Caribbean

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Title:
Caribbean
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Cristobal High School
Publisher:
Yearbook House
Place of Publication:
Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00093680:00017


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I Cristobal High School.


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Forewzord w

The Staff has labored long and hard,
To make this book the best.
We've our reputation to regard,
And you'll find it "best by test."


THE CARIBBEAN.













THE CARIBBEAN


VOL. XIII.


CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE, r930.

PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH- SCHOOL.


No. i.


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Hot-l W~ash~ington

T~BL.E OF CONTENTS.
Page.
2Juniors . ....
4Sophom"ores.
5 Freshme~n .
6 L~iterar . .
Spo'rs ..
8 School Notes.
9 Exchanges ..
11 Alumni
7 Jokes...
;o Adlvertise~ments


Page.
.. 35
39



93
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I IS
1217


Foreword. .. .. .. .
Dedication ..
Editorial.. .
Our Governor
Our Canal Zone School Officiatls. .
Our Principal ..
Statff ..
Faculty ..
Seniors ...
Class History .
Class W'lll


Bridge on thle old K~ing's Highway- to Panama City.






4F THE CARIBBEAN.


1~ D E DICA TI ON.

EECAUSE of their unceasing
interest in our school work and J
Their hopes for our future success,
we, the Staff, gratefully dedicate the
I~ thirteenth volume of
THE CARIBBEAN Bj
to I
Oulr Parents







THE CARIBBEAN.


To go to college or not to go, that is the question
which is probably foremost in the minds of those
of us who are graduating this June. It is a
question which requires a great deal of consider
ation and which should not be decided upon
hurriedly.
Think it over carefully-, anld if you have a fairly-
definite idea in mmnd of what profession you would
like to follow, ask yourself this question, "11'ould
a college education help me in getting ready for
this work?" InI the majority of instances it
would. The college man or woman has the
preference over the person with only a high school
education in obtaining a position. In addition
to this, he has an understanding and an appreci-
ation of the finer things in life, and he polssesses
the poise which comes from being college bred.
On the other hand, there are people who are
utterly~ unsuited to collPege and it would be a
waste of their time and of their parents' money
for them to attend. So in looking yourself over,
decide whether you would benefit in later life


from a college education. Perhaps yocur talents
are more suited to a tr-ade o~r dtramati c school than
to a college.
There is another question that may trouble the
less fortunate of us, and that is the lack~ ofneces-
sary funds. D~o not think that it is absolutely
impossible to be a success in life unless yo(u attend
college, because many men and women, who have
been unable to avail themselves of this oppo7r-
tunity through financial reasons, havle become
quite successful. However, they have done so
by extensive reading and studying onl subjects
which would lead to their advancement.
Remember that the world niow only wants
educated and trained men for its positions, so,
if y~ou are able, attend a school or a college that
will aid you in preparing fo~r your profession.
However, if you canl not go, because of the lack of
money., do, not forget that mlany~ people have
trained themselves by! studying inl their spare
time and~ hav-e become quite prom-inent in their
line of work;. After all, the road to success is
open to evreryone.


Ro,-al Falms in Colon.


i~i~


TO GO OR NOT TO0 GO.
Thomans L. coley, fr-. o.







THE CARIBBEAN.


COL. HARRY BURGEss, U. S. Army,
Governor, The Panama Canal

















Hlorne~ ./id,hns-G(re~en~sboro, N. C.


( or- 'ini;:)l-cenar- err IUniversity.

Deglres Obtar~ined- A.I t B I.


Sit\Y.

Degyrees Obtaillned-A. II.


Univer-


y 2, 1926.


'i~FT?:


A-sisistant Sulperintendent of Schools,~I 71uni(,r an)d Sen~ior High
SchAool--\V. H. BARKER.
Birthp/acer- Missouri.i
Homre .dd;ress--Illinois.

EDUCATION.

Name of Scr~ondary Sc~Vhoo/--Lebano n High School.
Locationl of .S'ecorndayl~ Schoo/--Lebalnon, 110.
- or- Unicvelrsity- N. E. M\issouri St;re TIeaicher's College.
DegreePS Obtaied--B. cS.
College or- Uni:ersity- Columin a Univerrsity.
Dgrees Obta2ined~-A 121.
D.i(e Entlering$ Serv.ice on Cn~a/Zonez--Septemberl -, 192-


THE CARIBBEAN.







THE CARIBBEAN.


Oucr Prijncipal--WVLIaux A. SAW'YERS. S c
Birth:place-W~esterly, R. I.
Home Add-e~ss-38 Sumnmer St., Westerly R. 1.


EDUCATION.


S~ame of Secondlary School-W~esterly High School.
Location of SeLcondary~ School-W~esterly, R. 1.
College or. UniversityG-Bates College, Lewiston, Me.
D~ates Atteldnde-1915-1919-
Degrees Obtained--B. S.


College or U'niversitiy-Columbia University.
Dates Attended--1924--I92c-
Degrees ObtaiNne-M. A.


PERSONAL.


Date Entering ServLice on Ca'~na/Zone-September 7, 192;.
Sub~jects Tau~ght 1929)-13o.--General Science.
Sponsor for Wh~at Clarss or School Actjiviy--THE CARIBBEAN..
Fraternity or Sor~ority-Phi Delta Kanppa.
Favorite Expression--"How many looked over the lesson ? It
appears evident that many of you overlooked it."





CARIBBEAN STAFF, 1930.


Sta~f A~dvisor ................ .Mr. Wu.Z. A. SAWYlERs
Stf Sponsor_ .. ..... ..........MRiss GRAC-E HESSE
Editor--inl-Chief ......... ..... ... .THOMAS COLEY
Assistant Edito-.. .... . .. .. .. .. CARLos RAxxxx
Bulsinerss JInager ............WA'LTER \fINIGSTAD
A~sst. Business danage .............RAYM OND TILL
Cir-culation Ma~cnlger .. .. ..~ . . ..RALPH CiRUM
//j~,r Circulation .Ilanatger .. .. .BURTON HACCETT
Literary Editor-. ... .. .. . .. ... .. M~avis THIRLWALL


Art Editor ...... .... _.VIRGINIA STEVENSON
Asst. ;drtEditor.... ............ .FRiEDERICK K~IROLL
Boys' Athletic ~ Edto. ..... ..THOMA4S PESCOD
Girls' Athletic Editror... .. .. .. .CE LESTE CLARKE
Ex\changrEr ditor........~.~ . . DELLA RArmIoSo
Schnool~otesEditjor .. ... .~ .... ~. RAE BLISS
aJll~l/inniEior.. . .. .~ . . . FRANSCEs D.4ys
Joke Editor .. .. ~.. \ ,, ILLIAM NEWYMAN
Typist. . .. ... ..~ . .LICE HENTER


MR 19742--2


THE CARIBBEA~N.


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10 THE CARIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN. 1I


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THE CARIBBEAN.


I -Name of Teacher--LILLIAN B. Gusunrson.
Birthplace--Chicago, Ill.
Home Address--Nunica, Mich.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School--Lake View High School.
Location of Secondary School--Chicago, Ill.
College or University--Northern Illinois Teachers' College.
Dates Attended-1913g-I915.
College or University-University of Ohio.
Dates Attended-1I925. Extension course, one term.
College or University~-Teachers' College, Columbia Uni-
versity.
Dates Attended-1926-Summer Session.
PERSONAL.
Date Entering Service on Cana/Zone-1I923-
Sponsor for W'hat Class or School Activity--Assistant Principal.
Favorite Expr-essoin--"Have you your excuse You owe me
I an excuse."


Namne of Teacher-ROBERT A. WEST.
Birthplace--Ashley, Pa.
Home Address-A~shley, Pa.
EDUCATION.
Nrun~e of Secondary School--Ashley High School.
Location of Secondary School--Ashley, Pa.
Co!Iege or University-University of Pennsylvania.
Dates Attended--I921--1922,
_or Univ-iersity-Bucktnell University.
Dates Attenlded-1922-1925.
Degr~ees Obtained--A. B.
College or- University-Pennsylvania State College.
Date~s Att1ended-1927-I928-
PERSONAL.
Date Entering Service on Canal Zone---October I, I928.
Sub~jects Taught INr~93-93-Algebra, History, Commercial .

Fraternity--Kappa Sigma. I
Favorite Expression--"If it's good, it's from Pennsylvania."-


Name of Teacher--MARY ELIZABETH MOORE.
Bir-thplace--West Alexander, Pa.
Home Address--West Alexander, Pa.
EDUCATION,
Name of Secondary School--Washington High School.
Location of Secondaty School--Washington, Pa.
College or University-University of West Virginia.
Dates Attended-1I92 1923-
Degrees Obtained-A. B.
College or Univer~sity--Wooster College.
Dates Attended-1919g-1920.
PERSONAL.
Date Entering Service on Canal Zone--October I, 1925.
Subjects Taught Ipap-193o--Latin, French, and Spanish.
Sponsor for What Class or School Activity--Juniors.
I ~Fraternity of Sorarily-K~appa Kappa Gamma.
Phi Beta Kappa.

~2~3\\ Favorite Expression--"And I said, 'Is that so?' "








THE CARIBBEAN. r3


Namne of Teach2Er-GRACE R. HESSE,
Birtlhplarce-Mliller, S. D.
Homle Addnlres-Shelbyville, Ill.
EDUCATION,
Namert of Se~onda).'ry School-Ann11 Airbor High School.
Locatrion of Secronda,:y Sc'hoo/--A~nn Arbor, M~ich.
College or- U.niversity-U~niversity of Mrichigan.
Dates AJtteNnded-- 1914-I19 7, 1923-'924-
Degrees Obtarii~nd-A. B., MI. A.
College or U'ni;' ljversi;ty-i onal Unliversity of M\exico.
Datles Attendlred--Summer 1921.
( IPERSONAL.
DateP Entlerinig Serv~ice on Cana/Zlone--October I, I926.
Sub~jects Taught79r)_-r29-go--Spanish and English.
Sponrsor for Ifatl Clacss or- School Actliirvi-Senior Class.
CARIBBEAN Staff.
Flratrn,)ity or Sorority~-Ka:p pa~ Delta.
Faoor~ite E.vpr.ession-"Dblme una; frase comllreta."l




iLName of Tearcher--FREDERICK J. REYER
Birtlplarce-Calmar, Iowal. s
Home Addnress--Calmar, lowa. -

EDUCATION,

Name of Secolndary School--Calmar High School.
Location of Seolndry~l School--Calmar, Iowa. r
College or- University-State University of lowa.
Dates Atrtended-1916h-1918 and 1924-1925- .
iDegrees Obtained-B. A. ~e
PERSONAL.

Date Entering Senrvie on Calna/Zone--October I, I198.
Subjects Taug~ht rgag-I93o-Mechanical Drawing, Plane
Geometry, and Algebra,
Favorite Esvpression2-"You dumb F~reshmen--






N~ame of Tac12her.-HELEN PATTERSON.
Birthplace--Helena, M~ont.
Hom~e AJddr~ss--GIrne Falls, M~ontr.

EDC`CATION.Y

Name of Seolndaryv Schoo/--Chanteau County High School.
Location of S~coindaryl~ Sch-ool--Fort Ben ~on, Mont.
Zi or Univer~sity-Montalna Stalte College.
ate Atte~llnded-19??--1926.
Degrees Obtalinedi-B. S.
FBratelrnit-Alph aL Omlicron Pi.

PERSONAL..

Date EntEr.ing SerCi'ce on2 Cana/(IZone-Mar.ch I 8, 1930.
rSub6jects Taucght cpag793yo--Shorthandl Bookikeeping, T!ype
d writing.
\ Favorite E.vptressionr-"That's good."








14 THE CARIBBEAN.


Name of Teacher--GLADYs M. KIMuno.
Birthplace-Cedar Rapids, lowa.
~w Home Address--Masonic Temple, Oklahoma City, Okla.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School--Chickasha. High School.
Location of Secondary School--Chickasha, Okla.
College or University--Oklahoma College for Women.
Dates Attended-19r3-I916-
Degrees Obtained-A. B.
College or Univ~ersity-University of Oklahoma.
6 DateJ AttEnded--I923-1I924-
Degrees Obtained--M. A.
PERSONAL.
Date Entering Service on Canal Zone-October I > I 929.
Subjects Taucght I929-193o-English..
Sponsor for what Class or School Activity--Sophomore Class.
Debating Club.
Favorite Expression--"Now what's funny about that?"



Name of Teacher-Awos C. PENCE.
Birthlplace--Marshall, Mo.
Home Addr~ess--Marshall, Mo.

EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-Marshall High School.
Location of Secondary School--Marshall, Mo.
College or U'niversity-M~issouri Valley College.
Dates Attended-r92I-l925-
Degrees Obtained-A. B.
College or University-M~issouri University.
Dates Attended-Summer, 1928.

PERSONAL.
Date Entering Service on Cana/Zone--October I, 1928.
Subjects Taught rpz9-(93o-Physiics, Mathematics, Commrer-
cial Arithmetic, and Geography.
Sponsor for What Class or School Activity--Freshmen.
Favorite Expression-'"You students take advantage of me."


Name of Teacher--EMILY RUSSELL.
Birthplace--Pine Bluff, Ark.
Home Address--Pine Bluff, Ark.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School--Pine Bluff High School.
Location of Secondary School-Pine Bluff, Ark.
College or University-University of Arkansas.
Dates Attended-1920-1924-
Degrees Obtained-Bachelor of Science in Home Economics.
College or U'niversity-University of W\isconsin.
Dates Attended.--Summer school, r927.
PERSONAL.
Date Entering Service on Cana/Zone--October I, r927.
Subjects Taught rp929-793o-Household Arts, English, U. S.
History.
Sponsor for What Class or School Activity-Supervisor of the
library.
I Fraternity or Sorority--Pi Beta Phi, Kiappa Delta Pi.
Favorite Expression-"All right."
















I ~Name of Teac(her.--BARBARA RAI.EY~.
Birthplacr-Rib I.Lake, WVis.
Home Addrlre'zsj- uskegoon, Mich.

EDU~CATI~ON,

Name of Sec~ondry~~ ScIhoob--Recreattion Training School.
Locationl of Secrlondry~,~ Sch-loo/-Chicago, Ill.
or- University-- Collumbiai Univeirsity..


PERSONAL.

Date Enrteringf Service onl Canal/Zone -December r I, 192S-
SSub~jects Taucght ly-'-,C:loao-Pagro und Directress.
Fav~orite Eprslzsionr-"T`h a's splendid!"








Naime of Teancher-VICTOR E. LSEIL.ER.
Bilyrrthprlae-uburn N. Y.
Home Alddre-ss-Berkele y,, Calif. IIs~`


EDUCATION, Qr

SCollege or- Univer-sity-University of California.
Dates Atltended-I923-192.5- CI.

PERSONAL.

Dater Entering Servi'ce on Canl ~tZoneP-M ay I 8,I 19 6.
Subjects Taulghlt 192--lOjo--Directo r of Phy.sical Activities.
Favo~rite.Evpression-"UsT e y-our head, fellow~s!"







Nalme of Teacher)-A. RIAXINE PorTS.
Birtlhplacer-Big Run, Pa.
Home Addre'',ss- Baltimore, A\ld.



f; iName of Seodndary Schoo/-Wesernm High School.
Locatrion of Secondryrr~ Scrhool---B:ultimore, Aldi.
College or (University-Marylandi State Normal.
Dates Attendedl-lg-192 .92
College or U~nivrsity-Pl aygroundi At\hletic Clalsses, Baltimore.
Dats Atteznded--1925-1r92 .



se.\9Date Entering Servicer onl C~na/Zone-JTnee, 1929.
Sponsor fo, Iri What Clas or Scrhool Actri:ity-Physical Directress.
Fav~oiritExprejsionr-"Snap into it, girls."


THE CARIBBEAN.









16 THE CARIBBEAN.


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Name of Teacher--HELEN CURRIER BAKER.
Birthplace-Minneapolis, Minn.
Home Address-Minneapolis, Minn.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School-Central High School.
Location of Secondary School--Minneapolis, Minn.
College or- University-University of Minneapolis.
Degrees Obtained--B. A4.
College or University--Session in Public School Music at
Cornell, Chicago, and New York Universitjes.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Service on CannalZone--192I-
Subjects Taurght, Igag-r93o-Supervisor of Public School
Music.


Name of Teacher--ROBERT GEORGE NOE.
Birrthplace-Kinoxville, Tenn.
Home Address-Kinoxville, Tenn.

EDUCATIONj.

Nanme of Sec~ondary School-YToung High School.
Location of Secondary Schoo(-l-noxville, Tenn.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Service on CanalZone--Decembher, 1924
Sponsor for What Class or School Actiigvit-Dramatic Coach.
Favorite Expression--"Snap out of it now, enunciate clearly."







THE CARIBBEANT.


MR 19742--3







18 THE CARIBBEAN.


RALPH SNEDIK(ER CRUM.
W'ise to resolve and patient to perform.
--Homer.
Nickname--Happy.
4 ~Birthplace--Cicero, Ind.
~Date of Birth--January 12, 1912.

Stt': ,'z'"""'--," 'G Ind.

Date of Enter-ing Cristobal Sch2ool--October, 1926.
Grade Entred--Freshman.
School Activites--Bowling, '27, '28; Track, '28; Carnival, '27,
'28; Glee Club, '27; Extra, '26, '27,'228; President Senior
Class,'30; Circulation Manager THE CARIBBEAN Staff,'30.
College Expected to Enter--University of Indiana.
Favorite Expression-"'Who said so? "
Chosen Vocation--Lawyer.
Hobby-Reading.
Pastime--Going to the movies.


MAVIS ELOISE THIRLWALL.
And still they wondered, and the wonder grew,
That one small head should carry all it knew.
-Goldsmith.
Nickname--Mavey.
Birikplace-Panama City, R. of P.
Date ofBirth--July 20, 1912-
State's Address--Baton Rouge, La.
Canal Zone Addr-ess--Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October, I 917.
Grade Entered--First.
School Activities-Supper Club, '27, '28, '29; Secretary Supper
Club, '30; Glee Club, '27, '28; Secretary of Class, '29;
Carnival, '27, '28, '30; Literary Editor THE CARIBBEAN
Staff, '30.
College Expected to Enter-Louisiana State University.
Favorite Expression--"Mercy! "
Chosen Vocation--Language Teacher.
Hobby--Reading.
Pastime-Reading.

RAE BLISS.
The sum of earthly bliss. --Milton.
Nickname--Tinsie.
Birthplace--Ancon, C. Z.
Date of Bi~th--November 25, 1912-
State's Address--Sherman, N. Y.
Canal Zon~e Address--Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School--October, 19'7.
Grade Entered--First.
School Activities--Class Treasurer, '27; Supper Club, '27, '28;
Treasurer Supper Club, '29, '30; Glee Club, '27, '28, '29;
Carnival, '27, '28, '29, '30; Gym, '27, '28; Class President,
'29; Class Vice President,'29, '30; Treasurer Athletic Asso-
ciation, '29; School Notes Editor THE CARIBBEAN Staff,
30; "The Lottery Man," '30.
College Expected to Enter--Oberlin, Ohio.
Favorite Expression--"Don't be an Airdale!"
Chosen Vocation--Language Teacher.
Hobby--Reading.


cJS Pastime-Swimming.








THE CARIBBEAN. 19


T`HOMAlS L.. COLEY, JR.
I know thouc'rt fulll of love and honesty,
A-ndl weighl'st thy words before thou gives them
brealth. -S-.hakespeare,.

N2ick~lname- Mike.
Birthplace-Bethayres, Pa.
Dakr of Birth-Jluly 29, 1913-
St~ate'sr Addres'ns-Bethn!res es P-a.
Carrnla/Zon A~ddres-Frort Davis.
Date of Entering Cr~istoba/l Schoo/--October, 1928i.
"s Gradce Enterled--J unior.
Other (1/i0/ Schools tnded Befor-e Comin~g to Ca~na/Zone-Hampton
\1 High School, Hampton, Va;.
School/ Actrivities-Editor-in-Chief, THF. CARIBBEAN Staff, '30.
Expectedn to EntrcP-Uniiversit y of Pennsylvania.
Chrosen V'ocation Medicine.
Hobbv--Swi mming.
Pastime--Swimming.
Favor-ite Expression-"Donl't you thinki-?. "


DELLA4 JOSEPHINE RAYMZOND.
The thing that goes farthest toward making
life worth while
That costs the least, and dloes the most, is
just a pleasant smile. -fl.: D. Nesbit.
Nickname-A:delina.
Birthplace-Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Birth-Mayn t0, 1912.
State's Address-Nrew Yorki, N. Y'.
Canal Zon~e Add~ress-Cristobal..
:Date of Enltering Cristoba/ Schoo/--Octoberl a, I9<8.
Grade Enter-ed-First.
SPchool Actrivities--Glee Club, '27, ~'8; Supper Club, '27, '28,
'29, '30; Carnival, '1:, )'2, '30; Class T~reasurer, '27, '2,8,
30; Exchange Ediitor THE CAfimacAxi Staff, '30, "The
Lottery Man," '30.
Favo,-rie Exression-"A\ren't you terrible:"
Ch~osen V'ocation-Perivate Secretary.
Hobby -Dancing.
Paslitime-P1lrab thep no


.


( a EVELYN ELIZA\BET`H GA-NZEMU'ILLER.
Within the mid-nightr of her ha~ir
Half-hiddlen in its deetpest deeps.
--Tennyson.
NicTkname--Evvie.
Bir-thp/alce-Peckiville, Pa.
Dart of Birtch--October 3, 191 2.
St'ate's Addre~rss-Peckville, Pa.
Ca~na/Zonez Add~ress~i~-G atun.
Date of Enerring Cristobal Schoo/--October, 1926.
Grade EntPered-Freshm nn.
Other) SchooIJ.ls Attended Before Com)inlg to Carna/Zonle-Blakelyr
High School.
School Actirites--Glee Club, '27, '28; Supper Club, '27, '28, '29,
30, Ca~rnival, '2;; President Debating Club, '30.
Favoritre Expre-tssion-"Oh, bab-! "
Chosenl Vocation -School Teacher.
Hobby~-Dancing.
Pastime--Reading.







20 THE CARIBBEAN.


ALICE EVELYN HENTER.


Thou who hast
The fatal gift of beauty.


--Byron.


Nickname--Jackie.
Birthplace--Gorgona, C. Z.
Date of Birth-December 8, r912.
State's Address-Philadelphia, Pa.
Canal Zone Address--Gatun.
Date of Enter-ing Cristabal School--October, 1926.
Grade Entered--Frs en
School Activites-Gle KClub, '27; Supper Club, '27, '29, 'So;
Secretary-Treasu'r iebating Club, '29; Debating Club,
30; Typist, THE CakihBE. L Staff, '30; Chorus, '27;
Carnival, '28. J
Favo tre Expressio "I ne~g laughed so many! "

Pastime--Tat Ing over the telephone.


F. WILLIAM NEWMAN, JR.

An ounce of wit is worth a pound of sorrow.
--Richard Baxter.

Nickname--Fitty.
Birthplace-Brooklyn, N. Y.
Date of Birth--July 14, 1912.
Canal Zone Addr-ess--Box 235, Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School---October, 1918.
Grade Entered--First.
School Activities-Orchestra, '27, '28; Carnival, '2'7, '28, '29,
'30; Wittiest Student, '29, '30; Joke Editor THE CARIB-
BEAN Staff, '29, '30; "The Lottery Man," '3o.
Favorite Expression--"E gad! "
Chosen Vocation-Electrician.
Hobby--Playing the violin.
Pastime--Joking.

















~4~P. J





L.


PAULINE HERMAN.
She is pretty to walk with and witty to talk with,
A4nd pleasant too, to think on.
Nickame-aul.-Sir rohin Suckling.
Birthplace--Fort Hamilton, N. Y.
Date of Birth-Mrarch I 9, 19I3
State's Address-Pine Point, Old Orchard, Me.
CanalZone Addu~-ss--Fort de Lesseps.
Date of Entlering~p Cristobal Schtool--October I, 1927.
prade Entered--Sophomore.
Other Schrools Attended Befor~e Com~ing to Canal Zone--Clifton
High School, Ohio; Star of the Sea School, Va.; Emmacu-
lata Highl School, K~an.; Miss Doharty's School for Girls,
Ohio.
School ActrivitieJ--Supper Club, '27, '28, '29; Glee Club, '27;
Swimming, '28; Tennis, '28; Track, '28; President of Girls'
Athletic Association, '29
College ELxpected to Enter--Wellesley College.
Favorite Expression--"You wouldn't fool me? "
Chosen Vocationr-Interior Decorator.
Hobby--Collecting pictures of movie stars.
Pastime--Tennis aInd swimming.








THE CARIBBEAN. 21


ELSIE BEAlTRICE BIRK~ELA.ND.

How her fingers went when they move by note
Through measures finle, as she marched them o'er
The yielding plank of the ivory floor.
--Benjamin F. Taylor.
Nickname-LT. C.
Birikhplace-Brooklyn, N. YI.
Date of Birth--September 24, Ig9 I.
State's Addrless--Brook lyn,~ N. Y-.
Cana/Zonre A-~?ddess-Cris tobal..
Date of Entering Cristobal Schoo/--October, 1917.
Grader Enteredn-First.
School Activriti~s--Supper Club, '27, '28, '29, '30; Orchestra,
'28, '29; Track, '26; Glee Club, '27, '28, '29; Chorus,'27.
Favorie ~Expr~ession-"Who''d a-thunk it! "
Chosen Vhcatio n--Ste nograp her.
Hobby--Reading.
Pastim~e-Reading.





























ELEANOR M. FITZGERALD.

The mildest manners and the gentlest heart.

Homrer.
Nickname--Fitz.
Birthp~nlac-Ancon, C. Z.
Date of Birth-June 25, r913.
State's Aldd-rss--New York, N. Y.
Calna/Zone A-ddress-Cristobal.
Date of Entrirng Cristobal Schroo/-Mayfl, 926h.
Grade Enlt~eredEighth.
Other Schtools Attendied Befor~e Com2ing to Cana/Zore--St. Cath-
erine's Academy, N. Y; Beidler School, Chicago, Ill.
School A~ctivities--Supper Club, '27; Glee Club, '27, '28; "The
Lottery Man," '0.
Favor-itepxpression-"You wouldn't fool me, would ya? "
Chosen V/ocation--Business career.
Hobby--Traiveling.
Pastime--Talking.


VICTORIA MELENDEZ.

Sir, y.our wit ambles well, it goes easily.

--Shakespeare.
Nickname--Mel.
Birthlplac~e--Brookl-n, NS. Y.
Date o Birt~h-June 18, 1912.
Cana/Zone Addrel-tss- Cristobal.n
SDate of Ente,rin Cristobarl School--October, 1918S.
Grade Entered-First.
Schiool Activites-Track, '28, '2r,; Swimming, '29); Czrnival, '28.
College ExrprretedfEnterl-Sibley.
FNworilte ExpreZSSion- "Y~l eah :"
Chrosen, kocation-Electrician.
Hobby--Boating.
Pastime-Water Polo.


M











FRANCES MERCEDES DAYS.

A friend more divine than all divinities.
--George Eliot.
Nickname--Franny.
Birthplacee-Ancon, C. Z.
Date of Birtht-December 31, r911.
State's Addr-ess--Savannah, Ga.
-- Canal Zone Address--Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School--October 4, I 923.
Grande Entered--Sixth.
School ;rdctivites--Girls' Glee Club, '28; Supper Club, '28,
'29, )30; Vice President Supper Club, '29; President
Supper Club, '30; Secretary Junior Class, '29; Secretary
Senior Class, '30; Gym, '27; Alumni Editor THE CARIB-
BEAN Staff, '30; Carnival, '30; "The Lottery Man," '30.
Favor-ite Expr-ession--"Oh, my cow! "
Chosen Vocation-Stenographer.
Hob-y--Dancing.
Pastime---Reading.



FRANCISCO M. WONG.

Patience is a necessary ingredient -imeiof genius.

N~ickname--Frisky.
Birthplace--Colon, R. of P.Dapo~lrr-eebr 8 go


Date of Entering Cristobal School--February, r926.
Grade Entered--Eighth.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z.-St. Joseph's ,
College.
School Activities--Glee Club, '2;, '28; Physical Training, '27,
'28; Orchestra, '29.
Favorite Expr-ession--"Use your brains."
Chosen Vocation--Business.
Hobby--Spiritual reading.
Pastime-Experimenting.




MARY VIRGINIA EBERENZ.

Plain without pomp, and rich without a show.
--Dryden.
Nickname-Gin.
a ~Birthplace--Ancon, C. Z.
Date of Birth--July 2, r91o.
State's Address--Louisville, Ky.
Cana/Zone AIddress--Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristabal School-4ctober, 19r7.
Grade Entered--First.
School Activities-Supper Club, '27, '28,'29 '30; Glee Club,
'27, '28; Carnival, '30; Gym, 127, )28.
Favorite Expression--"I don' wanna."
Chosen Vocatio n-S tenographer.
Hobby--Going places and seeing things.
Pastime--Reading.


THE CARIBBEAN.













Gentle of speech, beneficent of mindl.

NirickrnameElsita.

Date of Birth--August I 1, Igr3.
Cana/aZoner .Iddi~res-Criistobal.

Gra~de Entered-F~'reshmn.; n
Other Scrhools Atte~llnd Beforez C~oi~irni to Canalm Zone-Iic~io- de



Sco/oeo c .I ii tii d-- S apper 2 , 28,I, 'ag ; 30 ;G!re Club~,

FavUorite Expr)EJSion-"(Cheeri~o!
Ch2osen F~ocation 11r\itin".
Hiobby~-Readng.ng
Pastime--Swimming.


E. BEVERLY TURNER.

Speech is great; but sile-nce is greater.

Nvick~nam2e- Tunner.
Birthplace-Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Birth--lzlrch II, 191I2.
Canal Zone Addnress-Criristobl.
Date of Entrling Cristobal Schiool--October, I918S.
SGrade Entered--First.
School Activities-Swimmingc, '29, '3o; Captain Neptune Club,
'29; Captain Swimming Team, '29.
College Expct~edr to Enterl-Rutgers.
Favol-rie ~xpression--"I'll bite."
Hobby--Diving.
Pastime--Swimming and diving.











5,d


JOAN V'IRGINIA STIEY'ENSO N.
Her voice was likes the voice the star~s
Had when they- sang~ together.
-Dantei Ga~briie Rosetri
Nicikname--Sloe Gin.
Birthplac~e New Jersey.
Date of Birth--June 3, r9 rl -
Strate's Addilress-New Jersey.
Cana/Zoner AJlddress-Cri-stobal
Date of Enlter~ing Cristobal( Schoo/20-October, I927.
Gmrade Entererd-Sophomore.
School A~ctivities-Grl's Glee Club, '28, 'l9, '30 Supper Club,
'28,'29; Girl's Atrhletic A-ssociation, '28, '9, 'jo; T~rack
Team, '2r); Carnivanl Rerview, '30; B.'sk;et Ball Team, '30;
Volle!- Ball Tream, '29; Debating Club, '-9, '30; V~ice
President Debatre Club, '30; "Gy-psy Rov-er," '30; Artf
Editor T`HF CARIBBEAN Staff, '30; Fashion Show "Dow-n
Petticoat Lane," '29; Librarian, '29.
Fav~orite Exp~cir2"ession-"Blee it or not."
Chosen F'ocation-Arthletic Instructress.
Hobby--Canoeing and dancing.
Pasltim~e-Swimming~ and reading.


THE CARIBBEAN.


ELSIE DOROTHY DARLE.I-T


# u~
L








24 THE CARIBBEAN.


I WALTER WIKINGSTAD.
A man of mark. -Longf/ellowv.
Nickname--Wicky.
Birthplace-Kristiansund, Norway.
Datf- of Birth-September 17, 191 2.
meAddress-Kristiansund, Norway.
alZone Address--Cristobal.
ateof Entering Cristabal School--October, 191 8.
Grade Entered--First.
SSchool Activites--Glee Club, '27, '28; Class Vice President,
'27; Baseball, '27, '28, '29; Captain Baseball Team, '30;
Bowling, '28, '29, '30; Track, '29; Swimming, '27, )28,
29; Tennis, '27, '29, )30; Basket ball,'29,'30; Soccer, '29,
I '30; Vice President, Boys' Athletic Association,'29; Busi-
ness Manager, THE CARIBBEAN Staff, '30; President,
Boys' Athletic Association, '30; "The Lottery Man," '30.
College Expected to Enter--Bates College.
Favorite Expression--"Yenh! "
L' I `Hobby--Practicing sport of the season.
Pastime--Sports.
ESTAFANIA GRACE WHEELER. C

Her voice was ever soft,
Gentle and low, an excellent thing in woman.
Nickname-Sis. --Shakespeare.
Birtrpflace-Corona, Calif.
Date of Birth--July. I, 1911.
State's Addiress--Utica, N. Y.
Canal Zone Address--Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School--October, 1926.
Grade Entered--Sophomore. :
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Canal Zone-JTames
Kiimble School and Utica Free Academy.
School Activites--Supper Club, '27, '28, '29, '30; Glee Club,
'28; Baseball, '28; Girls' Athletic Association, '29.
College Expected to Entr~r-Utica Memorial Hospital.
Chosen Vocation--Nurse.
Hobby-Writing, reading, and sewing.
Pastime--Walking and Dramatic Club.
Favorite Expression--"Gee! "

RICHARD C`OROALLES SERGEANT.

Skill'd in the globe and sphere, he gravely stands,
And with his compass, measures seas and lands.
--Dryden.
Nickname--Uncle Dik.
Birthplace--Colon, R. of P.
Date of Birth--January 21, 191 1.
State's Address--12 Monroe Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.
F- Canal Zone Address--Cristabal.
Date of Entering Crirstaba School--October, 1922.
Grade Entered--Fi fth.
I ~Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Canal Zone--Public
S'School, Long Island, N. Y.
Srkool Activities-Orchestra, '27, '8, '29, '30; Glee Club, '27,
'28, '29; Calptain Swimming Team,'28,'29; Swimming,'30;
/ Captain Tennis Team, '29; Tennis, '28, '29, )3o; Neptunle
; IClub, '29, '30; Basket ball, '30.
Favorite Exporession--"Yeah! "
Chosen Vocation--Seaman.
Hobby--Swimming.
Pastime--Loafing.







THE CARIBBEAN. 25



JAMES CAMPBELL, Ja.

A1~ man of hope and forward-looking mind.
-Wllordsweorth.

k -Slim Jim.
irthpla~ce-Cooperstown, N. Y~.
DaeofBirth--July l 7, 1912.
State's Aiddress F~lint, Mlich.
anal~one Adidressi-Box 333, Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School--October, 1920.
Grade Entered-FIourth.
Schoo .l ctivities-Sw~imming, '2:, Track, '28; Carnival, '29,
'30.
College Expected to Entrpr-General Motors Technical School.
Favorite Exp~ression-"Hey~! "
Chosen V/ocationt-Mechancial Engineer.
Hobby--Playing the clarinet in the band.
Pastime--Paddling around in a cayuco.



RITA TERESA JOY'CE.
She is graceful as the greenly- waving boughs in
summer wind. --Gerald Ma~lssy.

Nickname--Rie.
Birthplace-Chester, Pa.
Date of Birth-August 23, 19I3
State's Address-Philadelphia, Pa.
Cal~naZone Address--Cristabal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School--October, 1920.
Grade Entered--First.
School AIctivities--Glee Club, '27, '28; Supper Club, '27, '28,
'29; Swimming, '27; CarnivalI, '28, '29, '30; "The Lottery-
Man," '30.
College Expected to Enter--Rosemont College.
Favorite Expression--"Most any minute now."
Chosen Vocation--Fashion Illustrator.
Hobby--Dancing.
Pastime--Having a good time.



ARTHUR JAMES M\UNDBERG.
A merryr heart doeth good like a medicine.

..~i Ncknam~e--Mundv.
Bir-thplace-Brooklyln, N. Y.
Date of Birth--July 29, 1911.
P ~Canal Zonre A-ddress-Cristabal.
C I ~Date of Enterijng Cristobal School-I 917.
Grade Entre,-d-FIirst.
School Actjivitis--Glee Club, '2;; Swimming, '27, '28, '29, '30;
Tennis, '2j, '28, '29, '30; Carnival, '30; "The Gypsy
.'Rover" Orchestra, '30.
College Expected to Enrter-Business College.
Favorite Expression2-"Y eah ?"
Chosen Vocatrion-Commercial Business.
Hobby--Swimming.
Pastime--Reading.

MR 19742---4











PHOEBE O'DONNELL.

Eyes so transparent,
That through them one sees the soul.
--Gautier.
Nickname--'Bama.
Birthplace-Mobile, Ala.
Date of Birth-Flebruary 2, 1911.
State's Address-Mobile, Ala.
Canal Zone Address--Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School--October, I928-
Grade Entered--Senior.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Canal Zone--Mobile
High, Barton Academy.
College Expected to Enter-University of Alabama.
Favorite Expression-"LI love you. Oh, yes! "
Chosen Vocation--Nurse or Stenographer.
Hobby--Swimming.
Pastime--Fibbing.


OIVIND ARNESEN.

He appeared like the sun-god at his rising in the
early morn.
--PAnraur.
NLickname-Eddie.
Birthlplace-Kaoistiansund, Norway.
Date of Birth--July 24, I9I3-
Canal Zone Anddress--Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal Sch2ool--October, 1929.
Grade Entered--Special Student.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Canal Zonle-KIoisti-
ansund High School.
School Activities--Soccer, '30.
College Expected to Enter--Oslo Business School.
Favorite Exwpression--"Sure! "
Chosen Vocation--Business Man.
Hobby--Reading and practicing sports.
Pastime--Sports.


ROSE T. CORRIGAN.

For she was jes' the quiet kind
Whose natures ncver vary,
Like streams that keep a summer mind
Snowhid in Jenooary.
--Lowell.
Nickname--Wush.
Birt-hplace--Gatn, C. Z.
Date of Birth--November i, 191"-
Cana/Zone Alddre~ss-Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School--January, 1930.
Grade Entered--Special Student.
Schlool Activities--Supper Club, '26.
Other Schtools Attended Before Coming to Canal Zone--Toms
River; Colegio de Sion, Costa Rica.
Favorite Expression--"Y de ahi."
Hobby--Reading.
Pastime--Reading.


THE CARIBBEAN.







THE CARIBBEAN.


MARIA CA4RIDAD STEWArRT.

Voice gentle as the breeze that playrs in the
evening
Among the Spices of Sabara.
-Dr-. Johnrson.

Nick~name-Mnaria..
Birthplacre-Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Birth-MayI\ 26, I9to
State's Add~llrJ-hltess Phiaepha Pa.
Carna/Zonec .J'iddress-C ristobal..
Date of Entlering C~jritabal School--October, 1921-
Grade Entered)-F-ourth.
Other, Schools Attecnded BeforeP Com)ing to Ca~nal Zone-WaVure
s. Notre Dame, BelgEium.
School Actrivities--Glee Club, '2;; Supper Club, '27, Girls'
Athletics, '27.
i ~Favorite Expressrion--"Shee! "'

~rz~t~- P le~4 Pastime--Reading.







NEHLS G. JANSEN.

An honest man's the noblest work of God.
-Pope. *~
Nickname--Swede.
Birthplare-KI~orsor, Denmarkr.
Date of Birth-April 14, 1905-
State's Address--Perth Amboy, N. J.
CarnalZone Address--France Field.
Date of Entering Cristobal Schrool--October, 1929.
Grade Entered-Special Student.
Other Schools AJttended Before Com~ing to Calna/Zone-RoskildeSloi Nnr rr Lmr o nn Lwns fla

Ho~bby-Studying aviation.
Favoorite Expression--"Sir!"




28 THE CARIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN. 29


As we wrere in 1928.


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CLASS HISTORY.
Mlavis Thir/wall '3o.


THE CARIBBEAN, and in every activity of our
school. Why, others too recognized us as out-
standing. The Freshmen-poor things such ordi-
nary ones--looked up to us with awed eyes.
We were busy all this year studying (and enjoying
it to our surprise), taking an interest in helping
every way we could, and actually beginning to
frown a little at the disturbances caused by the
Lower Classmen. The high spot of ourjunioryear
was--you must have heard--our Junior-Senior
Banquet. It was given at the Hotel Washington,
and this was the only "usual" thing about it. In
every other detail it was most unusual. After the
banquet, we gave a dance to entertain our guests.
Even some members of the Senior Class of 1929,
agreed (in private) that our banquet was a better
one than theirs had been. But, then, wee could
have told them that.

CHAPTER IV.--THE PRESENT.

At last! W~e are Seniors. But this isn't hard to
realize. We immediately assume a dignified and
preoccupied air, as if the burden of the whole
school rests on our shoulders alone. We feel, in
fact, that it does. We give our party--our last.
We star in athletics and other activities. Then,
"The Lottery Man," our play and the best ever
given, and, greatest of all, the publication of
THE CARIBBEAN, into which we have put all our
endeavor and hard work. But we are rewarded.
Isn't it a great success? Soon, in a very few short
weeks is Commencement and then we part. The
one disappointment of our Senior year was the loss
of about I 5 members of our class, which we had
hoped would be the largest ever to graduate from
Cristobal High School. But we made up our loss
in number by excelling in other qualities, and by
working together. Now we realize that June 20
is not far off. Our high school days will be over
and Cristobal High School will lose the most
unuSUal ClRSS it ever educated. Ask me if that
statement is true or not. I'm a member of that
class.


PROLOGUE.

The history of the Senior Class of '930 may
seem to others the same as that of any Senior
Class, but to the members of that class it has a
history unequaled. WThere before has such a
class graduated from high school? Ask a mem-
ber of that group. "Nowhere," we find. True
enough. Ask me. I'm a member of that class.

CHAPTER I.--THE DARK AGES.

October I, 1926--will we ever forget that date-
some 40 pupils registered in Cristobal High School
as Freshmen. That was the big day of our lives.
During that first year that group of 4o organized
a class that was to prove extraordinary. It got
hazed, gave a party, caused lots of trouble, in fact
it was a most unusual Freshman class. By June,
it had learned what high school life was, and had
decided that it was most exciting and enjoyable.
We were still a bit hazy about some things but
about these we pretended great knowledge.
So much for us as Freshmen.

CHAPTER TI.--THE MIDDLE AGES.

Oh--here is that extraordinary class again!
Just as extraordinary as ever. Almost the same
group with just a few losses and some additions.
We were getting used to each other, getting to
know which of us were the real students, which the
musicians, which the athletes, which the -but
we won't go further. As I said, this class was extr-a
ordinary\ and we found that we could be repre-
sented in every school activity our school boasted
of. This year, to prove that we noticed what was
going on in the world, we gave a "Lindbergh
Party-." Airplanes, propellers, and aeronautical
articles prevailed. This was one of the most
original parties ever given. Hah! Another un-
usual feat by an unusual class-

CHAPTER III.--THE RENAISSANCE.

Our Junior year. WTe suddenly found our-
selves very important personages on the staff of


THE CARIBBEAN.








THE CARIBBEAN. 31


~


Raie Bliss a~nd Elsie Da~r/ev.


W:e, the graduates of I930, in sane and sound mind, do solemnly bequeathe the following honors
and unusual abilities to y.e Juniors of Cristobal High School; this to be bequeathed only under the
consideration that ye future graduates seriously and untiringly strive to acquire these treasurable and
much-envied abilities quoted below:


BEQUJESTS.



Her musical talent

Her giggle and dancing feet..
His lank~iness .. .
His dignity. _
His devilishness. .
Her height. ..... -
Her typing medals .. .
Her seen-and--not-heard-ness.
Her happy-go-lucky was.....
Her personality- bob. .. ..
Her G~reta Garbo-ness. ....
Her long legs. . .
Herl lipstick.. ..
His come-hitherishness_ .. _
His shampoo..... .
His wit and slang ..
Hergeniality .
His stubborness .
Her Hanming tresses .
Her grace and smartness. .
His faithfulness. .

Her gentle voice .
His gallantry .. .. ....
His good nature. .....


Elsie Birkeland .
Rae Bliss....

James Campbel .
Thomas Cole. ..
Ralph Crum .
Elsie Darley. ..
Frances Days ..
Virginia Eberenz. _.
Eleanor Fitzgerrald .
Evelyn Ganzemuller.
Alice Henter .
Pauline Herman
Rita Joyce.......
Victor Melrendez.
Arthur Mundberg _
W\illiam Newman
Della Raymond.
Richard Sergeant ..
Virginia Stevenson .
Mavis Thirlwall. .
Beverly Turner. .. ..
Estafania Wheeler...
W\alter W'ikingstad. .
Francisco Wlong. .. .


The Drake boy~s.
Wm. Harmon and Mlargaret Dalvis respe~ctively..
Harold Mlueller and Manrion Neely
Mary Bretch.
Percival Ly-ew.
Fabian Englander.
John K~elly- an~d Bettina Powers.
Lillian Housel and Richard W'ood.
Ben Williams and Elsie Doar.
Fred Kroll and Eleanor Urwiler.
Clara Frisk an~d Carlos Rankin.
Ruth Duval.
Ray~mondc W'ill.
Parker Hanna1.
Crawford Campbell and Burton Hackett.
\Yelma Hall an1d Walter Bundy.
Dorothy Wertz and Russell Ellwell.
A-nna Ryan and Erle Ferrguson.
Thoma~s Pescod.
V~innie Elson and Edwaird Conkling.
Celeste Clarke.
Edwardf Wilkins andl Kenneth M\aurer.
Bill Bailey- and Beldling K~ing.
Ma~rgaret Mijtchell andl Eugenia MIcLain.


(Signedl


RAInT SEASON.
DaY SEASON.


~-----------







32 THE CARIBBEAN.


PREVIEW7I OF THE NEWS.
Eldie Darley~, 'o aind Rae Bliss, '3o.

SCENE-Lluxurious suite in office of Editor-in-
Chief of Consolidated Newspaper Corpora-
tion, 5th Avenue, New York City-.
TIME--I950 A4. D.
DRAMATIC PERSONAE
Tom COLEY, Editor-in-Chief.
BEVERLY TURNER, Star Reporter
(Mlale and married).
]EVELYN GANZM\ULLER, Star Repolrter
(Female and free).


ScENE I.
Editor-in-Chief seated at antique desk.
Tap of the knocker on door (marked private).
Boy in uniform enters.
Boy~: "Reporter wishes to confer with you, Sir."
Chiepf (Gruf~y): "I'm busy-h--er show him
in."
(Exit boy--enter star repor-ter (malle) inl Shirt slreeves).
Star Reporter- (male): "Here's to-day's news."
(Reads.) Byrd, Jr., conquers fourth pole. Wanl-
ter Wtikingstad, famous parachute jumper, makes
successful triple jump from loo,ooo feet over
Peoria, Ill. "Say, that's not so bad for C. H. S.,
ch?" (Reads again.) A4ngela Sapristi scores tre-
mendous success as "Azucena" in II Trovatore,
at the New Metropolitan. "Do you know that's
Virginia Stevenson? She's a second Schumann_
Heink, boy! That's getting on in the world, and,
believe it or not, her accompanist is none other
than our own Elsie Birkelandr-a really celebrated
pianist. I believe her stage name is Elsette
Kreland."
Editor (Taking long puff on choice cigar):
"That's great. I received some interesting news
from our special correspondents abroad to-day.
(Fumbles among papers on desk.) WIhere is that
paper? Oh! here it is. Strangely, a lot of it
concerns ex-C. H. S.students--our class of l930-
to beexact." (Reads.) Franncisco Wo~g, head of
Chinese Diplomatic Corps, says, among other
things, that James Campbell has succeeded in
converting 200 Chinese at one meeting. He has
wonderful power, speaks Chinese fluently. "So
James hasn't been killed yet!" "'And our corres-
pondent in Spain says that Senarita Rita Joyce
Terrancy is having great success with her new
Home for Divorce Orphans, at Madrid. It was


a 'go' from its very inception, for even you can
imagine what an inconvenience it would be to an
aspiring divorcee to have her offspring thrust upon
her every six months for temporary care. This
home cer-tainly fills a long felt need. I'm for it
myself. I hear there is a long waiting list already.
And from London we have the news of Elsie
Darley's new novel, to be out next month. I've
forgotten the title--Romance, tho' I believe.
Y'ou know she captured the Nobel Prize last year
with her masterpiece entitled 'Seven O'clock.'
From Paris, we hear that Mlelendez and Bliss, or
Victor- and Rae, as we knew them, are still the
sensation of the town with their eccentric dance
revue of 300 'ALrtistes de Terpsichor-is.' I heard
they copped a fortune at M~onte Carlo, too.
Pretty soft, ch?"
( Knock on dloor-. Bo~v in uniformn enterj--female
reporter d~il-rect/ behind himl.)
Boy to ~Editor: "A lady wishes---"
Star REpor~ter (Female, interrupting, to boy--):
"I've got my wish. (Smiles.) N\ow run along,
Algernon. (To Editor.) I've got lots of news in
these cables. (Excitedly waving same.) I just
had to rush right over and tell you about them.
It's all about our classmates. Some sad news, too.
ArthIur Mundberg, you remember 'Mundy,'
cute blonde with heavenly blue eyes? He has
been Air Traffic Cop on the new Zeppelin from
Berlin to Beverly Hills, California, and one of the
through Zepps from the Buenos Aires branch line
was late and to avoid a crash over the Bahamas,
'M~undv' dashed in front of the B. A. Z. r3-z3-o-o-
and was run over. They were making 963 miles
per, too, bult the cable says 'plucky Mlundy'
escaped with only minor cuts, and shock--and he
never used to shock easy either. (Smiles, and










Oswald, Jr. has matrimonial aspirations toward
F1nranes, as soon as he gets his divorce from the
former Countess Oshee Getserman. Pretty nice
for Franlces. She gained her ability to capture
'eml practicing for our Carn-ival, if she needed any
aid to her usual line of capti ven ess."'
Editor-: "Yeah! I remember that Carnival.
(Picks up newspaper.) I saw something in here
about some of the other members of our class.
Here in the photogravure section, just glance at
this sweet-faced nurse. Now, I could enjoy poor
health with that sort of a face gazing down on me
frequently; that's (reads from sheet) Headnurse
Wh'lee(~ler-connected with the Bellevue Char-ity-
Hospital for r3 years. She has had more babies
named for her than any ten presidents. The
secret is, she endows each little new arrival who
is given her name with a 8r00 bank account to
insure his way in the world. Quite an idea!
(Turns to another sheet.) And this athletic
personage is Paurlinez Hermalni. She has again
won the Golf Trophy in the Elimination Tourna-
ment between the United States and the Conti-
nent. Some feat! No, not double e this timer.
(Holds up paper.) Son, just gaze on this imposing
structure. Isn't that a great piece of architecture?
As I live! (Reads.) Beauty Salon at corner of
5th Avenue and Calle Galindo, G~rande Cristobal.
A powerful combine has been formed by the
amalgamation of the famous beauty specialists
Ebelren:- and Fitzgerldnk with Elizabeth AIrden;
$10,000,000 capital. Shoppes all over the world.
(Puts down paper.) Say, I wonder if they take
gentlemen clients too? (Feels flabby flesh onl
face; bald pate, and corpulent tummy.) I need
a trip somewhere; guess I'll try the tropics; it
ought to be interesting after being gone twenty
years. (Rings for boy who enters.) Say! Boy,
get me rates and sailings by P. A. A. to Panamna,
pronto .
Boy: "YIes, sir. Boss, could I be your personal
valet?" (Smiles broadly, exits.)
S. R. (Female): "How time does fly! (Sighs).
I need a rest too, you might let me know about
those sailings to Panama, Chief T`om (dreamily to
self) and Filtty will be there and Alice Henlter
and -"
S. R. (Male): "Seems as tho' r930 turned out
about as many notables as any class, before or
since. Well, so long, folks!"
CURTAIN.


picks up another yellow sheet.) And Fitty~ NeLw-
man wants us to write up his 'Nifty-Noise-
Makers;' they have been touring all the big
towns in the Unlited States and Europe, and now
they have settled in Grande Cristobal for the
racing season. Newman's 'Nifty-Noise-M/akers'
are the biggest hit of both continents, since Rudy
Vallee retired with his billions. (Reads from
another cablegram.) Alicia V'ani, as you'll easily
guess, that's our Alice Henter-, has just completed
her 99th starring talkie. It's in Spanish, 'Besos
Calientes.' I saw it in Bogota. Boy, it surely
lived up to its name. She heads her own comp-
panyy now--with studios at Bella Vista. That's
success in big letters, I say!"
Star Repor-ter (Male): "Since we are airing
personal matters, I may as well add my bit. I
had a letter from Ralpht Crumll recently. He is
Head Professor of English at Harvard. (Grandly-.)
L-a-dies and gent-leman! He's known as 'Crabby
Crum' in his classes--for he so objects to the
least muttering or talking. Same old Crum11, all
right! He sent me a copy of his 'English Idioms
in Slang;' tho't I might find it useful. It's used in
all the universities now. He's been keeping up a
punctual (that's his style) correspondence with
Ddlan and Macis it seems. Della has a beautiful
Home for the Insane in the Adirondacks--marvel-
ous surroundings, birds everywhere about the
grounds, and monkeys playing all around the
place--just watching them is part of the method
used in the cures--it has been very successful, so
her ads say, and she has cured thousands. She's
a wonderful woman. I heard, too, that the en-
tire property was willed to her by a former inmate
of the Home in appreciation of the wonder ul care
given him when she was matronly of the Incurable
Ward. She need never work a day, but memories
and love of the work keep her there. That's just
Della. Mavis has a Fashion Salon in Paris which
has become the rendezvous of all the very ultra
elite of the whole world. It is on Rue de la Prix
somewhere. That's just her line, Ba-be! How
she could wear clothes! C-rulnany said he had seen
Frances recently. She is secretary to Harold
Oswald Van Kirautz-ALmerica's wealthiest man,
you know. He owns a fleet of Zeppelins, anld has
yachts and racing cars by the dozens; spends ten
months of the year going places and doing things,
and seeing people. Takes his secretary along
most of the time. Ralphz hints that Harold
MR 19742-5


THE CARIBBEAN.







34 THE CARIBBEAN.


Photo by Koeduk, Prra~nma.




THE CA4RIBBEANT 35

JUNIORS




36 THE CARIBBEAN.

JUN Rg



















~


THE: CARIBBEAN.




JUNIOR CLASS.


NAMIE.


REPRESENTATIVE. SONG.


Miss Moore......

William Bailey .............. .....

Mary Bretch......
William Brodersen.,...... .

Walter Bundy......... .
Crawford Campbell........
Celeste Clarke. .. .. ..
Edward Conklin......... .

Margaret Davis.. .. .. ...
Elsie Doar... .. . ..
Frank Drake......... .
Rodman Drake. .. . ..
Ruth Duval... .. .... .
Vinnie Elson.. .. .....
Russell Elwell........

Fabian Englander . .....
Erle Ferguson. . ... ...
Clara Frisk. ........
Burton Hackett. . .....
Velma Hall....
Parker Hanna........
William Harmon ......
Lillian Housel........

Jack Kelly........
Belding Kiing. .. .....
Frederick K~roll ..

Percival Lyew. ......... . . ... .
Kenneth Maurer .. ........

Margaret Mitchell.........
Harold Mueller. .. ..

Caroline Napoleon.
Thomas Pescod ......... . . . ...

Ronald Phillpotts. ......... . . ....
Bettina Powers .. .. .. ..
Carlos Rankin. . ... .
Anna Ryan. .. .. .. .

Dorothy Wertz......
Edward Wilkins. .......

Raymond Will. .. .... ..


"Mean to Me."

"Oh, Baby, Where Can You Be?"
"Ain't Mlisbehavin'.

"Button Up Your Overcoat!"

"Pagan Love Song."
"I Get The Blues W~hen It Rains."

"Song of The Nile."
"I Faw Down and Go Boom!"
"If You Believed In Mle!"

"W~hen MyI) Dreams Come True!"
"I'll Alway-s Be In Love With ~ou."

"Wlhat Mak~es You Do Mle Like You Do?"

"Sweet Sue.'
"Roses of Picardv."
"I'm AL Dreamer. Aren't W`e All?"

"Singein' In The Rain."
"I Wnn t To Be Loved By- You Alone."
"I Love M~r Old-Fashioned Ma:n."

"Hallelujah! E'm A Bum."
"Myv Bill!"

"Prve Got A Feeling I'm Falling In Love."
"Satisfied."

"My Man!"'
"My W'ild Irish Rose.'
"I Wannt To Be Bad! '

"K~iss M~e Dear, W'hat D'y-a Say?"
"Little Pal."

"Down Byi The W\inegar W~oiks."
"That's Myr Weakness Now!"

"Do Something!"
"Dream Kiisses!"

"Pardon M~e, It's A Habit Of Mline, Bu t I've Gotta Be K~issed."
"Sunny Side Up."
"Where The Sh\ Little V'iolets Grow."
"Ah! Sweet My\steryT of Life!"'
"Sweet Rosie O'Grad\-."
"Louisiana Lullaby-."
"Sand Mfan's Blues.'

"I Don't Wa'nt To Be Sitting On Top of The W~orld If I Halve
To Be Sitting Alone."
"St. Louis Blues."

"I'm Just A Vagabond Lover."
"Lovable and Sweet."


Ben Williams. . ........ . .. .
Richard Wood .............. ..
Eleanor Urwiler . . ...... . .






'THE CA~RIBBEA.~N. 39




40 THE CARIBBEAN.




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THE CARIBBEAN. 47


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(.i
=-^*~T~9~c-~ c-
:.?;~"
~4r*~ IC --------1


I--1


THE SOPHOMORE TH-EATER.


Miss Kimbro........... .. ........."High Voltag~e"

Genevieve Barry ....... ."The Girl Fr-iend" '
Ernest Ber-ger., . ...-- . "Hlrd boiled'
Gladys Bliss. . .. . - "Sunny" ~
Mary Clark..........- ...... ."Be Calm, Camilla"
Alice Curtis. ........ _.....- "Pleasur-e Bounl"

Mary Curtis. ...... ."Sweet Adeciline"
Allene Deakins....... .....- ."The Charm School"

Mary Dean. .. ... .. .. .- "Glorifying the AImerican G~irl"
Willie Diers. .. . .- - .. .. .. "Penrod"

Paul Dignam. .......... ....."The Student Prince"
Zola Dorson ........... "The Exaltedi Flapper"
Beverly Dunn.. .. ... . .. . .- "T`he Sophomlore"
Dona Eaton. ....... ."T`he Dance of Life~"

Joseph Ebdon.. .. .. ... -.-. - ."Sonny Bo-"
Harry Egolf. .. ....... .. .. ."The Mlighty"
Vivian Elmgren ... .. .... . .. ."Treasure Girl"
Antonio Fernandez. .. .. -.- "The Desert Song"
Albin Forsstrom, . .. .. .. . "The Prince of HIearts"
Alice Gormerly. .........-.. ... . ."Honor Bright"

Frank Griesinger ... .. ....- - - ."The V'iking"
Marian Hahn. . . ,.. - "The Pealcocki Fan"
Mlildred Harmon. .. . .. ...- - .."Quality Street"

James Hayden .. .. .... . .. "Sons O' Guns"
Verona Herman ....... ...... - -- -- "Nila Rosa"
Beatrice Housel........ "Mrs. W'iggs of the Cabbage Patch"

Jodie Lu Jones.. .. .. .. .. -. .."Her Mlajesty The Queen"
Howard Keenan. .... .. .. .- "The Sonlg Writer"


Malrie Kle~efkens ..
AlvinLyew. .
F~ranklyn ~elririt

Thomas Mlurphy .
Manrtha Potts.

Jean Pruit. .
Blanca Pulgar
Eleanor Reinhold j
Nell W'ard law
Ben Roberts. ... .
Herman Roos ... .
Herbert Rose. . .
Bruce Sanders. ..

Betty Stabler ..
Myles Standish .. ..
Robert Stevenson
Inez T~heoktisto. .


Perry Washab~ugh
Maflcolm WVheeler .

Randolph Wikinlgstad l
Elizabeth Wirtz .. .

Jamers W/\ood . . .
Carl ~a~riger
Robert Mlarshall

George W\ertz
David Gregory


.... ...... Peg O' MyHe~rt"
."Bab"

. ."Sons of the G;ods"
"Down On The Falrm"

...."Holdl Everything'
"Flying High"
"Blow Your Own Horn'

"Landy of Destiny

. "Little W'omen"

."Exceedling Sma~ll"
...."Rip Yan W~inkle"'
... .. .. ."Good Boy"
... .. ."Mlother's Boy-"
. ."Sweetie"

"The Courtship- of Mliles Standish"
"Grumply"
.. "Countess Maritza"
. .."Red Halir"

S ."T`he Duke Steps Out"
S.."Little Lord Faluntelroy
"Yimmie Yonson's Yob"
S "Pollyalna
. . ."ALlibi"



.. ....."The~ Coconuts"


1Vind-swept Palm Trees on Colonl Beach.


MR 197412 6






42 THE CARIBBEAN.





THE CARIBBEAN.


43


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4F4 THE CARIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN. 45




FRESHMAN DIRECTORY.



Name.Sobriuet.Ambition. As realized in I940.


Buck private.

Dancer.

Shoemaker.

Cheer leader.

Chorus man.

Dressmaker.

Comedian.

Hobo.

Campus flirt.

Actress.

Dancing teacher.

Hermit.

Prize fighter.

Undertaker.

Secretary of Y. W. C. A.

Deep-sea diver.
Sheik.

Stool pigeon.

Butterfly collector.

Optimist.
Fortune teller.

Lawyer.

Jockey.

Spring dancer.
Bowler.

Preacher.

Dishwasher.

Paper hanger.
Lion tamer.

Loafer.

Nun.

Old maid.

Radio announcer.

Coal miner.

Singer.

2oo pounder.
Piano mover.

Teacher.

Second George K. Arthur.

Egyptian dancer.
Mann teaser.

Safety pin manufacturer.

Chorus girl.

Dog catcher.
Street cleaner.


Agnew, Harold. . ... .. .. .
Andrews, Maxine. .. . ... ..

Andersen, Harry .. .. ...

Beard, Webster. .. ....

Beine, Duval. .. .. ..

Birkeland, Dorothy... ...

Crouch, Walter .. . .....

David, Jesse........ .

Durham, Carmen. .

Foley, M ary.. . . .........

Foley, Velta. .. . .... ....

French, George...... ..

Gormerly, Edward. ........

Gould, Charles. .... .... .._

Hammond, Helen. .. .. ....

Heilbron, Oscar .. .. . .. . .

Howe, Charles....... .

Huff, Garrett. .. . .......
Keenan William.........

K~leefkins, Louis..............

Krause, Anna........ .....

Lee, H enry ......... ......

L~ockwood, Harold .. .. . .....

Marchosky, Mandi. .. ......

Melendez, Mary........ ...

Murphy, John .. .. .. .. .

O'Rourke, Genevieve. . ...

De la Ossa, Ernest _. ..._

Powers, Ann. .. .. .. .

Pescod, Charles.. .. ....

Rakovsky, Norine. . . ...

Randall, Violet,... ........

Rankin, Thomas. . ......

Reinhold, Ernest ..........

Safford, Natalie... .

Sanders, Bernice.. .

Smith, Harvey..............

Stewart, Olive.. .

Standish, Christian. .. .. ...

Thirlwall, Edna........ ...

Thornton, Elizabeth. .....

Tipton, Lando. .. .. ....

Townshend, Katherine.

Weigle, W illiam . .........

W ertz, George. ...... ....


"Sonny Boy".. .. ..

"Max".. .. .. .. .. .

"Andy". .. .. .. .. .

"Weby~"... .. .. .

"Tropical". .. .. ..
"Dot". . ......

"Handsome". . .

"Chess"...... ....

"Betty".. ... .. ..

"Billie".. ... .. .

"Cleopatra". .. .. .

"Frenchy"......... .

"Eddy"..... ......

"W~atty". .. .. ..

"Elena".. .. .. .

"Ossie". .. . . .

"A4nd how".. . .

"Huffeligree". . . .

"Peanuts"......

"Mono". ... .. .. _

"Buckie"_. .. . .

"Archibald". .. ..

"Locky". .. .. ..

"Mlaga-Nootch" .

"Melody"........

"Murph". .. .. . .

"Billy".. .. ...

"Delicious"

"Teakettle". .. .

"Pipito". . ..

"Shorty". . .. .

"Vi".. .. .. . .

"'Gassy"'.. .. .. .. .

"Pete"... . . .. .

"Stubby". .. .. . ..

"Billy" .... .. . .

"Tiny"... .. .. .
"Snooks"... .. . .

"Nanny".. ......

"'Eddie"'. ....

"Lizzie" .....

"Sands"... .. .. .

"Kiay". .. .. .. .
"Bill". .. .. ... .

"Physical culture".


Gob. . . .. .

Language teacher ..
Salesman. . _

Gob. .

Man .

Physical directress _.....
Fisherman ......_

Scientist. ... .

Nurse .. .. ....

Private secretary .. ....

Dancer. .. ....

Naval officer. .

Inventor....

Overseer .. ..

Stenographer. ..

Aviator . .

Hunter. .

Garbageman ..

Musician. .

Discoverer .

Private secretary.v ...

Moviola operator. ......

Loafer . . ...

Second Sherlock Holmes

Traveler... ..

Street cleaner .. .

Stenographer ......

Civil engineer

Writer. . .. ..

Star athlete........

Stenographer.. .

Actress. . . .

Loafer .. .....

Aeronautical engineer. ..

Manicurist. .. .. . .

Stenographer . .....

Electrical engineer.. .. .

Doctor . . .

Millionaire .

Teacher. ........

Stenographer . ... .

Mechanical engineer. ...

Nurse... .....

Airplane pilot .
Horse doctor. . ....









46 THE CARIBBEAN.


E.i.


Photo by Kiodak, Pana~ms.


a~






THE CA4RIBBEAN. 47






48s THE CARIBBEAN.


THE OLD, OLD STORY IN AN OLD,
OLD COUNTRY.
Eleanor Fitzgerald, '3o
(This story was judged the best submitted in the whole
high school in the 1930 Short Story; Contest.)

Pedro Arias de Avila founded the old city of
Panama on August 15, I5I9. Among the first
colonists of this city of Panama was Don Alvarey,
a very good fried of Pedro Arias and an important
member in the colony.
Don Alvarey lived with his wife and children in
a house known to all of Alvarey's friends as "Casa
de Alegria" or "House of Happiness." He had
two sons; the eldest was twelve years old, called
Carios, and the youngest, Juan-was nine years
old. He also had a little girl, Juana-seven
years old--who was the pet of the household and,
in fact, the pet of the colony. She was a pretty
little child with black curly hair and dark
brown eyes.
As the colony was still small and Alvarey had
no enemies Juana was allowed to play and run
around in any part of the village.
One day she was sitting on the beach near her
home gazing out to the sea. Ever since she could
remember she had loved the sea and every day
she came to sit there and dream of the time when
she would grow up and be able to go on a big boat
to the land where she had been born-
This particular day, while she was sitting there,
Pedro, the son of Arias, crept up on her and
frightened her by shouting in her ear.
Ait once she turned on him and commenced to
give him a tongue lashing. He clapped his hands
Over her mouth and she immediately bit him.
Just at this stage of the battle Juana's brother
Carlos came to bring her in for lunch.
"What's wrong, hermanita!" he asked her.
Juana, still breathless from the quarrel, tried
to explain what had happened but Pedro kept
interrupting her. Carlos laughed and said,
"LCome, come, Juana, you shouldn't let such a
little thing make you so angry." And they both
walked away from Pedro into the house.


From that time on Juana always hated Pedro
and he, knowing this, used to tease and torment
her until she cried.
Before long the colony expanded and grew so
that it was considered the most important colony
of Spain's American Empire.
By I53T, Alvarey had become the most impor-
tant member of the Real Audiencia, which was the
governing body of Panama.
Juana by this time was a young girl of I9, still a
favorite in the colony. She was tall and still had
her beautiful black hair and dark eyes. Her love
for the sea was greater than before and, although
no one knew it, her hatred for Pedro was as strong
as ever,
Don Alvarey for some time had cherished a
secret desire that Pedro and Juana be married,
but had said nothing to anyone. He knew that
this would unite the two most influential families
in the city; however he did not want to force his
daughter into a marriage that might not please
her. He resolved to see what Juana might have
to say about it and then, if she agreed, to arrange
the matter with Don Arias.
When he came home that evening, Juana came
to meet him looking so pretty and sweet, that it
brought tears to his eyes to think of parting with
her.
"Buenas tardes, hija mia--how has the day
passed--happily, I hope?" he greeted her.
"Yes, father, and do you not know that to-day
is your birthday?" she asked.
"(Ah yes,") he answered, "I had completely
forgotten."
"Well, well, hello, Carlos and Juan!'" he said as
he entered the house and saw the two boys.
Dona Alvarey had died when Juana was only I5-
Since that time IVaria, an old servant who had
come from Spain with the family, had taken care
of the two boys and Juana.
She was now fussing around the kitchen pre-
paring the evening meal. They sat down to the
table and began to chatter.
"We are expecting the Fortunato to arrive to-
morrow, father. Do you know of anyone who is
On it?" asked Carlos, now a young man of 24.






THE CARIBBEAN.S


"No, son, b~ut I hope that ship will bring some
letters and news fr-om \Yalencia," replied Alvarey.
At this talk; of the ship Juana's ey-es had bright-
eneed and she listened with interest.
"F'ather, when you go to meet the ship to-
morrow will you take me with you?"
"Certainly-, child." T'hen he spoke very serious-
l."I would like to speak to Juana alone, boys."
The boys left the roomn an~d Alvarey- looked at
Juana who, in turn was staring at him with
curious eyes,
"W\hat is it t'.ib r she asked.
"I am going to ask you a question, daughter,
and I want y-ou to answer me truthfully-. I have
seen that you have had many suitors but not
one that you favor more than the other. To me,
Pedro Alrias is the most suitable. Is it posshile
that you agree with me?"
"I shall never marry Pedro A~rias," replied
Juana in a voice which her father had never heard
from her.
"But what is it, daughter, that makes you turn
to ice when I speak of him. Surely- you do not
hate hlim?"
"Do not ask me, Father. I can not bear to
speak of himi," she replied.
"W\ell, I had hoped for better than this," said
Allvarey~! wear-ily, "but I shall not for-ce y-ou into it,
There is plenty of time yet any-way."
ALnd so, the interview ended. The neit
morning Juana prepared herself in the gayest
clothes in which to meest the boat. She looked
like a beautiful picture in her typically- Spanish
dress as she walked along beside he~r father. She
had evidently forgotten the conversation of the
night before as she was in the grayest mood and
chattered incessantlycin musical Castillian Spanish.
Finally- they- reached the busiest section of the
town and Alvarey took Juana to D~on Pedro's
where he told her to wait until the ship should be
sighted. She amused herself in the gorgeous
patio of D~on Pedro's home, and was not afraid
of meeting Pedro, for she knew he was away on a
trip to Puerto Bello.
After an hour or so her father cam~e after her
and they- rushed to the wharf.
Wihen the boat had approached quite close
but before the passengers had alighted, Juana
had time to notice a very- fair young man. He
was quite tall with light curly hair, and from the
moment Juana saw him her ey-es never left him.
Could hze be an Englishman--she wonldered?
MIR 9i1974--7i


T'he English -that Spain hated so mich--and
if he was, what was he doing here, among
enemies? All these anld many- other questions
were going through her head as she stood beside
her father.
W\hen the passengers alighted she still watched
the Englishman (she had now decided that he was
one). He seemed to be looking for someone.
Finally he spoke to a y-oung man who pointed
toward Juana and her father. He immediately
walked toward them and she stepped behind
her father in order to remain unseen. "Are y.ou
Senor Don Ricardo Alvarey ?" he asked her
father in excellent Spanish.
"Yers, I am," answered A~lvarey, "W1~hat can I
do for you ?"
"I have an important message for you, Don~
Alvarey. Perhaps there is som-e place we can be
alone?"
"Y~es, indeed," he answ~eredt, then turning to
Juana, "This is my daughter, Juana, Senor-ah-"
"Giles Mlartinez," said the young man while
looking at Juana.
"Wouuld it be inconvenient for y-ou to come to
myv home, senor?" asked D~on Ailvarey.
"No, indeed! I shall be glad to accompany
y-ou and tell y~ou something of my-self as we go
along. N~o doubt youl wonder who I am~, and
what message I might have for you," said the
young man.
They- began to walk; in the direction of Don
Alvarey's hom~e and the young man began to
speak.
"Perhaps first of all my namie strikes youu as
strange. Myv mother was an Englishwoman,
who, while traveling in France, met M~artinez,
my~) father, a Spanish- merchant on7 a business
trip in France. They- had very- little oppor-
tunity to meet each other as my mother knew
that her father would object very strenuously- if
he even thought she spoke to a Spaniard. How-
ever, the way- of lovers can not be surpassed, and
she eloped with her lover and returned to Spain
with him. W\hen I was born, she named me
after her father who never forgave her for marry-
ing my father. So, that is the way in which I
received my v-ery English name, Giles. The
m-essage that I have for you came from your
br-other, who for the last five years has been in
business with my father. I am sorry to bring
news of your brother's death. This message
was dictated from his deathbed and contains a








will in which he leaves you all his interest in the
business, which concerns exporting and importing.
My father has sent me here with the message."
Don Alvarey remained silent and the young
man, knowing that he was thinking of the death
of his brother, said nothing.
Finally Don Alvarey spoke, "I am too old a
man to think of entering a business of which I
know nothing. But this is an excellent oppor-
tunity for Carlos, is it not, Juanita?'
"Yes, indeed, Father, and do you think that
I could go with him ?" said Juana, whose desire to
see the land where she was born had never left her.
But her father merely laughed and told her it
was impossible.
Juana, seeing that this would probably be her
only opportunity of ever visiting Spain, was
determined to find a way of going with her
brother; so while Don Alvarey and the young
man was talking Juana walked along silently,
thinking very deeply.
Carlos, on hearing of what his father was
planning for him, was overjoyed. He listened
to all the counsel which his father gave him and
a strong friendship began to grow between Giles
and Carlos.
Juana had been constantly begging her father
to allow her to go with her brother, but he would
pay no attention to her.
Juana went to her brother Carlos and told him
how she longed to go with him to see the beauti-
ful country of Spain. He at first laughed at her,
but seeing her enthusiasm and unusual desire for
this impossible thing, listened to her and promised
her that he would try to persuade their father to
let her go.
If he agreed, Maria was to go along and watch
over her. The two of them kept afterDon Alvarey,
who was very reluctant to part with his daughter,
but just as he granted her every other wish, he also
granted this one. Juana and Maria, the old
servant, busied themselves with preparations
for the journey.
All this time Giles had been visiting the house
under the pretense of seeing Carlos, but had been
spending most of his time trying to gain the atten-
tion of Juana. Wlhen he did get her to take any
unusual notice of him she would pelter him with
questions of Spain.
Carlos andi his father were not blind and could
see that the young Spaniard (who did not resemble
a Spaniard in the least), had more than a friendly


interest in Juana. Carlos was pleased as he had
learned to admire his friend Giles, but Don
Alvarey, who still hoped to see Arias's son, Pedro,
married to his daughter, was not so pleased. He
spoke of this to Carlos, who was very much sur-
prised and said to his father, "I see where the
trip will be very interesting since both Giles and
Pedro will be traveling with us.")
"Do you mean to say that Pedro is going to
Spain!" exclaimed the father.
"Yes," replied Carlos, "and it is strange that
you did not know of it, although it seems to be
quite a secret."
"Yes, it is strange that Arias did not tell me,"
answered Don Alvarey; then the tone of his voice
changed: "I am trusting Juana to you, Carlos, and
you know that she is my heart, my life, so guard
her carefully and see that no harm befalls her.
The day of sailing finally arrived and Juana,
who was too excited to control herself was running
here and there saying good-bye to this one and
that one. After some time Carlos came and
brought her to her father, who could hardly
speak. The parting was a sad one and Juana
promised to return as quickly as possible. She
boarded the ship Fortunato, which had brought
the young man to America, and which was now
returning to Spain with the precious Juana.
The ship could not compare with our modern
transatlantic steamers, and poor Juana experi-
enced all the very worst pains of seasickness.
Her brother, Carlos, was constant tly at her bedside
and when she felt able to walk, he never left her
side. But as soon as Carlos and Juana came in
sight Giles would join them, and they would laugh
and sing and talk until Juana began to forget her
illness and to take notice of this very pleasing
young man, who always had some new form of
entertainment for her, or something to tell her of
Spain.
Pedro, in the meantime, watched all this with
jealous eyes and he, too, tried to join some of their
little gatherings; but as soon as he appeared
Juana would change from a gay, laughing young
girl to a very serious and haughty young woman,
Giles, noticing this, was determined to find out
the cause of it, but realized that he must be very
careful. He saw that it was something that
Juana kept to herself and was very sensitive about.
So the days continued and became weeks and
Juana began to tire of the wide expanse of nothing
but water, and sought the company of Giles more


THE CARIBBEAN.









and more. A strong friendship grew up between
them, and Carlos, who was always present, saw
that in time it would become more than just
friendship. He admired Giles and wished to see
him married to Juana, but he also remembered
the words of his father.
One day the three of them were sitting and talk-
ing when a boat was sighted. It carried no flag
and the crew were puzzled as to what kinld of
ship it might be.
Giles and Carlos began to have their suspicions
when the strange ship directed its course toward
the Fortunato. They looked at each other and
although no words were spoken, m~ade a joint oath
to protect the young girl who stood between them.
The little ship For-tunato kept on her- cour-se
although she saw that the larger boat meant to
block her way. After some time the larger boat
came alongside and a number of ugly men began
to jump aboard the little ship.
Giles, just a second quicker than Carlos, lifted
Juana into his arms and carried her to her cabin,
spending a few moments in warnings, telling her
not to leave until he should return.
The first person that he met on his return was
Carlos. "It is an English pirate ship and Pedro
Arias, the swine, is a spy in thze service of the
English, and has been for these three years."
"Then there is something more behind this than
iuse plunder or he would not be here," replied
Giles, then whispering, "Juana is safe in her cabin,
but it will be wise to keep a watch on her. I told
her not to leave till I should comer and fetch her."
At this moment Pedro Arias came toward them
with a sneer on his face. "The English pirate
ship demands the person of Juana A4lvarey to be
held for ransom. If she is delivered to us without
resistance the ship will be allowed to continue its
course, otherwise---" and Pedro left his sentence
unfinished, for Carlos had hit him and hit him
so hard that he lay at their feet unconscious.
Giles told Carlos to tie and gag Pedro while he
went after Juana. "I think I may be able to
settle this. Wait here until I return," he said to
Carlos.
Then he went toward Juana's cabin. When
she opened the door, he noticed that her face was
pale and she seemed nervous. "Have you been
frightened?" he asked her, "Has anyone molested
you ?"
"N~ot frightened for myself," she answered.
"Is Carlos safe? And you? Ylou are not hurt"


"Carlos is waiting for us," Giles answered.
"Do not fear for mle, quler~ida mlia, for my life is
worthless when yours is at stake. Perhaps it may
surprise you, but I may never have another oppor-
tunity to tell you that I love you, dearest one,
and I am going to pr-otect you if it costs my life."
Juana looked up into his face and said, "I am so
glad y-ou have told me, Giles, for I have discovered
since you left me that your life is dearer to me than
any.")
Giles clutched her arms and looking into her
face cried, "Ar1e you sur-e, sweetest one, are: you
sure?" And then, before she had time to answer
he remembered that time was now precious so he
lifted her in his arms and went back to Carlos.
"I am going to try- and talk; to these scoundrels
and make them believe I am an Englishman,
Whatever I say y-ou must agree with me. Do
you understand?" said Giles.
So the three of them boarded the ship and Giles,
now speaking inl English, asked for the captain.
W'hen he appeared, Giles said, "Sir, I know not
who you are but I am an Englishman of noble
birth, the grandson of Sir Giles Berkeley and this
is my wife and brother with me. W~e are travel-
ing to Spain where my father is to meet us."'
And he went on in such a manner that he im-
pressed the ignorant sea captain a great deal.
"I think there is a mistake, sir," said the
captain. "That fool, Arias, has probably got us
into another mess, but I swear by my beard, that
this will be his last trick. Where is he, the dirty
scoundrel ?"
Giles, after much discussion finally persuaded
the captain to let the Fo~tulnato pr-oceed on its
course peacefully, and to let him do with Arias
whatever he wished. He made up his mind to
turn him over to the officials as a spy- and let the
Spanish government prosecute him.
The good ship For~tulnato finally arrived in Spain
and abou t three months later Don Alvarey received
the following letter from his daughter (written
by Carlos, for she did not know how to write):
"Padre Querido:
"I have at last seen th~e beautiful country in
which I was born but it can not compare with the
other country where I have lived all my life.
"Giles and I were married yesterday, father,with
the permission of Carlos. WVe were married in a
beautiful little church in this city by the same
priest who baptized me. Is it all not very~
romantic, padre?


THE CALRIBBEALN.







52 THE CARIBBEAN.


"Carlos is writing to tell you about Pedro Arias
for I can not bear to speak of him. He was acting
as a spy for England and has been thrown into
prison.
"And just think, padre mio, Giles and I will be
returning to Panama soon because his father
wants him to continue the business there. Carlos
thinks it is a profitable and agreeable proposition,
and I am sure you think so, too. He will remain
here as he says he thinks he was destined to be a
merchant. So, father, it will not be long before
we will be together again. Giles wishes to be
remembered to you and thanks for me. Is he not
foolish but also lovable?

"Y'our loving daughter,
"LJUANA."




IT SOMETIMES HAPPENS.

Elsie Darley, '3o.

(This story was next to the grand prize story-, and the
best submitted from the Senior Class in the 1930 Short Story
Contest.)

"Who's that fellow over there?" asked my
companion, gazing at a man seated a few yards
from us. "Interesting looking chap," he added.
Wie were sitting on the veranda of the Stranger's
Club, watching the last rays of the sun disappear
behind Fort Sherman.
I followed Jack Benton's glance and saw a man
of about forty, gray-haired, and very sunburned.
His clothes, of a good quality, hung loosely on his
spare frame. As I looked, I recognized him.
"Great Scott!" I exclaimed. "It's Everard
D~eane! But how--"
"The explorer?" Jack interrupted. "But yIou
sound excited. W'hy so?"
"W'hat on earth is he doing her-e I went on,
almost to myself.
"Is he someone with a past ?" persisted Jack.
"He looks it."
"I'll tell you his story" I said, turning to Benton,
"since you will watrm it out of me sooner or later.
Deane lived here three years ago--before you
came down here. He was a wealthy traveler
staying at the W h~ii in.sn and the place got
such a hold on him that he decided to stay in-


definitely, instead of continuing his travels. He
remained and became very popular with the resi-
dents here. After a time, finding the place a bit
dull, he made arrangements to make a month's
trip into the jungle. I think he was interested in
gold--an~yway, he left for the interior soon after."
"Go on," urged Benton,
"But that isn't all, unfortunately. While
staying here he became very intimate with Cap-
tain Danliels, then the Port Captain. The
Daniels had a son, Bill, a boy of about 18, just
finished high school--nice boy, rather. Took a
great fancy to Deane, and Deane was equally
interested in him. W\henl he heard of Deane's
proposed expedition he was on pins and needles
to go with him, of course. Captain and Mrs.
Daniels, after demurring awhile, consented to his
going, because they trusted Deane implicitly.
Everard acknowledged frankly that he would
rather leave the boy behind, but Bill's eagerness
was so great that he couldn't resist taking him.
W'ell, they left in a couple of weeks, and no one
ever saw Bill Daniels again."
"Wlhat ?" said Jack, aghast. "Y-ou don't
mean ?-"-'
"No," I said with conviction. "I don't mean
that. No one ever saw Deane either, until a few
months ago, when one of the Airway pilots saw
him in Darien. But I am one of the very few who
didn't believe Deane was responsible in any seri-
ous way for that boy's disappearance. One of
the very few. Mrs. Daniels waited anld hoped
for three mon ths, and then left for the States with
a nervous breakdown."
There was a pause. Then Jack said: "Now
I'm as interested as y-ou to know what he is doing
here."
"I am going to speak to him," I said, and rose.
Deane recognized me at once, and almost his
first words were: "You're a white man, Harrison.
The only one of my friends who has spoken to me
since---" He broke off, and I did not press him.
"Well," I said. "Let's make it two white men.
I've a friend with me who I am sure would be
delighted to meet y~ou."~
Realizing my sincerity, he did not hesitate to
come over to our table and sit down. I introduced
him to Jack and ordered drinks. Deane spoke:
"(I kn~ow,"~ he started, "that you would like to
hear my story--"
"(I, too,"1 vouchsafed Jack.










A~nd I don't mind telling it--now," went on
Deane. "So you shall be the first to hear it."
"Yiou know the facts of our departure. \Y'e left
with three San Blas Inldians--porters, carrier-s,
or what you will. Myv intention was to travel
inland for about 25 miles in search of gold, because
I kn~ow there are deposits around there. It was
fair going for the first 15 miles. One morning
Bill and I woke to find that our three Indians had
gone--why, I never found out--and had taken
with them most of our supplies. \Ve, Bill and I,
had dug a little the previous day, and, to my
gratification, we had found signs of what promised
to be a large vein of gold. But the Indians had
not known this, or they would not have left.
So Bill and I were left with the prospect of going
back at once, as what food supplies remained
would obviously last for only a few days. Bill
began to pack, while I made notes as to the
location and other matters. I had moved aw~ay
from the camp in the course of making my an-
notations, when suddenly I heard a cry: 'Mr.
Deane! Quick!' I turned round sharply, and I
shall never forget what Isaw-" Deane's voice
was not as steady as it had been. "Bill was
try-ing desperately to free himself from the coils of
a snake which had wound itself round his arm. I
drew my revolver and fired at the thing, risking
hitting Bill, and shot it through the head. But
I was too late. Young Daniels had been bitten,
and in spite of all my efforts he died within 20
miTnuteS'
Deane paused, and very, very carefully, stubbed
out his cigarette. He must have loved that boy
very much.
Neither Jack nor I spoke, and Deane went on:
"I buried him there, with a gold m7in7e for his
monument." He smiled a little sadly.
"I should have returned to Mlrs. Daniels and
broken the news to her; but I hadn't the courage.
I know what you are thinking, M~r. Benton," he
said, and I think he must have caught Jack's
contemptuous look. "1Y'hy should I, who have
faced wild animals in Afr-ica without a qualm, be
afraid to do so simple a thing? There is more than
One kind of bravery, my boy, and perhaps some day
you will learn that. A~nd the best is the very
kind I lacked. Well (more brusqluelyr), I wander_
ed about in that jungle till I came upon an Indian
village, and for two years I have lived in Indian
villages with my fear. Now I am groinlg away


from Panama forever. I sail for Chinlato-morrow,
and I shall spend most of my time at my place in
Mlanchuria, trying to forget. Harrison, I want
y-ou to do something for me. I want you to write
to Mrs. Daniels and tell her. Say what you like
about me--the worst will not do me justice."
He laughed a little m~irthlesslyl. "And now
good-bye."
He rose, gave us each a firmn handshake, then
left us.
Jack and I went home, very- pensive.


THE COFFIN OF DON JUAN.

traherp, Bllndy, 'y.

(This story was the best submitted from the
Junior Class in the Ig30 short story Contest.)

W'hen I finished my college course, about two
years ago, I decided that European travel would
broaden my education, so for a year or more I
traveled throughout Europe, collecting old books
and manuscripts.
It was after my travels, while I was classifying
and cataloging my literary discoveries, that I dis-
covered an old letter in one of the Spanish books.
I looked at it carefully, read a few lines, and at
once became immersed mn the contents.
The following is a free translation of the letter,

Panama,
Prisoner of M~organ.
511- dear Don A\ndres:
Do not be afraid when you see that I aum a1 prisoner of
M~organ. I will soon be released, but if by some chance I do
not return to spain, I wish you to tell my friends why I am
here and, if possible, recover the j w~els for the K~ing.
As you know I was aide to the Governor of Panama. WIhen
he heard of the approach of the pirate, Mourgan, he summoned
mne to his quarters andi said, "You, Don Juan, have been my
aide for two years, and during that time you have served me
faithfully."
"I have only- done myv duty, Your Excellency," I replied.
"Yes," he said, "Y`our duty; but I have a greater diuty for
V'OU nOW.
"My! life is at your service,"' I smiled, giving the customnary
answer.
"You know that Englishman, Morgan, is approaching
Pa':nama. At the pr-esent time we have a large number of
jewels that were collected for- the K~ing, and it is absolutely
necessary to haves them in Spain within three months. If
i\lorgan surrounds the city it will be impossible to take the
jewels across the Isthmus by ordinary means. It is your du ty
to see that these jewels are taken safely to the Atlantic sea


THE CARIBBEA4N.







54 THE CARIBBEAN.


coast and put aboard one of our ships. I am trusting this
vast fortune to your care because of your loyalty and in^
regriry. .
"Yes, Y-our Exeellency, the jewels wall be delivered safely
if I live.",
"It is well. Make your preparations at once. You may
draw upon the city for supplies."
An hour later a flag-covered coffin was being slowly rolled
from the city on a gun-carriage. The procession was head d
by a young officer while a dozen soldiers marched on each side
with lowered gun muzzles.
They marched through the jungle toward San Lorenzo for
several hours when a party of armed men stepped into the
trail in front of them.
"What's this?" boomed the voice of the big man who seemed
to be the leader, "a funeral?"
The young office-r, whom you have probably guessed was
myself, recognized him as Sir Henry Morgan, but he, or rather
I, assumed a commanding look and said, "Strangers, I suppose
you are a party of sailors from some Spanish ship at San
Lorenzo. It is your duty to help me take this body to the
coast. .
The big man smiled and said, "I am Sir Henry Morgan.
Who are y'ou and what is the reason for taking this corpse
across the Isthmus, knowing that I was planning to attack
Panama? I have already captured Fort San Lorenzo."
After telling him who I was and arguing a few minutes, I
told him, apparently against my will, the following story:
"This is the body of a nobleman, who has been in Panama
for several years. According to an old story, Panama will
fall the day after this man is buried, if he is buried in the soil
of the New World; so I am trying to take his body to a Spanish
ship, that it may be buried in Spain.
"Amazing," boomed Morgan, "Now, men, we will have a

Th e was a brief fight in which all my men were killed or
captured, and the pirates carried the coffin into the jungle.
Soon we came to deep bog and Morgan stopped his men,
saying, "Here we are, men. Dump the corpse.
The copper coffin quickly sank from sight and Morgan'
laughingly said, "My dear Don Juan, since you were so useful,
I shall not kill you. You can live to see me take Panama.
Now I am Morgan's prisoner, and I must say, he has treated
me like a gentleman, even permitting me to send you this
letter. You probably think I am very indiscreet, putting the
secret of the coffin on paper, but Morgan said he would not
read it and he never breaks a promise. No, he will never
know thalt the coffin contains a fortune in jewels instead of a
body.
Soon, I hope, I will be free, for Morgan has taken Panama.
I will try to recover the jewels and in that way redeem
myself with my King.
Your faithful servant,
Don JUAN DE Enouso.

Of course this letter fascinated me. I investi-
gated a few old Spanish books in the collection
and discovered that a nobleman by that name was
tortured to death by Sir Henry Morgan. Also I
found that his best friend, Don Andres de Cer-


vantes died on an expedition to Panama two years
later.
Somewhere on the trail to San Lorenzo there is
a fortune waiting for someone to claim. Probably
it will be there forever, for all who knew where the
copper casket is buried are dead. Time will tell.

THE CARD SHARP.
Beverly Dunn, '33.
(This was the best story submitted from the Sophomore Class.)

The trip across, for even midwinter, had been
unusually dull. There were less than 100 persons
on the big liner, most of them traveling salesmen
or firm representatives coming home for Christ-
mas after a year abroad; and I had resigned
myself to a week of boredom. The weather, too,
was bitter, and I spent most of my time moping
around the great empty reading room, or the
smoking salon. It was natural, then, that I
should attach myself to Talbot, or, more truth-
fully, that he should attach himself to me. From
the first I had taken a liking to the lad, and even
after his unmasking I had not the heart to turn
him down. Indeed, had not some of the smoking-
room crowd testified that mine was a different
profession, I might have been ostracized as an
accomplice.
On the first night out I met him, and I was not
sure whether he was English or merely an imi-
tation. All the outward and visible signs were
English, but he told me that though he had been
educated at Oxford and had spent most of his
time since then playing polo in India, he was
an American. He had spent some time, and,
according to himself, much money, at the water-
ing places along the French Riviera. I thought
that I had seen him somewhere before, but I
could not seem to place him. He talked glibly
of people well-worth knowing in both New York
and London, but he occasionally made slips.
It was his obvious case to cover up these slips
that first made me wonder whether he had any
motives besides personal vanity in pursuing. I
could not tell whether he was working up to an
immediate loan, or asking me for an introduction
to a banker in New York, or a card to a club.
Then the next night I discovered his motive.
He was sitting in the smoking room playing
solitaire, and at once I recalled that I had seen







THE CARIBBEA4N.


him at Aix-Les-Bains, and that he was holding
a bank at baccarat. WChen he asked me to sit
down I said, "I saw you at Aix-les-Bains last
summer."
His eyes fell to the pack of cards in his hands,
and he fingered them, as if searching for a par-
ticular card.
"W;Chat was I doing there?" he asked.
"Dealing baccarat at the Casino des Fleurs."
WTith obvious relief he laughed. "Oh, yes," he
assented. "Jolly place, Aix--but I lost a pot of
money there. I'm a rotten hand at cards. Can't
win, and can't leave 'em alone. He smiled, as
though half ashamed of his weakness. "Poker,
chemin-de-fer, baccarat, I like 'em all, but they
don't like me; so I stick to solitaire now. It's
dull, but cheap. You like cards yourself?"
I confessed that I didn't know the difference
between a club and a spade, and had no desire to
learn. At this, when he discovered he was wasting
his time on me, I expected him to be annoyed;
but his disappointment struck far- deeper. He
slowly shut his eyes as if I had hurt him physically,
and for a moment I believe he was oblivious to my
presence. Quite improperly, I felt sorry for him.
If he showed his disappointment so keenly, his
need for a few dollars must have been great.
Almost at once I abandoned him and went on
deck. When I came back an hour later, he was
deep in a game of poker.
He looked up and passed, and called to me.
"Don't scold," he said laughingly. "I told
you I couldn't keep away from cards."
"Known him for years," he said to a player at
his side making a gesture in my direction. "He's
set me right many a time."
The player looked up and smiled at me, and
Talbot met my gaze with perfect serenity.
"Wrhat would you draw ?" he asked, holding
up his hand for me to see.
His audacity and inconsistency so astonished
me that I walked out of the room in silence.
When we met on the deck, he was not even
apologetic. Instead, as though we were partners
in crime, he chuckled delightedly.
"Sorry I had to use your name," he said. "But
they weren't any too pleased to have me take
that last hand, and I needed someone to ouch
for me."
"Vouch for you!" I exclaimed. "I didn't say
a word."


He looked at me wearily. ''1, no, of course
not," he said. "But it amounted to the same
thing. They think you vouched for me to-night;
so to-morrow they're going to raise the limit.
I've convinced them I'm an easy mark."
"A4nd I take it youl are not." I said stitffy.
He considered this unworthy of an answer,
hence only smiled. Then the smile died, and in
his eyes I saw fear, infinite weariness, and distress.
"I'm in bad," he said, and his voice was
frightened, like a child's. "I can't sleep; nerves
all on end. Can you give me something to
straighten m7y head?"
"What's the matter with the ship's doctor?"
I asked.
"But I don't know him." he said.
Mindful of the use he had made of my name, I
objected strenuously.
"WTell you certainly don't know me!"
"No-o-o. But I know who you are," he said.
"and--" he stopped short; then, speaking in a
much lower tone, continued, "Besides, the
doctor--he's an awful bounder. I think he's
watching me."
"As a doctor?" I asked, "or watching yJou play
cards?"
"Play cards," he replied. "I'm afraid he was
the ship's surgeon on the P. & :O. I came home on.
There was a little trouble on that trip and I fancy
he remembers me."
His confidences were becoming a nuisance.
"Y~ou mustn't tell me that," I said, "how do
you know I won't go and tell the captain all about
you "
"I know perfectly well you won't," he replied.
"Rot!" I retorted. "Yiou don't know anything
of the sort."
For a moment Talbot bit his lip and frowned,
as if fearing he had gone too far. "I've got to
make expenses," he muttered. "All card games
are games of chance, and a card sharp is one of the
chances. Anyway," he said, as though disposing
of the subject, "I've got to make expenses."
After dinner, when I came into the smoking
room, the poker crowd sat waiting, and one of
them asked where they could find "My friend."
"W'e want to give him his revenge," the man
said.
"He's losing then ?" I asked.
The man chuckled complacently.
"The only loser."










"(I wouldn't worry," I advised, "he'll come for
his revenge."
That night, after I had retired, he knocked at
my door. I switched on the lights and saw him
at the foot of my berth. His hands were shaking,
and I saw that he was holding himself in check
with great difficulty.
"I'm scared," he said, "scared."
In spite of his tan, his face showed white. For
a moment he looked old and worn; finished.
"They;'re crowdin' me," he whined. "Always
crowdin' me." His voice was querulous, like a
child's. "I can't remember when they haven't
been movin' me on. They moved me out of
India, then Cairo, then Port Said. Then they
closed Paris on me. Always pushin' me. Now
they've closed London. I had a club there.
Just a few games--roulette, baccarat. Very
quiet, y'know, very exclusive. Nice, fashionable
district, too, down on Berkeley Street. I think it
was my butler who sold me. Anyway, they took
us down to Bow Street. I've plunged on this
trip. It's my last chance."
"What, the trip ?" I asked.
"No," he answered, with a slight smile. "My
family. They've been payin' me to live abroad.
I'm goin' home to 'em. I've been away for ten
years. I'm comin' home as the Prodigal Son,
tired of eatin' the husks of life, now I'm just
waiting' for 'em to kill the fatted calf." He
chuckled to himself. "Fatted calf!" he said
scornfully. "Thev'd rather see me in Hell.
M/ly brother was the only member of the family
who ever cared a whoop about me, anyway. I
know of times when he tried to get me to come
home, but the rest of the family didn't want me.
He was always decent to me, even when the
others were treating' me like a dog. He's my best
bet."
It seemed to me, if he wished his family to
think he was really repentant, his course in the
smoking room would not help to really reassure
them. I suggested as much.
"If you get into trouble, as you call it," I said,
"they'll radio ahead to the police of New York,
and your people will hear."
"I know," hesaid. "I got tochance it. I got
to make enough to go on till I see my family."
"Andi what if they won't see you?" I asked.
He glancedi sadly: around the rooml. "Then I
guess it's just g....J~~-niight," he said.


I gave him a sleeping powder, and sent him
off to bed. Apparently it was just what he needed
for the next day after luncheon he was up on deck
looking fresh and strong, and active. He seemed
to have forgotten our previous night's conver-
sation, and when I asked him to abandon his
smoking-room activities for the rest of the voyage,
he only laughed.
"LCan't be done," he said, "I've got to make my
killing to-night." But it was others who made
the killing.
I came into the smoking room about 9 o'clock,
to see how the game was progressing. All the
players except Talbot were standing up; their
voices were raised in anger.
Talbot sat with his back against a bulkhead,
cool and nonchalant. Outwardly, at least, he
was indifferent to the hostile gestures which were
being directed at him by his chief tormentor, a
noisy, red-faced pest named Smedburg. In the
confident, bullying tones of a man who has the
crowd with him, he was addressing Talbot.
"When the ship's surgeon first met you," he
said, "You called yourself Lord Ridley."
"What of it," Talbot retorted, "If I choose to
dodge reporters, that's my business. And, further-
more, it's my business if I don't choose to give
my name to every meddling busybody I meet."
"You'll give it to the police, all right," sneered
Smedburg. "And in the meantime, you'll keep
out of this smoking room."
The chorus of assent was unanimous. It was
too evident to be ignored, even by Talbot. He
silently rose, and with an air of fastidious con-
cern brushed a speck from his coat.
"Only too glad to get out," he remarked. "The
atmosphere in here is very depressing."
But he was not to have the last word. His
persecutor pointed a long finger at him. "The
next time you take the name of Adolf Aleck,"
he shouted, "You better make sure he hasn't got
a friend on board to protect him from sharps and
swindlers."
Talbot turned and walked out into the night.
"Bad business," remarked the purser, a few
minutes later.
"What happened?" I asked.
"Caught him dealing off the bottom," he said.
"They rather suspected him all the time, and
to-night they had outsiders watching him. They
say he slipped himself an ace off the bottom of


THE CARIBBEAN.





THE CARIBBEALN.


the pack. It's a pity-! He's such a nice looking
chap."
I asked what Smedburg had meant by- his
allusion to Adolf A~leck;.
"They accused him of traveling under a false
name," explained the purser, "and he said that
he did it to dodge reporters. Then he said he
really was the brother of A\dolf Aleck, the banker,
but it seems Smnedburg knows ALleck; and he
called his hand. It was a crazy th-ing to do,
because eve~rybody knows A~leck hasn't a brother.
But now this Smedburg is going to send a wireless
to the police and to Aleck and tell them about the
whole business."
"Hasn't he any other way- of spending his
money?" I inquired.
"He's a confounded nuisance," growled the
pur-ser. "Alll he wants to do is to put Alteck; under
obligation to him, wants to show everybody! he
knows the manl. It means a scene on the wharf,
newspaper talk, and Heaven knows what. T~albot
will be the joke of the ship. He won't dare show
his face."
But the next morning found Talbot on deck,
acting as if nothing had happened. H-e ignored
the gibes and jokes which were flying about him,
and put on an air of great superiority. He would
have passed mne on deck, but I took his arm and
led him to the rail. W\e were now well past
quarantine, and a convoy of tugs were butting us
into the dock.
"W~hat are y-ou going to do?" I asked.
"It doesn't depend on mne," he replied. "'It's
up to Smedburg. He's the busy little boy-."
Then his flippancy fell from him like a cloak, and
fear took it's place. He turned to me and gripped
my arm.
"They're watching me," he said. "I could t-11 i
that. They're just waiting for a chance."
"W'hy did y-ou do it, then?" I inquired.
"I didn't!" he exclaimed. "I swear I didn't.
I was playing in luck all evening. Everything
was comin' my way. I didn't need to cheat.
But a loose card fell off the bottom, and they- all
jumped on me before I had a chance to explain,
It wasn't the truth they wanted. They- believed
what they wanted to believ-e. But I didn't cheat
once in the game."
It may have been foolish of me, but I felt that
he was telling the truth, and I was sorry- he had
not stuck to it; so I said rather harshly, "then
why did you lie about being Alleck's brother "
MIR 19742- 8


"W~hy not?" he replied. "'I hiad to say somne-
thing to pass it otf. I used to kn ow Aleck well too,"'
he paused, andl looked at the w\ater-. "Yetars ago!
But I'd forgotten he hadn't a brother. I thought
I could get away with it. Be~side~s, he's a Jew, and
two of the six: in the game were Jews."
"But you," I said, "are not a Jew.~
"No?" he queried. "Look at m-e a minute."
He paused and turned squarely around.
"Hair wai-y," he said, complexionn dark, ey-es
popping, mouth fu~ll, nose Roman or Hebraic,
according to taste. D~o you see?"'
He shl~ruged his shoullder-s.
"But it didn't workl," he said. "I picked the
wrong Jew. Do you suppose this Smnedburg
person has really- sent him a radio?"
Told him I thought it very! probable.
"An1d what will A-lckl do?" he asked. "W\hat
sort is he?"
Briefly I described him as the richest banker
in, New YJork;, given to philanthrophy- and the
betterment of his race.
"Then mebbe," he cried hopefully, "he won't
do any~th-ing, and my famlily- won't hear."
Then his shoulders sitiffned, and suddenly,
harshly-, he exclaimed. "Look! The little Jew in
the fur coat at the end of the pier."
I followed the direction of his gaze, and saw
on the dock, accompaniedc by two mermbtrs of the
strong-armn squad, the great bank~er, philanthropist
and Hebrew, A~dolf Aleck.
We' were so close I could read his face. It was
stern set, unrelenting. Of a bad business, Smed-
burg had made a worse one. I turned to speak to
T'albot, but found him gone.
His silent slipping away filled me wzith fear.
I ran to his stateroom. It was em~pty-. Then
starting at the bottom, I traversed every deck,
lane, and alley- on the ship. Talbot was not to be
found, and my inquiries to stewards fell on deaf
ears. There were hundreds of empty staterooms
in, which he might have hidden, and in the con-
fusion of landing no one would notice him.
Finally-, I had reached the gangplank and started
to the customs shed to continue my search, when
a white-faced steward touched my arm.
"The surgeon, sir," he said, "asked me to get
you. There's a passenger who's shot himself, and
he's ask~in' for you."
Fr-om the b-d inl the sur-geon's room, young
Talbot, with shocked, glazed e!-es, peelred at mej.
He was propped up against a pillow, and his shirt










was open. The doctor was applying a sponge to a
long, red wound in his chest.
I must have exclaimed aloud, for the doctor
looked up.
"He sent for you," he said curtly. "Fortu-
nately-, he's a darn bad shot. It isn't serious."
"I was so tired," groaned Talbot, "always
movin' me on."
Behind me came heavy footsteps; and though
I tried to bar them, two detectives pushed
through the door. They forced me to one side,
and through the passage came the little Jew in
the sable coat, Mr. Adolf Aleck.
For a minute he stood staring, with wide, owl-
like eyes, at the drawn, haggard face on the pillow.
H~e then sank softly to his knees. In both of
his hands he clasped the hand of the card sharp.
"Heine!" he begged. "'Don't you know me ?
It's your brother Adolf! Your brother Adolf!"


AIR PIRATES.

OscaEr Heilbron, '33
(This story won first place among the Freshmen stories.)

The large, all metal, Ford trimotor monoplane
was warming up in front of its hangar when I
arrived at France Field. After signing a few pa-
pers, I boarded the plane which was to take me to
Habana, Cuba. Three minutes later we were
soaring over Colon at an altitude of 10,000 feet.
The continuous hum of the three "wasp" motors
was becoming monotonous as I sat in the small
wicker chair of the spacious cabin. The only
passenger besides myself was a man of short
stature dressed in a dark blue suit. About half
an hour later, I noticed that we were flying over
the ocean and, as there wasn't anything worth
looking at, I soon fell asleep.
It seemed as if I had slept for ages when
suddenly I was awakened by a lurch of the plane.
To my great surprise my hands and feet were
bound with a piece of woven copper wire. Every
few seconds the plane bucked as if out of control.
Through the window leading into the control
cabin I could see the co-pilot of the plane strug-
gling with a man, while the pilot was trying his
best to keep the plane on an even keel. The man,
whom I hadi seen before in the cabin with me,
finally overpowered the pilots leaving them uncon-


scious. The interloper immediately grabbed hold
of the controls and steered the plane back toward
the mainland. After flying along the coast for
abou t three hours, he pointed the plane out toward
an island, which I judged to be about 30 miles from
the shore. This seemed to be our destination be-
cause in the center of the island there was a large
clearing which served as a landing field. From the
air the place seemed to be uninhabited, for all that
could be seen was tropical jungles. After circling
the island a few times,the man at the wheel brought
the plane to a landing. As soon as the plane
landed, we taxied toward a hangar, which had
been cunningly hidden so that it could not be
seen from the air. After turning off the motors,
the stranger stepped into the cabin and untying
my hands and feet, he motioned me to follow him.
He led me into a house that stood between the
two hangars. As we entered the house I glanced
back and saw the pilots of the plane being taken
away. Inside the building my captor motioned
me to sit down on a stool, which seemed to be the
only article of furniture in the room. Here I was
left alone. About ten minutes later, my captor
returned accompanied by a tall, bearded man.
The newcomer told me in very broken English
that, from now on, I was to consider myself
a prisoner of the notorious air pirates called the
"Black Hawks." I was taken down through a
long corridor and locked up in a small room. The
room was dark, for the onlylight came through a
small window on one side of the room. I was so
completely exhausted, that I lay down on the
cot and soon was fast asleep.
About five hours later I was awakened by a man
whom I thought, at first, to be one of my captors.
He proved to be one of the pilots of the plane that
had been captured. He whispered to me to
follow him. We jumped out of the window and
landed in the tall grass which surrounded the
building. After crawling though the grass for a
short distance, we met the co-pilot, who had been
waiting for us at the edge of the clearing. About
20 feet from us stood a trim Lockeed Vega, its
motor idling as it stood out in the moonlight.
The only person in sight was a mechanic, who was
walking toward the hangar. As soon as we saw
our chance, we made a dash for the plane. As
the last one of us entered the plane the mechanic
saw us and gave the alarm, but it was too late.
As we "zoomed" off the field we saw two single-


THE CARIBBEAN.





~------------


THE CA4RIBBEAN~.


seater fighting planes take off after us. Although
we had a fast plane, they soon caught up with
us and after circling around us a few times they
began to "pepper" us with their machine guns.
We were helpless since our plane was unearned.
Our pilot was wounded twice, so I took him to
the rear of the cabin to give him first aid while
the co-pilot took the controls.
Suddenly there was a great explosion and a
blinding flash and I immediately knew that our


gas tank had been hit. I could see the pilot of
the plane fighting the flames in the control cabin.
As the plane fell out of control the earth seemed
to rush up to meet us. Then there was a crash
and everything went black;.
I opened my! eyes expecting to find myself in a
quiet hospital room with a pretty nurse at my7!
bedside, but instead, the room was dlark and I
was flying on the floor. TIo my gr-eat diisappoint-
ment I realized that it had all beecn a dream.


THE STUDENT'S NIGHTMARE.

Vivien Elmgren, p.

There is a time in everyone's lIfe when his
troubles seem the greatest and his work the
hardest. Since I am no exception, this grievous
time in my life is during examinations. I n-
variably let things go until the last minute and
then try to strengthen myself for the puzzling
tests. Every year I make a resolution to be
prepared, but I have never kept it.
That is what happened this year. Before melay
books of all kinds which I glared at with contempt.
I muttered over and over again, Henry VIII, of
England; Charles V, of Germany; Francis I, of
France. My mind was crammed with English,
Geometry, Latin, and History. I was unaware
of anything around me but my books-
Suddenly I became aware of the roaring of the
ocean and the wind. I was no longer in my home
but on Colon Beach. The moon was full and all
the stars were out. The palm trees stood
majestic and tall in the moonlight, their fronds
waving to and fro. While I was wondering how
I came to be there, I noticed a ship in the bay.
On observing the ship I discovered it was a
Spanish Galleon. Next I heard voices and soon
four men came upon me. Never have I seen a
more picturesque group. One was a pirate,
another a court dandy, another an ancient Greek,
and the fourth an ancient Roman. Their faces
seemed strangely familiar.


The pirate saw me first and cried, "WThat have
we here?"'
The ancient Greek studied me carefullyv and at
last said, "31.I, 1... I can find out by- Geometry.""
"W~hy~ not ask it who it is?" suggested the
Roman,
"There is no need to ask the person," answered
the court dandy, "for I know who he is. He is a
modern."
< ! that we know who he is," said the pirate,
"we must introduce ourselves."
"I shall take the honor," answered the dandv-.
"I am Sir Francis Drake; this is the great pirate
Mlorgan; this is Euclid, and this is my- friend
Julius Ca~sar."
"How did you get in the bay ?" I managed to
stammer.
"Ah!" exclaimed Euclid, "I worked that little
matter geometrically, using the right triangle
hy-potenuse, and angle theorem. Do you know-
if the fronds of these palm trees are equal'"
"I have told you many times, 'Clid, old boy,
that they- were unequal when I conquered Colon."
Mlorgan told him.
"I must tell y.ou the plan I used in capturing
Panama," CaEsar exclaimed. "'First I sent my.
cavalry reconnoitering around the cit?. Nekst
I sent my airplanes to drop tear bombs on the
city. My~ next step was to tear down the walls;
and having accomplished the hardest tasks, I
ordered my- gunners to shoot laughing gas into the
town. I next entered the city- in my- Ford. It
did my heart good to see the English laughing.


~t~er ~Storie4',






60 THE CARIBBEAN.


I had performed the almost impossible; I had
conquered the English."
"l1on must let me give you the real reasons that
the English were laughing," began Sir Francis
Drake. "I was residmng in the city at the time of
Clrsar's conquest. That might my friends were
gathered in my apartment having a jolly time,
when we learned that Cae~sar had captured
Panama. The tear bombs and laughing gas did
not affect us, for the English are not easily con-
quered. The thmng that did break us and send us
into hysterics was Caesar. Wihen he entered
Panama in his Ford, the people howled. I never
expect to see anything funnier. Haw! Haw!
Haw! Haw!" and soon Sir Francis was shaking with
laughter.
"I see nothing funny about that," Caesar
grumbled.
"I am positive that that palm tree is unequal to
any of the others; and can prove my reason by
angles opposite equal sides." Euclid declared,
specifing a certain tree.
"W~ho is interested in your geometry ?" Miorgan
complained. "I am going to tell our. friend about
the time Cesar eloped with the Spanish Seno-
rita. Drake and I were dining with the French
Ambassador when all of a sudden our dinner was
interrupted by a soldier bringing news that
Caesar had eloped with a Spanish Senorita in his
tin-lizzy. I can just see Jubius driving his rattle-
trap with one hand. But they didn't get far, for
Caesar ran out of gas and the Spanish soldiers
captured them."
I noticed that Ccesar was quite angry by this
time because he was being made the victim of all
their jokes. Euclid sulked because no one would
listen to him talk about geometry. Drake and
Morgan were growing happier every minute.
I gathered all my courage together and cried,
"All of you are wrong. Caesar never captured
Panama. Morgan never conquered Colon. The
English never occupied Panama, and Euclid
can't prove the palm tr-ees are equal. In fact,
you are all liars."
The men stared at mne and all began to talk
at once. Caesar and Euclid could hold in their
wrath no longer. Mlorgan and Sir Francis stopped
laughing. Then my one-time friends turned on me
and soon I would have been no more if suddenly
everything had not been shattered by a loud
noise. I woke u'p when I fell off my chair.


ICE !
E/nie N~eely,'p.

It was on a Monday during vacation that I
first became a bit suspicious. I was busy in the
kitchen when the iceman's vell greeted me.
"Ice!" As usual, I hurried to the ice box and
removed the butter, the pitcher, and several
other articles. I turned back to my work and
was occupied fully three minutes before I heard
the iceman slam in the ice. I turned suddenly
just in time to see an understanding glance pass:
between him and the maid. I went on with my
work and the maid disappeared into the next
room .
As I left the kitchen, I met the maid reentering.
I went on, not even glancing toward her. I
heard the iceman leave, and now, when the door
slammed again I knew that she, too, had left.
My curiosity being aroused I went to the window,
from which I had a clear view of the back yard.
I was not surprised at what I saw and heard.
"Freeta, me love, I favoring to see you in de
night."
"Jim, I don' see how I'se goin' wait 'til de
time don' come."
"I seeing you later, den', ch!"
"I se gom'."
The following evening about six o clock, as we
were dining, I heard a "sisssst." I often hear
such noises so my attention was not attracted.
This peculiar calling sound, by the way, is called
the "Panamanian love call." We were ready
for the dessert, still Freeta did not appear.
"Freeta, dessert, please." No response.
"Freeta, we are waiting," I raised my voice.
Still no response.
My anger was rising, as I could not understand
what was detaining her. When I remembered,
I rose quietly, went into the kitchen, and began
to serve the dessert myself. Sounds of voices
came to me from the yard. I listened.
"I donl come early, Chiquita, I not having a
t'ing to do."
"I don finish as yet, I'se practic'ly don "ahora."
We finished dinner without any further dis-
turbance. The dishes were washed to the tune of
"I can't give you anything but love, baiby."
A week later a tourist friend of mine expressed
a desire to visit native dwellings, in order to get a







THE CARIBBJEAN.


glimpse of how they- live here in Panama. It
was on7 a Thur-sday afternoon~ during one of our
sightseeing walks that we passed a church.
Some special ceremony- was going on within. \e
entered and seated ourselves onl the pew which is
alway-s left v~acant for visitors. The strong a~dor
of various perfumecs which came to us made us
breathe heavily.
\Ye looked about us. Thell church was lavishly
over-decorated with white flowMer~s and ribbocns.
There was a bustle and a coinfusion no~t usual in a
chu~rch. Suddenl! a hush came ovetr the conglqre-
gation. The church was crow-ded, and the in-
creasing odor of incense and cheap perfumnes
became quite unpleasant. T'he organ played a
few notes and the silence became mo~re evident.
The choir joined the organ; then the whole mob
rose and sang regar-dless of the fact that very few
hy-mn books could be seen. As the hymn ended
and the people sat down again the organ began
"Here comes the bride."
"Do y-ou realize," I whispered to my companion,
"that we are wL~itnessing a maraecrmn "
Now, from my own experience with negro maids,
I know that they save earnestly andi actually de-
prive themselves of food in order to be able to
dress w~ell for a wedding, whether it be their o~wn
or their neighbor's. They sav-e for months.
'Their reward comes at last when the day of the
big event arriv-es. Then they deck themselves in
all their finery and strut proudly to church. T`he
men wear black tuxedoes, tall silk hats, and white
gloves. The wvomen havce the most expensive
qluality- of material in their clothes. White is a
favorite color, while gal, gaudy reds, blues,
y-ellow~s, and greens are second.
This wedding was certainly- a typical one. I
heard the procession entering from the back of the
church, so I tunrnd to get a clear view of the bride
and "lucky! groomn." The bride was dressed
in a long, too-fuljl, white dress. Her very- long
veil trailed m~agnificently- on the ground. In her
arms she held an immense bouquet trimmed w-ith
big white bows. T`he groom was as finely- dressed
as his bride. He wore a suit of white striped
f-lannel tr-ousers and a long black swallow-tail
coat. His black shoes shone and gleamed as the
light reflected on them.
As the procession neared I turned to see the
face of the blushing bride. It was Freeta! One
thought came to me. "W~ho was the groom ?"
Again I turned and faced the groom--the iceman,


F;IRE !


It was midnight, all was quiejt, when suddernly,
both of the hardi-workcd firemelln o~f the- Gatunl
station were rudlel\- aw~akened b\- the sound ofi
the fir-e gong.
The call came fr-om box 2;, at the Agua Clara
Pump Station. T~he person at- the boxs rang the
bell furliously as if all her- worldly goodls wetre
gojng up in smooke.
The firemen tried to, start the tire enrine~.Th
For-d refused, so they pushed it to thle edge o~f a
hill where it was started by letting it roll1.
T`he truck; went at its full speed of 25 miles an
hour, until it came to a steep hill w-heree it stalled
lust as it reached the to~p. T`he firemen, with the
help of a sorldier, pushed the truck over the brow,
and then the brakes refulsedi to function. Tlhe
man driving kept at the horn, the other man rang
the bell. The road to the pumping stations turned
off the main road at the bottom of the hill, but the
car went straight past the turn. TIhe firemen
had to go a quarter of a mile farther before they
could come to a stop. T`hey- then turned and started
back, reaching the fire plug without mishap.
Suddenly- there w~as a scream from a house
built back off the road. T'he firemen attached
the hose to the plug; one man started with the
hose toward the house, giving the signal to turn
on the water as he r-an. A1 fire hose nozzle can
be regulated so as to send any size stream of
water desired. At this time the nozzle waHs closed.
W\hen the sudden pressure reached the ho~se, it
burst, water going all over the lawn.
Just then a woman31 ruLshed out fr~antically.
telling the firemen to leave the hose and run to the
house. The firemesn picked up tw~o hand extin-
guisher-s and r-an. T'hey- looked forl fire, b~ut could
not see any flamne or smoket. A-gain the woman
screamed and pointed to a ladder leading to the
roof. The tiremnen, thinking the fire was on the
roof, immediately climbed the ladder. Still no
signs of fire.
A v-oice fr-om below cried out, "It's on the strip
of tinl along the peak of the roof."
T`he firemen looked again and w-hat should
the!- see but an old cat, which h-ad climbled a tree
adjoi ning the house, and was afraid to climb down.
The noble fire fighters saverd the cat, wrere
proutssely thanked by the woman, and began the
homeward struggle.















I~ f)oltrp. ~j


THE CARIBBEAN.


THE LOCKS.

A//ene Deakins, '32-
(Prize poem in poetry contest.)

Far ahead the tunnel winds,
As the night-watch makes his rounds>
Many things come to his mind
While he listens for the sounds
Of the distant ships approaching.
Gates will open, gates will close,
And the water as it changes
From each chamber, roars and flows.
Bells will ring, a whistle blows>
Voices shout to those below.
Little thought comes from the docks
Of the mighty power of the locks.

THE LUCKY ONES.
Edwar-d Conkling, '3"
(Second place in poetry contest.)

The people on the billboards,
They have lots of fun;
They smoke a certain cigarette
And all their goals are won.

They never fret or worry,
They're always bright and gay
They use the right electric range
And their work becomes as play.

The people on the billboards
Wear everlasting smiles,
They always pick the tire that lasts
Some ten thousand miles.

They always choose tobacco
That can not bite the tongue,
And the soap that keeps the woman's face
Always fresh and young.

I'm glad that on the billboards
Life is full and free,
Because along the public roads
There is little else to see.

ACCOMPLISHMENT.

Crawford Cam~pbel, 'p.

We try hard to accomplish something
Otherwise than to be fed;
If our lives are false and shalllow,
W~hen we die we shall be D~ead.


THE SCHOOL BELL.
(Or: What Poe Forgot to Mention.)
Elsie Darley, '3o.
(Third place in poetry contest.)

Hear the tolling of the bell--wretched bell!
What a day of tiresome toil it's noist clangs foretell!
How it beckons, beckons, beckons, in
The sunny morning air
To our Latin and our Physics
And our English and our Civics
From delightful daylight fair!
How we hasten lest we're tardv when we hear the second knell
Of that bell, bell, bell, bell, bell,
When we hear the second knelling of the bell!


A POET--TO HIS GIRL.

William Newman, 'So.

(ON SECOND THOVGHT.) (As interpreted by Fitty.)

I'd fight for you,
I'd spite for you,
I'd sit up all the night for you.

I'd fuss for you,
I'd cuss for you,
I'd smash an omnibus for you.

I'd read for you,
I'd speed for you,
I'd go without my feed for you.

I'd row for you,
I'd go for you,
I'd spend all of my dough for you.

I'd ride for you,
I'd slide for you,
I'd give up all my hide for you.

I'd tail for you,
I'd boil for you,
I'd eat a peckr of soil for you.

I'd cry for you,
I'd lie for you,
BUT DARN ME IF I'D DIE FOR YOU!







THE CARIBBEAN.


THE L.ETTER.

E/sie Dal-r/e, 'jo.

John Brown wa:s a sop~hom1ore,
NTot different from the rest,
Except that girls to him were just
A4 lot of wretched pests.

T'he reason for this attitude
I shall proceed to tell,
For ere this reason halppenled
John thought that girls were swrell.

One girl to him was all the world;
Her name was Lila Crutch.
She was his Greta Garbo, and
He worshipped her as such.

But Lila Crutch was p'opular
And rather indiscreet;
Shie treated himn as nothing
But the dirt beneath her feet.

The looks he gav~e expressing love
She did not deign to see;
He tried to speakl his passion,
But not an eair lent she.

One day, idling in Studly Hall
He thought he'd wcrite a note;
He poised his pen, then set about;
Aind this is what he wrote:

"Oh Lila dear, diear L~ila Crutch
I love you much, I love you much;
If you a look bult to mne gave
I'd be fore'er your faithful slave.

He wrote this out with flourishes,
(But not without a blot)
While thinking what a genius
For poetry he hadl got.

When "Lila dear" received this note '
She gave a cruel smile,
Tok out omeP1 yrr, til ed her pen'


The following day- a note John found
Inscribed "To dearl John Brown;
But while he read his joyous grin
Changed to an angry- fro~n:

"Oh Johnnie Brown, oh Johnnie Brown
I hate y-ou up I ha~te y-ou down;
I think you are a bumptious ass
I don't want any more of your bally sass.
(Or I'll read your note in English class.)"

To portray Jo'mnie's feelings then,
Words to me do fail;
Leaving you to imagine them,
I end my little tale.


IN CA1RNIV'AL TIMIE.

CIrrawford Campbe//6rj, '37-

All1 sorrows have endedl;
All joy-s have begun;
Join in the merrymaking;
Join in the fun.

T`he streets are crowded
WVith people and paper;
My~ it's a1 sight, but
It'll end later.

Aill colors e're known
Are seen floating there,
On people, cars, coaches,
All buildings afia~re.

Noises of all kinds;
Instruments and voices;
Sound mn the tumult
Of happy rejoicers.

At last come the floats
So majestic, serenle,
Coveredl with confetti,
Red, yellow, anld green.

T~he queens in their turrets
Look out on the crowds;
The moving flotillas,
All move like bright clouds.

Now it is over;
T`he gay.ety. and~ fun;
Thle queens have gone;
The rejoicing is dione.

A\N OCCURRENCE.

V'irgiini Steven~rson, 'Jo.

Grab your books the bell has rung'
Cramn and be pushed andi for y-our class run.
You know your teacher is a cranlk,
The one that acts like "Ma~ma spank."
Take a minute to powdielr our nose,
Palint your lips or fix your clothes;
Again the clang, the bell has gone!
Enter your class aund hear his song
"Get an admit you are lalte,
You and that other girl," Oh! Fate;
Then you go to the office on a run
The Principal says, "I can't give y-ou one."
You miss your class
And to the study hall go
And lose the work and get a zero.
The eryr\ next day y-ou walk into class
Your face unpowdered, and bold as brass.
The tardy bell sounds,
In the class room you wait,
In saunters the teacher on/v five minutes late.







64 THE CARIBBEAN.


A\ SONG FROM THE WrIND TO THE PALM;.

Fi- -7.. Stevenson, 'Jo.


Her stately arms she stretches high
To both the left and right,
The sun upon then shines all day
And the moon throughout the night.

The gentle breeze blows through her leaves
And whispers tales of old;
It tells of kings anld riches royal,
Of ladies and piraltes boli.

"Columbus," whispered 6irst this wind,
He sailed these oceans, too;
He found this land and started homes
For p-eop-le just like y-ou."

"Mlorgan, Morgaln, feared was he,"
Then it gently- sighed.
"He stole and plundered and he killed
On his journeys wide."

It whistled for a little while
And tried its best to tell.
A breaking, creaking crash was heard,
'Twas only- a frond that fell.

It hushed and then continued,
This tale of men of old.
The Frenchmen were the next in line;
Of their deeds it readily told.

"They- were the first in this great land
W'ho tried to dig this ditch.
They- slaved all night and day by hand
And never did get rich." ~

Again it paused to gather breath
For the story it had to tell,
Of A\mericalns who worked to death,
But who conquered the "living hell."

"They made the lake and waterway
They fought both land and sea.
For in 1914, they~ opened this ditch
And set world comnmer-ce free.'

Th~e pallm trees rustled, swayed, were still,
Breathless, the windi went down.
It had toldl a tale of might and will,
Wi~hich produced a wor-ld-known town.


RED ANTS.


A4nd looking down at my knee I behold,
A mece red ant sitting there so bold.
I sweep him from his chosen place,
And he lands upon a grassy space.


III


Once more I return to my wandering thoughts,
But soon they are scattered, now what?
The place of my dreamy rest
Was a nice big red ant's nest.


YOU TELL ME.

Mal~ry Dean, 'p.

When I've a smudge upon my fa~ce,
YIou tell me!
Whenever my shoes become unlaced,
You tell me!
And if I've gained a pound or two;
If there are freckrles breaking through;
It doesn't matter what I do-
You tell me!



THE STORM.

V;ivian Elmgr-en, 'p.




A dreary day, a stormy night,
Oh, how the wind does fulme and fight.
The gods of storm to battle ride
1Vith darkened clouds against the sky.


IL.


The rain in torrents fills the streets,
Like marching drums the thunder beats.
The sky is lighted aund we see
The gods of storm ride to victory.


V~ivin E/mgr'en, 'p.


A stillness o'er the land is sent;
Again is joy, peace, and content.
Life goes on with joys andi sorrows,
But a storm will come again t~o-morrow.


As I sit galzing at the sky;
Watching. the clouds pass merrily by.
Suddtenly my thoughts arre scattered away
By the p~rick!ing b~ite of an insect gay.








THE CARIBBEAN. 65


THE MEMORY LIVES.

Basil Franlk, Ex. 'p.

The years may come; the years may) go;
The rains may fall; the winds may- blow!
The hands of Time mayr move quite fast,
And many a man be of the past.
But, the memory lives on.

The memory lives; the thoughts come back!
Ah, there's the field, and there's the shack!
The place lights up as if to show
Me the faces I used to know.
Yes, the memnory lives on.

My heartstrings tug; my eyes grow damp.
I hear their voices! I hear the tramp
Of feet as up the aisle they walk,
And I try hard but can not talk.
Yet their souls live on!

My- poor head swims. I can not see!
Myv ears don't hear! W'hat can it be?
I'll join thee, schoolmates, in aI long, deep sleep,
For the hand of death shall make its sweep.
But, more'll come on!

The seas may roar and mountainls falll;
,Cities crumble; e'en Death may call,
Aind pals go down in the cold, damp ground,
Their souls on an upward journey bound,
Still the memory lives on!


BACK( TO SCHOOL.


Walter/ H. BuIndy, p.

When October rolled aIround once more,
School bells began to toll.
We all were there, prepared to work,
W'hen the teacher called the roll.

The Freshmen all grew grey with fear
Of the horrors to be seen,
If the clippers revealed their foolish heads
Till they looked like a Boston bean.

The Soph's strutted 'round like Indian Braves,
But still had a1 secret fealr
That the clippers woulld work on their coconuts
As they- did in their freshmann yrear.

The Juniors looked worried, no one knew why,
But they thought of the drastic way-
That teachers halve of making them wrork,
W'hen they much preferred to play-.

The Seniors paraded through the halls,
All ablaze in their nlew-found glory,
Then the faculty worked on them--
But that's another story.

Still as a whole they~ all were there
Prepared to struggle hard,
For C's and B's and maybe A's,
To put upon their card.


NOW.

Rose Crrigan2.

SVpecial.


SCHOOL.


Warlter H. Bundy, 'p.


This school term is ending falst,
And soon no more will be,
n'e know next week will be the last
Of work, of bells, of geometry-.

And when the last, long bell has tolled,
And we leave the well-kinow~n halls,
For rats, for bugs, for snakes to pull
The plaster from the walls.

Then we'll sigh, and groan, anld say,
"I know that school is past,
But when I think of the work and play,
I'm1 sorry. it didn't last."

But forget the past, it can't come back,
Alnd think of the times to be,
For the spirit of school will never lack
A place in our memory.


The world h'aint like it uster be>
That's a way it 'pears to me;
Cause, with all this modern science
Man ain't got no self-reliance.


N~ow when I was a young feller
Satterdays, I'd clean out the cellar.
But nowa days, with apartmentss up so high,
Soon, the kids 'll have to dust the sk-.

'Course when I was young, I'd get pretty! wild,
But toward these moderns, L~ordy, I wals mild;
I was given a limping pony, in my eighteenth yesar
But now, those whirlin', twistin' aeroplanes is here.

But then o' course, I'm not complainin'
Not fur all th' world do they need tamin'
Because for all this modern science
Those kids have got their self reliance.
MLR 19742--9





























"-~--~--------~-~----~----=~;j


qi3anama IZle' ~t~e Bbee ~ilt.


THE CARIBBEAN.


MISFORTUNE.

Be/ding King, 32-

On a hill far away
Stood my- old Chevrolet'
Its top was tattered and torn;
I traded it in
For an old Ford coupe
And saw that old Chevvy no more-

For a year and a daY
Ran the old Ford coupe
Till at last, one day, it broke down,
Then the junk man said
He'd give it a bed,
And now I am walking to town.


CALAMITY.
Howeard Keenan,'32.

The boy stood in the bath tub,
All covered up with soap,
Rocking gently to and fro,
For he was on a boat.

A woman came walking down the hall,
When all of a sudden she fell
The boy grabbed up a bathrobe,
And stammered, "What the-Well!

The woman turned up her nose and said,
"Oh, such language vile."
The boy then said, "Well please get out,
And stay out for quite a while."


THE LURE OF THE TROPICS.

Elsie Darley, 'Jo, and De~lla Rarymond, 'Jo,

No one who has not actually lived there knows
what is meant by the lure of the tropics.
Only those who have lived in the magic zone
long enough to make it their home, have ex-
perienced the magnetic power which makes them
want to return after they have left. Notwith-
standing their assertions to the contrary, it is the
mysterious call of the tropics that lures them back.
Perhaps it is speaking too broadly to say, that
everyone upon arrival is immediately enamoured
of the place, because there are many people who
develop a dislike for the country and leave by the
next boat. It may be because they can not
adapt themselves to a different type of life. But
there is no medium. The place is either loved or
hated.
There must be something which makes the
tropics so favorable. Is it the jungles that sur-
round us? Is it the rainy season with its sudden,
breath-taking downpours? Perhaps it is the
happy-go-lucky life about the the tropics that is
part of the lure. Perhaps it is because Panama
is progressing so rapidly and is getting to be a
"big place" in the world. Maybe some day
someone will have thought it all out.


HISTORY OF PANAMA AND COLON.

Macis Thirlwuall 'o.

Panama and Colon, gateways to the great
Canal, were established long before the oceans
were united. In fact, in no more than a century
after the discovery of the New World, both of
these towns were important in romance, explora-
tion, and commerce.
After Columbus had sailed along the coast of
what is now Panama, a host of other Spaniards
came, establishing the little settlement of Darien.
Using this as a base, Balboa explored the jungle,
and finally, from a hill in Darien, saw the great
Pacific. The settlement which became known
as Panama, however, was not established until
15'9. This name Panama is a native name
meaning "One who fishes in river or ocean."
Later on, in I 53 8,the "'Real Audiencia de Panama"
was established. This governed the territory far
north and about r00 miles south.
As other settlements grew up and colonists
arrived led by the stories of gold and treasure, an
immense traffic grew. Finally from a mere path
through the jungle a "camino real" was construct-
ed across the Isthmus. The terminus on the
Atlantic side was Porto Bello, which figured
greatly in shipping, also.







TH-E CALRIBBEAN. 67


This prosperity incited the envy of the English
and Europeans. Sir Francis Drake raided the
settlements many times. His body is said to be
buried in the bay of the town which is now Colon.
It was Henry Morgan, however, who completed
the entire destruction of Panama, in r671. Only
vine covered walls and half ruined bridges remain
to-day of this town.
When the Spa~niards built up their new town
they chose a rather high and r-ocky peninsula.A
great stone seawall, which is said to have cost
$11,000, was built for defense against further at-
tacks. Most of the seawall remains to-day. An
attractive walk or promenade has been made of it,
and it has been named "La Boveda." The houses
were built of stone with windows high above the
ground. The streets were narrow. The dun-
geons, several of which mnay be seenl to-day, were
horrible.
As years went by, Panama grew but slowly.
The first great move toward its progress was made
in r855, when the two towns at either coast,
Panama and Colon (then Aspinwall), were
united by rail. The financing and building of
this long-needed railroad was done by Americans,
among whom were William Aspinwall and John
Stephens. The work was accomplished after five
years of difficulties and danger-s.
M~r. Aspinwall was also the leading spirit in the
establishment of the trans-Pacific line of steam-
ships and the Pacific Mail Steamship Company.
Then came the French attempt to build a canal,
For seven years the work went on. But disease,
waste, and theft finally overcame this enterprise
and the work was finally discontinued.
The United States realized the possibilities, or
in fact the need of this waterway, and they pur-
chased the rights of the French company. This
time the work was carried through and in 1914
the great way was opened.
The sanitation, which had been a vital factor
in the building of the Canal, was also completed
by the United States. Col. W\illiam C. Gorgas
was appointed chief sanitary officer, and under
his strict and efficacious inspection, Panama
gradually became a healthful place.
The Republic of Panama is divided into nine
provinces. Panama and Colon are under control
of the Panamanian Government, although they
are within the area of the Canal Zone. Each prov-
ince has its "gobernador" under whom are the


lesser officials, alcaldes, who with the "concejo"
municipal, govern~ the towns and cities.
Panama City is the capital, and therefore the
home of the President, the seat of the Assembly,
and the residence of local officials.


THE POPULATION OF PANAMA.



The total population of the Republic of Panama
exceeds 450,000 people. This, of course, does not
include those in the Canal Zone itself.
Of this population the whites, or pure Spaniards
make up 60,000. The total number of half
Indian and half white is somewhat greater than
200,000 persons. The negroes, which come to
Panama from different parts of the W'est Indies,
n~ow number more than 100,000. There are
approximately 50,000 Indians in Panama, the
San Blas tribes being the m~ost important.
Strange as it may seem, there are over r,000 of the
yellow race in Panama. These people however,
do not go into the interior so much, but are center-
ed about Colon and Panama City principally.
A4 few, however, take to gardening on a small scale.
There are 75,000 foreigners on the Isthmus and
10,000 more men than women.
The population of Panama City is well over
70,000, and is twice as large as its nearest rival,
Colon, which has a population of slightly more
than 35>000.


RESOURCES OF PAiNAMA4.
tlraiter trikinlgstai, ';o.

Only about three-eighths of the country of
Panama is occupied, and of this area but a small
proportion is properly cultivated. The Unitedl
Fruit Company has about 35,000 acres devoted to
banana raising, this being the most important
cultivated product. Every tropical product may
be grown to perfection, and in the hills and
mountains practically all fruits and vegetables of
temnperate zones may easily be raised. There is
no reason why Panama should not produce
enough fruits, vegetables, and other agricultural
products to supply the entire Republic, and the
Canal Zone in addition, an~d yet, nearly all the
vegetables and fruits used on the Zone are im-






68 THE CARIBBEAN.


ported; and a large part of those sold in Colon
and Panama City are brought from other countries.
Other products besides the banana include coffee,
cocoa, coconIuts, sugar, tobacco, and various
dyestuffs and medicinal products. W;5ith the
present program of motor roads penetrating the
interior, there is no reason why a good living
should not be made by agriculturists in Panama.
In the old Spanish colonial days, cattle raising
was the chief industry aside from mining, but
to-day there are not over 2oo,oco head of cattle
in the entire Republic. Scrawn~y, poor, tough
cattle are the results of very little attention given
to breeding.
Good horses are not raised in the Republic, but
fairly good native ponies are. The majority are
miserable, undersized, thin and weak. Mules
are scarce and very high priced. Estimates place
the total number of horses and mules in Panama
at about 4opoo0.
Around the Perlas Islands the pearl fishing is
very lucrative, but it is not carried out to any
great extent. The waters of Panama teem with
fish, but the present fisheries do not fill all of the
demands of the cities and of the Zone.
Panama possesses nearly every common mineral
except coal, but they are scarcely mined. Among
them are granite, limestone, copper, iron, lead,
mica, nickel, oil, silver, tin, and gold. In the
old Spanish days, Panama was sacked by pirates
for its gold, and gold is still found in the famous
Darien mine and in practically every stream.
Panama is very rich in timber. In the forests
are many valuable cabinet, building, ornamental,
and dye woods. As a rule, the valuable woods
are scattered and are therefore not so accessible.


THE BRIDGE OF THE WORLD.
Macis ThirtwalN, '3o.

Panama, the land of eternal romance has had,
from early days, an important position- in the
world. In the fifteenth century it was named
"The Bridgeofthe World." This romantic name
wals given because Panama was really used as a
bridge to the rich, gold-producing countries in
Central and South America.
During the eighteenth century, conditions in
Panama became very bad, and she soon lost her
name, "T'he Bridge of the WMorld."


Very little was heard of Panama until the dis-
covery of gold in California, in 1849. Thousands
of people went by way of Panama, which was then
a veritable pest hole of disease.
Panama soon realized her opportunities and
built a railroad in 1855. Then the "Bridge of the
World" was again fulfilling its name.
The year 1903 saw Panama win her independ-
ence from Colombia. This event is celebrated
every year on November 3, with fiestas and fire-
works. Then, in r914, the great Canal was open-
ed to traffic by the Americans, and Panama, "The
Bridge of the World," became the world's highway
in truth.
Panama has also been called "The Crossroads
of the World." Since the recent development of
large airplane stations in Panama, a more modern
and less romantic name has been applied to her,
"The Crossroads of the Air."


THE PANAMA RAILROAD.
Elsie Darley, 'So

A concession was granted to William H. Aspin-
wall, Henry Chauncey, and John L. Stephens in
1848, to build a railroad across the Isthmus.
W~ork was begun in May, 1850, and the railroad
was finished by January, I855
The original railroad followed the valley of the
Chagres River from Gatun to Gamboa, but this
part is now submerged in Gatun Lake, the Canal
itself following the route of the old railroad very
closely. From Gamboa it crossed the divide
through the present site of Culebra, from there
through Paraiso and the bed of what is now Mira-
flores Lake to Panama. It was acquired by the
United States in 1904, but is was not found
possible to use much of the old road when the
Canal was built, so it was relaid to run almost
parallel with the Canal to the eastward. The
cost of relocation was S8,866,393-
The present railroad is 48 miles long and runs
from Colon to Panama with stations at Mount
Hope, Fort Davis, Gatun, M/onte Lirio, Frijoles,
Darien, Gamboa, Obispo, Summit, Pedro Miguel,
Red Tank, M/iraflores, Fort Clayton, Corozal, and
Balboa. The rates are high, a first-class return
costing $4.80. The crossing of the Isthmus by
train takes two hours or approximately one quarter
of the time taken by steamers.







THE CARIBBEAN. 69)


SAN BLAS INDIANS.
Alice Henter, 'jo.

The San Blas Indians habitat islands less than
100 miles from Colon. These islands are said to
be free from the usual pesky- insects of the tltropics,
and from wild animals.
The San Blas Indians cultivate only what they
need for themselves. On the mainland can be
found patches of corn, yams, sugar cane, and rice.
Unlike most uncivilized people, their women do
little wor-k in7 the field.
Although these people have been in contact with
Europeans since the sixteenth cen~tury), they had,
until about ten years ago, maintained racial
purity. Their language which is very simple,
consisting of onl 500 words, and their culture
shows South American origin. The white Indians
are also found amongst the San Blas people, but
this has been caused onlyfrom heredi tary-albinism.
The San Blas Indians have kept their independ-
ence byT opposing all foreign settlement. TIhey
used to take great pride in boasting that no
stranger had ever passed the night on their islands.
'They are not a war-like race, but they- have
peculiar beliefs. Their women are well guarded
and seldom seen.
The San Blas Indians are found to be very
intelligent and eager to learn. They hav-e a very
peculiar appearance, however, being very- short
and having large box-sized heads. They have
somewhat the same color as the North Aimerican
Indian.
They are fond of bright colors, and their dress
is very odd. The men wear cotton shirts and
trousers, which by the w~ay, they- make them~-
selves. The women wear skirts which are merely
long pieces of cloth wrapped around them. They
also wear rings in~ their noses and in their ears.
They wear no rings on their fingers, however, until
they are married, and then it is customary only to
wear the wedding ring.
The San Blas Indian's love of color is brought
out distinctive in their han~dwork. The women
are very adept at copy-ing all kinds of patterns.
They often copy- designs from boxes or ev~en flour
or sugar sacks. Mlany times, people have been
surprised to find that they- have purchased a
blanket made by- the San Blas Indians with a
Gold M~edal flour, or some such pattern worked
on it.


ONE OF THE STREET SCENES OF COLON.

JamesJ C. Whoo, 'p.

The scenes on the callse" and "avenidas" of
Colon are varied, numerous and interesting.
People and customs from the wor-ld over are
represented, although our- more frequent street
companions are Panamanians, Americans, WVest
Indians, Chinese, and Hindus.
Of all these scenes, the more local is the "Alma-
cen." This (store-affair) is usually- a two byfour
hole cut into the wall. They are run by WVest
Indians and are therefore located in the negro
sections. There are more of them on Bolivar
Street than in any other one street of Colon.
The lowly wares sold in these stores are bananas,
coconuts, oranges, bread, avocados (alligator
pears), and fr~ied fish. Whli na combination; but
they- are sold just the same. W~hen one passes by-
the store attendant may be seen fry)ing the fish
or baking the bread over the charcoal stoves.
T'he "Almacen" is really- a curious looking scene.


BARRO COLORADO ISLAND.

Tiomans L. Co/ev, j,., Jo.

During the building of the Canal the Chagres
valley was flooded in order to make what is now
known as Gatun Lake. The animals, who in-
habited this region, were forced a little farther
back each day as the water rose. Finally- when the
lake was full, many of these animals found them-
selves stranded on hilltops that were now islands.
The largest of these islands inl I923, was set aside
by- the Govesrnor of the Canal Zone as a forest
preserve. It is known as Barro Colorado, which
in English means "red clay." It is about six
miles square, covered with dense jungle and well
stocked with anim~als. No hunting or destruction
of trees is permitted there, as the island is to be
kept as a place wher-e people may come and see
animals in their native haunts.
Barro Colorado is also the home of several
scientists w'ho are studying the animals and their
habits. These men live in a small building over-
lookring Barro Colorado's little harbor.
Some of the many- animals which inhabit the
island are the coati, a member of the raccoon
family-, the well-known porcupine, the sloth, a
lazy animal somewhat resembling the monk~ey in







THE CARIBBEAN.


appearance, the armadillo, and monkeys of all
kinds. Many beautiful birds may also be seen
on the island. Snakes, spiders, and all .types of
insects are found in abundance. To me, just the
sight of any of these creatures in their native
homes would make a trip to the Barro Colorado
well worth while.


CRISTOBAL IN 1904-I906.
Delar Raymonrd, 'jo.

It seems funny these days to hear of the days
in 1904 and r906 when the first American
families started to come to Panama.
I always enjoy hearing my folks tell about the
times they used to have when they first came down
here. Naturally, for the first few months it was
hard to get accustomed to the ways and means
of Panama, after having lived in the United
States.
First of all the houses were not like they are
now. The few houses that there were were on
rollers and had to be moved from one place to
another. My brothers used to have a great time
trying to find our house when they would come
home in the evening. They would leave the
house early in the morning, and every night
when they would return they'd be all prepared to
go on the nightly search for the house. To hear
them talk about it now, it must have been great
fun to go looking for one's home every night,
but I can imagine their feelings when they had to
do it then.
There were just a few white people, but there
was plenty of other company. The colored
people lived in tents that surrounded the houses
of the white people. The place was mostly
swamps, and in the evenings there were many
serenades to be heard. These serenades were
given not only by the colored people, but by the
frogs from the swamps.
The sanitation was impossible. Many of the
inhabitants died or were deathly sick from
malaria. The food was not so appetizing. My
mother often tells us how she used to have to
send to my grandmother in New York for vege-
tables and other victuals that could not be ob-
tained here.
T'he streets were not streets at all. They were
nothing but boardwalks. There was even a


"main boardwalk" that took you to town (it
was called the town). The Government had just
started to build decent streets, and that was one
reason why the houses were placed on rollers, so
as to move them out of the way.
The Commissary was altogether different from
what itis now. It was nothing but a small shack
where both the white and the black people did
their purchasing. One had to do his shopping
mna hurry because if he stayed mn the place too
long he would "pass out" from the unpleasant
odors.
The stores in "town" were not like they are
now. They too were nothing but tiny shacks.
Some were not even shacks.
It certainly seems funny now, but it must have
been rather unpleasant living here in those first
days.

GATUN LAKE ON A MOONLIGHT NIGHT.
7ames C. Wtood, Ij2.

On a moonlight night, Gatun Lake is a sight to
see. The moonlight reflects on the rippling water,
as if to be a silvery highway stretching from shore
to shore. Bordering this silvery reflection, on
either side, is the darker water. Both form a
striking contrast. Dotting the scene are the
decaying trees of a former jungle, standing like
sentinels on guard duty. Farther on in the back-
ground is the mountainous shoreline. Lying over
the horizon are the lazy, black clouds, with their
edges tinted silver by the moon. A dead stillness
envelopes the whole region. This quietness is
broken by the occasional bark of the lake dweller's
pet dog. The lake is truly a sight to see on a
moonlight night.

PEARLS IN PANAMA.
Eleanor Fitzgeranld, '3o.

Some time ago, a boy, while wading along the
shore of Panama Bay, picked up an oyster and
found in it a pearl which he sold for S3,000, and
which the purchaser took to Paris and sold for
$12,000.
The early European navigators seemed to have
a great desire to fish for the pearl-bearing oyster
and Columbus himself had a great interest in the
pearls which the uncivilized natives possessed.







THE CA4RIBBEAN.


The Isthmus of Panama curves a great deal
and forms a sort of horseshoe shape. There are
two ocean currents that meet about a hundred
miles 06f the coast of Panama. One of these
comes fr-om the North Americanl coast, the other
comes up the South American coast. The m~eet-
ing of these two currents produce an unusual
effect on the tides, causing a rise and fall of 22
feet. Perhaps the tides have little to do with the
oyster but it is known that one may walk out far
from Panama City- on the muddy botton of the
bay when it is low tide, and once in a while oysters
may- even be seenl along the ground. WTho knows
but what they may- contain a pearl of some value.
About so miles southeast of the shoreline of
Panama are a group of islands known as the
Perlas Islands. There are about 40o small islands
in all, the largest called Rey, or K~ing. It is not
hard to find some way of visiting these historical
spots. The simplest and most comfortable method
is the steam launch, although too, one can alwa~s
find numerous small sail boats run by natives.
The trip takes about five or six hours, or even a
whole day, starting early and returning after dark;.
Even then that only gives a hurried view of the
islands.
Saboga, one of the islands, is the place where it
is said the people live on coconuts, and fish for
pearl oysters as a diversion. The fishermen on
this island go forth at dawn. Each boat contains
a few divers who are certain just where the best
results are obtained. On each dive a diver brings
up one oyster. The limit seems to be six dives
which they consider sufficient for a day s work.
The Panamanian divers, unlike most other divers,
remain in the water a shorter length of time, but
make more dives. All pearl divers are short-lived.
In Panama City there is an old church, built
by Spanish colonizers. The towers of this old
cathedral are thickly studded with mnother-of_
pearl shells, which have been obtained from the
Pearl Island fisheries.


PANArMA HIATS.
MI~aria Stewart, S'pecia/ Student.

Ripley tells us in his "Believe it or not," that
Panama hats are not mnade in Panama.
That is true. Panama hats, so-called because
they are marketed through Panama, are sold


throughout the shops of Colon and Panama at
prices far below those inl the States.
The best hats come from Monte Cristi, in
Ecuador, but the shops in Pwanama and Colon
frequently pass off inferior Colombian and Peru-
vian hats for the genuine Mlonte Cristi.
The hat, a fines handl-plaited hat, is made from
the young leaves of a palm-like plant native
to Central America and Colombia. The leaves
are gathered before maturity and thze soft parts
are removed. The fibers are soaked in water to
render them pliable. The weaving is done by
hand. TIhe best hats are made of a single leaf
and are therefore uniform in quality and tint.
It is very easy to distinguish them as the
Ecuadorian hats are started with a circular weave
in the center of the crown, while the others have
a square or squarish pattern. The quality and
pr"ice of a Panama hat depend upon the fineness
of the weave, the evenness, the color, the uniform
size of the straw, or rather palmn, the finish of the
edges, and many other details.
The tiber producing plant and stemless cr~ew
pine, has been introduced into the Philippin~es,
and the natives there have become expert manu-
facturers of these hats. The great centers of
manufacture of Panama hats are the Central
A4merican states and the countries on the coasts
of northern and western Southz Amer-ica.


RUBBER.

Howard~ Keenlan,'p.i-


Rubber was first found by the Indians in the
WVestern Hemisphere. W\hen Columbus came
over he found them playing with rubber balls.
This rubber would rebound when it hit a hard
object. It would not do for modern articles
because it was too soft and had to be mixed with
sulphur. Sulphur was niot known then.
Rubber is an elastic gam made fromn the milky
juice of a number of plants which grow in
tropical and semitropical regions of the world.
The juice is milk white. First, a vertical channel
is cut down the side of the tree, and then diagonal
cuts connecting with this are made on both sides.
This is called tapping. The tapping is done early
in the morning, and the latex or juice is gathered
a few hours later.







THE CARIBBEAN.


brought from Jamaica, Haiti, or California.
Apples, grapes, pears, etc., are usually on sale,
but are imported from the United States weekly.
Many fruits--bananas, coconuts, alligator pears,
mangoes--grow wild. Papaya trees are a great
favorite on the Zone and are usually found growing
in everyone's back yard. Bananas are universally
used. The banana industry of the United Fruit
Company in Bocas del Toro is the biggest enter-
prise in the Republic. Taken as a whole Panama
is very deficient in good tropical fruits.
On account of the heavy rains, the vegetation
is always green and luxuriant, and many rare and
beautiful flowers are found. Seventy-five varieties
of orchids grow wild with a great number of
colores, and other tropical plants. Hibiscus,
oleander, bougainvillaea, and frangipani are some
of the most common of the plant life of Panama.

NATIVE ANIMALS, BIRDS, AND FISH
OF PANAMA.
Elsie N. Doar, 'y.

Panama is the home of numerous animals,
birds, and fish. Among the animals found here
are tapirs, ant eaters, wild cats, deer, and many
monkeys, such as the red monkey, howlers, and
the spider monkey.
A4 great many birds are found here, among them
are parrots, parrakeets, egrets, white herons,
pelicans, gulls, and wild ducks. The most
common of these are the parrots and parrakeets.
The tourists who visit Panama each year buy
these parrakeets for young parrots, and are
very much surprised when they find they have
been fooled.
The more common fish found in the waters
around Panama are jack, Spanish mackerel,
red snapper, tarpon, barracuda, stingaree, blow-
fish, corbina, sea urchins, Portuguese man-o-war,
and many others of great interest. The tarpon
is a very good fish for sport and is hard to catch,
for it is very large in size. In Gatun there is a
club for such sport. The Portuguese man-o-war
is a very pretty fish, purple and pink in
color and is found along the beaches. The barra-
cuda is a long, slender, fighting fish resembling a
mackerel, and is very treacherous. If one is
caught on a line it will fight to get away. The
barracuda is a native fish of the warmer climates.


If the latex is allowed to stand the rubber will
rise to the top. But the water must be evapo-
rated and the rubber coagulated at once or the
rubber will be injured.
After the latex is gathered it is smoked. A
paddle is dipped into the latex and then held over
a fire until the water is evaporated, leaving a thin
coating of rubber. The paddle is dipped again
and again in the latex, and then held in the smoke
until a large rubber ball is formed. This ball is
then cut open on one side and the paddle is taken
out.
WThen the crude rubber reaches the factory it
is run through toothed rollers, through which
water is running. The rollers break the rubber
up into rough strips, and the water removes the
dirt and other impurities. The strips are then
mixed with sulphur. The rubber is never melted.
It may be warmed, but is is always pressed into
molds, not poured in.
Previous to 1839, rubber was of very little value
commercially because no method of preparing
it for practical use had been discovered. It was
sticky in warm weather and brittle in cold weather.
In 1839, Charles Goodyear, an American, dis
covered the process of making modern rubber.
Rubber is used for telephones, bicycles, auto-
mobiles, combs, hot-water bottles, knife handles,
buttons, etc.
In the tropics, rubber is taken in crude form
and poured over shoes so as to make them water-
proof. This is done only by the natives, however.
They also press it on sacks and make water-proof
bags out of it.
AS little while ago, the Uinited States sent a
representative down to Panama to see about
growing rubber in Gatun Lake. The soil was
not good enough and so the experiment was
dropped,

THE FRUITS AND FLOWERS OF PANAMA.
Pauline Henrman, jo.

All the tropical fruits of Panlama may be ob-
tained in the markets during their seasons, but
are high priced as compared to other tropical
countries. Tabaga pineapples have the repu-
tation of being the b~est, but some people consider
the L~imon or 10.~nre L~irio pines, the red, yellow-
meated variety, far superior. Native oranges are
excellent but scarce. TIhe bulk of citrus fruits are







THE CARIBBEALN.


In the reptile line are found many poisonous
snakes, all;:gators, crocodiles, iguanas, and harm-
less lizards. The iguanas are very ugly-, and many
people eat them for chicken. The iguana changes
in color during the change of seasons. In the
dry season it is brown in color, while in rainy
season it changes to a deep gr-een.
There are many insects wYhich are poisonous
such as the poisonous spider, the scor-pion, and the
tarantula. T'hey ar-e very- harmful and some_
times dangerous unless promnptly treated with an
antidote.
Before the U'nited States took charge of the
sanitation on the Isthmus, the malarial mosquito
was very- dangerous. Now all places where water
may~ stand and stagnate are covered with oil.
This kills the larvae of this mosquito and frees the
Canal Zone from malaria fever.


THE: COCONUT.

Alarvis Thirhea;/ll, 'Jo

The coconut tree is said to be the most service-
able tree, and the one which has the highest
commercial \-alue. This may- well be true since
this tree may be used for food, drink, clothing, and
shelter. Besides being a serviceable tree, it is
a beautiful one. It is usually associated with
romance; how often have you heard swayingg
palms, grace~ful palms, etc."
The milk; of the fruit or Iit of this tree is a
drink. The meat produces oil from which are
manufactured butter, soap, ...liiL.-, medicine,
confectionery, perfume, and cosmetics. After
the oil is extracted, the meat is used for fodder.
The shell makes combs, spoons, bowls, and many
other articles. T`he stemn goes for furniture and
lumber; the leaves for roofs, brooms, mats, and
baskets. AiSmong the numerous other useful
articles made from this are cement, vinegar, gum,
and yeast-
This tree grows best near the sea in lands of
rains and moisture. One of the attractive sights
of tropical coasts and islands is the palm tree.
The tree is veryc slender. Its age is indicated by
the rings around the bark. There are about tw~o
rings for each year of age. M~any coconut trees
curve gracefully. This fact, besides adding to
the beauty of the tree, provides easy climbing.
MIR 19742-10


In Bocas del Troro, a distant town of Panama,
thousands of trees have been planted which are
just recently beginning to hear. There are many;
other large plantations which produce great
quantities of nuts. Panama recently. shipped
more than a million coconuts in one m~onth. The
coconuts produced here are some of the finest.
They are gathered and mnark~eted by the San Blas
Indians, especially-. On the 300 islands of these
Indians, there are about 300,000 coconut trees
which !ield a considerable produce each year.
However, this is diminishing since they do not
replant their trees. They are not interested in
developing this industry-, but only in producing
enough for their own use.
On the whole, Panama is very active in pro-
ducing and exporting this useful pr-oduct.

SHIPS THAT COMCE TO CRISTOBA~L.
Jarmes Campbel, 'qo.

Up~on entering the Port of Cristobal, you will
be interested mn looking at the harbor. There is
the breakwater which is a protection against the
heavy seas during the dry season. It was made
by- dumIping boulders of rock into the water until
it reached a height of 20 feet. There ar-e two
open"ings in the breakwater, but only one is used
by larger ships. The bay within the breakwater
is capable of holding the whole U~nited States
Navy with ease.
The pier where your ship will go to dock is
situated with further protection against bad
weather. 'There are four large piers made of
concrete. Here you will see quite a number of
ships loading and unloading cargo.
Then you may ask "WShy are all these ships
here?" and y-ou will find several reasons. The
first reason is the situation of Panama. It has
been said that Panama is situated at the cross-
roads of the world. The second reason is the
presence of the Panama Canal with its shortening
of ocean routes attracts many ocean vessels.
Your next question may be "W\hat are: these
ships doing'" As you inspect the docks yIou can
usually see a tourist ship tied up at pier 6, the
newest pier. The tourist season is during the
winter of North America.
The other piers are crowded with fr-eighters and
tramp vessels. There are usually about twelve or
more in. The majority- of the car-go is shipped







741 THE CARIBBEAN.


from smaller ships, which go to the South and
Central American ports, to larger ships going to
America or Europe.
Whenever a ship needs coal it ties up at the
coaling station, but most vessels to-day burn oil or
have Diesel engines. The Diesel engine is becom-
ing more popular because it is cheaper to run once
it has beerrinstalled. The fuel oil is stored in huge
oil tanks and almost every day you may see a
tanker unloading oil.
Statistics are published by The Panama Canal
giving the movements of ocean vessels. They
show that during the month of January, r930, a
total of 531 ships passed through the Canal.
Two hundred and forty-six of these were Ameri
can ships, and 125 were British. Of the remaining
the Dutch, French, German, Norwegian, Swedish,
and Japanese ranked from I5 to 30 ships apiece.
Some smaller countries are also represented by
one or two ships apiece. During the same time,
36 ships arrived at the Port of Cristobal for the
purpose of taking cargo of some kind. Some
of these transited the Canal but most did not.
In conclusion, you will find that Cristobal ranks
second to New York as a seaport on the Atlantic
coast of the Americas. This refers to the ton-
nage of cargo which enters and clears the docks.


SEVERAL SUPERSTITIONS.

Crawford Campbell, 'p.

Superstition, like everything else, reflects the
local color. In Panama we are surrounded by the
negro whose conversations are often most en-
lightening, for instance, could anyone guess that
the flesh of an iguana may turn to butter?
One evening, after quarreling with a colored
man for at least an hour as to who had the better
fleet, the United States or Great Britain, we
switched to the subject of eating iguanas. It is well
known in the tropics that the meat of the iguana
is very delicate. The negro just couldn't see
that is was possible to eat this meat. He had
never tried it, but knew that iguanas were filthy.
If they were allowed to set in the sun all day with
salt on them, they would turn to butter. He had
never seen it done but seemed to have direct
information on the subject, and could not be
persuaded otherwise.


Taking a hike in the jungle, I came upon five
men killing a large snake, supposedly a Tomigoff.
When it had been killed and tied to a stick, their
thoughts naturally began to wander to snakes.
One swore up and down that if that snake was
put in a fire four little legs would burst out
unexpectedly. The others tried to persuade him
otherwise, but he was not to be persuaded from
what he knew to be true.
There was a little new-born goat near a negro's
house. It was a pretty little brown and white
kid. M~y first impulse was to stop and pet it,
but I was told that if I should happen to touch
its tail its mother would immediately disown it,
which would be a terrible catastrophe to the poor
kid, so I kept my hands off.
It is impossible to trace back the origin of
superstitions, but nevertheless they exist.' In
fact, they are as real to the darkiess" as the
things they see every day. A negro can make
you actually shudder at the thought of disregard-
ing one of his pet superstitions.

TWO QUEER THINGS.
David~regory, 'p.

One queer thing mn Panama is the bombers.
They are the firemen "de la Republica de Panama."'
These fire eaters are dressed in red, with big black
boots, and they are very proud of themselves.
On Sunday a person can see them drilling, looking
like British soldiers marching up and down the
streets. On parades and on Panamanian holidays
you can see them drilling and marching along at
night with torches held high above their heads.
I do not know about their ability as fire eaters, but
they must be pretty good.
Another queer thing of Panama are the dogs.
Before the Americans came here, the dogs and
buzzards were the garbage gatherers, "cafeteria
style." When the Americans came down, the
dogs were done away with and real garbage cans
set out. The Panamanian Government must love
these dogs quite a bit for their service to their
grandfathers and grandmothers, for if you hit a
dog with your car, the Government will be $25
richer. These dogs have so many breeds in them,
that Heinz would have to stop his factories. It is
a good thing that Chinese do not know about
them as the dogs are around r57 different varieties
as compared to the Heinz 57.

















THE LIFE OF A COCONUT.


greeted with "W'hy, Betty, where did you get that
lovely coconut?" A4nd, "I got it when they cut
the tree down over there."
"Wlell," said the child's mother, "place it on the
table and I will get 'Liza' (the colored maid) to
cut it for us and make a coconut custard pie."
"But, mother," replied the little tot, "I don't
like pie, so let's just ask papa to paint a pretty
picture on~ it and let's keep it as a souvenir."
"All1 right, darling, we can do that."
That night dear papa came home, and after
Betty had told him what she wanted done with
me, he took out his painting set and began to
paint me all up.
So now here I am--on a table in the sitting
room, all dolled up like a painted lady. I believe
I have a picture of a boat on me. This kind of
life isn't so bad, and I'm certainly glad I wasn't
cut up like some of my friends were.

DDOM.
E/sie Darle,~v o.

He sat there, his face drawn and pale, his hands
clenched between his knees in an effort to keep
them from trembling. Slowly .. slowlyr .. the
hands of the clock moved on, and to him they
served but to prolong his agony. Soon--ah, how
soon now! -the bell would ring and .. But he
wrenched his thoughts away from the future, and
Eixed them elsewhere. He allowed his gaze to
wander around his prison .Outside, in glorious
freedom, birds were singing .. theyl knewnothing
of his miserable fate. His mother .. he could
see her sweet, trustful ey-es now .. perhaps she
was praying for him .. Little Jackie, lispingly
asking where "Big Bruvver" was .. But it was
too late .. too late ..
The bell rang suddenly, and, pulling himself
together with a superhuman effort, the dumbest
freshman picked up his paper and pencils and
left the Assembly for his final exams


Della Rarymnond, jo.


I wonder if people have ever given it a thought
how coconuts enjoy life. Sometimes it is a cruel
life--especially if you happen to be a coconut on a
tree that is in a residential section of Panama-
Now, for instance, I was one of the many coco-
nuts on a coconut tree (of course, not a banana)
and this tree that I had grown on was planted by
one of the roads near the Cristobal High School
on Colon Beach. Well,one day I heard two little
boys who were sitting in the shade discussing the
cement road that was to be built. First of all,
my tree was like several others planted right on
the edge of this tar road. These little boys were
saying how it was going to be just "awful" to see all
the coconut trees cut down so they could make a
cement road, and naturally, since the trees were
planted so near the road, they; would have to be
taken out of the way.
Right then and there my fellow coconut brothers
and myself began to worry.
The day arrived for ;he men to cut down the
trees. There were three other trees from the end
of the road before ours. As these three were cut
down, there were "skaty-eight" kids hanging
around to gather up the coconuts that fell.
Finally our tree was cut a~d--boom!!--I fell
with a terrible noise and rolled over into the grass.
All of a sudden I felt myself being lifted up. A
little girl about seven years old was holding me
in her two arms, because, if I say it myself, I was
too big for her one arm.
Some little rascals of boys tried to pull me away
from her but she screamed and said she'd tell her
"mamma" on them, so they left me and her alone.
She ran home with me and I pray-ed all the way
that she wouldn't chop me up and ask her mother
to make pie or a cake out of me. W~hen we got
into her mother's kitchen, the little girl was


THE CARIBBEAN.







76 THE CARIBBEAN.


THE FRESHMAN BOY'S HANDBOOK.

E/sie Darley, Jo.

r. If, when you are assigned your seat in the
study hall, you can not see over the top of your
desk, have your seat raised. If this is not suffi-
cient, get one of those big Webster's Dictionaries
and sit on that. Sam or Butler will help you
carry it.
2. If you are so unfortunate as to have to sit in
one of tl e large chairs in room 27, do your best and
sprawl out in it asmuch aspossible. The modern
freshman is such that it requires careful scrutiny
by the teacher to determine whether or not he is
there. (Of course, when the teacher asks ques-
tions you do or don t know, you expand into
view or shrmnk from sight as the case requires.)
3. Start immediately to primp and groom
yourself in order to be voted the best-looking
boy. (Only be careful not to overdo it, or the
chances are that you 11 be chosen as the best-
looking girl.)
4. If you are called to the office, do not turn
pale or perspire unnecessarily. Probably Mr.
Sawyers only wants to know the middle name of
your father's cousin's aunt.
5. Do not try to bluff the teachers. They are
well versed in the peculiarities of high school
students and aren't having any. So, if you are
asked a question you can't answer, don't beat
about the bush, but say, "I don't know." This
will bring forth beautifully sarcastic comments
from the teacher on the density of high school
students in general, of freshmen in particular,
but it is a quick and otherwise painless method.
6. The inventive Freshman will find plenty of
scope in high school for his genius. There yet
remains to be invented a traffic regulation system
in the hall during passing of classes, devices that
will prevent people from sticking chalk in our
inkwells, "borrowing" our paper, carving wise-
cracks on our desks, using latter for waste-paper
baskets, etc., etc.
7. Finally, if you are of the gum-chewing
variety, do not leave blobs of chewed gum where
they are likely to be sat upon. Any accident of
this kind is no doubt very amusing to the on-
lookers but not so to the pantsi or dress of the
victim.


BUGHOUSE FABLES.
Thomas Coley, '3o.

r. Miss Hesse and Miss Gustalson not buying
a ticket to a school entertainment.
2. Mr. Meyer bawling someone out in less than
one-half hour.
3r:Miss Kimbro without a pair of earrings on,
buying a ticket to a school benefit.
4. Mr. West not arguing with someone for a
whole period.
5. Miss Russell yelling at someone.
6. Mr. Sawyers without a pencil behind his ear.
-7. Miss M/oore looking untidy.
8. Mr. Pence coming to school looking wide
awake.
9. Miss Patterson without a "Frat" pin.


MURDER!
Marian E. Hakln, 'p.

Yesterday as I was walking down the road,
enjoying the sights, I saw a poor little ant lying
dead in the dust of the street. A large foot-print
surrounded it. WChat can we do for the preven-
tion of this shameful slaughter of harmless insects?
Everywhere one goes, one sees them, poor, dead
ants.
The housewife slaughters them unmercifully.
And what, pray, do they do to her. They get in
her peanut butter, her sugar, her jam. How
little that is to taking the innocent life of a
creature of God!
And what do the children do to these innocents?
This is the shameful fact: They stamp on them
deliberately! I am ashamed of my generation.
And how, friends, do the ants harm the children?
They merely take bites of their candy or cake
when it is placed where it should not be. Such
unmerciful slaughter is overwhelming!
And then, the men, our dear fathers and elder
brothers, tread on them on their way to and from
work. Surely, it would not hurt them to look
where they are going.
I pity ants! Are they not our fellow creatures?
To the Creator we "are as ants crawling on the
face of the earth."







THE CARIBBEAN.


T is for TUTRNER in sports hard to pass,
For- THIRLWA~ILL, the idol of the class.

U is for U~seful, we hope we all are,

V is for Vice from which we are far.

W is for WTH EELER and 'I KI NGS ADtoo

For W'ONG, he's been with us four years thru,

Y is for Youth which we'll never forget,

Z is for Zero-y]rou got one, I'll bet!


THE SENIOR ALPHABET.
By a senrio.

A is for all of us, our class so dear,
What school will be without us, we sadly fear.

B is for BIRK~ELA1ND, our office girl clerk,
And also for BLISS who's always at work.

C is for CRUM, our President wise,
For CALMPBELL who always does what he
tries,
For COLEYI, too, our editor--a prize!

D is for DALRLEY, the little English lass,
For DAYS, who is always helping her class.

E is for EBERENZ who from ty-ping doesn't rest,

F is for FITZGERAILD whose story was best.

G is for GANZMUT~ELLER, her winning smile is
seen,

H is for HERMA~N, in sports she is keen,
For HENTER, sweet Alice, the Gatun queen.

I is for Ignorance which we all lack.

J is for June, on school we'll turn our back,
For JOY-CE who for talking has a great
knack.

K is for Kommencemen t-Oh, so near!

L is for Leaving--we'll shed a tear.

M is for MUNDNBERG our "Sonny- Bo-,"
For MIELENDEZ whose ready wit is a jo-.

N is for NEWMAilN w~ith humor so deep,

O is for Order which we: hate to keep.

P is for the Publication of our annual so great,

Q is for Qu~estions we ask at great rate.

R is for RAYMIOND of smile so wide,

S is for STEVENSON always on our side.


BEHIND THE COUNTER AT A RURMMAGE
SALE.
Raer Bliss, y.

'Twas the first week in December! The Girl
Reserves had agreed at their last meeting that
they would have a rummage sale to help raise
money- to send a delegate to the States. The
gir-ls brought all of their old dresses, their- sisters',
mothers', and grandmothers', banquet, Easter,
and party dresses, which had seen better day-s.
A few of the gairls brought some old trinkets,
which the "shines" actually called jewebyll, and
also a large pile of Victrola records. (I believe
the latest was "Panama Mamas.") Some of the
girls even brought their big brother's knee-
breeches, which he had haughtily- thrown in the
"old trunk;" since he had grown up. Then too
there: was an odd assortment of old toys brought
by' some thoughtful person.
W'e journeyed down to the Silver Clubhouse
with our carload of "jlunk" to start our afore-
mentioned Rummage Sale. '" Twas a busy
Saturday for us G. R.'s" WTe arranged the
"junk" attractively- on some tables and display-ed
the gowns by draping them artistically over a few
chairs. W\e priced everything very cheaply,
knowing that the darkiess" drew small salaries,
and that they seemed to belong to Scotch ancestry.
Dresses were 25 cents each (believe it or not),
V'ictrola records, 10 for a dime; men's coats,
5o cents each; boy's knee-breeches, 2S cents each;
ties (all colors of the rainbow wer-e well repre-
sented), 10 for a dime; toy-s, trinkets, and "jewel-
ry," 29 cents to a nickel. This was no sooner







78 THE CARIBBEAN.


~rr-~
rr- u ~..~I . ~


~bt ,,,..,.: .",-.~L~ih II


done when in came a mass of darkness, which
we fully realized was our customers flowing in,
We, of course, thought that our goods would
sell in no time, as it was so very, very cheap, in
fact we were almost giving things away.
But--those women would cast a slight glance
over our numerous dresses, finger 'em, rumple 'em,
mess 'em (if it was possible to add to their ample
suppy of it), and almost tear 'em--that unique
assortment of frocks! Finally a middle-aged,
female customer inquired the cost of a beaded
Georgette (slightly dilapidated) gown. When
told it was priced 25 cents, she said, if you please,
"What! Wid all dis here rippin's in de sides?
Man, ma dahter couldn't play mud-pies in dat
dere rig!"
We girls were actually dumfounded because
she wouldn't even consider buying the dress with
a little tear in the seam. Thus it happened with
several of our other customers, so we finally
reduced the price to Io cents. Yes siree! Only
one measly dime for any gown on the table! Then
business picked up a bit, but you may not believe
me when I say that those women were still
haughty about purchasing any of our goods.
All the little darkiess" in Silver City had
assembled at our famous Rummage Sale, so it
seemed. They were all crowded around our toy
division, which contained one "rickety-rackety,"
rusty toy gun, amongst other things. The boys


were simply wild about it but not one of 'em had
a nickel with which to satisfy their longing. One
of the most ardent admirers of the rusty toy gun
had a 23 cent piece and a penny, so we sold it to
him on the sly. He made "whoopee" galore after
the happy exchange, imitating Tom Mix and
"Buffalo Bill."
As for the Victrola records, each and every one
of 'em had to be played on the Clubhouse Ortho-
phonic, before we could make a single sale. Even
then they were hesitant about any record over
two months old, whether Gene Austin, Rudy Vallee,
Helen Kane, or "what have you?"
At the end of the day us "G. R.'s" were com-
pletely exhausted, as if we'd just played a strenu-
ous game of baseball or the like. Believe it or
not it was work trying to sell our carefully selected
"junk" to those impudent "shines," trying to
understand their "Bajan" talk and answer them
in the same language. 'Twas no wonder that we
felt like "The Heck of the Wresperus" at the close
of day. But 10 and behold! In spite of our re-
duction in prices 'n everything else taken into
consideration, we profited by only $6.373. How-
ever, we all unanimously agreed that the barrels
of fun we had were worth the time and trouble.
(I'll just tell you in strict confidence, though,
that the girls don't seem to be over anxious to
have another one right away.)







THE CARIBBEAN. i9




So ~DEER SLIM.
Maris;,., Thrw/,'o


Deer Slim:
Did ya notis what I notized this morning ? Tom
Coley cum to skule wit a black ey-e an' he sez he
was skatin' on the vice. Tell me, he musta ben
lien' cuz their ain't no ice ta skate on down heer,
besides if he fell on the vice wud he knok his ey-e?
Na, his eye wud be awrite, only he wudn'ta ben
able ta siddown.
I writ a pome for the K~ery-been. It's a swell
wun--reel intelechal-likie cuz I no that's whut
they- like to reed--about tha moon and the palm
treez. I wudda let y~a reed it only I don wan
nobudy to see it till it cums out in the K~erybeen,
Their's gonna be a opreta by the Glee Club-
I gues that's all tha singin' whut I been heering,
but listen, Slim, by lessenin to 'em singin ev~ery
day I'll save 7Sc.-Mnoozic is moozic, I sez, if ya
heer it in skule fur nuthin', or at the theater
firr 75c.
Didya see tha knew gurl in skule too day ?
Shes sum peach. I walks up ta her anld I sez,
"If I ken help ya," I sez, "ju~s lemme no," I sez.
Well, Slim, she blinked those lamps at me and sez,
"Thank you" reel refined like.
Ya no--seems to mne, weer getting' too old
ta go ta skule without a ty an so beginin
tamorro I'm gonna ware wun. That gurl--her
names Henretta he sits rite in frunt ame, ya no.
Wrell, I gotta stL ly~ my' jogerly lezon, see y-a at
tha ball game.
Yurs til Gatun locks,
SHORT.


Thursday, Mrl~lch -7~.
Deer Slim:
I huy ben involved en a grate mistry which haz
ben taking up my time. Ya no, I'm goin ta be
a detectif when I gro up so I thot I mite uz well
begin an praktis know. W`ell, sum misteeri-us
pursun, I've deesided its a wuman, haz benl leaving
misteeriyus pakugiz on a certain teachers desk.
I wuz not askt ta take up thiz caze but I'm doin it
fur praktiz. Any way, az I wuz sayin, thiz haz
benl goin on fur kwite awi e. TIha furst thing ta


doo, uf corz, waz ta fine tha kuntints of tha
pakige. A deteckitif haz ta bee very karful uf
unnown things so I tuk kare wen I opund it. Y~a
never kin tell it mite of had a bom in it. Anl I
wud uf hated ta see one uf my teachers blowed up.
A-nyway, I opened it an found a big suprize. It
was a swell piece of kake an boy, it was gud. Uf
corz, I saved a cupla krIums ta uze az evidunse
but I didn't see know senz in savein tha hole
peez ufkak~e. Da yoo?
I hav ben werkin on thiz kaze fur meny weaks
anl its still a big mistry ta mne. Evry morning I
open tha kapidge k~arfuly). Y~a never know wen
you'll fine a bomn, ya know.
I hav dun a lot a hevy thinkun and I'be kum ta
tha kuncloozun that thiz krime haz ben kumitted
by a womun. Tha motif, ya no every krime haz
got a motif, iz that she is inamoored to him (the
abuy mnenchoned teecher).
O, I furgot ta say- I hav a box: uf evidunse
(krums) ta uze against tha krimunul.
I hurd that a bunch of inspecturz uf skules is
kumin down heerpurtysoon tainspekt thiz skule. I
under what they-'ll do ta us. Welll Slim I bet
aftur they get heer their will be sum goins ons,
Sez I. Mlebee we'll hav to ware koats ta skule.
But I can't. Myr Ma wudn't let me ware my
Sunday koat and my uther uz in tha wash.
WTell, as tha ole sayrin goez "don't kawnt yure
chicks beefor they hack." Thiz mneens, dun't
wury' over things beefor they- happin.
O, Lisun, Slim, ef ya wan ta practis detectif
work with me, that there kake iz big enuf fiir too.
Yours mizteerusly
SHORT.



Tusday-, Marllc-h r9.
Deer Slim:
Their haz bin grate eggsitemunt in this town
sinz Fridy. Fridy- nite about 10.40 their wuz a
erthquak heer and boy-s! it wuz terrible. I tell ya,
Slim I was sleeping and dreemnin I wuz on a bote
and I woked up and sur-e nuf ef my bed wuzn't







80 THE CARIBBEAN.


just pitching A course I new it wuz a erthquak so
I run ta my ma's rum. I wuzn't scaird nor
nothing but I wanted to see ef she wuz awrite, ya
no. An' everybody wuz screemun and hollerin'
and tha ladeez wuz in the street wit there negle-
geez on and boys, my hart wuz jest palputatin.
I red in the papers and it says that Mr. Kerk-
patrik says their ain't gonna be no more earth-
quaks for a while anny way, ta bee on the safe
side I make spechul menchon in my praers uf
erthquaks.
A4n' another thin Colon's getting to be a reglur
Chikago. Their wuzabigholdupp Mundymornin'
and it wuzn't nobudy's suspenders neither. Too
men what had sum glazzs on robbed bout a
thousand dollars from too other men in tha
street. It was brawd daylite to at 12 u'clok
and tha men hav run away and can't be fownd.
An tha grates eggsitemunt uf al--Mr. Sawyers
cum ta skule this morning' with a knew suite, an
I goz up ta him an' I sez, "Pincheez, Mr. Sawyers,
but frum tha luk uf his faz I guez he don't no
what "Pincheez" meens.
Ya no, Slim tha glea club I wuz tellin' ya bout
beefor; well they had there pikchurs took yestiday
and we wuz watching them and they sur did luk
sappy. ~
The fleat haz gon. I wuz sitin in ma rum
today studin' my history and lukin awt tha
winda and I notised tha bay luked awful bare.
Then I remembud that it wuz cuz them I meen
those battle ships weren't their. They sur did
luk perty owt their. An' at nite wit all tha lites
on them, they luked like a big sity. An' thoz
salors were nize two they give me a cupla hats an
50c. Yeh, Slim, I luv ta see tha fleat cumin' in.
Are ya goin' to tha moveez tonite ta see Tom
Mix in the "Bucking Bronko." That's gonna be a
swell pitcher what I meen, I'm going.
S'along,
SHORTY.

Deer Slim:
Well, I hadda chanst ta show off my enteli-
gunz yestiday. Thoz inspekters which I wuz
tellin' ya abowt kum ta skule &: gived a inteli-
gunz test. They went rownd ta all the rumes &
choz sum kids. Well, when I seen them kumin
I put on a brite eggspreshun on ma fase &3 it wurked
'cauz they chaz me ta tak th~a test. In fact, they
chaz all tha br-ite kids, ya no.


Any way tha test wuz eezy. It asks ya, "Iz a
man alwaz, uzally, never or rarly shorter thun
hiz wif." Well Slim, I buleeve that ladeez like
ta mary men shorter than them so as then kin
boss em rownd so I sez, "M~en are alwaz shorter
than there wifes." That's won rite any way.
O yes, an another eezy wun waz this wun. "Iz
a boy uzully, never, alwaz or rarly more intelli-
junt then hiz Pa. That's eezy tha anser is
"alwaze," huh?
Thoz inspekturs mezured our skule and gave
us exams an there kuming back in a cupla weaks.
Wun of owr teachers wuz so eggsited thet she put
on a vary patryotik dres tha day they was sapozed
to kun all red &z white & blue striped. But they
never kame that day.
I hurd a gude joke yestiday. One guy--I
meen feller says to another, "Didja ever heer the
"'Ungarian Razzberries?" And the other wun
sez, "Yes, but that's eyebrow moozik ain't
it?" Funny izn't it, Slim.
I wuz reeding a "True Story" yestiday--Yeh,
my report card--an' boys! I wuz selabrating
too. It wuz vary patryotik! True brother, true.
I guez I'll haf ta put on ma best maners when I
tak that card home ta nite.
I lurned the rite way ta end a letter last weak.
I'll try it owt on yu.
Awateing for yure answer I remane
Yours truly,
LAWRENCE
(Shorty fer short).

Deer Slim:
I wuz passing buy tha skule tha uther nite an'
I hurd a terribul rakett goin on inside. I wuz
thinking it mita ben burglurz so in I walks. Acorz,
I went vary quite-like so'z not ta dizterb thum an'
I peaped into wun rume and low an beehole I
saw a bunch uf Seenyors jumpin rownd yellun' an
making funy faces. A man wuz thare to wachin
them an' he wuz lafin. It wuz funy. So I
begin ta laf two.
I tryd and tryd ta think whut them wuz doin
but I kudn't imajin. Aftur about Is minutes I
suddenly remembud thet it must be that them wuz
praktising fer the Seenyor play. It sur iz gude
tho--an' funy--why they wuz almost dieing of
lafin themselves.
Wunpart iz spechically komical. Thiz ladee,
see, is funy. She eets sum kake an' al of a suden.







THE CARIBBEAN. 8r


Well I guez it wudn't be rite ta tell ya. That me I that I wuz at a fuinral. A4ll tha Senyors wuz
wud be spillin tha b~eens. But I jus adviz ya ta their. Tha gurls hed on wite drezzes an long
see that play, that's all, fases and tha boys the same. I meen they hed
The Fresheez are givin a big blow-out thiz long fases too but not wire drez.zes. They hed
Friday. At the Washingtun Hotell, two. Sum dark soots. An a bunch of mnen wuz sitting on
clazz fer the Freshees, sez I. the platfurm with tha Senyiors and they made
Well, Slim, I gotta mnemrize sum po'try fer suml speeches. E~vry budy luk~ed so solum anld
to-morrow. their wuz flowurs all around. I reely thout I wuz
"Undur that spreading cheznut tree, at a funrel.
Tha village smithee stands" Then wun man gave evry Senyor a big peece
I've ben memrizin that part fer 2o minutes. I of papur. Thiz iz a d-uplomo, my Mlom says.
gez I'll get thru in a cupla howrs. I'm no pote Thats wut they get fe~r going ta skule 12 years.
but I don't take mec vary long ta memrize things. Ef va ask me--I donl think itz worth it da y-u?
I'll be seeing ya, Going ta skule 12 yeers anl then git a peece of
SuoRTY-. papur with y.ur name on it. W'hen I have myr
Kiomensment, I'mn goin to get somthin good or
Deer Slim: I won't Kiommense. H-ow about yu? But thoz
Know more pensils, dum Seenyors looked so happy ta get that papur.
K~now more books, I guez they didunt expect nothing a tall.
Knowmor teeher sasy loks ell, anyway tha seramony wuz_ very impresuv.
Boys, I sur am glad skull is ovur at last. I got Tha only thing I didunt lik wuz that their wuzn't
permotid but, wud you buleeve it Slim, I didunt know rifr-eshmunts. Ef I'd a known that I
pass in spellin. The teecher says my spellin is udtagoe
atrochious. Wel, I like that! I no I don spel WVel, Slim, I gruez I won see ya agen til October.
evry word jes rite but enybudy kan undur-stan 'or
whut I rite, -yu kan, kant ya? But y-a kant argu
SHouRT.
with a teecher.
I hed tha time uf my life las nite. I went ta P. S.--I'm still mad at that teecher fur flunkin
Komensmunt at the Wrashingtun H-otell. Buleeve me in spelin.


Piers at Cristobal


MR 19742--11










82 THE CARIBBEAN.


Carnival, Panama. Photo by~ T~ayne.


s
;- rr:


I I











1











-*':*. *
*=~-: ~'-;
;
U':


V--a

B

















































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i


__


money to supply- herself with a magnificent
coronation costume, besides a float and other
costumes, which she will need. She is very much
fated by all the local clubs, and during those
four days is accorded great honor.
The principal streets of both towns are lavishly
decorated w~ith~ vivid banners and ornaments.
Every afternoon from five to seven, this thorough-
fare becomes the carnival boulevard. Cars and
trucks, decorated and filled with natives and
Americans, dancing, and singing those famo s
Panamanian carnival songs, parade up and doa n
these streets. Confetti and serpentine add a
fairy touch to the already picturesque scene.
About seven, every~on~e leaves the boulevard.
Soon it is quiet again. But about ten the Queen
and her court begin their round of the city. They
visit all the var-ious clubs where dances are being
held and it is not until early morning that the
streets of the cities are really- quiet.
Business goes on in the usual manner during
these days since it is not until the late afternoon
that the festivities really begin.
People who have lived here for any length of
time can realize, I think, just how much this
carnival means to the Panamanians. After these
four days of gay merry-making, they enter the
Lenten season with as much solemnity as the
gaiety with which they celebrated their carnival.


PANAMANIAN CARNIVAL.

ifacis Thir/wa~cil 'jo.

Every year during the four days preceding
Lent, the Panamanians make "whoopee," as we
would say. During these days they: have their
Carnaval.
Each year, carnival differs very: little from the
preceding one, and still the Panamanians
await the fiestas as if they were unexperienced
affairs. Americans, who have been residmng in
Panama many years, have grown to like carnival,
and often participate with as much fervor as the
Panamanians themselves.
In the two principal cities of the Isthmus, Colon
and Panama, the carnival is elaborately planned
and directed by the Jtunta, a board of influential
men who manage the fiestas. A Queen selected
by popular vote. Often the rivalry is very keen-
An interesting case occurred this year in Panama
City when the fathers of the twoleading candidates
decided to leave the outcome of the contest to the
Panamanian Lottery. If anl even number played,
one girl would winl and vice versa. In this way,
the affair was settled amicably, since everyone
stands by the lottery-
The Queen chooses a court of damans and
gentlemen. She is allowed a sufficient sum of


Waterfront Scene in Panama.


THE CARIBBEAN.







84F THE CARIBBEAN.


APPRECIATION OF JUDGES.


We deeply appreciate the kindness and interest
shown by Mrs. Skemp, Mr. Cunningham, and
Mrs. Hearne who acted as judges for the short
stories, and by Miss Jensen and Miss Wlold who
judged the poetry.


STAFF HOP.
Fr~ances Days, 'yo.

The Staff Hop, given by THE CARIBBEAN staff,
was held at the Masonic Temple, Friday, the
r3th of December, r929.
The programs for this hop were white with a
large black 13 printed on them, emphasizing the
the fact that it was to be held on an unlucky
date.
The hop was given with the main purpose of
making money for the publishing of the High
School Annual. Invitations wer-e issued to High
School students and their friends. Admission was
25 cents for ladies, and 50 cents for men.
There were several novelty dances. All the
dances on the program had ghost-like names,
such as "The Bat's Bump," "The Goblins
Gallopp" etc.
Celeste Clark entertained those present with a
jazz dance.
T'he hall was decorated in yellow and black
crepe paper, and skeletons, and horseshoes were
hung about the hall to give a "spooky" at-
mosp-here.


In spite of the fact that it was held on a sup-
posedly unlucky Friday, a large crowd was
present and enjoyed the music furnished by
W~elch's orchestra.




THE SENIOR PARTY.

Evelyn Ganzmueller, '3o.

The Senior Party, which took place at the
Hotel Washington on November 5, was a very:
successful affair.
Welsh's Harmony Boys furnished real jazz
music, which, together with the fresh sea breeze,
made the dancing very enjoyable. The spot
dance was won by Pete WClardlaw and Tommy
Pescod. The prizes were dainty picture frames
for the girl, and a cigarette lighter for the boy.
The refreshments were greatly enjoyed by the
thirsty dancers.
The Seniors proved themselves such excellent
hosts and hostesses, that the other classes will not
forget their last party.







THE CARIBBEAN.


"'The Gypsy Rover." The plot is of no impor-
tance, being of the usual musical comedy type.
In brief, the story is this: Rob, a young gypsy,
falls in love with Lady Constance Martendale,
whom he meets while she is riding through the
forest. Ladv Constance has been forced into anl
engagement with Lord Craven by her father, Sir
George M~artendale. After many difficulties, Rob
succeeds in arranging an elopement with Lady
Constance, but just as they are preparing to leave,
Rob is captured and thrown into prison from which
he soon escapes. In the meanwhile, Meg, the
young gypsy's foster mother, tells of Rob's real
parentage. He is the son of Sir Gilbert Howe.
WYhen a child, Rob had been stolen by his gypsy
nurse. Upon Sir Gilbert's death, all the property
and wealth had been willed to Lord Craven unless
the real heir to the fortune was found. Rob returns
to England and Lady Constance. Lord Craven
is done away with by providing him with a yearly.
InCOme.
The music of the play was as good as one finds
in many a professional production.
The title r81e was played by Frederick Kiroll.
His fmne tenor voice and his ability as a dramatic
actor made his r81e one of the best in the show.
Virginia Stevenson played the part of Lady
Constance, her beautiful voice added much to the
production. Sinfo and Marto, the two gypsy
comedians were very capably played by Garrett
Huff and Oscar Heilbron. The r81e of Nina, Sir
George Martendale's second daughter, was very-
well played by Eleanor Urwiler. Her attractive
voice was one of the high spots of the show.
The nonvocal parts were:

Mleg (Rob's foster mother).......... .GENEVIEVE OIROURKE
Zara (The belle of the gy.psy camp) .. ....NATALIE SAFFORD
Lord Craven. . .. . .. .. ... ..PERRY\ \ASHABAICCH
Sir George Marten dale. .. . .. .. ... .. .. . JAMES \YOOD
captain Jerome (English army officer) ..... .GARRETT Herr
Sir Toby Ly~on (A social butterfly). ......\VILLIAM K;EENAN

The whole production owes its success only to
Miss Florence Ertel's untiring efforts. Every
detail of the musical scores and of the dramatic
action shows the results of her able direction.
Not enough credit can be given to her for her
splendid work in planning and supervising this
production.


THE SOPHOMORE PARTY.
h'Nl War-d/w, 'p.

The Sophomore partly, which was held at the
Strangers Club onl January 3d, seemed to be a
great success.
Dwyer's orchestra furnished the excellent dance
music during the evening. As is customary at
high school dances, one dance was designated as a
prize waltz. To the winners: Mavis Thirlwall
and Roger WTilliams, attractive prizes were
awarded.
The programs were white, decorated with the
Canal Zone seal and with the names of the
Sophomore Class officers. The dances weregiven
clever titles.
The r-efreshments which were served through-
out the evening were enjoyed byr everyone.
Due credit must be given to those who aided
in planning this delightful party.



FRESHMEN PARTY.

Mlaois Thiriw~al, ';o.

The last party of the year, the Freshmen party,
was given at the Hotel WIashington, Friday,
April 25th. Welsh's H-arm~on~y Boys, the popular
negro orchestra, played the latest "hits."
Two specialty numbers were given. Miss
Bobby Durham gave an excellent interpretation
of the "Break-Away." She made a bit with her
audience. Victor Melendez gave a solo specialty
dance which was the high spot of the evening.
He showed great talent.
Mary Curtis proved to be a lucky girl for she
won, with her partner, Tomi Pescod, the prize
fox-trot, and also the "spot" dance. Lovely
prizes were received.
The parents and members of the faculty who
attended, and the students, all agree that the
Freshies made a success of their party.


THE GYPSY ROVER.

Fr~ederick Kroll, 'y.

On March 21st, r 930, the Cristobal High School
Glee Club presented a three-act musical comedy,







86 THE CARIBBEAN.


very amusing, and Walter Wikingstad as Hamil-
ton, the chauffeur and butler of the Peytons, gave
a good performance.
The praise for the success of "The Lottery
Man" goes to Mr. Robert Noe, who directed this
play. For three years, Mr. Noe has produced for
C. H. S. very successful plays and "The Lottery
Man" is another to add to his list. He chose the
cast, directed the acting and stage effects of the
production, and was responsible for the great
applause with which the play was received. Not
enough thanks and credit can be given Mr. Noe,
who is always ready to spend his time producing
fine plays like "The Lottery Man" for C. H. S.


C. H. S. CARNIVAL.
Mauis Tlir/wal, '3o.

The annual Carnival of the Cristobal High
School, the proceeds of which go toward the
publication of THE CARIBBEAN, was held at Fort
De Lesseps on the night of February 21.
For at least a month before this event, prepara-
tions had been going on at school. Posters were
made, tickets distributed, side shows planned and
the actresses and actors in the Revue had much
praCticing to do. Some fortunate, or unfortunate
staff members attended school only one day of the
week preceding the 21st. The rest of the time
they spent working hard preparing the grounds.
At last the night came. The grounds were
filled with side shows, tents, the refreshment
stand, which was very popular throughout the
evening, several games of chance, and the contest
board.
Among the features of the side shows were the
freak man, who ate glass and iron, and one who
ate bananas under water; the tattooed lady, the
skeleton lady, and the gypsy fortune teller, who
seemed able to bring looks of satisfaction or dis-
pleasure to the faces of those who left her tent.
The fishpond proved to be a very profitable one
for the fishermen, since they made good "catches"
in a few minutes,
The popularity contest was won by Miss
Margaret Mitchell, whose chief rival was Miss
Carmen Durham.
The main attraction of the Carnival was, of
course, the Revue. This was worth the hearty


THE SENIOR PLAY.

"The Lottery Man."
.Macis hir/wall, 'so.

For several weeks before May! I placards
bearing this mysterious title, "The Lottery Man,"
were seen in every conspicuous place in town.
The mystified people soon learned that this was
the name of the play which was to be presented
by the Senior Class of C. H. S., at the Cristobal
Clubhouse, on May I5th and 16th.
The plot of "The Lottery Man," a very amusing
one, is this: Jack Wright, young newspaper man
offers himself to the women of America at $1 a
ticket. Just after this he falls in love with Helene,
a cousin of Foxey, Jack's rich college chum and
owner of the newspaper for which Jack works.
The comedy is brought in by Foxey's mother, Mrs.
Peyton, who is daily ageing herself in trying to
keep young, and by Lizzie, Mrs. Peyton's com-
panion, a thin, insignificant girl. Lizzie wins
Jack with a ticket she had stolen so she has to
give up her claims to him. She receives, however'
a large sum of money with which she builds a
home in the Bronx, while Helene turns out to be
"the lucky winner" after all.
Each character of "The Lottery Man" was well
selected and well played. The breezy young
hero was played by Fred Kroll. Fred has dis-
tinguished himself in former productions as a
great actor, and he hived up to his reputation in
his riile as Jack. His job was a difficult one, for
his role is the one on which the whole play rests.
Frances Days took the part of Helene, the
heroine. Her acting was excellent and she made
her charming character one of the most impor
tant in the play.
Foxey, Jack s chum, was played by Wilhiam
Newman. Wilhiam has always been called the
wittiest boy in school and he just transferred this
to the stage. His acting was most natural.
The difficult characters of the two mothers and
Lizzie were portrayed by Rae Bliss, Mrs. Wright;
D~ella Raymond, Mrs. Peyton; Eleanor Fitz-
gerald, Lizzie. Rae did splendid work in acting
the part of the sweet, gentle mother of Jack,
while D~ella and Eleanor, the comedy characters,
were the bit of the show.
Rita Joyce, cast as Hedwig, Mrs. Peyton's maid,
gave the audience a real Irish brogue that was







THE CA4RIBBEANh. 87


applause received from the audience. Among the
numbers were tap dances, song acts, a gypsy
chorus, a military- chorus, an~d an Egyptian dance,
all of which delighted the audience. The numbers
were all well given and the costumes were very
attractive. This Revue was planned and directed
by Mr. Robert Noe, whose kind efforts and co-
operation are greatly appreciated,
The main show ended at ten o'clock. The hall
was then cleared and the dancing began. The
Zonians furnished the music. At eleven o'clock
the door prize was given to the winner, Mr. Joseph
Corrigan, who received $2-50.
Owing to a very~ unfortunate circumstance, no
uniformed soldiers were allowed on the grounds,
and, consequently the crowd which attended the
Car-nival was only about one-half the size of the
crowd which had attended previously. In spite
of this drawback, the Carnival was a success.

THE SCHOOL, SURVEY.

(This article was written by a member of the
class of 1930J )

As the result of an idea of our enterprising
principal, Mr. Wlm. A. Sawyers, we have had the
good fortune to be visited by a Survey Committee
from the United States.
A year ago, when Congressman E. E. Denison,
from Illinois, was on the Isthmus, Mr. Sawyers
had a conference with him, during which he
mentioned that he thought a survey by a group of
well-known educators would greatly benefit our
school system. He suggested for this Dr. George
Strayer and Dr. N. L. Engelhardt, both professors
and recognized authorities in education and
school administration, in Teachers College of
Columbia Universityi, New Y'ork Cit-.
Congressman Denison took the matter up
with Congress. Soon afterwards, E10,000 was
appropriated by Congress for the organization of
a survey board, which would visit the Canal Zone
school system.
The committee left New Y'ork, March 18, '9370,
on the S. S. Anon2, and reached Cristobal, March
26. The survey lasted about three weeks.
In the course of their examination, the survey-
ors gave "achievement and intelligence tests" to
many of the pupils of our Canal Zone schools. Our
pupils were found to be from one-half to one full


grade in advance of the average pupils of the
States. Spelling and arithmetic tests showed
Canal Zone children a half-year ahead of the
pupils of the same grades and ages in the United
States. High school students also averaged high-
er than those in the U~nited States, and in social
studies the twelfth grade made an aver-age score
of 42, as compared with \12 for the average pupil
in the U'nited States.
The results of the tests given in Cristobal High
School were very gratifying. Elsie D~arley and
Mavis Thirlwall, both Seniors, received the high-
est averages of the school. Elsie Darley made a
score in English which is the highest ever made
by any student who has been given the test in the
United States by a Columbia University Survey
Committee.
As a result of this survey, there will be, no
doubt, many improvements made in the Canal
Zone schools, both inz the courses of education
offered and in the school buildings themselves.
Already we feel the results in Cristobal High
School, for Trigonometry and Chemistry are to be
added to the list of courses for next year. Many
changes will take place, also, in the school build-
ings, if the recommendations of the survey board
are followed completely. It is expected that new
buildings will be built in the near future, and more
complete equipment added.
If the Canal Zone pupils showed such high
intelligence without all this equipment, what
height will they attain when they are given more
advantages? Parents of Canal Zone pupils
should feel highly satisfied with the schools here,
since it has been shown that the education their
children are receiving is as good as that offered in
the schools of the United States, if not better.
There was mutual satisfaction between the
Canal Zone teachers and the members of the com-
mittee. The former found the survey-ors very
agreeable and pleasant to work with, while the
latter considered our teachers above the average.
The surveyors all stated that they were well
pleased with Panama. In addition to their trips
fr-om Balboa to Cristobal, several side-trips were
taken to many of the places of interest which
Panama has to offer. A4 visit was made to Old
Panama, and another trip was arranged by M~r.
Sawyers to San Lorenzo. The committee left
Cristobal on the S. S. Cr-istobal, April 13, com-
pletely satisfied with the results of their work.







88 THE CARIBBEAN.


C~ ~~


. .


A complete report of the Survey Board will be
available in booklet form the first of July. Of the
27 experts of the survey committee, four are on
the regular faculty of Teachers College, Columbia
University, while the remaining are all experienced
educators who are working for advanced degrees
at Columbia University. The committee was
made up of the following:
Dr. N-. L. ENGELHARDT Mr. W. B. LONGMAN
Dr. W~. S. ELSBREE. Mr. W. B. FEATHERSTONE


Dr. CARTER ALEXANDER
Mr. R. L. HAMON
Mr. Gvu L. HILLSBEE
Mr. I. o. FRISWOLD
Mr. L. P. YOUNG
Mr. CHARLES F. REID
Mr. R. W. BELL
Mr. H. F. ALVES
Mr. C. K. MORSE
Mr. GRANT RAHN
Mr. J. H. Surra


Mr. FRED F. BEACH
Mr. V. C. NICKLAS
Mr. CALVIN F. DENGLER
Mr. H. C. WYSOuc
Mr. HARLEY Z. WOODEN
Mr. HENRY S. CvanIs
Mr. J. FLINT WALLER
Miss EVELYN HonowN
Miss HELEN THORP
Mr. J. E. SCHOTT
Miss RAE SANDERS


. .


Debating Club.


The Cristobal High School Debating Club has
been organized for only two years, and as yet has
not attracted much attention among the pupils.
Meetings are held once a month in school hours,
during the last two periods of the day. The
debates are between members of the club, for as
yet there have been no interscholastic debates.
Mlis Kimbro is adviser to the Club. The other


officers are: Evelyn Ganzmueller, President; Vir-
ginia Stevenson, Vice-President; Celeste Clark,
Secretary and Treasurer; and Carlos Rankin,
Chairman of Program Committee.
Since the idea is rather new with us, and the
membership is not too large, much is to be hoped
for in the future.


~eathahH[ ~Club.
Carlos Rankin, p.







90 THE CARIBBEAN.


High School Glee Club.


THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL GLEE
CLUB AND ORCHESTRA.
Eleanor Reinhold, 'p.

The outstanding event of the school year for the
Glee Club and Orchestra, was the production of a
well known operetta "The Gypsy Rover." It
was a great success and the Glee Club students and
orchestra were highly complimented on their
splendid work. Miss Ertel, who directed the
play, deserves a great deal of credit for producing
such a finished performance.
Three times a week from 1.20 to 2.10 o'clock,
the High School Glee Club meets. Students


hear "blue" notes and true notes during this
music period. On Monday the boys meet;
Tuesday the girls meet; and Wednesday, a com-
bination class of boys and girls meet.
Miss Florence Ertel is the instructress. To
sponsor the Glee Club, one must be especially
patient, and much credit must be given to Miss
Ertel mn that respect.
The Glee Club is not very large, having twice
as many girls as boys. WTell-known composers
are studied and their compositions sung.
The High School Orchestra meets once a week
on Tuesday, from 3 to 5 o'clock.







THE CARIBBEAN. 9T


Hligh Sc~ooll Orcle lra.l


CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL SONG.
(Tune: LEt thZ Rest ofi th~ WIoI~rldGo By.)


We've come to sing the praise,
A4 hearty cheer to raise,
For the school we love so dear'
Our own Cristobal High.
WTe'll honor her name,
Increase her fame,
Through passing years 'twill be the same,
The best on the Zone.


She's second to none,
We're glad to claim her for our own,
Our v-ery own.
O, yes, we've found her- the best,
North, East, South, or Wezst.
She's our own school--
Cristobal High.


OUR Y'ELL.

Sav!
Say what?
That's what!
What's w~hat?
That's w~hat they- all sa\!
WThat do they- all sa\-?
C-C-R-I-S-T-T-OI-B-A~-L
CRISTOBAL!





Best L~ooking Boy. .. .. .. .. . .. RICHARD \\OOD (Junior). Queen of the Calrnival. . .MARGARET MITCHELL (JunlOr).
Most Populalr Bo . .. .. .... . ... THOMAS PESCOD, (unior). Best Looking Girl. .... .. .. VIOLET RANDALL (FreShman).
Wletiest Student...... .WuILLIAM "Frrrv".Y) NEWMAN (Senior). Most Popular Girl...........PETE WARDLAW (Sophomore).


THE CARIBBEAN.


POPULARITY CONTEST.








THE CARIBBEAN\. 93~


L-_l L~P~a ~V~IIU-~
, 'I
;pC~ g.~-~
_. I--.-~


SOCCER.

Our second y-ear of soccer b~all was not
very- successful although malny new faces
were seen on our team.
On the 24th of November, Balboa. de-
feated Cristobal in their first game of the
interscholastic series. T`he score of 10-3
proves thalt it wans an uninlterestring game.
No sooner had Cristobal kicked~t ot1
than Balboa scored the first goal. The
scoring increased as the game went on
and at the end of the first half Balboa had
scored seven goals to Cristoba;l's two.
In the second hallf, Ballboa scored three
more goals, mak11ing9 a grandli rtlf3 of 10.
Near the end of the gamne, Cristobal's
forward, by passing and dribbling, scored
another goal.
h1. Dew and Salterio brothers weres the
stars of the gaume, scoring goalls a~t will.
On the defensive Hele and Booth prov~ed
too strong for our forwards.
Cristobal did not have any- stars, but
the good playing of A\rnesen, Pescod, and
Conkling saved Cristabal from a blank.
On the 31st of November, Cristobal
High School defeated Balboa High School
in their second game of the interscholastic
soccer ball series at Cristobal. The score
was 3 to 2.
The first half started with the grrounds
somewhat wer. A-t the sound of the
whistle, the game started. Both teas
showed marvelous pass-worki andi coi-
bination in the early- part of this half
Nearing the latter part of the half, Cris
tobal came through with the first goal of
the game. After some minutes of play
the whistle ended the first half.
Cristobal came back strong in the last
half and scored twice in succession. In


Il~oprs' Pltbletic .,

Thomal~s Pescodt, p.


this half, Cristobal wa~s ahowhing Ballboa
their abilit to pass as wetll aIs score.
Nearing the endl of the game, Cristobal
showedrl signs of weake~ning, wvhenl Balboa
surprised the crowdi by scoring twice.
T`he game ended with the score 3-2 in
favor of Cristobal.
Cristobal played aI much better game
than Balboa. There wans no indiividiual
;play-ing in this game, but much credit
should be griven, to our goatlkeeper,
Ediwardi Conkling.
Balboa won the last and deciding game
by the score of (-2.
During the first five minutes of play- it
started to rain, making the field some-
what wet. This rain andi mudl did not
trouble Balboa's players as they- scored
three goals before the first half eniedl. In
this half Dewv wa;s responsible for two of
these noals andi De La; Pena scoredl the
other one.
The second half found Cristabal fight.
Sing for the ball near the Balboa goal,
Arnesen made good his opportunit)- to
k~ick and scorred. A little Ilaer T.Pescod
found the goal for another tally. Cris-
robal seemedi to weaken near the endi of
this half when Balbon scored twice, one
by- Solterio andl the others one by- Hele.
The game endedi with the score E-1 in
favor of Balboa, thereby- givingr them the
penlnant for the second y-ear.
Tlhe line uip in all three gameiis w-as is
followvs :




J. M\itter, Goalkieeper
J. Booth, F~ullbalck
H. Jones, Fullback
SJ. Salterio, C. Ha~lfback


B. Alichal~] elsen R. HaIlllfback

lY. Hele, C. F~orwanrd
J. Sa~lterio, R. Forwanrdi-- goal
S. Fields, L. Forwardnc
11. Dew, L. F~orwanr-rd I oall
11. De La Pe~na, R. F~orward:r

Cristoba/2.

E. Conkling, Goalkeepecr
lY. W\ikingstad, R. Fullback
R. W\ood, L. Fullback
T. Pescodl, C. Halibackl;-I goal
K. 11aurer, L.. Halback;
C. Rankin, R. Haliback
O. Arnese~n, C. Forwanrdi-r goal
C. Pescondlc, I.. Forwarl-- I goal
T. Rankin, R. Forwardr
S1. 11archosky,, R. Forw~ard
R. W~ikingstadi, L. F~orwa;rd


A\ new~ sp'rt was introdiuced to inter-
scholastic activities, that being handball.
Ba~lboal defeatedl Cristobal on th~e Izth
of April by- the scored of three single~ games
andi one double to Cristabanl's one double.

F~irt sing/es game..
r. -H. Jones 21
T. Pescoi I--
2.H. Jones 21
T. Pescad 18
In this game, T. Pescodi hadi the gamel
on ice, but Jones' placement tiredl hlim ou1t,
causing him to lose in the endl.

Second sjingles gamer.
I.-W. ele 2
T. Mrphy9
2.-W\. Hele 21
T. MIurphy 4








94r THE CARIBBEAN.


Hele w~as too strong for Murphy who
was unable to return without losing the
points.
Thrird sinrgles game.

I.-A~. Hele 21
R. W\ikingstad to
2.-A.Hele21
R. W`ikingstad to
R. Wijking~stad is not a "singles" player
but he is al"doubles." Hele was victo-
rious because of his fine placement and
W`ikingstad's poor returns.

First dourbles game.

I.-W\~. and A. Hele 21
T. Murphy and M. Wheeler 20
2.-W7~. alnd A. Hele 21
T. M~urphy- and M4. Wheeler IT
The first game was a see-saw affair from
the first. It was very hard to choose the
winner. In the second game, Balboa
came from the rear to win by a slight mar-
gin.
Second dobl~es game.

I.--T. Rankiin and E. Conklinlg 21
H. Jones and Kialeb II
2.-H. Jolnes and Kanleb 21
T. Rankin and E. Conkling 10
3.-T. Rankin and E. Conk~ling 21
H. Jones and Kaleb 16
The last doubles game proved to be the
best one. Conkling's placement and TI.
Rankin's fine returns won the game for
Cristobal. In the second game, Cristobal
seemed to have lost interest and was de-
featedf by\ Jones and Kialeb. The third
game saw Cristobal come from the rear to
win the deciding game. Conkling again
displayedf his atbility to place.

SWIhMMING.

Five records sanki in the wake of natant
speeers artt the Balboa swimming pool on
the 26,th Of Aipril, when Balboa High
School swimnming tealm swamped Cris-
tobal Hirh School teatm byi the score of
44-3 The girls were also defeated by the
score of So 9.
Wa;lston andi Brewerton, two of Bal-
boa's outstalnding stars, were responsible
for two new record~s.
In the loo-!ardl free style event,
Wanlstorn trariledl his pa;rtner HumphrcY
for 90 yanrds, b~ut nea:ring: the finish W'al-
ston addedc~ more power to finish by
about six inches aheld.


In the 200-yard race Grant, of Balboa,
was going like a motor boat for eight laps>
but 20 yards from the finish line, Brewer-
ton crept up bit by bit finishing a few feet
ahead of Grant.
Wood and Schwinderman also crashed
into falmedom by shattering the old
records in the backstroke and the breast-
stroke event, and Balboa's relay team,
consisting of Wood, Grant, Humphrey's,
and W'alston, went the 176 yards in I
minute 28 4 5 seconds to establish a
record, at the same time defeating Cris-
tobal's relay team-
Among the girls, Fern Kyleber made a
great exhibition of how one should dive.
She defeated the best divers from Cris-
tobal and collected a grand total of 89
pomnts-

The results were as follows:

Boys 2zo-vard Swoim.


2. Westendorf (B. H. S.).
3. Jones (B. H. S.).

Girls So-yard Breaststroke.

I. R. Quinn (B. H. S.). Time, 42 r/5
seconds.
2. E. Van Clief (B. H. S.).
3. Hall (C. H. S.).


Boys So-yard Backstroke.

r. Wood (B. H. S.). Time 31 seconds.
2. Kroll (C. H. S.).
3. Jones (B. H. S.).

Girls So-yard Backstroke.

r. J. Halderman (B. H. S.).
2. E. Van Clief (B. H. S.).
3. V. Stevenson (C. H. S.).


Boys Relay Race.

Won by Balboa Team. Time I min-
ute, 28 4/5 seconds. Wood, Grant,
Humphreys, and WTalston.

Girls Relay Race.

Won by Balboa Team. Time I min-
ute, So seconds. K. Conord, S. Pyle,
R. Quinn, and J. Halderman.

Boy~s Fancy Diving.

I. H. Brewerton (B. H. S.).
2. B. Turner (C. H. S.).
3. B. Hackett (C. H. S.).

Girls Fancy Diving.


I. Brewerton (B. H. S.)
minutes, 33 seconds.
2. Grant (B. H. S.).
3. Kroll (C. H. S.)


Time, 2


Girls jo-yard Swrmj.

I. Kathleen Conord (B. H. S.).
30 seconds.
2. W5ood (B. H. S.).
3. Bliss (C. H. S).


Time,


Boys So-yard Swim.

r. Wa'lston (B. H. S.). Time 24 sec-
onds.
2. Wood (B. H. S.)
3. Mundtberg (C. H. S.)

Boys soo-yard Swim.

I. Walston (B. H. S.) Time 59 2/3
seconds .
2. Humphreys (B. H. S.).
3. Grant (B. H. S.).

Girls loo-vardn Swim.


Fern Kyleber (B. H. S.)
Rita Quinn (B. H. S.).
Sara Py~le (B. H. S.).


BASEBALL.

A4s is the custom a series of three games
were scheduled between the Cristabal and
Balboa High Schools. However, since
Balboa won the first two games by a close
score, the third game was not necessary-.
The contests this year in baseball were
-xceptionally good; each team displaying
much ability and skill in this major sport.
The box-scores of the two games are as
follows:


I. Kanthleen Conord (B.H. S.).
I minute.
2. Sarah Prie (B. H. S.).


Time,


Boy~s o-.vard Brealsctsoke.

1. Schwinderman (B. H. S.). Time,
3' seconds.




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http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1930cris



THE CARIBBEAN.



HSMiEiEMMMMI



^mmmmm;



Forezvord

The Staff has labored long and hard,
To make this book the best.
We've our reputation to regard,
And you'll find it "best by test."



MMMmMMMMMMmMMmMMMM^MMMMl




THE CARIBBEAN



Vol. XIII.



CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE, 1930.



No. I.



PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL.




Hotel Washington

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

Page.



Foreword

Dedication

Editorial

Our Governor

Our Canal Zone School Official:

Our Principal

StafF

Faculty

Seniors .

Class History

Class Will



4
5
6

7
8

9
II

17
3



Juniors

Sophomores. .

Freshmen

Literary

Sports

School Notes. .

Exchanges

Alumni

Jokes

.Advertisements.



Page.

3S
39
43
47
93
100
II I

"3
118

127




Bridge un the old King's Highway to Panama City.



THE CARIBBEAN.



iwoMiMMMMmMMmM^mmmmMmmmmmmm^



DEDICATION.



B



ECAUSE of their unceasing
interest in our school work and
their hopes tor our future success,
we, the Staff, gratefully dedicate the
thirteenth volume of

The Caribbean

to
Our Parents



.



[MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM^



THE CARIBBEAN.




TO GO OR NOT TO GO.

Thomas L. Coley, Jr. 'jo.



To go to college or not to go, that is the question
which is probably foremost in the minds of those
of us who are gradualing this June. It is a
question which requires a great deal of consider-
ation and which should not be decided upon
hurriedly.

Think it over carefully, and it you have a tairly
definite idea in mind of what profession you would
like to follow, ask yourself this question, "Would
a college education help me in getting ready for
this work?" In the majority of instances it
would. The college man or woman has the
preference over the person with only a high school
education in obtaining a position. In addition
to this, he has an understanding and an appreci-
ation of the finer things in life, and he possesses
the poise which comes from being college bred.

On the other hand, there are people who are
utterly unsuited to college, and it would be a
waste of their time and ot their parents' money
for them to attend. So in looking yourself over,
decide whether vou would benefit in later lite



from a college education. Perhaps your talents
are more suited to a trade or dramatic school than
to a college.

There is another question that mav trouble the
less fortunate of us, and that is the lack ofneces-
sary funds. Do not think that it is absolutely
impossible to be a success in life unless )'ou attend
college, because many men and women, who have
been unable to avail themselves of this oppor-
tunity through financial reasons, have become
quite successful. However, they have done so
by extensive reading and studying on subjects
which would lead to their advancement.

Remember that the world now only wants
educated and trained men for its positions, so,
if you are able, attend a school or a college that
will aid you in preparing for your profession.
However, if you can not go because of the lack of
money, do not forget that many people have
trained themselves by studying in their spare
time and have become quite prominent in their
line of work. .After all, the road to success is
open to everyone.




Ro>"al Falms in Colon.



THE CARIBBEAN.




Col. Harrv Burgess, U. S. xArmy,

Governor, The Panama Canal



THE CARIBBEAN.




Superinlendent nf Canal Zone Schools Ben M. Williams.
Birthplace Stateshoro, Ga.
Home Address Greensboro, \. C.

EDLCATION'.

Name of Secondary iV/;oo/ Statesboro High School.
Location of Secondary School Statesboro, Ga.
College or University Mercer University.
Dates Attended igii to 191 <.
Degrees Obtained .\. B.

College or t>;c--.r;Vv Teacher's College, Columbia Univer-
sity.
Dates Attended 191 9.
Degrees Obtained .\. M.
College Fraternity Kappa Delta Pi.
Date Entered Service of The Panama Canal Februarv 2, 1926.



m



Assistant Superintendent of Schools; Junior and Senior High

Schools v. H. Barker.
Birthplace Missouri.
Home Address Illinois.

EDrCAlION.

Name of Secondary School Lebanon High School.
Location of Secondary School Lebanon, Mo.
College or University N. E. Missouri State Teacher's College.
Degrees Obtained B. S.

College or University Columbia L'niversity.
Degrees Obtained h. M.
Date Entering Service on Canal Zone September 7, 1 917.




THE CARIBBEAN.




Our Principal William A. Sawyers.
Birthplace Westerly, R. I.
Home Address 38 Summer St., Westerly R. I



U3^- f^- Sax^rtA.eA/^






EDUCATION.



Name of Secondary School Westerly High School.
Location 0/ Secondary School Westerly, R. I.
College or University Bates College, Lewiston, Me.
Dates Attended 1 9 1 5- 1 9 1 9.
Degrees Obtained B. S.



College or University Columbia University.
Dates Attended 1924-1921;.
Degrees Obtained M. A.



PERSONAL.



Date Entering Service on Canal Zone September 7, 1927.
Subjects Taught fg^g-jQjo. General Science.
Sponsor for ll'hat Class or School Activity The Caribbean.
Fraternity or Sorority Phi Delta Kappa.
Favorite Expression "How many looked over the lesson.'
appears evident that many of you overlooked it."



THE CARIBBEAN.




CARIBBEAN STAFF, 1930.



Staff Advisor Mr. Wm. .\. S.4wyers

Staff Sponsor Miss Grace Hesse

Editor-in-Chief Thomas Coley

Assistant Editor Carlos Rankin

Business Manager Walter Wiki.n'Gstad

Asst. Business Manager Raymond Will

Circulation Manager Ralph Crum

Asst. Circulation Manager Burton Hackett

Literary Editor Mavis Thirlwall



Art Editor

Asst. Art Editor . .
Boys' Athletic Editor
Girls' Athletic Editor
Exchan/e Editor ....
School Notes Editor

Alumni Editor

Joke Editor

Typist



. V'irginia Stevenson
. Frederick Kroll

Tho.mas Pescod

. . .Celeste Clarke
. .Della Raymond

Rae Bliss

Frances Days

. .William Newman
Alice Henter



MR 197422



lO



THE CARIBBEAN.




Phot > by Kodak, Panama.



THE CARIBBEAN.



II




12



THE CARIBBEAN.




Name of Teacher Lillian B. Gustafson.
Birthplace Chicago, 111.
Home Address Nunica, Mich.

EDUCATION.

Name oj Secondary School Lake View High School.
Location of Secondary School Chicago, III.
College or University Northern Illinois Teachers' College.
Dates Attended 1913-1915.
College or University University of Ohio.
Dates Attended 1925. Extension course, one term.
College or University Teachers' College, Columbia Uni-
versity.
Dates Attended 1926 Summer Session.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone 1923.
Sponsor for Jl'hat Class or School Activity Assistant Principal.
Favorite Expressoin "Have you your excuse? You owe me
an excuse."



Name of Teacher Robert A. West.
Birthplace .Ashley, Pa.
Home Address Ashley, Pa.

education.
Name of Secondary School .'\shley High School.
Location of Secondary School Ashley, Pa.
College or University University of Pennsylvania.
Dates Attended 1921-1922.
College or University Bucknell University.
Dates Attended 1922-1925.
Degrees Obtained A. B.

College or University Pennsylvania State College.
D.Hes Attended 1927-1928.

personal.
Date Entering Service on Canal Zone October I, 1928.
Subjects Taught igzg-igso ."Algebra, History, Commercial

Law, Economics.
Fraternity Kappa Sigma.
Favorite Expression "If it's good, it's from Pennsylvania."




QMSkL.~u)M r




Name of Teacher Mary Elizabeth Moore.
Birthplace West Alexander, Pa.
Home Address West .Alexander, Pa.

education.
Name of Secondary School Washington High School.
Location of Secondary School Washington, Pa.
College or University University of West Virginia.
Dates Attended 1 920-1 923.
Degrees Obtained h. B.
College or University Wooster College.
Dates Attended 1919-1920.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone Octoher i, 1925.
Subjects Taught /^.j^-z^^o Latin, French, and Spanish.
Sponsor for What Class or School Activity ]\imor%.
Fraternity of Sorority Kappa Kappa Gamma.

Phi Beta Kappa.
Favorite Expression And I said, 'Is that so?'



THE CARIBBEAN.



13




JVame 0/ Teacher Frederick J. Mever
Birthplace Calmar, Iowa.
Home Address Calmar, Iowa.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School Calmar High School.
Location of Secondary School Calmar, Iowa.
College or University State University of Iowa.
Dates Attended 1916-1918 and 1924-1925.
Degrees Obtained B. A.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone October i, 1928.
Subjects Taught ig2()-iQjo Mechanical Drawing, Plane

Geometry, and .Algebra.
Favorite Expression "You dumb Freshmen



Name of Teacher Grace R. Hesse.
Birthplace M'Msr, S. D.

Home Address Shelbyville, III.

education.

Name of Secondary School .Ann .'\rbor High School.
Location of Secondary School .Ann .Arbor, Mich.
College or University University of Michigan.
Dates Attended 1914-1917, 1923-1924.
Degrees Obtained h. B., M. A.

College or University National University of Mexico.
Dates Attended Summer 1921.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone October i, 1926.

Subjects Taught ig2cj-igjo Spanish and English.

Sponsor for IVhat Class or School Activity Senior Class.

Caribbean Staff.
Fraternity or Sorority Kappa Delta.
Favorite Expression "Deme una frase completa."





Name of Teacher Helen Patterson.
Birthplace Helena, Mont.
Home Address Great Falls, Mont.

education.

Name of Secondary School Chonteau County High School.
Location of Secondary School Fort Ben'.on, Mont.
^oJlege or University Montana State College.

:ites Attended 1922-1926.
Degrees Obtained B. S.
Fraternity Alpha Omicron Pi.

personal.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone March iS, 1930.
Subjects Taught ig2Q-igjo Shorthand, Bookkeeping, Type-
writing.
Favorite Expression "That's good."



14



THE CARIBBEAN.



1.


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. '^m -iM^B



Name of Teacher Gladys M. Kimbro.
Birthplace Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
Home Address M.asonic Temple, Oklahoma City, Okla.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School Chickasha High School.
Location oj Secondary School Chickasha, Okla.
College or University Oklahoma College for Women.
Dates Attended 1913-1916.
Degrees Obtained .\. B.

College or University University of Oklahoma.
Dates Attended 1923-1924.
Degrees Obtained M. A.

PERSO.VAL.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone October i, 1929.

Subjects Taught jg2Q-igjo English.

Sponsor for what Class or School Activity Sophomore Class.

Debating Club.
Favorite Expression "Now what's funny about that?"



Name of Teacher Amos C. Pence.
Birthplace Marshall, Mo.
Home Address Marshall, Mo.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School Marshall High School.
Location of Secondary School Marshall, Mo.
College or University Missouri \'alley College.
Dates Attended 1921-1925.
Degrees Obtained .\. B.
College or University Missouri University.
Dates Attended Summer, 1928.

PERSONAL.

Dale Entering Service on Canal Zone October i, 1928.
Subjects Taught igig-iQjo Physics, Mathematics, Commer-
cial .Arithmetic, and Geography.
Sponsor for What Class or School Activity Freshmen.
Favorite Expression "You students take advantage of me."





Name of Teacher Emily Russell.
Birthplace Vme Bluff, Ark.
Home Address P'uK Bluff, Ark.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School Pine Bluff High School.
Location of Secondary School Pine Bluff, -Ark.
College or University University of .Arkansas.
Dates Attended 1 920-1 924.

Degrees Obtained Bachelor of Science in Home Economics.
College or University University of Wisconsin.
Dates Attended. Summer school, 1927.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone October i, i9-7-
Subjects Taught /g2g'/gjo Household Arts, English, U. S.

History.
Sponsor for /('hat Class or School Activity Supervisor of the

library.
Fraternity or Sorority Pi Beta Phi, Kappa Delta Pi.
Favorite Expression "All right."



THE CARIBBEAN.



15




Name of Teacher Barbara Bailey.
Birthplace Rib Lake, Wis.
Home Address Muskegon, Mich.



EDUCATION'.



Name of Secondary School Recreation Training School.
Location of Secondary School Chicago, 111.
College or University Columbia University.
Dates Attended 1925-1926.



PERSONAL.



Date Entering Service on Canal Zone December 11, 1928.
Subjects Taught i()2C)-iq^o Playground Directress.
Favorite Expression "That's splendid!"



Name of Teacher Victor E. Seiler.
Birthplace Auburn, N. Y.
Home Address Berkeley, Calif.



EDUCATION.



' College or University University ot California.
Dates Attended 1923-1925.



PERSONAL.



Date Entering Service on Canal Zone May 18, 1926.
Subjects Taught iQ2g-igjo Director of Physical Activities.
Favorite.Expression "Use your head, fellows!"





Name of Teacher A. Maxine Potts.
Birthplace Big Run, Pa.

Home Address Baltimore, Md.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School Western High School.
Location of Secondary School Baltimore, Md.
College or University Maryland State Normal.
Dates Attended 1925-1927.

College or University Playground .Athletic Classes, Baltimore.
Dates Attended 1925-1927.

personal.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone June, 1929.

Sponsor for What Class or School Activity Physical Directress.

Favorite Expression "Snap into it, girls."



i6



THE CARIBBEAN.




Name of Teacher Helen Currier Baker.
Birthplace Minneapolis, Minn.
Home Address Minneapolis, Minn.

education.

Name of Secondary School Central High School.
Location of Secondary School Minneapolis, Minn.
College or University University of Minneapolis.
Degrees Obtained B. \.

College or University Session in Public School Music at
Cornell, Chicago, and New York Universitjes.

PERSONAL.

Dale Entering Service on Canal Zone 1921.
Subjects Taught, iq2Q'IQJ!0 Supervisor of Public School
Music.



Name of Teachei Robert George Noe.
Birthplace Knoxville, Tenn.
Home Address Knoxville, Tenn.



EDUCATION.



Name of Secondary School Young High School.
Location of Secondary School Knoxville, Tenn.



PERSONAL.



Date Entering Service on Canal Zone December, 1 924.
Sponsor for What Class or School Activity Dramatic Coach.
Favorite Expression "Snap out of it now, enunciate clearly.'





THE CARIBBEAN.



17




MR 19742 i



i8



THE CARIBBEAN.




MAVIS ELOISE THIRLWALL.
And still they wondered, and the wonder grew,
That one small head should carry all it knew.

Goldsmith.
Nickname Mavey.
Birthplace Panama City, R. of P.
Hate oj Birth July 20, 191 2.
State's Address Baton Rouge, La.
Canal Zone Address Cristobal.
Date oj Entering Cristobal School October, 191 7.
Grade Entered First.
School Activities Supper Club, '27, '28, '29; Secretary Supper

Club, '30; Glee Club, '27, '28; Secretary of Class, '29;

Carnival, '27, '28, '30; Literary Editor The Caribbean

Staff, '30.
College Expected to Enter Louisiana State University.
Favorite Expression "Mercy!
Chosen Vocation Language Teacher.

Hobby Reading.
Pastime Reading.




RALPH SNEDIKER CRUM.

Wise to resolve and patient to perform.

Homer.

Nickname Happy.

Birthplace Cicero, Ind.

Date of Birth January 11, 191 2.

State's Address Tipton, Ind.

Canal Zone Address Gatun.

Date 0/ Entering Cristobal School October, 1926.

Grade Entered Freshman.

School Activites Bowling, '27, '28; Track, '28; Carnival, '27,
'28; Glee Club, '27; Extra, '26, '27, '28; President Senior
Class, '30; Circulation Manager The Caribbean Staff, '30.

College Expected to Enter University of Indiana.

Favorite Expression "Who said so?"

Chosen Vocation Lawyer.

Hobby Reading.

Pastime Going to the movies.




RAE BLISS.

The sum of earthly bliss. Milton.

Nickname Tinsie.

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Date of Birth November 25, 1912.

State's Address Sherman, N. Y.

Canal Zone Address Cristobal.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 1917.

Grade Entered Fi rs t

School Activities Class Treasurer, '27; Supper Club, '27, '28;
Treasurer Supper Club, '29, '30; Glee Club, '27, '28, '29;
Carnival, '27, '28, '29, '30; Gym, '27, '28; Class President,
'29; Class Vice President, '29, '30; Treasurer .Athletic Asso-
ciation, '29; School Notes Editor The Caribbean Staff,
'30; "The Lottery Man," '30.

College Expected to Enter Oberlin, Ohio.

Favorite Expression "Don't be an Airdale!"

Chosen Vocation Language Teacher.

Hobby Reading.

Pastime Swim m i ng.



THE CARIBBEAN.



19




DELLA JOSEPHINE RAYMOND.

The thing that goes farthest toward making

life worth while
That costs the least, and does the most, is
just a pleasant smile. //'. D. Neshit.
Nickname .A'delina.
Birthplace Cristobal, C. Z.
Dale of Birth May lo, 191 2.
State's Address New York, N. Y.
Canal Zone Address Cristobal.
Date oj Entering Cristobal School October i, 1918.
Grade Entered First.

School Activities Glee Club, '27, '28; Supper Club, '27, '28,
'29, '30; Carnival, '27, '29, '30; Class Treasurer, '27, '28,
'30; Exchange Editor The Caribbe.in Staff, '30, "The
Lottery Man," '30.
Fai'orite Expression "Aren't you terrible?"
Chosen Vocation Private Secretary.
Hobby Dancing.
Pastime Plarhi^ the(p/ano.



THOMAS I.. COLEY, Jr.

I know thou'rt full of love and honesty.
And weigh 'st thy words before thou givest them
breath. Shakespeare.

Nickname Mike.

Birthplace Bethayres, Pa.

Date of Birth July 29, I913.

State's Address Betha>res, Pa.

Canal Zone Address Fort Davis.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 1928.

Grade Entered Junior.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Canal Zone Hampton

High School, Hampton, Va.
School Activities Editor-in-Chief, The Caribbean Staff, '30.
College Expected to Enter University of Pennsylvania.
Chosen Vocation Medicine.
Hobbv Swimming.
Pastime Swimming.
Favorite Expression "Don't you think .'





EVELYN ELIZABETH GANZEMULLER.

Within the mid-night of her hair
Half-hidden in its deepest deeps.

Tennyson.
Nickname Evvie.
Birthplace Peckville, Pa.
Date of Birth October 3, 1912.
State's .Address Peckville, Pa.
Canal Zone Address Gatun.
Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 1926.
Grade Entered Freshman.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Canal Zone Blakely

High School.
School Activites Glee Club, '27, '28; Supper Club, '27, '28, '29,

'30; Carnival, '27; President Debating Club, '30.
Favorite Expression "Oh, baby!
Chosen Vocation School Teacher.

Hobby Dancing. _,

Pastime Reading.



20



THE CARIBBEAN.




F. WILLIAM NEWMAN, Jr.

An ounce of wit is worth a pound of sorrow.
Richard Baxter.

Nickname Fifty.

Birthplace "Brooklyn, N. Y.

Date of Birth July 14, 191 2.

Canal Zone Address Box 235, Cristobal.

Date oj Entering Cristobal School October, 1918.

Grade Entered First.

School Activities Orchestra, '27, '28; Carnival, '27, '28, '29,
'30; Wittiest Student, '29, '30; Joke Editor The Carib-
bean Staff, '29, '30; "The Lottery Man," '30.

Favorite Expression "Egad!

Chosen Vocation Electrician.

Hobby Playing the violin.

Pastime ^Joking.



ALICE EVELYN HENTER.

Thou who hast

The fatal gift of beauty. Byron.

Nickname Jackie.

Birthplace Gorgona, C. Z.

Date of Birth December 8, 191 2.

State's .ffl'a'rf.tj Philadelphia, Pa.

Canal Zone Address Gatun.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 1926.

Grade Entered Freshmen.

School AclivitesGkeJOuh, '27; Supper Club, '27, '29, '30;
Secretary-Treasui^Njebating Club, '29; Debating Club,
'30; Typist, The 'J^aribbean Staff, '30; Chorus, '27
Carnival, '28

Favorite ExpressioW~"\ ne\>^r laughed :

Hobby Dan

Pastime Ta(Smg over the telephone.






PAULINE HERMAN.

She is pretty to walk with and witty to talk with,

.And pleasant too, to think on.

Sir John Suckling.
Nickname Paul.

Birthplace Fort Hamilton, N. Y.

Date of Birth March 15, 1913.

State's Address P'me Point, Old Orchard, Me.

Canal Zone Address Fort de Lesseps.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October i, 1927.

rade Entered Sophomore.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Canal Zone Clifton

High School, Ohio; Star of the Sea School, Va.; Emmacu-

lata High School, Kan.; Miss Doharty's School for Girls,

Ohio.
School Activities Supper Club, '27, '28, '29; Glee Club, '27;

Swimming, '28; Tennis, '28; Track, '28; President of Girls'

.Athletic Association, '29.
College Expected to Enter Wellesley College.
Favorite Expression "You wouldn't fool me?"
Chosen Focation Interior Decorator.
Hobby Collecting pictures of movie stars.
Pastime Tennis and swimming.



THE CARIBBEAN.



21





K^"^.




^M







VICTOR MELENDEZ.
Sir, your wit ambles well, it goes easily.

Shakespeare.

Nickname Mel.
Birthplace Brooklyn, N. Y.
Dale of Birlh June i8, 191 2.
Canal Zone Address Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 191 8.
Grade Entered First.

School Activites Track, '28, '29; Swimming, '29; Carnival,
College Expected to Enter Sibley.
Favorite Expression "Yeah ?"
Chosen Vocation Electrician.

Hobby Boating.

Pastime Water Polo.



ELSIE BE.ATRICE BIRKEI.AND.

How her fingers went when they move by note
Through measures fine, as she marched them o'er
The yielding plank of the ivory floor.

Benjamin F. Taylor.

Nickname L. C.

Birthplace Brooklyn, N. Y.

Date of Birth September 24, 191 1.

State's Address Brooklj-n, N. Y.

Canal Zone Address Cristobal.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 191 7.

Grade Entered First.

School Activities Supper Club, '27, '28, '29, '30; Orchestra,
'28, '29; Track, '26; Glee Club, '27, '28, '29; Chorus, '27.

Favorite Expression "Who'd a-thunk it!"

Chosen Vocation Stenographer.

Hobby Reading.

Pastime Reading.





^,/Ct-i!L-'>-<-- J ^n-




A^^



ELEANOR M. FITZGERALD.

The mildest manners and the gentlest heart.

Homer.

Nickname Fitz.

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Date of Birth June 25, 1913.

State's Address New York, N. Y.

Canal Zone .iddress Cristobal.

Date of Entering Cristobal School Ma)', 1926.

Grade Entered Eighth.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Canal Zone St. Cath-
erine's Academy, N. Y; Beidler School, Chicago, 111.

School .ictivities Supper Club, '27; Glee Club, '27, '28; "The
Lottery Man," '30.

Favorite Expression "You wouldn't fool me, would ya?"

Chosen Vocation Business career.

Hobby Traveling.

Pastime Talking.



22



THE CARIBBEAN.




FRANCISCO M. WONG.

Patience is a necessary ingredient ot genius.

Disraeli.
Xichiame Frisky.
Birt/:p/ace~Co\on, R. of P.
Date of Birth December 8, 1910.
Canal Zone Address Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School February, 1926.
Grade Entered Eighth.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. 7,. St. Joseph's

College.
School Activities Glee Club, '27, '28; Physical Training, '27,

'28; Orchestra, '29.
Favorite Expression "Use your brains."
Chosen Focation Business.
Hobby Spiritual reading.
Pastime Experimenting.



FRANCES MERCEDES DAYS.

.\ friend more divine than all divinities.

George Eliot.

Nickname Franny.

Birthplace -Ancon, C. Z.

Date of Birth December 31, 191 1.

State's Address Savannah, Ga.

Canal Zone Address Cristobal.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October 4, 1923.

Grade Entered Sixth.

School Activites Girls' Glee Club, '28; Supper Club, '28,
'29, '30; Vice President Supper Club, '29; President
Supper Club, '30; Secretary Junior Class, '29; Secretary
Senior Class, '30; Gym, '27; .'\lumni Editor The Carib-
bean Staff, '30; Carnival, '30; "The Lottery Man," '30.

Favorite Expression "Oh, my cow!"

Chosen Focation Stenographer.

Hobby Dancing. aaJ^

Prtj//7< Reading. v*) "^ ^





MARY VIRGINIA EBERENZ.

Plain without pomp, and rich without a show.

Diyden.
Nickname G i n
Birthplace .Ancon, C. Z.
Date of Birth July 2, 1910.
Slate's .iddress Louisville, Ky.
Canal Zone Address Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 1917.
Grade Entered First.
School Activities Supper Club, '27, '28, '29, '30; Glee Club,

'27, '28; Carnival, '30; Gym, '27, '28.
Favorite Expression "I don' wanna."
Chosen Vocation Stenographer.
Hobby Going places anil seeing things.
Pastime Reading.



THE CARIBBEAN.



n




E. BEVERLY TURNER.

Speech is gre.it; but silence is greater.

Carlyle.
Nickname Tunney.
Birthplace Cristobal, C. Z.
Dale of Birth March ii, 191 1.
Canal Zone Address Cristobal.
Date oj Entering Cristobal School October, 191 8.
Grade Entered First.
School Activities Swimming, '29, 'jo; Captain Neptune Club,

'29; Captain Swimming Team, '29.
College Expected to Enter Rutgers.
Favorite Expression "I'll bite."
Hobby Diving.
Pastime Swimming and diving.



ELSIE DOROTHY D.ARLF.Y.

Gentle of speech, beneficent of mind.

Homer
Nickname Elsi ta.
Birthplace Valparaiso, Chile.
Date of Birth .August ii, 1913.
Canal Zone Address Cristobal.
Date oJ Entering Cristobal School October, 1926.
Grade Entered Freshman.
Other Schools Attended Before Corning to Canal Zone Licio de

Nifias, Valparaiso; Bill-V'iew, Valparaiso.
School Activities Supper Club, '27, '28, '29, 'jo; Glee Club,

'27-
College Expected to Enter Clark's.
Favorite Expression "Cheerio!"
Chosen Vocation Writing.
Hobby Reading.
Pastime Swimming.





JOAN \IRG1NI.A STEVENSON.
Her voice was like the voice the stars
Had when they sang together.

Danle Gabriel Rosetti
Nickname Sloe Gin.
Birthplace New Jersey.
Date of Birth June 3, 191a.
State's Address New Jersey.
Canal Zone Address Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School Octoher, 1927.
Grade Entered Sophomore.

School ActivitiesG'nVs Glee Club, '28, '29, '30; Supper Club,
'28, '29; Girl's Athletic Association, '28, '29, '30; Track
Team, '29; Carnival Review, '30; B.asket Ball Team, '30;
Volley Ball Team, '29; Debating Club, '29, '30; Vice
President Debate Club, '30; "Gypsy Rover," '30; Art
Editor The Caribbean Staff, '30; Fashion Show "Down
Petticoat Lane," '29; Librarian, '29.
Favorite Expression "Believe it or not."
Chosen Vocation .'Athletic Instructress.
Hobby Canoeing and dancing.
Pastime Swimming and reading.



THE CARIBBEAN.




ESTAFANIA GRACE WHEELER.

Her voice was ever soft.

Gentle and low, an excellent thing in woman.
Nickname Sis. Shakespeare.

Birthplace Corona, Calif.
Dale of Birth July I, 191 1.
State's Address Utica, N. Y.
Canal Zone Address Cristobal.
Date oj Entering Cristobal School October, 1926.
Grade Entered Sophomore.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Canal Zone James

Kimble School and Utica Free Academy.
School Activites Supper Club, '27, '28, '29, '30; Glee Club,

'28; Baseball, '28; Girls' .Athletic Association, '29.
College Expected to Enter Utica Memorial Hospital.
Chosen Vocation Nurse.
Hobby Writing, reading, and sewing.
Pastime Walking and Dramatic Club.
Favorite Expression "Gee!




WALTER WIKINGSTAD.

A man of mark. Longfellow.

Nickname Wicky.

Birthplace Kristiansund, Norway.

Date of Birth September 17, 191 2.
'ome Address Kristiansund, Norway.
lal Zone .Address Cristobal.
ite of Entering Cristobal School October, 1 9 1 8.

Grade Entered First.

School .ictivites Glee Club, '27, '28; Class Vice President,
'27; Baseball, '27, '28, '29; Captain Baseball Team, '30;
Bowling, '28, '29, '30; Track, '29; Swimming, '27, '28,
'29; Tennis, '27, '29, '30; Basket ball, '29, '30; Soccer, '29,
'30;V^ice President, Boys' Athletic Association, '29; Busi-
ness Manager, The Caribbean Staff, '30; President,
Boys' Athletic Association, '30; "The Lottery Man," '30.

College Expected to Enter Bates College.

Favorite Expression "Yeah!

Hobby Practicing sport of the season. ^

Pastime Sports.




RICHARD COROALLES SERGEANT.

Skill'd in the globe and sphere, he gravely stands.
And with his compass, measures seas and lands.

Dry den.
Nickname Uncle Dik.
Birthplace Colon, R. of P.
Dale of Birth January 21, 191 1.
State's Address 12 Monroe Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.
Canal Zone .Iddress Cristobal.
Dale of Entering Cristobal School October, 1922.
Grade Entered Fifth.

Other Schools .4tlended Before Coming to Canal Zone Public
t School, Long Island, N. Y.
School Activities Orchestra, '27, '28, '29, '30; Glee Club, '27,

'28, '29; Captain Swimming Team, '28, '29; Swimming, '30;

Captain Tennis Team, '29; Tennis, '28, '29, "30; Neptune

Club, '29, '30; Basket ball, ';)o.
Favorite Expression "Yeah!
Chosen I'ocation Seaman.
Hobby Swimming.
Pastime Loafing.



THE CARIBBEAN.



25




RITA TERESA JOYCE.

She is graceful as the greenly waving boughs in
summer wind. Gerald Massy.

Nickna7>ie Rie.

Birthplace Chester, Pa.

Dale of Birth August 2^t, 191 3.

State's vfayrcj.5 Philadelphia, P.-.

Canal Zone Address Cristobal.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 1920.

Grade Entered First.

School Activities Glee Club, '27, '28; Supper Club, '27, '28,

'29; Swimming, '27; Carnival, '28, '29, '30; "The Lottery

Man," '30.
College Expected to Enter Rosemont College.
Favorite Expression "Most any minute now."
Chosen Vocation Fashion Illustrator.
Hobby Dancing.
Pastime Having a good time.



JAMES CAMPBELL, Jr.

A man of hope and forward-looking mind.

IVordsworth.

knaine Slim Jim.

irthplace Coopcrstown, N. Y.
Date of Birth July 17, 1912.
State's Address Flint, Mich.

'anal Zone Address Box 2ii-, Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 1920.
Grade Entered Fourth.
School Activities Swimming, '27; Track, '28; Carnival, '29,

JO,
College Expected to Enter General Motors Technical School.
Favorite Expression "Hey!
Chosen Vocation Mechancial Engineer.
Hobby Playing the clarinet in the band.
Pastime Paddling around in a cayuco.




2>^




ARTHUR JAMES MUNDBERG.

A merry heart doeth good like a medicine.

Proverbs.
Nickname Mundy.
Birthplace Brooklyn, N. Y.
Date of Birth July 29, 191 1.
Canal Zone Address Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School 1917.
Grade Entered First.
School Activities Glee Club, '27; Swimming, '27, '28, '29, '30;

Tennis, '27, '28, '29, '30; Carnival, '30; "The Gypsy

Rover" Orchestra, '30.
College Expected to E.nter Business College.
Favorite Expression "Yeah ?"
Chosen Vocation Commercial Business.
Hobby Swimming.
Pastime Reading.



26



THE CARIBBEAN.




PHOEBE O'DONNELL.

Eyes so transparent,

That through them one sees the soul.

Gautier.

Nickname 'Bama.
Birthplace Mobile, ."Ma.
Date of Birth February 2, 191 1.
State s .W Canal Zone Address Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 1928.
Grade Entered Senior.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Canal Zone

High, Barton Academy.
College Expected to Enter University of .\labania.
Favorite E.xpression "I love you. Oh, yes!"
Chosen Vocation Nurse or Stenographer.
Hobby Swimming.
Pastime Fibbing.



-Mobile



OIVIND ARNESEN.

He appear'd like the sun-god at his rising in the
early morn.

Phrtaur.
Nickname Eddie.
Birthplace Koistiansund, Norway.
Date oj Birth July 24, 191J.
Canal Zone Address Cristobal.
Dale of Entering Cristobal School October, 1929.
Grade Entered Special Student.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Canal Zone Koisti-
ansund High School.
School Activities Soccer, '30.
College Expected to Enter Oslo Business School.
Favorite Expression "Sure!
Chosen Vocation Business Man.
Hobby Reading and practicing sports.
Pastime Sports.





ROSE T. CORRIGAN.

For she was jes' the quiet kind

Whose natures never vary.

Like streams that keep a summer mind

Snowhid in Jenooary.

Lowell.
Nickname U'ush.
Birthplace Gatun, C. Z.
Date of Birth November i, 1912.
Canal Zone Address Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School January, 1930.
Grade Entered Special Student.
School Activities Supper Club, '26.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Canal Zone Toms

River; Colegio de Sion, Costa Rica.
Favorite Expression "Y de ahi."
Hobby Reading.
Pastime Reading.



THE CARIBBEAN.



27




cyi/tcc^>^x_^_.



MARIA CARIDAD STFAVART.

Voice gentle as the breeze that plays in the

evening
Among the Spices of Sahara.

Dr. "Johnson.

Nickname Maria.
Birthplace Cristobal, C. Z.
Date 0/ Birth May 26, 1910
State's /Address Philadelphia, Pa.
Canal Zone Address Cristobal.
Date 0/ Entering Cristobal School October, 1921.
Grade Entered Fourth.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Canal Zone Waure

Notre Dame, Belgium.
School .-Ictivities Glee Club, '27; Supper Club, '27; Girls'

Athletics, '27.
Favorite Expression "Shee!
Pastime Reading.



NEHLS G. JANSEN.



An honest man's the



noblest work of God.
Pope.



Nickname Swede.
Birthplace Korsor, Denmark.
Date oj Birth April 14, 1905.
State's Address Perth Amboy, N. J.
Canal Zone Address France Field.
Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 1929.
Grade Entered Special Student.
Other Schools .Ittended Before Coming to Canal Zone-
School.

Hobby Studying aviation.
Favorite Expression "Sir!"



-Roskilde




THE CARIBBEAN.





U)



w

&

o

CD





THE CARIBBEAN.



29




As we were in 1928



THE CARIBBEAN.



S=




CLASS HISTORY.

Mavis Tkirlwall, 'jo.




The Caribbean-, and in every activity of our
school. Why, others too recognized us as out-
standing. The Freshmen poor things such ordi-
nary ones looked up to us with awed eyes.
We were busy all this year studying (and enjoying
it to our surprise), taking an interest in helping
every way we could, and actually beginning to
trown a little at the disturbances caused by the
Lower Classmen. The highspot of our junior year
was you must have heard our Junior-Senior
Banquet. It was given at the Hotel Washington,
and this was the only "usual" thing about it. In
every other detail it was most unusual. After the
banquet, we gave a dance to entertain our guests.
Even some members of the Senior Class of 1929,
agreed (in private) that our banquet was a better
one than theirs had been. But, then, we could
have told them that.

Chapter lY. The Present.

At last! We are Seniors. But this isn't hard to
realize. We immediately assume a dignified and
preoccupied air, as if the burden of the whole
school rests on our shoulders alone. We feel, in
fact, that it does. We give our party our last.
We star in athletics and other activities. Then,
"The Lottery Man," our play and the best ever
given, and, greatest of all, the publication of
The Caribbean-, into which we have put all our
endeavor and hard work. But we are rewarded.
Isn't it a great success? Soon, in a very few short
weeks is Commencement and then we part. The
one disappointment of our Senior year was the loss
of about 15 members of our class, which we had
hoped would be the largest ever to graduate from
Cristobal High School. But we made up our loss
in number by excelling in other qualities, and by
working together. Now we realize that June 20
is not far off. Our high school days will be over
and Cristobal High School will lose the most
unusual class it ever educated. Ask me it that
statement is true or not. I'm a member of that
class.



PROLOGUE.

The history of the Senior Class of 1930 may
seem to others the same as that of any Senior
Class, but to the members of that class it has a
history unequaled. Where before has such a
class graduated from high school? Ask a mem-
ber of that group. "Nowhere," we find. True
enough. Ask me. I'm a member of that class.

Chapter I. The Dark Ages.

October i, 1926 will we ever forget that date
some 40 pupils registered in Cristobal High School
as Freshmen. That was the big day of our lives.
During that first year that group of 40 organized
a class that was to prove extraordinary. It got
hazed, gave a party, caused lots of trouble, in fact
it was a ?nos/ nniisna/ Freshman class. By June,
it had learned what high school life was, and had
decided that it was most exciting and enjoyable.
We were still a bit hazy about some things but
about these we pretended great knowledge.
So much for us as Freshmen.

Chapter II. The Middle Ages.

Oh here is that extraordinary class again!
Just as extraordinary as ever. Almost the same
group with just a few losses and some additions.
We were getting used to each other, getting to
know which of us were the real students, which the

musicians, which the athletes, which the but

we won't go further. As I said, this class was ext7-a-
ordinary and we found that we could be repre-
sented in every school activity our school boasted
of. This year, to prove that we noticed what was
going on in the world, we gave a "Lindbergh
Party." Airplanes, propellers, and aeronautical
articles prevailed. This was one of the most
original parties ever given. Hah! Another un-
usual feat by an unusual class.

Chapter III. The Renaissance.

Our Junior year. We suddenly found our-
selves very important personages on the staff of



THE CARIBBEAN.



31




k;=



CLASS WILL.

A'..f Bliss and Elsie D,irle\.




V>"e, the graduates of 1930, in sane and sound mind, do solemnly bequeathe the following honors
and unusual abilities to ye Juniors of Cristobal High School; this to be bequeathed only under the
consideration that ye future graduates seriously and untiringly strive to acquire these treasurable and
much-envied abilities quoted below:





BEQUESTS.


TO




Her musical talent


The Drake boys.

Wm. Harmon and Margaret Davis respective




Rae Bliss


Her giggle and dancing feet


y.


James Campbell




Harold Mueller and Marion Neelv




His dignity


Marv Bretch.




Ralph Crum

Elsie Darley




Percival Lvew.






Fabian Englander.






John Kellv and Bettina Powers.




Virginia Eberenz


Her seen-and-not-heard-ness ....


Lillian Housel and Richard Wood.




Eleanor Fitzgerald


Her happy-go-lucky ways


Ben Williams and Elsie Doar.




Evelyn Ganzemuller.
Alire Henfer


Her personality bob


Fred KroU and Eleanor Urwiler.




Her Greta Garbo-ness


Clara Frisk and Carlos Rankin.






Her long legs .


Ruth Duval.




Rita Joyce

Victor Meiendez

Arthur Miuidberg


Her lipstick


Ra\'mond Will.










His shampoo


Crawford Campbell and Burton Hackett.




William Xewman


His wit and slang


Velma Hall and Walter Bundy.




Delia Raymond


Hergeniality


Dorothy Wertz and Russell Eilwell.




Richard Sergeant


His stubborness


.Anna Ryan and Erie Ferguson.




Virginia Stevenson

Mavis Thirlwall




Thomas Pescod.




Her grace and smartness


Vinnie Elson and Edward Conkling.




Beverly Turner


His faithfulness


Celeste Clarke.




Estafania Wheeler


Her gentle voice


Edward Wilkins and Kenneth Maurer.








Bill Bailev and Belding King.




Francisco W'ong


His good nature


Margaret Mitchell and Eugenia McLain.





(Signed)



R.'iixv Seaso.v
Dry Season.



32



THE CARIBBEAN.



PREVIEW OF THE NEWS.

Eisie Darky, 'jo and Rue Bliss, 'jo.

SCENE Luxurious suite in office of Editor-in-
Chiet ot Consolidated Newspaper Corpora-
tion, 5th Avenue, New York Cit\-.

Ti.ME 1950 A. D.

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

Tom Colev, Editor-in-Chief.
Beverly Turner, Star Reporter

(Male and married).
Evelyn Ganzmuller, Star Reporter

(Female and free).



Scene I.

Editor-in-Chiet seated at antique desk.

Tap of the knocker on door (marked private).

Boy in uniform enters.

Boy: "Reporter wishes to confer with you, Sir."

C/iiff (Gruffly): "I'm busy Oh er show him
in."
{Exit boy eyjter star reporter ( male) in shirt s/eeves).

Star Reporter (male): "Here's to-day's news."
(Reads.) Byrd, Jr., conquers fourth pole. IFal-
ter fVikingstad, famous parachute jumper, makes
successful triple jump from 100,000 feet over
Peoria, 111. "Say, that's not so bad for C. H. S.,
eh?" (Reads again.) Angela Sapristi scores tre-
mendous success as "Azucena" in II Trovatore,
at the New Metropolitan. "Do you know that's
Virginia Stevenson.'' She's a second Schumann-
Heink, boy! That's getting on in the world, and,
believe it or not, her accompanist is none other
than our own E/sie Birke/and a really celebrated
pianist. I believe her stage name is Elsette
Kreland."

Editor (Taking long puff on choice cigar):
That's great. I received some interesting news
from our special correspondents abroad to-day.
(Fumbles among papers on desk.) Where is that
paper? Oh! here it is. Strangely, a lot of it
concerns ex-C. H. S. students our class of 1930
to be exact." (Reads.) Francisco IVong, head of
Chinese Diplomatic Corps, says, among other
things, that James Campbell has succeeded in
converting 200 Chinese at one meeting. He has
wonderful power, speaks Chinese fluent!)-. "So
James hasn't been killed yet!" ".'\nd our corres-
pondent in Spain says that Senorita Rita Joyce
Terrancy is having great success with her new
Home for Divorce Orphans, at Madrid. It was



a 'go' from its very inception, for even you can
imagine what an inconvenience it would be to an
aspiring divorcee to have her offspring thrust upon
her every six months for temporary care. This
home certainly fills a long felt need. I'm for it
myself. I hear there is a long waiting list already.
And from London we have the news of Elsie
Barley's new novel, to be out next month. I've
forgotten the title Romance, tho' I believe.
You know she captured the Nobel Prize last year
with her masterpiece entitled 'Seven O'clock.'
From Paris, we hear that Mclendez and Bliss, or
J'ictor and Rae, as we knew them, are still the
sensation ot the town with their eccentric dance
revue ot joo 'Artistes de Terpsichoris.' I heard
they copped a fortune at Monte Carlo, too.
Pretty soft, eh?"

( Knock on door. Boy in itnijorm enters Jemale
reporter directly behind him^)

Boy to Editor: ".A lady wishes

Star Reporter (Female, interrupting, to boy ):
"I've got my wish. (Smiles.) Now run along,
Algernon. (To Editor.) I've got lots of news in
these cables. (Excitedly waving same.) I just
had to rush right over and tell you about them.
It's all about our classmates. Some sad news, too.
Arthur Miindberg, you remember 'Mundy,'
cute blonde with heavenly blue eyes? He has
been Air Traffic Cop on the new Zeppelin from
Berlin to Beverh- Hills, California, and one of the
through Zepps from the Buenos Aires branch line
was late and to avoid a crash over the Bahamas,
'Mundv' dashed in front of the B.A.Z. 13-23-0-0-
and was run over. They were making 963 miles
per, too, but the cable says 'plucky Mundy'
escaped with only minor cuts, and shock and he
never used to shock easy either. (Smiles, and



THE CARIBBEAN.



33



picks up another yellow sheet.) And Fit/y New-
man wants us to write up his 'Nifty-Noise-
Makers;' they have been touring all the big
towns in the United States and Europe, and now
they have settled in Grande Cristobal for the
racing season. Newman's 'Nifty-Noise-Makers'
are the biggest hit of both continents, since Rudy
Vallee retired with his billions. (Reads from
another cablegram.) Alicia Vani, as you'll easily
guess, that's our z///Vc Haiter, has just completed
her 99th starring talkie. It's in Spanish, 'Besos
Calientes.' I saw it in Bogota. Boy, it surely
lived up to its name. She heads her own com-
pany now with studios at Bella Vista. That's
success in big letters, I say!"

Star Reporter (Male): "Since we are airing
personal matters, I may as well add my bit. I
had a letter from Ralph Criim recently. He is
Head Professor of English at Harvard. (Grandly.)
L-a-diesandgent-leman! He's known as 'Crabby
Crum' in his classes for he so objects to the
least muttering or talking. Same old Crum, all
right! He sent me a copy of his 'English Idioms
in Slang;' tho't I might find it useful. It's used in
all the universities now. He's been keeping up a
punctual (that's his style) correspondence with
Ddla and Mavis it seems. Delia has a beautiful
Home for the Insane in the Adirondacks marvel-
ous surroundings, birds everywhere about the
grounds, and monkeys playing all around the
place ^.iust watching them is part of the method
used in the cures it has been very successful, so
her ads say, and she has cured thousands. She's
a wonderful woman. I heard, too, that the en-
tire property was willed to her by a former inmate
of the Home in appreciation of the wonderful care
given him when she was matron of the Incurable
Ward. She need never work a day, but memories
and love of the work keep her there. That's just
Bella. Mavis has a Fashion Salon in Paris which
has become the rendezvous of all the very ultra
elite of the whole world. It is on Rue de la Prix
somewhere. That's just her line, Ba-be! How
she could wear clothes! Crummy said he had seen
Frances recently. She is secretary to Harold
Oswald Van Krautz America's wealthiest man,
you know. He owns a fleet of Zeppelins, and has
yachts and racing cars by the dozens; spends ten
months of the year going places and doing things,
and seeing people. Takes his secretary along
most of the time. Ralph hints that Harold



Oswald, Jr. has matrimonial aspirations toward
Frances, as soon as he gets his divorce from the
former Countess Oshee Getserman. Pretty nice
for Frances. She gained her ability to capture
'em practicing for our Carnival, if she needed any
aid to her usual line of capti veness."

Editor: "Yeah! I remember that Carnival.
(Picks up newspaper.) I saw something in here
about some of the other members of our class.
Here in the photogravure section, just glance at
this sweet-faced nurse. Now, I could enjoy poor
health with that sort of a face gazing down on me
frequently; that's (reads from sheet) Headnurse
//V/cc/tT connected with the Bellevue Charity
Hospital for 13 years. She has had more babies
named for her than any ten presidents. The
secret is, she endows each little new arrival who
is given her name with a Sioo bank account to
insure his way in the world. Quite an idea!
(Turns to another sheet.) And this athletic
personage is Pauline Herman. She has again
won the Golf Trophy in the Elimination Tourna-
ment between the United States and the Conti-
nent. Some feat! No, not double e this time.
(Holds up paper.) Son, just gaze on this imposing
structure. Isn't that a great piece of architecture ?
As I live! (Reads.) Beauty Salon at corner of
5th Avenue and Calle Galindo, Grande Cristobal.
A powerful combine has been formed by the
amalgamation of the famous beauty specialists
Eberenz and Fitzgerald with Elizabeth Arden;
$10,000,000 capital. Shoppes all over the world.
(Puts down paper.) Say, I wonder if they take
gentlemen clients too? (Feels flabby flesh on
face; bald pate, and corpulent tummy.) I need
a trip somewhere; guess I'll try the tropics; it
ought to be interesting after being gone twenty
years. (Rings for boy who enters.) Say! Boy,
get me rates and sailings by P. A. h. to Panama,
p7-onto.

Boy: "Yes, sir. Boss, could I be your personal
valet?" (Smiles broadly, exits.)

6\ R. (Female): "How time does fly! (Sighs).
I need a rest too, you might let me know about
those sailings to Panama, Chief Tom (dreamily to
self) and Fitty will be there and Alice Henter
and

cV. R. (Male): "Seems as tho' 1930 turned out
about as many notables as any class, before or
since. Well, so long, folks!"

CURTAIN.



MR 19742-



34



THE CARIBBEAN.




Photo hy Koihk. Panan



THE CARIBBEAN.



35






lORS




^^



36



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



37



JUNIOR CLASS.



NAME.



REPRESENT.ATIVE SONG.



Miss Moore

William Bailey. .

Mary Bretch

William Brodersen.
Walter Bundy ...
Crawford Campbell
Celeste Clarice ....
Edward Conklin. .
Margaret Davis .

Elsie Doar

Frank Drake

Rodman Drake. .

Ruth Duval

Vinnie Elson

Russell Elwell

Fabian Englander.

Erie Ferguson

Clara Frisk

Burton Hackett. .

Velma Hall

Parker Hanna

William Harmon .

Lillian Housel

Jack Kelly

Belding King

Frederick Kroll . .

Percival Lyew

Kenneth Maurer. .
Margaret Mitchell.
Harold Mueller. .
Caroline Napoleon.
Thomas Pescod . .
Ronald Phillpotts.
Bettina Powers . .

Carlos Rankin

-\nna Ryan

Dorothy Wertz

Edward Wilkins. .
Raymond Will

Ben Williams

Richard Wood

Eleanor Urwiler. .



"Mean to Me."

"Oh, Baby, Where Can You Be?"

"Ain't Misbehavin'."

"Button Up Your Overcoat!"

"Pagan Love Song."

"I Get The Blues When It Rains."

"Song of The Nile."

"I Faw Down and Go Boom!"

"If You Believed In Me!"

"When My Dreams Come True!"

"I'll Always Be In Love With You."

"What Makes You Do Me Like You Do?"

"Sweet Sue."

"Roses of Picardy."

"I'm A Dreamer. Aren't We .\11?"

"Singin' In The Rain."

"I Want To Be Loved By You .-Mone."

"I Love My Old-Fashioned Man."

"Hallelujah! I'm .A Bum."

"My Bill!"

"I've Got A Feeling I'm Falling In Love."

"Satisfied."

"My Man!"

"My Wild Irish Rose."

"I Want To Be Bad!"

"Kiss Me Dear, What D'ya Say?"

"Little Pal."

"Down By The Winegar Woiks."

"That's My Weakness Now!"

"Do Something!"

"Dream Kisses!"

"Pardon Me, It's ."^ Habit Of Mine, But I've Gotta Be Kissed."

"Sunny Side Up."

"Where The Shy Little Violets Grow."

".\h\ Sweet Mystery of Life!'"

"Sweet Rosie O'Grady."

"Louisiana Lullaby."

"Sand Man's Blues."

"I Don't Want To Be Sitting On Top of The World If I Have

To Be Sitting Alone."
"St. Louis Blues."
"I'm Just A Vagabond Lover."
"Lovable and Sweet."



38



THE CARIBBEAN.




Photo by Kodak, Panarna.



THE CARIBBEAN.



39




OPH





y



40



THE CARIBBEAN.




^.



THE CARIBBEAN.



THE SOPHOMORE THEATER.



Miss Kimbro "High Voltage"

Genevieve Barry "Tlie Girl Friend'

Ernest Berger "Hardboiled''

Gladys Bliss "Sunny"

Mary Clark "Be Calm, Camilla"

Alice Curtis "Pleasure Bound"

Mary Curtis "Sweet Adeline"

.\llene Deakins "The Charm School"

Mary Dean "Glorifying the American Girl"

Willie Diers "Penrod"

Paul Dignam "The Student Prince"

Zola Dorson "The Exalted Flapper"

Beverly Dunn "The Sophomore"

Dona Eaton "The Dance of Life"

Joseph Ebdon "Sonny Boy"

Harry Egolf "The Mighty''

Vivian Elmgren "Treasure Girl"

Antonio Fernandez "The Desert Song"

Albin Forsstrom "The Prince of Hearts"

Alice Gormerly "Honor Bright"

Frank Griesinger "The Viking"

Marian Hahn "The Peacock Fan"

Mildred Harmon "Quality Street"

James Hayden "Sons O' Guns"

Verona Herman "Nina Rosa"

Beatrice Housel "Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch"

Jodie Lu Jones "Her Majesty The Queen"

Howard Keenan "The Song Writer"



Thelma King Peg O' My Heart"

Marie Kleefkens "Bab"

Alvin Lvew "Sons of the Gods"

Franklyn Mcrrit "Down On The Farm"

Thomas Murphy "Hold Everything"

Martha Potts "Flying High"

Jean Pruit "Blow Your Own Horn"

Blanca Pulgar "Lady of Destiny"

Eleanor Reinhold .,, ,,, ,,

> Little Women

Nell Wardlaw J

Ben Roberts "Exceeding Small"

Herman Roos "Rip Van Winkle"

Herbert Rose "Good Boy"

Bruce Sanders "Mother's Boy"

Betty Stabler "Sweetie"

Myles Standish "The Courtship of Miles Standish"

Robert Stevenson "Grumpy"

Inez Theoktisto "Countess Maritza"

Alicia Thirlwall "Red Hair"

Perry Washabaugh "The Duke Steps Out"

Malcolm Wheeler "Little Lord Fauntelroy"

Randolph Wikingstad "Yimmie Yonson's Yob"

Elizabeth Wirtz "Pollyana"

James Wood "Alibi"

Carl Kariger

Robert Marshall ..,

\ 1 he Loconuts

George Wertz

David Gregory J




Wind-swept Palm Trees on Coluii Beacli.



MR 19742-



42



THE CARIBBEAN.




Panama CITY

SFROriTHEAlR r

~ COLO.\

Ene t/ CHS AT DIREK.E LEFT





n



Pan-America Fusrs
over the sea

HomevakkBoomd







Above Cristobal



A^




^=>



LOOMNG
"P JTHE
CflNAL
A,V

PeoroKiouel





is^'-^ir



Padduno H

HIS OVN
*C/\YUCA-




(D



Old vvAitii lovvER

* AT PORTO Bello -.




>!^'




APART OF Steamship Rt
Cristobal



THE CARIBBEAN.



43




44



THE CARIBBEAN.




?




(/TT^'^j




'^li.





O'r



li/"



THE CARIBBEAN.



45



FRESHMAN DIRECTORY.



Name.



Agnew, Harold

.'\ndrews, Maxine

Andersen, Harry

Beard, Webster

Beine, Duval

Birkeland, Dorothy

Crouch, Walter

David, Jesse

Durham, Carmen

Foley, Mary

Foley, Velta

French, George

Go.-merly, Edward

Gould, Charles

Hammond, Helen

Heilbron, Oscar

Howe, Charles

HufF, Garrett

Keenan William

Kleefkins, Louis

Krause, Anna

Lee, Henry

Lockwood, Harold

Marchosky, Mandi ....

Melendez, Mary

Murphy, John

O'Rourke, Genevieve .

De la Ossa, Ernest

Powers, .'\nn

Pescod, Charles

Rakovsky, Norine

Randall, Violet

Rankin, Thomas

Reinhold, Ernest

Safford, Natalie

Sanders, Bernice

Smith, Harvey

Stewart, Olive

Standish, Christian. .

Thirlwall, Edna

Thornton, Elizabeth.

Tipton, Lando

Townshend, Katharine

Weigle, William

Wertz, George



Sobriquet.



"Sonny Boy"

"Max"

"Andy"

"Weby"

"Tropical"

"Dot"

"Handsome"

"Chess"

"Betty"

"BiUie"

"Cleopatra"

"Frenchy"

"Eddy"

"Watty"

"Elena"

"Ossie"

"And how"

"Huffcligree"

"Peanuts"

"Mono"

"Buckie"

".Archibald"

"Locky"

"Maga-Nootch" .

"Melody"

"Murph"

"Billy"

"Delicious"

"Teakettle"

"Pipito"

"Shorty"

"Vi"

"Gassy"

"Pete"

"Stubby"

"Billy"

"Tiny"

"Snooks"

"Nanny"

"Eddie"

"Lizzie"

"Sands"

"Kay"

"Bill"

"Physical culture"



Ambition.



Gob

Language teacher

Salesman

Gob

Man

Physical directress

Fisherman

Scientist

Nurse

Private secretary

Dancer

Naval officer

Inventor

Overseer

Stenographer

Aviator

Hunter

Garbageman

Musician

Discoverer

Private secretary

Moviola operator

Loafer

Second Sherlock Holmes

Traveler

Street cleaner

Stenographer

Civil engineer

Writer

Star athlete

Stenographer

Actress

Loafer

Aeronautical engineer. .

Manicurist

Stenographer

Electrical engineer

Doctor

Millionaire

Teacher

Stenographer

Mechanical engineer.

Nurse

.Airplane pilot

Horse doctor



As realized in 1940.



Buck private.

Dancer.

Shoemaker.

Cheer leader.

Chorus man.

Dressmaker.

Comedian.

Hobo.

Campus flirt.

Actress.

Dancing teacher.

Hermit.

Prize fighter.

Undertaker.

SecretaryofY. W. C. .-v.

Deep-sea diver.

Sheik.

Stool pigeon.

Butterfly collector.

Optimist.

Fortune teller.

Lawyer.

Jockey.

Spring dancer.

Bowler.

Preacher.

Dishwasher.

Paper hanger.

Lion tamer.

Loafer.

Nun.

Old maid.

Radio announcer.

Coal miner.

Singer.

200 pounder.

Piano mover.

Teacher.

Second George K. .Arthur.

Egyptian dancer.

Man teaser.

Safety pin manufacturer.

Chorus girl.

Dog catcher.

Street cleaner.



46



THE CARIBBEAN.




r^jBTsilWlimv






Piwlo by Kudak, Patumd.



THE CARIBBEAN.



47




4?



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE OLD, OLD STORY IN AN OLD,
OLD COUNTRY.

Eleanor Fitzgerald, 'jo

(This story was judged the best submitted in the whole
high school in the igjo Short Story Contest.)

Pedro Arias de Avila founded the old city of
Panama on August 15, 15 19. Among the first
colonists of this city of Panama was Don Alvarey,
a very good fried of Pedro Arias and an important
member in the colony.

Don Alvarey lived with his wife and children in
a house known to all of Alvarey's frinds as "Casa
de Alegria" or "House of Happiness." He had
two sons; the eldest was twelve years old, called
Carlos, and the youngest, Juan was nine years
old. He also had a little girl, Juana seven
years old who was the pet of the household and,
in fact, the pet of the colony. She was a pretty
little child with black curly hair and dark
brown eyes.

As the colony was still small and Alvarey had
no enemies Juana was allowed to play and run
around in any part of the village.

One day she was sitting on the beach near her
home gazing out to the sea. Ever since she could
remember she had loved the sea and every day
she came to sit there and dream of the time when
she would grow up and be able to go on a big boat
to the land where she had been born.

This particular day, while she was sitting there,
Pedro, the son of Arias, crept up on her and
frightened her by shouting in her ear.

At once she turned on him and commenced to
give him a tongue lashing. He clapped his hands
over her mouth and she immediately bit him.
Just at this stage of the battle Juana's brother
Carlos came to bring her in for lunch.

"What's wrong, hermanita?" he asked her.

Juana, still breathless from the quarrel, tried
to explain what had happened but Pedro kept
interrupting her. Carlos laughed and said,
"Come, come, Juana, you shouldn't let such a
little thing make you so angry." And they both
walked away from Pedro into the house.



From that time on Juana always hated Pedro
and he, knowing this, used to tease and torment
her until she cried.

Before long the colony expanded and grew so
that it was considered the most important colony
of Spain's American Empire.

By 1 53 1, Alvarey had become the most impor-
tant member of the Real Audiencia, which was the
governing body of Panama.

Juana by this time was a young girl of 19, still a
favorite in the colony. She was tall and still had
her beautiful black hair and dark eyes. Her love
for the sea was greater than before and, although
no one knew it, her hatred tor Pedro was as strong
as ever.

Don Alvarey for some time had cherished a
secret desire that Pedro and Juana be married,
but had said nothing to anyone. He knew that
this would unite the two most influential families
in the city; however he did not want to force his
daughter into a marriage that might not please
her. He resolved to see what Juana might have
to say about it and then, if she agreed, to arrange
the matter with Don Arias.

When he came home that evening, Juana came
to meet him looking so pretty and sweet, that it
brought tears to his eyes to think of parting with
her.

"Buenas tardes, hija mia how has the day
passed happily, I hope?" he greeted her.

"Yes, father, and do you not know that to-day
is your birthday?" she asked.

"Ah yes," he answered, "I had completely
forgotten."

"Well, well, hello, Carlos and Juan!" he said as
he entered the house and saw the two boys.

Dona Alvarey had died when Juana was only 1 5.
Since that time Maria, an old servant who had
come from Spain with the family, had taken care
of the two boys and Juana.

She was now fussing around the kitchen pre-
paring the evening meal. They sat down to the
table and began to chatter.

"We are expecting the Fortunato to arrive to-
morrow, father. Do you know of anyone who is
on it?" asked Carlos, now a young man of 24.



THE CARIBBEAN.



49



"No, son, but T hope that ship will bring some
letters and news trom \'alencia," replied Alvarey.

At this talk of the ship Juana's eyes had bright-
ened and she listened with interest.

"Eather, when you go to meet the ship to-
morrow will you take me with you.'"

"Certainly, child." Then he spoke very serious-
ly. "I would like to speak to Juana alone, boys."
The boys left the room and Alvarey looked at
Juana who, in turn was staring at him with
curious eyes.

"What is it father?" she asked.

"I am going to ask you a question, daughter,
and I want you to answer me truthfully. I have
seen that you have had many suitors but not
one that you favor more than the other. To me,
Pedro Arias is the most suitable. Is it possbile
that you agree with me?"

"I shall never marry Pedro .Arias," replied
Juana in a voice which her father had never heard
from her.

"But what is it, daughter, that makes you turn
to ice when I speak of him. Surely you do not
hate hnn?"

"Do not ask me, Father. I can not bear to
speak of him," she replied.

"Well, I had hoped for better than this," said
Alvarey wearily, "but I shall not force you into it.
There is plenty of time yet anyway."

And so, the interview ended. The next
morning Juana prepared herself in the gayest
clothes in which to meet the boat. She looked
like a beautiful picture in her typically Spanish
dress as she walked along beside her father. She
had evidently forgotten the conversation of the
night before as she was in the gayest mood and
cha ttered incessantly in musical Castillian Spanish.

Finally they reached the busiest section of the
town and Alvarey took Juana to Don Pedro's
where he told her to wait until the ship should be
sighted. She amused herself in the gorgeous
patio of Don Pedro's home, and was not afraid
of meeting Pedro, for she knew he was away on a
trip to Puerto Bello.

After an hour or so her father came after her
and they rushed to the wharf.

When the boat had approached quite close
but before the passengers had alighted, Juana
had time to notice a very fair young man. He
was quite tall with light curly hair, and from the
moment Juana saw him her eyes never left him.
Could he be an Englishman she wondered?

MR 19 742 7



The English that Spain hated so much and
if he was, what was he doing here, among
enemies? .All these and many other questions
were going through her head as she stood beside
her father.

When the passengers alighted she still watched
the Englishman (she had now decided that he was
one). He seemed to be looking for someone.
P'inally he spoke to a young man who pointed
toward Juana and her father. He immediately
walked toward them and she stepped behind
her father in order to remain unseen. "Are you
Senor Don Ricardo Alvarey?" he asked her
father in excellent Spanish.

"Yes, I am," answered Alvarey, "What can I
do for you ?"

"I have an important message for you, Don
Alvarey. Perhaps there is some place we can be
alone?"

"Yes, indeed," he answered, then turning to
Juana, "This is my daughter, Juana, Senor-ah

"Giles Martinez," said the young man while
looking at Juana.

"Would it be inconvenient for you to come to
my home, senor?" asked Don Alvarey.

"No, indeed! I shall be glad to accompany
you and tell you something of myself as we go
along. No doubt you wonder who I am, and
what message I might have for you," said the
young man.

They began to walk in the direction of Don
Alvarey's home and the young man began to
speak.

"Perhaps first of all my name strikes you as
strange. My mother was an Englishwoman,
who, while traveling in France, met Martinez,
my father, a Spanish merchant on a business
trip in France. They had very little oppor-
tunity to meet each other as my mother knew
that her father would object very strenuously if
he even thought she spoke to a Spaniard. How-
ever, the way of lovers can not be surpassed, and
she eloped with her lover and returned to Spain
with him. When I was born, she named me
after her father who never forgave her for marry-
ing my father. So, that is the way in which I
received my very English name, Giles. The
message that I have for you came from your
brother, who for the last five years has been in
business with my father. I am sorry to bring
news of your brother's death. This message
was dictated from his deathbed and contains a



<;o



THE CARIBBEAN.



will in which he leaves you all his interest in the
business, which concerns exporting and importing.
My father has sent me here with the message."

Don Alvarey remained silent and the young
man, knowing that he was thinking of the death
of his brother, said nothing.

Finally Don Alvarey spoke, "I am too old a
man to think of entering a business of which I
know nothing. But this is an excellent oppor-
tunitv for Carlos, is it not, Juanita?'

"Yes, indeed. Father, and do you think that
I could go with him ?" said Juana, whose desire to
see the land where she was born had never left her.

But her father merely laughed and told her it
was impossible.

Juana, seeing that this would probably be her
only opportunity of ever visiting Spain, was
determined to find a way of going with her
brother; so while Don Alvarey and the young
man was talking Juana walked along silently,
thinking very deeply.

Carlos, on hearing of what his father was
planning for him, was overjoyed. He listened
to all the counsel which his father gave him and
a strong friendship began to grow between Giles
and Carlos.

Juana had been constantly begging her father
to allow her to go with her brother, but he would
pay no attention to her.

Juana went to her brother Carlos and told him
how she longed to go with him to see the beauti-
ful country of Spain. He at first laughed at her,
but seeing her enthusiasm and unusual desire for
this impossible thing, listened to her and promised
her that he would try to persuade their father to
let her go.

If he agreed, Maria was to go along and watch
over her. The two of them kept after Don Alvarey,
who was very reluctant to part with his daughter,
but just as he granted her every other wish, he also
granted this one. Juana and Maria, the old
servant, busied themselves with preparations
for the journey.

All this time Giles had been visiting the house
under the pretense of seeing Carlos, but had been
spending most of his time trying to gain the atten-
tion of Juana. When he did get her to take any
unusual notice of him she would pelter him with
questions ot Spain.

Carlos and his father were not blind and could
see that the young Spaniard (who tlid not resemble
a Spaniard in the least), had more than a friendly



interest in Juana. Carlos was pleased as he had
learned to admire his friend Giles, but Don
Alvarey, who still hoped to see Arias's son, Pedro,
married to his daughter, was not so pleased. He
spoke of this to Carlos, who was very much sur-
prised and said to his father, "I see where the
trip will be very interesting since both Giles and
Pedro will be traveling with us."

"Do you mean to sa)- that Pedro is going to
Spain!" exclaimed the father.

"Yes," replied Carlos, "and it is strange that
you did not know of it, although it seems to be
quite a secret."

"Yes, it is strange that Arias did not tell me,"
answered Don Alvarey; then the tone of his voice
changed: "I am trusting Juana to you, Carlos, and
you know that she is my heart, my life, so guard
her carefully and see that no harm befalls her.

The day of sailing finally arrived and Juana,
who was too excited to control herself was running
here and there saying good-bye to this one and
that one. After some time Carlos came and
brought her to her father, who could hardly
speak. The parting was a sad one and Juana
promised to return as quickly as possible. She
boarded the ship Fortunato, which had brought
the young man to America, and which was now
returning to Spain with the precious Juana.

The ship could not compare with our modern
transatlantic steamers, and poor Juana experi-
enced all the very worst pains of seasickness.
Her brother, Carlos, was constantly at her bedside
and when she telt able to walk, he never left her
side. But as soon as Carlos and Juana came in
sight Giles would join them, and they would laugh
and sing and talk until Juana began to forget her
illness and to take notice ot this very pleasing
young man, who always had some new form of
entertainment tor her, or something to tell her of
Spain.

Pedro, in the meantime, watched all this with
jealous eyes and he, too, tried to join some of their
little gatherings; but as soon as he appeared
Juana would change from a gay, laughing young
girl to a very serious and haughty young woman.

Giles, noticing this, was determined to find out
the cause of it, but realized that he must be very
careful. He saw that it was something that
Juana kept to herself and was very sensitive about.

So the days continued and became weeks and
Juana began to tire of the wide expanse of nothing
but water, and sought the company of Giles more



THE CARIBBEAN.



51



and more. A strong friendship grew up between
them, and Carlos, who was always present, saw
that in time it would become more than just
friendship. He admired Giles and wished to see
him married to Juana, but he also remembered
the words of his lather.

One day the three of them were sitting and talk-
ing when a boat was sighted. It carried no flag
and the crew were puzzled as to what kind of
ship it might be.

Giles and Carlos began to have their suspicions
when the strange ship directed its course toward
the Fortunato. They looked at each other and
although no words were spoken, made a joint oath
to protect the young girl who stood between them.

The little ship Fortunato kept on her course
although she saw that the larger boat meant to
block her way. Alter some time the larger boat
came alongside and a number of ugly men began
to jump aboard the little ship.

Giles, just a second quicker than Carlos, lilted
Juana into his arms and carried her to her cabin,
spending a few moments in warnings, telling her
not to leave until he should return.

The first person that he met on his return was
Carlos. "It is an English pirate ship and Pedro
Arias, the swine, is a spy in the service of the
English, and has been for these three years."

"Then there is something more behind this than
iusc plunder or he would not be here," replied
Giles, then whispering, "Juana is sale in her cabin,
but it will be wise to keep a watch on her. I told
her not to leave till I should come and fetch her."

At this moment Pedro Arias came toward them
with a sneer on his face. "The English pirate
ship demands the person of Juana Alvarey to be
held for ransom. If she is delivered to us without
resistance the ship will be allowed to continue its

course, otherwise and Pedro left his sentence

unfinished, for Carlos had hit him and hit him
so hard that he lay at their feet unconscious.

Giles told Carlos to tie and gag Pedro while he
went after Juana. "I think I may be able to
settle this. Wait here until I return," he said to
Carlos.

Then he went toward Juana's cabin. When
she opened the door, he noticed that her face was
pale and she seemed nervous. "Have you been
frightened?" he asked her, "Has anyone molested
you?"

"Not frightened for myself," she answered.
"Is Carlos safe? And you? You are not hurt?"



"Carlos is waiting for us," Giles answered.
"Do not fear for me, querida mia, for my life is
worthless when yours is at stake. Perhaps it may
surprise you, but I may never have another oppor-
tunity to tell you that I love you, dearest one,
and I am going to protect you if it costs my life."

Juana looked up into his face and said, "I am so
glad you have told me, Giles, for I have discovered
since you left me that your life is dearer to me than
any."

Giles clutched her arms and looking into her
face cried, "Are you sure, sweetest one, are you
sure?" And then, before she had time to answer
he remembered that time was now precious so he
lifted her in his arms and went back to Carlos.

"I am going to try and talk to these scoundrels
and make them believe I am an Englishman.
Whatever I say you must agree with me. Do
you understand?" said Giles.

So the three of them boarded the ship and Giles,
now speaking in English, asked for the captain.

When he appeared, Giles said, "Sir, I know not
who you are but I am an Englishman of noble
birth, the grandson of Sir Giles Berkeley and this
is my wife and brother with me. We are travel-
ing to Spain where my father is to meet us."
And he went on in such a manner that he im-
pressed the ignorant sea captain a great deal.

"I think there is a mistake, sir," said the
captain. "That fool. Arias, has probably got us
into another mess, but I swear by my beard, that
this will be his last trick. Where is he, the dirty
scoundrel?"

Giles, after much discussion hnalh- persuaded
the captain to let the Fortunato proceed on its
course peacefully, and to let him do with Arias
whatever he wished. He made up his mind to
turn him over to the officials as a spy and let the
Spanish government prosecute him.

The good sh\p Fortunato finally arrived in Spain
and about three months later Don Alvarey received
the following letter from his daughter (written
by Carlos, for she did not know how to write) :
"Padre Querido:

"I have at last seen the beautiful country in
which I was born but it can not compare with the
other country where I have lived all my life.

"Giles and I were married yesterday, father, with
the permission of Carlos. We were married in a
beautiful little church in this city by the same
priest who baptized me. Is it all not very
romantic, padre?



<;2



THE CARIBBEAN.



"Carlos is writing to tell you about Pedro Arias
for I can not bear to speak of him. He was acting
as a spy for England and has been thrown into
prison.

"And just think, padre mio, Giles and I will be
returning to Panama soon because his father
wants him to continue the business there. Carlos
thinks it is a profitable and agreeable proposition,
and I am sure you think so, too. He will remain
here as he says he thinks he was destined to be a
merchant. So, father, it will not be long before
we will be together again. Giles wishes to be
remembered to you and thanks tor me. Is he not
foolish but also lovable?

"Your loving daughter,

(t T

JUANA.



IT SOMETIMES HAPPENS.

Elsie Darky, 'jo.

(This story was next to the grand prize story, and the
best submitted from the Senior Class in the 19J0 Short Story
Contest.)



"Who's that fellow over there?" asked my
companion, gazing at a man seated a few yards
from us. "Interesting looking chap," he added.

We were sitting on the veranda of the Stranger's
Club, watching the last rays ot the sun disappear
behind Fort Sherman.

I followed Jack Benton's glance and saw a man
of about forty, gray-haired, and very sunburned.
His clothes, of a good quality, hung loosely on his
spare frame. As I looked, I recognized him.

"Great Scott!" I exclaimed. "It's Everard
Deane! But how

"The explorer?" Jack interrupted. "But you
sound excited. Why so?"

"What on earth is he doing here?" I went on,
almost to myself.

"Is he someone with a past?" persisted Jack.
"He looks it."

"I'll tell you his story" I said, turing to Benton,
"since you will worm it out of me sooner or later.
Deane lived here three years ago before you
came down here. He was a wealthy traveler
staying at the Washington, and the place got
such a hold on him that he decided to stay in-



definitely, instead of continuing his travels. He
remained and became very popular with the resi-
dents here. After a time, finding the place a bit
dull, he made arrangements to make a month's
trip into the jungle. I think he was interested in
gold anyway, he left for the interior soon after."

"Go on," urged Benton.

"But that isn't all, unfortunately. While
staying here he became very intimate with Cap-
tain Daniels, then the Port Captain. The
Daniels had a son. Bill, a boy of about 18, just
finished high school nice boy, rather. Took a
great fancy to Deane, and Deane was equally
interested in him. When he heard of Deane's
proposed expedition he was on pins and needles
to go with him, of course. Captain and Mrs.
Daniels, after demurring awhile, consented to his
going, because they trusted Deane implicitly.
Everard acknowledged frankly that he would
rather leave the boy behind, but Bill's eagerness
was so great that he couldn't resist taking him.
Well, they left in a couple of weeks, and no one
ever saw Bill Daniels again."

"What?" said Jack, aghast. "You don't
mean ?

"No," I said with conviction. "I don't mean
that. No one ever saw Deane either, until a few
months ago, when one of the Airway pilots saw
him in Darien. But I am one of the very few who
didn't believe Deane was responsible in any seri-
ous way for that boy's disappearance. One of
the very few. Mrs. Daniels waited and hoped
for three months, and then left for the States with
a nervous breakdown."

There was a pause. Then Jack said: "Now
I'm as interested as you to know what he is doing
here."

"I am going to speak to him," I said, and rose.

Deane recognized me at once, and almost his
first words were: "You're a white man, Harrison.
The only one of my friends who has spoken to me
since He broke off, and I did not press him.

"W ell," I said. "Let's make it two white men.
I've a friend with me who I am sure would be
delighted to meet you."

Realizing my sincerity, he did not hesitate to
come over to our table and sit down. I introduced
him to Jack and ordered drinks. Deane spoke:

"I know," he started, "that you would like to
hear my story

"I, too," vouchsafed lack.



THE CARIBBEAN.



53



" And I don't mind telling it now," went on
Deane. "So >ou shall be the first to hear it."

"You know the facts of our departure. We left
with three San Bias Indians porters, carriers,
or what you will. My intention was to travel
inland for about 25 miles in search of gold, because
I know there are deposits around there. It was
fair going for the first 15 miles. One morning
Bill and I woke to find that our three Indians had
gone why, I never found out and had taken
with them most of our supplies. We, Bill and I,
had dug a little the previous day, and, to my
gratification, we had found signs of what promised
to be a large vein of gold. But the Indians had
not known this, or they would not have left.
So Bill and I were left with the prospect of going
back at once, as what food supplies remained
would obviously last for only a few days. Bill
began to pack, while I made notes as to the
location and other matters. I had moved away
from the camp in the course of making my an-
notations, when suddenly I heard a cry: 'Mr.
Deane! Quick!' I turned round sharply, and I

shall never forget what I saw Deane's voice

was not as steady as it had been. "Bill was
trying desperately to free himself from the coils of
a snake which had wound itself round his arm. I
drew my revolver and fired at the thing, risking
hitting Bill, and shot it through the head. But
I was too late. Young Daniels had been bitten,
and HI spite ot all my efforts he died within 20
minutes.

Deane paused, and very, very carefully, stubbed
out his cigarette. He must have loved that boy
very much.

Neither Jack nor I spoke, and Deane went on:

"I buried him there, with a gold mine for his
monument." He smiled a little sadly.

"I should have returned to Mrs. Daniels and
broken the news to her; but I hadn't the courage.
I know what you are thinking, Mr. Benton," he
said, and I think he must have caught Jack's
contemptuous look. "Why shcjuld I, who have
faced wild animals in Africa without a qualm, be
afraid to do so simple a thing.'' There is more than
one kind of bra very, my boy, and perhaps some day
you will learn that. .And the best is the very
kind I lacked. Well (more brusquely), I wander-
ed about in that jungle till I came upon an Indian
village, and for two years I have lived in Indian
villages with my fear. Now I am going away



from Panama forev'er. I sail for China to-morrow,
and I shall spend most ot my time at my place in
Manchuria, trying to forget. Harrison, I want
you to do something for me. I want you to write
to Mrs. Daniels and tell her. Say what you like
about me the worst will not do me justice."

He laughed a little mirthlessly. ".And now
good-bye."

He rose, gave us each a firm handshake, then
left us.

Jack and I went home, very pensive.



THE COFFIN OF DON JUAN.

IValter Bundy, 'ji.

(This story was the best submitted from the
Junior Class in the 1930 Short Story Contest.)

When I finished my college course, about two
years ago, I decided that European travel would
broaden my education; so tor a year or more I
traveled throughout Europe, collecting old books
and manuscripts.

It was after my travels, while I was classifying
and cataloging my literary discoveries, that I dis-
covered an old letter m one of the Spanish books.
I looked at it carefully, read a few lines, and at
once became immersed in the contents.

The following is a free translation of the letter.

Pan.ima,
Prisoner of Morgan.
My dear Don .Andres:

Do not be atraid when you see that I am a prisoner of
Morgan. I will soon be released, but if by some chance I do
not return to Spain, I wish you to tell my friends why I arn
here and, if possible, recover the jewels for the King.

.As you know I was aide to the Governor of Panama. When
he heard of the approach of the pirate, Morgan, he summoned
me to his quarters and said, "You, Don Juan, have been my
aide for two years, and during that time you have served me
faithfully."

"I have onh' done my duty. Your Excellenc\'," I replied.

"Yes," he said, "Your duty; but I have a greater duty for
you now."

"My life is at your service," I smiled, giving the customary
answer.

"You know that Englishman, Morgan, is approaching
Panama. .At the present time we have a large number of
jewels that were collected for the King, and it is absolutely
necessary to have them in Spain within three months. If
Morgan surrounds the city it will be impossible to take the
jewels across the Isthmus by ordinary means. It is your duty
to see that these jewels are taken safely to the Atlantic sea



54



THE CARIBBEAN.



coast and put aboard one of our ships. I am trusting this
vast fortune to your care because of your loyalty and in-
tegrity."

"Yes, Your Excellency, the jewels will be delivered safely
if I live."

"It is well. Make your preparations at once. You may
draw upon the city for supplies."

An hour later a flag-covered coffin was being slowly rolled
from the city on a gun-carriage. The procession was head d
by a young officer while a dozen soldiers marched on each side
with lowered gun muzzles.

Thev marched through the jungle toward San Lorenzo for
several hours when a party of armed men stepped into the
trail in front of them.

"What's this?" boomed the voice of the big man who seemed
to be the leader, "a funeral?"

The young officer, whom you have probably guessed was
myself, recognized him as Sir Henry Morgan, but he, or rather
I, assumed a commanding look and said, "Strangers, I suppose
you are a party of sailors from some Spanish ship at San
Lorenzo. It is your duty to help me take this body to the
coast."

The big man smiled and said, "I am Sir Henry Morgan.
Who are you and what is the reason for taking this corpse
across the Isthmus, knowing that I was planning to attack
Panama? I have already captured Fort San Lorenzo."

After telling him who I was and arguing a few minutes, I
told him, apparently against my will, the following story:

"This is the body of a nobleman, who has been in Panama
for several years. According to an old story, Panama will
fall the day after this man is buried, if he is buried in the soil
of the New World; so I am trying to take his body to a Spanish
ship, that it may be buried in Spain."

"Amazing," boomed Morgan, "Now, men, we will have a
funeral."

There was a brief fight in which all my men were killed or
captured, and the pirates carried the coffin into the jungle.
Soon we came to deep bog and Morgan stopped his men,
saying, "Here we are, men. Dump the corpse."

The copper coffin quickly sank from sight and Morgan,
laughingly said, "My dear Don Juan, since you were so useful,
I shall not kill you. You can live to see me take Panama."

Now I am Morgan's prisoner, and I must say, he has treated
me like a gentleman, even permitting me to send you this
letter. You probably think I am very indiscreet, putting the
secret of the coffin on paper, but Morgan said he would not
read it and he never breaks a promise. No, he will never
know that the coffin contains a fortune in jewels instead of a
body.

Soon, I hope, I will be free, for Morgan has taken Panama.
I will try to recover the jewels and in that way redeem
myself with my King.

Your faithful servant,

Don Juan de Erouso.

Of course this letter fascinated me. I investi-
gated a few old Spanish books in the collection
and discovered that a nobleman by that name was
tortured to death by Sir Henry Morgan. Also I
found that his best friend, Don Andres de Cer-



vantes died on an expedition to Panama two years
later.

Somewhere on the trail to San Lorenzo there is
a fortune waiting for someone to claim. Probably
it will be there forever, for all who knew where the
copper casket is buried are dead. Time will tell.



THE CARD SHARP.

Beverly Dunn, '??.
(This was the best story submitted from the Sophomore Class.)

The trip across, for even midwinter, had been
unusally dull. There were less than loo persons
on the big liner, most ot them traveling salesmen
or firm representatives coming home for Christ-
mas after a year abroad; and I had resigned
myself to a week of boredom. The weather, too,
was bitter, and I spent most of my time moping
around the great empty reading room, or the
smoking salon. It was natural, then, that I
should attach myself to Talbot, or, more truth-
fully, that he should attach himself to me. From
the first I had taken a liking to the lad, and even
after his unmasking I had not the heart to turn
him down. Indeed, had not some of the smoking-
room crowd testified that mine was a different
profession, I might have been ostracized as an
accomplice.

On the first night out I met him, and I was not
sure whether he was English or merely an imi-
tation. .^11 the outward and visible signs were
English, but he told me that though he had been
educated at Oxford and had spent most of his
time since then playing polo in India, he was
an American. He had spent some time, and,
according to himself, much money, at the water-
ing places along the French Riviera. I thought
that I had seen him somewhere before, but I
could not seem to place him. He talked glibly
of people well-worth knowing in both New York
and London, but he occasionally made slips.
It was his obvious case to cover up these slips
that first made me wonder whether he had any
motives besides personal vanity in pursuing. I
could not tell whether he was working up to an
immediate loan, or asking me tor an introduction
to a banker in New York, or a card to a club.
Then the next night I discovered his motive.

He was sitting in the smoking room playing
solitaire, and at once I recalled that I had seen



THE CARIBBEAN.



'i^



him at Aix-Les-Bains, and that he was holding
a bank at baccarat. When he asked me to sit
down I said, "I saw you at Aix-les-Bains last
summer."

His eyes fell to the pack of cards in his hands,
and he fingered them, as it searching for a par-
ticular card.

"What was I doing there?" he asked.
"Dealing baccarat at the Casino des Fleurs."
With obvious relief he laughed. "Oh, yes," he
assented. "Jolly place, ."^ix but I lost a pot of
money there. I'm a rotten hand at cards. Can't
win, and can't leave 'em alone. He smiled, as
though half ashamed of his weakness. "Poker,
chemin-de-fer, baccarat, I like 'em all, but they
don't like me; so I stick to solitaire now. It's
dull, but cheap. You like cards yourself?"

I confessed that I didn't know the difference
between a club and a spade, and had no desire to
learn. At this, when he discovered he was wasting
his time on me, I expected him to be annoyed;
but his disappointment struck far deeper. He
slowly shut his eyes as if I had hurt him physically,
and for a moment I believe he was oblivious to my
presence. Quite improperly, I felt sorry for him.
It he showed his disappointment so keenly, his
need for a few dollars must have been great.
Almost at once I abandoned him and went on
deck. When I came back an hour later, he was
deep in a game of poker.

He looked up and passed, and called to me.
"Don't scold," he said laughingly. "I told
you I couldn't keep away from cards."

"Known him for years," he said to a player at
his side making a gesture in my direction. "He's
set me right many a time."

The player looked up and smiled at me, and
Talbot met my gaze with perfect serenity.
"What would you draw?" he asked, holding
up his hand for me to see.

His audacity and inconsistency so astonished
me that I walked out of the room in silence.

When we met on the deck, he was not even
apologetic. Instead, as though we were partners
in crime, he chuckled delightedly.

"Sorry I had to use your name," he said. "But
they weren't any too pleased to have me take
that last hand; and I needed someone to vouch
for me."

"^'ouch for you!" I exclaimed. "I didn't say
a word."



He looked at me wearily. "No, no, of course
not," he said. "But it amounted to the same
thing. They think you vouched for me to-night;
so to-morrow they're going to raise the limit.
I've convinced them I'm an easy mark."
"And I take it you are not." I said stiffly.
He considered this unworthy of an answer,
hence only smiled. Then the smile died, and in
his eyes I saw fear, infinite weariness, and distress.
"I'm in bad," he said, and his voice was
frightened, like a child's. "I can't sleep; nerves
all on end. Can you give me something to
straighten my head?"

"What's the matter with the ship's doctor?"
I asked.

"But I don't know him." he said.
Mindful of the use he had made of my name, I
objected strenuously.

"Well you certainly don't know me!"
"No-o-o. But I know who you are," he said.

"and he stopped short; then, speaking in a

much lower tone, continued, "Besides, the
doctor he's an awful bounder. I think he's
watching me."

"As a doctor?" I asked, "or watching you play
cards?"

"Play cards," he replied. "I'm afraid he was
the ship's surgeon on the P. & O. I came home on.
There was a little trouble on that trip and I fancy
he remembers me."

His confidences were becoming a nuisance.
"You mustn't tell me that," I said, "how do
you know I won't go and tell the captain all about
you?"

"I know perfectly well you won't," he replied.
"Rot!" I retorted. "You don't know anything
of the sort."

For a moment Talbot bit his lip and frowned,
as if fearing he had gone too far. "I've got to
make expenses," he muttered. "All card games
are games of chance, and a card sharp is one of the
chances. Anyway," he said, as though disposing
of the subject, "I've got to make expenses."

After dinner, when I came into the smoking

room, the poker crowd sat waiting, and one of

them asked where they could find "My friend."

"We want to give him his revenge," the man

said.

"He's losing then?" I asked.

The man chuckled complacently.

"The only loser."



56



THE CARIBBEAN.



"I wouldn't worry," I advised, "he'll come for
his revenge."

That night, after I had retired, he knocked at
my door. I switched on the lights and saw him
at the foot ot my berth. His hands were shaking,
and I saw that he was holding himself in check
with great difficulty.

"I'm scared," he said, "scared."
In spite of his tan, his face showed white. For
a moment he looked old and worn; finished.

"They're crowdin' me," he whined. "Always
crowdin' me." His voice was querulous, like a
child's. "I can't remember when they haven't
been movin' me on. They moved me out of
India, then Cairo, then Port Said. Then they
closed Paris on me. .Always pushin' me. Now
they've closed London. I had a club there.
Just a few games roulette, baccarat. \'ery
quiet, y'know, very exclusive. Nice, fashionable
district, too, down on Berkeley Street. I think it
was my butler who sold me. Anyway, they took
us down to Bow Street. I've plunged on this
trip. It's my last chance."

"What, the trip?" I asked.

"No," he answered, with a slight smile. "My
family. They've been payin' me to live abroad.
I'm goin' home to 'em. I've been away tor ten
years. I'm comin' home as the Prodigal Son,
tired of eatin' the husks ot lite, now I'm just
waitin' tor 'em to kill the tatted calt." He
chuckled to himself. "Fatted calf!" he said
scornfully. "They'd rather see me in Hell.
My brother was the only member of the tamily
who ever cared a whoop about me, anyway. I
know ot times when he tried to get me to come
home, but the rest of the family didn't want me.
He was always decent to me, even when the
others were treatin' me like a dog. He's my best
bet."

It seemed to me, if he wished his family to
think he was realK- repentant, his course in the
smoking room would not help to really reassure
them. I suggested as much.

"If you get into trouble, as you call it," I said,
"they'll radio ahead to the police ot New ^'ork,
and your people will hear."

"I know," he said. "I got to chance it. I got
to make enough to go on till I see my family."

"And what if they won't see you?" I asked.

He glanced sadly around the room. "Then I
guess it's just good-night," he said.



I gave him a sleeping powder, and sent him
off to bed. Apparently it was just what he needed
for the next day after luncheon he was up on deck
looking tresh and strong, and active. He seemed
to have torgotten our previous night's conver-
sation, and when I asked him to abandon his
smoking-room activities for the rest of the voyage,
he only laughed.

"Can't be done," he said, "I've got to make my
killing to-night." But it was others who made
the killing.

I came into the smoking room about 9 o'clock,
to see how the game was progressing. All the
players except Talbot were standing up; their
voices were raised in anger.

Talbot sat with his back against a bulkhead,
cool and nonchalant. Outwardly, at least, he
was indifferent to the hostile gestures which were
being directed at him by his chief tormentor, a
noisy, red-faced pest named Smedburg. In the
confident, bullying tones of a man who has the
crowd with hnn, he was addressing Talbot.

"When the ship's surgeon first met you," he
said, "You called yourself Lord Ridley."

"What of it," Talbot retorted, "If I choose to
dodge reporters, that's my business. And, turther-
more, it's my business it I don't choose to give
my name to every meddling busybody I meet."

"You'll give it to the police, all right," sneered
Smedburg. "And in the meantime, you'll keep
out ot this smoking room."

The chorus of assent was unanmious. It was
too evident to be ignored, even by Talbot. He
silently rose, and with an air of fastidious con-
cern brushed a speck from his coat.

"Only too glad to get out," he remarked. "The
atmosphere in here is very depressing."

But he was not to have the last word. His
persecutor pointed a long finger at him. "The
next time you take the name of Adolt .Aleck,"
he shouted, "You better make sure he hasn't got
a triend on board to protect him trom sharps and
swindlers."

Talbot turned and walked out into the night.

"Bad business," remarked the purser, a tew
minutes later.

"What happened?" I asked.

"Caught him dealing off the bottom," he said.
"They rather suspected him all the time, and
to-night they had outsiders watching him. They
say he slipped himself an ace off the bottom of



THE CARIBBEAN.



57



the pack. It's a pity! He's such a nice looking
chap."

I asked what Smedburg had meant by his
allusion to Adolf Aleck.

"They accused him of traveling under a false
name," explained the purser, "and he said that
he did it to dodge reporters. Then he said he
really was the brother of .'\dolf Aleck, the banker,
but it seems Smedburg knows Aleck and he
called his hand. It was a crazy thing to do,
because everybody knows Aleck hasn't a brother.
But now this Smedburg is going to send a wireless
to the police and to Aleck and tell them about the
whole business."

"Hasn't he any other way of spending his
money?" I inquired.

"He's a confounded nuisance," growled the
purser. ".\11 he wants to do is to put Aleck under
obligation to him; wants to show everybody he
knows the man. It means a scene on the wharf,
newspaper talk, and Heaven knows what. Talbot
will be the joke of the ship. He won't dare show
his face."

But the next morning found Talbot on deck,
acting as if nothing had happened. He ignored
the gibes and jokes which were flying about him,
and put on an air of great superiority. He would
have passed me on deck, but I took his arm and
led him to the rail. We were now well past
quarantine, and a convoy of tugs were butting us
into the dock.

"What are you going to do.'" I asked.

"It doesn't depend on me," he replied. "It's
up to Smedburg. He's the busy little boy."

Then his flippancy fell from him like a cloak, and
fear took it's place. He turned to me and gripped
my arm.

"They're watching me," he said. "I could tell
that. They're just waiting for a chance."

"Why did you do it, then?" I inquired.

"I didn't!" he exclaimed. "I swear I didn't.
I was playing in luck all evening. Everything
was comin' my way. I didn't need to cheat.
But a loose card fell off the bottom, and they all
jumped on me before I had a chance to explain.
It wasn't the truth they wanted. They believed
what they wanted to believe. But I didn't cheat
once in the game."

It may have been foolish of me, but I felt that
he was telling the truth, and I was sorry he had
not stuck to it; so I said rather harshh', "then
why did you lie about being Aleck's brother?"

MR 19742 8



"Why not?" he replied. "I had to say some-
thing to pass it off. I used to know Aleck well too,"
he paused, and looked at the water. "Years ago!
But I'd forgotten he hadn't a brother. I thought
I could get away with it. Besides, he's a Jew, and
two of the six in the game were Jews."

"But you," I said, "are not a Jew."

"No?" he queried. "Look at me a minute."
He paused and turned squarely around.

"Hair wavy," he said, "complexion dark, eyes
popping, mouth full, nose Roman or Hebraic,
according to taste. Do you see?"

He shrugged his shoulders.

"But it didn't work," he said. "I picked the
wrong Jew. Do you suppose this Smedburg
person has really sent him a radio?"

I told him I thought it very probable.

"And what will .Aleck do?" he asked. "What
sort is he?"

Briefly I described him as the richest banker
in New York, given to philanthrophy and the
betterment of his race.

"Then mebbe," he cried hopefully, "he won't
do anii'thing, and my family won't hear."

Then his shoulders stiffened, and suddenly,
harshly, he exclaimed. "Look! The little Jew in
the fur coat at the end of the pier."

I followed the direction of his gaze, and saw
on the dock, accompanied by two members of the
strong-arm squad, the great banker, philanthropist
and Hebrew, .Adolf .Aleck.

We were so close I could read his face. It was
stern set, unrelenting. Of a bad business, Smed-
burg had made a worse one. I turned to speak to
Talbot, but found him gone.

His silent slipping away filled me with fear.
I ran to his stateroom. It was empty. Then
starting at the bottom, I traversed every deck,
lane, and alley on the ship. Talbot was not to be
found, and my inquiries to stewards fell on deaf
ears. There were hundreds of empty staterooms
in which he might have hidden, and in the con-
fusion of landing no one would notice him.
Finally, I had reached the gangplank and started
to the customs shed to continue my search, when
a white-faced steward touched my arm.

"The surgeon, sir," he said, "asked me to get
you. There's a passenger who's shot himself, and
he's askin' for you."

From the bed in the surgeon's room, young
Talbot, with shocked, glazed eyes, peered at me.
He was propped up against a pillow, and his shirt



^8



THE CARIBBEAN.



was open. The doctor was applying a sponge to a
long, red wound in his chest.

I must have exclaimed aloud, tor the doctor
looked up.

"He sent for you," he said curtly. "Fortu-
nately, he's a darn bad shot. It isn't serious."

"I was so tired," groaned Talbot, "always
movin' me on."

Behind me came heavy footsteps; and though
I tried to bar them, two detectives pushed
through the door. They forced me to one side,
and through the passage came the little Jew in
the sable coat, Mr. Adolf Aleck.

For a minute he stood staring, with wide, owl-
like eyes, at the drawn, haggard face on the pillow.

He then sank softly to his knees. In both ot
his hands he clasped the hand ot the card sharp.

"Heinel" he begged. "Don't you know me?
It's vour brother Adolt! Your brother Adolf!"



AIR PIRATES.

Oscar Heilbron, 'jj.
(This story won first place among the Freshmen stories.)

The large, all metal. Ford trimotor monoplane
was warming up in front of its hangar when I
arrived at France Field. After signing a ftw pa-
pers, I boarded the plane which was to take me to
Habana, Cuba. Three minutes later we were
soaring over Colon at an altitude of 10,000 feet.
The continuous hum ot the three "wasp" motors
was becoming monotonous as I sat in the small
wicker chair of the spacious cabin. The only
passenger besides myself was a man of short
stature dressed in a dark blue suit. About half
an hour later, I noticed that we were flying over
the ocean and, as there wasn't anything worth
looking at, I soon fell asleep.

It seemed as if I had slept for ages when
suddenly I was awakened by a lurch of the plane.
To my great surprise my hands and feet were
bound with a piece of woven copper wire. Every
few seconds the plane bucked as if out of control.
Through the window leading into the control
cabin I could see the co-pilot of the plane strug-
gling with a man, while the pilot was trying his
best to keep the plane on an even keel. The man,
whom I had seen before in the cabin with me,
finally overpowered the pilots leaving them uncon-



scious. The interloper immediately grabbed hold
of the controls and steered the plane back toward
the mainland. .After flying along the coast for
about three hours, he pointed the plane out toward
an island, which I judged to be about 30 miles from
the shore. This seemed to be our destination be-
cause in the center of the island there was a large
clearing which served as a landing field. From the
air the place seemed to be uninhabited, for all that
could be seen was tropical jungles. After circling
the island a few times, the man at the wheel brought
the plane to a landing. As soon as the plane
landed, we taxied toward a hangar, which had
been cunningly hidden so that it could not be
seen from the air. After turning off the motors,
the stranger stepped into the cabin and untying
my hands and feet, he motioned me to follow him.

He led me into a house that stood between the
two hangars. As we entered the house I glanced
back and saw the pilots of the plane being taken
away. Inside the building my captor motioned
me to sit down on a stool, which seemed to be the
only article of furniture in the room. Here I was
left alone. About ten minutes later, my captor
returned accompanied by a tall, bearded man.
The newcomer told me in very broken English
that, from now on, I was to consider myself
a prisoner of the notorious air pirates called the
"Black Hawks." I was taken down through a
long corridor and locked up in a small room. The
room was dark, for the only light came through a
small window on one side of the room. I was so
completely exhausted, that I lay down on the
cot and soon was fast asleep.

About five hours later I was awakened by a man
whom I thought, at first, to be one of my captors.
He proved to be one of the pilots of the plane that
had been captured. He whispered to me to
follow him. We jumped out of the window and
landed in the tall grass which surrounded the
building. After crawling though the grass for a
short distance, we met the co-pilot, who had been
waiting for us at the edge of the clearing. About
20 feet from us stood a trim Lockeed Vega, its
motor idling as it stood out in the moonlight.
The only person in sight was a mechanic, who was
walking toward the hangar. As soon as we saw
our chance, we made a dash for the plane. As
the last one of us entered the plane the mechanic
saw us and gave the alarm, but it was too late.
.As we "zoomed" off the field we saw two single-



THE CARIBBEAN.



59



seater fighting planes take off after us. Although
we had a fast plane, they soon caught up with
us and after circling around us a few times they
began to "pepper" us with their machine guns.
We were helpless since our plane was unarmed.
Our pilot was wounded twice, so I took him to
the rear of the cabin to give him first aid while
the co-pilot took the controls.

Suddenly there was a great explosion and a
blinding flash and I immediately knew that our



gas tank had been hit. I could see the pilot of
the plane fighting the flames in the control cabin.
As the plane fell out of control the earth seemed
to rush up to meet us. Then there was a crash
and everything went black.

I opened my eyes expecting to find myself in a
quiet hospital room with a pretty nurse at my
bedside, but instead, the room was dark and I
was lying on the floor. To my great disappoint-
ment I realized that it had all been a dream.




THE STUDENT'S NIGHTMARE.

Vivieti Elmgren, 'j2.

There is a time in everyone's life when his
troubles seem the greatest and his work the
hardest. Since I am no exception, this grievous
time in my life is during examinations. I in-
variably let things go until the last minute and
then try to strengthen myself for the puzzling
tests. Every year I make a resolution to be
prepared, but I have never kept it.

That is what happened this year. Before me lay
books of all kinds which I glared at with contempt.
I muttered over and over again, Henry VHI, of
England; Charles V, of Germany; Francis I, of
France. My mind was crammed with English,
Geometry, Latin, and History. I was unaware
of anything around me but my books.

Suddenly I became aware of the roaring of the
ocean and the wind. I was no longer in my home
but on Colon Beach. The moon was full and all
the stars were out. The palm trees stood
majestic and tall in the moonlight, their fronds
waving to and fro. While I was wondering how
I came to be there, I noticed a ship in the bay.
On observing the ship I discovered it was a
Spanish Galleon. Next I heard voices and soon
four men came upon me. Never have I seen a
more picturesque group. One was a pirate,
another a court dandy, another an ancient Greek,
and the fourth an ancient Roman. Their faces
seemed strangely familiar.



The pirate saw me first and cried, "What have
we here?"

The ancient Greek studied me carefully and at
last said, "Maybe I can find out by Geometry."

"Why not ask it who it is?" suggested the
Roman.

"There is no need to ask the person," answered
the court dandy, "for I know who he is. He is a
modern."

"Now that we know who he is," said the pirate,
"we must introduce ourselves."

"I shall take the honor," answered the dandy.
"I am Sir Francis Drake; this is the great pirate
Morgan; this is Euclid, and this is my friend
Julius Ctesar."

"How did you get in the bay?" I managed to
stammer.

"Ah!" exclaimed Euclid, "I worked that little
matter geometrically, using the right triangle
hypotenuse, and angle theorem. Do you know
if the fronds of these palm trees are equal?"

"I have told you many times, 'Clid, old boy,
that they were unequal when I conquered Colon."
Morgan told him.

"I must tell you the plan I used in capturing
Panama," Ctesar exclaimed. "First I sent my
cavalry reconnoitering around the city. Next
I sent my airplanes to drop tear bombs on the
city. My next step was to tear down the walls;
and having accomplished the hardest tasks, I
ordered my gunners to shoot laughing gas into the
town. I next entered the city in my Ford. It
did my heart good to see the English laughing.



6o



THE CARIBBEAN.



I had performed the almost impossible; I had
conquered the English."

"You must let me give you the real reason that
the English were laughing," began Sir Francis
Drake. "I was residing in the city at the time of
Caesar's conquest. That night my friends were
gathered in my apartment having a jolly time,
when we learned that Caesar had captured
Panama. The tear bombs and laughing gas did
not affect us, tor the English are not easily con-
quered. The thing that did break us and send us
into hysterics was Caesar. When he entered
Panama in his Ford, the people howled. I never
expect to see anything funnier. Haw! Haw!
Haw! Haw!" and soon Sir Francis was shaking with
laughter.

"I see nothing funny about that," Cresar
grumbled.

"I am positive that that palm tree is unequal to
any of the others; and can prove my reason by
angles opposite equal sides." Euclid declared,
specifing a certain tree.

"Who is interested in your geometry?" Morgan
complained. "I am going to tell our friend about
the time Ca?sar eloped with the Spanish Seno-
rita. Drake and I were dining with the French
Ambassador when all of a sudden our dinner was
interrupted by a soldier bringing news that
Caesar had eloped with a Spanish Senorita in his
tin-lizzy. I can just see Julius driving his rattle-
trap with one hand. But they didn't get far, for
Caesar ran out of gas and the Spanish soldiers
captured them."

I noticed that Casar was quite angry by this
time because he was being made the victim of all
their jokes. Euclid sulked because no one would
listen to him talk about geometry. Drake and
Morgan were growing happier every minute.

I gathered all my courage together and cried,
"All of you are wrong. Casar never captured
Panama. Morgan never conquereti Colon. The
English never occupied Panama, and Euclid
can't prove the palm trees are equal. In fact,
you are all liars."

The men stared at me and all began to talk
at once. Ca;sar and Euclid could hold in their
wrath no longer. Morgan and Sir Francis stopped
laughing. Then my one-time friends turned on me
and soon I would have been no more if suddenly
everything had not been shattered by a loud
noise. I woke up when I fell off my chair.



ICE!

Elsie Neely, 'j3.

It was on a Monday during vacation that I
first became a bit suspicious. I was busy in the
kitchen when the iceman's yell greeted me.
"Ice!" As usual, I hurried to the ice box and
removed the butter, the pitcher, and several
other articles. I turned back to my work and
was occupied fully three minutes before I heard
the iceman slam in the ice. I turned suddenly
just in time to see an understanding glance pass
between him and the maid. I went on with my
work and the maid disappeared into the next
room.

As I left the kitchen, I met the maid reentering.
I went on, not even glancing toward her. I had
heard the iceman leave, and now, when the door
slammed again I knew that she, too, had left.
My curiosity being aroused I went to the window,
from which I had a clear view of the back yard.
I was not surprised at what I saw and heard.

"Freeta, me love, I favoring to see you in de
night."

"Jim, I don' see how I'se goin' wait 'til de
time don' come."

"I seeing you later, den', eh!"

"I'se goin'."

The following evening about six o'clock, as we
were dining, I heard a "sisssst." I often hear
such noises so my attention was not attracted.
This peculiar calling sound, by the way, is called
the "Panamanian love call." We were ready
for the dessert, still FVeeta did not appear.

"Freeta, dessert, please." No response.

"Freeta, we are waiting," I raised my voice.
Still no response.

My anger was rising, as I could not understand
what was detaining her. When I remembered,
I rose quietly, went into the kitchen, and began
to serve the dessert myself. Sounds of voices
came to me from the yard. I listened.

"I don come early, Chiquita, I not having a
t'ing to do."

"I don finish as yet, I'se practic'ly don "ahora."

We finished dinner without any further dis-
turbance. The dishes were washed to the tune of
"I can't give }'ou anything but love, baiby."

A week later a tourist friend of mine expressed
a desire to visit native dwellings, in order to get a



THE CARIBBEAN.



6i



glimpse ot how they live here in Panama. It
was on a Thursday afternoon during one of our
sightseeing walks that we passed a church.
Some special ceremony was going on within. We
entered and seated ourselves on the pew which is
always left vacant for visitors. The strong odor
of various perfumes which came to us made us
breathe heavily.

We looked about us. The church was lavishly
over-decorated with white flowers and ribbons.
There was a bustle and a contusion not usual in a
church. Suddenly a hush came over the congre-
gation. The church was crowded, and the in-
creasing odor of incense and cheap perfumes
became quite unpleasant. The organ played a
few notes and the silence became more evident.
The choir joined the organ; then the whole mob
rose and sang regardless of the fact that very few
hymn books could be seen. As the hymn ended
and the people sat down again the organ began
"Here comes the bride."

"Do you realize," I whispered to my companion,
"that we are witnessing a marriage ceremony?"

Now, from my own experience with negro maids,
I know that they save earnestly and actually de-
prive themselves of food in order to be able to
dress well for a wedding, whether it be their own
or their neighbor's. They save for months.
Their reward comes at last when the day of the
big event arrives. Then they deck themselves in
all their finery and strut proudly to church. The
men wear black tuxedoes, tall silk hats, and white
gloves. The women have the most expensive
quality of material m their clothes. White is a
favorite color, while gay, gaudy reds, blues,
yellows, and greens are second.

This wedding was certainly a typical one. I
heard the procession entering from the back of the
church, so I turned to get a clear view of the bride
and "lucky groom." The bride was dressed
in a long, too-full, white dress. Her very long
veil trailed magnificently on the ground. In her
arms she held an immense bouquet trimmed with
big white bows. The groom was as finely dressed
as his bride. He wore a suit of white striped
flannel trousers and a long black swallow-tail
coat. His black shoes shone and gleamed as the
light reflected on them.

As the procession neared I turned to see the
face of the blushing bride. It was Freeta! One
thought came to me. "Who was the groom?"
Again I turned and faced the groom the iceman.



FIRE

Hairy Egolf, 'j2.

It was midnight, all was quiet, when suddenly,
both of the hard-worked firemen of the GatLin
station were rudely awakened by the sound of
the fire gong.

The call came from box 27, at the Agua Clara
Pump Station. The person at the box rang the
bell furiously as if all her worldly goods were
going up in smoke.

The firemen tried to start the fire engine. The
Ford refused, so they pushed it to the edge of a
hill where it was started by letting it roll.

The truck went at its full speed of 25 miles an
hour, until it came to a steep hill where it stalled
just as it reached the top. The firemen, with the
help of a soldier, pushed the truck over the brow,
and then the brakes refused to function. The
man driving kept at the horn, the other man rang
the bell. The road to the pumping station turned
off the main road at the bottom of the hill, but the
car went straight past the turn. The firemen
had to go a quarter of a mile farther before they
could come to a stop. They then turned and started
back, reaching the fire plug without mishap.

Suddenly there was a scream from a house
built back off the road. The firemen attached
the hose to the plug; one man started with the
hose toward the house, giving the signal to turn
on the water as he ran. A fire hose nozzle can
be regulated so as to send any size stream of
water desired. At this time the nozzle was closed.
When the sudden pressure reached the hose, it
burst, water going all over the lawn.

Just then a woman rushed out frantically
telling the firemen to leave the hose and run to the
house. The firemen picked up two hand extin-
guishers and ran. They looked for fire, but could
not see any flame or smoke, .^gain the woman
screamed and pointed to a ladder leading to the
roof. The firemen, thinking the fire was on the
roof, immediately climbed the ladder. Still no
signs of fire.

A voice from below cried out, "It's on the strip
of tin along the peak of the roof."

The firemen looked again and what should
they see but an old cat, which had climbed a tree
adjoining the house, and was afraid to climb down.

The noble fire fighters saved the cat, were
profusely thanked by the woman, and began the
homeward struggle.



62



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE LOCKS.

Allene Deakins, '32.
(Prize poem in poetry contest.)

Far .ihead the tunnel winds.

As the night-watch malies his rounds,

Many things come to his mind

While he listens for the sounds

Of the distant ships approaching.

Gates will open, gates will close,

And the water as it changes

From each chamber, roars and flows.

Bells will ring, a whistle blows.

Voices shout to those below.

Little thought comes trom the docks

Of the mighty power of the locks.



THE SCHOOL BELL.

(Or; What Poe Forgot to Mention.)

Elsie Darley, jo.
(Third place in poetry contest,)

Hear the tolling of the bell wretched bell!

What a day of tiresome toil it's noisy clangs foretell!

How it beckons, beckons, beckons, in

The sunny morning air

To our Latin and our Physics

And our English and our Civics

From delightful daylight fair!

How we hasten lest we're tardy when we hear the second knell

Of that bell, bell, bell, bell, bell,

When we hear the second knolling of the bell!



THE LUCKY ONES.

Edward Conklingy 'jt.
(Second place in poetry contest.)

The people on the billboards,
They have lots of fun;
They smoke a certain cigarette
And all their goals are won.

They never fret or worry,
They're always bright and gay,
They use the right electric range
And their work becomes as play.

The people on the billboards
Wear everlasting smiles.
They always pick the tire that lasts
Some ten thousand miles.

They always choose tobacco

That can not bite the tongue.

And the soap that keeps the woman's face

.Always fresh and young.

I'm glad that on the billboards
Life is full and free,
Because along the public roads
There is little else to see.



A POET TO HIS GIRL.

IVilliam Newman, 'jo.
(on second THOVGHT.) (As interpreted by Fitty.)

I'd fight for you,
I'd spite for you,
I'd sit up all the night for you.

I'd luss for you,
I'd cuss tor you,
I'd smash an omnibus for you.

I'd read for you,

I'd speed for you,

I'd go without my feed for you.

I'd row for you,

I'd go for you,

I'd spend all ot my dough lor you.

I'd ride tor you,
I'd slide for you,
I'd give up all my hide for you.



ACCOMPLISHMENT.

Crawford Campbell, '?/.

We try hard to accomplish something
Otherwise than to be fed;
If our lives are false and shallow.
When we die we shall be Dead.



I'd toil for you,
I'd boil for you,
I'd eat a peck of soil for you.

I'd cry for you,

I'd lie for you,

BUT DARN ME IF I'D DIE FOR YOU!



THE CARIBBEAN.



63



THE LETTER.

Elsie Darley, 'jo.

John Brown was a sophomore,
Not different from the rest.
Except that girls to him were just
A lot of wretched pests.

The reason tor this attitude

I shall proceed to tell.

For ere this reason happened

John thought that girls were swell.

One girl to him was all the world;
Her name was Lila Crutch.
She was his Greta Garbo, and
He worshipped her as such.

But Lila Crutch was popular
And rather indiscreet;
S/ie treated /lim as nothing
But the dirt beneath her feet.

The looks he gave expressing love
She did not deign to see;
He tried to speak his passion.
But not an ear lent she.

One day, idling in Study Hall
He thought he'd write a note;
He poised his pen, then set about;
And this is what he wrote:

"Oh Lila dear, dear Lila Crutch
I love you much, I love you much;
It you a look but to me gave
I'd be fore'er your faithful slave."

He wrote this out with flourishes,
(But not without a blot)
While thinking what a genius
For poetry he had got.

When "Lila dear" received this note,
She gave a cruel smile.
Took out some paper, filled her pen,
.And thought a little while.

The tollowing day a note John found
Inscribed "To deur ]ohn Brown;"
But while he read his joyous grin
Changed to an angry frown:

"Oh Johnnie Brown, oh Johnnie Brown

I hate you up I hate you down;

I think you are a bumptious ass

I don't want any more of your bally sass.

(Or I'll read your note in English class.)"

To portray Johnnie's feelings then.
Words to me do fail;
Leaving you to imagine them,
I end my little tale.



IN CARNIVAL TIME.
Crawford Campbell, 'j/.

All sorrows have ended;
All joys have begun;
Join in the merrymaking;
Join in the fun.

The streets are crowded
With people and paper;
My it's a sight, but
It'll end later.

.All colors e're known
Are seen floating there.
On people, cars, coaches,
.All buildings aflare.

Noises of all kinds;
Instruments and voices;
Sound in the tumult
Of happy rejoicers.

At last come the floats
So majestic, serene.
Covered with confetti.
Red, yellow, and green.

The queens in their turrets
Look out ofi the crowds;
The moving flotillas.
All move like bright clouds.

Now it IS over;
The gayety and fun;
The queens have gone;
The rejoicing is done.

AN OCCURRENCE.
Virginia Stevenson, 'jo.

Grab your books the bell has rung.

Cram and be pushed and for your class run.

You know your teacher is a crank.

The one that acts like "Mama spank."

Take a minute to powder your nose,

Paint your lips or fix your clothes;

Again the clang, the bell has gone!

Enter your class and hear his song

"Get an admit you are late,

You and that other girl," Oh! Fate;

Then you go to the office on a run

The Principal says, "I can't give you one."

You miss your class

And to the study hall go

And lose the work and get a zero.

The very next day you walk into class

Your face unpowdered, and bold as brass.

The tardy bell sounds,

In the class room you wait.

In saunters the teacher on/y five minutes late.



64



THE CARIBBEAN.



A SONG FROM THE WIND TO THE PALM.

rirpnia Stevenson, 'jo.

Her stately arms she stretches high
To both the left and right.
The sun upon them shines all day
And the moon throughout the night.

The gentle breeze blows through her leaves

And whispers tales of old;

It tells of kings and riches royal,

Of ladies and pirates bold.

"Columbus," whispered first this wind,
He sailed these oceans, too;
He found this land and started homes
For people just like you."

"Morgan, Morgan, feared was he,"
Then it gently sighed.
"He stole and plundered and he killed
On his journeys wide."

It whistled for a little while

.And tried its best to tell.

A breaking, creaking crash was heard,

'Twas only a frond that fell.

It hushed and then continued,
This tale of men of old.
The Frenchmen were the next in line;
Of their deeds it readily told.

"They were the first in this great land
Who tried to dig this ditch.
They slaved all night and day by hand
And never did get rich."

Again it paused to gather breath
For the story it had to tell,
Of .Americans who worked to death,
But who conquered the "living hell."

"They made the lake and waterway
They fought both land and sea.
For in 1914, they opened this ditch
.And set world commerce free."

The palm trees rustled, swayed, were still.
Breathless, the wind went down.
It had told a tale of might and will,
Which produced a world-known town.

RED ANTS.

Vivian Elmgren, 'j2.

I

As I sit gazing at the sky;
Watching the clouds pass merrily by.
Suddenly my thoughts are scattered away
By the prickling bite of an insect gay.



II



And looking down at my knee I behold,
A nice red ant sitting there so bold.
I sweep him from his chosen place,
.^nd he lands upon a grassy space.



Ill



Once more I return to my wandering thoughts.
But soon they are scattered, now what?
The place of my dreamy rest
Was a nice big red ant's nest.



YOU TELL ME.

Mary Dean, 'j2.

When I've a smudge upon my face,

You tell me!

Whenever my shoes become unlaced.

You tell me!

And if I've gained a pound or two;

If there are freckles breaking through;

It doesn't matter what I do

You tell me!



THE STORM.

Vivian Elmgren, 'j2.

I.

A dreary day, a stormy night.
Oh, how the wind does fume and fight.
The gods of storm to battle ride
With darkened clouds against the sky.

II.

The rain in torrents fills the streets.
Like marching drums the thunder beats.
The sky is lighted and we see
The gods of storm ride to victory.

III.

A stillness o'er the land is sent;
Again is joy, peace, and content.
Life goes on with joys and sorrows,
But a storm will come again to-morrow.



THE CARIBBEAN.



65



THE MEMORY L1\ES.
Basil Frank, Ex. 'jl.

The years may come; the years may go;
The rains may fall; the winds may blow!
The hands of Time may move quite fast.
And many a man be of the past.
But, the memory lives on.

The memory lives; the thoughts come back!
.'^h, there's the field, and there's the shack!
The place lights up as if to show
Me the faces I used to know.
Yes, the memor\' lives on.

My heartstrings tug; my eyes grow damp.
I hear their voices! I hear the tramp
Of feet as up the aisle they walk,
And I try hard but can not talk.
Yet their souls live on!

My poor head swims. I can not see!
My ears don't hear! What can it be?
I'll join thee, schoolmates, in a long, deep sleep.
For the hand of death shall make its sweep.
But, more'll come on!

The seas may roar and mountains fall;
.Cities crumble; e'en Death may call.
And pals go down in the cold, damp ground.
Their souls on an upward journey bound,
Still the memorv lives on!



BACK TO SCHOOL.
Jl''alter H. Bundy, '31.

When October rolled around once more,

School bells began to toll.
We all were there, prepared to work,

When the teacher called the roll.

The Freshmen all grew grey with fear

Of the horrors to be seen,
If the clippers revealed their foolish heads

Till they looked like a Boston bean.

The Soph's strutted 'round like Indian Braves,

But still had a secret fear
That the clippers would work on their coconuts

As they did in their freshman year.

The Juniors looked worried, no one knew why,
But they thought of the drastic way

That teachers have of making them work,
W'hen they much preferred to play.

The Seniors paraded through the halls.
All ablaze in their new-found glory.

Then the faculty worked on them
But that's another story.

Still as a whole they all were there

Prepared to struggle hard,
For C's and B's and maybe A's,

To put upon their card.



NOW.

Rose Corrigan.
Special.

The world h'aint like it uster be.
That's a way it 'pears to me;
Cause, with all this modern science
Man ain't got no self-reliance.

Now when I was a young teller
Satterdays, I'd clean out the cellar.
But nowa days, with 'partments up so high,
Soon, the kids '11 have to dust the sky.

'Course when I was young, I'd get pretty wild,
But toward these moderns, Lordy, I was mild;
I was given a limping pony, in my eighteenth year
But now, those whirlin', twistin' aeroplanes is here.

But then o' course, I'm not complainin'
Not tur all th' world do they need tamin'
Because fur all this modern science
Those kids have got their self reliance.



SCHOOL.

ll'alter H. Bundy, 'jf.

This school term is ending fast.
And soon no more will be.
We know next week will be the last
Of work, of bells, of geometry.

And when the last, long bell has tolled.
And we leave the well-known halls.
For rats, for bugs, for snakes to pull
The plaster from the walls.

Then we'll sigh, and groan, and say,
"I know that school is past,
But when I think of the work and play,
I'm sorry it didn't last."

But forget the past, it can't come back,
.And think ot the times to be.
For the spirit ot school will never lack
A place in our memory.



66



THE CARIBBEAN.



MISFORTUNE.

Be/Jing King, 'j2.

On a hill far away

Stood my old Chevrolet,

Its top was tattered and torn;

I traded it in

For an old Ford coupe

-And saw that old Chewy no more.

For a year and a day

Ran the old Ford coupe

Till at last, one day, it broke down,

Then the junk man said

He'd give it a bed,

.And now I am walking lo town.



CALAMITY.

Howard Keeiian, 'j2.

The boy stood in the bath tub,
.AH covered up with soap,
Rocking gently to and fro.
For he was on a boat.

.\ woman came walking down the hall,
When all of a sudden she fell
The boy grabbed up a bathrobe,
And stammered, "What the Well!

The woman turned up her nose and said,
"Oh, such language vile."
The boy then said, "Well please get out,
.And stay out for quite a while."




THE LURE OF THE TROPICS.

Elsie Dar/ey, 'jo, and Delia J. Raymond, 'jo.

No one who has not actually lived there knows
what is meant by the lure of the tropics.

Only those who have lived in the magic zone
long enough to make it their home, have ex-
perienced the magnetic power which makes them
want to return after they have left. Notwith-
standing their assertions to the contrary, it is the
mysterious call of the tropics that lures them back.

Perhaps it is speaking too broadly to say, that
everyone upon arrival is immediately enamoured
of the place, because there are many people who
develop a dislike for the country and leave by the
next boat. It may be because they can not
adapt themselves to a different type of life. But
there is no medium. The place is either loved or
hated.

There must be something which makes the
tropics so favorable. Is it the jungles that sur-
round us? Is it the rainy season with its sudden,
breath-taking downpours? Perhaps it is the
happy-go-lucky life about the the tropics that is
part of the lure. Perhaps it is because Panama
is progressing so rapidly and is getting to be a
"big place" in the world. Maybe some day
someone will have thought it all cnit.



HISTORY OF PANAMA AND COLON.

Mavis Thirlwall, 'jo.

Panama and Colon, gateways to the great
Canal, were established long before the oceans
were united. In fact, in no more than a century
after the discovery of the New World, both of
these towns were important in romance, explora-
tion, and commerce.

After Columbus had sailed along the coast of
what is now Panama, a host of other Spaniards
came, establishing the little settlement of Darien.
Using this as a base, Balboa explored the jungle,
and finally, from a hill in Darien, saw the great
Pacific. The settlement which became known
as Panama, however, was not established until
1 519. This name Panama is a native name
meaning "One who fishes in river or ocean."
Later on, in 1538, the "Real Audienciade Panama"
was established. This governed the territory far
north and about 100 miles south.

As other settlements grew up and colonists
arrived led by the stories of gold and treasure, an
immense traffic grew. Finally from a mere path
through the jungle a "camino real" was construct-
ed across the Isthmus. The terminus on the
Atlantic side was Porto Bello, which figured
greatly in shipping, also.



THE CARIBBEAN.



67



This prosperity incited the envy of the English
and Europeans. Sir Francis Drake raided the
settlements many times. His body is said to be
buried in the bay of the town which is now Colon.

It was Henry Morgan, however, who completed
the entire destruction of Panama, in 1671. Only
vine covered walls and half ruined bridges remain
to-day of this town.

When the Spaniards built up their new town
they chose a rather high and rocky peninsula. A
great stone seawall, which is said to have cost
|i 1,000, was built for defense against further at-
tacks. Most of the seawall remains to-day. An
attractive walk or promenade has been made of it,
and it has been named "La Boveda." The houses
were built of stone with windows high above the
ground. The streets were narrow. The dun-
geons, several of which may be seen to-day, were
horrible.

As years went by, Panama grew but slowly.
The first great move toward its progress was made
in 1855, when the two towns at either coast,
Panama and Colon (then Aspinwall), were
united by rail. The financing and building of
this long-needed railroad was done by Americans,
among whom were William Aspinwall and John
Stephens. The work was accomplished after five
years of difficulties and dangers.

Mr. Aspinwall was also the leading spirit in the
establishment of the trans-Pacific line of steam-
ships and the Pacific Mail Steamship Company.

Then came the French attempt to build a canal.
For seven years the work went on. But disease,
waste, and theft finally overcame this enterprise
and the work was finally discontinued.

The United States realized the possibilities, or
in fact the need of this waterway, and they pur-
chased the rights of the French company. This
time the work was carried through and in 1914
the great way was opened.

The sanitation, which had been a vital factor
in the building of the Canal, was also completed
by the United States. Col. William C. Gorgas
was appointed chief sanitary officer, and under
his strict and efficacious inspection, Panama
gradually became a healthful place.

The Republic of Panama is divided into nine
provinces. Panama and Colon are under control
of the Panamanian Government, although they
are within the area of the Canal Zone. Each prov-
ince has its "gobernador" under whom are the



lesser officials, alcaldes, who with the "concejo"
municipal, govern the towns and cities.

Panama City is the capital, and therefore the
home of the President, the seat of the Assembly,
and the residence of local officials.



THE POPULATION OF PANAMA.

Il'm. Harmon, 'j/.

The total population of the Republic of Panama
exceeds 450,000 people. This, of course, does not
include those in the Canal Zone itself.

Of this population the whites, or pure Spaniards
make up 60,000. The total number of half
Indian and half white is somewhat greater than
200,000 persons. The negroes, which come to
Panama from different parts of the West Indies,
now number more than 100,000. There are
approximately 50,000 Indians in Panama, the
San Bias tribes being the most important.
Strange as it may seem, there are over 5,000 of the
yellow race in Panama. These people however,
do not go into the interior so much, but are center-
ed about Colon and Panama City principally.
A few, however, take to gardening on a small scale.
There are 75,000 foreigners on the Isthmus and
10,000 more men than women.

The population of Panama City is well over
70,000, and is twice as large as its nearest rival.
Colon, which has a population of slightly more
than 35,000.



RESOURCES OF PANAMA.

Walter Wikingstad, 'jo.

Only about three-eighths of the country of
Panama is occupied, and of this area but a small
proportion is properly cultivated. The L^nited
Fruit Company has about 35,000 acres devoted to
banana raising, this being the most important
cultivated product. Every tropical product may
be grown to perfection, and in the hills and
mountains practically all fruits and vegetables of
temperate zones may easily be raised. There is
no reason why Panama should not produce
enough fruits, vegetables, and other agricultural
products to supply the entire Republic, and the
Canal Zone in addition, and yet, nearly all the
vegetables and fruits used on the Zone are im-



68



THE CARIBBEAN.



ported; and a large part ot those sold in Colon
and Panama City are brought from other countries.
Other products besides the banana include coffee,
cocoa, coconuts, sugar, tobacco, and various
dyestufFs and medicinal products. With the
present program of motor roads penetrating the
interior, there is no reason why a good living
should not be made by agriculturists in Panama.

In the old Spanish colonial days, cattle raising
was the chief industry aside from mining, but
to-day there are not over 200,000 head of cattle
in the entire Republic. Scrawny, poor, tough
cattle are the results of very little attention given
to breeding.

Good horses are not raised in the Republic, but
fairly good native ponies are. The majority are
miserable, undersized, thin and weak. Mules
are scarce and very high priced. Estimates place
the total number of horses and mules in Panama
at about 40,000.

Around the Perlas Islands the pearl fishing is
very lucrative, but it is not carried out to any
great extent. The waters of Panama teem with
fish, but the present fisheries do not fill all of the
demands of the cities and of the Zone.

Panama possesses nearly every common mineral
except coal, but they are scarcely mined. Among
them are granite, limestone, copper, iron, lead,
mica, nickel, oil, silver, tin, and gold. In the
old Spanish days, Panama was sacked by pirates
for its gold, and gold is still found in the famous
Darien mine and in practically every stream.

Panama is very rich in timber. In the forests
are many valuable cabinet, building, ornamental,
and dye woods. As a rule, the valuable woods
are scattered and are therefore not so accessible.



THE BRIDGE OF THE WORLD.

Mavis Thirlwall, 'jo.

Panama, the land ot eternal romance has had,
from early days, an important position in the
world. In the fifteenth century it was named
"The Bridge of the World." This romantic name
was given because Panama was really used as a
bridge to the rich, gold-producing countries in
Central and South .America.

During the eighteenth century, conditions in
Panama became very bad, and she soon lost her
name, "The Bridge of the World."



Very little was heard of Panama until the dis-
covery of gold in California, in 1849. Thousands
of people went by way of Panama, which was then
a veritable pest hole of disease.

Panama soon realized her opportunities and
built a railroad in 1855. Then the "Bridge of the
World" was again fulfilling its name.

The year 1903 saw Panama win her independ-
ence from Colombia. This event is celebrated
every year on November 3, with fiestas and fire-
works. Then, in 1914, the great Canal was open-
ed to traffic by the .Americans, and Panama, "The
Bridge of the World," became the world's highway
in truth.

Panama has also been called "The Crossroads
of the World." Since the recent development of
large airplane stations in Panama, a more modern
and less romantic name has been applied to her,
"The Crossroads of the .Air."



THE PANAMA RAILROAD.

E/sie Darky, 'jo.

A concession was granted to William H. .Aspin-
wall, Henry Chauncey, and John L. Stephens in
1848, to build a railroad across the Isthmus.
Work was begun in May, 1850, and the railroad
was finished by January, 1855.

The original railroad followed the valley of the
Chagres River from Gatun to Gamboa, but this
part is now submerged in Gatun Lake, the Canal
itself following the route of the old railroad very
closely. From Gamboa it crossed the divide
through the present site of Culebra, from there
through Paraiso and the bed of what is now Mira-
flores Lake to Panama. It was acquired by the
United States in 1904, but is was not found
possible to use much ot the old road when the
Canal was built, so it was relaid to run almost
parallel with the Canal to the eastward. The
cost of relocation was $8,866,393.

The present railroad is 48 miles long and runs
from Colon to Panama with stations at Mount
Hope, Fort Davis, Gatun, Monte Lirio, Frijoles,
Darien, Gamboa, Obispo, Summit, Pedro Miguel,
Red Tank, Miraflores, Fort Clayton, Corozal, and
Balboa. The rates are high, a first-class return
costing S4.80. The crossing of the Isthmus by
train takes two hours or approximately one quarter
of the time taken by steamers.



THE CARIBBEAN.



69



SAN BLAS INDIANS.

Alice Henter, 'jo.

The San Bias Indians habitate islands less than
100 miles from Colon. These islands are said to
be tree from the usual pesky insects ot the tropics,
and from wild animals.

The San Bias Indians cultivate only what they
need tor themselves. On the mainland can be
found patches of corn, yams, sugar cane, and rice.
Unlike most uncivilized people, their women do
little work in the field.

Although these people have been m contact with
Europeans since the sixteenth century, the\' had,
until about ten years ago, maintained racial
purity. Their language which is very simple,
consisting ot only 500 words, and their culture
shows South American origin. The white Indians
are also found amongst the San Bias people, but
this has been caused only from hereditary albinism.

The San Bias Indians have kept their independ-
ence by opposing all foreign settlement. They
used to take great pride in boasting that no
stranger had ever passed the night on their islands.
'They are not a war-like race, but they have
peculiar beliefs. Their women are well guarded
and seldom seen.

The San Bias Indians are found to be very
intelligent and eager to learn. They have a very
peculiar appearance, however, being very short
and having large box-sized heads. They have
somewhat the same color as the North American
Indian.

They are fond of bright colors, and their dress
is very odd. The men wear cotton shirts and
trousers, which by the way, they make them-
selves. The women wear skirts which are merely
long pieces of cloth wrapped around them. They
also wear rings in their noses and in their ears.
They wear no rings on their fingers, however, until
they are married, and then it is customary only to
wear the wedding ring.

The San Bias Indian's love of color is brought
out distinctly in their handwork. The women
are very adept at copying all kinds ot patterns.
They often copy designs from boxes or even flour
or sugar sacks. Many times, people have been
surprised to find that they have purchased a
blanket made by the San Bias Indians with a
Gold Medal flour, or some such pattern worked
on it.



ONE OF THE STREET SCENES OF COLON.

James C. JVood, 'j2.

The scenes on the "calles" and "avenidas" of
Colon are varied, numerous and interesting.
People and customs from the world over are
represented, although our more trequent street
companions are Panamanians, Americans, West
Indians, Chmese, and Hindus.

Of all these scenes, the more local is the ".Alma-
cen." This (store-affair) is usually a two by four
hole cut into the wall. They are run bv West
Indians and are therefore located in the negro
sections. There are more of them on Bolivar
Street than in any other one street of Colon.
The lowly wares sold in these stores are bananas,
coconuts, oranges, bread, avocados (alligator
pears), and fried fish. What a combination; but
they are sold just the same. When one passes b}',
the store attendant may be seen frying the fish
or baking the bread over the charcoal stoves.
The "Almacen" is really a curious looking scene.



BARRO COLORADO ISLAND.

Thomas L. Coley,jr., 'jo.

During the building of the Canal the Chagres
valley was flooded in order to make what is now
known as Gatun Lake. The animals, who in-
habited this region, were forced a little farther
back each day as the water rose. Finally when the
lake was full, many of these animals found them-
selves stranded on hilltops that were now islands.
The largest of these islands in 1923, was set aside
by the Governor of the Canal Zone as a forest
preserve. It is known as Barro Colorado, which
in English means "red clay." It is about six
miles square, covered with dense jungle and well
stocked with animals. No hunting or destruction
ot trees is permitted there, as the island is to be
kept as a place where people may come and see
animals in their native haunts.

Barro Colorado is also the home of several
scientists who are studying the animals and their
habits. These men live in a small building over-
looking Barro Colorado's little harbor.

Some ot the many animals which inhabit the
island are the coati, a member of the raccoon
family, the well-known porcupine, the sloth, a
laz)' animal somewhat resembling the monkev in



THE CARIBBEAN.



appearance, the armadillo, and monkeys ot all
kinds. Many beautiful birds may also be seen
on the island. Snakes, spiders, and all .types of
insects are found in abundance. To me, just the
sight of any of these creatures in their native
homes would make a trip to the Barro Colorado
well worth while.



CRISTOBAL IN 1 904-1 906.

Delia Raymond, '?o.

It seems funny these days to hear of the days
in 1904 and 1906 when the first .American
families started to come to Panama.

I always enjoy hearing my f'jlks tell about the
times they used to have when they first came down
here. Naturally, for the first few months it was
hard to get accustomed to the ways and means
of Panama, after having lived in the United
States.

First of all the houses were not like they are
now. The few houses that there were were on
rollers and had to be moved from one place to
another. My brothers used to have a great time
trying to find our house when they would come
home in the evening. They would leave the
house early in the morning, and every night
when they would return they'd be all prepared to
go on the nightly search for the house. To hear
them talk about it now, it must have been great
fun to go looking for one's home every night,
but I can imagine their feelings when they had to
do it then.

There were just a few white people, but there
was plenty of other company. The colored
people lived in tents that surrounded the houses
of the white people. The place was mostly
swamps, and in the evenings there were many
serenades to be heard. These serenades were
given not only by the colored people, but by the
frogs from the swamps.

The sanitation was impossible. Many of the
inhabitants died or were deathly sick from
malaria. The food was not so appetizing. My
mother often tells us how she used to have to
send to my grandmother in New York for vege-
tables and other victuals that could not be ob-
tained here.

The streets were not streets at all. They were
nothing but boardwalks. There was even a



"main boardwalk" that took you to town (it
was called the town). The Government had just
started to build decent streets, and that was one
reason why the houses were placed on rollers, so
as to move them out of the way.

The Commissary was altogether different from
what it is now. It was nothing but a small shack
where both the white and the black people did
their purchasing. One had to do his shopping
in a hurry because if he stayed in the place too
long he would "pass out" from the unpleasant
odors.

The stores in "town" were not like they are
now. They too were nothing but tiny shacks.
Some were not even shacks.

It certainly seems funny now, but it must have
been rather unpleasant living here in those first
days.



GATUN LAKE ON A MOONLIGHT NIGHT.

James C. H'ood, '^2.

On a moonlight night, Gatun Lake is a sight to
see. The moonlight reflects on the rippli-ng water,
as if to be a silvery highway stretching from shore
to shore. Bordering this silvery reflection, on
either side, is the darker water. Both form a
striking contrast. Dotting the scene are the
decaying trees of a former jungle, standing like
sentinels on guard duty. Farther on in the back-
ground is the mountainous shoreline. Lying over
the horizon are the lazy, black clouds, with their
edges tinted silver by the moon. A dead stillness
envelopes the whole region. This quietness is
broken by the occasional bark of the lake dweller's
pet dog. The lake is truly a sight to see on a
moonlight night.



PEARLS IN PANAMA.

Eleanor Fitzgerald, 'jo.

Some time ago, a boy, while wading along the
shore of Panama Bay, picked up an oyster and
found in it a pearl which he sold for $3,000, and
which the purchaser took to Paris and sold for
$ 1 2,000.

The early European navigators seemed to have
a great desire to fish for the pearl-bearing oyster
and Columbus himself had a great interest in the
pearls which the uncivilized natives possessed.



THE CARIBBEAN.



71



The Isthmus ot Panama curves a great ileal
and forms a sort ot horseshoe shape. There are
two ocean currents that meet about a hundred
miles off the coast ot Panama. One ot these
comes from the North American coast, the other
comes up the South American coast. The meet-
ing of these two currents produce an unusual
effect on the tides, causing a rise and fall of 22
feet. Perhaps the tides have little to do with the
oyster but it is known that one may walk out far
from Panama City on the muddy botton of the
bay when it is low tide, and once in a while oysters
may even be seen along the ground. Who knows
but what they may contain a pearl of some value.

About 50 miles southeast of the shoreline of
Panama are a group of islands known as the
Perlas Islands. There are about 40 small islands
in all, the largest called Rey, or King. It is not
hard to find some way of visiting these historical
spots. The simplest and most comfortable method
is the steam launch, although too, one can always
find numerous small sail boats run by natives.
The trip takes about five or six hours, or even a
whole day, starting early and returning after dark.
Even then that only gives a hurried view of the
islands.

Saboga, one of the islands, is the place where it
is said the people live on coconuts, and fish for
pearl oysters as a diversion. The fishermen on
this island go forth at dawn. Each boat contains
a few divers who are certain just where the best
results are obtained. On each dive a diver brings
up one oyster. The limit seems to be six dives
which they consider sufficient for a day's work.
The Panamanian divers, unlike most other divers,
remain in the water a shorter length of time, but
make more dives. All pearl divers are short-lived.

In Panama City there is an old church, built
by Spanish colonizers. The towers of this old
cathedral are thickly studded with mother-of-
pearl shells, which have been obtained from the
Pearl Island fisheries.



PANAMA HATS.

Maria Stewart, Special Student.

Ripley tells us in his "Believe it or not," that
Panama hats are not made in Panama.

That is true. Panama hats, so-called because
they are marketed through Panama, are sold



throughout the shops of Colon and Panama at
prices far below those in the States.

The best hats come from Monte Cristi, in
Ecuador, but the shops in Panama and Colon
frequently pass off inferior Colombian and Peru-
vian hats for the genuine Monte Cristi.

The hat, a fine hand-plaited hat, is made from
the young leaves of a palm-like plant native
to Central America and Colombia. The leaves
are gathered before maturity and the soft parts
are removed. The fibers are soaked in water to
render them pliable. The weaving is done by
hand. The best hats are maele of a single leaf
and are therefore uniform in quality and tint.

It is very easy to distinguish them as the
Ecuadorian hats are started with a circular weave
in the center of the crown, while the others have
a square or squarish pattern. The quality and
price of a Panama hat depend upon the fineness
of the weave, the evenness, the color, the uniform
size of the straw, or rather palm, the finish of the
edges, and many other details.

The fiber producing plant and stemless crew
pine, has been introduced into the Philippines,
and the natives there have become expert manu-
facturers of these hats. The great centers of
manufacture of Panama hats are the Central
American states and the countries on the coasts
of northern and western South .America.



RUBBER.

Howard Keenan, '^2.

Rubber was first found by the Indians in the
Western Hemisphere. When Columbus came
over he found them playing with rubber balls.
This rubber would rebound when it hit a hard
object. It would not do for modern articles
because it was too soft and had to be mixed with
sulphur. Sulphur was not known then.

Rubber is an elastic gum made from the milky
juice of a number of plants which grow in
tropical and semitropical regions of the world.
The juice is milk white. First, a vertical channel
is cut down the side of the tree, and then diagonal
cuts connecting with this are made on both sides.
This is called tapping. The tapping is done early
in the morning, and the latex or juice is gathered
a few hours later.



THE CARIBBEAN.



If' the latex is allowed to stand the rubber will
rise to the top. But the water must be evapo-
rated and the rubber coagulated at once or the
rubber will be injured.

After the latex is gathered it is smoked. A
paddle is dipped into the latex and then held over
a fire until the water is evaporated, leaving a thin
coating of rubber. The paddle is dipped again
and again in the latex, and then held in the smoke
until a large rubber ball is formed. This ball is
then cut open on one side and the paddle is taken
out.

When the crude rubber reaches the factory it
is run through toothed rollers, through which
water is running. The rollers break the rubber
up into rough strips, and the water removes the
dirt and other impurities. The strips are then
mixed with sulphur. The rubber is never melted.
It may be warmed, but is is always pressed into
molds, not poured in.

Previous to 1839, rubber was of very little value
commercially because no method of preparing
it for practical use had been discovered. It was
sticky in warm weather and brittle in cold weather.
In 1839, Charles Goodyear, an American, dis-
covered the process of making modern rubber.

Rubber is used for telephones, bicycles, auto-
mobiles, combs, hot-water bottles, knife handles,
buttons, etc.

In the tropics, rubber is taken in crude form
and poured over shoes so as to make them water-
proof. This is done only b>- the natives, however.
They also press it on sacks and make water-proot
bags out of it.

A little while ago, the United States sent a
representative down to Panama to see about
growing rubber in Gatun Lake. The soil was
not good enough and so the experiment was
dropped.



THE FRUITS AND FLOWERS OF PANAMA.

Piuiliyie HeriDiui, 'jo.

All the tropical fruits of Panama may be ob-
tained in the markets during their seasons, but
are high priced as compared to other tropical
countries. Taboga pineapples have the repu-
tation of being the best, but some people consider
the Limon or Monte Lirio pines, the red, yellow-
meated variety, far superior. Native oranges are
excellent but scarce. The bulk of citrus fruits are



brought from Jamaica, Haiti, or California.
Apples, grapes, pears, etc., are usually on sale,
but are imported from the United States weekly.
Many fruits bananas, coconuts, alligator pears,
mangoes grow wild. Papaya trees are a great
favorite on the Zone and are usually found growing
in everyone's back yard. Bananas are universally
used. The banana industry of the L^nited Fruit
Company in Bocas del Toro is the biggest enter-
prise in the Republic. Taken as a whole Panama
is very deficient in gooti tropical fruits.

On account of the heavy rains, the vegetation
is always green and luxuriant, and many rare and
beautiful flowers are found. Seventy-five varieties
of orchids grow wild with a great number of
colores, and other tropical plants. Hibiscus,
oleander, bougainvillaea, and frangipani are some
of the most common of the plant lite of Panama.



NATIVE ANIMALS, BIRDS, AND FISH
OF PANAMA.

Elsie N. Doar, '31.

Panama is the home of numerous animals,
birds, and fish. Among the animals found here
are tapirs, ant eaters, wild cats, deer, and many
monkeys, such as the red monkey, howlers, and
the spider monkey.

A great many birds are found here, among them
are parrots, parrakeets, egrets, white herons,
pelicans, gulls, and wild ducks. The most
common of these are the parrots and parrakeets.
The tourists who visit Panama each year buy
these parrakeets for young parrots, and are
very much surprised when they find they have
been fooled.

The more common fish found in the waters
around Panama are jack, Spanish mackerel,
red snapper, tarpon, barracuda, stingaree, blow-
fish, corbina, sea urchins, Portuguese man-o-war,
and many others of great interest. The tarpon
is a verv good fish for sport and is hard to catch,
for it is very large in size. In Gatun there is a
club for such sport. The Portuguese man-o-war
is a very pretty fish, purple and pink in
color and is found along the beaches. The barra-
cuda is a long, slender, fighting fish resembling a
mackerel, and is very treacherous. If one is
caught on a line it will fight to get away. The
barracutia is a native fish of the warmer climates.



THE CARIBBEAN.



73



In the reptile line are found man)- poisonous
snakes, alligators, crocodiles, iguanas, and harm-
less lizards. The iguanas are very ugly, and many
people eat them for chicken. The iguana changes
in color during the change of seasons. In the
dry season it is brown in color, while in rainy
season it changes to a deep green.

There are many insects which are poisonous
such as the poisonous spider, the scorpion, and the
tarantula. They are very harmful and some-
times dangerous unless promptly treated with an
antidote.

Before the Ignited States took charge of the
sanitation on the Isthmus, the malarial mosquito
was very dangerous. Now all places where water
may stand and stagnate are covered with oil.
This kills the larvae of this mosquito and frees the
Canal Zone trcm malaria fever.



THE COCONUT.

Mavis Thirlwall, ';}0.

The coconut tree is said to be the most service-
able tree, and the one which has the highest
commercial value. This may well be true since
this tree may be used for food, drink, clothing, and
shelter. Besides being a serviceable tree, it is
a beautiful one. It is usually associated with
romance; how often have you heard "swaying
palms, graceful palms, etc."

The milk of the fruit or nut of this tree is a
drink. The meat produces oil from which are
manufactured butter, soap, candles, medicine,
confectionery, perfume, and cosmetics. .After
the oil IS extracted, the meat is used for fodder.
The shell makes combs, spoons, bowls, and many
other articles. The stem goes for furniture and
lumber; the leaves for roofs, brooms, mats, and
baskets. .Among the numerous other useful
articles made from this are cement, vinegar, gum,
and yeast.

This tree grows best near the sea in lands of
rains and moisture. One of the attractive sights
of tropical coasts and islands is the palm tree.
The tree is very slender. Its age is indicated by
the rings around the bark. There are about two
rings for each year of age. Many coconut trees
curve gracefully. This fact, besides adding to
the beauty of the tree, provides easy climbing.

MR 19742 10



In Bocas del Toro, a distant town of Panama,
thousands of trees have been planted which are
just recently beginning to bear. There are many
other large plantations which produce great
quantities of nuts. Panama recently shipped
more than a million coconuts in one month. The
coconuts produced here are some of the finest.
They are gathered and marketed by the San Bias
Indians, especially. On the 300 islands of these
Indians, there are about joo,ooo coconut trees
which yield a considerable produce each year.
However, this is diminishing since they do not
replant their trees. They are not interested in
developing this industry, but only in producing
enough for their own use.

On the whole, Panama is very active in pro-
ducing and exporting this useful product.



SHIPS THAT COME TO CRISTOBAL.

James Campbell, 'jo.

Upon entering the Port of Cristobal, you will
be interested in looking at the harbor. There is
the breakwater which is a protection against the
heavy seas during the dry season. It was made
by dumping boulders of rock into the water until
it reached a height of 20 feet. There are two
openings in the breakwater, but only one is used
by larger ships. The bay within the breakwater
is capable of holding the whole United States
Navy with ease.

The pier where your ship will go to dock is
situated with further protection against bad
weather. There are four large piers made of
concrete. Here you will see quite a number of
ships loading and unloading cargo.

Then you may ask "Why are all these ships
here?" and you will find several reasons. The
first reason is the situation of Panama. It has
been said that Panama is situated at the cross-
roads of the world. The second reason is the
presence of the Panama Canal with its shortening
of ocean routes attracts many ocean vessels.

Your next question may be "What are these
ships doing?" As you inspect the docks you can
usually see a tourist ship tied up at pier 6, the
newest pier. The tourist season is during the
winter of North America.

The other piers are crowded with freighters and
tramp vessels. There are usually about twelve or
more in. The majority of the cargo is shipped



74



THE CARIBBEAN.



from smaller ships, which go to the South and
Central American ports, to larger ships going to
America or Europe.

Whenever a ship needs coal it ties up at the
coaling station, but most vessels to-day burn oil or
have Diesel engines. The Diesel engine is becom-
ing more popular because it is cheaper to run once
it has been- installed. The fuel oil is stored in huge
oil tanks and almost every day you mav see a
tanker unloading oil.

Statistics are published by The Panama Canal
giving the movements of ocean vessels. They
show that during the month of January, 1930, a
total of 531 ships passed through the Canal.
Two hundred and forty-six of these were Ameri-
can ships, and 1 25 were British. Of the remaining
the Dutch, French, German, Norwegian, Swedish,
and Japanese ranked from 15 to 30 ships apiece.
Some smaller countries are also represented by
one or two ships apiece. During the same time,
36 ships arrived at the Port of Cristobal for the
purpose of taking cargo of some kind. Some
of these transited the Canal but most did not.

In conclusion, you will find that Cristobal ranks
second to New York as a seaport on the Atlantic
coast of the Americas. This refers to the ton-
nage of cargo which enters and clears the docks.



SEVERAL SUPERSTITIONS.

Crawford Campbell, 'j/.

Superstition, like everything else, reflects the
local color. In Panama we are surrounded by the
negro whose conversations are often most en-
lightening; for instance, could anyone guess that
the flesh of an iguana may turn to butter?

One evening, after quarreling with a colored
man for at least an hour as to who had the better
fleet, the United States or Great Britain, we
switched to the subject of eating iguanas. It is well
known in the tropics that the meat of the iguana
is very delicate. The negro just couldn't see
that is was possible to eat this meat. He had
never tried it, but knew that iguanas were filthy.
If they were allowed to set in the sun all day with
salt on them, they would turn to butter. He had
never seen it done but seemed to have direct
information on the subject, and could not be
persuaded otherwise.



Taking a hike in the jungle, I came upon five
men killing a large snake, supposedly a Tomigofl^.
When it had been killed and tied to a stick, their
thoughts naturally began to wander to snakes.
One swore up and down that if that snake was
put in a fire four little legs would burst out
unexpectedly. The others tried to persuade him
otherwise, but he was not to be persuaded from
what //(' knew to be true.

There was a little new-born goat near a negro's
house. It was a pretty little brown and white
kid. My first impulse was to stop and pet it,
but I was told that if I should happen to touch
its tail its mother would immediately disown it,
which would be a terrible catastrophe to the poor
kid, so I kept my hands off.

It is impossible to trace back the origin of
superstitions, but nevertheless they exist. In
fact, they are as real to the "darkies" as the
things they see every day. A negro can make
you actually shudder at the thought of disregard-
ing one of his pet superstitions.



TWO QUEER THINGS.

David Gregory 'j2.

One queer thing in Panama is the bomberos.
They are the firemen "delaRepublica de Panama."
These fire eaters are dressed in red, with big black
boots, and they are very proud of themselves.
On Sunday a person can see them drilling, looking
like British soldiers marching up and down the
streets. On parades and on Panamanian holidays
you can see them drilling and marching along at
night with torches held high above their heads.
I do not know about their ability as fire eaters, but
they must be pretty good.

Another queer thing of Panama are the dogs.
Before the Americans came here, the dogs and
buzzards were the garbage gatherers, "cafeteria
style." When the Americans came down, the
dogs were done away with and real garbage cans
set out. The Panamanian Government must love
these dogs quite a bit for their service to their
grandfathers and grandmothers, for if you hit a
dog with your car, the Government will be S25
richer. These dogs have so many breeds in them,
that Heinz would have to stop his factories. It is
a good thing that Chinese do not know about
them as the dogs are around 157 difl^erent varieties
as compared to the Heinz 57.



THE CARIBBEAN.



75




THE LIFE OF A COCONUT.

Delia Raymond, 'jo.

I wonder if people have ever given it a thought
how coconuts enjoy life. Sometimes it is a cruel
life especially if you happen to be a coconut on a
tree that is in a residential section ot Panama.

Now, for instance, I was one of the many coco-
nuts on a coconut tree (of course, not a banana)
and this tree that I had grown on was planted by
one of the roads near the Cristobal High School
on Colon Beach. Well, one day I heard two little
boys who were sitting in the shade discussing the
cement road that was to be built. First of all,
my tree was like several others planted right on
the edge of this tar road. These little boys were
saying how it was going to be just "awful" to see all
the coconut trees cut down so they could make a
cement road, and naturally, since the trees were
planted so near the road, they would have to be
taken out of the way.

Right then and there my fellow coconut brothers
and myself began to worry.

The day arrived tor che men to cut down the
trees. There were three other trees from the end
of the road before ours. As these three were cut
down, there were "skaty-eight" kids hanging
around to gather up the coconuts that tell.

Finally our tree was cut and boom!! I fell
with a terrible noise and rolled over into the grass.
All of a sudden I telt myself being lifted up. A
little girl about seven years old was holding me
in her two arms, because, it I say it myself, I was
too big tor her one arm.

Some little rascals ot boys tried to pull me away
from her but she screamed and said she'd tell her
"mamma" on them, so they left me and her alone.

She ran home with me and I prayed all the way
that she wouldn't chop me up and ask her mother
to make pie or a cake out of me. When we got
into her mother's kitchen, the little girl was



greeted with "Why, Betty, where did you get that
lovely coconut. ''" And, "I got it when they cut
the tree down over there."

"Well," said the child's mother, "place it on the
table and I will get 'Liza' (the colored maid) to
cut it tor us and make a coconut custard pie."

"But, mother," replied the little tot, "I don't
like pie, so let's just ask papa to paint a pretty
picture on it and let's keep it as a souvenir."

".'\11 right, darling, we can do that."

That night dear papa came home, and after
Betty had told him what she wanted done with
me, he took out his painting set and began to
paint me all up.

So now here I am on a table in the sitting
room, all dolled up like a painted lad>'. I believe
I have a picture ot a boat on me. This kind of
life isn't so bad, and I'm certainly glad I wasn't
cut up like some of my friends were.



DOOM.



He sat there, his face drawn and pale, his hands
clenched between his knees in an etfort to keep
them trom trembling. Slowly . slowly . the
hands of the clock moved on; and to him they
served but to prolong his agony. Soon ah, how
soon now! the bell would ring and . But he
wrenched his thoughts away from the future, and
fixed them elsewhere. He allowed his gaze to
wander around his prison . Outside, in glorious
freedom, birds were singing . t/iey knew nothing
of his miserable fate. His mother ... he could
see her sweet, trustful eyes now . perhaps she
was praying for him . Little Jackie, lispingly
asking where "Big Bruvver" was . But it was
too late . too late .

The bell rang suddenly, and, pulling himself
together with a superhuman effort, the dumbest
freshman picked up his paper and pencils and
left the Assembly tor his final exams .



THE CARIBBEAN.



THE FRESHMAN BOYS HANDBOOK.

Elsie Darhy, 'jo.

1. If, when you are assigned your seat in the
study hall, you can not see over the top ot your
desk, have your seat raised. It this is not suffi-
cient, get one of those big Webster's Dictionaries
and sit on that. Sam or Butler will help you
carry it.

2. If you are so unfortunate as to have to sit in
one of the large chairs in room 27, do your best and
sprawl out in it as much as possible. The modern
freshman is such that it requires careful scrutiny
by the teacher to determine whether or not he is
there. (Of course, when the teacher asks ques-
tions you do or don't know, you expand into
view or shrink from sight as the case requires.)

3. Start immediately to primp and groom
yourself in order to be voted the best-looking
boy. (Only be careful not to overdo it, or the
chances are that you'll be chosen as the best-
looking girl.)

4. If you are called to the office, do not turn
pale or perspire unnecessarih'. Probably Mr.
Sawyers only wants to know the middle name of
your father's cousin's aunt.

5. Do not try to bluff the teachers. They are
well versed in the peculiarities of high school
students and aren't having any. So, it you are
asked a question you can't answer, don't beat
about the bush, but say, "I don't know." This
will bring forth beautifully sarcastic comments
from the teacher on the density of high school
students in general, of freshmen in particular,
but it is a quick and otherwise painless method.

6. The inventive Freshman will find plenty of
scope in high school for his genius. There yet
remains to be invented a traffic regulation system
in the hall during passing ot classes, devices that
will prevent people from sticking chalk in our
inkwells, "borrowing" our paper, carving wise-
cracks on our desks, using latter for waste-paper
baskets, etc., etc.

7. Finally, if you are ot the gum-chewing
variety, do not leave blobs of chewed gum where
they are likely to be sat upon. Any accident of
this kind is no dtnibt very amusing to the on-
lookers but not so to the pants or dress ot the
victim.



BUGHOUSE FABLES.

Thomas Coley, jo.

1. Miss Hesse and Miss Gustafson not buying
a ticket to a school entertainment.

2. Mr. Meyer bawling someone out in less than
gne-half hour.

J:' Miss Kimbro without a pair ot earrings on,
buying a ticket to a school benefit.

4. Mr. West not arguing with someone for a
whole period.

5. Miss Russell yelling at someone.

6. Mr. Sawyers without a pencil behind his ear.
" 7. Miss Moore looking untidy.

8. Mr. Pence coming to school looking wide
awake.

9. Miss Patterson without a "Frat" pin.



MURDER!

Marian E. Hahi, 'j3.

Yesterday as I was walking down the road,
enjoying the sights, I saw a poor little ant lying
dead in the dust of the street. A large foot-print
surrounded it. What can we do for the preven-
tion of this shameful slaughter of harmless insects ?
Everywhere one goes, one sees them, poor, dead
ants.

The housewife slaughters them unmercitully.
.And what, pray, do they do to her. They get in
her peanut butter, her sugar, her jam. How
little that is to taking the innocent lite of a
creature ot God!

And what do the children do to these innocents?
This is the shametul tact: They stamp on them
deliberately! I am ashamed of my generation.
And how, friends, do the ants harm the children?
They merely take bites of their candy or cake
when it is placed where it should not be. Such
unmerciful slaughter is overwhelming!

-And then, the men, our dear fathers and elder
brothers, tread on them on their way to and from
work. Surely, it would not hurt them to look
where they are going.

I pity ants! Are they not our fellow creatures?
To the Creator we "are as ants crawling on the
face of the earth."



THE CARIBBEAN.



77



THE SENIOR ALPHABET.

-Sv a Senior.

A is for all of us, our class so dear,

What school will be without us, we sadly fear.

B is for BIRKELAND, our office girl clerk,

And also tor BLISS who's always at work.

C is for CRUM, our President wise.

For CAMPBELL who always does what he

tries.
For COLEY, too, our editor a prize!

D is for DARLEY, the little English lass,

For DAYS, who is always helping her class.

E is for EBERENZ who from typing doesn't rest,

F is for FITZGERALD whose story was best.

G is for GANZMUELLER, her winning smile is
seen

H is for HERMAN, in sports she is keen,

For HENTER, sweet Alice, the Gatun queen.

I is for Ignorance which we all lack.

J is for June, on school we'll turn our back.

For JOYCE who for talking has a great
knack.

K is for Kommencement Oh, so near!

L is for Leaving we'll shed a tear.

M is for MUNDBERG our "Sonny Boy,"

For MEXENDEZ whose ready wit is a joy.

N is for NEWMAN with humor so deep,

O is for Order which we hate to keep.

P is for the Publication of our annual so great,

Q is for Questions we ask at great rate.

R is for RAYMOND of smile so wide,

S is for STEVENSON always on our side.



T is for TURNER in sports hard to pass.

For THIRLWALL, the idol of the class.

U is for Useful, we hope we all are,

V is tor Vice from which we are far.

W is for WHEELER and WIKINGSTAD, too.
For WONG, he's been with us four years thru,

Y is for Youth which we'll never forget,
Z is for Zero you got one, I'll bet!



BEHIND THE COUNTER AT A RUMMAGE
SALE.

Rae Bliss, 'jo.

'Twas the first week in December! The Girl
Reserves had agreed at their last meeting that
they would have a rummage sale to help raise
money to send a delegate to the States. The
girls brought all of their old dresses, their sisters',
mothers', and grandmothers', banquet, Easter,
and party dresses, which had seen better days.
A few of the girls brought some old trinkets,
which the "shines" actually called jewelry, and
also a large pile of Victrola records. (I believe
the latest was "Panama Mamas.") Some of the
girls even brought their big brother's knee-
breeches, which he had haughtily thrown in the
"old trunk" since he had grown up. Then too
there was an odd assortment of old toys brought
by some thoughtful person.

W'e journeyed down to the Silver Clubhouse
with our carload of "junk" to start our afore-
mentioned Rummage Sale. 'Twas a busy
Saturday for us G. R.'s" We arranged the
"junk" attractively on some tables and displayed
the gowns by draping them artistically over a few
chairs. We priced everything very cheaply,
knowing that the "darkies" drew small salaries,
and that they seemed to belong to Scotch ancestry.

Dresses were 25 cents each (believe it or not),
Victrola records, 10 for a dime; men's coats,
50 cents each; boy's knee-breeches, 25 cents each;
ties (all colors of the rainbow were well repre-
sented), 10 for a dime; toys, trinkets, and "jewel-
ry," 2| cents to a nickel. This was no sooner



78



THE CARIBBEAN.



done when in came a mass of darkness, which
we fully realized was our customers flowing in.
We, of course, thought that our goods would
sell in no time, as it was so very, very cheap, in
fact we were almost giving things away.

But those women would cast a slight glance
over our numerous dresses, finger 'em, rumple 'em,
mess 'em (if it was possible to add to their ample
suppy of it), and almost tear 'em that unique
assortment of frocks! Finally a middle-aged,
female customer inquired the cost of a beaded
Georgette (slightly dilapidated) gown. When
told it was priced 25 cents, she said, if you please,
"What! Wid all dis here rippin's in de sides.''
Man, ma dahter couldn't play mud-pies in dat
dere rig!"

We girls were actually dumfounded because
she wouldn't even consider buying the dress with
a little tear in the seam. Thus it happened with
several of our other customers, so we finally
reduced the price to 10 cents. Yes siree! Only
one measly dime for any gown on the table! Then
business picked up a bit, but you may not believe
me when I say that those women were still
haughty about purchasing any of our goods.

All the little "darkies" in Silver City had
assembled at our famous Rummage Sale, so it
seemed. They were all crowded around our toy
division, which contained one "rickety-rackety,"
rusty tov gun, amongst other things. The boys



were simply wild about it but not one of 'em had
a nickel with which to satisfy their longing. One
of the most ardent admirers of the rusty toy gun
had a ih cent piece and a penny, so we sold it to
him on the sly. He made "whoopee" galore after
the happy exchange, imitating Tom Mix and
"Buffalo Bill."

As for the Victrola records, each and every one
of 'em had to be played on the Clubhouse Ortho-
phonic, before we could make a single sale. Even
then they were hesitant about any record over
two months old, whether Gene Austin, Rudy Vallee,
Helen Kane, or "what have you?"

At the end of the day us "G. R.'s" were com-
pletely exhausted, as if we'd just played a strenu-
ous game of baseball or the like. Believe it or
not it was work trying to sell our carefully selected
"junk" to those impudent "shines," trying to
understand their "Bajan" talk and answer them
in the same language. 'Twas no wonder that we
felt like "The Heck of the Wresperus" at the close
of day. But lo and behold! In spite of our re-
duction in prices 'n everything else taken into
consideration, we profited by only $6.37!. How-
ever, we all unanimously agreed that the barrels
of fun we had were worth the time and trouble.

(I'll just tell you in strict confidence, though,
that the girls don't seem to be over anxious to
have another one right away.)




THE CARIBBEAN.



79



S




Sf



DEER SLIM.

Miivis Thirlwall, 'jo.




Deer Slim:

Did ya notis what I notized this mornin? Tom
Coley cum to skule wit a black eye an' he sez he
was skatin' on the yice. Tell me, he musta ben
lien' cuz their ain't no ice ta skate on down heer,
besides if he fell on the yice wud he knok his eye?
Na, his eye wud be awrite, only he wudn'ta ben
able ta siddown.

I writ a pome for the Kerybeen. It's a swell
wun reel intelechal-like cuz I no that's whut
they like to reed about tha moon and the palm
treez. I wudda let ya reed it only I don wan
nobudy to see it till it cums out in the Kerybeen.

Their's gonna be a opreta by the Glee Club
I gues thats all tha singin' whut I been heering,
but listen, Slim, by lessenin to 'em singin every
day I'll save 75c. Moozic is moozic, I sez, if ya
heer it in skule fur nuthin', or at the theayter
fur 75c.

Didya see tha knew gurl in skule too day?
Shes sum peach. I walks up ta her and I sez,
"If I ken help ya," I sez, "jus lemme no," I sez.
Well, Slim, she blinked thos lamps at me and sez,
"Thank you" reel refined like.

Ya no seems to me, weer gettin' too old
ta go ta skule without a ty an so beginin
tamorro I'm gonna ware wun. That gurl her
names Henretta she sits rite in frunt ame, ya no.

Well, I gotta stu ly my jogerfy lezon, see ya at
tha ball game.

Yurs til Gatun locks,

Shorty.



Thursday, March 2j.
Deer Slim:

I huv ben envolved en a grate mistry wich haz
ben takeing up my time. Ya no, I'm goin ta be
a detectif when I gro up so I thot I mite uz well
begin an praktis know. Well, sum misteeriyus
pursun, I've deesided its a wuman, haz ben leeving
misteeriyus pakugiz on a certain teechers desk.
I wuz not askt ta take up thiz caze but I'm doin it
fur praktiz. Any way, az I wuz sayin, thiz haz
ben goin on fur kwite awi e. Tha furst thing ta



doo, uf corz, wuz ta fine tha kuntints of tha
pakige. A detecktif haz ta bee very karful uf
unnown things so I tuk kare wen I opund it. Ya
never kin tell it mite uf had a bom in it. An I
wud uf hated ta see one uf my teechers blowed up.

Anyway, I opened it an found a big suprize. It
was a swell piece of kake an boy, it was gud. Uf
corz, I saved a cupla krums ta uze az evidunse
but I didn't see know senz in savein tha hole
peez uf kake. Da yoo?

I hav ben werkin on thiz kaze fur meny weaks
an its still a big mistry ta me. Evry mornin I
open tha kapidge karfuly. Ya never know wen
you'll fine a bom, ya know.

I hav dun a lot a hevy thinkun and I'be kum ta
tha kuncloozun that thiz krime haz ben kumitted
by a wumun. Tha motif, ya no every krime haz
got a motif, iz that she is inamoored to him (the
abuv menchoned teecher).

O, I furgot ta say I hav a box uf evidunse
(krums) ta uze aginst tha krimunul.

I hurd that a bunch of inspecturz uf skules is
kumin downheerpurtysoon tainspekt thiz skule. I
wunder what they'll do ta us. Well Slim I bet
aftur they get heer their will be sum goins ons,
Sez I. Mebee we'll hav to ware koats ta skule.
But I can't. My Ma wudn't let me ware my
Sundy koat and my uther uz in tha wash.

Well, as tha ole sayin goez "don't kawnt yure
chicks beefor they hack." Thiz meens, dun't
wury over things beefor they happin.

O, Lisun, Slim, ef ya wan ta practis detectif
work with me, that there kake iz big enuf fur too.
Yours mizteerusly,

Shorty.



Tusday, March 2g.
Deer Slim:

Their haz bin grate eggsitemunt in this town
sinz Fridy. Fridy nite about 10.40 their wuz a
erthquak heer and boys! it wuz terrble. I tell ya.
Slim I was sleepin and dreemin I wuz on a bote
and I woked up and sure nuf ef my bed wuzn't



8o



THE CARIBBEAN.



just pitchin'. A cours I new it wuz a erthquak so
I run ta my ma's rum. I wuzn't scaird nor
nothin but I wanted to see ef she wuz awrite, ya
no. .^n' everybudy wuz screemun and hollerin'
and tha ladeez wuz in the street wit there negle-
geez on and boys, my hart wuz jest palputatin.
I red in the papers and it says that Mr. Kerk-
patrik says their ain't gonna be no more earth-
quaks for a while anny way, ta bee on the safe
side I make spechui menchon in my praers uf
erthquaks.

An' anuther thin Colon's gettin to be a reglur
Chikago. Their wuz a big holdupp Mu ndy mornin'
and it wuzn't nobudy's suspenders neither. Too
men what had sum glazzs on robbed bout a
thouzand dolars from too other men in tha
street. It was brawd daylite to at 12 u'clok
and tha men hav run away and can't be fownd.

An tha grates eggsitemunt uf al Mr. Sawyers
cum ta skule this mornin' with a knew suite, an
I goz up ta him an' I sez, "Pincheez, Mr. Sawyers,
but frum tha luk uf his faz I guez he don't no
what "Pincheez" meens.

Ya no, Slim tha glea club I wuz tellin' ya bout
beefor; well they had there pikchurs took yestiday
and we wuz watchin them and they sur did luk
sappy.

The fleat haz gon. I wuz sitin in ma rum
today studin' my histery and lukin awt tha
winda and I notised tha bay luked awful bare.
Then I remembud that it wuz cuz them I meen
those batle ships weren't their. They sur did
luk perty owt their. An' at nite wit all tha lites
on them, they luked like a big sity. An' thoz
salors were nize two they give me a cupla hats an
50c. Yeh, Slim, I luv ta see tha fleat cumin' in.

Are ya goin' to tha moveez tonite ta see Tom
Mix in the "Bucking Bronko." That's gonna be a
swell pitcher what I meen, I'm going.

S'along,

Shorty.



Deer Slim:

Well, I hadda chanst ta show off my enteli-
gunz yestiday. Thoz inspekters whitch I wuz
tellin' ya abowt kum ta skule & gived a inteli-
gunz test. They went rownd ta all the rumes &
choz sum kids. Well, when I seen them kumin
I put on a brite eggspreshun on ma fase& it wurked
'cauz they choz me ta tak tha test. In fact, they
choz all tha britc kids, ya no.



Any way tha test wuz eezy. It asks ya, "Iz a
man alwaz, uzally, never or rarly shorter thun
hiz wif." W'ell Slim, I buleeve that ladeez like
ta mary men shorter than them so as then kin
boss em rownd so I sez, "Men are alwaz shorter
than there wifes." That's won rite any way.
O yes, an anuther eezy wun waz this wun. "Iz
a boy uzuUy, never, alwaz or rarly more intelli-
junt then hiz Pa. That's eezy tha anser is
"alwaze," huh?

Thoz inspekturs mezured our skule and gave
us exams an there kuming back in a cupla weaks.
Wun ot owr tetchers wuz so eggsited thet she put
on a vary patryotik dres tha day they was sapozed
to kun all red & white & blue striped. But they
never kame that day.

I hurd a gude joke yestiday. One guy I
meen feller says to anuther, "Didja ever heer the
"'Ungarian Razzberries?" And the other wun
sez, "Yes, but that's eyebrow moozik ain't
it?" Funny izn't it, Slim.

I wuz reeding a "True Story" yestiday Yeh,
my report card an' boys! I wuz selabrating
too. It wuz vary patryotik! True bruther, true.

I guez I'll haf ta put on ma best maners when I
tak that card home ta nite.

I lurned the rite way ta end a letter last weak.
I'll try it owt on yu.

Awateing for yure answer I remane
Yours truly,

Lawrence
(Shorty fer short).



Deer Slim:

I wuz passin buy tha skule tha uther nite an'
I hurd a terribul rakett goin on inside. I wuz
thinkin it mita ben burglurz so in I walks. Acorz,
I went vary quite-like so'z not ta dizterb thum an'
I peaped into wun rume and low an beehole I
saw a bunch uf Seenyors jumpin rownd yellun' an
makin funy faces. A man wuz thare to wachin
them an' he wuz lafin. It wuz tuny. So I
begin ta laf two.

I tryd and tryd ta think whut them wuz doin
but I kudn't imajin. Aftur about 15 minutes I
sudenly remembud thet it must be that them wuz
praktising fer the Seenyor play. It sur iz gude
tho an' funy why they wuz almozt dicing of
lahn themselves.

Wunpart iz spechically komical. Thiz ladee,
see, is funy. She eets sum kake an' al of a suden.



THE CARIBBEAN.



8i



Well I guez ir wudii't he rite ta tell ya. That
wud be spillin tha hcens. But I jus adviz ya ta
see that play, that's all.

The Fresheez are givin a big blmv-out thiz
Fridy. At the Washingtun Hotell, two. Sum
clazz fer the Freshees, sez I.

Well, Slim, I gotta memrize sum po'try ter
to-morrow.

"L'ndur that spreding cheznut tree,
Tha vilage smithee stands"
I've ben memrizin that part fer ;o minutes. I
gez I'll get thru in a cupla howrs. I'm no pote
but I dozn't take me vary long ta memrize things.
I'll be seeing ya.

Shorty.



Deer Slim:

Know more pensils.

Know more books.

Know more teechers sassy looks !
Boys, I sur am glad skull is ovur at last. I got
permotid but, wud you buleeve it Slim, I didunt
pass in spellin. The teecher says my spellin is
atrochious. Wei, I like that! I no I don spel
evry word jes rite but enybudy kan undurstan
whut I rite, yu kan, kant ya? But ya kant argu
with a teecher.

I hed tha time uf my life las nite. I went ta
Komensmunt at the Washingtun Hotell. Buleeve



me I thot I wuz at a funral. All tha Senyors wuz
their. Tha gurls hed on wite drezzes an long
fases and tha boys the same. I meen they hed
long fases too but not wite drezzes. They hed
dark soots. An a bunch uf men wuz sittin on
the platfurm with tha Senyiors and they made
sum speeches. Evry budy luked so solum and
ther wuz flowurs all around. I reely thout I wuz
at a funrel.

Then wun man gave evry Senyor a big peece
of papur. Thiz iz a duplomo, my Mom says.
Thats wut they get fer going ta skule 12 years.
Ef ya ask me I don think itz wurth it da yu?
Going ta skule 12 yeers an then git a peece of
papur with yur name on it. When I have my
Komensment, I'm goin to get somthin good or
I won't Kommense. How about yu? But thoz
dum Seenyors looked so hapy ta get that papur.
I guez they didunt expect nothin a tall.

Well, anyway tha seramony wuz very impresuv.
Tha only thing I didunt lik wuz that ther wuzn't
know rifreshmunts. Ef I'd a known that I
wudn't a gone.

Wei, Slim, I guez I won see ya agen til October.
S'long,

Shorty.

P. S. I'm still mad at that teecher fur flunkin
me m spelin.




Piers at Cristobat



MR 1974211



THE CARIBBEAN.











r^.






Carnival, Panama.



Pholo by Wayne.



THE CARIBBEAN.



83



PANAMANIAN CARNIVAL.

Mams Thirlwail, 'jo.

Every year during the four days preceding
Lent, the Panamanians make "whoopee," as we
would say. During these days they have their
Carnaval.

Each year, carnival differs very little from the
preceding one, and still the Panamanians
await the fiestas as if they were unexperienced
affairs. Americans, who have been residing in
Panama many years, have grown to like carnival,
and often participate with as much fervor as the
Panamanians themselves.

In the two principal cities of the Isthmus, Colon
and Panama, the carnival is elaborately planned
and directed by the Junta, a board of influential
men who manage the fiestas. A Queen is elected
by popular vote. Often the rivalry is very keen.
An interesting case occurred this year in Panama
City when the fathers of the twoleading candidates
decided to leave the outcome of the contest to the
Panamanian Lottery. If an even number played,
one girl would win and vice versa. In this way,
the affair was settled amicably, since everyone
stands by the lottery.

The Queen chooses a court of damas and
gentlemen. She is allowed a sufficient sum of



money to supply herself with a magnificent
coronation costume, besides a float and other
costumes, which she will need. She is very much
feted by all the local clubs, and during those
four days is accorded great honor.

The principal streets of both towns are lavishly
decorated with vivid banners and ornaments.
Every afternoon from five to seven, this thorough-
fare becomes the carnival boulevard. Cars and
trucks, decorated and filled with natives and
Americans, dancing, and singing those famo: s
Panamanian carnival songs, parade up and down
these streets. Confetti and serpentine add a
fairy touch to the already picturesque scene.

About seven, everyone leaves the boulevard.
Soon it is quiet again. But about ten the Queen
and her court begin their round of the city. They
visit all the various clubs where dances are being
held and it is not until early morning that the
streets of the cities are really quiet.

Business goes on in the usual manner during
these days since it is not until the late afternoon
that the festivities really begin.

People who have lived here for any length of
time can realize, I think, just how much this
carnival means to the Panamanians. After these
four days of gay merry-making, they enter the
Lenten season with as much solemnity as the
gaietv with which thev celebrated their carnival.




V\'aterfront Scene in Panama.



H



THE CARIBBEAN.













APPRECIATION OF JUDGES.

We deeply appreciate the kindness and interest
shown by Mrs. Skemp, Mr. Cunningham, and
Mrs. Hearne who acted as judges for the short
stories, and by Miss Jensen and Miss Wold who
judged the poetry.



STAFF HOP.

Frances Days, 'jo.

The StafFHop, given by The Caribbean staff,
was held at the Masonic Temple, Friday, the
13th of December, 1929.

The programs for this hop were white with a
large black 13 printed on them, emphasizing the
the fact that it was to be held on an unlucky
date.

The hop was given with the main purpose of
making money for the publishing of the High
School Annual. Invitations were issued to High
School students and their friends. Admission was
25 cents for ladies, and 50 cents for men.

There were several novelty dances. All the
dances on the program had ghost-like names,
such as "The Bat's Bump," "The Goblins
Gallop," etc.

Celeste Clark entertained those present with a
jazz dance.

The hall was decorated in yellow and black
crepe paper, and skeletons, and horseshoes were
hung about the hall to give a "spooky" at-
mosphere.



In spite of the tact that it was held on a sup-
posedly unlucky Friday, a large crowd was
present and enjoyed the music furnished by
Welch's orchestra.



THE SENIOR PARTY.

Evelyn Ganzmuelier, '30.

The Senior Party, which took place at the
Hotel Washington on November 1;, was a very
successful affair.

Welsh's Harmony Boys furnished real iazz
music, which, together with the fresh sea breeze,
made the dancing very enjoyable. The spot
dance was won by Pete Wardlaw and Tommy
Pescod. The prizes were dainty picture frames
for the girl, and a cigarette lighter for the boy.
The refreshments were greatly enjoyed by the
thirsty dancers.

The Seniors proved themselves such excellent
hosts and hostesses, that the other classes will not
forget their last party.



THE CARIBBEAN.



85



THE SOPHOMORE PARTY.

Nell Jl'ardlaw, '32.

The Sophomore party, which was held at the
Strangers Club on January 3d, seemed to be a
great success.

Dwyer's orchestra furnished the excellent dance
music during the evening. As is customary at
high school dances, one dance was designated as a
prize waltz. To the winners: Mavis Thirlwall
and Roger Williams, attractive prizes were
awarded.

The programs were white, decorated with the
Canal Zone seal and with the names ot the
Sophomore Class officers. The dances were given
clever titles.

The refreshments which were served through-
out the evening were enjoyed by everyone.

Due credit must be given to those who aided
in planning this delightful party.



FRESHMEN PARTY.

Mmis Thirlwall^ 'jo.

The last party of the year, the Freshmen party,
was given at the Hotel Washington, Friday,
April 25th. Welsh's Harmony Boys, the popular
negro orchestra, played the latest "hits."

Two specialty numbers were given. Miss
Bobby Durham gave an excellent interpretation
of the "Break-Away." She made a hit with her
audience. Victor Melendez gave a solo specialty
dance which was the high spot of the evening.
He showed great talent.

Mary Curtis proved to be a lucky girl for she
won, with her partner, Tom Pescod, the prize
fox-trot, and also the "spot" dance. Lovely
prizes were received.

The parents and members of the faculty who
attended, and the students, all agree that the
Freshies made a success of their party.



THE GYPSY ROVER.

Frederick Kroll, 'ji.

On March 21st, 1930, the Cristobal High School
Glee Club presented a three-act musical comedy,



''The Gypsy Rover." The plot is of no impor-
tance, being of the usual musical comedy type.
In brief, the story is this: Rob, a young gypsy,
falls in love with Lady Constance Martendale,
whom he meets while she is riding through the
forest. Lady Constance has been forced into an
engagement with Lord Craven by her father. Sir
George Martendale. After many difficulties, Rob
succeeds in arranging an elopement with Lady
Constance, but just as they are preparing to leave,
Rob is captured and thrown into prison from which
he soon escapes. In the meanwhile, Meg, the
>oung gypsy's foster mother, tells of Rob's real
parentage. He is the son of Sir Gilbert Howe.
When a child, Rob had been stolen by his gypsy
nurse. Upon Sir Gilbert's death, all the property
and wealth had been willed to Lord Craven unless
the real heir to the fortune was found. Rob returns
to England and Lady Constance. Lord Craven
is done away with by providing him with a yearly
income.

The music of the play was as good as one finds
in many a professional production.

The title role was played by Frederick Kroll.
His fine tenor voice and his ability as a dramatic
actor made his role one of the best in the show.

Virginia Stevenson played the part of Lady
Constance, her beautiful voice added much to the
production. Sinfo and Marto, the two gypsy
comedians were very capably played by Garrett
Huff and Oscar Heilbron. The role of Nina, Sir
George Martendale's second daughter, was very
well played by Eleanor Urwiler. Her attractiv^e
voice was one of the high spots of the show.

The non vocal parts were:

Meg (Rob's foster mother) Genevieve O'Rourke

Zara (The belle of the gypsy camp) Natalie Safford

Lord Craven Perrv Washabaigh

Sir George Martendale .' . .James Wood

Captain Jerome (English army officer) Garrett Huff

Sir Toby Lyon (A social butterfly) William Keenan

The whole production owes its success only to
Miss Florence Ertel's untiring efforts. Every
detail of the musical scores and of the dramatic
action shows the results of her able direction.
Not enough credit can be given to her for her
splendid work in planning and supervising this
production.



86



THE CARIBBEAN.



THE SENIOR PLAY.
"The Lottery Man."

Mavis ThirlwaH, 'jo.

For several weeks before May 15, placards
bearing this mysterious title, "The Lottery Man,"
were seen in every conspicuous place in town.
The mystified people soon learned that this was
the name of the play which was to be presented
by the Senior Class of C. H. S., at the Cristobal
Clubhouse, on May 15th and i6th.

The plot of "The Lottery Man," a very amusing
one, is this: Jack Wright, young newspaper man
offers himself to the women of America at Si a
ticket. Just after this he falls in love with Helene,
a cousin of Foxey, Jack's rich college chum and
owner of the newspaper for which Jack works.
The comedy is brought in by Foxey 's mother, Mrs.
Peyton, who is daily ageing herself in trying to
keep young, and by Lizzie, Mrs. Peyton's com-
panion, a thin, insignificant girl. Lizzie wins
Jack with a ticket she had stolen so she has to
give up her claims to him. She receives, however,
a large sum of money with which she builds a
home in the Bronx, while Helene turns out to be
"the lucky winner" after all.

Each character of "The Lottery Man" was well
selected and well played. The breezy young
hero was played by Fred KroU. Fred has dis-
tinguished himself in former productions as a
great actor, and he lived up to his reputation in
his role as Jack. His job was a difficult one, tor
his role is the one on which the whole play rests.

Frances Days took the part of Helene, the
heroine. Her acting was excellent and she made
her charming character one of the most impor-
tant in the play.

Foxey, Jack's chum, was played by William
Newman. William has always been called the
wittiest boy in school and he just transferred this
to the stage. His acting was most natural.

The difficult characters of the two mothers and
Lizzie were portrayed by Rae Bliss, Mrs. Wright;
Delia Raymond, Mrs. Peyton; Eleanor Fitz-
gerald, Lizzie. Rae did splendid work in acting
the part of the sweet, gentle mother of Jack,
while Delia and Eleanor, the comedy characters,
were the hit of the show.

Rita Joyce, cast as Hedwig, Mrs. Peyton's maid,
gave the audience a real Irish brogue that was



very amusing, and Walter Wikingstad as Hamil-
ton, the chauffeur and butler of the Peytons, gave
a good performance.

The praise for the success of "The Lottery
Man" goes to Mr. Robert Noe, who directed this
play. For three years, Mr. Noe has produced for
C. H. S. very successful plays and "The Lottery
Man" is another to add to his list. He chose the
cast, directed the acting and stage effects of the
production, and was responsible for the great
applause with which the play was received. Not
enough thanks and credit can be given Mr. Noe,
who is always ready to spend his time producing
fine plays like "The Lottery Man" for C. H. S.



C. H. S. CARNIVAL.

Mavis Thirlwall, 'jo.

The annual Carnival of the Cristobal High
School, the proceeds of which go toward the
publication of The Caribbean, was held at Fort
De Lesseps on the night of February 21.

For at least a month before this event, prepara-
tions had been going on at school. Posters were
made, tickets distributed, side shows planned and
the actresses and actors in the Revue had much
practicing to do. Some fortunate, or unfortunate
staff members attended school only one day of the
week preceding the 21st. The rest of the time
they spent working hard preparing the grounds.

At last the night came. The grounds were
filled with side shows, tents, the refreshment
stand, which was very popular throughout the
evening, sev'eral games of chance, and the contest
board.

Among the features of the side shows were the
freak man, who ate glass and iron, and one who
ate bananas under water; the tattooed lady, the
skeleton lady, and the gypsy fortune teller, who
seemed able to bring looks of satisfaction or dis-
pleasure to the faces of those who left her tent.
The fishpond proved to be a very profitable one
for the fishermen, since they made good "catches"
in a few minutes.

The popularity contest was won by Miss
Margaret Mitchell, whose chief rival was Miss
Carmen Durham.

The main attraction of the Carnival was, of
course, the Revue. This was worth the hearty



THE CARIBBEAN.



87



applause received from the audience. Among the
numbers were tap dances, song acts, a gypsy
chorus, a military chorus, and an Egyptian dance;
all of which delighted the audience. The numbers
were all well given and the costumes were very
attractive. This Revue was planned and directed
by Mr. Robert Noe, whose kind efforts and co-
operation are greatly appreciated.

The main show ended at ten o'clock. The hall
was then cleared and the dancing began. The
Zonians furnished the music. At eleven o'clock
the door prize was given to the winner, Mr. Joseph
Corrigan, who received S2.50.

Owing to a very unfortunate circumstance, no
uniformed soldiers were allowed on the grounds,
and, consequently the crowd which attended the
Carnival was only about one-halt the size of the
crowd which had attended previously. In spite
of this drawback, the Carnival was a success.



THE SCHOOL SUR^'EY.

(This article was written by a member ot the
class of 19JO.)

As the result of an idea of our enterprising
principal, Mr. Wm. A. Sawyers, we have had the
good fortune to be visited by a Survey Committee
from the United States.

A year ago, when Congressman E. E. Denison,
from Illinois, was on the Isthmus, Mr. Sawyers
had a conference with him, during which he
mentioned that he thought a survey by a group of
well-known educators would greatly benefit our
school system. He suggested for this Dr. George
Strayer and Dr. N. L. Engelhardt, both professors
and recognized authorities in education and
school administration, in Teachers College of
Columbia University, New York City.

Congressman Denison took the matter up
with Congress. Soon afterwards, $10,000 was
appropriated by Congress for the organization of
a survey board, which would visit the Canal Zone
school system.

The committee left New York, March 18, 1930,
on the S. S. Ancon, and reached Cristobal, March
26. The survey lasted about three weeks.

In the course of their examination, the survey-
ors gave "achievement and intelligence tests" to
many of the pupils of our Canal Zone schools. Our
pupils were found to be from one-half to one full



grade in advance of the average pupils of the
States. Spelling and arithmetic tests showed
Canal Zone children a halt-year ahead of the
pupils of the same grades and ages in the United
States. High school students also averaged high-
er than those in the United States, and in social
studies the twelfth grade made an average score
of 42, as compared with 32 for the average pupil
in the United States.

The results of the tests given in Cristobal High
School were very gratifying. Elsie Darley and
Mavis Thirlwall, both Seniors, received the high-
est averages of the school. Elsie Darley made a
score in English which is the highest ever made
by any student who has been gi*ien the test in the
United States by a Columbia University Survey
Committee.

As a result of this survey, there will be, no
doubt, many improvements made in the Canal
Zone schools; both in the courses of education
offered and in the school buildings themselves.
Already we feel the results in Cristobal High
School, for Trigonometry and Chemistry are to be
added to the list of courses for next year. Many
changes will take place, also, in the school build-
ings, if the recommendations of the survey board
are followed completely. It is expected that new
buildings will be built in the near future, and more
complete equipment added.

If the Canal Zone pupils showed such high
intelligence without all this equipment, what
height will they attain when they are given more
advantages? Parents of Canal Zone pupils
should feel highly satisfied with the schools here,
since it has been shown that the education their
children are receiving is as good as that offered in
the schools of the United States, if not better.

There was mutual satisfaction between the
Canal Zone teachers and the members of the com-
mittee. The former found the surveyors very
agreeable and pleasant to work with, while the
latter considered our teachers above the average.

The surveyors all stated that they were well
pleased with Panama. In addition to their trips
trom Balboa to Cristobal, several side-trips were
taken to many of the places of interest which
Panama has to offer. A visit was made to Old
Panama, and another trip was arranged by Mr.
Sawyers to San Lorenzo. The committee left
Cristobal on the S. S. Cristobal, April 13, com-
pletely satisfied with the results of their work.



S8



THE CARIBBEAN.



m=



A complete report of the Survey Board will be
available in booklet form the first of July. Of the
2~ experts ot the survey committee, four are on
the regular faculty ot Teachers College, Columbia
University, while the remaining are all experienced
educators who are working for advanced degrees
at Columbia University. The committee was
made up of the following:



Dr. X. L. E.VGELHARDT

Dr. W. S. Elsbree



Mr. W. B. Longman
Mr. W. B. Featherstone



Dr. Carter .Alexander
Mr. R. L. Hamon

Mr. GlV L. HiLLSBEE

Mr. I. O. Friswold
Mr. L. P. YovNG
Mr. Charles F. Reid
Mr. R. W. Bell
Mr. H. F. .Alves
Mr. C. K. Morse
Mr. Grant Rahn
Mr. J. H. Smith




cbating: Club.

Carlos Rankin, 'j/.



Mr. Fred F. Beach
Mr. V. C. NicKLAS
Mr. Calvin F. Dengler
Mr. H. C. Wysong
Mr. Harlev Z. Wooden
Mr. Henry S. Cirtis
Mr. J. Flint Waller
Miss Evelyn Horton
Miss Helen Thorp
Mr. J. E. Schott
Miss Rae Sanders



'^




=



=a




Debating Club.



The Cristobal High School Debating Club has
been organized for only two years, and as yet has
not attracted much attention among the pupils.

Meetings are held once a month in school hours,
during the last two periods of the day. The
debates are between members of the club, for as
yet there have been no interscholastic debates.
Miss Kimbro is adviser to the Club. The other



officers are: Evelyn Ganzmueller, President; Vir-
ginia Stevenson, Vice-President; Celeste Clark,
Secretary and Treasurer; and Carlos Rankin,
Chairman of Program Committee.

Since the idea is rather new with us, and the
membership is not too large, much is to be hoped
tor in the future.



THE CARIBBEAN.



89



0\xt of ^djool ^o\it^.







MR 19742 12



90



THE CARIBBEAN.




High School Glee Club.



THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL GLEE
CLUB AND ORCHESTRA.

Eleanor Reinlwld, 'j2.

The outstanding event of the school year for the
Glee Club and Orchestra, was the production of a
well known operetta "The Gypsy Rover." It
was a great success and the Glee Club students and
orchestra were highly complimented on their
splendid work. Miss Ertel, who directed the
play, deserves a great deal of credit for producing
such a finished performance.

Three times a week from 1.20 to 2.10 o'clock,
the High School Glee Club meets. Students



hear "blue" notes and true notes during this
music period. On Monday the boys meet;
Tuesday the girls meet; and Wednesday, a com-
bination class of boys and girls meet.

Miss Florence Ertel is the instructress. To
sponsor the Glee Club, one must be especially
patient, and much credit must be given to Miss
Ertel in that respect.

The Glee Club is not very large, having twice
as many girls as boys. Well-known composers
are studied and their compositions sung.

The High School Orchestra meets once a week
on Tuesday, from J to 5 o'clock.



THE CARIBBEAN.



91




Iligli ScKoul OrcliCiira.



CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL SONG.

(Tune: Lei Ihe Rest of the World Co By.)



We've come to sing the praise,

A hearty cheer to raise,
For the school we love so dear.

Our own Cristobal High.
We'll honor her name,

Increase her fame.
Through passing years 'twill be the same;

The best on the Zone.



She's second to none,

We're glad to claim her for our own,
Our very own.

O, yes, we've found her the best.
North, East, South, or West.

She's our own school
Cristobal High.



OUR YELL.



Say!

Say what?

That's what!

What's what?

That's what they all sav!

What do they all say?

C-C-R-I-S-T-T-O-B-A-L

CRISTOBAL!



92



THE CARIBBEAN.



POPULARITY CONTEST.




Best Looking Boy Richard Wood (Junior^.

Most Popular Boy Thomas Pescod (Junior).

Wittiest Student William "Fitty" Newman (Senior).



Queen of the Carnival Margaret Mitchell (Junior).

Best Looking Ciirl Violet Randall (Freshman).

Most Popular Girl Pete Wardlaw (Sophomore).



THE CARIBBEAN.



93




JHopg* Itljleticsi,



Thomas Pescod, 'ji.



SOCCER.

Our second year ot soccer ball was not
very successful although many new faces
were seen on our team.

On the 24th of November, Balboa de-
feated Cristobal in their first game of the
interscholastic series. The score of 10-3
proves that it was an uninteresting game.

No sooner had Cristobal kicked off
than Balboa scored the first goal. The
scoring increased as the game went on
and at the end of the first halt Balboa had
scored seven goals to Cristobal's two.

In the'second half, Balboa scored three
more goals, making a grand total of 10.
Near the end of the game, Cristobal's
forward, by passing and dribbling, scored
another goal.

M. Dew and Salterio brothers were the
stars of the game, scoring goals at will.
On the defensive Hele and Booth proved
too strong for our forwards.

Cristobal did not have any stars, but
the good playing of .Arnesen, Pescod, and
Conkling saved Cristobal from a blank.

On the 31st of November, Cristobal
High School defeated Balboa High School
in their second game of the interscholastic
soccer ball series at Cristobal. The score
was 3 to 2.

The first half started with the grounds
somewhat wet. .At the sound of the
whistle, the game started. Both teams
showed marvelous pass-work and com-
bination in the early part of this half.
Nearing the latter part of the half, Cris-
tobal came through with the first goal of
the game. .After some minutes of plav
the whistle ended the first half.

Cristobal came back strong in the last
halt and scored twice in succession. In



this half, Cristobal was showing Balboa
their ability to pass as well as score.
Nearing the end of the game, Cristobal
showed signs of weakening, when Balboa
surprised the crowd by scoring twice.
The game ended with the score 3-2 in
favor of Cristobal.

Cristobal played a much better game
than Balboa. There was no individual
playing in this game, but much credit
should be given to our goalkeeper,
Edward Conkling.

Balboa won the last and deciding game
by the score of 5-2.

During the first five minutes ot play it
started to rain, making the field some-
what wet. This rain and mud did not
trouble Balboa's players as they scored
three goals before the first halt ended. In
this half Dew was responsible for two of
these goals and De La Pena scored the
other one.

The second halt found Cristobal fight-
ing tor the ball near the Balboa goal.
.Arnesen made good his opportunity to
kick and scored. -A little later T. Pescod
found the goal for another tally. Cris-
tobal seemed to weaken near the end of
this halt when Balboa scored twice, one
by Solterio and the other one by Hele.
The game ended with the score 5-2 in
favor of Balboa, thereby giving them the
pennant for the second year.

The line up in all three games was as
follows:

Balboa.

J. Mitter, Goalkeeper
J. Booth, Fullback
H. Jones, Fullback
J. Salterio, C. Halfback



B. Michaelsen, R. Halfback
.A. Salterio, L. Halfback
W. Hele, C. Forward

J. Salterio, R. Forward i goal
S. Fields, L. Forward
M. Dew, L. Forward i goal
M. De La Pena, R. Forward

Cristobal.

E. Conkling, Goalkeeper

\V. Wikingstad, R. Fullback

R. Wood, L. Fullback

T. Pescod, C. Halt back i goal

K. Maurer, L. Halfback

C. Rankin, R. Halfback

O. Arnesen, C. Forward i goal
C. Pescond, L. Forward i goal
T. Rankin, R. Forward
M. Marchosky, R. Forward
R. Wikingstad, L. Forward

H.ANDB.ALL.

A new sport was introduced to inter-
scholastic activities; that being handball.

Balboa defeated Cristobal on the 12th
of April by the score ot three single games
and one double to Cristobal's one double.

First singles game.
I. H. Jones 21

T. Pescod 17

2. H. Jones 21

T. Pescod 1 8

In this game, T. Pescod had the game
on ice, but Jones' placement tired him out,
causing him to lose in the end.

Second singles game.

W. Hele 21

T. Murphy 9

W. Hele 21

T. Murphy 4



94



THE CARIBBEAN.



Hele was too strong tor Murphy who
was unable to return without losing the
points.

Third singles game.

I. A. Hele a I

R. Wikingstad lo

:. A. Hele 21

R. Wikingstad 10

R. Wikingstad is not a "singles" player
but he is a "doubles." Hele was victo-
rious because of his fine placement and
Wikingstad's poor returns.

First doubles game.

I. W. and A. Hele 11

T. Murphy and M. Wheeler ic
2. W. and A. Hele 21

T. Murphy and M. Wheeler 17
The first game was a see-saw aflFair from
the first. It was very hard to choose the
winner. In the second game, Balboa
came from the rear to win by a slight mar-
gin.

Second doubles game.

I. T. Rankin and E. Conkling 21

H. Jones and Kaleb 1 1

2. H. Jones and Kaleb 21

T. Rankin and E. Conkling 10

J. T. Rankin and E. Conkling 21
H. Jones and Kaleb 16

The last doubles game proved to be the
best one. Conkling's placement and T.
Rankin's fine returns won the game for
Cristobal. In the second game, Cristobal
seemed to have lost interest and was de-
feated by Jones and Kaleb. The third
game saw Cristobal come from the rear to
win the deciding game. Conkling again
displayed his ability to place.

SWIMMING.

Five records sank in the wake of natant
speeders at the Balboa swimming pool on
the 26th of April, when Balboa High
School swimming team swamped Cris-
tobal High School team by the score of
44-3. The girls were also defeated by the
score of 50-9.

Walston and Brewerton, two of Bal-
boa's outstanding stars, were responsible
for two new records.

In the 100-yard free style event,
Walston trailed his partner Humphrey
for 90 yards, but nearing the finish W'al-
ston added more power to finish by
about six inches ahead.



In the 200-yard race Grant, of Balboa,
was going like a motor boat for eight laps,
but 20 yards from the finish line, Brewer-
ton crept up bit by bit finishing a few feet
ahead of Grant,

Wood and Schwinderman also crashed
into famedom by shattering the old
records in the backstroke and the breast-
stroke event, and Balboa's relay team,
consisting of Wood, Grant, Humphrey's,
and Walston, went the 176 yards in i
minute 284I5 seconds to establish a
record, at the same time defeating Cris-
tobal's relay team.

Among the girls, Fern Kyleber made a
great exhibition of how one should dive.
She defeated the best divers from Cris-
tobal and collected a grand total of 89
points.

The results were as follows:

Boys 220-yard Swim.

1. Brewerton (B. H. S.) Time, 2
minutes, 33 seconds.

2. Grant (B. H. S.).

3. KroU (C. H. S.)

Gir/s ^o-yard Swim.

1. Kathleen Conord (B. H. S.). Time,

30 seconds.

2. Wood (B. H. S.).

3. Bliss (C. H. S).

Boys ^o-yard Swim.

1. Walston (B. H. S.). Time 24 sec-
onds.

2. Wood (B. H. S.)

3. Mundberg (C. H. S.)

Boys lOO-yard Swim.

1. Walston (B. H. S.) Time 59 2/3
seconds.

2. Humphreys (B. H. S.).

3. Grant (B. H. S.).

Girls /00-yard Swim.

1. Kathleen Conord (B.H. S.). Time,
I minute.

2. Sarah Pyle (B. H. S.).

Boys ^0-yard Breaslslroke.

I. Schwinderman (B. H. S.). Time,

31 seconds.



2. Westendorf (B. H. S.).

3. Jones (B. H. S.).

Girls so-yard Breaslslroke.

1. R. Quinn (B. H. S.). Time, 42 1/5
seconds.

2. E. Van Clief (B. H. S.).

3. Hall (C. H. S.).

Boys 50-yard Backslroke.

1. Wood (B. H. S.). Time 31 seconds.

2. Kroll (C. H. S.).

3. Jones (B. H. S.).

Girts 50-yard Backstroke.

1. J. Halderman (B. H. S.).

2. E. Van Clief (B. H. S.).

3. V. Stevenson (C. H. S.).

Boys Relay Race.

Won by Balboa Team. Time i min-
ute, 28 4/5 seconds. Wood, Grant,
Humphreys, and Walston.

Girls Relay Race.

Won by Balboa Team. Time I min-
ute, 50 seconds. K. Conord, S. Pvle,
R. Quinn, and J. Halderman.

Boys Fancy Diving.

1. H. Brewerton (B. H. S.).

2. B. Turner (C. H. S.).

3. B. Hackett (,C. H. S.).

Girls Fancy Diving.

1. Fern Kyleber (B. H. S.)

2. Rita Quinn (B. H. S.).

3. Sara Pyle (B. H. S.).

BASEBALL.

As is the custom a series of three games
were scheduled between the Cristobal and
Balboa High Schools. However, since
Balboa won thefirst twogames by a close
score, the third game was not necessary.

The contests this year in baseball were
exceptionally good; each team displaying
much ability and skill in this major sport.
The box-scores of the two games are as
follows:



THE CARIBBEAN.



95




Cristobal High School Baseball Team which represented the Sea Scouts in the Twilight Baseball League.
Fro7n left to right: Mr. Sawyers, manager; Randolph Wikingstad. Walter Wikingstad, Edward Conkling, Kenneth Maurer. Raymond Will,
Richard Wood. Kneeling: Cliarles Pescod. Tom Pescod, Mandi Marchosky.
This team lost the series to Balboa High School.



FIRST GAME.

Cristobal AB R H

Marchosky, c. . 4 i i

C. Pescod, cf. . 2 I o

Wertz, If 4 o

T. Pescod, ,5b. .. J I

W. Wik'stad, 2b. 4 i

Will, rf 4 o

R. Wik'stad, 1 b. 4 o

Egolf, ss 4 o

Maurer, p 3 i



PO A

9
3

o



Total 32 5 5

Balbo.i AB R H

Morrison, cf . 4 o i

Dick, 2b 3 I I

Specht, 3b 5 o o

Hele, ss 5 2 i

Des Londes, p.. 434

Dew, If 4 I 2

Mitten, ib 4 o o

De La Pena, rt 2 o o

Jones, c 4 o o



PO

o
o
I



Total



-35 7



15 4



Score by innings.

Team i 23456789 -T

Cristobal 00000500 o 5

Balboa 00032000 2 7

Summary: Home runs Des Londes.
Struck out By Des Londes 10, by Maur-
ar, 9. Base on balls Off Des Londes 2
off Maurer, 2. Hit by pitcher Dick b\
Maurer, Pescod by Des Londes.
Umpires Raphael and Bell.

SECOND GAME.
Balboa High AB R H PO A E

5 o



Morrison, cf

Dick, 2b 4

Hele, ss 5

Des Londes, p.. 4

Dew, If 3

Specht, 3b 4

Mitten, lb 2

Jones, c 4

De La Pena, rf 4



o
o
I
o
I

13

10

o



Total.



35



14 5



Cristobal High AB R H PO

Marchosky, c . 3 o i 6

C. Pescod, cf . . 5 I o I

Wertz, If 5 1 2 4

T. Pescod, 3b. . 4012

W. Wik'stad, 2b. 4 o i 2

R. Wik'stad, ib.. 3 o o 9

Wood, rf 4 o I I

EgoU, ss 4 o I 2

Maurer, p 4 I i o



Total 36 3 S 27 9 2

Score by innings.

Team i 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9-T

Balboa o I 0000 I o 2 4

Cristobal 00200000 i 3

Summary: Struck out by Des Londes
1 1, by Maurer 7. Walked by Des Lon-
des I, by Maurer 2. Triple T. Pescod
Double Wertz. Umpire Pescod.



96



THE CARIBBEAN.




Cristobal High School Swiming Team.



A CRUISE ON THE ANNETTA I.

Tl.is article taken from TAc Star and Hirald of Thursday,
November 21, 1929.



Cri.stoi!.\l, No\-ember 19. When the motor-
ship Ayinctia I warped her weary way into the
Cristohal docks last night, a tired but exceedingly
happy and well indoctrinated aggregation of men
and boys piled out on to the docks with duffel
bags and souvenirs from the San Bias country,
ranging from shell beads to trained parrots, cayu-
cos and knick-knacks of all descriptions. It was
the finish of the .Sea Scouts cruise to the San Bias
country, the second cruise made by this organi-
zation since its inception on the Isthmus within
the past few months, the first cruise being a
week-end affair to Porto Bello.



LOG OF THE MOTOR SHIP ANNETTA I.

Friday, 15 November, 1929.

8.00 to 12.00 p. m.

At 10.15 cast off lines from Pier No. 6, Cristobal, C. Z., and
proceeded on various courses and speeds to clear docks and at
10.35 passed East Breakwater Light abeam. Took departure
on East Breakwater Light and at 10.35 set at 40 true for
Farallon Sucio, R. de P., sea moderate, sky partly overcast,
wind N. E.

1 2. CO to 4. CO a. m., 16 November, 1929.

Relieved the wheel and lookouts. Weather thickening,
wind increasing and with intermittent rain squalls. .At 12.30
a. m. sighted Farallon Sucio Light one point on the starboard
bow. ."^t 1. 31 Farallon Sucio Light abeam, distance i and
and J miles. At 1.38 changed course E. N. E. ht 2.25 Isla
Grande abeam, changed course E.

4.00 to 8.00 a. m.

Relieved the wheel and lookouts. Weather as before, wind
N. E. increasing in force, sea rough with rain .squalls. Ship



THE CARIBBEAN.



97



acting well under stress but most passengers well under the
weather. At (S.45 sighted San Bias Point and commenced
steering various courses to round shoal waters proceeding
into Porvenir Island.

8.00 to 12.00 noon.

Relieved the wheel and lookouts. .At S.jo anchored in 4
fathoms of water about 100 yards off Customs House, Porvenir
Island, San Bias. Presented ship's papers to port officials and
were granted treedom of the port and permission to visit San
Bias country with the exception of Carte Islands. .'\t 8.45
scrubbed down decks and held general field day; aired bedding.
Sent swimming party ashore and over the ship's side. At
9.55 piped down to breakfast. Al 10.45 weighed anchor and
got underway for Mandinga Harbor, Mate Terwilliger conning,
on various courses and speeds. .At 11.30 passed over shoal
waters in the vicinity of Nellie and Lena Cays, Robeson
Islands and struck ship's bottom on an unknown object.
Passed over clear without grounding. On giving signal on
engine-room telegraph and answering same on engines, no way
was made. Investigation proved propeller to be missing.
Drifted toward Mandinga Harbor and at about 1 1.45 dropped
anchor.

12.00 to 4.00 p. m.

Sent party of 4 men to vicinity of shoal waters to search for
propeller. Propeller located and brought back to ship.
Determined that shafting had been corroded and was less
than one-halt solid shaft twisted and snapped off immediately
aft ot shaft strut. Impossible to replace or repair with local
facilities.

4.00 to 8.00 p. m,

About 4.15 yacht Rolling Stone (Robert Wilcox, Colon,
owner) sighted proceeding to Mandinga Harbor. Distress
signals made by semaphore, inverted ensign, andrevolvershots.
Rolling Stone unable to intercept (or interpret) signals. At
5.30 party ot 4 men put off in dory to visit Rolling Stone and
request assistance in returning some men to Colon. Native
San Bias despatched with note to Governor at Porvenir re-
questing tow by Government launch Presidente. At 8.30,
Presidente picked up the 4 men on Rolling Stone and returned
them to the Annetta I. Robert Wilcox promised tow to
Porvenir Island in morning. (Note. Presidente had insuffi-
cient power for towing). Governor San Bias despatched
motor canoe to Colon to request tow by Maria Christina,
owned by .Antonio Tagaropulos.

12.00 to 4.00 p. m.

Anchored as before, no remarks.

4. CO to 8.00 a. m.

Anchored as before, no remarks.

8.00 to 12.00 a. m.

At 8.45 yacht Rolling Stone came alongside and took
Annetta I in tow. Underway at 8.57. At 10.28 threw o'ff
tow line; brought ship up into the wind and anchored in 4
fathoms ot water off Customs House at Porvenir. At 11. cx)
sent swimming and recreation party ashore on Porvenir
Island. Fishing party lett tor Chichime Cays on launch
Presidente. Yacht Rolling Stone shoved off on trolling trip
off San Bias Point.

12.00 to 4.00 p. m.



Held boxing bouts ashore, cayuco races and general recre-
ation. At 2.00 Standard Fruit Company ship Wanks rounded
Porvenir Island and proceeded into Mandinga Harbor.

4.00 to 8.00 p. m.

Liberty and recreation parties ashore. One watch aboard
(12 men) to clean ship. General seamanship instruction held
on board.

8.00 to 12.00 p. m.

Men were permitted to sleep ashore on point and in Gover-
nor's vacated house. Shore patrol maintained during watch.
Took on provisions from local store.

12.00 to 4.00 a. m.

Anchored as betbre. Shore patrol maintained during
watch in vicinity of men sleeping ashore.

4.00 to 8.00 a. m.

At 6.45 sighted Maria Christina off San Bias Point. Along-
side and towing lines bent on at 7.25 shoved off on tow line for
Colon, at approximately 4 knots per hour. After clearing
San Bias Point, held field day.

8.00 to 12.00 noon.

During morning held general instructions in seamanship,
signals, and navigation. Special instructions to crew leaders.
Upon completion of instructions boxing bouts held in midship
hold.

12.00 to 4.00 p. m.

Sighted 2 planes from Naval .Air Station, Coco Solo, at about
1. 00 p. m. Planes circled ship several times and received
semaphore messages from Annetta I that all was well. Planes
did not descend to water but proceeded in the general direction
of Cristobal.

4.00 to 8.00 p. m.

Underway as before. Recreation, singing, and radio con-
cert held, conducted by instructor Mr. Unterberg.

8.00 to 12.00.

Clearing ships for disembarkation. At 11. 30 passed through
breakwater and proceeded to Pier No. 6, Cristobal. All hands
ashore at 12.10 a. m.



ROSTER OF OFFICERS AND CREW.



Captain Charles E. Russey, U. S. N. (Sea Scouts of .America.)

Mate .Albert E. Terwilliger (Sea Scouts of America.)

Mate Frank W. Paulson, U. S. N. (Sea Scouts of America.)



INSTRUCTORS.

Mr. Unterberg, Radio.

Mr. Halvorson, Engineering and Electrical.

Mr. George Conright, Steward and Commissary.



Passengers. Mr. Sawyers, Principal, Cristobal High School;
Mr. Pence, Instructor, Cristobal High School; Mr. Pierson,
Mr. Nielson.



Sea Scouts. C. .Alberga, W. Beard, K. Booth, Ted. Brandon,

C. Campbell, J. Campbell, Jack Campbell, W. Diers,
P. Digman, D. Eberenz, J. Eberenz, F. Ehrman, C. Gould,

D. Gregory, B. Hackett, P. Hanna, J. Hearn, C. Hill, H. Lee,
M. Marchosky, D. Wood, R. Marshall.



MR 19742 U



98



THE CARIBBEAN.




Girls' Athletic Association.



THE CARIBBEAN.



99



ffi




Celeste Clarke^ '?/.




=S



GIRLS' ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION.

Mavis Thirlwatl, 'jo.

The Girls' Athletic Association of Cristobal
High School, has been organized tor several years,
and has now become one of the important organi-
zations ot our school. With the enthusiastic co-
operation of the girls, its membership increases
yearly.

The object of this organization is to promote



girls' athletics in the school and encourage a
lively interest in basket ball, volley ball, baseball,
swimming, tennis, and other sports. Girls making
a total ot 500 points in any sports during their four
years in Cristobal High School receive, in recog-
nition of their work, the otficial letter "C".
Many girls proudly boast of their letters. This
plan of reward has helped greatly to increase the
interest in the Girls' Athletic .Association.



VOLLEY B.ALL REVIEW.



CUira Frisk

Celeste Clarke (Captain)

Marion Neely

Gladys Bliss

Dorothy Birkeland

Fllizabeth Thornton

Miss Potts, new coach at Cristobal this
year, started volley ball practice with
about thirty girls out. Cristobal met
Balboa in the first game of the season,
November 16, 1929, losing this game by a
large score. Cristobal was defeated in
the second and last game ot the season,
November 23, 1929.

B.ASKET B.^LL REVIEW.

TEAM.

Gladys Bliss, f
Mary Clark (Captain), f
\'irginia Stevenson, f
Celeste Clarke, g
Dorothy Birkeland, g
.Alice Gormerly, re
Clara Frisk, jc



Miss Bailey, our regular coach, re-
turned in time for basket ball practice.
Cristobal played two games, one Feb-
ruary 8, and the other February 15,
losing them both to Balboa High School.



B.ASEB-ALL REVIEW.



Gladys Bliss
Velma Hall
Mary Clark
Dorothy Birkeland
Ruth Wikingstad
Clara Frisk
Betty Stetler
Elizabeth Thornton
Ellen Frisk

Cristobal made a better showing in the
baseball season by winning a hard fought
game from Balboa, The score was 18-I4.
Balboa took the championship by de-
feating the Gold Coast team in two games
with a a score of 28-18,33-1 1.



TENNIS REMEW.

Singles.

."Ann Powers

Doubles.

Pauline Herman
Velma Hall



.Ann Powers
Bettina Powers
Dorothy Birkeland
Margaret Mitchell
Pauline Herman
Velma Hall
Dorothy Wertz
Gladys Bliss



Cristobal traveled to Balboa March 27,
where they were defeated by a score of
two sets out of three.



lOO



THE CARIBBEAN.




Rtjf Bliss, 'jo.

Oct. I. The beginning, start, and commencing Oct. 21. One of those "Blue Mondays" that

of school. Introducing the new English teacher, you so often hear of. It rained continually

Miss Kimbro, from the States, and we are also during the whole day, making us all, especially

honored by having Mr. Meyer, of Balboa, with us. the students, lazy.

Oct. 2. Home rooms assigned to the various Oct. 22. Seniors learned from their president,

classes. Seniors, being a "hot bunch," were the well-chosen Ralph Crum, that they were to

naturally given the coolest corner in the building. have no privileges. This being due to the fact

Oct. 3. Behold! I perceive a mass of un- that last year's class took advantage of them.

adorned heads approaching me! Hold every- I^on't you fear, we're going to write a petition to

thing! It's only the bald-headed freshmen. Mr. Sawyers and demand a try out! Yes siree!

Oct. 4. Seniors elected their class officers. Our Oct. 23. Steamship Cm/oW docked, but no
adviser is none other than the ever-dependable
Miss Hesse.



Oct. 7. Discovered there are over 50 "Fresh-
ies" this year. Decided to let them have the
assembly all to themselves, providing they be-
have. Beware, "Freshies," it all depends on you.

Oct. 9. Hurray! Four more Seniors arrived
on "ye goode ole tub," the S. S. Ancon. There
are 25 of us now, but we expect more.

Oct. 10. Introduced to our new athletic



more Seniors for our class. Sad, but true!

Oct. 24. Tragedy! First white slips of the
year politely delivered to several individuals.

Oct. 2;. Seniors decide to give a Cake Sale
at "Commy" to-morrow morning, m order to feed
the class treasury.

Oct. 28. Cake Sale was fairly a success. In
meeting this morning the Seniors decided to give
a Candy Sale at school in the near future.

Oct. 2g. Keep cool, lower classmen! Seniors



directress, Miss Potts. She's real snappy looking are planning for their party, so it has been rumor-
and has some niftv ideas about gvm for this vear. ed.



Oct. 30. Hallowe'en greetings! I wonder
what damage the goblins (in other words the
dare-devils of C. H. S.) will do to the school?

Oct. 31. Believe it or not, the schoolhouse still
stands in the same "dear old spot!" Guess the
dare-devils went to bed early or else they weren't
in the humor to tackle the janitor. Something
drastic may happen yet. Who knows?

Nov. I. One month in the Temple of Learning,

Oct. 17. Teachers have pupils well in hand or should I say of merely sitting in classes, gone

by this time (or vice versa). by. Supper Club meeting this p. m. An

Oct. 18. We all, teachers included, heartily enormous attendance is expected as Senior girls

welcomed this Friday. And any other Friday, are serving, and they know their "onions" when

as far as that goes. it comes to pleasing the "tum-tum."



She surely did make a hit with us girls.

Oct. II. "Crazy" party given at Y. W. C. A.
to welcome the new secretary. Miss Van Every
(who immediately won the favor of the Girl
Reserves) and the new members of the faculty.

Oct. 16. Staff members for The Caribbean-
elected. Undoubtedly we shall surpass all the
preceding efforts in publishing the best annual
yet. Just wait and see!



THE CARIBBEAN.



lOI



Nov. 2. A trip to Porto Bello was enjoyed by
several members of the faculty and a number of
students.

Nov. 4. Three cheers for the Panamanians!
On their account to-day is a holiday. A group
of C. H. S. students went on a picnic to "Shimmy
Beach" to celebrate the day.

Nov. 5. Behold! Our city is being approached
by a mass of fire! Calm yourself, it's only the
sunburned picnickers.

Nov. 6. Seniors gave out the invitations tor
their class party. It's to be given at Hotel
Washington, this Friday. Steamship Ancon ar-
rived this morning and lucky tor us it brought
one more Senior.

Nov. 7. Are you all prepared tor the first-class
party of the year? I imagine all the little "Fresh-
ies" are "tickled pink" at the thought of going
to a Senior Class Party. I only hope they don't
act too wild out in society.

Nov. 8. Senior party was a huge success.
Everybody made "whoopee" and danced to their
hearts' (or should I say feet) content to the
vo-do-dee-o-do's of Welch's Harmony Boys.
We were honored by having "Wee Willy" Wil-
liams dance a specialty, which was highly ap-
plauded.

Nov. 9. The Balboa and Pedro Miguel Supper
Club cabinets met with the Cristobal cabinet on an
all day conference. They made an excellent
budget of events for this year. Are planning to
have the annual conference at Moro Island this
year. Hot dogs! We'll all be there with bells on
(and a little more of course!).

Nov. II. Armistice Day! Here's hoping the
teachers are peaceful when they put our grades on
our report cards to-morrow.

Nov. 12. Discovered that we have three "A"
pupils for the first term. One of the "A" students
is a Senior at that. There are 19 "B" students.
Not so bad for C. H. S., eh?

Nov. 13. Sea Scouts gave a dance at the Club-
house to raise funds for their trip next summer.
Immense crowd was there, must have made some
"dough." Three cheers for the Sea Scouts!

Nov. 1 4. Boys' Athletic Association planning
to give Cake Sale at the "Commy" this Saturday
in order to make money tor their letters, etc.

Nov. 15. Sea Scouts, also Mr. Sawyers and
Mr. Pence, left by boat for San Bias at 10 o'clock
to-night. Over 50 boys went on the trip.



Nov. 16. Cristobal girls came in second in a
volley ball game versus Balboa girls. S'too bad.
Boys' Athletic Association did fairly well on the
Cake Sale. Being so near Thanksgiving, they
couldn't expect too much.

No. 17. Sea Scouts were due home again from
their San Bias trip, but there is no sign of them.
Learned that they lost their propeller, so will be a
day late.

Nov. 18. School seemed mighty bare without
the Sea Scouts and Messrs. Sawyers and Pence.
Wonder who's bright idea it was to loosen the
propeller?

Nov. 19. A sorry bunch of seasick Sea Scouts
attended school this morning. But in spite of
their trials and tribulations each and every one of
'em had a dandy time on the trip. Our principal
is slightly sunburned. Report, he rested out on
deck.

Nov. 20. Strange sounds were heard from the
Caesar class during 4th period. Later learned
that their assignment had been to write a parody
in Latin. Here's hoping we'll see some of those
parodies in The Caribbean.

Nov. 21. French class made posters written
in French for their assignment to-day. Leave it
to Miss Moore to make a class interesting.
"Fitty" Newman's poster was well chosen as best.

Nov. 22. Girls approached the school in
fancy dress this p. m. The boys upon questioning
"Where's the banquet?" learned there was a
matinee party at the Y. W. C. A. for the Supper
Club girls.

Nov. 23. We lost in a volley ball game versus
Balboa girls. Boys went to Balboa to play
soccer. Wonder what the outcome will be.

Nov. 25. Sad but true, the boys lost in the
soccer game. But Oivend Arnessen is our star
player. Let's have more like him.

Nov. 26. The Caribbean staff are starting to
work early this year. Having a meeting this
p. m. Intend to put out a bigger and better no, I
didn't say louder and funnier annual this year.

Nov. 27. Some of the teachers were very kind-
hearted and didn't give us homework during
Thanksgiving holiday something to be thankful
tor. I guess they realize how hard it is to try and
study when you're on a vacation.

Nov. 28. Thanks to the Puritans, to-day is
a holiday. I guess there will be fewer turkeys and
more tummy-aches by the end of this day.



I02



THE CARIBBEAN.



Nov. 2g. I don't know wh)' to-day is made a
holiday unless the "calendar makers" are wise
emit to know that it would be useless to try and
make us attend school, on account of the over-
abundance of food contained in our abdomens.

Nov. 30. Another month in the Temple of
Knowledge has terminated. (I wonder if we are
one month wiser?) Balboa team was defeated by
CRISTOBAL in a soccer game. Hurray! Only
reason why we didn't win last Saturday was be-
cause we played on Balboa grounds.

Dec. I. At last Christmas is drawing nigh!
Girl Reserves gave a "rummage sale" at the Silver
Clubhouse. We had loads of fun but the "shines"
got the best of the bargain, we think. Dresses
were being sold at a nickel apiece! Imagine it!

Dec. 2. A true blue Monday. Those few
days off from school were just a "tease." It was
such an effort for us all to drag ourselves to school
this a. m.



Dec.



Miss Hesse aroused the sleepy stu-



dents in Spanish class to-day. Brought some
interesting articles which she purchased on her
trip in Peru. Dressed Tom Pescod as a Peruvian
and he surely looked the part, except that the
hat wouldn't fit. Must be a swellhead, eh?

Dec. 4. Had a staff meeting this p. m. and are
planning to give a "Staff Hop" on Friday, 13th.
Sh-h-h! We're going to find out who's supersti-
tious in this man's town.

Dec. 5. Rained cats and dogs to-day, so if we
pupils are late to school they'll have to blame the
wet grass through which we usually make our
short cuts. Ha! Ha! One point for us pupils.

Dec. 6. Supper Club meeting to-night. Junior
girls are serving. (I'll bet everyone eats at home
first.)

Dec. 7. Miss Kimbro took her Junior English
class over to Balboa to visit the Panama-American
Building. Final soccer game was played in
Balboa and we didn't win cause it was terribly
hot and our star player can't stand the heat.
(Pretty good excuse, me thinks. j

Dec. 9. Theday of miracles has come! Believe
it or not Virginia Eberenz paid her dues to-day.

Dec. 10. Had a staff meeting this afternoon.
Tickets for the Staff Hop were given out. They're
nifty looking. Each staff member has to sell at
least five tickets or else

Dec. II. Lower grades are giving a Christmas
play, "Topsy Turvy," to-morrow afternoon. It



was very cleverly announced this morning.
(Two children with their faces on backwards
visited all the rooms.)

Dec. 12. The play went off excellently this
p. m. and proved to us that many of these tots
are very talented. An enormous crowd gathered
at the Clubhouse to see the play.

Dec. 13. A Friday at that! An "unsupcrsti-
tious" crowd turned out at the "Staff Hop," which
was a fair success. Everyone had a dandy time.

Dec. 16. Had a beauty and popularit)- con-
test to-day among the C. H. S. students. Pete
Wardlaw and Tommy Pescod were voted the
most popular boy and girl. \'iolet Randall and
Dick Wood were voted the best looking. And
last but not least "Fitty" Newman was voted
the wittiest. .Also, Miss Moore was voted as the
best-liked teacher of C. H. S. Three cheers for
the winners of the contest. Rah! Rah! Rah!

Dec. 17. Sea Scouts played baseball against
Fort De Lesseps, but we lost. Sad but true.
Don't you worry, we intend to win the next game
by a wide margin.

Dec. 18. Making plans for our Christmas
party in our class rooms on Friday. "Gonna
have ice cream, cake, 'n everything."

Dec. 19. Pupils seem to be celebrating
Christmas already. Think vacation starts to-day,
according to the "rumpus" they're raising.
Teachers managed to quiet 'em down by threaten-
ing to assign more homework unless they "act
their age." (Maybe I should say, "stop acting
their age.")

Dec. 20. Each class raised "whoopee" in their
home room in order to celebrate Christmas and the
vacation to come. Exchanged gifts, had cake,
candy, ice cream, etc. A regular banquet, no
foolin! Hurra)'! We don't have to come back
to "Sing Sing" till December 30th!

Holidays! Good times! Fun galore! Whoopee!
MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYBODY!

Was Santa Claus good to you? Heigh Ho!

Dec. 30. "Gee, but I hate to get up in the
morning" tra-la-la-la-la-la-la. Boy, Man, we
students were not hurrying along to school this
morning! We wonder if this day will ever end.
What'sa matter? Too much Christmas cele-
bration, I guess.

Dec. 31. For a New Year's present from the
faculty we students received our report cards.



THE CARIBBEAN.



103



\\'hat a gift! But we only have to go to school
to 12 o'clock to-day. Our afternoon is tree!
Whoopee! and some Whoopee! ^^'e can start
celebrating at 12.05.

Jan. I, 1930. Snappy New Year, everybody.

Jan. 2. It may be a New Year but "Ye old
T. O. L." appears the same this morning. I
believe the "calendar makers" are trying to
tease us giving us a holiday every now and then.

Jan. 3. Ah! Blessed Friday has come around
again! Many of the Beauty contestants tor
the Miami Beauty Contest are from C. H. S.
Went to Balboa to-day to be measured and given
the once-over in their bathing suits. .Among
those pleasant beauties are Carmen Durham,
Mary Dean, ^'iolet Randall, Eleanor L'rwiler, and
Virginia Eberenz. Three cheers tor C. H. S.
Rah! Rah! Rah!

Jan. 4. Charley Pescod, the insignificant
Freshman president, did his daily Boy Scout deed
at noontime to-day. He picked up Miss Renison
after she had fallen up the school steps. Three
points for the freshmen.

Jan. 7. This school certainly does want to
know the life history of us students. To-day they
gave out circulars saying that it we sneeze, cough,
feel hot, look pale, etc.; and all that sort ot rot
that we should stay at home. All the flappers
immediately rubbed off the war paint so as to
look pale, but Mr. Sawyers was too wise.

Jan. 8. Sophomores beat the Fresh in a base-
ball game out at Breezy Point (Radio Station
field in New Cristobal.) Score was 7-2. Three
cheers for the Sophs.

Jan. 9. Doctors came over to school to ex-
amine us to-day. Those who were lucky were
called out of class just when it was their turn to
recite. Most ot us turned out to be normal.

Jan. 10. Had a staff meeting of long duration
this p. m. We're cussing and discussing the
yearly school Carnival to be given at Fort De
Lesseps. Mr. Noe was here at this assemblage.
He's taking charge of the revue and has some very
good ideas. Now its up to us to carry his orders
through. Come on, ye students, come one,
come all.

Jan. 13. Sea Scouts played a tie score game
with De Lesseps at Kokonut Park. Score was 4-4.
So our Sea Scouts aren't so easy to beat as one
might think.

Jan. 14. Hush, folks, and I'll let you in on



some high school scandal. Rita Joyce cleaned
her white oxfords with her own dainty hands.
Juniors won a close game of 8-7 from the Frosh.

Jan. 15. Mr. Noe was here this p. m. and ex-
plained our respective parts in the Carnival.
Some of the acts are already well on their way and
they look mighty good. Viva la Carnival!

Jan. 16. Staff meeting. Discussed more about
the Carnival. If boys don't show up next morning
to clean the grounds, they'll have to dig down deep
in their pockets and donate a dollar. Si, 100
cents, to the Staff Treasury. So, boys, I advise
you to show up the morning after the night before
so you'll have dough enuf to go to the next dance.
What say you?

Jan. 17. Senior class gave a Candy Sale in
main hall of C. H. S. building. Everything was
sold quickly. Every tiny tot brought a couple
of nickels, so we came out rather well. Fourteen
dollars to the good. Not so bad, me thinks.

Jan. 18. Sad but true, the Sea Scouts were
beaten to-day by the Unifruco team. But only
by the close score of 7-6. Come on, ye Sea Scouts,
show 'em what you can do in the next game.
We're rooting tor ya!

Jan. 20. Those taking part in the Carnival met
at the Y. W. C. A. with Mr. Noe to-day. Things
are coming along fine now. Show will be great if
it keeps up at this rate. Have planned to have it
on February 21st, if all's well.

Jan. 21. Girl Reserves are preparing them-
selves for conference at Moro Island. We're all
excited Will this week ever end?

Jan. 22. Girls of the Sweetheart March are
practicing a new dance. Looks rather cute.

Jan. 23. Staff meeting. We're knee-deep in
work about the Carnival. Mr. Noe is working
very hard on the revue.

Jan. 24. Girl Reserves left on 4.30 train.
^'ery high spirited.

Jan. 25. A party of Balboa boys and girls
slightly burned in a launch, starting on a trip.
Mothers worried sick for fear it's Girl Reserves.
Phoned and discovered differently.

Jan. 26. Girl Reserves came back on evening
train safe and sound. Not a scratch on 'em.
We were sure glad to see our parents though.

Jan. 27. A mighty tired looking bunch of Girl
Reserves appeared at school this morning. All
were telling tales of how worried their parents
were for fear thev were on board the "Big Bill."



I04



THE CARIBBEAN.



Jan. 28. Sea Scouts murdered the United
Fruit Co. team yesterday. Score was 14-2.

Jan. 29. Girl Reserves are knee-deep in work
over a Benefit Card Party they're giving this
Saturday. They are trying to raise money to
send a delegate to the States. Here's luck to
them!

Jan. 30. Staff meeting in which our Editor
gave us all fair warning that our annual would be
a "flop" unless we each and everyone settled
down to real work.

Jan. 31. Sophomores gave a nifty class party
at the Strangers Club. "A good time was had by
all," I'm sure.

Feb. I. Girl Reserves gave a Card Party to
raise money to send a delegate to the States.
Hear that they made 525 clear profit. Three
cheers for the Girl Reserves.

Feb. 3. Rita Joyce put her flowing tresses in a
knot this morning, and believe it or not they
stayed there all day.

Feb. 4. Mr. Noe had the revue meet at Fort
De Lesseps to-day. It's coming along slowly but
surely.

Feb. 5. Miss Hesse made her third year Spanish
class get busy. They all had to make a poster in
Spanish. There were some real good ones, ad-
vertising a circus, a baseball game, beer, and oh
yes some thoughtful person made one to adver-
tise our C. H. S. Carnival.

Feb. 6. Whoopee! Hurray! .And many other
expressions of glee! The fleet's in. Not many
pupils are doing much studying with those battle-
ships out in the bay. 'Tis a beautiful sight,
really.

Feb. 7. Revue practice at Fort De Lesseps.
Mr. Noe says we need "pep." I quite agree. I
don't believe some of us know what "pep" is.

Feb. 10. Streets are just flooded with white
uniforms. They really look clean. (I mean the
streets, not the uniforms.) Yes siree! The
fleet's in all right.

Feb. II. Girl Reserves had a cabinet meeting
and decided to have a boat ride this Friday night
up the old French Canal. We're tr)ing to raise
money for our delegate, so we're charging every-
body 25 cents.

Feb. 12. We students are kind of shaky in the
knees 'cause to-morrow we have our mid-year
exams. 'I'he>''ll place each and everyone of us
where wc belong. The year is half gone.



Feb. 13. Wonder how many tests I "flunked"
to-day ?

Feb. 14. More exams which we either passed
or ? ? ?

Feb. 15. Big game to-day! Yes siree! Balboa
High School vs Cristobal High School. 'Twas a
hard fight with a tie score until, in the eighth
inning, one those "Balboa bums" made a run.

Feb. 17. Mr. Sawyers calleti all members of the
Revue together and told them that if they didn't
turn out to practice there wouldn't be any
Carnival. So it's up to us.

Feb. 18. Had a Revue practice at Y. W. this
evening and at last the show's beginning to look
like something. Viva la Carnival.

Feb. 19. Be prepared, ye high school students,
'cause Carnival is nigh. Only two more days and
the date will have arrived.

Feb. 20. Mr. Noe had dress rehearsal of the
Revaie and it's beginning to look like something
now.

Feb. 21. \'iva la Carnival! It didn't rain and
a rather large crowd turned out. I wonder if we
made good. Time will tell. Everybody seemed
to be making "whoopee" and enjoying themselves
immensely. The "Sweetheart Revue" was a big
success in spite of all the work and worry.

Feb. 22. Hurray for George Washington! If
it wasn't for him we wouldn't have a holiday.
(But there's always a but to-day is Saturday.
Now laugh that off.)

Feb. 24. Mary Dean, a C. H. S. student who
won the beauty contest, sailed for Miami to
represent the Canal Zone. A group of her school-
mates were down to see her sail. She looked as
pretty as a doll (not a painted one either). Many
other contestants from Central and South
-America sailed on the same boat. I never saw
such a group of beauties all at once.

Feb. 25. Now editor-in-chief tells us that we
have to get busy on the operetta to make money
for our annual. Believe it or not each and every-
one of us on the Staff has to make a poster so it
will be well advertised. Or else pay a dollar.
I think our editor will receiv'e numerous posters.

Feb. 26. Sea Scouts won a game from L^nited
Fruit Company. It's a shame they're such good
players (being high school boys).

Feb. 27. Some of the fleet have come back
again, v\hich means less studying will be done in
study hall.



THE CARIBBEAN.



105



Feb. 28. Last day of February, the short and
snappy month. Freshmen are serving at Supper
Club. Wonder if the girls will all be alive to-
morrow? Time will tell.

Mar. I. Yes, we're still living. Sad but true.
Those freshmen girls surely can cook an "Eye-
talian" dinner.

Mar. 2. VivalaReina! Panamanian Carnival
has arrived and we young Americans are gladly
helping them celebrate. Viva! Viva! Viva!

Mar. 3. Wonder why so many students appear
sleepy this morning. Too much celebration,
I guess. Seems as though they indulge in Pana-
manian holidays more enthusiastically than in
their own.

Mar. 4. Last day of Carnival and all Colon
turned out. The natives with their tuzzy hair
and "Mi PoUera" costumes, etc. The big parade
started about 4 p. m. and took hours to cover the
whole city. Queen's float was gorgeous. Com-
missary float was by far the best so it has been
rumored, .'\nyway, "Viva la Reina!

Mar. 5. 'Twas on this fatal day that our own
editor-in-chief appeared at school with a beautiful
black eye. The excuse. Says he fell on the ice
in the tropics. Can you imagine it? Guess he
can't roller-skate so well, eh? (On the sly, Fll
just tell you that I think his excuse is kind of
shady.)

Mar. 6. Several of our C. H. S. students are
working hard on the operetta "The Gypsy Rover,"
which Miss Ertel is directing. Rumors are that
it will be very good if those concerned get down to
real hard work.

Mar. 7. .Another Friday heartily welcomed
not only by the students either. (Just between
you and me, Fll tell you that our editor-in-chief
didn't show up at school to-day. Guess he's try-
ing to "doctor up" that colorful eye of his before
Monday happens along.)

Mar. 9. Being a Saturday many of us students
visited the immense Navy ships principally the
airplane carriers, the Saratoga and Langley, which
are as big as cities themselves. Reports were that
the ambition of several C. H. S. students is to be
an Admiral in the Navy. (Decisions made since
visiting these powerful carriers.)

Mar. 10. The harbor looks sort of empty and
bare now without the ships of the Fleet there.
Yes siree! They all left to-day, only the hospital
ship, remains.

MR 19742 14



^h^r. II. "The Gypsy Rover" is going to be
nifty if all concerned turn out to practice and all
do their part. Just wait and see if Fm joking.

Mar. 12. Fm telling you that miracles happen
every day. Now Mr. Sawyers has a new suit.
A real classy-looking one, too and does it fit?

Mar. 13. Operetta seems to be coming along
O. K. Expect the whole high school to turn
out and see it.

Mar. 14. .Another Friday heartily welcomed
Seniors are busy whispering to themselves about
the Senior play. Here's hoping it's a snappy one
and goes over big. Good luck to you, Seniors!
(Maybe they'll need it.)

Mar. 15. Sea Scouts left for 10 days camp at
Gatun Locks. Yep, during school 'n everything.
If they don't keep up with their school work, they
are simply kicked out of camp. Sounds good to
me.

Mar. 16. Reports from the Sea Scouts' skipper
(none other than our own Walter Wikingstad)
were that 'twas a sleepless nite, being the first
nite out at camp.

Mar. 17. Three cheers for the Irishmen!
Yes, there are some "Irishers" in C. H. S. by the
looks of the mass of green that approached the
Temple of Learning to celebrate St. Patricks' Day.

Mar. 18. Mr. Noe was at school to-day trying
out parts for our Senior play. Have chosen
"The Lottery Man." Here's hoping it goes off
with a bang.

Mar. 19. Dress rehearsal for "The Gypsy
Rover." Here's wishing them the best luck and
success.

Mar. 20. Juniors received their class rings
to-day. They're white and yellow, gold and
square-shaped. Very nice looking. Just between
you and me, I'll tell you that I prefer the black
onyx. The 1930 class rings are richer looking
(I think).

Mar. 21. "The Gypsy Rover" was given at the
.America Theater on this memorable night.
'Twas unanimously agreed that it was excellently
carried out. Everyone in the audience appeared
to enjoy it thoroughly. Virginia Stevenson and
Frederick KroU acted and sang their parts wonder-
fully; also each and every other actor in the
operetta.

Mar. 22. Don't tell a soul, but C. H. S. girls
scored second in an indoor baseball game vs. B. H. S.
It's O. K. 'cause our girls put up a hard fight. A



io6



THE CARIBBEAN.



group of high school kids, known as the "Whoo-
pee Club," went on a picnic to Devil's Hole. "A
keen time was had by all," and I know they all
made "whoopee."

Mar. 23. First rehearsal for Senior play. Mr.
Noe says we will produce the best play ever given
if we work hard. Let's go, cast, and show 'em
what we can do.

Mar. 24. Committee from the States to arrive
from Columbia University to see what's wrong
with the Canal Zone schools.

Mar. 26. Mr. Sawyers consented to put on
some of the Carnival numbers at the request of
the commanding officer at Fort Randolph.
Practiced a few numbers to-day anci have a neat
little program worked up big by Miss Hesse.

Mar. 27. Committee from Columbia Univer-
sity visited school to-day. Measured this, that,
and the other thing. Guess we'll have a perfect
building when they get through. Miss Patterson,
the new commercial teacher, arrived on the
Steamship Ancon, too. Has very striking ap-
pearance and seems to know her onions. We
shall see. .Anyway, three cheers for Miss Patterson.

Mar. 28. Miss Hesse kindly arranged a pro-
gram for the Chaplain at Fort Randolph, which
consisted of some of the Carnival numbers and
parts of "The Gypsy Ro^'er." The boys seemed
to appreciate the entertainment immensely,
especially the "Sweethearts on Parade." In fact
they simply roared with laughter when those
girls tried to imitate a soldier's march.

Mar. 29. C. H. S. girls defeated B. H. S. girls
in an indoor baseball game played on this mem-
orable day. Three hearty cheers tor our girls!
Rah! Rah! Rah!

Mar. 31. The -Survey Committee from Colum-
bia University is giving us examinations this
morning. This p. m. we have free to ourselves.
(I wish they'd giv^eus exams every day in the week.)

April I. Only 50 per cent of C. H. S. students
have been fooled. Ha! Ha! The faculty? Surely
they've all been fooled. This p. m. was granted
free to all students on account of the .Survey
Board.

.April 2. Horrors! Will we ever get used to
going to scho(jl in the afternoon after two days off r
They've spoiled us now.

.April 3. Staff meeting in which we decided
that everything had to be in by May 1. Let's
get to work, staff members.



-April 4. Girl Reserves had a Supper Club
meeting at which the Senior girls served. So, of
course, the supper was de-lic-shush! .Appointed
our best-looking girls to work behind counter at
Food Sale to-morrow.

April 5. Girl Reserves made a hard-earned
$30 on Food Sale, which is rather good. We
surely do need it.

April 6. The "all-talkie" picture "Sweetie"
seems to have made a big hit with C. H. S.
students. They're all talking about it in the
halls. It's all about college life in and out of
classes.

-April 7. Don't fail to-buy a newspaper to-day
and cherish it. Big headlines 'n everything
stating that students on Canal Zone rate higher
than those in the States (according to the achieve-
ment tests.) Hurray! Viva! Whoopee! In
other words, three cheers for the Zonites.

-April 8. Had play practice at the Y. W. C. A.
to-night and it's coming along great. Have
decided to give it May 15 and 16th, at the Club-
house. That means work for the cast.

-April 9. Do and look, and act your best, ye
students of the T. O. L. The surveyors are visit-
ing each and every class to-day.

-April 10. One of our bright Junior boys lost
his shoes in sixth period Study Hall, much to the
surprise of Miss Kimbro. Reason for removing
shoes from feet? Pupil, who was that devilish
Tommy Pescod, of course, quoted that it was
entirely too warm.

-April II. Last day that the "educators" will
honor us with their presence at school. They're
going to leave us on the next boat. Boo-Hoo!

-April 12. "Show Boat," a i6-reel Lhiiversal
picture of lite on the Mississippi in the early days,
was very cleverly advertised this p. m. The
manager of the Strand Theater (you know who I
mean, Jack Blevins) had a float made almost a
carbon copy of the "Showboat." Then he had a
couple of girls (>'es, C. H. S. students) dressed in
old-fashioned costumes with poke bonnets, lace
gloves, hoop-skirts, little pantalettes 'n every-
thing. Also a couple of boys as their partners,
dressed to fit the part. This certainly did draw
a crowd to see and hear the picture.

-April 13. The surveyors departed on the
Steamship Cristobal this p. m. Mr. Williams, the
superintendent of schools, left with them. Bon
voyage!



THE CARIBBEAN.



107



April 14. Sh-h-h-h-h-h-h! Can you keep a
secret? One of our Junior girls is engaged.
Sh-h-h-h-h-h! Don't make so much noise, and
I'll tell you who. Yes siree! Elsie Doar has a
pretty diamond on her left hand. I don't know
who the "lucky guy" is but it's rumored that he's
one of the Pan .'\merican .Airways fellows.

April 15. Oh-h-h-h. Some more vacation
days. No more school till Monday, the 21st.
Three cheers for Easter.

.'^pril 17. Everyone's talking and wondering
and whispering and buzzing and cussing and dis-
cussing about the colored strips of paper posted
all around town, in cars, at school 'n everywhere
with just 3 words "The Lottery Man." Finally
discovered it was the name of the Senior play.

.April 18. Good Friday. Must be good and
quiet to-day. That means you and you and
you. Each and ever)' C. H. S. student.

April 19. 'Tis lovely to have it pour down rain
just when we're in the midst of our holidays.
(Strict sarcasm.)

April 20. Easter tidings, everybody! Yes,
it's raining to-day, too. Nevertheless the Easter
bunny managed to swim from house to house with
the Easter eggs.

April 21. Back in "Sing Sing" again and no
more holidays till June. Boo Hoo! (Unless one
desires to play "hookey.") No harm intended,
merely a suggestion.

April 22. Some C. H. S. students have started
the tad of "Opinion Books" which would be better
named "slam books." Trouble is you can't find
out who is your friend (or enemy) 'cause they
don't sign their names with the opinion. Mighty
mysterious, methinks.

April 23. Steamship Ancon docked this morn-
ing, but that doesn't mean a thing to us (except
we'd like to be one of its passengers on the return
trip northward).

-April 24. Play practice it's coming along
slowly but surely. The "ole" town certainly is
all "hot and bothered" with curiosity over the
nitty advertisements we have for it. One can't
turn his head without facing "The Lottery Man"
printed in front of him.

.April 25. Freshmen Party, the last of the year,
went over with a bang. A snappy time was had
by all at the Hotel Washington. Their programs
were very cute. .And the surprises of surprises
occurred on that eventful night. C. H. S. dis-



covered they had some excellent talent in the line
of eccentric dancing. Who was it? Would you
really like to know? Why it was none other than
our own Victor Melendez (one of the "dignified"
Seniors) impersonating Hal Skelly. Imagine he
will leave for Broadway after he graduates. It will
be just too bad, after Ziegfield catches a glimpse
ot his unsurpassable dance steps. Three cheers
tor Victor and the Freshman Party. Rah! Rah!
Rah!

.April 26. Our swimming team crossed the
Isthmus determined to defeat Balboa in a swim-
ming meet. Did you ask whether or not we won ?
I'm afraid I can't hear you or don't understand,
or something of the sort. .Anyway er-er-er, I'd
rather not tell ya.

April 28. Rained like cats and dogs to-day.
Lovely, isn't it? .And did it rain during Easter
vacation? What a silly question! Constantly!

.April 30. Last day of the Fools' month
which meansonly two more months in this prison
er-er, I mean "dream house."

May I. Yes, we students well know that it's
supposed to be May Day, and we should celebrate.
But how in thunder can one have a queen, and
skip around some flowered poles when it rains
"todo el tiempo?"

May 2. This Friday wasn't begrudgingly
received no-how. Oh that every day in the week
were a Friday.

May 5. Our editor-in-chief took all the
material for The C.4ribbean to press to-day.
Here's hoping all's well and ends well.

May 6. Tom Coley, the editor-in-chief, called
a Staff meeting in which he kindly informed us
that each and every one of us have to make a

poster for the Senior play or else Methinks

there won't be any "elses."

May 8. As Seniors approached their English
class this a. m. no teacher could be found behind
the desk. No, Miss Kimbro was actually absent.
Dignified or better said devilish Seniors started
raising "whoopee" but were soon stopped by the
appearance of Mrs. Grunewald. Mr. Sawyers
"put one over on 'em" 'cause he had phoned her
to come as substitute. Ha, ha, for the Seniors.

May 9. Girl Reserves had Supper Club meet-
ing in which Juniors served a very luscious supper.
Chose the officers tor next year appears to be
a very reliable group. Best ot luck and success
to 'em.



To8



THE CARIBBEAN.



May 12. Posters for the play turned out to be
real nifty. Have been placed in each and every
little cubby hole of the "big city."

May 13. More tests! But will you believe
me, it's the end of the 5th six-weeks period. My,
but time flies! Actually flies, I tell ya!

May 1 4. A nervous group ot Seniors faced
their classes to-day. Why? Because the Senior
play is to be given tor the first time t-o-m-o-r-r-o-w
night. It won't be long now for you of the play
cast. Better hurry and get rid of your shakiness.

May 15. One of the big days on the C. H. S.
calendar. Senior play was given at the Cristobal
Clubhouse and was a huge success. Is the best
one ever given, so the public says. Three cheers
for Mr. Noe, who was our faithful and untiring
director.

May 16. Play again given and was attended
by as equally large crowd as the previous night.
(Just between you and me I'll bet that some folks
went to see it twice 'cause they liked it so much.)

May 17. Congratulation graciously given to
various members of the play cast, compliment-
ing 'em and their excellent acting. Each and
every one portrayed his part wonderfully. And
I'm not trying to bluff you, either.

May 19. Juniors are busy "buzzin-buzzin"
over the Junior-Senior Banquet. They're plan-
ning to give it on the 29th of this very month,
so it has been rumored. Say there, girlies, that
isn't far off! Have you all got your exquisite
frocks prepared for the event?

May 20. It won't be long now, ye Seniors of
C.H.S. In fact exactly one month from to-day
you will have received your hard-earned dip-
lomas you will have "quituated" you'll be an
alumnus. Don't you understand? You'll be
leaving dear ole C. H. S.

May 21. Seniors received the very clever
invitations to the Junior-Senior Banquet to be
given this Thursday. Say, the close of the school
year must be drawing nigh, if the farewell banquet
is soon to be given. Lawdy, I didn't quite
realize it was so near the end of the year. Honest-
ly, I didn't.

May 22. Just another day on the calendar.
But don't you fear, there was no idleness on the
part of any student. (Not that I noticed.)

May 2.3. ."Another Friday has rolled around
again. Now, I'm telling you, we students are
simply infatuated with Friday no, not Crusoe's
handy man! We mean the day itself.



May 26. At last the thrill of the year has
occurred. The Caribbeans are out for sale
to-day. Come one! Come all! Buy yourself a
"Book of Knowledge in a snappier form." And
are they snappy? Just gif a look!

May 27. .'\nnuals are selling like the "hot
doughnuts grandma used to make." Really,
they're very appetizing and makes one hungry
for more.

May 28. I say there, ye fair maidens and
lassies of the graduating class of '30, have ye all
got thine elegant gowns prepared to don for
to-morrow evening at the Hotel Washington ?
Undoubtedly, you have. And boys, don't forget
that neat crease in your pants wear that spiffy
new necktie. (Also starve until to-morrow night
and save your appetite for the banquet.)

May 29. One of the best or should we say the
best, banquet ever given at Cristobal High School.
After an intensely appetizing dinner, in the
gorgeous dining salon of the Hotel Washington,
and several very clever speeches giving advice
to us Seniors we ventured into the be-you-ti-ful
ball room. Dancing was enjoyed until the wee
small hours of the morning.

May 30. Us banqueters are recuperating from
the morning after the night before. We're not
used to such rich food and such late hours. That's
a fine way to celebrate Memorial Day!

June I. I actually gasped when I discovered
that we were now living in the month of June.
I say there Seniors this is ]7' in school for ro.

June 2. Our class president, the popular Mr.
Ralph Crum, called a meeting this bright, sun-
shiny morning in June. Decided on speaker for
commencement, type of diploma, the Union
Church for Baccalaureate Services, etc. We
had so much business to discuss that we were
late to class. (But, being Seniors, we didn't
object.)

June 3. Several students had special exams
yesterday as they are leaving for the States early.
Wonder how they pulled through r Guess I can
tell by expressions on their faces.

June 4. Want to hear something very extraor-
dinary, unusual, unique, odd, and what have
you? Believe it or not, it poured down rain
to-day! Sure, right in the middle of the streets 'n
everything.

June 5. Senior girls had a heart-to-heart (or
should I say fist-to fist talk) this a. m. in regard



THE CARIBBEAN.



109



to the type of dresses they're going to wear for
Baccalaureate Services. Decided on fluffy, ruffly
dresses with big hats, and rather long. Sounds
"yum-yummy" to me. Can hardly wait to see
'em.

June 6. One of those beloved Fridays which
we Seniors so dearly love.

June 8. First bunch of students left for States
on steamship Cr;.f/o/^/ to-day. All prepared for a
snappy vacation. Bon voyage I say bon voy-
age!

June 9. Only one more Monday after this one.
I'm telling you Seniors, each and every one of
you "It won't be long now!"

June II. Seniors received their graduation
announcements to send out here and there and to
the relatives back home. My, but don't they feel
and aet big? Ha, Ha! But then too, you only
graduate from high school once in a lifetime.

June 13. Girl Reserves had their last Supper
Club meeting of the year in which they elected
their delegates for the National Conference at
Kiski Camp, near Pittsburgh. We, the students
of C. H. S., are so glad that they managed to
raise enuf dough. Three hearty cheers for the
Girl Reserves! Rah! Rah! Rah!

June 14. Say there, boys and girls of the class
of '30, are ye all prepared for the Baccalaureate
Services manana? If not, why not, and what
not, as the saying goes?

June 15. I must declare that the girls certainly
did look adorable in their garden dresses and big
floppy hats, and the boys equally neat in white
trousers and dark coats at the Baccalaureate
Services, held at the Union Church. The
church looked very beautiful and the services
were very impressive, especially to the sorrowful
Seniors.



June 16. Do you have a queer feeling deep
down inside, seniors? Now don't be shy and
backward about it, go ahead, and admit it. It's
only natural! Yessiree! This is the beginning
the start the commencement of your last week
at this T. O. L.

June 17. Seniors seem to think school has
closed already according to the freedom and in-
dependence they've been displaying lately.

June iS. \\\ the little Freshies, yes and a
few Sophs, too are begging the Seniors tor their
personal cards and pleading with tears in their
eyes for them to autograph this, that, and the
other thing. Of course, we willingly and gracious-
ly fulfill their ardent desires tor we fully realize
how treasurable our signatures will be after we've
climbed the ladder of success.

June 19. If you could only see this bunch of
Seniors on this memorable day! They have the
most forlorn and far-a-way expression on their
faces. You'd think they were about to approach
an electric chair or something ot the sort. I
guess they really do hate the thought of leaving
dear old C. H. S., the "gang" yes, and even the
teachers, in spite of their strictness to force us to
study. Three cheers for the best bunch of
teachers C. H. S. ever had! Rah! Rah! Rah!

June 20. C-O-M-M-E-N-C-E-M-E-N-T! All
of the proud papas and mamas could be seen in the
front row with a broad smile on this long-awaited
date. Each and every Senior boy and girl looked
his best. A very intelligent-looking class, to be
sure. I feel certain that they're going to make a
name for themselves in some way or other. Time
will tell! Congratulations! Congratulations!

Best of luck to you. Seniors!




Cristobal Coaling Station whcrt: bl]i| ul tlie World take Coal.



no



THE CARIBBEAN.




Photo by Kodak. Panama.



THE CARIBBEAN.




It is through our Exchange Department that we give information about us and about the

we learn of other schools in the United States. Isthmus of Panama to those who live far away.

We like receiving exchanges, because through We try to make our book better every year and

them we can get different ideas that help us to we enjoy publishing the comments that are sent

improve our Annual. Through our exchanges to us.



AS OTHERS SEE US.

The Caribbean Cristobal High School

The Purple §iiill has just received The Caribbean.
What a splendid yearbook! We read it with more enthu-
siasm than we've read anything in a long time. The
photographs are lovely.

The Purple ^uill,Ball High School, Galveston, Texas.

The Caribbean Cristobal High School

Your yearbook, containing so much general information
and such interesting snapshots of the ever-alluring and
magical tropics, has a universal appeal far more than the
average annual which is often so "localized" that it is
uncerstood only by the student body.

The pcetry and feature sections were unusually read-
able. In fact, we want to congratulate you on the entire
make-up including the distinctly pleasing print, and we
hope to be able to send you a copy of The Acorn in the
near future.

Sincerely,
The Acorn, Oak Cliff High School, Dallas, Texas.

The C.aribee.\n Cristobal High School

The Caribbean certainly speaks for itself. Erom
start to finish it contains nothing but the most delightful
of reading matter. The photographs of natural scenery
are beautiful, and the jokes are very humorous.
Wishing you continued success,
The Reflector, Il'ohurn High School, H'oburn, Mass.

The Caribbean Cristobal High School

Dear Exchange Editor:

I have shown your annual to others and am able to tell
you that they believe it the best high school magazine we
have received. I think it is very cleverly arranged and is
most interesting to us because of the real information it
contains concerning the Canal Zone. The Class Prophecy
by your Literary Editor, Ethel Barnett, appeals to our
Seniors who are beginning to think up ideas on that point.



In fact the whole book shows that the Staff h:is worked
hard and that their work has succeeded.

Hoping this \ ear's Caribbean may be still better, I am
Yours sincerely,
Corinna Bier, Exchange Editor.
The Mirror, Piinxsiitaivney High School, Punxsntawney, Pa.

The Caribbean Cristobal High School

The Caribbea.n is one of the most complete yearbooks
that we have ever seen, and I'm sure that I can safely say
that it is the most interesting. The pictures of Cristobal
and vicinity, to us so far from Panama, are the hit of the
book. Your poetry we thought good, too, but then we
were pleased with the whole book.

Sincerely,
LoNETA Harlan, Exchange Editor.
The Exponent, Greenfield High School, Greenfield, Mass.

The Caribbean Cristobal High School

Principal of Cristobal High School.

Dear Mr. Saavcrs: I just wanted to let you know what
the people up this way think about the Cristobal High
School annuals. Every one who has seen them thinks
they are pretty nice, and expecially the 1929 book. I've
loaned my books, i925-'26-'27-'28, and '29 to one of the
high school teachers here and he says the material, stories,
pictures, etc., equal that of a college annual. I am anx-
iously waiting to see a 19.50 copy.
Sincerely,

Gladvs Beers .Alrick, '28.



The Caribbean Cristobal High School

Your book, the 1929 Caribbean is, on the whole, well
made up. As the annual is a record of the school year, is
it advisable to picture so many civic scenes? Why not
substitute more features, snapshots of the students, etc?
The Omega, Ann Arbor High School, Ann Arbor, Mich.



112



THE CARIBBEAN.



The Caribbean" Cristobal High School

Several days ago we received the copy of The Carib-
bean. We thank you very much tor sending it to us. We
have gone over the edition and can sincerely say that is is
a piece of work reflecting credit upon your school. A
quotation comes to my mind, and it is fitting to say,
"When you have done your best, don't make apologies
for the qualities of your work; admit your errors, but be
able to say, 'We have done our best.'
Sincerely yours,
Gretchen' Rinbelmann, Exchange Editor.
Lincoln Times, Lincoln High School, ll'isconsin Rapids, Jl'is.



very good and enjoyable. How about some more car-
toons? We also liked the way in which the book was
printed.



The Senior. Westerly High School, Westerly, R. L

The Senior is one ot the most interesting school books
that we receive. We think it the most original of any.
The jokes are the most humorous we have ever laughed
over. On the whole we think it a wonderful book for
its size.



The Caribbean Cristobal High School

We really believe that your book is incapable ot being
improved. It is excellent! Your country must be very
beautiful, judging by the lovely scenes, and your weather
delightful. The snakes and alligators, however, do not
look so inviting. We were very much pleased to learn
that your Principal was born in Westerly. Best wishes
for The Caribbean. Come again!

The Senior, Westerly High School, If'esterly, R. I.



AS WE SEE OTHERS.



The Student. Holmes High School, Covington, Ky.

A very interesting and clever book. The Commence-
ment Number for January was exceedingly good. The
photographs were excellent and we thoroughly liked the
class prophecy.



The Sluill. Staten Island Academy, Staten Island, N. Y.

One of those short but sweet books. The Poet's Nook
shows that there are some future poets in your school.
Come again tor we enjoy hearing from you.



The Exponent. Greenfield High School, Greenfield, Mass.

Your paper is marvelous. It is very well balanced, and
we enjoy receiving it.



The Reflector. Jl'obiirn High School, ll'oburn, Mass.

The Football Number was well set up. The stories
were the best ever. We would suggest that you have
snapshots or cartoons to help set off the book more.



The Purple ^uill. Ball High School, Galveston, Texas

Your commencement issue is very cleverly written.
Your literary and poetry departments are very well
written and both are extremely interesting. We would
like to suggest that you print the advertisements in the
back of the book instead of in the interior.



The Jcorn. Oak Cliff High School, Dallas, Texas.

There are no words to express our feelings for the Acorn.
It deserves every compliment, and we hope it continues
to be a success.



The Mitror. Punxsutawney High School, Punxsutaivney, Pa.
Your Thanksgiving number of the Mitror was enjoyed
by many of the C. H. S. students. We thank you for the
comment and exchange. We think it wonderful that
you are able to put out four different numbers during the
year. This number is a very clever book. The Literary
Section, the Class Notes, and the Poetic License are all



We .Acknowledge the Following:

The Lincoln Times.
The Dickinson Crucible.
The Lakonian.
The Durfee Hilltop.
The Spectator.
The Omega.







lBAi£^^!i^^^^B9H9vM^^£ *^




'"*' >


'-^.r .,.



THE CARIBBEAN.




Frances M. Days 'jo.

T^VERY year the Alumni Section of The Caribbeant grows
larger. This year we boast of an Alumni Section ot 145
members.

Our worthy Alumni are always very thoughtful in remembering
us and sending little expressions of good will for the success of our
Annual and for the Seniors at graduation time. Some of them
are at school and many are working on the Zone or in the States.

Cristobal High School sends her best wishes to her Alumni, and
let us hear from you again.

Due to the lack of space we have omitted the Alumni News of
the years preceding 1926. However we appreciate the greetings
sent by the Alumni of these years.



MR 1974215



114



THE CARIBBEAN.



1926.

Richard Beverly, Broad Run, ^'a.
HiLDEGARDE Blythe, LandhatTi-Bounce X-ray

Clinic, Atlanta, Ga.
William Clixchard, 229 N. 17th Street, Lincoln,
Neb.
"I s'ncerely hope that th's year's Carib-
bean will be the paramount year book ever
produced by C. H. S., and I am also wishing
success to the Class of '30 on their graduation,
on The Caribbean, and best regards to the
faculty."

William Coffev, San Salvadore, Salvadore,

Central America.
Edna Duvall, 4802 Greenlee Avenue, St. Bern-
ard, Ohio.
Morris Eggleston, Columbia University, New

York City.
Rav Fischer, 4309 Furlev .A\'enue, Gardenville,

Md.
Irene Hopkins (Mrs. L. W.) McIlvaine, Cristo-
bal, C. Z.
Helena Deckman Bailey, Seefridge Field, Mt.
Clemens, Mich.
"To those of the Class of 1930 and those of
1926, I want to extend my sincerest wishes,
and am glad to be remembered again this
year.

Do suppose every one has changed and an
immense student body with an ever so good
Annual, and a very successful play. Sin-
cerest wishes to all."
Johanna Kleefkins (Mrs. R. O.) Antich, Box
1057, Cristobal, C. Z.
"A few weeks ago, wjiile passing the
y. W. C. A., I heard the familiar words:
'We've come to sing our praise,
A hearty cheer to raise, etc., etc.,'
and how I wished to be back with the happy
group who were singing.

Just think, four years have passed since the
Class of '26 received their diplomas and now
it is time for another group to go forth.

My best wishes go with you. Class of '30,
and may your memories of C. H. S. be as
pleasant as mine.

Here's hoping The Caribbean will be big-
ger and better than ever."
Delilah May (Mrs. G. W.) Parker, Gatun, C.Z.



Lola Munoz, Box 740, Panama City, R. P.
"Here I am fatherless from October 4, 1929.
My father was well known among the Ameri-
cans in Colon. He was (Q. E. P. D.) Luis
F. Munoz.

At present I am teaching English in the
Public School of San Felipe, just renamed
E. E. de America. At the same time I am
teaching Spanish as a substitute in Balboa
High. More than ever I am grateful tor the
two languages I know. Then I am learning
typing and shorthand at the National
Institute of Panama.

I wish I could have something to do for my
coming vacations, February, March, and
May, something like coaching Spanish.

I wish all the High School a prosperous
New Year, by experience learn all and well
learned at your present opportunity."

Mildred Neely, Cristobal, C. Z.

Carlos Pulgar, Gatun, C. Z.

Clarice Steenburg, Langley Field, ^'a.

Gay R. Turner, Neal Hall, Columbus University,
Columbus, Ohio.

Elizabeth Warren, Fort Davis, C. Z.

Christian Wirtz, Cristobal, C. Z.



1927.

Joseph Corrigan, Cristobal, C. Z.

Teresa Gallagher, 652 i;6th Street, Brooklyn,
N. Y.

James Grider, 416 Transylvania Park, Lexing-
ton, Ky.

Emily Bledsoe, 416 Transylvania Park, Lexing-
ton, Ky.

Lawrence C. Callaway, jr., Cristobal, C. Z.

Louise Heim, Cristobal, C. Z.

Clara A. May, Gatun, C. Z.

Helen Montgomery, 257 Park Avenue, Hunt-
ington, Long Island, N. Y.

John G. Nelson, Gonzaga Lhiiversity, Spokane
Wash.

Dorothy Svensson, 15 Pleasant Street, West
Roxbury, Mass.

SuRSE J. Taylor, 18 14 West Avenue, Austin,
Tex.

James Van Scotter (address unknown).

Helen Vineyard, Odessa, Del.



THE CARIBBEAN.



"5



Dorothy Wertz, Box 259, Cristobal, C. Z.
Charles Will, Cristobal, C. Z.
ErPHEML'V WooLNOuGH, 6oi West T6oth Street,
New York City.
"Good luck and best wishes to the Class
of 1930-"

1928.

JoHX G. Kluxk., 2015 University Avenue, New

York City.
Ethel K. Westman, 660 Clackamas Avenue,

Portland, Oreg.
Albert J. Days, 2015 University Avenue, New
York City.
"Hoping The Caribbean and Cristobal
High School all success. I sure wish I was
back in my high school 'daze.' It seems
like all the snap I had when I was in high
school is gone now. Every time I got
bounced then I always managed to bounce
back in, but now I don't even skid. I guess
I'm not a bouncing baby boy any more."
Gladys E. Beers (Mrs. H. G.) Alrick, 207
3d Street, N. Moorhead, Minn.
"Good luck and best wishes to the Class
of 1930. I hope you'll make the 1930
Annual the very best yet."
Emma Baxrs (Mrs. A.) Blaisdell, Cristobal,

C. Z.
Robert H. Axtell, Bates College, Lewiston, Me.
"Every year The Caribbean is a little
better than the year before. Let's have the
Class of 1930 keep up the record."
Kathryn E. Lambert (Mrs. W.) Gould, Cristo-
bal, C. Z.
Theodore C. Henter, 120 Gates Avenue,

Brooklyn, N. Y.
Evangeline Smith (Mrs. W.) Payne, Box 1453,

Cristobal, C. Z.
Arthur E. Rothenburg (address unknown).
Zoxella L. Bliss, 159 South Professor Street,
Oberlin, Ohio.
"It seems good to hear from C. H. S. I
am looking forward to the time when the 1930
Annual will be published and hope that it
will surpass all those that have preceded it.
I am a freshman at Oberlin College and
am enjoying my work ever so much.

Greetings, classmates of '28."



B. Edward Lowaxde, Cristobal, C. Z.
Lucia Salazar, Colon, R. P.

1929.

Royal R. Higgason, Gatun, C. Z.
Lilybel Cox, Gatun, C. Z.

"Best regards to the Class of '30. May
they have the best success possible in both
their Annual and class play."
Elizabeth Hackett, 333 Plymouth Avenue,
Rochester, N. Y.
"I'm attending school at the Rochester
Business Institute, am getting along splendid-
ly and enjoy it a lot, though it can't come up
to C. H. S. All the luck and success possible
to the Class of 1930 and their Annual."
Rosemary Keene, Cristobal, C. Z.
James F. Quinn, Gatun, C. Z.
Jean Wyllie, Roberts Beach School. Catons-

viUe, Md.
Ethel Barnett, 36 Browning Avenue, Dor-
chester, Mass.
Inez Barry, Cristobal, C. Z.
Woodford M. Babbitt, Gatun, C. Z.
Marion A. Boomer, 301 L^niversity Place,
Syracuse, N. Y.
"I have just time to say the best of wishes
to The Caribbean Staff and the Seniors of
'30. I am now in the midst of semester
exams and very busy. I love it here at
Syracuse, though, and am getting along
just fine."
Jack R. Pettit, New York Stock Exchange,

<; Cowbry Street, Yonkers, N. Y.
Dorothy* Heim, Cristobal, C. Z.
Paul Hayden, Box 41, Bates College, Lewiston,
Me.
"It does not seem possible that the book ot
'29 will soon be a back number. I am sure,
however, that the book of '30 will be a worthy
successor. If I remember correctly The
Caribbean, like many other good things,
improves with age so let's have a copy ot the
best to date."
Gretchen W. Palm, Box 4 16, Mount Holyoke
College, South Hadley, Mass.
"My letter heading, I think will tell you
where I am, but it can never reveal the love
I have for Holyoke or express the enjoyment
I am experiencing from college lite.



ii6



THE CARIBBEAN.



I teel ancient on thinking of 1930 being
this year's Senior Class and editing The
Caribbeax bvit that's only natural. You
are wondering it I wish you success. Certain-
ly, I do. Make C. H. S. as proud of you as
it was and is of us."
Roger Deakjns, Gatun, C. Z.
WiLHELMiNA Kleefkens, Cristobal, C. Z.

"Sure do miss Cristobal High, but have the
consolation of not being the only Cristobal
graduate working for the United Fruit Com-
pany. To see them and work with them
brings back memories of the good times
we've had.

Best of luck to The Caribbean and my
sincere wishes to Cristobal High School in
general."
Roy B. Walker, Balboa, C. Z.

"I'm hard at work now and can say that I
surely miss old C.H. S. classmates and all. To
you I extend my best wishes for a successful
play and commencement, to the Staff I give
my best regards and hope that your Annual
will be the best yet."
Marion K. Lowande, Gregg Business College,

Plainfield, N. J.
Lee Kariger, Gatun, C. Z.

"At present I am still living in Gatun and
working, but not for a living.

I sure hope that your class will publish as
good or even better Annual than the Class of
'29."
Vita V. Lvew, College of St. Teresa, Winona,
Minn.
"My best wishes to the Class of 1930, and
the best of luck to The Caribbean."
Morris M. Luce, Eastman School of Music,

Rochester, N. Y.
Anita R. Rankin, Cristobal, C. Z.



Morton Southard, Gatun, C. Z.
Margaret Hayes, 926 Home Avenue, Fort
Wayne, Ind.
"May The Caribbean Staff have all the
success of the year. But can they beat the
book of '29.''"
Adair Louise Taylor, 48, S. R. D., Austin, Tex.
"I am up here in Texas attending the
University and wishing I were back in
tropical Panama once more.

Best wishes for the Class of 1930, and may
the 1930 Caribbean be the best ever."
Sam Patchett, Cristobal, C. Z.
Lois A. Williams (Mrs. C.) Strobridge, Balboa,

C. Z.
Randolph Orbaugh, L^niversity of North Caro-
lina, Chapel Hill, N. C.
Charles Crum, L^niversitv of North Carolina,

Chapel Hill, N. C.
Mildred J. Bath, 926 West State Street, Trenton,
_ N.J.

"Rider College certainly is justified in say-
ing that Rider is the best business course in
the East. They make us work, too.

I belong to the most popular and best

sorority in school and have lots and lots ot fun.

For being a stranger here this year, I have

been treated royally. I have never been in

New Jersey before, but everyone is very

congenial. I live at my sorority house with

14 other girls, so we are all happy and have

good times besides learning a great deal.

I certainly enjoy college life."

Porfirio de Reuter, LTniversity of Detroit,

Detroit, Mich.
Phoebe O'Donnell, Cristobal, C. Z.
Theodore E. Brandon, Cristobal, C. Z.
Zoe Wyllie, Roberts Beach School, Catonsville,
Md.



THE CARIBBEAN.



"7




ST V)NCNT'3 PANAMA




BAL&OA WN/ON



Itwn.



IMMACULATE
CONCEPTIOU



W^M


=1


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uau :aHM, ^<^'|



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MIR/iCULOUi
MEDAL



VfSTA rnOM BAubOA UNION




CHfildJ CHmCH BvThi6£A



CRISTOBAL UN lOfi



CAT HE. DriAL-PX/^AMA'



ii8



THE CARIBBEAN.




.^se&s?5'^^S^''



jrHliam Ne'd'inan, '?o.



Miss Kinibro: "And how do you know that Landlord: "Yes, we have two rooms to let,

Chaucer dictated to a stenographer?" fifteen dollars a week. No cats, dogs, pianos,

Dick Wood: "Well, ma'am, just lookit the victrolas, loudspeakers, or children allowed."
spellin'." Prospective Alumnus: "Do you mind if my pen
squeaks a bit?"

Mr. Pence: "Water contains hydrogen and



oxygen.



Underrated Frosh: "What time is it bv vour



Dick Sargent: "What? Ain't there no water nose?"



m It at al



Illustrious Soph: "Heh! Heh! It ain't running!'



Randolph Jl'.: "I play a clarinet."
I'iolet R.: "What's a clarinet?"
Randolph JJ'.: "It's an ill wood-wind that no-
body blows good."



Senior: "How's life as a freshman?'
Frosh: "I've only a hazy idea."



1st He: "Gee, your sweetie uses plenty of
make-up."

2nd He: "Yeah, she's my powdered sugar!"



ll'ickv: "Do you give a guarantee with this
hair-restorer?"

Clerk: "Guarantee, sir! Why, we give a comb!"



Miss Russell: "How do I look, .Amos?"
Mr. Poice: "Sweet enough to kiss, Emily."
Mr. Sawxers: "Let me see your white slip." Miss Russell: ".Aw go on!"

Alice Hmter: "SIR? ?"

Gladxs B.: I dropped my vanity case and spilled

Carlos R.: "It was a swell party. -At about all the powder."
twelve o'clock the crowd waxed merry." Mundy: "Do you always carry it loaded?"
Thomas P.: "Alas! Poor Mary."



Passenger: "Why are we late, conductor?"

Dr. Sajford: "What tooth do you want ex- Conductor: "The train ahead, sir, is behind, and

tracted?" we were behind before besides."

Train Porter: "Lower seven, sir."

High Hat (at Stranger's Club): "Isn't the

Miss Hesse (to Marian at board) : "Please write orchestra divine?"

a little louder." Low Brow: "Naw, I tink it's de berries."



Mrs. A' /? fat school): "My engine's missing." Ralph C: "See any change in me?"

Bystander: "I'll bet one of those Seniors took J'ictor AL: "No, why?"

it." Ralph C.: "I just swallowed ten cents.



THE CARIBBEAN.



IT9



A soldier lost his left arm in the war, and so his
right arm was left. His left arm was not left
since it was cut off, and his left arm was right.
If he had lost his right arm instead of his left, his
left arm would have been left instead ot his
right, but that's not right for his right arm was
left and not his left. That made his right left.



That whistle at the R. R. crossing stop if
vou've heard it.



Never mind why the black hen lays a white egg.
Get the egg!



Alumnus '2g: "Does your firm pay good
salaries.^"

Alumnus '20: "I'm not in a position to say."



Mr. V. Siler: "Who broke that trapeze?"
Edward C: "I did sir, with my little acts."



Romeo (below window with saxophone): "Hist,
Jule, open the window or I'll play this darned
thing."



Patient: "I'm suffering dreadfully from in-
somnia."

New physician: "Well, just go to sleep and
you'll be all right."



Dr. Billick (at Commissary): "How's the
cheese?"

Greene (clerk): "Oh, it seems to be quite a bit
stronger, to-day. Doctor."



Mr. Webster, in his famous book, says that a
dumb waiter is an elevator for carrying dishes.
He is quite wrong. A dumb waiter is a guy who
asks a girl for a kiss and then waits tor it.



Cohcnstein : "I comes down here vere dey tells
me der trade vinds blow, undt dere vas no beez-
ness here at all."



Billie: "I'm not going to wear that orange and
black sweater any more."

Alice C: "Why not?"

Billie: Some guy mistook me for a stick of
peppermint, and gave me a good licking."



Interested bystander: Who was that vet}- slangy
young lady you were just talking to?"

Mr. Sawyers: "She's a teacher of English in
C. H. S. enjoying a day off."



Rae B.: "Gee, Wicky, how scared you look."
Wicky: "I'm not scared. I just washed my
hair."



George W.: "Poor old Hanna, he's so short-
sighted he's working hisselt to death."

Ray W.: "Wot's his short sight got to do wid
it?"

George W.: "Well, he can't see when the teacher
ain't looking, so he has to keep on working all the
time.



Kenneth M.: "May I have the first dance?"
Mary .: "Rather early to ask, isn't it?"
Kenneth M.: "Oh, well, you know, the early
bird catches the er-er-er ."



Mr. JVest: "Hey, porter, do you want to earn
a quarter carrying this suitcase and putting it on
the train?"

Colored porter: "Sorry, boss, but ah gotta
quahtah!"



An old lady with an hour to spare went into the
Strand without realizing that a talking film was
being shown. In two minutes she had returned
to the box office.

"I'm afraid there's been a mistake," she
stammered. "I thought this was a movie, but
when I got inside I discovered that a man with
asthma was giving a lecture in German."



How difficult it is to escape the pitfalls of sin
when even the music has traps.



Samuel: "Butler, when ah gets mad, ah gets
real black in de face. Ahm only peeved now."



Cop: "Hey, you're making 40 an hour!"
Paul H.: "Oh, ociffer, I can't be I've only
been gone 20 minutes."



Geojge: "Gee, I'm onlv a small pebble in your
life."

Aloha: "Then why not become a little boul-
der?"



I20



THE CARIBBEAN.



Two high school boys tossed to see which should
pay for the cones. The winner called "heads."
The loser called "fire!" and escaped in the con-
fusion.



We oncet heard Wicky say, "My mouth feels
like a parade ground. The dentist has been
drilling on it all afternoon."



"Love makes the world go around, but so does
a good chew of tobacco!"



The baseball players will now oblige with that
rollicking field ditty, "Our coach has seen better
days; we'll trade it in for a coupe."



Dr. Gilder: "Let me see your tongue. Why it
has a coat on it."

Ralph C: "Look again, Doc, maybe it has
pants on too."



Joloi S. (reporting accident) : "Hey officer, go
tell a policeman to call a cop."



Mr. Sawyers: "Before you are enrolled I must
know if you have any particular whim."
Freshman: "No. I'm off whimmin'."



"Here's where I shine," said Violet when she
lost her compact.



Evelyn G.: "You're no gentleman."
Fifty N^.: "Well, you're no blond."



1st pig: "I never sausage heat."
2nd pig: "Yes, I'm nearly bacon."



Any Frosh (on first day of school, when bell
rings): "W'here do I go now?"

Upper classman: "To the next class, of course."
Any Frosh: "Oh! do I get promoted so soon?"



IFillie D. (to striped kitty): "C'mere kitty.
Nice li'l kitty. Aw-w-w-w-w comon. Say, John,
this cat must have halitosis."



When Mr. Pence catches you cribbing on a
Physics quiz, be nonchalant light a Bunsen
burner.



Samuel the bulter, says, "My wife feeds me
onions so she can find me at night."



Even his best friend wouldn't tell him so he
flunked the exam.



Miss Kimbro: "When does the "Revival of
Learning" period begin?"
Bill Bailey: "Just before the exams."



Miss Renison: "It is against the law of the
United States for a bookkeeper to erase."
Mary Dean: "I'm going to Europe."



Mr. Myers: "I'm tempted to give a test."
Mandi: "Yield not to temptation."



Stranger: "Does Mike Howe live here?"

Mr. Sawyers: "Say, do ya think this is a barn?"



Vic M.: "If I was as dumb as you I'd quit
school."

Dik S.: "It I was as dumb as you I wouldn't
have started."



Belding: "Crusoe musta been an acrobat."
Ray IV.: "How so?"

Belding: "Well, it says here that when he
finished his davs work he sat down on his chest."



Miss Hesse: "Name the different clauses."
Frosh: "Noun clause, adverbial clause, and
Santa Claus."



1st half wit: Does oo know Odessa ?'
2nd half wit: "Odessa who?"
1st half wit: "Odessa itta bit!"



Sarcastic cop (to cringing Mundy): An' how'd
you ever learn to drive? By the blindfold test,
maybe, huh?



Mr. Myers: "Now, now, Eddie, you can't work
and whistle at the same time."
Eddie A.: "I ain't working, I'm only whistling."



Paul D.: "Can you imagine anything worse
than having cooties?"

Herbert R.: "Suppose you had them and they
chirped?"



She: "What have you got under there?"
He: Under wear?"



THE CARIBBEAN.



121



Miss Moore: "Say, who do you think you are,
the teacher?"

Tommy P.: "No, Miss Moore."

Miss Moore: "Well then don't act like a fool."



Tommy Pescod says: "I wonder if the Mexican
Border pays rent."



Mundy: ".Are you ticklish?"
Alice H.: "Naw, I'm Swedish."



Pete ir.: "What shall I do; I have water on the
knee?"

Alicia: "Wear pumps."



Mr. Silcr: ".Are you a professional swimmer?'
Mundy: "Naw, I just swim on the side."



Mr. Pence (to boys at board): "Boys, what's
that noise."
Ben ir.: "Oh, sir, I dropped a perpendicular."



Billy: "Impetuous aren't you?"
Billie: "Emphasis on the second syllable,
kiddo!"



Mr. Amos C. Pence had been explaining longi-
tude and time with illustrations from a map of
broadcasting, so up pipes a bright student, "If
you went to the north pole, would you get all the
stations at the same time?"



Bettx: "I always think twice before I let any one
kiss me."
Eddie: "Oh, alright, but make it snappy."



1st: "I used bicycle spokes for an aerial and
got Wheeling."

2nd: "That's nothing; I put my set on the bed
and got Davenport."



Sign in C. Z. restaurant: Don't crab about
vour coffee. You'll be old and weak yourself
some dav.



Sir Lancelot: "Farewell, sweete ladye. I muste
away to ye Rounde Table."

^ueen Guinevere: "So! You'd leave me flatte tor
a wilde partye at your olde Knight Club ?"



Mr. Myers: "Mandi, if your father bought a
radio set for S6o on the installment plan and paid
off S2 a week, how long will it take him to pay
it off?"

Mandi: "Ten years."

Mr. Myers: "Sir down, you don't know the
lesson."

Mandi: "Sit down yourself, you don't know
mv father."



If you call the keeper of a library a librarian,
does it necessarily follow that you should call the
keeper of a barber shop a barbarian?



Interested onlooker: "Is that girl Virginia Stev-
enson, the leading lady in this operetta?"

Bored one: "Yeah. She's leading the chorus
by about 4 measures.



Mr. Saivyers: "This is the skull of a man of the
old radio age. We can date it within 20 years."
Genevieve 0.: "Gosh, how can you?"
Mr. Sawyers: "Look at the evidence of wear
around the ears. He wore earphones."



If education is so refining, what makes a hi
school course?



Miss Russell: "Who caused that disturbance?'

Voice: "Beverly Dunn did it."

Miss Russell: "Mv heavens! What Endish!"



James C: "How do you like my new hat?"
Russell E.: 'Sail right, but suppose your ears
a;et tired?"



Mr. Sawyers: "Norine, explain to the class
what steam is.

Norine: "Water gone crazy with the heat."



Francisco says: "Fifty million Freshmen can't
be WONG."



Mr. West: Alicia, what is the process of
pasteurization?"

Alicia: "You stick a needle in a cow and the
milk is pasteurized!"

MR 19742 16



.All that stands between the high school gradu-
ate and the top of the ladder, is the ladder.



Frances (of the Senior Class) is called "Seven
Days," 'cause she makes one weak.



122



THE CARIBBEAN.



First Broken Heart: Well, anyway, your Les Victor M.: "Why do rabbits bark?"

Miserable: than I am! Ralph C: "They don't, ya poor sap."

Second Busted Jaw: There Hugo, complaining Victor M.: "Well, it says here that rabbits eat

again! carrots and bark."



Did you ever notice that a hard-boiled egg is
vellow inside?



Eva G. says: "Laugh and the world laughs
with you, smile and you're just a flirt."



Camouflage is French for cauliflower which is
disguised cabbage.



The following are answers from hi school
students from various classes:

I. Al Smith is a famous scientist.

2. There are two parts to a sentence, the sub-
ject and the predicament.

3. To kill a butterfly pinch its borax.

4. The heart is an infernal organ.

5. The teeth are grind organs.

6. Nicotine is such a deadly poison, that a drop
of it on the tail of a dog will kill a man.

7. Geometry teaches us how to bisect angels.

8. A circle is a round straight line with a hole
in the middle.

9. Gravitation is that, it there were none we

should fly away.
10. Georgia was founded by people who had
been executed.



Burton H.: "What makes that baby cry so
much?"

Ray W.: "Well, if all your teeth were out, your
hair ofl^ and your legs so weak you couldn't stand
on them, I guess you'd cry too."



Dick Wood arrived late at a baseball game this
season, and sat down beside a beautiful blonde.
"Whose game?" he asked. She looked at him
smilingly and replied, "I am."



Son: "Pop, I got in trouble at school to-day and
it's all your fault."

Pop: "How's that, son?"

Son: "Remember I asked you how much a
million dollars was?"

Pop: "Yes, I remember."

Son: "Well, 'a helluva lot' isn't the right
answer."



JiiniorF.: "Bad day for the race to-day.'
ZolaD.: "Why, what race?"
JiiniorF.: "The human race."



A Senior is a person who was a Junior last year.
(Sez you.)



Miss Hesse (in Spanish 11): "Eleanor, trans-
late this; Apiintole el bozo hacicndo la giiirra en
America."

Eleanor F.: "He began to grow a beard making
the war in America."



Mr. A. C. Pence: "Name three sources of
power, Ben."

Ben IV.: "Water source, air source, and apple
source."



Norine: "Can you swim?"

Violet: "I don't know."

Norine: "How d'ya mean yoa don't know?'

Violet: "I always sink before I can find out.'



A Soph stood in the lower hall,

He didn't hear the bell.
And when he got to Latin class.

The teacher gave him (lots of work to do).



An oyster and his father

Were swimming in the stew.
Said the father, "Son, we're lucky.

It's the third one we've been through."
Then someone saw the oysters,

And the father, with a frown
Hid behind a cracker.

And watched his son go down.



HEARD AT THE CENTRAL STUDIO.

Abie and Ikie: "\'e vant our pictures tooken
vit glass pants."

Mr. Li: "What do you mean, glass pants?"

Abie and Ikie: "You know, glass pants; vit dem
to-gedder."

Mr. Li: "Oh, clasped hands. Why didn't you
say so at first?"



THE CARIBBEAN.



123



Miss K'diiIto: "I'm sorry to say I've never yet
read Dante's 'Divine Comedy'."

J^ictor A/..' "Well, you got nothing on me."



After looking at some of the modern hunching,
stooping styles of dancing, one might say that the
dancers are on pleasure bent.



"No back torque, now," said Mr. Pence, the
physics prof, when he cranked Miss Kimbro's
Reo.



Some of our perennial high school students
evidently believe that one good term deserves
another.



She: "But I don't know you."

Him: "What you don't know won't hurt you.'



Editor: "This line is devoted to Philip.'
Reader: "To Philip who?"
Editor: "To Philip Space."



Miss Russell: "Hey, come back here! Mr.

Sawyers wants to see you."

Belding K.: "Did he ask for me personally?"
Miss Russell: "No. But he said he'd like to

see the fellow who could loaf away his school time

and eet by with it."



Soph: "There are several things that I can
always count on."
Frosh: "What are they ?"
Soph: "My fingers."



Rita J.: "Well, at last I've passed French.

Mundy: "Honestly?"

Rita J.: "Aw, don't be so inc^uisitive."



Miss Kimbro: "Walter, repeat in your own
words, 'I see the cow. The cow is pretty. The
cow can run'."

Walter IV.: "Lamp de cow. Ain't she a beaut?
An' say, baby, she sure can step."



Bill B.: "Use the word 'writhe' in a sentence."
Betina P.: "I writhe every morning at thickth
o'clock."



Librarian: "Hey, don't spit on the floor!'
Smart Egg: "Wassa matter, floor leak?"



1st Stude (in English): "What part of the body
is the fray?"

2nd Stude: "Fray? What are you talking
about?"

1st Stude: "The book says that Ivanhoe was
wounded in the trav."



He: "Sir, I want your daughter for my wife.'
Him: "And I, sir, am not willing to trade."



She was only an upholsterer's daughter, but
divan looking and full of good chair, and you can
bed that she knew her stuff.



Kit Jr.: "Who's that fat party getting on the
train?"

Fit N.: "That ain't no party. That's an
excursion!"



Ralph Crum says there's only one way to raise
a mustache. And that is: "Before retiring at
night, rub the upper lip well with salt. You
must then get a pail of water and place it at the
head of your bed. The hairs, being thirsty, will
come forth for a drink. The aspirant should then
quickly tie a knot in the hairs, and it will stay
out. (Hev! who threw that?)"



Fred K.: "Just think! A man came into the
music room and said, 'Not a sound or I'll fire!'
Uiikuowfi voice: "Were you just going to sing?"



Mr. Pence (explaining experiment): "First I'll
take some sulphuric acid, then I'll take some
chloroform."

Foice/rom back row: "That's a good idea."



Willie D.: "What kinda animal is a 'Dan-
geroo'?"

Billie 0.: "Never heard of one."

Willie D.: "Well, at the circus there was a sign
on one cage, 'Don't go near the cage; these
animals are 'Dangerous'."



Mundy sez, "Radium is the plural of radio, and
when two stations are on the same wave, it be-
comes radium."



When it gets too hot in the Study Hall, be
nonchalant take off your shoes. (Ask Tommy
Pescod.)



124



THE CARIBBEAN.



A MODERX VERSION- OF THE TWEXTV-THIRD PSALM.

The Ford is my auto, I shall not want;

It maketh me lie down in muddv roads, and
leadeth me into the repair shop;

I restoreth its spark plugs; curses! for its name-
sake;

Yea, though I ride through the valley of the
shadow of death I will fear all evil, for my
Ford is with me; its rods and its shafts dis-
comfort me;

It has blowouts in the presence of mine enemies;

Surely goodness and mercy shall not allow this
thing to follow me all the days of my life,
for I'll dwell in the bughouse forever.



The hawse is a nice animal. It has four legs,
one on each corner. It is longer than it is wide,
and at the beginning he has a head and at the end
there is a tale. It is different from an elephant
who has a tale m the beginning and one in the end.
(My hawse is a Texas pony and came from
Arabia.) There are many kinds of hawses,
chestnut hawses and hawse chestnuts, colts and
colt revolvers, saw hawses and hawse radish,
hawse pistols and night mares.



There's a certain sophomore in this school who
said he had an aunt who was so stingy that he
called her "Pennv .Auntie."



Rodman has often asked us, "Who's the best
and smartest boy in high school, and whv am I?"



Judge Murray: "You are accused of attempting
to choke the plaintiff, tell me all about it."
Guilty one: "Well, your honor, it's a lung story."



When better dates are made they won't be
blind. Ask the boy who phones one.



M/Vj Moon' (French lo): "We left off last time
with a storm bursting in earnest."
Fred KnAl: "Poor Ernest!"



Fiddy sez, "\ lotta guys are having fun at m-\'
expanse."

Mas- I hold your Palm, Olive?

Not on your Life Buoy.
Then I'm out of I.ux?

You sure are. Ivorv formed.



OVERHEARD IN SECRET.

Foxey: "Hedgewig, your freckles are going
away, don't you think? Yeah, going away into
one big one."

Hedgewig: "Foxey, if you were just a little bit
thinner you could get a job as fat man in Barnum
& Bailey's."

Foxey: "Seems to me as if you could get a good
job yourself with the Government, with feet like
you got. Yeah, that's it. Stamping out forest
fires."



Herman: "Do you know what spinach is?'
Mary B.: "Sure, that's the language they
speak in Spain."



Mr. Pence: "It gives me great pleasure to
mark a '90' on this paper, Bill."

Bill Bailey: "Make it a '100' and enjov vour-
self."



A CANAL ZONE MURDER TRIAL.

Prosecutor: "Where were vou on the night of
May 16?"

Murderer: "At home."

Prosecutor: "Were you with a lady?"

Murderer: "No, my wife."

Prosecutor: "Did anything strange happen?"

Murderer: "Yes, she said I could go out."

Prosecutor: "Did you suspect anything?"

Murderer: "I suspected that she had gone
crazy."

Prosecutor: "Did >ou hear any strange noises."

Murderer: "Yes, my daughter was singing."

Prosecutor: "When did you first suspect that
murder had been committed?"

Murderer: "When I saw three bullet-ridden
bodies on the floor."

Prosecutor: "Where were they shot?"

Murderer: "In the room."

Prosecutor: "^^"hat did you do?"

Murderer: "Tried to keep the policemen from
taking their watches."

Prosecutor: "What sensation ciid you feel?"

Murderer: ".An itching sensation."

Prosecutor: "What caused that?"

Murderer: "My new woolen underwear."

Prosecutor: "Case dismissed."



THE CARIBBEAN.



125



The strong man, knife in hand, gazed at the
smooth white body in the water. "I can not do
it," he groaned. "It's not a man's work," and
the tears streamed from his eyes. The woman,
with a look of utter scorn on her face, took the
knife and finished peeling the onions.



A small boy was walking home from a music
lesson with his violin under his arm when a thief
crept up behind him, snatched the instrument and
immediately disappeared.

It sounds like a dream come true. Millions of
small boys like to imagine such a theft while
practicing on the piano at home, but it almost
never happens.



Wicky sez, "Hair to-day and gone to-morrow."



The deuce is a card, but in Italy "II Duce" is
the whole deck.



Lawyer.
Witness:
Lawyer:
Witness:



ANOTHER CANAL ZONE COURT TRIAL.

Lawyer: "Where were you at noon, November
1st, last year?"

Witness: "Where was I at noon, November ist,
last year?"

Lawyer: "Yes, where were you at noon, Novem-
ber 1st, last year?"

Witness: "Why do you want to know?"
"Why do I want to know?"
"Yes, why do you want to know?"
"Because it is my duty to find out."
"Because it is your duty to find out?"

Lawyer: "Yes, because it is my duty to find
out.

Witness: "Then I will tell you."

Lawyer: "Then you will tell me?"

Witness: "Yes, I will tell you."

Lawyer: "What will you tell me?"

Witness: "What will I tell you?"

Lawyer: "Yes, what will you tell me?

JFitness: "Why, what do you want to know?"

Lawyer: "What do I want to know?"

Witness: "Yes, what do you want to know?

Lawyer: "I want to know why the judge is
tearing his hair and why the jurors are strangling
each other.



If all the books in C. H. S. were placed one on
top of the other the pile would fall over.



The old-fashioned girl had to be a good cook.
She had no mayonnaise dressing to hide her
ignorance under.



Mr. Pence: "How much is five 'q' and five 'q'?'

Bill: "Ten 'q'."

Mr. Pence: "You're welcome."



Velma Hall sez, "A goose is one geese, and a
geese is a whole lot of gooses."



She: "You you worm!"

Him: "Worm? Perhaps. But don't flatter
yourself you're not the early bird."



"I didn't mind the licking," sobbed the little
chap, "but I thought it cowardly to do it behind
mv back."



They say the shower bath was invented by a
plumber who was always being bawled out by his
wife about leaving a ring around the tub.



Wicky: "I wonder why it is that tat guys are
always good natured."

Mundy: "Probably because it takes them so
long to get mad clear through."



Fred KroU sez, "A bachelor is a man who has
cheated some woman out of a divorce."

"Stop!" screamed the dainty, sweet youngthing,

And the cabbie jammed his brake
"Drive on," roared the girlie's escort,
'Twas not to you she spake."



CHANSONETTE DI MARCHETT1_

Clatter and clash,
Slinga da hash
Smasha da deesh, an'
Twirla mustache,
Loopa da loop
Sloppa da soup
Winka da lady
No giva da whoop!



We want to make sure that you have heard
about the Scotchman who gave his girl a watch
case for Christmas, and then the next Christmas
gave her the works.



126



THE CARIBBEAN.



DO YOU KXOW-



In New York they arrested a policeman recently
because they found corn on the cop.



That the curse of true love is no different from
that of a truck driver.

That poise will be poise even in high school?

That no matter how angry a girl may be, she'll
always makeup?

That \'irginia Stevenson asked for four cheer
leaders, but they gave her four hoarse men?

That many a man is compelled to keep his word
because no one will take it?

That the only time a chicken crosses the road
nowadays is to hop into somebody's hack?

That the true test of fame is to have a twenty-
five cent sundae named after you?

That while some people love for a thrill, others
thrill for love?

That the game of love is never called ofi on
account of darkness?

That girls may be game, but they're not fish?

That a little loving is a dangerous thing, but
who'd want it if it wasn't?

That a parking space is the place in which an-
other car is parked?

That the molecules' motto is "Up and atom?"

That the girl who looks upon love as a circus
usually finds out, after all, that it is only a one-
ring affair?

That after many years of research, scientists
have discovered that the kind of hens that lay the
longest are dead hens?

That marmalade is that yellow, sweetish sub-
stance found on toast, neckties and piano keys?

That if a boy has a good line he can always keep
a couple of girls on the string?

That nothing is more humiliating than the last
minute date, unless it be no date at all?

That when a man is hungry he swallows his
pride?

That most people detest skunks because they
put on such airs?

That a woman's hair loses its charm when
found in a bowl of soup?

That everything comes to him who orders hash ?

That when there's nothing more to be said
Victor Melendez always says it?



Mavis T.: "Will you give me a penii\- for my
thoughts?"

Dc//a R.: "Du I look like a garbage man?"



Noiiuc: "Mr. Sawyers, how can the experts
tell when there's going to be an eclipse?"

Mr. Sawyers: "Don't ask foolish questions,
Norine. "Can't they read the papers like the
rest of us?"



Radio announcer: "The Harmony Quintet wil
now sing 'Together'."

Mundy (listening in): And about time, too!



Rac B.: "You don't even know what the
'Marseillaise' is."

Mavis: "Oh, but I do! It's the theme song of
the French Revolution."



The latest song out is, "The Sidewalks of New
York" bv the Portland Cement Co.



Miss Hesse: "Don't sit there and look like an
idiot."

Charley P.: "Very well. Miss Hesse. Where
shall I sit?"



OVERHEARD AT FIDDV S HOUSE WHILE TAKING
A FIDDLE LESSON.

Prof. Spinella: "Ach, vot a dummer! Yust
like your uncle, only yet better vorse! Himmle,
ten times now already you blay der Dew Drop
Dance and each time it ain't der same but
different yet and Awful!!! Haw All right
next veek my pewbills gif a reezidal, and )ou vill
come to blay but not der violeen No! You
vill come and blay London Britches game !

Fiddy: "But I'm gonna be a train engineer
when I grow up! Heck, what good will it be to
play a fiddle when I'm an engineer? How
can I play th' fiddle with my head stickin' out th'
engine window all th' time, watchin signals?
How can I ? ? ? ?



I own the sunshine and the birds.
They're treasures of first rank.

But it bothers me to think that I
Can't cash 'em at the bank!



If they want people to keep clean, why do they
bar soap?



THE CARIBBEAN.



I2'i






3n Appreciation to 0m AbUcrtigersJ

The Staff of the 1930 Caribbean of Cristobal High School
has been very careful in its selection of merchants
who were asked to contribute to the advertisements
in our Annual. We chose only the better type of
merchants, every one reliable and trustworthy, who
deal with the best goods. Without the help of these
advertisers the publication of our book would have
been impossible.

As our readers turn the pages of this Caribbean we
hope they will not forget the advertisers who helped
to make our book possible.



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128 THE CARIBBEAN.



i i



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Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits
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I DO YOU WONDER WHERE

THE BOYS GET SUCH SNAPPY HAIR CUTS? p

AND THE GIRLS THEIR MODISH BOBS? |

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r





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Unequaled for situation and comfort. A hotel in keeping -^g^
with the dignity, spirit, and service of the Panama Canal

Go/f ~ - Swimming - Water Sports - Tarpon Fishing

THE YEAR AROUND
JAMES E LEWIS, Manager .: .: P. O. Address, CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE




THE CARIBBEAN. 129



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MR 1974217



I30 THE CARIBBEAN.



The cove?' of this atinual was created by

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ANCON AVENUE and "H" STREET - PANAMA CITY 1



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THE CARIBBEAN.



131



1



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Phone 336



A*



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13-



THE CARIBBEAN.



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Enquiries at any of our offices are cordially invited.



OFFICES AT



Balboa, C. Z. Cristobal, C. Z. Panama, R. P.

PHONES:
Cristobal 1710 Balboa 1273 Panama 470






TRAVEL TO EUROPE ON



&



GERMAN

UOYD



NORTH GERMAN LLOYD'S
Luxurious Steamers



m



CONNECTIONS TO ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD WITH MODERN, FAST, AND
NEW STEAMERS

LLOYD EXPRESS SERVICE

Between New York and Bremen

NORTH GERMAN LLOYD

PANAMA CANAL AGENCY
Telephones



m



Cristobal 12 74 and 12 75
Balbo) 18 35



I



Passenger Agents for Panama
BOYD BROS.

Telephone, Panama 25

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COMPLIMENTS OF



Andrade Polanco & Cia.

Ltd.



^



PHONE 12



COLON



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THE CARIBBEAN.



133




Panama Railroad Steamship Line



CRISTOBAL to NEW YORK

VIA PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI



^



1



(ALL CABIN SHIPS)

S, S. "ANCON" and S. S. "CRISTOBAL"

FORTNIGHTLY SERVICE



&



MONTHLY SAILINGS TO WEST COAST

S. S. "GUAYAQUIL" and S. S. "BUENAVENTURA"

CALLING AT

BUENAVENTURA, TUMACO, ESMERALDAS, BAHL\, MANTA,
PUERTO BOLIVAR and GUAYAQUIL



OFFICES ON THE ISTHMUS:

Superintendent, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone
Steamship Ticket Agent, Cristobal, Canal Zone
Receiving and Forwarding Agency, Cristobal, Canal Zone

OFFICES IN THE UNITED STATES:

No. 24 State Street, New York City, N. Y.



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WONG CHANG & Co., Ltd.

HARDWARE

PAINT, and
FISHING TACKLE

Colon and Panama



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Join our

VICTROLA I
CLUB

and get an

ORTHOPHONIC
121 $3.00



iSeto l^ittor SRecorbs

EVERY MONTH



J. V. BEVERHOUDT |

COLON



134



THE CARIBBEAN.



m COMPLIMENTS OF |

I Pr. Wtrn Pricr Pr. Carl , ^afforb |

i CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



WWfWfWfWtS



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Visit our
MODERN BARBER SHOP



HANS MARXEN



PROPRIETOR



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10.081 BALBOA AVE., COLON



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PANAZONE GARAGE Co.



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96 CENTRAL AVENUE
PANAMA



Distributors of the

General Motor Co.



CADILLAC, LA SALLE, BUICK,

MARQUETTE, OAKLAND,

PONTIAC, CHEVROLET, OLDS- p

MOBILE, G. M. C. TRUCKS §




COMPLIMENTS OF

Panama Hgenciee Co.

i GRACE LINE PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO.

^



THE CARIBBEAN.



135



4 When Visiting Colon^ stay at the ^

GRAN HOTEL IMPERIAL



tss



This Hotel is modern in every respect, offering to visitors com-
fortable apartments, the best of cuisines and prompt service



I Improved Equipment - - Modern Methods

Efficient Service



s



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I



JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY

CHARGE ACCOUNT IF DESIRED

Cleaning Pressing and Dyeing

iT OlLivlriljl I

Phone: Colon 21 P. Box 1131, Cristobal, C. Z.






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DIERS & ULLRICH

IVhoIesale and Retail Merchants



%



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THE CARIBBEAN.



I AN INDEPENDENT MORNING DAILY I



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PANAMA AMERICAN



Q



ESTABLISHED 1925



Undisputedly in the lead

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COMPLIMENTS OF



i:



p. Olanabasgio I



i^



FRONT STREET - COLON



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COMPLIMENTS OF



OFFICE SERVICE Co.



^



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CATHEDRAL PLAZA

PANAMA



THE CARIBBEAN. 137



Haskins News Service ||

COLON GATUN BALBOA PANAMA |

Newsdealers and Publishers ||

I!

AT YOUR SERVICE PI



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Cable Address: IMPCO. A. B. C 5th 6th Bentley's P. O. Box 342

Colon Import & Export Co., Ltd.

JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS

DEALERS IN

GENERAL MERCHANDISE and NATIVE PRODUCTS

COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA



BRANCH RETAIL STORES AND TRADING STATIONS

Playa Dama Santa Isabel Porvenir Tupile Isle of Pines Carti Nargana

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Compliments of

THE ANCON INN

No. 20 J STREET - - PANAMA CITY
ARTHUR WEIL, Proprietor



Rathbun, Stilson & Company, Ltd. I

GENERAL HARDWARE and LUMBER MERCHANTS I

- DEALERS IN - g

Paints, Oils and Builders* Materials, etc. |

LUMBER YARD 114 ^

Telephones BRANCH STORE 253 _ _ POT ON R P ^

[OFFICE 253 \^\JL,yjr\, p^. r. p



MR 1974218



io8



THE CARIBBEAN.



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I ITS h:erE!

m The new era in entertainment for all Colon, Old and New Cristobal.

^ The Silent Drama is no longer Silent!

M T&o?ir ?inh <&0i> ^lf-?ltlfinni> the marvel of the age, the world-famous celeb-

g J^tai ailU Syct VliajpyUUt rities of the screen, opera, Vaudeville, Drama,

^ and Musical Comedy, with a degree of perfection never before attained.

& 'PVl^ ^'PT? A TITi ^^^ been remodeled and made comfortable in a manner

H ^ -^^^^ ^ ^ .^XXXl U befitting this marvelous innovation.

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Before eye-strain wrinkles become
permanent and nervous fatigue
becomes chronic, have your
eyes examined. If you need
glasses, you will be sur-
prised to find what a
comfort they are
when accurately
and
becomingly
fitted to
YOU

Have your eyes examined



SCADRON OPTICAL CO.

^ Registered Optometrists and Opticians Estab-
^ lished in Panama Over lo Years



&



PANAMA NEW YORK COLON

23 Central Ave. 9-034 Front St. ^

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INOCENCIO GALINDO, Jr. I



7th AND BOLIVAR STREETS
COLON



JOBBER AND COMMISSION
MERCHANT



i
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REAL ESTATE BROKER AND p
AGENT



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COMPLIMENTS OF



I "Cf,e


TENTH STREET AND BOITl.H ALLEY



OPPOSITE THE TROPIC



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THE CARIBBEAN.



139



I Something Yon Can't Learn at School



1



There is always a New and Large Assortment of

CLOTHING, SPORTS WEAR and NOVELTIES

Arriving on every Steamer

Especially Suited For Students

-^-^

COMPLETE LINE OF PERFUMES
-^^-^^

FRENCH BAZAAR

PANAMA - _ COLON



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COMPLIMENTS OF

Kodak Panama,

lilil*

Subsidiary of Eastman Kodak
Company



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^
^



WJ



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M PANAMA, R. of P.



^MMMMM:




COMPLIMENTS OF
THE



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ROBERT BROUGH, Proprietor
COLON



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140



THE CARIBBEAN.



i

I

I
I

P
I

i



^($Vi:



fi



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COMPLIMENTS OF



a ifrienb



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?



.1



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UNITED FRUIT COMPANY

Regular Sailings from Cristobal, C. Z. tc
NEW YORK NEW ORLEANS CUBA COLOMBIA JAMAICA COSTA RICA
For further pariicuiars apply to Pgul Wcst, Manager, Crlstobal DivisioH, C. Z. T. H. Jacome, Agent, Panama City



THE CARIBBEAN.



141



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We have prepared ourselves to outfit you
with your graduation GIFTS and CLOTHES

Fintst selection of

Dresses, Silks and Lace, Suits and Tuxedos






LUM'S

BOLIVAR AVE., Opposite the Market COLON, R. P.



SMMMMMMMMMSESilESKISMMig



PREMSING & SONS

GRAND SILK STORE

7.018 FRONT STREET, COLON, R. P.



ISSARSING & BROS.

IMPERIAL SILK STORE

10.055 FRONT STREET, COLON



Wholesale and Retail in

I INDIAN, CHINESE, AND JAPANESE p

I SILK GOODS & CURIOS, SPANISH ^

SHAWLS, COOLEY AND PERSIAN g

M COATS, PANAMA HATS, PERSIAN t^

j AND CHINESE RUGS. M

^ Big Bargains in Everything p



m



CENTRAL AMERICAN
PLUMBING & SUPPLY Co.



i Supplies and Tools



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION



"Good Houses Deserve Good Plumbing"
TRY US



COLON

8th St. and Balboa Ave.

Phone No. 4
P. O. Box No. 1 08



PANAMA
58 Central Ave.

Phone No. 249
P. O. Box No. 724




MMMMMMXMMMMMP



COMPLIMENTS OF



i CRISTOBAL BEAUTY SHOPPE



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142



THE CARIBBEAN.



CENTRAL PHOTO STUDIO



9.037 FRONT STREET, COLON, R. P.

Latest and best in Artistic Portraiture. Fancy
Lighting by Modern Electrical Methods

Enlargements in Water Colors, Oil, Pastel,
Carbon, Bromoil, and Platinotypes

Passports, Amateur Developing and Printing



4te-



i



I



Satisfaction Guaranteed



THE FINEST CAFE AND ^

RESTAURANT ^

ON THE PACIFIC SIDE M



1



a



RICE'S

CAFE AND RESTA URA NT

Opposite the Railroad Station

Visit our Second Floor Dining Room
Cool - Comfortable



PRIVATE BOOTHS



PRIVATE PARKING SPACE
for our Patrons



CHINESE DISHES



Hector S. Downe

Manager



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RALEIGH

THE ALL-STEEL BICYCLE



JOHN BULL TYRES
Colon Cycle Company

Phone 424 - Colon



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THE CARIBBEAN.



143



i



COMPLIMENTS OF



SP



1

i

i
i

i

i



Distributor for

PIERCE ARROW STUDE-
BAKER ERSKINE CARS

PENNZOIL STEELCOTE
PUROLATORS



^ 107 Central Avenue, Panama City






fe



I



^ Where to shop in Colon or Panama
% ORIGINAL

I D. CHELLERAM

1 ORIENTAL MERCHANTS

^ Wholesale and Retail



47 Front Street
Colon



8 1 -A Central Avenue
Panama



Big Bargains in Everything

WORLD VARIETY SOUVENIRS

Specialty in

SPANISH SHAWLS, NICE COL-
LECTION OF IVORY, READY-
MADE PONGEE SILK SUITS
ALWAYS IN STOCK
Where quality is obtainable
at the minimum expense



PHONES: Panama 340



Colon 159



SMiM^KMMiKSMMlSiM^E2HEM2EMMMMiraEMMMSEMSiMffiMMiSP



Compania
Panamena de Fuerza y Luz



(SUCURSAL DE COLON)



COLON, R. de P.



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'44



THE CARIBBEAN.



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p. O. BOX 415



FLORENCE HOTEL

Cable Address "LANATA"
CORNER OF 9th AND FRONT STREETS

Situated in the center of the City with an excellent
view of the Sea, Piers, and Railroad Station .



PHONE 704



Spacious and Well Ventilated Rooms



Modern Comfort



Italian, Creole, American, French, and Spanish Dishes

(ALL LANGUAGES INTERPRETED)



THE CHINESE SILK STORE

INEW CHINA

WE CARRY

GENUINE CHINESE and JAPANESE

SILKS and CURIOSITIES



?r.r|)



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LINENS, SILK MATERIALS,

SHAWLS, CARVED IVORY,

WICKER FURNITURE, VASES



Perfumes



Jewelry



FRONT STREET
Colon



CENTRAL AVE.
Panama



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i



Gittens and Taylor

FOR

EXCLUSIVE SUITINGS

AND

CAREFUL TAILORING
10th Street, Colon - Phone 291



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FATT KING WONG CHONG & CO.



nth STREET AND BALBOA AVENUE



COLON, R. P.



I



Dealers in

Chinese Hand-made Leather Suit Cases, Panama Hats, Men's Suits, Fourth ^
of July Fireworks. Chinese, Japanese, American and European Drygoods. p



P. O. BOX 305, COLON



p. O. BOX 1005, CRISTOBAL -

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PHONE No. 337



THE CARIBBEAN.



J 45




!



i






i



=4

a



BUREAU OF CLUBS AND PLAYGROUNDS

(The Recreational Division of the Panama Canal)

Has for voiir convenience

COMMUNITY CLUBHOUSES

Located at

ANCON, BALBOA, PEDRO MIGUEL, GATUN and CRISTOBAL

Offering you

Soda Fountain Service - Motion Pictures - Bowling Alleys
Billiard Rooms - Reading Rooms - Swimming Pools



Also SOCIAL, PHYSICAL and PLAYGROUND ACTIVITIES



i






^
^



I





3^



P. O. Box No. 174 Phone Corp. 310 p

S. CHENALLOY



8.053 BALBOA AVENUE
COLON, R. P.



AGENT FOR

The National Fire Insurance Company
of Hartford, Conn., U. S. A.

Paid up Capital, $3,000,000.00
Total Assets, over §46,000,000.00



i



Pan American Life Insurance Company
of New Orleans, La., U. S. A.

Paid up Capital, sSl, 000,000.00
Total Assets, over $20,500,000.00



i



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DRESSES AND HATS FROM PARIS

ARBOIX

Front and 9th Streets
COLON, R. P.



HAND EMBROIDERED LINENS
REAL SPANISH SHAWLS
ENGLISH LUGGAGE HAND BAGS



PARIS NOVELTIES



MR 1974219



1+6



THE CARIBBEAN.








m^m






Y/W':^;tr






C. CASULLO

JEWELER AND WATCHMAKER

P. O. BOX 675
PHONE 255

CRISTOBAL, C. Z.
9.036 Front Street, Colon, R. P.

mmmmmmmmmmmwmm



mMimmi>iMmnmmmmmmmmMmm




Kelso-
Jordan



More study periods free for
other work, less preparation at
home, more time your own.

Parker Duofold Fountain Pen
is fast, sure writer. Better look-
ing work too.

Pressureless Touch. Non-
Breakable Barrel. 28% Lighter
Weight. Five colors. $5 and
$7, according to size.

Let's show you at our pen
counter.



^



Masonic
Temple



CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



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1^ Telegram: ESSARDAS
Phone: 197-J COLON.






Postal Address:
1389 CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



ESSARDASS & SONS

ORIENTAL ART PALACE



f, 56 Front Street

I COLON, R. p.



135 Central Ave.

PANAMA CITY



PERFUME, PANAMA HATS and
ORIENTAL GOODS. GENUINE
JEWELRY FROM ORIENT

At Rock Bottom Prices

INSPECTION INVITED



BRANCHES:



AGENTS:



Compare our Prices with others before pur-
chasing elsewhere.



64 MAIN ST., GIBRALTAR BOMBAY HONGKONG
/=^ LAHORE DELHI KOBE KARACHI

SIMLA MOROCCO SHANGHAI YOKOHAMA



mmmiuMm mmMmmn mimmmMM MMmmm jmms^ ^



Compliments of WALLY'S



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COMPLIMENTS OF



^ottl triboU




THE CARIBBEAN.



147




Delicious and Refreshing



The Panama Coca-Cola Botthnsi Co., inc.



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Engravifigs of Unexcelled ^ijality

for School and College Publications



HOWARD-WESSON CO

WORCESTER, MASSACHL'SE'lTS



The College E?igravef^s of N^ew England

The Engravings for this Publication
were made bv Howard-Wesson Co.



m^m^mmmmwmmm^^^^i^^!^^^f^^^(^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^.



14?



THE CARIBBEAN.







PAGE 4

Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2010 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1930cris

PAGE 7

Cristollal lIi.;h &:11001.

PAGE 8

THE CARIBBE A N. -II mmmmmmmwwww = I; Fore'Zvord The Stafr h a s labored long an d hard'-I II T o make this b oo k th e b es t. 1 'vVe'v e our reputati on t o r ega rd 1 = An d yo u'll find i t "best b y test." Ii I wmwwwwmwmmw =

PAGE 9

THE CARIBBEAN VOL, X I II C R I S T O B A L C ANA L ZO;\lF., [ 930. P U BLI S HED B Y THE H I G H SC H O OL. F oreword D edication Editorial Ollr Governor. OUf Canal Zone School Officials Our P rincipal S t aff. Faculty Seniors Class H istory. Class \\'ill. H o t e l .\Yashingloll T .-IBI.E O F CO'HE:" TS. Page 7 30 ] J unio r s Sophomores .. F r es hm e n L it erary Sports School Note s .. Exc han ges Alumni J o k es. A d \ 'ertisemcnts Hrid t!c o n o ld hins s Highway to Panama Citro Page. 35 39 93 IIJ liS No. I.

PAGE 10

4 THE CARIBBEAN. D EDICA7ION. BECAUSE of t h e ir unceasin g i n terest in our sch oo l work an d t heir h o pes f o r our future s u ccess, IJ, w e th e Staff, gratefully dedicate th e t hirteenth vo lum e of I THE CARIBB EAN to Our P arents I

PAGE 11

TH E C.'IR I BBE.-\\l. (fbttoriai. TO GO O R NOT T O GO. 1'1/0111(/; L. Colty J r ?o T o g o t o c olleg e or not to go, t hat is t h e qu es ti o n w h ic h i s f o r emos t in t h e minds o f t hose o f u s w h o are graduating this June I t i s a q u estio n whi c h r equires a great deal o f con s id e r atio n and whi c h s h ould n o t be d ec id e d upo n hurri edl)". Think it o v e r and if Y OLI have a d e finit e id e a in mind o f what pro f ess i o n wo ul d lik e t o f ollo w, a s k y ourse l f t h i s questi o n, "\\'mlld a c ollege educatio n h elp m e in g etting r eady f o r this w o rk ? I n t h e majority o f in s t:lll ces i t w ould. T h e college man o r woman ha s t h e pre f e r e n ce o v e r the p e r so n with only a hig h sc h oo l educatiu n in obtaining a positi o n I n add i t ioll to t h i s h e ha s an unde r standing and an appreciation o f t h e nne r t h in gs in life and h e p ossesst's t h e p o i se whi c h co mes fr o m b e in g college bred. On t h e othe r hand, the re are peopl e wh o are urrerh' un su iteu to college and it w ou l d b e a waste' o f t h e ir t i m e and the ir pare nts' f o r the m to attend. So in looking \'oursel f O \ 'e r d e cid e w h e t h e r w o ul d b e n e fit' in la te r lif e fr o m a college educ a t i on. P erhaps y our talents are m o r e suited to a trade o r dr3mati c sc h oo l than to a college Then.: i s anothe r question that m:1\' t r u ubl e t h e l ess f o rtunate o f us, and that i s the ia c k ofneces s al' )' funds, D o n o t think that i t i s ahsolutelv imposs ibl e to b e a s u c c ess in life unless you atten d college h ecause m e n and w o m e n w h o have b ee n unahle to a\' ail the m se k es o f t hi s oppo r tunit y thro u g h finan cial r e a so n s ha ve b eco m e quite s u ccess ful. H o w e v e r, they have don e so by extclls i,'c r eading Jnd 011 s llbj ec t s whi c h w ould l ead to the ir advance m e n t. R e m embe r that t h e w o rld n o w only wants edu c:ttt:d :lne! traine d m e n f o r its p os i t i o n s so, if are abl e atte nd a sc h oo l o r a collt:gt: that will aid r Oll in preparing f o r pro f ess i o n H o wever, if y o u can n o t go h ecause o f t h e lac k o f do n o t f o r ge t th:lt many people ha ve t r ained t h e m s el ves by i n th ei r spare tim e a n d ha\'e becom e q uite prominent in the ir lin e o f work, : \frer all the r o a d t o s u ccess i s o p e n to e \ 'eryo n e Ro).'! falliU III Colon,

PAGE 12

6 THE C: \ R IBBE A N COL. H ARR\" BURGESS, U. S . -\.r m y Governor. T he P anama Canal

PAGE 13

THE C.-\R IBBEA:\. fJ J1J/lln l Superillul1d{'//( of SrI,OO/;; 7l11:i'Jr "lid "'miol" High Sc/too/;-\ ', H BARh.ER. H ome .Mdrtu-I llinois. Name of Suondm:\' School-L ebanon High School. LoctlliOll of Suondm:,' School-I.ebanon. ;\1 0. Col/t'ge' or L lIh'rsit.\''S E 51;:le T eacher's Co llege. Dcgrus Oo{(/i1ll!dB S. Colli'.'l.( o r L'ni:,t'rsily-Co lul11bia Degr<'<'10btain(d-.J.... i\1. D.lli' Ell/ail/X on Calln/ ZOlle-Septcmhcr -, 19!-, SlIperillfNUlt'lll rif CtiI/U/ /.Qllt SdIlJO!.s-B:-.-;\1. \\'ILJ./A\I<;, Bl rl/lp/II((-S(;tfC<;horo G;t. 1/0lllc' .1d",os (;recnsboru, :--", C. -,",Wit" if S<'(Ql:.II1n' Sr/wo/-St:llcshoro H igh Sch ool. 1.')CI11ion oj ,\'I'((P/,,;//:, SdlOo/-Stateshoro, G a Cf}///'gr' f)r (n!:'t'I"JIII.\f e r ce r L'llll 'c rsin", IJI/('J .fllt'lIdl,d-19 1 I to 1 9 1.'. D,'g/"(,(,J Ollfl/llil'd-.-\, B Col/I'gl' or Cllh'O'JII),-Te;lCncr's lollege, Colu mLi.1 L !nl\'er4 siry. D.lln .-JfltlIdt'd IIJlr). /)eXI't:'I'JObwilud A r.1. D llfI' <'1'<'11 S,.,.d(t' of TIlt' P(///([I11(/ CIIIIIlI-F ebru:Lry 2, 192 6

PAGE 14

THE C ARIBBEAN QUI' Principal-\Y1LLIAM A. S .... WYERS. W '":. S Birthplace W esterly, R 1. \j Home Address-38 Summer St.) Westerly R. I. EDUCATION. Name oj Steondm)' Sclloo/-W esterly H igh School. LO(lIlion of Seeol/dm)' Scl/oo/-W esterly, R I. College or L'niversitJ,-B atcs College, Lewiston, f\' i e. Dales nltwdd-191j-1919. Col/ege or UlIitl'rsjl), Co!ulllbia University. Dm;:; Allwded-I 9'].-+-1 9'15. Dt'grees Qbtajncd-f\'i. A. Degrees Oblnilled-B. S. PERSONAL. Dale Ellterillg Sen-ire 011 Cal/al Zone-September 7, 19'2/,. Subjec ts Tal/gill 192 9 1930.-General Science. SpollJor Jar If/hat Class or Sc hool .1
PAGE 15

Staff .iduisor Slfljf Spollsor Editor-ill-Chief dJSiJ/ant Editor Business Jtfluager .,",sst. BI/sill e s s t H al/a g a Cirw/alio n ,\tallager dSSI. Cirm/afion 1l!tl1ltlg a Literfll )' Edilor MR19742-2 THE CAR IBBEA.N. STAFF, [930 . r..lr. W,,1. A. S."WYERS ,i\l i s s GRACE H ESSE THOMAS COLEY . CARLOS RANKIN \\Al.TER \\'IKI:-.'G S T .o\.O R AY:'!OND \\'ILI. . RALPH CRU,\! BURTO:': HACKETT M AVIS THIRLWALL ."'rlEdi/ o r Asst. ,>!rIEdil o r 8 0 )'s' -tlld e /j e Edil o r Girl s A/Mt !i c Edito r ExclWlI,lI! Edit o r School N O ll'JEdilo r All/n/lli Edito r 7ok e Edif o r T)'phl, o4t \ t '-t "[RGINIA STE\'EXSON FREDERICK hROLI. . T HOl'oU S P E seOD .. C EL ESTE CL,HKE DELLA R .o\.ntONO R. .. E B u ss F RAl'o'CES DAYS \VlI. L I AM NCWMAl': .ALlCE HENTER

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1 0 THE CA RI BBEA N PllotJ b y Kodak, POlloma.

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T H E CA R IBBF.A'i. II

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12 THE C AR I BB E A N N a m e of Tt'fldterRoBERT A. WEST. B ir thplllu-':\ s hler, Pa. flo m ( 1ddrns-.-\shler, Pa. Ntllllt oj S u o 'ldary SclzoolAshley H igh School. LOCflfjo ll oj S u o ndary ScI/Ool-As hl ey. Pa. C ollege or UlIit:ersily-Universit)' of Pennsylvania. Dtlt u Alft!1lded 1 9'21 1 9'2'2. C o/leg e or Uni versity-B ucknell University. D !III'J Allended 1922 1925. D"g rus Obta ined -A. B College o r Uni uenily-P ennsyivania State College. D.ll n Allend e d 1927 19'2S. PERSONAl.. Dau Elliering Srr v i u all Canal ZOlle---Ocwber I, 1928 S u b jects Tal/ g M 1 9 29-1 93o-Algebra, H istory, Commercia l Law, E co nomics. Frnltmil:y-Kappa Sigma. Ffworiu EXprt H i oll-"l f it's good, it's from P ennsylvania," Nam( oj Ttadler-LILlIAN B. GUSTAfSON. Birthplau-Chicago, I ll. Home Addre.u-Nunica, Mich. EDUCATION. Name of Secondary School-L ake View High School. Location of Secondary School-Chicago, III. College or University-North ern Ill i n ois T eac h ers' College. Date; Aumded-1913-19IS. College or Universi ty-University o f Ohi o. Dates Aumded1 91S Extension cou r se, one term. Col/ege or Universi ty-T eac h e r s' College, Co lumbi a Uni ver sity Dalt's Attmded-1916-Su mmer Session. Dale Entering Service on Canal Zone-1913. Sponsor for What Clas.s or Scliool AClivity-;'\ ssistant P rincipal. Favorite E.,pressoin-"H ave you your excuse? Y ou owe me N(/me of Teacll/.'r-MARY ELIZABETH MOORE. Birthplace -West Alexander, Pa. Home Addres.s-West Alexander, P a. E DUCATION Name of Secondary Scllool-Wash ington High Sc hool. Location of Second(/ry School-Wash ington, POl. Col/ege o r Unive rsity-Univ ers ity of West Vir g ini a D(/Ies Aumded-I 91Q-1 913. D e grl'ts Obtnined-A B College or University-Wooster College. Dlltes Allmded-I 919-1 9'20. PERSONAl.. Dalt' Entering Service on Canal ZOlle-October I, 1925 Subjects Tllllg},t 1929-'93o-L atin, French, and Spanis h Spo1/Sor forWhal Class or Scliool ACliv it)' J uniors. Fraternity of Sorority Kappa K appa Gamma. Phi Beta K appa. Favorilt' Expressioll-"And I said, I s that so?'"

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THE CARIB B E A N 3 NIlme oj Teadler -FREDERI C K J 1\1 EYER, Birllip/(/(t:-Calmar, Iowa. H omt! Address-Calmar, I o wa. EDrJCATIOK'. Nami.' oj SclJoo/-Calmar High School. L o cati o n oj Scco l/(im y SC//Ool-C:dmar, I o wa C ollege or Uniuersily---Sr;ttc University o r I o wa. Da les nllended1 9 16-19IS :md 19'2.j.I 9'25 'Degrees Obt{/ined B A. Date Enterin g Service 0 1/ CIlJItII ZOlle-Ocrober !, 1 9'28. S ubject s Tal/ g hl 1 92919Jo-]\' l ec hanicai D rawin g, P l ane Geometry, and Algebra. Favorite Expressioll Y oll dumb f.re s hm c n I Vame oj T cac/lt' r -GRAcE R HESSE. Birthplace-Miller, S. D H o m e dddreJJ-Shelbyville, III. EDUC,\TIOX-. Name of SecOIit/tl')' Sdwo/-Anll ;\rbor H igh Sc h ool. LOCI/lio n oj Secondlll)' Sc/zool-Ann :\rbo r, i\l i c h. Col/e ge o r Ullh/;,rJit.y-Univcrsity o f l\l ichigan. D llli'S .f/lendtd1 91.+1 9 I 7 D eg ree s Oblaincd A B ., l\1. .-\. C olhge o r U llil'er si t.v-Natiol1aJ Univer s ity of i\l exico. Dlllcs 1/1O/ded-Summcr J 9"21. Dale Ellterillg ScnJiu 011 Callal Z OlleOctober I, 19"26. Subja/s '['augM 1 929 19JoSpani s h and Engli s h Spollsor Jor If/111ft CIIISS o r S(lIool 1Cliuity-Scnior Class. CARIBBEAN Starr. Fratt'mil.I' o r Sorority-Kapp a D e lt a. Fa(Jorile' lIna frase completa." Name oj T e ac/It'r H I.N PATTERSOK. Birlhpla(c-H clel1a,l\ l ol1t. Home Addros-Grcat Fall s l\101lr. Name oj Suolldm:1" SclIOOI-C h o lllC;;U C ounty High Sc h ool. oj Sccontim:v ,'(hool-Fort Bcn:on, i\!ont. o r L'lIiut'l"sil),-i\iolltana State C ollege . Drgr.,1'J Ob/ailled-B S. Frrll el"llit.I'-Alp h a Omicron Pi. Dale ElltlTill g St'/"iJirc 011 Callal I S 1930. S ubjal s TlIlI gh i 1929-19JO-Shortha n d B oo kkeepin g Type writing. Fauorilt! Expn'ssioll-"That's good."

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T H E CARIBB EAN Name oj C. PENCE. Birthplace-Marshall, Mo. f10me dddrt'Js-Marsh all, iVlo. E D UCAT ION. Name of Secondary Schoo/-l'vlars hall H igh School. L ocatioll of Secondary' Sdlool-I\lar s hall Mo. Col/ege o r University-Mi sso uri Vall ey College. Dates Auended-1921 1 925 Degrees Obtained-A. B. Col/ege or Uniuersily-fV lissQuri University. Dales .>'II/ended-Summer, 192 8 Dale Entering Serv ice 011 Canal ZOlle-October 1 928. Subjects Taug/II 1929-19JO-Physics, M athematics, Commercial Arithmetic, and G eograp hr. Sponsor for IF/wI Class or School.-1cl iuil).-Fres hmen. FarJOrilc Expression-"You students take advantage of me, Name of Teaclu:r-GLADYS M. KIMBRO. Birthplace-Cedar R apids, I owa. Home Address-Masonic Temple, Oklahoma City, Okla EDUCATION. Nmne oj Secondar y SclIool-Chickasha H igh School. Location oj Secondary School-Chickasha, Okla. College or Uniuersily-0klahoma Co llege for W omen. D a tes Degrees Obltli ned-A. B. College or Ull iuer si /y-Univer sit}" of Okla h oma. Datt! Degrees Ob/ained-M. A. PERSONAL. Dtlle Ent e rin g Service O n Canal Z o ne--Octobe r I, 19'29. S ubjecls Tal/ gilt Sponsor for wha l Class or Schoo! Activity-Sophomore C l ass D ebating C l ub FllIJorile Expres sion-"Now what's funn y about that?" Name oj Teach e r -EMILY R USSELL. Birt/lplace-Pine B luff, Ark. Home Address-P ine B luff, Ark. EDUCATION". Name of Secondary' School-P ine Bluff H i g h School. Locat ion of Secondary' School-P ine B luff, Ark. Col/ege o r Uniuersit)'-University of Arkan sas D a tes .-IlJended-1 9'2o-19'2-l-. Degrees Obtained-Bachelor o f Science in Home E conomics. College or U nit:ersity-Universit r o f \\'isconsin. Dates Attended.-Summer sch ool, 9'27 !'ERSONAL. Dat e Enterill.,( Sel'vice on Canal Zone-0ctobe r I, 19'27 S ubjec/ s Tau g llt 1 9.??1930-H ousehold Art s, English, U S H istory. S p onsor for If//wt elllSS o r School fiefiu ily-Supervi so r of the library. Fmtemif)' or SOl"Ority-P i Beta Phi, K appa D elta Pi. Favor;te E.\press;on-"All rig ht."

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THE CARIBBEAN I S .VtUlIe oj Tt'llcllt'r\ 'ICTOR. E. SEII.ER. Birll,p/nu-A.uburn, ,:\T Y Home Calif. Col/ege or of California. Daln .-1ueuded-1923 19'l5. Dale Enlerillg Seri.'iCt' 011 Canal ZOlle-J\lay 1 8 [ 926. SlIojt'(lJ T alfglit o f Physica l -\ctivities. FlI!'orite.\'prl"$sioll-"U se your he:lci, fellows!" ATa1Jle of T,'(/c/ur-B ,\RBARA BAIl.EY, Bir'lrp/Ilre-Hib L ake, \\"i s H om,' .-fddrl'Js -J\i llskcgon, j\l ich. EDL:CA,TIO:\", Name oj Sr/lOo/-H ecrcation T raining School. LOCflfi oll oj Secondtll:" Schoo/-Chicago Ill. College or L'lIh"'rJi1.r-Co!umbia Univt:rsirr. DaltS .1lft'lltlf'tI -r92S1926. I'EItSO"AL. Dal,' En/aillg $tTiJiu all Ctllw/2omD ecember [I, 1928. SlIojl'rlS Tal/glit IQ2Q-19Jo-Pbyground D irectress. Fa(jorifl' Expn'ssioll" That's splendid!" Nomf' oj TMcJl1'r -:\. l\tAXIS"E POTTS. B ir/J/pla(;'-B ig R un, Pa, Homf' ,-iddrrss-B :dtilllore, l\l d. Nallle oj Serondm:,' School-Western High School. Loca/ion oj Suolld(/I")" ScI/ool-Balrimore, ;\I d. o r State \!orrnal. Dali'S .-ilfmdl'dr925 1 9'!7 College o r ;-\thletic Cla sses, B altimore. DalN ,illmd,'d-192S-r9-:'-. Dalt' Ellfaillg SI'1Tire 01/ C(lnal ZOllt'-J ulle, 1919. SpollSorjor /1'//(/1 Clrlss o r S(!Jool .-i( litily-Physical D irectress. Favorite' Exprrssion-"Snap into it, girls. ,.

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1 6 THE CARIBBEAN. Name of Tt'tlcl'c:'rRoBER.T GEORGE NOE. Tenn. Home Address-K noxville, T enn EDUCATION. Nanu oj Secondar)' ScI,Do/-Y oung High Sc h ool. Localion of Secondar)' School-K noxville, T enn. PERSONAl.. Daft' Enlaing Servia on Cana/Zone-D ecember. 192-+. Spo11Sor Jor Whal C/ass or Sel/Oo/ ..7crivit)'-D r:un:nic Coac h FaIJorilt' Exprt'SJion-"Snap out of it now, enunciate clearly." Name of Tt'flcher-H ELEN CURRIER BAKER. l\l inn. Home .fddres.s-'tI l i n neapolis, l\l inn. EDUCATION, Name of Serondary Schoo/-Centr al High Sch ool. Location oj Suondfl1J' Sc/lOol-Minneapolis, Mi nn. Col/ege or UlIiuersif},-Univ ersit}' of M i n nea p olis. DegreeJ Obl a ined-B A Col/I'ge or U lliueTsily-Sessiotl i n Publ ic Sc h oo l Mus i c at C o rn ell, C hicag;, a n d New Y ork Universitjes. I' ERSONAL Dalt' Enuring Seroia 01/ Canal ZOllt'-19'l1. S ubju/ T al/g"', 1929-1930-Super visor of Pu blic Sc h ool l\'l us i c.

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C R I BBEA'< THE ."' 7 ;\JR I9142-3

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1 8 THE CARIBBEAN. E L O ISE THIRLIVA LL. :\nd still ther wondered, and the wonder grew, That one SJllall head should carr)' all it knew. -Goldsm;/}I. Birlhp/au-Panama City, R of P Dafe oj Birth-July 20, '912. SItZIe'S Addrns-Baton R ouge, L :l. Calla/ Zone Addren-Cristobal. Dale oj Enur ing Crhlooal Sc!lOol-Octo b e r '9'7. Grade Elltered-F irst. School AClilJifieJ-Supper Club, '27, ''28, ''29; Secretary Suppe r Club, '30; G l ee Club, ''17. '28; Sec retary of Class, '29; Carnival, ''27. '28, '30; L iterar}' Editor THE CARIBBEAN Staff, '30. Colltge Expuut/ to Enter-Louisiana State University. FalJorift Exprns;011-C(l\ l ercy!" CI10UlI Vocalion-L anguage T eacher. /-/obb)'-Reading. Pastime-Reading. R ALPH SNED I KE R C R UM. Wise to resolve and patient to perform. -Homer. Nicknamt"-H appy. Bir/hpllla-Cicero, I nd. Dill( oj Binll-J anuary 1'2, 1912. SIIlU'S dddrtsJ-T ipton, I nd. Cllnal Zone dddress-G at un. Dill( oj Enterint Cristobal Sc/lOo/--0crober, 1920. Grade Entered-Fresh man. School Artivites-B ow l ing, '27, '28; T rack, '28; Carniva l '27, '28; Glee Clu b '27; E xt r a, '26, '27, '28; P reside n t Senior Class, '30; C i rculation M anagerTHE CAIUBDEAN Staff, '30. College Expected to Enler-University of I ndiana. Fllvorite ExprtsJion-"Wh o said so?" Chou" Vocation-L awyer. Hobby-R eading. Pas time-Going to t h e movies. R AE BLI SS. The Slim of earthly bliss. Niclmamt-T insie. Birthp laa-Ancon, C. Z. Dal( oj Bir/h-November 25,1912. Sta l e's AddreJJ-Sher man, N. Y Canal ZOlle Address-Cristobal. -Milton. Date oj Enter i ng Cris t obal Sc/lOo/--0ctober, 1917 Grade Entered-F irst. Srhool ActilJities-Cl ass T reasurer, '27; S u pper C l ub, '27, '28; T reas ur er Supper C lub, ''29, '30; Glee Club, '27, '28, '29; Carnival, '27, '28, '29, '30; Gym, '2;, '28; C l ass P resident, '29: Class Vice P resident, '29, '30; T reasurer AthlericAsso ciation, '29; Schoo l Notes Editor THE CARIBBEAN Staff '30; T he Loner y Man," '30. Colltgt" Exp((tt"d to Enler--0berlin, O hio. FalJorite Expreuion-"Don't be an Air dale!" Chosm Pocation-Language T eac h er. /lobby-R eading. PIlJtime-Swimming.

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THE CARIBB EAN 9 DELLA J OSE PHIK E R ."nI OK D The thing that goes farthest toward making lif e worth while That costs the least, and does the most, is just a pleasant smile. -1/', D. Xeshil. ,Vickllflmt:-.-\'delina. Birlllplnu-Cristobal, C. Z. Dale oj Bir,II r.,l:tr 10, Slale',S .7ddri'.H-r\cw Y ork, N. Y C(l1/(// Z01U .fddrt'JJ CrislObal. ; Dale oj Elltl'ring Cristobal S(hool-OctoLer I, 191 S. Grade ElIlt'red-First. School ,'/cliDifit.'J-Glec Club, 'n. '18 ; Supper Club, '27. '28. '29. 'Jo; Carnival, '2j, '29. '3 0 ; Cla ss Tn:asurer, '2 7. '28, '30; Exc h ange E ditor THE CARIlIBEAX Staff, 'Jo, "The Lottery l\i:tn," 30. F,,;;orile Expn:ssion-":\rcn't you terrible?" CllOUlI Vocation-Private L. COL E1", J ,. I knnw (hou'n full of love and honesty, :\nd weigh'st thy words before thou gi\'cst them breath. -Slrakt'Jpl!lI1t. Xickllfll1lt -r.,l ikc. Bi,.fhplflu Bcdlayres, P a. DIlle 0./ Birlll Juir '29, 1913. Slal.,s Pa. CallaI201l., .1ddrt'Ss-F ort D a vis. Df/I,' oj Elllt'I'illg Crislobal School--October, 19:8. Crl/dl' I11'll'd -.1 1Illior Other ScllOols iffl'llded BrJ ore Comillg to Cmltll ZOlle-Hampton H igh School, Hampron, \ a. Sc/iool ic/iviti,'s-Editor-in-Chief, TIIF. CAR1B8A"" Stafr, 3. Col/ege E.\"p.'tfed / 0 En/I'r-U ni\'crsit)' of P en n sylvania. CllOstll VoCtllioll -'t-.l eciicinc. J /obb)-Swimming. P(willle-Swimming. Ffll.loriu Exprt'!sioll Don't you think-?" E \'EL1":--' ELlZ BETH \\'ithin the mid-night of her hair H alf-hidden in its deepest deeps. Ni(llIalflc-Ev\ie. Birt/lp/(lu-Pechilie, P ;l. DatI! oj Birt/I -Onouer .1,19['2. Sltlh"S .-fddr,'JJ P eckvilie. P:t. Callal ZOIlI' .iddress-Gatun. Tennyson. Dall! oj Enuring Cristobal School--October, 19:!6. Gmdl! Elllen'd F reshm:ln. Ot/It'" ScI/ools .-Iffl!lId.'d 8401'1' Comillg to Callfll ZOIlt'-Bbkely H igh School. ScI/Ool .-Itfid/('J-Glee Club, '2,. '28; Supper Club, ''27, ''28, ''29. '30 ; C:lrniv:d, '1-; President Debating Club, '30. Fal:oriu Exprl!Jsi oll-"Oh, baby! ,. Chasm row/ion-School T eacher. J lobb)'-D ancing. Pastime-R eading

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20 THE CARIBBEAN. F W ILLIAM NEWMAN, JR. An ounce of wit i s worth a po un d of sorrow. -Ric/lIlrd 8(/:.:ler Nickname-Fitry. Birlhplflce-B rooklyn, N. Y Dal e oj Biyt/l Jul y I..j., 1912, Callal Zone Addres.sB ox '235. Cri sro bal. Dale oj Entering CriJlobal SdloQI--0 ctober, ] 918. Grade Entered-First. School ACfivilies--Grchestra, ''27, ':28; Carnival, 27, '28, '29, 'Jo; Wittiest Student, '29. 'Jo; J oke Editor THE CARIB. BEAN Staff, '29, 'Jo; "The Lottery Man," 'Jo. Favorite E.\pressioll-"Egadl" Choull Vocation-Electrician. Hobby-Playing the vio l in. PasJinlt-j o king. A LICE EVELYN HENTER. T hou who hast The fatal gif t of benuty. Nicknallle-J ackie. Birlhp/(lu Gorgona, C. Z. Dale oj DirtllD ecember 8, 1912. Sia/e's Address-Phi ladelphia, P a. Canal Zone AddreH-Gatun. -B),ron. Date oj Enuring C,iJtobal Sdlool-october, 1 926. Grade Entered F resh en. School Club, '2 7; Supper Club, '27, ''19, '30; Secretary-T reasur ebating Club, '29; Debating Club, '30; Typist, THE ARI88AN Staff, '30; Chorus, '27; Carnival, ''18. Favorite E.\'preHio Hobby-Dancil PAULINE HERMAN. She i s prCtf)' to walk with and witty to talk with, : \ nd pleasant too, to thi nk on. -Sir John Suckling. Nickname-P aul. BirthplauF ort H amil ron, N. Y Date of Birtll Mar c h 15, 191 3. Slt/U'S AddreH P i n e Point, Old Orchard, Me. Canal Zone .--lddreH-F ort de J.esseps Date of Entering CriJtobal School Ocrober I, [927. /.mde Elltered Sophomore. Other Sd/Ools Alltnded Bl'jo/'e Coming to Canal Zone-Cl ifton H igh School, Ohio; Star of the Sea School, Va.; Emmaculata H igh Schoo l Kan .; Mi ss D o harty's School for Girls, Ohi o. S(hool lcli v ilies Supper Club, "17, '28, '29; Glee Club, ''17; Swimming, '28; T ennis, '2 8; T ra ck, '28; President of Girls' Athletic A ssociation, '29. College Expectrd 10 Enler-Wellesley College. Favorite Expression-HY ou wouldn't fool me?" Chosen VOWlionlnterior D ecorator. Hobby-Collecting pictures of movie stars. Pastime-Tennis and swimming.

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THE C AR I BBEA N 2 I V I CTO R ME LENDEZ. Sir, rour wit ambles well, it -SIIflJ.:espeart-, Nickllame-Mel. Y. Date oj Birllt JlIne IS, 191'2. Callal Z01/e! .-fddress Cristob:t1. Dille oj Enuril/g Cristobal Sr/wol-Oclober, 191 S. Grt/de EIIIl'I"edF irst. Scllool dctiuiles-T rack, '28, ''29: Swimming, ''29: '':!8. College E.\pa t ed 10 Favorite Chosen Vocatioll-Electrician. flobby-B oating Paslime-\Vater P olo E L S I E BEATRI CE BIRI-;E L AND H o w h er fingers Went when ther move by nOte Thro u g h measures fille, as s h e marched them o'er T h e rielding pl:l.Ilk of the ivarr floor. NicA'JlfllJleL. C. BirthplauB rookl yn, i\, Y -Ber/jllll/in F. T a)'/or. Dille of Birth-September [91 I. Slale's Address B rooklyn, N. Y Canal Zont' dddress Cristobal. Date oj EnterinJ( Cris t obal Sc/'ool--October 1917. C/"adeEntered First. Sc!Jool .-iclivities SlIpper Club, ''17, '28, ''19, '30: Orchestra, ''18, ''19: T rack, '2 6 ; Glee Club, '2 7 '2 S '29: Chorus,'27 Favorif(' Expressioll-"Who'd a-rhllnk it! .. CllOun Vocation Stenographer. Hobby-R eading. Pastime-R eading ELEANOR M FITZGE R ALD. The mildest mann e r s and the gentles t heart. -lIome1'. Nickname-Fin. Bi1'fllpll/u-Ancon, C Z. Dille oj Birtll J unc 25, '913. Stale's fiddress-New Y o rk, N. Y Canal Zone ."ddress-Cristobal. Dflle oj Entering Cr i s l obal Srllool-t\lar, 1926. Crt/de En/em/-Eighth. OIlier Sellools .-il/olded B ejore Coming 10 Canal Zone-St. C:lth erine 's Academy, N Y ; Beid ler School, Chicago, 111. Sc/'OOI"-/clivities-Supper Club, '2 7; Glee Club, '27, '28; The Lonery Man," 30. E.,pression Y ou wouldn't fool me, would ya?" Cllosw Vocation B u siness career. Hobb)'-T ravelin g PtlStime-T alking.

PAGE 28

2'2 THE CARIBB EAN. FRANCISCO M. WONG. Patience is a necessary ingredient of geni us. -DiJme/i. Nickname-Frisky. Bir/llplau-Cololl, R. of P. Date oj Bir/II D ecember 8, 1910. Canal Zone Address-Cristobal. Dale oj Entering CriJtobal ScllOolF ebruary, 1926. Gmde Entered-Eighth. Gt/ur Scllools .-it/ended Bifore Coming to C. Z.-Sr. J oseph's College. Scliool Aaivities-Glee Club, '27, '28; P hysical T raining, '27, '28; Orchestra, '29 Favo1"ile Expression-HUse your brains." CllOsen VOCll/ion-Business. Hobb),-Spiritual reading. Pastime-Experimenting. FRANCES MERCEDES DAYS. A friend more divine t h a n all divinities. -George Iiol. Nickname-F ranny. Birtllplace-Ancon, C. Z. Dale oj Bir/II D ecem b e r 31,1911-Slate's Address-Savannah Ga Canal Zone Address-Cristobal. Dale oj Entering Cristobal School-October 4,1923. Grade Entered-Sixth. Scliool .-ie/tUiles-Girl s' Glee Club, '28; Suppe r Club, '28, '29, '30; Vice President Supper Club, ':29 ; President Supper Club, '30; Secretary Junior Cla ss, '29; Secreta r y Senior Class, '30; Gym, ':27; Alumni E d itor THE CARIBBEAN Stalf, '30; Carnival, '30; "The Lotter y Man," '30. F avori/e Expression-HOh, my cow!" ClIosen Vow/ion-Stenogr ap h er. Hobb)'-D ancing. Pastime--R eadi ng. v' If' MARY V IR G I N I A EBE RENZ. P lain without pomp, and ric h without a s h ow. Dr ),den Nickname-Gin Birill plllce--Ancon C. Z. Dale oj Bir/II July 2,1 9 10. Sla / e's Address-L ouisville, Ky. Canal Zone Address Cristobal. Dille oj Enter in g CriJtobal School-October, 1 9 1 7 Grade Entered-F irst. School.-ic/iu;I ies-Supper Cillb, '27 '28 '29, '30; Glee Club, '27. 28; Carni val, '30; G ym, ':27. ':28. Fauorite Expression-HI don' wanna." Chosen Vocation-Stenograph er. lIobby-G oing pbces and seei ng things Pastime-R eading.

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THE CA RIBBEAN. 23 E. BE' ERLY TUR:>:E R Speec h is great; but silence is greater. Nid:1ItIntt-Tunllcy. Birll/plau-Cristobal. C. Z. DtlfcojBirlll-l\ h :rch [I, [911. Callal Zone .Udress-Cr istobal. Dale oj Elluring Cristobal ,Yd,ool-Octobcr, [9,8. Grade ElIlerrd-Firs t. ScI,ool .7ctioities-Swimming, '29, '30; Captain l\eptune Club, '29; Captain Swimming Team, '2 9 College Exp{'(/cd 10 Enh'l R utgers. Fatporift Expressioll-" I 'II bite," f-lobb),-D iving. Ptls timl'-Swimming and di\ing. ELSI E D O R O T H Y Gentle of speech, beneficellt of mind. l\,ick1lf11l1t'-Ebita. BirtlJplllu \ 'alp.,r:.iso, Chile. J)1I1t' oj l1irtl, \ ugusl Jr. 1913. Cawd Zont' .1ddrt'JJ-Cri:.wba1. -llolllc Daft; oj CriJlo/;fI/ SdtOol-Ocrol'cr, Grt/dc' ElIlt,/"td Frc s hman, O l/zer ScllooiJ ,fl!l'1Idal Belon' COlllil:x t o CtllI(//7.ollt'L icio de Nirbs. \'alp:>r,liso; B ill\ 'icw, \ ':llp:rr.li .. o, Sc/iool,1e1i:lilic'J-SuPl'cr Club, ':!i '2S, ':.,). , 0 : G!cc Club, Co/lr,'{,t' '\"/,l'cII'(II O / ::II{('r-Clark'l>, Favorile EX/'I""J'Jioll-"Cheerio!" CllOJe'II "o(fll:"ou -\\' ritin g Ilobb,l'-R c:rding. P(/JliJllt'-Swimming. 5TE'E:>:50:>:. H e r voice was like the voice the stars Had wh en they sang together, -DlllluG(/brid Roufli Nirkllflllu-Sloe Gin. Birlllplau-r\ e w D(/teo/BirtllJunej,191:!. S trlfe' J ..fddl"oJ ':\ew J ersey, Crlnal ZOlle' -Iddrt'JJ-Cristobal. D.lte oj Enl,rillg Crh/obrt/ Sc/zoo/-October, 19:7 Gr(/d,' En/aNI-Sophomore, Sellool .. feliuilin Girls Gke Club. ':. 8. ':'9, '3 0 : Supper Club. ':8, '19: Girl's \thletic : \ssoci:nion, ':!S, '3 0 : Track Team, ':!9: Carnival R e\iew. '3 0 ; B .lsket B :tll Team, 'Jo : olley B all Team, '29: Debating Club, ':'9, '30 ; icc President Deb:tte Club, '3 0 : "Gypsy R o\'Cr," 'Jo ; Art Editor THE C. ... R1BBE .... S Statr, '3 0 : Fashion Show "Down P ettico.1I Lane," '29: I.ibrarian, ':!9 Exprt'JJioll-"B elie\'e it o r not." CIIOJ(II {'ora/ion-Athletic I nstructrcsl>, Ilobb\'-CanoeirH! and dancing, and readinM,

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2 .. THE CARIBBEAN. WALTE R WIKI NGSTA D A man of mark. Nhkmmu\Vicky. BirlhplauK ristiansund, Norway. Dale oj Birth -September 1 7 '91 2. ( o m t' .1ddrt'ss-K ristiansund, Norway. 1111 ZOlle -tddreJJ-CristobaL .'l/e oj E1JIerillg Cristobal Sc/lOol---0ctooc r 19' S Gmde En/ered F i r st. School .dcf;uiles Glee Club, '2 7. '28; C l ass Vice P res ident, '2 7 ; :'27. :'28, '29; Te,:tm, :3 0 ; B o w l m g, 28, '19, 30; Track, 29; SWlIllrlllllg 2 7 28, ''29; T ennis, '27. '29. '3D; Basket ball, '29. '3 0 ; Soccer, '29. '3 0 ; Vice P resident, B oys' :hh!etic Association, '29; Busi_ ES T AFAN I A G RACE WHEELE R H er voice was ever so ft, G e ntl e and low an exce l l ent thing in woman. Nickname-Sis. Birlhplau-Coron:J, Calif. Dau oj Birlh Julr I, '911. Slau's Addren-Utit;:J, N. )'. Canal ZOlle Addreu-Cristobal. -SllfIk cspc are. Dale oj Enurillg CriJ l obal School-O cto b er, 1926. Grade Enlered-Sophomore. Olher Scl/ools /llfmdt,d Before Com illg 10 Cmllli Zone J ames K imble School and Utica F ree Academy. School Arlit/iles-Supper Club, '27, '28, '2 9 '30; Glee C l ub, '28; B a seba l l '28; Girls Athletic Assoc iation, '29 College Expttlrd 1 0 Enler-Utica rvl em o rial H ospital. Choun f/ o(a tion -Nurse. Hobby-W r iting, reading and se wing. Pas lime-W alking and Dramatic Club. FafJoriu Expreu;on-"Gee!" n ess Manager, THE CARI B BEAN Staff, '30; P resident, B oys' Athletic } \ ssociation, '30; The Man," '3 0 Col/ege Expected 1 0 Enter---Bates College. Ftlf)orile Expreufon" Yeahl" Hobby-P racticing sport of the Paslfme-Spons. RIC H A RD COROALLES SER GEAN T S k ill'd in the glo b e and h e gravely s tands, And with his compass, m eas ures scas and lands. Dryden. Nickllame-Un cle D ik. Birtl/placc Colon, R of P Dale oj Birlll J a nuar y 21,191 I. State's AddresS -I'! Mon r oe St r eet B rooklyn, N. Y Canal Zom' -1ddrt'u Cristo b al. Dale oj Entcrillg CriJl ,b,J/ ScI/OolOcrober, 1922. Grad c Enlered Fift h Olher Schools Atfendcd Before Coming 1 0 Cmllll Zonc P ublic Sc h ool, L ong I sland, N. S"/Ool ArJiIJilies-Orchestra, '2 7 '28, '29 30 ; Glee C l ub, '2 7 '28, '29; Captain Swimrning T eam, '28, '29; Swimming, Captai n Tennis Te:Jlll, '29; T ennis, '28, '29 30; Neptune Club, '29, 30; B a s ket b : dl, '30, FaIJorile Exprenion-"Yeah!" Chosen f/ocalion-Seaman. Hobby-Swimming, Pa s linlt Loafing

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THE CARIBBEAN. 25 RITA TERESA JOYCE. S h e is gractful as the greenly waving boughs in summer wind. -Gcralt! !\I(IJI),. Nick1UwltRie. Birfllplau-Chester, Pa. Dale of Birth-August '23. '9'3 Sla/e's dddress-Philadelphia, P:>. Call1l/ Zone /lddrns-Cristoba1. : Dale of Entering CriJIO/){l/ Scltool-Oclobcr, 9'20. Gmde En tered-F irst. Schoo/ .dclioilies-Glee Club, ''27, Supper Club, ''27. '::8, ''29; Swimming, ''27; Carnival, ''28 ''29. '30 ; T he Lottery Man," '30. College Exptc/ed 10 Enler--R osemont College. Fav orite Exprtuioll-"Most any minute now." ChoJ(lI / /oca lioll F ashion Illustrator. lIobbJ D ancing. p(lJlimeH aving a good time. J AMES jR. man of hope and forward looking mind. -/1/ ordswortll. !'\. lar lit-Slim J im. irthpltla-Coopcrstown, N. Y Da(('ojBirlh Julr 17, 1911. SI.11eS .1ddrrSJ-Flint, Mich. allal Zom .1ddros-B ox JJJ, Cristobal. D:lle oj Entering Cri.uol)(Z/ Srllool-oclober 1 9'20. Grad(' Entrrcd-Fourth. School/IClilJi tics-Swimming, ''27; Track, ''28; Carnival, ''29, 'Jo. Col/ege ExpeCl/ d to Enter-General t\' lotors T echnical Sc h ool. Fm'orite E'\'prt'SJioll Hey!" Chosm f/ocafion M ec han cial Engineer. Hobb),-Pl aying the clarinet in the ban e t Pastime P addling around in a cay u co. .I. -IME S MU:-IDBERG. A m e rr)' heart doeth good like a medicine. Nick,wmeMlIn \!r Birillpl(/(e-Brook!rn, N. Y Dale oj Birth J uly '29, 191 r. Callal ZOIl(' .-1ddrcSJ-Cr iswbal. D:lfl? of Enurillg Cri!lobal &110011 917. Grade Elltered-F irst. Scllool dcti;Jiti,'s-Glee Club, ''! 7 ; Swimming, ''!7, ''28, '29, 'Jo; Tennis, ''28, '29, 'Jo; Carnival, 'Jo ; T he Gypsy Rover" Orchestra, '30. Col/ege Expult'llro EII/t'r-Business College. Favoritt' Expreuioll-"Yeah?" Chost'll Vocation-Commercia! Business. Hobby-Swimming. Pflstimt-Reading.

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26 THE CARIBBEAN. O I V INO A R NESEN. H e appear'd l ike the s ungod at his rising in the carl y morn. Nickflflllle-Eddie. Biriliplau-K o i stians und, Norway. Dafe oj Bir/II J uly 1 913. Crowl Z one / JddreSJ-CristobaL -pmraur. Dal e oj Entering CriJ IOOnl ScllOolOctober, 19'29. Grade Entered-Spe c ial Student. OlllCr Sc hoob .-'lflmded Before Coming 1 0 Caual ZOlleK o i s t i -:lnS lin d H ig h Sc hool. Sclioo/ h ClilJiliu-Socce r '30. College xpUltd / 0 En/t'r-Oslo Bu siness SchooL FarJorile Expreuion-" S ure!" Chou" //OCfl'ion-Business r..lan. Hobby-R eading and p rac ticing spons. PlIs/ime-Sports. PH OE B E O' DONNELL Ey es so transparent, That t hr o ugh them one sees the so ul. Nick name-'Barna. Bi"tllplace M o bile, Ala. Daft oj Birth F e br u ary '2,1911. Slale's ..fddreu-Mobile, A l a Callal ZOlle ..fddreu-Cristobal. -Galilier. Dal e oj Elltering CriJlobal SdlOol-Onober, 1 928. Grade Enlered Senior. OI/lCr Sc/JOol! Allended Before Comi n g 10 Callal ZOlle-Mobile High B
PAGE 33

THE CAR IBBEAN. NEHLS G. J ANSE:-I. An honest man's the no b l es t work of God. -Popr. Nickname-Swede. Birlllp/(Iceh orsor, Denmark. Dale oj Bir/II-April [ oj., 905. Slate's Address P ert h Amboy, N. J. Cmlfll ZOIll! AddrnsFrance F ield Da / t of Entering Cristobal SrllOol-october. 9 "29. Grt/de Elltered-Special Student. Otllt!r Scltoo!.s Allmded B,jore Coming t o Cmull ZOfle-R oskilde Sc h ool. lIobb)-Srudying aviation. Ff/tlOrife E.\Opri'JJi oll-"Sirl" MARI A CAR l OAD S T EW .-1RT. \ 'oicc gentle a s the breeze th:!t pbys in th e ('vening Among the SpiccsoiSah:tf:l. Nickrulllu -r.l aria. Birthplace-Cri s t obal, C. Z. Dall! of Birtll r.l:ty 26,19[0 SltUe s .fddreSJ-P hilad elphia, Pa. Callal ZOIlt' .,dtln'ss-Cristobal. -Dr.]all/lson. Dnh' oj Entering CrisJO/HlI Sr/lOol-October, '9'21. Grt/de Enll'rt'd F o llrth. Ot/'IT Schools ,if/ouled B;jorr Comillg ( 0 Can{/I ZOlle -\\':tu rc Notre Dame, B elgiulll. Scllool nct;DilinGlee Cluh, ''27 : Slipper Club, ''27 ; Girl s Athletics, ''27

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THIS OF SENIORS, SOME YEARS AG.O, WON THEIR FIRST LAURELS AT THE BABY BELIEVE .IT s OR NOT ) ;j tTl (l >-::: IJ:> IJ:> tTl >Z

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THE CARIBBEAN . \swe wer e in 1 928.

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30 THE CARIBBEAN. ce CLASS HISTORY. Mavi TMr/ wall, ']0. !f. PROLOC[;E. The his torv o f the S e ni o r Cla ss o f 930 may see m t o othe r s the same as that o f any S e ni o r Cl ass, but t o the m embe rs of that cla ss it h a s a h isto r y unequaled W h e re b e f o r e ha s s u c h a cl ass g r aduated fro m high s c h oo l? A s k a membe r o f that g r oup. N o wh e r e," w e find True e n oug h A s k m e I m a m embe r o f that cla ss CHAPTER I.-THE D A RK A G E S O c t ober I I 9 26 will w e ever forget that dateso m e 4 0 pupil s re g i s t e r e d in Cri s t o ba l H igh S c h ool a s Fres hmen. That was the big d a y o f our live s D u r i n g that fir s t year that group o f 4 0 o rgani ze d a class that was to prove extraordinary it go t h azed, g a ve a party, c au sed l o t s o f t ro ubl e in fac t it was a most u nusu a l Freshman c la ss B y June it had l e arn e d what high sc ho o l l ife wa s and had d ecided that it wa s m os t excitin g and e nj oy abl e 'Ve w e r e s till a bit ha zy about so m e thin gs but a b out these w e g r eat kn owled g e So mu c h f o r u s a s Fres hmen. CHAPTER II.-THE MIDDLE A GES Oh-here i s that extraordinary cla ss a g ain Jus t a s extraordinary a s e ver. Alm os t the same group with j u s t a f e w l osses and some ad d iti o n s \Ve w e r e g etting u se d t o e a c h othe r, getting to kn o w w hich o f u s w e r e the r e al studen ts, whic h th e musici an s whi c h t h e a thletes, whic h the-but w e w o n t go furth er. A s I s aid this cla ss wa s e xtrao rdinary an d we f ound that w e co ul d b e r epresented i n eve r y sc h o o l a c ti vity our sc h oo l b o a s t e d of. This ye a r to p rove that we n o ti ced what wa s g oing o n i n the w orld we g ave a Lin d b e r g h Party." Air p l an es, p r o p elle r s, a n d ae r o n a u t i ca l articl es prevai l ed This was o n e o f t h e most origina l p arti e s e v e r giv e n H ah! An o t h e r un u s ual f eat b y all unus ual cla ss. C H .O\PTER III. -THE RENAISSANCE. Ou r J unio r yea r lVe s uddenly f ound our se lve s ver y i mpor t an t p e r so n ages o n the s t aR-" o f Ifi THE C ARIBBEAN, and in e v e r y a ctivity o f our sc h ool. \V h y othe r s t oo r eco gniz e d u s a s out standing The Fres hm e n p oo r t h i n gs su c h o rdi nary o n es l o oked up to u s wit h awed e yes. W e w e r e bu sy all thi s y ear studying (and enj oying it to our s urpri se ) taking an inte re s t in h e lpin g eve r y wa y we c o uld, and actually beginning t o frown a lit tl e at the di sturbances c aused b y the L o w e r Cla ss m e n. The high s p o t o f our junior year was-you must have heard-our J uni o r S enio r Banque t ] t wa s giv e n at the Hotel \ Vashin gton, and t h i s was th e only u sual" t hin g about it. I n eve ry othe r d e tail it wa s m os t unusual. Aft e r the banque t w e g a ve a dance to entertain our g ue s t s Eve n so m e m embe r s o f the S e ni o r C l ass of 1929, a greed ( in pri vate ) tha t our banque t was a b ette r o n e than the ir s had b ee n. But, then, we co ul d have t o l d th e m that. CHAPTER IV.-THE PRESENT. A.t la st! \ V e are S enio r s But thi s isn't hard to r ealize \Ve imm e d iate l y a ss um e a dignifi e d and p r eocc upied air, a s if the burden of the wh o l e s ch oo l r es t s o n our s h o uld e r s al o n e 'Ve f ee l, in fac t, that it doe s "oe give our party-our la s t. vVe star in athletic s and oth e r activities. The n, "The L otte ry i\1an, our play and the be s t eve r give n, and, gr eates t o f all the publicatio n of THE C ARIBBEAN, into whi c h w e ha v e put all our e ndeavor and hard w o rk. But w e are rewarde d. I s n't it a g r eat s u c c ess? S oo n in a very f e w short w ee k s i s C o mm e n ce m ent and the n w e part. The o n e di sappoin tmellt o f our S e nior y ear was the l oss o f about 1 5 m e mb e r s o f our cla ss which w e h ad h ope d wo uld b e the larg es t eve r t o graduate fro m Cristob a l High S c h ool. But w e made up our l oss in numb e r b y exce llin g in othe r qualities, and b y w o rkin g togethe r. w e r e ali ze that June 20 i s not f a r off. Our hig h sc h oo l day s will b e o v e r and Cristobal H i g h S c h oo l will l os e the m os t unus ual cla ss it e ver educate d. Ask me if t hat state m e n t i s true o r n o t. J m a member o f that cla ss.

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THE CAR I BBE AN 3 CL\SS \\"1 LL. r e i \\'e, rhe g radu a tes o f 193 0 in sane and sound mind, do so l emnly b equearhe t h e foll owi ng ho n o r s a n d unusual abilities t o Junio r s o f Cristobal High Sc h ool ; t h i s to b e b equeath ed unde r the consideratio n t hat ye futu re g raduates se ri o usly and untiringly s tri \'e to a cquire t h ese tre a surable and muc h-envied abiliti es q u o ted b e low: B EQUESTS. El s i e B irk eland H e r mu sic al tal ent R ae Bliss. H e r g iggl e and dancing f eet. James Campbell H i s lankin ess T h omas COler H i s dignity. Ralph Crllm H i s devilis hn ess. El s i e D arley H e r h eight Frances D:lYs H e r t ypi ng m edals \ 'irginia Eberenz. Her scc n-:l.Ild-not-heard-nes s Ele:m o r F irzgera l d Her happy-go-lu cky W :lys. Eve l yn Ganze mutl e r H e r p e rsonality b o b Alic e Hcnter Her Gre ta G arbon ess P auline H erman H e r long legs. Rita J oyce H e r lip s ti c k \ "icror f\l cle n dez His come-hitherishness Arthur f\l lln d berg H i s s hampoo Wi lliam :'\"e wrnan H i s wit and slang D e lla Rapno n d H e r geniality R ichard S e rg eant stubborness \ 'irginia Steve n so n H e r fI:un i ng tres ses .. i\lavis T hirlw all H e r gr: l ce and Btverly Turner His faithfulness. Estafania W h eele r H e r ge ntl e v oice Walter \\' ikin gs tad H i s gallantry F rancisc o W ong H i s good nature T O -T h e Drake b oys. W m. Harmon n n d I \largare t Davis r..'spcctivdy. H a r old i\l llellcr and i\l arion i\bry B retch. Percival Fabian Englander. J o hn e ll)' and B ettina P o w ers. L illian H o u se l and R ichard W ood. B e n William s and El s i e D oar. F red r oll and Ele:m o r Urwiler. Clara Fri s k and Carlos Rankin. Ruth D uval. Raymond \\'ill. Parke r Hanna. Crawfo r d Campbell and Burton Hackett. \ 'elrna H all and W alte r Bu ndy. Doroth y Wertz and R u ss ell Ellwell. Anna Ryan and Eric F e r guson. T h omas P escod. \ 'innie El son and E dw,l r d C o nklin g. Celeste Clark e. E d w ard W ilkins and "-e nn e th i\Ia ur cr Bill B ailey and B e lding "-ing. i\largaret and Eugenia (Sig n ed ) R A1:>:\ DR\" SA S O:-:

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32 THE CARIBBE.-\N. PREVI E W OF THE :'-IE\\,S Ebil' Dflr/r)'. ']0 fwd RIU BliJJ. ']0. seEsE Luxuri olis suite in office o f Editor-inChief of Consolidated X ewspape r C orpo ra tioll, sth Avenue, Y ork Cin" TIME1950 .-\. D. DRAi'.IATIS PERSONA E TOM COLE", Editor-in-Chief. BEVERI.\" T URNER, Star Reporter ( i\ I ale and married). EVELYN GANZi\IULLER, Star Reporter ( Female and fr ee) SeE"E I. Editor-in-Chief seated at antique desk. Tap of the knocker on door (marke d private) in uniform enters E o)': Reporte r wishes to confer with you, Sir." CMrj ( Gruffly ) : "I'm s h ow him In.'' (Exit bO)'-e1Jle r slnr rep o rt e r (male) in shirl slt'cves). Slnr Report e r ( male ) : Here's to-da\"s new s." ( Reads.) B y rd, J r., conquers f ourth Wal l er /4/ikingslad, famous parachute jumper, makes successful tripl e jump from 100,000 f ee t over P eoria, Ill. "Say, t hat's not so bad f o r C. H S. e h ?" ( Reads again.) A.nge l a Sapristi scores tremendous s uc c ess as "Azuce na" in II Trovatore, at the N e w l\letropolitan. "Do know that's Virginia S tevens on? She's a second S chumann Heink, boy! That's getting on in the world, and, believe it o r not, her accompanis t is non e othe r than our o wn Elsi e Birkeland-a really celebrated pianist. I believe her stage name i s El sette Kreland." Edilo r (Taking long puff on c h oice cigar) : "That's great. 1 rece i ved some interesting n e ws fr o m our specia l correspondents abroad to-da}'. (Fumbles among papers on desk.) I\'here i s that paper? O h h e r e it i s Strangely, a l o t o f it concerns ex -C. H. S. students-our cla ss of 1930-t o b e e xa ct." ( Reads.) Frallcisc o W Ollg, h ead o f Chinese Diplomati c Corps, says, among o th e r things, that James Campb e ll has s uc cee d e d in co nverting '100 Chinese at one m ee ting. H e has wonde rful p o w e r, speaks C h in ese fluently. "So James hasn't be e n kill e d yet!" An d our correspondent in Spain say s that S enorita Rita 70.rce Terrancy i s having great s u ccess with h e r new Home f o r Divo r ce Orphans at i\ Iadrid. I twas a 'go' from its incepti o n, t o r even you can imagine what an inconvenie n ce it would b e to a n a spiring divorcee to have her offsp rin g thrust upon her everr six months f o r t emporary care. This h o m e certainly fills a long f e lr need. 1 'm f o r it myself. 1 h ear there is a l o ng waiting list :\nd fr o m L ondon we have the n ews of Els ie Darlc)!'s n e w no vel, to b e out next m O l1th. I've forgotten t h e title-Romance, t ho' I b e lieve Y ou kn ow s h e captur ed t h e Nobel P rize last year with her masterpiece entitled 'Seven O'clock .' F rom P aris, w e h ear that lv/dentlt''!'. alldBliss, or Victor and Ra c as we kn ew t h e m are s till the sensation o f t h e town with t heir ecce n tric dance revue o ( JOO 'Artistes de T erps i c h o ris.' I heard they copped a f ortune at J\lonte Carlo, too. soft, e h 2 ( A 'nork on tloor 80)' in uniform c mers-jemale r epor/r:1' tliratl) belJin d him ) Bo)' 10 Edilor: ",-\ lady wishes--" Star Rl'PO}'/t'1' ( Female, interrupting, t o boy-): I've got my wish ( Smi l es.) N o w run along, Al ge rn o n. ( T o Editor.) I've got lots of news i n these cabl es (Excitedly waving sa m e.) ] j ust had to ru s h right over and tell yo u about t h em 1 t's all about our classmates. Some sad n e ws, too. / lr/llltr lvhmdb erg, you r e m embe r 'Mundy,' c ute b londe w i t h heavenl y blu e eyes? H e h as b ee n Air Traffi c Cop on t h e Ilew Zeppelin (r o m B e rlin to Beverly H ills, California, and o n e o( t h e through Zepps (rom t h e Buenos Aires branch lin e wa s late and to avoid a crash over the Bahamas, 'i\ lund,,' dashed in front of the B. A. Z. '3-'13-0-0. and wa s run over. They wer e making 963 miles p e r too, but t h e c abl e says 'plucky i\ lundy escaped with o nly minor cu t s and s h oc k -and h e never u se d t o s h oc k e a s y eithe r. ( Smiles, and

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THE CARIBBEAN. 3.1 p i cks up another yellow sheet. ) A nd Filly j Vt'Wmall wants us to write up his l\ifakers;' they have been to u ring all th e big t owns in t h e Un i ted States and Europe, and now they have settled in Grande Cristo bal f o r th e r aci n g seaso n. Newman 's 'Nifty-Noise-Makers' are rhe biggest hit of both co ntin ents, s inc e Vall ee reti red with his billions ( Reads f rom another cablegram.) Ali cia ani as yo u'll e a s ily g u ess, that s our Alice ffelller, has just compl e ted her 99th starring talki e. It's in Spanis h, B esos Calientes.' 1 saw it in B ogo ta. Boy, it s urely lived up to its name. Sh e heads her OWI1 COI11-pan y now-with studios at B e lla i s ra. That's success in big letter s, [ say!" Slnr Report e r (Mal e) : "Since we are airing p erso nal matters, I may as well add m)' bit. had a letter f ro m Ralph Crf{w recently. H e i s Head Professo r o f Eng lish at Harvard. (Grandly. ) L a -dies and gent-Ieman! He's kn o wn a s 'Crabby Crum' in his classes for h e so objec ts to t h e least mutte rin g or tal king. Same o l d Cruw, all right! H e sent m e a co p y of h i s 'Englis h Idioms in S lang;' t ho't I might find it u se ful. I t's u sed in all t h e univer sities now He's be e n k eeping up a punctual ( t hat's his style) correspondence with D! Iia and Mav is it seems. D ella ha s a beautiful H o m e for t h e Insane in th e Adirondacks-marvelous surroundings, birds eve rywh e r e about t h e grounds and monkeys playing all around the p lace-just watc h ing t h e m i s part of the m ethod u se d in t h e cures-it has been very succes s ful, so h er ads say, and s h e ha s cured thousands She's a wonderfu l w oman. I h eard, too, that th e entire property was willed to h e r by a form e r inmate o f t h e Home in appreciation of the wond e rful care giv e n him w h en s h e was matron of th e Incurable vVar d She need n eve r work a but mem ories an d lov e o f the work k eep h er th e r e. That's just D ella. Iv/av is ha s a Fashio n Sa l on in P aris whi c h has bec o m e the rendezvou s of all t h e ver y ultra elite o f the who l e world I t is on R u e d e la Prix so m ew h e re. That's just h e r l ine, B a-be! H ow s h e co ul d wear clothes Crummy s aid h e had see n Frances r ecently. S h e i s secretary to H arold Oswald Van Krautz-!\ m erica's wealthiest man, yo u kn ow. H e owns a fleet of Z e ppelins, and has yachts and racing cars by the dozens; spends ten month s o f the year going places and d o ing things, and seeing peopl e Takes his sec retary al o ng most of t h e time. Ralph hints that Harol d ].IRI9742-S O s wald, J r. has matrimo nial a spiratio n s toward Frances, a s soo n a s h e gets his divo r ce from t h e f o rm e r Countess Oshee Getse rll1an. Pretty nice for Fran(('s. S h e gained h e r ability t o c apture 'em prac ticing f o r our Carnival if s h e needed any aid to h er u s ual lin e of captivenesg." Editor : "Ye ah! J r e m embe r that Carnival. ( P icks lip new spaper.) I s aw somethin g in h ere abollt so m e o f the other m embe r s o f our cla ss H e re in th e photogravure sec ti o n, just g lan ce at thi s s w ee t -faced Ilur se. Now, T co uld enjoy p oo r health with that sort o f a face gazing down o n m e frequ ently; t hat's ( r eads fro m s h eet) Headnurse /I? hef!la-conn ected with the B ellev u e Hospital f o r [ 3 ,ears. S h e h as h a d m o re babi es name d f o r h e r than any ten presidents The secret is, s h e endows e ac h littl e n e w arrival who i s given h e r name with a SIOO bank account to insur e his way in t h e w o rld. Quite an idea! (Turns t o anoth e r s h ee t ) : \nd this athle ti c pers onage i s Paulill e H erman S h e ha s again w o n t h e G olf T rophy in th e Elimination T ourna m ent betw ee n t h e L 1nited States and the C O lltinent. Some f e at! N o, n o t double e thi s tim e ( H olds lip paper.) S o n, just g az e all t his imposing s t r u cture I sn't that a great piece o f architecture? A s I live! ( R eads ) B eaut)' Sal o n at co rn e r of 5 t h Avenu e and Calle Galindo Grande Cristobal. .-\ p o .... verful com bin e has b ee n formed by the amalgamation o f t h e fam o u s b eauty s p ec ialists Ebl rol':, and Fit:gaald with Eli zabeth Arden; 510 ,000,000 capital. S hoppes all over t h e w o rld. (Puts d own paper.) I wond e r if they take gentlemen cli ents too? ( F ee l s flabby fles h o n fac e ; bald pate a nd co rpul e n t I n eed a trip somewh ere ; guess -' 'II try t h e tropics ; it o u ght to b e inte r esting afte r b eing gone tw enty years (Rings (or wh o enter s ) Sa)' get m e rates and s ailin gs by P . -\. A. to Panama, pro1llo. Eo)': Y es sir. B oss, could I b e your pers o nal valet?" ( Smiles ex it s ) S R. ( F e male ) : H o w tim e d oes Av! ( Sigh s) I n eed a rest too, you might l e t m e kn ow abo llt those sailings to Panama, Chi e f T o m (dreamily to self) and Fill y will be the r e and ,llice H ellier and--" S. R. "Seems a s tho' [ 930 turned out about as many notabl es as any c la ss b e f o r e o r Sll1ce. \Ve ll, so l o ng, f o lks CURTAIN.

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THE CARIBBEAN P h oto by I\ od.) k, P al/u m a

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THE CARIBB EAN 35 JUNIORS

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36 THE CARIBB EAN N 10 ., JU RS = --' ..

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Miss Moore .. William B a i ler .. Mary B retch . William Brodersen . \ Valter Bundy. C r awford Campbell. Celeste Clarke. Edward Conklin . Margaret D avis Elsie Dcar.. F rank D rake . Rodman D rake R uth DuvaL .. Vinnie Elson . Russell Elwel l. Fabian Englander. Erie Ferguson . Clara Frisk B urton Hackett. Velma H all. Parker Hanna . William Harmon .. L illian H ousel. J ac k K elly B elding King .. F rederick K roll. P ercival L rew. K enneth i\lJaurer. i\ 'largaret Mitchell .. H arold i\' J ueller. Caroline Napoleon . T hom as P eseod. R onald Phillpons. Bettin a P owers .. Carl os Rankin. Anna Ryan Doroth y Wertz . Edward Wilkins .. Raym ond Will. Ben W illiams Rich a r d Wood. El e a nor Urwiler N.-IME. THE CARI B B EAN JUNI O R C LASS. REPRESE:"T H I I E SO:"G "1'''l eal1 to M e." "Oh, Baby, Where C an Y ou Be ?" "Ain't l\lisbehavin'," "Button Up ''our Overco:lt!" "P:lgan Love Song." '" Get The B lues Wh en It R ains," "Song of The Nile." I Faw D own and Go Boomr' "If Y ou B elieved I n ';When l\l r D re:ltns Come True!" ''I'll.-\lways B e I n Love W it h Y ou "What Makes Y ou D o M e l. ike You Do?" "Sweet S ue." "Roses of Picardr." ''I'm A Dreamer. Arent W e All?" Singin I n T h e R ain." I Want T o B e L oved B y Y ou : \Ione." ,,' L ove l\l y O ldF ashion e d l\lan." H allelujah! I'm A Bum." B ill!" " ve GOt A F eeling I'm F alling I n L o\e." 'Satisfied." ;'l\ l y l\lan!" ; M y W ild I rish R ose," ,,' Want T o B e B ad!" K iss l\l e D ea r, What D\a Sar:" Little Pal." D own By The Win egar Walks." That's M y W eakness "Do Something!" "Dre:lm Kisse s!" 37 P a r don l\l e, I t'S A Habit Of But I've Gona B e K i s sed." "Sunny Side Up," "Where The Shy Litde \"iolets Grow," :\h! S w eet M ystery of Life!'" "Sweet R osie O'Grady. L o u isian:l L ullaby." S:lnd i\'bn's B lues." ) D on t \\':lnt T o B e Sitting On T op of The \\'orld If ) H ave T o B e Sitting A lone." "Sc. Loui s B lues." "I'm J ust A V:lgabond Lover." L ovable :lnd Sweet."

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THE CARIBBEAN PholQby Kodak P al/lima.

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THE 39 OPH

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THE CARIBBEAN.

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M iss Kimb ro Genevieve Barry Ernest B e rger Gladys B liss Mary Clark. Alice Curtis Curtis. A llene Deakins. Mary Dean. W illie Diers. P aul Dignam Zola D orson Beverly Dunn Dona Eaton. J oseph Ebdon Harry Egolf. Yivian Elmgren. Antonio Fernandez. .Albin F orsstrol11 Ali ce Gorme r ly Frank Griesinger rvlarian H a h n .. i\l i l dred H armon .lames Hayden "crona Herman. B eatrice H ousel J odie L u J ones. Howard Keenan THE CARIBBE AN. THE SOPHO MOR E THEAT ER. H igh Voltage" T h e Girl F riend" H ardboiled" "Sunny" B e Calm, Camilla" Pleasure Bound" "Sweet Adeline" The Charm School" the Ameri ca n Girl" "Penrod" T h e Student Prince" T he Exalt ed Flapper" T h e Sophomore" T h e D:lllce of I. ife" "Sonny Boy" .. T h e i\l i g hty" "Treasure Girl" T h e Desert Song" "The P rince of '. HOllar Br ight" "The \'iking" "The Po.:acock Fan" Street" "So n s 0' GUllS" ":,\ina Rosa" "l\l r s. W iggs of the Cabbage Patch" H er l\lajcsty T h e Queen" "The Song Writer" The lma K ing i\1ari c Klecfkens Alvin L yew Franklyn i\lcrrit. T homas i\l lIrph y !\1artha P ottS Jcan P l'uit. B lanca I'ulgar Eleanor Reinh old \ \',Irdl:tw B en Roberts, Herman R oos Herbert R ose Bru ce Sanders, Bett)' Stahler. i\l yles Standish. Robert Stevenson I nez T heoktisto. ;\Iicia Thirlwall Perry \":lshaballgh 'heeler. R andolph \ \'ikingstad Elizabeth Wirtz, J amcs Wood. C;trl Kari ger 1 Robert t.1ar s h all G eorge Wertz \ D avid Gregory J Wind-::.\\'ept Palm Trees on Colon Beach. Peg O' l\J y H eart" "Bab" "Sons of th e God:." "Down On T he Fann" "Hold Everything" "Flying High" Blow Your Own H orn " I. ady of L ittle W omen "Exceeding Small" R ip Yan Winkle" "Good B oy" "l\lother's Bor" "Sweetie" T h e Courtship of l' l iles Standish" "Countess r.\aritza" R ed I -lair" "The D uke Steps Out" "Little L ord FalllHclroy" Y immic r onson's Y ob" "1'011),,111:1" "Alibi" "The Coconuts"

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T H E CARIBB EAN

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THE C.ARIBB EAN. 4 3 ---

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THE CARIBB EAN.

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Name. Agnew, H afoid An d r ews, Maxine .. Andersen, Harry. B ea rd, Webster. Bein e,Ou\':lI. Birkeland, Doroth y .. Crouch, W a ll e r D:lVid. J esse Durham, Carmen F oley l'vla ry. F o l ey, Velta. r rench. G eorge Go.-merty, Edward. Gould, C h arles Hammond, H e l e n Heilbr o n Oscar H owe Charles. Huff, Garrett .. Keenan W illiam. Kleefkins, L ou i s .. Krause, Anna. L ee, Henry. L ockwood H arold .. Maf chosky, i\ l:tndi. Mel endez, M ary Murphy, J ohn. O'R ou r ke, G e n evieve .. D e 13 O ssa Ernest P o w e r s, Ann P escod. Charles. Rakovsky. Norine Randall, Vio l e t R a nk in, Tho mas. R e inhold, Ernest. Safford, Natalie. Sa nd e r s, B ernice. Smith, Harvey. Stewart, Olive Standish Chri stia n T hirlwall, Edna .. Thornton, Elizab eth. T ip t on Lando. T ow n she nd, K:uh erin e W eigle, W illiam W e r tz, George. THE CAR I BBEA N. FRESHMAN DIRECTO RY Sobriquet. "Sonny B oy "Andy" W eby" T ro p ical" Dot" Handsome" "Chess" B etty" B illie". "CleOpatr;l" "French)''' "Eddy "\\'any" "Ele n;l" "Ossie" "And how" H uffcli g ree". P eanuts" .. .. B uckie" .. "Archib ald" "Locky" "Melody" .. "l\ lurph "Billv". "Delicious" T eakettle" Pipito" "Short}"" "Vi .... "Gassy". P ete" "Stubby" "Billy" .. T iny .... "Snooks" Nanny" "Eddie" "Lizzie" .. "Sands" "t\.ay" B ill" "Physica l c u lt ure" Ambition. Gob L angu:lge teache r Saleslll:ln Gob Man Ph ys i ca l direc tress Fi s hennan Scientist. Nurse .. Priv:lte sec ret:lry D:lrlcer N:lvalofficer Inventor Oversee r Stenogr:lp h e r A v iator. Hunter. Gar b:lgeman .. Musicia n D iscoverer Private scc r e t:lry Movi o b ope rator .. Lo:lfer. Second Sherlock H olme s Tr:lvcle r .. Street c1e:lner . Stenographer Civil engi n ee r W riter Star athlete .. Stenograph e r Actress Lo:lfer. Aer o n:luti ca i e ngineer. iVlanicurist. Stenogr:lp h e r Electric:l1 e n gineer .. Doctor t\l lillion:lire T eacher Stenographer. Mechanic:ll e ngine er. Nurse Airplan e pilot. H o r se doctor .. 45 A s r e alized in 1940 Buc k priv:lte. Dance r Shoern:lker. C h eer l eader. C h orus man. Dress mak er. Comedian. H obo. Campus Rirt. .J\ctress. Dancing teac h e r H ermit. Prize fighter. Undertaker. Secretary o f Y w. C. A Deep -se a diver. S h eik. Stool pigeon. colle ctor. Optimist. F ortune t elle r L awye r. Jocker Spring dancer B owler. P r eac h er. Di s hwa s h er. Pape r h anger. L io n tamer. Loafer. N un. Old maid. R adio announcer. Coa l min e r. Singer. zoo pounder. P ia n o mover. T eac h e r. Second George K Arthur. Eg yptian dancer. Man teaser. Safe ty pin manufacturer. Chorus girl. D og ca t c h er. Street clea n er.

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THE CARIBBEAN. P/lvI<,Iu>, Kodak, P
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THE CAR I BBEAN. 4 7

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+ 8 THE CARIBBEAN. !Ii l:i e Results o f tbe (!Contest. j !Ii THE OLD, OLD STORY I N AN OLD, OLD COUNTRY. Eleanor Fitzgerald, 30 ( Thi s story was judged t h e best s ubmitted in the whole high sch ool in the 1930 Short Sto r y Contest.) P edro Arias de Avi l a f ou nd ed the o l d c it y o f P anama o n August 15, 1 5 1 9 Amon g t h e first colonists of this city o f P anama was D o n Alvarey, a very good fried o f P edro Aria s and an important member in the co lony. D on Alvare y l ived wit h his wif e and c hil dre n in a h o use kn ow n to all o f A l va rey's frinds a s "Casa de Aleg ria" or "House of H appi ness." H e h ad two so n s ; t h e e ldest was twelve yea r s o l d, called Carlos, and the youngest, Ju a n-was nine years old. H e a l so h ad a little g irl Juana-seven years o ld-wh o was t h e pet o f t h e h o useh o ld and, in fact, the pet of t h e co l o n y. She was a p retty little c hil d with b l ack c url y h air and dark brow n eyes. As the co l ony was still s mall and A l va r ey ha d no enemies Ju ana was allowed to pla y and run around in any part o f th e vi lla ge. On e day s h e was s ittin g on t h e b eac h n ear h e r h o m e gazi n g o ut to the sea Ever si n ce s h e co ul d r e memb e r s h e h ad loved t h e sea and every day s h e came to si t th ere and drea m o f the tim e w h en s he would g row lip and b e able to go o n a big boat to t he land w he r e s he had b een b o rn. This pa r t i c ular day, while s h e wa s sitti n g t h ere, P ed ro, the son of Aria s, crept up on h er and frighte ned he r by s h o uting in h e r ear. .1\ t o n ce s h e turned o n him and com m e n ced to g i ve him a to n g u e las h i n g H e clapped his hand s over h e r m o uth and s h e immediately bit him. Just at this stage of t he battle Juana's brother Carlos ca m e to bring her in for lun ch. \ Vhat's wro ng, h e r manita?" h e asked h er. Ju ana, still breathless from t h e quarre l t r ied to exp l ain w hat had h appened b u t P edro kept interrupti n g her. Carlos l aug he d and said, "Com e, come, Ju ana, yo u s h ouldn't let s u c h a little t hin g make you so angry." And t hey both walked away f rom P ed r o into t he h o u se. From that tim e on Juana always hated P edro and he, kn o win g this, u sed to tease and t orment h e r until s h e c ried. B e f o r e l ong the col o n y expa n ded and g r ew so that it was conside r ed t h e most important co l o n y o f Spain's American Empir e B y '53', Alva r ey h ad become t h e most importan t member o f th e R ea l Au d i e n c i a, whic h was th e gove rning b ody o f Panama. Juana by this tim e was a young girl o f '9, s till a favorite in the col ony She was t all a n d still h ad h e r beautifu l b l ack hair and dark eyes. H er lov e f o r th e sea was greate r th an b e f o r e a nd, alth o u gh n o o n e knew i t her h atred for P ed ro was as stro n g as ever. D o n A l va r ey for so m e time h ad ch e rishe d a secret desire that P ed r o and Juan a b e married, but h ad sa i d n o thing to anyone. H e knew that thi s wo ul d u nite th e two most influenti a l families in t h e c it Y i however h e did n o t want to for ce hi s da u ghter int o a marriag e t hat might n o t pl e a se h er. H e r eso l ved t o see w hat Ju ana might have to say about i t and th e n i f s h e agreed, to arr ange t h e matte r wit h D o n Arias. h e ca m e h o m e t hat evening Ju ana ca me to meet him lookin g so pretty and sweet, that it broug h t tea r s t o his eyes t o think o f partin g wit h h er. "Bue nas tardes, hija mia how h as th e day passed h appi l y, I h ope?" h e greeted her. "Yes, fath e r and do yo u not know that to -da y i s yo ur birthday?" s he asked. "Ah yes," h e answered, I h ad co mpl e t e l y f o rgotten." "Well, well, h ello, Carlos a n d Juan!" he sa id as h e e n te r ed t h e h o use and saw th e two boys. D o n a A l varey h ad died w he n Jua n a was only s Since that tim e Maria, an o l d servant w h o h ad co m e from Spai n w ith th e famil y, h ad taken ca r e of the two b oys and Jua n a. S h e was now fuss ing arou n d the kitc h en pre paring the evening m eal. They sa t down to the tabl e a n d b ega n t o c h atter. W e ar e expec tin g t h e Fortunat o to arrive to m orrow, fat h er. D o yo u know o f anyon e w h o i s o n it?" asked Carlos, now a young man o f 24.

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T H E "No SOil, hut I h o p e that s h ip will bring som e l ette r s and n e w s fro m \ al e n cia," r e pli e d .-\\varey. A t this talk. o f the ship .luana's e y es had bri ghtene d and s h e listened with inte rest "Fathe r, wh e n g o to Il1cet the ship to m orro w will y o u take m e with Y Oll ?" "Certainly, c hil d .!' The n h e s p o k e v e ry serio u s l y ( w ould lik e to speak t o Juana alone, b o y s." The b o y s l e ft th e r oo m and lo o k e d at Juana who, in turn wa s staring at him with cuno u s "\\'hat i s it fat h er?" s h e a s k e d. I am go in g t o a s k a ques ti o n daughte r and I want y o u to ans w e r m e trut hfully. I ha ve seen that YOll have had suito r s but n o t one that y o u fav o r m o r e than the othe r. T o m e Pedro .-\ria s i s the m os t suitable I s it poss bil e that Y OLI agree with m e ?" ) s hall never P edro : \ ria s," r e pli e d Juana in a v o i ce whi c h h e r fathe r had never h eard from h e r. "But what i s it, daughte r, that makes y o u turn t o i ce wh e n I s p eak o f him. do not hate him? " D o n o t a s k m e Fathe r. 1 can n o t b ear to s p eak o ( him, s h e r e pli e d. "lI'e ll, J had h o p e d f o r bette r than thi s," said .-\lvar e y "but l s hall n o t f o r ce into i t The r e i s o f time .-\nd so, the intervie w ended. The next m orning Juana prepared h e r self in the clothes in whi c h to lll ee t the b oat. She l oo k e d lik e a b eautiful picture ill h e r Spanis h dress a s s he walked al ong beside h e r fathe r. She had f orgotte n the c o n ve r satio n o f t h e night b e f o re a s s h e wa s in the ga:,'est mood and chatter e d ill mus i c al Castillian Spanis h the y r e a c h e d the bu s iest sec ti o n o f the t o wn and t oo k Juana to D o n P edro s wh e r e h e t o ld h e r to wait until t h e ship s h ould b e s i ghted. She amused h e r self in the g orgeou s patio of D o n Pedr o s h o m e and wa s n o t afraid o f m ee tin g P edro f o r s h e kn e w h e was away o n a trip t o P u erto B ello Afte r an h our o r so h e r fathe r came afte r h e r and the y rus hed t o the wharf. \\' h e n the b oat had appro a c h e d quite c lose but b e fore the passenge r s had alighte d .r uana had time to noti ce a ve r y fair y oung man. H e w as quite tall with light curly hair, and fr o m the m o m e n t Juana saw him h e r eyes never l e ft him. Could h e b e an Englishman-sh e w onde r ed? The Englis h -that Spain hate d so Illu c h -and if h e wa s what was h e d o in g h e r e amo n g e n e mies? .-\11 t hese and many othe r q uesti o n s w e r e g oin g through h e r h ead a s s h e s tood besid e h e r fa the r. \Yh e n the passenger s ali ghte d s h e s till watc h e d the Englis hman (s h e ha d n o w decided that h e was o n e) H e see m e d t o b e looking f o r someon e h e s p o k e t o a y oung man wh o p ointe d t oward Juana and h e r fathe r. H e immediately walke d t oward t h e m and s h e s t eppe d behind h e r fathe r in orde r to r emain unsee n. .-\r e S e n o r D o n R i cardo :\Ivarey?" h e a s ked h e r fat h e r in e x cellent Spanis h. Y es, ] am, ans w ered Alvare y, II\Vhat call I d o f o r you?" I have an important m ess a ge ( o r y o u, D o n .Alvarey. P erhaps the r e i s som e plac e w e can b e al o n e ?" Y es indeed," h e ans w e red, the n turning t o Juana, "Thi s i s daughte r .luana, S enor-ah" "Giles i V lartinez," s ai d the y oung Illan whil e l ooking at Juana. d \Y o u l d it b e inc onve ni ent f o r t o com e t o h o m e se n or?" a s k e d D o n :'\Ivarey. "No, indee d! 1 s hall b e glad to a ccompany and t ell )"ou so m ething o f mysel( a s we g o al o n g N o d oubt w onde r wh o J alll, and what message J might ha\'e f o r said the y oung man. began to walk in the direc ti o n o f D o n :\lvarey's h o m e and t h e man b egan t o s p eak. P erhaps fir s t o f all Illy name strikes y o u a s strange i\!I y m o t h e r was an Englis hwoman, wh o w hile traveling in France, m e t Martinez, (athe r, a Spanis h m e r chant all a bus in ess trip in France ha d little oppo r tunity to m ee t e a c h othe r a s my m othe r kne w t h a t h e r fathe r w o ul d o bject ve r y strenuous l y if h e e \ 'e n thought s h e s p o k e to a Spaniard. H o w e v e r the way o f l o v e r s can n o t b e surpassed and s h e el o ped with h e r l o v e r and r eturne d t o Spain with him. \Yh e n I was born, s h e name d m e afte r h e r fathe r who n e v e r f orgave h e r for marrying fathe r. S o that is the way in which] rece iv e d v e r y Englis h name, Gil es The m essage that I have ( o r y o u came fr o m y our brothe r, wh o f o r the la s t five y ears has b ee n in bu s in ess with my fathe r. I alll sorry to bring n e w s o f y our brother's death. This m ess age was dictate d fr o m his d eathbe d and c ontai n s a

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50 THE CARIBBEAN. will in w h ich he lea v es you all his interest in t h e bus iness, whic h concern s exportin g and importing. 1\l y fat her h as sent me here with the message Don -\Ivarey r e mained si lent and t h e young man, knowing t hat h e was thinking of t h e death of his brother, said nothin g. Finally D o n Alvarey spok e I am too old a man to t hink of entering a business o f whi c h I know nothing. But t hi s is an excellent oppor tunity for Carlos, is it not, Juanita?' Y es, indeed, Father, and do yo u think that J could go with him?" s aid J llana, w h ose desire to see the land where s h e was born had never left h er. But her father m e rely laug h ed and told h e r it was impossible. Juana, seeing that this wo ul d probably b e her only opportunity o f ever visiting Spain, was determined to find a way of go in g with h e r brother; so while D o n Alvarey and the young man was talking Juana walked a l o ng si l ently, thinking very deeply. Carios, on h earing o f what h is father was planning for him, was overjoyed. H e lis tened to all the counse l which h is fa t h e r gave him and a str o n g friendship began to grow between Giles and Carlos. Juana had been constantl y b eggi n g h e r fathe r to allow her to go with her brother, but h e would pay no attention to h e r. Juana went to h e r brother Carl os and told him h ow s h e longed to go with him to see t h e beautif ul country of Spain. H e at first laugh ed at her, but see in g her enthusia s m and unusual desire for this impossible thin g listened to h e r and promised her that h e would try to persuade t heir father to let her go. 1 f h e agreed, 1\1aria wa s to go a long and watch over her. The two o f them kept after D on Alvarey, who wa s v ery reluctant to part with his daughter, but jus t as he grante d her every oth e r wis h h e also grante d this o n e Juana and 1\1 aria, the o l d servant, t h e m s e lves with preparations for the journey. All t h i s time Giles had been v i siti n g the h o u se unde r th e pre t e n s e of see ing Carlos but had been spending m os t of his time t r yin g to gain t h e attenti o n o f Juana. Whe n h e did g e t h e r to take any unus ual n otice o f him s h e wou l d pelter h im with ques ti o n s o f Spain. Carios an d his fathe r w e r e not blin d and c ould see that t h e young Spaniard ( who did not res e mbl e a Spaniard in the l e a s t ) h ad more t h an a friendly interest in Juana. Carl os was pl ease d as h e had learned to admire his friend Gile s, but Don Alvarey, wh o still h o ped t o see Arias's so n, Pedro, married to his daughte r, was not so p leased. H e s poke of t h is to Carlos, who was very muc h surprised and said t o h is fathe r, I see w here the trip will b e very interesting s in ce both Gil es and Pedro will b e travel ing with u s." D o yo u mean to say that Pedro is goi ng to Spain!" exclai med t h e father. "Yes," repl ied Carios "an d it i s strange that you did not know o f it, although it see m s t o b e quite a secret." "Yes, it i s strange that Arias did not t ell me," answered Don A l varey; t h e n the tone of his voice c hanged: I am t rusting Juan a t o yo u Carlos, and yo u know that s h e i s m y heart, my lif e, so guard h e r care full y and see that n o harm befalls h e r. The day o f sai lin g finall y arrived and Juana, wh o was too excited to control herself was running here an d th e r e sayin g goodb ye t o this one and that o n e. After some t im e Carlos ca m e and bro u g h t her to her father, who could hard l y speak. The parting was a sad o n e and Juana promised to return as quickl y as poss ibl e She boarded t h e ship Fortunato, whic h had brought th e young man to America, and whic h was n o w returning to Spain with t h e precious Juana. T h e ship could not compare with our modern transatlantic s t eame r s, and p oo r Jua n a experi e n ced all t h e ve r y worst pains of seas i c kn ess Her brother, Carios, was co n stantly at h e r bedside and when s h e felt able to walk, h e never l e ft her side Bu t as SOOI1 as Carlos and Juana cam e in sight Gi l es would join them, and t h ey wou ld laugh and s in g and talk until Juana beg an to f o rget h e r illness and to take notice of this very plea s ing you n g man, w h o always had so m e new form of entertainm ent f o r her, or so methin g to t ell h e r of Spain. Pedro, i n t h e m eantime watched all this with jealou s eyes and h e, too, tried to join so m e of the ir little gath e rin gs ; but as SOOI1 as h e appeared Juana would change from a gay, laugh ing yo un g g irl to a very serious and haughty young woman. Giles, noticing this was determined to find out t h e cau se of it, but realized t hat h e must b e very ca reful. H e saw t hat it was so mething that Juana kept to h erself and was very sensitiv e about. So the days continu ed and b eca m e weeks and Juana b egan to tire o f t h e wide expanse o f nothing but wate r and so u ght t h e company of Gi l es more

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T H E CAR IBBE A N 5 a n d m o re. A s t r o n g f ri e nd s hip gre w lip b e tw ee n t h e m and Carios w h o wa s present, saw t hat i n ti m e it w o u l d becom e m o r e t han j ust f ri e n d s h ip. H e admi r e d Gi les and w i s h e d to see h i m marrie d to J llana, but h e a l so r e m embe r e d the w ords o f h i s fat h e r. One day t h e t h r eeofth e m w e r e s itting a n d talk in g wh e n a b oat wa s s i g h t e d J t c arri e d n o A a g a n d t h e cre w w e r e p u z z l e d a s to w hat kind o f s h ip i t mi g h t b e G i l e s and C arlo s b egan to h a ve t h e ir sLis pi c i on s w h e n t h e stran g e s h ip di r ec t e d its course t oward t h e F o r/wlttl a T h e y l oo k e d at e a c h o t h e r a nd alth o u g h 110 w o r ds w e r e spok e n made a j oint oath to protec t t h e y o un g girl wh o s tood b e tw ee n t h e m. The little ship F o r /I/uol o k ept o n h e r course al t h o u g h s h e s aw t hat t h e la r ge r b oat m eant t o b l oc k h e r wa)". Afte r so m e tim e the large r b o a t came a l o n g s ide a n d a numbe r o f u gl y m e n b eg a n t o jump aboard t h e lit tl e ship. Gi l es jus t a second quic k e r t h an C arlos lift e d J u a n a into h i s a r m s and c arried h e r to h e r c a bin, s p e n d in g a f e w m omen t s i n warni n gs, t e llin g h e r not to l eave until h e s h ould r e turn. T h e fir s t p e r so n t hat h e Ille t 011 h i s r e t u rn wa s C a rl o s I t i s an E n glis h p i rate s h ip a nd P e d r o Ari a s t h e s w i n e i s a spy in t h e se r v i ce o f t h e E n g l i s h and h a s b ee n f o r t h e se t h r ee years." T h e n t h e r e i s so m e t h in g m o r e b e h i n d thi s t han iu s r p lu nder o r h e w ould not b e h e re," r e pli ed G i l es, t h e n w h i s p e r in g, J uana i s safe in h e r cabin, bu t it w ill b e wise t o k ee p a watc h o n h e r I t o l d h e r n o t t o l eave till 1 s h ould co m e an d fetch h er." A t t h i s m o m ent Pedro A ria s came toward t h e m with a s n ee r on h i s f a ce T h e Englis h pira t e ship d e mands t h e p e r so n o f J lIana t o b e h eld f o r ranSOIll. I ( s h e i s d elive r ed to u s with o u t r e s i stance t h e s hip will b e allo w e d to continue it s c o u r s e o t h e rw ise--" and P e d r o l e ft h i s sente n ce unfi n i s h e d f o r Carlos had hit h im an d h it him so h a r d t h a t h e b y at t h eir f ee t un co n sciou s Gi l es to l d Car l os to t i e and gag P e d r o while h e w e n t a f te r Juana. thi nk I m a y b e able t o settl e t h i s \ Vait h e r e until I r e t u rn h e said to C arlo s Then h e w ent t oward Juana's cabin. \Vhe n s h e o p e n e d t h e door h e n o ti ce d t h a t h e r face wa s pal e a n d s h e see m e d n ervo u s H a ve y o u b ee n frig h t e n e d ? h e a s k e d h e r, H a s anyo n e m o lested you?" "::\fot frig h t e ned f o r m yself, s h e ans w e r e d. I s Carlo s s a f e? And yo u ? Y o u are n o t hurt?" "Carl os i s wai t in g f o r LIS," Gi l es ans w e r ed D o n o t f ear f o r m e, Q u e r ida mia, for l11y lif e i s worthless w h en yo u rs i s a t stake Perhaps i t may surprise rou but Imay never h a ve anoth e r o p po r tunity t o t ell yo u t h a t I love yo u, dearest o ne, and J am go in g to p r o t ec t if i t cos t s 111)' lif e Juana look e d up into h i s face an d said, '" am so glad y o u h a ve to ld m e, Gi l es f o r have d i scove r e d since yo u l e f t m e that y o w' life i s d eare r t o m e t h a n a n y Gi l es clutch e d h e r arms and l oo kin g i n t o h e r face cried, A r e sure s w ee test o n e, are yo u sure ?" A nd t h e n, b e f o r e s h e h a d t i m e t o a n s w e r h e r e m embe r e d t hat tim e wa s n o w prec i o u s so h e l i f ted h e r in his arms a n d w e n t bac k t o Carlos 1 am goin g t o try and talk t o t h ese sco un d r e l s an d m ak e t h e m b elieve J am an Englis hman \\'hatever I s a y yo u must agree wit h m e D o u nderstand?" said Gil es So t h e three o f t h e m b oarded t h e s hip and Gil es, n o w s p eaking in Englis h a s k ed f o r t h e capta in. \\' h e n h e appeared, Gil es s a i d S ir, I k n o w n o t w h o y o u a r e but 1 a m an E n g l i s hman o f n oble birth t h e grandso n of Sir Gi l es B e rk e l ey and thi s i s m y w i f e and b r o t h e r with m e \ V e a r e trave l in g to Spain w h e r e m)' fath e r i s t o m ee t u s," And h e went o n i n s u c h a man n e r t hat h e Im p r esse d t h e ign orant se a capta i n a g r eat deal. I t h i n k t h e r e i s a mi s t a k e, s ir said t h e captain. "That f oo l }\ria s, h a s pro babl y go t u s into a noth e r m ess but I swear b y m y bear d that thi s will b e h i s la s t tri c k. Whe r e i s h e t h e dirty scoundr e l ? Gil es, afte r muc h disc u ss i o n finally p e r suaded t h e captain t o let t h e F orl/{ualo proceed 011 its course an d t o l e t h i m do w i t h Arias w hatever h e wis h e d. H e made up his mind t o turn h im over t o t h e offic i al s a s a and l e t the Spanis h g o v e rn m ent prosec ute h im. The goo d ship F ortuna l o arri ve d in Spain and abo u t t h r ee m o n t h s late r D o n Alvarey r ece iv e d t h e f ollo wing l ette r f r o m his d a u g h t e r (writte n by Carlos, f o r s h e did llo t kn o w h o w to write) : (( P a d r e Que rid o : H j h a ve at la s t see n t h e b eautiful COUll try in w h i c h I wa s b orn but it can n o t compare w i t h t h e oth e r country w h e r e 1 ha ve live d all m y life. Giles a n d J w e r e marrie d yes t e rday, fath e r, with t h e pe rmi ss i o n o f Carlos. \\'e w e r e married in a b eautiful l it tl e c hu r c h in t h i s b y t h e same priest w h o baptize d m e ] s i t all not very r omantic, padre ?

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THE CARIBB EAN. Carl os is wri ting to t ell y o u about P edro Aria s for I ca n not b ea r t o s p eak o f him. H e wa s a c ting as a spy f o r En g l and and ha s b ee n thrown into pri so n. "_-\nd jus t think, padre mi a Gi l es and I will b e returning t o Panama s oo n b e cau se hi s fath e r w ants h irn to continue the bu siness the r e Carlo s thin k s it i s a p r ofit abl e an d a g r ee abl e pro p os ition an d I am Slire Y Oll think so, t oo H e will r e main h e r e a s h e s ay s h e thinks h e wa s d es tin e d t o b e a m e r chant. So, fath e r it will n o t b e l o n g b e f o r e w e will b e t o g ethe r again. Gi l es wis h es to b e r e m embe r ed t o yo u and thanks for me. I s h e n o t f oolis h but al so l ov abl e ? Y our l o ving daugh t e r, "JUANA." IT SOMETIMES H AP P ENS. Elsie D(/r/ey, )0. (This story was next to th e g r a n d pri ze story, an d the b est s ub mitted fro m t h e Sen i o r Class in th e 930 S h ort S t o r y Co n test. ) "Who's that f ello w o ver there?" a s k e d my companio n ga z ing at a man seate d a f e w yards fro m liS lnte r es ting l oo kin g chap," h e adde d. V e w e r e siuing o n the veranda o f the Stranger's Club, watc hin g t h e la s t ra ys o f th e s un di sappear b e hin d F ort Sh erman. 1 f ollo w ed J a c k B enton's glanc e and s aw a man o f abo u t f orty g ray-haire d, and ve r y sunburned. Hi s clo th es o f a goo d quality hun g l oose l y all hi s s p a r e fram e A s 1 l oo ked, I r ecognize d him. "Great S cott!" J exc laimed. ''It's E verard D e ane! Bu t h o w--" "The explo r e r ? .J a c k in t errupte d. "But yo u so u n d exc i t e d \ \ h Y so?" "\\'hat o n earth i s h e d oing h e r e?" I w ent o n, a lmost to m yse lf. I s h e so m eo n e w i t h a p as t ?" p e r s isted J a ck. H e l oo k s it." J '1l t ell yo u his s t o r y I said t urin g to B entoll, "si nce yo u will wor m it out o f m e soo n e r o r la ter. D eane lived h e r e t hr ee years ag o b e f o r e yo u ca m e dow n h e r e H e w as a wealthy trave l e r sta ying at t h e \Va s h i ngton a n d th e pla ce g o t suc h a h o l d o n him t hat h e d ec id e d t o s ta y in d e finit e l y ins t e ad of continuing h i s trave l s H e r e main e d and b e cam e v e r y popular wit h the r esid ents here. Aft e r a t i m e finding the plac e a bit dull h e made arrange m ents to make a m onth's trip into t h e j ungle. 1 t h ink h e was int e r es t e d in g o ld an y way, h e l e ft f o r the interio r s oo n after." "Go on," urge d B ento n. But that i sn't all, unfortunate l y. '''' hil e stay ing h e r e h e be came v e r y intimate with Cap tain Dani e l s t h e n the P ort Captain. The Danie l s had a SOil, Bill, a boy o f about 18, jus t fini s h e d h igh school nic e boy, rathe r. Took a gr eat fan cy t o D e an e, and D e an e wa s e quall y inte r es t e d in him. \Vh e n h e h eard o f D e an e s pro p ose d ex p e diti o n h e wa s on pin s and n ee dl e s t o g o with him, o f c ourse. Captain and rVIrs Dani e l s afte r d emurring awhil e, c on se n t e d to his g o ing becau se t h ey trus t e d D eane implicitly. Everard a c kn owledge d frankl y that h e would rathe r l eave t h e boy b e hind, but Bill' s e a g ern ess wa s so gr eat t hat h e couldn't r es i s t taking him. '''' e li, they l e ft in a c o upl e o f week s and n o one eve r s aw Bill Daniel s a g ain. "What?" s ai d J c k a g ha s t Y ou d on't m e an?--" "No, 1 said wit h co nviction. I d on't m e an t h at. N o on e ev e r saw D e an e either, until a f e w months ag o, w h e n on e o f t h e Airwa y pil o t s s aw him in Dari e n. But J am o n e o f the v e ry f e w wh o didn't b e lie ve D e an e wa s r es p o n s ibl e in an y se ri o u s way f o r that b oy s di sappearance On e of th e v e r y f e w 1\1rs Danie l s wait e d and h oped f o r t h r ee m onth s and the n l e ft f o r t h e States with a n e r vo u s br eakdo wn. There wa s a pause The n J ack s aid: "Now 1 'm a s inte r es t ed a s y o u t o kn o w w hat he i s d o ing h e r e " I am g o ing to s p eak to him," I s aid, and r use D e an e r e cogniz e d m e at onc e and alm os t h i s fir s t w o rd s w e r e : "You're a white man H arris o n The onl y o n e o f my friends w h o ha s s p o ken to m e SIllCe--H e bro k e ofF, anu I did not press him. "\Vell, I s aid. "Let's make it tw o whit e m e n 1 ve a friend with m e wh o 1 am sure w o uld b e d elighte d to m ee t you." R ealizing m y sincerit y h e did not h esitate to co m e ove r t o our table an d s i t d o wn. I int roduced him to J a c k and o rd e r ed e liink s D e an e s p o k e : I kn o w," h e starte d, "that yo u w o uld lik e to h ear m)' story--" "1, t oo," vo u c h safe d J a c k.

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THE CAR I BBEA N 5 3 And I d o n't mind t e llin g itn o w," w e n t o n D eane "So you s hall b e the fir s t to hear it." Y o u kn ow t h e facts o f ollr departure \\'e l e ft with three San Bia s I nciians-p orte r s, carriers, or what yo u will. intentio n was to trave l inland f o r abollt 25 mil es in searc h o f g o ld, b ecause I kno w the r e are d e p osits around t h e r e 1 twas fair g oi ng f o r r h e first 1 5 mil es One m o rnin g Bill and I wok e t o find t hat our three T nciian s ha d nev e r f ound outan d h ad tak e n with t h e m Illost o f our suppli es \\'e, Bill and 1 had d u g a little the previous day, a nd, to gratification, w e had f ound s ign s o f what promised to b e a large v e in o f go l d. But t h e Indians had not known t h i s, o r they w ould not have l e ft. So Bill and I w e r e l e f t with r h e pros p ec t o f go in g bac k at o nc e, a s w hat food suppl i es r emaine d would obviou s ly la s t for only a f e w days Bill began to pac k, whil e I made notes a s to the locati on and oth e r matte r s I h:1d moved away from the camp in t h e co u rse o f making an n otatio n s wh en suddenl y I heard a cry: 'i"l r. D eane! Qui c k !' I turned r ound and I s h all never forget what I S<1W-" Dean e s voice was not a s steady a s it had b een "Bill wa s trying to fr ee himself fr o m the coils o f a snake whi c h ha d w o un d itself round his ann. I dre w m y revol ve r and fired at t h e thing, ri s kin g hitting Bill, and s hot it t hrough t h e head. Bu t I wa s t oo late Y o un g Danie l s ha d b ee n bitte n, and in spite o f all efForts h e died within 2 0 minutes D eane paused, and very, very stubbed out hi s ciga r e t te. H e mus t ha ve l o ved t hat ve r y muc h. Neith e r Jack n o r I s poke, and D eane w ent on : burie d h im the r e, with a go l d mine f o r hi s m onument." H e smiled a little s adl y 1 s h ou l d have returned to i' ll's Daniels and b ro k e n the n ews to h er; but I hadn't the courage I know w ha t are t hinking, 1'11'. B enton," h e said, and I think h e mus t h a ve caugh t Jack's contemptuous l oo k. s h ould I wh o have faced wil d animals in Afri c a without a qualm, b e afraid to do so simple a thing? The r e i s m o r e than one kind o f brave r y, b o y, and perhaps so m e day you will learn that. :\nd the best i s t h e very kin d I lacked. W ell ( m o r e brusq u e lv ) I wande r ed abo u t in that j u ngl e till I ca m e upon an Indian villag e and for two y ears I ha ve lived in Indian v illa ges with f ea r. Now I am going away fr o m Panama f o rever. I sai l f o r C hin a to-morrow, and] s hall spend most o f my time at m y place in l\Ianchuria, to f o rget. Harrison, I want you to do something f o r m e I want you t o write to Mrs Daniels and tell h e r. Say w ha t y o u lik e about me-th e w o rst will not do m e justice. H e laug hed a little mirthlessl) ".-\nd now good-b ye H e rose, g a ve u s each a lirm handshake, the n l e f t u s Jack and I w e n t h o m e p e n s i ve THE COFFI N O F DON J UAN. (This story W;1S thc best s ubmitted !rom t h e Junior Cl;1SS in th e 1930 S h ort Storr C ontest.) \\' h e n 1 fini s hed my college course, about two years ago, 1 decided that Euro p ean travel w ould broade n m y edu cation; so f o r a year o r m o r e I traveled t h r o u g h o u t Eur o p e, collecting o l d books and manuscripts I t was afte r my trave l s w hil e [ wa s classifying and cataloging literary discoveri es, that I d iscove red an o l d l ette r in o n e o f the Spanish books. T l oo ked at it care full y, r ead a f e w lin es, and at o n ce b ecame immersed in t h e contents The f ollo wing i s a fre e translatio n of t h e l ette r. l'I.t y de;1r DOll Andr es: P;1n;1Il1;1, Prisoner of i\i org;1n D o not be ;Jt"r;1id when you see that I ;1m :1 pri so n e r o f l'I.\ org;1n. I will soon b e rcle;1sed, but if by some ch;1nce J do 110t return to Spain, I wish yOll to tell my f r iend s why I am h e r e ;1nci, il possible recover the lor the "ing. A s you know I W;1S aide to the Governor 0 1 P a n :lrna. he n he he:trd of the :lppro;1ch ot the pirato:-, l\i org:tl1, h e summoned m e to hi s quarters :tnd s:tid, You, Don ./U;111, h:t\'e been my :tide f o r two years, and during th:tt tim e you h:tve served me l;1ithf ully." 1 h:tv e only done my duty, Your Exc ellency," I r e pli ed. Yes," h e said, Y our bur I h:t\ 'e :t greater duty for you now." "l\l y life is:tt your service,"' I smiled, gi\ing the custom:t ry :tll s wer. 'You know th:tt En glishm:tll, i\lorgan, is appro:tching P an:tm:t. : \ t th e present tim e w e have a larg e number of j e wel s th:lt w e r e collected lor the "-ing, and it is necessary to h ;!ve them in Spain within three months. I I I\lorgan surrounds the city it will be impossible to t;"lke th e jewels across t h e Isthmus by ordinary means. I t is your du ty to see that these jewels are taken safely to the Atlantic sea

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5+ T H E C ARIBBEAN. coast and put aboard one of OUf s hip s. I am trusting this vast fortune to yo ur care b eca u se of your lo yalty and integrity. Y es, Y our Excellency, t h e jewels will be delivered s a f ely i f J live." "It is well. M a k e your preparations at once. Y o u mar d r aw upon th e c it y for s upplies." An h o ur l a t e r a Rag-covered coffin wa s being s l o w l y rolled from the city on a gun-carriag e T h e process i o n was head d br a young officer while a doze n so l die r s marc h ed o n e ach side with lowered g un mu zz l es. T h ey march ed through t h e jungl e toward San L orenzo for seve ral hours whcn a party o f armed men s tepp ed i n to t h e trait in front o f them. "What's this?" b oo m ed t h e vo ice of the big man who see med to be th e kader "a funeral?" T h e }'oung offic : r, who m you have probabl y g u essed wa s myse lf, r ecognized h i m as Si r H enry l\lorgan, but he, or rather I assumed a comm an ding l oo k and said, "Stranger s, 1 s uppose rou are a party of sai l ors from so m e Span i s h sh i p at San L o r e nzo. I t i s yo u r duty to h elp me take thi s body to t h e coast The big man smi l ed and s aid I am Sir H enry l\' l organ. \V ho are you and what i s the r easo n for taking this corpse across the Isthmus, kn o win g t hat I wa s planning t o attack Panama? I ha ve already captur e d Fort San L orenzo." Afte r telling him who I wa s and arguin g a few minutes, I tol d him, apparently a ga in s t my will, the f ollo wing story: "Thi s is th e bod y of a n o bleman, w h o ha s been in Panama for seve r al years. According to an old story, P a nama w ill f all t h e dar afte r th i s man i s buried, if h e is b ur ied in t h e soi l o f the New World ; so I am try i ng to take h i s body to a Spanis h s hip, that it may b e buri ed in Spain." "Amazing," boo m ed M orga n, "Now, men we will have a fun eral." There w as a brief fight in which all my men w e r e kill e d or captured, and the pirates carried t h e coffin into t h e jungle. Soo n w e came to dee p bog and Morg an s topped hi s me n saying, H e r e w e are, m en. Dump t h e corpse." The copper coffin qui c k l y sa nk f r om sigh t and Morgan, lau g h ingly said, "My dear D o n Juan, s ince you w e r e so u se ful I s h all not k ill you. Y o u call live to see m e take Panama." Now I am l'vlorgan's prisoner, and I must sar, h e h as treated me lik e a gentleman, eve n pe rmitting me to se n d you t h is letter. Y ou p r o babl y think 1 am ve r y indiscreet, putting the s e c ret o f the coffin on paper, but M o rgan said h e w ould not read it and h e neve r brea k s a pro mi se. No, h e wil l n eve r kn o w t hat the coffin contains a fortu n e in jewels in s t e ad of a bod),. Soon, J h ope, J will be free, for M orga n h as take n Panama. I will try to r ecover t h e jewe l s and in that wa y r edee m myself with my K ing. Y ou r faithful servant, DoS' J UAN DE EROUS O Of course th i s letter fascinate d m e I inv es t i gated a f e w o l d Span i s h b ooks i n t h e collec tio n and discovered t hat a n oble ma n by t hat nam e was tortured to death b y Sir H enry Morgan. A l so I f ound that h i s best friend D o n A ndres d e Ce r -vantes d i e d on a n expe diti o n t o Panama t wo years l a t e r. S o m ewhe r e o n t h e tra i l to San L o r en zo t h e r e i s a f o r t un e waiti n g f o r so m eo n e t o claim. P r obabl y i t will be t h e r e f o r e v e r for all wh o kn e w w h e r e the cop p e r casket i s buried a r e d ead. Time will t e ll. T H E CARD S HARP. Beverly DUIlIl, 'JJ. (This was t h e best s tory submitte d f r o m t h e So phom o r e Cl ass ) The trip across for eve n midwinte r, h ad b ee n u n usally d ull. The r e were l ess than I CX) pe r sons o n t h e big line r, most of t h e m trave lin g sa l es m e n o r firm repr ese ntat ives co min g h o m e f o r C h ri s t m as a fter a year abroad j and I had r esign e d m yse lf t o a w ee k o f b o r edo m. T h e w e athe r to o, wa s bit t e r, a n d I s p ent m os t o f m y t i m e m o ping a r o un d t h e g r ea t empty r eading room, o r t h e s m o k ing s al on. I t was natural the n that I s h o ul d attac h m yse lf to T a lbot, o r m o r e truth f ully, that h e s h o u l d attac h him self t o me. F ro m the first I ha d take n a likin g to t h e lad, and e v e n a f t e r hi s unmaskin g I h ad n o t the h e a r t t o turn h im d o wn I n dee d h a d not so m e o f t h e sm o k i n g roo m crowd t es tified t h a t min e w as a dilt' e r e n t prof ess ion, I mi ght have bee n ostra c i ze d as a n accomp l ice O n the first night out I met h i m, a n d I w a s n o t s u re w h ether h e was Englis h o r m ere l y an imi tati o n. All t h e outward a n d v i s ibl e s ign s w e r e En glis h bu t h e tol d m e t h a t t h o u g h h e h ad b ee n ed u ca t e d a t O x f o rd and h a d s p ent m os t o f h i s ti m e sin ce then play in g p o l o i n I ndia h e wa s a n Am erica n. H e h ad spe n t so m e time, a n d acco r di n g t o him se l f, m u c h money, a t the w a t e r i ng p l aces a l o n g the Fre n c h Ri v i e r a I tho ug h t t h a t I h ad see n h i m so m ew h e r e b e f o r e, but I co ul d n o t see m t o p l ace h im. H e talke d g l ib l y o f peopl e w ellworth kn o wing i n b oth N e w Y o r k and L o n do n, but h e occas i o n ally made s lip s I t was hi s o b v i o u s case t o co ver u p these s l ip s t h a t first m ade m e wo nder w heth e r h e had a n y motives b es ides p e r so n a l vanity i n purs uin g I could n o t t ell w h ethe r h e was wo rkin g u p to a n immediate loan, o r a s k i n g m e for an introduc ti on to a b a n ke r i n New Y o rk, o r a ca rd t o a club. The n t h e n ex t nig h t I d i scovered h i s m o t iv e H e was s itting in the s m o k i n g r oo m p l a ying so litai r e, an d a t once I r ecalled t h a t I had see n

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THE CARIBBEAN. 55 him at AixL es Bai n s and t hat h e wa s h o l din g a bank at baccarat. \ ,Vhe n h e a s k e d m e t o sit down I said, I s aw yo u at AixI esBain s la s t summe r. H is e y es f ell t o t h e pa c k o f cards in his hands, and he finger e d them, a s if searching f o r a p a r ti cular card. \Vhat wa s I d o i ng the r e ?" h e a s ked. D e a l ing ba ccarat at t h e Cas ino d es F l eurs." \\'ith o bvio u s reli e f h e lau g h e d. "Oh, h e assented. J olly place Aix -but I l os t a pot o f money t h e re I'm a rotten hand at cards Can't win, and ca n't l eave e m al o n e H e s mil e d a s though h alf a s h am e d of h i s w eakness "Po k e r, c hemind ef e r, ba ccarat, I lik e e m all, but they don't lik e m e ; so I s ti c k to solitaire n ow. It's d ull b u t cheap. Y o u l ik e cards y ourself? I c onfesse d that I didn'r kn o w th e d iff e r e n ce betwe en a elu b and a spade, and had n o d es ir e t o learn. At t h i s when he di scove r e d h e wa s wastin g his time o n m e I expec ted him t o be anno y ed; but his di sappointment s t ru ck far d ee p e r. H e s l ow l y shut h i s e ye s a s if I had hurt him a n d for a moment J b e liev e h e was o blivi o u s to m y presence. Quite imprope rly, I f elt sorry f o r If h e s howed h i s di sappointment so keenl y h i s need for a f e w dollars must have been g r eat. Alm ost at on ce I abandoned him and went 011 deck. \\' h en ] came bac k an hour late r, h e wa s deep in a game o f poker. H e look e d up and passe d and c all e d t o m e Don't sc o ld," h e said laughingl y J t o l d you I couldn't k ee p away fr o m cards." Kn o wn him f o r y ears, h e said t o a at his s id e making a g es ture in direc ti o n. He's s e t m e ri g h t many a time." The playe r look e d up and s m iled at m e and Talbot m e t m y gaze with p erfect se r e nity "What wou l d you draw?" h e a s ked, h olding up his hand for m e to s ee His audacity and in co nsistenc y so a s t onis h e d me t hat I walked o u t of the ro o m in sil e n ce \"' h e n w e met on t h e d ec k, h e wa s n o t e v e n apol o geti c I n s t ead, as t hough we were partners in crime, he chuc kl ed d e lighted l y. "Sorry J had t o use y our name, he s aid. But they w e r en't any t o o p l eased t o have m e take that la s t hand; and I n ee d e d so m eo n e t o v o u c h f o r m e." "Vo u c h f o r you!" e xclaimed. 1 didn't s a y a w o rd." H e look ed a t m e w e ari l y "TO, n o, o f course n o t h e said "But it amounte d t o th e sa m e thing. They think yo u vo u c h e d f o r m e t o-night; so to-m orro w th ey're g o in g t o ra i se th e limit. I'v e co n vinced th e m I'm an e asy mark." "And I t a ke it yo u are not." I said stiffly H e co n s id e r e d this unworthy o f an an s w e r, h e n ce s mil ed The n the s mil e d i ed and in his e y es I s aw f ear, infinit e w eariness an d di s t r es s. I'm ill bad," h e said, and h i s v o i ce wa s frighte n e d lik e a c h ild' s I can't s l eep; n erves all o n e nd. Can y o u g i ve m e so m ething t o s trai ghte n m y h ead? " \Vhat's the matter with the ship's doctor ? J a s k e d "l3ut I d on't kn o w him." h e s ai d f\l in dful o f th e u se he had made o f m y name I o bject ed strenuo u s l y \V ell YOli certainly don't kn o w me!" "No-o-o But I kn o w wh o yo u are, h e sa id. and--" h e s t opped s h ort; th e n speakin g in a muc h l o w e r t o n e call tinued, ,. B es ides, th e d oc t o r h e s an awfu l b ounder. I think he's watching m e." "As a doctor?" I a sked, "or watch i n g yo u play cards?" Pl a y c a r d s," h e r e p l i e d I'm afraid h e was t h e s hip's surgeo n o n th e P. & O. I came h o m e o n. The r e wa s a little trouble o n that trip and I fancy h e r e m embe r s m e." His co nfid e n ces w e r e b ecoming a nui sance. Y o u mu stn't t ell m e that, I s aid, "ho w d o kn o w I w o n t g o and t ell th e captain all a b out yo u ? I kn o w p erfec tl y w ell y o u w on't, h e r e pli e d. R ot!" I retorted. "Yo u don t kn o w a n ything o f the sort." F o r a Illornent Talbo t bit his lip and fr o wn ed, a s if f earing h e had gon e too far. I've go t t o make expe n ses," h e mutte red. "All c arel games are games of chanc e, and a card s harp i s o n e o f t h e c hances An yway," h e said, a s t h o u g h di s p os i n g o f the s ubj ect, I v e go t to make e xp e n ses. Afte r dinne r wh e n I came into th e s m oking ro o m the p oker crowd sat waiting and o n e o f the m a s k e d wh e re the y c ould find r fri e n d." \ V e want to give him his r e v enge the man s aid. He's l os ing th en?" I a s ked. The man c hu c kl e d c ompl a cently "Th e anI), l oser."

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S6 THE CARIBBEAN J w ouldn't I advised, "he'll come for his rev enge." That night, after I had retired, h e knocked at door. I switched on the lights and saw h im at the f oo t o f berth. H is hands were shaking, and I saw that h e was h o l ding h imse l f in c h eck with great difficulty (jI 'm sca red," h e said "scared. I n spite of his tan, h is face s howed white F o r a moment h e looked o ld a n d worn; fini s h ed "They're crowdill' m e," h e w hin ed "Always crowdin' me, H is voice was q uerulous, like a c hild's. ] can't remembe r w h en they haven't b ee n mo\,in' me on. They moved m e Ollt o f India, then Cairo t h e n Pon Said. The n t hey clo se d P aris 011 me :\lways pushin' m e Now they've close d L o ndon. I had a club there. J u s t a few games-roulette, haccarat. \'ery quiet, y'know, exclusive :,\i ce) fashionabl e district, too, down on B e rkeley Street. I think it was m y butler who so l d m e t hey took u s down to B ow Street. 1 've p lun ged o n this trip. I t's my l a s t c hance." "What, t h e trip?" J asked. "No," h e answered, with a slig h t s mil e. "My fami l y They've b ee n payin' m e to liv e abroad. 1'01 goin' home to 'em l'ye b ee n away for ten yea r s 1' m COOlin' h o m e a s the Prodigal Son, tired of eatin' the hu s k s of life, now 1'01 just waitin' f o r 'el11 to kill t h e fatted calf." H e ch u ck l ed t o him se lf. Fatted calf!" h e sai d scornfull y "They'd rather see m e in H e ll. i\ l y brother wa s th e only member o f t h e famil\' who ever cared a whoop about me, anyway. I know o f times wh en h e tried to get m e to co m e h o m e) but th e rest o f t h e didn't want m e. H e wa s always decent to me, even wh e n t h e oth e rs w e r e treatin' m e like a dog. He's m y best bet." I t see m ed to m e, if he wished his famil y to think h e wa s r e all y repentant, his course in t h e s m o kin g room w o uld not h e lp to really rea ssure them. 'suggested as much. I f you get into troubl e, as you call it," 1 said, "they'll ra dio ah ead to t h e p o lic e of ,\Tew York, and your people will hear." '" know," h e s aid. got to chance it. I got to makt e nough to go on till I see my family." "And what if they WOl1't see you?" asked. H e g lanced sadl y around the room "Then I guess it's just good-night," h e sa id. T gave him a s l eepi n g powder, and sent him of r to bed Apparently it wa s just w hat h e needed for the next day after lu nc h eo n h e was up on deck looking fresh and stro n g, and active. H e seemed to have forgotte n our previ o u s nig ht's conversati o n, a n d w h en I asked him to abandon his s m oking-room activities for the r es t of t h e voyage, h e on l y laughed. "Can't be done," h e sa id l've got to make my killing to-night." But it was oth e rs who made th e killing. 1 cam e into the smokin g r oo m about 9 o'clock, to see how the game was p rogressing All the players except Talbot wer e standing up; the ir voi ces were raised in anger. Talbot sat with his back agai nst a bulkhead, coo l and nonchalant. Outwardl y, at least, h e was indifferent to th e h osti l e gestures whic h were b e in g di rected at him by his chief tormen t o r, a n oisy, red-faced pest named Smedburg. Tn t h e co n fide nt, tones of a man w h o has the c r o wd with him, h e wa s addressing Talbot. "\\'he n t h e ship's surgeo n first m e t )'ou," h e said, You c alled yoursel f Lord Rid l ey." "\\'hat of it," Talbot retorted, "If J c h oose to dodge reporte r s, that's m y bu s in ess And, furtherm ore it's my bu s in ess if I don't c h oose to give m y name to every meddling busybody I meet." Y ou'll g i ve it to the polic e all rig ht," s n ee red Smedburg. ".'\nd i n the meantime, you'll k ee p out of this s m oking room. The c h orus o f assent was unanimous. It wa s too evident t o b e ignored, even by T albo t H e silently rose and with an air of fastidious concern brus h ed a spec k from his coat "Only too g lad to get o ut," h e r emarked. "The atmosphere in here i s ve r y depressin g." Bu t h e was not to have t h e l ast wo r d His pe r secutor p ointed a l o ng finge r at him. "The next time you take t h e name of .L\dolf A l eck," h e s h outed, "'(a u better make sure h e has n't got a (riend o n board to protect him (r o m s harps a n d s win d l e r s." Talbot turned and walked out into the night: Bad business," remarked th e purser, a few minutes later. "\\'hat happened?" I asked. "Caught him dealing of F t h e bottom," h e sai d. "They rather s uspected him all the time, and to-night they had outs iders watchin g h im They say h e slippe d himself an ace oft" the bottom of

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THE C.-\R I BBE. -\'J. 57 the pack. I t s a pity! He's s u c h a nice looking chap." r asked what S medburg had m e ant his allu sio n to .-\dolf .-\Iec k. "Th e y :1ccused h im of travelin g under a fal se name, explain ed t h e p u rser, "and h e s aid t hat h e did it to dodge r e p orte r s. The n h e said h e reall, wa s t h e broth e r of .-\dolf Aleck, t h e banke r but it seems Smedbur g kn ows .-\Iee k and h e called h is hand I t was a t hing to do, b ec au se kn ows Al ec k hasn't a broth er. But now this Smedburg i s going to send a wirel ess t o the police and to :\\ec k and [ell th e m about t h e wh o l e business." Hasl1 't h e any other o f spending hi s money?" I inquired. ';He 's a confounded nuisance, growled the purser. ",-\11 h e wants to do is to put .-\lee k under obligation t o him; wants to s h ow h e knows the man. I t means a scene all t h e wharf, newspaper tal k and H eaven knows what. Talbot will b e the joke o f the ship H e won't dare s h o w his face." But the n ex t m orning found Talbo t on deck, acting a s if nothing ha d happe n ed H e ign o r ed t h e gibes and jokes whi c h were about h im, an d put o n an air o( great H e w ould have passe d m e o n deck, but] took his arm and l ed him to t h e rail. \Y e w e r e n o w w ell pas t quarantine, and a of tugs w e r e butting u s into th e dock. \Yhat are y o u goi n g to do?" I a s k ed I t doesn't depen d o n m e, h e replied "It's up to Smedburg. He's th e busy little Then his Aippanq' f ell (1'0111 him lik e a cloak, and f ear took it's place H e turned to m e and gripped my arm. "The y r e watching m e," h e said I cou l d t ell that They're just waiting f o r a c hance." "\\'hy did do it, t h en?" I inquired 1 didn't!" h e exc laim ed I swear J d idn't. was playing in lu c k all evening. Everything wa s comin' m)' wa y I didn't ne ed to c heat. But a l oose card f ell oft" t h e bottom, and t hey all jumped on m e b e fore I had a chance to explain. It wa sn't t h e truth they wanted. They b elieved w hat they wan ted to b elie \ e Bu t 1 didn't c heat once in the ga m e." It llla y ha ve been fooli s h of m e, but 1 f e lt that h e wa s telling t h e truth, and 1 wa s so r ry h e ha d not s tu c k to it; so 1 said rath e r "th e n wh y did you lie abo u t b e ing : 1Ieck's broth e r ? :\IR19i-'2-8 not?" h e replied ( had to say something to pass it of f f u sed to kn ow Aleck well too," h e paused, and l oo k ed at the water. Y ears ago! But r d f o rgotten h e hadn' t a hroth e r. I thought ( cou l d get away \ \'ith it. B esides, he's a J ew, and two of the six in the ga m e wert: J ews." Bu t you," I said, "are not a J ew." h e queried, "Look a t me a minute H e paused and turned squarely around. Hair h e s a id, "compl exion dark, popp ing, mOllth full n ose R oman o r H ebraic, accordi n g to taste. D o see? H e shru gged his s houlders. "But it didn't work," h e s ai d I pi c k ed t h e wron g J ew D o you suppose t his Smedburg person ha s sent h im a radio?" J told him I t h ought it ver), probable. ".-\nd what will .-\Ieck do'" h e a s k ed "\I' hat sort is he?" ( described him a s t h e ric hest banke r in :\Tew York, g i ven to and t h e b etterment o f his ra ce. "The n mebb e, h e cried hopefully, "he w on't do anything, and my won't h ear." T h e n his s h o uld ers stift-e neci, and h e exclai m ed L ook! The little .lew in the fur coat at the end of t h e pier." I f ollowed the direction o f his gaze, and s aw on the dock, accompanied two members o f t h e squad, t h e gre a t banke r philanthropist and H ebrew, .-\dul f .-\lec k. \\'e so close 1 cou l d read his face. I t was stern set, unrelentin g. Of a ba d business ) Smedburg ha d made a worse one. f turned to s peak to Talbot) but f o un d h im go ne. H is silent s lippin g filled me with fear. I ran to h is stateroolll. I t wa s The n starting at th e bottom, I traversed every deck, l an e, and on ( h e s hip. Talbot was not to be f ound, and l11y inquiries to stewards fell on deaf ear s The r e were hundreds of stateroom s in whic h h e might ha ve hidden, and in the confusion of landing no o n e would noti ce hil11. I h ad r e a c h ed th e gangplank and started to t h e custom s s h ed to continue sear c h wh e n a white-faced steward touch ed m y arm. "The surgeon, sir)" h e sa id "asked me to get There's a passenger wh o s shot him self, and h e's askin' for you." From the b:=d in the surgeon's room) Talbot, with shocked, g laz ed peered at me. H e was propp ed up a g ain s t a pillow) and his s hirt

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S 8 THE CARIBBEAN. wa s o p e n. The d octor was applying a sponge ro a l o n g, r e d w ound in his chest. I mus t have e xclaim e d aloud, for the doctor looked lip. H e sellt f o r y o u h e said curtl y. "Fortll nate ly, he's a darn bad s hot. I t isn't seriolls." 1 wa s so tir ed," groaned Talbot, "always 1110V1I1' m e o n. B ehind m e came heavy footsteps; and though I tri e d to bar t hem, two de t ec ti ves pus h ed t h r o ugh th e doo r. The y forced m e to olle side, and t h rou g h t h e passage came the little Jew in the sable coat, i\ l r ..I.dolf .",-Ieck. F o r a minute h e stood starin g, with wide, ow1 lik e e y es at t h e drawn, haggar d face on the pillow H e th e n sank softly to his knee s. I n both o f his hands h e cla sped the hand of t h e card sharp. H eine h e b e gged. Don't you kn o w m e ? It's ),our brother Adolf! Your brother Adolf!" AIR PIRATES. Oscar I-fe' ilbr o ll, )J. ( Thi s stor y w o n firs t place amon g th e F r es hm e n s t ories. ) The large all metal, Ford trimotor monoplane wa s warmin g up i n front of its hangar w h en J arrive d at F ra n ce Fi eld. After signing a few pap e r s, I b oarde d the plane whic h was to take me to Habana, Cuba. Three minute s later we wer e soaring o v e r Col o n at an altitude of 1 0 ,000 f ee t. The co n t inu o u s hum o f t h e thre e "wasp" m otors wa s b eco min g m onotono u s as I sat in t h e s mall wic k e r chair o f the spac ious cabin. The only passe n ge r b es id es myself was a man of s hort stature dresse d in a dark blue suit. About h a l f an h our late r, 1 n oticed that we wer e flying over th e oce an and, a s t here wasn't anything worth l o okin g at, I s o o n f ell as l eep. 1 t seemed a s if 1 had s lept for ages w h e n suddenly I wa s awakened b y a lurc h of t h e p lane. T o my g r eat surprise my hands and f e e t were b ound with a pi ece o f wove n c opper wire. f e \' : seco nd s the plane bucked a s i f out o f control. Thro u g h th e windo w l eading into the control cabin I co uld see the copil o t of th e p l an e strugg lin g with a m a n, whil e t h e pi l o t wa s tryin g his best to kt:e p th e plane o n an e v e n keel. The man, wh o m I had sec:n b e f o r e in th e cabin with m e finall y overpow e r ed the pi l o t s l e a ving them unco n scious. The interlo p e r immediate ly g rabbed h o ld of the contro l s and steered the plane bac k t oward the mainland. After fly in g along t h e co a s t f o r abou t three hours, h e p ointed the plane out toward an island, which I judged t o be aboutJo mil es fr o m the s h ore This see med to be our destination b ecause in the center o f the island there was a large clearing w h i c h served as a la nding fie ld. From the air the place seemed to b e uninhabited, f o r all t hat co u l d be see n was tropical jungles Afte r c i rcling theisland a f e w times, t h e man at t h e w h ee l brough t the p lane t o a landing. A s soon a s t h e p lane landed, we taxie d toward a h a ngar, which had been cunning l y hidde n so that it could not be see n f rom the air. Afte r turning o ff the m o t o r s, t h e stranger s t epped into the cabin and unty ing my hands and feet, h e m o tioned m e t o f ollo w him. H e l ed me into a hou se that stood between the two hangars. A s we entered the h o u se I g lan ced back a n d saw the pilots of the plane b e ing take n away. I nside the building m y captor m o ti o n e d m e to sit down o n a stool which see med t o b e the only article o f furniture in t h e room. H e r e I wa s left al o n e About ten minutes late r, m y captor returned a ccompanie d b y a tall, bearded man The newcomer tol d m e i n v e r y broke n Engl is h that, fr o m now on, I wa s t o consider myself a prisoner o f the n o torious air pirates called t h e Bla c k Haw k s." I wa s taken down through a long co rridor and l oc ked up in a s mall roo m. T h e room was dark, for the onl y light came through a small window on o n e s id e o f the room. I wa s so completely exhausted, that I lay down on t h e cot and soon was fast asleep. About five h ours late r I was awakened b y a man whom I t hought, at first, t o be one o f m y captors. H e proved to be one o f the pilots o f the p lane that had been captured. H e whi s p e r ed to m e to follow him. Vle jumped out o f the window and landed in t h e tall grass w hich surrounde d the buil d i n g. After crawling t hough the grass for a s hort d istance, we met th e copil ot, w h o had b ee n waitin g for us at t h e edge o f t h e cleari n g. About 20 feet from u s stood a trim L oc keed Vega, i t s motor i d lin g as it stood out in the moonlight. The onl y person in sight was a m echanic, who was wa lkin g towar d the hangar. A s soon as w e saw our chance, we made a dash f o r the plane As the l a s t o n e o f u s entered the p lane the mechanic saw u s and gave the a larm, but i t was too late. As we "zoomed" o ff the fie ld we saw two s ingl e-

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THE C.'\RI BBE.-\N. 59 seater fighting p lan es take of r after u s Although w e had a fas t plan e, they soon caught lip with u s and afte r circlin g around liS a few times began to pepp er" LIS with th eir mac h ine gUllS \\"c w e r e h e lpl ess si n ce our plane was unarmed Our pil o t wa s wounded t wice, so I took him to the rear of th e cabin t o give him fir s t ai d whil e t h e co-pilot t oo k th e co ntrol s Suddenly the r e was a great e xpl os i o n and a b linding fla s h and I immediately kne w that Ollr gas tank had b ee n hit I co uld see the pi lot of th e plane fighting the flames in t h e (ontrol ca hin. .-\.5 the p lane f ell out of contro l t h e ear t h seemed to ru s h lip to meet u s Then there was a crash and everythin g w ent black I opened eyes ex p ecting to find mysel f in a qui e t h os pital roOI11 with a nurse at bedside, but instead, t h e r oo m was dark and I wa s lyin g on t h e floor. T o great disappoin t m ent I r ealized t hat it had all b ec n a dream. $torie%. I e THE STUDENT'S N IGHTMARE. Fiuiell Elmgrm, ']2. The r e i s a time in ever yo ne's lif e w h e n his troubl es see m th e g reatest an d his wo rk t h e hardes t. Since I am no exceptio n, this g rievou s time in m y lif e i s during examinatio n s I in variably l e t t h in gs go until the la s t minute a nd t h e n try to strengthen m yse l f f o r the puzz lin g t es t s, Eve r y year I make a re so lution to be prepar ed) but I ha ve never kept it. That i s what happened this year. B e f o r e m e books o f all kin ds whic h I glared at with contempt. I mutte r e d over and over again, H en r y V III of England; Charles o f G ermany; F rancis I o f France M y min d wa s crammed with Englis h ) Geo metr y Latin, and History. I was unawa r e of anything around m e but m y books. Suddenly I became aware of t h e roarin g of the ocean and t h e wind. I was n o longer in my home but on C o l o n B eac h. The m oon wa s full and all t h e stars w e re out. The palm trees stood majes ti c and tall in the moonlight, t h e ir fr o nd s waving to and fro. \\' hil e I wa s w o ndering h ow I came t o be the re, I n oticed a ship in the bay. On observing the ship I discovered it wa s a Spanis h Galleo n. Next 1 h eard \ 'oices and soo n four m e n came upo n m e Never have 1 seen a m o r e pi cturesq u e group. One was a pirate anothe r a court dandy, anoth e r an ancient Gree k and the f ourth an anc i ent Roman. Their faces see m e d strange l y familiar. I The pirate sa w m e first and cried, \Vhat have w e here?" The anci ent Gree k studi ed m e carefulh' and at last said, 1 ca n find out b\' "\\' h y not a s k it who it is? R oman, "The re is no need to ask t h e person," an s we r ed t h e court d andy, "fo r I kn o w w h o h e i s H e i s a m o dern," "No w t hat w e kn ow w h o h e i s, said t h e pirate, "we must introduce ourseh'es." I s hall take t h e h onor," answered t h e d3nd\'. H I am Sir Franc i s Drake; this is t h e great t hi s i s Euclid, and thi s is m\' fri end Julius Cesar." How d i d g e t in t h e ?" I managed to stamlll e r. ":\h!" exclaimed Euclid, 1 worked t hat littl e matte r using t h e right triangle and angl e theorem D o you kn ow if t h e fronds of t h ese palm trees are equal?" '" have told tim es, 'Clid, o l d that the)' were un equ31 w h e n I co nq u e red C o l on." iVfo r g an tol d h im I mu s t t ell you t h e plan I u sed in capturing Panama," Cresar exclaimed F ir s t I sent nl\' r eco nnoitering around t h e I sent m)' airplanes to drop tear bombs on the next step was to tear down the walls; and having accomplis h ed t h e hardest tasks, I o r de r ed my gunners to s h oo t lau ghing gas intO t h e town I next entered t h e cin' in m\' Ford. I t did Ill)' h eart good to see t he' Engli;h lau g hin g

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60 THE CARIBBEAN. had p erformed the almost impossib le; 1 had conquered t h e Englis h. " Y o u must Ict me give YOLI t h e r eal r easo n that the Englis h were lau ghing," b egan Sir Francis Drake ] was residing in the city at t h e time of Ca:-sar's conquest. That nig h t m y friends we r e gathered in my apartment having a jolly time, when we learned that Ccesar had captured Panama. The tear b ombs and lau g h ing gas did not affect LIS, for t h e Engl is h are not e asily conquered. The thing that did break u s and se nd u s into h ysterics was C;esar \\' h en h e entered Panama in h is Ford, t h e people h ow l ed I never expect to see anything funni er. H aw! H aw! H aw! Haw!" and soo n Sir F rancis wa s shaking with laughter. j see nothin g fUllny abou t t hat," C({'sar grumbled ] a m positi ve t hat that palm tree i s unequal to any o f the others; and can prove my reason b y angl es opposite equal s ides. Eucl id declared, speci fing a certain tree. "\\' h o i s interested in your geometry?" rvtorgan complained. I am going to t ell our friend about t h e time e l o p e d with t h e Spanish Senorita. Drake an d I wer e dining with t h e French Ambassador w h e n all o f a sudden O llr dinner was interrupted b y a soldier bringing news that Cresa r had e loped with a Spanish Senorita i n his tin-lizzy I can j ust see J uliu s driving h is rattletrap with one h anci. Bu t they didn't get far, for ran out o f gas a n d the Spani s h so l diers captured t h em." I noticed that was quite angry by t h is time because h e was being made t h e victim of all their jokes. Eu c l id sulked because no one would listen to him talk about geo metry. Drake and I\l o rgan were growin g happier every minute. I gathered all m)' courage toge ther and c ried, "All of you are wrong. never captured Panama. M o rgan never conquered Col o n. The Englis h never occ upi ed Panama) and E u clid can't prove t h e pal m trees are equal. I n fact, YOLI are all liars." The men stared at m e and all began to tal k at once. and Eucli d could h o l d i n t h e i r wrath no l o nger. Morgan and Sir Francis stopped laughing. The n m y one-tim e frie nd s turned o n m e and s oon I would ha ve b een no morl,! if s lldd e nly everythin g had not been s hattered b y a l oud noi se J wok e Lip when I fell oft my chair. ICE! I t was o n a IVIo nday during vacation that I first b eca m e a bit s u s pi cio u s I w a s busy in the kitc h en w h en t h e iceman's yell greet ed m e Ice!" A s usual, I hurried to t h e ice b ox and r e moved t h e butter, t h e pitch e r, and several oth e r articles. I turne d bac k to my work and was occ upi ed full y three minutes b e f o r e I h eard the iceman slam in t h e i ce I turned suddenly jus t in time to see an unde r standing g lance pass between him and the maid. I w ent 011 w i th m y work and t h e maid disappeared into the next room. A s 1 l e f t t h e kitch e n I met t h e maid r eente rin g. I w ent on, not even g l an c i n g toward h e r. 1 had: heard t h e i ceman l eave, and n ow ) wh e n t h e door s lammed again I kn ew t hat s h e, too) ha d left. I\l l y c uri os it y b e in g arou sed I w ent to the w indow, fr o m w h ich I had a clear view of the bac k yard. ] was not surpri se d at w hat I saw and heard "Freeta, m e love I favorin g to see yo u in de nig ht." J im, I don see h ow I se goin' wait 'til de time don' co m e " I see in g you later d en', e h !" I 'se gain'." The f ollowi ng evenin g about s ix o'clock, as w e w e r e dining, I heard a "sisssst. 1 o ft e n hear such n oises so my attention was not attracted. This p eculiar calling sound, b y t h e way) is called the "Panamanian love ca ll. \ V e w e r e ready f o r t h e dessert, s till Freeta did not appear. "Freeta, dessert, pl e ase." No respon se. "Freeta, we are waiting," 1 raised m y vo i ce Still n o r es p o n se M y anger was ri s ing, a s J could not understand what wa s detainin g h er. \ 'Vhe n 1 rem embered, J rose quietly, we n t into t h e kitc hen, and b ega n to serve th e dessert m yse lf. Sounds of vo i ces came t o m e fr o m the yard. 1 l ist e ned. J d Oll co m e e arly, Chiquita, I not having a t'ing to do. " I dOll finis h as yet) I 'se p racti c 'l y don "ahara." \V e finis hed dinner without an y furthe r d i s t urbance The dishes w e r e wa s h e d to t h e t un e of J can't g i ve yo u an y t h ing but love, baiby." A wee k late r a t o urist frie n d o f min e expresse d a desire to v i sit native dwe llin gs, in order to get a

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T H E CAR I BBE -\l\'. 61 glimpse of h o w li, 'c h ere in Panama. I t was o n a afternoon during o n e o f our sightsee in g walk s that w e passed a churc h. Some s pecial wa s going on wirhin. \\'c entered and seated o llr seh-es 011 the p e w whi c h is l e f t vacant f o r visitors. The strong odor o f \ 'arious p e rfulll es whi c h came to u s made liS breathe \Y e l oo k e d about LIS T he church wa s over-decorated with white A O\\'ET S and ribbo n s There wa s a bu stle and :1 confusion not u s ual in it churc h. S uddenly a h u s h came over the congre genion. T h e church wa s crowded, and the incre a s ing odor o f inc e n se and c h eap p erfumes becam e quite unpl e a sant. The organ a f e w n o te s and the silen ce be came m o r e c \ id cnt. T h e c h oir joined the organ; then the wh o l e m o b rose and sang regardless of the fact t ha t \'ery f e w b oo k s could b e see n. :\s the hymn ended and the peopl e sat down again the organ began H e r e comes the bride," "Do r e ali ze," I whi s p e red to companio ll, "that W e are witllL"ss ing a marriage ?" '\"o\\', fr o m my o wn ex p e rience with negro maids, I kno w t ha t t h e)' save earnestly and depri\"e themse h 'es of food in order to b e abl e t o dress w ell f o r a wedding, whether it b e t h e ir o wn o r the ir neighbor's T hey save f o r m onths The ir r eward com es at last wh e n t h e o f t h e big e \'ent arri\'es, Then deck the m seln:.'s in all t h ei r finery and strut to churc h. T h e m e n w ear bla c k tuxedoes, tall si lk hats, and w hite g O\'es The w o m e n ha\'e the most expen si\'e quality of materi al in thei r clothes. \\'hite is a fav orite color, whil e reds, blues, and gree n s a r e seco nd. This wedding wa s a o n e h eard t h e process ion entering trom the bac k ot the c hurc h so I turned t o ge t a clear view o f the bride and "lucky groom." The bride wa s dressed in a lon g roo-full, w hite dress, Her very l o n g \ 'eil trailed on the ground. I n h e r arms s h e h e l d an imme n se bouquet trimmed with big white bows. T he groom was a s fin e ly dressed a s hi s bride. H e w o r e a suit of white stripell flann e l tro users and a l ong black s wallow-tail coat. H is black s h oes s h o n e and g l eamed as the light r eflec ted on t h e m. ,-\s the procession neared 1 turned t o see the face of the blushing bride It was Freeta! One t h ought c allle t o m e "\\'ho was the groom?" Again I turned and faced thegroolll t ht:: iceman. F I RE f/flrry F.golJ I t was midnigh t all was quier, when s uddenl ),. both o f the hard-worked nrt'lllen uf the CaHill station were awakent:d t h e sound of the fir e gong. The call c alll e from b ox 27, at t h e .-\ gll:l Clara Pump Station. The person a t t h e hox rang: the hell a s if all h e r gouds wel'l:.' going up in s m o ke T he fir e m e n tried to start t h e tire engi ne, T h e F o rd refused, so pushed it to t h e edge o f a hill wh e r e it was starte d lettin g it roll. The truck went itt its full speed of 15 mi les an h our, until it came to a steep hill where it stalled just as it r e a c hed the top, The fir e m e n, with the h e lp of a so ldi e r, pus hed the t ruck O \'el' tht' brow, and then the brakes refused to function. The man ciri\ 'ing k ept a t t h e horn, theorher man rang the b e ll. T h e road to the pumping station turned otf the main r oad at the b ottom o f the hill, but t h e car w ent straight past the turn. T h e firemen ha d to go a quarte r o t a mil e (anhe r hefore could co m e ro a stop, then turned and starte d bac k, reac hing t h e fir e plug without mi shap, Sudde n!), the r e wa s a scream fr o m a h Ollse built bac k off the road, The fir e m e n attac hed the hose t o the plug; ulle Illall started with t h e ho se toward the h o u se, gi\'ing the signal to turn o n the wate r as h e ran, .-\ tir e hose n ozz l e can be regulated so as t o send s ize stream of water desired. .-\t t hi s t im e the nozzle wa s clo sed, \\'h e n the sudden pressure reached t h e hose, i l burst, wate r going all O \ 'e r the lawl1. .Illst then a woman ru s hed out t e lling the fir e m e n to lea\'e the hose and run to the h o u se The fir e m e n picked up two hand extinguishers and ran. l oo ked for fire, but could not see flam e o r s moke. Again t h e w oman sc reamed and ro a ladde r l eading to rh e roof. The fir e m e n, thinking the nre wa s o n the roof, climbed the ladder, Still no s i g n s o f tir e .-\ v oice from b e low cried out, I t's all t h e strip of tin along the peak o f the roof." T h e firem en looked again and what s h ou l d see but an o l d cat) which ha d climbed a tree adjoining the house, and wa s afraid to climb down, T h e noble fir e fig hter s sa\'ed the (:at, wen:: thanked the w oman, and b('gan h o m eward s rruggl e

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62 T H E LOC KS. Allene Deakins, '3? (Prize poem in poetry contest.) Far ahead the tunnel winds, As the night-watch makes his rounds, i\1am' things come to his mind he listens for the sounds Of the distant ships approaching. Gates will open, gates will close, :\nd the water as it changes F rom each chamber, roars and Rows. B ells will ring, a whistle blows, Voices s hout to those below. Little thought comes from the docks Of the mighty power of the locks THE L UCK Y ONES. Edward Conk/illg, )1. (Second place in pONT,' contest.) The people on the billboards, They have lots of fun; They smoke a certain cigarette And all t h eir goals are won. The\' never fret or worry, always bright and gay. u se the right electric range An d their work be comes as play. T he people on the billboards Wear everlasting smiles, They always pick the tire that lasts Some ten thousand miles. They alway s choose tobacco That can not bite the tongue, And the soap that keeps the woman's face Always fresh and roung. I 'm glad that on the billboards Life i s full and free, Be cau s e along the public roads There is little else to see ACCOMPLIS H MENT. Crawford Campbell, )1. W e Ir\! hard to accomplish s omethi n g than to be fed; If our live s arc:: fals e and s hallow, Wh en we die we s hall be Dead. THE CAR IBBEAN T H E SC HOOL B E LL. (Or : What Poe Forgot to Mention.) Elsie' D(lrley, 30. (Thir d place in poetry contest,) H ear the tolling of the bell w r etched bell! What a dar of tiresome toil it's noisy clangs foretell! How it beckons, beckons, bec k ons, in T he sunny morning air T o our L atin a n d O U f P hysics And OUf English and our Civics From delightful daylight fair! H ow we hasten lest we're tardy when we hear t h e second knell Of t hat bell, bell, bell, bell, bell, When we hear the second knolling of the bell! A POET T O HI S G I RL. II / illiam Newman, '30. (ON SECOND TH01.iGHT.) (As interpreted Fitty.) I'd fight for you, I'd spite for you I'd sit up all the night for you I 'd fuss for you, I'd cuss for you, I 'd smash an omnibus for YOll. I'd read for you, I 'd speed for you, I'd go without my feed for you I 'd row for you, I'd go for you, I 'd spend all of m)' dough f o r you. I' d ride for rou, I' d s lide for you, I'd give up all my hide for you I 'd toil for you, I 'd boil for you, I'd eat a peck of soil for you I 'd err (or YOtl, I 'd lie for rOll, B UT D A R N ME I F I'D D I E F O R YOU

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T H E LETTER E /;ie Dar/t')' Jo. John Brown W:lS :t soph omore, Not eliA'erent fr o m the rest, Except thnt girls TO him were juSt :\ lot of wretched T he reason (or thi s attitude I shall proceed to tell For ere thi s re aso n happened John thought that girls were s well. One girl t o him wa s all the w orld ; Her name wa s Lila Crutc h. She w as his Greta G::rbo and H e worshipped her such. But L ila Crutc h wa s popular And rather indiscreet; S/u treated him as n othing But t h e dirt beneath her feet. T he look s he gave expressi n g love She did not deign to see ; H e tried to spe.l k his p.lssion But not all elf lent s he. One day, idling in Study H all H e t hought h e d write a n ote; H e poised h is pen, then set abOUT; And this i s what he wrote: "Oh L ila de
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THE CARIBB E A N . -1 SO:"G FROill THE \\"I:" D TO T H E P.-IUI. Virginifl SIr'fr?llSOIl, )0. H e r stately arms s h e stretch es hig h T o both t h e left and right, The sun upon them all da : \nd the moon throughout the T h e gentle breeze L lows thro u g h her l eaves An d whispers t:llc:::. of old; I t tells of king s and riches royal, Of belies and pirates hold. "Columbus,'" whispered first this wind H e sai l ed t h ese oceans, too: H e found t h is land and s t:lrted h o m es F o r p eople JUSt lik e you." "l\lorgan, i\torgan, feared wa s h e," T hen it gently sig h ed. H e slO l e and plundered and he killed On hi s journeys wide." I t whistle d for a litde whil e And tried its best to tell. A breaking:, c r eaking cral>h was h eard, 'Twas only a frond that fell. I t hus h ed and then continu ed This tale of m e n o f old. The Frenchmen were the Ilex t in line; Of th ei r deeds it r eadily told. "They were the first in this g reat land \\"h o tried to dig this ditch. They s laved all night and day by hand An d never did ge t rich." Again i t pau sed to gath e r breath For the SlOr}" it had to tell, Of -\rn erica n s wh o w o rk e d to death, But who conquered th e "livin g hell." T h ey made t h e lake and waterway They f o u ght both land and sea F o r in 19Q, they opened this ditch :\nd set world commerce free." The p a lm rustled, s wa yed wer e still, Breath less. t h e wind went down. I t had told a tale of rnigh t and will, \\"hi c h produce d a w o rld -kno wn town. R ED ANTS. Viv iall Elmgren, ']2. A s I sit gazing at t h e s k y: Watching the clouds pass merrily by. S u ddenl}' Iny though t ... a r e scatter ed : Iwa y B y t h e prickling hite of an in'ect gay. II And l ooki ng down at my kn ee I behold, .'\. nice r ed ant s i tting there so bo l d. I s w ee p him ( r olll hi s c h ose n place, And h e lands up o n a grassy s pace. III Once illorc I return to my wandering thoughts, B ut soo n they are scatte re d now what ? T he place of my dreamy re s t \\'as a nice big red ant's ne s t. Y OU T E LL ,lIm)' D((III, 32. \\' h e n I've a smudg e upo n my f ace You Iell me! \\"hencver my s h oes bec ome u nlaced, You tell me! And if I've gained a pound o r twO; If there a r e freckle s breaking through; I t doesn't nutte r what 1 do-You tell me! T H E S T O RM. Vivian Elmgrm, 32. I. A dreary day, a stormy night, Oh, how t h e win d does fum e and fight. T h e gods of s t o rm to battle ride With dark e n ed c l o uds the sky. II. The rain in torrents fills th e streets, L ik e marc h int! dru m s the th under b eats The sky i s lighted and w e see T h e gods of Sto rm ride to victory. III. \ stillness o'er the land i s sent; A gai n is jar, peace, and content. L ife goes o n with jars and sorrows, But a s t o rm will co m e again l'O-lTlorrow.

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T H E CAR I BBEAN. THE L1n:s. BIIJiI Frtwk, Ex, 'JI. T h e years may comc; the years Illay go; The rains mar fall; the winds rll:Jf blow! The hands of Time mar move quite fast, And many a man be of the past. But, the m e mory liv es on. The memory li\ ,cs; th e thoughts corne back! Ah, t here's the field, and there's th e s hack! The place light s lip as if to s how l'vl e the faces I u sed to know. Y es the memory lives on. heartstrings tug: my eyes grow damp. I hear their voices! J hear the tr:lI11p Of feet as up the aisle ther walk, And I try hard but ca n not talk. Yet their sOllls liv e on! !\I y poor head swims. I can not see! i\l y ears don't hear! What can it be? I'll join thee, schoolmates, in a long, deep s l eep, For the h:1.nd of death s hall make its sweep. But, more'JI come on! T h e seas may roar and mountains fall; ,Citi es crumble; e'en Death mar call, And pals go down in th e cold, d:tmp ground, T h eir so uls on an upward journe}' bound, Still the memory liv es on! NOW, Rose Corrigan. Spahl!. T he world h'aint like it lister be, That's a way it 'pears to me; Cause, with all this modern science i\lan ain't got no self-relia n ce. Now when I was a young f e l ler Sattercia),s, I'd clean out the cellar. But now a days, with 'partments up so hig h, Soon, the kid s 'II have to dust the sky. 'Course when I was young, I'd get p retty wild, BlIt toward these moderns, L ord}', I was mild; I wa S give n a limping in my eighteenth year But now, those whirlin', twistin' aeroplanes i s here. But then 0' course, I'm not complainin' Not fur all th' world do they need tamin' Be cau:.e fur all this modern science T ho se kids have got t h ei r self reliance. 19i.f2-9 BAO;: TO SCH OOL. If/filter H. BUild)" ']1. \\' h ell October rolled around once more, School bells began to toll. \\'0;'" all were there, prepared to work, Wh en the teacher called the roll. T he Freshmen all grew grey with fear Of the horrors to be seen, I f the clippers reve:tied their fooli:.h heads T ill t h ey looked lik e a Boston b earl. The Soph's strutted 'round lik e I ndian Bra ves, Bu t still had a secret fear That the clippers would work on t heir coconuts A s ther did in their freshman rear. The J uniors looked worried, no one knew why, But ther thought of the drastic way That teachers ha ve of Ill:lking them w ork When they much preferred to rby. The Seniors paraded through the halls, All ablaze in their new-found glory, T hen the faculty worked on thelllBut that's another story. Still as a whole they all were there P repar ed to stru ggle h:lrd, For C's and B's and maybe A's, T o put upon their card. SCHOOL. fralter H. BlIlI dy, ']1. This sc h ool term is ending fast, And soon no more will be, \\-e kno\\" next week will be the last Of work, of bells, of geometry. An d when the bst, long bell has tolled, A.nd we leave the well-known h:llls, For rats, for bugs, for snakes to pull The plaster from the walls. Then we'll sigh, and groan, and say, I know that sc h ool is past, But when I t hink of the work and play. I'm sorry it didn't l:lst." But forget the p:lst, it C:lll't come back, think of the times to be, For the spirit of school will never lack A place in our memory.

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66 THE CARIBBEAN. MISFORTUNE. Belding K ing, '32. On 3 hill faf :\\\'ay Stood myoid Chevrolet, I ts top was tattered and torn; I traded it in For an o l d Ford coupe : \ nd saw t hat old Chevvy n o m o re. For a year and a day Ran the old Ford coupe T ill at last, one day, it broke down, Then the junk man s:lid H e'd gin it a bed. And now I am w;llking to town. CALAM ITY H oward Kunart. ']2. The boy stood in the bath tub, All covered up with soap, R ocki n g gentl y to and fro, For h e wa s o n a boat. i \ woman came walking down the hall, When all of a s udden s h e fell The bo) grabbed up a bathrobe, And stammer ed, "What tht. \Vell! The woman turned up her n ose and sa id, "Oh, suc h language vile." The boy then said, "Well p l ease ge t out, And stay out for quite a w hile." 1 $ me $ee 3lt. THE L U R E OF T H E TROPICS Elsie Dar/e)', 30, and Del/a]. R(/ymond, )0. No one w h o has n o t actually lived the r e knows what i s meant b y the lure of t h e tro pic s Only those wh o have liv ed in the magic zo n e long e n o ugh to make it the ir h o m e have experienced t h e magnetic p o w e r whic h makes th e m want to return afte r they have l e ft. Notwith standing their assertions to t h e contrary, it is the mysterious c all o f the tropics t hat lures them back. Perhaps it is s p ea king too broadly to s a y, t hat everyone upo n arrival is immediatel y enamoured o f t h e place b ec au se t h e r e are many peopl e w h o develop a d i s lik e for th e country and l e a ve b y the next boat. I t may b e b ecause t h ey can n o t adapt t h e m se l ves to a difi'er ent typ e o f lif e. But there i s no m ed ium. The place is either loved or hated. The r e mu s t b e something whi c h makes the tropics so favorable I s it t h e jung les that sur round us? I s it t h e rainy se a so n with its sudden, breath-taking downpour s? P erhaps it is t h e happy-go-lucky l ife about t h e th e tropics t hat i s part o f t h e lure. P erhaps it i s because Panama is progressing so rapi d l y and is gettin g to b e a bi g p lace' in the world May b e so m e day so m eo n e will have t h o u ght it all out. HI STORY OF PANAMA AND COLON. Maoi; Thi,. /wa// '30. Panama and Colon, gateways to the great Canal, w e re establish ed long befo r e the oceans w e r e united I n fact, in 110 m o re than a century after the d i scovery of the New World, both o f these town s w e r e important in romance, explora ti o n, and comme rc e. Afte r Columbus had sai l ed a long the coast o f w hat i s n ow Panama, a host of other Spaniards came establis hin g th e lit tl e settlement of Darie n. U s ing this as a base, Balbo a explored the jungl e, and finall y, fr o m a hill in Darie n saw t h e great Pacific. The settJ e m en t w h ich became known a s Panama, however was n o t establi s hed until 1 5 1 9 This name Panama i s a native name meaning "One w h o fis h es in river o r ocean." Later on, in 1 538, t h e "Real Audienciade Panama" was establis h ed This govern ed t h e territ o r y far north and about 100 mil es south A s oth e r settle m e n t s grew up and co lonists arrived l e d b y the s tori es o f gol d and tre a sure, a n imm e n se t r affic grew. Finally fr o m a mere path t hrough t h e jungle a "camino r eal" wa s construct ed a c r oss t h e Isthmus The t erminus o n the Atlantic s id e wa s P orto B ello, whic h figured g r eatly in shipping, al so

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THE CAR 1 BBEA N. This prosperity incite d the envy o f the Englis h and Europeans Sir Franc i s Drake raide d the se ttl e m e n ts many tim es H i s body i s s aid t o b e buried in the bay o f the town which is now C o lo n. I t was H enry Morgan, however, who completed the entir e destructio n of Panama, in 1 67" Only vine cover e d walls and half ru i ned bridges r emain to -day of thi s tOWI1. \ IVhen the Spaniards built up the ir n e w town they c h ose a rathe r high and ro cky p enins ula. A great stone seawall, whic h i s s aid to ha ve cost $1 1,000, was built f o r d e fense against furthe r attacks. l V Jost of the se awall r emains :\n attractive walk o r rrollle naci e ha s been made o f it, and it ha s been nam e d "La B oveda." The h Ollses were built o f stone with windo w s hig h above t h e ground. The streets were narrow. The dungeons, several of whi c h may b e seen to-day, w ere horrib l e A s years went by, Panama gre w but s lowly. T h e first great m o v e toward its progress was made in 1 855 when the two towns at either coa st, Panama and Colon (the n Aspinwall) w e r e united by rail. The financing and building o f t h is long-needed railro a d was done by J\meri cans, among whom were \ Villiam A spinwall and J ohn Stephens. The work was accomplis hed afte r fiv e years of difficulties and dange r s I VIr. Aspinwall was also the l eading spirit in the establishment o f the trans-Pacinc line o f steams h ips and the Pacinc Mail Steamship Company. The n came the Frenc h attempt to build a canal. F o r seven years the work went on. But disease, waste, and t h eft finall y overcame this enterprise and the work was finally discontinued. The United States realized t h e possibilities, o r in fact t h e need o f this waterway, and they purchased the rights of t h e Fre n c h compan y T hi s time the work was carried through and in 1 91...j. the great way was opened. T h e sanitation, whi c h had bee n a vital factor in the building of the Canal, was also completed by the United States. Col. \Yilliam C. Gorga s was appointed chief sanitary officer, and unde r h is strict and efficaciolls inspection, Panama became a h ealthful place The Republi c o f Panama i s divided into nin e provinces. Panama and Col o n are under control o f the Panam:lnian Gove rnrn e ni:, although they are within the area of the Canal Zone. Each province h a s its "gobernador" under w h o m are the lesser officia ls, alcaldes, who wit h the "col1cejo" Illuni cipal, govern t h e towns and c i ties. P3nama City i s t h e capital, and therefore t h e h o m e o f t h e Pres ident, the seat o f t h e A ssembly, and the residen ce of local offic ial s T H E POPULATION OF PA NAMA. ".//1. I/armQ", '.;1. The toral population o f the R epublic o f Panama exceeds 450,000 p eo pl e This, o f course, does not include those in the Canal Zone itse lf. Of this populatio n the whites o r pure Spani3rds make up 6 0 ,000. The total numbe r of hal f lndian and half white i s som ewhat g r eater than 200,000 p e rs o n s The n eg ro es, whi c h come to Panama from difterent parts o f t h e \\'est I ndi es, n o w numbe r m o re than 100,000. The r e are approximate ly 50,000 1 ndians in Panama, the San Bia s rribes b e in g the most important. Strange a s it may seem, t h e r e are over 5 ,000 o f the yellow race in Panama. These people however, do n o t go into the inte ri o r so muc h but are centered about C o lo n and Panama City principally. A f e w h o wev e r, take t o gardening on a small sc al e T here are 75,000 for e ign e rs o n the I sthmus and 1 0 ,000 m o r e m e n than w o m en The populatio n of Panama i s w ell over 70,000, and is twice a s large a s its n earest rival, C olon, which has a p opulatio n of slightly more than 35 ,000. RESOURCES OF P '1NAMA. '{" fll/er /{lik ings/ad, '.;0. Only about three-eighths of t h e of Panam3 i s occupied, and of this area but a small proportion i s properly cultiv3ted. The United Fruit C ompany has about 35,000 acres elevated to banana rai sing, t hi s being the most important cultivated product. Every tropical product may be grown to perfection, and in the hill s and m ountains prac ti cally all fruits 3n d vegetables of t empe r3te ZOlleS may e a sily b e raised. There i s n o reason why Panama s h o ul d not produce enough fruits, vegetables and othe r a gricultural products to t h e entire R epublic, and t h e Canal Z one in addition, and yet, nearly all t h e vegetables and fruits used on t h e Z o n e are im -

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68 THE CARIBBEAN. ported; and a lar ge part o f those so l d in Colon and Panama City are brought f r om other COUll tries Other products besides t h e banana include co ffee, cocoa, coconuts, sugar, tobacco, and' various dyestuffs and medicinal products. \V it h t h e presen t program o f r/1o(or roads penetra ring t h e interior, there is no reaso n why a good living should not be made by agriculturists in Panama. In rhe o ld Spanish co lonial days, cattle raising was the c hief industry aside fro m mining, but to-day there are not ove r 200,000 h e ad o f cattl e in the entire Republi c. Scrawny, p oo r, to u g h cattle are t h e r esults o f ve r y little attention given to breeding. Good h orses are not raised in t h e Republ ic, but fairly good native p onies are. The majority are miserabl e, undersized, t h in and weak. iVl ules are scarce and very h ig h priced Estimates p l ace t h e total number of h orses and mules in Panama at about 40,000. Around the Perlas I s l a nds t h e p earl fis hin g is very lucrative but it is not carried out to any great extent. The waters o f Panama t ee m with fis h, but the present fis heries do not fill all o f t h e demands of the cities and of the Z o n e. Panama possesses nearly ever y common mine r al except coal, but they are sca rc e l y min ed Among them are granite, limestone, copper, iron, lead, mica, nickel, oi l, silv er, tin, and go l d I n the o l d Spanish days, Panama was sacked b y pirates for its gold, and gold is still found in t h e famous Darien mi n e and in practically every stream. Panama i s very rjc h in timber. I n t h e f ores ts are many valuabl e cabine t, buildin g, ornamental, and dye w oo d s :\s a ru l e, t h e valuabl e woods are scattere d and are therefore not so accessible THE BRIDGE O F THE W ORLD. Matlis T/,ir/ wl/!/ )0. Panama, the land o f et(: rnai romance h as had, from days, an important position in t h e w o rld. I n rhe fift eenth i t was named "The Bri dge o f the W orld." This romantic name wa s give n be ca u se P a nama wa s r e ally u se d as a bridge to the ric h, gold-produ cing countries 111 C entral and South Am e rica. Du ring the e i ghteenth century co nditi o n s in Panama b eca m e very bad, and s h e soon lost her name, "The Brid ge o f the World." Very littl e was heard o f Panama until the discovery o f go l d in California, in 18+9. Thousands of peopl e went b y way of Panama, w h ic h wa s the n a veritable p es t h o l e of disease. Panama soo n realized h e r opportunities and built a rai lroad in 1 855 The n t h e "Bridge o f the \\'orld" was again ful fillin g i ts name. The yea r 1903 saw Panama win her independe n ce from C o lombia. This eve n t is ce l ebrated ever y year on November 3, with fiestas and fir e works. Then, in 1 914, the grea t Canal was opened to traffi c by the Am erica n s, and Panama, "The Bridge o f the W o rld," became t h e world's hi g hway in tru t h. Panama has a l so be e n called "The Crossroads of t h e W orld." Sinc e t h e recent development of large airplane stat ions in Panam a, a more modern and l ess romantic name has b ee n applied to h e r "The Cross r oads o f the Air." THE R.'\ILROAD. E lsie Darle)', 30. A co n cessio n was granted to \ \lilliam H. Aspin wall, Henry C hauncey and J o h n L. Steph e n s i n 1 8 + 8 to build a railroad a cross the Isthmus. \ Vork was begun in May, 1 850, and the railroad was fini s h ed b y January, 1 855 The ori g inal rai lroad foll owed the valley of t h e Chagres R iver fro m Gatun to Gamboa, but thi s part i s {ow submerged in Gatun Lake, the Canal itself f ollowing t h e route o f the o l d railroad very c l ose l y. From Gamboa it crossed the divide thro u g h the p r esen t s i te of Culebra, fro m t h e r e through Paraiso and t h e bed o f what is now 1i ra A o r es Lake to Panama. ] t was acquired b y the United States in 190+, but is was not found po ss ib l e to u se mllch o f the o l d road when the Canal wa s built, so it wa s r e lai d to run a lmost par alle l with t h e Canal to the eastward. The cos t of relocati o n was 58,866,393. The present rail road i s + 8 mil es long and run s from C o l on to Panama with stati o n s at l\.10unt Hope, Fort Davis Gatun, i\I onte L irio, Frij o l es, D ari e n, Gamboa, Obi s po, Summit, Pedro Mi g u e l, R ed Tank, MiraA o r es, Fort Clayton, Corozal) and B a lb oa. The rates are hi g h a fir st-cl a ss return costing The c r ossing o f t h e I sthmus b y train takes two hours or approxi ma te l y one quarter of t h e tim e taken b y steamer s.

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T H E C.-\RIBB EAN. S A\, BL\S I\,DL\ \fS. Alia Henle,-, )0. The San B ia s Indians habitate i slands l ess than 100 mil es from C o l o n. These i s lands are s ai d t o b e fr ee f r o m th e lIs lJai ins ec t s o f the tropics, and frol11 wild an i mal s The San B ia s Indians c u ltivate what t hey n ee d f o r t h e m se lv es On t h e mainland c a n b e found patc h es of corn, sligar cane, and rice Unlike most u n c ivilized people, the ir wom e n do little work in t h e fie ld. .-\.lthough t h ese people have been in contact with E uropeans sin ce t h e sixteenth had, until about ten years ago maintaine d rac ial p urity. T h e ir language whic h i s \ "ery si mpl e, co n s i s tin g o f o nly 5DO words, and their culture s h o w s S outh .-\m erica n origin. T h e white Indians are a l so f Ollnd amongst t h e San Bia s peopl e, ou t t h is h a s b ee n caused only fr o m h e reditary albinism. The San B ia s lndians h a ve k ept thei r independence by opposing all f o r e ign settl e m ent. u se d t o take great pride in b o asting t hat n o strange r had ever p assed t h e nigh t 011 the ir i slands 'They are not a warlike race, but have p eculiar b e l i e f s Their wom e n are w ell guarded and sel d o m see n. The San Bia s I ndians are found to b e very i n t elligent and e a ge r to l earn. ha\'e a p ec u liar appearance, h owe \ 'e r, b e in g s h ort and having large b ox-s ized h e ads. have so m e w hat the sam e co lor as the :"orth ;\. merican I n dian. The)' are f ond o f bri ght col o r s, and their dress i s v ery odd. T h e m e n wear cotto n shirts and trouse rs, whi c h by the make t h e m se h-e s The w o m e n wear skirts w h i c h are m ere ly l o n g pi eces o f cloth wrapped around them. a lso w ear rings in t h ei r n oses and in the ir ear s The r wear n o rings o n t h e ir fing e r s, however until are married, and t h e n it i s to w ear t h e wedding rin g. T h e San Bias Indian's love o f color i s b ro u ght o u t distinctly in the ir handwork. T he w o m e n are adept at all kinds of pat terns. They o ften designs from boxes or even flour or sugar sac k s. l\ lany times, people ha\'e b ee n surprised to find that ha\'e purchase d a blanke t made the San Bias Indians with a G o ld i\l edal flo u r o r so m e s u c h pattern w o rked o n it. O\fE O F TH E STREE T SCE\'ES OF COLO'I. Jflmn C. Wood, 32. T h e sce nes on the "calles" and "a\'enidas" of Colon are varied, Ilumerou s and interesting. Peopl e and customs from the world o \'er are represented, although our m o r e fr eq uent street companio n s are Panamanians, .-\m ericans \ Vest I ndians Chinese and Hindus. Of all t h ese sce nes, t h e m o r e local is the ":\Imacell." This (s tore-affai r ) i s a two by f our h o l e cut into t h e wall. are run by \Vest Indians and are therefo r e located in the negr o sections. The r e are m o r e of them 011 B olivar Street than in any other o n e street o f Colon. The l o wly wares so l d in these stores are bananas, coconuts, oranges) bread) a\'ocados (alligator pears), and fried fish. \\'hat a combina t i on; but are sold j ust the same. \\" hen one passes by, the store attendant be see n fryin g the fis h o r baking the bread over the charco al stoves T h e .-\Ima cen" i s really a c uri o u s l ooki n g sce n e B .-\RRO COL O R -\D O I S U N D TIIOIII(/S L. Colt',,,,j,.., jo. During the building o f t h e Canal the C hagres valley was flooded in o rd e r to make w hat is now known a s Gatun Lake. T h e animals, wh o inhabited this regi on, were f o rced a little farthe r back e a c h as the wate r rose. when the lake was full, o f these animals foun d t h e m se h'es stranded on hilltops that were now islands. T h e largest o f these islands in 1923, was set aside the G O\'erno r o f the Canal Zone a s a forest preserve I t i s kno wn a s Barro Colorado, w h ich in E.ngli s h mean s "red It i s about six mil es square, covered with de n se j un g l e and well stocked with animals hunting o r destruction o f tret:S i s p e rmitted t h e r e, as t h e i sland i s to b e kept as a place wh e r e peopl e co m e and see animal s in t h e i r native haunts. Barro C o l orado i s al so t h e h o m e of sever a l scientists who are studying t h e animal s and t h e ir habits. These men l i ve in a s m all building o\'erl ooki n g Barro C o l orado s little harbor. Some o f the animals which inhabit t h e i s land are the coati, a rnember of the raccoon the w e ll-kn o wn porcupine, the s loth a animal so m ewhat r esembling the monkey in

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7 0 THE CARIBBEAN. appearance, the armadillo and monkeys o f all kinds. beautiful birds may also be see n on the is land. Snakes, spiders, a nd all .types of ins ects are found in abundan ce T o me, just t h e sight of o f th ese creatur es in t h e ir native h o m es would make a trip to t h e Barro Colorado well worth whil e CRI STOB.-\L I N 190 + -1906. Del/a Rtl.I'1J1on d, ']0. ] [ seems funny t h ese days to hear of the days in 1 90-+ and 1906 w h e n the first Ame ri can familie s started to cOllle to Panama. ] a lways enjoy hearin g m y t ell a b o u t the times they u sed to have w h e n they first came d o wn h e r e Naturally, for t h e first f e w m onths it was hard to get accu s t o med to t h e ways and m eans of Panama, a fter ha v in g lived in the United States First of all t h e h o u ses w e r e not lik e th ey are now. The few h ouses that the re w e r e wer e on r olle r s and had to be moved fr o m o n e place to anoth er. M y broth e r s u se d t o have a great time tryin g to find o u r h o u se w h e n t hey w o u l d co m e home in th e even ing They would leave the h o u se earl y i n the m orning, and ever y night whe n they wOlil d return they'd b e all prepar e d to go o n the ni ghtly sea r c h f o r t h e h Ollse. T o h ear t hem talk about it n ow it mus t have b ee n great fun to go lookin g for o ne's home ever y night, but I ca n imagine the i r fee lin gs when t h ey had to do it then. There wer e just a f e w white peopl e, but there was plenty of othe r company. The co lored peopl e lived in tents that surro unded th e h o u ses o f t h e whit e peopl e The place was m os tl y swamps, and in t h e e v e n ings t h e r e w e r e many se r enades to be h ea rd. These s e r enades w e r e given not only by t h e co l o r e d peopl e, but b y the frogs fr o m the swamps The sanitatio n wa s impossibl e. 1\1an y o f t h e inhabitan t s died or were deathly s i c k fr o m malaria. The food was not so appe tizin g W I y mother o f ten tells u s h ow s h e u se d to have t o se nd to m y grandmoth e r in N e w Y ork for vegetables and oth e r v i c tual s t hat co uld not b e obtained h ere. The streets w e r e n o t stree t s at all. They w e r e noth ing but boardwalks The r e was even a "main boardwalk" t h a t took you to t ow n (it was c alled the t ow n ) The Governm ent had just started to buil d decent stre e t s, and t hat was o n e reason wh y the h ouses were place d o n r ollers, so as t o move the m out o f the way. The C ommissa r y wa s altogether different fr o m what it i s n ow ] t was n othing but a small s h ack wh e r e both th e w hite and t h e b l ac k peopl e did the ir p llr c h as in g One had to do h is s hoppin g in a hurry b eca u se if h e stayed in t h e p l ace too long h e w ou l d "pass out" from t h e unpleasant odors. The stor es in "town" were not lik e t h ey are now. They too w e r e n o t h ing but tin y s hack s Som e w e re not even s h acks. It certa inl y see m s (unny now, but it must have been rath e r unpleasant liv ing h e r e in those fir s t days GATUN LAKE ON A MOONLIG H T N I GHT. Janus C. Irood, ']2. On a moonlight nig ht, Gatun Lake i s a sight t o see. T h e m oo nli g h t r eflects o n t h e water, a s if to be a s i l very h ig hway stretchin g (r o m s h o r e to s h o r e B o rderin g this si lvery reflec ti o n on either s ide, i s t h e darker water. B oth form a strikin g contrast. Dottin g t h e sce ne are t h e decayi ng trees o f a form e r jungl e standing lik e sentine l s o n g uard duty Farth e r on in the bac k ground i s the m o untaino u s s h o r elin e. L y in g over t h e h orizo n are t h e lazy, b lack clo uds, with t heir edges tinte d silve r b y t h e m oo n. A dead s tilln ess e n ve lopes the w h o l e regi o n. Thi s quietness i s bro k e n b y t h e occas ional bark of the l a k e dweller's p e t dog. The lake is truly a s ig h t to see o n a m oo nli g h t n ight. P EARLS I N PANAMA. Eleanor Fit-:.gerald, ']0 Som e t i m e ago, a boy, w hil e wading a long the s h o r e o f P anama Bay, pi c k e d up an oyster and ( ound in it a pearl w h i c h h e so l d for $3,000 and whi c h the purchase r took to Paris and so l d for SI'2,QC:X:). The ear l y E u rop ean navigators see m ed to have a great des ir e to fis h for t h e pearl bearin g oyst e r and Columbus him se l f had a great inte rest in t h e pearls whi c h the un c ivilized natives possessed

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TH E CAR I BBE AN. 71 T h e I sthmus o f Panama curves a g reat deal and ( o fm s a sort o f h o r ses h oe shape T h e r e are two ocean currents that m ee t abo u t a hundred mi les oA" the co a s t o f Panama. One o f these com es fr o m t h e .-\meri c an co a st, the other comes lip t h e S outh American coast. The meeti n g o f t h ese twO ClIrrents produ ce an unus ual effect 011 t h e tides, causing a rise and fall o f fee t. P e rhaps t h e tides have little to do with t h e oyster but it i s known t hat o ne mav wa l k out far fl :om Panam a C ity on t h e m uddy' botto n o f t h e bay w h en i t i s l o w tid e, and once in a w h ile o y s t e r s mar even b e see n along t h e ground. \Yh o kno w s but w hat ther contain a p e arl of so m e valuc. A b out 50 mil es southe a s t o f t h e s horelin e of Panama are a grou p o f i slands kno wn a s the P erlas I slands The r e are about -J.O small i slands i n all, t h e largest called Rer, o r K ing. I t is not hard t o find so m e way of visiting these historical spots. The s imples t and mos t comfortable method i s t h e s t eam la u n c h alth ough too one can fin d nume rou s s mall sail boats run br natives. The trip takes about fi\'e o r s i x h ours) o r even a w h o l e day, starting early and returning afte r dark. Even t h e n t hat on l y gives a hurried vie w of t h e is l a n d s Saboga, one of t h e i s lands, is t h e place w h e r e it is said t h e p eo p l e liv e o n coconuts, and fis h f o r pearl a s a diversion. T h e fis h erme n o n t h is i s land go f orth at dawn. Eac h b oat contains a few divers wh o are certain j ust w h e r e t h e best r es u l t s are obtained. On e a c h di\'e a diver brings up one oyster. The limit see m s to b e s ix dives w hich co n s id e r suffic i ent f o r a day's work. The Panamanian divers, unlike Illos t other divers, r emain in the water a s h orter l ength o f tim e, bu t make m o r e dives. :\11 pearl di\'ers are s h o rt-li ved. ] n Panama City t h e r e i s an o ld c hurch, buil t b y Spanis h co l on i zers. The towers o f this o l d cathedral are studded with Illot h e r -o f pearl s h ells w hich have been obtai n e d fr o m t h e Pearl I s l al1d fis h e r i es HATS. .\laria Suwart, Special SrI/dent. t ells us in hi s B e l ieve it or n ot," that P a nama hats are not made in Panama. T hat i s true Panama hats so-c alled b ecause t hey are marketed t hrough Panama, are so ld thro u g h out the s h o p s o f C o l o n and Panama at pri ces far b e low those in the States. T h e best hats come from i\l onte Cristi, In E cuado r, but the s hops in Panama and C o l o n pass o ff inferior C o l ombian and Peruvian hars f o r the genuine i\lonte Cristi. The hat, a fine hand-plaited ha t, i s made from t h e young leaves o f a pal m lik e plant native to C entral A meri c a and Colombia. The leaves a r e gath e red b e f o r e and t h e so ft parts are r e moved. The fiber s are soaked in wate r t o r e n de r t h e m pliable The w e a v i n g i s done by hand. The b es t hats are made of a sing l e l eaf and are t h e r e f o r e uniform in and tint. I t is very easy to distinguish them a s t h e E cuadorian hats are started with a circ u lar weave in the center o f t h e crown, whi l e the oth e r s have a square o r squari s h pat tern. T h e quality and pri ce of a Panama hat de p end upon the fin e n ess of the weave, the evenn ess the co l o r, the uniform size o f the straw, o r rathe r palm, the fini s h o f the edges, and man}' oth e r details. The fib e r producing plant and stem l ess c r e w pine, h a s b ee n introd u ced into the Phi lippines, and t h e natives t h ere ha ve become expert man ufac t u r e r s o f t h ese hats The great cente r s o f manufacture of Panama hats are the Celltral Am e ri can states and the countries o n t h e coasts o f n orthe rn and western South A.meric a. R UBBE R flo'.i,ard 1\eOl(I1I '.;2. Rubbe r was first f ound by the 1 nciiall s in t h e \ Vestern H e mi sphe r e \\'hen C o lumbus came over h e found them with rubber ball s Thi s rubbe r would r e b ound w h e n it hit a hard o bj ec t. I t w ould n o t do f o r modern articles b ecause it wa s too soft and had to be mixed with sulph ur. Sulphur was not kno w n t h e n. Rubbe r i s an e l a stic gum made from t h e milky j u i ce o f a number of plants w h i c h grow in tropic al and semitropical regi ons o f the w o rld. The juice i s mil k w hite. First, a v e rtical c hannel i s cut d o wn t h e s id e of t h e tree and then diagonal cuts connecting with this are made o n both s id es T hi s i s called tappil1g. T h e tapping i s done early in t h e morning, and the latex o r j ui ce is gathered a f e w hours late r

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THE CARIBBEAN. 1 f the latex is allowed to stand rhe rubber will rise to the top. But t h e water must be evap orated and the rubbe r coag ulated at once or t h e rubber will be injured. : \ frer the latex is gathered it is smoked. A paddle is dipped into t h e latex and then held over a fire until rhe water is e\raporated, leavin g a thin coating of rubber. The paddle is dipp ed again and again in the latex, and then h e ld in the smoke until a large rubber ball i s formed. This ball i s then cut open 011 olle side and r h e paddl e i s taken out. \Vhen the crude rubber reaches the factory it is fUll through toothed rollers, through which water is running. The rollers break the rubber up into rough strips, and the water removes the dirt and other impurities. The strips are t h en mixed with s ul p hur. The rubber is never m elted. I t may be warmed, but is i s always pressed into molds, not poured in. Previous to 1839, rubber was of very little value commercially because no method o f preparing it for practical us e had been discovered. 1 twas sticky in warm weather and brittle in co ld weath er. In 1839, C h arles Goodyear, an AITterican, d i scovered the process of making modern rubber. Rubbe r is u sed for telephones, bicycles, automobiles, combs, hot-water bottles, knife handles, buttons, etc. I n the tropics, ru bber is taken in crude form and poured over s h oes so as to make them waterproof. This is done only by t h e natives, however. They a l so press it on sack s and make water-proof bags ou t of it. A little whi l e ago, t h e United States sent a representative down to Panama to see about growing rubber in Gatun Lake. The soil was not good enough and so the experiment was dropped. THE FRUITS AND FLOWERS OF PANAMA. Pauline l-ferl1UW, 30. All the tropi ca l fruits of Panama may be obtained in the markets during their seasons, but are high priced as compared to other tropical countries. Taboga pineappl es have the reputation of being t h e best, but some people co nsider the L imon o r Monte L irio pines, the red, yellowmea ted variety, far supe rior. Native oranges are excellent but scarce. The bulk of citrus fruits are brought from Jamaica, Haiti, or California. Apples, grap es, pears, etc., are usually o n sa l e, but are imported from t h e United States weekly l\1anr fruits-bananas, COCOlluts, alligator pears, mangoes-grow wild. Papaya trees are a great fav orite all the Zone and are usually found growing in everyone's back yard. Bananas are universally u sed. The banana industry of t h e United Fruit Company i n B ocas del is t h e biggest enterprise in t h e R epublic. Taken as a w h o l e P anama i s very deficient in good tropica l fruits. On account o f the heavy rains, the vegetation is always green and lu xu ri a nt, and many rare and beautiful flowers are found. Seven ty-five varieties of orchids g row wild with a great number of c%res, and other tropical plants. H ibiscus, oleander bougainvillaea, and frangipani are some of the mo s t common of the plant lif e of Panama N.'\TIVE A:\, liVL\LS, B IRDS, AND FISH OF PANAMA. Elsie N. Don,., ']1. Panama is t h e hom e o f numerous a nim a l s bird s, and fish. :\mo ng the animal s fOllnd here are tapirs, ant eaters, wi l d cats, deer, and many monkeys, stic h a s the red m onkey, h ow l e r s, and the spider monkey. : \ great man)' bird s are found here, among them are parrots, parrakeets, egrets, white h e ron s, pelicans, g ull s, and wild ducks. The most common of these are the parrots and parrakeets. The tourists who visit Panama each yea r buy these parrakeets for young parrots, and are very much surprised w h en they find they have been fooled. The more common fis h found in the waters around Panama are jack, Spanish mackerel, red snapper, tarpon, barracuda, stingaree, blowfis h corbi n a, sea urc h ins, Portuguese man-o-war, and many others of great i nterest. The tarpon is a very good fis h for sport a n d is hard to catch for it is very large in size I n Gatun there is a club for sllc h sport. The P ortug u ese man-o-war is a very pretty fis h, purple and pink in co l o r and i s found along t h e b eaches The barracucla is a l o ng s lender, fighting fis h rese m b lin g a mac kerel and is very treach e rous. If one i s caught a ll a lin e it will fig h t to get away. The barracuda is a native fis h o f the warmer climates.

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THE 73 I tl the r e p t i l e lin e are ( ound p o i so n o u s snakes, all!gator s, crocodiles iguanas, and harm l ess lizards. T h e i guanas are very u g ly and p eo pl e eat the m f o r chic k e n. T h e i guana changes in co l o r duri n g the change o f se a so n s I n t h e dry se a s o n it i s b ro wn in col o r, whil e in rainy s ea s on it c han ges t o a deep g r ee n. The r e are insects whi c h arc poi so nous such a s the p o i so n o u s s pider the sco rpi o n and the tarantula. T h e y are ve r y harmful and so m etimes dange r o u s unless tre ated with an antido t e B e f o r e the Unired States t oo k charge o f the sanitatio n o n the Isthmus, t h e malaria l m osq uito was dange r o u s all places wh e r e wate r stand ancl stagnate are covered wit h o il. This kill s t h e larv a e o f thi s m osquito and fr ees the Canal Z o n e fr e m malaria fever THE COCO'illT. 1 /a!; i J T ltir/'Xtlil. 30 The coconut t r ee i s s ai d to b e t h e m os t se r\' ice abl e tree a n d t h e o n e w h i c h h a s the hi g h es t comme rcial v alu e This w ell b e true s in ce thi s tree b e lIsed f o r food, drink, clothing, and s h e I t el'. B es ides b e in g a se r v i ceable tree, it i s a b eaut iful one. I t is a ssoc iated with r omance ; h o w o ften have Y O ll h eard palms grace ful palms, e t c." The milk o f t h e fruit o r nut o f this tree i s a drink. The m eat p rod u ces oil fr o m whi c h are manufactured butte r, soap, cand l es m e di c in e confe cti o n e r) perfume, and cos metics. .-\ fter the oil i s extrac ted, the m eat i s u se d f o r fodder. The s h ell makes combs, s p oo n s b o w l s and many othe r articles. The s t e m goes f o r furniture and lumber; the l e a ves f o r r oo fs, broo m s mats and bas k e t s : \ m o n g the nume r o u s oth e r u se ful articles made fr o m thi s are ce m ent, vinegar, gum, and y e a s t. Thi s tree g r o w s best n ear the se a in lands o f rains and l11oisrure One o f the attrac ti ve s i ghts of tropical coas t s and i s lands i s the palm tree The tree i s s l e n de r. I t s age i s indicate d t h e rings around the bark. The r e are about two rin gs f o r e a c h y ear o f age i\lany COCOllut trees curve g r a ce full y Thi s fac t b es ides addin g to t h e b eauty o f t h e tree, provides e a sy climbing l\IRI 97U-JO T n B oc a s del Toro, a distant town o f P anama tho usands o f t r ees have b ee n p lanted w h i c h a r e jus t b eginning to b ear. The r e are othe r large pl antatio n s whi c h p rodu ce g r e a t q u a ntities o f nu t s Panama r ecently s hipped m o r e than a mill io n coconuts in o n e m onth. The coconuts p rodu ce d h e r e are so m e o f the finest. are gathe red and marketed the San BIa s lndians, es p ec iall r On the 300 i s lands o f these I n d ian s, t h e r e are about 300,000 coconut trees whi c h y i e l d a co n s iderable p rod u ce e a c h y ear. H o w e v e r, t hi s i s diminis hin g s in ce do n o t r eplant the ir treeS. They are n o t inte rested in dev e l oping thi s but in produ cing e n ough f o r the ir o wn lise On t h e wh o l e Panama i s ve r y a ctive in producing and exporting thi s u se ful produ c t S H I P S THA T COME T O J Ill/US Ct/mpb e l l 'so Upon ente rin g t h e P ort o f Cri s t obal, yo u will be inte r es ted in l oo kin g at t h e harbo r. The r e i s the breakwater whi c h i s a protecti o n a gains t the h eavy se a s during the d r y se a so n. I t wa s made dumping b o ulder s o f r oc k into t h e wate r until i t r e a c hed a h e i ght o f 2 0 f ee t. The r e are two o p e nin gs in t h e br eakwate r but o n e i s used l a r ge r ships T h e within t h e b r eakwate r i s capable o f h o l d in g the wh o l e Uni ted States Navy wit h e a se The pi e r wh e r e ship \vill go to dock i s situated wit h fur t h e r protection a g ain s t bad w eathe r r h e r e are f our large p i e r s made o f co n c r e t e H e r e r Oll will see q uite a numbe r o f ships l o a d in g and unlo a ding cargo The n yo u may a s k "\\'h)' are all these ships h e r e ?" and will find several reason s The fir s t r e a so n i s the situatio n o f Panama. J t has b ee n said that Panama i s situated at the c r oss r o ads o f the w orld The seco n d r e a so n is the p r ese n ce of the Panama Canal with i ts s h o rtenin g o f ocean r outes attrac t s many ocean v esse l s Y our n ext questi o n b e "\\'hat a r e these ships doin g? .-\s in s p ec t the dock s Y OLI c all u sually see a touris t ship t i e d up a t pi e r 6 the n e west pi e r. T h e t ouris t sea so n i s during the winter o f N orth A m eric a. The othe r pi e r s are c r o wded with fre i g h te r s and tramp v esse l s The r e are u sually abo u t t w e l ve o r m o r e 111. T h e majority o f the cargo i s shipped

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THE CARIBBEAN. from smaller ships, w hi c h go to the South and Central A.merican ports, to large r s h ips goi ng to -\m erica o r Europe. \\'henever a ship needs coa l it ties lip at t h e coaling station, but most vesse l s to-day bu rn oi l o r have Di esel engines. The Diese l engi ne is becoming more popular because it is c heaper to run o nc e it has been" installed. The fue l oi l is stored in hu ge oil tanks and almost every day you may see a tanker unloading oil. Statistics a r e publ ished b y The Panama Canal givi n g t h e movements o f ocean vesse l s. They show that during the month o f January, 1 930, a total of 531 s hip s passed through the Canal. T wo hundred and f o r ty-six of t h ese were American s h ips, a n d 125 were Briti s h. Of t h e remaining t h e Dutc h French German, Norwegian, Swedis h and Japan ese ranked from 15 to 30 s h ips apiece. Some smaller countries are a lso represented b y one o r two s hip s api ece. D uri n g the sa m e time, 36 ships arrived at t h e P ort of Cristobal for the purpose of taking car go of some k i nd Some of t h ese transited the Canal but most did not. In co n clus ion, yo u will find that Cristobal ranks seco n d to New York as a seaport o n the Atlantic coast o f t h e Americas. This r e f ers to t h e tonnage of cargo which enters an d clears t h e docks. SEVERAL SUPERSTITIONS. Crawford Campbell, )/. Superstition, like everything e l se, reflects the local color. In Panama we are surrounded b y t h e negro w h ose conversation s are often mOSt enlighten ing; for instanc e co ul d anyone g u ess that t h e flesh of an iguana may turn to butter? One evening, after quarrel ing with a co l o r ed man f o r at l e a s t an hour as t o w h o had t h e bett e r fleet, the United States o r Great Britain, we switched to t h e subject o f eatin g iguanas. I t i s well known in the tropics t hat t h e meat of the iguana is very delicate. The negro just couldn't see that is was possible to eat this meat. H e had never tried it, but knew t hat iguanas were filthy. I f they were allowed to set in the s un all day with sa l t on t h em, t h ey would turn to butter. H e had never see n it don e but seemed to have di rect information o n t h e subject, and co uld no t b e persuaded otherwi se. Taking a hik e in the jungl e, I came upo n fiv e m e n killin g a l a r ge snake, supposed l y a Tomigoff \ 'Vhe n i t had b ee n kill ed and tied to a s ti ck, the ir t h o u g hts natur ally began to wander to snakes. One swor e up and down t hat if that s nake was put in a fire four little l egs would burs t o u t unexpectedl y The others tried to p e r suade h im o th e rw ise, but h e was not to b e p ersuaded fr o m w hat lze k new to b e true. The r e was a little n e w b o rn goat near a n egro's h o u se 1t was a pretty little brow n and w hite kid. i\ 1 y first im p ul se was to stop and p e t it, but I was told t hat if I s houl d happen t o touch it s tail its moth e r would immediately disown it, which wou ld be a terribl e catastrophe to the poor ki d so I k ept m y hands off. I t i s impossib l e to trace bac k the o ri gi n of supe rstiti o n s, but neverthe l ess t hey exist. 1 n fact, t hey are a s real t o the "darkies" as the t h i ngs t hey see ever y day. A n eg r o can make yo u actually s hudder at the thought o f disregardin g one of his pet superstitions. TWO QUEER THINGS. DiltIidGre gory )2. One q ueer t hin g in Panama i s (he b ombe r os They are the firemen "dela Republi ca de Panama. These fir e eater s are dressed in red, with bi g black boots, and they are very proud of themselves. On S unday a person can see the m drilling, l oo kin g like British soldi ers marc hin g up and down the streets. On parades and o n Panamanian h o lidays yo u can see t h e m drilling and m a r c hin g along at night with torch es h e l d hig h above t h e ir heads. I do not know about their ability as fir e eaters, but t hey must be pretty good Another q ueer thing of Panama are the dogs. B efore the American s came h ere, th e dogs and bu zzards were th e garbage gath e r e rs) "caf e t e r ia styl e \\' h e n the Ame rican s came down, the dogs w e re done away with and real garbage ca n s set out. The Panamanian G overnment must love these dogs q uite a bit for their se r vice t o t heir grandfath e r s and grandmoth e r s f o r if yo u hit a dog with your ca r the Governme n t will b e $25 ric h er. These dogs have so many bree d s in them, t hat H e in z wou l d have to stop hi s fac tories. It i s a good t hin g that Chinese do not kn ow about t h e m as t h e dogs are arou nd 157 different varieti es as compared to t h e H e in z 57.

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THE CAR I BBEAN. 75 e l\anbumb. $ THE LIFE OF A COCONUT. Dcl/II RaYlllond, ']0. 1 wond e r if p eople have ever given it a thought h ow coconuts enjoy life S o m e tim es it i s a c ru e l life-especiall y if you ha ppen t o b e a coconut 011 a tree that i s in a r esidential sec ti o n o f Panama. N o w, f o r instance, T was o ne o f the lllallY coco nuts on a coconut tree (o f course, n o t a banana) and this tree t hat I had grown o n wa s planted b y o ne o f the r oads near the Cri s tobal H igh School 011 Colon Beach "Ve il, one day I h ea rd tw o littl e boys who were sitting in the s hade discussing th e cement road that was t o b e built. Firs t of all, m y tree was lik e se veral othe r s planted right on t h e edge of this tar road. These littl e boy s w e r e sayi ng h ow it was going to be just "awful" to see all the coconut trees cut down so they co uld make a cement road, and naturally since th e trees wer e plan ted so near the r oad, they would have to be taken out of the way. Right the n and th e r e m)' f ello w coconut brothe r s and myse l f began to w o rry. The day arrived f o r ( h e m e n t o cut down the trees. There wer e three o th e r trees fro m the end of the road before ou r s A s these t hr ee w e r e cut down, there wer e "skaty-eight" kid s hanging around to gath er up th e coconuts that f e ll. Finall y our tree was cut andbo om!!l f ell with a terrible noise and roll e d over into the grass. All o f a s lldd en I felt mys elf b e ing lift e d lip. A lit tl e girl about seven years o l d wa s h o lding me in h e r two arms, b ec au se, if I say it myself, Twas to o big for h e r one arm. Some little rasca l s o f boy s tried t o pull me away from her but s h e screamed and said s h e'd t ell h e r "mamma" on th e m, so they l e ft me and her al o ne. S h e ran home with m e and I prayed all the way that s h e wouldn't chop m e up and ask h e r mothe r to make pie or a cake out of me. \Vh en we got into her mother's kitc hen, the littl e girl wa s greeted with "\\' h y, Betty, where did you get t hat lovely coco nut?" And, I got it whe n they cut the tree down over th e r e." "\Vell," s aid th e c hild's m othe r "place it o n the table and I will get 'Liza' (the co l o r ed mai d ) to cut it f o r u s and make a coconut custard pie." "But, moth e r r e pli ed the littl e tot, 1 don't lik e pie, so let' s just a s k papa to paint a pretty picture on it and l et's k ee p it a s a souve nir." "All right, darling, w e can do that." That night d ear papa c am e home, and after B etty had tol d him what s h e wanted d o n e with m e, h e too k o u t his painting set and b egan to paint m e all up. So now h e r e I amon a tabl e in th e sitting room, all dolled lip lik e a painte d lad)'. I b elieve 1 have a picture o f a b oat o n m e This kind of lif e isn't so bad, and I'm certainl y g lad I wa sn't cut up like so me o f m y fri e nd s w e r e D OOM Elsi e Dflrit!.l', '30 H e sat th e re, his face drawn and pal e, his hands c l e n c h e d betwe e n his knees in an eA-'ort to k e e p them fro m t r embling. Slowly ... s l o wly ... the hands of th e clock moved on; and to him se rved but to prol ong his S o on -ah, h ow soo n now! t h e b ell w ould ring and. But h e wr e nched his thoughts away from the future and fixed t h e m e l se wh e re H e allow ed his gaze to wande r around his priso n Outside, in g lori o u s fr eedom, bird s w e r e s ingin g .. ,he ) kn ew nothing o f his miserabl e fate His moth e r h e could see h e r s we et} trustful now ... perhaps s h e wa s praying f o r him Little J ackie, lispingl y asking wher e "Big Bruvver" wa s But it wa s t oo late ... t oo late. The b ell rang sudde nly, and, pulling him s elf together with a superhuman effort, th e dumbest freshman picked u p his pape r and p e ncils an d l e ft th e A ssembly f o r his final ex am s

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THE CARIBBEAN. THE BOY'S H ,\NDBOOK. Elsie Dar/e.,', '.;0. I. I f, wh e n yo u a r e a ss i g ned y our seat in the study h a ll, yo u ca n n o t see ove r the t o p o f your des k have seat rai sed ] ( thi s i s n o t s uffi c i e n t, get one o f t h os e big \Veb s t er's Di c ti o nari es and sit o n that. Sam o r Butle r will h e lp you carry i t. '1. If yo u are so unfortunate a s to have to sit in o n e o f t h e large chairs in r oo m 27, do y our b es t and sprawl out in it as mu c h a s p oss ibl e The m o d e rn freshman i s sllc h that it r eq uir es care ful sc ru tiny b y t h e t e a c h e r t o det ermine wh ethe r o r n o t h e i s there (Of course wh e n the t e a c h e r a s k s questi o n s yo u d o o r do n t kno w yo u expand into v i e w o r shrink fr o m sight a s the ca se r equire s .) 3 Start imm ediate l y to primp and g r o om yourself in o rd e r to be vo t e d the b es t-l oo king b oy ( Onl y b e care ful n o t to o ve rd o it, o r the chances are that yo u'll b e c h ose n a s the b estl oo kin g g i rl.) 4. If yo u are c all ed t o the office d o n o t turn p a l e o r p e r spire unne c ess aril y Probably i Vlr. Sawye r s o nly wants t o kn o w the mi d dl e name o f y our fath e r 's co u s in' s aunt. s D o n o t try t o bluff the t e a c her s They are well ve r sed in the p ec uliariti es o f hi g h sc h oo l students and aren't having an y S o, if yo u are a s k ed a q u es ti o n can' t an s w e r, d on't b eat abo u t th e bu s h but s a y, "I d o n t kn ow." This will brin g forth b eautifully sarc a s ti c comments from the t e a c h e r o n th e d e n sity o f high sc h o ol s tu dents in ge n e ral o f fres hm e n in particular, but it i s a quic k an d othe rwi se painl ess m e th o d. 6 The in ve nti ve Freshman will find p l enty of scope i n hig h sc h oo l f o r his g e niu s The r e ye t r e mains to b e inv ented a traffi c r eg ula t i o n sys t e m i n the h all d urin g passing o f c la sses devi ces that will p revent p eo pl e f ro m s ti c kin g chalk in our inkwel l s, b orrow ing our pape r carv ing wise c r ac k s o n our desk s, u sing latte r f o r wa s t e-pape r bas kets, etc., etc. 7 F i nall y, i f yo u are o f the gum-c h e win g variety do no t leave b l o b s of c h e w e d gum wh e r e t h e y are like l y to be sa t upo n. An y a ccident o f t h i s k i n d is no doubt very amusin g to the o n look e r s b u t not so to the pant.:; o r d r ess o f th e victim BUGHOUSE FABLES T lwmflJ C oley '30. I. J\1iss H esse and iVliss Gustafso n n o t bu y ing a ti c k e t to a sc h oo l entertainment. 2, 1\1r. M eye r bawling s o m eo n e out in l e ss than 9 n e-hal f h o ur. 3 ; 'I\1iss Kimbro without a pair o f earrings a ll, bu y ing a tick e t to a sc hool b e n e fit. +, Mr. \ V es t not arguing with so me o ne f o r a w h o l e p eriod 5 J\I I i ss Ru ssell y e lling at so m eone. 6. 1\11'. Sawye r s without a pen c i l b ehind hi s e ar. 7 Mi ss iVloor e l oo kin g untidy 8 iVIr. P e n ce c o min g t o s ch oo l l oo king wide awake 9 I\/Iiss Patte r so n without a "Frat" pin MURDER! l Hflriflll E, Hfll m '32 Y es t e r d a y a s 1 wa s walking d o wn the r oad, the s i ghts ] saw a poor little ant l y ing d ead in the dus t o f th e stree t. A larg e f oot-print surrounde d it. ''''hat can w e do for th e preve n ti o n o f thi s shame ful slaughte r o f harml e ss insects? Eve r y wh ere on e g oes, o n e sees the m p oo r, d ead ants. The h o u sewife s lau ghte r s the m unme rcifull y An d what, d o they d o to h er. They g e t in h e r p eanut butter h e r sugar, h e r jam. H o w littl e that i s t o taking the inn ocent lif e o f a cr eature o f G od! And what d o the childre n do to t h e se innoc ents ? This i s the shame ful fact: They stamp 011 th e m d e lib erate l y I am a shame d o f m y g e n eration. And h o w fri ends, d o the ants harm the childre n? They m e rel y take bites o f their candy or cake wh e n it i s placed wh e re it s h o ul d n o t b e Su c h unme r c iful s lau ghte r i s overwh e lming! And then, the m e n, our d ear fath e r s and e lder brothe r s, tread o n the m o n the ir wa y t o and fr ol11 w o rk. Sure ly, it w o uld n o t hurt the m to l oo k wh e r e {hey are going I pity ants! Are they n o t our f ello w c r eatures? T o t h e Creato r w e "are a s ants crawl ing o n the face o f the earth."

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THE CA R I BBE:\N. 77 THE SENI O R ALPHABET. T is for T U R NFR in sports hard to pass, B.)' a Sen;,,. For TH I RL\\,ALL, the idol of t h e c l ass. A i s for all of LIS, O llr cla ss so d ear, U is (or Useful we hope we all are, \ IVhat sc hool will be withou t us, w e sadl y fear B i s for B IRKE LAND, our office girl clerk, And also f o r BLISS w ho's a l wa)"s at work. C is for C R U jVr, our P r esident wise, For C.-\MPBELL w h o a lways d oes what h e tries, F or CO L EY, too, our e ditor a prize! D is for D ARLE Y, t h e littl e Engli s h lass, For DA 1'5, w h o i s a lways h e lping h e r class. V is for Vice fro m whi ch we are far. W is f o r WHEEL E R and \\ 1 KINGST.-\D, too, F o r \YONG, he's been with LIS (our years thru, Y i s { o r Y o uth w h ich we'll never (orget, Z is f o r Zero-yoll got one, I 'll b et! B EHIN D THE COUNTER A T :\ R m IMAGE E i s (or EBERENZ w h o fr o m typing doesn't rest, SALE. F i s f o r F I TZGER ALD whos e story was b es t. G is for h e r winning smi l e i s seen H is for H in sports s h e i s k ee n, F o r HENTER, s weet Alice, th e Gatlin q u een I is ( o r Ignora nce which we all lack. J i s f o r J un e, o n sc h oo l we'll turn our back, For JOYCE w h o f o r talking has a great knack. K i s ( o r K ommencement-Oh so n e ar! L is (or L eavingw e 'll s h ed a tear. M i s for MUNDBERG our "Sonny 130 \," F o r E LENDEZ wh ose ready wit i s a jo)" N i s ( o r :,\T F,\Y[\ IA.N with humo r so deep, o is ( o r Order which we hate to keep P is ( o r th e P ublicati o n o ( our annual so great, Q is f o r Qu estions we ask at g r eat ra te. R i s for R ."1 YMOND of smile so wide, S i s for STEVENSON alwa)" s on our s ide. RaeB/ iss, '3D. T wa s t h e first w ee k in D ecember! The Girl R eserves had agreed at t h e ir last meeting that would ha ve a rUlllma ge sa l e to h e lp rai se m o n ey to se n d a delegate to t h e States. The girls brought all of their old dresses, their siste rs', mothe rs', and g randmoth e r s ', banquet, Easter, a nd partr dresses, whic h had see n better dars. A few of t h e g irl s brough t some old trinkets, whi c h the "shines" actually called jt?weh)', and a l so a large pile of Victrola r eco rd s. ( I believe the latest was Panama [\/ lal11as.") Some o f t h e girls even bro u g h t t heir big broth er's kn eebreec h es, which h e had haughtilr thrown in t h e "old trunk" s ince h e ha d grown up. Then too t hert was an odd assortment of old toys bro u g h t by some tho u g h t ful person \Y e journeyed down to t h e Silver C lubh o lls e with our carload o f "junk" to start our afore mentioned R Ul1lmage Sa l e "'T was a busr for u s G. R .'s" \Ve arranged t h e "junk" on some tabl es and disp layed t h e gowns by draping them over a few chairs \\'e priced everyth ing kn o win g that t h e "darkies" drew small sa lari es, an d that t h ey seemed to b e long to Scotch ancestry. Dresses were 25 cents each ( b elieve it o r not) Victr o l a r eco r ds, 1 0 ( o r a dime ; m en s coats, 50 cents eac h; boy's kn ee-breec h es, '25 cents eac h; ties (all co l o r s o f the rain bow w ere well represented) 1 0 (or a dime; trinkets, an d "jewelr y)" cents to a nickel. This was no sooner

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THE CARIBBEAN. done when in came a mass of darkness, w h ic h we fully r ealized was our customers flowing in. \Y e, o f course, thought t hat our goods would sell in n o time, as it was so very, very c heap, in fac t we were almost giving t h ings away But -those w o m e n would cast a s ligh t glance over our num e rous dresses, finger 'em, r umpl e 'em m ess 'em (if it was possible to add to t h eir a mpl e suppy of it ) and a l most tear 'em-th at u nique assortm ent of f rocks! F inally a m idd le-aged, fema l e custome r i n q u ired t h e cost o f a beaded Georgette ( s l ightly dil apidated ) gown. Wh e n t o ld it was p r iced '25 cents, s h e said, if yo u please, Wh at! W id all dis here r ippi n 's in de sides? r\1an, m3 dahter cou ldn't p lay mud-pies i n dar d e r e rig!" W e girls w e re actually dumfounded beca use she wouldn't even consider b uying the dress with a l ittl e tear in t h e seam. T h us it happened with several o f our oth er customers, so we finally reduced t h e pric e to 1 0 cents. Yes sir ee! Only one mea s l y dime for any gown on the tab le! Then business pick ed up a bit, but yo u may not be lieve me w h en I say t hat t hose wom e n w ere sl ill h aught), about purc h asing a ny o f ou r goods All t he littl e "darkies" i n S i lver City h a d ass e mbl e d at our f a m o u s R ummage Sal e so it seemed. T hey were all crowded aro u nd our toy division, w h ic h contained one "ric kety-rackety," rusty toy gun, amongst oth e r t h ings. The boys were simpl y wild about it but not one of 'em h ad a nickel w i t h w h ic h to satisf y t h e i r l ongi n g. One of t h e most ardent ad mir ers of t h e rusty toy g un had a 2? cent piece and a pen ny, so we sol d it to him on t h e sly. H e made "whoopee" ga l ore a f ter t h e happy exch a nge, i m i ta ting T om l\1i x and "Buf f a l o B ill." A s for t h e Victro l a reco rds, eac h and everyon e o f 'em h ad to b e p l ayed on t h e C l ub h o use Orthop h on i c be f o r e we coul d m a k e a sing l e sa l e Even th e n t hey w e r e hesi tant a b o u t any r ecord over two Illo n t hsold, w heth e r Gen e Austin, Rudy V allee, H ele n K a n e, or "what have you? At t h e e n d o f t h e day us "G. R .'s" were co m p l e te l y ex h a usted, as i f we' d just p layed a stren u o u s ga m e of baseball or t h e like. B e l ieve i t or not it was work trying to sell o u r carefully selected "junk" to t hose impudent "sh ines," trying to under s tand t h eir B ajan" talk a n d answer t hem in t h e same l a nguage. T was no wonder t hat we f e lt lik e "The Heck o f t he W resperus" at t he close of da), Bu t 1 0 and be h o ld! I n spite of our reducti on i n p r ices 'n everyth i n g e lse ta k e n into consideratio n we p r ofited by only $6. 37t. H owever, we all un an im o u s l y agreed t hat th e barrel s of fun we h ad we r e wo r t h t h e t im e a n d troubl e. ( I'll j ust tell you i n str ict confiden ce, t h o u g h t hat t h e gir l s don't seem to be over a n x i o u s t o have anoth er o n e right away. )

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THE CARII3I3EAY 79 II; !Ii DEER SLIM. (i) ,\/flQis Tllirlum/!, ')0. e !I: D ee r Slim: Di d ya noris w hat I n o tized t h i s Illornin? Tom C o ley cum t o s kul e wir a black eye an' h e sez h e wa s skatin' o n t h e r ice T ell me, h e Illusta b e n lie n C lI Z thei r ain'r 110 ice ta skate o n down heel', besi des if h e f ell o n t h e \Vud h e knok his Na) hi s eye wud b e awrite, onl y h e w ucln'ta b en abl e ta s iddowll. 1 writ a pome f o r the erybeen. T ['S a swell wu n-reel illt e lechal -like CliZ J 110 t hat's whut t h ey lik e to reeel-about [ha 11100n and the pa l m treez 1 wudda let r eed it I don wall nobudy t o see it till it cums o u t in the K erybecn. Their' s gOlllla b e a o preta by th e G l ee ClubI gues t hats all tha singin' whut] been heering, but liste n ) Slim, by l esscnin t o 'elll s ingin every day I 'll save 75c -l\Ioozic i s moozi e, I sez, if ya heer it in sku I e fur nuthin', o r at t h e theayter fur 75( Didya see t h a knew g url in skule too S h es sum peac h. I wa l k s up ta h e r and 1 Sfl., } f I k e n h elp ra," I sez, "jus l emme no," I sel.. \Y ell, Slim, s h e b l inked thos lamps at m e and sez, "Thank you" reel r efined lik e Y a no-seem s to me, weer gettin' too old ta go ta s kul e with o u t a ty all so begillin tamorro I'm gonna ware wun. That gurlh e r names H enretta i1 e s its rite in frllllt ame, ya n o \Y ell, I gotta St L ty my Jezon, see ya at t h a ball gam e Yur s til Gatun locks, SHORTY. Thursday, l 1 1 nrc/i 27. Deer Slim: I hu v b e n e n valved e n a grate mi stry w ie h haz b e n takei n g up m y time. 1'a no, I'm gain ta b e a detectif wh e n I g r o up so I t hat I Illit e uz well begin a n praktis know. \Y ell, sum purSUIl, I 've deesided its a wuman, haz ben ieevin g misteeriyus pakugiz o n a certain teechers desk. I wu z not a skt ta take up thiz caze bu t I'm doin it fur prakti z Any way, az I wuz s a r in t hi z haz ben gain o n fur kwite awi e Tha furst t hing ta doo, uf corz, wuz ta fine t h a kunt ints of t h a pakige. :\ detecktif haz ta b ee very karful uf ulln o wn t hin gs so I tuk kare wen I opul1d it. Y a never kin tell it mite uf had a b a m in it. An r wud uf hated ta see one uf m y teech e r s blowedup. I o pened it an found a b i g suprize 1 t was a swetl piece of kake an boy, i t was g u d Uf co rz, I saved a cupla krlllll s ta u ze az evidun se but 1 didn't see know se n z i n s a vein t h a h o le p eezufkake D a yoo? I hav ben werkin on thiz kaze fur m e n y weaks an its still a big mistry ta me. Evry mornin 1 open tha kapidge karful y. Y a never kll o w wen fin e a b a m ya know. I hav dun a lot a hevy thinkul1 and I 'be kUI11 ta tha kuncloozull that thiz kril11e haz ben kumitted b y a wumun. Tha m o tif, ya n o every krime haz got a m o tif, i z that s h e i s inamoor ed t o h im (the abu v ll1ellc h olled teech e r ) 0) I furgot ta I hav a box uf evidunse ( krull1s) ta uze aginst t h a krimullul. I hurd that a bunch of inspecturz lIf s kul es is kumin downheerpurtysooll tainspek t thizskule. I wunder w hat ther'll do ta us. \Yell Slim I bet aftul' get heel' t heir will be sum goi n s OilS, ez I i\lebee we'll ha\' to ware k oats ta sku I e But I can 't. i\I y i\I a wudn' t let me ware m)' koat and m y uther u z in t h a wash. \ Y ell) a s tha o l e sarin goez "don't kawnt yure chic k s beef o r t hey hack." Thiz meens, dun't o \ 'er t h i ngs beef o r t hey happin. G Lisun, Sli m e f ya wan ta practis detectif w ork with me, t hat the r e kake i z big enuf fur too. Y ours mizteeru s ly, SHORTY. Tusday, J\Jnrc/i 29. Deer Slim: The ir haz bin grate eggsitemunt in this town sinz Fridy. Fridy nite about 1 0 ..... 0 t h ei r wuz a erthquak heer and it wuz terrbl e 1 tell ra, Slim I wa s sleepin and d reemin I wuz o n a bote and I waked up and sure nuf ef my bed WUZl1't

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80 THE CARIBBEAN. just p itchin'. A cours I new it WllZ a erthquak so I run ta my ma's rum. 1 wuzn't sc aird n o r l10thin but I wanted to see ef s h e WlIZ awrite, ya n o An' everybudy WliZ screemun and h ollerin' and tha ladeez wuz in t h e street wit t h e r e n eg l e geez on and boys, my hart WliZ jest palputatin. I red in the paper s and it says that 1\1r. K erkpatrik says thei r ain't gonna be 110 more earthquaks for a whi l e al1l1)' way, ta bee on t h e sa f e side I make spec hul menchon in m y praers lIf e r t hquaks. An' anuther thin Col o n's gettin to b e a reglur Chikago. Their wuza b i g h olduppl\1undy mornin' and i t wuzn't nobudy's suspender s n either. Too men what had sum glazzs on robbed bout a thouzand dolars from too other men in tha street. It was brawd daylite to at 1'2 u 'c1o k and tha men hay run away and can't b e fownd. An tha grates eggs it emunt uf ai-Mr. Sawyers cu m ta sku I e this m o rn in' with a knew suite, an I goz up ta h im an' 1 sez "Pinc h eez, Mr. Sawyers, but frum tha luk uf hi s faz I g uez h e don't n o what "Pinc heez" m ee n s. Ya no, Slim t h a g l e a club I wuz tellin' ya bout be e for; well t hey had t here pikehurs took yestiday and we wuz watchin them and t h ey sur did luk sappy. The fleat haz go n I wu z s itin in ma rum today studin' m y hister y and lukin awt tha winda and I notised tha bay luked awful bare. Then I remembu d that it WliZ CliZ th e m I m ee n t h ose bade ships weren't t h e ir. They sur did luk perty owt their. An' at nite wit all t h a lites on them, the y luk e d lik e a bi g sity. An' thoz salors were nize two t hey g i ve m e a cupla hats an S o c. Y e h, S lim I lu v ta see tha fleat cumin' in. Are ya gai n to tha moveez tonite ta see T o m .Mix in t h e Bu c kin g Bronko That's gonna b e a swell pitc her what 1 meen, I'm goin g. S'along, SHORTY. Deer S l im : \ ,Vell, I hadda chanst ta s how o ff my enteligunz y estiday. Thoz inspekter s whitchl wuz t e llin' ya ahowt kum ta skul e & gived a inteli gunz t es t They w ent r ownd ta all t h e rume s & choz sum kid s "Ve il, w h e n 1 seen them kllmin J put o n a brite e g gs p r e s hun on rna fase & it wurked cauz t h e y c h o z me ta tak t h a te st. I n fact, t h ey eh o z all t h a brile kid s ya n o Any wa y tha t es t wuz eezy. It asks ya, I z a man alwaz, uzally, never o r rarly s horter thun hiz wif." Well Slim, I buleeve that ladeez like ta mary m e n s h orte r t han t h e m so as the n kin b oss e m r ow nd so I sez "Men are alwaz s horter than the r e wifes." That's wo n rite any wa y o yes, an anuthe r eezy wun waz this wun. I z a boy u z ully never, a lwaz or rarl y more inte llijunt the n h iz Pa. That's eezy tha a n se r i s "alwaze," huh? Thoz in spekturs m ezured our s ku I e and gave u s exams an t h e r e kuming bac k in a cupla weaks. \Nun o f owr tetch ers wu z so eggsite d t h e t s h e put on a vary patryotik dres tha day t hey wa s sapozed to kun allred & white & blu e striped. But they never kame that day. I hurd a gude joke yestiday. One guy-I m ee n f elle r says to anuther, Didja ever heer the '''Ungarian Razz b e rri es ?" And the other wun sez, "Yes, but t hat's eyebrow m ooz ik ain't it?" Funny izn't it, Slim. I wuz r eeding a "True Story yestiday-Yeh, m y r eport card-an' boys! I wu z selabrating too. It wuz vary patryo tik! True bruthe r, true. I guez I 'll haf ta put on ma b es t mane r s wh e n I tak that card home ta nite. I lurne d t h e rite way ta e n d a letter last weak. I'll try it owt on y u. Awate ing for yure answer I r emane Yours truly, D ee r Slim: LAWRENCE (Shorty f e r s hort). I wuz pass in buy t h a s kul e tha uthe r nite an' I hurd a terribul rakett goin on in s id e I wuz thinkin it mita be n burglurz so in I walks. Acorz, I went vary quitel ik e so'z not ta d izterb thum an' I peap ed into WUI1 rume and Iowan b ee hol e I saw a bunc h uf Seenyors jumpill rownd ye llun an makin funy fac es A man wuz thare to wachin them an' h e wuz l afi n 1 t wu z fun y So I b eg in ta laf two. I tryd and tryd ta think whut th e m wu z d o in but I kudn't imajin. Aftur about IS minutes I sudenly r e m embud thet it mus t b e that them wuz pl'aktising fer t h e S ee n yo r play. I t sur i z g ude tho-an' fUlly w h y t hey wuz almozt dieing of i afin t hemsel ves Wunpart i z spechieally komi e al. Thiz ladee, see i s fun y. S h e ee t s su m kake an' al o f a s uden.

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THF. C-\RIBBE!\:". S I \\'ell 1 guez it wudll'( be rite ta (ell ya That \Vud be spillin tha oce n s But I jus aclviz ya ta sec that p lay, that's all. The Fresheez are givin a big blow -out (hiz Friel)'. At t h e \ Y a s h ingtun Hotdl two. SLIm clazz fer the Fres h ees se z I \Yell, Slim, I g otra mcmrize sum p o '[ry fer to-morrow. "Undur that 5prcding cheznut tree, Tha vila ge smith e e stands" I've b en memrizin that part fer '20 minutes gez I 'll get thru in a c upla howl' s 1'111 n o p o te but I d OZIl'( take m e vary l ong ta m cmriz c things I 'll b e see ing ),a, D e er S lim: I-:now m o r e pen s i l s Kn ow m o re b oo ks, SHORTY. I\:now m o r e teech e r s l oo k s ! B o ys, ] sur am glad s kull i s Qvur at la s t. I got p ermotid but, \Vud r Oll buleeve it Slim, I didun( pas s in spe llin. The ( c e c h e r says m y s p e llin i s atrochi ous. \V e l, I lik e t hat! I 110 I d o n s p e l evry word jes rite but enybuciy kan unelurstan whut 1 rite, yu kan, kant y a ? Bu t ra kant argu with a teeche r. I h eel tha time uf mr life la s nite w ent ta m e I t h a t I WliZ at a funral. .L\1I t h a S e n y o r s WliZ t h e ir. "rh<1 g uri s h e d 011 witc clrezzes an l o n g fases and tha b o y s t h e same I m cen the y h ( d long (ases t o o but !lo t wire drezzcs. They h e d dark soot s. .-\n a bunc h lIf m e n WliZ sittin o n the p la tfurm with tha S e n y i o r s and they made sum s p eec hes. Evr)' luke d so solum and the r wuz A owurs all a rounci. I thollt I wuZ at a fUll r eI. T h c n \\'un man gave evr y S e ny o r a big peece o f papur. T hiz iz a ciupl o m o m)' l\' l o m s a ys Thats wut the y ge t f e r going ta skulc 12 y ears. Ef ya a s k m c I d o n think itz wurth it d a )'1I ? G o ing ta s kul e 1'1 reel's an the n g i t a peece o f papur with yur name o n it. \\'he n I ha ve JII)' K o m e n s m ent, 1 'm g o in to ge t somthin good o r I \\ 'on't K oml11e n se H o w about )'1I? But tho z dum S ce ll)' o r s look e d so hap)' ta ge t that papur. I g u e z they didunt expl:ct l10 t h in a tall. \\' ell, tha seramo n y WliZ v ery impresuv. Tha only thing I didllnt lik WlIZ that ther wlI zn't kno w rifreshmllnrs Ef I 'd a known that I wli dn't a gon e \Y e l, Slim, I g ucz I w o n see a ge n til Octo b e r. S'l o n g SHORTY. P S. -I'm still mad at that tc:ech e r fur flunkin Komensmunt at the \\'a s hingtull H o t e ll. Bul ee v c m e in spelin. Pier s a l C rist o b a l I\IR 19H!-ll

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8 1 THE C:\RIBBEA T 1 Carni\rtl P anama. Ph oto by

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THE CAR l BBEAN PA NAMAN I AN CAR N IVAL. Ht/uis T MriWllil, 30. Every year during t h e f O llr days preceding L ent, the Panamanians make "wh oo p ee," a s w e would sa)'. During t h ese days t h e y h a ve th e ir Canza v al. Each yea r, carnival difF e r s v e r y littl e from the preceding one and s till t h e Panamanians await the fit,.rlas as if t h ey w e re un expe ri e n ce d affairs. Americans w h o ha ve b ee n r esiding in Panama mallY years have grown t o l ik e carnival, and ofte n participate with a s much f ervor a s t h e Panamanians t h e ms e lv es I n the two principal c iti es o f th e l s t hl1111s Colon and Panama, t h e carnival i s elaborate ly p lanned and di r ected by t h e JunIa a board o f influ e n t i a l men who manage t h e fiestas A Qu ee n i s e l ec t e d b y popular vote Ofte n t h e rivalry i s v e r y k ee n. An interesting cas e occurre d this year in Panama City when the fathers o f t h e two l eading candidates decid e d to leave t h e outco m e o f t h e contes t to the Panamanian Lotte r y Ifan e v e n numbe r played, one girl would win and vice vers a. I n thi s the aft'air was s ettle d amic a bl y since everyo ne stands by the l ottery. The Quee n c h o o s es a court o f da m a s and gen tlemen. S h e i s all o w e d a s uffi c i ent sum o f m o n ey t o supply h e r se l f wit h a mag nifi ce n t co r onat i o n costllm e, bes ides a flo a t and oth e r costumes, whi c h s h e will n eed S h e i s ve r y mu c h f e t e d b y al! t h e l oc al clu bs and during those f our days is a cco rded g r eat h o n or. The prin c i p al streets o f both to wn s are la v i shly d ecorated wit h v i v i d b a nn e r s an d orname n ts Every afte rn oo n fro m five to seven ) this tho r o u g h far e b eco m es the carniv al b o ulevard Cars a n d trucks decorated and fil1ed with nat i ves a n d Ame ri cans, d an cing, an d s in gi n g those ram o s Panamanian carniv al so n gs, parade up and do \ n t h ese stree t s C onfetti an d serpentine a d d a fair y t o u c h t o th e alre ady pi cturesque sce n e A b o u t sevell, everyo n e l e a ves th e b oulevard S oo n it i s quie t a g ain. But about te n the Qu ee n an d h e r court b egin th eirroundofth e city. They v i s i t all t h e v ari o u s clu b s w h e r e d an ces are b e in g h e l d and it i s not un ti l ea rl y m orning that the stree t s o f t h e c iti es are r e ally q ui e t, B u siness goes o n in the u s ual manne r d urin g t h ese d a ys s in ce it i s n o t until t h e l a t e afte rn oo n that th e f es tivi t i es r e all y b eg in. P eo pl e wh o h a ve lived h e r e f o r an y l e n gth o f tim e c an r e ali ze, I think, jus t h o w muc h t h i s carnival m e an s to t h e Panamanians Afte r these f our d a ys o f g a y m e rr y-making they ente r th e L ente n se a so n with a s mu c h so l emnity a s th e g a i e t y with whi c h th e y ce l ebrate d t h e ir carniv al. \\a t c rf ro nt Scene i n P a nama.

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8 + T H E CARIBB EAN. APPREC I A T ION OF J U D GES deepl y appreciate t h e kindness and inte re s t s h o wn by Mrs Skemp, Mr. Cunningham, and 1\1rs. H earne w h o acted a s judges for t h e s h ort stories, an d b y iVJi ss J el1sen and Mi ss \ V o ld w h o judged t h e poetry. S T AFF H OP. France; DII)'J, )0. The Staff H op, g i ve n b y THE C ARIBBEAN s taff' was h e l d at t h e i\1a sonic T e mpl e Friday, t h e 13th o f D ece m b e r, 1 929 T h e programs f o r t h i s hop w e r e w hite wit h a large blac k 1 3 printe d 011 t h em) emph a s i z ing t h e the fac t that it was to b e h e ld o n an unlucky date. The h o p was given with t h e main purpose of making money for the publish ing of t h e H i g h Sc hool Annual. Invitations w e r e i ss u e d to H igh S c h ool students and th e ir friends Admission was 2 5 cents for la dies and SO cents f o r m e n. The r e were seve ral novelt y d an ces .All the dan ces on the program had g h os t lik e names, sllc h as "The Bat's Bump," T h e G o blin s Gallop," etc. C e leste Clark entertained t h ose present w i th a jazz dance. The h all wa s decorated in yello w and bla c k c repe paper, and s k e leton s and h orses h oes w e r e hung about t h e h all to give a s p oo ky" atmosph e r e 1 n spite of t h e fact t hat it was h eld all a supposedly unluc k y Friday, a large crowd was present and enjoyed t h e music furnis h ed by '''.' elc h s o r c hestra. T H E SEN I O R P ARTY El.lel)'l1 Gal1Z lJIlleller. '30. T h e S e nior Party whic h t oo k pl ace at t h e Hotel "Vas hington o n November 5, was a very s ucc essful affair. \ Nel s h' s Harmo n y Boys furnished r e a l jazz mus i c, w h i c h tog e t h e r wit h t h e f res h sea breeze made t h e dancing very enjoyab l e The spot dance wa s w o n b y Pete "Va rdlaw and T o mmy P escod T h e priz es w e r e dainty pi cture fram es for t h e g irl, and a c igar ette lig hter for t h e bo y T h e r e f res h m ents w e r e greatly enjoyed by t h e thirsty dancers. The Seniors proved t h e m se l ves suc h excellent hosts and h os tesses, t hat t h e oth er cla sses will not f o rget t h e i r la s t party

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THE CARIBBE A N 85 THE SOPHOMO R E PARTY, Ndllrard/{IW, ']2. The S o p h o m o r e w hich wa s h e l d at t h e Strange r s e l ll b o n January 3 d, s e e m e d t o b e a g r e a t s lIc cess D wy er's o r c h es tra furni s h e d t h e e x cellent dan ce mu s i c duri n g t h e evenin g A s i s c u stomary at' hig h sc h o o l dances o n e d a n ce was d es igna t e d a s a prize w a l t z T o t h e winn e r s : Mav i s Thir l w all and R o g e r \\' illia m s, attr a c t ive p r i zes w e r e a w a r d e d. The programs w e r e wh it e decorate d with t h e Canal Z o n e se al a nd with t h e names o f t h e S o p h o m o r e C l a ss officers The dances w e r e g i ve n cle v e r ti d es The r e fr cs hrnents w h i c h w e r e se r ve d thro u g h out t h e evenin g w e r e e njoyed by e ve r yo n e D u e c r edit mlls t b e giv e n t o t h ose w h o a id e d i n p lanning this d e l i g h tfu l part)' pRESHMEN PARTY, /L1 / aviJ T lu"rlwtl/l, ';0 The l a s t part)' o f t h e year, t h e Fres h m e n party, wa s g i v e n a t t h e H o t e l \V a s h i ngto n, April 25t h \re l s h s Harmony B o y s t h e p o pular n eg r o o r c h estra, played t h e lates t hits." T w o s p ec ia l t y numbe r s wer e gi ve n. Mi ss B o b b y Durham g a ve an excellent interpretatio n o f t h e B r eak-A.way S h e made a hit wit h h e r audie n ce V ictor M e l e nd e z g a v e a so l o s p ec ialty dance whic h wa s t h e h i g h s p o t o f t h e evening. H e s h o w e d g r eat tal ent. i V lary Curtis prove d to b e a l u c ky g i rl f o r s h e W OIl, w i t h h e r partn e r T o m P e scod, the pri ze f ox-trot, a n d also t h e "sp o t dan c e Lovel y pri z es w e r e r e ceiv e d The parents a n d m embe r s o f t h e f a c u l t y w h o atte nd ed, a nd t h e s t u d ents all a g r e e t hat t h e F r es h i es m a d e a s u cce s s o f t h e i r party. THE GYPS Y R O Y E R, Frederick A'ro // 'J I. O n M a r c h 1 1 St, 1 930, t h e C r istobal H ig h S c h oo l Gl e e Club p r ese n t e d a three-act mu s i c al co m e d y "The G y psy Rover." The plot i s o f n o impo rtan ce, b e in g o f t h e u sual mu s ical co m e d y t y p e, I n b r i ef, t h e story i s t h i s : Rob, a yo un g gypsy, fall s in love with Lady C o nstan ce i\l arten d al e w h o m h e m ee t s w h i l e s h e i s rid in g thro u g h t h e f o rest. L ady C o n stance h a s b ee n f o r ce d in to an e n g a ge m e n t w i t h L ord Crave n b y h e r fat h e r Sir G eo r ge Martendal e A f t e r many diffic u l t i es R o b s u ccee d s in arrangin g an e l o p e m ent wit h r C o n stan ce b u t j u s t a s t h e y are preparin g t o l e a ve R o b i s captu r e d and thro wn i n t o priso n fr o m whi c h h e soo n escapes I n t h e m e a n w hile M eg t h e yo un g g y psy' s f os t e r m o t h e r, t ells o f R o b s r e al pare n tage H e i s t h e so n o f Sir Gilbe r t H o w e \\' h e n a c h i ld, R o b had b ee n s t o l e n b )' his gyp S ) n u r se Upo n Sir Gilbert's d eath all t h e p ro p ertr an d w e al t h had b ee n wille d t o L o r d Crave n un l ess t h e real h e i r t o t h e f o r tune wa s f o un d R o b r eturns ro Eng lan d an d Lady C o n stance L ord Crave n i s d o n e away with by p rovid in g him w it h a Income The m u s i c o f t h e play wa s a s good a s o n e finds in many a profess i o na l p r o d u ctio n. The t itl e r61 e wa s played b y pre d eric k K r o ll. H i s fine t e n o r v o i ce and h i s abil it y a s a dramati c a c t o r m ad e h i s rol e o n e o f t h e b es t i n t h e s h ow. \,i r g i n i a Steven s o n pl a ye d t h e part o f L ad y C o n stance, h e r b eautif u l v o i ce added m u c h to t h e p rodu c ti o n, Sinfo and Marro, t h e t w O co m edians w e r e capably p layed b y Garre t t H uf F an d O scar H e i lbro n The r o l e o f Nina, Sir G eo r ge l\lartendale's second daug h t e r wa s ve ry well p layed b y E l eano r Urwil e r. H e r a t t racti\ e vo i ce wa s o n e o f t h e h igh spot s o f th e s h o w T h e n o n voc al parts w e r e : i\!cg ( Rob' s (o s t e r moth e r). GEI\' E \ I E \'E O ROURKE Zara ( T h e b elle of the gypsy cam p ) NATAI.IE SAlFOR D L o r d Craven . P E RRY \\' A S H A BAI' CII Sir Geor ge i\r1artendal e . J AMES \\'001) Captain J e r o m e ( E n glis h :lrmf office r), GARRETT !-I l I H Sir T o b y L yon (.'\ soci al burterAy ) \\'1I.J.IAl'ol EF.NA;o.; The w h o l e productio n o w es it s s u ccess only t o M i ss F l o r e n ce Erte l' s ulltiri n g eA-'or ts E ve r r d e t ai l o f t h e m u s i c al sco r es and o f t h e drama ti c a c ti o n s h o w s t h e r esults o f h e r abl e directio n l\"o t e n o u g h c r edit call b e gi ve n t o h e r f o r h e r s p l e ndid w ork in planning and supe rvi s i n g this produc t i o n

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86 THE CARIBBEAN. THE SENI O R PLAY. "The Lotter y M a n." .\fnois Thirlwall, ']0. F o r seve r a l week s b e f o r e 1\1a)' I S placards bearing t h is mysteri o u s t itl e "The L otte r y Man, were seen in co nspi c u o u s pl ace in tow n The myst ified peopl e soo n l earned that thi s wa s the Il a m e o f t h e pla y whi c h wa s to b e presente d b y t h e Se ni o r Cl ass o f C. H S., a t t h e Cri s t o bal C lubhouse, o n May 1 5th an d 16th. The p lot o f "The Lotter y M an," a very amus in g o n e i s thi s : J a c k yo un g n e w spaper man offe r s him self to the w o m e n o f Americ a at 5 1 a ti c k e t. J u s t afte r thi s h e fall s in love with H e l e n e, a co u si n o f F oxey J ac k's ric h college chum a n d own e r of the n e w s p a p e r f o r whi c h J a c k works The co medy i s bro u ght in b y F oxey s m othe r Mrs Peyton, w h o i s d ail y a ge i n g h e r se l f in try in g t o k ee p YOlln g and b y Lizz i e Mrs P ey t o n's co m panio n, a thin, in s i g nifi cant g irl. Li zz i e w in s Jac k with a ti c k e t s h e had s t o l e n so s h e has to g iv e lip h e r claim s t o him. Sh e r ece i ves h o w eve r, a large sum of m o ney wit h w h i c h s h e build s a h o m e in the Bronx whil e H el e n e turns o u t t o b e "the luc k y w inn e r afte r all. E ac h charac t e r o f "The L otte r y M a n wa s well se l ec ted and well pla ye d The b reezy young h e r o wa s p laye d b y Fre d Kro ll. Fre d has di s tin guis h e d him self in f o rm e r produc ti o n s a s a great ac t o r a n d h e lived up to his r eputatio n in his r o l e as J ac k. His j o b w as a difficult o n e, f o r his r o l e i s the o n e o n w h ic h the wh o l e pla y rests. Fran ces Days t oo k the part o f H e l e n e the h eroi n e H e r a c tin g wa s e x cellent and s h e made h e r c h arming c h a r ac t e r o n e of t h e m os t impo r tant in t h e p la y F oxey, J ac k's churn, w a s p la yed b y William Newman. \ \,illiam has alwa ys b ee n c all e d the w itties t b oy in sc h oo l and h e jus t trans f erre d thi s to t h e stage. His acti n g wa s m os t natural. The difficult c haracter s o f the two m others a n d L izzie we r e portrayed b y Rae Bli ss Mrs W right; D ella Raymond, rvlrs. Peyton; El eano r Fi tzgeral d Lizz i e Rae di d spl e n d i d wo rk in a c tin g t h e part o f t h e sweet, gentle moth e r o f J ac k, w h i l e D ella and Eleanor, t h e co medy charac t e r s we r e t h e hit o f t h e s how. Rita Joyce, cas t a s Hedwig, [ V l r s Peyton' s m a i d gave t h e a u d i e n ce a r e a l Iri s h brog u e that wa s very amus ing and \ Valt e r \iki ng stad a s Hamilt o n the chauffeur and butle r of the P eyto ns, gave a g oo d p erformance The praise f o r the s u ccess of "The L otte r y l\1an" g oes t o l\/ 1 r. R o b ert N oe w h o directe d this play. F o r three ye a r s Mr. N oe has produce d f o r C. H. S. ve r y s uc cess ful pla ys and "The L otte r y l\l lan" i s anothe r t o add to his list. H e c h ose the c a s t d ir ec ted the a c tin g and stage effec t s o f the productio n, and was r es pon s ibl e f o r t h e great applause with whi c h the play wa s r ece iv ed. N o t e n o u g h th a nk s and c r edit can be g i ve n Mr. N oe wh o i s a lways r ea d y to s p e nd his time p roduc in g fine play, lik e "The L otte r y Man" f o r C. H. S. C. H S. CA R N I V AL. Mavis Tliirlwall, )0. The an n ual Carnival o f t h e Cris t o bal Hi g h Sch oo l th e procee d s o f whic h go t oward t h e publica tion o f THE C A R I B BEAN, w as h e l d at F ort D e L esse p s o n t h e ni ght o f F ebruary 2 I. F o r at l eas t a m onth b e f o r e t h i s event, prepara ti o n s had b ee n go ing o n at s c h o ol. P os t e r s wer e made, tick e t s di stributed s id e sh o w s planne d and the actr esses and a c t o r s in the Revu e had muc h prac ti cing t o do. S o m e f ortunate o r unfortunate stafr m embe r s attended sc h oo l on l y o n e day o f the w ee k preceding the 21s t The r es t o f t h e time they s p ent w o rkin g hard preparing the grounds At la s t t h e ni ght came. The g r ounds w e r e fille d wit h side s h ows, t ents, t h e r efreshment stand, whi c h wa s ve r y p opular throughout the eve ning, se v e ra l games o f chance, and the contest b oard. Am o n g th e f eatures o f th e s ide s h o w s we r e the fr eak m a n w h o ate gla ss a n d ir o n an d o n e who ate bananas under wate r; the tattooe d lad y the s k e l e t o n lad y and t h e gy p s y fortun e t elle r, w h o see m e d a b l e t o bring l oo k s o f satisfac ti o n o r dis pl e a sure t o t h e fa ces o f those wh o l e ft h e r t ent. The fishpo n d p roved to be a very pro fitabl e o n e f o r th e fis h e rm e n since they made goo d "catc hes" in a f e w minutes The p opularity contes t wa s w o n b y l\1iss l\1argar e t Mitc h ell, wh ose chie f riv al wa s iVliss Carme n Durham. T h e main attrac ti o n o f the Carnival was, of c ours e the R e vue This was w orth t h e h ea rty

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THE CAR IBBEAN. applause re ce iv e d fro m the audie n ce Among the numbe r s w e re tap dances so n g a c t s, a g yps)' cho ru s a military ch o ru s, and an Egyptian dance j all o(whic h d elighte d the audie nc e The numbers were all w ell give n and the costumes w e r e v e r y attractive This R e vu e wa s planne d and direc t e d b y Mr. Robert Noe, whose kind e ff orts and coo p eratio n are greatly appre ciated. The main s how ende d a t t e n o 'cl oc k. The hall was t h e n c l eare d and the danc in g b egan. The Z onians furni s h e d the mus ic. At e leven o cloc k the door prize wa s g i ve n to the winne r, Mr. J oseph C orrigan, wh o r ece iv e d 5 2 50 Owing to a ve ry unfortunate circlIm stance, n o unifo rmed so l d i e r s w e r e all o w e d o n the g r ounds, and, co n sequently the cro w d whi c h a t t e nded the Carniv al was o nl y about o ne-half the s i ze o f t h e c r o wd w h i c h had attende d previ o u s l y I n spite o f this drawbac k, the Carniv al wa s a s u ccess THE SCHOO L SUR\Tr. (This article w as written b y a membe r o f t h e class o f 1 930.) A s the r es ul t o f an idea o f our enterprising pri n c ipa l i V l r. \\' m. A. Sawye rs, we h a ve ha d the g ood f ortune t o b e vi sited b y a Survey C ommittee from the Unite d States A year a go, wh e n Congressman E E. D e ni so n, from Illinois, wa s o n the I sthmus, Mr. Sawye r s had a confere nc e with him, during whi c h h e mentioned that h e tho u ght a survey by a group o f well-kn o wn educators w ould g r eatly b e n e fit our sc ho o l s y s t e m. H e suggested f o r thi s Dr. Geor ge Straye r and Dr. N. L. Enge l hardt, b oth professo r s and re cognize d autho rities in education and s c h oo l administrat i o n in T e a c h e r s C o lleg e o f C olumbia Unive r sity, Y o rk City. C ongressman D e ni so n too k the matte r up with C ongress So o n afterwards, 510,000 was appropriate d by C ongress f o r the o r g ani zatio n o f a surve y b oard, whi c h w o ul d v i sit the Canal Z o n e sc h oo l syst e m. The committee l e ft New Y ork, i\1ar c h 1 8, 1 930 on t h e S. S. //ncoJ1, and r e a c hed Cristobal, March 2 6 The survey la s t e d about three w ee k s I n the course o f their examinatio n the surveyors gave "ac hi e v e m ent and intellig e n ce t es t s t o many of the pupil s of our Canal Zon e s c hool s Our pupil s were found t o b e fr o m one-half t o one full grade in advance o f the average pupils o f the States. S p e llin g a n d arithmetic tests s h o wed Canal Z o n e c h i l d r e n a half-year ahe a d of the pupils o f the same grades and ages in t h e United States. H i g h sc h oo l students al so a ve r age d hi g h e r than those in the United S tates and in soc ial stu d i es the twelft h grade made an a verage sco r e o f 4 2 as compare d with 3 2 f o r the a verage pupil in the United States The results of the test s g i ve n in Cristobal Hig h S c h oo l w e r e ve r y grat if y in g El s i e Darley-and j VIav i s Thirlwall, both Senio rs, r ece i ved t h e hi g h es t a verages o f the sc hool. Els i e Darley made a sco r e in Englis h whi c h i s the hig h es t e v e r made by any student w h o ha s b ee n g i
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88 THE CARIBBEAN. <\ complete report of the Surve)' B oa r d will be available in book let form th e first o f Jul),. Of the '17 experts o f t h e survey committee, fouf are on the regular fa culty o f Teach e r s C ollege, Columbia whil e the remaining are all ex p e rienced educators wh o are w o rking for advanced degrees at Columbia Univers ity The committee was made up of th e foll o wing: Dr. L. EXGELHARDT Dr. \Y. S. ELSBREE W. B. LONGMAN l\1 r. W, B. FEATHERSTONE Dr. CARTER ALEXANDER M r R. L. HAMON Mr. G U \ L. H II L SBEE Mr. I. O. FRISWOI. O Mr. L. P YOUNG Mr. CHARI .ES F. REID [ Vir. R \Y. BELL i\.lr. H F. :\1.\' l\1r. C. 1\..1\10R 5 E l\'lr. GRANT RAIIN Mr. J H. SMITH Mr. FRED F. BEACH Mr. V. C. NICKLAS Mr. CALVI N F. DENGLER Mr. H C. WYSONG l\lr. HARLEY Z. WOODEN Mr. HENRY S. CURTI S t>.lr. J FLINT WALLER f!.liss EVELYX' HORTO:" Mi ss HELEN THORP Mr. J E. SCHOTT [vi iss RAE SANDERS e I fl\rbating
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THE CARI BB E AN. 89 Q&ut of .,. --. ----=-=--. --.... .. . .. .... -MRI9742-12

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T H E C.,\RIBBEAN. H igh Seho:>1 Glee Club. T H E C RI TO B AL HI G H SC H OO L G LEE CLUB A:-ID ORCH EST RA. Eleanor '12. The outstanding event o f the school year for the Glee Club and Orchestra, was the prod ucti o n o f a well known operetta "The Gypsy Rover. I t was a great s u ccess and the Glee C lub studen t s and orc hestra were highl y co mplimented o n their splendid work. Miss Ertel, who directed th e play, deserves a g reat deal of c redit f o r producing suc h a fini s h ed performance. Three times a week from 1.20 to 2.10 o'clock, the Hi g h School Glee Club meets. Students h ea r "blue" notes and tru e notes during t his mu sic peri o d. On Monday the boys meetj T u esd ay t h e gir l s meet; a n d \\" edl1esday, a combination cla ss of boys and girl s m eet. Mi ss Fl o r e nce Ertel is the instructress. To s p o n so r the G l ee Club, one mllst be especially patient, and muc h credit must be g i ve n to M iss Erte l i n that r es pect. The Gl ee C lub is not very larg e, having twice a s man y girls a s b oys \Yell-know n compose r s are studied and t h eir co m posi ti o n s sung. The High Schoo l Orchestra meets once a week o n Tuesday, fro m 3 to 5 o'clock

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THE C ARTBB E .-\N lIig:1 &1.0,,1 C RI S T O BAL HI G H SC H OO L SO G \\'e've c o m e to s ing t h e prai se :\ h e arty c h ee r to rai se F o r t h e s ch oo l w e l ove so d ear, Our o w n Cri s to b al Hi g h \\' e'lJ h o n o r h e r name, I ncr e ase h e r fame, ( Tune: Lei/he R .. s! of 11r .. W a rlil G a By.) S h e s secon d to n o ne \\" e're g la d to claim h e r f o r our own, OUf very O WI1. 0 y es, w e 'e f Olln d h e r th e best, ::\o rr h Eas t, S outh, o r 'es t. Thr o u g h p a ssing year s 'twill be t h e s am e ; The b es t 011 th e Z o n e S h e s o ur O WI1 sch oo l Cri sto ba l High OU R Y E LL. Say! Say w hat? That's what! hat's what That's w hat all \\"hat d o t h e," "II s"," : C C R I S T T O B -.'IL C R I S T O B -\L! 91

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B est Looking Boy. Most Popular B o},. Witti est Student .. THE CARIBBEAN P O P U L ARITY CON TEST. R 1 C HAI(D \\"00 0 (Junior) THOMAS PESCOD Uunior) .. \\'1 1.1IAM "FITn'" NEWMAN (Se nior ) Qu ee n of the Carnival. Best Looking Girl. J\' lost Popular Girl. i'\' IARGARET IVIITCHELL (Junior) . VIOLET RANDALL ( Freshman) . PETE WARDLAW (Sophomore).

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THE CA R IBBEAN. fjops' )gtblettcs. TIlOlJlm PeJCod, '';1. SOCCE R this h : il{, Cristobal wa s Balboa B. t\l ich:lc!scn, H. H :llfback thei r ability to pass as w ell :ts sco r e. -\. SalrLrio, L. l-blfb:ICk Our second r C:l r of soccer b;JiI was nOt ;\earing th e end of the game, Cristobal \'cry successful :llthough many new fa ces s h o wed sign s o f w C:lke ning, when Balboa were seen on our team. surprised -the crowd twic e On rhe '!_ph of \'ovember, Balboa dC_l The g:lIne ended with th e score J-'! in fe:ned Cristobal in th eir first game of th e fa\'or of Cristobal. interscholastic series The sco re of 1 0-3 Cristob:d play ed a mu c h beTter game proves that it waS;"ln uninteresting game. than B :llbo:l. T h e r e W:lS no indi\'idual \\'. He1e, C. Forward J. Salterio, R Forward-l goal S. F ields L F orward J'>.l. D ew, L. Forward-I go;d i\1. D e L a P ena, R Forward CriSloblli ;..Jo sooner had Cri stobal kicked otf playing in this game, but much credit E. Conkling, Goalkeeper than Balboa sco red the fir s t gont. T h e s h ould b e giv e n to o llr gon lkeeper, W. \\'ikingstnd, H. Fullbn ck scoring incrensed n s th e game went on Edward Conkling. R. Wood, L. F ullb ac k and at th e end of the fir:.t Balboa ha d Balboa w o n the last and deciding game T Pescod, C. i -blfback-l goal scored seven goals to Cristobal's two. b\' the score o f '-.!. 1\... i\laurer, L. Halfbnck I n the'second half, Balboa sco r ed three During the fi;st five minutes it C. Rankin, R H :dfback more goal s making a grand total of 1 0. st:lrted to rain, making th e field some-O :-\rllesell, C. goal Near the end of the game, Cristobal's what wet. This rain and mud did nOt C. P escond I .. F orwardl go:1I forward, by pass ing and dribbling, sco r ed trouble Balboa's playe r s as they scored T. Rankin, R F orwnrd nnother g o nt. th r ee L:oals bero r e th e first half ended. J n .\1. i\1:tr c h os b R. Forward :'\1. D_ew and Salterio ?rothers were t.he I t h is D e w w as respon s ibl e f o r twO of R L. Forward stnrs a t the g:l1ne, seating goals at wd!. these I!oals and D e L a P ella scor ed th e toO s trong for our f orwards T h e second half found Cristobal fight-. \ new SpOrt wa s introduced t o inter-On the defensive H e le and Booth pro v ed 1 other H .\:\' DB.--\L L. Cri stobnl did not have any stars, but ing f o r th e ball n ea r th e B alb o a g oa!.i sch ol:ts ti c acti\'ities, that being handball. the go?d playing of.---\rnesen, Pescod, .--\rn ese n made good .his to defeated Cristobal d l e I.!th Conkling saved CrI stobal from a blank. kick nnd sco red. :-\ little l:ner I P escod 0 1 .\pril by the score of three s!ngh." games On the J i St of :-':ovember, Cris t o bnl found th e for another tall\, Cri s-:ln d o n e douhle ta Cri:.roLaIsonedouble. H igh School defeated B :llboa H !gh School I tabal see m;d to we.lk en !lenr end of I FIIJI JlIIgli'J I{tllIU In their second g Ime o f th e Inte rsch olas tl c thiS h:lll 1\ h e n B :llhoa sco r ed [\\ Ice, one soccer ball serIes nt CrI stobal T he score b\ S o lteno :lIld the o th e r o n e b\ H ele I H lones :!l was J to ':! T he game ended \\Jth th e score ,_:! In r P e"cod 1-T h e hrst half :.t.lrted with the grounds f a \'or o f B:11boa, th e reb\ them the .! H lanes .2 T some\\hat \\et \ t the sound o f th e pennant for the second \ car I P escod I S \\ hls rle, the g.l111e started Both tenr1lS I I h e lme 1lp 11l ;'Ill three g;'l])llS \\ 1:. .IS I n thl:' g;'lme T P eseod ha d the g:lnle s howed III Irvel o us pass-work :lnd comf o][o \\ s 011 T ee but lones pllcement tired h!m out. b11l;'\[1011 1Il the earll part o f thl:S h;'l\t C;'lUS11lg hl1ll to lose Tn the end Ne;'lrmg the latter part 01 the hnlf, CrtS-Ba lboa f obnl cnme through with th e fir s t goal of the game. After so m e minutes of play 1.1. tllitte r, Goalkee p e r the whi s tl e ended the fir s t half. J Booth, Fullbac k Cristobnl came back strong in the bst H J ones, Fullbac k half and scored twice in successio n. I n J Snlterio, C. Halfback Secolld JlIIglt!J gl/Jllt' I. -\\'. H ele T. i\lurphy 2.-\\'. H e l e T. :'\lurphy

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9 4 H e ll" wa s t OO stro ng f o r l\l urph y wh o w a s una ble to r e t u r n w it h o u t l os in g th e point s T llird s ingll's g tl111i'. I.-A Hele R \\'iking s tad 1 0 :2.-:\ H e l e Z I R \Yikingstad 1 0 R \\'iki ng s fad i s no t :l s ing les" p l a y e r our h e i s a "doubles." H e l e wa s vi ctoriOll S because of h is nne place m ent an d \\"iking stad's poor re tu rns. First glllJle, I.-\\", and :\. H e ll" 21 T ;\ Iurph y :lnd 1\1. Wheele r 2C :!.-W. and A. H e l e 21 T. l\l ur p h y and i'd Wh e e l e r I i T h e first ga m e w as a sec-sa w affa ir from t h e first I t wa s ve r y hard t o c h oose the w inn er. I n the s econd gam e, Balboa came f rom t h e r ear to w in by;1. s l ig h t mar g in. Second d o u bles g ame 1.-1' R:tnkin and E Conk ling 21 H J o ne s :l.nd I I 2.-H J ones and a l eb '21 T Rank i n a n d E C o n k lin g 1 0 3 T I b n k i n and E C o n k l i n g 21 H J o n e s a n d Kaleb 1 6 T h e i:J.s t doubl e s game prove d to be the best one Conkling's pbcement a n d T. Rankin's fine r eturns wo n th e gam e f o r Cristobal. I n t h e second game, Cristobal see m e d to hav e lo s t inte rest and w as de f eated by J o n es a n d K al e b T h e third game saw C ri stobal co m e fr o m th e r ear to win t h e deciding game C on kl i n g again di spi:J.ye d h i s abil i ty t o pbce, F iv e r ecords sank in t h e wa k e o f natant s p ee d e r s at th e Balbo a s wim m i n g pool on the 16th of : \pril, w h e n B alboa High S c h oo l swimming team swampe d Cri!'tobal Hi"h S c hool l e;lIn by t h e sco r e of THE CARIBBE .-\N I n th e 200-yard race Grant, o f Balboa, wa s go in g lik e a m o t o r b oat f o r e i ght laps but 2 0 yards f r o m the finis h lin e B r e w e r t o n c rept u p bit by bit fini shing a f e w f ee t ahe a d o f G rant. 2. W es t e n dorf ( B H S.) 3 J ones ( B H 5. ) Girls 50-)'lIrd Bre ns/ slro ke. Wood a n d 5chwinderman al so c ra s h ed I. R Quinn ( S H. 5.) T im e 42 1 / 5 into f a medom b y shattering the o l d se c o nds. r eco rds in t h e b ac kstr o k e and t h e bre a st E. Van Cli e f ( B H S. ) strok e e v ent, a n d Balboa's r e lay t eam, 3 H all (c. H. S, ) consist i n g o f \\'ood Grant, Humphrey' s and \\'alston, w ent t h e 1 76 yards in I minu t e 2 8 4 1 5 seconds to establ i s h a r e c o rd, at t h e same time def e ating Cri s t o b a l' s relay t ea m. Among t h e girl s F e rn K y l e b e r made a great ex hibiti o n o f how o n e s h o uld d iv e S h e def e ated t h e best d i ve r s fr o m Cristobal a n d collec t e d a grand t otal of S 9 p o ints. T h e results w e re as f ollo w s : B o)'s 2 20_)'flr d Sw im. I. B re w erto n ( 8. H S ) T im e, m i nu tes 33 sec o nd s. G r;lI1t ( 8. H S ) 3 "coli (c. H 5. ) G i rls j o ) 'ard Sw im. I. Kath l ee n C o n o r d ( B H S ) T im e, 3 0 seco nds. 2. \ \ood ( B H S.) 3. Bliss ( C H 5 ) B oy; 50-.)' lIrd Swim. l. W n lston ( 8. H 5 ) T ime::q se c o n ds. 2 Wood ( B H 5 .) 3. Mund b e r g (c. H. S ) B oJ'S IOO-."lIrd Sw i m I. Walston ( 8. H S. ) T i m e 59 '2/.1 ; eco n ds. 2. H umphreys (8. 1-1. 5 ) 3. G ra n t ( B H 5.) Bop j o )'nrd Bllck ; / rok e I. W o o d (B. H 5.). 2. K o l l ( C H 5 ) 3 J o n (B. H 5 ) T im e 3 1 seconds Gi rls 50.)'flrd Bllcks/roke. I. J H a l d erman ( B H. 5.) 2. E Vnn Cli e f ( B H. S. ) 3 V. Ste ven so n (c. 1-1. 5.) Bop Relfl), R ace. Won b y B alboa T en m. T im e 1 minute, 28 + / 5 seconds. \\'ood, Grant, Humph reys, a n d Wals t o n. Gi rl; R ei n)' R nce. W o n b r Ihlbo a T eam. Time 1 m in_ ute, 50 seconds K C onard, S. P y l e, R Qui nn and J H a lderman. Bo., 's F ane)' D ivi n g I. H B r e w erto n ( B H 5.) 2. B Turne r ( C. H S ) 3 B Hock ett ( C H 5 ) G irl; Ffll/(-,' D ilJing I. F e rn K y l e b e r ( B H 5 ) 2. R it a Quinn ( B H 5.) 3 S a r n P y l e ( B H 5.) B A S E B A LL. 44-3 The g i rl s w e r e al so d e f eated by t h e Gil'/; 1 00--,'fl1'(1 S w i m. A s i s t h e c ustom n se r ies o f t h r ee games w e r e sc hedul ed b etwee n t h e C r i s t o b a l and T i m e, Bal bo a High Sc hool s. H o wever, s in ce Bnlboa won t h elirs t twognmes b y a cl ose t h e th i r d gam e w as n O t neCl."ssary. sco r e o f 50-9. W ah-to n and B r e w erton, two of Ihl-I K nt h l e e n C o n a r d (8. H 5.) boa's o utstan d in g star s w e r e 1 min u te. f o r twO nt'w r ecord... 2. Sarah P y l e ( B H S. ). I n t h e loo-yar d f ree .. tyl e e v enr, W a lston t r aikd h i .. partne r H um ph r e y B oy; 50-Yll rd f o r tiD ya rds, but n ea rin g t h e \\'n l -ston added m o r e p o w e r to lin i!>h by I Sc h wi nciermn n ( B H 5.) a b o u t .. ix i n c hes ahead. J I s eco n ds. T h e contests this rear i n b ase ball w e r e ::xceptio n all y good; e a c h r eam d i s pla y i n g m u c h a b ilit y nnd s kill i n r h i s major s p ort. T im e The box.scores o f th e two games arc a s f ollo w s :

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THE CAR I II it:h Scaool Team whkh r cpTt:"Cllt\ the SC.1 in thl' TwiliA:hl Ba sl'b:t!l L cai;uc. Fro m {rft to ri):hI: ;\ I r. 1113na\:cr; Randolph \\'jl.:in\:.tad, \\'altl'r \\'jking'tad. E d ward Conklin\:. Kenneth :\1 J.UT\ r Ra)'ll\onJ \Yill, Richard \\'ood. KJI(r/wg: Charles P l;;cod. T o m P c-.cod. :\1J.ndi This tcam h"t the to Balho."l Hit:h School. FIRST G -\:l lE. Score by innings. C ristob:d H igh -\B R H 1'0.-\ 10 Cri stob:d :\B R I I PO : \ E T eam :"l:trcho.)ky c 9 ..;. I CrisTObal I:: J..;. 5 6 -):i !)-T '\iarc h osky c o 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0--5 C. P l'scad, cf C. P cscod, cf. 0 0 B alboa Wertz, I i o 0 0 3 ::0: 0 0 0 T P cscod, 31, \ Y Wik':.tad,!b ..;. \\,ill,rf R \\'ik'srad, 1 b. 4 E golf, ss i\bure r, p T ot:tl B;llbol .\ I o r rison cf Dick,2b Specht, J b Hele, 55. D es Landes, p. D e w, If ;\l ittCII, 1 b., D c L:t P ena, rf J ones, c o o II T Pl" .. cod 3 0 o Summan' : H orne I"uns Dcs !.omlt's. \\', \Yik'stad,::b ..;. I C Struck I.ondes \Llur-4 0 o 0 ,!r, 9 on b:tlls-otf D "s I.ondes l R. \Yik'stad, [b. o 0 o ir ?-.iaun, r, 2. Hit hy pitch e r Di..:k by .\laurer P u;cod h y D l!' I olHlLs ; 1 L'mpires-R aph:lll alld B t ll. SECO:\D G '.:Il F B ,dboa H igh .IB!{ H P O .-\ E o c .\Iorrison, c i I Dick,!b I H ele,ss o D es Landes, p. o D e w, If Specht, 31> I 0 \Iitten, 11..1 o 1 o C o 4 c o 3 o 0 \\'ood, rf j.\l:l.llrLr, p T o tal Team Balboa Cristobal o o Score by innings. I 3 .' 6 8 fj-T .0 I 0 0 0 0 I 0 .:--+ 00 2 0 0 0 0 0 1-.1 o 0 J ones, c Summary: Strllck a lit -by D es Landes o D e L a Pena, rf 0 [I, .\laun."r Dls 1.01:-----------------1 des I, by .\laure r 2, Triple-T. P escod T ot:t l .35 9 '2; 15 -+ Total, 35 9::'/' 1-+ 5 Double-\\'crtz.

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THE C\RIBBEAN. Cristobal H iSh School Swiming Team. A C R U ISE ON THE f \NNETTA I. Tl.is article tal..cn from The Slllr lind !I!'(Ild of 11. 1929. CKISTOIlAL I\'O\"embe r 19. -\\'hen t h e lllotOfship / /JIn clln / warpe d her weary way into t h e Crisrohal dock s last ni ght, a tired but exceedingly happy and well indoctrinated aggregation o f m e n and boys piled Ollt o n to t h e docks with duffel bags and sOllveni r s from the San B ia s COUll try, ranging from s h ell b e ad s t o t rain e d parrots, cayucos and kni ck-knac k s o f all d esc ripti o n s I twas the fini s h o f t h e Sea Scouts c rui se to the Sa n Bia s COlmtry, the second c ru i se made b y t hi s organization s in ce its inception o n t h e I s thmus within tht: p a s t f e w m onths, t h e fir s t c ru i se b eing a week-e nd afrair t o P orto B ello I.O G OF THE MOTOR SHII' ANNETTA I. Fri day, 1 5 Nov c lllb e r, 19'29_ 8.00 to 12.00 p. Ill. A t 10.1 5 cast airlines from P i e r No.6, Cristobal, C. Z., and proce eded on variou s courses and speeds to clear docks an d at 1 0 .35 pa sscd Eas t B r eakwater L ight abe:II11. T ook d eparture on East Breakwat e r Ligh t and at 10.35 se t at 400 tfue for Farallon Sucio, ]{. de P ., sea mod erate s ky partl)' overca s t, w ind N. E. ] 2.CO to 4 .CO a. 111.,]6 i'ovcmbc r, 1929. R tlieved th e wheel and lookouts. Weather thickening, wind increasing and with intermitten t rain squalls At] 2.30 a. m. s ighted F aral l on Su cio light o n e p oint on the starboard bow. At 1 .31 F :lrallon Su c io L ight abeam, di stance] and and} miles At 1.38 c hanged co ur se E. N. E. I\t 2.25 I s la Grande abeam, c han ged cou r se E. 4.00 to 8.00 a. Ill. R e l ieved the wheel and lookoutS. Weath er before, wind E. in c reasing in f o r c e, se a r o ugh with rain squalls. S h ip

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THE CARIBBEAN. 97 acting w ell under stress but m os t passen g er s w ell unde r the weat h er. A t 6,-1-5 sighted San B i as P oint and comme n c ed steering various cours e s to round s ho a l wate r s proc e eding into P orvenir I sland. 8.00 to I '2.00 noo n. R elieved the wh e el and l oo k outs At 8.30 an c h o r ed in 4 fathoms of wate r about 100 p.rds o R Cus t o m s H Ollse P o rv e nir Island, San B ia s P r esented ship's pape r s t o p o n offic i a l s and wer e grante d freedom o f the p o rt and p e rmi ssio n to vis i t San BIas co:mtr}' with the e x ce p tio n o f C I n e I s lands. At 8,-1-5 scrubbed down d ec k s and h eld ge n e ral fie ld day; ai red b e d d in g Sem swimming a s h o r e and over th e ship's s ide. At 9 .55 piped down to breakfas t. :\t ] 0.-1-5 w eig h ed an c h o r a nd got underway f o r iVlandinga Harbor, Matt: T e rwilli ge r co nnin g on variou s co u r ses and s p eeds At [[ 30 pa ssed ove r s h o al waters i n the vicinity o f N e lli e and L e ila Cars R o b eso n I sla nds and s tru c k ship's b ottom on an unkno wn obj ec t. P assed over cl ear with out ground ing On giving s i g nal o n engin e _room t e legraph and a n s w e rin g s am e on e n g ines, n o wa y was made. I nvestigatioll proved pro p el l e r to b e mi ss ing. Drifted toward Harbo r a n d at :tb o m [1 .4-5 d r opped anchor. 12.00 to 4-.00 p. m. S ent partr o f 4-m e n to vi cinity of s h oa l wa te r s t o sea r c h f o r propeller. P r o p elle r l ocated and brou ght bac k to s hip. Determined that s h:tftin g had b ee n corroded :J.I1d wa s l ess t h an on e half so lid-sh:tt't twi s t ed :li1d snapped o ffimtll ediately aft of s haft strut. Imposs ibl e to r e p l a ce or r epair with l o cal facilities. 4-.00 to 8 .00 p m. Abou t 4-. 1 5 yacht R o llin g S I OII!! ( R o b ert Wilc o x, C o lon, o wner) sighted proceeding t o Mandinga H a r b o r. D i stress signa l s made by s emapho r e, inverteden sign,andre volv e r shots Rolling S t one unable to inte rc ept (o r interpret) s ignal s At 5 30 part}' of -4-m e n P U t o ff in dory to visit R olli n g S t o n e :tn d r e q u es t a ss i stance in r eturning some m e n to C o l o n. Native San Bias despatc h ed with note to G o v e rn o r at P o r venir r e questing to w Government launc h Presidl'lIh!. At 8.30 Prnidmle pick e d up th e 4-m e n o n R oll ill g StOlle an d r eturned the m to th e .-imulfa I. R o b ert W i lcox pro mi sed to w to P orve n ir I s land in m orning (NoTE.P residm l e had insuffi c i ent pow e r f o r towin g) Govern o r S a n B ia s despatc h ed m o t o r canoe to Col o n t o request toW b r .Hari a Cllristina owne d b y Anto nio T a garo pul os. 12.00 to 4-.00 p. m. A nc hore d a s befor e n o r e m:trk s 4-'CO to 8 .00 a. m. A n c hore d a s befo re, no r e m:trk s 8.00 to 1 '2.00 a. m At 8,45 ya c h t R oll ill g S t olle came alo n gside :tnd took Anllettfl f in tow. Under way at 8 .57. At 10.2 8 thre w o"f f tow line ; brought s hip up into th e w i n d a nd an c h o r e d in 4-fatho m s of water off Cus t o m s H o u se at P o rv e nir. At 1 [.00 sent s wim m ing and r ec r eatio n p:trt)" a s h o r e o n Porve nir I slan d F ishin g part)" left f o r Chic him e C;"Irs o n l aunc h Prl'Siden( (. '( a cht R o llin g S t onl' s h o ved off o n tro llin g trip off San BIas P oint. [ 1.00 t o 4-.00 p. m. MR1974-2 -1J H el d b ox in g b outs a shore, cayu co r:tces an d g e n e r:tl r ecreatio n . '\t '2.00 Standard F rui t Company s h i p I f/a n ks r ounded P o r ve nir I s lan d a n d p roceeded in to H arbor. 4-.00 to 8 .00 p Ill. L ib erty a n d r ecreatio n p a rti es a s h o r e One watch aboar d ( 1'2 m e n ) to cl e :tn ship G e n e r a l seamans hip instru c t io n h e l d o n b oa r d 8.00 to ['2.00 p. m. M e n w e r e p ermitted to s l ee p ;"Is h o r e o n point an d in Gover-nor' s vaca ted h o u se S h o r e patr o l maint ained d urin g watc h T oo k all provis i o n s fr o m loca l s t o r e I '2.00 t o +00 a. m A nch o r e d a s befo r e S h o r e p atro l maintained during watc h in vicinity of m e n s l ee p i n g a s h o r e +00 to 8 .00 a. Ill. At 6.4-5 s i g h t e d llftlrill ClIl'is /illa off S a n B ia s P oint. Alon g s ide and towing lines b ent o n at 7.'25 s h o v ed oA' on t o w lin e f o r C o lon, at approxima t elr 4-kno t s p e r h o u r. A f t e r cl earing S a n BIas P oint, h e l d fie l d dar. 8 .00 t o [2..00 n oo n During m orning h e l d ge n e r a l in structio n s in seama n ship, sign:Ils, :In d navigation S p ec ial in struction s to c r e w leader s Upo n c omplet i o n o f in s t r ucti o n s b ox in g b outs h e l d in midship hol d 12..00 t o 4-.00 p. m. Sighte d 2 planes fro m Nav:I1 ; \ ir Station, C o co S o lo, a t a b out 1.00 p. m. P lan es c ircled ship se\'e ral t i mes an d r ecei v ed s e m:Iph o r c m ess ages from dUlletffl l that:IlI wa s well. P lan es did n o t descend to w :tt e r bm proce eded in the g e n e ral d ir e cti o n of C ri stobal. 4-.00 t o 8 .00 p. m. Unde rwa}' a s b e f o re R e c r eation, s inging, a n d radio conc ert h e ld, co n d u c t ed b>' in structor !'vir. Unterberg. 8 .00 to 1 '2.00. Cl e a r ing s hips for d i semb:trkatio n. At 11.30 passed thro ugh breakwate r and pro c eede d to P ier N o.6, C r i s t o bal. All h a nd s a s hore at 12.10 a. m ROSTER OF O F F I CERS ASD C R EW. Captain C harles E R usse}" U. S N. ( S e a S couts of A m e ri c a. ) Mate Albert E. T erwilli ge r ( S e a SCOUt S of A m e ri ca ) Mate Frank W. P aul son, U. S. N (Se a S couts of Am e ri c a .) INSTRUCTORS Mr. Unterbc rg R a d i o Mr. Halvorson, Eng in ee rin g a n d El ec tri c al. M r. G eo r ge Conright, S t e w:tr d a n d C o mmissary. P assmge rs. -t\Jr. Sawre r s P r i n cipa l Cri s t o bal H i g h S c hool; Mr. P e n ce I n structor, C r istobal H i g h S c h o o l ; Mr. P i e r so n, Mr. Ni elso n Sell SCOlltS.-C. : \lbe r g a W. B ea rd, K Booth, Ted. B r a ndon C. C ampbel l J C ampbe ll, J ac k C:lmpbell, \\". D ie r s, P Digman, D Ebe r e nz, J E b erc n z, F. Ehrma n C. G o u ld, D Grego r y B H a c k ett, P Hanna,.I. H earn, C. H ill, H L ee, M. l\'i:t r c h osky, D Wood, R M a r s h:tll.

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THE CARIBBEAN. GAA Athletic \ ssociat ion.

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T H E CARIBBEAY 99 T i e
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100 THE CARIBBEAN. RlleB !hs, '3 0. Oct. I. The beginning, start, and commenci n g of sc h ool. Introducing the n ew English teacher, l\1iss Kimbro, fro m t h e States, and we are also h onored by ha ving Mr. Meyer,of Balboa, with us. Oct. 2. Home rooms assigned to the various c l asses. Seniors, being a h o t bunch," were naturally g i ven t h e coolest corne r in t h e building. Oct. 3 B e h old! I pe r ceive a mass of unadorned heads approachin g me! H old everythingl I t's on l y the bald-headed fres hm en. Oct. + Seniors elected their class officers OUf ad vis er is nOlle other t han the eve r-dependabl e Miss H e ss e Oct. 7 Di scovered t h ere are over 50 "Freshies" this year. D ecided to let them have th e a sse mbl y all to themsel ves providi ng they behave B eware, "Freshies," it all depends on you Oct. 9. Hurray! F our more Seniors arrived on y e goode ole tub," the S S. //I1C OI1 There are 2 5 of u s n o w, but we expect more. O c t. 1 0 Introduce d to our n ew athletic dir ectress i\1 i ss Potts. She's real snappy l ooking and ha s s om e n ifty i deas abou t gym for this year. Sh e sure l y did make a hit wit h u s gir l s Oct. II "Crazy" party giv e n at Y. \Y. C. A. to w elco m e t h e n e w s ecr etar y, i V l i s s Van Every ( wh o immediate l y won t h e fav or of t h e Girl R ese r ves ) and the new m embe r s of the faculty. O c t. 1 6 Staff membe r s f o r THE CARIBBEA N elected. U ndoubte dl y w e s h all surpas s all the preceding efforts in publi s hing t h e best annual y et. Just wait and see O c t 7 T e a c h e r s h av e pupi l s w ell in han d b y thi s time ( o r v ice v e r s a ) O c t 1 8 W e all t e a c h e r s includ ed, heartily w e lc o m ed thi s Friday And an y o t h e r Friday, a s far a s that goes Oct. 21. On e of those "Blue M ondays" that yo u so often hear of. It rained con tinuall y during the whole day, making u s all, especially the stu dents, la zy Oct. 22. Seniors learned from their president, the well-chosen Ralph Crum, that they were to have no privileges. This b eing due to t h e fact that last year's class took advantage of them. Don't you fear, we're going to write a petition to 1\1r. Sawyers and demand a tryout! Y es sir ee Oct. 23. Steamship Cristobal docked, but no m ore Seniors for our class. Sad, but true! Oct. 24. Tragedy! First white sli p s o f the year politely delivered to several indi vidua l s Oct. 25. Seniors dec id e to g ive a Cake Sale at "Commy" to-morrow m orning, in order to feed the class treasury. Oct. 2 8 Cake Sale was fairly a s u ccess. In meeting this morning the Seniors decided to g iv e a Candy Sale at sc h oo l in the near future. Oct. 29. K eep cool, l ower classmen! S e nior s are planning for the ir party, so it ha s been rumo r ed Oct. 30. Hall owe'e n greetings! 1 wonder what damage the go blin s ( in other words the dare-devils of C. H 5 ) will do to the sc h oo l ? Oct.31. B elieve it or not, the sc h ool h ouse still stands in t h e same "dear o l d spot!" Guess the dare-devils went t o bed early or e l se they weren't in the humor to tackle the janitor. Something drastic ma y happen yet kn ows? Nov. J. One month in the T e mpl e of Learning, o r s h o u l d I say o f merely sittin g in classes, gone by. Supper Club meeting this p. m. An enormou s atte ndance is ex pected as Senior g irl s are serving, and they know their "onions" w h e n it comes to p l easing the "tum -tum."

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THE CA R IBBEAN 1 0 1 N ov. 2. A trip t o P o rto B ello wa s e njoyeel b y several m embe r s o f t h e faculty and a numbe r o f students Nov. + Three c h ee r s f o r the Panamanians On the ir a ccount i s a h olid a y :\ g r o u p o f C H. S. students w ent 011 a pi c ni c t o "Shimmy B e a ch" to ce l ebrate the day. 5 B e h o l d Our c i t y i s b e in g app r o a c hed by a mass o f fir e Calm y ourself, it's only the sunburned pi c ni c k e r s Nov. 6. S e ni o r s g a ve o u t the invitat i o n s f o r t h e ir c la ss part)'. ] [ S t o b e g i ve n at H o t e l \\'as hington this Friday. Steamship Anron arrive d thi s m orning and f o r liS it bro u ght o ne m o r e S enio r. 7. Are you all prepared f o r the first-cla ss party o f the y ear? J imag in e all the lit tl e "Fres h i es are "tic kl e d pink" at the t h o u ght o f go in g t o a Se nior C laH P a rI),. J only h o p e the y don't act too wild out in soc i ety. S S e ni o r party wa s a hu ge s u ccess made "whoo p ee and dance d t o the ir h e a r t s ( o r s h o ul d I f ee t ) content to" t h e v o-do-dee-o-do' s o f \\'e!c h's Harmo n y \V e w e r e h o n o r e d by having \V ee \Vill y \\' i! Iiam s dance a s p ecialty, whi c h wa s hi ghlr applauded. Nov. 9. The Balbo a and Pedr o Suppe r Club cabine t s met with the Cris t o bal cabine t o n an all day confe r e n ce made an e x cellent budge t o f e vents f o r t hi s y ear. planning t o have the annual confe r e n ce at I\1 0 r o I s lan d thi s y ear. H o t dogsl \Ye'll all b e the r e wit h b ells o n (and a little m o r e o f course ) II. :\rmis ti ce H e re's h oping the t eache r s are p e a ce ful wh e n they put our g rades o n our r e p o r t cards to-Illorrow. :"\ TOV. 12. Disco v e r e d that w e ha ve three ":\. pupil s f o r the fir s t t erm. One o f the .-\" students i s a S e ni o r a t that. The r e are [ 9 "B" stude nts. :-.Jo t so bad f o r C. H. S. e h? Nov 1 3 S e a Scou ts gave a dance at the Club h o use t o rai se funds f o r the ir trip next SUlllmer. Imme n se c r o w d wa s the r e mus t have made so m e "dough." Thr ee c h ee r s f o r t h e S e a S couts N o v. Lt. '-\thl e ti c .-\ssoc ia t i o n planning t o gi ve Cake Sal e at the "ComlllY thi s Saturd a y in o rd e r t o make m o n e y f o r the ir l ette r s e tc. N ov. I 5. S e a S couts, a l so 1\1 r. Sawye r s and P e n ce l e ft by b oat for San Bia s at 1 0 o'c l oc k t o-night. O ve r 50 b o y s went all the trip. Nov. [ 6 Cristobal g irl s came in seco n d ill a volle r ball game ve r s u s Balbo a g irl s S'too bad Bo)'s' A t hl e ti c .I\ssociatio n d i d fairl y w ell o n the Cake Sal e B eing so n ear Thanksg i v in g they co ul dn't e xpect too much. N o 1 7 Sea Scouts w e r e due h o m e a g ain fro m the ir San Bia s trip, but the r e i s n o s ign o f the m. L earned that lost t h e ir pro p elle r, so will b e a la te. N ov. [ S S c hool see med mi ghty bare wit h out the S e a Scouts and I\I ess r s Sawye r s and P e nc e \\'onder wh o s bri ght id e a it wa s t o l oose n the propelle r ? Nov. 1 9 :\ so rr y bunc h o f sea s i c k S e a S couts atte nded sc h oo l this m orning But in spite o f t h e ir trials and tribulat i o n s e a c h and Olle o f e m had a t im e o n the trip. Our princ ipal i s slig htl y sunburned. R e p ort, h e r es ted out all deck. N o v. 20. Strange sounds w e r e h eard fr o m the (;:esar c la ss during 4 t h p eriod. Late r l earne d that the ir a ss i gnment ha d b ee n to write a pared )' in Latin. H e r e s h o pin g w e 'll see so m e o f t h ose p a rodies in THE C A R IJ3BEAi\. 21. Fre n c h c la ss made p os t e r s writte n ill Fre n c h f o r t h e ir a ss i gnme n t L e a ve it to i\I i ss i\I oo r e t o make a c la ss inte r esting. "Fitty" :-..rewman's p os t e r was w ell c h ose n a s b es t. ,..,., Girl s app r o a c hed the sc h oo l in fan c y d r ess thi s p. Ill. The b o y s upo n questi oning "\Vhe r e s the banque t ? l earned t h e r e was a matinee at the Y. \\' C. :\. f o r the Suppe r Club g irl s N ov. 2 3 \\'e l os t in a volley ball game ve r s u s Balbo a g irl s B ms w ent t o Balbo a to play socce r. \Y onde r what the outco m e will b e Xov. 2 5 Sad but true, the l os t in the socce r game But Oi vcnd : \ rn esse n i s our star playe r. L et's have m o r e lik e him. Nov. 2 6 THE C .4.R1BJ3EAN sta f f are starting t o w ork e arl y thi s y e ar. H a v in g a m eeting t hi s p. m. ] ntend t o put out a bigg e r and b ette r n o, I d i d n t say l o u de r a n d fUIlnie r -annual this Nov. 27 S o m e o f the t e a c h e r s w e r e very kin d h earted and d i dn't give u s h o m e w ork during Thanksg i v in g h olidayso m ething t o b e thankful f o r. I gu ess t hey r e ali ze h o w hard it i s t o try and wh e n y ou're o n a vacatio n. N o v. 28. Thanks to the Puritans to-day i s a h oliday. I g u ess the r e will be f e w e r turkeys and m o r e tum Illy a c h es by the end o f this day.

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102 THE CARIBBEAN. :0.'"ov. 29. I don't know why to-day is made a h oliday unl ess the "cal endar makers are wise el1uf to know that it w o uld b e u se l ess to try and make u s attend sc h ool, o n account of the overabundance o f food con tain ed in our abdomens. :"\ TOV 30. :1.no th er m onth in the Temple of Kn owledge ha s terminated. (I wonder if we are one month wiser?) Balboa t eam wa s defeated b y CRI S TOBAL in a socce r game. Hurray! Only r easo n why we didn't win last Saturday was b ecause we played o n Balboa grounds. D ec I. At last Christma s i s drawing nigh Girl R ese rv es gave a "rummage sale" at the Silver Clubh ouse \\'e hacll o ad s o f fun but th e "shin es" got the best of the bargain, w e t hink. Dresses w e r e being so l d at a nick e l apiece! Imagine it! D ec 2. : \ true blu e M onday. Those f e w days ofT" from sc h oo l were just a "tease." I twas s uch an effort f o r us all to drag ourse lv es to sc h ool this a. m. D ec 3 i\I iss H esse aro u sed the s l ee p y students in Spanish cla ss to-d ay. Brought some interesting articl es whic h s he purc ha sed o n h er t rip in P e ru. Dressed Tom P esco d a s a P eruvian and h e sure l y l oo k ed th e part, except that the hat w ou l dn't fit. i V l ust b e a s w ellh ead, e h? D ec. +-Had a staA-' m ee tin g this p. 111, and are planning to give a "StaA-' H op" on Friday, l3th. Sh-h-h! \Ye'r e goi n g t o find out who's superstitious in this man's town. D ec 5 Rained cats and dogs to-day, so if we pupils are late to sc h oo l they'll have to blam e the we t grass thro u g h which w e u s ually make our s hort cuts. Ha! Ha! One point f o r u s pupil s D ec. 6. Supper Club meeting to-night. Junio r gir l s are se r ving. (1'1\ b e t everyon e eats at home firs t. ) D ec 7 N J i ss Kimbro took h e r Junior Engl ish class over to Balboa to visit th e Panama-American Build ing Final socce r gam e was played in Balbo a and we d idn't win ca u se i t wa s terribly hot and ou r star pla ye r can't stand the heat. ( Pretty good exc u se, m e thinks.) D ec. 9 The day of miracle s h as co m e B elieve it or not-Vir g ini a Ebe renz pai d h e r dues to-day. D ec 1 0 Had a staftmeeting t h i s afte rnoon. J 'ickets f o r t h e StafF H op were g i ve n out. They're nift), l ook ing. Eac h staA-' m embe r has to sell at least fiv e ti c kets-or e lse--. D ec I r. Lower grades are g ivin g a C hri stmas play, T o psy Turvy," to-morrow afternoon, ] t was very cleverly announced t his morning (Two c hildren with their faces on backwards v i sited all th e room s ) D ec. 12. The play went off excelle ntly this p. m. and proved to us t hat many of these tots are very tal ented. An e normou s crowd gathered at t h e Clubhous e to see t h e play. D ec. 1 3 A Friday at that! An "unsuperstitious" crowd t u rn e d out at t h e "StafT" Hop," wHich was a fair success Everyone had a dandy tim e. D ec. 16. Had a b eauty and popularity co ntest to-day among t h e C, H S students. Pete \"'ardlaw and T om m y P escod were voted t h e most popular boy and girl. Vio let R andall and Di ck W ood wer e vot e d the best looking And last but n o t l east-"Fitty" Newman was voted t h e witti es t. Also, Miss Moore was voted as the b es t -like d teac h er o f C. H. S. Three c h eets for the winn e r s o f t h e contest. R ah! R ah! R ah! Dec. 1 7 S e a Scouts played bas e ball against Fort D e L esseps, but w e lost Sad but t r ue. D on't you worry, we intend to win t h e next game by a wid e margin. D ec. 1 S i\1aking plans for our C hristmas party in our class rooms on Friday "Gonna have i ce c ream, cake, 'n everything." D ec 1 9 Pupil s see m to b e celebrating Christmas already Think vacation starts to-day, according to t h e "rumpus" t hey're raising, T eachers managed t o q u iet 'em down by threatening to a ss ign m ore h o mework unless t hey "act t h e ir age (Maybe J s h o uld s a y, "stop acting th e ir ag e.") D ec. 20. Eac h class raised "wh oopee" in their hom e r oo m in order to celebrate Christmas and the vacation to co m e Exchanged g ift s, had cake, candy, ice cream, etc. A r e gu lar banquet, no f oo lin! Hurray! \ \ 'e d on't have to come ba c k to "Sing Sing" till D ecembe r 30th H olidays! Goo d times! Fun galore! \\' h oopee! MERRY CHRI STMAS EVERYB ODY! Wa s Santa Claus good to you I H e i g h Ho! D ec. 30. "Gee, b u t I hate to get up in the morning"tra-la-la-Ia-Ia-la-la, Boy, Man, we students w e r e not hurrying along to sc h ool this m o rning! \\'e w o nd e r if this day will ever end. \ V hat'sa matter? T oo !TIuch C hristmas ce l ebration, 1 guess. D ec 3 1 For a N e w Y ear's p r esent f rom t h e facu l t y w e students r ece ived ou r report ca rd s

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THE C\RI BBEA?'<. rOJ \\'hat a gift! But-we hav e to go to sc h ool to 1'2 o'clock to-day. Our afternoon i s free \Yh oopee! and some \Yh oopee! \\'e can start celebrating at 1'2. 05. J an. I, 1930 Snappy New Y ear, J an. 2. I t be a New Year but Y e o l d T. O. L. appears the same this morning. I b elie\'e the "calendar makers" are trying to t c a se lis-givin g u s a every now and t h e n. J an. J Ah! Blessed F riclar h as come around again! o f t h e conteStants f o r the Miami B eauty Contest are from C. H. S. \ Vent to B alboa to-day to be m e asur e d and g i\ 'e n the o n ce-ove r in their bathing suits. .-\m o ng those pleasant beauties are Carmen Durham, l\lary Dean, Yic ler Randall, Eleanor L rwiler, and \'irginia Eberel17.. Three c h ee r s for C. H. S. R a h Rah! R ah! Jan. + Charley Pescod, the insignificant Freshman president, did his daily B o y S cout deed at noontime to-day. H e picke d up 1\l i ss Renison after s h e had fall e n up t h e sc h oo l step s. Thr ee points for the fre shme n. .Ian. 7 This sc h ool certainly does want t o know the life history o f LIS students. T o-day they gave out circulars saying that if we s n eeze, cough, feel hot, look pale, etc.; and all that sort o f I'ott hat we s h ou l d at h o m e All the flappers immediately rubbed o ff the war paint so a s t o look pale, but 1\11'. Sawye r s was t oo wise Jan. 8 Sopho m o res beat the Fros h in a base ball game out at Br eez y Point ( Radio Station field in New Cristobal.) Score was 7 2. Three c h ee r s for the Soph s Jan. 9. Doctors came O\'el' t o sc h oo l to examine us Those wh o w e r e w e r e called out of cla ss just wh e n it was the ir tUl'll to rec ite. 1\l os t o f u s [timed out to b e n ormal. Jan. 1 0 Had a s taR' meeting o f long duratio n thi s p. m. \\'e're c u ssing and di sc u ssing the yearly school Carnival t o be given at Fort De L esseps. 1\11'. Noe was h ere at thi s a ssemblage. H e 's taking charge o f the r e\'ue and ha s so m e good ideas. N o w its up to u s to carry hi s o rders t hrough. Come o n, students co m e o ne, come alL Jan. 1 3 Sea S couts played a ti e sco r e game with D e L esse p s at Kok o l1ut Park. Score wa s -+--+. So our Sea Scouts aren't so easy to beat a s o ne rni g h t think. .Ian. 1-+. H u s h f o lk s and I 'll let YOll in on so m e hi g h sc hool scandal. Rita Joyce cl eaned h e r white ox f o rd s with h e r own han ds. J uni o r s w o n a close game o f 8-7 frol11 the Fros h. J an. 1 5 1\11'. wa s hLTe this p. Ill. and explained our resp ec ti ve parts in t h e Carni\ al. S o m e o f t h e acts are w ell o n their \\ all d l oo k good. \'i\'a l a Carniv al Jan. 1 6 Staflmeetillg. D iscllssed more abo u t the Carniv al. I f b o y s dOll 't s h o w up m o rnin g to clean the g r ounds ha ve to dig down d ee p in the ir pockets and donate a dollar 51, 100 cents to the StaR-' So, boys, I adv i se to s h o w up the m orning after t h e night h e f o r e so y o u'll ha\' c dou g h cnuf t o go to the next dance. \\'hat sar y o u? Jan. 1 7 S en i o r class gave a Sale in main hall o f C. H. S. buil di n g E verything wa s so l d quic kly. tot brought a co upl e of ni c k e ls, so w e came out rather wdl. F ourtee n d o llar s to the good. :,\ To t so bad, m e thinks. Jan. I S Sad but true, the Sea Scouts were b eate n to-day the L T nifru co team. Bu t by the close sco r e of 7-6 C o m e o n Sea Scouts, s h o w 'em what y o u ca n do in the next game \\'e're r ooting f o r ya! Jan. 2 0 Those taking part in the Carni\'almet at the Y. \\'. C . -\. with 1\lr. :--"oe Things are coming along fin e now. S h o w will b e g r eat if it k ee p s up at this rate Have planned to ha\' e it 011 F ebruary 21st, if all's well. Jan. 21. Girl R ese r ves are preparin g them-selves f o r confe r e nc e at 1\101'0 I s lan d \\'c r e all excite d \V ill this w ee k e v e r end? .T an. '22. Girl s o f t h e Sweeth eart l\Iarch are practicing a n e w dance. Looks rather cute. Jan. 23. Stafl' meeting. \\'e'r e kn ee-dee p in w o rk abollt the Carni\al. ;\ I r. is working \ 'ery hard o n t h e revu e Jan. 2-+. Girl R eserves l e ft o n +30 train. \ e r y hig h spirited. Jan. 2 5 .-\ pam' o f Balbo a bo)"S and g irl s burned in a launc h starting on a trip. i\l othe r s w o rried s i c k f o r f ear i t s G ir l R eserves. Pho ned and discovered Jan. 26. Girl Resen'es came bac k o n e \ e n ing train-saf e and sound. i\'ot a scratch on 'em. \\'e w e r e sure g la d to see our parents tho u gh. Jan. 2 7 A. mighty tired looking bUllc h o f Girl R ese r ves appeare d at sc h oo l thi s m orning All w e r e telli n g tal es o f how worried t h e ir parents were f o r f ear t hey w e r e all board the" Big Bill."

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THE CARIBBEAN. J an '28. Sea SCOllts murde red the United Fruit C o t ea m S co r e wa s I-t-'2. J an 29. Girl R ese r ves are kneed ee p in w ork over a B e n e fit Card Party the y r e g i v in g this Saturday. The r are trying to rai se m o n ey to se n d a de l egate t o the States H e r e s lu c k t o the m J an 30. Staff m ee tin g in whi c h our Edito r gave u s all fair warning lhat our annual w ould b e a A o p unless w e e a c h and e v e ry o n e settle d d o wn t o r cal work J an. 31. S o ph o m o r es g a ve a nifty cla ss party at t h e Strange r s Club. .\ goo d time wa s had bv all I' m s ur e F e b. I. Girl R ese r ves g a ve a Card Part)" t o rai se m o n ey to se n d a d e l egate to the States H ear that t h e y made 52 5 clear pro fit. Three c h ee r s f o r th e Girl R ese r ves F e b. 3 Rita put h e r flo win g tresses in a kn o t thi s m orning, and b elieve it o r not t hey stayed th e r e all day. F e b. -to I Vlr. N oe had th e revu e m ee t a t F ort D e L esse p s to-da y It's coming al o n g s l o wly but sure l y F e b. 5 Mi ss H esse made h e r third year Spanis h c la ss ge t busy. The y all had to make a post e r in Spanis h. The r e w e r e som e r e al g oo d ones, ad v ertising a c ir c u s a ba se ball game, b ee r and o h yes-som e t h o u ghtful p e r so n made o n e to a d v e r ti se our C H S. Carnival. F e b. 6 \\' hoop ee Hurray! .'-\n d many other e x p r ess i o n s o f g l ee! The flee t's in. N o t m a ny pupi l s a re doi n g mu c h studying with those b attle s h ips o u t in the ba y 'Tis a b eautiful s i g h t F e b 7 Revu e prac tic e at F ort D e L esse p s Mr. N oe s a ys w e n eed p ep." J quite a g r ee d o n't b elieve some o f u s kn o w wh a t p ep" i s. F e b 1 0 Stree t s are just flood e d wilh white uniforms They r e ally l oo k clean. ( I m e an the str ee t s n o t th e unifo rm s ) Y es s ir ee The Aeet's in all right. F eb. 1 I. Girl R ese r ves had a c abinet meetin g and decided to have a b o a t rid e this Fri d a y night u p t h e o l d Fre n c h Canal. \\'e'r e try in g to rai se m o ney f o r our delegate, so we'r e charg in g ever ybody 25 cents F eb. 1'1. \\'e students are kin d o f s h a k y in t h e k nees 'cause tom o r ro w we have our m i d-year exam s They 'll place each and ever yo n e o f u s w h e r e we be l o n g. The year i s half gon e F e b 1 3 'Yonder how many t es t s T flunk ed" t o-d a y? F e b. LJ.. M o re exams whi c h w e eithe r pass ed or? ? ? F e b. 15. Big game t o-day Y es s ir ee! Balbo a H i g h S c hool us Cristobal High S c h ool. 'Twas a hard fight with a ti e s co r e until, in the e i ghth inning, o n e those Balboa bums made a run F e b. 1 7 Mr. Sawyers call e d all m embe r s o f t h e R ev u e to ge t h e r and told the m t hat if t h e y didn't tllrn out to practice the r e would n't b e any Carnival. S o it' s up to us. F e b. 1 8 Had a R evue prac ti ce at Y. W. this evenin g and at la s t the s h ow's b eginning t o l ook lik e so m ething. Vi v a la Carniv al. F e b. 1 9 B e prepared, y e hi g h sc h oo l students c au se Carniv al i s nigh. Only two m o r e days and th e date will have arrived. F e b Mr. '
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THE CAR1BBEAN. l OS Feb. '28. Last day of t h e s hort and snappy month. Fres hm e n are serving at Supper C l ub. Wonder if t h e gir l s will all be ali ve tomorr ow? Time will t ell. Mar. I. Y es, w e' r e still livin g Sad but true. Those freshm e n girls sure ly ca n coo k an "Fyetalian" dinne r. Mar. '2. Viva la R e ina! Panamanian Carnival ha s arrived and w e young Am erica n s are g ladly h elping the m celebrate Viva! Viv a! r i v al Mar. 3 \Vo nd e r why so many students appear s l eepy thi s m o rning. T oo mu c h ce l ebratio n, I g u ess Seem s a s tho u g h they indulge in Panamanian h olidays mor e enthusiasti c ally than in th e ir o wn. + Last day of Carnival and all C o l o n turned out. The natives with thei r hair and "Mi Pallera" costumes, etc. The big parade started about ... p. m. and too k h ours to cove r t h e wh o l e Queen's Aoat was gorgeous. C o m mi ssary A oat wa s by far t h e best so it ha s b ee n rumo r ed. Anyway, Viva la R e ina! Mar. 5 'Twas o n this fatal day that our ow n editor-in-chie f appeared at sc h oo l wit h a bea u tiful bla c k The excllse Says h e f ell o n th e icein t h e tropic s Can you imagine it? Guess h e can't r olle r -s ka te so well, e h ? (On t h e s l", ['II jus t t ell y o u that I think his exc u se is kin d of s hady. ) j\lJar. 6. S eve ral of our C. H S. stud ents are workin g hard on the operetta ;' T h e G y p sy Rover," whi c h i\li ss Erte l i s directing. Rumo r s are that it will b e v e ry goo d if t h ose co n ce rn e d get down to r e al hard work i\' l ar. 7 An other Friday welcomed not only b y the stud ents eithe r. (Jus t b etwee n you and m e, 1 'II tell you t hat aliI' ed itor-in -chie f didn't s h o w up at sc h oo l to-day. Guess h e s trying to "doctor up" that co l o rfu l eye o f his b e f o r e happe n s al o ng. ) Mar. 9. B e ing a Saturday many o f us stud ents visited the imm ense Navy s hips-principall y t h e airplane ca rri e r s the Saratoga and L tl}lg/('y) whic h are a s big a s c iti es the m se l ves R e ports were that t h e ambitio n o f seve ral C. H S. stud ents i s t o b e an : \dmiral in the Navy ( D ec i sions made since visiting t h ese p o w e rful ca rri e r s ) Mar. 1 0 The harbo r l oo k s sort o f empty and bare now without the s h ip s o f th e Fle e t th e r e Y es si ree They all l e ft to -day, on l y t h e h ospital s hip ) r e main s ?-,IRI9i.J21 1 i\l ar. I I. "The G y psy Rover" i s going to b e nifty if all co n ce rn ed turn out to practice an d all do th e ir part. J u s t wait and see if I'm j o kin g i\l ar. 12. I 'm te llin g t hat miracl es happen day. Now Mr. Sawyers ha s a new stli t. : \ re al c lassr-l oo king o n e, too-and does i t fit? Mar. 1 3 Ope r etta see m s to b e coming al o ng O. K Expect t he w h o l e hig h sc h oo l to turn out and see it. Mar. q. An othe r Friday h eanil), w elco medSeniors are busy whi s p e rin g to t h e m se lv es a bout the Senior H e re's h oping it's a s na pp), o n e and goes over big. G ood lu c k to Seniors! (Maybe n eed it. ) i\l ar. 1 5 Sea Scouts l e f t f o r [ 0 days camp at Gatun L oc k s Y ep, during sc h oo l 'n e v e r y thin g I f d on't k ee p up wit h the ir sc h oo l w o rk, they are s imply kic k ed out o f camp. Sounds good t o m e Mar. 16. Reports fro m t h e S e a Scouts' skippe r ( n o n e o th e r than our OW/1 'alte r \\,ikin gstad) w e r e that 'twas a s l eepless nite, b e ing th e fir s t nite out at camp. i\l ar. 1 7 Three c h ee r s f o r t h e Iris hm en! 'fes t h e r e are so m e Iris h e r s in C. H. S. b y the l oo k s of th e ma ss of g r ee n that approac h ed the T e mpl e of L earni n g to ce l ebrate St. P a tric ks' i\I ar. 1 8 Mr. N oe was ats<.:h oo l to-day trying o u t parts f o r our Senior p l a y Have c h ose n "The L otter)" Man." H e re's h o pin g it goes off with a ban g 1 9 Dress r e h ea r s al f o r "The Gyps)' R over." H e r e s wis hin g th e m th e best luc k an d s u ccess i\l a r. '20. J lIniors r ece i ved t h e ir c la ss ring s to-d ay. They're white an d yellow, go l d an d square-shaped V e ry nice l oo kin g Jus t b e tw ee n o u and m e, I 'll t ell ),ou that 1 prefe r the bla c k onyx. The 1930 cla ss rin gs are richer l oo kin g ( I think) Mar.21. "'Th e Gypsy R o v er" wa s g iven at t h e :\mer i c a Theater o n this m e m o rabl e nig ht. 'Twas unanimo u s ly agreed that it was excellently ca rri ed out. E ve ry o n e in th e audie n ce appea red t o enjoy it tho r o ughly. Virginia Steve n son and Frederic k K r oll acted an d s an g th e ir parts wonder fully; a l so e a c h and eve r y othe r actor in t h e operetta. Mar. 22. D on't t ell a so ul, but C. H. S. g irl s sco r ed seco n d in an ind oo r baseball game UJ. B. I-I.S. 1 t's O ...::. 'cause our g irl s put up a hard fight. A

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106 T H E CARIBBEAN. g r o u p o f h ig h sc h oo l kids, kn o wn a s t h e \ V h oo pee Club," w ent o n a pi cnic to D evil's H o l e "A k ee n t im e wa s ha d b y all," an d I kn o w they all made "whoopee." f\f a r. 23 Firs t r e h ears al f o r S e n i o r p l a y f\1r. says we will p rodu ce t h e b es t play ever g iv e n if w e work hard L e t's g o c a s t and s h o w e m what w e ca n do l\f a r. 2 + C ommittee fr o m the States t o arrive fr o m C olumbia Unive r s it y t o see w hat's wrong w i t h the Canal Z o n e sc hool s i V lar. 26 i V rr. Sawye r s co n sented t o put o n so m e o f t h e C a rni v al numbe r s at t h e r eq u es t o f the command in g office r at F ort Rando lph. Practi ce d a f e w numbe r s t o d a y and have a n eat little program w orked lip big b y I V l i ss H esse .Mar. 2 7 C ommittee from Columbi a U n iv e r s it y v i s ited sc hool t o-d a y l\1e a sure d t hi s, t hat, an d t h e o t h e r t h in g Guess w e 'll have a p erfec t bui l d in g wh e n t h ey get t h r o u g h i V li ss Patte r so n t h e n e w comme r c ial t e a c h e r arrive d o n t h e Steams h ip Ancoll, too. H a s ve r y striking ap p earance an d see m s t o kn o w h e r o n i o n s V e s h all see . -\n y wa y t h r ee c h ee r s f o r Mi ss Patte rs o n. i\1ar. 28. j\I J i ss H esse kin d l y arranged a p rogram f o r t h e Chaplain at F ort R andolp h w hich co n s i s t e d o f so m e o f th e Carnival numb e r s and parts o f T h e G y p s )' R over." T h e boys see med to appreciate t h e entertainment imme n se l y, espec i all y t h e Sw ee t h earts o n Parade." I n fac t they s impl y r oared with la u g h t e r w h e n t h ose girl s tri e d to imitate a so ldi er's marc h. Mar. 29. C. H S. g irl s def eate d B. H S. g i rl s in an in doo r base ball game playe d o n t h i s m e m orabl e d a y T h r ee h earty c h ee r s f o r our g irls Rah R a h R a h j\1ar. 3 1 T h e Survey C ommittee fr o m C o lum b ia Unive r s ity i s g i ving LIS examina ti o n s this m o rni ng This p. m. w e ha ve fr ee to ourse lv es (l w i s h t hey'd g i ve u s exams ever y d a y in t h e w ee k. ) A pri l I. Only 50 per ce n t of C. H S. students have b ee n fool ed H a H a T h e fa c ulty I Sure l y t hey've all been fool ed This p. m. wa s grante d free to all studen ts on a ccount o f th e Survey B o ard. A pri l 2 H orro rs! \ V ill w e e v e r ge t u sed t o going to sc h oo l i n t h e a ftern oon afte r t w o d a ys ofl-? They've s p oiled LIS now : \ pril 3 StafF meetin g i n whic h w e dec ided t hat everyth i n g h a d to b e 111 b y May I Let' s get to work, stafF m embers. A p ril +-Gi rl R ese r ves had a Supper C lub m ee t i ng at w h i c h th e S enio r gi r l s serve d S o o f co u r se t h e supp e r wa s d e lic-s hu s h A p p o i n t e d our b es t lookin g g irl s t o w ork b e h ind c o u n t e r at F oo d Sale t o -lll orrow. April s G ir l R ese r ves made a h a r d -e a rned 530 o n Food Sal e w h i c h IS rath e r good W e s u r e l y d o n eed it. Apri l 6 The all-talkie pictu re Sw ee ti e see m s t o have made a b i g hit with C H. S students They'r e all tal k in g a b out it in t h e h alls It's all about colle g e l ife i n and out o f cla sses Apri l 7 D on't fail t o-buy a n e w spape r t o-day and c h eris h i t. B i g h eadl in es 'n e veryth in g stating t hat students o n Canal Z o n e rate h ig h e r t h an t h ose in t h e States ( a cco rdin g to t h e a c h iev e m e n t t es t s ) Hurray! Viva! \Vh oo p ee I n o t h e r w o rd s, t h r ee c h ee r s f o r t h e Z onites Apri l 8 Had play p r a c t i ce a t t h e Y. W. C. A t onig h t and it's c oming al o ng gr eat. Have d ec id e d t o g i ve it May 1 5 and 16t h at t h e C lu b h o u se That m e an s wor k f o r t h e c a s t. Apri l 9 D o and look and a c t ),our b est, ye s t u d ents o f t h e T O. L. The surveyo r s are vis iti ng e a c h and e ve r y cla ss t o-day Apri l 1 0 O n e o f our brig h t Junio r boys lost h i s s h oes in s ixt h p erio d Stud y H all, m u c h to t h e surprise o f j\/ I i ss Kimbro. R e a so n f o r remo v in g s h oes f ro m f eet? P upil w h o wa s t hat d evil is h Tommy P escod, of c o u r se, q u o t e d t hat i t was entire l y too warm. April I I. L ast day that t h e "ed u c a tors will h o n o r u s with t h e ir p r ese n ce at s c h ool. They r e g o ing t o l e a ve u s o n t h e n ext b oat. B o oH oo! April 1 2 "Sh o w B oat," a 1 6re e l Unive r sal picture o f life o n the M i ss i ss i p pi in t h e earl y clay s wa s ve r y c l e v erly advertise d this p m The manager o f t h e Strand Theate r (you k now w h o I m e an ) J a c k Blev i n s) had a Roat made a l m os t a carbo n co p y o f th e S h o wb oat. The n h e had a coupl e o f g irls (yes, C. H. S. students) dresse d in o ld fa shio n ed c ostumes with p o k e b o n n e t s l a c e g l oves) hoop s k irts littl e pantal ettes n e v eryt h in g Al so a co upl e o f boys a s the i r partne r s d r esse d to fit t h e part. Thi s certainly did draw a c r o wd t o see and h ear t h e pi c ture Apri l 1 3 T h e surveyor s d epar t e d o n t h e Steamship Cristobal t h i s p. m. Mr. '<\' illia m s t h e superinte nd ent o f sc h o o l s ) l e ft wit h t h e m B on voy a ge

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T H E CA R IBBEAN. 107 April '4. Sh h h h h h -h! Can you k ee p a sec r et? One o f our J uni o r g irl s i s e n g a ge d Shh h h h-h! D on't make so mll c h n o i se, and ]'11 t ell y o u wh o Yes s ir ee! El s i e D oar has a pretty diamo n d 011 h e r l e ft hand. I don't kn o w who th e "luc k y gu y i s but it's rumo r e d that he's o n e o f the Pan Ame ri can Airways f ello w s April 1 5 Ohh h -h. S o m e m o r e v a catio n days N o m o r e sc hool till j\;l onday, th e '2 [ s t. T hre e c h ee r s f o r Eas te r Apri l 1 7 Eve r yo n e s talking and w o nd e rin g and whi s p e rin g and buzzing and cllss in g and d i s cu ss ing about the co l o red strips o f pape r p os t e d all around t OWIl, in cars, at sc h oo l 'n e v erywhe r e with jus t 3 w o rds-"The I ottery Man." di sco v e r ed it wa s the name o f the S enio r April I S Good b e good and quiet That mean s y o u -and y o u Eac h and ever y C. H. S. student. April 1 9 T is lovel y to ha ve it p our down rain jus t wh e n we'r e in the midst o f our h olidars (Stric t sarc a s m. ) : \ pril 20. Eas t e r tidings everrbody! Yes, it's raining to-day too N e v erthe l ess the Eas t e r bunny manage d to s wim (rom h o u se to house wit h the Easte r e ggs. April'll. Bac k in "Sing Sing" a g ain and n o more h olidays till June B o o H oo! ( Unl ess o n e d es ires t o play "hook ey.") N o harm inte nded, m e r e ly a s u gges ti o n. April '22. S o m e C. H S. students have started the fad o f "Opinio n Books" whi c h w ould b e b ette r name d "slam b oo k s T rouble i s you can' t fin d out wh o i s y our fri e n d (or e n emy) cause d on't s i g n the ir names with the o pini o n. i\l i g hty mys t erio u s m ethinks April '23. Steamship .tucon dock e d this m ornin g but that d oesn't m ean a thing t o u s (except w e'd lik e to b e o n e o ( its passenge r s o n the return trip n orthward) April '2+ P lay practice-it's coming alo n g s lowly but sure ly. The o l e town certainly i s all "ho t and b othe red" with curiosity over the nifty adve rti se m ents w e have f o r it, One can't turn his h ead without fac in g T h e Lott e r y i\lan" printed in front o f him April '25 Freshme n the la s t o f the year, w ent o ve r with a bang. :\ snappy time was had by all a t the H o t e l Washingto n. The ir programs w e r e v ery cute :\nd the surprises o f surprises occurre d o n that e v entful night. C. H S d is-covered they ha d so m e excellent tale n t in t h e lim : o f eccentric danci ng. \\'ho was it? \\'ould yo u rad(r lik e to kn o w ? \\'hy i t wa s n o n e oth e r than o u r O WI1 Victor i\l e l e ndez (on e o f the d i g nified" Seni o rs) impersonating H a l S k elly I magine h e will l e a ve f o r afte r h e graduates. I t w ill b e jus t too bad, afte r Ziegfie l d c atch es a glimpse o f his unsurpass abl e dance s t e p s Three c h ee r s f o r Victor and t h e Freshman Party. Rah! Rah! R ah! April '26 Our swimming t eam c r osse d the I sthmus d etermine d t o de f eat Balbo a in a s wim ming m ee t. D id yo u a s k wh ethe r o r n o t w e W a ll? I'm afrai d 1 can't h ear y o u o r d on't understand, o r so m ething o f the sort. I d rat h e r n o t t ell r a . "\prjl 28. Rained lik e cats and dogs Lovely isn't i t ? "\n d did i t r ain d uring Easter va ca ti o n ? \\"hat a questi o n "\prjl .10. L as t d a y o f the F oo l s m o n t h whi c h two m o r e m onths i n this p r i so n e r -e r l m ean "dream h o u se." I. Y es w e stude n ts w ell kn o w that it's supposed t o b e and w e shou ld ce l ebrate But h o w in thunde r can o n e ha ve a quee n, and skip around so m e f10 w e r e d p o l es wh e n it rain s "todo e l ti el11po?" May '2. This Fridar wa sn't begrudgin g ly recei ved n oh ow. Oh that in the w ee k w e r e a Frida y. May 5 Our edi t o r in -c hi e f took all the mate rial f o r THE CARIBBEA:\' to press to-da y H e re's h o pin g all's w ell and e nds w e ll. 6 T o m the editor-in -c hi e f c all ed a S t aA-' meetin g in wh ic h h e k i ndl y informed LIS that e a c h and every o n e of u s have to make a p os t e r f o r t h e S e ni o r o r e l se--. i\l ethinks the r e w o n't b e any 'el ses." 8 A s S e ni o r s appro a c hed the ir Englis h c l a ss thi s a. m. n o t e a c h e r could b e f ound b ehind the d es k. N o Miss I\:imbro wa s a c tuall y absent. Di g nifiedo r b ette r saiddevili s h S e ni o r s starte d rai s ing "whoop ee but w e r e soo n stopped b y t h e appearance o f i\l r s Grune wa l d. 1\11'. Sawye r s "put o n e over o n em" 'cause h e ha d pho ned h e r to co m e a s substitute Ha, ha f o r t h e Seni o r s 9 Girl R ese rves had S u p p e r Club m ee t in g in whi c h Junio r s se r ved a lusc i olls s u p p e r. Chose the office r s ( o r next t o b e a very r e liabl e group. Best o ( lu c k and success t o 'em

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108 T H E CARI BB E AN. 1 2 Posters f o r t h e p lay turne d o u t to b e real nifty. Have bee n p l aced in e a c h and eve r y littl e c ubby h ole o f t h e "big city i\l a r 13. l\l[ o r e tests! But will yo u b elieve me, it's t h e endof the 5th sixw ee k s period M y, b u t time flies! Actu ally flies, I t ell yaJ q .-\ n e r vo u s group o f Senio r s faced thei r cla sses to-day. \\'hy? B ecause the Senio r i s to be g i ve n f o r t h e first tim e t-O-Ill-0-f f-O-W nig h t It w o n t b e l o n g n o w f o r yo u o f the pla y c ast. Better hurry a n d get rid of Y'Ollf shakiness 1 5 One o f t h e big d a ys o n th e C. H. S. ca lendar. S enio r pl ay w as give n a t t h e Cri s t o bal Club h o u se an d wa s a hu ge s u ccess I s t h e b es t olle ever g i ven, so t h e public s a ys Three c h ee r s f o r i\Tr. Noe, wh o was Ollr faith ful an d untiring d irector. l\1ay 1 6. Pla y a gain g iven an d was atte nded by a s eq uall y lar ge crowd as t h e previ o u s nig ht. (Just between yo u an d m e I 'll b e t that so m e f o lk s w ent t o see it t w i ce 'c au se they liked i t so mu c h. ) 1\1a)' 1 7 C ongratulatio n g ra c i o u s l y g iven to v ari o u s m e m be r s o f the p l ay c a s t co mplim enti n g 'e m an d the ir excellent acting. Ea c h an d eve ryon e po r t rayed his part w o n de rfull y An d I'm not try ing to bluff yo u e ith er. 1'1a y 9 J uni o r s are bu sy bu zzinbu zzin" ove r th e J uni o r S e nior B an q u e t. T hey're plan ning to g i ve it on t h e 29th o f thi s v e r y m onth, so i t ha s bee n rumo r ed S a y t h e r e, g irli es, that i s n't f a r off! H a ve YOll all got your e x quis i te fr oc k s prepared f or t h e eve n t? 1"1 a y 2 0 I t w o n't be l o n g n o w, ye S e n i o r s o f C H S I n f act e xa c tl y o n e m onth f ro m to-d a), you will ha ve r eceived your hard-earne d d ip lomas-you w ill ha ve "quit uated"-you 'll b e an alum nu s D o n t you un de rstand? Y o u 'll b e l e a v i ng dear o l e C. H S 1'1 ay 2 1 Sen i o r s r ece i ved th e very c l e v e r invitations to t h e J u nior S e nior Ban q uet to b e g i ven t his Thursday. S a y, t h e close o f the sc h oo l year m ust be drawin g nigh, if t h e far e w ell banquet i s soon to be give n. L a wdy, 1 d i d n't quite real i ze it was so nea r t h e e n d o f th e ye a r H o nestly, I didn't. M ay 22. J u s t anoth e r day o n t h e c al e n d ar. But dOll't you f ea r t h e r e was n o i d l e n ess o n t h e part of a n y student. (:--lot t hat I noti ced ) May 23. Anoth e r Fri d a y has r olle d around aga i n Now, 1 m t elling you, w e stu dents a r e s imply infatuated wit h Frida), n o, not Crusoe s handy man! \Ve m e an t h e day i tself. May 26 At la s t t h e t h rill o f t h e year h a s occurre d THE C ARIBBEANS a r e O llt for sale t o-d a y C o m e o ne! C o m e all! B u y yourse lf a B oo k o f Kno w l edge in a snappie r form And are t h ey snappy? J u s t gif a l oo k! May 2 7 A n nual s are s elling lik e t h e h o t d oughnuts g randma u se d t o make." R e ally they're ver y appe t izing and makes o n e h u n g r y f o r m o r e 1'1 a y 28. 1 s a y the r e, y e fair maid e n s and la ss i es o f t h e graduating class o f '30, h av e ye all go t t hine e l egant g o wns prepared t o d o n f o r to-m o r r ow evening at t h e H o t e l \Vas hing t o n ? U n d oubte dl y, you h a ve And b oys d on't f o r ge t that n eat c r ease in your pants-w ear t hat s piff y n e w n eckti e (Also starve until tom o rr o w night an d s av e y our appe ti t e f o r t h e banque t. ) 1'I Ia y 2 9 On e o f t h e b es t--or s h o uld w e s a y th e best, banque t eve r g iven a t Cri s t o ba l Hi g h S c h ool. A ft e r an inte n se l y appeti zing dinn e r in t h e go r geo u s dinin g sal o n o f t h e H o t e l \ 'Vashingto n an d seve ral ve r y c l eve r s p eec h es g iving advi ce t o u s Senio r s w e venture d into t h e b ey o u ti f ul ball r oo m D an cing was enjoye d u nti l t h e w ee s mall h o u rs o f t h e m o rn i n g May 30 U s banque t e r s are r ecupe ratin g from t h e m orning afte r t h e nig h t b e f o r e \ V e're n o t u se d to s u c h r ich f ood an d s u c h late h ours That's a fine w a y to ce l ebrate i V I e m o ria l D a y J lin e J. I ac tuall y g a s ped w h e n 1 d i scove red t h a t w e w e r e n o w living in t h e m onth o f Jun e I s a y the r e S e ni o r s thi s i s 7 une-the la s t m onth in sc h oo l f o r )'o/{. J un e 2 Our cla ss pres i dent, t h e p opular 1'1r. R al p h Cru m c all ed a m ee tin g thi s bright, s un s hin y m o rnin g in June D ec ided o n s p e ak e r f o r comme n c e n1ent, t y p e o f d ip l oma, t h e Union Church f o r Ba ccalaure a te S e r v i ces etc \ V e h ad so mu c h bu siness t o di sc u ss t hat w e w e r e l a t e to class. ( But, b e ing S enio r s w e didn't o bj ec t .) J un e 3 Seve ral students h a d s p ec ia l e xam s yes t erday a s t h ey are l eaving f o r t h e States e arl y \V on d e r h o w t h ey pulled t h ro u g h ? Gu ess I c an t ell b y exp r ess i o n s o n t h e ir faces J un e + \Vant to h ear so m e t hing v e ryextrao r dinary, unus u a l u niq u e, odd an d wha t h a ve yo u ? B e l i eve it o r n o t it p oure d down r ai n t o-d a y Sure, rig h t in t h e m i ddl e o f t h e stree t s '11 eve r y t hing. J un e 5 S enio r g irl s h a d a h eartt oh eart (o r s h o u l d I s a y fis t-to fis t talk) t h i s a ITI in r egard

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T H E CARI BB E. 'I'\T. to t h e of dresses they're going to wear for Bacc a laureate Sen ic es. D ec id e d o n fluff y, rumy dresses with big ha ts, and rather long. Sounds to m e Can hardl y wait to see 'e m. J un e 6 One of th ose b eloved Frid,,s whic h we Seniors so l ove. June 8 First bunc h o f students l e ft for States on steamshipCris/obnl to-day. :\11 prepared (or a vacation. B o n voyage I s ay b o n "Drage! June 9. Ollt' mon' Alonday after this o n e I'm telling you Seniors, each and one o f you-"I t w on't b e long n o w!" ] une 11. Sen iors r ecei,"ed their graduation announceme n ts to se nd out her e ane! there and to the r e latives back h ome. l \ ly, but don't t h ey f eel and a c l big? H a, Ha! But then too, graduate f ro m hig h sc h oo l OJJce in a lifetim e June 1 3 Girl Reserves ha d the ir la s t Supper Cl u b meeting o f t h e year in w h ic h t hey e lected t h e ir delegates for t h e National Conference at Kis ki Camp, near Pittsburgh. \\'e, t h e students o f C. H. 5., are so g lad that t hey managed to raise enuf dou gh. Three hearty c h ee r s for the Girl R eserves' Rah' R a h R ah! June '+ Say there, boys a n d girl s o f t h e class of '30, are all prepared f o r t h e Baccalaureate Services manana ? I f n o t why not, and w hat not, as the saying goes? June '5. I must declare t ha t the girl s certainly did l oo k adorable in th e ir garden dresses and big flopp y hats and the boys equally neat in w hite tro u se r s and dark coats at t h e Baccalaureate Services, h e l d at t h e Union Church. The churc h looked very beautiful and the se r v i ces w e r e very impress ive, especially to t h e sorrowful S e ni o r s June 16. ))0 you ha ve a queer f ee lin g deep down i nside, seniors? :"\TOW don't be s h y and backward ahout it, go ahead, and admit it. It's natural! Yes s ir ee! This is the beginningthe start-the comme ncement of rour last week at this T. O. I .. .June 1 7 Seniors seem to thi n k sc h ool ha s closed according to t h e freedom and independence been .J lin e I S :\11 the little Fres h ies, a few Soph s, too-are begging t h e Seniors for the ir personal cards and p leadin g with tear s in the ir eyes for t h e m to autograph thi s, that, and t h e oth e r thing. Of course, we willin glr and grac i o usly fulfill t h ei r ardent desires for we fully realize how treasurable our signatures will he after we'v e climbed t h e ladder of s u ccess June 1 9 I f cou l d only see t h is bunc h o f S e niors on t h is m e m orable They have t h e m os t f o rlorn and expression o n t h e ir faces Y o u'd think the y w e re about to approach all electric chair o r so methin g of the sort. I g u ess t hey really do hate the t h o u g h t of leavin g dear o l d C. H S., the and even the teach e rs, ill spite o f thei r strictness to f o rc e LIS to Three c h ee r s for t h e best bunch of teac h ers C. H S. e ver had' R ah! R ah! R a h J un e 20. .'\1\ o f t h e proud papas and mamas co ul d b e see n i n t h e front row with a broad s mil e o n this l ong-awaited date. Each and Senior boy and girl looked h is best. : \ very intelligent-looking class, to b e s u re. I feel certain that t hey're goi n g t o make a name for themselves in som e wa y or othe r. T ime will tell! Congratulati ons! C o n gratulatio n s! Best of lu ck to you e ni o r s Cristobal Coaling Station where Ships of the World take Coal.

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T H E CARIBBEAN. Pholo b y Kexluk, PIHlU IIIIJ.

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THE CARIBBEAN. III GES DI'lI" kll)' IIIIJ1ItI, jU. I t i s t h ro u g h our Exchange D epartment that we learn of oth e r sc h oo l s in rhe Cnited States. \\'e lik e recei\'ing exc han ges, because thro ugh them we ca n get different idea s t hat h e lp us to improve our Annual. Through our exc hanges .-IS OTHERS SEE US. THE CARIDBEA1\' Cri stobal Nigh Sr/100/ TIle PI/rple fJ.pill h:t:; j ust recei\'cd THE \\'hat:l splendid W e read it with more t:nthusi:ts m than rend anything in a long time. Th..: photographs are lovely. Pm'plt' fflllill, Ball High S{/tool,C(/I;;I'JIOIl, T t',WIS. TH E CARIBUEAX' CriSfobli1 lIi:dl Srhool Your yearbook, containing so much general inforrn:llion :l.lld such s ll:lJl shots of the t \'er-alluring and l1l:tgicaltropics, h as a uni\'ersal :tppeal i a r more t han the aver:tge a nnual which is often so "locali'led" that it i, unc'erstood on l y by the student body. T he pc.etry and feature sections were unusually readable, I n Llct, \\e want to congratulate yOll on the entire make-up including the distinctly pleasing print, and we hope to be able to send y O li a cory oi TIle' .from in the ne :lr future, Si n cere l y, The' .f{orn, O(//: Cliff Higll Sdlool. /)lll/flJ. Te'wlS. THE CARIBBEAX" CriJloullllligl1 Sdlool THE CARIRIIEA:-;' cenainly spe:tks ror itsel!, From stan to finish it contains nothing but the most delightful of reading m:ltter. The photogr:lphs at" natllral scenery :Ire be:llltiiul, :lnd the jokes :tre \'ery humoro us, \\'is hing yo u continued success, Tlu Rejlt'{Ior, /I'obltl'1I Higll Srllool, /I'OUIfl'II, ,\IIlss, TH E CARI8In:AX' CriJloulI1 lIigll Dear Exch:lng e Editor: I h :lve s hown your :llHlUal to others and am able to tell you that they believe it the best high school mag:lzine \\e have re ceived. I think it i s very arranged alld i s most interesting to us because of the re:ll int'ormation it contains concerning the Canal Zone, The Class Prophecy b)' rour Literary Editor, Ethel Barnett, appeal s to our Seniors who are beginning to think up ideas on that point. we g iv e info r mation a bout ti S and about the Tsthmus of Panama to those w h o li\"c far away. \\'e to our b ook better and we e njoy publishing the comments that are sent to LIS I n bct the whole book s how s that the StaR' ha.s worked hard :lnd that their work h:1S sliccec:ded. Hoping this CARIUIIEAX' may be s till better, I am Y ours sincerel)" CORIS'X'A BIER, E,\'cllIlIIge Editor. Thf.\/irror, PIIII \ 'JIIUlWlIf)' HighSrllool, P/(I1,\'JIII"W1/f)', PII, THE CAII.ILlIlEA:-;' Cristobal High Scliool THE CARIBBEAS is one of the IllOSt complete yearbooks th:lt we ha\' e ever see n, and I'm sure th:1t I C:lll s:tfelr sa)' that it is the most interesting. The pictures of Cri stobal :llld vicinity, to liS so f:lr irom Panama. are the hit of the book, Your poetry we thought good, too. hilt then we \\ere pleased with the whole book. Sincerely. LoX' ETA HARI.AS', Ew1/1/11.'{t! Editor, Tlu E>:POIIOlI. Creel/field Higll S{hool, Cru1Ifield, \/tfJJ, TH E C.o\RIIIBEAX" CrislOu,J! I -ligll Scliool Principal of Cristob:ll H igh School. DellI' .\11'. S"w,\'(1'J : I j ust wanted to let yOu know what the people up this W:ly think about the Cristobal Hi gh Sc h ool annuals. Evcry one who has seen them thinks they arc pretty nice, and the 1929 book, I've 10:lned my books, 19:!5-'::6-';:--':: 8 alld '29 to aile of the hig h school teachers here :lnd he the Ill:lt erial stor ies. pictures, ecc" equal that Of:1 college annual. l :tlll anxio u sly waiting to !>ee a 1 930 copy. Sincerely. GJ.AD\'S BEER" ALRICK, '-zS, THF. CARIUBEAX' CriJ/OUlIllIigl1 SrI/ool Your book, the 1929 is, on the whole, well made up, : \ s the :tnllu:d is a record of the school rear is it advisable to picture so Ill:llly civic scenes? Why /lot substitute more features, sn:lps hots of the students, etc? T !JeOmeg(/, .'1111/ ."rbor Hig/t S(/tool, .-11111 ,iruur, ,\/Irk

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112 THE CARIBB EAN THE CriJloblll High School Several ago we received t h e copr of THE CARIB. BEAS. \\'e thank you \'ery much for sendi n g it to us. \Ve have gone Ol'er the edition and ca n sincerely say that is is a piece of work reflecting c redit upo n rou r sc h ool. .. \ quotation comes to my mind, and it is fitting to say, "\\'hen you h ave done rour best, don't m a k e apologies (or the quali t ies of your wor k ; admit your err ors, but be able to say, '\\'e have done our best.''' Sincerely yours, GRETCHE:-' R I N BEI.MAN:-', Exc/uwge Editor. Lillcoln Times, Lincoln H igl/ ScI/ool, Jf' j Jfomill Rapids, I f/is. THE CARIBBEAN CriJ t oblll High Sclzool \\'e really belie\'e that your boo k is incapable of bein g imp r oved. I t is exrellent! Y ou r country must be very beautiful, judging by t h e scenes, and your weat her delightful. T he snakes and alligators, h owever, do no t look so inviting, \\'e were very much pleased to learn t h at rour Principal was born in \\'esterly. B est wishes for THE CARIBBEAS. Come again! The Sen ior, Jf'esfa(\' High School, R. I. -\5 II' E SEE O T H ERS. T he Expollmf. Greenfield H igh Sclzool, Granfield, tl/(IU. Y o u r paper is ma r velo u s. I t is very well b alanced, and we enjoy receiving it. The Purple flJlill. B(/II Higlz School, CIlIt'esfon, T exils Your commencement issue i s very cleverly w r itten. Your lite r ary and poetry departments are ver}' well written and both are extremely interesting. \\'e would l ike to suggest thar yOli print the advertisements in the back of the book instead of in the inte rior. T/zt .\li"or. PtmxslI((/wnq High School, Ptmxsl/((/wnq, p(/. Your Thanksgiving number of the .\I;l'ror was enjoyed by manr of the C. H S. students. W e t hank rou for t h e comment and exchange. \\'e t hink it wonderf u l that you are able to put out four different numbers d u ring the year. T his n u mber is a \'err cleve r boo k T he Literary Section, the Class :-..rotes, and the P oetic L icense are all very good a n d enjoyable. H o w a bout some m o r e ca r toons? \\'e also lik ed t h e way i n w h ic h th e boo k w as printed. Tht Senior. II/e;rerl)' High School, I f/esrerly R I. T he Smior is one of the most i n teresti n g sc h oo l boo k s t hat we r eceive W e t hink it t h e m ost o rigin a l of a n}'. The jok es a r e th e most h umo r ous we h a ve ever l a u g h e d over. On th e whole w e think i t a w o n de rful b oo k f o r its size. T ilt Student. H olme; Higlz Sclzool COIJi ng / on, K y. A v e r y interest i ng and cleve r b oo k. The C o m me n ce. ment Num b e r for J an ua ry was exceeding l y good The photograp h s w e r e excellent a n d w e t h o r o u ghly l i k ed t h e class p r ophecy. The !J!pill. Sfnfw Island .r/cadem.Y, Sfalm hlo1/d, N. Y. One of those s hort but sweet books. T he Poet's Nook shows that t h ere are some futu r e poetS i n your sch ool. Come again for we enjoy hearing from yo u 'I'll( Refltc/or. If/obllrn H igh School, ,robu rn, J \1au. T he Football N u m b e r was w ell set up The s t ories were t h e best ever. \\'e w ould suggest t hat you h ave snapshots o r cartoo n s to help set off t h e b oo k m o re. The' ."com. GIlN. Cliff Higlz School, Dllllas, T exas. There a r e no words to express alit f ee l ings f or t h e ncorn. 1 t dese r ves everr compliment, and we h ope it co n tinues to be a success. \\'e Acknowledge the F ollow i ng : TIlt Lincoln Time;. The Dickinson Crucible. Tht LakOlliall. The D1I1fu Hill/op. Tlu SptCfnfOr. TJzeGmtgtl.

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MR 19i 4 2 -15 THE CARIBBEAN. France; \1. Dn)'J 10. EVERY year the Alumni Section of THE CARIBBEAN grows lar ger T his year we boast of an :\lumni Section of 145 members Our worthy Alumni are always very thoughtful in remembering LIS and se nding littl e expressions of good will for the success of ollr Annual and f or the Seniors at g radua tion time. Some of t hem are at sc hool and many are working on t h e Zone or in the States. Cristobal Hi gh Schoo l se nd s her b est wishes to h er Alumni, and let us h ear from you again. Due to the la c k of space we have omitted the Alumni News of the yea r s p r eced ing 1926. H oweve r we appreciate the greetings se n t by the Alumni o f these years. 1'3

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THE CARIBBEAN. RICHARD BEVERLY, Bro a d Ru n, '"a. HILDEGARDE BLYTHE, Landham B olll1ce X-ray Clinic, : \ tia nta, Ga. \YILLL-HI CUXCHARD, 2:29 X. 17th Street, L incoln :\eb. I hope t ha t t h :s year' s CARIBBEAN will be t h e paramount b oo k ever produced by C. H. S., and 1 am a l so wis hin g success to t h e Class of '30 o n their graduation, on THE CARIBBEAN, and best regards to the faculty." \\"LLLHI COFFEY, Sa n Salvadore, Sa l vado r e, Central :l"m e rica. EDNA DUVJ\LL, +802 Greenlee }\venue, Sc. Bernard, Ohio. i\IORRI S ECGLE S TON, Columbia New Y ork City. R.o\y FISCHER, -1-309 Furley : \venue Gardenville, i\l d IRENE HOPKINS L. W.) Cristobal C. z HELENA D ECK"AN B A ILEY, See frid ge Field, Mt. Cle m e ns, Mich. T o those of t h e Class of 1930 and t hose o f 1 926, I want to extend m y sincerest wishes, and am glad to b e remembered again this year. D o suppose everyon e has changed and an immense student bodr with an ever so good Annual, and a very s uccessful play Sin-cerest wishes to all." R. 0 ) ANTICH, Box 1057, Cristobal C. z. A few weeks ago, w h i le passing the Y. w C. A., I heard t h e familiar words: '\\'e've com e to sing ollr praise, A hearty c heer to raise, etc., etc./ and how I wis hed to be back with the happy g r oup who we r e singing. Just think, fOllr years have passed s ince the Class of '26 received their diplomas and now it is time f o r another group to go forth 1\1y best wis hes go with rou, Class of '3D, and may your memories o f C. H. S. be as pleasant as mine H e re's hoping T'HE CARIBBEAN will b e bigger and better t han ever." DELILAH IVIA I (Mrs G. W.) PARKER, Gatlin, C. z. LOLA 1\IUNOZ, Box 7 ... .0, Panama City R. P. Here I am fatherless from O c tober.h 1929. iVry fat her was well known among t h e Americans in Colon. H e was (Q. E. P. D.) Luis F. i\Iunoz. present I 2m t e a c hin g English in the Public School of San F e lipe, just renamed E. E. de : \merica. At the same time 1 am teaching Spanish as a substitute in B alboa H igh. M o r e than ever I am grateful for the two languages I know. The n I am learning typing a n d shor t h a n d at the National Institute of Panama. I wis h I cou l d have something to do for my coming vacations, February, i\larch, and 1\'Iay, somethin g like coachin g Spanish. I wish all t h e H ig h School a prosperolls New Year by experie n ce learn all and well learned at present opportunity." 1\/ IILDRED i\TEELy, Cristobal, C Z. CARLOS PLLGAR, Gatun, C Z. CLARICE STEENBt.:RG, L a ngley Fi eld, Y a. GAY R. TURNER, Neal H all, Columbus Cniversit y C o lumbus, O h io ELIZABETH \VARREN, F o r t Davis, C Z CHRI STIAN \VrRTz, Cristob a l C. Z. J O SEPH CORRIGAN, Cristobal, C. Z. TERESA GALLAGHER, 652 56th Street, Brookl y n N. Y. l UIES GRIDER, +16 Transylvania Park, L ex ing ton, K y Ei\IIL\ BLEDSOE, .p6 Transylvania Park, Lexing-ton, 1\.y. LAWRENCE C. CALLAWAY, jr., Cristobal, C. Z. LOUISE HEJi\I, C ristobal C Z. CLARA A. i V I A \', Gatun, C. Z. HELEN MONTGOi\lERY, 257 Park Avenue, Huntington L o n g I s land, N. Y. JOHN G NELSO:-.', Gonzaga U niversity, Spokane Was h. DOROTHY SVENSSON, 1 5 Pleasant Street, \ Vest Roxbury, i\Iass. SUR S E J. TAYLOR, lSq \Yest Avenu e, Austin T ex. J Ai\1 ES V AN SCOTTER (address unknown) H El.EN VINEYARD, Odessa, D e l.

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THE CARIRBF.-\,\. 115 DOROTHY \\"ERTZ, B ox 2 59, Cri s tobal C. Z. CHARLE!) \\"11,1., Cristobal, C Z. \\"OOLN OL"CH, 601 \res t r60th Street, York City. "Goo d luck and best wishLS to th e Class of 1 930." JOHX G. K LL"XIZ '2015 .-\venue ;"'Tew Y o rk Ci t\". ETHEL K. \\' E.':>Ti'.I A:..' 660 Clackamas :\\'enl/ e, P ortland Oreg : \LBERT J '10 1 5 :\\-enu e, :"\e w Y o rk Cit\". H oping THE C ARllm E A N and Cristobal H igh S c hool all s u ccess I sure wis h J wa s back in my high sc h oo l 'daze. I t see m s like all the s nap I had whe n was in hig h sc h ool i s gon e n ow. rim e I g o t b o un c ed th e n J always manage d to b ounce back ill, but n o w r don't e \'en s kid. I gu ess I'm n o t a bounc in g m o r e GI.ADYS E. BEERS H G.) AI.RICK, 207 3 d Street, N. i\ loorhead, 1'linn. "Good lu c k and best wi s hes t o the Class o f 930 I h o p e )-ou 'll make t h e 1 930 :\nnual the \'ery best B A xK s ('\lrs :\ .. ) Bt..\b D E LI., Cristobal, C. z. ROIJERT H. AXT ELL, B a res C ollege, L e wistoll, i\l e y ear TH E C.-\RII3BEAX i s a littl e b ette r than rhe year b e f o r e Let' s ha\'e t h e Class o f 1930 k ee p lip the record." KATHRYN E. L;\!'IIIlERT (l'l rs. \\' ) GOL'LD, Cristobal, C. z. THEODORE C. 12 0 Gates .-\v enue Brooklm, '\. Y. EL;\N GELI:-.'E Si\IITH (1\l r s \Y .) P . \YXE, Box 1-+53, Cris t obal, C. z . -\RTHV R E. ROTHEi\'IlL"R G (address unknown) L. BLISS, 159 S o u t h Pro fessor Street Obe rlin, Ohio I t seem s good t o h ear fr o m C. H. s. ] am l o oking forward t o the time whe n the 1930 .-'Innual will b e publis h e d and h o p e that it will surpass all those thar ha\'e preceded it. I am a freshman at Oberlin C ollege and am my work e \ 'er so muc h. Greeti n g s, classmates o f ''28.'' B. EDw .\RD r. O\\".;\XDE, Cristobal, C. Z. LLeu S \L. \Z.\R, C o l on, R. P, ROYA L R. Gatun, C, Z LIL Y B E L Cox Gatlin, C. Z. "Best regards t o th e Class o f '30. t h e best s uccess possibl e in b oth their ,-\nl1\1al and class play." ELIZ ABET H HAcKE'n, 333 Plymo u t h .-\v enue R oc hester, '\. Y. "I'm atte n d in g school at the Rochester Bus iness I n s ti tute am getting al o n g s pl endidand enjo y it a l ot, tho u g h it can't com e up t o C. H. S. th e lu c k and s u ccess p oss ibl e to the Class o f 1930 and t h eir :\nnual." ROS;\I AR\' KEEi\'E, Cristobal, C. Z. JAi\IES F. QL'l X'x, Gartlll, C. Z. ,lEAX' \\ n .L1E R o b erts B e a c h S c hool. Catons-1'i1le E THEL BARNETT, 36 Browning .-\venue, D o r c hester, '\l ass. INEZ B ARRY, Cris t obal, C. Z. \,"OODFORD t\1. R ABBITT, Gatun, C. Z. i\1.;\RIOX' -\. B OO!'lIER, 301 Unive r sity Place, S yrac use, Y. I have jus t time to say t h e best o f wis hes to THE C "RIUBE.;\X Staff and the S e ni o r s o f '30. I am n o w in the midst o f semest e r exams and I love it h e r e at Syrac use, tho u g h and am getti n g al o n g just tin e J.. \CK R. PETTIT, l\: e w Y ork Stock Exchange, 5 C owbry Street, Y o n k e r s Y. DOROTHY H EIi\I, Cristobal, C. Z. P A C L H AYDEN, B o x -+1, Bates C ollege, L e wi s t on, "It does not seem possibl e that rh e book o f 2 9 will soon b e a back numbe r. I am sure h oweve r, tha t the book o f '30 will b e a successor. If I r e m embe r c orrectly THE C ARfBllEAX, lik e oth e r good things, impro\'es with age so l et's have a copy o f the b es t t o date. GRETCHEN \\' PAL!\I, Box -+16, M oullt H olyoke C ollege S outh H a d l e , "'\I y l etter h eading, 1 think will tell r o u whe r e I am, but it can Ile \"er reveal the l o v e I have for o r express the I am experie n c in g fr o m colle g e life

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116 THE CARIBBEAN. feel ancient on thinking of 1930 being this year's Senior Cla ss and editing THE CARIBBEAK-but that' s on l y natural. You are wondering if I wish you success Certainl y, I do. Make C. H. S as proud o f yo u as it was and is o f u s ." ROGER DEA KlNS, Gattln C. Z. \\'ILHELM INA KLEEFKENS, Cristobal, C. Z. "Sure do mi ss Cristobal Hi g h but have the consolation o f not being th e only Cristobal graduate working f o r the United Fruit Company. T o see t h e m and w ork with th e m brin gs back m e m ories o f the good times we've had. B es t o f lu c k to THE CARIBBEAN and my since r e w i s h es t o Cristobal H igh Sc h ool in general." Roy B. WALKER, Balboa, C. Z. I'm har d at work now and can s a y t hat I sure l y missoldC. H. S. classmates and all. T o yo u I extend m y b est wis h es for a success ful play and co mm e n ce ment, t o the Staff I give m y best regards and h ope t hat your Annual will b e t h e b es t yet." MARION K LOWANDE, Gregg Bu siness College, Plainfield N J. LEE KARIGER, Gatlin, C. Z. "At present I am still liv ing in Gatun and working, but n o t f o r a living. I sure hope that your class will publis h as good o r even better Annual than th e Class of '29 VITA V. LYEW, College of St. T eresa, Minn. "My best w i s h es to t h e Class o f 1 930, and t h e best of lu c k to TH E CARIBBEAN. l\10RRIS iVl. L ucE Eastman School o f lVI usic, Rochester, N. Y. ANITA R. RANKIN, Cristobal C. Z MORTON SOUTHARD, Gatun, C. Z. MARGARET HAYES, 926 Home Avenue, Fort Wayne I nd. "May TH E CARIBBEAN Staff have all the success of the year. But can t hey beat the book of '29?" ADAIR LOUISE TAYLOR, 4 8 S. R D., Austin, Tex. I am up h ere in Texas attending th e University and w i s hing I were bac k in tropical Panama o n ce m o r e. Best wis h es for t h e Class o f 1930, a n d may t h e 1 930 C ARIBBEAN be the best ever." SAM PATCHETT, Cristobal C. Z. LOIS A. W ILLIAMS (Mrs. C.) STROBRIDGE, Balboa, C. Z RANDOLPH ORBAUGH Universit y of North Carolina, C hape l Hill N. C. CHARLES CRUM, University of North Caro lin a, Chape l Hill N. C. :MILDRED J. B ATH, 926 \" 'est State Street, Trenton, N.]. "Ride r Colleg e certainl y is justified in saying-t hat Rid er is t h e best bu siness cour se in the East. They make us work, too. I be long to t he most popular and be s t soro rit y i n sc hool and have lots and lots of fun. For b ei ng a str an ger h ere t h is year, I have b een t reated royally. I have never been in New Jersey before, but everyone i s ver y congenial. I live at my soro rit y house with r 4 oth e r g irl s, so we are all happy a n d have good times besides l e arnin g a great deal. I certainly enjoy college l ife." PORFJRIO DE REUTER, University o f Detroit, Detroit, Mich. PHOEBE O'DONNELL Cristobal, C Z. THEODORE E. BRANDON, Cristobal, C Z. ZOE WYLLIE, Roberts Beach Sc h oo l Catonsville, M d.

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THE 7 KIRKS

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