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Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive

in 2010 witii funding from

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries



http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1929cris



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THE CARIBBEAN.



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/I The Staff of
V o 1 11 m e o t
"The Caribbean" wish to commem-
orate their happy and educational
years spent at school.

May the Class ot 1929 use this book
in later years as a diary of their
achievements and activities during this
memorable period.



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THE CARIBBEAN.



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"The Caribbean

CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL
CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



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Tal>/e of Contents



Foreword
Dedication-

Editorial

Our Governor

Our Canal Zone School Officials

Our Principal

Staff.

Faculty ...

Seniors

Class History

Class Will

Class Prophecy

Juniors

Sophomores

Freshmen
Literary

Sports

School Notes

Exchanges

Alumni

Jokes ...

Autographs

General Inlorniation

Advertisements



Page.

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39
43

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93
9>

lOI
109



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THE CARIBBEAN.







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DEDICATION.



"^OT f)nly because of her unceasing
ertorts, her unriagging interests in us,
her never tailing energy in school activities,
luit because of her sincerity and friend-
ship as well, we, the Staff, gratefully
dedicate this, the twelfth volume

of ''The Caribbean"' to
Miss Grace R. Hesse.



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THE CARIBBEAN.




THE VALUE OF AN EDUCATION.



Do we ever stop to consider what an education
will mean to us in later years? Most of us are
not true to ourselves; we pass over the subject
lightly.

There have been, and always will be, numberless
articles written on this subject. Perhaps some of
us have read them, but how many ot us would stop
to read an article about education? ^^'e make
ourselves believe that we know all there is to know.
In reality we are cheating ourselves.

If you could only picture in your mind the
value ot an education and its direct bearing on
your lite, your work, in tact, on your whole
existence.

Imagine yourself with an education and then
[licture yourself without one. A person with an
education can readily see the difference, but how-
can a person without one be expected to see the
comparison between the two or the value of a
thorough course ot study along some line?

With an education, life is made much happier,
^'ou naturally develop a keen insight, s\'mpathy
and understanding of the affairs of the world that
otherwise you might not have noticed nor appreci-
ated. Life means more than just striving for wealth



and power it means a thorough enjoyment from
everyday happenings, and this can only be at-
tained by an education.

-All ot us have talents in one direction or another
and the sooner we realize and develop these
abilities in the highest degree, the sooner will
success come to us.

It some knowledge of the various subjects is
taught to the student, he will get a glimpse of the
many fields in which he is eligible to qualify, and
can experiment along different lines to see what
he is best suited tor. B\' these experiments he
may choose his career, and with determination
and an education to assist him, he will attain
success.

Ot course, education for the young student
must not be above his power of comprehension
until his mind can assimilate uieas of such an
advanced nature. Then gradually show him or
her the advantages in lite and an education, and he
will do the rest.

With this advice and these ideas in mintl, the
student can, as Sir Francis Bacon tells us, be old
in hours and voune; in vears.




Colon Beach.



THE CARIBBEAN.




Col. Harrv Bi rgess, U. S. Army,
Governor, The Panama Canal.



THE CARIBBEAN.




Superintendent of Canal Zone Schools-
Birthplace Statesboro, Georgia.
Home Address Greensboro, N. C.



-Ben- M. Williams.



EDrC.4.TION.

Name of Secondary School Statesboro High School.
Location oj Secondary School Statesboro, Georgia.
College or University Mercer University.
Dates Attended igii to 191 5.
Degrees Obtained .\. B.

College or University Teacher's College, Columbia Uni-
versity.
Dates Attended 191 9.
Degrees Obtained .\. M.
College Fraternity Kappa Delta Pi.
Date Entered Service of The Panama Canal February 2, 1926.



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Assistant Superintendent oJ Schools; Junior and Senior High

Schools V. H. B.ARKER.

Birthplace Missouri.
Home Address Illinois.

EDUCATIOX.

Xame 0/ Secondary School Lebanon High School.
Location 0/ Secondary School Lebanon, Mo.
College or University N. E. Missouri State Teacher's

College.
Degrees Obtained B. S.
College or University Columbia L'niversity.
Degrees Obtained A. M.
Date Entering Service on Canal Zone September 7, 1927




THE CARIBBEAN.




Our Principal William A. Sawyers.
Birthplace Westerly, Rhode Island.
Home .tddrcss 38 Summer St., Westerly, Rhode Ishind.



EDL"CATIOX.

Name oj Secondary School Westerly High .School. Degrees Oitained B. S.

Location of Secondary School Westerly, Rhode Island. College or University Columbia L niversity.

College or University Bates College, I.ewiston, Maine. Dates Attended 1924-1925.

Dates Attended. 1915-1919. Degrees Obtained M. .\.

Fraternity Phi Delta Kappa.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Service on CanalZone September 7, 1927.

Subjects Taught 1928-1929 General Science.

Sponsor for What Class or SchoolActivity The Caribbean

Staff.
Favorite Expression "Now, where are the brains in this

groupr"



THE CARIBBEAN.




Stajf Ad'^'isor

Stajf Sponsor Miss Grace Hesse

StaJf Sponsor . Miss Margaret Mevers

Editor-in-Chief Jack Pettit

Asst. Editor Fred Stewart

Business Manager Paul Havden

Asst. Business Manager Walter Wikincstad



Circulation Manager .Royal Higgason
Assl. Circulation Manager .Ralph Crl'm

Literary Editor Ethel Barnett

Art Editor Morton Southard

Asst. Art Editor Lee Karicer

Boys' Athletic Editor Woodford Babbitt



Mr. Wm. a. Sawyers

Girls' Athletic Ed-tor Marion Boomer
Exchange Editor . Adair Taylor
School Notes Editor Anita Rankin
Alumni Editor . M.arion Lowande
Joke Editor . William Newman
Tvpist Rosemary Keene



MR 1J835-



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THE CARIBBEAN.






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THE CARIBBEAN.



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12



THE CARIBBEAN.




Assistant Principal Lillian B. Gustafso.v.
Birthplace Chicago, Illinois.
Home Address Nunica, Michigan.



EDl'CATIO.V.



Nav:e of Secondary School Northern Illinois State Normal

School.
Location of Secondare School. De Kalb, Illinois.



PERSONAL.



Date Entering Service on Canal Zone. October i, 192J
Subjects Taught ig28-/92Q .Assistant Principal.
Favorite Expression "Do \'ou owe me .".n excuse.^"



Name of Teacher Grace R. Hesse.
Birthplace Miller, South Dakota.
Home Address Shelbyville, Illinois.

education.
Name oj Secondary School .Ann .Arbor High School
Location 0/ Secondary School .Ann Arbor, Michigan.
College or University L'nn'ersity ot Michigan.
Dales Attended 1 9 1 4- 1 9 1 -.
Degrees Obtained .\. B.

College or University University ot Michigan
Dales Attended 1 923-1 924.
Degrees Obtained M. A.

College or University National University ot Mexico
Dales Attended Summer 1921.
Sorority Kappa Delta.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone October 1, 1926.
Subjects Tcughl /Q2S-icj3g English, Spanish.
Sponsor Jor ll'hat Class or School Activity Senior Class.
Favorite Expression ".Alright, alright, who belongs to
this.'"





Name of Teacher G. J. Benson.
Birthplace St. Cloud, Minnesota.
Home Address St. Cloud, Minnesota.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School Technical High School.
Location nf School St. Cloud, Minnesota.
College or University State Teachers' College.
Dales Attended 1917-1918, 1919-1920.
Degrees Obtained Diploma.

College or University Bradley Polytechnic Institute.
Dales Attended 1922-1924.
Degiees Obtained B. S.

College or University University of Minnesota.
Dales Attended Summer Session, 1920.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone October i, 1924.
Subjects Taught ic)2j-ig28 Manual Training.
Favorite Expression "Stop your talking, Lydia."



THE CARIBBEAN.



13




.Winie oj Teac'iur Makv iLi.iZA3.-;rH Moo.tE.
(Vorei Mo5t Popular Teicher.)
Birthplace West AleA.inJri s, Pennsylv.ini 1.
Home Address West Alexandria, Pennsylvania.

EDlJCArrON.

Naie of Secondary Schiol Wishington High School.
Location 0/ Secondary School Washington, Penn.'iylvnni
College or Unisersity West Virginia University.
Dates Attended 1 9 1 9 1 9 1;;
D.-grees Ohlained A. B.
Sororities Phi Beta Kapp.i, K ipp 1 Kappa Gamma.

l'ERSO.\AI..

Dite Entering Service on Canal Zone October i, 1925.
Subjects Taught /9^ Sponsor for IVhat Class or School Activity Sophomore.
Favorite Expression "Now, get ready to write."



Name of Teacher .'^mos C. Pence.
Birthplace Marshall, Missouri.
Home Address Marshall, Missouri.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School Marshall High School.
Location of Secondary School Marshall, Missouri.
College or University Missouri \'alley College.
Dates Attended. 1921-1921;.
Degrees Obtained .A. B.

College or University Missouri V'alley College.
Dates Attended Summer 1928.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone October i, 1928.
Subjects Taught ig2S-ig2g Geometry, Physics.
Sponsor for IVhat Class or School Activity Junior Class.
Favorite Expression "Show me. I'm from Mi.,suuri."





Name of Teacher F.mii.^- Ri ssell.

Birthplace Pine Blutf, .'\rkansas.

Home Address I4O4 Olive St., Pine Bluff, .ArkansaS-

edccation.

Name of Secondary School. Pine Bluff High School.
Location of Secondary School Pine Bluff', .Arkansas.
College or University University of Arkansas.
Dates Atteyided 1920-1924.
Degrees Obtained^B. S., H. E.
Sorority Pi Beta Phi.

rERSON.ll..

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone October i, 1927.
Subjects Taught ig28-rt)2<) Household .-^rts, U. S. History.
Sponsor for What Class or School Activity Librarian.
Favorite Expression ".All right."



14



THE CARIBBEAN.




Name of Teacher Robert A. West.
Birthplace Ashley, Pennsylvania.
Home Address .Ashley, Pennsylvania.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School Ashley High School.
Location of Secondary School .Ashley, Pennsylvania.
College or University University of Pennyslvania.
Dates Attended 1921-1921.
College or University Bucknell University.
Dates Attended 1 9 2 2- 1 9 2 5
Degrees Obtained A. B.

College or University Penns\lvania State College.
Dates Attended 1 9 2 7- 1 9 2 S
Fraternit} Kappa Sigma.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone October i, 1928.

Subjects Taught IQ2S-192C) Algebra, History.

Sponsor for What Class or School Activity Freshman Class,

Manager of Baseball Team.
Favorite Expression "Wake up! wake up!"



Name of Teacher Margaret E. Meyers.
Birthplace Keokuk, Iowa.
Home Address. Keokuk, Iowa.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School Keokuk High School.
Location of Secondary School Keokuk, Iowa.
College or University University of Iowa.
Dales Attended 1921-1925.
Degrees Obtained A. B.

PERSONAL.

Dale Entering Service on Canal Zone October i, 1928.
Subjects Taught tg28-i92g English, music.
Sponsor for What Class or School Activity Debating Clul
favorite Expression "En-un-ci-ate clear-ly."





Name of Teacher Margaret Renison.
Birthplace Rensselaer, New York.
Home Address Watertown, New York.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School. Watertown High School.

Location of Secondary School. Watertown, New York.

College or University Plattsburg State Normal School.

Dales Attended 1917-1919.

College or University New York University.

Degrees Obtained B. C. S.

Sorority Delta Clio.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone October i, 1928.

Subjects Taught ig28-l<)2ij Shorthand, typing, Commer-
cial Law, Bookkeeping.

Sponsor for What Class or School .Ictivity Manager of
funds.

Favorite Expression "Where did_yo/( get your privileges?"



THE CARIBBEAN.



IS




Name of Teacher Helen Currier Baker.
Birthplace Minne.ipolis, Minnesota.
Jlnuie .-Iddress Minneapolis, Minnestoa.

EDl'tATION.

Name of Secondary School Central High .School.
Location of Secondary School Minneapolis, Minnesota.
College or University University of Minneajiolis.
Degrees Obtained B. .\.

College or University Session in Public .School Music at
Cornell, Chicago, and New York Universities.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone 1921.
Subjects Tanght itjlS-uji'j Supervisor of Public School
Music.



Name of Teacher Victor E. Seiler.
Birthplace Auburn, New Vork.
Home Jddress Berkeley, California.

EDUCATION.

College or University University of California.
Dates Attended 1923-1924-1 925.

Personal.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone May 18, 1926.
Subjects Taught ig28-i<)2() Director of Phy.sical Activities.
Sponsor for what Class or School Activity .Athletics.
Favorite Expression Use the berry.





Name of Teacher Barbara Bailfv.
Birthplace Rib Lake, Wisconsin.
Home Address Muskegon, Michigan.



EOl'CATION.



Name of Secondary School Recreation Training School.
Location of Secondary School Chicago, Illinois.
College or University Columbia University, New York.
Dates Attended 1925-1926.



Date Entering Service on Canal Zone December 11, 1928.
Subjects Taught iij2S-7Q2g Pknground Directress.
Favorite Expression Now, up in the States.



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THE CARIBBEAN.






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THE CARIBBEAN.




LILYBEL COX.

"/ have a heart loilh room for every joy."

Niekuame Waco.

Birthplace Waco, Tex.

Dale of Birth May 2, 1912.

Canal Zone Address Gatun.

Date of Entering Cristobal School Oclober I J. 1927.

Grade Entered Junior.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z. El Paso
School, Fort Bragg, N. C. School, Lawton High School.

School Activities Supper Club, '2g; Vice-President Senior
Class; Secretary and 'I'reasurer of ."Athletic .-Asso-
ciation, '29; Carnival, '29; Most Popular Girl, '29;
"Kempy," '29.

Favorite Expression Hold Everj- th i ngl

Chosen Vocation Physical Education Instructor.

Hobby Dancing.

Pastime Playing the banjo and having a good time




ROY.Al. R. HIGGASON.

"/ am the Captain of my Soul f am the Master of my Fate.'

Xickname Higgle.

Birthplace Mart, Tex.

Date of Birth June 25, 191 1.

State's .iddress 391 1 Avenue J., Fort Worth, Tex.

Canal Zone .iddress Box 467, Cristobal, C. Z.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 1924.

Grade Entered Freshman.

Other Schools .Attended BeJ ore Coming to C.Z. Fort Worth
Grade School; Raton, N. M.; Washington, D. C;
Bluemont, Va.

School .ictivities Baseball, '26, '27, '29; Bowling, '28
Track, '26, '27, '28, '29; Cheer Leader, '28,
President, Senior Class, '29; Most Popular Boy,
Circulation Manager, The Caribbean Staff,
"Kempy," 29; .Assistant Business Manager,
Caribbean Staff, '28.

College Expected to Enter University of Texas.

Favorite Expression The meeting will please come to order.

Chosen l^ocation Electrical Engineer.

Hobby Sports.

Pastime .Athletics and sports.



29;
'29;
29;
'29;
The




ELIZABETH HACKETT.

".y tender heart; a iviil inflexible."

Nickname Sis.

Birthplace Paraiso, C. Z.

Date oj birth September 18, 1910.

Stale's Address 257 Field St., Rochester, N. Y.

Canal Zone .iddress Box 503, Cristobal, C. 2.

Date of Entering Cristobal School 1918.

Grade Entered Second.

Other Schools .Ittended Before Coming to C. Z. No. 51,
Rochester, N. '\'.

School .ictivities Supper Club, '26, '27, '28, '29; Basket-
ball, '26, '27; Baseball, '27; Carnival, '28, '29; Sec-
retary, Senior Class, '29; "Kempy," '29.

College Expected to Enter Nixon-Clay, .Austin, Tex.

Favorite Expression Sure, why not?

Hobby Dancing.

Pastime Having a gootl time.



THE CARIBBEAN.



19




JAMES F. QUINN.

"A man of inexhaustlhle :iit."

Nickname Duke.

Birthplace Fort Myer, Va.

Date of Birth November 27, 191 1.

Stale's Address 1S76 West 7th St., Kings Highway, Brook-
lyn, N. Y.

Canal Zone Address Box 173, Gatun, C. Z.

Dale of Entering Cristobal School March 2S, 1927.

Grade Entered Sophomore.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. 2. Hampton
High and St. Charles College.

School Activities Soccer, '29; Track; Basketball; Swimming;
Member of Student Council, '29; Carnival, '27, '28, '29.

College F.xpected to Enter West Point.

Favorite Expression Gosh.

Chosen location Aviation.

Hobby Moving pictures.

Pastime Athletics.



ROSEMARY KEENE.

'^There's rosemary^ that's for remembrance."

Nickname Rosie.

Birthplace Colon Hospital, Colim, R. 1'.

Date of birth February 2<;, 1911.

Stale's Address Scranton, Pa.

Dale of Entering Cristobal School. 1 924.

Grade Entered Eighth.

School .-/ctivities Secretary ot Class '2X; Supper Club, '2^1,
'27, '28, '29; "Rip Van Winkle," '26; Glee Club, '26,
'27; Athletic Association, '28; Carnival, '27, '28, '29;
Baseball, '27; Track, '27, '29; Typist of The Carib-
bean, '29.

Favorite Expression "Wot a lile!"

Chosen Vocation Private .Secretary.

Hobby Moving pictures.

Pastime Going to baseball games





JEAN W'YLLIE.

'^Simpleness and gentleness and honor
And clean mirth."

Nickname Jeanie.

Birthplace Fort Dade, Fla.

Date of Birth November I, 191J.

Canal Zone .iddress Fort de Lesseps.

Date of Entering Cristobal School December, 1928.

Grade Entered Senior Class.

Other Schools .ittended Before Coming to C. Z. KenwooJ-

Loring, Chicago; Sea Cliff High, Long Island, N. Y.
College Expected to Enter Cornell.
Favorite Expression Oh, Gee!
Chosen Vocation Architecture
Hobbv Tennis.
Pastime Swimming.



20



THE CARIBBEAN.




ETHEL BARNETT.

"The mildest manners anil the gentlest heart."

Nickname Barnie.

Birthplace Boston, Mass,

Date oj Birth September 15, 191 1.

Stale's .iilJress Boston, Mass.

Canal Zone Jddress Box 6, Colon, R. P.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October i, 191 7.

Grade Entered First.

School Activities Glee Club, '26, '27, '28; Chorus, '26, '27,
'28; Secretary of Class, '26, '27; Secretary of Supper
Club, '28; "Rip Van Winkle," '2b; Supper Club, '26,
'27, '28, '29; Carnival, '27, '28, '29; Athletic Asso-
ciation, '28; Literary Editor of The CARiBBE.-iN, '29.

College Expected to Enter Boston University.

Favorite Expression Figure that out.

Chosen Vocation Journalist.

Hobby Talking.

Pastime Going down town.



INEZ BARRY.

"Good humor only teaches charms to last.
Still makes neiv conquests and maintains the past."

Nickname Barryniore.

Birthplace Boonville, N. V.

Dale 0/ Birth December (1, 191 2.

State's .-Iddress Whitesboro, N. V.

Canal Zone .-Iddress Box 1J95, Cristobal, C. Z.

Date 0/ Entering Cristobal School October i, 1928.

Grade Entered Senior.

Other Schools .lltended Before Coming to C. Z. Whitesboro

High School.
School .-Ictivities Supper Club, '29.
College Expected to Enter Cornell.
Favorite Expression Oh, Christmas!
Chosen Vocation Teacher or Stenographer.
Hobby Swimming.
Pastime Dancing.





WOODFORD MARMON BABBITT.

"He steers his boat zvell."

Nickname Woody.

Birthplace Ketchikan, Alaska.

Date of Birth May 2j, 1909.

Canal Zone .-Iddress Box i^-j, Gatun, C. Z.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 1925.

Grade Entered Sophomore.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z. Public School,

Juncan, Alaska.
School .Ictivities Basketball, '26, '27, '28, '29; Swimming,

'27; Track, '28; Carnival, '28, '29; Baseball, '29;

Athletic Association, '28, '29; The Caribbean Athletic

Editor, '28, '29; "Kempy," '29.

Favorite Expression Ma)'be

Chosen Vocation Banana man.
//o% Basketball.
Pastime Any sport.



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THE CARIBBEAN.



21




JACK R. PETTIT.

^^ His heart as far from fraud as Heaven from earths

Nickname Jake.
Birtliplace Canal Zone.
Date of Birlli July I2, 191 1.
Canal Zone Address Cristobal, C. Z.
Dale of Entering Cristobal Sc/iool 1924
Grade Entered Eighth Graile.

Otfier Sc/iools Attended Be/ore Comins; to C. Z. Croton High
School.
School Activities Baseball, Glee Club, Editor-in-Chief The

Caribbean Staff.
Favorite Expression Jake.
Chosen f^ocation Electrical Engineer.
Hobby Baseball and swimming.
Pastime Reading.



MARION A. BOOMER.

"As merry as the day is long."

Nickname Mab.

Birthplace Conneaut, Ohio.

Date of Birth September 11, 1911.

States's Address .Adams, N. \

Canal Zone Address Cristobal, C. Z.

Date 0/ EnleringCristobal School October i, 1922.

Grade Entered Fifth.

School Activities President of Freshman Class; "Rip Van
Winkle," '26; Glee Club, '26, '27, '28; Basketball,
'26, '27; Baseball Captain, '27; Swimming, '27; Tennis,
'29; Track, '29; Cheer Leader, '27, '28, '29; Girls'
.Athletic Editor, '29, Supper Club, '26, '27, '28, '29;
Vice President, '28; "Kempy," '29; Carnival, '27,
'28, '29.

College Expected to Enter Syracuse University.

Favorite Expression Wherc'll we go?

Chosen Vocation Mathematician.

Hobhy~S,:\\.

Pastime Goins: to basebal





DOROTHY HEIM.

"Gentle of speech^ beneficent of mind."

Nickname .Asutes.
Birthplace Kentucky.
Date of Birth July J, 1912.
State's Addiess Newark, Ohio.
Canal Zone Address Box I491, Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School December, 1923.
Grade Entered Seventh.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z. Hebron, Ohio;

Newark, Ohio; Cincinnati, Ohio.
School Activities Supper Club; Debating Club, '29.
College Expected to Enter Business College, Ohio.
Favorite Expression Caracho.
Chosen Vocation Stenographer.
Hobby Reading.
Pastime Swimming.



11



THE CARIBBEAN.




GRF.TCHF.K WINNE PALM.
' Not more learned, but imbued with a belter kind of knowledge."

Nickname Geg.

Birthplace Tabernilla, C. Z.

Date 0/ Birt/i'Novemher 18, 191 1.

State's Address Schenectady, N. Y.

Canal Zone Address Cristobal, C. Z.

Date oj Entering Cristobal School 191 9.

Grade Entered First Grade.

School Activities "Kx^ Van Winlcle"; Carnival, '27, '28, '29;
Class Treasurer, '26, '27, '28; Supper Club, '26, '27,
'28, '29; Chorus, '26; Tennis, '29; Senior Play.

College Expected to Enter Uounx Holyoke College, Mass.

Favorite Expression Hector.

Chosen IWalion Business position.

Hobby Musk.

Pastime Reading.



PAUL HAYDEN.

"If'orth, courage, honor, these indeed
Your sustenance and birthright are."
Nickname Slim.
Birthplace New ^'ork.
Date 0/ Birth July i, 191 1.
State's Address 96 Read St., Bridgeport, Conn.
Canal Zone Address Box 64, Gatun, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School 1924.
Grade Entered Eighth Grade.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z. Bridgeport

Schools.
School Activities Baseball, Swimming, Basketball, Track;

Business Manager of The Caribbean '27, '28, '29;

Carnival.
College Expected to Enter Bates.
Favorite Expression Who'd a-thunk it?
Chosen Vocation Business.
//o% Radio.
Pastime Reading and baseball. '^





ROGER DEAKINS.

''/ neither fear nor despise."

Nickname Rodge.
Birthplace St. Joseph, Mo.
Dale of Birth August 20, 191 1.

State's Address 2121 Washington .Ave., St. Joseph, Mo.
Canal Zone .-Iddress Box 237, Gatun, C. Z.
Date of EnteringCristobal School October 4, 1925.
Guide Entered Freshman.
October Schools .Attended Before Coming to C. Z. Lafayette

School.
School .ictivities Swimming, Basketball, Carnival.
Favorite Expression Ell bite.
Chosen /WrtZ/ow-* Electrician.
Hobby Music.
Pastime Sleeping.



THE CARIBBEAN.



2.1




ROY BEACH WALKER.

" He attains whatever he pursues."

Nickname Fluffy.
Birthplace South Bend, Ind.
Date of Birth January 8, igog.
Stale's Address New Bedford, Mass.
Canal Zone Address Gatun, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School 1925.
Grade Entered Eighth.
School Activites Glee Club, -Assi.stant Business Manager,

'27; "Rip V'art Winkle;" Carnival.
Favorite Expression .-Xod How!
Chosen Vocation Electrical Engineering.
Hobby Mechanics and machinery.
Pastime Swimming and reading.



WILHELMINA KI.EEFKENS.

"That indefinable thing called charm has she

Nickname Minnie.

Birthplace Hoboken, X. J.

Date of Birth .August 7, 191 1.

Canal Zone Address Box io?7, Cristobal, C. Z.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 191 8.

Grade Entered Second.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Cristobal Gatun.

School Activities Supper Club, '26, '27, '28, '29; "Rip Van
Winkle;" Carnival, '28, 29; Orchestra, '26, '27; Bas-
ketball, '27.

Favorite Expression Oh, tor the love ot Lill.

Chosen Vocation Musician.

Hobby Danci ng.

Pastime Reading and music.





MARION KATHERYNE LOWANDE.

"The Glory of a full capacious mind."

Nickname Knitial.
Birthplace Bound Brook, N. J.
Date of Birth March 20, 1 9 1 1
Canal Zone Address Box 515, Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 191 7.
Grade Entered First.
School Activities SupperCkib, '26, '27, '28, '29; "Rip Van

Winkle," '26; Orchestra, '28; .-Mumni Editor 8f The

CARIBBEAN, '29.

Favorite Expression I still maintain

Chosen Vocation Stenographer.
Hobby .'\rguing.
Pastime Walking.



24



THE CARIBBEAN.




LEE KARIGER.

"A Mother ll'it, and wise withoid the schools."

Xickfiawe Flee.
Birthplace Honolulu, Hawaii.
Hale oj Birth March 30, 1912.
Canal Zone Address Box 224, Gatun, C. Z.
Date oJ Entering Cristobal School October, 1 925.
Grade Entered Freshman.

School Activities Carnival, '27, '28, '29; "Kenipy,
Favorite F.xpression I'm gonna tell on you!
Chosen Focalion Diesel F^ngineering.

ijohhy Mechanical machinery.

Pastime Boating.



29.



\nA \"I\ I.A\ LYEW.

".U_v heart is ever at your service."

Xickuamc Kam May.

Birthplace Port Limon, Costa Rica.

Date of Birth .April 12, 1910.

Canal Zone .iddress Box 2, Colon, R. P.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 1925.

Grade Entered Freshman.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z. Chinese
School, Miss Crawford's Escuela Publica.

School ActivilesSupTper Club, '26, '27, '28, '29; "Rip Van
Winkle," "26; Glee Club, '26, '27, '28; Carnival, '27,
'28, '29.

College Expected to Enter Johns Hopkins University.

Favorite Expression Oh, Heavens!

Chosen I'ocation Medical Doctor.

Hobby Dancing.

Pastime Reading.





}) .J^ \) :^-^^-^



MORRIS M. LUCE

"The framer of his own fortune."

Nickname Lukie.
Birthplace Shawnee, Okla.
Date of Birth November 20, 191 1.
Canal Zone .iddress Box 292, Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School 191 7.
Grade Entered First.

College Expected to Enter Eastman School of Music
Favorite Expression It don' sweetcha'!
Chosen Vocation Musician.
Hobby Music.
Pastime Music.



THE CARIBBEAN.



25




MORTON WALTON HARLEN SOUTHARD.

".-/ man of ivords and deeds."

Nickname Plutocks.

Date of Birth ]u\\ jo, 191 1.

Canal Zone Jddress Gatun, C. Z.

Date oj Entering Cristobal School Ocmher 5, I92<.

Grade Entered Freshman.

School Activities Sv.,ff, '26; Art Editor of Caribbean, '29;
"Rip Van Winkle," '26; Glee Club, '26 '27; Orchestra,
'26; Track, '28; Basketball, '29; "Kempy," '29.

Favorite Expression I don't know about that.

Chosen Focation Adventurer.

Hobby Cartooning.

Pastime Wandering.




ANITA ROSE RANKIN.

"For softness she, and siccet attractive grace."

Nickname .Anita.

Birthplace .Ancon, C. Z.

Date of Birth September fi, 1909.

Canal Zone Address Box 574, Cristobal, C. Z.

Date of Entering Cristobal School 1 926.

Grade Entered Sophomore.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z. Hrnduras,
Costa Rica, and New Orleans, La.

School Activities Supper Club, Glee Club, "Rip \'an Win-
kle," '26; Carnival, "Cupid Scores a Touchdown," '28;
School Notes Editor of The Caribbean, '29.

Favorite Expression If Oh, Yeah!

Chosen Focation Private Secretary.

Hobby Horseback riding.

Pastime Reading and music.




MARGARET HAYES

" Here, there, and everyivhere."

Nickname Smuxie.

Birthplace Cristobal, C. Z.

Date of Birth November 25, 1910.

State's Address 921 Home .Ave., P'ort Wayne, Ind.

CanalZone .iddress Box 202, Cristobal, C. Z.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 1 9 1 6.

Grade Entered First.

School Activities Supper Club, Debating Club.

College Expected to Enter Business College.

Favorite Expression Caracho.

Chosen Focation Doctor.

Hobby Swi m m i ng.

Pastime Horseback riding.



26



THE CARIBBEAN.




ADAIR LOUISE TAYLOR.

"From this one you may learn all."
Nickname Taylor.
Birthplace Colon, Panama.
Date of Birth May 2, igii.

State's .iddress 21 1 Woodill Heights, McKinney, Texas.
Canal Zone .Address Box 156, Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School 1 9 1 9.
Grade Entered Third.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming toC.Z. Public School

No. 4, Albany, N. Y.
School Activities Tennis; Supper Club, '26, '27, '28, '29;

President of Supper Club, '29; Carnival, '27, '28, '29;

Glee Club, '27, '28; Exchange Editor of The C-4rib-

BEAN, '29.
College Expected to Enter University of Texas.
Favorite Expression Horse Collar.
Chosen Vocation Teacher.
Hobby Dancing and tennis.
Pastime Going places, seeing people, and doing things.



SAM PATCHETT.

"Gentle in manner but vigorous in the deed."

Nicknatne Patrica.

Birthplace Washington, D. C.

Date of Birth .^pril 7, 19 10.

State's .-Iddress Washington, D. C.

Canal Zone Address Cristobal.

Date of Entering Cristobal School ^^y 15, 192S.

Grade Entered Junior.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z. West Junior

High, Hine Junior High.
School Activities Soccer, '29.
Favorite Expression Go fish.
Chosen Vocation Apprentice.
Hobby Making models.
Pastime Loafing.



0^


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i


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HH




LOIS A. WILLIAMS.

*^ Her very frowns are fairer far
Than smiles of other maidens are."

Nickname Mockey.
Birthplace Las Cascadas, C. Z.
Date of Birth. .August 12, 191 1.

Stales' Address 708 West Spring St., New .Albany, Ind.
Canal Zone Address Box I, Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 1921.
Grade Entered Fifth.

School Activities Supper Club, Debating Club, Glee Club.
Favorite Expression .Asutes!
Hobby Reading.
Pastime Reading.



THE CARIBBEAN.



27



^^^HRvT-


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RANDOLPH ORBAUGH.

"Il'ise to resolve, ami [Hilie>il to perform."

Nickname Randy.

Birthplace Indianapolis, Ind.

Date 0/ Birth January 12, 191 1.

Canal Zone Address Gatun, C. Z.

Date of Entering: Cristobal School March 15, 1926.

Grade Entered Sophomore.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z. Fayetteville

High, Fayetteville, N. C.
School Activities Carnival.

College Expected to Enter University of North Carolina.
Favorite Expression Iszatso.
Chosen location Mechanical Engineer.
Hobby Reading.
Pastime Movies.



MILDRED JENNIE BATH.

"A daughter of the Gods, divinely tall
And most divinely J air '

Nickname Bobs.

Birthplace Ancon, C. Z.

Date of Birth May 19, 191 1.

State's Address Norwalk, Conn.

Canal Zone Address Box 224, Cristobal, C. Z.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 1917.

Grade Entered First.

School Activities "Rip Van Winkle," '26; Carnival,
'29; Glee Club, '26, '27, '28; Supper Club, '26,
'29; "Cupid Scores a Touchdown," '28.

College Expected to Enter Boston LIniversity.

Favorite Expression Oh! Oh!

Chosen Vocation .Accountant.

Hobby Dancing.

Pastime Reading.



17, 28,
27, 28.,





PORFIRIO DeREUTER.

"With winged feet which lend a walking grade."

Nickname Porfy.
Birthplace New York.
Date of Birth March 6, 1909.
Canal Zone Address Box 565, Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School October i, 1921.
Grade Entered Fourth.
School Activities Soccer; Baseball; Track; Basketbal

Bowling; "Rip Van Winkle," '26; Glee Club.
Favorite Expression Jake.
Chosen Vocation Draftsman.
Hobby xAthletics.
Pastime .Athletics.



28



THE CARIBBEAN.




CHARLES CRUM.

A man of a sound and composed mind.'

Nickname Crum.

Birthplace Cicero, Ind.

Dale of Birth July 4, 1910.

Canal Zone Address Gatun, C. Z.

Date oj Entering Cristobal School October, 1924.

Grade Entered Freshman.

School Activities Carnival.

College Expected to Enter University of Indiana.

Favorite Expression Well, I'll be darned!

Chosen Vocation Electrical Engineering.

Hobby Electricity.

Pastime Electricity.



PHOKBE O'DONNELL.

'Her voice was ever soft, gentle, and low, an excellent thing
in woman."

Nickname 'Bani a.

Date of Birth February 1, 191 1.

Canal Zone .iddress Cristobal.

States .Address Mobile, .Alabama.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October 12, 19:8.

Grade Entered Senior.

Favorite Expression I'd like to knock you in the ear.

Chosen Vocation Nurse.

Hobby Skating or dancing.

Pastime Dancing.





THEODORE E. BRANDON.

"An honest man the noblest work of God."

Nickname The Minute Man.

Birthplace Colon, Republic of Panama.

Dale of Birth ^June 29, 1910.

Canal Zone .Address Box 456, Cristobal.

Date of Entering Cristobal School 191 9.

Grade Entered Third Grade.

School .ictivities Track, '27 '28 '29; Soccer, '29; Baseball,
'29; Bowling, '28 '29; .Acting President of Debating
Club, '29; President of Class, '27; Debating Club
Team, '29.
-F'avorite Expression .After me, \ou come first.

Chosen Vocation Medicine.

Hobby Collecting curiosities.

Pastime Playing billiards.




THE CARIBBEAN.



29



ZOE WVI.LIE.

".'/ nature sweet; a disposition pleasant."

Nickname Zoe Wyllie.
Birthplace Fort Hamilton, New York.
Date oj Birth February 2j, 1912.
Canal Zone Address Fort lie I.e.ssep.s.
Date oj Entering Cristobal School Deiemher, 192S.
Grade Entered Post Graduate.
Other Schools Attended BeforeComingtoC./,. Kenwood-F.oring,

Chicago. Sea Cliff High School, N. Y.
College Expected to Enter Goucher College.
Favorite Expression Now, I ask ;ou
Chosen Vocation Journalism
Hobby Tennis and swimming.
Pastime. Swimming.



BL.'^NCA W.ALKER.

'The Mirror of all Courtesy




.administration Building. Balboa Hciglits. Canal Zone.



30



THE CARIBBEAN.




Place: Cristobal High School.
Time: In early June, 1929.
Scexe: Tourist is visiting schoolhouse.
Characters: Tourist.

Mr. Sawyers.

Students.
Atmosphere: Deep depression all around.



Tourist: "Why are the faculty and the students
so sad?"

Mr. Sawyers: "Why, after June 21, we will
lose the finest Senior class that ever graced this
school. Do you wonder that we all are sad?"

Tourist: "But I don't understand seniors
leave ev'ery year. Why should you feel such a
sense of loss when hordes of new freshmen will be
rushing in?"

Mr, Sawyers: "Yes, but never has a more
talented group been in our midst. It's a pleasure
to teach such geniuses. I only regret that I have
not been here since their first grade days. How-
ever, I have made it a point to educate myself on
their history."

Tourist: "Tell me about them I'm interested.
They seem such paradoxes."

Mr. Sawyers: "In 1917, four of the present
Seniors attended first grade in Cristobal School.
Even then they showed signs of remarkable, if
undeveloped, intelligence. Every year they be-
came more learned, and they increased in number.



When they became freshmen, they were joined
by an equally intelligent group from Gatun. In
school work, in athletics, in social activities alike,
they proved their quality for four years. And
now, that we are to lose them, I am almost
tempted to resign."

Tourist: "But where do they come from? To
what State does the credit belong?"

Mr. Sawyers: "They come from all over the
United States the cream of each State is among
us, as well as that of Panama."

Tourist: "What do they look like? I want to
know that I may henceforth determine genius by
its appearance."

Mr. Sawye?-s: "Their appearance is marvelous.
But no two look alike large, small, short, tall,
light, dark, they are, but the quality is present
in all."

Tourist (becoming depressed): "I certainly
marvel. And I understand your feelings now.
I certainly sympathize with you."

Mr. Sawyers: "I appreciate it, but that can not
help me. I know that for a time at least I shall
be known as the man who 'never smiled again.'
I am sorely tempted to flunk them so that the
school and I may have the pleasure of their com-
pany at least another year, but I know that I
should only be cheating the world. So I am
resigned to losing them. But the heartache
remains."

Curtain.




Bridge on the old King's Highway to Panama City.



THE CARIBBEAN.



31




We, the Seniors ot 1929, having taken four years
to reach this exalted position and who are now
preparing to forsake these sacred portals, do with
mutual consent draw up this, our last will and
testament, with the hope that it will be duly
read and carried out.

To the Freshmen we do leave the thrill of
being Sophomores.

To the Sophomores we leave the penalty of
being Juniors with the result of having to give a
Junior-Senior banquet.

To the Juniors the Senior Class as a whole
leave their ability to disagree in class meetings,
to be added to the latters' already enormous
tendency in that direction.

Morris Luce leaves his silence to William
Newman with fervent hopes that he will make
good use ot it.

James Quinn leaves his smile in the custody ot
Celeste Clark.

Elizabeth Cunningham leaves her title to
Elaine Blauvelt and her condescending manner
to Scott Parsons.

Inez Barry leaves her soft voice to Virginia
Stevenson.

Adair Taylor wills her cherished position in the
otSce to Mavis Thirlwall.

Ethel Barnett leaves her ability to have an
alibi always on hand to Rae Bliss.

Lee Kariger leaves his ever-ready smile to
James Campbell.

Anita Rankin wills her love of dancing to Elsie
Darley.

Teddy Brandon leaves his remarkable ability
to be absent 4 days out of 5 to Francisco Wong.

Elizabeth Hackett leaves her love of Fords to
Peggy Bretch.

Blanca Walker wills to Mabel Schulert her
ability to get all her work done in the first 1 5
minutes in the morning.

Jack Pettit wills to Jack Maher his record of
being hit in every baseball game.

Royal Higgason wills to Fred Stewart the
Book of Parliamentary Law, which is still in
good condition.



Marion Boomer leaves to Helen Logan her
ability to get to her destination in as short a time
as possible.

Morton Southard leaves his power of arguing
to Ralph Crum.

Vita Lyew leaves her untiring etforts in Supper
Club to Marguerite Bush and her cheery manner
to Caroline Napoleon.

Marion Lowande leaves Elise Doar her ability
to make up her mind at a moments notice.

Rosemary Keene leaves her permanent seat
in the library to Elsie Birkeland.

Lilybel Cox leaves her ceaseless activity to
Elizabeth Raymond.

Margaret Hayes leaves her love of outdoor
lite to Alice Henter.

Lois Williams leaves her seat at the Sunday
Matinee at the Strand to Evelyn Ganzmueller.

Mildred Bath leaves her record of never being
asked to leave the room to Victor Melendez.

Roy Walker wills his curly hair to Walter
Wickingstad knowing that it will be appreciated.

Roger Deakin leaves the welfare of the Student
Government to Dick Sergeant.

Wilhelmina Kleefkins wills her love of good
times and her good sportmanship to Frances
Days, this to be added to Frances' own great
supply.

Zoe Wyllie wills her love of sports to Virginia
Eberenz.

Sam Patchett wills his military bearing to
John Whidden.

Gretchen Palm wills her literary ability to
Pauline Herman because of her fine showing in the
Short Story Contest.

Dorothy Heim leaves Eleanor L'rwiler her
ability to understand what Senior English is all
about.

Paul Hayden wills his baseball glove to
Arthur Mundberg.

Porfirio leaves to Rita Joyce his stature with
the consolation that it will not be given in vain.

Randolph Orbaugh leaves to Delia Raymond
his gift ot being seen and not heard.



32



THE CARIBBEAN.



Jean Willie leaves Estafania Wheeler the use
ot the swimming pool after class hours.

Woodtord Babbitt leaves Tom Coley custodian
of his seat in the back of the room.

Charles Crum leaves to Tom Conley his ready
study on how the morning class meeting should
be held.



And now having duly read and agreed upon all
small details and sincerely hoping we have
offended none of our worthy brethren, we do
scrawl our X's and quietly pass out.

The Senior Class of 1929.
Witnesses: Old Ironsides.
Uncle Sam.
Big Ben.




THE CARIBBEAN.



33




THE CLASS PROPHECY,

Et/ie/ Barnetr, '^9.



M=




I was breathless when I had reached Heaven at last
From a stiff climb up those Golden Stairs,
And there at the Gates was St. Peter himself,
Harrassed by hard work and great cares.

"Who are you, what are you, why are you here.'"
He asked in a suspicious tone;
So I told him I'd once gone to Cristobal High
(I could see that his interest had grown.;

I then said I belonged to that marvelous class

That C. H. S. lost in twenty-nine

"Twenty-nine," he then gasped, "you're the last one to die-

.My, my, my, tor your age you look fine ! I !"

So I asked it the others all resided there.

He said, "Sure," that they'd been there for years.

He said, too, they'd made Heaven a Heave'nlier place

Which was sweet, sweet music in my ears!

He summoned an angel who just flitted past,
I looked looked again in surprise;
For who should it be, but Jack Pettit himselt',
I hardly could believe my eyes!

It seemed that his work had been diving tor pearls.
But he'd dived once too often, and so,
He'd arrived here in Heaven, and joined all of those
Who'd been first ot our class to go.

He said Royal'd been killed in a wreck of a train
(A traveling salesman was he.)
.^nd it death hadn't come to Marion Lowande,
The world's greatest singer would she be.

Lois had married, and was here with her husband.
Their joy now having a revival;
.'\dair, Minnie, and Margaret, all married too,
Were now waiting their husbands' arrival.

As radio announcer, Paul lived and died,
.'Vnd Morton had been a great broker
But his wife caused him many a marital woe
So he came up to Heav'n to provoke her.

Sam'd been a Shakespearian actor of note,
Roger, a great financier,
Porfy, the greatest of all human flies
That ever had flown on the sphere.

Lilybel opened a dressmaking shop
But not tor long; she soon married
Then Sis took it over till she married, too.
But on earth neither one of them tarried.

Jack had to stop, he was all out of breath,
Besides, he was due at a date.



So he showed me the way to the .'Vngel's Hotel
And I rushed, since it was getting late.

.And who was hat-check girl, but Dorothy Heim.
She told me she'd been one on earth;
She said Inez had been a vaudeville star
In a song and dance act of greit worth.

She'd have told me of more, but a guest then arrived
So I went to my registration,

And who was the desk clerk, but Teddy Brandon,
Whose books are now read by a nation.

He said Mildred posed for magazine covers
And had wed a man of great wealth.
While Anita wed early, but didn't live long,
Nor did Blanca, who had quite poor health.

Roy and Lee died in a submarine race:
Elizabeth Cunningham, a teacher,
\ ita had been a doctor of great skill.
And Morris Luce had been a preacher.

He stopped, then, as he had some duties to do.
And as he tended his next guest
I went up and slept, but next morning went out
To see it I could find the rest.

On the corner of Cherubim Street, I found Charles,
Woody, Randolph, and Jim, harmonizing!
This was practise, they said, for Community Night.
I found their vocal talents surprising.

Randolph had lecture-toured over the world;
Jimmie, a prize winning jockey;
Woody had starred in the Olympic games,
-And Charles Crum had won fame in hockey.

They continued to sing, so I wandered off
.And there, on a beautiful lawn
Marion Boomer and Gretchen were plaving tennis
While Jean and Rosemary looked on.

They hailed me, and I learned that Jean'd been a paintei ;
Gretchen, a most daring flyer;
Rosie, always in a fast auto race;
Marion'd wed a rich cleaner and dyer.

They told me they thought that I never would die,
Which was just what my relatives thought
But I tooled 'em and left them the department store
Which my own hard-earned money had bought.

St. Peter then came up and gave me a harp

Which I practised, heedless of intrusion;

But they warned me that Heav'ns full of QUIET and PEACE

So I now practise in strict seclusion!



34



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



35




36



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN. 37



What would happen to C. H. S. if the Class of '30

agreed to agree?




Elsie Birkcland couldn't tease the ivories.

Elaine Blaiivelt forgot to bring her purp to school.

Rae Bliss stopped making whoopee.

Peggy Bretch didn't hav^e such pretty curls.

Marguerite Bush hadn't discovered the bed bugs.

James Campbell wore Paris Garters and had "Sox Appeal."

Celeste Clark didn't have banjo eyes.

Tom Coley didn't have his Cicero.

Tom Conley was Fred Stewart's twin brother.

Ralph Crum kept his feet under his own desk.

Elsie Darley should grow taller.

Frances Days didn't know all the latest songs.

Elise Doar didn't have that Southern drawl.

Virginia Eberenz came to school on time.

Evelyn Ganzmueller didn't worry over her Physics

Alice Henter hadn't won the popularity contest.

Pauline Herman wasn't a mermaid.

Rita Jfiyce was tongue-tied.

Helen Logan didn't resemble Greta Garbo.

Jack Maher wasn't our most handsome boy.

Victor Melendez didn't dress so neatly.

Arthur Mundberg didn't have a weakness for teasing the girls.

Caroline Napoleon was seen and heard.

\\'illi;;ni Xev\'man ran out of wise cracks.

Scott Parse ns couldn't make a "sax" talk.

Delia Haymond's hands were tied while she tried to talk.

Elizabeth Raymond was unable to blush.

Mabel Schulert should bob her blond, silky tresses.

Dick Sergeant ever agreed with the majority ot the class.

Virginia Stevenson wasn't one of oin- faithful Juniors.

Fred Stewart forgot to say, "May I ha\'e your attention, please?'

Mavis Thirlwall got a "wind blown."

Estafania Wheeler ever made a loud noise.

John Whidden moved more rapidly.

Walter Wikingstad didn't have red hair.

Francisco ^^'ong stopped paying his class dues promptly.



3^



THE CARIBBEAN.




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THE CARIBBEAN.



39




40



THE CARIBBEAN.




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THE CARIBBEAN.



41



SOPHOMORE CLASS.



Roll Ca



.Ambition.



As Realized in 1950.



Stella Arthur

William Bailey

Floribel Barngrover.
Earnest Berger. .
William Blauvelt
Mar\' Bretch,
Robert Brougli.

Walter Bundy

Crawford Campbell

Dan Coffey

Edward Conkling. .
Margaret Davis ....
Frank Drake. .
Rodman Drake
Ruth Duvall
Russell Elwell.
Fabian Englander. .

Erie Ferguson

Eleanor Fitzgerald.
Clara Frisk
Burton Hackett
Parker Hanna

Robert Hanna

William Harmon
Lillian Housel
Percival Lyew. .
Robert Marshall
Kenneth Maurer. .
Eugenia McLain. .
Margaret Misrahi. .
Margaret Mitchell.
Harold Mueller. .
Marion \eely.
Gerald Neil. ..
Mary Patterson
Blanca Pulgar.

Carlos Rankin

.Anna Ryan

Aloha Slocum.
Theo. Theohtisto.

Beverly Turner

George Wertz

Edward Wilkens

Raymond Will

Ben Williams



Eugene Williams



.A vamp

Army general

Good mother

General

.An artist

Interior decorator

Transcontinental bus line owner.

Famous lawyer

Professor

A tabloid reporter

Poet

School teacher

.Army officer

Navy officer .

Botanist

Six-day bicycle rider

.An historian

.Architect

Domestic science teacher

Librarian

.A sculptor ...

Hymn composer

A trombonist in Whitman's Band.

.Arbitrator

.A chorus girl

A mathematician

Dean

Second Sheridan

Married lady

Stenographer

Nurse

Polar explorer. . .

Woman's Club leader

.Apache dancer

Stenographer

Physical Directress

Foreign Diplomat

Language teacher

Social leader

Banana checker

Policeman

Second Babe Ruth

.Aviator

A minister

Bug collector



El:



lectncian.



Second Pavlowa.
Salvation Army drummer.
A much divorced actress.
General nuisance.
Spanish teacher.
Human fly.
L'ndertaker.
Village postmaster.
A spiritualist.

Editor oi Chriilian Science Review.
Radio bedtime story teller.
Cabaret girl.
Gob.

.A stool pigeon.
Settlement worker.
Inventor of perpetual motion.
.A taxi driver.
Tight rope walker.
Dressmaker ot Darien.
Bookbinder.

Member o( the Royal Mounted Police.
Colon bombero.
A tiller of the soil.
A revolutionist.
Sunday school teacher.
A circus clown.
Head of Watson's Institute.
A preacher.
Old maid.
Seconci Houdini.
Woman hypnotist.
.An .African missionary.
.A governess in a family of eight.
Heavyweight champion.
Zoologist.
Invalid.

Chief Politician of Wall Street.
Joke Editor of JF/iiz Bang.
Only woman forest ranger.
Wo Id lecturer
Jay walker.

.Absent-minded professor.
Mining engineer.
.An executioner at Sing Sing.
Conducts research laboratory for extermi-
nation of the boll weevil.
Handling "live wires" in a Broadway
chorus.



MR 138.^5-



42



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



43




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44



THE CARIBBEAN.



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J 9i *i ^





p-'ftnv-



THE CARIBBEAN.



45



FRESHMAN CLASS.



Epithet.


-Sobriquet.


Hobby.


Future.


Edward .'\lbin


"Eddie"








James Albiii


"Jimmie".


Being important, .


Thomas Edison, ;d.




TheliTi!! Albritton


"Tillie"


Being with Emma


Washwoman.




Geneveive B.irr\'


"Gen"


Writing notes. .


Moomonette.




Gladys Bliss


"Curly-to|)"


Phoning.


Female Beau Brummel.




Allene Deikins.


"Al"


Being ambitious


Great musician.




William Diers


"Scutch"


7-year-okl


Bartender.




Zol.i Dorson


"Bumps", .


Roval


Flapper.




Dona Eaton


"Blondie"


He's tall, d.trk, an' h.indsoiiie


Mary Pickford, 2d.




Joseph Ebdon


"Parson Joe"


Preaching


Preacher.




Harry Egolf


"Kgg"


Eating


.A "King's taster."




Vivian Elmgren. -


"Viv".


School


School teacher.








Selling.


"Shippy."
Horsegroom.


















.Alice Gormerlv


"Alee"


Reading.


Teacher.




Fr.mk Griesinger


"Germany"


Sax


Wiedolph, id.




Emma Hill


"Goldie"


Collecting stamps


Postmistress.




Mildred Harmon


"Millie"


Laughing.


Private secretarv.




Marion Hahn


"Mem"


Howard


Old maid.




James Hayden


"Pest"


Radio






Verona Hermiin


"Ronev".


Gossiping


Housewife.




Beatrice Hoiisel.


"Bee-dee"


Chewing gum


Movie actress.




Jodie Lu Jones

Carl Kariger


"Jo-Jo"


Playing "Beloved"
Teasing






"Diablo"


Bachelor.




Howard Keenan


"Howa'd Deah",


Nagi-saci


Boiler maker.




Thelma King


"Thelm'


Studying.


Housewife.




Marie Kleefkens


"Kleefie",


Clarence.


Married woman.




.Alvin Lvew


"Chino"


Tennis


Galley cook.




Peggy McGehee


"Peg"


Ralph...


Russian dancer.




Frances Mclnenv


"Fr innie"


Poetrv


Public speaker.
Painter.




Virginia McSparren


"Ginnie"


Painting




Fr ink Merrit


"Merrv"


Flirting.


.A ladies' man.




UrselMock


"Jerkie"


Dincing,


Pavlowa, 2d.




FJIwin Neil


"Smarf-I"


Girls


Heartbreaker.




Elsie Neelv ...


"Neelv" ..


Commercial geograpin


\'iolinist.




Rov Perkins. .


"l.indv"...


Getting .A's


.Aviator.




Martha Potts


"String Bean"


Dancing,


Fatty .Arbuckle, 2d.




Virginia Price


"Ginger".


Riding, ,


Woman jockey.




Eleanor Reinhokl


"Reinie".


Piano


Paul Whitman, 2d.




Ben Roberts


"Baby Face"


Talking


Dancing professor.




Herman Roos.


"Heimie"


Pesteriiig,


Paderewski, 2d.




Herbert Rose.


"Rosie"


Blushing


Harem owner.




Bruce Siunderi


"Sonnv"


Bicvcles,


Road digger.




Helen South ;rd


"Giggles"


Giggling


Juggler.




Robert Stevenson


"Stevie"


Looking ange'ic


Hermit.




Inez Theotisto


"Theo"


Being late.


Novelist.




.Alicia Thirlwall


"Reds"


Parties. .


Clara Bow, 2d.




NellWardlaw.


"Pete"


Pepito


Famous heartbreaker.





46



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



47




THE CARIBBEAN.




IMAGINATION.

Grelchen Palm, 2().

(This story was awarded Grand Prize in the Short Story
Contest.!

Tony spoke thoughttuUy :

"Well, Bibs, we're here at last, most prosaicalh'
seated upon the romantic, ancient, tamed,
celebrated, distinctive, renowned

" flat-arch bridge of Panama," ended Bibs
with a flourish.

Tony continued undisturbed.

"Bibsy, considering that I have followed you,
the object of my adoration, into this terrible
jungle, that I have been flea-bitten, and that I
have been yanked out of a perilous stream twelve
inches deep, I think it is only fair that you join
me in singing, 'Be it ever so humble, there's no

ply"

"My, my, you're really longer winded than
Cicero himself; I have no hope of your recovery
now," Bibs interrupted. "Seriousl}', Tony, I'm
here to vvriie a local-color legend tor my series ot
travel sketches."

"Man, that's easy, merely grease \'our top-
story; the wheels will go 'round, then

"Can it! Let's see yoti tell a story about this
bridge, if it's so all blamed easy!"

Tony laughed.

"O. K. with me. Sit on yon telled tree. Sir
Bibs; lake out th\- mighty pencil and th\- pap>Tus
and prepare thvseltturtakino; notes on mv wondrous
tale."

"The characters of this legend," began Tony,
"are Don \'asco Nuiiez de Balboa, who, on an
exploring spree in Panama, finds himself and his
cavalcade detained by a simple, glad-heartetl
little brook, Flaine, the Lily Maid ot Astalot,
Houdini, Mr. .Archimedes, the Greek math shark
and, of course, many dashing cavaliers.

.A brook stood in the way of the great Balboa.
What? Would it change his router Nay, never!
"What ho, men, what have we here, a tinkling
brook : Doughts' retainers, measure yon streame."
]3on Balboa snuffed his snutf and tapped his foot
impatiently, then, "What are thy calculations?"



A. Spaniard spoke up: "The width is two
lengths of myself plus four hands, sir. The depth
is one foot and two thumbs' length, sir."

Balboa attempted to look wise; after pondering
deeply he said, "How now, it is too insignificant
a stream tor me to walk through; 'twould sully
my diginity to be carried on thy back like a
meal-sack, and my horse catches cold too easily
tor him to carr\- me. Go, call Houdini; his
mighty brain will solve our predicament."

After being duly received by his superior,
Houdini meditated long upon the weighty
question which was his to work. How to get
across the stream? Suddenly he cried, "Gad-
zooks, I've got the answer, and how. Buikl a
bridge."

The brilliance ot the plan pleased Balboa so
much that Houdini was immediately decorated
with a certain gold medal, given to those ot
superior intellectual power.

This act was rudely dispelled when Elaine ran
up to Balboa shrieking, "Vasco, my beloved,
protect me! The jungle, it overwhelms me; it
stifles me; it clasps me to its greedy heart, it

"Dearest heart, the terrejrs (jt thy brain surpass
those of reality."

"But, bur, I cling t.) thee, my knight; take me
from here speedily; let us go to, go to

"Silence, maiden thy 'go tos' smack too muc'i
of Shakespeare to please thy proud Spanish lover."

"Forsooth, if my love goeth unrequited, I shall
bestow it elsewhere," Elaine replied cooly. Her
eye lighted on Houdini. "Then honest Houtlini
will be my shield and protector, and not th.)u,
f) false Balboa."

Houdini grimaced that this superfluous, fair
maiden shouki cast herselt at his mercy. "Come
on then. Snowdrop, your big boy will go hunting
orchids tor your petal lips to kiss. Come along,
step lively, please."

Balboa was so bitter at Elaine's actions that he
vowed that he would be a bachelor (ot course he
never kept his resolution).

.Archimedes was then sent tor and his opinion
on the bridue sought.



THE CARIBBEAN.



49



"Oh RuIIkju, it is a difficult prolik-m, hut upon
.stud\in^ the liypf)thesis, I can deduce the tacts
that the bridge will require 100,001 brick and a
mortar made from three boxes of Elaine's face-
powder, coconut-iuice ani salt and pepper to
taste." Needless to say, Archimedes was given a
blue ribbon with the words "Exceptional merit."

The royal Ford was pulled up (the gasoline had
all leaked out) and Senor Flanigan, the driver,
dumped 100,001 brick upon the bank. The face-
powder from Elaine's suit-case, the coconut-juice
obtained, and the pepper and salt taken from
Archimedes, who had lately been computing the
number of ants it would take to carry away
3,000,000,000 grains ot pepper (not counting the
ants that sneezed to ileath).

Construction was begun on both sides. In
building the center of the bridge, four men stood
in the stream with boards over their heads (so
that the dripping mortar would not rumple their
hair) and shaped the arch. The bridge was done!

"Bravo," exclaimed Balboa, from the side-lines.

"Help," cried the four men in the stream.
Heavens! the arch had fallen and now lay flatly
upon the boards which the gallant soldiers had
just used for protection.

"Hold it!" shouted Balboa. "Stay there 'til
the mortar drys; it's a flat arch, but it'll do, tor



the present." (Balboa was unconsciously using
the "mutilated" English of Houdini, it is sad to
notice.)

Being magic, the mortar soon set. "Ready
my gallant soldiers!' We will go; the shrew and
her two friends may dig their own graves here,
tor all / care."

With this the company crossed the bridge.
Distressing cries were heard. "Elaine!" Houdini
shouted, "Wait, take this little bundle of excess
baggage with you; I don't want her." There
was .'\rchimedes, too, holding up his robes that he
might ncjt trip. But oh, what a fate awaited
them. Three small stones treacherously reposed
upon the bridge; Archimedes stumbled; Elaine
tripped; Houdini turned a somersault; they
fell fell into the stream that was one foot and
two thumbs' length in depth and drowned.

"That is all, Bibs; I thank you for your kind
attention. Did you take any notes?"

"Heck, I forgot."

"Murder, all that work for nothing? Heavens!
I faint; I gasp for breath; the smelling salts,
quick" and mockingly Tony sank weakly to the
ground.

Bibs laughed, "Ha, ha, go on and faint; you'll
get up soon enough; you're lying on a red ants'
nest."



HAVE YOU A HAWSER ?

Charles Criim, 2g.
(This srory was awarded the Senior Class Prize.)

I remember well, one trip I made on the ately. We exchanged messages steadily now,

Crtr/^^caw back in 1920. The C^;7'^/^6'rt was a con- checking courses and bearings as our skippers

verted sea-going suction dredge, used to trans- worked them out on the charts. By 3.30 the

port cattle from Colombia to the Canal Zone. A'^cwrtJ was sighted ofi^ our starboard bow. From

I did not dislike this boat greatly after I had that time on, I have the messages exactly as I took

become used to the cattle. There w^ould be an them down, eight years ago. At 3.45, I received



occasional passenger to break the monotony.

On January 30, we were about 139 miles
southwest of Cristobal. I was on duty that morn-
ing when, at 9.15, I picked up a call for help trom
the S. S. Xenas. I sent back my call letters and
signitied that I was ready. Her message came im-
mediately. The Xenas had lost her rudder and
was rolling helplessly in a rather rough sea.
Her position was about fifty miles southwest ot
the Caribbean. I took the message to the "old
man." He gave orders to change course immedi-



this message:
Have vou a Hawser?



Conk.



.As we had no heavy cable for towing, I sent
back a negative answer. At 4.00 I received
another.



\Vc wil
on us.



give you a cable from the port how, and tow easy

Cook.



This cable was not long enough so the next
message at 6.45 read thus:



MR 138JS-



^o



THE CARIBBEAN.



I have another piece of the same kiml ot wire that I will
give you. It is a little longer than the one you have hold of
now. Cook.

By 9.00 o'clock the sea had roughened con-
siderably. The captain became worried, so at
10 o'clock I relayed a message to Balboa asking
for help. At 12.J0 p. m. came this message.



Gorgona 50 miles north of Cape Mala, 8 a. m., .speed
eleven knots. Keep me informed of your position.

Howard.

I sent our course to the Gorgona and at 10.55
received this message.

10.45, Gorgona lat. 7.48 N., long. 79.49 \V., course S. S.



E. mag. Will this course intercept yours?



Howard.



Will send tug Gorgona immediately.



Port Captain.



At 9.20 the next morning I received this mes-
sage.

Gorgona left at 4 a.m. Keep in touch with her by wireless.
If you have to abandon tow, anchor \'essel and mform
Gorgona. Port Captain.

The first message was picked up from the
Gorgona at 10.15.



Her signals were now so loud that I did not need
the captain to tell me that the relief ship was near
and on the right course. After the captain had
studied his chart I sent word that the Gorgotias
course was "O. K." At 1.25 came the message
that was to complete our role as rescuer.

You are in sight. Cast off your hawser when ready.

Howard.

We dropped our hawser, the Gorgona picked
it up and we were free to proceed on our course.



THE GIRL \\UO WAS NOT.

Elsie Darky, 'jo.
(This story was awarded the Junior Class Prize.



Sailor Andrew Bones, ot the U. S. warship
Texas, anchored in Panama Bay, was sitting in a
small, deserted plaza in Panama City. He was
reading a magazine of adventure, hair-raising and
impossible. Occasionally Andy would let the



He stopped to plan out his mode of attack,
(now what was it the hero did in "Fighting
Blood).''" .As it was impossible to climb to
the window on account of the smooth walls, he
would have to use the door and once inside, e;rab-



book fall, and would dreamily put himself in the bing a poker darn, they didn't have the things

place of the hero, a handsome, devil-may-care in this country a-a-well, whatever he first put

young man, whose sole duty seemed to be to hands on, he would creep upstairs and pu* up a

rescue beautiful young ladies in dire need of heavenly fight. The rest was easy.

rescuing. Gee, but suppose the guy had a revolver. That

Presently the sun grew so hot that Mr. Bones wouldn't improve matters at all. Maybe he'd

sighed, picked up his book, arose, and looked for a better wait for a more favorable adventure

street down which to walk to the wharf. He "Help! H-e-e-!p!"

espied a narrow, cool-looking alleyway that led in At this shrill scream, Andy's chivalry got the

the right direction, and proceeded to walk down it, better of him, and throwing caution to the winds,

pondering the while on the deeds of his latest he dashed up the front steps. He saw the curtains

hero, who of the window move. Gosh! Maybe the guy

.,,,,_ IT 1 I" had accomplices on the lookout for mterferers.

Help bocorr-rr-o-o H-e-l-p! n 1 1 tt 1 j 1

nut he must not get scared. He pushed his cap

.Andy came back to earth with a start. The cry over one eye and gave a determined tug to his

had come from the second floor of a large white jumper. The door seemed locked at his first

building on his left. Andrew Bones, that simple- turn of the handle, but suddenly it opened, and

minded soul, at once deduced that har, at last, he found himself face to face with a little, brown,

was Aij chance to rescue a fair lady from, probably, withered old lady who beamed on him tooth-

the clutches of a bad man, or, most likely, from a lessly and said,

mouse. Anyway, it would give him a chance to "DeSenor, he weesh to buy a parrot ? I'aveaver'

get acquainted with one of the pretty seiioritas clever performing one. Come een, Seiior, to see."

of the City, and she would be able to see how But .Andy was rapidly making his way down the

brave he was. street.



THE CARIBBEAN.



51



m=




UNDISCOVERED TREASURE.

Robert Broug/i, 'ji.
(This story was awarded the Sophomore Cl.iss Prize.)




The tropical sun beat down on two boys
sitting quietly in a small boat. Land was two
miles to the north, but they had no means of
reaching it for their motor hail broken down, and
they were drifting steadily.

"Well," saiti the older, "What are we going to
do?"

"Don't ask me!" replied the other. "We've
no oars. Guess we'll have to swim."

"What'cha think I am.'" returned the other.
"You must have forgotten that fin we saw halt
an hour ago."

Quiet again came over them, but it did not
last long.

"Hoo-ray!" yelled Frank the younger, "We're
drifting on to that small island!"

"Now ye're speaking," replied Arthur.

A few minuteslaterthey wereable tostand in the
shallow water and drag their boat up on the sand.

The island was covered with coconut trees, and
the boys made haste to satisfy their thirst.

"Let's try to fix the motor," suggested the
younger.

"Naw," his companion replied, "Let's explore
this place first."

"O. K."
The island was not large, but it was covered with
tropical vegetation, and as they started inland
they had to force their way through the bush.

On a small hill in the center of the island they
discovered what appeared to be the ruins of an
old castle.

"Maybe this is where the people of Old Panama
hid their gold from Morgan," suggested the older,
thinking of an old legend.

"Let's see if we can find a dungeon or some-
thing," said the other.

After searching the ruins for a while the
younger called excitedly to his companion. In
the center of the ruins he had found a small pit
with a tunnel at the bottom. Both dropped into
the pit and looked into the tunnel. It was lined
with blocks of stone and only a little light entered
from a hole in the ceiling.



They entered on hands and knees, but once
inside, were able to stand up. Becoming quickly
accustomed to the gloom, they advanced through
the tunnel. About a hundred yards along the
tunnel, a small room appeared on one side.

LTpon entering it they saw two boxes in one
corner and a table in the other. The large box
was tackled by Frank, and after some struggling
he managed to break the lock, and throwing back
the lid he gave a sharp cry, which brought Arthur
to his side.

There in the box was a grim skeleton with a
knife in its mouth. There was nothing else in the
box so they tried to pry open the smaller one, but
try as they would, the lock would not budge.
When they tried to lift it, they heard a metalic
sound inside.

"Big Spanish dollars, by the thud," said
Arthur.

"Yeah, guess we'll be rich for life now. Come
on. Let's get it to the boat."

After tugging, pushing, and sweating they
managed to get it to where the boat lay on the
beach.

"Well, now to get the motor repaired."

"Sure, we've got '.he treasure but we've got to
get it home."

After spending a good half-hour trying to find
trouble, they found they had no gas.

"Well, I'll be hanged!" said Arthur. "We
could have been started long ago."

"Yes," replied Frank, "It's lucky we brought
that extra tank full."

Ten o'clock that night the "Cascade" ran up to
the tying-place in Balboa, and two travel-weary
and tired boys lifted a heavy box onto the plat-
form.

"I'm going to open it as soon as I get at my
tool box," said Arthur, "so let's hurry."

Almost exhausted, but excited, they arrived
at Arthur's home, and dived into the tool box for
a file.

Arthur's mother, father, and sister all came to
see the opening of the treasure chest, so Arthur
set to work with vigor.



-Jl



THE CARIBBEAN.



The rusty iron soon gave way, and he threw the
lid back. On the top was an oily piece of cloth,
and with great excitement he lifted this.

Quiet reigned for a while, then Arthur's father
burst into a roar of laughter, and his mother did



likewise. Frank looked foolishly at Arthur, and
they shut the lid slowly.

They had brought home a box of musket balls
which was left in the deserted castle.

It's a peculiar thing, but they never went back
to follow that mysterious tunnel to the end.




A LEGEND.

Roger Deakins, '2g.

Proud old Fort San Lorenzo lay majestically on were to scale the hill unseen and attack from the
her high bluff, guarding the entrance to the rear. With much labor the venture was started.
Chagres River. Within the fort was an air of Just as the moon was going down and the fort

sleepy indolence, for the "Dons" were never an was sinking into complete silence, the sleepy
energetic race. And indeed, what cause was there sentry heard a noise in front of the gate. Instantly
for vigilance? Above the fort floated the golden he was wide awake, but it was too late, for at the
banner of Castile and was not Spain ruler of the same instant a cannon roared and the shot crashed
seas, and master of life and death on this tortured, through the gate, splintering a great piece from
oppressed isthmus? It was true that strange
sails had been sighted that afternoon at the mouth
of the river but then, pirates were a cowardly
breed and would never dare attack an armed fort.

A full moon shone down in the massive walls
and straw-thatched huts. A man of the garrison



It.

Inside the fort all was_ contusion with everyone
shouting, "Pirates!" Finalh', a defense was
organized and for a time it seemed as though the
attackers would be beaten off.

One of the pirates, receiving an arrow almost



was whispering to a girl seated on some stone through his body, pulled it out and wrapping a

steps. A sentry walked his round perfunctorily, piece of his shirt around it, thrust it into his

The moat was full, the gates were strong. What musket and fired it back before he died.

had they to fear? The arrow with its flaming burden fell on the

Farther down the coast and around the bend, roof of one of the thatched huts,

to the west of the fort was another scene. Here As the Spaniards were fighting fire within, and

men were cursing and sweating as they toiled to the force at the gate without, the reinforcements

place a brass culvirin upon a low, wheeled cart from the rear had little trouble entering. Two

together with some shot and a keg of powder. hours later Henry Morgan and his followers, un-

\\ hen this was accomplished a man stood forth, troubled by a single Spaniard, were feasting in

Evidently he was the leader. He gave his orders, the impregnable fortress of San Lorenzo, and pre-

The cannon with most of the men was to go to the paring for their expedition across the isthmus to

fortress gate, while the rest going by small boat, Panama City.



MORGAN'S ATTACK ON PANAMA CITY.

//'. //. Bidiilv, ?/.

"Yes," said the old traveler, "Morgan was a
smart man. No one but a brave man could have
forced fourteen hundred men to march through the
jungles of Panama as he did. Of course he lost
many men on the trip. Some were caught by wild
animals, and some died of fever, but he lost more
by starvation than in any other way. When he
reached Panama Cit\' the terrified inhabitants



sent out a herd of wild bulls. As the bulls came
thundering across the plain the natives of Panama
expected the pirates to turn and run, but the wil\-
okl pirate. Captain Morgan, wouki not retreat.
He mere!)' ordered his men to shoot the wild cattle,
although they greatly outnumbered his men.
After this the hungry pirates took a night off and
feasted on the fresh meat which was so obligingly
supplied by the polite inhabitants of Panama City."



THE CARIBBEAN.



53



BALBOA'S BLOODHOUNDS AND THEIR
DESCENDANT.

Carlos Rankin, 'j/.

On a sunny afternoon in August, two boys were immense ocean which was at the other side of the

seated under an ahnond tree. Beside them was Isthmus. Balboa decided to find it, so he and his

a medium-sized, biacli dog. His ears, snoot, and companions traveled across the country through

tail were long, and in fact his general proportions marshy swamps, bitten by mosquitoes and all

denoted a hound of one sort or another. The sorts of vermin found in tropical jungles. They

owner, a boy of sixteen, preferred to believe that discovered it, and acquired from the natives

it was an offspring of a bloodhound. As flecks pearls of large size, and quite a bit of gold. They

of sunshine fell through the leaves on its glossy returned with exaggerated tales of the great

coat, his eyes appraised it proudly. ocean and the wealth along its coast.

"Do you know. Jack," he saii.1 to his com- The purpose of his second trip was to explore

paninn, "I really believe that Blackie descended along the Pacific coast. With his bloodhounds,

from the pack of bloodhounds that Balboa took he gathered natives to carry provisions and parts

with him across the Isthmus." of ships across the Isthmus. Through dense

"I never heard about that," answered Jack, jungles, swamps, and stricken with fever, the

"Tell me about it." natives struggled under their huge burdens. If

The following is a summary of what the owner they dropped with exhaustion or from fever,

told to his friend: they were goaded on again by the fear of being torn

Vasco de Nunez Balboa was one of the many to pieces by the hounds, tortured by sharp, steel

Spaniards who left Spain, came to the new world, rods, and hot irons, or left to die in the jungles,

and were changed into cruel-hearted, lawless men Many were left to die because they could not

by the horrible conditions and the mad cra\-ing possibly go farther at any cost or punishment,

for gold. Through an enemy of his, one who was jealous

On his first expedition, he gathered a force of of the sensation Balboa caused in Spain and the

about one hundred and ninety rough men and colonies, he was falsely charged with treason and

started across the Isthmus. He would set his beheaded in 151 7.

bloodhounds after ihe natives to round them up, "Boy, life must have been cruel and vet ex-
then subject them to all sorts of torture in an citing in those days," said Jack. "How do you
effort to make them tell where their cities of figure that Blackie might have decended from
wealth were hidden. They would tell the truth, one of those bloodhounds?"

which was that they knew of none, and as a "Oh, he was brought in from some village near

result, they were either torn to pieces by the Gatun, and he can follow animals and human

bloodhounds, had their ears cut off, or put on the beings very easily by smell. It's good to fhink

rack. One thing they liid hint of; that was an he is, anyway."



One day, many years ago, before Columbus
discovered America, a San Bias Indian sought the
witch-doctor of the village. When he found the
w itch-tloctor he asked him if there was a way in
which he could kill his rival without the rest of the
Indians knowing about it. The witch-tloctor told
the Indian to return in a week ani.1 he would tell
him a way in which he could secreth' kill his rival.



A LEGEND.

Elhahelh Raymond, 'jo.

trying to find a method that will achieve your
purpose. The time is not favorable. Return
next week and I will see if the spirits will tell me



the method."

The Indian left the abode of the witch-doctor
impatient at the delay.

When the week was up the Indian again sought



When the week was up and the Indian returned, the witch-tloctor who told him a method which
the witch-doctor said, "All week I have been would enable him to exterminate his rival.



54



THE CARIBBEAN.



Leaving the witch-doctor tlie Indian gathered
together a number at" small bamboo sticks and
took them liome. After examining the bamboo
sticks he saw that there was not one which was in
perfect condition.

Three weeks he spent in finding the required
number of perfect bamboo ^sticks. Their "fie"
took a pure white hen's egg antl with tar inscribed
the name of his ri\al ami a date two weeks distant
on it.

A'ery carefully he made a raft out of the
bamboo sticks antl placed the egg in the middle.
When the bamboo sticks and the egg were wired
securely together he patiently waited for night to
fall.

There was no moon. The Indian with great
care transported his raft of bamboo sticks to his
canoe. Under cover of the night he rowed a mile
from shore. Then he set the little raft afloat
with a great feeling that soon his rival would die.



The days slipped by slowly for the Indian, who
began to wish that he had made the date of his
rival's death sooner.

At last the long looked for day arrived. The
Iiulian was curious to know how his rival would die.
He was^.coijfident that the man would die! That
afternoon a storm arose and the wind blew strong-
ly. The Indian's rival was walking along the
beach when a coconut tree blew over on him and
instantly killed him.

All of the .San Bhis Intlians believe this is true.
Recently they have changed the idea a little and
say that the person whose name is written on the
egg will die when the raft washes ashore and the
egg breaks.

One of these queer rafts was found in the water
near the coaling station about a year ago. The
egg was rescued and buried without breaking it.
So there is one San Bias Indian more than there
should be.




FOURTH OF JULY ON THE ZONE.

Elhe! Barnett, '2g.



Although the Canal Zone is a considerable dis-
tance from the "sweet land of liberty," Inde-
pendence Day is always celebrated in true Fourth
of July style. There is plenty of patriotism in
evidence, and even a surplus of the "Spirit of '76."
The youth of Panama celebrates for weeks before,
and days after the birthday of our country. But
the main action takes place at Pier 6, a dock which
is always used for occasions which require enter-
taining on a massive scale.

From early morning, when athletic and aquatic
events start the day off, in grand style, until late
at night, when the last dance is over, patriots swarm
the pier. Although the shooting of fireworks is
prohibited on or near the dock, the younger gen-
eratifjn is always in its element. The distribution
of various sweets, /rt'f, at certain intervals, makes
a hit with everyone. The refreshment stand is
never deserted, as people never tire of eating.

Among the attractions offered to the crowd are:



athletic contests of all kinds for children as well
as for adults, boat races, revues put on by dancing
classes, band concerts, boxing bouts, refreshments,
and of course, shooting of fireworks the real
thing by experts, and dancing. Little electric
cars which ride the children round and round the
dock unceasingly, are very popular. Free busses
convey the people to and from the dock (that is,
to a certain point, away from the dock) but the
multitude usually bring their own cars.

^'ast numbers of cars are parked in and around
the vicinity of Pier 6, and many an erstwhile
patriot's vocabulary increases as he vainly tries
to extricate his automobile from the masses that
surround it.

Everyone is sorry when the day ends, because
they have to wait a whole year for the next Fourth.
But they live in the hope that it will be more
glorious than the last, a hope which seems to grow
more impossible as the years pass.



THE CARIBBEAN.



55



.tu



^ult/ iS2E




AS



I a*'











^6



THE CARIBBEAN.



BLUE HEAVEN.

Adiiir Taylor, '2g.

One evening I walked down Bolivar Street on
my way home. When I was in the middle of the
block I heard a \'ictrola, with a very raspy sound
to it, playing "M>- Blue Heaven," l''inally the
music became so loud that I turnetl around and
looked into the room, my curiosity getting the
better of me.

The room, as it was called, should have right-
fulh' been named a box, for it wasn't much larger.
It was divided in two parts, the front part serving
as the living room and the latter part as the bed-
room. The only front porch they had was the side-
walk and their kitchen was an alley at the side of
the house. A screen, dividing the two rooms, was
covered with moving picture posters, making it a
very colorful and picturesque affair. The bed,
which could be seen very dimly, was covered with
clean linen and a cr,;cheted coverlet- the brass
bed posts had a red ribbon around each one. In
the "front room," there was a table upon which
the \ictrola was set, and by the \'ictrola a cellu-
loiti doll was keeping watch over a glass dog and
cat and some moving picture programs. Under
the table, on a shelf, a vase stood holding three
or four crepe paper flowers.

The mother of the "box" sat on a chair in the
"front room" holding the baby, and father sat
across from her sans shirt and shoes. .A lamp,
hitched on the wall, furnished a very dim light
for the scene. .As I walked on down the street
I thought to myself of the humble "Blue Heaven"
I had just passed.



AN ANECDOTE.

Fabian Englander, 'jr.

On my way home one evening, I noticed the
Bajan maid who took care of the kiddies next
door walking rapidly up and down under the
house, with a baby in her arms and crooning such
a peculiar sounding tune that my curiosity was
arou.sed. Making a pretense of examining some
new plants that were just taking root, I managed
t ) draw close enough without attracting her at-
tention, to hear what she was singing.

I'p and down, hack and forth, her feet keeping
time to some d''ggcrel air, went that big, over-
grown Chunk of Charcoal, singing over and over
again, these words:

"And the Lord said unto Moses, 'Chut-Mon.'



THE PANAMANIAN.

Margaret Misrahi, 'j/.

Truly a cosmopolitan country is Panama.
Every color, creed, and race is here; turbaned
Hindus, Chinese, Japanese, Negro, an.l Slav,
Spaniard, Greek, Italian, .Arab, German, Dane,
Dutch, French, and English. .Americans by
thousands, and countlessothers of every imaginable
mixture of all. Panama is a melting pot of
nations. It has a true democracy and is a free
country.

Whether of high or low degree, the Panamanian
is polite, courteous, artistic in temperament,
passionately fond of music and poetry, romantic,
gallant, and intensely patriotic. To our minds
he may be cruel, because he loves the ockfights
and bullfights; he may be a gambler becau ;e of the
lottery, but he is seldom or never tiirbvilent or
rowdyish. It is a rare thing indeed to see him
intoxicated. He has the manners of a grandee
and he is fonder of a baseball match, a horse race
or a boxing match than of a bull-fight.



WEST INDIAN CEREMONIES
OF THE DEAD.

Marie K/ee/keits, 'j/.

The West Indian people have a most peculiar
ceremony for their dead. They mourn for one of
their people for a period of nine days.

L^pon hearing of a death, the neighbors and
friends flock to the house of the deceased and
offer their consolation and help. Chairs and
tables are placed about the house. People
gather by early evening on the day of the death.
Quiet games of chess, cards, and checkers are
played until late into the night. .A good deal of
singing is done in low, hushed tones. .A few
minutes before midnight, the assembh' quiets
down. Usually the one who has led the singing
offers up a prayer. Numerous other prayers are
heard about the room and everyone is heard
conversing in low, hushed voices. .After mid-
night they leave, one by one. Only a few stay
to console, and help the bereaved family bear their
Inu-den.

For a period of nine days the home of the deatl is
constantly visited by friends who offer their
sympathy and try to lighten the sorrow of the
relatives of the dead person.



THE CARIBBEAN.



57



During rhe final ceremony on the ninth night,
the home of the tleail is a scene of great gaiety.
Tables and chairs are placed around the rooms of
the house. A large crowd gathers; coffee is made,
sandwiches prepared, and passed arouinl. Lic^uor
is also served. Numerous domino and card
games are formeil. The singing of this night is
quite different from that of the first. It is loud
and boisterous and sung m a tunc quite lacking in
reverence. In fact, during this whole final serv-
ice, at least till midnight, there is nothing very
reverent about the action of the assembly of
people.

At nikinight the singing is hushed for a few
minutes. A few people offer prayers and the
assembly joins in. Then again, the singing and
card pla>ing is started. This continues till dawn.
.^t early morning they leave for home, some in
small groups, others alone. Each acts in a very
solemn manner. Before leaving the house, each
of the guests goes to the family of the deceased,
wishing each member a carefree and happy
future life.

After this ninth day service, the departed is
quite forgotten and is mentioned neither in the
home nor among friends.



THE CHIRIQUI INDIANS.

iriHidin Huriiio)!, 'j/.

In the desolate wilderness of Panaman jungle
lands near the Costa Rican border, dwell the
tribe of Chiriqui Indians. The}' are very peace-
ful, as a rule, and often work on the large planta-
tions in Panama.

Many of these Indians file their teeth to sharp
points, which they claim helps to preserve them
for a long period of time. Looking at these
Indians, with their filed teeth and green-painted
faces, one might take them to be cannibals, but
they are quite harmless.

The squaws wear a superfluous amount of
peculiar beads and other ornaments typical of
the Red race, while nearly every matured male
of the tribe has a small necklace of crocodile
teeth for "dress occasions." This is a token of
bravery handed down through generations, in
many cases. The crocodile also gives something
besides its teeth in the form of "grasa de lagarto"
(crocodile fat) which is used as a cure for rheu-
macism, sore throat, cuts, in fact fur almost any
human ailment.



The Chiriqui Iiuiians are natural-born hunters,
and the section of Panama in which they live is
infested with game. Sometimes, when hunting,
they wear feathers about their ankles as a pro-
tection against a poisonous snake. They claim
the snake will strike at the feathers rather than
the bare skin and in this way give them time
to dodge further assaults.

These Indians live in miserable grass huts with-
out a floor, except for the ground. The squaw
has very little, if an>', housework to do. Her
daily duties consist of cooking meals for the
family, fetching water from a near-by water
source, washing in a chosen stream, and weaving
cloth in primitive Indian fashion.

The Chiriqui Indians are, indeed, an interesting
t}'pe of people to visit.



"EN MI PUEBLO"

Blancit Walker, '2Q.

"En mi pueblo," were the first words Susita
used to say before starting a conversation, no
matter what subject was being discussed.

"En mi pueblo we grow big, sweet and string-
less mangoes which we call 'de calidad' because
they are of the best quality that can be found on
the Isthmus. We als(j have a kind which is
very, very small no bigger than a dove's egg.
These grow in bunches something like grapes
only they are of reddish-yellow color instead of
green or purple. We call these mangoes 'chan-
cletas' meaning a flat slipper because the seed
is almost flat. En mi pueblo there are many
kinds of mangoes; some we call apple-mangoes
because they are red and the pulp is very much
like the apples; others we call peach-mangoes
and others take rhe name of the fruit which they
resemble most. En mi pueblo we have mangoes
before any other section and long after their sea-
son is finishetl. The reason for this is that we
have so many different kinds and each kind
bears its fruit a little later than the other; this
is why we have mangoes long after the other
sections do not have even one for a sample.
En mi pueblo we have sweet and juicy pine-
apples, stringless alligator pears, coconut palms
which give the best coconut fruit I ever have
tasted, and we have many other species of wild
fruits that are so good that it is a pity to call
them wild.



MR 13835-



^8



THE CARIBBEAN.



"The seas en mi pueblo are so clear and calm;
from them we get delicious fish. We send
fish ro other places because we want others to
taste what is good. The beaches en mi pueblo
are so beautiful that every )ear people come to
spend their vacation and to enjoy all the good
things which we offer them here en mi pueblo."

This way Susita can talk about her little
pueblo which in reality is very pleasant and
fruitful. In her town we may find, as she says,
all sorts ot things and we will surely find them
of the best kind. Taboga, Susita's town, is the
most looked for summer resort.



THE CARNIVAL.

F.'oribe! Barngrover, ?/.

\Mien Rome was young, it was the custom ot the
people to have a season of feast and holiday.
This generally started a week before Ash Wednes-
day and lasted until midnight of .Ash Wednesday.
The people celebrated the carnival season with
feasts and parades. During the six weeks of
Lenten Season following Ash Wednesday, Sun-
day was held as a feast day.

Later in Spain carnival lasted only three days
and their Lenten Season began on Ash Tuesday.

In Itah- the carnival only lasted three riotous
days.

In Panama there is a carni\-al each year which
lasts four days before Ash Wednesda)'. Carnival
may almost be compared with ^he Mardi Gras of
New Orleans, the Fiesta of Los .Angeles, or the
Rose Carnival of Portland.

The natives save every penny they can possibly
keep out of their poor earnings, so that they may
have nice costumes. The streets are decorated
with colored lights and signs and posters which are
gaily painted. For days before the carnival, the
small stores are supplied with confetti ami ser-
pentine, PoUera slippers, and the gay, gaud}'
materials of which the costumes are made.

.About a week before Carnival the voting for
queen is at its highest pitch. There is generally
a queen representing each outstanding race,
such as the Panaman, Chinese, and Negro. The
Army and Navy very often have their queen also.

The day before Carnival the small children get
dressed in their costumes. Clowns with painted,
laughing faces, red and white devils carrying
large forks made of cardboard parade the streets.
Many more costumes, both original and comical,
may be seen.



The first (.lay of Carnival, everyone is ready and
anxious to show his or her costume. About four
o'clock the parade begins. The barbaric musical
instruments of graters, cans with stones in them,
and others are heard on every side. The voices
of the Spanish, Panamans and Negroes, as they
sing the carnival songs, are not unpleasant.

There are many truck loads of laughing people,
parading up and down the main street. They
throw confetti and serpentine at the crowds
standing on the sidewalks watching the procession.
-A few tourists in caromattas enjoy the gaiety
almost as much as the natives themselves, though
perhaps not so boisterously.

After Carnival, the queens have their various
dances which last late, or early, into the next
morning.

The next day of Carnival is practically the same.
King Momo, king of joy, is well represented in
the faces of his subjects.

On the last day of Carnival everyone is out, as
the big parade is held on that day. On either
sitle, cars line the street, and the people joyously
shout at every passer-by, whether they know them
or not. The queen rides in a beautiful float, while
pages announce her with the blast of their bugles.
Her attendants follow in a truck behind her.

Gradually, as it becomes darker, the people
drop out of the parade. But late the same night
they appear again at the dances, ready for more
fun.

The Carnival is over at last. NLiny are glad
of the rest to come, others wish there were only
more. But all classes look forward to the
Carnival to be held next vear.



THE BOOTBLACK.

I'ilii Lynu, '21).
"Shine, Seiior? 1 will polish up your shoes
fine, and shine 'em bueno for you. Shine,
Seiior.'' I am bes' bootblack in Panama, Seiior.
I hablo Inglis and Spanish, and my charge is
only twenty cents plata. Shine, Seiior? You
ask my name? My name is Jos^, Seiior. Where
is my mama? I have no mama, no papa. I
jus' live mos' anyway I can. When it rains and
business is poor I sleep on the parque banco, and
ask Dios for better day maiiana. I have no big
loss. I do what please me. When I have plenty
dinero I go to the cine. Every dfjmingo I put on
clean ropa and go to church. Yes, Seiior, I like
the Gringos ver' much. Dem soldier muy bueno.



THE CARIBBEAN.



59



On pay day they get borracho but always they
give poor muchacho tip. I like the sailors bes'.
When I am hombre I am goin' to be one so that I
will see the whole mundo. I am finis', Senor.
To-day I earn un peso. Dat is suficiente for one
day so I will put 'way my box, and go play with
other muchachos. Muchas gracias, Seiior.



PANAMA MONKEYS.

Royal Higgason, '2g.

One of the most interesting things that a
visitor to Panama can see is the various animals
which are in the Republic, and in -he Canal
Zone. But ot all the animals, the most amusing
is the naiive monkey. There are man\' differ-
ent kinds ot monkeys such as the white faced,
the red ring-tailed, the black faced, and the
spider. I have at present a red ring-tailed
monkey which I bought when it was only three
months old. It was at that time so small
and such a baby monkey that 1 had to feed
him from five to six times a day. Of course,
he could not be given food that would ordi-
narily be given to a full grown monkey, so I was
forced to teed him on warm milk, bread crumbs,
and all such food that is easily digested.

As soon as I got my monkey, I began to
choose names that I could give him, but at
last I selected the name of Jack, since that is
the name given to most all the monkeys, of his
type especially. A great deal of time was spent
at first in endeavoring to make him tame
enough to have around the house without the fear
of his biting someone. It was some tour months
before this job was completed and by this time
Jack knew his name as soon as anv person
called him. My next problem was that of
finding what I could feed him in order to make
him grow and be healthy. I soon found that a
human being is not the only one that can get
in the habit of being stubborn, because this
monkey ot mine was soon in the habit of re-
fusing to ea"- if he was not given the things that
he especially cared for. Sugar was the first
thing that I tound that this pet of mine liked
exceptionally well. In fact, he would accept
anything that was at all sweet. Fat meat was
also another thing that Jack took an early
liking for. By this rime he has learned to eat
whatever we give him and each day as we sit
down to eat we give him a small bit of each ot



the foods that we have on the table and very
seldom does he refuse any of them.

The habits of a monkey are so queer that a
person can amuse himself at any time by just
sitting down and watching the different things,
such as tricks, that a monkey does. Jack has
been taught, since I have had him, that as
soon as he sees one of us eating something, he
should hold both of his hands up in cjrder to
get some. \N'hen he does something that he
knows is wrong, he immediately starts to run
away, and as I get up to punish him he hohls
both of his hands over his head in order to
escape punishment. Also, if he knows that he
IS going to be punisheti or whippeti for some cif
his meanness, he starts to do all the tricks that
he can possibly think of so that I will not whip
him. When he is allowed to come into the house
he walks around to see if there is anything new
to his eye or if any changes have been made.
But he has been taught that he is not to touch
anything that is on the table or dresser. His
greatest pleasure when he gets into the house
is to go immediately to one ot the floor pillows
and make himself perfectly comfortable.

In general the animals of the Canal Zone and
the Republic of Panama are many in number
and none of them is lacking is some form of
entertainment or interest.



THE SAN BLAS INDIANS.

Rodman Drake, 'j/.

Of all the Panama Indians, the best known are
the so-called San Bias. The San Bias Indians
are a peaceful, semicivilized people who dwell
upon the islands and the adjoinmg mainland
of the San Bias Gulf. The)- are in constant
communication with Panamanians and Ameri-
cans and visit Colon regularly. There are
trading posts on the San Bias islands and a large
banana estate in the heart ot the San Bias
district.

The maiority of the Indians speak English
more clearly than Spanish. Many of these
Indians have resided in New York and elsewhere
in the United States. Some of the islands are
model up-to-date settlements with straight,
well-kept streets, clubs, societies, dance halls,
schools, street lights and all other ideas of
moiiern ci\ilizations. The Indians also own



6o



THE CARIBBEAN.



cars and frequently may be seen driving about
the streets of Colon or Panama City.

The San Bias Indians are peculiar in their
appearance, having dwarf-sized bodies and large,
box-like heads.

The men dress in rough trousers, ready-made
shirts, or more often shirts of San Bias make
with tucks at shoulders and sleeves and chest,
and for a head gear palm-leaf hats many sizes
too small tor them. The men also wear huge
disk-shaped earrings of thin gold. The costumes
of the women consist of loose blouses of brilliant
cloth of all colors beautifully fashioned in elabor-
ate designs. Olten one may see all manner
of odd patterns embodied in a design, Arabic
and Roman numerals, letters of the alphabet,
Chinese characters and even the design of a
Corn Flake box copied letter by letter.

About their necks are draped dozens of strings
of beads, shells, teeth, and coins. Huge gold
disks are worn in the ears, a heavy gold nose
ring of triangular shape hangs over the upper
lip, and a brilliant red bandana handkerchief is
draped over the head and shoulders.

Miss Anna Coope, an American missionary,
was the first foreigner to be allowed to live in the
San Bias country. She lived there for fourteen
years teaching them to read and write, and
helping them to learn better ways of living. She
found them intelligent and capable of mastering
the English language.



THE NEGRO IN PANAMA.

Carlos Rankin, 'ji.

There are approximately 55,000 negroes in
Panama, and with a few exceptions, their cus-
toms and modes of living are the same. The
negroes have very large families, and all are
crowded into one room. A curtain of some sort
divides the room in halt; in the front, a few
chairs are placed, while in the back there are a
bed and several small hammocks. Usually in
front ot the houses, there are a few boxes with
native fruits, candy, bread, sweet-peppers, and
lemons, which are sold to the passers-by. The
insanitary conditions which exist in the negro
homes are one of the greatest evils of that race.

The main characteristic of the dress of the
negro is his extravagance. The )'oung men
wear silk shirts, sometimes purple or green.



with flannel pants, and Panama hats. All the
women wear bright-colored dresses, and the older
men, on special occasions, wear derby hats,
long-tailed coats, and neat vests.

Rocks are their principal weapons and more
than one fight between the white boys anti
the negro boys has ended with serious results.

Their careless attitude towards life is noticeable
in each one. They are very indepeiulent, enioy
late hours, dances, and wild midnight jaunts
more than anything else. There are very few
men, it any, who try to save part of their earn-
ings. Most ot them believe in living the day out
betore thinking of the next. All negroes are
tond ot music; they are famous for their "jazz".

In their various religions, they are apparentlv
sincere. Many of them go into fits during their
vigorous devotions. They are unusually super-
stitious and have many different religions, some
of which do not seem of a civilized order.

I have described only the majority of the
negroes. There are some who are very trust-
worthy, clean, and ambitious. As to their dislike
for the white people, it may he excused to a
certain extent only, by the way the white men
and women treat some of them. At times one
may well sympathize with the negroes. Humor
is not entirely lacking in them, if one cares to
recognize it.



TO OUR ADVERTISERS.

Pdit/ Hayden, IQ.

Does an advertiser in The Caribbean gain or
lose from a business point of view? Let us
investigate the term "business point of view."
In business the object is that for every dollar put
out, one dollar plus interest should come back
sooner or later preferably sooner. If this object
is not obtained it is poor business; in fact, we were
told that it was not business.

There are, however, more ways than one in
which an advertiser may be compensated. The
Isthmus as a whole, is a small place and a whole
is greater than any of its parts. We learned
that in geometry. Therefore, an advertisement
in The Caribbean would not necessarily cause
the business man to work over time. That is a
good feature, is it not?

Now, friends of The Caribbean, you who ad-
vertise, you who help us in our work and you



THE CARIBBEAN.



6i



who buy, you are probably wondering just how rhe
advertiser makes a good investment. It is simple.
Just look around; you will observe quite readily
that nearly every adult you see has a son or
daughter or a relative who is in high school, u ill
soon be in, or was in high school. These adults or
parents love their children and because thechildren
love the Annual and take great pride in it the
parents also love it. One way to make friends
with a person is to admire his children.

.^11 this leads up to the point that The Carib-
bean needs the support ot its advertisers. By
inserting an "ad" the advertiser becomes the
student's friend. He mdirectly becomes the
parent's friend. Therefore as the parents form
two-thirds of the public down here, the business
man gains the good will of his customers and that
is worth something.

Several of our advertisers never expect to
realize anything from their "ad" because of their
not doing any local business. They are true
friends indeed.



CHI RI QUI PRISON.

Arthur Mundberg, 'jo.

In the days of old, before the United States
thought of building a canal in Panama, the
Spanish descendants of old Spain ruled with a
high hand in South America.

Colombia, the possessor of Panama for many
years, let Panama rule itself to a certain extent.
As long as high officials of Colombia and Panama
received some money, they did not care how
much the people of the poorer class suffered.
Many died from disease, and some even died from
starvation. Many were forced to steal for a
living.

Those who were caught stealing were put in a
prison built of thick, strong, cold stone. There
were also some choice dungeons for the worst.

This prison is now only a "has been," but still
shows very plainly what the prisoners had to go
through in the long years that they spent in the
lonely cells.

A tourist visiting Panama is taken to Chiriqui
Prison as a site of interest. Little does a tourist
realize when he is walking on the promenade
built on the roof of the dungeons of the Chiriqui
Prison, the sufferings of the inhabitants that it
contained in the \ears before.



After he has admired the beauty for several
minutes, the guide takes him down to see the
prison itself. Here are rooms of bare stone with
heavy, steel doors. Of course there are no prisoners
in the cells now, but there were once upon a time,
and how well some remember. Just for the thrill
of it, the tourist probably goes in one of the cells.
He sees the balls and chains rusty from age and
disuse, piled up in one corner. Once these were
shiny from the continual rubbing of the skin of
some prisoner. He may also see pictures and
initials carved on the walls carved by some
poor man "framed" by a higher official, and
doomed to ser\'e a long term of years.

The guide most likely takes him up to the
watch towers that were used by the guards to
watch the prisoners as they walked around the
prison ground, or sat staring emptily into space,
dreaming of the freedom that they would be,
perhaps, forever denied.

The tourist usually takes out his camera and
snaps a few pictures of his companions standing
in front of the little watch tower, naming it,
"Chiriqui Prison," little realizing how much
the natives and inhabitants of Panama dreaded
to hear that name in the days before the United
States of America started to clean Panama of
disease, and to help Panama form a republic to
make it what it is to-dav.



THE COCONUT PALM.

Morris Liicf, '2g.

In the whole broad belt of the tropical climates
there is probably no tree quite as common as th?
coconut palm. One reason for this is that this
specie is so hardy; it thrives in climates variable
both in rainfall and temperature. Peculiarlv too,
it seems to grow just as luxuriantly on the salt,
rather arid seashore as it does in a fertile vallev
or even in a swamp. Then too, it makes an
ideal domestic tree, being useful as well as
decorative, and is used for both purposes by the
inhabitants of the tropics.

The tree itself is very beautiful and unique in
appearance. The trunk develops its full thick-
ness of about eighteen or twenty inches within
the first year of growth, but it takes about twenty
\ears to attain its full height which in some cases
is nearly a hundred feet, though it is usually
sixtv or seventv feet. The surface of this trunk



62



THE CARIBBEAN.



is ringed all the way up with alternate rough and
smooth banils of four or five inches in width. The
wood is the same beautiful brown color all the
way through as it is on the surface, but is is very
porous and fibrous and consequently of no value
commercially.

The frond or leaf is unique in that it is in reality
a leaf and a branch at the same time. These
fronds, eigh' or ten feet in length, are also made
of a very fibrous material and are built on much
the same plan as the human spinal column and
ribs system. A long flexible "backbone" runs
the full length of the leaf, the wider end, or butt,
being set firmh- against the bole of the trunk,
and along each side of this central support all the
way out to the tip long thin leaves are set per-
pendicularly to it. These leaves are green in
color, between a foot and two feet in length, and
are also built on a little central support of their
own, much as a blade of long wild grass. There
are twelve or fifteen of these fronds, all shooting
out from the very top of the trunk. Two or three
fronds will start growth straight up inio the air
out of the tip of the tree above all the rest of the
fronds, but as the tree grows other ones shoot out
above them until they are the lowest of the three
or four levels of branches; they then cease to
draw nourishment from the tree, die, and then
drop off to the ground. It is the branches that



make the rings on the trunk, the rough bands
being where they once grew and the smooth ones
representing the distance between the branches.

It is the development of the fruit itself that is
most wonderful. This starts with a long green
pod that comes out among the branches. This
breaks open, disclosing thousands of little yellow
kernels growing on a support of the same color.
Only eight or ten of all these little kernels are
destined to become coconuts; the rest of them
drop off one by one, all the time growing in size,
until there are finally only the several fullv
developed fruit left. If these are left alone,
as they are in the jungle, they too, finally drop to
the ground, and the milk in the shell hardens to
a spongy consistency and roots sprout through
the shell into the grojnd to start a new tree.
The coconut palm always has several bunches f)f
fruit on it in the various stages of development.
Science has examined the milk of this fruit and it
has been shown that it has as much food value as
pure cow's milk, l^he meat too, is very nourish-
ing. Another valuable product is the heart of the
tree, which is fount! in the very center of the bole.
This has much the same consistency as garden
cabbage, but is inuch sweeter.

Panama is truly proud of being represented by
this tree in being called "the Land of the Coconut
Palm."



A TRIP TO PORTO BELLO.

Rodman Drake, '?/.



Porto Bello is probably one of the most inter-
esting places in Panama. It was at one time the
metropolis of the New World. It is located about
twenty miles east of the Atlantic entrance to the
Panama Canal.

In order to get there, we left Fort Sherman by
boat. We arrived at the beautiful little bay of Porto
Bello, whose shores are covered with fruit trees
and palm trees, with an uneventful trip. So
attractive was this spot that Columbus called it
Porto Bello (beautiful port).

We left our boat by means of sinall native
canoes and arrived at the little village of Porto
Bello. We walked up the main way, which at
one time was a flourishing street, until we came to
a graveyaril. In this graveyard we saw some



old tombs, but most of them were inodern. We
also saw inany bones and skulls scattered around.
These had been dug up. It is the custom of the
inhabitants of Porto Bello to disinter the dead if
the rent is not paid for the grave in use. Upon
leaving the graveyard we went to an ancient
cathedral. In this cathedral we saw some more old
tombs, tomb with a wax muminy of their Christ
in it, which they often carry around in Sunday
services.

After leaving the cathedral we visited the ruins
of Fort Porto Bello which was built by the early
Spaniards and subsequently captured by Morgan.
On leaving the Fort, we returned to our boat and
later arrived at Fort Sherman with the idea in
mintl th:rt we had spent a most interesting day.



THE CARIBBEAN.



63



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64



THK CARIBBEAN.



THE ISTHMUS.

Mavis Thirlwall, 'jo.

A novel, interesting, and healthful vacation may
be spent at the Isthmus of Panama at any season
of the year. The climate, although tropical, is
equable. It is always summer in Panama. The
hottest day is about the temperature ot a "hot
spell" in the United States. Although the Isth-
mus has a reputation for being a rainy place,
weather reports show that forty-seven per cent
of the day-light hours are sunshiny on the Pacific
side and fifty-two on the Atlantic side. The
cloudy days lessen the heat. During the dry
season, January, February, and March, there is
scarcely any rain. In the other nine months
statistics prove that rain tails on an average ot
forty minutes a tlay. The rainfall is made up ot
heavy and light showers which pass quickly and
are usualK' followed by a burst of sunshine. There
is seldom a day without breeze and the nights are
invariable cool.

The Isthmus is healthful. If one observes the
general rules of health, there need be no fear of
unusual illness. Mosquitoes, the dreaded fever-
carriers, have been exterminated by the drainage
of swamps and the spraying of oil on breeding
places. From the extensive screening of houses
in the Canal Zone, one gets the idea that insects
are prevalent, but this screening is merely a pre-
cautionary measure. In Panama City and Colon
there are no screens. The greater part of the
windows are just shaded by blinds, nevertheless
you seldom see a mosquito or tly. The sanitary
conditions of Panama and Colon, which are under
the control of the Canal Zone authorities, are very
good. There is a modern sewage system, brick
paved streets, and pure water supply in both of
these cities.

The greatest attraction offered by the Isthmus
is, of course, the Canal, which has been said to be
one of the world's greatest sights. There are
several different angles from which one may view
the Canal; namely, by passage through, by a rail
trip across the Isthmus, and by auto trips to
various points.

Next to the inspection of the Canal, a visit to
the ruins of Old Panama is the "high spot" in a
vacation ( n the Isthmus. These ruins which are
seven miles by automobile from Balboa or Pana-
ma, are unlike any others in the world. They
Ere the remains of a citv that was destroveil b\'



one attack of a desperate band of adventurers,
Morgan's buccaneers. The city was rich, with a
splendid cathedral, several smaller churches,
shops, warehouses, and, probably, twenty thou-
sand inhabitants. It was a station for transfering
treasure from Peru to Spain. It was this treasure
which lureil Morgan anil his men.

The old cathedral and the city hall are the most
notable ot the ruins. The jungle has covered
much of the city, but by careful observation the
walls of the monasteries and convents, the city
market, the jiaved streets, and even Morgan's
bridge may been seen. The Panaman (jovern-
ment has matie some progress in clearing the
ruins but there is still much to be ilone.

Although there is yet no highway entirely across
the Isthmus, the roads in the Canal Zone, and at
Panama and Colon are so good that many en-
joyable rides ma\- be hail. The longest aut ) tour is
into the coinitry to the west of the Canal, which
may be reached from the ferry at Pedro Miguel.
There is a macadam road in the interior, passing
through lo\ely scenes and several old towns, one
hundred and seventy-five miles to Santiago.

There is also a great va'-iety of diversions to be
enjoyed. There is dancing at several hotels,
besides at the numerous clubs free|uented by
Isthmian societ\-. There is a first-class golf-
course at Panama and an eighteen-hole course at
Gatun, which can be compared to the best courses
in the States.

Swimming, which is very popular, expecially
among the Americans, is a sport indulged in b>-
people of all ages. There is a fine pool at the
Balboa Clubhouse, and one connected with the
Washington Hotel, in Colon. Surf baching is
available at Bella Msta, Panama, where an
exclusive, beautiful club has recently been erected.

Other amusements include horse-racing, dog-
racing, the weekly drawing of the National
Lottery at the Bishop's Palace on Sunday morn-
ings, and the great annual fiesta of the four days
before Lent.

For newcomers and visitors there are other
diversions, as a visit to the market on the beach
at Panama, strolls in quaint old streets, evening
concerts in city squares, \'isits to the odd Chinese
and Hindu shops, and visits to the Canal Zone
Clubhouses.

For the fisherman and hunter, Panama is an
ideal spot. There is extensive duck shooting



THE CARIBBEAN.



65



and deer hunting. Fishing in Panama Bay
proves to give good results. Crocodile ami turtle
hunting are unusual and interesting sports also
found here.

On the .Atlantic side at Gatun, the tarpon
fishing is a great attraction to fishermen. For
their convenience there is a Tarpon Club at the
Spillway.

The City of Panama alone, is a source ot inter-
esting sights. At the seawall is Las Bovedas,
a promenade built over the dungeons of an ancient
prison. It is dedicated to the French Canal
builders. Inside the wall the history ot the Canal



is told on stone tablets. Near this walk are the
ruins of the Santo Domingo Church which was
burned in 1737. In contains a flat arch ot brick
that is an architectural curiosity. Another old
relic is the San Jose Church, or the Church ot the
(jolden .Altar, so named because of the gold altar
within it. There is also the Cathedral and many
handsome buildings including a National Theatre.
Panama has also beautiful residential sections con-
taining palatial homes. In all respects I think
the Isthmus is an ideal place for a vacation or for
a permanent residence.



INDIVIDUAL THRIFT.

Marion Neely, 'j/.
(Prize Essay in National City Bank Thrift Contest.)

Dinner over studies done and kiddies in bed feJt to-day. School children are being taught the

now for an evening with the radio. However, as value ot thrift. Why? Because early development

the soft music flooded the room, my mmd wander- will instill that quality in them, and guarantee a

ed back over the past twenty years to the first future free from cares and financial worries,

day of my new job; a messenger boy and the Lectures are given on this now all-important

coincidence of my employing two to-day. Now problem; the budget plan, and the importance of

I thought of my chum, Tom Daley, how he lauded starting savings accounts as soon as possible, are

over me because he was from the inner office! explained, taught and partially enforced in schools.

But times changed and soon I was plodding up People realize that if the government needs a

the ladder clerk head clerk confidential secre- budget system, that it is much more necessary

tary and now really one of the partners. How for the individual to accustom himself to wise

proud I was as year by year my savings increased, expenditure,

and now, I am enjoying the comfort of my home "Crippled and disabled youths returned from the



and my well-supported family. My thoughts
rambled on. Soon I was aware of the entrance ot
a man. Before long Tom Daley told his story.

Success had missed him, according to his out-
look. But one realized that his one lacking qual-



War, unprepared, helpless, and dependent on their
families. How many of them had heeded that
adage 'Be Prepared,' and had realized that un-
foreseen and unav'oidable misfortunes occur.'
We dislike to think ot these thmgs, it is true, and



ity that of thrift and economy had remained keep the thought awav.

undeveloped. "Then we realize, too late, the value of thrift

"What helped your success, most?" he asked. 'Nothine ventured, nothing gained' has been

"Thrift," I said, "or an economical management ^^^^^^_^ ^^^^^ ^^j ^^ g,^Q^,lj ^p^,^, -^ f ^,^,^ n^gj

of my savings. The thrift of the Scotch, as we all ,|^ii^.^ ^,^. jgygiopi,,^ ecommv in both time and



know, is very highly developed. But it is, never-
theless, a fine example.

"The World War proved that even though the
majority of the Americans did not practice thrift
to a great extent, it could be readily developed.
They realized that it was an admirable, as well
as a necessary quality, to a happy, well-balanced
life, and was well worth possessing.

"During the War economy was practiced in our
country to the fullest extent, and its mark is to be



money, from the first. If not now, then, when?
It is usually the person who is careful about how
he spends his day and dollars, who succeeds and
prospers. That is the secret of my success and

The men the world call lucky

Will tell you, one and all
That success comes not with wishing

But bv constant thrift that's all!"



MR 1J835 9



66



THE CARIBBEAN.



A TRAGEDY.

Roy H'lilker, '2g.

Her name was Polly Prattle. When she first Prett\- Polly," and occasionally calling Gyp and

came into our family she was about the size of a my name which she would never fail to follow

new-born chick; little fuzzy green feathers were with a shrill whistle.

sticking out all over her body, as if she had been One day Polly could not be found. We searched

covered with glue and then thrown into a pile of here, there, high and low, but to no avail. Our

feathers. Just above her little yellow eyes, she first thought was that she had at last flown awav

had a red topknot which she learned later to and joined her friends who every evening flew

ruffle prettily when she was talking. This, then homeward over the farm. Three days later I

was our Polly who grew up to be a pet of the was cleaning out the corn bin beside the hen coup

family. when I heard a low chuckling, "Here Polly."

When Polly Prattle was nine months old she I looked up into the tree nearby but could not see

learned her first lesson. W'e had a dog- on our her, tor I knew it was she, at once. Again I



place called Gyp. Every noon I used to whistle
for him and call him to his dinner. One day I
whistled and was surprised to hear a clear answer
from the porch where Polly had her perch. A
few seconds and Polly was calling: "Here Gyp,
here Gyp," and was whistling in perfect imitation
of mvself. After that time until her death PoUv



heartl it. This time it seemed to issue from a
barrel near the bin. I hurried to the barrel,
\\ hich was an old tar container, and peered inside.
Poor thing, there she was buried, all but her head,
in the soft tar at the bottom of the barrel. She
must have been walking around the edge, slipped
and fallen into the barrel where she had sunk



never failed to call Gyp to dinner at the proper into the soft tar at the bottom. As soon as she

time. saw me she chuckled my name and then called

As she grew older, Polly became more and more for mother. I dug her out of the tar, took her

versed in the human vocabulary. She learned to home, and mother and I endeavored to remove

say her own name, to call mother when she was as much of the tar as possible. We used kerosene

hungry, and to call my name. Often we would and gasoline and removed nearly all, but the tar

take her out on the farm and let her ramble all had been on the feathers so long that most of them

about the place. She would mingle with chickens, came off with it. She lived less than a week

climb up in the orange and star-apple trees and afterwards (how she lived that long I do not

help herself to the fruit. Often we would find know), and we buried her in a little tin box on the

her in the corn loft and one time after an all day farm. It was a long time before we got over her

search we discovered her in the pig pen having loss, for it had been so cheerful to hear her calling

dinner with the grunts. Always she woul.i betray and whistling about the farm.
here whereabouts by chuckling: "Nice Polly,



The ".Ancon" and "Cristobal" mean more to
Zonians than would be generally thought, for
they are the means of connecting government
employees with "home" and "home folks." The
ship's names symbolize vacations, of which, I
confess, there are many kinds. There's touring
in a Model T Ford, or camping in the "woods,



FRIENDS.

GreUhen W. Palm, '2().

Haiti, may be abominable, with its fine, white
dust, its torrid, oppressive heat and its beggars.



but, to sa)- the least, it is a startling change from
the two days' scene of endless, choppy Caribbean
water. The remaining five da\-s stretch to New
York is intensely pleasant with anticipation of
the days before us days of work or play, make



where bodily activity is found by killing mosqui- them what we will. ^

toes, and mental exercise by worrying over all There are boats and boats, but these two seem

one's unsightly, empty tin cans. Nevertheless, to hold an especially close place in our lives; like

vacation starts on boartl ship, where universal dependable friends to whom we instinctivel)

Canal Zone friendliness prevails. Port .Au Prince, turn when it is time to go a-voyaging.



THE CARIBBEAN.



67




S. S. Crhlobiil in Gaillard Cut, December .U. 102^.




Opening of the Panama Canal. S. S. Ancon passing through Culebra Cut (now Gaillard Cut) at Cucaracha Slide. Looking South
between Cold Hill and Contractor's Hill. August 2.1. 1914.



68



THE CARIBBEAN.




TRIPLE-CROSSED.

M^.rioi Loivande, '^p.

Fernandez was on duty in this district for the
first time. It was that section in which ail the
wealthy people lived. It was a dull section at
this time of the year, for it was summer and the
residents were spending money in some other
part of the world. Yes, indeed, it was a ver>' dull
beat.

Fernandez was thinking ot the wonderful dinner
he could be enjoying now it he were only on his
i^st beat. The people certainly had been nice to
him there, and Sef or Tomas had some good beer
in his cellar.

Fernandez's musings were cut short by the ap-
pearance of a taxi in front of one ot the most
beautiful houses on the street. Fernandez had
been told that it belonged to Don Torrens, a
young bachelor. A tall, well-built young man
alighted, paid his fare, and went up the stairs to
the door of the house. .After having some trouble
opening the door he finally entered. In the back
of the house an electrician's truck drew up, and a
medium-sized man got out and went up the back
steps. Fernandez moved on. Evidently the
owner had returned from vacation and was having
some repairs made.

Meanwhile, once inside, the tall man quickly
divested himself of his overcoat, the inside ot
which revealed a complete set of burglar's tools.
At the rear of the house the medium-sized man
opened his electrician's case and drew from it
tools similiar to those of the tall young man.
Both proceeded to go their ways, and both
entered the library at the same time.

The tall young man was the first to regain his
equilibrium, and with a refined voice asked the
other what he might be iloing in his house. The
latter, with a puzzled l.jok on his tace, reciprocated
with the same question. Immediately each began
to convince the other that he was in the wrong
house.

Before they were aware of it, another had enter-
ed the argument. 'I'his man had come upon them
while they were arguing anti was attempting to
convince them with a revolver. The owner ot



this little plaything proceeded to order them to
reach for the ceiling until he had called the police.
They did so. No, not quite, for when the man
turned to telephone, the tall man quickly brought
one ot his tools down on the other's head. He
tell with a dull thud. The first two men immedi-
atel\- proceeded to evacuate.

It was autumn and a tall, well-built young
man entered a restaurant. A few minutes later
a medium-sized man entered. They sat at differ-
ent tables. Opening their newspapers their
attention was iminediately attracted bv the
headlines.

Don Torrens, we.Tlthy young b.jchelor, returned from

n vacation in the Maine woods to find his house robbed

ot everything but the w.tU paper.

I need only add that a tall well-built man and
a medium-sized man were evicted from a restau-
rant tor using improper language



WHY HOUSEKEEPERS GROW GRAY
IN PANAMA.

Jdtiir L. Taylor, 2g.

Scene: Kitchen in my home.

Characters: My mother anil maid Tiny, who
weighs 200 pounds.

Time: 2.40 p. m., about the >'ear .\. D. 1914.

Curtain rises on my mother giving Tiny
directions on washing the kitchen floor.

Mother: "Tiny, take some good hot suds and
water and scrub this floor."

Tiny: "Oh, yes. Mistress Taylor."

Curtain drops to show that twenty-five
minutes have elapsed. Rises to show my moth-
er talking to Tiny once more.

Mother: "Why, Tiny, you'll never get it
cleaned unless you rub harder. Use some
elbow grease."

Curtain falls a second time tor twenty-five
minutes, and rises to find Tin\- asleep in a chair
with floor half cleaned.

Mother (shaking Tiny): "Well, Tiny, do I
have to sit here and watch you? Why aren't
you cleaning this kitchen.'"

Tinv: "Well, Mum, you see it was this away.
I was jes' a sittin' here waitin' tor de elbow
grease and I done telled asleep."



THE CARIBBEAN.



69



NIZE BABY.

Elhel I.. Baruetl, '2q.



I hatl spent a tiring tlay in Panama City, and I
was looking forward to a peaceful two hours on the
train before I should again take up weighty
matters in Colon. The train was unusually
crowded, but I was lucky enough to find an
empty seat, with another facing it on which to
place my feet. I had no sooner made myself
comfortable, however, than a woman with a
beautiful child came in and occupied the seat
which I had cherished for n\\ feet. I was slightly
annoyed, but I realized that it was the only
place she could find to sit, and besides she probabh'
wouldn't bother me. So I dozed off commenting
inwardly that I had never before seen such a
beautiful child.

Suddenly my would-be slumbers were inter-
rupted by a shrill cry from the youthful beauty
(whose name, it developed, was Randall), who
was shouting, "I wanna sit over there," indicating
my seat by the window. The mother tried to
dissuade her son, but he would not listen to
reason so I moved over to let the bo\- sit there.
.As soon as he was established, however, he pro-
ceeded to see how far he could lean out of the
window. Complying with his mother's wish,
I closed the window and the boy screamed lustily.
So I had to open the window, and while he tried
his best to fall out of it, I had to hold on to him
in spite of the damaging kicks I received. His
beauty began to fade in my eyes.

While Randall endangered his life antl my peace
of mind, his mother was regaling me with the
history of her son's lite, and all of his cute deeds
and sayings, and the neighbors' affection for him.
\'ainly did I tr)' to remove m\' belongings and self
to a more healthy locality, but she, waxing more
ckjqueiii, anil he, waxing more playful, held me
there.

The child soon tired of the open window, so he
demantied that it be shut. Dutifully I shut if,
and nearly smothered from the heat that resulted.
Randall's lack of amusement became so desper-
ate that even my poor tie seemed to offer oppor-
tunities to him. I protested at donating my tie
to his cause, but he was so violently insistent that
I succumbed. He promptly mutil.ited it and
then put it back on me, nearly choking me in the
operation.



Following that, he found something extremely
interesting in my hair, pulling out about ten
hairs and analyzing them all. .After rumpling my
hair till my magnificent pompadour looked like
a degenerated mop, he was quiet a moment.

The woman in back of me was remarking
audibly to her husband, "My, what a cute little
boy," and "Oh! isn't he adorable!" and "The
little dear" at every new escapade in which the
active Randall indulged. .And I was seriously
contemplating ending his pestilential existence
when his voice rang out with, "Mamma, I wanna
drink." His poor mother, it developed, was
very tired, and did I mind getting a drink for



Randa



Seething invvardlv I stumbled down the



aisle and returned with the water. But Randall's
thirst had abated, it seemed, so he amused him-
self by pouring most of the wafer down my neck.

I gave the boy one of my famous "dirty looks"
but this didn't seem to affect him much, aside
frt)m inspiring him still further. I muttered
something about a friend of mine in the next car
wanting me and started to leave only to hear
Randall yell, "Mamma, don't let the nice mango.
Let him stay here and play with me." And
since Randall's mother, interested as always, only
in her son's welfare, begged me to stay, I stayed.
Then Randall's mother decided that she wanted
a drink so I obligingly got one for her. I got to
her seat with it just as the train pulled into
Monte Lino with a jolt, and all the water was
spilled on Randall. He immediately began a
wail which drowned out even the train's whistle
and it was only after two stations of pacification, the
loan of my watch and sleeve garters, and the
gift of two fifty-cent pieces (which I needed very
much at the timt), that he quieted down to his
usual racket.

During the rest of the ride I was so miserable
that nothing seemed to matter any more, so
nothing Randall did agonized me much. .As
the train pulled into Colon, Randall wanted to
hang onto me, but I, pretending to see an aged
uncle, dashed off. Nowadays, on trains, I sur-
round myself with a crowd (strictly adult), and
whisper audibly "What a cute little boy," if I
see any one being hooked the way I was.



70



THE CARIBBEAN.



GOING TO THE DOGS.

Rosemary Keene, '2g.



Scene.

At the Dog Races, Ketuiehvort/j.

Characters.

FiViny, daughter of the Skipper who zvreeked the

" Hesperus."
Hamlet, sorrowful Prince of Denmark.
Julius Caesar, big butter and egg man from Rome.

(Scene I: Hamlet and Fanny arc tr\ing to
sneak into the grandstand.)

Fanny (clutching Hamlet): "Duck! He ap-
proacheth."

Hamlet: "Now might we do it pat, now the
gatekeeper has turned away."
( Hamlet and Fanny slip in unseen and grab a seat.)

Fanny: "Oh, Hamlet! I see a fleeting hound!
Oh, say, what may that be?"

Hamlet: "My father's spirit in legs!"

Voice Jrom behind: "Come on Lightning! Show
some action!

Hamlet (aside to Fanny): "He speaketh of
lightning. Perchance a storm is arriving. (He
puts up an umbrella.)

Julius Caesar: "Hey, you sap! This is the dog
races and not an asylum. Go back to the keepers."

Fanny: "Oh, Hamlet, who is this man and
what spake he?"

Hamlet: "Fis Julius Caesar, the big cow anil
hen man from Rome."

Fann\: "Oh, Hamlet! I see a fl\ing hare!
Oh, say, what may it be?"

Hamlet: "There is oiih" one lock loose; here
is a pin for you."

Julius Caesar (again).- "Here comes Lightning!
Come on Lightning!"

Hamlet (becoming excited).' 'Tis a fast race.
I incline toward the yellow streak."

Julius Caesar: "Hey! Where do you think you
are? Get off my foot, or I'll knock you ofl! !"

Hamlet (still more excited): "The amber one
gains onward hound, onward!"

Julius Caesar (giving Hamlet a blow): "I told
you to get off my foot and I mean it."

Hamlet (returning the blow): "The tiine is out
of joint; oh, blessed spite, that I was ever born to
set it right."



Julius Caesar (becoming angry): "It will be
more than 'time' that will be out of joint when I
get through with you!"

Hamlet (losing consciousness): "I doubt some
toul play."

Fanny: "Oh, Hamlet, the people leave their
seats. Oh, say, what may it be?"

But Hamlet answered never a word
A knockeii out Prince was he !



MANANA FEVER.

Adair L. Taylor, '2g.

Scene: Doctor's office in Panama.
Characters: Doctor and patient.
Time: The most convenient.

Curtain rises to show Doctor and patient in the
Doctor's office.

Patient: "Ooh, yooy, yooy, such a mi-lady I
have got."

Doctor: "Why, my good man, what malady
iiave you? You look healthy enough."

Patient: "Oh, jess, I look so, but I ain't I got
a machinery in me what don't work. No not
in my haid."

Doctor: "Just where does it pain; come let me
examine you."

Patient: "No, no, no I don't need no telephone
put on me. I ain't a party line fo' no one. But
I tell you, I am not well. My own Doctah did
told me so. He said I was goin' to die with no
clothes and I wan't goin' to have no nice black
coffin with silver trimmings, because oh Lawd,
have mercy 'pon I."

Doctor: "But come! Tell me wha*: this afflic-
tion is that you have. I have lots ot pills that will
help you, I am sure."

Patient: "No suh all de pills won't do me no
good. 'Cause'n dis is eber lastin'. De uder Doc-
tah done tole me I wouldn't have 'nouf strong
to answer St. Peter."

Doctor: "Come, come away with this nonsense.
What did he say you had."

Patient: "Well, suh, he did say it was common
to people like I he called it a mighty interes'in'
name and for a time I was real proud 'bout it.
Saiil it was "Maiiana P'ever."

Curtain.

Note. Manana means"to-morrow" in Spanish.



THE CARIBBEAN.



71



PROHIBITION.

(Speech by Tattoo Ike.l

When I was a youngster, I was led astray by bulges. P.ven our young girls, or mothers of

those vile and cruel vagabonds known as Drug to-morrow, drink it. The>- gurgle two or three

Store Cowboys. They taught me to drink. glasses at a time and then the\' want more.

That ilrink preyed upon me until I now drink it Look at me, if you wish to see the effects ot soda

straight (that is without water). You may pop. .^s Patrick Henry said a tew months ago,

wonder what kind of drink I mean so that you "Cj)ve me soda pop and you give me death."

may try it. I will relate it; that drink is the I should think that you would know better than

deadly, oversweet, soda pop. You can get it in to drink soda pop. What was the meaning of

every store. Oh! Why can't we do away with Brutus' coat of arms, "Mors et Destructo."

it altogether? A^ Ceasar said some twenty years I shall translate it as it is: "Drink more and be

ago, "Do not drink, for it is a waste." I now destroyed." In my closing I shall tell )-ou in one

say it over. Take Napoleon's advice and steer proverb what to do to get rid of this habit. "If

clear of soda pop. The young man ot to-day a soda pop is ruinous, tr}- Coca-Cola." I thank

drinks soda pop until he gets so that he even you.




ON TYPING.

Ethel Burnett, 'jij.

Life is so futile; ome goes to school and tries
to Izarn typong woth tha folliwing resilts.
Tyling is soch an effirt, and yet is it wortj
amy thing? Why is there soch a thimg as a
tylewroter? So far as I cen see, we struggling
begimners in thet scudy gain notjing but an
imcreased vocavulary, and lost faith in lite.

Ome learns to type; one ty^pes; one thonks
one knows how to type; and look at the resilts.
A new langiage one invents. No one cam
read it but tha aspiring typost. Teachers
don't ajpreciete the typist who is jest lezrning.
Wahre is thatsilber liming to thet cloid?

.'\md yet great pnilosophirs say; "Pursever-
ance wons. ".Amd, "Of at first uou dun't
succeed, try, try agaim." Ome troes and
tries again, with tha seme resilts. (Why, oh,
why do i persust in hotting the i tor the u!)
.And tha more one trues, the blecker, or rether
the ridder, omeHs outloik on the roport canl
siims. .And the relations at home become
note streimed. ^^'hat most ome do in a czse
like thet?



Sish is lote! Thoxe who are burn dumb are
jist out of lock. Tha itherx get all tha brakes.
.Amd tha dumb omes muxt jist kee.i on typing
im spote of srraimed relatoins at htjne and
partriotic rdport czrds. I em SHackoed to
my typewroter amd I cam do mothing but
lemint my sed tzte amd agree wirh Patreck
Hejry im his immortel wirds: "Gebe me
liverty, ot geve me dezrh."

ZMEN!!!!



ON FIRE ALARMS.

Grelchen Pnitn, 2<).

It warms us to think of fire alarms; they are
exhilarating, to say the least. The effects of
theirshrillness in that home of learning, C. H. S.,
IS so stupendous, that it actualU' jars you and
me to sensibility. We believe in preparedness,
so, few are the poor souls whose tragic physiog-
nomies portray consternation in not being
ready tor this supreme moment of life when a
tearful farewell is bade to beloved books in
order to join the thundering herd scampering
down the stairs. Pushed by a hundred students,
)ou tall, but outside in the wide world a new



72



THE CARIBBEAN.



aspect of life soothes your wounded feelings.
Relish that scandal; crack those jokes; hum
that song; chew that gum; tor this is merely a
respite from life's great work a holiday a
golden opportunity. Back in study hall,
reality drowns your former pleasant feelings.
Wh\' didn't you hear her the first time? "Will
the girl in the seventeenth seat of row three
come to the front of the room and place her
gum gently in the waste-paper liasket?"
The fall you received on the stairs really hurts
now.



speak at the Commencement



THE SENIOR CLASS OF C. H.
CLASS MEETING.

Rosemary Keene, '2g.



S. HAS A



The ability to hold a class meeting is really an
art. For those who have not tried it let them
tr\- it! The President rises in front of the room
and after several dirty looks toward some lo-
quacious students, he announces, "Will the Sen-
iors please come to order." It is not a request,
it is a command. .\ few slightly interested
Seniors glance up to see what it is all about, but
the rest go on with their important work. The
President continues, "We have to decide about
the Graduation programs." No response. He
adds, "Is there any discussion about this?" Still
no response. A student suddenly awakens to the
fact that a class meeting is supposed to be going
on. He raises his hand.

"Mr. President, I would like to know when we
are going to decide about the Graduation pro-
grams. VN'e have only two more months."

The President looks as if he is going to collapse.

"We were just discussing that," he says in a
slighdy disgusted tone, "and if you were listening
you would have heard."

".And another thing," continues the president
(supposedly to the class, but seemingly to no one),
"\\'ho wouki \f.u like to speak at Commencement?"

.All continue working fast and furiously on some
important work that has to be finished by the
first period.

The same stutlent raises his hand long enough
fnjm his work to ask, "Who is going to speak at
the Commencement Exercises?"

".As I told you before, we were just discussing
that," says the president in a slightly more dis-
gusteil tone. "Now how many are in favor of



having Mr.
Exercises?"

.A dead silence.

"Will you please raise your hands high in the
air so that I can count them more easily?"

Not one hand appears.

"Well," continues the president, "as none of
you will tell me who you want to speak. Miss
Hesse and I will decide who /// speak and let you
know later."

One righteous student rises up in behalf of
justice and says weakly, "I think that it is up to
the class who will speak at the Cominencement
Exercises, and I think that the rest of the class
will agree with ine."

The rest of the class goes on working studiously,
and the former student sits down, thoroughlv
winded, and thinking that he has done his bit,
goes back to work.

The president repeats again, ".As there are no
discussions or suggestions. Miss Hesse and I
shall decide this inatter. Is there an}- objection
to this?"

Still dead silence.

The bell rings and the students dash niadK'
out of the room for the various class rooms.



THE JUNIOR CLASS OF C. H. S. HAS A
CLASS MEETING.

Arthur Mtindberg, 'jo.

The President of the class, better known as
"Stew," approaches the front of the rooin with
large, manly, and noisy strides. .A whispered
word with Mr. Pence, the Junior Class advisor,
and "Stew" emits a noisy "Can I have your
attention, please?"

The members of the class refrain froin their
hilarities long enough to hear what "Stew" has
to say.

He starts with, "I just received a letter from
the ring company, and the}' say that they have to
raise the prices of the rings fifty cents!"

Such a calamity is enough to make any person
keep still for a while at least, but the Juniors are
different; their whispers grow to a buzz, ami then
to a commcjn, ordinary riot. The girls have the
floor. Their voices are better trained for a con-
tinuous blabber; they keep it up until "Stew"
makes himself heard above the noise by a loud
"Shut up, will'ya?"



THE CARIBBEAN.



73



He then says, "Mr. Pence advises that we pay
this extra charge without any question. Has
anyone anything to say about that?"

"Yea, tell the company we'll pay it," (comes
from a male individual in the back of the room).

Then someone comes out wi'-h, "Take it out ot
the treasury."

The girls then break loose with their loud-
speakers and continue to broadcast until "Stew"
again is able to stop the noise.

"How many are in tavor ot paying the extra
fifty cents?" asks "Stew," our class president.



When the hands are raised, "Srew" glances over
the room at the up-raised hands, and with a look
at Mr. Pence, says, "We'll pay."

"Stew" again comes to the front of the room
with a business air, but, only comes out with,
".\nyone make a motion that the meeting be
closed?"

"Aw, sit down, what do ya think this is. Con-
gress?" comes from all parts ot the room, mainl\-
trom the manly Juniors, at which "Stew" meekh-
shuffles back to his seat, but with no less noise,
ending a Junior Class meeting.



LIBR.ARY.

Grelchen Palm, '2Q.



I open the library

With unerring haste

For the joys of Algebra I must taste;

Two Seniors disturb

My swimming x squares,

'Til I squelch them with terrible, unladylike glares.

-A freshman rushes in

A book-report he must make.

Could he "The .Alamo" take.

I answer sweetly,

Unharried still am I,

And also suggest, "The Crisis" and "The Spy."

Freshmen come thick and fast

'Til I wish they would go;

"Where do the trade winds blow?"

"Is the crocodile a fish?"

"Is a coffee bush a tree?"

-Are some ot the questions asked ot me



My mind grows dizzy

Their questions to reply,

"Where did Robert Louis Stevenson die?"

"Where is the drama?"

"Who wrote '5440 or Fight:'

And "Who invented the electric light?"

The eloquent typewriters

W'ith my Algebra continually vies,

That gladly I forsake it with long, drawn out sighs,

To take up my history

Stoicly to learn

That Washington the English once did burn.

A senior takes my pencil,

Another, my eraser needs,

With growing wrath for quiet I plead.

The bell rings

With fervor, thanks I give.

That through this hour again I did live.



ELEGIE.

Adair L. Taylor, '2g.
(.A struggling poetess tries imitating Gray's style with the



tollowing results.)



The school bell tolls the start of another day.
The teachers tor another day reign supreme.
The scholars come plodding along the way
Leaving the world of play to those like me it seems.

\ow fades the merry laugh trom all our sight,
.And all the air a solemn stillness holds
Save where a laggard whispers to left and right.
For what cares he if his books catch dust and mold?

For who to dumb (oregettulness a prey.
Did not at last become resigned,
To leaving the soft warmness of the "hay,"
Nor cast one longing, lingering look behind?



Now again, trom yonder concrete-covered tower,
The bell rings twice with might and main
Warning those who from her sacred portals cower
That they will be late again.

Let not .-Ambition mock their useful toil
Their homeh' joys and destiny obscure;
Nor Wisdom hear with a disdainful smile
The short and simple prayers ot the unsure.

Far trom the maddening crowd's ignoble strife.
Their sober wishes never learned to stray,
.Along the hot and bothered vale of life
They keep the noisy tenor ot their way.



74



THE CARIBBEAN.



ON ERASING.

Rosemary Keerte, 'SQ.
(With apologies to Shnkespenre and Hamlet.)



To erase, or not to erase that is the question:

\\ hether 'tis nobler in school to suffer

The turies and insults of an outraged teacher,

Or to take up an eraser against a sea of mistakes,

.And by erasing end them. To obliterate to erase

Some more; and by obliterating to say we end

The "F's", and a thousand dirty looks

The student is heir to 'tis a consummation

Devoutly to be wish'd. To obliterate to erase

To erase! Perchance to be caught! Ah, there's the rub;

For in that act of erasing, the looks which come

When we have just begun to erase

Would make us pause: that's the heck of it;

For who would bear the slams and scorn of students,

The insolence of teachers, and the spurns



That the patient worthy student takes

When he himself might a "loo" make

With a mere eraser? Who'd these indignities bear,

To grunt and sweat over a darn typewriter,

But that the fear of someone after us

The cold and icy glares from which

No student e'er recovers scares us to death.

And makes us rather keep those mistakes we have

Than to era.se and risk a teacher's wrath?

Thus teachers do make cowards of us all;

.And thus the student's vow for a perfect paper

Is swept away by the pale face of another unfortunate student;

And students with great ideas of ambition and fame.

With this regard, they put the eraser down,

.And lose the praise of teachers.



TO A BEDBUG.

Adair L. Taylor, '2g.
(With apologies to William Shakespeare and Macbeth.)



Is this a bedbug which I see before me

His head toward my hand? Come, let me slap thee.

I have thee not, and yet I feel thee still.

-Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible

To our feelings as to our sight? or art thou but

-A bedbug of C. H. S., a touching creation

Proceeding from the heat-oppressed chair?

I see thee yet in form as palpable

As this which now I scratch.

Thou sendest me the way I was not going;

.And such language thou makest me use.



The bedbugs put in action my five senses.

And I am given no rest: I see thee still

.And in thy wake a foreign feeling follows

Which was not so before such active things,

It is the biting business which informs

Thus to mine leg.

Now over C. H. S. bedbugs are dead, and the

Language we did use is now erased. Now students celebrate

The Flit Gun's offerings, and withered bites are now but

Scars of Time.





mmmm.^^


^5.a





^


^^^^^^^r




1


ii m^^M




^3^"-


f


t




f



Raying waters rusliing down tlie spillway from Gatun Lake above.



THE CARIBBEAN.



75




FRUITS OF PANAMA.

Esltifania Wheeler, 'jo.

Practically all the 'Vuits ot' Panama have a
peculiar flavor and a person has to cultivate a
taste for most of them.

The most popular of all the fruits of Panama is
the banana. Throughout the Isthmus manv
nati\'e farmers are engaged in cultivating them.
The banana is harvested every day, while green.
Bananas contain a great deal of starch when
green, but as they grow ripe the starch changes to
sugar. .As a rule, the banana fruit is five or six
inches long and more than an inch in diameter;
the pulp is soft and luscious, and seedless through
long cultivation. It is eaten either cooked or
raw.

The avocado, which is commonly known here in
Panama as the "alligator-pear" is another
familiar fruit. It is large, round, oval, oblong or
pear-shaped, with either a green, yellowish-green
or russet to deep purple, and sometimes black
skin. Inside of the avocado is a firm yellowish-
green pulpy flesh which is of high food value,
especially in oils. It also has a single large black
seed. The alligator pear has a very pleasant
nutty flavor and hardly a trace ot fiber in the
flesh.

The mango is as well known over the whole
tropical world as the apple is known in the
temperate world. Unlike most fruits, the mango
is good to eat in all stages ot its growth. This
fruit varies in size from that of an ordinary plum
to five or six pounds in weight. In color, some ot
the mangoes are green when ripe, others deep
vellow as an apricot, with yellow or orange flesh
which is juicy, melting, rich, and luscious in the
case of the best varieties. There are hundreds ot
varieties. Some are regarded as excellent m
flavor, while in others the taste and odor is so
strongly of turpentine, as to be inedible. It is
claimed by those who have actjuired the habit ot
eating the mango that "while there are those who
may not like them because of their smell ot
turpentine, there are those who have corne to
like turpentine because it reminds them ot the io\'
of eating mangos."



The papa>a is related to the pumpkin and
melons. It is something like a melon and it
varies in size from three to thirty inches in length
and up to twenty pounds in weight. The flesh
is salmon-pink or yellow. There are several
\ arieties of this fruit, some are sweet, others are
insipid, some have excellent flavor and others
have no flavor at all.

Panama has many other kinds of fruits, among
which the lime, the orange, and the pineapple are
the most common, but the banana, the avocado,
the mango, and the papaya are the most commonly
commercialized of all the fruits of the Isthmus of
Panama.



THE HILLS OF COCO SOLO.

Elizabeth Hackelt, '2C).
Monday :

Slowly the majestic sun is rising over the
densely wooded hills casting fantastic shatiows on
then- foreground. .All looks like a green velvety
carpet. .At last it has risen to its lofty height,
shming down with intense heat.
Tuesday :

But how dift'erent those hills look this morning!
They are hardly distinguishable against the grey,
sullen sky. One would hardly consider them a
thing ot beauty but rather some imposing edifice,
blotting out what lies behind them.
ff'i'dfit'sday:

This morning rain is pouring down almost ob-
structing that endless chain of hills from view.
The sea is beating w iLll\- against the shore, while
the wind is noisily howling through the desolate
appearmg mass.
Thursday :

What a gorgeous sight those fascinating hills
present this morning. .A fine silvery drizzle is
reflecting the sun's warm radiance in wondrous
colors. The tall, gracetul palm trees sway rh>'th-
mically to the gentle breeze.
Friday :

.All looks like a shimmering jade pool reflected
in the dancmg sea. I look, but all I can see is an
endlesschain of hills rollinginto an infinite distance
leaving me to wonder where.



THE CARIBBEAN




THE CARIBBEAN.



77



THE CARIBBEAN VliUM MY WINDOW.

Frank Drake, j/.

To-da)' the Caribbean is a mar\el of lieaiity to
liehold. Its waters glisten like a mirror and not a
ripple can be seen. Here and there I can see
)"elicans playing on the dark blue water.

I his morning as I look out upon ihe Caribbean,
the sun is just peeping over the horizon. Nearby
the dark shadows of the night are beginning to
disappear, while in the distance the flickering
lights from the ships anchored in the bay look like
main" little jewels. The water is calm and
beautiful, there being onK' an occasional ripple
made by the wind.

To-day there are dark clouds overhead. The
wind is blowing hard and great white-capped
waves are breaking high against the breakwater.
The furious sea is in an uproar. The ships in the
bay bob up and down like little corks.

This morning is perfectly clear and I can see for
miles over the Caribbean. Nearby the water is
brown; in the distance however, the brown seems
to turn to azure blue, which fades in the horizon.
The sun is shining bright and the white caps
glisten like diamonds.

To-day the sky is dull and the sea looks as if it is
made of blue ink. The sk>' and the sea seem to
meet nearby in a dark haze. The sea is boisterous
and great waves continualh' break over Toro
Point.

No sun ever shone brighter or seemed larger
than the one that came up from beyond the
Caribbean this morning. The whole sea is in an
uproar; it is covered with foam and white caps as
far as the eye can see.

This morning is perfect!)- clear and I can see
for miles over the Caribbean. The great white-
capped waves glisten in the earh' morning sun.
The sea roars as though it was furicnis and many
vessels in view seem to toss about as though they
were mere toys.

THE SKY.

Walter Bundy, 'j/.

JVednesday.

The sky was parth' covered with nebulous
clouds, which were scudding across the sky like
a fleet of fishing boats in a gale. Here and there
through the haze, a group of stars could be seen



peeping out from behind the small mass of water
vapor, but the clouds would quickly close in, very
much as a troop of Indians would ambush a wagon
train. .Although a gale was blowing overhead,
the trees were motionless. Suddenly everything
woke up, anil the palms waving back and forth,
made a sound of greeting to some invisibile being
who was passing by.

Thursday.

The sky was the color of black veK'et with the
stars appearing like diamonds on a jeweler's tray.
Orion, the might)- hunter, looked down upon the
peaceful world, holding one arm upraised as if in
amazement. A fleecy cloud ran playfully before
the trade winds, across the zenith, and here and
there a shooting star dashed through the firma-
ment. On the horizon, a few slightly luminous
clouds were resting, waiting for a breath of wind
to set them in motion.

Friday.

The night was very quiet, and the moon looked
like a great silver bowl, upheld by a mass of
black clouds shaped like a hand. The sky was
silvery near Luna, getting darker on the sides
until it was almost black in the east. The black
cloutls were orange in the edges, making a wonder-
ful frame for the moon.

Saturday.

This was a noisy night. The moon was still a
silver crescent in the west, surrounded by a halo
of many colors. Everything was alive, even
Darius the BliII, standing in the sky under the
hand of Orion, seemed happy. Clouds swirled
closely around him, partly veiling his splendor.
One large black cloud enveloped the moon for a
moment, casting an ominous shadow upon the
world.

Sunday.

Man)- clouds gyrated across the zenith, play-
fully assuming absurd and unusual forms. One
cloud looked like an ocean w^ave with the spray
dashing high in the air. Then it quickly changed,
formed a shapeless mass, then took the form of a
man. The clouds and all the stars in the firma-
ment seemed to be guided by an unseen hand.
Effortless and quietly the billowing clouds spun
across the dark skies, the stars kept their vigil



78



THE CARIBBEAN.



in the heavens, and all this was done noiselessly
and pertecti)'.

Monday.

There was little to be seen in the sky except the
usual stars and rlouas always seen in the trade
belt. The moon was shining with a taint
tremulous light, surrouinled by a golden halo.
The wavy white clouds were slipping across the
sk;\- as ships pass through the night with billowing
sails, outward bounti to some mysterious port.



PANAMANIAN WATERFRONT.

Grclchen Palm, 2g.

Trade winds, salty and saucy, are important
factors in the enjoyment of Panamanian life.
The one that I met face to face on the sea shore
of Panama City was such that in spite oi the
torrid sun, I was persuaded by it to sit down on
the gray sea v\all there and to watch with
avitiitv the scene before my American eyes.
At the foot of the wall upon the muddy beach,
left by the receding tide, lay a miscellaneous
fleet of small, commercial cratt.

Such tiny fishing boats! Well might they
boast of their catch in the Pacific of the night
previous Spanish mackeral, jack, snapper, and
even the colorful parrot-fish some of which
flopped helplessly in Irst efl^orts to escape the
murderous machetes ot the fishermen employed
in cleaning them.

The natives themselves were happy boldh'
impudent and volatile, friendly and sympathetic
with their coworkers, and voluble with exagger-
ated stories of every day occurrences. The
marine birds and buzzards were also pleased
with life and its favors; with what ease the\'



glided down to catch in mid-air the stray tid-
bits offish their friends cast to them.

Over there a number of folk was collected
about a young hopeful, who was expounding
with Latin flourishes the amazing tale of the
shark that "got away." With all sincerity
the hearers listened to his description. "A
laz)- devil, senores, but mean! Wicked eyes!
Gleaming teeth they snapped for my flesh;
his belly was white and lean; he was hungry tor
me, who was battling to kill him!" To believe
or not to believe, that was the question.

What a chatter of tongues; I decided privately
then and there that old women however little
they have to talk about, can out-run anyone in
haranguing about anything. .And thus did
these pestiferous, wizened women who had come
to the beach to buy diminutive amounts ot yams
and charcoal. The latter, together with bananas,
pineapples, guavas, sour oranges, and coconuts,
were in constant demand, it one interpreted
their vociferations such.

Children abounded, unkempt and dirt)' but
happy; they reveled in the smooth sensation ot
wriggling their brown feet in the moist mud, ot
throwing fish to the birds, of pelting unsuspecting
playmates with yams and trying to catch one of
the many disdainful pelicans that clumped and
talked to themselves, apparently oblivious of
ever\thing else. I'm sure these urchins wished
to know what the pelicans hid in their enormous
shell-like beaks, (at least I did).

NN'hen I finally left, it was with the hope that
these same scenes would often "flash upon the
inward eye, which is the bliss ot solitude,"
recalling the picturesqueness ot that Panamanian
seashore.




Famous I'hit-.Arch in Panama Citj'.



THE CARIBBEAN.



79




THE INDIAN BRA\'E.

Waller Bnndy, '?_'.
(This poem was awarded Grand Prize in the Poetry Contest.)



One time there lived an Indian brave

.And very brave was he.
He Hved three hundred years ago,

While Spain ruled the sea.

This brave, he fought and ate and fought,

.'\nd when he did not fight,
Then this brave slept and ate and slept

-And drank with all his might.

This brave laid down and went to sleep,

.And for forty days he lay.
He slept so long t'was thought he died.

But up he rose one day.

PANAMA.

Helen Soulluirii, 'j2.

In the tropical regions of Panam..

.Among the ruins of old,
There Morgan, that bloody old pirate.

Looted the .Spaniards for gold.

There Balboa discovered the Pacific
That surrounds the jungles so dense

Where the malaria and the heat are terrific
And you walk as if in a trance.

.And the Locks! How General Goethals
.And his men so brave and bold.

Worked to connect transportation
Ot the new world with the old.



-And when again this brave did live

To eat, to drink, to fight.
He found that all the world had changed

To a new world over night.

He saw that Spain had stolen the land

-And made the people slaves.
The once fair land of his was gone.

Destroyed by Spain's cruel knaves.

Did this young brave go moan and cry

.And show that he was low.-
He simply ate and drank some more

-And back to sleep did go.

THE COMING OF NIGHT.

Pauline Herman, 'jo.

(Honorable Mention.)
A gentle breeze
Swept through the trees;
The tropic sun,
Its work now done,
Sank down to rest.
It left a hint
Of a rosy tint
In the dark'ning sky.
Where with eerie cry
Birds sought their nest.
Then the moon appeared,
.And the darkness cleared
In the splendor bright
Of the Queen of Night
Shinmg at her best.



RAIN.

Helen Logan, 'jo.
(With apologies to Edgar .Allen Poe.)



See the misty rain come sweeping down the hills,
From the valley of the Chagres, down the hills,
The misty, silv'ry rain sweeps down the hills and o'er the plain,
While I hear the stilly stir announce the sweeping, pouring
rain.

Oh, the misty \'eil comes still

Down the green and verdant hill

As I listen tor the coming of the rain, rain, rain.

Of the rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain;

Ot the rain.

Of the rnisty, silv'ry, sweeping, pouring rain



See the dancing, sparkling rain is drawing near.

It glimmers just before me, far, yet near.

Like Spring's glittering jeweled train, it comes toward me from

the plain,
.And I do not mind the gloom that comes with the sparkling

rain.

Oh, the dancing rain is neref

.All around me, far and neat,

While I hail the calm and coolness of the rain, rain, rain.

Of the rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain ;

Ot the rain.

Of the dancing, sparkling, jeweled, glimmering rain.



8o



THE CARIBBEAN.



THE CANARY MURDER CASE.

(With all apologies.)

Ethel L. Barnett, ''p.



There were once five canaries who lived in one cage

A cage which was roomy and wicker,
They were beautiful songsters and beautiful birds

.And never were they known to bicker.

They were gentle and loving and sweet-tempered birds;

They were happy and gleeful and gay;
-And they lived e'er in peace with the world and themselves

In harmonv from dav to dav.



So they called Scotland Yard in, and they went to work.

To find the villain they resolved
When they hunted the cage and they found bits of fur

They said, "I,o, a part of this is solved."

So they gathered the clues and they studied them well
Then they shocked the whole world with the words:

"We have found that the horrible fiend is a CAT! !
Who has murdered and eaten the birds! ! !"



They trusted all humans and loved everything
They knew not that the world is ott painful;

They just knew they were happy and loved and beloved-
Thev were never haughty or disdainful.



They collected the cats who lived near that place

And the guilty one was soon found
For his feet matched exactly the footprints he'd made

And the law took its course: he was drowned.



But one sad early morning the cage was found broken

With not a canary in sight
.And at first it was thought they had all flown away,

But thev knew that this could not be right.



And after his death his cruel relatives came
To the judge in great wrath they then cried,

"You have taken nine lives tor the murder of five
Give us four birds to avenge he who died."



For they found in the cage a small group of feathers

They found, too, a few drops of blood;
And they found, too, some footprints made by the fiend

Who had obviously been through some mud.



Then the judge pondered deeply and called Scotland Yard

-And at last in deep tones did he say:
"Nine lives did kill five; so the law took all nine

Long, long may justice hold its sway."



But the mystery deepened; they saw no solution
So they hired a world-famed detective.

And for weeks he did sleuth for clues and evidence
But in this he did not seem collective.



Then the bloodthirsty cats slunk away; they'd been foiled!

And the courtroom cheered loudly and long
And all the canaries, long silent and sad

Of one accord burst into song.



Still in that place all was mourning and sorrow
Until the vile cats all were banished.

Now five new canaries have one iieic steel cage
-And all sorrow and mourning have vanished.



VIOLET ASTER.
Verona Herman, 'j3.



Long ago there lived a little girl
Whose name was Violet .Aster;

.Although the wind can travel fast
Her song could travel faster.

She lived not with aristocrats
But with the simple folks,

Who'd always sit and listen

To her dreams and joys and hopes

One day as she was talking
To a little boy named Sam,

There came walking up the highway
.An old, tired, and worn-out man.

"Good morning pretty maiden,
Do you happen to go my way?

If you do, I'd like your company
For I'm very tired to-day."



Violet readily consented

And she walked oft with the man.
Leaving on the highway

.A discontented Sam.

That night when ail were seated

After supper on the lawn
There was no sound of song or mirth.

For \ lolet was gone.

Sam had told his story

.And they'd paced the highway long
But not a glimpse of her the\ 'd found.

For \'iolet was gone.

' lis said that ever since that day

.A little boy looks long
But never will he find her

For \'iolet is gone



THE CARIBBEAN.



8i



'Twas the good ship, President Adams,
And she went upon the rocks;

The tugboats from the harbor
Had to tow her to the docks.



THE WRFXK.

IJoivard Keemin, ';



The passengers came running out

-As frightened as could be.
They soon calmed down when they saw the land.

They had thought they were out at sea.



The captain was asleeping,
He should have been awake.

The mate tried to bring her in;
.And then she met her fate.



Boats came from the harbor
To tow her to the docks.

But they couldn't even budge her
So they left her on the rocks.



He did not know ot currents there.

That were so swift and strong;
He should have waked the captain

But he didn't and that was wrong.



Most of the people were serious.
The women they were mad

The men didn't like it any too well
But the children onlv laughed.



The boat was going smoothly

When there came a sudden crash.

The captain jumped right out of bed.
And saw the awful smash.



The President -Adams was soon fixed up,
.And resumed her seaward way,

She probably won't hit another rock
For the old mate has gone away.



And now my tale is done, I hope
It's lesson you will take,

.^nd never, never be asleep
When vou should be awake.



THE RAMBLER'S SONG.

Basil Frank, Ex '?/.



From the stormy seas of Good Hope

To the mines at Kimberley
To the vast, sun-scorched Sahara

.And to the .Arab slavery;

O'er well-worn paths; o'er those that lead

To riches, danger, quest,
I've steered my course and come thru sate,

I reallv think I'm bless'd.



I must confess I've travelled much

.And seen and heard a lot,
But though that's true, I'm a-telling you

For me there's just one spot.

It's where the sun does always shine;

Where the balmy trade winds blow.
Why, man, you'd take one little look;

You'd go there then, I know.



The memories that it brings me,

Ot all the years gone by;
With a "C. H. S." laid on my breast

I'd be happy, should I die.




82



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE SHORT STORY CONTEST.

The results of this year's Short Story Contest An additional feature this year was a Poetry

were as follows: Gretchen Palm, '29, won the Contest for which only one prize was offered.
Grand Prize, a five-dollar gold piece, with her Walter Bundy, 31, won the $2.50 with his poem.



story "Imagination;" Charles Crum's story,
"Have you a Hawser?" won the Senior Class
Prize. "The Girl Who Was Not," written by
Elsie Darley, won the Junior Class Prize; and
Robert Brough was awarded the Sophomore
Class Prize for his story "Undiscovered Treasure."
The winners of the class prizes each received an
annual with their name on it in gold.



"The Indian Brave." Pauline Herman, '30,
received honorable mention.

We deeph' appreciate the kindness and interest
shown by Mrs. Skemp, Mr. Cunningham, and
Mrs. Hearne who acted as judges for the short
stories, and by Miss Madge Thomas who judged
the poetry.



THE SENIOR PARTY.

The Senior Party, which took place at the
Strangers Club on November 9, was rather a
formal affair, as befitted newly acquired Senior
dignity. However, this did not prevent it from
being highly enjoyed.

It was essentially a dance (a fact which caused
little sorrow). Two members of the Senior class,
Anita Rankin and Roy Walker, captured the
Prize Waltz. For entertainment Anita Rankin
and Marion Boomer danced the Argentine Tango.
Wilhelmina Kleefkens played a violin solo entitled
"Jeannine, I Dream of Lilac Time".

It was with regret that the gathering noted the
approach of midnight and the end of the party.



THE JUNIOR PARTY.

The Juniors held their party at the Masonic
Temple and everyone who attended was delight-
fully entertained by an orchestra and several solo
dances. The Prize Fox Trot was won by Jack
Maher and his partner, Margaret Bretch.

The party was highly enjoyed by everyone as
was witnessed at the end of the party, when
everyone seemed loath to leave.

The Juniors have prcjved themselves such good
hosts and hostesses that the Seniors no longer
fear the Junior-Senior Banquel.



THE SOPHOMORE PARTY.

A large group of C. H. S. merrymakers assem-
bled at the Strangers Club to make "whoopee."
And "whoopee" they made! And many hitherto
skeptical students became admirers ot the
Sophomore Class.

To begin with, it was a tacky party and every-
one felt at ease. And then, it was a good dance
with a good orchestra. But the crowning
triumph was the entertainment. The flower of
many beauties in the Sophomore Class attired as
flippant flappers comprised a talented chorus.
The vocal and terpsichorean talent was surpris-
ing. Mary Bretch did a solo dance.

When the party ended, the customary "I had a
wonderful time's" were undoubtedly genuine.



THE FRESHMAN PARTY.

The Freshman Class of C. H. S. held their
annual party at the Hotel Washington. It was
supposed to be a costume party and even though
very few showed up in costumes, the party was a
huge success.

Dona Eaton did a song and dance act that was
very popular and L'rsel Mock did an acrobatic
stunt.

In all, the party was enjoyed by everyone, and
may the class of '32 always give as entertaining
parties as this one was.



THE CARIBBEAN.



83




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84



THE CARIBBEAN.



THE DEBATING CLUB.

The Debating Club is a society which was Although they have had many private debates,

formed at the beginning of the year under the they only held one in public. In this they opposed

supervision of Miss Emmons. Miss Emmons, ^u wu r\ \ i i c ^ i u

'^ .- II 11 ^"'^ \^n^ LIuo and were defeated. However,

however, was soon transferred to Balboa and ,,,,..

1 I ^L T^ u . r-i 1 J L r 1 l^his vear has onlv marked the beginnmg of a

her place in the Debating Club and in the faculty . . .

was taken bv Miss Mevers worthwhile society which, it is hoped, will con-

The officers are Tom Conley, Theodore Bran- tinue to grow stronger and eventually become the

don, and Alice Henter. pride of C. H. S.




C. H. S. CARNIVAL.

.As in years gone by, a Carnival was held on the
Fort de Lesseps grounds, on February 8, in order
that funds might be obtained with which to
publish The Caribbean*. .\nd, as in years gone
by, a generous and enthusiastic public made this
possible.

In mysterious tents were the sitle shows. A
fishpond revealed that a larger majority of the
population which attended were skillful fishermen.
A wheel of chance rivaling that of Monte Carlo
was very popular. The popularity contest arous-



ed much enthusiasm throughout the entire eve-
ning, and closed with Miss Alice Henter as Queen
of the Carnival.

The Big Show in the movie hall was a very
clever musical revue, "The Pirate Ship" filled
with pretty and talented girls. This made a
great hit.

The refreshment booth needed no advertising.
It was never forgotten.

In all, as in years gone by, this Carnival was
very successful, thanks to Fort de Lesseps and to
the public.



THE CARIBBEAN.



85



THE SENIOR PLAY.



"Kempy," a clever little three-act comedy of
.'\merican home life, was the play presented by
the Senior Class. Mr. Robert Noe, the very
competent and skillful director showed his re-
markably good judgment in casting, tor the
members all had the quality of entering into the
spirit of the character which they were portraying,
and acted with the ease and spontaneitx' which is
so rarely seen in amateurs.

Dad Bence, the irritable, grumpy, aggressive
but none the less kind father, was played by
Woodford Babbitt, who showed great acting
ability. Dad is a retired harness manufacturer
whose ambition is to marry his per\'erse daughter,
Kate, to a young millionaire. She, howe\'er,
proves a great trial to him and his almost con-
stant wrath causes much amusement.

Ma Bence, a sweet, gentle, but rather old-
fashioned woman was played by Gretchen Palm.
As this was a character part, it was rather hard,
but Gretchen acted admirably. Ma spends her
time trying to pacify Pa, whose upheavals are so
numerous that pacification has become second
nature to her.

Jane Bence Wade, well portrayed by Marion
Boomer, is independent and conscious of her
independence as the oldest and only married
daughter in the family. She is rather intolerant
and frequently irritates her father.

Ben Wade, cleverly acted by Morton Southard,
is a small-town real estate agent, is breezy, self-
important and very tactless. He is very talkative
and undiplomatic, but well-meaning.

Lilybel Cox, as Kate Bence triumphed over a
hard role. She is the rather haughty middle
daughter who feels that she is very talented
(though in what line she has yet to discover) and



that she is misunderstood by very unsympathetic
parents. She is in love with Duke Merrill but
refuses to marry him because he is skeptical as to
her talent.

Royal Higgason is very convincing in the part
of Duke Merrill, a young but very worldly million-
aire who, after two years away from her, is still in
love with Kate. He appeals to Pa as an ideal
son-in-law, but Kate rejects him because he has
no faith in her.

Ruth Bence, excellently characterized by Eliza-
beth Hackett is the youngest daughter. She is
verv ilramatic and has romantic ideas.

Lee Kariger was very fine in the role of Kempy
James, a young plumber (really an architect)
who is very determined, and who always gets
what he wants. He is very boyish and impulsive,
a contrast to the calm, thoughtful Duke who
weighs his words.

Kempy James comes into the Bence home to
fix a pipe and in the course of a few hours, finds
himself married to Kate, who had had another
quarrel with Duke and who wanted to show him
that she could do without him. The marriage
does not make anyone happy, the couple least of
all, and after a hectic night in which Pa storms,
Ma pacifies in vain, Duke argues, and Kempy
asserts himself while the rest of the family are too
completely overcome to enter the battlefield,
they find that the marriage can be annulled and
all ends happily.

"Kempy" was a very great success, due to the
cleverness of the play, the splendid acting of the
cast, and the incomparable direction and manage-
ment of Mr. Robert Noe. Whether another
Senior play can be better or even be equal to it is
yet to be proved.




Hotel Washington Swimming Pool.



86



THE CARIBBEAN.




BASEBALL.



CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL VeiSHS BALBOA
HIGH SCHOOL.

(FiyslGame.)

The first game of the series w.is played
at the Colon diamond, February 2, 1929.

This was an interesting and well-played
game, through the eight innings, being
anybody's game, until that time. In the
ninth Balboa broke loose and scored
thirteen runs.

Balboa was as well represented in the
stands as on the diamond. There was a
continual storm of cheers from Balboa
and Cristobal rooters.

The game started with Maurer of
Cristobal facing Reese of Balboa. Both
went fine until the seventh. In the
ninth Pettit went in to relieve Maurer; he
gave a base on balls, was hit tor a single
and a triple. He was replaced by Hayden
who struck out the first batter, and then
was hit for two homers and a single.

Bridgens relieved Reese of B.ilboa, and
he survived the battle.

Morrison started for Balboa with a hit
through third. Des Londes forced him



at second and went to third on a passed
ball. Hele hit through De Reuter, and
Des Londes scored the first run of the
game.

Cristobal High took the lead in the
third inning. Higgason's weak grounder
went through Des Londes' legs and Hig-
gason stole second. De Reuter brought
him home with a hit to deep right.
Babbitt followed with a hit and stole
second. De Reuter scored on a pass ball,
and Pescod hit a safty to center, scoring
Babbitt, altogether making three runs.

Reese's three-bagger to center with a
man on, and an error, resulted in two
runs for Balboa, tying the score. Cris-
tobal went into the lead again when
Maurer made first on Hele's error. He
stole second and third and scored on a
hard single to center by Pescod.

Balboa took the lead in the sixth inning
and there they stayed. Reese homered
with a man on and Quinn singled and
went around on a succession of passed
balls and a stolen base. Three more
runs for Balboa. Cristobal came with-



in one of tying the score in the eighth
when the heavy-hitting Pescod tripled
to center scoring Maurer. Then he
waited on third while W. Wikingstad
grounded out.

Then came Balboa's lucky ninth. Pow-
ell opened with a strike out. Murray
took a base on balls. So did Morrison,
and the bases filled when Des Londes was
hit. Wood doubled to right, and Hig-
gason fielded it very slowly. Hele hit
to center. Pettit took up the pitching
duties. Reese walked, filling the bases.
Quinn hit to right, and Jones sent a
triple down the left field foul line.

Exit Pettit. Hayden forced Powell to
hit a grounder and it went through De
Reuter. Bridgens fanned for the second
out. Morrison was hit in the back. Des
Londes hit a long fly to right which Hig-
gason badly misjudged, and chased to the
fence. Wood hit to deep center for an-
other homer. Hele hit to left and Reese
grounded out to first. Cristobal came
right back at them in their half. With
one out Brandon walked, and De Reuter



THE CARIBBEAN.



87



homered to center. The game ended as
Havden and Pettit fanned.



The box score:

Balboa High .AB R

Morrison, ct . . 4 ;

Des Londes, i b. 4 j

Wood, 2b 4 ,-

Hele, ss 6 ,-

Reese, p, rf 5 .'

Quinn, 3b 5 :

Jones, If 4 I

Powell, c 5 1

Bridgens, p i c

Murr.iv, rf 2



H



PO

I
ij

4
I

o
o
6
o
o



Total



40 '9 13



16



CRISTOB.1L HIGH SCHOOL VeiSHS B.4LB0A
HIGH SCHOOL.



Cristobal High XR


R


H


PO


.A


E


R,VVikingstad,lf.

















Will, If J








"!








PescoJ, 3b 5





3


4


,3


2


W.Wikingstad,2b 5








7


2





Wertz, cf 3








I


I





Brandon, rf

















Higgason, rf. . . 3


2














DeReuter, ss. . 4


2


2





3


3


Harden, ib, p. . 4





I


5





!


Stewart, c

















Babbitt, c 4


I


I


4


I


I


Pettit, p, lb I


c





I








Maurcr, p 4


2


I





3


2



Total



36 7 8

Score by innings.



13 9



Balboa i o o 2 o 3 o o 13-

Cristobal o 3 o i o o o i 2-



-19



Summary: Two base hits Wood,
Jones. Three base hits Reese, Pescod.
Home runs Reese, DesLondes, DeReuter,
Wood. Stolen bases W. Wikingstad,
Wertz, Higgason, Hadyen,Babbitt,Maur-
er (4), Wood, Hele (3), Reese, Murray.
Sacrifice hits ^Jones. Double plays
Wertz to DeReuter to W. Wikingstad,
Pescod to W. Wikingstad, Pescod to W.
Wikingstad to Hayden. Bases on balls
off Reese 6, off Maurer 6, off Pettit i, off
Bridgens 2. Struck out by Maurer 3,
by Reese 4, by Hayden i by Bridgens 2.
Hits off Maurer 8 in 8 and 1/3 innings,
off Reese 7 in 7 and 2/3 innings, off Pettit
2 in no innings, off Hayden 3 in 2/3
innings, offBridgens i in i and 1/3 innings.
Winning pitcher Reese. Losing pitcher
Maurer. Hit by pitcher, Reese i (Wertz),
Maurer i (Des Londes), Hayden i
(Morrison). Wildpitch Maurer. Passed
ball Powell 2, Babbitt, Stewart. Llm-
pires Longnecker and Graham.



iSecnnil Game.)

The second game of the series was
played at Balboa, February 9, 1929-
The game went to Balbo:i High School,
6-5. This gave them the High School
Championship for the first time in three
years.

The game was fast and exciting from
beginning to end and would have done
credit to many ball teams of higher ctass.

Cristobal High started with three
runs in the first inning. Balboa High
put one over in the second and then took
the le.id in the fourth, scoring four runs.
Cristobal scored one run in the fifth, and
Balboa cam back with one in their half.
From the fitth to the ninth both teams
drew blanks. Cristobal scored her last
run in the ninth with the bases full and
two out. Whidden, pinch-hitting for
Brandon, struck out to end the game.

Bridgens, Balboa's pitcher, was the
star of the game. He allowed only five
hits, no earned runs, and struck out
eleven men, passing three.

Balboa hit hard, collecting eleven hits.
Jones led with three singles in three
official times to bat.

Cristobal played a much better game
in the field than Balboa, making only
three errors. W. Wikingstad played the
best game, but DeReuter made the out-
standing play of the day when he grabbed
Hele's liner with one hand. Maurer
left the box in the fourth and was relieved
by Pescod, who pitched excellent ball.
If he had started, there might have been
a different tune to sing.

With one out in the first for Cristobal,
W. Wikingstad got first on Wood's
error, Pescod fanned, Wikingstad stole
second. Cristobal scored three runs on
another error, a walk and DeReuter's
triple. Morrison led with a hit tor Balboa
but they failed to score.

Cristobal went scoreless in the second,
although Hayden walked to start the
inning. Balboa made one run on Wood's
walk, two errors by Maurer, and Jones'
hit.

Neither team scored in the third.
Cristobal went out in order in the
fourth. Balboa made four runs on three
hits, two walks, a sacrifice fly, and an
error.



Both teams scored in the fifth. Cris-
tobal made one run on two hits and an
error. Balboa, on three hits and a walk,
scored one run.

Cristobal went out in order in the
sixth. Balboa got two hits and a walk,
but failed to score because of foolish base
running.

In the seventh both teams got men on
bases but tailed to score.

Cristobal went out in order again in the
eighth. Jones led with a hit for Balboa,
and went to third but Preston ended the
inning with a fly to right.

In the first of the ninth Higgason hit to
center. Haj'den got on b\' another error
by Quinn. Babbitt forced DeReuter,
Maurer walked to fill the bases. Hayden
scored on a passed ball, and Whidden,
pinch-hitting for Brandon, ended the
game with a strike out.



The box score:

Cristobal High AB

Wills, If 3

Brandon, If i

"Whidden i

Wikingstad 2d. 4
Pescod, 3d, p. .. 4

Wertz, ct 4

Higgason, rf 3

DeReuter, ss. . 4
Hayden, ist, 3d 3

Babbitt, c 4

Maurer, p, ist. . 3



R H PO A



Total



34



24 S



Balboa High

Morrison, ct . . 2

Preston, cf 3

DesLondes, 1st. 5

Hele, ss 5

Reese, If 4

Wood, id 2

Quinn, 3d 4

Jones, rt 3

Powell, c 3

Bridgens, p 3



AB R H PO



I

1 1
o



Total 34 ^ II 2" 8 .<

*Whidden hit for Brandon in the ninth.

Two base hits Quinn. Three base
hits DeReuter. Stolen bases Jones
Reese, Wikingstad, Babbitt, Maurer, 3
Sacrifice fly Jones. Struck out by
Bridgens 11, by Maurer 2, by Pescod 4
Walked By Bridgens 3, by Pescod 3, by
Maurer 2. Passed balls Powell, 2.



88



THE CARIBBEAN.




Cristobal Higli School Baseball Squad. Coach, Ed Morris, Boston "Red Sox" pitcher (American League),



TENNIS.



Xot much interest was taken in tennis
this year in Cristobal High School, al-
though the few bo>'s that canie out for
this sport were very enthusiastic. Two
tournaments were played with Balboa
High School this year, Balboa coming out
victorious by a large margin.

The first tournament was played at
France Field, March i6, igig. Colonel
Fisher was kind enough to allow us to
use the France Field courts, becauseof the
poor condition of the Cristobal courts.

RESfl.TS.

T. Maduro (B, H. S.) defeated H.
Mueller (C. H. S.) 6-0, 6-0. Mueller
was outpointed throughout, but put uji a
good fight.



S. Dicks (B. H, S.) defeated F. Drake
(C. H. S.) 6-1, 5-0. Drake won the
first game, but was outpointed in the
remainder of the play,

\V. Hele (B. H. S.) defeated D. Ser-
geant (C. H. S.) 6-1, 6-0. Sergeant won
the second game but was unable to take
any more.

Taylor and Wainer (B. H. S.) defeated
Mueller and Maher (C. H. S.) 6-:, 6-0.
Mueller lost heart after severe beating
in singles; although Maher tried hard,
they were defeated.

Dicks and Maduro (B. H. S.) defeated
Harmon and Mundberg (C. H. S.) 6-2,
6-0. Harmon and Mundberg surprised
the rest of the team, by making the best
score of the day.



The second tournament played at
Balboa, March 13, 1929, was a repetition
of the first, Balboa winning every set.
The score this time was not so one sided.
Our team made a much better showing.



T. Maduro (B. H. S,) defeated \V.
Wickingstad (C. H. S.) 6-j, 6-1.

S. Dick (B. H. S.) defeated F, Drake
(C.H.S,) 6-1,6-1.

Wainer (B. H. S.) defeated H. .Mueller
(C. H. S.) 6-1, 6-0.

Wainer and Taylor (B, H. S.) defeated
Mueller and Harmon (C. H. S.) 6-2, 6-2.

Dick and Drew (B. H. S.) defeated
Wickingstad and Drake (C. H. S.) 6-1,
6-3.



THE CARIBBEAN.



89



To begin with, this is the first year
soccer has been played in C. H. S. Al-
though our team lost the series to Balboa,
we teel greatly encouraged because thi
IS Balboa's second year at the game.

The soccer team was organized by Mr.
\'. E. Seiler, our coach. About two-
thirds ot the boys who went out tor the
team had never seen a game of soccer.
Several of the others had played the game
once or twice. Our captain, Thomas
Pescod, was a veteran player and from
him and Mr. Seiler our players gained a
considerable knowledge of the game by
the time the series with Balbga rolled
around.

The first game with Balboa was played
at the Radio Station, New Cristobal, on
November 24, 192S. Balboa was fairly
well represented and these rooters made
noise enough for a crowd twice the size.

The game was called at two o'clock.
We kicked off to Balboa and immediately
a struggle began for possession of that
swiftly moving sphere, which was continu-
ally changing sides. Balboa finally took
possession of the bail and by their good
passing and team work, they caged the
first goal of the game, which was the last
for the first half. .At the end of the first
half, De Reuter was substituted for
Conklin.

Balboa kicked off at the start of the
second half. Their forw.irds showed, in
their speed and ability to handle the ball,
that they knew something about the
game of soccer. The field soon became
a mud hole, for with the start of the second
half a light drizzle began and increased in
volume until the end ot the game. Bal-
boa fired shot after shot at our goal, only
to have them stopped by Whidden, the
goal keeper, or the two backs. Captain
Pescod and Babbitt. It is said thatif you
are persistent enough you will attain
your end, which Balboa finally.did. With
a series of fine passes they finally caged
the second and last goal of the game.



Our basket ball squad was very small
this year, only about nine or ten possible
players coming out. They practiced for
two weeks under Mr. Seller's coaching
and then played several practice games.
The first game was played with Head-
quarters Battery, 2d Field .Artillery,
Gatun. This game went six periods, the
Field Artillery coming out on the long



SOCCER.

.After the kick-ofl^, our forwards carried
the game to Balboa. They threatened
Balboa's goal many times but were un-
successful. Brandon, Conley, Stewart,
and W. Wickingstad carried the ball
right to the goal line several times only
to lose it in fierce scrimmages, sometimes
right between the goal posts.

The final score was 2-0 in Balboa's
favor.

Dew, Rader, Quinn, and Maduro fea-
tured the play for Balboa, with their fine
passing and ground-gaining ability. For
our team, Pescod was the star. With
the little assistance the other back, could
ort^er, Balboa was held down far below
what they expected.

Balboa's team played fine soccer and,
although they defeated us, they had to
fight and fight hard for the goals they
made.

The second game of the series was
played at the Balboa Stadium, Decem-
ber I, 1 928, on adry, hard field, and under
a very hot sun.

Balboa again displayed their abilty to
play as a team by their fine passing. Our
men showed brilliant work, but not as a
team, only as individuals.

Mike Dew starred for Balboa, with a
spectacular game and three of Balboa's
four goals to his credit. Vengochea,
captain of the B. H. S. team, played a
fine game, making the fourth goal for
Balboa on a pretty penalty shot.

Tommy Pescod, our captain, was
easily the best player on the field. He
showed his ability to carry the ball by
many charges into Balboa's territory.
Here he would lose the ball to their backs
because of lack of support by his team
mates.

The game was a see-saw affair from
start to finish. The ball changed hands
rapidly and continually. Just before the
end of the first half Pescod scored the
first goal for Cristobal, on a penalty kick.
This made the score 2-1 in Balboa's favor, 1

BASKET BALL.

end of a 26-24 score. The second game
w.as played with "A" Battery. They
won, 46-30. The following week the
third game was played at Cristobal.
We won this game, 46-28. The last
practice game before we met Balboa
High School was with "C" Co. of Fort
Davis. We defeated them easily 58-4.



they having made two goals early in the
half.

Balboa scored again in the beginning
of thj second half. A few minutes later
the second and last goal was scored for
Cristobal by De Reuter, after a series of
fast passes. Near the end of the second
half Balboa scored again, making the
score 4-2. There it stayed the remainder
of the game.

Our goal keeper deserves mention for
the many would be goals that he stopped,
many of them very dilficult stops.

BAl.BOA.

Forwtirdj.

C. F. Capt. P. Vengochea

I. R. Mike Dew

I.. W. William Michelson

I. I.. Jose Salterro

R. W. Fred Maduro
Halfbacks,

C. James Booth

I.. H. James Quinn

R. H. William Hele
Fullbacks.

L. B. Billy Taylor

R. B. William Rader
Goal.

Amos Waner

CRKSTOBAL.

Forwards.

C. F. W. Wickingstad

I. L. Tom Conley

L. W. Fred Stewart

I. R. Teddy Brandon

R. W. R. Wickingstad
Halfbacks.

C. P. De Reuter

L. H. Sam Patchett

R. H. James Quinn
Fullbacks.

L. B. Capt. T. Pescod

R. B. Woodford Babbitt
Goa].

John Whidden



CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL VCrsUS BALBOA
HIGH SCHOOL.

{First Game.)

On May 4, 1929, Cristobal High School
met Balboa High School at the Cristobal
Playshed.

This was one of the best and fastest
games ever played between the two
schools.



90



THE CARIBBEAN.



Our team was rated as not having a
chance with the strong Balboa combi-
nation.

When the first whistle blew, Cristobal
went right after Balboa. They had not
expected anything like that ami they
seemed dazed. Cristobal soon worked
this out of them, and then both teams
went at it in earnest. The Babbitt-Pes-
cod combination went to work and the
points began to go up. Babbitt worked
the ball down to Pescod under the basket
and he very seldom missed a goal. If
Balboa got the ball Blauvelt was always
under the basket to spoil the shot. If
Cristobal had had another guard like
him, Balboa would not have won.

The greater part of Balboa's playing
was done by Hele and Des Londes. They
showed fine passing ability and were able
to land baskets. Balboa had a superior
number of players thereby having a
slight advantage.

.At the half Balboa led 14-11.

The second half was a repetition of
the first. Hele, Wood and Des Londes



carried the attack for Balboa; Pescod
and Harden for Cristobal.

In the third quarter Cristobal took the
lead and held it for many minutes.
Balboa's superior numbers and their fine
team work began to tell. They recovered
the lead at the end of the quarter, and
went ahead a tew points on their own.

The last quarter was fast and furious
neither team being able to gain on the
other, although each scored.

Score: Balboa High School 2,7

Cristobal High School n

LINEUP.

Balboa.

Romig, rf.



Des Londes, rf.
Hele, If.
W. Wood, c.
Waincr, rg.
Jones, Ig.



(^uinn, If.

Key, rg.
J. Wood, Ig.
Cristobal.



Babbitt, rf.
Pescod, If.
Hayden, c.
Blauvelt, Ig.
W. Wikingstad, n'.



I*,. Conklin, rg.



CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL VerSUS BALBOA
HIGH SCHOOL.

{Second Game.)

During the week, after our first defeat
by Balboa, we played two practice games.
The first game was played with the post
team from Camp Gatun. They defeated
us 36-1 ". The second game was played
at Fort Davis with "M" Co. They won
15-10.

On Saturday, May II, 1929, Cristobal
High School went to Balboa to play the
second game of the high school series.

This was a very one-sided game in
Balboa's favor. Cristobal's forwards
were unable to penetrate Balboa's de-
fense, with the exception of a few times
when they broke through. Toward the
end of the game Cristobal's men were
tiring. Four of them played through the
entire game, while Balboa was continually
making substitutions, which were very
necessary to stop Cristobal's attack.

Wood and Hele battled for high point
honors of the game, while Pescod of




Cristoljul High Sciiool Track Squad.



THE CARIBBEAN.



91



Cristobal ran them up very close. Blau-
velt of Cristobal again proved his ability
as a guard by making many spectacular
stops and spoiling many shots for Balboa.
The loss of this game gave Balboa High
School the basket ball championship tor
the school year of 1928-29-

BALBOA.

FG FT PF TP

Des Londes, rf i c o 2

Dew, rf o o o o



Romig, rf i

Hele, If-c 5

Solenberger, It o

Quinn, If i

Wm. Wood, c 5

Wainer, rg o

J. Wood, rg o

Jones, Ig o

Powell, Ig o

La Peira, Ig o

Total TT



CRISTOBAL.

FG FT PF TP

Babbitt, rf 2 o c 4

Pescod, If 4 o c 8

Hayden, c i 2 o 4

Blauvelt, rg o o 3 o

Wikingstad, Ig 0000

Conklin, Ig o o 2 o

Quinn, Ig o o o o

Total ~ 2 5 i^




Swimming was not much of a success
this year. Little interest was taken in
this sport. Also, there was so much
competition between swimming and
other sports that many of those who were
interested were unable to come out.

The annual swimming meet between
Cristobal High School and Balboa High
School was held at the Hotel Washington
Pool, .April 20, 1929. This turned out to
be a walk-away for Balboa, as the score
shows 50-9.

The outstanding teature of the meet
was the breaking of the Canal Zone High
School record for the 220-yard swim, by
George Lowe, of Balboa. The time for
the event was 2 minutes and 36 seconds.

Balboa took all the first places, while
we took only two second places and three
third places.



SWIMMING.

SLMMARV OF EVENTS.

^c-yard Crawl.

1. W. Walston (B. H. S.). Time, 26-3 5
seconds.

2. B. Romig (B. H. S.i.

3. P. Hayden (C. H. S.).

\cc-vnyd Swim.

1. W. Walslon ( B. H. S.i. Time, i
minute, 2 seconds.

2. H. Mueller iC. H. S.).

3. W. Burdge IB. H. S.).

^o-yiirJ Breast Stroke.

I. A. Schwinderman I B. H. S. I. Time,
305 seconds.

i. G. Halloran (B. H. S.).
3. A. Mundberg (C. H. S.).



^o-yard Back Stroke.

1. G. Lowe (B. H. S.). Time, 35
seconds.

2. W. Robinson (B. H. S.).

3. L. r.kwurzel (B. H. S.).

120-yard Swim.

1. G. Lowe (B. H. S.). Time, 2
minutes, 36 seconds (new Canal Zone
High School record).

2. H. Brewerton (B. H. S.).

3. H. Mueller (C. H. S.).

Fancy Diving.

1. H. Brewerton (B. H. S.).

2. B. Turner (C. H. S.).

3. C. Dockery (B. H. S.).

1 20-yard Relay.

Won by B. H. .S. Time, i minute, i
second.



92



THE CARIBBEAN.




Again our year was broken up by the
leaving ot Miss Alexander and the arrival
of Miss Bailey. A little time was neces-
sary forgetting acquainted, but soon Miss
Bailey was in the swing of things here,
and several ot the gir's became interested
in the various sports. Although Balboa
has won the most of the honors in com-
petition with us, the Cristobal High School
girls who came out regularly for practice
deserve great credit.



GIRLS' .'\THLETICS.

Marion Boomer, '2Q.
The first thing Miss Bailey did was to
get up a tennis tournament, so as to see
who should go to Balboa. Pauline Her-
man proved herself Champion of Cristo-
bal. On March i6, Cristobal played
against Balboa at the Balboa Courts.
In the singles Pauline gave Louise Martin
a good fight but lost by a score of 6-2, 6-3.
In the doubles, Clarita and Cecilia Smith
were victors over, first, Gretchen Palm
and Marion Boomer bv 6-1, and then




over Gretchen and Jean Wyllie by 6-4.
Balboa is to be congratulated on the
wonderful team work shown by the Smith
sisters and the fast playing of Louise
Martin.

The girl's track meet was held the
same day as the boys, April 13. Maybe
it was on account of its being the 13th
that Cristobal only had 5 points to Bal-
boa's 41. The five points were obtained
in the baseball throw by Marion Boomer.
Rae Newhardt is to be con-
gratulated upon her broad
jump. She was within two
feet of the world's record.

The next and last event was
swimming. This meet was held
at the Washington Pool on
.April 20. Zoe Wyllie made
the only point for Cristobal
by getting 3d place in diving.
The following girls came out
for sports this year.

TENNIS.

Pauline Herman, Jean Wyllie,
Gretchen Palm Marion Boomer.

TR.ACK.

Pauline Herman, Virgi ni a
Stevenson, Betty Cunningham,
Gladys Bliss, Rosemary Keene,
P^lsie Birkeland, Mary Bretch,
.Alice G o r m e r I > Marion
Boomer.

SWIMMI.S'G.

Pauline Herman, Zoe Wyllie,
Jean Wyllie, Marion Neely.



THE CARIBBEAN.



93




Oct. I. Whoopee! Introducing Messrs. Pence
and West and the Misses Meyers and Emmons.

Oct. 2. Seniors and Juniors are presented with
new home rooms Seniors were a '"rifle disappoint-
ed, but are O. K. now.

Oct. 5. Election of class officers. Seniors start
the ball a-rolling in elections.

Oct. 8. Supper Club begins, enrolling 60 mem-
bers.

Oct. II. Athletic Association meets, and elec-
tion of officers takes place.

Oct. 15. Staff elections held in Assembly
full attendance.

Oct. 20. Student government introduced by
Seniors and privileges announced.

Oct. 22. Staff meeting held to discuss matter of
"Caribbean."

Oct. 31. Day alter Halloween, school bell minus
clapper.

Nov. I. Freshmen boys beat the Sophs in
initiation.

Nov. 3. Panamanian National Holiday.

Nov. 6. Green suspenders inaugurated by Con-
ley and Stewart.

Nov. 9. Senior party best of the year.

Nov. 24. Robert Edwards and Marion Ed-
wards leave school on account of sudden death of
their lather.

B. H. S. vs C. H. S. in a soccer game. B. H. S.
are victors. Debating Club introduced in C. H. S.

Nov. 25. Thanksgiving Holiday. It was tur-
key.

Dec. I. C. H. S. vs B. H. S. in a second soccer
game. B. H. S. are again victors too bad!

Dec. 3. C. H. S. mourns loss of one ot her best
teachers to B. H. S., but is introduced to Miss
Meyers. Who will prove to be the better?

Dec. 9-1 1. Conference ot Supper Club held in
Cristobal Y. W. C. A.

Dec. 21. After parties in Home room, students
leave merrily tor Christmas holidays which are
reduced to one week.



Jan. 2. Some boys raided school damaged
much property were caught. It's just too bad.

Jan. 10. Nothing important for awhile.

Jan. 17. Senior Banner swiped by ? ? ?.

Jan. 20. Grounds offered for school carnival by
Colonel Wyllie of Fort de Lesseps.

Jan. 23. Mr. Williams addressed future Sen-
iors "You all need ."

Jan 25. A lecture by Mr. H. C. Hanks. Very
interesting talk of the school for several days.

Jan. 30. Bugs Bugs How exciting Fumi-
gation orders predominate in two rooms.

Feb. 2. Baseball B. H. S. vs. C. H. S. Balboa

wins.

Feb. 5. Staff meeting held to decide Carnival
matter.

Feb. 6-7-8. Mid-year exams whew! 1



my!



Did we



Feb. 8. School Carnival Oh
make good and how

Feb. 9. B. H. S. vs C. H. S. in baseball. B. H.
S. were victors, but it was exciting for both of us.

Feb. 12. Short Story Contest for "Caribbean"
announced.

Feb. 15. What a relief that's over with, but
there still remains the verdict.

March 9. Seniors lose another classmate
Miriam .Arthur.

March 11. "Whv Club" in debate against
C. H. S. at Y. W. C. A.

March 11. Senior play chosen and so is the
cast. Mr. Noe to direct it.

March 15. Sophomore party held at the
Strangers Club. A wow what entertainment!
A Tacky Party.

March 16. C. H. S. v^s B. H. S. in tennis.

B. H. S. victor.

March 29. Governor .Arosemena's cup lost by

C. H. S. lo de Lesseps.

April I. Upper Classmen challenge Lower
Classmen to a contest for the sale of "Caribbean"
tickets loser gives a party.



94



THE CARIBBEAN.



April 8. Senior girl reveals a solitaire on the
fourth finger of left hand guess who?

April 13. Girls' track meet. B. H. S. victors.

April 20. Girls' and hnys' swimming meet.
B. H. S. victorious.

April 26. Freshman party a character party
held at the Washington Hotel best of the year.

May 4. First basket ball game between C. H. S.
and B. H. S. B. H. S. victorious by a small mar-
gin.

May 17. Senior play held at America best of
anv held during all the C. H. S. vears.



May 31. Senior play held in Balboa went over
big.

June 7. Junior-Senior Banquet held at the
Hotel Washington. Biggest attendance of all
C. H. S. banquets.

June 14. Diplomas arrived. Seniors can't see
them Ha! Ha!

June 16. Baccalaureate service held at Union
Church. Was an impressive service long to be
remembered.

June 19. Commencement. The Seniors can't
believe their eyes and ears. Juniors are ushers.
Largest class ever graduated from C. H. S.



^..,-


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mrn^




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Dense jungle growth of the tropics.



THE CARIBBEAN.



95



?^=




EXCHANGES.

Adair L. Taylor, '2tj.




m



The staff of the Caribbean tr)- their best to
make it a book which will be long remembered,
and they are helped in their attempt by the many
interesting exchanges from other schools.

We regret that our school has not yet come to
the point where they are able to exchange with
the papers that are sent but they appreciate them
and enjoy reading them.



AS WE SEE THEM.

The Purple ^idll. Ball High School, Galveston, Texas.

Your magazine is very well composed. We compli-
ment you on winning a prize in journalism. Let us hear
from you again.

The Pat. Talmalpais Union High School, Sausalito, Calif.
Your cuts deserve special mention and your book is
interesting, but we suggest an exchange department.

The Nutshell. Moorestown High School, Moorestown, N. J.
Your book is well arranged, but more literature would
improve it. We also suggest an exchange department.

The Student. Holmes High School, Covington, Ky.

Congratulations on your magazine. "Our Gcogravihy"
was quite original.

The Beacon. Gloucester High School, Gloucester, Mass.

Your magazine is very good and you are to be compli-
mented on your Literary Department.

The Red and White. Rochester High School, Rochester, N. H.
You have an excellent m.agazine and your Literary
Department is very interesting.

The Chronicle. Lyman Hall High School, lValling(ord, Conn.
A book that is bound to come out on top. Excellent,
and we would like to have you call again.

The Senior. Westerly High School, II 'esterly ,R. I.

Your editorials are good as is the general make-up of
your book. Come again.

The .iuthentic. Stoneham High School, Stoneham, .Muss.

Your magazine was most entertaining and we enjo\ed
reading it. Exchange with us again.

The Exponent. Greenfield High School, Greenfield, Mass.

A very complete magazine and we are glad to have you
on our exchange list.



The Echo. Hume Fogg High School, Nashville, Tenn.

We have only one regret and that was that this splendid
magazine was not larger.

The Reflector. 11 'ey mouth High School, 11 'ey mouth, Mass.

Your Literary Department shows hard work as does the
rest of your book, but where are your exchanges?

The Whisp. Wilmington High School, Wilmington, Del.

We rate your magazine as one of the best. Exchange
with us again.

The Bulletin. Lawrence High School, Lawrence, Afass.

Very good magazine, but we think a few more stories
and an exchange department would help.

The Zoniiin. Balboa High School, Balboa, Canal Zone.

Congratulations on your interesting annual, Balboa.
We enjoNed reading it.

The Acorn. Oak Clijf High School, Dallas, Texas.

A well-composed magazine with good material.



We acknowledge the following papers:

The Hi- Newsetle froin Vandergrift, Penn.

The Colgate Maroon from Coltjate University, Hamilton,
N. J.

The Herald from Holyoke High School, Holyoke, Mass.

The Il'est Il'ing from Mission High School, San Francisco,
Calif

The Hebronian from Hebron, Me.



AS THKY SEE US.

The Caribbean. Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.

We always like to increase our Exchange Department,
and it is with pleasure that we read The Caribbean.
It is a fine, interesting annual.
The Chronicle, Lyman Hall Hi^h School, IVallingford, Conn.

The Caribbean. Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.

The Caribbean shows intensive work and preparation
on the part of all contributing to the various departments.
The book is well written and the illustrations are excellent.
We extend to you our best wishes for great achievements
in the year 1929.

The Senior, Il'esterly High School, Westerly, R. I

The Caribbean. Cristobal High Schrol, Cristobal, C. Z.

Yours is an excellent magazineon accountot theunique
cuts, beautiful scenes, and well-edited columns. We
like especially the arrangements of theclass photographs.
Let us hear from you again.
The Red and White, Rochester High School, Rochester, N. H.



96



THE CARIBBEAN.




"I IKE the brook the Year Book of Cristobal High goes on
f^ forever. Every year an old group goes and a new one
enters. The alumni never fail to take an interesc in the book.
This year's Senior Class will be the largest to be graduated from
Cristobal High School.



1918.

LuLA May Pui.lig (Mrs. J. B.) Coman, Cristobal,

C. Z.
MiNOT Co'iTON, 81 John Street, New York Ci'ry.
Susie Harrison, Ancon, C. Z.
Catherine Wade, 451 West 23d Street, New York

City.
Burke \N'ei.ch (address unknown).
Mary Verner, Chapel Hill, N. C.

1919.

.'^i ICE Ari.ene Ball, 118 Maple Avenue, Tacoma
Park, Md.

James Raymond, Cristobal, C. Z.

DoKoiHY Weir (Mrs. John) Montanye, Cristo-
bal, C. Z.



Kenneth Edwards, Karlstromer i'\pts., Hope-
well, Va.
"Your note received and pleased to hear
from my old High School. I am working
as an electrician in a large plant at Hope-
well, Virginia. There are lots of old Canal
Zone people working at this plant and we
all get together once in a while. Once a
year they give a Panama banquet. Last
year there were thirty-four, but this year I
know there will be more to attend as some
have come here since. I would sure like to
visit the school once more and may do so
some day not far in the future. I remain a
well-wisher of The Caribbean, and am en-
closing money for this year's copy. I still
have my first one of eleven years ago."



THE CARIBBEAN.



97



i(y:o.

Li.NUALE Da\'Is (adilress unknown).

Jack B. Fields, care of Tela Railroad Engineering

Dept., Tela, Honduras.
Kenneth Greene, Coudersport, Pa.
Harlan Holmwood, Balboa, C. Z.
.Ai.soN Sears, Balboa, C. Z.
Kathrvn Birgoon Stewari', Cristobal, C. Z.
.Alice Stilson (Mrs.) Pincus, Balboa, C. Z.
A\.. Doyle, 1964 Thirty-sixth Street, Sacramento,

Calif.
Ei'HA Bevinc;to.n, Balboa Heights, C. Z.

1 92 1

Carl Diev, Box 95, Lemon Cit\-, Ela.

KiRiiv Fercuson, Cristobal, C. Z.

.Alice Huni'er (Mrs. L. A.) Hohn, Cristobal,

C. Z.
Charles Hknter, Coast Guard Cutter Kii//-

bal^' Norfolk, \'a.
Dr. Frank Raymond, care of Gorgas Hospital,

Ancon, C. Z.
Eleanor Zimmerman, 120 Kingsle\' A\enue,
Westerleigh, .Staten Island, N. "\'.
"I am still residing on Staten Island and
like it very much. I am still with the same
concern. I began going to business with
it four years ago the 13th of February.
No doubt you will hear from my brother,
Jordan, in Syracuse. My sincere wishes and
good luck to the Class ot 1929, and may they
succeed in all they set out to do.

"Remember me to any of those who were
in C. H. S. when I was there in 192 1. I
often think of Cristobal High School."

1922.

Mar|orie Ball, uS Maple .Avenue, Tacoma

Park, Md.
Ida Brown (Mrs. A. A.) Doyle, 1964 Thirty-
sixth Street, Sacramento, Calif.
George Cartwright, 62 Birgen Ccjur', Ruther-
ford, N. J.
"Some day you will realize how gratifying
it is to we graduates to receive your yearly
request to tell you where we are and what
we are doing.

MR 138J5 13



"When the Class of '22 was graduated the
thought often came to me as to how the
school could get along without us. That is
not conceit, it only expresses the feeling that
you will all some da\' experience. I am glad
to know that The Caribbean is progressing
yearly and I sincerely hope that all the other
pleasant school features are existing and
making }our school life as happy as they
made mine.

"Since I was graduatetl in 1926 from the
Pennsylvania State College, I have been
working with the New York Telephone
Company. I am in the Engineering Depart-
ment, located in Brooklyn, N. Y. I was
married in 1927 to a girl from Balboa High
School. I have a hard time trying to con-
vince her that C. H. S. beats them all. I
am always glad to see my friends from the
Zone. When any ot you come up here as
)ou will some day, please telephone me on
Main Official Extension 757, and give me all
the high school news. My home is in
Rutherford, N. J.

"Please give my regards to all in C. H. S."

Paul Doyle, 24 State Street, care of Venezuela
Gulf Oil Co., New York City.

Mary Glenn Fields, Balboa Heights, C. Z.

LeRoy Magnuson, Balboa, C. Z.

Jordan Zimmerman, 303 University Place, Syra-
cuse, N. Y.

"I received )'our card this morning and
dutifulh' answer as soon as I can. I always
like to get my news in early.

"Well, here goes! I was graduated last
year, January, and after looking over the
field of forestry, I decided I'd stay in the
book business. I am the assistant manager
of the University Book Store at Syracuse now
and am making enough money to be married,
and will do just that in a month.

"I haven't seen an annual for years, but I
can remember the work we put in on ours.
I'm going to get one this year as you'll notice
by the enclosed slip of paper. To The
Caribbean of 1929 I extend best wishes for
success, and await the copy with my name
on it quite anxiously.

"Best wishes from a 1922 to a 1929 class."



98



THE CARIBBEAN.



Mit.DRED Stafford, i loi Markham Street, Vicks-
burg, Miss.

Emma Towxsexd (Mrs. Robert) Noe, Box i,
Cristobal, C. Z.

Wesley Townsend, 1195 Ruby Street, Hough-
ton, Mich.

1923.

Gerald Bliss, Cristobal, C. Z.

Ernest Euphrat, 3935 Burwood Avenue, South
Norwood, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Louise Henter, Nurses' Home, Sydenham Hos-
pital, Baltimore, Md.

Edward May, Cristobal, C. Z.

Henry Moore, Box 21a, Marshfield, Wis.

Emogene Nash (Mrs. E. S.) Van Bemschoten,
Balboa, C. Z.

Mattison Pullig (Mrs. J. D.) McCauley,
Cristobal, C. Z.

1924.

Dorothy Abendroth (Mrs. A.) Flood, Cristobal,

C. Z.
Florence Albert, 107 Beument Avenue, West

Brighton, Staten Island, N. Y.
Jose Arosemena, Colon, R. P.
Edith Colbourn Smith, 717 Colonial Avenue,

Norfolk, Va.
Charlotte Housel (Mrs. R. W.) MacSparran,

Cristobal, C. Z.
Morris Marchosky, Colon, R. P.
Inza Markham, 409 Lake .Avenue, Rochester,
N. Y.
"My very best wishes to the class of '29
and all the success in the world for The
Caribbean."
Irene McCourt (Mrs. Cjeorge G.) Ethel, 17540
89th Avenue, Jamaica, N. Y.
"I enjoy looking through the year book
and seeing the names of the graduates that
were children when I left the Isthmus.
I can hardly realize that it is five years since
our class of '24 was graduated. My son,
George, Jr., is now a }ear old and getting
along fine.

"I will close for this time wishing the
Class of '29 the best of luck and am looking
forward to a very successful annual."



George Oakes, Fort Banks, Mass.
Chester Pike, 2148 Acton Street, Berkeley, Calif.
Andrew Smith (address unknown).
Ethel Sonneman, 98 Macon Street, Brooklvn,
N. Y.

1925.

Helen Abendroth, Cristobal, C. Z.
Olga Arcia (Mrs. A. de) Leignadier, Colon, R. P.
William Cousins, 2623 Oakford Street, Phila-
delphia, Pa.

Dorothy Deibert, Fort Sill, Okla.

Ruth Duey (Mrs. Spencer) Lincoln, Cristobal,

C. Z.
Katherine Fischer, 4309 Furley Avenue, Gar-

denville, Md.

Anniel Heim (Mrs. J. H.) Brenchick, Cristobal,

C. Z.
Ruth Hopkins, Box 256, Ancon, C. Z.
Hubert Lee, 221 i Speadway, Austin, Texas.
Harriet Steenburg (address unknown).

1926.

Richard Beverly, Broad Run, Va.

Hildegarde Blythe, Landham-Bounce X-Ray

Clinic, .Atlanta, Ga.
William Clinchard, 229 N. 17th Street, Lin-
coln, Neb.
"I hope I'm not too late to wish to the
Class of '29 nvy- sincere congratulations on
their graduation and I'm also wishing
success to the greatest year book ever pro-
duced, The Caribbean of '29."
William Coffey', Cristobal, C. Z.
Edna Duvall, 4802 Greenlee Avenue, St.

Bernard, Ohio.
Morris Eggleston, Columbia University, New

York City.
Ray Fischer, 4309 Furley Avenue, Gardenville,

Md.
Irene Hopkins (Mrs. L. W.) McIlvaine, Cris-
tobal, C. Z.
"I was a student nurse at the Staten Island
Hospital until I became Mrs. L. W. Mc-
Ilvaine.

"I am anxious to see the 1929 Annual.
Make it the best ever."



THE CARIBBEAN.



99



Helena M. Deckman, Box 28, Mt. Clemens,
Mich.
"There's snow on the ground and the
north wind's wintery blast can be heard
outside. Suppose you all are enjoying real
nice, warm sunshine. This is indeed quite a
difference, from one extreme to the other,
but I've enjoyed it all immensely.

".'\her two and a half years absence from
school I am taking up a post-graduate
course at the Mt. Clemens High School. I
am taking a business course and like my work,
it I may call it that, very much. I also like
the High School.

"It surely seems good to be back at school
again, and it doesn't seem as though I'm a
day older and that I belong to the Alumni of
dear Cristobal High, who my sincerest wishes
goto. Best ofluck to The Caribbean and the
staff, and all ot my fellow classmates who will
nex; year be one ot the Alumni and were but
freshmen my first and last year in C. H. S."
Johanna Kleefkins (Mrs. R. O.) Antick.,
Box 1057, Cristobal, C. Z.
"My, how time does fly! You 'dignified
Seniors' were 'green Freshies' in '26, but
nevertheless I think you merit the honor of
'Seniors'.

"My best wishes to all of you and may The
Caribbean be the best ever.

"What's the matter. Class of '26, why not
correspond with some of your old class-
mates"?
Delilah May (Mrs. G. W.) Parker, Gatun, C. Z.
Lola Munoz, Panama City, R. P.
Mildred Neelv, Cristobal, C. Z.
Carlos Pui.gar, Gatun, C. Z.
Clarice Steenburg, Langley Field, Va.
Gay R. Turner, Neal Hall, Columbus L'niversity,

Columbus, Ohio.
Elizabeth Warren, Florida State College for

Women, Tallahassee, Fla.
Christian Wirtz, Cristobal, C. Z.

1927.
Joseph Corrigan, Cristobal, C. Z.
Teresa Gallagher, 863-57th St., Brooklyn, N. Y.
James Grider, 416 Transylvania Park, Lexing-
ton, Ky.



Emily Bledsoe, 416 Transylvania Park, Lexing-
ton, Ky.
Lawrence C. Callaway, Jr., Wentworth Mili-
tary Academy, Lexington, Mo.
"I hope you are successful on the Annual.
Beat '27, if you can. That's pretty hard to
do.

"Best wishes for success to the Class of
'29. May it have the best luck ever."
Louise Heim, Cristobal, C. Z.
Clara A. May, Gatun, C. Z.
Helen Montgomery, 257 Park Avenue, Hunting-
ton, Long Island, N. Y.

John G. Nelson, Gonzaga LTniversitY, Spokane,

Wash.
Dorothy Svensson, i <; Pleasant Street, West
Roxbury, Mass.
"I'm just in the midst of term 'exams' at
Simmons College and they're not easy, one
bit. All I have time for, then, is to say
'hello' to everyone. I wish you people
success in your annual and all your under-
takings."
SuRSE J. Taylor, Jr., 1814 West Av^enue, Austin,
Texas.
"I extend my heartiest regards to the Class
of '29 and may their Caribbean be the best
yet."
James Van Scotter (address unknown).

Helen Vineyard, Box 374, Women's College,

Newark, Del.
Dorothy Wertz, Box 259, Cristobal, C. Z.
"Where am I? The United Fruit Co.,
Cristobal Division, Cristobal, C. Z.

"What am I doing? Stenographic work
and I just love il.

"Best wishes tor the Class of '29 and their
Class Play.

"Wherever you are, Class ot '27, regards to
all."
Charles Will, Cristobal, C. Z.

Euphemia M. Woolnough, 601 West i6oth
Street, Apt. 3-A, New York City.
"I do hope that this year's Annual is the
best ever published and I wish all the Seniors
of '29 the best of luck in the future. Wish
I could be there tor the graduation exercises.
But we can't have everything we want."



lOO



THE CARIBBEAN.



1928.

John G. Klunk, Westfield, New Jersey.
Ethel K. Westman, 660 Clackamas Avenue,
Portland, Oreg.
"I'm still taking high school work I'm a
post-graduate .it Washington High in Port-
land, Oreg. I have been viewed with a
great deal of curiosity because I happened
to be from such a far-off place as Panama.
"Next year I plan to enter a business college
in Portland.

"I am still reading with interest the
'Cristobal High School Notes' published in
the 'Star and Herald.' (You see, we can't
be without that newspaper.)

"I send the staff of '29 my best wishes for a
wonderful Caribbean, and I will anxiously
be awaiting my copy."
Gladys E. Beers (Mrs. H. G.) Alrick, 207-3d
Street, N. Moorhead, Minn.
"Best wishes to the Class ot 1929 and I
hope you all the best yet."
Emma E. Banks, (Mrs. A.) Blaisdell, Cristobal,
C. Z.



Robert H. Axtell, Bates College, Lewiston, Me.
"Best wishes to the Class of 1929. May
they put out the best Caribbean ever."

Kathrvn E. Lambert, ,^451 S. Clarkson Street,
Denver, Colo.

"I am glad to say I am progressing rapidly
and soon hope to be out of the Sanitarium.

"I would be glad to hear from any and all
of you.

"I wish you the best of luck on this year's
Caribbean."

Theodore C. Henter, 120 Gates Avenue,

Brooklyn, N. Y.
Evangeline Smith (Mrs. Walter) Payne, Box

1453, Cristobal, C. Z.
Arthur E. Rothenburg, Fort Randolph, C. Z.

Zonella L. Bliss, 22 East Loraine Street,
Oberlin, Ohio.

"I wish the Class of '29 success on The
Caribbean."

B. Edward Lowande, Cristobal, C. Z.

Lucia Salazar, 22s W. 14th Street, New York
Citv.




THE CARIBBEAN.



lOI




LB'23



HEARD AT DWVER S.



Pager s voice: "Telephone! Somebody's call-
ing the sax player."

Dwyer: "What are they calling him, now?"



Roy (teaching Anita to dri^e the car): "The
irake is something you put on in a hurry."
.hnta: "Oh, I see, a sort of kimono."



S/eii': "I really can't figure out what's wrong
with my radio set. Maybe I need a new vacuum
tube."

A/r. Sazvyers: "Use you head, Fred, use your
head."



Potfy: "What are you looking for?"
S/ew: "A nickel."
Porfy: "When did you lose it?"
Steii): "Who said anything about losing any-
thing? I'm just looking for one, that's all."



Ralph: "What's the difference between Scott
Parsons and Chubby Hackett?"

Tom: "I don't know. What?"

Ralph: "Wh>-, there's no difference, they
both're very tall except Chub."



\Ve hear that Robert Hanna is trying to join
the Navy.



Miss Guslafson (at station to conductor) : "Is
this train ready for occupancy?"

Conductor: "No, Miss. This train goes to
Gatun, Balboa, and Panama."



Englishman (visiting Zone, to Scott): "I say,
ol' chappie, have you got a Fortunate Blow?"

Scott (perplexed): "What's that?"

Englishman: "I say, have you a Fortunate
Blow? A cigarette?"

Scott: "Oh, I see, you mean a Lucky Strike!"



Rodman took his first cheque to the Chase
Bank. The cashier asked him to endorse it, so
he took up a pen and wrote on the back, "I
heartily endorse this cheque."



MissEmmons (discussing book reports, to Dan) :
"Have you read Freckles.

Dan C: "No, mine are of brownish hue."



Margaret D.: "I fell down on my general aver-



age.



George IV.: "Did it hurt much?"



Passerby: "Are you a little Bretch?"
Mary: "Say, Fresh, don't call me names!'



We could tell you a lot more jokes, but it's of
no use, you'd only "laff" at them.



A//.r.f Hesse (to English class): "Tomorrow we
shall take the life of Tennyson. Every one come
prepared."



James: "I take aspirin to clear my heati."
Jack: "Oh, I see. Sort of vaciuun cleaner."



Scot: "Your dog's legs are too short."
Bill: "Short nothing, ^hey all four reach the
floor."



I02



THE CARIBBEAN.



We, of the class of English XI, have a deep
sympathy for poets. They are the only species
with a language you can read but can't speak.
We offer this as sufficient proof. One of our
favorite poets writes, "The eyes are the windows of
the soul." That sounds well in print, but can you
imagine saying to a girl, "Darling, nothing could
give me so much pleasure as gazing into your
windows all niijht."



Mary: "Very few men would marry you.'
Maude: "Very few would be enough."



Scott (to Burton): "Why, you little insect,
you know what I'd like to do to you?"

Burton: "Yeh, I know. But ya can't cause
I've hidden the Flit."



Miss Myers: "No, Edward, you must not say,
'I ain't agoin.' You should say, T am not going,
vou are not going, he is not going, we are not
going, you are not going, they are not going'.

Edward (very surprised): "Gee, ain't nobody
goin"?



Fred: "Where do you swim?"

Alice: "In the Spring."

Fred: "I didn't say WHEN, I said WHERE."



Mr. Sawyers (discussing radio, pro and con, with
Fred): "Have you had static on your new radio?"

FredS. (innocently) : "Well, I've had Los Ange-
les and Cuba, and I'm sure I could get Static if I
wanted to."



Jack Pettit: "I say, Roger, I heard that the
sultan of Turkey sleeps in a bed eight feet wide
and twelve feet long."

Roger Deaki?i: "G'wan, that's a lotta bunk."



Kenneth M. (in restaurant): "Hey, there!"
Waiter: "Yessir, how will you have it?"



Royal (at desk of theater ticket agency):
"Have you tickets for Ben Hur?"

Agent: "Sorry, sir, but Mr. Hur made no
reservations."



"Fitty" (to Grace, concerning French): "Say,
Grace, do you parley-vous?"

Graft' (preoccupied): "I don't know. If it's nice
I do."



Mr. Sawyers (during registration): "Name,
please."
Freshman: "Whose?"



Miss Emmons (in English class, to Red Wicky) :
"Do you like Kipling?"

Wicky: "Why I I I I don't know. How
do you kipple?"



Miss Myers: "So you don't know what a
sonnet is, or an ode, or a ballad?"
Bill Bailey: "No'm."
Miss Myers: "Well, then, do you know what



Guide (at ruins of Porto Bello): "Look at that
half ruined castle. It might be at least 800 years
old. Believe me, lady, they don't build such
ancient castles nowadavs.



a pun is



Bill Bailey : "Oh, yes! I like puns. Puns and
coffee!"



Anita: "Sav, Roy, I think a wheel is coming
off."

Roy: "O. K. with me, Anita; I'm kinda tired
of that out-of-gas gag myself."



Father: "My son, I'm afraid I'll never see you
in Heaven."

Son: "Why? Whatcha been doing now. Pop?"



Scott: "I didn't know you smoked a pipe."
BillB.: "I'm not, I'm holding it for a plumber."



Scott desperately seized her and kissed her.
"You're terrible," Mary shouted.
"Well, that's the best I can do," was Scott's
reply.



Royal (selling Caribbeans): "I'm very sorry
to hear that your mistress is out. Don't forget
to tell her that I called, will you?"

Maid: "No, sir, I'll tell her at once."



Mr. Sawyers (to Mr. Pence): "How do you like
that cigar I gave you, old man? For 200 bands off
that brand they give you a gramaphone."

Mr. Pence: "You don't say! If I smokei.1 200
of those cigars, I wouldn't want a gramophone.
I'd want a harp.



THE CARIBBEAN. 103



Mr. West (in history class): "What are you Mundy: "Did you hear about his teeth falling

doing back there, learning anything?" out while he was playing tennis?"

Walter: "Oh, no, just listening to you." Dick: "No, did he lose the set?"



Ban: "Is that Freshman dumb?" Harold, straying around Shimmie Beach on a
BillB.: "Is he? He thinks Culebra Cut is a new picnic given by the DeMolays, came across a sign
pipe tobacco." which read "Swimming 10 cents if you have a suit.
Twenty-five cents if you haven't."



Freshman: "How big is a battleship?" "Do you think the extra 15 cents," he asked his
Sophomore: "What kind of a battleship?" followers, "is to pay for the fine?"
Freshman: "A big one."



Sophomore: "How big?" D;V,^ (at a concert) : "Watch that violin player."
Mundy: "My, yes. Do you know what he's

Jack Pettit (entering the building excitedly): doing?"

"Say, Mr. Sawyers, is Henry Ford here?" Dick: "Yeah, he's playing one of Handel's

Mr. Sawyers: "Why no. Jack." pieces."

Jack: 'Sfunny. His car's outside." Mundy: "Gwan, he's giving his bow a ride."
Dick: "Gwan yourself, he's only stringing his



Mr. Pence (very excitedly, telephoning) : "Hello, bow along."

is this the fire department?"

Fire Department: "Yes, what do you want?" Chubby: "Will you have a peanut?"

Mr. Pence: "Please tell me where the nearest Ray: "Thanks, I shell."

fire alarm box is. My laboratory is on fire and I

must know immediately." Wicky: "Say, Fitty, why are you so fat?"

Fitty: "Just to show the skinny people how far

Mr. Sawyers (in General Science): "We will my skin will stretch without busting."

now name some of the lower species of animals,

starting with Randolph Wikingstad." Mr. /"t-wrt' (in Physics laboratory): "John, put

your finger in that boiling mercury and see if it's

Mary Maker (to James Campbell at class party) : too hot to touch."

"Can you dance, Jimmy?"

James Cambpell: "No, but I can hold you while .^'^/r/ (meaningly, to Dick): "I just adore dark

you dance." men."

Dick: "Boy, you'd have a big time in Africa."



Tom Conley (in restaurant): "Hey, guy, gimme

a ham sandwich, and make it snappy." Mr. West (in History class): "And then we

Waiter (hollering to cook) : "Ham sandwich and have the early Romans coming over to

step on it." say, Walter, wake that fellow up next to you.

Walter: "Aw, wake him up yourself. You put

AluuDius: "You see, we've gone into truck him to sleep."

farming."



Fresh: "You can't tool me. You don't raise Burton (after a hot argument).- "Alright, I'

trucks; they come from a factory. toss you up for it."

Scott: "G'wan, you couldn't even lift me."

"No matter where I hide," sighed the leopard,



"I'm always spotted." "My dear, listen to this," exclaimed the elderly
English lady to her husband on their first visit to

Paul Hayden: "Igiv^eup! What is the best way the Washington. She held the hotel menu almost

to kill ants?" at arm's length and spoke in a tone of horror:

James ^uinn: "Hit your uncle's wife on the "Baked Indian pudding. Can it be possible in a

head with a hammer." civilized country?"



I04



THE CARIBBEAN.



TO MR. PENCE.

He is my teacher, I shall not want,

He maketh me to explain hard propositions

And exposeth my ignorance to the class;

He increaseth my sorrows;

He causeth me to draw difficult triangles, for
my class's sake.

Yea, though I study till mitiiiight I shall gain
no knowledge

For my propositions sorely bothereth me.

He prepareth a test for me in the presence ot
mine classmates.

He giveth me a low mark.

Surely, distress and sadness shall follow me all
the days of my life,

And I shall remain in the geometry class forever.
Donatccj by a student.



Miss Moore (in Spanish class): "William New-
man, what in the world are you pounding for?"

William: "I'm just trying to sharpen my Ever-
sharp pencil."



Miss Moore (in assembly, seeing Scott chewing
gum anci with his feet out in the aisle): "Scott,
take that gum out of your mouth and put your
feet in."



Bananas grow wild in man}' parts ot the world
it is announcctl. Who can blame them?"



//('. "I was b(jrn in Ancon Hospital."
She: "Wh\? ^^'hat was wrong with you?"



Mr. Pence (in Geometry class explaining prob-
lem): "And now if you watch the board closely
I'll go through it again."



Va)i Seller: "Hey, Tom, how do you account
for your remarkable ability for playing football?"

Tom Pescod: "Well, you see, it's this way.
Ever since I was a baby it was just bawl, bawl,
bawl."



Roval: "I can't swim."

Zola: "Why?"

Roxal: "Because I'm not in the water!'



Frosli: "Doesn't horseback riding give you a
headache?"

Senior: "No, on the contrary."



Miss Moore: "What's the awful odor in this .'\ Freshman and his hair are soon parted.



First she: "Mr. Sawvers bawled me out this



room r
Louise: "Someone's lunch."
Miss Moore: "No, it's the rotten Caesar marks." morning about my lipstick ?"

Second she: "Gonna stop using it?"



First she: "No, gonna use stuff that doesn't
come off."



Mr. JVest (to the barber): "Part m>' hair in
the middle please."

Barber: "Sorry, Sir, I can't, there is an odd

number!" Mr. Sawyeis: "Did you break that window with

that baseball?"
E. Albin: "Yes, but that's alright."
Mr. Sawyers: "Yes? Well look at it."
E. Albin: "Gosh, it's more serious than I
"I may be down, but I'm not out," said Pettit, thought. It's broken on both sides."
as he slid safely home from third.

_ Any He (at the ball game) : "Yea! Whoopie!

Miss Moore (in Spanish class talking of maps gock 'em! Bust 'em! Grind 'em! Fight, Fight,

of Spain to be handed in): "Edward, what's the pjGHT! Kill' em! Gr-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r-r!

I



Samuel (at explosion of a shell) : "Lawdy, Hell
done laid a egg!"



matter with your map?"
Edward (feeling his face) : "I don't know.'



Mrs. Baker Cm orchestra practice): "William, I
do not doubt but that your violin is slightly out
of tune."

William (in disgust): "Yeali. I guess it's
because somebody is always fiddling with it."



Any She (at the ball game): "Ye, team
Whee-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e! Fight, team! Oh,
isn't the visiting third baseman just too cute tor
words?"



In early youth we are taught to "Love one
another." Later we love one and another.



THE CARIBBEAN.



105



DICKSTER S WEBTIONARY.



SOME MORE BOLONEY.



I. A nice girl is one who walks in her sleep

when she dreams of auto rides.
2. A perfect husband is one who even sand-
papers the fire wood to keep his wife from

getting splinters in her fingers.
3. Modern dancing and golf are alike in one

respect. Both interfere with what might

be a good walk.
4. The trouble with a lot ot hotel beds is that

the sides are too near the middle.
5. Women are like automobiles some are

chummy roadsters and others are merely

runabouts.
6. Sports are like shoes; the cheapest ones

always squeak the loudest.
7. The height of consideration is the tough

guy who takes off his brass knuckles before

socking his wife on the jaw.
8. The modern maid says, "Take me or leave

me!" And the modern man does both.



One of the high school girls was pardoned for
stealing a bottle of milk, because it was the first
thing she took in her life.



Speaking of Old Golds, we saw Roger smoking
away and coughing like a machine gun. He
explained he was on his second carload.



Laugh and the world laughs with you,

Laugh and you laugh alone.
The first, when the joke's your teacher's,

The last, when the joke's your own.



Fitly (in geometry class): "Would you mind
explaining that over again, Mr. Pence? I don't
know if I know all I know about it."



Mundy (at jewelers): "You told me this watch
would keep time and it stopped yesterday at eight
o'clock.

Casullo: "And what time does it say now.''"

Mundy: "Why, eight o'clock, of course. It
hasn't moved since."

Mr. Casullo: "Then it's keeping time, isn't itr"



Policeman: "Does your dog have licenses?"
Bill Bailey : "Yes, sir. He's just covered with
them."



A hungry dog once wandered

Into a butcher's store;
The butcher threw some sausage

To the dog upon the floor.
The butcher said, "Now eat it,"

The dog said, "I decline.
For in that link of sausage is

That Old Gal of Mine."



Anila: "I'm through with Roy."
Carlos: "How come, 'Nita?"
Anita: "I just heard him telling Lee that he
tried out Ethyl in his Dodge last night."



Roy is learning magic by mail, and after the
third lesson he turned his Dodge into a lamp-post.



A girl looks into a boy's eyes for love, but a
boy looks around to see if the coast is clear.



Marion (at beginning of baseball season) : "Dj
you have sweat shirts?"

J. V. Beverhoudt: "No, but you might try the
sweatshops



Father: "Why were you kept in after school?"
Son: I didn't know where the Azores were."
Father: "In the future just remember where
you put things."



Jack: "Lotsa school girls don't wanta get
married."

Peggy: "Howja know?"
Jack: "Asked 'em."



Jack: "I play all of the pieces that I know on
the piano by ear."

Morris: "Yes, of course. But isn't it rather
awkward?"



Royal (speaking of book reports) : "Have you
read Dumas?"

Marion: "No, but I didn't know that they
were showing."



Tom Pcscod: "Say, Fit, how do you like this
new lighter."

Fit: "Pretty good. How many cigarettes do
you get on a gallon?"



MR 13835 14



io6



THE CARIBBEAN.



A MATHEMATICAL NIGHTMARE.

The secants flutter all about,

The scarlet tangents sing;
The blooming polygons are pink,

And spheres are on the wing.

Fierce propositions roam the woods,

And cosines fill the air
With music sweet; bright hexagons

Are growing everywhere.

The octagon sits on her nest

To keep the quadrant safe.
And warm, until it hatches out

A quadrilateral waif.

When Fall is here, and love is warm;

Matriculations mate;
The quadrant to the sextant sings.

And rhombuses rotate.



IVilly: "I just bought a nickel eraser."
Mike: "But I should think that a rubber one
would be much better."



Elsie: "I'm a little hoarse."

Scott: "I knew vou wasn't a ladv."



Mr. Pence: "What's the difference between
the North and South Pole?"
Jack: "All the difference in the world."



She: "Kiss me, Billy."

Father (entering): "Yes, billet-doux.'

She: "What faux pas?"



Lee: "Say, Roy, you just ran over a cat.'
Roy: "'Sail right. No felines hurt."



Miss Myers: "Define a goitre."
Donna: "It's an Adam's apple ambitious to
become a watermelon."



A freshman asked us, "Why should we learn to
read? They have talking moving pictures now."



He: "Our coach just got some new water-
proof pants for the team."
She: "Oh, the big babies."



Porfy: "We gave the umpire fifty bucks to let
us win that game."
Jean: "And still you lost?"
Porfy: "Yes the umpire was crooked."



Employee: "Pardon me, my lad, but you
haven't paid for your purchase. These articles
aren't free."

IVillie Dicrs: "Isn't this a gift shoppe?"



Lee: "How much gas have we got, Roy?"
Roy: "Gosh, Lee, it points to one-half, but

whether the darn thing means half full or half

empty, I don't know."



She was a Freshman, and her lips
Were tempting, fresh and ripe;

We reached a nice secluded spot.
To kiss her seemed alright.

So I smacked her on the lips

Those lips without a flaw.
She came right back and smacked me too

But mine was on the jaw.



She (after the party): "Will )ou call me a
itney?"
He: "Nix, I never call people names."



Jack: "Not so bright, is he?"
Stew: "Naw, he thinks a short circuit is a
hook-up used to tune in the wave stations."



I bought a goat to give me milk,
It really was quite silly

I thought it's name was Nanny,
But it turned out to be Billy.



Gypsy: "I tella your fortune, mistah?"
Hanna: "How much?"
Gypsy: "Twenty-five cents."
Hanna: "Correct. Howja guess it?"



He looked her square between the eyes.

As her swan-like neck he stroked.
He knew that it was useless

But still he begged and coaxed.
But she did not move from where she sat.

It was useless of him to beg.
For she had done her duty once

And could not lay another egg.



THE CARIBBEAN.



107



HALL DUTY.



A teacher was accused of sleeping on her watch.

"How could I sleep on my watch when it was

at the pawnbroker's?" she triumphantly replied.



quietly rubbed out the "1", and the notice read
"The Professor is unable to meet his asses
to-morrow."



Paul: "The poor fish looks kinda musical.'
Roger: "Perhaps a piano tuna."



The way these women dress, by heck!

Is certainly quite shocking.
They shove their compacts down their neck

And find them in their stocking.



Overheard: "You gave me the wrong paper,
Barry. I will never ask you for another, Barry.
Your sister, the elder Barry, would not have been
such a goose, Barry. But you need not look so
black, Barry, for I don't care a straw, Barry, and
shan't re-ask you again till Xmas, Barry."



Aloha: "What are you doing?"

George: "Keep quiet. I'm adding up figures in
my head and every time I think of you, I add a
zero.



Jack P.: "What does Wicky have to stay in
after school for?"

Fitly: "Miss Myers wants him to write some
poetry."

Jack: "What does she think he is, a poet?"



The eternal triangle is usually caused by some-
body not being on the square.



Roger: "Have you got an extra cigarette for
me?"

Victor: "Sure I got cigarettes to burn."



Paul (politely, on crowded train): "Is this seat
engaged. Miss?"

Young Miss (coyly): "No, but I am."



Mundy: "Why wasn't "Uncle Tom's Cabin"
written by a man's hand?"

Ralph: "I don't know, why?"

Mundy: "Because it was written by Harriet
Beecher's toe."



Mr. Sawyers (sternly): "Sit down!"
Scott (impudently): "I won't do it!"
Mr. Sawyers: "Well stand up then, I will be
obeyed."



Porjy: "Wick, do you understand French?"
Wick: "Yes, if it's spoken in English."



Rodman: "Did you ever see an elephant's
skin?"
Eugene: "Yes, I have."
Rodman: "Where?"
Eugene: "On an elephant!"



Steve: "Where did you put my bass horn I
just saw you with?"

Russell: "I lost it, Steve."

Steve: "Then I'll break every bone in your body
with it if vou don't find it."



Conductor (on train): "Your fare."
Sweet Young Thing: "Oh, yes, I know it!'



Mr. Greisenger: "There will be a tour-days'
band rehearsal every evening this week except
Sunday afternoon."



Mr. Pence (in class): "If you had five dollars
and I gave you five dollars more, what would you
have?"

Royal: "A darn good time."



Jack: "Don't strike me. Is not one man as
good as another?."

Roger: "Of course he is, and a great deal
better."



Mr Pence once chalked on his notice board in
school, "The Professor is unable to meet his
classes to-morrow." A smart student removed the
"c", leaving ''lasses". When the professor re-
turned, he noticed the new rendering. Equal to
the occasion, the Professor (alias .'\mos Pence)



Butcher: "Come, Bill, be lively now; break the
bones in Mr. Williamson's chops and put Mr.
Smith's ribs in the basket for him."

Bill Bailey (butcher's helper at "commy"):
"All right, sir, just as soon as I have sawed off
Mrs. Jones' leg."



;o8



THE CARIBBEAN.



Marion L.: "I wonder how old Miss Moore is."
Mildred B.: "I don't know, but some say she
used to teach Caesar."



Mundy: "Since you're going to the States, are
ytu going to buy a trunk?"
Diik: "What for?"
Mititdx: "To put your clothes in."
Piik: ".And go naked? Not a bit of it."



Tom Conley: "Let me and you and Ralph walk
across the Isthmus to-day."

Stew: "Aw, we couldn't do it in a day. It's
more than 48 miles."

Tom Cordey: "That's avvright. That makes it
only 16 miles apiece."



WHy woRRy oyER exams.
You have two alternatives your teacher is
either easy or hard. If he is eas>', you have noth-
ing to worry about; if he is hard, you have two
alternatives either you study hard or you bluff.
If you study hard you don't need to worry; it you
bluff you have two alternatives either your bluff
works or it doesn't. If it works, you don't need
to worry; if it doesn't, you have two alterna-
tives either you are conditioned or you flunk.
If you are conditioned, you don't need to worry;
if you flunk, you won't have to worry any longer.
Therefore, why worry?



Tourist (politel)j: ".Am I half way to Gatun
now?"

Donna: "Why, I don't know. Where did you
start from?"



Dick: "Man, I was fishing here all day and
haven't caught a thing. I guess it's because my
shrimp isn't half trying."



Miss Meyers: "Who was the first man, Tom?"

Tom Coley: "Washington, he was first in war,
first in ."

Miss Meyers: "No, No, Tom. Adam was the
first man."

Tom Coley: "Oh, if you're talking of foreigners,
I s'pose he was."



Mike: "I can't believe that story that Mr.
Sawyers told about a man eating a wiener three
feet long and six inches in diameter."

Dike: "It sound like a lotta boloney to ine."



EXAMS.
Randolph Orbaugli, '.?p.

(Before.)
"Oh Lord of Hosts, be with us yet
lest we forget lest we forget."

Ufler.)
"The Lord of Hosts was with us not
For we forgot for we forgot."




What's riglit (ur wrong) with this picture?



THE CARIBBEAN.



AUTOGRAPH PAGE.



109








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I lO



THE CARIBBEAN.



AUTOGRAPH PAGE.
(Jo







THE CARIBBEAN.



Ill




entrance to the Canal is 3J.52 statute miles north
of and 27.02 miles west of the Pacific entrance.

The general plan of the Canal may be grasped
quickly by reference to the map of the Canal
Zone (see page 116) and the profile of the Canal
on the following page.

Lakes and locks. By building Gatun Dam across
the valley ol the Chagres, Gatun Lake was formed,
the land rose, and left the Isthmus as a barrier It floods a great part of the valley and backs up
between the oceans. After centuries of erosion, against the Continental Divide. Its surface is 85
with the formation of valle>'s on either side of the feet above the level of the sea at normal elevation,
central ridge, the distance between shores at the which made it possible to reduce by 85 feet the
place selected for the Canal was 34 miles. The depth ot the cutting necessary to make the channel



CONSTRUCTIOX.

Situation. The Panama Canal connects the
Atlantic anci Pacific oceans through the narrow
Isthmus of Panama, where also the long Conti-
nental Divide, extending from Alaska to Magellan,
dips to one of its lowest points. In ancient geologic
periods there was a natural channel here, but later



lowest point on
the Continen-
tal Divide was
about 276 feet
above sea level.
The route of
the Canal, how-
ever, passed
half a mile to
the east of this
point, the cen-
ter line cross-
ing the Divide
at 312 feet
above sea level.
The lowest
point in the
saddle between
Gold and Con-




The locks at Gatun looking south toward Gatun Lake in the background, showing 3
sets of chambers lifting vessels from sea level to the surface of the lake 85 feet above.



between Gatun
anti Pedro Mi-
guel, a distance
of 3if miles.

The passage
between the
Atlantic Ocean
andGatunLake
is made by the 3
steps at Gatun
Locks. On the
Pacific side the
passage be-
tween the sum-
m i t level
(Gatun Lake
level) and the
Pacific is made
by means of



tractors Hills was 305 feet above sea level. The Pedro Miguel Lock, Miraflores Lake, and Mira-
height of Gold Hill is 662 feet, that of Contractors flores Locks. A set of 3 locks, to make the whole



Hill 410 feet.

Route of Canal. The line of the Canal goes up
the valley of the Chagres River on the Atlantic
slope, passes through the ridge of the Continental
Divide in the Gaillard Cut, and descends to the
Pacific down the valley of the Rio Grande.

Following this route the Canal is 50.72 statute
miles in length, the distance from shore line to shore
line being 40.27 miles. The air-line distance from
end to end of the Canal is 43.05 miles. The Atlantic



step at one time, would have been built on the
Pacific side if it had been practicable to secure
a site affording a firm rock foundation large
enough to accommodate them.

Gatun Locks, including the approach wpIIs, are
I 1/5 miles long; Pedro Miguel Lock, 5/6 of a mile;
Miraflores Locks, slightly over i mile. Each of the
twin chambers in every flight of locks has a usable
length of 1,000 feet, and width of no feet and is
about 70 feet deep. The Miraflores Locks have
extra depth on account of the tidal variations in



112



THE CARIBBEAN.



the Pacific. The flights are duplicate or "double-
barreled" and ships may be passed in opposite
directions simultaneously.

Sections. The sections between the Atlantic
Ocean and Gatun Locks and the Pacific and Mira-
flores Locks are at sea level. The Atlantic sea-
level section is about 6 2/3 miles long. The length
of channel within Gatun Lake from Gatun Locks
to the north or Atlantic end of Gaillard (Culebra)
Cut is 23! miles. The Cut is 8 miles long, extend-
ing from Gamboa to Pedro Miguel. The channel
through Miraflores Lake is a mile, and the length
ot the Pacific sea-level section is 8 miles.

Gatun Dam. Gatun Dam is a long, low, broad
ridge built across the valley of the Chagres where
it passed through a gap, about 7 miles above the
mouth of the river. It was built in 2 wings, extend-
ing from either side to an intermediate hill which
rose near the center of the swampy stretch across
the valley. The hill, being rock, was taken as the
foundation for the concrete spillway. In building
each wing, parallel ridges or "toes" of rock were
dumped about half a mile apart, and the space
between the ridges was filled with an impervious
mixture of clay and sand. As the height increased
the liumping of rock was carried inwarci, bringing
the toes closer together; and gradually an artificial
ridge was formed. The total amount of fill placed
was approximately 23,000,000 cubic yards.

As completed, the two wings of Gatun Dam and
the spillway have an aggregate length of 8,400
feet. Gatun Dam is nearly half a mile wide at the
base, sloping gently to a width of 100 feet at the
top. The top of the dam is 105 feet above sea level
or 20 feet above the normal surface of the lake.
The surface of the dam has been planted with
grass and shrubbery and the two wings are the
site of an i8-hole golf course.

Spillway. To control the rise of the lake, Gatun
Dam is provided with a spillway, through which
excess water in the lake is wasted, flowing into
the Atlantic through the old channel of the
Chagres. The spillway dam, a structure of con-
crete, on which the 14 regulating gates are
mounted, was built in the form of an arc of a circle
and is 808 feet in length. The spillway discharge
channel is 285 feet wiiie.

Hydroelectric station. A hydroelectric station
of 13,140 kilowatt capacity, with provision for
future extension to 22,140 kilowatt capacity, has
been erected at Gatun on the east bank of the






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THE CARIBBEAN.



113




MR 1JS35-



114



THE CARIBBEAN.



spillway discharge channel and uses water from
Gatun Lake for the generation of electricity. A
high-voltage transmission line parallels the Panama
Railroad across the Isthmus and distributes
electric power to the various towns and locations
for operation of locks, shops, water pumping sta-
tions, coaling stations, refrigerating plants and tor
various other industrial and eeneral uses on the




Electric Locomotives Towing \'essel in Lock Chamber.

Canal Zone. A Diesel-electric generating station,
located at Miraflores, is held in reserve.

Gatun Lake: Gatun Lake has an area of 163.38
square miles with shore line of 1,100 miles, when
its surface is at its normal elevation ot 85 feet
above sea level. It is the largest artifically formed
lake in the world. The area of the watershed tribu-
tarv to the lake is 1,320 square miles. The quan-
tity of water in the lake at normal level is 183,136
million cubic feet, or 4,204,000 acre-feet.

Miraflores Lake. Extends between Pedro
Miguel Lock and Miraflores Locks, which are about
a mile apart. Pedro Miguel Lock is at the Pacific
end of the Cut (which is an artificial arm of Gatun
Lake), and Miraflores Locks are at the inner end
of the Pacific sea-level section. The normal sur-
face elevation of Miraflores Lake is 54 feet above
sea level, or 31 feet below the level ot Gatun Lake
and the Cut; its area is 1.60 square miles, its
watershed 38.5 square miles, its capacity 878.5
million cubic feet. Gatun Lake has 102 times the
area of Miraflores Lake and contains 208 times
as much water.

Miraflores Lake has a spillway with 8 gates,
similar to the 14 gates on the spillway ot Gatun
Lake.

Width and depth of channel. The width of the
Canal channel is 500 feet in the sea-level sections,
from 500 to 1,000 feet in Gatun Lake, and not less
than 300 feet in the Cut. It is 42 feet deep in the



.Atlantic sea-level section, from 85 to 45 feet deep
in the lake section, including the Cut, and 45 feet
deep at mean tide in the Pacific sea-level section.

Tidal variations. The normal variation between
high and low tide on the Atlantic side is about i
foot; on the Pacific side it is about 125 feet, with
occasional ranges of 21 feet. The mean level of
the Pacific at the Isthmus has been tound to be
about 8 inches higher than the mean level ot the
."Atlantic. In the month of February the mean
levels are the same; but throughout the rest of
the year, on account of current, tidal, and wind
influences the mean level of the Pacific ranges
abo\e that of the .Atlantic; it is as much as i
foot higher in October.

Direction. Where the Canal is, the axis ot the
Isthmus runs from southwest to northeast. The
Canal was built from northwest to southeast,
almost at right angles to the strip ot land, and
the Pacific end of it is about 27 miles east of the
.Atlantic end.

.-/ids to navigation. Both entrances to the Canal
are protected by breakwaters. A thorough system
of lights and buoys makes possible the use of the
Canal at night as well as by day.

Capacity. The Canal is capable of handling the
largest ships in existence. The capacity ot the
present Canal the year around is estimated at ap-
proximately 48 ships of usual size per day or
about 17,000 a year.



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Two of 14 Spillway Gates Discharfiing, Gatun.
P.AN.AM.^ R.AILRO.AD.

The Panama Railroad extends between Colon
and Panama on the eastern side ot the Canal and
is 47-6 1 miles long. .A branch line extends from
Colon to France Field (.Army air station). Coco
Solo (Naval base), and Fort Randolph, a distance
of 5.1:9 miles. This line is now used tor treight



THE CARIBBEAN.



115



service, without scheduled passenger service. The
railroad as built in 1850-55 followed the course of
the Chagres from Gatun to Gamboa, and was for
the most part on the west side of the route of the
Canal. With the building of the Canal it was
necessary to relocate the railroaii throughout
practically its whole length

The construction of the original railroad was
done by an American company in the years of 1 850
to 1855 under great difficulties; its completion
antedated by 14 years the completion of the first
transcontinental railroad in the United States.
At that time gauges had not been standardized,
and a width of 5 feet was adopted for the Panama
Railroad. This gauge has been maintained since.
The Railroad was an essential factor in the con-
struction of the Canal, and is an important
adjunct to its operation. It is equipped with 90-
pound rails, rock-ballasted track, and automatic
signals. It uses modern .American rolling stock,
incliidina; oil-burnina; locomcjtives.



demand and the ship trade. Thoroughly modern
hotels, restaurants, hospitals, and laundries ac-
commodate the traveling public as well as Govern-
ment employees, including the -Armv and Xavv
forces stationed on the Isthmus.

Dry docks, repair shops, salvage equipment.
The repair facilities include a dry dock 1,000 feet
long by 1 10 feet in width, with a depth over keel
blocks at normal high tide of 43 feet, and a 300-
foot dry dock for smaller vessels. The large dry
dockisoneof the largest in the world; it can receive
any ship afloat. Extensive foundries and shops
are operated in connection with the dry docks and
have performed repair and manufacturing and
construction work on a wide scale. Floating
cranes, tug boats, and a salvage steamer assist in
repair and salvage.

The Government has followed a policy of mak-
ing the Canal route attractive as well as feasible
and of coupling with it many features of assistance
to shipping.



F.ACILITIES FOR SHIPIMNG.



HISTORY.



The completed Canal has been equipped not
only tor its own satisfactory operation but for
assistance and supply to the ships traveling this
way. It is an outpost of repair and supply in a
section of the world otherwise not well equipped
for the maintenance of modern vessels.

Coal, fuel oil, water. The Canal has coaling
plants of 700,000 tons combined capacity, which
can load up to 1,500 tons an hour, as fast as the
ships can receive the coal in their bunkers. The
oil tanks, operated by oil companies as well as
by the Canal, have storage for approximatelv
2,443,792 barrels of oil, including crude fuel oil,
Diesel oil, and gasoline. The supply (jf pure water
is practically unlimited. Most of it is drawn from
Gatun Lake, filtered and purified and pumped to
the towns and cities.

Stores, slaughterhouses, ice plants, hotels, etc.
In addition, the Government operates stores
which handle all sorts of foodstuffs and supplies
for the ships and their personnel. These supplv
35,000 people on the Isthmus regularly, and have
ample reserve stocks. Cold storage plants and a
modern abattoir and packing-house are operated.
.\pproximateh- 8,500 head of cattle, maintained on
40,000 acres of cleared pastures, are consumed
annually. Two large ice plants supply the local



Columbus. Christopher Columbus visited the
shores of Panama, on his fourth and last voyage,
in T502. He was then skirting the coast south-
ward from Honduras to Venezuela, seeking "the
secret of the strait" which should lead on to
India. He turned into the beautiful harbor of
Porto Bello, which he so named, and investigated
the reaches of Limon Bay, now the .Atlantic
entrance of the Canal. Columbus died in the belief
that he had reached Asia, and the hope of the
secret strait persisted years after the discovery of
the Pacific, in 15 13, by Vasco Nuiiez de Balboa.

Balboa. Balboa crossed the Isthmus on a
course about 100 miles to the southeast of the
line of the Canal, and entered the Pacific in the
Gulf of San Miguel, naming it that because he
reached it on the day of St. Michael. Four hundred
years later, almost to the day, on September 26,
1913, took place the first test operation of Gatun
Locks.

Projects. Following the discovery of the Pacific
the search for the strait continued on both sides of
the continent, resulting in the discovery of the
Strait of Magellan (1520), but nothing closer to
north latitudes. Leaders began then to talk of
making a strait, and in 1529 Alvaro de Saavedra,
a companion of Balboa in the discovery of the



ii6



THE CARIBBEAN.




Pacific and later one of Cortez's most persistent the centuries made surveys and developed projects.

lieutenants in the search for the strait, prepared The project made an inescapable appeal to popular

the firsi plans for a canal. as well as commercial and naval imagination.

From that time it was an international hope; Couslrmtiou. The first actual work on the

Spanish, French, British, and Americans through Canal was begun by the French on January 20,



THE CARIBBEAN.



117



1882, in excavation of Cuiebra Cut. This company
operated until 1889. A reorganized company
resumed operations in October, 1894, ^'"-^ continu-
ed work of varying extent until its rights and
property were purchasetl by the I'nited States
under the authority of the Act of Congress of
June 28, 1902. The American occupation of the
Canal Zone began on May 4, 1904, and in the
eleventh year after that the Canal was opened.
The first ocean steamer passed through on .August
3, 1914, and on August 15, 1914, the Canal was
opened to commerce. The official and formal
opening of the Canal was proclaimed by the
President on July 12, 1920.

Pirates and political disturbances. Features in
the history of Panama, aside from those mentioned
in connection with the Canal and the Panama
Railroad, include the fountling of the city of Pan-
ama (Old Panama) in isi9; the assaults on Xom-




bieamer in Oauiara Cut. near Goia Hill.

bre de Dios and Porto Bello by the British under
Sir Francis Drake, in 1572; the capture of Porto
Bello by buccaneers under Sir Henry Morgan,
in 1668; and in 1671, the capture of Fort San
Lorenzo, at the mouth of the Chagres River, by
Morgan, who then crossed the Isthmus, going up
the Chagres to Las Cruces and overland, and
sacked the city of Panama; the founding of the
present city of Panama, in 1673; the beginning
of a Scotch colony on Calidonia Bay in 1698 bv
William Patterson, the founder of the Bank of
England; the achievement of independence from
Spain by Panama in the period from 1808 to 1821,
under the leadership of Simon Bolivar, the Liber-
ator; subsequent coalition with Colombia; vari-
ous revolutions under the Colombian regime and
the secession of November _^, 190,^, h\ which the
independence of Panama was established.



TOLLS AND REVENUES.

Rates. Tolls are levied on the net tonnage of the
ships, which is the interior spaces which can be
devoted to the carriage of cargo or passengers. The
rate for laden ships is Si. 20 per net ton, Panama
Canal measurement, and the rate for ships in
ballast, 72 cents per net ton; with the proviso
that the amount collectible shall not exceed the
equivalent of Si. 25 per net ton as determined
under the rules for registr\- in the LInited States,
or be less than 75 cents per net ton on the same
basis. Each "net ton" is loo cubic feet or 2.83
cubic meters.

Revenues and expenses. The investment in the
Canal and its adjuncts is partly for National de-
fense and partly commercial. For accounting pur-
poses these items have been separated. The invest-
ment charged to National defense at the beginning
of the fiscal year 1929 (stated in round figures) was
Si 13,000,000 and that chargeable to commercial
use S275,ooo,ooo. The latter figure may be con-
sidered the capital invested in the Canal in a com-
mercial sense. The annual interest on this capital
investment at 3 per cent (which is the rate on
most of the bonds issued to cover Canal construc-
tion) would be $8,250,000. At 4 per cent it would
be Si 1,000,000, and at 5 per cent, $13, 750,000.
The following figures of Canal expenses do not
include such interest charge but do include a
fixed annual charge of S3 ';o,ooo for amortization
of Canal fixed propert)' having a life of 100 years
and S635,ooo covering depreciation at 2 per cent
per annum on property having a life of less than
100 years, which together with interest at 3
per cent per year will provide for amortization
of the investment or replacement of all items at the
end of 100 years. In addition, the expenses include
a further charge of approximately $750,000 per
year for depreciation of Canal equipment.

For the first four years of operation the reve-
nues were less than the actual expenses of oper-
ation, due largely to slides in Gaillard Cut.
In the later years revenues have exceeded the
cost of operation and maintenance. To June 30,
1928, the operating expenses for the Canal proper
amounted to approximate!)' $104,000,000, and
the revenues to over $196,000,000, of which
$193,018,936.71 was for tolls alone. In addition,
the operating expenses of certain auxiliary
business units amounted to over $159,500,000



ii8



THE CARIBBEAN.



more, against business revenues of over Si66,-
000,000. The excess of total earnings over
total expenses at the beginning of the fiscal year
1929, stood at $98,915,439.82. But as previously
explained, this figure does not include at least
38,250,000 annual interest on the commercial
investment which must be taken into consider-
ation in comparing the Canal with a commercial
enterprise. For the 14-year period at simple
interest this charge would now amount to $ii5r
500,000, and applying the §98,900,000 operating
surplus against this charge would still leave a
deficit of Si 6,600,000, and at compound interest
the deficit would be considerably more.

The total earnings of The Panama Canal




Flu.ilmg Crane "Hercules." at Gatun Locks.

during the fiscal year closed June 30, 1928, were
344,105,292.92, of which tolls amounted to
326,943,513.11. The corresponding expense of
operation and maintenance including depreciation,
but exclusive of interest on the commercial
capitalization, was $25,143,728.63, leaving net
revenues of 318,961,564.29, which is over twice the
annual interest figure and leaves a surplus of
approximately $10,700,000 to be applied to wipe
out the deficit of previous years.

The greatest amount of tolls earned in any one
month was $2,502,815.12, in January, 1929.

Cost of tolls pel- ton of cargo. Tolls are not
levied on the nature of the cargo carried, but on
the capacity of the ship. The cost per ton of
cargo for sending a shi]i through the Canal



varies, accordingly, with the nature of the ship
and the quantity carried; the lowest cost per
ton has been 21.46 cents, on a cargo carrier
heavily laden with iron ore, and from this figure
it ranges upward. The average for bulk cargoes
is approximately 65 cents per ton of 2,240 pounds.
Saving J 2lj to 6 days at sea pays toll. If the
cost of operating a ship be taken at 20 cents per
net ton a day (and this, of course, varies greatly
as among ships, depending on the vessel and the
route over which she is operating), the cost of the
tolls on laden ships is equivalent to about 6 days
of operation at sea. On such an assumption,
other considerations being equal, if a ship saves
over 6 days in her voyage by using the Canal
it is profitable to come this way. Translated
into distance, a lo-knot ship, traveling 240
nautical miles a day, will gain by using the
Canal it it shortens the distance by 1,440 miles.
On the same basis, a ship in ballast can profit by
using the Canal if it saves 323 days.

DISTANCES SAVED.

The reason for the Canal is the reduction it
effects in distances at sea. The following are
representative savings of distances through its
use:

From New York. Between New York and San
Francisco the distance of 13,135 nautical miles
by way of the Strait of Magellan has been re-
duced to 5,262 miles by the Canal; the saving is
7,873 miles, or three-fifths. From New York to
Valparaiso the reduction by use of the Canal is
3,747 miles; to Callao 6,250 miles; to Guayaquil,
7,405 miles; to Wellington, N. Z., 2,822 miles;
to Yokohama, 3,357 miles.

From Liverpool From Liverpool to San Fran-
cisco the distance by the way of the Strait of
Magellan, 13,502 miles, has been reduced to 7,836
miles by the Canal, a saving of 5,666 miles.
The distance saved on the voyage to Valparaiso
is 1,540 miles; to Callao, 4,043 miles; to Honolulu
4,403 miles; to Wellington, New Zealand, 1,366
miles.

The chart on the following page illustrates
graphically some of the reductions of distances
by the use of the Canal.

TRAFFIC TO JANUARY I, I929.

To January I, 1929, tolls-paying traffic,
through the Canal had aggregated 50,018 vessels



THE CARIBBEAN.



119



of 281,843,525 gross registered [005,218,869,099
Panama Canal net tons; tolls paid amounted to
$206,670,023.06. For the five years ended De-
cember 31, 1928, such traffic averaged 5,501
vessels, $24,139,740.29 tolls, 27,136,716 tons of
cargo per year. In these 5 years ships of 29
nationalities passed through the Canal; American
ships were almost 47 per cent of the total, British
slightly over 27 per cent. About 38 per cent of
the cargo was in the United States intercoastal
trade.




Representative savings of distances by use of Canal.

United States Governme7Tt and other nontoll-
paving vessels. In atldition to the commercial
traffic noted above, to January i, 1929, there
had been 4,4 ;i transits of vessels passing through
the Canal without payment of tolls, exclusive ot
craft in the service of the Canal. These were
principally United States Government vessels,
but also include vessels owned by the Govern-
ments of Panama and Colombia, and vessels
transiting the Canal solely for the purpose ot
dry-docking and undergoing repairs at Balboa
shops.

Total transits through the Canal other than
Canal floating equipment, numbered 54,469 to
the end of business on December 31, 1928.

ORGANIZATION'.

EstablisliDunit. The organization for the oper-
ation and maintenance ot the Canal and the



government of the Canal Zone, as at present
constituted, was established by the President
in conformity with the provision of the Panama
Canal .^ct of August 24, 1912. .Authority is
vested in a Governor as head of the organization
known as The Panama Canal. The Governor
is also President of the Panama Railroad. The
Panama Canal is an independent establishment in
the Government service, directly under the
President; but as a matter of executive arrange-
ment, the Secretary of War represents the
President in the administration of Canal atfairs.
Organization on the Isthmus. The organization
on the Isthmus includes a number of departments
and divisions in charge of the various activities,
as follows:

Department of Operation and Maintenance, in-
cluding the Marine Division, Mechanical Division,
Dredging Division, Section of LockOperation, Elec-
trical Division, Division of Municipal Engineering,
Fortifications Division, and several sections; the
Supply Department, made up of the Quarter-
master section. Subsistence section, Commissary
Division, Cattle Industry and Plantations, and
Hotel Washington; the Accounting Department;
the Health Department; the Executive Depart-
ment, and the Panama Railroad.

Offiees in United States. The Panama Canal
has an office in Washington, D. C, and the
Panama Railroad Company has an office at
24 State Street, New York.

Foree. The operation of the Canal and Rail-
road and their extensive adjuncts requires under
present conditions a force of approximately 3,150
.Americans known as "gold" employees and
i2,';oo "silver" or alien employees.

SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR CONVENIENCE
OF VISITORS.

Railroad. The Panama Railroad extends be-
tween Panama antl Colon, with way stations at
Mount Hope, Fort Davis, Gatun, Represo (flag),
Monte Lirio, Frijoles, Darien, Gamboa, Obispo
(flag), Summit, Pedro Miguel, Red Tank,
Fort Clayton, Corozal, and Balboa. There are
three regular daytime passenger trains each
way every week day, leaving Colon at 7.00
a. m., 12.15 P- '"' ^""-l 4-3 P- ni-> '1IK-1 Panama
at 7.05 a. m., 12.20 p. m., and 4.35 p. m. On
Sundays the noon train in each direction is
omitted, trains leaving Colon at 9.20 a. m. and



I20



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



121



4.00 p. m., and Panama at 7.05 a. m. and 6.15
p. m. The schedule is subject to change.

The time for crossing the Isthmus by train is
I hour and 45 minutes. The distance is 48 miles.
The fare is 5 cents a mile, first-class, or 2i cents
a mile, second-class; the one-way passage, Colon
to Panama, or Panama to Colon, is S2.40, first-
class; and ?i.2o second class.

Hotels. The Hotel Washington in Colon (with
88 rooms) and the Hotel Tivoli (222 rooms) in
Ancon, overlooking the city of Panama, are
operated by the United States Government
They are operated on the European plan, with
both a la carte and table iVhotc restaurant service.
Rates for rooms are: Per person, I4.00 to $12.00
per day at the Tivoli; II4.00 to Jio.oo per day at
the Washington.

There are several privately owned and operated
hotels in the cities of Panama and Colon which are
considered first-class.

Restaurants. In addition to the restaurants
of the Washington and Tivoli Hotels, contractors
operate restaurants, primarily for Government
employees, in Cristobal, Pedro Miguel, Balboa,
and Ancon, which are open to the public. These
restaurants are open in general, from 5.30 a. m.
to 8 p. m.; and that at Cristobal is open continu-
ously.

There are various hotels, restaurants, and
lunch rooms in the cities of Colon and Panama.

Commissaries. The retail commissary stores
in the various Canal Zone villages are solely
for Government employees, and sales may not
be made to the general public, except to those
individuals to whom the privilege ot purchasing
there is extended on request of the Government
of Panama.

Currency. United States paper and coin are
the currency in the Canal Zone and the terminal
cities, the Panaman currency having almost
disappeared from circulation. Prices, however,
may be quoted either in "gold" (United States
currency) or "silver" in which the peso of Panama
(worth half a dollar or half a "Balboa") is the
basis. "Silver" prices are exactly twice the
equivalent gold prices; thus "a dollar silver" is
equivalent to 50 cents in United States currency.

Standard "Traveler's checks" are cashed at
the hotels and banks.

Automobile and coach fares are established on a
system of zones. The base fare for one adult



passenger within any zone is 15 cents and 15
cents more for each additional zone entered.
When more than one passenger is carried the
additional charge for each extra passenger is
50 per cent ot the charge for one passenger, pro-
vided that such additional charge is not less
than 10 cents for each extra passenger. Between
12 midnight and 6. a. m., charges may be increased
by 50 per cent.

At the Atlantic terminus the charge for one
passenger from the pier to the railroad station
is 15 cents; to the Hotel Washington, 30 cents.
Between the railroad station and the Washington
the base fare is 15 cents. At the Pacific end
the charge for one passenger from the pier to
the railroad station at Balboa is 15 cents; to
the Hotel Tivoli, 30 cents. The base fare
between the Tivoli and the railroad station in
Panama or in Balboa is 15 cents.

Details of the charges, with maps showing the
zones, and hourly rates are presented in a pam-
phlet which the operator of a passenger vehicle
for hire is required to have with him.

Street car fares. The fare on the street car
system of Panama is 5 cents within each fare
zone. From Balboa to the city line is one zone;
within the city proper is another; the third zone
begins at the bull ring and comprises the remainder
of the system.

Communication. A complete telephone system
covers the Canal Zone and the cities of Panama
and Colon. The All-America Cables have stations
in Balboa, Cristobal, and Panama, and in all
Panama Railroad stations. Radio stations hand-
ling commercial business are located at each end
of the Canal; messages may be sent through
Panama Railroad stations. Eleven United States
post offices are operated in the Canal Zone, on
the system of the United States Post Office
Department and in close cooperation with it.
United States postage stamps are not valid in
Canal Zone or Panama post offices.

Canal villages, built in the Canal Zone near the
terminals and locks, contain quarters for employ-
ees, and necessary public buildings. Each prin-
cipal village has its community clubhouse,
commissary store, school, churches, dispensary
for medical service, restaurant, lodge halls, etc.
All the industrial life is controlled by the Govern-
ment, which has acquired the title to all land
within the Zone. Prior to January i, 1922,



MR 13835-



122



THE CARIBBEAN.



only people connected with the operation and
protection of the Canal were permitted to live
in the Canal Zone. Since then areas have been
licensed tor agricultural purposes.

Army and Niv^y forces. .Arm)- forces are
stationed at both ends ot the Canal Fort
Sherman, Fort Randolph, and I'ort de Lesseps
at the Altantic end, and P'ort Amador at the
Pacific end and at Fort Davis, near Gatun-
Fort Clayton, near Miraflores Locks; and Coro-
zal. There is an aviation station at France Field
and a naval air station and submarine base at
Coco Solo, near Colon. Naval vessels are fre-
quently inCanal waters, averagingabout45 a month.

Most of the posts, with the exception of the
batteries mav be visited.




.'\ liuge dredse working in tlic cllanTiel with barees alongside.

Health condilio7is. Sanitation and municipal
engineering have made the cities of Panama and
Colon and the Canal Zone towns as healthful tor
the traveler as the United States or Europe.
The water supply is pure.

Weather on the Isthmus is continuous summer.
The highest shade temperature recorded has been
98 Fahrenheit, the lowest 59. January to
April is the dry season, with very little rain.
The rest of the year there is rainfall averaging
about 40 minutes of the daylight time per day.
Ten days in a month, as an average, have less
than i-ioothof an inch of rainfall. The maximum
rainfall recorded in 24 hours is 12.25 i'lches.



Hospitals. The Panama Canal has modern
hospitals in Colon and .Ancon. There are modern
private hospitals in Colon and Panama.

.imuscmoits. Motoring, swimming, boating,
hunting, fishing, riding, dancing, golf, baseball,
visiting the Canal and historic spots, the theater,
horse racing, bull fighting, boxing, tennis and
participation in the native /7('.f/rt.y are among the
most usual diversions. The presence of large .Arm>'
ami Navy forces adds to the gaiet}' of sf)cial life.

(dublunisis. The Panama Canal maintains
cluhhoLises tor its American employees at Cristo-
bal and at Balboa near the docks and also at
Ancon, Pedro Miguel, and Gatun. 'J'ravelers
are welcomed at these clubhouses, and are in-
vited to make use of the refreshment rooms,
soda fountains, reading rooms, writing tables,
and amusement facilites, such as bowling,
billiards and pool, tennis, basket ball, volley ball,
and moving pictures. Information is supplietl,
flee telephone service is available, and money is
changed; souvenirs, post cards, and camera
supplies are sold, and developing and printing
done. Fresh water swimming pools are operated
in connection with the clubhouses at Balboa and
Pedro Miguel. \ boat house is also operated
at Balboa, where fishing parties may be accommo-
dated.

Language. .Spanish is the official language of
Panama and visitors who use it find through it
greater intimacy with the people of Panama;
but English is well-nigh universal in the Canal
Zone, is the predominant language in Colon, and
readily understood and spoken by the majority
of business people in Panama. In the hotels
the staffs speak English and Spanish.

Steamship lonnections. Lines of passenger
vessels passing through the Canal or calling at its
terminal ports afford direct connections for
.Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the United States,
the Pacific coast of South America, Central
America, and Mexico, Atlantic ports of the
northern and eastern part of South America,
many of the West Indies, various European
countries, and .Australia, New Zealand, and the
Far East.



THE CARIBBEAN.



123





Golf



HOTEL WASHINGTON



f^r^^



Unequaled for situation and comfort. A hotel in keeping ^^^
with the dignity, spirit^ and service of the Panama Canal

'^ Swimming "^ Water Sports "^ Tarpo?i Fishing

THE YEAR AROUND
JAMES E. LEWIS, Manager :. :. P. O. Address, CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



124



THE CARIBBEAN.







Paramoumt Eamous Lasky Corp



COMPLIMENTS OF



Paramount Films ^ S. A.



i



if it s a Paramount Picture it s the best show in tonm



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THE OFFICE SERVICE Co.



PANAMA



N



i

I

1
i



Art Metal Steel Furniture
Monroe Calculating Machines
Sundstrand Adding Machines

ROYAL TYPEWRITERS

Pacific Manifolding Supplies
General Office Supplies

- Repair Service -



^



CATHEDRAL PLAZA



PHONE 1360



TRAVEL TO EUROPE ON




NORTH GERMAN LLOYD'S
LUXURIOUS STEAMERS



NORTH GERMAN LLOYD

Panama Canal Agency

Telephone: Cristobal 12 74 - Balboa 18 35



^



S



Passenger Agents for Panama

BOYD BROS.

Telephone: Panama 25



THE CARIBBEAN.



125



POHOOMULL BROS.

ORIENTAL SILK MERCHANTS



p. O. Box I

Cristobal 349 Front Street, Colon |



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UNITED FRUIT COMPANY



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Regular Sailings

from

CRISTOBAL, C.Z.

to
NEW YORK
NEW ORLEANS
CUBA

COLOMBIA
JAMAICA and
COSTA RICA



For further particulars
apply to




PAUL WEST, Manager Cristobal Division, Cristobal, C. Z.



isis



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T. H. JACOME, Agent, Pan:;ma City



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The Pan-American Drug Store



N. SALAZAR

J*



Main Store:

9.038 Front Street
Phone 336



Branch Stores:

4.060 Bolivar Street, Phone 166
11.156 Bolivar Street, Phone 356



126



THE CARIBBEAN.



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DRINK



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UMLICIOUS AND REFRESHING

-?-

Panama Coca-Cola Bottling Company

PHONES :



g PANAMA 65 COLON 84

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SPALDING ATHLETIC GOODS



BRUNSWICK
PANATROPES AND RECORDS



L. J. GRANIE

DISTRIBUTOR



COLON, R. P.

Whatever sport, we have the p
supplies



Wd



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^



INOCENCIO GALINDO, Jr.

7th AND BOLIVAR STREETS
COLON



&



JOBBER AND COMMISSION
MERCHANT



m



REAL ESTATE BROKER AND
AGENT



^



THE CARIBBEAN.



127



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Complimentsi of tije

C. K. GROUSE COMPAN Y



NORTH ATTLEBORO, MASS.



MAKERS OF THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL RINGS



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mMMMMMMmmmmAmm



Finish

School Papers

Quicker

Pressureless Touch, 28%
Lighter Weight, better bal-
ance (Parker Poise), steady,
sure ink flow mepn faster,
easier v/riting. -> ,i^i^






Kan

Duqfbld

Fountain Pen

gets your work finished quicker, better
more time your ov/n. Take it back to
school with you. Non-Breakable. Last you
through college and beyond.

Try one here. Five colors, men's and women's
sizes prices $5 and $7.



KELSO-
JORDAN
SALES Co.

1 (N

MASONIC TEMPLE

n; '

1 IN

Cristobal
Canal Zone



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Rathbun, Stilson & Company, Ltd.

Hardware, Lumber, Paints and Oils



p. O. BOX 140, COLON, R. de P.
Telephones: Branch Store 253 Main Store 114



Office 192



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K3



128 THE CARIBBEAN.



Panama Railroad Steamship Line

CRISTOBAL to NEW YORK

VIA PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI



I



(ALL CABIN SHIPS)

S. S. "ANCON" and S. S. "CRISTOBAL"

FORTNIGHTLY SERVICE



MONTHLY SAILINGS TO WEST COAST

S. S. "GUAYAQUIL" and S. S. "BUENAVENTURA" |

CALLING AT

BUENAVENTURA, TUMACO, ESMERALDAS, BAHIA, MANTA,
PUERTO BOLIVAR and GUAYAQUIL



fe



OFFICES ON THE ISTHMUS: SS



7/-\



Superintendent, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone
Steamship Ticket Agent, Cristobal, Canal Zone
Receiving and Forwarding Agency, Cristobal, Canal Zone

OFFICES IN THE UNITED STATES:

No. 24 State Street, New York City, N. Y.



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BUREAU OF CLUBS and PLAYGROUNDS I

THE RECREATIONAL DIVISION OF TH E PANAMA CANAL |

i Visit Our Clubhouses at -

ANCON

BALBOA

PEDRO MIGUEL

GATUN

CRISTOBAL



THE CARIBBEAN. 129



I COMPLIMENTS OF

i

I Bilgrays Tropic Restaurant



IT'S HERE! I

The new era in entertainment for all Colon, g

Old and New Cristobal. m

The Silent Drama is no longer Silent! M

Hear and See I^ita phone

the marvel of the age, the world-famous celeb-
rities ot the Screen, Opera, Vaudeville, Drama,
and Musical Comedy, with a degree ot perfec-
tion never before attained. p

^ / hn QT^O A IVTT^ has been remodeled and S

1 nehl K AJN U ^^d, ,fo,t,ble in a |

manner befitting this marvelous innovation. %

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I EUSTACE LEE I

COMMISSION MERCHANT M

^

Cable Address "EUSTLEE" - - P. O. Box 338

COLON, R. P.



MR 13835 17



no THE CARIBBEAN.



COMPAGNIE GENERALE TRANSATLANTIQUE

FREINCH l_l N E:

Fortnightly sailings for freight and passengers to Colombian Atlantic ports, Vene-
zuela, West Indies, and Europe.
Fortnightly sailings for cargo to North Pacific ports.
Fortnightly sailings for cargo to South Pacific ports.

FPrNPH I INF CRISTOBAL, C. Z. - PHONE 1585, P. O. BOX 128

riYLlltn LlnL CAPRILES & CO., LTD., PANAMA PHONE 759

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WITH ITS ASSOCIATED COMPANIES, OFFERS
i UNEXCELLED FACILITIES FOR CABLE COM-

I MUNICATION TO ANY PART OF THE WORLD.



All America Cables Inc.,



<=§<=



We have various tariffs to suit all the Cabling Public.

Enquiries at any of our offices are cordially invited.



OFFICES AT

Balboa, C. Z. Cristobal, C. Z. Panama, R. P.

§ PHONES:



^



^ Cristobal 1710 Balboa 1273 Panama 470 ^



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JVhen Visiti?ig CoIo/i^ stay at the

GRAN HOTEL IMPERIAL



This Hotel is modern in every respect, offering to visitors com- m

fortable apartments, the best of cuisines and prompt service '^



THE CARIBBEAN. 131



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COMPLIMENTS OF

^fjt Samaritan ^osipital



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NESTLE'S CHOCOLATE |

IS GOOD FOR YOU, GOOD FOR KIDDIES, AND KIDDIES LIKE IT g



Chocolate is Both Nonrishiuii and Sustaining - ^



EAT MORE CHOCOLATE

AND i

I Ask for the Brand that stands for Quality i



NESTLE'S Chocolate

i "RICHEST IN CREAM"

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i Frederick's Auto & Supply Service |

I W. H. FREDERICK I



I CANAL ZONE . AND . REPUBLIC OF PANAMA

^ Box 246, CristobaL Canal Zone

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1.12



THE CARIBBEAN.




Compania
Panamena de Fuerza y Liiz



tSUCURSAL DE COLON)



COLON, R. de P.



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RICHARDS' PHOTO STUDIO



Box 523



Cristobal, C. Z.



i
^



The Oldest and Most Reliable
Studio



PORTRAITS, VIEWS, ENLARGEMENTS

and

KODAK FINISHING



ALL WORK GUARANTEED j



MRS. N. C. REID

Proprietor



^



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[MMI



p. O. Box No. 174 Phone Corp. No. 310



S. CHENALLO\

8.053 BALBOA AVENUE
COLON, R. P.



T



AGENT FOR



The National Fire Insurance Company,
of Hartford, Conn., U. S. A.

Paid up Capital, S3,000,000.0()
Total Assets, over §46,000,000.00



Pan-American Life Insurance Company,
of New Orleans, La., U. S. A.

Paid up Capital, Si, 0(10,000. 00
Total Assets, over $20,500,000.00



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THE CARIBBEAN.



Improved Equipment



Modern Methods



Efficient Service



JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY

CHARGE ACCOUNT IF DESIRED

Cleaning Pressing and Dyeing

o* /\ ui Li viriLi I



I

I



Phone: Colon 21



P. 0. Box 1131, Cristobal, C. Z.



P



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il



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^



The Cream of the English
Woolen Mills



IN



S3



3^



3



Serges, Flannels, Tritwisls,

Palm Beach

Linens and Unions

Can he Secured -

AT

GITTENS & TAYLOR



p



p loth STREET



COLON



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^mMmMMMMMMMMmEMMmmm

i PREMSING & SONS |

I GRAND SILK STORE |

I Wholesale and Retail m

S IN P

I INDIAN, CHINESE & JAPANESE

^ SILK GOODS & RARE CURIOS

ft SPANISH SHAWLS

I COOLY COATS

^ HOOLI COATS

i PANAMA HATS



COMPLETE STOCK OF

... ... FRENCH PERFUMES



7.018 Front St.
COLON



89 Central Ave. p
PANAMA



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134



THE CARIBBEAN.



I

I



COMPLIMENTS OF



THE METROPOLE HOTEL



*CENTRAL AVENUE _

(Opposite Santa Anna Plaza)

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PANAMA



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i



Where to Shop in Colon or Panama



D. CHELLERAM

ORIENTAL MERCHANTS
WHOLESALE and RETAIL



47 Front Street

COLON



81-A Central Avenue

PANAMA



Big Bargains in Everything

WORLD VARIETY SOUVENIRS

Specialty in Spanish Shawls. Nice Col-
lection of Ivory. Ready-made Pongee
Silk Suits, Always in Stock

OUR MOTTO IS:

SMALL PROFIT & QUICK RETURNS
Phones: Panama 340 Colon 159




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m



Before eye-strain wrinkles become
permanent and nervous fatigue
becomes chronic, have your
eyes examined. If you need
glasses, you will be sur-
prised to find what a
comfort they are
when accurately
and
becomingly
fitted to
YOU

HAVE YOUR EYES EXAMINED



I

!
SCADRON OPTICAL CO.

Registered Optometrists and Opticians Estab-
lished in Panama Over 10 Years jjg

PANAMA NEW YORK COLON g

23 Central Ave. 9-034 Front St. p



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HARRY C. NICHOLLS



DODGE BROTHERS AUTOMOBILES



TRUCKS and MOTOR COACHES



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THE CARIBBEAN.



135



MENS SANA IN CORPORE SAN?



Eat more BREAD and PASTRIES from

THE FRENCH BAKERY

BOLIVAR STREET, 8.103



LOOK!

BEFORE BUYING YOUR

PANAMA HATS

AIGRETTES and

SOUVENIRS



I

i



VISIT OUR STORE WHERE YOU WILL
FIND THE LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN P



Perrone & Lobato

FRANCISCO F. LOBATO

(Successor)



Money Exchange



No. 57 FRONT STREET



COLON



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m mm mm ^m!i.mmmJimm Mjmmmmm



DRESSES AND HATS FROM PARIS

ARBOIX

Front & 9th Streets
COLON, R. P.

HAND EMBROIDER ED LINENS
REAL SPANISH SHAWLS
ENGLISH LUGGAGE HAND BAGS



&



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PARIS NOVELTIES



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I PANAMA



DAY AND NIGHT GARAGE

REPAIRS AT FLAT RATES

Complete Line of Accessories at Low Prices

DISTRIBUTOR FOR FIRESTONE TIRES AND CHRYSLER CARS

COLON



i.s6



THE CARIBBEx'\N.



MP



DO YOU WONDER WHERE

THE BOYS GET SUCH SNAPPY HAIR CUTS?

AND THE GIRLS THEIR MODISH BOBS?
WHY, AT

Charley Payne's Barber Shop



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COMPLIMENTS OF

HOSPITAL de PANAiMA



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Cable Address: IMPCO. A. B. C 5th 6th -Bentley's P. O. Box 342

Colon Import & Export Co., Ltd.

JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS



MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS



DEALERS IN

GENERAL MERCHANDISE and NATIVE PRODUCTS

COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA



BRANCH RETAIL STORES AND TRADING STATIONS

Playa Dama Santa Isabel Porvenir Tupile Isle of Pines Carti Nargana



suiun.j'ju/Ln siL^Aj:iLiia



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THE CARIBBEAN.



137



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COMPLIMENTS OF


J. L


SALAS


& Co.


COLON




PANAMA



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COMPLIMENTS OF



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j SMOKE

LUCKY STRIKE CIGARETTES

NO THROAT IRRITATIONS-NO COUGH



MR 13835 18



THE CARIBBEAN.



SMMMMMl



DIERS & ULLRICH

liliohsaJc and Retail Merchants

4S FRONT STREET : .



COLON j



Central American
Plumbing & Supply Co.

SUPPLIES AND TOOLS

Of Every Description



'Good Houses Deserve Good Plumbing"
TRY US



COLON
8th St. & Balboa Ave.

Phone No. 4
P. O. Cox No. lO.S



PANAMA

58 Central Ave.

Phone No. 249
P. O. Bo.v; No. 724



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The Chinese Silk Store

New China

WE CARRY



GENUINE CHINESE and JAPANESE
SILKS and CURIOSITIES

LINENS, SILK MATERIALS,

SHAWLS, CARVED RORY,

WICKER FURNITURE, VASES

Perfumes Jewelry



FRONT STRF.ET
Colon



CENTRAL AVE.

Panama




C. CASULLO

JEWELER AND WATCHMAKER

p. O. BOX 675
PHONE 255

CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



9.036 Front Street, Colon, R. P. g



THE CARIBBEAN.



139



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[MMMMI



The National City Bank of New York



o



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Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits
$166,993,905.98 U. S. Cy.



#&



PANAMA BRANCH:
33 CENTRAL AVE.



COLON BRANCH:
FRONT & 7th STREETS






COMPLIMENTS OF
THE

HOTEL ASTOR



ROBERT BROUGH, Proprietor
COLON



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COMPLIMENTS OF



P. CANAVAGGIO



-9



FRONT ST.



COLON



140



THE CARIBBEAN.



I STANDARD FRUIT AND STEAMSHIP COMPANY



ra



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FAST FREIGHT and PASSENGER SERVICE

BETWEEN

NEW ORLEANS AND CRISTOBAL, C. Z.

For further particulars, apply PANAMA CITY AGENTS

STANDARD FRUIT & STEAMSHIP COMPANY PACIFIC AGENCIES

Masonic Temple, Cristobal, C. Z. CAPRILES & CO.

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COMPLIMENTS OF



KODAK PANAMA, LTD. I

Subsidiary of Eastman Kodak
Company

GREBMAR BUILDING

PANAMA, R. of P.



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is quick service and elimination
of overhead expenses, bringing
patrons and service in direct and
immediate contact at .

l,o^^'est Possible Cost



MAKE OUR CAFETERIA
YOUR HEADQUARTERS

FOR GOOD THINGS TO EAT



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The Panama Canal Restaurants [^

CARL STROM, Lessee M

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COMPLIMENTS OF

Manama Hgeitcies Co.

I (JRACK IJNK PANAMA ^L'\IL S. S. CO.



THE CARIBBEAN.



141



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COMPLIMENTS OF

THE HOTEL TIVOLI



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Something Yon Can't Learn at School |



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There is always a New and Large Assortment of

CLOTHING, SPORTS WEAR and NOVELTIES

Arriving on every Steamer
ESPECIALL Y SUITED FOR STUDENTS

COMPLETE LINE OF PERFUMES

FRENCH BAZAAR



I PANAMA



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COLON



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COMPLIMENTS OF

Br. ^ern J^ricr Br. Carl . ^afforb

CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



ssii



142



THE CARIBBEAN.



Creators a)id Ma?iufacturers of Book a?id Catalog Covers

THE DAVID J. MOLLOY Co.



2857 NORTH WESTERN .A\'ENUE



CHICAGO, ILLLNOIS



Manufacturers of the Covers of
The Cristobal High School Annual



"THE CARIBBEAN"



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A COMFORTABLE BABY IS A H^PPY BABY



"fl| I i*



'PHE use of impure talcs
causes much discom-
fort to the child and need-
less worry to the mother.
Avoid both by using Men-
nen's Borated Talcum. It
absorbs moisture, soothes
skin irritations and gives
the baby the freshness
and comfort which keeps
him healthy and happy.
Use it just as thousands
of other careful mothers
all over the world have
done for nearly 50 years.

First and still the

standard hahy

powder



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BORATED I
TALCUM i

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W. T. LUM DRY GOODS Co.



OPPOSITE THE MARKET

GENTLEMEN:

Constant selection in Hats, Ready-made
Suits, Neckwear, Belts, Shirts, Handker-
chiefs, Socks, Etc. .....

For Tourists and Visitors uc o/Tcr -

THE FINEST STOCK OF SILKS, PERFUMES, CURIOS, AND GIFT SETS

BOLIVAR STREET PHONE 414 COLON, R. P.



-t



LADIES:

The very latest fashions in Dresses, Hats,
Flowers, Underwear, Trimmings, Laces,
Hosiery, Etc



THE CARIBBEAN.



143



j Unique Cleaners and Dyers

6.008 FRONT STREET



t^



We



CLEAN PRESS
REPAIR ALTER
TAILOR oj DYE



Your (iiirnients '0



LADIES' DRESSES

HANDLED BY EXPERTS



MONTHLY RATES

CALL PHONE 524

- And Watch Resiilt^^



To Ensure the Success
of your -

CLASS PARTY:



&



DWYER'S

Orchestra




144



THE CARIBBEAN.



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Engravings of Unexcelled ^lality

for School and College
Publications



f



HOWARD-WESSON CO

WORCESTER MASSACHUSETTS



77;t' College Engravers of Ahw E?igla?id



The Engravings tor this PuhMcation
were maile h\' Howard-Wesson Co.



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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00093680/00016
 Material Information
Title: Caribbean
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Cristobal High School
Publisher: Yearbook House
Place of Publication: Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date: 1929
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00093680:00016

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
        Front Matter 3
        Front Matter 4
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
    Foreword
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Dedication
        Page 4
    Editorial
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Faculty
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Seniors
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Juniors
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Sophomores
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Freshmen
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Literary
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Sports
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Alumni
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
    Jokes
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
    Panama Canal
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
    Advertising
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
    Back Matter
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
    Back Cover
        Page 149
        Page 150
Full Text
















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2010 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries


http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1929cris























- -..


iU._. --


Cnmlul Hoih ScAol.






THE CARIBBEAN.


I ------:-----------------Il

The Staff of
ore ord. the twelfth
St/ volume of
"THE CARIBBEAN" wish to commem-
orate their happy and educational
S years spent at school.
S May the Class of 1929 use this book
in later years as a diary of their
achievements and activities during this
I memorable period.
I L -ii. AL i i I
BI 1
l I _I







THE CARIBBEAN.


S "The Caribbean"

CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL
SCCRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE
E-' .......-- I

i1 Table of Contrents.

Foreword

Dedication4

Editorial

Our Governor h B

Our Canal Zone School Officials

Our Principal

SStaff

Faculty .

Seniors

Class History- o 3

S Class Will |

S Class Prophecy

Juniors. P

: Sophomores. 3 ,

L Freshmen 43 i I

Literary 4

S Sports I '

S School Notes 93

Exchanges ; ,;

Alumni 9

J okes .I. '

Autographs. o10

General Informatnon I I

S Advertisements 23


;-,-.-.....-.-----.---.--.-- -------------'-'--"'- ;""" ... '""""'" 7------"- "'-'

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4 THE CARIBBEAN.


















I K



DEDICATION. l


N OT only because of her unceasing
I efforts, her unflagging interests in us,
her never failing energy in school activities,
S but because of her sincerity and friend-
ship as well, we, the Staff, gratefully
dedicate this, the twelfth volume
of "THE CARIBBEAN" to

Miss Grace R. Hesse.

Ad .M






THE CARIBBEAN.


Sbitorial.


THE VALUE OF AN EDUCATION.


Do we ever stop to consider what an education
will mean to us in later years? Most of us are
not true to ourselves; we pass over the subject
lightly.
There have been, and always will be, numberless
articles written on this subject. Perhaps some of
us have read them, but how many of us would stop
to read an article about education? We make
ourselves believe that we know all there is to know.
In reality we are cheating ourselves.
If you could onlv picture in your mind the
value of an education and its direct bearing on
your life, your work, in fact, on your whole
existence.
Imagine yourself with an education and then
picture yourself without one. A person with an
education can readily see the difference, but how
can a person without one be expected to see the
comparison between the two or the value of a
thorough course of study along some line?
With an education, life is made much happier.
You naturally develop a keen insight, sympathy
and understanding of the affairs of the world that
otherwise you might not have noticed nor appreci-
ated. Life means more than just striving for wealth


and power-it means a thorough enjoyment from
everyday happenings, and this can only be at-
tained by an education.
All of us have talents in one direction or another
and the sooner we realize and develop these
abilities in the highest degree, the sooner will
success come to us.
If some knowledge of the various subjects is
taught to the student, he will get a glimpse of the
many fields in which he is eligible to qualify, and
can experiment along different lines to see what
he is best suited for. By these experiments he
may choose his career, and with determination
and an education to assist him, he will attain
success.
)f course, education for the young student
must not be above his power of comprehension
until his mind can assimilate ideas of such an
advanced nature. Then gradually show him or
her the advantages in life and an education, and he
will do the rest.
With this advice and these ideas in mind, the
student can, as Sir Francis Bacon tells us, be old
in hours and young in years.


Colon Beach.


9IYI


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6 THE CARIBBEAN.


-A \'-


COL. HARRY BURGESS, U. S. Army,
Governor, The Panama Canal.








THE CARIBBEAN.


: Superintendent of Canal Zone Schoo/s-BEN \I. \ II.I.IAIS.
Bnirlhplace--Statesboro, Georgia.
Home .,ddre.s-G(reenoboro, N. C.

EDL CATION.

Name of Secon/dar Schoo/-Statesboro High School.
Location of ,Secoadara Schoo!/-Statesboro, (;Gcorgia.
( or Universttv-Mercer university .
Dates .ttended--o I to 1915.
)egrees Obtained-A. B.
College or Universitv-Teacher's College, Columbia UIni-
versitv.
Dates .ttended- I 19.
1)Dearees Obtained-A. M.
Fraternitv-Kappa l)elta Pi.
Date pEtered.Yervice of The Panama Cal--February 2, 1926.































assistantt S'uperintendent of Schools; 7ginior and Senior High
Schools--V. H. BARKER.
Birthplace-- Missouri.
Home .ddress-lllinois.

EDUCATION.

Name of Seco ,danv School-Lebanon High School.
Location of Secondarv Sczhool-LIebanion, M1o.
College or Lniversit-N. E. E. Missouri State Teacher's
College.
Degrees Obtained-B. S.
College or Universityi-Columbia University.
Degrees Obtained-A. NM.
Date Entering Service on Canal Zone September 7, 1927








8 THE CARIBBEAN.


Our Principal-WILLIAM A. SAWYERS.
Birthplace-WVesterly, Rhode Island.
Home Address-38 Summer St., Westerly, Rhode Island.

EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-Westerly High School. Degrees Obtained-B. S.
Location of Secondary School-Westerly, Rhode Island. College or University-Columbia University.
College or University-Bates College, Lewiston, Maine. Dates Attended- 1924-l925.
Dates Attended.- 9 5-1919. Degrees Obtained-M. A.
Fraternity-Phi Delta Kappa.

PERSONAL.
Date Entering Service on CanalZone-September 7, 1927.
Subjects Taught 1928-1929-General Science.
Sponsorfor What Class or SchoolActivity-THE CARIBBEAN
Staff.
Favorite Expression-"Now, where are the brains in this
group?"







THE CARIBBEAN.


7- '''-


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- -





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Staff .disor . . . . .... . M. \M. A. SAWYERS
Staff Sponsor . . . Miss GRACE HESSE Circulation lanaiger . RoYAL HiaIC3A x O ir/s'. athletic Editor MARION BOIImER
Staff Sponsor ... Miss IMAA ARET MEVERS Asst. Circulation lanaer .RAIPH CRc I Echan' Editor . ADAIR TaLOR
Editor-in-Chief . . . . JAC PErTTI Literarv Editor ... E. TH B. BARtNEI r ,hio l ,rit Edutor AxrrA RAKIX
Asst. Editor ... .... .. FRE STEWART .irt Editor. ...... ..MoKox SormIHAx I .//n/ni Editr . .MARIOX I.WAX(DE
Business Manager ...... .PACL HAYDEN ..sst. .in Editor . ...I.. LEE KARICER Totke Editor . .ILLIAM NVEW.AN
Asst. Business Manager WALTER \WIKINGSTAD Boys'thleticEditor WOODFORD BABBIrr Tvpist .... .. ROSEMARv KEENE


MR 13835-2


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---
---~--~--








12 THE CARIBBEAN.




Assistant Principa!-L LLIAN B. GU TAFSON.
Birthplace-Chicago, Illinois.
Hon e Address-Nunica, Michigan.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School-Northern Illi nois State Normal
School.
Location of Secondary School.-De Kalb, Illinois.

PERSONAL.

DateEntering Service on CanalZone.-October 1, 1923.
Subjects Taught 1928-Ig-2 -Assistant Principal.
Favorite Expression-"Do you owe me an excuse?"




NAame of Teacher-GRacE R. HESSE.
Birthplace-Miller, South Dakota.
Home Address-Shelbyville, Illinois.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-Ann Arbor High School
Location of Secondary School-Ann Arbor, Michigan.
College or Uniiversioty-University of Michigan.
Dates ,ttended- 919I4-191 -.
Degrees Obtained-A. B.
College or Universi/Y-University of Michigan
Dates Attended-9 23- 1924-
Degrees Obtained-- M. A.
College or U'ni:ersit --National University of Mexico
Dates lAttended-Summer 1921.
Sororit--Kappa Delta.
PERSONAl..
Date Entering Service on Canal Zone-October 1, 1926.
Subjects Tcught 1z28-l-E29-English, Spanish.
Sponsorfor Wlhat Class or School .ctivity--Senior Class.
Favorite Expression-"Alright, alright, who belongs to
this?"
Name of Teacher-G. J. BENSON.
Birthplace-St. Cloud, Minnesota.
Home Address-St. Cloud, Minnesota.
EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School-Technical High School.
Location of School-St. Cloud, Minnesota.
College or University--State Teachers' College.
Dates Attended-I917-1918, 1919-1920.
Degrees Obtained-Diploma.
College or University-Bradley Polytechnic Institute.
Dates .lttended-1922-1924.
Degrees Obtained-B. S.
College or University -University of Minnesota.
Dates Attended-Summer Session, 1920.
PERSONAL.

Date Entering Service on CanalZone-October I, 1924-
Subjects Taught 1927-1928-Manual Training.
Favorite Expression--"Stop your talking, Lydia."









THE CARIBBEAN. 13




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21 ,Ccre~idN i-rlii,



A'amne of lea, her- Nto s C. Pr, Nc E. __
Birthplace I'sIrshal, Mlissouri.
Homoe .1dalress-a, Iirshall, Mlissoiuri.

EDUC(ATiON."

A ameN, of Secondrierv SIchool/-MashsLI Hasih Sch sat
Location of .SecondarY School-\1.ish Ill. WI sour I
College or Unit,',Si i/t \-iuSSOUri Valle,\ ('nllve.
L)ates .Yttendcd.-192I-192;.
Degree's Olalned-A. B.
College 0 L'n is', u/v Musonui VruLiex C. i
Dates .9;;ended Summer i928.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Se; sirie on Canal7 Zone OC tiI Ici I-, is, 5
Subjects Tanujit Ji2S-1929o-GennietrN Phiis.
Sponsor for II that CIIns Oi Chool I, i: i i
Faz,oruteExp;1ession-zoo; Sin I'm Xli M sii



Xan,,of F1 a, hs ii Ri-rif



B\iitsiC s! t\r..ino!~l~ L~(.ldl. -Xi'n k IIII in ~ ri i'slc~
SS-,i, -14/11 -`4 ()lt c "ti- Pine WHi t, Xi l% im is

E5I I A IlON.


/d~ s~iti ~alS'i .s /s Pinc BILIid SCIksn 1

C( ori Uns.,-s,s:ii- tiiici its\ (,f _rksii a-
I) s Iti, ,I~l 52 i'4-

.s rl i'l-I, Betai Phil


i?;..,~~~~ Ic w I an! ZrXi crb2

.5 lj~ its lo2,/ Y /'5 11' 20.5 RmehoiI. Airts, 1' S. Histm-Il
~spois g for Clit(Uas s /so s. lilt itt Lilriv ivia.
Isi.'(iilse Exjsiss si-oni'-XIAI tiiht."









14 THE CARIBBEAN.


Name of Teacher-ROBERT A. WEST.
Birthplace-Ashley, Pennsylvania.
Home Address-Ashley, Pennsylvania.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-Ashley High School.
Location of Secondary School-Ashley, Pennsylvania.
College or University-University of Pennyslvania.
Dates Attended--I921-922.
College or University--Bucknell University.
Dates Attended-i 922- 1925.
Degrees Obtained-A. B.
College or University-Pennsylvania State College.
Dates Attended-1927-1928.
Fraternity-Kappa Sigma.
PERSONAL.
Date Entering Service on Cana/lZone-October 1, 1928.
Subjects Taught 192S-1929-Algebra, History.
Sponsor for What Class orSchoolActivity-Freshman Class,
Manager of Baseball Team.
Favorite Expression-"Wake up! wake up!"


Name of Teacher-MARGARET E. MEYERS.
Birthplace- Keokuk, Iowa.
Home Atddress.-Keokuk, Iowa.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School--Keokuk High School.
Location of Secondary School-Keokuk, Iowa.
College or University-University of Iowa.
Dates Attended- 1921 -1925.
Degrees Obtained-A. B.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone-October 1, 1928.
Subjects Taught 1928-1929-English, music.
Sponsor for 'h/at Class or School Activity--Debating Club.
favorite Expression-"En-un-ci-ate clear-ly."


Name of Teacher-MARGARET RENISON.
Birthplace-Rensselaer, New York.
Home Address-Watertown, New York.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School.-Watertown High School.
Location of Secondary School.-Watertown, New York.
College or University-Plattsburg State Normal School.
Dates Attended-- 197-1919.
College or University--New York University.
SDegrees Obtained-B. C. S.
Sorority-Delta Clio.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone-October I, 1928.
Subjects Taught z928-z929-Shorthand, typing,Commer-
cial Law, Bookkeeping.
Sponsor for I'hat Class or School AIctivity-Manager of
funds.
Favorite Expression-"'Where did you get your privileges?"








THE CARIBBEAN. T5



Name of Teacher;--H LEN CtURRIERi BAKER.
Birthplace-Minneapoj..II Nlinneotia.
Home .Iddress--Minnealhis, Minnestoa.

EfDC'A I ION.

an.e f .eod,,ar Schoo- -C! Cc .tral I ligh Schol.
Lnocalinn of Sc,,,ondai' cho/--Miheplis, Mine' ta.
S or niersiit--niersity of Minncapolis.
Arers Obain,'d- 1. A.
'or ('nii-r,i/y-Session in Puldic Sc.hool Music at
Cornell, Chicago, and New' York tniveririet.

I- R ON-\ L.

Dale 1 I.terio.'g Seri" on Cana Zo I2 1.
Su/jects Ta,,e..I 1d '-,),-Supervisor of Public School
,Music.






Name of Teacher-- VIcToR E. SEILER.
Birthplace-Auburn, New York.
Home Address-Berkeley, California.

EDUCATION.

( or Univ:ersilv-University of California.
Dates lAttended--1923-1924-1925.

PERSONAL.

Date Entering Sertice on CainalZone-- lay 1S, o192,.
Subjects Taughit 92;S-12o--Director of Physical Activitie,.
Sponsor for what Class or School .1Activiy--Athletics.
Favorite Expression --Use the berry.







Aine of Te'acher-iBARBARA B u.rv.
Birthpl/ace-Rib Lake, Wiconsin.
Home I-, dress -Muskegon, Mi higan.




.ante of Secuondart svhoo/-Recrcatint Trainingt School
Location of ,crondar Svchoo/l-Clhicilgo, Illlinis.
( Eni'ersitt-Coluhmbia University, New York.
Date .Ittended-ic,5 t e96.

-PERSONAL.

Date Enlter ing Ser vice on ('Cania/l Zone l)-December it I, its
.' ,Subjetts Tang&tl Ii2S-is2-Pil .. ..... I Directress.
1 ." tTwaorite Expression--Now, up in the States






18 THE CARIBBEAN.


g
F'



3


LILYBEL COX.
"I have a heart with room for ercry joy."

Nickname-Waco.
Birthplace-Waco, Tex.
Date of Birth-May 2, 1912.
Canal Zone Address-Gatun.
Date ofEntering Cristobal School-October 13. 1927.
Grade Entered-Junior.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z.-El Paso
School, Fort Bragg, N. C. School, Lawton High School.
School Activities-Supper Club, '29; Vice-President Senior
Class; Secretary and Treasurer of Athletic Asso-
ciation, '29; Carnival, '29; Most Popular Girl, '29:
"Kempy," '29.
Favorite Expression-Hold Everything!
Chosen Vocation-Physical Education Instructor.
Hobby-Dancing.
Pastime-Playing the banjo and having a good time


ROYAL R. HIGGASON.
"I am the Captain of my Soul I am the Master of my Fate."
Nickname-Higgie.
Birthplace-Mart, Tex.
Date of Birth-June 25, 1911.
State's Address-3911 Avenue J., Fort Worth, Tex.
CanalZone Address-Box 467, Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October, 1924.
Grade Entered-Freshman.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z.-Fort Worth
Grade School; Raton, N. M.; Washington, D. C.;
Bluemont, Va.
School Activities-Baseball, '26, '27, '29; Bowling, '28, '29;
Track, '26, '27, '28, '29; Cheer Leader, '28, '29;
President, Senior Class, '29; Most Popular Boy, '29;
Circulation Manager, THE CARIBBEAN Staff, '29;
"Kempy," 29; Assistant Business Manager, THE
CARIBBEAN Staff, '28.
College Expected to Enter-University of Texas.
Favorite Expression-The meeting will please come to order.
Chosen Vocation-Electrical Engineer.
Hobby-Sports.
Pastime-Athletics and sports.


ELIZABETH HACKETT.
"A tender heart; a will inflexible."

Nickname-Sis.
Birthplace-Paraiso, C. Z.
Date of birth-September 18, 1910.
State's Address-257 Field St., Rochester, N. Y.
CanalZone Address-Box 503, Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School--1918.
Grade Entered-Second.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z.-No. 5i,
Rochester, N. Y.
School Activities-Supper Club, '26, '27, '28, '29; Basket-
ball, '26, '27; Baseball, '27; Carnival, '28, '29; Sec-
retary, Senior Class, '29; "Kempy," '29.
College Expected to Enter-Nixon-Clay, Austin, Tex.
Favorite Expression-Sure, why not?
Hobby-Dancing.
Pastime-Having a good time.








THE CARIBBEAN.


ROSEMARY KEENF..
'ITrc1r'c ci it tou I" Ih fil's n ut c.


I,'thil 't1tueCo Ct,!c1n I t,tl, Colotn, R. 1'.
Dlde of birlh Feb uairx 2;, 1,) 1.
slate's ~'ddres' crattituit, Pta.
1).tie of Enlering /itlt A i oIt 4
C; adc Enic; ed-Fitghtrh.
School Ycltiz.'iies--Secret. rY of C~i.ts"'\ Su~puer Club, ''f0,
28 ',; "Rip Va.n Vs ikY,"'26n; Gl~ee Club, '6
27; Athletic Asuocatittn, 'sx; C.trttc.tA, '2_ 2s, '2, ,;
Batsebal~l, '27; 'Tr ick, '2- '2-); IT cvit of CA] CoIB
BE SN, 2D).
li~~otitcloslcta iolVc ifte!''
Chosen I or alittnit rt s.tte Sctret.trv.
I/Houtibbv-'Ming pictures.
Icie'-jrt? Goi, to b.isebtll ganies


JAMES F. QUINN.

"A. man of inexhaustible a.it."

Nickname-Duke.
Birthplace-Fort Myer, Via.
Date of Birth-November 27, 191 .
State's .ddress-i 8t West -th St., Kings Highwa. Brook-
lyn, N. Y.
CanalZone Iddress-Box 173, Gatun, C. Z.
Date ofEntering Cristolbai School-March 2X, 1927.
Grade Entered-Sophomore.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z.-Hampton
High and St. Charles College.
School/Activities-Soccer. '29; Track; Basketball; Swimming;
Member of Student Council, '29; Carnival, '27, '2, '29.
College Expected to Enter-West Point.
Favorite Expression-Gosh.
Chosen Vocation-Aviation.
Hobby-Moving pictures.
Pastime-Athletics.


JEAN WYLLIE.
"Simpleness and g-entleness and hImnor
.nd clean mirth."


Xickname-Jeanie.
Birthplace-Fort Dade, Fla.
Date of Birth-November I, 1913.
CanIalZone IAddress-Fort de Lesseps.
Dale of Entering C istobal Schooi--December, 1928.
Grade Entered-Senior Class.
Other Schools .lenlded Before Coming to C. Z.-Kenwoo.l-
Ioring, Chicago; Sea Cliff High, I.ong !land, N. Y.
SExpected ioEnter--Cornell.
Favortle Expression-Oh, Gee!
Chosen J ocation-Architecture
Ilobbv-Tennis.
Pastime-Swimming.


a


i~\cl"








THE CARIBBEAN.


ETHEL BARNETT.

"The mildest manners and the gentlest heart."


Nickname-Barnie.
Birthplace-Boston, Mass.
Date of Birth-September 15, 191 I.
State's Address-Boston, Mass.
Canal Zone Address-Box 6, Colon, R. P.
Date of Entering Cristobal School--October 1, 1917.
Grade Entered-First.
School Activities-Glee Club, '26, '27, '28; Chorus, '26, '27,
'28; Secretary of Class, '26, '27; Secretary of Supper
Club, '28; "Rip Van Winkle," '26; Supper Club, '26,
'27, '28, '29; Carnival, '27, '28, '29; Athletic Asso-
ciation, '28; Literary Editor of THE CARIBBEAN, '29.
College Expected to Enter-Boston University.
Favorite Expression-Figure that out.
Chosen Vocation-Journalist.
Hobby-Talking.
Pastime-Going down town.

INEZ BARRY.

"Good humor only leaches charms to last,
Still makes new conquests and maintains the past."

Nickname-Barrymore.
Birthplace-Boonville, N. Y.
Date of Birth-December 6, 1912.
State's Address-Whitesboro, N. Y.
CanalZone Address-Box 1395, Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School--October I, 1928.
Grade Entered-Senior.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z.-Whitesboro
High School.
School Activities-Supper Club, '29.
College Expected to EntertCornell.
Favorite Expression-Oh, Christmas!
Chosen Vocation-Teacher or Stenographer.
Hobby-Swimming.
Pastime-Dancing.

WOODFORD MARMON BABBITT.

He steers his boat well."

Nickname-Woody.
Birthplace-Ketchikan, Alaska.
Date of Birth-May 23, 1909.
Canal Zone Address-Box 123, Gatun, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School--October, 1925.
Grade Entered-Sophomore.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z.-Public School,
Juncan, Alaska.
School /ctivities-Basketball, '26,'27, '28, '29; Swimming,
'27; Track, '28; Carnival, '28, '29; Baseball, '29;
Athletic Association, '28, '29, THE CARIBBEAN Athletic
Editor, '28, '29; "Kempy," '29.
FavoriteExpression-Maybe-
Chosen Vocation-Banana man.
Hobby-Basketball.
Pastime-Any sport.








THE CARIBBEAN. 21


MARION A. BOOMER.
",s merry as the day is long."
Nickname-Mab.
Birthplace-Conneaut, Ohio.
Date of BiRth-September i I, )oil 1.
States's Address-Adamls, N. Y.
Canal Zone .Iddress-Cristobal, C. Z.
Date ofEntering Cristoba/ School-October 1, 1922.
GradeEntered-Fifth.
School .ctivities-President of Freshman Class; "Rip Van
Winkle," '26; Glee Club, '2h, '27, '28: Basketball,
26, '2,; Baseball Captain, '27; Swimmi'ig, '2,; Tennis,
29; Track, '29; Cheer L.eader, '27, '2 '28, '2); Girls'
Athletic Editor, '29, Supper Club, '26, 27, '2, '29;
Vice President, '28; "Kempy," '29; Carnival, '27
'28, '29.
College Expected to Enter-Syracuse University.
Favorite Expression-Wherc'll we go
t Chosen location-NMathematician.
Hobbv--Sax.
Pastime-Going to baseball games.


JACK R. PETTIT.

" His heart as far from fraud as Ileaven from earth."

Nickname--Jake.
Birthplace-Canal Zone.
Date of Birth-July 12, 1911.
Canal Zone -.ddress-Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal 'chool- 19 24
Grade Entered-Eighth Grade.
Other Schools attendedd Before Coming to C. Z.-Croton High
School.
School A.ctivities-Baseball, Glee Club, Editor-in-Chief THE
CARIBBEAN Staff.
Favorite Expression--Jake.
Chosen Vocation-Electrical Engineer.
Hobby--Baseball and swimming.
Pastime-Reading.



DOROTHY HEIM.

"Gentle of speech, beneficent of mind."

Nicknanme-Asu tes.
Birthpklce--Kentucky.
Date of Birth--July 3, 1912.
State's .diess--Newark, Ohio.
CanalZone Addres--Box 1491, Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School--l)ecember, I923.
Grade Enlered-Seventh.
Other Schools attendedd Before Coming to C. Z.-Hebron, Ohio;
Newark, Ohio; Cincinnati, Ohio.
School .ctivities-Supper Club; Debating Club, '29.
..- Expected to Enter-Business College, Ohio.
Favorite Expression-Caracho.
Chosen Vocation-Stenographer.
Hobby--Reading.
Pastime-Swimming.








22 THE CARIBBEAN.


PAUL HAYDEN.
"Worth, courage, honor, these indeed
Your sustenance and birthright are."
NVickname-Slim.
Birthplace-New York.
Date of Birth-July i, 1911.
State's Address-96 Read St., Bridgeport, Conn.
CanalZone Address-Box 64, Gatun, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School--1 924.
Grade Entered-Eighth Grade.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z.-Bridgeport
Schools.
School Activities-Baseball, Swimming, Basketball, Track;
Business Manager of THE CARIBBEAN '27, '28, '29;
Carnival.
College Expected to Enter-Bates.
Favorite Expression-Who'd a-thunk it?
Chosen Vocation-Business.
Hobby-Radio.
Pastime-Reading and baseball.

GRETCHEN WINNE PALM.

"Not more learned, but imbued with a better kind of knowledge."

Nickname-Geg.
Birthplace-Tabernilla, C. Z.
Date of Birth-November 18, 1911.
State's Address-Schenectady, N. Y.
CanalZone Address-Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-- 919.
Grade Entered-First Grade.
School Activities--"Rip Van Winkle"; Carnival, '27, '28, '29;
Class Treasurer, '26, '27, '28; Supper Club, '26, '27,
'28, '29; Chorus, '26; Tennis, '29; Senior Play.
College Expected to Enter--Mount Holyoke College, Mass.
Favorite Expression-Hector.
Chosen Vocation-Business position.
Hobby-Music.
Pastime-Reading.


ROGER DEAKINS.

"I neither fear nor despise."

Nickname-Rodge.
Birthplace-St. Joseph, Mo.
Date of Birth-August 20, 1911.
State's Address--2121 Washington Ave., St. Joseph, Mo.
CanalZone Address-Box 237, Gatun, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October 4, 1925-
Grade Entered-Freshman.
October Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z.-Lafayette
School.
School Activities-Swimming, Basketball, Carnival.
Favorite Expression-I'll bite.
Chosen Vocation-Electrician.
Hobby-Music.
Pastime-Sleeping.







THE CARIBBEAN. 23


ROY BEACH WALKER.

"He attains whatever he pursues."

Nickname-Fluffy.
Birthplace-South Bend, Ind.
Date of Birth-January 8, 1909.
State's Address-New Bedford, Mass.
CanalZone Address-Gatun, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-1925.
Grade Entered-Eighth.
School Activites-Glee Club, Assistant Business Manager,
'27; "Rip Van Winkle;" Carnival.
Favorite Expression-And How!
Chosen Vocation-Electrical Engineering.
Hobby-Mechanics and machinery.
Pastime-Swimming and reading.











-i.


\WILHI'I.MINA KLEEFKENS.

"That indefinable thing called charm has she"

Nicknapme-Minnie.
Birthplace-Hoboken, N. J.
Date of Birth-August 7, 191 1.
CanalZone Address-Box lo57, Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristoba! School-October, 1918.
Grade Entered-Second.
Other Schools Attended Before( Coming to Cristobal--Gatun.
School Activities-Supper Club, '26,, '2, '28, '29; "Rip Van
Winkle;" Carnival, '28, 29; Orchestra, '26, '27; Bas-
ketball, '27
Favorite Expression-Oh, for the love of Lill.
Chosen Vocation-Musician.
Hobby --Dancing.
Pastime-Reading and music.


MARION KATHERYNE LOWANDE.

"The Glory of a full capacious mind."


Nickname-Knitial.
Birthplace-Bound Brook, N. J.
Date ofBirth-March 20, 191 1.
Canal Zone .ddress-Box 5 15, Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristoba/ School-October, 1917.
Grade Entered-Fi rst.
School .ctivities-SupperClub, '26, '2-, '28, '29; "Rip Van
Winkle," '26; Orchestra, '28; Alumni Editor 8f THE
CARIBBEAN, '29.
Fa'0orite Expression-I still maintain-
Chosen Vocation-Stenographer.
Hobb y-Argui ng.
Pastime-Walking.


X
r







24 THE CARIBBEAN.




LEE KARIGER.

"A Mother Wit, and wise without the schools."

I .Nickname-Flee.
Birthplace-Honolulu, Hawaii.
Date of Birth-March 30, 1912.
CanalZone Address-Box 224, Gatun, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School--October, I 95.
Grade Entered-Freshman.
School Activities-Carnival, '27, '28, '29; "Kempy," '29.
Favorite Expression-I'm gonna tell on you!
Chosen Vocation-Diesel Engineering.
Hobby-Mechanical machinery.
Pastime-Boating.




VITA VIVIAN LYEW.

"Mv heart is ever at your service."

Nickname-Kam May.
Birthplace-Port Limon, Costa Rica.
Date of Birth-April 12, 191o.
CanalZone Address-Box 2, Colon, R. P.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October, 1925.
Grade Entered-Freshman.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z.--Chinese
School, Miss Crawford's Escuela Publica.
School Activites-Supper Club, '26, '27, '28, '29; "Rip Van
Winkle," '26; Glee Club, '26, '27, '28; Carnival, '27,
'2R, '29.
College Expectedto Enter-Johns Hopkins University.
Favorite Expression-Oh, Heavens! /
Chosen Vocation-Medical Doctor. I
Hobby-Dancing.
Pastime-Reading. )j O ). % 4-J




MORRIS M. LUCE.

"The framer of his own fortune."

Nickname-Lukie.
Birthplace-Shawnee, Okla.
Date of Birth-November 20, 1911.
Canal Zone Address-Box 292, Cristbbal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-i 917.
Grade Entered-First.
College Expected to Enter-Eastman School of Music.
Favorite Expression-It don' sweetcha'!
Chosen Vocation-Musician.
Hobby-Music.
Pastime-Music.







THE CARIBBEAN.


ANITA ROSE RANKIN.
"Fo'r softness she, and seet allacie,'r grare.

NA'icknate-Anita.
Birthplace-- Ancon, C, Z.
Date of Birt h-Septrem her 6, i9o9.
C/ (nalZone ddrcss-Box 574, Crist,,h;l, C. Z.
Date of Entering C' istobalt School- 19 20.
Grade Enht'e red-- Sophomore.
01/Otheer Schoo/s It1endped Before Coming to C. Z. -H nduras,
Costa Rica, and New Orleans, La.
"School/cti'iies,-Supper Club, Glee Clulh, "Rip Van Win-
kle," '26; CarniV\al, "Cupid Scores a T['ouchrwIIn, '28;
School Notes Editor oft THE CAxrIBBEA, '2;.
I'Fa-orite Expression-I f-Oh, Yeah!
Chosen I'roatiron-Private Secretary.
SIlobb-Horseback riding.
SPastime-Reading and music.



MORTON WALTON HARLEN SOUTHARD.

".1 man of words and deeds."

Nrickname-Plutocks.
Date of Birth-July 30, lIl. : ,
Canal Zone .dldress-- Gatun, C. Z.
Date of Elterin;;g 'CrisTobal S,chrool-October ;, 192,. .
Grade Entered-Freshman.
School lctivrities-Str ff, '26; Art Editorr of Caribbean, '29;
"Rip \'Van Winkle," '26; Glee Club, '2 '27; Orchestra,
'26; Track, '28; Basketball, '2; Kempy," '29.
Favorite Expression--I don't know about that.
Chosen; location--Adventurer.
Hobby--Cartooning.
Pastime-W wandering .






MARGARET HAYES

,ere, there, ad erre\herre.r


Birthp/lace-Cristobal, C. Z.
Date o/ Birth NMovember 2', ove.
,State' idress--2l Homre Ave., Fort \V ayne, Inm.
CamnaZon,, Yddress-Box _o2, Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of tnterin. Cristoba! Scho!-October, I h16.
;Grade Entered- First.
S,/hool / .tiiti's-Supper Club, DI)catring Club.
SExpec.ted to Enter Business College.
Fa. orite Avprejsion-Caracho.
Chosen l'ocation- Doctor.
Htobby -SiSwimming.
Pastirme--Horseback riding.


MR 13835---4








26 THE CARIBBEAN.


ADAIR LOUISE TAYLOR.
"From this one you may learn all."
Nickname-Taylor.
Birthplace-Colon, Panama.
Date of Birth-May 2, 1911.
State's Address--2i I Woodill Heights, McKinney, Texas.
Canal Zone Address-Box 156, Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-- 1919.
Grade Entered-Third.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C.Z.-Public School
No. 4, Albany, N. Y.
School Activities--Tennis; Supper Club, '26, '27, '28,'29;
President of Supper Club, '29; Carnival, '27, '28, '29;
G!ee Club, '27, '28; Exchange Editor of THE CARIB-
BEAN, '29.
College Expected to Enter-University of Texas.
Favorite Expression-Horse Collar.
Chosen Vocation-Teacher.
Hobby-Dancing and tennis.
Pastime-Going places, seeing people, and doing things.

SAM PATCHETT.

"Gentle in manner but vigorous in the deed."

Nickname-Patrica.
Birthplace-Washington, D. C.
Date of Birth--April 7, 1910.
State's .Address-Washington, D. C.
Canal Zone Address-Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-May 15, 1928.
Grade Entered-Junior.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to C. Z.-West Junior
High, Hine Junior High.
School .4ctivities-Soccer, '29.
Favorite Expression-Go fish.
Chosen Vocation-Apprentice.
Hobby--Making models.
Pastime-Loafing.





LOIS A. WILLIAMS.

"Her very frowns are fairer far
Than smiles of other maidens are."

Nickname-Mockey.
Birthplace-Las Cascadas, C. Z.
Date of Birth.-Augus t 12, 19 11.
States' Address-708 West Spring St., New Albany, Ind.
CanalZone Address-Box I, Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October, 1921.
Grade Entered-Fifth.
School Activities-Supper Club, Debating Club, Glee Club.
Favorite Expression-Asutes!
Hobby-Reading.
Pastime-Reading.








THE CARIBBEAN.


\,.

MILDRED JENNIE BATH.

"A daughter of the Gods, divinely tall
And most divinely fair."

Nickname-Bobs.
Birthplace-Ancon, C. Z.
Date ofBirth-May 19, 1911.
State's Address-Norwalk, Conn.
CanalZone Address-Box 224, Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October, 1917.
Grade Entered-First.
School Activities-"Rip Van Winkle," '26; Carnival,'27, '28,
29; Glee Club, '26, '27, '28; Supper Club, '26, '27, '28
'29; "Cupid Scores a Touchdown," '28.
College Expected to Enter-Boston University.
Favorite Expression-Oh! Oh!
Chosen Vocation-Accountant.
Hobby-Dancing.
Pastime-Reading.


RANDOLPH ORBAUGH.

"ll'ise to reso/;le, and patient to perform."

Nickname-R andl.
Birthplace-Indianapolis, Ind.
Date of Birth--January 2, 11I1.
Cana/Zone .ddress-Giatun, C. Z.
Date of Enteringl Cristobal SchoolN-March I i, 1926.
Grade Entered--Sophomore.
Other Schools tendedd Before Coming to C. Z.-Fayetteville
High, Fayettevillc, N. C.
School .icti,,ities-Carnival.
S- Expected to Enter-University of North Carolina.
Fak ,orite Expressi'n--I szatso.
Chosen 'ocationi-Mechanical Engineer.
Hobby-Reading.
Pastime-Movies.






























PORFIRIO DEREUTER.

"ll'ith winged feet which lend a walking grade."

Nickname-Porfv.
Birthplace-New York.
Date of Birth--March 6, 1909.
Cania/Zone .Addriess-Box (56, Cristobal, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October I, 1921.
Grade Entered-Foirth.
School .ctivities-Soccer; Baseball; Track; Basketball;
Bowling; "Rip Van Winkle," '26; Glee Club.
Favorite E.vpression-Jake.
Chosen location-Draftsman.
Hobby--Athlerics.
Pastime-Athletics.








28 THE CARIBBEAN.


CHARLES CRUM.

"A man of a sound and composed mind."

Nickname-Crum.
Birthplace-Cicero, Ind.
Date of Birth--July 4, 1910.
Canal Zone Address-Gatun, C. Z.
Date of Entering Cristobal School--October, 1924.
Grade Entered--Freshman.
School Activities-Carnival.
College Expected to Enter-University of Indiana.
Favorite Expression-Well, I'll be darned!
Chosen Vocation-Electrical Engineering.
Hobby--Electricity.
Pastime-Electricity.






PHOEBE O'DONNELL.

'Her noice was ever soft, gentle, and low, an excellent thing
in woman."

Nickname-'Bamna.
Date of Birth-February 2, 1911.
CanalZone Alddress-Cristoba!.
States Address-Mobile, Alabama.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October 12, 1928.
Grade Entered-Senior.
FavoriteExpression-l'd like to knock you in the ear.
Chosen V'ocation-Nurse.
Hobby-Skating or dancing.
Pastime-Dancing.






THEODORE E. BRANDON.

".An honest man-the noblest work of God."

Nickname-The Minute Man.
Birthplace-Colon, Republic of Panama.
Date of Birth--June 29, 1910.
CanalZone Address-Box 456, Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School--i 919.
Grade Entered-Third Grade.
School Activities-Track, '27 '28 '29; Soccer, '29; Baseball,
'29; Bowling, '28 '29; Acting President of Debating
Club, '29; President of Class, '27; Debating Club
Team, '29.
sFavoritcExpression-After me, you come first.
Chosen Vocation-Medicine.
IHobby--Collecting curiosities.
Pastime-Playing billiards.








THE CARIBBEAN.


Z0), WYLLIE.

"-- nature sweet; a disposition pleasant."

.iA(knam;--Zoc \VvIlie.
Birthp/ac-Forr Hamilton, New York.
)ate of Birth- February v.2, i1 2.
Caa /Zone Idrcss-'ort e le.seps.
Date of Enlu;trin' (u',ristba/ ./choo/-Dcccinher, 192.
Gr)att" Anterd-P-lost GradulItit_'.
Oil <'r Schoo/l.iutth'ndedB or'c( omistintto ('.Z..--Kenwood-l.oring,
Chicago. Sea Cliff High School, N. Y.
S I'Evpected to Enter-G(oucher College.
a:orit F.pres':Sio-Now, I ask ou--
C(.'.hoen I ocatn-fournalimni.
//obb 1-Tennis and .,swmming.
lPatime.-S\\ imming.








BLANCA \VAI.KER.

"The Mirror of a/ll (o.'ur's


Administration Building. Balboa Heights. Canal Zone.







30 THE CARIBBEAN.


CLASS H



PLACE: Cristobal High School.
TIME: In early June, 1929.
SCENE: Tourist is visiting schoolhouse.
CHARACTERS: Tourist.
Mr. Sawyers.
Students.
ATMOSPHERE: Deep depression all around.

Tourist: "Why are the faculty and the students
so sad?"
Mr. Sawyers: "Why, after June 21, we will
lose the finest Senior class that ever graced this
school. Do you wonder that we all are sad?"
Tourist: "But I don't understand-seniors
leave every year. Why should you feel such a
sense of loss when hordes of new freshmen will be
rushing in?"
Mr. Sawyers: "Yes, but never has a more
talented group been in our midst. It's a pleasure
to teach such geniuses. I only regret that I have
not been here since their first grade days. How-
ever, I have made it a point to educate myself on
their history."
Tourist: "Tell me about them-I'm interested.
They seem such paradoxes."
Mr. Sawyers: "In 1917, four of the present
Seniors attended first grade in Cristobal School.
Even then they showed signs of remarkable, if
undeveloped, intelligence. Every year they be-
came more learned, and they increased in number.


HISTORY.


When they became freshmen, they were joined
by an equally intelligent group from Gatun. In
school work, in athletics, in social activities alike,
they proved their quality for four years. And
now, that we are to lose them, I am almost
tempted to resign."
Tourist: "But where do they come from? To
what State does the credit belong?"
Mr. Sawyers: "They come from all over the
United States-the cream of each State is among
us, as well as that of Panama."
Tourist: "What do they look like? I want to
know that I may henceforth determine genius by
its appearance."
Mr. Sawyers: "Their appearance is marvelous.
But no two look alike-large, small, short, tall,
light, dark, they are, but the quality is present
in all."
Tourist (becoming depressed): "I certainly
marvel. And I understand your feelings now.
I certainly sympathize with you."
Mr. Sawyers: "I appreciate it, but that can not
help me. I know that for a time at least I shall
be known as the man who 'never smiled again.'
I am sorely tempted to flunk them so that the
school and I may have the pleasure of their com-
pany at least another year, but I know that I
should only be cheating the world. So I am
resigned to losing them. But the heartache
remains."
CURTAIN.


Bridge on the old King's Highway to Panama City.







THE CARIBBEAN. 31


CLASS WILL.


IIHX.~sf


We, the Seniors of 1929, having taken four years
to reach this exalted position and who are now
preparing to forsake these sacred portals, do with
mutual consent draw up this, our last will and
testament, with the hope that it will be duly
read and carried out.
To the Freshmen we do leave the thrill of
being Sophomores.
To the Sophomores we leave the penalty of
being Juniors with the result of having to give a
Junior-Senior banquet.
To the Juniors the Senior Class as a whole
leave their ability to disagree in class meetings,
to be added to the letters' already enormous
tendency in that direction.
Morris Luce leaves his silence to William
Newman with fervent hopes that he will make
good use of it.
James Quinn leaves his smile in the custody of
Celeste Clark.
Elizabeth Cunningham leaves her title to
Elaine Blauvelt and her condescending manner
to Scott Parsons.
Inez Barry leaves her soft voice to Virginia
Stevenson.
Adair Taylor wills her cherished position in the
office to Mavis Thirlwall.
Ethel Barnett leaves her ability to have an
alibi always on hand to Rae Bliss.
Lee Kariger leaves his ever-ready smile to
James Campbell.
Anita Rankin wills her love of dancing to Elsie
Darley.
Teddy Brandon leaves his remarkable ability
to be absent 4 days out of 5 to Francisco Wong.
Elizabeth Hackett leaves her love of Fords to
Peggy Bretch.
Blanca Walker wills to Mabel Schulert her
ability to get all her work done in the first i 5
minutes in the morning.
Jack Pettit wills to Jack Maher his record of
being hit in every baseball game.
Royal Higgason wills to Fred Stewart the
Book of Parliamentary Law, which is still in
good condition.


Marion Boomer leaves to Helen Logan her
ability to get to her destination in as short a time
as possible.
Morton Southard leaves his power of arguing
to Ralph Crum.
Vita Lyew leaves her untiring efforts in Supper
Club to Marguerite Bush and her cheery manner
to Caroline Napoleon.
Marion Lowande leaves Elise Doar her ability
to make up her mind at a moments notice.
Rosemary Keene leaves her permanent seat
in the library to Elsie Birkeland.
Lilybel Cox leaves her ceaseless activity to
Elizabeth Raymond.
Margaret Haves leaves her love of outdoor
life to Alice Henter.
Lois Williams leaves her seat at the Sunday
Matinee at the Strand to Evelyn Ganzmueller.
Mildred Bath leaves her record of never being
asked to leave the room to Victor Melendez.
Roy Walker wills his curly hair to Walter
Wickingstad knowing that it will be appreciated.
Roger Deakin leaves the welfare of the Student
Government to Dick Sergeant.
Wilhelmina Kleefkins wills her love of good
times and her good sportmanship to Frances
Days, this to be added to Frances' own great
supply.
Zoe Wyllie wills her love of sports to Virginia
Eberenz.
Sam Patchett wills his military bearing to
John Whidden.
Gretchen Palm wills her literary ability to
Pauline Herman because of her fine showing in the
Short Story Contest.
Dorothy Heim leaves Eleanor Urwiler her
ability to understand what Senior English is all
about.
Paul Hayden wills his baseball glove to
Arthur Mundberg.
Porfirio leaves to Rita Joyce his stature with
the consolation that it will not be given in vain.
Randolph Orbaugh leaves to Della Raymond
his gift of being seen and not heard.


f~c~




~j------







32 THE CARIBBEAN.


Jean Wyllie leaves Estafania Wheeler the use
of the swimming pool after class hours.
Woodford Babbitt leaves Tom Coley custodian
of his seat in the back of the room.
Charles Crum leaves to Tom Conley his ready
study on how the morning class meeting should
be held.


And now having duly read and agreed upon all
small details and sincerely hoping we have
offended none of our worthy brethren, we do
scrawl our X's and quietly pass out.
THE SENIOR CLASS OF 1929.
WITNESSES: Old Ironsides.
Uncle Sam.
Big Ben.








THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CLASS PROPHECY.

Ethel Barnett, '2).


I was breathless when I had reached Heaven at last
From a stiff climb up those Golden Stairs,
And there at the Gates was St. Peter himself,
Harrassed by hard work and great cares.

"Who are you, what are you, why are you here?"
He asked in a suspicious tone;
So I told him I'd once gone to Cristobal High-
(I could see that his interest had grown.)

I then said I belonged to that marvelous class
That C. H. S. lost in twenty-nine-
"Twenty-nine," he then gasped, "you're the last one to die
My, my, my, for your age you look fine ! "

So I asked if the others all resided there.
He said, "Sure," that they'd been there for years,
He said, too, they'd made Heaven a Heave'nlier place-
Which was sweet, sweet music in my ears!

He summoned an angel who just flitted past,
I looked-looked again in surprise;
For who should it be, but Jack Pettit himself,
I hardly could believe my eyes!

It seemed that his work had been diving for pearls,
But he'd dived once too often, and so,
He'd arrived here in Heaven, and joined all of those
Who'd been first of our class to go.

He said Royal'd been killed in a wreck of a train
(A traveling salesman was he.)
And if death hadn't come to Marion Lowande,
The world's greatest singer would she be.

Lois had married, and was here with her husband,
Their joy now having a revival;
Adair, Minnie, and Margaret, all married too,
Were now waiting their husbands' arrival.

As radio announcer, Paul lived and died,
And Morton had been a great broker-
But his wife caused him many a marital woe
So he came up to Heav'n to provoke her.

Sam'd been a Shakespearian actor ot note,
Roger, a great financier,
Porfy, the greatest of all human flies
That ever had flown on the sphere.

Lilybel opened a dressmaking shop
But not for long; she soon married-
Then Sis took it over till she married, too,
But on earth neither one of them tarried.

Jack had to stop, he was all out of breath,
Besides, he was due at a date,


So he showed me the way to the Angel's Hotel
And I rushed, since it was getting late.

And who was hat-check girl, but Dorothy Heim.
She told mie she'd been one on earth;
She said Inez had been a vaudeville star
In a song and dance act of gre it worth.

She'd have told me of more, but a guest then arrived
So I went to my registration,
And who was the desk clerk, but Teddy Brandon,
Whose books are now read by a nation.

He said Mildred posed for magazine covers
And had wed ai man of great wealth,
While Anita wed early, but didn't live long,
Nor did Blanca, who had quite poor health.

Roy and Lee died in a submarine race:
Elizabeth Cunningham, a teacher,
\ ita had been a doctor of great skill,
And Morris I.uce had been a preacher.

He stopped, then, as he had some duties to do,
And as he tended his next guest
I went up and slept, but next morning went out
To see if I could find the rest.

On the corner of Cherubim Street, I found Charles,
Woody Randolph, and Jim, harmonizing!
This was practise, they said, for Community Night.
I found their vocal talents surprising.

Randolph had lecture-toured over the world;
Jimmie, a prize winning jockey;
Woody had starred in the Olympic games,
And Charles Crum had won fame in hockey.

They continued to sing, so I wandered off
And there, on beautiful lawn-
Marion Boomer and Gretchen were playing tennis
While Jean and Rosemary looked on.

They hailed me, and I learned that Jean'd been a painted ;
Gretchen, a most daring flyer;
Rosie, always in a fast auto race;
Marion'd wed a rich cleaner and dyer.

They told me they thought that I never would die,
Which was just what my relatives thought-
Hut I fooled 'em-iand left them the department store
Which my own hard-earned money had bought.

St. Peter then came up and gave me a harp
Which I practised, heedless of intrusion;
But they warned me that Heav'ns full of QUIET and PEACE
So I now practise in strict seclusion!


Q


I





~------=---=---~







THE CARIBBEAN.


What would happen to C. H. S. if the Class of'30
agreed to agree?



-or if-


Elsie Birkcland couldn't tease the ivories.
Elaine Blauvelt forgot to bring her purp to school.
Rae Bliss stopped making whoopee.
Peggy Bretch didn't have such pretty curls.
Marguerite Bush hadn't discovered the bed bugs.
James Campbell wore Paris Garters and had "Sox Appeal."
Celeste Clark didn't have banio eyes.
Tom Colev didn't have his Cicero.
Tom Conley was Fred Stewart's twin brother.
Ralph Crum kept his feet under his own desk.
Elsie Iarlev should grow taller.
Frances Days didn't know all the latest songs.
Elise Doar didn't have that Southern drawl.
Virginia Eberenz came to school on time.
Evelyn Ganzmueller didn't worry over her Physics
Alice Henter hadn't won the popularity contest.
Pauline Herman wasn't a mermaid.
Rita Joyce was tongue-tied.
Helen Logan didn't resemble Greta Garbo.
Jack Maher wasn't our most handsome boy.
Victor Melendez didn't dress so neatly.
Arthur Mundberg didn't have a weakness for teasing the girls.
Caroline Napoleon was seen and heard.
\\illiam Newman ran out of wise cracks.
Scott Parscns couldn't make a "sax" talk.
Della Raynamnd's hands were tied while she tried to talk.
Elizabeth Raymond was unable to blush.
Mabel Schulcrt should bob her blond, silky tresses.
Dick Sergeant ever agreed with the majority of the class.
Virginia Stevenson wasn't one of our faithful Juniors.
Fred Stewart forgot to say, "May I have your attention, please?"
Mavis Thirlw all got a "wind blown."
Estafania Wheeler ever made a loud noise.
John Whidden moved more rapidly.
Walter Wikingstad didn't have red hair.
Francisco Wong stopped paying his class dues promptly.








THE CARIBBEAN.







SOPHOMORE CLASS.


Roll Call


Stella Arthur . .
William Bailey. .
Floribel Barngrover.
Earnest Berger...
William Blauvelt
Mary Bretch. ...
Robert Brough..
Walter Bundy..
Crawford Campbell.
Dan Coffey...
Edward Conkling.
Margaret Davis
Frank Drake. ..
Rodman Drake
Ruth Duvall ....
Russell Elwell. .
Fabian Englander..
Erie Ferguson.
Eleanor Fitzgerald.
Clara Frisk
Burton Hackett.
Parker Hanna ....
Robert Hanna ..
William Harmon. .
Lillian Housel ....
Percival Lyew.....
Robert Marshall....
Kenneth Maurer ..
Eugenia McLain ..
Margaret Misrahi..
Margaret Mitchell..
Harold Mueller .
Marion Neely
Gerald Neil .
Mary Patterson
Blanca Pulgar ..
Carlos Rankin
Anna Ryan .... .
Aloha Slocum . .
Theo. Theohtisto...
Beverly Turner.....
George Wertz. ..
Edward Wilkens....
Raymond Will..
Ben W illiams .......

Eugene Williams.


Ambition.

A vamp
Army general....
Good mother ..
General
An artist
Interior decorator....
Transcontinental bus line owner
Famous lawyer.
Professor .
A tabloid reporter
Poet ...
School teacher ...
Army officer ..
Navy officer....
Botanist .
Six-day bicycle rider
An historian .
Architect
Domestic science teacher.
Librarian
A sculptor
Hymn composer
A trombonist in Whitman's Band
Arbitrator ..
A chorus girl
A mathematician
Dean ...
Second Sheridan
Married lady .
Stenographer .......
N urse . . ..
Polar explorer .
Woman's Club leader
Apache dancer. .
Stenographer .....
Physical Directress
Foreign Diplomat ..
Language teacher .. ..
Social leader .. . ..
Banana checker ..............
Policeman ..
Second Babe Ruth.... .....
Aviator . ......
A minister .... ....... ...
Bug collector.................

Electrician ... ........ .


As Realized in 190o.


Second Pavlowa.
Salvation Army drummer.
A much divorced actress.
General nuisance.
Spanish teacher.
Human fly.
Undertaker.
Village postmaster.
A spiritualist.
Editor of Christian Science Re view.
Radio bedtime storv teller.
Cabaret girl.
Gob.
A stool pigeon.
Settlement worker.
Inventor of perpetual motion
A taxi driver.
Tight rope walker.
Dressmaker of Darien.
Bookbinder.
Member of the Royal Mounted Police.
Colon bomber.
A tiller of the soil.
A revolutionist.
Sunday school teacher.
A circus clown.
Head of Watson's Institute.
A preacher.
Old maid.
Second Houdini.
Woman hypnotist.
An African missionary.
A governess in a family of eight.
Heavyweight champion.
Zoologist.
Invalid.
Chief Politician of Wall Street.
Joke Editor of JJ'hiz Bang.
Only woman forest ranger.
Wo Id lecturer
Jay walker.
Absent-minded professor.
Mining engineer.
An executioner at Sing Sing.
Conducts research laboratory for extermi-
nation of the boll weevil.
Handling "live wires" in a Broadway
chorus.


MR 13835--6




THE CARIBBEAN.


E4 .

Lj9~1


.4.5..


m


as~~a 3~ U ~t


SI






Mm
im


M.
U


v-F~Lqdp.








THiF CARIBBEIAN.





FRESHMAN CI.ASS.


Hobby.


Edward Albin ..
James Albin ...
Thelm i Albritton
Geneveive B.rry
Gladys Bliss .
Allene De ikins..
William Diers
Zol. Dorson ..
Dona Eaton....
Joseph Ebdon .
Harry Egolf .....
Vivian Elmgren .
Antonio Fernandee..
Donald Finlason .
Albin Forsstrom ..
Alice Gormerl ..
Fr.nk Griesinger
Emma Hill.
Mildred Harmon
Marion Hahn.
James Hayden
Verona Herm:in
Beatrice Housel
Jodie Lu Jones.
Carl Kariger. .
Howard Keenan.
Thelma King...
Marie Kleefkens
Alvin Lyew..
Peggy McGehee
Frances MlIneny
Virgini.a McSparre-n
Frink Merrit
IUr:el Mhok
Elwin Ned
FIlsie Neely
Ron Perkins
Martha Potts
Virginia Price
Eleanor Reinhold .
Ben Roberts.
Hermn n Ro:s.
Herbert Rose
Bruce S un er-
Helen South ;r
Robert Stevenson
Inez Theotisto.
Alicia Thirlwall
N ell ,, ,11 .


"Eddie". . Gathering lunches
"Jimmie". Being important
"Tillic" Being with Emma
"Gen".. 'Writing notes
"Curly-top'" 'Phoning
"Al" Being ambitious
"Scotch" 7-year-old
"Bumls" Royal
"Blondie . He's tall, dark, an' handsomec
"Parson Joe" Preaching
I ." .' Ea ting .
"\iv" School
"Tony".. Selling
"Swede" Horseback riding
"Frosty" Dancing
"Alee" Reading
"Germany" Sax. .
"Goldie" Collecting stamps
"Millie" I1tughing
"Mem" Howard
"Pest" Radio
"Roney" Gossiping
"Bee-dee" Chewing gum
"JoJoo" j Pla ing "Beloved"
"Diabil," Te'asing .
"Howa'd De.h Nagi-stici
"T'helm' Studying
"Kleefic" Clarence
'Chino" T'ennis
"Pe'" R ilph
"lFrnie" Poetrv
"Ginnie" Painting
"Merr\ Flirting
"Jerkie" ) Dincimg
''I' r ii Ii'' (.rtIir 'r A
"Neelv" Commercial geography
"L.in, Getting A's
"String Be.in" Danlcingi
"G(inger hiding
"Reinic" Piano
"Baby IFace" Talking
"Heimiie' Pestering
"Rosie" Blushing
"Sonn'y" Bicycles

"Stevie" Looking ange'i
"Theo" Being lite.
"Reds" sParties
'"Pete" Pepito


Plumber.
Thomas Edison, 2d.
Washwoma n.
Moomonette.
Female Beau Brunmmel.
Great musician.
Bartender.
Flapper.
Mary Pickford, 2d.
Preacher.
A "King's taster."
School teacher.
"Shippy."
Horsegroom.
Farmer.
Teacher.
Wiedolph, 2d.
Postmistress.
Private secretary.
Old maid.
R.idio announcer.
Housewife.
Movie actress.
Pianist.
Bachelor.
Boiler maker.
Housewife.
Married woman.
Galley cook.
Russian dancer.
Public speaker.
Painter.
A ladies' man.
Pavlowa, :d.
Heartbreaker.
Violinist.
Aviator.
Fatty Arbuckle, 2d.
Woman jockey.
Paul Whitman, 2d.
Dancing professor.
Paderewski, 2d.
Harem owner.
Road digger.
Juggler.
Hermit.
Novelist.
Clara Bow, 2d.
Famous heartbreaker.


Epithet.


Sobrique t.


Fur re







48 THE CARIBBEAN.


Rte'ultt5 of the (onte5t.


IMAGINATION.
Gretchen Palm, '29.
(This story was awarded Grand Prize in the Short Story
Contest.)
Tony spoke thoughtfully:
"Well, Bibs, we're here at last, most prosaically
seated upon the romantic, ancient, famed,
celebrated, distinctive, renowned-"
"-flat-arch bridge of Panama," ended Bibs
with a flourish.
Tony continued undisturbed.
"Bibsy, considering that I have followed you,
the object of my adoration, into this terrible
jungle, that I have been flea-bitten, and that I
have been yanked out of a perilous stream twelve
inches deep, I think it is only fair that you join
me in singing, 'Be it ever so humble, there's no
pl-' "
"My, my, you're really longer winded than
Cicero himself; I have no hope of your recovery
now," Bibs interrupted. "Seriously, Tony, I'm
here to write a local-color legend for my series of
travel sketches."
"Man, that's easy, merely grease your top-
story; the wheels will go 'round, then-"
"Can it! Let's see you tell a story about this
bridge, if it's so all blamed easy!"
Tony laughed.
"O. K. with me. Sit on yon felled tree, Sir
Bibs; take out thy mighty pencil and thy papyrus
and prepare thyselffor taking notes on my wondrous
tale."
"The characters of this legend," began Tony,
"are Don Vasco Nufiez de Balboa, who, on an
exploring spree in Panama, finds himself and his
cavalcade detained by a simple, glad-hearted
little brook, Flaine, the Lily Maid of Astalot,
Houdini, Mr. Archimedes, the Greek math shark
and, of course, many dashing cavaliers.
A brook stood in the way of the great Balboa.
What? Would it change his route? Nay, never!
"W'hat ho, men, what have we here, a tinkling
brook? Doughty retainers, measure yon streame"
D)on Balboa snuffed his snuff and tapped his foot
impatiently, then, "''What are thy calculations?"


A Spaniard spoke up: "The width is two
lengths of myself plus four hands, sir. The depth
is one foot and two thumbs' length, sir."
Balboa attempted to look wise; after pondering
deeply he said, "How now, it is too insignificant
a stream for me to walk through; wouldd sully
my dignity to be carried on thy back like a
meal-sack, and my horse catches cold too easily
for him to carry me. Go, call Houdini; his
mighty brain will solve our predicament."
After being duly received by his superior,
Houdini meditated long upon the weighty
question which was his to work. How to get
across the stream? Suddenly he cried, "Gad-
zooks, I've got the answer, and how. Build a
bridge."
The brilliance of the plan pleased Balboa so
much that Houdini was immediately decorated
with a certain gold medal, given to those of
superior intellectual power.
This act was rudely dispelled when Elaine ran
up to Balboa shrieking, "Vasco, my beloved,
protect me! The jungle, it overwhelms me; it
stifles me; it clasps me to its greedy heart, it- "
"Dearest heart, the terrors of thy brain surpass
those of reality."
"But, but, I cling to thee, my knight; take me
from here speedily; let us go to, go to--"
"Silence, maiden thy 'go tos' smack too much
of Shakespeare to please thy proud Spanish lover."
"Forsooth, if my love goeth unrequited, I shall
bestow it elsewhere," Elaine replied cooly. Her
eye lighted on Houdini. "Then honest Houdini
will be my shield and protector, and not thou,
O false Balboa."
Houdini grimaced that this superfluous, fair
maiden should cast herself at his mercy. "Come
on then, Snowdrop, your big boy will go hunting
orchids for your petal lips to kiss. Come along,
step lively, please."
Balboa was so bitter at Elaine's actions that he
vowed that he would be a bachelor (of course he
never kept his resolution).
Archimedes was then sent for and his opinion
on the bridge sought.


aIIXI







THE CARIBBEAN.


"Oh Balboa, it is a difficult problem, but upon
st.1' in.- the hypothesis, I can deduce the facts
that the bridge will require 100,001 brick and a
mortar made from three boxes of Elaine's face-
powder, coconut-juice anI. salt and pepper to
taste." Needless to say, Archimedes was given a
blue ribbon with the words "ExceptioiTal merit."
The royal Ford was pulled up (the gasoline had
all leaked out) and Senor Flanigan, the driver,
dumped 100,001 brick upon the bank. The face-
powder from Elaine's suit-case, the coconut-juice
obtained, and the pepper and salt taken from
Archimedes, who had lately been computing the
number of ants it would take to carry away
3,000,000,000 grains of pepper (not counting the
ants that sneezed t:, death).
Construction was begun on both sides. In
building the center of the bridge, four men stood
in the stream with boards over their heads (so
that the dripping mortar would not rumple their
hair) and shaped the arch. The bridge was done!
"Bravo,"exclaimed Balboa, from the side-lines.
"Help," cried the four men in the stream.
Heavens! the arch had fallen and now lay flatly
upon the boards which the gallant soldiers had
just used for protection.
"Hold it!" shouted Balboa. "Stay there 'til
the mortar drys; it's a flat arch, but it'll do, for


the present." (Balboa was unconsciously using
the "mutilated" English of Houdini, it is sad to
notice.)
Being magic, the mortar soon set. "Ready-
my gallant soldiers? We will go; the shrew and
her two fric'nds may dig their own graves here,
for all I care."
With this the company crossed the bridge.
Distressing cries were heard. "Elaine!" Houdini
shouted, "Wait, take this little bundle of excess
baggage with you; I don't want her." There
was Archimedes, too, holding up his robes that he
might not trip. But oh, what a fate awaited
them. Three small stones treacherously reposed
upon the bridge; Archimedes stumbled; Elaine
tripped; Houdini turned a somersault; they
fell-fell into the stream that was one foot and
two thumbs' length in depth-and-drowned.
"That is all, Bibs; I thank you for your kind
attention. Did you take any notes?"
"Heck, I forgot."
"Murder, all that work for nothing? Heavens!
I faint; I gasp for breath; the smelling salts,
quick"-and mockingly Tony sank weakly to the
ground.
Bibs laughed, "Ha, ha, go on and faint; you'll
get up soon enough; you're lying on a red ants'
nest.


HAVE YOU A HAWSER ?
Charles Crnm, '2).
(Thi, storv was awarded the Senior Class Prize.)


I remember well, one trip I made on the
Caribbean back in 1920. The Caribbean was a con-
verted sea-going suction dredge, used to trans-
port cattle from Colombia to the Canal Zone.
I did not dislike this boat greatly after I had
become used to the cattle. There would be an
occasional passenger to break the monotony.
On January 30, we were about 139 miles
southwest of Cristobal. I was on duty that morn-
ing when, at 9.1 I picked up a call for help from
the S. S. Xienas. I sent back my call letters and
signified that I was ready. Her message came im-
mediately. The Xenas had lost her rudder and
was rolling helplessly in a rather rough sea.
Her position was about fifty miles southwest of
the Caribbean. I took the message to the "old
man." He gave orders to change course immedi-


ately. We exchanged messages steadily now,
checking courses and bearings as our skippers
worked them out on the charts. By 3.30 the
Xenas was sighted off our starboard bow. From
that time on, I have the messages exactly as I took
them down, eight years ago. At 3.45, I received
this message:


Have you a Hawser?


Cook.


As we had no heavy cable for towing, I sent
back a negative answer. At 4.00 I received
another.
\We will give you a cable from the port bow, and tow easy
1o us. Cook.

This cable was not long enough so the next
message at 6.45 read thus:


M\R 13835- 7







THE CARIBBEAN.


I have another piece of the same kind of wire that I will
give you. It is a little longer than the one you have hold of
now. Cook.

By 9.00 o'clock the sea had roughened con-
siderably. The captain became worried, so at
to o'clock I relayed a message to Balboa asking
for help. At 12.30 p. m. came this message.

Will send tug Gorgona immediately.
Port Captain.

At 9.20 the next morning I received this mes-
sage.
Gorgona left at 4 a.m. Keep in touch with her by wireless.
If you have to abandon tow, anchor vessel and inform
Gorgona. Port Captain.

The first message was picked up from the
Gorgona at 1o.15.


Gorgona 50 miles north of Cape Mala, 8 a. m., speed
eleven knots. Keep me informed of your position.
Howard.
I sent our course to the Gorgona and at 10.55
received this message.
10.45, Gorgona lat. 7.48 N., long. 79-49 W., course S. S.
E. mag. Will this course intercept yours? Howard.
Her signals were now so loud that I did not need
the captain to tell me that the relief ship was near
and on the right course. After the captain had
studied his chart I sent word that the Gorgona's
course was "0. K." At 1.25 came the message
that was to complete our r61e as rescuer.
You are in sight. Cast off your hawser when ready.
Howard.
We dropped our hawser, the Gorgona picked
it up and we were free to proceed on our course.


THE GIRL WHO WAS-NOT.
Elsie Darley, '30.
(This story was awarded the Junior Class Prize.)


Sailor Andrew Bones, of the U. S. warship
Texas, anchored in Panama Bay, was sitting in a
small, deserted plaza in Panama City. He was
reading a magazine of adventure, hair-raising and
impossible. Occasionally Andy would let the
book fall, and would dreamily put himself in the
place of the hero, a handsome, devil-may-care
young man, whose sole duty seemed to be to
rescue beautiful young ladies in dire need of
rescuing.
Presently the sun grew so hot that Mr. Bones
sighed, picked up his book, arose, and looked for a
street down which to walk to the wharf. He
espied a narrow, cool-looking alleyway that led in
the right direction, and proceeded to walk down it,
pondering the while on the deeds of his latest
hero, who-
"Help-Socorr-rr-o-o-H-e-l-p!"

Andy came back to earth with a start. The cry
had come from the second floor of a large white
building on his left. Andrew Bones, that simple-
minded soul, at once deduced that here, at last,
was his chance to rescue a fair lady from, probably,
the clutches of a bad man, or, most likely, from a
mouse. Anyway, it would give him a chance to
get acquainted with one of the pretty seihoritas
of the City, and she would be able to see how
brave he was.


He stopped to plan out his mode of attack,
(now what was it the hero did in "Fighting
Blood)?" As it was impossible to climb to
the window on account of the smooth walls, he
would have to use the door and once inside, grab-
bing a poker-darn, they didn't have the things
in this country--a-awell, whatever he first put
hands on, he would creep upstairs and put up a
heavenly fight. The rest was easy.
Gee, but suppose the guy had a revolver. That
wouldn't improve matters at all. Maybe he'd
better wait for a more favorable adventure-
"Help! H-e-e-lp!"
At this shrill scream, Andy's chivalry got the
better of him, and throwing caution to the winds,
he dashed up the front steps. He saw the curtains
of the window move. Gosh! Maybe the guy
had accomplices on the lookout for interferers.
But he must not get scared. He pushed his cap
over one eye and gave a determined tug to his
jumper. The door seemed locked at his first
turn of the handle, but suddenly it opened, and
he found himself face to face with a little, brown,
withered old lady who beamed on him tooth-
lessly and said,
"DeSeiior, he weesh to buy a parrot? I'aveaver'
clever performing one. Come een, Sefior, to see."
But Andy was rapidly making his way down the
street.







THE CARIBBEAN.


_A


UNDISCOVERED TREASURE.
Robert Brough, '31.
(This story was awarded the Sophomore Class Prize.)


The tropical sun beat down on two boys
sitting quietly in a small boat. Land was two
miles to the north, but they had no means of
reaching it for their motor had broken down, and
they were drifting steadily.
"Well," said the older, "What are we going to
do?"
"Don't ask me!" replied the other. "We've
no oars. Guess we'll have to swim."
"What'cha think I am ?" returned the other.
"You must have forgotten that fin we saw half
an hour ago."
Quiet again came over them, but it did not
last long.
"Hoo-ray!" yelled Frank the younger, "We're
drifting on to that small island!"
"Now ye're speaking," replied Arthur.
A few minutes later they were able to stand in the
shallow water and drag their boat up on the sand.
The island was covered with coconut trees, and
the boys made haste to satisfy their thirst.
"Let's try to fix the motor," suggested the
younger.
"Naw," his companion replied, "Let's explore
this place first."
"0. K."
The island was not large, but it was covered with
tropical vegetation, and as they started inland
they had to force their way through the bush.
On a small hill in the center of the island they
discovered what appeared to be the ruins of an
old castle.
"Maybe this is where the people of Old Panama
hid their gold from Morgan," suggested the older,
thinking of an old legend.
"Let's see if we can find a dungeon or some-
thing," said the other.
After searching the ruins for a while the
younger called excitedly to his companion. In
the center of the ruins he had found a small pit
with a tunnel at the bottom. Both dropped into
the pit and looked into the tunnel. It was lined
with blocks of stone and only a little light entered
from a hole in the ceiling.


They entered on hands and knees, but once
inside, were able to stand up. Becoming quickly
accustomed to the gloom, they advanced through
the tunnel. About a hundred yards along the
tunnel, a small room appeared on one side.
Upon entering it they saw two boxes in one
corner and a table in the other. The large box
was tackled by Frank, and after some struggling
he managed to break the lock, and throwing back
the lid he gave a sharp cry, which brought Arthur
to his side.
There in the box was a grim skeleton with a
knife in its mouth. There was nothing else in the
box so they tried to pry open the smaller one, but
try as they would, the lock would not budge.
When they tried to lift it, they heard a metallic
sound inside.
"Big Spanish dollars, by the thud," said
Arthur.
"Yeah, guess we'll be rich for life now. Come
on. Let's get it to the boat."
After tugging, pushing, and sweating they
managed to get it to where the boat lay on the
beach.
"Well, now to get the motor repaired."
"Sure, we've got 'he treasure but we've got to
get it home."
After spending a good half-hour trying to find
trouble, they found they had no gas.
"Well, I'll be hanged!" said Arthur. "We
could have been started long ago."
"Yes," replied Frank, "It's lucky we brought
that extra tank full."
Ten o'clock that night the "Cascade" ran up to
the tying-place in Balboa, and two travel-weary
and tired boys lifted a heavy box onto the plat-
form.
"I'm going to open it as soon as I get at my
tool box," said Arthur, "so let's hurry."
Almost exhausted, but excited, they arrived
at Arthur's home, and dived into the tool box for
a file.
Arthur's mother, father, and sister all came to
see the opening of the treasure chest, so Arthur
set to work with vigor.


a


81







THE CARIBBEAN.


The rusty iron soon gave way, and he threw the likewise. Frank looked foolishly at Arthur, and
lid back. On the top was an oily piece of cloth, they shut the lid slowly.
and with great excitement he lifted this. They had brought home a box of musket balls
which was left in the deserted castle.
Quiet reigned for a while, then Arthur's father It's a peculiar thing, but they never went back
burst into a roar of laughter, and his mother did to follow that mysterious tunnel to the end.


A LEGEND.
Roger Deakins, '29.


Proud old Fort San Lorenzo lay majestically on
her high bluff, guarding the entrance to the
Chagres River. Within the fort was an air of
sleepy indolence, for the "Dons" were never an
energetic race. And indeed, what cause was there
for vigilance? Above the fort floated the golden
banner of Castile and was not Spain ruler of the
seas, and master of life and death on this tortured,
oppressed isthmus? It was true that strange
sails had been sighted that afternoon at the mouth
of the river but then, pirates were a cowardly
breed and would never dare attack an armed fort.
A full moon shone down in the massive walls
and straw-thatched huts. A man of the garrison
was whispering to a girl seated on some stone
steps. A sentry walked his round perfunctorily.
The moat was full, the gates were strong. What
had they to fear?
Farther down the coast and around the bend,
to the west of the fort was another scene. Here
men were cursing and sweating as they toiled to
place a brass culvirin upon a low, wheeled cart
together with some shot and a keg of powder.
NW hen this was accomplished a man stood forth.
Evidently he was the leader. He gave his orders.
The cannon with most of the men was to go to the
fortress gate, while the rest going by small boat,


were to scale the hill unseen and attack from the
rear. With much labor the venture was started.
Just as the moon was going down and the fort
was sinking into complete silence, the sleepy
sentry heard a noise in front of the gate. Instantly
he was wide awake, but it was too late, for at the
same instant a cannon roared and the shot crashed
through the gate, splintering a great piece from
it.
Inside the fort all was.confusion with everyone
shouting, "Pirates!" Finally, a defense was
organized and for a time it seemed as though the
attackers would be beaten off.
One of the pirates, receiving an arrow almost
through his body, pulled it out and wrapping a
piece of his shirt around it, thrust it into his
musket and fired it back before he died.
The arrow with its flaming burden fell on the
roof of one of the thatched huts.
As the Spaniards were fighting fire within, and
the force at the gate without, the reinforcements
from the rear had little trouble entering. Two
hours later Henry Morgan and his followers, un-
troubled by a single Spaniard, were feasting in
the impregnable fortress of San Lorenzo, and pre-
paring for their expedition across the isthmus to
Panama City.


MORGAN'S ATTACK ON PANAMA CITY. sent out a herd of wild bulls. As the bulls came
IF. II. Bundv, '31. thundering across the plain the natives of Panama
"Yes," said the old traveler, "Morgan was a expected the pirates to turn and run, but the wily
smart man. No one but a brave man could have old pirate, Captain Morgan, would not retreat.
forced fourteen hundred men to march through the.
So P i. r He merely ordered his men to shoot the wild cattle,
jungles of Panama as he did. Of course he lost
many men on the trip. Some were caught by wild although they greatly outnumbered his men.
animals, and some died of fever, but he lost more After this the hungry pirates took a night off and
by starvation than in any other way. When he feasted on the fresh meat which was so obligingly
reached Panama City the terrified inhabitants supplied by the polite inhabitants of Panama City."







THE CARIBBEAN. 53


BALBOA'S BLOODHOUNDS AND THEIR
DESCENDANT.
Carlos Rankin:, 'I.


On a sunny afternoon in August, two boys were
seated under an almond tree. Beside them was
a medium-sized, black dog. His ears, snoot, and
tail were long, and in fact his general proportions
denoted a hound of one sort or another. The
owner, a boy of sixteen, preferred to believe that
it was an offspring of a bloodhound. As flecks
of sunshine fell through the leaves on its glossy
coat, his eyes appraised it proudly.
"Do you know, Jack," he said to his com-
panion, "I really believe that Blackie descended
from the pack of bloodhounds that Balboa took
with him across the Isthmus."
"I never heard about that," answered Jack,
"Tell me about it."
The following is a summary of what the owner
told to his friend:
Vasco de Nuiiez Balboa was one of the many
Spaniards who left Spain, came to the new world,
and were changed into cruel-hearted, lawless men
by the horrible conditions and the mad craving
for gold.
On his first expedition, he gathered a force of
about one hundred and ninety rough men and
started across the Isthmus. He would set his
bloodhounds after ihe natives to round them up,
then subject them to all sorts of torture in an
effort to make them tell where their cities of
wealth were hidden. They would tell the truth,
which was that they knew of none, and as a
result, they were either torn to pieces by the
bloodhounds, had their ears cut off, or put on the
rack. (ne thing they did hint of; that was an


immense ocean which was at the other side of the
Isthmus. Balboa decided to find it, so he and his
companions traveled across the country through
marshy swamps, bitten by mosquitoes and all
sorts of vermin found in tropical jungles. They
discovered it, and acquired from the natives
pearls of large size, and quite a bit of gold. They
returned with exaggerated tales of the great
ocean and the wealth along its coast.
The purpose of his second trip was to explore
along the Pacific coast. With his bloodhounds,
he gathered natives to carry provisions and parts
of ships across the Isthmus. Through dense
jungles, swamps, and stricken with fever, the
natives struggled under their huge burdens. If
they dropped with exhaustion or from fever,
they were goaded on again by the fear of being torn
to pieces by the hounds, tortured by sharp, steel
rods, and hot irons, or left to die in the jungles.
M1any were left to die because they could not
possibly go farther at any cost or punishment.
Through an enemy of his, one who was jealous
of the sensation Balboa caused in Spain and the
colonies, he was falsely charged with treason and
beheaded in 1517.
"Boy, life must have been cruel and yet ex-
citing in those days," said Jack. "How do you
figure that Blackie might have decended from
one of those bloodhounds?"
"Oh, he was brought in from some village near
Gatun, and he can follow animals and human
beings very easily by smell. It's good to think
he is, anyway."


A LEGEND.
Elizabeth Raymond, '-o.


One day, many years ago, before Columbus
discovered America, a San Bias Indian sought the
witch-doctor of the village. When he found the
witch-doctor he asked him if there was a way in
which he could kill his rival without the rest of the
Indians knowing about it. The witch-doctor told
the Indian to return in a week and he would tell
him a way in which he could secretly kill his rival.
When the week was up and the Indian returned,
the witch-doctor said, "All week I have been


trying to find a method that fll achieve your
purpose. The time is not favorable. Return
next week and I will see if the spirits will tell me
the method."
The Indian left the abode of the witch-doctor
impatient at the delay.
When the week was up the Indian again sought
the witch-doctor who told him a method which
would enable him to exterminate his rival.







54 THE CARIBBEAN.

Leaving the witch-doctor the Indian gathered The days slipped by slowly for the Indian, who
together a number of small bamboo sticks and began to wish that he had made the date of his
took them home. After examining the bambnn rival's death conner.
sticks he saw that there %ai. in.r ic hki h ':1i- in A. last the long.-looied for day arrived. The
perfect condition. nJin iwas curiou- to kn.iw how his rival would die.
Three weeks he spent in finding the required H W- .Ludin sA t r'the man would die! That
number of perfect banmbj .,ick. -'iT atterin .iin a ..rm art-se :and the wind blew strong-


took a pure white hen's egg and with tar inscribed
the name of his rival and a date two weeks distant
on it.
Very carefully he made a raft out of the
bamboo sticks and placed the egg in the middle.
When the bamboo sticks and the egg were wired
securely together he patiently waited for night to
fall.
There was no moon. The Indian with great
care transported his raft of bamboo sticks to his
canoe. Under cover of the night he rowed a mile
from shore. Then he set the little raft afloat
with a great feeling that soon his rival would die.


ly. The Indian's rival was walking along the
beach when a coconut tree blew over on him and
instantly killed him.
All of the San Bias Indians believe this is true.
Recently they have changed the idea a little and
say that the person whose name is written on the
egg will die when the raft washes ashore and the
egg breaks.
One of these queer rafts was found in the water
near the coaling station about a year ago. The
egg was rescued and buried without breaking it.
So there is one San Blas Indian more than there
should be.


jfeaturet.



FOURTH OF JULY ON THE ZONE.
Ethel Barnett, '29.


Although the Canal Zone is a considerable dis-
tance from the "sweet land of liberty," Inde-
pendence Day is always celebrated in true Fourth
of July style. There is plenty of patriotism in
evidence, and even a surplus of the "Spirit of '76."
The youth of Panama celebrates for weeks before,
and days after the birthday of our country. But
the main action takes place at Pier 6, a dock which
is always used for occasions which require enter-
taining on a massive scale.
From early morning, when athletic and aquatic
events start the day off, in grand style, until late
at night, when the last dance is over, patriots swarm
the pier. Although the shooting of fireworks is
prohibited on or near the dock, the younger gen-
eration is always in its element. The distribution
of various sweets,free, at certain intervals, makes
a hit-with everyone. The refreshment stand is
never deserted, as people never tire of eating.
Among the attractions offered to the crowd are:


athletic contests of all kinds for children as well
as for adults, boat races, revues put on by dancing
classes, band concerts, boxing bouts, refreshments,
and of course, shooting of fireworks-the real
thing-by experts, and dancing. Little electric
cars which ride the children round and round the
dock unceasingly, are very popular. Free busses
convey the people to and from the dock (that is,
to a certain point, away from the dock) but the
multitude usually bring their own cars.
Vast numbers of cars are parked in and around
the vicinity of Pier 6, and many an erstwhile
patriot's vocabulary increases as he vainly ries
to extricate his automobile from the masses that
surround it.
Everyone is sorry when the day ends,'because
they have to wait a whole year for the next Fourth.
But they live in the hope that it will' be more
glorious than the last, a hope which seems to grow
more impossible as the years pass.







56 THE CARIBBEAN.


BLUE HEAVEN.
.dair Taylor, '29.
One evening I walked down Bolivar Street on
my way home. When I was in the middle of the
block I heard a Victrola, with a very raspy sound
to it, playing "My Blue Heaven," Finally the
music became so loud that I turned around and
looked into the room, my curiosity getting the
better of me.
The room, as it was called, should have right-
fully been named a box, for it wasn't much larger.
It was divided in two parts, the front part serving
as the living room and the latter part as the bed-
room. The only front porch they had was the side-
walk and their kitchen was an alley at the side of
the house. A screen, dividing the two rooms, was
covered with moving picture posters, making it a
very colorful and picturesque affair. The bed,
which could be seen very dimly, was covered with
clean linen and a crocheted coverlet; the brass
bed posts had a red ribbon around eachone. In
the "front room," there was a table upon which
the Victrola was set, and by the Victrola a cellu-
loid doll was keeping watch over a glass dog and
cat and some moving picture programs. Under
the table, on a shelf, a vase stood holding three
or four crepe paper flowers.
The mother of the "box" sat on a chair in the
"front room" holding the baby, and father sat
across from her sans shirt and shoes. A lamp,
hitched on the wall, furnished a very dim light
for the scene. As I walked on down the street
I thought to myself of the humble "Blue Heaven"
I had just passed.

AN ANECDOTE.
Fabian Englander, '3.
On my way home one evening, I noticed the
Bajan maid who took care of the kiddies next
door walking rapidly up and down under the
house, with a baby in her arms and crooning such
a peculiar sounding tune that my curiosity was
aroused. Making a pretense of examining some
new plants that were just taking root, I managed
t draw close enough without attracting her at-
tention, to hear what she was singing.
I'p and down, back and forth, her feet keeping
time to some doggerel air, went that big, over-
grown Chunk of Charcoal, singing over and over
again, these words:
"And the Lord said unto '.l'.,e, 'Chut-Mon.' "


THE PANAMANIAN.
Margaret Misrahi, '3.

Truly a cosmopolitan country is Panama.
Every color, creed, and race is here; turbaned
Hindus, Chinese, Japanese, Negro, and Slav,
Spaniard, Greek, Italian, Arab, German, Dane,
Dutch, French, and English. Americans by
thousands, and countless others of every imaginable
mixture of all. Panama is a melting pot of
nations. It has a true democracy and is a free
country.
Whether of high or low degree, the Panamanian
is polite, courteous, artistic in temperament,
passionately fond of music and poetry, romantic,
gallant, and intensely patriotic. To our minds
he may be cruel, because he loves the cockfights
and bullfights; he may be a gambler becau ;e of the
lottery, but he is seldom or never turbulent or
rowdyish. It is a rare thing indeed to see him
intoxicated. He has the manners of a grandee
and he is fonder of a baseball match, a horse race
or a boxing match than of a bull-fight.

WEST INDIAN CEREMONIES
OF THE DEAD.
Marie Kleefkens, 'r.
The West Indian people have a most peculiar
ceremony for their dead. They mourn for one of
their people for a period of nine days.
Upon hearing of a death, the neighbors and
friends flock to the house of the deceased and
offer their consolation and help. Chairs and
tables are placed about the house. People
gather by early evening on the day of the death.
Quiet games of chess, cards, and checkers are
played until late into the night. A good deal of
singing is done in low, hushed tones. A few
minutes before midnight, the assembly quiets
down. Usually the one who has led the singing
offers up a prayer. Numerous other prayers are
heard about the room and everyone is heard
conversing in low, hushed voices. After mid-
night they leave, one by one. Only a few stay
to console, and help the bereaved family bear their
burden.
For a period of nine days the home of the dead is
constantly visited by friends who offer their
sympathy and try to lighten the sorrow of the
relatives of the dead person.







THE CARIBBEAN.


During the final ceremony on the ninth night,
the home of the dead is a scene of great gaiety.
Tables and chairs are placed around the rooms of
the house. A large crowd gathers; coffee is made,
sandwiches prepared, and passed around. Liquor
is also served. Numerous domino and card
games are formed. The singing of this night is
quite different from that of the first. It is loud
and boisterous and sung in a tune quite lacking in
reverence. In fact, during this whole final serv-
ice, at least till midnight, there is nothing very
reverent about the action of the assembly of
people.
At midnight the singing is hushed for a few
minutes. A few people offer prayers and the
assembly joins in. Then again, the singing and
card playing is started. This continues till dawn.
At early morning they leave for home, some in
small groups, others alone. Each acts in a very
solemn manner. Before leaving the house, each
of the guests goes to the family of the deceased,
wishing each member a carefree and happy
future life.
After this ninth day service, the departed is
quite forgotten and is mentioned neither in the
home nor among friends.

THE CHIRIQI' INDIANS.
l'il//am IHirmuno, "',.
In the desolate wilderness of Panaman jungle
lands near the Costa Rican border, dwell the
tribe of Chiriqui Indians. They are very peace-
ful, as a rule, and often work on the large planta-
tions in Panama.
Many of these Indians file their teeth to sharp
points, which they claim helps to preserve them
for a long period of time. Looking at these
Indians, with their filed teeth and green-painted
faces, one might take them to be cannibals, but
they are quite harmless.
The squaws wear a -up,, Hil..1, amount of
peculiar beads and other ornaments typical of
the Red race, while nearly every matured male
of the tribe has a small necklace of crocodile
teeth for "dress occasions." This is a token of
bravery handed down through generations, in
many cases. The crocodile also gives something
besides its teeth in the form of "grasa de lagarto"
(crocodile fat) which is used as a cure for rheu-
macism, sore throat, cuts, in fact for almost any
human ailment.


The Chiriqui Indians are natural-born hunters,
and the section of Panama in which they live is
infested with game. Sometimes, when hunting,
they wear feathers about their ankles as a pro-
tection against a poisonous snake. They claim
the snake will strike at the feathers rather than
the bare skin and in this way give them time
to dodge further assaults.
These Indians live in miserable grass huts with-
out a floor, except for the ground., The squaw
has very little, if any, housework to do. Her
daily duties consist of cooking meals for the
family, fetching water from a near-by water
source, washing in a chosen stream, and weaving
cloth in primitive Indian fashion.
The Chiriqui Indians are, indeed, an interesting
type of people to visit.

"EN MI PUEBLO"
Blanca Jl'alker, '2).

"En mi pueblo," were the first words Susita
used to say before starting a conversation, no
matter what subject was being discussed.
"En mi pueblo we grow big, sweet and string-
less mangoes which we call 'de calidad' because
they are of the best quality that can be found on
the Isthmus. We also have a kind which is
very, very small-no bigger than a dove's egg.
These grow in bunches something like grapes
only they are of reddish-yellow color instead of
green or purple. \Ve call these mangoes 'chan-
cletas' meaning a flat slipper because the seed
is almost flat. En mi pueblo there are many
kinds of mangoes; some we call apple-mangoes
because they are red and the pulp is very much
like the apples; others we call peach-mangoes
and others take the name of the fruit which they
resemble most. En mi pueblo we have mangoes
before any other section and long after their sea-
son is finished. The reason for this is that we
have so many different kinds and each kind
bears its fruit a little later than the other; this
is why we have mangoes long after the other
sections do not have even one for a sample.
En mi pueblo we have sweet and juicy pine-
apples, stringless alligator pears, coconut palms
which give the best coconut fruit I ever have
tasted, and we have many other species of wild
fruits that arc so good that it is a pity to call
them wild.


MR 13835---







THE CARIBBEAN.


"The seas en mi pueblo are so clear and calm;
from them we get delicious fish. We send
fish to other places because we want others to
taste what is good. The beaches en mi pueblo
are so beautiful that every year people come to
spend their vacation and to enjoy all the good
things which we offer them here en mi pueblo."
This way Susita can talk about her little
pueblo which in reality is very pleasant and
fruitful. In her town we may find, as she says,
all sorts of things and we will surely find them
of the best kind. Taboga, Susita's town, is the
most looked for summer resort.

THE CARNIVAL.
Foribel Barngrover, '3j.
When Rome was young, it was the custom of the
people to have a season of feast and holiday.
This generally started a week before Ash Wednes-
day and lasted until midnight of Ash Wednesday.
The people celebrated the carnival season with
feasts and parades. During the six weeks of
Lenten Season following Ash Wednesday, Sun-
day was held as a feast day.
Later in Spain carnival lasted only three days
and their Lenten Season began on Ash Tuesday.
In Italy the carnival only lasted three riotous
days.
In Panama there is a carnival each year which
lasts four days before Ash Wednesday. Carnival
may almost be compared with the Mardi Gras of
New Orleans, the Fiesta of Los Angeles, or the
Rose Carnival of Portland.
The natives save every penny they can possibly
keep out of their poor earnings, so that they may
have nice costumes. The streets are decorated
with colored lights and signs and posters which are
gaily painted. For days before the carnival, the
small stores are supplied with confetti and ser-
pentine, Pollera slippers, and the gay, gaudy
materials of which the costumes are made.
About a week before Carnival the voting for
queen is at its highest pitch. There is generally
a queen representing each outstanding race,
such as the Panaman, Chinese, and Negro. The
Army and Navy very often have their queen also.
The day before Carnival the small children get
dressed in their costumes. Clowns with painted,
laughing faces, red and white devils carrying
large forks made of cardboard parade the streets.
Many more costumes, both original and comical,
may be seen.


The first day of Carnival, everyone is ready and
anxious to show his or her costume. About four
o'clock the parade begins. The barbaric musical
instruments of graters, cans with stones in them,
and others are heard on every side. The voices
of the Spanish, Panamans and Negroes, as they
sing the carnival songs, are not unpleasant.
There are many truck loads of laughing people,
parading up and down the main street. They
throw confetti and serpentine at the crowds
standing on the sidewalks watching the procession.
A few tourists in caromattas enjoy the gaiety
almost as much as the natives themselves, though
perhaps not so boisterously.
After Carnival, the queens have their various
dances which last late, or early, into the next
morning.
The next day of Carnival is practically the same.
King Momo, king of joy, is well represented in
the faces of his subjects.
On the last day of Carnival everyone is out, as
the big parade is held on that day. On either
side, cars line the street, and the people joyously
shout at every passer-by, whether they know them
or not. The queen rides in a beautiful float, while
pages announce her with the blast of their bugles.
Her attendants follow in a truck behind her.
Gradually, as it becomes darker, the people
drop out of the parade. But late the same night
they appear again at the dances, ready for more
fun.
The Carnival is over at last. Many are glad
of the rest to come, others wish there were only
more. But all classes look forward to the
Carnival to be held next year.

THE BOOTBLACK.
Vila Lyew, '29.
"Shine, Seiior? I will polish up your shoes
fine, and shine 'em bueno for you. Shine,
Seiior? I am bes' bootblack in Panama, Sefior.
I hablo Inglis and Spanish, and my charge is
only twenty cents plata. Shine, Seior? You
ask my name? My name is Jose, Seiior. Where
is my mama? I have no mama, no papa. I
jus' live mos' anyway I can. When it rains and
business is poor I sleep on the parque banco, and
ask Dios for better day mariana. I have no big
loss. I do what please me. When I have plenty
dinero I go to the cine. Every domingo I put on
clean ropa and go to church. Yes, Sefior, I like
the Gringos ver' much. Dem soldier muy bueno.







THE CARIBBEAN. 59


On pay day they get borracho but always they
give poor muchacho tip. I like the sailors bes'.
When I am hombre I am goin' to be one so that I
will see the whole mundo. I am finis', Seflor.
To-day I earn un peso. Dat is suficiente for one
day so I will put 'way my box, and go play with
other muchachos. Muchas gracias, Sefior.

PANAMA MONKEYS.
Royal Higgason, '29.
One of the most interesting things that a
visitor to Panama can see is the various animals
which are in the Republic, and in -he Canal
Zone. But of all the animals, the most amusing
is the native monkey. There are many differ-
ent kinds of monkeys such as the white faced,
the red ring-tailed, the black faced, and the
spider. I have at present a red ring-tailed
monkey which I bought when it was only three
months old. It was at that time so small
and such a baby monkey that I had to feed
him from five to six times a day. Of course,
he could not be given food that would ordi-
narily be given to a full grown monkey, so I was
forced to feed him on warm milk, bread crumbs,
and all such food that is easily digested.
As soon as I got my monkey, I began to
choose names that I could give him, but at
last I selected the name of Jack, since that is
the name given to most all the monkeys, of his
type especially. A great deal of time was spent
at first in endeavoring to make him tame
enough to have around the house without the fear
of his biting someone. It was some four months
before this job was completed and by this time
Jack knew his name as soon as any person
called him. My next problem was that of
finding what I could feed him in order to make
him grow and be healthy. I soon found that a
human being is not the only one that can get
in the habit of being stubborn, because this
monkey of mine was soon in the habit of re-
fusing to ea* if he was not given the things that
he especially cared for. Sugar was the first
thing that I found that this pet of mine liked
exceptionally well. In fact, he would accept
anything that was at all sweet. Fat meat was
also another thing that Jack took an early
liking for. By this time he has learned to eat
whatever we give him and each day as we sit
down to eat we give him a small bit of each of


the foods that we have on the table and very
seldom does he refuse any of them.
The habits of a monkey are so queer that a
person can amuse himself at any time by just
sitting down and watching the ditlni r things,
such as tricks, that a monkey does. Jack has
been taught, since I have had him, that as
soon as he sees one of us eating something, he
should hold both of his hands up in order to
get some. When he does something that he
knows is wrong, he immediately starts to run
away, and as I get up to punish him he holds
both of his hands over his head in order to
escape punishment. Also, if he knows i hat he
is going to be punished or whipped for some of
his meanness, he starts to do all the tricks that
he can possibly think of so that I will not whip
him. When he is allowed to come into the house
he walks around to see if there is anything new
to his eye or if any changes have been made.
But he has been taught that he is not to touch
anything that is on the table or dresser. His
greatest pleasure when he gets into the house
is to go immediately to one of the floor pillows
and make himself perfectly comfortable.
In general the animals of the Canal Zone and
the Republic of Panama are many in number
and none of them is lacking is some form of
entertainment or interest.

THE SAN BLAS INDIANS.
Rodman Drake, '3Z.
Of all the Panama Indians, the best known are
the so-called San Bias. The San Bias Indians
are a peaceful, semicivilized people who dwell
upon the islands and the adjoining mainland
of the San Bias Gulf. They are in constant
communication with Panamanians and Ameri-
cans and visit Colon regularly. There are
trading posts on the San Bias islands and a large
banana estate in the heart of the San Bias
district.
The majority of the Indians speak English
more clearly than Spanish. Many of these
Indians have resided in New York and elsewhere
in the United States. Some of the islands are
model up-to-date settlements with straight,
well-kept streets, clubs, societies, dance halls,
schools, street lights and all other ideas of
modern civilizations. The Indians also own







THE CARIBBEAN.


cars and frequently may be seen driving about
the streets of Colon or Panama City.
The San Bias Indians are peculiar in their
appearance, having dwarf-sized bodies and large,
box-like heads.
The men dress in rough trousers, ready-made
shirts, or more often shirts of San Bias make
with tucks at shoulders and sleeves and chest,
and for a head gear palm-leaf hats many sizes
too small for them. The men also wear huge
disk-shaped earrings of thin gold. The costumes
of the women consist of loose blouses of brilliant
cloth of all colors beautifully fashioned in elabor-
ate designs. Often one may see all manner
of odd patterns embodied in a design, Arabic
and Roman numerals, letters of the alphabet,
Chinese characters and even the design of a
Corn Flake box copied letter by letter.
About their necks are draped dozens of strings
of beads, shells, teeth, and coins. Huge gold
disks are worn in the ears, a heavy gold nose
ring of triangular shape hangs over the upper
lip, and a brilliant red bandana handkerchief is
draped over the head and shoulders.
Miss Anna Coope, an American missionary,
was the first foreigner to be allowed to live in the
San Blas country. She lived there for fourteen
years teaching them to read and write, and
helping them to learn better ways of living. She
found them intelligent and capable of mastering
the English language.

THE NEGRO IN PANAMA.
Carlos Rankin, '3J.
There are approximately 55,000 negroes in
Panama, and with a few exceptions, their cus-
toms and modes of living are the same. The
negroes have very large families, and all are
crowded into one room. A curtain of some sort
divides the room in half; in the front, a few
chairs are placed, while in the back there are a
bed and several small hammocks. Usually in
front of the houses, there are a few boxes with
native fruits, candy, bread, sweet-peppers, and
lemons, which are sold to the passers-by. The
insanitary conditions which exist in the negro
homes are one of the greatest evils of that race.
The main characteristic of the dress of the
negro is his extravagance. The young men
wear silk shirts, sometimes purple or green,


with flannel pants, and Panama hats. All the
women wear bright-colored dresses, and the older
men, on special occasions, wear derby hats,
long-tailed coats, and neat vests.
Rocks are their principal weapons and more
than one fight between the white boys and
the negro boys has ended with serious results.
Their careless attitude towards life is noticeable
in each one. They are very independent, enjoy
late hours, dances, and wild midnight jaunts
more than anything else. There are very few
men, if any, who try to save part of their earn-
ings. Most of them believe in living the day out
before thinking of the next. All negroes are
fond of music; they are famous for their "jazz".
In their various religions, they are apparently
sincere. Many of them go into fits during their
vigorous devotions. They are unusually super-
stitious and have many different religions, some
of which do not seem of a civilized order.
I have described only the majority of the
negroes. There are some who are very trust-
worthy, clean, and ambitious. As to their dislike
for the white people, it may be excused to a
certain extent only, by the way the white men
and women treat some of them. At times one
may well sympathize with the negroes. Humor
is not entirely lacking in them, if onecaresto
recognize it.

TO OUR ADVERTISERS.
Paul Hayden, '29.

Does an advertiser in THE CARIBBEAN gain or
lose from a business point of view? Let us
investigate the term "business point of view."
In business the object is that for every dollar put
out, one dollar plus interest should come back
sooner or later-preferably sooner. If this object
is not obtained it is poor business; in fact, we were
told that it was not business.
There are, however, more ways than one in
which an advertiser may be compensated. The
Isthmus as a whole, is a small place and a whole
is greater than any of its parts. We learned
that in geometry. Therefore, an advertisement
in THE CARIBBEAN would not necessarily cause
the business man to work over time. That is a
good feature, is it not?
Now, friends of THE CARIBBEAN, you who ad-
vertise, you who help us in our work and you







THE CARIBBEAN.


who buy, you are probably wondering just how the
advertiser makes a good investment. It is simple.
Just look around; you will observe quite readily
that nearly every adult you see has a son or
daughter or a relative who is in high school, will
soon be in, or was in high school. These adults or
parents love their children and because thechildren
love the Annual and take great pride in it the
parents also love it. One way to make friends
with a person is to admire his children.
All this leads up to the point that THE CARIB-
BEAN needs the support of its advertisers. By
inserting an "ad" the advertiser becomes the
student's friend. He indirectly becomes the
parent's friend. Therefore as the parents form
two-thirds of the public down here, the business
man gains the good will of his customers and that
is worth something.
Several of our advertisers never expect to
realize anything from their "ad" becauseof their
not doing any local business. They are true
friends indeed.

CHIRIQUI PRISON.
rthir 1', . 'o.
In the days of old, before the United States
thought of building a canal in Panama, the
Spanish descendants of old Spain ruled with a
high hand in South America.
Colombia, the possessor of Panama for many
years, let Panama rule itself to a certain extent.
As long as high officials of Colombia and Panama
received some money, they did not care how
much the people of the poorer class suffered.
Many died from disease, and some even died from
starvation. Many were forced to steal for a
living.
Those who were caught stealing were put in a
prison built of thick, strong, cold stone. There
were also some choice dungeons for the worst.
This prison is now only a "has been," but still
shows very plainly what the prisoners had to go
through in the long years that they spent in the
lonely cells.
A tourist visiting Panama is taken to Chiriqui
Prison as a site of interest. Little does a tourist
realize when he is walking on the promenade
built on the roof of the dungeons of the Chiriqui
Prison, the sufferings of the inhabitants that it
contained in the years before.


After he has admired the beauty for several
minutes, the guide takes him down to see the
prison itself. Here are rooms of bare stone with
heavy, steel doors. Of course there are no prisoners
in the cells now, but there were once upon a time,
and how well some remember. Just for the thrill
of it, the tourist probably goes in one of the cells.
He sees the balls and chains rusty from age and
disuse, piled up in one corner. Once these were
shiny from the continual rubbing of the skin of
some prisoner. He may also see pictures and
initials carved on the walls-carved by some
poor 'man "framed" by a higher official, and
doomed to se.-ve a long term of years.
The guide most likely takes him up to the
watch towers that were used by the guards to
watch the prisoners as they walked around the
prison ground, or sat staring emptily into space,
dreaming of the freedom that they would be,
perhaps, forever denied.
The tourist usually takes out his camera and
snaps a few pictures of his companions standing
in front of the little watch tower, naming it,
"Chiriqui Prison," little realizing how much
the natives and inhabitants of Panama dreaded
to hear that name in the days before the United
States of America started to clean Panama of
disease, and to help Panama form a republic to
make it what it is to-day.

THE COCONUT PALM.
Morris Luce, '29.
In the whole broad belt of the tropical climates
there is probably no tree quite as common as the
coconut palm. One reason for this is that this
specie is so hardy; it thrives in climates variable
both in rainfall and temperature. Peculiarly too,
it seems to grow just as luxuriantly on the salt,
rather arid seashore as it does in a fertile valley
or even in a swamp. Then too, it makes an
ideal domestic tree, being useful as well as
decorative, and is used for both purposes by the
inhabitants of the tropics.
The tree itself is very beautiful and unique in
appearance. The trunk develops its full thick-
ness of about eighteen or twenty inches within
the first year of growth, but it takes about twenty
years to attain its full height which in some cases
is nearly a hundred feet, though it is usually
sixty or seventy feet. The surface of this trunk







62 THE CARIBBEAN.


is ringed all the way up with alternate rough and
smooth bands of four or five inches in width. The
wood is the same beautiful brown color all the
way through as it is on the surface, but is is very
porous and fibrous and consequently of no value
commercially.
The frond or leaf is unique in that it is in reality
a leaf and a branch at the same time. These
fronds, eigh- or ten feet in length, are also made
of a very fibrous material and are built on much
the same plan as the human spinal column and
ribs system. A long flexible "backbone" runs
the full length of the leaf, the wider end, or butt,
being set firmly against the bole of the trunk,
and along each side of this central support all the
way out to the tip long thin leaves are set per-
pendicularly to it. These leaves are green in
color, between a foot and two feet in length, and
are also built on a little central support of their
own, much as a blade of long wild grass. There
are twelve or fifteen of these fronds, all shooting
out from the very top of the trunk. Two or three
fronds will start growth straight up into the air
out of the tip of the tree above all the rest of the
fronds, but as the tree grows other ones shoot out
above them until they are the lowest of the three
or four levels of branches; they then cease to
draw nourishment from the tree, die, and then
drop off to the ground. It is the branches that


make the rings on the trunk, the rough bands
being where they once grew and the smooth ones
representing the distance between the branches.
It is the development of the fruit itself that is
most wonderful. This starts with a long green
pod that comes out among the branches. This
breaks open, disclosing thousands of little yellow
kernels growing on a support of the same color.
Only eight or ten of all these little kernels are
destined to become coconuts; the rest of them
drop off one by one, all the time growing in size,
until there are finally only the several fully
developed fruit left. If these are left alone,
as they are in the jungle, they too, finally drop to
the ground, and the milk in the shell hardens to
a spongy consistency and roots sprout through
the shell into the ground to start a new tree.
The coconut palm always has several bunches of
fruit on it in the various stages of development.
Science has examined the milk of this fruit and it
has been shown that it has as much food value as
pure cow's milk. The meat too, is very nourish-
ing. Another valuable product is the heart of the
tree, which is found in the very center of the bole.
This has much the same consistency as garden
cabbage, but is much sweeter.
Panama is truly proud of being represented by
this tree in being called "the Land of the Coconut
Palm."


A TRIP TO PORTO BELLO.
Rodman Drake, '3/.


Porto Bello is probably one of the most inter-
esting places in Panama. It was at one time the
metropolis of the New World. It is located about
twenty miles east of the Atlantic entrance to the
Panama Canal.
In order to get there, we left Fort Sherman by
boat. We arrived at the beautifullittle bay of Porto
Bello, whose shores are covered with fruit trees
and palm trees, with an uneventful trip. So
attractive was this spot that Columbus called it
Porto Bello (beautiful port).
We left our boat by means of small native
canoes and arrived at the little village of Porto
Bello. We walked up the main way, which at
one time was a flourishing street, until we came to
a graveyard. In this graveyard we saw some


old tombs, but most of them were modern. We
also saw many bones and skulls scattered around.
These had been dug up. It is the custom of the
inhabitants of Porto Bello to disinter the dead if
the rent is not paid for the grave in use. Upon
leaving the graveyard we went to an ancient
cathedral. In this cathedral we saw some more old
tombs, tomb with a wax mummy of their Christ
in it, which they often carry around in Sunday
services.
After leaving the cathedral we visited the ruins
of Fort Porto Bello which was built by the early
Spaniards and subsequently captured by Morgan.
On leaving the Fort, we returned to our boat and
later arrived at Fort Sherman with the idea in
mind tha-t we had spent a most interesting day.







THE CARIBBEAN.


THE ISTHMUS.
Mavis Thirlwall, '3o.
A novel, interesting, and healthful vacation may
be spent at the Isthmus of Panama at any season
of the year. The climate, although tropical, is
equable. It is always summer in Panama. The
hottest day is about the temperature of a "hot
spell" in the United States. Although the Isth-
mus has a reputation for being a rainy place,
weather reports show that forty-seven per cent
of the day-light hours are sunshiny on the Pacific
side and fifty-two on the Atlantic side. The
cloudy days lessen the heat. During the dry
season, January, February, and March, there is
scarcely any rain. In the other nine months
statistics prove that rain falls on an average of
forty minutes a day. The rainfall is made up of
heavy and light showers which pass quickly and
are usually followed by a burst of sunshine. There
is seldom a day without breeze and the nights are
invariable cool.
The Isthmus is healthful. If one observes the
general rules of health, there need be no fear of
unusual illness. Mosquitoes, the dreaded fever-
carriers, have been exterminated by the drainage
of swamps and the spraying of oil on breeding
places. From the extensive screening of houses
in the Canal Zone, one gets the idea that insects
are prevalent, but this screening is merely a pre-
cautionary measure. In Panama City and Colon
there are no screens. The greater part of the
windows are just shaded by blinds, nevertheless
you seldom see a mosquito or fly. The sanitary
conditions of Panama and Colon, which are under
the control of the Canal Zone authorities, are very
good. There is a modern sewage system, brick
paved streets, and pure water supply in both of
these cities.
The greatest attraction offered by the Isthmus
is, of course, the Canal, which has been said to be
one of the world's greatest sights. There are
several different angles from which one may view
the Canal; namely, by passage through, by a rail
trip across the Isthmus, and by auto trips to
various points.
Next to the inspection of the Canal, a visit to
the ruins of Old Panama is the "high spot" in a
vacation ( n the Isthmus. These ruins which are
seven miles by automobile from Balboa or Pana-
ma, are unlike any others in the world. They
are the remains of a city that was destroyed by


one attack of a desperate band of adventurers,
Morgan's buccaneers. The city was rich, with a
splendid cathedral, several smaller churches,
shops, warehouses, and, probably, twenty thou-
sand inhabitants. It was a station for transferring
treasure from Peru to Spain. It was this treasure
which lured Morgan and his men.
The old cathedral and the city hall are the most
notable of the ruins. The jungle has covered
much of the city, but by careful observation the
walls of the monasteries and convents, the city
market, the paved streets, and even Ml.rgan's
bridge may been seen. The Panaman Govern-
ment has made some progress in clearing the
ruins but there is still much to be done.
Although there is yet no highway entirely across
the Isthmus, the roads in the Canal Zone, and at
Panama and Colon are so good that many en-
joyable rides may be had. The longest aut tour is
into the country to the west of the Canal, which
may be reached from the ferry at Pedro Miguel.
There is a macadam road in the interior, passing
through lovely scenes and several old towns, one
hundred and seventy-five miles to Santiago.
There is also a great variety of diversions to be
enjoyed. There is dancing at several hotels,
besides at the numerous clubs frequented by
Isthmian society. There is a first-class golf-
course at Panama and an eighteen-hole course at
Gatun, which can be compared to the best courses
in the States.
Swimming, which is very popular, especially
among the Americans, is a sport indulged in by
people of all ages. There is a fine pool at the
Balboa Clubhouse, and one connected with the
Washington Hotel, in Colon. Surf bathing is
available at Bella Vista, Panama, where an
exclusive, beautiful club has recently been erected.
Other amusements include horse-racing, dog-
racing, the weekly drawing of the National
Lottery at the Bishop's Palace on Sunday morn-
ings, and the great annual fiesta of the four days
before Lent.
For newcomers and visitors there are other
diversions, as a visit to the market on the beach
at Panama, strolls in quaint old streets, evening
concerts in city squares, visits to the odd Chinese
and Hindu shops, and visits to the Canal Zone
Clubhouses.
For the fisherman and hunter, Panama is an
ideal spot. There is extensive duck shooting







THE CARIBBEAN.


and deer hunting. Fishing in Panama Bay
proves togive good results. Crocodile and turtle
hunting are unusual and interesting sports also
found here.
On the Atlantic side at Gatun, the tarpon
fishing is a great attraction to fishermen. For
their convenience there is a Tarpon Club at the
Spillway.
The City of Panama alone, is a source of inter-
esting sights. At the seawall is Las Bovedas,
a promenade built over the dungeons of an ancient
prison. It is dedicated to the French Canal
builders. Inside the wall the history of the Canal


is told on stone tablets. Near this walk are the
ruins of the Santo Domingo Church which was
burned in 1737. In contains a flat arch of brick
that is an architectural curiosity. Another old
relic is the San Jose Church, or the Church of the
Golden Altar, so named because of the gold altar
within it. There is also the Cathedral and many
handsome buildings including a National Theatre.
Panama has also beautiful residential sections con-
taining palatial homes. In all respects I think
the Isthmus is an ideal place for a vacation or for
a permanent residence.


INDIVIDUAL THRIFT.
.1 arion Neel\ '31.
(Prize Essav in National City Bank Thrift Contest.,


Dinner over-studies done and kiddies in bed
now for an evening with the radio. However, as
the soft music flooded the room, my mind wander-
ed back over the past twenty vears-to the first
day of my new job; a messenger boy-and the
coincidence of my employing two to-day. Now
I thought of my chum, Tom Daley, how he lauded
over me because he was from the inner office!
But times changed and soon I was plodding up
the ladder-clerk-head clerk-confidential secre-
tary-and now-really one of the partners. How
proud I was as year by year my savings increased,
and now, I am enjoying the comfort of my home
and my well-supported family. My thoughts
rambled on. Soon I was aware of the entrance of
a man. Before long Tom Dalev told his story.
Success had missed him, according to his out-
look. But one realized that his one lacking qual-
ity-that of thrift and economy-had remained
undeveloped.
"What helped your success, most?" he asked.
"Thrift," I said, "or an economical management
of my savings. The thrift of the Scotch, as we all
know, is very highly developed. But it is, never-
theless, a fine example.
"The World War proved that even though the
majority of the Americans did not practice thrift
to a great extent, it could be readily developed.
They realized that it was an admirable, as well
as a necessary quality, to a happy, well-balanced
life, and was well worth possessing.
"During the War economy was practiced in our
country to the fullest extent, and its mark is to be


felt to-day. School children are being taught the
value of thrift. Why? Because early development
will instill that quality in them, and guarantee a
future free from cares and financial worries.
Lectures are given on this now all-important
problem; the budget plan, and the importance of
starting savings accounts as soon as possible, are
explained, taught and partially enforced in schools.
People realize that if the government needs a
budget system, that it is much more necessary
for the individual to accustom himself to wise
expenditure.
"Crippled and disabled youths returned from the
War, unprepared, helpless, and dependent on their
families. How many of them had heeded that
adage 'Be Prepared,' and had realized that un-
foreseen and unavoidable misfortunes occur?
We dislike to think of these things, it is true, and
keep the thought away.
"Then we realize, too late, the value of thrift
'Nothing ventured, nothing gained' has been
proved true and we should apply it to our lives
daily, by developing cconmmv in both time and
monev, from the first. If not now, then, when?
It is usually the person who 13 careful about how
he spends his day and dollars, who succeeds an-l
prospers. That is the secret of my success and

The men the world call lucky
Will tell you, one and all
That success comes not with wishing
But by constant thrift-that's all!"


MR 13835-9






66 THE CARIBBEAN.


A TRAGEDY.
Roy Walker, '29.


Her name was Polly Prattle. When she first
came into our family she was about the size of a
new-born chick; little fuzzy green feathers were
sticking out all over her body, as if she had been
covered with glue and then thrown into a pile of
feathers. Just above her little yellow eyes, she
had a red topknot which she learned later to
ruffle prettily when she was talking. This, then
was our Polly who grew up to be a pet of the
family.
When Polly Prattle was nine months old she
learned her first lesson. We had a dog- on our
place called Gyp. Every noon I used to whistle
for him and call him to his dinner. One day I
whistled and was surprised to hear a clear answer
from the porch where Polly had her perch. A
few seconds and Polly was calling: "Here Gyp,
here Gyp," and was whistling in perfect imitation
of myself. After that time until her death Polly
never failed to call Gyp to dinner at the proper
time.
As she grew older, Polly became more and more
versed in the human vocabulary. She learned to
say her own name, to call mother when she was
hungry, and to call my name. Often we would
take her out on the farm and let her ramble all
about the place. She would mingle with chickens,
climb up in the orange and star-apple trees and
help herself to the fruit. Often we would find
her in the corn loft and one time after an all day
search we discovered her in the pig pen having
dinner with the grunts. Always she would betray
here whereabouts by chuckling: "Nice Polly,


Pretty Polly," and occasionally calling Gyp and
my name which she would never fail to follow
with a shrill whistle.
One day Polly could not be found. We searched
here, there, high and low, but to no avail. Our
first thought was that she had at last flown away
and joined her friends who every evening flew
homeward over the farm. Three days later I
was cleaning out the corn bin beside the hen coup
when I heard a low chuckling, "Here Polly."
I looked up into the tree nearby but could not see
her, for I knew it was she, at once. Again I
heard it. This time it seemed to issue from a
barrel near the bin. I hurried to the barrel,
which was an old tar container, and peered inside.
Poor thing, there she was buried, all but her head,
in the soft tar at the bottom of the barrel. She
must have been walking around the edge, slipped
and fallen into the barrel where she had sunk
into the soft tar at the bottom. As soon as she
saw me she chuckled my name and then called
for mother. I dug her out of the tar, took her
home, and mother and I endeavored to remove
as much of the tar as possible. We used kerosene
and gasoline and removed nearly all, but the tar
had been on the feathers so long that most of them
came off with it. She lived less than a week
afterwards (how she lived that long I do not
know), and we buried her in a little tin box on the
farm. It was a long time before we got over her
loss, for it had been so cheerful to hear her calling
and whistling about the farm.


FRIENDS.
Gretchen IV. Palm, '29.


The "Ancon" and "Cristobal" mean more to
Zonians than would be generally thought, for
they are the means of connecting government
employees with "home" and "home folks." The
ship's names symbolize vacations, of which, I
confess, there are many kinds. There's touring
in a Model T Ford, or camping in the "woods,"
where bodily activity is found by killing mosqui-
toes, and mental exercise by worrying over all
one's unsightly, empty tin cans. Nevertheless,
vacation starts on board ship, where universal
Canal Zone friendliness prevails. Port Au Prince,


Haiti, may be abominable, with its fine, white
dust, its torrid, oppressive heat and its beggars,
but, to say the least, it is a startling change from
the two days' scene of endless, choppy Caribbean
water. The remaining five days stretch to New
York is intensely pleasant with anticipation of
the days before us-days of work or play, make
them what we will.
There are boats and boats, but these two seem
to hold an especially close place in our lives; like
dependable friends to whom we instinctively
turn when it is time to go a-voyaging.







68 THE CARIBBEAN.


9i.XI


TRIPLE-CROSSED.
M, ricn Lowande, '29.
Fernandez was on duty in this district for the
first time. It was that section in which all the
wealthy people lived. It was a dull section at
this time of the year, for it was summer and the
residents were spending money in some other
part of the world. Yes, indeed, it was a very dull
beat.
Fernandez was thinking of the wonderful dinner
he could be enjoying now if he were only on his
l'st beat. The people certainly had been nice to
him there, and Sefor Tomas had some good beer
in his cellar.
Fernandez's musings were cut short by the ap-
pearance of a taxi in front of one of the most
beautiful Louses on the street. Fernandez had
been told that it belonged to Don Torrens, a
young bachelor. A tall, well-built young man
alighted, paid his fare, and went up the stairs to
the door of the house. After having some trouble
opening the door he finally entered. In the back
of the house an electrician's truck drew up, and a
medium-sized man got out and went up the back
steps. Fernandez moved on. Evidently the
owner had returned from vacation and was having
some repairs made.
Meanwhile, once inside, the tall man quickly
divested himself of his overcoat, the inside of
which revealed a complete set of burglar's tools.
At the rear of the house the medium-sized man
opened his electrician's case and drew from it
tools similar to those of the tall young man.
Both proceeded to go their ways, and both
entered the library at the same time.
The tall young man was the first to regain his
equilibrium, and with a refined voice asked the
other what he might be doing in his house. The
latter, with a puzzled look on his face, reciprocated
with the same question. Immediately each began
to convince the other that he was in the wrong
house.
Before they were aware of it, another had enter-
e-l the argument. This man had come upon them
while they were arguing and was attempting to
convince them with a revolver. The owner of


this little plaything proceeded to order them to
reach for the ceiling until he had called the police.
They did so. No, not quite, for when the man
turned to telephone, the tall man quickly brought
one of his tools down on the other's head. He
fell with a dull thud. The first two men immedi-
ately proceeded to evacuate.
It was autumn and a tall, well-built young
man entered a restaurant. A few minutes later
a medium-sized man entered. They sat at differ-
ent tables. Opening their newspapers their
attention was immediately attracted by the
headlines.
Don Torrens, wealthy young bachelor, returned from
a vacation in the Maine woods to find his house robbed
of everything but the wall paper.
I need only add that a tall well-built man and
a medium-sized man were evicted from a restau-
rant for using improper language

WHY HOUSEKEEPERS GROW GRAY
IN PANAMA.
Adair L. Taylor, 's9.
Scene: Kitchen in my home.
Characters: My mother and maid Tiny, who
weighs 200 pounds.
Time: 2.40 p. m., about the year A. D. 1914.
Curtain rises on my mother giving Tiny
directions on washing the kitchen floor.
Mother: "Tiny, take some good hot suds and
water and scrub this floor."
Tiny: "Oh, yes, Mistress Taylor."
Curtain drops to show that twenty-five
minutes have elapsed. Rises to show my moth-
er talking to Tiny once more.
Mother: "Why, Tiny, you'll never get it
cleaned unless you rub harder. Use some
elbow grease."
Curtain falls a second time for twenty-five
minutes, and rises to find Tiny asleep in a chair
with floor half cleaned.
Mother (shaking Tiny): "Well, Tiny, do I
have to sit here and watch you? Why aren't
you cleaning this kitchen?"
Tiny: "Well, Mum, you see it was this away.
I was jes' a sitting' here waiting' for de elbow
grease and I done felled asleep."


----- ---~--~-- -----


=~=~~


*ob *Sftoritg.






THE CARIBBEAN.


NIZE BABY.
Ethel I.. Barnelt, '29.


I had spent a tiring day in Panama City, and I
was looking forward to a peaceful two hours on the
train before I should again take up weighty
matters in Colon. The train was unusually
crowded, but I was lucky enough to find an
empty seat, with another facing it on which to
place my feet. I had no sooner made myself
comfortable, however, than a woman with a
beautiful child came in and occupied the seat
which I had cherished for my feet. I was slightly
annoyed, but I realized that it was the only
place she could find to sit, and besides she probably
wouldn't bother me. So I dozed off commenting
inwardly that I had never before seen such a
beautiful child.
Suddenly my would-be slumbers were inter-
rupted by a shrill cry from the youthful beauty
(whose name, it developed, was Randall), who
was shouting, "I wanna sit over there," indicating
my seat by the window. The mother tried to
dissuade her son, but he would not listen to
reason so I moved over to let the boy sit there.
As soon as he was established, however, he pro-
ceeded to see how far he could lean out of the
window. Complying with his mother's wish,
I closed the window and the boy screamed lustily.
So I had to open the window, and while he tried
his best to fall out of it, I had to hold on to him
in spite of the damaging kicks I received. His
beauty began to fade in my eyes.
While Randall endangered his life and my peace
of mind, his mother was regaling me with the
history of her son's life, and all of his cute deeds
and savings, and the neighbors' affection for him.
Vainly did I try to remove my belongings and self
to a more healthy locality, but she, waxing more
eloquent, and he, waxing more playful, held me
there.
The child soon tired of the open window, so he
demanded that it be shut. Dutifully I shut it,
and nearly smothered from the heat that resulted.
Randall's lack of amusement became so desper-
ate that even my poor tie seemed to offer oppor-
tunities to him. I protested at donating my tie
to his cause, but he was so violently insistent that
I succumbed. He promptly mutilated it and
then put it back on me, nearly choking me in the
operation.


Following that, he found something extremely
interesting in my hair, pulling out about ten
hairs and analyzing them all. After rumpling my
hair till my magnificent pompadour looked like
a degenerated mop, he was quiet a moment.
The woman in back of me was remarking
audibly to her husband, "My, what a cute little
boy," and "Oh! isn't he adorable!" and "The
little dear" at every new escapade in which the
active Randall indulged. And I was seriously
contemplating ending his pestilential existence
when his voice rang out with, "Maamma, I wanna
drink." His poor mother, it developed, was
very tired, and did I mind getting a drink for
Randall? Seething inwardly I stumbled down the
aisle and returned with the water. But Randall's
thirst had abated, it seemed, so he amused him-
self by pouring most of the water down my neck.
I gave the boy one of my famous "dirty looks"
but this didn't seem to affect him much, aside
from inspiring him still further. I muttered
something about a friend of mine in the next car
wanting me and started to leave only to hear
Randall yell, "Mamma, don't let the nice mango.
Let him stay here and play with me." And
since Randall's mother, interested as always, only
in her son's welfare, 'c-'.:u.l me to stay, I stayed.
Then Randall's mother decided that she wanted
a drink so I obligingly got one for her. I got to
her seat with it just as the train pulled into
Monte Lirio with a jolt, and all the water was
spilled on Randall. He immediately began a
wail which drowned out even the train's whistle
and it was only after two stations of pacification, the
loan of my watch and sleeve garters, and the
gift of two fifty-cent pieces (which I needed very
much at the time), that he quieted down to his
usual racket.
During the rest of the ride I was so miserable
that nothing seemed to matter any more, so
nothing Randall did agonized me-much. As
the train pulled into Colon, Randall wanted to
hang onto me, but I, pretending to see an aged
uncle, dashed off. Nowadays, on trains, I sur-
round myself with a crowd (strictly adult), and
whisper audibly "What a cute little boy," if I
see any one being hooked the way I was.







70 THE CARIBBEAN.


GOING TO THE DOGS.
Rosemary Keene, '2y.

SCENE.
At the Dog Races, Kennelworth.
CHARACTERS.

Fanny, daughter of the Skipper who wrecked the
Hesperus."
Hamlet, sorrowful Prince of Denmark.
Julius Caesar, big butter and egg man from Rome.
(SCENE I: Hamlet and Fanny are trying to
sneak into the grandstand.)
Fanny (clutching Hamlet): "Duck! He ap-
proacheth."
Hamlet: "Now might we do it pat, now the
gatekeeper has turned away."
( Hamlet and Fanny slip in unseen and grab a seat.)
Fanny: "Oh, Hamlet! I see a fleeting hound!
Oh, say, what may that be?"
Hamlet: "My father's spirit in legs!"
Voice from behind: "Come on Lightning! Show
some action! !
Hamlet (aside to Fanny): "He speaketh of
lightning. Perchance a storm is arriving. (He
puts up an umbrella.)
Julius Caesar: "Hey, you sap! This is the dog
races and not an asylum. Go back to the keepers."
Fanny: "Oh, Hamlet, who is this man and
what spake he?"
Hamlet: 'Tis Julius Caesar, the big cow and
hen man from Rome."
Fanny: "Oh, Hamlet! I see a flying hare!
Oh, say, what may it be?"
Hamlet: "There is only one lock loose; here
is a pin for you."
Julius Caesar (again): "Here comes Lightning!
Come on Lightning!"
Hamlet (becoming excited): 'Tis a fast race.
I incline toward the yellow streak."
Julius Caesar: "Hey! Where do you think you
are? Get off my foot, or I'll knock you off! !"
Hamlet (still more excited): "The amber one
gains-onward hound, onward!"
Julius Caesar (giving Hamlet a blow): "I told
you to get off my foot and I mean it."
Hamlet (returning the blow): "The time is out
of joint; oh, blessed spite, that I was ever born to
set it right."


Julius Caesar (becoming angry): "It will be
more than 'time' that will be out of joint when I
get through with you!"
Hamlet (losing consciousness): "I doubt some
foul play."
Fanny: "Oh, Hamlet, the people leave their
seats. Oh, say, what may it be?"
But Hamlet answered never a word
A knocked out Prince was he

MANANA FEVER.
Adair L. Taylor, '29.
Scene: Doctor's office in Panama.
Characters: Doctor and patient.
Time: The most convenient.
Curtain rises to show Doctor and patient in the
Doctor's office.
Patient: "Ooh, yooy, yooy, such a mi-lady I
have got."
Doctor: "Why, my good man, what malady
have you? You look healthy enough."
Patient: "Oh, jess, I look so, but I ain't-I got
a machinery in me what don't work. No-not
in my haid."
Doctor: "Just where does it pain; come let me
examine you."
Patient: "No, no, no I don't need no telephone
put on me. I ain't a party line fo' no one. But
I tell you, I am not well. My own Doctah did
told me so. He said I was goin' to die with no
clothes and I wan't goin' to have no nice black
coffin with silver trimmings, because-oh Lawd,
have mercy 'pon I."
Doctor: "But come! Tell me what this afflic-
tion is that you have. I have lots of pills that will
help you, I am sure."
Patient: "No suh-all de pills won't do me no
good. 'Cause'n dis is eber lastin'. De uder Doc-
tah done tole me I wouldn't have 'nouf strong
to answer St. Peter."
Doctor: "Come, come away with this nonsense.
What did he say you had."
Patient: "Well, suh, he did say it was common
to people like I-he called it a mighty interes'in'
name and for a time I was real proud 'bout it.
Said it was "Mafiana Fever."
Curtain.
NOTE.-Maiiana means "to-morrow" in Spanish.






THE CARIBBEAN.

PROHIBITION.
(Speech by Tattoo Ike.)
flames Qtuinn, '29.


When I was a youngster, I was led astray by
those vile and cruel vagabonds known as Drug
Store Cowboys. They taught me to drink.
That drink preyed upon me until I now drink it
straight (that is without water). You may
wonder what kind of drink I mean so that you
may try it. I will relate it; that drink is the
deadly, oversweet, soda pop. You can get it in
every store. Oh! Why can't we do away with
it altogether? As Ceasar said some twenty years
ago, "Do not drink, for it is a waste." I now
say it over. Take Napoleon's advice and steer
clear of soda pop. The young man of to-day
drinks soda pop until he gets so that he even




N *Ocboo1

^__---- .. .--- .------- .--

ON TYPING.
Ethel Barnett, '20.

Life is so futile; ome goes to school and tries
to Izarn typong woth tha following results.
Tying is soch an effirt, and vet is it wortj
anything? Why is there soch a thimg as a
ty.ewroter? So far as I cen see, we struggling
begimners in thet scudy gain nothing but an
increased vocavulary, and lost faith in life.
Ome learns to type; one ty pes; one thanks
one knows how to type; and look at the results.
A new language one invents. No one cam
read it but tha aspiring typost. Teachers
don't a2preciete the typist who is jest learning.
Wahre is thatsilber liming to thet cloid?
Amd yet great pnilosophirs say; "Pursever-
ance wons. "Amd, "Of at first uou dun't
succeed, try, try agaim." Ome troes and
tries again, with tha seme results. (Why, oh,
why do i persust in hotting the i for the u!)
And tha more one trues, the blecker, or rether
the ridder, ome8s outlook on the report card
slims. And the relations at home become
nore streimed. What most ome do in a czse
like thet?


bulges. Even our young girls, or mothers of
to-morrow, drink it. They gurgle two or three
glasses at a time and then they want more.
Look at me, if you wish to see the effects of soda
pop. As Patrick Henry said a few months ago,
"Give me soda pop and you give me death."
I should think that you would know better than
to drink soda pop. What was the meaning of
Brutus' coat of arms, '\I. et Destructo."
I shall translate it as it is: "Drink more and be
destroyed." In my closing I ,ll.ii tell you in one
proverb what to do to get rid of this habit. "If
a soda pop is ruinous, try Coca-Cola." I thank
you.


ViHEi


Sish is lofe! Thoxe who are burn dumb are
jist out of lock. Tha itherx get all tha brakes.
Amd tha dumb omes muxt jist kee, on typing
im spote of srraimed relatoins at hone and
partriotic rdport czrds. I em SHackoed to
my typewroter amd I cam do 1mothing but
lemint my sed fzte amd agree wirh Patreck
Hejry im his immortel wirds: "Gebe me
liverty, ot geve me dezrh."
ZMEN!!!

ON FIRE ALARMS.
Grelchen Palm, '29.
It warms us to think of fire alarms; they are
exhilarating, to say the least. The effects of
their shrillness in that home of learning, C. H. S.,
is so stupendous, that it actually jars you and
me to sensibility. We believe in preparedness,
so, few are the poor souls whose tragic physiog-
nomies portray consternation in not being
ready for this supreme moment of life when a
tearful farewell is bade to beloved books in
order to join the thundering herd scampering
down the stairs. Pushed by a hundred students,
Vou fall, but outside in the wide world a new


. wti ligipg.







THE CARIBBEAN.


aspect of life soothes your wounded feelings.
Relish that scandal; crack those jokes; hum
that song; chew that gum; for this is merely a
respite from life's great work-a holiday-a
golden opportunity. Back in study hall,
reality drowns your former pleasant feelings.
Why didn't you hear her the first time? "Will
the girl in the seventeenth seat of row three
come to the front of the room and place her
gum gently in the waste-paper basket?"
The fall you received on the stairs really hurts
now.

THE SENIOR CLASS OF C. H. S. HAS A
CLASS MEETING.
Rosemary Keene, '29.
The ability to hold a class meeting is really an
art. For those who have not tried it-let them
try it! The President rises in front of the room
and after several dirty looks toward some lo-
quacious students, he announces, "Will the Sen-
iors please come to order." It is not a request,
it is a command. A few slightly interested
Seniors glance up to see what it is all about, but
the rest go on with their important work. The
President continues, "We have to decide about
the Graduation programs." No response. He
adds, "Is there any discussion about this?" Still
no response. A student suddenly awakens to the
fact that a class meeting is supposed to be going
on. He raises his hand.
"Mr. President, I would like to know when we
are going to decide about the Graduation pro-
grams. We have only two more months."
The President looks as if he is going to collapse.
"We were just discussing that," he says in a
slightly disgusted tone, "and if you were listening
you would have heard."
"And another thing," continues the president
(supposedly to the class, but seemingly to no one),
"Who would you like to speak at Commencement?"
All continue working fast and furiously on some
important work that has to be finished by the
first period.
The same student raises his hand long enough
from his work to ask, "Who is going to speak at
the Commencement Exercises?"
"As I told you before, we were just discussing
that," says the president in a slightly more dis-
gusted tone. "Now how many are in favor of


having Mr. -- speak at the Commencement
Exercises?"
A dead silence.
"Will you please raise your hands high in the
air so that I can count them more easily?"
Not one hand appears.
"Well," continues the president, "as none of
you will tell me who you want to speak, Miss
Hesse and I will decide who will speak and let you
know later."
One righteous student rises up in behalf of
justice and says weakly, "I think that it is up to
the class who will speak at the Commencement
Exercises, and I think that the rest of the class
will agree with me."
The rest of the class goes on working studiously,
and the former student sits down, thoroughly
winded, and thinking that he has done his bit,
goes back to work.
The president repeats again, "As there are no
discussions or suggestions, Miss Hesse and I
shall decide this matter. Is there any objection
to this?"
Still dead silence.
The bell rings and the students dash madly
out of the room for the various class rooms.

THE JUNIOR CLASS OF C. H. S. HAS A
CLASS MEETING.
Arthur Mundberg, '30.
The President of the class, better known as
"Stew," approaches the front of the room with
large, manly, and noisy strides. A whispered
word with Mr. Pence, the Junior Class advisor,
and "Stew" emits a noisy "Can I have your
attention, please?"
The members of the class refrain from their
hilarities long enough to hear what "Stew" has
to say.
He starts with, "I just received a letter from
the ring company, and they say that they have to
raise the prices of the rings fifty cents!"
Such a calamity is enough to make any person
keep still for a while at least, but the Juniors are
different; their whispers grow to a buzz, and then
to a common, ordinary riot. The girls have the
floor. Their voices are better trained for a con-
tinuous blabber; they keep it up until "Stew"
makes himself heard above the noise by a loud
"Shut up, will'ya?"








THE CARIBBEAN.


He then says, "Mr. Pence advises that we pay
this extra charge without any question. Has
anyone anything to say about that?"
"Yea, tell the company we'll pay it," (comes
from a male individual in the back of the room).
Then someone comes out with, "Take it out of
the treasury."
The girls then break loose with their loud-
speakers and continue to broadcast until "Stew"
again is able to stop the noise.
"How many are in favor of paying the extra
fifty cents?" asks "Stew," our class president.


When the hands are raised, "Srew" glances over
the room at the up-raised hands, and with a look
at Mr. Pence, says, "We'll pay."
"Stew" again comes to the front of the room
with a business air, but, only comes out with,
"Anyone make a motion thac the meeting be
closed ?"
"Aw, sit down, what do ya think this is, Con-
gress?" comes from all parts of the room, mainly
from the manly Juniors, at which "Stew" meekly
shuffles back to his seat, hut with no less noise,
ending a Junior Class meeting.


LIBRARY.
Gretchen Palm, '2?.


I open the library
With unerring haste
For the joys of Algebra I must taste;
Two Seniors disturb
My swimming x squares,
'Til I squelch them with terrible, unladylike glares.

A freshman rushes in-
A book-report he must make,
Could he "The Alamo" take.
I answer sweetly,
Unharried still am I,
And also suggest, "The Crisis" and "The Spy."

Freshmen come thick and fast
'Til I wish they would go;
"Where do the trade winds blow?"
"Is the crocodile a fish?"
"Is a coffee bush a tree?"
Are some of the questions asked of me


My mind grows diizz
Their questions to reply,
"Where did Robert Louis Stevenson die!"
"\'here is the drama?"
"Who wrote ';4-40 or Fight?'
And "\Who invented the electric light?"

The eloquent typewriters
With my Algebra continually vies,
That gladly I forsake it with long, drawn out sighs,
To take up my history
Stoicly to learn-
That Washington the English once did burn.

A senior takes my pencil,
Another, my eraser needs,
With growing wrath for quiet I plead.
The bell rings-
With fervor, thanks I give,
That through this hour again I did live.


ELEGIE.
Adair L. Tay/or, '2y.
(A struggling poetess tries imitating Gray's style with the
following results.)


The school bell tolls the start of another day,
The teachers for another day reign supreme,
The scholars come plodding along the way
Leaving the world of play to those like me it seems.

Now fades the merry laugh from all our sight,
And all the air a solemn stillness holds
Save where a laggard whispers to left and right,
For what cares he if his books catch dust and mold?

For who to dumb foregetfulness a prey,
Did not at last become resigned,
To leaving the soft warmness of the "hay,"
Nor cast one longing, lingering look behind?


Now again, from yonder concrete-covered tower,
The bell rings twice with might and main
Warning those who from her sacred portals cower
That they will be late again.

Let not Ambition mock their useful toil
Their homely ioys and destiny obscure;
Nor Wisdom hear with a disdainful smile
The short and simple prayers of the unsure.

Far from the maddening crowd's ignoble strife,
Their sober wishes never learned to stray,
Along the hot and bothered vale of life
They keep the noisv tenor of their way.


MR 13835-10








74 THE CARIBBEAN.


ON ERASING.
Rosemary Keene, '29.
(With apologies to Shakespeare and Hamlet.)


To erase, or not to erase-that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in school to suffer
The furies and insults of an outraged teacher,
Or to take up an eraser against a sea of mistakes,
And by erasing end them. To obliterate-to erase-
Some more; and by obliterating to say we end
The "F's", and a thousand dirty looks
The student is heir to-'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To obliterate-to erase-
To erase! Perchance to be caught! Ah, there's the rub;
For in that act of erasing, the looks which come
\hen we have just begun to erase
Would make us pause: that's the heck of it;
For who would bear the slams and scorn of students,
The insolence of teachers, and the spurns


That the patient worthy student takes
When he himself might a "soo" make
With a mere eraser? Who'd these indignities bear,
To grunt and sweat over a darn typewriter,
But that the fear of someone after us-
The cold and icy glares from which
No student e'er recovers-scares us to death,
And makes us rather keep those mistakes we have
Than to erase and risk a teacher's wrath?
Thus teachers do make cowards of us all;
And thus the student's vow for a perfect paper
Is swept away by the pale face of another unfortunate student;
And students with great ideas of ambition and fame,
With this regard, they put the eraser down,
And lose the praise of teachers.


TO A BEDBUG.
Adair L. Taylor, '29.
(With apologies to William Shakespeare and Macbeth.)


Is this a bedbug which I see before me
His head toward my hand? Come, let me slap thee.
I have thee not, and yet I feel thee still.
Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible
To our feelings as to our sight? or art thou but
A bedbug of C. H. S., a touching creation
Proceeding from the heat-oppressed chair?
I see thee yet in form as palpable
As this which now I scratch.
Thou sendest me the way I was not going;
And such language thou makest me use.


The bedbugs put in action my five senses,
And I am given no rest: I see thee still
And in thy wake a foreign feeling follows
Which was not so before-such active things,
It is the biting business which informs
Thus to mine leg.
Now over C. H. S. bedbugs are dead, and the
Language we did use is now erased. Now students celebrate
The Flit Gun's offerings, and withered bites are now but
Scars of Time.


Raging waters rushing down the spillway from Gatun Lake above.







THE CARIBBEAN.


ce--


FRUITS OF PANAMA.
Estafania IF'e/ler, '3o.
Practically all the fruits of Panama have a
peculiar flavor and a person has to cultivate a
taste for most of them.
The most popular of all the fruits of Panama is
the banana. Throughout the Isthmus many
native farmers are engaged in cultivating them.
The banana is harvested every day, while green.
Bananas contain a great deal of starch when
green, but as they grow ripe the starch changes to
sugar. As a rule, the banana fruit is five or six
inches long and more than an inch in diameter;
the pulp is soft and luscious, and seedless through
long cultivation. It is eaten either cooked or
raw.
The avocado, which is commonly known here in
Panama as the "alligator-pear" is another
familiar fruit. It is large, round, oval, oblong or
pear-shaped, with either a green, yellowish-green
or russet to deep purple, and sometimes black
skin. Inside of the avocado is a firm yellowish-
green pulpy flesh which is of high food value,
especially in oils. It also has a single large black
seed. The alligator pear has a very pleasant
nutty flavor and hardly a trace of fiber in the
flesh.
The mango is as well known over the whole
tropical world as the apple is known in the
temperate world. Unlike most fruits, the mango
is good to eat in all stages of its growth. This
fruit varies in size from that of an ordinary plum
to five or six pounds in weight. In color, some of
the mangoes are green when ripe, others deep
yellow as an apricot, with yellow or orange flesh
which is juicy, melting, rich, and luscious in the
case of the best varieties. There are hundreds of
varieties. Some are regarded as excellent in
flavor, while in others the taste and odor is so
strongly of turpentine, as to be inedible. It is
claimed by those who have acquired the habit of
eating the mango that "while there are those who
may not like them because of their smell of
turpentine, there are those who have come to
like turpentine because it reminds them of the joy
of eating mangos."


The papaya is related to the pumpkin and
melons. It is something like a melon and it
varies in size from three to thirty inches in length
and up to twenty pounds in weight. The flesh
is salmon-pink or yellow. There are several
varieties of this fruit, some are sweet, others are
insipid, some have excellent flavor and others
have no flavor at all.
Panama has many other kinds of fruits, among
which the lime, the orange, and the pineapple are
the most common, but the banana, the avocado,
the mango, and the papaya are the most commonly
commercialized of all the fruits of the Isthmus of
Panama.

THE HILLS OF COCO SOLO.
Elizabeth Ilackett, '29.
AMondav:
Slowly the majestic sun is rising over the
densely wooded hills casting fantastic shadows on
their foreground. All looks like a green velvety
carpet. At last it has risen to its lofty height,
shining down with intense heat.
Tucsda v:
But how different those hills look this morning!
They are hardly distinguishable against the grey,
sullen sky. One would hardly consider them a
thing of beauty but rather some imposing edifice,
blotting out what lies behind them.
I Wednesday :
This morning rain is pouring down almost ob-
structing that endless chain of hills from view.
The sea is beating wil tly against the shore, while
the wind is noisily howling through the desolate
appearing mass.
Thursday :
What a gorgeous sight those fascinating hills
present this morning. A fine silvery drizzle is
reflecting the sun's warm radiance in wondrous
colors. The tall, graceful palm trees sway rhyth-
mically to the gentle breeze.
FridaY:
All looks like a shimmering jade pool reflected
in the dancing sea. I look, but all I can see is an
endlesschain of hills rollinginto an infinite distance
leaving me to wonder where.


IIHX~ih


Dw~briptioneg.







THE CARIBBEAN.


THE CARIBBEAN FROM MY WINDOW.
Frank Drake, D '.

To-day the Caribbean is a marvel of beauty to
behold. Its waters glisten like a mirror and not a
ripple can be seen. Here and there I can see
pelicans playing on the dark blue water.
This morning as I look out upon the Caribbean,
the sun is just peeping over the horizon. Nearby
the dark shadows of the night are beginning to
disappear, while in the distance the flickering
lights from the ships anchored in the bay look like
many little jewels. The water is calm and
beautiful, there being only an occasional ripple
made by the wind.
To-day there are dark clouds overhead. The
wind is blowing hard and great white-capped
waves are breaking high against the breakwater.
The furious sea is in an uproar. The ships in the
bay bob up and down like little corks.
This morning is perfectly clear and I can see for
miles over the Caribbean. Nearby the water is
brown; in the distance however, the brown seems
to turn to azure blue, which fades in the horizon.
The sun is shining bright and the white caps
glisten like diamonds.
To-day the sky is dull and the sea looks as if it is
made of blue ink. The sky and the sea seem to
meet nearby in a dark haze. The sea is boisterous
and great waves ...rriin, 1 break over Toro
Point.
No sun ever shone brighter or seemed larger
than the one that came up from beyond the
Caribbean this morning. The whole sea is in an
uproar; it is covered with foam and white caps as
far as the eye can see.
This morning is perfectly clear and I can see
for miles over the Caribbean. The great white-
capped waves glisten in the early morning sun.
The sea roars as though it was furious and many
vessels in view seem to toss about as though they
wecr mere toVs.

THE SlKY.
l'a ter Bumnl v, r.
I 'codnesda \'.
The sky was partly covered with nebulous
clouds, which were scudding across the sky like
a fleet of fishing boats in a gale. Here and there
through the haze, a group of stars could be seen


peeping out from behind the small mass of water
vapor, but the clouds would quickly close in, very
much as a troop of Indians would ambush a wagon
train. Although a gale was blowing overhead,
the trees were motionless. Suddenly everything
\woke up, and the palms waving back and forth,
made a sound of greeting to some invisibile being
who xwas passing by.

Thursday.
The sky was the color of black velvet with the
stars appearing like diamonds on a jeweler's tray.
Orion, the mighty hunter, looked down upon the
peaceful world, holding one arm upraised as if in
amazement. A fleecy cloud ran playfully before
the trade winds, across the zenith, and here and
there a shooting star dashed through the firma-
ment. On the horizon, a few slightly luminous
clouds were resting, waiting for a breath of wind
to set them in motion.

Friday.
The night was very quiet, and the moon looked
like a great silver bowl, upheld by a mass of
black clouds shaped like a hand. The sky was
silver near Luna, getting darker on the sides
until it was almost black in the east. The black
clouds were orange in the edges, making a wonder-
ful frame for the moon.

Yatlurday.
This was a noisy night. The moon was still a
silver crescent in the west, surrounded bv a halo
o(f man- colors. Everything was alive, even
Darius the Bull, standing in the sky under the
hand of Orion, seemed happy. Clouds swirled
closely around him, partly veiling his splendor.
One large black cloud enveloped the moon for a
moment, casting an ominous shadow upon the
world.

Sl'/ndaY'.
Mlany clouds gyrated across the zenith, play-
fully assuming absurd and unusual forms. One
cloud looked like an ocean wave with the spray
dashing high in the air. Then it quickly changed,
formed a shapeless mass, then took the form of a
man. The clouds and all the stars in the firma-
ment seemed to be guided by an unseen hand.
Effortless and quietly the billowing clouds spun
across the dark skies, the stars kept their vigil







78 THE CARIBBEAN.


in the heavens, and all this was done noiselessly
and perfectly.
Monday.
There was little to be seen in the sky except the
usual stars and clouds always seen in the trade
belt. The moon was shining with a faint
tremulous light, surrounded by a golden halo.
The wavy white clouds were slipping across the
sky as ships pass through the night with billowing
sails, outward bound to some mysterious port.

PANAMANIAN WATERFRONT.
Gretchen Palm, '29.
Trade winds, salty and saucy, are important
factors in the enjoyment of Panamanian life.
The one that I met face to face on the sea shore
of Panama City was such that in spite of the
torrid sun, I was persuaded by it to sit down on
the gray sea wall there and to watch with
avidity the scene before my American eyes.
At the foot of the wall upon the muddy beach,
left by the receding tide, lay a miscellaneous
fleet of small, commercial craft.
Such tiny fishing boats! Well might they
boast of their catch in the Pacific of the night
previous-Spanish mackeral, jack, snapper, and
even the colorful parrot-fish-some of which
flopped helplessly in l-st efforts to escape the
murderous machetes of the fishermen employed
in cleaning them.
The natives themselves were happy-boldly
impudent and volatile, friendly and sympathetic
with their coworkers, and voluble with exagger-
ated stories of every day occurrences. The
marine birds and buzzards were also pleased
with life and its favors; with what ease they


glided down to catch in mid-air the stray tid-
bits of fish their friends cast to them.
Over there a number of folk was collected
about a young hopeful, who was expounding
with Latin flourishes the amazing tale of the
shark that "got away." With all sincerity
the hearers listened to his description. "A
lazy devil, senores, but mean! Wicked eyes!
Gleaming teeth-they snapped- for my flesh;
his belly was white and lean; he was hungry for
me, who was battling to kill him!" To believe
or not to believe, that was the question.
What a chatter of tongues; I decided privately
then and there that old women however little
they have to talk about, can out-run anyone in
haranguing about anything. And thus did
these pestiferous, wizened women who had come
to the beach to buy diminutive amounts of yams
and charcoal. The latter, together with bananas,
pineapples, guavas, sour oranges, and coconuts,
were in constant demand, if one interpreted
their vociferations such.
Children abounded, unkempt and dirty-but
happy; they reveled in the smooth sensation of
wriggling their brown feet in the moist mud, of
throwing fish to the birds, of pelting unsuspecting
playmates with yams and trying to catch one of
the many disdainful pelicans that clumped and
talked to themselves, apparently oblivious of
everything else. I'm sure these urchins wished
to know what the pelicans hid in their enormous
shell-like beaks, (at least I did).
When I finally left, it was with the hope that
these same scenes would often "flash upon the
inward eye, which is the bliss of solitude,"
recalling the picturesqueness of that Panamanian
seashore.


Famous lat-Arch in Panama city.








THE CARIBBEAN.


Sloetrp.



THE INDIAN BRAVE.
1 i/alter Bundty,, ','.
(This poem was awarded Grand Prize in the Poetry Contest.


One time there lived an Indian brave
And very brave was he.
He lived three hundred years ago,
While Spain ruled the sea.

This brave, he fought and ate and fought,
And when he did not fight,
Then this brave slept and ate and slept
And drank with all his might.

This brave laid down and went to sleep,
And for forty days he lay.
He slept so long t'was thought he died,
But up he rose one day.
PANAMA.
Helen Southard, '/2.

In the tropical regions of Panam,.
Among the ruins of old,
There Morgan, that bloody old pirate,
Looted the Spaniards for gold.

There Balboa discovered the Pacific
That surrounds the jungles so dense-
Where the malaria and the heat are terrific
And you walk as if in a trance.

And the Locks! How General Goethals
And his men so brave and bold,
Worked to connect transportation
Of the new world with the old.


See the misty rain come sweeping down the hills,
From the valley of the Chagres, down the hills,
The misty, silv'ry rain sweeps down the hills and o'er the plain,
While I hear the still stir announce the sweeping, pouring
rain.

Oh, the misty veil comes still
Down the green and verdant hill
As I listen for the coming of the rain, rain, rain.
Of the rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain;
Of the rain,
Of the misty, silv'ry, sweeping, pouring rain


And when again this brave did live
To eat, to drink, to fight,
He found that all the world had changed
To a new world over night.

He saw that Spain had stolen the land
And made the people slaves.
The once fair land of his was gone,
Destroyed by Spain's cruel knaves.

Did this young brave go moan and cry
And show that he was low?
He simply ate and drank some more
And back to sleep did go.
THE COMING OF NIGHT.
,"auline Herman, 30o.
(Honorable Mention.)
A gentle breeze
Swept through the trees
The tropic sun,
Its work now done,
Sank down to rest.
It left a hint
Of a rosy tint
In the dark'ning sky,
Where with eerie cry
Birds sought their nest.
Then the moon appeared,
And the darkness cleared
In the splendor bright
Of the Queen of Night
Shining at her best.
RAIN.
He/en Logan, '3o.
(With apologies to Edgar Allen Poe.J


See the dancing, sparkling rain is drawing near,
It glimmers just before nme ar, yet near.
Like Spring's glittering jeweled train, it comes toward me from
the plain,
And I do nor mind the gloom that comes with the sparkling
rain.
Oh, the dancing rain is nerd
All around me, far and neal,
While I hail the calm and coolness of the rain, rain, rain.
Of the rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain, rain;
Of the rain,
Of the dancing, sparkling, jeweled, glimmering rain.


(~ai


THE CARIBBEAN.


I








80 THE CARIBBEAN.


THE CANARY MURDER CASE.
(With all apologies.)
Ethel L. Barnett, '29.


There were once five canaries who lived in one cage
A cage which was roomy and wicker,
They were beautiful songsters and beautiful birds
And never were they known to bicker.

They were gentle and loving and sweet-tempered birds;
They were happy and gleeful and gay;
And they lived e'er in peace with the world and themselves
In harmony from day to day.

They trusted all humans and loved everything
They knew not that the world is oft painful;
They just knew they were happy and loved and beloved-
They were never haughty or disdainful.

But one sad early morning the cage was found broken
With not a canary in sight-
And at first it was thought they had all flown away,
But they knew that this could not be right.

For they found in the cage a small group of feathers
They found, too, a few drops of blood;
And they found, too, some footprints made by the fiend
Who had obviously been through some mud.

But the mystery deepened; they saw no solution-
So they hired a world-famed detective,
And for weeks he did sleuth for clues and evidence
But in this he did not seem collective.


Long ago there lived a little girl
Whose name was Violet Aster;
Although the wind can travel fast
Her song could travel faster.

She lived not with aristocrats
But with the simple folks,
Who'd always sit and listen-
To her dreams and joys and hopes

One day as she was talking
To a little boy named Sam,
There came walking up the highway
An old, tired, and worn-out man.

"Good morning pretty maiden,
Do you happen to go my way?
If you do, I'd like your company
For I'm verve tired to-day."


So they called Scotland Yard in, and they went to work.
To find the villain they resolved-
When they hunted the cage and they found bits of fur
They said, "Lo, a part of this is solved."

So they gathered the clues and they studied them well
Then they shocked the whole world with the words:
"We have found that the horrible fiend is a CAT! !
Who has murdered and eaten the birds! ! !"

They collected the cats who lived near that place
And the guilty one was soon found
For his feet matched exactly the footprints he'd made
And the law took its course: he was drowned.

And after his death his cruel relatives came-
To the judge in great wrath they then cried,
"You have taken nine lives for the murder of five-
Give us four birds to avenge he who died."

Then the judge pondered deeply and called Scotland Yard
And at last in deep tones did he say:
"Nine lives did kill five; so the law took all nine-
Long, long may justice hold its sway."

Then the bloodthirsty cats slunk away; they'd been foiled!
And the courtroom cheered loudly and long
And all the canaries, long silent and sad
Of one accord burst into song.


Still in that place all was mourning and sorrow
Until the vile cats all were banished.
Now five new canaries have one new steel cage
And all sorrow and mourning have vanished.


VIOLET ASTER.
Verona Hermann, '2.

Violet readily consented
And she walked off with the man,
Leaving on the highway
A discontented Sam.

That night when all were seated
After supper on the lawn
There was no sound of song or mirth,
For Violet was gone.

Sam had told his story
And they'd paced the highway long
But not a glimpse of her they'd found,
For Violet was gone.

'Tis said that ever since that day
A little boy looks long
But never will he find her
For Violet is gone








THE CARIBBEAN.


'Twas the good ship, President Adams,
And she went upon the rocks;
The tugboats from the harbor
Had to tow her to the docks.

The captain was sleeping,
He should have been awake.
The mate tried to bring her in;
And then she met her fate.

He did not know of currents there.
That were so swift and strong;
He should have waked the captain
But he didn't and that was wrong.

The boat was going smoothly
When there came a sudden crash.
The captain jumped right out of bed,
And saw the awful smash.


From the stormy seas of Good Hope
To the mines at Kimberley
To the vast, sun-scorched Sahara
And to the Arab slavery;

O'er well-worn paths; o'er those that lead
To riches, danger, quest,
I've steered my course and come thru safe,
I really think I'm bless'd.


THE WRECK.
Hloward Keenan, '32.

The passengers came running out
As frightened as could be.
They soon calmed down when they saw the land,
They had thought they were out at sea.

Boats came from the harbor
To row her to the docks.
But they couldn't even budge her
So they left her on the rocks.

Most of the people were serious,
The women they were mad-
The men didn't like it any too well
But the children only laughed.

The President Adams was soon fixed up,
And resumed her seaward way,
She probably won't hit another rock
For the old mate has gone away.

And now my tale is done, I hope
It's lesson you will take,
And never, never he asleep
When you should be awake.



THE RAMBLER'S SONG.
Basil Frank, Ex '31.

I must confess I've travelled much
And seen and heard a lot,
But though that's true, I'm a-telling you
For me there's just one spot.

It's where the sun does always shine;
\\here the balmy trade winds blow.
Why, man, you'd take one little look;
You'd go there then, I know.


The memories that it brings me,
Of all the years gone by;
With a "C. H. S." laid on my breast
I'd be happ', should I die.


MR 13835-11







82 THE CARIBBEAN.


eIH8!


dcbool SctibitieS.


THE SHORT STORY CONTEST.


The results of this year's Short Story Contest
were as follows: Gretchen Palm, '29, won the
Grand Prize, a five-dollar gold piece, with her
story "Imagination;" Charles Crum's story,
"Have you a Hawser?" won the Senior Class
Prize. "The Girl Who Was Not," written by
Elsie Darley, won the Junior Class Prize; and
Robert Brough was awarded the Sophomore
Class Prize for his story "Undiscovered Treasure."
The winners of the class prizes each received an
annual with their name on it in gold.


THE SENIOR PARTY.
The Senior Party, which took place at the
Strangers Club on November 9, was rather a
formal affair, as befitted newly acquired Senior
dignity. However, this did not prevent it from
being highly enjoyed.
It was essentially a dance (a fact which caused
little sorrow). Two members of the Senior class,
Anita Rankin and Roy Walker, captured the
Prize Waltz. For entertainment Anita Rankin
and Marion Boomer danced the Argentine Tango.
Wilhelmina Kleefkens played a violin solo entitled
"Jeannine, I Dream of Lilac Time".
It was with regret that the gathering noted the
approach of midnight and the end of the party.

THE JUNIOR PARTY.
The Juniors held their party at the Masonic
Temple and everyone who attended was delight-
fully entertained by an orchestra and several solo
dances. The Prize Fox Trot was won by Jack
Maher and his partner, Margaret Bretch.
The party was highly enjoyed by everyone as
was witnessed at the end of the party, when
everyone seemed loath to leave.
The Juniors have proved themselves such good
hosts and hostesses that the Seniors no longer
fear the Junior-Senior Banquet.


An additional feature this year was a Poetry
Contest for which only one prize was offered.
Walter Bundy, '31, won the $2.50 with his poem,
"The Indian Brave." Pauline Herman, '30,
received honorable mention.
We deeply appreciate the kindness and interest
shown by Mrs. Skemp, Mr. Cunningham, and
Mrs. Hearne who acted as judges for the short
stories, and by Miss Madge Thomas who judged
the poetry.


THE SOPHOMORE PARTY.
A large group of C. H. S. merrymakers assem-
bled at the Strangers Club to make "whoopee."
And "whoopee" they made! And many hitherto
skeptical students became admirers of the
Sophomore Class.
To begin with, it was a tacky party and every-
one felt at ease. And then, it was a good dance
with a good orchestra. But the crowning
triumph was the entertainment. The flower of
many beauties in the Sophomore Class attired as
flippant flappers comprised a talented chorus.
The vocal and terpsichorean talent was surpris-
ing. Mary Bretch did a solo dance.
When the party ended, the customary "I had a
wonderful time's" were undoubtedly genuine.

THE FRESHMAN PARTY.
The Freshman Class of C. H. S. held their
annual party at the Hotel Washington. It was
supposed to be a costume party and even though
very few showed up in costumes, the party was a
huge success.
Dona Eaton did a song and dance act that was
very popular and Ursel Mock did an acrobatic
stunt.
In all, the party was enjoyed by everyone, and
may the class of '32 always give as entertaining
parties as this one was.







84 THE CARIBBEAN.


THE DEBATING CLUB.


The Debating Club is a society which was
formed at the beginning of the year under the
supervision of Miss Emmons. Miss Emmons,
however, was soon transferred to Balboa and
her place in the Debating Club and in the faculty
was taken by Miss Meyers.
The officers are Tom Conley, Theodore Bran-
don, and Alice Henter.


C. H. S. CARNIVAL.
As in years gone by, a Carnival was held on the
Fort de Lesseps grounds, on February 8, in order
that funds might be obtained with which to
publish THE CARIBBEAN. And, as in years gone
by, a generous and enthusiastic public made this
possible.
In mysterious tents were the side shows. A
fishpond revealed that a larger majority of the
population which attended were skillful fishermen.
A wheel of chance rivaling that of Monte Carlo
was very popular. The popularity contest arous-


Although they have had many private debates,
they only held one in public. In this they opposed
the Why Club and were defeated. However,
this year has only marked the beginning of a
worthwhile society which, it is hoped, will con-
tinue to grow stronger and eventually become the
pride of C. H. S.


ed much enthusiasm throughout the entire eve-
ning, and closed with Miss Alice Henter as Queen
of the Carnival.
The Big Show in the movie hall was a very
clever musical revue, "The Pirate Ship" filled
with pretty and talented girls. This made a
great hit.
The refreshment booth needed no advertising.
It was never forgotten.
In all, as in years gone by, this Carnival was
very successful, thanks to Fort de Lesseps and to
the public.







THE CARIBBEAN. 85


THE SENIOR PLAY


"Kempy," a clever little three-act comedy of
American home life, was the play presented by
the Senior Class. Mr. Robert Noe, the very
competent and skillful director showed his re-
markably good judgment in casting, for the
members all had the quality of entering into the
spirit of the character which they were portraying,
and acted with the ease and spontaneity which is
so rarely seen in amateurs.
Dad Bence, the irritable, grumpy, aggressive
but none the less kind father, was played by
Woodford Babbitt, who showed great acting
ability. Dad is a retired harness manufacturer
whose ambition is to marry his perverse daughter,
Kate, to a young millionaire. She, however,
proves a great trial to him and his almost con-
stant wrath causes much amusement.
Ma Bence, a sweet, gentle, but rather old-
fashioned woman was played by Gretchen Palm.
As this was a character part, it was rather hard,
but Gretchen acted admirably. Ma spends her
time trying to pacify Pa, whose upheavals are so
numerous that pacification has become second
nature to her.
Jane Bence Wade, well portrayed by Marion
Boomer, is independent and conscious of her
independence as the oldest and only married
daughter in the family. She is rather intolerant
and frequently irritates her father.
Ben Wade, cleverly acted by M1orton Southard,
is a small-town real estate agent, is breezy, self-
important and very tactless. He is very talkative
and undiplomatic, but well-meaning.
Lilybel Cox, as Kate Bence triumphed over a
hard r61e. She is the rather haughty middle
daughter who feels that she is very talented
(though in what line she has yet to discover) and


that she is misunderstood by very unsympathetic
parents. She is in love with Duke Merrill but
refuses to marry him because he is skeptical as to
her talent.
Royal Higgason is very convincing in the part
of Duke Merrill, a young but very worldly million-
aire who, after two years away from her, is still in
love with Kate. He appeals to Pa as an ideal
son-in-law, but Kate rejects him because he has
no faith in her.
Ruth Bence, excellently characterized by Eliza-
beth Hackett is the youngest daughter. She is
very dramatic and has romantic ideas.
Lee Kariger was very fine in the r6le of Kempy
James, a young plumber (really an architect)
who is very determined, and who always gets
what he wants. He is very boyish and impulsive,
a contrast to the calm, thoughtful Duke who
weighs his words.
Kempy James comes into the Bence home to
fix a pipe and in the course of a few hours, finds
himself married to Kate, who had had another
quarrel with Duke and who wanted to show him
that she could do without him. The marriage
does not make anyone happy, the couple least of
all, and after a hectic night in which Pa storms,
Ma pacifies in vain, Duke argues, and Kempy
asserts himself while the rest of the family are too
completely overcome to enter the battlefield,
they find that the marriage can be annulled and
all ends happily.
"Kempy" was a very great success, due to the
cleverness of the play, the splendid acting of the
cast, and the incomparable direction and manage-
ment of Mr. Robert Noe. Whether another
Senior play can be better or even be equal to it is
vet to be proved.


Hotel Washington Swimming Pool.







THE CARIBBEAN.


BASEBALL.


CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL versSll BALBOA
HIGH SCHOOL.
(First Game.)
The first game of the series was played
at the Colon diamond, February 2, 1929.
This was an interesting and well-played
game, through the eight innings, being
anybody's game, until that time. In the
ninth Balboa broke loose and scored
thirteen runs.
Balboa was as well represented in the
stands as on the diamond. There was a
continual storm of cheers from Balboa
and Cristobal rooters.
The game started with Maurer of
Cristobal facing Reese of Balboa. Both
went fine until the seventh. In the
ninth Pettit went in to relieve Maurer; he
gave a base on balls, was hit for a single
and a triple. He was replaced by Hayden
who struck out the first batter, and then
was hit for two homers and a single.
Bridgens relieved Reese of Balboa, and
he survived the battle.
Morrison started for Balboa with a hit
through third. Des I.ondes forced him


at second and went to third on a passed
ball. Hele hit through De Reuter, and
Des Londes scored the first run of the
game.
Cristobal High took the lead in the
third inning. Higgason's weak grounder
went through Des Londes' legs and Hig-
gason stole second. De Reuter brought
him home with a hit to deep right.
Babbitt followed with a hit and stole
second. De Reuter scored on a pass ball,
and Pescod hit a safety to center, scoring
Babbitt, altogether making three runs.
Reese's three-bagger to center with a
man on, and an error, resulted in two
runs for Balboa, tying the score. Cris-
tobal went into the lead again when
Maurer made first on Hele's error. He
stole second and third and scored on a
hard single to center by Pescod.
Balboa took the lead in the sixth inning
and there they stayed. Reese homered
with a man on and Quinn singled and
went around on a succession of passed
balls and a stolen base. Three more
runs for Balboa. Cristobal came with-


in one of tying the score in the eighth
when the heavy-hitting Pescod tripled
to center scoring Maurer. Then he
waited on third while W. Wikingstad
grounded out.
Then came Balboa'slucky ninth. Pow-
ell opened with a strike out. Murray
took a base on balls. So did Morrison,
and the bases filled when Des Londes was
hit. Wood doubled to right, and Hig-
gason fielded it very slowly. Hele hit
to center. Pettit took up the pitching
duties. Reese walked, filling the bases.
Quinn hit to right, and Jones sent a
triple down the left field foul line.
Exit Pettit. Hayden forced Powell to
hit a grounder and it went through De
Reuter. Bridgens fanned for the second
out. Morrison was hit in the back. Des
Londes hit a long fly to right which Hig-
gason badly misjudged, and chased to the
fence. Wood hit to deep center for an-
other homer. Hele hit to left and Reese
grounded out to first. Cristobal came
right back at them in their half. With
one out Brandon walked, and De Reuter


- 'I~"LC


r.- I..-


,i


0,
,......~









THE CARIBBEAN.


homered to center. The game ended as
Harden and Pettit fanned.


The box score:
Balboa High
Morrison, cf .
Des Londes, 11b.
Wood, 2b..
Hele, ss....
Reese, p, rf.
Quinn, 3h..
Jones, If.
Powell, c
Bridgens, p.
Murray, rf. .

THt.i ..

Cristobal High
R. Wikingsad,l If.
VW ill, If... .
Pesco.l, 3b ...
VW.'A. n, r, I :
W ertz, cf ....
Brandon, rf ....
Higgason, rf.....
DeReuter, ss ...
Ha yden, ib, p.,
Stewart, c .
Babbitt, c . .
Pettit, p, b ....
Maurer, p ...

Total .. ...


40 1 1,1 27 I6 i3


R H PO
o 0 0
o 0 3,
o 3 4
o 0 -
o o I
0 0 1
0 0 0
2 0 0
2 2 2
0 1 5


4 I I
I c o
4 2 1

36 7 8


Score by innings.

Balboa ...... 2 o 3 0 0 13-19
Cristobal.. o 3 o oo 0 I 2- -


Summary: Two base hits-W-ood,
Jones. Three base hits-Reese, Pescod.
Home runs-Reese, DesLondes,DeReuter,
Wood. Stolen bases-W. W'ikingstad,
Wertz, Higgason, Hacdyen, Babbitt, Maur-
er (4), Wood, Hele (3), Reese, Murray.
Sacrifice hits-Jones. Double plays-
Wertz to DeReuter to W. WVikingstad,
Pescod to WV. Wikingstad, Pescod to W.
Wikingstad to Hayden. Bases on balls
off Reese 6, off Maurer 6, off Pettit i, off
Bridgens 2. Struck out-by Maurer 3,
by Reese 4, by Hayden I, by Bridgens 2.
Hits-off Maurer S in S and 1/3 innings,
off Reese in 7 and 2/3 innings, off Pettit
2 in no innings, off Hayden 3 in 2/3
innings,off Bridgens i in I anid l3 innings.
Winning pitcher-Reese. Losing pitcher
Maurer. Hit by pitcher, Reese I (Wertz),
Maurer I (Des Londes), Hayden 1
(Morrison). Wildpitch-Maurer. Passed
ball-Powell 2, Babbitt, Stewart. Uim-
pires-Longnecker and Graham.


CRISTOBAI. HIGH SCHOOL uerSiiS BALBOA
HIGH SCHOOL.

(Second Game.)


Both teams scored in the fifth. Cris-
tobal made one run on two hits and an
error. Balboa, on three hits and a walk,
scored one run.


The second game of the series was Cristobal went out in order in the
played at Balboa, February 9, 1929. sixth. Balboa got two hits and a walk,
The game went to Balboa High School, but failed to score because of foolish base
6-5. This gave them the High School running.
Championship for the first time in three In the seventh both teams got men on
bases but failed to score.
years.
The game was fast and exciting from Cristolal went out in order again in the
beinnin to ed a nd he done eighth. Jones led with a hit for Balhoa,
beginning to end and would have done P l p,
in A went to their 1 but ]'rest )n end th


to right.
the ninth Higgason hit to
Sgot on by another error
bbitt forced DeReuter,
o fill the bases. Ha dien
sed ball, and Whiddiin,
ir Brandon, ended the
ike our.


credit to many ball teams of higher class. inning ith
inning, with a fly
Cristobal High started with three In the first o
In the first ot t
runs in the first inning. Balboa High center. Ha den
put one over in the second and then took by Quinn. Ba
the lead in the fourth, scoring four runs. Maurer walked t
Cristobal scored one run in the fifth, and scored on a pas
Balboa cam back with one in their half. pinch-hitting fc
From the fifth to the ninth both teams game with a str
drew blanks. Cristobal scored her last
run in the ninth with the bases full and The box score
two out. Hidden, pinch-hitting for CristobalHigh
Brandon, struck out to end the game. Wills, If
Bridgens, Balboa's pitcher, was the Brandon, If.
star of the game. He allowed only five /*Whidden...
hits, no earned runs, and struck out \Vikingstad 2d
eleven men, passing three. Pescod, 3d, p.
Balboa hit hard, collecting eleven hits. W'ertz, cf.
Jones led with three singles in three Higgason, rf.
official times to bat. DeReuter, ss.
Cristobal played a much better game Hayden, ist, 3d
in the field than Balboa, making only Babbitt, c
three errors. W. Wikingstad played the Maurer, p, Ist.
best game, but DeReuter made the out-
Total ...
standing play of the day when he grabbed
Hele's liner with one hand. Maurer Balboa High
Balboa High
left the box in the fourth and was relieved
by Pescod, who pitched excellent ball. Morrison, c...
If he had started, there might have been Preston, cf.
a different tune to sing. DesLondes, Ist.
With one out in the first for Cristobal, Hele, ss
\V, .,,, .Reese, It. .
W. \ikingstad got first on Wood's oRee, if
error, Pescod fanned, Wikingstad stole Qood, d. .
second. Cristobal scored three runs on i
Jones, r. ..
another error, a walk and DeReuter's Jones, t..
Powell, c ....
triple. Morrison led with a hit for Balboa Bridges, ...
-Bridgens, p.. ,
but they failed to score.
Cristobal went scoreless in the second, Total ...
although Havden walked to start the hidn
*\\'hidden hit
inning. Balboa made one run on \Wood's
walk, two errors by Maurer, and Jones' Two base h
hit. hits-DeReuter
Neither team scored in the third. Reese, Wikings
Cristobal went out in order in the Sacrifice fly
fourth. Balboa made four runs on three Bridgens II, b
hits, two walks, a sacrifice fly, and an Walked-By B
error. Maurer 2 Pa


AB R H PO A E
2 0 1 0 1
3 0 0 1 i o
5 0 2 5 0 0
0. o o 3 2 0
4 2 2 2 I o
2 2 0 C I 2
4 1 2 3 0 2
So 3 o o

S3 i o a 2

34 6 I I 27 S

for Brandon in the ninth.

its-Quinn. Three base
.Stolen bases-Jones,
,tad, Babbitt, Maurer, 3.
Jones. Struck out-by
y Maurer 2, by Pescod 4.
ridgens 3, by Pescod 3, b y
ssed balls-Powell, 2.








THE CARIBBEAN.


Cristobal High School Baseball Squad. Coach. Ed Morris, Boston "Red Sox" pitcher (American League).



TENNIS.


Not much interest was taken in tennis
this year in Cristobal High School, al-
though the few boys that came out for
this sport were very enthusiastic. Two
tournaments were played with Balboa
High School this year, Balboa coming out
victorious by a large margin.
The first tournament was played at
France Field, March 16, 1929. Colonel
Fisher was kind enough to allow us to
use the France Field courts, becauseof the
poor condition of the Cristobal courts.

RESUI.TS.
T. Maduro (B. H. S.) defeated H.
Mueller (C. H. S.) 6-0, 6-o. Mueller
was outpointed throughout, but put up a
good fight.


S. Dicks (B. H. S.) defeated F. Drake The second tournament played at
(C. H. S.) 6-1, 6-0. Drake won the Balboa, March 23, 1929, was a repetition
first game, but was outpointed in the of the first, Balboa winning every set.
remainder of the play. The score this time was not so one sided.
W. Hele (B. H. S.) defeated D. Ser- Our team made a much better showing.
geant (C. H. S.) 6-1, 6-0. Sergeant won
the second game but was unable to take RESULTS.
any more. T. Maduro (B. H. S.) defeated W.
Taylor and Wainer (B. H. S.) defeated Wickingstad (C. H. S.) 6-3, 6-1.
Mueller and Maher (C. H. S.) 6-1, 6-0. S. Dick (B. H. S.) defeated F. Drake
Mueller lost heart after severe beating (C. H. S.) 6-1,6-1.
in singles; although Maher tried hard, Wainer (B. H. S.) defeated H. Mueller
they were defeated. (C. H. S.) 6-1, 6-0.
Dicks and Maduro (B. H. S.) defeated Wainer and Taylor (B. H. S.) defeated
Harmon and Mundberg (C. H. S.) 6-2, Mueller and Harmon (C. H. S.) 6-2, 6-2.
6-0. Harmon and Mundberg surprised Dick and Drew (B. H. S.) defeated
the rest of the team, by making the best Wickingstad and Drake (C. H. S.) 6-1,
score of the day. 6-3.








THE CARIBBEAN.


SOCCER.

To begin with, this is the first year After the kick-off, our forwards carried
soccer has been played in C. H. S. Al- the game to Balboa. They threatened
though our team lost the series to Balboa, Balboa's goal many times but were un-
we feel greatly encouraged because this successful. Brandon, Conley, Stewart,
is Balboa's second year at the game. and W. Wickingstad carried the ball
The soccer team was organized by Mr. right to the goal line several times only
V. E. Seiler, our coach. About two- to lose it in fierce scrimmages, sometimes
thirds of the boys who went out for the right between the goal posts.
team had never seen a game of soccer. The final score was 2-0 in Balboa's
Several of the others had played the game favor.
once or twice. Our captain, Thomas Dew, Rader, Quinn, and Maduro fea-
Pescod, was a veteran player and from toured the play for Balboa, with their fine
him and Mr. Seller our players gained a passing and ground-gaining ability. For
considerable knowledge of the game by our team, Pescod was the star. With
the time the series with Balbga rolled the little assistance the other back, could
around, offer, Balboa was held down far below
The first game with Balboa was played what they expected.
at the Radio Station, New Cristobal, on Balboa's team played fine soccer and,
November 24, 1928. Balboa was fairly although they defeated us, they had to
well represented and these rooters made fight and fight hard for the goals they
noise enough for a crowd twice the size. made.
The game was called at tw6 o'clock. The second game of the series was
We kicked off to Balboa and immediately played at the Balboa Stadium, Decem-
a struggle began for possession of that ber I, 1928,on adry, hard field, and under
swiftlymoving sphere, which was continu- a very hot sun.
ally changing sides. Balboa finally took Balboa again displayed their abilty to
possession of the ball and by their good play as a team by their fine passing. Our
passing and team work, they caged the men showed brilliant work, but not as a
first goal of the game, which was the last team, only as individuals.
for the first half. At the end of the first Mike Dew starred for Balboa. with a
half, De Reuter was substituted for spectacular game and three of Balboa's
Conklin. four goals to his credit. Vengochea,
Balboa kicked off at the start of the captain of the B. H. S. team, played a
second half. Their forwards showed, in fine game, making the fourth goal for
their speed and ability to handle the ball, Balboa on a pretty penalty shot.
that they knew something about the Tommy Pescod, our captain, was
game of soccer. The field soon became easily the best player on the field. He
a mud hole, for with the start of the second showed his ability to carry the ball by
half a light drizzle began and increased in many charges into Balboa's territory.
volume until the end of the game. Bal- Here he would lose the ball to their backs
boa fired shot after shot at our goal, only because of lack of support by his team
to have them stopped by Whidden, the mates.
goal keeper, or the two backs, Captain The game was a see-saw affair from
Pescod and Babbitt. It is said that if you start to finish. The ball changed hands
are persistent enough you will attain rapidly and continually. Just before the
yourend,which Balboa finally.did. With end of the first half Pescod scored the
a series of fine passes they finally caged first goal for Cristobal, on a penalty kick.
the second and last goal of the game. This made the score 2-i in Balboa's favor,

BASKET BALL.


Our basket ball squad was very small
this year, only about nine or ten possible
players coming out. They practiced for
two weeks under Mr. Seller's coaching
and then played several practice games.
The first game was played with Head-
quarters Battery, 2d Field Artillery,
Gatun. This game went six periods, the
Field Artillery coming out on the long


they having made two goals early in the
half.
Balboa scored again in the beginning
of th- second half. A few minutes later
the second and last goal was scored for
Cristobal by De Reuter, after a series of
fast passes. Near the end of the second
half Balboa scored again, making the


score 4-2.


There it stayed the remainder


of the game.
Our goal keeper deserves mention for
the many would be goals that he stopped,
many of them very difficult stops.

BALBOA.
Forwards.
C. F. Capt. P. Vengochea
I. R. Mike Dew
I. W. William Michelson
I. I.. Jose Salterro
R. W. Fred Maduro
Halfbacks.
C. James Booth
I.. H. James Quinn
R. H. William Hele
Fullbacks.
L. B. Billy Taylor
R. B. William Rader
Goal.
Amos Waner


CRISTOBAL.
Forwards.
C. F. W. Wickingstad
I. .. Tom Conley
L. W. Fred Stewart
I. R. Teddy Brandon
R. W. R. Wickingstad
Halfbacks.
C. P. De Reuter
L. H. Sam Patchett
R. H. James Quinn
Fullbacks.
L. B. Capt. T. Pescod
R. B. Woodford Babbitt
Goal.
John Whidden


end of a 26-24 score. The second game CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL 'ersus BALBOA
was played with "A" Battery. They HIGH SCHOOL.
won, 46-30. The following week the (Fist Game.)
On May 4, 1929, Cristobal High School
third game was played at Cristobal. met Balboa High School at the Cristobal
We won this game, 46-28. The last Playshed.
practice game before we met Balboa This was one of the best and fastest
High School was with "C" Co. of Fort games ever played between the two
Davis. We defeated them easily 58-4. schools.


MR 13835-12








90 THE CARIBBEAN.


Our team was rated as not having a
chance with the strong Balboa combi-
nation.
When the first whistle blew, Cristobal
went right after Balboa. They had not
expected anything like that and they
seemed dazed. Cristobal soon worked
this out of them, and then both teams
went at it in earnest. The Babbitt-Pes-
cod combination went to work and the
points began to go up. Babbitt worked
the ball down to Pescod under the baske:
and he very seldom missed a goal. If
Balboa got the ball Blauvelt was always
under the basket to spoil the shot. If
Cristobal had had another guard like
him, Balboa would not have won.
The greater part of Balboa's playing
was done byHele and Des Londes. They
showed fine passing ability and were able
to land baskets. Balboa had a superior
number of players thereby having a
slight advantage.
At the half Balboa led 14-11.
The second half was a repetition of
the first. Hele, Wood and Des Londes


carried the attack for Balboa; Pescod CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL versus BALBOA


and Hayden for Cristobal.
In the third quarter Cristobal took the
lead and held it for many minutes.
Balboa's superior numbers and their fine
team work began to tell. They recovered
the lead at the end of the quarter, and
went ahead a few points on their own.
The last quarter was fast and furious
neither team being able to gain on the
other, although each scored.
Score: Balboa High School....... .
Cristobal High School..... 1


Des Londes, rf.
Hele, If.
W. Wood, c.
Wainer, rg.
Jones, Ig.

Babbitt, rf.
Pescod, If.
Hayden, c.
Blauvelt, Ig.
W. Wikingstad,


LINEUP.
Balboa.
Romig, rf.
Quinn, If.

Key, rg.
J. Wood, Ig.
Cristobal.





ri. E. Conklin, rg.


HIGH SCHOOL.
(Second Game.)
During the week, after our first defeat
by Balboa, we played two practice games.
The first game was played with the post
team from Camp Gatun. They defeated
us 36-17. The second game was played
at Fort Davis with "M" Co. They won
15-10.
On Saturday, May II, 1929, Cristobal
High School went to Balboa to play the
second game of the high school series.
This was a very one-sided game in
Balboa's favor. Cristobal's forwards
were unable to penetrate Balboa's de-
fense, with the exception of a few times
when they broke through. Toward the
end of the game Cristobal's men were
tiring. Four of them played through the
entire game, while Balboa was continually
making substitutions, which were very
necessary to stop Cristobal's attack.
Wood and Hele battled for high point
honors of the game, while Pescod of


Cristobal High School Track Squad.









THE CARIBBEAN.


Cristobal ran them up very close. Blau- Romig, ri....
velt of Cristobal again proved his ability Hele, If-c. .
as a guard by making many spectacular Solenberger, If
stops and spoiling many shots for Balboa. Quinn, It.....
The loss of this game gave Balboai High WVm. Wood, c.
School the basket ball championship for Wainer, rg.
the school year of 1928-21. J. Wood, rg
BALBOA. Jones, g. .
FG FT PF TP Powell, Ig
Des ILondes, rf .... c o 2 La Peira, I
Dew, rf ..... o 0 0 Total


CRISTOBAL.


o 4 r Babbitt, rf ..
10 Pescod, If
C c Hayden, c .
o c Blauvelt, rg
0 c Wikingstad, I1
Conklin, Ic
c ,: Qnu1inn, 11
5 2.1 Total


G FT PF TP
2 0 c 4
4 o c 8
1 2 0 4
0 0 3
S 0 0 0
0 0 2 0
0 0 0 0
2 ,7 16


L T


Swimming was not much of a success
this year. Little interest was taken in
this sport. Also, there was so much
competition between swimming and
other sports that many of those who were
interested were unable to come out.
The annual swimming meet between
Cristobal High School and Balboa High
School was held at the Hotel Washington
Pool, April 20, 1929. This turned out to
be a walk-away for Balboa, as the score
shows 50-9.
The outstanding feature of the meet
was the breaking of the Canal Zone High


S\V IMMING.

SL MMARY OF EVENTS.


rc-vard Cr(awl.

i. W. Walston (B. H. S.). Tin e, 2(>-3 5
seconds.
2. B. Romig (B. H. S.,.
3. P. Hayden (C. H. S.I.

I co-viar! Sz';wm.

i. nW. Walston (B. H. S.i. Tirme, I
minute, 2 seconds.
2. H. Mueller (C. H. S.I.
W3. W. Burdge B. H. S.).


School record for the 220-yard swim, by o-Yard Breast Stroke.
George Lowe, of Balboa. The time for
the event was 2 minutes and 36 seconds. i. A. Schwinderman I B. H. S,. Time,
Balboa took all the first places, while 30o seconds.
we took only two second places and three 2. G. Halloran (B. H. S.).
third places. 3. A. Mundberg (C. H. S.).


5o-yard Back Stroke.
i. G. I.owe (B. H. S.). Time, 3
seconds.
2. W. Robinson (B. H. S.).
3. .. Ekwurzel (B. H. S.).
220- ard Swi.im.
G. Lowe (B. H. S.). Time, 2
minutes, 36 seconds (new Canal Zone
High School record.
2. H. Brewerton (B. H. S.).
3. H. Mueller (C. H. S.).
Fancy Dicing.
i. H. Brewerton (B. H. S.).
2. B. Turner (C. H. S.).
3. C. Dockery (B. H. S.).

120-vard Re/av.
Won by B. H. S. Time, I minute, I
second.








THE CARIBBEAN.


Again our year was broken up by the
leaving of Miss Alexander and the arrival
of Miss Bailey. A little time was neces-
sary forgetting acquainted, but soon Miss
Bailey was in the swing of things here,
and several of the gir's became interested
in the various sports. Although Balboa
has won the most of the honors in com-
petition with us, the Cristobal High School
girls who came out regularly for practice
deserve great credit.


GIRLS' ATHLETICS.
Marion Boomer, '29.
The first thing Miss Bailey did was to
get up a tennis tournament, so as to see
who should go to Balboa. Pauline Her-
man proved herself Champion of Cristo-
bal. On March 16, Cristobal played
against Balboa at the Balboa Courts.
In the singles Pauline gave Louise Martin
a good fight but lost by a score of 6-2, 6-3.
In the doubles, Clarita and Cecilia Smith
were victors over, first, Gretchen Palm
and Marion Boomer by 6-1, and then


over Gretchen and Jean Wyllie by 6-4.
Balboa is to be congratulated on the
wonderful team work shown by the Smith
sisters and the fast playing of Louise
Martin.
The girl's track meet was held the
same day as the boys, April 13. Maybe
it was on account of its being the I3th
that Cristobal only had 5 points to Bal-
boa's 42. The five points were obtained
in the baseball throw by Marion Boomer.
Rae Newhardt is to be con-
gratulated upon her broad
jump. She was within two
feet of the world's record.
The next and last event was
swimming. This meet was held
at the Washington Pool on
April 20. Zoe Wyllie made
the only point for Cristobal
by getting 3d place in diving.
The following girls came out
for sports this year.
TENNIS.
Pauline Herman, Jean Wyllie,
Gretchen Palm,Marion Boomer.
TRACK.
Pauline Herman, Virginia
Stevenson, Betty Cunningham,
Gladys Bliss, Rosemary Keene,
Elsie Birkeland, Mary Bretch,
Alice Gormerly, Marion
Boomer.
SWIMMING.
Pauline Herman, Zoe Wyllie,
Jean Wyllie, Marion Neely.







THE CARIBBEAN.


SCHOOL NOTES.
.,nita Rankin, '2o.


Oct. i. Whoopee! Introducing Messrs. Pence
and West and the Misses Meyers and Emmons.
Oct. 2. Seniors and Juniors are presented with
new home rooms-Seniors were a trifle disappoint-
ed, but are O. K. now.
Oct. 5. Election of class officers. Seniors start
the ball a-rolling in elections.
Oct. 8. Supper Club begins, enrolling 60 mem-
bers.
Oct. ii. Athletic Association meets, and elec-
tion of officers takes place.
Oct. 15. Staff elections held in Assembly-
full attendance.
Oct. 20. Student government introduced by
Seniors and privileges announced.
Oct. 22. Staff meeting held to discuss matter of
"Caribbean."
Oct. 31. Day after Halloween, school bell minus
clapper.
Nov. i. Freshmen boys beat the Sophs in
initiation.
Nov. 3. Panamanian National Holiday.
Nov. 6. Green suspenders inaugurated by Con-
lev and Stewart.
Nov. 9. Senior party-best of the year.
Nov. 24. Robert Edwards and Marion Ed-
wards leave school on account of sudden death of
their father.
B. H. S. vs C. H. S. in a soccer game. B. H. S.
are victors. Debating Club introduced in C. H. S.
Nov. 25. Thanksgiving Holiday. It was tur-
key.
Dec. I. C. H. S. vs B. H. S. in a second soccer
game. B. H. S. are again victors-too bad!
Dec. 3. C. H. S. mourns loss of one of her best
teachers to B. H. S., but is introduced to Miss
Meyers. Who will prove to be the better?
Dec. 9-II. Conference of Supper Club held in
Cristobal Y. W. C. A.
Dec. 21. After parties in Home room, students
leave merrily for Christmas holidays-which are
reduced to one week.


Jan. 2. Some boys raided school-damnaged
much property-were caught. It's just too bad.
Jan. o1. Nothing important for awhile.
Jan. 17. Senior Banner swiped by ? ?
Jan. 20. Grounds offered for school carnival by
Colonel Wyllie of Fort de Lesseps.
Jan. 23. Mr. Williams addressed future Sen-
iors-"You all need-."
Jan 25. A lecture by Mr. H. C. Hanks. Very
interesting talk of the school for several days.
Jan. 30. Bugs-Bugs-! How exciting-! Fumi-
gation orders predominate in two rooms.
Feb. 2. Baseball--B. H. S. vs. C. H. S. Balboa
wins.
Feb. 5. Staff meeting held to decide Carnival
matter.
Feb. 6-7-8. Mid-year exams-whew! !
Feb. 8. School Carnival-Oh my! Did we
make good-and how-
Feb. 9. B. H. S. vs C. H. S. in baseball. B.H.
S. were victors, but it was exciting for both of us.
Feb. 12. Short Story Contest for "Caribbean"
announced.
Feb. 15. What a relief-that's over with, but
there still remains the verdict.
March 9. Seniors lose another classmate-
Miriam Arthur.
March I "Why Club" in debate against
C. H. S. at Y. W. C. A.
March 1. Senior play chosen and so is the
cast. Mr. Noe to direct it.


March 15. Sophomore party
Strangers Club. A wow-what
A Tacky Party.


held at the
entertainment!


March 16. C. H. S. vs B. H. S. in tennis.
B. H. S. victor.
March 29. Governor Arosemena's cup lost by
C. H. S. to de Lesseps.
April I. Upper Classmen challenge Lower
Classmen to a contest for the sale of "Caribbean"
tickets-loser gives a party.


IIH :i








94 THE CARIBBEAN.


April 8. Senior girl reveals a solitaire on the
fourth finger of left hand-guess who?
April 13. Girls' track meet. B. H. S. victors.
April 20. Girls' and boys' swimming meet.
B. H. S. victorious.
April 26. Freshman party-a character party
held at the Washington Hotel-best of the year.
May 4. First basket ball game between C. H. S.
and B. H. S. B. H. S. victorious by a small mar-
gin.
May 17. Senior play held at America-best of
any held during all the C. H. S. years.


May 31. Senior play held in Balboa-went over
big.
June 7- Junior-Senior Banquet held at the
Hotel Washington. Biggest attendance of all
C. H. S. banquets.
June 14. Diplomas arrived. Seniors can't see
them-Ha! Ha!
June 16. Baccalaureate service held at Union
Church. Was an impressive service-long to be
remembered.
June 19. Commencement. The Seniors can't
believe their eyes and ears. Juniors are ushers.
Largest class ever graduated from C. H. S.


Dense jungle growth of the tropics.