fre<;hm a n class t oo k the p a r t of the r 'ld i o announ cer. The p r og r a m includ e d ,til im i t ti o n of \';lriolls ra di o s tars. Ilut t u rn s out HS well it ... t h eir d a nce thi .... ,veilr J u:;t ICil\c it t o the Frc"hme n f o r.1 goo d time! -18

PAGE 65

DlU_'I.\TIC Cu.m It;:'iiOR-SE:'i iOR DR_ I.\\'\TlC CLL 'II ./liMn,/ (1",,'/1 ';; The J unior.S<.'ninr f)r. lIlhttiL' Chd. 01 Cri ... toh.t! I li gh SdlOOI \\.1:' org" ni l.ed 1. .... 1 under the "' ,l1ll ... or :.hip o f ,"i ...... Gl.ldys I<.hoo\ Their purpo,;;e i .. T o nhlk e tomorro\\ better thOin t o d.I."." There ;}rc -10 m clll l)(!r .... The memhcr ... of the e.,L inet .Ire: Pre.sident Ell"" T IlIlt1.\\'\11 '33 V Pre.... I h:u"::-: \ ....... TOO ... '3.1 Secrct.lr." Ih'T!! Pl(IO':l'l' '3-1 T re ..... urer ".' 1n.llIlEIl Owt-: ... '3.') $()(i.11 Ch . irlll ln EUZ\Ut-:TlI I I\'-F;S ',34 Sen i("e Ch"irnMII \ ....... )0' GIII"n ... '.')4 Fellm\ .. hip CIr.,irm.1Il -.' 1 \IIU1)o: n .. h'" 'j4 ."" .. il-Ch.lirm.1Il L \l'1I \ '34 Pul ,lit"it.\ CIr.,ir m.1II GE"" van_ B\JIRY ':i:> The le;}(ler i<; .'\ i ........ O{lmthy C .ltC. T he .H:ti\ itie ... ul the .,c.lr \'ere: \ mll\ ins lood .... de. confer('ncc at \rrai;.,". and.1 .. "imming rl.lrt." .,t Ihe :"\C\\ Cri .. tnh.d pllint. The Cluh meet ... til(' .. eLtlild Frill .,., of ("cry month. -'O:'iE TIII:'i(; ,I!'TEI! 1:'iOTilER" f)"ro""" /Jrll..t1.I11./ .;; The lir-t puhlil' .ll'pe.lr.llll;'C 01 the IJ r.llu.,ti l Chlb thi"ye.,r \\.1 ... It the Cri ... toll,tl Cluhhllu .. e "" ,'\.,r\ h to" They pre<;entell "One T hillg .\ltcr \lIother.".1 three-.u:t come\ly. ,I ir el"letl hy .'\ i .... GI.ul,\" I,iml,to It met "ith huge su('('e"" iudgctll.y Ihe .lttentI.IIH:e. Thc :let ion of the entire pl.l,\ took pl.l('e in the Ii, ing n.om 01 the old \..'lIe hOllle .. te.,d IlIt theout .. kirt .. o f t\rdcmore. V : r g illi ,l. The (11 the pl.l." ..... h.l .. cd un.1 vcr.' ridl re.11 e,;;t,lte m n. "IHI rented the L'llle h ameste:ld to.t gronp ol.leitu .... "ho look the r'\,lrt-. (If.1 "ne"I .,'-ric h l"o.11 miner' .. I.IInil., ,lIld ".In Iri ... tocratie Engli ... h I.lmil."." in order 10 help Ilellr., Crll\\ell. e t he yOllllg re .J c ... t,lte m.11I til \\in tlu"'IO\c of Lane. \\ ho .11 the time \\.1" .Is .. uming the p.lrt 01.1 <;"' i.,J "ecret.lr," "'0 th.lt ... he l'Quld g . ther 49

PAGE 66

ilIGH SCHOOL material fo r h e r no\c l. Thro u g h out thc w h o l e play, the r e were pl enty of l a u g h s and it ..:erta inl y was complic;'!ted to the end. w hen they all t old cach other w h o they really were. Those i n the cast wcre: HENRY CROWELL., j\ \INERVA LANE (Norma's Aunt) b IRS. S.\\YTlIES \\ITIiER S ROSE S \ IYTHE-S"IITIlEltS PAUL S.\IYTIIE-S l tTlIERS. LUCY F EATlIERSl'ONE"-HALI, PERCIVEL FEATHERSTONE-HALL EOWAIWS (the b u t ler) ... ETTA (the maid) SENIOR PLAY Emu l de In Oun ';; lie/en Anl!. l l oo.! Jnlll a "'u.gin Dorolh.'! Birkeland B e"f.'rley IlInrcllJC EJlellGrall/eaj William Slont. Edlin Thir/wnlf Frallk W n.!hnbatl.gh J ol/ll L olhrop ,Ifildud O wt./I This ycar's Senior play is entitled 1 l o t Copy" and as the name s uggests i s a newspaper s t o ry. Both the plot and setting arc d ifferent th;'!n those o f a n )' othe r pia." that has been g iven in C H S Tryouts were h eld under the superv i s i o n of t h e dramatic coach, j \ 1iss Kimbro. I n H o t Cop."." Kenneth Wade, cditor and owne r of the E\'cning H e r ald. i s the central fig ure o f the p i ".". J a n e Corwin. s uccessful young woman reporter, p lll.,'s opposite K enneth. Sylvia Dale and Bill Gregor." p lay togethcr as i'I pai r of peppery young report e r s. Bud Rice and Peggy Wilson try thei r hest to outdo the i'lbo\'e p a i r with their w ise-cracks and snapp,)' comebac k s. Dudley Kay i s the v illain olls cityboss w h o r cl'or m s in the cnd. Hazcl \Vin s t o n. alth o u g h a general nuisance b eci'l use of her soci.ai a s p irations, aids in bringing about I h lpP." ending. b -\r s. Dcville i s the 1 0y .. 1 coh ort of Dudley Kay, and i'I comedy touc h i s lent b y R andolph Peters. the messcnger hoy. The cast: W \I)E J \lIn: C Oln\'IN 5"',VI \ D ,\LF: BIL L G,tECOnY \\'II.SON l lL-u Rlo; IIAZEL WINSTON DUOI_EY I{.", j \ \'t-;. R \ rER Emufde in o.r.!1/ Doroilip Bir/.:dnl1d .1Jildred Oww Johll L oilirop /ldell / nll.!loo,{ J"ma U "o'!Jin L Inne GihJoII Fran/.: "JII, '''''II.lI/' Rdl/ n Thir/U'IlII "'illi"", f{eCtlnn A ... in C\'cry p l .I., johs othcr than dr, lIn :.tic OI:CS mus t be gi,'en out. Thest: we re g i\'en out after c:rrei u l con The st"ff follows: ArnltUR VANE 50

PAGE 67

. \,,:t Stage .'l gr. nll .. ine ...... l all.lger Ilead U ... hcr Cn .. tlllUcr IIIGII SCliool. onCIIE';TIU 1 \1-"".1(11\ ,'1 \lIll"l CII Got 111 C\IHTO:" 111l1I1 .... ,.: Cou:-. C.\\II'H,..II. CIO 1",-':1 1',1\1"" The 1Il in pllrpo",c of the Sen ior pl. .' I' .... to ..:.lrtI money to aid th c puhli .. hing of thc "C.lril'\o(.".Hl." . utl thi..; .'c.lr "ith th e new loochool ,tl ldit ori.'111 .11.lil"h le. the pl.ly did h,ne a record ,lltcrul.lIIl"(, T he pl . ,' I'.'" pre--cnlcd 011 I llne 10. C. II S. C!til,11I B r",,'" 'j] Under the dircction of .'lr. lo\" 01 n.III)().1 Hieh School. the recentl, or1:.lIlizcd h.IIHI h.I" m.tde progre ...... during the ,\"ear .. l r 10.' .... ,I junior b,lnd d.I ...... (If ... ix mel11")('r .... -during the eighth pcrirn.-' till \\'edne..;d.l."loo. :md conduct.. the rc!!"ul,.,. b.wel of .. rome h'cnt." memher .... nn \\'cdnc .. d.l.' .tltt'rnoon .... ,liter "c hool A joint com'crt with the 1\,111,<).1 H igh S choolll.,nd h" .. I \ecn pl.lnned. The 1;0(,<1 Ilill lIith IIhiLh the .. h :n'C turned o ut thi ... ,e,lr .Iiter ,:;chool hour .. h.l .. heen grc"tl.'" appreLi"tcd ORCIIESTR \ Rulli Pit"i..dl ').1 The Cri<;tohail l igh SdUlol On' hc<:tr., II hie meet .. o n \\cdne .. tI.I,'" Rtll perintl, lIork .. Ill" .. t dilig(,lltly t n ,lcC(lmpli .... h nil it'i work in "5 .. 11I1ft minutc .. e.l("h I\eek. I)uc to th(' ,,;c;1rcit.' 01 ill .. trlll11ll1h. it i .... lonlincd t o limit ed piecc" .. \mon" thc ill .... trumenh I,rc .. ent. there .Irc : .... ,n.nphonc .. .. I.lrineh. trllllll"lCt ...... Ind I i.,lil1 .... '\is" ;'liltlrcd F.lner. supcr\i .... nr 01 '\\1 .... ; ... in Cri"h,h,d. i .... their l e,Hler, During th e ye.lr the ordlc .. tr p l .I.\ed .It the Y ,'\. C .. \ .. \ u .... ic Ii olir. th .. \\OIH.III' .... Clul .. lflll the Commencemcnt e;\efcise.;, C. II. S !lien "r,1 I( n,,,,,d.1 i-l The ide.! of putting out ;1 mimeogr.,phed ne""IMper origin.lted lIith the "C.lril.l...: . n .. 1.ill \t" \il',',;t i':; i I; i:: ... I., ollcrcll th e U"c <11 till' one I,hic h the.'" h"d. Thcre 11.1" nothing Telt to do. ,Ift('r h,l,ing nl,t.lined til(' \I"e 01.1 m,ldline. Ih,1I1 til pili out 11;1"; cho-.cn 10 be cciitor, "hill' Eli 7 .. ll.eth Thorntnn ...... to he ........ i ... t.Hlt T" .. 1,,]1"1\ inl: IIcre c ho .... cn to do mi<:ecIl.lIlcou'" ioh ... lIecc .... <;.;lf\": .'lildrctl ()\Ien. 'I,.,e". nett." "'h:tltr .. '\ '11111 ....... Ruth l e .... ic \'.lOe. \elt.1 \'iolet R.lOd.111. loe B.,L;n, l e ...... 4. 1).11 i\1. l)/ln;tI" Birkeland .l1ld Ch,lrle .... P(,-.crKI The 1,.lpcr h,l" been cnthu .. i.l .... tiL.d'.\ rcl'"t'i'cd h.' the .. tut!ent .... uul h.I" .. 111 l.lrr.\III!; ,.ul it purpo .... e. 11.1mel.'". crc;1ting .11' interc .. t in school .lLti, itie .... 5 1

PAGE 68

HONOR STUDE;\I1'S HO NO R STUDENTS The two hig h es t ra nkin g students from each class werc c h ose n as h ono r !>fudents. ScniOls : Hel e n Hilllllll o nd Ernest de l a Ossa: Juniors: Bctty Stetler. William Stone; Sophomores: Anna Ro.!illy, Erncs t Jari lln illo: Fres hm c n : Esther Hilfl'i s. Will i alll Hill. I (.l l' .. (.l 1 Sept. 22. F o r the firs t time in the his tory of Cris t obal Hi g h sc h oo l ope n ed during the m onth of September. Sept. 23. The Sup ,)er Club g irl s h eld the ir first me e ti ng o f the new sc h oo lycar and had the p l easu re of meeting [\,\iss D o r o th y Cele. the new Y W C. A Secret"r,Y w h o i s I'Il so co un se l o r of the club. Supper "'as se rved by m e mbers o f the cabi nct. Oct 6. The Spen i sh Club L a Pas". lost n o t i me in getting toget hcr a nd h eld their firs t business meeting Oct. 12. The Fresh i es celebrated Co lum bus Da y in a ve r y sweet way b'y h o lding a ca nd'y sa l c in t h e sc ho ol. There was a l so a debating cl u b meeting. 52 Oct. J t The regular ,llonthly m ee tin g of t h e S"pper Club \\'as h eld at l h e Y. W C. A. and supper ",as serve d by J''\ildred Owen a n d h e r abl e ass i sta nt s. j"iiss Cate. \.-ho h as work e d the I ndi a n s o f the Unit e d S t a t es and i s f a mili a r wit h their lives a nd h a b i ts. gave a most int eresting t alk on I ndi a n l ege nd s. Oct. 22 The soccer and vollcyball teams clashed in ihe first g,nne o f the season C. H S. ccm i ng oui victorious. I n t h e evening t h e Spanis h C lub h eld a dance at t h e r oo f ga rd e n of the C o l o n B om ba Durin g th e cou r se of the eve nin g, so:ne o f Colon's P a n a m anian offic i a l s t a lk e d t o th e clu b m embe r s in Span i sh. Anot h e r di ve rsi o n of the eve nin g was a

PAGE 69

nativc clan c c Ilv Ell e n GIc" 'nk,,f, Stell l Bog gs. and \ 'i\ i .1Il .\II I \thams, \\ho \\ere cll'cs:ocd in Oct. 28 \ nd upo n thi .. l 'l..'nin g the Supper Cluh g irls gaH' a danc e at the Y \ V C A \Vel sh's Orc hl..'stl ';l fUI ni shl..d the IllU!cr!
PAGE 70

as t h e bo y s \\or e th eir s hirt s b ac kw ards, and th e girls \\ o r e the ir dresses ba c k w ards J a n 1 3. Again we see th e m e mb e r s initi a t e d by wearing cla shin g c o l o r s, th e exc u s e f o r Bill y \Vhee l e r 's orange pants. Th e J anua r y S upp e r Club m eetin g \\ as h eldatthe Y W. C A Also, t o ni ght. was a s u ccessful card p arty, s p o n so r e d by th e Juni o r C l ass. a t th e I '1 asonic T e mpl e. J a n 1-1. C. H S l os t the ba se ball series t o B H S \ \ h o a l so \\' o n b as k e tb a ll. Th e Liga-P a n a m erica n a h a d a dinn e r party aboa rd the S S Ju a n Elcano." J a n 18. The S e ni o r s h a d a ca nd y sa l e Th e f orma l initi a ti o n o f the Spani s h Club L a Pas", as pe rform e d a t the Y W C A Aft e r the ce r e m o n y all present e nj oye d a S pa ni s h play Qu e Feli cida d." The n th e r e w as a s hort m ee tin g f oll o w e d b y r efres hm e nt s and dancing. J a n 21. The base ball a nd ba s k etball t ea m s h a vin g t o play the gam e s that w e r e sc h edule d, went t o B a lb oa. The g irls l os t bas k e t ball. but the boys wer e f o rced t o s t ay over night on th e P acific side due t o a m e m o r ab l e 16 innin g gam e w ith th e f m a l sco r e 1 0 w ith C. H S o n t o p J a n 27 Supp e r C lub ca bin etmee ting a t the Y W C A J a n 28. The g irl s played ba s k etball aga in s t B H S in Cri s t o b al. a nd walk e d away \\ ith th e game F e b 2 N ee d we explain why th e s tud y c r a mmin g? If so-you sec \\ e / r e h aving mid y ea r exa m s t o day and t e-mo -rro\\". F e b -I. The Sup pe r Club g irl s h a d a moving f o o d sa le. F e b 9. E i g hth p erio d th e r e \\ as a b u sines s m ee ting o f th e Dra m a ti c Clu b a t \\'hic h office r s w e r e e l e cted Aft e r s c h oo l th e r e was a ( I L a P as" m ee tin g. F eb. 10. Seve r a l girls l eft o n th e n oo n t r ain f o r Th a t c h e r Camp a t Arra ijan w h er e t h e y atte n ded the Suppe r Cluh C a n f e r e n c e F e b 1-1. The G irl 's Gl ee Club sa n g a g r o u p o f so n g s for t h e \V o m an's Aid \ v h e \\e r e h o ldin g a m e e tin g in th e Uni o n C hurc h I f a ll. In th e e vening. tb e S p anis h Club. "L a P as ", h a d a dinn e r and d a n ce a b oard t h e S S "I'lagalla n e s. Fe b 1 5 In t h e s c h oo l buildin g was h eld the J lInio r Lun c h eo n whic h was a b i g s u cc e ss. F e b 1 6. The Juni o r class h e ld a p o p 54 and h o t-d og s a l e a t no o n They lik e t o be diffe rent. but it helps th eir tr e asury F e b 17. The monthl y Supper Club m eeting w as h eld a t the Y W C A. F e b. 18. The bo ys' tennis t e am play e d th e t o urn a ment gam e in B alboa a nd l os t F e b 2-4. The firs t d a n c e of th e year \\ a s g i\ e n b y th e S enio r class at th e H o t e l \V as hingt o n J"lany attende d and enjo y e d the m se l ves. F e b 25. The g irls, ha v ing forfeit e d the firs t base ball game formed a t e am and played B a l bo a o n our h o m e diamond t o d ay. Wh a t a gam e --Balboa walked with it. The t e nni s mat c h \vas played o n F ort Davi s co urt s. Th a t t oo, \\ a s a vict o r y for Balbo a Fe b 27 A be a utiful Am erica n flag was pre s ente d C H. S. b y the D. A R o rganizati on. Th e hist o r y o f our fla g was r ea d and th e diff e r ent flags wer e dis played b y B oy Scouts. "1ar. 2 A Dra mati c Club Meeting w as h e ld a t the Y W C A. A o ne -act play call e d "The Rose Shade Lamp" was pr ese nt e d Mar 3 Liga-Panam e rican a meeting at 7:30 at the Y W. C. A M a r -I. The S o ph o m o re s h a d a su cce ssful f o od s al e at the Cristobal c o mmis sa r .Y J'1a r 5. Th e r e w a s a Liga -Panam e ricana held at l '1.rs. Spencer's thi s afternoon. M ar. 6. The C a ribbean staff issu e d a n e wsp a p e r It w as ve r y int eres ting .It co nt a in e d nin e pages. a nd the first c o p y w as di s tribut e d free c f charge. It is t o b e publi s h e d bi-w eekly until the e nd o f th e year Th e s ub s cripti o n price f o r the r es t o f th e year i s 1 5 c e nts. All m o rnin g cl asse s ar e b eing s h o rten e d thi s w ee k as it i s r e gistr a tion w eek. J'1ar. 8 Th e Senio r class had a candy sal e. and f o r th e firs t tim e in th e histor y o f the cla ss they h a d so much c andy th a t a s al e was n ecessa r y th e foll ow ing d ay. Mar. 9 S e nior C a nd y Sal e. The adva n ce d s h o rthand class w ent thr o ugh the P C printin g press and h a d the printing t erms appa ratus. e tc . explaine d to th e m M a r 10. A t la s t the big da y cameth e Hi g h S c h oo l Dra mati c Club presented "One Thin g Aft e r An o th e r at th e Cris t o b a l C lubh o u se. Any one not pres e nt

PAGE 71

sur e ly did ,niss a gond pl ,.y!! ,\\:u' I I Tht:: h d .1 h :.ke s:de at C"istniJ: d dml h : t Ilh: tell."tlll. it ,\\:\1'. I f The l i re r : lllS' this rllr :t rl'\\ lIlin utes to .\itnl'ssthe \\nnderful III' till..' Navydirig illle .\knlt1" g liding o\l..rC. I I S It ce rt : tinl." .lI1d re m ind ed Illany of liS ,,)1' the li Ill..'. fllllr ,\'e"rs ago. \\ hell the" LIIS ,\ngdl..s sa iled : dun l' C.ILS . \ t thrcl.. p'doc\t thl.. Glee C luil \\enl t o the Y \V. C \ . \\hl. I 'l' thl'y san g the \Vonwn's Club. ,\\ar. If). ..-\ t a n :c\..ting or the N a ti ,)lKtl Thespians tol..l"y. m:ln." Pt.\\ ml.. mll e r s \\l'rl' in stalled. ,\\ar. 1 7 The Junie r s s h o\\ed the I rish in thcl11 and h c ld a cilnd\, sale and n o o ne \HIS Scotch in helping m a k e it a s u ccess ,\\ar 1 8 TheSlIp)1crCluhg irl s had:l 11I'eakfast and s \\ imming party this morn ing.1t 1\01\0 Nut GI m l'. The intc l sc h o l a stic trac k meet was h e ld at P I)rt Da \'is. B:dbo a "ran a\\ilY" with the h onors hut Cri s t o hill wa s close .. \ t this meet l11.1n." record s wcre hro ken ,\\ar 22 "Rcd", \ \ cl\:c l so n.orB .ILS m.1de a wagcr tha t C I I. S \\ o uld 1l 0 t ge t O\'cr 20 points in the track mc d ir thcy did h e \\ o uld "cat hi s h a C" C. II. S. got 37 p oints .. \ general asscml,ly "as held t a da.\'at \\hich R ed" p edormed the "hat cilling act and it \\ 'ils c!C\ 'c r t oo. Spcalters r o r the assembly besides "Red" .\\r FI'ank s. O sca r Ilc illll' o n. and ,\\r. Vinto n. \\ h n illso a\\ardcd rilliion s t l' Cris t n h a l' s \\ inning trac k l1'cn ,\\ilr. 23 The program at t h e Ora 111.1 ti c Cluh me eting t o dil.'-' "as three s h o rt talks o n Dr:lma and the Stage Tocby \ p r 3. \\<'ts thc 111'St d:I\ of \' i s itroti o n \\I;'t:k In pilSt ye."lrs only onl' day \\.'lS dl. \'otl'd h \ i si1ol's hut nllt so this ye[lr. \pr. 4 The Suprer Club held a crort! party a t the Y \\'. C .. \ Lonl y pril.l.'s \\C I C g i\cf'1 thl' \\in"I.. r s ,"111(1 thcrl.. \',I S ;I large a t tcndal1 ce. \pr. 5. \ Spanish Cluh Ilh.('(in g \\;'s h e ld t thc .\rmy ;lnd N a\y y .\\. C \ The cntert,'linll'ent \\;"s IIY thl.. "ne\\" members. I t \\as ,I Sp:lnish pl.l Y and \\as vcry gnnd. .\pr h Thl. Senior t:Lt ........ Ii.tel '1,,"thl..l c:llldy s.dl.' \\hi c h \\.t .... L'
  • 11. During inkr.lli ...... i o n the r e \\crl.' nrnl.'ll." numhl..'fs the sc h l'llla: Has a .. "dilll lnlildc;'st ... Lltion .\by 9 Thl.' Girl h':lIl their a llnu al .\\other and n.llIghkr 1l,lllqlll'l at thl.. Y \\'. C .. \ .. \ \cry intl.rl.. ... ting lIld litting program \\.L<; presenll'd, lunl':!. The Scni l I' Cb ... s pl.lY. "Ilut

    PAGE 72

    Copy," was presente d t o a l a r ge a udi e nce in th e n e w hi g h sc hool a udit o rium a ft e r w hi c h t h e actors a nd s t aff h ad a pO?rty. June 3 The N a ti o n a l Thes pi a n s had the ir la s t inst alla ti o n a t a dinn e r p arty. A t t.he beginnin g of next. year th e N a ti o n a l Thespi a n s g r oup w ill have a Ia.r ger m embership th a n i t has h a d at. th e b e g inning o f a n y previ o u s year Jun e 9. The Juni o r-S e ni o r b a nquet wa s a hu ge s u ccess. It was h e l d a t t h e \Vashin g t o n H o t e l a nd was f ollo \\ e d b y a dance in th e b all room. The toast s g i ve n a t th e dinn e r werea II very interesting and d el i ve r e d ver y well. Jun e 11. The B acca la ureat e Ser v ices we r e h e ld a t the C hri s t Church by the Sea. The s er v ices w e r e ver y impressive June 1 6. The b i g ni ght came a t la s t! Gra du at.io n exer c ises wer e h eld in the n e w sc h oo l audito rium The girls wor e pr etty white evenin g dr e s ses, and the boys, d ark suits. Juni o r girl s w e r e fl o w e r g irl s. Sever a l t a lk s wer e d elive r e d by \ ario u s Se ni o r s. H e r e' s lu c k t o you, Seni o r s] I Q 1 1 93 0 RALPH S. CRUj\\, (addr ess unknown ). MAVIS E T H IRLWALL, Cristobal C. Z RAE BLISS, 1 59 S outh Pro f esso r Street, O be rlin Ohi o. THOMAS L C OLEY, Jr., (a ddr ess un kno wn). DELLA J RAYo'IOND, Cris tobal, C. Z EVELYN E GANZEj\\ULLER (J\\rs. H.) F ento n M adde n D a m C. Z ALICE E HENTER (Mrs. Jack ) Cor ri ga n Balboa, C Z I \1R \V1LLlAI\\ NEWI\L<\N, T e nn PAULINE HERI \ \AN, (a d d ress u n known ). ELSI E R BIRKELAND, 5 0 Neve n s Street B"ookly n N Y V ICTOR "\ELENDEZ, Col o n R d e P ELEANOR M FITZGERALD ( M rs. G ) Robin so n, Ba l boa, C. Z PRANCES M DAYS, G atun, C. Z. PRANCISCO WONG, B ox Cristobal, C Z B es t s u ccess t o th e class o f '33." M. VIIlGINIA EBERENZ, Cris t oba l C Z E.LSI E DARI.EY, Cristobal C Z. E. BEVERLY TURNER, Cris t o h a l C. z J V IRGINIA STEVI!:NSON, Cris t o bal, C, Z. \VALTEn \VIK INCSTAD. Duke College, Durham, N. C. ESTAFANI A G. \VIIEELEn, Uti c a l "\ e m orial H os pi ta l Uti ca, N. Y 56 RICHARD C SERGEANT, (address un known ). JAHES CAr-1PBELL Jr., Geor g ia Tec h A tl anta, Ga. RITA TERESA JOYCE, St. J oseph's C o l l ege, Phila d e l phia, Pa. ARTHUR MUNDBERG, Cristo b a l C. Z PHOEBE O'DONNELL, B a lboa, C Z DIVINO ARNESON, Kri s ti a nsund N or-way. ROSE T CORRIGAN, N ewark. N J. MARI A C STEWART ( M rs. 0.) P abreg a P a nam a C ity. N E HLS G JANSEN, ( addr ess unknown ). 1 93 1 CAIlLOS BOGART RANKIN \Vittinb e r g College, M eye r s H all, Springfie ld, Ohi o. VEL"" HALL, Cris t o b a l C. Z RUTH DUVALL, 297.t C o l eria n A v e nu e Cinc inn a ti, Ohi o. j\1.ARION NEELY, Cris t o b a l C. Z THO"AS PESCOD, C r is t o b al. C Z \VILLI, V\ BAILEY. Cris t o b al, C. Z E nNEsT BEHGr:R, G ahm, C Z CE LESTE CLAR\(, (Mrs. B .) P o w e ll, B a l boa, C. Z CRAWFORD 1. CAI\\PBELL, Eme r y Urivel'sity, Ox f ord, Ga. EDWARD CONKLING, .t282 Street, S a n Di ego Calif. j\' \ARGAnET j\'\. D J\vls, Cri s t o b al, C Z G oo d Luc k and be::.t wi s h es t o th e class o f '33."

    PAGE 73

    \"r:AN." RONALD PIIILLPOTTS. New Y o rk City. B ETTINA PowEns. Fort Il ancock. N. J ANN; \ RYAN, 468 East State Street. Trenton, N J ALOII,\ SLOCl.:.". Cristobal. C Z DOllOTII \' \Vllnz. Cristobal. C Z G EORGE \\'ERTZ. Cristobal. C. Z BEN \\'ILLlA,\\S. Cristobal. C Z BARBARA \\'EleK, France Field, C Z R .. \Y,\lOND \\'ILL. Cristobal. C Z R'CIIAIlD \\'000. Cris lob.,1. C Z PIIOEBE O[)ON NELL. Balboa. C Z ALICE I GOR.'IELY. Balboa. C. Z. FlUNK GnIES INGEll. Gec rgia T ec h At-lanta. Ga. EVELYN \\'nIGJlT. (address unkno wn ). )",.\\ES IIAYDEN. (address uflkn o\\-n). VERON.\ C I-IER.\l t \ N of Texas, Austin. T exas. R OGER \\. HOWE. Purdul' Univers ity. L .1fayet-te, Ind. C .\nt I\AR IGER. C Z TIIEL.\\A KING, 27 Broac h",y Terrace. ew Y ork Citv. ALVIN A L \:EW. Colon. R de P l\\ARGAnFT ,\\IZRAClII. Ct l e n. R d e P ELWIN NEAL. Crist c hal. C Z ,""ES \\'000. Cristohal. C Z ELSIE NEEI.\,. Cristohal. C. Z RouElI'rs. 701 Uni o n Street. Union C ollege Schnectady, N Y JANET R;OINSON. B ox 13.."i-l, \\'illiam and J \ \ary College. \\'illi arnsburg Va. HER.'L\N Roos. Ir" Gatuo. C Z BRUCE SANDERS, Cristob.,1. C. Z JESSE SINCLAIR (address unkno",,). BETTY STAIILER. (address unkno wn ). ROBERT STEVENSON, Cristob.,I. C. Z. 57 TIIEOKTISTO. Colon. R cit.' P AI. leIA TIII ItL\\' \1.1. Cri,,{ollal. C Z IESSlf: V ANI; FI' rt Sherman. C Z NI::LL \\'''HIlI A\\'. Nc\\collll, CClIlt.'g:c, J osep hin e L o ui s c 1 11I1ISt.'. Ncw Orlc i!!I .... 1.:1. P E IHt Y \\' \$11 \B \L'CII. Cri,,( o llill. C Z "Bes t w i s h cs Ii,, a I,cttcr "CII' il I ca ll" find hest wis hcs to yllU : ill fol' continu ed s u cce!)s. EnwlN Purdue Univcrsity. I.af:lyctle. I nd ,\\.-\LCOL\' \\'IIVI';I.EU. ('. Z ELlZ.HWTII \\'Ii( f Z Cri s t o l, C 7 1 9.;2 RANDOLPII ,\\. \\'IIi:!:o-JGST.-\D. Cristoh.ll. C Z ALBIN B FOllssTI(O.\\. (address unknown). ELEANon l\\. REINIIOLD. l'istoh.'l.1. C. Z I [OWAIW I(EENt \ N. Purdue nl\'!:r-sity. L..'lf':I 'ye t teo Ind. '" a m having a swell time a t Purdue alth o u g h it is so different fr o m hi g h sc h ool. The w o rk i s har<1. hut I don' t mind it ; I lik e it. I o ft e n think of Illy hi g h sc h ool days and w onder h o w C. II. S. i s getting along. r wish the 'Carihbean o f 1 9.i3 every a nd may it b e the he s t t:ve r." RICIIAno B E ITEIN. Fort Randolph. C Z GLAJ)\'S BLISS. Cris t o !.al. C Z "Bes t \\ish es to tilt.' St.a.ff for 3. s u ccess-ful C arihhean." B es t of luck to the Class o f ':)3" ALLENE \ \nnLf: D E .\KINS. G atun, C Z "S till a "Gatun-itt:. Bt.'s t \\ i shc..'O;; fllr the success o f the 19:),3 Caril IX:;lI' and t il t h e Class o f '33." ,\L\ln C. D f;,\NS. CI' i s t o t .. d, C Z JOliN D EL.\NEY. (addrt.'ss unknO\\ n ) O ox.-\ \'. E.\TON. Barnard Collcgt." I (ewitt Ilnli. 1"\e\\ York City. "Best w i s h es and nil the luck in the world t o the class of 19:),). 1 0s>:PII E unON. Galun. C Z IbRIlY C ECOLF. G ntun. C Z \'I\'I.\N G (address un known ). frOW.-\RD S E.X G f I .KE, Cri.tnlt...11. C Z ,\bRIf' ENSRL'D. (add res!) 1II1knuwn ) JOSE \NTONIO F'f:nN \NUFZ. Collin. R d e P.

    PAGE 74

    58

    PAGE 75

    ATHLETICS.

    PAGE 77

    .\TIILETIC F o r the lir,1 lime i n 1,,(, .,('.Ir' l I e h.l\e I,cell ,lh1e 1 0 Ld,e Ihe u pr(' m .' l',' in Snncr Irum 1 L I Ilo. Ili g h SdlOOI ()ur ,mTC" 1 1 1:-due 1 0 Ih l' pcrfel I l e.lmllor!;, 0 1 the pl ,.\ l'r, .11U1 till' l-'IIl,i'lcnt co, Ie'lling: 0 1 \ \1'. V S eiler. \\'e 'Ion three !fame' n \,1 0 1 the li,e g. llII e w r ic" Iinning the fir'l third .. lIn.l thlI ."t g, lIlle,. The lilth g,""e p b y( d ()n .)u r h o m e 1::"IHIIH I 1\;0' till' he,t .... nn 1(.-,11 11 II." surc 0 1 lie l or,' IIlltil thc I;"t "ili tl c II.'" 1 l olln. Charlic Pe,nld our diminu ti '-e c;lpt.lin. contiuLi c.llhe '0 t h .1I i t .'ppe;.n,t! like.1 uc1l oiled m a l'ilin c UII the licit!. helping: h Ulh the ddell,i\l' tIld oHell,i,(' lillc,.11 .11 time, 01 till' !;;Ull e. T o m R . nkin II.'" o\lr ,corin g l. l r ItW, II ith hi, cdul'oll e d toc, Ill' h elped ttl m . kc I Ill' !fo,d, II ill'lI they II e r e mo,t nel'c",l ry 1 0 1111 P .. i,. lor G T lrllillger. "ho h.ul In go t o the hn'pit 1 .dter the -cl'oml g.llIIe. pl. . ,ed like 1 .,'ler.1I1 .lIn l I n.ll l e ,nOll.' " e.llI tilul" top' III hlutl. lII.tIl,1 01 till.'" 13 .11.0 011,1 IUgh"_ IUl' B,I/..I11 ;lIul B ill \\' hedl'r. Ilur i'ulllo.'ll{,. pl. . led ,I delcll,i,c th.lt socc .. ::n TI-:.\\\ .i9

    PAGE 78

    TEA.lI,l was very hard to equal e\'en h y profess ionals. and with steady k icks and righti ng hearts they got the b a ll out of sco rin g area numero u s t i me s, The other pbyers of the team played w ith as much enthusiasm and due to their steady fight i n g our p layers were able to down our Pacirlc Side Ri va l s. Due c r ed it must b e gi"en to our opponents a s they p layed socce r like gentlemen and showed high s p o rtsman ship for w h i c h their coach es mus t b e complimen ted. Their outstanding p layers wer e D e l a Penn, who was their sco rin g power and who was always with t h e ball; Our f r ee. at cente r ha l f back. who helpe d hi s team i n taki n g the b all down the field and getting it away fro m their own goa l ; and Eldermi r e and Onderonk in the ba c kfield who played a great game and w h o gave u s iI grea t deal of trouble in getting the ball through for goa l s. TENN I S TEA'\l 60

    PAGE 79

    rH.\CI'" The fir .. t g.ll11e pl,I .... ed in Cri .. tnh,11 11,".1 g,l m e of the ",III goi n g dO\I none .. iele or the field :\nd b;\ck to the oth e r .. id .... Our te.lI11work .tide d liS in deleating the Ihl"oa :\greciltion. for \Ie h.leI them pllzzled Ilith (HII' p,I .... \lork. I n the lir .. t qU
    PAGE 80

    T h e secone! game wa s o n e o f co ntinu o u s l o n g k i c k s in order to ge t the b.d l out. of the sco rin g zon e D e l a P e n a and J S a lt e ri o woule! work the b a ll d o wn the field. and then o n e o f ou r b a c ks would ge t it a n d se nd i t down t h e fie l d t o o n e o f our p layer s. D c l a P e n a a fter w o rk in g t h e ball t o the s::o rin g ari!a wit h j\bra l es b o o l e d the ball into the g oa l jus t out o f r e ac h o f Tarflin ger' s l o n g arm s to m a k e Ih e fir s t s c o r e o f t h'! ga m2. I n Ih e third qua rter U e l a Pena a ga i n boo t ed a n other p o i nt for his tea m I n t h i s quarte r our t cam snappe d out of its d ream s and made a g oal. P esco d a nd r>-\ a r c hosky w o r ke d the b dl d own the field f r o m the ce n t e r of the fie l d i nt o t h e go al. D e I n P e n a go t the b all o n a co rn e r kic k nnd w i t h a neat ki c k tri e d f o r the go al. T h e ball h it the post a nd b o un c ed b ac k With a Slight tw i s t o f h i s head h e hit the ball to s c o r e a p oint for Bal bo:l. W e ca m e o ut wit h b l oo d in our eyes in t h e l as t q uarte r :ln d det ermined to be a t Bi\l boa We t oo k the ball o n the fir s t p l a y and Ran11 i n m a d e a l o n g Il:lSS fr o m t h e r i ght w in g to P e scod w h o m a d e our s e co n d t a lly o f t h e ga me. W e Ilepl t rying f o r t h e t h i rd g oal. but t hE' B a l boan s wer e d etermi n e d n o t t o l ose t h i s ga m e and j u s t a s t he.y w e r e i n p os i t i o n t o sco re ano t h e r time t he whi s t l e blew. e n ding t h e ga m e 3-2 i n f : I\ o r of t h e Ba l boaile s I n the thi r d g a me. w e h d ve r .'" l ittl e diffic ulty in ke e pin g the B a l boa n s f ro m sc oring m o r e tha n o n e goa l a s w e h a d p ossess i o n o f the b all m os t o f t h e t ime. l os i n g i t o n l y w h en we tried for goa l s h o t s The tir s t quarte r wa s u ne ve ntful. w ith b o t h t e a m s tr. y i ng t o get the ball in t h e o pe n without s u cc e ss. The seco n d a n d thi rd q Uilr l e r s wer e a wa l k awa y f o r o u r boy s a s we drib b l e d thro u g h the i r d efen s i v e and s:::or e d twi ce w it h ca se. Rankin made a goa l from i n fro n l of the po s t s after our t ea m h a d b ro u ght t h e b 311 d ow n t h e e ntire l e n g t h of t h e fiel d W irtz made a nic e s h o t fro m the l e ft side o f the field w h i c h w e n t t h ro u g h d es p i t e the effo rt s o f T Alley Wa l ker c.ame i n o n a h i g h p ass fro m the ce nt e r o f the field t o m a k e the a n i,)' tally that hi s t e a mmates w e re abl e t o g athe r in thi s game. The fourth quarter \\, s s low:.s we had t h e b all m os t o f t h e time a nd k e pt polSsi ng i t unti l the fina l whi s t l e bl e w S co r e, 2-1. in f a y o r o f Cris t o b a l. B alllOa e ve n e d t h e sco r e i n g m es w h e n we met the m t h e f ollow ing Saturda.y o n the ir grou n d s W e w e r e h e l d sco rel ess altho u g h we put up a g re a t fight. W e held the m t o a tie f o r t h e fir s t q u a rter but Lipz i n s k i playi n g int e r l e ft for Bal boa, made a goa l after r ec e i v i ng a l o n g pass f r o m M o i s e s d e la P e n a. The B a lbo a boat e r s mu s t have se nsed v icto r y olfte r making t h eir fir s t go a l and h o ldin g u s sco r el ess f o r a h a lf. I n the t hi rd quarte r t h e y came o u t onto t h e fie l d a n d made two s m as hin g goa l s th" t co u l d n o t be b y J P a r i s our g oa lk e epe r The last quarter was a ro u g h a n d tu m b l e go f o r t h e ba ll. S co r e Ba l bon 3 Cris t o b a l O T h e d ec i ding g a m e p J "yed i n Cris t o b a l was o n e in w hi c h we s h owed our s up re m a c y over th e B a l boa soccer t ea m Ea c h tea m p1"yed w i t h t h edelerminati o n t o w in or d i e. T o mm y R a nkin p l y e d the ga m e o f hi s lif e. maki n g t w o s h o t s t hat co ul d not have bee n stoppe d b y a n y B alboa go l ke e p e r Ba l boa s t a rt ed sc oring when Durfree ma d e a short p a s s t o S a lleri o w h o put i t into th e co r n e r o f the g o a l p o st-o u t o f P a l i s r e a c h T o m m y j umpe d on the next ball a n d took i t down the o p p on e n t s s ide of the field b y him s el f and m a d e a l o n g s h o t t h a t wa s too fa s t t o b e h a n d l e d b y th e goa l k ee p e r In the s e co nd quarter B a l bo a t oo k t h e l ea d w h e n L ipzins l ti sco r e d a nic e goa l afte r Durf r ee a nd j \ l o ra l e s b r o u ght the b all d ow n the fiel d Ranki n a g a i n ca m e in t o t h e l i m elight afte r h e a nd I l a r c h os ky bro u ght the b all d own the fie ld, and made anoth e r s h o t t h a t w as t oo hot to h a ndl e. I n the l as t qua rt e r P esco d c h a l k e d up a n other p o inte r f o r u s whe n he made a g o al after r e c e i "ing a cente r pass f ro m R a nk i n A co uple of minutes l ater.Cha rlie put the ga m e o n i c e by m aking:l f o ul s h o t. W e h a d posse s s i o n of the b all for t h e rest o f the game n o t bein g threate ne d in a n y way b y our B a lboa ri v al s. The lin e u ps for the t ea m s a rc: Balboa Spe cht O nd e rd o nk E ldermire Clar11 Durf r ee Novey D e I n P e n a W alker S :dteri o L ipz i n s k i j\lor l es P o.rilioll.r G oa l k ee per L e n F ullb a clt R i ght Fulluaclt Rig ht H;1l f back C ente r H a l rhacl l L e ft H n l rba c k R i g h t Win g In l e r R i ghl C e nt e r F o rw.lrd Inter L eft L e n W i n g BAS EBAL L Cri.rl oba l Tarfli n g e r a nd Pari s B az a n Whee ler Bath P e sco d Lo c k woo d R anlt i n J o hn s t o n Marc h os ky Paris a n d Eber e n z W irtz D espite th e fact t h a t the ba seball teams o f B a lboa Hig h a n d Cri stobal Hig h sc h oo l s were even l y matc h e d our ri"a l s d e f ea t ed u s i n the (ir s t three g a m es o f a fiv e g a m es se r i es t o w in t h e inte r sc h o l a ... ti c T h e B a l b o a aggregati o n u se d so m e cl eyer h ead w o rk f o r w hi c h they mu s t be duJ." p ra i s e d J t WOl S thro u g h this bra nd of p laying that we m e t o u r Waterloo." Our s e co nd {e; lm p layed the l a s t two ga m e s ga i n s t the B n l b o a subs t i t ut es n d d o wn e d t h e m i n a fin e fa"hio n T he f ir s t o f the s e two games w a s o n e of t h e b es t b ase b all ga m es e ve r wit n esse d b y If i g h S e h o u l T h e ga m e wenl sco r e l ess f o r s i xteen innings and in t hi s c a n to our boys 62

    PAGE 81

    lI\'III 'lgcd t n 1'"1 .1\ ro, .... t ulI l 1 ,111 \ "I I h c IlIl' ""'111\' E' ,til l 1.,.11 It, 1"', t td I d t I" .. \ "1111, ill Ihe ('oming ,\C,lr The lir .. t pll,\clllII Cn"'n l, .1, D c, c ll.! ll'r :!II \\1 .... lul.I,,r' 1''"''\\'l"1I \ Ill' ,111'\ e Hie of g dlou 1 .1!,;.li" .. 1 Ch Irli c Ill ... lid Till' 1111 .. 1'1 ,'11 I . I .. '1"1 "l'n' \,'n k II .llId tt'nd, hul tlu. n.dl ..... III .. hId Ihl' h 1I .. lil II' "'l'r Ii" III h 1\ 1111.. pi 1.,\1 til ti l\' I difhl 1.1.: II.;'IIC, till" f: lining elHlUg h c\!,crielhe Iii 1" .. 1 tick.11 .. I,., line rlill \\ C 'l'nl 1\\" rUIl" ill I hl' "Cl'Olhlllll1illJ; II Ill' I' ."e "II.: .,11"" ld "i1C hil ,,1111 \\ .,11(\",111" ee 1,.1 t It:r, \ llc y rcpl.lCld him .,"d .,II'l\\ed I" "lie nu.rl.: .. 1111 III th,' tillh Illl'"lllhl' ,,"rillj.: It,r 1>1,,' It.11\ 1 '111'11,1 .,I",'''(llrl.'' !\In .. lin .. inlhl' "Cl'IHHI il1ll1l1!: ,.:l'Itlll Ih .. 1111 .. III 1111' 111111111 I IH'.I 1'111 tl,,: g IIIIel1l1 in,' in the ninth il1l1ill!" "hclIlllI'.' ... ,.1 III,. hit .. .lI d I",.ru,,", .,ltlr'''ll III 'II h "I .,I\t'n n h 111 ..-rror SUlrt ollh; .. g,II1I(' II .... B "I" ... II; Cri .. tul. ":i, Ch .,lu I.llIn,d 1:, .. 1 the mel) \,ht.) i.u cd hilll 1 0 111,1 I t", ,I nel' .. 1 .. ike I\"t re("l'rd I .. r CI i .. I,,11 Ii Ilq.dl "',hn,,1 S;\ rllll" ill III(' lir .. t inlling i .. elln"gh 1 .111' k,m. 11I1! '\111" lelln\\.; j,1I1chl .,11 tll( l'lrtll'r ii' Ir. to ('lit dn\'II .. u{ h le I\IIIIII .I1 ill 1.lil1 \llhllu,ch \11.: 1,,\.1 ""Irt' III II I i. n dllll 1 ".HI tn pl.'.1 li"'td, ..... 1,.dJ III keep Ih t'ir 11'.,,1 Pl .. cnd our .. ,,"thp.l\\ 11U1 II:r. I.i hit.. ilion.' th.n H ,III,,, . 1,.111 C\l.:r drt' . mcIIIII }:,c:tliu!; in till' p I .. 1 Ih rl'e .Ie,.r ... The," 1 thcm h." .. i,,!.: Ihci r h c,II I ... .. i, hi, .... IIII.II ... .. i filii" in Ihe lir l inning . \lIe' \e.lde "lin h lIl hurled hlr "("CII il1l1ill". dlli,,!, 11111' ,ol l o j h"ldin!: " 1 ... 1 1('\\ "l',.llered hil .. Thc .. e \'0.'" "itl-hell like Icter.'n .... I1tII.l'plll .. r,l(her Plluled \\ith Ihlil I".nk .. llIti .. I . nl ... B.' prelioll" .Igrccment o f 1lI.IIMBel ... thi .. g.lllle 1',I"l'.lllet! in the I.:i t-:hlh inning Y'''IIlI'ICr Lin It'll "h.lt 111.1.'1. . \(' h ,lppCl1t'd. l )lIt Ihe g;\ llle .. hnllill h ,llc I lcen hlli .. lll d Ullt! PI.lying.1 8.lnlC of ni c k ,Ind ludt. I,nth ie.lm .. \\ere out t o "ill thi .. g.lflI e. foliC ttl (,mil Ih e .. el ie ... t hI' o t ill'r t o .. 1.11 e oft' defe.lt, 11111 110 1ll.11 ter 1111\1 h.lrd "e I .. ied, 1\ e 1\ ('rt' ;ill 'l.:l l 1\..11'0,1 II Ilil tlu. .. eri c .. II.' defe.dillg .. hy ,I ,,('l1re 0 1.J t o 3, \\'e ';l'ored olle rUIl in Ihe lir .. t o lle run in the fourlh. ,!lid o llr I. ... t "('ore II.", 111.111(, in tl.,, .. i,I" "hen \\'heeler l.lIn e h o rne on.1 .. int:!c ".' S,lmier" .dter re.lchill lir .. t nl\ ,I ".d k .'l1d ",e.dil1;,! "el'und. B dl"IC),1 did it.. ... cnrin g I,., m d in g t \\O fI"''' in thl' 1(llIrl'" .1IIt! 1\\0 rtln .. in the eight. "hell I)e 1,1 Pt'il,\ \I .!ked. Cllrri!;.11l ht'.lt Ollt .1 ",":ri t il'c .. 1 .. in g lc y :\el ille Iillet! the 1 1 . s" . m l thell e.u le .. ingled t n .. end D e 1.1 Peii;1 .llld C orris .ln ,Ilft) .... "ith tyillt: .Ind ,\il1ning rUIl" ,\Ithoush Ch,lrlie P e .. cod .llIn"..-.! o n I.' li,e hi". the.' I\ere IHllahld ,l1Id I\C"t hit ;\1 .. 1 \lhen ncedcd. W e t:{lIlCt:lcll..-igitt hit .. irpm .\lIe.,' .. pitl he ... \ pitc hc,.. h.,ttle Ih.11 I. ... tcd for .. i ,tl'en inning .. \\,1" the 1lI"in .Itir,u.ti"'l i n thi .. g,lInl: :\nt until the 1.1 .. 1 out \\ 1 .. 111;\.1 ... \\.1" thi .. c.llne lini .. h ... d .. ., (',I l h IC.II11 h ,,, 1 111.1111 111l'lI 011 h.I""" e,l e h inning. George T.trflinger .lIld Pcte n. npl"",in g pitthl'r ... did.1 linc nil the Innund .H1d the he s t l e,lIn won. \\'e .;;cored the only t.ill ., of the F.Wle in tli..-lir .. 1 of the .. i ,llClllh inl\i"g. B o!. ='el'i.' l=0l nn h .lw "hen ,I .. 10\1 grounder "elll thro u s h Suthcrl'lIld ... I Hlrt ... l o!' t,\( Ih e B .II'o.lil l'" .lIld .... lrcd 1\ hcn Cll rti .. hit .1 line drile t n I..-It lidd th.11 Fritl.I' ... (\lIldl",t !..Iudle =,cdy. hehind ihe h.ll. .Ind \sne". p l.l .. c(nmll .,:t'. did ""l1Ie 'er.1 ..r"IPP.' 1'1,1,\ Ilig .lIul kl'pt th(' illiidd PCPP tllrllugllUli l the /,;.lIl1e \11 of thc bo.,'" th.tt pl.l.led in Ihi .. J;.III1t! .. IUHilt! he highl.' \1'lIll'l illlel1lt.'d I r Iht' \\,1,\ Ihl',\ pl.",ed . \ g;\il1 our ",cl'ond Ic.lln did \\h,lt Ihe \ '. .. ;1., Ie,IIn ('(w ilt lint .].. Ul'.11 n."',".11 Till.: I \., I \.n,litc .. didn't .. 1.11111 1 c h : \flee Ill" \linning till g.lInl .. 1' IlIlr ..... lol\l l t t',IIIl \\ . Iltcil til .. !.II" up Ihe \.tr .. it.\ ,IIHI did!! Our 1.0.'" dcl ... .llet! their ril .! .. IO ,"l in.1 \(r., nlle\l'lIllul/;!,IIll(' \\ .......... (lred "nc rllII ill Ihe lir.;;t inning'. three in Ihe Ihird. ItlUr in the f"urlh .. 111,1 I"" IIlI"l.: ill thc .. i ... lh B.d'"".1 ... "rt'd U lll ill t hc lir-t. t hrl'C in the I l1inl. t \1(1 ill th1 .. i 1 II lllti t "" ill I Ill' illlllllL:. III t'IIII I hc '" .. 11.lmld \ gIlC\\ .. utt.:r..-d.1 fr.lllurl'll lill!;!..'r in thi .. hilt: Ill!,;' Il' up ,I . ,11 ill Ihe third inning. ()ur reprc<;cnt,lti\e<,.IIl.1 Ih cir 1>11\ ....... 'rc .. \\er,, Eh.TClll ..... .'l.ul"iIO .. ln. C \II'og.l.d PC'HUII, I' T Mfiin!;cr. rf .1Ilt! I' "'hecler. II \\'irt7.t h R :lnkin. ,ir \1. '" I.i I:! II I'; II> I. II ," I II I l:i

    PAGE 82

    AB PO A E .B Curtis. 2n d . I S 2 6 8 4 I S lOd ers, I f... H 0 0 0 A g n ew, 2nd .. 8 I 4 9 0 Pari s. rL. 4 0 I [ 0 0 Neely. c . 1 0 [ [ [ 8 9 O Ebdon. IsL ... [[ [ 0 30 0 0 [ Stone, rL . 2 0 0 0 0 0 De l a Ossa, 2nd ... 0 0 3 0 Pierce ... 0 12 See you next year B albo;!.l BOYS TENNI S I nterclas s match es. with the New Cris t o b d T ennis Club and the Co co So l o officers, feature d t hi s year in ten n i s. In the fir s t set of matches with Balhoa B a l boa somewhat s urpri sing l y took f Ollr matc h es ou t of five. Bejaran o coming throug h in the u s u a l C H S s t y l e easily took hi s match RESULTS: No. I Sing le s : Ht::NORICKSON ( B ) defeated PESCOO (C), 4-6. 8 -6. 64 No.2 S in g l es: B EJARANO (C) defeated FIDANQUE ( B ), 6-1. 1 -6 6-4. No.3 S in g l es: ARROYO ( B ) d efea ted BERRY (C), 61 6-2. G. NOVEY RANKIN No. I D oubles: ( 8 ) defeated ( C ) 7 5, 2.6. 6-3 R N OVEY REINHOLD SPINELLA LOCKWOOD No. 2 D o ubl es: ( 6 ) defeat ed ( C ) 4-6 6-2 6-4 M C CARTNEY HILL The seco n d set o f matches was held at Fort Davi s but Balboa's superiority seemed t o s how again whcn Loc\twood. R einho ld. Bcrry and Campbell we r e the onl y o nes to com e w i t h t h e ir matc hes in t h e bag. RESULTS; No, I Singles: HENDRICKSON ( 8 ) defeated P ESCOO (C). 61 5-7, 6-4. No.2 Singles: MORALES ( 8 ) defeated B E JARANO ( C ) 2-6,7-5, 6-4. No.3 S in g les: AHRO Y O ( 8 ) defeated RANKIN (C), 8-10, 61 6 4. R E INHOLD R. NOVEY No. I Doubles: (C) defeated ( 8 ) 4-6, 6 -2, 6-3 LOCKWOOD G. NOVEY BERRY J'1.CCARTNEY No. 2 Doubles: ( C ) defeated ( 8 ) 6-4. 6-0. CA,\IPBELL SPINELLA The last m atch was forfeited after our team had won the first set in order that the Bal hoa t ea m coul d m a k e train connections. The l a s t meet at Balboa featured so m e rath e r cl ose a n d exciting pla y w hi c h the match scores did not see m t o indica t e. B ejar a n o. Number two man, p layin g again s t Henric k so n B alboa's Num be r o n e man, look hi s first set ilnd was well on the way to takin g the m a t c h b e fore hi s o p ponent woke up fro m hi s daze. Lockwood. our number five m a n pla y i n g Morales. B dbo,,s second ranking lIso took h i s set. s lowed down a trifle and the n coming bad, in the third. set the pac e until five:all w h e n h e s lowed down a trifle t o l ose 5-7. R E SULTS: No. I S in g les: HENRIC KSON ( B ) defe;:ded B EJAR.O\NO (C), 7-9. 6-3. fl-2. No.2 S in g les: b \OR,\LES ( B ) defeated LOCKWOOD (C), 2-6.6-1. 7-5. No.3 Sing les: ( 8 ) defeilted R E INIiOLD (C). 6-3 6-4. FIOANQUE ELLIOT No. I D oubles: ( B ) defeated ( C ) 60], 6-2 OONAV,\N D E LA OSSA I n .:.11 evcnts C. H S. next "ear will have a s mooth workin g t ennis t ea m w hi c h will b e co n s i .. tcntly ictorioll s. t h e ground:,'o r l havin g bee n l a id this year as s h ow n h y the hi g her rankings of the newcr members obl ili n ed this year The "anki n g l i s t : \. P,,;scou 2 3. RANKI N . 5. LOCKWOOD 6. 0,,: LA OSSA 7. C "NPIH :LL 8. HILL 9. ELLIOT 1 0 B E IH{Y II. I \1AR CIIQSKY 12. BATII 13. STONE 64

    PAGE 83

    TIL\CI\ The ir,,.. :!. !Hel,j hl,ld .11 F,"'I 1),,\ i" \1.,,, "'1 .. (.1 till: nl ..... 1 thrilllllL. "1111 ... llIlill' ,.I .,11 Ih .. "lin n ,lIloo.1 III l'r hcrc" illl "II thl' .1",,111":1111'1' .lIhll'CI I"illl., ,II illL. !lUI" Ir,', I, k.,"1 "" h, ... 1,. I "l,ill/,;' th,lt 1"HIIt! 1,1,' rclll"'I11II\.'rl'll. B\ll IICrC Ihe., "uq'ri'I'I\" 11.".,1 .. .'111 I,j th .. P.Kili...: "ilil! "I) Iri/,;hh-I, ... ,I, "h"II. Ililh \.\11 thl' 1.,,>1 t"lIl"d,I",>ldt. \lC "c .i; .-;:. 110..'1(1 ... 1, ,.e h,ul thc .... I\i,I.Io..li,,1I 1,1 gil in,!:; "ur "1'1'11111,'1110.", rill! I .. r 111l'lr "'''111:.1 \\'0..' "erc undl'r ,I' cr,' 1",,1 Ii ,mli .. ,'I" till'" I" nur poor Ir.,illll1l:' 1.11 ililil'" ... ", II ,I' ,I ", r.d,]".lc 11',h It, .1 "n:: m ... I It 1111 .. ,11 .. :!:!n,' .,nl ... '>Ird .. h .. In,1 ,I "lIgun. 440 ..... 11"11 \ ir. "it nil! rq.: 11"1110..'" flf thi 11'. \ 'intoll. 0111" "':1"ll..h. ,ll'illo..'(\ ii' ... 0 IIcll (k,t II .. ,.1111",1 did Ih .. 1I1I1'1",d,11' III the ]1"]1)(1,, .1,!;gl"q,;.llioll, ,lIId he ... holdd I.c hi g hl.1 t"I'llIplim .. '"I .. ,lllIf hi, 1,',,,1,'11 ... 111 ",,1'1, Fi, C 11,,'11 1"0..'('01",1, \,ef'" c,i.,hli,h ... d. tl"'cl: I" CIi ... i"I,.,I,lIld 1\\11 \" I \,dl,,,,, .'\.llldi '\..r, h" ... ln. eri ... I "lloIlll ..... h ... h .. 1 te n,d I Ill' hllllllr .. .ly.lrd I,., 1 \0 ........ ollll, 1Il.lilin!! I h ... "'1'1'1111 ill III,:. .. 'n.rlll, / \ 1 ...... It :.lping thl"ough th ... ,11;0111,' IIlI" :!O'i", hl' II ...... Ihl... tll "'I,,;, .. h thc ,)Id l'fOl.hljllrlll' I"c\'ol"ll 1,.1 16\ :!" U c 1.1 P eii l. "'I' l' ... d.\ B."I,n.1I1. ";,11" ... tht'ough "illl the ki''r::: 111ll .. "I :! ;ih'" ill I Iii.: .,.Ird d,l,h. T.,rllillg ... r, tile hll ... k,' Cri ... tlll . 1 \1"'ighllll.1l1. \'1',,1, .. the II ..... 111.1'11111 r('Hlnll.y plltling th .. ... 11(.1 . di"'I,lllCC nl ;)<)';". Th .. KHIl rd .. le.11ll Inll11 11 :;':!" .,1 the tim ..... ...1 11,1' eri,t'll . 1..: 111 ill \ 9:) 1 Ch.lrli;,: P ... .. "". "II hi ... lit!"h\ lor n1.1 C II. S .. high ;"IllI' ... ;u,t t" "ill ,1\ ... '\)'I [] ... ,I ... t.trol l.Ionl,\lhl!I"I!" r..:: .. H ,' \ (li ... ... d .. 1.1 P cii 1 ... Iill I . ld ... in I,,,th the ,\:Inl ..... ntl the :!:!O., ,11 d ... d ..... h \0 ;11.1":(';t ",cculld ill .... Ilh III tli .. ..... 'I,,n!... Th .. rc ... ultc; 01 tho..' "'lIli,(: I r,u'" 11\\.'0..'1 ,Ire "lllllm.lril;"'..! b ... lolI : lel.v.l. /)" . 11 T i"I<': 5.,-J. D ... b P eil.l. (13) .\11''''1"<:;,'. ( e l 81'"".1 ./lImp 1); . /,"'1',,: :!{J'i" ( X,'"' H''/"''ld) J. 'I.'I'o..,IH"k,\'. l e i ., :--:'\\"'y, 1111 ,J, J 1 I IO\.;ty. ill) :!:!LJ lid. f)II ./r '1"/11/1 :!;.I, h'I'""d,,' ( .I'"" I D c 1.1 P ... ii ... ( H I _. .\lhcq,;" ( e 3. 11."1 (13) SImI 1'111 I',.
    PAGE 84

    BASKETBALL Due t o the coif! ... publicati o n o f our annu a l it i s impossibl e to g i v e it comple t e s u mmar y of t h e bas ketb:dl se r i es be tw ee n t h e B a lboa and C i s t o ba l H i g h S c h ool. J ud g i n g fr o m th e re sults of t h e fir s t four gnmes i t nppea r s t h a t we will win th e c h ampio n s hip Our team r ompe d all O\'e r our riva l s outpl a y i n g t h e m o u t s h ooting the m and outsmarting the m in a l most every pby o f t h e fir s t thre e games. W e wo n the fir s t three games pi"''ycd, l o s in g t h e f o urth w hen we we r e forced to play with Peseod out o n a C CQunt o f flu OUf team needs to wi n one more g ame t o cop t h e s e ri es. w hi c h r equires f oUl' w i n s out o f s even games. ,'\r. K enneth Vint o n our C O i H : h whipped the fe. 1 m i n t o co nditi o n in two short wee k s and had it eli cit i n g lik e a g r o u p of ve t e r ,1Il ball pl ; yers. H e tallght t h e boys some p lays that r a n o u r opposit i o n literi'd l y "off their feet." We o we all t h e s u cc e ss o f our fin e team to J\'l r. Vinton and to the P G s. w h o h elpe d whip the s q uad into s h a pe by practi cing w i t h them. Our i s compose d o f the f ollo w in g ph'yefs : Fir.;1 Gailit': C. P ESCO!), P T R \ N I( l N F. ( C apt.) G T \RFLINGEn C j\\. J \ \ A R C110SKY G & C H Loo,wooo, G. B \VlIEEI.Jo:R G S ANI)Jo:RS, BAnNETT, ALBER G', m d H ORINE, utility, The B a lbo a Pla."s h e d was t h e sce n e o f the fir s t c a ge thrille r Our boy s ca m e o u t t h e first quarte r w ith int enti o n s o f making our r i yal s k n o w t h a t we wer e m a s t e r s and s u cceed e d very well. The ga m e o pen e d with sUl"pris in g s peed :ll1d kept the S,U lle pa c e until t h e fin al w hi s tl e f i n i s h e d the p l a y in g. Tho u g h the sco r e was so c l ose, t h e game was ver y u nbalan c ed a s our boys had the a d van tage fro m the b eg innin g of play wh e n bhrc h oslty s u nk the firs t fiel d g oal until W h ee l e r P llt the hall t h r o u g h the h oo p .fo r the last COllntel". P esco d d i mi nuti\'e forward, the scor in g star with twe lve po ints to hi s c r ed i t. The entire tea m s h owed supre mac.y O\'e r Balbo a i n p ass in g, s h oot in g a n d te,:, mwo r k. E s kil so n B a l bo f orwa rd. had O U I" guards puzzle d w ith h i s type of p layin g for a quarter o r so but W':IS soo n s t opped when w e go t u s ed t o hi s s t y le T.Hrflin ger h a d a "ji nx" o n \V oo d, p iv o t m lIl f o r the P acifi c s iders and k e p t h im worr i ed t hroushout the ga m e, L ockwoo d. Whee l e r a nd l\-blr c h os k y pl a y e d s t ellar games in hol d ing our oppon ents t o the mi n imum of s h o t s R a n kin. Charlie s t eammate. aide d in bring i n g t h e ball d o wn i n a l mo s t every p lay. His was a bit errati c, but h e d esen' c s a l o t o f c r edi t f o r help i n g u s i n w in ni n g t h i s ga m e The score of this ga m e \ W I S 28-2-1. Secolld Gfllllr.!: Balboa suffe r ed t h e ir seco n d d efeilt" ilt the C .. i s t oh, d P l ily s h e d. < Ifte r a two week s l a y-ort" (!tll'i n E"ster \ ac.l t i o n \\'e defea t e d the m t o the tune o f .32-22 This g;1I11e W[lS a ro u g h .and t u m bl e exh ibiti on. ilild f o u l s w e r e ca ll e d "cry often. March o sky, R;.nlti n and ( ,oc k wood wcr e a l l thl'own out o f the ga me f o r f O llr perso na l s. A coupl e of t h e Bal boa pbyer s wer e throw n out [01' fouls. \\'e o p ened w ith a r ; pi d attack o n t h e e n e m y goal. ,:uld h a d them pu.tz l ed thro u g h o u t the ga m:!. P csco d with h i s c1eve l s h i ft i n g :md d ea J eye f o r the basl tct, ke p t all t le Ba l boan s g u e ss i n g as to wha t to happen n ex t. \\'e had the g:ln le in t h e bag f ro m the b eg innin g o f play till the e nd o f the game. B.dhoas s tars in t hi s game wer e NO\'ey ,lIld E ski!so n TII;,.,I Galli c : We made it three in a I'O\\, the follo win g Friday night w ith a .382 7 \'ietor ), O\'cr our opponcnts. T h i:-. game r;lggcd a nd s l o w in co m p;ui son with the prec ed i n g S lim e s Hnd had it n o t been for our ,hilrp,h oo ti ng a l t h e 1 Is-ltd w e m i ght h a \'C lost. r tdlJoil's gU:Il'ds wez 'e l wffled o n e \'ery p b y and couldn' t s t o p o u r boys fr o m sco ri ng Wheeler. L odl\\'oo d u ld M a r c h os k y p layed a g l 'ea t game at guards w hil e Tarflinger a l s o d i d hi, ,Inre I,,\' ge tti ng lhe h all off the basltct numero u s t i me s. I n our fOl'ward dep artme n t, Pc'co d and R an kin co uld n' t see m t o dick. Both Sutherl:Lnd and EskilsoLI o f the team pla y e d well.
    PAGE 85

    /';I/Ir/j,{,'/lII,': I ,II Ctl'1t ,I .1. II ....... IIIl' "t till' .... I 1 . I . .11 \"I 1'1.. I,d II H.)th .... ill p, ........ II.I.: 1 . .11 .. 11111 III it tlll,n'l.:lI the 1".,,1' 1"1" 1'''1111'0 T he .... ot tlli .... g.lIlle ...... 1\ .1111'" I I. CI", .... t"I . .! 10. tlw IOIH .... t IlIllId'l" ,01 1""11\ tn ''''1', .1 ill .111' 1 . I .... lll"l l,.dl A;.IIII, I,dl,nll C.iI.I . 1 .11,,1 B . ll" . 1: ... llil .... I>II .1I1e1 pl . Hd . .IIIIC J,lr 111'1" "hil ... l.ul"l.."",1I1 .,11.1 \\!tnllr ',ere hi!,hliJ:ht I'll" Cri .... tol . d /"Ih,' 111,"11/ .. /.1",1,. "/',,,,. ,,,'/"./,.1"' .... 111.11 (',.; . 1,01,," /,,/. ,,',11/ ,ft, /../.J."'II,,dl rOI,'. l'llLLE Y ll.IL L The ti, .... g,IIllC nlthe i"{l",-... ,-hool I'olky 1. .11 nt W.I..,\l1l \\", .... pl.,.,",:.1 "11 (l, \ul'l'l' :!:.! .11 C,i ... hlh.d. Thc "irl ... IIcn! Olll (In\o the I lOIn" II illt '"Io\...." ill III .... hn" thc B.,I1",., gi,I .... Ih .,t IIC h,.d .... olllccrllnpctililllll. 1l.ISI(ETIl.ILI. Cri .... lnh.t1 jOllrn".'l"l1 1(' B.,II" . (" \,1.1-' tit .... lir .... t !,;.tlIIC "t ...... ... 'HI 1.11Utrt -n ..... !:!1 .. 1 ... did th ..... ir l'e .. 1 In .... tllJl I\,dl"'.I. I,"t "'''mel"", ,'r lltlwr "l'rl' 1I1l.,I,lc I" .1" .... P. \lth"tIJd. e\\'r_, lCirl p1.I.,ed It .. rd .1".1 tried tn do h ... r 1'.I1-t. lIll.' \\0..'1"1.' .1lulI.d,11.: In ... tll!' n . II.".1 Thc ".Irt,; \,., :i-l.q C .. i .... h'h.d .... lin..:-lIp II ...... ,I .... 1t,1I1'1 ..... : F"rll.lnl .... .... Rllth \\'il\ill;:"'!,ul, . ",1 '\.11 neinhllld; GII.ln!..... .'\ill, ()lIl'\!, '\.111"1"0 .... ,'Ild Belt, Stetler: CCllhr". I)nt Ilirl.d . nd (C,lpC). Belly Stctla. ";1(1 .'\.Iry .\nn C.'rruthl .. r..... S.-:lu"n G'.IE-I\ ..... ( HO' 1-1 come ii' Cri .... lnh.tllhi .... SlIlIrd ... ttl pl.l." I hI.' .... l.'lII"d g.lme of thl.' .... 'i Tl1i ... g,lIll(' "t,'ril.'d (lui nn ... :h I ..:tkr th.tII tit..: UIl": hefore "ith Cri ... tol>..1 ,..hn\\ ing m"rl' J.rilli.t1It 1'1.1.' jng il1ld p.'''!-IInrk. TllrnuJ;h,"ul thc ,,11.,lc ;,;,Im(" lhc :;i rl .... their I, ....... t, Il clermint:.1 I .. "in l.ut found i l il1lpos:,.ihk 10 d .l "". Tlti .... g.III1C enJcd "ith 111.:-.... lnrc or ::!il)q, [."or "I ltdl ..... The s;\mc.lin ..... ull II.IS lI:,.cd .,,.. ihe \lcek 67

    PAGE 86

    TIIiRO GA.\I-JANU,\RY 21. F o r t h e third ga meofthe ser i es. Cris t obal went t o B a lboa. On t hi s day Cri s tobal again trie d its be s t t o win the ga m e b ut fat e was aga i n s t it agai n The game wa s about the fa stest a nd h ardes t pbyed o f t h e seaso n The r eg u la r t eam pl ayed t h e w h o l e ga m e and i t end ed with the sco r e o f 25 15. F O L 'RTII G A .\\E-J ,\NU,\RY 2 8. O n J a nu a r y 28. B a l boa ca m e O \ 'e r to Cris t obal bri nging most of h e r s u b stitutes in stea d of h e r regular team and s till det e rmined t o b ea t u s. H o w e v e r this t ime C r i s t o b a l f oo l e d her b y taki n g all t h e p o int s i n t h e fir s t quarte r B a l boa ilt o n ce put i n h e r two star p layers but was s till unabl e t o s top t h e sple n did p a ss w o rk o f C r i s t o b al. The ga m e was fa s t and ended with the s co r e o f 58. I N D OO R BASEBA LL So m e h o w o r other. t h e r e w asn't m u c h i n t ere s t s h own i n t h e G irl s' I ndoor Ba seball this y e a r a n d ;lI" t a few of the V a r s it y s h o wed lip a t p rilcti ce. J\liss B ailey a nd Mr Fra nk s pl a nned to dro p the s p or t b ut i f this h a d b ee n d o ne i t w o uld I Hl\r e m a d e u s l o s e o u r c h a n c e t o w i n the cup. T he g y m cbss ca m e t o t h e r esc u e h owev er. and played t h e b aseball s c hedule, for w hi c h mu c h credi t s ho uld be g i \ e n the m B a l boa ca m e t o Cris t o b a l t o play the f i r s t ga m e of t h e indoo r baseball seri e s on F eb. 2 6 B o t h tea m s work ed hard. but Bal boa s howe d the better b r a n d of p layin g a n d won by the sco r 01'4 5 T h e f ollowing g i r l s r e pr e s e nt e d Cri s t o ba l : j \ l a r ga r e t R e inh o l d ( C a p L ).c. E i l ee n Fo rd p ., V ictori: 1 H ollowell. 1st B nse. l\\ary A nn C a rr u t h e r s 2nd B a se. B etty S t e tl e r 5 rd bas e S i ster H;I."es s.s . H o p e H ollowell. r r . A n n Gibso n. I. f.. T h e subs t i t utes wer e Ruth W i k i ng s t a d a nd O l g;'l R oe. I n the s eco n d ga m e. w hi c h wns played in B a l boa. f e w e r erro r s were m ade t h a n in the p revious game a n d t h e g i r l s p byed mu c h b ette r as a wh o le But s t ill Cristobal wa s u nabl e to beat B a l boa a n d l os t 26 12. The snm e line.up was used as in t h e firs t game. B a l hoa won the l as t ga m e o f the selics th e reby o n e m o r e spor t toward t h e c u p. The B a l bo : 1 g irls o utcl asse d C r i s t o b :.I in all the g n m e s b u t t hi s time the g irl s s ettle d dow n a nd B a lbo a \\"o n b y the ci o sescoreofS. Thissh o w e d that Cri s t o b a l renlly coul d ha\' e had a c h a n c e of w innin g t h e pas t g n m e s i f m o r e s p i rit h ad b e e n s h o wn ilt the be g i nn in g o f the sea so n GIRLS TENNI S FIRS T .'IEET, At t he fir s t m ee t p layed a t B a l boa April 22 the Cri:.t o b a l g i rl s l o s t tw o out o f t h e t hree matches to B a lb oa. They l o s t the 2 sing l es milt c h es a nd w o n the dou b l e s. VOLLEYBA LL TEAt'\ 68

    PAGE 87

    n \SKETB.\LL TE \\\ \".ISIII"I," O Griflin ( Bi t S ) dch:,.h.\1 Eli!. II.I,'"c", (CII"), "oh; hO; 7_:1 . \'".:!S ill',I,, Edith RtkC'r ( Bl I S ) dch:,tlcd ,\\..hellc Hli ...... (eIISl. h.I. b-". Stetler .lId \\ i<.,kin g ... t,HI ddc,tlCl1 .\lich,.cI"'on ;.Ild loll.tlllh.: .... 1.11: tl':;; h-:! \ EET L \ I Ihi ... mcd C ri ... t o l ... 1 \\,1'" more ... lIcee ...... lu!. \\in"i,,!;:! IHII 01.1 m . t...hc' I I \\.t ... 1'1. \l:d on thc home courts o n \ pril :!9. 19:;,1 Eli;/.. 1I,.ye ... cetlS) defe . lcli Domlh., Grilhn BlIS. h:;: r..,h. f),IIIM,. Fi .... t ... ct D c 1.1 PCii.I,.1lt1 GlI.lnli.1 ( Bl IS, 1\(lI! from ... I,.(I.,nd Stt.-"tler e lls t I Second ... et \\i .. ... I"d ,<1",1 Stl..'IJ..:r ( ellS} 1\1111 lrom 1,,1111111\ ... ,tnd .\ l i .. It .... II".! f'I .\SS 69

    PAGE 88

    TENNI S TEr\;\\ Third se t \\,id,ingsbd :Inc! S t e tl e r ( C H S) w o n fro m d e Ia P en:l :lnd GU:lrcii:l ( B H S ) 6-4. THIRD j\\EET, Thc fin a l m ec t W:lS p l :lye d I \\ay 6 1 933 at B a l boa and Cri stob:tl w o n all three mnt c h es fro m thei r o p po n e nts. Thi s d ecide d the o u tco m e o j the series i n Cri stohn l's. f mor .\'0. I Sin g / a ] \1. Bli ss ( C H S ) w o n fr o m E I3nkcr ( 81-15), -1-6; 6-.3: 6-4 . \-0.2 Sin.q/u E I b yes (CIIS) w o n f r o m O. Grifl i n ( B H S ). -1-6: 6-2; 6-2. J)ouM.,f' R \\'icltingsbd :tne! B S tetler ( C II S) won fro m R J o h a nn es an d T l \ l i clw e \ so n ( 81-15 ), 7-5: 7-5. BOWLlKG TE,\J\I 70

    PAGE 91

    II[GII SUI"OI F.\lTLr\ Fr,,,,, L.-II I" r'cl,1 I \ l,,, I"" .... ". FLncr ,'\ i I' .. ,'\'., Fr!..!.,\\" Ih".'.-",. \ n'''''III,'O TilE JUNIOR IIIGII selloo!. One of the Tn.1n." n ew features in the 1933 "Carihhean" i s a scction oe"oted to the Junior llig h Sc h ool. Th(' sllggestion that this g r oup hc g i\ 'c n ,'11 opp odunity to identif" it sc lf \\ itll th e Senior Ilidl ycar.oook' met \\ ith a \'cry ('nt htl s iastic re s p o nse from the students of gr?oes SC\ 'cn and eight. It \\','.5 hoped that .1. l a rge numbe r of contl'ihutiol1l' dea lin g with th e v arious acti\'ities of Juni o r IIid1 would he submitted t o th" staff for puhlica ti o n in this sec ti on. ,\1. though the a m ount o f offered this ,\'car \\as r ather sl1l?lI, \\e ?re not discouraged s ince the students of Juni o r I l igh had no previo u s experien ce in thi s sort o f w o rk \\'ith? new huilding, and the m an." facilities o ff e red in connecti{'n with it. it will be possible for these y o un g er students to organi ze their t)\\" cluh:... a thl e ti c organizatio n s and c lass grours, 71 .md we s h .dl \\('Ie, m e th(' (lPf' rtunity to a id them in g:linillg l'I..'cngnitinn I)." in eluding \\ I'it eupl' ,'nd pi ... tu ... .: ... in thl.' "C:II' ihhec'n." By Illec'ns 01 thl.'sl.' .'rg;'ni. zatic;lls in the s('n:nth :'ncl I.'ighth I';d ... ... it is hoped tl1:d :1 I:rgl. .1l1ltlunt of \.dUd IJle l'xperience \\ ill 1)( g
    PAGE 92

    EIGHTH GRADE BOYS EIGHTH GRADE elH! S 72

    PAGE 93

    CIUllF BOYS Cll.\IW GlUtS ;3

    PAGE 94

    HONOR STUDENTS Rendins I ... f t t o ri ght: Phillip R ei{ldl, Blnnch e Howe, K nt h iee n PJ,illit )s, Rober t R{'l'pn, Betty McCleAry, Anrl B ohhy Reinho ld. AMERICAN LEGION AWARD This year the American L eg ion Post of Cristobal beg a n the a nnu al polic y of a ,, a rding to the bo y a nd g irl from t h e eighth g t 'ade bronze med a l s f o r bein g outstandin g in the clas s The o utstandin g s tud ents \\ere nomin a ted in eac h h o m eroo m a nd th e n voted upon by the students a nd t h e teachers. Robe rt Reppa a.nd K a thleen P h illi;s \\ere c h ose n the mosl outs t a:lc1ing hey a nd g irl in the e i ghth g t 'a d e cl ass on the follo\\ing b as i s : (20% ee. c h ) HONOR: StrengHl a nd s t abili ty of character; hig h s ta.nd a I'cls o f r onriuct : keef" scpse of ", I m t right; a dh e rence t c truth and ccnsc i e oc e, a nd d e\'o ti ol1 to dut y a nd practice o f clea n s peech. COU RAGE: B rave r y in th e f ace of oppos iti o n a nd d a n ge r and grit t o sLand lip [ 0 1 th e rig ht a nd 74 o ne's duty. SCHOLARSHIP: Sc h o l as ti c att a inment; evidence of in d ustry a nd application in stu dies. LEADERSHI P: Abilit y to lead and to accompl ish through g roup acti on SERVICE: Kindliness unselfishness, fello -,v-shi p; p rctection of t h e wea k ar. d the p romotion of the interests an.d welfa.re of asso c iates wit h out hepe of personal a -.\ard. T h e schoo l most certainly has Captain M. \V. Basi eux to t hank for t h e starting of this annual affair, of w hi c h a simi l a r type h as begun i n t h e high sc h ool. At all t i m es do the school children G nd Captain Basieux m os t t h oug htful a nd co-op erative.

    PAGE 95

    "TOUR 1ST ,\"n "O"TOL'({ .. 1I" rI' /)",./(.'/ )/-i, .... g \'lllll p ll'dllll," "11111..'1 PI.: nllll' nllll'l .. ...... 1111..,' 1"'\1,111..' P OI" ,Ill', I t'll,kn l U p in till\!,.' t \ l "1..'1.: IlIrl.. '\'" tlluri ... h Ii .... lpjllt r intI! ,I Ilimiu ... h" p I 1,IIII,Hd tlll.'lli ill I \\,1", ... ttl gl"l 1 u .. ... I.. 11 1 1111" ;. f "il'nd The .. In n: \\.1' .IIlY 111111.'1 Ililll l u sture \ '!I\I mi ght I.'Iltl-r: g l., ......... 11,1\\\..,\.. .... :dllng thl..' ;tll d ;11 IIItI..' CPt!: ( ) r i c l1t a i ( 'arpl't!> 1111 t hl' till.:d 1I"tll": "'I1I,dl. 111\\ $ 1ll1.1kin g !' t.l lltl .... llId h:.t -t.d,ll: .... cOIn.,.'d ,111<1 p nli, h c d : Sp.lIli:-.h s lll\.\\ I ... \\I. : n .. tl.n l\\ 11 I.. .. t I'l..'fu I I 1)\1..'1' hair ... : h.IIl!:;i ll,!; ti ll tilt.' \\.",. \\1..'1'1.: Llpcs-trit-'s. I n thL' ... h tl\\I...' ... I..' ... \\cn.: .1111111..' tlll i i\'(ln 1II..,,,ds hr. lccl..:t s. ,. .. ning.... lIld sll1:t1l Budd . ", ;lI\t! IIthl.'1' ",mall Ilgun.'s. C u l.'fully pbnd o n cotlo n ,,"ou l tnd in $l1\all 1 1\".I.s \\1,,'1'1.' pil.'('I.s o f j .ldl.' ;l'\\l.'h y The l 'l. '\1. '1'(,' d s n paj.IIl"'''' lIltl I t im o n ; \ s of all e n l o t'''', pig-skin pur ... l.s and things so l ncn Ii.'und ill II indu ",hops. Thl. Illul i s htl h a d p u s h e d pasl m e wanderc d a t 'IHIIHllItltil she s a \\' sll Tlld hin g s hl:. likcd and ".lIltl.'d O\' C I to it. II II\\, much i s it shL' ; \ skcd tilL' ; l.ltl.'ndant that c ame up t o sel'\ l.' hl.' r lie tho u ght f o r a Illn n1ent and said a t I cngth, Fifteen dllll.\rs." "That's tno much," s h e pro test e d "it's n o t \\ orth it." \Yell. y o u rL' a t i ... L a k e a l moonli ght. The Illuc'n reflect ... n n the \\afL"r and rippling <\. gains t t h e 1'I.1ck s a t the surf,lce nf t h e l akc, \ s y o u look a t i t. it gi\l.'s you t h ... impress i o n tha t you a r c looking a l iI lJroad s iher\' hi!!'h w.\\', ne\-a cum in!! (.-, a n end, .\i s i dl.' (Ii t hL' lakl' -arLO s eL'n t h e hlack. irre1!u l;lr S h 'ldll\\s of the tre e s p(;'epin g intn (he \\;t t n F a rthL'r Iwck are th\. g l ot)IllY a n d i r regutll' nhl un li l in s, compll.'lin g t h e o utline nl" t h i ... picturesque sce ne. I f .'()U \\.tnt t o 'I.C ,()Illdhing I'c.llly I,e
    PAGE 96

    Befo re you realize it, the n ex t year beg in s, a nd "Fi eld Day" i s jus t a f ew d ays off. Then the glor i o u s day dawns. After he in g m ade to pull a car, you're forced to carry s i g n s d e nouncin g your self, for instan ce H\Ve dumb Scabies" (..r ''Down with the Fres hmen." The n the fun begin s at th e field Or is i t fun ? The Sop h omo res have pla.nn e d for a year t o ge t the ir revenge. a nd now h ere's their c h a nc e. a nd what a c h a n ce! Sometimes they a r e s u ccessful. o r per haps it i s the oth e r way around The n comes the flour fight a nd you emerge lik e a pl atinum b l o nd e o r a person w h o h as n eve r see n the s un. Next comes th e paddles a nd you h ear, How in t h e wor ld will they ever expect u S t o sit d ow n for a week?" Tug-of-war comes a nd the Sop h omores g i ve the Fres hm e n a l oo k lik e a t hund e rcloud, a nd probably your h a nd s a re blis t e re d from pulling, but you k ee p thinking. "\Ve've got to beat 'em." So you s ti c k The day i s o n e n eve r t o be forgotten, a nd it's soo n over Y o u go h o m e m os t likely with a goo d coat o f g ree n paint, lipsti c k and rouge a ppli ed in streak s and s pot"., and sc m ew here all the illbred Soph o mores hav e ki c k ed you you are blister e d in different places from dif f e rent things. But a littl e smi l e comes t o you beca u se you're thinking, "Oh won't we tak e it out o n the g ree n Freshmen next year though." THE BEWILDERED FRESHMAN Rulh "l1oody '5i After eight l o n g yea.r s of s t ea d y grind i n g s h e has a t last re ac h ed o n e c f t h e most important s t e ps in h e r life. Entering the b uildin g s h e stands, "The bewildered fres hm an," wit h the m.?p of th e year in her hand, not kn owing w hi ch way to turn. She sees teac h ers a nd p u pils hu r ryin g and scurrying a r ound h er. After going int o t h e assemb l y she sees a nd h ea r s a l m ost everyo n e t a lkin g a t oncc What a babble! The tc a c her is spee kin g it seems as though h e is l ist i ng the rul es a n d regula tions of the comi n g year. H e soo n I'enl izes 76 h e isn't being h ea rd, a nd calls for the a ttenti on o f the pupils. Things soo n begin t o get o r ganized a nd quieted d o wn The n the f reshman decides s h e isn't go in g to ha\l e stich a bew ild e rin g time ?fter all. "JAMES. A NEGRO BOY" ["ane '58 M y m aid has &. m i sc hi evo u s b oy n a m e d J e mes. She says h e i s "perezoso." H e has a cat n a m ed Caton o n ] believe h e n a m ed it tha t because "ge.to" m ea n s cat in Spani s h Sometimes J ames goes fishing ;md brings bac k "Fescados" as h e calls the fish I cften pity poor Gatoilon. becau se h e \\ hin es so piteousl y for fish a nd hi s reward i s a uyank" of hi s tail. I am not at all fond o f J a m es nor hi s cruel pranks. Sometimes h e ties Gatono n to a pole, places a fish just out of reach, walk s off and l a ugn s to hear Gatonon h owl for the fish a nd lib erty, t hen returns a nd picks up the fish, walks off a nd l eaves Catonon there. Sometimes T set him free. James i s ver y he a rtl ess. H e beats Gatonon very cruelly at tim es. I would lik e him t o kn ow how it i s to suffe r like ( hat. I believe James, for one, will never understand Gatonon's feelings. "STUDEN T COOPERATION" Loui,fe de la Oua '57 Student coope rati o n i s the backbone of t h e whole sc h oo l system ; therefore it will be n ecessa ry to have stud ent coope r a ti o n when we ente r the n ew hi g h sch ool. The n ew sc h oo l ha s ccs t the gove rn m ent hundreds of tho u se nds of d ollars. Each student s h o uld m a k e it hi s duty t o ref. 'a in fro m destroying sc h oo l p r o p erty, a nd see tha t other students d o lik ew i se. If we start out in the right way, oth e r cl asses will f ollow. We would not think of d estroying some val u ahle possess i(..n of our ow n, and since t h e n ew schoo l has been built for tht! ben efit a nd u se of the students every stud ent should take the sa m e ca r e of the sc h oo l ?S though it were hi s own Certa in liberties will be offe red in the n ew sc h oel a nd i f the proper advantage i s t a k e n c f the m, we will have a n ideal sc h oo l sys t e m.

    PAGE 99

    1lf 1t lit 11 r An Ambassador (0 Fr.lnl.. ... ,,1m did nllt speak the language of thilt l'uulltr.'" at t imc he took hi!' nc\\ PI''''t. ;Ith'ndcd hi ... first formal luncheon OInt! made ,\ w hi c h was recei\'ed with n idi\( p olih.ncss hy the g u ests wlln did not English A fter the American Iwd acknlm I'-.'dgcd t he applause. h e sat
    PAGE 100

    DICKSTER' S WEBTlONARY Ato m th e first m an. Bea ker-Iarger Com'cction -cake or candy Incluction--met h o d of getting acquaint-ed. J o n heavy m e t a l f ound in razor s. b \anu a l -commo n Spanis h n a m e. J\lo lar so iuti o n -Lis t c l'in e Seca n t 1 1 60t h of a minute. Sin e--a n o tic e T angenta n Ethiopian Vector a winner V o lt t o cas t a ballot Cuts slang term d e n oting courage C l asses receptacles for liquid Chapel -Fre n c h for hat. Princ ipal's lis t -the headma n's uneven wa lk O\'cr cuts heavy au tside garments worn in winte r 1.aborafor y -pertainin g to Labrador, a Northern p e nin s ula. Sc i e n ce-pain f ul a ilm ent of the nos e and f o r e h ea d. Quot a two bits. B oatmeaning two S hip -to drink coffee o r tea s l owly. Tra m t o t a k e your partncr' s ace. Gullo n e o f the fema l e sex. S h a rk t o ast ound o r surprise. Wh a le-to c r y lik e a baby. Santa C l a u s a m y th. Cheer-somethin g to s i t on. Buoy -One o f t h e mal e sex. Shirk-part of wearing apparel. Coatt o woo so m e fai r youn g m aide n Risk -par t o f t h e arm. Bells -things tha t co m e i n at t h e first o f t.he m onth. Ga rds-you kn ow, ye cards. H olly -to yell Seals -Fra m e w o rk of a window. S n o w a n ega ti ve a d velb. Sox -the diffe re n ce betwee n m a l e a nd femal e. T oys n ec kwear. Trce--a number. Yule--contracti o n o fyoll will. Dicti o n a ry of S c i e n t ific T e rm s Ln/(lric th e third balco n y in a theatre. larg e anim a l in the c ir c us. Purelle-a littl e bureau. Celllimeier-a b u g w ith a hundre d l egs. .l/a.lJl/cla bug t hat lives o n dead peop l e So/ule-a g es tu re directed t.o :an a rm y office r 78 .... l lom -the first man. Logarithm -music o f the woods. dntimonyw hat a div orce d g u y pays t o his for m e r w i f e. Bariumw hat you d o to dead p eo ple Coe.rlum -the man w h o conq u ered all G a ul. Coppera p oliceman. Go/d a di sease that you get in the winter-tim e. lOllw hat t h e wa s h e rwoman u ses Zinc-so m et-h ing t hat you wa s h di s h es in. I llduclor-a g u,Y that takes up m o n ey in t h e stree t ca r H OLD ON TIGHT Crowded Clubh o u se. ( Y o un g lady is vain l y g r o pin g for h e r purS' to pay her ticket. ) Y oul1g .. 11011: P a r do n m e mi ss but ma y I not pay your ti c k et?" Y oul/gLady, "Sir!" ( S eve ral s eco nds of gropi n g.) YoulIg .. IJolI: "I begyour pardon aga in young lady but won't you let m e p a y your ti c k e t.?" Y oullg Lad,lj : \Vh y I d o n't eve n eve n kn ow you and anyway, I 'll have this purse o p e n e d in a minute (Co ntinu ed grop in g.) l"OLllIg .11011: I r eally m ust insist on paying you r f a re Y o u' ve unbotto n ed m y suspenders three timesl" "Ah, \Vatson, commented th e prospec t i ve Sherlock, I see you c h ange d your unde rwear." "fI \ a r velous, H olmes h ow'd YOll kn ow? " \ Vell. you've forgotte n to put your trouse rs o n \Vhe n you fIrst sa w thi s Y o u lik e oth e r suck e r s Tho u g h t i t was a poem, Btl t we beg to sayIt's n ot! Last ni ght I h eld a littl e hanci. So prett y a nd so swee t, r gazed a t it wit h l oving l ooks. I fondled it with joy; No othe r h a nd unto my sou l Can g reater sol ace bring, Tha n t hat one which 1 h eld l ast -nig h t F ou r A ces a nd a Kingl

    PAGE 101

    TF l elll'lt' ILl (,"".,-,./ 1/",,"/.\,' j, II, ICI;FTT I t "cern, 11 . 1 ,'\ r I I.ukt:tI t.II' \\'itll gr ..... t.: .. t l',., .. . Ild ,,''''l''1, Rl'd nllt the \\ . r .... . IIl" t"". \.111 It'll \\hith .. I,ll .. '" ... ,\\,d .. ,' ,'IEYEH \ml.\1r. \ \ l.\ .... rt,'ll ldl.,,, .. h,,\\ Th ... Frl.' ... llIn,1I1 CI." .... i .. dllllli. \nd lion III IlIrlll p ... \nd I\hit II It:,,, c me 1111111'" l'i.I,\\BlH) 11 .1, ( ... cern .. Ih,lt .'\ .... h:iml ..... \\lw' .. lr.I\\'I ... II.,r.I\\.I\. 1'1111\, ... 111.d'''\l1 till' .. h rule .. Fur '\",.,," .11,,1"1,1\" .11101 "11\,1\'" 1 '1:-:'1'0:-: In "illlnll'" \1 ...... \\",l e"rll "Ill II Ihul;:" \ .. \\cight nr !!r,l\ it\ \\'(, .aI"'lI hc . r ... Bul thi .. .. "Creek" 111 Illl,I SPF:-:O: H Phil kllll" .. Ill'r Sp.mi .. h \\\. She'll tdl.\'H' .tII,\ thin,g Frolll Gu,"'" o.d t o Sl'.lIli .. h 1'0 .. 111 .... Tn I tcr .'\11.1' qlle .... li.HI .... I .. illt.:' IJR()II':-: Slw .. he \I( ... "llIr "Ird ..... Ind 11.11111 '1IIIklpk ... \ml.d ... o .. h,lrgc'" .Ill .. .. \11.11111 .... 11 .. ... '011 \\ IIell 1.lIul." ... :,: .. 1. So mind yuur .. p' ..... LllIl "q' .. ,'\OO R E Shc I c .... h(, .. Ffelld, III 1:.lf,,r nil .. .. Ami m,lke ... them l'IlI\iue,.h' Thi .. (,u .... "'h:, Ill'r ''''1111: i ... 'lnon (GUlli d'C\\lr ....... 111.' doc ... II,. Ie I ,'I,IC 1l0:-: 11.1l She tli ... ,:ollr,Ig .. '"IH1!,:. hlll'dttl ... \\'ho think th . t t il .. ,' l.ltl p . int \\ 1r"'11 tit .. kno\\ not till' rt.".1 Irom Th ne,er .I.ll" ... lre 1 . i.II ". Sire le.n Iw ... 1 \ .Inh",' Itl Fro ... !' \11.1 11, .. ., mu ... 1 .1"'0 1"lru. B .' 1II\'Il\,ln', .'\..rk \1111" 1.', .\1 .... ., "It, .Iid T rn, I,urn' .'Ir til "01':( 1111 .1 I'.,ilrn.tli up in a ba .... I.:lIunty in thl' Sl.lt\. ..... and he nnel' had ,In .lrgllll1l 'nt \\ ith
    PAGE 102

    Y o u ha\'e pro b ably h ea rd seve ral s t ories about Sh a w b u t have you eve r h eard thi s o n e?: H e o n ce mi sse d hi s um b rella fro m the stan d at h i s cl u b. C o n seq u ently. h e posted a n o ti ce in the h all r equesting t h e nobl e m a n w h o had r e m oved hi s umbrella t o k i ndl y r eplace it. A frie nd ask ed him if it was n t r athe r c r ude sa r cas m to say n oble m an." "Not a t all, r etorted Sh a w "The co n stitutio n o f thi s club s t a t es t hat it i s compose d of "no b l e m e n a nd ge ntl e m en." H e co ul d n t b e a ge ntl e m a n a nd take m'y um b rella co uld he?" A r athe r absentmin de d pro f esso r w h o was dri\ing a l o n g a co untry road. offer e d a s t ra n ge r a lift The stra n ge r ac cepted. and s h ortly a ft e r wa rd s the p r o f esso r n ot i ce d that hi s w a tc h was mi ss in g. \\' hippin g out a revol ve r h e ca rri e d i n the ca r h e s h ove d it into the m a n's rib s a nd d emande d him t o h a nd ove r the watch! The m a n m eekly co mplied b e f o 'e b e in g o rd e red out o f the ca r. The n the p r o f esso r went o n h i s way prid i n g him se l f o n hi s cl eve rn ess \Vh e n h e a rri ve d h o m e, hi s w if e g r ee t e d him sayin g: ''How di d you ge t al o n g today without you r wa t c h ? Y o u l e ft i t o n your d resse r thi s morn i ng." P a th e ti c C ase No. 1 ,-I98,013%" i s that of t h e d oc t o r w h o treated a m a n three year s f o r j a undi ce a n d the n di sco \ 'e re d h e was J a p a n ese. Doclor: I s the p a ti ent co min g a r ound all right?" X ur.Je: "Oh yes, h e has s t a rt e d t o blow t h e f oa m o ff hi s m e di cine alrea dy." T h e top se r geant sa n g o ut j u s t b efo r e the company was d i s mi sse d : "All those fond of mus i c step two p aces f orwa rd." \"ith \'is i ons of a soft job in th e reg i mental ba n d, h a l f a doze n m e n ste p ped out. "Now t h e n cr i ed t h e se r gea n t. "Yu u .,i x chaps get busy a nd ca r ry th e g r a nd p i ano in t h e base ment u p t o th e office r s quarters on the sevent.h floo r." 80 Undoubte dly you h ave all h ea rd o f s3d pre a c h e r s b u t the sa d des t preac h e r I h a v e e v e r h ea rd o f went f rom P osey C ounty, Ind ian a. t o Pik e C ounty, j"\\iss H e was s t a r v in g t o d eath on d o n a ti o n s o f c atfi s h. p oss um and a h u n d r e d d olla r sa l a r y Fin ally h e m a d e up his min d t o g o away. '''ith we t eyes h e stood up in the prayer m eeting t o bid goodbye t o hi s wee pin g co n g r egatio n "Brothe r s and s i ste rs", h e said, wipin g hi s eyes o n his r e d b a nd a n a h a ndk e r c h i e f "I have caIIe dyou t o ni ght t o sa y f a r e w ell. The L o rd h as calle d m e t o anothe r place. T d o n't think the L o rd l oves you p eople muc h b ecause n o n e o f you see m t o di e. H e d oes n' t see m t o w ant,vou a nd y o u d o n t see m t o l ove each f o r T have n eve r m a rri e d a n y of you, a nd I do n t think you love m e, for you don t pay m e m y salary-and your d ona ti o n s a r e m o uld y f ruit s a nd w o rm y a pples." By their fruit. s ye s hall kn ow the m. " And now, brothe r s a nd s i s t e rs, T am going to a b ette r place. T h a \ 'c b ee n appointe d c h aplain a t the p enitentiary at J olie t. \Vh e r e I go ye canno t co me; but I go t o pre p a re a pla ce f o r you.' Y oung h tuban d : "Last ni ght w h e n I got h o m e, m y wife had m y c h a ir drawn up b e f o r e t h e fire, m y s lipp e r3 r ead'y f o r m e t o pu t o n m y pip e filled, a nd-" P U.Ji m i,r/: H ow did you lik e h e r n e w hat?" E ve rybod y kn ows tha t m a n y a n o b o d y w h o i s n't kn ow n b y anybod y b eco m es a so m e b o d y and i s kn own by everybody, a nd eve r y b o d y t ells him h e knew him w h e n h e was a n o b o d y tho'..lgh h e kn ew h e would b e so m e body so m e d::ty. Fond parcllt: \ V hat di d the say about your the m e ?" B. BeeN: "Oh. s h e said ; t l oo k ed like it was writte n by a left-h a nd e d m a n with a p os t offi ce p e n in the rumb l e sea t of a seco nd hand ca r F Olld paren t : ".'\y dear a n ything c i s"!?" B B eers: "Sh e s aid tha t s h e (h ollght the ca r was o n a d e t our."

    PAGE 105

    WE wish to impress upon our readers our ind e btedness to t h e advertisers for t h e backing they have given us. Without their aid the Caribbean could not hav e gone to press. In order to make certain that the ads will not be overlooked we have combined them with jokes. We urge that our readers "Patronize Our Advertisers." x x x x x j x x x x .A x Yo X X x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x X Yo X X X X X X x x x x x X TIlE llOSI ) ['I'.\L x 1' ..... \\1 \ ,Iry. h'. nt-I', X X X w:.:x:.:xx:.:x:-: x:.::-::::::::::::::.::::-::.:::;:>:::::x:::-::::::::-::-:::: ::::::-:-.. ::::::::::.::.::-::.::.::.:;.::.::.::.::.::.::.::-:;.::.::.:;.::-:;:::::xxx;.:;.::.:.

    PAGE 106

    a:-::-:: .. :-: x FRENCH DR UG SrrORE B FRONT STREE T. 1.021 Q 0 0 I COME HERE FOR EVERYTHING YOU NEED I :.: 0 0 x :-: Quality an4 Prices if our Goods defy competi t i o n X Our Prescription Department under the care of reBistered and competent p harmacists. Keep iu your m in d X "FRENCH DRUG S TORE" and you will save both money and health X HOME DELIVER IES -Four l anBuBBes spoRen : Spanish EnBlish. German ana French. V. DEL.GADO M. Chn'.r 0.: "Th e r e wer e thirtee n m en und e r an um brella, and o nl y o n e got wet. Edwin fl.: "Oh, you a r e gass in g h ow co uld they k ee p d ry?" Chri.r: "It r a ining." Ed",ill:"\Veli h ow did t h e one get wet?" Chri.r: frHe went h o m e and t oo k a ba th. "And why d idn't Santa bring you a n y thing, E l s ie?" Dol/jaced child: D oggone ;t. Aunt;e. I trumped Fath e r's ace in a brid ge ga m e C hristmas Eve," \'lr. j\'\' s favor ite s ubject forar g um enti s : \ Vhich cam e first, the h e n o r t heeggT' aX:-::-::-::-::-:xx:-:x:-::-:x:::-::-:xx:-::-:x:-::::-:x:-:XXxxxxx:-::-::.: :-::-::-::-::-::-::-::::::::::::-::-:xx:-:xx:-:x:-:xx:-:x:-:xx:-:xxxxxx. X X X X x X X X COMPLIMENTS OF X x X X B AMERICAN TRADING CO., LTD. B .xx::xxx:-::-:::::x:{:-:x:-:x:;:-::-:xx:-:x:-:x:-:x:-::::-::::: xxx:-:x:-:xxxxxxx :o::: xx:o:xxxxxxxx:-:x:-:xxxxxxxxxxx .JJr, Ha cke ll, ab.relll-milldedZy: "Fro m w h o m did the U. S. pu r c h ase the Ru ss i a n t e r r i tory?" H enry Lee: "Oh fr o m A laska." lie: L ove i s blind." Sire: Yes. but the n e ighbo r s aren't. Pull down th e s hades," Jli.r'} K imbro: lilt i s practically impos s i bl e to live in a n English s p ea kin g countr y all your life with o u t heari ng a n d quoting Shalt espeare. /f/i.re crackill.9 .rl udent, ulld!'r hi.r breath : "Oh yea h w hat a b o u t a d ea f a nd dumb p erso n?" x X x X COMPLIMENTS OF -X X X X X X B CHUNG HING x X P. O. BOX. 435 COLON. R. P TELEPHONE 564 B x X .:-:x:::-::.:x:-::-:x:-:xxxx:.::-:x:-:x:-:xxxx:-::-:xxxx:.:xxxxxxxxx:-:xxxxx:-:xx:-:xxxxxxx:-:xxx:-:xxxxxxxxxx. 82

    PAGE 107

    x 91h wuf Front Street. Colon. H P >: FLOWERS if BETTER QUALITY SERVICE THAT EXCELS x X PROMPT DELIVERY TO ALL HOSPIT ALS. H OTELS .:met STEAMSHIP DAY P HONE, FREE DELIVERY N'G"T !""ON' x COLON. 311 GATUN, 345 \ \ ISS Kim hro. I .":lmining her En gli ... h dass o n the p oc m "Ca<; a hicnl.'a" : "\\'ily did th e boy stand on the hurnin g dc c k?" Jt.',r,rt /Jill'itl: "Bl:c:t u",:: it \\'.1<; tnn h o t for him tosit down. .Jlir'f ( Ionl. J.OC.ITEJ) .IT"""'-> BALBOA PEDRO MIGUEL ---CRISTOBAL ana lADDE DAt. \ OFFERING YOU Athletic Fiel d. .. -T enni .. CourL .. -Gymnasiums -Swimming Pool" Bowling Alley ... Billiard Room ... -Reading Rooms Sodn Fountain Service Sound Motion Picture c.Vuf Other General Community 83

    PAGE 108

    _xxxxxxxxxx x x x xxxx:: xxxx. B '.' The Chinese Sil k Store x y. x NEW CHINA x x x x g We carry Genuine Chine s e and B Japa ne s e SILKS and Curiosities. x x x x LINE N S SILK MATER IALS x x S HAWLS x x CARVED IVORY W I CKER FUR N ITURE x x VASES x x PERFUMES JEWELRY x x x x FRONT SlREET CENTRAL AVE. x x C OLON PANA M A x x x x .;.:x:-:x:-::-::: x:.:xxxx xxxxxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxx {"i.filer: Now .i\lrs. MacDonal d. I t hat that i s o n e o f thoge h o rri d p ortra i f s you call Art?" .l1r.! .. Il ac.: "No M a d a m tha t I S a mirro r .llr.r. Spe ncer: "Ar e you c h ea tin g o n this examina ti o n?" /f/ Slocum: N o mam, I w a s o n l y t e llin g h im hi s n ose was drippin g o n m y pap e r." J Cl1e.r: How d o you s p e n d you r in co me?" Smith: "About 30 p e r cent f o r clothin g 3 0 p e r ce n t for r ent, 40 p e r cent f o r f ood, a n d 20 p e r ce n t f o r amuse m e nt." JOIIU: "But t hat a dd s up to 120 p e r cent!" SlIIi l h : "Do n t I know it!" COMPLIME N TS B Yo X X X OF -:..: X ) : X CONEY ISLAND HOT DOG ST A N D x X J HOKIM. Prop x x x x :.:xxxxxxxxxxxx xxx> :x:-::-:xxx:.:xxxxx:-:xxx:;xx. 84

    PAGE 109

    ! Hotel Washington i I "",,""'.' 1m '''''''0" '"' oomlo" I A H otel in keeping with the dignity, spiril, and service t of the Panama e ana 1. B. B. yolf ..-S wimming ..-UJater Sport s cr arpon Fishing B. Cfh e lJear Around X x JAmES E L EUJIS P. 0 Address Manager CRISTOBAL. CANAL ZONE Final exam t I i go n ornct r y pl'Obl c m : If a rlag p o l e 5 0 fcet h i g h stands o n the t op of a b uil d i ng and the a n gle of e leva ti o nofthc top a n ti theoottt)m arcCOand 4.; de g r ees. lind the color of the flag. .flr.r. (.\ t Spanish Club b anquet) ) say. Ernes t wh y a r c you washing your spoon in your fingt'r bowl?" F:rnu/: "Do you think I want t o ge t egg a 11 over my pocket ? /la"d": "Say, ,\ l r ,\ l e.n:r. everythin g you t ell m e gOl.' S i n one ear a n d out the othe r." .Il r . /l(lIl'r : "Sure. it <.lues. there's nothing in there t o it." /louh: "Gee. ain't that hell .lli.r.I'I\'i",f,rtl.-"Bo h. 110\\ 1ll,Iny have I told you not til !>,ly The 'cere! of health lie' in eating But h n\\ can it 1'11.' h 'pt a .... I. enl

    PAGE 110

    .xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxw x x bCOMPUMENTS OF x x Ca rera's (3rocerll Store J x x x x FanclJ x x Phone 158 Colon, R. P x x iiixxxxxxxxxxx:-:xxxxxxx:-:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxii H e taught h e r thi s h e taught h e r that. The clin g ing ki ss the cl eve r c h a t A sc h o l a r apt s h e turne d t o b e \Vhil e s h e w a s rapt in constancy. But love' s bri ght flam e ca n t always g l o w The d a rk day came w h e n it burne d low N ow he's upse t distraught. and blue. T o find his p e t h as sc h o l a r s t oo .xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:-::-:xxxxx>=x:-:xx:-:x::xxx:-:xxxxx::xxxx:-:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx. x x x x x x ROOSEVELT ON LABOR UNIONS x x I F I were a factory employee, a workingman on the rail -roads, or a wage-earner of any sort, I would undoubted-x x ly join the union of my trade If I disapproved of its policy I would join in order to fight that policy; if the union leaders wer e dishonest I would join in order to put them out. I believe in the union and I b e lieve that all men who are bene-fited by the union are morally bound to help to the extent x x of their power in the common interests adv a nced by the x x union ."-Theodore RooseQl elt x x x x x x x x COMPLIMENTS OF x x x x MET AL TRADES COUNCIL x x x x The r e i s a noth e r inte r esting s t o r'y a b o u t a m a n askin g f o r a d i vorce. During the procee din gs the m a n r e mark e d to t h e judge: I t i s a nno'ying to have a wife w h o k nows h ow to coo k b u t will n oH/I The attorn ey for t h e def ense won the case by snapping bac k : "Still. it i s wor se to have one w h o cannot b u t w ill. 86 Opel' h eard: I s Ernes t de l a O ssa a a b oo k w o rm?" N o j u s t a n o rdin a r y o n e A littl e fish o n ce ask e d it s m othe r wh a t s h e would d o if s h e saw a worm a nd s h e said, ''I'll bite."

    PAGE 111

    rEAUf-i I PERFORMANCE SAFETY ECONOMY: ; ... r\ definit i o n o f a freddL"d p e r<':;1l1l i s o n e who gnt tann,, : d thro u!fh a ... il'v c. :\ m ountainl't' r "',I S put ling his .son In and he a s!;l'l 1 the tea c h I \\ha t s uhj ec ts sht. t a u ghl "\\ 'ell." said till' tea c h,,:r, we h :\\(' arithmd i c writ ing-. gCOInci ry and trigon o m etry. "Fill him up till Trigon olllL'iry," s aid th e m ountainl',,' r "Itt,' ... th e Will ... t ... hot in the ramil"." C,rl A'.: S a.". I lost Ill." in g in thl' Spillw
    PAGE 112

    x x x A DRINK WITH REAL x x SPARKLE x x x x x x x x THE P ANAMA x x x x B COCA -COLA fJ BOTTLING COMPANY, x x X x INCORPORA TED x x x x a PI I I I x x x x I COLON I x x x x B 84 x x x x I == I PANAMA x x I ffi B B x x x x axxx:-:x:.e::xxxxxxxxxxxx_ (at dinne ) : P apa. a r e cate r p i llar s good t o eat?" P apa: "Have n't I t o lel 'yOU n eve r to mention suc h t h in gs at t h e table?" .IIama (after a pause): W h y. B illy. did you ask th a t question?" l3il(y: I just saw o n e 011 P a pa' s l ct tuce. b u t it s gon e now'" 88 xx:::.:xxxx:-:. X X B EMILIO E. WONG 6 BAOS. x x x x X X PERFUMERY, FANCY DRY GOODS I i:i ana ::! GENERAL MERCHANDISE x 7.112 BOLIVAR ST :< x x g P. o BOI 446 COLON, R. P. Telephone 187 B iixx:-:xxx:-:xxx:-:x:-:x:-:xxxx:-:xxxx:-::-:xxx:-:xxx:-:.

    PAGE 113

    _xxxxx:-:xxxxxxxxxx xx:.:x x xxx x x x x x x x x I HOTEL TIVOLI x x x x ANC O N. A N A L ZOl\E B. x x x x x x B B x x x x x X A comfortabfil e restfu l Hfothel. pideafillY o locat e d with ::: magni cent v iew 0 t e aci c cean mid s t pi c turesque sce n ery. 9 : The cen t e r o f soc i ailife. close t o eve r y p o i n t o f in terest on the ... .. : Pacific sid e o f the Canal Zone. ; X >.:.; ... J/r. F rnIlJ, :.r: "I 5.".". Snm. w h y a r c you in such a hurry?" Sam: (\\' h o is w<:l s h ing the floor ): Oh. I want t o finish before thi s bu c k e t o f water gives out?" Butler bawling out boys for making no i se i n bath r oom: H ey. what d o y o u boys thi n k this isa class room?" .1Ir.r. Sp(tlNr: I see t hat \\'arre n Slocu m is wearing sun glasses this afternoon. H e took a tcs t in Spanis h class this morn ing so maybe he strained hi s eycs (r)-'in g to see t h r ough the paper. A teakcttk' in!'pirc d \\'att'ssteam engin e w ht) hut what a little thing lik c coasting t hrough;t rcvolvingdooron somcone e lse' s the origin II I free wheeling.'! you an openin g h c r e fnr me?" Inquire J a }une: diplnma-cd l ot:. (Elxlun) Yes" said the boss b e hind the desk "Please close it sently as you gl)." Is'nt it strange hl)\\ this world c hanges c;o? At first it was thought tf, lX' flat. then it was found t o hI.' round. no\\ no one any aht)ut it'!-heing crooked xxxxxxxxx:>:xxxx:.:xxx:.:::x:::-:x:::::-::-:x : ::::-:: ::-::-:::::x:-::::-::-::-:x:-::::::: .. : :::::::-::::-:: :::;.: x .. ::-:x;,:x:-:x:,::,:. X X X >< X STEPHEN LANE FOL G ER Inc. 8 x CLAS S RINGS P INS x x x ALL KINDS OF JE W ELRY x x 8 1 80 BROADWAY EIV YORK CITY axxxxxxxxx>:xxxxxxxxx:o:x>:xx>:x:<>!: : xx:<>:xx : ::-:;.:x:-::-::-!;.:x;.::.:>:xxxx > :x:-:xx xxxxxx:-:x:-:x x xxxx 8'1

    PAGE 114

    . B PortraIts FOR REMEMBRANCE Miniatures Enlargements Your portrait of today wi ll be just as priceless in years t o come will recall Flashli ght happy memuries just as vividl y as do x ,., those wonderful photographs of b y -:< .. d M k r . :i ::: ::: gone ays. a e an appOIntment lor :' x Photographs,., a new portrai t t o day, x o f a ll types x Q x Architectural FINLAYSON'S STUDIO x L 1 7,018 FRO N T ST. COLON, R if" P ::: ega P HONE ., x X Banquets, large Whe n buy in g photog r aphs look f o r this e mb l em. gro ups, e The Pho t o gr aphe r s Internatio nal Association of :.: Ame ri c a s t a nd s for g oo d craftsmanship and b et-News Pictures :< ter bus in ess princ ipl es. x x y .. C har/i e Pucod : H o w did you ge t tha t cute littl e r o und m outh, d ea r?" .lJar: y Ann C : "Fro m sa y in g "no" t o the r es t of the b oys. darling." Deal er ill car s: "\\'hat's the matte r wit h the ca r you b o u ght? hn' t it satisfacto r y?" .'Jr. Fral1ks: "Eve r ythi ng makes a n o i se o n it but the horn. 111r. H acke : a nd the n the cotto n pro ducti o n d oubl e d and r e d o ubl e d." Jr. Slocum: "Set two!" Vinloll: "Ernes t, do you kn o w whe re the fli es co m e fro m?" Ernu l D. : "\Vell, the cyclon e makes the h o u se fly t h e wind makes fir e fly. t h e J oc key mak es the h o r se fly and the c hildr e n make the butte r fly rillio ll : /(V e r y go o d. N o w w h e r e d o t h e fli es go i n t h e wint e r t im e?" Ernes l : "They go b l ind. ,71r. F. : W h y i s that? Ern u l : B ec a u se whe n they get co l d t h e y start flying a nd l eave their Sp ecs' o n the wall so t h ey ca n t see." N o t e n o u g h m o n ey i s t h e r oo t of all evil. .xx;.:;.:xxxxxxx:.:xxxxxxxxxx:-:xx:-:xxx:.::-::-:x:-::-:x ::x:-::::.:xxxx:-:x:-::.::-:x:-::-::.:xxx:-:x:-:x:-::-::-::-:xx:-::-:x:-::-:. X X UNITED FRUIT COMP ANY GREAT WHITE FLEET FAS T F REI GHT AND PA SS ENGER S T EAMERS Q NEW YOR K WEEKLY SAILINGS TO: KING STON . PORT LIMON SANTA MARTA 90

    PAGE 115

    X :-: x COMPLIMENTS OF B THE N AT I ONAL MATTRESS FACTORY "!ON[ '72. COLON ",h m[ET I .:.::.::-::.::. : : .::.';.: :.::.:;.::.::.::.::.;;,::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.:: .::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.::.;:.::.::.::.::.::.::.:::::::: :::::::::;':;':;'::-::'::'::": : : ;:iI \\'hen '1r, inftul h eard .lho ut th1. Akro ll' s c l a .... h a s a llltii'lIl dl1. mi .... tl'y It'a chl.'l th1. fir s t thtlll!:ht tha t came t o hi s mind wa'.: "\\'hat a lilt or heliUIll \\'a .... lost." i s \\ n ndcrl'lI! \ milli o n y cars ago sh1. didn't !mtl\\ \\'1.' \\ 'CI1. g l l i n g 1 0 weal' g!aSS1.'S, yet I"llk :11 tll1.' \\,;lY sill.' pbc t'd OUl' 9 1 III raur! "1)(1 .\"Illl tliilll < thc Illdl1 hit you \\ith lIl, dilc il ll r1. t l lt)lI ght!" .I/al/di .11. :'\' ,1\\, h c hit m c wid .1 IJI' i c k o." f 'fll' /It'i/lIl ,tHl' ",\\r, .\11.,\'(.'r. I a thcory th.tI thc .... I lt)r h ..... l lin e IIt.t \\1.'1.'n t\\'o p o int s i":111 ;llIg l t', .111' .. 1/" .IIt'r: "Gil nn. it i .... nt truc." O /I. : Oil ,\'c ..... it i ......... t r .. i g ll t I ngle

    PAGE 116

    .:.:xx:-::-:xxxxxxxxxxx:-:xxxxxx:-:xxx:-::.:x:-:x:::.:;:.::.;xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:-:x:.:x. x x x x C. CASULLO U Jeweller 8. Watchmaker x x x x : .; P o. Box 675 :-: Phone 225 X X X Cristobal, C Z 1$ x x x 9.036 Front Street, Colon R P. l:S x x x .:-::,.)'::-::-:x:-::,::-:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:-::-:x:-:x:-::-::.::-:xxxXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX. g COMPLIMENTS OF ;{ B. BARNETT x COLON, R P. X BOX 6 P HONE 507. COLO N iixxxxxxxxxxx:-::-:xx:<:-:xxxxx:-:x:-:xx:-:x:-::-::-:xx Mi ss Kimbro t ells u s a humo r o u s in cid ent tha t h appe n e d in h e r h om e town Two g irls w e re eating t o g e t her, and o n e was as k e d if s h e w o uld lik e so m e m eat. \Vh e n s h e r e pl i e d i t s immateri a l to me the othe r g irl p ip e d up. ''I'll take so m e o f t h e imm a t e ria l t oo X X XXXXXXxxxxxx:-: x:-::-:x:-:X:-::-:X:-:X:-:XXX:-:XX:-:x:-::..:xx:-::-:xxxx:-::-::-::-::-:xxxxxx:-:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx. X X X X X I StanJarJ Steamstr I ComranlJ X X X X X X X X X V ACCARO LINE X X X X X X X X X X X X Wish everq success to the qraciuating Class of 1933. x x x x x x X .xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx: xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:,::,:x:,:x:,::,::,::,::,::,:>::,:>::,::,::,:. 92

    PAGE 117

    a:.:xx:::::<:::o:x::: : : : : x:-: : :::x:::::::::::.: :.::.::.: : ::.:;.::. ::.;:.::.:;::.: BUY YOUH DH G NEEDS AT 8 SALAZAR'S DRUG STORE x x COLC)N. H p N f llln Sto re: BYtl1lfb S r .. 1 rl'.\: 9.038 Front S tr cet 406(} /l"[II' ar 51. Ph" " [66 :.: PlJo c JJ6 [1.160 B "[II'"r SI. Pho n c 35 :-: . :.:: ::.::. ::.::.::.::. : :.::.::.:: .::. : : : : : : : : ::.::.:;.::-:: ::-::.::-:: .::::::::.: x x:.::-::-::-:ii Ih/(,/ G (to hl' I h n h .1l1 i ll'l'll t.1 t h (' doctor) : "nut "I,y .ll'l ynu "'I angry with th l doc t o r " B"rham: "\\'hy. I t tl ld him I \\il:-; t irl'd. a n d he a slu" d 10 Sl'l' Illy l o n g ue. /) .,/i( l'IlIa l l f P l'lItillt,:ing Ilo tl.'illlllk): ":\.IIlW pll'''''l' ,'' Ilorl'fta.d .. .'I li:1II PIt/in'lI/all "\\l,lI. don't 11.:1 Inl..: L.,kh yllu ag;lIl1 ax: :;:: :x::: ::::.;::::: : :::: : :::::::::;.::.::.::.::.::.: : : : ::.;:,::.::. ::.::,: : .::.::.::.::.::.::.:: .::.::.::.::.: :.::.: : .::.::.::.::.: : .::.::.::-::.::-::,::. : : ::.::-::.::. :;.: : .::. : ;.;:.:: ::-:_ MENS SA NO I N CORPORE SA O? ;:i 8 Eat m ore SUN-MAID R A I SIN B REA D x x T9ge FRENCH BAKERY ., Bolivar Avenue. 8103 Phone 346 :.: :.:: ::.::. : : .::.::.::.: : .::.::.::.:: : :-:;.::.::.::. ::.: : : : .::. :;.: : .::.::. : :.::-::.::.::. : :.:;.: . ,llr I ;,dl 'I I. I \lnd"''I'-..l:X:-::':::;'::-::':;':: ::':: ::::::::::::::::.::. : : .::.::.::.::.::. ::.::.::.::.::.::. : '::.::.::.::.::'::.::.::.::. : : ::.::.::.::.::-:: ::.::.::' ::'::'::'::'::'::'::'::':;'::";'; :'::'::'::'::':

    PAGE 118

    axxxxxxxxxxxx:-:xx xxxxxx x x xxxxxx:-::-:x:-::-:_ TUNG HING x x x :-: GE N ERAL FANC Y GOODS CORNER 9th BOLIVAR X X P O. Box 354 T el. 5 7 5 COLON ::x: : : ::-:x:-::.: x x:-::-::.::-:xx:-:xxxx: :x x : < > :x:::-::< > :x:-::<>::-:xx:-::-:xxxxxx:-: :<:-:xxxxx_ ./Jr Llleyer. ill Plan e Geom et r y cla,f.J; R a l p h h ow wo u l d you go abou t provin g two l i nes pa r alle l by the indirect meth od'!" Ra/ph D a"iJ: ,,' W ell, first, I would p r ove t hat they wer e n t p a r all el." The d i n e r had waited h!n m inutes. "t last the wai ter appeared. "You r fis h will be h e re i n five m inutes", h e said. A nother t e n m i nu t es p assed. T h e custo mer's pa ti e n ce was ex h a u sted. T ell me, wai t er, h e sa i d, "what ba i t a r e using?" A nd t h e n t here was t h e S enior w h o was so co n ce i te d that h e autogr aphe d hi s p icture in hi s ow n annu al. X X X X r. X MARGARITA flORIST ; X X X t . :; Phone: P O. Address 8 eris. t 9 t 6 Clatun 157 .x:-:x xx:-:xx xxx:-:x xxxxx: :xx xxx xxx xx x x x xX.

    PAGE 119

    lJllral rruirr <&aragr
    PAGE 121

    H ones tly, I nsuranc e is the Best P olicy You (a:1 tell what \'.'111 ha pfl'! 11; nor wllt'l! It ttl"') h"ppen. "What mu!'t will l,c' X The I nsurance Companies have plentv l)f IlHlJiC\, : : . THEl\1. for a few uoJlar:o'. to pay whilt l11av your : .. 5 ... .... heavy I0S5t!5. .... -;ct all In<.;un.ln c 1 1.formanon from "our l oca l I man: W \V. Gould. It 1:-free anj rchallc. Q RISTOBAL. 127 aLaN. 52. }:x:-:: :::-:>::.;-:-:xxx:-::-::--::-::::::: :.:>::::::.::::::::::.::.::.::.: :.::.::.::.: ',' : :.,::,::,::,::::,::"::':: ::.::0: : :::: :: : : :: ::-:: :::::: :::: :x :-: : : .. ".::-: :.: x x GITTENS ANn TAYLOR u FOR B EXCLUS IVE SUITINGS x x x x X x B ::: 10th S treet -Colon. R P. Phone 2 9 1 xx :-::-:xx:::.:;.::::-::::::.:x:: x:-::':xx:..::::-: :-:::::: : :.::.::.::.::.::-: \\'he n .\1 r wa s takin'! his kncher's examinatio n in American j>r ohlems. h e was stumped h." o n : of lions "hieh "State-the rtumh: r \\1' tun'" of co . "\1 shipp:d tl'Jt of th: L '. S in an\' ci\'cn H o w e\,e r hi s wib being'" nhnut him a ... u ... ual. h ... wrot .. ,; .... ,',rhu til II 1I'.:Ji".'1 ( t o a cnld. f.ligniflld lad y ): ... \ r .... ynu fI fri .... ml o f th: groom?" "lnJccd n ot! I'm the bride's moth .... r ... 97 .1I0Ild; .11. '" \\,wu!t.r il C ..... lrg ... \\:l ... hing t o n W : I!o.;I ... h on .... l-ot 1'" th: y .. ay h:.. \\iI';!" lIi,r ... A ',mbr(l, "\\ hy. c..'rtain:y. \ \ ... 11. int;t oll \\.1:-t h .. mn .... t Iwl1l. ... \ ml.'ric;tll 1.'\l.r h orn," .1If1ndi. "Thl.'l1 hl)\\ com: th;.y do .. : a!l the nil his h irtluby'!" I ',.. I'illioll: ";'\o\\'adays all snrb 01. Inatcrial s a l .... u se d il1 fhl.' manuf :'1du r .... nl illum inating gas." .Il r. F,.;".'It'r: "You'rl. right: thl.y I.,\,cn mak<: light of consum c r 's c0:11pla ints," ... : ; : ;:-::::':.::-: ; .::.-::' ::': :.:: '::. : :.::.::.::.:.,:,::,::,::,::,::::,::'::.':0 Before eye-strain wrinhles ceccme permanent wul ner\'ous fatigue becomes chronic. have your eyes exam ined. If you need gla sses. YOII will b e surpri sed to find what a comfcrt they are when accurately and becomingly ,', fi Hed to j:! l:l Hut'e eXJmineJ I :' :

    PAGE 122

    x x x x x x x x x x x x i'.i COM PLIMENTS OF i'.i x x x x x x LUCKY STRIKE I x x x x \Vh os e picture i s t hat? Oh, tha t's a of m e when T was a baby. Oh, 'you w e r e a ni ce ba ld-headed baby! H ey! Y o u a r c l ook in g at that picture up sid e d o wn .lfr. N ackel/: H ow man y p co pl c i n h e r e have f athe r s in the Army o r Navy? "-h, T esse, I sec you have your hand up. Cou!dyou find out from h im t h e procedurc o f a J e u e Dmid: "\Vhy. I don't know. my father ha s n eve r b:!c n cO:1r t-martialE'd." :-::-::-:x : ::-::-::,;:,:x:-::,::,: : ::,;x:';:-: :-:::x::xx:-::';:::.;x:-: ::xx:-:: ::::-:.:;;:x:-::.;::x:-:xx:.;xxx;-:x:-::-:x:-:x:-:xx:.;x x xx> : ::: :}: X X COMPLIMENTS Of X X B All America Cables Inc. B x x x x C o lon P a n a m a Balboa x x x x Ernie D e la Dua: (At banqu e t o f t h e P a n-American Leagu e Aboard shi p ) : "Say, \ Villi a m quit eati n g your soup. r want {-o hear the o r c h estra. Lllandi: G o t some n e w shoes C h 3 r : i e? Putti n g o n the dog, e h?" C hal'lie: "Puttin o n t h e dog. \ V e ll, w h e r e e l se do you expect me to put new shoes?" axxxzxxx:-:xxxxx:-: x x x:..:x:--:x:-:x:;xx:-:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxx:.;xx;.::
    PAGE 123

    99

    PAGE 124

    "utograpQ Jagr ______ 1 _____ -----1 -,I ____________ 'I II --------1 \1 II II I -______ 11 ____ -II 1--I 100



    '^f^ ^l^'Sros^



    X Mfc










    >GnVr, HO'Es



    N^vy />LANei



    PAiM ^<,oub



    C '>

    \






    bn



    CDLDh























    i



    UI7 ^



    Ml



    Quo fiCK




    HOUS



    O O P(



    ^S?/\ fiuLL5



    -fc^i'ACK.-,



    ^<^_/c/__;Xy



    Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive

    in 2010 with funding from

    University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries



    http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1933cris



    1



    \^




    /^ II =i||alli iirnlH D\ 1


    ^


    1 Foreipord 1


    ]


    n : Tilt' Caribbean Staff of 1935 has j


    I had an unusual amount ot co-o|icTation j




    j from everyone in producing this year's j




    I Annual, and is proud to present to the :




    yi : student body, the faculty, and the j li


    i


    UJ j general public this representation of its : [L


    J


    n j literary and artistic ability, the product j




    : of all the departments of the school. j




    ^^1?= ilfnlli HlDlli II c


    V



    I



    THE CARIBBEAN



    Vol. XVI



    CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE, 1933



    No. 1



    PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL



    lEittnnal



    Oscar He ilhron '33



    Can you imagine Cristobal High School
    without any clubs? An institution solely
    for the purpose of teaching children their
    "readm", riting," and rithmetic," from
    8 a. m. to 3 p. m. without any forms of
    e.xtr? curricular activities to interest the
    students in their school life?

    Such was the case during the pioneer
    days of C. H. S., during its first years of
    operation. However, throughout the
    steady progress of the years a notable
    advancement in club activities has de-
    veloped in the school, from an average
    of two or three clubs a year to the present
    number of thirteen clubs. Among these
    active clubs are represented two national
    organizations, the "National Thespians,"
    and the "Liga Panamericana," one club
    which depends on high scholastic stand-
    ing for membership, and various musical
    and athletic organizations.

    A school club program cannot be suc-
    cessful unless there is faculty support and
    co-operation. The members of the faculty
    of C. H. S. have shown the student body
    their interest on behalf of the progress
    of the school by contributing much of
    their spare time in order that our clubs
    might be successful in maintaining the
    interest of the students in general. That
    the students are interested is easily
    proved by the large voluntary member-
    ship in each club.

    Membership into one or more of our
    clubs is an honor towards which everv



    student should strive. It develops and
    stimulates social contacts amongst the
    students and teachers. The school life
    is made much more enjoyable and the
    monotonous routine of everyday classes
    is greatly reduced. The many opportuni-
    ties for artificiality which the regular
    classes offer between the student body
    and the faculty are practically eliminated.
    Thus the instructors as well as the stu-
    dents gain a better understanding of each
    other, which later results as a great aid
    in the carrying out of the everyday
    classes.

    As we look into the future, there is a
    far wider scope for e.xtra curricular acti-
    vities than ever before. With the new
    modernly equipped high school building
    with its many facilities for carrying out
    club programs, the present active clubs
    should be greatly developed and many
    new ones organized. The activities room
    will provide a place in which to carry,
    out club activities, and the fact that
    every teacher will have a room
    will provide every club with a regular
    meeting place. The well-organizetl assem-
    blies which are being planned for the new
    auditorium will gi^e each club an oppor-
    tunity to show Its progress and display
    its abilities.

    Let's hope that ne.xt year with our
    expanded facilities we will show our
    school spirit by boosting our clubs and
    developing these activities one hundred
    per cent.




    (2\\i



    5]i:^lfc



    3\



    m^



    VXJK, the Class of 1953. dedicate this, the
    sixteenth volume of the "Caribbean,"
    to the New Cristobal High School. Although
    we have never attended it, we know how
    much those who succeed us will appreciate
    its modern and complete workmg lacilities.



    ^[E



    r^





    CARIBBEAN STAFF



    Editor


    Oscar Heilesron


    Asst. Editor


    -- Richard Reinhold


    Business Jlanaqer


    Ernest de la Ossa


    Asst. Business Jlanager.


    - --. Clifton Brown


    Asst. Business JIana/jer.


    Jerry Gorin


    Asst. Business Jlanagcr


    ---- --- Henry Sanchez


    Circulatuin Jlanager


    . Elizabeth Hayes


    Asst. Circulation Jlanager


    Robert King


    Asst. Circulation Jlanager


    Kathleen GooDENOUGH


    Asst. Circulation Jlanager


    - William Hill


    Asst. Circulation Jlanager


    . Robert Brown


    Asst. Circulation Jlanager


    ... .. . . Ruth Pickett


    Literary Editor


    Helen Hammond


    Asst. Literary Editor


    Elizabeth Thornton


    Asst. LAterary Editor


    Ellen Greenleaf


    Asst. Literary Editor


    .. Anna Reilly


    Asst. Literary Editor


    . Margaret Hollingshead


    Art Editor


    Ernest Wood


    As.d. Art Editor


    Iack Egozcue


    Hoys Sport Editor


    Mandi Marchosky'


    A.fst. Boy.r Sport Editor


    Louie Barnett


    (iirl.r Sport Kditor


    Dorothy BirkelaNd


    //..,,/. CirW Sport Editor


    ,^lAR(;ARET Barnard


    Typist


    Mildred Owen


    Exchange Editor


    Betty Stetler


    Joke Editor


    William Keenan


    Asst. Joke Editor


    .. Ernest Jaramillo



    School A otes Editor

    Asst. School .\oles Editor



    At',



    i Edito



    Helen Aanstoos

    Mabel Bliss

    Norine Rakovsky'




    C. H. S.

    How olton througlioiit tlic sclmol year
    is the criticism of the teachers, "Tor,
    much hcmewcrk." heard among the
    stuilent body? However, in spite of this
    and similiar uncompUmentary remarks,
    the school this year has had one of the
    best faculties that has ever taught in a
    Canal Zone School. Not only does every
    teacher thoroughly understand the sub-
    ject which he teaches, but he is also well
    acquainted with all ot the stiuleiils under
    his guidance.

    In addition to an ideal laculty, C. H.
    S. has had at its head a principal who has
    done very much to make C. H. S. a model
    school. He has introduced many new
    features into school life making it much
    more interesting and attractive to the
    students. Among the most important
    features which A\r. Franks has intro-
    tluccd into the school is the C. H. S.
    newspaper. Let us hope that Mr. Milford
    Franks will occupy the principal's desk
    at the new high schocd next year.

    The Household Arts Department this
    year has been under (he guidance of Miss
    Blanche Anderson. Miss Jeanne Brown
    has taken care of the library in acklition
    to teaching English, Commercial .\iilh-
    metic and Commercial Geography.

    In his shop a couple of blocks from the
    school Mr. Harry Fringer has been turn-
    ing out "A-1 tradesmen in Mechancial
    Drawing and Manual Arts.

    Those strange scunds which escaped
    from Room 2 at the beginning of the year
    have become melodious vocal and instru-
    mental selections marking the progress of
    Miss MiUlred Elner's musicallv inclined



    FACULTY

    students. Mr. Roger C. Ha.ckett in his
    Social Science Depardnent is doing great
    work in preparing his students to become
    upright citizens.

    "1 think w'e will memorize forty lines
    lor foniorrcw," seems to be the slogan of
    our c;i.pable English Department head.
    Miss Gladys Kimbro. who also is sponsor
    of the Dramatic Club and Natic.nnl Thes-
    pians.

    .^luch credit should be given to Mrs.
    Joy McDonaUl, head of the Art Depart-
    ment, for the success of the art work of
    the "Caribbean," and for the beautiful
    pieces of work done by the art classes
    this year.

    Mr. Frederick J. Meyer, "Micky" to
    the Seniors, in addition to his elementary
    and advanced mathematic classes, has
    sponsored the Senior Class for three years
    and this year is sponsoring the "Carib-
    bean."

    The Language Departments, French,
    Latin, and Spanish, are under the gui-
    dance of Miss Mary E. Moore, sponsor
    of the Sophomores, and Mrs. Phyllis
    Spencer, who is also sponsoring the
    Juniors, the Spanish Club, and the Liga
    Panamericana.

    Miss Helen Patterson is at tiie head of
    the commercial classes, teaching the
    many aspiring stenogs how to "push the
    Chinese lawn-mowers."

    Antl last but not least is the popular
    Mr. Kenneth \'inton, head of the Science
    Department, ami sponsor of the Athletic
    Association. Students are well acquaint-
    ed with Mr. Vinton's many scientific
    researches in the school.



    XiiDif OsiAK Hmi.uron.

    /tir/hp/ace Colon. R. de P.

    /),i/f luilere.i Canal Zone S,liooh^\92\.

    /iron/f K. \ pre. r.r ion I ilon'l Relieve it!

    ./clu'i/ie.r Cl;iss Alternale 1: Class President 2, .3. 4;
    Glee Club 1 ; "Gyps.v Kover" 1 ; "Bells of Beaujalais"
    2; B. A. A. 1; Caribbean Staff, Ass't. Editor 5, Editor
    4: Dramatic Club 3: National Thespians 5, 4; Spanish
    Club 2. 5, 4, President 3; I.iga Panamericana 3;
    StaH C. II. S. 4.



    .-=*iC*>






    %



    .Xante Ernest ue la Ossa.

    A ickname "Horsv."

    BirllipUue-'CoXon, R. de P.

    Dale Entered Canal Zone SchooLt 1923.

    I'aforile E.\pre.r.rion Let it go.

    Jcli\'ilie.r Carnival 1, 2; Debating Club 2, 3; President 3;
    Spanish Club 2, 3. 4, President 4; Liga Panamericana
    4. President 4; B. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club 4;
    Caribbean Staff, Ass't. Business Manager 3, Business
    Manager4;Baseball2, 3, 4; Golf 3; Tennis 3, 4; Class
    Vice-President 3, 4; Varsity Club 4; Track 4; Basket-
    ball 4: National Thespians 4.






    Jl



    ^



    kAAAAAAAAAA



    Name DoROTMV M. BlRKELAND.

    y ickname Dot '
    Birthplace Brooklyn. New York.
    Date Entered Canal Zone SchooLt 1920.
    Faforite Expression You telling me!

    ./c/A'/V/Vj- Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 3, 4: Cap-
    tain 4: Baseball 1, 2: G. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President
    1, Secretary 2; Spanish Club 2. 3. 4: Dramatic Club
    4; "One Thing After Another" 4; Class Treasurer 3;
    Class Secretary 4; A. D. T. Club 4: National Thes-
    pians 4, Secretary 4; Varsity Club 3. 4: Caribbean
    Staff, Girls' Sports 4.



    Same Mildred L. Owen.

    A ickname "iMilly."

    Birthplace Kansas City, Missouri.

    Dale Entered Canal Zone Schools 1930.

    luworite Expression How about some dues?

    .Jcln'ilies Spanish Club 2,3, 4, Treasurer 4; Dramatic

    Club 4: National Thespians 4; Supper Club 3, 4;

    Treasurer 4; Liga Panamericana 4; Basketball 2, 3,

    4; Baseball 2, 3; "One Thing After Another" 4; A.

    A. 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 3, 4: Class Treasurer 4;

    Caribbean Staff 4; Staff; C.H. S. 4.






    .Vij/Ht' Freuerick Harvey Smith )r.
    .VuXr/irt/Hc" Emma."
    Birthplace Hartford, Connecticut.
    Dale Entered Canal Zone Schools 1927.
    Fai'orite Expression Me and Molly.

    Jclifilies Swimming 2, .1, 4: Track 4; Class Alternate .1
    4.



    c



    Vl



    fc%*>fc-i



    kAAAAAAAAi



    Name Helen C. Aanstoos

    Nickname "Stoosie."

    Dale Entered Canal Zone Schools 1921

    Faforite Expression Aw, nuts!

    .Jclifilies Supper Club 5, 4, Vice-President 4: Dramatic
    Club 3, 4; President 4; National Thespians ,3. 4,
    President 4; A. A. 5, 4; Glee Club 3, 4; Varsity Club
    3, 4; Spanish Club 4; Volleyball 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4;
    Baseball 5; "When's Your Birthday" 3: "One Thing
    After Another" 4; Caribbean Staff. School Notes
    Editor 4.



    %



    A'amf Harold A. Agnew, (r.
    Xtckna/ne "H. A."
    Birthplace New Orleans, Louisiana.
    Date Entered Canal Zone Schools 1929.
    Eatvrite Expression Hot-cha
    ./.. Baseball 3, 4: B. A. A. 2, 3;



    lAAiiAAAAA^



    Name Thel.ma Louis .iVlbritton
    Nickname "Tillie."
    Birthplace Panama.
    Date Entered Canal Zone Schools 1928
    Eai'orite Expression A jo!

    ,/(:7/f///t'j---Supper Club 1, 2, .3; Spanish Club 4; Dramatic
    Club 3, 4: Swimming 3.



    LAAAAAAAAA



    .Vij/Hf W'kiistkh a. Mkard.
    XickimnK: Web. '
    /ii'r//i/>l,icf Ciisl()l)al. Canal Zone.
    J>.i/,- F.nUn:! Caiutl y.oix .SV,><>/.<- 1 92 1
    Iiuviile F,xpre-'.tion "Olil stufl."
    ./,//.///,.. Orchestra 1, 2. 4.



    Name Howard Berry.

    Niikna me Berrv

    liirllipltice Long Beach, Calilornia.

    Dale Entered Canal Zone .SV/kx-/.. 1952

    Favorite Expression Aw, Gee!

    ./i//i7'//V.r Tennis 4.



    A',1 me J A N K B H KTC 1 1
    Xtckname Jane.

    lUrlhpUice Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
    /'.;/( Entered Canal Zone Scliool.' 1924
    Eaivrite Expression What a lite!

    ./c/<;77/V.i Carnival; Basketball 2; Baseball 2; Golf 2:
    Neptune Club 1.



    \ame Edward Ci.ifton Brown.
    .\ /cA/Kiwic "Clit

    Birthplace Los Angeles. California.
    Dale entered Canal Zone Schools 1924.
    Eaforile Expressions Gorblumv.

    Jcti.'ities Camera 1, 4; Spanish Club 4: Band 2, 4: Glee
    Club .1, 4; Orchestra 2, 5, 4; Track 4.



    AAAAAaAAAA



    XiiniL- Robert William Brow'n.

    Xicfcname "Bob."

    Birlliplace Honolulu, Hawaii.

    Date Entered Canal Zone Schools 1924.

    Fatvrite Expression Pow.

    Actwlties Glee Club 3, 4; Orchestra ", 4; Camera Club
    4: Band 4.




    Name Jesse David.

    Nickname Jay."

    Birthplace Cayev, Porto Rico.

    Dale Entered Canal Zone Schools 1921.

    Fnmrile Expressions Alas, poor Yorick! Tish, tish!



    Name Velta C. Foley.

    Nickname "Pineapple Sadie."

    Birthplace Panama City.

    Date Entered Canal Zone Schools 1923.

    Fai'orite Expression Ooooh! Mama!

    Actn'ilies Spanish Club 3, 4; Supper Club 1. 2, 3, 4;

    A. A. 1; Carnival 2; Dramatic Club 2, 4, Secretar3'

    4; "When's Your Birthdav?" 3.



    WAAAAAAAAAA



    Name Mary Elsie Gruber

    Nickname "Molly"

    liirlhplace West Point, New York.

    Date Entered Canal Zone Schools 1932

    I'ai'onte Expression Brother, can you spare a dime?



    X-



    10



    Willi:- Parki:r Hanna.

    Xicknnme "Spike."

    litrlliplace H;incock Point, Maine.

    IKilf Entered Canal Zone Scliool.t 1920.

    laforile Expression Nertz!



    \anie RoBRRT Hanna.

    Xickname ' Bob '

    litrthptace Hansel t, Maine.

    Dale Entered Canal Zone A/loo/.r 1921.

    Favorite Expression Cucca.

    //ctifities Swimming 4; Orchestra 4: Band 4: Cilce CUili



    Xame Hklicn Marik Ha.m.monu

    .\ it'kname "Teatse"

    Birthplace Cristobal, Canal Zone.

    Date Entered Canal Zone A/ioo/.r 1921

    Earorile Expression I don't care.

    ^ictifilies Spanish Club 2, 5, 4, Secretary 4: Class Secre-
    tary 3; Orchestra 3, 4; G. A, A. 1, 2; Liga Panameri-
    cana 4; Supper Club 1. Caribbean Stall, Literarv
    Editor 4.



    Xante CiiARi.KS Stanley Howe.
    Xickname "Charlie."
    liirtliplace Marblehead, Massachusetts.
    Date Entered Canal Zone Schools 1924.
    Eai'orite Expression How v;i mean!

    ./ctifilies Spanish Club 2, 3, 4; Deliating Club 3; Glee
    Club 3.



    11



    Xante William H. Keknan, Jr.

    Xic^nanic; "Peanuts."

    Btrthpliice Ancon, Canal Zone.

    DaU Entered Canal Zone School.t 1922.

    Fawrile Expression I had one too, but the cat licked all

    the paint ott.
    ./(//I'iV/fj' Glee Club 1; Spanish Club 2, 3,4, Ayudador

    3, 4; Liga Panamericana 4; Caribbean Staff, Ass't.

    Circulation Manager 3, Joke Kditor 4.



    Name Hermanus A. Kleefkens.
    Nickname "Louie."
    Dale Entered Canal Zone Schools 1920.
    Eai'orile Expression Hot-cha!



    '-9^^]






    Name John Lothrop.
    Nickname "Johnny."
    Birthplnce San Francisco, California.
    Dale Entered Canal Zone Schools 1932.
    Eai'ortle Expression "Is my face red?"
    .-tclirilies Track 4; Glee Club 4; Dramatic Club 4;
    National Thespians 4.



    kAAAAAAAAA



    .\ame Henry I^ee.

    Nickname "Archie."

    Birthplace Boquete, Panama.

    Dale Entered Canal Zone Schools 1921.

    .hiii'ilies Swimming 3; National Thespians 4.



    AAAAAAAAAJ



    12






    kAAAAAAAAA



    .\' Xickntjme ' Lock v '
    /iir/hplticr >\ill)ur.v, Massachusetts.
    /),>U Kiilcied Canal Zone School.i 1910.
    h'ai'oriU Expression I had one but the wheels fell off.
    ./. 4; Baskettiall 7>.
    4; Soccer 5, 4; Glee Club 5; Track 4; A. D. T. Club 4.



    Xante Natm.vn M. Marcmosky.

    S'icknamc "Maga Nootch, Mancii."

    Hiiihplace New York Citv, New York.

    Dale Entered Canal Zone Schools 1921.

    Eaforile Expression Prettv clever, eh!

    ./i//,'(V/>.r Baseball 1, 2, 5. 4: Basketball 1, 2. .1, 4; Soccer

    1. 2, 5. 4; Handball 1.2; B. A. A. 1, 2, ,>, 4; Spanish
    Club 2: Carnival 1. 2; Varsity Club 2, 5, 4; Track

    2, 4: Tennis 4; A. D. T. Club 4; Sports Editor, Carib-
    bean 4.



    Xame Mary D. Mei-endez.

    Xickname ".^\el. 11."

    BirthplaccCoXon. R. de P.

    Dale Enlered Canal Zone Schools \9\9

    Faforile Expression Aw, vour grannv!

    .Ic/irilies Supper Club 2, 4; Spanisli Club 2.

    responding Secretary 3; Vice President 4;

    Club 4; Liga Panamericana 4.



    ^. 4. Cor-
    Dramatic



    Xamr Christian J. Oiilschlager.

    Xictcnnnie "Chris."

    I'irlhplarr Kno.wille. Tennessee.

    EtjK'orile Expression You're telling mc. Oh, yeah!

    Dale Enlered Canal Zone Schools 1952.



    13



    .V,7(f Jack Fulton Paterson.
    Xi'c^nuftje "Pat.

    Birlhptace Arlington, Massachusetts.
    Date Entered Canal Zone SclwoL<\91A.
    Faforite Expression Darn it. Aw. shoot!
    .Ictifities Tennis 4; Basketball 4.



    WAAAAAAAAA



    .Xante Chari.es Redward Pescod.
    Xiciname "Charlie."

    Birthplace Ecuador.

    Dale Entered Canal Zone Schools 1921.

    ./(//.///W Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 5, 4; Basketball

    1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4; Golf 1. 2; Handball 1, 2;

    Volleyball 1; Track 2. 4; B. A. A. 1, 2, 3. 4; Varsity

    Club 3, 4; President 4; Dramatic Club 4; A. D. T.

    Club 4.



    Name NoREEN E. Rakovsky.

    Nickname "Shorty."

    Birthplace Presburg, Hungary.

    Date Entered Canal Zone Schools 1923.

    Favorite Expression Oh, Oscar!

    Activities Supper Club 1, 2, 3; Treasurer 3; G. A. A. 1,

    2; Glee Club 1; "Gypsy Rover" 1; Spanish Club 2,

    3, 4; Dramatic Club 3.



    ;V
    Nickname "Tommy."

    Birthplace Ancon, Canal Zone.

    Date Entered Canal Zone Schools 1921.

    Eat'orile Expression Forget it.

    Jcliiuties Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Handball 1, 2; Volleyball 1;

    Baseball 3, 4; Tennis 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4; Track 4;

    B. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, President A. A. 4; Vaislty Club

    3, 4; Secretary 4; A. D. T. Club 4.



    14



    AAAAAAAAAi



    LAAAAAAAAA^



    .Willie Ernkst M. REiNrioM).

    .Xirkname "Van."

    liiiihptiice Aiuon, Canal Zone.

    Pate EnkreJ Canal /one .SV/ioo/.r lOl'l

    Fai'orile Expression Oh, Oscar!

    .titifilies Tennis 4.



    -W^



    Xante El.IZAIiKTH TlIORNTON.

    Biiihplace Ancon, Canal Zone.

    Dale Entered Canal Zone Scliools^\922.

    Eaxvrite Expression Mavbc!

    ./ 5, 4; Dramatic Club 7t. 4; National Thespians 3, 4
    Liga Panamericana 4, Secretary 4; Supper Club 1
    2, 4: Caribbean Staff 4; Associate Editor C. H. S. 4
    Letter Club ]. 2. Volleyball Baseball 1.



    AAAAAAAAAAi



    '-r



    .V(7/H Xtckname "Art."
    Birthplace Portland, i^laine.
    Hate F.nlered Canal Zone Schools-
    Eai-orile Expression Nope!



    1930.



    LAAAAAAAAAJ



    V



    .V<)/(/c May Wkcner.

    \irknanie "Minnie."

    Hirlliplait Hartlesville, Oklahoma.

    Pate Entered Canal Zone Schools 1951.

    l\i<'orile Expression Oh, for crving out loud!



    AAAAAAAAAAi



    15



    XiiDif James R. Wergin.

    .Xirktitiffii' J imm V '

    Birthplace Mobile. Alabama.

    Dale Entered Canal Zone School.r 19.31.

    Facorile Expression Swell

    Jilii'itie.t Debating Club 3: Spanish Club .3, 4; Dramatic

    Club 4: National Thespians 4; "One Thing After

    Another" 4.




    Xame Edna Lenore Thiri.wali..
    Xickname "Eddie."
    Birthplace Panama City.
    Date Entered Canal Zone Schools 1919.
    Fai'orite Expression You Brute! Hot-cha!
    .Jclii'ities Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Spanish
    Club 3, 4; Dramatic Club 3, 4.



    COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES

    The program at commencement was rather novel this 3'ear. In addition to
    being held in the new high school, the type was a decided change from the tradi-
    tional past. The usual outside-speaker plan was supplanted by student speakers
    who were chosen upon the following basis: (1) rank in graduating class; (2)
    number of years in Cristobal High Schocl; (3) choice by appropriate major
    subjects; (4) appro.ximately equal representation of sexes; (5) stage presence,
    voice, etc.

    The purpose of the change in program was tc give a student progra.Tn and to
    give a type cf program which would give the parents and patrons a review of the
    work accomplished in the high school. Helen Hammond, as Salulatorian, gave
    the introductory address. She was followed by Howard Berry who talked on
    "Social Studies Routine." Talks on commercial work, science and mathematics
    classes, learning languages and English were naade by Mildred Owen, James
    Wergin, Oscar Heilbron, and Dorothy Birkeland. Ernest de la Ossa, Valedictorian,
    gave the closing address which was followed by presentation of awards and diplomas.

    Seven Secret Seniors




    16



    eh



    (ElaHs Hiflturii

    I'.lizabdli Tliornlon '33



    =!



    The labors of the class of '3,3 arc ahoiil
    to draw (o a close.

    Four years of work, ol anxicl.v, anil ol
    anticipation have stolen t|iiictl,v awav
    into the long vista of the past, leaving
    us to tlweli thoughtfull.v on the ex[ierience
    of those l)v-gonc davs'with teeluigs akui
    to sadness.

    Pleasure and pain, hope and tiespair,
    great expectations, and great disaiipoint-
    ments, have followed each other in rapid
    succession through the high school ex-
    perience of many, perhaps most, ot us.
    Yet this is no new thing. It has been ever
    thus since the wheels of progress began
    to turn, and will be thus till the last
    human crv is lost in the wreck of worlds.

    As a class we are not remarkable for
    anv one thing, but for a great many
    things.

    Tc a casual reader and one unfamiliar
    with our school, the class history will
    mean but little; but to the members of
    our graduating class it should mean more,
    and a historian may feel his work well
    done, if at some future period he may
    glance at these pages and recall with joy
    or w istfulness, as the case may be, some
    fcrgotten incident that causes the heart
    to s\\ell and a sigh for old high school
    days expresses itself.

    As we turn to the time of our entrance
    to C. H. S., we behold a modest group
    ol girls and boys eager to begin their high
    school days. There was nothing striking
    nor characteristic in their appearance tc
    distinguish them from other girls and
    boys; on the contrary they were for the
    most part awkward, gawky children who
    had suddenly found themselves called
    upon to take the part of sedate young
    ladies and gentlemen. However, it is well
    worth one's time to follow this group
    through its high school career.

    A few days after enrollment, we find this
    body of students tor the most part hard
    at work; but of course there were among
    us a few who for some reason yet unknown,
    thought then^selves to be privileged cha-
    racters and so we occasionally found an
    eraser zooming across our vision and often



    felt the sting of a wad of paper as it lell
    its nesting place in a rubber band.

    Then came athletics, and the boys ti-
    midly \enlureil out on the lield picturing
    themselves as the ci.ming stars of the game
    The girls were not to be outdone. They
    took up their places in volley-ball and
    other sports, arid looking back to those
    days, many a laugh we must have afforded
    the upperclassmen in (!ur awkward ellorts
    to do seme outstanding teat in the Held of
    athletics.

    The days seemed to be riiiming a race,
    for time and holidays sped by before we
    realized that they had even come, and so it
    wassoon time for our dance, and the Jun-
    ior-Senior Banquet which hekl no interest
    what-so-ever lor us at that time.

    Then the high school w hich a few weeks
    before had been filled w ith happy laughing
    boisterous girls and btys was a deserted
    building and another class had gone forth
    to seek positions in the world.

    The next year, or rather our So])homore
    year, passed in much the same wa^'. We
    lost our sh3mess to some extent and were
    little more polished than before. From
    this time on we took a prominent part in
    everything (hat was of interest to the
    sch(il.

    Finally the third year arrived, and nc w
    we were Juniors. We made our debut, so
    (o speak, in school affairs and gradually
    asserted ourselves among the okler iiigh
    school astudents.

    Some of the members ol the class were
    hard at work on the baseball fields; others
    having joined one ot the literary societies
    were busying themselves with debates.
    By this time all of us were taking active
    parts in school affairs. Many were at
    work making plans lor the Junior-Senior
    Banquet which was to us one of the
    swankiest events we had e\er known, and
    one which proved a big success. And so
    another year rolled by.

    Summer passed, and once more we
    entered the portals of C. H. S. intent on
    better work during this, our last session.
    Some of our fellow students had fallen and
    perished by the wayside, others had gone



    17



    away, and new and untaniiliar faces appea-
    red to replace them.

    It was during our Senior year that the
    school decided to issue a bi-weekly news-
    paper called "C. H. S. The class of '33
    was represented by many of its members

    Then along came the mid-year exams,
    and lazy weather was right there to accom-
    pany them, but we had no time for laziness
    for we had undertaken to publish an
    annual, and that meant work.

    Days, weeks, and months passed swiftly
    and the Senior dance, which had been
    looked forward to by many, was now a
    thing of the past. We were face to face
    with final exams, the last we were ever
    to take at Cristobal High School.

    Again the Junior-Senior Banquet loomed
    up and to the Juniors we owe thanks for
    a lovely banquet and dance, and an en-
    joyable time.

    As we are about to make our adieu
    and step across the threshold into a more
    strenuous life of possibilities and realities,
    we feel tha t the mantles we wore as Seniors
    w ill fall upon the shoulders of those worthy



    to take our place in C. H. S.

    New as our high school careers draw to
    an end and Commencement comes to
    claim us, it is with a mingling of joy and
    sorrow that we view the retrospect, and
    often we find ourselves dreaming of the
    past joys and pleasant associations and
    realize that nothing shall ever obliterate
    them from our memory.

    Our pathway has not been brightened
    w ith sunshine all of the way, but strewn
    with roses wherein a thorn was hurried
    here and there to prick us as we trcd upon
    them.

    We have found many obstacles along
    the way, but remembering that success
    comes only to those who endeavor, we
    have, by ever putting forth an effort,
    risen above them all.

    Class of '33, you are now setting sail
    on the great sea of life. You are no longer
    the children you were, but men and women
    Conduct yourselves as such, and may you
    reflect honor upon your school, and upon
    the teachers who have striven so hard for
    your success.



    (ElaHB HtU

    Helen Aansloos '33



    :S



    We, the Seniors of Cristobal High
    School, in the year of Our Lord, one thou-
    sand nine hundred thirty-three, being of
    sane mind and reason, and being about
    to pass from, the port of know ledge to the
    sea of life beyond declare this our last will
    and testament.

    To the Faculty, we bequeath our deep
    appreciation for the know ledge they have
    imparted to us.

    To the Juniors, we leave the dignified
    position, title and privilege of Senicrs.

    Individually v\e make the following
    bequests :

    THELMA ALBRITTON wills her
    shyness to Louie Barnett and David Levy.

    MILDRED OWEN bequeaths her
    go(cl typing speed and grades to Charles
    Belden and Victoria Ilollowell.

    HAROLD AGNEW leaves his great
    desire for sea life, and his sun^mer trips,
    (w'orking on ships) to the also desirous
    Warren Slocum, Robert Wertz, and Char-
    les Gould,



    WEBSTER BEARD wills his violin,
    and ability to "make it talk" to Rose
    Mizrachi.

    CRIS OSCHLAGER bequeaths his
    blende tresses to Blossom Lam and Henry
    Sanchez.

    EDNA THIRLWALL leaves her wil-
    tiness to Sydney Wharton and Marguerite
    Winn.

    HELEN HAMMOND bequeaths her
    curls to Helen Leach.

    DOROTHY BIRKELAND wills her
    slender figure and her secrets for acqui-
    ring it to Ruth Egolf and Ruth Pickett.

    HELEN AANSTOOS bequeaths her
    dramatic ability to Anne Gibson.

    HENRY LEE leaves his ability to
    bluff in English 12 to Robert Molten and
    may he enjoy this class as well as Henry
    does.

    CHARLES PESCOD wills his athle-
    tic, also, dancing ability to Eileen Dona-
    van and Jeanne Lewis; to Freddy Ebdon
    he leaves his high athletic standing.



    18



    MANI)lMARCII()SKYI,i.(iiKMtlislils
    al)ililv lo use his haiuls while talking lo
    Margiicrilc Winn.

    WILLIAM KEKNAN leaves liis (horse)
    laugh to Betl.v Stetler, Here's ho.iing il
    will go with her "imisical nose."

    IIARVKY SMITH wills his love f
    swinin ipg anil diving lo Ar nantio Fiines.

    VELTA FOLEY hcqeealhs her l.ve ol
    lirtimr to jerrv Gorin.

    ROBERT HANNA leaves his one ami
    only heart to Beverley Marcuse.

    ELIZABETH THORNTON wills her
    eyc-liro .\ pencil to Sis I laves.

    ERNEST REINHOLI) l.eq.Tealhs the
    iokler ol'his diplo na to his hrother. Rich-
    ard. \vilh hojX'S that it will preser\e his
    diplo-ivi well.

    OSCAR HEILBRON leaves his Set^or
    class (>lfice and Carihhean work ti; I'-llen
    Grcenleaf and Ernest \\'ood.

    >\ARY MELENDEZ wills her iol. as
    school news reporter to Mayno Bliss.

    WILLIAM KEENAN heque; ths his
    "sax" appeal to \'iclel Rantlall.

    MAY WEGNER leaves her "I. lushing"
    to Jose Bazan.

    MARTHA POTTS wills her slo.v ro-
    tic'i to .^laxine Hofl'Tian enahlini; Maxine
    to talk longer in the halls between classes.

    JANE BRETCH heciueaths her ncss in working English hurdles to Ethel
    lluntoon and Chester Wirtz.

    ARTHUR VANE leaves his ahility to
    be seen and rot heard lo Grant Lemmon
    and Blanche Belden.

    CHARLES HOWE wills his love of
    reading lo Stella Boggs.

    I lAROLD LOCKWOOD bequeaths lis
    love to tease Ic Gloria i^larrix and L?ura
    Ncal. for there surely is enough lo go
    aroiird.

    TOM.NIY R \NI\IN leaves his of ice ns
    president c.f the Athletic Association to



    Ray Wheeler. Here's hoping ihcx'll run
    a few specials in ',14.

    NOREEN RAK( )VSKY wills her small
    phvsii|ue to George Tarlliiiger. Think he
    neeils it.'

    LOUIE KLEEEKENS beiueaths his
    disagreeing nature tiuring class reelings
    lo Betty Stetler and Aleiandro Wong.

    lOh'N LOTHROP leaves his "butler"
    act lo Colin Canij)bell.

    MOLLY GRL'!5ER wills her st-ielv
    apjK'arance to Alice Wood.

    CLIFTON BROWN beque-ths his
    seriousness (around school) lo \'irginia
    I lanna.

    ERNEST I)E LA ()SS\ Lives his
    willipgners lo William St(Mie.

    LACK PATERSON wills his tnlkative-
    ness lo Edison Wirlz and John Maiinix.

    JESSE DAVID be lueaths his funny
    (??) jokes to Evelyn Johnson and Ray
    Bejarano.

    GENEVIEX'E B.\RRY leaves her
    "wind blown" to Edna Mueller.

    EDWIN HANNA wills his preference
    for blondes lo Clautle Berger.

    J.X.NIES WERGIN be lueaths his abili-
    ty tc make 100 in the Algel)ra tests to
    Frank Washabaugh.

    ROBERT BROWN leaves his social
    standing to Norma Davis.

    PARKER HANNA wills his slick hair
    comb to Carlton Horine ami Charlie
    South.

    DORIS BATES bequeaths her height
    lo Jane Hill.

    We, the Senior Class, do solemnly
    swear that this is our last will and testa-
    ment.

    Signed,

    SENIOR CL.\SS OF '55
    WITNESSES:
    I. W.\NT\ Bi;i:u
    \\'i:(;oT R. Wines



    CO.\LTyG STATION







    '^iiSSSi.:






    19



    oil as a Prnpl|fru

    Helen AanAoos ">> and .llildred Owen JJ



    =3



    The office of Carl Laemelle, the movie
    producer, was closed after a busy day,
    and Mildred Owen his private secretary,
    was caught in the maze of traffic on her
    way home. That afternoon Universal
    Pictures had signed a contract with the
    cinema's most famous star, John Loth-
    rop, whom Milly was very much sur-
    prised to encounter. She still had her
    mind on this unexpected surprise and
    her thoughts were so occupied with her
    old senior class days, that she was on the
    track of the "Golden State Limited"
    before she knew it, and the train crashed
    into the rear of her car. She was taken tc
    the John Hopkins Hospital unconscious.

    The day before she was to leave the
    hospital, a nurse from Ward A, came to
    her room. Starting conversation, the
    nurse said, "I've lieen told that you are
    a graduate of Cristobal High School on
    the Canal Zone."

    "Yes," responded Milly, glad of the
    opportunity to reminisce. "It was a
    grand class, too. I often wonder what's
    become of some, of my old classmates."

    "I'm going tc surprise you," said the
    nurse. "Remember Martha Potts? Here
    I am."

    "Why, Martha, I'd never have known
    you!

    "I guess not," said Martha. "You see
    after graduating I took a course in nurs-
    ing, and now I'm working here with
    Arthur Vane."

    "What's he doing here?"

    "Why, he's the head surgeon. Haven't
    you heard about the wonderful invention
    of his, the "Limping Devil," a Spanish
    author once named it? By a scientific
    process, which he alone knows, it will
    reveal certain mysteries you would like
    solved. Of course, this doesn't mean
    detective mysteries."

    "Tell me, Martha, could this er-er-er
    "Limping Devil" tell me where to find a
    person?"

    "Nearly alwaA's, yes. Whom do you
    want to find?"

    "My oUI pal, Stoosie."



    Another old acquaintanceship was re-
    newed between Milly and Arthur Vane.
    The following morning they went to the
    laboratory to see the "Limping Devil."
    Upon being asked the whereabouts of
    Helen Aanstoos it promptly replied,
    "Why, she's probably in her office on
    Wilshire Boulevard."

    "Office!" exclaimed Milly.

    "Don't you know she owns the famous
    Madame Helena Beauty Salons?"

    "And to think I've been going to one
    of them for the past two years!"



    "By means of a wonderful scientific
    discovery cf Arthur V^ane's, we can view
    our old classmates in their present sur-
    roundings regardless of where they are.
    It was through this invention that I
    found you. We are to be ready at two
    this afternoon, and in twenty-four hours
    the "Limping Devil will have shown us
    a glimpse of all our classmates of '33."
    "What do you mean, Milly?"
    "The "Limping Devil" has the power
    to go to any far corner of the globe, and
    also to see into the most private moments
    of anyone's life. Do you remem ber the
    magic carpet in Douglas Fairbanks'
    picture "The Thief of Bagdad?" Well,
    we, too, are going on a "magic" carpet."



    On the carpet gliding over San Diego,
    the three, (Milly, Stoosie, and the
    "Limping Devil"), found Howard Berry,
    the commander of the Naval Base.

    On passing through Kansas City, they
    discovered that May Wegner was the
    matron of an orphanage. She was very
    much loved by all the children.

    In Chicago, Ernest Reinhold was fol-
    lowing the footsteps of the once notori-
    ously famous Al Capone, but they found
    him more clever than Capone for the law
    had not as yet been able to get him within
    its grasp.

    If Ernest should be caught they were
    assured that no sentence would be im-
    posed upon him for he had Thomas Ran-
    kin, the prominent criminal lawyer,
    backing him.



    20



    llicv en\ictl llic peace and iiuiel llial
    'I'lielma Alhritton enjoyed so niucli on
    her plantation in North Carolina. The
    girls promisetl thenselves to holt! a class
    reunion in the near luture on Thelna's
    plant.ition.

    They never thought they ut)ukl iind
    Henry I-ee as Panama's .^linister to the
    United States, but so it was, for Henrv
    was on the Governing Board oi Latin
    American Countries, which was having
    a conference in the Panamerican BuiUhng
    in Washington, D. C.

    They next viewed with interest an
    exciting haseball game in the Yankee
    Stadium, where the Army was playing
    the Athletics. They were very much
    surprised to see the famous combination
    with Charlie Pescod, as pitcher, and
    Mantli A\archoskv, as catcher, which had
    begun during their high school days.
    One of the Army's most ardent rooters
    was Colonel James W'ergin, who was
    stationed at Governor's Island. With
    him was his wife, the former A\iss lane
    Bretch. (The two girls wondered it this
    romance had binkled in '53).

    In Woolworth's Five and Ten they
    found Noreen Rakovsky, who was "tick-
    ling the i\ories" to the tunes of the
    latest song hits. Beside her ability to
    play so well, her attractiveness was the
    reason for her high sales average. Fre-
    quently she was contracted to play over
    the radio.

    \'isiting one of New York's most
    notorious night clubs, Molly was found
    to be a congenial hostess, with the witty
    lesse David as master of ceremonies.
    This club was popular for its potent
    cocktails which were mi.xed by Chris
    Ohlschlager. The club was filled uith
    many of the "Four Hundred" who were
    dancing to the harmonious music of the
    orchestra in which Robert Hanna, Will-
    iam Keenan, and Webster Beard formed
    an important portion.

    Leaving the gay tunes of the night
    club, they went to the other extreme
    and saw Genevieve Barry, who was in
    St. Mary's Convent in New Haven,
    Connecticut. She had been wearing the
    veil for five years.

    Genevieve was not the only classmate
    who had gone in tor religion, for in
    Massachusetts, Charlie Howe was the



    Ciiid Reader of (he Firs! Church of
    Chiist Scientist of Boston.

    On returning to New York, they saunt-
    ered into the Empire St-'le Building, and
    loinid there one of the most la'iious
    ionrnahsts of (he time, Ernest ile la Ossa.
    I le was editor of "Fortune."

    Sailing past the Statue of Liberty was
    the world's largest liner, which was de-
    signed and constructed under the super-
    vision of the Brown Brothers, Clilton
    iiri] Robert. The captain of this liner
    was Han^ld Agnew, and on the passenger
    list was the name, EiKvin Hanna, Senator
    from N'irginia, who was going abroad
    after a l(mg session of Congress in which
    he had played a very prominent part.

    Crossing the ocean to England where
    the Olympics were being held, they found
    that Harvey Sriith, representing the
    United States, had broken all world
    records by his fast crawl stroke.

    From here they went to Paris, and the
    headlines of a newspaper told the success-
    ful tale of iMiss Doris Bates who had just
    been awarded the great art prize for her
    masterpiece. Doris had devoted her time
    to drawing and painting, and apparently
    she had been successful.

    .\lso in Paris was \'elta Foley, who was
    a fashion designer. \'elta often visited
    Paris to gather new ideas to combine
    with her own clever ones. She was
    classed highly w ith Max Ree and other
    outstanding motion-picture fashion de-
    signers.

    While still tra.veling with the "Limping
    Devil," an airplane whizzed by. The
    aviator appeared to be a girl and a girl
    it was, as it was none other than Dorothy
    Birkeland, who was then known as "Fly-
    ing ,Ace Dot." She was piloting an air-
    pla.ne on the route from New York to
    Norway.

    Dorothy wasn't the only classmate who
    hatl "taken the air," for it was le.Trned
    that Oscar Heilbrrn was at (he head of
    the trans-.^tlantic fleet cf passenger
    planes. Oscar's planes always had a filled
    passenger list. The only thing he didn't
    like was the lack of time for solo flying.

    On passing c\er the Netherlands, they
    noted with interest that Louie Kleetkens
    was the president of the Kleefkens Dyke
    Building Company.



    21



    "Not a cough in a carload," was Jack
    Paterson's advertising slogan when try-
    ing to sell "Old Golds" to the leaders of
    the Russian government.

    In Tokyo, Elizabeth Thornton was the
    wife of the American consul. Her three
    daughters were well known in Japan for
    their beautiful blonde hair.

    While floating over the large banana
    plantations in Costa Rica, they were
    prcud to find that one of the largest of
    these plantations was being managed by
    Harold Lockwood, Jr., the manager of
    the United Fruit Company plantations
    there.

    On stopping for a while in Panama Ci-
    ty, they were pleased to fmd that Parker
    Hanna was the editor and owner of the
    newspaper which "always told the truth,"
    regardless of the cost. On his staff was
    Panama's Walter Winchell, Mary Melen-
    dez, whose column was read with daily
    interest. They also visited the Junior



    College, where Helen Hammond was the
    head of the English department.

    On reaching the Gold Coast, they
    noticed on the billboards the familiar
    name of Edna ThirK\all, who was making
    a persona] appearance tour on the Isth-
    mus. This was the first tour ot its kind,
    and was received with much enthusiasm.
    "Eddie" was well known for her ability
    to imitate Zazu Pitts, who had been so
    popular in '33.

    The trip wouldn't be complete if they
    hadn't visited their old class advisor,
    Mr. Meyer. So over the new Cristobal
    High School they went. iMr. Meyer was
    up to his old tricks, keeping children
    after school, for outside his door were
    four children. They looked further into
    the matter, when they saw that the
    children were not of high school age, and
    what a surprise] These children were
    waiting for their "daddy," none other
    than our "Mickv^" Meyer.



    MOONLIGHT ON THE PACIFIC




    22




    SiUiiui, L. lo R.: Grant Lemmon. Armando Funes. Daviil Levy, Siilntj W'liiii ton, Jcnj Cuiin, Ccwrgt- Taillniiit:!,
    Chester Wirtz, Robert Wert/., Louie Barnetf, Claude Berger.

    Second RiHi', L. to R.: Jose Bazan, Richard Reinhold, Robert Molten, Henry Sanchez, Raymond Beiarano, Colin
    Campbell, Fred Knox, Frank Washabaugh, Ernest Wood.

    Sl.inditti}. L. to R.: Charles Gould, Alejandro Wong, Fred Ebdon, Carlton Horine, John Mannix, Charles Belden,
    Edison Wirtz, William Stone, Ray Wheeler, Warren Slocum, Charles South.



    3 It n t n r a



    Stttini}, L. to R.: Stella Boggs, Doris Stroop, Mabelle Bliss, Jeanne Lewis, Evelyn Johnson, Marguerite Winn, Ellen
    Greenleaf, Victoria Hollowell, Beverly Marcuse, Alice Wood.

    Second RoH'. L. to R.: Betty Stetler, Violet Randall. Marguerite Seibler, Laura Neal. Edna Mueller, Ruth Pickett,
    Blossom Lam, Eileen Donovan, Ruth Egolf, Doris Bates.

    Slundimi /,. lo R.: Virginia Hanna, Rose Misrahi, Maxine Hoffman, Elizabeth Hayes, Helen Leach. Blanche Belden,
    Jane Hill, Ethel Huntoon, Anne Gibson, Gloria Mannix.




    24



    UNIOR STATISTICS



    Obikcts of Interest


    1.


    RarneK, Iconic


    ')


    Ba/.an. Idscph


    .1.


    I^cjaraiKi, K.i\-


    4.


    HelilcM. IMuwUv


    o.


    IWI.Ien, Charles


    ().


    Iieri;cr, Claiulc


    ~


    Bliss. .^la\-n<>


    S.


    Boggs. Stella


    q


    Cam|il)cll, Ccillii.


    111.


    n.i\is, Norma


    11.


    Donowtii, Kilecn


    \2.


    Doiiglicrtv. William


    l.i.


    Elulon, Kred


    14.


    Egolf, Rudi


    15.


    Fiines. .Irmantlo


    Ih.


    (liltson, .Anne


    17.


    (jorin, ferrv


    18.


    Goiilil, Charles


    19.


    Greenleal'. Kllen


    20.


    Hanna. X'irginia


    21.


    Haves, Elizabeth


    22.


    Hill. lane


    23'


    Horine. Carltcin


    24.


    Hiillman. .^\a.\ine


    25.


    Htillowell. \'iet(iria


    26.


    Hiintoon. Ethel


    27.


    lohnson. Evelvn


    28.


    Kno.N. I'Veil


    29.


    Lam Blos.som


    .10.


    Leach. Helen


    51.


    Lemmon. (rai(


    32.


    Levy. Davitl


    33.


    Lewis, leanne


    54.


    Mannix, Ghirl.i


    35.


    Atanni.\. I

    56.


    .^\arcuse. Beverley.


    37.


    .^lizrachi. Rose


    58.


    .Nlolten. Robert


    59.


    .^luellcr. Eilna


    40.


    Ncal. Laura


    41.


    PicUell. Ruth


    42.


    Ranilall. Viokl


    4."..


    Relnlu.ld. nick


    44.


    Roos. Dorothy


    45.


    Sanchez, Henry


    46.


    Seibier. Margueriie


    47.


    SloL'um, Warren


    4S.


    Sletler, Betty


    49.


    South, Char'.e>


    50


    Stro(ip, Dtiris


    51


    Stone, Willi ini


    52


    Tart'linger. George.


    53


    Washab.iiigh. Er.ink


    54


    Werlz, RoWrt


    55


    Winn, .^larguerite


    (i6


    Wh,irt(n. Svtlnev


    57


    Wheeler, R.'.y


    58


    Wooil, .Mice


    59


    Wirtz, Chester


    60


    Wirtz, Etiison


    61.


    Wong, .Mcianilrii


    6?


    Wood, Ernest


    65.


    Whidden, Louise



    Where to be Foi-n'o



    What Thkv Re.mind Us Ok



    l*'n>nt seat, lilth row-
    In that orange car
    Eighth street, some place.
    I Ionic sometimes
    r.ilknig sctme place
    Pity it's Gatun
    Enjoying hersell
    .\t your service
    With a book ...

    In exile Old Cristobal

    Typing room

    We haven't found out yet

    Gatun

    Libr.try

    Conlering with Rose

    Doing Shorthand in English

    Uut til Lunch

    Here and there

    .^\ost anywhere

    With Gerald

    Surrounded !% the "kids"

    |-\>rt Da\ is or .Art Class

    lumor 1 lome R<)om

    Wil h somebody

    .\t the wheel ol the car.

    Swimmuig pool

    I-'ort L)e Lesseps

    Room 1

    .\lwavs present

    Bridgette Club

    In the background

    On the (atun bus

    Hotel Washington

    L'n usually busy

    Wondering what it's all about..

    With Bob

    Often absent

    Some place in school

    Glee Club

    Orchestra practice..

    Taking Caribliean orders

    Day dreaming

    Class meetings

    "States"

    Sptnish Chdi .

    With lessie V

    In bad with Mii:s Kimbrn

    Play-hed

    .At a ilance

    The other place

    U. S. History class

    Two ieet above our heads

    .Aroinul and about

    Sea S^'out dock
    On the way to school
    In the study hall
    I'o'din' .-iround
    With the Gatun girls
    Working on a boat
    In .-I red "kayak"
    In his car

    Taking movie tickets
    With L. Tarfiinger



    "You Rascal ^'ou"
    "The Gay Caballero"
    "1 Apoligize" (English H)
    "Ramona"
    "Goofus"

    "Hallelujah, I'm a Bum"
    "(iirl ol Al y Dreams"
    "St. LtiiMs Blues"
    "Strange Interlude"
    "Sweet Sue"
    "jMv Silent Love"
    "Sidewalks of New York"
    "In .^ly Hideaway"
    ".A Great Bunch of A'ou"
    "Mani"

    "Sweet Rosie O'Grady"

    "I Can't Give you .Anything but Love, Baby"
    "Down on the Farm"
    "Trees"

    "That Red-headed Woman"
    "^ly E.xtraordinary Girl"
    "Lo\-eablc"

    "That Sentimental Gentleman from Georgia"
    "Little Girl"
    "Lazy Day';
    "Ain't She Sweet?"
    "Isn't It Romantic"
    "Keepin' Out of Mischief"
    ".At Peace with the WorKl"
    "Hummin' to .^lyseli"
    "Was That the Human Thing To Do"
    "The Cop on the Beat"
    "Puleeze, .^Ir. Hemmingway"
    "I'm a Dreamer, ,Aren't We .\H"
    "Then Came the Dawn"
    "How'm I Do'n, Hey-hey!"
    "Sonnv Boy"
    "The Cuban Love Song"
    ".As You Desire .^le
    "Alinnie, the Aloochcr"
    "It Was So Beautiful"
    "Aloonlight anti Rtises"
    "Fit Asa Fiddle"
    "School Days"
    "On the Shores ol Waikiki"
    "She's Funny That Wa\-"
    "L:uigh, Clown, Laugh
    "Smile, Darn Ya, Smile"
    ""(lot the South in .^1_\' Soul"
    "Please Don't Ta!k .AUiut .^le When I'm (jone"
    "Hey. Young Fella"
    "Thiit Little'Boy ot Mine"
    "Just a Gigolo"
    "Barnacle Bill, the Sailor
    ".^lightv Lak a Rose"
    'Baby Face"
    "I Love .^le"

    "Is She that Way Ixjveable and Sweet
    "Oh. .^\an of the .\\ountains"
    ""Sailing, Sailine"
    "Hawaiian Nights"
    "You Tellin' .^le!
    "I Heard" (She Came from Balboa)



    25




    'Se&!^^ijm



    Stih,:.,. L. I.> A'.. -l]erl,ur( Phillip!,, Jack Egoztuc, John ON..il, RicliarJ Molttn, JaeU L..rs. CIk.iIcs Ilcuii, BLTliam
    Asensio, John Veney, Robert Neely, Paul Gregory.

    /(V.I-/ Row:S tnntilnii, L. io R. Edgar Stein, John Palm, Burton Pierce, William Wirtz, Jack Eberenz, Edgar Borden

    Ernest Tar.Tniilln. Irl Sanders, Robert Peterson, Charles Miirphrey, Robert King, Stuart Townshend,

    Richard Prctto. David Marshall.

    Seronil Jt.iw: Shiniilng, T.. Io F. David Pretto, William Beers, Theodore .Mbrltton, Maxwell Sanders, Avellno David,

    Charles Bath, John Hammond .\ldrcd Bettien, Malcolm Duey, R,^.lph Davis, Jack Dwyer,

    William Hollowell, Lloyd Alberga.



    f>n;iltomnrpB



    S'lHin.i, A. /(/ H.: Margaret Rcinholtl, Josephine Hatch, Ruth Wikingstntl, Annie Turberville, Alary Carri.thers,
    Margaret Barnard, K.-ithleen Goodenough, Anna Rcilly, Ol^a Roe.



    Sl.uuHno. A. to



    R.: Alice MacSpnrran, Jane Huntoon, Charlotte Randall, Blossom Ensminger, Liicnie Tarflinger,
    Eileen ForJ, Leta Deakins, Yvonne Le Dew. I,illian Marden.




    26



    SOPIIOAIORK niRKCrORV



    NAAVK



    UIIKKK l-C)LM>



    lOl'.llV



    1. AlhiTi;:!. 1. 1.. V.I

    'J. Allllittoll. 'riioniloiv

    o. Asciisu>. Hci'tr-ain.

    4. Ii;irn;irtl, M.ii"y;irct

    5. Bath. Cllarli-s
    (i. Becr^. William
    7. Hi-tlcin, Alilri-il
    S. Hoi-ilon, K.lyai

    ^). Carrullifl's, Marx- Arul.

    ID Collins. Kli/.al.i-t'li

    I 1 n,i\ ill. .\vclino

    IJ. Davis. Ralph

    l.l. Dealiiiis. I.L-ta

    14. Diic.v. .N\ak(>lm

    15. Dunn. D<)n>tliy

    16. Dwver. Jolin.

    17. Klerenz. lack

    18. Egit/.ciic. lack

    19. Klliot. Bill

    20. Flnsniiniicr, Ulosstm

    21. Konl. Kilcen ..

    22. C'looilcniuiali. Kathleen j
    25. Crcyiu'v. Paul

    24. Haninionii, luhii

    25. Hatch. InscphuK*
    2(). Hcim. Cli.irics

    27. Hollowell. William

    28. Htintoon. I.me

    29. lar.iniillo. Krnest.
    .30. Kinf. Rcit

    51. I.c Dew. ^'vonnc

    52. Lonfc'. lack

    5.5. .^lacSparran. .Mice

    54. .^\arilcn. Lillian

    55. .^larsh.ill. I)a\iil

    56. .^l(.ltcn. RicharJ

    57. .^lllllanc. KluKir

    .5S. .Nlnrphicv. Charles

    .59. Neelv. Rnl.erl

    40. O'C.'.nnell. Ailvir;

    41. ONeill. lohn

    42. Palm. Ii.hn
    4.5. Paris, John

    44. Peterson. Rol.ci

    45. Phillip-. Herl.erl
    4(. Pierce. Burton
    47. Prelto. Davi.l
    4S. Pretto. Ri h aril

    49. Ranil all. Charlotte

    50. Reillv. .\nna

    51. ReinhoKI, .Margaret.

    52. Roe, ()ls: I

    .55. Rosani.i. \'incent

    .54. Rvl'kogel. .Nlarv

    55. Sanders, 'rl

    56. Santier^ .^laxwell
    .57. Stein, Eiig.ir

    .58. Tartlinger. Lucille

    59. Townsheiul. Stuart

    60. Turl>er\ille. .Annie L.

    61. Wikinustail. Ruth

    62. Wirtz. VVilliam
    65. .^liss .^Inore



    K..konul I'.uk

    Where he iloesn'l Itelon::

    .Se.i Scout Sh.uk

    I womlerll

    Pl..vvhe.l

    Ciat'un

    l*\)rt Randolph

    Baml practice

    Pl.ivsheil

    Conimissarv

    .\t home

    I'reru-h C.iiK.I

    With P.itsv R.\an

    .\sk .^\.ir\- .\nn

    .\t home

    .\sk .^laga-niitch

    .\nv place hut home

    .\l home

    Tennis court

    \\'ashingtt>n Pool

    I'ort Sherman

    .Ask Norma Da\is

    OM Cristol...l

    M home

    With "liMiloi"

    With Bert

    W.ishington Pool

    With Charlotte ami Alice.

    Cristoh.il lllirarv

    With lohn Pah'n

    l-leel Air IV.se

    T.trpon Cluli

    With Charlotte and Jane

    I'ort Sherman

    Kvervwhere

    Coco Solo

    l*\>rt tic Les'.ep..

    No place in pirticular

    Washington Pool

    De Lesseji

    Kleet .\ir B.ise

    Will, Roherl \\\v.L.

    Ki>konMl l*.irk

    Willi Dougherty

    Colon Beacli

    I'ori D.ivis

    Heaven knows'

    .*>t<^nkeyin' around

    \\ I h .\ lice .ind Line

    With Bill Bailee

    W.i hirgton Poi.l

    .\t home

    P I \\ n shi>p

    De Lesseps movie.

    li ilun

    .u iiome

    Coco Soto

    .At home

    Sea Scout shack

    Ci.itun

    .\t home

    Kishini;

    RiXtm 21



    i'alldng at the W lori^ I in'c
    Arguing with .^Ir. AU*_\-ers
    Joking
    D.'incing
    Sports
    Cieoiiietrv
    Tennis
    Sea Souts
    Painting'
    Cooking
    Keeping quiet
    Rowing
    Chewing gum
    Women!!!
    Reatling

    (letting A's (?) in Spanish
    Learninc Latest Popular Songs
    L.itin?
    Dieting
    Swimming

    .^laking Bright Remarks in Knglish Cl.ass
    Blushing
    Bicycle riding
    Reading

    L'sing Her Hands to Talk
    Loahng
    Swimming
    Writing notes
    Studving
    Baseliall

    .^linding Her Own Business
    Hunting
    Flirting

    Trying to Get Geometry
    .Arguing
    Whispering
    I'iilgctmg
    Dreaming
    Sports
    Studying
    .Swimming
    P..sel.,dl
    Fennis

    CoiT'-g to the Alovies
    Ridiig His Pike
    Pcirg Late to Class
    *.skirs questions
    Criticizing
    Putting on lipstick
    1' Imikipg
    Swimming
    .Vrguipg

    Showing His Beard
    Dres'^-makinc
    Baseball
    Teasing

    Not P.i_\'ing .\ttention in Cl.i'^'i
    I'lnger-w.'ivinc
    Sailing
    Being Quiet
    S|Hirts

    St u-stu-st uttering
    Kickine Kids Out of School




    Sdlm,/, L.lo Ji.:



    -Anlonio Riiiiiiici, I'l.n.ri. I. ....,, K^.nlcr Uowdcll, 1..:.,.,..! L,..;,.. .V^,
    Barnett, Julio Dominguez, Robert Moot, Robert Richardson.



    W illlam Hill. Paul



    Sl.indlnii, L lo R.: lames Lothrop, Robert Marsh, Edward Durham, Fred O'Rourke, Howard Will, Alpheus Baldwin
    John Szivos, James Da.vs, John Will, Robert Wirtz, James Hall-

    Bark Ktur Slandiiui, L. to R. Joseph Retall.v. Armando Gasperri, Wendell Cotton, Donald Levy, Sam Roe. Charles
    Meade, Carl Starke, Charles Hill, Tom Sullivan, Donald Townshend. Frank Szivos.



    3xta{\\n^\\



    Sitling.L.to R.: L.vdia Gravatt. Jean Hall. Virginia Sanders, Viola Tuik, Mar.v Goulct. Hope Shaeler, Lillian

    Grossman, Mar.v Griffin.

    First Raw: Standing. L. to /{..Virginia Thomas, Jeannette Hyler, Elizabeth Murray, Rachel Cuesta, Muriel Mullane,
    Margaret Hollingshead, Doroth.v Hoecker, Evelyn Dwyer, Lois Heim, Ruby Lyew, Hope Hollowell, Sophie Seaberg.

    Strand Rau.:- Stondini), L. to R.: Nora Hewitt, Frances Patclielt, Agnes Reinke, Esther Harris, Doris Ebdon, Patricia
    Ryan, Barbara Gruber, Muriel Hanna. Jane Starke, Rosemma Fishbaugh. Olga Dominguez, Ivy Vane, Doris Peterson.




    Jt.



    FRESU.MAN DIRECTORY



    Name



    Present Occupation



    1. Arli-k. Alex...

    2. Baldwin. Alpliciis
    .1. BirncU. Paul

    4. Bciaraiio. Cirat'c

    o. Birkcland, Tlicotloro

    b. Collou, Wcmlcll

    7. Cucsta, Rachel

    8. Curtis, Kclgar
    0. Days, lames

    10. Ooiniiiguez. lulio
    1 I Doniini^vic/. Oli^a
    11'. Dow.lell, Rcmicr

    13. Diu'hant. Kilwartl

    14. Dvvver, Kvelyn

    15. EluloM, Diiris

    16. Ellis. Phillip

    17. Gaspcrl. .\rmaiulci

    18. Goulct. .^larv.

    19. Gravatt. I.vdia

    20. GrIKIn. .Nl.irv

    21. Grossman, l.illi.iti

    22. Grul)cr. Barhar.i
    '23. Hall, James

    24. Hall, Jean

    25. Hanna. .^lurlel

    26. Hanna. William

    27. Harris, Esther

    28. Helm. Lois

    29. HIM. Charles

    30. Hill. \Vllll,,m

    31. Hewitt. Nora

    32. Hoccker, Dorothy

    55. Holling^hc ul, Margaret

    54. Hollowell. Hope

    55. Hyler. Jeinnette

    56. Kalandar. Cccili.t
    37. Lothrop. James

    58. Lvew. Riili\-

    59. .^larsh. Ro(.ert

    40. .Nlead. Charles

    41. .Moot, Rol.ert

    42. .^lur^ay, Ell/.al)elh
    45. Mullane, .^liiriel

    44. O'RouUe, Kred

    45. Patchctt. Erances

    46. Peterson, Dons

    47. Ramirez, .\ntonlo

    48. Reinke. .Agnes..

    49. Rctally. Joseph

    50. Richardson. Robert

    51. Roc, S imuel

    52. Sanders. Virginl i
    55. Scaberg, S.tpliie

    54. Schaeller. Hope

    55. Starke. C ul

    56. Starke, N.uicy Jane

    57. Stone, Stanl'onl

    58. Sullivan. Thomas

    59. Szivos, Er uik

    60. Szivos, John

    61. Thomas, Viriiini i

    62. Townshend, Don.dd
    65. Tuck. Viola

    64. Vane. I^'V

    65. Will. How.ird.

    66. Will. John

    67. WIrtz, Robert



    FijTURE Occupation



    None
    Ad\-isor
    Nol>od_\' knows

    Gettmg sick

    LouTiging

    (letting in trouble

    Hurrying

    Thmking

    .\llblng

    Slud_\ ing

    Talknig

    Day dreaniei-

    Teasing

    .^looning

    .Acting

    St-stuttering

    Reading

    Looking pretty.
    Bchaving hcrsell
    Giggling
    Going High-hat
    Studying
    Bemg (piiet
    Grownig up
    I'lirting
    Benig sick
    Studying
    Quarreling
    Playing Pool

    Stiulying --

    E.iling
    Being good
    Reading
    Baseball directing

    Student

    Looking pretty

    Star-gazing

    Studying

    .\rguing

    Slccpinc

    T.dking

    .Arguing

    Kce|>ing out of the sun

    Nothing ,.

    .^lakmg eyes

    Leanung

    Doing what he shouldn't

    .Anything that comes U])

    Sitting

    Being important

    Talking too much

    lust anythnig

    Washing dishes

    Day-tlreaming

    Woman killing

    B.-iwIing-out big brother.

    Dr.'iwing

    Ha\ Ing a good time
    Baseball

    Eighting

    Trying to grow up....

    Learning

    X'amping the professors

    Dreaming

    Keeping to himself

    Bothering ..

    Helping around here and there



    Hobo

    Newspaper Editor

    Big Shot

    Nurse

    Unemployed

    AAech.inic

    School Teacher

    Poet

    Radio Announcer

    Professor

    Lecturer

    h'ishing

    Circus Clown

    Crystal-gazer

    .^lovie Actress

    Clowning

    h'armer

    Beauty Parlor

    Opera Singer

    Butterfly

    Stenogr.'ipher

    Perfect Lady

    Radio Crooner

    Growing Down

    Housekeeping

    Getting Well

    School Teacher

    Heart Breaker

    Doctor

    Prolessor

    .^latron

    Earmer's Wife

    Musician

    Inmate ol an .\sylym

    .^lusician

    .^lan Slayer

    Woman Killer

    Private Secretary

    Congressman

    Tree Sitting

    News Reporter

    Explaining

    Looking Nice

    Good-for-nothing

    V.imping

    Housewiie

    Doing What HeShouh

    Sail
    Standing

    Nothing .^luch

    Chasing h'ems.

    .^lanicnrist

    Housekeeping

    Eortunc Telling

    Caveman

    Nursemaiil

    Sign J'alntcr

    W orkliig

    Eootball

    Jail-warden

    Still Trying

    Prcsiilent

    Ellrting

    Keeping House

    I'ireman

    Bootlegger

    King of Spain




    30



    IP^^^





    IC i t r r a r It



    BKSI SllORl' STORY
    "Till-: TO.VI-BOY"



    F'rom the li.iic site wjvs oli! cpinigli to
    climli Icnccs, Joscpliinc Bi'.nous \\;is
    known iill i'lung Aleadows Creek as "that
    Barrows tcni-hov. Slie got into more
    deviltry tlian all the other Barrows chil-
    dren, put tcgether, and trailed her lather
    all over the ranch niiniicking his striile,
    his voice, and his gestures.

    "Best farmer of the hunch!" he was
    wont to s;-y of" her. When the other girls
    began to giggle over their beaus, Jo
    would aKvays say: "Dcn't see any sense
    of being cra.zy over biiys. What's so
    wonderful about 'em? They can't dc
    anything I c;m't!'

    I here was only oiie biy whoiii b'
    wouUl even alk)w to go coasting with
    her. and that was Dave Craddick. a
    neigiibor boy who iucd just tlown the
    road, anil it seemed thai he was forever
    at the Barrows.

    Lou AniK- and Sue were older than Jo,
    but it was Jo who took charge of things
    around the house. She could cook for the
    family wiien she was ten. and yet folks
    si'iil: "Fred Barrows did bring up them
    six n't therless children ;'pd had 'em ;!
    turn out good, 'cept Jo. She's a wild
    one."

    They ditln't know that Fred B;m-i( ws
    depeniled more upon Jo than ail the
    rest. lie didn't knew it himself, but
    Jo hail sensed his dependency when
    she was but a chilil clindiing her llrst
    tree, and lived up to it. She fully believed
    that she was not as pretty as Lou .\nne
    and Si'e, in fact, she wasn't pretty at all
    to most people, but she iliil believe that
    her father turned to her as he had turned
    to her mother, in the ilays when there
    had been a mother and she got a greater
    thrill out of that than the other girls did
    out of all their little pleasures.

    One by one the boys and Sue married
    and left Meadows Creek.



    "You're the only 'boy' I've got left,"
    Hied Barrows said to Jo. "Guess I'll have
    to send you to Ag' school so you'll be
    able to help me run the farm." Jo's
    heart had leaped at that, but when she
    had finished high school there was a bad
    year for the crops. Lou.Annehad finished
    the same year and had planned to go to
    college. Dave was going there too! Jo
    hail never realized hou very, vary much
    she had been counting on it ui'til now.

    It was soon time for Lmi .\nr>e :>im\
    Da\e to leave. (o hail been thinking
    about her own little iileasures. ol' the
    sports at school; her work at home.turi'-
    itig up the sod. seeing the different things
    coming up all the time, the smell of the
    earth, hearing the purr of the plow and
    the little grunts iA' the horses it, she
    thought, had been fun. And then, too,
    were those hikes with Dave! She could
    see him now, lean, darkly tanned, gay
    eyed and cu rly ha ireil Her eyes sma rled
    but she didn't cry. That's what they said
    about her: "Jo never cries."

    "It'll run Hito moi'ey for us if I go,"
    she spid to herself. This long day li:ially
    came to an end and Jo had fought it out
    and Lou Anne ne\er knew there was a
    fight.

    The day that Lou .Vnne left, Fred
    Barrows said: ".^lavbe, ne.xt year we
    can make it for the two of you."

    Along in Nove;nber, Jo was asked to
    take the I^istrict school for the rest of
    the year. When asked, however. Jo only
    laughed and said: "I wasn't cut out for
    school teaching." I^ut that night she
    noticed for the first tiive how tired and
    v orn her father was l)eginning to look
    when he said: "I thought Lou Anne had
    plenty of clothes to start with. What's
    this new dress she's wanting? I've bor-
    rowed on the aj)ples already don't
    know where I'm going to rake up any



    31



    more money!

    And so Jo took the position as teacher
    of No. 6, which was near by, and Lou
    Anne had her new dress and joined a
    sorority. Jo hated teaching. Night after
    night she came home sick, tired with the
    effort of carrying on the school work
    properly, of keeping house, getting the
    meals, tending to the various little needs
    around the house, and taking the milk
    to the station.

    Around Christmas, she dressed a hun-
    dred chickens and sent them to the city.
    She made great plans for Christmas.
    Lou Anne and Dave would be home and
    the married children were coming too.
    She planned a party for Lou Anne Lou
    Anne loved parties. She had a new dress,
    rose crepe de chine, for Lou Anne s
    present.

    However, the night before Lou Anne
    was to come home she called to say that
    she was going to a house party with some
    friends and thus, would not be home.
    Jo's own disappointment merged into
    pity for her father when she remembered
    the hours her father had spent painting
    the old bobs for a coasting party.

    By Spring vacation, Jo was pretty well
    tired out. Lou Anne didn't get home for
    this either. One day during the vacation
    Dave came over to ask her to go after
    arbutus with him, but all the light went
    out of (hat April day when he said: "Kin-
    da' thought Lou Anne away like this for
    Easter, might like a little package or box
    from home."

    "Sure she would," Jo hatl said, but
    that night she buried her head In her
    arms on the window sill.

    School was over at last, but It was a
    strange summer that followed. Lou Anne
    had a friend there for three weeks, a girl
    who only smiled indulgently when she
    knew that Jo was trying her best to be
    funny and amusing, who came down to
    breakfast at ten in the morning. Dave
    was there a lot now. He took the girls
    everywhere, but Jo seldom went along as
    she felt, somehow, out of place with Lou
    Anne and her friend in their gay attrac-
    tive clothes. She always had a host of
    things to do anyway. Lou Anne never
    seemed to see that there was anvthing to
    do.

    Jo had hoped right up to the time
    college opened again that she would be



    able to go, but she saw at the end that
    there wasn't a chance. But, she did take
    the egg money to buy what books she
    could on the course. She poured over
    them late into the night after the Umg
    hours of teaching and other numerous
    duties. She and her father talked about
    a new drainage system for the flats and
    they were very close in those long wmter
    evenings they spent together. They were
    making great plans for the spring.

    Then one evening Jo came home to
    find her Dad very ill. The doctor pro-
    nounced it a bad case of pneumonia.
    "Heart's bad too," he said, "can you
    afford a trained nurse?"

    "Of course," she said, though she
    wondered how.

    The nurse came. Jo would rather have
    taken care of htm herself, but they must
    not take a chance. She hired a substitute
    for the school, cooked for the nurse,
    tended to the other little things around
    the house that needed attention, and
    caught her breath a hundred times a day
    at the sound of her father's labored
    breathing. Several days later the nurse
    advised her to send for the rest of the
    family.

    They all came, and the following day
    Dave came back to help. She felt that
    he was there for Lou Anne's sake, but
    his presence was comforting. He said
    that he only wished that there might be
    some little thing for him to do as Jo
    looked so hurt.

    The nurse told them now that It was
    but a matter of hours.

    "Let me go in," begged Jo.

    "It is better that you stay here, I
    belle\e.'

    They all sat silently \\aiting. Once
    Lou Anne did say to Dave though, "It
    was good of you to come Dave, and
    you're missing the Prom."

    That Lou Anne could think of the
    Prom when death shadowed their house!
    Jo though of the letter her father wrote
    every Saturday night, no matter how
    tired; the scrimping on clothes for the
    past two years; and the painting of the
    bobs on that first Christmas. How could
    she criticize her, Jo, for not crying? "Jo



    never cries!



    !" Lou Anne had said.



    Then she heard Dave's quiet voice
    saying, "I I've always thought an awful
    lot of your father. He was always giving



    32



    wluslk's iiii' l)iixl-hmises an' (islipolcs
    he's l>ccii good lo nic.

    'llie other girls were all crying now.
    [o looked ahout at then ail and a \va\e
    of sick resent nent s\vep< over her. \\'h>l
    good did il ilo t(; crv, now? Why haihi't
    they cone home more often? Dave, only
    l)a\e, miderstood. Dave who halcil
    sentiment had tried lo tell thc;n so.ne-
    ihing real that was in his heart. Then Jo
    said: "This is the way I always think of
    Dad. You know where we used to cross
    the creek to go to the milk statif>n? Well,
    I was a kid then, and Dad wouUl always
    dri\c right down through the creek and
    up the hanks, to wash the wheels, I sup-
    pose. There wasn't much water then,
    Dad would crook out his elbow and I
    would clutch it so tight. Then, once
    when 1 was a little older I asked him
    why he did it when he knew driving
    through the creek frightened me so, and
    he said: "Because I like to feel yoin-
    little hands on my arm." lie always let
    us hang on like that just because
    he loves us and oh I'm going to him
    now. I don't care what anybody says
    I won't let him go alone!"

    She knelt down and gently took her
    father's hand in hers and put her cheek
    against it.

    "Dad, Dad, it's lo. Don't die Dad,
    don't go! You can't go! We're going to
    drain the marsh together this spring,
    we're going to be partners, you and I,
    Dad! Dad stay with me there's just
    you and me now Dad. I won't let you
    go!



    .Ml night long she knell there, clinging
    to his hanti, willing that hei- alumdant
    young strength might be his too. A
    giver, that's what he'd been always.
    Whistles llshpoles 1( ve "Oh, Dad.
    don't go!

    In the morinng when the doctor came
    she still knelt there.

    "Come, child, gel up! ^Ouj- l.ilher's
    belter. A lot better; looks like he might
    get well. Ditln't think yesterday that
    he'd last the night out. looks like a mira-
    cic!"

    fo crept out to the kitchen. She was
    slifl and tired in every muscle, but there
    was a glad song in her heart as she quietly
    began to set the table for breakfast.
    Nothing, not even Dave and Lou .\nnc,
    could ever hurt her so again.

    Then there was Dave in the kitchen
    doorway, very sober, looking at her.

    "He's better, Dave! He's going to get

    well!"

    She made her way to the door leading
    out to the porch, and Dave's fingers
    caught hers as she reached for the door
    to steady herself. A slender, boyish
    figure, in her little sports dress, she
    leaned against him, and Dave put his
    arm around her.

    "Jo!" Dave was saying humbly, "Jo,
    I love you! I love you! I I guess I
    always have, only, I didn't know till
    last night, that you ever wanted anyone
    to to lean on! Jo why Jo darling,
    don't crv!



    SECOND BEST SHORT STORY



    'MIS LAST SONG"
    E.iilier Harris '>5



    In a cozy two-story home on a chilly
    winter's night, a family of six sat in the
    living room near their heater. Happiness
    and sadness mingled in the atmosphere,
    for the mother sat reading her well-worn
    bible with tears in her eyes. The father
    lounged in a chair reading the daily
    newspaper. The boys. Albert ami Adolph.
    were playing checkers while .Andrew, the
    youngest, being only five years old, was
    looking at an animal picture book. There
    was a vacant chair near the heater at



    which the boys cftcn glanced. Everyone
    was silent until Andrew broke the mono-
    tony by exclaiming: "Mama, is gramma
    in heaven now?"

    That was a queer topic for Andrew to
    speak of but he was answered thus:

    "Yes, honey, grandma died, that is,
    went to heaven two weeks ago tonight.
    Why?"

    "Well, isn't gramma going lo come
    an' sit in that chair anymore?"

    "No. Andrew, but the "Good Book"



    spys that she is living in a mansion that
    is very pretty now. She isn't going to
    come back to us, but we shall go to be
    with her when we die, though."

    "Is she happy there?" proceeded the
    joy cf the family.

    "Yes."

    "Is heaven the land where we'll never
    grow old like the song you sing says?

    "Yes, honey."

    "Well, will you help me pack up,
    cause I miss gramma so much. I want
    to see her now.

    The pprents looked at each other and
    smiled, for just the previous evening they
    had planned how Andrew would go to
    school the following autumn and they
    wouldn't have any "baby."

    "No, dear, you don't want to go to
    heaven yet," protested his mother, Mrs.
    Lattine, "you want to stay with us a
    while.

    "But I'm going to heaven tomorrow-,
    cause I want to be an angel and be wiz
    gramma. I'm so happy now."

    When he said angel, Mrs. Lattine
    looked at his little beaming face which
    daily seemed to become more like an
    angel's than a child's.

    "You're going to stay with us, honey."

    So she thought, but fate works in
    strange and mysterious ways.

    The following morning a sunny-faced
    Andrew Lattine was standing on a nine-
    inch ledge outside the bannisters of the
    front stairs. His arms w'ere wrapped
    around the bannisters and he was singing



    to his heart's content while his brothers
    were playing in the basement beneath.

    "Come on and play with lunior, An-
    dy!" called Albert.

    "All right, this will really be my last
    song."

    "O Kay, come on dow'n when you have
    finished."

    Andrew loved to play the part of a
    famous singer, so, of course, he wanted
    his concluding number to be the best.
    His clear, little voice rang out the words
    of the song as clearly as a bell. His voice
    sounded like an angel's and his mother
    thought of the words he had said the
    previous evening, but she took them as
    a joke or a childhood fancy.

    As he began to climb the bannisters
    after his song, there was a creaking sound,
    a crash, a scream, and four pattering
    footsteps. Andrew had come down, but
    not as he was e.xpected to.

    "Mother," they shrieked, "he's dead,
    he's dead."

    Two days later quite a large group of
    friends ^ve^e standing on a green lawn
    about a mile long and a mile wide. Here
    and there, there were markers to show- the
    resting place of loved ones. In the midst
    of the group was a small casket. Everyone's
    head was bowed while fifteen or si.xteen
    wept silently as the minister prayed.

    Andrew's little body was laid beside
    his grandmother's, and to this day one
    can see the words: "Andrew D. Lattine,
    born 1927, died, 1932, has finished his
    last song on earth.



    BEST ESSAY



    "FAVORITE EXPRESSIONS'

    Jesse Dcu'id 'T'



    Did you ever have a. song, a word, or
    even an idea take possession of your
    mind, and try as you might, you could
    not get it out of your system? Were you
    ever beset by this disease? The "favorite
    expression" disease? Notice the effect it
    has on your friend on you.

    These expressions are a constant men-
    ace, taking control of you like an un-
    pleasant and uninvited guest. I am not
    referring to the too frequent usage of
    certain words; for that is caused by the



    lack of a vigorous mind. A person knows
    more synonj^ms for every word he uses
    than he cares to spend energy on.

    Note the speech of the people you
    chance to meet. It is full of "favorite
    expressions, which seem to be a part ot
    their personality. They are a small but
    significant group of words. There has
    always been a tendency to utter some-
    thing whenever the mind cannot grasp
    an idea, in order to prevent an embar-
    rassing silence. When in doubt, isn't it



    54



    ra(ln.T oasv (n si'\' sumclliiiig loulisli,
    cs|u-ci;lly ilonc h;is run mil oi cigarcKcs?
    that is, pnividcd, one docs smoke.
    W'licllicr you re conscious of it or nol.
    you usually ilo use some |iet expression
    in situations where iiitelliiient replies do
    not form rapidly enough lo express your
    thoughts adequately and tactlully. These
    are the nioments when the expression will
    pop out spontaneously. Isn't this much
    more henelicial to l>oth parties, tiii-n
    giving way to your Im-ei' linniglits .'

    It is very easy to cast away an expres-
    sion that troubles you, if there he an
    outsiile influence helping. For e.xample
    one of my friends had the hahit of ex-
    claiming "stupid" to whatever was said
    to'him. If they toUl him a jolly tale, he
    would smile giving the joker a sharp
    "stupid" at the same time, th.it wouUl
    cither amuse or displease the latter. lie
    woulil linger on the "s." thus giving it a
    hissing sounil. This exclamation at-
    tractetl many a friend, hut it soon became
    nerve racking, although some were al-
    ready using this same expression. It
    certainly was contagious. When asked
    he could not explain how he had acquired
    it. hut after using it a few weeks, he
    ilropped it. not naturally, hut a hit
    consciously. We do not always value what
    cur enemies tell us: however, let some
    one whose opinion we do value, suggest
    that some idiosyncrasy of speech is an-
    noying, and immediately we atte.iipt to
    correct the fault. This was the case with
    lum.

    His second famous last words, (they
    would have heen hati he kept them up)
    were "Who cares?" When given any
    ipfor. nation whatsoever. "Whr^ cares?"
    would introduce itself, if he ha else to say, and that was very often. He
    was not trying tt. he funny or rude. The
    mischievous expression would be there
    uncalleil lor. Fortunately we understord
    him. We are human, too, or rather, sub-
    ject to the same malady. Once we askeil
    him why he used this remark so often.
    It applietl, much to our irritation, too
    well to suit us. He said that our intorma-
    tion meant nothing to him, therefore the
    thing to say was "Who cares?" One of
    my iriends agreed with him, but not to
    be outdone, adopted the remark "Pipe
    down!" This one did not come so natural



    to him, ft r it was a chosen one; but it
    counteracted the other's quite effectively.
    Fn m then on everything wa.s "Pipe
    down" lor the last victim.

    ludging by the aforesaid remarks oiii-
    (irst hero must have thought himself an
    i nportant persr.nagc, giving one the
    nnpression ol having a superiority com-
    plex. We knew differently, however. It
    was for the most part the effect of these
    words of his character. He was suffering
    from a "favorite expression" complex.
    His next one, by the way, hapf)ened to
    he "blah." a suggestion of disgust and
    boredom. What could be uglier? Ik-
    soon gave It up.

    Remark after remark antl e.\clamation
    after exclamation marks many a person's
    character. For every occasion there is a
    "favorite saying." .Another chance friend
    would cry "Hi Kid when meeting some-
    one else. The reply would be "'Lo or
    Low Kid." If close enough, the remark
    would be followed by a sharp slap on the
    arm or back. He received his share of
    them too. Pretty soon his classmates
    were "Hi Kidding" each other back and
    forth, not that it was an original ex-
    pression, but it took as firm a hold of
    their minds as it did of his. This ex-
    pression is not offensive unless it hap-
    pens to come from someone you dislike
    heartily.

    Turning to another victim of this
    mania when passing a person, deep in
    his thoughts or unusu.iily quiet, he would
    snap his fingers in his face, cry "Come out
    of it" followed by a "Pull yourself to-
    gether. If the person moved he woiilil
    surely be faced with "Control yourself"
    or "As you were." This soon became
    monotonous. When in school he would
    "Tish, tish" his classmates or give them
    the doggish expression "arf!" He would
    ilo this whenever one of the.Ti was recit-
    ing. The effect upon the recitation was
    not the best. He was sure to see to that.
    If the first expression ditl not bring a
    laugh, he would exclaim, "How tragic!
    He usually succeeded in his a.i'ii, but
    always received the wi when he recited. This cured him.

    .^lost expressions originate frini ac-
    (juaintances, movies, articles, and what
    not. Try "I declare!" when slightly
    astonished; "Egad" when patting your-



    35



    s



    self on the back; "Rawther" when agree-
    ing with someone; "Aw nuts!" when
    somewhat irritated; "Let's harmonize"
    followed by a long "do" when butting
    into conversation, getting a girl's goat,
    or whenever anv circumstances permit
    it, either seriously or in fun. The list and
    the circumstances are unlimited.

    "Favorite expressions" are somewhat
    like words colloquial, of good usage, or
    slang. Then there are those that are used
    almost universally. Some of these are
    "Can you beat that?" "Beats me,"
    "Wotta man," "How you sink em,
    "Can't take 'em," and "Tell it to the
    Alarines." Most of these expressions are
    modern, but others such as "Go to" and
    "Something rotten in the state of Den-
    mark," were either known during Shakes-
    peare's time or coined by him.

    Alany a person's presence has been
    betra^'ed by his mode of speech, his
    laughter, his voice, or whatever pecu-
    liarity he has to contribute. His mode
    of speech has the most effect on his



    companions, for it determines the quality
    of his personality and his environment by
    means of these expressions. They de-
    termine, in other words, a person's "class"
    and "style to some extent. Who could
    be more boresome than the person who
    is so grammatically and scientifically ac-
    curate in form of speech that it would put
    a follower of Hoover to shame for its
    dryness, and make you thirsty just to
    hear him speak? On the other hand his.
    opposite could be just as bad, such as
    the person who cannot say anything but
    "Oh yeah" or "Let it lay" whenever he
    is spoken to.

    The etiquette of speech should not be
    exaggerated, that is, do not be too polite
    relax, without going to the extremes.
    Formality, even in important events, is
    not always essential. Vividness Is the
    required quality. Be sure, however, that
    if we must imitate, let us imitate those
    qualities of the human speech which are
    the richest in beauty and the least of-
    fensive.




    TWILIGHT IN PANAMA

    .11 Uriel Jlullane ''6



    A little bit of Eden greets me as I
    raise my weary eyes from laborious trans-
    lation of Spanish to gaze out of my bed-
    room v\indow.

    Swaying bamboo trees, majesdc royal
    palms, royal poncianna, a rose garden in
    bloom, notldlng coconut and papaya
    trees, brilliant boganvilla, and coral vines
    climbing everywhere hedges, a riot of
    colors, in green, orange, yellow, retl, and
    brown sleepy hibiscus, closing their
    scarlet bells for the night, a white frangi-
    pangi tree in full bloom, sending its
    sweet essences through the evening air.

    Green lawns and a blue, blue sea, with
    tiny white sail boats and dignified steam-
    ers on its crest.

    The retiring sun flashes its glory,
    painting pictures upon a tired world, in



    opalescent hues against an ethereal blue,
    of castles, lakes and rocky sea shores,
    peaceful beaches, little islands of purple
    hills and golden clouds promising another
    world with a golden shore just ahead. A
    mirage methinks, perhaps, but it breathes
    hope renew^ed.

    Hundreds of mating golden-yellow
    butterflies, like fairy phantoms, float
    past. A songbird sends his love call to
    some shy mate. One senses the deep
    drowsiness of nature, sending all to rest.
    The crickets begin their endless chirping,
    and the locust his tireless buzzing.

    As the last beacon red rays fade from
    (he sky, sending their glow or warmth
    and radiance to a nestling world, I seem
    to hear a whisper, "All's right with the
    world."



    36



    GATUN BUS

    .'Innif Lattrie Turhgri'ille 'Ti



    TlMK


    7 ;i. in.


    Place


    Scliool l)iis Iruiu Cia




    Uin (ii Ciistolial.


    Cmahactek


    1 lljili Sclniol Girls




    Pliillip, the chauf




    feur, and a Panama-




    nian cop.



    Hope: (eating an orange) : "Annie, yon
    need a hair cut."

    .Innte Laurie (glancing np irom morn-
    ing's paper borrowed from Philip): "You
    tellin' me?"

    Dori.i- E. (holding one sitle ot paper):
    "I wonder who Gitleon Gordon is?"

    (tlorm: "I don't know, liiit "Willie
    has seen him somewhere.

    Philip, the chaurt'eur (tying the hood
    ilown on bus with a piece ot wire, to stop
    ihe rattle); "Is everybody here?"

    Gtrl.f (in chorus): ".All except three,
    and it they are not here when the scooter
    passes, let's leave them."

    AWIly and .^\arg_v appear.

    JLnffii (standing in doorway ot bus):
    "Well, where do I sit? Where do I sit?

    ..///ci (putting out hand): "Here, sit
    on my thumb."

    (iirl.i- (in chorus): "Philip, let's go,
    let's go! The 7:l;i scooter has passed.

    Philip starts bus.

    Dons B. (looking ilown street): "Holil

    it! hold it! Here comes Eiliui."

    F.diin (fi.xing pins in her liaii): "I'm
    all out ot breath."

    Bus starts again rattle, rattle, aiul

    bumpty bump.

    Hope (calling stations): "Chink gar-
    denl All off for Chink Garden!"

    <7/r/.i- (in chorus) : ".^lorning, John."

    Philip, speeding up hills anil around
    curves, slows down as he enters Fort
    Davis.

    Girit (humming): "Battery .V Is out
    today."

    Bus passes long line of marching sold-
    iders.

    GirU (breaking into song): "You are
    in the army now you are not l)ehind the
    plow." (Officers look disgusted, and



    soldiers warm). "You'll never get rich by
    digging a ditch, you're in the army now!"

    Bus stops at Radio Towers for Dtiris
    C, who takes her own time, and is very
    quiet.

    Girls (pretending impatience): "All
    right take your time, I^oris' just take
    your time."

    The bus speeds on its way, passing
    new lines of soldiers and army mules.

    Girls (gasp for breath anil begin the
    song all over again. Song suildenly
    ceases, each girl grabs her nose and yells) :
    "Mindi, .Windi!"

    linnte Luidrie (yelling through nose)
    "Wanted a great engineer who can
    dam, drain, and ditch MINIJI."

    tUice (laughingly): "Listen to the old
    Democrat. There she goes again."

    Dons 1',.: "That's not talking politics,
    that's just plain sanitary engineering."

    Ruth: "Did you hear about the light
    on bus six yesterday?"

    Girls (in chorus): "Yes, chllil, and
    there was some hair pulling."

    Cecilia (looking out of winilow at
    French Canal): "l^ook at that big alli-
    gator."

    Girls: "Oh, oo, ooo! And see the pretty
    pink heron."

    Philip turns bus to uni- >-ulc ,is ,i l.irge
    Iguana runs across road.

    .IJari/i/ (sniffing): "W'lial is llie fra-
    grant perfume?"

    Gloria: "Aly pop says that is (lie Hang
    Hang tree."

    .Iniiie Laurie (reflectively): "Just
    think of all I'll have to tell them back
    home in Carolina: of the sweet smells
    and bad smells; the pretty things and
    ugly things we see on this bus riile every
    morning. Some ride, provided one's eyes
    and ears anil nose do not become insen-
    sitive."

    Philip turns corner at Broadway. The
    Navy bus, and a high school big boys'
    bus are just ahead.

    Girls (excitedly): "Quick, Philip, pass
    them! Big road hogs! Now's your chance,
    pass them!"

    Philip speeds up; gets in lead. Other



    busses give chase. The noise of clapping
    and cheering is suddenly drowned by
    the scream of a siren. A motorcycle
    policeman pulls up along along side of the
    bus, which comes to a quick stop.

    Panamanian Cop (putting out hand on
    side of bus): "Hey! You] What do you
    think this is?" (hands Philip a ticket).

    Girls look at each other in wonderment.

    Bus starts slowly off.

    Girls (breathing a loud sigh of relief) :
    "Philip, we'll help pay the fine." (Begin
    taking up collection).

    Hope (Dropping in a coin): "Good-



    bye, bottle of pop!"

    Alice (Alaklng contribution): "Fare-
    well. Clark Gable!"

    Gloria: "Buenas noches, Greta Gar-
    bo!"

    Bus stops at Cristobal High School.

    Girls run tor shelter.

    Ruth (out ol breath): "It's raining
    cats and dogs."

    Jlilly: "You mean it's raining pitch-
    forks.

    Annie Laurie: "Mr. Vinton says it's
    raining tish."

    END



    THE BANANA
    Dai'id Lei'i/ '34

    The banana is a tender sweet fruit, a
    little smaller than a policeman's billy club.
    It comes in bunches, like trouble, and its
    use has made it possible for the Italian
    race to prosper in Am.erlca.

    The banana can be bought in the Uni-
    ted States wherever small change is found
    It grows in the tropics and Its bearer Is a
    large plant with extensive leaves that
    produces a bunch of bananas hung upside
    down and sometimes a tarantula or small
    snake thrown in for good measure.

    It is picked green and turns yellow and
    ripe when kept long enough. It is very
    nutritious (this fact is sometimes ques-
    tioned) and has been in Africa, breakfast,
    lunch, and dinner for some natives ever
    since Africa was discovered by Nature.

    In the United States the banana is rated
    a delicacy and is used principally by tra-
    vellers to kill time and small boys for
    pleasure and excitement.

    With a nickels' worth of bananas, a
    small boy can eat himself into a warped
    and distended shape and can litter quite
    a large section of sidewalks with treache-
    rous banana skins. Slipping on a banana
    skin is one of the most flustrating things
    that can happen to man In this country.
    Nothing can floor a man as quickly as an
    innocent little banana skin.

    America owns millions of acres of banana
    plantations In Central America, and em-
    ploy large fleets of steamships to bring the
    crop home. Some day all the land between



    Brownsville and Panama City will be one
    huge banana plantation, and Italians will
    be able to enjoy the banana In their own
    country without immigrating to America
    and spending seventy years selling it for
    a living.



    ARRIVING IN PANAMA

    Thelina Puri'is '-'
    As we were slowly drifting Into the
    Bay of Limon, I felt a sudden pang of
    home-sickness. Number eight was the
    dock at which the "Ancon" was to dock
    in Cristobal. The waters rolled around
    the ship. Everyone aboard was packing
    to leave, but a few people. Children were
    playing about the decks. Before the ship
    docked, everyone had to go downstairs
    and sign a paper. Cries of "Oh! and
    "Ah!" were filling the room. How could
    anyone en;oy this? "Hurry folks, the
    man in charge of the papers was calling.
    Mother \\as at the front of the line,
    busily singing papers. The ship was
    preparing to deck. Straining my eyes to
    see the city that was to be my future
    home, I caught sight of a familiar figure.
    I uttered a cry of joy, for Instead of dirty
    docks like Haiti, the city was sanitary.
    The ship had docked! People were rushing
    down the gangplank to see their loved
    ones. People were laughing and greeting
    one another; horns blew and I decided I
    would like Panama after all.



    38



    m:sr i'ok.ni

    SU.MAVKK SIIOWKUS
    liorit Half,' y >

    Tlie skv's were getting stormv

    One Slimmer ilav in M;iv,
    When I \v;is leeilin' cliiclu-ns

    And ^liclin' in the \v.\\.

    The horses started na.ving,
    AntI the c'tiws lK.*gan to moo,

    And 1 heard the chickens crowing.
    Anil tlie ilo\-es liegan to coo.

    The skies got black and blacker,
    All about was grav and still.

    And then there was a crash and bang
    And a loud, loud shrill.



    S1-:C().\I) IlKST I>()K..N\

    HOYS
    /,'//< /I Grefnlcaj >/

    At tunes I tlunU the_\'re a\i I ill.

    At times I think they're nice
    And some 1 like to lie with lots

    And others never twice.

    Thev tease and plague and pester
    Then come with tiatter.v sweet

    .And lirst I say, "I hate them,"
    .And then. "The\* can't be beat."



    The cKuids then burst right o|)en,

    .Ami the rain ilroppeil on (lOil's tloor,

    And me, I made a dash

    Straight for our kitchen door.

    The rain just stayeil ;in hour

    Outside our comlV home.
    And the horses, cows anil chickens

    Were a'weathering it all alone.

    And now the ram is o\-er.

    Anil the clouds have passed aw.iy,
    And we kids just keep a praymg

    It will come again some day.



    HISTORIC.M. ROCF.R

    Listen, my students, and you shall hear,
    01 a teacher, whose homework was a fear,
    ".Make maps, outlines and take notes olthis.
    And then lor tomorrow I want you to list,
    The dates ot settlements, relwllions and revo-
    lutions,
    And also you can bring some political solutions.
    Which party will win in the ne.vt campaign?
    Vote lor Roosevelt get beer, wine and cliam-

    l)agne."
    \\ h(i IS this teacher that runs such a racket?
    None other than our historical Roger C. Hackett!



    nil) VOL' KVKR WONDER?
    Dorir Btile.t >4

    Did you ever woniler how the clouils were made,
    Or how the thorns on bushes got their pointv

    blade.
    Or how the birtis all gather as if they're in a raiil.
    Dill you ever wonder?

    Did you ever wonder how the birds could sing.
    Or how the grass turns green at the approach of

    spring.
    Or how the streams of water to the ground could

    cling.

    Did you ever wonder?

    Did you ever wonder who this creature could be,
    Who does these Iteautifid things for you and me.
    .^Uither Nature is the one, don't you think it
    must be?

    Dill vou e\-er wonder?



    Ll.MERICKS

    F,IL-n (Iretnleal ">4

    \ girl from Cristobal once said,
    "Tonight I'll go early to bed,"

    She went out to the beach.

    Now this lesson ct>ulil teach.
    That the moon goes right straight to the head.

    On hurrying through the hall.
    One ilay 1 hearil somclniily call:

    "Come back, you big bum,

    A'ou have stolen my gum,
    1 left under the desk in study hall.

    Oft" in English our teacher is cross.
    Then from class, a Itoy's sure to lie lost.

    But you can't blame her then.

    If you realize when.
    She is trying to show you "Who's Boss!"



    39




    40







    \lHo T^e LoowMO Cuaji)



    \ -.



    (I'^f^:.



    HT With FiA<^














    \ AKn.OM '}



    41




    CLASS OFFICERS



    CLUB AND CLASS OFFICERS

    The class and club oflicers deserve a great deal ol credit for the splendid services they have pertorni-
    ed during the past school year. They can always be relied upon to do their work etiiciently and they always
    strive to add to the laurels of their organization. It has been through the ettorts oi these olticers that the
    many inipro\-ements in school lite ha\'e been ciirned out with the succes.^ that is so apparent.

    E\'er\' high school student Is a member ot some class organization. Each class holds a school dance at
    some time during the school year. In order to hold these dances money must be raised. For this purpose
    candy sales must be held, dues must be collected, and many other duties must be performed. Class ol-
    ficers are elected tor these purposes and generally the classes are iinancially successtul.



    CLUB OFFICERS




    42




    HOYS GLKE CLUB



    BOYS GLEE CLUB

    Hull, PUkc-ll 'J-/



    The Bovs GIfc Cliili tills ,ve;ir, iiiiclcr tlio sii|)ervislon of Miss Mildred EIncr, lias gre.ill.v improved.
    On tKeir meeting days, Monday and Thursday 8th period, they practice 2, 3 and 4 part music. The Cluli
    often sings in pul)lic during the school year. This year they sang at the Christmas program at the Clulilmusc.
    ami at the Woman's Clidi program.

    There is much to he le.irneil In a (dec Cluli and in preparing their programs much practicing is ne-
    cessary.

    GIRLS GLEE CLUB
    Ruth PUkfll '3-1

    Al>out 2') girls this year enrolled lor Glee Club so that the organization is larger than in previous
    years. This, like the Boys Glee Club, is under the supervision ol Miss .^lildred Elner. The regular meetings
    are Tuesday and Friday Sth period. This year the Glee Club sang at several social functions, among them
    were: The Christmas program at the Clubhouse, the Ladies' Aid Society of the Cristoba. Union Church,
    and the Womans' Club.



    fllRLS r.LFK CI.LB




    4.1




    LH.A 1' \\.\\lhi;a A.X A



    LIGA PANAMERICANA

    F.lizahelli Tliornlon '33

    Chapter Nine ol the "Liga Panamericana," a national club first organized in the state ot Texas, has
    the honor of lieing the hrst chapter of that club organized outside of the United States. It is sponsored bv
    Mrs. Spencer.

    This club has grown out ol the first Spanish Club e\er organized on the Canal Zone. "LA PAS." and
    consists ol certain qualified members of that club.

    The object oi the Chapter is to better relationship between Latin and North American countries.
    Much has been done to attain this object, and much more is being planned. Important and interesting
    among the ai fairs of the club was the meeting in commemoration of Pan-American day on the evening of
    Wednesday, April 19. An interesting program was arranged as follows:

    Address oi Welcome b_\- President Ernest de la Ossa; iMusic by Henry Sanchez, Alejandro Wong, and
    lulio Pinden: Address in behalf of North America by Mr. Jordan; Address in behalf of Latin America by
    Sefior Paris, hijo.



    Members of the club are:

    Ernest be la Ossa
    Gladys Bliss
    Mildred Owen
    Jerry Gorin
    Helen HA.\l.^loND
    Alejandro Wong
    Ei.wiN Neal
    Alice Wood
    Richard Reinhold
    Ellen Grkenleaf
    Elizabeth Thornton
    Oscar Heilbron



    William Keenan
    Henry' Sanchez
    Miss Dorothy Cate
    Charles Belden
    Alcalde L. J. A. Ducruet
    Mr. M. J. Franks
    Mr. R. C. Hackett
    Mr. F. C. Jordan
    Capt. Jose V. Delgado
    Mr. Gaylord S. Briggs



    SOPHOMORE DANCE

    Jiiihi Ri-illu '33

    One ot the biggest hits ol the year was the April Fool Dance given by the Sophomores at the Washing-
    Inn Hotel on Friday, March ol, 193.3.

    .Ml ol the dancers enjoyed the excellent music furnished by Dwyer's orchestra.

    The novelty numbers, performed In- Bert Asensio, Charles Heim, and Richard Pretto, were thoroughly
    enjoyed by e\'eryone.

    The prize spot dance was won by Alice Wood and Carlton Horlne, who were awarded a vanity case
    and a pearl penknife.

    Everyone declared thai he had enjoyed a wonderful time and we only hope the rest ot the Sophomore
    .affairs turn out .'is well.



    44




    SPANISH CLLB



    SPANISH CLUB

    Helen Iliimnionii >>

    The Spanish Cluli. known ;is "La P.is." was introduceJ into C. H. S. actix ilics in Octolicr, I'TiO.
    It is a verv exclusive cliil). oniv tliose who have an average of "90" being elegiblc lor membership.

    This i-|ul> was organized li.v AVrs. Ph.vllis Spencer in order to promote an interest in the stiidv of
    Spanish, and to better the relations between Spanish and English speaking people.

    Before a person mav become a member, he must be taking at least second vear Spanish, besulcs
    having the required average. He is initiated both formalU- and informallv. The formal initiation is a very
    impressive ceremony for the new-comers ot the club.

    After each meeting there is always an entertainment put on by either the members who ioined the
    club at the last meeting, or some of the old memliers.

    We have been honored by many very distinguished visitors who have gi\en t.dks.

    Every year "La Pas" presents a play. This year it was "Castillos de Torresnobles," a three-act
    comedy. The cast was as follows:

    Cul.IN C.X.MI'BKI.t.



    Duke of Guzman..



    Mercedes

    Suslta
    Cum ...

    .Agapito

    Scfior Rodrigo

    Gitana ..

    Tio Trompeta

    Pcrico, un mozo de Estacion I. ^

    .\ banipiet was given on l>oard the Spanish ship ".^lagallancs" alter which tiic c.ipt.tin 'l tlic boat
    cntert. lined for us on deck. Everyone thoroughly enjoyed the event and looks eagerly forward to more things
    of this type next year.

    Shortly l>efore the end of the school year, the club gave a banquet lor the installation ol the new
    officers. ,^I.in_\- memliers anti also some who had gradu*ited were there to enioy the reunion.



    T1IEI..MA Albritton
    Helen Aanstoos
    Wii.i.iA.M Beers
    Frank Wasiiauai oh
    Ci.iKTON Brown
    Betty Stkti.er

    IdHN H \^l^l(l^I'



    SENIOR DANCE

    /'.V/ijAf/A Thorn/on >

    On the night of Frid.iy the 24th. of February, the ballroom ol the \\',ivhiiii;lnii Hotel was the scene
    of a delightful dance given by the Senior class.

    Alusic was turnishctl by Welsh's orchestra, and some music at that!

    Everyone .seemed to lie h.'t\ing .-i grand time and from the haste in which the punch disappearetl, we d
    say it was good punch!

    Regardless ol the fact that the dance was given a little late in the year, it turned out to lc a huge
    success, as the Freshies can tell you!

    45




    ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION



    THE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION

    Eliz,,hclh Ilat/cf '34

    The Athletic Association of Cristobal High School has proved itself to he a bigger and better organi-
    zation than in previous years. It is a combination of last year's Boys' Athletic Association and Girls'
    Athletic Association, and its main purpose is to arouse and encourage more interest in school athletics and
    better sportsmanship in inter-scholastic contests.

    The membership tee is one dollar, for which the student recei\'es a card which admits him tree oi charge
    to all mter-schohistic ;ithletic contests.

    Much credit lor the success of this organization should be gi\'en to Air. Kenneth Vinton, who, as
    sponsor of the club, has done very much in behalf of its activities. The officers of the organization are:



    Thomas R.snkin








    George T.^rflinger


    J'ice Pre,riiA'n/


    Elizabeth Hayes






    Secretari/














    SUPPER CLUB




    ir


    "1


    ^'"h.

    '''..>*


    ' "'" *.




    46




    BOYS VAHSITY CLUB



    HOYS VARSITY CLUIJ

    l/.m./i JI.urho.d-i/ '>>

    the V.iisltv Club i



    DIIU Ml wIikIi must Ot tllC .itlllL'tCS .1 TC



    Aniimg tin.' illllcrciil cliilis in this stiiool,
    represented.

    A\emlK'rsl)i|> in this honoriirv lIu1> rc anv athletic sport arc eligible to join. Each vear a large number of "greenies" are initiated to replace those
    students who graduate.

    The lunctlons ot the Varsitv Club are those ol setting up standards lor the requirements ol an athlete
    to earn his credit in the sport he tries out lor. and also tor the awarding of letters in all sports.

    This club has had gre;it success in its past two vears and every year it increases in size. This year
    there are twenty-lour memliers representing the dillercnt athletic competitions in which our school par-
    ticipates.

    The oilicers ol the \'.ir^il\ C!tib .ire:

    President Cn-\R1-IE Pescou

    Treasurer Bil.l. Wheklkr

    5>ecretarv To.M.MY Rankin



    r,IR!.S VARSITY CLL'B




    -Vt-'Kr- ^ - T -"




    NATIONAL THESPIANS



    THE NATIONAL THESPIANS SOCIETY

    .lllLhrd Owen '33

    To become a member of the National Thespians Society is the aim of every Dramatic Club member.
    This organization is a national honor society in high school dramatics. The chiet aim is to de\'elop a spirit
    of acti\'e and intelligent interest in dramatics among high school students.

    Our group is knoun as Troupe 217 of the National Thespians. \\'e all appreciate the interest in dra-
    matics which Miss Gladys Kimbro, our director, has aroused in us, and ue all know we ha\-e profited in
    carrying out the aims of this society.

    The society is much stronger this year than last, and will be stronger still ne.xt year, as there are many
    Juniors who ha\'e become members this ye^ir and will carry on the work.

    This year we presented one three-act comedy. "One Thing After Another." which was quite a success.
    Alany Thespians were in the Senior play, "Hot Copy."

    A regular meeting is held the third Thursday of each month, and once a month we present a one-act
    play for the Dramatic Club.

    Helen Aan.stoos President

    Dorothy Birkeland Secretary



    GIRLS VARSITY CLUB

    Dorothu Birketand '33

    This club was organized for the purpose of showing more spirit among the athletes. .Miss Bailey
    organized this club last year, and it is just for the girls who have made the Varsity Team of any s^ort played
    during the year. The members are: Elizabeth Hayes, Mayno Bliss, Betty Stetler, Mary Ann Carruthers.
    Dorothy Birkeland, Hope Hollowell, Victoria HoUowell, Eileen Ford, Margaret Reinhold, Mildred Owen,
    Helen Aanstoos, Ruth Wikingstad, Anne Gibson, and Olga Roe.



    THE FRESHAIAN DANCE
    Jamci- T)a\f.y *^6



    imen were



    The Freshman Novelty Dance, given on .May fifth, turned out quite a success. The Fiesl
    the first class this year to put out something tlifferent in the way of dance entertainment.

    The entire dance was carrie were entert.iined. Robert March, a talented member of the Freshman class, took the part of the radio
    announcer. The program incKuied an imitation of various radio stars.

    Before the dance was given, everybody was razzing the green Freshmen on this so-called experiment,
    but the class surprised everyone. When the Frosh give their Sophomore dance next year, let's all hope it
    turns out as well as their dance this year. Just leave it to the I'reshmcn lor a good time!

    48




    UUAMATIC CLUB

    I LMOK SENIOR DRAMATIC CLUB

    .UlLlrcl ih.; >>

    The luniiir-Scnlor Dr^imatic Cliili oT Cristobal High School was organized last vear under the sponsor-
    ship ol Miss Gladys Kimliro.

    The nieml)crship is much larger than last year and the talent on the whole is much better. Regular
    niectings are held the first, secon
    The purpose oi the clidt is to encourage dramatics and to help give the students more confidence in
    themselves.

    Ever\- member is gi\en a chance to be in plays, direct plays, or to have .some other position connected
    uitli [iresenling a play. By doing this, we give every member a chance to become a National Thespian,
    which IS the goal the\" all aim tor.

    .Among the manv one-act plays presented this year were: "Tlic Kcd Sli.ulc L.imp," "His One Econo-
    my His Wile." and "The Sweetest Stor\- K\er Told."

    The oilicers ol this year were;

    Hklkn .\.\nstoos President

    Velta Folky Secretary



    SUPPER CLUB
    Ruth Piikell 'J4



    The Supper Club, an organization of the Girl Reserves, is quite the thing this year in school. Their
    purpose is "To make tomorrow better than today." There are 40 members. The members of the cabinet are:

    President Edna Tiiik[.\vai.i, '53

    v. Pres. Helen Aanstoos '53

    Secretary RiTH Pickett '54

    Treasurer .NIii.ohki) Owen '55

    Social Chairman El.lZAUETII Hayes '34

    Service Chairman AnneGibsoN '54

    Fellowship Chairman Mabei.I-E Bliss '34

    .^lusic Chairman LaurA Neal '54

    Publicity Chairman Genevieve Barry '55
    The leader is .^\iss Dorothy Cate. The activities of the year were: A moving food sale, conference
    at .Vrraijan. and a swimming party at the New- Cristobal point. The Club meets the second Friday- of
    evcrv month.



    ONE THING AFTER ANOTHER"
    Dorolliv Birkelanit '

    The tirst public .ippearance of the Dr.imatic Club this year was at the Cristobal Clubhouse on .^\arch
    10. They presented "One Thing .Alter .\nother," a three-act comedy, tlirectcd by .^liss Gl.idys Kimbro.
    It met with huge success as iudgcd by the attendance.

    The action of the entire plajV tooU place in the living room ol the old Lane homestead on the outskirts
    of Ardemore, V-rginia. The story of the play was based on a very rich real estate man, who rented the
    Lane homestead to a group of actors, who took the parts ot a "newly-rich coal miner's family" and "an
    aristocratic English family. in order to help Henry Crowell, (the young real estate man I to win the love
    of Norman Lane, w ho at the same time was assuming the part ot a social secretary so that she could gather

    49




    HIGH SCHOOL BAND



    material lor her novel. Throughout the whole play, there were plenty ot laughs and it certainly was com-
    plicated to the end, when they all told each other who they really were.
    Those in the cast were:

    NoR.M..\ L.4NE - ---- Helen Aan,r(oos

    Henry Crowell James lf'en)in

    Minerva Lane (Norma's Aunt) - - Dorothi/ Birkeland

    Mrs. S.mythe Smithers Beverley Marcusc

    Rose Smythe Smithers Ellen GreenUaJ

    Paul Smythe Smithers William Slone

    Lucy Featherstone Hall _ - Eiina ThirUfall

    Percivel Featherstone Hall._ ._ Frank Wasltahaiuih

    Edwards (the butler) John Lolhrop

    Etta (the maid) ..-- .Mildred Ourn



    SENIOR PLAY

    Erne J- 1 de la 0.r,m 'jJ

    This year's Senior play is entitled "Hot Copy" and as the name suggests is a newspaper story. Both
    the plot and setting are different than those of any other play that has been given in C. H. S. Tryouts
    were held under the supervision of the dramatic coach. Miss Kimbro.

    In "Hot Copy," Kenneth Wade, editor and owner of the Evening Herald, is the central figure of the
    play. Jane Corwin, .successful young woman reporter, plays opposite Kenneth. Sylvia Dale and Bill
    Gregory play together as a pair of peppery young reporters. Bud Rice and Peggy Wilson try their best to
    outdo the above pair with their wise-cracks and snappy comebacks. Dudley Kay is the villainous city-boss
    who reforms in the end. Hazel Winston, although a general nuisance because of her social aspirations, aids
    in bringing about a h;ip[\v ending. Mrs. Devine is the loyal cohort ot Dudley Kiiy, and a comedy touch is
    lent by Randolph Peters, the messenger boy.
    The cast:

    Kenneth Waiik Ernest de ta O.r.ra

    Jane Corwin Dorothxi Birkeland

    Sylvia Dale . Jlildred Owen

    Bill Gregory John Lolhrop

    Peggy Wilson Helen Jansloas

    Bud Rice James If'crain

    Hazel Winston Jnne Gihson

    Dudley Kay Frank IVasliahauoh

    Mrs. Devine Edna ThirU-all

    Randolph Peter William Keenan

    As in every play, jobs other ih.in dr.imalic ones must be gi\cn out. These were gi\*en out alter carefiiJ
    con ilderation. The staff follows:

    Stage Manager Arthur Vane

    50




    mc.ii sciiu



    > I RA



    Prompter
    .\ss'(. Stage Mgr.
    Hiismess Manager
    Mead Usher
    Costumer



    Rkvichi.ev Marcuse
    Charles Gm'i.n
    Cari.ton Horine
    Colin Cami'defx
    Ellen Greemi.eak



    The main purpose ol the Senior plav was tt^ earn moncv to aid the puhhshing nl the "Carinl>ean. anil
    this year with the new school aiiditoriun\ availaMe, the plav did liavc a record attendance. Tlic plav was
    presenteti on luiie 10.



    C. H. S. lUND
    Clijlon Brown '}}

    Under the ilirection ol .^\r. loy ol Ballioa High School, the recently organized hand has made good
    progress during the year. Mr. loy teaches a junior hand class ol si.\ members duringthc eighth period on
    Wednesdays, and conducts the regular band of some twenty members on Wednesday atternoons alter
    school. A joint concert with the Balboa High School band has been planned. The good will with which
    the students have turned out this year alter school hours has been greatly appreciated.



    ORCHESTRA

    Ridh Pickett '>4

    The Cristobal High School Orchestra which meets on Wednesdays 8th period, works most diligently
    to accomplish all its work in 4.T short minutes each week. Due to the scarcity of instruments, it is conlincd
    to limited pieces. .Among the instruments present, there are: sa.xophones. clarinets, trumpets, and viohns.
    .^\iss .^lildrcil Elner. sii|H;r\'is(>r ol .^\usic \n Cristobal, is their leader.

    During the year the orchestra played at the Y. M. C. A. Music Hour, the W om.in's Clid>, .ind the
    Commencement exercises.



    C. n S. NEWSPAPER
    RlcharA ReinhoU i-/

    The idea of putting out a mimeogr.iphed new-spaper originated with the "C.iribltean" staff. .\t .i
    staff meeting, the svdijcct of putting out a pa|K-r ol some sort, to create an interest in school activities was
    discus-sed. It was lin.dly decitled that a mimce l>est. lor, it was cheajKrr. and at the
    s;imc time woidd contain more .uid l>etter news than a printed pa|icr.

    .\s the school did not own a mimeograph machine, the Italian Line graciously offered the use of the
    one which they had. There was nothing lelt to do. .ifter having obtained the use of .-i machme. than to put
    out the newspaper.

    Richard Keudiold w.is chosen to l>e editor, while Elizidieth Thornton w;is to Ix? assistant. The follow-
    Hig were chosen to do miscellane HIiss. Ruth Wikingstad. lessic Vane. Vclta Foley, Violet Randall. Joe Bazan, Jesse David. Donithy
    Rirkeland .uul Charles Pescotl.

    The pa|)er has ticen enthusiastically received by the students, and has Mi.vlc-d in i .irrviiiL' nut its
    purjiose, namely, creating an interest in school activities.

    51




    HONOR STUDENTS



    HONOR STUDENTS



    The two highest ranking students from each class were chosen as honor students. Seniors:
    Helen Hammond, Ernest de la Ossa; Juniors: Betty Stetler. William Stone; Sophomores: Anna
    Reillv, Ernest Jaramillo; Freshmen: Esther Harris. William Hill.



    E=



    =1S



    Helen Aansloos '33



    Sept. 22. For (he iirst time in the
    history of Cristobal High, school opened
    during the month of September.

    Sept. 23. The Supper Club girls held
    their first meeting of the new school year,
    and had the pleasure of meeting Miss
    Dorothy Gate, the new Y. W. C. A.
    Secretary who is also counselor of the
    club. Supper was served by members of
    the cabinet.

    Oct. 6. The Spanish Club, "La Pas",
    lost no time in getting together and held
    their first business meeting.

    Oct. 12. The Freshics celebrated
    Columbus Day in a very sweet way by
    holding a candy sale in the school. There
    was also a debating club meeting.



    Oct. 14. The regular monthly meeting
    of the S jpper Club was held at the Y. W.
    C. A. and supper was served by Mildred
    Owen and her able assistants. Miss Catc,
    V, ho has worked among the Indians of the
    United States and is familiar with their
    lives and habits, gave a most interesting
    talk on Indian legends.

    Oct. 22. The soccer and voUevball
    teams clashed in the first game of the
    season, C. H. S. ccming out victorious.
    In the evening the Spanish Club held
    a dance at the roof garden of the Colon
    Bomba. During the course of the evening,
    soTJe of Colon's Panamanian officials
    talked to the club members in Spanish.
    Another diversion of the evening was a



    52



    native tlancc l(.v Kllcn Grecnical, Stella
    Miiytis, Marguerite arnl \'i\ian Aliraliams,
    who were dresseil in costume.

    (Xrt. 28. And upon this evening (he
    Supper Clul) girls gave a dance at the
    ^. W. C. A. Welsh's Orchestra furnished
    the music for a large numher of lianccrs.
    The evening was a social success and fell
    short lit of lieing a financial success.

    (X:t. 29. The soccer and \(>lle_vliall
    teams crossed the Isthmus to Balhoa
    \\ here two exciting and well-fought games
    were plaveii.

    Nov. 3. We are iit>t sorrv i'anama
    ilcclareil her inile|X'nilence from Colomliia
    on this tlay twenlv-nine vears ago. as il
    gave us a ilav on which we laid aside our
    hooks and went in search of entertainment

    Nov. o. The ihirti game of soccer anti
    volleyball was played ui Cristobal.

    Nov. 8. New material furnished for
    history classes Franklin D. Roosevelt
    elected president of the United States.

    Nov. 9. My, how those Freshmen do
    work. .Again today they had a successfid
    candy sale. Keep it up Frosh!

    Nov. 12. C. II. S. and B. H. S. in
    .soccer and volleyball games in Balboa
    .\fter missing the train, the two teams
    attended a dance at the Mosque which
    was given by the lunii^rs of B. H. S. for
    the soccer teams.

    Nov. 18. Several of the high school
    boys (we won't tell on you, fellows) were
    seen aboard the "S. S. Toloa" giving
    "Peaches" Browning the "once over."

    Nov. 19. Both the soccer and volley-
    ball series were won by C. II. S. Three
    Cheers! The A. D. T. club, consisting of
    the soccer and volleyl>all players, had
    and enjoyable outing at the Tarpon Club,
    .^liss Margaret Hayes and .^Ir .^liltortl
    Franks were chaperons.

    Nov. 2,1. The Junior class under the
    supervision tlelicious luncheon in the school. A rainy
    day. hungry students anil teachers, sufli-
    cient money, and plenty of good eats,
    helped make a successful day.

    Nov. 29. This was a record breaking
    week tor rain; so much water coming
    down, the "Old Chagres" necesitated the
    opening of fourteen spillway gates t(.
    carry away the tlood water.

    Dec. 4. Spanish Club meeting.
    Dec. 8. Deceml)erSupf)erClid> meeting
    was held at the Y. W. C .\. where all



    who atteniletl enjoyed ;i delicious turkey
    diruK-r serveil by .\nne (libson ,ind her
    committee. The program consisted of
    some interesting Christmas legends read
    by mendiers.

    Dec. 9, The hard-working Juniors
    continue to keep their good repul.ition
    and toilay hail a canily s.'de.

    Dec. 13. The baseball team had a
    canily sale, anil every player must have
    a long telephone list for they had more
    canity than they coulil sell in one il.iy.

    Dec. 14. The Dramatic Club had a
    meeting 8th |X.Tiod ;it the Y. W. C. A.
    A very interesting progr.iin was presented

    Dec. 15. The "Carribean" staff was
    selected and the first meeting helil at
    noon. Many changes arc going tol>emade
    in the book anil we hope to make it the
    best ever published.

    Dec. 22. The Glee Club, under the
    direction of Miss Hllner, sang a cantata,
    "The Child Jesus," for the assembly 8th
    period, and between shows repeated this
    number at the Cristobal Clubhouse.

    Dec. 26. The ]>ennies contributeil by
    the school children of the United States
    made pxissible the trip of "Old Ironsides"
    to Canal Zone waters. Taking advantage
    of the holidays our school was well repre-
    sented with visitors on this historical ship.

    Dec. 27. Many of our schoolmates
    wllmessed the wonderful sight of the
    "Constitution"passing through the Gatun
    Locks.

    Dec. 29. Balboa baseball team "took
    home the bacon" after winning the first
    game of the series. The A. D. T. Club
    had a hay-ride journeying as far as the
    .\tlantic side roads woulil permit.

    Jan. 6. First S|xinish Club meeting
    for the new "memlx."rs-to-l>c." .\t this
    time the mysteries of their coming initia-
    tion were unloldeil to them.

    Jan. 7. The Caribl>ean staff, baseball
    anil basketball teams went to Balboa.
    Both games were lost to Balboa.

    Jan. 9. Spanish Club informal initia-
    tion was started. .Ml the girls wore big
    hair ribbons on which were the Spanish
    Club insignia. The Ixiys wore the same
    kind of Ihiws in the form of neckties.

    Jan. 11. Today each of the Sjjanish
    Club members went limping around school
    wearing two different coloreil shi>es with
    different sized heels.

    Jan. 12. The scene was changed today



    as the boys \\ore their shirts backwards,
    and the girls w ore their dresses backwards.
    Jan. 13. Again we see the members
    initiated by wearing clashing colors, the
    excuse for Billy Wheeler's orange pants.
    The January Supper Club meeting was
    heldattheY.W.C. A. Also, tonight, was
    a successful card party, sponsored by the
    Junior Class, at the Masonic Temple.

    Jan. 14. C. H. S. lost the baseball
    series to B. H. S. who also won basketball.
    The Liga-Panamericana had a dinner
    party aboard the S. S. "Juan Elcano."

    Jan. 18. The Seniors had a candy sale.
    The formal initiation of the Spanish Club,
    "La Pas", was performed at the Y. W. C.
    A. After the ceremony, all present enjoyed
    a Spanish play "Que Felicidad." Then
    there was a short business meeting fol-
    lowed by refreshments and dancmg.

    Jan. 21. The baseball and basketball
    teams having to play the games that were
    scheduled, went to Balboa. The girls lost
    basketball, but the boys were forced to
    stay over night on the Pacific side due to
    a memorable 16 inning game with the
    final score 1-0 with C. H. S. on top.

    Jan. 27. Supper Club cabinet meeting
    at the Y. W. C. A.

    Jan. 28. The girls played basketball
    against B. H. S. In Cristobal, and walked
    away w ith the game.

    Feb. 2. Need we explain why the
    study cramming? If so you see we're
    having mid-year exams today and tc-mo-
    rrow.

    Feb. 4. The Supper Club girls had
    a moving food sale.

    Feb. 9. Eighth period there was a
    business meeting of the Dramatic Club
    at which officers were elected. After
    school there was a "La Pas" meeting.

    Feb. 10. Several girls left on the noon
    train for Thatcher Camp at Arraljan
    where they attended the Supper Club
    Conference.

    Feb. 14. The Girl's Glee Club sang a
    group of songs for the Woman's Aid who
    were holding a meeting in the Union
    Church Hall. In the evening, the Spanish
    Club, "La Pas", had a dinner and dance
    aboard the S. S. "Magallanes."

    Feb. 15. In the school building was
    held the Junior Luncheon which was a
    big success.

    Feb. 16. The Junior class held a pop



    and hot-dog sale at noon. They like to be
    different, but it helps their treasury.

    Feb. 17. The monthly Supper Club
    meeting was held at the Y. W. C. A.

    Feb. 18. The boys' tennis team played
    the opening tournament game in Balboa
    and lost

    Feb. 24. The first dance of the year
    was given by the Senior class at the Hotel
    Washington. Many attended and enjoyed
    themselves.

    Feb. 25. The girls, having forfeited
    the first baseball game, formed a team and
    played Balboa on our home diamond to-
    day. \\'hat a game-Balboa walked with it.
    The tennis match was played on Fort
    Davis courts. That, too. was a victory
    for Balboa.

    Feb. 27. A beautiful American flag
    was presented C. H. S. by the D. A. R.
    organization. The history of our flag was
    read and the different flags w ere displayed
    by Boy Scouts.

    Mar. 2. A Dramatic Club Meeting
    was held at the Y. W. C. A. A one-act
    play called "The Rose Shade Lamp" was
    presented.

    Mar. 3. Liga-Panamericana meeting
    at 7:30 at the Y. W. C. A.

    Mar. 4. The Sophomores had a
    successful food sale at the Cristobal
    commissary.

    Mar. 5. There was a Liga-Paname-
    ricana meeting held at Mrs. Spencer's
    this afternoon.

    Mar. 6. The Caribbean staff issued
    a newspaper. It was very Interesting.
    It contained nine pages, and the first
    copy was distributed free cf charge. It Is
    to be published bi-weekly until the end of
    the year. The subscription price for the
    rest of the year Is 15 cents.

    All morning classes are being shortened
    this week as it is registration week.

    Mar. 8. The Senior class had a candy
    sale, and for the first time In the history
    of the class, they had so much candy that
    a sale was necessary the following day.
    Mar. 9. Senior Candy Sale. The ad-
    vanced shorthand class went through the
    P. C. printing press and had the printing
    terms, apparatus, etc., explained to them.
    Mar. 10. At last the big day came
    the High School Dramatic Club presented
    "One Thing After Another" at the Cris-
    tobal Clubhouse. Anyone not present

    54



    surely iliil iiiiss a gotid play!!

    A\ar. II. Tlic I'lVsiinUMi liad a liakf
    sale at Cristobal Conimissary aiul let mc
    toll you, it was a success!

    Alar. 15. Tlie lire alar lis rang this
    iiuirniiigiiisn';issipg classes for a few min-
    utes to .\itnesstlie woiulerfiil sight of the
    Na\y ilnigilile '".Xkrou" gliiliiig over ClI.
    S. It certainly was interesting anil re:niiul-
    eil many ol us of the ti ne, lour years
    ago. when the "I.os .\ni;eles "sailed aliove
    CHS.

    At three o'clock the ("dee Cluh went to
    the Y. W. C. A., wiiere they sang lor the
    Woman's Cluli.

    Mar. 16. At a n-.eetiiigol'the National
    I hespians today, many new memhers were
    installed.

    Alar. 17. Tlie Junit.rs showed the
    I rish in them anil held a candy sale anil no
    one was Scotch ni helping make it a
    success.

    Mar. 18. The Supper Ciul) girls had a
    lircaklast anil sw imniing party this iiiorn-
    ingat Ko Ko Nut Grove. The inter-schol-
    astic track meet was held at Fort Davis.
    Bailioa "ran away with tlie honors, Imt
    Cristobal w;is close behind. .\t liiis meet
    many recorils were broken.

    .N\ar. 22. "Rcd".\lcKelson,ofB.H.S
    maile a wager that C. 1 1. S. would not get
    over 20 points in the track meet if they
    did he would "eat his hat." C. U.S. got
    37 points. .\ general assembly was held
    today at w hich "Red" performed the "hat-
    eating" act and it was clever too. Speakers
    for the assembly besides "Red were:
    .^\r. Franks, Oscar Heilbron. and Mr.
    \ inlon, who also awarded ribbons tc Cris-
    tobal's winning track men.

    Mar. 25. The program at the Drama-
    tic Club meeting loilay was three short
    talks on Drama and the Stage Today.

    Apr. 3. This was the (irst th'v of
    visitation week. In past years only one
    day w.is devoteil to visitors, but not so
    this year.

    .\pr. 4. The Supper Club held a cpril
    party at the Y. W. C. .\. Lovely prizes
    were given the winners and there w.>s a
    large attenilance.

    Apr. 5. \ Spanish Club meeting w.ts
    held at the .\rmy and Na\y Y. ,^l. C. .\.
    riie entertainment w.?s furnisheil by the
    "new" members. It was a Spanish play
    and was verv i:ooil.



    .Vjir. <). The Senior cla.ss h.ul another
    Cindy sale which was carried on lor two
    da\ s. I he Seniors-' surely are working
    these ilays!

    .\pr. 7. 1 he jiiniiir class h.ul a ilancc
    at the I'l.iyshed. Dwyer's orchestra
    iiirnisheil the music. F.veryone w.is
    happy and had a good time.

    .\pr. X. The boys |>laved their first
    mter-scholastic b.isket-ball game of the
    season at Balbo.i playshed. i'he season
    was starteil right as C II. S. wmi the
    first game.

    .\pr. 9. The DeAloIays and the Sup-
    per Club girls had .i picnic at Shimmy
    Beach.

    Apr. 19. There was a meeting of the
    Athletic Association, and arrangements
    were maile for a ilance after the next
    basketball game. There was also a Lig;i
    Panamericana meeting.

    Apr. 20. A Dramatic Club meeting
    was belli 8th period. "Hot Copy" was
    selecleil to be the S.'iiKir pl.iy lor this
    year.

    Apr. 2 There was a short pep rally
    Sth period.

    At the Supper Club meeting tliis after-
    noon arrangenx'nts were made lor the
    annual Mother and Daughter Banquet.

    The playshed was filleil with spectators
    to see the second basketball game, anil as
    before, Cristobal won. The .Athletic
    .Vssocialion hail a ilance alter the game.
    The music was furnished by the Inter-
    national Club boys, a colored orchestra
    that knew its music!

    .Apr. 22. Cristobal girls went to Bal-
    boa to play tennis. Balboa won the
    singles and Cristobal won tiic doubles.

    .^lay. 4. The Dramatic Club pre-
    sented two one-act |>l."ys at the Y. W. C.
    .A. (^ne of these plays ivas put on by the
    Thespians.

    .^lay 5. The Freshman Class helil a
    novelty dance at the Washington Hotel.
    Dancers were dresseil in many original,
    comical and beautiful costumes. It was
    a gala night for all. During intermission
    there were many novelty numbers since
    the scheme was a radio broailciist station.

    ,^\ay 9. The Girl Reserves hail their
    annual .^lother and Daughter bamiuet
    at the Y. W. C. A. .A very interesting
    anil fitting program was prc"senteil.

    lune 2. The Senior Class play, "Hot



    55



    Copy," was presented to a large audience
    in the new high school auditorium after
    which the actors and staff had a perty.

    June 3. The National Thespians had
    their last installation at a dinner party.
    At the beginning of next year the Na-
    tional Thespians group will have a larger
    membership than it has had at the be-
    ginning of any previous year.

    June 9. The Junior-Senior banquet
    was a huge success. It was held at the
    Washington Hotel and was followed by
    a dance in the ball room. The toasts



    given at the dinner werea 11 very inter-
    esting and delivered very well.

    June 11. The Baccalaureate Services
    were held at the Christ Church by the
    Sea. The services were very impressive.

    June 16. The big night came at last!
    Graduation e.xercises were held in the
    new school auditorium. The girls wore
    pretty white evening dresses, and the
    boys, dark suits. Junior girls were flower
    girls. Several talks were delivered by
    various Seniors. Here's luck to vou,



    m=



    Alumni



    1950

    Ralph S. CrUiM, (address unknown).

    Mavis E. Thirlwall, Cristobal, C. Z.

    R.AE Bliss, 159 South Professor Street,
    Oberlin, Ohio.

    Thomas L. Coley, Jr., (address un-
    known).

    Della J. R.w.MOND, Cristobal, C. Z.

    Evelyn E. Ganzemuller (Mrs. H.)
    Fenton, Madden Dam, C. Z.

    Alice E. Henter (Mrs. Jack) Cor
    rigan, Balboa, C. Z.

    Mr. Willla.m Ne\\'M.\n, Memphis-
    Tenn.

    Pauline Herman, (address unknown).

    Elsie B. Birkeland, 50 Nevens Street
    Brooklyn, N. Y.

    Victor Melendez, Colon R. dc P.

    Eleanor M. Fitzgerald (Mrs. G.)
    Roliinson, Balboa, C. Z.

    Fr.ances M. ID.ays, Gatun, C. Z.

    Francisco Wong, Box 1734, Cristobal,
    C. Z.

    "Best success to the class of '33."

    M. Virginia Eberenz, Cristobal, C. Z.

    Elsie Darley, Cristobal, C. Z.

    E. Beverly Turner, Cristol>al, C. Z.

    J. Virginia Stevenson, Cristobal,
    C. Z.

    Walter Wikingstad, Duke College,
    Durham, N. C.

    Estafania G. Wheeler, Ufica Memo-
    rial Hospital, Utica, N. Y.



    Richard C. Serge.-\nt, (address un
    known)

    J.A..MES C.a.mpbell Jr., Georgia Tech.
    Atlanta, Ga.

    Rita Teres.\ Joyce, St. Joseph's Col-
    lege, Philadelphia, Pa.

    Arthur Mundberg, Cristobal, C. Z.

    Phoebe O'Donnell, Balboa, C. Z.

    OiviND Arneson, ICristiansund, Nor-
    way.

    Rose T. Corrigan, Newark, N. J.

    Maria C. Stewart ("Mrs. O.) Fabrega,
    Panama City.

    Nehls G. J.vnsen, (address unknown).

    1931

    Carlos Bog.art Rankin, Wittinberg
    College, Meyers Hall, Springfield, Ohio.

    Vel.ma Hall, Cristobal, C. Z.

    Ruth Duv.all, 2974 Colerlan Avenue,
    Cincinnati, Ohio.

    Marion Neely, Cristobal, C. Z.

    Thomas Pescod, Cristobal, C. Z.

    William Bailey, Cristobal, C. Z.

    Ernest Berger, Gatun, C. Z.

    Celeste Clark, (Mrs. B.) Powell,
    Balboa, C. Z.

    Cr.4vvford J. C.vmpbell, Emery Uni-
    versity, Oxford, Ga.

    Edward Conkling, 4282 Street, San
    Diego, Calif.

    Margaret M. Davis, Cristobal, C. Z.

    "Good Luck and best wishes to the
    class of '33."



    56



    \'iNNlK ELSOiN. Box ;')7;'). College Sta-
    tion, Pullman, Washington.

    RuSSELI. Elwhi.L. Duke University,

    N. C.

    Fabian Enc.landkk, (aililrcss un-
    known).

    Claha FuiSK. Bo.\ 728, Leanitiglon.
    Ontarii Canaila.

    Burton Hackktt. Cristolial, C. Z.

    John Kelly, (address unknown).

    Maria Kleefkens, Cristobal, C. Z.

    De.metra Lewis, Ball)o;i C. Z.

    Percival Lyew, Bo.\ 1099, Cristobal,
    C. Z.

    Kenneth Maurer. Rallio.i. C. Z.

    Elt,enia M. McLain, Cristobal, C. Z.

    "Aly best wishes to the class of '33 and
    the best of luck to the Caribbe.xn."

    Ronald Pmillpotis, New York City.

    Bettina Powers, Fort Hancock, N. I.

    Anna Ryan, 468 East State Street.
    Trenton, N. ].

    .Aloma Slocl'.m, Cristobal, C. Z.

    Dorothy Wirtz, Cristobal, C. Z.

    George W'ertz, Cristobal, C. Z.

    Ben Willi A.MS, Cristobal, C. Z.

    Barbara Weick, France Field, C. Z.

    Ray.mond Will, Cristobal, C. Z.

    Richard Wood, Cristobal, C. Z.

    Phoebe O'Donnell, Balboa, C. Z.

    Alice I. Gor.mely, Balboa, C. Z.

    Frank Griesi.nger, Georgia Tech. At-
    lanta, Ga.

    Evelyn Wright, (address unknown).

    James Hayden. (address unknown).

    Verona C. Her.man, University of
    Texas, Austin, Texas.

    Roger .^l. Howe. Punlue University.
    I^fayette, Ind.

    Carl Kariger, Gatun, C. Z.

    TllEL.MA King, 27 Broadw.iy Terrace,
    New York City.

    Alvin A. Lyew, Colon, R. de P.

    Margaret >\izr.\chi, C< k n. R. de P.

    Elwin NeaL, Cristr.bal, C. Z.

    James Wood, Cristobal, C. Z.

    Elsie Neely, Cristobal, C. Z.

    Benja.min Roberts, 701 Union Street,
    Union College, Schnectady, N. Y.

    Janet Robinson, Box 1")."4. William
    and Mary College, Williamsl>urg, \'a.

    Her.nun Roos, Jr., Gatun, C. Z.

    Bruce S.vnders, Cristobal, C. Z.

    Jesse Sinclair, (address unknown).

    Betty Stahler, (address unknown).

    Robert Stevenson, Cristobal, C. Z.



    Inez TiIKOKTISTO, Colon, R. de i*.

    Alicia Thirlwall, Cristoiial, C. Z.
    Jessie Vane, Fort Sherman, C '/..

    NeI.I. WaRDLAW, Newcomb College,
    Iose|)hine l^iuise House, New Orleans,
    La.

    Pkrky Washabvl'gh, Cristobal, C. Z.

    "Best wishes tor a better "Caribbean"
    and best wishes to you all for continued
    success."

    Edwin Weis.\i.\n, Purdue University,
    Lafayette, Ind.

    .^Lalcol.m Wheeler, Cristob.-l, C. Z.

    Elizabeth Wiriz, Cristob.d, C. Z.

    1932

    R.XNDOI.l'll y\. WiKINGSTAD, Cristobal,

    c. z.

    Alhin B. Forsstrom, (address un-
    known).

    Eleanor M. Reinhold, Cristobal, C.
    Z.

    Howard U. Keenan, i'urdue Univer-
    sity, Lafayette, Ind.

    "I am having a swell time at Purdue
    although it is so different fnmi high
    school. The work is hard, l)ut I don't
    mind it; I like it.

    I often think of my high school days
    antl wonder how C. IL S. is getting aking.
    I wish the 'Caribbean of 1933' every
    success, and may it be the best ever."

    Richard Bettein, Fort Randolph, C.
    Z.

    Gladys Bliss, Cristobal, C. Z.

    "Best wishes to the Statf for a success-
    ful Caribbean."

    Best of luck to the Class of '33."

    Allene Myrtle Deakins, Gatun, C.Z.

    "Still a "Gatun-ite." Best wishes for
    the success ol the 19,33 Caribbean and to
    the Class ot '33.

    .^L\RY C. Deans, Cristotial. C. Z.

    John Delaney, (address unknown).

    Dona \'. Eaton, Barnard College,
    Hewitt Hall, New York City.

    "Best wishes and all the luck in the
    world to the class of 19.33."

    Joseph Ebdon. Gatun. C. Z.

    Harry C. Egolf. Gatun, C. Z.

    N'lviAN G. El.mgren. (address un-
    known).

    liowARD S. Engelke. Cristobal, C. Z.

    AL\RIE Ensrld, (address unknown).

    JosE Antonio Fernandez, Colon, R.
    de P.



    57




    58



    ATHLE.TI&5.





    ATTILETIC LKAIIKRS



    SOCCER



    I'or the llrst lime in li\'c vears. wc ha\c Itceii a!)lc' to take the supremacy in Soccer from Bal-
    boa High School. Our success was due to the perfect teamwork oi the plavers and the consistent
    coaching of Mr. V. Seller. We won three games out ol the five game scries, winning the first,
    third, and the last games. The filth game played on our home grounds was the best as no team
    was sure ol victory until the last whistle was blown.

    Charlie Pcscod. our diminuliye captain, conilucted the team so that it appeared like a well-
    oiled machine on the held, helping luith the detensiye and ollensive lines at all times ol the game.
    Tom Rankin was our scoring star, lor, with his educated toes he helped to make the goals when
    they were most necessary. John Paris, substituting lor G. Tarllinger, who had to go to the hospi-
    tal alter the second game, playeil like a yeteran and made some "beautiful" stops to block many
    of the Balboa onslaughts. )oe Bazan and Bill Wheeler, our luUbacks, played a delensiye game that



    SOCC FR TH.\M





    BASEBALL TEAM



    was very hard to equal even by professionals, and with steady kicks and fighting hearts they got
    the ball out of scoring area numerous times.

    The other players of the team played with as much enthusiasm and due to their steady light-
    ing our players were able to down our Pacific Side Ri\'als.

    Due credit must be given to our opponents as they played soccer like gentlemen and showed
    high sportsmanship for which their coaches must be complimented. Their outstanding players
    were De la Pena, who was their scoring power and who was always with the ball; Durfree, at
    center half back, who helped his team in taking the ball down the field and getting it away irom
    their own goal; and Eldermire and Onderonk in the backtield who played a great game and who
    gave us a great deal ot trouble in getting the ball through tor goals.



    TENNIS TEAM




    60




    TRACK TKAM



    The lirsl game pl.ivcil in Cilslolia! was a game of see-saw, the hall going down one side of the
    field and hacli to the other side. Our teamwork aided us in defeating the Balboa aggregation, for
    we had them puzzled with our passwork. In the lirst quarter, T. Rankin kicked a goal from an
    angular position which Spcchts could not reach. De la Peiia retaliated with a hard kick around the
    penalt.v area which was a mite too hard for our goalkeeper to stop. In the second quarter, the
    two teams plavcd on even scale, nolmd.v getting near scoring position. The third and fourth
    quarters were thrilling from the beginning to the end. Marchosky scored a l>cautilul goal after
    receiving a |X"rlcct pass from Pcscod, who brought the ball down the entire length of the field.
    De la Pena again scoreil, aided bv his teammates, from in front of the goal just out of reach of
    Tarflinger. Pescod came through with a "sizzling" shot from near the center ol the (ield to make
    the winning tallv for our team. Score, 3-2. The referees who handled the game made the two
    teams play snappy and clean soccer and through their refereeing, one of the best games to be
    played in Cristobal was witnessed.



    B.VSKETBALL VE.\>\




    bl



    The second game was one of continuous long kicks in order to get the ball out of the scoring
    zone. De la Pena and J. Salterio would work the ball down the iield, and then one of our backs
    would get it and send it down the field to one of our players. Dc la Pena after working the ball
    to the scoring area with Morales booted the ball into the goal just out of reach of Tarflinger's
    long arms to make the first score of the gams. In the third quarter De la Pefia again booted an-
    other point for his team. In this quarter, our team snapped out of its dreams and made a goal.
    Pescod and Marchosky worked the ball down the field from the center of the field into the goal.
    De la Peiia got the ball on a corner kick and with a neat kick tried for the goal. The ball hit
    the post and bounced back. With a ^light twist of his head he hit the ball to score a point for Bal-
    boa. We came out with blood in our eyes in the last quarter and determined to beat Balboa. We
    took the ball on the first play and Rankin made a long pass Irom the right wing to Pescod who
    made our second tally of the game. We kept trying for the third goal, but the Balboans were
    determined not to lose this game and ;ust as they were in position to score another time the
    whistle blew, ending the game .i-2 in favor of the Balboaites.

    In the third game, we had very little difficuUy in keeping the Balboans from scoring more than
    one goal as we had possession of the ball most of the time, losing it only when we tried for goalshots.
    The first quarter was uneventful, with both teams trying to get the ball in the open without
    success. The second and third quarters were a walk-away for our boys, as we dribbled through
    their defensive and scored twice with ease. Rankin made a goal from in front of the posts after
    our team had brought the ball down the entire length of the field! Wirtz made a nice shot irom the
    lelt side of the field, which went through despite the efforts of T. Alley. Walker came in on a
    high pass from the center of the field to make the only tally that his teammates were able to gather
    in this game. The fourth quarter was slow as we had the ball most of the time and kept passing it
    until the final whistle blew. Score, 2-1, in favor of Cristobal.

    Balboa evened the score in games when we met them the following Saturday on their grounds
    We were held scoreless, although we put up a great fight. We held them to a tie for the first quarter
    but Lipzinski, playing inter-left for Balboa, made a goal after receiving a long pass from Aloises
    de la Peiia. The Balboa hooters must have sensed victory after making their first goal and holding
    us scoreless for a half. In the third quarter they came out onto the field and made two smashing
    goals that could not be handled by J. Paris, our goalkeeper. The last quarter was a rough and
    tumble go for the ball. Score, Balboa 5, Cristobal, 0.

    The deciding game, played in Cristobal, was one in which we showed our supremacy over
    the Balboa soccer team. Each team played with the determination to win or die. Tommy Rankin
    played the game of his life, making two shots that could not have been stopped by any Balboa
    goalkeeper. Balboa started scoring when Durfree made a short pass to Salterio who put it into
    the corner of the goal post out of Paris' reach. Tommy jumped on the next ball and took it down
    the opponents'side of the field by himself and made a long shot that was too fast to be handled by
    the goalkeeper. In the second quarter, Balboa took the lead when Lipzinski scored a nice goal
    after Durfree and Morales brought the ball down the field. Rankin again came into the limelight
    after he and Marchosky brought the ball down the field, and made another shot that was too
    hot to handle. In the last quarter Pescod chalked up another pointer for us when he made a goal
    after receiving a center pass from Rankin. A couple of minutes later, Charlie put the game on ice
    by making a foul shot. We had possession of the ball for the rest of the game not being threatened
    in anv way by our Balboa ri\'als.



    The line ups for the teams are:
    Balboa Positions

    Specht Goalkeeper

    Onderdonk Left Fullback

    Eldermire Right Fullback

    Clark Right Halfback

    Durfree Center Halfback

    Novey Left Halfback

    De la Pena Right Wing

    Walker Inter Right

    Salterio Center Forward

    Lipzinski Inter Left

    A'lorales Left Wing



    Crtslohal
    Tarflinger and Paris
    Bazan
    Wheeler
    Bath
    Pescod
    Lockwood
    Rankin
    Johnston
    Marchosky
    Paris and Eberenz
    Wirtz



    BASEBALL

    Despite the fact tli.il the b.iscb.ill teams of Balboa High and Cristobal High schools were
    evenly matched our rivals defe.ited us in the first three games of a five games series to win the
    inter-scholastlc championship. The Balboa aggregation used some clever "head work for which
    they must be duly praised. It was through this brand of playing that we met our "Waterloo."

    Our second te.im played the last two games against the Balboa substitutes and downed them
    in a fine fashion. The first of these two games was one of the best baseball games ever witnessed
    by High School fans. The game went scoreless for sixteen innings, and In this canto our boys



    62



    managed to put across the nnl v tall v of the game. Some gtioil liall is cxpeclcil ol these voiiiigstcrs
    in tlie coming year.



    The lirst game, played in Cristolial, Oecemhcr 29. was a pitcher's li.ittle liclween Allc.v and
    .^le ide of Dallio.i against Charlie Pesoid. Tlic liits given l>.v these tosscrs were very lew and scat-
    tered. Init the B.illMians li.id the h iniiic ip over us ol h iving pl.iyol hall in the Twilight League,
    thus g lining enough e.sperience to just deleat us l>y one run.

    We scored two runs in the second inning when Me ide alio weil one hit and w.dlied three hatters
    Alley replaced him an Billioa also sceired tw g (me on ice in the ninth inning when they got two hits and two runs, alter one man h ul gotten l>v an error. Score of this g.inic was D.dlio.i 4; Cristoli.d .". Charlie lanned 1.") ol the nicn lio
    faced him to malte .i new strike-out record for Cristobal High School.

    Six runs in the lirst inning is enough to discourage any team, l>ut our fellows fought all the
    harder to try to cut ilowii such a hig lead hut .dl in v.iin.. .Although we lost liy a score of 1 1 to 7,
    B.dlin.i had to play lirst-class l>alj to keep their lead.

    IVscod our southpaw hurlcr, allowed l.'i hits, more than Baltio.i had ever dreamed of
    getting in the past three years. They got them liy using their lie.ids, getting si.\ hits and also six
    runs in the lirst inning.

    Alley relieved Meade who had hurled for seven innings, doing .i line job ol holding us to a
    few scattered hits. These boys pitched like veterans and kept us rather puzzled with their hooks
    and slants.

    By previous agreement of managers, this g.ime w.is calleil in the eighth inning. You never
    can tell what may have happened, but the game should have been linishcd out!

    Playing a game of nick and tuck, both teams were out to win this game, one to cinch the
    series, the other to stave off defeat, but no matter how hard we tried, we were jinxed. Balboa won
    the scries by defeating us by a score of 4 to 5.

    We scored one run in the lirst. one run in the fourth, and our last score was made in the sixth
    when Wheeler came home on a single by Sanders after rcacliing lirst on .i walk .ind stealing
    second

    Ballxia did its scoring by making two runs in the fourth, and two runs in the eight, when
    De la Pena walked, Corrigan beat out a sacrifice, a single by Neville, filled the bags and then
    Meade singleil to send Oe la Peiin and Corrigan across with tying and winning runs.

    .Mthough Ch.irlie Pescod allowed only live hits, they were bunched and were hit just when
    needed. We collecteil eight hits from .Alley's pitches.

    .\ pitchers battle that lasted lor sixteen innings was the main attraction in this game.
    Not until the last out was made was this game finished, as each team ha each inning. George Tarflinger and Pete Corrigan. opposing pitchers, did a line job on the mound
    anti the best team won.

    We scored the only tally of the game in the first of the sixteenth inning. Bob Necly got on
    ba.sc when a slow grounder went through Sutherland, short-stop for the Balboaites and
    scored when Curtis hit a line drive to left field that I'ritlay could not handle.

    Ncely, behind the bat, and .Agncw, playi/ig second base, did some very snappy playing and
    kept the inlield peppy throughout the game.

    .All of the boys that played in this g.imc should be highly complimented for the w.iy they
    pl.iyed.

    .Again our second team did what the V.irsity team could not do. Beat Balboa! The Bal-
    boaites didn't stand a chance of winning this game, as our second team wanted to show u|> the
    Varsity and diti!!

    Our lx)ys defeated their rivals 10-8 in a very uneventful g.ime. We scored one run in the
    first inning, three runs in the third, four in the fourth, and two more in the sixth. Balboa scored
    one in the first, three in the third, two in the sixth and two in the eighth inning, to end the scoring.

    Harold .Agnew suffered a fractured finger in this game while trying to scoop up a ground Udl
    in the third inninc-



    Our representatives and their l>ox scores were:

    EWrenz, ss.
    Marchosky. C
    .Albrrga. cf.
    Pescod. p.

    Tarflinger, rf. and p.
    \\'hceler. II.
    Wirtz. lb.
    R.inkin. ."rtl.



    Ml


    H


    1.-.


    II


    11




    l.->


    1


    1.


    .>


    14


    .">


    .S


    1


    11


    3



    PO


    A


    K


    BO


    (>


    .T


    1





    "


    4


    1


    I


    1


    1


    (1





    IJ


    4


    (1





    T|


    14





    n


    1


    1


    1)


    n


    !.


    n


    1






    Curtis, 2nd._

    Sanders, if _.

    Agnew, 2ncl.

    Pans, rt

    Neely, c.

    Ebdon, 1st. ..

    Stone, rl

    De la Ossa, 2nd..
    Pierce



    AB


    R


    H


    PO


    A


    E


    BB


    18


    o


    4


    6


    8


    4


    1


    14


    n


    n











    o


    8


    1


    4


    4


    9








    4





    1


    1











    10


    1


    1


    18


    9


    1





    11


    1





    ,iO








    1


    o




















    4


    n








    5









    7
    See you next year, Balboa!



    BOYS' TENNIS

    Interciass matches, with the New Cristobal Tennis Club and the Coco Solo officers, were
    featured this year in tennis.

    In the first set of matches with Balboa, Balboa somewhat surprisingly took four matches
    out of five. Bejarano coming through in the usual C. H. S. style, easily took his match.

    Results:



    No.


    1 Singles:


    Henurickson


    (B)


    defeated


    Pescod


    (C),


    4-6,


    8-6,


    6-4.


    No.


    2 Singles:


    Bejarano


    (C)


    defeated


    Fidanque


    (B),


    6-1,


    1-6,


    6-4.


    No.


    3 Singles:


    Arroyo

    G. NOVEY


    (B)


    defeated


    Berry
    Rankin


    (C),


    6-1,


    6-2.




    No.


    1 Doubles:


    R. NoVEY

    Spineli.a


    (B)


    defeated


    Reinhold
    Lock WOOD


    (C)


    7-5,


    2-6,


    6-3


    No.


    2 Doubles:


    McCartney


    (B)


    defeated


    HiLl.


    (C)


    4-6,


    6-2,


    6-4



    The second set of matches was held at Fort Davis, but Balboa's superiority seemed to show
    again when Lockwood. Reinhold, Berry and Campbell were the only ones to come with their
    matches in the bag.





    Results:














    No.


    1 Singles:


    Hendrickson


    (B)


    defeated


    Pescod


    (C),


    6-1, 5-7, 6-4.


    No.


    2 Singles:


    Morales


    (B)


    defeated


    Bejarano


    (C),


    2-6, 7-5, 6-4.


    No.


    3 Singles:


    Arroyo
    Reinhold


    (B)


    defeated


    Rankin

    R. NoVEY


    (C),


    8-10, 6-1, 6-4


    No.


    1 Doubles:


    Lockwood
    Berry


    (C)


    defeated


    G. NoVEY

    McCartney


    (B)


    4-6, 6-2, 6-3


    No.


    2 Doubles:


    Ca.mpbell


    (C)


    defeated


    Spinella


    (B)


    6-4, 6-0.



    The last match was forfeited after our team had won the first set, in order that the Balboa
    team could make train connections.

    The last meet at Balboa featured some rather close and exciting play which the match scores
    did not seem to indicate. Bejarano. Number two man. playing against Henrickson, Balboa's
    Number one man, took his first set and was well on the way to taking the match before his op-
    ponent woke up from his daze.

    Lockwood. our number fi\-e man. playing against Morales, Balboa's second ranking, also
    took his set, slowed down a trifle and then coming back in the third, set the pace until live-all
    when he slowed down a trifle to lose 5-7.





    Results:


















    No,


    1 Singles:


    Henrickson


    (B)


    defeated


    Bejarano


    (C),


    7-9,


    6-3,


    6-2


    No


    2 Singles :


    Morales


    (B^


    defeated


    Lockwood


    (C),


    2-6,


    6-1,


    7-5


    No.


    5 Singles:


    Arroyo
    Fidanque


    (B)


    defeated


    Reinhold
    Elliot


    (C),


    6-3,


    6-4.




    No


    1 Doubles:


    Donavan


    (B)


    defeated


    De la Ossa


    (C)


    6"1


    6-2





    In all events C. H. S. ne.Nt year will have a smooth working tennis team which will be con-
    sistently victorious, the groundwork having been laid this year as shown by the higher rankings
    of the newer members obtiiined this vear.



    The ranking list:

    1. Pescod

    4. Reinhold

    7. Ca.mpbell

    10. Berry



    11.



    Bejarano
    Lockwood
    Hill
    Marchosky

    Stone



    3.


    Rankin


    6.


    De la Ossa


    9.


    Elliot


    12.


    Bath



    64



    TKACK

    The tr.icU meet lu-lil .il I'ort Davis was one of llie ino-.t thrilling and stirring f all llic i'lfcr-
    sfht^lastic athletic cx'cnts held tins \'ear.

    liallH>a came over here with .dl the :issnranei' and ccrtainlv of (living our track team a " liitc
    washing" that would long Ik; rememhereil. But were Ihcv surprised? Never was a team ol the
    I'acilic side so frightened, when, with but the last two relays left, we were leading .'i7-55. Though
    we lost, we had the satisfaction of giving our opponents a run for their money.

    We were under a verv had handicap, due to our poor training facilities, such as a "crali-holc"
    track, a "cement" hur of this. ^\r. Vinton, our coach, drilled us so well that we almost iliil the impossililc in deleating
    the HalUia aggregation, anil lie should lie highlv complimented lor his excellent wi)rk.

    Five new records were estalilished. three 1>\- Cristolial and two l)\- Dallxia. .'^landi .^l.irchoskv.
    Cristobal flash, shattered the hundred yard dash by 1 1 10 second, making the sprint in 10. 'j seconds.
    Also, leaping through the oxone for 207". he was able to smash the old broadjump record by
    16-112".

    Oe la Pen.i. speedy BallHian, came through witli the record breaking time of 2 .lb" in the
    220 yard dash, (leorge Tarflinger. the husky Cristobal weightman. broke the 12 lb. shot-put
    record by putting the shot .i distance i>f .")0'7". The SSO relay team from IJalUia cut off r/2" ol
    the time set by the Cristiib.il te;im in lO.ll.

    Charlie Pescod, giving all his light lor old C. 11. S., high jumped just enough to win over
    Hollow.iy. so-called star of B.dboa. I.loyd .Alberga gave >\oises de la Peiia a stiff battle in both
    the 50 yards and the 220 yards dash to place a good second in each of these events.

    The results of the entire track meet are summarized below:

    }0 J/'/- Dit.rh Time: 5.7 jeconii-

    1. De la Pena. (B)

    2. -Mberga. (Cl

    3. Stephenson. (B)

    /{r,i,i,l .lump l)i.tlance: 20'7" (.NVic Record)

    1. Marchosky. (C)

    2. C.. Novey, (B)
    ,-). llolloway, (B)

    220 1/ J Dash Time 2>.li .tecomis (.V<-ii' Record)

    1. He la Pena, (B)

    2. .\lbcrga (C)

    3. Hall (B)

    Shot VttI Distance jOV" (.V<-.i' Record)

    1. Tarflinger (C)

    2. Westendorff (B)
    .>. Clarke (B)



    /I'l' ,1.1 D.r.h -Time: 10. i seconds

    I .^^archosky (C)
    2. Hall (B)
    7). Rankin (C)

    lli.lh ./um/t~//ei,ild: i'4"

    1. Pescod (C)

    2. llolloway (B)
    .3. S
    Di.'ciis Tlir.u^- Di.rliiiice: 'Jy'2"

    Tarflinger (C)
    2. Westendorff ( B i
    .-1. Duey (Cl

    X,SOj/d. Dash Time: 2min. 21 sec.

    1. Eldermire (B)

    2. Lockwoo .- Ilollowcll (C)



    (.W-KC Recoi.l)



    .lledlev AV/.jy Time: 30.1 seconds
    Won by Ballioa:

    Walker. Hollowav. Stevenson, de la Pefi.i



    fi.SOud. AVAi.v Time: 1 min. >,S.ti .rec. ( .\eu- Record)

    Won by B.-dlxia:

    .\llev. G. Novev. Hall. D. Novev



    BASKETBALL

    Due to the early publication ot our annual, it is impossilile to give a complete summary ol
    the basketball series between the Balboa and Cristobal High School.

    Judging from the results ol the first four games it appears that we will win the championship.
    Our team romped all over our rivals, outplaying them, outshooting them, and outsmarting them,
    in almost every play ot the first three games.

    We won the first three games played, losing the t'ourtli when we were forced to play with
    Pescod out on account of flu. Our team needs to win one more game to cop the series, which
    requires four wins out of seven games.

    Mr. Kenneth Vinton, our coach, whipped the team into condition in two short weeks and
    had it clicking like a group of veteran ball players. He taught the boys some plays that ran our
    opposition literally "off their feet." We owe all the success of our fine team to Mr. Vinton, and
    to the P. Gs. who helped whip the squad into shape by practicing with them.

    Our team is composed of the following players:

    C. Pescod, F.

    T. Rankin. F. (Capt.)

    G. Tarpxinger, C.

    M. Marchosky, G. & C.

    H. LOCKWOOD, G.

    B. Wheeler, G

    Sanders, Barnett, Alberga, and Horine, utility.

    I'ir.fl Gijtnc:

    The Balboa Playshed was the scene ot the tirst cage thriller. Our boys came out the first
    quarter with intentions of making our rivals know that we were masters and succeeded very well.

    The game opened with surprising speed and kept the same pace until the final whistle finished
    the playing.

    Though the score was so close, the game was very unbalanced as our boys had the advantage
    from the beginning of play when Marchosky sank the first field goal until Wheeler put the ball
    through the hoop for the last counter.

    Pescod, diminutive forward, was the scoring star with twelve points to his credit. The entire
    team showed supremacy over Balboa in passing, shooting and teamwork.

    Eskilson, Balboa forward, had our guards puzzled with his type of playing for a quarter or
    so, but was soon stopped when we got used to his style.

    Tarflinger had a "jinx" on Wood, pivot man for the Pacific siders. and kept him worried
    throughout the game.

    Lockwood, Wheeler and Marchosky, played stellar games in holding our opponents to the
    minimum of shots.

    Rankin, Charlie's teammate, aided in bringing the ball down in almost every play. His
    shooting was a bit erratic, but he deserves a lot ot credit for helping us in winning this game.

    The score of this game was 28-24.

    Scconii Game:

    Balboa suffered their second defeat at the Cristolal Playshed, after a two weeks lay-off
    during Easter vacation. We defeated them to the tune of 52-22.

    This game was a rough and tumble exhibition, and fouls were called very often. iMarchosky,
    Rankin, and Lockwood were all thrown out of the game for four personals. A couple of the Balboa
    players also were thrown out for fouls.

    We opened with a rapid attack on the enemy goal, and had them puzzled throughout the
    game. Pescod, with his clever shifting and dead eye for the basket, kept all the Balboans guessing
    as to what was to hapi)en next.

    We had the game in the bag from the beginning of [ikiy till tlic end ol the game.

    Balboa's stars in this game were Novey and Eskilson.

    rhlni Game:

    We made it tlircc m a row the following Friday night with a 58-27 victory over our opjionenls-
    This game was ragged and slow in comparison with the preceding games, and had it not been

    for our sharpshooting at the basket we might have lost.

    Balboa's guards were balllcd on e\ery play and couldn't stop our boys from scoring
    Wheeler, Lockwood, and Marchosky played a great game at guards, while Tarflinger also

    did his share by getting the ball off the basket numerous times. In our forward department,

    Pescod and Rankin couldn't seem to click.

    Both Sutherland ami Eskilson, (f the opposing team, played well, am! it the rest of the Pacific

    aggregation had played as they did, Balboa High School might have given us some competition

    in basketball.

    66



    Fmirlli (iiimr:

    Tliis game, pl.iyccl at Cristolial. was one i>l tlic nIowcsI lia^Uetliiill gaiiivs ever pla.vcil lic(ccii
    llii- two lilgli schools. Tlic shooting on tioth sides was vcrv erratic.

    Tlie services ot Charlie Pescoil, star lorwanl, were missed yreiitl.v. as he was out iil the game
    hec.iuse ol illness.

    Both teams were ragged in passing the hall, and in pulling it llinnigh the hoop lor jMiints.
    The score ol this game was DalUia 14. Cristoli.il 10, the lowest nundier ol points to he scorcil in
    anv haslietttati game plaved lK*twecn Cri'^tttlial and l)aUH>a.

    Kskilson and S|>echt plavett a great game lor our rivals, while Liickwood an the highlight lor Cristnhal.



    ./r the .Inniiiil iioe.t lo /in-.r.r wani cjiiifs lluil Crirloluil lutr umh llie hii.tki-lhiill serif






    0)trlii' ^;tnrtii



    VOLI.KY n.ALL
    First Ga.mk Octohkh 22.

    The lirst game ol' the inter-school volley hall of the season was plaved on Octolier 22 at
    Cristobal. The girls went out onto the lloor with "Iots"or pep and proceetlcd to show the liallMta
    girls that we had some competition to give them. Through the splendid passwork we were alilc to
    win the lirst two sets liut unaMe to take the third set as most of the players were tired out. The
    scores were 21-19, 22-20, .tntl lS-21. The following plavers represented Cristobal: Eliz.'dieth
    Hayes (Capt.), Betty Steller, Rntli W'lUingsl.id. .^lary Ann Carriithers. Grace Bejarano, and
    Dot. Birkehnul: our suhstitutes were Mildreil Owen, .^largarct Reinhoid, Helen Aanstoos. .uid
    Doris Stroop.
    Si-x'oNi) Ga.mk (Xtouku 29.

    This game was playetl over at B.-dlx^a on October 29, when B.'ilhoa wiis figain ticle.'ited. Tlie
    games were hist anil both teams showeil splendid passwork. The same line-up was u.scti with tlic
    exception ol Helen Afinstoos going in to relle\'e Mary .Ann Carruthers in the la*it g;ime. The
    scxircs were 21-19. 21-15. and 10-21.
    Tmni) Ga.mk Novk.muer 5.

    On November 5 we played Ballioa again on our own floor but somehow or other the girls
    di sets but had to light hard to take them. The scores were 22-20, 21-11 to our one game which ended
    with the score of 22-20- The line-up was the s.imc as the previous game.
    KoiKTii Ga.mk Nove.mbkr 12.

    The Cristobal girls journeyed to Ballx>aon November 12 with hopes of taking all three games.
    This Saturday the girls, showing their old spirit much better and with the aid of the nct-womcii
    and spleiulid passwork, took the lir>;t two games with the scores of 21-16 and 22-20. The same
    line-up was used as in the tirst game of the season.
    Kirrii Ga.mk Novk.miikr 19.

    The last g.'inie of the series was played in Cristob;d on Noveml>er 19. jBoth te;ims were tle-
    termined to win and as Cristobal only needed take the lirst game: liowevcr, we were unable to do so, but we did take the second g.imc alter a
    hard light. Cristobal's score was 21-14 and B.dboa's was 21-18. The regular team pl.iyeil the whole
    game. Cristobal won the series by taking eight games out the'scheduled lifteen games.



    BASKETBALL
    First Ga.mk Jani-arv 7.

    Cristobal journeyed to BalUia to play the lirst game of the series on Janury 7. The girls
    did their best to stop Ballma, but somehow or other were unable to do so. .Although cver.v girl
    played hard and tried to do her part, they were all unable to stop Balboa. The score was .14-9.
    Cristobal's line-up was as follows: Forw.irils, Rliz.ibeth Hayes, Ruth Wikingstad, and Margaret
    Reinhoid; Guards, .^\illy f)wen, Helen Aanstoos anil Betty Stetler: Centers, Dot. Birkcland
    (Capt.), Betty Stetler. and Mary .Ann Carruthers.
    Skconii Ga.mk Janiary 14.

    Balboa come to Cristobal this S.iturday to play the seconil game of the live game series. This
    game started out much better than the one before with Cristobal showing more brilliant pl.iying
    and passwork. Throughout the whole game the girls plaved their liest. determined to win but
    lound it impossible to do so. This game ended with the score of 2.T-19. f.ivor ol BallK>a. The
    same line-up was used as the week licforc

    67



    Third Game January 21.

    For the third game of the series, Cristobal went to Balboa. On this day Cristobal again tried
    its best to win the game but fate was against it again. The game was about the fastest and hardest
    plaved of the season. The regular team played the whole game and it ended with the score of
    25-15.
    Fourth Ga.me January 28.

    On January 28. Balboa came over to Cristobal bringing most of her substitutes instead of
    her regular team and still determined to beat us. However, this time Cristobal tooled her by
    taking all the points in the first quarter. Balboa at once put in her two star players but was
    still unable to stop the splendid passwork of Cristobal. The game was fast and ended with the
    score of 58-9.



    INDOOR BASEBALL

    Somehow or other, there wasn't much interest shown in the Girls' Indoor Baseball this year
    and just a few of the Varsity girls showed up at practice. Aliss Bailey and Mr. Franks planned
    to drop the sport, but if this had been done it would have made us lose our chance to win the cup.
    The gym class came to the rescue, however, and played the baseball schedule, tor which much
    credit should be given them.
    First Ga.me Fekruay 26.

    Balboa came to Cristobal to play the tirst game of the indoor baseball series on Feb. 26
    Both teams worked hard, but Balboa showed the better brand of playing and won by the scor
    of 45-5. The following girls represented Cristobal: Margaret Reinhold (Capt. )-c., Eileen Ford-p.,
    Victoria Hollowell, 1st Base, Alary .Vnn Carruthers, 2nd Base, Betty Stetler, 5rd base. Sister
    Hayes. S.S.. Hojie Hollowell, r. I., .\nn Gibson. 1. f.. The substitutes were Ruth Wikingstad and
    Olga Roe.
    Second Ga.me March 4.

    In the second game, which was played in Balboa, fewer errors were made than in the previous
    game, and the girls played much better as a whole. But still Cristobal was unable to beat Balboa
    and lost 26-12. The same line-up was used as in the lirst game.
    Third Ga.me March 11.

    Balboa won the last game of the series, thereby taking one more sport toward the cup. The
    Balboa girls outclassed Cristobal in all the games but this time the girls settled down and Balboa
    won by the close score of 8-6. Thisshowed that Cristobal really could have had a chance ot winning
    the past games if more spirit had been shown at the beginning ot the season.



    GIRLS TENNIS
    FIRST MEET:

    At the first meet played at Balboa April 22. the Cristobal girls lost two out ot the three
    matches to Balboa. They lost the 2 singles matches and won the doubles.

    VOLLEYB.ILL TE.^.M




    68




    UASKETBAI.L CIvXM



    .V,>. / .SV/,.;/,-.r
    D. Griffin (BHS) (iefeatcl Kliz. Hayes (CHS). 4-6; 6-0; 7-5.

    All. Siiijih:'
    Edith Baker (BHS) defeated A\.d.clle Bliss (CHSK 6-3; 6-4.

    /),.///./<..
    Stctler and W'iekingstad defeated Micliaelson and Johannes, 1-6; 6-3; 6-2.
    SECOND MEET:

    At this meet Cristobal was more successtul. winning 2 out of 3 matches. It wa-; pl.iyed on
    the home courts on April 29, 19.33.

    A'... : Sin.iU-.'

    Ellz. Haves (CHS) defeated Dorothv Griflin (BHS), 6-3; 8-6.

    DoKhl...-
    First set L)c la Pefia and (luardia (BHS) won from Wickingstad and Stetler (CHS I. ()-l.
    Second set Wickingstad and Stetler (CHS) won fron> loliannes and .^lichaelson (BHS). 6-2.



    (A.M t.I .\SS




    69




    Third set \\'lcltmgstncl and Stetler (CHS) won from de la Peiia an
    THIRD MEET:

    The final meet was played May 6, 1935 at Balboa and Cristobal won all three matches Irom
    their opponents. This decided the outcome of the series in Cristobal's ia\-or.

    ^o. J Smites
    M. Bli.ss (CHS) won from E. Baker (BHS), 4-6; 6-3; 6-4.

    .^o. 2 Singles
    E. Hayes (CHS) won from D. Griffin (BHS), 4-6; 6-2; 6-2.

    Douhlts
    R. W'icUingstad and B. Stetler (CHS) won from R. Johannes antl T. Michaelson (BHS),



    BOWLING TE.^.M




    70




    IL'NIOK HIGH SCHOOL FACULTY

    From li-tl In rinhl; Miss K-n^cn, Miss KInvr, Miss NfUnn, Mi-is Fity,
    MiHS F.rli-I, Miss Bt-Hvcrs, Miss BozL-man.



    THE lUXIOR HIGH SCHOOF.



    One of the many new features in the
    195.3 "Caril)hean" is a section devoted to
    the Junior High School. The suggestion
    that this group he given an opportunity
    to identify itself with the Senior High
    year-lxiok met with a very enthusiastic
    response from the students of grades
    seven and eight. It was hoped that a
    large numlier ot contributions de;iling
    with the various activities of Junior High
    would he submitted to the "Caribbean"
    staff for publici'.tion in this section. Al-
    though the amount r.i' material offered
    this year was rather small, we are not
    discourageil, since the students of Junior
    High had no previous experience in this
    sort of work. With a new building, and
    the many facilities offered in connection
    with it, it will be possible for these young-
    er students to organize their own clubs,
    athletic organizations, and class groups.



    .-.nd we shall welcr-me the opportunity to
    a.id them in gaining recognition by in-
    cluding write-ups and pictures in the
    "Caribbean." By means of these organi-
    zations in the seventh i"nd eighth grades,
    it is hoped that a large amount of valua-
    ble experience will l)e gained by the
    students participating, and that this
    experience will make the ( rganiz.'tions in
    Senior High even more valui'.ble than
    they are at present. \\'ith all the grades
    organized, the entire school should be
    able to show marked improverrent in so
    far as ability to carry out various types
    of school activities is concerned. We are
    confident that the Junior High is ready
    to demonstra.te its eagerness to launch
    its school organizations, and their section
    should be one of the most interesting sec-
    tions of the 19.>4 "Caribbean."




    71




    EIGHTH GRADE BOYS




    3lmtt0r iitiili ^rl^nnl




    EIGHTH GRADE GIR! S




    72




    Sl-:\KNTI1 GKAUE bulS




    diuninr iiiiiih ^rlmnl




    SKVKNTII r,R AUK niHI.S





    HONOR STUDENTS

    Rcadina; left to right: Phillip Reidell, Blanche Howe, Kathleen
    Phillips, Robert Rcppa, Betty McCleary,
    and Bohhy Reinhold.



    AMERICAN LEGION AWARD



    This year the American Legion. Post of
    Cristobal began the annual policy of
    awarding to the boy and girl from the
    eighth grade bronze medals for being
    outstanding in the class. The outstand-
    ing students uere nominated in each
    liomeroom and then voted upon by the
    students and the teachers. Robert Reppa
    and Kathleen Phillifs were chosen as
    the most outstanding bey and girl in the
    eighth grade class on the foIlo\\ing basis:
    (20% each).

    HONOR: Strength and stability of
    character; high standards of
    conduct: keen sense ot what is
    right; adherence tc truth and
    ccnscience, and devotion to du-
    ty and practice of clean speech.

    COURAGE: Bravery in the face of
    opposition and danger, and grit
    tc stand up for the right and



    one's duty.
    SCHOLARSHIP: Scholastic attain-
    ment; evidence of industry and
    application in studies.

    LEADERSHIP: Ability to lead and
    to accomplish through group
    action

    SERVICE: Kindliness, unselfishness,
    fellowship; protection of the
    weak and the promotion of the
    interests and welfare of asso-
    ciates without hcpe of personal
    award.

    The school most certainly has Captain
    M. W. Basieux to thank for the starting
    of this annual affair, of which a similar
    type has begun in the high school. At
    all times do the school children find Cap-
    tain Basieux most thoughtful and co-op'
    eratlve.



    74



    "TOURIST AN'I) NON'IOLRISI'

    .//<;/// Diir/ri/ '

    "1 l((.-g vuiir p;iriliin," s iniiii.'il ;is llicv IiiiisIk'iI |i;ist .lU'. I limki-il
    ti|i ill limo til si'f tlii'ii- tiiiii'1-.ls (lisappc.'ir
    iiilti a iliiulu simp. I rii||(iAt.-il (hi-iii in as
    I was slioppinu' In Kft a piv'ioiit lor a
    friciul.

    The store was like anv other lliiulii
    store vou niii;!)! enter: glass showcase.-.,
    along the siiles and at one enil ; Oriental
    carpets on the tileil iloors; small, low
    smoking slanils anil tea-tal>les. carved
    magnilicentlv and highU' polishetl; Span-
    ish shawls were thrown carelulK"" o\er
    chairs; hanging on the walU were tapes-
    tries. In the showcases were amher and
    ivory heads, bracelets, earrings, and
    small Buililas anil other small figures.
    C.'irelully placeil on cotton w(m)I aiul in
    small lio.xes were pieces ol jade jewel rv
    There were also pajamas and kimonas ol
    all colors, |>igskin purses anil things so
    cftcn I'rund in Hindu shops.

    The tourist who had pushed past mc
    wanilereil aroiiml until she saw something
    she liked ami walked over to it. "How-
    much is it?" she asked the attendant that
    came up to serve her.

    He thought for a moment and said at
    length, "Fifteen dollars."

    "That's too much," she protesteil,
    "it's not worth it."

    "Well, you're a tourist, yes? So I give
    it to yru for twelve.

    I walked over to the other side of the
    room, dodging a stand or two, and picked
    up the exact replica of what she had
    pickeil up. "Hiiw much?" I askeil a
    clerk.

    He looked at it .iiid sitiil, "Fifteen
    dollars."

    I said as she hail diine, "That's loo
    much!"

    "Well," he saiil, "You not a tourist,
    so I give it to vou for twelve."



    ".\T THE WH.VRF"
    Jaci/uf/ine Bri.fcoe '>/"

    Let us mingle with these Inizzing
    bees! Hoarse, hellowing and screeching
    cries of the weary lishermen rise ahove
    the shifting of nets, docking of crafts.



    .'rr.-nging of fish, and li.ilililing ol voices,
    which are bartering lor suilalile prices in
    selling their catch.

    .\s .1 stiickly-luiilt llsherin.'n comes
    tuw.'rd us. cl.'il mostly in patihed g;r-
    menls, which give Neptunian .'ir com-
    mon to theiii. Iiut rather oilensive to the
    hysti'iider, he ie(|iiests, with an ini|uiring
    lock thi't we purchase some lish, .\lter a
    rather lengthy story of the h;'rilslii|-,s and
    small gains reali/.ed irom his long hours
    at work, at his suggestion I ex.tmined the
    dilterent varieties ol lish. .\inong the
    drali grey colors the parrot lish stood out
    in contrast, with its nire shailes. Deing
    especially interesteil in the parrot lish
    liec.'use ol its conspicuous colors, I
    liought one for a very small sum.

    Passing through this cosmopolitan
    crowd, we loitereil at the various ohjecls
    that arouscil our curiosity, until we h.ul
    oliserveil, to our satislaction. .ill the
    glamour r.l this cnlorlul scene.



    .\ SILVERY HIGHW.\Y'

    ) iiliiiiiiii Salo.f '/"

    I think that one of the loveliest sights
    that can he seen on the Isthmus is Gatun
    Lake at moonlight. The moon reflects
    on the water splashing and rippling a-
    gainst the rocks at the surface of the
    lake. .\s you look at it, it gives you the
    impression that you are looking at a
    broad silvery highway, never coming to
    an end. At either side of the lake are
    seen the black, irregular shatlows of the
    trees peeping into the water. Farther
    back are the gloomy and irregular moun-
    tains, completing the outline of this pic-
    turesque scene. If you want to see
    something really beautiful go out to
    Gatun Lake at moonlight, anil see 'he
    "SiKerv llichwav."



    "IIAZIXG"
    Jean If'al.di > ~



    When you think of l>eing a freshman,
    you naturally think it's wonderlul. Then
    some perstm brings up the subject ol
    initiation. Your cheerful expression
    chances, and you mutter uniler your
    breath like "Why did that |x-rson ever
    have to come arrund?"



    7:.



    Before you realize it, the next year
    begins, and "Field Day" is just a few
    days off. Then the glorious day dawns.
    After being made to pull a car, you're
    forced to carry signs denouncing your-
    self, for instance "We dumb Scobies" cr
    "Down with the Freshmen."

    Then the fun begins at the field. Or
    is it fun?

    The Sophomores have planned for a
    year to get their revenge, and now here's
    their chance, and what a chancel

    Sometimes they are successful, or per-
    haps it is the other way around. Then
    comes the flour fight and you emerge
    like a platinum blonde or a person who
    has never seen the sun. Next comes the
    paddles and you hear, "How in the world
    will they ever expect us to sit dorni for a
    week?" Tug-of-war comes and the Soph-
    omores give the Freshmen a look like a
    thundercloud, and probably your hands
    are blistered from pulling, but you keep
    thinking, "We've got to beat 'em." So
    you stick.

    The day is one never to be forgotten,
    and it's soon over. You go home most
    likely with a good coat of green paint,
    lipstick, and rouge applied in streaks and
    spots, and somewhere all the illbred
    Sophomores have kicked you and you
    are blistered in different places from dif-
    ferent things.

    But a little smile comes to you because
    you're thinking, "Oh, won't we take it
    out on the green Freshmen next year,
    though."



    he isn't being heard, and calls for the at-
    tention of the pupils. Things soon begin
    to get organized a,nd quieted down. Then
    the freshman decides she isn't going to
    have such a bewildering time after all.



    "THE BEWILDERED FRESHMAN"

    Ru//i Jloodi/ '37

    After eight long years of steady grind-
    ing she has at last reached one cf the most
    important steps in her lile. Entering the
    building she stands, "The bewildered
    Freshman," with the map ot the year in
    her hand, not knowing which way to
    turn. She sees teachers and pupils hur-
    rying and scurrying around her. After
    going into the assembly she sees and
    hears almost everyone talking at once.
    What a babble!

    The teacher is speaking it seems as
    though he is listing the rules and regula-
    tions of the coming year. He soon realizes



    "JAMES, A NEGRO BOY"

    Jlar/orie J ane '38

    My maid has a mischievous boy named
    James. She says he is "perezoso. He
    has a CP.t named Gatonon. I believe he
    named it that because "gato" means cat
    in Spanish. Sometimes James goes fishing
    and brings back "pescados" as he calls
    the fish. I often pity poor Gatonon, be-
    cause he whines so piteously for fish and
    his reward is a "yank" ot his tail.

    I am not at all fond of James nor his
    cruel pranks. Sometinies he ties Gatonon
    to a pole, places a fish just out of reach,
    walks off and laughs to hear Gatonon
    howl for the fish and liberty, then returns
    and picks up the fish, walks off and leaves
    Gatonon there. Sometimes I set him
    free.

    James is very heartless. He beats
    Gatonon very cruelly at times. I would
    like him to know how it is to suffer like
    that. I believe James, for one, will never
    understand Gatonon's feelings.



    "STUDENT COOPERATION"

    Louise de la Ossa '37

    Student cooperation is the backbone of
    the whole school system; therefore it will
    be necessary to have student cooperation
    when we enter the new high school.

    The new school has cost the govern-
    ment hundreds of thousands of dollars.
    Each student should make it his d\ity to
    refrain from destroying school property,
    and see that other students do likewise.
    If we start out in the right way, other
    classes will follow.

    We would not think of destroying some
    valuable possessic.n of our own, and since
    the new school has been built for the
    benefit and use of the students, every
    student should take the same care of the
    school as though it were his own.

    Certain liberties will be offered in the
    new school, and if the proper advantage
    is taken cf them, we will have an ideal
    school svstem.



    76




    H u m n r

    If'illiitni Kcenan '>>



    An amhassailor (o France, who tlid not
    speak llic language of that foiintrv at the
    time he took his new post, attendetl his
    first formal luncheon ami maile a speech,
    which was received with nati\e poiitx-ncss
    liv the guests who did not imderstand
    Knglish.

    Alter the American had acknowledged
    the applause, he sat ilown anil listenetl to
    a Frenchman who made what sounded like
    n flowerv speech in his own language.

    Not wishnig to he outdone in corthality
    the ambassador at each pause in the tlis-
    course applauiled loudl.v. This diil not
    appear to please his wile, who Irowned at
    at him repeatedly hut tailed to discourage
    him.

    She linallv sent a note to the speaker's
    table telling him that what he was applau-
    ding so generously was a translation ol
    his own speech.



    .\ boxer in training was asked bv a
    bystander what he was doing.

    On replying that he was shadow-boxmg
    the bystander said, "Well, why don't you
    hit the shadow?"

    "Oh, I'm iust waiting for the shadow to
    hit first." snappeil the bo.xer.



    A country hick once saw a mirror lor
    sale, ant! thinking it was a picture ol his
    son. bo-jght it and hid it up in th^- attic.
    His wife, knowing that he hail something
    up there, but not knowing what it was,
    went up and searcheil th.- attic until she
    founti it. Then she instantly exclaimed,
    "So this is the hag you have been running
    arounil with lately."



    \ man was carrying some bananas, and
    when asked where he was going, he ans-
    wered. "Oh, I am going out with the
    bunch..



    .^Ir Hackett has so many wrinkles on
    his forehead that he has to screw on his
    hat.



    .\n .American tourist was sight-seeing
    in Rome, and from all appearances, he
    wasn't enjt>ying himsell any too well.
    Suddenly the guide stoppetl the bus, and
    pointeil to an ornate lountain on the side
    ol the roail.

    "Ff you throw a coin in there," said he,
    "you will never be able to rest until you
    come back to Rome.

    "Oh, yeah, snorted the .American as he
    reached for the door hanille.

    "Where are you going?, "asked the guide

    "To pull a coin out of that pool," he
    snapped, "iust to prove that I ilon't want
    to be here even now."



    Ernest Jaramillo, strange to say, was
    very slow at arithmetic in the lower
    grades, anti his teacher hail particular
    difficulty in making him learn to sub-
    tract.

    "FvOtik here." she sai yi>u hati eight pjnnies and lost three,
    how many wouKI you have left?"

    Jaramillo thought for a minute.

    "But lor vy." was his puzzle "should I lose three pennies?"



    I't'rltme Teller: ".\ndyouare going to
    marry a short, s'im. blomic girl.

    Clmrlie P.: "Can't you be specific
    that description tits all four."



    lur.rt school po.'.'ip: "Do you kni>w Bil-
    ly Hollowell has three eggs every morn-
    ing for his breakfast?

    Second S. G: "Why three eggs?
    First S. G.: "Oh. one for himself and
    two for his shirt."



    77



    DICKSTER'S WEBTIONARY

    Atom the first man.

    Beaker larger

    Convection cake or candy

    Inductionmethod of getting acquaint-
    ed.

    Ion heavy metal found in razors.

    Manual common Spanish name.

    Molar solution Listerine

    Secant 1 160th of a minute.

    Sine a notice

    Tangent an Ethiopian

    Vector a winner

    Volt to cast a ballot

    Cuts slang term denoting courage

    Classes receptacles for liquid

    Chapel French for hat.

    Principal's list the headman's uneven
    walk.

    Overcuts heavy outside garments
    worn in winter.

    Laboratory pertaining to Labrador,
    a Northern peninsula.

    Science painful ailment of the nose
    and forehead.

    Quota two bits.

    Boat meaning two.

    Ship to drink coffee or tea slowly.

    Tram to take your partner's ace.

    Gull one of the female sex.

    Shark to astound or surprise.

    Whale to cry like a baby.

    Santa Claus a myth.

    Cheer something to sit on.

    Buoy One of the male se.x.

    Shirk part of wearing apparel.

    Coat to woo some fair young maiden.

    Risk part of the arm.

    Bells things that come in at the first of
    the month.

    Cards ^you know, ye cards.

    Holly to yell

    Seals Frame work of a window.

    Snow a negative adverb.

    So.x the difference between male and
    female.

    Toys neckwear.

    Tree a number.

    Yule contraction of you will.
    Dictionary of Scientific Terms
    Cahrie the third balcony in a theatre.
    Klemenl a large animal in the circus.
    Purelle a little bureau.
    Cenltmeler a bug with a hundred legs.

    Jlatpicl a bug that lives on dead people
    Solute & gesture directed to un army
    officer.



    Atom the first man.
    Logarithm music of the woods.
    lintiinom/ what a divorced guy pays to
    his former wife.

    Barium what you do to dead people.
    Caesium the man who conquered all
    Gaul.

    Copper a policeman.

    Gold a disease that you get in the winter-
    time.

    Ion what the washerwoman uses.
    Zinc something that you wash dishes in.
    Indudoi a guy that takes up money in
    the street car.



    HOLD ON TIGHT

    Crowded Clubhouse. (Young lady is
    vainly groping tor her pura; to pay her
    ticket.)

    Young JJan: "Pardon me, miss, but
    may I not pay your ticket?

    Younc) Lad}/: "Sir!"

    (Several seconds of groping.)

    YounffJlan: "I beg your pardon again
    young lady, but won't you let me pay
    your ticket.?

    Young Ladi/: "Why, I don't even
    even know you, and anyway, I'll have this
    purse opened in a minute.

    (Continued groping.)

    Young JJan: "I really must insist on
    paying your fare. You've unbottoned my
    suspenders three timesl



    "Ah, Watson," commented the prospec-
    tive Sherlock, "I see you changed 3'our
    underwear.

    "Marvelous, Holmes how'dyou know?"
    "Well, you've forgotten to put your
    trousers on ...



    When you first saw this
    You like other suckers

    Thought it was a poem.
    But we beg to say
    It's not!



    Last night I held a little hand.

    So pretty and so sweet,

    I gazed at it with loving looks,

    I fondled it with joy;

    No other hanti unto my soul.

    Can greater solace bring.

    Than that one which I held last night

    Four Aces and a King!



    78



    TF.ACIIKKN Al.l.

    (iloriil Jlitnnix >-/

    HACK Kir

    It seems lli.it >\r. H.ukctt i.iii
    With greatest e.ise ami speeil,
    Reel out the wars ami treaties too.
    Ami tell wliiili states seietlel

    >\KYKR

    Ami y\r. Alever can tell \'oii luw
    The Freshman Class is dimili.
    And how to form a |>enta(:oii
    Ami tliiniis whii'li leave me numh'

    KIMURO

    It also seems tli.it .^\iss Kimliro,
    Who's traveled t.ir awa.v.
    Knows all alHiul the Knglish rules.
    For *\*an" aiul "lav" ami "m.t\ !"

    VINTO.X

    In X'liiton's class c learn siiih things
    .As weight or gravitv.
    We also hear of molecules.
    But this's "Greek" to me!

    SPENCKR

    Phil Spencer knows her Spanish well
    She'll tell \ou anvthing
    From Gtn'ii's iirt to Spanish poems.
    To her vour tiucstions bring!

    liROWN

    She checks vour cards anil h.imls tut Ikxiks,

    .Vnd also charges dues.

    .\ntl hushes \-ou w-hen loud von get.



    So



    miml vour "p's" and "q's!*



    MOORE

    She teaches French to eager ones.
    And makes them conjugate.
    This liusv one. her name is Almire.
    (Gum chewers she tloes hatc>!



    HOW lO I \KK A I'l.N \I.

    I'lrsl III all ask vniir tcaciici- how iiiati.v
    ptiints vnii iK'cil ( Maik-mmsclk- ik- Parlcz-Vous as he
    wliiiios, "You sliall luit pass. Kniliarrass
    him further li.v asking wli.it liimk the
    course prescribes.

    Go home anil look at hook. He mav
    ask lor the name of the author in lhee.\am.
    Spend tlav woniiering what he will ask.
    Join kids in merrvmaking the night lielore.

    Go loe.xam with newspaper in one hand,
    cigarette in pocket, and a lianana sticking
    out ol lapel pocket. Deign not to speak as
    you enter room. Snatch hlue hook Irom
    instructor.

    Sit in hack 111 rooin, park feet on seat
    in front, and calmly imfold newspaper.
    Whistle as you read. Scorn teacher as he
    reminds you that you should lie working.
    Reniind him ol difference in social position.
    Kat lianana and ilrop skin over your hcid,
    causing class to titter. Be nonchalant.
    Smoke a cigarette. W'henyoii are told.vou
    must not smoke, I lick ashes on teacher's
    shoes. Resume reading newspaper. .After
    an hour or so, look at the questions. You
    might know the answers to a couple of
    them. Fling blue book away with disgust.
    It's a lot of trash, anyway. Rise, look
    coolly about the HMim, and stritle out,
    banging heels on floor as you walk. Don't
    bother to look for a grade after a day or so.
    You flunk!



    .N\AC llONAI.l)

    She discourages voiing hopeliils.

    Who think that thev can p.iint.

    \\ hen thev know not the rcil Irom green.

    ("Tho never does she faint )!"

    ANDERSON

    She teaches Ivanhoe to Frosli.
    Ami thev must also learn.
    R.v memorv. .^lark .\ntlionv.
    Also whv did Trfiv liiirn!



    'Twas the eve before finals.

    And all through the house.

    Not a student was studying.

    Not even a louse.

    For men may come anil go.

    Anil nothing mav happen at all.

    But life goes on anil on.

    And stuilents just stall and stall.



    .^Ir .^U'V;.T useil to work on a railroad
    up in a ba.kwdods county in the Stales.
    and he once had an argument with a brake-
    man over h'nv ti^ pronounce the name
    "Furelia. Passengers were often startled
    upon arriving at this station to hear y\v.
    .^Icvcr, who was the coniluctoryell. "You
    re a liar, you're a liar. Then Irom the
    brakeman at the other end, woulil come
    the crv, "\ on reallv are, vou reallv arc.



    I'lcrl: "Ha\eyiiu heard the snake song?"

    . Uiirirl: "No, what is it '.'

    I'lcii:" One more hiss, then gtmd-night.



    dt



    " I his is the skull ot a man who was
    shipwrccketl for two years on a desert
    island with two chorus girls." "How did
    he ilie? "He wore himself out tearing
    down the signals they put up."



    79



    You have probably heard severa'
    stories about Shaw, but have you ever
    heard this one?:

    He once missed his umbrella from the
    stand at his club. Consequently, he
    Dosted a notice in the hall requesting
    the nobleman who had removed his um-
    brella to kindly replace it.

    A friend asked him if it wasn't rather
    crude sarcasm to say "nobleman.

    "Not at all," retorted Shaw. "The
    constitution of this c'ub states that it is
    composed of "noblemen and gentlemen."
    He couldn't be a gentleman and take my
    umbrella, could he?"



    A rather absent-minded professor who
    was driving along a country road, of-
    fered a stranger a lift. The stranger ac-
    cepted, and shortly afterwards the pro-
    fessor noticed that his watch was missing.

    Whipping out a revolver he carried in
    the car, he shoved it into the man's ribs
    and demanded him to hand over the
    watch! The man meekly complied before
    being ordered out of the car. Then the
    professor went on his way priding himself
    on his cleverness.

    When he arrived home, his wife greeted
    him saying:

    "How did you get along today without
    your watch? You left it on your dresser
    this morning."



    Pathetic Case No. 1,498,01331 is that
    of the doctor who treated a man three
    years for jaundice and then discovered he
    was Japanese.



    Doctor: "Is the patient coming around
    all right?"

    Xurse: "Oh yes, he has started to
    blow the foam off his medicine already."



    Undoubtedly you have all heard of sad
    preachers, but the saddest preacher I have
    ever heard of went from Posey County,
    Indiana, to Pike County, Miss. He was
    starving to death on donations of catfish,
    possum, and a hundred dollar salary.
    Finally he made up his mind to go away.
    ^^'ith wet eyes he stood up in the prayer
    meeting to bid goodbye to his weeping con-
    gregation.

    "Brothers and sisters", he said, wiping
    his eyes on his red bandana handkerchief,
    "I have called you together tonight to say
    farewell. The Lord has called me to
    another place. I don't think the Lord loves
    you people much because none of you
    seem to die. He doesn't seem to want you,
    and you don't seem to love each other, for
    I have never married any ot you, and I
    don't thinkyou love me, for you don't pay
    me my salary and your donations are
    mouldy fruits and wormy apples." By their
    fruits ye shall know them.

    "And now. brothers and sisters, I am
    going to a better place. I have been
    appointed chaplain at the penitentiary at
    Joliet. 'Where I go ye cannot come; but
    I go to prepare a place for you.'



    Yottnp hiishand: "Last night when I
    got home, my wife had my chair drawn
    up before the fire, my slippers ready for
    me to put on, my pipe filled, and

    Pessiniid: "How did you like her new
    hat?"



    Everybody knows that many a nobody
    who isn't known by anybody becomes a
    somebody and is known by everybody,
    and everybody tells him he knew him
    when he was a nobod3' though he knew
    he would be somebody someday.



    The top sergeant sang out just before
    the company was dismissed: "All those
    fond of music step two paces forward."

    With visions of a soft job in the regi-
    mental band, half a dozen men stepped
    out.

    "Now then" cried the sergeant. "You
    six chaps get busy and carry the grand
    piano in the basement up to the officers'
    quarters on the seventh floor.



    Fond parent: "\\'hat did the teacher
    say about your theme?'

    B. Beers: "Oh. she said it looked like
    it was written by a left-handed man with a
    post office pen, in the rumble seat of a
    second hand car."

    Fond parent: ".^ly dear, anything else?"

    B. Beers: "She said that she thought
    the car was on a detour.



    80



    MoyjL




    MRTISEHEHIS



    ^Ill -IIICHlll ^^ifLZllll^ )|f^N






    Jin A^tprrriattun tn (Our A^urrliii^ni

    T\7'7'E wish to impress upon our








    VV leaders our iiidcbtcdticss to


    I!=






    the advertisers for the backing they
    have given us. Without thcii aid
    the Caribbean could not have gone








    to press. In oider to make certain








    that the ads will not be overlooked
    we have combined them with jokes.
    We urge that our readers "Patron-
    ize Our Advertisers."




    uj lyj

    V^lli ^llrn|li 'Halle Hf^



    XXXXXKXXXKXXKXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX:-



    ;XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXI




    '1^ 11 K iA X A M A II OS irr A I.

    PANAMA CI IV. IV. <.l IV

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:


    81



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    XM**



    xx:-::':>:xx:-:x:-:xxxxxx:-:xxxxxxxxxkxx;-::-::::-;:-:x::xxxkxkxxxxxxxxkxxxxxxxxxk;-;x:';:-"-:xxx

    French Drug Store ^



    FRONT STREET, 1.021



    COME HERE FOR EVERYTHING YOU NEED



    Quality a^2£/' Prices of our Goods defy competition

    Our Prescription Department under the care of registered and competent pharmacists. Keep in your mind

    "FRENCH DRUG STORE" and you will save both money and health.

    HOME DELIVERIES

    Four languages spoken: Spanish, English, German O'lt/^ French.

    V. DEr^(4ADO M.

    IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXt'VXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXB



    Chris 0.: "There were thirteen men
    under an umbrella, and only one got wet."

    Edwin H.: "Oh, you are gassing, how
    could they keep dry?"

    Chris: "It wasn't raining."

    i?(/u'//!. "Well how did the one get wet?"

    Chris: "He went home and took a
    bath."



    Kind old aunt: "And why didn't Santa
    bring you anything, Elsie?

    Doll-Jaced child: "Doggone it. Auntie,
    I trumped Father's ace in a bridge game
    Christmas Eve.



    Mr. M's favorite subject for argument
    is:" Which came first, the hen or the egg?"



    xxxxx:-



    COMPLIMENTS OF



    AMERICAN TRADING CO., Ltd.



    :XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXB

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXKXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXHXXXXI



    .llr. Hackett, absent-mindedly: "From
    whom did the U. S. purchase the Russian
    territory?"

    Henri/ Lee: "Oh, from Alaska."



    He: "Love is blind."
    She: "Yes but the neighbors aren't.
    Pull down the shades."



    Jliss Kimhro: "It is practically impos-
    sible to live in an English speaking country
    all your life without hearing and quoting
    Shakespeare.

    JFise cracking student, und''r his breath:

    "Oh, yeah, what about a deaf and dumb
    person?"



    ixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:-



    ....A.'TA.'.A.



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X

    X p. O.

    X
    X

    xxxxxx:



    BOX, 435



    COMPLIMENTS
    OF

    Chung Hing

    COLON, R. R



    TELEPHONE 564



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    ;-:XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXHXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXB

    82



    X



    IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX^XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX"

    Gatun Gardens Flower Shop i

    9lh ancf Front Street. Colon. K. P.



    X
    X



    FLOWERS of BETTER QUALITY
    SEKVICE THAT liXCLLS



    DAY PHONE:
    COLON. .111



    NIGHT PHONE:
    GATUN. 3-15



    PROMPT DELIVERY TO ALL HOSPITALS. HOTELS a^ic^ STEAMSHIPS

    FREE DELIVERY

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx



    .^liss Kinihro. examining tier hnglisli
    class on the poem "Casaliicnca" : "Why
    did the boy stand on (he luiriung deck?"

    Jesse Dat'id: "Becaust- it w.is too hot
    for him to sit down."



    ".^Ir. \'inton is a wonderful huslmnd."

    "Yes, houzat?"

    "Why, he helps his wife do all the work,
    .^londay he washeil the dishes with her;
    Tuestiay he dusted with her. and tomorrow-
    he is going to mop the floor with her."



    Senior .JJirs (looking at her picture for
    the annual): "This picture can't go into
    the annual! I won't stand for it. It
    doesn't tlo ine justice.

    (hear II. (wearily): "^'ou doii'l w.iiil
    justice what you need is mercy.



    "Why. so much mail today. y\r. Post-
    man'.'

    "Well, the National Corresp School is having a pep meeting anti they've
    mailed each stuilent a honfire."



    IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X

    ^

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X

    x:



    BUREAU of CLUBS andT PLAYGROUNDS |



    TIIK RKCRK.\TI()NM)IVISI()N Ol- THE I'.\N.\.n\.\ C.W.M. ^

    ll.\S 1\)K YOLR CONVKNIHINCK ^

    X

    COMMUNITY CLUBHOUSES

    v_.SJ. LOCATED \Vs29^ §

    ANCON BALBOA PEDRO MIGUEL |

    GATUN - CRISTOBAL a^id^ MADDEN DAM |

    OFFERING YOU |

    Athletic Field.s Plnyprounds Tennis Courts Gymnasiums Swimming Pools g

    Bowling Alleys Billiard Rooms Reading Rooms Soda Fountain Service ft

    Sound Motion Picture ofuf Other General Community Activities. x

    X
    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXM

    85



    XXXXXXXKXXXXKXKXXKXXXXXXXXXXXXKXXXXXXXKXKXKXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX,.'->:>::-:XXJ

    IMPROVED EQUIPMENT -^-- MODERN METHODS

    EFFICIENI- SERVICE



    JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY

    Broadway, near Folks River
    COLON, R. de P.



    PHONE:

    COLON 21



    P. O, BOX 5061
    CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



    kixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxB



    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    X



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X

    X
    X



    X
    X
    K
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    The Chinese Silk Store

    NEW CHINA

    ^'e carry Genuine Chinese and
    Japanese SILKS and Curiosities.

    LINENS
    SILK MATERIALS

    SHAWLS

    CARVED IVORY

    WICKER FURNITURE

    VASES

    PERFUMES

    JHWELRY



    FRONT SI REET

    COLON



    CENTRAL AVE.

    PANAMA



    X

    V

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X



    J'isHor: "Now, Mrs. MacDonald, I
    suppos? that that is one of those horrid
    portraits you call Art?"

    Jlrjr. Jlac: "No, iMadam, that is a
    mirror."



    Jlr.f. Spencer: "Are you cheating on
    this e.xamination?"

    JF. Slocum: "No, mam, I was only
    telling him his nose was dripping on my
    paper."



    li-IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXM



    Jcnes: "How do you spend your in-
    come?"

    Sni/t/i: "About 30 per cent for cloth-
    ing, 30 per cent for rent, 40 per cent for
    food, and 20 per cent for amusement."

    Jones: "But that adds up to 120 per
    cent!"

    Smith: "Don't I know it!"



    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:-:xx:-;xxx:-:xxxx:>:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:-:;:::xi



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    COMPLIMENTS
    OF



    i Coney Island Hot Dog Stand



    J. HOKIM, Prop.



    x:-:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx;

    84



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X

    ixxa



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X

    V

    X
    V



    ::>:y.x::y.y.y.>:y.:-



    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx




    tiotel IDdshinqton

    Unequdled for situation and comjort




    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X
    X

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    A Hotel in keeping ipith the diqnitij, spirit, and seruice
    of the Panama Canal.



    Qoll



    Sipimming ^ IDdter Sports
    Q'drpon Fishing



    The year Around



    JAOIES E. LElDtS

    Manager.



    P. O. Address;
    CRISTOBAL. CANAL ZONE



    X
    X
    X



    IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX



    Final e.xam trigonDiiictrv problem:

    If a flag pole 50 feet high stands on the
    top of a building and the angle of eleva-
    tion of the top anil the hottom are GO and
    40 degrees, (inil the color ol the Hag.



    JJr.c. Spencer: (At Spanish Club ban-
    quet) "I say, Ernest, why areyou washing
    your spoon in your finger bowl?"

    Erne.rl: "Do you think I want to get
    egg all over my p


    JlanJc "Say, .^Ir. .^leyer, everything
    you tell me goes in one ear and out the
    other."

    Jlr. Jlei/er: "Sure it does: there's
    nothing in there to stop it."



    Boh Jlarsh: "Gee, ain't that hell."
    Jli.rs himhro: "Bol), how many times
    have I toll! vou not to sav "ain't"'.'"



    The secret of health lies in eating
    onions. But how can it be kept a secret?



    X
    X



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    :xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxi

    COMPLIMENTS
    OF

    is£q honest store

    COLON I

    :xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx\;::-;;-;xx,-::-:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx'i

    85



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    y



    X



    XXXXXXKXXXXKXXXXXXXXXXHXXXKKXXKXKXB



    )



    L COMPLIMENTS Of
    rerd's Qrocer
    Store

    Fancy Qroceries

    Phone 158 Colon, R.P. ^

    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXI



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    K
    X
    X



    He taught her this, he taught her that.
    The cHnging kiss, the clever chat,
    A scholar apt she turned to be,
    While she was rapt in constancy.
    But love's bright flame can't always glow
    The dark day came, when it burned loiv.
    Now he's upset, distraught, and blue,
    To find his pet has scholars too.



    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXB



    ROOSEVELT ON LABOR UNIONS

    ^'TF I were a factory employee, a workingman on the rail-
    roads, or a wage -earner of any sort, I would undoubted-
    ly join the union of my trade. If I disapproved of its policy I
    would join in order to fight that policy; if the union leaders
    were dishonest I would join in order to put them out. I be-
    lieve in the union and I believe that all men who are bene-
    fited by the union are morally bound to help to the extent
    of their power in the common interests advanced by the
    'Theodore Roosevelt.



    union.



    COMPLIMENTS OF
    METAL TRADES COUNCIL



    X
    X
    X
    X

    X
    X
    K
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    K
    X
    K
    X
    X
    K
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXM



    There is another interesting story about
    a man asking for a divorce. During the
    proceedings, the man remarked to the
    judge: "It is annoying to have a wife who
    knows how to cook but will not!

    The attorney for the defense won the
    case by snapping back: "Still, it is worse
    to have one who cannot but will."



    Oi'er heard: "Is Ernest de la Ossa a
    a book worm?
    "No just an ortlinarv one."



    A little fish once asked its mother what
    she would do if she saw a worm, and she
    said, "I'll bite.



    86



    i BEAUTY

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    COMFORT



    :xxxxx>:x>:xxxxxxxxxxxx>:i

    STRENGTH



    X
    X



    H UPMOBILE



    S PERFORMANCE



    SAFETY



    ECONOMY \



    xxxxx:



    IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX/



    A iletinition ol a Irccklcil pcrsmi Is one
    who got tanncil (hrougli a sieve.



    IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXI



    A mounlaineer was putting his son in
    school, ant! lie as!;eil the teacher what
    subjects she taught

    "Well," saiti the teacher, "we have
    arithmetic, reading, writing, geimietrv
    and trlgonometrv.

    "I'll! liini up on Irlgonometrv. saiil
    tile mountaineer, "he's the worst shot in
    the laniilv."



    Carl K.: Say, I lost my ring in the
    Spillway the other ilay, and five minutes
    later I caught a sniM>k. Just guess what I
    found Inside of him?"

    Ihtmh h'ro.th: "Why. the ring, of
    course."

    Carl: "No, just flesh and bones."



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    fMHi^




    I Universal ExpofiT Corporjtion



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    Chase Bank Building

    CATHEDRAL PLAZA
    PANAMA. R. P.



    Representdtiues of

    LIGGETT & MYERS TOBACCO COMPANy



    X

    ^

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X

    ^

    X
    X
    X

    X
    X



    X
    X
    X

    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X



    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXI

    "^

    X
    X
    X
    X

    ^ COMPLIMENTS OF

    X
    X

    1 GRADE ^ HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS

    y
    X
    X
    X

    X

    iiixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxi

    87



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    A DRINK WITH REAL
    SPARKLE



    X
    X
    X
    J<
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X

    y.

    K
    X
    X

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    IXXXXXXXXXXXXXX xxxx>



    IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXB

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    The Panama
    Coca Cola

    Bottling Company,



    INCORPORATED



    Phone:

    COLON

    84

    o

    PANAMA

    65

    Kxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:




    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    JiJ

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X

    V

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    :xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxi



    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:-



    Bi'llt/ (at dinner): "Papa, are cater-
    pillars good to eat?"

    Papa: "Haven't I told you never to
    mention such things at the table?

    .llama (after a pause): "Why, Billy,
    did you ask that question?"

    Billy: "\ just saw one on Papa's let-
    tuce, but its gone now!"



    EMILIO E. JONG I Ml

    PERFUMEBY, FANCY DRY GOODS
    GENERAL MERCHANDISE



    7.112 BOLIVAR ST'
    P. 0. Box 446 COLON, R. P. Telephone 187

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx



    "XXXXXXXHM
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    88



    "rXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXKXXXXXXXKXXXXXXXXXXKXXXXXXXXXXXXXI



    Hotel Tivoli



    ANCON. CANAL ZONE




    X
    K

    xx;



    A comfortable, restful Hotel, ideally located with

    magnificent view of the Pacific Ocean

    midst picturesque scenery.



    ^
    ^



    The center of social life, close to every point of interest on the
    Pacific side of the Canal Zone.

    :>.xxxxx.>:x.vxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx;-:;-:xxxxxxxxxi



    X
    X
    X

    X



    Jlr. FninLi-: "1 sa.v, S;im. wliv arc
    you in such a hurrv?"

    Stini: (Who is wasiiing the floor):
    Oh. 1 want to tiiiish l)tiore tills l)ucltet of
    water gives out?"



    Butler, bawling out hoys for making
    noise in bathroom: "He_v, what do you
    bovs think this is a class room?"



    Jlr.r. Spencer: "I see that Warren
    Siocum is wearing sun glasses this after-
    nocin. He took a test in Spanish class this
    morning so mayln.- he strained his eyes
    trying to see through the paper."



    A teakettle inspireii Watt's steam engi-
    ne, who knows but what a little thing like
    coasting througii a revolvingiiiHiron some-
    one else's push was the origin of free
    wheeling.?



    "Have you an openwig here for me?'
    Inquired a June iliploma-eil Joe. (Kbilon)
    "Yes said the boss behind the desk.
    "Please cU>se it gently as you go."



    Is'nt it strange how this world changes
    so? At first it was thought to be flat, then
    it was lound to be rounil, now no one has
    any doubts about it's lieing crtoked.



    IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXI

    STEPHEN LANE FOLGER, ^nc.

    CLASS RINGS - PINS
    ALL KINDS OF JEWELRY



    X

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X

    X
    X
    X



    X 180 BROADWAY NEW YORK CITY x

    X X

    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX-XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXB

    89



    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    X

    V

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X

    X
    X
    X
    X



    Portraits
    Miniatures
    Enlargements
    Flashlight

    Commercial
    Photographs

    of all types.

    Architectural

    Legal

    Banquets, large
    groups, e"c.

    News Pictures



    S=^



    X
    X



    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXZ-IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXI'



    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X
    X



    FOR REMEMBRANCE

    Your portrait of today will be just as
    priceless in years to come, will recall
    happy memories just as vividly as do
    those wonderful photographs of by-
    gone days. Make an appointment for
    a new portrait today,

    FINLAYSON'S STUDIO



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X

    x>;xx>;KXXXx;-:xxx:-:x.vxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:-:Kxyxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxii



    X
    X



    X
    X



    MEMBER




    7.018 FRONT ST. COLON, R. ^ P.
    PHONE /

    When buying photographs look for this emblem.
    The Photographers International Association of
    America stands for good craftsmanship and bet-
    ter business principles.



    Charlie Pescod: "How did you get that
    cute little round mouth, dear?"

    Jlari/ Ann C: "From saying "no" to
    the rest of the boys, darling."



    Dealer in .recond-liand cars: "\\'hat's
    the matter with the car you bought?
    Isn't it satisfactory?"

    Jlr. Franks: "Everything makes a
    noise on it but the horn."



    Mr. Hacked: "and then the cotton
    production doubled and redoubled."

    ff^. Stocuni: "Set two!"



    Jlr. f'lnton: "Ernest, do y^ou know
    where the flies come from?"

    Ernest D.: "Well, the cyclone makes
    the house fly, the wind makes fire fly, the
    Jockey makes the horse fly, and the
    children make the butter fly.

    Jlr. J'lnton: "Very good. Now where
    do the flies go in the winter time?"

    Ernest: "They go blind."

    Jlr. J'.: "Why is that?"

    Ernest: "Because when they get cold
    they start flying and leave their 'Specs'
    on the wall so thev can't see."



    Not enough money is the root of all
    evil.



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    NEW YORK
    NEW ORLEANS
    SAN FRANCISCO
    PORT LIMON
    CARTAGENA



    FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER STEAMERS

    WEEKLY SAILINGS TO:



    TELA



    KINGSTON

    LOS ANGELES

    PTO. COLOMBIA

    SANTA MARTA

    HAVANA



    X

    X



    IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXI

    UNITED FRUIT COMPANY

    GREAT WHITE FLEET



    X
    X



    X
    X



    X
    X



    IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXB



    90



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    COMPLIMENTS OF

    The National Mattress Factory



    PHONE 172, COLON



    I4ih STREET



    X
    X
    X



    X
    X



    rxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxyx:-



    When Mr. \'infon lieartl alxmt the
    Altnin's crash, as a (liililul chemistry
    k-aclicr. the first ihouglit that came to
    his mini! was: "What a lut of hehum was
    lost."



    ./ tliink tile man hit you with mahcc aforc-
    thouglitV"

    .Uandi .11.: "Naw, \\u hit me wiil a
    brick."



    Naliue is umulertiil! A milhon years
    ago she iliiln'l Unnw we were gomg to
    wear glasses, yet look at the way she
    placed our ears.



    O.rcar Ihilhron: ".^Ir. .^Uyer, I have
    a tlieory that the shortest line Inftween
    two points is an angle."

    .Ilr. .llei/fr: "Goon, it isn't true."

    O. II.: "Oh. yes, it isstraight angle."



    xxx:

    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    :xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:



    dnmiTlimrutii uf



    tar tc MrraU"! Cn



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXI

    91



    X
    X



    X



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X




    C. CASULLO

    Jeweller & Watchmaker



    p. O. Box 675

    Phone 225

    Cristobal, C. Z.



    9.036 Front Street, Colon R. P.



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X

    V

    X
    X
    X



    ix>.xxxxx'-:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx



    :xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxi



    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxsxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
    x

    X

    x

    X

    ^ COMPLIMENTS OF

    X

    i B. BARNETT

    X

    g COLON. R.P.

    X
    X
    X
    X

    K BOX 6 PHONE 507, COLON

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    ^.

    ::



    Miss Kimbro tells us a humorous inci-
    dent that happened in her home town.

    Two girls were eating together, and one
    was asked if she would like some meat.
    When she replied, "Oh, its immaterial to
    me," the other girl piped up, "I'll take
    some of the immaterial too."



    MXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXH

    X

    K X

    K X

    X X

    I 1 1 ^'" 1 I

    i Stdnddrd Fruit &. Steamship I

    I Compdny L |

    ^ L I

    ^ I

    K X

    ^ X

    I Vaccaro Line |

    X ^

    X X

    X X

    X X

    X X

    X X

    ^ IDish euery success to the Graduatinq Class of 1933. x

    X S

    S X

    X X

    X V

    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXIXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXB



    92



    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXKXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXKXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXI
    X

    ? Bin YOUR l^RUC, NEEDS AT _^

    X

    I S^L^ZAR'S DRUG STORE

    I COLON. R. ]>.

    X Main Store: Branch Stores:

    X 9,038 Front Street 4.0H) Bolivar St. Phone 166 ^

    X Phone 336 1/ /
    X :

    x>.;sX>:xxxxx;-::-:xx:'::-:yxxxxxxxxxxxxx:-:x-::-::----:.:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxi

    .Uolli/ (i. (to licr sister wlm li.ul ln-i-ii Policcnuin (producing notcUook):

    In tlu- doctor): "But wliy arc vnii so "Nairn- please."

    angrv with tlic linctor?" .Uanlw.rki/: Aloysius Maiuli Sebas-

    tian

    liarhara: "Why. I tokl him I was Poliirnuiii: "Well, don't let me catch

    tired, and he asked to see niv tnniiiie." yoii ayam.



    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXB

    f- X

    '^ MENS SANO IN CORPORE SANO? S

    i i

    I Eat more SUN-MAID RAISIN DREAD

    I 13^e FRENCH BAKERY |

    g Bolivar Avenue. 8103 - Phone 346 ^

    X X

    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXB



    .Ur. I iiiti'ii: "I understand your wife .l/i.r.r h.: "You know no one ever gets

    came from a fine old lamil.v." anywlier^ h.v letting things slide."

    .///. Iliikdl: "Came is haril.y thj If'i rf cracker: "\\'h,it ahout a troml>ti:u'

    woril. She hrought it with her." player?"



    xxx::xxxxxxxxxxxx::xxxxxx:-:xxxxxxxxxxxx>:/::-.xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>;xxxxx:-::-:x;-:xxx:-;.-:x>;:b

    X X

    X X

    ^ rr x^ ^



    I H. A. Dot EN. a as.

    X

    i D. M. DiCKERSON, D. D. s. i

    X ADMINISTRATION BUILDING CRISTOBAL. CANAL ZONE x

    ?? X

    MXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX-IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXH

    95



    HXXXXXXXKKXXKXXXXXXKXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX*



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    TUNG HING



    GENERAL FANCY GOODS



    CORNER 9th BOLIVAR



    P. O. Box 354



    Tel. 575



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X



    COLON



    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx^

    Jlr. Hackett (in history class) : "I have
    been talking for nearly ten minutes, but
    there is so much noise and confusion in
    here, I can hardly hear myself speak."

    / oicejroin the hack of the room: "Don't
    worry, you're not missing much."



    The Trig, class has been working so
    long with logs that their heads are begin-
    ning to feel like wood.



    At the Senior girls meeting the other
    day, the prophecy was under discussion.

    .llillu: "By the way, Mrs. Spencer,
    Mr. Meyer didn't appreciate the ending
    of our prophecy."

    .Ur,\\ Spencer: "Why?"

    .mill/: "He didn't like the part where
    we gave him four children."

    Jlrs. Spencer: "You only gave him
    four! Why, I'd given him at least six!"

    Slcosie: "Mrs. Spencer, remember this
    prophecy takes place five years from
    now!"



    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    X
    X

    Cable Address: IMPCO
    A. B. C. 5th S- 6th Ed.
    Bentley's

    JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS MANUFACTURERS AGENTS



    XXXXXXXXXXXXKX,



    Colon Import & Export Company, Ltd,



    p. O. Box 342
    Colon. R. P.



    Dealers in GENERAL MERCHANDISE ar?if NATIVE PRODUCTS

    Colon, Republic of Panama



    PLATA DAM A
    SANTA ISABEL



    Branch Retail Stores
    and Trading Stations

    XXXXXXHXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXI'XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX



    PORVENIR

    TUPILE

    ISLE OF PINES



    CARTI
    NARGANA



    :xxxxxxxx:



    ^fJr. Jleyer in Plane Geonielri/ class:
    "Ralph, how would you go about proving
    two lines parallel by the indirect method?"

    Ralph Dai'i.r: "Well, first, I would
    prove that they weren't parallel."



    And then there was the Senior who
    was so conceited that he autographed his
    picture In his own annual.



    The diner had waited ten minutes.
    At last the waiter appeared.

    "Your fish will be here in five minutes",
    he said.

    Another ten minutes passed. The

    customer's patience was e.xhausted. "Tell
    me, waiter," he said, "what bait are yoj
    using?"



    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXB

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    y;

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X




    iReARITA FLORIST



    Phone:
    \ Cris 1916

    ixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:-



    P O. Address
    Qatun 157

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxM



    94



    I ilitral §rntirr Oiarayr (£it.. Jar. |

    it MELENDEZ AVENUE BETWEEN X

    X 12TM a 13TM STREETS. COLON JJ

    X EXPERT MECHANICAL SERVICE X

    PHCNK. HIDRAULIC LIFT SERVICE box X

    OPFICK X



    COLON. f> P



    X
    X
    X

    g OAHAOl ..2 J^ l.(M>

    S HOBORT BROS. BATTERY SERVICE 2

    b HIGH GRADE OILS. ACCESSORIES AND IDEAL HARTFORD X

    X STORAGE BATTERIES X

    X



    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXI

    "How imicli dill villi s i.v llK-m apples S/w: "Isn't it strange that the Icnyth

    is.' ol a man'sarm is e(|ual to the circumler-

    "Filteen eents a peek." ence of a girl's waist?"

    "Wlial (111 villi tiiink I am ^a bird?" //c. "Let's get a string and sec."



    X



    COMPLIMENTS 5



    B

    X 6

    X X

    X /^/^x/inT T A /r 17X11-0 S

    X
    X

    I OF I

    I LUIS R LEE I

    i? X

    x.-:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>iXxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx;-.xxxx:-.xxB



    ".\nd reniemlK'r" saiil the baseball JlountninnerFro.rh: Mr. Seiler, I want

    coach, "that this game develops indivi- to go out for Track.

    iluality, initiative, antl leadership. Now .Ur. Seller: "Have vou had any

    get out there, and if anv man doesn't do experience,

    as he's told, he can turn in his suit." Fro.rli: "I've tracked bears ail my life."



    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXB
    X X

    X COMPLIMENTS OF |

    X X

    X X

    X X

    -- X

    X

    X

    X

    X

    X X

    X X

    X X

    X X

    X X

    MXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXxii



    mim. mmmm!^



    95



    MXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXKXXXXXXXXXXXXKKXXKXXXXXXXXXXKXXXXXXXXXKXXXXXXXXXXXKXKXXXXM

    1 COLOMBIAN LINE I

    X WEEKLY SAILINGS TOi^^^



    X
    X



    ^ PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti x



    ^ NEW YORK, New York x



    X KINGSTON, Jamaica x

    X ^

    X Luxurious, Comfortable, Fast Passengers Express Steamers x

    X EXCELLENT CUISINE x

    X X

    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXB

    "Say, I hear that all the C. H. S. stu- Charlie: "I passed by your house

    dents are drowning. Is that true?" yesterday.

    "Yes, Jesse David has been telling some .lliiri/ Ann: "Thanks,
    more of his jokes that were too deep."



    Mr. Stevenson has been making a boat

    A new clerk was in doubt about the use to travel to the States in, and he asked

    of a new phrase. He turned to a steno- Robert if he wanted to go along.

    grapher and said, "Do you retire a loan?" "Stei'ie" instantly replied, "No, I'll

    "No, I sleep with mama." stay down here and collect the insurance."

    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXB

    V X

    X
    X



    LOOK 1 1 Before Buying IJour x

    X Pdnamd lidls, .Tligreltes and Souuenirs |

    Uisit our Store u;here i]ou u;ill find ttie ^



    X Lou;est Prices in Q'ou?n.

    X ^

    ^ FRONT STREET x

    X FRANCISCO F. LObATO Colon 57 rtloneij Exchange |

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxS

    Mr. Hackett, waving a hand toward a Fre.fh Freshman: "What is that which

    painting above him in his home: "That "orks when it plays and plays when it



    works?"

    Sc.hcr Senior: "Relieve my anxiety,
    llr. Franks: "And h; wa- n;ar'y one (a' c the i" oor."



    is one of my ancestors

    .llr. Franks: "And
    of mine. I bid up to .$15.00 for him." F. F.: "A fountain.'



    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:-:xx>.xxxxxj;xx;-:xxxxxxxxxxxxxx:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxM

    X X

    '^ Q^^ For IDedding Inuitations, Uisiting and Business Cards, x
    "A. ==:= Season and Business Stationeru x

    X ^.=s.;a*_, ??

    g Also Canal Zone Represenlaliue for MOUNTAIN RESORT LA QLORIA" x

    X 10 miles from San Jose, C.R, in the heart of Tablazo mountains

    I D. L. PRATHER I

    X q-elephone Balboa 2780 1405-D Carr St. P- Box 0514, Balboa. ^

    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXH

    96



    IXXXXXXXXXXXXXX



    ':xxxxxt-:x';xx."



    HcMiestly, Insurnnce is the Best Policy!

    You never can tell what will happen; ni)r when it mu)

    happen. "What must be will be"

    The Insurance Companies have plenty i)t money. Get

    THEM, for a few dollars, to pay what may be your

    heavy losses.

    Get all In^urana information from your local Insurance

    man; W. W. Gould. It is free and reliable.



    CRISTOBAL, 127



    x

    X

    V



    COLON, 52. X



    X

    >:xx>:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>xx:


    IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXI



    X
    X
    X
    X
    .<
    X
    X
    X
    %

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    K
    X
    X
    X
    N
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X
    X

    X



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    GIITENS m WLOI



    FOR



    EXCLUSIVE SUITINGS



    AND



    CAREFUL TAILORING



    lOth Street



    - Colon, R. P.



    Phone 291



    X
    X
    X
    X



    K
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    .\
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    xxxx;


    \\'ln.'n .^'r. Hac'ii-tt was taking his
    teacher's examinatimi in .Vmcrican Prob-
    lems, he was stumpeil by on . of th? ques-
    tions which read: "State the number of
    tons of coal shippjtl o-.it of th- U. S. in
    any given year." However, his wits
    lieing alM^iit him as usual, h.' wrote:
    !4')2-none."



    f .tlifr at a \i'edtnp (to a colli, ilignified
    laily): "Are you a friend of the groom?"

    TAidu: "Indeed not! I'm the briile's
    mother."



    .//(//!(//.//.. "1 uondcr if (jcorge Wash-
    ington was as honest as they say he was?"

    Jli.f.r Kimhro: "Why, certainly, Wash-
    ington was the most honest American
    c\tr born.'

    .Ilnndi: "Then how come they close
    all the banks on his birthdav?"



    .llr. J'inlon: "Nowadays all sorts ol,
    materials arc used in tht- manufacture of
    illuminating gas."

    Jlr. l-'riniier: "VouVc right; they even
    make light of consumer's complaints.



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    jc

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X


    X
    X

    >:

    X
    X



    X
    X
    X



    X
    X



    Before eye-strain vrinKles become

    permanent a^?c/ nervous fatigue x

    becomes chronic, have your g

    eyes examined. If you need >:

    glasses, yo" '^'H ^ ^^^~

    prised to find -what a

    comfort they are

    when accurately

    and

    becomingly

    fitted to

    YOU



    Have your eyes examined

    S MORON nPTICSLn
    PAN.\Ma| I K^..lr.eJ I
    A Ut,'"y"lU

    Avenue ^ir New Tiirh^^



    COLON

    19.034 Pro.it

    Street



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X



    IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX"



    97



    K
    K
    K
    X

    COMPLIMENTS OF |

    X

    LUCKY STRIKE |

    X
    X
    X

    : X

    I X

    ^;;xxxxxxx^!Xx::x::xxx::xxxxxx^:xxxxx"xxxxxxxx::xHxxx^:xxxxxxxxxxxx::xxxxxxxxxxxxx



    Whose picture is that?
    Oh, that's a picture of me when I was
    a babv.

    Oh, you were a nice bald-headed baby!

    Hey! You are looking at that picture
    upside down.



    .Jlr. Harkett: "How many people in
    here have fathers in the Army or Navy?
    Ah, Jesse, I see you have your hand up.
    Could you find out from him the procedure
    of a court-n^artiai?"

    Jesse Dai.' id: "Why, I don't know, my
    father has never been court-martialed."



    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:-;:';xxxxxxxxxxxxx>:xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx:-:



    x

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X

    y.



    X



    COMPLIMENTS OF



    All America Cables Inc.



    Colon



    anama



    Hi.XXXXXXXXXXXXHXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX.-IXX^IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX:-



    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X

    :xxxxxxxxxxxxH



    Balboa



    Ernie De la Ossa: (At banquet of the
    Pan-American League Aboard ship) :

    "Say, William, quit eating your soup.
    I want to hear the orchestra.



    Jlandi: "Got some new shoes, Charlie?
    Putting on the dos, eh?"

    Charlie: "Puttin' on the dog. Well,
    where else do you e.\pect me to put new
    shoes?



    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx*



    X
    X
    X

    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    COMPLIMENTS OF



    Dr. Vern Prier



    Dr. Carl E. Safford



    CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



    K
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X
    X



    X
    X

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxHxxxxxxxxxxxxxx^:xx::xxxxxx^:x



    98



    Autniu*a;ih \}mv



    99



    Autngra^li ^agp






    100




    ^f ^ iRiS TO



    X ^Jfc










    ^;/X >CiDVr, HO



    m



    N^vY Plan£<



    ^AiN C^out




    4 HOP/



    CDLDh



    m










    I*- -*



    llHljBS






    M



    uI7



    0-*^ (<\CK







    o D DO m



    ^S^(\ fiuLLS



    4*i>CK