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PCANAL
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THE CARIBBEAN



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Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries



http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1932cris




CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL



THE CARIBBEAN



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Foreword



The Caribbean Staff of 1952 is very
proud to present to you, the student
body, the faculty, and the general
public, an Annual which we belie^'e is
the best presentation of the Literary
and Athletic ability ot our students.



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111



THE CARIBBEAN



VOL. XV



CRISTOBAL. CANAL ZONE



No. 1



PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL



TABLE OF CONTENTS



Page
4



Foreword

Dedication ._

Editorial-

Our Canal Zone School Olficiiils

Staff

Faculty .

Seniors..

Class Prophecy 29 Alumni

Class Will...... 31 roUes

Class Historv .32 Advertisements



6 Sophomores

7 Freshmen

8 Literary

9 School .Activities

11 Sports

15 School Notes



Page
55

. 37

41

45

54

. 75

. 88

95

. 101

. 107




THE CARIBBEAN




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DEDICATION

the Class of '52, dedicate this our
loth, \olume oi the Caribbean to Mr.
Franks, our principal. He has not



only contributed much toward making our
last year here a pleasant and profitable one,
but also he has made C. H. S. a school from
which we shall be proud to ha\e graduated.



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THE CARIBBEAN



ODE

To THE N'kw Cristohal High
//i)uv2n/ Kcf/itiii '-



Between the two great oceans

And under a tropical sky.
Rise girders o! steel so stately

Of our new Cristobal High.

The ships which, anchored, lie
Outside the breaUwater grand

Behold the tower of strength.
The finest in the land.

O'er head the planes are soaring

Like gulls in the azure blue,
,As they wing their way with ease

Upon their course so true.

Upon the roclty beach.

When the tide is low, and dark
Are the shells, and the sand, and the moss:

Children shout and play on the bank.

In peace in the warm, spring sun
Basks a mangy, homeless cur.

With contempt for the wildest gale
In the horizon's distant blur.

As workmen .it their tasks

Toil earnest, ceaseless, and proud.

The startled air gives back

The echoes from hammers loud.

The stately palms above

Rear columned trunks on high.

While afar, upon the horizon.
Fades a rainbow in the sk^.

The new days come, as the old

Pass away with fading night.
To find the happy workers

Still toiling with faces bright.

I'll cheer until I cease

To tread this earthly sphere
The school of my boyhood days,

Cristobal High so dear.




THE CARIBBEAN








^^^^k y fll^^^l



Name Ben M. Williams.

Title Superintendent of Canal Zone Schools.



Name V. H. Barker.

Title Assistant Superintendent ol Schools.



Name EvERET B. Sackett.
Title Director ot Research.



Name Paul E. Miller.
Title Director of Physical Training
in the Canal Zone Schools.





THE CARIBBEAN




10



THE CARIBBFAN




THE CARIBBEAN



11




12



THE CARIBBEAN




Frederick L. Meyer
Jfath^nmtirs



MiLFORD Franks
Pnnctpijl



Kenneth W. Vinton
Science



Harry E. Fringer
JLintiat .Irts



Victor F. Seiler
Bo i/j' .llhletics



Roger C. Hacikett
Social Studies



Mii.uRED Lenore Ei.ner
Jhtsic



Blanche S. Anderson
HoitselwLi Aris^ English



Helen I. Patterson
Commercial



Gladys M. Kimbro
English



Miriam Broun
Enjlish, Social Studies



Mary Elizahetii Moore
Jianguages



Lillian Grace Beata Gustafson
AssL Principal



E. Phillis Spencer
Lanouai/^s



THE CARIBBEAN



13



SCAf/OfiS




14



TfTF CARIBBEAN




Xiime iif S/aJen/ Randolph M. Wikingstad.

Birthplace Paraiso. C. Z.

"A man ot no mean understanding."
School ylcth'iiies Class President 2, 3, 4: Treasurer
B. A. A. 3, 4; Vice-President 3; President 4; Biiseball
1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Soccer 2, 3, 4; StatT3. 4:
Handball 2, 5. 4: Dramatic Club 4: O. G. A. 4;
Presulcnt Letter Club 4.



Xamc of Sludcnt Albin B. Forsstrom.
Birthplace Cristobal. C. Z.
"I shall show the cinders ot my spirit
Through the ashes of my chance."
School ./ctioitiej Class Vice-President 4; Staff 3; Orchestra
1, 2, 3; "Gypsie Rover Orchestra" 2; Tennis 3, 4; Soc-
cer 3, 4; Golf 3, 4; Extra Class 2; Pyramid Team
1 ; Carnival 1, 2, 3; B. A. A. 1, 2, 3. 4; Dramatic Club
4; Baseball 4; Letter Club 4.





Name of Student Eleanor A1. Reinhold.

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.
"Nothing is impossible to inilustrv."
School ,yc//V/7(>.r Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1. 2. 3, 4;
Class Secretary and Treasurer 3. 4; Spanish Club
3. 4; Secretary 3; Vice-President 4: "Gypsy Rover"
2; Bells of Beaujolais 3; Dramatic Club 4; Carnival
1, 2: National Thespian 4.



THP PARTRRFAN



15




\,ime oj SUidenl Howard U. Kee.man.
Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

"Untwisting all the chains that tie the hidden soid of
harmony."
Srii'iol .Iclti'itu;! Carnival I. 2. 3: Track 1; Coll 3;
Swimming 4; Editor Caribbean 4; Extra 4; B. A. A.
1. J, 3, 4; Letter Club 4. "Who's Boss?" 4.




:* ;:*



X,vne oj Student Richard Bettikn
/iirttip/tice Washington, D. C.



"It b



becomes a voune m



an to be modest





XiiDie of S/ifteiil Gladys Bmss.

Rirl/tpliice Cristobal, C. Z.

"Good plight of body, plumpness."
.SV/j,'i).' .Irli.-itiet Swimming 2. 3: VoUev Ball 2. 3. 4;
Captain 4; BasUetball 2, 3, 4: Track 1: Supper Club
1, 2, 3, 4: President 4; Spanish Club 3. 4; G. A. A. 3, 4;
Vice President 5: President 4: Staff 4; Delegate to
Girl Reserve Conference to Pennsylvania 3.



16



THE CARIBBFAN




.V<7mf of Student Ai.LENE Myrtle Deakins.
Birthplace St. Joseph, Mo.
"Heart on her lips, and soul witiiin her eyes.



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Soft as her dime, and sunn\' as her skies.
School .^ctiritier Spanish Club 5, 4; Supper Club, 4;
O. G. .\. 4.



.Xnme oj Student M.ARV CoN'K.-ANCE Deans.
Birthplace Sheepshead R.ny. Brooklyn, N. Y.
"The dimple that thy chin contains has beauty in its
roundness."
School ./cli.'itie.r Glee Club, 1.2, J, 4; Orchestra 2, 5.4;
Supper Club 2, 3, 4; Pres. Spanish Club 3; Bells of
Beaujolais 3; High School Carnival 3: Spanish Club
4; Dramatic Club 4; Sec'v.-Tres. O. G. A. 4.





.\anie oJ Student JoHN DeI-ANEY.
Birthplace Altoona. Penn.
"Silence is one of the \irtues of the wise.



THE CARIBBEAN



17




.V(;/n<- of Student Dona Vircin'ia Eaton.
.6//7/ip/,;r( CristoLal. C. Z.

"A daughter of the Gotls. divinely tall, and most
divinely fair."
Sclwol Jclii-ilier Glee Club 1; High School Carnival
1. 2, .i; Supper Club 1, 2, 5, 4; Cabinet Member 4;
Vice-President Class 3; Treasurer Spanish Club 5. 4;
Dramatic Club 4; Golf Team 3: Staff 4; School Notes
Reporter 4.



Xame oj Slu.ient Joseph F.bdox.
5////v/<;<-,.^Cristobal, C. Z.
"Young fellows will be young fellows."
Sclwo! ./f//,vV/.-J Carnival I. 2. .3; B. .A. A. 1. 2. 3. 4;
Spanish Club 3: Baseball 3, 4; Basltetball 3, 4;
Soccer 4; Staff 4: Dramatic Club 4; Tennis 4: Letter
Club 4: Bovs Glee Club 4; Pvramid Team 1.





Xame of SliidenI Harry C. Egoi.f.
Birtttplace Reading, Penn.
"He will be Caesai or nobody."
Sclnwt ./,-//, ///>.r-^Ba.seball 1, 2, 3. 4; Basketball 1. 2, 3, 4
Carnival 1, 2, 3; Swimming 3, 4; Soccer 4; Jonesy 3
Dramatic Club 4; B. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 4
Letter Club 4; Staff 3.



18



THE CARIBBEAN




Xil/Ht' oj ShiJcnl \'lVIAX G. El.MGREN

Birthplace Sa\'aniiah, Ga.

"Smiling always with a never-tading serenity of coun-
tenance."
Schnot ,l(-ltx'il{c.\- Spanish Clul) 4; Dramatic Cluh. Officer.
"Who's BcKss?" -4.



Xante of StuJcnl Howard S. Encelke.

Builiplace Ancon, C. Z.

"To flo good rather than to be too conspicuous."
Schml .AV/.vV/V,. Baseball 4; Glee Club 4: Dramatic Club
4; Xat. Thespian 4.





Name of Sliicnf Marii-: R andi Ensri'o.

BirlhpLuy-OiyUinvA. Cal.

"A quiet conscience makes one so serene.
School Jdii'ilie.iVoWQy Ball 4; Basket Ball 3. 4; Suim-
mini: 4: Dramatic Club 4: f'jlee Club >.



THE CARIBBEAN



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\iii)ic ,tj Sli4(lcnl JoSF. Antonio Fernandez.
Rirlhpliicc Panama, R. de P.
"Speech is great; but silence is gieater."
School .Ic!i>'i/ie.rCAee Club 1. 2; B. A. A. 2; Track .3:
"Gypsv Rover" 2: Dramatic Club 4; Soccer 2: Soccer
2; "Prarie Doll" 4.



A'rt/Hi' cyj S/uiA-nt Alice J. Gormelv.
Birthplace Ancon. C. Z.

"A person whose uit is not derived from instruction."
School .:/c/(VA>.. Athletics I, 2, 5, 4; Glee Club 2, o, 4
Spanish Club 3. 4; Dramatic Club 4; OtTice Girl 4
Staff 4; Operettas 2, 3; G. A. A. 3; Supper Club 2, 3
O. G. A. 4.





Name oj Sluilenl Frank D. Griesinger.
Birthplace Cristobal, C. Z.

"You would readily pronounce him a good man. and
willingly, a great one.
School .Ulifitier Pyriimid Team 1; Carnival 1, 2, 3;
B. A. A. 1.



20



THE CARIBBEAN




.Xaine oj Sliuirnl EvELYX M. Wright.
Birlhnliicc Qiieensliu rough. Mil.

"Pl.ito Is my tnend, Svicratcs is my triend, lut truth is
more my inend,"
School .Ictti'tlies Sp.uiish Cliil' 4: Dramatic Chil) 4;
"Who's Boss?" 4



Xtimr of SluJcnl I.^MES R. Havokn.

BtrlkpLlCL New ^'oi-li Cit\-.

"The usetvil with the pleasant."
School .Icth'itic.' Glee CUib 3; Bells of Beau/olais
B. A. A. .'). 4; Treasurer 4; Baseball 4; Carnival 3.



" ^ If






Xante of Shuicnl Vkrona C. Herman.
Huihplaci' Houston. Te.Nas.
"Wise to resolve and patient to perform."
School .tclii'itie.t Supper Chili I ; Cdee Club 2. o: Spanish
Club 4: Dramatic Club 4; Operetta 2. .3: "Who's
Boss''" 4.



THE CARIBRFAN



21




\iii>ie oj Sliiih'iil R(h;i:k M. Howe.
Birthplace .^larbleheaci, Mass.
"A v\ise man will oo\-ern tlie stars.'



Xiwc oj Sludent C.\RI- L. K.-IRK'.IOR.

Birthplace Staten Ipland, N. Y.

".A merry heart goes all the daw"
School .Ictii'iiies Swimmmg .1: SoL'cer 4; Statl 4: Carni\-.il
2. 5: Letter Club 4: Pvramid Team 1.





Xaine oj ShiiientTwv.t^w M. King.

fl//-Mp/,7<-. Buffalo, N. Y.

"01 manners gentle, ol aitections mild."
School *'Jctii'ilies Caruu'id 1, 3: Class Secretar\- 1; O. G.
A. 4.



THF, CARIBBEAN




Xame oj Sliuient Alvin A. Lyew.
Hlrlhpbc^CoXon, R. de P.
"He prepares himself for the battle."
Sellout .h'tit'llics Glee Club 3, 4: B. A. A. 2, 3: Carnival
1, 2, 5; Pyramid Team 1; Tennis 3, 4; Basketball 5;
Dramatic Club 4: Orchestra 2.



Xante oJ S/iii/e/il Margaret Sarah Mizrahi.
BuihpLic, Panama, R. de P.
"Simple in neatness."





Xaine oJ Slitdeiil Ei.wiN N'i'-AL.

Birthplace Costigan, Maine.

"To climb steep hills requires slow pace at first."
School .lcli\'ilit:i- Neptune Club; Glee Club 4; Debating
Club 4: S^vimming 4: Carni-al 1. 2; "Who's Ross?" 4.



THE CARIRPFAN




.Xame oj Student Ja.^ies C. Wood.

Birthplace Whistler. Ala.

"Tall men are admired."
School Activities Swimming 1, 2; "Gypsy Rover"
Carnival 1, 2, 3; B. A. A. 1: Tennis 4; BasUetb.dl 4.



Name of Student F.l.SiE B. Nret.y
Birthplace .'Vshland. N. J.
"She lengthens to the last a sunny mond."
School ,/i-//,7V/V.r Basketball 2, ,1; Volleyball 2, 3; Sv.i Ti-
ming 1, 2. .1: Baseball .3: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra
Supper Club 1 2. 3, 4; Bells of Beaujolais 3; Stall 4:
Star and Herald Reporter 4; G. A. A. 2, 3, 4: O.G.A. 4.





Xanie oJ Student Benja.min Franklin Robert.s.
Birthplace -Abington, Penn.

"He preferred to be good, rather than to seem so."
School Activities Carnival 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 3, 4; "Bells
oi Beaujolais 3; Dramatic Club 4; National Thespian
4; "When's your Birthday" 4; B. A. A. 4; Pyramid
Team 1.



24



THE CARIBBEAN




.V,j/Hf of Slii.ienI Ja.vkt E. Robinson.

Birthplace Hampton. Va.

"The gentle mind b_v gentle deeds is Unown."

School ActiiHties Girl's Basketball 4: Letter

Dramatic Club 4; G. A. A. 4: "Who's Boss?



Club
' 4.



\ame oj SlwleiilHER^iAr^ August Roos, Jr.

Birthplace Cristobal, C. Z.

"None but himself can be his parallel.
School Acticiticf'R. A. A. 1. 2. ."). 4: Secretary 4: Debating
Club 2. 4; Spanish Club 3, 4: Varsity Club 4: Tennis
5. 4: Dramatic Club 4: National Thespian 4; Staff 4;
"Who's Boss?" 4.





Xame of SliiJcul Buret: G. S.iNDERS.
Birthplace Ancon. C. Z.
"He steers his boat well."
Scfiool ./f//,vV/<'.r Baseball .i, 4; B. A. A, 1.
Club 4; () G. A. 4.



Z, 4: Letter



THE CARIBBEAN



25




.V liiithi'Lice Cliarleston, S. C.

"To be a welMa^-ored man is the sitt ot fortune."
School ,/c//.v7/ B. A. A. 3, 4; Bells of Beaujolais 5; Glee Club 3;
Prairie Doll 4; "When's your Birthday?" 4; "Who's



Bo



' 4.



\anu' of Sludenl Bktty S Stahi.er.

Birlliptace Clearwater. Fla.

"Zealous, yet modest."
Sdiool JclU'llics~<-. A. A. 2: BasUetball 2,
Club 4.



Dramatic




Xame oJ Sludenl Robert C. SrEvF^ssoN'.
Birthplace ler.sey City, N. ]
"A tall strong boy thin as a nraith
With eyes so clear, they inspire true taith."

School JcliriliWB. A. A. 1, 2, 3, i: Soccer 4; Dramatic
Club 4: StatY4: Cheer Leader 3: Swimming 4.



26



THE CARIBBEAN




Name oj ShiJenI Inez Theoktisto.
BirlhpLuYCoXon, R. de P.
"Fortune smiles on her ilrst iittempt."
School Jc/irilie.<-C\ee Club 3, 4; O. G. A. 4: Spanish Club
5, 4: Operetta 3: Dramatic Club, Secretary 4; Supper
Club 1.



Xaine of S/uJenl-- AuciA V. TmRI.WALL.

Birlliplace Panama R. de P.

"For her own person, it beggar'd all description."
School Actii'itiet Spanish Club 4; Dramatic Club 4;

Supper Club 1, 2, 3, 4; O. G. A. 4; Staff 4 ;Carnival

1, 2, 3; "Who's Boss?" 4.





Name oj Student Jessie C. Vane.

Birthplace Portland, Maine.

"Steadiness is the foundation of all virtue."
School ./f/AvV/.-.r Basketball 4; Varsity Club 4.



THE CARIBBEAN



27




Name of Sttuli-nl Nki.i, M. VVardlaw.
BtrthplaCL' Ancon, C. Z.
"A light heart Ii\*es long."
School Jclit'itifs Class President 1; Supper Club 1,2, 3, 4;
\'ice-President 5, 4; Carnival 1, 2, 3; Staff 4; Dramatic
Club 4; President 4; National Thespian 4; "Who's
Boss?" 4.



Xaine of Stiuienl Perry F. Washabaugh.
Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.
"The shortest answer is doing."
School .ictiyitict Carnival 1. 2; B. .\. A. 4: Pyramid Team
1; Glee Club 2, 3, 4; "Gypsy Rover" 2; Bells of
Beaujolais 5; Staff 4.





Name oj Student Edwin Wkisman.
Birthplace Ithaca, N. Y.

"Cheerful at morn he waUes Irom short repose
Breathes the keen air, and carols as he goes."

School I'Jctifities Tennis 4; Debating Club 4; Glee Club 4.



28



THE CARIBBEAN




Xaiiie oj Sluiienl >\ai,coi.m R. Wheri.kr.
BirlhpLice Ancon. C. Z.

"A merrv lieart ilotli iiood like a medicine"
School .lctiotfte.f Ca^^i^cll 1. 3: Soccer o, 4; Swimming
2, 5; Baseball 4: Tennis 3, 4; Handball 2. ,", 4: Rasliet-
Ball 4; Letter Cljb 4.



Xaine of SituienI El-izABRTii Sauaii Wirtz.

Birlliploce Ancon, C. Z.

"Gentle of syieech, beneficent ol niinil."
School JctU'ities~-G\ee Club 1. 2. 5: Athletics I. 2, 3:
Carnival 1.2:G. A. A. 4; O. C.. A. 4.





THP: CARIBBEAN



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THE CARIBBEAN



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THE CARIBBEAN



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Slowly the sun of graduation is setting into the
west of our school days and before we venture out
into the darkness, we the class of '32 do hereby
publish and proclaim this to be our last will and
testament.

RICHARD BETTEIN, leaves his good be-
havior in school to Robert Marshall and Charlie
Goodenough. (They can use it).

GLADYS BLISS, wills some of her plumpness
to Eddie Thirlwall.

RUTH CASTO, her black hair to Elizabeth
Thornton, for gentlemen may not always prefer
blonds!

ALICE CURTIS, her petiteness to Helen
Hammond.

ALLENE DEAKINS, her position in the
office to Dorothy Birkeland.

JOHN DELANEY, his curly locks to Mildred
Owen, for what business has a boy with curls?

MARY DEANS, her reputation of lieing the
best dressed girl in school to Billie O'Rourke.

HOWARD ENGELKE, his cute little laugh to
Arthur \'ane. Try it out, Arthur.

DONA EATON, her nose for news to Natalie
Safford. She ought to keep C.H.S. on the front
page.

JOE EBDON, his good batting average in the
baseball series against Balboa, to Mandi.

HARRY EGOLF, his desire to run the school
to Edward Gormely.

VIVIAN ELMGREN, her demureness to
Mary Curtis.

MARIE ENSRUD, her taste for swimming to
Violet Randall. How'd she look with a tan?

ANTONIO FERNANDEZ and ALVIN
LYEW, their friendship to Mary Melendez and
Jane Bretch.

ALBIN FORSSTROM, his fHrtiness to Charles
Gould. He has plenty for both.

FRANK GRIESENGER, his aversion to girls
to Charlie Pescod. Don't think Charlie wants it?

AI.ICE GOR.\lELY, her good disposition to
Clifton Brown.



PARKER HANNA. his pipe to George Wood.

JL\L\IIE HAYDEN, his activities in the
B.A.A. to Harold Agnew.

VERONA HERMAN, her admiration for Mr.
Meyers to Elizabeth Thornton.

ROGER HO\\'E, his ability to brag to Robert
Brown.

CARL KARIGER, his love of a joke to Wilbur
Ginsberg. Hope he doesn't turn out to be a pest,
too!

HOWARD KEENAN. his musical talent to
any Junior who can use it.

THELMA KING and ALIE THIRLWALL.
their auburn tresses to Henry Lee. Poor Henry!

MARGARET MIZRAHI, her brillance to
Ernest de la Ossa. Don't take it too seriously,
Ernie.

GERALD and ELWIN NEAL, their English
accent to Jesse David.

ELSIE NEELY, her turned up nose to Mandi.

ELEANOR REINHOLD, her perfect atten-
dance record to Helen Southard. I'm sure Miss
Kimbro will be glad.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN ROBERTS, his
famous name to Harvey Smith It really takes
something to make the name Smith famous.

JANET ROBINSON, her soft voice to Jack
Wright. We certainly hope he takes the hint.

HERMAN ROOS, his pretty teeth to Oscar
Heilbron.

BRUCE SANDERS, his numerous freckles to
Wm. Keenan. Where'U he put them?

JESSE SINCLAIR, his liking for hanging
around the office (we wonder why) to Tommy
Rankin. Maybe Margaret will be an office girl!

BETTY STAHLER, her talkativeness to Velta
Foley.

ROBERT STEVENSON, his line of jokes to
Theima Albritton.

INEZ THEOKTISTO. her skill in languages
to Ernest Reinhold.

JESSE \'ANE, her mathematical ability to
Elizabeth MacSparran.



THE CARIBBEAN



PETE WARDLAW, her "specs" and her boy
friend to Helen Aanstoos.

lAME-S WOOD, his sti-ong right arm to Robert
x^larshall. Maybe he wi^n'l lie hit liy any more
swinging doors.

MALCOM WHEELER, his teasing ways to
Tames Wergin. (He probably won't use them).

PERRY WASHABOUGH, his love for dancing
to Norine Rakovsky. Don't know why we think
she needs it

EDDIE WEIS.^lAX. his cherubncss to Ir.



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RANDY WIKINGSTAD. his industriousness
to lane Bretch. What a joke.

ELIZABETH ^^'IRTZ. her meekness to Charlie
Howe. He can use it.



EVELYN WRIGHT, her amiabilitv to Bcrnice
Sanders.

lOHN WHIDDEN, ah me! \\'hal is there
left lor him to will after all these years.

We, the staff of this Carribean, and all other
seniors, leave to next year's staff our ability to
surpass all others in putting out annuals.

Now, my worthy bene'iciaries. we hope that
each and everyone ol you will carry out every
mandate of this, our last will and testament, and
will l)enefit thereby.

Sealed, and signed this day in witness thereof:
THE SENIOR CLASS OF '52

\\'itnesses: FINN and CADDIE.



S=



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Xell n\,nilw



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Now quickl^f time has passed away!
Why, it can't be more than the other day
That there entered into C. H. S.
A class of iiO or more. I guess.



Cristobal boys have featured in sports:
.\mong those starring in games of all sorts
Are Alalcolm, Randy. Bruce, Harry and Joe,
And these are all Seniors, we'll have you know



Four years we've given an annual ball,
(Ev-eryone says they were best ot all)!
At our banquet at the Washington
We're proud to say we had great fun.



Not many Senior girls helped w in games
But even then our class won fame
Through Gladys Bliss, a maiden well-known.
Who captained her teams in a way of her ow n.



Our Freshman advisor was Mr. West.
How can one tell if he was the best?
I doubt if Miss Kimbro enjoyed our class.
But i^liss Patterson's with us to the last.

I could write plenty about all she's done.
She's helped us often find ways to have fun
Instead of scolding like most teachers do
She tries to advise us and laugh with us, too.



I'm sure you all know Randy, too.
Or perhaps you know him by "Blow" or "Blew
For the last three years wherever he went
He was pointed out as our president.

A funny thing happened this school year
The Senior boys weren't very smart, I fear,
Since two girls came at the head of the class
Eleanor first, Inez second, close race to the last.



About graduation I'll have to be sad.
Since forC. H. S. it will be too bad
To lose a class as good as ours,
For other Seniors who have less powers.



THE CARIBBEAN



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34



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35



JUNIOR COMIC SECTION



1.


Harold Teen and


.__ Harold Agnew


o


Lillunis


Helen Hammond


3.


Toots and


Dot. Birkland


4




Clifton Brown


5.


Boots and


Betty MacSparran


6.


Willie


Robert Brown


7.


Cora


Thelma Albritton


8.


Salesman Sam


Roliert Grant


9.


Guzz


__A\'ilbur Ginsburg


10.


Kittv


Natalie Saft'ord


11.


Mrs. Guzzlem


Mildred Owen


12.


Boob McNut


Charles Howe


13.


Pearl McNut


Katherine Townshend


14.


Dumb Dora


Genevieve O'Rourke


15.


Somebodv's Stenog


Bernice Saunders


16.


Tillie The Toiler


Mary Curtis


17.


I'Sgs


Harvev Smith


18.


Maggie


Helen Aanstoos


19.


Little Orphan Annie


. Edna Thirwall


20.


Major Hoople


Henrv Lee


21.


Barnev Google


William Keenan


22.


Happy Hooligan


.._ Jack Wright


23.


Buck Rogers


Edward Gormely


24.


Mom'n


Norine Rakovsky


25.


Pop


Harold Lock wood


26.


Abie Kabible


Mandi Marchoskv


77


Wash Tubbs


George Wood


28.


Chess and


.Charles Goodenough


29.


Wal Nut


Paul Dignam


iO


Chick


Thomas Rankin


51.


Gladys


Velta Folev


52.


Mutt and...


Arthur Vane


53.


leff


Louie Kleefkins


34.


Mrs. Mutt


.Helen Southard


35.


Andv Gump


Oscar Heilbron


36.


Min Gump


Violet Randall


37.


Winnie Winkle


Jane Bretch


38.


Suitcase Sampson


Gordon Birnie


39.


Simp O'Dill


Ernest Reinhold


40.


Rudv Nebb


Charles Pescod


41.


Mrs. Nebb..


Elizabeth Thornton


42.


Moon MuUins


James Wergin


43.


Maime


Georgia Seaburg


44.


Kavo


. ..Sidnev Wharton


45.


Mushmouth


Jessie Da\-id


46.


Lord Plushbottom


Ernest De La Ossa


47.


Mrs. Hoople


Marv Melendez


48.


Minnie Mouse


.^la\- Wegner


49.


Mickey Mouse


Mr. Meyer



36



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oO



SOPHOMORE DIRECTORY



Harry M. Anderscjn
C. J. Bailey
Henry L. Barlow
J. Louie Barnett
Ramon Bejarano .
Blanche V. Belden...

Charles E. Belden

Clautie E. Berger
Aldred G. Bettien
Mabelle J. Bliss
Stella V. Bosgs___^
Clarence H. Brown
Colin D. Campbell
Norma A. Da\-is..
Aimee L. Day
Eileen R. Dono\'an



Handy Man Anderson

Clanking [aws Bailey

...Heaven's Light Barlow

|t)yoiis Lawbreaker Barnett

-Reatlily Abolished Bejarano

. Beaiitious Vision Belden

Cabbage Ears Belden

Come Hither Eyes Berger

Andy Gump Bettien

.Aloney Juggler Bliss

Stepping V^enus Boggs

Caulillower Head Brown

Ctilon Dude Campbell

No Admittance Davis

Artfully Lipstick Day

Ever Readv Donovan



Fred A. Ebdon Fortunately Alert Ebdon

Ruth E. Egolf Rare Elf Egolf

Bill Elliot Beef Stake Elliot

Armando M. Funes Algo Mas Funes

Anne V. Gibson ..Artless Vamp Gibson

Jerry J. Gorin Jumping Jack Gorin

Ellen K. Greenleal E\'er Eflicient Greenleat

Virginia Al. Hanna Vivid Mop Hanna

O. Elizabeth Hayes Our Energetic Hayes

Mary V. Hearne Modest Villain Hearne

S. Jane Hill ..Sheer Joy Hill

Maxine A. Hoffman Midget Angel Hoffman

Victoria M. HoUowell Vivacious Mama Hollowell

Carlton L. Horine Careless Lo\'er Horine

Garret Hutt Gassy Huff

Ethel M. Huntoon Egyptian Mummy Huntoon

Evelyn K. Johnson Ever Kind Johnson



Andrew G. Johnston

Blossom E. Lam

Helen I^. Leach

J. Grant Lemmon
David J. Lexy
Gloria M. Mannix
John F. iMannix
Beverly J. Marcu.se
Rose M. Misrahi
Edna M. Mueller
Charley P. Murphrey

Laura H. Neal

Jack F. Paterson
A. Ruth Pickett
George D. Poole
Richard M. Reinhold



Another Great Johnston

Bashful Eel Lam

..Half Lemon Leach

..Just Grated Lemmon

Don't Jump Levy

Gone Mad Mannix

January Freeze Mannix

..Bon Jour Marcuse

Remember Me Misrahi

Eat Much Mueller

Cream Puff Murphrey

Little Heard Neal

Jabber Forever Paterson

..Always Right Pickett

Gone Dry Poole

. Readv-Made Reinhold



Dorothy A. Roos Dutiful Always Roos

Henry E. Sanchez Hold Everything Sanchez

Marguerite T. Siebler Merry Tongued Siebler

R. Warren Slocum ..Roman Warrior Slocum

Charles S. South Count Screwloose South

Betty H. Stetler Boop A-doop Stetler

Willima F". Stone Whata Fake Stone

George O. Tartlinger Great Olympic Tartlinger

Frank J. Washabaugh Fiddle Joe Washabaugh

Robert L. \\'ertz Run Lightly Wertz

W. Ray Wheeler Woman Ruined Wheeler

Marguerite Winn Must \\'inn

Chester C. Wirtz . ..Cow Catcher Wirtz

Edison W. Wirtz Earnest Worker Wirtz

Alejandro L. Wong .Always Laughing Wong

Alice E. Wood Artless Eve Wood

Earnest L. Wood Ever Lasting Wood




40



THE CARIBBEAN




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43



FRESHMEN DIRECTORY



NAME



Alberga, Lloyd

Albritton, Theordore
Aricli. Alex
Ascensio, Bertram
Baldwin. Alpheus
Barlow. Ruth
Bath. Charles
Beers, William
Borden, Edgar
Briggs. Adah

Coyle. Edward

David. Aveline

Da\'is. Ralph

DeaUins. Leta

Dunn. Dorothy

Durham. Edward ---

Eaton. Lucy

Eberenz, Jack __

Egozcue, Jack

Ensminger. Blossom -.

Finnegan. James

Goodenough. Kathleen

Gormerly. W'llham

Gregory-. Paul

Hammond, John

Heim, Charles,

Hollowell, Hope

Hollowell, William,, __

Huntoon. Jane--
Jaramillo. Ernest

King. Robert _.

Long. Jack

AlacSparran. Alice

Marden. Lillian

Mullane, Elinor

Neilson, Martin

Packard, Anne

Palm, John

Pfeil, Robert

Herbert Philips

Pierce. Burton

Pretto. David

Pretto. Richard

Randall. Charlotte

Reiahold. Margaret

Reilly. Anna

Roe.Olga

Russel. Tomas

Rytkogel. Alary

Sanders. Irl

Sanders. Maxwell

Stein. Edgar_

Stillwell. Jean ..

Tarhinger. Lucille
Townshend. Stuart.

Turberville. Anne

Webb. Orin

Wikingstad. Ruth

Will, j'ohn

Wirtz, William



APPEARANCE



Words couldn't explain it

Shy...

Al Capone

Tomato catsup

A nice pet

A\'erage

Farm-hand...

Undertaker

Stumpy

Harmless

Studious

Hard to tell

Ladies. Look out!

Shy. maybe?

Fitth-grader

Unconscious

Plump and placid

Aged- .-- -.- .. .-

Dimpled Darling

Stump

Fuzzy cave-man

Sweet

Mouse -.

Eager



Big, tall, and hefty .-

Pest

Let's hope there's hope
Dirty Gus

Snappy

Absent-minded professor.
Pretty lair
Short and wide

Meek

Pleasingly plump
Pseudo Angelic

Lazy-looking

What a woman!

OkeL

Happy-go-luckv!
Get a Microscope

Halt way there

How handsome???..

Mama's Boy

Well painted

Tough egg!

Not bad!

Buzzing Bee

Mutt, (not left)

Fussy

Ghandi

SpiftV. ..

Angel-faced

Passable

Dreamy -.

Timid

Not seen yet __

You've n'r seen one 1

Freckles

Take a look at Baby
Sharp



HOBBY



keit



Talking

Alechanics
Starting ilghts
Blah. Blah, Blah
Stamps
Chewing gum.
Swimming

Eating

Listening
Tennis
Electricity...
Hunting- --

K. Good-enough

Throwing slams

Trying to grow ....

Playing hooky

Switching down the aisles
You'd be surprized

Women

Gazing

Baseball

Ask Ralph Davis

Reading.- ..

To cause trouble

Fiddling

Raise Cain

Athletics
Cussing

Piano playing

Studying

Losing his voice

Blowing his nose .

Dancing

Doing French

Crying over Algebra

Crabbing

Copying her homework.

Sleeping at baseball

Sleeping ---.

Something good

Waiting tor 5 o'clock
Pestering collector

Hobbiless

Drawing -. --

Making love in kitchen.
Swimming with C. Bath

Buzzing around

Entert'ng. in Algebra CI.
Danc'g. w' her Gr'd Dad

Gassing

Pitching

Playing the innocent

Peace-making.-

Just Imagine!

Not a thing

A rare one

Playing Poker

Not very outstanding .

Flirting

Forgetting



FUTURE



Traveling Salesman

Preacher

Gangster

Conedian

Electrical engineer

Famous Divorcee

AA.inne

Engineer

Magician

An old Maid

Eiticiency expert

Big Game Hunter

Woman-hater

Alarried lite

Sjiinster

Alex's partner

Fashion model

Member of the Freshman class

Gigolo

Astronomer

Babe Ruth's successor

Bathing beauty

Book Censor

Following Father's toot-steps

Salvation Army Officer

Cane Raiser

Channel Swimmer

Swearing Champ.

Alatchy's wife

Governor of Cuba

Ci\'il Engineer

Fisherman

Still unknown

Matron oi an Orphan's Home

Costume Designer

Hobo

Not a chorus Girl!

Chemist

Critic

Member ot a Flea Circus

Dog-catcher

Life-guard

President ot Panama

Owner of Beauty-parlor

Prize-tighter

Lawyer (this ain't tunny)?

Fortune Teller

Cartoonist ot Ballyhoo

Dressmaker

Back Woodsman

Think one up

Bum, Slugger

A nice Mammy

Authoress ot "How To Acquire It'

Still longing

Idealist

Wolf of "Wall Street"

Inventor of "Freckle Remover."

Too funny tor words

Cabinet-maker



44



THE CARIBBEAN





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THE CARIBBEAN



ICttrrarii



BEST OF ALL SHORT STORIES

'THE DEATH OF THE GRAND DUCHESS'

Airnee Day '34



The pale nioonlight streair^ed through the open
attic window, piercing the inky blackness of the
room, and throwing its wan light upon the ghastly
white face of an apparently old woman, the sole
occupant ot the place. She was seated in a decre-
pit armchair, wore an elaborate white satin dress,
and was gazing fascinatedly first at a jewelled
gold dagger, which was wet with fresh blood, then
at the rapidly spreading red stain on the bodice of
her dress. It was Kissa, once Grand Duchess of
Russia, who was patiently waiting to die. As she
sat there, the shades of past days an~e to comfort
her in the last hours of her life.

The gloomy black attic faded from her sight.
It was forty years before. She was in the brightly
lighted ballroom of the Czar's palace, and, as a
shy girl of seventeen, was attending her first
formal dance. The strains ot the Blue Danube
Waltz filled the air, and Kissa enjoyed herself
more, perhaps, than ever afterward, for she had
experienced no sorrow to embitter her against
the world. It was that night that she was in-
troduced to the Grand Duke, Nicholas, whose
wife had recently died.

The ballroom disappeared, and in its stead a
great church of Aloscow came into view. A year
after the ball, Kissa, in white satin, was being
married to the Grand Duke. The mighty church
bells pealed, and the people of the palace were
happy, for they were ignorant of the horrible fate
which awaited most of them in the future.

Again the scene changed. It was early dawn
in the palace, many years after Kissa's marriage.
She was awakened by the boisterous shouts of
soldiers, the crashmg of glass, and the sound of
straining, smashing wood. Nicholas hurriedly
grasped his sword and rushed downstairs. What
he saw made his heart grow faint. The revolution
had brcjken! He fought bravely, but there were
too many men against him, and soon he fell,
stabbed by three bayonets. Not dead, but
seriously wounded, he was borne off by the
revolutionists. Kissa's family, her friends, every-
one was massacred before her eyes. The palace



was crimson with running blood. Kissa was
almost glad to be taken to prison, as she was
spared looking any longer upon that awful, gory
sight. A terrible shock awaited her her husband
was to be shot the next morning at dawn. As
he was being led to execution, the guard allowed
him a few seconds' conversation with her. Nicholas
said very little. His only words were 'T)o not
cry, Kissa. Escape, and go to the peasant,
Lenowsky. I once saved his life ; he will save
yours." Then he was taken out and stood with
his back to the wall, like the other condemned
men. He would not have his eyes bound, and
without a tremor, faced the rifles of the firing
squad. The wi.ndow of Kissa's cell opened upon
the courtyard, but she never saw the final shot,
as she sobbed wildly and turned her head away.

The Grand Duchess stirred uneasily in her
chair back in the attic, as she thought of how that
mangled, bloody form of what had once been
Nicholas was carried away to be thrown In a hole,,
and to have perhaps dozens of other corpses piled
on top of it. She had not cried much after the
shot. It might have been that she had already
wept so much that there were no tears left. Her
whole mind was bent on escape. Not that she
wished to live she had nothing left to live for.
It was simply that she did not wish the revolu-
tionists to have the pleasure of killing her, so that
there would be one less of the "cursed aristocracy.'

Her chance came the night after Nicholas'
execution. The guard drank too much wine and
became drowsy as a result. Kissa's heart leaped
w ith joy w hen she was aware of this fact. Stealthi-
ly she tiptoed across the stone floor of the cell to
where he sat nodding. Little by little, her hand
reached nearer the pocket where his keys were
kept. Now It seemed as though she had succeeded
her fingers were closing over the keys. But,
suddenly, with a jerk, the guard regained his
wits. Kissa was frantic. She must not be dis-
covered. In the minute that she looked desperate-
ly around the room, her glance fell upon a short
iron bar, which had, bv some chance of fortune.



THE CARIBBEAN



47



been placed within her grasp. A \\ ild idea dawned
in her head, and, raising the liar, she held it aldft
in the air for the fraction of a second, then, hardly
knowing what she did, brought it down with a
sickening crash upon the stupefied nan's skull.
It was all over. Kissa stepped back, terrified b.v
what she had done, and dropped the iron as
though it burnt her fingers. She had never before
killed a iran, and the sight of blood sickened her.
There was no tin e for thought, however, so she
hastily seized the keys and opened the iron-
barred door. The danger was not o\cr, though,
once she was out in the hall. One could never
tell when a soldier would appear around the next
corner. Trembling, Kissa made her way along
the passage, clinging to the walls, and trying to
stay as much as possible in the shadow Finally,
after what seemed years of horror to her, she
passed the last drunken guard in the prison, and
crept out into the open air. She was free! Free!
The word kept ringing in her ears, but still she
could not believe it. As she rushed along the dark
streets, and across the fields which led to the hut
of the peasant, Leno vsky, she niagined that
every noise nust be the revolutionists, who had
discovered her escape, and were coming after
her with their bloody bayonets. Nevertheless,
she reached her destination in safety, though in a
hic!:hlv delirious condition. It was a week before



she was normal again. At the first chance, Kissa
took a ship bound for foreign ports.

Back in the attic, the Grand Duchess Kissa saw
herself wandering from continent to continent,
country to country, and city to city, until she
arrived in Montreal, Canada. She saw herself
struggling for years to earn a living with her
remarkably fine voice, and, just when it seemed
as if she would succeed, catching a cold in her
throat, and losing forever her ability to sing. She
had been foreced to move to the stuffy little
attic room where she now was. as all her money
had been spent. On the verge of starvation, but
too proud to ask help from friends, she took the
only alternative left her. On the anniversary of
the revolution, she put on her satin wedding dress,
got out the gold dagger given her by her husband
before his execution, and late in the night, with
the sane grim deternination with which she had
always done unpleasant things, she plunged the
dagger far into her side.

The ghostly noon grew dinnner, as a nearby
church clock struck four. The phantoms vanished,
and Kissa smiled faintly into the first light of
dawn, as her head sank lower and lower upon the
blood-stained w aist of her dress. She had gone to
join her lo\ed ones in some land not of this world.
The Grand Duchess was dead.



BEST SHORT STORY IN SENIOR CLASS
"A GOLDEN MELON"

f'n'iiiii ]'.li}i(iren '51'



April 15. 1856 seemed such a calm peacclul day
that no one would have believed it was to end in
disaster.

\ number of lioats were lying in the harbor at
Colon. They had brought to this lazy town many
Americans on their way to the California gold-
fields. Among these were Henry Harrington and
his wife. Clara. Since they were well-provided
with money, they chose to go to California by way
of Panama. Mr. and Mrs. Harrington had only
been married a few months and were enjoying
their adventurous trip.

Colon was a squalid noisy town. It had tried
to run into a city over night w hen the gold-rush,
for California started. Hotels without floors,
kitchens, or other necessities sheltered the travel-
ers. The railroad and the railroad tracks carried



tlic people to Panama. The latter was used by
those who could not afford to pay the high price
of a ticket on the train.

The Harringtons walked down something that
was called a street but was really a muddy alley.
The inhabitants were peaceful and pleasant, the
children, naked and playful. All this delighted
the venturesome young people.

Suddenly a loud shot was heard. It came from
a near by alley. Screams and another shot fol-
lowed. The Harringtons hurried along with a
mixed crowd of natives and Americans to the
scene. An American with a re\olver was keeping
at bay an angry group of Panamanians. More
.Americans came to his aid and with their help he
held the angry mob back. They suddenly broke
loose: revolvers appeared almost from no-where;



48



THE CARIBBEAN



cluhs were easily acquired by both sides, and with
the help of other make-shift articles it turned into
a free-for-all.

The Harringtons by this time thought they
should seek safety, but it was too late. They were
swept along with the crowd of Americans to\\ard
the Panama Railroad Station. When it was
reached, the now excited Americans began to
entrench themselves for a battle. The Harring-
tons, being unable to escape, prepared to fight.

The only other woman in the crowd was a
middle-aged lady named jMrs. Sander. She and
Clara were huddled together in one corner listen-
ing to the firing.

"^^'hat IS all the fighting about?" Clara asked.

"I am not so sure myself, but I believe an
American took a melon from a fruit-seller and
refused to pay him."

"Is that all. \\'hy, where I come from melons
grow wild. How silly to fight over such a trivial
thing. If this fighting continues someone will be
killed."

And continue it did. At last the Governor of
Colon attempted to end the battle, but was shot
at by an alert American. The natives went wild
and stormed the station, at this insult to their
Governor.

Clara and Mrs. Sander were kept busy dressing
the wounds of their fighters. They tore up their
petticoats for bandages.

Mrs. Sander was standing by her husband when
he staggered and fell. Blood poured from his
mouth as he (aid, "It looks like I'll never see
California, Aland. You go."

Airs. Sander cried and moaned, but not for
long, for another man was wounded and needed
her attention.

Henry picked out a lean little native, who was



creeping toward the building with a flaming
torch, and let him have it. The victim fell.
Henry felt a sting in his shoulder, looking down
he saw a thin stream of blood. Clara, after trying
to comfort Airs. Sander, saw the blood on Henry's
shoulder and hurried to him.

"Are you hurt?"

"Just a scratch, dear," he reassured her. "You
are needed elsewhere."

The Americans had been fighting for hours and
were losing. At last they raised a white shirt and
gravely surrendered. The inhabitants seemed
satisfied because one of the dead Americans was
he who had stolen the melon, however, an under-
current of ill-feeling remained.

The Harringtons and Airs. Sander were afraid
to go to a hotel for fear some native might attack
them. They asked an American Captain if he
would let them stay on his ship all night; he
gladly consented for a reasonable price. They
also arranged for Air. Sander to be buried at sea.
Bright and early the next morning they left for
Panama City.

Panama was Colon on a larger scale. The
Harringtons had lost much of their desire for
adventure and were relieved when their Spanish
friend, Don Pedro, took them to his home. He
said he would be glad to shelter them until they
should obtain passage on one of the boats leaving
for the gold-fields.

The Harringtons and Airs. Sander waited three
weeks before they sailed on a dirty crowded boat
for California. They never forgot that day they
spent in Colon, the most disastrous and adven-
turous day in their entire lives.

It was indeed tragic that the price of one
trivial melon should cause the death of fifteen
Americans and two natives.



BEST STORY IN JUNIOR CLASS
"HOW A BAD HABIT WON OUT"



"A stitch in time saves nine." Did anyone ever
hear the tale of how a safety-pin caught Frances
her husband? If not, bear with me a little and I
will tell you the story of Frances' life, up to her
happy marriage.

"Ook, Aluvver, dis, dis?" There was urgent
demand for e.xplanation in the baby voice. Alother



Rowe, proud of her small daughter's budding
intellect, carefully showed her the workings of the
safety-pin, and later told Daddy Rowe that
Frances was going to be a bright child.

By the time Frances was ten, however, Alother
Rowe had regretted many times the child's
interest in safety-pins. For an argument like



TUF Cy\RIRB'-^AN



40



the following one was a common occurence:
"Frances, sew a button on this dress.
"But, Mother, a safety-pin is just as good.
"Frances, do as I ask you. I nu\er saw such a
slack child."

"All right, I will, hut gee. Mother, a safety-pin
is lots more fun.

There were some periods when no safety-pins
appeared on Frances' small figure, as a result of
maternal threats. Inevitably, these spells were
followed by others during which Frances glittered
like a general sprinkled with medals. To be sure,
she did not use them on her dresses as openly as
she had when she was smaller, but Mother Rowe's
neat soul was even then full of despair and lectures
were renewed.

At seventeen Frances was ready to leave the
country town for college. Her Mother's parting
words were, "For goodness sake, Frances, I hope
they will make you stop using safety-pins." But
Mother Rowe's hopes were not realized, for
Frances, freed from her mother's watchful eye,
revelled in safety-pins. In fact, she never sewed
on a button during her four years at college e-\cept
when her supply of safety-pins was temporarily
exhausted. She won the nickname of "Safely.
If any class mate needed a safety-pin in a harry,
Frances extracted one speedily from some portion
of her person. Even the supposedly non-seeing
Professors nudged one another when they glimpsed
a tiny safety-pin doing valient duty in an other-
wise unassailable shirt-waist.

At the class day e.xercises, amid affectionate
cheers, Frances was presented with a box of
safety-pins, with the wish that she would hold
together as well in the future as she had in the
past.

Thus Frances went home to Mother Rowe not
the least bit reformed. Mother groaned when
she saw Frances step from the train, for she had
caught the gleam of a safety-pin, though skillfully
placed, on the girl's dress.

Frances had been home only a few days, but
her mother could contain herself no longer. Now
that she was through college, what did she think
that she was going to do? Did she suppose she'd
e\er be able to hold a position, with her slack
habits? Did she hope to find a marriagable
young man who would tolerate safety-pins in his
shirts and coats and trousers? Whatever was
going to become of her?



Frances listened quietly to her mother's ques-
tions; smiled a little.

"Well, mother, I'll tell you what I'll do. I'll
go to the city for a year let's make it a year and a
day, to be romantic, I'll write you once a month
to let you know that I am well. Then I'll come
back, either a success or a failure."

Frances was true to her word. Twelve ti;ncs
she sent her mother a single line, reporting that
she was well. Mother Rowe, repentant, wrote
passionate letters, pleading for more news.
Frances remained stubborn and refused to answer.

"Let her be," said Daddy Rowe, who had a
fondness for safety-pins himself and understood
his girl. "She'll come out on top in her own way.

In a year and a day, to the hour, Frances re-
turned (with a safety-pin holding a rose pinncil
on her coat), followed by an energetic, prosperous-
looking man.

"Folks," she announced after the first greetings,
"your future son."

Mother Rowe collapsed on the dusty seat
outside the station. (She certainly was upset for
she did not stop to wipe the benchV

"Child, tell me right away what has hap{x;ned.
T can't wait until we get home."

Frances winked at Daddy, who, taking the
hint, led the young man away from the scene.

"Everything's all right, Alother, only I still
like safty-pins better than buttons. But here's
what I have been doing. As soon as I reached the
city, of course I looked at once for a job. You can
guess very easily where I went first: yes, to the
safety-pin manufacturer. I thought I might as
well. The firm didn't need a stenographer just at
that time, but I got a place as a clerk, with a
promise of promotion if I did my work satisfactori-
ly. I guess I must have been all right, for when
the lunior partner's secretary left to be married, I
was offered her place. That's when the fun start-
ed. Mother. I saw Mr. Ellis (the Junior partner,
looking at me somewhat quizyically one day, and
then he chuckled. Naturally I asked him what
the joke was. For answer, he pointed to the
sleeve of my dress. Safety-pin, of course! He
appeared so jolly I couldn't resist telling him the
whole story of my liking for safety-pins. He
wasn't disgusted with me, instead he began send-
ing me flowers and asking me to go to the theatre
with him. I liked him from the beginning, so I
went and here we are.



50



THE CARIBBEAN



iMother Rowe slowly emerged from her dazed
state. "I'd ne\er have believed it possible," she
managed to utter, at last, faintly.

"x\nd Mother, he won't have to wear safety-
pins in his shirts and trousers on account of my
shiftlessness. He has plenty of money, so I'll



be able to hire someone just to sew on buttons."
At the wedding. Mother Rowe was so com-
pletely won over to the cause that she didn't
make the slightest objection when Francis in-
sisted upon fastening her wedding veil with a
safety-pin.



BEST STORY IN THE SOPHOMORE CLASS
"CHAK," OR "THE SURVIVAL OF THE FITTEST"

Colin Caniphcll '^4



The sun was chasing the blackness from the
heavens. There was no wind at all but cxerything
was cool with dampness. Dark, shadowy objects
were just being distinguished as naked trees rising
from the water. Bushy masses ot lake grass
floated in the water arridst the nun^erous lily
pods. In and about the young, unstable lake
growth, a path of water resembling a forest trail
rippled silently. It was one of those characteristic
inlets of Gatun Lake.

Half in the water and half on a grassy, muddy
shore lay Chak, the leader of his tribe, the strong-
est, the wisest, and the most powerful. His half
submerged figure could not be distinguished from
the other arts of nature about him. He slept with
happy contentment, for the night before he had
caught a silly but wise fish that no other one of his
tribe was able to catch. He had thought that
maybe he could hold his youthful supremacy for-
ever but, no, Chak was growing older, he was



again the troublesome questions ran through his
mind.

Not until alter the sun went down was Chak
relieved. Jager had hopped on his snoot. This
always awakened him. Slowly, he backed out into
the rippleless water for it was time for him to
get up. The cool water felt good as he started
towards a special spot where the coolest mud re-
freshed him every evening. Oh, what could be
better, thought Chak. than to squeeze and to roll
in soft, watery mud when you are hot, and what
could be better than a meal of slimy fish after
that? Beneath the surface of the water he dis-
appeared, and in a few minutes he emerged with
a full stomach. The night was black except for
the stars above and the bright, red eyes of his
tribe that dotted the surface of the water. A
cool breeze passed over him and the occasional
bark of a crocodile could be heard. All seemed
peaceful. He thought he would visit some of his



losing his strength but he would not let himself friends but just then Jager alighted on his back.

admit it. "Chak," she said, "It's the nearest crocodile to

the left."

Chak, startled, lay in perfect silence. He had
forgotten that, that crocodile, the only one he had
e\er heard of was as large as he and was young,
yes younger than he. He must conquer him, but
would he? He had not had a serious battle with a
purpose for years. Yesterday he had thought that
he would be ruler fore^e^, but today was different.
A straight, long figure, swimming slowly through
the glassy water approached. He swam easily and
his coat showed no sign of battles. He must
(nercome Chak or otherwise go back up the stream
Chak saw him clearly advancing toward him.
Oh, for his younger days, those many battles,
those victories, and that battle where he stood
alcve all. How strong and free he must have
been, how quick, how majestic! Where were
those fighting days? Must they come to an end?
I will, I must send him back up the stream.



While Chak rested motionless a small incon-
spicuous bird hopped on his back. She was Chak's
best friend, Jager, who had lived by him ever
since she could remember and had once saved his
life. Chak opened one eye sleepily and winked
when he saw that she wished to tell him something.
Lightly hopping on his snoot, she began, "Chak,
there's bad news in the air. I've seen a very large
crocodile something like you but much younger
and I heard that he wished to have a Itattle with
you, and that he's plotting to be ruler over all.
I'm warning you. I'll be up in the tree.

Chak could not stay awake, for it was impossible
in the daytime but his mind w'as disturbed. He
wanted to think that this foe could easily be
conquered, but he couldn't, but why shouldn't
he be the better of the two? He had always been,
'out he hadn't fought for a long time and this one
was as large as he and younger. Over and over



THE CARIBBEAN



51



Darting at each other like arrows from a giant's
bow they clashed. The smack of teeth filled the
air with revenge. The splashes and commotion
filled the air with spray. Attack after attack and
crushing blows with their huge tails finally wearied
both. Now the spray was tinged with blood. The
opponents were covered with red, burning marks.



Still they continued. Chak wearied, the p)ain
increased, he could not stand it longer, he backed
away from the last attack.

Slowly swimming, with comforting Jager on
his back, he made his way up the stream to live
with the thoughts of his younger days and his
true friend Jager.



BEST SHORT STORY IN FRESHMAN CLASS

"A PRINCESS IN EXILE"

jlnnie Tuhhenulle '15



"Yes," replied my Mother, "she is a real prin-
cess, and lives right here in Panama."

Through my mind ran visions of velvets and
silks, diamonds and pearls. Ever .since I could
remember I had been told fairy stories about
princesses, and now I was really going to see one.
I wanted to wear my best dress, and felt disap-



I was eager to have her tell of herself, but she
was more interested in extoUing the virtues of the
little waif she had adopted and raised from a baby
to school age. Though her own means were
scant, yet she had more than divided with a little
deserted orphan.

"But what of vour own vouth? Some one of



pointed when my Mother said, "No, my dear, ^,ur party asked her. I wanted to get her off to
just wear a middy bluse and skirt."

We had an early breakfast, and went to the
Gatun Docks where our party was joined by



friends. A launch soon came for us, and sped out
over the mirrored waters of the lake. What a pity
the noise of the engine and the smell of gasoline
could not be left out of such a trip.

In the party was a British iMajor, and I strained



myself, where I could ask her <|ucstions, and hear
all of her answers, because in a party of people
the insane chatter is most distracting. But I
managed to hear: "Many sisters and brothers,
all of whom Queen Victoria of England, named by
pro-xy. My uncle was the mighty King Kaffir.
Do not know what became of any of my people.
I was just a child when left with my father on



my ears to hear what he was saying, but for the Robinson Crusoe Island. I used to love to wear
noise of the engine, I only caught such snatches of jewelry, and to dance, and she held up her fist,



his narrative as: "Kaffir King of many millions"

"Diamond mines of South Africa" .

"Trouble; royal family taken and left scattered in
various parts of the world. Rhoda past

sixty charity."

We were nearing the island, and I had reluctantly
given up the thoughts of a castle, which one
naturally associates with a princess. As the
boat stopped, each of us reached for our packages.
Some had rice, tea, beans. Beans for a princess!
I had strawberries and cream. (Suppose I might
have taken bread and honev).



to fight, but now I'm living with Jesus; living
with Jesus.

It seemed that she was most religious; and
earned a part of her living by cleaning the church
in a near village.

"The church members were good to me when
I was sick," she said, "and they brought me
plantains and sometimes a cucumber.

I was astonished one whose possessions had
been diamond mines. Her gratefulness and
appreciation were sincere. That "sometimes a



The Princess, standing very tall and very cucumber" struck me in a way I cannot just



straight, came out to meet us, and graciously
invited us into her home. Though she was black,
and her garments were rags, her manner was just
as regal as if she wore the jewels and silks of my
imagination.

Her "castle" made of scrap lumber and old
pieces of tin, was not large enough to receive us,
so we remained under the shade of a breadfruit
tree in the vard.



describe, and though I have not seen "Princess
Rhoda" again, I have inquired many times about
her, and each time I marvel more. A lady told us
recently that she dropped by to see the "Princess"
unexpectedly. The "Princess" had a guest for
dinner, and was stiying grace over one green bana-
na, which she had fried.

Let me remind you that this is no fairy story,
but a true story about a "real Princess."



THE CARIBBEAN



BEST POEM

SILILOQUY
JIarie En.srud ^2

Mv moods are like the waves at sea.
That plav round the ship that's me
And then I'm carefiee, happv. gay
As are the bubbles in the sprav.

But when the waves grow dark and grey,
And no one knows just how they lay.
Then I'm troubled and depressed
In the struggle to the crest.

But the mast ot the sea.
\\'ho is master over me
Guides my little ship at night
Until at last I reach the light.



BEST POEM IN JUNIOR CLASS
FAIRIES

irillfiini At't'ncn >3

Do you wonder where the tairies are.

Whom folks declare have vanished?
They're very near, and yet very tar.

But they're neither dead nor vanished

They live in the same green world today.

As in by-gone ages golden.
And you enter in by the ancient way.

Through an ivory gate and golden.

'Tis the land of dreams all fair and bright

And sought by many a rover.
But the heart must be pure and the conscience light
To pass its threshold over.

Some night, when the sun in darkness dips.

We'll seek that dreamland golden.
And you shall touch with your finger-tips
That ivory gate and golden.



THE DRY SEASON WIND

i'tt'itiii Elmijren '-

The grass is dry. not green like yesterday.

The wind a haughty monarch is
That bows the trees before his scornful sway

The sky with fleeting clouds is spattered.

The great strong wind o\'er the earth
Tosses the waves upon the sand.

Tearing and puffing over the land.
But fades away before too long.

Leaving eight months ot ruling rain.



BEST POEM IN SENIOR CLA.SS

AT SUNSET

JU'in Lue^o >2

lust as the sun o\'er the western edge retires
The salty lilue sea catches

The last ray of its splendor.
Melting its beauty in the tranquil waters.
Gentle and undisturbed, the waves roll on.

Lightly tossing the small sail-boats.
While the cool breezes
Whisper soft words to the placid wa\-es.

What more can anyone wish
Than to be living in the Tropics

Bidding the sun good night
While being tossed about in a sail-boat?
Watching the sun's ray

Piercing the shiny water
Converting it into a golden pool
That anvone would like to call his own.



BEST POEM IN SOPHOMORE CLASS

MY PAL. LIMON BAY

Efeti/n John-ton >/

Limon Bay is like a pal.

It is always at my side
Here in Fort de Lesseps with

The ships out on the tide.

When I get up in the dawning.

No matter how the night.
It is there beneath my window

Sparkling in the morning light.

Upon leaving the school building
Where I've studied all the day,

It is waiting there to greet me
O'er the road across the way.

Since my e.xercise is swimming,

It is with me when I play.
As I dive beneath the waters.

Of my good pal, Limon Bay.

In the evening it is dearest.

For it dri\"es away my woe
By reflecting all the changes of

The sunsets atter-glow.

When I'm ready tor my slumbeis.

And the evening tasks are o'er
It soothes me off to dreamland

With its swish upon the shore.

When I leave. I'm going to miss it.

And I'll dream ot it atar.
There will always be a longing.

For my pal in Panama.



THE CARIBBEAN



A GRAY DAWN
Jtiif'u Ht'iirne >4

Gray sUies, grav roofs and gray rain, too,
Blend in one monotonous hue.

The palms and all the other trees

Bend with rythmic sway in the breeze.

The graceful branches bow in shame
As they are beaten by the rain.

The storm grows gradually less;

The lightening streaks seem spiritless;
The mumbling thunder dies away.

But you know that some other day
There will be the wiml and the rain

And the thunder's ilvine reirain.



NEVER SAY CAN'T

There's a time to work and a time to pla\

And also a time to rest:
But whether you choose to work or to play

Be sure to do your best.

There are tasks that beckon and others that Irown.

And the latter are the ones that test;
But the way of the cross is the way to the crown

The way that insures your best.

The trii ler who weakens and sighs and says "who cares!'

Weakly bares a craven soul;
But the man that says "I will!" then boldly dares

'Tis he who attains the goal.



THE WANDERER
Roper /louY '32

I'll wander tree as a gypsy,

And move with the breath of spring;

Oh, why budd on a solid rock,

And \Iew over and over the same thine?

I'll pitch my tent in a garden
Beneath sapphire-tinted skies.
And worship at nature's altar,
Hmtlered not by worldly ties.

I'll move when the spirit calls me.
In the open iields I'll roam.
And wherever I place my tent
Is the place I'll call my home.



LIFE

James Halt FineQan >6

I live to love,

And love to live

Upon this earth so grand

I love to do most everythmg

That's in the way ot Man.

For one's life is a short life;

And time it must go on;

It cannot wait for any man

But must continue, on and on!

If I were but a little bird

Up in the air I'd fly.

But even tho' I were a bird

iMy time would come to die

So why not stand and laugh at life;

And fight it 'till you win?

Don't back out and say you're beat,

But take it on the chin!




54



THE CARIBBEAN



SENIOR PARTY

Xell ff'ardlaa' '32

On Novemlier 26th. the Seniors gave their
annual dance at the Strangers' Club. Of course
there was a large crowd, for wasn't it the Freshies'
first chance to go to a High School partyl

Mr. Franks, our popular principal, was just
"one of the boys" that night, and the girls were
thrilled to have him cut in.

Dwyer's orchestra furnished the perfect dance
music and a good time was had by all even
though we were full of turkey and cranberry
sauce.



SOPHOMORE LEAP YEAR DANCE

Betty S teller 34

\\'hen the curtain rose on the Soph's Leap Year
Dance at the Hotel Washington, February 26, at
eight o'clock, the atmosphere was one of a rather
strained, uneasy calm ; but when it fell at midnight
it was with a very successfuU and very noisy
"bang!" For everyone agrees that it was the
most unusual and pleasing dance of the year.

Contrary to the general belief that women of
C. H. S. are shrinking little violets, they were
made of sterner stuff by reducing all males to a
lower level and by taking the wellknown upper
hand. They asked whomever they desired for
dances, wandered about the floor tagging reck-
lessly and never sat down which all goes to show
what a peachy time the girls had.

The music provided by Welch and his Atlantic
Syncopators was "hotcha, hotcha" as was the tap
dance given by Stella Boggs and Lydia Gravatt.
Another feature of the evening was a "spot" dance
in which the couple who happened to be under or
over a certain spot at the end of the dance, won a
prize. The lucky couple who happened to be "on
the spot" were Barbara Weick and George Wertz,
both graduates of last year's class.

So harken, ye big brutes of Cristobal Hi, and
never under-estimate the fair ladies for since
the hot time they gave you and themselves at the
Leap Year Dance, THEY RATE.



THE FRESHMAN DANCE

Aniia S. Reillii )6

On Friday, April 15, 1932, the Freshman Class

gave a Depression Dance at the Washington

Hotel. iMany teachers, students and alumni, all

of whom were invited, were attired in various



t^'pes of clothing appropriate to hard times.
Following the seventh dance a breadline march
led by Richard Pretto, the president, and Mar-
garet Barnard, the vice-president, was held.
Ellen Greenleaf and Bruce Sanders, whose pathe-
tic costumes strongly appealed to the judges,
received a prize of one dollar to help them in their
hard times. Because of the success of the girls'
tag at the other school dances, the girls could not
resist the temptation to continue the habit. There
were also a few boys' tag dances, which have
recently become a custom. The music for this
"Hard Times" dance was furnished by Welch's
Orchestra.

"WHEN'S YOUR BIRTHDAY?"

Inez Theoktisto, '32

"When's Your Birthday?" was the first three-
act play presented by the Cristobal High School
Dramatic Club. It was given at the Cristobal
Clubhouse, on March 19, for the benefit of the
Junior Class. The play was directed by Miss
Gladys Kimbro, who did a very good job of it,
with the aid of a cast that worked with much good
will, and did what they were told to do without
friction.

The story of this play revolves around a gypsy
girl who wanders into a staid New England home
and upsets all the people. All the incidents
resulting from this make this play a comedy long
to be remembered. The players all gave their
best, and represented each character very well.
The list of characters are:

Ann Parsons Alice Gormely

Malory Dwight Paul Dignam

Aunt Nabby Nash Helen Aanstoos

Timothy Gale Charles Goodenough

Nick Jameson .Jesse Sinclair

Leonora -Inez Theoktisto

Ben Ali b. Alvin Lyew

Clara Dwight Velta Foley

LIndy Nash Dona Eaton

The play would not have succeeded if the follow-
ing had not contributed their help:

Prompter Vivien Elmgren

Costume and Make-up Eleanor Reinhold

Stag Craft Nell Wardlaw

State Managers Howard Engelke

Herman Roos

Business Manager Henry Lee

Head Usher Oscar Hielbron



THE CARIBBEAN



55



GIRLS' LETTER CLUB




BOYS' LETTER CLUB









56



THE CARIBBEAN



CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING CLUB

E. de la Ossa




The Debating Club has been completely re-
organized and as a result has grown both in size
and importance. A new constitution was adopted
by the club and has proved itself a valuable asset.
The work of the Club has been greatly aided by
the efficient sponrorship of Mr. Hackett and under
his supervision, meetings are held in a business-like
manner.

The meetings of the club arc held the first and
third Wednesdays of every month. The Club
has held one practice debate. The debaters who
will debate against Balboa .vill be chosen according
to their al ility.

So.r.e progress has been made towards organiz-
ing a debate with Balboa. Questions have been



submitted to them, and the appro.ximate date has
been selected.

Officers

President Ernest de la Ossa

Vice-president.. Harvey Smith

Sec'y.-Treas Elsie Neely

Sponsor Mr. Roger Hackett

Members

Ernest de la Ossa Harvey Smith

Elsie Neely Fabian Englander

Charles Howe Elwin Neal

James W'ergin William Hollowell

Edward Weisman Herman Roos

Wilber Ginsberg



THE CARIBREAN



57



THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT

Elsie Xeeli/ ->2



The Cristobal High Schoiil Gleo Cluhs show a
marked improvement over last year and Miss
Elner deserves full credit tor her splendid work.

We boast of thirty-eight me nbers in the Girls'
Club and twenty-five in the Boys' Club. However
it may be added that together with quantity we
have quality which is ot great importance. The
girls meet every Tuesday and Friday while the
boys meet every Alonday and Thursday.

The girls are doing archipelio work this year;
that is, singing without piano. Believe it or not



the results are amazing.

The orchestra must be mentioned also. There
are many new me.nbers this year. Some of the
most unusual sounds often escape from Room 2,
harmonious and otherwise.

One activity the Glee Clubs and Orchestra
participated in was a program for the Woman's
Club in March.

Ne.\t year we sincerely hope the music depart-
ment will sho.v even more i.nprovement although
thev will have to work hard to do so.




BOYS' GLEE CLUB




58



THE CARIBBEAN



It



i'-^




I'Mmt^




|THE EFFE KUBE CLUB

Colin Campbell '34

The Effe Kube Klub, the dramatic club of the Spencer and the Asst. Advisor, Miss Wieck.

under classmen, has the honor of being the first -pj^^ Officers are-
organized dramatic club in the Cristobal High

School. The Club was organized bv the class of President Colm Campbell

"34" under the direction of Mrs. Spencer. Vice-President. _.... Elizabeth Hayes

TU u- 4- r iU T?rf i/^ 1 i.n 1 ^ Secretary Ruth Pickett

Ihe obiect oi the Ette Kube Klub is to secure ,^i i o ,i

,. 111 1 -i-i Ireasurer Lharles ^outh

ease in speaking and to develop dramatic abilitv. ,^i , t-. , ai it

_, , 1 /^i I 1 J \ J Lhairiran of Dramatics Marv Hearne

lo attain this object, the Clul) has presented two

groups of one act plays, is preparing for a two act The members are-

play and is planning to present another group of Yl-Arvy Anderson Maxine Hoffman

one act plays. Blanche Belden Carlton Horine

"Gassed," "The Trick of the Trade," and Charles Belden Edna Mueller

"Who's Afraid?" were presented in our first group Mabelie Bliss Arthur Plath

of plays this year at the Army and Navy Y..^1.C.A. Stella Boggs Richard Reinhold

on December 12. Ft was a success in every way. Aimee Day Dorothy Roos

"The Red Lamp" a two act play is going to be Anne Gibson \\'illiam Stone

presented on February 19, and another group of Jerry Gorin Frank W'ashabaugh

plays will be presented in April. Ellen Greenleaf Alice Wood

Altogether, there arc twenty members in the Norma Da\is Betty Stefler

Effe Kube Klub besides the Advisor, Mrs. Ethel Huntoon



THE CARIBBEAN



59



C. H. S. ORCHESTRA




GIRLS' GLEE CLUB




no




1 .IV



->






p irr-.rf







60



THE CARIBBEAN



THE NATIONAL THESPIAN SOCIETY

Dona Eaton. '32



On December 16, 1951, .^liss Kimbro called
a meeting of all Juniors and Seniors interested in
drama in order to form a club. She had a definite
goal as an aim for the club, which was that it
should become part of a great national organiza-
tion of High School dramatic clubs. This society
was the National Thespian Society of High School
Dramatics, and there are many clubs all over the
United States belonging to this organization.

From the beginning we ha\e been known as
Troupe 217 of the National Thespians, and our



group adheres strictly to the rules given us by the
Thespian Society. The requirements to become
a real member of the society, rather than a troupe
member, are very strict, and only 13 people in our
club have fulfilled all of them. However, some of
them are Juniors this year, and they intend to
carry on the work started by MJss Kimbro next
year. We hope, eventually, to become a strong
organization, and we thank Miss Kimbro for
arousing our interest in something we may never
have known about, were it not for her.



THE GIRL RESERVE SUPPER CLUB

Edua Tliirwall '33



On the evening of the first Friday in every
month, the Y. \V. C. A. is the meeting place of the
Girl Reserves Supper Club.

First the business meeting is conducted, and all
old and new business discussed. The president,
Gladys Bliss, takes charge of the meeting with
Miss Van Every as the advisor. Alany activities
such as picnics, boat rides, and hikes are discussed
and voted upon.

After the business meeting a supper is served
by one of the committees. Each committee plans
and serves its own supper. During the supper
songs are sung, and there is much fun and hilarity.

When the supper is over the program Com-
mittee takes charge. There is always a very



enjoyable program, consisting of musical solos,
readings, talks, and dances.

Each year a girl is sent to Camp in the States.
Everyone works very hard during the year in
order to raise money to send this girl to the States.
Many card parties, fashion shows and food sales
are given, and in that way money Is raised. At
the end of the term, the delegate is voted upon
and given her passage to Camp. This trip is
wonderful for any girl and so they all work very
hard all during the year to see which one will
receive the honor of going to Camp.

The Club is very popular and the girls are very
interested in it. This year there are forty-nine
members.



O. G. A.

Mary Deans '32



The "(J. G. A." (Order of Gregg Artists), organ-
ized by Miss Patterson our commercial teacher.
Is a Club for the members of the Advanced Short-
hand class only.

At our first meeting, it was agreed upon to have
weekly meetings every Thursday afternoon. The
officers for the year were also elected. The
following students hold offices: Alice Gormely,
President; Inez Theoktisto, Vice-President; Mary
Deans, Secretary-Treasurer.

The purpose of this Club Is tf) promote more
interest in the study of shorthand and typewrit-



ing. A short while after our Club was organized.
Miss Patterson took us up to Mount Hope to
visit the Commissary office. This visit was
stimulating as many things of interest to the
commercial students are to be seen there.

Every month we receive copies of "The Gregg
Writer" a monthly magazine for shorthand stu-
dents. This magazine contains contests and
articles of Interest to the commercial students,
and according to the enthusiasm and efforts
shown by the students In competing for these
contests, the "O. G. A." seems to be proving a
real success.



THE CARIBBEAN



61



O. G. A.




SPANISH CLUB







62



THE CARIBBEAN



THE BOYS' ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION

E. de la Ossa '33

The boys' Athletic Association of 1931-32 has Most of these improvements are largely due to

functioned with more efficiency than at any time the influence of Air. Vinton, the B. A. A. sponsor,

in the past. Money has rolled Into Its treasury The Association was also aided by the good work

with almost every business undertaking and the of the men teachers in coaching the different

Association has taken o\'er many ne^\ responsi- teams and by the splendid cooperation of the

billtles. principal, Mr. Franks.

The meetings of the Association have been held ^^ the beginning of the school year an election

regularly on the second and fourth Wednesday ^f officers was held. The following officers were

of every month. The school as a whole has shown elected

real interest In the B. A. A. Proof of this as seen t^ , n i i i iit\ i i

, ,,1 ,1 y 1 1 J- President Kandolph VNikmestad

m the attendance at the mter-scholastic games ,. r. u ^ ir

...1 I ifj 17 TJAA Vice-President Harrv Kgolf

and in the regular pavment oi dues, r-very ti.A. A.

member upon payment of his dues received a Secretary Herman Roos

season pass to all games. Treasurer James Hayden

Several changes have taken place in the Asso- The officers of the Athletic Association are as

elation. The G. A. A. and B. A. A. are now one follows:

organization. The Athletic Association. The n j d j i u \\r\ a j

,. .... 1 1 i President Kandolph V\ ikingstad

two bodies were joined in order to obtain better ,,. t-> i /^i i m-

\ic- President Uladvs Bliss

cooperation. n o i

. ,. ^, ,, ,. 11 1- Secretary Betty Stetler

A few of the more athleticallv inclined were . r, tt n

r,, n j^-i^ i^ f Ti. i i J i Ass t. Sec V Herman Koos

of the opinion that it uas not fair that anv student t tr j

when he had joined the B. A. A. should be on Treasurer. James Hayden

equal rating with the letter men. For this reason, Ass't. Treas Ruth Wikingstad .

the athletes automatically became members of a The results of the Varsity Club election were:

Varsity Club when they receive their "C" In any President Randolph Wikingstad

snort. Sec 'y. -Treas Jesse Sinclair



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION

1!^




THE CARIBBEAN



63




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64



TfiE CARIBBEAN





Troupe 217

Spoiuror Miss G. Kimbro



Nell Wardlaw
FIleanor Reinnold
Helen Anatoos

Ip:sse Sinclair
\'i\-iAN Elmgren



Her.\l\n Rods
Dona Eaton
Howard Engelke
Inez Theoktisto
Alice Gormelv



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THE CARIBBEAN



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DRAMATIC CLUB

Ine: Tlieoklislo, >2

This year Miss Glarlvs Kimliro introduced the cast. The coach for this plav was Verona Herman.

Dramatic Club into Cristohal High School. I'he The parents present scented to get a great deal of

purpose of this Club is to encourage dramatics in enioyment out of it.
the high school. The Dramatic Club took upon itself to present

Our club has thirty-nine members. Regular a three-act play for the benefit of the lunior Club.

meetings are held on the first and third W'ednes- The name of it was "When's Your Birthday?"

davs of the month. The first is generally a ti i i t oiv r iU m i- i tu

'. I his clul) IS I roop 217 ot the National 1 hes-

business meeting, anil the second a program, j i ii i n i i i

, . r 1 I plans, and we have recently installed twclv

usually a plav given by some of the members. i ,1 1 u u i- -i 1 t-u-

, , -1 members or the club who were eligible. 1 his

VVe have had much success, considering our late i r 1 j -ii u

. group now consists 01 an inner circle and will have

start, and we hope to continue this success all 1 . ^ lz 1 > l

' social meetings at night, in sorre members house.

through the vears. ^ir 1 t u ~ u r -i 1

"^ We hope to have some more members eligible as

The first one-act play: "The Prairie Doll" was ^he play "Hannah Gives Notice" will give Its

given at the American Legion hall. Notwithstand- characters, Elizabeth Thornton, Verona Herman,

ing poor stage equipment, it was a success, al- Evelyn Wright, and Vivien Elmgren enough units

though its being free may have had something j^, j^^ members. This play was coached by Betty

to do with the crow
Dona Eaton, lack Wright, and lesse Sinclair. , j, , 1 ii i i j

"1 T^i 1 I ""^ credit tor making this club a success is due

Alice Gormelv was coach. I his plav was later .ai-i--i 1 ", j j

' . T-, to I'liss Kimbro, whose patience and good nature

given tor the Eastern Star with Antonio rernandez , -i 1 1

r , 1 has made possible such cooperation,
in lack Wrights place. r 1 /^i 1

" , T^- The officers of this Club are:

Uur second one-act play Washington s rirst

Defeat," was given at the Y. W. C. A. on February President Nell \^'ardlaw

18. Nell \^'ardlaw, Tommy Rankin and Betty Vice-President Henry Lee

Stabler were the cast, and this play was coached Secretary Inez Theoktisto

by Vivian Elmgren. Treas. and Business Manager.. Oscar Heilbron

On Parent's Visiting Day the Dramatic Club Programs Velta Eolcy

presented a play, again at the American Legion Research Vivien r Imgren

hall, called "Red Carnations." Eleanor Relnhold, Out last and biggest job of the year Is the

Howard Engleke, and Herman Roos were the Senior play "Who's Boss.'



1














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THE CARIBBEAN




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THE CARIBBEAN



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BOYS' ATHLETICS

Joe F.bdon '52



SOCCER

Our fourth year ot soccer was the
best that we have ever had, although
we met with defeat, we succeeded in
winning two games out of five, a higher
average than was ever attained hv an\-
previous soccer team of C.H.S. We
owe much ot our success this year to
our coach, \ E. Seiler.

The varsity team consisted of the
lollowing players;

G. Tarflinger -Goalkeeper
R. Wheeler -R. Fullback
M. Wheeler -L. Fullback
J. Eberenz C Halfback
A. Forstrom R. Halfback
H. Egolf -R, Halfback
J. Ehdon -L. Halfback
E. Wertz -L. Halfback
R. Wikingstad -L. End
L. Tipton L. Forward
C. Pescod (Capt.) -C. Forward
Al. Alarchosky R. Forward
T. Rankin -R. End
C. Berger -R. Halfback (sub)
J. Lockwood -L. Halfback (sub)
R. Stevenson -L. Halfback (sub)
C. Kariger -R. Halfback (sub)

The first game of the soccer series
was played October 24, 1931 at Balboa
Balboa started out as if they meant
business by scoring two goals before
Cristobal could tally one. Balboa's
lirst goal carr.e in the first quarter when
A. Salterio booted a goal past Cristo-
bal's goalkeeper, Tarflinger, and their
second goal came ill the second quarter
vhen De la Pena scored on a penalty
liicU. This seemed to warm Cristobal
lip and R. Wikingstad scored Cristo-
Iial's first goal near the end of second
(juarter when he shot the ball past
goalkeeper Judson of Balboa.

Soon after the opening of the third
quarter L. Tipton scored Cristobal's
second goal by placing one past ludson.
Soon after this M. jMarchosky scored
Cristobal's third goil. The score re-
gained the same until about two
minutes belore the enfl of the game
.vhen ). Salterio made a goal for Balboa
tying the score. About a minute later
L. Tipton s.ored Cristobal's fourth



point which won the first game of the
series for C.H.S. by the score of 4-3.

The second game was pla\ed the
following Saturday on Cristobal's home
ground, Cristolial won by the score of
4-2. Cristobal scored two goals in the
lirst half before Balboa could tally.
Cristobal duplicated this performance
in the second half, scoring two goals
before Balboa scored their second goal.
Both teams were so an.\lous to keep
the other team from scoring that they
both used rough tactics.

C. Pescod, L. Tipton, and R. Wik-
ingstad each scoreil one goal for Cristo-
bal. G. Walker of Balboa in an error
kicked the fourth goal for Cristobal.
M. De la Pena scored a goal for Balboa.
Balboa showed lack of team work in
this game.

Balboa won the third game on No-
vember 7, at Balboa by the overwhelm-
ing score ot 13-2. This game was
played on a muildy field and Balboa
showed that they were mud-horses.
Both Cristobal's offense and defense
cracked in this game. The score at the
end of the first half was 7-2 in favor of
Balboa. Cristobal scored both of her
points at the beginning of the third
quarter.

In the second halt Balboa picked up
where they left off and scored si.x points
while holding Cristobal scoreless.
Cristobal never seemed to be able to
keep the ball when they had possession
oi it T. Rankin and L. Tipton scored
Cristobal's two goals.

The fourth soccer game was played
at Cristobal on November 14. Balboa
evened up the series by defeating
Cristobal. The score was 3-1. This
game, like the third game, was played
in the rain. Balboa scored once in each
oi (he lirst three quaiters. Cristobal
scored its lone gn.il in the third quarter.
De la Pena and G. Walker scored
Balboa's first two goals. The third
goal lor Balboa came when M. Wheeler
oi Cristobal got mi\ed up in a scrim-
mage in front of his own goal and footed
one through for Balboa. The lone
Cristobal score came near the end of
the third (]iiarler when T. Rankin
scored on a pass ircmi C Pescod. This



game was marked by team play on the
part of both teams.

The fifth and deciding game of the
soccer series was played at Balboa on
No\ ember 21, 1951. Balboa won this
game by the score 10-1. So, for the
fourth consecutive year Balboa has
been the interschool soccer champion.
This game was played on a dry field
which was a marked difference to the
two preceding games. Both teams
started out at full speed and the whole
lirst half was marked by furious playing
on the part of each. The score at the
end of the fust half was 3-0 in favor of
Balboa.

In the second half Cristobal went
completely to pieces. Balboa scored
seven points while Cristobal scored
only one. Cristobal seemed to be over-
trained for this game. In the last
quarter they were so tired they could
hardly run. T. Rankin scored Cristo-
bal's one goal. A. Salterio and G.
Walker scored three goals for Balboa
while J. Salterio ran them a close
second by scoring twice. The other
two Balboa scores were mid; bv M.
Dew and .^1. De la Pena.

BOYS' BASEBALL
Joe Ehdon '32

The lirst baseball game of this year's
series was played at Balboa, December
12, 1931. Cristobal defeated Balboa
by the .score of 5-4.

Balboa scoied the first run in the
second inning when Corrigan singled
over second, stole second, and came
home on an o\'erthrow.

Cristobal tied the score in the first
of the si.xth. Pe.scod singled past third.
He then stole second and reached third
on an overthrow. He scored on a
fielder's choice when Wirtz hit to
second.

Balboa took the lead again in the
.seventh inning. Judson reached first
on a single. McGroarty walked. Jun-
kie hit over "short" sending Judson
home. AlcGroarty was put out on the
same I>la^ when he tried to reach home.
Hunkle reached third and came home
on an o\-erthrow to home.

lialboa scoretl iigain in the eighth



THE CARIBBEAN



75



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76



THE CARIBBEAN



inning when DombrowsUv walked,
stole second, and went to third on an
overthrow to second. Judson brought
him home with a hit past third.

Cristobal started the fireworks in the
ninth inning and turned the tables on
Balboa. Alberga, Ebdon. and Wiking-
stad got on base. Alberga and Ebdon
scored when Finnegan singled past
second. Wikingstad was caught otf
third. Pescod brought Finnegan home
when he knocked a tast one past third.
He reached third and came home on an
o\-erthrow to home.



CRISTOBAL

Alberga

Ebdon

Wickv

Finnegan

Pescod

Wirtz

Egolf

Tartlinger

Rankin

Total

BALBOA

Ue la Pena

Stoudner

Specht

Barkhurst

Corrigan

Dombroskv

Judson D.

iMcGroarty

Kunkel

De.v

Total



Pes



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.5 14












1


4


1


1


12


3





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1


6








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1


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1


1


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1


5


1





1


1





3


1


















Second Game

The second game ot the series was
p'.^'ved December 19, 1951 at Cristobal.
For the second time Cristobal defeat-
ed Balboa. The score was 6-1.

Kunkel started ior Balboa but he
was niched tor si.\ hits and five runs in
the first four innings. Kunkel was
relieved by Dew, who held Cristobal
to two hits and no runs the fi\'e innings
he was in the bo.x.

Cristobal scored three runs in the
third inning. Marchosky and Alberga
were thrown out at first. Ebdon
singled through iirst. Wikingstad
sing'ed to left, ad\'ancing Ebtlon to
secoml. I'innegan hit to third ;ind the
thir.l baseman overthrew first base.
Kbdon scored, W'ikingstad went to



third and Finnegan went to second.
Both runners scored when Pescod
doubled.

In the fourth Inning Cristobal con-
tinued to score. Wirtz struck out,
Eberenz walked, iMarchosky sacri-
ficed, Alberga was hit by pitched ball,
and Ebdon singled scoring Eberenz.
Alberga scored on a single by Wicking-
stad.

Balboa scored their lone tally in the
fifth inning. Corrigan reached first on
Ebdon's error. He scored when Judson
doubled to right.



Pos

ss-,3b

rf

2 b

P-lf

cf

lb

3b

ss

c

If-b



h





BALBOA

Stoudner

De la Pena

Specht

Kunkel

Corrigan

Dombroskv

Judson J.

Judson \y

McGroary

Dew

Total

CRISTOBAL

Alberga

Tartlinger

Wheeler

Ebdon

Wikingstad

Finnegan

Pescod

Egolf

Wirtz

Agnew

Eberenz

Marchosky

Total



Third Game

The third game ot the series was
played at Balboa on January 9, 1952.
For the third consecutixe time, Cris-
tobal came out victorious.

Hard hitting, with the aid of many
errors on the part ot the Balboa team,
made it an easy win tor Cristobal.
Kunkel started for Balboa, but was
taken out after the fourth inning.
Cristobal scored four runs in the first
inning, three in the second, and one in
the fourth off Kunkel. Dew, who
relieved Kunkel, held Cristobal to one
run.

Balboa scored their runs m the first.



Pos

cf
cf

cf

lb

5 b
rf

P

ss

If
If

2b



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pa


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II
1



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1







12



second and si.xth innings. They could
get only five hits off Pescod.

The highlights of the game were the
two fast double plays that Balboa
succeeded in making.



CRISTOBAL Pes



Eberenz

iMarchosky

Ebdon

Pescod

Farflinger

Wikingstad

Egolf

Alberga

Wheeler

Total

BALBOA

Stoudner

De la Pena

Corrigan

Kunkel

De

Judson W.

Judson D.

McCroarty

Barkhurst

Dombroskv

Total



2b
c

lb
P

cf
3 b
ss
rf
If



ab

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4
4



po

4

6

11





9 27



Pos ab

SS-3b 3
rt 5

cf 4

P 2

P 1

ss

5b 4
c 4

4
4



If
lb



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4



51



Fourth Game

Balboa played Cristobal at Cristobal
on lanuary 16. Balboa won its first
game when it defeated Cristobal 8-6.

Although outhit 15-6, Balboa took
advantage of all the breaks and man-
aged to score enough runs in the last
inning to nose out Cristobal.

Balboa took the lead in the first
inning, scoring one run on a hit and a
walk. Cristobal came back strong
in their half and scored three runs on
four hits. Balboa tied the score in the
second and went ahead in the third.
In the fifth Balboa added one more run
to give them a 5-3 lead. Cristobal
again went into the lead in the si.xth
when they scored three runs.

In the ninth inning, McGroarty of
Balboa doubled through short. Dew
dumped one in front of the plate, both
runners being sate as Pescod was slow
in fielding the ball. Dombroskv fouled
out to the catcher but Stoudner bunted
and McGroarty scored. Corrigan hit
to the infield and Dew scored with the
winning run. Balboa pushed across
another run before they were stopped.



THE CARTRBEAN



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78



THE CARIBBEAN



BALBOA


Pos


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h


po


BALBOA


P03


ab


r


h


po


Stoudner


ss


5


1


1


1


Stoudner


SS




o


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1


Corrigan


c(


4


1








Corrigan


cf







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De la Pena


ir


4


o


1


1


Kunkel


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Kunkel


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1


De la Pena


If







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5


Speclit


31,


4





i)


1


Specht


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1


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L'l.


4





1


4


ladson W.


2 b










1


McGroart.v


c


3


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1


4


.^IcGroart V


c


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1


6


Dew


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3


1





n


Dew


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1


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DomlirosUy


lb


3


(1





15


D imhrosUv


lb


1


1





15


Total




34


8


6


27


Total




30


4


4


27


CRISTOBAL


Pos


ab


r


h


po


Six


th Game








Eliercnz


L'h


5


1


2


'>


On lanuary


30, C


ristob


al


won


the


WiUingst.id


:,h


5


1


>





Baseball championsh


p for


the second


El>don


u.


5


')


>


6


consecutive year. The score


was


6-4.


Pescod


p


5





>


n


The game was call


ed on


account of


Egolf


ss


4





1


o


rani at the end


of the


fifth


inning.




Allierga


rf


o





,)




Balboa took


the


ead in


the


first


TarliiTiger


cf


4


f)







inning, scoring


one run on


tl


ree


hits.


Raniciil


ci


I


n


(1





In this inning they didn't seem to


Ta\'e


Wheeler


If


4


I


I




any trouble in hitting Pescot


's


ifferings.


MarcluisU_v


(.'


1


1


1


u


Balboa continued their scoria
the second and third innings


; in


Total




31


6


15


27


and



Fifth Game

On Januarv '17i. Ball>oa deteated
Cristobal lor the second consecutive
time. The score was 4-1.

Alike Dew ot Balboa and Charley
Pescod o[ Cristobnl staged a brilliant
pitcher's battle for the first seven
innings ol the game. Pescod cracked
in the eighth when Bilboa scored three
runs on lour hits.

Cristojil scored its lone run in the
third inning. Alarchosky scored this
run on a sing'e. a stolen base, and



scored three more runs. This gave
Balboa a lead oF 4-0.

The Cristobal team came to life in
their hall of the third and scored five
runs. By taking advantage of the
breaks and by hard hitting Cristobal
forged into the lead for the first time.
Cristobal strengthened their lead in the
last ol the fourth by scoringanothar ran.

By some fast fielding, Balboa was
shut out in the first of the fifth. The
game was called at the end ot this
inning because of the poor condition
ot the field after the rain.



another single












BALBOA


Pos


ab


r


h


po


Balboa tiec


the s.


ore in the


si.xth


Stoudner


ss


5





1





inning. Stoudner led


off with a


single


Corrigan


cf


,3











and stole second. Co


rigan


sent


a long


Kunkel


rf


5


o


')





single to left


lield on


whic


h Stouc


Iner


De la Pena


If


5


1


1





scorer!












Specht


5b


3








1


In the eighth inning Ba


Iboa


scored


Judson I


3 b














3 runs. Afte


r Dew


had singled


and


Judson W.


2 b





1


2





Dombrosky


lad walked


Stoudner


McGroarty


c








1


5


tripled to ri


ght, scoring


Dew


and


Dew


p-rf











1


Dombrosky.


Kunkel


score


d Stoudner


Dombrosky


lb


2








4


with .1 single.












Total




23


4


7


12


CRISTOBAL


Pos


ab


r


h


po


CRISTOBAL


Pos


ab


r


h


po


Eberenz


21>


4





1


b


Eberenz


ss


3








I


A\archosky


c


4


1


1


8


Marchosky


c


o


I


1


6


Wikingstad


3b


4








4


Ebdon


lb


3


1


1


5


Pescod


P


4





1





Alberga


rf





1








Ebdon


lb


4





1


4


Pescod


P


1


1


1





Egolf


ss


4





1


1


Egolf


2 b


5





1


3


Alberga


rf


2


n








Wheeler


If


3











Wheeler


If


3








1


Rankin


3b


')





(1





Rankin


cf


3











Wirtz


cf





(1





1


Tarflinger




I











Wikingstad


cf


y


1


1


1


Total




53


1


5


24


Total




19


6


5


15



winning every



BOYS' SWIMMING

Joe EbAon 12

The inter-scholactic swimming meet
tietween Cristobal High School and
Balboa High was held at Balboa on
March 19. 1932. Balboa decisively
defeated Cristobal,
first place.

The Balboa High School boys a-
massed a total of 58 points against the
12 scored by the Cristobal High School
boys.

The events, the order in which they
were run off, and the winners are as
follows:

K'-//./. I' ree Slyk

1. B. Smith (B.)

2. H. Smith (C.)
5. T. Alley (B.1

50-\hi. Back Stroke

1. B. Crandall (B.i

2. B. HoUowell (C.)

3. W. Grant (B.)

HU/,1. Brea.'t Stroke

1. I. We!itend.nrff (B.)

2. B. Onderdonk (B.)

3. F. Washibaiigh (C.)

I'anci/ Di.'iiu^

1. H. Breiverton (B.)

2. B. Grand ill (B.)

3. E. NeaKC.)

22l>-,/J. free Sli/le

1. H. Brewerton (B.)

2. B. O.iderdonk (.)

3. H. Raphael (B.)

1. W. Gr.int (B )

2. H. Smith (C.)

3. H. Egolf (C.)

I7f<-,/L Medly Relax,

Balboa fCrandall. Westendortt, and
Smith 1.

17 h Relay

Balboa (Peterson, Grant, Piper.
Brewerton ).

JuuGES: (Cristobal) V. E. Seiler, H.
Wardlaw, Bev. Turner.

Juur.ES: (Balboa) P. E. Miller,
Emma Van Clief, C. Walters, and H.
J. Greiser.

BOYS' TENNIS

The lirst tennis meet between Balboa
High School and Ci istobal High School
was held at Fort Davis on February
20, 1932. Balboa High won this meet.
three matches to two. Balboa won



THE CARIBBEAN



79




80



THE CARIBBEAN



all the singles, and Cristobal all the
doubles.

The results were:

.^'('. / Siiii//ci

Dew (BHS) deteated Pescod (CHS)
"-5. '-6, 6-4.

Xo. 2 Sinfllc:

Booth (BHS) dt.'ented Wheeler
(CHS) 9-7. S-6.

-V o. > Siiiflles

Heiirtematte (BHS) defeated Birnie
(CHS) 6-5. 6-3.

Xo. 1 Doublet
Forsstrom and Rankin (CHS) de-
feated Grant and de la Pefia (BHS)
6-.i, 6-4.

Xo. 2 Doiihle.-
Eberenz and Slocum (CHS) de-
feated HendricUson and .\lorales
(BHS) 9-7, 4-6, 6-4.



Second Mket

Balboa High School and Cristobal
High School pla.ved their second tennis
meet at Balboa on February 27, 1952.
For the second straight time Ballioa
came out victorious, winning the meet
four matches to one.

The results were:

Xo I Sinijtes

Dew (BHS) defeated Pescod (CHS)
3-6, 6-0, 6-5.

-\o. 2 Sinale.r

M. Wheeler defeated Booth (BHSi
2-6, 10-8, 7-5.

.vt7 T Singles

Huertematte (BHS) defeated Lvew
(CHS) 6-1, 5-6. 7-5.

Xo. 1 Doiihles
De la Peiia and Hendrickson (BHS)
defeated Forsstrom and Rankin (CHS)
6-0, 4-6, 6-4.

Xo. 2 DouhUs
Morales and Grant (BHS) defeated
Lockwood and Slocum (CHS) 3-6
7-5, 8-6.

Third Mket

On March 5. 1052 Balboa High
Srhool and Cristobal High School met
for the third time. For the third time
Balboa succeeded in winning. The
sco.-e in matches was Balboa three.
Cristobal two.

The results were:



Xo. 1 Sincilc.r

Pescod (CHS) defeated Booth
(BHS) 6-5. 6-5.

Xo. 2 Siiiijlc.i
Wheeler (CHS) defeated Huerte-
matte 6-5, 5-7, 7-5.

Ao. 3 Singles

Hendrickson (BHS) defeated Lveu-
(CHS) 6-2. 8-6.

Xo. I Doiihlo
^ Morales and Grant (BHS) defeated
P'orsstrom and Rankin (CHS) 6-''
.''-6, 6-4.

Xo. 2 Doiille..
De la Peiia and Arro.vo (BHS) de-
feated Eberenz and Birnie (CHS) 6-0
6-0.

BASKETB.\LL
The first basketball game between
Balboa and Cristobal was plavCd April
2, 1952 at Cristobal. Cristobal defeated
Balboa bv the close score of 15-15. The
feature of this game was the wonderful
guarding of both teams.

Balboa started out like thev weren't
going to give Cristob;d a chance. Thev
completely outplayed Cristobal in this
quarter, scoring five points while hold-
ing Cristobal to two points.

In the second quarter Cristobal
turned the tables on Balboa. Cristobal
scored four points while Balboa didn't
succeed in scoring a marker. The
score at the end of this quarter was
6-5 favor Cristobal.

The heaviest scoring of the game
was in the third quarter. Both teams
amassed a total of si.x points in this
quarter. The lead in this quarter kept
going back and forth between the two
teams.

The fourth quarter was marked by
close guarding on the part of boih
teams. Cristobal scored three points



Balboa:










Name


Pos.


FGF


oil]


sTP


Mc Groartv


R.F.











De la Pena


R.F.











Hele


L.F.











Barkhurst


L.F.


o


1


5


Bleakly


C.


1


1


4


Salterio


R.G.





n





.^lichelson


R.G.











Spects


L.G.











Dew


L.G.


1


2


4



Totals 4 5 15

Second Game

Balboa and Cristobal met for the
second time at Balboa on April 9,
1952. Balboa evened up the series In
this game, winning by the close S'-ore
of 18-15.

Cristobal started out strong in the
first quarter. They scored eight
points and Balboa scored four points.

Balboa came back strong in the
second quarter. But at the end of this
quarter Cristobal was still on the long
end of the score. The score at the end
ot the second quarter was 11-9.

The end of the third quarter found
the two teams battling on even teams.
But in the fourth quarter C.-istobal
weakened for a few minutes and Balboa
succeeded in overcoming a one point
lead. Balboa made another goal
before the game was oyer and when the
whistle blew Balboa still enioyed a
three point lead.



Game Si.npiary
Cristobal:
Name
T. Rankin
W. Wheeler



C. Pescod
M. Wheeler
R. Wikint!stad
I. Ebon

M. Marchoskv
H. Egolf



Pos.
R.F.
R F.
L.F.
L.F.
C

R.G.

R.G.

J^G^

Totals



FGFoul:.TP



G.

Cristobal:

Name

Rankin

Eberenz

C. Pescod

M. Wheeler

Ebdon

Marchoskv

Wikingstad



..^1E Su.MAlARY



n
1





1






1









Egolf

Balboa:

Name

Stoudner

He'c

De la Pefia

Bleakly

Barkhurst

Michelson

Salterio

Dew

Spects



Pos.

R.F.

R.F.

L.F.

L.F.

C.

R.G.

R.G.

L.G.

Totals



FG Foul:

2 1



2



1
1 2












^TP


4


4





Pos.

R.F.

R.F.

L.F.

C.

C.

R.G.

R.G.

L.G.

L.G.



FG Foul
1



15



TP



n
1

o

n



1
]




n


n




n



1 15



Tota



als



6



4


IF



THE CARIBBEAN



81







f,






V



"(Si



e.




^'*






v



^



I



^.






^



'Ni





a




V


(!.1




JSI




^




'Hf


i \





^\



^.



/' \






^



-r




THE CARIBBEAN



Third Game

The third game ot the series was
played at Balboa on April 25, 1952.
Cristobal won its second game, de-
feating Balboa 17-11. This was the
most interesting oi the first three
games.

Balboa took the lead in the ilrst
quarter but Cristobal came back in
the second quarter and tied the score.
Cristobal forged ahead in the third
quarter and went into the lourth quar-
ter with a one point lead.

Then the fireworks started. Cristo-
bal made a field goal but Balboa soon
evened up the score with a foul shot
and a spectacular field goal by Kunkel.
Then with only two minutes lett
Marchosky made two long field goals
and Pescod one. In these last two
minutes Cristobal completely out-
classed Balboa.



G.\.ME Sl.\i>'.ARY



CRI<^TObAL:

Name

Rankin

Pescod

Fbdon

jMarchoskv

Egolf

W^ikingstad



Balboa:

De la Pefia

Stoudner

Bleakly

KiinUel

Spects

Alichelson

Barkhurst

Dew



Pos.

R.F.

L.F.

C.

R.G.

L.G.

L.G.



FG Fouls TP



Totals

R.F.

L.F.

C.

C.

R.G.

R.G.

L.G.

L.G.



17

4
4


n








Fourth Game

The fourth game of the series was
plaved at Balboa on May 7, 1952.
Cristobal won this game by the score
of 26-20.

In the first quarter Ciistobil out-
played Balboa. Balboa was continually
miif'infr the ball and thev were not able



to stop Cristobal's fast and accurate
passes. The score at the end of the
first quaiter was 8-5 in favor of Cristo-
bal.

Cristobal continued to increase their
lead in the second cjuarter. The score
at the end of the second (luarter was
14-6 in favor of Cristobal.

In the third quarter Balboa started
to play hard, and they outscored
Cristobal. They collected a total of
eleven points while Cristobal was
amassing a total ot live points. Cris-
tobal was still in the lead at the end ot
this quarter by the close score of 19-17.

At this point of the game each team
had a good chance to win. For a few
minutes in this quarter the score re-
mained close but in the last few
minutes of the game the Cristobal
team found the range of the basket
and when the whistle blew Cristobal
was on the long end of a 26-20 score.



Game Su.^l.MARV



Cristobal:

Name

Rankin

Pescod

Ebdon

Wikingstad

Wood

."^larchosky

Esolf



Balboa:

Name

De la Pen a

McGroarty

Stoudner

Hele

Barkhurst

Kunkel

De.v

Salterio

Bleikley

Speckts

Michelson



Pos



FG

R.F.

L.F.

C

C

C

R.G.

L.G.



Fouls TP
2



Tot 3



11



4 26



Po.;



FG

R.F.

R.F.

L.F.

L.F.

C

C

R.G.

R.G.

L.G.

L.G.

L.G.



Fouls TP
n 5


5



1 2


1





Tota



Fifth Game

On May 13, \932 Cristobal won the
Interscholastic Basketball Champion-
ship ot the Canal Zone. The score was
21-15. Cristobal went into the lead in
the first quarter and held it until the
end of the game.

Cristobal outscored Balboa in the
first quarter. Some fast passing and
fancy shooting enabled Cristobal to
keep ahead in this quarter.

Cristobal continued to outplay Bal-
boa in the second quarter and at the
end of the halt we were on the long end
of an 11-5 score. Cristobal's detense
was a little too much tor Balboa.

The only quarter that Balboa
showed signs of really playing basket-
ball was 111 the third quarter when they
outscored Cristobal. This quarter was
featured by close guarding.

Cristobal continued its good work
in the last quarter, and when the
whistle blew we were on the long end
of a 21-15 score and were champions
for the second consecuti\'e year.

Game Sum.mary



Cristobal:














Name


Pos.


FG


Fo


uls


TP




Rankin




R.F.













M. Wheeler




R.F.









n


Pescod




L.F.






'>


10


Fbdnn




C






I


5


Marchosky




R.F.






1


5


Egolf




L.G.






1


3



Total



Bai boa:
Barkhurst
Hele
Dew

Bleakley
Kunkel
De la Pena
Michelson
Sjieckts



R.F.


1





1


L.F.


1


5


5


L.F.





1


1


C


1


1


5


C











R.G.











L.G.





1


1


L.G.





1


1



Totals



7 13




THE CARIBBEAN



83




. ,;.{,-. ^- .._.^ ;-:r-M y^ ^





84



THE CARIBBEAN



S-



EB^=



GIRLS' ATHLETICS

Gladu.f B/ii:r



= B



rsa



VOLLEY BALL
For 1951-52

The girls started ol't their sports
program this vear with volleyball. In
the absence of Aliss Bailey, our regular
coach, Miss Smart substituted.

Forty girls attended practice and
after the first and second varsity team
were chosen, the rest of the girls were
divided into four teams. These teams
were the Lucky Seven. Select Six,
Double Four, and Shooting Stars.

A series of five games was played
against Balboa, the team winning the
majority of the games being champion.
The first of the interschool games of
the season was played at the Cristobal
Playshed, October 51. Cristobal started
out fine, winning the first game 21-8,
but dropped in the ne.\t two games.
The scores were 21-10 and 21-16 in
favor of Balboa. Cristobal held good
passwork in the first game, but weak-
ened in the next two. We weren't able
to return Balboa's swift balls when
they were served. Those playing for
Cristobal were: Gladys Bliss (Cap-
tain), Elizabeth Hayes, Mabelle Bliss,
Betty Sfetler, Ruth Wickingstad,
Ruth Pickett, Eileen Donovan and
Margaret Reinhold.

2nd. Game

On November 7, the girls journeyed
to Balboa to play their second game.
Cristobal was again defeated, Balboa
winning all three games 21-12, 21-4
and 21-19. Cristobal didn't play up to
their standard. However, in the third
game they showed some real spirit. It
was anybody's game until the last
point was made. Cristobal used the
same lineup as in the first game.

3rd. Game

The third game was played at the
Cristobal Playshed, November 14.
This time Cristobal came out on top,
winning all three games, 21-15, 21-11
and 21-16. Cristobal was in very good
form and their passwork was excellent.
Elizabeth Hayes was the outstanding
player of the day. The line-up was
changed a little, this time the team
was composed of Gladys and Maybelle
Bliss, Elizabeth Hayes, Bettv Stetler,



Ruth Wickingstad, Helen .'\anstoos
and Dorothy Birkland.

4th. Game
The fourth game was played in
Balboa, November 21. The games were
fast and the passwork of both teams
was well worth mentioning. Both
teams were in excellent condition. The
first game was won by Cristobal 21-18.
Balboa took the next two games 21-10
and 21-15. The same line-up was used
as in the third game.

5th. Game

As Balboa won the toss-up, Cristobal
went to Balboa again, November 28.
Cristobal started out fine, winning the
first game 21-19. In the second game
we weakened and lost 21-10. In the
third game we found our stride
again, but after a hard struggle the
game ended in Balboa's favor 25-21.
Those playing were Gladys Bliss,
Maybelle Bliss, Elizabeth Hayes, Helen
Aanstoos, Ruth Wickingstad, Betty
Stetler, Ruth Pickett, Stella Boggs and
Margaret Reinhold.

Balboa won the Volley Ball series
having 9 games to their credit, while
Cri.stobal had onlv 6.



BASKET BALL

The Cristobal High School Girls'
Basket Ball Team with their Captain,
Gladys Bliss, started the season with
the hope of repeating last year's victory
of the series over Balboa High School,
but the loss of some of last year's stars
weakened the team to an extent that
inexperienced players could not over-
come. Credit should be given, however,
to the efforts of these new players, and
to the e.xcellent consistent playing of
Gladys Bliss, Ruth Casto and Dot
Birkeland at Center, and of the out-
standing work of Mildred Owen as
Guard, and the many long difficult
shots to the basket, made by Cristo-
bal's star girl athlete, Elizabeth Hayes.

First Game January 23

On January 25 the Cristobal Team
journeyed to Balboa for the first game
of the series. In memory of last year's
defeat, the Balboa girls were all set to
win, which they did. Good pass work



on the part of the Cristobal Team
failed to stop the fast playing of Jones
and Maurice who netted the winning
scores for Balboa. Girls representing
Cristobal High School were :

P''orwards Elizabeth Hayes

Jessie Vane
Guards Mildred Owen

Helen Aanstoos
Centers Ruth Casto

Gladys Bliss
Subs Betty Stetler

Janet Robinson

Second Game -January 30.

Balboa Girls came to Cristobal to
play the second of the five game series.
Cristobal was unfortunate in that
several of the members of the team
were attending a Girl Reserve Con-
ference at Morro Island. However,
the second string players, and substi-
tutes recruited for the game, fought
valiantly, and held Balboa to a tie
score during the first half of the game.
The following girls made up the team
for Cristobal High that day;

Forwards Jessie Vane

Janet Robinson
Guards Mildred Owen

Stella Boggs
Centers Dorothy Birkeland

Ruth Casto
Subs Margaret Reinhold

Score: Balboa 16
Cristobal 5

Third Game.

For the third game, Cristobal High
went again to Balboa. On this day the
Cristobal Team played its hardest,
determined to win if possible. However,
the fates were against us, and in spite
of excellent pass work on the part of
Dot, Ruth and Gladys, and the close
guarding by Mildred and Helen, the
Balboa Team outplayed us, and won
the series.

TEAM:
Forwards Jessie Vane

Elizabeth Hayes
Guards Mildred Owen

Helen Aanstoos
Centers Dot Birkeland

Gladys Bliss

Ruth Casto



VOLLEY BALL








/>^^



a




^



#>




1^






/ i



I*.



iiiiSiiiiitiiliiii






9



BASKET BALL




IC






^




r



U





86



THE CARIBBEAN




Subs jm Janet Robinson
Betty Stetler
Score: Balboa 12

Cristobal 7

Fourth Game February 13

On February 13. the Balboa team
journeyed to Cristobal, to add a fourth
victory, to the three already made, but
on this day Cristobal rallied to play
their best game of the season. Fast
passing ended with scoring shots to the
basket, netted a total of 31 points for
Cristobal, with Balboa's forwards
being able to score but 9 points. In
this game Cristobal's star Forward,
Elizabeth Hayes, scored 22 points for
her team.

The line-up for this game was:
Forwards Elizabeth Hayes

Jessie Vane
Guards Mildred Owen

Helen .Aanstoos
Centers Dot. Birkeland
Gladys Bliss
Ruth Casto
Sub Betty Stetler

Score: Cristobal .31
Balboa 9

Fifth Game February 20

The last game of the series was
played on the Balboa floor. In this
game. Balboa came back with a ven-
geance, to even the score of the pre-



! vious game. Excellent shots scored a
victory for Balboa. Cristobal's pass
work in the game was the best in the
five games series. The team was
weakened by the absence of Sister
Hayes, and was unable to shoot bas-
kets due to Balboa's splendid defense.

TEAM:
I'orwards Jessie Vane

Ruth Wikingstad
Guards Mildred Owen

Helen Aanstoos
Centers Ruth Casto
Dot Birkland
Gladys Bliss
Subs Janet Robinson

Margaret Reinhold
Score: Balboa 22
Cristobal 3

GIRLS' SWIMMING

This year the girls didn't show as
much interest in swimming as has
formerly been shown. However, those
who did turn out deserve much praise
and credit. They practiced regularly
and worked hard to put up a good
light against the Balboa girls.

On March 19, the girls and boys
journeyed to Balboa for the inter-
scholastic wimming meet. The girls'
team with .Margaret Reinhold as cap-



tain, made 12 points against 42 for th:
Balboa girls.

The results of the girls events ar a :
follows :

50-t/d. Free S/t/lc

1. G. Harris (B.)

2. H. HoUowell (C.)

3. M. Reinhold (C.)

Time 32 .3|5.

5('-i/,A Brej.t.' S/rokc-

1. G. Harris (B.)

2. M. Brewerton (B.)

3. M. Ensrud (C.)

Time 40 415.

5('-i/,/. Bcicfc Sirofce

1. G. Harris (B.)

2. M. Reinhold (C.)
.3. B. Ensminger (C.)

1. H. Hearne (B.)

2. H. Hollowell (C.)

1. L. Duff (B.I

2. H. Hearne (B.I

3. M. Brewerton (B.)

Gir/.f Dii'iili]

1. I,. Duff (B.I

2. M. Brewerton (B.)

3. J. Kyleber(B.)



THE CARIBBEAN



87



GIRLS' INDOOR BASEBALL

This vear the girls did not do so
well in indoor haseball. Balboa won
the ioiir games that were played.

The first game was played at the
Cristobal Playshed. March 19. Both
teams worked hard, but Balboa lorged
ahead in the last inning. The score
was 18-14.

In the second game at the Balboa
Playshed, March 26, Cristobal didn't
work together at all. They made many
errors which were costly. The game
ended 20-S in Balboa's la\'or.

The thiril game was the best game



oi the series. It was played at the
Cristobal Playshed, April 2. Both
teams were in their best form to play.
The score at the end of the seventh
inning was 20-20 so we had to play
another inning. B.dboa held the
Cristobal girls scoreless in this half.
Then when Balboa came to bat, they
were set on getting the winning run.
M. Dryden hit the ball that brought
E. Fluharty in. The game ended
21-20 in favor of Balboa.

On April 9, the Cristobal team
journeyed to Balboa but several good
pla\-ers were unable to make the trip.
Balboa was in good form and played
a very tine game. The Cristobal team



could not get started until it was too
late. The score was 31-8. Elizabeth
Hayes, Ruth Casto and Betty Stetler
played well in all the games.

Those who made the team weie:
Ruth Casto-c
Gladys Bliss-p (Captain)
Ruth Wikingstad-lst base



Helen Aansto



2nd base



Betty Stetler-ord base
Alayno Bliss-ss
Elizabeth Hayes-rf
Ho]->e Hollowell-cf
iM;irgaret Reinhold-lf



Subs



Pete Hollwell
Adah Briggs



BASEBALL




88



THE CARIBBEAN




'^^^^fyVo^^



Dona Eaton ")2




ifffKifee



Oct. 1. Our old seat of learning has once more
opened it's doors. Two new teachers Miss
Brown and y\v. Franks, a new principal. Just
wait till the girls get a look at him he'll need a
body guard!

Oct. 2. The largest numher of students ever
have been enrolled in C.H.S. this year. Why
they're even breaking the ground for a new school.

Oct. 5. Mr. Eranks has arranged for a half
holiday for us so we can ha\-e a field day. I just
knew appearances were'nt decening.

Oct. 6. Thursday's the big day for the Fresh-
iesl We're having our field day then and the Sophs
are going to beat some of the freshness out of them

Oct. 7. Seniors given privileges "if we're
good. It all depends on you, ye Seniors, so act
accordingly.

Oct. 8. Field day today a nice muddy, rainy
day and what those Ereshies didn't get
They're going around with a meek look which
very much befits them, after the chastising they
got.

Oct. 9. And I didn't think there were any
more left like this one- some dizzy blonde asked
y\x. \'inton today if he would show her some sky
hooks and striped paint.

Oct. 10. Had some real wet rain today but
we actually saw the sun for about ten minutes
this afternoon.

Oct. 15. The whole school schedule has been
changed our third peruKl is the eighth now
People taking athletics can get out the last period.
Too bad a lot of us aren't the "wim and wigorish'
type.

Oct. 14. Short class meeting of Seniors. Miss
Pat unanimously reelected our advisor.

Oct. 15. Everything going smoothly these
days until 2:15. Then the fun begins about
three people are left in school -seems kind of
funny when only about 100 are signed up for
athletics. Of course it couldn't be that they were
skipping that period'.' No-o-o-o.



Oct. 16. Well, the novelty is beginning to
wear off- -e\eryone looked pretty happy this
Friday.

Oct. 20. Miss Pat "slipped this morning
mmm- she slipped a lot of shamefaced Seniors
some "white slips.

Oct. 21. Athletic Association meetings iield
this afternoon. New coach say, girls, don't you
think we have a cute faculty this year?

Oct. 22. X'arsity volley ball and soccer teams
chosen- some line ups it doesn't look as though
Balboa will have a chance.

Oct. 26. Spanish Club meeting today -wait
till you see the names of the guests for their first
meeting!

Oct. 27. Shame, Seniors, shame! An extra
ballot was found in the votes for election of class
officers today. After a crushing lecture by Miss
Pat, we were told we'd have to vote all over again.

Oct. 28. Randy reelected president of Senior
class. Dues are only three dollars and twenty
five cents. It doesn't look as though the depres-
sion's bothering the Senior class, does it'.'

Oct. 51. This belongs in Ripley's wonder
Book! C.H.S. won the first soccer game from
the Balboa team. Three cheers for us!

Nov. 1. Does everybody feel a month wiser?
Wait till next week and the teachers will write
just what they think about it on your report card!

Nov. 2. Supper Club Cabinet meeting held
today to discuss the first supper to be given Thurs-
day e\ening. Better starve until then girls, cause
we know our "a b c's" when it comes to making
alphabet soup!

Nov. 5. \'iva Panama! Today's a holKlay!
Everybody went to the boat races to celebrate.

Nov. 4. Sh-sh-sh -Big secrets! The Seniors
are discussing their class party. The little Eresh-
ies are all eyes and ears!

Nov. 5. Forty-four girls present at first Supper
club meeting. The largest number ever had and



THE CARIBBEAN



89



was that supper good! Ask anybody ask me I
helped cook it!

Nov. 6. We'll have to go see the weather man
about this rain. It rains all over on top of the
school and everywhere!

Nov. 8. Gatun was nearly Hooded with all
this rain. A slide at Culebra cut and two slides on
the railroad track 12 Spillway gates open
that's where all those missing students were this
afternoon.

Nov. 9. Nominating committee for Staff
officers chosen by Miss iMoore today voting
tomorrow.

Nov. 10. All Staff elections over and let me
tell you we're an AI staff we've got just what it
takes watch our stuff!

Nov. 1 1 The Latin American history class
was entertained today by Dr. Jose Wendehake
Venezuelan historian, Aliss Moore and Mr. Gerald
Bliss will speak to the same class in the near future.

Nov. 12. Brand new style report cards! But
they still tell the same old story, sad to say.

Nov. 13. Oh! Oh! Mary and Elsie (office
girls) resigned today! Why? I wonder . ?

Nov. 16. Big scandal! The nurse came today
to see that everyone had the right kind of a vac-
cination, and imagine Eleanor's embarrassment
(her's is somewhere near the middle of her ana-
tomy) the nurse would'nt let her off, either!

Nov. 17. Students told they would be given
a holiday tomorrow so Dr. J. H. Newlon, curricu-
lum advisor to Zone schools could tell our teachers
how to run this y'ar sc'ool.

Nov. 18. Ahem! The Governor and Mayor
of Colon are to be feted at the first meeting of the
Spanish Club tonight. Style plus, what?

Nov. 20. Supper club party tonight. They're
promising us a big time a new kind of party.

Nov. 21. The jinx again! C.H.S. loses both
volley ball and soccer championships this morning.
After the good start we made, too! But that was
just a little hard luck, we'll do better next time.

Nov. 22. The American Clipper arrived yes-
terday a great many students went out to insjsect
the big ship. We couldn't let her go without our
O. K.

Nov. 23. Seniors will be "at home" Thursday
night, 8 o'clock, at the Strangers club. Whee-
ee-ee!!!



Nov. 24. Marshall Franchez d'Esprey arrives
on S. S. Colombie. And here's some inside
information Mrs. Spencer went to a dinner in
his honor and he kissed her! These Frenchmen
aren't slow by any means!

Nov. 26. Everybody had turkey for dinner
today and for once we girls could eat to our
heart's content- -we knew we'd dance off all the
pounds we might gain at the Senior party tonight.

Nov. 27. Well, everybody we did it again!
The li'l ole' class of 32 added the best Senior dance
ever given to its long list of successes. Today was a
holiday. I think most of us spyent it in recuperating
from "after affects."

Nov. 30. The fxjor imposed upon Senior
English classes given a test on "Hurdles." Miss
Kimbro certainly does keep us on the jump!

Dec. 1. School notes reporters catch the old
Harry today. Us poor woikin' goils

Dec. 2. Staff meeting held today. All Seniors
told to go and watch the birdie as soon as possible
here's where we learn the truth about ourselves!

Dec. 3. Aliss Kimbro organized the Jr. Sr.
Dramatic club today. Srs. were well represented.
Hope we can make a success of it.

Dec. 4. The doctor came today to see that our
works run all right. Betty, who was playing nurse
for him, caught one of the boys in a rather em-
barrassing position (she's resigned).

Dec. 7. Faculty receives a challenge to a game
of volley ball from a bunch of our boys here's
where we get our revenge-grr-rr-rr!

Dec. 6. Poor Perry! He was sawing a piece
of wood in the Manual training building and the
saw slipp>ed, cutting one of his fingers right off!
There's no sense in taking such a foolish subject,
anyway.

Dec. 9. Free movies at the Clubhouse this
afternoon, which reminds me of the joke about
the Scotchman who went to a continuous show at
one P. M. and had to stay until 1 1 P. M.

Dec. 10. Naughty Seniors told their privileges
would be taken away if they don't stop wri'^in on
"Miss Kimbro's" board during the noon hour.
Well, that's the same old question of state's rights
coming before national rights.

Dec. H. The big faculty game is this Monday.
Don't forget the ripe tomatoes!

Dec. 12. Eureka!!! We did it! What? Why,
we beat Balboa in the first game of the baseball



90



THE CARIBBEAN



season! 5 4. Are we good? I esk u ^? ? ?

Dec. 14. It seems as though the faculty in-
tends to rule as well as reign our boys met a
crushing defeat in their game against the faculty
but say. girls. I am able to say. with even greater
con\4ction than before, that I think we have a
perfectly adorable faculty!

Dec. 15. All those wild-looking, painted,
women are the initiates of the Effe Cube Club.
(Fresh. Soph, dramatic club) they're being
inaugurated into the organization.

Dec. 16. Fourteen novitiates led through the
mysteries of the honorary Spanish club tonight.
The formal initiation took place at the Y. W. C. A.
at 7 P. M.

Dec. 17. The teachers are going to give us all
a nice little Xmas present! No report cards until
after Xmas vacation!

Dec. 18. Big celebrations today. Every class
is having a Christmas party. We're all oggsited,
oi! yoi!

Dec. 19 Today us students enter into two
weeks ot ease and luxury "no more pencils, no
more books."

Dec. 21. This is the life! We should be given
a two weeks holiday every fourteen days then
we'd enjoy school!

Dec. 24. Are your stockings all ready for
Santa? Don't forget to hang 'em up!

Dec. 2o. MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERY-
BODY!!!

Dec. 30. Big preparations getting all ready
to bounce the old year tomorrow night!

Dec. 31. 12:00 P. M. Whoopee-ee-ee!!!-
Happy New Year! Eat, Drink, and be Merry, ye
students, for Monday we go back to school!

Ian. 1. Scandal! Our shining e.xample, Mr.
Franks, was out until four o'clock last night!

Jan. 4. Once more we trod the well worn
paths to our seat of learning wonder who thought
up school, anyway?

Jan. 5. Everybody received the sad news
today report cards but then that's what you
get for l)cing Merry at Christmas and Happy over
the New Year.

Jan. 6. Jr. Sr. Dramatic club meeting today
our first play will be "The Prairie Doll."

Jan. 7. O. G. A. organized today they're
going to put C. H. S's. advanced typing class on



the map. by golly! Gonna try for silver cups and
everything!

Ian. 8. Ah! Friday we'll always remember
this day with special pleasure two holidays
come after it.

Jan. 9. Ha! Ha! We fooled Balboa they
had two rows of cheer leaders all ready to show
off for us and we didn't have a special! And even
after all their high powered cheers we beat them
9-3.

Jan. II. Now here's a real teacher! Mrs.
Spencer told her Spanish 12 class that if they
memorize a Spanish ballad they won't have to
take a mid-year e.xam and are we good at
memorizing !?!

Jan. 12. Not a game have we won in the
Twilight League! And we beat Balboa all the
time wonder what's the matter with our boys?

Ian. 13. Well!! The second team won the
first game for us in the Twilight series! Why
didn't somebody think of putting them in sooner?

Ian. 14. Didn't you notice how dreary today
was? Of course, we had to send our little sunshine,
Mr. Franks, over to Balboa to brighten up their
school can't be selfish y'know.

Ian. 15. Big doin's today -the Sophomores
gave a Luncheon Dance and Balboa sent over
three cheer leaders and a teacher to ask us to show
a little more sportsmanship at the school games.
They gave us long talk about being better sports
and no foolin' I was almost in tears before it
was over but they have the right idea we
shouldn't boo so when they're giving one of their
e.vtra special fancy cheers.

Ian. 16. Curses!! Foiled! We lost a game ot
baseball to Balboa today all we needed to win
the series, too. Grrrr-rr!

Ian. 18. Tonight Mrs. Spencer gave a talk
and exhibition of her slides taken while she was in
Spain. And, incidentally, of the people she met
there they certainly grow them handsome in
Spain!

Ian. 19. Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club gave it's
play today. Watch out fer thet "Prairie Doll,"
men, she's dangerous! See thet thar six shooter
a-hanging' on er hip? And how she can shoot is
no rifle expert's business.

Jan. 20. Seniors, do you, or do you not, want
a Caribbean? Mr. Franks says No mon no
Caribbean' So get to work and bring in some



THE CARIBBEAN



91



money ^the depression is Just your imagination.

Jan. 21. Guess it's just too bad for us in the
Twilight League we can't seem to hck anybody.

Jan. 22. Another game lost to Balboa today
say whatsamatter with us, anyway?

Jan. 25. The Hon. Alandi Marchosky lent his
voice (and his couldn't-talk-without-'em hands)
to gi\-ing a speech to the members of the Rotary
Club today. He 'n' Air. Franks told them all the
things they could do to aid and abet us.

Jan. 26. BANG!!! Whatwuzat!!!? Oh-iust
Hunka and Robert fooling arountl with some oi
Mr. \'inton's chemicals the idea is to see how
near to blowing up the uhole lab they can come
then they won't have to take chemistry any more,
see?

Jan. 27. Phooey!!! Hold your nose when you
go past that chemistry lab! Some of the smells
those kids can't stink up!!!

Jan. 29. Are you wondering why the boys are
looking so dejected? That's easy all the girls
have gone to Morro Island for a three day stay.

Jan. 30. Hurray!!!! Thanks to some good wet
rain we won the baseball game today! That
makes us the champs! Look us over everybody
are we good? Ubecherlife!

Feb. 1. C. H. S. Girls Slogan for this month.
Get Your Man!!!!

(S'Leap Year, y'know).

Feb. 2. Wheel! We're picking up. We won
another game in the Twilight League today.

Feb. 3. Lotta Club meetings and things today
we're very busy.

Feb. 4. And another baseball game we win.
Lady Luck, keep a-lookin' right this way!

Feb. 5. Mr. Vinton's Chem and Physics
classes go on board M. S. Augustus today wanna
see what makes it go.

Feb. 6. New Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club play
will be "When's Your Birthday?"

Feb. 7. Well, look us over we're the champ
baseball players on the Isthmus. We won the
inter school series and now we're making the
teams in the Twilight League look like a lotta
Ping Pong players.

Feb. 8. Coming events cast their shadows
before this time in the form of reviewing for
mid-year exams.

Feb. 9. Group of the Seniors attended a dance
on the Kungshohn.



Feb. 11. _

Feb. 12.

and that's all we'll say about mid-year
e.xams.

Feb. 13. Spent today recuperating from the
after effects of a few of those e.xams.

Feb. 14. Guesswat!!! We had a burglar in
our school!! But Hairbreadth Harry (alias
"Wottaman," alias iMr. Franks) took out his six
shooter and said O, it doesn't matter what he
said, anyway, the burglar jumped out the
window. Ain't dat sum'pin?

Feb. 15. S'no use boys you should realize
after three attempts that tacks should not be
placed on Miss Kimbro's chair.

Feb. 16. Tennis began today. Hope we can
beat Balboa in this.

Feb. 17. The Seniors gave 'The Prairie Doll'
at the Masonic Temple tonight, in honor of the
Mostest-Worthicst Grandest-est-est Matron or
somebody. (Ya' can't say it it has to be read
slowly and each adjective thought over carefully).

Feb. 18. "Washington's First Defeat" given
by Jr. Sr. Dramatic Club. Georgie certainly
had some technique! I always thought I had been
born 200 years too soon.

Feb. 19. Say-a-ay did you see that 'bookay'
on iMr. Frank's desk? Girls, let's do some de-
tective work. Somebody's stealing a march on us!

Feb. 22. Hurray! At last we poor, imposed
upon, girls get a break! The Sophomore dance is
a Leap Year Dance!

Feb. 23. Too bad Washington couldn't have
been born more than once then we'd have two
holidays.

Feb. 25. There's a dirty horse thief in this
school! Somebody stole Warren's shoes and now
what's he ganna do]?!

Feb. 26. We girls realize now how fortunate
a man is. The Leap Year dance was so much fun!
Guess the boys know now just how it feels.

Feb. 29. Last chance girls. Better grab a
man while there's still time!!!

Alar. 1 Look sweet, everybody, and watch
the birdie you won't have a picture in our annual
if vou don't!



Ma



School is so quiet and unnatural these



days Robert Marshall has quit, and now nobody
ever explodes things in chem lab, or puts tacks in
teacher's seats.



92



THE CARIBBEAN



Mar. 5. Oh ho! Randy, vve saw your fond
father In the principal's office better be good
from now on!

Mar. 4. Visitation Day today. All the papas
and mamas came to learn the sad truth about
their brilliant (?) sons and daughters. But really,
it was a big day for C. H. S. had ushers, lots of
teachers from Balboa, 'n' everthing!

Mar. 5. Lost a tennis meet to Balboa today
could it be that vve aren't so good at it?

Mar. 7. Oh you "Most Consistent Lovers!
After winning that title, why go and have a fight?

Mar. 8. Some dirty Scotchman put a plugged
fifty cent piece in the B. A. A. treasury. Now I
esk u IS that helping the depression?

Mar. 9. This is somethin' confidential no-
body knows it but you and me and maybe one or
two other. It rained today!

Mar. 1 1 Balboa had to copy us and have a
Visitation Day, so we sent a whole lot of our
teachers over to see that it went off all right.

Mar. 12. Well, as far as we're concerned, ten-
is isn't we handed Balboa the championship on
a silver platter or should I say racket?

Mar. 14. Don't tell me they're experimenting
on Guinea pigs in the chemistry class!?! Oh, no,
that's just some of Miss Moore's Spanish class
doing a little yodeling.

Mar. 15. Practice going on for "When's Your
Birthday." If we keep up at this rate we won't
be having any when it's over.

Mar. 16. Mr. Harold June spoke to all of us
today about his trip with Byrd to the South Pole.
E.xtremely intrestin' the poor man signed his
name so many times he nearly had writer's cramp
before he could break away.

Mar. 17. See anything green? Sure we all
like St. Patrick.

Mar. 18. Why is everybody so happy today?
Because we get a whole week for Easter Vacation,
beginning today Whoopee!!!

Mar. 19. Big picnic at the Tarpon Club today.
Mr. Franks was chaperone.

Mar. 22. Life is swell these days nothin' to
do, and all the time in the world to do it.

Mar. 26. The time is nearing when we must
go hack Id school, so make the most of your re-
maining days of freedom!

.^lar. 28. Well, here we arc back in the little



red school house (the roof is red, anyway). Looks
just the same.

Mar. 29. Such a lot of empty seats! What
with all the flu that's going around only about
half of the kids are in school. But I've got a
sneaking' hunch that a bad cold is as good as the
flue to a lot of these school-jumpers.

Alar. 7)0. Report cards are nearing us six
weeks exams are being given in all classes.

Mar. 31. Miss Kimbro is preparing to get even
with the "Terrible Seniors." She's got our
English test all ready and what a test!

Apr. 1. No school today!! (April fool) Did
you notice all the empty Senior seats today.
Miss Kimbro must have scared them away with
her test. Supper Club girls gave a dance tonight
and was it good!?! I don't mean April fool,
either!

Apr. 4. Miss Kimbro pulled a fast one on the
Seniors that were absent yesterday and missed
their test. Soon as she saw them they were sent
into the office and presented with 30 questions!
There ain't no justice!

Apr. .5. Spanish club meeting today a play
will be put on very soon.

Apr. 6. A lot of the honorable Seniors were
admitted to the National Thespian society today,
always knew we had a great deal of dramatic
talent in that class why, our performances bring
tears to our teachers eyes!

Apr. 8. Baseball boys give a dance at the
school tonight and is it e.xclusive Why they
won't even let the girls crash the gate! 'S just too
bad for a poor girl trying to get along.

Apr. 9. O-dear-o-dear!!! Lost a Basketball
game to Balboa tonight this can't go on!

Apr. 1 1 Well, the seats are all filled up again
the ol' school's beginning to look natural.

Apr. 12. Saa-aa-y how about a little coopera-
tion in this school they won't let the students
chew gum in class and the teachers go around
acquiring that flashing smile as much as they
please. 'T'ain't right!

.4pr. 15. Pan-American Day today. Spanish
club holds a big program at the Y. W. C. A. Viva
Panama! Viva America!!

Apr. 14. Try outs for Senior Play today. Name
of it is "Who's Boss." We're hoping it'll go over
big.

Apr. 15. Freshman Party tonight. Very-very-



THE CARIBBEAN



93



very nice. They get three ptits on the head and
one on the back for giving such a nice one. But
with i^liss Brown for an advisor why wouldn't
they?

Apr. 18. Hall of Fame pictures were taken for
our Caribbean today, ^^'e certainly do have a
little bit of everything in this school!

Apr. 19, Do the "A" students ever rale!!?!!
Don't have to report to any study halls, can come
whenever they want. I have a hunch that these
teachers are gaing to have a lot more diligent
students from now on.

Apr. 20. Staff meeting today we arc just
going to get enough money in order to put it out
that's such a relief!

Apr. 21. Jr.-Sr. Dramatic club gave a play at
the Y. \V. today "Hannah Gives Notice." We're
doing better and better, thank you.

Apr. 22. What!?! Another office girl! My!
My! My! It can't be that there's enough work
for that many girls maybe they want to make it
easier for the other 2.

Apr. 25. The Sophomores are going to debate
on whether or not the PhiUipines should receive
their independence glad someliody's going to
decide this weighty question for us.

Apr. 26. Watch out there, girlie- he's a
married man anyw ay w hat do a couple of
"D's matter?

Apr. 27. Just when we're beginning to get
used tt) our teachers they have to get sick! Of
course we're sorry for them, but there's nothing
worse than substitutes that know nothing about
what they're teaching!

Apr. 28. Well, the faculty got some of the
shine wiped off them tonight though they'd be
smart and challenge the Seniors to a Basketball
game. They couldn't even keep "Razz" from
making four points!

Apr. 50. Were showing the old spirit all right!
Had a special train to take us to Balboa today and
went over there and had a big "gettogether.
Sure Balboa's O.K. Maybe it's the world that's
wrong e\ery once in a while.

May 1. No May pole dancing for the frolic-
some C. H. S. students this day we had to sit
inside lookin' out at the rain, rain, rain.

May. 2. We Senior girls must not have that
certain something here's two funiors with big
diamonds on their left hands and a big light in
their eves Ah! Love!!



May 3. What's this I hear? Was that Junior
saying there was to be no banquet don't say it!
The shock would be too much!

May 4. Latest news from the front!!! Senior
Iianner seized by a group of Juniors short
skirmishes all during the day!!

May 5. Hon. Editor in Chief informs members
of Staff that all material for the Caribbean must
(emphasized) be in by the end of this week or
else

May 6. Well, the Seniors are glad to see a
little action on the Jr.-Sr. banquet front! The
Juniors gave a card party at the Masonic Temple
tonight w'asn't a flop, either!

May 9. Oh ho!! What do we know about
somebody!? Wearing a pretty onyx ring with a
U. S. Army seal on it!!

May 10. Well, today's the last day to buy
Carlbbeans. If you don't bring your money now
it'll be iust too bad!

Alay 11. Characters for our play were picked
today with that cast and that play we can't
lose!!

May 12. Here's one for Ripley's book of
wonders! The Seniors have all paid their dues.
Hurray!

May 13. Sophomore class gave a dance, that
was well attended by C. H. S. students, tonight
at the playshed it's a good thing we have a class
like that to pep things up once in a while!

May 16. Girl Reserves gave a dinner for the
Rotary Club tonight and by "special request"
we got to eat also, instead of just serve.

May 17. Only one, just one, more six weeks
period left for us in our good old C. H. S. : you
Seniors. Don'cha feel kinda funny?

May 18. Well, got our reports today, and even
though they weren't all they should have been,
we Seniors are gonna treasure them cause we'll
only get one more grade from our dearly beloved
High School teachers.

May 19. Play practice going on steadily
we're going to have to do some hurrying if we're
going to have it put on by June 10.

Mav 20. A Friday!! Need I sav more?







Tests given to all Freshies today



though it doesn't seem possible they really pass
these intelligent tests! (Sure one out of every
five or so).

May 24. And "lust another day passes away."
The nearer to graduation we get the harder we



94



THE CARIBBEAN



have to work! What with plavs, Caribheans, and
homework

iMay 25. Couple of Staff members were sent to
Balboa today to fix up a "dummy" copy of our
annual. They came back with big smiles ;it's
going to be the best yet!

May 26. What's all this running to the office
by those Freshmen? Oh they're just making
out their next years schedule, and they have to
have the principals approval on everything they
take wouldn't want to get in bad you'd think
they had no mother to guide them, the way they
go in there and look at him with that trusting
look!

Alay 30. For once Memorial Day comes at the
right time we get a holiday this time and say,
there. Seniors, it's only one month, thirty days,
and then we commence!!! We'll be going to
alumni banquets and e\erything!

May 51. Spanish club gives a play at the
Y. \\'. C. A. tonight- "El Novio Espanol." Was
very well done those Spanish lovers are plenty
lovin!

June I. Well, here we are, it's the month of
roses, brides and graduations and the class of
'52 are going to be graduaters! We're so eggzited!!
(Of course we're pretending to take it very cal.nly,
but oh)!

June 2. Girls and boys of the Senior class get
down to bare facts and decide on the clothes
they'll wear for Graduation uhite for the girls,
dark blue for the boys. We decided on Bacca-
laureate clothes too, they're to be "sport clothes.
(And say, don't ever let me hear any man say that
women are slaves to fashion! Our boys had their
clothes figured up right down to black shoestrings
in black and white sport shoes tie that in a
knot)!!

June 5. The first week in June is all gone!
Now how do you feel, you Seniors?!

June 6. Coming events cast their reviews
before!! Tests for kids leaving early are to be
given on Thursday and Friday of this week, it
was announced.

June 8. Baccalaureate services will be held at



the Christ Church by the Sea. (Unanimously
decided by members of Senior class).

June 10. Well, by the looks on the faces of
those who took the tests, the teachers made up
pretty good ones.

June 15. Graduation announcements and call-
ing cards were received today, very, very, pretty
ones, too. Gonna send them all over we want
people to know something's happening when the
cla.ss of '52 graduates!!!

June 14. Spanish club holds meeting to elect
officers for ne.xt year pretty soon they're going
to have a banquet to inaugurate them into their
new offices. Style, uh?

June 15. It's not so very lung until we'll be on
the outside looking in at our good old High
School! We Seniors feel all tearv.

June 17. Girl Reserves hold the last meeting
of the year tonight. Doesn't look as though we'll
be able to send a delegate to summer camp this
year no nion'.

June 20. This is one of the most important
days in this year because our Caribbean is now on
sale!! And is it selling!!! At this rate there won't
be any left by this afternoon.

June 21. Seniors are going around like they're
something on a stick!! We're gonna commence in
eleven days! Why shouldn't we?

June 22. We're all shaking the old moth balls
out of our extra-special occasion suits only eight
days now!!

June 24. Our last Friday!! And did plenty
ever happen today big tights for our banner and
everything!!

June 27. All of us went (o church tonight for
our Baccaluareatte service. (Between you and
me, it's the first time I ever saw so many Seniors
in church). We were given a couple of inspiring
lectures that T just know are going to make
presidents of all the boys and successes of all the
girls.

June 28. (During these periods of distress
(final exams),

Juno 29. 'tis better to say nolb.ing of our daily
life).



JUNE 50!!!!!

""THE class of '52, has at last graduated from C. H. S. Now that we have, it doesn't seen as goo J as

we thought it would- but anyway, vvc really enjoyed our four 3'ears, and hope that the rest of

the classes will have as good a time as we did. The ceremony was held at the Washington at 8:00 P.M.,

and all our proud pa[)as and mamas were there to sec us! Congratulations, Seniors, Congratulations!!!!



THE CARIBBEAN



95




i/ff / /f^


96



THE CARIBBEAN



Alnmut

"T^O me our school life is like a tree. It starts as a tiny seed, and grows graduallv, spreading out and
offering more shade and shelter to people as the years pass. Its harvests grow too, and are finally
scattered to all parts of the globe, always bearing the stamp of the mother tree. Our class of 1952
is one of the richest of these harvests.

The Staff of the 1932 Caribbean extends to all the Alumni most sincere wishes for success, hap-
piness and fulfillment of ambitions and desires that the future can possibly bring.



1918

LuLA M.\Y PuLI.IC (Mrs. I. B.) Coman, Cristo-
bal, C. Z.

MiNOT Cotton, 81 lohn Street, New York City.

Susie H.arrison, Ancon, C. Z.

Catherine Wade, 451 West 25rd. Street, New
York City.

Burke Welch (address unknown).

Mary Yerner, Chapel Hill, No. C.

1919

Alice Ari.ene Ball, 14 Crescent Place, Tako-
ma Park, Md.

James Ray.mond, Cristobal, C. Z.

Dorothy Weir (Mrs. John) Montanve, Cristo-
bal, C. Z.

Kenneth Edwards, Karlstromer Apts. Hope-
well, Ya.

1920

Lindale Da\'IS (address unknown).

Jack B. Fields, care of Tela Railroad Engineer-
ing Dept., Tela, Honduras.

Kenneth Greene, Coudersport, Pa.

Harlan Holmwood, Balboa, C. Z.

Alson Sears, Balboa, C. Z.

Kathryn Burgoon Stewart, C. Z.

Alice Stilson (Mrs.) Pincus, Balboa, C. Z.

Al. Doyle, 1964 Thirty-sixth Street, Sacra-
mento, Calif.

Etha Bevinoton, Balboa Heights, C. Z.

1921

Carl Duey, Box. 95, Lemon City, Fla.
KiRBY Ferguson, Cristobal, C. Z.



Alice Hunter (Mrs. L. A.) Hohn, Cristobal,
C. Z.

Charles Henter, Coast Guard Cutter "Kim-
bal," Norfolk, Ya.

Dr. Frank Raymond, care of Panama Hospital,
Panama City, R. de P.

Eleanor Zlm.merman, 120 Kingsley Avenue,
Westerleight, Staten Island, N. Y.

1922

Marjorie Ball, 14 Crescent Place, Takoma
Park, Md. ^

Ida Brown (Mrs. A. A.) Doyle, 1954 Thirty-
sixth Street, Sacramento, Calif.

George Cartwright, 62 Birgen Court, Ruther-
ford, N. J.

Paul Doyle, 24 State Street, care of Yenezuela
Gulf Oil Co., New York City.

Mary Glenn Fields, Balboa Heights, C. Z.

LeRoy Magnuson, Balboa. C. Z.

Jordan Zimmerman, 305 University Place,
Syracuse, N. Y.

Mildred Stafford, 1101 Markham Street,
Vichsburg, Miss.

Emma Townsend (Mrs. Robert) Noe, Box 1,

Wesley Townsend, 1195 Ruby Street, Hough-
ton, Mich.

1923

Gerald Bliss, Cristobal, C. Z.

Ernest Euphrat, 5935 Burwood Avenue,
South Norwood, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Louise Henter, Nurses' Home, Sydenham
Hospital, Baltimore, Md.

Edward May, Cristobal, C. Z.

Henry Moore, Box 212, Marchfkld, Wis.



THE CARIBBEAN



97



Emogene Nash (Mrs. E. S.) Van Bemschoten'
Balboa, C. Z.

M,\TTiSON PuLLiG (Mrs. J. D.) McCauley,
Cristobal, C. 7.

1924

Dorothy Abendroth (Mrs. A.) Flood, Cristo-
bal, C. Z.

Florence Albert, 107 Beaument Avenue,
West Brighton, Staten Island, N. Z.

Jose Arosemena, Colon R. P.

Edith Colbourn Smith, 717 Colonial Avenue,
Norfolk, Va.

Charlotte Housel (Mrs. R. \V.) MacSparran.
Cristobal, C. Z.

Morris Marchosky, Colon, R. P.

Inza Markham (Mrs. R.) Elspree, Sayre, Pa.

Irene McCourt (Mrs. George G.) Ethel,
17540 89th. Avenue, Jamaica, N. Y.

George Oakes, Fort Banks, Mass.

Chester Pike, 2148 Acton Street, Berkeley,
Calif.

Andrew Smith (address unknown).

Ethel Sonneman, 98 Macon Street, Brooklyn,
N. Y.

1925

Helen Abendroth, Cristobal, C. Z.

Olga Arcia (Mrs. A. De) Leignadier, Colon,
R. P.

William Cousins, 2623 Oakford Street, Phila-
delphia, Pa.

Dorothy Diebert, Fort Sill, Okla.

Ruth Duey (Mrs. Spencer) Lincoln, Cristobal,
C. Z.

Katherine Fischer, 4309 Furley Avenue,
Gardenville, Aid.

Anniel Heim (Mrs. J. H.) Brenchick, Cristo-
bal, C. Z.
Ruth Hopkins, Box 256, Ancon, C. Z.
Hubert Lee, Colon, R. de P.
Harriet Steenburg (address unknown).

1926

Richard Beverly, Broad Run, Va.
HiLDEGARDE Blythe, Landham-Bounce X-ray
Clinic, Atlanta, Ga.



William Clinchard, Balboa, C. Z.

William Coffey, Cristobal, C. Z.

Edna Duvall, 4802 Greenlee Avenue, St.
Bernard, Ohio.

Morris Eggleston, Cristobal, C. Z.

Ray Fisher, 4309 Furley Avenue, Gardenville,
Md.

Irene Hopkins (Mrs. L. W.) Mcllvaine, Cris-
tobal, C. Z.

Helena Deckman Bailey, Seefridge Field,
Mt. Clemens, Alich.

Johanna Kleefkens (Mrs. R. O.) Antich,
Bo.x 1057, Cristobal. C. Z.

Delilah May (Mrs. G. W.) Parker, Gatun,
C. Z.

Lola Munoz, Box 740, Panama City, R. P.

Mildred Neely, Cristobal. C. Z.

Carlos Pulgar, Gatun, C. Z.

Clarice Steenburg, Langley Field, Va.

Gay R. Turner (Mrs. Hugh) Craigs, Cristobal,
C. Z.

Elizabeth Warren, Fort Davis, C. Z.

Christian Wirtz, Cristobal, C. Z.

1927

Joseph Corrigan, Cristobal, C. Z.

Teresa Gallagher, 652 56th. Street, Brooklyn
N. Y.

James Grider, 416 Transylvania Park, Lexing-
ton, Ky.

Emily' Bledsoe, 416 Transylvania Park, Lex-
ington, Ky.

Lawrence C. Callaway, Jr. Cristobal, C. Z.

Louise Heim, Cristobal, C. Z.

Clara A. May, Gatun, C. Z.

Helen Montgomery, 257 Park Avenue, Hunt-
ington, Long Island, N. Y.

John G. Nelson, Gonzaga University, Spokane
Wash.

Dorothy Svensson, 15 Westmount Avenue,
West Roxbury, Mass.

"Have been quite busy with exams so have not
been able to write before.

"I am a senior at Simmons College In Boston
where I am specializing in secretarial studies.

"This summer Helen \'ineyard and I are plan-



98



THE CARIBBEAN



ning a reunion why don't some of you join us?
Aly best wishes to you all.

SuRSE J. Taylor, 1814 West Avenue, Austin,
Tex.

James Van Scotter (address unknown).

Helen Vineyard, Odessa, Del.

Dorothy Wertz (Mrs. Arthur) Cotton, Cris-
tobal. C. Z.

Charles ^^'ILL, Cristobal, C. Z.

EuPHE.\nA \\'oOLNOUGH, Box 225, Journal
Square Post Office, Jersey City, N. Y.

"Your card asking me for a message was sent
to my previous address, but reforwarded to me.

"I am afraid that there are very few in C. H. S.
who remember or know me, but just the same I
feel as though I know you all. I am still working
for the United Fruit Company and am quite
satisfied, although things aren't so good up here,
all on account of the well-known word "Depres-
sion," but we all hope for better things in 1932.



1928

John G. Klltnk, 2015 University Avenue, New
York City.

Ethel K. Westman, Balboa, C. Z.

Albert J. Days, Gatun, C. Z.

Gladys E. Beers (Mrs. H. G.) Alrick, Gatun,
C. Z.

Emma Banks (Mrs. A.) Blaisdell, Cristobal,
C. Z.

Robert H. Axtell, Bates College, Lewiston,
Me.

"I wish the Caribbean the utmost success for
their 1932 edition, knowing that it Improves each
year."

Kathryn E. L..\mbert (Mrs. W.) Gould, Cris-
tobal, C. Z.

Thedore C. Henter, 120 Gates Avenue,
Brooklyn, N. Y.

Evangeline S.\nTH (Mrs. W.) I'ayne, Box 1453,
Cristobal, C. Z.

Arthur E. Rothenburg (address unknown).

Zonella L. Bliss, 159 South Professor Street,
Oberlin, Ohio.

B. Edward Lowande, Cristobal, C. Z.

Lucia Salazar, Colon, R. P.



1929

Royal R. Higgason, Gatun, C. Z.

LiLYBEL CoX (Mrs. L.) Kariger, Gatun, C. Z.

Elizabeth Hackett, 333 Plymouth Avenue,
Rochester, N. Y.

Rosemary Keene, Cristobal, C. Z,

James F. Ouinn, Gatun, C. Z.

Jean Wy'LLIE, 555 Colusa Avenue, Berkeley,
California.

Ethel Barnett, Colon, R. P.

Inez Barry, Cristobal, C. Z.

Woodford M. Babbitt, Balboa, C. Z.

Marion A. Boomer, 301 University Place,
Syracuse, N. Y.

Jack R. Pettit, New York Stock Exchange,
5 Cowbry Street, Yonkers, N. Y.

Dorothy Heim (deceased)

Paul Hayden, Box 41, Bates College, Lewiston
Me.

Gretchen W. Pal.M, Box 416, Mount Holyoke
College, South Hadley, Mass.

Roger Deakins, Gatun, C. Z.

WiLHELMiNA Kleefkens (Mrs. D.) Rudge,
Cristobal, C. Z.

Roy B. Walker, Balboa, C. Z.

"Greetings Class of '32 and here's hoping your
annual will be the best ever. We though ours \\'as
pretty good and you know you must keep up the
good work.

"It seems such a short time since I was a Senior.
Gosh, I wish I were back. School days are the best
ever and are most appreciated when over. Greet-
ings to Class of '29."

Marion K. Lowande, Cristobal, C. Z.

Lee Kariger, Gatun, C. Z.

Vita V. Lyew, College of St. Teresa, Winona,
Minn.

Morris M. Luce, Eastman School of Music,
Rochester, N. Y.

Anita R. Rankin. Cristobal, C. Z.

Morton Southard, Gatun, C. Z.

Margaret Hayes, Cristobal, C. Z.

Adair Louise Taylor (Mrs. L.) Pierpoint,
Apartado 253, Guatemala City, C. A.

"Best wishes to the Class of 1932, and may this
vear's Caribbean be the liest vet."



THE CARIBBEAN



99



Sam Patchett, Cristobal, C. Z.

Lois A. Williams (Mrs. C.) Strobridge,
Balboa, C. Z.

Randolph Orbaugh, University of North
Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C.

Charles Crum, University of North Carolina,
Chapel Hill, N. C.

Mildred J. Bath, Cristobal, C. Z.

PoRFlRlO De Reuter, University of Detroit,
Detroit, Mich.

Phoebe O'Donnell, Balboa, C. Z.

Theodore E. Brandon, University of Texas,
Austin, Tex.

ZoE Wyllie, 555 Colusa Avenue, Berkeley,
California.



1930

Ralph S. Crum, University of North Carolina,
Chapel Hill, N. C.

Mavis E. Thirlwall, Cristobal, C. Z.
Rae Bliss, Balboa, C. Z.
Thomas L. Coley, Jr., (address unknown).
Della J. Raymond, Cristobal, C. Z.
Evelyn E. GaN- emuller, (Mrs. H.) Fenton,
Gatun, C. Z.

Alice E. Hunter, (Mrs. J.) Corrigan, Balboa*
C. Z.

"Wishing the Class of '52 the best of luck and
success."

F. William Newman, Jr., Cristobal, C. Z.
Pauline Herman (address unknown)

Elsie B. Birkeland, 422 State St., Brooklyn,
N. Y.

"I am still with the same firm, here in New-
York. I have been with them now for 16 months.

"I still miss Cristobal High, the faculty and
students, and send my sincerest wishes to the
Class of 1932. Please don't forget to sent my
Caribbean. I'll be anxiously waiting for it."

Victor Melendez, 613, E. State St., Ithaca,
N. Y.

Eleanor M. Fitzgerald (Mrs. G.) Robinson,
Balboa, C. Z.
Frances M. Days, Gatun, C. Z.



Francisco Wong, Box 1734, Cristobal, C. Z.

"Still on the Isthmus still with the same ;ob,
but I have to admit things are getting tighter.

"Luck to the 1932 Caribbean."

M. Virginia Eberenz, Cristobal, C. Z.

Elsie D. Darley, Cristobal, C. Z.

E. Beverly Turner, Cristobal, C. Z.

J. Virginia Stevenson, Cristobal, C. Z.

Walter Wikingstad, Box 278, Bates College,
Lewiston, Me.

"You know we, the Alumni, are wishing you,
Class of '32, the best of luck. Go to it and publish
the best Caribbean yet.

Estafania G. Wheeler, Utica Memorial
Hospital, Utica, N. Y.

Richard C. Sergeant, (address unknown).

James Campbell, Jr., Georgia Tech, Atlanta,
Ga.

"I enioyed receiving a card from your alumni
editor, and I always like to hear of Cristobal High.
Whenever the opportunity comes, I always boast
of Cristobal High, because I know that it prepares
you for college. I sure hope you all are taking
advantage of it.

"I have been having a big time here at Georgia
Tech., and I hope that you may be off to college
some day."

Rita Teresa Joice, St. Joseph's College,
Philadelphia, Pa.

Arthur Mundberg, Rider College, Trenton.
N. J.

Phoebe O'Donnell, Balboa, C. Z.

On'IND ArneSON, Kristiansund. Norway.

Rose T. Corrigan, C. Z.

Maria C. Stewart, Philadelphia, Pa.

1931

Nehls G. Jansen, Cristobal, C. Z.

Carlos Bogart Rankin, Wittinberg College,
Meyers Hall, Springfield, Ohio.

Vel.ma Hall, 132 West Elm St. Stockton,
California.

Ruth Duvall, 2974 Calerain Ave.. Cincinnati,
Ohio.

Marion Neeley, Cristobal, C. Z.

Thomas Pescod, Cristobal, C. Z.



100



THE CARIBBEAN



William Bailey, Box 4182, Duke Branch,
Durham, N. C.

Ernest Berger, University of North CaroHna,
Chapel Hill, N. C, Grimes No. 214.

Celeste Clark (Mrs. B.) Powell, Balboa, C.
Z.

Crawford J. C.\.mpbell, Emery University,
Georgia.

Edward Conkling, 4282 36th. Street, San
Diego, California.

"I am now residing in San Diego, and in the
fall expect to enter the San Diego State Teacher's
College.

"To the members of the Staff, go my most
sincere wishes for their success in producing a
bigger and better Caribbean than ever before.

"With best regards to each indi\-idual of the
Class of '32."

iMargaret M. Davis, 1828 N. Park Ave.,
Temple University, Philadelphia, Pa.

"Life in Temple Dorms isn't the life of good
old C. H. S. But it is interesting and I like it
here very much.

"Temple students are energetic, promising and
full of ambition to attain the height of success.
It is increasing its popularity in sports as well as
knowledge of the commercial world.

"In June I shall be graduated from Temple,
after having taken the full ten months Secretarial
Course. After that time the college will secure
for me a secretarial position.

"To the members ot the Statt and the Faculty,
I sincerely wish the best of luck for a successtul
1932 Caribbean."

Vinnie Elson, South 1711 Wall St., Spokane,
Wash.

"There isn't much I can say about my activities
except that I took a P. G. course at the Lewis &
Clark High School for one semester. I had a good



time in the Canal Zone, but I don't want to go
back there to live."

Russell Elwell, (address unknown).
Fabian Englander, Cristobal," Canal Zone.
QUARA Frisk, Box 728, Leamington, Ontario.
Canada.

Burton Hackett, Cristobal, C. Z.
John Kelly, (address unknown).
Maria Kleefkens, Cristobal, C. Z.
Demetra Lewis, Balboa, C. Z.
Percival A. Lyew, Box 1099 Cristobal, C. Z.
Kenneth Maurer, Balboa, C. Z.
Eugenia M. McLain, Cristobal, C. Z.
Ronald Phillpotts, Fort Sherman, C. Z.

"In answer to your card, I take pleasure in
saying that I will leave Fort Sherman in April.
Although I have enjoyed my stay in Panama, and
my year at C. H. S., I will be glad to see the
United States again.

"I am doing very little at present, e.xcept
enjoying life, but I shall study aviation, after my
return to the States. I wish you luck in publishing
the annual Caribbean, for 1932, and I will help
out by buying a ticket for one."

Bettina Powers, Ft. Hancock, N. J.

Anna Ryan, 568 East State Street, Trenton,
N. J.

"My best wishes for a successfull 1932 Carib-
bean."

Aloha Slocu.m, Cristobal, C. Z.
Dorothy Wirtz, Cristobal, C. Z.
George Wertz, Cristobal, C. Z.
Ben Williams, Cristobal, C. Z.
Barbara \\'eick, France Field, C. Z.
Raymond Will, Cristobal, C. Z.
Richard Wood, Cristobal, C. Z.
Phoebe O'Donnell, Balboa, C. Z.




THE CARIBBEAN



101





Tf,



f



?^ih



/




inftetjt



J,.?


Captain: "All is lost. We cannot save the
ship."

Mike: Ike, did you hear what the captain
said? The boat is going to sink."

Ike: "Well let it sink, it ain't our boat."



A Scotchman was listening over the radio to
some church services.

The priest then said: "Now we will make a
collection."

The Scotchman promptly turned off the radio.



IT'ije: Why is it that when you go fishing you
always take Billy and not Johnny along?"

Husband: "Didn't the doctor say that Billy
had worms?



Two Hebrews made a promise that if one of them
died before the other, the one who survived would
have to place $1000 in the coffin of his friend.
One of them died, and the other placed a check
in his coffin.



"No, I can't give you an appointment to-day,
I have 18 cavities to fill," said the dentist as he
hung up the telephone receiver and picked up his
gulf clubs.



"Really, gentlemen," said the candidate," with
this uproar I cannot even hear myself."

"Well, cheer up," shouted a man, "you are not
missing much."

Customer: There's a fly in this beer.

trader: Aw, how much can a little fly drink?



"What do you think of a man that throws a
banana skin on the footpath?"

"I don't know. What do you think of a banana
skin that throws a man on the footpath?"



Scotch Baby's Birthday
"Ach, Sandy, the baby has swallowed a penny.
"Weel, let him have it tomorrow is
birthday."



his



102



THE CARIBBEAN



Good Reason "How did you get banged up?"

Examiner: "Your pulse is as regular as a Skiing,

clock." "What happened?"

Applicant: "It ought to be. You have your "I couldn't decide which side of a tree to go

finger on my wrist watch." around.



"I hear that you acted in this last talkie.'
"Yes, I was the approaching footsteps."



"What do you think, my wife bought a suit of
combination underwear and she can't get it off."
"How's that?"
"She lost the combination."



A Gum Chewing Boy
A gum chewing boy
And a cud chewing cow
Seem to me
Alike somehow.
A difference there is.
Oh I see it now
It's the thoughtful look
On the face of the cow.



Another Version
Beneath the spreading chestnut tree

The village smithy snoozes;
No nag, since 1923,

Has been to him for shocses.



Garage Poem
Oily to bed, and oily to rise, is the fate of us
grease and gasoline guys.



Teacher: Who can name three kinds of nuts?"
Billy: Walnuts, chestnuts and doughnuts.



Issy: "How is it you get in the theatre for
nothing?"

Ikey: "(Don't say anything) I walk in back-
wards and the doorkeeper thinks I'm going out."



The aho^'e jokes were submitted by one oj our most promising
]/ount] Freshmen, Ernest Jaramitlo.



Judge: Remember, anything you say will be
held against you.

Prisoner: "Greta Garbo."



Roger: I got the copper residue in Ex. 7 and
guess how much it weighed?
Five grams? (Mr. Vinton).
No.

Seven grams?
No.

Ten grams?
No.

Well how much then?
I don't know, I didn't weigh it.



The lowest thing in the world is the ring around
a Scotchman's bath tub when the water is on a
meter.



Chicago was settled in 1 833 and at rare intervals
since then.



Stei'e: Miss Kimbro, you look like Helen
Brown.

Jlisf Himbro: Yes, but I look worse in white.



AIiss Jloore: Why do you always answer a
question by asking another?
GuapoHujJ: Do I?



Old JIaid: Why did you take the legs off vour
bed?

Other: No man is going to get a chance to get
under my bed.



Diner: I know nothing more exasperating than
to find a hair in my soup.

Waiter: Well, it would be worse, wouldn't it,
to have the soup in your hair?



Expectorate is a nasty word but it's worse if
you're tongue tied.



F.llen: There are two periods in a man's life
when he doesn't understand women.

Henry Lee: Yes. Before and after marriage.



THE CARIBBEAN



103



Jess: Which kind of girls do you like the best
1 this school?
The conceited or the other kind?
Blow: What other kind?



"Then if that's the man who married you,"
said Archie, "What's pa doing at our house?"



X: Do you believe in Hereafter?

Y: Sure, sure.

A'.' Well, wadda think I am hereafter?



Jliss Kimhro: (Eng. 12) Memorize any one of

these four sonnets.

Swede: (God's gift to women): Which one (In the dark) (Slap!) Fresh, who said you could

is the shortest? kiss me.

(Voice in the dark) Everybody.

Jlr. Flnton in Chemistri/: Betty, name a base.

Betty: Coco Solo.

Jlr. J'lnton: Coco Solo?

Betty: Sub-base.

Fishing develops reticence. Forstrom and Gus

Jack: Did you ever take a course in stuttering? Griesinger met one morning at the break-water



Mr. Meyers (in geometry class) Alice, you have
a good figure, put it on the board.



Jackass: Nun-no I ;-;-just picked it U-u-up.



f'iolet (at arri\ing at a ball game): What's the
score?

Oscar: Nothing to nothing.

J'iolet: Oh, splendid, I ha\en't missed a thing.



//. Jtjnew: I'm going to kiss you.

(No answer).
H. A.: I'm going to kiss you.

(No answer again).
H. A.: Say, are you deaf?
She: No, but you're dumbl



and greeted each other thusly:

Going?

Been.

Any?

Some.

Gordon Birnte: Ahem, I'm an electrician.

Babs Wieck: Yeah, how come?

G. B.: The fuse blew out at Joe Bull's and I
fixed it.

Babs: No not electrician a sap.



I am a helluva good fighter, but my feet don't
like to stand around and see mv body abused.



Roos: May I have the next dance?
Ruth: No, I'm too danced out.
Roos: Oh, no, you're not too damn stout, just
pleasingly plump.



Were you mad when Charlie kissed you?
Pete: Say, it just burned me up!



Jlr. J'lnton: John, what's work?

J. ir hidden: (stretching and opening one eye)
Everything is work.

Jlr. J'inton: Do you mean to tell me that
table is work?

J. //".. Sure, woodwork.



Bib: Who's the silly heel over there playing
ring-around-the-rosie with all those beautiful
dames?

Tuck: \\'hy, that's Brigham Young having
the last dance with his wife.



She (fearsomely ) . Why are you sharpening that
izor?

He: I'm going to shave it there isn't a man in
Edi/th: "Did I ever show you where my hip those shoes under your bed.

was cut in the auto accident?

Boy Friend: "No, but I wish you would." "For the last time, shouted the sergeant, I ask

Edyth: "All right, we'll drive over that way." you the simple question. What is fortification?"

The recruits stood fast to a man. No one an-

Seeing his mother nod pleasantly to the minister swered. Striding up to the most intelligent looking
who went by, Archie inquired: man, the N. C. O. bawled out,

"Who's that, mamma?" "Tell me, what is fortification?"

"That's the man who married me, dear," replied The answer came like a cork out of a bottle,

mother. "Two twentifications, sergeant."



104



THE CARIBBEAN



P. Ditinam: I have a beastly cold in my head.
D. Reinhold: Never, mind, Paul, that's some-
thing anyway.



Tired of living? Want to die? Have your
picked your method of suicide?

No, I can't decide between lightning and an
earthquake!



I ne\er knew what real happiness was until I
married, and then of course it was too late.



"Did you get my check?"

"Yes, twice. Once from you and once from the
bank."



^^'eIl did you all find a job?

Yeh! You starts to wukk tomorrah!



I never sausage eyes as thine
And if you'll butcher hand in mine,
And liver round me every day
We'll seek some ham-let far away.
We'll meat lifes frown with life's caress
And cleaver road to happiness.



T'is hard to part with those we love
When our hearts are full of hope.
But 'tis harder still to find a towel
When our eyes are full of soap.



Jlandi: It must be wrong to love me like this
dear. aP^

Ruth Egolj: It is.



A new way has been discovered to cook sea
gulls. A brick is placed in the pot with the gull.
When a fork can be stuck through the brick with
ease the gull is done.



Gee, I'd hate to be in vour shoes.

Why?

You just stepped on a nail.



"Kinda funny that you'd bust up with Norine,"
said the friend.

"Last week you said her kisses were as intoxi-
cating as wine."

"Yeah", mumbled Oscar, "But that was before
I caught her mixing her drinks in a parked coupe."



Claude B.: This is a quiet spot. I'd like to
pause here and park.

May no B.: You mean you'd like to park here
and paw, but you're not going to!



JIai/no: What big eyes you have grandmother.
Grandmother: And that my dear is how I
caught your grandfather.



WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IF

1 Miss Anderson lost interest in the aeroplanes that have a tendency to fly over the school?

2. It Miss Brown decided that there were other states in the Union besides Te.\as?

5. If Miss Gustafson didn't write the admits in pencil?
4. If Air. Franks didn't have that certain way?

3. If Mr. Hackett would ask questions in a test pertaining to subject matter in the text book?

6. If Miss Kimbro would stop rewriting Long's Literature for him?

7. If Miss Moore lost interest in the report cards that are not in?

8. If Mr. Meyer would stop talking about women to young boys in the Jr. class?

9. If Miss Patterson came to Advanced Stenog. without a certain time-piece?

10. II .^Irs. Spencer always overlooked the Fs received in a test?

11. And if Mr. Vinton made something in the Laboratory besides odors?

H. A. S. '33



THE CARIBBEAN



105



AUTOGR^


^PH PAGE
































































106



THE CARIBBEAN



AUTOGR^


^PH PAGE
































































THE CARIBBEAN



107 T?



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The Panama Hospital

Panama City, R. of P.




THE HERRICK CLINIC



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Portraits



I

FOR REMEMBRANCE



Miniatures

Enlargements

Flashlight

Commercial
Photographs

of all types

Architectural

Legal

Banquets, large
groups, etc.

News Pictures



Your portrait of today will be just as
priceless in years to come, will recall
happy memories just as vividly as do
those wonderful photographs of by-
gone days, Make an appointment for
a new portrait today.

FINLAYSON'S STUDIO



7,018 FRONT ST.



COLON, R.cfP.




PHONE y



"'ONOi-'



When buying photographs look for this emblem.
The Photographers International Association of
America stands for good craftsmanship and bet'
ter business principles.



ga?f^il?r^fly!ffir^ffi7^^



108



THE CARIBBEAN



Cable Address: IMPCO
A.B.C. 5th.&-6th.Ed.
M Bentley's

JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS



gjjBsaaaaasiai-gaaiiBgaaaaaatfisa'jaiiiatigg^



Colon Import & Export Company, Ltd.



p. O. Box 342
Colon. R. P.



Dealers in GENERAL MERCHANDISE ar^^ NATIVE PRODUCTS

COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA



BrancK Retail Stores
and Trading Stations



PLEYA DAMA
SANTA ISABEL



PORVENIR CARTI

TUPILE NARGANI

ISLE OF PINES



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COMPLIMENTS OF



Dr. Vern Prier



Dr. Carl E. Safford



CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE

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Business goes where it is invited, and stays where it

is well treated.' If you are looking for Quality and

the latest style Merchandise and at the Right Price,

^-There's only one place in Town

W.T. LUM DRY GOODS STORE



9126 BOLIVAR ST. ^



i:is(ifrstra(,:re


OPPOSITE MARKET COLON, R. de P.



[igjjigaBWiaMgjjaaigaiJsaiaatgiiigjiasatjWtgjiigatg^



Mens Sano in Corpore Sano ?



Eat more SUN-MAID RAISIN BREAD

THE FRENCH BAKERY



BOLIVAR AVE. 8,103



PHONE 346



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THE CARIBBEAN



109



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Sldnddrd Fruit & Stedmship

Company L

Vaccaro Line



1



IDish ever-Q success to the Qraduatinq Class of 1932.



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BUREAU OF CLUBS a^^ PLAYGROUNDS

THE RECREATION DIVISION OF THE PANAMA CANAL
HAS FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE

COMMUNITY CLUBHOUSES

-_=.LOCATED AT.2^

ANCON BALBOA PEDRO MIGUEL
GATUN cTZdi'XRISTOBAL

OFFERING YOU

Athletic Fields Playgrounds Tennis Courts Gymnasiums Swimming Pools

Bowling Alleys Billiard Rooms Reading Rooms Soda Fountain Service

Sound Motion Picture and Other General Community Activities.



FiJEaraiaaaftf^ffifsijfTfif



it^r)sr.r)iiivitvii>itiit(;t)a>f(t)ivS{;^vi



110



THE CARIBBEAN






COMPLIMENTS OF



CRISTOBAL BEAUTY SHOPPE



irainirriiiTarrirriirriirrfliT^ir^





Hotel IDdshington

Unequaled for situation and comfort



A Rotel in keepinq ipith the dignity, spirit and seruice
of the Pandma. Canal



Qolf



Su;imming --Water Sports
Q'drpon Fishing



The year Around



JAMES E. LEWIS

Manager



^7YllFrili7rili7rik7mTiliTrii)rrilT7Tilr7^lt7^lr^^




P.. O,. Address:
CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



Somet hing You Cant Learn at School

There is always a Large and New Assortment of

CLOTHING, SPORTS WEAR a^z^NOVELTlES

Arriving on every Steamer, especially suited for Students
COMPLETE LINE OF PERFUMES

PANAMA FRENCH BAZAAR



COLON li



(itrsars<\t/s


THE CARIBBEAN



111



gi^ i 'i^ iyiiuj io RafU 'ii U ia ufflU iii U ffiu^^



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i



A DRINK WITH REAL
SPARKLE

The Panama
Coca-Cola
Bottling Company,



Incorporated



Phone.



COLON

84

PANAMA

65




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; '!'^iMKJiKJBLaiiy!liR'l';jiBU'|t^?iJJIiyi|i^



GATUN GARDENS FLOWER SHOP

9th o^o^FRONT STREET, COLON, R. P.

FLOWERS OF BETTER QUALITY
SERVICE THAT EXCELS

PROMPT DELIVERY TO ALL HOSPITALS, HOTELS cr^o^STEAMSHIPS

DAY PHONE CD pt:; T^CT TA /T7R V NIGHT PHONE

COLON 311 rrVCn, I^CLI V HIV l GATUN345



I



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112



THE CARIBBEAN



Jt' iU! l M!y!BU.' iU! l iy .' Ki! l !y ttyiliyi l M^

BUY YOUR DRUG NEEDS

AT



SALAZAR'S DRUG STORE



COLON. R. P.




Branch Stores:
4,060 Bolivar Street, Phone 166
11.150 Bolivar Street, Phone 35



H^^^ssig



aMiKJi KJffiLi i igjma i EmaiU'iU' i iyiK^ i iu ^^



IMPROVED EQUIPMENT



MODERN METHODS I



EFFICIENT SERVICE



JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY

Broadway, near Folks River



PHONE:
COLON 21



COLON, R. de P.



p. O. BOX 5061
CRI.STOBAL, C.Z.



^1li^arslifi!^I^ssfw^li7^lrarag^



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''' Ai ii y i ^ 6 LH !i U 'l! U! l' iJ.¥iai l!U!l }Ui^XH8yiBUiliLH B y ffl ^



H. A. DOTEN, D.D.S.
D. M. DICKERSON, D.D.S.



ADMINISTRATION BUILDING CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



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COMPLIMENTS OF



LUCKY STRIKE



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THE CARIBBEAN



lU



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Panama's Leading Newspaper



'HE Panama American

(An Independent Morning Daily)



PANAMA, R. de P.



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a^rsi.7^TT^i.7^irsi!raigri!irsirrarairri]rn



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C. CASULLO

Jeweler and Watchmaker



p. O. BOX 675

PHONE 225

CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



9,036 Front Street, Colon, R. P.







!;?^ jS^!iirarsyag^ir7ytii7^iraitT^:T7Tiitysiira



,'l iUiKJiay!l'iJllU'l'i^liU¥iJiliUiliLEi!KJi6LaiU'^



FOR DEPENDABLE FLORAL SERUTCE

Call

cfhe TTLdrgdritd Florist Shop

TTlrs. Docia HI. Hodqes, Proprietor I

Qraduate of the Standard School of Floriculture
1 Phone; Cristobal 1916

I



114



THE CARIBBEAN



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GlITENS/UYLOR

FOR

Exciusiue Suitings
Careful Q'diloring



lOth. Street - Colon, R. P.

Phone 291







The Finest Assortment of
Students' and Young
Mens' \>^ear on
the Isthmus.

r

EISENMANN ^ELETA Co. Inc.

The Ainerican
Bazaar

PANAMA a^a^ COLON



mim


The Chinese Silk Store

NE"^ CHINA

^^e carry Genuine Chinese and
Japanese SILKS and Curiosities.

LINENS
SILK MATERIALS

SHAWLS

CARVED IVORY

WICKER FURNITl'RE

VASES

PERFUMES

JEWELRY



FRONT STREET

COLON



CENTRAL AVE.

PANAMA



f^igara'iTTiiirrtitfriiiTyiiiTTiitTriiirriitrriiTTi'j^iaigainiirriiR^



Before eye-strain wrinkles become
permanent and nervous fatigue
becomes chronic, have your
eyes examined. If you need
glasses, you will be sur-
prised to find what a
comfort they are
when accurately
and
becomingly
fitted to
YOU

Hdue your eyes examined



SCADRON n
panamaI I
23 Central I I
Avenue ^^



PIlCflL

Registered
Optometrists
S'Optrcians.

New YorI<



^?r^i?rrTirT^iT^!ffrT:?7Tii?r7iiTr^ifrff,f7TTiJ^^




THE CARIBBEAN



11;



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3r£ggs:oi!ypiJS i!'i^mfliiU¥;ji8U¥i^'sa^E^



WHEN YOU THINK OF ENTERTAINMENT

THINK OF THE



I



COLON



AND



STRAND



Special Matinee s For All

HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS 3.20 P. M.



COLON THEATRE



il



^Jia-iito^atniift^imfiT^fgwi^^




116



THE CARIBBEAN




^^ err ^[fr









t



Printed by the

STAR S- HERALD COMPANY

Engravings by R. G. de POOL

Star &- Herald Co., Panama City, R. of P.





STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093680/00019
 Material Information
Title: Caribbean
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Cristobal High School
Publisher: Yearbook House
Place of Publication: Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date: 1932
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 463018377
System ID: UF00093680:00019

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Foreword
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
    Dedication
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Faculty
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Seniors
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Juniors
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Sophomores
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Freshmen
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Literary
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Clubs
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Sports
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
    School notes
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
    Alumni
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
    Jokes
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
    Advertising
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    Back Matter
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
    Back Cover
        Page 123
        Page 124
Full Text















THE CARIBBEAN I


ATE CO1 OERT_


AflNUAL


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4D'+ *T SY


0F


34


CENTRAL AVENUE


PANAMA,


R. DE P



















Digitized by the Internet Archive


n 2010 with funding from


University of Florida


, George A


Smathers Libraries



























































CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL






4 THE CARIBBEAN















body, the Foreworaculty, and the general
El m
wII The Caribbean Staff of 1932 is very
El proud to present to you, the student E
T body, the faculty, and the general w
[l public, an Annual which we believe is ]
Dm
[ the best presentation of the Literary T
and Athletic ability of our students.

l 1-------------- ::slE~



















VOL. XV


CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE


No. 1


PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL


TABLE


Foreword. ....... .. ...


D edicatio n .... .. ... .. ... ...... . ....... .. .... .... ..

Editorial ..... .......

Our Canal Zone School Officials . .... ...


Staff ....... .. ... ... ....


CONTENTS


Juniors


6 Sophom


ores ....


Freshmen.


Literary..


9 School Activities


Faculty ...........


Sports


Senio


rs. .


School Notes


Class Prophecy -.................................... .... .. . .


Alumn

lokes.


Class Will ... ..


Class


History


Advertisements


~rsr ~:U P~eI
.II-: 4


41


I







THE CARIBBEAN


DEDICATION


Class of
volume of


dedicate


our


the Caribbean to Mr.


Milfo
only
l1^


ird


Franks,


contributed
\'me r orhe n


our principal.


much


toward


making


rnlen'inf n n nrnfitnhlep


1 i 1. -









THE CARIBBEAN


ODE


To TIIE NEV CRISTOBAL


fltniir


Between the


two great oceans


And under a tropical sky,
Rise girders of steel so stately
Of our new Cristobal High.

The ships which, anchored, lie
Outside the breakwater grain
Behold the tower of strength.
The finest in the land.


O'er head the


planes are soaring


Like gulls in the azure blue,


As they wing


their way with ease


Upon their course so true.

Upon the rocky beach,
When the tide is low, and dark
Are the shells, and the sand, and the


moss:


Children shout and play on the bank.

In peace in the warm, spring sun
Basks a mangy, homeless cur,
With contempt for the wildest gale
In the horizon's distant blur.

As workmen at their tasks
Toil earnest, ceaseless, and proud,
The startled air gives back
The echoes from hammers loud.


The stately palms above
Rear columned trunks on high,
While afar, upon the horizon.


Fades


a rainbow in the sky.


The new days come, as the old
Pass away with fading night,
To find the happy workers
Still toiling with faces bright.


I'll cheer until I cease
To tread this earthly sphere
The school of my boyhood days.


HIii'ar, Keenan,








THE CARIBBEAN


'M. WILLIAMS.


Name-V. H. BARKER.


Title-Superintendent of Canal


Schools.


Titte-Assistant Superintendent of Schools.


Name-PAUL E. MILLER.


Title-Director of Physical Training
in the Canal Zone Schools.


VR)~-E


Name-EVERET B. SACKErTT.
Tille-Director of Research.










THE CARIBBEAN


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THE CARIBBEAN


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73
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F;REDERICK L


MEYER


MILFORD


FRANKS


IENNETH W.


VINTON


Afna/henw


'N~CiPal


Science


HARRY E. FRINCER


ViCTOR E.


EILER


ROGER C. HACIKETT


' Athletics



BLANCHE


MILDRED LENORE ELNER
AMusic


Social Studies.


S. ANDERSON


HELEN I. PATTERSON


0Thlncrcea


GLADYS M. KIMBRO
English


MIRIAM BROWN


English,


Social Studies


MARY ELIZAbHIT MOORE


Li LLtAN GRACE


BEATA


GuJSTA FSON


E. PHILLIS SPENCER


La 'h/flat/es


Arsi. Principal


Languagers


*.


** S .


d*.--*


5A J


iManual


Household Arts, English


I,







THE CARIBBEAN 13








THE CARIBBEAN


Vamnne


of Student-RANDOLPH


WIKINGSTAD.


Birthplace-Paraiso, C. Z.
"A man of no mean understanding.


School


Actiiptliex-Class


President


2, 3, 4;


Treasurer


A. 3, 4; Vice-President


3: President 4; Baseball


1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball
Handball 2, 3, 4;


2, 3,4; S
Dramatic


Soccer 2, 3,


4; Staff 3, 4;


Club 4; 0. G. A. 4;


President Letter Club 4.


X -,s


of Student-


ALBIN


Birkplace-Cristobal,


B. FORSSTROM.
C. Z.


"I shall show the cinders of my spirit
Through the ashes of my chance."


School,
1,


.Ictie'ities--Class Vice-President 4; Staff 3; Orchestra


"Gvpsie Rover Orchestra" 2;


cer 5, 4; Golf 3, 4; Extra


Class 2:


Tennis 3,
Pyramid


4; Soc-
Team


1; Carnival 1, 2,


3; B. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club


4; Baseball 4; Letter Club 4.


Name of Student--ELEANOR


M. REINHOLD.


Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
"Nothing is impossible to industry.


School lctivitiets-Orchestra 1,


2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4;


Class


Secretary and Treasurer 3,


4; Spanish Club


3, 4; Secretary


Bells of


Beaumol


Vice-President 4; "Gypiy Rover"'
ais 3; Dramatic Club 4; Carnival


9 M -.;i-. I lo-m ;. A










THFr ('\R R \N


,,f~~~~~I .S1df1j~~n


liXFi N A N~


i3rthp la--Ancon, C. Z.
L'Untwistina all the chains that tic the hliden soul ot
larmonv."


IC/B1 i/ic''~l --Ca rn iv a


I. 2.~ Irc


1: ( olf ;"


SwiinminLg 4; Editor Caribbzean 4; .xtra 4: B.


A. A.


1, 2. 4: Letter Club 4.


o/1 Sit,/ --R ICuA nRD


Birfhpl ac,- -ashingt)m, f). C.
"It becomes a young man to be io dest


\ fnlc 1 Of


GL\ DYS


I


3Lj N s.


(~00d p!ight ofl]'OtV 1,1


SU~ixI,


l/. l i'/' ---Swi mm in


-


VXolley


Captain 4; Basket.ball


51 4: Track 1; Supper Club


2,: 4; President 4; Spanish Chlub 4; ,. A, . 34;


Vice- President 3:


President 4: Staff 4: I)cleate to


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F it rss7' 1 I.


It,'./hl'~r r.---C I ist rl,;ll C.


















NV


iame of Sludent-ALLENE MYRTLE DEAKINS.
Birthplace-St. Joseph, Mo.
"Heart on her lips, and soul within her eyes,
Soft as her clime, and sunny as her skies."


School


Aclivities-Spanish Club


3, 4; Supper Club,


Nameln of ~lU~~ Studen-A RY


AN1S.


Birth/plrce--Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn,


N. Y.


"The dimple that thy chin contains has beauty in its
roundness."


School lctiilie.-Glee Club, 1,
Supper Club 2, 3, 4; Pres.
Beaujolais 3; High School


2, 3, 4: Orchestra 2,


Spanish Club
Carnival 3; S1


3; Bells of
banish Club


4; Dramatic Club 4; Sec'v.-Tres. O. G. A. 4.


Name of


Studlent-JotN DELANEY.


Birthplace-Altoona, Penn.
"Silence is one of the virtues of the wise.


THE CARIBBFAN


O. G. A. 4.


CONSTANCE









THE CARIBBEAN


A tImeP


,Studen-DONA V


IRCINIA


EA TOX.


Birthpblce--Cristolial. C. Z.


"A daughter
divine v f


of the Gods,


1 lcvial~


Sc/zoo I
1.


S1ich'i/ie r- ---Glee


C lul)


2, 3; Supper Club 1, 2,


1: High


School


Carnival


3, 4; Cabinet Member 4:


Vice-President Class 3; Treasurer Spanish Club
Dramatic Club 4; Golf Team 3: Staff 4; School ?


Reporter 4.


Name of Student-JOSEPH EmDON.


Birthplace-Cristobal, C.


"Young fellows will be young fellows.


rcliit ic'1-Carnival


1, 2, 3;


Club 3; Baseball


B. A. A. 1. 2, 5,


a, 4;


Basketball


Club 4: Boys Glee Club 4: Pyramid Team 1.


T;aw n oJShtdenlt--HARRY C. ECOvF.


Bhix(P(Ih/CcI-R leading,


Penn.


"He xiill be Caesai or nobody.


Sc/zool


.tril/,tlcs-- Baseball 1.


3, 4: Basketball 1,


Carnival 1, 2, 35 Swimming


4; Soccer 4;


Dramatic Club 4: B. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4;


Glee Club 4:


Letter Club 4; Staff 3.


most


Sc/A!o


Spanisl
Soccer


4; Staff 4; Dramatic Club 4; Tennis 4;: Letter


lonesy


1








THE CARIBBEAN


Name


Sludent--IVIAN G.


ELMGREN


Birthplace-Savannah, Ga.
"Smiling always with a never-fading serenity of coun-
tenance."


Acldiies-Spanish Club 4; Dramatic Club, Officer.


"IIVhO'S


iVaZIne qI, S/tb/call(- HOWArD n


Boss?"


ENCELKE.


Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
"To do good rather than to be too conspicuous."
Ihlo/ /clivit/icA-Baseball 4; Glee Club 4; Dramatic Club
4; Nat. Thespian 4.


nanle


o,/ Student-MARIE


RANDI


ENSRUD.


Birthplace-Oakland, Cal.


"A quiet


conscience makes one so serene.


School


-leliiA'ie.r- Volleyv


Ball 4; Basket Ball


4; Swim-


ming 4; Dramatic Club 4; Glee Club 3.


School









THE CARIBBEAN


Maie c/ S/tIent-I-


OS ANTONIO FERNAN DZ.


Birlhplacn Panama, R. Ide P.


"Speech is great: but
School Ilch/tiies--Glee
"Gypsy Rover 2;
2; "Prarie Doll'" 4.


silence is


greater.


Club 1, 2; B. A.
Dramatic Club 4;


A- 2; Track .;


Soccer


2: Soccer


Sname oJ Student'-Arlc- J. GORn.i.LY-.

Birthplace--A ncon, C. Z.
"A person whose wit is not derived from instruction."


Achtii'ie,-Athletics 1, 2, 3,


Spanish Club 3, 4; Dr
Staff 4; Operettas 2, 3;
0. G. A. 4.


4; Glee Club 2,


amatic Club 4: Office Girl 4;


(LN


A. 3;: Supper Club 2,


7jneo


Sludent-FRANK D. GRIESINGER.


Birthplace-Cristobal, C. Z.


"You


would readily pronounce him


good man.


School


willingly, a great one.
.Iclcifier-Pyramid


Team


1: Carnival


C)
.-,


W~A.


School








THE CARIBBEAN


A anme


oJ Studce/---EvELYN M.


WRIGHT.


Birhplace--Queensburough, ML.


"Plato is my friend.


Socrates is


my friend, but truth


School


more my friend."
.Icfliiies -Spanish


Club 4;


Dramatic Club 4;


H xx LiEN


Birthplacn-New


York City.


"'The useful with the


, Ic~itIl;ZtCr-cle


Club


Bells of Beaujolais


B. A. A. 5, 4;: Treasurer 4; Baseball 4; Carnival 5.


Sluden/-V ERa


NA C. HERMAN.
Texas.


"Wise to resolve and patient to perform.


School


Achiitiie.--Supper Club


Club 4: Dramatic Club


1; Glee Club 2, 3;
4;: Operetta 2, 3;


Spanish
"Who's


Boss?" 4.


SI~h~


Nanic o]


Bir/hp fact-Houstonl,


~'\t~hls Ross?"" 4,


~lmr of .Clcc~it,l~ln\lES F,.


I'lelrsnnt.









THE CARIBBFAN


*
- I dine


of ,/,l,/'nt/ -Roc


1I MAl. HowE.


Birthplace--Marblehead, Mass.
"A wise man will govern the stars.


-r


tame of Studen.-CaRt L. K7AHU.C

Birlhplacc--Staten Island, N. Y.
"A merrv heart goes all the day."
School ,livitirs -Swimming 5; Soccer 4; S
2. 3; Letter Club 4: Pvr;amid Team 1.


;taff 4: Carniv


\I~aNe o~ \~lrCf Ste-e?- TrFIv\1A 31. KIC


BirttzlacLrr-Buffalo,


N. Y.


"Of manners gentle, of affections mild."
School Jctivitief--Carnival I, 3; Class Secretary 1: O. G.
A. 4.


i








THE CARIBBEAN


Name of Stu


dent---ALviN


A. LYEW.


Birthplace-Colon, R. de P.
"He prepares himself for the battle.


School
1,


Activities-Glee Club 3, 4; B. i
2, 3; Pyramid Team 1; Tennis


. A. 2, 3;


Carnival


35, 4; Basketball 3;


Dramatic Club 4; Orchestra 2.


N~aine


of Student-MA RGARET


SARAH


MIZRAHI.


Birhpliace--Panama,
"Simple in neatness.'


R. de P.


Name


Studient-ELwrs


Birlhplace-Costigan,


4 NFAL.
Maine.


"To climb steep hills requires slow pace at first."


School


CI1


-ctii'itier-Neptune
ub 4; Swimming 4; C


Club; Glee Club 4; Debating


carnivall 1, 2; 'Who's


Boss?" 4.










THE CARIRPPAN


' r
. ,l~ttt'


S/tab','l


AMeES


1%/v/hp fact' -----A\ Ii ist icr.


"Tall men are admired."


C. Wool)

Ala.


tSt/)tJll


,tic/i he,--Swimming


Rover" 2:


Carnival 1, 2, 3; B. A. A. 1; Tennis 4: Bisketltt!l 4.


A1iedeaI-~Fisi r~


Birthplace-Ashlland,


SB. NIar.

N. I.


"She lengthens to the last


Ui Stlflfl


Imi)(hl


School


1/Ath'i '//r-BasJket al 2,


Volleyball


1, 3: Swi ln-


ming 1. 2, 3; Baseblll 5: G!ee


Club 1,


2, 3. 4; Orchestra


Supper Club


2-, 3, 4;


Bells of Beanjolais


3i; Staff 4;


Star and Herald Reporter 4;


G.A. A.2,5, 4;O.G.A. .


J] StudLnt/-BENJA.MIN


F:RaNKrLIN ROBElE'rS.


Birlhplac --Abington, Penn.


"He preferred to be


rather than to


.Iclicth'iei'-Carnival 1, 2, 3; Glee


of Beauiolais"


seem so.


"Bells


3; Dramatic Clu 4; National Thespian


"When


s your Birthday


" 4; B.


A. A.


4: Pvramid


t 1


Name


.\;mnc


Srhoall








THE CARIBBEAN


1'r g


oj Student-JANET E. ROBINSON.


Birthplace--Hampton. Va.
"The gentle mind by gentle deeds is known.


School


Activities-Girl s


Basketball


Dramatic Club 4; G. A. A. 4;


4; Letter


"Who's Boss?" 4.


Club 4;


San2/te C ~~a HRA


AccGUST


Roos,


Birthplace-C ristobal,


C.z2,


"None but himself can be his parallel.


A. A. 1, 2, 4;


Secretary 4;


Debating


Club 2, 4; Spanish Club 3, 4; Varsity Club 4; Tennis
3, 4: Dramatic Club 4; National Thespian 4; Staff 4;
"Who's Boss?" 4.


Name vfj


S/u/e~/B~cE C


SANDERS.


Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
"He steers his boat well."


School Activi/ie.Fr-Baseball


3, 4: B. A. A. 1. 2, 3, 4; Letter


Club 4; 0. G. A. 4.


S~6oo~









THE CARIBBEAN


*
A a ~


KShE


ItiIlip/ Ut- --C' a!; r'.estoiv.


ToI
Sc/zoo!


Ar

S. C.


d !CIi-l nieti l:i


Ic/i ~//itX


S\\ imming


SINCl\IlR.


5 gift of fortune
4; Dramatic 4


B. A. A. 5. 4:
Prairie Doll 4:


Bells of Beaujolais


3; Glee Club


"When's your Birthday?" 4;


Boss?"


Na mo


S~l~r- '/jEg~jBvj SI' Sii r


Bihpllace-Clearwater.
"Zealous, vet modest."


" c/lzoo


lc/iih/es-G. A. A. 2;


3, Dramatic


Club 4.


Birthpl/ace-- jersey City,


strong


bov thin as a wraith


With eyes so clear. they inspire true faith."
hoo tI/,'t/ie--B. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4: Soccer 4: Dra.matic
Club 4: Staff 4; Cheer Leader 3: Swimming 4.


"\l~twS


co]~2


)H1E RI


C. S t'. E : so';.


*"A tall


Br~slretb;~ll








THE CARIBBEAN


Studenl-INEZ


Birthplace-Colon,


THEOKTISTO.
. deP.


"Fortune smiles on her first attempt."


School Aclivitie.--Glee Club 3,


4; 0. G. A. 4; Spanish Club


3, 4; Operetta 3; Dramatic Club, Secretary 4;
Club 1.


Supper


?ame


of Student--
B *rhp~ae~~Panaa R


ALucIA


BirthplacePanama R.
"For her own person, i


School


Activi/ier -Spanish


V. THIRLWALL.
de P.


t beggar'd all description.


Club 4;


Dramatic


C


lub 4;


Supper
1 ') .


Club 1, 2, 3, 4; O. G.


"Who's


A. 4; Staff 4 ;Carnival


Boss?" 4.


Name oj Student-JESSIE


C. VANE.


Birthplace-Portland, Maine.
"Steadiness is the foundation of all virtue.


School


Aciviuticie-Basketball 4;


Varsity


Club 4.


Name









THE CARIBBEAN


~Va;ne


hVtudent-N r~ij.


N1I. WA:ROLA\n


Birlhplace-Ancon, C. Z.
"A light heart lives long.


~S'coll#1


c--Class


President


Supper Club 1, 2,


Vice-President


3, 4; Carnival 1, 2, 3; Staff 4; Dramatic


Club 4; President 4; National Thespian 4;
Boss?" 4.


"'Who's


Sa tme


Student-PERRY


F. W\ASHABAUGH.


Birthptlce-Ancon, C. Z.


"The shortest


answer


is doing.


School Acth'vitiefl-Carnival
1; Glee Club 2. 3, 4
Beauiolais ; Staff 4.


1, 2; B.


I; "G"psy


A. 4; Pyramid Team


Rover


Bells of


.Stludent-EunvrN


Birthplace-Ithaca, N
"Cheerful at morn he
Breathes the keen air


Schactlrl


Y.


wakes


from short repose


, and carols


ItcA',iitier-Tennis 4 ;


as he


goes.


Club 4: Glee Club 4.


Nafme


Delralin








THE CARIBBEAN


Name


S/u dent-NI


ALLCOLM


R. WHEELER.


Birthp/aceAnonn


c. Z.


"A merry heart doth good lil


,ctivitie.r--Carnival 1,


ce a medicine.
3: Soccer ,.


4; Swimming


2. 3; Baseball 4; Tennis 3, 4: Handball 2, 5, 4: Basket-
Ball 4: Letter Club 4.


. ame


.S'tau/en/--FUZABETETI


SARAHl


Wiwrz.


Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
"Gentle of speech, beneficent of mind."


School


Ca


Act',i/ies--Glee
rnival 1, 2: G. A.


Club 1,


Athletics 1. 2, 3;


A. 4: G. A. 4.


S.'kar









THE CARIBBEAN


C-t


fIiMI MINtS "t
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N., Wnedmod I
1~Nsamsv)


J. DVetE '(
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t ,i,,f<.C.,-tf)


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THE CARIBBEAN


~3 .~S\or,

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"I"-


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(PpisaC)




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(ERvNyrclst)


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(ch r, n







THE CARIBBEAN


_ 23


(Glan


Xell Iardla,,


Slowly the sun of graduation is setting into the
west of our school days and before we venture out
into the darkness, we the class of '32 do hereby
publish and proclaim this to be our last will and
testament.


PARKER HANNA, his pipe to George Wood.


JIMMIE


HAYDEN,


B.A.A. to Harold Agnew.
VERONA HERMAN,


Meyers to Elizabeth


activities


her admiration for Mr.


Thornton.


leaves his


havior in school to Robert Marshall and Charlie
Goodenough. (They can use it).
GLADYS BLISS, wills some of her plumpness


to Eddie


Thirlwall.


ROGER HOWE, his ability to brag to Robert
Brown.
CARL KARIGER, his love of a joke to Wilbur


Ginsberg.


Hope he doesn't turn out to be a pest,


RUTH CASTO,
Thornton, for gen
blonds!


ALICE


CURTIS,


her black


hair to Elizabeth


tlemen may not always prefer


petiteness


Helen


Hammond.


HOWARD KEENAN,
y Junior who can use it.


THELMA
their auburn


KING
tresses


MARGARET


his musical


and ALIE


to Henry Lee.


MIZRAHI,


talent


THIRLWALL.


Poor Henry!
brillance to


ALLENE DEAKINS,


position


Ernest de la Ossa.


Don't take it too


seriously,


office to Dorothy Birkeland.


Ernie.


JOHN DELANEY


his curly locks to Mildred


GERALD and ELWIN NEAL,


their English


Owen, for what business has a boy with curls?


accent to


Jesse David.


MARY DEANS,


her reputation of being the


ELSIE NEELY, her turned up nose to Mandi.


best dressed girl in school to Billie O'Rourke.
HOWARD ENGELKE, his cute little laugh to


ELEANOR REINHOLD, her perfect
dance record to Helen Southard. I'm sure


atten-
Miss


Arthur Vane.


Try it out, Arthur.


Kimbro will be glad.


DONA EATON, her


nose for news to Natalie


BENJAMIN


FRANKLIN N


ROBERTS,


Safford.


She ought to keep C.H.S. on the front


famous name to Harvey Smith


It really


takes


page.


something to make the name Smith famous.


JOE EBDON, his good batting


average


in the


JANET ROBINSON,


her soft


voice


to Jack


baseball


series


against Balboa, to Mandi.


Wright.


We certainly hope he takes the hint.


HARRY EGOLF,
to Edward Gormely.


his desire to run the school


HERMAN ROOS,


his pretty


teeth


to Oscar


Heilbron.


VIVIAN


ELMGREN,


demureness


BRUCE SANDERS, his


numerous freckles to


Mary Curtis.


Wm. Keenan.


Where'll he put them?


MARIE


Violet Randall.
ANTONIO


ENSRUD, her taste for swimming to


How'd she look with a tan?


FERNANDEZ


ALVIN


JESSE SINCLAIR,


around
Rankin.


the office


his liking
wonder why)


for hanging
to Tommy


Maybe Margaret will be an office girl!


LYEW, their friendship to Mary Melendez
Jane Bretch.


BETTY STAHLER, her talkativeness to


Velta


Foley.


ALBIN


FORSSTROM, his flirtiness to Charles


ROBERT STEVENSON, his


line of jokes to


Gould.


He has plenty for both.


Thelma Albritton.


RICHARD BETTEIN,


e3


rtntiu







THE CARIBBEAN


PETE WARDLAW, Ih
friend to Helen Aanstoos.


specs


and her boy


EVELYN WRIGHT, her amiability to Bernice
Sanders.


JAME


Marshall.


WOOD, his strong right arm to Robert


Maybe he won't


be hit by any more


JOHN HIDDEN,


ah me!


left for him to will after all these


What
years,


is there


swinging doors.


MALCOM WHEELER,


ames Wergin.


teasing


ways


(He probably won't use them).


We, the staff of ti
seniors, leave to next


his Carribean, and all other


year s


staff


our ability to


surpass all others in putting out annuals.


PERRY WASHABOUGH,


to Norine Rakovskv.


his love for dancing


Don't know why


we think


she needs it.


EDDIE WEISMAN,


his cherubness


Loockwood.


RANDY WIKINGSTAD,


to Jane Bretch.


his mdustriousness


Now, my worthy
each and everyone


beneficiaries,


we hope


you will carry out


that
every


mandate of this, our last will and testament, and
will benefit thereby.


Sealed, and signed this dav


What a joke.


in witness thereof:


THE SENIOR CLASS OF


'32


ELIZABETH WIRTZ, her meekness to Charlie


Howe.


He can


use it.


Witnesses:


FINN and CADDIE.


Qlatss 3)istart
.ell Wardlaw t\


Now quickly time has passed away!
Why, it can't be more than the other day


That there entered into


A class of 50 or more, I


C.H.


guess.


Cristobal boys have featured in sports;
Among those starring in games of all sorts
Are Malcolm, Randy, Bruce, Harry and Joe,
And these are all Seniors, we'll have you know.


Four years we've given an annual ball,


(E everyone says they


were


Not many Senior girls helped -win
But even then our class won fame


best of all)


games


At our banquet at the Washington


We're proud to


say we had great fun.


Through Gladys Bliss, a maiden well-known,
Who captained her teams in a way of her own.


Our Freshman advisor was Mr. West.


I'm sure you all know Randy, too,


How can one tell if he


was the best?


Or perhaps you know him by


"Blow


or "Blew


I doubt if Miss Kimbro enjoyed our class,
But Miss Patterson's with us to the last.

I could write plenty about all she's done;
She's helped us often find ways to have fun;
Instead of scolding like most teachers do
She tries to advise us and laugh with us, too.


For the last three years wherever he went


He was pointed out


as our president.


A funny thing happened this school


year


The Senior boys weren't very smart, I fear,
Since two girls came at the head of the class
Eleanor first, Inez second, close race to the last.


About graduation I'll have to be sad,


nr. s'- Vll nt fl S. t


a3


E







THE CARIBBEAN 33


- F-.


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OC"P '


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N~Y;C


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THE CARIBBEAN


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THE CARIBBEAN


JUNIOR COMIC SECTION


Harold Teen an
Lillum s........
Toots and ..
Casper ...
Boots and
W illie .
Cora
Salesman Sam
Guzz .
Kitty
Mrs. Guzzlem
Booh McNut


Pearl McNu
Dumb Dora
Somebody's
Tillie The T


d


Stenog.
oiler


Jiggs
Maggie
Little Orphan Annie .......
Major Hoople
Barney Google
Happy Hooligan
Buck Rogers ..
Mom'n
Pop
Abie Kabible ..
Wash Tubbs
Chess and -
Wa Nut .
C hick ........
Gladys
Mutt and .
Jeff
AMrs. Mutt ....
Andy Gump
Min Gump
Winnie \inkle .....
Suitcase Sampson ...
Simp O'Dill ..
Rudy Nebb... .....
AMrs. Nebb
Moon Mlullins
Maime
Kavo ... ..
Mushmouth. .
Lord Plushbottom .
Mrs. Hoople
Minnie Mouse .......
Mickey Mouse .........


. Harold Agnew
Helen Hammond
Dot. Birkland
Clifton Brown
Betty MacSparran
Robert Brown
.Thelma Albritton
Robert Grant
Wilbur Ginsburg
..... Natalie Safford
.... Mildred Owen
..........Charles Howe
.Katherine Townshend
Genevieve O'Rourke
Bernice Saunders
.. ...M....larv Curtis
.....larvey Smith
Helen Aanstoos
Edna Thirwall
-Henrv Lee
William Keenan
Jack Wright
Edward Gormelv
.-Norine Rakovskv
Harold Lockwood
-Mandi Marchoskyv
George Wood
Charles Goodenough
Paul Dignam
.. Thomas Ranlin
Velta Foley
Artlhur Vane
Louie Kleefkins
Helen Southard
.Oscar Heilbron
Violet Randall
Jane Bretch
Gordon Birnie
Ernest Reinhold
Charles Pescod
Elizabeth Thornton
James Wergin
Georgia Seaburg
...Sidney Wharton
Jessie David
Ernest De La Ossa
.Mary Melendez
May WVegner
..... Mr. Mlever










sb THE CARIBBEAN


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THE CARIBBEAN


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38 THE CARIBBEAN


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THE CARIBBEAN


SOPHOMORE DIRECTORY


Harry M. Anderson
C. J. Bailey .
Henry L. Barlow
J. Louie Barnett
Ramon Bejarano ......
Blanche V. Belden
Charles E. Belden
Claude E. Berger ...
Aldred G. Betten ...
Mabelle 3. Bliss
Stella V. Boggs ...
Clarence H. Brown
Colin D. Campbell .
Norma A. Davis.....
Aimee L. Day ..
Eileen R. Donovan ....
Fred A. Ebdon .....
Ruth E. Egolf ..........


Bill Ellic
Armando
Anne V.
Jerry I.
Ellen E.
Virginia
O. Eliza
Mlarv V.
S. Jane
Maxine
Victoria
Carlton
Garret I


Ethel M. Huntoon .........
Evelyn K. Johnson....


lines


>M. Fi
Gibson


..... andy Man
Clanking Ja


A
ws


............Heaven's Light
...... Joyous Lawbreaker
.Readily Abolished B
Beautious Vision
Cabbage Ears
Come Hither Eyes
A... ndy Gump
.. .. .. .Money luggl
..... Stepping Venu
........ Cauliflower Head
........ .. Colon Dude C
. ......No Admittanci
..............Artfully Lipsti


nderson
Bailey
Barlow
Barnett
ejarano
Belden
Belden
Berger
Bettien


Ar:
e
ci


. Ever Readv Do
.......... Fortunately Alert I
... .... ......Rare Elf


r Bliss
Boggs
Brown
npbell
Davis
k Day
novan
Sbdon


....... Beef Stake Elliot
........--......Algo M as Funes
............Artless Vamp Gibson


......... lumping Jack Gorin
........Ever Efficient Greenleaf
................Vivid Mop Hanna
...... Our Energetic Haves
.... Modest Villain Hearne
.... Sheer Joy Hill
..... ......Midget Angel Hoffman
....... Vivacious Mama Hollowell
........ Careless Lover Horne
S.....Gassy Huff


Egyptian Mummy Huntoon
... -Ever Kind Johnson


G. Johnston


Blossom E. Lam .......
Helen L. Leach .. ...
J. Grant Leminon
David J. Levy
Gloria MI. Mannix
lohn F. Mannix
Beverly J. Marcuse
Rose Mi. Misrahi
Edna M1. Mueller
Charley P. Murphrey.
Laura H. Neal ...
Jack F. Paterson
A. Ruth Pickett
George D. Poole
Richard M1. Reinhold .
Dorothy A. Roos ..
Henry E. Sanchez .
Marguerite T. Siebler
R. Warren Slocum
Charles S. South -
Betty H. Stetler
Willima F. Stone .
George O. Tarflinger
Frank J. Washabaugh
Robert L. Wertz
\V. Ray Wheeler
Marguerite Winn
Chester C. Wirtz


Edison W. Wirtz
Alejandro L. Won
Alice E. Wood
Earnest L. Wood


Andrew


so\


Another Great Johnston
.Bashful Eel Lam
.Half Lemon Leach
.....Just Grated Lemmon
.... Don't Jump Levy
...Gone Mad iMannix
January Freeze Mannix
.Bon Jour Marcuse
Remember Me Misrahi
....... .. Eat Much Mueller
Cream Puff Murphrey
Little Heard Neal
Jabber Forever Paterson
.......Always Right Pickett
... .. ......Gone Dry Poole
... ....Ready-Made Reinhold
Dutiful Always Roos
Hold Everything Sanchez
..... Merry Tongued Siebler
.......Roman Warrior Slocum
Count Screwloose South
......Boop A-doop Stetler
..Whata Fake Stone
Great Olympic Tarflinger
.......Fiddle Joe Washabaugh
.... Run Lightly Wertz
.....Woman Ruined Wheeler
..... Must WVinn
Cow Catcher Wirtz
Earnest Worker Wirtz
..........Always Laughing Wong
...... rtless Eve Wood
Ever Lasting Wood


Gorin .
Greenleaf -
M. Hanna
beth Haves
Hearne ...
H ill .. . .
A. Hoffman .
M. Hollowel!
L. Horine
luff ... ...













THE CARIBBEAN


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THE CARIBBEAN


FRESHMEN DIRECTORY

NAME APPEARANCE HOBBY FUTURE

Alberga, Lloyd .... Words couldn't explain it. Talking Traveling Salesman
Albritton, Theordore Shy ......... ... ..... Mechanics Preacher
Arick, Alex Al Capone Starting lights Gangster
Ascensio. Bertram Tomato catsup B. lah, Blah, Blah Co median
Baldwin, Alpheus A nice pet i Stamps Electrical engineer
Barlow, Ruth Average .. Chewing gum Famous I)ivorcee
Bath, Charles Farm-hand ... Swimming \I marine
Beers, William Undertaker. ................. Eating Engineer
Borden, Edgar Stumpy ...... Listening Magician
Briggs, Adah tHarmless.. .. Tennis An old Maid
Coyle, Edward Studious .... I Electricity Efficiency expert
David, Aveline Hard to tell Hunting Big Game Hunter
Davis, Ralph Ladies, Look out! K. Good-enough .... .Woman-hater
Deakins, Leta Shy, maybe? ..... Throwing slams Married life
Dunn, Doroth ..... Fifth-grader ... Trying to grow ... .. Spinster
Durham, Edward ...... Unconscious .. Playing hooky .. Alex's partner
Eaton. Lucy. Plump and placid....... Switching down the aisles Fashion model
Eberenz, Jack. Aged .................. You'd be surprised Member of the Freshman class
Egozcue, Jack Dimpled Darling Women Gigolo
Ensminger, Blossom.... Stump ............ Gazing Astronomer
Finnegan, James Fuzzy cave-man Baseball ..... Babe Ruth's successor
Goodenough, Kathleen Sweet .. Ask Ralph Davis Bathing beauty
Gormerly, William ..-....- Mouse.... Reading ... Book Censor
Gregory, Paul .. Eager ... .... To cause trouble .... Following Father's foot-steps
Hammond, John Big, tall, and hefty. ..... Fiddling.. .. ... Salvation Army Officer
Heim, Charles,.......... .. Pest .....-................... Raise Cain Cane Raiser
Hollowell, Hope. -. Let's hope there's hope Athletics Channel Swimmer
Hollowell, William .. .. Dirty Gus Cussing Swearing Champ.
Huntoon, Jane Snappy i Piano playing Matchy's wife
Jaramillo, Ernest. Absent-minded professor.. Studying -.. Governor of Cuba
King, Robert Pretty fair Losing his voice Civil Engineer
Long, Jack .... Short and wide .. Blowing his nose Fisherman
MacSparran, Alice .. .. Meek .. Dancing Still unknown
Marden, Lillian ..... .. Pleasingly plump Doing French Matron of an Orphan's Home
Mullane, Elinor Pseudo Angelic Crying over Algebra Costume Designer
Neilson, Martin .. Lazy-looking Crabbing Hobo
Packard, Anne ..... i What a woman! .. Copying her homework. Not a chorus Girl!
Palm, John Oke!.... .. Sleeping at baseball Chemist
Pfeil, Robert.... Happy-go-lucky! ... Sleeping - Critic
Herbert Philips Get a Microscope Something good -. Member of a Flea Circus
Pierce, Burton ...... Half way there Waiting for 3 o'clock Dog-catcher
Pretto, David - How handsome??? Pestering collector Life-guard
Pretto, Richard. Mama's Boy Hobbiless President of Panama
Randall, Charlotte ... ell painted Drawing - Owner of Beauty-parlor
Reinhold, Margaret Tough egg!.. Making love in kitchen. Prize-fighter
Reilly, Anna Not bad!- Swimming with C. Bath Lawyer (this ain't funny)?
Roe, Olga ...... Buzzing Bee Buzzing around Fortune Teller
Russel, Tomas ...... .. Mutt, (not Jefft Entert'ng. in Algebra Cl. Cartoonist of Ballyhoo
Ryfkogel, Mary v Fussy- Danc'g. w' her Gr'd Dad Dressmaker
Sanders, Irl Ghandi ... Gassing Back W'oodsman
Sanders, Maxwell... Spiff. Pitching Think one up
Stein, Edgar .. Angel-faced Playing the innocent. .. Bum, Slugger
Stilwell. lean ..... Passable P(eace -makIng A nice Mlammv












THE CARIBBEAN


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THE CARIBBEAN 45








THE CARIBBEAN


Eitrrarg


BEST OF ALL SHORT STORIES
"THE DEATH OF THE GRAND DUCHESS"


Aimie Day


The pale moonlight streamed through the open
attic window, piercing the inky blackness of the
room, and throwing its wan light upon the ghastly
white face of an apparently old woman, the sole
occupant of the place. She was seated in a decre-
pit armchair, wore an elaborate white satin dress,
and was gazing fascinatedly first at a jewelled
gold dagger, which was wet with fresh blood, then
at the rapidly spreading red stain on the bodice of
her dress. It was Kissa, once Grand Duchess of
Russia, who was patiently waiting to die. As she
sat there, the shades of past days ame to comfort
her in the last hours of her life.


The gloomy black
It was forty years be
lighted ballroom of
shy girl of seventh
formal dance. The
Waltz filled the air
more, perhaps, than
experienced no sorr
the world. It was
produced to the Gr


; attic faded from her sight.


;fore. She was in the
the Czar's palace, an
en, was attending h
strains of the Blue
, and Kissa enjoyed
ever afterward, for
ow to embitter her
that night that she


and


Duke.


Nichola


S


brightly
id, as a
ler first
Danube
herself
she had
against
was in-
. whose


wife had recently died.
The ballroom disappeared, and in its stead a
great church of Moscow came into view. A year
after the ball, Kissa, in white satin, was being
married to the Grand Duke. The mighty church
bells Fealed, and the people of the palace were
happy, for they were ignorant of the horrible fate
which awaited most of them in the future.
Again the scene changed. It was early dawn


in the pal


many


years


after Kissa'


S


She was awakened by the boisterous
soldiers, the crashing of glass, and the
straining, smashing wood. Nicholas
grasped his sM ord and rushed downstai
he saw made his heart grow faint. The
had broken! He fought bravely, but t
too many rren against him. and snn


marriage.
shouts of
sound of
hurriedly
rs. What
revolution
here were
n he fell.


was crimson wi
almost glad to 1
spared looking a
sight. A terrible
was to be shot 1
he was being led
him a few second
said very little.
cry, Kissa. Es
Lenowskv. I o0


th
be
"ny
shc
the
to
' C(
H
;cap
nce


yours." Then he was
his back to the wall,
men. He would not
without a tremor, fac
.squad. The window c


running blood. Kissa was
taken to prison, as she was
longer upon that awful, gory
ock awaited her--her husband
next morning at dawn. As
execution, the guard allowed
)nversation with her. Nicholas
is only words were "Do not
'e, and go to the peasant,
saved his life: he will save


*ed the i
)f Kissa's


the courtyard, but she never


ut an
othej
; eyes
'ifles
cell


d stood with
r condemned
bound, and
of the firing
opened upon


saw the final shot,


as she sobbed wildly and turned her head away.
The Grand Duchess stirred uneasily in her
chair back in the attic, as she thought of how that
mangled, bloody form of what had once been


Nichol
. and to
on top
shot.
wept s
whole
wished
It was
tionist,


as


was carried


away


to be thrown


have perhaps dozens of other cor
of it. She had not cried much
It might have been that she ha
o much that there were no tears
mind was bent on escape. Not


S


in a hole.,
pses piled
after the
d already
left. Her
that she


to live-she had nothing left to live for.
simply that she did not wish the revolu-
to have the pleasure of killing her, so that


there would be one less of the


"cursed aristocracy.


Her chance came the night after
execution. The guard drank too muct


becarr
with j
ly she
where
reach<
kept.
-her
suridde


C


drowsy as a result. Kissa's h<
when she was aware of this fact


tiptoed


across


the


* he sat nodding. L
ed nearer the pockl
Now it seemed as t
fingers were closing
nlyv with a jerk


stone floor of
littlee by little
et where his
hough she had


I II


Nicholas'
i wine and
heart leaped
. Stealthi-
the cell to
, her hand
keys were
succeeded


over the keys. But,
e Olurd rePained his









THE CARIBBEAN


been placed within her grasp.


A wild idea dawned


in her head, and, raising the bar, she held it aloft
in the air for the fraction of a second, then, hardly
knowing what she did, brought it down with a
sickening crash upon the stupefied mnan's skull.
It was all over. Kissa stepped back, terrified by


she had done,


and dropped


though it burnt her fingers.


iron as


She had never before


killed a man, and the sight of blood sickened her.
There was no tire for thought, however, so she


she was normal again.


At the first chance, Kissa


took a ship hound for foreign ports.
Back in the attic. the Grand Duchess Kissa saw


herself wandering from


continent


country to country, and city


arrived


in Mlontreal,


Canada.


to continent,


to city, until she
She saw herself


struggling for years to earn a living with her
remarkably fine voice, and, just when it seemed
as if she would succeed, catching a cold in her
throat, and losing forever her ability to sing. She


hastily


seized


the keys


and opened


1I'Ofl-


had been


forced


move


to the stuffy


barred door.


The danger was not over, though,


attic room where she now was, as all her money


once she was out in the hall.


One could never


had I


ieen spent.


On the verge of starvation, but


tell when a soldier would appear around the next


corner.


Trembling,


Kissa made


her wav


along


too proud to ask help from friends, she took the


only alternative left her.


On the anniversary of


the passage, clinging to the walls, and trying to


stay as much as possible in the shadow.


after what seemed


vcyears of horror


Finally,


to her, she


passed the last drunken guard in the prison, and


crept out into the open air.


She was free! Free!


The word kept ringing in her ears, but still she


could not believe it.


As she rushed along the dark


streets, and across the fields which led to the hut


peasant,


Leno vskv,


she imagined
-


every noise irust be the revolutionists, \hno had


the revolution, she put on her satin wedding dress,
got out the gold dagger given her by her husband
before his execution, and late in the night, with
the san-e grim detern-ination with which she had
always done unpleasant things, she plunged the
dagger far into her side.
The ghostly n-oon grew dinmer, as a nearby
church clock struck four. The phantoms vanished,


and Kissa


sm ilded


faix dlv


into the first


light of


discovered
her with


escape,
bloodv


were


I )avocnets.


comingr


Nevertheless.


dan\ n, as her head sank lower and lower upon the


blood-stained waist of her dress.


She had gone to


she reached her destination in safety, though in a


highly delirious condition.


It was a week before


join her loved ones in som
The Grand Duchess was


e land not


of this world.


dead.


BEST SHORT STORY IN SENIOR CLASS
"A GOLDEN MELON"


IT i'an Eh/naren


April 15. 1856 seemed such a calm peaceful day
that no one would have believed it was te end in


disaster.


A number of boats


Colon.


were


lying in the harbor at


They had brought to this lazvy town many


Americans on their way to the California gold-


the people to Panama.


latter


was used by


those who could not afford to pay the high price
of a ticket on the train.
The Harringtons walked down something that
was called a street but was really a muddy alley.
The inhabitants were peaceful and pleasant, the


fields.


his wife,


Among these were Henry Harrington and


Clara.


Since they were well-provided


children, naked and playful.
the venturesome young people.


All this delighted


with money, they chose to go to California bv way


Suddenly a loud shot was heard.


It came from


of Panama.


Mr. and Mrs. Harrington had only


been married a few months and


were enjoying


their adventurous trip.


a near ,v alley.


lowed.


Screams and another


The Harringtons


mixed crowd


hurried


of natives and


alon~


American


shot fol-
; with a
s to the


-, .


. i I I -







THE CARIBBEAN


clubs were easily acquired by both sides, and with
the help of other make-shift articles it turned into
a free-for-all.


creeping


torch,


toward


the building


and let him have


with a flaming
The victim fell.


Henry felt a sting in his shoulder, looking down


The Harringtons


by this


thought


he saw a thin stream of blood.


Clara, after trying


should sdek safety, but it


was too late.


They were


swept along with the crowd of Americans toward


to comfort Mrs. Sander, saw the blood on Henry's
shoulder and hurried to him.


the Panama


Railroad


Station.


When


was


"Are vou hurt?"


reached,


now excited


Americans


entrench themselves for a battle.


began


The Harring-


"Just a scratch, dear,
are needed elsewhere."


" he reassured her.


"You


tons, being unable to escape, prepared to fight.


The only


other woman in


the crow(


middle-aged lady named Mrs. Sander.


1 was a
She and


Clara were huddled together in one corner listen-
ing to the firing.


"What is all the fighting about?"


"I am not so


sure myself, but


American took a melon from a


Clara asked.


I believe


fruit-seller


refused to pay him.


The Americans had been fighting for hours and


were losing.
gravely sui


At last they raised a white shirt and


rendered.


The inhabitants


seemed


satisfied because one of the dead Americans was
he who had stolen the melon, however, an under-
current of ill-feeling remained.
The Harringtons and Mrs. Sander were afraid
to go to a hotel for fear some native might attack


them.


They asked an American Captain if he


"Is that all.
grow wild. H
thing. If this
killed."


Why, where I come from melons
ow silly to fight over such a trivial
fighting continues someone will be


And continue it did.


At last the Governor of


would let


them stay on his ship all night; he


gladly consented for a reasonable price.
also arranged for Mr. Sander to be buried at


rhey
sea.


Bright and early the next morning they left for
Panama City.


Colon attempted to end the battle, but


at by an alert American.


was shot


The natives went wild


and stormed the station, at this insult to their
Governor.


Clara and Mrs. Sander


were


the wounds of their fighters.
petticoats for bandages.


Mrs. Sander
he staggered a
mouth as he (


kept busy dressing
They tore up their


was standing by her husband when
rnd fell. Blood poured from his


"It looks like


I'll never


Panama
Harringtons


was Colon


on a larger scale.


had lost much


of their


desire for


adventure and were relieved when their Spanish
friend, Don Pedro, took them to his home. He
said he would be glad to shelter them until they
should obtain passage on one of the boats leaving
for the gold-fields.
The Harringtons and Mrs. Sander waited three
weeks before they sailed on a dirty crowded boat


for California.


Thev never forgot that day they


California, Maud.


You go.


Sander cried and moaned,


not for


spent in Colon, the most disastrous and adven-
turous day in their entire lives.


long, for another man
her attention.


was


wounded and needed


Henry picked out a lean little native, who was


was indeed


tragic


trivial melon should cause
Americans and two natives.


that the price


one


the death of fifteen


BEST


STORY


IN JUNIOR


CLASS


"HOW


A BAD HABIT WON OUT"


William Keenen


"A stitch in time


saves


" Did anyone ever


Rowe,


proud


of her


small


daughter


's budding


hear the tale of how a safety-pin caught Frances


intellect, carefully showed her the workings of the


her husband?


If not, bear with me a little and I


safety-pin,


and later


told Daddy


Rowe








TIlE CARIBB;\N


the following


one was a common


oQ


"Frances, sew a button on this dress.


ccurence:
'


"But, Mother, a safety-pin is just as good."


"Frances, do
slack child."


as I ask you.


I never saw such a


Frances listened quietly to her mother's ques-
tions; smiled a little.
"Well, mother, I'll tell you what I'll do. I'll
go to the city for a year- let's make it a year and a
day, to bie romantic, I'll write you once a month


"All right, I will, hut
is lots more fun."


gee, Mother, a safety-pin


There were some periods when no safety-pins


to let you know that I am well.
back, either a success or a failure.
Frances was true to her word.


Then I'll


come


Twelve ties


appeared on Frances


small figure, as a result of


she sent her mother a single line, reporting that


maternal


threats.


Inevitably,


these spells were


followed by others during which Frances glittered


she was well.


passionate


Mother


letters,


Rowe,


pleading


repentant,


more


wrote
news.


like a general sprinkled with medals.


To be sure,


Frances remained stubborn and refused to answer.


she did not use them on her dresses as openly as
she had when she was smaller. but Mother Rowe's
neat soul was even then full of despair and lectures
were renewed.


At seventeen


Frances was ready to


country town for college.


words were,


leave the


Her Mother's parting


"For goodness sake, Frances, I hope


they will make you stop using safety-pins." But


her be,


said )Daddv


Rowe,


who had a


fondness for safety-pins himself and understood


his girl.


"She'll come out on top in her own wav.


In a year and a day, to the hour, Frances re-
turned (with a safety-pin holding a rose pinned
on her coat), followed by an energetic, prosperous-
looking man.


"Folks,


" she announced after the first greet


Mother


Rowe's


hopes


were


not realized,


vour future son.


Frances, freed from
revelled in safety-pin:


her mother's watchful eye,
s. In fact, she never sewed


Mother


Rowe


outside the station.


collapsed


on the dusty


(She certainly was upset for


on a button during her four years at college except
when her supply of safety-pins was temporarily
exhausted. She won the nickname of "Safety."'
If any class mate needed a safety-pin in a hurry,
Frances extracted one speedily from some portion


of her person.


Even the supposedly non-seeing


Professors nudged one another when they glimpsed
a tiny safety-pin doing valient duty in an other-
wise unassailable shirt-waist.


At the class day


cheers,


Frances


safety-pins,


exercises,


a


was presented
the wish that


together as well in the future


imid
witl


affectionate
I a box of


she would


as she had in the


past.
Thus Frances went home to Mother Rowe not


the least


bit reformed.


Mother


groaned


when


she did not stop to wipe the bench).
"Child, tell me right away what has happened.
I can't wait until we get home."


Frances


winked


at Daddy,


taking


hint, led the young man awav from the scene.


"Everything's


all right,


Mother,


like safty-pins better than buttons.


what I have been doing.


But here's


As soon as I reached the


city, of course I looked at once for a job.


guess very easily where


safety-pin


manufacturer.


went first:


thought


You can


to the


I might


The firm didn t need a stenographer just at


that time, but


got a


promise of promotion if


place as a clerk,


with a


did my work satisfactori-


ly. I guess I must have been all right, for when
the Junior partner's secretary left to be married, I


she saw Frances step from the train, for she had
caught the gleam of a safety-pin, though skillfully
placed, on the girl's dress.
Frances had been home only a few days, but
her mother could contain herself no longer. Now
that she was through college, what did she think


was offered her place.


ed, Mother.


That's when the fun start-


I saw Mr. Ellis (the Junior partner,


looking at me somewhat quizzically one day, and


then he chuckled.


the ioke


was.


sleeve of my dress.


Naturally


answer,


I asked him


he pointed


to the


Safety-pin, of course!


that she


was going to do?


Did she suppose she'd


1 I


-.- -.' .. -4- L- -. -A *-. - - .I-


appeared so jolly I couldn't resist telling him the
_ r c"1 '- r m_ I_


L, c,


* *







THE CARIBBEAN


Mother Rowe slowly emerged from her dazed
state. "I'd ne;er have believed it possible," she
managed to utter, at last, faintly.
"And Mother, he won't have to wear safety-
pins in his shirts and trousers on account of my
shiftlessness. He has plenty of money, so I'll


BEST STORY


be able to hire someone just to sew on buttons."
At the wedding, Mother Rowe was so com-
pletely won over to the cause that she didn't
make the slightest objection when Francis in-
sisted upon fastening her wedding veil with a
safety-pin.


IN THE SOPHOMORE CLASS


"CHAK," OR "THE SURVIVAL OF THE FITTEST"
Colin Canmpell '34


The sun was chasing the blackness from the
heavens. There was no wind at all but everything
was cool with dampness. Dark, shadowy objects


were just being
from the wate
floated in the
pods. In and
growth, a path
rippled silently.
inlets of Gatun
Half in the w
shore lay Chak,


distinguished as naked trees rising
r. Bushy masses of lake grass
water amidst the numerous lily
about the young, unstable lake
of water resembling a forest trail
It was one of those characteristic
Lake.
ater and half on a grassy, muddy
the leader of his tribe, the strong-


est, the wisest, and the most powerful. His half
submerged figure could not be distinguished from
the other arts of nature about him. He slept with
happy contentment, for the night before he had
caught a silly but wise fish that no other one of his
tribe was able to catch. He had thought that
maybe he could hold his youthful supremacy for-
ever but, no, Chak was growing older, he was
losing his strength but he would not let himself
admit it.
While Chak rested motionless a small incon-
spicuous bird hopped on his back. She was Chak's


best friend, Jager,
since she could rem
life. Chak opened
when he saw that sh
Lightly hopping on
there's bad news in
crocodile something
and I heard that he
you, and that he's
I'm warning you.
Chak could not st
in the daytime but
wanted to think t


who had
member and
one eye s
e wished to
his snoot,
the air. I'
g like you
wished to
plotting to
I'll be up i
ay awake, f
his mind 1
hat this fi


lived by him ever
had once saved his
leepily and winked
tell him something.
she began, "Chak,
ve seen a very large
but much younger
have a battle with
be ruler over all.
n the tree.
or it was impossible
was disturbed. He
3e could easily be


again the troublesome questions ran through his
mind.
Not until after the sun went down was Chak
relieved. Jager had hopped on his snoot. This
always awakened him. Slowly, he backed out into
the rippleless water for it was time for him to
get up. The cool water felt good as he started
towards a special spot where the coolest miud re-
freshed him every evening. Oh, what could be
better, thought Chak, than to squeeze and to roll
in soft, watery mud when you are hot, and what
could be better than a meal of slimy fish after
that? Beneath the surface of the water he dis-
appeared, and in a few minutes he emerged with
a full stomach. The night was black except for
the stars above and the bright, red eyes of his
tribe that dotted the surface of the water. A
cool breeze passed over him and the occasional
bark of a crocodile could be heard. All seemed


peace


"ful. He thought he would


d visit some of his


friends but just then Jager alighted on his back.
"Chak," she said, "It's the nearest crocodile to
the left."
Chak, startled, lay in perfect silence. He had
forgotten that, that crocodile, the only one he had
ever heard of was as large as he and was young,


yes younger than
would he? He ha
purpose for years.
he would be ruler
A straight, long
the glassy water a
his coat showed
overcome Chak or
Chak saw him
Oh, for his your
those victories, a


he. He must conquer him, but
d not had a serious battle with a
Yesterday he had thought that
forever, but today was different.
figure, swimming slowly through
approached. He swam easily and
no sign of battles. He must
otherwise go back up the stream
clearly advancing toward him.
iger days, those many battles,
nd that battle where he stood








THE CARIBBEAN


Darting at each other like arrows from a giant's


bow they clashed.
air with revenge.


The smack of teeth filled the
The splashes and commotion


Still they


continued.


Chak


wearied,


increased, he could not stand it longer, he backed
away from the last attack.


filled the air with spray.


Attack after attack and


Slowly


swimming,


comforting


Jager


crushing blows with their huge tails finally wearied


both.


Now the sprav was tinged with blood.


his back, he made his way up the stream to live
with the thoughts of his younger days and his


opponents were covered with red,


burning marks.


true friend


Jager.


BEST SHORT STORY IN FRESHMAN CLASS
"A PRINCESS IN EXILE"


Annie


Tubbertlle


"Yes,


replied my Mother,


"she is a


real prin-


was e


ager to have her tell of herself, but she


cess, and lives right here in Panama."
Through my mind ran visions of velvets and


was more interested in extolling the virtues of the
little waif she had adopted and raised from a baby


silks, diamonds and


pearls.


Ever since


could


to school


Though


own means


were


remember


had been


told fairy stories about


princesses, and now I was really going to see one.
I wanted to wear my best dress, and felt disap-


pointed when my


Mother said,


"No, my dear,


scant, yet she had more than divided with


deserted


orphan.


"But what of your own youth?"
our party asked her. I wanted to


a little


Some one of
get her off to


just wear a middy bluse and skirt."
We had an early breakfast, and went to the


myself, where I could ask her questions, and hear
all of her answers, because in a party of people


Gatun
friends.


Docks


where


our party


was joined


A launch soon came for us, and sped out


the insane chatter is most distracting.


managed


to hear:


"Many sisters and


But I


brothers,


over the mirrored waters of the lake.


What a pity


the noise of the engine and the smell of gasoline
could not be left out of such a trip.
In the party was a British Major, and I strained
my ears to hear what he was saying, but for the
noise of the engine, I only caught such snatches of


all of whom Queen Victoria of England, named by


proxy.


My uncle was the mighty


King Kaffir.


Do not know what became of any of my people.
I was just a child when left with my father on


Robinson Crusoe Island.


I used to love to wear


jewelry, and to dance, and she held up her fist,


his narrative as:


"Kaffir King of many millions


,.......'"Diamond mines of South Africa"---..-- -..
"Trouble; royal family taken and left scattered in


various


parts


of the world.


sixty ....... charity."
We were nearing the island, and


given up
naturally


the thoughts of


associates


Rhoda. ..... past


had reluctantly


a castle,


a princess.


which


one


As the


boat stopped, each of us reached for our packages.
Some had rice, tea, beans. Beans for a princess!


I had strawberries and cream.
have taken bread and honey).


The Princess,


straight,


came out


standing
to meet


(Suppose I might


to fight, but now-I'm living with
with Jesus.


It seemed


that she


was most


Jesus; living


religious:


earned a part of her living by cleaning the church
in a near village.
"The church members were good to me when


was sick," she


and they


brought


plantains and sometimes a cucumber.


was astonished-one whose


diamond


appreciation


tall and


very


and graciously


cucumber


mines.


were


" struck


describe, and


sincere.
me in


possessions had


Her gratefulness


sometimes


a way I


though I have not seen


cannot


"Princess


invited us into her home.


Though she was black,


Rhoda


again. I have inquired many times about


and her garments were rags, her manner was just
as regal as if she wore the jewels and silks of my
9 9 *


her, and each time I marvel more. A 1
recently that she dropped by to see the
-- . ------ __. j 1 .. T KJ D ... .. *.A


adv told us
"Princess"








THE CARIBBEAN


BEST POEM IN SENIOR


BEST POEM

SILILOQUY


CLASS


AT SUNSET


if.r~


Enfrud '52


AMin


moods


are like the waves


That play round the ship that's me


And then I'm carefree,


happy,


As are the bubbles in the spray.

But when the waves grow dark


Just as the sun over the western edge retires
The salty blue sea catches
The last ray of its splendor,
Melting its beauty in the tranquil waters.
Gentle and undisturbed, the waves roll on,
Lightly tossing the small sail-boats,
While the cool breezes
Whisper soft words to the placid waves.


grey,


And no one knows just how they lay,
Then I'm troubled and depressed
In the struggle to the crest.


What more can anyone wish


Than


But the mast of the sea,
Who is master over me
Guides my little ship at night


Until at last


I reach


to be living in


the Tropics


Bidding the sun good night
While being tossed about in a sail-boat?
Watching the sun's ray


the light.


Piercing


the shiny water


Converting it into a golden pool
That anyone would like to call his


BEST POEM IN JUNIOR


CLASS


FAIRIES
Irillhm Keenen


BEST POEM IN SOPHOMORE


CLASS


MY PAL. LIMON


Do you


wonder where the fairies are.


Er~e/yn


Johns'On


Whom folks


declare have vanished?


They're very near, and yet very far,
But they're neither dead nor vanished


Limon Bay is like a pal,
It is always at my side


Here in Fort


The ships


They live in the same green world


de Lesseps with
out on the tide.


As in by-gone ages


golden,


When I


And you enter in by the ancient way,


Through


an ivory gate and golden.


'Tis the land of dreams all fair and bright
And sought by many a rover,
But the heart must be pure and the conscience
To pass its threshold over.

Some night, when the sun in darkness dips,
We'll seek that dreamland golden,


And vou shall touch
That ivory gate and


with your finger-tips
golden.


get up in the dawning,


No matter how the night,
It is there beneath my window
Sparkling in the morning light.

Upon leaving the school building
Where I've studied all the day,
It is waiting there to greet me
O'er the road across the way.

Since my exercise is swimming.
It is with me when I play,
As I dive beneath the waters,


Of my good


pal, Limon


In the evening it is


dearest,


THE DRY


I ,. *


SEASON
Elmgren


WIND


For it drives away my woe
By reflecting all the changes of


The sunsets


after-glow.


The grass is dry,


not green like


yesterday.


The wind a haughty monarch is
That bows the trees before his scornful sway
The sky with fleeting clouds is spattered.


rw .. .


When I'm ready for my slumbers,
And the evening tasks are o'er
It soothes me off to dreamland
With its swish upon the shore.


S.II tL.. ~tU


own.










THE CARIBBEAN


A GRAY DAWN


Marlv


Ilcarne


NEVER


SAY CAN'T


SahAl'r


Cmv


skies, gray roofs and


gray


rain, too,


There's


a time to work and a time to play-


Blend in one monotonous hue.
The palms and all the other trees
Bend with rvthmic sway in the breeze.
The graceful branches bow in shame


As they are beaten by th


e ram.


The storm grows gradually less:


And also a time to rest:
But whether vou choose to work or to play
Be sure to do your best.


There are tasks that beckon and others that
And the latter are the ones that test;


trOwnI,


But the way of the cross is the way to the crown-


The way that insures your best.


The lightening streaks seem spiritless;
The mumbling thunder dies away.
But you know that some other day
There will be the wind and the rain


The trifler who weakens and sighs and says
Weakly bares a craven soul:


But th


e man that says


'Tis he who


attains


"I will!"-then boldly


1who cares
who cares.


dares-


the goal.


And the thund


er's dying refrain.


LIFE


Jame.s Hall


THE WANDERER


IRoger Hlowe*


I live to love,
And love to live


a gypsy,


And move with the breath of spring;
Oh, why build on a solid rock,


And view over and over the same


Upon this earth so grand
I love to do most everything
That's in the way of Man.


For one s


thing?


I'll pitch my tent in a garden
Beneath sapphire-tinted skies,
And worship at nature's altar,
Hindered not by worldly ties.


life is a short life:


And time it must go on:
It cannot wait for any man
But must continue, on and on!
If I were but a little bird
Up in the air I'd fly.
But even tho' I were a bird
My time would come to die-


I'll move when the spirit calls me,


In the open fields I'll


roam,


So why not stand and laugh
And fight it 'till you win?


at life;


Don't back


And wherever I place my tent
Is the place I'll call my home.


But take it on t


and say
he chin!


vou


re beat,


tf"

-C->"7I.


wander free as


FGI~q,?,l


'49







THE CARIBBEAN


SENIOR PARTY
Nell Wardlaw "52


On November 26th. the Seniors gave their
annual dance at the Strangers' Club. Of course
there was a large crowd, for wasn't it the Freshies'
first chance to go to a High School party!
Mr. Franks, our popular principal, was just
"one of the boys" that night, and the girls were
thrilled to have him cut in.
Dwyer's orchestra furnished the perfect dance
music and a good time was had by all-even
though we were full of turkey and cranberry
sauce.


SOPHOMORE LEAP YEAR DANCE
Betty Stetler' 34
When the curtain rose on the Soph's Leap Year
Dance at the Hotel Washington, February 26, at
eight o'clock, the atmosphere was one of a rather
strained, uneasy calm; but when it fell at midnight
it was with a very successful and very noisy
"bang!" For everyone agrees that it was the
most unusual and pleasing dance of the year.
Contrary to the general belief that women of
C. H. S. are shrinking little violets, they were
made of sterner stuff by reducing all males to a
lower level and by taking the wellknown upper
hand. They asked whomever they desired for
dances, wandered about the floor tagging reck-
lessly and never sat down-which all goes to show
what a peachy time the girls had.
The music provided by Welch and his Atlantic
Syncopators was "hotcha, hotcha" as was the tap
dance given by Stella Boggs and Lydia Gravatt.
Another feature of the evening was a "spot" dance
in which the couple who happened to be under or
over a certain spot at the end of the dance, won a
prize. The lucky couple who happened to be "on
the spot" were Barbara Weick and George Wertz,
both graduates of last year's class.
So harken, ye big brutes of Cristobal Hi, and
never under-estimate the fair ladies-for since
the hot time they gave you and themselves at the
Leap Year Dance,-THEY RATE.

THE FRESHMAN DANCE
Anna S. Reilly '36


types of clothing appropriate to hard times.
Following the seventh dance a breadline march
led by Richard Pretto, the president, and Mar-
garet Barnard, the vice-president, was held.
Ellen Greenleaf and Bruce Sanders, whose pathe-
tic costumes strongly appealed to the judges,
received a prize of one dollar to help them in their
hard times. Because of the success of the girls'
tag at the other school dances, the girls could not
resist the temptation to continue the habit. There
were also a few boys' tag dances, which have
recently become a custom. The music for this
"Hard Times" dance was furnished by Welch's
Orchestra.


"WHEN'S YOUR BIRTHDAY?"
Inez Theoktisto, '32


"When's Your Birthdav?" was the first three-
act play presented by the Cristobal High School
Dramatic Club. It was given at the Cristobal
Clubhouse, on March 19, for the benefit of the
Junior Class. The play was directed by Miss
Gladys Kimbro, who did a very good job of it,
with the aid of a cast that worked with much good
will, and did what they were told to do without
friction.
The story of this play revolves around a gypsy
girl who wanders into a staid New England home
and upsets all the people. All the incidents
resulting from this make this play a comedy long
to be remembered. The players all gave their
best, and represented each character very well.
The list of characters are:
Ann Parsons....................Alice Gormely
Malory Dwight ............. ..... Paul Dignam
Aunt Nabby Nash ............Helen Aanstoos
Timothy Gale ............ Charles Goodenough
Nick Jameson ........ .....-- ------Jesse Sinclair
Leonora .........----------...............Inez Theoktisto
Ben Ali ............ ............... ......Alvin Lyew
Clara Dwight............--......... ..--Velta Foley
Lindy Nash........... ...... .......Dona Eaton
The play would not have succeeded if the follow-
ing had not contributed their help:
Prompter..----....................... Vivien Elmgren
Costume and Make-up....... Eleanor Reinhold
Stag Craft..................................Nell Wardlaw








THE CARIBBEAN


GIRLS'


LETTER CLUB


r


+-S.


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Ih..4


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" S


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BOYS' LETTER CLUB


t~ ~
-~;7c" ~jrj~







THE CARIBBEAN


CRISTOBAL HIGH


SCHOOL DEBATING CLUB


132deIa Otrja


The Debating Club has


organized and a
and importance.


been completely


s a result has grown both in size
A new constitution was adopted


by the club and has proved itself a valuable


asset.


The work of the Club has been greatly aided by
the efficient spon: orship of Mr. Hackett and under
his supervision, meetings are held in a business-like
manner.
The meetings of the club are held the first and


submitted to them, and the approximate date has
been selected.
Officers
President .-.....-...............-- -Ernest de la Ossa
Vice-president ......... ...........Harvey Smith
Sec'y.-Treas ......... .. .............. Elsie Neely
Sponsor ............ ..Mr. Roger Hackett

Members


third Wednesdays of


every


has held one practice debate.


month.


The Club


The debaters who


1rl~l,,,:, ai,..rr A 1-' 11 'ii nfl nf


Ernest de la Ossa
Elsie Neely


Harvey Smith
Fabian Englander








THE CARIBBEAN

THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT


ACC /4


The Cristobal High School Glee Clubs show a


the results are amazing.


marked improvement


over


year


and Miss


The orchestra must be mentioned also.


There


Elner deserves full credit for her splendid work.
We boast of thirty-eight me nbers in the Girls'


Club and twenty-five in the Bovs' Club.


However


are many new members this vear.


Some of the


most unusual sounds often escape from Room 2,
harmonious and otherwise.


it may be added


that together with quantity we


actvvivt~'


the Glee


Clubs


and Orchestra


have quality which is of great importance.


girls meet every


Tuesday and Friday while


boys meet every Monday and Thursday.
The girls are doing archipello work this year;


participated in w
Club in March.
Next year we s


as a program for the Woman's


incerelv hope the music depart-


ment will showv even more improvement although


that is, singing without piano.


Believe it or not


they will


have to work hard to do so.


BOYS' GLEE CLUB


t


. 1es3


r







THE CARIBBEAN


ITHE EFFE KUBE CLUB


Colin Campbell


The Effe Kube


Klub


the dramatic club of the


Spencer


and the


Advisor,


Wieck.


under classmen, has the honor of being the first


organized dramatic clul
School. The Club was


the Cristobal


organized by the class of


under the direction of Mrs. Spencer.


The object of the Effe Kube Klub


is to secure


ease m speaking and to develop dramatic ability.
To attain this object, the Club has presented two
groups of one act plays, is preparing for a two act
play and is planning to present another group of
one act plays.


"Gassed,"


"Who


"The


's Afraid?"


Trick


of the


Trade,


were presented in our first group


The Offi
President-


cers are:


.. Colin


Campbell


Vice-President--------....... Elizabeth Hayes


Secretary...................


.-......Ruth Pickett


Treasurer ................ .......... Charles


South


Chairman of Dramatics .. ...Mary Hearne
The members are:


Harry Anderson
Blanche Belden
Charles Belden
Mabelle Bliss


Maxine Hoffman
Carlton Horine
dna Mueller


Arthur Plath


of plays this year at the Army and Navy Y.M.C.A.


on December 12.
"The Red Lamp


was a success in every way.


a two act play


is going to be


Stella Boggs
Aimee Day
Anne Gibson


Richard Reinhold
Dorothy Roos
William Stone


I








THE CARIBBEAN


CATH


S. ORCHESTRA


GIRLS' GLEE CLUB


"K
~rr


;$lb


ii ts~j



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I 4


w rmBmi
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THE CARIBBEAN


THE


NATIONAL


THESPIAN


SOCIETY


Dona Eaton,


On December


1931,


Miss Kimbro called


a meeting of all Juniors and Seniors interested in


drama in order to form a club.
goal as an aim for the club,


She had


a definite


which was that it


should become part of a great national organiza-


group adheres strictly to the rules given us by the
Thespian Society. The requirements to become
a real member of the society, rather than a troupe


member, are


very


club have fulfilled


strict, and only 13 people in our
all of them. However, some of


tion of High School dramatic clubs.


This society


them are


Juniors this year, and they intend to


was the National Thespian Society of High School


carry on the work started by


Miss Kimbro next


Dramatics, and there are many clubs all


over


year.


We hope, eventually, to become a strong


United States belonging to this organization.


organization,


and we thank


Kimbro


From


Troupe 21


the beginning


we have been known


of the National Thespians, and our


arousing our interest in something we may never
have known about, were it not for her.


THE GIRL RESERVE SUPPER CLUB
Edua Thirwall '33


On the evening of the first


Friday in


every


enjoyable program,


consisting


of musical solos,


month, the Y. W. C. A.


is the meeting place of the


readings, talks, and dances.


Girl Reserves Supper Club.


Each year a girl is sent to Camp in the States.


First the business meeting is conducted, and all


Everyone works


very


hard during the year in


old and new business discussed.


The president,


order to raise money to send this girl to the States.


Gladys Bliss,


takes charge of the meeting with


Miss Van Every as the advisor.


Many activities


such as picnics, boat rides, and hikes are discussed
and voted upon.
After the business meeting a supper is served


by one of the committees.


and serves its


songs


When


mittee


own supper.


Each committee plans


During the supper


are sung, and there is much fun and hilarity.


the supper is over the program Com-


takes charge.


There


is always


a very


Many card parties, fashion


shows and food sales


are given, and in that way money is raised. At
the end of the term, the delegate is voted upon


and given


her passage


to Camp.


trip is


wonderful for any girl and so they all work very
hard all during the year to see which one will
receive the honor of going to Camp.
The Club is very popular and the girls are very
interested in it. This year there are forty-nine
members.


O. G. A.
Alary Deans'"


The "0. G.


ized b


A." (Order of Gregg Artists), organ-


Miss Patterson our


commercial teacher,


is a Club for the members of the Advanced Short-


hand class only.


At our first meeting, it


was agreed upon to have


weekly meetings every Thursday afternoon.


officers


for the


year


were


following students hold offices:


also elected.


Alice Gormely,


D4.~T1^.Lf L i f, WL Vn x: f 2n.N


* 1


ing. A snort wnue after our .IUD was organized,
Miss Patterson took us up to Mount Hope to
visit the Commissary office. This visit was


stimulating


as many


things


interest


to the


commercial students are to be seen there:


Every month we


Writer
dents.


receive copies of "The Gregg


a monthly magazine for shorthand stu-


magazine


contains


contests


articles of interest to the commercial students,


A 1 1 I 1 Ps C'1 1









THE CARIBBEAN


O. G. A.


a S lQ


it"b






1'c
4


4~~





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I.!.


'it


L~rr dlilr


"ie.


SPANISH CLUB


--I
-.- Iso
mr


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ai w
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23:)4i'Lii







THE CARIBBEAN


THE BOYS'


ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION


B. aeIa Osva


The boys


' Athletic Association of 1931-32 has


functioned with more efficiency than at any time


Most of these improvements are largely due to
the influence of Mr. Vinton, the B. A. A. sponsor.


in the past.
with almost


Money has rolled into its treasury


every


business undertaking and the


The Association


of the men


was also aided by the good work


teachers


in coaching the different


Association has taken


over many new responsi-


teams


and by the splendid cooperation


of the


abilities.


principal, Mr. Franks.


The meetings of the Association have been held


regularly on the second and fourth


of every month.


Wednesday


The school as a whole has shown


real interest in the B. A. A.


Proof of this


as seen


Smin the attendance at the inter-scholastic games
and in the regular payment of dues. Every B.A. A.


member upon


payment


of his dues received a


season pass to all games.
Several changes have taken place in the Asso-


At the beginning of the school year an election
of officers was held. The following officers were
elected:


President..........------. Randolph


Wikingstad


Vice-President ..---..........Harry Egolf


Secretary ............. ...........Herman


Roos


Treasurer ......................James Hayden
The officers of the Athletic Association are


ciation.


The G. A. A. and B. A. A. are now one


follows:


organization.


The Athletic


Association.


two bodies were joined in order to obtain better
cooperation.
A few of the more athletically inclined were


of the opinion that it


was not fair that any student


when he had joined the B. A. A. should be on
equal rating with the letter men. For this reason,
the athletes automatically became members of a


Varsity Club when they receive their


sport.


in any


President...........---- Randolph Wikingstad


Vic-President
Secretary.........
Ass't. Secy.............


.......Gladvs


........ ..Betty Stetler
............... Herman Roos


Treasurer. ..-. -- ....-....James Hayden


Ass't.


Treas .......... Ruth Wikingstad'


The results of the varsity Club election were:


President.....--......... Randolph


Sec'y.-Treas...


J


Wikingstad
Iesse Sinclair


ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION







THE CARIBBEAN


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THE CARIBBEAN


DRAMATIC CLUB


Inez 7heoklirlo,


This year Miss Gladys Kimbro introduced the
Dramatic Club into Cristobal High School. The
purpose of this Club is to encourage dramatics in
the high school.


Our club


has thirtv-nine members.


Regular


cast.


The coach for this play was Verona tlerman.


The parents present see-red to get a great deal of
enjoyment out of it.
The Dramatic Club took upon itself to present
a three-act play for the benefit of the Junior Club.


meetings are held on the first and third Wednes-


The name of it was


"When s


Your Birthdav?"


of the


business
usually


m


meeting
a play


onth.
g, ar


The first is generally


id the second


a program,


given by some of the members.


We have had much success, considering our late
start, and we hope to continue this success all
through the years.


The first one-act play:


"The Prairie Doll"


given at the American Legion hall.


ing poor stage equipment,


though its


being free may


to do with the crowd.


Dona


Eaton,


was


Notwithstand-


it was a success,


had something


The characters in it were


Wright,


and Jesse


Alice Gormelv was coach.


I Sinclair.
was later


given for the Eastern Star with Antonio Fernandez
in Jack Wright's place.


TOur second one-act play


"Washington's


This club is


plans,


Troop 217


and we have


members of


of the National Thes-


recently


the club


VweFr


installed
eligible.


group now consists of an inner circle and will have
social meetings at night, in sore member's house.
We hope to have some more members eligible as


the play


"Hannah Gives


characters, Elizabeth


Thornton,


Notice


will give


Verona Herman,


Evelyn Wright, and Vivien Elmgren enough units


to be members.


This play was coached bv Betty


Stahler.
The credit for making this club a success is due
to Miss Kimbro, whose patience and good nature


has made possible such


cooperation.


The officers of this Club are:


Defeat."


was given at the Y. W. C. A. on February


President


. Nell Wardlaw


Nell Wardlaw,


Tommv


Rankin and


Betty


Vice-President


- Henrv


Stahler were the cast, and this play was coached
by Vivian Elmgren.


Secretary


Theoktisto


Treas. and Business Manager..Oscar Heilbron


On Parent's


Visiting Day the Dramatic Club


presented a play, again at the American Legion
hall, called "Red Carnations." Eleanor Reinhold,


Program s
Research


Out last and biggest


....... .Velta Folev


Vivien Elm


iob of


vcear
ri


green
is the


Howard


Engleke,


and Herman


were


Senior play


"Who's Boss.


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THE CARIBBEAN


lB ROYS' ATHLETICS

Joe JIbdon '32
S. ...._____


- ~ ~ -------~ ~


SOCCER R
Our fourth year of soccer was the
best that we have ever had, although


we met with defeat,


we succeeded in


winning two games out of five,


a higher


average than was ever attained byv
previous soccer team of C.H.S.
owe much of our success this year


our coach,


V. E. Seller.


The varsity team consisted
fallowing players:
G. Tarflinger -Goalkeeper
R. Wheeler-R. Fullback
M. Wheeler--L. Fullback
J. Eberenz -C. Halfback
A. Forstrom--R. Halfback
H. Egolf -R. Halfback
J. Ebdon -L. Halfback


E. Wertz


of the


-L. Halfback


R. Wikingstad -L. End
L. Tipton -L. Forward


C. Pescod


(Capt.) -C. F


Forward


M. Marchosky -R. Forward
T. Rankin--R. End


C. Berger -R.


Halfback (sub)


J. Lockwood --L. Halfback


R. Stevenson -L. Halfback (sub)
C. Kariger -R. Halfback (sub)
The first game of the soccer series
was played October 24, 1931 at Balboa.
Balboa started out as if they meant


business by scoring


Cristobal could


two goal


tally one.


s before
Balboa's


lirst goal carr.e in the first quarter when
A. Salterio booted a goal past Cristo-


hal's goalkeeper,


Tarflinger, and their


second goal came in the second quarter


,vhen De la


Pena scored on a penalty


This seemed to warm Cristobal


up and R.
al s first
quarter wl


Wikingstad
ail near the


scored Crasto-
end of second


he shot the ball


goalkeeper Judson of Balboa.


SOt
ilu:'rt
l~ cU) F


)n


after the opening of the third


er L.
(d goal I


Soon after


Cra.'StOI)Ail


Tipton scored Cristball


bv


placing one past


this M. Marchos v


third go:Al.


Judson.
scored


The score re- of I


which won the first game


series for C.H.S. by the score of 4-3.
The second game was played the
following Saturday on Cristobal's home


ground.


Cristobal won by the score of


4-2. Cristobal scored two goals


first half before


in the


Balboa could tally.


Cristobal duplicated this performance


in the second half,


scoring


two goals


before Balboa scored their second goal.
Both teams were so anxious to keep
the other team from scoring that they
both used rough tactics.
C. Pescod, L. Tipton, and R. Wik-
ingstad each scored one goal for Cristo-
bal. G. Walker of Balboa in an error


kicked the fourth goal
M. De la Pena scored a g


Balboa showed


for Cristobal.
oal for Balboa.
team work in


game.


Balboa won the third game on No-


member 7,


score


at Balboa bv the overwhelm-


of 13-2.


game


was


played on a muddy field and Balboa


showed


that they were mud-horses.


Both Cristobal's
cracked in this gar


offense and defense
ne. The score at the


end of the first half was 7-2 in favor of
Balboa. Cristobal scored both of her
points at the beginning of the third
quarter.
In the second half Balboa picked up


where they left


while


holding


off and scored six points


Cristobal


Cristobal never seemed to


scoreless.
be able to


keep the ball when they had possession
of it. T. Rankin and L. Tipton scored
Cristobal's two goals.
The fourth soccer game was played


at Cristobal on November


evened


Crisitobal.


game,


series


Balboa


by defeating


The score was 3-1.


like the third game, was


in the rain.


This
played


Balboa scored once in each


of the first three quarters.


scored
De la


Cristobal


its lone goal in the third quarter.


Pena and G.


Walker


Balboa's first two goals.


scored


The third


for Balboa came when M. Wheeler


Cristobal got mixed up


in a scrim-


game was marked by team
part of both teams.
The fifth and deciding


play on the


soccer series was played at Balboa on


November 21.


game by the score
fourth consecutive


Balboa won this


So, for the
Balboa has


been the interschool soccer champion.
This game was played on a dry field
which was a marked difference to the


two preceding


games.


started out at full speed and the


teams
whole


first half was marked by furious playing


on the part of each.


end of the first half was 3-0 in favor of
Balboa.


In the second half Cristobal


completely to pieces.
seven points while I


only one.


Balboa
Cristobal


Cristobal seemed to be over-


went
scored
scored


trained for this


game.


quarter they were so tired they could
hardly run. T. Rankin scored Cristo-


ball's one i


A. Salterio


Walker scored three goals


while
second


Salterioa


by scoring


ran them
twice. T


two Balboa scores were made
Dew and M. De la Pena.


I


BOYS'


and G.
Balboa
a close
ie other
by M.


BASEBALL


Joe Ebdon '52


The first baseball game of this


series was played at Balboa,


12, 1931.


Yeaf I


December


Cristobal defeated Balboa


the score of


Balboa scored the first run in the


second inning when


Corrigan


over second, stole second,


singled
I came


home on an overthrow.
Cristobal tied the score in the first


of the sixth.


Pescod singled past third.


He then stole second and reached third


on an overthrow.


fielder's


choice


He scored


second.
Balboa took the lead again in the


on a


seventh inning.
on a single. MA


kle hit


Judson
cGroarty v


over "short


sending Judson


reached first
talked. Jun-
iding Judson


Iick.


~ ^^^


i


game


U";rtz


1


sen


nF the


of the


The scare at the


In the last


when


O\reT '"shorl


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THE CARIBBEAN


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THE CARIBBEAN


inning


when


Dombrowskv


ninth inning and turned the tables on


Balboa.


Alberga,


stad got on base.


scored
second.
third.


when


Finnegan


37

Pos ab


singled


was caught


Pescod brought Finnegan home


when he knocked a fast one past third.
He reached third and came home on an


overthrow to home.


Pos ab r


CRISTOBAL
Alberga
Ebdon
Wicky
Finnegan
Pescod
Wirtz
Egolf
Tarflinger
Rankin

Total

BALBOA
De la Pena
Stoudner
Specht
Barkhurst
Corrigan
Dombroskv
Judson D.
McGroarty
Kunkel
Devw


Total


Second


h po


walked,


stole second, and went to third on an


overthrow to second.


him home with


a intp;


7 9


Game


The second game of the series was
p!;yed December 19, 1931 at Cristobal.
For the second time Cristobal defeat-


ed Balboa.


The score was 6-1.


Kunkel started for Balboa but he
was niched for six hits and five runs in


the first four
relieved by D


innings.


to two hits and no runs the


was


live innings


he was in the box.
Cristobal scored three runs in the


third inning.
were thrown


Marchosky and Alberga


out at first.


Ebdon


. .


third and


Eberenz


by Wicking-


Balboa scored their lone tally in the


Corrigan reached first on
He scored when ludson


made


Total


Finnegan


runners


it an easy win


Kunkel started for


taken


out after the fourth


Cristobal scored four runs in


went


when


Pescod


doubled.


In the fourth inning Cristobal


score.


walked,


struck


con-
out,
sacri-


Ebdon, and Wiking- ficed, Alberga was hit by pitched ball


and Ebdon singled,


0 0


5 29


Total


r h


0 0


0 0


0 0 0


2 11


4 0


for C


the


8 27


Third 'Game


The third game of the


series


played at Balboa on January 9, 1932.
For the third consecutive time, Cris-


tobal came out victorious.
Hard hitting, with the aid of many


first


second and sixth
get only five hits
The highlights
two fast double


Cristobal


innings.


s off Pescod.
of the game


came


They could


were the


plays that Balboa


succeeded in making.


CRISTOBAL
Eberenz
Marchosky
Ebdon


r h


1 11


Pescod


T'arflinger
Wikingstad
Egolf
Alberga
Wheeler

Total

BALBOA
Stoudner
De la Pena
Corrigan
Kunkel
Dew
Judson W.
Judson D.
McGroarty
Barkhurst
Dombrosky


0 0


3 0


5 0 0


Pos
SS-3b
rf
cf
P
P
ss
3b

If
lb


9 9

r h
0 0


0 0


0 0
0 1


0 0 0 0


4 0


Total


4 23


Fourth Game
Balboa played Cristobal at Cristobal


on January 16.


game when


Balboa won its first


it defeated


Cristobal 8-6.


1 Although outhit 15-6, Balboa took
0 advantage of all the breaks and man-


aged to score enough


inning


Balboa took the lead in the first


inning,
walk.


runs in the last


strong


in their half and scored three runs on


four hits.


Balboa tied the score in the


second and went ahead in the third.
In the fifth Balboa added one more run


to give them a 5-3
again went into the


Cristobal


lead in the sixth


when they scored three runs.


In the ninth
Balboa doubled


inning, McGroarty of
through short, Dew


dumped one in front of the plate, both


runners being safe a
in fielding the ball.


s Pescod was slow
Dombrosky fouled


Judson brought
ast third.


scored


Cristbalstarted the fireworks in the tinued


to second.


Alberga and Ebdon


Wirtz


Wikingstad


Marchosky


ast Alberga scored on a single
off stad.


scoring


Eberenz.


fifth inning. 1
Ebdon's error.


doubled to right.


8 4 1 0 0 0 0
3 4 1 3 14 0 1
5 4 0 0 0 1 4


2 5 1 1 12


1 5 2 2 0 1 7
7 3 0 0 0 0 0
6 4 0 1 2 1 6
9 4 0 0 2 0 1
4 4 0 0 0 0 2


BALBOA
Stoudner
De la Penn
Specht
Kunkel
Corrigan
Dombrosky
Judson J.
ludson W
McGroarv
Dew


5 9 27


2 0
1 0


7 5 0 0 2 0 0
6 4 0 0 1 1 5

9 4 0 0 1 0 0
8 2 1 1 0 0 0
3 2 1 1 3 0 0
5 3 1 1 3 2 0
2 3 0 1 3 1 0
1 3 1 1 0 3 1
1 1 0 0 0 0 0
1100000


CRISTOBAL
SAlberga
Tarflinger
Wheeler
Ebdon
Wikingstad
Finnegan
Pescod
Egolf
Wirtz


Agnew
Eberenz
Marchoskv


4 5 27


0 0


0 0 12


to nose out Cristobal.


scoring one run on a hit and a


Kunkel


who held Cristobal


errors on the part of the Balb


Balboa,


oa team,
Iristobal.
but was
inning.
I,1'


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THE CARIBBEAN


BALBOA
Stoudner
Corrigan
De la Pena
Kunkel
Specht
Judson \V.
McGroartvy
Dew
Dombroskyv


0 0o
1 1
2 1


o BALBOA
1 Stoudner


Corrigan
Kunkel


De la


4 0
4 0


2 0


Pena


1 Specht


0 15
6 27


Total


CRISTOBAL
Eberenz
Wikingstad
Ebdon
Pescod
Egolf
Alberga
Tarf;inger
Ranlkin
Wheeler
Mlarchosky
Total


r h


0 2


A n 0n


'A


6 15


Fifth Game


On January


Balboa


defe


Cristobal for the second conseci


time.


The score was 4-1.


I
11
27


rated
utive


Mike Dew of Balboa and Charlery
Pescod of Cristolbl staged a brilliant


pitcher


battle


innings of the game


for the first


s


even


Pescod cracked


in the eighth when 1Bdboa scored three
runs on four hits.
Cristonil scored its lone run in the


third inning.


run oni
another


Marchoskv scored this


a single, a stolen


base, and


sing.e.


Judson W.
McGroarty
Dew
D mbroskyv


Total


0 0


2 0


0 13
4 27


Sixth Game


On January 30, Cristobal won the
Baseball championship for the second


consecutive year.


The score was 6-4.


The game was called on account of
rain at the end of the fifth inning.


Balboa took


the lead in the first


inning, scoring one run on three hits.
In this inning they didn't seem to have


any trouble in hitting Pescod'


Balboa continued


the s<
scored


second


s offerings.


their scoring


and third innings


three mo


re runs.


Balboa a lead of 4-0.
The Cristobal team came to life in
their half of the third and scored five


runs.,


By takin


g advantage


of the


breaks and by hard hitting Cristobal
forged into the lead for the first time.
Cristobal strengthened their lead in the
last ol the fourth by scoringanother ran.
By some fast fielding, Balboa was
shut out in the first of the fifth. The


game


was called at the end of this


inning because of
of the field after


the poo


r con


edition


the rain.


BALBOA


Balboa tied the score in the sixth Stoudner


inning.


Stoudner led off with a


and stole second.


single
scored.


Co:rigan sent a long


to left field on which Stoudner


In the eighth


runs.


in fling


Balboa


scored


After Dew had singled and


Dombroskv


tripled


to right,


Dombroskv.
with a single.
CRISTOBAL
Eberenz
Marchoskv
Wikingstad
Pescod


Kunk


walked,
scoring
el scored


Stoudner


Stoudner


r h


Ebdon


Egolf


Corrigan
Kunkel


De la Pena
Specht
iudson I.
Judson W.
McGroart v
Dew
Dombrosky
Total
CRISTOBAL
Eberenz
Marchosky
Ebdon
Alberga
Pescod
Egolf


2 0


0 0


0 0 0 0


0 0


0 0 0


0 0


7 12


0 0


1 3
0 0


BOYS' SWIMMING
,Joe Ebdon 32


The inter-scholactic swimming meet
between Cristobal High School and
Balboa High was held at Balboa on


March 19. 1952.
defeated Cristobal,
first place.


Balboa decisively


winning


The Balboa High School


every


boys a-


massed a total of 58 points against the
12 scored by the Cristobal High School
bovs.


events,


were run
follows:


the order in which they


off, and


the winners are as


50-yd. Free


1. B. Smith (B.)
2. H. Smith (C.)
3. T. Alley (B.)
50-.ud. Back Stroke
1. B. Crandall (B.)
2. B. Hollowell (C.)
3. W. Grant (B.)


S/rn Ic


1. 1. Westendarff (B.)
2. B. Onderdonk (B.)
5. F. Washabaugh (C.)


antl~


D~bng


1. H. Brewerton (e
2. B. Crandll (B.)
3. E. Neal (C.)


22-gd0~.


Free Slyle


1. H. Brewerton (B.)
2. B. Onderdonk (.)
3. H. Raphael (B.)


100-ld. Free


1. W. Grant (B.)
2. H. Smith (C.)
3. H. Egolf(C.)


I 76-jriL.


Balboa (Crandall, Westendorff, and
Smith).
176 Relay


Balboa


Grant,


Piper,


JUDGES:


V. E. Seller,


Wardlaw, Bev. Turner.


JUD08ES:


P. E. Miller,


Emma Van Clief, C. Walters, and H.
J. Greiser.
BOYS' TENNIS


BnarEt


31 cL~dl y


(Peterson,


Brewerton).


(Cristobal)


(Balboa)











THE CARIBBEAN


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THE CARIBBEAN


all the singles, and Cristobal all the
doubles.
The results were:

No. 1 Singles


Dew (BHS) defeated Pescod


(CHS)


7-5, 3-6,


No. 2


Booth


(BHS)


Singeated
defeated


Wheeler


(CHS)


No. 3 Singles.
Heurtematte (BHS) defeated Birnie
(CHS) 6-3, 6-3.


N.I


Forsstrom
feated Grant


Dote tic.


and Rankin (CHS) de-


and de la


Pefia


(BHS)


6-3, 6-4.


Eberenz
feated H
(BHS) 9-7


No. 2 Doubles
and Slocum


endrickson
', 4-6, 6-4.


SECOND


MEET


(CHS)


Morales




:ristobal
d tennis
\7, 1932.
Balboa
he meet


Balboa High School and C
High School played their second


meet


at Balboa on February 2


For the second straight time
came out victorious, winning t
four matches to one.
The results were:

No 1 ,Sinrles


Dew (BHS) defeated Pescod (CHS)
3-6, 6-0, 6-3.


No. 2 Singler
M. Wheeler defeated Booth
2-6, 10-8, 7-5.
No 3 Singles
Huertematte (BHS) defeated
(CHS) 6-1, 3-6, 7-5.

No. 1 Doubles
De la Pefia and Hendrickson
defeated Forsstrom and Rankin
6-0, 4-6, 6-4.

No. 2 Doubles


Morales
Lock wood


and Grant (BHS) del


and Slocum


(CHS)


(BHS)


Lvew


BHS)
CHS)



heated
3-6,


TrnmaD MEET


On March


a, 1932 Balboa


School and Cristobal High


for the third time.


School met


For the third time


Pescod


(CHS)


defeated


The first basketball game


quarter


Booth


(BHS)


'l ,9 QJ(El


Wheeler


matte


(CHS)


defeated


Huerte-


6-3, 5-7, 7-5.


No<. 3 Singiles


Hendrickson (BHS) defeated
(CHS) 6-2, 8-6.


No. 1 Double.i


Morales
Forsstrom
2-6, 6-4.


De 1
feated


a Penia
Eberenz


(BHS) de-


between


Balboa and Cristobal was played April
2, 1932 at Cristobal. Cristobal defeated
Balboa by the close score of 15-13. The


feature


of this


game


was the wonderful


guarding of both teams.
Balboa started out.like they weren't


going to


give Cristobal a chance.


completely outplayed Cristobal in this


quarter, scoring
ing Cristobal to


In the second


Cristobal


turned the tables on Balboa. Cristobal


scored four points while


succeed


in scoring


score at the end


6-5 favor Cristobal.


The heaviest


was in


the third


amassed a total of six points in this
quarter. The lead in this quarter kept
going back and forth between the two
teams.
The fourth quarter was marked by
close guarding on the part of both


teams.


p


in this quarter and Balboa scored


GAMn


points
two.


SUM 'MA RY


ISTOBAL:


Name


T. Rankin
W. Wheeler
C. Pescod
M. Wheeler
R. WVikingstad


FG Fou


2 0


Balboa didn't


a marker.


of the


game


BALBOA:


Name


Me Groartv


De la
Hele


FG Fouls TP
0 0 0
0 0 0


Penia


0 0


Barkhurst


Bleakly
Salterio


0 0 0


Michelson
Spects
Dew


0 0


0 0 0


ime,


Second


winning


Game


Balboa and Cristobal met for


second
1932.
this gp


Balboa


on April


series


score


by the


of 18-15.
Cristobal started out strong in the


scored


points and Balboa scored four


came


strong


eight
points.
in the


Balboa


second


quarter Cristobal was still on the long


end of the


of the


score.


quarter was 11-9.


The end of the third
the two teams battling


found


on even teams.


But in the fourth quarter Cristobal
weakened for a few minutes and Balboa
succeeded in overcoming a one point


lead.


made


before the game was over and when the


whistle blew


three point lead.


GAME


CRISTOBAL


Name
Rankin
Eberenz


Pescod


0 0 0


2 0


M. Wheeler


Ebdon


Marchosky
XWikingst.ad
Egolf


Totals


0 2


0 0 0
0 0 0
0003
0003


3 15


BjALBOA:


Name


FG Fouls TP


Stoudner
He!e


De la


0 0 0


Pefia


R~eallv


Barkhurst
Michelson


Balboa still


enjoyed


No. 1 Singles.


and Grant (BHS) defeated


and Rankin


(CHS)


2IaT 2 Ihndiles


Totals 4 5 13


and Arrovo


and Birnie (CHS) 6-0,


time at


BASKETBALL


Balboa evened up the


quarter.


quarter.


But at the end of this


second


The score at the end


five points while hold-
two points.


quarter


Balboa


of this quarter


another


scoring
quarter.


Both teams


SUMMARY


Cristobal scored three


0 0


R.G. 0 0 0


_I II








TI IE CARIBBEAN


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THE CARIBBEAN


Third Game
The third game of the series was
played at Balboa on April 23, 1932.


Cristobal
eating I


won its second


3alboa


most interesting


17-11.


game,


This was the


of the first three


games.
Balboa took the lead in the first
quarter but Cristobal came back in


the second quarter and tied the


Cristobal forged ahead in


score.


the third


quarter and went into the fourth quar-
ter with a one point lead.
Then the fireworks started. Cristo-
bal made a field goal but Balboa soon
evened up the score with a foul shot
and a spectacular field goal by Kunkel.


Then


with only


two minutes


Marchosky made two long field


and Pescod one.


minutes


Cristobal


In these last
completely


classed Balboa.


GAME


SUMMARY


CRI

Name
R a ali n
Rankin
Pescod
Fbdon


FG Fouls


0 0 0


Marchoskv
Egolf
Wikingstad


0 0 0


0 0


Totals


3 17


BALBOA:


De la Peiia
Stoudner
Bleakly


Kunkel


2 0


0 0 0
0 0 0


Spects
Michelson
Barkhurst
Dew


0 0


Fourth Game


The fourth game of the series


played at Balboa on May
Cristobal won this game by


was


7, 1932.


score


of 26-20.
In the first quarter Ciistnbal out-
played Balboa. Balboa was continually
muffing the ball and they were not able


to stop Cristobal's fast and accurate
passes. The score at the end of the
first quarter was 8-3 in favor of Cristo-
bal.
Cristobal continued to increase their


lead in the second quarter.


The score


at the end of the second quarter


was


14-6 in favor of Cristobal.
In the third quarter Balboa started


to play
Cristobal.
eleven p


and they


outscored


points


while


game


Cristobal


amassing a total of five points. Cris-
tobal was still in the lead at the end of
this quarter by the close score of 19-17.
At this point of the game each team
had a good chance to win. For a few
minutes in this quarter the score re-


mained
minutes


close
of th


the Cristobal


team found the range of the basket
and when the whistle blew Cristobal


was on the long end of a 26-20


GAME


score.


SUMMARY


CRISTOBAL:


Name
Rankin
Pescod
Ebdon


Pos. FG


Wikingstad
Wood


Fouls TP


0 0


March
Egolf


Totals


4 26


BALBOA:


Name


Fouls TP


De la Penia
McGroarty
Stoudner
Ilele
Barkhurst
Kunkel
Dewv
Salterio
Bleakleyv
Speckts
Mlichelson


0 3


3 0 6
000 i


0 0


0 0
2 0


Totals


6 20


Fifth Game


On May 13, 1932 Cristobal


won


Interscholastic Basketball Champion-


ship of the Canal Zone.


21-13.


The score was


Cristobal went into the lead in


the first quarter and held it until the
end of the game.
Cristobal outscored Balboa in the


first quarter.


Some fast passing


shooting enabled Cristobal


keep ahead in this quarter.
Cristobal continued to outplay Bal-
boa in the second quarter and at the
end of the half we were on the long end


of an 11-5 score.


Cristobal's defense


was a little too much for Balboa.


The
showed


quarter


Balboa


of really playing basket-


ball was in the third quarter when they


outscored Cristobal.


This quarter was


featured by close guarding.
Cristobal continued its good work


in the last


quarter,


and when


whistle blew we were on the long end
of a 21-13 score and were champions
for the second consecutive year.


GAME


SUMMARY


CRISTOBAL:


h'Jrl


FG Fouls TP


Rankin
M. Wheeler
Pescod
Ebdon
Marchosky
Ezolf


Totals


BAlBOA:


Barkhurst
Hele
Dew
Bleaklev
Kunkel
De la Pena
Michelson
Speckts


Totals


0 0


2 10


5 21


Thev collected a total of


but in the last few


0 0 0
0 0 0


7 13


e













THE CARIBBEAN


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THE CARIBBEAN


U~

GIRLS' ATHLETICS
Gladyrs' B trs
8 3 _________________________ ______________ ________________


VOLLEY BALL
Fon 1931-32


The girls started


off their


sports


program this year with volleyball.


the absence of Miss


coach,
Fort,


Bailey,


our regular


Miss Smart substituted.


attended


practice


after the first and second varsity team


were chosen,


the rest of the girls were


divided into four teams.


were the Lucky


Seven,


These teams


S


Double Four, and Shooting


select
Stars.


A series of five games was played


against


Balboa, the team winning the


majority of the games being champion.
The first of the interschool games of
the season was played at the Cristobal
Playshed, October 51. Cristobal started
out fine, winning the first game 21-8,
but dropped in the next two games.
The scores were 21-10 and 21-16 in


favor


of Balboa.


Cristobal held good


passwork in the first game,


ened in the next two.


to return
they were
Cristobal


Balboa's sv


served.
were:


but weak-


We weren't
rift balls


Those playing for


Gladys


Bliss (Cap-


Elizabeth Hayes, Mabelle Bliss,


Stetler,
Pickett,


Margaret


Ruth
Eileen


Wickingstad,
Donovan and


Reinhold.


2nd. Game


On November 7, the


girls journeyed


Wickingstad.


Helen


Aanstoos


and Dorothy Birkland.
4th. Game


The fourth


game


was played


Balboa, November 21. The


games were


fast and the passwork of both teams


was well worth


ment


longing.


teams were in excellent condition. The
first game was won by Cristobal 21-18.
Balboa took the next two games 21-10


and 21-15.


The same line-up was used


as in the third game.
5th. Game
As Balboa won the toss-up, Cristobal
went to Balboa again, November 28.


Cristobal started out fine,


first game 21-19.
we weakened and


third
again,


game we
but after a


winning


In the second game


lost
foun


21-10.
d our


hard strugg


game ended in Balboa's


Those


playing


favor


were Gladvs


In the
stride
le the
23-21.
Bliss,


Maybelle Bliss, Elizabeth Haves, Helen


Aanstoos,


Ruth


Wickingstad,


when Stetler, Ruth Pickett, Stella


Margaret


BOge


Betty
gs and


Reinhold.


Balboa won the


having


9 games to


Cristobal had only


Volley Ball


series


their credit, while
6.


BASKET BALL


The Cristobal


School


Girls'


Basket Ball Team with their Captain,


to Balboa to play their second game. j Gladys Bliss, started the season with


Cristobal was again defeated,


Balboa


winning all three games 21-12,
and 21-19. Cristobal didn't play u
their standard. However, in the t
game they showed some real spirit.


was anybody's
point was made.


game


21-4
p to
third


the hope of repeating last year's victory
of the series over Balboa High School,
but the loss of some of last year's stars
weakened the team to an extent that


inexperienced players could


not over-


the last come. Credit should be given, however,


Cristobal used the I to


same lineup as in the first game.
3rd. Game
The third game was played at the


Cristobal


Playshed,


November


This time Cristobal came out on top,
winning all three games, 21-15, 21-11


and 21-16.


Cristobal was in very good


form and their passwork was excellent.


the efforts of these new players,


to the excellent consistent playing of


Gladys


Casto


and Dot


Birkeland at Center, and of the out-


standing
Guard,


work of Mildred


and the


many


Owen


long difficult


shots to the basket, made by


ball's star


Cristo-


girl athlete, Elizabeth Hayes.


First Game -January 23


on the part of the Cristobal Team
failed to stop the fast playing of Jones


and Maurice who netted the


scores


for Balboa.


Cristobal High
Forwards -

Guards

Centers

Subs


winning


Girls representing


School were:
- Elizabeth Hayes
Jessie Vane
- Mildred Owen
Helen Aanstoos
- Ruth Casto
Gladys Bliss
- Betty Stetler


Janet Robinson
Second Game -January 30.
Balboa Girls came to Cristobal to


play the second
Cristobal was


several


of the five game series.


unfortunate


in that


of the members of the team


were attending a Girl Reserve


ference at


Morro


the second string


Island.


However,


players, and substi-


tutes recruited for the game, fought
valiantly, and held Balboa to a tie
score during the first half of the game.
The following girls made up the team
for Cristobal High that day:


Forwards


Guards

Centers

Subs
Score:


-- Jessie Vane
Janet Robinson
- Mildred Owen
Stella Boggs
- Dorothy Birkeland
Ruth Casto
-- Margaret Reinhold
Balboa 16


Cristobal 5


Third


Game,


For the third game, Cristobal High


went again to Balboa.


On this day the


Cristobal Team played its hardest,
determined to win if possible. However,


the fates were against


us, and in spite


of excellent pass work on the part of
Dot, Ruth and Gladys, and the close


guarding by


Mildred and Helen, the


Balboa Team outplayed
the series.
TEAM:


Forwards


and won


- Jessie Vane


Elizabeth Hayes


y


t


I







VOLLEY


BASKET


BALL


BALL


A.


ZA

t4


Ft-'









THE CARIBBEAN


i %.s. .
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~ :4..


- Janet Robinson
Betty Stetler


Balboa
Cristobal


Fourth Game--February 13
On February 13, the Balboa team
journeyed to Cristobal, to add a fourth
victory, to the three already made, but
on this day Cristobal rallied to play
their best game of the season. Fast
passing ended with scoring shots to the
basket, netted a total of 31 points for


Cristobal,


Balboa's


forwards


being able to score but 9 points.


this game Cristobal's star


Elizabeth Haves,
her team.


scored 22


The line-up for this


Forwards


Guards


Centers


Sub.
Score :


Forward,
points for


game was:


- Elizabeth Hayes
Jessie Vane
- Mildred Owen
Helen Aanstoos
- Dot. Birkeland


Gladys Bliss
Ruth Casto


- Betty Stetler
Cristobal 31


Balboa


vious game.
victory for


Excellent shots


Balboa.


scored


Cristobal's


work in the game was the best in the


live games
weakened 1


series.


The team


the absence


was


of Sister


Haves, and was unable to shoot bas-
kets due to Balboa's splendid defense.

TEAM:


Forwards


Guards


Centers


Score:


- Jessie Vane
Ruth Wikingstad
Mildred Owen


Helen Aanstoos


- Ruth Casto


Dot Birkland
Gladys Bliss
-- Janet Robinson
Margaret Reinhold


Balboa


Cristobal 3

GIRLS' SWIMMING


Gladv.r B/irsf


This year the girls didn't show


much


interest


in swimming


formerly been shown.


as hlas


However, those


who did turn out deserve much praise
and credit. They practiced regularly
and worked hard to put up a good
.- j -- II *


tain, made 12 points against 42 for th?
Balboa girls.


The results of the


girl events


follows:


5O~vd.


Free Style


1. G. Harris (B.)
2. H. Hollowell (C.)
3. M. Reinhold (C.)


Time


32 315.


50-yd. Breast Stroke
I. G. Harris (B.)
2. M. Brewerton (B.)
3. M. Ensrud (C.)
Time 40 415.


Back


Slroke


1. G. Harris (B.)
2. M. Reinhold (C.)
3. B. Ensminger (C.)


100-vd. Free


I. H. Hearne (B.)
2. H. Hollowell (C.)

60-yd. AMedley
1. L. Duff (B.)
2. H. Hearne (B.)
3. M. Brewerton (B.)


Subsrell

Score:


i










THE CARIBBEAN


GIRLS' INDOOR BASEBALL
Gladys B/i.,r
This year the girls did not do so


well in indoor baseball.


Balboa won


the four games that were played.
The first game was played at the
Cristobal Playshed, March 19. Both
teams worked hard, but Balboa forged


ahead in the last inning.


The score


was 18-14.
In the second game at the Balboa
Plavshed, March 26, Cristobal didn't


work together at all.
errors which were cc


ended 20-8 in


Balho


They made many
istlv. The game
a's ftavor-


The third game was the best game


of thle series.


Cristobal


It was played ;at the could not get started until


I'Iavshed,


teams were in t heir


, April
best torn


2. Both
k to play.


The score at the end of the seventh
inning was 20-20 so we h lI to play


another inning. ilJaioa i
Crist oal girls score less in
Then when Balboa came to


thjs~


biat


were set on getting the wirnin


M. Drvden hit
E. Fluhartv i


the ball that


I )


tgzire


21-20 in favor of Balboa.
On April 9., the Cristolal
journeyed to Balboa but several
players were unable to make th


Balboa was
a very tine o


in goid "orm and
amnec. Tile Cristoba


:, they
g run.
brought
ended



I good
e trip.
played
l team


The score was 31-S.


it was too
Elizabeth


Haves, Ruth Casto and Betty Stetler


plavec


1 well in all


the games


Those Xwho made the team weie:
Ruth Casto-c
Gladys Bliss-p (Captain)
Ruth Wikingstad-lst base
Helen Aanstoos-2nd base


Betty Stetler-3rd b)as
Maino Bliss-ss
Elizabeth Haves-rf
Hope Hollowell-ef
Al:rgaret Reinhold-lf

Pete Hollwell


Ad3t id


BASEBALL


tbltaIt~!s


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I







THE CARIBBEAN


00


Dona Eaton '2


opened


. Our old
it's doors.


scat of learning has once more


newc


teachers-Miss


wear


Well,


-everyone


the novelty


looked


is beginning


pretty


happy


Brown and Mr.


Franks, a new principal.


Friday.


wait till the girls get a look at him


-he'll need a


Oct. 20.


Miss Pat


"slipped"


this morning-


body
Oct.


guard!


The 1l


largest number of


udents ever


mmm
some


-she slipped a lot of shamefaced Seniors
"white slips."


have been


enrolled


in C.H.S.


this year.


Oct. 21.


Athletic


Association


meetings


they're even breaking the ground for a new school.


this afternoon.


New coach--say, girls, don't you


Mr. Franks has arranged for a half


think we have a cute faculty this year?


holiday for us so we can have a field day.
knew appearances were'nt deceiving.


Oct. 6.


I lust


Thursday's the big dav for the Fresh-


ies! We're having our field day then and the Sophs
are going to beat some of the freshness out of them.


Oct. 22.


Varsity volley ball and soccer teams


chosen-some line ups-it doesn't look as though
Balboa will have a chance.


Oct. 26.


till you


see


Spanish Club meeting


today- wait


the names of the guests for their first


Oct. 7.


Seniors


given


we re


meeting!


good."


It all depends on you, ye Seniors, so act


Oct. 27.


Shame,


Seniors,


shame!


An extra


accordingly.


ballot was found in the votes for election of class


Field day today---a nice muddy, rainy


those


They're going around


very


Freshies


didn't


with a meek look


get--!
which


much befits them, after the chastising they


Oct. 9.


And I


didn't


think


there


were


officers today.


After a crushing lecture by Miss


Pat, we were told we'd have to vote all over again.


Oct. 28.


Randy reelected president of Senior


class. Dues are only three dollars and twenty
five cents. It doesn't look as though the depres-
sion's bothering the Senior class, does it?


more left like this one-some dizzy blonde asked
Mr. Vinton today if he would show her some sky
hooks and striped paint.


Had some real wet rain today-hut


we actually saw the sun for about ten minutes
this afternoon.


The whole school schedule has been


changed---our third period is the eighth now- -
People taking athletics can get out the last period.


Too bad a lot of us aren't the


"wirn and wigorish"


Oct. 31.


Book!


C.H.S.


the Balboa tean


belongs


Ripley s


wonder


won the first soccer game from
i. Three cheers for us!


Nov. 1. Does everybody feel a month wiser?
Wait till next week and the teachers will write
just what they think about it on your report card!
Nov. 2. Supper Club Cabinet meeting held
today to discuss the first supper to be given Thurs-


day evening.
we know our


Better starve until then girls, cause


"a c's


when it comes to making


Oct. 14.


Short class meeting of Seniors.


Pat unanimously reelected our advisor.


Oct.
days


Everything


until 2:15.


going


smoothly


these


Then the fun begins- about


alphabet


soup!


Panama!


Today


a holiday!


Everybody went to the boat races to celebrate.


Sh-sh-sh--Big


secrets!


The Seniors


1~.a I fl ,.


Oct. 8.


day-and


K~qRlfjF;Q


'I (/*B,
pnzrlleges---- It


"


rr I








THE CARIBBEAN


was that supper good!
helped cook it!


Ask anybody-ask me--I


Nov. 24.


Marshall Franchez d'Esprey arrives


on S. S. Colombie.-And


here's


some


inside


Nov. 6. We'll have to go see the weather man
about this rain. It rains all over---on top of the
school and everywhere!


information-- Mrs. Spencer went to a dinner in


his honor and he kissed her!
aren't slow by any means!


Nov. 8.
this rain.


Gatun


was nearly flooded


A slide at Culebra cut and two slides on


Nov. 26.


today


Everybody


--and for once


had turkey


for dinner


we girls could eat to our


the railroad


track--12


Spillway


gates


open--


that's where all those missing students were this
afternoon.


heart's content-we knew we'd dance off all the
pounds we might gain at the Senior party tonight.


Nov. 27.


Well, everybody--we did it again!


Nov. 9.
officers c


Nominating
chosen by Mis


committee
Moore toc


Staff


day-voting


The li'1 ole' class of 32 added the best Senior dance


ever given to its long list


of successes.


Today was a


tomorrow.


holiday.


I think most of us spent it in recuperating


All Staff elections over-and let me


"after affects.


tell you we're an AI staff-we've got just what it
takes--watch our stuff!


Nov. 30.


imposed


English classes given a test on


upon


"Hurdles.


Senior
" Miss


The Latin American


history


was entertained today by Dr. Jose Wendehake--
Venezuelan historian, Miss Moore and Mr. Gerald
Bliss will speak to the same class in the near future.


Kimbro certainly does keep us on the jump!
Dec. 1. School notes reporters catch the old


Harry today.-Us poor woikin


goils .... !


Staff meeting held today.


report cards!


they still tell the same old story, sad to say.


and Elsie
wonder- .


(office
9


told to go and watch the birdie as soon as possible
-here's where we learn the truth about ourselves!


Miss Kimbro organized


Dramatic club today.


the Jr.- -Sr.


Srs. were well represented.


Hope we can make a success of it.


to see that everyone had the right kind of


a vac-


cination, and imagine Eleanor's embarrassment-
(her's is somewhere near the middle of her ana-
tomy)-the nurse would'nt let her off, either!
Nov. 17. Students told they would be given
a holiday tomorrow so Dr. J. H. Newlon, curricu-
lum advisor to Zone schools could tell our teachers
how to run this y'ar school.


Ahem!


The Governor


and Mavor


of Colon are to be feted at the first meeting of the


The doctor came today to see that our


works run all right.


Betty, who was playing nurse


for him, caught one of the boys in a rather em-
barrassing position--(she's resigned).


Faculty receives


a challenge to a game


of volley ball from a bunch of our boys-here's
where we get our revenge-grr-rr-rr!
Dec. 6. Poor Perry! He was sawing a piece
of wood in the Manual training building and the
saw slipped, cutting one of his fingers right off!
There's no sense in taking such a foolish subject,


Spanish Club tonight.


Style plus,-what?


Nov. 20. Supper club party tonight. They're
promising us a big time-a new kind of party.


anyway.
Dec. 9.
afternoon,


movies


at the Clubhouse


which reminds me of the joke about


The jinx again! C.H.S.


volley ball and soccer championships this morning.


the Scotchman who went to a continuous show at
one P. M. and had to stay until 11 P. M.


After the good start we made, too!


But that was


10. Naughty Seniors told


their privileges


just a little hard luck,-we'll do better next time.


would be taken away if they don't stop writing on


Nov. 22.


The American Clipper arrived yes-


"Miss


Kimbro's"


board during the noon


hour.


terday-a great many students went out to inspect
the bie shio. We couldn't let her ao without nnr


Well, that's the same old question of state's rights
coming before national rights.


These Frenchmen


Brand new style


Oh! Oh! Marv


girls) resigned today! Why? I


Big scandal! The nurse came today


All Seniors


Nov. 21.







THE CARIBBEAN


season! 5-4.


Are we good?


esk u-? ? ?


It seems as though the faculty in-


the map, by golly
everything!


Gonna try for silver cups and


tends to rule as well


as reign-our boys met a


crushing defeat in their game against the faculty--


Jan. 8.
this day


Friday-we'll always remember


special


pleasure-two


holidays


but say, girls. I am able to


say, with even greater


come after it.


conviction than before.


that I


think


we have a


Jan. 9.


Ha! Hal


We fooled


Balboa-they


perfectly adorable faculty!


had two rows of cheer leaders all ready to show


those


wild-looking,


painted,


off for us and we didn't have a special!


And even


women are the initiates of the Effe Cube Club,


after all their high powered cheers we beat them


(Fresh.--Soph.


dramatic


club)


they're


being


inaugurated into the organization.


here's


a real teacher!


Dec. 16.


Fourteen novitiates led through the


Spencer told


her Spanish 12 class that if they


mysteries of the honorary Spanish club tonight.
The formal initiation took place at the Y. W. C. A.
at 7 P. M.


memorize a Spanish ballad they won't


take a mid-year
memorizing i?!


The teachers are going to give us all


exam-and


a game


are we good


have we


won in


a nice little Xmas present
after Xmas vacation!


No report cards until


Twilight League!


And we beat Balboa all the


time-wonder what's the matter with our boys?


Dec. 18. Big celebrations today. Every class
is having a Christmas party. We're all oggsited,
oil yoi!


Well!!


The second


first game for us in the


Twilight


team


won the


series


didn't somebody think of putting them in sooner?


Dec. 19


Today


us students


enter


into two


Didn't you notice how dreary today


weeks of


ease


and luxury-"no more pencils, no


more books.


was? Of course,


Mr. Franks,


we had to send our little sunshine,


over


to Balboa to brighten up their


Dec. 21.


is the life!


a two weeks holiday
we'd enjoy school!


every


We should be given
fourteen days--then


school--can't be selfish y'know.


Jan. 15.


gave


doing's


today-the


Sophomore s


a Luncheon-Dance and Balboa sent over


Dec. 24.


Santa?


your


stockings


Don't forget to hang


all ready


em up'


three cheer leaders and a teacher to ask us to show
a little more sportsmanship at the school games.


MERRY


CHRISTMAS


EVERY-


They


gave


us long talk about being better sports


BODY!!!
Dec. 30.
to bounce
Dec. 31


Big preparations--getting all ready
the old year tomorrow night!


12:00 P.


- Whoopee-ee-ee!!!--


Happy New Year! Eat, Drink, and be Merry, ye
students, for Monday we go back to school!


Jan.
Franks,


Scandal!


Our shining example,


was out until four o'clock last night!


--and no foolin'--I


was over-bu
shouldn't boo


was almost in tears before it


t


the right


idea-we


so when they're giving one of their


extra special fancy cheers.


Jan. 16.


Curses!! Foiled!


We lost a game of


baseball to Balboa today-all we needed to win


series,


Jan. 18.


Grrrr-rr!


Tonight


Spencer


a talk


and exhibition of her slides taken while she was in


Once


more


we trod the well


worn


Spain.


And, incidentally, of the people she met


paths to our seat of learning-wonder who thought
up school, anyway?


there-they
Spain!


certainly


grow


them


handsome


Everybody


received


the sad


news


todav- -report cards-but then that's what you
get for being Merry at Christmas and Happy over


the New


Year.


Jan. 19.
play today.
men, she's


a-hanging


- Sr. Dramatic Club


Watch out fer thet


dangerous!


on 'er hip?


gave


"Prairie


See thet thar six shooter
And how she can shoot is


S~n. .. S S


.


rr 1 I


i n








THE CARIBBEAN


money-the depression is just your imagination.
Jan. 21. Guess it's just too bad for us in the
Twilight League-we can't seem to lick anybody.


Feb. 11.


Feb. 12. ....
--and that's all we'll say about mid-year


Jan. 22.


Another game lost to Balboa today


exams.


--say-whatsamatter with


us, anyway:


Spent


today recuperating from


Jan. 25.


The Hon. Mandi Marchoskv lent his


after effects of a few of those exams.


voice (and his couldn't-talk-without-'em hands)
to giving a speech to the members of the Rotary
Club today. He 'n' Mr. Franks told them all the
things they could do to aid and abet us.


our


school!


"Wottaman,


Guesswat!!!
! But Ha
" alias Mr.


11


We had a burglar in
rbreadth Harry (alias
Franks) took out his six


shooter and said-O, it doesn't matter what he


BANG!!!


Whatwuzat!!!?


Oh-just,


Hunka and Robert fooling around with some of
Mr. Vinton's chemicals-the idea is to see how
near to blowing up the whole lab they can come -
then they won't have to take chemistry any more,


said,-any
window.
Feb. 15.


after three


way, the burglar
Ain't dat sum'pin?


jumped


use boys--you


attempts


should


that tacks should


realize
not be


placed on Miss Kimbro's chair.


Feb. 16.


Tennis began today.


Hope we can


Jan. 27. Phooey!!!
go past that chemistry


Hold your nose when you
lab! Some of the smells


those kids can't stink up!!!


beat Balboa in this.


Feb. 17. Th
at the Masonic


Ce Seniors gave


'The Prairie Doll'


Temple tonight, in honor of the


Jan. 29.


Are you wondering why the boys are


jilostest..W\orthjest


Grandest-est-est


Matron


looking so dejected?


That's easv--all


the girls


somebody.


can't say it-it has to be read


have gone to Morro Island for a three day stay.


slowly and each adjective thought over carefully).


Jan. 30.


rain we


Hurrayv!!!!


won the baseball


Thanks to some good wet


game


today!


That


Feb. 18.


by Jr.-Sr.


"Washington's I
Dramatic Club.


Defeat"


Georgie


given


certainly


makes us the champs!


are we good?


Look us over everybodv--


had some technique!


Ubecherlife!


years


I always thought I had been


soon.


C. H.


S. Girls Slogan for this month.


Get Your Man!!!!


Feb. 19.


Say-a-ay--did you


on Mr. Frank's desk?


Girls,


see that 'bookay"
let's do some de-


(S'Leap
Feb. 2.


Year,


Whee!!


another game in the


y'know).


tective work.


We're picking up.


We won


Twilight League today.


Somebody's stealing a march on us!


Hurrav!


upon, girls get a break!


At last we poor, imposed
The Sophomore dance is


Feb. 3. Lotta Club meetings and things today
-we're very busy.


And another baseball game


Lady Luck, keep a-lookin


we win.


right this way!


a Leap


Year Dance!


Feb. 23. Too bad Washington couldn't have
been born more than once--then we'd have two


holidays.


Feb. 5.


Vinton's


Chem


Physics


classes go on board M. S. Augustus today-wanna
see what makes it go.


Feb.
school!


There's a dirty


horse


thief in


Somebody stole Warren's shoes-and now


what's he ganna doj?!


Feb.
will be
Feb.


6.


Jr. -Sr.


Dramatic


"When's Your Birthday?"
7. Well, look us over-we're the champ


Feb. 26.


We girls realize now how fortunate


a man is. The Leap Year dance was so much fun!
Guess the boys know now just how it feels.


baseball players on the


inter school
teams in the


series


Twilight


Isthmus.


and now


we re


We won
making


League look like a lotta


Feb. 29.


chance


Better


grab a


man while there's still time!!!


Look sweet,


everybody, and


watch


Ping Pong players.
r'i. Cr


the birdie-you won't have a picture in our annual


I '~I I I


i


'r I r, r







THE CARIBBEAN


Oh ho! Randy,


father in


we saw your


the principal's office-better


be good


red school house (the roof is red, anyway).
just the same.


Looks


from now on!


Mar. 29.


Such a lot of empty seats!


What


Mar. 4.


Visitation Day today.


All the papas


with all the flu that's going around-only about


and mamas came to learn the sad truth about


their brilliant (?) sons and daughters.


But really,


half of the kids are in school.


sneaking


" hunch that a bad cold is


But I'


as good


got a
as the


was a big day for C. H. S.-had ushers, lots of


flue to a lot of these school-jumpers.


teachers from Balboa,


'n' everything!


Report cards


are nearing


US--SIX


Lost a tennis meet to Balboa todav-


weeks exams are being given in all classes.


could it be that


we aren't


so good at it?


Mar. 31.


Miss Kimbro is preparing to get even


Mar. 7. Oh you
After winning that tit


Mar. 8.


"Most Consistent Lovers!"
:le, why go and have a fight?


Some dirty scotchman put a plugged


fifty cent piece in the B. A. A. treasury.
esk u-is that helping the depression?


Now I


vou notice


"Terrible


Seniors.


She's


our


English test all readv-and what a test!


No school today!!


all the


empty


(April fool)


Senior seats


today.


Miss Kimbro must have scared them away with


Mar.


is something


confidential-no-


body knows it but you and me and maybe one or


two other.


Visitation Day,


It rained today!
Balboa had to copy us and have a


so we sent


a whole lot of our


teachers over to see that it went off all right.


Mar. 12.


Well,


as far as we're concerned, ten-


is isn't-we handed Balboa the championship on
a silver platter-or should I say-racket?


Mar. 14.


Don't tell me they're experimenting


on Guinea pigs in the chemistry class!?! Oh, no,


that's just some of Miss Moore
doing a little yodeling.


Mar. 15.


Practice going on for


s Spanish class


"When's Your


her test.
-and w
either!


Supper Club girls


ias it good!?!


Seniors thai
their test.


gave


a dance tonight


I don't mean April fool,


Miss Kimbro pulled a fast one on the
t were absent yesterday and missed


Soon


as she


saw them they were sent


into the office and presented with 30 questions!
There ain't no justice!


Apr. 5. Sp
will be put on
Apr. 6. A


banish club meeting today-a play


very


soon.


lot of the honorable Seniors were


admitted to the National Thespian society today.


always knew


we


had a great deal of dramatic


talent in that class--why, our performances bring
tears to our teachers eyes!


Birthday.


" If we keep up at this rate we won't


be having any when it's over.


Mar. 16. Mr. Harold June spoke to all of us
today about his trip with Byrd to the South Pole.


Baseball


a dance at


school tonight- and is it exclusive-!


won't even let the girls crash the gate! 'S
bad for a poor girl trying to get along.


Why they


just too


Extremely


name


intrestin'-the


man signed


so many times he nearly had writer


before he could break away.
Mar. 17. See anything green?
like St. Patrick.


Mar. 18.


Because


we get


is everybody


s cramp


Sure--we all


so happy today?


a whole week for Easter Vacation,


beginning today-Whoopee!!!


O-dear-o-dear!!!


a Basketball


game to Balboa tonight--this can't go on!


Apr. 11.
- the oi' schc
Apr. 12.


Well, the seats are all filled up again
cool's beginning to look natural.


Saa-aa-v- how about


a little coopera-


tion in this school-they won't let the students
chew gum in class and the teachers go around


acquiring that flashing smile as much


as they


Mar. 19.
Mr. Franks


Big picnic at the Tarpon Club today.
was chaperone.
Life is swell these days-nothin' to


please. '1
Apr. 13.


"'ain't right!


Pan-American Day today.


Si


club holds a big program at the Y. W. C. A.


)anish
Viva


do, and all the time in the world to do it.


Panama!


Viva America!!









THE CARIBBEAN


very nice.


They get three pats on the head and


WVhat's this I hear?


Was that Junior


one on the back for giving such a nice one.


with Miss Brown


for an advisor why wouldn't


saving there was to be no Ibanquet don't say it!
The shock would be too much!


thev?


May 4.


Latest news from the front!!!


Senior


Apr. 18.


Hall of Fame pictures were


taken for


banner


seized


a group


of Juniors--short


our Caribbean


today.


We certainly do have a


skirmishes all during the day!!


little bit of everything in this school!


Mav 5.
t


Hon. Editor in Chief informs members


Do the


"A" students ever


rate!!?!!


of Staff that all material for the Caribbean must


Don't have to report to any study halls, can come


whenever they want.


have a hunch that these


(emphasized) Ie in by
else--


the end of this week or


teachers


are gaming to


a lot


more


diligent


Well,


the Seniors are glad


to see a


students from now on.


little action on the


Jr.-Sr.


banquet front!


meeting todav--we are


going to get enough money in order to put it out-
that's such a relief!


Juniors gave a card party at the Masonic Temple
tonight--wasn't a flop, either!


Mav 9.


Oh ho!!


What do


we know


about


Apr. 21.


Jr.-Sr. Dramatic club gave a play at


the Y. W. todayv--


"Hannah Gives Notice.


" We're


somebody!? Wearing a pretty onyx ring with a
U. S. Army seal on it!!


doing better and better, thank you.


Well,


today's the


last day


to buy


Apr. 22.
My! Mv!
./*


What!?!


Another office girl!


It can't be that there's enough work


for that many girls--maybe they want to make it
easier for the other 2.


Apr. 25.


The Sophomores are going to debate


Caribbeans.


If vou don't bring your money now


it'll be lust too bad!


May 11.


today-
lose! -
lose!!


Characters for our play


with that cast and


that play


were picked


w\c can't


on whether or not the Phillipines should receive


independence- glad


somebody's
SO~flU)OdV '


going


decide this w eighty question for us.


Apr.
marries
"D's"


Watch


there,


man- anvway- -w hat


girlie----he's
a couple


matter'7


when


wve re


beginning


to get


wonders!


Here s


The Senio


one for Ripley's book of
rs have all paid their dues,


Hurrav!
May 13. Sophomore class gave a dance, that
was well attended by C. H. S. students, tonight
at the playshed-- it's a good thing we have a class
like that to pep things up once in a while!


used to our teachers they have to get sick!


Girl Reserves gave a dinner for the


course we're sorry for them,


but there's nothing


Rotary Club tonight--and by


special


request


worse than substitutes that know


nothing about


what they're teaching!


we got to eat also, instead of just serve.
May 17. Only one, just one, more six weeks


Well,


the faculty


t some of


shine wiped off them tonight- though they'd be
smart and challenge the Seniors to a Basketball


period left for us in our good old C. H.


vou


Seniors. Don'cha feel kinda funny?
May 18. Well, got our reports today, and even


game.


They


couldn't


making four points!


Apr. 30.


Were showing the old spirit all right!


Had a special train to take us to Balboa today and


even


"Razz


" from


though


they weren't all they should


we Seniors are gonna treasure them


have been,
cause we'll


only get one more grade from our dearly beloved
High School teachers.


went


over


there and


had a


"gettogether.


practice


going


on steadily--


Sure--Balboa's O. K. Mavlbe it's the world that's
wrong every once in a while.
May 1. No May pole dancing for the frolic-


we're going to have to do some hurrying if
going to have it put on bv June 10.


Mav 20.


A Friday!!


w e re


Need I say more?


some C. H.
a a S aW


S. students this dav--we had to sit


Tests given to all Freshies today


a .


Staff








THE CARIBBEAN


have to work!
homework-


May 25.


What with plays, Caribbeans, and


Couple of Staff members were sent to


Balboa today to fix up a "dummy" copy of our
annual. They came back with big smiles--it's
going to be the best yet!


the Christ Church


by the


(Unanimously


decided by members of Senior class).
June 10. Well, by the looks on the faces of
those who took the tests, the teachers made up
pretty good ones.


June 13.


Graduation announcements and call-


May 26.


What's all this running to the office


ing cards were received today,


verv,


very,


pretty


by those


Freshmen?


Oh- they're just making


ones, too.


Gonna send them all


over-we


want


out their next years schedule, and they have to
have the principals approval on everything they
take-wouldn't want to get in bad-you'd think
they had no mother to guide them, the way they
go in there and look at him with that trusting
look!


May 30.
right time-


For once Memorial Day comes at the
we get a holiday this time- and say,


people to know something
class of '32 graduates!!!


June 14.


's happening when the


Spanish club holds meeting to elect


officers for next year-pretty soon they're going
to have a banquet to inaugurate them into their


new offices.
June 15.
the outside


Style, uh?


It's not


so very


looking in


long until
our good


we'll be on


there, Seniors, it'


only one month, thirty days,


School!


We Seniors feel all teary.


and then


we commence! !


We'll


gomg


June 17.


Girl Reserves hold the last meeting


alumni banquets and everything!


of the year tonight.


Doesn't look as though


May 31. Spanish
Y. W. C. A. tonight-


gives


a play


at the


"El Novio Espafiol.


be able to send a delegate to summer camp this


vear-no mon .


very well done--those Spanish lovers are plenty
lovin'!


June 1.


roses,


Well, here


we are, it's the month of


brides and graduations-and


the class of


June 20.


This is one of the most important


days in this year because our Caribbean is now on
sale!! And is it selling!!! At this rate there won't
be any left by this afternoon.


'32 are going to be graduates! We're so eggzited!!


June 21.


Seniors are going around like they're


(Of course
but oh)!


June 2.


down


we're pretending to take it very calmly,


something on a stick!!


eleven days


Girls and boys of the Senior class get


to bare


facts and


decide on


the clothes


they'll wear for Graduation--white for the girls,


We're gonna commence in


Why shouldn't we?


June 22. We're all shaking the old moth balls
out of our extra-special occasion suits-only eight
days now!!


dark blue for the boys.


We decided on Bacca-


June 24.


Our last


Friday!


And did


plenty


laureate clothes too, they're to be


sport


" clothes.


say, don't ever let me hear any man say that


ever happen today-big fights for our banner and
everything!!


women are slaves to fashion!


Our boys had their


June 27.


All of us went to church tonight for


clothes figured up right down to black shoestrings


our Baccaluareatte


service.


(Between you and


in black
knot)!!
June 3.


and white sport shoes--tie


that in


me, it's the first time I ever


in church).


The first week in


June is all gone!


Now how do you feel, you Seniors?!


lectures


were


that I


saw so


many Seniors


given a couple of inspiring


know


presidents of all the boys and


are going


successes


to make
of all the


Coming


events


cast their


reviews


before!!
given on


Tests for kids leaving early are to be


Thursday and


Friday of this week, it


(During


these


periods


of distress


(final exams),


was announced.


June 29.


'tis better to


say nothing of our daily


Baccalaureate services will be held at


JUNE


30!!!!!


JUNE








THE CARIBBEAN


ctszz

-5 r


-x


L


S-


~=- I~-~Ri~~







THE CARIBBEAN


Alumni


T0 me our school life is like a tree.


It starts


as a tiny seed,


grows


gradually, spreading out and


offering more shade and shelter to people as the years pass.


Its harvests grow too, and are finally


scattered to all parts of the globe,


always bearing the stamp of the mother tree.


Our class of 1932


is one of the richest of these harvests.


The Staff of the 1932 Caribbean extends to all the Alumni most sincere wishes for
piness and fulfillment of ambitions and desires that the future can possibly bring.


1918

LULA MAY PULLIG (Mrs. J. B.) Coman, Cristo-
bal, C. Z.
MINOT COTTON, 81 John Street, New York City.


SUSIE HARRISON, Ancon, C.


CATHERINE WADE, 451 West 23rd. Street, New
York City.


BURKE


WELCH


(address unknown).


success,


ALICE HUNTER (Mrs. L. A.) Hohn, Cristobal,
C. Z.


CHARLES HENTER, Coast Guard Cutter


bal," Norfolk, Va.
DR. FRANK RAYMOND, care of Panama Hospital,
Panama City, R. de P.


ELEANOR ZIMMERMAN,


Westerleight,


120 Kingsley


Staten Island, N.


MARY VERNER, Chapel Hill, No. C.


MARJORIE BALL,


14 Crescent


Place,


Takoma


Park, Md.


ALICE ARLENE BALL, 14 Crescent Place,


Tako-


ma Park


JAMES RAYMOND, Cristobal, C.


DOROTHY WEIR (Mrs.
bal, C. Z.


John) Montanye, Cristo-


IDA BROWN (Mrs. A. A.) Doyle, 1964 Thirty-
sixth Street, Sacramento, Calif.
GEORGE CARTWRIGHT, 62 Birgen Court, Ruther-
ford, N. J.
PAUL DOYLE, 24 State Street, care of Venezuela


KENNETH EDWARDS, Karlstromer Apts. Hope-


Gulf Oil Co., New York City.


MARY GLENN


FIELDS, Balboa Heights, C.


LEROY MAGNUSON, Balboa.


C.Z.


LINDALE DAVIS (address unknown).
TACK B. FIELDS, care of Tela Railroad Engineer-


Dept.,


Tela, Honduras.


KENNETH GREENE, Coudersport, Pa.
HARLAN HOLMWOOD, Balboa, C. Z.


ALSON SEARS, Balboa, C.


JORDAN
Syracuse, bN
MILDRED


ZIMMERMAN,


STAFFORD,


Vichsburg, Miss.


EMM A
WESLE


ton, Mich.


KATHRYN BURGOON STEWART, C


ALICE STILSON (Mrs.) Pincus, Balboa, C.


AL. DOYLE,
mento, Calif.


Thirty-sixth


Street,


ETIIA BEVINGTON, Balboa Heights, C.


Sacra-


GERALD BLISS, Cristobal, C.


ERNEST


EUPHRAT,


3935


Burwood


Avenue,


South Norwood, Cincinnati, Ohio.


TflITSW HIJTRWNI11 rP


' Home.-


Svdenham


a


"Kim-


Avenue,


University


1101 Markham


Place,


Street,


TOWNSEND (Mrs. Robert) Noe, Box 1,
Y TOWNSEND, 1195 Ruby Street, Hough-


InrrrcP


TTENTER