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Digitized by the Internet Archive

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CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL



THE CARIBBEAN




Foreword



The Staff of 1951 have had an un-
usuaL number of difficulties in produc-
ing this year's Caribbean. Neverthe-
less, we are proud to present the re-
sult of our efforts to the student body,
the faculty, and the general public.



THE CARIBBEAN

Vol. XIV. CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE No. 1



PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HI 5H SCHOOL



TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page Page

Foreword - 2 luniors ..- 37

Dedicatio 1 - 4 Sophomores - --. 41

Editorial 5 Freshmen 45

Our Governor ._ 6 Literary 49

Our Canal Zone School Officials 7 School -Xctivitles 61

Our Princi]Kil 8 Sports 79

Staff.. 9 School Notes 94

Faculty... 11 Exchanges 99

Seniors 17 Alumni.. 100

Class History .. 32 Jokes.... 104

Class Prophecy 3.? Advertisements 119

Class Will 34



THE CARIBBEAN




ID



E, the Senior Class of 1931 dedicate this
edition of the "Caribbean" to the one
who has been beside us with inspiring
leadership for the tour years of our High
School career,

Miss Mary Elizabeth Moore.



THE CARIBBEAN



CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL.

Carlos Rankin, "'7.

Away down here on a little neck of land stands
Cristobal High School. It faces the Caribbean
Sea, and has its back to the Pacific Ocean ; on its
left and right stretch two vast continents: it is
in Panama, the hinge of the western hc.nisphere.

Manv, many years ago t.vo oceans rolletl auay
and this little strip of land can.e up and first bared
its shells and marsh to the tropic sim. Then came
its aninals and Indians, the Spaniar 's, the French,
anrl finally the Am.ericans, who fuliilled the
enornous task of :. aking "the big c'itch," and
letting the two oceans run together again. The
land was divic'ed and the v, orld united.

With the Americans came Cristobal High
School, and since it was completed, it has faith-
fully turned out its stuf'ents to perform their
duties along with the rest of the worl '. C. H. S.
students are essentially the sarr e as these of any
other country. Others boast of the oak and the
pine, but can we forget the palm and coconut
trees? When another is \\ alldng thr( ugh snow,
we are being rainef^' on, and walk thrcvgh puddles
of water. While others are picking apples and
peaches, we climb mango trees, cut do.vn bunches
of bananas, and shake papaya and guayaba trees.
But in n'^any things we are unique; nowhere else
in the world does the sea display its colors as it
does down here; nowhere is the sun as bright or
the moon as perfect. Do the trees anywhere else
act as much like Hula dancers as our coconut
trees in a strong wind? Does any other place
bring together so many foreign people, customs,
and languages as we c'o? Ships from every corner
of the globe pass through here, bringing everything
from commercial products to distinguished tra-
vellers. Theatrical companies, circuses, and per-
formers of all kinds pass here and give exhibitions.
We get the latest news, down to the last detail,
from everywhere. Yes, our lot is "the sum of
earthly bliss." We feel the influences of people
every w here on the map : so you can lay your hand
on the pulse of the world in Panama.

Through it all, Cristobal High School, like the
Panama Canal, raises its ships from one level to
another, finally letting them down where they
have an altogether different view than w hen they
began the transit. \\'herever they go, they never
forget Cristobal High School standing far down by
the shores of the Caribbean, through rain, wind,
and sun; combining at the same time both the
wild spirit of the tropics and the firm ideal of the
North.




THE CARIBBEAN




Col. HARRY BURGESS. U. S. Army,
Governor, The Panama Canal



THE CARIBBEAN




Name Ben M. Williams.

School Actixntie.' Superintendent of Canal Zone Schools.

Education Stateshoro Hiyh School. Statesboro. Ga.

1911-1915 Mercer University (A.B.)

1919 Teacher's College. Columbia University (A.M.)
Date oj enterlnij .vrrice on Canal Zone Feb. 2. 192().



Name V. H. Barkeu.

School iJctii'ttu\f Assistant Sii['-erniter,tlent ol Schools.

( Junior and Senior High).
F.diicaHon Lebanon High School, Lebanon. Mo.

N. E. Missouri State Teacher's College (B.S.)

Columbia Uni\-ersity (A.M.)
Date oJ enfennij .yeri'ire on Canal Zone Sept- 7, 1927.





Name EvEHET B. Sackett.
Title Director of Research.
Education Graduated 1919 irom Normal High School.

Marquette. Mich.

1919-192,3 Hamllne University, St. Paul, ;\linn.

Degree B.A.

1925 Unn'ersity ot Minnesota. Degree M.A.

1927-1928 Teachers College. Cc.'umbia Unn'ersity.

Degree Ph. D.
Fraternities Social, Eta Phi. Professional, Phi Delta

Kappa, Kappa Delta Pi.



THE CARIBBEAN




Name oj Teacliei William A. Sawyers.

School AdU'Ulej Principal.v

Educallon Westerly High School, Westerly, Rhode Island.
1915-1919 Bates College, Lewiston, Maine (B.S )
1924-1925 Columbia University (MA.)

Dale oJ Enleriiuj Cruflolml High School September 7, 1927.

Fa^vrite Expression "We'll see."



THE CARIBBEAN




Center Carlos B. Rankin, '51.

Lower left Miss Alary E. Aloore.
Lower right Miss Gladys Kimbro.
North Burton Hackett, '3L

N.N.E. Junior Forsstrom, '52.

N.E. Velma Hall, 5L

E.N.E. Randolph Wikingstad, '52,

East Ed\\'ard ConUling, '31.

E.S.E. Celeste Clarke, '5L

N.N.W.



CARIBBEAN
luiitor.

SlaJJ Jdyuor.
SlaJJ Sponsor.
Art Editor.
A.}.f. Bu.fine.fs Mpr
Girts Sports.
Assistant Editor.
Boys Sport.K
E.xcliange Editor.
Harry Egolf, '52.



STAFF.

S.E. Eleanor Reinhold, '33.

S.S.E. Marion E. Neely, ol.

South Raymond Will. '51.

S.S.W. Richard Wood. '51

S.W. Beverly Dunn. '51.

W.S.W. Anna Ryan, '51.

West Ben Williams. '51.

W.N.W. Clara Frisk, '51.

N.W. Jack P. Kelly, '51.
Assistant Circulation Manager



.liumni Editor.
Literari/ Editor.
Busint^.fs Jli/r.
Circulation J/i/r.
A.r.rt. Art Editor
Sc/wol Notes.
OJficial Photographer.
Ti/pist.
.Joke Editor.



10



THE CARIBBEAN



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5CENES




THE CARIBBEAN



11



FACULTY




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12



THE CARIBBEAN




Name oj Teachei Lillian Grace Beata Gustafson.
Subject' Taught Assistant Principal.
School ActU'ttie,' Attendance recorder.
Education Lake View High School, Chicago, 111.
1913-1915 Northern Illinois Teachers College.

1925 University of Ohio.

1926 Teachers College, Columbia University.
1930 Chicago University (Summer).

Date i^J Entering Cristobal High School October 1. 1923.

Eai'ori'e Expression "Tardy or absent?"



Xante of Teacher Roger C. Hackett.

Subjects Taught History, Ci\ics, Economics, Commercial

Law.
School Actirities Sponsor of Freshman Class, Coach of

Boys Tennis.
£
Indiana.

1919-1923 Indiana Uni\ersltv, Bloomington, Indiana

(A.B.)

1923-1924 Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

(A.M.)
Date oJ Entering Cristobal High Scliool October 1, 1930.
Favorite Expression "That's it exactly."





Xame oj Teachei Mary Elizabeth Moore.

Subjects Taught Latin, French and Spanish.

School Activities Sponsor for Senior Class, Stall Sponsor.

Education Washington High School, Washington, Pa.

1920-1923 University of West Virginia (A.B.)

1919-1920 Wooster College.

1930 Columbia University (Summer)
Date oj Entering Cristobal High School October 1, 1925.
Favorite Expression "I've done m^- best."



THE CARIBBEAN



13




\amc oj Teacher E. Phyllis Spencer.

Subjects Taught Spanish, French, English.

School Activities. Spanish Club, Freshman Dramatic,

Sponsor: Freshman Advisor.
Education 1921 B.A. Coe College, Cedar Rapids, Iowa,

192-1 M.A. State University of Iowa, Iowa.

1925 Diploma de Suficlencia, Madrid, Spain.

Associate Prot. Romance Languages Coe College.
Date Entered in Cristobal High School Oct. 1, 1950.
Favorite Expression "Debe tener vergiienza."



Xante oj Teacher Frederick J. AIeykr.

Subjects Taught Commercial Arithmetic and Geographv,

Solid Geometry and Algebra.
School ./ctivities Sponsor for Sophomore.s.
E-liiralion Calmar High School, Calmar, Iowa.

State Uni\'ersity of Iowa (B.A.)
Date oJ Knlering Cnslohal High AV/h;,-/ October 1, 1928.
Favorite Expression "What are you doing in here'.'"





Name oj Teacher Helen I. P.^tterson.

Subject.) Taught Shorthand, Typewriting, Bookkeeping.

School Activities Junior Class Advisor, Manager of School
Funds, Sponsor of "O.G.A." Club. Secretary of At-
lantic Side Teachers' Federation.

Education Montana State College, Bozeman, Montana.
B.S. Degree Chouteau Count\' High School, Fort
Benton, Mont.

Date Entered in Cristobal High School >UrcU 27, 1950.
Favorite Expression "Get to work now!"



1-4



THE CARIBBEAN




Xante oj Tenchei Gladys M. Kimbro.

SubjecU Taught English.

School Actit'iCie.i Debating Club. Literary Sponsor.

Education ChicUasha High School, Chickasha. Oklahoma.
1916 Oklahoma College for Women (A.B.)
1924 University of Oklahoma (M.A.)

Dale oJ Entering CrUlohat High School October 1, 1929.

Fai'orite Expre^i'sion "Put something in it and you'll get
something out of itl"



\ame oj Teacher Kenneth W. Vinton.

Subjects Tauflht Science, Chemistry, Physics.

School ./c-//,v7/f,. Basketb.ill Coach.

Education Fond du Lac High School, Fond du Lac,

Wisconsin.

1920-1924 Ripon College, Ripon, Wisconsin (A.B.)

1929-19.i0 University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis.

Graduate W^ork.
Date oj loitering Cristobal High School October 1, 1930.
Fai'orite Expression "Get paper and pencil ready.




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Name Blanche S. Anderson.

Subjects Taught Household Arts, English.

Education S>i. Olaf College, Northfield, Minn. (B.A.)

Summer School, University of Minnesota.

Graduate Dietitian, Stanford University Hospital.

Fai'orite Expression "Get me a banana."



THE CARIBBEAN



15




Aame nj Teacher JoY N. McDonald.
Sabjeds Taughl Art.

Education Kansas State Teachei s College (B.S.)
Teacher's College. Columbia University (A.M.)
Date oj Entering Cristolial High School, October 1
Favorite Exprej^ion "Now, we'll make a poster"



lO.in.



Name oj Teachei Lawrence Johnson.

Sulijectj Taught Algebra, Mechanical Drawing, i^lanual
Training.

School Activitie.f Director of High School Athletics, Ad-
visor of Bovs Athletic Association, Baseball Coach,
President Atlantic Chapter, American Federation of
Teachers.

Education High School, Grafton, North Dakota Col-
lege, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks,
North Dakota State Teachers College, Valley City,
North Dakota. University of Washington, Seattle,
Washington.

Date Entered in Cri.itohal High Sc/iool October 1. 1930.

Favorite Expression "Cut out your whistling."





Xaine oj Teactier MiLURED Lenore Elner.

Subjects Taught Music.

Sclioot Activities Orchestra, Boys and Girls Glee Club
Operetta.

Education High School, Moorhead. .^lianesota.

Graduate Piano, F"argo College. Fargo, North Da-
kota, (B. M.) Graduate Public School of Music,
Fargo College, Drake University. Des Aloines,
Iowa, Graduate work in Drake University 1924.

Date oj Entering Cristobal High School October 1, 1950.

Favorite Expression "I have had se\'en classes already,
and I'm not tired yet



16



THE CARIBBEAN




Xame oj Teacher ^Barbara Bailey.
School Aciis'dlcs Girls' Coach.

Ediicalion Recreation Training School, Chicago, 111.
Columbia University.

Fai'onle Expression "Qovne on, girls, we want to heat
Balboa again."



.V(7/Hf' oJ Teacher Victor E. Si^iler.

School .lcli\-ii(ies Director of Physical Activities.

Education 1923-25 University of" Calil'ornia.

Dale oJ Enterinp SerAce on Canal Zone ^May bS, 1926.

Fa^'o-tfe Expre-is'tcn "Don't horse arouml."





Xame of Teacher Robert George Nqe.

.icTii'Uie,} Dramatic Coach.

Education. Young High School, Kno.wille. Tennessee.

Dale oJ Entering Sen'ice on Canal Zone December, 1924.

Favorite Expression "Now get the idea?"



THE CARIBBEAN



17



SENIORS




18



THE CARIBBEAN




"The hand that follows intellect can achieve."



Name of Sluiieni Carlos Bogart Raxkin.

Birthplace- Ancon, Canal Zone.

Date oj Birth ]u[y 4, 1915.

School AcUi'ilie. Class President 1 2, 5, 4 ; Debating
Club 2; Chairman 5, President 4; Soccer 3, 4; Track 4;
Swimming 5, 4; Assistant Editor Caribbean 5, Edi-
tor-in-chief 4; Carnival 4; Neptune Club Secretary
7i, 4; Debating team 3, 4; Spanish Club 4; "Jonesy" 4.

HoKK' uv ^(7u' Ihetn- ^"Carlos."

Cho
Pastime Reading and swimming.



"Jolly good natured, tull oi tun.

It vou want a real tnend. here is one."



Xatne oj Sludenl Velma Irene Hall.

5////?/7A7ri^Oroville, California.

Dale oJ Birth ]anuiuy 14, 1914.

School tidiK'Hies President G.A.A. 4; Vice President
Senior Class 4; Carnival 4; Sports Writer for Carib-
bean 4; Librarian 4; Supper Club 4; "Jonesy" 4;
Volley Ball 4; Basket Ball 4; Baseball 4; Tennis 4;
Swimming 4.

Hoiv ii'e know them "Hall."

Chosen Vocation Gym. Teacher.

P(7.r//Vt' Athletics.





'Reason is not meisured by size nor by height, but
1 y principle.'



Xamc oj Student Rlth Marie Dlval.
BirthptaceCo\oi\, RP.
Dale oj Birth December 1. 1914.

School ilctii'ities- Supper Club 2; Carnival 4; Sec. ot
Class 4; Office Girl 4; O.G.A. 4: Fonesy 4; Operetta 5. 4.
How u'f know them "Ruthie."
Chosen location Private Secretary.
Pastime Reading.



THE CARIBBEAN



19




"Her smile makes sunshine in sliadv places."



Name oj Student Marion Eleanor Neelv.

Birthplace Philadelphia, Pa.

Dale oJ Birl/i October 28. 1912.

School AcIhhIIc' Supper Club 1. 2, 5, 4; Vice-President 3
Neptune Club 7>. 4; Debating Club (Librarian) 4
Class Treas. 4; Star & Herald Reporter 4; Carnival 4
O.G.A. 4: G.A.A. 7>. 4: Secretary 5; Literary Editoi
Caribbean 4: Secretary and Treasurer 4: Cheer
leader 4; Tennis 4; Swimming 2. 3, 4; "Jonesy" 4;
Volley Ball 3. 4; Operetta 4.

How we know them "Neely."

Chosen Vocation Secretary and Journalist.

Pastime Going places and seeing things.



"Hang sorrow, care'll kill a cat;
Therefore, lets' be merry."



Name oj Student To.\l Pescod.

Birthplace Ecuador.

Date oJ BirlliSept. 12, 1911.

School Jcli>'itie.< Track 4: B.A.A. 1,2,3; Carnival 4;
Baseball 1,2,3 4: Basketball 1,2,3,4; Soccerball
1,2,3,4: Handball ,3,4; Tennis 4: Swimmmg 2; Bowl-
ing 1,4: "Jonesy" 4.

How we know them "Tommy."

Chosen Vocation Physical Director.

Pastime Sports.





"Speak but little and well.

If vou would be esteemed a man of merit."



Name of Student W'ii.i.ia.m C. Bailey.

Birthplace Cristobiil, Canal Zone.

Date oj Birth Auguf.t 28, 1912.

School Actii'itie.i President Orchestra Club 4; Operetta

3, 4; Orchestra 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Bros. 4: Track 2:

Swimming 2; Carni\'al 2, 3 4:
How we know them "Bill."
Chosen J ocation Chemistry.
Pastime Ellen



20



THE CARIBBEAN




"An honest man's the noblest work of God."



Xiiiiie oj Sluiienl Ernest E. Berger.
Birlh place NorfolU, Virginia.
Dale oj Bir/h November 5. 1915.

School Aclit'ilic.> Orchestra 2. 5 and 4; Swimming 4; Car-
nival 2 and 4.
ILw u'c X.710U' Ihcm "Ernie."
Chosen J'ocalioii Civil Engineer.
Pasl'ime Reading, sports.



"A smile for all, a welcome glad.
A jovial, coa.\ing way she had."



Xaine oj Skidenl M.ARY Celeste Cl.arke.

Birthplace St. Joseph, Missouri.

Dale oj BirlhNoyemher 20. 1911.

School Actit'illes Debating team 2, .", 4; Secretary and
Treas. 2, .5, 4; Cheerleader 3, 4; E.xchange Editor,
Caribbean 4; Carnival 3, 4; O.G.A. 4; Volley Ball
Team 3; Captain 4; Basketball 4; Junior Set Benefit 2.

//oil' ii'c X:i?ou' them "Heaven."

Cho.^en Vocation Physical Director.

Pastime Dancing and Swimming.



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"His heart is as far trom fraud as hea\-en from earth."



Xame oj SliutenI Cr.wvford (. C.\.^1PBELL.

Birthplace Cooperstown, N. J.

Dale oj Birl/i December. 15, 1913.

School .-JctifilieJ Tennis 4; Debating Club 4: Swimming

4; Spanish Club 4; Neptune Club 4; Orchestra 4.
//oil' ii'c X/iou' them "Quart."
Paslune Swimming.
Chosen location Lawver.



THE CARIBBEAN



21




"A true tnemi and a real sport."



.V(7///(- of Shtiit'iil Edward Pai'l Conklinc.

Biiihpl(U\i\ncon. Canal Zone.

Dale oj Bir/h]iinuiiry 7, 1914.

School Aclix'ities Swimming 5.4; Basketball 2. 3. 4; Base
ball 2, 5, 4; Handball 3. 4; Soccer 2. 3. 4; Xeptiine
Club 5, 4; Carnival 2. 3. 4; BA.A. 2. 3. 4; O.G.A. 4.
Extra 4; Jonesy 4; 4.

Ho\.-.' u't' kno^^' Ihem "Conk."

Pastime Basketball.

Chosen location Physical Director



"It is good to lengthen to the last a sunny mood.'



Xame of SUufent ^AIargaret Mildred Davis.

Birthplace Harrogate, Tennessee.

Date oj 5/>M September 19, 1913.

School Activities G-A.A 3. 4; O.GA. 4; Carnival 4;

Vice-President Spanish Club 3, 4; Vice-President

Supper Club 3, President 4.
Ho\.v wv fcnoKi^ tliem "Marg."
Pastime Swimming.
Cfiosen Jocaiion Private Secretary.





"Aly book and heart must never part."



Xame oj Sludenl ViNNiH Elson.

Birthplace Galveston, Texas.

Date oj Birth AprW 10, 1914.

School Activ'ilies Spanish Club. Carnival Committee 4.

HoKK' ur kno^v them "Vee."

Chosen 1 ocalion Librarian.

Pastime Read i ng



22



THE CARIBBEAN




"We grant although he had much wit,
he was verv shv at usine it."



Xaine oj Stmienl Russell Elwell.
BtrthpUice Ehzabeth, New Jersey.
Date oj .B/VM March 12. 1913.
School Acli\Hlle.s Orchestra 3, 4; Carni\al
Ho^^^ KK'g know them "Russy."
Pastime Playing tricks.



'He is a man. take him all lor all."



Same oj Student Fabian Englander.

Birthplace Colon, Republic of Panama.

Dale oj Birth ]ur.e 10, 1913.

School Jclu'illej Carni\al 1, 2, 5, 4; Debating Club 4;

Tennis 4.
HoiC iir knon' them "Fabian."
Chosen J'ocatlon High Finance.
Pajtlme Tennis and Reading.





"Her actions were modest and her words discreit.'



Name oj Student Clara Elizabeth Frisk,
Birthplace Blenheim, Ontario, Canada.
Date oj Birth December 8, 1912.

School .Ictu'ltles VicePresident O.G.A.4: Typist Carib-
bean 4; G.A.A. 4;
How we know them "Hicky".
Chosen I ocatlon Stenographer.
Pa.ttlme Swimming.



THE CARIBBEAN



23




"Wliose liltlc



.)()J\- UiUgeil



;iit:hl\- niiiiti.*"



A',j/;;i' (>/ .S'/k, /,;;/ I? run IN I. Hackktt. ]h.

Bir//ip/iii\ Ancoii. C.iiial Zone.

/h,le oj BirihUXy 9, 1912.

School .Iclh'ilie.i Sviir.n.irg 2, 3, 4; Siicccr 7>. -l; Extra 3:
Caribbean Staff 3. 4; Neptune Club 2, 3, 4; Carniv.il
1. 2. 3, 4; B.A.A. 1. 3. 4: Chemistry Bros. 4.

How ice know litem "Chubby."

ClioAt'n Vocal ion Drattsman.

I'a.'linii Swininiinu' and Diving.



"Speech is great; but silence is greater.'



Name P.-\rki:h P. Hanna.
B'uihpliice Hancock Point. Maine.
Dale oj /J////, October 21. 1913.
School .Jcli,'ilie.tB. A. A. 4.
Clw.ten Vocolion Aviation iMechanic.
How we ki>ow Iheoi Park.





"A merrv heart maketh a cheerlui coiintcaance."



Name oj Sludenl John Patrick Keli.y.

Birihpla-e San Francisco, California.

Dale oj .B/VM September 28. 1914.

School ^-Jclifiliej B.A.A. 3. 4; Carnival 3.4: Debiitina

5, 4; "Jonesy" 4; Clieerleader 4; Joke nuiior,

Caribbean 4.
How we know Ihem "). P."
Chojen Vocalion Army Otficer.
Paslime Dancing and swimming



24



THE CARIBBEAN




"With a smile on her lips
And a gleam in her eye."



Name oj Student Maria Kleefkens.
Birthplace Hoboken, New Jersey.
Date oJ Birth October 1, 1912.

Schoot .Ic/i,;ti'e.i Carnival 4; O.G.A. 4; G.A.A. 4; Swim-
ming 4.
Hon.' we k/iow them "iMarie".
Chosen J'ocat'ton Secretary.
Pastime Writing to N.J. and swimming.



"He will succeed for he believes all he savs.'



Xame oj Student De,\ietra I. Lewis.

Birthplace Houston, Texas.

Date oj Birth February 10, 1913.

School Adh'lllej Carnival 4: "Jonesy" 4; B.A.A. 4.

How we know them By his walk.

Chosen J'ocallon Aviation.

Pastime Boating.





"The secret of success is constancy to purpose.'



Name oj Student PerCIVAL A. Lyew.
Birthplace Co\on. R.P.
Date oj Birth October 20, 1912.

School ^Jctlrlllej Boy's Glee Club 2; Orchestra 5; Span-
ish Club 4; Carnival 1, 2; 4; B.A.A. 2,5,4.
How we know them "Percy."
Chojen J'ocalion Doctor.
Pastime Studying.



THE CARIBBEAN



25




"All his taiilts arc such that one lo\-es him the better
tor them."



Xame oj Student Kknnrth Maurer.

Btrtliplace New York City.

Date oj Birt/iHay 4, 1912.

School Jcliiutie. Baseliall 2, .", 4; Bowling 1, 2, 5. 4;

Soccer 3, 4; Glee Club 2: B.A.A. 2, 3, 4; Jonesy 4.

Operetta 4.
How we X'rttni' t/u'/n "Kenny."
Chosen 1 cent ion Clerk.
Pas time Baseba 11



"She is sweet and she is shy.
But there's mischiet in her eve."



Xanie oj Student EuGENH M.4Y McLain.

Birthplace Richmond, Va.

Date oJ Bi'rth November 6, 1912.

School Jctu;'t,e.rSupper Club 1, 2, 3. 4.; O.G.A. 4; G.A.A.



4; Carnival 4; Assistant Literary
Typist Caribbean 4; Operetta 4.

How we hiow /hem "Gene".

Pastime A good murder story.

Chosen J'ocation Private Secretarv.



Etlitor 4; Assistant





"Red hair radiates sunshine.'



Xame oj Student RoNALU PliiLLPOTTS.

Birthplace Fort Cosey, Washington.

Date oj Birth August 22. 1914.

School yictifilies Carniwil 4.

How we know them "Red".

Chosen Vocation Sur\eyor and draftsman.

Pastime Laughing.



26



THE CAEIBBEAN




"A maiden ne\'er bold in spirit still and quiet.



.^ijnw of Sttuicnl Bettina Powers.

Birthplace Ocean Gro\'e, New fersey.

Dale oj birth ]u\y 8, 1914.

School .Ictii'itie.' G.A.A. 2. 5, 4: Jonesy 4.

//i>u' ur know then "Betty".

Cho-'cn J oca 1 1 on "? '

Pa.r/mii Su'immine and tennis.



"Here's a girl with a heart and a smile
That makes the bubble oi lite worth while."



Name oj Student Ann.\ M.ARiK Ryan.

Birthplace Ancon, Canal Zone.

Date oJ Birth March 1, 1914.

School Jcticities Supper Club 1.2 5, 4; C.A.A. 1: Sec. ot
Class 2; School Note Editor 4; Pres. O.G.A. 4; Spanish
Club 4; Office Girl 4: Carnival 2.7>A; Panama Ameri-
can Reporter 4.

How we know them "Irish".

Chosen I'ocaton Private Secretary.

Pastime Readtna





"It is mv motto ne\'cr to hurt anvbodv's feeling



Xame oj Studcnl Aloh.\ SloCU.M.

Birthplace Washington. D. C.

Dale oj Birth ]une 10, 1913.

School Aclii-ilie.rSu\Yer Club 1. 2, 5. 4; G.A A. 4: .Ath-
letic Asst. 1; S]janish C ub 4; Delegate to G.R. Con-
ference to Penna, o; Carnival 1, 4; Treas. Supper
Club 2; Secretary G.R. 4.

flow we know them "SloUy."

Pa.* ttme Georije.



THE CARIBBEAN



27




"Not much talU a great sweet silence.'



\i2/ne oj Stuiietd Dorothy Mae Wirtz

Birihptace A neon. Canal Zone.

Date oj Birf/iOcioher 1. 1910.

Sc/iooi .A/A/V/V.r G.A.A. 2. 3. 4: O.G.A. 4.

/^oif uv hiiHi' Ihem -"Dot."

Chosen location Stenographer.

Pastime Walking, music, moving pictures.



"Turning to mirth, all thmgs ot earth,
As onlv bovhootl can.



Xiime of Sliuient George Walton Wertz.
Btrlliplace -Bas O'Bispo. Canal Zone.
Date oJ Birt/iJunuiiry S, 1912.
School Jctii'itiesBasehnW 1. 2. 3, 4.
Hok^' u'f knoii' them "SUvru".
Ctiojen 1 'ocation'Posta\ Clerk.
Pastime Hunting and lishmg.





"A man ol hopes and forward looking mind."



Name oJ Student Ben T. Williams.

Birthptace Miliington, Tennessee.

Date oj Birtti December 24, 1912.

Schoot .Jctu'itu'.* Swimming 3. 4: Tennis 4; Carnival

2, 5. 4; Neptune Club 3. 4; Orchestra 4; B.A.A. 4;

Official Photographer Caribbean S atl 4; Chemistry

Bros. 4; Diploma Committee 4.
How iiv know them "Spider."
Chosen location ^Electrical Engineer.
Pastime -Tennis. Swim m nig. Fishing. Hunting



28



THE CARIBBEAN




"Not bold nor shy, nor short or tall ;
A pleasant mingling of them all."



Xnme oj Siudcni Barbara Elizabeth Wieck.

Birthplace Houston. Te.xas.

Date oj 5/r//i November 27. 1914.

School ^-^ctfi'iticf Carni\'al 4: "Jonesy" 4.

Hoii' ur f:noif.' them "Bobbie."

Chosen Vocation To have a good time.

Pastime Having fun.



"The mildest manners with the bravest mind



Xame oj Student Rav.mond Robert Will.

Birthplace Astoria, Long Island.

Date oj Birth ]une 27. 1912.

School Acti~'itiej Baseball 2. 3, 4; Basketball 2,5,4; Soc-
cer 5. 4; Swimming 2: Vice-President Sophomre Class
2; Carnival 1: Chemistry Bros. 4; Asssistant Business
Manager 3; Treasurer B.A.A. 4; Business Manager
Caribbean 4; Neptune Club 3, 4.

How we know them "Ray".

Chosen Vocation Electrical Engineer.

Pastime Sports and music.





"I will not retreat a single inch-
I will be heard."



Name oj Student Richard F. Wood.

Birthplace Cristobal, Canal Zone.

Date oj Birth AprW 25, 1912.

School ,/,-/n'///fj Track 4; B.A.A. 3, 4: Baseball 3, 4,;

Soccer 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4; Swimming 3, 4; Carnival

4; Chemistry Bros. 4; Jonesy 4; Circulation Manager

Caribbean 4.
How we know them "Dick."
Chosen location Chemistry.
Pastime Selling tickets and making explosi\"es in Chemistry

Class.



'J'HE CARIBBEAN



29




"A mcrrv heart tliietli yood like a medicine.'

\nini' PnoKnE O'Donneli-

Birthplace Mobile, Ala.
Dale aj lilrlhVchruiny 2. 1111.
How ICC know l/icin Plioebc.
C/w.ien location Stenographer.
School .Iclit'ilic.' Post Graduate.




30



THE CARIBBEAN



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32



THE CARIBBEAN



B

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QIlaHH MiHlnrij

JIcBern. 57.


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B



SPRING.

On October 6, 1927, a different class appeared
to grace the halls of C. H. S. In the initiation on
the big Field Day, Freshmen boys showed their
superiority by defeating the Sophomores. We
were determined to make a grant! ilebut. so we
gave the first Costume Bail at the Washington
Hotel on April 15, 1928. Neither were we lack-
ing in scholarship, tor we had five high-honor
students on the Honor Roil.

SUMMER.
In our Sophomore year we were bored v\ith the
inquisitlveness of the Freshmen and condescend-
ing attitude of the upperclassmen. Neverthe-
less, we "threw" t/ie Tacky Party at the Strangers'
Club, the best of our four vears. It included the



never-to-be-forgotten Boy's Follies. The rest
of the year was spent in thinking of our forth-
coming importance.

.AUTUMN.
We fulfilled our promise as upperclassmen in
that three of the four members of the Debating
team which defeated Baiboa were Juniors. We
then gave the Class of 1930 a u'e/l-de.rerfed ban-
quet. Later, in the Ballroom, a Woman-less
Wedding was staged. Those present will never
forget the unrivalled beauty of our boys.

WINTER.
We were snoweti under with Social Science assign-
ments, staff work, debating, athletics, senior
play, the Operetta, etc. As the book goes to press
we are gradually thawing out.



B

3


Jlarion Xcctv, '31.


- g?

a



Our breakfast \\as very leisurely that morning;
for we had not seen each other tor years, and now
we were talking o\er old times, when we were
younger. I was very happy to ha\e my old class-
mate from Cristobal High visit me for a few weeks.
And Mrs. Aloha Slocuni Wertz, famous interior
decorator who hati just finished re-decorating the
\'anderl)ilt home, seemed happy to be at my home
in New York also.

She told me aljout some of the Class of '31 and
what they had been doing. First she informed
me how successful Celeste Clarke Powell had been
with her School of Classic Dancing ; and how good
Demetra Lewis was as a comedian on Broadway.
Other members of our class had been "called"
to the stage, the team of Elwcll and Philpotts, was
now worth millions, for everyone was crazy over
their Paramtmnt sketches.

Then I told her that Gene McLain hati written
me very recently that Dr. Percival Lyew had
appointed her head nurse and next only to him in



his new hospital, which would probably rival
"John Hopkins."

I rememlier that several years ago in my so-
ciety column 1 had seen that Barbara Weick
had been appointed official chaperone at West
Point. This was a surprise to Aloha who thought
she had become a Mrs. General, but I told her
that school romances do not often turn out well.
She laughed sheepishly but then defended her-
self "Well, George is President of the B. & O.
besides being my high school boy friend." \\'e
had a good time out of that, too.

Having talked over all we knew, we decided
to settle down and read the NEW YORK SUN, of
which I \\as editor. There in blazing headlines
we saw that the Ambassador from United States
to China was coming back on a vacation on the
"President Hoover", before leaving for a new post
in France. Who was it but Carlos Rankin, our
class president for four years, and the editor of
the Senior Annual?



THE CARIBBEAN



83



Well, Aloha was insistent that \vc go clown to
the clocks and see him in. On our way I had to
stop at the office to sec that everything was going
O.K., and to my astonishment Ben Williams was
there, waiting for an interview with me. Alter the
palaver was over he told me that he wanted to get
our contract to furnish the society cuts for the
Sunday paper, as he had taken most of the pic-
tures this season of the debutantes, prominent
business people, and "everybody and his dog.
From his walk I gleaned that he was the owner of
The Williams Studios, New York. \\'hen we told
him where we were going he, of course, decided
to go along and have a real reception for Carlos.

On the way we passed a magnificent building
that was being erected, and I asked my chauffeur
to whom it belonged. He told mo that the Chemis-
try Laboratories, owned by Wood, Bailey, and
Will, had asked for bids tor the construction of it,
and strange as it seemed to the business world of
New York, the Hackett Construction Co. had
agreed to do the ;ob for practically nothing. Self-
ish, greedy. New York could not understand why.
But we could, tor why should not a classmate help
out in a case like that?

We were nearing the pier now and all of us
were getting excited. Arriving, we found that
the place was crowded. The huge crowd pressing
against each other, all eager to be near the gang-
plank and see the passengers disembark. A large
well built man tried to get ahead of me and I stood
up for my rights and talked to him like the editor
of a newspaper might. He turned around and
glared at me and then commenced to laugh. For
it was Ed. Conkling and beside him Velma Hall.
"Well, what are you two doing here.'" They
answered that the Olympics' officials were coming
in and they had to meet them. After being asked
why, they answered that as head coaches of the
U.S.C. they had been asked by Thomas Pescod,
chairman of the Olympics this year, to do this
honor. Tom, like \'elma and "Conk." had dis-
tinguished themseUes in the world of sports.

Then Ben chimed in and said that speaking of
the world of sports had we heard of Ken Maurer's
taking the place of Babe Ruth, and taking it so
well that his new book "Around the Diamond"
was a sensational hit. Of course, it may have been
that the help of Ruth Duval, holder of a Pulitzer
Prize, had sold the book too, but still its success
was unusual.



No time for more talk now, for the boat was
tying up and even such interesting talk as this
was had (o be stopped for a while, as all eyes
searched the boat for familiar faces. Finally we
spied Carlos way up on the bridge, and after see-
ing us he waved frantically. To our surprise so did
the ca])tain. "Wry courteous of him," remarked
Velma. Then Ben said that the Captain surely look-
ed a lot like Parker i lanna and after due observa-
tion we discovered (lial was w Im il was. By George!

.\fter the boat tieil up we immediately boarded
it and Parker told us all to come to his suite and
we would talk (lungs over. For the benefit of
Carlos and Parker we told all the news that we had
discc:)vered about old friends and the Class of '31
in particular. Then Parker began to tell us things.
His boat belonged to Fabian f^nglander. who had
recently bought out the steamship company an had given Parker the captaincy of the "President
Hoover." Ernest Berger had become the "Wolf
of Wall Street." We all took note of this; may-
be our incomes could be increased If Ernie would
give us a few pointers as to how to play the game.

In his travels he learned that Marie Kleefkens
had married some rich American Planter and had
opened up a Commercial School in Honduras for
the native girls. Strange to say, she had the sup-
port of the Honduran government behind her
and all of the officials were trained In her school.

In the same country Jack Kelly was Command-
er-in-chief of the army and was training the cadets
as well as Marie was her stenos.

Carlos then told us that Crawford Campbell,
now one of the judges in the World Court was
married to Vlnnle Elson, one of the most prom-
inent women writers of America.

Bettina Powers was a missionary In Africa and
doing wonders with the natives there. Clara
Frisk, the chairman of the National Typing Tests
of the United States, was editor of the "Gregg
Writer." We were disturbed by a voice outside,
cautiously asking for the Ambassador. Carlos
told her to come in and it was "Dot" Wirtz, who
explained that she had heen traveling around the
world Incognito, and at China had met our Presi-
dent and become his secretary. He then told us
that "Dot" was very modest and probably never
would acknowledge that she was head stenog in
the Supreme Court of the United States, a job
which Anna Ryan had recently resigned in order
"to take the veil."



34



THE CAKIBBEAN



And then to change the subject she told us that
a lady outside wanted to see the Captain and
"right away." The steward opened the door and
in rushed Miss Mary Moore. "Hide me quick."
she said, "just because I was made President of
the American Dean Association all these reporters
insist that they take my picture. And you know
mine didn't come out good for the Annual." Well,
that ended our day and "Conk" made the motion
that we all go up to my house and celebrate and



have dinner. But, I've been away all day I
don't know what's in there to celebrate with.

Then Ben suggested that we telephone Schraft's,
the best delicatessen store in New York State,
with branches all over, even in London. "Sure,
It's good stuff. Margaret Davis runs it isn t
that enough." "Suits me" said Conk, and we all
knew that if Conk was satisfied it was good eats
WE WERE.




Cristobal. Canal Zone,

June JO, 1931.
We, the Senior Class of 1931, of the Cristobal High School. City of Cristobal. County of Colon,
and State of Canal Zone, do hereby scribble, and say this, our last will and testament as students of
that famous Cristobal High School, hereby revoking all former wills, bequests, and devises of whatever
nature by us made.

We bequeath to each member of the Junior Class, the Senior Class of 1932, something which we
excel in, and that we feel will thereby improve the said class.



Bill Bailey.__

Ernest Berger

Edward Conkling

Margaret Davis

Ruth Duval

Fabian Englander

Vinnie Elson

Russell Elwell

Clara Frisk .,

Burton Hackett._

Parker Hanna

Velma Hall

Marie Kleefkens

Demetra Lewis.

Percy Lye\v..._

Eugenia McLain -...

Kenneth .^laurer

.Marion Xeeiy__

Celeste Powell

Thomas Pescod

Bettina Powers

Ronald Philppotts

Carlos Rankin

Anna Ryan

Dorothy W'irtz

Richard Wood

George Wertz these

Aloha Slocum .with..

Barbara Weick

Ben Williams



BEQUEATHS



His sax appeal

His reserve

His appetite

The Supper Club

Her petiteness

His tennis serve

Her intellect

His mischief

Her seriousness

His stature

His LOVE for "Hurdles'

Her night life

Her six subjects

His absences in class

His ambitions

Her man

His slimness

Her West Pointer..

Her fun

His athelicability

Her \-ocabulary

His red hair--

His scholarship

Her giggle

Her quietness

His good looks

Two say they are

them; but wish the

Her love of Latin--

His little camera --



TO



Junior Forsstrom.

Jesse Sinclair.

Alice Gormerlv.

Nell Wardlawl

James \\'ood and Dona Eaton.

Malcolm Wheeler.

Tom Murphy.

Allene Deakins and Anthony Fernandez.

Alicia Thirlwall and Gladys Bliss.

Harry Egolf and Ben Roberts.

Eleanor Reinhold and Jean Pruit.

Elizabeth \\'irtz and Laura Rose.

Thelma King and Elsie Neely.

Perry Washabaugh.

Jake Dietzer and Carl Kariger.

Evelyn Wright.

Jessie Vane.

Betty Stahler.

Mary Deans and Inez Theokisto.

Howard Keenan and Richard Betten.

Verona Herman.

Alvin Lyew.

.Martha Potts and James Hayden.

Vivian Elmergen, Ruth Casto, and Marion Waldau

Robert Stevenson.

Herman Roos.

Taking e\'eiyting

Juniors luck.

.'Mice Curtis.

Frank Greisinger and Edward Weisman.



Signed on the dotted line, sealed with chewing gum, published and declared by the said members
of the Class of 1931, as and for their laast Will and Testament, in the presence of us, who at their
request, in their presence, and in the presence of each other, have hereunto subscribed our names as
attesting witnesses to said instrument.

S. W. A. K. Witnesses: YOU, ME and US.

[seal] Address: Here. There, and Everywhere.



THE CARIBBEAN



35




OCR EDITOR







LOOK OfT BEM/k/D





noNKS






36



THE CARIBBEAN




THE CARIBBEAN




38



THE CARIBBEAN




THE CARIBBEAN



39



JUNIOR DIRECTORY



NAMES



Glays Bliss

AUene Deakins

Alary Deans

Jacob Dietzer

Beverl_\- Dunn

Dona Eton

)oe Ebdon

Antonio Fernandez

Albin Forsstrom

Alice Gormerly

Verona Herman

Howard Keenan

Carl Kariger

Thelma King

AKin Lyew

Robert Marshall

Thomas Murphy

Elsie Neely

Jean Pruit ---

Eleanor Reinhold

Ben Roberts

Herman Roos

Laura Rose.-

Bruce SaunderS--

Charles Goodenough..

Frank Griesinger

Jesse Sinclair

Harry Egolf

Robert Stevenson

Inez Theoktisto

Alicia Thirwall

Jesse Vane

Perry Washabaugh...

Nell Wardlaw

Malcolm Wheeler

Randy Wickinstad ...

Elizabeth Wirtz

James Wood

Evelyn Wright

Vivian Elmgren

Ruth Casto

Betty Stabler

Eddie Weisman

Marian Waldau

Alice Curtis

Richard Bettien



MEANS OF DISTINGUISHING THEM.



Curly hair and not much altitude.

Her air ot mystery.

Alwa_\'S doing shorthand.

His bright red comb.

"School's an institutiim ot nient.d torture."

Always losing inone\-

Look for Gladys and he'll be there.

His big gold ring.

His flirting with the girls..

She always knows the answer.

Always working about solid geometry.

His piano playing.

Always drawing cartoons.

Her red hair.

His good tennis playing

The desk carver.

His eraser and chalk throwing

P. A. A.

Her bright blue lunch box

Her vain attempts to collect dues.

That baby lace.

Found where\'er there is trouble.
Her coy ways.

Always in the typewriting room.
Usually talking to "Dolly."

PORKY.

His short pants.

His love ot giving orations.

Never pays his dues.

Being Miss Kimbro's pet.

Always with Pete.

Her studying.

Found in Chemical Laboratory.

Always talking to the boys.

Running on Junior room desks.

His efforts to get order in the Junior class.

Her good cooking.

J I LOP Y.

Her efforts to lose Robert.

Her "all A report card.

Her windblown bob.

Those big eyes.

Corporal ot the Guard.

Always with Alice.

Her graceful dancing.

His good (?) grades in Span. 9.



40



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THE CARIBBEAN



41





42



THE CARIBBEAN



^^m-\



"B



ADVISOR



ALTERNATE VICL-PRESIDLNT






PRESIDENT SECYcSTREAS.



C PESCOD
'Paps'



K FOLLY
'MarLj'



FMEYLRS

TieJdy"





OHtllBRON M ANDREWS

'Prof Max




ft :fl M 5-0 ffl '@



HAQneai TAIbntton DBeine "GBernie QBirteland
'Head' Tiilis' 'Beans" 'Bud' 'Dot

ll



JBretch' R Bfydon V^/Beard_
"Jenny" BecKy' Doc




H




L,



M tf^



J David C.Durham V Foley EGormely C Gould
Jay' 'Betty" "Vee'- 'Eddie' Peoria



H Hammond JHayden C Hoaie
Elena' 'Jimmy'- Holu



^ :f It






&Huff WKeenan LKIeefKms H Lee JLockiuood
"Guapo" 'Peanuts" MonK' Archie LocKy



liMarchosky nMelehdez JMurphy
Maga' "Mel' Nurph




ftj ,f fi if^ ^ li



CMunKittncK JNeilson EdelaOssa G.ORourKe M.Oujen

"MunKy" 'Bugs" 'Horsy" Billy' "Miily'

MSafford B.Sanders KSmith Ljipton EThirtuall

'Natty" "Bern' Tiny' "Sands' 'Eddie'




A.PoLuers MRaKoujsKy V Randal I

"Rifadi "Shorty' "Ginger"

EThorton KToLunshetid /I Vane

Lee' "Kay" "Arc"








TPanKin GWilberg^
Gas" "Gmns"



m

nCariiS
"Mono"



Papa I Maga



THE CARIBBEAN



43



SOPHOMORE DIRECTORY



NAiME



Harold Agnew
Thelnia Albritton
M.ixine Ainlrews
Dii\-al Bene -.
Gordon Bernie
Dorothy BirltelaiKi
Jesse David
Carmen Durham.

Velta Foley

Edward Gormely
Charles Gould

Helen Hammond

James Haydcn

Oscar Heilbron

Charles Howe

Garrett Huff

\Vm. Keenan

Louis Kleekens

Henry Lee

Jr. Lockwood

Mandi Marchowsky

Mary Melendez

Carl Munkitrick

Jolin Murphy

Ernest de la Ossa

Genevieve O' Rourke..

Mildred Owen _.

Charles Pescod.

Ann Powers

Norine Rakovsky

Violet Randall

Tommy Rankin

Natalie Sattord

Bernice Sanders.-

Harvey Smith

Lando Tipton

Edna Thrlwill

Elizabeth Thornton

Kay Townshend

Arthur Vane

Wilber Ginsberg

Rebecca Brydon

Webster Beard

Mary Curtis. ._



HOBBY



Sailing
Tennis
I3i\-lng and tlancing...

Sports

Tennis

Spoits

Debating

Dancmg

Dancing

Swimming

Reading

Studying

Swimming

Aviation

Hunting

Drinking

Studying

Bo.xing

Diving

Nunting

Sports

Riding

Tom Thumb golfing..

Sailing

Baseball.

Men

Swimming

Sports...

Tennis

Sports

Dancing

Sailing

Flirting
Swimming.

Swimming

Loaiing

Dancing.

Sports

Swimming

Radio

Reading

Sports

Sea Scouts...
Flirting



AMBITION.



Sea Captain

Private Secretary
Folly's Girl

Success

Forest Ranger

Librarian

Scientist

Aviatcl.\

Language Teacher

Aviator

Salesman
Teacher

Skipper

Aeronautical engmeering.

Forest Ranger

Navigatior
Great man?

Hobo

Banker
To live

Cowboy

Private Secretary

Good husband..

Trimmer..

Civil Engineer

Men

Secretary...

Athetic Coach

Lady ot leisure

Housewife..

Artist

Civil Engineer..

Diver

Secretary

Engineer

Engneer

Teacher

Steno

Singer

Monare

Army officer .,

Physical director

Mariner

None



SAYING.



"What!"

"Heck with You!"

"Oh Gee!"

"Oh, Yeah!"

"Scram!"

"Really!"

"Blah. Blah, etc."

"There's number five."

"Oh! Bull."

U wan!
"Well, well, well!"
" 1 don't know."
"Who Opened the cage."
"O! wotta life!"
"Sure "!
"Awww"
"Not much!"
"Crasando!"
"Well, for Pete's sake"
"Rammed!"

"Why don't you go home?
"Sez U!"
"I'se regusted.
"Yea! Boy!"
"Wotta Slam!"
"Boop Boop a doop."
"Wouldn't kid me?"
"Alr'ght, alright"
"Beautiful"

"It was too funny for .Anything
"Oh! Dear!"
"Bologna".
"Phooey!"
"Y Como!"
"Ahah!"

"Take a flying leap."
"You Sap."
"Maybe!"
"Hot Darn!"
"You're all wet!"
"O! Yeah."
"Oh! Yeah!"
"Sey Yah!"
"Nothing Doing."



44



THE CARIBBEAN



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47



FRESHMEN DIRECTORY



NAME

Anderson. Harry

Arthur, Kathleen

Bailey, John

Barnett, Louis
BeUlen, Blaiichc
Beklcn. Charles
Beriicr. Claiuk'
Bettien. Altrctl
Bliss, .^lal)elle
Boggs. Stella
Campbell. Colin

Davis. Norma

Davis. \'eachel

Day. Aimee

Dearth. Frances

Duey, Malcolm

Dwver, JacU

Ebtion. Fred

Ego\i, Ruth

Funes, Armando

Gibson. Anne

Gorin. Jerry

Greenleaf. Ellen

Hanna. Virginia

Hayes. Elizabeth

Hearne. .^lary ._.

Hoitman. Maxine .
Hollowell. \'ictoria.-.
Holloweli. William....

Horine. Carlton

Hiintoon, Ethel

Lam. Blossom

Larnsson, Clarice

Leach. Helen

Lewis, feanne

Levy. David __.

Lyons. John

."^tannix, Gloria

.^lannix. John...

Marshall. David

Mueller, Edna

i^lurphy. Charles..

Packard, Edwin

Pickett. Ruth

Plath. Arthur

Poole. Dorothy

Poole. George

Remhold. Richard ..

Rocs, Dorothy

Slocum. Warren
Small. Bettv

Small. Harold

South. Charles

Standish, Chris.-

Stetler, Betty

Stewart. Olive

St
Thompson. John

Turner. Howard

Torres. Blanca

Washabaugh. Frank

Wheeler. Ray

Wirtz. Chester
Wirtz. Edison

Wood. Alice

Wood. Ernest

Mrs. Spencer .

Mr. Hackett



RECOGNIZED BY



Dimples

Friendly maimer. __

Kansas City Stomps

His grin

Raven locks

"Ohyeahl"...

Valentino hair

Rosv checks

Curl_\ (oi>

"Happv feet"

THO.^Ecycs"
"A'ariability"

Mis wa\cs __.

Pious atmosphere

Inaudibility

"Gatunishiiess".

"Ice cold pop"
Green polo shirts
Ponderous walk
Latin ieatures
Freckles
Knickers!
Bill Bailey
Titian tresses

Velocity!

"Humpt !"

.^lagiiitude

Tinv voice

Alibis

His curls

Beautiful Blushes? ,

Shy manner

"Greto Garbishness"

Boyishness

Fabulousness

Hearty laugh

Length

Art collection

Sea-green eyes!

"Age of innocence" -.

Arching brows

Expression efface.

Open countenance

Wind-blown

Linear measurement.

Her sneeze

Sleepishness

Pompador

Bashful smile

Mockery

Brown eyes

Shambling gait

"Fore!"- ._.

Hair cut

Her continual chattering

Practirabilitv

$1000 profile

Red hair ..

Southern accent

Spanish combs

Delicate giggle!

Crooked grin

Unconcern ,.

Caroons

Sott tones

Caribbean Illustrations
Grass bag and umbrella
Philosophy



TYPE.



ANTICIPATED ACHIEVEMEN I



Phlegmatic

Reliable

Beau BrummcU

Inquisitive.

Black beauty

Highbrow

Flirt
Tranquil

Pollvanna

"Siinpatica"

Witty
\'amp

Uiiassuniiny._ __

Bookworm

Seen but not heard

Highbrown superlati\c..

SK)\v but sure --

Here, there, everywhere

Io\-ial

Silent

Titi;tnes<]iic

Alecicllcsonie

Coyishness

Nonchalant

Autogenetic

Diffident,

Petite

Victorious!!

Uncontrollable

Scientific

Coquettish

Demure

Languid

"Free and easy"

Dramatic

Mathematical

Listless

Passive

Rudesby

January-molasses

Sensitive

Happy -go-lucky

Waggish

Domineering

Unot tensive

Ever-ready _.._

Interrogative

Altruistic, _

Disposed to murmur

A would-be-wise-person...

Dare-devil____ ,, ._

Careful

Anticipating for the best.

Nautical

Hilarious .

Industrious.

Fluent

"We're in the Navy now*

Aimable

Divine

Blushing!..
Rowdy-
Ambitious
Feminine-plus
"Still-water" .

Humble but worthy.,

"Let's be good sports "..
Quiet but forceful...



To swim the .Atlantn.
Usher

Strong man
Joe Brown 1 1
Opera star
Floor walker
Warden: Sing Sing
liaskctball star

African missionarvTimee Semple
McPherson 11.
Undcrstudv of Rudv Valee
Old in.iid
Truck drn cr
Chorus girl
Circus barker
Wolf of Wail vStreet
Prolessional tlancer
.^lanufactu^er of rubber hot dogs.
\'cnus ot driima.
".\poll<,"
I' anions dn-orcee
I^carl di\er.

.^latron of Orphan .Asylum.
Parisian modiste.
Inwilid.
Cabaret girl.
Champion heavyweight.
Literary genius.
.A Senior.
.A cannibal.

First Lady-of-the-Land
Physical director.
Chinese Diplomat.
Society debutante.
Grass widow.
Dissector of bugs.
Civilize the Indian Ocean.
Head of a laundry.
100' ; teacher's pet.
Student of Divinity.
Landscape gardener.
White House janitor.
Martvred priest.
To bathe in the Nile.
Chicago racketeer.
.\thletic coach.
Fool-proof Somnambulist.
Revive the Dead Sea.
Mathematician.
Stylist.

Chief chaperon,
(jigolo.

Champion swimmer.
.A na\'y.

Italian Princess.
Notorious hypnotizer.
Yale muscle-builder.
.A perfect \-alet.
Indian court othcial
Pnmadonna.
Salesman.
Baker.
Censor.

.^lilitant sulfragette
.^lonte Carlo gambler.
Paris style designer.
Policeman.
A Nazarene.



48



THE CARIBBEAN



RIVfR IN THE INTERIOR
/ \





SEA 5 HDR E
/ \






5 :ene5

FROn OUR



[Dnni55ARY





THE CARIBBEAN



49




J/arion E. Xeelj/ '31.



50



THE CARIBBEAN



The Staff of The Caribbean takes this opportunity to thank the ladles who acted as judges for
our short story and poetry contests. We feel that it added much to the success of both contests.
The judges were: Mrs. O. S. Hearne, Mrs. Adella M. Kolle, Mrs. Madge Butler, Mrs. J. F. Jenness.



BEST POEM
PICTURES.

Carlos Rankin, '31.

I.

On G.\tun Lake.

The blazing sun stands high at noon.

And the glistening waters of the lake

Swamp the island's reedy shores.

The huge dead trees stand against the noon-day sky.

Their arms twisted in the agony ot death;

Their form and orchid-covered trunks

Rise out of the dark depths.

II.
B.ACK Fro.m the City.

As the banners of departing day
Were streaming across the horizon,
A worn cayuca sharply stayed
Its progress through the waters.
In it sat a young Machi,
His timid eyes afire.
His Indian soul was dancing now-
To the tune of Nature's Ivre.



THE POEM WITHOUT A NAME.
Malcolm Duey, 'J4.

"We are lost!" the captain shouted, as he

staggered down the stair,
"Man the boats! he ne.xt commanded,

but no sailorman was there:
And the waves beat high and heavy, and the

tog was thick as soup.
When from aft there came an answer, and it

said, "Poo-poo-pa-doop!"

For his crew was at the talkies, hearing

Helen "Sugar" Kane,
And the captain could not rouse them.

though he yelled with might and main;
So the gallant vessel foundered, with the

skipper on her poop.
And her quarterdeck went under with a

"Glub! Poo-poo-pa-doop!"

Now she's down six hundred fathoms,

where King Neptune's gardens lie
With the fronds oi pea-green seaweed

wa\-ing to the distant sky.
And the fishes swim around her, in a jolly,

scaly group,
Just to hear the Mermaid's chorus singing

"Ah! poo-poo-pa-doop!"



HONORABLE MENTION
A STUDENT TURNS FORTUNE-TELLER.

.ilice Gormerly, '32.

Far down on the horizon

I see a cloud.

It IS a verv black

And angrv cloud.

It seems to menace

Those around me.

With each hour

This cloud grows larger.

Slowly it comes upon

My unsuspecting

Fellow-men.

Should I warn them?

They would not listen.

Fun would still

Be their aim.

No, I will not

Tell them.

Let them enjoy life

While they can.

Too soon this creeping specter

Will reach out and seize them,

Surprising them in the very act

Ot studying something

To amuse them.

Ah! It is almost upon them now.

Too late they see this

Thing which haunts them all.

They fly around in confusion.

Seeking a way out ol their

Ignorance-

Only those who worked steadily

Go serenely on, with no fear

Of this black shadow.

You ask me what it is?

Do you not know?

Is it the wrath of God,

Come upon all sinners?

Oh, no, it is the wrath of teachers

Descending upon erring students.

It is Final Exams.,

The plague of the students' world.

MOONLIGHT ON THE CHAGRES.

Dai'td Levi/, '34.
When it's moonlight on the Chagres,
And the stais are shining down.
When the alligator's swimming
By a little native town.

When it's moonlight on the Chagres
And you're feeling kind of blue,
I'll get out my little cayuca
And cross the lake to voti.



THE CARIBBEAN



51



SUCH A GIRL.

F,d^>.'ard Conklinch '31.

If a girl doesn't smoke, or drink strong rve.
Thev give her a sneer and pass her \i\.
The boys never really stop to think
That it wrecks her charm it she does drink.

It a girl isn't snappy and talk liahv talk

The hoys turn her down with the look of a hawk

The silly things, if they could see.

Baliv talk isn't all its cracked up to he.

If a girl doesn't look like an Easter egg,
They're not the type to whom they're engaged;
If they could see beyond the paint
iMany a boy would surely faint.

If a girl doesn't neck she isn't a go;
They think she is dumb and awtully slow,
Gooilness! If a boy could only agree
That a girl who necks just can't brew tea.

If a girl doesn't have her eyebrows plucked
And her eyelashes blackened and all stuck up.
If she doesn't have lipstick and a cute Cupid's bow-
They says she's "out without a ghost of a show.

THINGS CHANGE.

Craii'Jord Campbell, 'J/.

Lilies white, yellow, and orange,
Roses white and red.
Flowers scented and sweet to-day,
To-morrow will be dead.



Buildings made of wood and rock.
Marble and minerals bright.
To-day seem lasting: to-morrow gone
'Tis age comp.ared with a night.
Animals and bright plumed birds
On this earth's small crust.
People too, and insects all.
To-morrow will be dust.
O Nature, giver antl taker again;
O Time that tells the fate of men;
Keep on that upward trail.
Do not let mankind fail.



HIGHER.

Crawjord Campbell, '31.

In frantic trenzy against the wind

They stretch up toward the sky
With graceful ciir\-es, with upward leap

Their fluffy heads held high.
And deep jungle trees throw out their arms

To catch a glimpse of light.
Their eager limbs want hea\'en's charms

Their leaves the sun so bright.
And grasses fight for lack of space

To view the sky so blue
They want to see that shining face

'Twill give them life anew.
Let us look up and see the light

Keep truth and honesty in sight.



BEST SHORT STORY.
'T)UN"

Ernest De la Ossa, '31.



The grass, parched by the many weeks of
glaring sun, rustled as a weak gust of dust-laden
air passed along the plain. Here and there a
\-ulture wheeled and circled in the azure expanse
overhead, waiting always waiting. Scattered
heaps of bleached bones formed a rim for a muddy.



under his sleek, glossy, dun-colored hide. He
was past his prime, not having much more time
to live on earth; yet he was still undisputed as
leader over all this great expanse. Men had
never been able to conquer him although many
had sworn to do so. His herds and mares were



half-dry waterhole which was becoming drier always considered as uncapturable under his

ea'-h day and would soon vanish until the winter wily leadership. Lately, however, he had been

supplied it with the much-needed moisture. fighting a losing fight his herds were gone,

Into this desolate scene came a superb figure, scattered and captured. Dun's eyes took on

as masterful appearing as the full-blooded arab a frightened look and he became like a ghost

steeds of old. With his head held high, dainty just a fleeting vision.

nostrils sniffing for that hated scent and stand- As he approached the waterhole he cast glances
ing on a small hillock he presented a picture no to either side, walking warily. After drinking
artist has painted. He was sweat, streaked but enough to last him through other days of hard-
far from exhausted; all day he had run eluding ship and flight he laid down and rolled in the
capture and shaking off pursuit only by using his dust, a pleasure denied him for many days,
almost human brain to its utmost. Dun was Finally he slept to awake with a start. It was
twelve hands high; every muscle had its place rapidly nearing dawn and to the east a fire cast



THE CARIBBEAN



its dull glow toward the heavens. Dun snorted ;
again fiendish means were being useil to bring
about his capture. Running and dodging was his
lot all day. Toward dusk his tired ears failed
him and a light swish turned his body into a
bundle of nerves as a rope whizzed through the
air encircling his long taunt neck. He plunged
and bucked all in a fury antl in the dropping of a
leaf was free. Again they were thwarted, but
became more incensed in the chase.

Dun was becoming haunted by visions of men,
ropes and corrals. At every canyon, thicket or
cleft he shied. Bets anil rewards flamed the ardor
of these hunters so that the horse never rested.
They all knew that tirhe would wear the animal
down until a slight slip and he was theirs.

The horse would not leave his old home and
haunts; he began to circle aimlessly. One morn-
ing upon awakening he found that he had blun-
dered into a box-canyon and his pursuers had
been awake and taken advantage of his blunder.
The sole outlet was fence! by spiked timbers,
but desperation drove the animal on and with a
terrific display of energy he cleared the barrier
although he was badly spent.

His victory had been a moral one. The hunters
began to wonder if it was possible to capture the
spirited beast. All their traps had failed and not
a few of the men returned. For a while life be-
came almost peaceful again, but raids upon a
nearby horserance were laid at his feet and at-
tributed to him. Rewards were doubled for his
capture alu'e.

The brief pause in the hunt had been a timely
one and enabled him to laugh at their attempts for
a while, but again the strain began to tell. Dun
had begun to regather his herds from the well,
lilled pens of wild horse ranchers. One night as
he was striving to lift a wooden bar to a corral
gate a rancher saw him an'l angered because of
his inability to capture the wild stallion, shot at
him, hitting him in his soft rump. Dun snorted
with pain and ran, not stopping until many miles
away from the spot of his misfortune.

Several weeks later a refreshed Dun returned
to his old haunts. An undefinable magnetism
had lured him back to his tlangerous realm where
he somehow felt that he must end his days. The
same morning of his return he was sighted and
the animal again was forced to be a fugitive.

Near sundown the stallion was fatigued and
weary to seeking a place of refuge he walked out



on a narrow shelf-like protusion. Then the dread-
ed thing happened. The hunters had separated
and a returning band had seen his figure outlined
against the sky. Advancing stealthily they hatl
succeeded in surrounding hini.

The horse stood trembling close to the preci-
pitous side of the hill. On both sides and to the
rear lay death on sharp rocks at the bottom of the
ravine. To the front lay capture in the form of
advancing lines of horsemen, lassoes whirhng,
preparatory to the cast.

Dun thought of his youthful days happiness,
freedom, and leadership. His many sons and
daughters all In the hands of these hated men.
He had roamed the plains at will for years. Now,
men, because of money, sought to ruin this all
and enslave him as they had done all his brethren.

Pictures of dusty corrals, saddles, cruel spurs,
and bits flashed through his mind. Could he
live through a life of that sort? He had lived
the greater part of his life in freedom. If cap-
tured he would be much like a wild bird in a trap^.
The horsemen steadily advanced gloating over
their success. They tlid not hurry. They were
assured of his capture.

A lasso shot out, followed by others, some
reached Imt a devil was at the end of all of them.
Biting and kicking he disentangled himself from
their coils, yet he was not free. Recoiling their
ropes the men stood In front of him, blocking his
path to freedom. They slowly quieted their
horses and again they advanced. This time they
were sure of their prize.

As they neared Dun he sensed capture and
defeat. Recollections of the past flashed through
him. Life was sweet, yet capture didn't seem
as life to him. He acted then. The horsemen
gasped In surprise at the sight that met their eyes.

Dun was never captured.




THE caribbi<:an



53



RF.ST STORY IN SENIOR CLASS.
IMPOSSIBLE.



John joincil the Na\\v. lie- was assiiiiiuil to llic
U.S.S. "New Mexico," a line, hit; l.alllesliip.
The maneuvers were to lie lielil near Panama
Think ot it, going to Panama where he couki see
the famous Panama Canal!

The U.S.S. "New Me.xlco", with the rest of the
battlefleet, left I lamiiton Roads early Sunikiy
morning. The.v were to lie in the vicinity of Colon
on Friday. |olin was st) interested in the trip
and the siiip that the days just rolletl hy as did
the waves.

He wonderetl whether he would he allowed to
go ashore. On Tucstlay he fount! that they were
to attack the Canal, tiie "unconcjuered" Canal.
The Canal's fortifications were on the lookout
for them.

lohn thought he would not he alloweil shore-
leave: ami he hail planneil so much on it, on seemg
the beautiful stores, where one could buy almost
anything he w isheil : in ivories, perfumes, shawls,
ami curios. Yes, he wanted one of those big
Spanish shawls for his sister who was in college
back home.

John has always been gootl in geography, so
if he couldn't see Panama he would learn about
it from the map. He was looking at a map close-
ly, reading the different names of the larger
towns of Panama, when an officer happened l>y.
He spoke to John; John arose ami saluted. He
said, "I see you're interested m Panama, have
you been there before?" John said, "No Sir,"
but that he knew the lay of the land fairly well,
from having studietl the map. The officer told
him to report to him in his office the ne.xt day at
nine-thirty. John wondered what was going to
happen. That night he tokl two of his buddies
his orilers. They were surprised, too. John re-
ported on time. He was with the officer half an
hour. That evening his buddies asked, "What
was up?" The only response they could get was
"You'd be surprised." He went to see the officer
again the next day. The ship was now in sight of
land and moving very slowly as they were afraid
the enemy's planes would see them. They an-
chored about six-thirty off a quiet lagoon,
and a detachment of sailors and marines were
sent ashore. Now, this naturally caused much
excitement.



John slept little that night as he had heun told
to he jirejiared to lea\e by airplane from the
ship at five-fifteen the next morning. He was
going on a special commission. When he was
ready and had put on his helmet and goggles he
was given a letter, and was tokl to give it to the
officer in charge of the base where he was to land.
This was not John's iirsl flight in the air lor al-
ready he had done some parachute jumping.

When in the ]ilane, he fastened his parachute
on for he was tokl he would have to jump, for
the base had no landing field. The plane was
shot off the cata[-.ult and "took the air" nicely.
John was all eyes now. The country was beau-
tiful and so green. They flew over numerous
little settlements, and once spotted a plane on
the horizon. Alter about one and a half hour's
ride, John saw the pilot talking to him in sign
language. He said they would soon be there.
John made ready ami looking down saw a group
of pup-tents. This was where he was to get off.
Some place! The pilot circled around three times
to attract the attention of those on the grouml,
then motioned to John, asking him if he were
ready. John said, "Yes." So the pilot put the
plane upward so as to gain altitude. In a few
minutes John got up and stepped on the seat
ready to jump, and was nearly blown over before
he could step off. What a sensation! Down
down he went, the parachute opened those
on the ground saw a small white speck appear.
John came tlown near the tents and soon had a
large group around him. He gave his letter to
the officer in charge who had been watching for
him. John drank some coffee and then spent the
day resting for he knew he would have a hard job
the next day.

The next morning the officer gave him a pack-
age and his instructions. He was to go with the
two men who were standing near by. He had
changed his suit to that of a civilian, like the
other two nr.en. He followed them. In about
half an hour they came to a body of water. Oh,
yes! now he remembered, Gatun Lake! They
walked along the edge of the lake for a short dis-
tance, when they came upon two natives with a
boat, called a cavuca. The cayuca is a canoe dug



54



THE CARIBBEAN



out of a solid piece of a tree trunk and larger than
those seen in our northern lakes.

John was to go with the natives to Monte Liro,
a small native town, from which place he could
get the train for Gatun. The natives paddled
hard as their boat was full of bread-fruit which
they wanted to get to market on the morning
train. In a couple of hours they reached their
destination. What a sight to John! One lonely
station master and a policeman were the only
white persons in the place. They asked John
who he was. He said he was a planter and gave
a fictitious name. Soon a train came in view.
What a queer sight in this God-forsaken country
to see a train, an honest to goodness train. He
boarded it and watched the scenery until he
arrived at Gatun. Here he got off, went behind
a shed and opened his package. He was nervous
now. He had a perfect right to be. He took
the two iron, ball-shaped objects and looked at
them. Then he put them back and made for the
locks which he could see a short distance away.
Soldiers were on guard walking up and down,
everywhere. In back, across on what he thought
to be the Gatun Dam was a village of pup-tents.
He crossed over the locks. A soldier had just
gone on his beat and was on the way down, with
his back to John. John hurried across the locks



up the embankment by the camp to the spillway.
Here he left one of his small round objects in a
vital place. Then he walked back to the locks.
He was very nervous now. How was he going to
get rid of the other one? Luckily for him a party
of tourists were sight-seeing. He mingled with
the crowd. He went down a stairway near the
lock chambers till he came to the culverts, where
he left the other object. When he came up to the
top of the stairs he found an officer and gave him a
card. It took the officer almost off his feet. For
the "impossible" had been done. The Gatun
locks had been taken without a shot! The officer
took him to a higher officer who went with John
to the places where he had laid his small black
round objects bombs. Eombs! Yes, tinr.e
bombs, without the powder. He had captured the
locks single handed. John reported to the officers
at the Submarine Base and made his report and
was given great praise for his work.

As his ship had not come into port John was
allowed to go to town. He bought a beautiful
shawl from one of these famous Chinese shops
and then went to the Y.M.C.A. to enjoy the
evening.

What a life it had been the last couple of days,
and what a story to write home! He had cap-
tured the locks alone, "The Impossible."



BEST STORY IN JUNIOR CLASS.
THE BROKEN PACT.

J'ii'tan Etmgren, '32.



The coming of Vasco Nunez Balboa was re-
ported to Teoca. Teoca Panea hurriedly gathered
his Indian forces together and prepared for battle.
He knew that his neighbors had peacefully sur-
rendered to this mighty Spaniard, but Teoca
was no fawning pet. The kindness and friend-
ship of Balboa to the Indians had travelled far,
but this treacherous chieftan, fearing death, pre-
pared to fight back.

Balboa, camped about ten miles from Teoca's
headquarters, was holding a council with his men.

"Teoca is a devil. One of the shrewdest
of chieftans. He will fight." One of Balboa's
leaders stated.

"Even so, I am going to give him a chance to
surrender and make an alliance with me," Bal-
boa declared.



"But, Mi Capitan, Teoca Panea is cruel and
blood-thirsty. It is said he puts captives and
slaves to death by throwing them to the dogs.
He is not like the others."

"I will proceed as always. We will approach
his town with all signs of peace; if he wishes to
fight, we fight!"

The next day Balboa moved his camp toward
the Indian city. His Spanish knights in their
polished armor and the long train of slaves and
hostages were a spectacle in the tropical sunlight.
They crossed some jungle that day and only
advanced four miles.

Beside Balboa rode two Knights. The tallest
seemed to be always smiling and his eyes twinkled
mischieviously. He was Manuel Franco. The
other, more serious and quiet, was Jorge Alcazon.



THE CARIBBEAN



55



Manuel turned to Balboa ami said, "The
maidens of Panea are reported to be pleasing to
the eye. You and I, aniigo, will have a joyous
time; but poor Jorge, he is airaid oi women.

Jorge paid no attention to his iriend's remark,
but rode silently' beside tiiem.

They covered more territory the next day and
were only a mile from Teoca that night. Balboa
had given orders that a strict sentry watch be
held. He planned to call on Teoca the next day
with his peace pact.

Early in the morning Balboa set out. He met
Teoca about half a mile from the town. Teoca
was escorted by ten of his warriors. They ap-
peared peaceful and were only lightly armed.

Balboa approached ami gave the sign of friend-
ship. Teoca hesitated, then he drew near and
returned the sign.

'T am glad you wish to be friends with me,
Teoca," Balboa said.

"iMy brother, to be friends with you is the
highest honor I could wish for."

After this ceremon3' of pjeace was o\-er Balboa
returned to his camp. He met his two comrades-
in-arms and gaily hailed them saying, "Jorge
you were wrong. Teoca agreed to my terms."

'T)on't be too sure, mi capitan," Jorge cau-
tioned. "Teoca is cruel. He is bidding his time;
guard yourself."

"Nonsense, Jorge, to night I will visit the town
in search of dusky maidens," Manuel frivolously
shouted.

Manuel started for the city accompanied by
his servant, Alberto. He, too, was looking for
dusky maidens.

The town was a regular tropical Indian village.
It contained one large building, the so-called
palace of Teoca. There were about ten houses
grouped around it and ten other scattered huts.
The inhabitants were cooling themselves in the
street, where many chiUlren were playing games.

"No so bad, Alberto," his master exclaimed
eyeing one pleasant looking maiden.

"Si, senor, the gay servant answered.

This maiden disappeared in the direction of the
palace and Manuel followed.

Through a tropical garden he sped until he
caught up with his game. "Chiquita, you fas-
cinate me.

From out of the shrubbery came a low, deep
growl. The girl screamed and Alanuel cried,
"Madre de Diosl Alberto!"



Alberto, being near enough to hear the deep
growl and then tiie cry, rushed to his master.
Too late he found Manuel lying on the ground
with his throat ripped ; it was torn from car to ear.

Allierto, dazeil and bewiklered, stumbled into
the camp. 1 le rushed to Balboa.

"Mi Capitan, Don Manuel is murdered!"

"Calm yourself, man. Are you crazy?" Bal-
boa asked

"No, senor, tiead with his throat chewed!"
and Alberto related the horrible story.

Both Balboa and Jorge becam- excited. Jorge
believed Manuel had been deliberately murdered
by Teoca, while Balboa declared it must have
been some wild animal.

Teoca visited Balboa in the morning bringing
back the bixly.

"It grieves me much, oh brother, to bring you
the body of one of your knights."

Balboa grimly recei\ed Teoca's consolation.

Jorge had planned to go that night with Alberto
to investigate the palace garden. Balboa was
constantly becoming angrier, blaming Teoca
for the sad occurrence.

"Wait until T return," Jorge begged. "Then
we will kill him in the same way."

Just after moonrise, Alberto antl Jorge started
on their way.

"If you are not back by morning, I will attack
Teoca," Balboa said, as he fondly bid his remain-
ing comrade good-bye.

Jorge found the town in the same state as it had
been the night before. He pretended interest in
the girls. Slowly he worked his way with Alberto
to the scene of the murder. Through tropical
jungle they crept. They did not enter the same
way as Manual had, but took a round-about way.

Suddenly they heard a low growl and they saw
Teoca leading a large animal resembling a dog on
a leash. Teoca let the animal loose and ran. The
creature leapt towartl the two Spaniards, and as
it did Jorge's sword passed straight through the
beast's body.

"We shall take this dog back to El Capitan. I
hope Teoca has more of these animals; if not, we
will have to substitute some other method for his
punishment."

Balboa received Jorge with joy. He listened
silently to his story and then he cried. "You and I
will teach Teoca to murder a knight of Spain.
The peace pact Is broken. Get the men ready
to march against him immediately.'



56



THE CARIBBEAN



Teoca, when he found his beast gone and no
dead Spaniard, became frightened and gathered
his warriors for battle. He was ready for Balboa,
but he had no change against the disciplined
fighters from Spain.

When Balboa had killed nearly all of Teoca's
warriors and Teoca had been made prisoner, he
ordered his men to drag the chieftan before him.

"So you thought you could tool \'asco Nunez



Balboa. Madre de Dios! I will show you. Bring
me the other dogs."

They tied Teoca to a stake and set the dogs on
him. The air was filled with their hoarse growls
and the terrified cries of Teoca Panea.

Balboa looked on scornfully. When all was
finished he turned to Jorge and said, "I have
broken my pact, but avenged my comrade's
death."



BEST STORY IN SOPHOMORE CLASS.
THE AVENGING FIRE.

Ann Poi.i'ers, 'JJ.



The fire crackling, glowing, spreading warmth
and cheer was the thing that first caught your
attention in the room. Then the great size of the
chamber whose walls were completely covered
with shelves of books impressed you. The re-
flected flames were the only light and they danced
on the ceiling, and fading into the corners, became
part of the groping, black, menacing shadows.

Sunken so deep in a chair that he seemed a part
of it, sat a middle-aged men. He had a brooding
air of contentment like that of a cat after eating
its fill lies awaiting another victim. His eyes a
murky grey and set too close together gazed
straight ahead but seemed to see nothing. His
rather corpulent body seemed to bask in the
warmth of the fire. A glass of sherry glowed with
strange reddish lights held in his hand that had
grown flabby and soft with the years.

The man sat thinking of how he came to be in
such luxurious circumstances. He had been out-
liistanced in success by his brother so that his
brother had been in affluence while he had been
brought to poverty by his own faults. A great
hatred for his brother had been born because of
the dissimularity of circumstances; thus he had
not felt great sorrow when he learned of his
brf)ther's death. A smile crossed his face at this
point of his reflections when he considered his
present cofort while living on the money in-
herited from his brother. At that moment his
train of thought was broken becaue of the door's
sudden opening.

When he saw the figure in the doorway he gave
one startled exclamation then sat in open-moutheo
horror. The person entering said reassuringly,
"Don't be alarmed, George, I am not a ghost."



George sprang from the chair and exclaimed,
"My Gotl! John, I thought you were dead."
He slumped back into the chair with a hundred
ideas in his mind. Thoughts jumped like devils
at him asking ceaseless questions. What was he
going to do? His brother in some incredible
way alive and here to take all his new-found
comfort and luxury from him.

John told briefly why he had wished to be
thought dead that he might put over a business
deal that involved millions and concluded saying
that he thought it would be a pleasant vacation
for George to have his house and money for a
month. His remarks aroused the hidden resent-
ment and hatred that George had borne secretly
for so long toward his brother but he stifled his
rage realizing the uselessness of words and asked
politely, "I suppose the whole world knows about
your starting to return to the realm of the living."

But was answered by Jolm's surprising retort,
"You are the only man that does not think me
safely beneath a tombstone."

This remark brought a horrible chain of thought
to George's mind that was quickly stifled yet
would not stay buried. One question seemed to
be flung at him from all sides. "Why don't you
get him out of the way?" He brought will power
and most strong arguments to bear but still the
question cotinued pounding at him. The flames
of the fire had burnt down to glowing coals and
still he sat there silent beside his brother John.

At last he rose to go upstairs realizing that this
was the last night he would spend in this house
and thinking of the many chances his brother
had given him to mend his fortunes that he had
ruined. A sudden force made him turn back, walk



THE CARIBBEAN



57



over to the large mahogany desk thai was placed
at the end of the room. He pulled open the middle
drawer, his hand closed around something and he
raised his arm. A lerrifving e.xjilosion scemctl to
have rocked the I'oundatioiis of the house itself.
George looked and on the floor his brother lay
in a strangely twisted position. An overwhelm-
ing sense of triumph antl power seemed to ct)me
over him for a moment dah he was the conqueror
and his hrother the concjuered. The period of
supremacy and e.xaltation passexl. then in its place
came a feeling of terror. He ielt the force of a
million eyes, a million hands reacheil out to him.

He hurried to the iloor and locked it though it
seemed a frail harrier against the terror of dis-
covery that came over him. He must tlo something,
any moment someone might come and take him as
a murderer. His fevered thoughts seemed to
grasp at one woril escape. He must run away.
But where? Then realization of what flight would
bring upon him brought mental pictures of him-
self tracked and hunted to any hiding place. The
tenacles of the law woukl reach out ami find him
however far he ran. Then like a breath of fresh
air he realized that nobody knew his brother had
been alive. All he had to do was to get rid of the
bodj' and he would never run the risk of detection.

How to dispose of the body. His tortured brain
next tried to decide that problem, Throw it in
the river? No, that was too much of a risk. Sud-
denly a simple solution leaped to his mind. Why
not burn the house and with it the body. No
one knew he had had a caller this night anil the
fire would destroy the evidence. Then the thought
of burning the house that had so recently been his
brought a moment of hesitation. Yet in a few-
seconds his resolution had strengthened. He
must make the fire appear an accident so that
he could collect the insurance. A few papers
scattered too near the fire place, a few glowing
coals near them woukl start a fire blazing. Now
it was all set he woukl leave and let the house
burn in peace. Then another moment of terror,
suppose the fire did not burn, what would l;e the
consequences? He must stay in the room until the
blaze had reached such a height that there would
be no chance of extinguishing it.

As the papers caught fiire they sent up sudden
flames that threw ghostly, w rithing iir.ages on
the walls. Then the flames grew lower but ten-
drils of smoke arose from the floor. The line of
fire made a colorful halo around the head of the



body on the floor. A sinister curiosity drew him
over to look at the sprawled figure. He looked
(low n on the face of the dead man and was struck
with a sucklen horror because of the expression
graven on it. .\ smile at his follies and crime was
impressed on the features of his dead brother.
He felt a momentary feeling of remorse. He
(luickly strangled that feeling and as the flames
were growing very hot he turned to lea\e. .\t
his second step he tripped over the body and
crashed to the floor.

His first sensation when consciousness returned
to him was that he must be dead and this be i)art
of Hell. Scorching, flaring flames spread arouiul
the walls leaving by some miracle but a small area
near him free of fire. He tried to rise yet fell
back so dizzy that even his thoughts ran arounil
antl round. In a moment overwhelming fear
make him force himself to a sitting position on the
floor. He was surrounded by a wall of flames.
Panic had him in its grasp, but he resolutely
tried to calm his over-strung nerves and marshal
his wandering senses. He must have a clear
head to escape from the room that was now be-
coming unbearably hot. The smell of burning
leather filletl the air and made it hard to breathe,
the circle of fire was growing nearer and nearer
to him.

With a great effort he gathered his strength
for a dash to the door and then freedom. Wrap-
ping himself in a small rug to protect himself
from the flames he rushed through the wall of
lire In the direction of the door, reached for the
key but felt nothing but the bite and sting of the
fire. Swiftly fear had him in its grip as he re-
treated to the middle of the room, but he was
soon strengthenetl by the thought that if he couKl
not escape by the door he could by the window.
He ran to each window and battered against it
vainly. He broke the small window panes but
the fresh air only fanned the flames to greater
heights. His clothes were in flames he could
hardly breathe and for the first time despair came
over him. He realized that in a few minutes he
would not be able to breathe; then he made one
last effort at the windows, but they refused to
open. Finally he fell gasping and almost scorched
to death on the floor. It seemed as if in a dream a
great voice said "Thou shalt not kill.' Gibbering
red imps leaped at him shouting. At last a sense
of great horror and deep remorse came to him for
the deed he had done.



58



THE CARIBBEAN



The great old chimney is all that stands of that house burnt down. In the evening around an
house that once was. Grandmothers tell their open fire the villagers speculate on what happened
children of the famous night when the manor the night of the great fire.

BEST STORY IN FRESHMEN CLASS
AN IRISH TRICK.

Ellen GreenleaJ. '34.



The North River subway came whirring into
Forty-second Street station jammed with its
full capacity of tired New Yorkers returning after
a hard day's work, and halted for the flash of a
second to let three or four passengers off. Among
these was a girl about nineteen years old. Miss
Patrician Flannlgan alias "Pat" pushed her way
through the crowds of humanity in the station
and emerged at the top of the subway stairs
breathless.

Which way did he go? Can he be the one?
were the thought's running through this young
lady's mind as she glanced about her eagerly as
if in search of someone. A tall figure disappeared
around the corner of Main and Forty-second
Street and like lightening Pat was after him.

The puruist continued for almost an hour.
Sometimes the tall man would be within arms
length; other times at a hundred yards distance
and even out of sight but Pat managed to keep
up the chase. Never once did the pursued one
turn to look back which was fortunate for Pat,
and finally he disappeared from view into a
privately owned red brick house.

Yes, that's the place. Pat was almost certain.
Hadn't they been watching this house for a month
now but could not find even the slightest suspicion
of anything wrong? Oh, well, she'd take the
chance. Crossing the street Miss Flannigan went
into Fisk's drug store and ordered a soda before
entering the telephone booth. What would she
say. Gosh what a feeling to have on your first
"job." Supposing she were wrong. Wouldn't
they laugh at her. Summoning all her nerve
she entered the booth and dialed her number.
"Hello, hello, headquarter's? Yes. Pat Flan-
nigan speaking; send the men to 169 Sixty-third.
Yes. Get A. C. K. spotted, I think. Yes, sir."
Pat hung the receiver up and came out of the tele-
phone booth.

She ordered another soda not because she
wanted it but anything to pass the time away.
Minutes elapsed. Pat was nervous. She tapped
her foot up and down, up and down, and vaguely
wondered if everyone in the store was staring
at her. She heard the burr of a powerful motor



and saw a big gray Cadillac stop opposite the
store. Hurriedly she dropped fifteen cents on the
counter and joinetl the men getting out of the
gray car.

"Oh, hello boys, yes, this is the same place I'm
sure, Pat said, "I followed one of A. K.'smen after
leaving the office and saw him go in here so that
I thought I'd better have you come down."

"Good girl Pat, Faith and if ye ain't afollowlng
after yer old father," Officer O'Brien answered
and with this the five policemen and Pat entered
the house by forcing the door open.

The tall man Pat had followed met them in the
hall and cried indignantly. "Say, what's the idea?"

"Never mind what the idea is but take that rod
out of your coat pocket and stick those mitt's
of your's up in the air," said one of the men. The
other four men scattered in all directions leaving
Pat and one officer in the hall.

"A nice little place you've got here, "said the
officer. "Crovs sure live in style nowadays, hey
Pat? Looks like you rounded up Kopolini's gang
all by yourself Pat. Ole Flannisgan sure will be
proud of you.

"I hope so Mike, Pat said with a smile.

The tall man made a move to escape. "Quiet
down big-boy, I've got you covered," the officer
cried quickly stepping forward.

There was a fight going on upstairs now but
after ten or fifteen minutes the noise quieted and
the men came down stairs with six rough looking
fellows in handcuffs. "Got the whole gang this
time. Kopolinl included and O'Brien jerked
his thumb at a fat greasy Italian who glowered
at them fiercely.

"Take 'em to the station, boys. Pat, that was a
mighty fine ;ob. Look's like yer follow in in yer
old man's footsteps," O'Brien said.

Pat followetl the men out and went to the station.

"Well, Flannigan," said O'Brien addressing
a red-faced Irishman sitting at the desk of the
chief, "Yer daughter just rounded up Kopolin's
gang."

"Just Irish luck, Datl, wasn't it?" Pat exclaim-
ed, with a grin.
"Yes, Patty, darlin', and a dirty Irish trick at that."



THE CARIBBEAN



59



THE YOUNGEST OF FOUR.

Rf/ieccd Jiri/Jori, '33

I have onU' two dresses that were really and
truly bought for me. Where did I get the others?
My three big sisters gave them to me. The dresses
are all out of style, ot course, or my sisters would
still be wearing them. Every time I ask mother
what I shall wear she says, "That blue one of
Ruth's, or the pink one of Mary's, or that yellow
one of Susan's." The dressmaker comes for a
week every spring and fall just to make over the
old things for me. I hate her. She always says,
"What a lucky girl you are to have so many big
sisters." If she only knew how I hate those
dresses!

My sisters are always getting tired of their shoes
and hats. But do I get them? I should say not!
"Why, of course, you can't wear those high heels!"
says mother, or, "Those hats are much too old
for you." Then she sends me shopping with Ruth,
iMary, or Susan and I come home with the ugliest
shoes and hats in the whole town. Not one of
them will let me buy what I want.

But I am fifteen now and even if my sisters
don't get married and leave me in peace I am
going to get a job as soon as I'm through school.
I am going to spend all ot my first check for
dresses that I like, slippers with high heels, and
hats that don't look so "sweet and girlish."

0\^RHAUL OF GATUN LOCKS.

Jean Prttil. >3.

The thing that put Panama on the map, the
thing that makes tourists stop here, the thing that's
first thought of when Panama is mentioned is
The Panama Canal.

Like all good things it will soon wear out if not
kept in proper repair. There are three sets of
locks and to keep them in shape each is repaired
once every four years. It has been my good
fortune to live near the Gatun Locks while they
were being overhauled in 1931.

The repairing ol the locks is done in dry season.
There are two sides to the locks and to distinguish
them I shall call one side east, the other side west.

The east side was repaired first. All the water
was emptied out to prepare the chamber for the
workmen. The water was then emptied out of
the ne.xt chamber. The bottom of the last cham-
ber is below sea level and had to be pumped out.
New parts, cranes, tools, electrical appliances were



piled on both sides ready for use. Men, workers,
hurrying to and fro, spectators crowding around
in and out of the worker's way, noises that make
you think of the boiler shop, issued forth from the
east side while this remarkable project was being
made new again.

On the other hand while the west side was being
repaired the east side hatl to keep the traffic going.
While the West side had to be repaired the east
side has to work day and night to carry on. Of
course, when the west side was finished the tables
were turned anil the other side worked day and
night.

Thus that marvelous and incredible engineering
feat. The Panama Canal, is kept repaired without
stopping or delaying the regular traffic.

OVER THE HORIZON.

Bfrer/i/ Dunn. '32.

The long, narrow harbor resounded with the
shouts of men and the chug-chug of a donkey en-
gine, as barrels of salt meat, bo.xes of biscuits,
reels of line, and innumerable bo.xes of salt were
lifted off the dock, transported through the air,
and deposited in the hokl of a large, black schooner.
Men hung like spiders in the rigging, exchanging
black, worn ropes for new yellow ones and repair-
ing blocks and tackles; painters hung at the sides,
at the bow, stern, and every other place a painter
could hang, while from far down inside came the
sound of hammers and saws; even the steer-
ing tackle was being repaired. Finally all was
finished, the last painter had left, the carpyenters
had gathered up their tools and gone home, the
hatches had been nailed down and the doves
nested. Before the paint had time to dry the men
were aboard, sailors and greenhorns, tall men and
short, men with bags and men with chests, and
several without either who were leaving port until
some little mistakes had blown over.

Two hours later the harbor echoed with songs
and yells as the schooner hauled up her bow an-
chor; a minute more she hung on her stern hook,
her bow headed toward the sea. Up came the
stern line, up went the jib, up the fore and main-
sails, up went the main topsail and down went
the lee sail as the wind caught her and off went
the schooner bound for the banks of Newfound-
land. A minute later and two other stout vessels
followed her. In a line thev tacked out to sea,
vanished over the horizon and were never seen
again.



60



THE CARIBBEAN



ULY.

Rehecca Brvdon,



Our maid's name is "Uly". We had a terrible
time at lirst getting used to it. My brother called
her "Hoolie." mv father called her 'fulie." There
are times \\hen mother says she thinks her name
should be "jMulie as she acts so dumb.

Uly rarely speaks unless she is spoken to, and
then ninetv-nine times out of a hundred she savs



One day I called my home on the telephone
and said "Hello, this is Rebecca" "Rebecca
not here came the answer. I repeated it again;
the same answer came, and bang went the re-
ceiver. Another day I called and asked "Is my
sister there?" She repeated, "What you said?"
three times and bang went the receiver. Mother



"All right. When breakfast is ready in the morn- is the only person to whom she will listen on the

ing she comes to our door and says "All right." telephone.

When lunch is ready she rings the bell and says The funniest thing about Uly is her hair. She

in a loud voice, "All right," and she does the has fifteen little plats, each about three inches



same for dinner. When mother tells her how to
do something she says "All right." When she is
ready to go home at night she comes to the
kitchen door and says "All right." She can say
a few sentences, though. Some of her most com-
mon expressions are. "It don't hot yet," "Do
you want this to starch," "Do you think this
will eat," and "Must I do the smoothin' to-dav?"



long, and when she gets excited they stick up
straight. She hasn't any front teeth.

We will miss her when she goes home to Ja-
maica to see her "Mudder" as she calls her. We
don't know when she's going because she will
not have enough money until she wins the lot-
tery. To win the lottery is her chief ambition in
life.



THE SENIOR MODELS.



Eugenia McLain's Feet.

Celeste Clarke's- Legs.

Marie KleetUens's Shape.

Aloha Siocum's Clothes.

Alanon Xeely's __ Hair.

Ruth Du\'ars -.. Voice.

Margaret Davis'. Mouth.

Anna R van's Eyes.

Barbiira W'eick's ^ -- Smile.

V'elma Hall's Teeth.

Bettina Powers'...... V^ocabulary-

Clara Frisk's Height.

Vinnie Elson's --.. Intellect.

Dorothy Wirf^'s Reserve.

Mary E. Moore's Personality.

Thomas Pescod's Dimples.

George Wertz's Smile.



Fabian Englander's Height.

Richard Wood's Physique.

Ronald Philpotts'._ Hair.

Parker Hanna's.. Tan.

Chubby Hackett's .. Eyes.

Ernest Berger's Glasses.

Edward Conkling's Appetite.

Kenneth .^laurer's Hat.

Ben Williams' Business-like way.

Crawtord Campbell's Intellect.

Ray Will's Clothes.

Demetra Lewis' Southern drawl.

Bill Bailey's Sa.\ appeal.

Jack Kelly's. Wit.

Russell Elwel's .. Mischief.

Percy Lyew's Ambitions.

Carlos Rankin's Personality.




( 'tirivt < "hurrl, Hy-tl,i



THE CARIBBEAN



61




l¥ll¥IIIIICt






62



THE CARIBBEAN



SENIOR PARTY.

J/f Bern, 'jl

To keep up their tradition of giving "different"
parties, the Senior Class on November 25, 1950,
gave a barn dance at the Alasonic Temple.

Through this informal affair, the Freshmen
were introduced into High School social life. Re-
gardless of the danger of hay-fever a unique pro-
gram for the entertainment of "farmers" and
"farmerettes" was presented and thoroughly
enjoyed. Pete Wardlaw '32, and Carlos Rankin,
'31, won the prize fox-trot, and costume prizes
were awarded to Aloha Slocum '31, Celeste Clarke
Powell '31, and Richard Stoudnor '34, (of Balboa
High School).



SOPHOMORE DANCE.

Alaxine Andrev:s, '33.

On February twenty-seventh, the sophomores
held their class dance at the Hotel Washington.

Edna Thirwall and Dick Wood were given
attractive prizes for waltzing, Pete Wardlaw
and Freddie Pescod won the fox trot prizes. Mandy
Alarchosky excelled as master of ceremonies.

The success of the evening was due a great deal
to the excellent music furnished by Dwyer's
orchestra



FRESHMAN HOP.

Richard ReinhoU. '34.

The foggy uppyerclassmen were coming to see
how well their "most delightful colleagues" could
entertain, and to try to enjoy themselves at the
Freshman Hop given at the Hotel Washington
on April seventeenth. They were de-fogged as
the dance proved to be quite lively.

The outstanding event of the evening was the
Grand March, led by Elizabeth Hayes and Louie
Barnett. Prizes for the most interesting costumes
were presented to Elizabeth Wirtz, '32, and Ches-
ter Wirtz, '34. They were both dressed in typical
Dutch costumes. Charles Gould, '33, was given
the prize for the funniest costume.



A most interesting feature was the tenth dance,
a prize Fox-Trot. After much consideration,
Rebecca Brydon, '33, and Carlos Rankin, '31,
were awarded the prizes.

Everybody agreed that it was the most success-
ful and enjoyable dance of the year.



SENIOR PLAY "JONESY."

Jftjrion E. Xeel\/, '31.

Before one of the largest crowds ever assembled
for a students, production, Cristobal High School
presented the Senior play "Jonesy". Directed
and cast by Robert G. Noe, Director of Drama-
tics at the high school, the play itself was good
and the acting excellent. The cast was picked
according to type and it was a perfect job. Miss
Mary Moore, Senior Class adviser and staff spon-
sor, was also invaluable in line rehearsal and many
other ways.

The cast is as follows:

Anne the intellectual sister, Ruth Duvall.
Mildred EUis the jealous ex-fiance, Marion
Neely.

Mrs. Henry Jones the hysterical mother,
Barbara Wieck.

First Plumber Carlos Rankin.

Second Plumber ^Demetra Lewis.

Henry Jones the father, a prominent lawyer,
Kenneth Maurer.

Wilbur Jones the son "Jonesy," Jack Kelly.

Billy Morgan the college fraternity brother
of Jonesy 's, Dick Wood.

Diana Devereau.x the actress, Velma Hall.

Katie the Irish maid, Bettina Powers.

Stanley Jackson the business man, Harry
Egolf.

Mr. Silverberg a travelling salesman, Thomas
Pescod

Policeman Edward Conkling.

Everyone connected with the play in any way
was thrilled to see such a large turnout. The
place was packed to the doors, not an empty seat
and many extra ones added along the sides of the
"movie" hall.



THE CARIBBEAN



63



It was advertised as a good show people came
to see one and they got more than they asked.
From the beginning to the end every ;oke was
thoroughly appreciated by the audience and this
niatle the cast work harder tlian ever.

Ruth Duval, as Anne, was a knockout and
took her part perfectly. vShe exasperated Kate
and Billy holii with her "horn-rimmetl spectacles"
and her "big worils." And it was only proper that
such a good character should open (his side-split-
ting comedy.

Miklred Ellis, taken by Marion Neely, tried
to put e\erybody in his place with her sarcasm,
and slams, but only succeedetl in ilomg that little
thing to herself and making the audience laugh
at her every sentence. Her gold-digging ways
finally captivated Billy.

Mrs. Jones, one of the really hard parts in the
whole cast was played by Barbara W'eick and her
shreiks, cries, and deep emotions from the wor-
ries of "glorious" motherhood amused the crowd
beyond words. With the "paper hangers in the
dining room" and the plumbers, and Billy and
\\ ilbur and the car, besides the near escape of the
dreadful "mesaliance" were only part of her
troubles.

The plumbers, by Carlos Rankin and Demetra
Lewis, who get an inside view on the Jones family
and who are surprised by the treat Mrs. Jones
gave them, took their parts well, and gave their
slams to Wilbur very much as plumbers might.

Henry Jones as portrayed by Kenneth Maurer
was a riot. A prominent lawyer "after slaving
for forty years of his life" finds out that life still
has its kicks and troubles and sins. With his
reminescences, his business engagement with
Stanley Jackscn, and with Wilbur as a son, Ken-
neth took the part and with it almost took down
the house. He had a most difficult role and
only as a member of the class of "31" Could, he
\\as Henry Jones.

Wilbur, as the hero, acted by Jack Kelly, also
deserves much praise for his portrayal which uas
excellent. Nothing more need be said, but that
he was the real hero.

Dick \\'ood as one of "The Morgans of De-
troit" was great, and even up to the last act, wet
and squelched he kept the thought in your mind
that his father "shakes down about three million
dollars a year out of stoves. But he finally weak-
ens and falls for Mildred Ellis.



Diana Devereaux, the actress, was taken by a
girl who did her work so-well that one might be able
to say that she was an actress truly, instead of a
Senior. As a character, she stood out in the play
and helped to make the production such a suc-
cess as it was.

Bettina Powers, startled the folks with the Irish
brogue of the maid Katie. This was a very
amusing part and most cleverly taken.

Stanley Jackson, the businessman, was por-
trayed by Harry Egolf. We commend the Junior
Class on loaning us such a good character, for so
unusual was (his part, that Harry had to take it.

Mr. Silverberg or Tommy Pescod, the travelling
salesman, was a scream, with his odd speech and
accent. His act was one of the high spots in the
play.

The policeman taken by Edward Conkling was
excellent. His scene with the rest and the sudden
entrance in the last act was really hard but Eddie
put it over big.

With such a good choice of characters could the
play be anything but great from the beginning?
With all the situations that arise and the com-
plications that set in, we believe it to be the best
high school play ever produced on the Isthmus.

The music department showed its generosity
and talent by playing selections between acts
and before the play started. The high school
appreciated the work Miss Elner is doing and
how she has made the orchestra such a good one
as it is.

Much credit is due Mr. Noe, Miss Moore, Mr.
Sawyer, Miss Elner and the general public for
turning out and sponsoring this play and the high
school feels that the Seniors gave you your
money's worth.



"OUR CARNIVAL."

Jlanon R. Xeely, '/.

The Carnival this year was held at Fort Davis
through the courtesy of Col. Gohn, Commanding
Officer of that Post. It was a most successful one,
and really enabled the Class of '31 to secure the
necessary money for the printing of the Caribbean.

Each class had a separate booth on the parade
grounds, and the Home Ex:oncir.:cs Departmen t
had a refreshment stand. Also there were g^^psies.



64



THE CARIBBEAN



fortune tellers and other entertainments for the val, the following: Colonel Gohn, Captain Elson,

huge crowd that came to support such a great Captain J. M.Stewart, Mr. Robert Noe, Miss

affair. Mary Betty Moore, Mr. W. A. Sawyers, Mr.

The Revue added much to the attractions; Robert Neely, Mr. Chas. Klunk, Mr. H. C. Davis

and the dance held in the gym was well attended. and also the general public and the entire personnel

We have to thank for the success of the Carni- of Fort Davis for their generous support.



CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING CLUB.

Celeste Clarke, 'jJ.




The Debating Club is one of the most important
clubs of the High School. This is the third year
of its organization, and it has grown to be the
pride of the school. Due to our sponsor. Miss
Kimbro, a great deal of intellectual work is ac-
complished in this club. The meetings are held
every other Tuesday in the library.

The Debating Team of 1929-30, consisting
of Affirmative, William Harmon and Celeste
Clarke, Negative, Alice Henter and Carlos Ran-
kin, defeated Balboa's respective teams in the
first interscholastic debate held May 27, 1930.
The question. Resolved: "That the past record
of I'rohlbition justifies its continuance," was one
that caused a great deal of competition, and was
very interesting.



Due to an unnecessary disagreement in ques-
tions, no debate has yet been scheduled with Bal-
boa for this season.

OFFICERS.

President Carlos Rankin

Secretary-Treasurer Celeste Clarke

Librarian Marion E. Neely

Chairman Crawford Campbell

Sponsor Miss Gladys Kimbro

MEMBERS.

Carlos Rankin, Marion Neely, Celeste Clarke,
Fabian Englander, Crawford Campbell, John
Kelly, Beverly Dunn, Thomas Murphy, Max-
ine Andrews, Ernest de la Ossa, and Joe Neilson.



THE CARIBBEAN



65




C. II. S. GLEE CLUBS



THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT.



KUie Xc;

The decision of the authorities to give a sjjecial
music teacher to the Atlantic side, has contri-
buted much to the development of the music de-
partment. Here we introduce Miss Elner, who
is talented and shows interest in every detail of
this work. She not only shows interest herself,
but tends to acquire the interest of the student too.

For the first time we have the course of Theory
and Harmony, an interesting study of the theory of
music and training of the ear for classical composi-
tions. This is really a study of harmony and theory,
combined with the course of Music Appreciation.

The orchestra is doing a great work this year,
and as interest is a very important factor in an
organization like this. Miss Elner again shows her
talent, not only in music, but in gaining the pupils'



/y, '>2.

attention. The orchestra has a third period dur-
ing school hours, but the students of that organi-
zation were not satisfied with the short time, and
agreed to met weekly an hour after school. They
have appeared at the Woman's Club, Parents'
Visiting Day at school, and also at the reception
give in honor of the Hon. Mr. Denison.

The Glee Clubs are also very important this
year, having appeared several times, and the big
event yet to come. Our operetta will show that
the local talent here is above the average. But not
only the glee clubs took interest here, but the
whole school turned out for the operetta try-
outs, and the success of the affair, we feel, now
depends largely on the cooperation of the students
with the teacher and director.




( 11. s. ORCHESTKA



66



THE CARIBBEAN




SPANISH CLUP.

JIari/ Deans, >2.

This year Mrs. Phyllis Spencer introduceil the pupils in their studies, but it also pron^otes a

Spanish Club into Cristobal High School, ^^luch friendly feeling between the Spanish and English

enthusiasm has been shown by the students in speaking peoples. I know that all the students

this new organization. are thankful to Mrs. Spencer for organizing it,

Mrs. Spencer's object was to see if we would be and even if she shouH leave I'm sure that we

able to obtain a chapter or au.xiliary chapter in wouki all do our best to keep up the good work

one of the National Fraternities. that she has started.

In the beginning 12 charter members were I he ofticers are:

chosen. After the Club had been organized, the President Mary Deans

rules and regulations made, officers elected, all Vice-Pres Margaret Davis

pupils having an average of 90 for their 6 weeks Secretary Eleanor Reinhold

work were eligible. Treasurer Dona Eaton

This Club not only gives encouragement to Ayudante Percy Lyew



FRESHMAN DRAMATIC CLUB.

JIan/ J'injinia Ht'arnt', '>-/.



The Effe Klub, which is the first Dramatic
Club in Cristobal Hi, was organized at the be-
ginning of the school year by the incoming class.
The founders thought it woukl be a good idea, in
order to hold the interest ot the members, to
involve the meetings in secrecy and mystery and
give the club thcuni(]ue name which it now bears.
This attempt at secrecy is the reason why the
upper classmen difl not know of our club until
several months ago, when we were prepared to
present a [)lay.

We knew that in order to draw a crowd we must
have publicity; it was then that we suddenly
revealed ourselves to (he jHii)lic in general.



"The Revolt", a one act comedy, was given
April 10th at the Y.W.C.A. The cast and Mrs.
Spencer deserve credit for makir^g the play a
success and also for making enough money for
our page in "The Caribbean."

Since then the club has been studying story
telling and pantomine and the members have
shown such a remarkable interest and loyalty to-
ward the club that we hope we may be able to
carry on during our Sophomore, Junior and Senior
years, and leave as a heritage to the classes that
follow us another really worthwhile organization
in C. H. S.



THE CARIBBEAN



67





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68



THE CARIBBEAN




THE GIRL RESERVE SUPPER CLUB.



.liar



Xeclu.



The purpose of the Cristobal Girl Reserve Sup-
per Club is "To make to-morrow better than to-
day.

Our club has thirty-five members. Regular
meetings are held once a month, as are Cabinet
meetings. One extra meeting for special activities
is generally held monthly also.

The chief interests in the Supper Club are :

Summer Camp at Alorro Island.

Mid-winter Girl Reserve Conference.

Service work in the community.

Promoting school spirit.



National Girl Reserve Conference in Pennsyl-
vania.

The officers of the Club are:

Prtwidenl Margaret Davis, '31.

J'ke-President Nell Wardlaw, '32.

Secretary Mayno Bliss, '34.

Trea,rurer Aloha Slocum, 31.
Other Cabinet officers are:

Marion Necly. '31.

Gladys Bliss, '32.

Alicia Thirlwall, '32.

Maxine Andrews, '33.




O. G. A. CLUB



THE caribbi<:an



69



O. G. A.

.11., mm /;. .\V,-/v, ">1.



Order of Gregg Artists was organi/od in Cris-
tobal Fligh SJiool, llie first ol its kind on the
Isthmus. Its |nii'()ose is to de\elo() (Ik interest
in shorthand among tlie aiKaneed eommercial
students. 1 lie clul) is in eonneetion u ifh the
"Gregg Writers" and the memiiers have partici-
pated in eonlesls in that magazine.



The oi't



le oliicers (



.f ll



Pn-.adent
I ice-Presidenl
Secrelan/- Treasurer
K.xlra



Anna Rvan

Clara I'Visk

Marion 1*". Neely

I'.dward Conklinij



US chill are:



Sponsor ^liss Helen T. Patterson

Other niemhers are: I'-iigenia .^Icl^ain, Marie
Klcefkens, Celeste Clarke Powell, Margaret
Davis, i^iill) Oiival. ,ind Dorotlu' Wirtz.




THE BOYS' ATHLETIC ASSOCI.XTION.

Charle.r PescoJ, '33,

The Bovs' Athletic Association ol 1930-51 coach, Mr lohnson, who has to this day handled

has been one of the most successlul organizations the hoys to pertection.

in school this year. The first meeting was held It lias been for the first time in Cristobal High

September 14. 1950, in which one hundred l-.ovs School that a B. A A. has been under rules and

were present. by-laws, or in other wortls, a constitution. In

^M 1 , , ,-r .1 '^h the activities that Cristobal has competed

1 rie election ot oliicers was tlie most imjiortant u n i i i , i

., ,. ^, .,., ..,, , against Balboa thev have made a wonderful

incident ol the meetint;. 1 lie oliicers elected were i i , i

,. ,, showing wliich. ol course, most ol the credit

as follows: iii^- i i ti

r> -J 1 ll n 1 slioukf tie aiven to tlie coaches: lolinson. Hackett,

f resident I liomas PescocI i ^ -i

r-n -J 1 v> 1 I L \i-i ) \ inton, and .Seller.

/ ice-Fresident Randolph W ikingstad tu R A a cr \ i it- u c u i u

c /-.I 1 n 1 Ine ti. A. A. ot Cristobal I ligri School wishes to

oecretari/ Lliarles Pescod .

.,. ,, ,,,.,, express its eratitude to the new men teachers

ireusurcr Kavmond Will /_ i wi- i , i i i

o r ,-, I' T 1 /> 1 1- ot Cnstolial tii£;h lor the work thev spent in de-

Ciport lutitor hdwarti Lonklins i "ii i T i i

veloping good athletic teams, and hope that they

The organization is untler the thief athletic will be here in Cristobal the coming year.



70



THE CARIBBEAN




GIRLS' ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION.

Ellzahdli Hai/cs. '54.
The Girls' Athletic Association of Cristobal Dorothy Birkeland, secretary; and Elizabeth
High School of 1950-31 has just completed one of Hayes, Treasurer,
the most successful seasons in girls' sports that Emblems are awarded to the girls who earn

. , r T-1 A L- £ r i. them. At the end of the vear the school letter

it has known tor vears. Ihe Association ot torty , / i i i ,i



members



hol'.'s its meetings weeklv unticr the



of purple and gold is awarded to those having the



required number of emblems. The girls feel that
supervision of Miss Barbara Bailey, the girls' ^j^^ Association has done much toward their suc-
coach. The following were elected officers: Velma ^ess in sports and hope that it will be even more
Hall, President: Glady.s Bliss. Vice-President: successful in the coming year




A TROPICAL .SUN.SET



THE CARIBBEAN




THE CARIBBEAN




Miss Elizabeth Hayes '54
Queen of Carnival, 1931



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78



THE CARIBBEAN




I'Hl'. CAHIBBKAN



79




dfcA COK



SOCCKR

We can tonsiilcr our third year of
soccer a very successtul one even
though we did lose the pennant to
Balboa. Many ot the last year's play-
ers were again on the team of '51
The team this year was composed oi
the lollownig players:

Crislohal
E. ConUlinu. Goalkeeper
R. Wood. R. Fullback
K. Maurer, L. Fullback
T. Pescod (Capt.). C. Halfback
C. Rankin, L. Halfback
M. Wheeler, R. Halfback
R. Wikingstad. L. E.

B. Hackett, L. Forward

C. Pescod, C. Forward

y\. Marchoskv, R. Forward

T. Rankin, R. E.

R. Will, R. Forward

A. Forstrom, L. Forward

Balhoa
W. Chochez, Goalkeeper
I- Gelabert, Goalkeeper

Our first game was played November
8, 1930, on our home grounds and we
were successtul in holding the strong
Balboa team to a 3-5 tie. We held
our own during the ilrst halt of the
game, but they led us 2-0 at the end.
T. Pescod, our captain, shitted irom
the defense to the offensive line and
from then on it was our game or no-
body's game. Fields. Dew and De la
Pena made all of the goals tor Balboa,
while T. Pescod made two and C.
Pescod made the other goal for our
side. The whole team played a good
game and the five men in the detense
line should be given a great deal ot
credit tor their wonderful work in
keeping the ball down in Balboa's
territory during the latter part of the
game.



The second game was played at
Balboa the following week and we
came out on the long end of the score
5-4. It was anybody's game right up
to the last whistle. At the end of the
first lialf, the score was 2-5 in tavor



HOYS' ATHLETICS

Thomii.( Pcscoii ?/

oi Balboa. Botli our goals were kicketl
by C. Pescoil during the first half and
he also added another one ui the last
h.tll while the otiier two were made
by T. Pescotl and T. Rankin. Dur-
ing the second halt the Balboa players
found that they had run against a
stone wall, because our defense only let
one ball get through for a goal. R.
Wood and K. i^laurer played a gread
game at fullbacks. They continually
kept sending the ball down the fielt
on long distance flights. R. Wiking-
stad and B. Hackett played a fine
game on the offensive line.



The third game was altogether a
different type of game. Balboa came
over here with revenge In their eyes.
They beat us 11-4. They out-played
us in all stages of the game and during
the first half made seven goals to our
one. But during the second half we
held our own, they made four goals
and we made three. There were no
indnidual stars in this game but Joe
Salterlo and M. Dew ol Balboa need
special mention because they scored
four and three goals respectively.
Our goals were made bv T. Pescod
2, T. Rankin 1, and B. Hackett 1.



The last and final game ol the series
was played on Balboa's ground where
they proved they were superior to us
in tills game by defeatuig us 6-^2.
At the end of half game the score was
4 2 In Balboa's favor. They made
their goals on passes from Booth to
Fields, and Fields also made two nice
shots from tlie corners of the field.
T. Pescod made one goal on a pass
from T. Rankin. During the second
half of the game neither team scored
till the last {\\q minutes of pkiy. Dur-
ing the first twenty-five minutes of
this half many times both teams came
within scoring distance but they lacked
the punch that was necessary. There
will be many new faces in the line-up
for next year because the following
players will leave school In June; R.



Wood. K. Maurer. E. Conklum, T.
Pescod, C. Rankin, B. Hackett. and R.
Will.

BASKIi.ALI-

Our baseball season started off with
;i bang. Air. lohuson. our coach,
."alleti lor camhdates from all ot the
.lasses In High School and thlrty-
si.\ fellows answered the call. Four
ieams were organized to find out what
kind ot material there were, from
which he could pick a team. After a
few games the follow lug players were
picked to represent Cristobal High
School against Balboa High and also
in the Twilight League:
T. Pescod C. Pescod

R. Wlklngstad H. Egolf

B. Sanders ]. Ebdon
M. Marchosky R. Wooil
E. Conkllng K. Maurer

H. Will

The first game ot the Cristobal
High School series was played on our
home ground Saturday, January 17.
1931. We won the game bv downing
Balboa 10-3. This was the first
game we have won from them in three
years. Loose fielding on the part ot
the Balboa team and slugging by the
boys from Cristobal ieaturetl the game.
Ken Maurer, on the mound tor Cris-
tobal had things jirctty much his own
way during the game. His team gave
him an early lead to work on and
fielded well behind him. Maurer
struck out nine batters and allowetl
but (\\'Q scattered hits.

Vlen, the Balboa t wirier, allowed
ten hits and fanned nine batters. He
had trouble controlling his curve ball,
walking four battcis and hitting two.

C. Pescod was the hitting star ot the
game getting four hits out of five times
at b:it. Stoudncr's three-base hit in the
third Inning was the longest hit ot the
game.

In the first inning Egolf walked
filling the bases. With Maurer at
bat, Egolf stole second only to find that
one of his team-mates was there ahead
of him. Wertz was on third at tlie



80



THE CARIBBEAN



time and he tried to draw the throw
to save Egolf. In this he was success-
ful, but he had to sacrifice Iiimselt" to
save the other runner.

The Balboa team made eight errors,
four ot which were charged to D.
Stoudner. Dick is usually a depend-
able fielder, but he was way olt form.
Errors accounted tor the three runs
scored by Balboa, not one ot the runs
being earned.

The tielding masterpiece of the
game was made by C. Pes rod in the
tifth inning when he went over the
iett held foul line to take De la Pena's
long toul tly.

We started the ball rolling in the
first halt of the hrst. scoring tour runs
on three hits and two walks. \\'e
added two more in the last oi the second
on two hits. Neither team scored
again until the seventh and in that
inning Balboa broke the ice making
three counters on two hits. We finish-
ed the game the way we started by
making tour runs in the eighth Inning.



The second game of the series was
played January 24. at Balboa Stadium.
We got the surprise of our lite when
we came out with the short end of the
score. They beat us 7-6.

A double to Iett field in the tenth
Inning by Vien sent De La Pena across
the nlate tor the winning run.

\^ien of Balboa, and C. Pescod of
Cristobal walked seven men apiece.
Vien was touched for nine hits while
his team-mates made six errors. Cris-
tobal committed five errors while
Pescod allowed six hits.

Neither team scored in the first
inning. In the first of the second we
pushed our first tally across the plate
on a single, a wild pitch antl a passed
ball. Again in the third we scored on
one error and a double. Warwick
walked to start the third for Balboa,
stole second and came home on an er-
ror by the catcher. Runs in the fourth,
fifth and sixth and eighth innings fin-
ished scoring for us. Balboa woke up
in the fourth by scoring two runs. C.
Pescod was wild gning two bases on
balls and hitting one man. Two errors
and a base on balls netted two more
runs for Balboa in the seventh and one
more run was made in the eighth.

Both teams failed to score In the
ninth. Three men faced Vien in the
tenth: one struck out and the otlier
two llicd out. Specht and iMcGroarty
tanned in the last halt the tenth. With
two down De la Pena re iched first
on T. Pescod's error and "Barrel"
V^ien, the Balboa portsider, won his
own game by doubling to left.

Both teams pliyed good baseball
during the entire game. Stoudner
accepted ten chances without a boot
at shortstop. T- Pescod accepted nine
chances at third making one error, but
he also made thre espectacular catches.



For the first time in three years we
have been able to capture tlie tlag
from Baoa in batjlseball. By defeat-
ing the Balboa Hi team In the (inal



game of the series on their own field
by the score of 7-4 we have won the
right to claim the flag.

Two portsiders were opposed to
each other when hostilities began. Vien,
tor Balboa, and iMaurer for Cristobal.
Vien tailed to go the entire distance
being knocked out ot the box In the
eighth frame. Maurer was touched
for ten hits but he showed rare form
when men were on bases.

T. Pescod, our captain, was a tower
ot strength to our team. Besides hit-
ting the ball tor a trio oi safties he
also stole four bases. R. Wood, of
Cristobal, collected the only extra base
hit of the game when he clouted a long
trijile to right in the fifth session.

Barkhurst led the attack for the
Balboa team, getting three hits. D.
Stoudner played an unusually good
game at short accepting nine chances
without a bobble.

ATLANTIC SIDE TWILIGHT LEAGUE

This year the Cristobal Hi School
entered a team in the Twilight League.
During the first halt they won 12 and
lost 2 tor an average of .857.

The results ot the games are as fol-
lows :

Dec. 15- We won the opening
game of the Twilight League by de-
feating the United Fruit Co. to the
tune of 7-4. Maurer allowed them
only tour hits while the Hi School was
making seven oft C Will. This is a
fine start.

Dec. bS. In this game C Pescod
made his debut as a pitcher in the
Twilight League. We beat DeLesseps
by the score of 8-1. Wood and Egolf
hit home runs.

Dec. 22. Ken Alaurer in this game
with the Post Office allowed only one
hit while his team mate.s were scoring
six runs on four hits that they got
oli of Daily ot the Clerks. Alaurer
fanned 11 of the Postal players.

Dec. 29. Behind the pitching of
T. Pescod we beat the R. F. A. by the
score ot 6-3. Besides pitching a good
game he led us in the hitting honors by
getting two out ot three. Tom allowed
them five hits and whitted tivc men.

Jan. 5. W^e lost our first game of
the season to the Automats when they
defeated us 7-6. They scored three
runs in the last inning. Ken Maurer
on tiie mound for us fanned twelve
telephone men and allowed twelve
hits. Wertz for the Hi School got 2
hits out of 2 trips to the plate.

Jan. 8. We again succeeded In
defeating the Fruit Co. and this time
by the score of 2-0. C. Pescod allow-
ed them three hits and walked four.
He also got two hits out of three trips
to the plate, one of them being a triple.

Jan. 12- C. Pescod only allowed
the Postal Clerks one hit. \Ve ,ti;ot tour
hits oif of Dally and six runs. Daily
struck out fourteen and Pescod whiffed
eleven. T. Pescod got two hits one
of them being a double with the bases
loaded.

Jan. 15. Wertz led the High School
when we beat the Automats bv the



score of 9-4. He got a triple and a
home run out of three times to bat.
T. Pescod allowed five hits and also
walked hve men. We got eight hits
otf of Sudati, an old Navy pitcher.

Jan. 19. We collected eleven hits
for twelve runs off the offerings of
Griner and Eberenz. T. Pescod allowed
five hits, struck out eight and did not
walk a single man. J. Ebdon and T.
Pescod each got three out of four,
while K. Maurer got a long triple to
right field.

Jan. 22. Ken Alaurer set the team
from DeLesseps back 18-0. We scored
12 runs In the second inning. Ken
was in perfect form. Not a man on
the Del^esseps was able to hit him for
even a scratch hit. Only one man
reached first base and this was a walk.
This is the first no-hit, no-run game
this season. Wertz, Marchosky. C
Pescod, and Egolf each parked one
across the street for a home run.

Jan. 26. This game was a pitch-
ing duel between K. Maurer and C.
Will of the United Fruit Co. That is
up till the seventh inning when we
scored nine runs on seven hits. Alandi
with a double and a homer led the
High School sluggeis. Alaurer allow-
ed only three hits and tanned six. C-
Pescod robbed Ed. Lowande of a home
run when he crossed the street to gather
In his bid for a hit. The scorewas 10-3.

Jan. 29. We again lost to the Au-
tomats the only team able to defeat
us during the first half of the Twi-
light League. They beat us 1-0. They
scored when Alarchosky failed to touch
Trout coming home; thinking it was
two down he threw to tirst C. Pescod
allowed six hits and walked, home.

Feb. 1. The Postal Clerks sure
gave us the surprise of our lite when
they came within one run ot tying us
In the last game of the first halt. We
finally beat them 5-2. They got one
hit off of C. Pescod and we only got
three hits off of Daily. R. \^ i^^ing-
stad made two of the three hits off of
Dail\, but the Clerks made six errors.

SECOND HALF OF THE LEAGUE

Feb. 4. We opened the second half
of the Twilight League by defeating
the Post Office to the tune of 17-2. C
Pescod al lowed t hem one hit, he
struck out II. During this game we
stole eleven bases and T. Pescod got
four of them. T. Pescod and C. Pescod
connected lor double.

Feb. 10. The R. & F. A. took us
in by the score of 9-2. We could only
get two hits off of Griner and thes
came in the last inning. The game
was fine for about three or four innings
and then they liegan to get on Tommy.



THE CARIBBEAN



81



PHoTO*. BY W>C%J




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82



THE CARIBBEAN



Paine for the R. & F. A. hit one of
Tom's fast balls for a home run.

Feb. 12. We finally came out of our
losing streak by beating the Auto-
mats 16-0. We made sixteen runs on
sixteen hits. R. Wikingstad making
four out ot the si.xteen. T. Pescod
and K. i^laurer each connected for a
circuit clout.

Feb. 18. Maurer turned the Ba-
nanamen back by the score of 6-3.
Mauier allowed seven hits, walked
one batter, while we got seven hits
ot Will and he also walked five men.
Maurer also led the High School for
hitting honors, getting two out of three.

Feb. 20. We held the strong
R. & F. A. team to a 4-4 tie for eight
innings before the game was called on
account of darkness. C. Pescod, our
vest pocket edition, pitched the whole
game for us allowing the Checkers
six hits. J. Ebdon made two hits
out of three times at bat.

Feb. 24. Ken Alaurer, blanked the
Automats by fhe score of 9-0. They only
got two hits, while Alaurer struck out
eight and walked one, Pierce and Kelly
allowed the High School five hits. They
made three errors of which two were
charged to Al. Days. R. W'ood carried
off the hitting honors of the day.

Mar. 3. We trounced the R. &
F. A. by the score of 12-7. W^e col-
lected a dozen hits off of Griner and
they got eight off C. Pescod. They
also made an even dozen errors while
we made four. R. Wood held the hit-
ting honors of the day, getting threg
out of four trips to the plate, one goine
for a homer.

Alar. 5. We again were able to
trounce the Automats and this tine
by the score of 12-1. Ken Alaurer
allowed four scattered hits, striking
out eight. He was a little wild, walk-
ing five men. C. Pescod was the
hitting star ot the game. He got two
homers iu two consecutive times at
bat. T. Pescod also connected with one
of Pierce's fast ones for a home run.

Mar. 7. The United Fruit Co.
again sent us down to defeat by the
score ot 7-1. We gnt three hits off of
Daily while they made seven runs
on nine hits off ,^laurer. R. Wik-
ingstad made three hits for C. H. S.

Mar. 10. The United Fruit Co.
set us back a frame when they defeated
us by the score of ,5-4. C. Pescod allow-
ed fi\-e hits and walked two and Will
allowed us three hits and fanned nine



ot our men. He also hit a homer with
one on in the second inning. C. Pes-
cod and T. Pesrod each got a triple.

Mar. 14. The R. & F. A. handed
us another defeat and this time by
the score of 5-3. K. Alnurer allowed
the "Dock Rats" only five hits and
at the same time we only got iive hits
off Griner.

Sunday, March 22d, we beat the
United Fruit Company in the final
game of the series by the tune of 4-3.
We only got three hits off Dailey,
the Fruit Co. pitcher, but two ot
these went for extra bases. Maurer
and Conkling and Marchosky are the
last three men in the batting order.
During the most of the season it has
been the first four and five men get-
ting all of the hits. The fielding was
ragged on both sides. They only got
five hits off iMaurer. By winning this
game we took the title of the Atlantic
Side Twilight League Champions.

TRACK
We held our annual Track Meet
against B.H.S.. April 11, 1951, at the
Balboa Stadium. The final score was
39 to 38 in our favor. Hurrah for us.
Balboa High has been practicing for
the past month, while we were no-
tified that we were going to run against
Balboa only the Tuesday before the
meet. J. Dietzer and D. Wood were
the iiidnidual stars of the meet. Wood
making 15^4 points and Dietzer mak-
ing 14^.^, totaling thirty out of our
thirty-nine points. Aloise de la Pena
made 10 points for Balboa High. In
the 50-yd. dash J. Dietzer made it in
5 3|5 seconds, and in the 100-yd
dash R Wood m i le it in 10 3-5 seconds.
F. Banan made a new High School
record in the running high jump. He
made ,5*9" for the new record, the
old one being 5'6 '. The result of the
meet is as follows:

1. J. Dietzer (C) 5 3-5.

2. M. de la Pena (B).

3. R. Wood (C).

Sl,.>ll'ul

1. J. Dmbroiky (B) 42'1134"

2. R. WoDd (C).

3. T. Pe-od (C).

NEW RECORD
S,W-,v^J Run.

1. !". Birch (B) 2.18 1-5.

2. C. Pescod (C).

3. R. Cleveland (C).



220-mJ- Dash.

1. J. Dietzer (C) 24.

2. M. de la Pena (B).
5. C. Rankin (C).

S80 Rela,,.
Won by Cristobal Team. 1.41 4-5.
R. Wood, M. Marchosky, C. Rankin
and Deitzer.

The result of our inter-class meet
in track events held at Fort Davis on
April 9 is as follows:

hkhyd. Da.^h

1. Wood 10 4-5.

2. Deitzer.

3. Rankin.

HalJ Alile

1. C. Pescod 2:37 4-5.

2. Kelly.

3. iMarchosky.

50-yd. Da.tli

1. Deitzer 6.

2. Wood.

3. Rankin.

Runni'nif Broad Jump

1. T. Pescod, 16.11.

2. Wood, 16.4.

3. Hackett, 16.

220-wd. Da.ch

1. Deitzer, 28 2-5.

2. Woad.

3. Rankin.

Shol Put

1. Pesrod, 39.10.

2. Wood, 39.9.

3. Conkling 39.8.

Out of a total of sixty-four points
the Senior Class took forty-five of
those points with three first places,
five seconds, and five third places.

The Juniors, who took second place,
had thirteen points, all made by the
same runner. |. Deitzer took two
first places and one second place.

The individual high score meu of the
meet were D. Wood '31 who made 14
points and J. Deitzer '32 who made 13
points for his class.

GOLF.

This was a new sport that was in-
troduced into this school this year
and though we lost to Balboa we put
up a very stiff fight. They beat us
about 12 points. C. Pescod, our Cap-
tain, was the player with the lowest
score. The teams were as follows:
Crl.rlohcit.

C. Pescod

B. Dunn

M. Duey

H. Keenan

A. Forstrom



THE CARIBBEAN



83




84



THE CARIBBEAN



. BASKET-
BALL




T. Pe,cod



R.Vs/, I)






Balboa

]. Warwick

B. Alesser

B. Adams

i^\. Huertematte

iM. Sanford.

The first game was played at the
Gatun Golf Club, and the second
game which never did materialize
was supposed to be played on the
Amador Course.

FOOTBALL.

.^Ir. Johnson, our athletic super-
visor, and also the most popular teach-
er in High School, tried his luck in the
line of football in this school. He had
the Seniors and Sophomores, play
against the Freshmen and Juniors.
The Seniors won the first game 12-0.
Wood and T. Pescod both crossed the
line for a touchdown in the first quarter.
C. Pescod and J. Dietzer both played
an e.xceptionally good game for the
Juniors and Frosh.

We played another game and again
the Seniors were victorious 6-0. In
the last minute of play T. Pescod
catches a long forward pass from D.
Wood. He was instantly tackled by
R. Wikingstad but he fell across the
line for the winning points. Wood
missed the kick after the goal.



S\\ l.MMING.

This year a lot of interest was taker
in swimming. Four teams were formed
to see what material they had to pick a
first string swimming team. The four
teams were the "Eels", "Shrimps".
"Baracudas". and the "Blue Streaks";
The following members \\'ere on the
teams:

EeU Shr/nip.f

H. Smith-c B. Hackett-c

T. Pescod E. Conkling

C. Kariger J. Sinclair

E. Berger J. Kelly

L. Cotton C. Berger

J. Nielson T. Murphy

H. Lee V Davis

C. Campbell R. Will

Baraciiiia.\ B/ue S/rra^r

C. Campbell-c C. Rankin-c

B. Hollowell H. Egolf

J. Lockwood F. Washiibough

.\. Forstrom C. Pescod

M. Wheeler B. Wheeler

C. Horine M. Marchosky
B. Dunn R. Wood

A. Lyew R. Wikingstad

The "Blue Streaks" won the meet.
but much competition was shown in the
different races. B. Hackett won the
diving, and C. Rankin came in second.
The follovvlng men were picked from



this group to represent C. H.
against their ri\-als. B. H. S.



C. Rankin-c '31
H. Smith '53
B. Hackett '31
J. Kelly '31
F. Washabough '54
Saturday. April



C. Kariger '32
H. Egoff '52

B. Hollowell '54

C. Campbell '31
C. Berger '54

2.5. Balboa High



School walked away with the meet,
^hat is in points. They made 4934,
while we made 4?-^ points. But some
of the races gi\-en by our boys were
real close and made the Balboa boys
fight all the harder for their points.
B.H.S. has three boys Brewerton.
Wood, and W^estendorf who e.xpect
to take part in the Olympics in 1952.
The result of the swimming meet
between CHS. and B.H.S. was as
follows:

}0-,Vii. Pa.tll Bov-i

1. J. Wood (B).

2. W. Walston (B).

3. B. Brown (B).
Time 25 flat.

This was a cIo.se race all the way
from the start to the finish between
J. Wood and Wm. Walston. If Wals-
ton would stop smoking and put in
some strenuous practice, I believe
that \\^ood would not have a chance.



THR CARIBBEAN



85



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C. Camp Vse II




B. Holowell



F. Wavho baugW




C Kat-il^r



86



THE CARIBBEAN



}P-ijd. Dash GirLr

1. L. Morgan (B).

2. T. Dryden (B).
5. R. Quinn (B).
Time 50.5.

This was Drvden's race till almost
to the finish line, when all ol a sudden
L. J^Iorgan gave a sudden sprint that
brought her across the line just a stroke
ahead of Dryden. R. Quinn was not
very far behind either of the two
girls.

100-_xjd. Dash Bi>_vs

1. W. Grant (B).

2. J. Wood (B).
5. A. Peterson (B).
Time, 1 5-5.

This was anybody's race until the
very end. Going across the pool both
Grant and \\'ood looked like one per-
son because they were in perfect uni-
son and A. Peterson was right on their
heels and it was not until the last
moment that Grant was able to
pull ahead of Wood.

100-yd. Dash Girls

1. H. Hearne (B).

2. J. Halderman (B).
5. S. Pyle (B).
Time, 1.11.1.

This was H. Hearne's race from the
very start. She has a wonderful smooth
stroke that takes her through the
water in a very short time for a girl.
Both J. Halderman and S. Pyle de-
serve credit for their swimming.
50-yd. Breast Boj/s.

1. W. Westendorf (B).

2. B. Onderdonk (B).
5. R. Romig (B^
Time, 55.5.

Westendorf was superior in all stages
of this race. It looked like he had
something that he was pulling on and
every time he came out of the water
he used to gain a great deal. Washa-
bough swam a good race for us, but
it was not good enough e\'en to take
third place.

220-,vd.~Boi/s.

1. H. Brewerton (B).

2. I. Smith (B).
5. C. Hirsh (B).
Time, 2.57.1.

Brewerton was the only one in this
race. He was resting when the race
was over. Smith and Hirsh were
fighting it out with Campbell and H.
Smith of the Gold Side. They just
had a little too much practice, or we
did not have enough, that is the main
reason we did not take a place in this



race, but Harvey Smith with a little

more training will be breaking lines in

swimming races with the best of them.

SO-j/J. Breast Girts

1. T. Dryden (B).

2. R. Quinn (B).
5. V. Hall (Cris.)
Time, 45 flat.

Balboa entered two men ( 1 mean
girls) in this race, but if they had en-
tered another she would have had to
been pretty good to take a place. This
was one of the closest races of the day.
Tho' Balboa took two places, V. Hall
of Cristobal was right on their heels
and making them do their best to
beat her. Better luck next time. Hall.
50-i/ti. Back Boj/s

1. B. Crandall (B).

2. I. Wood (B).

5. B. HoUowell (C).

Time, 51.4.

Young B. Hollowell of the Fresh-
man class of Cristobal showed his metal
when he took third place in this event.
B. Crandall took first and J. Wood was
right behind him, but Bill Hollowell
was just a few inches behind W^ood.
There was not ten inches difference
between Crandall and Hollowell. B.
Hollowell has three more years of
High School, so Balboa High better
watch their step.

)0-t/d. Back Girls

1. G. Wahl (B).

2. E. Van Cllef (B).
5. I- Halderman (B).
Time, 37 flat.

\\'ahl was in a class by herself. She
did not ha\-e much competition, but
the race was between Van Clief. Hal-
derman, and Kleefkins of Cristobal.
But again luck was against us because
both Van Clief and Halderman took
second and third respectively.

Relau Bi\)/s
Cristobal Balboa

Smith Brewerton

Washabough Wood

Lyons Smith

Rankin Grant

This race was a dead heat and the
points were split. Our break came
when Smith of Balboa took it into his
head to swim crooked. We took ad-
\*antage of this break and Carlos, our
last swimmer, came into a dead heat
with Joe Wood of Balboa.

Relay Girts.
Cristobal Balboa

Neely, E. Dryden

Hall Morgan



Bliss, M. Hearne

Bliss, G. Quinn

Time, 1.14.

Balboa again showed her superiority,
by defeating us by nearly a half lap.
FOOTBALL.

A team to represent the High School
was picked to play the Apprentice
Boys from the Dry Docks. The fol-
lowing made the team:
T. Pescod '51 H. Smith '55

C. Pescod '55 B. Hackett '51
R. Wikingstad '52 K. Maurer '51

D. Wood '51 L. O'Rourke '51
J. Deitzer '32 B. Dunn '52

E. Conkling '51 T. Rankin '35

T. Murphy '52
On the \'ery first play in the first
quarter we took the ball over for the
only touchdown of the game. T.
Pescod made a nice run behind the in-
terference of O'Rourke, Hacketl,
Maurer and Dietzer. Many a time
both teams were under the shadows
of their own goal posts, but then the
opposing team held like a stone wall.
This was the last game we were allow-
ed to play because it was thought to be
too strenuous of a game to be played
between the Balboa and Cristobal
High Schools.

TENNIS.

On February 1, 1951, our tennis
team composed of the following players:
M. Wheeler, C. Campbell, A. Lyew,
H. Roos, A. Forsstrom, F. Englander
and J. Lockwood was defeated by the
Balboa High Tennis Team. Balboa
won all five of the matches. The
results were as follows:
No. 1 Singles

W. Maduro (Balboa) defeated M.
Wheeler (Cristobal) 46, 62, 62.
No. 2 Sitiijies

D. Stoudner (Balboa) defeated C.
Campbell (Cristobal) 6 1, 6 1.
No. 3 Singles

D. Morales (Balboa) defeated A.
Lyew (Cristobal) 86, 62.
No. I Doiihle.:

Sanford and Delvalle (Balboa) de-
feated Englander and Forsstrom (Cris-
tobal) 65, 62.

No. 2 DoiMes

Booth and Grant (Balboa) defeated
Roos and Lockwood (Cristobal) 7 5,
64.



The second games of the series was
played at France Field, February 7.
C. Pescod was the only one to win a
set.



HI': CAKIBRRAN



87







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F. 6 r><^ ''*'"*'^5tTi /







^ 4 ,^ C.Compbell



H> LocKwood




H. ^oo'.




A.L



e.w.



C. Pescoti (C) defeated Delvalle

(B) 61. 62.

W. Maduro (B) defeated T. Pescod

(C) 64, 6 i.

M. Sanford (B) defeated M. Wheeler
(C) 46, 62, 62.

In the doubles the first set was won
bv Cristobal 6 2 and the second and
third sets bv Balboa 6 5, 6 4. For
Cristobal C. Campbell and A. Lyew
played and Balboa was represented
by M. Dew and C. Morales.

The second double match was won
by Balboa also, the Pacific Siders win-
ning a love set in the first and rain
halting the next set, with Cristobal
leading 3 1. Lockwood and Roos
for Cristobal, and Grant antl Booth
played tor Balboa.

H.ANDBALL.

We started our handball season off



with a bang. We held elimination
tournaments to see who would re-
present Cristobal High in the inter-
scholastic games and the lollowing
boys were picked. For singles: T.
Pescod, C. Pescod and .M. Wheeler;
and for doubles: R. Wikingstad and
M. Marchosky making one team and
T. Rankin and E. Conkling the other.

Saturday, April 18. Balboa High
came over to the Gold Side and were
defeated four out of five sets. R.
\\'ikingstad and M. Marchosky losing
to I. Piera and Barkhurst. 21-15
(B); 15-21 (C); and 21-18 (B).

In the singles T. Pescod beat J.
Pierera 4-21 (B); 21-11 (C); and 21-16
(C). C. Pescod defeated A. Hele 21-14
(C); and the second game he won by
the score of 21-17 (C). M. Wheeler who
played our third game of singles de-



feated M. Huff 25-2.3 (B). 21-1.-5 (C),
and 21-14 (C). All three of these men
deserve winning. T. Pescod and M.
Wheeler, after losing the first game,
came back to win the last two and the
set. C. Pescod outplayed .\. Hele
in all departments of the game.

In the doubles we beat them. T.
Rankin and E. Conkling won their
double set in two straight sets. 21-15
(C), and the second set 21-17 (C).



The second game of the series were
played at Balboa Playshed, Saturday,
.^lay 9. In this we were successful
in beating B.H.S. in five straight sets.
T. Pescod defeated J. Lapiera 21-7 and
21-8; C. Pescod beat A. Hele two
straight games 21-16 and 21-14; M.
Wheeler also won two straight games
from >\. Huff 21-16 and 21-15. In



THE CARIBBEAN



doubles E. Conkling and T. Pescod
beat J. Dombrosky and D. Bark-
hurst 16-21. 21-4. and 21-9. C. Pes-
cod and R. W|ingstand defeat iM. Dew
and M. Sanford 21-12 and 21-15.
We now hold the Interscholastlc
Championship in Handball.

BASKETBALL.

On Saturday, May 16, 1931, the.
C. H. S. basketball team defeated
B. H. S. on our home floor by the
score of 26 12. Our team is made up
of the following players "Seniors"
T. Pescod, E. Conking, and D. Wood;
"Juniors" R. \\'ikirgstad, H. Egolf,
and J. Ebdon; "Sophomores" C.
Pescod. and M. Marchosky.

Cristobal played a very fine game
during the second half, but during ihe
first half just played on a par with
Balboa. During the first quarter
Balboa made three field goals, the
only field goals they made during the
game The other six points they got
were on foul shots. Cristobal High
School only made two field goals dur-
ing the first quai ter. The score at
the end of the quiirter was Balboa 6;

Cristobiil 1. In the second quarter,

the score was Balboa 8 Cristobal 6.
Things looked pretty black. luit that



two points IS not much to hold at only
a halt game.

During the third quarter Cristobal
made 12 points while Balboa was
making but five. The "Four Horse-
men," T. Pescod. C. Pescod, E.
Conkling, and D. Wood finally came
to life and with the help of STONE-
WALL JACKSON. Harry Egolf, we
held them so that they could not score
another field goal on us.

E. Conkling was the high point
scorer, making ten points in the course
of the game, while T. Pescod was
gathering eight. H. Egolt jilayed a
find game on the defense. R. W'lk-
ingstad went in for E. Conkling dur-
ing the second quarter and played a
good game while he remained.
BASKETBALL.

Saturday. May 25. 1931, we journey-
ed over to Balboa to play the return
game of basketball. We won by the
tune of 51 17. We were never be-
hind. Another championship title
for Cristobal High! We scored two
field goals right oti the handle and
at the end ol the first quarter the
score was 6 2. Pescod 6 and B.H.S.
2.

Dring the second quarter R. Wdtmg-
stad was sent into the game in the



place of E. Conkling. He can fill in
this place at center very well since he
has been under the coa?hing of Mr.
Vinton, our basketball coach. In this
quarter we both made two field golds,
making the s^ore to the end of the
half 106 in fa^or ol Cristobal High.
During the next ha!t ol the game
we niiide 21 points while Balboa was
having a hard time making seven
points. Again "Stonewall lackson"
showed that he was an equal to any
occasion that came up before him.
Many a tmie he broke up plays that
might ha\e turned irto points. C.
Pescod couldn't be stopped in this
game. He was everywhere at once
and he sure could drop them, making
se\ en field goals for a total of four-
teen points. The "Four Horsemen"
and "Stonewall Jackson" formed a
defense that was hard to break. There
was a report that B.H.S. 's defense
was almost impregnable, but look
what we did to it. For two games we
scored 57 points whi!e they were scor-
ing only 29. We almost doubled their
number of points. This was the first
time that Balboa High School has
been defeated in five years in the
annual contests with Cristobal High
School. Champions at last!




THE CARIBBEAN



89




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90



THE CARIBBEAN



GIRLS' ATHLETICS.

I'elma Hall. '57.



Well, our sports this year were greeted with
"mucho" enthusiasm. The Freshmen turned out
almost 100/c. The Upper classmen also turned
out to aid the younger girls. We have had a very
successful vear and we all feel that without the



help of Miss Bailey we would not have had one.
To reward the girls, Miss Bailey gave them em-
blems for each sport. All those taking part in
inter-class teams and inter-class games received
an emblem.



VOLLEY BALL.

This year i^liss Bailey, our worthy
coach, started the girls volley ball
season off with a bang. Class teams
competed for the school championship
There was a great deal of enthusiasm
and class spirit created which this
school certainly needs. The Fresh-
men won the school championship
much to the "Senior's disgust.

Thirty girls attended practice and
played with class teams through the
Inter-class Tournament. These girls
were awarded Volley Ball emblems
ot purple and gold felt.

Aliss Bailey then picked the stars
irom all the class teams and those were
sent to compete with Balboa for the
Inter-school championship. Those who
made the team were: Gladys Bliss
(Capt. ), Celeste Clarke, Dorothy Birke
land, Ruth Pickett, Marion Neely.
Elizabeth Hayes. Elsie Neely, Velma
Hall. Betty Stetler, Jean Pruit. and
iMary Clark. The first series of
the season was played in Balboa on
November 8. This set was won by the
Balboans, two games out ot three.

The second game ot the season was
played here in Cristobal Playshed on
November 15. The outstanding star
was Elizabeth Hayes, a Freshman.
Cristobal won two games in a row,
eliminating the third.

The third and deciding series ot the
season was played at the Ancon Play-
shed on November 22. Both teams
were in good fighting condition, and a
very e,\citing game was played. Every-
one on the team played splendidly,
and, as a result, Cristobal High School.
which since 1926 has taken a licking
from Balboa in every sport, beat their
unconquered rivals and now Cristobal
High School Girl's Volley Ball Team
holds the Isthmian Championship.
Hot stuff

BASKET BALL.

A strenuous week of basket ball
practise followed our victorious vol-
ley ball series. The first game was
played at Balboa and ended disas-



trously. We were swamped 20 fo 4.
Our team was composed of the follow-
ing players: Forwards Elizabeth
Hayes and Rebecca Bryden, Centers
Gladys Bliss and Velma Hall Guards
iMildred Owen and Celeste Clarke.
The substitutes included Betty Stetler,
Elsie Neely, Alice Gormerly, and
Stella Boggs.

The second battle was played at
Cristobal and the tables were turned.
The game was close and see-sawed
until the last two minutes of play when
"Sis" Hayes and "Becky" Bryden
brought us victory by looping a basket
apiece and placing the final outcome
at 13 11. We needed this game and
fought to the last gasp.

A toss-up-^and the God ot Chance
willed the deciding game to be played
on our home floor. This game turned
out to be the best played of the series.
"Sis" Hayes, our diminutive forward,
was the outstanding player of the
morning. Our pass work functioned
brilliantly all through the game, and
"Sis," was fed the ball consistently.
This, coupled with her remarkable
accuracy in shooting, enabled her to
win for us a total of eighteen points,
which represent all the points made
by our team. The final outcome was
18 to 15.

The Balboa girls played hard all
through the series. Mary Louise Grif-
fen, Ella Jones, and Agnes Tonneson
were the leading Balboa basketeers.
For Cristobal "Sis" Hayes, and
"Beckie" Rryden were always in the
limelight.

Thus ended a remarkable bacsket-
ball season and after the jolt of our
20 to 4 defeat In Balboa we settled
down and practised earnestly under
the direction ot Aliss Barbara Bailey.
BASE BALL.

Our baseball practise was started
after the ending of basketball season
As we did not have enough girls to
compete in Inter-class games, we
rigged up an Upper and Lower class
team. The girls practised every week



under the supervision of Aliss Bailey,
aided by our Captain, Ruth Casto.

The first game was played in Balboa
on a Saturday. The lineup was as
follows : Catcher Rebecca Bryd en,
Pitcher Gladys Bliss; First base
Velma Hall ; Second base Mable
Jean Bliss; Third base Betty Stetler;
Right field Ruth Casto (Capt.) and
left field Elizabeth Hayes. The
girls played hard, but Balboa's team
defeated them 26 to 12.

The next week the Y.W.C.A. had
their annual Conference in Panama.
Many of the girls on our team went,
thus leaving the remaining girls to
try to hold up C.H.S.'s standard.

This second team, composed ot
Catcher Ruth Casto; Pitcher-
Gladys Bliss; First base Velma Hall;
Second base Victoria HoUowell; third
base Helen Leach; Right field
Dorothy Birkeland ; and left field
Mildred Owen, practised hard, but
when the game with Balboa came the
next week, it also met Its Waterloo.
The Balboans put in a pitcher who
seemed to wreck our team. The final
score ended 16 to 4, a disastrous game
for us.

This was our first defeat, and believe
us, we felt it.

TENNIS.

The next sport to be taken up was
tennis. Because of our victory over
Balboa in Volley Ball and Basket Ball,
the gills settled down to some hard
practice in tennis. There were Inter-
class games, and then the big play off.
Those who made the team were the
following: Ann Powers (Capt.) for
singles. Elizabeth Hayes and Velma
Hall for doubles, and the substitutes
were Mabel Jean Bliss, Gladys Bliss
and Jean Pruit.

In our first game with Balboa over
there, Ann lost the singles to Mary
Louise Griffin by 6 2, 56, 6 3.
It was beautiful tennis and tun to
watch as the girls were evenly matched.
The doubles team fared better. Doris
Stroop and Ella Jones, of Balboa, were



THK CAHIBBrOAN



91



V^ToTTv"v7W




0. BiRfclond



G-. B\l^s



E. Niee/y



R. PIcKett-



E.W.



PHort v "wrw.




R. B rv'^<"i



BASKET BALL



V. Hall

(Capt.)






tw,



92



THE CARIBBEAN




^ e^ Hoyes



V. Holl



A Rowers




^WoT^V. "WM^.



n.Bii^s




t.w.



defeated by a score ot b 1. 4 6. 6 1.
The next game was played here. In
order that Balboa would not lose the
doubles Alary Louise Gritiin and Dons
Stroop were put in to play against our
same double team. Once again we
showed them which was the better
team. Elizabeth and Veima cleaned
up by a score of 2- ^6. 8 6. R 6. Our
Worthy Anne showed up Francis
Avers by defeating her in two set:>

Thus we won the doubles and stood
a very good chance ot winning the
singles. So, when the next game came,
Anne and the rooters traveled to the
other side and there watched Anne

defeat iMary Louise by 6 1, 5 7,

6 0. Rah, ior oui side! Winners of
three sports!

SWLNLNIING.

About the first of April the girls
started practicing for the swimming
meet which was to be held in the
Washington Pool on April 25. The
girls swam ten laps per day and prac-
ticed starts. When the atlair arrived
the Red, White and Blue troupe crossed
the line into Cristobal.

The line up was as follows : 50
yard dash Elsie Neely and Gladys
Bliss; 50 vard breast Rebecca Brv-



den and Velma Hall; 100 yard dash
Marie Kleetkens and Velma Hall:
BackstrokeAlarie Kleefkens and
Elizabeth Hayes; Relay Elsie Neely,
Gladys Bliss, and Velma Hall. Our
one lone diver, iMabel Jean Bliss,
competed against three of Balboa's
stars. The troupe took all three
places in everything except third
in breaststroke. which was taken by
Velma Hall. Alarion Neely, who was
elected Captain was unable to swim
Saturday. This proved a big handicap
to us.

This was a sad ending for oui swim-
ming season, but Balboa has always
held the championship for s\^imming.
The girls there should be congratulated
on their swimming and good sports-
manship.

GOLF.

This year Cristobal and Balboa com-
peted in golf tor the Isthmian Cham-
pionship. It was the first \'ear tor this
sport and was so satistactory that it
will probably be continued next year.

The first game was played at Ama-
dor LinUs. The girls from the Atlantic
side who pla_\'ed were: Anna Ryan,
Dona Eiiton. Elizabeth Hayes, Ruth
Pickett (who made the best score of
our girls), and Betty Stetler and Jane



Bretch. Although the links weie
strange to our girls they made a great
effort, but lost to Balboa by 9 holes.

The ne.\t match was held on Gatun
Links. The girls here proved them-
selves able to hold their own. The
final score ended 21 20 in favor of
Cristobal. The third game has not
yet been played, but we are looking
forward to it with enthusiasm.

Mr. Duer, the golf professional at
Gatun, ottered a dozen golf balls to
the girl with the best score. Emelia
Sherwood of Balboa won them. The
girls trom Balboa were: Margaret
Woodland, Emelia Sherwood, Eleanor
Hammond, Elizabeth Beverly, and
Alice Westman.

BOWLING.

Bowling was our last sport. The
girls \\-ho made the team were the fol-
lowing: Gladys Bliss, Kathleen Ar-
thur, Mabelle Bliss, V^ictorla Hollo-
well, Elizabeth Ha\'es. Betty Stetler
and Ruth Casto. No inter-scholastic
games have been played as yet, but
our team is good and we defy Balboa
to beat us.

On the whole, I think this year's
athletic season has been the most suc-
cessful and I 'm sure it is going to last
for vears to come.



THE cai;ihhi;an



93







^. Co, to



B.Stetle^



94



THE CARIBBEAN



QHOOL NOT






.Jniui Ri/nn '31



Oct. 1 Vacation days are over, hard work
faces all. There are many New teachers in the fa-
culty this year; y\v. fohnson. mechanical draw-
mg teacher: Mr. Hackett, Social Studies; Mr.
\inton, Science teacher; Miss Anderson, House-
hold Arts teacher; Mrs. MacDonald, Art teacher:
Mrs. Spencer, language teacher, and last but not
least. Miss Elner, music teacher.

Oct. 2. Home rooms were assigned and, of
course, the Seniors were given the most desirable
room.

Oct. 3. "The Bald-Headetl Brigade" greets
us this morning, showing that the upper classmen
have been "Up and at 'em."

Oct. 6. The high and mighty Seniors had
their class meeting, chose Miss Moore for their
advisor, and none other than Carlos Rankin for
president.

Oct. 7. To-day the new "Upper Classmen,"
or otherwise Juniors hatl their election of officers.
Also Elect Class advisor.

Oct. 8. Five more Seniors join us to-day,
having just returned from the States. Take it
from one who knows, the Senior class is "Bigger
and Better than ever." The Freshmen held their
first class meeting to-day.

Oct. 9. Next to elect their class officers were
the Sophomores, who were rather late in getting
organized.

Oct. 10. Athletics have started out with a
Bangl And are we going to end up with 1 IC-
TORYV.] Just watch our Smoke!!!

Oct. 13. To-day the "Frosh" elected their
class officers.

Oct. 14. B.A.A. and G.y\.A. meeting, and
Sh! I'll let you in on a secret C.H.S. is going to
have Cheer Leaders, real, honest to goodness
live ones. "Y Como."

Oct. 15. Two weeks ago to-day C.H.S. opened
wide its Golden Portals.



Oct. 16. Things are well under way by now
and the stutlents have lost that vacation look.
(If you know what kind ot a lookl mean).

Oct. 17. Friday is welcomed by one and all,
especially members of Supper Club as a picnic is
planned for Saturday for Cabinet members of
Cristobal and Balboa.

Oct. 20. Three Rousing Cheers! The Seniors
are granted four grantl privileges this year pro-
viding we know how to use them. Seniors. Be
careful. It all depends on you!

Oct. 21. B.A.A. adopted a Constitution.
Here's hoping better results in athletics will be ob-
tained. Tennis gets a flying start under the care-
ful supervision of none other than Mr. Hackett.

Oct. 22. Seniors, are we for it? What? A
football game against the Juniors. I'll say we
are. \\'atch out. Juniors' you brought it on your-
selves.

Oct. 25. Some of the Junior boys look quite
broken up this morning. Mmm! I wonder uhy?

Oct. 24. Staff members were elected for the
"Caribbean." All members of the staff made a
resolution to do their best to put the annual over



bie;! Y



Supper Club meeting this p.m.



and say, what a supper it was. The Cabinet surely
knows its X.Y.Z.'s when it conies to serving sup-
pers.

Oct. 27. Sh! Shi Seniors held a class meet-
ing. Maybe they are planning their party. "What
ya say?

Oct. 28. Mr. Sawyers had quite a surprise
for some of us "\\ alas, alas, what a terrible surprise; "white slips"!

Oct. 29. C.H.S. beat the Brother's school
team at soccer, but what else could be expected?
(ahem.)

Oct. 30. The famous football team of C.H.S.
defeated the Cristobal Apprentice boys.



THE CARIBBEAN



95



Oct. 31. The Staff decided to give a "Staff
Hop" which will he given in carlv December.

Nov. 5. Three rousing ciiccrs "para la Rc-
piililica dc Panama". Today is a holiday!

Nov. 4. Meeting of the "{lonorarv Spanish
Club."

Nov. 5. Miss Elner, the new music teacher
has unilertaken to teach the students to sing-with-
out straining their voices. (Something tells me
she will have a hard job.)

Nov. 6. Something in the air. I feel it. All
C.H.S. students had to till out slips telling the
vocation they desire to follow after leavnig school.
And can you Imagine one of our Seniors wanted
to be a preacher (never knew we had such religious
people in our class.)

Nov. 7. C.H.S. hekl their first Pep meeting,
but by the noises that came from the assembly
they didn't need much practice.

Nov. 8. Believe it or not. C.H.S. tied B.H.S.
In a soccer game. Viva C.H.S.!

Nov. 9. The "Honorary Spanish Club" held
a illnner at the Florence Hotel this evening.

Nov. 10. Seniors held a class meeting. I wish
they would hurry and give their party. Oh, yes!
The Senior class added another member to their
flock.

Nov. II. B.A.A. and G. A. A, meetings.

Nov. 12. Hurrah! Find we have two students
on High Honor Roll for first six weeks, and one,
and only one, is a Senior.

Nov. 13. C.H.S. defeats Brother's school, 20
at soccer.

Nov. 14. Spanish Club hail a meeting to elect
new members.

Nov. 15. Hip! Hip! Hurrah! C.H.S. beat
B.H.S. in soccer, 5 4, 'Ray! for our side!

No\. 17. Oh. Oh! Why is it that we have
school on Mondays? Everybody Is half asleep
anyway.

Nov. 18. Senior class meeting. It's about
time they had their party. We're getting tired
waiting.

Nov. 19. Things were pretty quiet until third
p)eriod and then Oh' of all the screeching noises.
Why, oh why, can't those lower classmen learn
not to make so much noise when they are sup-
posed to be singing? (Ask me another).

Nov. 20. To-day Capt. Ammel arrived on a
record-breaking non-stop flight from Long Island
to France Field



Nov. 21. We were honored to-day by having as
a visitor Major Stevens, of I'ort Davis, who gave a
most interesting talk on the "Story of America."

Nov. 22. Oh! Oh! Balboa beat us to-day
at six-cer. Next Saturday is the deciding game.
Team! Team! Do your best.

Nov. 24. To-tlay is "Red Letter Day" In
C.H.S. The Seniors sent out ehri Invitations to
their party. (At last.)

Nov. 2o. Staff meeting. ,^\ust be a big (jues-
tion up before it.

Nov. 26. Senior class party! Was it hot?
Well, 1 should smile! (1 mean the weather.) And
the decorations were not to be sneezed at unless
vou caught hay fever from the hay strewn around.
Hurrah! Four days vacation!

Dec. 1. Oh! How are we supposed to study
when we haven't yet got over the effects of
Thanksgiving vacation.

Dec. 2. Debate Club held Its first real debate.

Dec. 3. Why are all those (people bowing to
one another? Why, don't you know, those are
the new members being initiated into "La P.A.S.

Dec. 4. \\'ho says we haven't artistic stu-
dents in this school? If you don't believe me
just look at the walls in the hallway.

Dec. 5. Social meeting of Spanish Club at
Y.W.C.A. Formal initiation of new members to
the Club.

Dec. 8. This is a blue Monday, and howl
B.H.S. defeated C.H.S. in the final soccer game.

Dec. 9. Rain! Oh. can't It do anything else
but rain?

Dec. 10. The Art Class Is surely putting
themselves on the map. They have gone so far
as to make their own Christmas Cards.

Dec. 11. By the soumls coming from short-
hand class one would think they were attending
a Chinese school. But, no, they are only trying
to learn the difference between "Oh" and "Uh"!

Dec. 12. Mr. R. Z. Klrkpatrick gave a talk
on "Engineering" which was appreciated by every
one and especially those boys exjjecting to take
up that vocation.

Dec. 15. Rah! Rah! Rah! for our Cheer Lead-
ers, they surely have plenty of school spirit as
shown by Pep meeting. Rah! Rah! Rah! (again).
C.H.S. defeated Uni-Fruco-Baseball Club.

Dec. 16. Girls of Volley Ball team got their
letters. False alarm; thought there was a real
fire but onlv a fire drill!



96



THE CARIBBEAN



Dec. 17. Mr. Campbell gave a talk to the
Commercial Class on the "Aspects of Commer-
cial Law."

Dec. 18. Business meeting of the Spanish
Club.

Dec. 19. \Mioopee! Big day to-day. Christ-
mas Party n' everything. But the best of all is
the Staff Hop!

Jan. 5. Boys and girls you've had your two
weeks fling; now get to work.

Jan. 6. Senior class meeting; chose play

44-T

jonesy

Jan. 7. B.S.S. meeting. Report cards for
second six -weeks went out.

Jan. 8. Seniors meet Mr. Noe after school an 1
discuss play.

Jan. 12. What? Another B.A.A. meeting.
They ought to have some organization.

Jan. 13. C. P.?? (if you know who I mean)
seems to be making it a habit to break windows.
This Is two to his credit so farl! Hold on, C.P.,
don't go too fast.

Jan. 14. Watch your step Ye Students ot
Chemistry or the next explosion will be worse.

Jan. 16. Pep Rally, Jack Kelly gave a .r/iort
talk on "School Spirit.

Jan. 17. Rah! Rah! Rah! for C.H.S. beat
B.H.S. In the first Baseball game of the season.
Whoopee!

Jan. 19. Everything going smooth. (Saysme.)

Jan. 22. First Carnival rehearsal at Y.W.C. A.

Jan" 23. What! Another Pep Rally; and a
talk on "School Spirit.

Jan. 24. All aboard! for the Special to Bal-
boa. Whew! What a game; better step on it
boys we ha\e one more chance to sho.v them.
Who? and what? We are. Even though we
didn't win the baseball game we won the Fa-
culty Basketbal game. Say! I didn't realize
what nice looking teachers we hatl on our faculty
till I saw them in their basketball suits, and then?

Jan. 26. Doctor Swift talked to girls at
Y.W.C.A.

Jan. 27. Doctor Swift talked to boys.

Jan. 28. Girls attend Doctor Swift's second
lecture.

Jan. 30, Mrs. John McCormack gave a very
interesting talk on nursing.

Jan. 31. Hip! Hip! Hurrah! We beat Bal-
boa for the second time in Baseball; that makes
us the CHAMPIONS. Three cheers for our side!



Feb. 2. The boys on the Baseball team au-
tographed the last pitched ball of the series.
(The series in which we beat Balboa).

Feb. 4. Selected committee on Diplomas. It's
a very serious question as we only graduate once
and we want nice lookini) diplomas.

Feb. 5. Committee went to Balboa Heghts to
discuss Diplomas. Here's hoping we agree on
something.

Feb. 6. Mr. O. F. Thomas, Manager, Na-
tional City Bank, gave a very interesting talk
on "Banking."

Feb. 9. Carnival Practice. Believe me we
have one "gay Caballero.

Feb. 10. Debating Club had a meeting and
had one "hot" debate. Sss!

Fe!). II. We missed the spirit of Tommy
Rankin in school this morning. But the hospital
claimed him.

Feb. 12. Cram, cram, cram, till we can't
cram any more!

Feb. 13. Tests and more tests and Oh! what
tests!

Feb. 14. "Going! Going! Gone!" said the
auctioneers at the Valentine party given at the
Y.W.C.A.

Feb. 16. Ra! for C.H.S. we beat Unifrucos
6 3. (In baseball If you don't know what I
mean.)

Feb. 17. When the Junior boys give a candy
sale they surely are successful, especially when
only two batches of candy are donated.

Feb. 18. Talk on "International Affairs" by
Mrs. Hooper. Many questions were asked by
our would-be brilliant students.

Feb. 19. Report cards!

Feb. 20. What was wrong with school this
afternoon? Oh! didn't you know? Mr. SavT-
yers went to Balboa. Hurrah! for the Sopho-
mores and their party! It was one "swell dance.

Feb. 23. Only ten cents a piece! Buy one!!
Buy what? A tag for your choice for queen of
Carnival, of course.

Feb. 24. Another Carnival practice. We ought
to be good by the time this Is over.

Feb. 26. Now's the time In a lifetime when
the boys have to work, for a change. All tents
for Carnival have to be up this afternoon.

Feb. 27. To-night's the nite! The big nite.
Viva! Sister Hayes, La Reina del Carnival!

Mar. 2. Boys practiced golf at Gatun. May-



THE CARIBBEAN



97



he we'll have aniillier Roliliy Jones among us sonn.
W ho knows.

Mar. 3. "Greggites" hold a business meeting,
and lots of business was discussed.

Mar. 4. C.H.S. defeated R.&F.A. 148.
Baseball.

Mar. 5. Say! Can't you [unions behave in
English Class? Try and act like upper classmen,
for a change.

Mar. 6. Try-outs for Senior play.

Mar. 7. Oh! Oh! B.II.S. boys beat us in
Golf. I guess we won't have one after all.

Mar. 9. Miss Kimbro entertained Seniors:
verbs anil their conjugations being the form of
entertainment.

Alar. 11. "Greggites" hold a meeting. De-
cide to give a play.

Mar. 12. Girls of tennis teams receive em-
blems.

Mar. 13. Supper Club girls give a strictly
feminine picnic at "Shimmy Beach". Sorry,
boys, next time we'll let you come. Maybe!

Mar .16. What? Miss Kimbro entertaining
again?

Mar. 17. Staff decideil to dedicate the annual
to Miss i^loore, and who is more worthy of it than
she!

Mar. 19. What's going on? All the boys
wearing ties to school! Oh! no wonder, pictures
are being taken for the annual.

Mar. 20. Today the girls are all dressed up.
Conference on the other side.

Mar. 25. Oh, Seniors! ^^^^y can't you be-
have like Seniors should, now we've lost one of
our "privileges."

Mar. 24. Three cheers for the navy! The
Fleet's in!

Mar. 25. C.H.S. played a basket ball game
against Navy team off the Vestal. We won!

Mar. 27. Senator Brookhart gave a speech
on "Education.

Apr. 6. Our faculty is quite crippled if you
ask me. Where did they go??? What did they
do during Easter vacation??? (Ask me another.)

Apr. 7. Registering pupils for next year, no-
body can say office girls didn't work these days.

Apr. 8. Big dance at Miramar, many stu-
dents attended.

Apr. 9. Morning after nite before. Ho! Hum!
Some people look as if they needed more sleep.



Apr. 10. Freshmen Dramatic Club gave play
"Revolt" at Y.W.C.A.

.\pr. 11. WHOOPS!!! C. H. S. beat B.H.S.
in (he Irack Meet for the first time in five years.
Who says we're not putting ourselves on the map
this year???? The girls didn't do so good; got
beat in golf.

Apr. 12. Three cheers for our baseball team,
beat "Unifruco" 4 3. Now we're champions of
Twilight Ix.'ague. Some CHAMPIONS we are
getting to be.

.Apr. 14. Ahem! The "Scobies" sent out the
invitations to their dance. (Say how do you like
the engraving? some class, eh! what!)

.Apr. 15. Test a la achievement.

.Apr. 16. More tests.

Apr. 17. Whoopeeeeee!!! To-nites the nite,
the Freshman nite. Costume party.

Apr. 18. C. H. S. bet B. H. S." in hand ball.
Hurrah! for our girls. They beat the Balboa girls
in golf.

Apr. 21. Every member of the "Greggites"
received a membership certificate to the O. G. A.
and "Hickie" got a gokl pin. Good for you
"Hickie."

.Apr. 22. lust another
Apr. 24. Come and buy our candy, say the
Juniors. We need money.

Apr. 25. Oh! Oh! Oh! Cristobal nearly
(but not quite) lost its good name. Balboa had it
all over us in the swimming meet.

Apr. 27. Another Monday?

Apr. 29. What? and we didn't know before.
Oh! Celeste! how did you keep your marriage
a secret three weeks?? Congratulations, Celeste,
and all the luck in the world.

Apr. 30. What another wedding? Oh! no
just rumor. These rumors will get around.

May 1. Junior Benefit Card Party at Masonic
Temple. Miss "Pat" got a pretty bouquet from
her shorthand class.

Alay 4. Some bridge club we have here at
school at noon. Only the ELITE play.

May 7. WTiere have the Seniors lieen??? Prac-
tisingfor "JONESY." They ought to be good by
now.

May 8. The day has at last arrived, and the
best fjerformace ever put on by the Hi School
was put on by the the cast of Jonesy".

May 9. C. H. S. won in hantl ball, .^leet the
CHAMPS! That's us!



98



THE CARIBBEAN



^lay 11. The "Sophs" are ambitious editing
a weekly paper known as the "SLAM" and does
it live up to its name?? I should say so.

"Greggites" gave a shower for the
Guess who??
New student enrolled in the Junior



May 12.
new bride.

May 15
class.

May 14

Mav 16



Rain, Rain, Rain.
Hurrahl for our basket-ball team,
we beat Balboa Hi 2612. Ra! Ral Ral

May 19. "Greggites" are stepping out, having
a moonlight ride up the Old French Canal.

May 20. You uv// sleep at noon, Jessie, and
be late for school!

May 22. Art E.xhibit of the work by C.H.S.
students at the Y.M.C.A.

May 25. Special Train, WHOOPS!! what a
train. Three rousing cheers for our Basket Ball
team and the coach, Mr. Vinton. (Heh! turn
those lites off???)

May 26. P. A. S. meeting. Ye ole Spanish
club)."

jMay 28. Seniors (ahem) received calling cards
and invitations.

May 28. What's wrong T. P. YYYYou
SSSStutter.

May 29. One of our Seniors was called a
'child" by a substitute teacher. Horrors!!

June 4. Spanish Club elects officers for 1951-
1952.



June 5. Banana Checkers absent.

June 12. A.M. Senior Tacky Day. Seniors
great Miss Moore with an old song: "Good
morning, dear Teacher," Razzberries!

June 12. P.M. C. H. S. Operetta, "The Bells
of Beaujolais" is a big success.

June 17. Some of C. H. S.'s old brood come
back to roost, on the S.S. Ancon.

June 19. Junior-Senior Banquet! The Class
of 1951 receives a fine and well-deserved banquet
at the Washington Hotel. It won't be long now.
Seniors!

June 25. Junior-Senior battle! The Seniors
retain their battle-scarred banner.

June 24. Cram, boys, cram.
Cram for the e.xam.

June 25. "Oh! Lord of hosts, be with us yet.
Lest we forget, lest we forget."

June 26. "The Lord of hosts was with us not,
For we forgot, for we forgot."

June 28. Miss Moore leaves the Seniors.
Boo Hoo! Sniff! Blub! The Baccalaureate ser-
vices at Christ Church by-the-Sea.

June 29. The day before!!!!!!!!!

June 50. Commencement Exercises. Cristobal
High School loses another brood. "We'll honor
her name ; increase her fame, through passing years
twill be the same.




I^iitraiice to Hotel Washington.



THE CAHIBBKAN



99




, chub



Cclcftc Clarf.c, '.'/.



The Exchange Department is one of the in-
teresting departments of" our Annual. We re-
ceive letters, comments, praises and sometimes
advice from tlie North. South, East, and \\'est of
the United States, all of which go to make up a



better Annual. We enjoy receiving and publish-
ing letters that are sent to us, and in return we
send out letters and comments, also information
about the Isthmus of Panama.



T/,e C.irihhr



Cri'lolhil IIi,,h Sclwol. Cri.'hlhil. C.Z.



Tlie Purple Quill has received another copy ol The
Caribbean. it gets more nitcrcsting e\ery vear.

Please keep up the good work.



The PurpU- Q"i//.



Ball Illoh School. GoLvston. Te.xa.t



AS WE SEE OTHERS
The Purple Quill. Hull Iliiili School, Galff.rlon, Texas.

We are very glail to have your book on our list, and
hope we may continue to do so. ^' in a very clever way. Your literary and poetry de-
partment is most interesting.



The Carthbec



Cri.rlohul Hiith School, Crl.rlohal, C.Z. The Lincoln Times.



The Caribbean is one ot the most interesting books
we ha\-e on our list ot exchanges, but we would
suggest that you cut out some ot the written matter
and substitute more teatures. snapshots, etc.



Wi.rcon.'in Rapiiht, Ifircoihrin.

Your paper is quite interesting. The write-up of
the athletics is very good. We enjoy receiving copies
of The Lincoln Times.



Humanist, Memorial High School, West New> York, X..J. The Humanist, .lie,



il Uiflh School. \Xesl .\V..' York. S.J.



The Caribbean.



Cristobal Hiah School, Cristobal. C.Z.



The style ot your book is enjoyable, and could not
be improved upon. Your literary department is
very well written. We read it with more enthusiasm
than we've re.'id an\-thing in a long time.

The Oineoa. .Inn .trbor llujh School. .Inn .lihor. .Mich.



The Caribbeo



Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.



The Short Story Contest in your year book is quite
a treat. The stories are unusually good, also the
poetry. Please send us a copy next year.
SincereU-,



The Rejleclor.



The Carihhe



Ifoburn High School, Koburn, .Jla.'s.



Cristobal High School. Cristobal, C.Z.

We were very much pleased to receive a copy of
your book, "The Caribbean." The scenes of Panama
are \'erv pretty, and that part ot the book was well-
tingered by us. We hope you will send us a copy next
year, but please put more pictures in it.

The Exponent, Greenfield High School, Greenfield, .llass.



The literary department of The Humanist contains
some tine material. Your article on "What Can Lit-
erature Do For .Me?" is very interesting. Please
send us a copy of your book next year.



The r.akon



Laconia, ,\Va' Hampshire.

Although your book is small it Is well worth read-
ing. We suggest that you print all your ad\'ertlse-
ments in the back instead of part ot them in the tront.
Your exchange department is cleverly written.



The IVakitan. Central High .School, St. .lo.u-ph. .flo.

The Wakitan is one of the most interesting books
we ha\'e ever read. Your pictures .are excellent, also
your club note: The athletic section ot your book
is well written. The Wakitan deserves every compli-
ment.



We acknowledge the following:
The Rejleclor.
The Student.
The .J/irror.
The Spectator
The .horn.
The Quill.
The Dickinson Crucible.



100



THE CARIBBEAN



ALUMNI




Eleanor ReinhoLi, '32.



ALUMNI.

Our years in school are like marching to music
in a big parade. At first the parade was small and
now each year it gets larger as the new classes come
in, leaving last year's graduates to lead the pro-



We students of Cristobal High School, extend
our best wishes to the Alumni, and to those who
have remembered us with their thoughtful greet-
ings. Ne.xt year we hope to hear from you again.



THE CARIBBEAN



101



1924.

Dorothy Abenhkotii (Mrs. Artluir) Fiooci,
Cristobal, C. Z.

Florknck Albert, 107 Beaumcnt Avenue,
West Brighton, Staten Island, N. Y.

loSE ArOSEMENA. Panama Cilv, R, P.

Edith Coulbourn Smith, 717 Colonial Avenue,
Norfolk. Va.

Charlotte Housel (Mrs. R. W.) MacSparran,
Cristobal, C. Z.

Gl.xdvs Lowande (Mrs. C. O.) Baldwin, Cris-
tobal, C. Z.

Morris Marchosky, Colon, R. P.

Inza Markha.M, 409 Lake Avenue, Rochester,
N. Y.

Irene McCourt (Mrs. George G.) Reithel,
14 Islington Place, Jamaica, Long Island, N.Y.

George Oakes, Fort Banks, Mass.

Chester Pike, 2148 Acton Street, Berkeley,
Calif.

Andrew S.\uth, Bo.\ 2, Foster Route, Rich-
mond, Texas.

Ethel Sonneman, 98 Macon Street, Brooklyn,
N.Y.



William Clinchard, 229 North Seventeenth
St., Lincoln, Nebraska.

William Coffey, Cristobal, C. Z.

Helena M. Deckman, Cristobal, C. Z.

Edna Duval, (Mrs. Howard) Bammerlin,
1784 Colerain Ave., Cincinnatti, Ohio.

Morris Eggleston, Notre Dame University,
Notre Dame, Ind.

Ray Fischer, 4.309 l'"iiil(.v .\\enue, Ganlen-
ville, Md.

Irene Hopkins (Mrs. L.) Mcllvaine, Cristob.il,
C. Z.

Helen J. Keene, Cristobal, C. Z.

Johanna Kleefkens (Mrs. R. O.) Antich
Box \0f>7. Cristobal, C.Z.

Delilah May (Mrs. G. \\'. ) Parker, Gatun,
C. Z.

Lola Mu.noz, Panama City, R. P.

Mildred M. Neely, Cristobal, C. Z.

Carlos Pulgar, Gatun, C. Z.

Clarice Steenburg, Langley Field, \'a.

Gay R. Turner, (Mrs. Hugh) Craigs, Colon,
R. de P.

Elizabeth Warren, (Mrs. Elmer) Gude, Fort
Davis, C. Z.

Christian Wirtz, Cristobal, C. Z.



1925.

Helen Abendroth, Cristobal, C. Z.
Olga ArCIA (Mrs. A. de) Leignatlier, Colon, R.P.
Willia.m Cousins, 2625 Oakford Street, Phila-
delphia, Penn.
Dorothy Deibert, Fort Sill. Okla.
Ruth Duey (Mrs. Spencer) Lincoln. Cristobal,

c. z.

Katherine Fischer, 4309 Furley Avenue,
Gartlenville, i^ld.

Anniel Helm (Mrs. J. H.) Brenchick, Denver,
Colorado.

Ruth Hopkins, Box 256, Ancon, C. Z.

Hubert Lee, 2211 Speedway, Austin, Texas.

Harriet Steenburg (address unknown).



1926.

Richard Beverly, Broad Run, \'a.
Hildegarde Blythe, Landham-Bounce X-Ray
Clinic, Atlanta. Ga.



1927.

Joseph Corrigan, Cristobal, C. Z.

Teresa Gallagher, 652 56th Street, Brooklyn.
N.Y.

Ja.mes Grider, 416 Transylvania Park, Lexing-
ton, Ky.

Emily Bledsoe, 416 Transylvania Park. Lex-
ington, Ky.

Laurence C. Calloway, jr., Balboa, C. Z.

Louise Heim. Cristobal. C. Z.

Clara A. May, Gatun, C. Z.

Helen Montgomery. 257 Park .Avenue, Hun-
tington. Long Island, N. Y.

John G. Nelson, Gonzaga University, Spokane,
Wash.

Dorothy Svenson. 15 Pleasant Street, West
Roxbury, Mass.

SuRSE J. Taylor, 1814 West Avenue, Austin.
Texas.

James Van Scotter (address unknown).

Helen Vineyard, Odessa, Del.



102



THE CARIBBEAN



Dorothy Wertz (Mrs. A.) Cotton, Cristobal,

C. z.

Charles Will, Cristobal, C. Z.
EuPHEMiA WooLNOUGH, 601 West 160th Street,
New York Citv.



1928.

John G. Klunk, 2015 University Avenue, New
York City.

Ethel K. Westalan, Panama City, Panama.

Albert J. Days, Gatun, C.Z.

Gladys E. Beers (Mrs. H. G.) Alrick, Gatun,
C.Z.

Emma Banks (Mrs. A.) Blaisdell. Cristobal, C.Z.

Robert H. Axtell. Bates College, Lewiston,
i^laine.

Kathryn E. Lambert (Mrs. W.) Gould, Cris-
tobal, C. Z.

Theodore C. Renter, 120 Gates Avenue,
Brooklyn, N. Y.

Evangeline Smith (Mrs. W.) Payne, Box
1455, Cristobal, C. Z.

Arthur E. Rothenburg, (address unknown).

Zonella L. Bliss, 159 South Professor Street,
Oberlin, Ohio.

B. Edward Lowande, Cristobal, C. Z.

Lucia Salazar, Colon, R. P.



1929.

Royal R. Higgason, Gatun, C. Z.
Lilybel Cox (Mrs. L.) Kariger, Gatun, C. Z.
Elizabeth I^ackett, 333 Plymouth Avenue,
Rochester, N. Y.

"No doubt I must break down and give you
the customary, so here goes I am working in
an attorney's office. There are so many in-
teresting matters that one comes in contact
with. It simply fascinates me. My sincerest
wishes to my friends in C.H.S. and the best of
luck with the 1931 annual."

Rose.mary Keene, Cristobal, C. Z.
James F. Ouinn,

Jean Wyllie, 555 Colusa Ave., Berkeley, Calif.
Ethel Barnett, 36 Browning Avenue, Dor-
chester, Mass.

Inez Barry, Whitesboro, N. Y.
Woodford M. Babbitt, Gatun, C .Z.



Marion A. Boomer, 301 University Place,
Syracuse, N. Y.

Jack R. Pettit, New York Stock Exchange,
5 Cowbry Street, Yonkers, N. Y.

Dorothy Heim, Cristobal, C. Z.

Paul Hayden, Box 41, Bates College, Lewis-
ton, Maine.

Gretchen W. Palm, Box 416, Mount Holyoke
College, South Hadley, Mass.

Roger Deakins, Gatun, C. Z.

Wilhelmina Kleefkins, (Mrs. D. H.) Rudge,
Cristobal, C. Z.

Roy B. Walker, Balboa, C. Z.
Marion K. Lowande, Cristobal, C. Z.

Lee Kariger, Gatun, C. Z.

Vita V. Lyew, College of St. Teresa, Winona,
Minn.

"I am still at St. Teresa's. I am a Sophomore

now, and hope to stay here until I get my degree.

iMy best wishes to the Class of '31, and "hello"

Ckss '29."

Morris M. Luce, Eastman School of Music
Rochester, N. Y.

Anita R. Rankin Cristobal, C.Z.

"I wish the Caribbean every success for its

New Year and what's more I know it'll be a

better one every year. Of course you'll have to

work very hard to out-class ours but I know

the class of '31 can do it."

Morton Southard, Gatun, C.Z.

Margaret Hayes, 926 Home Avenue, Fort
Wayne, Ind.

Adair Louise Taylor (Mrs. T.) Pierpont,
Guatemala City, Guatemala.

Sam Patchett, Cristobal, C.Z.

Lois A. Williams (Mrs. C.) Strowbridge, Bal-
boa, C. Z.

Randolph Orbaugh, University of North
Carolina, Chapel Hill. N. C.

Charles Crum, University of North Carolina,
Chapel Hill, N. C.

Mildred J. Bath, 926 West State Street, Tren-
ton, N.J.

"In August around the 19th I shall graduate

from Rider College, Trenton, N.J. The college

will secure for me a position after that time, as

a social secretary.

May this year's Caribbean be a great success,

even surpass the one in 1929."

PoRFiRio De Reuter, University of Detroit,
Detroit, Mich.



THK CARIBBEAN



103



PlIOEBK O'DoNNKLL, Cristohal, C. Z,
TllHODOUH K. I^RANDON, UnivcTsitv of Tcxas,

Austin, Texas.

ZoE Wyi.i.ik. 555 Colusa Avenue, Berkeley,

Caliiornia (attentling University of Calilornia).



1930.

Ralph S. Ckum, University of North Carolina,
Chapel Hill, N. C.
Mavis E. Thirlwall, Cristohal, C.Z.
Rae Bliss, Keep Cottage, Oherlin College,
Oberlin, Ohio.

"Although 1 am many (too many) miles
away from "Home, Sweet Home" anil tlear ole
C. H. S. I think of them both, constantly.

"I am aelually in love with Olierlm College,
but let me forewarn all students planning to
enter college that it is no playhouse! I dis-
covered that fact on my very first ilay of class
attendance. However, I greatly enjoy my
stuilies here at Oberlin; but must confess again
that it is a steady grind.

"According to the reports I have heard con-
cerning my former Temple of Learning (that
is to say C. H. S.) there have been many and
advantageous changes. I have also heard that
C. H. S. has gained many honors in the athletic
field. Sounds as though the High School Car-
nival was a huge success this year also. Ru-
mors have reached me, concerning the fact
that the Freshmen Class is worthy to be proud
of this year. Three hearty cheers for good ole
C. H. S.!!!

"The Caribbe.an is bound to I e a success this
year, it just can't be otherwise. I well know
I'm not in danger of having my expectations
of the Caribbean of 1931 raised too highly."
Tho.M.AS L. Coley, Jr., (address unknown).
Della J. Ray.mond, Cristobal, C. Z.
EvELY'N E. Ganzemuller, Bucknell College,
Penn.
Alice E. Henter, Gatun, C.Z.

"First I must say, the best of luck to gooil old
Cristobal High in general. To the members of
the staff, go my most sincere wishes for their
success in producing a bigger and better Carib-
BE.\N than ever before.

With best regards to each individual of the
Class '31."



F. William Newman, Jr., Cristobal, C. Z.
Paulime Herman (ac'.dress unknown).
Elsie B. Birkeland, 50 Nevlns Street, iirook-
lyn, N.Y.

"I am working in New York and I live at the
Y.W.C..\. in Brooklyn. I like it very much here,
but I ill) miss C.H.S., the faculty', and (he stu-
ilents.

"I send my sincerest wishes tor a very suc-
cessful 1931 Caribbean. I shall try to wait
patiently for mine.'

Victor Melendez, 613 E. State St., Ithaca,
NY.

Eleanor M. Fitzgerald, Balboa, C. Z.
Frances M. Days. Gatun, C. Z.
Francisco y\. Woxc, Colon, R. P.

"lam now luchani'o' with lite in old Panama
City. W hat is life after all? '^ly sincere wishes
anil good luck to the Caribbean staff and the
class of ',31.

^\. \'iRC,iNiA Eberenz, Cristobal, C. Z.

Elsie D. Darley. Cristobal, C. Z.

E. Beverly Turner, Rutgers College, New
Brunswick, New Jersey.

J. \'iRGiNi.\ Stevenson, Cristobal, C. Z.

Walter Wikingstad, Bo.x 278, Bates College,
Lewiston, Maine.

"It won't be long now, so make the best of
your days at good oil C.H.S. I sincerely hope
that you have the best of luck with the Carib-
bean of 1931."

EsTAF.\NiA G. Wheeler, Utica Memorial Hos-
pital, Utica, N.Y.

Richard C. Sergeant, Cristobal, C. Z.

James Campbell, Jr., Georgia Tech, Atlanta,
Ga.

Rita Teresa Joyce, St. Joseph's College,
Philadelphia, Penn.

Arthur Mundberg, Rider College. Trenton,
N.J.

Phoebe O'Donnell, Cristobal, C.Z.

OlviND .Xrnesen, Kristiansund, Norway.

Rose T. Corrigan, C. Z.

M.\RI.\ C. Stew.ART, Philadelphia, Pennsyl-
vania.

Nehls G. Jansen, Cristobal, C. Z.



104



THE CARIBBEAN




LilL



CaT Gte I >.pt


0\'ERHEARD.

Jack Kelli/. '31.



Traffic Cop: "Don't you know you can't turn
around in the middle of the block?"

George If'ertz: "Oh, I don't know. I think I can.
Just watch."



The main difference between a cigarette lighter
and a school child is that the cigarette lighter
works sometimes.



My father says that he thought nothing of
studying five hours at night. Well, I don't think
much of it either.



CAUGHT IN THE ACT.

Mrs. Smith rushed into her living room.

"Oh, John!" she cried, as she panted for breath.
"I dropped my diamond ring off my linger and
I can't find it anywhere."

"It's all right, dear," said John. "I came cross
it in my trousers pocket."



1931 MODEL.

Liza at the zoo saw a zebra for the first time.

"Rastus," she said, "What kind a animal am
dat?"

Rastus also gazed in much perplexity and awe.
He had never seen one before, either. "Why, Liza,
dat am a sport model jackassl"



THE CARIBBICAN



105



FAK-SIGHTED.



"Officer," said a .lOO-pound lady, "coidd you
see me across the street '.'"

"Madam, I could see you three blocks away."



/'nnrl/er: -"Do you know my frionij James
Jones?"

//. Sniitli: "Yes, I usetl to sleep witii him.
Tnweller: "Roomates?"
H. Smith: "Classmates.



Dentud: "Coukl you please open your mouth
wider?"

JlanJi: "Yes, indeed, if you'll move your
ceiling up a tew feet."



Jlif.f Kinihro: (to Kenny iM) "I want a bright
little boy who wants to mail this letter for me for
a penny."

hennu J/: "Ladv, what vou want is a dumb-
bell.



A general (on inspection) met a wagon filled
with dirty harness. "Where are you taking that
harness?" he asked of the driver.

"Oh, the corporal told me to go hide it until
that blankety-blank general got through with
inspection."



Miss Kimbro: "What people live in Wales?"
Tommy P: (not understanding Wales)
"Jonah's!"



Jimmy: "Oh, look at the rhinoceros."

Will: "That ain't no rhinoceros. That's a

hippopotamus. Can't you see it ain't got no

radiator cap?



himhro: "These books remain on the shelves
of the best libraries."

yelma: "No wonder, no one takes them out."



Salesman: "Say, do you know who was crazy
enough to get up at four o'clock in the morning
to go horseback riiling?"

.Stenograp her: "No, who?"

Salesman: "Paul Revere."

Stenographer: "H'ni, does he work here?"



Mrs. Spencer: "I only have two reasons for
going back to teach in college."

Students: "Why?"

Mrs. Spencer: "Senor Marshall and Senor
Forsstrom?"



IF THE BASFR.XLL TEAM COACH WERE
ALSO A PROFESSOR.

"Now, listen, you bunch of dim wits, T want
you to put some pep into the recitation this
morning savvy? An' remember, you're not
at any pink tea. You've been stalling around
long enough this year, an' I'm tired of it, see?
Yeah, I mean all of you, every cock-eyed one.

"Aw right there Weick, recite that piece by
Browning I told the class to memorize. You
can't do it, huh? Well, I thought not, you dumb
apple ^_vou'll never be anything but a bench-
warmer. Hey there, you dizzy blond in the front
row, can you come out of the coma an' give it?
Aw right that's pretty fair. You're showin'
better form, Miss Neely.

"Well, Rankin come out of the fog an' tell
me where old Browning, was born. Huh? Whv,
you quarter-wit, you moron, I've a good mind
to kick you out. So you didn't study the lesson,
huh, you lily, livered goofus?

"Aw right. Miss Hall, whad di'ja s;iy? Why

it no! That's not the right answer.

Damnnation, I never in my life s;w such a bunch
(I shameless ilead-head phoneys as the students
in this class. Holy Cow, I'll never in God's
world be able to drill enough seuse in your empty
beans so that you'll even ha\e a chance to pass
the semester exams. Yeah, all the whole bunch
of you better come out of your shells pretty (]uick.
An' I mean it, you pikers!



"Will some one in the class," asked the teacher
of rhetoric, "give a better form of the sentence,
'John can ride the mule if he wants to?"

"John can ride the mule if he wants him to,"
said the bov with the bad eve.



106



THE CARIBBEAN



Bill: "WTiat do you do with your clothes
when you wear them out?"

Frank: "Wear them home again naturally."



The sighing lover had a heart.

The girl for diamonds played;

The father came down with a club;
The sexton held the spade.



(C. Pescod out in car with P. Wardlaw on lonely
road): "Every moment, dear, you're getting "One reason I like watermelon," said economi-

prettier and prettier. You know what sign that ^al Eva," is because you can eat it, drink it, and



wash vour face."



Pete: "You are going to run out of gas."



CITY AND COUNTRY ENGLISH.

0(i/ hoi/: "Thursday we motored out to the
links and goljed till sundown, then we trained
down to the beach and Friday ed there."

Country hoy: (not outdone) "Yesterday we
huyyied to town and hasehalled till dinner. Then
we came home and muled out to the field where
we cornstalked till dark. Then we suppered and
piped awhile. Later we staircased upstairs and
bedrteaded until the clock ;f^r(/.



Jlattie: "Little boy, can I go through this
gate?"

Little Boy: "I guess so Mattie, a load of hay
just went through."



Why did the salt sliakerl
Because he saw the spoon holder.
The Potato masher in the kitchen.
The yas meter in the cellar.
The lemon squeezer.
The sugar spoon with her.
And the egg beater.



"What is your name, little boy?" inquired the
kindergartner of her new pupil.

"I don't know," said the little boy. "Well,

what does your father call you?" "I don't know,"
still bashfully. "How does your Mother call you
when the griddlecakes are done?" "She doesn't
call me," beamed the new pupil; "I'm there."



Jlr. Sawyers: (on the telephone) "WTio? Oh,
no! We don't have any of that kind here."



Jliss Klmbro: "What does the word tocth
signify ?"

Randy IF.: "Pain!"



K. JIaurer: "My head is hot."

D. Wood: "I thought I smelled something
burning."



One day Mr. Smith went to buy a bushel of
buckwheat for sowing. The man who sold the
wheat was away, but his wife undertook to make
the sale. She found a peck measure and they
went to the granary.

She filled the measure twice, poured the con-
tents into the bag, and began to tie it up.

"But, Mrs. Lawton," said the man, "it takes
four pecks to make a bushel."

"O, does it?" replied the woman, untying the
bag. "Well, you see I never had any experience
in measuring grain before I was married. I al-
ways taught school."



"What could be more sad than a man without
a country?" feelingly asked the high school litera-
ture teacher of her class.

"A country without a man," responded a pret-
ty girl just as feelingly.



Voice on phone: "Who's this speaking?"
Second Voice: "How should I know? I can t



see you!



1"



THE CARIBBEAN



107



"But your finance has such a small salary, how
are you going to live?

"Oh, we're going to economize. We re going
to ilo without such a lot of things that Jack
needs!"



Joliniu/: "Mother, my toes are not as hard as
leather, are they?"

Mother: "No, Johnny."

Johnnii: "Then, mother, how ilo they wear
themselves through my shoes?"



Archie: "Papa?"

Papa: "Yes, Archie."

A.: "Teacher says we're here to help others."

Papa: "Of course we are.

A.: "Well, what are the others here for?"



Xilt: "Would you be afraid to hunt grizzly
bears with a club?"

Witt: "Not if there were enough members in
the club."



Little Edna, four years of age, was saying her
|)rayers just before jumping into beil. She was
on iier knees a few seconds when she turned to
her sister, aged six, and asked:

"Why wouldn't it do to pray for our bread once
a week or once a month? \\'hy must we ask for
our daily bread every day?

"So as to have it fresh," re[)iieil tlie sister.



I'isitor (consolingly to Tommy, who has upset
a bottle of ink on the new carpet)

"Tut, mv bov, there's no use crying over spilled
milk."

Toninii/: "Course not; any one knows that.
All you've got to do is to call in the cat, and she'll
lick it up; but this doesn't happen to be milk, an'
mother'll do the licking.



Yells from the nursery brought the mother,
who found the baby gleefully pulling small Billy's
curls. "Never mind, darling, she comforteil.
"Baby doesn't know how it hurts." Half an hour
later wild shrieks from the baby made her run
again to the nursery. "\\'hy, Billy! she cried.
"What is the matter with the baby?" "Nothing,
mozzer," said Billy, calmly, "only now he knows!"



Teacher (in English Class): "I am beautiful
\\'hat tense is that?"

Senior: "Past."



Ask Aloha or I'.dna "A camera doesn't lie,
but it often catches one at his worst moments.



Jlr. I inion: "What is electricity?
Student: "Somethina shockine.



THE LAND OF THE FREE.

The Prince of Monaco, who, having had both
an English and an American wife, knows whereof
he speaks, said of marriage at a dinner:

"Through marriage a French woman gains her
liberty, an English woman loses hers and an
American woman "The prince paused and
looked quizzically about him.



'Yes? The American woman?



de



butante.



"The American woman," ended the prince,
'continues to do as she likes.



Did you ever hear about the Scotchman that
the first time he used free air he blew out all five
tires.



Jliss Kimhro: "Now we will study the tenses.
If I say 'I am handsome', what tense is that?"

Roliert Jlarshall: "Pre-tense.



108



THE CARIBBEAN



WORTH KNOWING.

The editor of the Evening Star was deeply
engrossed in his work when he was suddenly in-
terrupted by the office boy, who remarked:

"There's a tramp at the door, Mr. Clyde, and he
says he ain't had nothin' to eat for six days."

"Fetch him in," said the editor. "If we can
find out how he does it, we can run the paper
for another week."



Jlotlier: "Teddy, we must all try to give up
something while times are so hard."
Teddy: "I'm willing."
Jlotlier: "What will it be, dear?"
Teddy: "Soap."



Jlary D.: "I just got a phone call from Junior;

he's the most considerate boy I ever knew."
Margaret D.: "WTiat did he have to say?"
Jlary: "He wanted to know if I got safely

home from the dance he took me to last night."



Robert JIarrlmll: "Hey you, mule, why don't
you put that pan down."

Henry Lee: "Before I was a horse, now I am a
mule, which am I?"

Robert: "Jackass."



Toni Pescod: "Your room-mate says that he is
a practical socialist.

Dick ir.: "He must be. He wears my shirts,
smokes my cigarettes, and writes to my girls."



Jlistress: "\ saw the milkman kiss you this
morning. I'll take the milk in myself after this."

Jeannette: "It won't do you any good, ma'am,
he promised not to kiss anybody except me."



Jlr. Uackett: "Well, Ernest, what did you
learn yesterday?"

Krne.rt B.: (after deep thought) "You ought
to know. You teached me."



Jesse S.: "You are the breath of my life."
liarhara: "Well, why don't you hold your
breath once in a while?"



Grandpa Wayback rises to remark, "I never
expected to live to see the day when the girls
would get sunburned on the places they do now."



Jlrs. Spencer: "\ have noticed that English
women have a fixed grin on their faces at all
times. Have you noticed it?"

Jack Kelly (absent-mindedly) "All I've noticed
is that they wear shorts."

Jlrs. Spencer: (after a short pause) "Say! Do
vou mean the men or the women?"



Jesse: "London is the foggiest place in (he
world."

Gordon: "I've been in a foggier place."

Jesse: "Where?"

Gordon: "I don't know where it was, it was so
foggy when I was there."



Charlie Pescod sez: "WTien an automobile
stops along the road in the daytime, it's trouble.
When it stops at night it's romance."



Alalia: "Will you love me as long as I live?
George: "It depends on how long you live."



Two sentries were marching up and down their
separate posts. An old lady watched them in
silence until she could hold her tongue no longer,
and grabbed one of the men by the arm:

"Can't you two fools make up and be friends?"
she asked reproachfully.



Jlr. Jleyer: (in Algebra class) looking at his
watch "As we have a few minutes left, I should
like to have some one ask me a question that is
bothering him.

Betty Stetler: "What time is it, please?"



Jlary D. (at end of year) : "Now that you have
kissed me. Professor, what do you think?

Pro].: "You'll fail. I need you in my class
next year.



The "talkies" at many movies depends on
who sits near you.



THE CARIBBEAN



100



Billie: "WTiat arc you doing with that letter
on vour sweater? Don't voii know vou re not
supposed to wear thai unless vou \e made the
team?"



Ca



We



Harry \^'ilcox of this city, left to day for a short
trip to Chicago.

Tile Baptist Cliurcli of which he is a memher
will hold prayer services tonight.



I'iolcl Randall: "You drunken beast! If I
were m your contlition I'll shoot inysell.

Clhirlic Pc.fcod: "Lady, if you wash in my con-
dition you'd mish yourseli!



Jlr. Ilackett: "What do you mean by woman
suffrage?"

Toniim/ P: "I mean a woman has as much right
to suffer as a man.



Doctor: "Congratulations professor, it's a boy."
Ahsenl-mindfd Prof.: "What is?"



John P. Kelly took the book "What Every Wo
man Knows" out of the library the other day.
What we want to know is this Does Kelly know
what "Everv Woman Knows?'



JlLfS Jloore: "How can I prevent my students
from coming in unprepared on Monday?"

Jlr. Saa\i/t'r,i-: "Don't give them any home-
work over the week-end."



Jli.r.f Anderson: "I am not going to give any
passes until this room gets down to work."

Student to himself: "As if the room is going to
get down to work.



Jli.r.'' FJner (in Glee Club): "If you want
to go over big you must sing louder."

Jimmy Hai/dcn: "I'm singing as loud as I can.'
Jliss Elner: "But be enthusiastic! Open
vour mouth and throw vourself into it."



Mr. Sawyers tells us an experience he had once
in A\aine. He was starving and had only f)ne
shot in his gun. Staggering along, faint from
hunger, he heard the whirring of wings. Look-
ing up he spied twelve ducks flying in a row. He
pointed his gun and took aim. He shot, the ball
piercing the necks of the twelve ducks, killing
them all. The ducks on falling lit in a dead tree,
broke off a limb, which fell and killetl a deer.
The deer in its death throes kicked a rabbit
against Mr. Sawyers chest knocking him into the
lake. Mr. Sawyers got out of the lake with his
pockets full of fish and lived happily ever after.



GOOD .v\.\TERI.\L.

Rufus was proudly sporting a new shirt when a
friend asked. "How many yards does it take to
make a shirt like dat one. Rufus?"

"Well, suh." replied Rufus, "Ah get two shirts
like this out'n one yard last night."



Te



THE BEST CHOICE.

Judge: "You can take your choice :
dollars or ten days."

D. Lewis: (still in a foggy condition): "I'll
take (hie) the monev. vour honor."



THE DECLENSION OF A KISS.

You may please decline 'kiss', said a teacher one
day
To a miss of sixteen, who was pretty and sweet.

"Why, I hardly know how. but I'll try anyway,"
She replied with a smile bewitchingly sweet.

"It's a noun that's quite common, and when it's
desired

It may be quite proper, I'm happy to say.
It's gender is common, second person required.

And it's plural in form in a singular way.
It's case is objective, you plainly can see,

Because it's an object so ardently sought.
It agrees, in most cases, with you and with me.

But according to no rule by schoolmasters
taught.
I've made a mistake, very likely, somewhere

If I have. I assure you it's no fault of mine.
For I think to ask me was not very fair,

When vou know that a kiss is hard to decline."



Ruth EgolJ: "These shoes certainly cry when
I walk."
B. W'ertz: "No wonder. Look what's in them.



no



THE CARIBBEAN



The old negro preacher came rushing up the
pier, shouting and signalling for the boat to wait.
He reached the end of the pier and taking a
broad jump over six feet of water, landed on the
boat face first.

"Well, boys, ah jus did git heah. didn't ah?"
he said rising and mopping his brow.

"Yo' sho did, rev'end," responded the crew,
"but so is we jus gittin' hyar.



Collector: "Say, you're six payments behind
on this piano.

Howard Keenan: "Well, the company ad-
vertises "pay as you play."

Collector: "Well, what's that got to do with it?"

Hoi^'arJ K.: "I play very poorly."



Meyer: "So you say your girl attacked you
with a death, dealing weapon?
Cliarlie: "Yes, a flv swatter."



Mother: "Johnny, why did you have to stay
after school today?"

Johnny: "Well, the teacher told us to write a
composition on the "Result of Laziness" and I
just handed in a blank sheet of paper."



(.^landi Marchosky walking up to the boss of
the Dry Dock with his hand on his nose.)

Mandi: "Mr. Stone, I've come to see you for
a job."

Jlr. Stone: "Well, my boy, what's the matter
with your nose, take your hand away."

Mandi: (removing his hand) "Oh! nothin."

Jlr. Stone: "No siree, you can't work here;
try the tarpon club."



JUSTIFIABLE HO.MICIDE.
Eric, six years of age, strolled into the living-
room where his father and the lady visitor were
pondering over the checkerboard. He stood
watching for a few moments, but when the game
seemed to him to be at a standstill he rushed out
to the kitchen where his mother was washing
up the dishes and exclaimed excitedly! "Gee
Mom, Dad and Jean are in a tight squeeze. Neither
one of 'em can move.



Junior: "Do you like Poe's books?"
Pete: "Yes, do you like O'Henry's?"
Junior: "No, the peanuts in them stick to my
teeth."



Robert Marshall tells of a friend of his, an
exceedingly deaf man who was being introduced
to a young woman. The young woman was pretty,
but she had a strange name. Her name was
Dinglefugle.

"'Mr. Smith," said the mutual acquaintance,
"this is Miss Dinglefugle."

The deaf man cupped his hand behind his ear.

"Please pardon me," he said, "but I'm hard of
hearing, \^'hat did you say the name was?"

"Miss Dinglefugle."

"I'm awfully sorry," murmured the afflicted
one with a strained and puzzled look in his eye;
"but I haven't caught it yet."

The other man raised his voice to a shout.

"Miss Dinglefugle! he blared.

Resignedly, hopelessly, the deaf man shook his
head.

"It's no use," he said; "sounds like "Dingle-
fugle to me."



HIGH RESOLVE.

Mr. Hackett: "So you have resolved to follow
the example of George Washington, eh, my lad?"

Ben. iniliams: "I suppose you mean in al-
ways telling the truth?"

Jlr. Hackett: "No, sir; in marrying a rich
widow.



(In the Spanish class the students were very
noisy) Jlrs. Spencer: "Oh, pardon me, class, but
I forgot this was social hour instead of class.

Roht. Jlarshatl: "Oh, that's all right."



BRIGHT.



Anna Ryan: (For position as stenographer)
"I'm pretty smart. I've won a lotta prizes in
cross-word puzzle competitions."

Sawyers: "Yes, but I want someone who can
be smart during office hours'"

Anna Ryan: "This was during office hours."



THE CARIBBEAN



HI



The kindergarten teacher told her pupils the
storv of the wolf and the lamb. Then she said :

"Now, children, you see that the lamb would
not have been eaten b_v the wolf if he had been
good and sensible."

One little boy raised his hand.

"Well, John," asked the teacher, "what is it?"

"If the lamb had been gooti and sensible,"
said the little boy, gravely, "he would have been
eaten by us, wouldn't he?"



CALIFORNIA RAI'-SOnY.



SuHiJcit/ Sc/iool Tiaclier: "And when it rained
forty days and forty nights, what happened then?"

Bright Willie: "The natives said it was very
unusual."



A little boy on returning from Sunday School
one day, when asked by his mother what the
golden te.xt was, instantly replied, "Hold a grater
to Solomon's ear." For a moment the mother
was puzzled, until she recalled the true te.xt, "Be-
hold a greater than Solomon is here."



Girl: "Who's that popular boy down there?"
Boy: "That's Herman Roos, the biggest pest
in C. H. S."



GETTING OUT OF A TIGHT PL.^CE.

On their return home from a dinner partv Mrs.
Jones turned to her husband with a look of
curiosity on her face.

"Tom, dear" she asked, "whatever made you
tell the Thompsons that you married me for my
voice, when you know I can't sing a note?

Tom was a tactful man as a rule, but this time
he tripped.

"Well, darling," he replied soothingly, "I had
to give some reason, and that was the only one
I could think of at the moment."



ALIBI.



Cop: "Who was driving when you hit the car?



Sinclair (triumphantly]
were all in the back seat."



"Nc



of



us ; we



Paul Difjnan: "Dad, you are a lucky man."
bather: "How is that?

Paul I).: "You won't have to buy me any
school books this year. I'm taking all of last
year's work over again."



Tommy P.: "Do you play golf?"
Alicia Phirwell: "Dear me, no, I don't be-
lieve I should e\en know how to hold the caddy."



Miss Kimbro found a hen's nest under the barn
yesterday that she didn't know was there, but
the eggs she found won't pass inspection.



Teacher:



THOSE WHO KNOW.
"How is the earth divided?"



Johnny: "One-fourth land and three-fourths
water, e.xcept the Missouri River, which is half
and half."



The real optimist is the man who alwa^'s hopes
the home club will win in the ninth inning.



Sam: Mr. Sawyers, "I shall like to ask for a
small raise in my wages, because I have just been
married".

Mr. S.: "\'ery sorry, Sam, but I can't help
you. We are not responsible for accidents that
happen to our employees outside of school.



Jack: "Why do you keep your eyes open when
you kiss?

Carmen: "I always look before I lip."



Jliss Kimbro: "What's the matter with you?"
J. }\eilson: "Eyes tired.

Jlij-s Kimbro: "Such terrible grammer! You
should sav 'I am tired.'



112



THE CARIBBEAN



Jlr. Hackett: "In which of his battles was
King Gustavus of Sweden slain?"

Carmen: "I'm pretty sure it was his last."



Bunni/:

Hunka:

them awa



"Do you file your fingernails?"
"No, I just cut them off and throw



THE IRISH WAY.

Two Irishmen were out for a row one day, when
their boat in some mysterious fashion capsized.
One of them swam to the shore, and after tak-
ing a "breather" was seen to start back again
toward the other man, who was wrestling with
the waves.

"\Miy are you going back?" inquired a by-
stander.

"Oi had to save meself foirst," replied Pat,
"and now, be gorra, Oi'm going back to save
Moike."



Jlr. Hacketi: (in History class) "Junior, who
was the Black Prince?"

Junior L: "He was the sun of Old King Cole,
wasn't he?



Tom P., finding himself in need of temporary
financial assistance, called on a banker and asked
for the loan of $1000.00 without security.

"jMy dear Tom, said the Air. Slocum "I
can't do that. How do I know I'll get it back?"

Tom: "I always have paid other loans back,
haven't I?"

Jlr. Slocum: "Yes, but suppose you die."

Tommy scratched his head. "Well, that's easy
enough," he said. "If I'm in heaven I'll send it
to you, if not, I'll hand it to you."



Juhb: "WTiat does that young boy of yours do?"
Pegrew: "He's a girl scout."
Juhb: "You mean a Boy Scout."

Pegrew: "No, he's always out scouting for

* 1
girls.



I'elma: iai football game) "Oh, look, the
players are all covered with mud. How will they
get it off?"

Kenneth Jl.: "WTiat do you think the scrub
team is for?"



Ethel used to play a good deal in Sunday School,
but one day she had been so good that the teacher
said in praise:

"Ethel, my dear, you have been a very good
girl today."

"Yeth'm," responded Ethel. "I couldn't help
it. I have a stiff neck."



Jlis.f Jloore: (trying to get pupils to use in-
direct discourse) "I went swimming yesterday.
Now tell me what I did."

Dui'al B.: (just waking up) "You swam."



WANTED TO MAKE SURE.

The electrician was puzzled. "Hi, Huff!" he
called to his youthful assistant, "put your hand
on one of these wires.

Sparks did as he was told.

"Feel anything?"

"No," replied Sparks.

"Good!" said the electrician. "I wasn't sure
which was which. Don't touch the other wire
or you will be electrocuted."



C. Goodenough: "Send me your pencil, I want
to make a mark."

.//..' "Here."

C. Goodenough: (makes mark "Now, lend me
your fountain pen, I want to rub it out.''



Jlandi/: "Didn't I get my last hair cut here?"
Barber: "No, we have been here only two
years."



Dick ir.: "You know, Tommy, you're a good
egg, but you have one habit I wanna break you
of."

Tommi/: "What is it?"

Dick jr.: "Breathing."



A little fresh air child watched with round eyes
the cattle enjoying the cud. "Say, mister," she
asked the farmer, "do you have to buy gum for all
them cows to chew?"



Fir.rl Bum: "What time is it?"

Second Bum: "Ten to."

First Bum: "Ten to what?"

Second Bum: "Tend to your own business.'



TIIK CARIBBEAN



11.3



The Sunday Schoool teacher had explained (he
familiar Bible story at length, and then askeii
Tommy if he expected to be among the sheep or
among the goats. "I dunno, saul lOmmy,
doul)tfully. "Ht)\v's a feller to tell when iiis maw-
calls him a lamb an' his paw says he's a pesky kid?"



SNAPSHOTS.



The sixth fjeriod class of Theory and Harmony
on Wedne.sday leaves a "sweet taste" to those who
were present to show just how alert a student is
to outwit any member of the faculty.

As it happened the class was intent on a re-
view. Who woiikln't be with a test looming be-
fore us in the near future? Our clever teacher
was asking each eager, knowledge-hungry pupil
various (juestions over the review which evidently
was not studied beforehand. Coming to Kenneth
Alaurer she put the same question to him that
many of the others had tailed to explain.

"Kenneth, what is a tetrachord?" asked Miss
EIner.

"Let me explain it on the blackboard because
I can't explain it in words," replied Kenneth.

"Well, suppose you were on a desert island
without any paper, pencils, or anything. How
could you explain it then?" xMiss Elner asks with
a smile.

Kenneth answers quickly, "I'd write on the sand



i-ith



witn mv iineer!



1"



Jli.rs Anderson: "Good heavens, I smell some-
thing burning!"

Freshman: "Yes, it's the pie, but according
to the cook book, I can't take it out for twelve
minutes vet."



Bessie is a bright one. The other day her
teacher in drawing class let them choose their own
subjects. After the teacher had examined what
the other children had drawn, she took up Bessie's
sheet.

"Why, what's this? she said. "You haven't
drawn anything at all, chikl."

"Please, teacher, yes, I have," returned Bessie.
"It's a war picture a long line of ammunition-
wagons at the front. You can't see em cause
they're camouflaged."



TAKING AWAY HIS ONLY HOPE.

Murphy was making his first trip across the
Atlantic and he felt unspeakably awful. The
doctor came to him as he tossed about in his lierth.

"Cheer up, man," he said heartily. "I know
you're feeling rott.-n, but you're not going to die."

Murphy opened horrified eyes. "Not going
to die?" he wail'-d. "Eaith, doctor, I thought I
was! That was the only thing that kept me alive."



A kind-hearted old gentleman came upon a
small, whimpering urchin.

"What's the matter, my little man?" he asked
sympathetically, placing his hand on the young-
ster s heatl.

"I'm lost. Boohoo!"

"Lost? Nonsense! We musn't give up so soon.
Where do you live?

"I d-don't know, sir, whinned the youngster.
"We-we've just moved and I ca-can't remember
the address.

"Well, what's your name?

"D-don't know, sir.

"Don't know!" exclamined the old gentlemen.

"No, sobbed the urchin. "M-mother got
married again this morning."



THE OWLING OWL.

.Ur. XeuTic/i (Englishman:) "WTiat's that aw-
ful noise?

Hostess: "Oh, I think it's only an owl."
Jlr. ^ewric/i: "Yes, I know it's an 'owl, but
'oo's owling?"



The Sunday School responded in that monotone
usual in such performances in unison.

"Very good, commended the pastor. "And
now, tell me, who said those beautiful words?"

No response. Pause.

"Can no little boy or little girl tell me who said
those beautiful words? Any one."

One little hand waving in the rear.

"Ah, Willie, I'm glad to see your hand up. Tell
me, who said those beautiful words?
'I did, sir."



,///. Hacketl: "What do we call a person who
talks and talks and continues talking after nobody
is interested in what she is saying?"

Tom P.: "Please, sir, an English teacher."



114



THE CARIBBEAN



Teacher: "^^ hat is Boston noted for?"

Johnny: "Boots and shoes."

Teacher: "Correct. And Chicago?"

Johnny: "Shoots and booze."



NOTHING NEW.



Wlien Noah sailed the ocean blue.
He had his troubles, same as you,
For days and days he drove the Ark,
Looking for a place to park.



"There's another baby over to the Bascomb s
and they don't know what to call it, for there are
so many children now that they've used up all
the names in the Bible and the dictionary," ex-
claimed little Eleanor, as she came in from a visit
to the home of a school friend.



NOTICE ON BOARD CONCERNING MID-YEAR EXAMS.

Next week is the coming catastrophe Tests.
Prepare for thy heights of blissful happiness or
else thy downfall. We may all now bow in prayer.
May the teachers now, one and all, have mercy
on us. Ah- women.



YOUNG IDEAS.



Farmer: "Shall I show you how to milk a



9"
cow .'

Town J untor: "Hadn't I better start on a

calf?"



PERFECT HAR.MONY.



"Phyllis," said the father sternly, "I don't like
hat young Rabbitt you go out with."

"Yeah?" retorted the daughter. "Well, don't
worry, you're simply poison to him, too.



BITS OF FUN.

"Is this the Adams House?" asked a stranger of
a Bostonian.

"Yes," was the reply. "It'is Adam's house until
you get to the roof, then it's leaves."



A Scotsman very much addicted to smoking
was persuaded by the minister of the kirk to give
it up.

The minister was surprised, when he met Sandy
a short time afterwards to have Sandy ask him
for a pipe of tobacco.

"But, Sandy, you promised to give it up."

"Eh, mon, I am breaking myself in gradually :
I have not bought any since.



Little Tommy had been naughty. His mother
did not know what to do with him. She wanted
to confine him somewhere, but he showed signs
of breaking everything he was put into, and he
threatened revenge at every suggestion. She
besought herself of a place where there was no-
thing to break, and where he could not work any
serious revenge. He was borne into the garden
and locked up in the chicken house. He was si-
lent this was something beyond his capacity
to talk about; but as his mother was going away
his head appeared at one of the little openings.

"Alammal

His mother stopped.

"Mamma, you can lock me in here if you like,



but I



won't lay any eggs



Jeweler: "Did you sell anything while I was
out?"

Kelly (clerk): "Yes, I sold all the rings."

Jeweler: "Are you sure you got the right
price?"

Kelleii (clerk): "Oh yes. The price was marked
in each ring. 8c. The man would have taken
more if we had had them.



Jack: "Isn't that an attractive building?"
Bill: "Yes, everybody's crazy about it. It s
an insane asvlum."



A large, slouchy colored man went shuffling
down the road whistling like a lark. His clothes
were ragged and his shoes were out at toes and
heels, and he appeared to be in the depths of
poverty for all his mirth.

As he passed a prosperous-looking house a
man stepped from the doorway and hailed him.
"Hey, Jim! I got a job for you. Do you want
to make a quarter?"

"No, sah," said the ragged one. "I done got a
quarter."



THE CARIBBEAN



11.5



Henry dislikes being bathed and argues with
his mother over every square inch ol his tour-year-
old anatomy. One night when his patience was
especially tried by what he consiiiered wholly
unnecessary work, he exclaimed: "Oh, mama,
couldn't you skip my stomach? Nobody ever
sees mv stomach!"



"Now chililren," the professor remarked to his
offspring on Saturday morning, "I wish you to
attend my lecture this afternoon. If you fail to
do so, as you have in the past, I will be compelled
to chastise you."

For some moments the young folks exchanged
consulting glances, then Tommy remarked
resignedly:

"Well, we've been licked before and got over it."



Clias. Pescod: "Miss Kimbro, if there is an3'one
that likes you, it's me."

.///.r,r Kinihro: "You think I don't know who
likes me and who doesn't?"

JIaiiJi/ .Ucirclwski: (coming in at the same
time she has finished saying these words) "Miss
Kimbro, I love you."



NAME, PLEASE.

At a dinner party the absent-minded professor
was seated next to a charming woman.

"Don't you remember me, professor?" she smiled.
"WTiy, some years ago you asked me to marry
you!"

"Ah, yes," said the professor, "and did you?"



Mr. Vinton: "Now, class, the chemical com-
position of water is H-0. Hunka, what did I say
the chemical composition of water is?'

Hiinha: "H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O."

Jlr. J'inton: "How's that?"

Hunka: "You said H to O."



(Celeste and Thomas making signs on black-
board in Senior Classroom).

Jliss Moore: "WTiat are you doing. Celeste?"

Celeste: (looking up) "I'm writing Shorthand."

Jliss Moore: (speaking to both Tom and

Celeste) "If you are not studying I'll have to have

you take your seats. WTiat are you doing,

Thomas?"

To/n/ni/: (who was drawing imitating designs)
"Oh, I'm writing Chinese."



PLAY POST OFFICE.

She was bidding her lover a fond farewell, for
he was going on a prolonged business trip around
the workl.

Tearfully she clung to him and asked: "My
dear Adolf, will you be true to me when you are
far away? Promise me that you will write to me
from every town you visit!"

And as he gathered her in his arms, he cried:
"O Ada, is it love that prompts you to say this?
Ada, swear to me, do you really love me or are
you merely collecting foreign postage stamps?'



/lloha: "What's the matter? Is your Austin
out of gas?"

George: "No, it's stuck on a piece of chewing
gum."



Aloha: "Oh! Are we going through a tunnel?"
George: "No, our Austin is under a truck."



Miss Elner: (at orchestra practice) "iMary,
why do you keep repeating that strain?"

Mary Deans: "Well, every time I get back
there, the two dots are still there."



honk! honk!



Sinclair: "I wasn't going forty miles an hour,
not thirty, nor even twenty."

Judge: "Here, steady now, or you'll be back-
ing into something."



AGAINST THE RAINY' DAY.



Landlord: "What is the complaint?"
Tennanl: "The bathroom faucet won't run;

would you mind having the hole in the roof shifted

over the tub?"



Mrs. .Vcu'/yu'C(/.- "I'm sorry, dear, but dinner
is a little burnt to-night."

Jlr. .Vcn'/i/uW.- "What's the trouble? Fire
at the delicatessen?"



"Motoring is surely a great thing. I used to
be fat and sluggish before the motoring craze, but
now I'm spry and energetic.

"I didn't know you motored."

"I don't, I dodge."



116



THE CARIBBEAN



HARD TIMES.
(In physics Mr. Vinton had just finished talk-
ing about poison substances.)

Jlr. J'inton: "Robert, name a poison.

Robert Slei'en.wn : "Aviation.

Mr. T'lnhm: "What's that!"

Robert Stei'eiuwn: "One drop will kill."



NOT A CHANCE.

"What were your father's last words?
"There were no last words. Mother was with
him to the end."



RUSHING MATTERS.

Bill: "Every time I kiss you it makes me a
better man."

Ellen: "Well, you don't have to try to get to
heaven to-night.



Little Helen was taken to church for the first
time one Sunday. The services was a source of
wonder to her, but after the alms basin had been
passed and she had put in her mite, her curiosity
was uncontrollable, and she turned to her mother.
"Mother," said she, "what do we get for our
money?"



Alice's grandpapa had set her bantam hen on
eleven cunning white eggs and Alice was greatly
Interested in watching the result. One day she
run Into the house, calling excitedly,

"Mamma, mamma, two chickens have bloomed!"



"In winter time, when it's cold, said Bobbie,
"I wish I was a polar bear with a white robe grow-
in' all over me; but in summer, when the baseball
season's on, bein' a giraffe'd just suit me.

"Why a giraffe, Bobbie?"

"He km see over the fence.



SOME PUMPKIN.

The young man was prematurely gray and
proud of it.

"Looks quite poetic, don't you think? he
asked a girl he had met on the beach.

"It does remind me of a certain poem," she said.

"And what is that?"

"When the frost is on the pumpkin."



A Boston minister is telling with glee of a re-
cent experience. He was paying a parish call on a
woman member ot his church, when into the room
rushed the very small hopeful of the family. The
youngster evidently did not see the caller. He
was dragging at the end of a string, attached to
its tail, a very dead rat.

"Oh, mamma!" he exclaimed, "I found a rat
in the yard, and I pounded him on the head with
a rock until I squashed his head, an' I pounded
him on the tall until I squashed his tail, an' here
he suddenly became aware of the presence of the
minister. He concluded with heroic effort to
mend matters:

"An' God called him home."



Small boys who are away from home, and try
to write about their good times, sometimes get a
little mixed. One little boy who was visiting on
his grandfather's farm sent his mother, accord-
ing to the Chicago News, the following letter:

"DEAR MOTHER: I am having an awful
good time, and have seen lots of animals and
accident. It was an exciting accident. You know
Bill Hitchcock, the hired man's neck? Well, he
fell in the creek up to it yesterday. Your loving
son, Jim.



HE WAS GOING FAR AWAY.

When a group of visitors was going through the
county jail recently, a burly Negro trusty was
called to open doors and perform other smlliar
duties for the visitors.

"How do you like it in here?" one of them
asked.

"Like it? If evah Ah gets out o' heah, I'll go
so far frum town it will take nine dollars to sen'
me a postal card."



Pete jr.: "I believe I'll make my mouth tri-
angular in shape."

Alicia T.: "Oh! So it will coincide with an-
other triangle."



FROM WHAT?
He placed his arm around her waist.

And on her lips a kiss;
Then sighed, 'Tis many a draught I've had,

But not from a mug like this."



THE CARIBBEAN



ii;



I.lAliS.

"Folks," said the colored minister, "the subject
of my sermon dis evenin' am "liars". How many
in de congregation has tlone reail the 69th chap-
ter ob Matthew?"

Nearly every hand in tht- audience was raised
immediately.

"Dat's right," said his Reverence. "You is
just de folks I want to preach to. Dere is no
69th chapter ob Matthew."



A FAMILY AFFAIR.



Dona: "Oh, dear, clear why did you turn out
the light?"

Dick: "I wanted to see if my pipe was lit."



"Alicia," ordered the teacher, "throw that gum
in the waste-basket!"

The pupil's face grew scarelet but she did not
stir.

"If you tlo not |)ul that gum in the waste-
basket immetliately I will send you out of the
room," said the teacher, gravely.

'! he girl walked reluctantly to the desk.

"I can't, teacher," she confessed; "it's ma's
gum an' she'll lick me if I come home without it.



The story is told of a Scotchman who walked
into a drug store and exclaimed, "Give me 10
cents worth of poison. I w'ant to commit suicide."

The clerk, much excited, shouted to the man-
ager, "How can I stop him."

The manager replied: "Charge him 20 cents."



Jlrs. Spfnrtr: "What is mostly raised in
damp chmates?

Charle,'- GoulJ: "Umbrellas."



"Shall I brain him?"

"You can't, just hit him on the head, he is a
senior."



Scotchman (to one of the Siamese twins): Jlr.J'inlon: "Sleep is a great factor in growth."

"Ditch your girl-friend and I'll take you to din- li'lrt:: "If sleep is a great factor in growth,

ner. then our modern boys and girls could be called

the rising generation."



"How long did it take your wife to learn to
drive?" Then there's the absent-minded professor who

"It will be five years in January." jumped in the garbage can instead of his Austin.



For those who might be interested in who the
prominent "McBern, '31", is, we ask you to do a
little bit of figuring.

Take the initials of two class officers; mix them
thoroughly and you get McBern. Savvy?



118



THE CARIBBEAN




The Eldilor
after it's a II over and done



THE CARIBBEAN



119



Appreciation.



ID'



|F. wish to reci5mmen(i the acKcrtisers
who ha\e so generously subscribed to
the 1951 Caribbean. We know that
these firms are expcniling their efforts
to give the public their best in cjuaiity
and service.



COMPLIMENTS OF



LUCKY STRIKE




5^^^





AH America Cables, Inc.



WITH ITS ASSOCIATED COMPANIES. OFFERS
UNEXCELLED FACILITIES FOR CABLE COM-
MUNICATION TO ANY PART OF THE WORLD



We have various tariffs to suit all the Cabling Public
Enquiries at any of our offices are cordially invited



Balboa, C. Z.



Balboa 1273



OFFICES AT

Cristobal, C. Z.



PHONES:
Cristobal 1710



Panama, R. P.



Panama 470
2056



120



THE CARIBBEAN



)^V^UIgO'^7 f{t jV"'''i'''iii'''^



nrmmiu 1 1 'i ini^ 'tifl(teJi^



Drin



.1




Delicious and Refreshing

Q'he Pdndmd Coca -Co
bottling Co., Inc.



IMPROVED EQUIPMENT



MODERN METHODS



EFFICIENT SERVICE



Jackson's Steam Laundru

5roddu?dy, Tledr Folk's Riuer I



COLON, "R. deP.







p. O. BOX 5061

CRISTOBAL. C. Z.



in: CAKIBBKAN 121



Engravings of Unexcelled Quality

for School and College Publications



HOWARD -WESSON CO.

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS



The College Engravers of New England



The Engravings for this PubHcation
were made bv lioward -Wesson Co.






ntEJMUtJgnnit^ ^^ ^ri lll lll Emm nTTTin i U imiLmim mi JIIII I LIILn iqO^^ II^t^^li yij ynrmnnnTiiiMiiTrinmrirTrTTTrTmirrMTriiniiiTrnTrirniii i^ jj^



Panama's Leading New spaper

The Panama American

(An Independent Morning Daily)



PANAMA, R. de P.



122



THE CARIBBEAN




Q'he national Citu bank

of Tleip york



1



J



Capital, Surplus and Undiuided Profits
$226,037,392.14



U. S. CURRENCY



PANAMA BRANCH:

33 Central Auenue



COLON BRANCH:

Front and 7th Streets




Compania Panamena
de Fuerza y Luz



(SUCURSAL DE COLON)



COLON, R.deP.



THK CARIBBEAN



123



a^lCTBi m fr^ Tmnrmmmmi l i i m ii i ii i i^ mrdW.GTamiuW^i^

CENTRAL PHOTO STUDIO

9.037 FRONT STREET, COLON, R. P.
LATEST AND BEST IN ARTISTIC PORTRAITURE

FANCY LIGHTING BY MODERN ELECTRICAL METHODS



Enldroements in Water Colors, Oil, Pastel,
Carbon, Bromoil and Platinotypes



PASSPORTS
AMATEUR DEVELOPING AND PRINTING

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED




Panamd Rdilroad Steamship Line

CRISTOBAL lo NEU; l]ORK



UlA PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI



.ALL CABIN SHIPS I

S.S. "ANCON" and S.S. '-CRISTOBAL'

FORTNIGHTLY SERVICE



MONTHLY SAILINGS TO WEST COAST

S.S. "GUAYAQUIU and S.S. ''BUENAVENTURA'

CALLING AT

BUENAVENTURA, TUMACO, ESMERALDAS, BAHIA, MANTA,
PUERTO BOLIVAR and GUAYAQUIL



OFFICES ON THE ISTHMUS;



President, Balboa Heights, C.Z.
Superintendent. Balboa Heights. C.Z.



Steamship Ticket Agent, Cristobal, C.Z.
Receiving and Forwarding Agency, Cristobal, C.Z.



OFFICE IN THE UNITED STATES: No. 24 State Street, New York City, N.Y.



124 THE CARIBBEAN




Rolel IDdshington

Unequaled for situation and comfort




A Hotel in keeping ipith the dignity, spirit and seruice
of the Panama Canal



Qolf Stpimming IDdler Sports
Qfdrpon Fishing

Q'he year Around.



JAMES E. LEIUIS P O. Address:

Manager CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



^it'lj^ngil'ftttfS' n TTTmnfmTTTTTi i M iii i iiiii i iii nnrmnnnTTm imgiWl^ hmi i 'iiii^ ")^(l(jal



The Standard Fruit
and Steamship Company



VACCARO LINE



Wish every success to the Graduatinj

Class of 1931



Ill; CARIBBKAN



12.-



mm Of am and PLAidRoyNos

THf RECREATIONAL DIVISION Of THE PANAMA (ANAL

HAS fOR YOUR (ONVENIENCE

(OMMyNiiy (lyBHoysEs

LOCATED AT

AN(ON, BALBOA. PEDRO MIGUEL. GATUN dnd CRISTOBAL



OFEERINO YOU

Athletic fields Pldy^rounfls Tennis Courts Gymmasiiims Swimmings Pools Bowling Alleys -Billidrd

Rooms Redding Rooms Soda Eountdin Service Sound Motion Picture

and Otner Oeneral Community Activities.





A comfortable, restful Hotel, ideally located with magnificent view of the

Pacific Ocean, midst picturesque scenery. The center of social life, close

to every point of interest on the Pacific side of the Canal.

HOTEL TIVOLI

ANCON, CANAL ZONE



126



THE CARIBBEAN



nn!iniiiiiiMiiiiitiMiiiia :^>^;5TqiIIl^li ^)jpDT!i[i[r,'Ti;iii[[mTiTitii^



Mens Sana in Corpore Sano?

Eat more SUN-MAID RAISIN BREAD

THE FRENCH BAKERY



BOLIVAR AVE. 8.103

TtiiiiMiiiirTTTKC )V| ^?rnip '^j^ ^



5^?Kk^



PHONE 346




C. CASULLO

JEWELER AND WATCHMAKER

P. O. BOX 675

PHONE 255

CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



9,036 Front Street, Colon, R.P.




PnL^rij w^ iJ' '|| ^TU- ||^^ '^^^^^r^'''''''' g^pJ ^"nTm nim nTT^ ^



COLON



STRAND



WE OFFER

THE BEST ENTERTAINMENT POSSIBLE IN OUR HOUSES
KOOL KLEAN KOMFORTABLE

WILCOX -- SAENGER THEATRES




COMPLIMENTS OF



CRISTOBAL BEAUTY SHOPPE



iirTT um TTTTiii M iiiiiriiiii mumimiJ l jrjlig W^



THE CARIBBEAN



127



COMPLIMENTS OF



BILGRAY



m^



PICTliRES



1^



WELL KNOWN SYMBOL
OF A GOOD SHOW




RADIO PKiyRES

ARE SHOWN AT THE

(ANAl ZONE THEATRfS



Baseball Supplies
Tennis Rackets
Tennis Balls
Basketballs
Athletic
Athletic
Shirts Panti
Bathim




i ALWAYS LOOK FOR THEM!



s^ii^^s



Cabe Address: IMPCO ^ A. B.C. 5th &- 6th Ed. ^ Bentley's



Colon Import &^ Export Company, Ltd.

JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS

DEALERS IN

GENERAL MERCHANDISE and NATIVE PRODUCTS

COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
BRANCH RETAIL STORES AND TRADING STATIONS

<^ Pleya Dama Santa Isabel Porvenir Tupile Isle of Pines Carti Nargana i



128



THE CARIBBEAN




Haskin's News Service

COLON GATUN BALBOA PANAMA



Newsdealers and Publishers



AT YOUR SERVICE




THE CHINESE SILK STORE

NEW CHINA

WE CARRY

Genuine Chinese and Japanese
Silks and Curiosities



i



The Finest Assortment of

Students' and Young

Men's -wear on the

Isthmus.



LINENS, SILK MATERIALS.

SHAWLS. CARVED IVORY.

WICKER FURNITURE. VASES



Perfumes



Jewelry



FRONT STREET
Colon



CENTRAL AVE
Panama



W Eisenmann %^ Eleta Co. Inc.

The American
Bazaar




Compliments of

Dr. Uern Prier Dr. Carl E. Saff ord



CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



THE CARIBBEAN



129




Before eye-strain wrinkles become
permanent and nervous fatigue
becomes chronic, have your
eyes examined. If you need
glasses, you will be sur-
prised to find what a
comfort they are
when accurately
and
becomingly
fitted to
YOU

Have your eyes examined



D. CHELURAM



ORIENTAL MERCHANTS
Wholesale and Retail



47



FRONT STREET

COLON



8t



CENTRAL AVENUE

PANAMA



Scadron Optical Co,

Registered Optometrists and Opticians
Established in Panama Over 10 Years



i



Big Bargains in Everything
WORLD VARIETY SOUVENIRS

Specialty in

Spanish Shawls

Nice Collection of Ivory

Ready-Made Pongee Silk Suits

Always in Stock

All assortments of PERFUMES and
Ladies Underwear

Where Quality- is obtainable
at the minimum expense




H. J[. Doten, d.d.s.
D. m. Dickerson, d.d.s.



Jldministration building



Cristobal, C.Z. |



130



THE CARIBBEAN




The New York Coffee Pot

Between 10th and 11th St., Balboa Ave. Colon, R. of P.



The only sanitary frigidaired lunch counter in Central America

This Establishment has been in operation tor 15 years

Open Day and Night. GROS BROS. Props. ^




i



COMPLIMENTS OF



P. CdUdUdqgio



i



7th ancf BOLIVAR STREETS
COLON



<5



3



FRONT STREET



COLON



1







JOBBER AND COMMISSION
MERCHANT



#



<5



3



REAL ESTATE BROKER
AND AGENT



n'^tiyii^i^^. ^^llllUMTTTI ]



Frederick Auto & Suppii] Seruice



Telephone 7



^ QOOD SERUICE FOR ALL"



Box 2246



Cristobal, C. Z.



[TTnT T^^^^^^-^^^



[ mj "" ' i n To S'K*^!!!^^'^^^, < iii ''^ """"""" ^ tiii ii iin j. j f i 'iTiii^^ MpS fT'^ Oiphr' TTTTTFi rr




TtnnrrrTTTTTi;[iijji||iiiMLrTT\Oijjmf



THE CAUIBBEAN



\:u



y& ^n^U fXi M^^T f"'' TO ii



nn mm u^ ijyiijm^



LOOK!!



BEFORE BUYING YOUR



Panama Hats. Aigretes 8c Souvenirs

Visit Our Store
where you will find the lowest prices in town

Francisco F. Lobato
MONEY EXCHANGE

FKOfSlT STREET. COLOf^. Nu. 57



i &





FOR



Exclusiue Suitings

ancC



Careful Q^di



onng




mmnnniimiimimmiimmnTn iiDiiijm iiiirirorninTmniTmrrammmi aiiai^



COMPLIMENTS OF





Li



Sutisidiapy of Eastman Kodak



GREBMAR BUILDING

PANAMA, R, of P.




BUY YOUR DRUG NEEDS AT

Salazar's Drug Store



Main Store:

9.038 Front Streeet
Phone 336



Branch Stores:

4. 060 Bolivar Street, Phone 166
11.150 Bolivar Street, Phone 35



132



THE CARIBBEAN



When Visiting Colon, stay at thes2s^~-s >

GRAN HOTEL IMPERIAL

This Hotel is modern in every respect, offering to visitors com-
fortable apartments, the best of Cuisine and prompt service





We have prepared ourselves to outfit you
with your graduation GIFTS and CLOTHES



Finest selection oj<.

Dresses, Silks and Lace, Suits and Tuxedos
LUM'S DRY GOODS STORE

BOLIVAR AVE., Opposite the Market COLON, R.P.



THE CAKIBBEAN



133




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s^twLffl'



I Rdthbun, Slilson&.Compdnij,Lld.

QENERAL HARDIPARE and LUMBER MERCHANTS

- DEALERS IN -

Pdinls, Oils dud Builders' ITldteridls, etc.




-Lelepnones ; branch sto.'ve 253

: OFFICE 253



COLON, R.P.





Something You Cant Learn at School

There is always a Large and New Assortment of

CLOTHING, SPORTS WEAR and NOVELTIES

Arriving on Every Steamer, Especially Suited For Studerits

COMPLETE LINE OF PERFUMES



FRENCH BAZAAR



COLON



134



THE CARIBBEAN



TAC ZNO




Printed by

The Star & Herald Co.

Panama, R. P,



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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093680/00018
 Material Information
Title: Caribbean
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Cristobal High School
Publisher: Yearbook House
Place of Publication: Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date: 1931
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00093680:00018

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
    Foreword
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Dedication
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Faculty
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Seniors
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Juniors
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Sophomores
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Freshmen
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Literary
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Activities
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Sports
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
    School notes
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Exchanges
        Page 99
    Alumni
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
    Jokes
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
    Advertising
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
    Back Matter
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
    Back Cover
        Page 139
        Page 140
Full Text



















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2010 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries


http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1931cris


























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CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL


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2 THE CARIBBEAN


Foreword

The Staff of 1931 have had an un-
usual.number of difficulties in produc-
ing this year's CARIBBEAN. Neverthe-
less, we are proud to present the re-
suit of our efforts to the student body,
the faculty, and the general public.
IMUUUUGHUU I 1


I


ft ^ ^bnTL iLiiiii IMiiiTV ITri iTTmiiiiiii













THE CARIBBEAN

TOL. XIV. CRISTOBAL. CANAL ZONE No.

PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HI }H SCHOOL


Foreword

Dedication

Editorial

Our Governor

Our Canal Zone School Officials

Our Principal

Staff

Faculty

Seniors

Class Histor ...

Class Prophec-

Class Will


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Pag.gc
"2 Juniors

4 Sophomores

5 Freshmen

6 Literary

7 School Activities

8 Sports

9 School Notes

11 Exchanges

17 Alumni

32 Jokes

32 Advertisements
34


V


1







THE CARIBBEAN


i E, the Senior Class of 1931 dedicate this
edition of the "Caribbean" to the one
who has been beside us with inspiring
leadership for the four years of our High
School career,

MISS MARY ELIZABETH MOORE.







THE CAHiBBIAN


CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL.
Carlo., Rankti, 1.
Away down here on a little neck of land stands
Cristobal High School. It faces the Caribbean
Sea, and has its back to the Pacific Ocean: on its
left and right stretch two vast continents: it is
in Panama, the hinge of the western he-nisphere.
Many, many years ago tvo oceans rolled away
and this little strip of land can-e up and first bared
its shells and marsh to the tropic sun. Then came
its ninr als and Indians, the 2,panie.r's, the French,
and finally the Americans, who fulfilled the
enorn-ous task of :_ aki:ig "the big ditch." and
letting the two oceans run together again. The
land was divided and the a.orld united.
With the Americans came Cristolal High
School, and since it was completed. it has faith-
fully turned out its stu,'ents to perform their
duties along with the rest of the worl.. C. H. S.
students are essentially the san e as thi.se of any
other :ountry. Others boast of the oak and the
pine, but can we forget the palmi and coconut
trees? When another is walking thr ugh snow,
we are being rained on, and walk thnru-gh puddles
of water. While others are picking apples and
peaches, we climb mango trees, cut do,.n bunches
of bananas, and shake papaya anc' guayab1a trees.
But in many things we are unique: nowhere else
in the world does the sea display its colors as it
does down here; nowhere is the sun as bright or
the moon as perfect. Do the trees anywhere else
act as much like Hula dancers as our coconut
trees in a strong wind? Does any other place
bring together so many foreign people, customs,
and languages as we c'o? Ships from every corner
of the globe pass through here, bringing everything
from commercial products to distinguished tra-
vellers. Theatrical companies, circuses, and per-
formers of all kinds pass here and give exhibitions.
We get the latest news, down to the last detail,
from everywhere. Yes, our lot is "the sum of
earthly bliss." We feel the influences of people
everywhere on the rnap: so you can lay your hand
on the pulse of the world in Panama.
Through it all. Cristobal High School, like the
Panama Canal, raises its ships from one level to
another, finally letting them down where they
have an altogether different view than when they
began the transit. Wherever they go, they never
forget Cristobal High School standing far down by
the shores of the Caribbean, through rain, wind,
and sun: combining at the same time both the
wild spirit of the tropics and the firm ideal of the
North.





6 THE CARIBBEAN







'I"I
,/ 7 ~f


/-~ ;^

.i ss us^^^^


i


Col. HARRY BURGESS, U. S. Army,
Governor, The Panama Canal








THE CARIBBEAN


aii,- hI.N M. WILLIAMS.
SSc/hol .Irlci'i.e-Superintendent of Canal Zone Schools
l/,ticol,,-i-Statieshl)oro High School. Statesb,)ro. Ga.
1911-1915 Mercer University (A.B.)
1919 Teacher's College. Columbia University (A.M.)
SDa oJ n,',le'1/1.,r,i 'ic o1n C'anl /Zome-Feb. 2. 1Q920.

















XVame-V. H. BAxRKIe.
School .Icli,.ilc.,-AsrIs stant Sulerintei-ldent of Schools.
( Junior and Senior High).
Edl'ca!oti-Lebanon HIigh School, Leibanon, Mo.
N. E. Mlissouri State Teacher's College (B S.)
Columbia University (A.M.)
Dale" c l' i 'in' ci. on' C malt Zom- Sept, 7, 1927.














V;ai,'Fe-EVERET B. SACKETT.
T17le--Director of Research.
EdIi,,,allio,-Gradiuated 1919 from Normal High School,
Marquette. FMich.
1919-1925-Hamline Unliversitv, St. Paul, )linn.
Degree-B.A.
1925-Unixversity of )Minnesota, Degree-M.A.
1927-1928 Teachers College. Cf,1umbia University.
Degree--Ph. D.
SFaternitlie. --Social, Eta Phi, Professional, Fhi Delta
Kappa, Kappa Delta Pi.








8 THE CARIBBEAN


2* iE


Name oj Teacher-WILLIA.M A. SAWYERS.
School Acti,'ilie --Principal.'
Education-Westerly High School, Westerly, Rhode Island.
1915-1919 Bates College, Lewiston, Maine (B.S.)
1924-1925 Columbia University (M.A.)
Date oj Enleringl Cristobal High School-September 7, 1927.
Favorite Expre.sion-"We'll see."








THE CAHIBBEAN


CARIBBEAN
Center Carlos B. Rankin, '51. Editor.
Lower left Miss Mary E. Moore. Sa/j .Il'i*or.
Lower right Miss Gladys Kimbro. Sta!f Spon'Ior.
North Burton Hackett, '31. .rt Editor.
N.N.E. Junior Forsstrom, '32. ...,'. Bu.,,mee. -.lJI/r
N.E. Velma Hall, '31. Girls Sporl,.
E.N.E. Randolph Wikingstad, '32. t.li.lant Editor.
East Edward Conkling, '31. BoyA Sport...
E.S.E. Celeste Clarke, '31. Exchange Edilor.
N.N.W. Harry Egolf, '32.


STAFF.
S.E. Eleanor Reinhold. '53.
S.S.E. lMarion E. Neely, '31.
South Raymond Will. '31.
S.S.W. Richard Wood, '31
S.W. Beverly Dunn. '31.
W.S.W. Anna Ryan, '31.
West Ben Williams. '31.
W.N.W. Clara Frisk, '31.
N.W. Jack P. Kelly, '31.
.s'ij/tant Circulation .Janaqer


Li" 11 ,,






Jok,!e Eli/or.


I




THE CARIBBEAN


FACULTY


,,YA








12 THE CARIBBEAN


.ame of Teacher-LILLIAN GRACE BEATA GUSTAFSON.
Subject, Taught-Assistant Principal.
School rctivihte.,-Attendance recorder.
Education--Lake View High School, Chicago, Ill.
1913-1915 Northern Illinois Teachers College.
1925 University of Ohio.
1926 Teachers College, Columbia University.
1930 Chicago University (Summer).
Date of Enteritig Crietobal Hiqh School-October 1, 1923.
Favorite Expre,,,sion-"Tardy cr absent?"











amre of Teacher-ROGER C. HACKETT.
Subjec.r Taught-History, Civics, Economics, Commercial
Law.
School Iclioitie,-Sponsor of Freshman Class. Coach of
Boys Tennis.
Education--1915-1919 Central High School, Evansville,
Indiana.
1919-1923 Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana
(A.B.)
1923-1924 Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.
(A.M.)
Date of Enlering Crildobal High School-October 1, 1930.
Favorite Expre.xsion-"That's it exactly."











Name oJ Teacher-MARY ELIZABETH IMOORE.
Subject.r Taught-Latin, French and Spanish.
School ,IctiVities-Sponsor for Senior Class, Staff Sponsor.
Educalion-Washington High School, Washington, Pa.
1920-1923 University of West Virginia (A.B.)
1919-1920 Wooster College.
1930 Columbia University (Summer)
Date of Entering Crisrlobal High School-October 1, 1925.
Favorite Exprejsion--"I've done my best."









THE CARIBBEAN


iName j ;ieacher-- E. PHYLLIS SP'-NCER.
Sui)j'ctl Tlzu/qh/--Spanish. French. English.
School eti,itic..-- Spanish Club, Freshman Dramatic.
Sponsor; Freshman Advisor.
EIducalion--1921--B.A. Coe College, Cedar Rapids, Iowa,
1924 -M.A. State Universitv of lowa. Iowa.
1925-Diploma de Suficiencia, Aladrid, Spain.
Associate Prof. Romance Languages-Coe College.
Date Entered, i'n Critloabal Hi/ School-Oct. 1, 1950.
Fl .orli Exprex..io',t-"Debe tener vergiienza.













AName 4/ Tecer-- FREDERICK I. CK
,ubljccl.r Taulght-Commercial Arithmetic and Geography.
Solid Geometry and Algebra.
School .Ichi'itie,c-Sponsor for Sophomores.
Elatl,,io-- Calmar High School, Calmar. Iowa.
State University of Iowa (B.A.)
DaIe of Enterinli CLri'lobal HitIh School--October 1, 1928.
o,',,ril.e Epre.'.,ionl-"What are you doing in here?"













Name of Teacher--HEi-EN I. PATTERSON.
Subieclh Tau./,lt-Shorthand, Typewriting, Bookkeeping.
School .Iti,'it'.ile.-Junior Class Advisor, .Manager of School
Funds, Sponsor of "O.G.A." Club. Secretary of At-
lantic Side Teachers' Federation.
Educalion--Montana State College, Bozeman. .Montana.
B.S. Degree Chouteau County High School, Fort
Benton, Mont.
Date Entered i'n CrL,,tobal HJih School--March 27, 1930.
Favorite Expre.srio,, -"Cet to work now!"









THE CARIBBEAN


AName of Teacher-GLADYS M. KInBRO.
Subjects Taught--English.
School lctivitier--Debating Club, Literary Sponsor.
Educahton-Chickasha High School, Chickasha, Oklahoma.
1916 Oklahoma College for Women (A.B.)
1924 University of Oklahoma (M.A.)
Dale of Enterinqg Cristobal High School-October 1, 1929.
Favorite Exprexrnion-"Put something in it and you'll get
something out of it!"












\,ame of/ Teacher-KENNETH IW. VINTON.
Subject, Taughi-Science, Chemistry, Physics.
School ctiviticf-Basketball Coach.
Educahtion-Fond du Lac High School, Fond du Lac,
Wisconsin.
1920-1924 Ripon College, Ripon, Wisconsin (A.B.)
1929-1950 University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis.
Graduate Work.
Dat, of Entering CriL'obal High School-October 1, 1930.
Faorite Expression-"Get paper and pencil ready."















Name--BLANCHE S. ANDERSON.
Subject Taught--Household Arts, English.
Education-St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minn. (B.A.)
Summer School, University of Minnesota.
Graduate Dietitian, Stanford University Hospital.
Favorite Expresion--"Get me a banana."








THE CARIBBEAN


.Vame of Teacher-Jo, N. \McDo sALD.
i Subhjecr. Taughl--Art.
EdcaloIn Kansas State Teacher's College (B.S.i
Teacher's College, Columbia University (A.I.)
Dale a/ Enterimy Critbt al b Hiih School- O()ctober 1, 19.0.
Far,,ite Expre.., io, -"Now, we'll make a poster'












Nlne of Teacher-LAWRENCE JOHNSON.
Sulijec, Tauht Algebra, Mechanical Drawing. Manual
Training.
School .icti,'ilie.-Director of High School Athletics, Ad-
visor of Boys Athletic Association, Baseball Coach,
President Atlantic Chapter. American Federation of
Teachers.
Education-High School, Grafton, North Dakota Col-
lege, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks,
North Dakota State Teachers College, Valley City,
North Dakota. University of Washington, Seattle,
Washington.
Date Entered in (Crilobal Hi.hi School-October 1, 1930.
Faorie Expre.a,,on--"Cut out your whistling."








Vame of Teacher-\MILDRED) LIENORE EiLNER.
Subject Tautaht-- lusic.
School .cli,.itie.r-Orchestra, Boys and Girls Glee Club
Operetta.
Education-High School, Moorhead. ,linnesma.
Graduate Piano, Fargo College. Fargo. North D, -
kota, (B. M.) Graduate Public School of Music,
Fargo College, Drake University, Des Moines.
Ioxwa, Graduate work in Drake UniversitS 1924.
Date qo Enterig Cri.lobal High Schoaol-- October 1. 1930.
Favorite E'.pre,,'ionI--" have had seven classes already,
/ I and I'm not tired -'et "









16 THE CARIBBEAN


Name of Teacher-BARBARA BAILEY.
School Activitie,r-Girls' Coach.
Education-Recreation Training School, Chicago, Ill.
Columbia University.
Favorite Expresxion-"Come on, girls, we want to beat
Balboa again."


Xame of Teacher-VICTOR E. SELLER.
School .ctiidlie.r-Director of Physical Activities.
Education-1923-25 University of California.
Date oJ Enterinig Serice on Canal Zone-May 18, 1926.
FI'a.,i'e. Expre.,iieTci-"Don't horse around."


Name of Teacher-ROBERT GEORGE NOE.
Activities-Dramatic Coach.
Education-Young High School, Knoxville, Tennessee.
Date of Entering Service on Canal Zone-December, 1924.
Favorite Expression-"Now-get the idea?"




THE CARIBBEAN


5E


IORS


/


&C71


~153









18 THE CARIBBEAN




"The hand that follows intellect can achieve."



Vame of Stludent-CARLOS BOGART RANKIN.
SBirthplace-Ancon, Canal Zone.
Date of Birth-July 4, 1913.
School Acticitee.-Class President 1, 2, 3, 4; Debating
Club 2; Chairman 3, President 4; Soccer 3, 4; Track 4;
Swimming 3, 4; Assistant Editor Caribbean 3, Edi-
tor-in-chief 4; Carnival 4; Neptune Club Secretary
3, 4; Debating team 3, 4; Spanish Club 4; "Jonesy" 4.
Ho' we know them--"Carlos."
Cho.,en Vocation-Diplomat.
Parhine-Reading and swimming.







"Jolly good natured, full of fun.
If you Nant a real friend, here is one."



NVame oJ S11tudent-VELiMA IRENE HALL.
Birlhplac--Oroville, California.
D)ate o Birh-J-lanuary 14, 1914.
School ActiAlies-. President G.A.A. 4; Vice President
Senior Class 4; Carnival 4; Sports Writer for Carib-
bean 4; Librarian 4; Supper Club 4; "Jonesy" 4;
Volley Ball 4; Baskliet Ball 4; Baseball 4; Tennis 4;
Swimming 4.
Ho... ..e know,, thenm-"Hall."
LC/.F, ,catlo,n-G\ym. Teacher.
Pa.hl,,me Athletics.








"Reason is not measured by size nor by height, but
I y principle.'



Name of Student-RurTH MIARIE DURVAL.
Birthplace-Colon, R.P.
Date of Birth-December 1. 1914.
School .cthi,itieS--Supper Club 2; Carnival 4; Sec. of
Class 4; Office Girl 4: O.G.A. 4;: Jonesy 4; Operetta 3, 4.
How' we know them -"Ruthie.'
Chosen l ocalion-Private Secretary.
Patime-Reading.








THE CARIBBEAN 19



"Her smile makes sunshine in shady places."



Name of Sladenlt-, ARIO, E NI.I OR NEEL).
Birthplace-Philadelphia. Pa.
Date of Birth-Octol;er 28, 1912.
School Jctiitic.,-Supper Club 1. 2. 35, 4; Vice-President 3;
Neptune Club 3. 4; Debating Club (Librarian) 4:
Class Treas. 4; Star & Herald Reporter 4; Carnival 4;
O.G.A. 4; G.A.A. 5, 4: Secretary 3; Literary Editoi
Caribbean 4; Secretary and Treasurer 4: Cheer
leader 4; Tennis 4; Swimming 2, 3, 4; "Jonesy" 4;
Volley Ball 3, 4; Operetta 4.
How we know tlhem--"Neely."
Choren Vocathon-Secretary and Journalist.
Pa.rtimne-Going places and seeing things.







"Hang sorrow. care'll kill a cat;
Therefore, lets' be merry."



.Vame oj Stdent--To:i PEsco n.
Bi'rthplace-Ecuador. .
Dale of Birt'--Sept. 12, 1911.
School .clh'iitjie.-Track 4: B.A.A. 1,2,3; Carnival 4;
Baseball 1.2.5.4; Basketball 1,2,3.4; Soccerball
1.2,3,4; Handball 3,4; Tennis 4; Swimming 2; Bowl-
ing 1.4: "Jonesy" 4.
How we kno w them-"Tommy."
Cho.,en Tocai'on -Physical Director.
Pa,, t'ime-Sports.








"Speak but little and Nwell,
If you would be esteemed a man of merit."



Vame of Student--XVur.Ls n C. BAiLeY.
Birthplace-Cristobdl, Canal Zone.
Date of iL ,', \o.,.i 28. 1912.
School .lcthicitie,-President Orchestra Club 4: Ope.etta
3, 4; Orchestra 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Bros. 4; Track 2:
Swimming 2; Carnival 2. 3 4;
How we know themn-" Bill."
Chosen V'ocatton-Chemistry.
Padlime-Ellen.









THE CARIBBEAN


"An honest man's the noblest work of God."



Name of Student-ERNEST E. BERGER.
Birthplace--Norfolk, Virginia.
Date cf Birth-November 3, 1913.
School .ctcllitie,j-Orchestra 2, 3 and 4; Swimming 4; Car-
nival 2 and 4.
How' we know themI-"Ernie."
Choren T Vcation-Civil Engineer.
Pathime--Reading, sports.










"A smile for all, a welcome glad,
A jovial, coaxing way she had."



.ane of SludenIt-MARY CELESTE CLARKE.
Birthplace-St. Joseph, Missouri.
Date of Birth-November 20, 1911.
School .Ictlivitie.-Debating team 2, 3, 4: Secretary and
Treas. 2, 3, 4; Cheerleader 3, 4; Exchange Editor,
Caribbean 4; Carnival 3, 4; O.G.A. 4; Volley Ball
Team 3; Captain 4; Basketball 4; Junior Set Eenefit 2.
How 'we know then-Heavsen."
Cho.ren 'ocation-Physical Director.
Pastimne-Dancing and Swimming.









"His heart is as far from fraud as heaven from earth."



Name of StudeInt-CRAWFORD J. CAMPBELL.
Birthplace-Cooperstown, N. 1.
Date of Birth-December. 15, 1913.
School .clivitiea-Tennis 4; Debating Club 4; Swimming
4; Spanish Club 4; Neptune Club 4; Orchestra 4.
Ho', we know lhem--"Quart."
Pastime-Swimming.
Chosen T'ocaion-Lawyer.








THE CARIBBEAN


"A true friend and a real sport


Al ,n / Sltd'nl L-E-R .\iV.\R PA.UI CONK'.IN' ;
Bir,/lhplatce-Ancon, Canal Zone.
Dale ,j Birlh-IJinuary 7, 1914.
School /l,/ici S inSwimming 3,4; Basketball 2, 5. 4: Base
hall 2, 3. 4; Handhall 5. 4; Soccer 2. 3, 4: Neptunot
Club 3, 4: Carnival 2, 3. 4: BA.A. 2. 3, 4: ().( A 4.
Extra 4; Jonesy 4; 4.
How ttwe know themn-"Conk."
Pasttime-Basketball.
LCho1,t'n I o'alio,/ n-Physical Director


"It is good to lengthen to the last a sunny mood."



Name of StudientIl- ARGA.RT M 111-DRItE DI).\v.i
Birthplace-Harrogate, Tennessee.
Dale of Birth-September 19, 1915.
School .cti/,,ilier-G.A.A 53. 4; O.GA 4; Carnival 4;
Vice-President Spanish Club 3, 4; Vice-President
Supper Club 3, President 4.
IHow we know, them-' M1 i
Patitme-Swimming.
Chosen Vocation-Private Secretary.


"1Iy book and heart must never part."



Armte o/ Student-VINNI: EliSoN
Birlhplac,-Galveston, Texas.
Dale oj Bi//h-April 10, 1914.
School .cl'iit;'.,is-Spanish Cluit, Carnival Committee -4
H,( c '. .e -,know' them- "ee."
Chosen l'toca,,tion-Litirarian.
Padimne- Readione.








22 THE CARIBBEAN


"We grant although he had much wit,
he was very shy at using it."



Name of Student-RUSSELL ELWELL.
Birthplace-Elizabeth, New Jersey.
Date oj Birth- March 12. 1913.
School Actiities-Orchestra 3, 4: Carnival 4.
How we know them-"Russy."
Pastime-Playing tricks.


"He is a man, take him all for all."



Vamne oj Student-FABIAN ENGLANDER.
Birthplace-Colon, Republic of Panama.
Date oj Birth-June 10, 1913.
School Acliodiiiei-Carnival 1, 2, 3, 4; Debating Club 4;
Tennis 4.
How we know them,-"Fabian."
Chosoen Vocation-High Finance.
Pastimne-Tennis and Reading.


"Her actions were modest and her words discreet."



Name oj Student-CLARA ELIZABETH FRISK.
Birthplace-Blenheim, Ontario, Canada.
Date oj Birth-December 8, 1912.
School .tcliviliej-VicePresident O.G.A.4: Typist Carib-
bean 4; G.A.A. 4;
How we know them-"Hicky".
Chosen l ocation-Stenographer.
Patime-Swimming.








THE CARIBBEAN


"W1hose little hmlvy h-Jded a mighty mIiiul



Valance i/ Slde/ii/- BI I'I I. H ACKI' ri I R
Bir/iplaci A\nion, Cinl Zone.
Dale 1l/ Birth- Iuly 9, 1912.
,7>hool/ .li /ili.,--Sv inn ii 2. 3. 4: SOITcc 3, !; E\tria ;
Caribbliean Staffi -. 4; Neptune Clulb 2. 5 4; C.aniiil
1. 2. .5, 4; B.A.A. 1. 5. 4; Chel mistry 'ii s. 4.
NHow we ko./ them --"Chu[by."
Cihoi,,n I ',i.,/io.i-D raftsmain.
PaIi/me- Swnimnming and l)iving.


"Speech is great: but silence is greater.



AValr--PARKIER P. HANNA.
Birlhplace-, Hancock Point, Maine.
Dale of Bir h--October 21, 1915.
School .lclii ie.r- B. A. A. 4.
Cho/wen I' oration-Aviation Mechanic.
,How we know i thiii em/ -Park.


"A merry heart maketh a cheerful Comiitc ,nL mc.



X7nme 0o/ Slu Ye,i'/- iN P.I .'RC KI-:I Iv.
Bir'ihp/,i'e-San Francisco, California.
Date of Birth-Septeml.er 2S. 1914.
School ,5./cl//i/e,.- B. A.A. 5, 4; Carnival .5!: l)h 1 ina
5, 4: "|Jones"" 4; CIheerleader 4; folc Iit i .
Caribbean 4.
IIo,,' ie,' kno,' /Ihem -" P."
Cho.e,i I a'oan-Army Ofticer.
Pa/diiIe-Daicing and s\\ immin.


. N N...am>








24 THE CARIBBEAN


"With a smile on her lips
And a gleam in her eye."



Name of Student-MARIA KLEEFKENS.
Birthplace-Hoboken, New Jersey.
Date of Birth-October 1, 1912.
School 1cliodties-Carnival 4; O.G.A. 4; G.A.A. 4; Swim-
ming 4.
How we know them-"Marie".
Choxren Vocation-Secretary.
Padimne--Writing to N.J. and swimming.












"He will succeed for he believes all he says."



Vame of Student-DEMETRA I. LEWIS.
Birthplace--Houston, Texas.
Date of Birth-February 10, 1913.
School Actiilies-Carnival 4; "Jonesy" 4; B.A.A. 4.
How we know them--By his walk.
Cho.ren Vocation-Aviation.
Pastime-Boating.












"The secret of success is constancy to purpose."



NVame of Student--PERCIVAL A. LYEW.
Birthplace-Colon, R.P.
Date of Birth-October 20, 1912.
School lctivitiej--Boy's Glee Club 2; Orchestra 3; Span-
ish Club 4; Carnival 1, 2; 4; B.A.A. 2,3,4.
How we know them--"Percy."
ChoJen T'ocation-Doctor.
Pashme-Studying.








THE CARIBBEAN


"All his faults are such that one loves him the better
for them.



.Vamne of Stu/ent-I- PE N N.1r XNI' IMR.
fBirthp/ace-New York City.
nDale of Birlh-Mla 4, 1912.
School .lclicie.,-- Baseball "2, 3, 4; Bowling 1, 2, 3. 4:;
Soccer 5, 4; Glee Club 2; B.A.A. 2. 5, 4; lonesy 4.
Operetta 4.
Ho .' we know, them-"Kenny."
'ho.ren I'ocatlion--Clerk.
Pai time-Baseball.









"She is sweet and she is shy.
But there's mischief in her eve."



.Name o/ Stlu,dent-Et'(;EY-.\A MAY M1cLAIN.
Birthplace-Richmond, Va.
Date o/ Birlh-November 6, 1912.
School .elflitdie.s-Supper Club 1, 2, 5, 4,; O.G.A. 4; G.A.A.
4; Carnival 4; Assistant Literary Editor 4; Assistant
Typist Caribbean 4; Operetta 4.
How, we know,' thein-"Gene".
Pa,.l'ime-A good murder story.
ChoL.en I ;ocalon--Private Secretary.










"Red hair radiates sunshine."



Aame of Student-RoNALDt PtIL.PorTTS.
Birlhplace-Fort Cosey, Washington.
Date oj Birth-August 22. 1914.
School ,.cli,,tie.-Carnival 4.
Hoa,,' ,'e kn/,ow them'-"Red'".
Choa,en I'ocati, "m-Survevor and draftsman.
Pat,lime-Laughing.








THE CARIBBEAN


I


"A maiden never bold in spirit-still and quiet."


SVame of Student-Bettina Powers.
Birthplace-Ocean Grove, New Jersey.
Date of birth-July 8, 1914.
School .Acliiltie.--G.A.A. 2, 3, 4: Jonesy 4.
HIIo, e know' the n--"Bettv".
C'ho.'en 'ocation-"?"
Pan.,'ime- Swimming and tennis.


"Here's a girl with a heart and a smile
That makes the bubble of life worth \xhile."


Name of Student-ANNA MIARII RYAN.
Birthplace-Ancon Canal Zone.
Date oj Birth--March 1, 1914.
School Acti'ilie--Supper Club 1,2 3, 4: G.A.A. 1: Sec. of
Class 2; School Note Editor 4; Pres. O.G.A. 4; Spanish
Club 4; Office Girl 4; Carnival 2.3,4; Panama Ameri-
can Reporter 4.
Howl we know them-"'Irish".
Chosen Vocaton-Private Secretary.
Pastine-Readtna.


"It is my motto never to hurt anybody's feelings."



Name of Studen:.-AIo.HA SIOCU.M.
Birlthplace-W\'ashirgton. D. C.
Date of Birt-lune 10. 1913.
School ./,'i,'if.,'--Sui er Club 1, 2. 3, 4; G.A A. 4; Ath-
letic Asst. 1; Spanish C ub 4; Delegate to G.R. Con-
terence to Penna, 3; Carnival 1, 4; Treas. Supper
Club 2; Secretary G.R. 4.
How' we know the, -"Sloky."
Pa, timne-George.








THE CARIBBEAN 27


"Not much talk---a great sweet silence."



.Vane' of ,/tudeni-DoRnoTY MAi \WIIrz
Birthil,/ce-Ancion, Canal Zone.
Date o/ Biirt--October 1, 1910.
School .tc/i'ite, -G.A.A. 2, 3. 4: O.G.A. 4.
Ho,.' .'.e know them/"rDot."
Chosen I ocat ion-l Stenographer.
Pla.tlime Wlking, music, moving pictures.













"Turning to mirth, all things of earth,
As only boyhood can."



Name of Stenl-Gi-:o li.F \\ILTON ~FE'IRTZ.
Birthplace-Bas O'Bispo, Canal Zone.
DaI)le BIi, lh-Januarv S, 1912.
School .tclic'iliej--Baseball 1. 2, 5, 4.
How we kLo,,, lthen-'-"Skyru".
Cho .en l, calLioI Postal Clerk.
Pa.,tim.e--Hunting and fishing.







"A man of hopes and forward looking mind."



'ame of S,,,'e,,if--Hi. T. W\ ILIAMis.
Birthplace-- lillington, Tennessee.
SD)ale of BI/,'lh-December 24, 1912.
Sch 'oo ,I .1c,','die,' -Swimming 5.3, 4: Tennis 4; Carnival
2, 4;: Neptune Club 3. 4: Orchestra 4; B.A.A. 4;
Official Photographer Caribbean S aff 4; Chemistry
Bros. 4: Diploma Committee 4.
V-I
'How we know,, then "Spider.''
Cho oen I oct,,lion-Electrical Engineer.
Padinme -Tennis. Swimming., Fishing, Hunting








THE CARIBBEAN


"Not bold nor shy, nor short or tall;
A pleasant mingling of them all."



Name of Student--BARBARA ELIZABETH WIECK.
Birthplace-Houston. Texas.
Date of Birth-November 27, 1914.
School Aclivilies-Carnival 4; "Jonesy" 4.
How we know them-"Bobbie."
Chosen Vocation-To have a good time.
Pastime-Having fun.









"The mildest manners with the bravest mind."



Name oj Student-RAY.MOND ROBERT WILL.
Birthplace-Astoria, Long Island.
Date of Birth-June 27, 1912.
School Jcticitiej -Baseball 2. 3, 4; Basketball 2,3,4; Soc-
cer 3. 4; Swimming 2; Vice-President Sophomre Class
2; Carnival 1; Chemistry Bros.4; Asssistant Business
Manager 3; Treasurer B.A.A. 4; Business Manager
Caribbean 4; Neptune Club 3, 4.
How we know them--"Ray".
Chosen Tocation-Electrical Engineer.
Pastime--Sports and music.







"I will not retreat a single inch-
I will be heard."



-Name of Student-RICHARD F. WOOD.
Birthplace-Cristobal, Canal Zone.
Date of Birth-April 25, 1912.
School zctivities--Track 4; B.A.A. 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4,;
Soccer 3, 4; Basketball 3, 4; Swimming 3, 4; Carnival
4; Chemistry Bros. 4; Jonesy 4; Circulation Manager
Caribbean 4.
How we know themn-"Dick."
Chosen Vocation-Chemistry.
Pa.thme-Selling tickets and making explosives in Chemistry
Class.








THE CARIIBBEAN







"A merry heart docth gooI like ;a ncicilincie-


a.V mtl-- P ()I.:HI.: ()'I)l)NNI]:,I,.
Birtliplac, Molbile, Ala.
)atle of Birlh FeIbrtLary -". 1011.
HoW we know thon. Phoehe.
C/Io.,ca 1 o',i/n -Stcographer.
Sc/,hool .l //i/e"-P,.t (raitluate.




30 THE CARIBBEAN


PIM


it


A


*


Asf We Wlere 3~ '29







THE CARIBBEAN


cBe, '31.istry
MJcBerni, '31.


SPRING.
On October 6, 1927, a different class appeared
to grace the halls of C. H. S. In the initiation on
the big Field Day, Freshmen boys showed their
superiority by defeating the Sophomores. We
were determined to make a grand debut, so we
gave the first Costume Ball at the Washington
Hotel on April 13. 1928. Neither were we lack-
ing in scholarship, for we had five high-honor
students on the Honor Roll.

SUMMER.
In our Sophomore year we were bored with the
inquisitiveness of the Freshmen and condescend-
ing attitude of the upperclassmen. Neverthe-
less, we "threw" the Tacky Party at the Strangers'
Club, the best of our four years. It included the


never-to-be-forgotten Boy's Follies. The rest
of the year was spent in thinking of our forth-
coming importance.
AUTUMN.
We fulfilled our promise as upperclassmen in
that three of the four members of the Debating
team which defeated Balboa were Juniors. We
then gave the Class of 1930 a well-deserved ban-
quet. Later, in the Ballroom, a Woman-less
Wedding was staged. Those present will never
forget the unrivalled beauty of our boys.
WINTER.
We were snowed under with Social Science assign-
ments, staff work, debating, athletics, senior
play, the Operetta, etc. As the book goes to press
we are gradually thawing out.


Mt a rion Neepy ry
Marion Neely, '31.


Our breakfast was very leisurely that morning;
for we had not seen each other for years, and now
we were talking over old times, when we were
younger. I was very happy to have my old class-
mate from Cristobal High visit me for a few weeks.
And Mrs. Aloha Slocum Wertz, famous interior
decorator who had just finished re-decorating the
Vanderbilt home, seemed happy to be at my home
in New York also.
She told me about some of the Class of '31 and
what they had been doing. First she informed
me how successful Celeste Clarke Powell had been
with her School of Classic Dancing; and how good
Demetra Lewis was as a comedian on Broadway.
Other members of our class had been "called"
to the stage, the team of Elwcll and Philpotts, was
now worth millions, for everyone was crazy over
their Paramount sketches.
Then I told her that Gene McLain had written
me very recently that Dr. Percival Lyew had
appointed her head nurse and next only to him in


his new hospital, which would probably rival
"John Hopkins."
I remember that several years ago in my so-
ciety column I had seen that Barbara Weick
had been appointed official chaperone at West
Point. This was a surprise to Aloha who thought
she had become a Mrs. General, but I told her
that school romances do not often turn out well.
She laughed sheepishly but then defended her-
self-"Well, George is President of the B. & O.
besides being my high school boy friend." We
had a good time out of that, too.
Having talked over all we knew, we decided
to settle down and read the NEW YORK SUN, of
which I was editor. There in blazing headlines
we saw that the Ambassador from United States
to China was coming back on a vacation on the
"President Hoover", before leaving for a new post
in France. Who was it but Carlos Rankin, our
class president for four years, and the editor of
the Senior Annual?


I~


'R^:,







THE CAHIBBEAN


Well, Aloha was insistent that we go down to
the docks and see him in. On our way I had to
stop at the office to see that everything was going
O.K., and to my astonishment Ben Williams was
there, waiting for an interview with me. After the
palaver was over he told me that he wanted to get
our contract to furnish the society cuts for the
Sunday paper, as he had taken most of the pic-
tures this season of the debutantes, prominent
business people, and "everybody and his dog."
From his walk I gleaned that he was the owner of
The Williams Studios, New York. When we told
him where we were going he, of course, decided
to go along and have a real reception for Carlos.
On the way we passed a magnificent building
that was being erected, and I asked my chauffeur
to whom it belonged. He told me that the Chemis-
try Laboratories, owned by Wood, Bailey, and(
Will, had asked for bids for the construction of it,
and strange as it seemed to the business world of
New York, the Hackett Construction Co. had
agreed to do the job for practically nothing. Self-
ish. greedy, New York could not understand why.
But we could, for why should not a classmate help
out in a case like that?
We were nearing the pier now and all of us
were getting excited. Arriving, we found that
the place was crowded. The huge crowd pressing
against each other, all eager to be near the gang-
plank and see the passengers disembark. A large
well built man tried to get ahead of me and I stood
up for my rights and talked to him like the editor
of a newspaper might. He turned around and
glared at me and then commenced to laugh. For
it was Ed. Conkling and beside him Velma Hall.
"'ell, what are you two doing here?" They
answered that the Olympics' officials were coming
in and they had to meet them. After being asked
why, they answered that as head coaches of the
U.S.C. they had been asked by Thomas Pescod,
chairman of the Olympics this year, to do this
honor. Tom, like Velma and "Conk," had dis-
tinguished themselves in the world of sports.
Then Ben chimed in and said that speaking of
the world of sports had we heard of Ken Mlaurer's
taking the place of Babe Ruth, and taking it so
well that his new book "Around the I)amond"
was a sensational hit. Of course, it may have been
that the help of Ruth Duval, holder of a Pulitzer
Prize. had sold the book too, but still its success
was unusual.


No time for more talk now, for the boat was
tying up and even such interesting talk as this
was had to be stopped for a while, as all eyes
searched tie boat for familiar faces. Finally we
spied Carlos way up on the bridge, and after see-
ing us he waved frantically. To our surprise so did
the captain. "\'Ver courteous of him," remarked
Velma. Then Ben said that the Captain surely loo(k-
ed a lot like Parker I lanna and after due observa-
tion we discovered that was who it was. By (eorge!
After the boat tied up we immediately boarded
it and Parker told us all to come to his suite and
we would talk things over. For the benefit of
Carlos and Parker we told all the news that we had
discovered about old friends and the Class of '31
in particular. Then Parker began to tell us things.
His boat belonged to Fabian Englander, who had
recently bought out the steamship company and
had given Parker the captaincy of the "'PI l olt
Hoover." Ernest Berger had become the "Wolf
of Wall Street." We all took note of this: may-
be our incomes could be increased if Ernie would
give us a few pointers as to how to play the game.
In his travels he learned that Marie Kleefkens
had married some rich American Planter and had
opened up a Commercial School in Honduras for
the native girls. Strange to say, she had the sup-
port of the Honduran government behind her
and all of the officials were trained in her school.
In the same country Jack Kelly was Command-
er-in-chief of the army and was training the cadets
as well as Marie was her stenos.
Carlos then told us that Crawford Campbell,
now one of the judges in the World Court was
married to Vinnie Elson, one of the most prom-
inent women writers of America.
Bettina Powers was a missionary in Africa and
doing wonders with the natives there. Clarc
Frisk, the chairman of the National Typing Tests
of the United States, was editor of the "Gregg
Writer." We were disturbed by a voice outside.
cautiously asking for the Ambassador. Carlos
told her to come in and it was "Dot" Wirtz, who
explained that she had been traveling around the
world incognito, and at China had met our Presi-
dent and become his secretary. lie then told us
that "Dot" was very modest and probably never
would acknowledge that she was head stenog in
the Supreme Court of the United States, a job
which Anna Ryan had recently resigned in order
"to take the veil."








34 THE CARIBBEAN


And then to change the subject she told us that
a lady outside wanted to see the Captain and
"right away." The steward opened the door and
in rushed Miss Mary Moore. "Hide me quick,"
she said, "just because I was made President of
the American Dean Association all these reporters
insist that they take my picture. And you know
mine didn't come out good for the Annual." Well,
that ended our day and "Conk" made the motion
that we all go up to my house and celebrate and


have dinner. But, I've been away all day-I
don't know what's in there to celebrate with.

Then Ben suggested that we telephone Schraft's,
the best delicatessen store in New York State,
with branches all over, even in London. "Sure,
it's good stuff. Margaret Davis runs it-isn't
that enough." "Suits me" said Conk, and we all
knew that if Conk was satisfied it was good eats
-WE WERE.


CLASS WILL.

McBern '31

------ ==S-----~
CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE,
June 30, 1931.
We, the Senior Class of 1931, of the Cristobal High School, City of Cristobal, County of Colon,
and State of Canal Zone, do hereby scribble, and say this, our last will and testament as students of
that famous Cristobal High School, hereby revoking all former wills, bequests, and devises of whatever
nature by us made.
We bequeath to each member of the Junior Class, the Senior Class of 1932, something which we
excel in, and that we feel will thereby improve the said class.

BEQUEATHS TO


Bill Bailey ......
Ernest Berger...--.--
Edward Conkling
Margaret Davis.......
Ruth Duval .......--
Fabian Englander.
Vinnie Elson .........
Russell Elwell .......
Clara Frisk -............
Burton Hackett ...-
Parker Hanna.........
Velma Hall..............
Marie Kleefkens --
Demetra Lewis .......
Percy Lyew.............
Eugenia McLain ...
Kenneth Maurer .....
Marion Neel...........
Celeste Powell .....-
Thomas Pescod ...
Bettina Powers.........
Ronald Philppotts...
Carlos Rankin ......
Anna Ryan ...........
Dorothy Wirtz .....
Richard Wood. ...
George Wertz .. t
Aloha Slocum......
Barbara Weick.......
Ben Williams.....


His sax appeal..................
His reserve ............-. ......--
His appetite ...................
The Supper Club..............
Her petiteness.................
His tennis serve ..............
Her intellect ............- -
His mischief ............... .....
Her seriousness ................
His stature...................
His LOVE for "Hurdles"-
Her night life..................
Her six subjects ...........
His absences in class.........
His ambitions .......... .....
Her man.............. ........
His slimness ........- .. .
Her West Pointer .........
Her fun........ -
His athelicability-......... ...
Her vocabulary ..... .
His red hair ......
His scholarship. ............
Her giggle... ...........
Her quietness..........- -....
His good looks .............-
Two say they are ..........
them; but wish the.............
Her love of Latin ...........
His little camera ............ .


Junior Forsstrom.
Jesse Sinclair.
Alice Gormerly.
Nell Wardlaw.
James Wood and Dona Eaton.
Malcolm Wheeler.
Tom Murphy.
Allene Deakins and Anthony Fernandez.
Alicia Thirlwall and Gladys Bliss.
Harry Egolf and Ben Roberts.
Eleanor Reinhold and Jean Pruit.
Elizabeth Wirtz and Laura Rose.
Thelma King and Elsie Neely.
Perry Washabaugh.
Jake Dietzer and Carl Kariger.
Evelyn Wright.
Jessie Vane.
Betty Stahler.
Mary Deans and Inez Theokisto.
Howard Keenan and Richard Betten.
Verona Herman.
Alvin Lyew.
Martha Potts and James Hayden.
Vivian Elmergen, Ruth Casto, and Marion Waldau
Robert Stevenson.
Herman Roos.
Taking eveiyting
Juniors luck.
Alice Curtis.
Frank Greisinger and Edward Weisman.


Signed on the dotted line, sealed with chewing gum, published and declared by the said members
of the Class of 1931, as and for their last Will and Testament, in the presence of us, who at their
request, in their presence, and in the presence of each other, have hereunto subscribed our names as
attesting witnesses to said instrument.


S. W. A. K.
[SEAL]


Witnesses: YOU, ME and US.
Address: Here. There, and Everywhere.


hese
with.





36 THE CARIBBEAN


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THE CARIBBEAN 37


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38 THE CARIBBEAN


~








THE CARIBBEAN


JUNIOR DIRECTORY

MEANS OF DISTINGUISHING THEM.


Glays Bliss
Allene Deakins
Mary Deans
Jacob Dietzer
Beverly Dunn
Dona Eton....
Joe Ebdon....
Antonio Fernandez
Albin Forsstrom ..
Alice Gormerly
Verona Herman
Howard Keenan ...
Carl Kariger .......
Thelma King ........
Alvin Lyew ..
Robert Marshall
Thomas Murphy
Elsie Neely .
Jean Pruit...
Eleanor Reinhold
Ben Roberts
Herman Roos ..
Laura Rose.........
Bruce Saunders ..
Charles Goodenough
Frank Griesinger
lesse Sinclair.........
Harry Egolf ......
Robert Stevenson
Inez Theoktisto ....
Alicia Thirwall
Jesse Vane ....
Perry Washabaugh
Nell Wardlaw ...
Malcolm Wheeler....
Randy Wickinstad
Elizabeth Wirtz...
James Wood ....
Evelyn Wright.....
Vivian Elmgren........
Ruth Casto....
Betty Stahler ......
Eddie Weisman .....
Marian Waldau..
Alice Curtis --
Richard Bettien........


Curly hair and not much altitude.
Her air of mystery.
Always doing shorthand.
His bright red comb.
"School's an institution of mental torture."
Always losing money
Look for Gladys and he'll be there.
His big gold ring.
His flirting with the girls..
Shie always knows the answer.
Always working about solid geometry.
His piano playing.
Always drawing cartoons.
Her red hair.
His good tennis playing
The desk carver.
His eraser and chalk throwing
P. A. A.
Her bright blue lunch box
Her vain attempts to collect dues.
That baby face.
Found wherever there is trouble.
Her coy ways.
Always in the typewriting room.
Usually talking to "Dolly."
PORKY.
His short pants.
His love of giving orations.
Never pays his dues.
Being Miss Kimbro's pet.
Always with Pete.
Her studying.
Found in Chemical Laboratory.
Always talking to the boys.
Running on Junior room desks.
His efforts to get order in the Junior class.
Her good cooking.
. LOPY.
Her efforts to lose Robert.
Her "all A" report card.
Her windblown bob.
Those big eyes.
Corporal of the Guard.
Always with Alice.
Her graceful dancing.
His good (?) grades in Span. 9.


NAMES.





THE CARIBBEAN


r'


AiORNYS
ATTORNEYS


5 OCC eR


TH~E END"


"Soc c eR


"FISH'" "C WEE-RS


ii'e


"S E AV I C Er"




THE CARIBBEAN


-.4


~hi~1~







42 THE CARIBBEAN


A DVISOR

ALTERNAT VICE-PPESi.5DEIT I PRESIDENT ECY & TREAS.




C: PE-.COD Mi FOL, i FM l'LERS OH[EILJN M ANDREWS
.F' .,, Il. T., P.i Prol M af




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Guapo 'c.januts rMonr "Archie" LorKu Mga, Mel' Murph



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TPankr in GWlberg MCurtli
Gas Grnns "Motio








THE CARIBBEAN


SOPI I()MORE DI RECTO()RY


H OBBY


AMBITION.


Harold Agnew
Thelma Aibritton
Maxine Andrews
Duval Bene ..
Gordon Bernie
Dorothy Birkeland
Jesse David
Carmen Durhanm.
Velta Foley...
Edward Gormely
Charles Gould ..
Helen Hammond._
James Hayden
Oscar Heilbron
Charles Howe
Garrett Huff
W'm. Keenan
Louis Kleekens
Henry Lee
Jr. Lockwood
Mandi iMarchowsky
Mary Melendez
Carl Munkitrick
John Murphy .
Ernest de la Ossa
Genevieve O' Rourke..
Mildred Owen
Charles Pescod
Ann Powers ..
Norine Rakovsky
Violet Randall ..
Tommy Rankin
Natalie Safford
Bernice Sanders...
Harvey Smith
Lando Tipton
Edna Thrlwill
Elizabeth Thornton
Kay Townshend
Arthur Vane .
Wilber Ginsberg
Rebecca Brydon ....
Webster Beard
Mary Curtis .


Sailing
Tennis
Diving and dancing
Sports
Tennis
Spoi ts
Debating
Dancing
Dancing
Swimming
Reading
Studying
Swimming
Aviation
Hunting
Drinking
Studying
Boxing
Diving
Nunting
Sports .
Riding.
Tom Thumb golfing
Sailing .
Baseball
Men
Swimmilng
Sports
Tennis
Sports
Dancing
Sailing
Flirting
Swimming
Swimming
Loating
Dancing
Sports
Swimming
Radio ..
Reading .
Sports ..
Sea Scouts
Flirting..


Sea Captain
Private Secretary
Folly's Girl
Success
FIorest Ranger
Librarian
Scientist
Aviatrix
Language Tealcher
Aviator
Salesman
Teacher
Skipper
Aeronautical engineering.
Forest Ranger
Navigatior
Great man?.
Hobo.
Banker
To live
Cowboy
Private Secretar
Good husband
Trimmer
Civil Engineer
M en.....
Secretary ..
Athetic Coach
Lady of leisure
Housewife .....
Artist
Civil Engineer
Diver
Secretary
Engineer
Engneer
Teacher
Steno
Singer....
Monare
Army officer...
SPhysical director
Mariner ... -
None... .


"What!"
"Heck witl You!"
")Oh Gee!"
C )Oh. Yeah!'"
"Scram!"
"Really'"
"Blah. Blah, etc."
"There's nuliler live."
"Oh! Bull."
"(;G'wan!"
"Well, well, well!"
"I don't know."
"Who Opened the cage."
"01 wotta life!"
"Sure"!
'Awww"
"Not much!"
"Crasando!"
"Well, for Pete's sake"
"Ranmmed!"
"VWhy don't you go home?"
"Sez U!"
"I'se regusted."
"Yen! Boy!"
"'otta Slam!"
"Boop Boop a doop."
"Wouldn't kid me?"
"Ahlrght. alright"
"Beautiful"
"It was too funny for Anything."
"()i! Dear!"
"I oulgna",
"Phoey!"
"Y Conmo!"
"Ahah!"
"Take a flying leap.
"You Sap."
"'iaybe! "
"Hot Darn!"
"You're all wet!"
"(! Yeah.
'"Oh! Yeah!"
"Sev Yah!"
"Nothing Doing."


NAME


SAYING







THE C'A1IBBEAN 4P)





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TillH; CARIBBEAN


FRFSI L'lEN I)IRI"C'I'RY


RECOGNIZE) iBY


TYPF.


Anderson. Harry
Arthur, Kathleen
Bailey, John .
Barnett, Louis
Belden. Blanche
Belden. Charles
Berger, Claude
Bettien, Alfred
Bliss, Mabelle
Boggs, Stella
Campbell. Colin
Davis, Norma..
Davis, Veachel ..
Day, Aimbe ...
Dearth, Frances
Duey, Malcolm
Dwyer, Jack
Ebdon. Fred
Egolf, Ruth
Funes. Armando
Gibson, Anne
(Gorin. erry ..
Greenleaf. Ellen
Hanna, Virginia
Haves. Elizabeth .
Hearne, Mar .-
Hoffman, Maxine
Hollowell. Victoria
Hollowell. William
Horine. Carlton
Huntoon. Ethel....
Lam, Blossom ..
Larrisson. Clarice
Leach. Helen...
Lewis. leanne ...
Levy, David
Lyons. ohn .........
Mannix, Gloria...
Mannix, John.. .
Marshall, David
Mueller, Edna
Murphy. Charles
Packard, Edwin
Pickett. Ruth
Plath. Arthur ..
Poole. Dorothy..
Poole, George ..
Reinhold. Richard
Roos. Dorothy
Slocum, Warren
Small, Betty
Small. Harold
South. Charles
Standish, Chris...
Stetler, Betty
Stewart, Olive
Stone, William
Thompson, John....
Turner. Howard...
Torres. Blanca...
Washabaugh, Frank.
Wheeler, Ray
\irtz, Chester
Wirtz. Edison
Wood. Alice ..
Wood. Ernest
Mrs. Spencer
Mr. Hackett .....


Dimples
Friendly manner.
Kansas City Stonmps
His grin
Raven locks
S"Oh yeah!"..
\Valentini hair
Rosy cheeks
SCurly top
S'l"Happy feet"
"TfHOSE eves"
"Variability" '
I Iis waves"
SPious atmosphere
i Inaudibility
"'Gatunislhness".
"Ice cold pop"
;Green polo shirts
I Ponderous walk
Latin features
Freckles
Knickers!
Bill Bailey
Titian tresses
VelocitYv!
"Humpf!"
M magnitudee
Tiny voice
Alibis
SHis curls
Beautiful Blushes?
Shy manner
"Greto Garbishness"
Boyishness
Fabulousness
Hearty laugh.
Length
Art collection...
Sea-green eyes!
"Age of innocence''
Arching brows.
Expression of face.
Open countenance
. Wind-blown ....
Linear measurement.
Her sneeze
Sleepishness
SPompador
Bashful smile
Slockery
Brown eves
Sh'iml-hl; n-: i it

Hair cut
Her continual chattering
Practicability v
$1000 profile
Red hair
SSouthern accent
Spanish comibs..
Delicate giggle!
Crooked grin
Unconcern
Ca roors
SSoft tones
Caribbean Illustrations
SGrass bag and umbrella
Philosophy ... .. ..


Phlegmiatic
Reliable
Beau Brummeill
Inquisiti ve
Black beauty
1 Highbrow
Flirt
Tra.nquil
Pollvanna
"Simplitica"
Witty
Vamp
Unassuming
Bookworm
Seen but t not head
High brown superlative..
Slow but sure
Here, there, everywhere
lovial
Silent
Titianesque
Meddlesome
Coyislhness
Nonchalant
lAutogenetic
Diffident
Petite
Victorious!!
Uncontrollable
Scientific
Coquettish.
Demure
Languid
"Free and easy"
Dramatic
Mathematical
Listless
Passive
Rudesby
January-molasses
Sensitive
Happy -go-lucky
W\aggrish
Domineering
Unoffensive
Ever-ready
Interrogative
Altruistic
Disposed to murmur
A would-be-wise-person.
IDare-dev il
Careful
Anticipating tIor the best.
Nautical
Hilarious
Industrious
Fluent.
we're e in tile Na; y nowxr
Ainmable
Divine
Blushinrg!
Rowd v
Ambitious
Feminine-p'us
'"Still-water"
Humble but worthy
"Let's be good sports"..
Quiet but forceful


NAME


.ANTICIP.AI'TD ACHIIEV'EMEN I

TI'l swimn the Atlanti,
I'slcr
Strong man
1,e Brown 11
()pera star
Floor walker
Warden: Sing Sing
lBaketball star
African milssionaryTimiie Semple
M1c'1PhIerso II.
Understudy of Rud.v \\alee
Old mlil!d
Truck driver
'i'criulr I fr'cr
Cirus girl
Circus barker
\Violf of aill Street
Prfilesslonial dancer
Manufacturer of rubbelcr hot dogs.
Venus of dramlat.
"Apolhlo"
Fiamollns divorcee
Pearl (I Il r.
Maltron of ()rphan Asvylum.
Pari.i'm modiste.
Invalid.
Calbaret girl.
Ch.mipion heavyweight.
Literarv genius.
. Senior.
A cannibal.
First Lady-of-the-Land.
Physical director.
Chinese Diplomat.
Socletv debutante.
(rass widow.
I )issec tor of lhus.
Civilize the Indian Ocean.
lHead of a laundry.

Student of Divinity.
Landscape gardener.
White House janitor-
Martyred priest.
Tio bathe in the Nile.
Chicago racketeer.
Athletic coach.
Fool-proof Somnambulist.
Rex ive the Dead Sea.
\liat ematicrin.
Stylist.
Chitef chaperon.
(;igolo.
Champion swimmer.
.\ na\y.
I talian Princess.
Notorious hypnotizer.
Yale Imuscle-liilder.
A perfect valet.
Indian court otllcial.
Primlladonna.
Salesman.
Baker.
Censor.
Militant sut fragette
Monte Carlo gambler.
Paris style designer.
Policeman.
A Nazarene.








50 THE CARIBBEAN



Eitrrar!
The Staff of The Caribbean takes this opportunity to thank the ladies who acted as judges for
our short story and poetry contests. We feel that it added much to the success of both contests.
The judges were: Mrs. O. S. Hearne, Mrs. Adella M. Kolle, Mrs. Madge Butler, Mrs. J. F. Jenness.


BEST POEM

PICTURES.
Carlos Rankin, '31.
I.
ON GATUN LAKE.
The blazing sun stands high at noon,
And the glistening waters of the lake
Swamp the island's reedy shores.
The huge dead trees stand against the noon-day sky,
Their arms twisted in the agony of death;
Their form and orchid-covered trunks
Rise out of the dark depths.

II.
BACK FROM THE CITY.
As the banners of departing day
Were streaming across the horizon,
A worn cayuca sharply stayed
Its progress through the waters.
In it sat a young Machi,
His timid eyes afire,
His Indian soul was dancing now
To the tune of Nature's lyre.


THE POEM WITHOUT A NAME.
Malcolm Duey, '34.
"We are lost!" the captain shouted, as he
staggered down the stair,
"Man the boats!" he next commanded,
but no sailorman was there;
And the waves beat high and heavy, and the
fog was thick as soup,
When from aft there came an answer, and it
said, "Poo-poo-pa-doop!"

For his crew was at the talkies, hearing
Helen "Sugar" Kane,
And the captain could not rouse them,
though he yelled with might and main;
So the gallant vessel foundered, with the
skipper on her poop,
And her quarterdeck went under with a
"Glub! Poo-poo-pa-doop!"

Now she's down six hundred fathoms,
where King Neptune's gardens lie
With the fronds of pea-green seaweed
waving to the distant sky,
And the fishes swim around her, in a jolly,
scaly group,
Just to hear the Mermaid's chorus singing
"Ah! poo-poo-pa-doop!"


HONORABLE MENTION

A STUDENT TURNS FORTUNE-TELLER.
Alice Gormerly, '32.
Far down on the horizon
I see a cloud.
It is a very black
And angry cloud.
It seems to menace
Those around me.
With each hour
This cloud grows larger.
Slowly it comes upon
My unsuspecting
Fellow-men.
Should I warn them?
They would not listen.
Fun would still
Be their aim.
No, I will not
Tell them.
Let them enjoy life
While they can.
Too soon this creeping specter
Will reach out and seize them,
Surprising them in the very act
Of studying something
To amuse them.
Ah! It is almost upon them now.
Too late they see this
Thing which haunts them all.
They fly around in confusion,
Seeking a way out of their
Ignorance.
Only those who worked steadily
Go serenely on, with no fear
Of this black shadow.
You ask me what it is?
Do you not know?
Is it the wrath of God,
Come upon all sinners?
Oh, no,-it is the wrath of teachers
Descending upon erring students.
It is Final Exams.,
The plague of the students' world.

MOONLIGHT ON THE CHAGRES.
David Levy, '34.
When it's moonlight on the Chagres,
And the stais are shining down,
When the alligator's swimming
By a little native town,
When it's moonlight on the Chagres
And you're feeling kind of blue,
I'll get out my little cayuca
And cross the lake to you.







THE CARIBBEAN 51


SUCH A GIRL.
Edward Conkling, '31.
If a girl doesn't smoke, or drink strong rye,
They give her a sneer and pass her by.
The boys never really stop to think
That it wrecks her charm if she does drink.
If a girl isn't snappy and talk baby talk
The boys turn her down with the look of a hawk
The silly things, if they could see,
Baby talk isn't all its cracked up to be.
If a girl doesn't look like an Easter egg,
They're not the type to whom they're engaged;
If they could see beyond the paint
Many a boy would surely faint.
If a girl doesn't neck she isn't a go;
They think she is dumb and awfully slow,
Goodness! If a boy could only agree
That a girl who necks just can't brew tea.
If a girl doesn't have her eyebrows plucked
And her eyelashes blackened and all stuck up,
If she doesn't have lipstick and a cute Cupid's bow-
They says she's "out" without a ghost of a show.

THINGS CHANGE.
CrawJord Campbell, '51.
Lilies white, yellow, and orange,
Roses white and red,
Flowers scented and sweet to-day,
To-morrow will be dead.


Buildings made of wood and rock,
Marble and minerals bright.
To-day seem lasting; to-morrow gone
'Tis age compared with a night.
Animals and bright plumed birds
On this earth's small crust.
People too, and insects all,
To-morrow will be dust.
O Nature, giver and taker again;
O Time that tells the fate of men;
Keep on that upward trail.
Do not let mankind fail.


HIGHER.
Crawford Campbell, '31.

In frantic frenzy against the wind
They stretch up toward the sky
With graceful curves, with upward leap
Their fluffy heads held high.
And deep jungle trees throw out their arms
To catch a glimpse of light,
Their eager limbs want heaven's charms
Their leaves the sun so bright.
And grasses fight for lack of space
To view the sky so blue
They want to see that shining face
'Twill give them life anew.
Let us look up and see the light
Keep truth and honesty in sight.


BEST SHORT STORY.

"DUN"
Ernest De la Osa, '31.


The grass, parched by the many weeks of
glaring sun, rustled as a weak gust of dust-laden
air passed along the plain. Here and there a
vulture wheeled and circled in the azure expanse
overhead, waiting-always waiting. Scattered
heaps of bleached bones formed a rim for a muddy,
half-dry waterhole which was becoming drier
each day and would soon vanish until the winter
supplied it with the much-needed moisture.
Into this desolate scene came a superb figure,
as masterful appearing as the full-blooded arab
steeds of old. With his head held high, dainty
nostrils sniffing for that hated scent and stand-
ing on a small hillock he presented a picture no
artist has painted. He was sweat, streaked but
far from exhausted; all day he had run eluding
capture and shaking off pursuit only by using his
almost human brain to its utmost. Dun was
twelve hands high; every muscle had its place


under his sleek, glossy, dun-colored hide. He
was past his prime, not having much more time
to live on earth; yet he was still undisputed as
leader over all this great expanse. Men had
never been able to conquer him although many
had sworn to do so. His herds and mares were
always considered as uncapturable under his
wily leadership. Lately, however, he had been
fighting a losing fight-his herds were gone,
scattered and captured. Dun's eyes took on
a frightened look and he became like a ghost
-just a fleeting vision.
As he approached the waterhole he cast glances
to either side, walking warily. After drinking
enough to last him through other days of hard-
ship and flight he laid down and rolled in the
dust, a pleasure denied him for many days.
Finally he slept to awake with a start. It was
rapidly nearing dawn and to the east a fire cast







52 THE CARIBBEAN


its dull glow toward the heavens. Dun snorted;
again fiendish means were being used to bring
about his capture. Running and dodging was his
lot all day. Toward dusk his tired ears failed
him and a light swish turned his body into a
bundle of nerves as a rope whizzed through the
air encircling his long taunt neck. He plunged
and bucked all in a fury and in the dropping of a
leaf was free. Again they were thwarted, but
became more incensed in the chase.
Dun was becoming haunted by visions of men,
ropes and corrals. At every canyon, thicket or
cleft he shied. Bets and, rewards flamed the ardor
of these hunters so that the horse never rested.
They all knew that time would wear the animal
down until a slight slip and he was theirs.
The horse would not leave his old home and
haunts; he began to circle aimlessly. One morn-
ing upon awakening he found that he had blun-
dered into a box-canyon and his pursuers had
been awake and taken advantage of his blunder.
The sole outlet was fenced by spiked timbers,
but desperation drove the animal on and with a
terrific display of energy he cleared the barrier
although he was badly spent.
His victory had been a moral one. The hunters
began to wonder if it was possible to capture the
spirited beast. All their traps had failed and not
a few of the men returned. For a while life be-
came almost peaceful again, but raids upon a
nearby horserance were laid at his feet and at-
tributed to him. Rewards were doubled for his
capture alive.
The brief pause in the hunt had been a timely
one and enabled him to laugh at their attempts for
a while, but again the strain began to tell. Dun
had begun to regather his herds from the well,
filled pens of wild horse ranchers. One night as
he was striving to lift a wooden bar to a corral
gate a rancher saw him and angered because of
his inability to capture the wild stallion, shot at
him, hitting him in his soft rump. Dun snorted
with pain and ran, not stopping until many miles
away from the spot of his misfortune.
Several weeks later a refreshed Dun returned
to his old haunts. An undefinable magnetism
had lured him back to his dangerous realm where
he somehow felt that he must end his days. The
same morning of his return he was sighted and
the animal again was forced to be a fugitive.
Near sundown the stallion was fatigued and
weary to seeking a place of refuge he. walked out


on a narrow shelf-like profusion. Then the dread-
ed thing happened. The huntershad separated
and a returning band had seen his figure outlined
against the sky. Advancing stealthily they had
succeeded in surrounding him.
The horse stood trembling close to the preci-
pitous side of the hill. On both sides and to the
rear lay death on sharp rocks at the bottom of the
ravine. To the front lay capture in the form of
advancing lines of horsemen, lassoes whirling,
preparatory to the cast.
Dun thought of his youthful days-happiness,
freedom, and leadership. His many sons and
daughters all in the hands of these hated men.
He had roamed the plains at will for years. Now,
men, because of money, sought to ruin this all
and enslave him as they had done all his brethren.
Pictures of dusty corrals, saddles, cruel spurs,
and bits flashed through his mind. Could he
live through a life of that sort? He had lived
the greater part of his life in freedom. If cap-
tured he would be much like a wild bird in a trap.
The horsemen steadily advanced gloating over
their success. They did not hurry. They were
assured of his capture.
A lasso shot out, followed by others, some
reached but a devil was at the end of all of them.
Biting and kicking he disentangled himself from
their coils, yet he was not free. Recoiling their
ropes the men stood in front of him, blocking his
path to freedom. They slowly quieted their
horses and again they advanced. This time they
were sure of their prize.
As they neared Dun he sensed capture and
defeat. Recollections of the past flashed through
him. Life was sweet, yet capture didn't seem
as life to him. He acted then. The horsemen
gasped in surprise at the sight that met :their eyes.
Dun was never captured.







THI'E (CAIMI1BI3AN


BEST STORY IN SENIOR CLASS.
IMPOSSIBLE.
l'ibian E',inlantder, 1.


John joined the Navy. lie was assigned to the
U.S.S. "New Mexico," a fine, big battleship.
The maneuvers were to be held near Panama
Think of it, going to Panama where he could see
the famous Panama Canal!
The U.S.S. "New Mexico", with the rest of the
battlefleet, left IIlampton Roads early Sunday
morning. They were to be in the vicinity of Colon
on Friday. John was so interested in the trip
and the ship that the days just rolled by as did
the waves.
Hle wondered whether he would be allowed to
go ashore. On Tuesday he found that they were
to attack the Canal, the "unconquered" Canal.
The Canal's fortifications were on the lookout
for them.
John thought he would not be allowed shore-
leave: and he had planned so much on it, on seeing
the beautiful stores, where one could buy almost
anything he wished; in ivories, perfumes, shawls,
and curios. Yes, he wanted one of those big
Spanish shawls for his sister who was in college
back home.
John has always been good in geography, so
if he couldn't see Panama he would learn about
it from the map. He was looking at a map close-
ly. reading the different names of the larger
towns of Panama, when an officer happened by.
He spoke to John: John arose and saluted. He
said, "I see you're interested in Panama, have
you been there before?" John said, "No Sir,"
but that he knew the lay of the land fairly well,
from having studied the map. The officer told
him to report to him in his office the next day at
nine-thirty. John wondered what was going to
happen. That night he told two of his buddies
his orders. They were surprised, too. John re-
ported on time. He was with the officer half an
hour. That evening his buddies asked, "What
was up?" The only response they could get was
"You'd be surprised." He went to see the officer
again the next day. The ship was now in sight of
land and moving very slowly as they were afraid
the enemy's planes would see them. They an-
chored about six-thirty off a quiet lagoon,
and a detachment of sailors and marines were
sent ashore. Now, this naturally caused much
excitement.


John slept little that night as he had been told
to be prepared to leave by airplane from the
ship at five-fifteen the next morning. lie was
going on a special commission. \hen he was
ready and had put on his helmet and goggles he
was given a letter, and was told to give it to the
officer in charge of the base where he was to land.
This was not John's first flight in the air for al-
ready he had done some parachute jumping.
When in the plane, he fastened his parachute
on for he was told he would have to jump, for
the base had no landing field. The plane was
shot off the catapult and "took the air" nicely.
John was all eyes now. The country was beau-
tiful and so green. They flew over numerous
little settlements, and once spotted a plane on
the horizon. After about one and a half hour's
ride. John saw the pilot talking to him in sign
language. lie said they would soon be there.
John made ready and looking down saw a group
of pup-tents. This was where he was to get off.
Some place! The pilot circled around three times
to attract the attention of those on the ground,
then motioned to John, asking him if he were
ready. John said, "Yes." So the pilot put the
plane upward so as to gain altitude. In a few
minutes John got up and stepped on the seat
ready to jump, and was nearly blown over before
he could step off. What a sensation! Down-
down-he went, the parachute opened-those
on the ground saw a small white speck appear.
John came down near the tents and soon had a
large group around him. He gave his letter to
the officer in charge who had been watching for
him. John drank some coffee and then spent the
day resting for he knew he would have a hard iob
the next day.
The next morning the officer gave him a pack-
age and his instructions. He was to go with the
two men who were standing near by. He had
changed his suit to that of a civilian, like the
other two n-en. fie followed them. In about
half an hour they came to a body of water. Oh,
yes! now he remembered, Gatun Lake! They
Stalked along the edge of the lake for a short dis-
tance, when they came upon two natives with a
boat, called a cayuca. The cayuca is a canoe dug







54 THE CARIBBEAN


out of a solid piece of a tree trunk and larger than
those seen in our northern lakes.
John was to go with the natives to Monte Liro,
a small native town, from which place he could
get the train for Gatun. The natives paddled
hard as their boat was full of bread-fruit which
they wanted to get to market on the morning
train. In a couple of hours they reached their
destination. What a sight to John! One lonely
station master and a policeman were the only
white persons in the place. They asked John
who he was. He said he was a planter and gave
a fictitious name. Soon a train came in view.
What a queer sight in this God-forsaken country
to see a train, an honest to goodness train. He
boarded it and watched the scenery until he
arrived at Gatun. Here he got off, went behind
a shed and opened his package. He was nervous
now. He had a perfect right to be. He took
the two iron, ball-shaped objects and looked at
them. Then he put them back and made for the
locks which he could see a short distance away.
Soldiers were on guard walking up and down,
everywhere. In back, across on what he thought
to be the Gatun Dam was a village of pup-tents.
He crossed over the locks. A soldier had just
gone on his beat and was on the way down, with
his back to John. John hurried across the locks


up the embankment by the camp to the spillway.
Here he left one of his small round objects in a
vital place. Then he walked back to the locks.
He was very nervous now. How was he going to
get rid of the other one? Luckily for him a party
of tourists were sight-seeing. He mingled with
the crowd. He went down a stairway near the
lock chambers till he came to the culverts, where
he left the other object. When he came up to the
top of the stairs he found an officer and gave him a
card. It took the officer almost off his feet. For
the "impossible" had been done. The Gatun
locks had been taken without a shot! The officer
took him to a higher officer who went with John
to the places where he had laid his small black
round objects-bombs. Pombs! Yes, time
bombs, without the powder. He had captured the
locks single handed. John reported to the officers
at the Submarine Base and made his report and
was given great praise for his work.
As his ship had not come into port John was
allowed to go to town. He bought a beautiful
shawl from one of these famous Chinese shops
and then went to the Y.M.C.A. to enjoy the
evening.
What a life it had been the last couple of days,
and what a story to write home! He had cap-
tured the locks alone, "The Impossible."


BEST STORY IN JUNIOR CLASS.
THE BROKEN PACT.
Vivian Elmgren, '32.


The coming of Vasco Nufiez Balboa was re-
ported to Teoca. Teoca Panea hurriedly gathered
his Indian forces together and prepared for battle.
He knew that his neighbors had peacefully sur-
rendered to this mighty Spaniard, but Teoca
was no fawning pet. The kindness and friend-
ship of Balboa to the Indians had travelled far,
but this treacherous chieftan, fearing death, pre-
pared to fight back.
Balboa, camped about ten miles from Teoca's
headquarters, was holding a council with his men.
"Teoca is a devil. One of the shrewdest
of chieftans. He will fight." One of Balboa's
leaders stated.
"Even so, I am going to give him a chance to
surrender and make an alliance with me," Bal-
boa declared.


"But, Mi Capitin, Teoca Panea is cruel and
blood-thirsty. It is said he puts captives and
slaves to death by throwing them to the dogs.
He is not like the others."
"I will proceed as always. We will approach
his town with all signs of peace; if he wishes to
fight, we fight!"
The next day Balboa moved his camp toward
the Indian city. His Spanish knights in their
polished armor and the long train of slaves and
hostages were a spectacle in the tropical sunlight.
They crossed some jungle that day and only
advanced four miles.
Beside Balboa rode two Knights. The tallest
seemed to be always smiling and his eyes twinkled
mischieviously. He was Manuel Franco. The
other, more serious and quiet, was Jorge Alcazon.







THE CARIBBEAN


Manuel turned to Balboa and said, "The
maidens of Panea are reported to be pleasing to
the eye. You and I, amigo, will have a joyous
time; but poor Jorge, he is afraid of women."
Jorge paid no attention to his friend's remark,
but rode silently beside them.
They covered more territory the next day and
were only a mile from Teoca that night. Balboa
had given orders that a strict sentry watch be
held. He planned to call on Teoca the next day
with his peace pact.
Early in the morning Balboa set out. He met
Teoca about half a mile from the town. Teoca
was escorted by ten of his warriors. They ap-
peared peaceful and were only lightly armed.
Balboa approached and gave the sign of friend-
ship. Teoca hesitated, then he drew near and
returned the sign.
"I am glad you wish to be friends with me,
Teoca," Balboa said.
"My brother, to be friends with you is the
highest honor I could wish for."
After this ceremony of peace was over Balboa
returned to his camp. He met his two comrades-
in-arms and gaily hailed them saying, "Jorge
you were wrong. Teoca agreed to my terms."
"Don't be too sure, mi capitAn," Jorge cau-
tioned. "Teoca is cruel. He is bidding his time;
guard yourself."
"Nonsense, Jorge, to night I will visit the town
in search of dusky maidens," Manuel frivolously
shouted.
Manuel started for the city accompanied by
his servant, Alberto. He, too, was looking for
dusky maidens.
The town was a regular tropical Indian village.
It contained one large building, the so-called
palace of Teoca. There were about ten houses
grouped around it and ten other scattered huts.
The inhabitants were cooling themselves in the
street, where many children were playing games.
"No so bad, Alberto," his master exclaimed
eyeing one pleasant looking maiden.
"Si, senior," the gay servant answered.
This maiden disappeared in the direction of the
palace and Manuel followed.
Through a tropical garden he sped until he
caught up with his game. "Chiquita, you fas-
cinate me."
From out of the shrubbery came a low, deep
growl. The girl screamed and Manuel cried,
"Madre de Dios! Alberto!"


Alberto, being near enough to hear the deep
growl and then the cry, rushed to his master.
Too late he found Manuel lying on the ground
with his throat ripped; it was torn from ear to ear.
Alberto, dazed and bewildered, stumbled into
the camp. HIe rushed to Balboa.
"Mi Capitan, Don Manuel is murdered!"
"Calm yourself, man. Are you crazy?" Bal-
boa asked.
"No, senor, dead with his throat chewed!"
and Alberto related the horrible story.
Both Balboa and Jorge becam- excited. Jorge
believed Manuel had been deliberately murdered
by Teoca, while Balboa declared it must have
been some wild animal.
Teoca visited Balboa in the morning bringing
back the body.
"It grieves me much, oh brother, to bring you
the body of one of your knights."
Balboa grimly received Teoca's consolation.
Jorge had planned to go that night with Alberto
to investigate the palace garden. Balboa was
constantly becoming angrier, blaming Teoca
for the sad occurrence.
"Wait until I return," Jorge begged. "Then
we will kill him in the same way."
Just after moonrise, Alberto and Jorge started
on their way.
"If you are not back by morning, I will attack
Teoca," Balboa said, as he fondly bid his remain-
ing comrade good-bye.
Jorge found the town in the same state as it had
been the night before. He pretended interest in
the girls. Slowly he worked his way with Alberto
to the scene of the murder. Through tropical
jungle they crept. They did not enter the same
way as Manual had, but took a round-about way.
Suddenly they heard a low growl and they saw
Teoca leading a large animal resembling a dog on
a leash. Teoca let the animal loose and ran. The
creature leapt toward the two Spaniards, and as
it did Jorge's sword passed straight through the
beast's body.
"We shall take this dog back to El Capitan. I
hope Teoca has more of these animals: if not, we
will have to substitute some other method for his
punishment."
Balboa received Jorge with joy. He listened
silently to his story and then he cried. "You and I
will teach Teoca to murder a knight of Spain.
The peace pact is broken. Get the men ready
to march against him immediately."







56 THE CARIBBEAN


Teoca, when he found his beast gone and no
dead Spaniard, became frightened and gathered
his warriors for battle. He was ready for Balboa,
but he had no change against the disciplined
fighters from Spain.
When Balboa had killed nearly all of Teoca's
warriors and Teoca had been made prisoner, he
ordered his men to drag the chieftan before him.
"So you thought you could fool Vasco Nufiez


Balboa. Madre de Dios! I will show you. Bring
me the other dogs."
They tied Teoca to a stake and set the dogs on
him. The air was filled with their hoarse growls
and the terrified cries of Teoca Panea.
Balboa looked on scornfully. When all was
finished he turned to Jorge and said, "I have
broken my pact, but avenged my comrade's
death."


BEST STORY IN SOPHOMORE CLASS.
THE AVENGING FIRE.
Ann Powers, '33.


The fire crackling, glowing, spreading warmth
and cheer was the thing that first caught your
attention in the room. Then the great size of the
chamber whose walls were completely covered
with shelves of books impressed you. The re-
flected flames were the only light and they danced
on the ceiling, and fading into the corners, became
part of the groping, black, menacing shadows.
Sunken so deep in a chair that he seemed a part
of it, sat a middle-aged men. He had a brooding
air of contentment like that of a cat after eating
its fill lies awaiting another victim. His eyes a
murky grey and set too close together gazed
straight ahead but seemed to see nothing. His
rather corpulent body seemed to bask in the
warmth of the fire. A glass of sherry glowed with
strange reddish lights held in his hand that had
grown flabby and soft with the years.
The man sat thinking of how he came to be in
such luxurious circumstances. He had been out-
distanced in success by his brother so that his
brother had been in affluence while he had been
brought to poverty by his own faults. A great
hatred for his brother had been born because of
the dissimularity of circumstances; thus he had
not felt great sorrow when he learned of his
brother's death. A smile crossed his face at this
point of his reflections when he considered his
present cofort while living on the money in-
herited from his brother. At that moment his
train of thought was broken because of the door's
sudden opening.
When he saw the figure in the doorway he gave
one startled exclamation then sat in open-moutheo
horror. The person entering said reassuringly,
"Don't be alarmed, George, I am not a ghost."


George sprang from the chair and exclaimed,
"My God! John, I thought you were dead."
He slumped back into the chair with a hundred
ideas in his mind. Thoughts jumped like devils
at him asking ceaseless questions. What was he
going to do? His brother in some incredible
way alive and here to take all his new-found
comfort and luxury from him.
John told briefly why he had wished to be
thought dead that he might put over a business
deal that involved millions and concluded saying
that he thought it would be a pleasant vacation
for George to have his house and money for a
month. His remarks aroused the hidden resent-
ment and hatred that George had borne secretly
for so long toward his brother but he stifled his
rage realizing the uselessness of words and asked
politely, "I suppose the whole world knows about
your starting to return to the realm of the living."
But was answered by John's surprising retort,
"You are the only man that does not think me
safely beneath a tombstone."
This remark brought a horrible chain of thought
to George's mind that was quickly stifled yet
would not stay buried. One question seemed to
be flung at him from all sides. "Why don't you
get him out of the way?" He brought will power
and most strong arguments to bear but still the
question continued pounding at him. The flames
of the fire had burnt down to glowing coals and
still he sat there silent beside his brother John.
At last he rose to go upstairs realizing that this
was the last night he would spend in this house
and thinking of the many chances his brother
had given him to mend his fortunes that he had
ruined. A sudden force made him turn back, walk







THE CARIBBEAN


over to the large mahogany desk that was placed
at the end of the room. Ie Ipulled open the middle
drawer, his hand closed around something and he
raised his arm. A terrifying explosion seemed to
have rocked the foundations of the house itself.
George looked and on the floor his brother lay
in a strangely twisted position. An over\\helm-
ing sense of triumph and power seemed to come
over him fora moment dah lie was the conqueror
and his brother the conquered. The period of
supremacy and exaltation passed, then in its place
came a feeling of terror. He felt the force of a
million eyes, a million hands reached out to him.
He hurried to the door and locked it though it
seemed a frail barrier against the terror of dis-
covery that came over him.He must do something,
any moment someone might come and take him as
a murderer. His fevered thoughts seemed to
grasp at one word escape. Hie must run away.
But where? Then realization of what flight would
bring upon him brought mental pictures of him-
self tracked and hunted to any hiding place. The
tenacles of the law would reach out and find him
however far he ran. Then like a breath of fresh
air he realized that nobody knew his brother had
been alive. All he had to do was to get rid of the
body and he would never run the risk of detection.
How to dispose of the body. His tortured brain
next tried to decide that problem, Throw it in
the river? No, that was too much of a risk. Sud-
denly a simple solution leaped to his mind. Why
not burn the house and with it the body. No
one knew he had had a caller this night and the
fire would destroy the evidence. Then the thought
of burning the house that had so recently been his
brought a moment of hesitation. Yet in a few
seconds his resolution had strengthened. He
must make the fire appear an accident so that
he could collect the insurance. A few papers
scattered too near the fire place, a few glowing
coals near them would start a fire blazing. Now
it was all set he would leave and let the house
burn in peace. Then another moment of terror,
suppose the fire did not burn, what N would be the
consequences? He must stay in the room until the
blaze had reached such a height that there would
be no chance of extinguishing it.
As the papers caught fire they sent up sudden
flames that threw ghostly, w rithing images on
the walls. Then the flames grew lower but ten-
drils of smoke arose from the floor. The line of
fire made a colorful halo around the head of the


body on the floor. A sinister curiosity drew him
over to look at the sprawled figure. He looked
down on the lace of the dead man and was struck
with a sudden horror because of the expression
graven on it. A smile at his follies and crime was
impressed on the features of his dead brother.
HIe felt a momentary feeling of remorse. lie
quickly strangled that feeling and as the flames
were growing very hot he turned to leave. At
his second step he tripped over the body and
crashed to the floor.
His first sensation when consciousness returned
to him was that he must be dead and this be part
of Hell. Scorching, flaring flames spread around
the walls leaving by some miracle but a small area
near him free of fire. He tried to rise vet fell
back so dizzy that even his thoughts ran around
and round. In a moment overwhelming fear
make him force himself to a sitting position on the
floor. He was surrounded by a wall of flames.
Panic had him in its grasp, but he resolutely
tried to calm his over-strung nerves and marshal
his wandering senses. He must have a clear
head to escape from the room that was now be-
coming unbearably hot. The smell of burning
leather filled the air and made it hard to breathe,
the circle of fire was growing nearer and nearer
to him.
With a great effort he gathered his strength
for a dash to the door and then freedom. Wrap-
ping himself in a small rug to protect himself
from the flames he rushed through the wall of
fire in the direction of the door, reached for the
key but felt nothing but the bite and sting of the
fire. Swiftly fear had him in its grip as he re-
treated to the middle of the room, but he was
soon strengthened by the thought that if he could
not escape by the door he could by the window.
Hle ran to each window and battered against it
vainly. He broke the small window panes but
the fresh air only fanned the flames to greater
heights. His clothes were in flames he could
hardly breathe and for the first time despair came
over him. lHe realized that in a few minutes he
would not be able to breathe; then he made one
last effort at the windows, but they refused to
open. Finally he fell gasping and almost scorched
to death on the floor. It seemed as if in a dream a
great voice said "Thou shalt not kill.' Gibbering
red imps leaped at him shouting. At last a sense
of great horror and deep remorse came to him for
the deed he had done.







58 THE CARIBBEAN


The great old chimney is all that stands of that
house that once was. Grandmothers tell their
children of the famous night when the manor


house burnt down. In the evening around an
open fire the villagers speculate on what happened
the night of the great fire.


BEST STORY IN FRESHMEN CLASS
AN IRISH TRICK.
Ellen GreenleaJ, '34.


The North River subway came whirring into
Forty-second Street station jammed with its
full capacity of tired New Yorkers returning after
a hard day's work, and halted for the flash of a
second to let three or four passengers off. Among
these was a girl about nineteen years old. Miss
Patrician Flannigan alias "Pat" pushed her way
through the crowds of humanity in the station
and emerged at the top of the subway stairs
breathless.
Which way did he go? Can he be the one?
were the thought's running through this young
lady's mind as she glanced about her eagerly as
if in search of someone. A tall figure disappeared
around the corner of Main and Forty-second
Street and like lightening Pat was after him.
The puruist continued for almost an hour.
Sometimes the tall man would be within arms
length; other times at a hundred yards distance
and even out of sight but Pat managed to keep
up the chase. Never once did the pursued one
turn to look back which was fortunate for Pat,
and finally he disappeared from view into a
privately owned red brick house.
Yes, that's the place. Pat was almost certain.
Hadn't they been watching this house for a month
now but could not find even the slightest suspicion
of anything wrong? Oh, well, she'd take the
chance. Crossing the street Miss Flannigan went
into Fisk's drug store and ordered a soda before
entering the telephone booth. What would she
say. Gosh what a feeling to have on your first
"job." Supposing she were wrong. Wouldn't
they laugh at her. Summoning all her nerve
she entered the booth and dialed her number.
"Hello, hello, headquarter's? Yes. Pat Flan-
nigan speaking; send the men to 169 Sixty-third.
Yes. Get A. C. K. spotted, I think. Yes, sir."
Pat hung the receiver up and came out of the tele-
phone booth.
She ordered another soda not because she
wanted it but anything to pass the time away.
Minutes elapsed. Pat was nervous. She tapped
her foot up and down, up and down, and vaguely
wondered if everyone in the store was staring
at her. She heard the burr of a powerful motor


and saw a big gray Cadillac stop opposite the
store. Hurriedly she dropped fifteen cents on the
counter and joined the men getting out of the
gray car.
"Oh, hello boys, yes, this is the same place I'm
sure, Pat said, "I followed one of A. K.'s men after
leaving the office and saw him go in here so that
I thought I'd better have you come down."
"Good girl Pat, Faith and if ye ain't following
after yer old father," Officer O'Brien answered
and with this the five policemen and Pat entered
the house by forcing the door open.
The tall man Pat had followed met them in the
hall and cried indignantly. "Say, what's the idea?"
"Never mind what the idea is but take that rod
out of your coat pocket and stick those mitt's
ofyour's up in the air," said one of the men. The
other four men scattered in all directions leaving
Pat and one officer in the hall.
"A nice little place you've got here, "said the
officer. "Crovs sure live in style nowadays, hey
Pat? Looks like you rounded up Kopolini's gang
all by yourself Pat. Ole Flannisgan sure will be
proud of you."
"I hope so Mike," Pat said with a smile.
The tall man made a move to escape. "Quiet
down big-boy, I've got you covered," the officer
cried quickly stepping forward.
There was a fight going on upstairs now but
after ten or fifteen minutes the noise quieted and
the men came down stairs with six rough looking
fellows in handcuffs. "Got the whole gang this
time. Kopolini included" and O'Brien jerked
his thumb at a fat greasy Italian who glowered
at them fiercely.
"Take 'em to the station, boys. Pat, that was a
mighty fine job. Look's like yer following in yer
old man's footsteps," O'Brien said.
Pat followed the men out and went to the station.
"Well, Flannigan," said O'Brien addressing
a red-faced Irishman sitting at the desk of the
chief, "Yer daughter just rounded up Kopolin's
gang.
"Just Irish luck, Dad, wasn't it?" Pat exclaim-
ed, with a grin.
"Yes, Patty, darlin', and a dirty Irish trick at that."







THE CARIBBEAN 59


THE YOUNGEST OF FOUR.
Rebecca Brydon, '73
I have only two dresses that were really and
truly bought for me. Where did I get the others?
My three big sisters gave them to me. The dresses
are all out of style, of course, or my sisters would
still be wearing them. Every time I ask mother
what I shall wear she says, "That blue one of
Ruth's, or the pink one of Mary's, or that yellow
one of Susan's." The dressmaker comes for a
week every spring and fall just to make over the
old things for me. I hate her. She always says,
"What a lucky girl you are to have so many big
sisters." If she only knew how I hate those
dresses!
My sisters are always getting tired of their shoes
and hats. But do I get them? I should say not!
"Why, of course, you can't wear those high heels!"
says mother, or, "Those hats are much too old
for you." Then she sends me shopping with Ruth,
Mary, or Susan and I come home with the ugliest
shoes and hats in the whole town. Not one of
them will let me buy what I want.
But I am fifteen now and even if my sisters
don't get married and leave me in peace I am
going to get a job as soon as I'm through school.
I am going to spend all of my first check for
dresses that I like, slippers with high heels, and
hats that don't look so "sweet and girlish."

OVERHAUL OF GATUN LOCKS.
Jean Pruit, '32.
The thing that put Panama on the map, the
thing that makes tourists stop here, the thing that's
first thought of when Panama is mentioned is-
The Panama Canal.
Like all good things it will soon wear out if not
kept in proper repair. There are three sets of
locks and to keep them in shape each is repaired
once every four years. It has been my good
fortune to live near the Gatun Locks while they
were being overhauled in 1931.
The repairing of the locks is done in dry season.
There are two sides to the locks and to distinguish
them I shall call one side east, the other side west.
The east side was repaired first. All the water
was emptied out to prepare the chamber for the
workmen. The water was then emptied out of
the next chamber. The bottom of the last cham-
ber is below sea level and had to be pumped out.
New parts, cranes, tools, electrical appliances were


piled on both sides ready for use. Men, workers,
hurrying to and fro, spectators crowding around
in and out of the worker's way, noises that make
you think of the boiler shop, issued forth from the
east side while this remarkable project was being
made new again.
On the other hand while the west side was being
repaired the east side had to keep the traffic going.
While the West side had to be repaired the east
side has to work day and night to carry on. Of
course, when the west side was finished the tables
were turned and the other side worked day and
night.
Thus that marvelous and incredible engineering
feat, The Panama Canal, is kept repaired without
stopping or delaying the regular traffic.

OVER THE HORIZON.
Beverly Dunn, '32.
The long, narrow harbor resounded with the
shouts of men and the chug-chug of a donkey en-
gine, as barrels of salt meat, boxes of biscuits,
reels of line, and innumerable boxes of salt were
lifted off the dock, transported through the air,
and deposited in the hold of a large, black schooner.
Men hung like spiders in the rigging, exchanging
black, worn ropes for new yellow ones and repair-
ing blocks and tackles; painters hung at the sides,
at the bow, stern, and every other place a painter
could hang, while from far down inside came the
sound of hammers and saws; even the steer-
ing tackle was being repaired. Finally all was
finished, the last painter had left, the carpenters
had gathered up their tools and gone home, the
hatches had been nailed down and the doves
nested. Before the paint had time to dry the men
were aboard, sailors and greenhorns, tall men and
short, men with bags and men with chests, and
several without either who were leaving port until
some little mistakes had blown over.
Two hours later the harbor echoed with songs
and yells as the schooner hauled up her bow an-
chor; a minute more she hung on her stern hook,
her bow headed toward the sea. Up came the
stern line, up went the jib, up the fore and main-
sails, up went the main topsail and down went
the lee sail as the wind caught her and off went
the schooner bound for the banks of Newfound-
land. A minute later and two other stout vessels
followed her. In a line they tacked out to sea,
vanished over the horizon and were never seen
again.








60 THE CARIBBEAN


ULY.
Rebecca Brydon, '33.


Our maid's name is "Uly". We had a terrible
time at first getting used to it. My brother called
her "Hoolie," my father called her 'Julie." There
are times when mother says she thinks her name
should be "Mulie" as she acts so dumb.
Uly rarely speaks unless she is spoken to, and
then ninety-nine times out of a hundred she says
"All right." When breakfast is ready in the morn-
ing she comes to our door and says "All right."
When lunch is ready she rings the bell and says
in a loud voice, "All right," and she does the
same for dinner. When mother tells her how to
do something she says "All right." When she is
ready to go home at night she comes to the
kitchen door and says "All right." She can say
a few sentences, though. Some of her most com-
mon expressions are, "It don't hot yet," "Do
you want this to starch," "Do you think this
will eat," and "Must I do thesmoothin' to-day?"


One day I called my home on the telephone
and said "Hello, this is Rebecca"-"Rebecca
not here" came the answer. I repeated it again;
the same answer came, and bang went the re-
ceiver. Another day I called and asked "Is my
sister there?" She repeated, "What you said?"
three times and bang went the receiver. Mother
is the only person to whom she will listen on the
telephone.
The funniest thing about Uly is her hair. She
has fifteen little plats, each about three inches
long, and when she gets excited they stick up
straight. She hasn't any front teeth.
We will miss her when she goes home to Ja-
maica to see her "Mudder" as she calls her. We
don't know when she's going because she will
not have enough money until she wins the lot-
tery. To win the lottery is her chief ambition in
life.


THE SENIOR MODELS.


Eugenia McLain's-
Celeste Clarke's ...
Marie Kleefkens's.
Aloha Slocum's
Marion Neely's ...
Ruth Duval's........
Margaret Davis'
Anna Ryan's ..
Barbara Weick's
Velma Hall's...........
Bettina Powers'....
Clara Frisk's..........
Vinnie Elson's
Dorothy Wirtiz's....
Mary E. Moore's..
Thomas Pescod's.
George Wertz's ....


Feet.
Legs.
Shape.
Clothes.
Hair.
Voice.
Mouth.
Eves.
Smile.
Teeth.
Vocabulary-
Height.
Intellect.
Reserve.
Personality.
Dimples.
Smile.


Fabian Englander's ....
Richard Wood's...........
Ronald Philpotts'-.....
Parker Hanna's...........
Chubby Hackett's ....
Ernest Berger's ......
Edward Conkling's.....
Kenneth Maurer's ....
Ben Williams'.........
Crawford Campbell's.
Ray Will's........
Demetra Lewis'.........
Bill Bailey's..............
Jack K elly's.............
Russell Elwel's .......
Percy Lyew's ------
Carlos Rankin's .........


Height.
Physique.
Hair.
Tan.
Eyes.
Glasses.
Appetite.
Hat.
Business-like way.
Intellect.
Clothes.
Southern drawl.
Sax appeal.
Wit.
Mischief.
Ambitions.
Personality.


Christ Church By-the-Sea


I,&







THE CARIBBEAN (il







THE CARIBBEAN


SENIOR PARTY.
Mc Bern, '31

To keep up their tradition of giving "different"
parties, the Senior Class on November 25, 1930,
gave a barn dance at the Masonic Temple.
Through this informal affair, the Freshmen
were introduced into High School social life. Re-
gardless of the danger of hay-fever a unique pro-
gram for the entertainment of "farmers" and
farmerettess" was presented and thoroughly
enjoyed. Pete Wardlaw '32, and Carlos Rankin,
'31, won the prize fox-trot, and costume prizes
were awarded to Aloha Slocum '31, Celeste Clarke
Powell '31, and Richard Stoudnor '34, (of Balboa
High School).



SOPHOMORE DANCE.
Maxine Andrew., '33.

On February twenty-seventh, the sophomores
held their class dance at the Hotel Washington.
Edna Thirwall and Dick Wood were given
attractive prizes for waltzing, Pete Wardlaw
and Freddie Pescod won the fox trot prizes. Mandy
Marchosky excelled as master of ceremonies.
The success of the evening was due a great deal
to the excellent music furnished by Dwyer's
orchestra.



FRESHMAN HOP.
Richard Reinhold, '34.

The foggy upperclassmen were coming to see
how well their "most delightful colleagues" could
entertain, and to try to enjoy themselves at the
Freshman Hop given at the Hotel Washington
on April seventeenth. They were de-fogged as
the dance proved to be quite lively.
The outstanding event of the evening was the
Grand March, led by Elizabeth Hayes and Louie
Barnett. Prizes for the most interesting costumes
were presented to Elizabeth Wirtz, '32, and Ches-
ter Wirtz, '34. They were both dressed in typical
Dutch costumes. Charles Gould, '33, was given
the prize for the funniest costume.


A most interesting feature was the tenth dance,
a prize Fox-Trot. After much consideration,
Rebecca Brydon, '33, and Carlos Rankin, '31,
were awarded the prizes.
Everybody agreed that it was the most success-
ful and enjoyable dance of the year.



SENIOR PLAY "JONESY."

Marion E. Neely, '31.

Before one of the largest crowds ever assembled
for a students, production, Cristobal High School
presented the Senior play "Jonesy". Directed
and cast by Robert G. Noe, Director of Drama-
tics at the high school, the play itself was good
and the acting excellent. The cast was picked
according to type and it was a perfect job. Miss
Mary Moore, Senior Class adviser and staff spon-
sor, was also invaluable in line rehearsal and many
other ways.
The cast is as follows:
Anne-the intellectual sister, Ruth Duvall.
Mildred Ellis-the jealous ex-fianc6, Marion
Neely.
Mrs. Henry Jones-the hysterical mother,
Barbara Wieck.
First Plumber-Carlos Rankin.
Second Plumber-Demetra Lewis.
Henry Jones-the father, a prominent lawyer,
Kenneth Maurer.
Wilbur Jones-the son "Jonesy," Jack Kelly.
Billy Morgan-the college fraternity brother
of Jonesy's, Dick Wood.
Diana Devereaux-the actress, Velma Hall.
Katie-the Irish maid, Bettina Powers.
Stanley Jackson-the business man, Harry
Egolf.
Mr. Silverberg-a travelling salesman, Thomas
Pescod.
Policeman-Edward Conkling.
Everyone connected with the play in any way
was thrilled to see such a large turnout. The
place was packed to the doors, not an empty seat
and many extra ones added along the sides of the
"movie" hall.







THE CARIBBEAN


It was advertised as a good show-people came
to see one-and they got more than they asked.
From the beginning to the end every joke was
thoroughly appreciated by the audience and this
made the cast work harder than ever.
Ruth Duval, as Anne, was a knockout and
took her part perfectly. She exasperated Kate
and Billy both with her "horn-rimmed spectacles"
and her "big words." And it was only proper that
such a good character should open this side-split-
ting comedy.
Mildred Ellis, taken by Marion Neely, tried
to put everybody in his place with her sarcasm,
and slams, but only succeeded in doing that little
thing to herself and making the audience laugh
at her every sentence. Her gold-digging ways
finally captivated Billy.
Mrs. Jones, one of the really hard parts in the
whole cast was played by Barbara Weick and her
shreiks, cries, and deep emotions from the wor-
ries of "glorious" motherhood amused the crowd
beyond words. With the "paper hangers in the
dining room" and the plumbers, and Billy and
Wilbur and the car, besides the near escape of the
dreadful "mesaliance" were only part of her
troubles.
The plumbers, by Carlos Rankin and Demetra
Lewis, who get an inside view on the Jones family
and who are surprised by the treat Mrs. Jones
gave them, took their parts well, and gave their
slams to Wilbur very much as plumbers might.
Henry Jones as portrayed by Kenneth MIaurer
was a riot. A prominent lawyer "after slaving
for forty years of his life" finds out that life still
has its kicks and troubles and sins. With his
reminescences, his business engagement with
Stanley Jackscn, and with Wilbur as a son, Ken-
neth took the part and with it almost took down
the house. He had a most difficult role and
only as a member of the class of "31" could, he
was Henry Jones.
Wilbur, as the hero, acted by Jack Kelly, also
deserves much praise for his portrayal which was
excellent. Nothing more need be said, but that
he was the real hero.
Dick Wood as one of "The Morgans of De-
troit" was great, and even up to the last act, wet
and squelched-he kept the thought in your mind
that his father "shakes down about three million
dollars a year out of stoves." But he finally weak-
ens and falls for Mildred Ellis.


Diana Devereaux, the actress, was taken by a
girl who did her work so-well that one might be able
to say that she was an actress truly, instead of a
Senior. As a character, she stood out in the play
and helped to make the production such a suc-
cess as it was.
Bettina Powers, startled the folks with the Irish
brogue of the maid-Katie. This was a very
amusing part and most cleverly taken.
Stanley Jackson, the businessman, was por-
trayed by Harry Egolf. We commend the Junior
Class on loaning us such a good character, for so
unusual was this part, that Harry had to take it.
Mr. Silverberg or Tommy Pescod, the travelling
salesman, was a scream, with his odd speech and
accent. His act was one of the high spots in the
play.
The policeman taken by Edward Conkling was
excellent. His scene with the rest and the sudden
entrance in the last act was really hard but Eddie
put it over big.
With such a good choice of characters could the
play be anything but great from the beginning?
With all the situations that arise and the com-
plications that set in, we believe it to be the best
high school play ever produced on the Isthmus.
The music department showed its generosity
and talent by playing selections between acts
and before the play started. The high school
appreciated the work Miss Elner is doing and
how she has made the orchestra such a good one
as it is.
Much credit is due Mr. Noe, Miss Moore, Mr.
Sawyer, Miss Elner and the general public for
turning out and sponsoring this play and the high
school feels that the Seniors gave you your
money's worth.



"OUR CARNIVAL."
M.larwn E. Xecd, 'Ti.

The Carnival this year was held at Fort Davis
through the courtesy of Col. Gohn, Commanding
Officer of that Post. It was a most successful one,
and really enabled the Class of '31 to secure the
necessary money for the printing of the Caribbean.
Each class had a separate booth on the parade
grounds, and the Home Econcn.ics Department
had a refreshment stand. Also there were gypsies,







64 THE CARIBBEAN


fortune tellers and other entertainments for the
huge crowd that came to support such a great
affair.
The Revue added much to the attractions;
and the dance held in the gym was well attended.
We have to thank for the success of the Carni-


val, the following: Colonel Gohn, Captain Elson,
Captain J. M.Stewart, Mr. Robert Noe, Miss
Mary Betty Moore, Mr. W. A. Sawyers, Mr.
Robert Neely, Mr. Chas. Klunk, Mr. H. C. Davis
and also the general public and the entire personnel
of Fort Davis for their generous support.


CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL DEBATING CLUB.
Celeste Clarke, '31.


The Debating Club is one of the most important
clubs of the High School. This is the third year
of its organization, and it has grown to be the
pride of the school. Due to our sponsor, Miss
Kimbro, a great deal of intellectual work is ac-
complished in this club. The meetings are held
every other Tuesday in the library.
The Debating Team of 1929-30, consisting
of Affirmative, William Harmon and Celeste
Clarke, Negative, Alice Henter and Carlos Ran-
kin, defeated Balboa's respective teams in the
first interscholastic debate held May 27, 1930.
The question, Resolved: "That the past record
of Prohibition justifies its continuance," was one
that caused a great deal of competition, and was
very interesting.


Due to an unnecessary disagreement in ques-
tions, no debate has yet been scheduled with Bal-
boa for this season.
OFFICERS.
President. .................... Carlos Rankin
Secretary-Treasurer........... Celeste Clarke
Librarian ..--..............-- Marion E. Neely
Chairman -............. Crawford Campbell
Sponor .. .............Miss Gladys Kimbro

MEMBERS.
Carlos Rankin, Marion Neely, Celeste Clarke,
Fabian Englander, Crawford Campbell, John
Kelly, Beverly Dunn, Thomas Murphy, Max-
ine Andrews, Ernest de la Ossa, and Joe Neilson.







THE CARIBBEAN


C. H. S. GLEE CLUBS


THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT.
Tlrie -Neev,/ '-32.


The decision of the authorities to give a special
music teacher to the Atlantic side, has contri-
buted much to the development of the music de-
partment. Here we introduce Miss Elner, who
is talented and shows interest in every detail of
this work. She not only shows interest herself,
but tends to acquire the interest of the student too.
For the first time we have the course of Theory
and Harmony, an interesting study of the theory of
music and training of the ear for classical composi-
tions. This is really a study of harmony and theory,
combined with the course of Music Appreciation.
The orchestra is doing a great work this year,
and as interest is a very important factor in an
organization like this, Miss Elner again shows her
talent, not only in music, but in gaining the pupils'


attention. The orchestra has a third period dur-
ing school hours, but the students of that organi-
zation were not satisfied with the short time, and
agreed to met weekly an hour after school. They
have appeared at the Woman's Club, Parents'
Visiting Day at school, and also at the reception
give in honor of the Hon. Mr. Denison.
The Glee Clubs are also very important this
year, having appeared several times, and the big
event yet to come. Our operetta will show that
the local talent here is above the average. But not
only the glee clubs took interest here, but the
whole school turned out for the operetta try-
outs, and the success of the affair, we feel, now
depends largely on the cooperation of the students
with the teacher and director.


C. H. 8. ORCHESTRA







THE CARIBBEAN


1*vT


SPANISH CLUB.
.Vlary Deanx, '352.


This year Mrs. Phyllis Spencer introduced the
Spanish Club into Cristobal High School. Much
enthusiasm has been shown by the students in
this new organization.
Mrs. Spencer's object was to see if we would be
able to obtain a chapter or auxiliary chapter in
one of the National Fraternities.
In the beginning 12 charter members were
chosen. After the Club had been organized, the
rules and regulations made, officers elected, all
pupils having an average of 90 for their 6 weeks
work nere eligible.
This Club not only gives encouragement to


pupils in their studies, but it also promotes a
friendly feeling between the Spanish and English
speaking peoples. I know that all the students
are thankful to Mrs. Spencer for organizing it,
and even if she shoulH leave I'm sure that we
would all do our best to keep up the good work
that she has started.
The officers are:
President ..-.-.................------ Mary Deans
Vice-Pres ......................-...........M argaret Davis
Secretary ..-.............. --. ...... Eleanor Reinhold
Treasurer ......... .... .........- Dona Eaton
Ayudante ......-..--........-........-Percy Lyew


FRESHMAN DRAMATIC CLUB.
JIary lirginia Hearne, '34.


The Effe Klub, which is the first Dramatic
Club in Cristobal Hi, was organized at the be-
ginning of the school year by the incoming class.
The founders thought it would be a good idea, in
order to hold the interest of the me-nbers, to
involve the meetings in secrecy and mystery and
give the club the unique name which it now bears.
This attempt at secrecy is the reason why the
uppzr classmen did not know of our club until
several months ago, when we were prepared to
present a play.
We knew that in order to draw a crowd we must
have publicity; it was then that we suddenly
revealed ourselves to the public in general.


"The Revolt", a one act comedy, was given
April 10th at the Y.W.C.A. The cast and Mrs.
Spencer deserve credit for making the play a
success and also for making enough money for
our page in "The Caribbean."
Since then the club has been studying story
telling and pantomine and the members have
shown such a remarkable interest and loyalty to-
ward the club that we hope we may be able to
carry on during our Sophomore, Junior and Senior
years, and leave as a heritage to the classes that
follow us another really worthwhile organization
in C. H. S.






THE (CArIBBEAN


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THE CARIBBEAN


THE GIRL RESERVE SUPPER CLUB.
Mlarion Neely/, '31.


The purpose of the Cristobal Girl Reserve Sup-
per Club is "To make to-morrow better than to-
day."
Our club has thirty-five members. Regular
meetings are held once a month, as are Cabinet
meetings. One extra meeting for special activities
is generally held monthly also.
The chief interests in the Supper Club are:
Summer Camp at Morro Island.
Mid-winter Girl Reserve Conference.
Service work in the community.
Promoting school spirit.


National Girl Reserve Conference in Pennsyl-
vania.
The officers of the Club are:
Presidenl-Margaret Davis, '31.
Vice-President-Nell Wardlaw, '32.
Secretary--Mayno Bliss, '34.
Treasurer-Aloha Slocum, '31.
Other Cabinet officers are:
Marion Neely, '31.
Gladys Bliss, '32.
Alicia Thirlwall, '32.
Maxine Andrews, '33.


O. G. A. CLUB








THE CAIIBBEAN


0. G. A.
.l ,i ,,i, l'. .. ,'e ., '!1.


Order of Gregg Artists was organized in Cris-
tobal High School, the first of its kind on the
Isthmus. Its purpose is to develop the interest
in shorthand among lthe advanced comnnercial
students. The club is in connection with the
"Gregg Writers" and the members have partici-
pated in contests in that magazine.

The officers of this club are:


I ~n',i~A',z/


[a/ia


Anna Rvan
Ciara Frisk
5Mar1,n I. Neelv
Edward Co1iklinm
ss I elen T. Patterson


Other members arc: Iugenia McLain, Marie
Kleefkens, Celeste ( larke I Pwell. Nlariaret
)Davis, Ruth Duval, and Dorothy Wirtz.


THE BOYS' ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION.
Char/c-. e., od, '33.


The Boys' Athletic Association of 1950-,1
has been one of the most successful organizations
in school this year. The first meeting was held
September 14, 1930, in which one hundred I boys
were present.

The election of officers was the most important
incident of the meeting. The officers elected were
as follows:
President ........ Thomas Pescod
I ire-President Randolnh W\jkinestad


Secretary
Treasurer
Sport Editor


Charles Pescod
Ra mond \ill
. l Edward Conkling


The organization is under the chief athletic


coach, Mr. Johnson, who has to this day handled
the bhoys to perfection.
It has been for the first time in Cristobal Hilgh
School that a B.A. A. has been under rules and
by-laws, or in other words, a constitution. In
all the activities that Cristobal has competed
against Balboa they have made a wonderful
showing w which, of course, most of the credit
should lIe given to the coaches: Johnson. I ackett.
Vinton, and Seiler.
The B..\ A. AofCristobal Iligh School wishes to
express its gratitude to the new men teachers
of Cristobal ligh for the work they spent in de-
veloping good athletic teams. and hope that they
will be here in Cristobal the coming year.








THE CARIBBEAN


GIRLS' ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION.
Elizabeth Hayes, '34.


The Girls' Athletic Association of Cristobal
High School of 1930-31 has just completed one of
the most successful seasons in girls' sports that
it has known for years. The Association of forty
members holds its meetings weekly under the
supervision of Miiss Barbara Bailey, the girls'
coach. The following were elected officers: Velma
Hall, President: Gladys Bliss, Vice-President;


Dorothy Birkeland, secretary; and Elizabeth
Hayes, Treasurer.
Emblems are awarded to the girls who earn
them. At the end of the year the school letter
of purple and gold is awarded to those having the
required number of emblems. The girls feel that
the Association has done much toward their suc-
cess in sports and hope that it will be even more
successful in the coming year


A TROPICAL SUNSET


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THE CARIBBEAN 71
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72 THE CARIBBEAN


Miss ELIZABETH HAYES '34
Queen of Carnival, 1931







74 THE CARIBBEAN


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MOST CONSISTENT
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TIHII ('ARIBBEIAN


,dck c-x


SOCCER
We can consider our third year of
soccer a very successful one even
though we did lose the pennant to
Balboa. Many of the last year's play-
ers were again on the team of '51.
The team this year was composed oft
the following players:
C,.G',tobal
E. Conklini, Goalkeeper
R. Wood, R. Fullback
K. Maurer, L. Fullback
T. Pescod (Capt.), C. Halfback
C. Rankin, L. Halfback
M. Wheeler, R. Halfback
R. W il.m.. .t1. L. E.
B. Hackett, L. Forward
C. Pescod, C. Forward
M. Marchosky, R. Forward
T. Rankin. R. E.
R. Will, R. Forward
A. Forstrom, L. Forward
Balboa
W. Chochez, Goalkeeper
J. Gelabert, Goalkeeper
Our first game was played November
8, 1930, on our home grounds and we
were successful in holding the strong
Balboa team to a 5-5 tie. We held
our owni during the first half of the
game, but they led us 2-0 at the end.
T. Pescod, our captain, shifted from
the defense to the offensive line and
from then on it was our game or no-
body's game. Fields. Dew and De la
Pena made all of the goals for Balboa,
whiile T. Pescod made two and C.
Pescod made the other goal for our
side. The whole team played a good
game and the five men in the defense
line should be given a great deal of
credit for their wonderful work in
keeping the ball down in Balboa's
territory during the latter part of the
game.

The second game was played at
Balboa the following week and we
came out on the long end of the score
5-4. It was anybody's game right up
to the last whistle. At the end of the
first half, the score was 2-3 in favor


BOYS' ATHIlETICS
Thowia, Plco. TI
of Balboa. Both our goals were kicked
by C. Pescod during the first hall and
he also added another one in the last
hall while the other two were made
ty T. Pescod and T. Rankin. D)ur-
ing tile second half the Balboa players
found that they had run against a
stone wall, because our defense only let
one hall get through for a goal. R.
Wood and K. Mlaurer played a grad
game at fullbacks. They continually
kept sending the [ball down the fielt
on long distance flights. R. \Viking-
stad and B. Hackett played a tlne
game on the offensive itle.

The third game was altogether a1
different type of game. Bialboa came
over here with revenge in their eyes.
They beat us 11-4. They out-played
us in all stages of the game and during
the first half made seven goals to our
one. But during the second half wxc
held our own, they made four goals
and we made three. There \\ere no
individual stars in this game hibt loe
Satterio and M. Dew of Balllbo need
special mention because tlhexy scored
four and three goals respectively.
(Our goals were made by T. Pcscod--
2. T. Rankin-1, and At. Hackett- 1.

The last and final game of tie series'
was played on Balboa's ground w here
they proved they were superior to us
in this game by defeating us )( 2.
At the end of half game the score ,as
4-2 in B1alboa's fa or. They made
their goals on passes from Booth to
Fields, and Fields also made itio nice
shots from the corner s of the lie'd.
T. Pescod made one goda on .1 pass
from T. Rankin. During the sec ond
half of the game neither team scored
till the last five minutes of pli:y. Dur-
ing the first twenty-five minutes of
this half mian times both teams came
within scoring distance tbut they lacked
tile punch that was necessary. There
will be many new faces in the line-up
for next year because the following
players will leave school in June; R.


Wood. K. Malurer. E. Coklding, T.
Pescod, C. Rankin. 1. lackett, and R.
W ill.
BASI' I\l L,
Our liasIeball season started off withi
i bang. Mr. ohnson, lour coach,
.ailed for candidates from all of tilhe
:lasses in High School and thirty-
six fellows answered tie call. FIour
caiis were organized t t find out what
kind of material there were, from
which lie could pick a team. Aft. er a
'ek% games the following players were
picked to rereesent Cristobal High
School against Balboa H igh and also
in the Tw\ilight League:
T. Pescod C. Pescod
R- WiVkingstad 11. Egolf
B. Satders 1. Ebdon
MI. Marchosky R. Wood
E. Conkling K. Maurer
H. Will
The first game of tlie Cristbal
Highi School series was played on our
home ground Saturday, Januilary 17.
1951. We won tile came Ib downing
Balboa 10-5. This was the first
a.ine we have won from them iin three
ears. Loose fielding on the part of
thie Balboa team aud slugging by the
boys from Cristolal featured the game.
K'lii Miaurer, on the mound for Cris-
toblal had things pretty much his own
miay during the game. Hisl team gave
him an early lead to work on and
tielded well behind hiim. Ml.iurer
struck out nine batters anid allo ed
but five scattered hit-.
Vien, the Balboa txwier, allowed
ten hits and fanned nine Ibatters. He
had trouble control!incg his curve bail.
walking four batltis and hitting tio.
C. Pescod was the hitting. star of the
game getting four htis out ofl lie li nm'
at b:it. Stotdner's three ,ase hit in the
third inning w s. tlie lonu est hit iif tile
game.
InI the first inning V 1I walked
killing the bases. With Maurer at
bat, Egolf stole second only to find tliit
one of his team-mates was there ahead
of him. Wertz wsas on third at the


/fr
~








THE CARIBBEAN


time and he tried to draw the throw
to save Egolf. In this he was success-
ful, but he had to sacrifice himself to
save the other runner.
The Balboa team made eight errors,
four of which were charged to D.
Stoudner. Dick is usually a depend-
able fielder, but he was way off form.
Errors accounted for the three runs
scored by Balboa, not one of the runs
being earned.
The fielding masterpiece of the
game was made by C. Pes-od in the
fifth inning when he went over the
left field foul line to take De la Pena's
long foul fly.
We started the ball rolling in the
first half of the first, scoring four runs
on three hits and two walks. We
added two more in the last of the second
on two hits. Neither team scored
again until the seventh and in that
inning Balboa broke the ice making
three counters on two hits. We finish-
ed the game the way we started by
making four runs in the eighth inning.

The second game of the series was
played January 24, at Balboa Stadium.
We got the surprise of our life when
we came out with the short end of the
score. They beat us 7-6.
A double to left field in the tenth
inning by Vien sent De La Pena across
the plate for the winning run.
Vien of Balboa, and C. Pescod of
Cristobal walked seven men apiece.
Vien was touched for nine hits while
his team-mates made six errors. Cris-
tobal committed five errors while
Pescod allowed six hits.
Neither team scored in the first
inning. In the first of the second we
pushed our first tally across the plate
on a single, a wild pitch and a passed
ball. Again in the third we scored on
one error and a double. Warwick
walked to start the third for Balboa,
stole second and came home on an er-
ror by the catcher. Runs in the fourth,
fifth and sixth and eighth innings fin-
ished scoring for us. Balboa woke up
in the fourth by scoring two runs. C.
Pescod was wild giving two bases on
balls and hitting one man. Two errors
and a biae on balls netted two more
runs for Balboa in the seventh and one
more run was made in the eighth.
Both teams failed to score in the
ninth. Three men faced Vien in the
tenth: one struck out and the other
two flied out. Specht and McGroarty
fanned in the last half the tenth. With
two down De la Pena reached first
on T. Pescod's error and "Barrel"
Vien, the Balboa portsider, won his
own game by doubling to left.
Both teams played good baseball
during the entire game. Stoudner
accepted ten chances without a boot
at shortstop. T. Pescod accepted nine
chances at third making one error, but
he also made there spectacular catches.

For the first time in three years we
have been able to capture the flag
from Baoa in bablseball. By defeat-
ing the Balboa Hi team in the final


game of the series on their own field
by the score of 7-4 we have won the
right to claim the flag.
Two portsiders were opposed to
each other when hostilities began. Vien,
for Balboa, and Maurer for Cristobal.
Vien failed to go the entire distance
being knocked out of the box in the
eighth frame. Maurer was touched
for ten hits but he showed rare form
when men were on bases.
T. Pescod, our captain, was a tower
of strength to our team. Besides hit-
ting the ball for a trio of safeties he
also stole four bases. R. Wood, of
Cristobal, collected the only extra base
hit of the game when he clouted a long
triple to right in the fifth session.
Barkhurst led the attack for the
Balboa team, getting three hits. D.
Stoudner played an unusually good
game at short accepting nine chances
without a bobble.
ATLANTIC SIDE TWILIGHT LEAGUE
This year the Cristobal Hi School
entered a team in the Twi.ight League.
During the first half they won 12 and
lost 2 for an average of .857.
The results of the games are as fol-


score of 9-4. He got a triple and a
home run out of three times to bat.
T. Pescod allowed five hits and also
walked five men. We got eight hits
off of Sudati, an old Navy pitcher.
Jan. 19. We collected eleven hits
for twelve runs off the offerings of
Griner and Eberenz. T. Pescod allowed
five hits, struck out eight and did not
walk a single man. J. Ebdon and T.
Pescod each got three out of four,
while K. Maurer got a long triple to
right field.
Jan. 22. Ken Maurer set the team
from DeLesseps back 18-0. We scored
12 runs in the second inning. Ken
was in perfect form. Not a man on
the DeLesseps was able to hit him for
even a scratch hit. Only one man
reached first base and this was a walk.
This is the first no-hit, no-run game
this season. Wertz, Marchoskv, C.
Pescod, and Egolf each parked one
across the street for a home run.
Jan. 26. This game was a pitch-
ing duel between K. Maurer and C.
Will of the United Fruit Co. That is
up till the seventh inning when we
scored nine runs on seven hits. Mandi


lows: with a double and a homer led the
Dec. 15. We won the opening High School sluggers. Maurer allow-
game of the Twilight League by de- ed only three hits and fanned six. C.
eating the United Fruit Co. to the
tune of 7-4. Maurer allowed them Pescod robbed Ed. Lowande of a home
only four hits while the Hi School was run when he crossed the street to gather
making seven off C. Will. This is a in his bid for a hit. The scorewas 10-3.
fine start.
Dec In thisgame C. Pescod Jan. 29. We again lost to the Au-
Dec. 18. In this game C. Pescod
made his debut as a pitcher in the tomats the only team able to defeat
Twilight League. We beat DeLesseps us during the first half of the Twi-
by the score of 8-1. Wood and Egolf light League. They beat us 1-0. They
hit home runs. scored when Marchosky failed to touch
Dec. 22. Ken Maurer in this game
with the Post Office allowed only one Trout coming home; thinking it was
hit while his team mates were scoring two down he threw to first. C. Pescod
six runs on four hits that they got allowed six hits and walked, home.
off of Daily of the Clerks. Maurer Feb. 1. The Postal Clerks sure
fanned 11 of the Postal players. e
Dec. 29. Behind the pitching of gave us the surprise of our life when
T. Pescod we beat the R. F. A. by the they came within one run of tying us
score of 6-3. Besides pitching a good in the last game of the first half. We
game he led us in the hitting honors by 3. he got one
getting two out of three. Tom allowedinally eat them They got one
them five hits and whiffed five men. hit off of C. Pescod and we only got
Jan. 5. We lost our first game of three hits off of Daily. R. 'W iing-
the season to the Automats when they stad made two of the three hits off of
defeated us 7-6. They scored three Dai, but the Clerks made six errors.
runs in the last inning. Ken Maurer a
on the mound for us fanned twelve SECOND HALF OF THE LEAGUE
telephone men and allowed twelve Feb. 4. We opened the second half
hits. Wertz for the Hi School got 2
hits out of 2 trips to the plate. of the Twilight League by defeating
Jan. 8. We again succeeded in the Post Office to the tune of 17-2. C.
defeating the Fruit Co. and this time Pescod allowed them one hit, he
by the score of 2-0. C. Pescod allow- struck out 11. During this game we
ed them three hits and walked four.
He also got two hits out of three trips stole eleven bases and T. Pescod got
to the plate, one of them being a triple, four of them. T. Pescod and C. Pescod
Jan. 12. C. Pescod only allowed connected for double.
the Postal Clerks one hit. We got four
hits off of Daily and six runs. Daily Feb. 10. The R. & F. A. took us
struck out fourteen and Pescod whiffed in by the score of 9-2. We could only
eleven. T. Pescod got two hits one get two hits off of Griner and these
of them being a double with the bases came in the last inning, The game
loaded.
Jan. 15. Wertz led the High School was fine for about three or four innings
when we heat the Automats by the and then they began to get on Tommy.








THE CARIBBEAN


Paine for the R. & F. A. hit one of
Tom's fast balls for a home run.
Feb. 12. We finally came out of our
losing streak by beating the Auto-
mats 16-0. We made sixteen runs on
sixteen hits. R. Wikingstad making
four out of the sixteen. T. Pescod
and K. Maurer each connected for a
circuit clout.
Feb. 18. Maurer turned the Ba-
nanamen back by the score of 6-3.
Mauler allowed seven hits, walked
one batter, while we got seven hits
of Will and he also walked five men.
Maurer also led the High School for
hitting honors, getting two out of three.
Feb. 20. We held the strong
R. & F. A. team to a 4-4 tie for eight
innings before the game was called on
account of darkness. C. Pescod, our
vest pocket edition, pitched the whole
game for us allowing the Checkers
six hits. J. Ebdon made two hits
out of three times at bat.
Feb. 24. Ken Maurer, blanked the
Automats by fhe score of 9-0. They only
got two hits, while Maurer struck out
eight and walked one, Pierce and Kelly
allowed the High School five hits. They
made three errors of which two were
charged to Al. Days. R. Wood carried
off the hitting honors of the day.
Mar. 3. We trounced the R. &
F. A. by the score of 12-7. We col-
lected a dozen hits off of Griner and
they got eight off C. Pescod. They
also made an even dozen errors while
we made four. R. Wood held the hit-
ting honors of the day, getting threg
out of four trips to the plate, one gone
for a homer.
Mar. 5. We again were able to
trounce the Automats and this ti.ne
by the score of 12-1. Ken Maurer
allowed four scattered hits, striking
out eight. He was a little wild, walk-
ing five men. C. Pescod was the
hitting star of the game. He got two
homers iu two consecutive times at
bat. T. Pescod also connected with one
of Pierce's fast ones for a home run.
Mar. 7. The United Fruit Co.
again sent us down to defeat by the
score of 7-1. We got three hits off of
Daily while they made seven runs
on nine hits off Maurer. R. Wik-
ingstad made three hits for C. H. S.
Mar. 10. The United Fruit Co.
set us back a frame when they defeated
us by the score of 5-4. C. Pescod allow-
ed five hits and walked two and Will
allowed us three hits and fanned nine


of our men. He also hit a homer with
one on in the second inning. C. Pes-
cod and T. Pescod each got a triple.
Mar. 14. The R. & F. A. handed
us another defeat and this time by
the score of 5-3. K. Maurer allowed
the "Dock Rats" only five hits and
at the same time we only got five hits
off Griner.
Sunday, March 22d, we beat the
United Fruit Company in the final
game of the series by the tune of 4-3.
We only got three hits off Dailey,
the Fruit Co. pitcher, but two of
these went for extra bases. Maurer
and Conkling and Marchosky are the
last three men in the batting order.
During the most of the season it has
been the first four and five men get-
ting all of the hits. The fielding was
ragged on both sides. They only got
five hits off Maurer. By winning this
game we took the title of the Atlantic
Side Twilight League Champions.
TRACK
We held our annual Track Meet
against B.H.S., April 11, 1931, at the
Balboa Stadium. The final score was
39 to 38 in our favor. Hurrah for us.
Balboa High has been practicing for
the past month, while we were no-
tified that we were going to run against
Balboa only the Tuesday before the
meet. I. Dietzer and D. Wood were
the individual stars of the meet. Wood
making 15Y4 points and Dietzer mak-
ing 141, totaling thirty out of our
thirty-nine points. Moise de la Pena
made 10 points for Balboa High. In
the 50-yd. dash J. Dietzer made it in
5 315 seconds, and in the 100-yd
dash R Wood m rte it in 10 3-5 seconds.
F. Banan made a new High School
record in the running high jump. He
made 5'9" for the new record, the
old one being 5'6". The result of the
meet is as follows:
50-yd. Dash
1. J. Dietzer (C) 53-5.
2. M. de la Pena (B).
3. R. Wood (C).
Shot Put
1. J. Donbrosky (B) 42'113/
2. R. \Wood (C).
3. T. Pe;-od (C).
NEW RECORD
880-yd Run.
1. F. Birch (B) 2.18 1-5.
2. C. Pescod (C).
3. R. Cleveland (C).


220-yd. Dash.
1. J. Dietzer (C) 24.
2. M. de la Pena (B).
3. C. Rankin (C).
880 Relay.
Won by Cristobal Team. 1.41 4-5.
R. Wood, M. Marchosky, C. Rankin
and Deitzer.
The result of our inter-class meet
in track events held at Fort Davis on
April 9 is as follows:
100-yd. Dash
1. Wood 10 4-5.
2. Deitzer.
3. Rankin.
Half Mile
1. C. Pescod 2:37 4-5.
2. Kelly.
3. Marchosky.
50-yd. Dash
1. Deitzer 6.
2. Wood.
3. Rankin.
Running Broad Jump
1. T. Pescod, 16.11.
2. Wood, 16.4.
3. Hackett, 16.
220-yd. Dash
1. Deitzer, 28 2-5.
2. Woad.
3. Rankin.
Shot Put
1. Pescod, 39.10.
2. Wood, 39.9.
3. Conkling 39.8.
Out of a total of sixty-four points
the Senior Class took forty-five of
those points with three first places,
five seconds, and five third places.
The Juniors, who took second place,
had thirteen points, all made by the
same runner. J. Deitzer took two
first places and one second place.
The individual high score men of the
meet were D. Wood '31 who made 14
points and J. Deitzer '32 who made 13
points for his class.
GOLF.
This was a new sport that was in-
troduced into this school this year
and though we lost to Balboa we put
up a very stiff fight. They beat us
about 12 points. C. Pescod, our Cap-
tain, was the player with the lowest
score. The teams were as follows:
Cristobal.
C. Pescod
B. Dunn
M. Duey
H. Keenan
A. Forstrom








84 THE CARIBBEAN

r


Balboa
J. Warwick
B. Messer
B. Adams
M. Huertematte
M. Sanford.
The first game was. played at the
Gatun Golf Club, and the second
game which never did materialize
was supposed to be played on the
Amador Course.


SWIMMING.
This year a lot of interest was taker
in swimming. Four teams were formed
to see what material they had to pick a
first string swimming team. The four
teams were the "Eels", "Shrimps",
"Baracudas", and the "Blue Streaks";
The following members were on the
teams:
EeLr Shrimps
H. Smith-c B. Hackett-c


FOOTBALL. T. Pescod E. Conkling
Mr. Johnson, our athletic super- C. Kariger J. Sinclair
visor, and also the most popular teach- E. Berger J. Kelly
er in High School, tried his luck in the L. Cotton C. Berger
line of football in this school. He had J. Nielson T. Murphy
the Seniors and Sophomores, play H. Lee V. Davis
against the Freshmen and Juniors. C. Campbell R. Will
The Seniors won the first game 12-0. Baracuida Blue Slreakr
Wood and T. Pescod both crossed the C. Campbell-c C. Rankin-c
line for a touchdown in the first quarter. B. Hollowell H. Egolf
C. Pescod and J. Dietzer both played J. Lockwood F. Washabough
an exceptionally good game for the A. Forstrom C. Pescod
Juniors and Frosh. M. Wheeler B. Wheeler
We played another game and again C. Horine M. Marchosky
the Seniors were victorious 6-0. In B. Dunn R. Wood
the last minute of play T. Pescod A. Lyew R. Wikingstad
catches a long forward pass from D. The "Blue Streaks" won the meet,
Wood. He was instantly tackled by but much competition was shown in the
R. \V.I.,,,.t ,.1 but he fell across the different races. B. Hackett won the
line for the winning points. Wood diving, and C. Rankin came in second.
missed the kick after the goal. The following men were picked from


this group to represent C. H. S.
against their rivals, B. H. S.
C. Rankin-c '31 C. Kariger '32
H. Smith '33 H. Egolf'32
B. Hackett '31 B. Hollowell '34
I. Kelly '31 C. Campbell '31
F. Washabough'34 C. Berger '34
Saturday, April 25, Balboa High
School walked away with the meet,
'hat is in points. They made 49Y4,
while we made 412 points. But some
of the races given by our boys were
real close and made the Balboa boys
fight all the harder for their points.
B.H.S. has three boys Brewerton,
Wood, and Westendorf who expect
to take part in the Olympics in 1932.
The result of the swimming meet
between C.H.S. and B.H.S. was as
follows:
50-yd. Da.rh-Boi/.f
1. J. Wood (B).
2. W. Walston (B).
3. B. Brown (B).
Time 25 flat.
This was a close race all the way
from the start to the finish between
J. Wood and Win. Walston. If Wals-
ton would stop smoking and put in
some strenuous practice, I believe
that Wood would not have a chance.


: , ~ PHOTOS Z' Y WMU.-,1
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86 THE CARIBBEAN


50-,d. Dash-GirLr
1. L. Morgan (B).
2. T. Dryden (B).
3. R. Quinn (B).
Time 30.3.
This was Dryden's race till almost
to the finish line, when all of a sudden
L. Morgan gave a sudden sprint that
brought her across the line just a stroke
ahead of Dryden. R. Quinn was not
very far behind either of the two
girls.
100-yd. Dash-Boyys
1. W. Grant (B).
2. J. Wood (B).
3. A. Peterson (B).
Time, 1 3-5.
This was anybody's race until the
very end. Going across the pool both
Grant and Wood looked like one per-
son because they were in perfect uni-
son and A. Peterson was right on their
heels and it was not until the last
moment that Grant was able to
pull ahead of Wood.
100-yd. Dash-Girls
1. H. Hearne (B).
2. J. Halderman (B).
3. S. Pyle (B).
Time, 1.11.1.
This was H. Hearne's race from the
very start. She has a wonderful smooth
stroke that takes her through the
water in a very short time for a girl.
Both J. Halderman and S. Pyle de-
serve credit for their swimming.
50-yd. Breast-Boy.r.
1. W. Westendorf (B).
2. B. Onderdonk (B).
3. R. Romig (B).
Time, 33.3.
Westendorfwas superior in all stages
of this race. It looked like he had
something that he was pulling on and
every time he came out of the water
he used to gain a great deal. Washa-
bough swam a good race for us, but
it was not good enough even to take
third place.
220-yd.-Boy. .
1. H. Brewerton (B).
2. J. Smith (B).
3. C. Hirsh (B).
Time, 2.37.1.
Brewerton was the only one in this
race. He was resting when the race
was over. Smith and Hirsh were
lighting it out with Campbell and H.
Smith of the Gold Side. They just
had a little too much practice, or we
did not have enough, that is the main
reason we did not take a place in this


race, but Harvey Smith with a little
more training will be breaking lines in
swimming races with the best of them.
50-yd. Breast---Girls
1. T. Dryden (B).
2. R. Quinn (B).
3. V. Hall (Cris.)
Time, 43 flat.
Balboa entered two men (I mean
girls) in this race, but if they had en-
tered another she would have had to
been pretty good to take a place. This
was one of the closest races of the day.
Tho' Balboa took two places, V. Hall
of Cristobal was right on their heels
and making them do their best to
beat her. Better luck next time, Hall.
50-yd. Back-Boys
1. B. Crandall (B).
2. J. Wood (B).
3. B. Hollowell (C).
Time, 31.4.
Young B. Hollowell of the Fresh-
man class of Cristobal showed his metal
when he took third place in this event.
B. Crandall took first and J. Wood was
right behind him, but Bill Hollowell
was just a few inches behind Wood.
There was not ten inches difference
between Crandall and Hollowell. B.
Hollowell has three more years of
High School, so Balboa High better
watch their step.
50-yd. Back-Girls
1. G. Wahl (B).
2. E. Van Clief (B).
3. J. Halderman (B).
Time, 37 flat.
Wahl was in a class by herself. She
did not have much competition, but
the race was between Van Clief, Hal-
derman, and Kleefkins of Cristobal.
But again luck was against us because
both Van Clief and Halderman took
second and third respectively.
Relay-Bos,
Cristobal Balboa
Smith Brewerton
Washabough Wood
Lyons Smith
Rankin Grant
This race was a dead heat and the
points were split. Our break came
when Smith of Balboa took it into his
head to swim crooked. We took ad-
vantage of this break and Carlos, our
last swimmer, came into a dead heat
with Joe Wood of Balboa.
Relay-GirlJ.
Cristobal Balboa
Neely, E. Dryden
Hall Morgan


Bliss, M. Hearne
Bliss, G. Quinn
Time, 1.14.
Balboa again showed her superiority,
by defeating us by nearly a half lap.
FOOTBALL.
A team to represent the High School
was picked to play the Apprentice
Boys from the Dry Docks. The fol-
lowing made the team:
T. Pescod '31 H. Smith '33
C. Pescod '33 B. Hackett '31
R. Wikingstad '32 K. Maurer '31
D. Wood '31 L. O'Rourke '31
J. Deitzer '32 B. Dunn '32
E. Conkling '31 T. Rankin '33
T. Murphy '32
On the very first play in the first
quarter we took the ball over for the
only touchdown of the game. T.
Pescod made a nice run behind the in-
terference of O'Rourke, Hackett,
Maurer and Dietzer. Many a time
both teams were under the shadows
of their own goal posts, but then the
opposing team held like a stone wall.
This was the last game we were allow-
ed to play because it was thought to be
too strenuous of a game to be played
between the Balboa and Cristobal
High Schools.
TENNIS.
On February 1, 1931, our tennis
team composed of the following players:
M. Wheeler, C. Campbell, A. Lyew,
H. Roos, A. Forsstrom, F. Englander
and J. Lockwood was defeated by the
Balboa High Tennis Team. Balboa
won all five of the matches. The
results were as follows:
No. 1 Singles
W. Maduro (Balboa) defeated M.
Wheeler (Cristobal) 4-6, 6-2, 6-2.
No. 2 Singles
D. Stoudner (Balboa) defeated C.
Campbell (Cristobal) 6-1, 6-1.
No. 3 Singles
D. Morales (Balboa) defeated A.
Lyew (Cristobal) 8-6, 6-2.
No. 1 DoubleJ
Sanford and Delvalle (Balboa) de-
feated Englander and Forsstrom (Cris-
tobal) 6-3, 6-2.
No. 2 Doubles
Booth and Grant (Balboa) defeated
Roos and Lockwood (Cristobal) 7-5,
6-4.

The second games of the series was
played at France Field, February 7.
C. Pescod was the only one to win a
set.








'T'HE ('ARIBBI'AN


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C. Pescod (C) defeated Delvalle
(B) 6-1. 6-2.
W. Maduro (B) defeated T. Pescod
(C) 6-4, 6-4.
M1. Sanford (B) defeated M. Wheeler
(C) 4-6,. 6-2, 6--2.
In the doubles the first set was won
bv Cristobal 6-2 and the second and
third sets by Balboa 6-3. 6-4. For
Cristobal C. Campbell and A. Lyew
played and Balboa was represented
by M. Dew and C. Morales.
The second double match was won
by Balboa also, the Pacific Siders win-
ning a love set in the first and rain
halting the next set, with Cristobal
leading 3-1. Lockwood and Roos
for Cristobal. and Grant and Booth
played for Balboa.
HANDBALL.
We started our handball season off


with a bang. We held elimination feated I. Huff 25-23 (B), 21-13 (C).
tournaments to see who would re- and 21-14 (C All three of these men
present Cristobal High in the inter- deserve winning. T. Pescod and M.
scholastic games and the following Wheeler, after losing the first game,
boys were picked. For singles: T. came back to win the last two and the
Pescod, C. Pescod and M. Wheeler; set. C. Pescod outplayed A. Hele
and for doubles: R. Wikingstad and in all departments of the game.
M. Marchosky making one team and In the doubles we beat them. T.
T. Rankin and E. Conkling the other. Rankin and E. Conkling won their
Saturday, April 18, Balboa High double set in two straight sets. 21-13
came over to the Gold Side and were (C). and the second set 21-17 (Ci.
defeated four out of five sets. R.
Wikingstad and M. Marchoskv losing The second game of the series were
to J. Piera and Barkhurst. 21-15 played at Balboa Playshed. Saturday.
(B); 13-21 (C); and 21-18 (B). Mlav 9. In this we were successful
In the singles T. Pescod beat 1. in beating B.H.S. in five straight sets.
Pierera 4-21 (B); 21-11 (C); and 21-16 T. Pescod defeated J. Lapiera 21-7 and
(C). C. Pescod defeated A. Hel6 21-14 21-8; C. Pescod beat A. Hele two
(C); and the second game he won by straight games 21-16 and 21-14; IM.
the score of21-17 (C). M. Wheeler who Wheeler also won two straight games
played our third game of singles de- from M. Huff 21-16 and 21-15. In


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Moamar








THE CARIBBEAN


doubles E. Conkling and T. Pescod
beat J. Dombrosky and D. Bark-
hurst 16-21, 21-4, and 21-9. C. Pes-
cod and R. Wlingstand defeat M. Dew
and M. Sanford 21-12 and 21-13.
We now hold the Interscholastic
Championship in Handball.

BASKETBALL.
On Saturday, May 16, 1931, the.
C. H. S. basketball team defeated
B. H. S. on our home floor by the
score of 26-12. Our team is made up
of the following players "Seniors"-
T. Pescod, E. Conking, and D. Wood:
"Juniors"-R. Wikirgstad, H. Egolf,
and J. Ebdon; "Sophorrores"-C.
Pescod, and M. Marchosky.
Cristobal played a very fine game
during the second half, but during the
first half just played on a par with
Balboa. During the first quarter
Balboa made three field goals, the
only field goals they made during the
game The other six points they got
were on foul shots. Cristobal High
School only made two field goals dur-
ing the first quarter. The score at
the end of the quarter was Balboa-6;
Cristobal-4. In the second quarter,
the score was Balboa-88 Cristobal-6.
Things looked pretty black, but that


two points is not much to hold at only
a half game.
During the third quarter Cristobal
made 12 points while Balboa was
making but five. The "Four Horse-
men," T. Pescod, C. Pescod, E.
Conkling, and D. Wood finally came
to life and with the help of STONE-
WALL JACKSON, Harry Egolf, we
held them so that they could not score
another field goal on us.
E. Conkling was the high point
scorer, making ten points in the course
of the game, while T. Pescod was
gathering eight. H. Egolf played a
find game on the defense. R. Wik-
ingstad went in for E. Conkling dur-
ing the second quarter and played a
good game while he remained.
BASKETBALL.
Saturday. May 23, 1931, we journey-
ed over to Balboa to play the return
game of basketball. We won by the
tune of 31-17. We were never be-
hind. Another championship title
for Cristobal High! We scored two
field goals right off the handle and
at the end of the first quarter the
score was 6-2. Pescod-6 and B.H.S.
-2.
During the second quarter R. Wiking-
stad was sent into the game in the


place of E. Conkling. He can fill in
this place at center very well since he
has been under the coaching of Mr.
Vinton, our basketball coach. In this
quarter we both made two field golds.
making the s-ore to the end of the
half 10-6 in favor of Cristobal High.
During the next half of the game
we made 21 points while Balboa was
having a hard time making seven
points. Again "Stonewall Jackson"
showed that he was an equal to any
occasion that came up before him.
Many a time he broke up plays that
might have turned irto points. C.
Pescod couldn't be stopped in this
game. He was everywhere at once
and he sure could drop them, making
seven field goals for a total of four-
teen points. The "Four Horsemen"
and "Stonewall Jackson" formed a
defense that was hard to break. There
was a report that B.H.S.'s defense
was almost impregnable, but look
what we did to it. For two games we
scored 57 points while they were scor-
ing only 29. We almost doubled their
number of points. This was the first
time that Balboa High School has
been defeated in five years in the
annual contests with Cristohal High
School. Champions at last!








90 THE CARIBBEAN


GIRLS' ATHLETICS.
Velma Hall, '31.


Well, our sports this year were greeted with
muchh" enthusiasm. The Freshmen turned out
almost 100%. The Upper classmen also turned
out to aid the younger girls. We have had a very
successful year and we all feel that without the


help of Miss Bailey we would not have had one.
To reward the girls, Miss Bailey gave them em-
blems for each sport. All those taking part in
inter-class teams and inter-class games received
an emblem.


VOLLEY BALL.
This year Miss Bailey, our worthy
coach, started the girls volley ball
season off with a bang. Class teams
competed for the school championship
There was a great deal of enthusiasm
and class spirit created which this
school certainly needs. The Fresh-
men won the school championship
much to the "Senior's disgust.
Thirty girls attended practice and
played with class teams through the
Inter-class Tournament. These girls
were awarded Volley Ball emblems
of purple and gold felt.
Miss Bailey then picked the stars
from all the class teams and those were
sent to compete with Balboa for the
Inter-school championship. Those who
made the team were: Gladys Bliss
(Capt.), Celeste Clarke, Dorothy Birke
land, Ruth Pickett, Marion Neely,
Elizabeth Hayes, Elsie Neely, Velma
Hall, Betty Stetler, Jean Pruit, and
Mary Clark. The first series of
the season was played in Balboa on
November 8. This set was won by the
Balboans, two games out of three.
The second game of the season was
played here in Cristobal Playshed on
November 15. The outstanding star
was Elizabeth Hayes, a Freshman.
Cristobal won two games in a row,
eliminating the third.
The third and deciding series of the
season was played at the Ancon Play-
shed on November 22. Both teams
were in good fighting condition, and a
very exciting game was played. Every-
one on the team played splendidly,
and, as a result, Cristobal High School,
which since 1926 has taken a licking
from Balboa in every sport, beat their
unconquered rivals and now Cristobal
High School Girl's Volley Ball Team
holds the Isthmian Championship.
Hot stuff!
BASKET BALL.
A strenuous week of basket ball
practise followed our victorious vol-
ley ball series. The first game was
played at Balboa and ended disas-


trously. We were swamped 20 fo 4.
Our team was composed of the follow-
ing players: Forwards-Elizabeth
Haves and Rebecca Bryden, Centers-
Gladys Bliss and Velma Hall. Guards-
Mildred Owen and Celeste Clarke.
The substitutes included Betty Stetler,
Elsie Neely, Alice Gormerly, and
Stella Boggs.
The second battle was played at
Cristobal and the tables were turned.
The game was close and see-sawed
until the last two minutes of play when
"Sis" Hayes and "Becky" Bryden
brought us victory by looping a basket
apiece and placing the final outcome
at 13-11. We needed this game and
fought to the last gasp.
A toss-up-and the God of Chance
willed the deciding game to be played
on our home floor. This game turned
out to be the best played of the series.
"Sis" Haves, our diminutive forward,
was the outstanding player of the
morning. Our passwork functioned
brilliantly all through the game, and
"Sis," was fed the ball consistently.
This, coupled with her remarkable
accuracy in shooting, enabled her to
win for us a total of eighteen points,
which represent all the points made
by our team. The final outcome was
18 to 15.
The Balboa girls played hard all
through the series. Mary Louise Grif-
fen, Ella Jones, and Agnes Tonneson
were the leading Balboa basketeers.
For Cristobal "Sis" Hayes, and
"Beckie" Eryden were always in the
limelight.
Thus ended a remarkable bacsket-
ball season and after the jolt of our
20 to 4 defeat in Balboa we settled
down and practised earnestly under
the direction of M!iss Barbara Bailey.
BASE BALL.
Our baseball practise was started
after the ending of basketball season.
As we did not have enough girls to
compete in Inter-class games, we
rigged up an Upper and Lower class
team. The girls practised every week


under the supervision of Miss Bailey,
aided by our Captain, Ruth Casto.
The first game was played in Balboa
on a Saturday. The lineup was as
follows: Catcher-Rebecca Bryden,
Pitcher-Gladys Bliss; First base-
Velma Hall; Second base-Mable
Jean Bliss; Third base--Betty Stetler;
Right field-Ruth Casto (Capt.) and
left field-Elizabeth Hayes. The
girls played hard, but Balboa's team
defeated them 26 to 12.
The next week the Y.W.C.A. had
their annual Conference in Panama.
Many of the girls on our team went,
thus leaving the remaining girls to
try to hold up C.H.S.'s standard.
This second team, composed of
Catcher-Ruth Casto; Pitcher-
Gladys Bliss; First base-Velma Hall;
Second base-Victoria Hollowell; third
base-Helen Leach; Right field-
Dorothy Birkeland; and left field-
Mildred Owen, practised hard, but
when the game with Balboa came the
next week, it also met its Waterloo.
The Balboans put in a pitcher who
seemed to wreck our team. The final
score ended 16 to 4, a disastrous game
for us.
This was our first defeat, and believe
us, we felt it.
TENNIS.
The next sport to be taken up was
tennis. Because of our victory over
Balboa in Volley Balland Basket Ball,
the girls settled down to some hard
practice in tennis. There were Inter-
class games, and then the big play off.
Those who made the team were the
following: Ann Powers (Capt.) for
singles. Elizabeth Hayes and Velma
Hall for doubles, and the substitutes
were Mabel Jean Bliss, Gladys Bliss
and Jean Pruit.
In our first game with Balboa over
there, Ann lost the singles to Mary
Louise Griffin by 6-2, 3-6, 6-3.
It was beautiful tennis and fun to
watch asthegirls wereevenly matched.
The doubles team fared better. Doris
Stroop and Ella Jones, of Balboa, were








92 THE CARIBBEAN


9. S .


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C,. BI.c,


defeated by a score of 6-1. 4-6, 6-1.
The next game was played here. In
order that Balboa would not lose the
doubles Mary Louise Griffin and Doris
Stroop were put in to play against our
same double team. Once again we
showed them which was the better
team. Elizabeth and Veima cleaned
up by a score of 2-6, 8-6, 8-6. Our
Worthy Anne showed up Francis
Avers by defeating her in two sets
6-0. 6-0.
Thus we won the doubles and stood
a very good chance of winning the
singles. So, when the next game came.
Anne and the rooters traveled to the
other side and there watched Anne
defeat Mary Louise by 6--4, 5-7,
6-0. Rah, for oui side! Winners of
three sports!
SWIMMING.
About the first of April the girls
started practicing for the swimming
meet which was to be held in the
Washington Pool on April 25. The
girls swam ten laps per day and prac-
ticed starts. When the affair arrived
the Red, White and Blue troupe crossed
the line into Cristobal.
The line up was as follows: 50
yard dash-Elsie Neely and Gladys
Bliss; 50 yard breast-Rebecca Bry-


den and Velma Hall; 100 yard dash-
Marie Kleefkens and Velma Hall;
Backstroke-M arie Kleefkens and
Elizabeth Hayes; Relay-Elsie Neely,
Gladys Bliss, and Velma Hall. Our
one lone diver, Mabel Jean Bliss,
competed against three of Balboa's
stars. The troupe took all three
places in everything except third
in breaststroke, which was taken by
Velma Hall. Marion Neely, who was
elected Captain was unable to swim
Saturday. This proved a big handicap
to us.
This was a sad ending for our swim-
ming season, but Balboa has always
held the championship for swimming.
The girls there should be congratulated
on their swimming and good sports-
manship.
GOLF.
This year Cristobal and Balboa com-
peted in golf for the Isthmian Cham-
pionship. It was the first year for this
sport and was so satisfactory that it
will probably be continued next year.
The first game was played at Ama-
dor Links. The girls from the Atlantic
side who played were: Anna Ryan,
Dona Eaton. Elizabeth Hayes, Ruth
Pickett (who made the best score of
our girls), and Betty Stetler and Jane


Bretch. Although the links were
strange to our girls they made a great
effort, but lost to Balboa by 9 holes.
The next match was held on Gatun
Links. The girls here proved them-
selves able to hold their own. The
final score ended 21-20 in favor of
Cristobal. The third game has not
vet been played, but we are looking
forward to it with enthusiasm.
Mr. Duer, the golf professional at
Gatun, offered a dozen golf balls to
the girl with the best score. Emelia
Sherwood of Balboa won them. The
girls from Balboa were: Margaret
Woodland, Emelia Sherwood, Eleanor
Hammond, Elizabeth Beverly. and
Alice Westman.
BOWLING.
Bowling was our last sport. The
girls who made the team were the fol-
lowing: Gladys Bliss, Kathleen Ar-
thur, Mabelle Bliss, Victoria Hollo-
well, Elizabeth Hayes, Betty Stetler
and Ruth Casto. No inter-scholastic
games have been played as yet, but
our team is good and we defy Balboa
to beat us.
On the whole, I think this year's
athletic season has been the most suc-
cessful and I'm sure it is going to last
for years to come.


Ut;:
M.Bliss







THE CARIBBEAN


tAnia Ryan '31


Oct. 1 Vacation days are over, hard work
faces all. There are many New teachers in the fa-
culty this year; Mr. Johnson, mechanical draw-
ing teacher: Mr. Hackett, Social Studies; Mr.
Vinton, Science teacher; Miss Anderson, House-
hold Arts teacher; Mrs. MacDonald. Art teacher;
Mrs. Spencer, language teacher, and last but not
least, Miss Elner, music teacher.
Oct. 2. Home rooms were assigned and, of
course, the Seniors were given the most desirable
room.
Oct. 3. "The Bald-Headed Brigade" greets
us this morning, showing that the upper classmen
have been "Up and at 'em."
Oct. 6. The high and mighty Seniors had
their class meeting, chose Miss Moore for their
advisor, and none other than Carlos Rankin for
president.
Oct. 7. To-day the new "Upper Classmen,"
or otherwise Juniors had their election of officers.
Also Elect Class advisor.
Oct. 8. Five more Seniors join us to-day,
having just returned from the States. Take it
from one who knows, the Senior class is "Bigger
and Better than ever." The Freshmen held their
first class meeting to-day.
Oct. 9. Next to elect their class officers were
the Sophomores, who were rather late in getting
organized.
Oct. 10. Athletics have started out with a
Bang! And are we going to end up with ['IC-
TORY!!! Just watch our Smoke!!!
Oct. 13. To-day the "Frosh" elected their
class officers.
Oct. 14. B.A.A. and G.A.A. meeting, and
Sh! I'll let you in on a secret-C.H.S. is going to
have Cheer Leaders, real, honest to goodness
live ones. "Y Como."
Oct. 15. Two weeks ago to-day C.H.S. opened
wide its Golden Portals.


Oct. 16. Things are well under way by now
and the students have lost that vacation look.
(If you know what kind of a lookI mean).
Oct. 17. Friday is welcomed by one and all,
especially members of Supper Club as a picnic is
planned for Saturday for Cabinet members of
Cristobal and Balboa.
Oct. 20. Three Rousing Cheers! The Seniors
are granted four grand privileges this year pro-
viding we know how to use them. Seniors. Be
careful. It all depends on you!
Oct. 21. B.A.A. adopted a Constitution.
Here's hoping better results in athletics will be ob-
tained. Tennis gets a flying start under the care-
ful supervision of none other than Mr. Hackett.
Oct. 22. Seniors, are we for it? What? A
football game against the Juniors. I'll say we
are. Watch out, Juniors' you brought it on your-
selves.
Oct. 23. Some of the Junior boys look quite
broken up this morning. Mmm! I wonder why?
Oct. 24. Staff members were elected for the
"Caribbean." All members of the staff made a
resolution to do their best to put the annual over
big! Y como! Supper Club meeting this p.m.
and say, what a supper it was. The Cabinet surely
knows its X.Y.Z.'s when it comes to serving sup-
pers.
Oct. 27. Sh! Sh! Seniors held a class rreet-
ing. Maybe they are planning their party. "What
ya say?"
Oct. 28. Mr. Sawyers had quite a surprise
for some of us "would be" brilliant students, but
alas, alas, what a terrible surprise; "white slips"!
Oct. 29. C.H.S. beat the Brother's school
team at soccer, but what else could be expected?
ahemm.)
Oct. 30. The famous football team of C.H.S.
defeated the Cristobal Apprentice boys.







THE CAHIBBEAN


Oct. 31. The Staff decided to give a "Staff
Hop" which will be given in early December.
Nov. 3. Three rousing cheers "para la Re-
publica de Panama". Today is a holiday!
Nov. 4. Meeting of the "Honorary Spanish
Club."
Nov. 5. Miss Elner, the new music teacher
has undertaken to teach the students to sing-with-
out straining their voices. (Something tells me
she will have a hard iob.)
Nov. 6. Something in the air. I feel it. All
C.H.S. students had to fill out slips telling the
vocation they desire to follow after leaving school.
And can you imagine one of our Seniors wanted
to be a preacher (never knew we had such religious
people in our class.)
Nov. 7. C.H.S. held their first Pep meeting,
but by the noises that came from the assembly
they didn't need much practice.
Nov. 8. Believe it or not. C.H.S. tied B.H.S.
in a soccer game. Viva C.H.S.!
Nov. 9. The "Honorary Spanish Club" held
a dinner at the Florence Hotel this evening.
Nov. 10. Seniors held a class meeting. I wish
they would hurry and give their party. Oh, yes!
The Senior class added another member to their
flock.
Nov. 11. B.A.A. and G.A.A. meetings.
Nov. 12. Hurrah! Find we have two students
on High Honor Roll for first six weeks, and one,
and only one, is a Senior.
Nov. 13. C.H.S. defeats Brother's school, 2-0
at soccer.
Nov. 14. Spanish Club had a meeting to elect
new members.
Nov. 15. Hip! Hip! Hurrah! C.I.S. beat
B.H.S. in soccer, 5-4, 'Ray! for our side!
Nov. 17. Oh, Oh! Why is it that we have
school on Mondays? Everybody is half asleep
anyway.
Nov. 18. Senior class meeting. It's about
time they had their party. We're getting tired
waiting.
Nov. 19. Things were pretty quiet until third
period and then Oh' of all the screeching noises.
Why, oh why, can't those lower classmen learn
not to make so much noise when they are sup-
posed to be singing? (Ask me another).
Nov. 20. To-day Capt. Ammel arrived on a
record-breaking non-stop flight from Long Island
to France Field.


Nov. 21. We were honored to-day by having as
a visitor Major Stevens, of Fort I)avis, who gave a
most interesting talk on the "Story of America."
Nov. 22. ()h! ()h! IBalboa beat us to-day
at soccer. Next Saturday is the deciding game.
Team! Team! Io your best.
Nov. 24. To-day is "Red Letter Day" in
C.HI.S. The Seniors sent out ehri invitations to
their party. (At last.)
Nov. 25. Staff meeting. Must be a big ques-
tion up before it.
Nov. 26. Senior class party! Was it hot?
Well, I should smile! (I mean the weather.) And
the decorations were not to be sneezed at unless
you caught hay fever from the hay strewn around.
Hurrah! Four days vacation!
Dec. 1. Oh! H ow are we supposed to study
when we haven't yet got over the effects of
Thanksgiving vacation.
Dec. 2. Debate Club held its first real debate.
Dec. 3. Why are all those people bowing to
one another? Why, don't you know, those are
the new members being initiated into "La P.A.S."
Dec. 4. Who says we haven't artistic stu-
dents in this school? If you don't believe me
just look at the walls in the hallway.
Dec. 5. Social meeting of Spanish Club at
Y.W.C.A. Formal initiation of new members to
the Club.
Dec. 8. This is a blue Monday, and how!
B.H.S. defeated C.H.S. in the final soccer game.
Dec. 9. Rain! Oh, can't it do anything else
but rain?
Dec. 10. The Art Class is surely putting
themselves on the map. They have gone so far
as to make their own Christmas Cards.
Dec. 11. By the sounds coming from short-
hand class one would think they were attending
a Chinese school. But, no, they are only trying
to learn the difference between "Oh" and "Uh"!
Dec. 12. Mr. R Z. Kirkpatrick gave a talk
on "Engineering" which was appreciated by every
one and especially those boys expecting to take
up that vocation.
Dec. 15. Rah! Rah! Rah! for our Cheer Lead-
ers. they surely have plenty of school spirit as
shown by Pep meeting. Rah! Rah! Rah! (again).
C.I.S. defeated Uni-Fruco-Baseball Club.
Dec. 16. Girls of Volley Ball team got their
letters. False alarm: thought there was a real
fire but only a tire drill!







THE CARIBBEAN


Dec. 17. Mr. Campbell gave a talk to the
Commercial Class on the "Aspects of Commer-
cial Law."
Dec. 18. Business meeting of the Spanish
Club.
Dec. 19. Whoopee! Big day to-day. Christ-
mas Party n' everything. But the best of all is
the Staff Hop!
Jan. 5. Boys and girls you've had your two
weeks fling; now get to work.
Jan. 6. Senior class meeting; chose play
"Jonesy".
Jan. 7. B.S.S. meeting. Report cards for
second six-weeks went out.
Jan. 8. Seniors meet Mr. Noe after school and
discuss play.
Jan. 12. What? Another B.A.A. meeting.
They ought to have some organization.
Jan. 13. C. P.?? (if you know who I mean)
seems to be making it a habit to break windows.
This is two to his credit so far!! Hold on, C.P.,
don't go too fast.
Jan. 14. Watch your step Ye Students of
Chemistry or the next explosion will be worse.
Jan. 16. Pep Rally, Jack Kelly gave a short
talk on "School Spirit."
Jan. 17. Rah! Rah! Rah! for C.H.S. beat
B.H.S. in the first Baseball game of the season.
Whoopee!
Jan. 19. Everything going smooth. (Saysme.)
Jan. 22. First Carnival rehearsal at Y.W.C.A.
Jan' 23. What! Another Pep Rally; and a
talk on "School Spirit."
Jan. 24. All aboard! for the Special to Bal-
boa. Whew! What a game; better step on it
boys we have one more chance to show them.
Who? and what? We are. Even though we
didn't win the baseball game we won the Fa-
culty Basketbal game. Say! I didn't realize
what nice looking teachers we had on our faculty
till I saw them in their basketball suits, and then?
Jan. 26. Doctor Swift talked to girls at
Y.W.C.A.
Jan. 27. Doctor Swift talked to boys.
Jan. 28. Girls attend Doctor Swift's second
lecture.
Jan. 30. Mrs. John McCormack gave a very
interesting talk on nursing.
Jan. 31. Hip! Hlip! Hurrah! We beat Bal-
boa for the second time in Baseball; that makes
us the CHAMPIONS. Three cheers for our side!


Feb. 2. The boys on the Baseball team au-
tographed the last pitched ball of the series.
(The series in which we beat Balboa).
Feb. 4. Selected committee on Diplomas. It's
a very serious question as we only graduate once
and we want nice looking diplomas.
Feb. 5. Committee went to Balboa Heghts to
discuss Diplomas. Here's hoping we agree on
something.
Feb. 6. Mr. O. F. Thomas, Manager, Na-
tional City Bank, gave a very interesting talk
on "Banking."
Feb. 9. Carnival Practice. Believe me we
have one "gay Caballero."
Feb. 10. Debating Club had a meeting and
had one "hot" debate. Sss!
Feb. 11. We missed the spirit of Tommy
Rankin in school this morning. But the hospital
claimed him.
Feb. 12. Cram, cram, cram, till we can't
cram any more!
Feb. 13. Tests and more tests and Oh! what
tests!
Feb. 14. "Going! Going! Gone!" said the
auctioneers at the Valentine party given at the
Y.W.C.A.
Feb. 16. Ra! for C.H.S. we beat Unifrucos
6-3. (In baseball if you don't know what I
mean.)
Feb. 17. When the Junior boys give a candy
sale they surely are successful, especially when
only two batches of candy are donated.
Feb. 18. Talk on "International Affairs" by
Mrs. Hooper. Many questions were asked by
our would-be brilliant students.
Feb. 19. Report cards!
Feb. 20. What was wrong with school this
afternoon? Oh! didn't you know? Mr. Saw-
yers went to Balboa. Hurrah! for the Sopho-
mores and their party! It was one "swell dance."
Feb. 23. Only ten cents a piece! Buy one!!
Buy what? A tag for your choice for queen of
Carnival, of course.
Feb. 24. Another Carnival practice. We ought
to be good by the time this is over.
Feb. 26. Now's the time in a lifetime when
the boys have to work, for a change. All tents
for Carnival have to be up this afternoon.
Feb. 27. To-night's the nite! The big nite.
Viva! Sister Hayes, La Reina del Carnival!
Mar. 2. Boys practiced golf at Gatun. May-