Caribbean

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Title:
Caribbean
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Cristobal High School
Publisher:
Yearbook House
Place of Publication:
Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00093680:00015


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I Cristobal High School.


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2 THE CARIBBEAN.


FOREWORD.


S7HE Editorial Staff of
S"THE CARIBBEAN"
has endeavored this year to portray
the school life of the pupils of Cris-
Stobal High School. In years to come
we hope to be able to look through 1
Sour book .and remember our happy
1 school days. We have done our best
to publish the best book possible,
and it must now rest on its merits.
*Rl{ S


(aI







THE CARIBBEAN. 3


DEDIC ACTION.


i In grateful appreciation of his sin-
cere interest and untiring efforts in
Behalf of Cristobal High School,
we, the students, dedicate this,
S the eleventh volume of
"The Caribbean" to our
principal

S Mr. fWilliam A. S,1.yc.' :
ftY _iqT fz ,'- _J2. .,


THE CARIBBEAN.


3







4 THE CARIBBEAN.


In Arlmoriam






"Silent as midnight's falling meteor slides
Into the stillness of the far off land."


IT IS WITH FOND REMEMBRANCES
OF A LOYAL CLASSMATE THAT
WE, THE CLASS OF 1928,
DEDICATE THIS PAGE
TO


&bWtarb laWrence 1leene
April 13, 1909-July 24, 1927



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THE CARIBBEAN.


Porte Cochere-Hotel as hington.
Porte Cochere--Hotel Washington.


Table of Contents.


Foreword . .
Dedication...... .
In Memoriam.......

Staff.. ............
Editorial........
Faculty.........
Seniors... ..
Class History........
Class W ill .......

Class Prophecy......
Juniors ..........


Sophomores.
Freshmen .

Literary.
Alumni ..
School Notes.

Sports ..
Exchanges .
Jokes ...
Autographs.
Advertisements.


Cathedral at Central Plaza, Panama City.


MR 10066-Panama Canal-6-16-28-425








6 THE CARIBBEAN.


Staf f of "The Caribbean."


Faculty Adviser ..... ....

Editor-in-Chief. .. ....
Assistant Editor-in-( ,' ..... ..

Business Manager (resigned).........
Business Manager .................
/ssi:tti t ifrsi.css A 'ai.c gr (resigned).

Assislta t li sia ess 'ar~m.cr... ....
Circulation Manager. ......

Assista,.t C rculdtion A 'c.cger.......


.... MR. SAWYERS Literary Editor ....................... ETHEL WESTMAN

.... JACK KLUNK Art Editor ..... ...................... MORTON SOUTHARD
. ... .JACK PETTIT Exchange Editor. ... ....... ......... GLADYS E. BEERS

..FRANK KIMBELL School Notes Editor.....................EMMA E. BANKS

....PAUL HAYDEN Alumni Editor............... ......... ZONELLA BLISS
....RoY WALKER Boys' Athletic Editor (resigned)................ MIKE GREEN

.ROYAL HIGGASON Boys' Athletic Editor............... WOODFORD BABBITT
.... ALBERT DAYS Girls' Athletic Editor...................EVANGELINE SMITH
...CHARLES CRUM Joke Editor ............. ............. TEDDY HENTER








THE CARIBBEAN. 7


fbitorial.



By John G. Klunk, '28.

"Our sincerest laughter with some pain is fought;
Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thought."
-Shelley.


0


To write the appreciation of the Editorial Staff
of the Cristobal High School annual, THE CARIB-
BEAN, and of the Class of '28, to the community,
is a task deserving of another pen than ours;
because it is so real it is difficult to express. The
school and the community are close to each other,
working for the same things, the successful com-
pletion of a high school course for the students,
and high standards for the school.
Not until we are Seniors do we realize what the
community means to the school. When the time
arrives for the staff to start work on THE CARIB-
BEAN, to see the printers, to raise funds, to put on
the carnival and class play, to see to the adver-
tising, only then do we realize the kindly interest,
the generous support, and friendship of which each
day brings fresh proof. This is the spirit that
develops our students, brings out their best,
teaches them the meaning of community interest,
understanding, and friendship.


In our games you are with us; if we win, you
knew we could and are glad of it; if we lose, better
luck next time. We are proud of our school, our
faculty, and our community, who have given us
their best.
We wish THE CARIBBEAN, the last and greatest
effort of the Class of '28, to carry to you our
warmest and sincerest thanks. Peans of praise
could only tell us, as we have tried to do, of the
share this community has in the welfare of the
students of our school. In graduating honorably
we have in part fulfilled your hopes for us.
Happy, carefree school days are ended; Cris-
tobal High School for us is finished. Well may we
say, "Our sweetest songs are those that tell of
saddest thought." That it pays to be patient
with youth, and to give encouragement when
needed is the lesson we have learned as we too have
needed these helps from the men and women
who are our community.


Fishing Boats Along the Beach of Panama City.


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8 THE CARIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN.


Name-LILLIAN B. GUSTAFSON.
Birthplace-Chicago, Ill.
Home Address-Nunica, Mich.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-N. I. S. N. S.
Location-De Kalb, Ill.
Favorite E;.,rr ,ioi--\\ ell. now, etc.
Date Entering Service on Canal-October I, 1923.
Subjects Taught g197- 928-Assistant Principal.

Miss LILLIAN B. GUSTAFSON.
Miss Gustafson is a necessary part of our High
School. Her position ensures the smooth running
of each day's work. Acquainted with all the
details of the office routine, she has proved to be
of valuable assistance to our school.
In Miss Gustafson's study halls, one can always
see her helping puzzled students with perplexing
problems.
During her stay she has become immensely
popular with the student body, and we hope to
welcome her to Cristobal High next year.


Name-WILLIAM A. SAWYERS.
Birthp..',e-W-\eterly, R. I.
Home Address-38 Summer St., Westerly, R. I.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-Westerly High School.
Location-Westerly, R. I.
College or University-Bates College, Lewiston, Me.
Dates Attended-915- 1919.
Degrees Obtained-B. S.
College or University-Columbia University, NewYork City.
Dates Anie'-,dd. 4- i'.1
Degrees Obtained-M. A.
Favorite Expression-I can't talk above all that noise.
Date Entering Service on Canal Zone-September 7, 192~.
Subjects Taught i927y-9i8-Economics, General Science.
Sponsorfor what Class-THE CARIBBEAN Staff.

MR. WILLIAM A. SAWYERS.
Mr. Sawyers, our principal, has been with us
only this year. He not only handles the respon-
sibilities of the principalship but also teaches
General Science and Economics, not to speak of
being the sponsor of THE CARIBBEAN Staff.
He has instilled in us the school spirit by help-
ing us to give the best carnival that Cristobal
High School has ever had. It was through his
initiative that we had a special train to see
Lindbergh "hop off," and also the train to Balboa
when we won the "flying colors" in baseball.
The success of our annual, our class play, our
graduation, and our many activities is largely
due to his help.
Our Principal has the welfare of our school at
heart. He is the biggest "booster" we have.
We know that Cristobal High School will flourish
under his wise and friendly counsel.








THE CARIBBEAN. 11


Name-G. J. BENSON.
Birthplace-St. Cloud, Minn.
Home Address-St. Cloud, Minn.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-Technical High School.
Location-St. Cloud, Minn.
College or University-State Teachers' College.
Dates Attended-1917-I8, 1919-20.
Degrees Obtained-Diploma.
College or ( ',..':. -Br ,,llt. Polytechnic Institute.
Dates Attended-1922-24.
Degrees Obtained-B. S.
College or University-University of Minnesota.
Dates Attended-Summer Session, 1920.
Favorite Expression-Stop your talking now.
Date Entering Service on Canal Zone-October I, 1924.
Subjects Taught 1927-g928-Manual Training.
MR. GEORGE BENSON.
To all boys taking Manual Training and Me-
chanical Drawing, Mr. Benson is a well-known
character, but he is also known to the remaining
portion of the student body.
Mr. Benson and his pupils proved to be a valu-
able help at our annual High School Carnival.
They erected the tents and booths which were a
necessary part of the celebration.
Mr. Benson has been with us several years, and
is a familiar member of the faculty. This year
he surprised us by returning from the States with
a bride.
All Cristobal High will gladly welcome Mr.
Benson if he again resumes his work with us
next year.


Name-MARY ELIZABETH MOORE.
Birthplace-West Alexandria, Pa.
Home Address-West Alexandria, Pa.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School--Washington High School.
Location-W shinglon, Pa.
( ..c.' or Uni:,er'ity--West Virginia University.
Dates .ttended-1 919-1923.
Degrees Obtained-A. B.
Favorite Expression-Now when I was at college, etc.
Date Entering Service on Canal Zone--October 1, 1925.
Subjects Tanght 1927-lc(28-Spanish, Latin.
Sponsor for what Class-Freshman.
Nli .,. MARY ELIZABETH \l n.RE.
Miss Mary Elizabeth Moore, our very popular
Latin and Spanish teacher, has been with us for
3 years. For 2 years she was the able sponsor of
the Junior Class, and conducted two of the best
banquets ever held at Cristobal High School.
This year she is the sponsor of the Freshman
Class. Under her management the Freshmen
gave a most entertaining masquerade party. For
the first time in the history of the High School,
the party was held in the Washington Hotel
Ballroom.
All of the students enjoy Miss Moore's classes,
for she is a vivacious and interesting teacher.
Everyone is looking forward to her coming back
next year.


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12 THE CARIBBEAN.


Name-CARRIE A. SEWELL.
Birthplace-Carbondale, Colo.
Home Address-Carbondale, Colo.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-Carbondale Union High School.
Location-Carbondale, Colo.
'..,, or University-University of Colorado.
Dates Attended-1911 -1915.
Degrees Obtained-A. B.
College or University-State Teachers' College.
Dates Attended-Summer, 1916.
I ... or it .,, -University of Oregon.
Dates Attended-Summer, 1925.
Favorite Expression-Most of you pupils do not even look
at your lesson.
Date Entering Service on CanalZone-October, 1, 1925.
Subjects Taught 1927-z928-Algebra, Geometry, Physics.
Sponsorfor what Class-Sophomore.

Miss CARRIE A. SEWELL.
Miss Carrie A. Sewell is our Mathematics
teacher. She teaches Algebra to Freshmen,
Geometry to Sophomores, and Physics to Juniors
and Seniors. When help is needed in perplexing
problems, propositions, or experiments, Miss
Sewell is our ready aide.
This is .li., Sewell's third year with us. For
two years she has sponsored the Class of '30.
This year she helped the Sophomoresgive a very
original "Lindbergh Hop" at the Ma,,nic Temple.
We need her at Cristobal High School to answer
our stupid questions that she never seems to tire
of answering for us. We hope that she will
continue with us for a long time,


Name-GRACE R. HESSE.
Birthplace-Miller, S. Dakota.
Home. /,ide. ,-Shelbv %ille, Ill.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-Ann Arbor High School.
Location-Ann Arbor, Mich.
College or University-University of Michigan.
Dates Attended--914-1917.
Degrees Obtained-A. B.
College or University-University of Michigan.
Dates Attended-1923-1924.
Degrees Obtained-M. A.
C i e or University-National University of lMe'io
Dates Attended-Summer, 1921.
Favorite Expression--Quien sabe?
Date Entering Service on CanalZone-October I, 1926.
Subjects Taught 1927-g9zS-English, Spanish.
Sponsorfor what Class-Junior.

Miss GRACE R. HESSE.
Miss Grace R. Hesse, our capable English and
Spanish teacher, is admired by all of the students.
Miss Hesse's time is occupied not only by teaching,
but also by conducting the Boys' and Girls' Glee
Clubs, which have, during the year, sung for the
Y. W. C. A., Y. M. C. A., and the Woman's Club.
As adviser of the Junior Class, Miss Hesse
helped the Juniors to give a very entertaining
party. The success of the Junior-Senior Banquet
was also due to her helpful suggestions. The
Musical Review for our Carnival was composed
and directed by her.
We appreciate the help that Miss Hesse has
given us and hope that she will return next year.








THE CARIBBEAN.


Name-EMILY RUSSELL.
Birthplace-Pine Bluff, Ark.
Home Address-1404 Olive, Pine Bluff, Ark.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-Pine Bluff High School.
Location-Pine Bluff, Ark.
College or University-University of Arkansas.
Dates Attended-1920-1924.
Degrees Obtained-B. S. H. E.
Favorite Expression-All Right!
Date Entering Service on Canal Zone-October I, 1927.
Subjects Taught 1927-1928-U. S. History, Household Arts.

Miss EMILY RUSSELL.
Miss Emily Russell, Household Arts and United
States History teacher, has been gladly hailed
by Cristobal.
As our Household Arts teacher, she has helped
the girls to become adept with the i...l... Also
she has taught them to prepare many tasty,
delectable dishes. The girls demonstrated their
ability by serving a dinner to their guests, Mrs.
Sawyers, Mrs. Benson, and M17i Gustafson.
If one should happen to pass by the library
second period, he could see 1i:; Russell explain-
ing the details of United States History to a class
composed of Sophomores.
Because of Mlib Russell's ability to teach and her
charming personality, many students are eagerly
looking forward to her classes next year,


Name-MARY B. MARVIN.
Birthplace-Duluth, Minn.
Home .Address--823 Oneida Street, Duluth, Minn.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-Central High School.
Location-Duluth, Minn.
( or Unizersity--University of .tI: i
Dates .'ttended- 1911- .
Degree., Obtained-A. B.
College or Univers ty-Graduate work at Columbia Univer-
si'y.
Dates Attended-1924 1nil Summer of 1927.
Favorite Expression- e irn this poem for to-morrow.
Date Entering Service on CanalZone -October i, 1927.
Suiitjcts Tal.ght 1)27-, Ir.. i.... and Senior English,
U. S. History, a;nd lMoern History.
Sponsor for what Class-Senior.

Miss MARY B. MIARVN.
Miss M.irt. B. Marvin is also a new arrival
at our High School. She teaches Freshman and
Senior English, United States and Modern
History. She is also the sponsor for the "dignified"
Seniors and supervisor for the Feature Article
section of THE CARIBBEAN.
Because of Miss Marvin's extensive European
travels, all of her classes are made extremely
interesting by descriptions of places she visited
while in Europe.
We sincerely regret that Miss Marvin does not
expect to be with us next year-but we have
thoroughly enjoyed her this year.







14 TH-E CARIBBEAN.


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16 THE CARIBBEAN.


Name-Ethel Katherine Westman. Nickname-"Westie."
Birthplace-Kansas City, Missouri. Date-July 26, 1912.
Home Address-400 South Van Brunt, Kansas City, Mo.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October I, 1926. Grade-
Junior.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone-Entered first
grade Balboa.
Class Offices Held-Vice President, Class of '28.
School Activities-High School Carnival, 1927; Supper Club,
1925-26-27.
School Athletics-Basket Ball, Indoor Baseball, and Track.
Favorite Expression-You're foolin'.
Chosen Vocation-Private Secretary.
What College Do You Expect to Enter-Business College.
Hobby-Athletics.
Favorite Pastime-Reading.
ETHEL WESTMAN.
"Ethics" and her smile can never be parted.
Ethel came to us from Balboa in her Junior year.
Since then she has been a constant delight both
to her own classmates and to her numerous
friends of C. H. S. She is also a shining star
in athletics. Is it a wonder she was chosen as a
heroine in our play? Her pep and popularity
well fit her in the part of young Dulcy.
\\hen there is a good time to be had, Ethel is
there and her impersonations often lend to the
jollity of the hour. She has the art of throwing
one into spasms of laughter.


Name-John G. Klunk. Nickname-Jack.
Birthplace-Columbus, Ohio. Date-April 3, 1909.
Home Address-Columbus, Ohio.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October I, 1916.
Grade-First.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone-None.
Class Offices Held-Secretary, Sophomore Class; President,
Senior Class.
School Activities-Orchestra, 1925-26-27-28; Glee Club,
1925-26; Chorus, 1925-26-27; Senior Class Play; Assistant
Editor, THE CARIBBEAN, 1927; Editor-in-Chief, THE CARIB-
BEAN, 1928.
School Athletics-Baseball, 1925-26-27-28; Captain, Base-
ball team, 1927; Swimming, 1925-26-27-28; Captain, Swim-
ming, 1926-27; Track, 1928; Basket Ball, 1927-28; Hand-
ball, 1927; Tennis, 1927.
Favorite Expression-You're a great man.
Chosen Vocation-Musician.
What College Do You Expect to Enter-Columbia.
Hobby-Baseball. Favorite Pastime-Baseball.
JOHN G. KLUNK.
Jack's middle name must be "success" as he is
a success at whatever he tries. He is an excellent
musician on the cornet, at athletics he's a "whiz,"
a certain proof of his popularity and success in
the fact that he is Editor-in-Chief of THE CARIB-
BEAN, and President of the Senior Class.
He does not linger on the ladder of advance-
ment but reaches the top. During his High
School career Jack's name has found a prominent
place in everything he has taken part in, and
those are not few.
As Barton Hawley, the villian in the Senior
play, "Cupid Scores a Touchdown," he is a dash-
ing character.
Jack is also noted for having a good, clear voice
which has been a great help to our singing groups.








THE CARIBBEAN.


Name-Albert Days. Nickname-Daysie.
Birthplace-Ancon, Canal Zone. Date-May 8, 1910.
Home Address-Cristobal, Canal Zone.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-February, 1922.
Grade-Seventh.
Class Offices Held-None.
School Activities-Carnival, "Rip Van Winkle," Glee Club,
Orchestra.
School Athletics-Baseball, Swimming, Handball, Basket
Ball.
Favorite Expression-I'll betcha.
Chosen Vocation-Aeronautical Engineering.
What College Do You Expect to Enter-Northwestern Univer-
sity.
Hobby-Banjo, Violin.
Favorite Pastime-Baseball.

ALBERT DAYS.

Daysie is also called Tiney Days. Al has many
accomplishments. His fame as a violinist is well
known. Now he is on his way to be a banjo
player, and he will make the grade, we feel sure,
as he is a natural musician. He was also discovered
to have a good voice.
Often Daysie is called on for his drawing.
He is always ready to help his classmates.
As an athlete Albert also is good, as any one who
has seen the High School games and swimming
races can testify.
MR 10066--3


Name-Gladys Elizabeth Beers. Nickname-Glad Eves.
Birthplace-Columbia, S. C. Date-December 30, 1909.
Home Address-Box 78, Watertown, Conn.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October 1, 1924.
Grade-Freshman.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone-Elyton
School, Birmingham, Ala.
Class Ofces Held-Treasurer, Sophomore, 1925-26; Treas-
urer,Junior, 1926 -27; Secretary and Treasurer, Senior, 1927-28.
School Activities-Carnival, 1925; Japanese Operetta, 1925;
Carnival, 1927; Kleptomaniac, 1927; Supper Club, 1925-26-
27-28.
Favorite Expression-Where y'all going .
Chosen Vocation-Private Secretary.
hat ( do You Expect to Enter-Business college.
Hobby-Sewing.
Favorite Pastime- Talking.

GLADYS BEERS.
\\ h-, information is desired, or help needed,
we all ask for our Gladys. For the last three
years she has held the responsible position as
Treasurer of the Class of '28. Gladys is noted for
her ability in Domestic Science. When the Class
of '28 gives a party, she is at the head of the
Refreshment Committee, and has given fame to
our parties as having "good eats."
Her clear contralto voice has graced our Glee
Clubs for four years.
Our "Alabama" Gladys is everybody's friend
and she will help you whenever she can.







I8 THE CARIBBEAN.


Name-Robert H. Axtell. Nickname-Axie.
Birthplace-Stratford, Conn. Date-November 5, 1911.
Home Address-Bridgeport, Conn.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October I, 1924.
Grade-Freshman.
OtherSchools AttendedBefore Coming toZone-Stratford,Conn.
Bridgeport High School, Bridgeport, Conn., October, 1926, to
January, 1927.
School Activities-Orchestra, 1926-27.
Favorite Expression-Something is rotten in the State of
Denmark.
Chosen Vocation-Scientist.
What College Do You Expect to Enter-Bates College.
Hobby-Swimming.
Favorite Pastime-Music.
ROBERT H. AXTELL.
"A" stands for Axtell and also for "arguing"
and the two can easily be spoken of together for
"arguing" seems to be Axie's favorite pastime.
He would make a good debater or lawyer, we feel
sure.
Robert is also an excellent clarinet player and
has played in the High School Orchestra for
two years.
Few of the teachers have ever had to complain
about his work, least of all the mathematics
teacher. For he is unusually quick at under-
standing problems and questions that those less
proficient in this line find puzzling to say the
least. Robert can often be seen helping those
who do not understand the whys and wherefore's
of Ph) i5S or Geometry.


Name-Emma Ellen Banks. Nickname-Bemma Anks.
Birthplace-Colon Hospital. Date-October 14, 1909.
Home Address-167, New Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School--October I, 1916.
Grade-First.
Class Offices Held-Vice President, Junior Class; Chairman,
Service Committee, 1926; Treasurer, Junior and Senior Classes,
Assistant Librarian, 1926-27.
School Activities-Glee Club, 1925-26-27; Carnival, 1925
and 1927; "Rip Van Winkle;" "The Japanese Girl;" Chorus,
1925-26-27; The Kleptomaniac; Supper Club, 1925-26-27-28.
School Athletics-Track Team, Indoor Baseball, 1926-27.
Favorite Expression-Aw-- .
Hobby-Music.
Favorite Pastime-Swimming.

EMMA BANKS.
Bemma Anks as she has been nicknamed by
her friends, is an important member of this Class
of '28. That she can sing is attested to by
the fact that she was in both Glee Club and
Chorus for three years, taking part in "Rip Van
Winkle" the Japanese Operetta and the "Musical
Review" in the Carnival at Fort De Lesseps in
1927 as well.
But singing is not her only talent for Emma
plays the piano very well also.
At gym she also shows ability in the way she
carries out directors' instructions. She swims,
plays tennis, basket ball and indoor baseball with
equal ease.








THE CARIBBEAN. 19


Name-Theodore E. Henter. Nickname-Dutchy.
Birthplace-Gorgona, Canal Zone. Date-May 2, 1910.
Home Address-Gatun, Canal Zone.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October, 1924.
Grade-Freshmen.
School Activities-Orchestra, 1926-27. Joke Editor, 1927-28.
Favorite Expression-Now--
Chosen Vocation-Electrical Engineer.
Hobby-Hunting.
Favorite Pastime-Hunting.
THEODORE CENTER.
Dutchy's genius is shown in the general abhored
science of Physics, where noble minds have tried
to swim and sunk.
When we run across him on a holiday we are
reminded of-
"Blessings on thee little man
Barefoot boy with cheeks of tan
With his turned up pantaloons
And his merry whistled tunes."
"Teddy" is well known for his ability to play on
the saxophone. He has been a great help in the
High School orchestra. We all know of his
place in the Gatun Boys' Band.


Name-Kathryn Estelle Iambert. Nickname-Kay.
Birthplace-Ancon, Canal Zone.
Date-August t6, I)0o.
Home .ddress-Box 130o, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-November 13, 1924.
Grade-Freshman.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone-Chestertown
High School.
School .4ctivities-Captain, Track Team, 1927; Captain,
Swimming Team, 1927; Glee Club, 1926-27-28; Chorus,
1926-27; "Rip Van Winkle;" Supper Club, 1925-26-27;
Carnival, 1926-27-28; "Kleptomaniac," 1926-27.
School Athletics-Swimming, Track, Gym, Basket Ball,
Indoor Baseball.
Favorite Expression-Is that so.
Chosen Iocation-Interior Decorator.
Hobby-Fancy Work.
Favorite Pastime-Fancy Work or Athletics.
KATHRYN ESTELLE LAMBERT.
Kathryn's intimate association with the office
has made her a veritable Socrates. She has made
herself indispensable to Mr. Sawyer and Miss
Gustafson. She is always busy.
Kathryn has gained athletic fame, especially
in swimming, also basket ball is one of her achieve-
ments as well as track.
She has been active in school competitions to
the advantage of C. H. S.
Her ability as an actress has been well displayed
in the Junior play, and now she is very promising
in her part as the young gold digger in the Senior
play.
Kathryn is a musician, too. She is one of the
members of the Girls' Saxophone Band.


34








20 THE CARIBBEAN.

Name-Evangeline Smith. Vick'anane--Vannie.
BI,rp,'a-Birmnngham, Ala. Date--February 5, 1909.
Home Address-Cristobal, Canal Zone.
Date of I -r,~rIe Crir1 baSC r..o--Januarv, 1921.
Grade-Fifth.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone-Gordon
School, Memphis, Tenn.
School Activities-"Japanese Operetta," "Kleptomaniac,"
Glee Club, 1924-25; Chorus, 1924-25; Supper Club, 1924-25-
26-27; Girls' Athletic Editor, THE CARIBBEAN.
School Athletics-Basket Ball, Track, Swimming, Indoor
Baseball.
Favorite E pression-Aw Gee !
Chosen Vocation-Undecided.
Hobby-Reading.
Favorite Pastime-Swimming.

EVANGELINE SMITH.
Vannie, the ever-pleasant Vannie, is a bright
and shining light in athletic fields. For years
she has been the "old faithful" in the Balboa
basket ball games-and a glorious "faithful" she
has proved. The track team's backbone was
always-Vannie. In fact, a synonym for athletic
ability in C. H. S. is-"Vannie."
And she is a real pal. Many a vanquished
soul struggling along the weedy path of education
has she helped. To know her is to love her.
Name-Arthur E. Rothenberg. Nickname-Art.
Birthplace-Fort Mott, N. J. Date-November 9, 191o.
Home Address-Fort Randolph, Canal Zone.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October, 1926.
Grade-Junior.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone-Northeast
High, Philadelphia, Pa., Middletown Township High School,
Leonardo, N. J.
School Activities-Carnival, 1927-28; Chorus, 1926-27.
Favorite Expression-Gee! Too much work.
Chosen Vocation-Engineer.
Hobby-Reading.
Favorite Pastime-Hunting.

ARTHUR E. ROTHENBERG.
When Arthur joined our ranks during our
Junior year, our curiosity was immediately aroused
to penetrate his quiet manner and to become
acquainted. Now we wouldn't sacrifice him for
six others, as he has so completely fitted into
our group that we would be lost without his
underlying current of humor that adds to our
pleasure in his character.
Arthur's well-earned honors are received un-
a,,-uminL ,,.
Arthur spends many spare moments away from
the haunts of mankind (also womankind) in the
tropical jungles.








THE CARIBBEAN. 21


Name-Bernard Edward Lowande. Nickname-Eddie.
Birthplace-Bound Brook, N. J. Date-January 27, 1909.
Home Address-5415 Tennis Ave., Olney, Philadelphia, Pa.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October I, 1916.
Grade-Second.
Class Offices Held-Vice President, Sophomore Class;
President, Junior Class.
School Activities-"Rip Van Winkle," 1926; Carnival, 1927;
Glee Club, 1925-26-27-28; Chorus, 1925-26-27-28.
School Athletics-Baseball, 1925-26-27-28; Basket Ball,
1925-26-27-28; Swimming, 1925-26-27-28; Tennis, 1927;
Handball, 1927.
Favorite Expression-He keeps it to himself.
Chosen Vocation-Aviation.
Hobby-Baseball.
Favorite Pastime-Athletics.

BERNARD EDWARD LOWANDE.
"Hey, Eddie!" He is equally popular with the
boys and girls.
Edward keeps us guessing as to what his true
character is. He is the man of the moment, the
hero of "Cupid Scores a Touchdown."
Eddie must have his joke and the life of the
object of it, is one of long teasing. Many are the
girls who miss their trinkets-bracelets and hand-
kerchiefs-to have them suddenly appear in
his possession, and he leads them a life of misery
until they are returned. But Edward can also
be as serious as the hero of the Senior play, he
was well chosen. Although he deserted our group
for a time by going to Philadelphia, he soon re-
turned to complete the journey aboard old C. H.
S. We're glad to have you with us, Edward.


Name-Zonella Bliss. Nickname-Zone.
Birthplace-Ancon, Canal Zone.
Date-November I, 1910.
Home Address-Cristobal, Canal Zone.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October, 1916.
Grade-First.
Class Offices Held-Secretary, Junior Class.
School .Activities-Supper Club, Orchestra, Chorus, Glee
Club.
School Athletics-Basket Ball.
Favorite Expression-I'd like to ask a question.
Chosen I'ocation-Secretary.
l%'hat C .. Do You Expect to Enter-Oberlin Business
College.
Hobbv--Music.
Favorite Pastime-Tennis.

ZONELLA BLISS.
"Oh Zone, what's the English assignment?"
Thus we always depend on the dependable.
Zonella is one of the few who have followed this
class from the ground up, through twelve long
years of learning. Her violin talent is well known
both in and outside of school. She has led the
Supper Club as president with a firm but patient
hand this year.
As Mrs. Connors, the mother in the Senior
play "Cupid Scores a Touchdown," she is an
assured success. Zonella is a worker and a
reliable one, as has been proved through her
school career. As we glance through her High
School calendar we are surprised that one girl
has attained so much.








22 THE CARIBBEAN.


Name-Lucia Salazar. Nickname-Sucia.
Birthplace-David, Republic of Panama.
Date-December 17, 1908.
Home Address-Colon, Republic of Panama.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October I, 1921.
Grade-Sixth.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone-Panaman
School.
School Activities-"Kleptomaniac;" Chorus, 1924-25-26-27.
Favorite Expression-Down with Physics!
Chosen Vocation-Household Art Instruction.
Hobby-To read.
Favor te Pastime-To play the piano.

LUCIA SALAZAR.
Lucia is another joy to the heart of Miss
Sewell, because of her wondrous adventures in
the realm of Physics. Lesser stars gasp at her
marvelous adventure in the realm of Physics.
Lesser stars gasp at her marvelous understanding
of that study-the cause of many a downfall.
Although she is shy and somewhat retiring,
she is an important factor in the Senior Class-
far more important than she guesses. Full many
a student owes his rise to her. She never refuses
to aid.
She is not an athlete, 'tis true, but she is a
splendid student. Oh! that there were more like
her.


Showing Steamer in Gatun Locks, to Transit the Panama Canal Southbound.








THE CARIBBEAN.


CLASS HISTORY.
By Kathryn Lambert, '28.


Looking back over the history of the Class of
'28, I am reminded of a trip through the Panama
Canal. I seem to see a Phantom Ship bearing the
name Cristobal High School and flying its colors of
purple and gold. In my fancy its crew seem to be
my school fellows, its officers, my teachers. The
Canal represents the four years of training in
High School and each set of locks signifies the
advancements we have made from year to year
in the four classes.
We, the Class of '28, who have successfully
weathered our journey through "The Canal of
Learning" are now out on the sea of "Self Sup-
port," having just passed the "Buoy of Gradua-
tion."
On October I, 1924, we entered "The Break-
water of the Freshman Class." This was a year
of excitement, when we first learned to look down
upon the eighth graders and the grammar school
students.
We noticed many landmarks on our journey to
"The Locks of the Sophomore Class." The most
important was the initiation. Next in line came
the party which we gave for the whole crew and the
officers of our good ship Cristobal High School.
By the time we reached the "Locks of the Sopho-
more Class" we had lost many of our passengers.
As we passed through these locks the landmarks
became more numerous.
We then continued our journey to the "Locks
of the Junior Class." By the time we reached these
locks our group of passengers had grown smaller
and some of our old passengers had left and new


ones replaced them. At this time our journey
took on a more interesting aspect, as most journeys
do when they are nearing their end. The work
grew heavier for us and new types of work ap-
peared. No one will forget the Junior-Senior
Banquet which our captain, Miss Dodds, told us
was the best she had ever attended in her seven
years as captain of the Cristobal High School.
We slowly passed out of the "Locks of the Junior
Class" only to enter the"Locks of the Senior Class."
The first landmark of importance was the roll
call which made known to us that seven of the
girls and five of the boys who had started on the
journey were still with us and the other boy had
joined us at the "Locks of the Sophomore Class."
At the "Locks of the Senior Class" we changed
captains. The first step which our new captain
took was to organize the staff of THE CARIBBEAN.
After these members had straightened out their
affairs, we began to make ready for the Senior
Party. Having passed this landmark we made
ready for the Carnival. We presented "Cupid
Scores a Touchdown" under the able direction of
Mir. Robert Noe. Shortly after this the Junior-
Senior Banquet was the daily topic for discussion.
Day by day the very last landmark of our jour-
ney, the one which marked the end, grew closer,
the "Buoy of Graduation." We began at once to
make ready for embarkation and soon we will be
scattered far and wide, and hope by this history
of the Class of -. to keep the life of the Class of
'28 fresh in your minds always.


Monument to Builders of Panama Railroad, Hotel Washington
Grounds.


1(I1X~II
i~Yz~

55


0;4! -- _


.~I







24 THE CARIBBEAN.


We, the Class of '28 of Cristobal High School,
being about to give up the ghost, and having
been examined and found of sound mind, body,
and memory, do hereby make, and publish and
declare this to be our last will and testament,
before advancing into the unknown future:
To the most aspiring Class of '29 we allot
the lot in" Monkey Hill,"-Mount Hope Cemetery,
wherein repose the dead and buried privileges of
Seniors, past, and present, mostly past, that the
Class of '29 cherish and place wreaths thereon,
keeping the endeared memory of the deceased
ever green.
Robert Axtell wills his playful ways to Roy
Walker, his eye shade and his arguing to Randolph
Orbaugh, his slow walk to Lilybel Cox, and his
melodious voice displayed in Senior English Class
to Morris Luce.
Emma Banks wills her soulful eyes to Wood-
ford Babbitt, her pearls to Mildred Bath, and her
good patronage of the telephone company to
Dorothy Heim, provided she uses the legacy
faithfully.
Gladys Beers wills her Southern brogue to
Virginia Stevenson, her use of the typewriter
to Adair Taylor, who has already been practicing
on it, her driving license to Marion Boomer, her
wind-blown bob to Miriam Arthur, and her ability
to talk to Vita Lyew.
Zonella Bliss wills her art of always knowing
her lessons to Robert Edwards.
Albert Days wills his speed in baseball to Paul
Hayden, a few inches of his stature to Roger
Deakins and Mike Green, and with much reluc-
tance, his nickname of "Tiney" to Lee Kariger.
Teddy Henter wills his understanding of Physics
to Lois Williams, his happy-go-lucky attitude to
Gretchen Palm, and his canoe trips to Woodford
Babbitt.
Jack Klunk wills his pull with the girls and the
teachers to Royal Higgason, his popularity to
Fieldon Bradford, to be added to his own supply,
and his part as villian in the Senior play to
Portirio De Reuter.


Kathryn Lambert wills her reign in the office
and her right to answer the telephone to Margaret
Hayes, and her tardiness to classes to Betty
Montgomery.
Edward Lowande wills his punctuality of
getting to school at one second to eight to Jack
Pettit, his motto "After Me You Come First"
to Teddy Brandon, and his part as hero in the
Senior play to Vincent Lugli.
Arthur Rothenberg wills his good marks to
Fieldon Bradford, Vincent Lugli and Lee Kariger.
Lucia Salazar wills her long curls to Rosemary
Keene and Blanca Walker, her Spanish diction
to Charles Crum, and her ability to be seen and
not heard to Morton Southard and Virginia
Stevenson.
Evangeline Smith wills her ability to always
have a fountain pen to lend, to Morton Southard,
and her ability to translate Latin to James Quinn.
Ethel Westman wills her smile to Ruth Banks,
her dimples to Marion Lowande, her height to
"Sis" Hackett, her literary ability to Ethel
Barnett, and her vamping the boys to Rosemary
Keene.
To Lee Kariger and Anita Rankin we will a
year's growth before entering the Seniordom.
To the Junior boys, the Senior boys will their
grace in wearing loud ties.
To the Junior girls, the Senior girls leave their
seats at the Banquet table, their yells at the base-
ball games, and their parts in the Senior play.
To the whole school, we will our books, our
looks and our nooks to be cherished ever after.
IN WITNESS THEREOF, we have set our sealing
wax and hereto subscribed our John Doe's and
Mary Blank's, this first day of June, nineteen
hundred and twenty-eight Anno Domini.


THE SENIOR CLASS OF '28.


Witnesses:
Sand Fleas.
Palm Trees.
Gentle Breeze.








THE CARIBBEAN.


CLASS PROPHECY.


Dramatis Personae.
r\t. Klunk..........By HIMSELF
Mrs. Klunk...... ETHEL \WES1TMAN
P/ace.-Riverside Drive, New York, 1935.


Time.-- a. m.
Mrs. Klunk.-"Home again at 3 P. X. Staying
up with a sick friend again, or perhaps a late
meeting at Tammany where you seem to be so
popular lately?"
Klunk.-"Well, you see it was this way-- ."
Mrs. Klunk.-"All right, let's have the weak
explanation."
Klunk.-"You remember Days, don't you? He
just dropped into New York after a around-the-
world flight. He was out celebrating, so I decided
to celebrate too. We climbed in his plane and took
off for a hop down to Birmingham. When we were
walking up the street Days told me how he had
run into Gladys the last time he dropped off there.
She had married a millionaire, J. Pierpont Morgan
Doolittle, who made his fortune manufacturing
hairpins since long hair came back in 1930. She
told "Daisie" that Emma was making fine progress
in the law profession. She holds down a job with
a probate court; her main duty is to settle dis-
putes between disinherited relatives."
Mrs. Klunk.-"Well, what did you do when
you arrived in Birmingham? Don't try to avoid
the subject!"


Klunk.-"I bought a paper on the way up the
street, and read where Axtell had constructed a
200-inch telescope, and mounted it on a 'peak
in Darien' to look for lost planets. Say, by the
way, I heard that down in Panama, Lucia is the
head of an international chain of drug stores;
also down in that neck of the woods, Teddy Hen-
ter is a chemist in the Gatun waterworks. Oh, yes!
Days says that Lowande is a star football player,
learning from experience acquired in the Canal
Zone."
"On his round-the-world rgh ir Days stopped at
the South Sea Islands where Arthur Rothenberg
is engaged in the very profitable business of selling
wooden nutmegs to the unsuspecting natives.
Arthur, of course, is acquainted with Zonella,
who is a missionary in an adjoining island."
"Kathryn is the head professor in a secretarial
training school. Evangeline runs a rest-cure
sanitarium for tired business men at Porto Bello,
the new health resort at the start of the trans-Isth-
mian Highway."
AMrs. Klunk.-"Well, I'll forgive you this time
for such late hours. I'm glad you met Albert
because it's a long time since I have heard any-
thing from the Class of'- ; of C. H. S."


Raging Waters from Spillway Gates Dashing against Bridge Piers.


MR 10066-4


I Ill XO IL


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26 THE CARIBBEAN.


Cristobal High School from the Air, showing.City of Colon.


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THE: CARIRBBEAN. 27




















































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28 THE CARIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN.


JUNIORS.

WHAT WE SHAI.. KNOW THEM BY.

MIRIAM ARTHR'R-Her love (?) of Spanish II and her long
black hair.
WOODFORD BABBITT-H is love () of Spanish 1 I and his basket
ball fame.
MILDRED BATH-Her stately walk and her smile.
ETHEL BARNETT--Her smile and lack of enemies; also her
ability to be humorous.
MARION BOOMER-Her boyish bob and her tailored clothes.
FIEILDON BRADFORD- -His big jade (?) ring and his pal "Higgie."
"TEDDY' BRANDON--His A (?) recitation in History class.
LILYBEL Cox-Her Southern dialect and jokes; also her
resemblance to Peter Pan.
CHARLES CRIt'M-His love ofshouting "Phooee" and his poker
face.
PORFIRIO DE RIETER-The way he leaves class parties and his
love of playing basket ball with the girls.
ROGER DEAKIN-His inches up from his feet and his soulful
glances.
ROBERT EDWARDs-His rackett" on the tennis courts.
"MIKE" GREENE-His handsome face, his baseball fame, and
the downcast look on some of the girls' faces since he left.
"Sis" HACKETT-Her continual "Charleston" and her per-
manent wave.
PArL HAYDE--Hisability to pitch and his love of basket ball;
also Dese, Dat and Doz.
MARGARET HAvEs-Her childish ways and her giggle.
DOROTHY HEIM-Her meek manner and her lack of growth.
RoyAL HIGGASON-His ungodly bellow and his perpetual "I
don't agree."
LEE KARIGER-His love (?) of Spanish lI,his shortstature, and
his love of tormenting the girls.


ROSEMARY K[r.-Ei E-N--TIhe future High School Gym teacher.
"MpIxIE KLiEi KEIs-Her sunny smile and herloveofmusic,
swiimmin g, and corresponding.
MARION Low ANDE-Her love of college and her ability to get
to school on time.
MORRIS I. E--His continual grin and talent at "tickling the
ivories.
VITA L.YEw- Her jet black hair and the continual presence of
her name on the Honor Roll.
"'BETTY" MONTGOMERv--Her habit of coming to school late
and her happy-gn-locky ways.
RANDOLPH ORBAI(;H-His resemblance to "Doc" Webster
in the Collegiate Series; also his IiU,....- to help at class
affairs.
GRETCHEN PAI.i--Hter demand for class dues and her ability
to play the piano.
JACK PETTIr-His quiet ways, his deep bass voice, his slick
hair comb, and his baseball fame.
ANITA RAN KIx-Her presence in the yellow car and her ability
to flirt.
VIRGINIA STEVE\SON-Her ability to sing and the fact she is
such a good pal.
MORI-ON SOiTHARD -His oratory in first period English Class,
and his ability to draw apes.
ADAIR TAiLOR--The parties she gives and her becoming
blonde boh; also the mysterious letters she receives
in first period in the afternoon.
RoY \\ALKER- His mop of curly hair, his yellow car, and his
asthenic dancing.
S.\A PACHEI:T .Although Sam entered late and his picture
isn't here, we will list his name. His quietness and his
spunk when it comes to answering back.
Loil \ViiMs cs-Her love of good times, her attractiveness
and the fact she has a "Blue Heaven."


Hydroelectric Station at Gatun shows ing Gates of Spillway.








30 THE CARIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN.














































































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THE CARIBBEAN.


SOPHOMORE DIRECTORY.


Name.

Bailey, W illiam..........
Birkeland, Elsie .......
Blauvelt, Elaine.........
Bliss, R ae...............
Bradford, Fieldon.........
Bretch, Margaret......
Bush, Marguerite.....
Campbell, James ........
Crum, Ralph...........
Darley, Elsie..........
Days, Frances.........
Doar, Elise.... ... .
Doar, Lillian ....... .
Eberenz, Ruth..........
Fishbough, Edmund....
Fitzgerald, Eleanor ......
Frank, Leah .. ....... .
Ganzemuller, Evelyn....
Hanna, Robert...........
Harris, Beatrice ..........
Henter, Alice ...........
Herman, Pauline ........
Joyce, Rita ..............
Logan, Helen.............
Lugli, Vincent...........
M aher, Jack............
Martin, Charles .........
Maurer, Kenneth.....
Melendez, Victor ......
Mundberg, Arthur........
Napoleon, Washington...
Newman, William.......
Parsons, Scott............
Quinn, James............
Raymond, Della..........
Sargeant, Richard........
Schmoll, Martin.........
Schulert, Mabel...... .....
Sprague, Louise .........
Stewart Fred...........
Thirlwall, Mavis.........
Urwiler, Eleanor.........
Wong, Francisco.........
Wikingstad, Walter.......
Wheeler, Estafania........

Miss Sewell (Sponsor).....


Nickname.

"Apo"...... ...
"M ike".... ...
"Angel Face"
"Tinsie"....
"Static". .....
'P '- ".. .
"Gigg!es". .
"Bones". ...
"Andrew Jackson".
"Shorty".
"Frangypany"..
"Elise"....
"L il". .....
"Ruthie". .
"Fish" .....
"Fitzie". .
"Frankie". .
"Levinsky" ...
"Hanna" ..
"Bee". ..
"Blondie" .......
"Miss C. H. S.".
"Shrimp". ...
"Loganberry".
"Patuch". ....
"Handsome".
"Chubby". .
"Pest" .....
"Vicks".
"Mundy".....
"Wishy Washy"..
"Fitty" ... .
"Lanky". .
"Jimmy". .....
"Bridget"....
"D ik"... ..... .
"Doc Webster"...
"May bells". ... .
"Professor". .....
"Stew".......
"M avie"........
"Boots".........
"Francis". ......
"Wicky". .......
"Ester".........

"Carrie".. .....


SOPHOMORE DIRECTORY.


MR 10066---5


Pastime. Pet expression.

Fishing...... . "Don't be an airdale."
Reading... . . "Well, I'll be darned."
MLemorizing English... ...... "Good gracious."
PI1I iL "Stingy Woman Blues". "Oh, my cow."
Being with Connie........... "You don't say."
Writing notes .. .. "Who's next."
Blushing.... .. ... "Really."
Studying .. ............ "Aw, heck."
Dancing........... .. "Hang it."
Studying ........ "Oh! Really."
Being with Tinsie.... "Ya, no mis."
Dancing ...... ..... "Darn it."
Sewing. ..... "Please don't."
Playing the piano...... "Don't be funny."
Fishing... .... .,',,.I m uch.".
Not missing a movie .. .. "It's the truth."
Being busy... .... ... .. ... "We haven't heard."
Talking to the boys ..... .. "Heavens."
Canoeing ............ "Aw!"
Tickling the ivories ...... "Don't be an idiot."
Dreaming. ... .. ...... ... Says nothing.
Studying Caesar ... ....... "Oh, how smelly."
Whispering. ......... .. "She's crazy."
Getting her lessons... .. "Quit yer kidding."
Pinching girls ......... "Gimme a kiss."
Flirting ............... "Be a sport."
Getting bawled out .. "Come on."
Loafing ....... . "Laugh, I thot I'd die."
Correcting people ........ "Use your head, mon."
Talking ..... .. .... "Now stop."
Being inconspicuous..... Hasn't any.
Teasing Grace ........ "Kisssss."
1'1 ,i the "sax".. "Watch out."
Making people laugh........... "What next."
T.- I1... jokes. ......... "Oi geivalt."
,.-..pl rL,. his name... "Ha! Ha!"
Memorizing the dictionary....... Anything in the dictionary.
Getting her lessons.. ...... "My goodness."
Reading Harvard Classics.... "Oh! that's easy."
To eat, sleep, and drink with radio. "Stay sober."
Driving the Ford............. "Ha-Ha-Haha-Ha!"
Flirting ................ .... "W would you believe it?"
Studying. ........ .... .. :-' _- ."
Playing the cornet ............ "Come on, guy."
Reading. ... ....... .. .. "All's well."

Swimming. .. .. .. "That's enough."








34 THE: CARIIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN. 35












36 THE CARIBBF.N.


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THE CARIBBEAN. 37


FRESHMAN STARS.


Miss Moore, C'ass Jdviser. .

Carlos Rankin, President.....

Robert Brough, Vice President.


"Silence."

"Beau Geste."

"Seen and Not Heard"


Lillian Housel, Seiretary and Treasurer. "She's a Sheik."


Edward Albin, Extra.


Joyce Alberga..

James Albin.......

Stella Arthur ......

Ernest Berger....

Nellie Berger......

William Blauvelt .

William Bodden..

Mary Bretch.....

Crawford Campbell

Daniel Coffey. .

Edward Conkling.

Dorothy Dallow...

Frank Drake......

Rodman Drake.....

Adele Dengar ....

Ruth Duvall...

Virginia Eberenz...

Fabian Englander..
Erle Ferguson......
Edmund Fishbough

Leon Fishbough. ...

Eleanor Fitzgerald.

Basil Frank... .

Marion Godwin.

Antonio Gonzales...

Burton Hackett .

Parker Hanna......

Beatrice Harris....

Beatrice Housel .

Grace Keegan......

William Keepers....

David Ketchum....


"Knockout Reilly."

"Stella Dallas"

"The Poor Nut."

"The Dress Parade."

"The Denver Dude."

"The Runaway Ford."

"Smilin' Thru'."

"The Sap."

"The Scarlet Youth."

"His Majesty Bunker Bean."

"Dorothy Vernon of Haddon
Hall."
"Sir-Gal-I-Wish-I-Had."

"Beau Sabreur."

"The Dancing Girl."

"Along Came Ruth."

"Red Hair."


"Rookies."


"The Volga Boatman."

"The I.ife of Riley."

"The Pioneer Scout."

"The Five O'Clock Girl."

"The Lone Wolf."

"The Skyscraper."

"Johnny Get Your Hair Cut."

i ..... Don't Lie."

"Hula."

"The Woman on Trial."

"The Nebraska Wild Cat."

"A Little Bit of Nothin'."


"Rainbow Reilly."

Belding King.. ....

Marie Kleefkens .

Percival Lyew

Mzry Maher ..

Zoe Manual ..

Kenneth Maurer ....

Eugenia McLain........

Margaret Misrahi .....

Margaret Mitchell ..

Harold Mueller ......

Marion Neel

Mary Patlerson.

Cleta Phillips .......

W\\.va Phillips ... ...

Blanca Pulgar...

Anna Ryan .

Martin Schnmill .

Juanita Schofield .

Aloha Slocum .

John Stetler .

Theo. Theoktiste ..

Beverly Turner ..

George Wertz

Alice Westnan .

Dorothy Wirtz......

Louisa Whitehead .....

Eugene Williams ....

Ben Williams ...

Raymond W ill.........

Veronica Wilson......

Margaret Wyatt.....


"A Son of Toil."

"Swim, Girl, Swim."

"Chinatown Charlie."

"The Campus Flirt."

"The Wise Wife."

"Slide, Kelly, Slide."

"Sadie Thompson."

"The Seventh Heaven."

"We're in the Navy Now."

"White Pants Willie."

"Tillie the Toiler."

"Now We're in the Air."

"Get Your Man."

"Sallie of the Sawdust."

"The Tempest."

"Little Annie Roonie."

"Tenderfoot."

"Mickey."

"Beverly of Graustark."

"The Black Pirate."

"Nuff Said."

"The Little Shepherd of Kingdom
Cone."
"When Babe Comes Home."

"Naughty But Nice."

"Simple Sis."

"The Fair Co-ed."

"The Student Prince."

"The Spider."

"The Patent Ieather Kid."

"She Was Just a Sailor's Sweet-
heart."
"For the I.ove of Mike."


The End.







38 THE, CA~IRIBBE1N.


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THE CARIBBEAN. 39
39








THE CARIBBEAN.


* ~------- ------ ------* ------------------- ----
DERELICTS; HUMAN OR OTHERWISE.
Robert H. Axtell, '28.
GRAND PRIZE SHORT STORY.
> *'"


"Robbers Still at Large." Thus screamed out
the 2-inch headlines of Colon's morning paper,
The Tribune. The column went on to relate how
two thieves had broken into the Front Street
jewelry store and before the very eyes of the
paralyzed night clerk, had made off with a large
packet of uncut diamonds and were last seen
boarding the night freight for Panama, immedi-
ately after quitting the rear exit of the shop.
The clerk, coming to his senses, had notified the
police, who in turn, stopped the freight at
Gatun, only to be met with no traces of
the escaped criminals. Only one clue had been
attainable. The purser of a large immigrant
ship lying in the harbor had notified the police
of the disappearance of two third-class passen-
gers, and pictures of the same had been forwarded
to the authorities, who had had them published
under the screaming headlines of the aforesaid
Tribune.
Little did Roy Smith of Gatun think of this,
however. Roy was a 13-year old boy in the eighth
grade. He and his chum, Bill Mlartin, were pre-
paring for a morning's outing in their cayuca upon
the island-dotted waters of Gatun Lake.
"'W111, Bill, we had better put in the canteen
for we might get thirsty, and I don't favor drink-
ing lake water unless I have to."
"Yeah! That's a safe bet, Roy. You'd better
put a flash light in too, if we are going to board
that old ship. It might be dark down below."
The ship alluded to in this conversation was an
old boat anchored up in the lake. It had been
there a long time, and was put up in an island
cove used as a sort of ship's boneyard.
The two boys put off in their cayuca for the
island up the lake. After p.ddling for about an
hour the island was neared.
"Well, Bill, the old island seems to be about
abeam now."
"Yeah, and our old boat, the Mary F., seems
to be mi iing right along, too. Well, let's cut
around the point of the island. I know a short
cut, but the channel is full of stumps."


"Well, then, Bill, you come back here and take
the stern paddle and see if you can get through
without hitting about 'steen stumps."
The cayuca sped forward under the renewed
vigor of their strokes. Now and then the boat
would give a roll to one side or would be shoved
off its course, and a dull scraping noise would be
heard on the bottom, signifying the collision
with a stump. This amounted to nothing worse
than a trifling annoyance, and the boys made fun
out of it by seeing how few stumps they could hit.
"Say, you're some navigator, you are. How
much farther are we going, anyway?"
"Aw, Roy, you just keep your shirt on and
by the time we hit about two more stumps you'll
see the old ship herself."
A few hundred feet more and they were in a
sheltered cove where the old ship lay. She had
been once a good steamer but was now abandoned.
She was open to the caprices of the mild, tropical
weather.
Both of the boys remarked how picturesque
and queer the scene was with massive trees on
the bank nearly overreaching her decks as she
was anchored stem and stern. It seemed strange
that such an example of man's maritime progress
should be seen rotting away in the jungle-
bordered waters of the tropical lake.
There she lay, however, with ferns growing in
the damp corners of her deck and old canvas
awnings flapping in the breeze, while rotten
ropes trailed overboard into the pensive waters
of the lagoon below. On her foremost crosstrees
roosted a lone bird of the jungle, the only sign
of life in the drowsy heat of the landlocked cove.
"Let's tie up here to this ladder in the bow
and we'll go aboard. You can go up first, Bill,"
said Roy.
Bill suggested that Roy go up first as he was
the heavier and the ladder appeared somewhat
rotten. This, however, was only a cover for his
own reluctance to board such a spooky looking
craft.
Both boys were soon aboard her, and although
they spoke in subdued voices, as the situation








THE CARIBBEAN.


seemed to demand, they both were eager to see
what the old ship contained.
"Say, Bill," said Roy, "did you notice that
fire ax lying on the deck and those splinters
beside it? It looks as though someone were aboard,
doesn't it?"
"Righto! But no one comes away out here,
you know."
"\'*I -rtheless I have a hunch that someone
has been here, but we hear nothing of him at
present. Oh, -ll'\ We might as well forget
about it," observed Bill. "Let's go into the
forecastle and take a look below to start off
with."
Clambering cautiously down into the dimly
lighted forecastle, and brushing aside cobwebs
as they descended, they finally reached the crew's
quarters. On rounding the corner of the bulk-
head they suddenly came upon two rough-looking
men sprawled asleep on the dirty mattresses
spread on the floor. Both of the boys stopped on
tiptoe in blank amazement.
As Bill was the foremost he came to such an
abrupt stop that he braced his hands against the
bulkhead opposite him in such a manner as to
peel off a large cake of rust which fell on the
floor with a crash, awakening the sleepers.
"Schmidt, we're took," shrieked the wider
awake of the two men, "Beat it."
The men dashed down a dark passageway
leading into the forward hold. The thought of
the morning's headlines fl.ii'..l through the boys


I. -


minds. Instinctively they plunged after them
until they realized the danger of a possible en-
counter with the two m n.
"Stop, Bill! They're liable to come back and
kill us if they come to their senses!" exclaimed
Roy, who immediately grasped the situation.
"Let's shut that iron door, and we will have
them."
Summoning all their strength the two boys
managed to swing the ponderous iron door upon
its hinges. Shouts arose from the entrapped
men who realized their desperate plight as they
heard the bolt dropped. The boys rushed out
and climbed over side into the cayuca. Paddling
furiously, they came out into the Gatun-Escobal
launch route. They hailed the first passing
launch, which happened to be bound for Gatun.
In fifteen minutes they were ashore in Gatun
and in another five were aboard the police launch
with the Mar: F. in tow, bound for the old ship.
When the police boat reached the cove, the
anchor was dropped, and the boys, followed by
the two officers of the lake police force, jumped
into the cayuca and paddled quickly to the ship,
went into the hold, and after a short scuffle,
brought the men out h i.i., i..i and carried
them aboard the launch.
"Well, boys," said officer Donnelly, "you
have those two robbers who broke into the Colon
jewelry store night before last. They stole a
caayca and hid aboard the old ship, thinking
themselves safe from discovery."


AN OLD TIME VISIT TO FORT SAN LORENZO.
By I'oodfordB Babbitt, '-2.
(Best Junior Story.)


Stede Bonnet's scarred and weather-beaten
face was very pale as he watched the water
gradually rising. The only light in the room came
from a flickering torch, which threw a ghastly
light over the water. The room in which he was
confined was below the level of the sea, which he
could faintly hear, beating on the rocks in front
of the fort, Fort San Lorenzo.
The hole through which the water was entering
the room was at the level of the sea at low tide.
(The tide rises only a few feet.) As the tide rose
the stream of water increased in size. When the
chamber was filled, Stede would be drowned.
MR 10066-6


a


He had been here only a short time and already
the salt water had reached his waist, entirely
covering the stone bench to which he was securely
fastened. The level was gradually rising. His
fate was inevitable.
The evening before, Sir Henry Morgan, the
famous English pirate who was so active around
Panama during the :;1 I'II. seventeenth century,
had personally ordered Stede and another man,
Dayton, to go ashore and see if they could gain
entrance to Fort San Lorenzo. They were to
bring him a report as to the strength of the fort,
and the best method of attack.








42 THE CARIBBEAN.


They had landed nearly a mile up the coast,
in a small boat, about six o'clock. With a great
deal of hard and dangerous climbing they reached
the moat in the rear of the fort. They lay there
until it grew dark, watching the walls all the time.
There was one place in the wall which seemed to
be lower. It was just where two sentries met,
and was very dark, because the light from the
torches in the sentry boxes did not penetrate
that far. They noticed that the sentries always
stopped at the light at each round, so that there
was an interval of four minutes during which time
no one was on the wall. Finally, as the guards
parted, Stede and his companion slipped into the
moat. Silently they swam across, gaining the
slight embankment between the wall and the moat,
just as the sentries returned. They lay there,
hardly daring to breathe. When the guards again
departed, Stede, climbing onto his mate's should-
ers, quickly scaled the wall and slid down the
other side. He was the first of many of Morgan's
men who would enter the fort in the next 48
hours.
In a short time he had all the information
necessary. Just as he was about to climb the wall
his heavy cutlass hit against a stone, attracting
the attention of the passing guard. The latter
came over to investigate, and Stede struck him
down with a blow from his cutlass. The guards
on the wall, attracted by the confusion, seized
Stede as he attempted to climb it. He was taken
before the Spanish Commander and questioned.
As he had given no information and had been very
disrespectful, he was sentenced to death by


MA DEAR NIECE:
If, as you say, you can write a book from my
story I wish you all the luck in the world. I am
trusting to your discretion not to mention the
names of my twin brother and myself. As for the
others, I shall change them to suit my fancy.
You will remember, probably, my reputation
all through college was quite bad. I gambled and
drank continuously, but things went on alright
until my senior year. I was always lucky at cards


drowning. He was placed in a dungeon for the
rest of the night. In the morning a heavily armed
guard had come and taken him to the death
chamber. Here they left him, and now the water
was gradually rising. In the last half hour he had
noticed that the boomingof thesurf had increased,
and was now a deafening roar. The water was
up to his shoulders now, and as it crept slowly up-
ward, it made his scalp crawl. He realized that
his end was very near.
Now the water had risen above his mouth;
it would soon cover his nose and cut off all
possible means of breathing. He was straining
against the straps that bound his head, to bury
his face in the water and end the terrible torture.
Suddenly a trap door, directly over his head,
was thrown open and a ladder quickly put down.
His comrade of the night before, spattered with
blood and carrying a smeared cutlass, tumbled
down the ladder, dived into the swirling water
and hurriedly carried Stede up out of the
dungeon. Whey they at last reached the open
air, Stede, dazed and weak, saw that it was not
the surf which had caused the terrible booming,
but that it had been the guns of the pirate ships,
his ships. Everywhere about him were men that
he knew, not Spaniards. While going to report
his strange experiences to his general, he stumbled
over the headless body of the Spanish Com-
mander who had sentenced him to death.
Fort San Lorenzo, an impregnable fortress,
had easily fallen into the hands of Sir Henry
Morgan, just in time to save the life of one of his
most able assistants.


and that year someone pulled the old gag about
cheating. I had taken it before, but this particu-
lar person was so insistent that we had a friendly
argument. Then he grabbed a gun and when I
tried to get it away, it went off and shot him.
I was just drunk enough to realize that I had to
get away or ruin the family name and fortune,
as well as Phil's chances. I don't remember wheth-
er there were any witnesses or not, but I knew a
trial would be the last straw. Dad was hard and








THE CARIBBEAN.


I'd have had to leave anyway. Better that
mother should think me just-gone.
Of my trip west I haven't the slightest remem-
brance. In San Francisco I enlisted for Panama.
I remember noticing the men in the same group
with me, and it took my mind off my troubles.
They were all different types, but there was only
one who took my fancy. He couldn't have been
seventeen, but I heard him answer to twenty-one.
He was of a slender, athletic build, with a quick
alert look about him, as if he had been through
many experiences in spite of his youth.
On the boat I sauntered over to where he stood.
"Got a match?"
Without looking at me he put his hand in his
pocket, pulled out a box and handed it to me.
I saw it would be hard to break his reserve,
and the way to do it would be to act as aloof as he.
Before the boat docked we were buddies.
At first everyone grumbled, but we all liked
it after a while. Most of the bunch were old
timers, and I had been through Panama before
several times, on visits, so we knew the place a
little.
From vague sources I had heard that I was sup-
posed to have gone to Canada, to China, to
Nicaragua, to Chicago, to have committed
suicide, to have become a rum runner, and other
such foolish ideas. The papers wrote it all up,
of course, and the "general" was supposed to be
very angry. That did not matter any more. But
the most important thing was always omitted.
I couldn't find out whether the man had been
killed or not.
Then Phil came down. He was an officer in the
Medical Corps, had been through West Point,
and was quite important in army circles,
especially medical. Luckily, I was of a type which
seldom attracts especial attention. He did not
even notice me. He was at an engineer post, and
I was in the infantry, so he never saw me.
One day a group of us went out hunting, my
buddy and I,and three others, who had comedown
with us. We had a Io-day pass. At the end of
five days things began to look ugly. The three
others were always watching us with a half-sly,
wily glance. That afternoon the Kid, as my bud-
dy was called, came to me and said:
"Steve, I'm worried. Martinez and the others
are planning to'go over the hill.'"


After discussing the matter we decided not to
interfere. They could not force us to go. It was
not our place to make them return, except that
we might be accused of aiding them to escape.
On the sixth day they told us. Wehadstarted to
turn back, but they said that they would need all
the provisions. Plainly, we would go with them
or starve. A native was to guide them along the
coast to Costa Rica; from there boats would
take them to different ports.
No one thought about or questioned our past,
but the Kid had evidently had some experience
with affairs of this type. He motioned me to be
quiet.
"We'll go on for a way. At least till we can get
some provisions."
It went over pretty well. That night we stop-
ped at a native shack that had been deserted.
By the time we had eaten and the fire was dying
into embers in the clearance, lighting up the
grim, surrounding jungle, our plans had been
made.
As we sat in a circle waiting, the quietness
grew oppressive, the oppressiveness grew tense,
and finally the Kid nudged me, at the same time
rising and strolling into the hut. There is a great
deal in taking a situation psychologically. Every-
thing was done casually. I pulled the pipe out
of my mouth, knocked the ashes out.
"Well, it looks like the Kid and I would turn
back to-morrow."
The big Swede, Arlsen, was on his feet.
"Vat! You tink you take dose grub?"
It was threatening. Farman growled, "Shut
up, let me handle this," as he pulled the Swede
down.
Then I heard a voice behind me, and its cool
tones made me wonder just how much the Kid
would mind killing a few people.
"If you gentlemen will be so good as to remain
seated, perhaps we can discuss this quietly."
He was handling a pretty little automatic and
leaning coolly against the door. The Swedejump-
ed and stared open-mouthed at the gun.
"Private property. Comes in handy some-
times, you know," the Kid explained. Then
sharply, "we're going back, and you're coming
along. If you want to 'go over the hill,' wait
until we're not along."
Just for an instant I saw Farman look side-
ways with a malicious smile. From inside the







44 THE CARIBBEAN.


hut a knife appeared, and the hand that held it was
one I had never seen before. I fired, the Kid fired
over my shoulder, and as I wheeled instinctively,
I saw Martinez fall and Farman pull a Colt
automatic from somewhere.
The scene, as I remember it before I went
down, impressed itself indelibly on my mind. The
Swede stood out plainest in the savage surround-
ings, because of his tall, huge frame as well as his
fairness of complexion. The coals were almost
out, and only a faint glow illuminated the scene,
lighted up the dark green of the jungle, and dis-
closed the body of Martinez who had fallen with
the knife still clutched in his hand. There was a
hi a \v, sweet odor of tropical flowers, and after a
last report, I remember remarking to Farman,
who still crouched with a heavy, smoking gun.
Well, I'll see you later, old chap," as I shot
for the last time.
Then I must have been unconscious for some
time, and when I awakened, I was in the hos-
pital, and Phil was leaning over my bed. He
smiled the old familiar smile that was typical
of his quiet way. I've learned to love that smile,
and I knew the game was up.
"Steve, you certainly had it over on us, didn't
you?"


"Sir?"
"None of that. Dad bought you out yester-
day."
"Pardon, sir, but I don't understand."
"Never mind. The boy didn't die, and besides,
young Hampton had been watching from the
window."
Then I must have cried. Phil held my head
saying, "You poor kid. We were almost too late."
Once a year, now, Phil and the Kid, now
Second Lieutenant A. J. Weseley, and I have asort
of reunion. As an Army Chaplain, I am very
happy, and when you and young Weseley are
married, I'll be as contented as an old man can
be. Phil is a famous surgeon now, and since you
are his niece, there will be a church full of im-
portant people at your wedding.
Your husband-to-be is very brave, but very
bashful. I'll leave him the task of explaining how
we cleared his record and sent him through the
academy. Also you must find out from him how
he held off the others, and took care of me until
Phil and his men arrived. Now, my dear, I must
go to see some of the men in the hospital.
Your devoted uncle,
FATHER STEPHEN, S. J.


THE CAPTURE OF OLD PANA
By Fabian Englander, '3i.
(Best Freshman Story.)


Governor Arias had received a note from
Mrgari saying that he would appear within the
year and that he would take the city. Morgan
had just captured Fort San Lorenzo. Since I was
a personal friend of the governor, he told me that
he was very worried. He at once sent out an
order for stronger fortifications and more soldiers.
The work of fortif' ing the city and training the
men went on speedily. Ships, laden with gold
from Peru, were coming into port every few days.
Soon, however, the ships coming in told of the
hard time they had keeping away from the
English. Finally, one day, news was brought to
us that Ml,.rLan was coming. The g,,verntr was
very distressed, but nothing happened in the
next few days so we thLught no more of it.
,M1,nth, passed and still no sign of N Mrgan.


(I learned afterwards that he had taken his
ships apart on the Atlantic side and had crossed
over by land to the Pacific side and had put them
together on Taboga Island.)
Four months passed when finally we saw four
English ships come into the harbor. They
started firing at us and we fired back. Our men
were soon frightened as the English were pretty
good marksmen. They had blown big holes in
the Cathedral where many people had gathered
to pray.
I ordered my few belongings taken to a cave
just outside the city. The governor, by this time,
was panic stricken. The guns in our forts, which
had been booming for some time, suddenly
stopped firing. Our men came pouring out of the
forts saving that the English had blown our guns


a

B,


i








THE CARIBBEAN.


to pieces. By this time the people were leaving
the city and it was getting dark. The governor
placed a heavy guard over on the city walls.
The monks were taking the silver and gold
from the churches and burying it in the secret
underground tunnels. The rich Spaniards, after
turning their valuables over to the monks, were
buying up mules and horses and escaping in the
direction of Porto Bello and some of the interior
settlements.
The next morning, when I went to the gov-
ernor, he said that he wanted me to command
the left wing of the army. He had the soldiers
already lined up. I proposed staying inside the
walls of the city, for I knew that Morgan could
not have many men, but he refused, and when we
saw the English advancing, we went out in army
formation to meet them. We had some natives
drive bulls at the enemy, but the bulls broke loose
and scattered. The fighting began. Mv men
fought bravely for a while, but when they saw
the other wing had fled and they were being
surrounded, they turned and fled toward the
city. A large number of them were taken
prisoner and killed. I escaped because I had
hidden in the cave.
The governor had been killed during the battle
so there was no one to govern the people. The
English began to loot and to torture the people.
They killed the monks outright if they did not tell
were they had hidden the gold. They took some
of the richer people for ransom. After much
plundering, the English set fire to the city.
The next day I thought everything was all right
so I left my cave. The city had been burned to
the ground. As I came into the public square
who should I see but Morgan and his men. I saw
at once that it was useless to try to escape, so
I was taken prisoner. Horrible thoughts h.,-,:.l
through my mind as to how he would kill me.
It was a long tiresome trip across the Isthmus.
We had very little food and the Indians were
constantly shooting at us. At last we reached


Porto Bello. We were all taken on board the
ships and put in chains until we should be ran-
somed. That night was a miserable one for me.
The next morning Morgan came to our ship.
They had on board 16 monks who were trying
to get someone to ransom them. Thev asked
Morgan to let them go and to hold a rich girl
instead. \\ -,, he heard this, he ordered every
one of them to be killed and had their heads
hung up on the ship's yards. I thought my turn
would be next, but it didn't come. Morgan
ordered the girl to be given a sum of money
and an escort to take her across to Panama City.
When they came to take me back downstairs
they told me that I would be killed at sunset
the next day if some one did not ransom me.
They only had one man on guard that night
as there were only a few of us left. I found a piece
of file by my side and was soon at work getting
the rusted chain off my leg. This did not take
very long. I then got my knife from my belt and
waited until the guard came. As it was dark he
could not see me and I soon had him laid out on
the deck. I pulled him in behind some of the
chests and after putting on his clothes, I waited
for morning. At daybreak I went on deck and
asked the captain for a boat to go ashore. He
gave it to me after I promised him part of my
supposed plunder. I had not gotten more than
a thousand yards when I heard the report of a
pistol. I knew, then, that I was discovered so I
rowed as hard as I could. I did not wait for the
boat to ground. I jumped from it and ran
toward the jungle. I heard the shots whizzing by,
but none of them more than grazed me. I hid up
a tree until it was dark fearing that some of
my pursuers might be around.
At about eight o'clock I started for Panama
City. When I reached the city, I found that the
few inhabitants who remained had decided to
move to another place seven miles away. They
thought that the new place could be more strongly
fortified.


An Isthmian Highway.









46 THE CARIBBEAN.









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THE CARIBBFAN. 47


ALL HAIL! COLONEL LINDBERGH!
By Emma Banks, '28.


All, on entering Cristobal school this morning
of mornings, January 26, 1928, were greeted with
an air of intensity-a feeling of excitement and
expectancy. Quickly the joyous news reached
every ear. "We're going to France Field on a
special train to see Lindbergh hop off!"
The graded school marched in files. The High
School was left to take its own course. Some
skipped, some ran. Breathlessly they climbed
the train, and soon the long line of cars pulled
out with laughing, singing, chattering children.
At France Field all interests concentrated upon
catching the first glimpse of their hero. Soon a
Douglas transport plane landed. Colonel Lind-

BANANAS GWINE BY.

By Aoyce Alberga, '-.

"Bananas' Bananas! Ripe bananas gwine by!
Come missus, tek a look! Bananas! Six fo' a
nickel; 12 fo' a dime!"
Such is the cry of an old colored woman selling
bananas to make a living.
She lives in a large tenement house in one of
the many alleys of Colon. Every morning rain
or shine, she rises at 5 o'clock in order to
begin her sale of bananas before anyone else.
Her clothes are always clean, but of course not
all of the latest fashion. On her head she wears
a piece of soiled cloth wound around it, somewhat
like a coolie turban. This is necessary because on
it she carries a big board in the form of a waiter.
It is filled with ripe bananas. She carries it on
her head all day, and never once does it fall.
It is really remarkable.
When Mammy, as she may be called, finds a
customer she is very pleased and talks the whole
time that she is selling. Her conversation nma be
heard to be-"Yes, Mum, dey his lufly dis
martin'. Oh! hain't you going to take more
than that? Please, li-Ius, dey really ham
nice. Dere, das a good lady. I'se gwine to
give her hextra fo' dat. Good-bye and tank
you Mum. Hi'll come agin timmarrah."


bergh had taken eight "lucky" people up' 'Midst
clicking cameras and straining eyes, Lindbergh
climbed out and calmly walked to the hangar
where the "Spirit of St. Louis" was.
Then the gates of the hangar were thrown
wide and soldiers pushed "The Spirit" on to the
field.
.Iuain the "Idol of the Air" made his entrance.
After the mechanic had tried the motor, Lindy
donned his aviator's helmet, shook hands with a
few of his personal friends, and climbed in.
Shortly, he waved good-bye to the eager thr.nIi,
glided across the field and into his kingdom-the
atmosphere.

THE TOM-TOMS.
By Arthur Rothenburt, '2S.
Night after night I heard it. Always the
same irregular cadence of knocking coming from
off in the distance. Somehow, it always sug-
gested someone hitting on wood.
Whenever I heard it, romantic fancies of savage
Indians far off in the dense ungles beating on
tom-toms and performing their wild dances would
come to my mind.
One night I heard the sound louder than usual.
It seemed to come from an island a short distance
from shore. Hurriedly seizing a flash light, I
rushed to the beach. At first I heard nothing;
then to my hearing came the same irregular
rhythm of wooden thumps, but this time followed
by mighty splashes.
Upon looking closely in the direction of the
noise, I perceived a dark, moving blur on the
water. It moved in a large circle, and finally
approached the beach where I stood.
Turning my light on it, it proved to be a
cayuca containing several fishermen, who had
been laying a seine. When I inquired the source
of the knocking and splashes, I was told that
fisherman when laying seines always beat on the
boat and water with their paddles to scare the
fish into the seine.
So perished my fancies of Indians, jungles, and
drums.


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THE CARIBBEAN.


"Ah, land at last!" So exclaimed Jim Thorpe,
looking through the porthole upon the outline of
the land which was to be the home of his new
adventures. He was anxious to make a success of
the work which might place his name among the
foremost engineers of the day.
The commercial world demanded the exchange
of products between east and west in the shortest
possible time. Thus the project of the Panama
Canal. And young Jim was one of the engineers
detailed to work on the locks of the great water-
way.
After the strenuous work of drawing plans,
organizing details, and assembling materials,
Jim began to feel the need of companionship.
The monotony of the tropical heat by day and the
cries from the jungle by night did not furnish
enough excitement.
One day while wandering among the interesting
ruins of old Panama, he had a misfortune to fall
and hurt his ankle. While sitting on the ground
wondering what to do next, he heard voices.
Glad that some human beings were in calling
distance, he shouted for help. Much to his relief
a party of fine people soon loomed in sight.
Don Pedro, his daughter, Rosita, and his two
sons and their guide were returning from a fishing
trip. The injured man was carried on a hastily
made stretcher to their ranch house.
The injury, although not severe, kept him in
bed for several days. Every kindness was shown
him by his host and many a pleasant hour was
whiled away in teaching the young sefiorita to
understand the English language.
After his recovery he returned to his work but
not before he promised to come and see his bene-
factors. .Many happy week ends were spent at
the ranch and the friendship soon became a
lasting one.


One morning the overseer received an unusually
large quantity of mail. Among the letters was an
official envelope bearing Thorpe's name. The
news it contained was both delightful and dis-
appointing. He had been promoted and this
meant his going back to the States. His new field
of work was to be in the Mississippi Valley. The
next day he went to bid his new friends farewell.
It was hard to say good-bye and Rosita's sorrow
was not hidden.
His work in the States lasted for several years.
Then came the anxious exciting days of the World
War. Thorpe was one of the first of America's
youths to rally to the Colors. After a few months
of hurried drills at training camp his company
was sent overseas.
During the gloomy, dreary days of the fall of
1917, while some soldiers were working on a
bridge, a bomb dropped from a German plane,
damaging the bridge and taking a heavy toll of
life and injuring many.
Thorpe was severely wounded and was knock-
ed unconscious. When he awakened he found
himself in a field hospital. It seemed that he
dreamed of a cool hand placed on his feverish
brow. It was in reality for an angel of mercy was
standing near murmuring, "Oh, Jim! Do you not
remember your old friend?" He stared and tried
to recall, but, soon exhausted, he fell into a
swoon-like sleep.
The next morning the angel said, "It is more
serious than the injury to your ankle, but I
hope to have the same success in making you
well." Then he remembered! "Rosita, you
have twice been my benefactress. I hope some
day to reward you." She only smiled in answer.
After peace was declared a ship bound for
Panama carried Mr. and Mrs. Thorpe on their
honeymoon.


THE SHORT STORY CONTEST.


The short story contest was r-;iL.crly sponsored
by the literary aspirants of the high school classes.
Stories of all descriptions were handed in, and
there was a wealth of material to choose from.


Mrs. Grunewald, Mrs. Kidd, and Mr. Cun-
ningham were the judges who chose the winning
stories. The Staff sincerely appreciates the serv-
ices rendered by the judges during the contest.








THE CARIBBEAN.


THE SAN BLAS INDIANS.
By Vita Lyew, '29.


The San Bias Indians live on islands less than
a hundred miles from Colon. These islands are
free from mosquitoes, flies, and wild animals.
The Indians cultivate little patches of corn,
yams, cane, and rice on the mainland, and un-
like most uncivilized peoples their women do
little work in the fields. They are not a war-like
race, preferring a peaceful existence to one of
fighting and bloodshed, but are capable of the
most savage practices when once roused. For
generations they defied every attempt to civilize
them, holding their standard of race purity
above all else. They rigidly enforce the rule that
no stranger should pass the night on their shores.
Until 10 years ago the San Bias tribe was an
absolutely pure race of people.
They are peculiar in their appearance, having
dwarf-sized bodies and large, box-like heads.
Their features are coarse but even, and their color
is much like that of the North American Indian.
The men wear cotton blouses and trousers, which
they make themselves. The costumes of the
women and girls are both unique and pretty.
The fronts and backs of their blouses are of vari-
ous colored materials, and their skirt is a long
piece of cloth wrapped around the body and
tucked in at the belt. The women wear rings

THE DESTRUCTION OF THE PANAMA
CANAL.
By David Ketchum, '3r.

It had been raining for three weeks without
stopping once. Gatun Lake was rising at a
fearful rate. Communication with the outside
world was impossible. The wireless masts were
washed away although the air would have been
full of interference to have sent real messages
anyway. None could go out without risking
life or limb in the streets that had turned into
beds of raging rivers. Many of the houses were
being washed away. Forts Sherman and Randolph,
and the Naval Base were under many feet of
water. Gatun Spillway, strained to the utmost,
could hold no longer and crashed. Then an old
and supposedly extinct volcano just outside the
breakwater erupted. Slowly the Isthmus began
to---
"John," cried Mrs. Okly, "John, now hurry
and dress for school."
MR 10066--7


in their noses and ears but no rings on the fingers
until they are married.
The father of the girl makes all marriage ar-
rangements. She does not leave the parental
roof-instead the husband lives with her family
where he becomes more or less a servant. The
father naturally chooses one who will be a good
worker for him. For this reason, girl babies are
mach more welcome among these Indians than
among most uncivilized tribes. There are no
bachelors of either sex among the San Blas.
Matrimony is universal.
Their language is very simple, consisting of
about 50o words. They have no numbers beyond
ten and have no way of reckoning their ages.
Among them are found those strange freaks
of nature-white indians. They have the usual
dwarfed bodies, but their skins are absolutely
colorless. Their eyes are usually weak, causing
them to wear a perpetual squint which, with their
stiff yellowish hair and Indian features, gives
them a weird appearance.
Miss Anna Coope, an American missionary,
was the first foreigner to be allowed to stay in
their country. She lived there for I5 years,
teaching them and helping them to learn better
ways of living. She found them very intelligent
and eager to learn to read and write.

THE OLD HIGHWAY.
By Roger Deakins, '2y.
\ii.n.I' the many traces of ancient Spanish
occupation of Panama, left by the bold con-
quistadores, is the Las Cruces Road. Once a
well-traveled roadway, winding among the hills
and the dank fever-breeding swamps, stretching
from the massive walls of Old Panama City to
the beautiful harbor of Porto Bello. On this
highway, murder and thievery ran as unrestrained
as the luxuriant tropical jungle growth which
now almost completely obliterates it. Great
trees have grown in the road and their grasping
roots have dislodged the cobblestones in such a
manner that the parts of the road that can be
seen are barely recognizable. Once the air
tinkled with the sound of silver bells attached
to the pack mules that formed the gold train.
Now the harsh sound of the parrot's scream and
the squeak of a lizard as it scuttles over the blocks
are the only sounds heard, and the old road lies
and dreams of past days.










5(o THE CARIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN.


TOURISTS IN COLON.

By MWlargaret Hoaycs, '29.

I .

One sunny morning in the city of Colon,
There came a group of tourists to town,
Buying shawls, beads, and all sorts of things,
Fit even for the greatest of kings.



One little woman, short and fat,
Wearing a plaid coat and large black hat,
Pulls off her gloves, and gives a sigh,
"I don't see how they stand the heat!
Oh, my!"
3-

"Now isn't this a most gorgeous shawl?"
To her husband whispers a lady tall.
"Yes, yes, dear, but don't forget my advice
Never should one pay the first price."

4.

"Mother, mother, I want this box;
Look how it opens, and just how it locks.
First one has to find the key!
Mother, I want it. Oh, Jiminy Gee!"

5-
One old gentleman, perspiring with heat,
Looks at the cigarette holders, while taking a seat.
"It is just the kind for you, Meester."
"For me? No, no. For my sister."

6.

"And what is that queer animal's name?"
"Oh, he's the ant eater of great, great fame."
Comes from the jungle, not far from here.
He's dead, Miss, please have no fear."

7-

"Buy a lottery ticket," the vendors cry,
"Six is the number for the lucky guy.
Tink ob de gran surprise
When you wins de big first prize."

8.

"Say, there goes the Panama Railroad train,
And now, my gracious, 'tis beginning to rain.
I never did see such a dirty place,
Why look at that negro's good-natured face."

9.

Two young chaps in a hat store
Are trying on Panama hats galore.
"I know the weakness of we males,
But I think I resemble the Prince of Wales!"


There passes us, a foreign man,
A bunch of bananas in his hand.
He calls to his mate to hurry up,
Who growls in answer, "Aw, shut up."
I[.
In a carametta, a curio of this town,
Sat two old ladies, riding up and down.
And enjoying themselves, forgetting th heat
And thought the ride was such a treat.
12.
"Come, come, 'tis late; we must haste,
Back to the boat; there's no time to waste,
You know the boat will soon be leaving,
As it is scheduled to leave at six this evening."
i.1.
If you should wish to have some fun,
Go watch the tourists, every one,
When thev visit this fair little town
Called the City of Colon.

IF I WERE A POET.
By Helen Logan, 'Jo.

I wish I were a poet,
With gift of thought sublime;
The kind who put elusive words
In magic verse and rhyme.

I'd write of the little golden stars,
That twinkle in a deep blue sky;
Or the moon like a beautiful lady,
Who goes slowly floating by.

Oh, I would write such interesting things
That nature tells to me;
(If I were a poet,
And could write it well, you see.)

But I am not a poet,
And my words sound stiff and dry.
So I think I'll put aside my pen
And let another try.

EVENTIDE.
By ./ice E. l'estman, i.

The night is slowly coming on,
And the day is slowly i....r;r,
The skies are aflame with red and gold,
And shadows now are creeping.
The palm trees near by the sea
Look black against the evening sky,
And seem to whisper tales of old
As the close of the day is drawing nigh.
The waters of the open sea
Sing songs of mystery to me,
And blackbirds now do cease their call
As the shades of night finally fall,









52 THE CARIBBEAN.


GLIMPSES OF LIMON BAY.

By i r,1 .. '29.

I sit upon the old wall by the sea
\\ -i, hint. the children at their play,
And the large waves coming toward me
Forgetful of the sun's scorching ray.

At evening still you find me there
When slowly the sun sinks,
Coloring the wall with its flare
And dyeing the bay with pinks.

The sunset must gradually fade away
Into the splendor of the night;
The children in their little beds lay,
And the bay glistens in the moonlight.

The lighthouse across the bay
Flashes out its ever faithful light
To guide the ship on its way
And emphasize the darkness of the night.

The tiny stars begin to shine
Like diamonds againstt the sky so blue,
And the wan white moon divine
Whose radiance lights the heart so true.

How calm and serene life seems
With all these beauties rare,
As if painted by an artist in his dreams
When freed from all sorrow and care.

Far from the city's adding roar
I revel in my quietude and dream.
The nearby chimes announce the late hour
And start me from my dream.

And as I homeward turn sleepily
The waves their adieu bid
The chimes are pealing sweetly,
Of 'iur .,ri lre the wall is rid.


ODE TO FORT SAN LORENZO.

By Robert Axtell, '28.

Peace to thee, thou noble ruin;
Long may we see thee stand
Above the rocks, above the dune,
Above the coral strand.
With crumbling walls and long dried moat,
And cannon now in rust,
Thou listenest to the breaker's note,
To whispering palm trees hushed.
Oh, Glory of the Spaniard's fame,
Who fixed thy stones so high;
Their glory now is but a name,
But yours still brooks the sky.


A TRIO FROM THE 1[1 HMLiS.

By Basil Frank, '3r.

"Ripe bananas! Ripe bananas!
A dozen fo' a dime.
Dese am nice ones, lady
Fo' I sell dem all de time."

It's the old banana lady
With her tray upon her head.
I hear her early in the morning
When I am still in bed.

There is also the bootblack
With his "Shine, Mister? Shine?"
He'll clean your shoes up nicely
For the small cost of a "dime."

He's always around by the barber's
Where he finds a ready fee.
Sometimes he gets a five cent tip,
Then he's happy as can be.

Another one who is never sure
If he's going to get a dinner,
Is the age-bent driver of the orange cart.
His eyes have long lost their glimmer.

He may be seen in the morning
Apushing his cart along;
And if a "cochero" blocks his way
He rings his home-made gong.

They are just a few of the many
Who have lived on the Isthmus so long-
The banana lady, the bootblack,
And the orange-cart man with his gong.

But let me tell you something.
Of which you do not know,
These people are always satisfied.
They smile wherever they go.


OUR HIGH SCHOOL BOOK,
"THE CARIBBEAN."

By Mary Bretch, '31.

A book of memories so fond and dear,
Of reminiscences you love to hear;
Of sports, alumni and literature too,
The fun and joy we've all passed through.

When other roads you travel, and new friends you meet,
Ponder oft' thoughts of childhood days so sweet.
Remember, yes! Remember the good old days of yore,
So gayly spent at Cristobal High on the Caribbean shore.









THE CARIBBEAN.


DAY-DREAMS.
By BasilFrank, '3i.
While sitting down beside a stream,
I watched the clouds. They began to seem
Like the things upon the earth below,
On this land long, long ago.
I saw a castle in the air;
I saw a lady in despair;
The castle stood on running sands
In the land of caravans.
And there a knight of the Table Round,
Stood below upon the ground,
Fighting bravely for to save
His lady from an Arab knave.
When this scene from before me flew,
The deep wide ocean came to view.
There was a ship with all sails set
Going where the trade winds met.
It was a Spanish ship I saw;
Its splendor filled my soul with awe.
But what ship follows in its wake?
A vessel captained by Francis Drake!
Then I saw a flash of flame;
A roar as from a giant came;
Both ships disappeared from view,
And the scene was changed to something new.
I saw a scene, a scene of peace
In the lovely land of Greece.
A young man though his arm lacked brawn,
Was carving the figure of "September Morn."
He cut a smile upon her lips;
A graceful curve upon her hips;
The face was tilted in the air;
Wavy and curly was the hair.
The spell then broke, the apell of the dream,
And I found myself beside the stream.
All these things I had composed
From the clouds as I sat there and dozed.


PERPLEXITY.

By Elsie Darley, 'jo.

What shall I write about?
What shall it be?
These questions I'm stating
Are bothering me.
What sort of language and
What sort of rhyme?
Dear me, I am having
A troublesome time.
The more things to choose from
The harder the choice.
The sooner I've finished
The sooner I voice
My relief at just dropping
This burdensome job,
And write like the rest
Of the prose-writing mob.
A poet is born, and not made,
So they say;
And now I'll discreetly retire
For to-day.




THE LOCKS AT NIGHT.

By Ruth Duvall, 'J.

Have you seen the locks at night?
They are a very wondrous sight,
With great ships passing to and fro,
Going to lands we do not know.
And many lights along the way,
Standing there like sent'nels grey,
Seem to beckon you at sight,
To come and see the locks at night.


THE PALM TREES.

By David Ketchum, '3r.

You see them standing
In the sunlight,
Tall and proud, showing
Their royal might.
You see them on the borders
Of the romantic lagoon,
Bending and bowing while silhouetted
Ag iinst the moon.
You'll see them in the jungles
Where Morgan hid his gold,
Standing o'er all the trees,
Like sentinels of old.
If under tropical sun you have
Chanced to live,
Surely you'll appreciate the shade
This graceful tree gives.







THE CARIIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN.








56 THE CARIBBEAN.

ALUMNI.
The Alumni Department of THE CARIBBEAN continues to grow. Each year
a dozen or more names are added to the ever-lengthening list. This year we
have passed the hundred mark. Cristobal High School has 1or graduates.
Nearly half of these are still on the Isthmus. Several of them have visited us
at school. We are always pleased to see them and hope that they as well as those
who are in the States, will continue to be interested in C. H. S. and its activities.
ZONELLA BLISS,
Alumni Editor.


1918.

LULA MAY PULLING (Mr. J. B.) COMAN, Cristobal,
C. Z.
MINOT COTTON, 81 John Street, New York City.
SUSIE HARRISON, Cristobal, C. Z.
CATHERINE WAID, 451 West 23d Street, New York
City.
BURKE WELCH (address unknown).
MARY VERNER, Chapel Hill, N. C.

1919.

ALICE ARLENE BALL, 118 Maple Avenue, Tacoma
Park, Md.
KENNETH EDWARDS, Wellsboro, Pa.
JAMES RAYMOND, Cristobal, C. Z.
DOROTHY WEIR (Mrs. JOHN) MONTANYE, Cristo-
bal, C. Z.
"It is always a pleasure to send greetings
to THE CARIBBEAN and to the graduating
class. I know this year's annual will be the
best ever and I am wishing success to all the
Seniors."
1920.
LINDALE DAVIS, 336 Commonwealth Ave., Boston,
Mass.
JACK B. FIELDS, care of Tela Railroad Engineering
Dept., Tela, Honduras.
KENNETH GREENE, Coudersport, Pa.
HARLAN Ho WOOD, Balboa, C. Z.
ALSO SEARS, Balboa, C. Z.
KATHRYN BURGOON STEWART, Cristobal, C. Z.
ALICE STILSON, Colon, R. P.
LILLIAN COTTON VANWAGNER, 124 Elm Street,
Cranford, N. J.


AL DOYLE, Apartment 9, 1515 Tenth Street,
Sacramento, Calif.
ETHA BEVINGTON, Balboa Heights, C. Z.

1921.
CARL DUEY, Box 95, Lemon City, Fla.
KIRBY FERGUSON, Cristobal, C. Z.
ALICE HUNTER (Mrs. L. A.) HOHN, Cristobal,
C. Z.
CHARLES HENTER, Coast Guard Cutter Kimbal,
Norfolk, Va.
FRANK RAYMOND, 344 East I20th Street, New
York City.
ELEANOR ZIMMERMAN, 120 KinEgsle Avenue.
Westerleigh, Staten Island, N. Y.
"To the Class of 1928. I wish you all the
success in the world in making this year's
CARIBBEAN the best ever."

1922.

MARJORIE BALL, 118 Maple Avenue, Tacoma
Park, Md.
IDA BROWN (Mrs. A. A.) DOYLE, Apartment 9,
1515 Tenth Street, Sacramento, Calif.
GEORGE CARTWRIGHT, 159 Boyle Avenue, Totowa
Borough, Paterson, N. J.
PAUL DOYLE, Cristobal, C. Z.
MARY GLENN FIELDS, Balboa Heights, C. Z.
LEROY MAGNUSON, Balboa, C. Z.
MILDRED STAFFORD, 395 North Henderson St.,
Cape Girardeau, Mo.
EMMA TOWNSEND (Mrs. ROBERT) NOE, BOX I,
Cristobal, C. Z.
WESLEY TOWNSEND, 1195 Ruby Street, Houghton,
Mich.









THE CARIBBEAN.


JORDAN ZIMMERMAN, 214 Clarendon Street, Syra-
cuse, N. Y.
"At last I am graduated from the College of
Forestry and believe me it feels pretty ,-r.ind
to be an alumnus. I have just accepted a
position as salesman for Oaklands and
Pontiacs so I must get to work.
"THE CARIBBEAN has my best wishes for a
successful year-it seems that each year
brings improvement in the annual. I can't
be egoist enough to say that the annual in my
Senior year was the best because that is not so.
Each year it is a little better-and I feel sure
that this year will be the best ever."

1923.
GERALD BLISS, Cristobal, C. Z.
ERNEST EUPHRAT, 3935 Burwood Avenue, South
Norwood, Cincinnati, Ohio.
LouISE HENTER, Nurses Home, Svdenham Hos-
pital, Baltimore, Md.
EDWARD MAY, Cristobal, C. Z.
HENRY MOORE, Box 212, M.Ir d.lh. ., \Wis.
"Greetings!"
EMOGENE NASH (lr-. E. S.) VAN BENSCHOTEN,
Balboa, C. Z.
MATTISON PULLIG (Mrs. J. D.) MNICALLEY, Cris-
tobal, C. Z.
1924.
DOROTHY ABENDROTH (Mrs. ARTHUR) FLOOD,
Cristobal, C. Z.
FLORENCE ALBERT, 107 Beument Avenue, West
Brighton, Staten Island, N. Y.
"Kindly extend to the Class of 1928 my
best wishes for a successful annual."
JOSE AROSEMENA, Colon, R. P.
EDITH COULBOURN SMITH, 717 Colonial Avenue,
Norfolk, Va.
CHARLOTTE HOUSE (Mrs. R. W.) MACSPARRAN,
Cristobal, C. Z.
GLADYS LOWANDE (Mrs. C. O.) BALDWIN, Cris-
tobal, C. Z.
MORRIS IM %i H, -... ', Colon, R. P.
INZA MARKHAM, 409 Lake Avenue, Rochester,
N. Y.
"Still skating along but am never too busy
to think often of C. H. S. Congratulations
and best wishes to the graduates of '28."
MR 10066---8


IRENE MICouRT (\Mr,. GEORGE G.) REITHEL, 14
Islington Place, Jamaica, Long Island,
N. Y.
"I am sending my best wishes to the Class
of '28 and for the success of this year's an-
nual."
GEORGE OAKES, Fort Banks, Mass.
CHESTER PIKE, 2148 Acton Street, Berkeley, Calif.
ANDREW SMITH, Box 2, Foster Route, Richmond,
Texas.
ETHEL SONNEM1AN, 98 Macon Street, Brooklyn,
N. Y.
"I am now an upper Junior at \1 i....11
Training School for Teachers. At present I
am quite busy taking examinations for I am
to go out to practice teaching again. I will be
out for five weeks.
"Best wishes for the Class of 1928 and for the
success of the annual."

1925.

HELEN ABENDROTH, Cristobal, C. Z.
OLGA ARCIA (\Ir. A. DE) LEIGNADIER, Colon,
R. P.
WILLIAM CousiNs, 2623 Oakford Street, Phila-
delphia, Pa.
DOROTHY DEIBERT, Fort Sill,Okla.
RUTH DUEY (Mrs. SPENCER) LINCOLN, Cristobal,
C.Z.
KATHERINE FISCHER, 4309 Furley Ave., Garden-
ville, Md.
ANNIEL HEIXI (Mrs. J. H.) BRENCHICK, Cristobal,
C. Z.
RUTH HOPKINs, Box 2i6, Ancon, C. Z.
"My very best wishes for THE CARIBBEAN.
I've noticed that you have been getting some
newspaper publicity for your social and
athletic events; good work!
I very best regards to all who remember
me.
HLBERT LEE, 221I Speedway, Austin, Texas.
HARRIET STEENBLRG (address unknown).

1920.

RICHARD BEVERLY, Broad Run, Va.
HILDEGARDE BLYTHE, Iandham-Bounce X-Ray
Clinic, Atlanta, Ga.








58 THE CARIBBEAN.


WILLIAM CLINCHARD, 229 North Seventeenth St.,
Lincoln, Nebr.
"I am looking forward with anticipation
to seeing the first copy of THE CARIBBEAN
of '28 and I sincerely hope that it will be the
best year book ever produced by C. H. S.
I am also wishing success to the Class of '28
on THE CARIBBEAN, congratulations on their
graduation, and best regards to the Faculty."
WILLIAM COFFEY, Cristobal, C. Z.
HELENA M. DECKMAN, 1195 East i8th St., N.
Portland, Oreg.
"With sincere and best wishes to THE
CARIBBEAN and to all my school friends I say
'au revoir' to Panama. Luck to the annual and
to those that follow."
EDNA DUVALL, 4802 Greenlee Ave., St. Bernard,
Ohio.
MORRIS EGGLESTON, Room 104, Freshman Hall,
Notre Dame University, Notre Dame, Ind.
RAY FISCHER, 4309 Furley Avenue, Gardenville,
Md.
IRENE HOPKINS, Cristobal, C. Z. Home-Panama
City, R. P.
"Accept my best wishes for the students and
Faculty of C. H. S. Congratulations, Seniors.
Make the 1928 CARIBBEAN go over the top."
HELEN J. KEENE, Cristobal, C. Z.
"Greetings to the Class of '28 and best
wishes for the success of the play and this
year's annual."
JOHANNA KLEEFKENS (Mrs. R. O.) ANTICK, Box
1057, Cristobal, C. Z.
"'The moving finger having writ moves
on.' Class of '28, I sincerely hope that the
deeds you have written will live long in the
hall of fame of dear old C. H. S. I have often
desired to be back in school.
"Each year is filled with memories. The
parties, friends, and above all the 'school
spirit' C. H. S. has shown year by year.
S'28 you have kept up the spirit as those
before you have so I just know THE CARIB-
BEAN is going to be the best ever. Congratu-
lations and best wishes to all."
DELILAH MAY (Mrs. G. W.) PARKER, Gatun, C. Z.
LOLA MUNOZ, Panama City, R. P.
MNll.,ReF. NEELY, Cristobal, C. Z.
CARLOS PULGAR, Gatun, C. Z.


CLARICE STEENBURG, Langley Field, Va.
GAY R. TURNER, Randolph-Macon Woman's
College, Lynchburg, Va.
"I've been thinking and thinking and think-
ing, and I can't think of a thing original, so
'I'll have to say the same old thing in the same
old way,' though with a heart full of love and
meaning.
"Congratulations, Class of '28, and the best
of wishes for a most successful annual."
ELIZABETH WARREN, Florida State College for
Women, Tallahassee, Fla.
CHRISTIAN WIRTZ, Cristobal, C. Z.

1927.
EMILY BLEDSOE, 416 Transylvania Park, Lexing-
ton, Ky.
LAWRENCE C. CALLAWAY, Jr., Wentworth Mili-
tary Academy, Lexington, Mo.
"I wish the staff all the success in the world
in the publishing of their '28 annual. I also
hope that the Senior Class graduates in 'style'
as Klunk would say. I expect to be there to
see the graduation exercises and to wish the
whole class good luck."
JOSEPH CORRIGAN, Box 123, Gatun, C. Z.
TERESA GALLAGHER, 863 57th St., Brooklyn,
N.Y.
JAMES GRIDER, 416 Transylvania Park, Lexington,
Ky.
LOUISE HEIM, 510 Church Street, St. Bernard,
Ohio.
CLARA A. MAY, Gatun, C. Z.
HELEN MONTGOMERY, Cristobal, C. Z.
JOHN G. NELSON, Gonzaga University, Spokane,
Wash.
DOROTHY SVENSSON, 39 Nikisch Avenue, Rosin-
dale, Mass.
"My plans went topsy-turvey so that
instead of being a freshman in the University
of Washington I'm a post graduate in Jamaica
Plain High School, Boston. I'm planning to
enter Simmons College this fall and work for a
degree in Library Science. (My work in the
C. H. S. library started that.)
"I suppose my best wishes come too late---
however, they will still be 'best wishes.' I've
racked my brain in vain for some original way








THE CARIBBEAN.


of expressing my affection for C. H. S. I'm
afraid I'll just have to say 'Sincere wishes
and regards to THE CARIBBEAN, its staff,
and all my schoolmates.' "
SURSE J. TAYLOR, Jr., 1814 West Avenue, Austin,
Texas.
JAMES VAN SCOTTER, Fort Davis, C. Z.
HELEN VINEYARD, Box j74, Women's College,
Newark, Del.
"One more year has rolled its course and
one more class is preparing to take its final
leave of old C. H. S. With all my heart I wish
the Class of '28 the greatest of success and all
the happy recollections that I have of 'back
home.' "
DOROTHY WERTZ, Box 259, Cristobal, C. Z.
"Seems ages since June, 1927, and yet it
has not been so long. Last year I promised
myself that I would answer all C. H. S. notes
promptly; this promise, of course, resulting
from my experience of waiting while on THE


CARIBBEAN staff of 1927. Of course, I have not
lived up to my promise.
"Now I am a stenographer at the United
Fruit Company in Cristobal and therefore not
a stranger to C. H. S. and her good work.
"Best wishes to the staff and the school.
Congratulations to the Class of '28 and may
your class play be the best ever. Hard to do,
isn't it?
"Howdy, Class of '27."
CHARLES \'ILL, 2423 Kindred Street, Astoria,
Long Island, New York City.
EvPHEMIA M. \\OOLNOUGH, Cazenovia, N. Y.
"I greatly enjoy my studies in Cazenovia
Seminary and the new surroundings, but I
often wish to be back in good old C. H. S.
I know that this year's CARIBBEAN will excell
those of former years and I send my sincerest
wishes for this yeac's publication and to those
who work to make it the best ever."









60 THE: CA~RIBBEA~N.





































gy rggngu4M~tPPil~llIIMM "










THE CARIBBEAN. 61


V\~"'







62 THE CARIBBEAN.



EXTRACTS FROM MY DIARY.
Emma E. Banks, '28.
r -


Oct. 3. School opens with a bane. Mr. Wil-
liam A. Sawyers, the new principal, is full of pep
and good-looking. He promises to be popular
with both the boys and girls. C. H. S. is also
honored with two new teachers, Miss Marvin
and Mli,. Russell. Both have given very flatter-
ing "first impressions." The Seniors get room
27 for their den.
Oct. 4. The Juniors get room 32 for their h.-ppv
home. C. H. S. has a record attendance. Books
and assignments make their debut. The front
of the assembly hall is decorated by bald pates.
Oct. 5. The inevitable initiation is pending,
much to the sorrow of the Freshmen. The
hot-headed convicts dot the assembly as Mercuro-
chrome is daubed on those most noble domes of
the unfortunate bald Fresh.
Oct. 6. Seniors prove authority by ousting
Juniors from room 27.
Oct. 7. Room 32 sports warning "Keep Out"
sign.
Oct. o1. Athletic meeting is held and great
enthusiasm is aroused. The Seniors organize their
class. Adviser, Miss M. Marvin; President,
Jack Klunk; Vice President, Frank Kimbell;
Secretary-Treasurer, Gladys Beers.
Oct. 12. The Ancon comes in with many
C. H. S. students returning from the States.
Oct. 13. The Athletic Association elects officers.
President, Albert Days; Vice President, Wood-
ford Babbitt; Secretary, Rae Bliss.
Oct. 14. The Juniors and Seniors win an
interclass baseball game from the Freshmen and
Sophomores.
Oct. 18. Elections for officers of THE CARIBBEAN
Staff are held.
All are startled by an apparent thunderstorm
that proves to be the piano being moved down
the hall to another room. A Glee Club meeting
is held to get the yodelers together.
Oct. 19. THE CARIBBEAN Staff elections are
completed. New (loud) class bells added, nearly
cause Jumping-gitis. The doomed Freshmen
boys are commanded to wear their ties backward
until 1- rl:h The girls are ordered to wear green


hair ribbons. The Staff meets in the library and
a unanimous vote makes Mr. Sawyers adviser.
Mr. Sawyers gives a general idea of the work
to be accomplished.
Oct. 21. The Junior Class organizes. Adviser,
Miss Hesse. President, Marion Lowande; Vice
President, Mike Green; Secretary, Rosemary
Keene; Treasurer, Gretchen Palm.
A Field Day (initiation) goes over big. Many
spectators witness the Freshmen carry away the
honors from the Sophomores. The girls are
decorated like Indians in grease and war paint.
Oct. 24. A Junior boy appears this morning bald
like a Freshman. The Junior room receives desks.
Oct. 26. Sophomore Class is organized. Ad-
viser, Miss Sewell; President, Rae Bliss; Vice
President, Fred Stewart; Secretary, Mavis Thirl-
wall; Treasurer, Della Raymond; Extra, Ralph
Crum.
More arrivals from States.
Oct. 27. Freshman Class organized. Adviser,
Miss Moore; President, Carlos Rankin; Vice
President, Robert Brough; Secretary-Treasurer,
Lillian Housel.
Oct. 28. Friday and Saturday, Balboa and Pedro
Miaticl Supper Club officers come to Cristobal
Y. W. C. A. to plan Girl Reserve Conference.
The Staff has picture taken by Heron.
Oct. 30. (Sunday) Staff picture appears in
Star &' Herald (Ahem!)
Oct. 31. Hallowe'en Black Cats (in the form of
class tests) cross many paths.
Nov. I. Senior rings discussed pro and con.
Nov. 3. Panama Independence Day. No
school. Three cheers for Panama!
Nov. 4. The Seniors give parties a debut by
giving a "Collegiate" Hop at the Ias..niic Temple.
Dwyer's orchestra furnished plenty of pep.
Nov. 9. A Staff meeting is held at school.
Nov. 11. The Senior Banner is stolen from the
Senior room. Call out the spies.
Nov. 11-13. Conference in Balboa-Girl
Reserves.
Nov. 14. Report cards (shiver me timbers).
Athletic meeting held by Mr. Seiler in assembly









THE CARIBBEAN.


Nov. 15. The Senior Banner is returned painted
in Junior colors, blue and M41.1. Many Seniors
challenge the culprits.
A Senior meeting is held about class rings.
Nov. 16. A swimming meet is held at the
Washington pool by Mr. Seller for try outs for
both boys and girls.
Nov. 18. Staff meeting. Supper Club.
Nov. 24-25. Thanksgiving holidays. (We
thank you for more.)
Nov. 28. Edward Lowande returns from the
States, making 14 Seniors.
Dec. 7. Staff meeting.
Dec. 12. Yell practice, 2.45-3.oo p. m. First
game of season in baseball; C. H. S. 6, Outlaws i.
Dec. 17. C. H. S. defeats De Lesseps 6 to 5 in
baseball.
Dec. 20. Caroling in front of school by entire
student body. Home-room parties following.
Santa Claus is coming. Bring us some A's, please.
Dec. 21-Jan. 2. Christmas holidays.
Dec. 23. C. H. S. defeats R. & F. A. 4 to 2.
Jan. 3. H. S. baseball record smashed by Out-
laws 8 to 2.
Jan. 6. Junior "Leap Year" Party at the
Masonic Temple enjoyed by all. How does it
feel to be asked to dance, boys ?
Jan. 9. At 1.45 p. m., "Lindy" arrived in Pana-
ma. Hurrah for Lindy!
Jan. II. C. H. S. defeats R. & F. A. 8 to 6 in
baseball.
Jan. 12. Holiday-All school children assemble
"en masse" at school to see "Lindy" pass in the
parade. Welcome, "Lindy." Come again.
Jan. 14. C. H. S. defeated the Maulers Io to 7,
gaining first place in the Atlantic Twilight League.
Jan. 16. C. H. S. defeats the Outlaws 6 to 3.
Jan. 20. Supper Club.
Jan. 23. H. S. defeats De Lesseps 7 to 6.
Jan. 26. Cristobal School goes on special train
to France Field to see Colonel Lindbergh leaving
for Colombia. Bon Voyage.
Jan. 28. C. H. S. defeats the Maulers 14 to 4.
Feb. i. Girls conduct a candy sale at school
during recess and the noon hour to raise funds
for a special train February 4th, for the B. H. S.-
C. H. S. baseball game.
C. H. S. defeats R. & F. A. 5 to 4.
Feb. 2. Fort De Lesseps defeats C. H. S. 4 to 3.
Big "pep" meeting held this morning for Cristobal-
Balboa game.


Feb. 3. Special train takes Cristobal rooters
to Balboa to witness a victory of 12 to 10. (\l.,,-
throat gargles needed later.)
Feb. 7. Supper Club business meeting held in
library at 8.oo a. m.
Feb. 9-1o. Zone moisture increases owing to
toil and sweat of mid-year examinations.
Feb. 13. Senior library privilege taken away.
When do we get our rattles?
Feb. 15. Received invitations to take a flight
to the Masonic Temple this Friday.
C. H. S. defeats R. & F. A. i to 3. We win
the pennant for the first half of the Twilight
League. Won 14, lost 2.
Feb. 17. The Sophomores give a "Lindbergh
Hop" at the Masonic Temple. The flight was
thrilling.
Feb. 17-21. Colon celebrates Carnival. Viva
La Reina!
Feb. 21. School dismissed at 2.10 to enable
everyone to see the big parade. Boom-Boomety-
Boom!
Feb. 28. The fire alarm was rung by Mr. Saw-
vers so we could all go out to see the "Los Angeles,"
the monstrous dirigible, sail by.
\l.,r. 9. \I.1..r-, Carnival held on grounds of
Fort DeLesseps. Great success, both financially
and socially.
Mar. 19. Mr. Robert Noe holds a Senior meet-
ing after school to choose characters for the
Senior play.
Mar. 20. Girls' Glee Club sings at the ninth
anniversary of the Y. W. C. A.
Mar. 21. Arrival of Senior rings causes great
joy and excitement among the Seniors.
Mar. 22. End of fourth six weeks; marks come
out.
\I.lr. 31. C. H. S. loses a popular fellow-
student, Mike Greene, to Mobile, Ala. We wish
you the same success in Mobile that you've had
here, Mike.
Apr. 13. The Freshmen \1 -."- trade Ball at the
Washington Hotel is proclaimed the best party
of the year.
Apr. 17. A contest is staged. Prettiest girl,
l.iry Maher. Best looking boy, Jack Maher.
Most popular girl, Eleanor Urwiler. Mostpopular
boy, Jack Klunk.
Apr. 20. Cheer meeting to encourage our boys'
swimming team on their trip to Balboa.
Apr. 21. Swimming meet lost by one point.








THE CARIBBEAN.


Apr. 22. The first game of series for the
Governor's Cup in the League is won by C. H. S.
from De Lesseps.
Apr. 28. The Twilight League season closes
by C. H. S. capturing the Governor's Cup.
May 4. Girls roll stockings to their ankles and
boys roll their trousers to knees to create a new
sensation.
_May 8. A complete rehearsal of"Cupid Scores
a Touchdown" was held at the Y. W. C. A.
building to-night.
May 25. "Cupid Scores a Touchdown" is given
by the Senior Class at the America Theatre
and is a big success. A matinee for the Grade
school was staged in the afternoon.
lMa 26. The play is repeated at Gatun Club-
house.
June 11-12. Final examinations engulf us.
Hush, don't disturb us.
June 15. The Junior-Senior Banquet is given
by the Juniors to the Seniors at the Washington
Hotel. You know your onions, Class of '29.
June 17. Baccalaureate service is held at
Christ Church by the Sea. Bishop Morris
officiating.
June 20. Commencement exercises at the
Washington Hotel. The Seniors are left to face
the strife of life alone.
June 22. The last call. Report cards are out
and so are we.
At last 'tis arrived, the end of the year,
The time we've longed for now is here;
Yet there is sadness in many a heart.
It means that good friends soon must part,
Memories of the dear school will e'er be en-
shrined,
And many's the time we'll look behind,
As though in a crystal we'll clearly see
Those happy hours dear to you and me.


THE SENIOR PARTY.
By Lilybel Cox, 'a9.

The invitation to the Senior Party was received
by all classes of Cristobal High School with
great enthusiasm. It came out about o1 days
before the party, and these were spent in pleasant
anticipation.


On Friday night, November 4th, there
assembled at the Masonic Temple a large and
happy crowd. The Seniors, trying to excite
their guests, told them that the orchestra for
the evening was not able to be there. At this
everyone became disheartened.
From eight until nine, the High School Orches-
tra played several selections. Then a soldier from
Fort Davis offered several popular airs and gave
a "Charleston" exhibition.
The real orchestra then arrived. Everyone
was livened up and did his or her best to dance
when Mr. Dwyer and his orchestra gave forth
the "jazzy strains."
In the meantime punch and sandwiches were
welcomed by the guests. Dancing was again
resumed and kept up until 12 o'clock, when
everyone bade the Senior hosts and hostesses
"Good night."


THE JUNIOR PARTY.
By Evelyn Ganzemuller, '30.

Friday evening, January 6th, the Juniors of
'29 gave a clever leap year party at the Masonic
Temple.
The hall was beautifully decorated in the class
colors, blue and gold, and gay colored electric
lights.
As it was a leap year party, the Juniors an-
nounced that the girls would have to ask for
the dances. This caused much mirth among the
guests.
Dwyer's orchestra furnished the music which
was most enjoyable. Mr. and Mrs. Witherspoon
were the chaperons for the evening.
The first part of the evening was spent in
dancing. Later, Roy Walker and James Quinn
gave a humorous duet entitled "Romeo and
Juliet" for which they received much applause.
During the evening, delightful refreshments of
cake and punch were served.
The prize waltz was won by Ethel Westman
and Jack Maher, who were indeed worthy of it.
She received a Parker pencil and he a bill fold.
The remaining part of the evening was spent
in dancing until I o'clock when the party ended.
Everyone agreed that it was one of the most
enjoyable parties given this school year.









THE CARIBBEAN.


THE SOPHOMORE PARTY.
By Alice Henter, '30.

The aviators of the Class of '3o of Cristobal
High School gave their annual party on the air-
ship, "The Spirit of the Sophomores," which
started from the .ia'.nic Temple, Friday eve-
ning, February i7th.
One of the aviators met the guests, gave them
a program of the flight and d erected them to the
airship.
The airship was decorated with the aviator's
colors, blue and silver. A large American d1.'
was drap, d, with their emblem beneath it.
Little airplanes were hung from the streamers
of blue and silver.
At 8 o'clock the airship left its moorings with
the orchestra .p i', in- a lively tune.
An entertainment was given by Aviatress
Eleanor Urwiler, who did the Charleston, and
one of the guests, Mary Bretch, who recited.
During the flight, punch, cake and sandwiches
were served to the weary guests and aviators.
At 12 o'clock the airship again was at its moor-
ings, the guests thanking each aviator in turn ftor
the lovely flight.

THE FRESHMAN PARTY.
By J cyce -. \ .

"We, the Freshmen, invite you to come
To a costume party ait the Washington.
April I3h is the date.
Be there early for its starts at eight.
There will be a prize for the funniest and best,
Be sure to come-we'll do the rest."

Such read the invitations to the delightful
costume ball given by the Freshmen.
There was a very large attendance, and the
music rendered by Dwyer's orchestra was enjoyed
by all. Delicious punch and sandwiches were
served throughout the evening.
The biggest event of the party was the Grand
March. Everyone took part in this. Up and down
the ballroom did they march until the judges decid-
ed who the winners would be. Ma y Patterson
won first prize f the best costume. She represent-
ed "Little Bo Peep". Ethel Westman won the
prize for the funniest. Her costume of"Kiki" was
very well designed. The boys winning the prizes
were Jack Maher, the "Midshipman," and
Raymond Will, "Our Old-Fashioned School Boy."
MR 10066-9


Another inr,.r .rin. event was the prize waltz
which was won by Mildred Bath and Vincent
Lugli.
Much credit must be given to Miss M.. ..., the
Freshman Class adviser. It was under her super-
intendence that such a wonderful party was given.

THE SENIOR PLAY.
By Ejtr// Barmett, '"2.
This year's Seni )r Play, "Cupid Sco- r a
Touchdown," proved a decided success. Directed
hb Mr. Robert Noe, this gay little comedy made a
deep impression on the school hackers. Much
very much-of the credit for this is due Mr. Ne,
for it was only through his indefatigable lab r,
his admirable casting, that the play was given
as well as it was.
The story revolves around Dulcy Connors,
a charming school girl, whose father is out of
town facing financial difficulties. Bart-n Hawley,
a shady politician, offers to aid him on condition
that Dulcy be part of the bargain. H 'r sweet,
wise mother, however, takes Barton do.vx a peg or
two. Going to Mrs. Belden-Grey's private s.-h i:l,
Dulcy learns to know Beatrice and Stanley Cmnp-
ton, who come from a family of culture andl g,).l
breeding. Mrs. McNulty, Dulcy's mar-iel sister,
strives to kill Stanley's affection for D.ilcy, but
fails. In the end everything turns out splen Ili ly.
Other characters are Betty, Mrs. Conn.-s's
trusted maid, Gladys Fluttermore and Chubby
Wriggley. Gladys and Chubby are n- i, I anl
their clever lines provided much amnusement.
Gladvs is a sophisticated g:)ld-i,-;_. -. Chubby is
her much stepped-on prey, and together tihr
furnish hilarious comedy.
Ethel Westman was very well cast a D.ilcy,
the heroine. She act_.l just as a gay, but t-ue-
hearted young school girl should act. Jack Klunk
made a true villain. Zonella Bliss, as Mrs. C)n-
nors had a heavy part, but she carried it i
admirably. Emma Banks was perfect as the cin-
ceited M'rs. McNulty. Mildred Bath and Ed.var.t
Lowande, as the gentle, lovely society girl, an I
the college football star, did exceedingly well.
Mrs. Belden-G:e., was well-portrayed by G!lils.
Beers. Anita Rankin was adorable as the ma-i.1.
But never did two characters suit their pa-rs as
Kathryn Lambert and Albert Days suited theirs.
Kathryn was Gladys, the gold-digger, and
Albert was her fiance.







66 THE CARIBBEAN.


Be LOO soG

Mary Maker

Jack Maher


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b.


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I
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I .




I


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dad- Klunk


O.H S.


I DST POPULAR

Eleanor Urwdter








THE CARIBBEAN. 67


THE POPULARITY CONTEST.

April seventeenth was another gala day in
Cristobal High. The students were informed
that there was a popularity contest to be held.
Students were handed blanks to fill in. Pupils
were questioning each other who the best looking
and most popular boys and girls were.


Four-masted Sailing Vessel
THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL
CARNIVAL.
By Ethel Barnett, '29.

To aid the Staff to put forth an honorable
CARIBBEAN, a carnival was held at Fort De-
Lessep's grounds on March 9, 1928. As it has
been before, the carnival was composed of a
Musical Revue, Side Shows, Dancing, a popularity
Ccntest, and Eats.
Many were the thrills the enthusiastic public
received from various side shows. A murderous
N ild Man who escaped; A Three-Ring Dog Show;
and the Missing Link, furnished much excitement.
Heart throbs were increased by the sight of a
Fat Lady, and a strange maiden, Zoma, who


Ballots were collected and counted, and a heated
contest was in progress all during this performance.
The final results of Cristobal High School's
popularity contest were:
Prettiest Girl, Mary Maher.
Best Looking Boy, Jack Maher.
Most Popular Girl, Eleanor Urwiler.
Most Popular Boy, Jack Klunk.


Transiting Gaillard Cut.
neither ate, drank, walked, talked or slept-
ever. There were other interesting things-
a Fish Pond, where strange to say, every fisher-
man got a "bite." The Musical Revue was
extremely satisfactory. The Popularity Contest
waxed fast and furious in the eleventh hour, but
Miss Pauline Herman was the victorious "'\Ii.
Cristobal High School." Dancing occurred in
the Movie Hall after eleven. The "Eats"
need no mention-the refreshment booth was
crowded at all times.
Due to the cooperation of Colonel Greig and
the personnel of Fort De Lesseps, Cristobal
High School, and the public, the carnival ac-
complished its purpose. It was also a roaring
success.







THE CARIBBF.AN.


Cristobal High School Saxophone Band.

THE GIRLS' SAXOPHONE BAND. THE GATLN BOYS' BAND.


This band, which is composed mainly of Cris-
tobal High School girls, is one of the best known
musical organizations on the Isthmus. Mr. Rein-
hold, the director, deserves a great deal of credit
for the excellent training of each girl in the organi-
zation, and for the splendid way in which they
play. Each girl is trained individually, then they
get together twice a week and give the neighbors
a treat.
The Saxophone Band has given many recitals
on the Pacific side as well as on the Atlantic side,
so it is well known and always well received. These
girls were asked to play during the banquet given
for Colonel Lindbergh when he was in Colon,
and they received high praise for this performance.


When we sit back and enjoy the harmonious
music of the Gatun Boys' Band, we forget those
first agonizing do-re-mi's which these young
musicians produced a short time ago. The band
was organized about three years ago through the
efforts of Mr. R. M. Crum, who is now president
of this < r a:i ri; n ti, in.
At present there are about 40 members in the
band, and, under the very able leadership of Mr.
M)Lcr Cohen, of Fort Davis, this organization
plays very well and need no longer be considered
amateur.
The Gatun Boys' Band has given concerts on
both sides of the Isthmus and is well known for its
well-balanced and well-presented programs.


Gatun Boys' Band, Includes many Cristobal School Boys.


i;

ir ~b~a!







THE CARIBBEAN. 69







70 THE CARIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN. 71


C RISTOBAL High School had good fortune this
year to have several excellent men. Some of
whom, greatly to our sorrow, will not be with us next
year. Largely owing to their efforts, we have had a
good year athletically. We did not always win but
we set a good example in sportsmanship, and have
always rendered a good account of ourselves.


Our baseball season this year was a
great success. Our Cristobal boys always
could play ball, and Witherspoon, our
coach par excellence, was loaned to us
by the Navy. The rules of the Twilight
League allowed two big league players
on each team. Witherspoon played with
us the entire season, but the other man
given to us was constantly changing.
Roberts, of the Navy, began the year with
us, but Orsi finished, pitching us to
victory in the final game of the champion-
ship series.
Next year, C. H. S. ball team will be
greatly weakened by the loss of four
players. Greene, our pitcher,has already
gone to the States, and Lowande, Klunk,
and D L). ..II .1. e been graduated.There
will be others to fill their places, of course,
and let us hope they will uphold the
honor of Cristobal High School as their
predecessors have done this year.
F..11l.. ;i, are the results of the Atlantic
Side Twilight League:
FIRST HALF.
1927.
12-12 C. H. S. 6, Outlaws I.
12-12 C. H. S. 6, Outlaws i.
12-17 C. H. S. 6, De Lesseps 5.
12-28 C. H. S. 4, R. & F.A. I.
1928.
1-3 C. H. S. 3, Outlaws 8.
1-5 C. H. S. 7, De Lesseps 7.
l-I C. H. S. 8, R. & F. A. 6
1-13 C. H. S. 10, Maulers 7.
i-I5 C. H. S. 6, Outlaws 3.
1-23 C. H. S. 7, De Lesseps 6.
1-28 C. H. S. 14, Maulers 5.
2-I C. H. S. 5, R. & F.A. 4.
2-2 C. H. S. 3, De Lesseps 4.
2-8 C. H. S. 9, Maulers 5.
2-9 C. H. S.-Outlaws (forefeited).
2-15 C. H. S. 10, R. & F. A. 3.
SECOND HALF.
2-20 C. H. S.-Outlaws (forfeited).
2-25 C. H. S. 7, De Iesseps 3.
3-1 C. H. S. 14, Maulers 4.
3-7 C. H. S. 3, R. & F. A. 2.
3-12 C. H. S. 6, Maulers 13.
3-15 C.H.S. 5, Maulers 7.
3-19 C.H.S. 5, R.& F.A. 3.


Unfortunately our high school represents a rather
small community and we have no wealth of
material to draw from as Balboa High School has.
Our men, by entrance into every kind of sport
and by their hard work and strenuous efforts, have
set an example for the students in the years to
come.


BASEBALL.
Feb. II, 1928-Before an immense B. H. S.
throng at "Razzberry" Park, Balboa, Cris- Quinn, 2b..
tobal won the first game of the high school Del.ondes, p
series, 12 to 10. The game was a free- Clishee, ib..
hitting affair, Balboa outhitting us 12 to Wood, ss..
to, but their hits were more scattered. Hele,3b .
Cristobal's hits came with men on base. Powell, c.
The feature of the game was Hele's drive Jones, cf..
into the tennis court in the first inning Tavior, If.
with two men on. Later in the game Jack Russey, rf.
Klunk hit one into the tennis court, easily Daniels, rf
making the circuit. Brown, p.


AB. R.
5 o
6 1
4 0


2 2
1 I1
2 1
i o


H. PO.
3 1

0 1
I 0
0 2

4 3


0 0
o o
3


S 0 0 2


Cristobal played a great fielding game,
not one error being charged against them Totals. 38 10 13 27 7 8
during the entire game. On the other
hand, Balboa seemed to have the weak- Summary.
ness of missing them at the wrong time, Home runs-Klunk, Hele. Three-base
eight miscues being made by them. The hits-Hele 2. Two-base hits--Lowande,
chief offender was \ood, who missed Hele. Hit by pitched .I- i Greene
four. The batting honors were grabbed 2 (Clisbee and Taylo-). Struck out-Bv
by Hele of Balboa, who got four clean Greene 15, by Brown 7, by DesLondes 2.
hits out of five times up. Russey and Baseon balls-Off Greene ;, off Brown 3.
Quinn of Balboa made three apiece. For Earned runs-Cristobal 8, Balboa 10.
Cristobal the feature was Klunk's catch- Winning pitcher-Greene. Losing pitcher
ing and his homer into the tennis court. -Brown
Lowande made two hits out of four at- March I,l ., -1,, the second gameof
tempts, one of them being a double to the series, played on the Atlantic side,
left field. Cristobal High School won her second
A special train took almost the entire straight game from Balboa High School,
school and a large number ofother rooters thereby making a clean sweep of the
to Balboa, to cheer for the team. The series. The game was witnessed by a
girls were the loudest in their cheering, crowd of rooters from both sides, who
giving Balboa competition on their own packed Broadway Park. Balboa had her
grounds. The game was half over when force of backers present; having run a
our rooters arrived in force upon the field. special train. The crowd was given good
Balboa was taken by surprise; they had music between the innings by the Fort
neversuspected anything like that. De Iesseps band.

FIRST GAME. Things started in the first inning.
Quinn of Balboa, first man up, walked
C. H. S. AB. R. H. PO. A. E. and scored later on Wood's single to left.
Wertz, rf 3 2 1 0 c Cristobal also scored in the first inning.
Das, 3b..... 5 o 1 o Klunk forced Days at second and then
Klunk, c. 5 4 2 1 c stole second and scored on Greene's
Greene, p 4 -2 i 2 o single to left. Balboa secured another
Wikingstad, cf 3 1 2 i c run in the third inning on Hele's triple.
Lowande, ss. 4 1 i c Hele scored when Lowande fell in catching
Pettit, rf 5 0 1 I o Klunk's throw to second.
DeReuter, ib 5 4 o o In the sixth inning Cristobal put the
Maher, 2b .. I5 I 1 o o game safely away. With two men on,
Klunk hit a long homer to deep right


39 12 io 27 5 a center. Later in the game Klunk hit a


Totals.










THE CARIBBEAN.


triple. His batting during the series was
hard and timely, he making two homers
and a triple.
The game from this stage on was well
played. Balboa fought hard but was
unable to push runs across the plate.
Thus ended a well-played series, many
of the boys being sorry that more games
were not to be played.
Cristobal High School appreciates the
coaching and advice rendered by Messrs.
Dundon, Picard, and Campbell during
the Cristobal-Balboa series.
Score, Cristobal 6, Balboa 2.
SECOND GAME.


Pes
Qui
Dil
Clis
Wo
He'
Ru
Bro
Jon
Po,
Des


Balboa. AB. R. H
cod, cf........ l o
nn, cf...... .. 3 o
ling. 2b....... 4 1
sbee, Ib....... 4 I
od, ss......... 4 o
e, 3b......... 4 I
ssey, c, If. ..... 4 0
wn, p, cf ..... I o
es, If. ........ 3 0
veil, rf........ 3 o
s Londes, If, p. 4 o

Totals....... 35 3
Cristobal. AB. R. F


Wertz rf........
Days, 3b........
Klunk c........
Greene, p.......
Wikingstad, cf....
Lowande, ss......
Maher, 2b.......
Pettit, If.........
De Reuter, ib....


i. E.
I o
o 0
I c
I C
I 0
I 0
1 3
o 0
I I
0 I
I 0

8 5
I. E.
I o
o 0


Totals....... 32 9 8 4
Summary.

Home run-Klunk. Three-base hits-
Hele, Klunk. Two base hit-Dilling.
Base on balls--Off Greene 2, off Des
Londes 4. Earned runs-Balboa o,
Cristobal 3. Struck out-By Greene Io,
by Des Londes 3, by Brown I.

On April 22, Cristobal High School de-
feated Fort De Lesseps by the score of
7 to 3 in a hotly contested game. This
game was the first of a 3-game series
between De Lesseps and the High School
to decide the championship of the Atlantic
Twilight League for i,,x. The ideal
weather conditions brought out a large
and enthusiastic crowd of rooters.
Both teams were noticeably nervous in
the early innings. Cristobal, first to bat,


was given one run on errors. De Lesseps
retaliated in their half with a home run,
tying the score. The tie held until the
fourth inning when Cristobal scored again.
Klunk hit a three-bagger and came in on a
sacrifice by Witherspoon. By errors on
the part of Cristobal in the field, De Les-
seps in their half raised the score by
two runs. Score, 3 to 2. Hayden's good
work in the box, supported ably by good
fielding, held De Lesseps scoreless the
remainder of the game. A double play
;n the seventh, Lowande to Witherspoon
to De Reuter, helped Hayden out of a
difficult hole. The score was again tied
in the eighth, made possible by Klunk's
two bagger. The game was won in the
ninth. With two men on and two out
Wertz hit a homer, making the score 6 to
3. This was followed by another double
by Klunk, who scored on a single by
Witherspoon. This made the score 7 to 3
in Cristobal's favor. De Lesseps failed to
score, dying with three pop flies to Wither-
spoon at short.
I think Hayden, our pitcher, deserves
special mention for this game. He is
new at the business this year, and this
was the first game of real importance he
has pitched for the High School. He was
in hot water several times but he came
through with flying colors.
The score:

C. H. S. AB.R. H. PO.A. E.
Days, cf..... 4 2 I I 0 I
Wertz, If..... 4 1 I 0 o
Klunk, c..... 4 3 3 4 1 o
Witherspoon,
ss......... 3 0 3 5 5 i
Lowande,2b. 5 0o o 5 I
Wikingstad, If 5 o o o o o
DeReuter, Ib 4 o o 14 o I
Hayden,p... 4 o o o 4 o
Maher, 3b .. 2 0 0 2 2
Maurer, cf... o I o o o o

Totals..... 35 7 8 27 17 6

De Lesseps. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Dodgson, ib. 4 o o o1 0 o
Evans,lf.... 5 o I 2 o o
Galarza, 2b.. 5 I I I 2 o
Frank, ss ... 4 I I I 3 1
Carter, p.... 3 o o I 5 0
Turner, 3b... 4 0 1 2 1 1
Wilson, cf.... 4 I o o o o
Harding, rf.. 4 0 I o o o
Hirsh,c..... 4 o 2 10 o 0


On April 25, 1928, at 4.30 p. m., Cris-
tobal High School played the second game
of the Atlantic Side Championship Series
with Fort De Lesseps, winning a very
exciting victory by a score of 8 to 6.
This game was very gratifying to the
students and rooters of the High School
not to mention the colored contingent
which was there in force. Our team
throughout the game showed a marked
superiority, even though the luck broke
against us during the first three innings.
In the first half of the first inning, De-
Lesseps scored two runs, but were stopped
by a double play, Days to Witherspoon.
In our half a run was scored-a homer by
Klunk.
Hayden, over-anxious to win, was not
at his best through these first innings,
and was relieved by Orsi in the fourth.
De Lesseps scored in the second, third,
and fourth innings. When we came to bat
in the 4th, the score was 5 to I against us.
In our half we scored two runs on a hit
and a sacrifice and two errors by De-
Lesseps.
After shutting out De Lesseps in the
fifth, for the first time, we staged the usual
batting rally, scoring four runs. Every-
body hit in spite of the fact that De Lesseps
changed pitchers.
The soldiers were again shut-out in the
sixth. We scored one run this inning
on a pass and a base hit.

In the seventh De Lesseps scored their
final run on a three-bagger by Galarza
who was sent home by the umpire because
the ball was fielded by a spectator.

This game was very exciting to the
supporters of the High School team, be-
cause of the poor start. It was later
retrieved by the excellent playing of the
team as a whole.
De Lesseps. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.


Dodgson, ib,
If. ......
Evans, If, p..
Galarza, 2b,
Ib .......
Frank, ss, If,
2b. .......
Carter, p, ss..
Turner, 3b...
Wilson, cf....
Hersh, c.....
Tomlinson, rf


3 I 2 8 o I
4 1 1 0 0 0

4 I 2 4 I I


Totals..... 37 3 7 27 I 21 Totals..... 31 6 1o 18 12 9









THE CARIBBEAN.


H. PO. A. E. Porfirio DeReuter broke in as first BOWLING.
t 3 2 0 baseman during the Balboa games and
i u .... i ,r the first time in our high school we


C. H. S. AB. R.
Days, 3b .... 4
Klunk, c.... 3 3
Wertz, rf 3 o
Witherspoon,
2b, ss ... 2 o
Orsi, ss, p.. 4 I
Lowande, Ib. 2 1
Wikingstad,
cf .... 4 2
Maurer, If. I
Hayden, p,2b. 2 0


Totals.. 2- 8 S 21 to


I 8 i mai"e suc it gLioo jo oL t t i at ii*e was
0 Io o put there and in the outfield so as to take
Advantage of his hitting and fielding.
o o I Jack Maher, utility second baseman,
2 0 4 1 was used only in the Balboa Series and
I 6 o o played his position well.
George Wertz, starting out as a rookie
1 0 0 outfielder, soon blossomed into a star
I o 0 o outfielder and was with Klunk the Ruth-
I o 2 2 Gehrig twins of the Twilight League.
SVertz led the Twilight League in home


5 runs.


have had an opportunity to bring out our
Material for bowling. This year we had a
real successful season. Our bowlers work-
ed hard at the giiie and came out victori-
ous against Balboa. The first match was
won by Balboa but we came through with
two decisive victories and by doing so won
the honors against Balboa. The results
are s follows:
3a, 12, .. at Ba/boa-Balboa,
1,233 pins; Cristobal, 1,216 pins.
Ma.'v I,, i at Cristobal.-Balboa,


BASEBALL NOTES. Albert Days also enjoyed the best year ,216 pins; Cristobal, 1,26o pins.
of his High School career. He developed "une 2, at Cristoba.--Balboa.
Mike Greene, our only pitcher, after into a very dependable fielder. Although 1,1''; pins; Cristobal, 1,225 pins.
winning two games against Balboa, left he played third most of the season he was
us at a critical period in the Twilight used in other infield positions very effec- BASKET BALL..
League schedule. Without his pitching tively. At bat he was always dangerous
arm and hitting prowess we were left and finished third in the lineup, with an Alarge number candidates turned out
considerably weakened. Mike was con- average of .304. for basket ball this season. Six of thee
sidered the Twilight League's best pitcher were laist-year men Klunk, L.owandet,
and was one of the HighSchool's leadingkngstad our flin out- Haen, Dais, ugli, and Babbitt.
hitters, finishing second among High fielder, was as ill Vikings-steady. These six men practically made up the
hitters, finishing second among High \Wicky's fielding was sure and his hitting High School team.
School batters, with an average of .314.
was dependable. We played one practice game with the
Jack Klunk enjoyed the best year of Jack Pettit was our flashy outfielder, Chase National Bank and came out vic-
his High School career, leading the High his fielding bordering on the sensational, torious-21 to 20.
School team in batting with an average of His hitting was developed during the On May 19, we went to Balboa and
.348, and leading the Twilight League in second halfof the Twilight League season, before a large crowd of Balboa's rooters
runs scored. Jack was considered by far Paul Hayden was not able to show his were badil defeated 40 to 10.
the best backstop in the Twilight League ability during the first half the Twilight On May 23, Balboa came to Cristobal
and one of the fastest baserunners. He League because of Mike Greene, but when a;nd this time before a crowd of our rooters
was also one of the League's home run he did enter into the games he showed thev defeated us again. This time 5o to
hitters, getting two in the Balboa Series. enough to assure the team that they had 10.
Lowande, our first baseman, rapidly another pitcher besides Greene. The teamwork of Balboa was fine.
picked up from a slow start and ended the Kenneth Maurer was used during the They seemed to know just where every
series brilliantly as DeLesseps can testify, second half because of his sure fielding other fellow was and where he was going.
His batting during the second half was and hitting. Our players played more as individuals,
loud and often,and his fielding was steady. Vincent Lugli, our utility infielder, was not being able to work together.
Lowande held the shortstop position dur- not used often enough to show his playing
ing the Balboa Series. ability. TENNIS.


BATTING AVERAGES.


Player. G. AB.

Klunk, c...... .. 28 92
Greene, p... .. 22 70
Days, cf, 3b....... 28 92
V.:rr -, rf ... 27 85
Lowande, I b, c ... 28 83
DeReuter, ib. .. 15
\\" k,,L .r ,I. If. f 2. 7 80
Pettit, If, cf 18 33
Maurer .... .. 16 39
Lugli...... ... 5 13
Hayden, p. ...... 13 26
Maher, 3b ...... 5 12


R. H. TB. 2B. 3B. HR.


2


0 0

0 0
0 0


Little interest was taken in tennis.
However, a few boys turned out and
SH. SB. Pet. practiced faithfully for the match with
-I- I'I which occurred on February 18.
4 8 348 We were handed a severe beating. Gil-
; 3 314 man, of Balboa, showed the best playing.
I 4 i04 His hard serve helping much to carry
o 2 .250 his team to victory.
5 o1 253 The score was s to o.
3 o 23-
RESULTS.
0 0 18S
0 o .12 I. Gilman and Fidanque (B. H. S.)
o o to defeated H. Mueller and R. Edwards
o o 13 ClC. H. S.). Score, 6-4, 6-3.
o I 154 2. H. Meredith and J. Humphreys
o o o83 (B. H. S.) defeated A. Mundberg and
Fishbough (C. H. S.). Score, 6-o, 6-2.


MR 10066-10








74 THE CARIBBEAN.


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Phy sical
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THE CARIBBEAN.


3. Gilman (B. H. S.) defeated R.
Edwards (C. H. S.). Score, 6-4, 6-2.
4. Hele (B. H. S.) defeated R. Sargent
(C. H. S.). Score, 6-2, 6-2.
5. F. Maduro (B. H. S.) defeated E.
Fishbough (C. H. S.). Score, 6-o, 6-o.

SWIMMING.
Although new material was plentiful
this year there was not much interest
taken in swimming. An interclass meet
was held April 13, 1928, Junior-Senior
vs. Freshman-Sophomore. Only three
Seniors represented the upper classmen.
However, they were sufficient to defeat
the lower classes, 31 to 13.
On April 21, eight days later, with
hardly any training, our swimming team
went to Balboa to compete in the annuJ .
swimming meet between Balboa High
and Cristobal High. We arrived on the
noon train, and went immediately to the
pool to find the Balboa team ready and
waiting.
Jack Klunk, our aquatic star, was high
point scorer of the day with 19i points.
His closest rivals were Win. Walston and
A. Schwinderman, of Balboa, with 6 point:
each.
The meet was hard fought throughout,
sometimes we forged ahead only to have
Balboa take the lead in the next event.
When the events were ended we were one
point behind, 29-30.

Following are the official results of the
meet:
1oo-yard Free Style.

1. Klunk (C. H. S.). Time, 59 45 sec-
onds. 5 points.
2. Wim. Walston (B. H. S.). 3 points.
3. R. Sargent (C. H. S.). i point.
4. R. Watson (B. H. S.).
Points-Cristobal 6, Balboa 3.

22o-yard Free Style.

I. G. Lowe (B. H. S.). Time, 2 minutes
5o seconds. 5 points.
2. H. Mueller (C. H. S.). 3 points.
3: Wm. Rader (B. H. S.). 1 point.
4. P. Hayden (C. H. S.).
Points-Cristobal 3, Balboa 6.


50-yard Breast Stroke. .11.. -.I are the official results:

I. A. Schwinderman (B. H. S.) Time, o- vard Dash.
31 415 seconds. 5 points. 1. August Schwindeman B H


2. G. Halloran (B. H. S.) 3 points.
3. W. \Wikingstad (C. H.S.). I point.
4. A. Mundberg (C. H. S.)
Points-Cristobal i, Balboa 8.

50-yard Back Stroke.

i. H. Granberry (B. H. S.). Time,
32 315 seconds. 5 points.
2. J. Klunk (C. H. S.). 3 points.
3. F. Key (B. H. S.). I point.
4. H. Mueller (C. H. S.)
Points-Cristobal 3, Balboa 6.


Fancy Diving.
i. J. Klunk (C. H. S.). 5 points.
2. J. Morrison (B. H. S.). 3 points.
3. A. Schwinderman (B. H. S.) I point.
4. A. Days (C. H. S.).
Points-Cristobal 5, Balboa 4.
76- vard Relay.
1. Cristobal (E. Lowande, R. Sargent,
H. Mueller, J. Klunk). Time, I minute
34 seconds. 5 points.
2. Balboa (Grimison, Granberry,
Schwinderman. '".\ I. '.. I


S CAn


seconds.
2. Higgason, C. H. S.
3. l.owande, C. H. S.

loo-yard Dash.
1. McGuigan, B. H. S. Time, 1
seconds.
2. Lowande, C. H. S.
3. Schwindeman, B. H. S.
DeReuter, C. H. S., ruled out.


22o-yard Dash.
i. McGuigan, B. H. S. Time, 23 S
seconds.
2. DeReuter, C. H. S.
3. Lowande, C. H. S.

44o-yard Dash.

i. Jones, B. H. S. Time, S9.6 seconds.
2. Gelabert, B. H. S.
3. Melendez, C. H. S.

12-pound Shot Put.

i. Klunk, C. H. S. Distance, 54 feet


Total points scored-Cristobal 29, 6 nches
Balboa 30. 2. Lowande,C.H.S. Distance, 4 feet
Cristobal won four firsts. 6 inches.
Balboa won three firsts. 3. Woo l, Wm., B. H. S.
High point scorers-J. Klunk (C.H.S.), ih ump.
19 1i4 points i. Wm. alston (B. H. S.),
6 points. A. Schwindeman (B. H. S.), i. Lowe, B. H. S. Height, 5 feet 2
6 points. inches.
Number of contestants-Cristobal 8, 2. Miller, B. H. S. Height, 5 feet 2
Balboa o1. 'inches.


TRACK.
Track started with a bang this year and
on March 3, 1928, at Fort Davis, an inter-
class meet was held, Junior-Senior rs.
Freshmen-Sophomores. The final score
was 66 to 20, the upper classes on the
long end. From the winners of this meet
a track team was chosen to meet Balboa.
On March 17, 1928, we traveled to
Balboa to sce what we could do to them.
Our high hopes were soon shattered.
Balboa showed us that she also had some


5-yard Free Stye. track men and that they had done some
serious training. High honors were won
1. J. Klunk (C. H. S.). Time, 24 4~' by Gayle McGuigan of Balboa, with I 11
seconds. 5 points, points. Lowande, of Cristobal, came
2. Wm. Walston (B. H.S.). 3 points, second with 8 points. Of the entire meet
3. E. Lowande(C. H.S.. ). point. we only won one first place, the shot put.
4 A. Schwinderman (B. H. S.). In this, two of our men tied, Klunk and
Points-Cristobal 6, Balboa 3. Lowande.


3. Small, C. H. S.

Broad "Jump.
1. Gelabert, B. H. S. Distance, 17 feet
5( inches.
2. '-I; ...r B.H .S.
3. I.owande, C. H. S.
SS -Yvard Pe'ar.

i. Balboa High School. Time 1.44.
2. Cristobal High School.
Total Points Scored.


Balboa High School.....
Cristobal High School.

Total ...

Individual Honors.


l. McGuigan, B. II. S., Ii points.
2. Lowande, C. II. S., 8 points.









76 THE CARIBBEAN.


Moonlight Scene on the Pacific.








THE CARIBBEAN.









78 THE CARIBBEAN.




THE EXCHANGE DEPARTMENT.
By Glady Elizabeth Beers, '28.



The exchanges that we receive at Cristobal are is unable to comment on newspapers but neverthe-
always welcomed. We are always pleased to know less that does not mean that we do not read the m
what is going on in the high schools in the United and keep in touch with the "doings" of the schools.
States and how they like our book. Our department Our comments on the following annuals are:

The Tomahawk. Fernsdale Union High School,Fernsdale,Calif. The Whisp. Wilmington High School, Wilmington, Del.
Your general make-up of the book is excellent. Your Your art editors should be praised and especially
cover is beautiful and your cuts good. We like the the one who drew the picture of Lindbergh. The
feature of running the jokes between the ads; also the Who's Who Directory is a clever idea.
introductory page. The classification of the classes such
as Seniors as Golden Age-Freshmen as Stone Age is We also acknowledge the following exchanges:
lI. A fc uur...f uc .-1lIb i: w iug:


cever. ew unlllavora e crllltciisms are: we suggest a
smaller staff. We also recommend using different back-
grounds and arrangements for group pictures. Why do
you not exchange more with schools out of your State?
The Reflector. Woburn High School, Woburn, Mass.
We like your magazine very much. The headings
are good, especially the one for "Stories." The poem
"Little Freshman" amused the Seniors in particular.
The Student. Holmes High School, Covington, Ky.
You have a neat magazine. Your headings are
excellent. The Exchange Department for November
is the cleverest we have seen.
The Blue Chick. Wilmington High School, Wilmington, Del.
Your annual is the very best we have received.
The cover and cuts deserve special mention. The
material that is worked in with the advertisements
is a very clever idea.
The Cardinal. Girls Commercial High School, Brooklyn,N.Y.
The art department of your magazine is very good.
Your covers are very clever..
The Observer. CentralFalls High School, CentralFalls, N. Y.
You have a good magazine. The heading for U
and I is very attractive.
The Nutshell. Moorestown High School, Moorestown, N. J.
Your magazine is well compiled. The Literary
Department should have special mention.
The Stampede. Sunset High School, Dallas, Texas.
The idea of giving the staff the name of the "Stam-
pede Gang" and the names to the different depart-
ments is very suitable.
The RedandWhite. Rochester High School, Rochester, N. H.
The cover of your book is very neat. We especially
like the poetry written by Annie Phillips, '29 and James
Watson, '28.
La Reata. Albuquerque High School, Albuquerque, N. M.
We like your book as a whole. The border around
each page is very attractive. Your cuts are wonderful.
We are glad to see that you are able to produce an
annual without advertising. We suggest exchanging
with one or two eastern schools; also a permanent
cover.


TheZonian, Balboa High School, Balboa, C. Z.
The Oracle, Jamaica High School, Jamaica, N. Y.
The Northfield Star, Northfield High School, Northfield,
Mass.
The Roman, Rome High School, Rome, Ga.
The Garnet and White, West Chester High School, West
Chester, Pa.
The Exponent, Greenfield High School, Greenfield, Mass.
The Authentic, Stoneham High School, Stoneham, Mass.
The Nautilus, Waterville High School, Waterville, Me.
The Pai, Tamalpais High School, Sausalito, Calif.
The Spectator, Johnstown High School, Johnstown, Pa.
The Hermes, Hudson Falls High School, Hudson Falls,
N.Y.
The Beacon, Gloucester High School, Gloucester, Mass.
The Acorn, Oakcliff High School, Dallas, Texas.
The Taconic, Williamstown High School, \lluhamstown,
Mass.

The following are some comments that we have received:

The Caribbean. Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.
The pictures are very interesting to us. The cuts
are very appropriate. Your literary department is
the best we have ever seen in a school magazine.
The Exponent,Greenfield High School, Greenfield,Mass.

The Caribbean. Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.
As usual, we found your annual very clever and
interesting. It is arranged neatly and there are some
original features in this new publication.
The Whisp, Wilmington High School, Wilmington, Del

The Caribbean. Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z
An all-around good magazine with departments
well-arranged. The beautiful pictures add much to
the magazine.
The Student, Holmes High School, Covington, Ky

The Caribbean. Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.
We think your annual is very good. While your
literary work is excellent we suggest more pictures.
However, the pictures you have are arranged cleverly.
We also like your sport section and are glad to see your
girls taking such an active part in sports.
La Reata, Albuquerque tlNh S.icoo!, MA'bt.querqe,. N. M







THE CARIBBEAN. 79







8o THE CARIBBE AN.


OVERHEARD IN ENGLISH CLASS.

Miss Hesse.-"Use Euripides in a sentence."
Bright Guy.--"Euripides pants, I kill you."


Fieldon.
Barber.-
Fieldon.
paint?"


-''\\.u l you give me a job?"
-"Sure, paint that striped pole."
-"O. K. Wh-crc do I find the striped


Zola D.-"I'd like to see you kiss me again!"
Royal.-"All right, keep your eyes open this
time."

Mr. Benson.-"If you ever want to learn any-
thing, Eddie, you must always begin at the bot-
tom."
Eddie A.-"Yes, Mr. Benson, but how about
swimming?"

Bill.-"Hello, Bee, how do you like your new
electric washer?"
Bee.-"Not so good. Every time I get in the
thing knocks me off my feet."
7. Whidden.-"I wish I were like the rivers."
Roy.-"How so?"
J. W.-"To follow my course without leaving
my bed."

Miss Sewell (in Physics Class).-"Roger, how
many magnetic poles are there?"
Roger.-"Two."
Miss Sewell.-"What are they?"
Roger.-"Blondes and brunettes."
R. Axtell.-"Say, Arthur, did you ever hunt
bear?"
Arthur.-"Of course not. I always wear
clothes."
Mr. Sawyers (in Economics Class).-"Scott,
what is an organizer?"
Scott.-"He is the guy that makes the music
in the church."
Freshman.-"Say, I bought one of those suits
with two pair of pants."
Sophomore.-"Well, how do you like it?"
Freshman.-' \,. so well. It's too hot with
two pair of pants."
Charles C.-"Dlo you all want me to shoo these
flies for you?"
Zonella B.-"Oh no, let them run around in
their bare feet a little longer."


Soph.-"I wonder why that Senior carries a
cane?"
Fresh.-"I wonder?"
Soph.-"Because it can't walk."
Gladys B.-"Oh, I've been stung, it must have
been a bee."
Edward L.-"Don't worry, don't worry. Just
put a little alcohol on it."
Gladys B.-"Yes, but I'm sureithasflown away."

Joe to Chloe.-"You know you remind me of the
ocean.
Chloe.-"Why, just because I'm wet and un-
tameable?"
Joe.-" N' you're all wet and you make mesick."
Jack P. (to stranger).-"Haven't I seen your
face before?"
Stranger.-" Probably, I'm not in the habit of
walking around backward."
Lee K.-"Randolph, why are some women
called Amazon?"
Randolph.-"Because they're so wide at the
mouth."
Walter W. (to bus driver).-"Slow up, I'm
going to jump at the next corner."
Other Passenger.-"Well, don't scare it."
VincentL.-" -\l- girl goes with only one part\."
Victor M.-"Which party-the Democrats or
Republicans?"
Miss Sewell.-"Can you prove that the square
on the hypotenuse is equal to the sum of the square
on the two sides of this triangle?"
Royal H.-"I don't have to prove it, I admit it."

FRESHMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTE.

Don't get discouraged; it takes some circuses
six years to train a jackass.
"My heart is with the ocean," the poet cried.
"You've gone me one better," said his seasick
friend as he took a firmer grip on the rail.
We call Kathryn "Kitty" because she dyed
nine times.
Why, certainly! In Panama boys aren't allowed
to sell newspapers under 12 years of age.
R. Axtell (looking at picture of pinhead).-"I
bet he's narrow minded."








THE CARIBBEAN.


"What are you writing?"
"A joke."
"Well, give him my best regards."

Albert calls his best girl "garbage" because no
one can love him like his little garbage can.

He trod on the corn of the belle of the ball,
And then-so the other girls tell-
Slumbering echoes were aroused in the hall,
Because of the bawl of the belle.

Miss Marvin.-' \ i. i.nr, who prompted you?
I distinctly heard someone whisper that date.
Was it you, James?"
James 9.-"No, ma'am, it must have been
History repeating itself."

Erie F.-"Say, Mister, call your dog off."
Mister.-- N.rhium; doing, I've called him
Towser ever since he was a pup."

Which freshman is it that thinks "Bacteria"
is the rear entrance to a cafeteria?

Sweet Young Thing.-"I'd like to buy a petti-
coat."
Floor Walker.-"Antique department on the
third floor, Miss."
CIGAR BAND STYLE.
Mary had a little dress
A dainty bit and airy.
It didn't show the dirt a bit,
But gee, how it showed Mary.
Klunk.-"Did you know I was a life saver last
summer?"
Gladys.-"Really, what flavor?"

Foolishness.
Roughnecks.
Egotism.
Silliness.
Hazy.
Mushy.
Evergreen.
Numbskull.
"Is that movie actor very much conceited?"
"Conceited! Why, every time he hears a
thunderclap he stands up and bows."
R. Axtell.-"What does the Washington Monu-
ment stand for?"
Emma Banks.-"Well, now, it would look funny
lying down."
MR 10066--11


Royal Higgason (to waiter in Canal Zone
restaurant).-"This is a good restaurant, isn't it?"
JWaiter.-"Yes, if you order a fresh egg here
you get the freshest egg in the world. If you order a
cup of coffee you get the best -.ft. in the world,
and-."
R. H.-"Yes, I believe you. I ordered a small
steak."

Overheard in Physics Class after lengthy dis-
cussion by Morton Southard-"Oh, boy, when
there's nothing more to be said, Morton always
says it."


Roy Wialker.-"Do you dance?"
AJnita Rankin.-"Yes, I love to."
Roy Walker.-"Great, that beats
day."


dancing any


We can not change our nature,
That is beyond our reach;
The girl who's born a lemon
Can never be a peach.

In English.--"What's the technical word for

Bright student.-"Sheet music."

Miss Marvin.--"This sonnet symbolizes to let
your mind have complete forgetfulness."
Jack Maher (who has forgotten his sonnet).-"I
have complete forgetfulness."

THE MODERN SHEIK.
(Taken from the Boston Post.)
Blessings on thee, modern sheik,
Millionaire on ten a week,
With thy hatless slickumed hair,
And thy flivver worse for wear-
With thy sweater gaudier still
Than the sunset o'er the hill.
With thy b'loon pants-miles too big-
Thy whole comic valentine rig,
You'll always be an also ran;
I thank the stars I'm not a man.
THE SHEIK'S RETORT.
Blessings on thee, little dame,
Bare of neck and knee the same;
With thy rolled down silken hose,
And thy thin transparent clothes;
With thy pretty made-up face,
And thy bobbed hairs jaunty grace;
With thy red lips reddened more
With thy lipstick from the store;
With all my heart I wish thee joy
But I thank the Lord 1 was born a boy.





82 THE CARIBBEAN.

AUTOGRAPH PAGE.

Is9 4 r-4. ---
Umr t <










































HOTEL WASHINGTON

Unequaled for situation and comfort. A hotel in keeping
with the dignity, spirit, and service of the Panama Canal

Go lf Sc'wimming Water Sports 7 Tai-pon Fishingi
THE YEAR AROUND
JAMES E. LEWIS, Manager P. 0. Adres, CRISTORBAI., CANAI. ZONE











THE CARIBBEAN.


krn__;7 wT 717- V ITT TvT i-^ rvi=,r5 ,r i:r ,T\


Panama Railroad Steamship Line

CRISTOBAL To NEW YORK
VIA PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

(ALL CABIN SHIPS)
S. S. "ANCON" and S. S. "CRISTOBAL"
FORTNIGHTLY SERVICE

MONTHLY SAILINGS TO WEST COAST
S. S. "GUAYAQUIL" and S. S. "BUENAVENTURA"
CALLING AT
BUENAVENTURA, TUMACO, ESMERALDAS, BAHIA, MANTA,
PUERTO BOLIVAR and GUAYAQUIL

OFFICES ON THE ISTHMUS:
Superintendent, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone
Steamship Ticket Agent, Cristobal, Canal Zone
Receiving and Forwarding Agency, Cristobal, Canal Zone i
OFFICES IN THE UNITED STATES:
No. 24 State Street, New York City, N. Y.
f TIN -10 m-f A -L._ L. _L E A L ,. -tL! k _L-L -L-. L j-
SO-,'. -r. r ,1; ,'.. r,.,rT -rr--- ar1 ,,- .T-T rT z-.r -.n r 1..r ;._r7-rr.-,,-.r-T,.r-."r .-,r r-'.rT-. r v .r r i >.1
.. .. ...... .... .. ............ .... .. . ... .. ... ... .. .. .


The Bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds

IS READY TO SERVE YOU





MOTION PICTURES
BOWLING ALLEYS
BILLIARD ROOMS

R R





I' "Social, Plhvsical, and I'Lnavgrotund .\cti\itic," ;







84 THE CARIBBEAN.


UNITED FRUIT COMPANY


r; Regular Sailings
from
SCRISTOBAL, C.Z.
to
NEW YORK
I1 NEW ORLEANS
SCUBA '






-- L l--.ii
JAMAICA and J. mw.
COSTA RICA 1-41"










COMPLIMENTS OF
For further particuan aut aror
S aFront & 9th Streets
PAUL WEST, Manager Criobal Div n, C bal, C.Z. T. JACO ME, Agent, Panama Ci







SALL LINES OF BEAUTY CULTURE 'f F- *M E
1^1 !;2 |J DRESSES AND HATS FROM PARIS

NETLE COMPLIMENTS OF A RBO

, cmmcran u autg J arlor L- |4l
*| 6 Front & 9th Streets

?I COLON, R. P.
P^i SPECIALIST IN -3 ]

", ALL LINES OF BEAUTY CULTURE f-! !^ s


I NESTLE PERMANENT WAVING REAL SPANISH SHAWLS
S! i ENGLISH LUGGAGE HAND BAGS


I I ...,nc :., '" I r..nr Sr ,.r
ajL.
I I


Paris Novelties
n 7T.---l ..








THE CARIBBEAN.


OF^TL -T-r-riFT -r -TJ ^ ^ i- T 1 i r r7-r iy r- -,.r7- -T-V V r r.-r--r- r T r r




THE NATIONAL CITY BANK OF NEW YORK





I Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits

i $146,176,246.85 U. S. Cy.



PANAMA BRANCH: COLON BRANCH:
CATHEDRAL PLAZA FRONT & 7th STREETS


[Mywww n-'--""y-' a mt' -'- "';-; ........


Tir r-r-r -r'rvi-TT v,-f i- ,- r rr r-i r u r r ~i- r" rvr-,,

P 0 B.,,z rd... -, Ph' .... ., -.. j3 .,

S. CHENALLOY
E, 8.053 BALBOA AVENUE
COLON, R. P.

: *-- AGENT FOR-
SThe National Fire Insurance Company,
of Hartford, Conn., U. S. A.
i Paid up Capital S3,ooo,ooo.oo
K; Total Assets over $46,000,000.00


SPan-American Life Insurance Company,
of New Orleans, La., U. S. A.
Paid up Capital $1,ooo,ooo.oo
S Total Assets over $20o,oo,ooo.oo


2T Tl-r -r Vriri r-rl r-r-Fr r- Tr I ir -' ;


FARMAGIA PRINCIPAL
'. DR A C DA COSTA GOMEZ

L-4,
; e: We always carry in Stock a fresh asso t- '~I
ment of American and European ;
Diugs and Patent Medicines,
Rubber Good-, Toilet i
Articles and
Perfumer
SOUR PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENT 1
is under the care of a registered ;
chemist of wide experience



--41
COLON
C C ." 1, ,n,\ "1 .:.l.. i ..
T. -! -.sh n 22 P. 0. P.\ .
e1E.'L i Li L l '' '-LJ'.'l -l '--L L l I 'l






THE CARIBBF.AN.


l )COMPLINIF NTSI- I

Fidanque, Henriquez & Cia.


'-3 LTL'LL-'_ L11 I A .V '. J-. 10J 1 r .T.. .F. 7i I


1"T the G('raduanitirng Studn i. ts (of the Cristubal High School!

Sour very sincere good wishes,
for this auspicious occasion should
Send to your ambitions



WINGS

1._ as would the PARAMOUNT super-special

The CINEMA PAN AMERICANO


';' _5j-T; -r

Rathbun, Stilson & Company, Ltd..

Hardware, LIumber, Paints and Oils

P. 0. Box 140, Colon, R. de P.
Telephones: Branch Store 253 Main Store 114 Office 192
^'~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~k I r 1". L "^TL ^^^ZI^^^^Q^^^^E^







THE CARIBBEAN.


P. 0 Box 675
CRISTOBAL, C. Z



9.036 Front Srrtct


CRISTOBAL, C. Z

.-k


C. ^AS~L-'-L-O. .I,'n-el ld u athlakr I
L...oL.J.. _L-IL.ILi_ l-LELLJ A i4J-L J -L-i _LLi 'i J LAL _l-I L.AL L .IL LIJ-a_ J. ll_ LI'_I


LOOK!
BEFORE BUYING YOUR

PANAMA HATS
AIGRETTES and
SOUVENIRS
VISIT OUR STORE WHERE YOU WILL FIND
THE LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN


PERRONE & LOBATO

FRANCISCO F. LOBATO
(Successor)


Money Exchange

No. 57 FRONT STREET, COLON

A


' ..'.'.. = :...L '..L'. _. 7, T. _. 1/.' ,' ''.'.T.- T_. "-Y' r .'..T. '_, 1


Muebleria "La Moderna"

S X1.AS\ I KR IT*TY



Furniture .
-J
L" Manufacturers


. FIXTURES WINDOWS
SSHOWCASES DOORS
" ^,

Esiun.itr. GiLen I-Workmnanhip GuaranteedJ
B B-.
SEE US BEFORE BUYING ELSEWHERE "
,- -, '--'- I, -; IL 'L L --


_ _ _r-7 p 1,-rr-T--l' ,r r -r r. ,r T -rr-


DUQUE COMPANY, Inc.
Hardware and Lumber Building Materials Arms and Ammunition

Agents for the FAMOUS DEVOE-RAYNOLDS PAINTS AND VARNISHES
Agents for COLT'S PATENT FIRE ARMS COMPANY
STORE: CENTRAL AVENUE and irth STREET WAREHOUSE: NORTH AVENUE
Tel. 592 Tel. 596
r,,WI TL ,' -" ,,, i .A 'M L_ L LL.L 1 ,- I L L:-L LLLLJ i ''-,-






88 THE CARIBBEAN.


1 DO YOU WONDER WHERE
STHE BOYS GET SUCH SNAPPY HAIR CUTS?
p AND THE GIRLS THEIR MODISH BOBS?
WHY, AT
Charley Payne's Barber Shop
A-M--A'IN_


COMPLIMENTS OF


HOSPITAL de PANAMA






I






Compliments of
Bilgray's Tropic Restaurant


0g .
^ Coplientsof






THE CARIBBI AN.


AI, 7 IJ\ T\ r1? ) r 7 0r 7 7 ; T v V7! 101 TW-I 7.\r; 7 1, 7 7.. T 77 i 7 3 T 7;.-77 rT kT-T.rr I 1,



I -i




COMPLIMENTS OF


PARAMOUNT FILMS, S. A.





If it's a Paramount Picture it's the best show in town

rLL--f T -- L-A1L-AL ILLj.. a 1.. I............ L- L- ... j......"- LL .. LA E .--!L L .. LPi k JL... i. L. I 1. 7 L
Sj COPLIMNTS F '^
.3j ;. 1
li PA AM UN FI _'LMS, S. A.--LI_ iII


% A,_gr,\r yCT \ ', 'i.' ', 3"^ -TTFFVr .TV TT,- t .-
T, ,.T -




S" 'q l
- : l





I ii

VICTROLAS FROM $20.00 UP
NEW VICTOR RECORDS EVERY MONTH

J. V. BEVERHOUDT Colon

MR 10066--12


I'rT ',. TrTv *i if J ij 7.17y1T fTnT v 'r.n ir
. 22. . ... ..


~ ittens & aylor


SFOR


SClothes of Class



:1 i

i oth Street

COLON


IYELL; I





90 THE CARIBBEAN.
Igurj ,im 'FM! Fmi H r, -Fm, i am .ini Smyn m Fmmi s1*1 rfiTn.11hrmrrS *ll a 1i3 m Ml Sin n i r n irn El


DRINK



1


DELICIOUS AND REFRESHING

Panama Coca-Cola Bottling Company
PAM PHONE:
PPANAMA 65 COLON 84
'I__ 's L^' I!I 1^ ____ -' ^ s^ ^:^ '^^ ^ ; s r ^ w t


SPALDING ATHLETIC GOODS -1


L. J. GRANITE R
SI DISTRIBUTOR
COLON, R. P.



I5 iWhatever sport, we have the
supplies
_~ ;I


The Progressive Cleaning
and Pressing House
z3th & BOLIVAR STREETS, COLON


SWE SAY IT AS A STATEMENT OF FACT:
"That we do satisfy the most
critical and exacting customer"


Please call Phone z6z, Colon
1| IC






THE CARIBBEAN.


COMPLIMENTS OF








CHOCOLATE
IS GOOD FOR YOU, GOOD FOR KIDDIES, AND KIDDIES LIKE IT

CHOCOLATE IS BOTH NOURISHING AND) SUSTAINING


Eat More Chocolate
Aand
Ask for the Brand that stands for Quality


NESTLE'S CHOCOLATE
"RICHEST IN CREAM"
7ri- 7: "-~ ^-=- l= 'T T S


GREBIEN & MARTIN *,-l
ARCHITECTS AND CONTRACTORS
Builders of ARMY and NAVY Y. M. C. A.'s
FIRST UNIT BOLIVARIAN UNIVERSITY, HOSPITALS, CHURCHES
And Many Other Public Buildings and Private Residences
PANAMA COLON







THE CARIBBEAN.


S Cable Address: IMPCO. A. B. C.--5th-6th-Bentley's P. 0. Box 342

I! Colon Import & Export Co., Ltd.
JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS


DEALERS IN
General Merchandise and Native Products
COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA


BRANCH RETAIL STORES AND TRADING STATIONS
PLAYA DAMA SANTA ISABEL PORVENIR
TUPILE ISLE OF PINES CARTI NARGANA
L& V&.IF-V1R Hr i1


B

I COMPLIMENTS OF

THE

HOTEL ASTOR




S BOB BROUGHT, Proprietor
COLON


s>: YM
___1 LUiL


The Chinese Silk Store


NEW CHINA





We carry Genuine Chinese and
Japanese Silks and
Curiosities



Front Street Central Avenue
COLON PANAMA
MA3& _Ia f ~j 1j
\ ~ f ^WWS-^~'WMW'r




Full Text




18 THE CARIBBEAN.


Name-Robert H. Axtell. Nickname-Axie.
Birthplace-Stratford, Conn. Date-November 5, 1911.
Home Address-Bridgeport, Conn.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October i, 1924.
Grade-Freshman.
OtherSchools AttendedBefore Coming toZone-Stratford,Conn.
Bridgeport High School, Bridgeport, Conn., October, 1926, to
January, 1927.
School Activities-Orchestra, 1926-27.
Favorite Expression-Something is rotten in the State of
Denmark.
Chosen Vocation-Scientist.
What College Do You Expect to Enter-Bates College.
Hobby-Swimming.
Favorite Pastime-Music.

ROBERT H. AXTELL.
"A" stands for Axtell and also for "arguing"
and the two can easily be spoken of together for
"arguing" seems to be Axie's favorite pastime.
He would make a good debater or lawyer, we feel
sure.
Robert is also an excellent clarinet player and
has played in the High School Orchestra for
two years.
Few of the teachers have ever had to complain
about his work, least of all the mathematics
teacher. For he is unusually quick at under-
standing problems and questions that those less
proficient in this line find puzzling to say the
least. Robert can often be seen helping those
who do not understand the whys and wherefore's
of Physics or Geometry.


Name-Emma Ellen Banks. Nickname-Bemma Anks.
Birthplace-Colon Hospital. Date--October 14, 1909.
Home Address-167, New Cristobal.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October 1, 1916.
Grade-First.
Class Ofices Held-Vice President, Junior Class; Chairman,
Service Committee, i926; Treasurer, Junior and Senior Classes,
Assistant Librarian, 1926-27.
School Activities-Glee Club, 1925-26-27; Carnival, 1925
and 1927; "Rip Van Winkle;" "The Japanese Girl;" Chorus,
1925-26-27; The Kleptomaniac; Supper Club, 1925-26-27-28.
School Athletics-Track Team, Indoor Baseball, 192b-27.
Favorite Expression-Aw---.
Hobby-Music.
Favorite Pastime-Swimming.

EMMA BANKS.
Bemma Anks as she has been nicknamed by
her friends, is'an important member of this Class
of '28. That she can sing is attested to by
the fact that she was in both Glee Club and
Chorus for three years, taking part in "Rip Van
Winkle" the Japanese Operetta and the "Musical
Review" in the Carnival at Fort De Lesseps in
1927 as well.
But singing is not her only talent for Emma
plays the piano very well also.
At gym she also shows ability in the way she
carries out directors' instructions. She swims,
plays tennis, basket ball and indoor baseball with
equal ease.






THE CARIBBEAN.


'^M i p 'EL ;Q ?"W-r~z xr .^,^^,,,rT ", .- 7 1:7 ,7; ", ,lr ITT 7T 1v ,, ,'T

CHOCOLATE
IS GOOD FOR YOU, GOOD FOR KIDDIES, AND KIDDIES LIKE IT

CHOCOLATE IS BOTH NOURISHING AND SUSTAINING ,


Eat More Chocolate
and
Ask for the Brand that stands for Quality ;


NESTLE'S CHOCOLATE
"RICHEST IN CREAM"

7 W W ? W:,I,_WIr= 1iW7 1 rr r- L r, L 3 .

GREBIEN & MARTIN
ARCHITECTS AND CONTRACTORS
Builders of ARMY and NAVY Y. M. C. A.'s
FIRST UNIT BOLIVARIAN UNIVERSITY, HOSPITALS, CHURCHES -
And Many Other Public Buildings and Private Residences
PANAMA COLON "j
"I, ". "JL L..L.. .. 1 I la .jL"J I








THE CARIBBEAN. 25


CLASS PROPHECY.



Dramatic Personae.
Mr. Klunk...........By HIMSELF
Mrs. Klunk. ..... ETHEL WESTMAN
Place.-Riverside Drive, New York, 1935.
Time.-3 a. m.


Mrs. Klunk.-"Home again at 3 P. X. Staying
up with a sick friend again, or perhaps a late
meeting at Tammany where you seem to be so
popular lately?"
Klunk.-"Well, you see it was this way-- ."
Mrs. Klunk.-"All right, let's have the weak
explanation."
Klunk.-"You remember Days, don't you? He
just dropped into New York after a around-the-
world flight. He was out celebrating, so I decided
to celebrate too. We climbed in his plane and took
off for a hop down to Birmingham. When we were
walking up the street Days told me how he had
run into Gladys the last time he dropped off there.
She had married a millionaire, J. Pierpont Morgan
Doolittle, who made his fortune manufacturing
hairpins since long hair came back in 1930. She
told "Daisie" that Emma was making fine progress
in the law profession. She holds down a job with
a probate court; her main duty is to settle dis-
putes between disinherited relatives."
Mrs. Klunk.-"Well, what did you do when
you arrived in Birmingham? Don't try to avoid
the subject!"


Klunk.-"I bought a paper on the way up the
street, and read where Axtell had constructed a
200-inch telescope, and mounted it on a 'peak
in Darien' to look for lost planets. Say, by the
way, I heard that down in Panama, Lucia is the
head of an international chain of drug stores;
also down in that neck of the woods, Teddy Hen-
ter is a chemist in the Gatun waterworks. Oh, yes!
Days says that Lowande is a star football player,
learning from experience acquired in the Canal
Zone."
"On his round-the-world flight Days stopped at
the South Sea Islands where Arthur Rothenberg
is engaged in the very profitable business of selling
wooden nutmegs to the unsuspecting natives.
Arthur, of course, is acquainted with Zonella,
who is a missionary in an adjoining island."
"Kathryn is the head professor in a secretarial
training school. Evangeline runs a rest-cure
sanitarium for tired business men at Porto Bello,
the new health resort at the start of the trans-Isth-
mian Highway."
Mrs. Klunk.-"Well, I'll forgive you this time
for such late hours. I'm glad you met Albert
because it's a long time since I have heard any-
thing from the Class of '28 of C. H. S."


Raging Waters from Spillway Gates Dashing against Bridge Piers.


MR 10066-4


1 /7. in a I




















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2010 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries


http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1928cris






82 THE CARIBBEAN.

AUTOGRAPH PAGE.



J91tg 4r4 .


-- ---









THE CARIBBEAN.


JORDAN ZIMMERMAN, 214 Clarendon Street, Syra-
cuse, N. Y.
"At last I am graduated from the College of
Forestry and believe me it feels pretty grand
to be an alumnus. I have just accepted a
position as salesman for Oaklands and
Pontiacs so I must get to work.
"THE CARIBBEAN has my best wishes for a
successful year-it seems that each year
brings improvement in the annual. I can't
be egoist enough to say that the annual in my
Senior year was the best because that is not so.
Each year it is a little better-and I feel sure
that this year will be the best ever."

1923.
GERALD BLISS, Cristobal, C. Z.
ERNEST EUPHRAT, 3935 Burwood Avenue, South
Norwood, Cincinnati, Ohio.
LOUISE HENTER, Nurses Home, Sydenham Hos-
pital, Baltimore, Md.
EDWARD MAY, Cristobal, C. Z.
HENRY MOORE, Box 212, Marshfield, Wis.
"Greetings!"
EMOGENE NASH (Mrs. E. S.) VAN BENSCHOTEN,
Balboa, C. Z.
MATTISON PULLIG (Mrs. J. D.) McCAULEY, Cris-
tobal, C. Z.
1924.

DOROTHY ABENDROTH (Mrs. ARTHUR) FLOOD,
Cristobal, C. Z.
FLORENCE ALBERT, 107 Beument Avenue, West
Brighton, Staten Island, N. Y.
"Kindly extend to the Class of 1928 my
best wishes for a successful annual."
JOSE AROSEMENA, Colon, R. P.
EDITH COULBOURN SMITH, 717 Colonial Avenue,
Norfolk, Va.
CHARLOTTE HOUSE (Mrs. R. W.) MACSPARRAN,
Cristobal, C. Z.
GLADYS LOWANDE (Mrs. C. O.) BALDWIN, Cris-
tobal, C. Z.
MORRIS MARCHOSKY, Colon, R. P.
INZA MARKHAM, 409 Lake Avenue, Rochester,
N. Y.
"Still skating along but am never too busy
to think often of C. H. S. Congratulations
and best wishes to the graduates of '28."
MR 10066-8


IRENE MCCOURT (Mrs. GEORGE G.) REITHEL, 14
Islington Place, Jamaica, Long Island,
N. Y.
"I am sending my best wishes to the Class
of '28 and for the success of this year's an-
nual."
GEORGE OAKES, Fort Banks, Mass.
CHESTER PIKE, 2148 Acton Street, Berkeley, Calif.
ANDREW SMITH, Box 2, Foster Route, Richmond,
Texas.
ETHEL SONNEMAN, 98 Macon Street, Brooklyn,
N.Y.
"I am now an upper Junior at Maxwell
Training School for Teachers. At present I
am quite busy taking examinations for I am
to go ot to practice teaching again. I will be
out for five weeks.
"Best wishes for the Class of 1928 and for the
success of the annual."

1925.

HELEN ABENDROTH, Cristobal, C. Z.
OLGA ARCIA (Mrs. A. DE) LEIGNADIER, Colon,
R. P.
WILLIAM COUSINS, 2623 Oakford Street, Phila-
delphia, Pa.
DOROTHY DEIBERT, Fort Sill, Okla.
RUTH DUEY (Mrs. SPENCER) LINCOLN, Cristobal,
C. Z.
KATHERINE FISCHER, 4309 Furley Ave., Garden-
ville, Md.
ANNIEL HEIM (hIr-. J. H.) BRENCHICK, Cristobal,
C. Z.
RUTH HOPKINS, Box 256, Ancon, C. Z.
"My very best wishes for THE CARIBBEAN.
I've noticed that you have been getting some
newspaper publicity for your social and
athletic events; good work!
"My very best regards to all who remember
me.
HUBERT LEE, 2211 Speedway, Austin, Texas.
HARRIET STEENBURG (address unknown).

1926.

RICHARD BEVERLY, Broad Run, Va.
HILDEGARDE BLYTHE, Landham-Bounce X-Ray
Clinic, Atlanta, Ga.







24 THE CARIBBEAN.


We, the Class of '28 of Cristobal High School,
being about to give up the ghost, and having
been examined and found of sound mind, body,
and memory, do hereby make, and publish and
declare this to be our last will and testament,
before advancing into the unknown future:
To the most aspiring Class of '29 we allot
the lot in "Monkey Hill,"-Mount Hope Cemetery,
wherein repose the dead and buried privileges of
Seniors, past, and present, mostly past, that the
Class of '29 cherish and place wreaths thereon,
keeping the endeared memory of the deceased
ever green.
Robert Axtell wills his playful ways to Roy
Walker, his eye shade and his arguing to Randolph
Orbaugh, his slow walk to Lilybel Cox, and his
melodious voice displayed in Senior English Class
to Morris Luce.
Emma Banks wills her soulful eyes to Wood-
ford Babbitt, her pearls to Mildred Bath, and her
good patronage of the telephone company to
Dorothy Heim, provided she uses the legacy
faithfully.
Gladys Beers wills her Southern brogue to
Virginia Stevenson, her use of the typewriter
to Adair Taylor, who has already been practicing
on it, her driving license to Marion Boomer, her
wind-blown bob to Miriam Arthur, and her ability
to talk to Vita Lyew.
Zonella Bliss wills her art of always knowing
her lessons to Robert Edwards.
Albert Days wills his speed in baseball to Paul
Hayden, a few inches of his stature to Roger
Deakins and Mike Green, and with much reluc-
tance, his nickname of "Tiney" to Lee Kariger.
Teddy Henter wills his understanding of Physics
to Lois Williams, his happy-go-lucky attitude to
Gretchen Palm, and his canoe trips to Woodford
Babbitt.
Jack Klunk wills his pull with the girls and the
teachers to Royal Higgason, his popularity to
Fieldon Bradford, to be added to his own supply,
and his part as villian in the Senior play to
Porfirio De Reuter.


Kathryn Lambert wills her reign in the office
and her right to answer the telephone to Margaret
Hayes, and her tardiness to classes to Betty
Montgomery.
Edward Lowande wills his punctuality of
getting to school at one second to eight to Jack
Pettit, his motto "After Me You Come First"
to Teddy Brandon, and his part as hero in the
Senior play to Vincent Lugli.
Arthur Rothenberg wills his good marks to
Fieldon Bradford, Vincent Lugli and Lee Kariger.
Lucia Salazar wills her long curls to Rosemary
Keene and Blanca Walker, her Spanish diction
to Charles Crum, and her ability to be seen and
not heard to Morton Southard and Virginia
Stevenson.
Evangeline Smith wills her ability to always
have a fountain pen to lend, to Morton Southard,
and her ability to translate Latin to James Quinn.
Ethel Westman wills her smile to Ruth Banks,
her dimples to Marion Lowande, her height to
"Sis" Hackett, her literary ability to Ethel
Barnett, and her vamping the boys to Rosemary
Keene.
To Lee Kariger and Anita Rankin we will a
year's growth before entering the Seniordom.
To the Junior boys, the Senior boys will their
grace in wearing loud ties.
To the Junior girls, the Senior girls leave their
seats at the Banquet table, their yells at the base-
ball games, and their parts in the Senior play.
To the whole school, we will our books, our
looks and our nooks to be cherished ever after.
IN WITNESS THEREOF, we have set our sealing
wax and hereto subscribed our John Doe's and
Mary Blank's, this first day of June, nineteen
hundred and twenty-eight Anno Domini.


THE SENIOR CLASS OF '28.


Witnesses:
Sand Fleas.
Palm Trees.
Gentle Breeze.








58 THE CARIBBEAN.


WILLIAM CLINCHARD, 229 North Seventeenth St.,
Lincoln, Nebr.
"I am looking forward with anticipation
to seeing the first copy of THE CARIBBEAN
of '28 and I sincerely hope that it will be the
best year book ever produced by C. H. S.
I am also wishing success to the Class of '28
on THE CARIBBEAN, congratulations on their
graduation, and best regards to the Faculty."
WILLIAM COFFEY, Cristobal, C. Z.
HELENA M. DECKMAN, 1195 East 18th St., N.
Portland, Oreg.
"With sincere and best wishes to THE
CARIBBEAN and to all my school friends I say
'au revoir' to Panama. Luck to the annual and
to those that follow."
EDNA DUVALL, 4802 Greenlee Ave., St. Bernard,
Ohio.
MORRIS EGGLESTON, Room 104, Freshman Hall,
Notre Dame University, Notre Dame, Ind.
RAY FISCHER, 4309 Furley Avenue, Gardenville,
Md.
IRENE HOPKINS, Cristobal, C. Z. Home-Panama
City, R. P.
"Accept my best wishes for the students and
Faculty of C. H. S. Congratulations, Seniors.
Make the 1928 CARIBBEAN go over the top."
HELEN J. KEENE, Cristobal, C. Z.
"Greetings to the Class of '28 and best
wishes for the success of the play and this
year's annual."
JOHANNA KLEEFKENS (Mrs. R. O.) ANTICK, Box
1057, Cristobal, C. Z.
"'The moving finger having writ moves
on.' Class of '28, I sincerely hope that the
deeds you have written will live long in the
hall of fame of dear old C. H. S. I have often
desired to be back in school.
"Each year is filled with memories. The
parties, friends, and above all the 'school
spirit' C. H. S. has shown year by year.
"'28 you have kept up the spirit as those
before you have so I just know THE CARIB-
BEAN is going to be the best ever. Congratu-
lations and best wishes to all."
DELILAH MAY (Mrs. G. W.) PARKER, Gatun, C. Z.
LOLA MUNOZ, Panama City, R. P.
MILDRED NEELY, Cristobal, C. Z.
CARLOS PULGAR, Gatun, C. Z.


CLARICE STEENBURG, Langley Field, Va.
GAY R. TURNER, Randolph-Macon Woman's
College, Lynchburg, Va.
"I've been thinking and thinking and think-
ing, and I can't think of a thing original, so
'I'll have to say the same old thing in the same
old way,' though with a heart full of love and
meaning.
"Congratulations, Class of '28, and the best
of wishes for a most successful annual."
ELIZABETH WARREN, Florida State College for
Women, Tallahassee, Fla.
CHRISTIAN WIRTZ, Cristobal, C. Z.

1927.
EMILY BLEDSOE, 416 Transylvania Park, Lexing-
ton, Ky.
LAWRENCE C. CALLAWAY, Jr., Wentworth Mili-
tary Academy, Lexington, Mo.
"I wish the staff all the success in the world
in the publishing of their '28 annual. I also
hope that the Senior Class graduates in 'style'
as Klunk would say. I expect to be there to
see the graduation exercises and to wish the
whole class good luck."
JOSEPH CORRIGAN, Box 123, Gatun, C. Z.
TERESA GALLAGHER, 863 57th St., Brooklyn,
N.Y.
JAMES GRIDER, 416 Transylvania Park, Lexington,
Ky.
LOUISE HEIM, 510 Church Street, St. Bernard,
Ohio.
CLARA A. MAY, Gatun, C. Z.
HELEN MONTGOMERY, Cristobal, C. Z.
JOHN G. NELSON, Gonzaga University, Spokane,
Wash.
DOROTHY SvENSSON, 39 Nikisch Avenue, Rosin-
dale, Mass.
"My plans went topsy-turvey so that
instead of being a freshman in the University
of Washington I'm a post graduate in Jamaica
Plain High School, Boston. I'm planning to
enter Simmons College this fall and work for a
degree in Library Science. (My work in the
C. H. S. library started that.)
"I suppose my best wishes come too late-
however, they will still be 'best wishes.' I've
racked my brain in vain for some original way








THE CARIBBEAN. 31


.
ctf "`
4' i










THE CARIBBEAN. 71


SRISTOBAL High School had good fortune this
year to have several excellent men. Some of
whom, greatly to our sorrow, will not be with us next
year. Largely owing to their efforts, we have had a
good year athletically. We did not always win but
we set a good example in sportsmanship, and have
always rendered a good account of ourselves.


Our baseball season this year was a
great success. Our Cristobal boys always
could play ball, and Witherspoon, our
coach par excellence, was loaned to us
by the Navy. The rules of the Twilight
League allowed two big league players
on each team. Witherspoon played with
us the entire season, but the other man
given to us was constantly changing.
Roberts, of the Navy, began the year with
us, but Orsi finished, pitching us to
victory in the final game of the champion-
ship series.
Next year, C. H. S. ball team will be
greatly weakened by the loss of four
players. Greene, our pitcher, has already
gone to the States, and Lowande, Klunk,
and Days will have been graduated. There
will be others to fill their places, of course,
and let us hope they will uphold the
honor of Cristobal High School as their
predecessors have done this year.
Following are the results of the Atlantic
Side Twilight League:
FIRST HALF.
1927.
12-12 C. H. S. 6, Outlaws I.
12-12 C. H. S. 6, Outlaws I.
12-17 C. H. S. 6, De Lesseps 5.
12-28 C. H. S. 4, R. & F. A. I.
1928.
i-3 C. H. S. 3, Outlaws 8.
I-5 C. H. S. 7, De Lesseps 7.
i-11 C. H. S. 8, R. &F. A. 6.
1-13 C. H. S. o1, Maulers 7.
I-i5 C. H.S. 6, Outlaws 3.
1-23 C. H. S. 7, De Lesseps 6.
1-28 C. H. S. 14, Maulers 5.
2-1 C. H. S. 5, R. & F. A. 4.
2-2 C. H. S. 3, De Lesseps 4.
2-8 C. H. S. 9, Maulers 5.
2-9 C. H. S.-Outlaws (forefeited).
2-15 C.H.S. o1, R. & F.A.3.
SECOND HALF.
2-20 C. H. S.-Outlaws (forfeited).
2-25 C. H. S. 7, De Lesseps 3.
3-1 C. H. S. 14, Maulers 4.
3-7 C. H. S. 3, R. & F. A. 2.
3-12 C. H. S. 6, Maulers 13.
3-15 C. H. S. 5, Maulers 7.
3-19 C. H. S. 5, R. & F. A. 3.


Unfortunately our high school represents a rather
small community and we have no wealth of
material to draw from as Balboa High School has.
Our men, by entrance into every kind of sport
and by their hard work and strenuous efforts, have


set an example
come.


BASEBALL.
Feb. II, 1928-Before an immense
throngat "Razzberry" Park, Balboa, Cris-
tobal won the first game of the high school
series, 12 to 10. The game was a free-
hitting affair, Balboa outhitting us 12 to
o1, but their hits were more scattered.
Cristobal's hits came with men on base.
The feature of the game was Hele's drive
into the tennis court in the first inning
with two men on. Later in the game Jack
Klunk hit one into the tennis court, easily
making the circuit.
Cristobal played a great fielding game,
not one error being charged against them
during the entire game. On the other
hand, Balboa seemed to have the weak-
ness of missing them at the wrong time,
eight miscues being made by them. The
chief offender was Wood, who missed
four. The batting honors were grabbed
by Hele of Balboa, who got four clean
hits out of five times up. Russey and
Quinn of Balboa made three apiece. For
Cristobal the feature was Klunk's catch-
ing and his homer into the tennis court.
Lowande made two hits out of four at-
tempts, one of them being a double to
left field.
A special train took almost the entire
school and a large number of other rooters
to Balboa, to cheer for the team. The
girls were the loudest in their cheering,
giving Balboa competition on their own
grounds. The game was half over when
our rooters arrived in force upon the field.
Balboa was taken by surprise; they had
never suspected anything like that.
FIRST GAME.


C. H. S.
Wertz, rf ....
Days, 3b.....
Klunk, c..
Greene, p
Wikingsrad, cf
Lowande, ss..
Pettit, rf ....
DeReuter, I b
Maher, 2b..


for the students in the years to


B. H. S. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Quinn, 2b.... o 3 1 1 2
DeLondes, p. 6 I i I i o
Clisbee, Ib. 4 o o 1o o 0
Wood, ss.... 3 2 0 2 4 4
Hele,3b.... 5 3 4 3 0
Powell, c... 2 2 I o o
Jones, cf..... I r I o o o
Taylor, If ... 2 I o o o I
Russey, rf .. 5 o 3 3 o o
Daniels, rf. .. o o o o o
Brown, p.... 5 o o 2 o

Totals... 38 10 13 27 7 8

Summary.
Home runs-Klunk, Hele. Three-base
hits-Hele 2. Two-base hits-Lowande,
Hele. Hit by pitched ball-By Greene
2 (Clisbee and Taylo-). Struck out-By
Greene i5, by Brown 7, by DesLondes 2.
Base on balls-Off Greene 5, off Brown 3.
Earned runs-Cristobal 8, Balboa 1o.
Winning pitcher-Greene. Losing pitcher
-Brown
March 11, 1928-In the second game of
the series, played on the Atlantic side,
Cristobal High School won her second
straight game from Balboa High School,
thereby making a clean sweep of the
series. The game was witnessed by a
crowd of rooters from both sides, who
packed Broadway Park. Balboa had her
force of backers present; having run a
special train. The crowd was given good
music between the innings by the Fort
De Lesseps band.
Things started in the first inning.
Quinn of Balboa, first man up, walked
and scored later on Wood's single to left.
Cristobal also scored in the first inning.
Klunk forced Days at second and then
stole second and scored on Greene's
single to left. Balboa secured another
run in the third inning on Hele's triple.
Hele scored when Lowande fell in catching
Klunk's throw to second.
In the sixth inning Cristobal put the
game safely away. With two men on,


Klunk hit a long homer to deep right
Totals..... 39 12 10 27 5 o center. Later in the game Klunk hit a








6 THE CARIBBEAN.


Staf f of "Te Caribbean."


Faculty Adviser ............ ...... ... ...MR. SAWYERS
Editor-in-Chief. ......... .......... JACK KLUNK
Assistant Editor-in-Chief ...... ... .............JACK PETTIT
Business Manager (resigned)............... FRANK KIMBELL
Business Manager. ............ ...........PAUL HAYDEN
Assi.tc1 t Et.si, css A,'ar.agcr (resigned)........ ROY WALKER
AssistatI Bi si, ess Manragcr ............... ROYAL HIGGASON
Circulation Manager .......... ....... ...ALBERT DAYS
Assistant C.rculation Act:cger.............. CHARLES CRUM


Literary Editor.................. .......ETHEL WESTMAN
Art Editor ...........................MORTON SOUTHARD
Exchange Editor.......................GLADYS E. BEERS
School Notes Editor.......................EMMA E. BANKS
Alumni Editor.......................... ZONELLA BLISS
Boys' Athletic Editor (resigned).............. MIKE GREEN
Boys' Athletic Editor. ................... WOODFORD BABBITT
Girls' Athletic Editor...................EVANGELINE SMITH
7oke Editor........... ..... .............TEDDY HENTER





THE CARIBBEAN.


COMPLIMENTS OF
Fidanque, Henriquez & Cia.






NG S
To the Graduating Students of the Crstobal High Schoolt
















P. 0. Box 140, Colon, R. de P.
Tour very sincere good wishes,
for this auspicious occasion should
lend to your ambitions


WINGS
1 as would the PARAMOUNT super-special
The CINEMA PAN AMERICANO



P Rathbun, Stilson & Company, Ltd.
1 Hardware, Lumber, Paints and Oils
P. 0. Box 140, Colon, R. de P.
Telephones: Branch Store 253 Main Store I 14 Office 192








THE CARIBBEAN.


THE SOPHOMORE PARTY.
By Alice Henter, '30.

The aviators of the Class of '30 of Cristobal
High School gave their annual party on the air-
ship, "The Spirit of the Sophomores," which
started from the Masonic Temple, Friday eve-
ning, February r7th.
One of the aviators met the guests, gave them
a program of the flight and d rected them to the
airship.
The airship was decorated with the aviator's
colors, blue and silver. A large American flag
was draped, with their emblem beneath it.
Little airplanes were hung from the streamers
of blue and silver.
At 8 o'clock the airship left its moorings with
the orchestra playing a lively tune.
An entertainment was given by Aviatress
Eleanor Urwiler, who did the Charleston, and
one of the guests, Mary Bretch, who recited.
During the flight, punch, cake and sandwiches
were served to the weary guests and aviators.
At 12 o'clock the airship again was at its moor-
ings, the guests thanking each aviator in turn for
the lovely flight.

THE FRESHMAN PARTY.
By Joyce Alberga, '31.

"We, the Freshmen, invite you to come
To a costume party at the Washington.
April I3ih is the date.
Be there early for its starts at eight.
There will be a prize fcr the funniest and best,
Be sure to come-we'll do the rest."

Such read the invitations to the delightful
costume ball given by the Freshmen.
There was a very large attendance, and the
music rendered by Dwyer's orchestra was enjoyed
by all. Delicious punch and sandwiches were
served throughout the evening.
The biggest event of the party was the Grand
March. Everyone took part in this. Up and down
the ballroom did they march until the judges decid-
ed who the winners would be. Ma -y Patterson
won first prize fa:- the best costume. She represent-
ed "Little Bo Peep". Ethel Westman won the
prize for the funniest. Her costume of"Kiki" was
very well designed. The boys winning the prizes
were Jack Maher, the "Midshipman," and
Raymond Will, "Our Old-Fashioned School Boy."
MR 10066-9


Another interesting event was the prize waltz
which was won by Mildred Bath and Vincent
Lugli.
Much credit must be given to Miss Moore, the
Freshman Class adviser. It was under her super-
intendence that such a wonderful party was given.

THE SENIOR PLAY.
By Ethel Barnett, '29.
This year's Senior Play, "Cupid Score; a
Touchdown," proved a decided success. Directed
by Mr. Robert Noe, this gay little comedy made a
deep impression on the school backers. Much-
very much-of the credit for this is due Mr. Noe,
for it was only through his indefatigable lab-r,
his admirable casting, that the play was given
as well as it was.
The story revolves around Dulcy Connors,
a charming school girl, whose father is out of
town facing financial difficulties. Bartnn Hawley,
a shady politician, offers to aid him on condition
that Dulcy be part of the bargain. Her sweet,
wise mother, however, takes Barton down a peg or
two. Going to Mrs. Belden-Grey's private school,
Dulcy learns to know Beatrice and Stanley Comp-
ton, who come from a family of culture and gD3d
breeding. Mrs. McNulty, Dulcy's married. sister,
strives to kill Stanley's affection for Dalcy, but
fails. In the end everything turns out splendidly.
Other characters are Betty, Mrs. Conno:s's
trusted maid, Gladys Fluttermore and Chubby
Wriggley. Gladys and Chubby are engaged ani
their clever lines provided much amusement.
Gladys is a sophisticated gold-digger. Chubby is
her much stepped-on prey, and together they
furnish hilarious comedy.
Ethel Westman was very well cast a; Dalcy,
the heroine. She acted just as a gay, but true-
hearted young school girl should act. Jack Klunk
made a true villain. Zonella Bliss, as Mrs. Con-
nors had a heavy part, but she carried it off
admirably. Emma Banks was perfect as the con-
ceited Mrs. McNulty. Mildred Bath and Edward
Lowande, as the gentle, lovely society girl, an I
the college football star, did exceedingly well.
Mrs. Belden-G:e: was well-portrayed by Gladys
Beers. Anita Rankin was adorable as the maiil.
But never did two characters suit their parts as
Kathryn Lambert and Albert Days suited theirs.
Kathryn was Gladys, the gold-digger, and
Albert was her fiance.







THE CARIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN.


Name-LILLIAN B. GUSTAFSON.
Birthplace-Chicago, Ill.
Home Address-Nunica, Mich.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-N. I. S. N. S.
Location-De Kalb, Ill.
Favorite Expression-Well, now, etc.
Date Entering Service on Canal-October I, 1923.
Subjects Taught 1927-1928-Assistant Principal.

MIss LILLIAN B. GUSTAFSON.
Miss Gustafson is a necessary part of our High
School. Her position ensures the smooth running
of each day's work. Acquainted with all the
details of the office routine, she has proved to be
of valuable assistance to our school.
In Miss Gustafson's study halls, one can always
see her helping puzzled students with perplexing
problems.
During her stay she has become immensely
popular with the student body, and we hope to
welcome her to Cristobal High next year.


Name-WILLIAM A. SAWYERS.
Birthplace-Westerly, R. I.
Home Address-38 Summer St., Westerly, R. 1.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-Westerly High School.
Location-Westerly, R. I.
College or University-Bates College, Lewi ton. Me.
Dates Attended-I915-1919.
Degrees Obtained-B. S.
College or University-ColumbiaUniver]itN, Nei York C;y.
Dates Attended-1924-1925.
Degrees Obtained-M. A.
Favorite Expression-I can't talk above all that noise.
Date Entering Service on Canal Zone--September 7, 1927.
Subjects Taught g927-19z8-Economics, General Science.
Sponsorfor what Class-THE CARIBBE N Staff.

MR. WILLIAM A. SAWYERS.
Mr. Sawyers, our principal, has been with us
only this year. He not only handles the respon-
sibilities of the principalship but also teaches
General Science and Economics, not to speak of
being the sponsor of THE CARIBBEAN Staff.
He has instilled in us the school spirit by help-
ing us to give the best carnival that Cristobal
High School has ever had. It was through his
initiative that we had a special train to see
Lindbergh "hop off," and also the train to Balboa
when we won the "flying colors" in baseball.
The success of our annual, our class play, our
graduation, and our many activities is largely
due to his help.
Our Principal has the welfare of our school at
heart. He is the biggest "booster" we have.
We know that Cristobal High School will flourish
under his wise and friendly counsel.












14 THE CARIBBEAN.


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PAGE 4

Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2010 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1928cris

PAGE 7

Cristobal H igh School.

PAGE 8

THE CARI BBEAN. FOREIVORD.--------, I I C7"'HE E d i to rial Stair o f I L '''TH E CARIBBEAN" II hasendea vo r ed t h i s y ear to p ortray t h e sc h oo l lif e o f th e pupil s o f Cri s-to bal H i g h Sc h ool. In years tocom e w e hope to b e abl e to l oo k t h ro u g h II OUI b oo k a n d re m embe r our h appy !ll1 sc h oo ldays. \\'e havedoneourbes t I to pubhs h t h e b es t b oo k pOSSibl e, II an d I t mu s t n o w r es t o n It s m erits J

PAGE 9

THE CARI BBEAN. DEDICATION. In grate ful appre ciati o n o f h i s sin c e r e inte r est and untiring e ffort s in b e half of Cri s tobal H igh Sch ool, w e th e students d e di cate thi s, t h e e l e v e n t h v o lum e o f "Th eCaribbean" to our p rin cipal

PAGE 10

THE BBE AN. 1fn jfflcmoriam "Silent as midnig h t's falling meteor slides I nto t h e stillness of the far off land." I T I S W ITH F ON D O F A L OYAL THAT W E THE CLASS O F 1928 DEDICATE THI S PAGE TO (lEbb:Jarb JLab:Jrence 1Seene A pril 13, 1 909 Jul y 2 -1,19 2 7

PAGE 11

TH E CARIBB EAN. P o rte Cochere--Hotcl W ashington. Tab l e of COl/t e l/ts Page. PaRe F o rew ord . Soph omores .)2 D edication . Fres hmen 3 6 I n l\ l emoriam .. l .iter;lry 4 0 S taff ... : \ llIlllni 56 Editoria l Sc h ool :-"lotes 6, Facult y . Spons Seniors ... 6 E xc h ;tnges 7 8 Class H i s t ory. '3 Jokes 80 Class W ill '4 Autograp h s 8, Class Prop h ecy. '25 '\dvertiscments 83 J uniors .. ,s Cathedra l at Centr al Plaza. Panam3 City. IOO66-Panama Canal-6-1 6 28-425

PAGE 12

6 Fawlty Adr:iur dtIOr-11l-Chi4 / IJJ;J/alll Edllor.in-Chld BU;H1(SJ ,llanaxey (rnlgntd) J)lIs;ne.JJ AI/mager ""SJi:/l".1/ rUtUSJ I 'iii "1.(r (rnignd) An/;lnl/D,Jlles; J'fII ... :;cr. C;YCllhlion .\"mUig(r ,JJJ/J(flI,ICrCl/!t:.tlo/ ; l'o.l.-geT THE CAR 1 BBEAN. Staff of "The Caribbean l\IR. SAWYERS Literm y Ediro r ... JACK KLUNK Ar' Edilor ... J ACK PEn-IT Exchan ge &iir o r r.R,AN .... KIMBELL School Noles Editor" PAUL I-IA\'OEN AIU!JIni Editor ... 1\0\' "'AI."-ER B oys' All/Mil Editor (re.ri gn d ) .. R o \',,1. HICGA!>ON B o)'5' Alh/el;c l! i lilor AI-HERT DA\'S Girl;' .iJJh/ef;c Edi/ or (HARU ;::' CRtM 7o JuEdil or. ... ETHEL \VESTMAN f\IORTON SOUTHARD GLA DY S E BEERS EMMA E. BANKS ZONELLA BLISS MIKE GREF.N \VOOOfORI) BABBITT EVAN"CELINE SMITH TEDDY HENTER

PAGE 13

THE CAR IB BEAN. i 0 1 QEbitorial. I 0 i B}, John C. K lunk, '28. "Our since r est laughter with some pain is frought; Our sweetest songs are t h ose that tell of saddest thought," Shdley. T o write the appreciation of t h e Editorial Staff o f the Cristobal H igh School annual, THE CARIBBEAN, and o f rh e Class o f ''28, to the communit)" is a tas k deservin g o f another pen than ou rs; b ecause it i s so r ea l it is diffic ul t to express The sc h oo l and t h e community are close to each other, workin g for the same things, the successful COI11-pletion of a hi g h sc h oo l course f o r the students, and hi g h standards f o r t h e sc h ool. J ot until we a r e Seniors do we realiz e w hat the community means to the sc h ool. \\' h en the time arri ves f o r the staff to start work o n THE CARIBBEAN, to see t h e printers to raise fun ds, to pu t o n the carnival and class pla y, to see to t h e advertis in g, o nl y then do we realize the kindl y inte rest, the ge n e rous s upport, and friendship of whic h eac h day brin gs fresh proof. This is the spirit that develops our sUldents, brings out the ir best, t eac h es the m the m eani n g of community interest, understanding, and fri e n ds hip. In our games you are with us; if we win, you knew we could and are glad of it; if we lose, better luck next time. \\'e are proud of our sc h ool, our faculty, and ou r community, who have given u s t heir best. \Ve wis h T ilE CARIBBEAN, the last and greatest effort of the Class o f ''28, to carry to you our wannest and sincerest thanks. Peans of praise could only tell tiS, as we have tried to do, of the share this community ha s in the welfare of the students of our school. I n graduating honorably we have in part fulfilled your h opes for tis. Happy, carefre e sc h oo l days are e nded; Cristobal H ig h Sc h oo l for u s is finis h ed \Vell may w e say, "Our sweetest songs are those that t ell of saddest thought." That it pays to be patient with youth, and to give encouragement when needed i s the lesson we have learned as we toO have needed these helps from the men and women w h o are our community. Fisldng Boats Al o ng the Beach of PananJa CiO'.

PAGE 14

[VERY "w [" (Ctun H e sChool) THE CARIBBEAN. OF riCE s rUDY S[NIDR HALL ROOM I LAB 5C[NCSI BANDSTAND CRISTOBAL COMI115SARY DAY HALL\JAY COLON HOSPITA L

PAGE 15

THE CARlBBEAN. 9 ),IN. 10066--2

PAGE 16

]0 THE CARIBBEAN Namr-LII ... lIAl<.' B GUSTAFSON, Birrhpltlu-Chi cago Ill. H ome .-fddress-Nuni ca, r..l ich. EDUCATIOS'. Name of Suondary School-r\. I. S. N. S. Location-D e K a lb, Ill. FatJor;f e ExpreSJion-Well, now, etc. Daf e Entering Serviu o n Callal-October" 1923. Subjul$ Tau glll 1927-J928-Assistant Principal. MISS LILLIAN B. GUSTAFSON. Miss Gustafso n is a n ecessary part of our H igh S c hool. H e r position e n sures the smooth running o f each day's work. Acquainted with all the details o f the o ffice r outine, s h e ha s proved to b e of valuable assistance t o Ollr sc h ool. I n Mi ss Gustafso n' s s tudy hall s one can a lways see h e r h e lping puzzled students with p e rplexing problems. During h e r stay s h e ha s become imm e n se l y popular with the stud ent body, and we hop e t o welcome h e r to Cri s tobal Hi g h next year. A. SAWYERS Birthplau-Wes terlr, R. l. H o m e .1ddreJJ-38 Summer St., W esterly, R EDUCATION. Name of Suondary School-W esterly H igh School. Location-Weste rl) R. 1. C oll ege or U"hlersity-B ates College, L ewiston, Me. Dal es .-1l1ended-1915 1 9 19. Degrees Obtained-B. S. College or University-Columbia University, New 'York City. Daft s nllended-I 9'24 1 9'25. Degrtts Obtained-NI. A. Fav o rite Expressi o n I can't talk above all that n oise. Date Entering Se rv;u on Canal Zone-September 7, 19'27. S ubjects Tau ghl I 92 7-1928-Eco nomics, Genera l Science. Sponsor for wha t ClaJJ-THE CAR IBBEAN Staff. MR. \VII.LlA1\1 A. SAWYERS. Mr. Sawyers, o u r principal, ha s been wit h us only t his year. H e not on l y handl es th e respon s ibiliti es o f the principalship but also teac hes Gen e ral Science and E co n o mi cs, not to speak o f being t h e spo n so r o f THE CARIBBEAN Staff. H e ha s ins tilled in u s the school spirit by h e lp ing us to give th e best carnival that Cristobal Hi g h Sc h oo l ha s ever ha d I t was through hi s initiative that we h ad a spec ial train to see Lindbergh h o p off," and also t h e train to Balboa when we won the flying colors" in ba se ball. The s ucce ss of our annual, our cla ss play, our graduation, and our many activi ties is larg e l y due to his h e lp. Our Principa l ha s the welfare of our sc hool at heart. H e i s the biggest b oos ter" we ha ve, W e kn o w that Cristoba l H igh Sch oo l will A ouris h under his wise and friend l y counsel.

PAGE 17

THE II J BENSON. Bmhplaa-St. Cloud, I\linn. /-lome .-1ddres;-St. Cloud, i\l inn. Name oj Secondary ScMol-T echnical High School. L OCfllion-St. C l oud, i\l inn. Col/ege or UlliverJil)'-Sr att:. T eachers' College. Dal n .7I1endrd-1917-IS, [919-:0. Dl'grus Ootained-Dipl oma. College or L'lIitt'rJity-Bradlcr Polytechnic Institute. Daln ..fflUlded-1 9'2'2-24. DeguI!J Obtained-B. S. Co/lege or Cni1!L'rsil)'-Universitr of i'linnesota. Dtlln .1I1mdtd-Summer Session, 1920. Favorite Exprnsioll-Stop rour talking now. Dau Emerillg Servi(( 011 COlla/ ZOllt"----Octobe r I, '924-Subju(J T allght '927 19.?8i\lanual T raining. i\I R. GEORGE BENSON. T o all boy s raking l\l allual Training and i\J e c h anical D rawing, l\1 r. B e n so n i s a w ellknown c haracter, but h e is a l so known to t h e remaining portion of t h e student body. M r B enson and h i s pupi l s proved to b e a valu able h elp at our allnual High School Carnival. T hey e re c t ed t h e tents and booths whic h w e r e a nece ssary part o f t!l e ce l ebratio n. i\lr. B e nso n ha s b ee n with u s several years, and is a familiar member o f the faculty. This year h e surprised u s by returning fr om the States with a bride . -\11 Cristobal H igh will gladl\' w elco m e Benson i f h e again r esumes his work with tiS next year, NfWIt'-i\IAR1' El.IZABETH :\iOORE. BlrlhplauW cst : \ Iexandria, P a. Alexandria, P a. S,lI/l( (>J Sutmdar.y Srh!)ol-\\'ashington H igh School. LocaliOIl-\\' shinglon, P:l. or \ 'irginia University. Daln 19:::3. Ob/ailll:d-A B. FarJoriu Expression-Now when I was at college, etc. D-l/e Entering Seruiu on Canal Zone-October I, 19'25. Su/:juts 'IIII/glit 19.?7lc.?8-Spanish, La tin. Spo1lJor for u;/m/ i\llss i\IARY ELIZABETH i\I iss i\lary Elizabeth i\l oore, our very popular Latin anti Spanish teacher, ha s been with tiS for J years. F o r '2 years s h e was the abl e sponsor o f the J tlnior Class, and condu c ted two of the best banq uets e \'er h e l d at Cristobal H igh S c h ool. This year s h e i s the s ponsor of the Freshman Cla ss Under h e r management the Fres hm e n gave a most entertainin g masq uerade part)'. F o r the first tim e in the histor y o f the H igh S c h oo l the party wa s h e ld in the \Vas hington Hotel B allr oo m. All o f the students enjoy J\1iss i\loore's classes, f o r s h e i s a vivacious and interesting teacher. Eve r yo n e i s l ooki n g f orward [0 her coming back n ex t year.

PAGE 18

I! THE CARIBBE: \ N. \'ame-CARkIE : \ SEWELL. BiTlhplau-Carbondalc, Colo. lIomt' .-Iddrus-Carbondale, Colo. ,\'ame ()f Suondm:\' Sclloo/-Carbondale Union High School. L owI /o1l-COlrbonciale, Colo. Col/egl' or L'niut'TJil)'-Uni\'c r s it)' of Colorado. DnuJ .tllmdtd-1911 1 9 15. Dt'grel'J OblililUd-A. B Col/egt' or Clli:-t'rsil),-St:1tc T e.lchcrs' C o llege. Dalt's .fumdd-Summ e r, 1 916. Co/legt' or of Oregon. D.lIt's .il/mJed-Summ e r, 1915. Fn'::oriu E>:prusion-'j.IOSI of you pupils do not even look at your Dalt' Enlt'rifiJ( Snda 011 Callal Zont"-0ctober 1,1925. Suhju/J T aughI 1 9.?719.?8-Algebra, G eomet r y Ph ysics. SpolIJor Jar u.hal Class-Soph omore. i\ I ISS CARRI E A. SEWELL. Carrie A. Sewell i s our l\Ia t h ematics teac her. S h e teaches Alg ebra to Freshm e n, G eometry to Soph omores and Ph ysics t o J 1I1liors and Seniors. \\'h e n h e l p i s n eeded in p e rplex i ng problems, propos ition s or experi m ents, l\t i ss Sewell i s our ready aide This is l\tiss Sewell's third rear with u s F o r two yc:ars s he ha s s pon so r e d the Cl ass o f 30. This year s h e h elped the Sophomores give a very origina l Lindbergh I lop" at t h e j\l as o nic T e mpl e. \\ c need her at Cristobal H igh Schoo l to answer O'Jr stupid questions that s h e never see m s [Q tire of answcring f o r u s \\'c hope that s h e will continue with u s for a long: time. NfWIl'-GRACE R. HESSE. S. D a kota .MdroJShelbyville, 111. EDUCATION . oj Suondm:.r School-Ann Arbor Hig h Sch ool. LIJUiIIOIl-Ann A rbor, i\l i ch. or of r.lichiga n Dalr J DrgruJ Ob/aintd-A. B Co/lt'ge or of Mic higan Da/rJ .1Ilwded-19'-3 19'-4. DrgruJ i \ o r l lI1Lrrsity-Nationa [ Uni\'er s iry o f l\l exiro 1Il wd,dSumrr:er, 19"21. FII(1or/'r sa be? /Jail' Emrrinx Stratu on Canal Zonr--Gctober I, 1926. S u oju/s Tau gh t 927 1928-Engli s h Spanis h S p onso r Jor what Clflu-J uni or. GRAC E R H E SSE. l\l i ss Grace R. H esse, our capabl e Engli s h and Spanish t eac h e r, i s admired by all o f th e students M i ss H esse's time i s occ upi ed n o t only b y t eac hin g, but also b y conducting th e B o)'s and Girls' Gl ee Clubs, whic h have, durin g t h e year, sung f o r the Y IV. C. A., Y. M. C. A., and the W oman's C lu b A s advise r o f th e .r uni or C l a ss, Mi ss H esse h e l ped t h e Junio r s to g i ve a very en t ertaining party. The s u ccess o f th e Junior -Senio r Banquet was also due to h e r h e lpfu l s ug gestio n s The l\l u s i c al R ev iew f o r our Carnival wa s composed and d irected b y her. \\'e appreciate th e h elp that H esse h as give n liS a n d h o pe t hat s he will r eturn n ex t yea r

PAGE 19

T H E CARIBBEAN. I } Name-E.l.f1I.Y RUSSELl . Birthplau Pine Bluff Ark Home Addrt'n q o 4 Olive, P ine Bluff, Ark. Name of Suolldm)' School-P ine Bluff High Schoo!. Location Pine Bluff, Ark. College or l/lIiversify-Uni\'ctsit)' o f Arkansas. Dalt; Atullded-19'lQ-19'l4. DegruJ Obtained B S. I -I. E. Favorite Expressi o n All R ight! Dale Entering Stroh ... 011 elma! ZOIl ... -O::tober I, 1 9'2 SuojWJ TallghI1927-/928-l'. S. H istory, H ousehold ;\rrs. l'liss i\1I L \' RUSSELL. Mi ss Emily R u sse ll, H o u se hold Arts and United States H i story t eac her, ha s been g la d l y hailed by Cri sto bal. As our H ouse h o ld Arts t e a c h er) s h e ha s help ed the girls to b eco me adept with th e needle. :\.Iso s h e ha s taught them to prepare many tasty, delectable (:is h es T h e girls dem o nstrated their ability by cen ing a din n e r to t h e ir guests, i\irs Sawyers, I\!r s B enso n and !\ii ss Gus l.lf son. I f one s h ould happe n to pa ss by th e library seco n d p e r iod, h e co uld see i\li ss Ru ssell ex plain ing t h e detail s o f L lnited States H ist o r y to a cla ss composed o f Sophomores B ec au se o f i\l i ss Ru ssell's ability to t eac h and her charming p erso nalir y, many students are eagerly looking forward to her cla sses ne::-;t year. Na1llt"-J\L'-RY B Bl1'Ihplact"-D ututh, ,\Iinn. .1ddrnJ-58zJ Oneida Street, Duluth, J\l inn. Nallu oj School-Ccntr;d H igh Sc h ool. Loca/ion-Duluth J\!lnn. or l'nil'ersiry of ;\ I ichigan. Data ... 1 Ii. lJt'J{rul Obtait;n/-A. B or Grnluate Ilork at Columbia llniver_ si}'. Da/n .111I'11dcd1924 SUllll1"Cr of 191-. Fm."Ortl" Exprasion-I cun this poem fOI to-morrow. on Ca!wlZou -October I, '92-. S"lj'cts T{l/.ght hm;n and Senior Engli<;h, U S. Histon', and J\loJcrn Ilistory. SptH/Jorjor wllfl/ C/aSJ-Swior. !\IISS \RY B. l\li ss l\Iary B. t\larvin i s a l so a new arri\'al at our H igh S c h ool. Sh e teac h es Fres hrnan and S e nior English, United States and ;\Iodern H i s tory. Sh e i s also the spo n s')r forth e "dignilieJ" Seniors an d supe r visor f o r the Feature Article secti o n o f THE C.-\lUIlBEAN. B ec au se o f i\l i ss l\l arvill' s exten s i ve Europe an trave l s, all of h e r c la sses are made extremely inte r esti n g desc ripti o n s o f pla ces she visite d whil e in Europe "oe s in cere l y regret t hat ;\I ar\'in does not expect to b e wit h u s next rear-but we ha ve tho roughly e njo yed her thi s year.

PAGE 20

THE CAR IBBEAN. CONTROL HOUSE. USS.TCXA5 GATUN "' .... ;,.. LOC K S ----,-' --, LOCK CHAMBER CULVERT

PAGE 21

THE CARIBBEAN. 5

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,6 THE CARIBBEAN. Nfll1U-Ethc l K atherine \Ves utlarl. Nicknll1lH:--"\\'e s tie." Birlhp/{l(l'-Kan s a s Cit) (\l i sso uri. Dnlt'J uly 26, 1 9 1 '2. Addrns-.J,oo SOUdl "an Brunt, K anS;I S Cit)". 1\1 0. Da/( of Enurin g C r i s t obal Sc h ool-Oc lober I, 1 926. Junio r. O lh r r Sc h aab 1l1mded Etifor C oming t o Z OIlt'Fntered first grade B alb o a C/rlJj Ojfil'f'S IIdd\ 'i c e P r esident, Cla s s o f ''28 School .1(/i vilin-I l i g h S c h oo l Carnival, 1 9'27 ; Supper Club, 1 9 25-26-2 7 S c hool Alhlt tics-Basket B all, I n doo r Bas eba ll, and T rack. Ftl'Jorilt' .\'prnsi o n Y ou're ( oo lin', Chosm Vocation -Private S ec r etary. What C olltgt D o V Olt E :'(pc (! t o Enter Bu sine ss Co l lege. H obby-Athl etics. Fa(Jorilt' ETHEL \\'E STi\'IAN. "Eth ics" and h er smile ca n never be parted. Eth el came to us fr om Balboa in her Junior year. Sin c e the n s h e ha s been a constant del ight both to her o wn cla ssmates and fa h e r numerous friends of C. H. S. She i s als o a s hinin g star in athletics 1 s it a w onder s h e was c h osen as a h e roine in our play? Her pep and popularity w ell fit h e r in the part of young Dule y. \\' h e n the r e i s a g ood tim e to be had, Ethel is the r e and h e r impe r sonations often l end to the j ollity o f the h o ur. Sh e ha s the art of t h rowi n g o n e into spas m s o f laugh ter. Nallu J ohn C. Klunk.. Niclwrwu-j ack. Birlhp/rut"-Colurnbus, Ohio. Dalr -ApriI3,1909. 1I01lu Ohio. Dlllr of Entering CriJlobal School-oclOber I, 1 9 1 6. Grade F irst. Otllf:" SrI/ooh AI/tndnl Coming 10 ZOllt"-None. Clfl.JJ Ojficn !lrld Secretary, Sophomore Class; Pr esident, Senior Cla ss Sc hool nclilJilinOrchestra, 1 925 26 27-28; Glee Club, 1925-26; Chorus, 1925''26-"17; Senior Class Pia)"; A ssistan t Editor, TH E CARIBBEAN, 19"17; Editor-in-Chief, TH E CARIBBEAN, [92 8 SrI/ool 19"1526 27-28; C apt:tin, B ase ball realll, 192 7 ; Swimming, 19"25-"2627-28; Captain, Swim ming, 1926 2 7 ; T rack, 1928; B asket B all, [9"17-"28; H and baJl, 19"17 ; T ennis, [9"17. Fti/Jorilr Exprn.riol/ You're a great man. CMUn Yoclll;oll -rvl u sic i an. IVlwl Colle g e Do Y'OIl 10 ElIft'r-Columbia H obb),-B a s eball. Pa.r/imt'-B aseball. J O H N G. KLUNK. J a ck's middl e name must b e "success" a s h e i s a s u ccess at whatever h e tri es H e i s an excelle n t music ian on t h e co rn et, at athletics he's a "whiz a certain proo f of his popularity and s u ccess in the fac t t ha t h e i s Editor-in-Chief o f THE CARIBBEAN, and Pres ident of t h e Senior C l ass. H e does n o t linger o n t h e ladder o f advance ment but reac h es the top. During hi s H i g h Sc h oo l career Jack's name ha s found a prominent place in everything h e ha s taken part ill, and t h ose are not f ew A s Barto n H aw ley, the v ill ian i n t h e Senior play, "Cupid Scores a T o u c h down," h e i s a dash ing c haracter. J a c k i s also noted for ha v in g a good, clear vo i ce w h ic h ha s b ee n a great h e lp to our sing in g groups

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THE CARIBBE A N ______________ ____ _______________________________________________________ 7 Naflu -Albe r t D a ys. Nirkllflme-D aysie. Bir,hplauAn c on, Ca n al Z o ne. Dfll ... 8, 1 9 10. H o m e Addrl"u-Cri s t o b a l C a n a l Z o n e. Da(( oj Ent e rin g Cri s t obal School-F e bruar y. 1922. Class Offices flelt/ N o ne. Sc h ool Ar(; u ;/in-Carnival, R ip V an \\'inkle," Glee Club, Orc h e s t r a. &1,00 1 -fl h/flirs-B a seball, Sw i mm i n g, Handball, B as ket B all. ... ExprtJJio n I '1I bet c ha. Choull VOCllli o n A ero n autical En g in e erin g I/? /Ifll Col!rgt Do Y OII E:O:PUI I O Enft'r-N o r tlHYCstern Univ e r sity. /lobbyB anjo, Violin. Fav or ;'t Pa sJi1luB a sej>all. ALBE R T DAYs. D a ys i e i s also c alle d Tiney Days. AI h a s man y a cco mpli s hm ents His fam e a s a v i o lini s t i s w ell kn o wn. ow h e i s o n h is way to b e a banjo p la ye r ) a n d h e will make th e g ra de w e f ee l s u r e a s h e i s a natural mu s i c ian H e was also d i sco v e r ed to have a good vo i ce Ofte n Days i e i s c alled o n f o r his d r awing H e i s alwa ys r e ady t o help his cl assmates A s an athl e t e Alb ert a l so i s good, a s a n y o n e w h o h as s een th e Hi g h S c h oo l games a n d s w im m in g ra ce s can t estify lI.lR 100663 Nmnt"-Gbdrs El i7:abe. h B ee rs. Nickllamt"-Gl ad E yes. B trlhplact"C o lurnbia, S. C. Dalt"-D ecem b er 30, 1 909. /lome 1ddrns-B ox 78, Watert own, Conn. Daft of Entering C r istobal School-Dctober I, '9"24 Of/ur Schools /lttnuil'd Bl"jore Com i n g /0 Zont'-Elpon Sc h oo l B i rmin g h : u ll, Ala. Class Ojjius Ihld-T reasurer So ph omore, 925-"26; Tre:ls_ ure r J unior, 19"26-"2-; Sec r e t a r y and Treasurer,Senior, '92-Sihoo/.iClim/it'S-ClrIlival, Operetta, [ 925; C arni \'al, 1 927; K l cplOma n inc, Su p per Club, 1925' 26-,-F(n'orilt' Exprt'Ssion Wh ere r'all goin'. Chost'll rOia/ion-Private Secretary. lI'hr/l College do ) '01/ .\"pu/ /0 Emfr B usiness co l lege. Ilobb_\'-Se w ing. FfltlOril e PaSl ime T a lkin g. GI.ADYS BEERS \\' h e n informatio n i s d e s ired, o r help n ee d ed w e all a s k f o r our G ladys. F o r th e la s t three y ears s h e h a s h e ld t h e r es p o n s ibl e p os iti o n a s Tre a sure r o f t ht:: C l a ss o f ''28 Gladys i s n o t e d f o r h e r ability in D o m estic S c i e n ce. \\'h e n th e Class o f '28 gi ves a party, s h e i s a t t h e h e a d o f t h e R efres h m ent C o mmi t t ee an d ha s g i ve n fam e t o our parties a s h a v in g go o d eats." H e r cle a r contralto voi ce h a s gra ce d o u r Gl ee C lub s f o r f o u r y e a r s Our Alabama" Glad)'s i s ever y b o d y's frie nd an d s h e will h elp yo u w h e n eve r s h e c an.

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THE CAR I BBEAN Name--R obert H Axtell. Nickname--Axie. Birll/plau-Stratford, Conn. Dille-November 5. 191 I. /-lome .r/ddreJs Bridgeport, Conn. Date oj EnUring Cristobal Scltaol O crobe r I, 19'24-Grade -Freshman. Otller Srhooh If/ended BeJoreComi l1g 1 0 Zone-Stra t ford,Con n. Bridge port H igh School, Bridgeport, Conn.,Ocrober, 1926, to January, 19'27. School naivi/it'S-Orchestra, 19'26-'17_ FarJOrile E,I,"preSJion-Something is rotten in t h e State of Denmark. Chou" YOlo/ion-Scientist. If/hal College Do YOII E.>:prcl to Enter-B ates College. Hobby-Swimming. Favorite PflJlime--lV lu sic. ROBERT H. AXTELL. "A" stands f o r Axtell and a l so f or "arguing" and th e two can easily be s p oken of toge th e r f o r "arguing" seems to be Axie's favorite pastime. H e would make a good debater or l a w yer, we feel sure. Robert i s also an excellent clarinet p layer a n d has p layed in t h e H igh Sc h oo l Orchestra for two years. F ew of the teache r s h ave eve r ha d to complain about his work, l e ast of all t h e marh emat i cs teacher. For he is unusually quick at un derstanding problems and questions t hat t h ose l ess proficient in this lin e find puzzling to say t h e least Robert can often b e see n h elping t h ose who do not understand the whys and w h ere f o re's of P hysics or Geometry. Namo!'-Emma Ellen B anks. NitKlIame-Bemma Anks. Birthplau-Colon H ospital. Dalt'-0ctober 14, 1 909. H o m e AddreSS-I 67, New Cristobal. Date of Entering Cri s tobal School-0ct ober I, 1916. Grade-F irst. Class Ojjius Held-Vice Pr esident, J unior Class; Chairman, Ser v i ce Committee, 1926; T rea s urer, Junioran d Senior Cl3sses, Assistant Librarian, 19'26-'27. School Atliuilin-Glee C l ub, 1 9'25-'26 -'27; Carni",al, 19'25 and 1 9'27; R ip Van Winkle;" T he J apanese Girl;" Cho ru s, 19'25-'26-27; The Kleptomaniac; Supper Club, 19'25-'26-'27-'28. School Alhletics-Track T eam, I ndoor B aseball, 1926-27. Fa/)orite Expressioll-Aw--. Hobby-Music. FtlUoriu Pastime-Swimming. EMMA BANKS. B emma Anks as s h e h as b ee n nickname d by her frie nd s, i s an important m embe r o f thi s Class o f '28 That s h e c an sin g i s attested to b y th e fact t hat s h e was in both Gl ee Club and C h o ru s f o r t h ree years, taking part in "Rip Van \Vinkle" th e Japanese Ope r etta and t h e "Mu s ical R ev i ew" in the Carnival at Fort D e L esse p s in 1 927 as w e ll. Bu t s inging i s n o t h e r only tal e n t f o r Emma plays t h e piano ve r y w ell also. At gym s h e also s h o w s abilit y in the way s h e c arri es out directors' in struc ti o n s S h e swi m s plays t e nni s bask e t ball and in doo r baseball with eq ual ease.

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THE CARIBB EAN. Name-Theodore E H enter. Ni(kmmu-Dutchy. Birthp/au-G o r go na, C a nal Zone DflU' i'1ay 2, 191 0 H ome AddreSJ-Gatun, C : mal Zone. Dale' oj Entering Cristobal School-October, 19'24. Grade -Fres hmen. School Aa/titin-Qr cnestra, 1 926-'2-. J oke Editor, '927-28. Favorit e E.l"presJion-i'-!ow--Chosw Vocolion-Ele ctrical En gineer. Hobby H unting. FaIJQr.1e' PaJ/il1lt'-Hunting. THEODORE HENTER. Dutc hy's genius i s s hown in the general abhored sc ie nce of Ph ysics, where nobl e minds have tried to swim and sunk. \\' h e n w e run across him o n a h oliday we are rem j nded of-"Blessings on thee little man Bare foot boy with c heeks of tan \\,ith his turned up pantaloons A .nd his merry whistled tune s." "Teddy" is well known for his ability t o p lay o n the saxophone. H e has be e n a great h e lp in the High School orchestra. W e all know o f his p la ce in the Gatun Boys' Band. ,vllme -Kalhryn Estelle Lambert. NhKllame-K ay. Ihrlhplllu-Anco n Canal Zone. Drlle-August 1 6, 1 910. /lome AddreJs B ox 1305, Cristobal, Canal Zone. Dale of Enlering Crislobal School-November [3, '914. Grade -Freshman Other Schools .-{umded Before Coming 10 ZOlle-Chestenown H igh School. School .fctivitieJ -Captain, Track Team, 192-; Captain, Swimming T eam, 191:; Glee Club Chorus, 1916-17; "Rip V a n \\'inkle;" Supper Club, 1915-16-17; C a rniv a l, 1916-17-18; "Kleptomaniac," 1926-1:. School AIMelin-Swimming, T rack, Gym, Rlsket B all, I n door B aseball. Fm :oriu Exprnsion-1s t hat so. Choun i"OClltiOIl1 n[erior De co rat or. /loDD),Fan c), \\'ork. Ffltlor;te pllJtime F anc}' W o rk o r Athleti cs. KATHRYN E STELLE LAMBERT. Kathryn s intimate a ssoc iati o n with the o ffice has made h e r a v eritable Socrates She has made h e r self indispen sabl e to i V f r. Sawye r and l\1 i ss Gustafson. Sh e is always busy. Kathryn ha s gained athletic fam e especially in swimming, also bas ket ball i s o n e o f her a chi evements as w ell a s trac k. S h e has be e n a c tive in sc h ool competitio n s to the advantage of C. H S. Her ability a s an actress has been w ell displayed in the Junior play, and n ow s h e i s very promi s ing in her part as the young gold d i gge r in the Senior play. Kathryn is a mu s i cian, too. Sh e i s one of the mem bers of the Girls' Saxoph o n e Band.

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20 TH E CAR IBB EAN. Name-Arthur E R othenberg. Nickname-Art. Birlhplau-F ort !\Iott, N. j. D(/Ie--November 9. 1910. Home Addrns-F o rt R andolph, Canal Z o ne. Dau of Enuring Crislobal School-Qct o ber, 1926. Grade-J unior. Olhtr Schools .1l1mded B tfore Coming 10 High Ph i l adelp h ia, P a., Town s h ip H igh School. Leona r do, N. J School nClirilit"s Carnival, 192--28; Ch orus, 1926-27. Far:oriu ExpreHio1l-Gee! T oo much work Chasm Voco/ioll-Engineer. Ilobb)-R eading. Fafloriu Paslwlt H unting. ARTHU R E. ROTHENBERG. \\' h en Arthur joined ou r ranks d ur ing o u r Junior year, o ur curiosity was immediately aroused to pen etrate his qui e t manner and to b eco m e acquainted Now we w o u ldn't sacrifice h im for six others, as h e ha s so co mpl e t e ly fitted into o ur group that w e would be lost wit h out his underlying current o f hum o r that adds to our pleasu re in his charac t er. Arthur's well-earned h o n o r s are re ce ived un assuming!)'. Arthur spe nd s many spare moments away fro m the haunts o f mankind (a l so w omankind) in th e tropical jungle s .Vamt-Evangeline Smith. Nickname-\annie. Birlhplace-B irmingham, A la. Dalt-February 5. 1 909. I-Iomt" Addrns-Cristobal, Can al Zone. Dau of ElllerillgCrislobaISchoolJ anuary, 1921. Grade-F ifth. Olher Schoo/; Allt"1Idtd B dore Comillg 1 0 ZOlle-Gor don S c h oo l, !\I emphis, T enn. School -1clit:ilits-" J apanese Operetta," Kleptomaniac;' Glee Club, 191,.-25; Cho ru s, 1 92,.-'25; Suppe r C lub, 19'24 -'25-26-27; Gir l s Ath l etic Edito r THE CAJUBBEAN. School dlMelics-B asket B a ll, Trac k Swimming, I ndoor R ascb:!ll. Fllllo n'l e E prtHio, t A w Gee! Choun "om/ion-Undecided. Ilobb),-R eading. fin-orilt Pa s /imr Swimming. EVAXCELINE SMITH. \"annie, the eve r-plea sant Vann ie, i s a bright and s hinin g light in athle ti c field s For yea r s s h e has been the "ol d faithful" in th e B a lb oa basket ball games a n d a g loti o u s "faithful s h e ha s proved. The track team's backbone was a l ways V annie. I n fact, a sy n o n ym for athletic ability in C. H S is-"Vanni e And s h e i s a real pal. .Many a vanquished soul stru ggl ing along the weedy path o f ed ucati o n h as s h e h e lped. To know h e r i s t o love h er

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TH E Nal1u-B e rn a r d E d w a r d Lowande. Nickname-E ddie. Birt h plau-B o un d B r ook, N. J '2-, 1 909 H o m e A d d ress-54' S T e nnis Ave. Diner. Ph iladelp h ia, 1>3. Dal t oj E nt ering CrisloDal School O ctohe r I) 1 9 16. Grade-Seco n d C IIlJJ Offices H el d V ice P r eside n t, So ph omore C l: 1 SS; Pres ident, Junior Class. Sch ool A i vifit'J-" R i p Van \\'inkl e, 19'26; C a rni\ 'a l 19'27 ; Glee Club, 1 9'25-'26 -'27 28; Ch o ru s 19'25-'26-'27-2 8 School Alhli'licJ-Baseb all, 1 925 '26-27-'28; B a s ket B all, 1925-26-27-2 8 ; Sw immi ng, 1 925 -261 7' 2 8 ; T enn i s 1 92 7 ; H a n d ball, 1 9 2 7. Fauor;/ ( Exprtu;otlH e keeps it to h imself. Chosw Vocatio n A v i ation. I-Iobb),-Baseball FalJor i t e p flJli me-A t hlc tics. BERNARD EDWARD LOWANDE. H ey E ddie H e i s equally p o pu lar wit h t h e b oy s an d g irls. Edwa rd k eep s u s gu ess i ng a s to what h i s true c h a ra c t e r i s H e i s t h e ma n o f th e m o m ent, t h e h e r o o f Cu p i d Score s a T ou c hdowll." Eddi e mu s t ha ve h i s joke and t h e l i f e o f t h e o b j e c t o f it, is o n e o f l o n g t e a s i ng. i\lan y are th e girls w h o m i s s their trinke t s bra celets and h an dk erc hiefs-to h a ve t h e m s u d denly appear in his po ss e ssion and he l e ad s th e m a lif e o f misery unti l t hey arc r e t u rn e d. But E dward can al so be a s serio u s a s t h e h e r o o f t h e S enio r p l a y, h e was well c h osen Alt h o u g h h e d eserted our g r oup f o r a tim e b y g o ing t o Ph i l ad e l p h ia h e soo n r eturned to co m p l e t e t h e journ ey abo a r d old C. H. S V e' re gla d to have y o u wit h u s Edward Namt'-ZonelJa B liss. Nickname Z one. Birthplflu-Anc oll, Clllla i Z o n e, Dflu -;\Iovcm b e r I 1 9 1 0 Addr rs J -Crist o b al, Can a l Dau o j C"; J / ooal ScI,ool-oClober, 1 9 1 6. Clau O.ffie(J "tidSecretary, J uni o r Class Sch o ol A e /i viluJS up pe r Club, Or c hesl r C ho r us, Glee Club. Srhool .. 1IMi'lieJ-B asket B all. FatlonteE. \p/, tJJion -J'd like t o a s k a q u estio n Cl,oJtll W hal Colltgt D o 1,101l E.,(PUI 1 0 E"u/,Oberli n Busin ess C o l lege Faaoriu PllJllnu Tcnnis. ZONE LLA B L I S S O h Z o n e, w hat's th e En glis h a ss i g nm e nt?" Thu s w e alwa ys dep e nd o n t h e d e p e n d abl e Z o n e lla i s o n e o f t h e f e w who ha ve f ollo w e d thi s cla ss fro m t h e g r o un d up, t h r o ug h t w e l ve l o ng years o f l e arnin g H e r vio lin tal e n t i s w ell kn own b o t h in an d outs ide o f sc h ool. Sh e ha s led t h e Suppe r Club a s p res ident w ith a firm bUl patient hand t h i s ye ar. A s l\Jr s C o nn o r s, t h e moth e r in t h e S enio r p l a y Cupi d S co r es a T o u c h d own," s h e i s an a ss ur e d s u ccess Zon e lla i s a w o r k e r an d a r e liabl e o n e a s ha s b ee n proved thro u g h h e r sch oo l ca r eer. A s w e g lan ce thro u g h h e r H i g h S c h oo l cale n dar w e a r e s urpri sed th a t o n e g irl ha s attained so mu ch.

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THE CAR IBB EAN. Naml'-LuciaSalazar. Nickname-Sucia. Birthplau-David, Re public of Panama. Date D ecember 17. 1 908. Home Addrus-Co1on, Republi c o f Panama. Dolt' o j Entering Crhlobal Scnool--ocwber I 1911. GradeSixth. Othey Scho o l s AI/ended Bejoye Comillg 10 Zone-Panaman School. School ...Je l;uiliu Kleptomaniac;" Chorus, 1 91 4-25-26-27. Fat -orill' Exprt'JJiol1D own with Ph },sics! Choun f/o{flfioll H ouseho!d Art I nstruction. f/obb)'-T o read. FafJor Ie Paslillu-To play the piano. LUCIA SALAZAR. Lucia is another joy to the heart o f i\l iss Sewell, because of her wondrous adventures in the r ealm o f Phys i cs. L esser s tars gasp at h e r marvelous adventure in the r ea lm of Physics. Le sse r stars gasp at her marvelous understanding o f that stud y the cause of many a downfall. Alt h oug h she i s s h y and somewhat r e tiring s h e is an important factor in the Senior Classfar more important than s h e guesses. Full many a student owes his rise to h er She never refuse s to aid. She is not all athlete, 'tis true, but s h e is a splendid student. Oh! that ther e wer e more lik e h er. Sho\\ing Steam e r in Gmun Lo c k s t o Tra n sit the PanallJa Canal Southbound,

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TH E CARIBBEAN. '3 C L ASS HISTORY. l e I By Kflf/lr),11 Lambert, '28. L ooking back ove r rhe history o f the Class of '28 1 am remi nded o f a t r ip through t h e Panama Canal. I see m to see a Phantom Ship b earing t h e name Cristobal High 'icltocl and flyin g its colors of purple and gold. ] n my fancy its crew seem to be my sch oo l fello w s, its officers) my teac h ers. The Canal repr esents the f o u r years of training in High S c h ool and each set o f l oc k s signifies the advancements w e h ave made from yea r to year in the four classes. \ V e, the Class of '28, who ha ve s u ccessfully w ea th ered OUf journey t h roug h "The Canal of Learning" are n o w ou t o n t h e sea of "Self Support," h aving jus t passed th e Bu oy of Gradua-cion On October I 19'2+, w e entered T he Brea k water o f t h e Fres hm an Cla ss." This was a year of exc itement, when we first learned to look down upon t h e eig h t h graders and t h e grammar sc h oo l s tu dents. \Ve n o tic ed many landmark s o n o ur journey to "The L oc k s of the Sop h omore Class." The most important was the initiati o n N ext in lin e came the par ty whic h we gave f o r t h e w h ole crew and the oRicers of ou r good ship Cristobal High School B y the time we rea c h ed t h e "Locks of the Sopho mor e C l a ss" we had lost man y o f our passengers. A s w e passed through t h ese l ocks t h e landmarks becam e m ore num ero u s \Ve t h e n continu ed our journey to the H L oc k s o( t h e J uni o r C l ass B y t h e time we reached t h ese lock s ou r g r oup o f pa ssenge r s ha d grown s m aller a n d some of o ur o l d passengers h ad l e ft and n ew iii ones replaced t h em A t t hi s time our journ ey took on a more interesting aspect, as most journeys do when t h ey are nearing their end. The work grew h eavier for us and n ew types of work appeared. No one will forget t h e Junior-Senior Banquet which o ur captain, i\liss D odds, reid us was t h e b est s h e had ever attended in her seven years as captain of the Cristobal High School. \Ye s l owly passed out of t h e Lock s of the.r unior Class" only to enter the" Locksof t h eSelliorClass." The first landmark of importance was the roll call which made known to us t hat seven of the g irl s and five of the boys who had started on the journey were still with u s and t h e other boy had joined tiS at the L ocks of the Sophomore Class At t h e L ocks o f the Senior Class" we c han ged captains. The first step which our new captain took was to organize the staff of THE CARIBBEAN. After these m embe r s had straightened out their afl-airs, we began to make ready for t h e Senior Party. H aving p assed this landmark we made ready for the Carnival. \Ve presented "Cupid Scores a T ouc hdown" under the able directi on of I\lr. Robert Shortly after this the J unior Senior Banquet was the daily topic (or disclission. Day b y day the very last landmark of our journey, the one which marked t h e end, grew closer, the Bu oy of Graduation." \Vebeganatonceto make ready for embarkation and soon we will be scattered far and w i de, and h ope by this histof)' of t h e C l ass of '18 to keep the life of the Class of '28 fresh in you r minds alwlYs. Monuznenl lO Builders o f Panama Railroad, H Olel Washinglon

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THE CARIBBEAN. 1 __ __ _________________ T H E __ C L A S S _\\_ I L L ________________ ___ : W e, the C l ass of '28 of Cristobal High School, being about to give up the g host, and having b ee n examined and found of sou n d mind, bod y and memory, do hereby make, and publi s h and declare this to be our last will and testament, b e fore advanc ing into the unknowll fut u re : T o the m ost aspiring Class of '29 we allot thelotin "Monkey Hill,"-lVl o ullt HopeCemetery, wherein repose the dead and buried privileges of S e niors, past, and present, mostly past, t ha t t h e Class of '29 c h eris h and place wreath s t h e r eo n keeping the e ndeared m e mory o f t h e deceased ever gre e n. Robert Axtell w i lls his pla),ful wa),s to R o)' \V alker, his eye s h ade and h is arguing to Randolph Orbaugh, his s low wa lk to L ilybel Cox, and his melodious voice displayed in Senior Englis h C l as s to Morris Luce. Emma Banks wills h e r sou lfu l eyes to \ Vood ford Babbitt, h e r pearls to Mi ldred Bath, and h e r good patronage of the telep h one company to Dorothy H e im provid e d s h e u ses t h e l egacy faith full),. Gladys B ee r s wills h e r South ern brogu e to Vir gin ia Stevenson, h e r use of the typewri te r to Adai r Taylor, who ha s already been practicing on it, her dri ving lic e nse to Mario n Bo o m e r, h e r wind blown bob to Miriam A rthur, and her abil it y to talk to Vita L yew. Zonella Bli ss wills h e r art of a l ways knowing h e r l essons to R o bert Edwards. Alb ert Da)'s wills his speed in baseball to Pa u l Hayde n, a f ew inc h es o f his stature to R oge r Deakin s and Mik e Gree n, and wit h much reluc tan ce his nickname of "Tiney" to L ee Kariger. Teddy H ente r will s his understanding o f Ph ys ics to L o i s \Villiam s his happy-go-luc ky attitude to Gre t c h en Palm, and his canoe trips to \ Noodfo r d Babbitt. J ack Klunk will s his pull with th e girl s and t h e t eac h e r s to Royal Hi ggason his popularity t o Fieldon Bradford t o b e added to his own suppl y, and his part a s v illian in the Senior p lay to Porfiri o D e R eute r. Kathryn Lambert wills her r eig n in the office and her r ight to a n swe r th e telep h o n e to Margaret Hayes, and h e r tardiness to class es to Betty i V [ on tgomery. Edward Lowande wills his punctuality o f getting to sc h oo l at one seco n d to eight to J ack Pettit, his motto "After i\1e Y ou Come First" to Teddy Brandon, and his part as h ero in th e Senior play to Vin ce n t Lug li. Arthur Roth enberg wills his good marks to Fieldon Bradford, Vincent Lugli and L ee Kari ger. Luci a Salazar will s her l ong curls to Rosemary K eene and Blanca \ ,Valk e r h e r Spani s h d icti o n to Charles Crum, and her abilit y to b e see n and not heard to Morton Southard and V irgi nia Stevenson. Evange lin e Smit h wills h e r ability t o a lways have a fountain pen to l end, to Morto n South ard, and her abi lity t o t ran slate Latin to James Quinn. Ethel \Vestman wills her s mil e to Ruth Banks, her dimpl es to Mario n L owa n de, h e r h eig h t to "Sis" Hackett, her literary ability to Eth e l Barnett, and her vamping the boys to R ose mary Keen e T o L ee Kariger and An it a Rankin we w ill a year's growth before entering the Seniordom. T o t h e Junior boys, t h e Senior b oys will their grace in wearing l o u d t i es T o t h e J unior girls, th e Senior girl s leave their seats at th e Banquet tabl e, t h eir yells at the ba se ball games, and t h eir parts in t h e Senior play. To the w h ole sc h ool, we will our b oo k s, our l ooks and our nooks to b e c h eris h ed ever a ft er. [ N W ITNESS THEREOF, we ha ve set our sea lin g wax and h e reto subscribed our John D oe's and Mary Blank's, this first day o f June, nineteen hundred and twenty-ei g h t Anno D o mini \-Vi tn esses: Sand fleas. P a lm Trees Gentle Breeze. THE SENIOR C L A SS OF' ''28.

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T H E C:\RIBBE -\N. ---!I'; 1 $ 1 C I. ASS PROPHECY .!j; Drama/is Personae. J\Ir. K lunk By HI.\lS":LI l\l rs. K lunk ETHEL \ \ 'EST",'! \N Plfl(t'.-Riversitie D rive, New York, 1935-Timf.-.1 :1.111. AIrs. J..'/unk.-"H ome again at 3 P X. Staying up with a sick friend again, or perhaps a lar-e meeting at Tammany where YOLI seem to be so popular lately?" A.'/ul1k.-"\\'e ll, YOll see it was this wa)'--." 1 \ /rs. K/unk.-"All rig ht, Ict's have the weak explanation." A'!ullk.-"Yoll remember D ays, don't H e just dropped into ;'\Iew York after a around-the world flight. H e was out celebrating, so I decided to ce lebrate roo \\'e climbed in hi s plane and took ofr f o r a hopelawn to Birmingham. \\'h en w e were wal k ing lip the street Days tol d me how h e had run into Gladys the last time he dropped ofr there. She had married a millionair e, J Pierpont t\Iorgan D oolittl e, who made hi s fortune manufacturing hairpins since long hair came back in 1 930 She told" Daisie" that Emma was making fine progress in t h e law profession. She hold s down a job with a probate court; her main is to settle disputes between disinherited relatives." ,\Irs. A"/unk.-"\\'ell, what did you do when you arrived in Birmingham? Don't try to avoid t h e su bject!" A'/unk.-' I bought a paper on the way up the street, and read \\ h ere Axtell had constructed a 'loo-inch telescope, and mounted it on a 'peak in Darien' to hok for lost planets. Say, by the way, I heard that down in Panama, L ucia is the head o f an international c hain of drug storeS j also down in that neck o f the woods, Teddy Hentt:r is a c hemist in the Gatlin waterworks. Oh, yes! says that I.owande is a star foothall player, learning from experience acquired in the Canal Zone," "On his round-theworld Right Days stopped at the South Sca I s land s where A .rthur Roth c nberg is e ngaged in the \'er), profitable bu siness of se lling wooden nutmegs to the unsuspecti n g natives. Arthur, of course, is acquainteu with Zanella, who is a missionaary in an adjoining island." "Kathryn is the head profess o r in a secretarial training school. Evangelin e runs a rest-cure sanitarium for tired business men a[ Porro B e llo, the n ew h eal til resort at the start of the trans-Isth mian Highway." ,\In A '/u nk.-"\\'e1I I 'll forgive this time for such late hours. I'm glad rOll met Albert because it's a l ong time since I ha ve heard anything (rol11 the Class o( '28 o( C. I -I. 5." R.J.l!ing Water::; from SVillway Gates Dashing against Budge 10066-1

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2 6 TH E CARIBB E A N Cwtltlll 0/ Noral Air Statio". COClISolo, C.Z. Cristobailligh School from the Ai r showing.City of Colon.

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THE CAR I BBEAN. 27

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T H F C ARIBB EAN.

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THE CARIBBFA:"I. .IU:-':I O H5. i\I IRIA.\\ :\RTHl"R-l-ier lo\c (?) of Spanish I' :lnt! her long blac k hair. \\"OOOr-ORI) BABBITT-I lis love (?) of Spanish II and hil> basket ball fame. l\IILDRED BATII-Her stately w al k and her smile. ETHEl. B \RNETT-I Ier smile and lack of enemies; also her abilitr to b e humoro u s. i\I AII.ION BOO.\lER-llef boyish hob and her t:lilored clothes. F IELDON B RAD,Olm -l-iis bigjade (?) ring anti h isp:tI" H iggie." "1')\'" BRANDONHis A (?) recit:ltion in History class. LILYBEL Cox-H er Southern dialect jokes; also her re semblance to Peter P an. CHARLES CRl:MH i s l ove of s houting P hooee" and his poker f :lce. P ORFIRIO D E RrETER-The h e le:H'esclass parties and his love of playing basket ball with the girls. ROGER. DEAKll';-I-ils inches up from his feet and his soul(ul g lances. ROBERT EDWARDSH is "rackett" on the tenruscourts. "l\ItK" handsome face, h is baseball (ame, and the dOwnC:lSl look on some o( the girls' (aces since he left. "SIS HACKETT-H e r continual "Charleston" and her perPAUL H AYDE:-IHisability to pitch and his 10\'e o( basket ball: also O ese, Dat and 001. l\lARGARET HAYEs-ller c hildi s h ways and her giggle. DOROTHY H E l M Her meek manl1t::r ;tnd her lack o( R O \'AL I-hGGASO:-l-l-lis ungodly hdlow and h is rcrpetual I don't agree." LEE KARIGER-His love (0 o(Spanish [l, hisshortstatllre, and hi s l o ve o f tormenting t h e girls. ROSEMAR\' I\:EENE-The future H igh School Gym teacher ";"\1",:-;-1" smile and herlo\'eofmusic, swimming, and corresponding. i\\ARIO:-;-Lo\\ 100' e of college and her ability to get to sc h ool on time. i\]OR.RIS continual grin and talent at "tickling the \'ITA L\'Ew-ller jet black hair and the continual presence of her name on the I 1 01l0r R oll. "BElT"" l\\ ONTGOi\IER\"-l-Ier halm of coming t o sc hool late and her h appy-go-Illd.;.y ways. OROAl 'GH-i-lis resemblance 10 Doc" \\'ebstcr in the Collegiate Series; ;lIsa his willingness to hclpatclass affairs. GRETCHI::.N PALM-H e r demand for class ducs and her a bili t\" to play the piano. JACI-;. PETTIT-I lis quiet wars, his deep bass voice, hi s s lick hair comb. and hi s baseball (;'me. .-\:-IITA in the rellow car and her abilit\ to flirt. \"IRG]",]A STE\'Exsox-Her to sing and the fact she is such a good pal. ,\ SOl'THARD-I l is oratory in first period Engl i s h Cl ass :lnd his ability to draw apes. ADAIR T AYLORThe P:lrtICS she gi\'cs and h e r becomllHz blonde bob; also the mysterious letters s h e in first period in the afternoon. Ro\' \\'AI.h.ERHis mop or c url y hair, his yello w C;lr, and hi s :li>thenic dancing. PAcHEn-.--\lthough Sam entered late and his picturc isn't here, \\e will list his name. H is quietnei>s and hi s spunk \\ hen I t comes to answ e nng b :!c k. L Ot" \\'ILLtU1S' Iler lo\e of good times, her attracti\eness and the f:lct s h e h:ls:l B lue Heaven." Station at Gatun sho\dng Gates of Spillway.

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THE CARIBBEAN.

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THE CARIBBEAN. 31

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32 THE CAR IBB EAN.

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THE C ARIBBEAN. 33 01 RECT O RY. Name. :,\lickname. P astime. P et expression. -------------!----------I----------------------------------Baile)" W illiam Birke land, E lsie Blauvelt, Elaine Bliss, R ae B rad f ord, F ieldon. Breteh, B us h i\1argue r ire Campbell, J ames C rum, Ralph D a r ley. Elsie D ays, Frances Doar, E l ise Doar, L illian Eberenz, Ruth Fish bough, Edmund F itzgera l d, Eleanor F rank, Leah Ganzemuller, E elyn Hanna, Robert. Harr is, Beatrice ] ] e n te r, Alice Herm a n P a u line J oyce, Rita Logan, H elen. Lugli, Vincent i\l:t her, J ack i\tartin, Charles i\iaurer Kenneth l\l elendez, Victor f!.lundberg, Anhur Napoleon, Washington Newman, W i lliam P arsons, Scott .. Quinn, J ames Raymond, D ella Sargeant, Sc hmoll,l\1artin .. Sc h ulert, i\l abe l ... Sp ragu e, L ouise Stew: l rt F red Thi r lwa l l (I.'lavis .. Urwile r E leanor .. \\'o n g, Francisco W ikingst:ICI, W a lt e r W heeler, Estafania.,. (l.l iss Sewell (Sponso r ) ?.IR lOO66---.S "Apo", '. A ngel Face" "Timie", "Stalic" "Peggy". "Gigg!es" "Bones ":\ ndre\\ Jackson". "Shorq'" "Frangypany" Elise" "Lil" Ruthic" "Fish" Fitzie" "Frankie" Levinsky" 'Hanna". "Bee" R lanelie" C. H S. "Shrimp" Loganberrr" Patuch" Handsome" "Chubby" "Pest" \'ieks" .. "Fitl)'''. Lanky" Jimmy". B ridger". Dik". D oc Webster". bells" P rofes sor" dS tew .. "i\1avie". Boots" Francis" .. Wicky" .. "ESler" "Carrie" .. Fi s hing R eading .. P laying "Stingy W o m an B lues" B eing with C o nnie Writin g notcs Blu s hing Studying Dan cing Stud}ing Being Yo ilh Tinsie D ancing Se\\ing ing Ihe piano Fis hing :'\'at missing a movie Being busy T alking to the bop: Canoeing Tic kling the i\'ories Dreaming Studying Cae sa r Whis perin g Getting her lessons. Pin c hing gir l s F lirtin g Getting baYoled out l. o:lfing. Correcting people Talking Bein g inconspicuouo;;. Teasi n g Grace P l aying the "sax" L 1king pe ople laugh Tellin g jokcs i\l isspelling hi s name 1 \ lemorizing The dielion:lry GctTing her lessons. RC;I(.Iing H arv:lrd Cla ssics. T o cat, slee p, and drink with radio. D riving the F ord F lirting Studying Pla}ing the cornet R eadi ng SwiTrming .. Don't be an airdalc." W ell, I 'll be d:Jrned." "Good gracious." "Oh, m)' cow." )'"ou don't 6a}." "Who's next." "Really." ".'\w, he ck." H ang it." "Oh! Really." "Ya, llamas." "Darn it." "Please dOIl't:' "Don't be funny." "1\'o(hing much." "It's the truth." "We ha\'e n 't heard." Heavens. "Awl" Don't bc all idiot." Says nothing. "Oh, how smelly." "She's crazy." ';Quit yer kiddin g. "Gimme a kiss. "Be a sport." "Come on." Laugh, I that I'd die." "Use your h ead, man." stop." Hasn't anl'. "Kissss." "\\'atch out." "\\'hat next." "Oigeivah." Ha! Ha!" An ything in the dictionary. ";-'l y goodness." "Oh! that's cas)'." "Stay sober." Ha Hal" "Would you beJie\ e it?" "=..:/_i. ... "Come all, gu)'." "All's well." "That's enoug h."

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3 4 T H E CARIB BEAN Peeled H ead [fRESHMAN ONITII\TION Run D--/You Run What IS It ?

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THE CARI BBEAN. 35

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THE CARIBBEAN.

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J oyce .-\lbcrga James :\lbin Stella A.rthur Ernest B cq;er Berger W illiam 8 1am'clt W illiam Bodden i\larr Br eten Crawford Campbell D aniel Coffe,-Edward Conkling D orOlh), D allo\\' Frank Drake Hodmall Drake A dele Dcngar R uth Du vall \'irginia F bcrcllI-F .lbian E ng1.1ndcr Eri e F erguson Edmund Fishbaugh L eon F ishbaugh Eleanor F it1:gerald B asil F r.lnk i\larion Godwin An tonio G onzales Burton H ,lcket t Parker Hanna Beatrice Harris Beatrice H omel Grace K eegan W illiam Keepers D avid Ketchum THE C:\RJ 37 STARS. i\liss I\loore, C.'IlJ! .ldr:iur "Silence," Carlo:. Rankin, Presidml, Ge!>tt:." Robert B rough, rice Pr:'Jidw/ "Seen and Heard" L illian Hou!>cl. tllld Trramnr. "She's a Sheik." Edw:ord Albm, '\/ra 1< ... ""nockout "Stella Dallas" T he P oo r;'\' lit. "Tht: Dress P;:rade." "The Denver Dude." "The Runaway Ford." "Smilin' Thru'." T he Sap." T he Scarlet Youth," His i\l:tjestr Bunker Bean. Doroth y \'ernon of H J.ddon H all. "Sir-Gal-I -\\'is h I H ad." Beau Sabreur." T he D ancing Girl." "Along Came Ruth." Red Hair." Rookies." ) T he \ 'olga Boatman." ''The Life of "The P ioneer Scout," T he Fi\'e O'Clock Girl. " T he Lone Wolf." T he Skyscrnrcr." Johnny Get Your Hair Cut." F igures Don't Lie." Hula." "The \\'oman on Trial." "The ;'\'ebraska W ild Cat." "A Little B it of :\'othin'." I Lllnbow Redly," B elding K ing t\Llrie Kleefkens Zoe i\l:tnual Kenneth i\laurer E ugenia i\Ic L ain ;\l:trg,lret ;\Iisrahi i\l.rg:lret ,\ I uchell I brold i'.! ueller i\l arion :\'edr i\lary Paner ... on Cleta P hillips \\';va P hillips B lanc,\ Pulgar Ann,. R yan i\l artll1 Sdlmoll J u,tllIta Schofield :\loh.1 Slocum John Stetler Theo, Thcoktiste Be\ erly Turner G eorge Wertz :\Iice Westman D orot hy \\'irtz Louisa Whitehead Eugene Will iams Ben Will iams Raymond Will V eronica W ilson i\l:trgaret \\'yatt The End. "A Son of T oil." "Swim, Girl, Swim, "Chinatown Charlie." "The Campus Flirt." T he W ise Wife." "Slide, K elly, Slide." "Sadie Thompson." "The H eaven." "We're in the i\'a\'y ;'\'ow." "White P ,tIlts W illie." "Tillie the T oiler." ";'\ow We're in the Air." "Get Your i\lan." "Sallie of the Sawdust," "The Tempest." "Little ,-\nnie Roonie." ,'enuerfoot, ";\ltckey." B everly of Graustark." "The B lack Pirate." ";'\'uR'Said." T he Little Shepherd of K ingdom Come." "When Babe Comes Home." ";'\'aughtr Bu t Nice. "Simple Sis." T he F air Co-eel." T he Student Prince." "The SpIder." "The Patent Leather Kid. "She W as Just a Sailor's S"eet_ heart." "For the I.ove of i\l ike,"'

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THE CARIBBEAN.

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THE CARIBBEAN. D ERELICTS; HUMAN O R OTHERWI S F. Rober! J/ .. -Ix/ell, '28. GRAN D PR IZE S H ORT STO RY. 1 $ [ R ohbers Still at Large." T h us screamed out the 2-i:1Ch headline:; o f Col on's m orning paper, T/Ie Tribune. The column went on to relate how two thieves had broke n into the Front Street jewelry store and b e fore t h e very eyes o f the paralyzed n i g h t clerk, haclmade off with a large packet of uncut diamonds and were la s t see n boarding t h e night freight for Panama, immediate ly after quitting t h e fear exit of the s hop. The c lerk, coming to hi s senses, ha d notified the police, w h o in turn, stopped t h e freight at Gatun, only to b e met with no traces of the escaped criminals. Only olle clue had been attainable. The purser o f a large immigrant ship lying in the harbor had notified t h e police o f the disappearance o f two third-cl ass passengers, and p ictures of the same ha d be e n forwarded to the authorities, wh o had ha d the m publis h ed under the screaming headl ine s o f t h e aforesai d Tribune Littl e did Roy Smith of Gatun think of t h is, however. Roy was a IJ-year o l d boy in the eighth grade. H e and hi s chum, Bill Martin, wer e preparing f o r a morning' s outing in theircayuca upon the island-dotted waters o f Gatun Lake. "\Ve l l, Bill, w e had b etter put in t h e canteen f o r we might get thirsty, and] don't favor drinking lak e water unless ] have to." Y eah! That's a safe bet, Roy. You'd better put a fla s h light in too, if we are goi n g to board that old s hip. 1t migh t b e dark d o wn b e low." The ship alluded to in thi s conversation wa s an old boat anchored tip in t h e lak e J t ha d been there a long time, and was put tip in an i s land cove lIsed as a sort of ship's boneyard. The two boys put of l' in thei r cayuca for t h e island u p t h e lak e Afte r paddling for abollt an h our the i s land was n eared. "vV ell, Bill t h e o l d i sland seems to be about abeam now." "Yea h, and o u r o l d boat, the Mary F., seems to b e moving right a long, too. \Ve ll, let's cut arou nd the point of the i sland. I know a s hort cut, but the c hannel i s full o f stumps." \ V ell, t h e n, B ill, yo u co m e bac k here a n d take the stern paddle and see if yo u can get through without hitting about 'steen stumps." The cayuca sped forward under t h e r e n e wed vigor o f their strokes. Now and then t h e boat w o ul d give a r oll to o n e s ide or w o ul d b e s hoved oR" its course, and a d ull scraping n o ise w ould b e heard on the bottom, signify in g t h e co lli s i o n with a stump. This amounted to nothin g worse t han a trifling annoyance, and t h e boys made fun out of it by seeing how few stumps t hey cou ld hi t. "Say, Yo.j're some navigator, yo u are How much farther are we going, anyway?" "Aw, Roy, you just keep your s hirt o n and by the t im e we hit about two m o r e stumps you'll see the old s h ip herself." A few hundred feet m o r e and they w e r e in a s h eltered cove wh e r e the o l d s hi p lay. S h e had been o n ce a good s t eame r bu t was now abandoned. S h e was o pen to the capri ces o f t h e mild, tropical weather. Both of t h e boys remarked h o w picturesque and q u ee r t h e scene was with mass iv e trees on t h e bank nearly overreachin g h e r dec k s as s h e was anchored stem a n d s tern. 1 t see med strange that such an exampl e of man's maritim e progr ess s hould b e see n rotting away in the jungle bo r de r ed waters of t h e tropical lake. The r e s h e lay, h o wever, with ferns g r o win g in the damp corn e r s o f h e r d ec k and o l d canvas awnings flappin g in t h e breeze, while ro t te n ropes trailed overboar d into t h e pensive waters of t h e la goon b e low. On h e r f o r e most crosstr ees roosted a lone bird of the jungle, the only s i g n o f l ife in t h e drowsy heat of t h e land locked cove. Let's tie lip h e r e to this ladder in t h e bow and we'll go aboard. You ca n go up first, Bill," sai d R oy B ill s uggested t hat Roy go up first as h e was the heavier and t h e ladder appear ed som ew ha t rotte n. This, however, was only a cover f o r h i s ow n r e luctance to board s u c h a s p oo k y looking craf t. Both boys were soo n aboar d her, and a l t h ough t hey s p o k e in subd ued vo i ces as the situatio n

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THE Ct\RI LlBE:\;-.I. seemed to d emand, they both w e r e e a ge r [ 0 sec w hat the o l d ship containe d. "Say, B ill," s aid R o y, "did y o u n o ti ce that fir e ax lying on the d ec k and those spiinras b es id e it? I t look s a s t h o u gh so m eo n e w c r eaboard, doesn't it ? "Rig h to! But n o o n e c om es away Ollt h e r e you know." "Nevertheless I have a hunc h t hat som eo n e has been h e r c but w e h ear nothing o f him at present. Oh, w ell! \\'e might a s well f o r ge t abollt it," observe d Bill. L et's go into the forec a s tle and take a look bdD W to start oR" wit h." C lambering cautio u s l y down into the l i ghte d f o r e ca s tle, and brushing a s id e cobw e b s a s t h e y descended, rher finally r e a c hed the c r e w's quane r s On r ounding the co rn e r o f the bulk h ead t h e y suddenly came upo n two r oughl oo k i n g men sprawl e d a s l ee p o n the dirty matt r esses spread on the floo r. Both o f the b o y s stoppe d o n tiptoe in blank amaze m ent. A s B ill wa s t h e f o r e m os t h e came to s u c h an abrupt stop t ha t h e brace d hi s hantls agaill s t t h e bulkhead opposite him in s u c h a manne r a s to pe e l off a large cake o f ru s t whi c h fdl on tht: floor with a crash, awakening the s l ee p e r s "Schmidt, w e're took," s hrie k e d t h e wid e r awake o f the two m e n, "Beat it." The m e n das hed d o wn a dark pa ss a ge wa y l eading into the f orward hold. The tho u ght o f the morning s h eaulines flas h e d thro u g h the boys' minds. I n s tin ctively t hey plunged a fter t h e m un til th..:y r e ali ze d t h e danger o f a p oss ibl e e n counter w ith t h e t w o "Sro p, Bill! They'r e liabl e to com e bac k and k ill u s if t hey com e to the ir se n ses!" exc l a im e J Roy, who gra s p ed the situatio n. Let' s shut that ir o n door, and w e will ha ve the m .. Summoning all the ir stre n gth the t w o b o)'s manage d to s wing the p o nder olls ir o n door upo n its h in ges Sh outs arose fr OIll the e n trappe d Ille n w h o r e31il.ed the ir d es p erate pli g h t a s they h eard the bolt d r o pped. The boys rus hed o u t and climbed over s ide illto t h e Paddlin g they ca m e o u t into t h e GatunE sco bal laun c h route. They h ailed the first pa ss in g launc h, whi c h happe ned t o be bound f o r Gatlin. I n fift ee n m i nutes they were a s h o r e in Gatun and in another n\'e were abo a rd the p olice l aunc h with the \1m)' F. in tow, b ound f o r the o ld s hi p \\' h e n the p olice boat r e a c h e d the co v e, the anc h o r wa s dropped, and the boys, f ollo w e d by the two office r s o f the lak e p o l i ce f o r ce jumpe d into the c a y u c a and padd l e d quickly to the ship, w ent into th e h o ld. and afte r a s h ort SCUm!;!, br ought the m e n out handc uff e d and carrie d t h e m ahoard the launc h. "\\'e ll, boys," s aid offi ce r D o nn elly "you ha ve those two robbers wh o b ro k e into the Col o n jt;:w e lr y stor e ni g h t h e f o r e last. They stol e a c a yuc a and hid aboar d t h e o l d ship, thinking safe fro m d i scove r y l!ei I A;-.I OLD "ISIT T O F O R T S .-\;-.I LORE:--:'ZO. B y /rood ford BII06111, ( B es t J un ior Stor y.) ------Stede B o nn et's s carre d and w eathe r b eate n face wa s v e r y pal e as h e watc h e d the wate r g radually ri s ing. T h e light in th e room c alll e fro m a flic k ering torc h, w h i c h thre w a l ig h t over t h e wate r. Tht;: room in w h i c h h e wa s confin e d wa s b e l o w t h e l e v e l o f the sea, whi c h h e c o ul d faind), h ear, b eating o n the r oc k s in fr ont of t h e f ort, Fort San I .or e n zo The h o l e through whi c h the wate r wa s ente rin g the room wa s at t h e l e vel of the se a at l o w tide. (The tide ri ses only a f e w f eet.) A s th e tiue rose the stream o f wate r inc r e a se d in s i ze \\' h e n the chambe r wa s fille d Steci e would b e drowned. M R 10066---6 H e had bee n h e r e onlr a s h ort time and already the salt wate r had r e a c h ed his wai st, e n t ir e l), co verin g th e ston e b e n c h to whi c h h e wa s securd), fasten e d. The level w a s ris in g Hi s fate wa s inevi t abl e The e v e nin g b e f o r e Sir H enry i\l o r gan, t h e fam olls En glis h pirate wh o wa s so a c t i \ 'e around Panama during the midd l e seventeenth ce n tury, ha d p e r so n ally o r de red Stede and a noth e r rna n D ayton, to go as hore a n d see i f they could gain entra n ce to Fort San L o r e nzo. Ther we r e t o hring him :l r e port as to t h e stre ngth o f t h e f ort, and the b es t meth o d of attack.

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. p THE CARIBBEAN They h ad landed nearly a mil e up the coast, in a small boat, about six o clock \\,ith a great deal o f hard and dang e r ous c limbin g they r eac h ed the moat in the r ea r of the f ort. They lay t h ere until i t grew dark, watching the walls all the time. There was o n e p l ace in the wall which seemed t o be lower. I t was just w h e r e tw o sentries m et, and was very dark, b eca u se the light fro m th e torches in the sentry b oxes did not p e n etrate that far. They noti ced t ha t th e sentries alwa ys stopped at the light at each r ound, so that there was an interval o f f our minutes during which time n o o n e was on t h e wall. Finall y, a s t h e guards parted, Stede and his companio n slipped into the moat. Sil e ntl y they sw am ac r oss gainin g the slig h t embankment between the wall and the moat, just as the sentries returned. They la y there, hardly dar ing to breathe. \Vh e n the guards again departed, Stede, climbin g onto his mate's s h o uld e r s, qu i ck l y sca l ed the wall and sl id down the oth er s i de. H e was the first o f many o f i\l orga n 's men who would enter t h e f ort in th e next -+8 h ou r s. I n a s hort time h e h ;td all the information necessary. Just as h e was abo u t t o climb th e wall his heavy cutlass hit against a ston e, attracting the attention o f t h e passing g uard. The latter ca m e ove r to investigate, and Stede stru c k h im down with a blow f r o m his cutlass The guards on the wa ll, attract ed b y t h e co nfu sion, se i zed Stede as h e attempted to climb it. H e was t a k e n before the Spanish Commander a n d questioned. A s he had give n no information and had b ee n ve r y disrespectful h e was sentenced to death b y drowning. H e was placed in a dungeo n for the r es t o f t h e night. In the morning a h eavily armed guar d had come and taken him to the death chambe r. H e re they left him, and now the water wa s gradually ris ing. In the last half hour h e had n o ti ced that th e booming of the surf h ad increased, and was now a deaf ening roar. The water wa s up to his s h oulde r s now, and as it crept s lowl y upward, it made his sc alp c raw!' H e r ealized that his e nd wa s very n ea r. Now th e wate r had rise n above his mouth; it would soo n cover his n ose and cut off all p oss ibl e m eans o f breathing. H e wa s straining against t h e straps that bound his h ead, to bury his face in th e water and e nd th e t e rribl e torture Suddenl y a trap door, directly ove; his h ead was thrown open and a ladder quick l y put dow n. His comrade o f the night b efo re, spatte red wit h blood and carrying a smeared cutlass, tumbled down the d ived into the s wirling water and hurriedl y c arri ed Stede up out o f th e dungeon. \\' h ey they at last r e a c h ed t h e o p e n air, Stede, dazed and weak, sa w that it wa s n o t th e surf whi c h ha d caused the terrible booming, but that it had b ee n the guns o f th e pirate s hip s his s hip s Ev e r ywhe r e about him w e r e m e n that h e knew, not Spaniards. \Vhile goi n g to r e port his strange e xp erie n ces t o his ge n e ral, h e stumbled over the headl ess body o f the Spanis h C o m mander who had sente nced him to death. F ort San L o r e nz o an impregn abl e fortr ess, had easi l y falle n into the hands o f Sir H enry I\l o r g an just in tim e to save the lif e of one o f hi s most abl e assistants. i. I SOLD I ERS TWO. I !fil By Hl'll'n L o,{on, 30. ( B e s t Sophomore StoryJ J\.I Y DEAR IEeE: lf, as you say, you ca n write a book from story I w i s h yo u all the Ilic k in t h e wor l d. I am trusting to your d i scretion not to mention t h e names of my twin brother and myself. A s for the others, I shall change them to suit my fancy. YOli will remember, probably, my reputation all through college was quite bad. I gambl ed and drank continuousl y, but things we n t on a lright until my senior year. I wasalwa ysluckyatcards and that yea r so m eo n e pull ed t h e o ld gag about c h eating I had take n it befo re, but this parti c u lar p e r so n wa s so ins i s tent that w e had a frie ndly argument. The n h e grabbed a gu n a n d whe n I tried to get it away, it w ent off and s hot him. I was just drunk e n o u g h to r ealize that 1 h ad to get awa y o r ruin the family name and f ortune, as well as Phi l's chances 1 J on't r e m embe r whether the r e were any witnesses o r not, but I kn e w a trial wou l d b e the last straw. D ad was hard and

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THE CAR IB BEAN. 4 3 I'd have had to leave an y wa y B ette r that mother s h ould think me justgone. O f my trip west I haven't the slightes t r e m e m brance J 11 San Franc i sc o 1 e nli s ted f o r Panama. 1 r e m ember n o ti cing the m e n in the same g r oup with me, and it took m y min d off m y troubles They were all difl"e r ent t y pes, but the r e wa s o nl y one wh o took m y fancy. H e couldn't h a ve b ee n seventeen, but J h eard him ans w e r to tw enty-one He wa s o f a s l e n de r athle ti c build with a quic k al ert look about him, a s if h e had b ee n through many expe ri e nc es in spite o f hi s youth. On th e boat 1 saunte r e d over to whe r e h e s too d "Got a match?" \ Vith ollt lo oking at m e h e put h i s hand in hi s p ocket, pull e d out a b ox and handed it to m e 1 saw it w o ul d b e hard to break hi s r eserve, and the wa y to d o i t w o ul d b e t o a c t a s aloof a s h e B e f o r e the boat dock e d w e w e r e buddi es At fir s t ever yo n e grumbled, bu t w e all liked it after a whil e Most o f the bunc h w e r e o l d time r s, and I had been thro u g h Panama b e f o r e se v e ral times, o n v i sits, so w e kn e w the place a little From vague sources I had h eard that 1 wa s sup posed t o have g o n e to Canada, to China, to Nicaragua, to Chicago, to have commit ted s ui c ide, t o have becom e a rum runne r and othe r s u c h foolis h id e a s The pape r s wrote it all up, o f course and t h e ge n eral" wa s supposed t o be v e r y angry. That d id n o t matte r any m o r e But the most important thing wa s a lways o mi t ted. I c ouldn' t find out wh ethe r the man had been kill e d o r n o t The n Phil came down. H e wa s an officer in the M ed ic a l C orps had been thro u g h \\'est P oint, and wa s quite important in a r m y c i rc les, es peciall y m ed ic al. Luckil y I wasof a t y p e whi c h s eldom attracts es pecial attention. H e d i d n o t e v e n n o ti ce m e H e .vas a t an enginee r post, and I wa s in th e infantry so h e never saw m e One d a y a g r oup o f u s w ent o u t hunting m y budd y and 1, and three othe r s, wh o had comedown with u s \Ve had a lo-da y pass A t t h e e n d o f fiv e days things b egan to look ugl y The t h ree othe r s w e r e a lways watching u s with a half-s ly, wil y glanc e That afte rnoon the Kid a s m)' buddy wa s c alled, came t o m e and s ai d : "Ste v e I'm w o rri ed. Martine z and the othe r s are planning to 'go ove r the hill.'" After discu ss in g the mat t e r w e decided n o t t o interfe r e They coul d n o t f o rce u s to go. I t was n o t our place to make t h e m r eturn, excep t t hat w e mi ght b e a ccllsed of ai di n g t h e m to escap e On t h e s i xth d a y t hey tol d u s \ V e hadstarte d to turn bac k but they s a id t hat t hey wo ul d need all the provi s i o n s Plai nly, w e wo ul d go w i t h t h e m o r starve. A nati ve was to g uide t h e m a lo n g the coast t o Costa Ri ca; f ro m there boat s w o ul d take the m to d iff e r e n t por ts. N o o n e tho u ght a b o u t o r questio ned our past, but the Kid had evidently had som e ex p erie nce with affairs o f this t y p e H e m o t io ned me to be quie t. \ Ve'li g o o n f o r a wa y At least till w e can get som e prOVl S 1 o n s It w ent o v e r prett y w e ll. That nig h t w e stop ped at a native shac k that had b ee n deserted. B y the time w e had eaten a n d t h e fir e was d y in g into embe r s in the c lear a n ce ligh t in g up the grim, surround in g jung le our plans had b ee n made. A s w e sat in a c ir cle wa i t ing, t h e q uietn ess g r e w oppress iv e, t h e oppress iv e n ess gre w te n se) and finall y t h e Kid nudged m e a t t h e same ti m e ris in g and str o llin g into th e hu t There i s a great deal in taking a s i t uati o n psych o log ically E ve r ything wa s d o n e c a s uall y 1 pulled t h e pipe o u t o f m y m outh, kn oc ked t h e a s hes alit. "\Ve ll) it look s lik e t h e Kid and I wo u l d turn bac k to-m orrow." The b ig S wede, Arisen, was on h is feet. "Vat! Y o u tink you t a k e dose grub? I t wa s thre atening Farman g r owled "Shut up, le t m e hand le t h is)" as h e p ulled t h e Swede d o wn. The n 1 h eard a v o i ce b ehind m e, and its coo l ton es made m e w onde r j ust how m u c h t h e Kid w o ul d mind killin g a few people. ] f yo u ge n tl e m e n will b e so good as to r e m ai n se ated, perhaps we can discu ss t h is quietl y H e was h a n dling a p retty littl e a utonntic a n d l eaning coolly a gainst t h e door. The Swedejumpe .. and stared open mouth ed at t h e gun. Pri v ate property. Comes in handy somet im es yo u kn o w," t h e K id ex plained. Then sharply, we'r e going back ) a n d yo u're co m i n g al o n g I f yo u want to 'go over the h ill,' w a i t until we'r e not al o n g J u s t f o r a n in s t ant T saw Far m a n look s idewa ys with a malic io u s s mil e Fro m i n s ide the

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THE CAR I BBEAN. hut a knife appeared, and the hand that helci it wa s one I had never seen before. 1 fir ed t h e Kid fired over my s h o ulder, and as 1 wheeled in stinctive ly, ] saw Martinez fall and Farman pull a Col t automatic from somewh ere The sce ne, as 1 remember it b e f o r e I went down, impressed itselfindeliblr 011111)' mind. The Swede stood out plainest in th e savage surround ings, because o f his tall, h uge frame as well a s h is fairn ess of compl exion The coa l s were a lmost Ollt, and Dilly a faint glow illuminated the scen e lighted up the dark green of the jllllg i e and dis closed the body of Martinez who had f allen with the knife still cl u tc hed in h is hand. The r e wa s a heavy, sweet odor of tropical flowe r s, an d after a last report,l r e m em b e r remarking to Farman, w h o still crou c hed with a h eavy smokin g gun. \\'e ll, I'll see YOli later, o ld chap," as I s hot f o r the last time The n I must have been unco n sc io u s f o r so m e time, and wh en I awake ned, I wa s in the h ospital, and Phil wa s leanin g over my bed. H e s miled t h e o l d familiar s mil e that wa s typical o f his quiet wa y I've learned to love that s mil e, and I knew t h e gam e was up. "Steve, yo u certainly had it over o n liS d idn't you ?" "Sir?" "None of that. Dad bough t yo u out yesterda)'." "Pardo n sir, but 1 don't understand." Never mind. T h e bo y d idn't die, and besid es, young H ampto n had been watching fr o m the window." The n 1 must have cried. P hil hel d m y h ead s a y i ng "You po o r ki d \V e were a l most too late." Once a year now, Phil and the Ki d now Secon d L ieu t enan t A. J \ '\'eseiey, and] have a sort o f r e union. A s an Army Chaplain, 1 am ver y happy, and wh e n you and young \ \Tese ley are married, I 'll b e as contented a s an o l d man can b e Phil i s a f a m o u s surgeon now, and since yo u are hi s niece, there will be a churc h full o f important peo pl e at your wedding. Y our hu sband-to-b e i s very brave, but ve r y bashful. J 'II leave him the task o f explaining h ow w e c leared hi s record and sent him through the academy. Also you mus t find out from him h o w h e h e ld off t h e othe r s, and took care of m e until Phil and hi s m e n arrived. Now, m y dear, 1ll1ust go to see som e o f the m e n in the hospital. Your devoted uncle, FATHER STEPHEN, S. J 1 e I THE CAPTURE OF OLD PANAMA. e l By Fabian Eng/tinder, 31. (Best Freshman StoryJ Governor Arias had received a n o t e from l\forgan saying t hat h e would appear within the year and that h e w o ul d take the city. M o rgan hadjustcaptured F ortSan L o renzo. Since 1 wa s a personal fri e n d o f t h e governor, h e tol d m e that h e was very worried. H e at o nce sent out an order for stronger fortifications and more sol d ie r s. The work of f o r tifying the c ity and training the men went on speedily. Ships, laden w i t h gol d from Peru, we r e corni n g into port every few d:tys. Soon, however, the ships comin g in told of tht: hard time they had keeping away from t h e English. Finally, one day, news was bro u g h t to us that Morgan was coming. The govern o r was very distressed, but nothing happened in t h e next few days so we thou ght n o more o f it. Months passed and still no sign of M o rgan. (l learned afterwards that h e had taken hi s ships apart on t h e Atlantic s i d e and had crossed over b y land to the Pacific s id e and had pu t the m toget h e r on Taboga I s lan d.) F our m onth s passe d wh e n finall y we saw four Engli s h ships com e into th e h arbo r. They started firing at tiS and we fired back. Our m en w e r e SOOI1 fri ghte ned a s the Englis h we r e pretty good marks m e n. T hey had bl o wn big h o les in the Cathedral wh e r e many p eo pl e had g a t hered to pra)'. J ord e red m )' f e w belongings taken to a cave justoutside the city The gove rn o r by this time, was panic stric k e n. The guns in our forts, which had been bo o min g for som e time, s uddenly stopped firing. Our m e n cam e pouring out o f the forts s a ying that t h e English had b lown our guns

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T H E CAR I BBEAN. to pieces. B y this time the people were leaving the city and it was getting clark. The governor p laced a heavy guard over all the city walls. The monks were taking the silver and gold from the churches and burying it in the secret underground tunne l s T h e rich Spaniards, after turning thei r valuables over to the m o nks, were buying lip mules and horses and escaping in the direction of Porto Bello and SOllle of the interior settlements. The next morning, when I went to the governor he sai d that he wanted me to command t h e left wing of the arl11)'. H e had the soldiers a lready lined lip. I proposed stayin g inside the walls o f the city, f o r I knew that iHorgan cou ld not have men, but h e refused, and when we saw the Englis h advancing, we wenl out in army formation to meet them. \\'e had some natives drive bull s at the enemy, but the bull s broke loose and scattered. T h e fighting began. men fought bravely f o r a while, but when the,-saw the other wing had R ed and they were being surrounded, they turned and R ed toward the c ity. A large number of them were taken prisoner a n d killed. I escaped because I had hidden in t h e cave. The governor had been killed during the battle so t h e re was no onc to govern the people The Englis h began to loot and to torture the peol le T hey killed the 1110 nksoutright if the)' did not tell were t hcy had hidden the gold. T hey took some of the richer people for ransom. After mllch plundering, the Englis h set fir e to the c ity. The next day 1 thought everythin g was all right so 1 left Illy cave. The city had been burned to the ground. A s J came into the public square w h o s hould I see but and his mep. I saw at once t hat it was usele ss to try to escape, so ] was taken pri so n e r. Horribl e thoughts fla s hed t hrough my mind a s to how he wou l d kill me. I t w a s a long tiresome trip across the Isthmus \\'e had very little food and the Indians w e r e constantly s hooting at u s At last w e reached Porto B ello. \\'e were all taken 011 board the ships and put in chains until we s hould be ransomed. That night was a miserable one for me. The next morning i\lorgan came to our ship. had on board 16 monks who were trying to get someon e to ransom them. The" asked i\lorgan to let them go and to h old a ;ich girl instead. \\'hen h e heard this, h e ordered ever y o nt! of them to b e killed and had their heads hung up 011 the s hip's yard s .I thought my turn would he next, but it didn't come. ordered the g irl to be given a sum of m o ney and an escort to take her across to Panama City. \\'hen they came to take me back downstairs ther told me that I would be killed at sunset the next day if some one did not rans')m me. T hey onl y had one man on guard that night as there were onl y a few of us lefr. I f o ul1J a piece of file br m)' side and was soon at work gettin g the rusted chain oR' my leg. This did not take vcry long. I then got m)' knife from my b elt and waited until the guard came. As it was dark h e could not sec m e and I soon had him laid out o n the deck. I pulled him in behind some of the chests and after putting on his c loth es I waited for morning. At daybreak 1 went on deck and asked the captain for a boat to go a s horc. H e gave it to me after I promised him part of my supposed plunder, .I had not gotten more than a thousand yards when 1 heard the report of a pistol. I knew, then, that I was discovered so I rowed as hard as I could. I d id not wait for the boat to ground. I jumped from it and ran toward the jungle. I heard the s hots whizzing br, but none of them more than grazed me. I hid up a tree until it was dark fearing that some of Illr pursuers might b e around. At about eight o'clock J started for Panama City. \\' h en I reached the ci ty, J found that the few inhabitants who remained had decided to move to another place seven miles awa),. They thought that the new place co ul d be more strongl y fortified. An Isthmian I -lighwa}.

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THE CARI BBEAN. u ss I AIR I PLANE CARRIER SARHOGAj ........... ......... RECENT To ISTHMus One of I'W e" La. ANGEI. .. E S R ut En Rout .. WOIU.O rRf04011t Av..O\l OIl.s L. B""L,oJbergh ."d, e o s l es at F"nee

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THE CARTBBEAN. 47 I i ALL H -\[L! COLO:-.rEL U:-;OBERGH! B y Emma Btwks, '-'!S. All, on e ntering Cristobal school this morning of mornings J anlJary 26, 1 928, were greeted with an air o f intensit)7-a feeling of excitement and expectancy. Quickly the joyous news reached ever y ear. "\\'e'r e going to France F ie l d on a spec ial train to see Lindbergh hop om" The g raded sc hool marc hed in files The H igh School wa s left to take its own course. Some skipped, some ran. Breathl ess l y they climbed the train, and soon the long line of cars pulled out with laughing, singing, chattering children. At France Fi e ld all interests concentrated upo n catching the first glimpse of their hero. S oo n a D ouglas transport plane landed. Colonel Lind-BA I ANAS G \\,l:-.rE BY. Bananas' Bananas! Ripe bananas gwine by! Come missu s, t e k a look! Bananas! Six fo' a nick e l; 1'2 fo' a dime!" Such i s the cry of an old co lored woman se llin g bananas to make a living. She l ives in a large tenement house in one of the many alleys of Colon. Every morning rain or s hin e s h e rises at 5 o'clock in order to begin h e r sale of bananas before anyone else. Her clothes are always clean, but of course not all of the latest fashion. On h e r head she wears a piece of soiled cloth wound around it, somewhat lik e a coolie [Urban. This i s nece ssa ry because on it s h e carri es a big board in the form of a waiter. 1t is filled wit h rip e bananas. S h e carries it on her head all day, and never once does it fall. 1 t is really remarkable. \\'hen iVlanHny, as she may be called, finds a customer she is very pleased and talks the whole time that s h e i s selli ng. Her conversation may be heard to be-"Y es, i\lllm, dey his luR y dis marnin'. Oh! hain't you going to take more t han that? P lease, i\li ssus, dey really ham I11ce. Dere, das a good lady. I'se gwine to give h e r hextra fa' dat. Good-bye and tank yo u Mum. H i'll come agin timmarrah." bergh had taken e i ght "lucky" people up' clicking cameras and straining eyes, Lindber g h climbe d out and calmlr walked to the hangar wh e r e the "Spirit o f St. L ouis" was. The n the gates of the hangar were thrown wid e and soldiers pu s h ed "The Spirit" on to the field . Again the I dol of the Air" made hi s entrance. Afte r rhe m echanic ha ... 1 tried the motor, Lindy donned his a\jator's helmet, s h ook han ds with a few o f hi s personal friends, and climbed in. h e wa\'cu t o t h e eager throng, glided a c r oss th e fie l d anJ into his kingdom-th e a tl11osphe r e THE B)' ,1rllll/r R Olhmbl/ r.'l.. '28. after night I h eard it. Always th e same irregular cadence of knockin gs coming fr o m off in the distance. Somehow, it always sug g es ted som eo ne hitting on wood. \\'henever I heard it, r omantic fan cies o f savage Indians far ofF in the dense .:ungl es b earing o n t OIll-toIllS and performing their wild dances would come to 111)' l11ind. One night I h eard the sound lo uder than u sual. I t seemed to com e from an island a s hort distance from shore se izing a fla s h light, I rushed to the beach. A.t fir s t I heard nothing; then to 111)' hearing came the same irregular r)'thm of wooden thumps, but this tirne followed by mighty splashes. Upon looking clos elr in the direction of the noise, I perc e ived a dark, m ovi ng blur o n the water. I t moved in a large c ircl e and finally approached the beach where I stood. Turning m)' light on it, it proved to b e a caruea containing several fis herm en, who had been laying a se ine. \\"h en I inquired the source of the knocking and splash es, J was told that fish erman when laying sei n es beat on the boat and wate r with their paddles to scare the fish into the seine. So p eris hed my fan c ies o f Indians, jungles, and drums.

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48 THE CAR I BBEAN. !/: !fi PEACE DECLARED. e j B y blybel CO,\', '29( Honorabl e II< Ah lan d a t la st!" S o ex claim ed J im Thorpe lookin g t h ro u g h rh e p ortho le upo n rh e outline o f the land whic h was to b e the h o m e o f hi s n e w adventures H e wa s anxiolls t o make a s u ccess o f the w o rk whic h mi ght p l ace hi s name amo ng the f o r e m os t e ngin ee r s o f the day The comme r c ia l w o rld demanded rh e e x change o f prod u c t s b e tw ee n e a s t and w es t ill t h e s h ortes t p ossible tim e Thus th e pro j ec t o f th e Panama Canal. And young Jim was o n e o f the e ngineer s det ailed t o w o rk o n th e l oc k s o f th e g r ea t wate r way Afte r the stre nll o u s w o rk o f drawing plans o rgani z ing d e tail s and a sse mblin g mate rial s Jim b egan to feel the need o f companio n ship. The m o noton y o f the tro pi c al h eat b y day and the cries from the jungle b y night did n o t furni s h e n ough e x citement. One d a y whil e wande rin g among the inte r esting ruins o f o l d Panama) h e had a mi s f ortune to fall and hurt hi s ankle \\' hil e sitting 011 the ground w o ndering what t o do n ex t ) h e h eard vo ices. Gla d that som e human b e in gs w e r e in c allin g d i stance, h e s h outed f o r h e lp. Muc h t o his r elie f a party o f fin e people soon loom e d in sight. D o n P ed ro, hi s daughte r, Rosita, and hi s two son s a n d the ir guide w e r e r eturning fr o m a fis hill g trip. The injured man wa s carrie d o n a has til y made stre r c h e r t o t h e ir ranc h h o use. The injury, altho u g h not sev e re, k ept him in bed f o r several d a ys E ve r y kindness wa s s h own him b y hi s host and many a ple a sant h our was whil e d away in tea ching the young se n orita to understand the Englis h lan guage Afte r hi s recover y h e r eturned to his w ork but n o t b e f o r e h e pro mised to com e a n d see his b e nef ac tors. M a n y happy week e nds wer e s p ent at the r a n c h and the fri e ndshi p soon became a lasting one. One m orning the o v e r see r r eceived an unusuall y large quantity o f mail. Amo ng the letters wa s an offic ial enve l o p e b earing Thorpe's name The n e w s it containe d was b oth deligh tful and d isappointing. H e had b ee n promote d and this m eant hi s g o ing bac k to the States H i s n e w field o f w ork wa s t o b e in the Mi ss i ss ippi Valley. The n ex t d a y h e w ent to bid hi s n e w fri ends fare w e ll. It wa s hard to s a y good bye and R osita's sorro w wa s n o t hid d e n. His w o rk in the States las ted f o r sev eral years The n came t h e anx io u s e x citing d ays o f the \"orld \\'ar. Thorpe wa s o n e o f the fir s t o f Ame ri ca's youths t o rall y to the Col o r s Afte r a f e w m onths o f hurried drills at t raining camp hi s c ompany wa s sent o v e rsea s Du.ing the gloom y dreary days of t h e fall of 9 7 whi le som e sol di e r s w e r e working on a bridge, a b omb d r oppe d from a G erman plane damag in g the bridge and taking a heavy toll o f life and in juring many Thorpe wa s sever e l y w ounded anJ was knoc ked un co n sc io u s \Vh e n h e awake n e d h e f ound himself in a field hospital. Tt seem e d that h e d r eamed o f a coo l hand place d o n hi s f e v e rish bro w. I t was in r eality f o r an ange l o f mercy was standing n ear murmuring) "Oh, J im! D o you n o t r e m embe r your old fri end?" H e stared and trie d to r ecall, but, soon exhaus t ed, h e f ell into a s woon lik e s lee p. The n ex t m orning t h e angel said, "It i s m o r e seriolls than the injury to your ankle but I hope t o have the same s uccess in making y o u w ell." The n h e r e m embe red! R o sita, you have twice been m y b e n efactress T hope some d a y t o r e w a r d you." She o nly s miled in ans w e r. Afte r p e ace was declare d a ship b ound for Panama carried i\1 r. and i\[ r s Thorpe on their h o neymoon. T H E S H O RT STORY CONTEST. The s h o r t story contest wa s eagerl y s p o nsor ed by t h e l i terar y a spira nts o f t h e hig h s c hool cla sses. Storie s o f all descrip t i o n s were h a nded in, and t h e r e was a wea l t h o r materia l to c h oose f ro m. IVIrs Grune w a l d Mrs Kidd, and lVf r. Cun nin gham w e r e the judges wh o c h ose t h e win n ing s t ories The Staff sincer e l y apprec iates the se rv ices r e ndered b y t h e judges during the con t es t.

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THE CAR I BBEAN. T H E SAN BlAS INDIANS. B y Vil a L ),tw 29. The San BIas Indians liv e o n i s lan ds l ess than in th e ir no ses and ears n o rin gs o n th e finge r s a hundre d mil es from Col on. These i s lan ds are until th ey a re m a rri ed fr ee from m osquitoes, flies and wild animal s The f a th e r o f th e g irl makes all m a rria ge a r The I ndian s cultivate littl e patc h es o f co rn, range m e n ts S h e does Ilot l e a ve t h e p a rental y am s canc and rice on th e mainland, an d UIl-ro o f in s t e a d t h e hu s b a n d lives wit h h e r f a mil y lik e Illos t un c i vilize d p eoples th e ir w o m e n d o wh e r e h e b eco mes m ore o r l ess a se r val'[. The littl e w o rk in th e fie ld s They arc not a war lik e fath e r naturally c h ooses o n e wh o will b e a goo d rac c pre f e rrin g a p e a ce ful ex i s t e n ce to o n e o f w o rk e r f o r him. F o r this r easo n g irl babi es a r e fighting and blo o ds h ed, but are capable o f th e mJc h m o r e w e l co m e am o n g th ese Ind ian s than m os t savage practices wh e n o n ce r o u se d. F o r amo n g most un c i vilized tribes The r e a r e n o g e n eratio n s they d efie d e v e r y attempt t o c i vilize ba c h e l o r s o f e i t h e r se x amo n g t h e San Bia s th e m, h o l d in g th e ir stand ar d o f ra ce l\latrimo n y i s uni ve r sal. above all else They rigi d l y enfo r ce th e rul e that The ir lan g .Jag e i s v e r y s impl e co n s i s tin g o f no strange r s h ould pass th e night o n th e ir s h o r es abo u t 50:J w o r ds They ha ve n o numbe r s b eyo nd Until 1 0 years a go th e San Bia s tribe wa s an t e n an d ha ve n o way o f reck o nin g t h e ir a ges abso lutel y pure ra ce o f p eo pl e Am o n g th e m are f o un d th ose strange fr eaks They are p eculiar in th e ir appearance having o f nature-white indian s The y ha ve th e u su al dwarf-size d b odies an d lar ge, b o x lik e heads. dwarfed b od i es but th e i r s kin s a r e absolute l y Their f eatures are co ar se but even, an d th e ir colo r i s mu c h lik e that o f th e N orth Am erican r Ild ian. The m e n w ear cotto n bl o u ses an d trOllse r s, whi c h th ey make the m se l v es The costumes o f th e women and girl s ar e b o th unique an d pre t ty The fronts an d ba c k s o f th e ir blo u ses ar e o f v ari o u s co l o r e d mate rial s and th e ir s kir t i s a lon g piece o f c1o+:h wrappe d around th e b o d y and ru c k ed in at th e b e lt. The w o m e n w ear rings T H E DESTRUCTION OF T H E CANAL. B), David KelrJl/{11/, 'JI It ha d b ee n rainin g f o r three w ee k s witho u t stopping o n ce Gatun Lak e wa 5 ris in g at a f e arfu l rate Communic ati o n with th e o u ts i de world wa s imp oss ibl e The wir e l ess ma s t s w e r e wa s h e d away altho ugh th e air w ould ha ve b ee n full of interfe r e nc e to have sent r eal m ess a ges an y wa y N o n e c ou l d go out with out ris kin g lif e o r limb in th e stree t s that ha d tllrn ed in to b e d s o f ragin g rive r s i\f an} r o f th e h o u ses w e r e being wa s h e d awa y F orts Sh erman and R an d olph and th e Nav al Ba se w e r e un de r many f ee t o f water. Gattln Spillwa y straine d to th e utmost, c ould hold no l o n ge r and c ra s h e d The n an o ld and supposedly e xtin c t v o lcan o jus t outs i de th e breakwate r erupted Sl owly th e ] sthmus b eg an to--" J ohn," crie d Mrs Okly, J o hn n o w hurry and dres s for s c hool." 10066-7 co l orless The ir eyes are u s uall y w eak, c au sing th e m t o wear a p e rpe,ual squint which, wit h t h e ir s tiff y ell owis h hair an d I n d ian f eatures gives th e m a w e ir d a ppearance. Mi ss Anna C oo p e an Am erican miss i onary, wa s th e first f ore i g n e r t o b e all o w ed t o sta y in th e ir country Sh e liv e d t h e r e f o r 1 5 ye ars t eac hin g th e m an d h e lpin g t h e m to l earn b ette r wa ys o f livin g She f ound th e m ve ry intelligent an d e a ge r to l earn t o r ea d an d writ e THE OLD HIGHWAY. B)' Roger Dt'tlkins 29. Am o n g t h e many traces o f an c i e n t Spanis h occupatio n o f Panama, l e f t b y th e b o l d co n quistador es, i s th e Las Cruces Road. On ce a w ell-trave l ed r oadway, win d in g a m o n g t h e hill s an d t h e dank f eve r-br eeding s wamp s str etc hin g fr o m t h e mass i ve walls o f Ol d Pana m a City t o t h e b ea u t iful h arbo r of Pono B ello On this hig hwa y Illurder a nd thieve r y r a n as un rest r ained as th e lux urian t tro pi ca l j un g l e growth which n o w a lmost co mpletel y obliterat es i t. Great trees ha ve grown i n t h e r oad and t h e ir g ra spi n g r oo t s ha ve d i s l odged th e co b b leston es in s u c h a manne r that t h e p ar ts o f t h e road that can be see n are b a r e l y r ecog n izab l e O n ce t h e a ir tinkl e d with th e so un d o f silve r bells att ac h ed to th e pa c k mul es t ha t f o rm ed t h e go l d t r ain N o w t h e hars h so un d o f th e p arrot's scre am and th e squeak o f a lizard as i t scuttles ove r t h e bloc k s are th e onl y so und s h ea r d a n d t h e o l d ro a d lies and dreams o f past days

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T H E C.'1RI BBEAN.

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THE CAR IBBEAN. TOUR I S T S 1:-1 COLO:-I. B,I' Jlllr,'l.flrl' 1 I-f llYO, '29. One sunn}' m o rning in the city o f C olon, There c arn e a g r oup o f tourists to town, Bu ying s hawls, be ads a nd all SOrtS of things, F it even for the greatest of kings. One little w oman, s hort and fat, \rearing a plai d coa t and l:lrge black hat, P ull s off her gloves, and gives a sig h, I don't see how the)' stand the heat! Oh, my!" J. "j\'ow isn't this a most gorgeous s hawl?" T o her husban d whisper s a lady tal!. Y es, yes, dear, but don't forget my advice Never s houl d one pay the first price." "Mother, mother, I want this box; L ook how it o pen s, and just how it l ocks. Firs t one ha s to fin d the key! i\l other, I want 11. Oh, J imin}' G ee!" 5 One o l d gentleman, perspiring with heat, L oo k s at the c igarette holders, while taking a seat. I t isjust the kind for you, i\leestcr." "For me? No, n o. For m y sis t er." 6. "/\ n d what is that queer animal's name?" "Oh, he's the ant eater o f great, great fame." Comes from the jungle, not far from h ere. He's dead, i\l iss, please have no fear. 7 B u y a loner), ticket," the \'endors cqt, "Six is the numbe r for the lu c k)' g u y. Tink ob de gran surprise W hen win s de bi g first prize." 8. "Say, there goes the Panama R ail road train, .'\ !ld now, m}" gracious, 'tis beginning to r.lin. I ne\'er did see s u c h a dirt)' place, W h y look at that negro' s good-natured face." 9 T wo young c haps in a hat store Ar e tr}"ing o n P a nama hats galore. I know the weakness of we males, But I think I resemble the P rince of Wales!" 10. There p.lsses u s, a foreign man, A bunch o f bananas in his h anel. H e calls to his mate to hurry up, Wh o growls in ans wer, "Aw, shut up. II. I n a carametta, a curio of this town, Sat two old ladies, riding up and down And enjoying t hemselves, forgetting th heat And thought the ride wa s s u c h a treat. "Come, come, 'tis late; w e must haste, B ack to the boat; there's no time to wa Ste, Y o u know the boat will soon be leaving, As it is sc heduled to leave at six this evening." IJ. I f YOll s h o ul d wis h to have some (un, G o watch the tourists, ever)" one, Wh e n ther visit this f ai r little town Called the City of C o lon. IF I W E R E A P OE T By H einl Logan, )0, I wish I were a poet, With gi(t of thought sublime; T h e kind wh o put elusive words I n magic verse and rh)'me. I 'd write of the littl e golden stars, That twinkle in a deep blue sky; Or the moon like a be;tutifullady, Who goes slo w I}" Roating b y. Oh, I w ould write s u c h interesting things Tha t nature tdl s to me; (If I were a poet, An d could write i t well, you $ee.) nut I am not a poet, And m)" words sound stiff and dry. So I think I 'll put aside my pe n And let :mother try. EVENTIDE. B y Alice rotma n, 'JI. The night i s s lowly coming on, And the day i s slowly Reeting. The skies are aflame \\ith red and gold, An d s hadows now are creeping T he p;llm trees ne;:r b r the se a Look bla c k against the evening sky, .. -\nd seem to whisper tales of old A s the close of the d:1.)' is drawing nigh. T he waters of the open se:1. Sing songs of mystery to me, An d bla ckbirds now do cease their call A s the shades of nisht finall y f:1.ll. 5 I

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1 HE CARIBBEAN. G LlillPSES OF Ll ilIO!' BAY. j sit upon the o ld wall by the sea Watching the children at their play. An d the large waves coming toward me F orgetful of the sun's scorc hing ray. :\t evening still you find me there \rhen slowly the sun sinks, Coloring the wall with its flare And dyeing the bay with pinks. The S lInset must gradually fade away Into the splendor of the night; The children in their little beds l ay, An d the bay glis ten s in the moonlight. The lighthouse across the bay Fla shes out its ever faithful light T o guide the ship on its way And emph asize the darkness of the night. The tiny stars begin to shine Like diamonds 'gainst the sky so blue, And the wan white moon divine W hose radiance lights the heart so true. H ow calm and serene life seems \rith all these beauties rare, As if painted by an anist in his dreams When freed from all sorrow and care. F a r from the city's madding roar revel in mr quietude and dream. The nearby chimes announce the late hour And Start me from m)" dream. And as I homeward turn sleepily The waves their adieu bid T he chimes are pealing sweetly, Of human life the wall is rid. ODE T O FORT S AN LORENZO. By Rohrl /Xull, P eace to thee, tholl noble ruin; Long may we see thee Stand Above the rocks, above the dUlle, Above the coral strand. With crumbling walls :tnd long dried mOat, .'\nd C:LIlIlOIl now in rust, Thou listenest to the breaker's nOle, To whispering palm trees hushed. Oh, Glory of the Spani:ud's fame, Who fixed thy stones so high; Their glory now is but a name, But yours still brooks the skr. A TRI O FR Oil l THE I S T HilIUS. B)' 8aJil Frtmk, 31. "Ripe bananas! R ipe bananas! A doze n fa' a dime. D ese am nice ones, lad)' Fo'l sell delJl all de time." I t's the old banana lady With her tra), upon her head. I hear her early ill the morning When 1 am still in bed. There is al so the bootblack With hi s "Shine, Shine?" He clean your s hoe s up nicely For the small cost of a "dime." He's a l ways around by the barber's Where he finds a ready fee. Sometimes he gets a five cent tip, Then he's happ)' as can be. Another one who is never sLire I f he's going to get a dinner, I s the age-bent driver of the orange cart. His eyes ha\'e long lost their glimmer. H e lJlay be seen in the morning Apus hing his cart along; And if a "cachero" blocks his way H e r ings his home-made gong. They are JUSt a few of t h e many Who have lived on t h e Isthmus so longThe banana lady, the bootblack, And the orange-cart Illan with his gong But let me tell you somet h ing. Of whic h you do not know, T hese people are always satisfied. They smile whereve r they go. OUR HI G H SC HOOL BOOK THE CIRIBBEAN .. BJ' 1/ ary Bre/ell, 31. :\ book of memories so fond and dear, Of remini scences you love to hear; Of sports, alumni and literature too, The fun and joy we've all passed through. \\" hen other road s YOLI travel, and new friends yo u meet, Ponder oft' th o ught s of chi l dhood days so sweet. Remember, yes! Remember the good old da}'s of yore, So gayl y spent at Cristobal High on the Caribbean s h ore.

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T H E C AR IBBE AN. By Basil Frank, '31. W hile sitting down beside a SfrC:lIll, I watched the douds. T hey began [Q seem L ike the things upon the earth below, On this land long, long ago. I saw a castle in the air; I S3W a lady in despair; The castle stood on funning s:mds I n the land of caravans. .'\nd there a knight of the Table Swod below upon the:: ground, Fighting bravel}" for to save I-lis lady from an Arab knave. \\'hen this scene from before me flew, T he deep wide ocean Came to vicw. There waS a ship with all sails set Going w here d"c trade winds met. I t was a Spanish ship I saw; Its splendor filled my soul with :mc. But w hat ship follows in its wake? A vessel captained by Francis D rake! Then I saw a flash of flame; : \ roa r as from a giant came; B oth ships disappeared frolll view And the scene was changed to something new. I saw a scene, a scene of peace I n t h e lovely land of Greece. A young man though his arm lacked brawn. W:lS c:lrving the figure of "September \\Iorn.' H e cut a smile upon her lips; A. g r aceful c un'e upon her hips; T he face was tilled III the air; W avy and curly W:lS the h air. T he spell then broke, the of t h e dream, A nd I found myself beside the stream. :\11 these things I had composed F rom the clouds a:. J sat there and dozed. T H E P ADI T REES. By D'Wd K e/chum, '.Jr Y ou see them standing I n the su n light, Tall and proud, showing Their royal might, Y ou see them on the borders Of the ron1.llltic lagoon. P EIl PLEX ITY. By El.rie Darle)', '.)0. \\'hat shall I write about? \\'hat shall it be? T hese questions I' m stating Are bot h ering me. W h,lt sort of language and \\'hat SOrt of rhyme? O e:lr me, I am having A troublesome time T he more things to c h oose from T he harder the choice. T he sooner I 've finis h ed The sooner I voice i\l y r elief at just dropping T his burdensome job, A nd write like t h e rest Of the prose-writing mob. : \ poet is born, and not made, So they sa)'; : \ nd now I'll discreetl)' retire For to-day. THE LOC K S A T N I GHT. By Ru/h Duvall, '.11. I -lave you seen the locks at night? T hey are a \'err wond r ous sight. W ith g reat ships passing to and fro, Going to lands we do not know And m any l ights along the war, Standing the r e l ike sent'nels grey, Seem to becko n vou at sig h t, T o come and see' the locks at night. B ending and bowing while silhouetted the moon, Y ou'll see them in the jungles W here i\! organ hid his gold, St.lnding o'er all the trees I.ike sentinels of old. I f under tropical sun you have Chanced to live, Surely you'll appreciate the shade This gracefu l t ree gives, 53

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THE C.'\RIBBE .-\';-<.

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T H E CARIBBEAN 55

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56 THE CAR IBBEAN. ALUMNI. The Alumni Department o f THE CARIBBEAN continues to grow. Each year a dozen or more names are added to the ever-lengt h ening list. Thi s year we have passed the hundred mark. Cristobal High School has 1 0 1 graduates. Nearly half of these are still on the Isthmus. Several of them have visited us at school. \ \'e are always pleased to see them and hope that they as well as those who are in the States, will continue to be interested in C H. S. and its activities. 1918. LULA MAY PULLIG ( Mrs. J. B.) COMA", Cristobal, C. z. MINOT Co'rrON, 8 1 J o hn Street, New York City. SUSIE HARRISON, Cristobal, C. Z. CATHERINE\VAID,-I-5 \Vest23d Street, New York City BURKE WELCH (address unknown ) MARY "ER"ER, Chapel Hill, N. C. 1919. ALICE ARLENE BALL, 118 Maple Avenue, Tacoma Park Md. KENNETH EDWARDS, \\'ells b o r o, Pa. JAMES RAYMOND, Cristoba l C. Z. DOROTHY \\'EI R (lVlrs. JOHN) MONTANYE, Cristobal C. z "It is always a pleasure to send greetings to THE CARIBBEAN and to the graduating class. I know this yea r' s annual will be the best ever and I am wishing success to all the Seniors." 1 910. LINDALE DAVIS 336 Commonwea lth Ave., B oston, Mass. JACK B. FIELDS care of T ela R ailroad Enginee rin g Dept., T ela, H ondu r as. KENNETH GREENE, Coudersport, Pa. HARLAN HOL1'.1WOOO, Balboa, C. Z. ALSO" SEARS, Balboa, C z KATHRYN B URGOON STEWART, Cristobal, C Z ALICE STILSON, Colon, R. P. LILLIAN COlTON VAN\VAGNER, 1'24 Elm Street, Cranford, N J. ZONELLA BLIss, Alum1li Editor. AL DOYLE, Apartment 9, ISI S Tenth Street, Sacramento, Calif. ETHA BEVINGTON, Balb oa H eights, C. Z. 1 911. CARL DUEY, Box 95, L emon City, Fla. KIRBY FERGUSON, Cristobal, C. Z. ALICE HU"TER ( Mrs. L. A.) HOH", Cristobal, C. z CHARLES HENTER, Coast Guard Cutter Kim bal, Norfolk, \ 'a. FRANK R A nl,lO NO, 3-H East l'2oth Street, New Y ork City ELEANOR ZIMl\'IERl\IAN, 1'20 Kingsley Av en ue. \Vester l e i gh, Staten I sland, N. Y. T o the Class o f 1928. I wish YOll all the success in the world in making this year's CARIBBEAN the best ever." .MARJORI E BALL, 118 iVIapl e Avenue, Tacoma Park, Md. lOA BROWN (iVlrs. A. A .) Don.E, Apartment 9, T 5' 5 Tenth Street, Sacramento, Calif. GEORGE CARTWRIGHT, '59 B oy l e Avenue, T otowa B orough, Pa terson, N. ] P A U L DO\"LE, Cristobal, C. Z. MAR\T GLENN FIELDS, Balb oa H eights, C. Z. MAG"USON, Balb oa, C. Z. MILDRED STAfFORD, 395 North H enderson St. Cape Girardeau, iV[o. EMMA TOWNSEND (Mrs. ROBERT) NOE, Box I, Cristobal, C. Z. \YESLEY TOWNSEND, 1195 Ruby Street, H oughton, Mic h

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THE CARIBB EAN. 57 JORDAN 21+ Clare nd o n Street, Syra c u se N. Y. "At last 1 am g raduated f rom th e College of F o restry a n d be l i eve m e it feel s pretty grand to b e an alumnus 1 have just accepted a p ositio n as salesman for Oak land s and P ontiacs so I must get to w ork THE CARIBBEAN ha s my best wis h es for a s u ccessful seems t hat eac h ycar bri ngs improvemen t in the annual. I can't b e ego ist e n o u g h to say t hat the annual in my Senio r yea r wa s t h e best bec:1Use that i s not so Ea c h ycar i t is a little better-and I feel sure that this year will be t h e best ever.' GERA LD BLISS Cri s tobal, C. Z. ERNEST EUPHRAT, 3935 B urwood A ven u e, South Nor wood, Cincinnati, Ohio. LOUISE HENTER, Nurses H ome Sydenham H os pital B altim ore i\1tl. EDWARD MAY, Cristobal, C Z. HENRY MOORE, B ox 212, Mars hfield, 'is. "Greetings!" Er-.IOGENE NASI I (Mrs E S.) VAN BENSCHOTEN, Balb oa, C. z. MATTISON P U LLIO ( M rs. ] D .) Cris t o bal, C. Z J 92+. DOROTHY ABE:-"DROTH (i\ Jrs. ARTHUR) FLOOD, Cristobal, C. Z. FLORENCE ALBERT, 1 07 B e um ent Av enue, \Vest Br ighton, Staten I s land N. Y. K indly extend to t h e Class o f 1928 my b es t wis h es for a s u ccessful annual." JOSE AROSEr-.IENA, C o l o n, R P. EDI T H COULBOURN Sl\IITH, 7 1 7 Colonial Av en u e, Norfol k, Va. CHARLOTIE HOUSEL (i\l rs. R \Y .) i\[ACSPARRAN, Cristobal C. Z. GLADYS LOWANDE (i\l rs. C. 0.) B A LDWIN, Cris to bal C. Z. MORRIS i\1ARCHOSKY, C o l o n, R P. INzA MARKHAr-.I, +09 Lake Av enue, Roch ester, N. Y. "Still s ka ting alo n g but am n ever too bus)' t o t hin k oft e n of C H S. C ongra tulati ons and b es t wis h es to t h e graduates of '28." MR 10066-8 TRENE GEOROE G.) R E ITHEL q J s l ington P lace, J amaica, L ong I sland, N.Y. ( am sending my best wishes to t h e Class of '28 and for the success of this year's annual." GEORGE OAKES, Fort B anks, i\J ass. CH ESTER PI KE, 2 ,+8 Acton Streer, B erke l ey, Calif. ANDREW Sr-.IITH, B ox 2, Foster R oute, Rich mond, T exas. ETHEL SONNHIAN, 98 i\l acon Street, Br ooklyn, N. Y I am now an upper J unior at i\/laxwell T raining Sc h oo l for T eac h ers A t present [ am quite busy taking examinations for ( am to go ().!It to practi ce teaching agai n. [ will be out for five weeks. B est wishes for the Class of 1 928 and for the success of t h e annu:tl." 192 5. HELE:>.r ABENDROTH, Cristobal, C. Z. OLGA ARCIA (1\l rs. A. DE) L E IGNADIER, Colon, R. P. \VILLIAM COUSINS, 2623 Oakford Street, Phi l a de lphia, P a. DOROTH Y DEIBERT, Fort Sill, Ok l a RUTH DUEY (i\ l rs. SPE:-.'CER) LINCOLN, Cristobal, C. Z. KATHERINE FISCHER, +309 F urle), A ve Gardenville, i\[d. ANNIEL H E Jr-.1 (1\[ rs. J H.) BRENCHICK, Cristoba l C. Z. RUTH HOPKINS, Box 256, Ancon, C. Z "i\I)' very best wish es for THE CARIBBEAN. I've noriced t ha t you h ave been getting some newspaper publicity for your soc ial and athleti c events; good work! "1\1)' very best regards to all who remember me. HUBERT LEE, 2211 Speedway, Au stin, T exas. HARRIET STEENBURG (address unknown). RICHARD BEVERL\', Broad Ru n, Va. HILDEGARDE BLYTHE, Landham-Bounce X-Ray Clinic Atlanta, Ga.

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'rHE CAR I BBEAN \\'ILLIAM CLINCHARO, 2'29 North Seventeenth St. Lincoln, Nebr. 1 am looking forward with anticipation to seeing the first copy of THE CARIBBEAN of ''28 and 1 sincer e l y hope that it will be the best year book ever produced by C. H S. ] am also wishing success to the Class of ''28 011 THE CARIBBEAN, congratulati ons o n their graduation, and best regards to the Faculty," \\'ILLlAI\I COfFEY, Cristobal, C. Z. HELENA M. DECKMAN, 1195 East 18th St., N. P o rtland, Oreg. "\\'jrh since r e and best wishes to THE CARIBBEAN and to all m y sch oo l friends I say 'au revoir' to Panama. Luck to the annual and to those that f ollow." EONA DUVALL, 480'2 Greenlee Av e., St. 13ernard, Ohio. l\IORRIS EGGLESTON, R oom 104, Freshman H all, Notre Dame University, Notre Dame, I nd. RAY FISCHER, 4309 Furley Avenue, Gardenville, ]RENE HOPKINS, Cristobal, C Z. Home-Panama City, R. P. "Accept my best wishes for the students and Faculty o f C. H. S. Congratulations, Seniors. Make the 19'1.8 CARIBBEAN go ove r the top." HELEN J. KEENE, Cristobal, C. z. "Greetings to the C lass o f ''1.8 and best wishes for the sllccess of t h e play and this year's annual." JOHANNA KLEEFKENS (Mrs. R. 0.) ANTICK, B ox 1057, Cristobal, C. z. .. 'The moving nnger having wri t moves on.' Class of ''1.8, ] s in ce r e l y hope that the deeds yo u have written will live long in the hall of faille of dear o l d C. H S. J have often desired to be back in school. "Each year is nlled with memories. The parties, friends, and above all th e 'school spirit' C. H. S. has shown year by year. ''28 you have kept up the spirit as those before you have so I just know TH E CARIBBEAN is going to be the best ever. Congratulations and best wishes to all." DELILAH MAY (Mrs. G. \V. ) PARKER, Gatun, C. Z. LOLA MUNOZ, Panama City, R P. MILDRED NEELY, Cristobal, C. Z. CARLOS P U LGAR, Gatun, C. Z. CLARICE STEENBURG, Langley Fi e ld, Va GAY R. TURNER, Randolph-Macon \\'oman's College, Lyn c h burg, Va. J 've been thinking and thinking and thinking, and I can't think o f a thing original so I 'll have to say the same o ld thing in the same o l d way,' though with a heart full of love and meaning. "Congratulations, Class o f ''1.8, and the best of wishes for C1 most successfu l annual." ELIZABETH \\'ARREN, Fl o ri d a State College for \\'omen, Tallahassee, Fla. CHRISTIAN \ \'IRTZ, Cristobal, C Z. BLEDSOE, .p6 Transylvania Park, Lexington, "-y. LAWRENCE C. CALLAWAY, J r., \Ventworth Military Academy, L exi ngton, Mo. I wish the staR' all the s u ccess in the world in the publishing of their ''28 annual. 1 also hope that the Senior Class graduates in (sty le' as Klunk wou l d say. I ex pect to be the r e t o see the g raduation exe r cises and to wi s h the whole class good luck." JOSEPH CORRIGAN, Box 1'23, Gatlin, C Z TERESA GALLAGHER, 863 57th St., Brooklyn, N.Y. JAMES GRIDER, 416 Transylvania Park, L ex in g t o n Ky. LOUISE H E lhl, 5 1 0 Church Street, St. B ernard) Ohi o CLARA A. MAY, Gatun, C Z. HELEN Cristobal, C. Z. JOHN G NELSON, Gonzaga University, Spokane, Wash. DOROTHY SVENSSON, 39 Nikisch Avenue R osindale, Mass. "My plans w ent topsy-turvey so that instead of being a fr eshman in the University of\Vashington I'm a postgraduate in Jamaica Plain H igh School, Boston. I'm planning to en t e r Simmons Ccllege thi s fall and work f o r a degree in Library Science. (My work in t h e C. H S library started that.) I suppose my best wishes come too latehowever they will still be 'best wishes.' I've racked my brain in vain for some ori ginal way

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T H E CARIBBEAN 5 9 of expressing m )' afFec tion f o r C H S. I'm afraid I 'll j u s t ha v e t o s a y Sin ce r e wis h es and regards t o THE C ARIBBEAN, its staR-"', and all m y sch oolmates .''' SURS E j T AYLOR, Jr., I S q \\'es t Avenue, Aus tin T exa s J Aio.lE S VAN S COTTER, Fort D a v i s, C Z. HELEN VINE'''ARD, B o x 37-b \\'o m e n s C ollege Newark, D el. "One m o r e year ha s rolled its co ur se an d o n e m o r e cla ss i s preparing t o take its final l eave of o l d C. H S With all my h eart 1 wis h t h e Cla ss of '2 8 the g r eates t o f s u ccess and all t h e happy r ecollec ti o n s that I ha ve o f 'bac k hom e.' DOROTHY \-VERTZ B o x 2 59, Cri s t o bal C Z. "See m s ag es since J un e 1 9 2 7 an d yet i t h as n o t b e en so l o ng. L a s t y ear] promised m yself that T w o uld ans w e r all C. H S. n otes promptly ; thi s pro mi se, o f course r esult in g from m y e xp erie n ce of wairing whil e o n T H E C ARJJ3BEAN staR"o f 1 927 Of course l ha ve n o t liv e d u p to m y promise. N o w I am a sten ographe r a t t h e Unite d Fruit C ompany in Cristob a l and the r e f o r e not a strange r t o C I -I. S. and h e r goo d w ork. B es t wis h es to rhe staff and t h e sc h ool. C o n gratulatio n s to the Cla ss of '28 a n d may rour cla ss p la y b e th e best eve r. Hard to d o i s n t it? H o wdy, Cl ass o f 2 7 CHARLES \\' I L L 2 423 Kin d r e d S t reet, A s t o ria, L o n g I s lan d N e w Y o rk City E UPHHIIA 1\1. \\'OOLNOUGH, C aze n ov i a, N. Y. I gr eatly e njoy m y stud i es in Caze n o via S eminary and the n e w surroundings, but 1 o f te n wis h to b e b ac k in good o l d C. H S. J kno w that thi s year's C ARIBBEAN will excel! those o f f o rm e r years aneI I send m y s in ce r es t wis h es f o r rhi s yea,"s publi catio n and to those who w o rk to make it the best e v e r.

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60 THE CARIBB EAN.

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THE CAR1BBEAN.

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6, T H E CARIBBEAN. !fi--I e EXTR ACTS D I :\RY. Emma B allks, ';?S. I @ i Oct. 3. School ope n s with a banu:. I\l r. \\'il iia m .-\. Sawyers, tht: n ew prin c ipal, i s full of pep and goodl oo king. H e promises to b e p opular with both the boys and girls. C. H S. is also h o nored with two n e w teach e rs, Mi ss i\Iarvin and i\li ss Ru ssell. Both have gi,'cn very flattering "first impress i o n s." The S cni0 f s ge t room 27 for the ir den. Oct. 4-The J unior s get room 32 (Oi th e ir happy hom e C. H S ha s a r eco rd attendance B ooks and assignments make th e ir debut. The front o f the assembly hall i s decorated by bald pates Oct. 5. The inevitable initiatio n i s pending, mu c h to th e sorrow o f th e f.r es hm cil. The h o t-ht:ad cd co nvi c t s dot th e a sse mbl y a s M e rcur o chro m e i s daubed o n those mo s t n o bl e domes of the unfortunate bald Fresh. Oct. 6 Seniors prove authority b y ousting J tlnior s from reom 2 7 Oct. 7 R oo m 32 sports warning ., K ee p Out" sig n. Cet. 10. :hhleti c meeting is h e ld and g reat enthusia s m i s aroused. The S enio r s org ani ze th e ir class. Advi se r, i\l i ss i\1. i\larvin; President, J ack Klunk ; Vice P res ident, Frank Kimb ellj Secretary-Treasurer, B ee r s Oct. 1 2 The /Iucon co m es in wit h many C. H S students r eturning fro m the States Oct. 1 3 The A thleti c A ssoc iati o n e l ec t s officers. Pres id ent, Alb ert Daysj Vice P r es id ent, \\'ood f o r d Babbitt; Secretary, Rae Bliss Oct. '4. The J uni ors and S enio r s win an inte r class baseball game fro m t h e Fres hm e n and oph ol11ores, Oct. ,8. Election s f o r office r s of TII E C" R IBBEAN Staff are hel d All are startled b y an apparent th und e rstorm that proves to be the piano b e in g moved down the h all to another room. A Gl ee Club meetin g is h eld to get the yode l ers together. Oct. [9. THE CARIBHE_\N StaR' election s are completed. i\Tew ( l o ud ) class bells added, n e arl y cause J lImping-giris. The doomed Fres hm e n boys are commanded to wear their ties backward until Friday. The girls arc o rd e r ed to wear g re e n hair ribbons T h e Staff !'!leets in the lib rary and a unanimolls vote makes i\l r. Sawyers advise r. i\l r. Sawyers gives a gene ral id e a o f the work to be acco m plished. Oct. 21. The J unior C l ass organizes. Adviser, Mi ss H esse, P resident, Marion L owa ndej Vice President, 1\ I ike Green j Secretary, R osemary K ee nej T rea sure r, Gretche n P alm. A F i eld D ay ( initiation ) goes over big. Many spectators witn ess the F re s hm e n carry away th e h o nors from t h e Sophomores The gir l s are decorated lik e Indians in g r e ase and war paint. Oct. 2+ A J tlnior boy appears this m orni n g baH lik e a Fres hman. The Juniorroorn r ece iv es desks. Oct. 26. Sophomore Class i s organized. Ad viser, i\l i ss Sewellj P re sident, R ae Bliss j \,i ce P res ident, Fred Stewart; S ec reta!") ': Mav i s Thirl wallj Treas urer, D e lla Raymond; Extra, R alph Crul11. i\l ore arrivals from States Oct. 2 7 Freshman Class o r ganized. Ad v i se r i\l i ss loore; P re sident, Carl os Rankin; \ i ce P re s id ent, R o b ert Brough ; Secretary T rea sure r L illian H Ollsel. O c t. 28. Friday and Saturday, B alboa and Pedro i\l iguel Suppe r Club office r s come to Cristobal Y \V. C A. to p lan Girl R ese r ve Conference. The Staff h as pi cture take n by H ero n. Oct. 30. (Sunday) StafF picture appears 111 Slar & H erald ( Ah e m! ) O c t. 31. Hallowe'en B lack Cats ( in t h e form o f cla ss tests) c r oss many paths TOV I. S enio r ring s disclissed pro and con. N ov 3. Panama l nd epende n ce Day, No sc h ool. Thr ee c h ee r s for Panama! Nov. + The S e niors give parties a debut by g ivin g a "Colleg iate" Hop at dl e i\l a so nic Templ e. Dwyer's orc h estra furni s h ed plenty of pep. Nov. 9 . '\ Staff m eeting i s h eld at sc h ool. Nov. II. The S e nior Bann e r i s stol e n from t h e S enio r rO'J1n. Call out th e spies [11,3. C onference in Balboa-Girl R eserves Nov. q R e p ort cards (s hiver m e timbers) Athle tic meeting h eld by Mr. Seiler in a ssembly

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T H E CARl BBE.>\N. Nov. [5. The Senior Hann e r i s returned pain ted in J unior colors, blu e and gold. i\J any S e niors c hall e ng e the cu lpri ts. A Senior meeting i s h eld abollt cla ss ring s. N ov 16. A sw immin g meet is hel d at the \\' ashillgron pool by i\l r. Seiler for tryouts f o r both bo )'s and girls. Nov. 1 8 Stafr m eet in g. Supper Club. Nov. '2-1--'25. Thanksgiving holidays. (\\'e thank you for m o re. ) Nov. 2 8 Edward Lowande returns fro m t h e States, making 1+ S enio r s D ec. 7 Staff meeting. D ec. 12. Y ell prac ti ce 2.+5-3.00 p. m. First gameo(season in baseballj C. H S. 6,Outl:lws I. D ec. 17. C. H S d e f ea t s D e L esseps 6 t o 5 in ba seball. D ec 2 0 Caroling in fr ont of sc h ool by entire student body. H ome-room parties following Santa Claus is coming Brin g u s some:\ s please D ec. :1IJ an. 2. Chri stmas h o l idays. D ee. 2 3 C. H S. defeats R. &: F. A. 4 to 2. J an. 3 H. S. ba se ball r eco rd s ma s h ed b y Outlaw s 8 to 2. J an. 6. Junior L eap Y ear" Party at t h e l\l asonic Templ e c njoy ed by all. H ow does it f eel to b e a s k ed to dance, bors? Jan .'\t 1,45 p. m., Lindy" arrived in Panama Hurrah ( o r Lin dy! Jan. 1 I. C. H S. defeats R &: F. A. 8 to 6 in ba se ball. J an. 12. Holiday-.-\II sc h ool child r e n assemble "en masse" at sc h oo l to see Lindy" pass in the parade \\'eicome, Lindy." Come again. J an. q. C. H S. d e feated t h e 1 0 to 7 gaining first plac e in th e A .tlanticTwilig h t L eague. J an. 16. C. H. S. defeats the Outlaws 6 to 3 .I an. 20. Supper Clu b. J an. 23 H S. defeats D e L esse p s 7 to 6 J an. 26. Cristobal Sch oo l goes on s p ec ial train to France Fi e l d to sec Colonel Lindbergh leavin g for Col o mbia. BOil V oyage. J an. 2 8 C. H S defeats th e 14 to 4. F eb. I. Girls conduct a candy sale at sc h oo l during re cess and th e n oo n hour to rai se fund s (or a s p ecial train February 4th, for th e B. H S.C. 1-1. S. ba se ball game. C. 1-1. S. defeats R &: F. A. 5 to 4. F eb. 2. Fort D e L esseps de feats C. H S. 4 t o 3 Big pep" meeting h eld thi s morning for Cristobal B alboa game. F e b. 3. p cc ial train takes Cristobal rooters to Balb o a to witn ess a victo r y o f 12 to J o. (l\ 1 any t hroat garg l es needed later. ) F e b 7 Supper Club business meeting h e l d in library at 8 .00 a. m. F e b. 9 1 0. Z o n e moisture in creases owing to toi l and sweat of mid-year exa mina tions. F e b. I J S enio r library privilege taken awa),. \\' h e n do w e get our rattles? F e b. 15. R ece i ved invitations to take a Right t o th e J\lasonic T e mpl e this F r iday. C. H S. defeats R. b.: F .. -\. llto.1. W e win the p ennant for the first half of the Twili ghr L e agu e. \\'on 14, lost 2. F e b. 7 The Sophomores give a "I.indbergh Hop" at t h e l\l a sonic T e mpl e. The Right was thrilling. F e b. 7 21. C o l o n ce l ebrates Carnival. "iva L a R e ina! F e b. 21. S c h oo l dismissed at 2.10 to e nabl e e \'eryo n e to see th e big parade. Bool11-BoometyB oo m F eb. 28. The fire alarm was rung b y \ I r. Saw ye r s so we co uld all go out to see tht: L os An ge les," th e monstrou s d iri g ibl e, s ail by. i\lar. 9 I\l o nster Carnival h eld 011 grounds of F ort D e L esseps Great s u ccess, both financially and soc iall y l\lar. 9. I\lr. Robert :\Toe h o l ds a Senior meeting after sc h oo l to c h oose characters for the S cnior pia)'. l\lar. 20. Girls' Gl ee Club sings at t h e ninth anniversary o f the Y. \ \'. C. : \ i\Iar. 2 1 . J\.rri\'al o f Senior rings causes great joy and exc itemen t among t h e Senio r s. l\lar. 22. En d o f f ourth six we;>ks; marks co m e out 31. C. H. S. loses" popular f
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THE CARIBBEAN. Apr. '22. The first game o f series (or t h e Governor's Cup in the L eag u e is won b y C H. S. from D e L esseps. Apr. 28. The Twili ght Leagu e seaso n closes by C H. S capturing the Governor's Cup. i\Jay ..... Girls roll s[Qc kin gs to their ankles and boys roll their trousers to knees to c reate a new sensation. 8. A complete re hearsal o f "Cu p i d Scores a Touchdown" was h e ld at t h e Y. W. C. A. building to-night. 1\1 3)' 25. "Cupid Scores a T o u c hdown" is given by the Senior Class at the Am erica Theatre and is a big success. A matinee for th e Grade sc h oo l was staged in the afternoon. May 26. The play i s repeated at Gatun Club h ouse. June 1112. Final examinations engulf us. H ush, don't disturb us June IS. The J unior-Senior B anq uet is given by the J uniors-to the Seniors at the \Vashington H o t el. Y o u know your onions, Class of ''29. June 1 7. B accala ureate servi ce is h eld at Christ C hu rc h by t h e Sea. Bis hop M o rri s officiating. J une 20. Commencement exerc i ses at the \\'ashington H otel. The Seniors are left to face the strife o f life alone. June '2'2 The last ca ll. R eport ca rd s are out and so are we At last 'tis arrived th e e n d o f th e year, The t i me we've l onged f o r now is h e re; Yet there i s sadness in man y a h eart. h means that good friends soon must part, Memories of the dear sc h oo l will e'er be e ns hrin ed, And many's the time wc'lllook behind, As though in a crystal we'll clearly see Those happy h ou r s dear to yo u and me. THE SENI OR PARTY. By Lily/u/ Cox, '29. The invitation to the Senior Party was r ece i ved by all classes of Cristobal H igh School with great enthusiasm. J t came out about 1 0 days before the party, and these were spent in pleasant anticipation. On Friday night, N ovembe r 4th t h e r e asse mbl e d at the Masonic Templ e a l arge and happy c rowd. The Seni o rs, trying to excite t heir guests, to l d them that t h e orc hestra for t h e evening was not abl e to be th e r e. At this eve r yone became disheartened. From eight until nine, the Hi g h Sc h oo l Orchestra played sever al se lecti o ns. Then a so l die r from Fort Da vis ofl'ered seve ra l p op u lar airs an d gave a "Ch arleston" ex hibi tion. The r ea l orc hestra t h en arrived. Everyone was liv e n ed up and did his o r h e r best to dance when i\.Jr. Dw ye r and his o rch estra gave forth the "jazzy strains." I n the meantime punch and sa ndwiches were welcomed by the guests. Dancing was again resu m ed and kept up until 1 2 o'cloc k when everyon e bad e t h e Seni o r h osts and h ostesses "Good night." THE J UN I O R PARTY By ue/J"I Gnnumlllln', '30, Friday eve n ing, January 6th t h e Juniors o f '29 gave a clever leap year party at t h e i\' l asonic T em pl e The hall was beautifull y decorated in t h e class co l ors, blu e and gold, and gay co l ored e lenric lights. A s it was a leap year party, t h e Junio r s announ ced that t h e girls would ha ve to ask for t h e dances. This caused much mirth among the guests. D wyer's orc hestra furni s h ed th e music which was most enjoyabl e. i\, I r and i\1rs. \Vit h e r spoon were rhe chaperons for t h e eve ning The first part o f r h e evening was spent in danci n g Late r, R oy \ Valker a nd J ames Quinn gave a humo r o u s duet entitled R omeo a n d J u liet" f o r whic h t h ey r eceived mu c h applause. During th e eve ning, delig htful refres hm ents o f cake and punch were served. The prize wa l tz was won b y Eth e l \ Vestman and J ack i\laher, who w e re i ndeed worthy of it. She received a Parke r pencil and h e a bill fold The remaining part o f th e eve nin g was spent in dancing until II o'clock w h en th e party ended Everyo n e agreed t hat it wa s one of the most enjoyable parties given this sc h oo l year.

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THE CARIBBEA:-<. 65 THE By.1fiu 110110",30. The aviators o f the Class o f '3 0 of Cristobal H igh S c h ool gave their annual party 011 the airs hip, "The Spirit of the Sophomores," which started from the i\lasonic Templ e Friday !ling, 17th. One of the aviators met the guests gave them a program o f th e Right and d r ceted th e m to th e airship. The airs hip was decorated with the aviator' s colors, blue and sih'cr. .'-\. large .-\ m erican Rag was draped, with their cmhk'll1 h e n eath it. Little airplanes were hung frol11 the strC<1mc;os o f blue and sil\'cr. At 8 o 'clock the airship left its moorings with t h e orchestra a tune An entertainment was give n : hiatresc; Eleanor L'rwilcr, who did t h e Charleston, anJ one of the guests, l\lary Bre t ch, wh o recited. During the Right, pUllch, cake and sandwic he:; were se n'ed to the weary guests and a\'iators. At 12 o'clock the airship again wa" at its moorings, the guests thanking each aviator in turn f )r the lovelr fligh t. 1 HE FRESHi\IA:-< "\\'e. the Fre"hnen, invite you to come T o 3. pany at the :\pril IJth is tht: date. B e there earh for its starts.1t eight. There will be a prize f r the funn ic,( and he"t, B e sure t o come-we'll do the Such read the invitations to the deligh t ful costume ball given the Freshmen. There was a large attendance and the music rendered b\ Dw\'er's orchestra \\ as elljQ\'ed by a ll. pu'nch and sandwiches' \;'ere served throughout the e \'ening. The biggest event of t h e wa s the Grand l\larch. Everyone took part in this. L I p and down the ballroo m c i d ti'ey march until the judges c.!ccidcd wh o tl:c would b e i\b r Patterson won first pri ze f), b es t costume. She e d Little B o Peep". 1 :the1 \\'estman won the pri ze fur the funni es t. Her costume of" Kiki" wa s very well designed. The boys winning the priLes were Jack i\laher, the "i\lidshipman," and Raymond \\,ill, "OurOIJ-Fashioned School 130)'." MR 10066-9 Another inte restin g e\'ent was the prite waltz which was won by ;\ Iildred Bath and \'incent L ugli. i\luch credit mus t b e given t o ;\I iss ;\I oore, the F r eshman Class ad \'iser. I twas L1nde:-her Slnerintendence that sllc h a wonderful party W'l<:; THE SE:-
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66 MISS c.H.S T H E CARI BBEAN. B EST LOOKING Mal)' Maher Jack Maher MOST POPULAR [Ieanor Urwder Jack Klunk Pauline Herman

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THE C :\RIBBE.-\:-r. THE P O P L 'UHI T Y CON T E T .-\ pril seventeenth \\ as another gala dar in C ristobal H ig h The students w e re informed t hat t h ere was a popularity contest to b e held. Students were hande d b lanks to fill in. P upil s were q u es t ioning each other w h o the b es t loo king a n d most popular boys and gir l s wer e B allot s w e r e collected and counted, and a h eated contest was in prog r ess all during thi s performance T he final results of Cristobal H igh School's p opularity contest were: P rettiest Girl, i\tary Best L ooking J ack "laher. i\lost Popular Girl, El eano r Urwil e r. lost Popular 130)" J ack Klunk. Four-masled Sailing ressel Transiling Gaillard CUI. THE C R I S T OB Al. H I G H SCHOOl. C AH N I \,-\L. By Elltel Barnell, '29. T o aid t h e StafF to put fort h an h o n o rabl e CARIBBEAN, a carnival was h eld at Fort D e L essep's grounds on l\l arc h 9, 1 9 2 8 :-\s it ha s been before, t h e carnival was composed of a i\ l u sica l R ev u e, Side Sh o w s, D ancing, a popu larity C Clltest, and Eats. M a n y were t h e thrills t h e e n t h usiastic public recci\ e d f:-o m various s ide s h ows. A mu rderous \\ i l d i\i an w h o escaped; A ThreeRi ng D og S h o w; and th e i\l iss i ng Link, furni s h ed much excitement. Heart t h robs were increased by t h e sig h t of a Fat L ad)", and a strange maiden, Zoma, who neither ate, drank, walked, talked or sleptever. T her e w e r e o th e r interesting thingsa F i s h P ond, wher e strange to say, fis h e rman got a "bite." T h e J\lu s i cal R evue wa s extremel y s ati s fact o r y The Popularity Con r es t wax e d fas t and furi o u s in the e leventh hour, but [\l iss Pauline H erman wa s th e victorious "!\ I i ss Cri s tobal H i g h School." Danc in g occ u rred in th e i\lovi e H all after e l even. The "Eats" need n o m e nti o n th e r efreshm e n t booth was c rowd e d at all times D ue to the coo p eratio n o f C o l o n e l Greig and the pers o nn e l o f Fort D e L esseps, Cristobal H igh S c hool and th e public, the carnival accompl i s hed it s purpose r t was also a roaring success

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68 THE C-\RIBBEAN. Cristobal High School Saxophone Band THE GIRLS' S.-\XOPH O:-iE B -\:-iD. This band, whi c h i s composed o f C ristobal H igh S c h oo l g irls. i s o nt': o f the best know n Illusical organizations 011 the Isthmus ;\ I r. R e in h o ld, the d irector, deserves a great deal o f c redit f o r the excellent rraillin3 of eac h girl in the organizati on, and for the splendid way in whi c h they play. Eac h girl i s trained incii\ j dually, the n they get together t\\ ice a week and give the n eighbors a treat. The Saxoph one Ban d ha s gi \'en many recitals on the P acific side a s well a s on the : \ t1antic side so it i s well kno wn and always w ell r ecei v e d. Thesl: girls we r e asked t o d uring the banq u e t given (or C o l onel Lindhergh when h e wa s in Colon, and the y recei\ 'ed high prai se for this p:.:rformance. TilE G -\TU:\' BOYS' B \:\,D \\' h e n We sit bac k and enjoy the mus i c o f the Gattln B oys' Bantl, we f orget those fir s t agonizing do-re-mi' s whi c h these roung mu s i c ian s produced a s h ort time ago The band wa s organized about three rears a go thr o ugh t h e eR'orts of I'll'. R 1\1. Crul11, who i s now president o f t his organizatio n. A t present the r e are about 4 0 m embers in the band, and, under the very abl e l eadership o f 1'[r. ;\Ieyer Cohen, o f F ort D avis, thi s organization plays \'ery well and n eed n o longer b e considered amatt.::ur. The G:vlIn B o)'s Band ha s given co n certs on b oth sides of t h e I sthmus and is well know n for its well-halan ced and w ell-presented programs. Gatun Do) 8o.1nd. I ncludes many Boys.

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THE CAR IBB EAN.

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7 0 THE CARIBBEAN.

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T H E CARIBBE A N. 7 CRIS T OBA L H i g h School h ad good f ortune t his year to ha ve se veral excellent m en S ome of w h o m, g r ea d y (oour sor r ow, wil l not be wit h liS next ye ar. Large l y owin g to t h e ir effo r ts we h ave h ad a goo d y e ar a thle ti c all y \\'e d i d not always w i n but w e se t a g ood ex ampl e in s portsmanship and have a l way s re n de r ed a gooJ acco un t of ou r selves L 1nforrtlnately our h igh sc h ool represents a rather s m all community and we have n o wea l th of material to draw from as B alboa H ig h Sc h ool h as Our b aseball seaso n this yea r was :1 greaT success. OUf Cris t o bal bo},o;; a lways coul d play h:1I1, and Witherspoon. our coach par excellence, was loaned to us t h e T he rules of the Twdighr L e:lg u e :1l1o\\ed two big league players all eac h rcam. W it h ers p oon played with u s t h e entire seaSon, but rhe other man give n to liS W:lS const:tnlly changing. rhe began the ye:tr II irh us b u t O r si finished, pitching us to victory in t h e final game of the champions h i p se r ies. Next C. H S. ball teant will be g reatly weakened by the loss of four p layer s. G reene, our pitcher, has already gone [Q t h e States, and Lowande, Klunk, and Days w ill have been graduated. T he r e w ill b e othe r s [Q fill t h ei r places, of co u rse, and let u s hope t her w ill uph o l d the honor of C r istobal High Schoo l as their predecessors have done this year. F ollowing are the resu l ts of the Atlantic Side Twil ight League; rJlt.ST SECOND H A Lf". '2-10 C. H S. -Outlaws ( forfeited ) '2-25 C. H S. I D e L esseps J. 3-1 C. H S. 1.40 i\lau lers 4. 3-7 C. 1-1. S. 3. R & F A. ,. 3-1 2 C. H S. 6, f!.l:tuler s 13. 3-15 C. H S. 5, f!.l:t ulers 7. 3-1 9 C H S. 5, R & F A. J. O u r men, by e n t r a n ce into every kin d of s p Ort a n d by t heir h a r d work and str en uous efforts, h ave set an exampl e for rhe students in t h e years (0 corne. BASE B A LL. F eb. II, 1925-B efore an immense throng al Hazzberry" P .lrk, B.tlboa, Cris tobal won the first game of the high school series, 1 2 TO 1 0 T he game was a freehitting atf,lir, Balboa Oluhlttlllg us 12 to 1 0 but their hits were more scatter ed. Cristobal"s hits came with men on base T he feature of the game was Hde's drive into the tennis court III the first inmng \\ithtwomenon. LaterinthegameJack Klunk hit o ne into the tennis court,easil\ making the circuit. Cristobal played a gre:Jt fielding game, nOt one error being charged against rhem dunng the entire game. On the other hand, B albo:1 seemed to h;l\'e the weak ness of missing t hem at the \Hong time, eig h t miscues being made by them. T he chief offende r was Wood, w h o missed four. T he batting honors were grabbed by I I ele of Balboa, who got four clean hits out of five times up. R ussey and Quinn of Balboa made three apiece. For Cristobal the feature was Klunk's catch-ing and his homer into the tennis court. Lowande made two hits out of four attempts, one of them being a double to left field. : \ special train took almost the enlire school and a large numberof other rooters to B alhoa, to cheer for the team. The girls were the loudest in their cheering, giving R alhoa competition on their own grounds. T he game was half over when our rooters arrived in force upon the field. B alboa was taken by surprise; they had never suspected anything like that. B I -1. s. QUinn, '2b D e Londes, p Clisbee, 1 b \\'ood. ss. Ilclc,3h Po\\dl. c Jones,cL Taylor,lf H ussey, rf D ,lIliels. rf B rown, p .-\Il R. H PO. -\. F. Totals. 38 1 0 1 3 2-SUilllllary. I I oille runsKlunk, Hell.'. T hree_base hits-H ele 2. T wo-base hits-Lowande, 1 l ele. I-lit hr pitched ball-B ) Greene 2 ( Clishee alld Taylo-). Struck out-B\ Greene 15, by Brown -::-, by DesLandes 2. Base on balls-offGreene 5. off B rown 3. Earned runs-Cristobal M, Balboa 10. \\'inning pitcherGreene. pitcher B rown i\larch II, 1928 l n the second game of the series, played on the Atlantic side, Cristobal H igh School won her second straight game from Balboa H igh School, therebr making a clean sweep of the series. T he gal11e was witnessed by a crowd of rooters from both sides, \\ho packed Broadwa} Park. Balbo:!. had her force of hackers present, having run ,I special train. The crowd was given good music between the IIlnings by the Fort D e I .esseps band. T hings started in the first inning. C. H S. .-\B. Il. Quinn of B albo;l. first man up, walked II. PO. '\ F and scored later on \\'ood's single to left. Wertz, d a also scored In the first inning. Days,.)b. o Klunk forced Days at second and then Klunk, c. '7 o second and scored on Greene's Greenc. p o Single to lert. Ba l hoa secured another \\'iking!.t:lJ, cf o run in the third inning on Hele's triple. LowanJe. ss. o I-Ielescored when Lowande fell in catching Klunk's throw to second. Pettit, rf ;\laher, ,b T ot,lls. o I n the sixth inning Cristobal put the 01 g:1Il1e safely away. \\'irh tWO mell .011. --------K lunk hit a long homer to deep right o ct'llter. Later in the game K lunk hlt a ,h 39

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triple. H is batting during the se rie s was hard and timelr, he making tw o h omers and a triple. The game from this stage on was well played. Balboa foug h t hard but was unable to push runs across the plate. Thus ended a well_played series, many of the boys being sorry th:lt more g;:mes were not to be p layeJ. Cristob:d H igh School appre.::i.,tes the coac hing and advice rendered b y Messrs. Dundon, P ica rd, and Campbell duting the Cristobal-Balboa series. Score, Cristobal 6, B"l bo:l 'l. SECOI\D CAMf.. T H E CARIBBEAN. was given one run all err ors. D e L esseps retaliated in their half with a home run, tying the score. The tie held until the fourth inning when Cristobal scored again. Klunk hit a three-bagger and came in on a sacriflce b y Witherspoo n. B y err ors on the part of Cristobal in the fleld, Dc L es seps in their half r aised the score by two runs. Sco re,3 to '2. Hayden's good work in the box, supponed ably by good flelding, held D e L esseps scoreless t h e remainder of the game. A double pIa)' ;n t h e seventh, Lowande to Withers poon to D e Reuter, helped Hayden alit of a difficult hole. The score was again tied in the eighth, made possible by Klunk's B alboa. AB. Il. 1-1. E. two bagger. The game was won in the Pescod, cf. .. Quinn, cf. D illing. '2b .. Clisbee, lb ... Wood,$s .. He'e,3b .. Rusey, c, If. Brown, p, cf .. o ninth. \Yith two men on and two out o Wertz hit a homer, making the score 6 to c 3 This was followed by another double c by Klunk, who scored on :l sing le o W itherspoon. This made the score 7 to 3 o in Cristobal's f avor. D e L esseps failed to score,dying with three pop Aies to Withero spoon at short. On April '25.1 928, at 4.30 p. m., Cris tobal H igh Sc h ool played the second game of t h e Atlantic Side Championship Series with Fort D e Lesseps, winning a very exciting by a score or8 to 6. This game was vcry gratifying to the student. and rooters of the Hi gh Sc h ool lIot to mention the colored contingent which was there in force. Our tca m throughout the game s how ed a marked superiority, even though the luck broke against us d uri ng the flrst three innings. I n the flrst half of t h e flrst inning, D e Le sseps sco red two runs, but were stopped by a double play, Days to Witherspoon. I n our half a run was scored-a homer by Klunk. Hayden, over-anxious to win, was not at his best through these flrst innings and was relieved by Orsi in the fourth. D e L esseps scored in the second, third. and fourth innings. 'vVhen we came to bat in the the score was 5 to I against us. I n our half we sco re d two runs on a hit J ones,If. . I think Hayden, our pitch e r, deserv es al1d a sac r ifice and two errors by De. Powell,rf.. D es Landes, If, p Total s .. Cristobal. Wertz rf .. Days,3b Klunk c.. Greene, p . Wikingstad, cf .. Lowande, ss ... I special mention for this game. H e is Lesseps. o new at the busine ss this ycar, and this -------was til e first game of real importance he After s hutting out De Le sseps in the fifth, for the first time, we staged the usual batting rally, scoring four runs. Everybody hitinspiteofthefact that D e L esseps c hanged pitchers. 35 AB. Il. 1-1. 5 ha s pitched for the Hi gh Sc h ool. H e W;IS E. in hot water several times but he came through with Aring colors. The score; The soldiers were again shut-out in the C. H. S. AB. R 1-1. PO. A. E. sixt h. We scored one run this inning on a pass and a ba se hit. o D ays, cf.. I n the seventh D e L esseps scored their Maher, 'lb .. Pettit, If. .. De Reuter, lb. Wertz, If . Klunk, c . o Witherspoon, o final run on :t three-bagger by Galarza who was sent home by t h e umpire because I t h e ball was fielded by a spectator. Totals . 3' Summary. Lowande, 'lb. 4 Wikingsrad, If D e Reurer, J b Hayden, p Home run-Klunk. Three-base hir s -Maher,3h This game waS very exciting to the supporters of the Hi g h Sc h oo l team, be calise of t h e poor start. It was later o retrieved by the excellent playing of t h e team as a whole. H ele, Klu nk. Two base hit-Dilling. Maure r, cf.. Base on baJls-Off Greene 'l, off D es _______ D e L esseps. AB. R. H PO. A. E. Londes 4 Earned runs-Balboa 0, Totals . Cristobal 3. Struck outB), Greene 10, by Des Londes 3, b}' Br own I. D e L csseps. On Apri l '2'2, Cristobal H igh School de feated Fort De L esseps by the score of 7 to 3 in a hotly contested game. T his game was the flr s t of a 3 -game series between D e L esseps and the H igh Sc h ool to dec ide the championship of the Atlantic Twilight League for 19'18 The ideal weather conditions brought Out a large and enthusiastic crowd of rooters. Both teams were noticeably nervous in Dodgson, l b Evans, If Galarza, 'lb. Frank, ss .. Cartt:r, p Turncr,3b . Wilson, c f .. Harding, rf. Hirsh,c. the early innings. Cristobal, first to bat, Totals .. 35 '27 1 7 D odgson, I b, If .. AB. R. H PO. A. E. Evans,lf, p . 37 '17 II o Galarza, 'lb, b a Frank, ss, If, ,b. Carter, p, ss .. J Turner,3b. a \\'ilsol1, cf. .. o H ers h c . o Tomlinson, rf Totals .. 3' ,8

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C. H s. AB. R H Days,3b Klunk, c ... Wertz,rf Witherspoon. 2b, ss Orsi,ss, p. Low:mdc, [0 W ikingst:ld, cf t>.iaurer, If Hayden, p,2b. po. A. THE E I Porfin o D e Heuter broke III as first \ BOWLING o baseman dUring the B:llb oa grunes .\I1e1 r I fi I h h 1 1n,lde 1:illch a 'om\ Job of It th It he was or t Ie rst ume JI1 Ollt 11g sc 00 \.\C I I 1 I fi 1\ k have h,ld an opportullln to brmg Ollt our o e m:ltena] (or bo\\hng I hIS }cat lIe had.1 g \ real s uccessful season Our howlers I lork l ack :\iaher, utI lit) second ba:;cm \11, ed h Ird .It the Ime .Ind c.lme out \,1CtCrt\I.IS u<;ed only III the B rllhoa SerIes ,md OliS ag:lIllst Ba-lbo.l The first match II IS p1.l\ed hl1:i pO:;ltlon well lIon b) Ihll}();t but we came through l\lth George \\ t;rtL, Stal ring out ,LS a rookie n\o(lec I s n'c VlctOriCS and 0" domg-so \\on a outfielder, soon blossomed into a star the honors B nlboa. The re sults o outfielder and was with Klunk the Ruth-;Ire ,'s fdlo,,;; Gehrig twins of the Twilight League. .\Illy 12, 1928, at Ba/boa B :llboa, --------Wertz led the Twilight League in home I ,13J pins; Cristobal, [,'2[6 pins. T otals. '17 8 '1 B .-ISEB ALL NOTES. i\like Greene, our only pitcher, after winning twO games against B :llbo:1, left us at a critical period in the T wilight Albert Days also enjoyeJ the best year of h is H igh School career. H e JcvelopeJ into a very dependable fielder. Although he pIa red third most of the season he wa!) used in other infield positions ,'err elT'ec-.l:fl," 19, 1 928 (/I [,216 pins; Cristobal, [,260 pins. 7ulI 2, 1 928, (/t 1,[65 pins; Cristobal, 1,'2'25 pins. il. -ISKET BALL. : \ la rge nurn berof candidates turned au t considerably we:tkened. l\like was con-a\'erage of .304. for basket ball this season. Six of sidered the i "wilight I.eague's best pitcher ,. "R .,' were last-) ea r l.owande, and was one of the H igh School's leading \\ alter \\ lklngstad, .. amlng out-[layden, Oars, L ugli, nnd B,lbbitt. hirters finishing second arllong H igh W:LS. as all \ T hese six men practically made up the School' batters, with an ave rage of .Jq. \\Icky s ficldlllg was sure and hIS luttlllg I H igh School tearll. was dependablc. \\" e played onc practice game with the Jack Klunk cnJoyed the best rear or Jack Pettit was our flashy ol1tfielder, Chase :--.iarional Ba nk and cnll1C out vic-his H igh School career, leading the H igh his fielding bordering on the sensational.i toriolls-21 to 20. School tearll in. an H is hitting was devcloped during the On i\lay 19, we went to Balboa and .34-8, and le:l.dlng the I wI1Lg.ht League [11 second halfoftheT wilight League season. before a large crowd of Balboa's rooters runs scored. Jack wa s conSIdered br f.u Paul Hayden was not able to show his \\ere badly defeated -1-0 to 10. the best backstop in the Twilight League ability during the first half OC the Twilight On i\lay '23, Balboa came to Cristobal and one of the fastest basenlllners. H e League because of :-Olike Greene, but when and this time before a crowd of our rooters was also one of rhe League's home run he did enter into the games he showed they defeated us again. This time 50 to hitters, getting two in the Balboa Series. enough to assure the team that ther had Lowande, our first baseman, another pitcher besides Greene. picked up from a slow srart and ended the Kenneth I\laurer was used during the series brilliantly as D c L esseps can testify. second half because of his sur;; fielding H is batting during the second half was I and hitting. loud and often, and his fielding was steady. \'incent L ugli, our utility infielder, was Lowande held t h e s hortstop position dur-not used often enough to show his playing ing the Ralboa Series. ability. BATTING AVER.AGES. P layer. G. .-IB R H TB ,B. .lB. HR S H S B Pet. Klunk, c S 9' 33 3 2 4 6 J48 Greene, p 7 0 '4 .-'9 J!..t Days, cf, Jb ,8 9' 19 ,8 3" 3 0 4 \\"ertz,rf 85 45 '259 Lowande, I b c 83 18 3.' '53 D e Heuter, I b 15 .18 'r Wikingstad, If '17 80 15 16 188 Pettit, If, cf IS 33 6 8 [ 8 2 i\laurer 16 39 1 80 Lu gli 5 13 15S H a}'den, p. 1.1 ,6 154 l\laher,3 b oS3 1\IR 10066-10 The teamwork of B alboa was fine. T hey seemed to know just where every other fellow was and where he was going. Our players played more as individuals, not being able to work together. TENi\IS. Little in:erest was taken in tennis. Howe\'er, a few boys turned out and practiced f;lIfhfully for the match wilh lhlboa, which occurred all February 18. \Ye were handed a severe beating. Gilman, of Balboa, showed the best playing. Hi s h;>rd sen'e helping much to cart)' his [earn to \ ictory. T he score was 5 to o. I. Gilman and Fidanque ( B H S.) defeated H I\l ueller and R. Edwards (c. II. S.). Score, 6-4, 6-J. 2. H l\leredith and J Humphreys ( 8 H S.) defeated A Mllndberg and Fishbaugh (C.H 5.) Score, 6-0, 6-z.

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THE CARIBBEAN. Mr Stott Bop Phpl<..a\ IMlruclo! Mr. S.der P n y S I (.al I n$\roc.to,..

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3. Gilman ( 8 1-1. S.) defeated R. Edw a r ds ( C J -1. S.). Score 6-4. 6-1. 4. H ele ( B H S.) de f eated R Sargent ( C. H 5.) Scm,. 6-,. 6-,. s. F i\la d ur o ( 8 H S.) defeated E. Fis hb a ugh (c. H S.). Score, 6-0, 6-0. Although new material wa s p lentiful this year there w as /lot mll c h interest taken in swimming An interclass meet wa s h eld April 13, [ 9'28, Junior-Senior VJ. Freshm an-Sophomore. Only three Seniors r e pr ese nted th e upper classmen. H oweve r ther w e r e sufficient 10 defeat the l o wer classes, 31 to [.1. O n Apri l 21, eig ht days later, :lny training, out s\.\.imm ing tcam wen t to B a lb oa to compete in the annud swim min g meet between Balboa Hi2J1 a n d Cri stoba l High. W e arrived on the noon train, .:Ind went immedi:ucl y to the pool to find the Balboa team ready and waiting. J ack Klunk, our aquatic star, was high point score r o f the day w i th [9! point!>. H is closest riv a l s w e r e W m. Walston and -\. Sc hw i ndt'nnan,ofB a lboa, with6point each THE CARfBBE:\\,. 50-)ard BUa!1 Siroke. I. : \ Schwinderrnan ( B I I. S.) Time. 3 [ ... 5 seco nds. 5 points. 2. G. Halloran ( B H S.) 3 p oims. 3. \Y Wikingstad Ie. H .S.l. 1 point. + A. ,\Iundberg (C. H S.) Points-Cristobal [, B a lboa 8. jO-)'flrd Bark Slrolu. l. H Granberry ( B H S.). T ime, 32. 315 seconds 5 points. J Klunk (c. H 5.). J points. 3. F K ey ( B H 5.). 1 point. .... H i\l uelier (c. H 5.) Points-Cristobal 3, Balboa 6. Fmu_, Dit"lIg. I. J Klunk (C. II S.). 5 points. J ,\ Iorrison ( B H S. 3 points. 3 .4.. Schwinuerman ( 8 II. 5.) I point. + f \ Days (c. II. S.l. Points-Cristobal 5, B alboa .... q6'_"flrd I. Cristobal ( E Lowandc, R Sargent, H '\ ludler,.I. Klunk). T ime, I minute 34 seconds. 5 points. 2. B a lb oa ( Grimi so n, Gr:l.nbcrn Schwindcrmall, Walston.) The meet was h:l.rd foughf through o ut Total points scored-Cristobal 29, we f o r ge d ahead only t o ha\'e Ihlboa 30 Balboa take t h e lead in th e n ext evenl Cristobal won four firsts. \\'hen the events w e r e ended we were ant' p oi nt behind, F ollo .... ing are the officia l results of the meet: loo_)'ard S(\'le. I. Iunk (c. H S.). T ime, 59 ... 5 seconds. 5 points. \\'m. Walston ( B H 5.). J point!>. 3. R Sargent (c. H 5.). I point. .... R Watson ( B 1-1. 5.). Points-Cristobal 6, Balboa 3. 22o-yard Free Slyle I. G. Lowe ( 8 .1-1. 5.). T ime,2. minutes 50 seconds. 5 points. '2. H i\l ueller ( C H 5.). 3 points. 1 \rill. Rader ( B H S.). L point. 4 P "!ayde n ( C. H 5.). Points-Cristobal 3, B alboa 6. 50-yard Free SI.vl e L. J K lunk (c. H S.). T ime 24 ... 5 o;cconds. 5 points. W m. W a lston (8. II S.l. 3 points. J. E Lowande (c. H S.l. I poinl. 4 -\ SchwinJerman (8. II S.). Poims-Cristobal 6, Balboa 3. Balboa w o n three firsts. I1lgl/ poinl S(orers-J Klunk (C.II.S.), 19 I -+ points. \\'m. Walston (B. 11.5.), 6 points. .-\. Sch\\indcll};Jn ( B II 5.), 6 points. :'\'umber of conte,. tanis-Cristobal Balboa 10. I RACK. Track started \ \ ith a bang this >e:lr and on .\I.lrch3,1928,at Fort Oa\is,an interclass meet waS held, J unior-Seni o r I.IS. r.'res h men-Sop h omores. The final score was 66 to 2.0, the upper classes o n the long end. r.'rom the winners of t his meet a track team w as c h osen to meet Ihlbo:t. On i\larch 1 7, 1928, we rra\'eled to Balboa to see what we could do to them. Our h igh hopes w ere soon shattered. Balboa showed us that she also had some track men and that they had done some se rious training. H igh honors were won br Gayle i\IcGuigan of Balboa, with II: points. Lowande, of Cristobal, came second with 8 points. Of the enure meet we only won aile first place, rhe shot put. I n this, twO of our men lied, K luilk ;1l11! Low a n de. 75 F ollowing are the official re:>ults : jO-_"flrd Dash. I. August Schwindeman, B II. 5., 5.9 seco nd s. 2. H iggason, C. H S. 3. Lowande, e. H S. IDO-yard Dasll. I. i\IcGuigan, B H S. Tillie, [I seco nd s. _. Lowande, e. H S. 3. Schwindernan, B H S. D e Reuter, C. H S., ruled alit. 22o-yard Dasll. I. i\lcGuigan, B H S. seconds. T ime, 2J S 2. D eRe!Jter, C. H S. J. L ow:lIlde C. H S. -I-Io-J'flrd D.uh. I J ones, B H S. Time, .,9.6 secon.I .... Gebbert, B H S. 3. i\l elendez, C. H S. 12-POlflld Sllol PilI. [. Klunk, e. I -I. S. D istance, q feet 6 inches. 2. L ow:mde, C. H S. O ist:lI1cc, 54 feet (i inches. 3. \\'ooJ, \\'111., B. H S. lIigllJllmp. I. L o we, B H S. Height, 5 feet Inches. 2. ,\1IJ:er, B H S. inches. I leight, 5 feet ..! J. Small, C. H S. B,.oad Jump. I. Gelabcrt, B I I S. Distance, 1 7 ft"et 5 inche'i. 2. I iiler, B H S. 3. Lowande, C. H S. 881_.wlr:/ R e 'flY. l. l3:l.lbo:l H igh School. I-ligh School. Tolal Points B a lbo:! H igh School Cristobal Iligh School Total Indicidual 1I0mir!. ('s I. '\IcGuigan. [3. II. S., I [! points. Lowande, C. II. 5. 8 poinrs.

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-6 T H E C A R Ii33EA N. i\l oonlighl Scene on the Pacific

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THE Cil RIBBEiI.:..:...-:'>_ o ___ --------j"

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T H E CARIBBEA By Glady Eliwoeth Bur;, '28. The exchanges that we receive at Cristobal are is unable to comment on new spape r s but n everthealways welcomed. \\'e are always pl eased to know less that does not m e an that w e do n o t read the m what is going o n in th e high sc hoo l s in the United and keep in touc h wit h t h e "doings" of t h e sc h oo l s. States and how they lik e our book. Our department Our comments on t h e following annuals are: ---------The Tomahawk. Fermda/e Unio n High School,FfrllJda/r,Calij. Your general make.up of the book is excellent. Your co \ 'cr is beautiful and your cutS good. We like the feature of running the jokes between the ads; a l so the introductory page. The classification of the classes such as Seniors as Golden Age-Freshmen as Stone Age is cleve r. A few unfa\'orable criticisms are: we s uggest a smaller staff. \\Ie also recommend using different backgroun ds and a rra ngements for group pict ur es. \\Ih)' do you not excha ng e more with schools out o f yo ur State? II'o/mnI /-ligh School,/f/olmrn, Mas;. We like your magazine very much. The headings are good, especially the one f o r 'Stories." The poem Little Fres hman" amused the Senior s in particular. Sludml. Holmts H igh School, COfJington, Ky. You have a neat magazine. Y ou r headings are excellent. The Exchange Department for November is t he cleverest we have seen. Chick. Wilmillgtoll High School, Wilmillgton, Dd Your annual is the very best we have received. T he cover and cutS deserve special mention. The material that is worked in with the advertisements is a very clever idea. Cardinal. Girh Commtrcial High School, Broolrl),",N. Y. The art department of your magazine is verr good. Y ou r cover s are ver)' cleve r .. COilralFlI/ls HighSchool,Cmtral Falls, N Y. You have a good magazine. The heading for U and I is very attractive. High School, ,\foorestoum, N. J. Y ou r magazine is well compiled. The Literar y Department shoul d have special mention. SIlIIUI High School, Da/l(l.f, Tex as. The idea of giving the staff the name of the "Stampede Gang" and the names to the different departments is verr suitable. Whiu. Rochtsler HighSchool, N. II. The cover of your book is very neat. We especiaJl)' like the poetry written b)' Annie Phill ips, '29and J ames Watson, ''28 I a Albuqlurqlle High School, N l \1. \\'e like your book as a whole. The border around e;t c h page is vcr)' attractive. Y ou r cuts are wonderful. We are glad to see that you are able to produce a n annual without advertising. \\'e suggest exchangin g with one or tWO eaStern schools; also a permanent T he Whisp. W i lmillgloll High School, Wilm;ngtoll, Dd Your art editors shoul d be praised and especially the one who drew the picture of Lindbergh. The \\'ho s Wh o Director), is a clever ide.1. We a l so acknowl edge the following exc h anges : Balboa High School, B a lboa, C. Z. J a mai ca H igh School, Jamaica, N. Y. NorJhjidd Star, Northfield High School, Northfield, T he Roman, Rome H ig h School, Rome, G a. The and II/hiu, West Chester High School, Wes t Chester, P a. The Expo,wlJ. Greenfield H igh Sc h ool, Greenfie ld The 1Illlllmtie, Stoneh am High School, Stoneham, l\lass. The Nautilus, Waterville H ig h Sc h oo l, Watervill(:, Tlu Pai, Tamalpai s H igh Sc h oo l Sausalit o Calif. The Spulfll or, J oh nstown H igh Sc h oo l, J o hnstown Pa. T he Hermn, H udson F alls Hi gh School, H ud son Fall s, N. Y T he Btacon, Gloucester H igh Schoo l Gloucester, I\l ass. Acorn, Oakcliff High School, Dallas, Texas. Taconic, Williamstown Hi g h School, Williamstown, 1\lass. The following are some comments that we have received : The Cllribbuw. CriSlobal High School, CriJtoblll, C. Z. The pictures are very interesting to u s The cuts are very appropriate. Y ou r literary department i s the best we have ever seen in a sc h ool magazine. EXpo,wll,Grunjidd High School, T he CaribbMu. Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z. As usual, w e found },our annual ve r y clever and interesting. I t is arranged ne atl}' and there are some original features in t h is new publication. The Whisp, Wilmington H igh School, I/' ilmington, T he Caribb(lIl1. Crislobal High School, Cris t obal, C. Z An all-around good magazine with departments well_arranged. The beautiful pictures add much to the magazine. TMStudmt lIolmn High School, Co,ingt01l, 1\), Caribbtall. Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z. W e think your annual is verr good. While your lite rary work is excellent we suggest more pictures. H owever, the pictures )'OU have a r e a rr anged cleverly We also lik e you r sport sectio n and are glad to see yo ur girls taking s u ch an active part in sports. La Rtata,lIlImqlurque High School, Albuqlurqlu, N AI

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THE CARIBBEA;\'. 79 Ca't Glf' I H, ... o.oi ... "I c..,. ...... ),," .,

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THE BBEAN. OVERHEARD IN ENGLI S H CLASS. Soph.-"I w o nder w h y t hat S enior carries a ,\liss /lesSt'. -"Usc Euripid es in a scnte nce." Bright Cuy. -"Euripides pants, I kill you." Fit'!dolI.-" \\'oul d give m e ajob?" Barba.-"Sure, paint that striped pole." \\'here do I find th e stripej paint?" 7.ola D.-"I d like to see you kiss m e a g ain!" ROJal. "AII r ight, keep your eyes o p e n this time." / \11'. B ellsoll I f you c \ 'e r want to l e arn anything, E ddie you mus t always b egin at th e b o t to m Eddie A Y cs, 1\11'. B e n son, but h ow ab out sw imming?" Bill. H ello B ee h o w clo yo u l ike your n ew electric washer?" Bee.-"-y,ot so good Ev ery time I get in th e thin g kn oc k s me oR'm)' feet." J. /I/lJiddcl1.-"1 wis h I w e r e lik e th e river s." ROJ.-"How so? ]. If/.-"T o follow m)' co urse without l e aving my bed." ,\liss Sewell (in Ph ysics Class ) R oger, how many magnetic pol es arc the re?" Roger.-"Two ... "/iss Sewell .-"\\'hat are they?" Roger.-"Bl o nde s and brun ettes." R. /Ixlell.-"Say, Arthur, did ),ou ever hunt hear?" /rlllUr. -"Of co urSl: n ot. 1 always w ea r clothes." ,\II' Saw ... vers (in E co nomi cs Cla ss) -"Scott, what is an o rgani zer?" ScoII.-" H e i s t h e guy t ha t mak es th e mu sic in t h e c hur ch." I bought one o f those suits wirh two pair of pants." Sophomore.-"\\'ell, h ow do you lik e it?" FreJll1uan.-"';:\Tot so well. I t's to o h o t with two pair of pants." Charles C.-" D o yo u all wan t me to s h oo these nics f o r you?" 7.fJllcl/a B.-"Oh n o, l e t th em run around in their bare feet a little l o ng er." cane?" Fresh. I wond er?" Soph Because it can't walk." GIll 11.-"Oh, I 've b ee n s tun g, it mlls t hav e been a bee." Edward I.....-"D on't w o rry, don't w o rry. J ust put a l ittle alc o h o l 011 it." Glad)'s B,-" Y es but I 'm sureith a sflownaway." JOe! to CM O l Y o u k n o w you r e mind me o f th e ocean. CMoc. "\\' hy J just becau se I 'm wet and UIltam eahle ?" Jor.-"No,you' reall wet and you mak e mesi ck." 7ar k P. ( to s tranger).-"Haven't ) see n your face b e f o r e?" S lran ger Probablr I 'm n o t in the hab i t o f walking around ba ck war d Lee K. R ando l ph, why are some women called Amazon?" RfWd ol pll.-"R ecause th ey 'r e so wid e at th e mouth." If/all er If/. ( to bu s driver ) "Sl o w u p, I 'm going to jump at t h e next corner Other Pa sSfJlgl'r.-"\\'ell, don't sc are it." F iucentl.....-.. i\l y girl g oes wit-h on l y one pany." Victor i\/.-"\\'hic h parry th e D emocrats or R ep ubli ca n s ?" J\liss Sewell -"Can you p rove that the square on t h e h ypot enuse to t hesum ofthesq uare3 on th e two s i des o f t h i s triangl e?" R o)'al H. I don't hav e to prove it, I adm i t it." FRES HioolEX PLEAS E TAKE NOTE. D on't get d i sco urag ed; it take s some c ircu ses six years to train a jackass. "My h eart i s w i t h th e ocean," th e poet cried. "You've gone m e o n e b ette r," sa i d his seasick frie nd as h e took a firm e r grip o n the rail. \\'e call h:at hrrn "h:itty" because s h e dyed nine tim es \\' hy,ccrtainl r! I n Panama b o)'s aren't allow ed to sell n e w spapers u n de r 1'2 years o f ag e R /lxlell (looking at pictur e o f pin head).-"I bet h e's narrow m inded."

PAGE 87

THE CARIBBEAN. 8 1 "\\'hat are YOll writing?" joke." "\Ve ll, give him my be s t regards." Alb e r t c all s his best girl "garbage" b ec au se 110 one can love him like his little garbage can. H e trod on the corn o f t h e bell e of the ball, An d then-so the oth e r girls tell Slumbt:ring ec h oes w ere aroused in the hall B ec au se of t h e bawl o f t h e b elle J\/i ss j\[arvin.-"\ 'incel1t, who prompted yo u ? heard so m eo ne w h isper t hat date. \\'a s it you, James? Jallles ma'am, it must have been History repeating itsel f." Eri e F.-"Say, call your dog ofF." l/isla.-":\'othin g doing, I've called him T a w ser eve r since h e was a pup. \\' hi.:h freshman is it t hat "hink s Bacteria" is t h e r ear entranCe to a cafeteria? Swee! V oung Thing.-"I'd lik e to buy a petticoat. Floor /I /nlker .-"Antique department on th e t h ird R oa r l\1 i ss." C IGAR BAND STYLE. had a little dress A dainty _bit and airy. I t d idn't s h ow t h e dirt a bit, But gee h ow it s h owed IVlary. A.'/uJ/k.-"D id you know 1 was a life saver last summer?" Glndys.-"Really, what flavor?" F oolis hn ess R o u g hn ec k s, E gotism Sillin ess Hazy. Mus h y Evergreen Numbs kull. I s that movie actor very much co nceited?" "Conceited! \\'hy, ever y time h e hears a thunde rclap h e stands up and bows." R. /lx/ell .-"What does the Washington m t:nt stand f or?" Emma Bank s.-"\ V ell, n ow, it would l ook funn y l y ing down." 10066--11 ROl'al HiggasoJ/ (to waiter in Canal Zone re<;t,Hlrant).-"This is a good restaurant, isn't it?" /Vaitcr ,-"Y cs, if rou order a fresh egg ht:re yo u get t h e fres hest egg in t h e world. I f you order a cup of coRee you get the best coRee in t h e world, and-. R. II.-'Y es, J believe you J ordered a small steak." OverhcarJ in P h ys i cs Class after l e ngth y dis c u ss i o n b y l\1orton Southard-"Oh, boy, when t here's nothing more to be said, i\lorton always it Ro)' D o YOll dance?" .-Iuila Raukin.-"Y es, I love to." Ro)' /Valker .-"Gr eat, that bt'ats dancing any day," \ \ 'e can not change our nature, That i s berond our reach; The girl who's born a lemon Can never be a peach, /u uglish .-"\\' hat' s t h e technical word for s n o ring?" Bright Jtlfdtlll .-"Sheet mu sic." A/i!s j\[arvin.-"This so nnet symbolizes to let your mind have complete forgetfulness." 7ack A/ahtr {wh o ha s forgotten his sonnet),-'" have complete forgetfulness THE SHEIK. (Taken from the Boston Post.) Blessings on thee, modern sheik, ;\Iillioruire on ten a week, \\'ith thy hatless slickumed hair, : \ nd thy flivver worse for wear\\'ith thy sweater gaudier slill Th;lIl the o'er the hill. "'ith th}' b'loon pants-miles too brg:Thy whole comic valentine rig, You'll always be an also ran; I thank the stars 1'111 not a man. THE SHEIK'S RETOR.T. Blessings on thee, little dame, Bare of neck and knee the same; \\'ith thy rolled down silken hose, And thy thin transparent clothes; With thy pretty made-up face, And thy bobbed hairs jaunty grace; W ith thy red lips reddened more With th}' lipstick from the store; W ith all my heart I wish thee joy But I t ha nk the L o r d I was born abo}'.

PAGE 88

THE CARIBB EAN. AUTOG R APH P AGE.

PAGE 89

HOTEL \N' ASHINGTON Unegua led for situatio n and comfort. A hotel in keeping with the dignity spirit, and se rvice o f the P a n a m a Can a l .... G olf <......, If/ate r Sports Tarpoll Fishillg Till YHR L ... J.'\;\I E S E I.E \\' IS, P 0 .. CHI S T O R.\,L C'\'\'A L ---. ....

PAGE 91

THE CAIUBBEA:-<. Panama Railroad Steamship Line CRISTOBAL TO NE'vV YORK VIA PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAlTI (ALL CABIN SHIPS) S. S. "AN CON" and S. S. "CRISTOBAL" FORTNI G HTLY SERVICE MONTHLY SAIL I NGS TO WEST COAST S. S "GUAYAQUIL" and S. S. "BUENAVENTURA" CALLIN G AT BUENAVENTU RA TUMACO, ESMERALOAS, BAI-IIA, MANTA, P UERTO BOLIVAR and GUAYAQUIL OF FI CES ON THE ISTHMUS: Superintendent, Balboa H e ight s Canal Zone Steamshi p Ticket Agent, Cristobal, Canal Zone R ecei v i n g and F orwa rd ing Agency, Cristobal, Canal Zone OFFICES I N THE UNITED STATES : No. 24 State Street, N ew Y or k City, N. Y. The Bureau of Clubs and Pla ygrounds I l S READY TO SER\'E Y OU I w 1 SODA FOUNTAIN SERVICE MOTION PICTURES BOWLING ALLEYS BILLIARD ROOMS READING AND WRITING ROOMS "Soci al, Physical, and Playground Actil'ities" I FJtWi\WW4W4Wlf\VJ1MM\VIf\\TiiM\\Iit\V4WbVlbif0\rQV(\vo11b1Jl >'It l'lL .rJ1Lill'dJi'M Mi:N1. Wl1Ii. I

PAGE 92

84 ______________________ T H __ E __ C A R B B _EA __ N ______________________ ___ UNITED FRUIT COMPANY Regular Sailings I from CRISTOBAL, C. Z to NEW YORK II -For further particula r s apply to I COSTA RICA PAUL WEST, Manager Cris t obal Division, Cris t obal, C. Z. T. H. JACOME, Agent, Panama C i ty , O F -amrricun 'arlor 1 -----s '''''=.--I Ii Au. I.,,," :."""" C U,"' ;-.JESTLE P E RMANENT \\'AV ING Ph one 29 K 8 .030 Front STreet If
PAGE 93

r I I THE CAIUBBEA:-<. 8 5 THE NATIONAL CITY BANK OF NEW YORK I Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits $146,176,246.85 U. S. Cy. II ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,1 Ir;. I 8053 BALBOA A VENUE I G I; COLON, R P -We a l ways car r y lD Sto c k a fresh assort ment of American and European I il Dlugs and P atent M e dicine s I 11 --AGENT F O R Rubber Goods Toil e t I Th e Nation a l Fire Ins urance Company -Articles and -II of H artford, Conn U S. A. E:il -P e rfum ery I P aid up Capital 53,000,000.00 OUR PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENT Total A sse t s over -+6,c:x:K), ooo .oo i s under the care of a regi s tered chemi s t of wide experience Pan-Am erican Life Insurance Comp a n y, I e of Ne w Orleans, L . U. S A. COLON lip CapItal 5 I ,000,000 00 C o rner o f 9t h and B olivar St reets, N o. 8 11 1 -T otal A ssets over $20,500,000.00 -Tele9hone 222 P O Box 84

PAGE 94

86 THE CAR I BBEA N. OF I F id anque H e nriquez & Ci a T o t h e Graduating Stu d e n ts of t h e Cristobal Hi g h School o u r ye r y since r e good w i s h es for t h i s au spic iou s o cca s ion s h ou ld l e nd to your am bi tio n s WINGS IL:=:==:::J R a th bu n, S t i lson & Company Ltd. H ardware, Lumber, Paints a n d Oil s P. O. Box 140, Colon, R. de P Telephone s : Branch Store 2 53 -Main Store 1 1 4 -Office 1 92

PAGE 95

TH E CARIBBE.'\:-<. P. O. B O lt 6 75 P hone l5S CRISTOBAL, C Z CRIS TOB A L C. Z. 9.0,) 6 F ront Street COLON R P. c. CASULLO, l:lnd '\!\'atch."ake. __ Ei 1 1 ASA & RETTY LOOK BEFORE BUYING Y OUR and 9 th St. a nd Balbo a Avenue Ph o n e 181, Colon I SOUVENIRS Furniture VISIT OUR STORE WHERE YOUWILLFlND Manu facturers THE LOWE ST PRI CES IN TOWN PERRONE & LOBATO I FIXTURES -WINDOWS F RA:-
PAGE 96

88 THE CARIBBEAN. YOU WONDER WHERE THE B O Y S GET SUC H SNAPPY HAIR CUTS? AN D THE GIRLS THEIR MODISH B OBS? WHY AT Charley Payne's Barber Shop COMP LIM ENTS OF HOSPITAL de PANAMA J I ) J 1 } J I Compliments of Bilgray's Tropic Restaurant

PAGE 97

I THE CAR IBBEAN. """""""""'_""""""""'''''''11 I O F PARAMOUNT FILMS, S. A. If it's a Paramount Picture it's the best s how in town II II =1 II VICTROLAS FROM $20.00 UP II NEW VICTOR EVERY MONTH J V. BEVERHOUDT Colon MR 10066-12 Gittens & Taylor FOR I =1 Class loth Street

PAGE 98

T H E CARIBB EAN. !J! ; DRINK ; I DELICIOUS AND REFRESHING Panama Coca-Cola Bottling Company I PANAMA 6 5 PHONE: COLON 84 I __ _WIf\'WSj1IrwiiWltWiWllWc\'jf{\l:l1 SPALDING ATHLETIC GOODS =1 II L. J. GRANIE DISTRIBUTOR COLON, R. P. Whateve r spo rt, we have t h e s upplies mr'W'll' I The Progressive Cleaning =1 ; and Pressing House I i 13th & BOLIVAR STREETS, COLON I -1-WE SAY IT AS A STATEMENT OF FACT : "That we do satisfy the most critical and exacting customer" Please call Phone 161, Colon

PAGE 99

THE CARIBBE :\:-<. -------------------------be amaritan ospital I CHOCOLATE IS GOOD FOR YOU, GOOD FOR KIDDlES, AND KIDDIES LIKE IT C HOCOLATE I S B O TI-I NO UR I SHING A:-
PAGE 100

92 THE CARIBBF..I\N. ---------------------Cable Address: IMPCO A. B. C. Sth -6thB e ntley's P. O. B ox 342 Colon Import & Export Co Ltd. JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS DEALERS IN General Merch andise and Nati v e Produc t s COLON REPUBLIC OF PANAMA BRANCH RETAIL STORES A N D TRADI NG STATIONS PLAYA DAMA SANTA ISABEL PORVENIR TUPILE ISLE OF PINES CARTI NARGANA I Th, C hin"e Silk S to" I II O F THE HOTEL ASTOR BOB B ROUGH, Proprietor COLON NEW CHINA I We carry Genuine Chinese and Japanese Silks and Curiosities Front Street Central Avenue COLON PANAMA

PAGE 101

THE C AR IBBEA:-<. 9.3 O F T H E HOTEL T IVOLI 1= SOMETHl NG YOU C A N T LEA R N A T SCHOOL ':' II I I __ II The r e i s alway s a New and L arge Assortment of 1 = CLOTHING, SPORTS WEA R a n d NOVELTIES I 1= Arri ving o n eve r), Steamer I II -II II Ii 1= I I ES PECI A LLY SU I T E D F O R S T U D E1\ T S ---COil I P I 1'1 E1'TS 0 1 -"" -I lIlr tlrjtr 19r I(.r[ if ..... (for b ill C RI S T O B A L CA;\ ,\L 20:-
PAGE 102

9 4 THE C ,RJ BBEAN. O F I American Fruit & Steamship Corporation K o dak Panama Ltd. G rebmar B lIilding R of P II i The Cafeteria Idea I I i s quick se r v i ce a nd e limin at i o n o f overhead expenses, bring ing p atro n s a nd sen i c e in dir ec t a nd immed i a t e c o n tact a t LOWES T POSS IBLE COST M A KE OUR CAFETERIA YOUR HEA DQU ARTERS FOR GOOD THINGS TO EAT II -The Panama Canal Restauran: s CARL STRO M, Lessee .. "1llfjLJfjn<;[tNHJl.\'l[.IDI1 OF j.\nn:s R P OWELL

PAGE 103

THE C / IRIBBEAN. 95 Compaiiia Panameiia de Fuerza y Luz ( SU C UR SAL D E COLON ) COLON, R. de P. II 1:;;11 f51 =1 I I RICHARDS' PHOTO STUDIO !i (N e xt [ 0 N a ti o n:.! Cit y Bank o f N e w Y orkl C rist o bll, C z. B o x 52J The Oldest and Most Reliable Studi o I PORTRAITS, VIEWS, ENLARGEMENTS I ALL WORK GUARANTEED I M". N. C REID F. FINLAYSON I Pmpd"" .. ,,"d Ph""m,h" and KODAK FINISHING P 0 no> ",. Cd",b". C. Z. Ph, "". II P h 'me 1345 C)ion soo c r J9S MAC'S I GARAGE AND TOURIST SERVI CE i CARS WITH OR WITHOUT DRI VERS -GOOD SERVICE AT LOW PRICES J -I eo,,, ="" I Try U s f o r R epa ir s, Supplies, Etc. IElllW0VIi\VIf) r WAW(',l'Tf\"WW(','Vr'I1tb1tK'\lIt\1Ilt\\:l1

PAGE 104

THE CARIBB EAN 'II COMPLIMENTS OF I The Metropole Hotel CENTRAL AVENUE PANAMA I (Oppos>te Santa Ann, Plaza) Where to Shop in Colon or Panama D. CHELLARAM III WHOLESALE and RETAIL ORIENTAL MERCHANTS 1 -r=N 47 Fro nt Street 8I-A Central Avenue -I COLON PANAMA -If WORLD VARIETY SOUVENIRS Specialty in Spanish Shawls, Nice Col lection in Ivor y, Ready made Pongee Silk S uit s, Always in Stock OUR MOTTO IS: 1 -SMALL PROFIT & QUICK RETURNS Phones: Pan ama 340 Colon 159 [I Before eye-strain wrinkles become permanent and nervou s fatigue becomes chronic, have your eyes examined. If you need glasses, yo u will be surprised to find w hat a comfort they are w hen acc urately and becomingly fitted to YOU HAVE YOUR EYES EXAMINED SCADRON OPTICAL CO. Registered Optometrists and Opticians Estab -Iisbed in Panama Over 10 Years PANAMA 23 Central Ave. NEW YORK COLON 9.034 Front St. Dr. E. A URWILER DENTIST

PAGE 105

THE CARIBBFA:'\'. 37 CENTRAL AVENUE LEADING MENS' FURNISHING HOUSE ON THE ISTHMUS I FULL BAGS I A F I:,\,E ASSO R H IENT OF TWEEDS, SERGES, LINE:,\, A:,\,D "HA"I DR IL LS, BOOTS AND S H OES, H ATS AND CAPS, SHIRTS, CO LL ARS, T I ES, Etc. CARLOS W. MULLER, Proprietor II W6\'Vi\)f6\)ffWi\WWTiVf\Vr'\lTf\'Vi\"\7lWZW6\)ft\"\7lWZWf\WWf\)ff\Jll'i' I!BWWf\Vf\'Vi\WWf\)fdliDVI Plumbing & Supply Co. i: Supplies and Tools I: OF EVERY DESCRIPTION "Good H o uses Deserve Good Plumbing" TRY US COLON 8th St. & Balboa Ave. Pbo n e NO. 4 P 0 B ox No. 108 i\IR 10066--13 PANAMA 5 8 Central Ave. Phone No. 249 P O. Box No. 724 AU BON MARC HE Ii CENTRAL AVENUE 54 Telephone 1320 -!-II The Most Complete Assortment of Articles for LADIES, GENTLEMEN AND =1 CHILDREN -!-Pay u s a v i sit before yo u buy e l sew h e r e -!-NEW YORK, PARIS, MANCHESTER JAPAN 1;;u)'lib\ib\ib\Ilb1tfWb\ttM51llb1il'l\ibllld1fl\Vl'MWkf I

PAGE 106

98 THE CARIBBEAN. i I 1= DAY AND NIGHT GAR AGE REPAIRS AT FLAT R ATES Complete Line o f Accessorie s at Low Prices DISTRIBUT O R FOR FIRESTONE TIRES AND TUBES PANAMA C OLON MRS. PAULA M CARDOZE T S OF AT THE Panama Hat Store WONG CHANG & Co., Ltd. No. 35 FRONT STREET + Off e r s Her Cu stomers a Selected A ssortment o f -Panama Hats Hand Bags GENERAL H A RD W A RE Birds of Paradise il Feath e r s and !\rANY OTHER DJff'ERE:-I'T C UR IO SITIES 01 All at Very Reasonable Prices COLON and PANAMA Without Equal in Town 9.033 Front St. 93 Centra l Ave. The Pan-American Dru g S t o re N. SALAZAR Main Store: 9 038 Front Street Pho n e 336 Bran eh Stores: 4 .060 Bolivar Street, Phone 166 11. 156 Boli va r Street, Phone 356 II

PAGE 107

THE 99 S pecialty : FRENCH PERFU1\IERY i Feli x B. Maduro 2 1 CEN TRAL A VE:'-1UE T elephone: P anama 2.J. 1 -P O. B ox lOiS P.\:\UIA, R P. I I Viva-Tonal R ecording -The Record s Without Scratch MUEBLERIA "LA MODERNA" MASA & RETTY 9th SI. and Balboa Avenue COL O N R ep. de P. I Pllone 181 P O. Address 410 I INOCENCIO GALINDO. Ir. 7th & Bo li var Streets E1 COLON I M JOBBER AND COMMISSION MERCHANT -I; REAL ESTATEM BROKER AND It., __ ,i

PAGE 108

100 THE CARIBBE A N Improved Equipment Methods -Efficient Service JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY BROADWAY, NEAR FOLKS RIVER We So licit the Patronage of Cana l Zone Empl oyees WEEKLY COLLECTIONS AND DELIVERIES OF LAU N DRY WORK CHARGE ACCOUNT IF DESIRED CLEA N I N G PRESSING and DYEING A SPECIALTY P O Box 1131, Cristobal, C Z. [j,

PAGE 109

T H E CARI BBEAN. 1 0 1

PAGE 110

102 THE CARIBBEAN. EJlgravings Of Unexcelle d !?2J/{flity for School and College Publications HOWARD-WESSON CO. WORCESTER MASSACHUSETTS Th e C ollege Eng ra vers of New England T he Engr:Jvings for this Publication were m:lde by H owatdW esson C o.






68 THE CARIBBEAN.


Cristobal High School Saxophone Band.

THE GIRLS' SAXOPHONE BAND. THE GATUN BOYS' BAND.


This band, which is composed mainly of Cris-
tobal High School girls, is one of the best known
musical organizations on the Isthmus. Mr. Rein-
hold, the director, deserves a great deal of credit
for the excellent training of each girl in the organi-
zation, and for the splendid way in which they
play. Each girl is trained individually, then they
get together twice a week and give the neighbors
a treat.
The Saxophone Band has given many recitals
on the Pacific side as well as on the Atlantic side,
so it is well known and always well received. These
girls were asked to play during the banquet given
for Colonel Lindbergh when he was in Colon,
and they received high praise for this performance.


When we sit back and enjoy the harmonious
music of the Gatun Boys' Band, we forget those
first agonizing do-re-mi's which these young
musicians produced a short time ago. The band
was organized about three years ago through the
efforts of Mr. R. M. Crum, who is now president
of this organization.
At present there are about 40 members in the
band, and, under the very able leadership of Mr.
Meyer Cohen, of Fort Davis, this organization
plays very well and need no longer be considered
amateur.
The Gatun Boys' Band has given concerts on
both sides of the Isthmus and is well known for its
well-balanced and well-presented programs.


Gatun Boys' Band. Includes many Cristobal School Boys.








36 THE CARIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN. I


Name-G. J. BENSON.
Birthplace-St. Cloud, Minn.
Home Address-St. Cloud, Minn.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-Technical High School.
Location-St. Cloud, Minn.
College or University-State Teachers' College.
Dates Attended-1917-18, 1919-20.
Degrees Obtained-Diploma.
College or University-Bradley Polytechnic Institute.
Dates Attended--922-24.
Degrees Obtained-B. S.
College or University-University of Minnesota.
Dates Attended-Summer Session, 192o.
Favorite Expression-Stop your talking now.
Date Entering Service on Canal Zone-October I, 1924.
Subjects Taught 1927-g928-Manual Training.

MR. GEORGE BENSON.
To all boys taking Manual Training and Me-
chanical Drawing, Mr. Benson is a well-known
character, but he is also known to the remaining
portion of the student body.
Mr. Benson and his pupils proved to be a valu-
able help at our annual High School Carnival.
They erected the tents and booths which were a
necessary part of the celebration.
Mr. Benson has been with us several years, and
is a familiar member of the faculty. This year
he surprised us by returning from the States with
a bride.
All Cristobal High will gladly welcome Mr.
Benson if he again resumes his work with us
next year.


Name-MARY ELIZABETH MOORE.
Birthplace-West Alexandria, Pa.
Home Address-West Alexandria, Pa.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-Washington High School.
Location-WU shington, Pa.
College or University-West Virginia University.
Dates Attended- 1919-1923.
Degrees Obtained-A. B.
Favorite Expression-Now when I was at college, etc.
Date Entering Service on CanalZone-October 1, 1925.
Subjects Taught r927-1Q28-Spanish, Latin.
Sponsorfor what Class-Freshman.

Miss MARY ELIZABETH MOORE.
Miss Mary Elizabeth Moore, our very popular
Latin and Spanish teacher, has been with us for
3 years. For 2 years she was the able sponsor of
the Junior Class, and conducted two of the best
banquets ever held at Cristobal High School.
This year she is the sponsor of the Freshman
Class. Under her management the Freshmen
gave a most entertaining masquerade party. For
the first time in the history of the High School,
the party was held in the Washington Hotel
Ballroom.
All of the students enjoy Miss Moore's classes,
for she is a vivacious and interesting teacher.
Everyone is looking forward to her coming back
next year.








20 THE CARIBBEAN.

Name-Evangeline Smith. .Vicknamnie--annie.
Birthplace-Birmingham, Ala. Date-February 5, 19o9.
Home Address-Cristobal, Canal Zone.
Date ofEntering Cristobal School-January, 1921.
Grade-Fifth.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone-Gordon
School, Memphis, Tenn.
School Activities-"Japanese Operetta," "Kleptomaniac,"
Glee Club, 1924-25; Chorus, 1924-25; Supper Club, 1924-25-
26-27; Girls' Athletic Editor, THE CARIBBEAN.
School Athletics-Basket Ball, Track, Swimming, Indoor
Baseball.
Favorite E pression-Aw Gee !
Chosen Vocation-Undecided.
Hobby-Reading.
Favorite Pastime-Swimming.

EVANGELINE SMITH.
Vannie, the ever-pleasant Vannie, is a bright
and shining light in athletic fields. For years
she has been the "old faithful" in the Balboa
basket ball games-and a glorious "faithful" she
has proved. The track team's backbone was
always-Vannie. In fact, a synonym for athletic
ability in C. H. S. is-"Vannie."
And she is a real pal. Many a vanquished
soul struggling along the weedy path of education
has she helped. To know her is to love her.
Name-Arthur E. Rothenberg. Nickname-Art.
Birthplace-Fort Mott, N. J. Date-November 9, 19ro.
Home Address-Fort Randolph, Canal Zone.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October, 1926.
Grade-Junior.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone--Northeast
High, Philadelphia, Pa., Middletown Township High School,
Leonardo, N. J.
School Activities-Carnival, 1927-28; Chorus, 1926-27.
Favorite Expression-Gee! Too much work.
Chosen Vocation-Engineer.
Hobby--Reading.
Favorite Pastime-Hunting.

ARTHUR E. ROTHENBERG.
When Arthur joined our ranks during our
Junior year, our curiosity was immediately aroused
to penetrate his quiet manner and to become
acquainted. Now we wouldn't sacrifice him for
six others, as he has so completely fitted into
our group that we would be lost without his
underlying current of humor that adds to our
pleasure in his character.
Arthur's well-earned honors are received un-
assumingly.
Arthur spends many spare moments away from
the haunts of mankind (also womankind) in the
tropical jungles.








THE CARIBBEAN. 77










THE CARIBBEAN.


SOPHOMORE DIRECTORY.


Name.

Bailey, William............
Birkeland, Elsie.........
Blauvelt, Elaine ........
Bliss, Rae................
Bradford, Fieldon.........
Bretch, Margaret.........
Bush, Marguerite.........
Campbell, James........
Crum, Ralph.............
D arley, Elsie.............
Days, Frances............
Doar, Elise..............
Doar, Lillian ............
Eberenz, Ruth...........
Fishbough, Edmund......
Fitzgerald, Eleanor.......
Frank, Leah.............
Ganzemuller, Evelyn... .
Hanna, Robert...........
Harris, Beatrice..........
Henter, Alice.............
Herman, Pauline ........
Joyce, Rita..............
Logan, Helen.............
Lugli, Vincent ..........
M aher, Jack .............
Martin, Charles .........
Maurer, Kenneth.......
Melendez, Victor..........
Mundberg, Arthur........
Napoleon, Washington...
Newman, William........
Parsons, Scott............
Quinn, James............
Raymond, Della..........
Sargeant, Richard........
Schmoll, Martin..........
Schulert, Mabel...........
Sprague, Louise ..........
Stewart Fred...........
Thirlwall, Mavis..........
Urwiler, Eleanor..........
Wong, Francisco...........
Wikingstad, Walter.......


Nickname.

"Apo"............
"Mike"........ ..
"Angel Face".....
"Tinsie". ........
"Static". ........
"Peggy". .........
"Giggles". ..... .
"Bones". ........
"Andrew Jackson".
"Shorty". ........
"Frangypany"....
"Elise"...........
"L il"..............
"Ruthie". .. .
"Fish"...........
"Fitzie"........
"Frankie". .......
"Levinsky".. ..
"Hanna" ........
"Bee"...........
"Blondie". .... ..
"Miss C. H. S."..
"Shrimp".........
"Loganberry".....
"Patuch".........
"Handsome".....
"Chubby". .......
"Pest" ...........
"Vicks".........
"Mundy"........
"Wishy Washy"...
"Fitty"...... ....
"Lanky". ...... .
"Jimmy". ... ....
"Bridget".........
"Dik"..........
"Doc Webster"....
"May bells"......
"Professor". ......
"Stew ...........
"Mavie"........
"Boots"...........
"Francis.........
"Wicky"..........


Wheeler Estafania... .


Miss Sewell (Sponsor).....


"Carrie"..........


Making people laugh.........
Telling jokes. ................
Misspelling his name ......... .
Memorizing the dictionary.......
Getting her lessons........... .
Reading Harvard Classics.... .....
To eat, sleep, and drink with radio.
Driving the Ford...............
Flirting........... ............
Studying .......... .........
Playing the cornet ............ ..
Reading .............. ........

Swimm ing. ....... ...... ..


"What next."
"Oi geivalt."
"Ha! Ha!"
Anything in the dictionary.
"My goodness."
"Oh! that's easy."
"Stay sober."
"Ha-Ha-Haha-Ha!"
"Would you believe it?"
"+-- ."
"Come on, guy."
"All's well."

"That's enough."


MR 10066---5


33


Pastime. Pet expression.

Fishing.............. .......... "Don't be an airdale."
Reading................... "W ell, I'll be darned."
Memorizing English.............. "Good gracious."
Playing "Stingy Woman Blues"... "Oh, my cow."
Being with Connie............... "You don't say."
Writing notes .................."Who's next."
Blushing............... "Really."
Studying. .................... "Aw, heck."
Dancing....... .... ... "Hang it."
Studying. .... .. "Oh! Really."
Being with Tinsie................ "Ya, no mis."
D ancing..................... "D arn it."
Sewing.................. ..... "Please don't."
Playing the piano................ "Don't be funny."
Fishing...... ... .... .. . "Nothing much.".
Not missing a movie ......... "It's the truth."
Being busy ....... ....... .... "We haven't heard."
Talking to the boys........... "Heavens."
Canoeing............. ........ "Aw!"
Tickling the ivories ........ "Don't be an idiot."
Dreaming................... Says nothing.
Studying Caesar ............. "Oh, how smelly."
Whispering.................. "She's crazy."
Getting her lessons... ........ -. "Quit yer kidding."
Pinching girls ................ "Gimme a kiss."
Flirting................ ...... "Be a sport."
Getting bawled out ... ...... .. "Come on."
Loafing.................. .. "Laugh, I thot I'd die."
Correcting people ........ ..... "Use your head, mon."
Talking.................. ...... "Now stop."
Being inconspicuous.............. Hasn't any.
Teasing Grace............... "Kisssss."
Playing the "sax"............... "Watch out."







THE CARIBBEAN. 27









THE CARIBBEAN. 37


FRESHMAN STARS.


Miss Moore, Class Adviser ......

Carlos Rankin, President ........

Robert Brough, Vice President...


"Silence."

"Beau Geste."

"Seen and Not Heard"


LillianHousel, Secretary and Treasurer. "She's a Sheik."


Edward Albin, Extra ..........


"Rainbow Reilly."


Joyce Alberga............ "It."

James Albin......... "Knockout Reilly."

Stella Arthur............. "Stella Dallas"

Ernest Berger............ "The Poor Nut."

Nellie Berger..... ........ "The Dress Parade."

William Blauvelt ......... "The Denver Dude."

William Bodden.......... "The Runaway Ford."

Mary Bretch............. "Smilin' Thru'."

Crawford Campbell....... "The Sap."

Daniel Coffey............ "The Scarlet Youth."

Edward Conkling......... "His Majesty Bunker Bean."

Dorothy Dallow.......... "Dorothy Vernon of Haddon
Hall."
Frank Drake............ "Sir-Gal-I-Wish-I-Had."

Rodman Drake............ "Beau Sabreur."

Adele Dengar ............ "The Dancing Girl."

Ruth Duvall............. "Along Came Ruth."

Virginia Eberenz.......... "Red Hair."

Fabian Englander....... .
Erie Ferguson. ........... i "Rookies."
Edmund Fishbough.......

Leon Fishbough. ......... "The Volga Boatman."

Eleanor Fitzgerald........ "The Life of Riley."

Basil Frank... .. ..... "The Pioneer Scout."

Marion Godwin .......... "The Five O'Clock Girl."

Antonio Gonzales ....... "The Lone Wolf."

Burton Hackett ......... "The Skyscraper."

Parker Hanna............ "Johnny Get Your Hair Cut."

Beatrice Harris........... "Figures Don't Lie."

Beatrice Housel. ....... .. "Hula."

Grace Keegan............ "The Woman on Trial."

William Keepers.......... "The Nebraska Wild Cat."

David Ketchum.......... "A Little Bit of Nothin'."


Belding King..........

Marie Kleefkens ......

Percival Lyew.........

Mary Maher.... .....

Zoe Manual .. ....

Kenneth Maurer .....

Eugenia McLain.......

Margaret Misrahi......

Margaret Mitchell.. .

Harold Mueller........

M arion Neely. ........

Mary Patterson ..

Cleta Phillips..........

Wa.va Phillips .........

Blanca Pulgar.... .....

Anna Ryan ..........

Martin Schmoll .....

Juanita Schofield ..

Aloha Slocum .........

John Stetler..........

Theo. Theoktiste ......

Beverly Turner........

George Wertz. .......

Alice Westman.. .. ..

Dorothy Wirtz ........

Louisa Whitehead......

Eugene Williams.......

Ben W illiams ..........

Raymond Will.........

Veronica Wilson ......

Margaret Wyatt.......


S"A Son of Toil."

S"Swim, Girl, Swim."

"Chinatown Charlie."

"The Campus Flirt."

"The Wise Wife."

"Slide, Kelly, Slide."

"Sadie Thompson."

"The Seventh Heaven."

"We're in the Navy Now."

S"White Pants Willie."

."Tillie the Toiler."

"Now We're in the Air."

. "Get Your Man."

."Sallie of the Sawdust."

."The Tempest."

S"Little Annie Roonie."

"Tenderfoot."

"Mickey."

."Beverly of Graustark."

."The Black Pirate."

. "Nuff Said."

S"The Little Shepherd of Kingdom
Come."
."When Babe Comes Home."

S"Naughty But Nice."

."Simple Sis."

S"The Fair Co-ed."

"The Student Prince."

S"The Spider."

S"The Patent Leather Kid."

"She Was Just a Sailor's Sweet-
heart."
."For the Love of Mike."


The End.






88 THE CARIBBEAN.



DO YOU WONDER WHERE
THE BOYS GET SUCH SNAPPY HAIR CUTS?
AND THE GIRLS THEIR MODISH BOBS?
WHY, AT
Charley Payne's Barber Shop










COMPLIMENTS .OF

HOSPITAL de PANAMA













Compliments of
Bilgray's Tropic Restaurant








THE CARIBBEAN.


I'd have had to leave anyway. Better that
mother should think me just-gone.
Of my trip west I haven't the slightest remem-
brance. In San Francisco I enlisted for Panama.
I remember noticing the men in the same group
with me, and it took my mind off my troubles.
They were all different types, but there was only
one who took my fancy. He couldn't have been
seventeen, but I heard him answer to twenty-one.
He was of a slender, athletic build, with a quick
alert look about him, as if he had been through
many experiences in spite of his youth.
On the boat I sauntered over to where he stood.
"Got a match?"
Without looking at me he put his hand in his
pocket, pulled out a box and handed it to me.
I saw it would be hard to break his reserve,
and the way to do it would be to act as aloof as he.
Before the boat docked we were buddies.
At first everyone grumbled, but we all liked
it after a while. Most of the bunch were old
timers, and I had been through Panama before
several times, on visits, so we knew the place a
little.
From vague sources I had heard that I was sup-
posed to have gone to Canada, to China, to
Nicaragua, to Chicago, to have committed
suicide, to have become a rum runner, and other
such foolish ideas. The papers wrote it all up,
of course, and the "general" was supposed to be
very angry. That did not matter any more. But
the most important thing was always omitted.
I couldn't find out whether the man had been
killed or not.
Then Phil came down. He was an officer in the
Medical Corps, had been through West Point,
and was quite important in army circles,
especially medical. Luckily, I was of a type which
seldom attracts especial attention. He did not
even notice me. He was at an engineer post, and
I was in the infantry, so he never saw me.
One day a group of us went out hunting, my
buddy and I, and three others, who had come down
with us. We had a Io-day pass. At the end of
five days things began to look ugly. The three
others were always watching us with a half-sly,
wily glance. That afternoon the Kid, as my bud-
dy was called, came to me and said:
"Steve, I'm worried. Martinez and the others
are planning to'go over the hill.'"


After discussing the matter we decided not to
interfere. They could not force us to go. It was
not our place to make them return, except that
we might be accused of aiding them to escape.
On thesixth day they toldus. Wehadstarted to
turn back, but they said that they would need all
the provisions. Plainly, we would go with them
or starve. A native was to guide them along the
coast to Costa Rica; from there boats would
take them to different ports.
No one thought about or questioned our past,
but the Kid had evidently had some experience
with affairs of this type. He motioned me to be
quiet.
"We'll go on for a way. At least till we can get
some provisions."
It went over pretty well. That night we stop-
ped at a native shack that had been deserted.
By the time we had eaten and the fire was dying
into embers in the clearance, lighting up the
grim, surrounding jungle, our plans had been
made.
As we sat in a circle waiting, the quietness
grew oppressive, the oppressiveness grew tense,
and finally the Kid nudged me, at the same time
rising and strolling into the hut. There is a great
deal in taking a situation psychologically. Every-
thing was done casually. I pulled the pipe out
of my mouth, knocked the ashes out.
"Well, it looks like the Kid and I would turn
back to-morrow."
The big Swede, Arlsen, was on his feet.
"Vat! You tink you take dose grub?"
It was threatening. Farman growled, "Shut
up, let me handle this," as he pulled the Swede
down.
Then I heard a voice behind me, and its cool
tones made me wonder just how much the Kid
would mind killing a few people.
"If you gentlemen will be so good as to remain
seated, perhaps we can discuss this quietly."
He was handling a pretty little automatic and
leaning coolly against the door. The Swede jump-
ed and stared open-mouthed at the gun.
"Private property. Comes in handy some-
times, you know," the Kid explained. Then
sharply, "we're going back, and you're coming
along. If you want to 'go over the hill,' wait
until we're not along."
Just for an instant I saw Farman look side-
ways with a malicious smile. From inside the







30 THE CARIBBEAN.






THE CARIBBEAN.


I:^1


COMPLIMENTS OF
Kodak Panama, Ltd.
Grebmar Building
PANAMA, R. of P.


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he Cafeteria Idea


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CARL STROM, Lessee


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THE CARIBBEAN. 67


THE POPULARITY CONTEST.

April seventeenth was another gala day in
Cristobal High. The students were informed
that there was a popularity contest to be held.
Students were handed blanks to fill in. Pupils
were questioning each other who the best looking
and most popular boys and girls were.































Four-masted Sailing Vess
THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL
CARNIVAL.
By Ethel Barnett, '29.

To aid the Staff to put forth an honorable
CARIBBEAN, a carnival was held at Fort De-
Lessep's grounds on March 9, 1928. As it has
been before, the carnival was composed of a
Musical Revue, Side Shows, Dancing, a popularity
Ccntest, and Eats.
Many were the thrills the enthusiastic public
received from various side shows. A murderous
N ild Man who escaped; A Three-Ring Dog Show;
and the Missing Link, furnished much excitement.
Heart throbs were increased by the sight of a
Fat Lady, and a strange maiden, Zoma, who


Ballots were collected and counted, and a heated
contest was in progress all during this performance.
The final results of Cristobal High School's
popularity contest were:
Prettiest Girl, Mary Maher.
Best Looking Boy, Jack Maher.
Most Popular Girl, Eleanor Urwiler.
Most Popular Boy, Jack Klunk.


el Transiting Gaillard Cut.


neither ate, drank, walked, talked or slept-
ever. There were other interesting things-
a Fish Pond, where strange to say, every fisher-
man got a "bite." The Musical Revue was
extremely satisfactory. The Popularity Contest
waxed fast and furious in the eleventh hour, but
Miss Pauline Herman was the victorious "Miss
Cristobal High School." Dancing occurred in
the Movie Hall after eleven. The "Eats"
need no mention-the refreshment booth was
crowded at all times.
Due to the cooperation of Colonel Greig and
the personnel of Fort De Lesseps, Cristobal
High School, and the public, the carnival ac-
complished its purpose. It was also a roaring
success.









26 THE CARIBBEAN.


Cristobal High School from the Air, showing City of Colon.


Courtesy of Naal Air Station,
Coco Solo, C. Z.


--i

:~1
."'








THE CARIBBEAN. 19


Name-Theodore E. Henter. Nickname-Dutchy.
Birthplace-Gorgona, Canal Zone. Date-May 2, 1910.
Home Address-Gatun, Canal Zone.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October, 1924.
Grade-Freshmen.
School Activities-Orchestra, 1926-27. Joke Editor, 1927-28.
Favorite Expression-Now--
Chosen Vocation-Electrical Engineer.
Hobby-Hunting.
Favorite Pastime-Hunting.
THEODORE HENTER.
Dutchy's genius is shown in the general abhored
science of Physics, where noble minds have tried
to swim and sunk.
When we run across him on a holiday we are
reminded of-
"Blessings on thee little man
Barefoot boy with cheeks of tan
With his turned up pantaloons
And his merry whistled tunes."
"Teddy" is well known for his ability to play on
the saxophone. He has been a great help in the
High School orchestra. We all know of his
place in the Gatun Boys' Band.


Name-Kathryn Estelle Lambert. Nickname-Kay.
Birthplace-Ancon, Canal Zone.
Date-August 16, 1910.
Home Address-Box 1305, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-November 13, 1924.
Grade-Freshman.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone-Chestertown
High School.
School Activities-Captain, Track Team, I927; Captain,
Swimming Team, 1927; Glee Club, 1926-27-28; Chorus,
1926-27; "Rip Van Winkle;" Supper Club, 1925-26-27;
Carnival, 1926-27-28; "Kleptomaniac," 1926-27.
School Athletics-Swimming, Track, Gym, Basket Ball,
Indoor Baseball.
Favorite Expression-Is that so.
Chosen Vocation-Interior Decorator.
Hobby-Fancy Work.
Favorite Pastime-Fancy Work or Athletics.
KATHRYN ESTELLE LAMBERT.
Kathryn's intimate association with the office
has made her a veritable Socrates. She has made
herself indispensable to Mr. Sawyer and Miss
Gustafson. She is always busy.
Kathryn has gained athletic fame, especially
in swimming, also basket ball is one ofher achieve-
ments as well as track.
She has been active in school competitions to
the advantage of C. H. S.
Her ability as an actress has been well displayed
in the Junior play, and now she is very promising
in her part as the young gold digger in the Senior
play.
Kathryn is a musician, too. She is one of the
members of the Girls' Saxophone Band.


10-41L 1








42 THE CARIBBEAN.


They had landed nearly a mile up the coast,
in a small boat, about six o'clock. With a great
deal of hard and dangerous climbing they reached
the moat in the rear of the fort. They lay there
until it grew dark, watching the walls all the time.
There was one place in the wall which seemed to
be lower. It was just where two sentries met,
and was very dark, because the light from the
torches in the sentry boxes did not penetrate
that far. They noticed that the sentries always
stopped at the light at each round, so that there
was an interval of four minutes during which time
no one was on the wall. Finally, as the guards
parted, Stede and his companion slipped into the
moat. Silently they swam across, gaining the
slight embankment between the wall and the moat,
just as the sentries returned. They lay there,
hardly daring to breathe. When the guards again
departed, Stede, climbing onto his mate's should-
ers, quickly scaled the wall and slid down the
other side. He was the first of many of Morgan's
men who would enter the fort in the next 48
hours.
In a short time he had all the information
necessary. Just as he was about to climb the wall
his heavy cutlass hit against a stone, attracting
the attention of the passing guard. The latter
came over to investigate, and Stede struck him
down with a blow from his cutlass. The guards
on the wall, attracted by the confusion, seized
Stede as he attempted to climb it. He was taken
before the Spanish Commander and questioned.
As he had given no information and had been very
disrespectful, he was sentenced to death by


drowning. He was placed in a dungeon for the
rest of the night. In the morning a heavily armed
guard had come and taken him to the death
chamber. Here they left him, and now the water
was gradually rising. In the last half hour he had
noticed that the boomingof thesurf had increased,
and was now a deafening roar. The water was
up to his shoulders now, and as it crept slowly up-
ward, it made his scalp crawl. He realized that
his end was very near.
Now the water had risen above his mouth;
it would soon cover his nose and cut off all
possible means of breathing. He was straining
against the straps that bound his head, to bury
his face in the water and end the terrible torture.
Suddenly a trap door, directly over his head,
was thrown open and a ladder quickly put down.
His comrade of the night before, spattered with
blood and carrying a smeared cutlass, tumbled
down the ladder, dived into the swirling water
and hurriedly carried Stede up out of the
dungeon. Whey they at last reached the open
air, Stede, dazed and weak, saw that it was not
the surf which had caused the terrible booming,
but that it had been the guns of the pirate ships,
his ships. Everywhere about him were men that
he knew, not Spaniards. While going to report
his strange experiences to his general, he stumbled
over the headless body of the Spanish Com-
mander who had sentenced him to death.
Fort San Lorenzo, an impregnable fortress,
had easily fallen into the hands of Sir Henry
Morgan, just in time to save the life of one of his
most able assistants.


SOLDIERS TWO.
By Helen Logan, '3o.
(Best Sophomore Story.)


MY DEAR NIECE:
If, as you say, you can write a book from my
story I wish you all the luck in the world. I am
trusting to your discretion not to mention the
names of my twin brother and myself. As for the
others, I shall change them to suit my fancy.
You will remember, probably, my reputation
all through college was quite bad. I gambled and
drank continuously, but things went on alright
until my senior year. I was always lucky at cards


and that year someone pulled the old gag about
cheating. I had taken it before, but this particu-
lar person was so insistent that we had a friendly
argument. Then he grabbed a gun and when I
tried to get it away, it went off and shot him.
I was just drunk enough to realize that I had to
get away or ruin the family name and fortune,
as well as Phil's chances. I don't remember wheth-
er there were any witnesses or not, but I knew a
trial would be the last straw. Dad was hard and








THE CARIBBEAN. 81


"What are you writing?"
"A joke."
"Well, give him my best regards."

Albert calls his best girl "garbage" because no
one can love him like his little garbage can.

He trod on the corn of the belle of the ball,
And then-so the other girls tell-
Slumbering echoes were aroused in the hall,
Because of the bawl of the belle.

Miss Marvin.-"Vincent, who prompted you?
I distinctly heard someone whisper that date.
Was it you, James?"
James Q.-"No, ma'am, it must have been
History repeating itself."

Erle F.-"Say, Mister, call your dog off."
Mister.-"Nothing doing, I've called him
Towser ever since he was a pup."

Which freshman is it that thinks "Bacteria"
is the rear entrance to a cafeteria?

Sweet Young Thing.-"I'd like to buy a petti-
coat."
Floor Walker.-"Antique department on the
third floor, Miss."
CIGAR BAND STYLE.
Mary had a little dress
A dainty bit and airy.
It didn't show the dirt a bit,
But gee, how it showed Mary.
Klunk.-"Did you know I was a life saver last
summer?"
Gladys.-"Really, what flavor?"

Foolishness.
Roughnecks.
Egotism.
Silliness.
Hazy.
Mushy.
Evergreen.
Numbskull.
"Is that movie actor very much conceited?"
"Conceited! Why, every time he hears a
thunderclap he stands up and bows."
R. Axtell.-"What does the Washington Monu-
ment stand for?"
Emma Banks.-"Well, now, it would look funny
lying down."
MR 10066-- 11


Royal Higgason (to waiter in Canal Zone
restaurant).-"This is a good restaurant, isn't it?"
tWaiter.-"Yes, if you order a fresh egg here
you get the freshest egg in the world. If you order a
cup of coffee you get the best coffee in the world,
and-."
R. H.-"Yes, I believe you. I ordered a small
steak."

Overheard in Physics Class after lengthy dis-
cussion by Morton Southard-"Oh, boy, when
there's nothing more to be said, Morton always
says it."


Roy Walker.-"Do you dance?"
Anita Rankin.-"Yes, I love to."
Roy Walker.-"Great, that beats
day."


dancing any


We can not change our nature,
That is beyond our reach;
The girl who's born a lemon
Can never be a peach.

In English.--"What's the technical word for
snoring?
Bright student.-' Sheet music."

Miss Marvin.-"This sonnet symbolizes to let
your mind have complete forgetfulness."
Jack Maher (who has forgotten his sonnet).-"I
have complete forgetfulness."

THE MODERN SHEIK.
(Taken from the Boston Post.)
Blessings on thee, modern sheik,
Millionaire on ten a week,
With thy hatless slickumed hair,
And thy flivver worse for wear-
With thy sweater gaudier still
Than the sunset o'er the hill.
With thy b'loon pants-miles too big-
Thy whole comic valentine rig,
You'll always be an also ran;
I thank the stars I'm not a man.
THE SHEIK'S RETORT.
Blessings on thee, little dame,
Bare of neck and knee the same;
With thy rolled down silken hose,
And thy thin transparent clothes;
With thy pretty made-up face,
And thy bobbed hairs jaunty grace;
With thy red lips reddened more
With thy lipstick from the store;
With all my heart I wish thee joy
But I thank the Lord I was born a boy.







80 THE CARIBBEAN.


OVERHEARD IN ENGLISH CLASS.

Miss Hesse.-"Use Euripides in a sentence."
Bright Guy.-"Euripides pants, I kill you."
Fieldon.-"Would you give me a job?"
Barber.-"Sure, paint that striped pole."
Fieldon.-"O. K. Where do I find the striped
paint?"
Zola D.-"I'd like to see you kiss me again!"
Royal.-"All right, keep your eyes open this
time."

Mr. Benson.-"If you ever want to learn any-
thing, Eddie, you must always begin at the bot-
tom."
Eddie A.-"Yes, Mr. Benson, but how about
swimming?"

Bill.-"Hello, Bee, how do you like your new
electric washer?"
Bee.-"Not so good. Every time I get in the
thing knocks me off my feet."
J. Whidden.-"I wish I were like the rivers."
Roy.-"How so?"
J. W.-"To follow my course without leaving
my bed."

Miss Sewell (in Physics Class).-"Roger, how
many magnetic poles are there?"
Roger.-"Two."
Miss Sewell.-"What are they?"
Roger.-"Blondes and brunettes."
R. Axtell.-"Say, Arthur, did you ever hunt
bear ?"
Arthur.-"Of course not. I always wear
clothes."
Mr. Sawyers (in Economics Class).-"Scott,
what is an organizer?"
Scott.-"He is the guy that makes the music
in the church."
Freshman.-"Say, I bought one of those suits
with two pair of pants."
Sophomore.-"Well, how do you like it?"
Freshman.-"Not so well. It's too hot with
two pair of pants."
Charles C.-"Do you all want me to shoo these
flies for you?"
Zonella B.-"Oh no, let them run around in
their bare feet a little longer."


Soph.-"I wonder why that Senior carries a
cane?"
Fresh.-"I wonder?"
Soph.--"Because it can't walk."
Gladys B.-"Oh, I've been stung, it must have
been a bee."
Edward L.-"Don't worry, don't worry. Just
put a little alcohol on it."
Gladys B.-"Yes, but I'm sureithasflown away."

Joe to Chloe.-"You know you remind me of the
ocean."
Chloe.-"Why, just because I'm wet and un-
tameable?"
Joe.-"No, you're all wet and you make mesick."
Jack P. (to stranger).-"Haven't I seen your
face before?"
Stranger.-"Probably, I'm not in the habit of
walking around backward."
Lee K.-"Randolph, why are some women
called Amazon ?"
Randolph.-"Because they're so wide at the
mouth."
Walter W. (to bus driver).-"Slow up, I'm
going to jump at the next corner."
Other Passenger.-"Well, don't scare it."
VincentL.-"My girl goes with only one party."
Victor M.-"Which party-the Democrats or
Republicans?"
Miss Sewell.-"Can you prove that the square
on the hypotenuse is equal to the sum of the square
on the two sides of this triangle?"
Royal H.-"I don't have to prove it, I admit it."

FRESHMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTE.

Don't get discouraged; it takes some circuses
six years to train a jackass.
"My heart is with the ocean," the poet cried.
"You've gone me one better," said his seasick
friend as he took a firmer grip on the rail.
We call Kathryn "Kitty" because she dyed
nine times.
Why, certainly! In Panama boys aren't allowed
to sell newspapers under 12 years of age.
R. Axtell (looking at picture of pinhead).-"I
bet he's narrow minded."








THE CARIBBEAN. 45


to pieces. By this time the people were leaving
the city and it was getting dark. The governor
placed a heavy guard over on the city walls.
The monks were taking the silver and gold
from the churches and burying it in the secret
underground tunnels. The rich Spaniards, after
turning their valuables over to the monks, were
buying up mules and horses and escaping in the
direction of Porto Bello and some of the interior
settlements.
The next morning, when I went to the gov-
ernor, he said that he wanted me to command
the left wing of the army. He had the soldiers
already lined up. I proposed staying inside the
walls of the city, for I knew that Morgan could
not have many men, but he refused, and when we
saw the English advancing, we went out in army
formation to meet them. We had some natives
drive bulls at the enemy, but the bulls broke loose
and scattered. The fighting began. My men
fought bravely for a while, but when they saw
the other wing had fled and they were being
surrounded, they turned and fled toward the
city. A large number of them were taken
prisoner and killed. I escaped because I had
hidden in the cave.
The governor had been killed during the battle
so there was no one to govern the people. The
English began to loot and to torture the people.
They killed the monks outright if they did not tell
were they had hidden the gold. They took some
of the richer people for ransom. After much
plundering, the English set fire to the city.
The next day I thought everything was all right
so I left my cave. The city had been burned to
the ground. As I came into the public square
who should I see but Morgan and his men. I saw
at once that it was useless to try to escape, so
I was taken prisoner. Horrible thoughts flashed
through my mind as to how he would kill me.
It was a long tiresome trip across the Isthmus.
We had very little food and the Indians were
constantly shooting at us. At last we reached


Porto Bello. We were all taken on board the
ships and put in chains until we should be ran-
somed. That night was a miserable one for me.
The next morning Morgan came to our ship.
They had on board 16 monks who were trying
to get someone to ransom them. They asked
Morgan to let them go and to hold a rich girl
instead. When he heard this, he ordered every
one of them to be killed and had their heads
hung up on the ship's yards. I thought my turn
would be next, but it didn't come. Morgan
ordered the girl to be given a sum of money
and an escort to take her across to Panama City.
When they came to take me back downstairs
they told me that I would be killed at sunset
the next day if some one did not ransom me.
They only had one man on guard that night
as there were only a few of us left. I found a piece
of file by my side and was soon at work getting
the rusted chain off my leg. This did not take
very long. I then got my knife from my belt and
waited until the guard came. As it was dark he
could not see me and I soon had him laid out on
the deck. I pulled him in behind some of the
chests and after putting on his clothes, I waited
for morning. At daybreak I went on deck and
asked the captain for a boat to go ashore. He
gave it to me after I promised him part of my
supposed plunder. I had not gotten more than
a thousand yards when I heard the report of a
pistol. I knew, then, that I was discovered so I
rowed as hard as I could. I did not wait for the
boat to ground. I jumped from it and ran
toward the jungle. I heard the shots whizzing by,
but none of them more than grazed me. I hid up
a tree until it was dark fearing that some of
my pursuers might be around.
At about eight o'clock I started for Panama
City. When I reached the city, I found that the
few inhabitants who remained had decided to
move to another place seven miles away. They
thought that the new place could be more strongly
fortified.


An Isthmian Highway.







THE CARIBBEAN. 99

12. MM_7 3A M.^._ ______ I r-ri-?-r--I77--7rI

Specialty: FRENCH PERFUMERY
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Telephone: Panama 24
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THE CARIBBEAN. 21


Name-Bernard Edward Lowande. Nickname-Eddie.
Birthplace-Bound Brook, N. J. Date-January 27, 1909.
Home Address-5415 Tennis Ave., Olney, Philadelphia, Pa.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October i, 1916.
Grade-Second.
Class Offices Held-Vice President, Sophomore Class;
President, Junior Class.
School Activities-"Rip Van Winkle," 1926; Carnival, 1927;
Glee Club, 1925-26-27-28; Chorus, 1925-26-27-28.
School Athletics-Baseball, 1925-26-27-28; Basket Ball,
1925-26-27-28; Swimming, 1925-26-27-28; Tennis, 1927;
Handball, 1927.
Favorite Expression-He keeps it to himself.
Chosen Vocation-Aviation.
Hobby-Baseball.
Favorite Pastime-Athletics.
BERNARD EDWARD LOWANDE.
"Hey, Eddie!" He is equally popular with the
boys and girls.
Edward keeps us guessing as to what his true
character is. He is the man of the moment, the
hero of "Cupid Scores a Touchdown."
Eddie must have his joke and the life of the
object of it, is one of long teasing. Many are the
girls who miss their trinkets-bracelets and hand-
kerchiefs-to have them suddenly appear in
his possession, and he leads them a life of misery
until they are returned. But Edward can also
be as serious as the hero of the Senior play, he
was well chosen. Although he deserted our group
for a time by going to Philadelphia, he soon re-
turned to complete the journey aboard old C. H.
S. We're glad to have you with us, Edward.


Name-Zonella Bliss. Nickname-Zone.
Birthplace-Ancon, Canal Zone.
Date-November I, 190o.
Home Address-Cristobal, Canal Zone.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October, 1916.
Grade-First.
Class Offices Held-Secretary, Junior Class.
School Activities-Supper Club, Orchestra, Chorus, Glee
Club.
School Athletics-Basket Ball.
Favorite Expression-I'd like to ask a question.
Chosen Vocation-Secretary.
What College Do You Expect to Enter-Oberlin Business
College.
Hobby-Music.
Favorite Pastime-Tennis.

ZONELLA BLISS.
"Oh Zone, what's the English assignment?"
Thus we always depend on the dependable.
Zonella is one of the few who have followed this
class from the ground up, through twelve long
years of learning. Her violin talent is well known
both in and outside of school. She has led the
Supper Club as president with a firm but patient
hand this year.
As Mrs. Connors, the mother in the Senior
play "Cupid Scores a Touchdown," she is an
assured success. Zonella is a worker and a
reliable one, as has been proved through her
school career. As we glance through her High
School calendar we are surprised that one girl
has attained so much.








12 THE CARIBBEAN.


Name-CARRIE A. SEWELL.
Birthplace-Carbondale, Colo.
Home Address-Carbondale, Colo.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-Carbondale Union High School.
Location-Carbondale, Colo.
College or University-University of Colorado.
Dates Attended-1911-1915.
Degrees Obtained-A. B.
College or University-State Teachers' College.
Dates Attended-Summer, 1916.
College or University-University of Oregon.
Dates Attended-Summer, 1925.
Favorite Expression-Most of you pupils do not even look
at your lesson.
Date Entering Service on CanalZone-October, I, 1925.
Subjects Taught 1927--928-Algebra, Geometry, Physics.
Sponsorfor what Class-Sophomore.

Miss CARRIE A. SEWELL.
Miss Carrie A. Sewell is our Mathematics
teacher. She teaches Algebra to Freshmen,
Geometry to Sophomores, and Physics to Juniors
and Seniors. When help is needed in perplexing
problems, propositions, or experiments, Miss
Sewell is our ready aide.
This is Miss Sewell's third year with us. For
two years she has sponsored the Class of '30.
This year she helped the Sophomores give a very
original "Lindbergh Hop" at the Masonic Temple.
We need her at Cristobal High School to answer
our stupid questions that she never seems to tire
of answering for us. We hope that she will
continue with us for a long time,


Name-GRACE R. HESSE.
Birthplace-Miller, S. Dakota.
Home Address-Shelby ille, I I.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary Schoo.r'-Ann Arbor High School.
Location-Ann Arbor, Mich.
College or University-Llniersitr of Michigan.
Dates Attended-i 914-111 -.
Degrees Obtained-A. B.
College or University-Liniverslir of Michigan.
Dates Attended-1923-1 ) 24.
Degrees Obtained-M. A.
College or University-Narionl Liniteritr of aMexico
Dates Attended-Sumrrer, Io2 i
FavoriteExpression--Quen sa be'
Date Entering Service o., Cana! Zone-October I, 926.
Subjects Taught 1927-1o-.S- English, Spanish.
Sponsor for what Class-Junior.

Miss GRACE R. HESSE.
Miss Grace R. Hesse, our capable English and
Spanish teacher, is admired by all of the students.
Miss Hesse's time is occupied not only by teaching,
but also by conducting the Boys' and Girls' Glee
Clubs, which have, during the year, sung for the
Y. W. C. A., Y. M. C. A., and the Woman's Club.
As adviser of the Junior Class, Miss Hesse
helped the Juniors to give a very entertaining
party. The success of the Junior-Senior Banquet
was also due to her helpful suggestions. The
Musical Review for our Carnival was composed
and directed by her.
We appreciate the help that Miss Hesse has
given us and hope that she will return next year.








74 THE CARIBBEAN.


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SI







THE CARIBBEAN. 95








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THE CARIBBEAN.


triple. His batting during the series was
hard and timely, he making two homers
and a triple.
The game from this stage on was well
played. Balboa fought hard but was
unable to push runs across the plate.
Thus ended a well-played series, many
of the boys being sorry that more games
were not to be played.
Cristobal High School appreciates the
coaching and advice rendered by Messrs.
Dundon, Picard, and Campbell during
the Cristobal-Balboa series.
Score, Cristobal 6, Balboa 2.
SECOND GAME.


Pes
Qui
Dil
Clis
Wo
He:
Rus
Bro
Jon
Po'
Des




We
Da


Balboa. AB. R. H. E.
cod, cf........ I o i o
nn, cf ....... 3 o o o
ling. 2b....... 4 I I c
sbee, Ib....... 4 i i c
od, ss........ 4 0 I 0
e, 3b......... 4 I I o
ssey, c,lf. ..... 4 o 1 3
wn, p, cf ..... I o o o
es, If. ........ 3 o I I
vell, rf........ 3 o o I
s Londes, If, p. 4 o I o

Totals....... 35 3 8 5
Cristobal. AB. R. H. E.
rtz rf ........ 4 2 I 0
ys, 3b........ 2 2 0 0


Klunk c......... 4 3 2 0
Greene, p........ 4 o 2 o
Wikingstad, cf.... 4 0 0 0
Lowande, ss...... 4 2 2 2
Maher, 2b....... 4 o 1 2
Pettit, If........... 3 o 0 0
DeReuter, ib.... 3 0 0

Totals....... 32 9 8 4
Summary.

Home run-Klunk. Three-base hits-
Hele, Klunk. Two base hit-Dilling.
Base on balls-Off Greene 2, off Des
Londes 4. Earned runs-Balboa o,
Cristobal 3. Struck out-By Greene to,
by Des Londes 3, by Brown I.
On April 22, Cristobal High School de-
feated Fort De Lesseps by the score of
7 to 3 in a hotly contested game. This
game was the first of a 3-game series
between De Lesseps and the High School
to decide the championship of the Atlantic
Twilight League for 1928. The ideal
weather conditions brought out a large
and enthusiastic crowd of rooters.
Both teams were noticeably nervous in
the early innings. Cristobal, first to bat,


was given one run on errors. De Lesseps
retaliated in their half with a home run,
tying the score. The tie held until the
fourth inningwhen Cristobal scored again.
Klunk hit a three-bagger and came in on a
sacrifice by Witherspoon. By errors on
the part of Cristobal in the field, De Les-
seps in their half raised the score by
two runs. Score, 3 to 2. Hayden's good
work in the box, supported ably by good
fielding, held De Lesseps scoreless the
remainder of the game. A double play
in the seventh, Lowande to Witherspoon
to De Reuter, helped Hayden out of a
difficult hole. The score was again tied
in the eighth, made possible by Klunk's
two bagger. The game was won in the
ninth. With two men on and two out
Wertz hit a homer, making the score 6 to
3. This was followed by another double
by Klunk, who scored on a single by
Witherspoon. This made the score 7 to 3
in Cristobal's favor. De Lesseps failed to
score, dying with three pop flies to Wither-
spoon at short.
I think Hayden, our pitcher, deserves
special mention for this game. He is
new at the business this year, and this
was the first game of real importance he
has pitched for the High School. He was
in hot water several times but he came
through with flying colors.
The score:

C. H. S. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Days,cf..... 4 2 I I o I
Wertz, If..... 4 I I o o
Klunk, c..... 4 3 3 4 I o
Witherspoon,
ss......... 3 0 3 5 5 i
Lowande, 2b. 5 0 0 o 5 I
Wikingstad, If 5 o o o o o
DeReuter, Ib 4 o o 14 o I
Hayden,p... 4 o o o 4 o
Maher, 3b... 2 0 o 2 2
Maurer, cf... o i o o o o

Totals..... 35 7 8 27 17 6

De Lesseps. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Dodgson, ib. 4 o 0 io o o
Evans, If.... 5 0 I 2 0 0
Galarza, 2b.. 5 I I I 2 o
Frank,ss .... 4 I I I 3 I
Carter, p.... 3 o o I 5 o
Turner, 3b... 4 0 1 2 1 1
Wilson, cf.... 4 1 0 0 0 0
Harding, rf.. 4 0 I 0 0 o
Hirsh, c..... 4 o 2 10 o o


On April 25, 1928, at 4.30 p. m., Cris-
tobal High School played the second game
of the Atlantic Side Championship Series
with Fort De Lesseps, winning a very
exciting victory by a score of 8 to 6.
This game was very gratifying to the
students and rooters of the High School
not to mention the colored contingent
which was there in force. Our team
throughout the game showed a marked
superiority, even though the luck broke
against us during the first three innings.
In the first half of the firsc inning, De-
Lesseps scored tuo runs, but were stopped
by a double play, Days to Witherspoon.
In our half a run was scored-a homer by
Klunk.
Hayden, over-anxious to win, was not
at his best through these first innings,
and was relieved by Orsi in the fourth.
De Lesseps scored in the second, third,
and fourth innings. When we came to bat
in the 4th, the score was 5 to I against us.
In our half we scored two runs on a hit
and a sacrifice and two errors by De-
Lesseps.
After shutting out De Lesseps in the
fifth, for the first time, we staged the usual
batting rally, scoring four runs. Every-
bodyhit in spite of the fact that De Lesseps
changed pitchers.
The soldiers were again shut-out in the
sixth. We scored one run this inning
on a pass and a base hit.

In the seventh De Lesseps scored their
final run on a three-bagger by Galarza
who was sent home by the umpire because
the ball was fielded by a spectator.

This game was very exciting to the
supporters of the High School team, be-
cause of the poor start. It was later
retrieved by the excellent playing of the
team as a whole.
De Lesseps. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.


Dodgson, ib,
If.........
Evans, If, p..
Galarza, 2b,
b. ........
Frank, ss, If,
2b. .......
Carter, p, ss..
Turner, 3b...
Wilson, cf....
Hersh, c.....
Tomlinson, rf


3 I 2 8 o i
4 I 1 0 0 0

4 I 2 4 I I


Totals..... 37 3 7 27 11 2 Totals..... 31 6 io 18 12 9








THE CARIBBEAN.


Panama Railroad Steamship Line
CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK
VIA PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

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OFFICES ON THE ISTHMUS:
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Steamship Ticket Agent, Cristobal, Canal Zone
Receiving and Forwarding Agency, Cristobal, Canal Zone
OFFICES IN THE UNITED STATES:
No. 24 State Street, New York City, N. Y.


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70 THE CARIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN.



FOREWORD.






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\u



HE Editorial Staff of

"THE Caribbean"

has endeavored this year to portray
the school life of the pupils of Cris-
tobal High School. In years to come
we hope to be able to look through
our book and remember our happy
school days. We have done our best
to publish the best book possible,
and it must now rest on its merits.



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THE CARIBBEAN.




DEDICATION.



In grateful appreciation ot his sin-
cere interest and untiring efforts in
behalf of Cristobal High School,
we, the students, dedicate this,
the eleventh volume of
"The Caribbean" to our
principal

Mr. William A. Sawyers



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THE CARIBBEAN.



3fn iWemoriam






"Silent as midnight's falling meteor slides
Into the stillness ot the far off land."



IT IS WITH FOND REMEMBRANCES

OF A LOYAL CLASSMATE THAT

WE, THE CLASS OF 1928,

DEDICATE THIS PAGE

TO

April 13, 1909 July 24, 1927



e



THE CARIBBEAN.




Porte Cochere Hotel Washington.



'Table of Co?itefits.



Foreword

Dedication

In Memoriam.

Staff

Editorial

Faculty

Seniors

Class History..

Class Will

Class Prophecy.
Juniors



Page.



4

6

7

10

i6

-4

25



Sophomores.

Freshmen

Literary

.Alumni

School Notes.

Sports

E.xchanges.

Jokes

.Autographs.
.Advertisements.



Page.

32
36
40
56
62

71
78
80
82
83




Cathedral at Central Plaza. Panama City.



MR 10066 Panama Canal 6-16-28 425



THE CARIBBEAN.





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Sfa^ of '''The CaribbeanT



Faculty Aii-jiser Mr. Sawyers Literary Editor Ethel Westman

Editor-in-Chief Jack Klunk Art Editor Morton Southard

Assistant Editor-in-ChieJ Jack. Pettit Exchange Editor Gladys E. Beers

Business Monaster (resigned) Frank Kimbell School Notes Editor Emma E. Banks

Business Manager Paul Hayden Alumni Editor Zonella Bliss

Assistct tLi.sihcss h'ai.c.gcr [resigned) Roy Walker Boys' Athletic Editor (resigned) Mike Green

AssistattUi sii ess k'ar.agcr Royal Higgason Boys' Athletic Editor Woodford Babbitt

Circulation Manager Albert Days Girls' Athletic Editor Evangeline Smith

Assistant Crcuh.tion A 'cr.cger Charles Crum "Joke Editor Teddy Henter



THE CARIBBEAN.




By John G. K/unk, '2S.

"Our sincerest laughter with some pain is trought;
Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thought."

Shelley.



To write the appreciation of the Editorial Staff
of the Cristobal High School annual, The Carib-
bean, and of the Class of '28, to the community,
is a task deserving of another pen than ours;
because it is so real it is difficult to express. The
school and the community are close to each other,
working for the same things, the successful com-
pletion of a high school course for the students,
and high standards for the school.

Not until we are Seniors do we realize what the
community means to the school. When the time
arrives for the staff to start work on The Carib-
bean, to see the printers, to raise funds, to put on
the carnival and class play, to see to the adver-
tising, only then do we realize the kindly interest,
the generous support, and friendship of which each
day brings fresh proof. This is the spirit that
develops our students, brings out their best,
teaches them the meaning of community interest,
understanding, and friendship.



In our games you are with us; if we win, you
knew we could and are glad of it; if we lose, better
luck next time. We are proud of our school, our
faculty, and our community, who have given us
their best.

We wish The Caribbean, the last and greatest
effort of the Class of '28, to carry to you our
warmest and sincerest thanks. Peans of praise
could only tell us, as we have tried to do, of the
share this community has in the welfare of the
students of our school. In graduating honorably
we have in part fulfilled your hopes for us.

Happy, carefree school days are ended; Cris-
tobal High School for us is finished. Well may we
say, "Our sweetest songs are those that tell of
saddest thought." That it pays to be patient
with youth, and to give encouragement when
needed is the lesson we have learned as we too have
needed these helps from the men and women
who are our community.



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THE CARIBBEAN.





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THE CARIBBEAN.




MR 10066 2



lO



THE CARIBBEAN.




Name Lilliax B. Gustafson.
Birthplace Chicago, 111.
Home Address Nunica, Mich.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School N. I. S. N. S.

Location De Kalb, 111.

Favorite Expression Well, now, etc.

Date Entering Service on Canal October i, 1923.

Subjects Taught ig2y-ig28 .Assistant Principal.

Miss Lilllan B. Gustafson.

Miss Gustafson is a necessary part of our High
School. Her position ensures the smooth running
of each day's work. Acquainted with all the
details of the office routine, she has proved to be
of valuable assistance to our school.

In Miss Gustafson's study halls, one can always
see her helping puzzled students with perplexing
problems.

During her stay she has become immensely
popular with the student body, and we hope to
welcome her to Cristobal High next year.



Name William A. Sawyers.
Birthplace Westerly, R. I.
Home Address 38 Summer St., Westerly, R. I.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School Westerly High School.

Location Westerly, R. I.

College or University Bates College, Lewiston, Me.

Dates Attended 1 9 1 5- 1 9 1 9.

Degrees Obtained B. S.

College or University Columbia University, New York City.

Dates Attended 1924-1925.

Degrees Obtained M. .\.

Favorite Expression I can't talk above all that noise.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone September 7, 1927.

Subjects Taught ig2y-i<)28 Economics, General Science.

Sponsor for what Class The Caribbean Staff.

Mr. William A. Sawyers.

Mr. Sawyers, our principal, has been with us
only this year. He not only handles the respon-
sibilities of the principalship but also teaches
General Science and Economics, not to speak of
being the sponsor of The Caribbean StaiT.

He has instilled in us the school spirit by help-
ing us to give the best carnival that Cristobal
High School has ever had. It was through his
initiative that we had a special train to see
Lindbergh "hop off," and also the train to Balboa
when we won the "flying colors" in baseball.
The success of our annual, our class play, our
graduation, and our many activities is largely
due to his help.

Our Principal has the welfare of our school at
heart. He is the biggest "booster" we have.
We know that Cristobal High School will flourish
under his wise and Iriendlv counsel.




THE CARIBBEAN.



1 1




Name G. J. Benson.

Birthplace St. Cloud, Minn.
Home Address St. Cloud, Minn.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School Technical High School.
Location St. Cloud, Minn.
College or University State Teachers' College.
Dates Attended 1917-18, 1919-20.
Degrees Obtained Diploma.

College or University Bradley Polytechnic Institute.
Dates Attended 1922-24.
Degrees Obtained B. S.

College or University University of Minnesota.
Dates Attended Summer Session, 1920.
Favorite Expression Stop your talking now.
Date Entering Service on Canal Zone October i, 1924.
Subjects Taught ig2y-ig28 Manual Training.

Mr. George Benson.

To all boys taking Manual Training and Me-
chanical Drawing, Mr. Benson is a well-known
character, but he is also known to the remaining
portion of the student body.

Mr. Benson and his pupils proved to be a valu-
able help at our annual High School Carnival.
They erected the tents and booths which were a
necessary part of the celebration.

Mr. Benson has been with us several years, and
is a familiar member of the faculty. This year
he surprised us by returning from the States with
a bride.

.\11 Cristobal High will gladly welcome Mr.
Benson if he agam resumes his work with us
next year.



Name M.'Vry Eliz.^beth Moore.
Birthplace West .Alexandria, Pa.
Home Address West .Alexandria, Pa.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School Washington High School.
Location W. shington, Pa.

College or University West Virginia University.
Dates Attended 1919-1923.
Degrees Obtained \. B.

Favorite Expression Now when I was at college, etc.
Dnte Entering Service on Canal Zone October i, 1925.
Subjects Taught I()2y-IQ28 Spanish, Latin.
Sponsor for nhat Class P'reshman.

Miss Mary Eliz.abeth Moore.

Miss Mary Elizabeth Moore, our very popular
Latin and Spanish teacher, has been with us tor
3 Years. For 1 years she was the able sponsor of
the Junior Class, and conducted two of the best
banquets ever held at Cristobal High School.

This year she is the sponsor of the Freshman
Class. Under her management the Freshmen
gave a most entertaining masquerade party. For
the first time in the history of the High School,
the party was held in the Washington Hotel
Ballroom.

.AH of the students enjoy Miss Moore's classes,
for she is a vivacious and interesting teacher.
Everyone is looking forward to her coming back
next Year.




12



THE CARIBBEAN.




Name Carrie A. Sewell.
Birthplace Carbondale, Colo.
Home Address Carbondale, Colo.

EDUCATION.

Name oj Secondary School Carbondale Union High School.
Location Carbondale, Colo.
College or University University of Colorado.
Dales Attended 1 9 1 1 1 9 1 5
Degrees Obtained A. B.

College or University State Te.ichers' College.
Dates Attended Summer, 191 6.
College or University University o( Oregon.
Dates Attended Summer, 1925.
Favorite Expression Most of you pupils do not even look

at your lesson.
Date Entering Service on Canal Zone October, i, 1925.
Subjects Taught j^2y-/()28 Algebra, Geometry, Physics.
Sponsor for tvhat Class Sophom.ore.

Miss Carrie A. Sewell.

Miss Carrie A. Sewell is our Mathematics
teacher. She teaches .'\lgebra to Freshmen,
Geometry to Sophomores, and Physics to Juniors
and Seniors. When help is needed in perplexing
problems, propositions, or experiments. Miss
Sewell is our ready aide.

This is Miss Sewell's third year with us. For
two years she has sponsored the Class of '30.
This year she helped the Sophomores give a very
original "Lindbergh Hop" at the Masonic Temple.

We need her at Cristobal High School to answer
our stupid questions that she never seems to tire
of answering for us. We hope that she will
continue with us for a long time.



Name Grace R. Hesse.
Birthplace \\\\\er, S. Dakota.
Home Address .Shelbyville, 111.

EDl'CATION.

Name of Secondary School .Ann .Arbor High School.
Location Ann Arbor, Mich.
College or University University of Michigan.
Dates Attended 1914-1917.
Degrees Obtained A. B.

College or University University of Michigan.
Dates Attended 192,3-1924.
Degrees Obtained M. A.

College or University National University of Mexico
Dates Attended Summer, 1921.
Favorite Repression dQuien sabe.''
Dale Entering Service on Canal Zone October i, 1926.
Subjects Taught l<)2y~l()2S English, Spanish.
Sponsor for what Class Junior.

Miss Gr.4ce R. Hesse.

Miss Grace R. Hesse, our capable English and
Spanish teacher, is admired by all of the students.
M iss Hesse's time is occupied not only by teaching,
but also by conducting the Boys' and Girls' Glee
Clubs, which have, during the year, sung for the
Y. W. C. A., Y. M. C. A., and the Woman's Club.

.'\s adviser of the Junior Class, Miss Hesse
helped the Juniors to give a very entertaining
party. The success of the Junior-Senior Banquet
was also due to her helpful suggestions. The
Musical Review for our Carnival was composed
and directed by her.

We appreciate the help that Miss Hesse has
given us and hope that she will return next year.




THE CARIBBEAN.



I-!




Name Emily Russell.

Birthplace Pine Bluff, Ark.

Home Address 1404 Olive, Pine Blul^",



^rk.



EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School Pine Bluff High School.
Location Pine Bluff, Ark.
College or University University of Arkansas.
Dates Attended 1 920-1 924.
Degrees Obtained^. S. H. E.
Favorite Expression All Right!

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone October i, 1927.
Subjects Taught 1^27-1928 U. S. History, Household Arts.

Miss Emily Russell.

Miss Emily Russell, Household Arts and United
States History teacher, has been gladly hailed
by Cristobal.

As our Household Arts teacher, she has helped
the girls to become adept with the needle. Also
she has taught them to prepare many tasty,
delectable dishes. The girls demonstrated their
ability by serving a dinner to their guests, Mrs.
Sawyers, Mrs. Benson, and Miss Gustafson.

If one should happen to pass by the library
second period, he could see Miss Russell explain-
ing the details of United States History to a class
composed ot Sophomores.

Because of Miss Russell's ability to teach and her
charming personality, many students are eagerly
looking forward to her classes next year.



Name Mary B. Marvin.
Birthplace Duluth, Minn.
Home Address 5823 Oneida Street, Duluth, Minn.

EDUCATION.

Name of Secondary School Centrr.l High School.

Location Duluth, Minn.

College or University University of Michigan.

Dales Attended 1 9 1 1 1 5

Degrees Obtained A. B.

College or Uniicrs.'ty Graduate work at Columbia Univer-
sity.

Dates Attended 19:4 and Summer of 1927.

Favorite Expression leirn this poem for to-morrow.

Date Entering Service on Canal Zone October i, 1927.

Subjects Taught ig2y-ig28 Freshman and Senior English,
U.S. History, and Modern History.

Sponsor for what Class Senior.

Miss M,\rv B. M.4rvin.

Miss Marv B. Marvin is also a new arrival
at our High School. She teaches Freshman and
Senior English, United States and Modern
History. She is also the sponsor for the "dignified"
Seniors and supervisor for the Feature Article
section of The Caribbean.

Because of Miss Marvin's extensive European
travels, all of her classes are made extremely
interesting by descriptions of places she visited
while in Europe.

We sincerely regret that Miss Marvin does not
expect to be with us next year but we have
thoroughly enjoyed her this year.




14



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



15




i6



THE CARIBBEAN.




Name Ethel Katherine Westman. Nicknmntt "Westie."

Birl/ip/ace^Kansas City, Missouri. Dale }u\y 26, 1912.

Home Address 400 South Van Brunt, Kansas City, Mo.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October i, 1926, Grade
Junior.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone Entered first
grade Balboa.

Class Offices HeldYice President, Class of '28.

School Activities High School Carnival, 1927; Supper Club,
1925-26-27.

School Athletics Basket Ball, Indoor Baseball, and Track.

Favorite Expression You're foolin'.

Chosen Vocation Private Secretary.

What College Do You Expect to Enter Business College.

Hobby Athletics.

Favorite Pastime Reading.

Ethel Westman.

"Ethics" anci her smile can never be parted.
Ethel came to us from Balboa in her Junior year.
Since then she has been a constant delight both
to her own classmates and to her numerous
friends of C. H. S. She is also a shining star
in athletics. Is it a wonder she was chosen as a
heroine in our play? Her pep and popularity
well fit her in the part of young Dulcy.

When there is a good time to be had, Ethel is
there and her impersonations often lend to the
jollity of the hour. She has the art of throwing
one into spasms of laughter.



Name John G. Klunk. Nickname Jack.

Birthplace Columbus, Ohio. Dale April 3, 1909.

Home Address Columbus, Ohio.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October i, 1916.

Grade First.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone None.

Class Offices Held Secretary, Sophomore Class; President,
Senior Class.

School Activities Orchestra, 1925-26-27-28; Glee Club,
1925-26; Chorus, 1925-26-27; Senior Class Play; Assistant
Editor, The Caribbean, 1927; Editor-in-Chief, The Carib-
bean, 1928.

School Athletics Baseball, 1925-26-27-28; Captain, Base-
ball team, 1927; Swimming, 1925-26-27-28; Captain, Swim-
ming, 1926-27; Track, 192S; Basket Ball, 1927-28; Hand-
ball, 1927; Tennis, 1927.

Favorite Expression You're a great man.

Chosen Vocation Musician.

What College Do You Expect to Enter Columbia.

Hobbt Baseball. Favorite Pastime Baseball.

John G. Klunk.

Jack's middle name must be "success" as he is
a success at whatever he tries. He is an excellent
musician on the cornet, at athletics he's a "whiz,"
a certain proof of his popularity and success in
the fact that he is Editor-in-Chief of The Carib-
bean, and President of the Senior Class.

He does not linger on the ladder of advance-
ment but reaches the top. During his High
School career Jack's name has found a prominent
place in everything he has taken part in, and
those are not few.

As Barton Hawley, the villian in the Senior
play, "Cupid Scores a Touchdown," he is a dash-
ing character.

Jack is also noted for having a good, clear voice
which has been a great help to our singing groups.




THE CARIBBEAN.



17




Name Albert Days. Nickname Daysie.

Birthplace Ancon, Canal Zone. Date May 8, 1910.

Home Address Cristobal, Canal Zone.

Date of Entering Cristobal School February, 1922.

Grade Seventh.

Class Offices HeldNone.

School Activities Carnival, "Rip Van Winkle," Glee Club,
Orchestra.

School Athletics Baseball, Swimming, Handball, Basket
Ball.

Favorite Expression I'll betcha.

Chosen J'ocalion .'Aeronautical Engineering.

What College Do You Expect to Enter Northwestern Univer-
sity.

Hobby Banjo, Violin.

Favorite Pastime Bas^all.

Albert Days.

Daysie is also called Tiney Days. .^1 has many
accomplishments. His fame as a violinist is well
known. Now he is on his way to be a banjo
player, and he will make the grade, we feel sure,
as he is a natural musician. He was also discovered
to have a good voice.

Often Daysie is called on for his drawing.
He is always ready to help his classmates.

As an athlete Albert also is good, as any one who
has seen the High School games and swimming
races can testify.

MR 10066 3



Name Gladys Elizabeth Beers. Nickname Glad Eyes.

Birthplace Columbia, S. C. Date December 30, 1909.

Home Address Box 78, Watertown, Conn.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October i, 1924.

Grade Freshman.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone Elyton
School, Birmingham, Ala.

Class Offices Held Treasurer, Sophomore, 1925-26; Treas-
urer, Junior, 1 926-27; Secretary and Treasurer, Senior, 1927-28.

School Activities Carnival, 1925; Japanese Operetta, 1925;
Carnival, 1927; Kleptomaniac, 1927; Supper Club, 1925-26-
27-28,

Favorite Expression Where y'all goin'.

Chosen Vocation Private Secretary.

ll'hdt College do You Expect to Enter Business college.

Hobby Sewing.

Favorite Pastime Talking.

Gl.4dys Beers.

When information is desired, or help needed,
we all ask for our Gladys. For the last three
years she has held the responsible position as
Treasurer of the Class of '28. Gladys is noted for
her ability in Domestic Science. When the Class
of '28 gives a party, she is at the head of the
Refreshment Committee, and has given fame to
our parties as having "good eats."

Her clear contralto voice has graced our Glee
Clubs for four years.

Our ".'\labama" Gladys is everybody's friend
and she will help you whenever she can.




i8



THE CARIBBEAN.




1911.



Name Robert H. Axtell. Nickname Axie.

Birthplace Stratford, Conn. Date November 5,

Home Address Bridgeport, Conn.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October i, 1924.

Grade Freshman.

Other Schools. -ItlendedBeJore Coming toZone Stratford, Conn.
Bridgeport High School, Bridgeport, Conn., October, 1926, to
January, 1927.

School Activities Orchestra, 1926-27.

Favorite Expression Something is rotten in the State of
Denmark.

Chosen Focation Scientist.

What College Do You Expect to Enter Bates College.

Hobby Swimming.

Favorite Pastime Music.



Robe



H. A>



"A" stands for Axtell and also for "arguing"
and the two can easily be spoken of together for
"arguing" seems to be Axie's favorite pastime.
He would make a good debater or lawyer, we feel
sure.

Robert is also an excellent clarinet player and
has played in the High School Orchestra for
two years.

Few of the teachers have ever had to complain
about his work, least of all the mathematics
teacher. For he is unusually quick at under-
standing problems and questions that those less
proficient in this line find puzzling to say the
least. Robert can often be seen helping those
who do not understand the whys and wherefore's
of Physics or Geometry.



Name Emma Ellen Banks. Nickname Bemma Anks.

Birthplace Colon Hospital. Date October 14, 1909.

Home Address 167, New Cristobal.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October i, 191 6.

Grade First.

Class Offices Held Vice President, Junior Class; Chairman,
Service Committee, i926;Treasurer,Junior and Senior Classes,
Assistant Librarian, 1926-27.

School Activities Glee Club, 1925-26-27; Carnival, 1925
and 1927; "Rip Van Winkle;" "The Japanese Girl;" Chorus,
1925-26-27; The Kleptomaniac; Supper Club, 1925-26-27-28.

School Athletics Track Team, Indoor Baseball, 1926-27.

Favorite Expression .Aw

Hobby Music.

Favorite Pastime Swimming.

Emma Banks.

Bemma Anks as she has been nicknamed by
her friends, is an important member of this Class
of '28. That she can sing is attested to by
the fact that she was in both Glee Club and
Chorus for three years, taking part in "Rip Van
Winkle" the Japanese Operetta and the "Musical
Review" in the Carnival at Fort De Lesseps in
1927 as well.

But singing is not her only talent for Emma
plays the piano very well also.

At gym she also shows ability in the way she
carries out directors' instructions. She swims,
plays tennis, basket ball and indoor baseball with
equal ease.




THE CARIBBEAN.



19




Name Theodore E. Henter. Nickname Dutchy.

Birthplace Gorgona, Canal Zone. Date May I, 1 910.

Home Address Gatun, Canal Zone.

Date oj Entering Cristobal School October, 1924.

Grade Freshmen.

School Activities Orchestra, 1926-27. Joke Editor, 1927-28.

Favorite Expression Now

Chosen Vocation Electrical Engineer.
Hobby Hunting.
Favorite Pastime Hunting.

Theodore Renter.

Dutchy's genius is shown in the general abhored
science of Physics, where noble minds have tried
to swim and sunk.

When we run across him on a holiday we are
reminded of

"Blessings on thee little man
Barefoot boy with cheeks of tan
With his turned up pantaloons
And his merry whistled tunes."
"Teddy" is well known for his ability to play on
the saxophone. He has been a great help in the
High School orchestra. We all know of his
place in the Gatun Boys' Band.



Name Kathryn Estelle Lambert. Nickname Kay.

Birthplace Ancon, Canal Zone.

Date ,'\ugust 16, 19 10.

Home Address Box 1305, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

Date of Entering Cristobal School November 13, 1924.

Grade Freshman.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone Chestertown
High School.

School Activities Captain, Track Team, 1927; Captain,
Swimming Team, 1927; Glee Club, 1926-27-28; Chorus,
1926-27; "Rip Van Winkle;" Supper Club, 1925-26-27;
Carnival, 1926-27-28; "Kleptomaniac," 1926-27.

School Athletics Swimming, Track, Gym, Basket Ball,
Indoor Baseball.

Favorite Expression Is that so.

Chosen Vocation Interior Decorator.

Hobby Fancy Work.

Favorite Pastime Fanc)' Work or Athletics.

K.-iTHRYN Estelle Lambert.

Kathryn's intimate association with the office
has made her a veritable Socrates. She has made
herself indispensable to Mr. Sawyer and Miss
Gustafson. She is always busy.

Kathryn has gained athletic fame, especially
in swimming, also basket ball is one of her achieve-
ments as well as track.

She has been active in school competitions to
the advantage of C. H. S.

Her ability as an actress has been well displayed
in the Junior play, and now she is very promising
in her part as the young gold digger in the Senior

play.

Kathryn is a musician, too. She is one of the
members of the Girls' Saxophone Band.




20



THE CARIBBEAN.




Name Arthur E. Rothenberg. Nickname Art.

Birthplace Fort Mott, N. J. Date November 9, 1910.

Home Address Fort Randolph, Canal Zone.

Date oj Entering Cristobal School October, 1926.

Grade Junior.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone Northeast
High, Philadelphia, Pa., Middletown Township High School,
Leonardo, N. J.

School Activities Carnival, 1927-18; Chorus, 1926-27.

Favorite Expression Gee! Too much work.

Chosen Vocation Engineer.

Hobby Reading.

Favorite Pastime Hunting.

Arthur E. Rothenberg.

When Arthur joined our ranks during our
Junior year, our curiosity was immediately aroused
to penetrate his quiet manner and to become
acquainted. Now we wouldn't sacrifice him for
six others, as he has so completely fitted into
our group that we would be lost without his
underlying current of humor that adds to our
pleasure in his character.

Arthur's well-earned honors are received un-
assumingly.

.Arthur spends many spare moments away from
the haunts of mankind (also womankind) in the
tropical jungles.



Name Evangeline Smith. Nickname Vannie.

Birthplace Birmingham, Ala. Date February 5, 1909.

Home Address Cristobal, Canal Zone.

Date of Entering Cristobal School January, 1 92 1

Grade Fifth.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone Gordon
School, Memphis, Tenn.

School Activities "Japanese Operetta," "Kleptomaniac,"
Glee Club, 1924-25; Chorus, 1924-25; Supper Club, 1924-25
26-27; Girls' .Athletic Editor, The Caribbean.

School Athletics Basket Ball, Track, Swimming, Indoor
Baseball.

Favorite E pression .Aw Gee

Chosen Vocation Undecided.

Hobby Reading.

Favorite Pastime Swimming.

Evangeline Smith.

^'annie, the ever-pleasant Vannie, is a bright
and shining light in athletic fields. For years
she has been the "old faithful" in the Balboa
basket ball games and a glorious "faithful" she
has proved. The track team's backbone was
always Vannie. In fact, a synonym for athletic
ability in C. H. S. is "Vannie."

And she is a real pal. Many a vanquished
soul struggling along the weedy path of education
has she helped. To know her is to love her.




THE CARIBBEAN.



21




Name Bernard Edward Lowande. Nickname Eddie.

Birthplace Bound Brook, N. J. Dale January 27, 1909.

Home Address 5415 Tennis .Ave., Olney, Philadelphia, Pa.

Date oj Entering Cristobal School October i, 1916.

Grade Second.

Class Offices Held Vice President, Sophomore Class;
President, Junior Class.

School Activities "Rip Van Winkle," 1926; Carnival, 1927;
Glee Club, 1925-26-27-28; Chorus, 1925-26-27-28.

School Athletics Baseball, 1925-26-27-28; Basket Ball,
1925-26-27-28; Swimming, 1925-26-27-28; Tennis, 1917;
Handball, 1927.

Favorite Expression He keeps it to himselt.

Chosen Vocation .Aviation.

//oWv Baseball.

Favorite Pastime Athletics.

Bern.^rd Edw.<\rd Lowande.

"Hey, Eddie!" He is equally popular with the
"boys and girls.

Edward keeps us guessing as to what his true
character is. He is the man of the moment, the
hero of "Cupid Scores a Touchdown."

Eddie must have his joke and the lite of the
object of it, is one of long teasing. Many are the
girls who miss their trinkets bracelets and hand-
kerchiefs to have them suddenly appear in
his possession, and he leads them a life of misery
until they are returned. But Edward can also
be as serious as the hero of the Senior play, he
was well chosen. Although he deserted our group
for a time by going to Philadelphia, he soon re-
turned to complete the journey aboard old C. H.
S. We're glad to have you with us, Edward.



Name Zonelhi Bliss. Nickyiame Zone.

Birthplace Ancon, Canal Zone.

Date November i, 1910.

Home Address Cristobal, Canal Zone.

Date of Entering Cristobal School October, 1916.

Grade First.

Class Offices Held Secretary, Junior Class.

School Activities Supper Club, Orchestra, Chorus, Glee
Club.

School Athletics Basket Ball.

Favorite Expression I'd like to ask a question.

Chosen Focation Secretary.

What College Do You Expect to Enter Oberlin Business
College.

Hobby Music.

Favorite Pastime Tennis.

Z0NELL.4 Bliss.

"Oh Zone, what's the English assignment?"
Thus we always depend on the dependable.
Zonella is one of the few who have followed this
class from the ground up, through twelve long
years of learning. Her violin talent is well known
both in and outside of school. She has led the
Supper Club as president with a firm but patient
hand this year.

As Mrs. Connors, the mother in the Senior
play "Cupid Scores a Touchdown," she is an
assured success. Zonella is a worker and a
reliable one, as has been proved through her
school career. As we glance through her High
School calendar we are surprised that one girl
has attained so much.




THE CARIBBEAN.




Name Lucia Salazar. Nickname Sucia.
Birthplace David, Republic of Panama.
Date December 17, 1908.
Home Address Colon, Republic of Panama.
Date of Entering Cristobal School October i, 1921.
Grade Sixth.

Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone Panama n
School.

School Activities "Kleptomaniac;" Chorus, 1924-25-26-27.
Favorite Expression Down with Physics!
Chosen Vocation Household .^rt Instruction.
Hobby To read.
Favor te Pastime To play the piano.

Lucia S.-^lazar.

Lucia is another joy to the heart of Miss
Sewell, because of her wondrous adventures in
the realm of Physics. Lesser stars gasp at her
marvelous adventure in the realm of Physics.
Lesser stars gasp at her marvelous understanding
of that study the cause of many a downfall.

Although she is shy and somewhat retiring,
she is an important factor in the Senior Class
far more important than she guesses. Full many
a student owes his rise to her. She never refuses
to aid.

She is not an athlete, 'tis true, but she is a
splendid student. Oh! that there were more like
her.




Showing Steamer in Gatun Locks, to Transit the Panama Canal .Southbound.



THE CARIBBEAN.



23



s=



=m




CLASS HISTORY.

By Kalhryti Lambert, '28.




'Sa



Looking back over the history of the Class of
'28, I am reminded of a trip through the Panama
Canal. I seem to see a Phantom Ship bearing the
name Cristobal High School and flying its colors of
purple and gold. In my fancy its crew seem to be
my school fellows, its officers, my teachers. The
Canal represents the four years of training in
High School and each set of locks signifies the
advancements we have made from year to year
in the four classes.

We, the Class of '28, who have successfully
weathered our journey through "The Canal of
Learning" are now out on the sea of "Self Sup-
port," having just passed the "Buoy of Gradua-
tion."

On October i, 1924, we entered "The Break-
water of the Freshman Class." This was a year
of excitement, when we first learned to look down
upon the eighth graders and the grammar school
students.

We noticed many landmarks on our journey to
"The Locks of the Sophomore Class." The most
important was the initiation. Next in line came
the party which we gave tor the whole crew and the
officers of our good ship Cristobal High School.
By the time we reached the "Locks of the Sopho-
more Class" we had lost many of our passengers.
As we passed through these locks the landmarks
became more numerous.

We then continued our journey to the "Locks
of the Junior Class." By the time we reached these
locks our group of passengers had grown smaller
and some of our old passengers had left and new



ones replaced them. At this time our journey
took on a more interesting aspect, as most journeys
do when they are nearing their end. The work
grew heavier for us and new types of work ap-
peared. No one will forget the Junior-Senior
Banquet which our captain, Miss Dodds, told us
was the best she had ever attended in her seven
years as captain of the Cristobal High School.

We slowly passed out of the "Locks of the Junior
Class" only to enter the "Locks of the Senior Class."
The first landmark of importance was the roll
call which made known to us that seven of the
girls and five of the boys who had started on the
journey were still with us and the other boy had
joined us at the "Locks of the Sophomore Class."

At the "Locks of the Senior Class" we changed
captains. The first step which our new captain
took was to organize the staff of The Caribbean.
After these members had straightened out their
affairs, we began to make ready for the Senior
Party. Having passed this landmark we made
ready for the Carnival. We presented "Cupid
Scores a Touchdown" under the able direction of
Mr. Robert Noe. Shortly after this the Junior-
Senior Banquet was the daily topic for discussion.

Day by day the very last landmark of our jour-
ney, the one which marked the end, grew closer,
the "Buoy of Graduation." We began at once to
make ready for embarkation and soon we will be
scattered far and wide, and hope by this history
of the Class of '28 to keep the life of the Class of
'28 fresh in your minds always.





1


^ii


^..,,J


^^





Monument to Builders of Panama Railroad. Hottl V\"ashington
Grounds.



THE CARIBBEAN.




We, the Class of '28 of Cristobal High School,
being about to give up the ghost, and having
been examined and found of sound mind, body,
and memory, do hereby make, and publish and
declare this to be our last will and testament,
before advancing into the unknown future:

To the most aspiring Class of '29 we allot
the lot in "Monkey Hill," Mount Hope Cemetery,
wherein repose the dead and buried privileges of
Seniors, past, and present, mostly past, that the
Class of '29 cherish and place wreaths thereon,
keeping the endeared memory of the deceased
ever green.

Robert Axtell wills his playful ways to Roy
Walker, his eye shade and his arguing to Randolph
Orbaugh, his slow walk to Lilybel Cox, and his
melodious voice displayed in Senior English Class
to Morris Luce.

Emma Banks wills her soulful eyes to Wood-
ford Babbitt, her pearls to Mildred Bath, and her
good patronage of the telephone company to
Dorothy Heim, provided she uses the legacy
faithfully.

Gladys Beers wills her Southern brogue to
Virginia Stevenson, her use of the typewriter
to Adair Taylor, who has already been practicing
on it, her driving license to Marion Boomer, her
wind-blown bob to Miriam Arthur, and her ability
to talk to Vita Lyew.

Zonella Bliss wills her art of always knowing
her lessons to Robert Edwards.

Albert Days wills his speed in baseball to Paul
Hayden, a few inches of his stature to Roger
Deakins and Mike Green, and with much reluc-
tance, his nickname of "Tiney" to Lee Kariger.

Teddy Henter wills his understanding of Physics
to Lois Williams, his happy-go-lucky attitude to
Gretchen Palm, and his canoe trips to Woodford
Babbitt.

Jack Klunk wills his pull with the girls and the
teachers to Royal Higgason, his popularity to
Fieldon Bradford, to be added to his own supply,
and his part as villian in the Senior play to
Porfirio De Reuter.



Kathryn Lambert wills her reign in the office
and her right to answer the telephone to Margaret
Hayes, and her tardiness to classes to Betty
Montgomery.

Edward Lowande wills his punctuality of
getting to school at one second to eight to Jack
Pettit, his motto "After Me You Come First"
to Teddy Brandon, and his part as hero in the
Senior play to Vincent Lugli.

Arthur Rothenberg wills his good marks to
Fieldon Bradford, Vincent Lugli and Lee Kariger.

Lucia Salazar wills her long curls to Rosemary
Keene and Blanca Walker, her Spanish diction
to Charles Crum, and her ability to be seen and
not heard to Morton Southard and Virginia
Stevenson.

Evangeline Smith wills her ability to always
have a fountain pen to lend, to Morton Southard,
and her ability to translate Latin to James Quinn.

Ethel Westman wills her smile to Ruth Banks,
her dimples to Marion Lowande, her height to
"Sis" Hackett, her literary ability to Ethel
Barnett, and her vamping the boys to Rosemary
Keene.

To Lee Kariger and Anita Rankin we will a
year's growth before entering the Seniordom.

To the Junior boys, the Senior boys will their
grace in wearing loud ties.

To the Junior girls, the Senior girls leave their
seats at the Banquet table, their yells at the base-
ball games, and their parts in the Senior play.

To the whole school, we will our books, our
looks and our nooks to be cherished ever after.

In witness thereof, we have set our sealing
wax and hereto subscribed our John Doe's and
Mary Blank's, this first day of June, nineteen
hundred and twenty-eight Anno Domini.



The Senior Class of '28.



Witnesses:

Sand Fleas.
Palm Trees.
Gentle Breeze.



THE CARIBBEAN.



2?




T)ramatis Person ae.



Mr. Klunk

Mrs. Klunk

Place. Riverside Driv
Time. 3 .1. m.

A/rjr. Klioik. "Home again at 3 P. X. Staying
up with a sick friend again, or perhaps a Ia':e
meeting at Tammany where you seem to be so
popular lately?"

Klioik. "Well, you see it was this way ."

Mrs. Klunk. "All right, let's have the weak
explanation."

Klioik. "You remember Daws, don't you? He
just dropped into New York after a around-the-
world flight. He was out celebrating, so I decided
to celebrate too. We climbed in his plane and took
oft" for a hop down to Birmingham. \Vhen we were
walking up the street Days told me how he had
run into Gladys the last time he dropped off there.
She had married a millionaire, J. Pierpont Morgan
Doolittle, who made his fortune manufacturing
hairpins since long hair came back in 19JO. She
told "Daisie" that Emma was making fine progress
in the law profession. She holds down a job with
a probate court; her main duty is to settle dis-
putes between disinherited relatives."

Mrs. Klunk. "Well, what did you do when
you arrived in Birmingham? Don't trv to avoid
the subject!"



. By Himself
Ethel Westman
e, New York, 19J5.

Klunk. "I bought a paper on the way up the
street, and read where .Axtell had constructed a
200-inch telescope, and mounted it on a 'peak
in Darien' to luok for lost planets. Say, by the
way, I heard that down in Panama, Lucia is the
head of an international chain of drug stores;
also down in that neck of the woods, Teddy Hen-
ter is a chemist in the Gatun waterworks. Oh, yes!
Days says that Lowande is a star football player,
learning from experience acquired in the Canal
Zone."

"On his round-the-world flight Days stopped at
the South Sea Islands where Arthur Rothenberg
is engaged in the very profitable business of selling
wooden nutmegs to the unsuspecting natives.
Arthur, of course, is acquainted with Zonella,
who is a missionaary in an adjoining island."

"Kathryn is the head professor in a secretarial
training school. Evangeline runs a rest-cure
sanitarium for tired business men at Porto Bello,
the new health resort at the start of the trans-Isth-
mian Highway."

Mrs. Klunk. "Well, I'll forgive you this time
for such late hours. I'm glad you met Albert
because it's a long time since I have heard any-
thing from the Class of '28 of C. H. S."




Raging Waters from Spillway Gates Dashing against Bridge Piers.



MR 10066 +



26



THE CARIBBEAN.




Courtesy of Natal Air Station, Cristobal High School from the Air. showing^City of Colon.

Coco Sdo, C. Z.



THE CARIBBEAN.



27




THE CARIBBEAN.



n




THP: CARIBBEAN.



29



JUNIORS.

WHAT WE SHALL KNOW THEM BY.

Miriam Arthur Her love (?) of Spanish II .iiui her long

black hair.
Woodford Babbitt His love (?) of Spanish II and his basket

ball tame.
Mildred Bath Her stately walk and her smile.
Ethel Barnett Her smile and lack of enemies; also her

ability to be humorous.
Marion Boomer Her boyish bob and her tailored clothes.
FiELDON Bradford His big jade (r) ring and his pal "Higgle."
"Teddv" Brandon His A (?) recitation in History class.
LiLVEEL Cox Her Southern dialect and jokes; also her

resemblance to Peter Pan.
Charles Crum His love of shouting "Phooee" and his poker

face.
Porfirio De Rl eter The way he leaves class parties and his

love of playing basket ball with the girls.
Roger Deaki.v His inches up from his teet and his soulful

glances.
Robert Edwards His "rackett" on the tennis courts.
"Mike" Greene His handsome face, his baseball fame, and

the downcast look on some of the girls' faces since he left.
"Sis" Hackett Her continual "Charleston" and her per-
manent wave.
PailHayden Hisability to pitch and his love of basketball;

also Dese, Dat and Doz.
Margaret Hayes Her childish ways and her giggle.
Dorothy Heim Her meek manner and her lack of growth.
Royal Higgason His ungodly bellow and his perpetual "I

don't agree."
Lee Kariger His love (?) of Spanish II,hisshort stature, and

his love of tormenting the girls.



Rosemary Keene The future High School Gym teacher.
"Minnie" Kleefkens Her sunny smile and her love of music,

swimming, and corresponding.
Marion Lowande Her love of college and her ability to get

to school on time.
Morris Luce His continual grin and talent at "tickling the

ivories."
Vita Lyew Her jet black hair and the continual presence of

her name on the Honor Roll.
"Betty" Montgomery Her habit of coming to school late

and her happy-go-lucky ways.
Randolph Orbaugh His resemblance to "Doc" Webster

in the Collegiate Series; also his willingness to help at class

affairs.
Gretchen Palm Her demand for class dues and her ability

to play the piano.
Jack Pettit His quiet ways, his deep bass voice, his slick

hair comb, and his baseball fame.
.Anita Rankin Her presence in the yellow car and her ability

to flirt.
Virginia Stevenson Her ability to sing and the fact she is

such a good pal.
Morton Soithard His oratory in first period English Class,

and his ability to draw apes.
.Adair Taylor The parties she gives and her becoming

blonde bob; also the mysterious letters she receives

in first period in the afternoon.
Roy Walker His mop of curly hair, his yellow car, and his

asthenic dancing.
Sam Pachett .Although Sam entered late and his picture

isn't here, we will list his name. His quietness and his

spunk when it comes to answering back.
Lois Williams Her love of good times, her attractiveness

and the tact she has a "Blue Heaven."




Hydroelectric Station at Gatun showing Gates of Spillway.



3



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



31




32



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



33



SOPHOMORE DIRECTORY.



Name.



Bailey, \Villi.im

Birkeland, Elsie

Blauvelt, Elaine

Bliss, Rae

Bradford, Fieldon

Bretch, Margaret

Bush, Marguerite

Campbell, James

Crum, Ralph

Darley, Elsie

Days, Frances

Doar, Elise

Doar, Lillian

Eberenz, Ruth

Fishbough, Edmund
Fitzgerald, Eleanor,

Frank, Leah

Ganzemuller, Evelyn

Hanna, Robert

Harris, Beatrice

Renter, Alice

Herman, Pauline

Joyce, Rita

Logan, Helen

Lugli, Vincent

Maher, Jack

Martin, Charles

Maurer, Kenneth

Melendez, Victor

Mundberg, Arthur.
Napoleon, Washington
Newman, William ...

Parsons, Scott

Quinn, James

Raymond, Delia

Sargeant, Richard.

Schmoll, Martin

Schulert, Mabel

Sprague, Louise

Stewart Fred

Thirlwall, Mavis

L'rwiler, Eleanor

Wong, Francisco

Wikingstad, Walter
Wheeler, Estafania

Miss Sewell (Sponsor).



Nickname.



'Apo"

Mike"

'.Angel Face".

Tinsie"

'Static"

'Peggy"

'Giggles"

'Bones

'.Andrew Jackson'

'Shorty"

'Frangypany".

'Elise"

'Lil"

'Ruthie"

'Fish"

'Fitzie"

'Frankie"

'Levinsky"

'Hanna"

'Bee"

Blondie"

Miss C. H. S.".

Shrimp"

Loganberry".

'Patuch"

Handsome"

Chubby"

Pest"

'Vicks"

'Mundy"

'Wishy Washy".

Fifty"

Lanky"

Jimmy"

'Bridget"

Dik"

Doc Webster"..

May bells"

Professor"

Stew"

Mavie"

Boots"

Francis"

VVicky"

'Ester"

'Carrie"



Pastil



Fishing

Reading

Memorizing English

Playing "Stingy Woman Blues".

Being with Connie

Writing notes

Blushing

Studying

Dancing

Studying

Being with Tinsie

Dancing

Sewing

Playing the piano

Fishing

Not missing a movie

Being busy

Talking to the boys

Canoeing

Tickling the ivories

Dreaming

Studying Caesar

Whispering

Getting her lessons..

Pinching girls

Flirting

Getting bawled out

Loafing

Correcting people

Talking

Being inconspicuous

Teasing Grace

Playing the "sax"

Making people laugh

Telling jokes

Misspelling his name

Memorizing the dictionary

Getting her lessons

Reading Harvard Classics

To eat, sleep, and drink with radio

Driving the Ford

Flirting

Studying

Playing the cornet

Reading



Swimming.



Pet expression.



"Don't be an airdale."

"Well, ril be darned."

"Good gracious."

"Oh, my cow."

"You don't say."

"Who's next."

"Really."

".Aw, heck."

"Hang it."

"Oh! Really."

"Ya, no mas."

"Darn it."

"Please don't."

"Don't be funny."

"Nothing much.".

"It's the truth."

"We haven't heard."

"Heavens."

"Aw!"

"Don't be an idiot."

Says nothing.

"Oh, how smelly."

"She's crazy."

"Quit yer kidding."

"Gimme a kiss."

"Be a sport."

"Come on."

"Laugh, I thot I'd die."

"L'se your head, mon."

"Now stop."

Hasn't any.

"Kisssss."

"Watch out."

"What next."

"Oi geivalt."

"Ha! Ha!"

.Anything in the dictionary.

"My goodness."

"Oh! that's easy."

"Stay sober."

"Ha-Ha-Haha-Ha!"

"Would vou believe it?"

"=^-e_<."

"Come on, guy.

"All's well.''

"That's enough."



MR 1006S



34



THE CARIBBEAN.



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RESHMAN UNITIATION





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THE CARIBBEAN.



35




36



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



FRESHMAN STARS.

Miss Mooie, Cass Jiiviser "Silence."

Carlos Rankin, President "Beau Geste."

Robert Brough, I'ice President. "Seen and Not Heard''

Lillian House!, Seereliiry and Treasurer. "She's a Sheik."

Edward hWnn, Extra "Rainbow Reilly."



Joyce Alberga "It."

James .Albin "Knockout Reilly."

Stella .Arthur "Stella Dallas"

Ernest Berger "The Poor Xut."

Nellie Berger "The Dress Parade."

William Blauvelt "The Denver Dude."

William Bodden "The Runaway Ford."

Mary Bretch "Sniilin' Thru'."

Crawford Campbell "The Sap."

Daniel Coffey "The Scarlet Youth."

Edward Conkling "His Majesty Bunker Bean."

Dorothy Dallow "Dorothy Vernon of Haddon

Hall."

Frank Drake "Sir-Gal-I-Wish-I-Had."

Rodman Drake "Beau Sabreur."

Adele Dengar "The Dancing Girl."

Ruth Duvall ".Along Came Ruth."

Virginia Eberenz "Red Hair."

Fabian Englander 1

Erie Ferguson i- "Rookies."

Edmund Fishbough >

Leon Fishbough "The \'olga Boatman."

Eleanor Fitzgerald "The Life of Riley."

Basil Frank "The Pioneer Scout."

Marion Godwin "The Five O'Clock Girl.

Antonio Gonzales "The Lone Wolf"

Burton Hackett "The Skyscraper."

Parker Hanna "Johnny Get Your Hair Cut."

Beatrice Harris "Figures Don't Lie."

Beatrice Houiel "Hula."

Grace Keegan "The Woman on Trial."

William Keepers "The Nebraska Wild Cat."

David Ketchum "A Little Bit of Nothin'."



Belding King

^Llrie Kleefkens.
Percival Lyew.

Mary ^L^her

Zoe INLanual

Kenneth ^Llurer.
Eugenia McLain.
Margaret Misrahi.
Margaret Mitchell
Harold Mueller.
Marion Neely.
Mary Patterson.

Cleta Phillips

Wr.va Phillips.
Blanca Pulgar.

.Anna Ryan

^L^rtin SchmoU,
Juanita Schofield.
Aloha Slocum.

John Stetler

Theo. Theoktiste.
Beverlv Turner.



George Wertz

.Alice Westman.
Dorothy Wirtz.
Louisa Whitehead.
Eugene Williams.

Ben Williams

Raymond Will. ...
Veronica Wilson.



Margaret Wyatt.
The End.



".A Son ot Toil."

"Swim, Girl, Swim."

"Chinatown Charlie."

"The Campus Flirt."

"The Wise Wife."

"Slide, Kelly, Slide."

"Sadie Thompson."

"The Seventh Heaven."

"We're in the Navy Now."

"White Pants Willie."

"Tillie the Toiler."

"Now We're in the .Air."

"Get Your Man."

"Sallie of the Sawdust."

"The Tempest."

"Little .Annie Roonie."

"Tenderfoot."

"Mickey."

"Beverly of Graustark."

"The Black Pirate."

"Nutf Said."

"The Little Shepherd of Kingdom

Come."
"When Babe Comes Home."

"Naughty But Nice."

"Simple Sis."

"The Fair Co-ed."

"The Student Prince."

"The Spider."

"The Patent Leather Kid."

"She Was Just a Sailor's Sweet-
heart."
"For the Love of Mike."



38



THE CARIBBEAN.




lYci-'i- ^ 'S chimney a_ r i d cr dt e r



THE CARIBBEAN.



39





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40



THE CARIBBEAN.



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DERELICTS; HUMAN OR OTHERWISE.

Rohcrl U. --!xle!l, 'jS.

GRAND PRIZE SHORT STORY.




^



"Robbers Still at Large." Thus screamed out
the 2-inch headlinea of Colon's morning paper,
T/ie Tribune. The column went on to relate how
two thieves had broken into the Front Street
jewelry store and before the very eyes of the
paralyzed night clerk, had made off with a large
packet of uncut diamonds and were last seen
boarding the night freight for Panama, immedi-
ately after quitting the rear exit of the shop.
The clerk, coming to his senses, had notified the
police, who in turn, stopped the freight at
Gatun, only to be met with no traces of
the escaped criminals. Only one clue had been
attainable. The purser of a large immigrant
ship lying in the harbor had notified the police
of the disappearance of two third-class passen-
gers, and pictures of the same had been forwarded
to the authorities, who had had them published
under the screaming headlines of the aforesaid
Tribune.

Little did Roy Smith of Gatun think of this,
however. Roy was a 13-year old boy in the eighth
grade. He and his chum. Bill Martin, were pre-
paring for a morning's outing in their cayuca upon
the island-dotted waters ot Gatun Lake.

"Well, Bill, we had better put in the canteen
for we might get thirsty, and I don't tavor drink-
ing lake water unless I have to."

"Yeah! That's a safe bet, Roy. You'd better
put a flash light in too, if we are going to board
that old ship. It might be dark down below."

The ship alluded to in this conversation was an
old boat anchored up in the lake. It had been
there a long time, and was put up in an island
cove used as a sort of ship's boneyard.

The two boys put oft' in their cayuca for the
island up the lake. After padtiling for about an
hour the islantl was neared.

"Well, Bill, the old island seems to be about
abeam now."

"Yeah, and our old boat, the Mary F., seems
to be moving right along, too. Well, let's cut
around the point of the island. I know a short
cut, but the channel is full of stumps."



"Well, then. Bill, you come back here and take
the stern paddle and see if you can get through
without hitting about 'steen stumps."

The cayuca sped forward under the renewed
vigor of their strokes. Now and then the boat
would give a roll to one side or would be shoved
ofl^ its course, and a dull scraping noise would be
heard on the bottom, signifying the collision
with a stump. This amounted to nothing worse
than a trifling annoyance, and the boys made fun
out of it by seeing how few stumps they could hit.

"Say, you're some navigator, you are. How
much farther are we going, anyway?"

"Aw, Roy, you just keep your shirt on and
by the time we hit about two more stumps you'll
see the old ship herself."

A few hundred feet more and they were in a
sheltered cove where the old ship lay. She had
been once a good steamer but was now abandoned.
She was open to the caprices of the mild, tropical
weather.

Both of the boys remarked how picturesque
and queer the scene was with massive trees on
the bank nearly overreaching her decks as she
was anchored stem and stern. It seemed strange
that such an example of man's maritime progress
should be seen rotting away in the jungle-
bordered waters of the tropical lake.

There she lay, however, with ferns growing in
the damp corners of her deck and old canvas
awnings flapping in the breeze, while rotten
ropes trailed overboard into the pensive waters
of the lagoon below. On her foremost crosstrees
roosted a lone bird of the jungle, the only sign
of life in the drowsy heat of the landlocked cove.

"Let's tie up here to this ladder in the bow
and we'll go aboard. You can go up first, Bill,"
said Roy.

Bill suggested that Roy go up first as he was
the heavier and the ladder appeared somewhat
rotten. This, however, was only a cover for his
own reluctance to board such a spooky looking
craft.

Both boys were soon aboard her, and although
they spoke in subdued voices, as the situation



THE CARIBBEAN.



41



seemed to demand, they both were eager to see
what the old ship contained.

"Say, Bill," said Roy, "did you notice that
fire ax lying on the deck and those splinters
beside it ? It looks as though someone were aboard,
doesn't it?"

"Righto! But no one comes away out here,
you know."

"Nevertheless I have a hunch that someone
has been here, but we hear nothing of him at
present. Oh, well! We might as well forget
about it," observed Bill. "Let's go into the
forecastle and take a look below to start ofl
with."

Clambering cautiously down into the dimly
lighted forecastle, and brushing aside cobwebs
as they descended, they finally reached the crew's
quarters. On rounding the corner of the bulk-
head they suddenly came upon two rough-looking
men sprawled asleep on the dirty mattresses
spread on the floor. Both of the boys stopped on
tiptoe in blank amazement.

As Bill was the foremost he came to such an
abrupt stop that he braced his hands against the
bulkhead opposite him in such a manner as to
peel off a large cake of rust which fell on the
floor with a crash, awakening the sleepers.

"Schmidt, we're took," shrieked the wider
awake of the two men, "Beat it."

The men dashed down a dark passageway
leading into the forward hold. The thought of
the morning's headlines flashed through the boys'



minds. Instinctively they plunged after them
until they realized the danger of a possible en-
counter with the two men.

"Stop, Bill! They're liable to come back and
kill us if they come to their senses!" exclaimed
Roy, who immediately grasped the situation.

"Let's shut that iron door, and we will have
them."

Summoning all their strength the two boys
managed to swing the ponderous iron door upon
its hinges. Shouts arose from the entrapped
men who realized their desperate plight as they
heard the bolt dropped. The boys rushed out
and climbed over side into the cayuca. Paddling
furiously, they came out into the Gatun-Escobal
launch route. They hailed the first passing
launch, which happened to be bound for Gatun.
In fifteen minutes they were ashore in Gatun
and in another five were aboard the police launch
with the Mary F. in tow, bound for the old ship.

When the police boat reached the cove, the
anchor was dropped, and the boys, followed by
the two officers of the lake police force, jumped
into the cayuca and paddled quickly to the ship,
went into the hold, and after a short scuflle,
brought the men out handcuffed and carried
them aboard the launch.

"Well, boys," said officer Donnelly, "you
have those two robbers who broke into the Colon
jewelry store night before last. They stole a
cayuca and hid aboard the old ship, thinking
themselves sate from discoverv."



Wi














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AN OLD TIME VISIT TO FORT


SAN


LORENZO.


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By Wooiijord Babbitt, '2g.
(Best Junior Story.)






m>


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Stede Bonnet's scarred and weather-beaten
face was very pale as he watched the water
gradually rising. The only light in the room came
from a flickering torch, which threw a ghastly
light over the water. The room in which he was
confined was below the level of the sea, which he
could faintly hear, beating on the rocks in front
of the fort. Fort San Lorenzo.

The hole through which the water was entering
the room was at the level of the sea at low tide.
(The tide rises only a few feet.) .'^s the tide rose
the stream of water increased in size. When the
chamber was filled, Stede would be drowned.



He had been here only a short time and already
the salt water had reached his waist, entirely
covering the stone bench to which he was securely
fastened. The level was gradually rising. His
fate was inevitable.

The c\'ening before. Sir Henry Morgan, the
famous English pirate who was so active around
Panama during the niideUe seventeenth century,
had personally ordered Stede and another man,
Dayton, to go ashore and see if they could gain
entrance to Fort San Lorenzo. They were to
bring him a report as to the strength of the fort,
and the best method of attack.



MR 10066-



4^



THE CARIBBEAN.



They had landed nearly a mile up the coast,
in a small boat, about six o'clock. With a great
dealot hard and dangerous climbing they reached
the moat in the rear of the fort. They lay there
until it grew dark, watching the walls all the time.
There was one place in the wall which seemed to
be lower. It was just where two sentries met,
and was very dark, because the light from the
torches in the sentry boxes did not penetrate
that far. They noticed that the sentries always
stopped at the light at each round, so that there
was an interval oi four minutes during which time
no one was on the wall. Finally, as the guards
parted, Stede and his companion slipped into the
moat. Silently they swam across, gaining the
slight embankment between the wall and the moat,
just as the sentries returned. They lay there,
hardly daring to breathe. When the guards again
departed, Stede, climbing onto his mate's should-
ers, quickly scaled the wall and slid down the
other side. He was the first of many of Morgan's
men who would enter the fort in the next 48
hours.

In a short time he h^id all the information
necessary. Just as he was about to climb the wall
his heavy cutlass hit against a stone, attracting
the attention of the passing guard. The latter
came over to investigate, and Stede struck him
down with a blow from his cutlass. The guards
on the wall, attracted by the confusion, seized
Stede as he attempted to climb it. He was taken
before the Spanish Commander and questioned.
As he had given no information and had been very
disrespectful, he was sentenced to death by



drowning. He was placed in a dungeon for the
rest of the night. In the morning a heavily armed
guard had come and taken him to the death
chamber. Here they left him, and now the water
was gradually rising. In the last half hour he had
noticed that the booming of the surf had increased,
and was now a deafening roar. The water was
up to his shoulders now, and as it crept slowly up-
ward, it made his scalp crawl. He realized that
his end was very near.

Now the water had risen above his mouth;
it would soon cover his nose and cut off all
possible means of breathing. He was straining
against the straps that bound his head, to bury
his face in the water and end the terrible torture.
Suddenly a trap door, directly ove.- his head,
was thrown open and a ladder quickly put down.
His comrade of the night before, spattered with
blood and carrying a smeared cutlass, tumbled
down the ladder, dived into the swirling water
and hurriedly carried Stede up out of the
dungeon. Whey they at last reached the open
air, Stede, dazed and weak, saw that it was not
the surf which had caused the terrible booming,
but that it had been the guns of the pirate ships,
his ships. Everywhere about him were men that
he knew, not Spaniards. While going to report
his strange experiences to his general, he stumbled
over the headless body of the Spanish Com-
mander who had sentenced him to death.

Fort San Lorenzo, an impregnable fortress,
had easily fallen into the hands of Sir Henry
Morgan, just in time to save the life of one of his
most able assistants.



S=



-m




s-



SOLDIERS TWO.

By Helen Lo%an, 'jo.
(Best Sophomore Story.)




I



My DEAR Niece:

If, as you say, you can write a book from my
story I wish you all the luck in the world. I am
trusting to your discretion not to mention the
names of my twin brother and myself, ."^s for the
others, I shall change them to suit my fancy.

You will remember, probably, my reputation
all through college was quite bad. I gambled and
drank continuously, but things went on alright
until my senior year. I was always lucky at cards



and that year someone pulled the old gag about
cheating. I had taken it before, but this particu-
lar person was so insistent that we had a friendly
argument. Then he grabbed a gun and when I
tried to get it away, it went off and shot him.
I was just drunk enough to realize that I had to
get away or ruin the family name and fortune,
as well as Phil's chances. I don't remember wheth-
er there were any witnesses or not, but I knew a
trial would be the last straw. Dad was hard and



THE CARIBBEAN.



43



I'd have had to leave anyway. Better that
mother should think me just gone.

Of my trip west I haven't the slightest remem-
brance. In San Francisco I enlisted for Panama.
I remember noticing the men in the same group
with me, and it took my mind off my troubles.
They were all different types, but there was only
one who took my fancy. He couldn't have been
seventeen, but I heard him answer to twenty-one.
He was of a slender, athletic build, with a quick
alert look about him, as it he had been through
many experiences in spite ot his youth.

On the boat I sauntered over to where he stood.

"Got a match?"

Without looking at me he put his hand in his
pocket, pulled out a box and handed it to me.
I saw it would be hard to break his reserve,
and the way to do it would be to act as aloof as he.
Before the boat docked we were buddies.

At first everyone grumbled, but we all liked
it after a while. Most of the bunch were old
timers, and I had been through Panama before
several times, on visits, so we knew the place a
little.

From vague sources I had heard that I was sup-
posed to have gone to Canada, to China, to
Nicaragua, to Chicago, to have committed
suicide, to have become a rum runner, and other
such foolish ideas. The papers wrote it all up,
of course, and the "general" was supposed to be
very angry. That did not matter any more. But
the most important thing was always omitted.
I couldn't find out whether the man had been
killed or not.

Then Phil came down. He was an officer in the
Medical Corps, had been through West Point,
and was quite important in army circles,
especially medical. Luckily, I was of a type which
seldom attracts especial attention. He did not
even notice me. He was at an engineer post, and
I was in the infantry, so he never saw me.

One day a group of us went out hunting, my
buddy and I, and three others, who had come down
with us. We had a lo-day pass. At the end of
five days things began to look ugly. The three
others were always watching us with a halt-sly,
wily glance. That afternoon the Kid, as my bud-
dy was called, came to me and said:

"Steve, I'm worried. Martinez and the others
are planning to 'go over the hill.'



After discussing the matter we decided not to
interfere. They could not force us to go. It was
not our place to make them return, except that
we might be accused of aiding them to escape.

On the sixth day they told us. We had started to
turn back, but they said that they would need all
the provisions. Plainly, we would go with them
or starve. A native was to guide them along the
coast to Costa Rica; from there boats would
take them to different ports.

No one thought about or questioned our past,
but the Kid had evidently had some experience
with affairs of this type. He motioned me to be
quiet.

"We'll go on for a way. At least till we can get
some provisions."

It went over pretty well. That night we stop-
ped at a native shack that had been deserted.
By the time we had eaten and the fire was dying
into embers in the clearance, lighting up the
grim, surrounding jungle, our plans had been
made.

As we sat in a circle waiting, the quietness
grew oppressive, the oppressiveness grew tense,
and finally the Kid nudged me, at the same time
rising and strolling into the hut. There is a great
deal in taking a situation psychologically. Every-
thing was done casually. I pulled the pipe out
of my mouth, knocked the ashes out.

"Well, it looks like the Kid and I would turn
back to-morrow."

The big Swede, Arisen, was on his teet.

"Vat! You tink you take dose grub?"

It was threatening. Farman growled, "Shut
up, let me handle this," as he pulled the Swede
down.

Then I heard a voice behind me, and its cool
tones made me wonder just how much the Kid
woukl mind killing a few people.

"If you gentlemen will be so good as to remain
seated, perhaps we can discuss this quietly."

He was handling a pretty little automatic and
leaning coolly against the door. The Swede jump-
ed and stared open-mouthed at the gun.

"Private property. Comes in handy some-
times, you know," the Kid explained. Then
sharply, "we're going back, and you're coming
along. If you want to 'go over the hill,' wait
until we're not along."

Just for an instant I saw Farman look side-
ways with a malicious smile. From inside the



44



THF. CARIBBEAN.



hut a knife appeared, and the hand that held it was
one I had never seen before. 1 fired, the Kid fired
over my shoulder, and as I wheeled instinctively,
I saw Martinez fall and Farman pull a Colt
automatic from somewhere.

The scene, as I remember it before I went
down, impressed itself indelibly on my mind. The
Swede stood out plainest in the savage surround-
ings, because of his tall, huge frame as well as his
fairness of complexion. The coals were almost
out, and only a faint glow illuminated the scene,
lighted up the dark green of the jangle, and dis-
closed the body of Martinez who had fallen with
the knife still clutched in his hand. There was a
heavy, sweet odor of tropical flowers, and after a
last report, I remember remarking to Farman,
who still crouched with a heavy, smoking gun.

" Well, I'll see you later, old chap," as I shot
for the last time.

Then I must have been unconscious for some
time, and when I awakened, I was in the hos-
pital, and Phil was leaning over my bed. He
smiled the old familiar smile that was typical
of his quiet way. I've learned to love that smile,
and I knew the game was up.

"Steve, you certainly had it over on us, didn't
you?"



Sir?

"None of that. Dad bought you out yester-
day."

"Pardon, sir, but I don't understand."

"Never mind. The boy didn't die, and besides,
young Hampton had been watching from the
window."

Then I must have cried. Phil held my head
saying, "You poor kid. We were almost too late."

Once a year, now, Phil and the Kid, now
Second Lieutenant A. J. Weseley, and I haveasort
of reunion. As an .Army Chaplain, I am very
happy, and when you and young Weseley are
married, I'll be as contented as an old man can
be. Phil is a famous surgeon now, and since you
are his niece, there will be a church full of im-
portant people at your wedding.

Your husband-to-be is very brave, but very
bashful. I'll leave him the task of explaining how
we cleared his record and sent him through the
academy. Also you must find out from him how
he held off the others, and took care of me until
Phil and his men arrived. Now, my dear, I must
go to see some of the men in the hospital.

Your devoted uncle,

Father Stephen, S. J.




K=



THE CAPTURE OF OLD PANAMA.

By Fabian Englander, 'j/.
(Best Freshman Story.)




-m



Governor Arias had received a note from
Morgan saying that he would appear within the
year and that he would take the city. Morgan
had just captured Fort San Lorenzo. Since I was
a personal friend of the governor, he told me that
he was very worried. He at once sent out an
order for stronger fortifications and more soldiers.
The work of fortifying the city and training the
men went on speedily. Ships, laden with gold
from Peru, were coming into port every few days.
Soon, however, the ships coming in told of the
hard time they had keeping away from the
F^nglish. Finally, one day, news was brought to
us that Morgan was coming. The governor was
very distressed, but nothing happened in the
next few days so we thought no more of it.
Months passed and still no sign of Morgan.



(I learned afterwards that he had taken his
ships apart on the Atlantic side and had crossed
over by land to the Pacific side and had put them
together on Taboga Island.)

Four months passed when finally we saw four
English ships come into the harbor. They
started firing at us and we fired back. Our men
were soon frightened as the English were pretty
good marksmen. They had blown big holes in
the Cathedral where many people had gathered
to pray.

I ordered my few belongings taken to a cave
just outside the city. The governor, by this time,
was panic stricken. The guns in our forts, which
hati been booming for some time, suddenly
stopped firing. Our men came pouring out of the
forts saying that the English had blown our guns



THE CARIBBEAN.



45



to pieces. By this time the people were leaving
the city and it was getting dark. The governor
placed a heavy guard over on the city walls.

The monks were taking the silver and gold
from the churches and burying it in the secret
underground tunnels. The rich Spaniards, after
turning their valuables over to the monks, were
buying up mules and horses and escaping in the
direction of Porto Bello and some of the interior
settlements.

The next morning, when I went to the gov-
ernor, he said that he wanted me to command
the left wing of the army. He had the soldiers
already lined up. I proposed staying inside the
walls of the city, for I knew that Morgan could
not have many men, but he refused, and when we
saw the English advancing, we went out in army
formation to meet them. We had some natives
drive bulls at the enemy, bur the bulls broke loose
and scattered. The fighting began. My men
fought bravely for a while, but when thev saw
the other wing had fled and they were being
surrounded, they turned and fled toward the
city. A large number of them were taken
prisoner and killed. I escaped because I had
hidden in the cave.

The governor had been killed during the battle
so there was no one to govern the people. The
English began to loot and to torture the people.
They killed the monks outright if they did not tell
were they had hidden the gold. They took some
of the richer people for ransom. After much
plundering, the English set fire to the city.

The next day I thought everything was all right
so I left my cave. The city had been burned to
the ground. As I came into the public square
who should I see but Morgan and his men. I saw
at once that it was useless to try to escape, so
I was taken prisoner. Horrible thoughts flashed
through my mind as to how he would kill me.

It was a long tiresome trip across the Isthmus.
We had very little food and the Indians were
constantly shooting at us. At last we reached



Porto Bello. We were all taken on board the
ships and put in chains until we should be ran-
somed. That night was a miserable one for me.
The next morning Morgan came to our ship.
They had on board i6 monks who were trying
to get someone to ransom them. They asked
Morgan to let them go and to hoKi a rich girl
instead. When he heard this, he ordered every
one of them to be killed and had their heads
hung up on the ship's yards. I thought my turn
would be next, but it didn't come. Morgan
ordered the girl to be given a sum of money
and an escort to take her across to Panama City.

When they came to take me back downstairs
they told me that I would be killed at sunset
the next day if some one did not ransom me.
They only had one man on guard that night
as there were only a few of us left. I found a piece
of file by my side antl was soon at work getting
the rusted chain ofl-" my leg. This did not take
very long. I then got my knife from my belt and
waited until the guard came. As it was dark he
could not see me and I soon had him laid out on
the deck. I pulled him in behind some of the
chests and after putting on his clothes, I waited
for morning. At daybreak I went on deck and
asked the captain for a boat to go ashore. He
gave it to me after I promised him part of my
supposed plunder. I had not gotten more than
a thousand yards when I heard the report of a
pistol. I knew, then, that I was discovered so I
rowed as hard as I could. I did not wait for the
boat to ground. I jumped from it and ran
toward the jungle. I heard the shots whizzing by,
but none of them more than grazed me. I hid up
a tree until it was dark fearing that some of
my pursuers might be around.

At about eight o'clock I started for Panama
City, \^'hen I reached the city, I found that the
few inhabitants who remained had decided to
move to another place seven miles away. They
thought that the new place could be more strongly
fortified.




.\n Isthmian Highway.



46



THE CARIBBEAN.




u.ss.

AIR

PLANE

CARRIER




ECEINT VISITORS







STHhU5




One Of *'We^'




World Fhmous Aviators

Le BnXjLindberoK DifiJ. ;

Costes at I




THE CARIBBEAN.



47



^-



=m




ALL HAIL! COLONEL LINDBERGH!

By Emma Banks, '2S.




-m



All, on entering Cristobal school this morning
of mornings, January 26, 1928, were greeted with
an air of intensify a feeling of excitement and
expectancy. Quickly the joyous news reached
every ear. "We're going to France Field on a
special train to see Lindbergh hop oif!"

The graded school marched in files. The High
School was left to take its own course. Some
skipped, some ran. Breathlessly they climbed
the train, and soon the long line of cars pulled
out with laughing, singing, chattering children.

At France Field all interests concentrated upon
catching the first glimpse of their hero. Soon a
Douglas transport plane landed. Colonel Lind-



bergh had taken eight "lucky" people up.' 'Midst
clicking cameras and straining eyes, Lindbergh
climbed out and calmly walked to the hangar
where the "Spirit of St. Louis" was.

Then the gates of the hangar were thrown
wide and soldiers pushed "The Spirit" on to the
field.

Again the "Idol of the Air" made his entrance.
After the mechanic had tried the motor, Lindy
donned his aviator's helmet, shook hands with a
few of his personal friends, and climbed in.
Shortly, he waved good-bye to the eager throng,
glided across the field and into his kingdom the
atmosphere.



BANANAS GWINE BY.

By Joyce Alberga, j/.

"Bananas! Bananas! Ripe bananas gwine by!
Come missus, tek a look! Bananas! Six fo' a
nickel; 12 fo* a dime!"

Such is the cry of an old colored woman selling
bananas to make a living.

She lives in a large tenement house in one of
the many alleys of Colon. Every morning rain
or shme, she rises at 5 o'clock in order to
begin her sale of bananas before anyone else.

Her clothes are always clean, but of course not
all of the latest fashion. On her head she wears
a piece of soiled cloth wound around it, somewhat
like a coolie turban. This is necessary because on
it she carries a big board in the form of a waiter.
It is filled with ripe bananas. She carries it on
her head all day, and never once does it fall.
It is really remarkable.

When Mammy, as she may be called, finds a
customer she is very pleased and talks the whole
time that she is selling. Her conversation may be
heard to be "Yes, Mum, dey his lufly dis
marnin'. Oh! hain't you going to take more
than that? Please, Missus, dey really ham
nice. Dere, das a good lady. I'se gwine to
give her hextra fo' dat. Good-bye and tank
you Mum. Hi'U come agin timmarrah."



THE TOM-TOMS.

By Arthur Rolherihiirg, '28.

Night after night I heard it. Always the
same irregular cadence of knockings coming from
off in the distance. Somehow, it always sug-
gested someone hitting on wood.

Whenever I heard it, romantic fancies of savage
Indians far ofl^ in the dense Jungles beating on
tom-toms and performing their wild dances would
come to my mind.

One night I heard the sound louder than usual.
It seemed to come from an island a short distance
from shore. Hurriedly seizing a flash light, I
rushed to the beach. \t first I heard nothing;
then to my hearing came the same irregular
rythm of wooden thumps, but this time followed
by mighty splashes.

Upon looking closely in the direction of the
noise, I perceived a dark, moving blur on the
water. It moved in a large circle, and finally
approached the beach where I stood.

Turning my light on it, it proved to be a
cayuca containing several fishermen, who had
been laying a seine. When I inquired the source
of the knocking and splashes, I was told that
fisherman when laying seines always beat on the
boat and water with their paddles to scare the
fish into the seine.

So perished my fancies of Indians, jungles, and
drums.



48



THE CARIBBEAN.



-m




PEACE DECLARED.

By Lilybel Cox, '2g.
(Honorable Mention.)




=a



"Ah, land at last!" So exclaimed Jim Thorpe,
looking through the porthole upon the outline of
the land which was to be the home of his new
adventures. He was anxious to make a success of
the work which might place his name among the
foremost engineers of the day.

The commercial world demanded the exchange
of products between east and west in the shortest
possible time. Thus the project of the Panama
Canal. And young Jim was one of the engineers
detailed to work on the locks of the great water-
way.

After the strenuous work of drawing plans,
organizing details, and assembling materials,
Jim began to feel the need of companionship.
The monotony of the tropical heat by day and the
cries from the jungle by night did not furnish
enough excitement.

One day while wandering among the interesting
ruins of old Panama, he had a misfortune to fall
and hurt his ankle. While sitting on the ground
wondering what to do next, he heard voices.
Glad that some human beings were in calling
distance, he shouted for help. Much to his relief
a party of fine people soon loomed in sight.
Don Pedro, his daughter, Rosita, and his two
sons and their guide were returning from a fishing
trip. The injured man was carried on a hastily
made stretcher to their ranch house.

The injury, although not severe, kept him in
bed for several days. Every kindness was shown
him by his host and many a pleasant hour was
whiled away in teaching the young senorita to
understand the English language.

After his recovery he returned to his work but
not before he promised to come and see his bene-
factors. Many happy week ends were spent at
the ranch and the friendship soon became a
lasting one.



One morning the overseerreceivedan unusually
large quantity of mail. Among the letters was an
official envelope bearing Thorpe's name. The
news it contained was both delightful and dis-
appointing. He had been promoted and this
meant his going back to the States. His new field
of work was to be in the Mississippi Valley. The
next day he went to bid his new friends farewell.
It was hard to say good-bye and Rosita's sorrow
was not hidden.

His work in the States lasted for several years.
Then came the anxious exciting days of the World
War. Thorpe was one of the first of America's
youths to rally to the Colors. After a few months
of hurried drills at training camp his company
was sent overseas.

During the gloomy, dreary days of the tall of
1 91 7, while some soldiers were working on a
bridge, a bomb dropped from a German plane,
damaging the bridge and taking a heavy toll of
lite and injuring many.

Thorpe was severely wounded and was knock-
ed unconscious. When he awakened he found
himself in a field hospital. It seemed that he
dreamed of a cool hand placed on his feverish
brow. It was in reality for an angel of mercy was
standing near murmuring, "Oh, Jim! Do you not
remember your old friend?" He stared and tried
to recall, but, soon exhausted, he fell into a
swoon-like sleep.

The next morning the angel said, "It is more
serious than the injury to your ankle, but I
hope to have the same success in making you
well." Then he remembered! "Rosita, you
have twice been my benefactress. I hope some
day to reward you." She only smiled in answer.

.'\fter peace was declared a ship bound for
Panama carried Mr. and Mrs. Thorpe on their
honeymoon.



THE SHORT STORY CONTEST.



The short story contest was eagerly sponsored Mrs. Grunewald, Mrs. Kidd, and Mr. Cun-

by the literary aspirants ot the high school classes. ningham were the judges who chose the winning

Stories of all descriptions were handed in, and stories. The Staff" sincerely appreciates the serv-

there was a wealth of material to choose from. ices rendered by the judges during the contest.



THE CARIBBEAN.



49



THE SAN BLAS INDIANS.

By Vila Lyew, '2g.

The San Bias Indians live on islands less than in rheir noses and ears bui- no rings on the fingers

a hundred miles from Colon. These islands are until they are married.

free from mosquitoes, flies, and wild animals. The father of the girl makes all marriage ar-

The Indians cultivate little patches of corn, rangements. She does not leave the parental

yams, cane, and rice on the mainland, and un- roof instead the husband lives with her family

like most uncivilized peoples their women do where he becomes more or less a servant. The

little work in the fields. They are not a war-like father naturally chooses one who will be a good

race, preferring a peaceful existence to one of worker tor him. For this reason, girl babies are

fighting and bloodshed, but are capable of the mjch more welcome among these Indians than

most savage practices when once roused. For among most uncivilized tribes. There are no

generations they defied every attempt to civilize bachelors of either sex among the San Bias,

them, holding their standard of race purity Matrimony is universal.

above all else. They rigidly enforce the rule that Their language is very simple, consisting of

no stranger should pass the night on their shores, about 500 words. They have no numbers beyond

Until 10 years ago the San Bias tribe was an ten and have no way of reckoning their ages,
absolutely pure race of people. .^mong them are found those strange freaks

They are peculiar in their appearance, having of nature white Indians. They have the usual

dwarf-sized bodies and large, box-like heads, dwarfed bodies, but their skins are absolutely



Their features are coarse but even, and their color
is much like that of the North American Indian.
The men wear cotton blouses and trousers, which
they make themselves. The costumes of the
women and girls are both unique and pretty.
The fronts and backs of their blouses are of vari-



colorless. Their eyes are usually weak, causing
them to wear a perpetual squint which, with their
stiff" yellowish hair and Indian features, gives
them a weird appearance.

Miss Anna Coope, an American missionary,
was the first foreigner to be allowed to stay in



their country. She lived there for 15 years,
ous colored materials, and their skirt is a long teaching them and helping them to learn better
piece of clo':h wrapped around the body and ways of living. She found them very intelligent
tucked in at the belt. The women wear rings and eager to learn to read and write.



THE DESTRUCTION OF THE PANAMA
CANAL.

B\ Dai'iii Ketchit??!^ 'j/.

It had been raining for three weeks without
stopping once. Gatun Lake was rising at a
fearful rate. Communication with the outside
world was impossible. The wireless masts were
washed away although the air would have been
full of interference to have sent real messages
anyway. None could go out without risking
life or limb in the streets that had turned into
beds of raging rivers. Many of the houses were
being washed away. Forts Sherman and Randolph,
and the Naval Base were under many feet of
water. Gatun Spillway, strained to the utmost,
could hold no longer and crashed. Then an old
and supposedly extinct volcano just outside the
breakwater erupted. Slowly the Isthmus began
to

"John," cried Mrs. Okly, "John, now hurry
and dress for school."

MR 10066 7



THE OLD HIGHWAY.

By Roger Deakins, '2g.

Among the many traces of ancient Spanish
occupation of Panama, left by the bold con-
quistadores, is the Las Cruces Road. Once a
well-traveled roadway, winding among the hills
and the dank fever-breeding swamps, stretching
from the massive walls of Old Panama City to
the beautiful harbor of Porto Bello. On this
highway, murder and thievery ran as unrestrained
as the luxuriant tropical jungle growth which
now almost completely obliterates it. Great
trees have grown in the road and their grasping
roots have dislodged the cobblestones in such a
manner that the parts of the road that can be
seen are barely recognizable. Once the air
tinkled with the sound of silver bells attached
to the pack mules that formed the gold train.
Now the harsh sound of the parrot's scream and
the squeak of a lizard as it scuttles over the blocks
are the only sounds heard, and the old road lies
and dreams of past days.



5*



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.






TOURISTS IN COLON.

By Margair! Hnycs, '2g.

I.

One sunny morning in the city of Colon,
There came a group of tourists to town,
Buying shawls, beads, and all sorts of things,
Fit even tor the greatest ot kings.



One little woman, short and fat,
Wearing a plaid coat and large black hat.
Pulls off her gloves, and gives a sigh,
"I don't see how they stand the heat!
Oh, mv!"



"Now isn't this a most gorgeous shawl?"
To her husband whispers a lady tall.
"Yes, yes, dear, but don't forget my advice
Never should one pay the first price."

4-

"Mother, mother, I want this box;
Look how it opens, and just how it locks.
First one has to find the key!
Mother, I want it. Oh, Jiminy Gee!"



One old gentleman, perspiring with heat.

Looks at the cigarette holders, while taking a seat.

"It is just the kind for you, Meester."

"Forme? No, no. For my sister."

6.

" \nA. what is that queer animal's name?"
"Oh, he's the ant eater of great, great fame."

Comes from the jungle, not far from here.

He's dead, Miss, please have no fear."

7-

"Buy a lottery ticket," the vendors cry,
"Six is the number for the lucky guy.

Tink ob de gran surprise

When you wins de big first prize."



"Say, there goes the Panama Railroad train.
And now, my gracious, 'tis beginning to rain.
I never did see such a dirty place.
Why look at that negro's good-natured face."



Two young chaps in a hat store
Are trying on Panama hats galore.
"I know the weakness of we males.
But I think I resemble the Prince ot Wales!"



There passes us, a foreign man,
A bunch of bananas in his hand.
He calls to his mate to hurry up.
Who growls in answer, ".Aw, shut up."



In a carametta, a curio of this town.
Sat two old ladies, riding up and down.
-And enjoying themselves, forgetting th heat
.'\nd thought the ride was such a treat.



"Come, come, 'tis late; we must haste.
Back to the boat; there's no time to waste,
You know the boat will soon be leaving,
As it is scheduled to leave at six this evening.'

If you should wish to have some fun,
Go watch the tourists, every one.
When they visit this (air little town
Called the City of Colon.



IF I WERE A POET.

By Helen Logan, 'jo.

I wish I were a poet.
With gift ot thought sublime;
The kind who put elusive words
In magic verse and rhyme.

I'd write of the little golden stars.
That twinkle in a deep blue sky;
Or the moon like a beautiful lady.
Who goes slowly floating by.

Oh, I would write such interesting things

That nature tells to me;

(If I were a poet.

And could write it well, you see.)

But I am not a poet.
And my words sound stiff and dry.
So I think I'll put aside my pen
And let another trv.



EVENTIDE.

By Alice E. PVestmaii, 'j/.

The night is slowly coming on,

."^nd the day is slowly fleeting.

The skies are aflame with red and gold,

And shadows now are creeping.

The palm trees ne.ir by the sea
Look black against the evening sky,
.And seem to whisper tales of old
As the close of the day is drawing nigh.

The waters of the open sea

Sing songs of mystery to me,

.And blackbirds now do cease their call

As the shades of night finally fall,



<;2



THE CARIBBEAN.



GLIMPSES OF LIMOX BAY.
By Vila Lyew, '2g.

I sit upon the old wall by the sea
Watching the children at their play,
And the large waves coming toward me
Forgetful ot the sun's scorching ray.

.\x. evening still you find me there
When slowly the sun sinks,
Coloring the wall with its flare
And dyeing the bay with pinks.

The sunset must gradually fade away
Into the splendor of the night;
The children in their little beds lay,
.And the bay glistens in the moonlight.

The lighthouse across the bay

Flashes out its ever faithful light

To guide the ship on its way

And emphasize the darkness of the night.

The tiny stars begin to shine
Like diamonds 'gainst the sky so blue,
.And the wan white moon divine
Whose radiance lights the heart so true.

How calm and serene life seems
With all these beauties rare,
As if painted by an artist in his dreams
When freed from all sorrow and care.

Far from the city's madding roar

I revel in my quietude and dream.

The nearby chimes announce the late hour

-And start me from my dream.

And as I homeward turn sleepily
The waves their adieu bid
The chimes are pealing sweetly,
Of human life the wall is rid.



ODE TO FORT SAN LORENZO.

By Robert Jxtell, '28.

Peace to thee, thou noble ruin;

Long ma\" we see thee stand

.Above the rocks, above the dune,

.Above the coral strand.

With crumbling walls and long dried moat,

.And cannon now in rust.

Thou listenest to the breaker's note,

To whispering palm trees hushed.

Oh, Glory of the Spaniard's fame.

Who fixed thy stones so high;

Their glory now is but a name.

But yours still brooks the sky.



A TRIO FROM THE ISTHMUS.

By Basil Frank, 'ji.

"Ripe bananas! Ripe bananas!
A dozen fo' a dime.
Dese am nice ones, lady
Fo' 1 sell dem all de time."

It's the old banana lady
With her tray upon her head.
I hear her early in the morning
When I am still in bed.

There is also the bootblack
With his "Shine, Mister? Shine?"
He'll clean your shoes up nicely
For the small cost of a "dime."

He's always around by the barber's
Where he finds a ready fee.
Sometimes he gets a five cent tip,
Then he's happy as can be.

Another one who is never sure

If he's going to get a dinner.

Is the age-bent driver of the orange cart.

His eyes have long lost their glimmer.

He may be seen in the morning
.Apushing his cart along;
And if a "cochero" blocks his way
He rings his home-made gong.

They are just a few of the many

Who have lived on the Isthmus so long

The banana lady, the bootblack.

And the orange-cart man with his gong.

But let me tell you something.
Of which you do not know.
These people are always satisfied.

They smile wherever they go.



OUR HIGH SCHOOL BOOK,
"THE CARIBBE.AN."

flv Mary Bretch, 'jr.

.A book of memories so fond and dear.
Of reminiscences you love to hear;
Of sports, alumni and literature too,
The fun and joy we've all passed through.

When other roads you travel, and new friends you meet,
Ponder oft' thoughts of childhood days so sweet.
Remember, yes! Remember the good old days of yore.
So gayly spent at Cristobal High on the Caribbean shore.



THE CARIBBEAN.



53



DAY-DREAMS.

By Basil Ftaiiky 'ji.

While sitting down beside a stream,

I watched the clouds. They began to seem

Like the things upon the earth below.

On this land long, long ago.

I saw a castle in the air;

1 saw a lady in despair;

The castle stood on running sands

In the land of caravans.

.And there a knight of the Table Round,

Stood below upon the ground,

Fighting bravely for to save

His lady from an .Arab knave.

When this scene from before me flew.

The deep wide ocean came to view.

There was a ship with all sails set

Going where the trade winds met.

It was a Spanish ship I saw;

Its splendor filled my soul with awe.

But what ship follows in its wake?

A vessel captained by Francis Drake!

Then I saw a flash of flame;

A roar as from a giant came;

Both ships disappeared from view,

And the scene was changed to something new.

I saw a scene, a scene of peace

In the lovely land of Greece.

A young man though his arm lacked brawn.

Was carving the figure of "September Morn."

He cut a smile upon her lips;

.\ graceful curve upon her hips;

The face was tilted in the air;

Wavy and curly was the hair.

The spell then broke, the apell of the dream,

And I found myself beside the stream.

All these things I had composed

From the clouds as I sat there and dozed.



PERPLEXITY.

By Elsie Darley, 'jo.

What shall I write about?

What shall it be?

These questions I'm stating

-Are bothering me.

What sort of language and

What sort of rhyme?

Dear me, I am having

A troublesome time.

The more things to choose from

The harder the choice.

The sooner I've finished

The sooner I voice

My relief at just dropping

This burdensome job.

And write like the rest

Of the prose-writing mob.

A poet is born, and not made.

So they say;

.And now I'll discreetly retire

For to-dav.



THE LOCKS AT .\IGHT.

By Ruth Duvall, jf.

Have you seen the locks at night?
They are a very wondrous sight.
With great ships passing to and fro,
Going to lands we do not know.
And many lights along the way.
Standing there like sent'nels grey.
Seem to beckon you at sight.
To come and see the locks at night.



THE PALM TREES.
By David Kelchum, 'j/.

You see them standing

In the sunlight.
Tall and proud, showing

Their royal might.
You see them on the borders

Ot the romantic lagoon.
Bending and bowing while silhouetted

-Agiinst the moon.
You'll see them in the jungles

Where Morgan hid his gold.
Standing o'er all the trees.

Like sentinels of old.
If under tropical sun you have

Chanced to live.
Surely you'll appreciate the shade

This graceful tree gives.



54



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



S'S




56



THE CARIBBEAN.



ALUMNI.

The Alumni Department of The Caribbean continues to grow. Each year
a dozen or more names are added to the ever-lengthening list. This year we
have passed the hundred mark. Cristobal High School has loi graduates.
Nearly half of these are still on the Isthmus. Several of them have visited us
at school. We are always pleased to see them and hope that they as well as those
who are in the States, will continue to be interested in C. H. S. and its activities.

ZoNELLA Bliss,

Jlitmiii Editor.



1918.

LuLA May Pullig (Mrs. J. B.) Coman, Cristobal,

C. Z.
MiNOT Cotton, 81 John Street, New York City.
Susie Harriso.n, Cristobal, C. Z.
Catherine Waid, 451 West 23d Street, New York

City.
Burke Welch (address unknown).
Mary Verner, Chapel Hill, N. C.

1919.

Alice Arlene Ball, 118 Maple Avenue, Tacoma

Park, Md.
Kenneth Edwards, Wellsboro, Pa.
James Raymond, Cristobal, C. Z.
Dorothy Weir (Mrs. John) Montanye, Cristo-
bal, C. Z.
"It is always a pleasure to send greetings
to The Caribbean and to the graduating
class. I know this year's annual will be the
best ever and I am wishing success to all the
Seniors."

1920.

Lindale Davis, 336 Commonwealth .Ave., Boston,

Mass.
Jack B. Fields, care of Tela Railroad Engineering

Dept., Tela, Honduras.
Kenneth Greene, Coudersport, Pa.
Harlan Holmwood, Balboa, C. Z.
Alson Sears, Balboa, C. Z.
Kathrv.v Burgoon Stewart, Cristobal, C. Z.
Alice Stilson, Colon, R. P.
Lillian Cotton VanWagner, 124 Elm Street,

Cranford, N. J.



Al Doyle, Apartment 9, 151 5 Tenth Street,

Sacramento, Calif.
Etha Bevington, Balboa Heights, C. Z.

1 92 1.

Carl Duey, Box 95, Lemon City, Fla.
Kirby Ferguson, Cristobal, C. Z.
Alice Hunter (Mrs. L. h..) Hohn, Cristobal,
C. Z.

Charles Henter, Coast Guard Cutter Kimbal,

Norfolk, Va.
Frank. Raymond, 344 East 120th Street, New

York City.
Eleanor Zimmerman, 120 Kingsley Avenue.
Westerleigh, Staten Island, N. Y.
"To the Class of 1928. I wish you all the
success in the world in making this year's
Caribbean the best ever."

1922.

Marjorie Ball, 118 Maple Avenue, Tacoma

Park, Md.
Ida Brown (Mrs. A. A.) Doyle, Apartment 9,

1515 Tenth Street, Sacramento, Calif.
George Cartwright, 159 Boyle .Avenue, Totowa

Borough, Paterson, N. J.
Paul Doyle, Cristobal, C. Z.
Mary Glenn Fields, Balboa Heights, C. Z.
LeRoy Magnuson, Balboa, C. Z.
Mildred Stafford, 395 North Henderson St.,

Cape Girardeau, Mo.
Emma Townsend (Mrs. Robert) Noe, Box i,

Cristobal, C. Z.
Wesley Townsend, i 195 Ruby Street, Houghton,

Mich.



THE CARIBBEAN.



57



Jordan Zimmerman, 214 Clarendon Street, Syra-
cuse, N. Y.

"At last I am graduated from the College of
Forestry and believe me it feels pretty grand
to be an alumnus. I hav'e just accepted a
position as salesman for Oaklands and
Pontiacs so I must get to work.

"The Caribbean has my best wishes for a
successful year it seems that each year
brings improvement in the annual. I can't
be egoist enough to say that the annual in my
Senior year was the best because that is not so.
Each year it is a little better and I feel sure
that this year will be the best ever."

Gerald Bliss, Cristobal, C. Z.

Ernest Euphrat, 3935 Burwood Avenue, South
Norwood, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Louise Henter, Nurses Home, Sydenham Hos-
pital, Baltimore, Md.

Edward May, Cristobal, C. Z.

Henry Moore, Box 212, Marshfield, Wis.
"Greetings!"

Emogene Nash (Mrs. E. S.) Van Benschoten,
Balboa, C. Z.

Mattison Pullig (Mrs. J. D.) McCauley, Cris-
tobal, C. Z.

1914.

Dorothy Abendroth (Mrs. .\rthur) Flood,

Cristobal, C. Z.
Florence .Albert, 107 Beument .Avenue, West
Brighton, Staten Island, N. Y.
"Kindly extend to the Class of 1928 my
best wishes for a successful annual."
Jose Arosemena, Colon, R. P.
Edith Coulbourn Smith, 717 Colonial Avenue,

Norfolk, Va.
Charlotte Housel (Mrs. R. W.) MacSparran,

Cristobal, C. Z.
Gladys Lowande (Mrs. C. O.) Baldwin, Cris-
tobal, C. Z.
Morris Marchosky, Colon, R. P.
Inza Markham, 409 Lake Avenue, Rochester,
N. Y.
"Still skating along but am never too busy
to think often of C. H. S. Congratulations
and best wishes to the graduates of '28."

MR 10066 8



Irene McCourt (Mrs. George G.) Reithel, 14
Islington Place, Jamaica, Long Island,
N.Y.
"I am sending my best wishes to the Class
of '28 and for the success of this year's an-
nual."
George Oak.es, Fort Banks, Mass.
Chester Pike, 2148 Acton Street, Berkeley, Calif.
Andrew Sauth, Box 2, Foster Route, Richmond,

Texas.
Ethel Sonneman, 98 Macon Street, Brooklyn,
N.Y.
"I am now an upper Junior at Maxwell
Training School for Teachers. .\t present I
am quite busy taking examinations for I am
to go Q!Jt to practice teaching again. I will be
out for five weeks.

"Best wishes for the Class of 1928 and for the
success of the annual."

1925.

Helen x'\bendroth, Cristobal, C. Z.

Olga Arcia (Mrs. A. de) Leignadier, Colon,

R. P.
William Cousins, 2623 Oakford Street, Phila-
delphia, Pa.
Dorothy Deibert, Fort Sill, Okla.
Ruth Duey (Mrs. Spencer) Lincoln, Cristobal,

C.Z.
Katherine Fischer, 4309 Furley Ave., Garden-

ville, Md.
Anniel Heim (Mrs. J. H.) Brenchick, Cristobal,

C.Z.
Ruth Hopkins, Box 256, Ancon, C. Z.

"My very best wishes for The Caribbean.
I've noticed that you have been getting some
newspaper publicity tor your social and
athletic events; good work!

"My very best regards to all who remember
me."
Hubert Lee, 221 i Speedway, Austin, Texas.
Harriet Steenburg (address unknown).

1926.

Richard Beverly, Broad Run, Va.
Hildegarde Blythe, Landham-Bounce X-Ray
Clinic, Atlanta, Ga.



58



THE CARIBBEAN.



William Clinchard, 229 North Seventeenth St.,
Lincoln, Nebr.
"I am looking forward with anticipation
to seeing the first copy of The Caribbean
of '28 and I sincerely hope that it will be the
best year book ever produced by C. H. S.
I am also wishing success to the Class of '28
on The Caribbean, congratulations on their
graduation, and best regards to the Faculty."
William Coffey, Cristobal, C. Z.
Helena M. Deckman, 1195 East i8th St., N.
Portland, Oreg.
"With sincere and best wishes to The
Caribbean and to all my school friends I say
'au revoir' to Panama. Luck to the annual and
to those that follow."
Edna Duvall, 4802 Greenlee Ave., St. Bernard,

Ohio.
Morris Eggleston, Room 104, Freshman Hall,
Notre Dame University, Notre Dame, Ind.
Ray Fischer, 4309 Furley Avenue, Gardenville,

Md.
Irene Hopkins, Cristobal, C. Z. Home Panama
City, R. P.
"Accept my best wishes for the students and
Faculty of C. H. S. Congratulations, Seniors.
Make the 1928 Caribbean go over the top."
Helen J. Keene, Cristobal, C. Z.

"Greetings to the Class of '28 and best
wishes for the success of the play and this
year's annual."
Johanna Kleefkens (Mrs. R. O.) Antick, Box
1057, Cristobal, C. Z.
" 'The moving finger having writ moves
on.' Class of '28, I sincerely hope that the
deeds you have written will live long in the
hall of fame of dear old C. H. S. I have often
desired to be back in school.

"Each year is filled with memories. The
parties, friends, and above all the 'school
spirit' C. H. S. has shown year by year.

" '28 you have kept up the spirit as those
before you have so I just know The Carib-
bean is going to be the best ever. Congratu-
lations and best wishes to all."
Delilah May (Mrs. G. W.) Parker, Gatun, C. Z.
Lola Munoz, Panama City, R. P.
Mildred Neely, Cristobal, C. Z.
Carlos Pulgar, Gatun, C. Z.



Clarice Steenburg, Langley Field, Va.
Gay R. Turner, Randolph-Macon Woman's
College, Lynchburg, Va.
"I've been thinking and thinking and think-
ing, and I can't think of a thing original, so
'I'll have to say the same old thing in the same
old way,' though with a heart full of love and
meaning.

"Congratulations, Class of '28, and the best
of wishes for a most successful annual."
Elizabeth Warren, Florida State College for

Women, Tallahassee, Fla.
Christian Wirtz, Cristobal, C. Z.

1927.

Emily Bledsoe, 416 Transylvania Park, Lexing-
ton, Ky.
Lawrence C. Callaway, Jr., Wentworth Mili-
tary Academy, Lexington, Mo.
"I wish the staff all the success in the world
in the publishing of their '28 annual. I also
hope that the Senior Class graduates in 'style'
as Klunk would say. I expect to be there to
see the graduation exercises and to wish the
whole class good luck."
Joseph Corrigan, Box 123, Gatun, C. Z.
Teresa Gallagher, 863 57th St., Brooklyn,

N. Y.
James Grider,4i6 Transvlvania Park, Lexington,

Ky.
Louise Heim, 510 Church Street, St. Bernard,

Ohio.
Clara A. May, Gatun, C. Z.
Helen Montgomery, Cristobal, C. Z.
John G. Nelson, Gonzaga University, Spokane,

Wash.
Dorothy Svensson, 39 Nikisch Avenue, Rosin-
dale, Mass.
"My plans went topsy-turvey so that
instead of being a freshman in the University
of Washington I'm a post graduate in Jamaica
Plain High School, Boston. I'm planning to
enter Simmons College this fall and work for a
degree in Library Science. (My work in the
C. H. S. library started that.)

"I suppose my best wishes come too late
however, they will still be 'best wishes.' I've
racked my brain in vain for some original way



THE CARIBBEAN.



59



of expressing my afFection for C. H. S. I'm
afraid I'll just have to say 'Sincere wishes
and regards to The Caribbean, its staff,
and all my schoolmates.'

SuRSE J. Taylor, Jr., 1814 West Avenue, Austin,
Texas.

James Van Scotter, Fort Davis, C. Z.

Helen Vineyard, Box 374, Women's College,
Newark, Del.
"One more year has rolled its course and
one more class is preparing to take its final
leave of old C. H. S. With all my heart I wish
the Class of '28 the greatest of success and all
the happy recollections that I have of 'back
home.'

Dorothy Wertz, Box 259, Cristobal, C. Z.

"Seems ages since June, 1927, and yet it
has not been so long. Last year I promised
myself that I would answer all C. H. S, notes
promptly; this promise, of course, resulting
from my experience of waiting while on The



Caribbean staff of 1927. Of course, I have not
lived up to my promise.

"Now I am a stenographer at the United
Fruit Company in Cristobal and therefore not
a stranger to C. H. S. and her good work.

"Best wishes to the staff and the school.
Congratulations to the Class of '28 and may
your class play be the best ever. Hard to do,
isn't it?

"Howdy, Class ot '27."
Charles Will, 2423 Kindred Street, Astoria,

Long Island, New York City.
Euphemia M. Woolnough, Cazenovia, N. Y.

"I greatly enjoy my studies in Cazenovia
Seminary and the new surroundings, but I
often wish to be back in good old C. H. S.
I know that this year's Caribbean will excell
those of former years and I send my sincerest
wishes for this year's publication and to those
who work to make it the best ever."




6o



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



6i




THE CARIBBEAN.



S=




EXTRACTS FROM MY DIARY

Emma E. Banks, '2S.




Oct. 3. School opens with a bans. Mr. Wil-
liam A. Sawyers, the new principal, is full of pep
and good-looking. He promises to be popular
with both the boys and girls. C. H. S. is also
honored with two new teachers, Miss Marvin
and Miss Russell. Both have given very flatter-
ing "first impressions." The Seniors get room
27 for their den.

Oct. 4. The Juniors get room 32 for their happy
home. C. H. S. has a record attendance. Books
and assignments make their debut. The front
of the assembly hail is decorated by bald pates.

Oct. 5. The inevitable initiation is pending,
much to the sorrow of the Freshmen. The
hot-headed convicts dot the assembly asMercuro-
chrome is daubed on those most noble domes of
the unfortunate bald Fresh.

Oct. 6. Seniors prove authority by ousting
Juniors from room 27.

Oct. 7. Room 32 sports warning "Keep Out"
sign.

Oct. 10. Athletic meeting is held and great
enthusiasm is aroused. The Seniors organize their
class. Adviser, Miss M. Marvin; President,
Jack Klunk; Vice President, Frank Kimbell;
Secretary-Treasurer, Gladys Beers.

Oct. 12. The Jinoii comes in with many
C. H. S. students returning from the States.

Oct. 13. The .Athletic Association elects officers.
President, Albert Days; Vice President, Wood-
ford Babbitt; Secretary, Rae Bliss.

Oct. 14. The Juniors and Seniors win an
interclass baseball game from the Freshmen and
Sophomores.

Oct. 18. Elections for officers of The Caribbean

StaflF are held.

.All are startled by an apparent thunderstorm
that proves to be the piano being moved down
the hall to another room. A Glee Club meeting
is held to get the yodelers together.

Oct. 19. The Caribbe.an Staff elections are
completetl. New (loud) class bells added, nearly
cause Jumping-gitis. The doomed Freshmen
boys are commanded to wear their ties backward
until Friday. The girls are ordered to wear green



hair ribbons. The Staff meets in the library and
a unanimous vote makes Mr. Sawyers adviser.

Mr. Sawyers gives a general idea of the work
to be accomplished.

Oct. 21. The Junior Class organizes. Adviser,
Miss Hesse. President, Marion Lowande; Vice
President, Mike Green; Secretary, Rosemary
Keene; Treasurer, Gretchen Palm.

A Field Day (initiation) goes over big. Many
spectators witness the Freshmen carry away the
honors from the Sophomores. The girls are
decorated like Indians in grease and war paint.

Oct. 24. A Junior boy appears this morning bald
like a Freshman. The Junior room receives desks.

Oct. 26. Sophomore Class is organized. Ad-
viser, Miss Sewell; President, Rae Bliss; Vice
President, Fred Stewart; Secretary, Mavis Thirl-
wall; Treasurer, Delia Raymond; Extra, Ralph
Crum.

More arrivals from States.

Oct. 27. Freshman Class organized. .Adviser,
Miss Moore; President, Carlos Rankin; Vice
President, Robert Brough; Secretary-Treasurer,
Lillian Housel.

Oct. 28. Friday and Saturday, Balboa and Pedro
Miguel Supper Club officers come to Cristobal
Y. W. C. -A. to plan Girl Reserve Conference.

The Staff has picture taken by Heron.

Oct. 30. (Sunday) Staff picture appears in
Star & Herald (Ahem!)

Oct. 31. Hallowe'en Black Cats (in the form of
class tests) cross many paths.

Nov. I. Senior rings discussed pro and con.

Nov. 3. Panama Independence Day. No
school. Three cheers for Panama!

Nov. 4. The Seniors give parties a debut by
giving a "Collegiate" Hop at the Masonic Temple.
Dwyer's orchestra furnished plenty of pep.

Nov. g. A Staff meeting is held at school.

Nov. 1 1. The Senior Banner is stolen from the
Senior room. Call out the spies.

Nov. 11-13. Conference in Balboa Girl
Reserves.

Nov. 14. Report cards (shiver me timbers).

Athletic meeting held by Mr. Seller in assembly



THE CARIBBEAN.



63



Nov. 15. The Senior Banner is returned painted
in Junior colors, blue and gold. Many Seniors
challenge the culprits.

A Senior meeting is held about class rings.
Nov. 16. A swimming meet is held at the
Washington pool by Mr. Seller for try outs for
both boys and girls.

Nov. 18. Staff meeting. Supper Club.

Nov. 24-25. Thanksgiving holidays. (We
thank you for more.)

Nov. 28. Edward Lowande returns from the
States, making 14 Seniors.

Dec. 7. Staff meeting.

Dec. 12. Yell practice, 2.45-3.00 p. m. First
game of season in baseball; C. H. S. 6, Outlaws i.

Dec. 17. C. H. S. defeats De Lesseps 6 to 5 in
baseball.

Dec. 20. Caroling in front of school by entire
student body. Home-room parties following.
Santa Claus is coming. Bring us some A's, please.

Dec. 2i-Jan. 2. Christmas holidays.

Dec. 23. C. H. S. defeats R. & F. A. 4 to 2.

Jan. 3. H. S. baseball record smashed by Out-
laws 8 to 2.

Jan. 6. Junior "Leap Year" Party at the
Masonic Temple enjoyed by all. How does it
feel to be asked to dance, boys?

Jan. 9. At 1.45 p. m., "Lindy" arrived in Pana-
ma. Hurrah for Lindy!

Jan. II. C. H. S. defeats R. & F. A. 8 to 6 in
baseball.

Jan. 12. Holiday All school children assemble
"en masse" at school to see "Lindy" pass in the
parade. Welcome, "Lindy." Come again.

Jan. 14. C. H. S. defeated the Maulers 10 to 7,
gaining first place in the Atlantic Twilight League.

Jan. 16. C. H. S. defeats the Outlaws 6 to 3.

Jan. 20. Supper Club.

Jan. 23. H. S. defeats De Lesseps 7 to 6.

Jan. 26. Cristobal School goes on special train
to France Field to see Colonel Lindbergh leaving
for Colombia. Bon Voyage.

Jan. 28. C. H. S. defeats the Maulers 14 to 4.

Feb. I. Girls conduct a candy sale at school
during recess and the noon hour to raise funds
for a special train February 4th, for the B. H. S.
C. H. S. baseball game.

C. H. S. defeats R. & F. A. 5 to 4.

Feb. 2. Fort De Lesseps defeats C. H. S. 4 to 3.
Big "pep" meeting held this morning for Cristobal-
Balboa game.



Feb. 3. Special train takes Cristobal rooters
to Balboa to witness a victory of 12 to 10. (Many
throat gargles needed later.)

Feb. 7. Supper Club business meeting held in
library at 8.00 a. m.

Feb. 9-10. Zone moisture increases owing to
toil and sweat of mid-year examinations.

Feb. 13. Senior library privilege taken away.
When do we get our rattles?

Feb. 15. Received invitations to take a flight
to the Masonic Temple this Friday.

C. H. S. defeats R. & F. A. ii'to 3. We win
the pennant for the first half of the Twilight
League. Won 14, lost 2.

Feb. 17. The Sophomores give a "Lindbergh
Hop" at the Masonic Temple. The flight was
thrilling.

Feb. 17-21. Colon celebrates Carnival. Viva
La Reina!

Feb. 21. School dismissed at 2.10 to enable
everyone to see the big parade. Boom-Boomety-
Boom!

Feb. 28. The fire alarm was rung by Mr. Saw-
yers so we could all go out to see the "Los Angeles,"
the monstrous dirigible, sail by.

Mar. 9. Monster Carnival held on grounds of
Fort De Lesseps. Great success, both financially
and socially.

Mar. 19. Mr. Robert Noe holds a Senior meet-
ing after school to choose characters for the
Senior play.

Mar. 20. Girls' Glee Club sings at the ninth
anniversary of the Y. W. C. A.

Mar. 21. Arrival of Senior rings causes great
joy and excitement among the Seniors.

Mar. 22. End of fourth six wesks; marks come
out.

Mar. 31. C. H. S. loses a popular fellow-
student, Mike Greene, to Mobile, Ala. We wish
you the same success in Mobile that you've had
here, Mike.

Apr. 13. The Freshmen Masquerade Ball at the
Washington Hotel is proclaimed the best party
of the year.

.Apr. 17. A contest is staged. Prettiest girl,
Mary Maher. Best looking boy. Jack Maher.
Most popular girl, Eleanor Urwiler. Most popular
boy, Jack Klunk.

Apr. 20. Cheer meeting to encourage our boys'
swimming team on their trip to Balboa.

Apr. 21. Swimming meet lost by one point.



64



THE CARIBBEAN.



Apr. 22. The first game of series for the
Governor's Cup in the League is won by C.H. S.
from De Lesseps.

Apr. 28. The TwiHght League season closes
bv C. H. S. capturing the Governor's Cup.

May 4. Girls roll stockings to their ankles and
bovs roll their trousers to knees to create a new
sensation.

May 8. A complete rehearsal of "Cupid Scores
a Touchdown" was held at the Y. W. C. A.
building to-night.

May 25. "Cupid Scores a Touchdown" is given
by the Senior Class at the America Theatre
and is a big success. A matinee for the Grade
school was staged in the afternoon.

May 26. The play is repeated at Gatun Club-
house.

June 11-12. Final examinations engulf us.
Hush, don't disturb us.

June 15. The Junior-Senior Banquet is given
by the Juniors' to the Seniors at the Washington
Hotel. You know your onions, Class of '29.

June 17. Baccalaureate service is held at
Christ Church by the Sea. Bishop Morris
officiating.

June 20. Commencement exercises at the
Washington Hotel. The Seniors are left to face
the strife of life alone.

June 22. The last call. Report cards are out
and so are we.

At last 'tis arrived, the end of the year,

The time we've longed for now is here;

Yet there is sadness in many a heart.

It means that good friends soon must part,

Memories of the dear school will e'er be en-
shrined,

And many's the time we'll look behind,

As though in a crystal we'll clearly see

Those happy hours dear to you and me.



THE SENIOR PARTY.

By Lilybet Cox, '2g.

The invitation to the Senior Party was received
by all classes of Cristobal High School with
great enthusiasm. It came out about 10 days
before the party, and these were spent in pleasant
anticipation.



On Friday night, November 4th, there
assembled at the Masonic Temple a large and
happy crowd. The Seniors, trying to excite
their guests, told them that the orchestra for
the evening was not able to be there. At this
everyone became disheartened.

From eight until nine, the High School Orches-
tra played several selections. Then a soldier from
Fort Davis offered several popular airs and gave
a "Charleston" exhibition.

The real orchestra then arrived. Everyone
was livened up and did his or her best to dance
when Mr. Dwyer and his orchestra gave forth
the "jazzy strains."

In the meantime punch and sandwiches were
welcomed by the guests. Dancing was again
resumed and kept up until 12 o'clock, when
everyone bade the Senior hosts and hostesses
"Good night."



THE JUNIOR PARTY.

By Evelyn Ganzemuller jo.

Friday evening, January 6th, the Juniors of
'29 gave a clever leap year party at the Masonic
Temple.

The hall was beautifully decorated in the class
colors, blue and gold, and gay colored electric
lights.

As it was a leap year party, the Juniors an-
nounced that the girls would have to ask for
the dances. This caused much mirth among the
guests.

Dwyer's orchestra furnished the music which
was most enjoyable. Mr. and Mrs. Witherspoon
were the chaperons for the evening.

The first part of the evening was spent in
dancing. Later, Roy Walker and James Quinn
gave a humorous duet entitled "Romeo and
Juliet" for which they received much applause.

During the evening, delightful refreshments of
cake and punch were served.

The prize waltz was won by Ethel Westman
and Jack Maher, who were indeed worthy of it.
She received a Parker pencil and he a bill fold.

The remaining part of the evening was spent
in dancing until 1 1 o'clock when the party ended.
Everyone agreed that it was one of the most
enjoyable parties given this school year.



THE CARIBBEAN.



65



THE SOPHOMORE PARTY.

By Alice H enter, '30.

The aviators of the Class of 30 of Cristobal
High School gave their annual party on the air-
ship, "The Spirit of the Sophomores," which
started from the Masonic Temple, Friday eve-
ning, February 17th.

One of the aviators met the guests, gave them
a program of the flight and d rected them to the
airship.

The airship was decorated with the aviator's
colors, blue and silver. A large American flag
was draped, with their emblem beneath it.

Little airplanes were hung from the streamers
of blue and silver.

At 8 o'clock the airship left its moorings with
the orchestra playing a lively tune.

An entertainment was given by Aviatress
Eleanor Urwiler, who did the Charleston, and
one of the guests, Mary Bretch, who recited.

During the flight, punch, cake and sandwiches
were served to the weary guests and aviators.

At 12 o'clock the airship again was at its moor-
ings, the guests thanking each aviator in turn tor
the lovely flight.

THE FRESHMAN PARTY.

flv Joyce Alberga, 'jr.

"We, the Freshmen, invite you to come
To a costume party at the Washington.
.'\pril ijih is the date.
Be there early for its starts at eight.
There will be a prize fcr the funniest and best,
Be sure to come we'll do the rest."

Such read the invitations to the delightful
costume ball given by the Freshmen.

There was a very large attendance, and the
music rendered by Dwyer's orchestra was enjoyed
by all. Delicious punch and sandwiches were
served throughout the evening.

The biggest event of the party was the Grand
March. Elveryone took part in this. Up and down
the ballroom did they march until the judges decid-
ed who the winners would be. Ma y Patterson
won first prize fj- the best costume. She represent-
ed "Little Bo Peep". Ethel Westman won the
prize for the funniest. Her costume of "Kiki" was
very well designed. The boys winning the prizes
were Jack Maher, the "Midshipman," and
Ravmond Will, "Our Old-Fashioned School Boy."



Another interesting event was the prize waltz
which was won by Mildred Bath and Vincent
Lugli.

Much credit must be given to Miss Moore, the
Freshman Class adviser. It was under her super-
intendence that such a wonderful party was given.



THE SENIOR PLAY.

By Ethel Burnett, '21).

This year's SeniDr Play, "Cupid Scores a
Touchdown," proved a decided success. Directed
by Mr. Robert Noe, this gay little comedy m.ade a
deep impression on the school backers. Much
verv much of the credit for this is due Mr. Noe,
for it was only through his indefatigable labor,
his admirable casting, that the play was giv;n
as well as it was.

The story revolves around Dulcy Connors,
a charming school girl, whose father is out of
town facing financial difficulties. Barton Hawley,
a shady politician, offers to aid him on condition
that Dulcy be part of the bargain. Her sweet,
wise mother, however, takes Barton down a peg or
two. Going to Mrs. Belden-Grey's private school,
Dulcy learns to know Beatrice and Stanley Comp-
ton, who come from a family of culture and good
breeding. Mrs. McNulty, Dulcy's married sister,
strives to kill Stanley's afl^ection for DjIcv, but
fails. In the end everything turns out splendidly.

Other characters are Betty, Mrs. Connors's
trusted maid, Gladys Fluttermore and Chubby
Wriggley. Gladys and Chubby are engaged ani
their clever lines provided much amusement.
Gladys is a sophisticated gold-digger. Chubby is
her much stepped-on prey, and together they
furnish hilarious comedy.

Etliel Westman was very well cast as Daley,
the heroine. She act;J just as a gay, bat true-
hearted young school girl should act. Jack Klunk
made a true villain. Zonella Bliss, as Mrs. Con-
nors had a heavy part, but she carried it off
admirably. Emma Banks was perfect as the con-
ceited Mrs. McNulty. Mildred Bath and Edward
Lowande, as the gentle, lovely society girl, an 1
the college football star, did exceedingly will.
Mrs. Belden-G:e7 was well-portrayed by Gladys
Beers. -Anita Rankin was adorable as the maii.
But never did two characters suit their pa-ts as
Kathryn Lambert and .Albert Days suited theirs.
Kathryn was Gladys, the gold-digger, and
Albert was her fiance.



66



THE CARIBBEAN.




u EST Looking
Mary Maker

Jack NaKer



55



QH,S,





Host Popular

Lleanor Urwiler

Jack Klunk




rau ine r



erman




THE CARIBBEAN.



67



THE POPULARITY CONTEST.

April seventeenth was another gala da>- in
Cristobal High. The students were informed
that there was a popularity contest to be held.

Students were handed blanks to fill in. Pupils
were questioning each other who the best looking
and most popular boys and girls were.



Ballots were collected and counted, and a heated
contest was in progress all during this performance.
The final results of Cristobal High School's
popularity contest were:

Prettiest Girl, Mary Maher.
Best Looking Boy, Jack Maher.
Most Popular Girl, Eleanor LIrwiler.
Most Popular Boy, Jack Klunk.




Four-masted Sailing Vessel Transiting GaiUard Cut.



THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL
CARNIVAL.

By Ethel Burnett, '29.

To aid the Staff to put forth an honorable
Caribbean, a carnival was held at Fort De-
Lessep's grounds on March 9, 1928. As it has
been before, the carnival was composed of a
Musical Revue, Side Shows, Dancing, a popularity
Contest, and Eats.

Many were the thrills the enthusiastic public
received from various side shows. A murderous
^^ ild Man who escaped; A Three-Ring Dog Show;
and the Missing Link, furnished much excitement.
Heart throbs were increased by the sight of a
Fat Lady, and a strange maiden, Zoma, who



neither ate, drank, walked, talked or slept
ever. There were other interesting things
a Fish Pond, where strange to say, every fisher-
man got a "bite." The Musical Revue was
extremely satisfactory. The Popularity Contest
waxed fast and furious in the eleventh hour, but
Miss Pauline Herman was the victorious "Miss
Cristobal High School." Dancing occurred in
the Movie Hall after eleven. The "Eats"
need no mention the refreshment booth was
crowded at all times.

Due to the cooperation of Colonel Greig and
the personnel of Fort De Lesseps, Cristobal
High School, and the public, the carnival ac-
complished its purpose. It was also a roaring
success.



68



THE CARIBBEAN.




Cristobal High School Saxophone Band.



THE GIRLS' SAXOPHONE BAND.

This band, which is composed mainh' ot Cris-
tobal High School girls, is one of the best known
musical organizations on the Isthmus. Mr. Rein-
hold, the director, deserves a great deal of credit
for the excellent training of each girl in the organi-
zation, and for the splendid way in which they
play. Each girl is trained individually, then they
get together twice a week and give the neighbors
a treat.

The Saxophone Band has given many recitals
on the Pacific side as well as on the Atlantic side,
so it is well known and always well received. These
girls were asked to play during the banquet given
for Colonel Lindbergh when he was in Colon,
and they received high praise tor this performance.



THE GATUN BOYS' BAND.

When we sit back and enjoy the harmonious
music of the Gatun Boys' Band, we forget those
first agonizing do-re-mi's which these young
musicians produced a short time ago. The band
was organized about three years ago through the
efforts of Mr. R. M. Crum, who is now president
of this organization.

At present there are about 40 members in the
band, and, under the very able leadership of Mr.
Meyer Cohen, of Fort Davis, this organization
plays very well and need no longer be considered
amateur.

The Gatun Boys' Band has given concerts on
both sides of the Isthmus and is well known tor its
well-balanced anil well-presented programs.




t^Mn



^>^:'



1 1




Gatun Boys' Band. Includes many Cristobal School Boys.



THE CARIBBEAN.



69







70



THE CARIBBEAN.







^y<^iiJ.^iNO0&



i§i



-/^t.!i.



THE CARIBBEAN.



71



CRISTOBAL High School had good fortune this L'nfortunateiy our high school represents a rather
^ 1 1 11, ^_ C _i- II .__ 1 1 f



year to have several excellent men. Some of
whom, greatly to our sorrow, will not be with us next
year. Largely owing to their efforts, we have had a
good year athletically. We did not always win but
we set a good example in sportsmanship, and have
always rendered a good account of ourselves.



small community and we have no wealth of
material to draw from as Balboa High School has.

Our men, by entrance into every kind of sport
and by their hard work and strenuous efforts, have
set an example for the students in the years to
come.



Our baseball season this year was a
great success. Our Cristobal boys always
could play ball, and Witherspoon, our
coach par excellence, was loaned to us
by the Navy. The rules of the Twilight
League allowed two big league players
on each team. Witherspoon played with
us the entire season, but the other man
given to us was constantly changing.
Roberts, of the Navy, began the year uith
us, but Orsi finished, pitching us to
victory in the final game of the champion-
ship series.

Next year, C. H. S. ball team will be
greatly weakened by the loss of four
players. Greene, our pitcher, has already
gone to the States, and Lowande, Klunk,
and Days will have been graduated. There
will be others to fill their places, of course,
and let us hope they will uphold the
honor of Cristobal High School as their
predecessors have done this year.

Following .ire the results of the .Atlantic
Side Twilight League:

FIRST HALF.

1927.

12-12 C. H. S. 6, Outlaws i.

12-12 C. H. S. 6, Outlaws i.

12-17 C. H. S. 6, De Lesseps 5.

12-28 C. H. S. 4, R. & F. A. I.
1928.

1-3 C. H. S. 3, Outlaws 8.

1-5 C. H. S. 7, De Lesseps 7.

i-ii C. H. S. 8, R. &F. A. 6.

1-13 C. H. S. 10, Maulers 7.

1-15 C. H. S. 6, Outlaws 3.

1-23C. H. S. 7, De Lesseps 6.

1-28 C. H. S. 14, Maulers 5.

2-1 C. H. S. 5, R. & F. A. 4.

2-2 C. H. S. 3, De Lesseps 4.

2-8 C. H. S. 9, Maulers 5.
2-9 C. H. S.-Outlaws (forefeited).

2-15 C. H. S. 10, R. &F. .A. 3.

SECOND HALF.

2-20 C. H. S.-Outlaws (forfeited).

2-25 C. H. S. 7, De Lesseps 3.

3-1 C. H. S. 14, Maulers 4.

3-7 C. H. S. 3, R. & F. A. 2.

3-12C. H. S. 6, Maulers 13.

"3-15 C. H. S. 5, Maulers 7.

3-19 C. H. S. 5, R. & F. A. 3.



BASEBALL.

Feb. II, 1928 Before an immense
throng at "Razzberry" Park, Balboa, Cris-
tobal won the first game of the high school
series, 12 to 10. The game was a free-
hitting afl^air, Balboa outhitting us 12 to
10, but their hits were more scattered.
Cristobal's hits came with men on base.
The feature ot the game was Hele's drive
into the tennis court in the first inning
with two men on. Later in the game Jack
Klunk hit one into the tennis court, easily
making the circuit.

Cristobal played a great fielding game,
not one error being charged against them
during the entire game. On the other
hand, Balboa seemed to have the weak-
ness of missing them at the wrong time,
eight miscues being made by them. The
chief offender was Wood, who missed
four. The batting honors were grabbed
by Hele of Balboa, who got four clean
hits out ot five times up. Russey and
Quinn ot Balboa made three apiece. For
Cristobal the feature was Klunk's catch-
ing and his homer into the tennis court.
Lowande made two hits out of four at-
tempts, one ot them being a double to
left field.

A special train took almost the entire
school and a large number of other rooters
to Balboa, to cheer for the team. The
girls were the loudest in their cheering,
giving Balboa competition on their own
grounds. The game was half over when
our rooters arrived in force upon the field.
Balboa was taken by surprise; they had
never suspected anything like that.





FIRST


GAME.








C. H. S.


AB.


R.


H.


PO.


A.


E.


Wertz, rf


3


1


I











Days, 3b


^








I


1





Klunk, c


?


4


2


1 7


I





Greene, p


4


2


I


I


2





Wikingstad, c


3


I


2


I








Lowande, ss..


4


I


I


I


I





Pettit, rf


,'





I


I








DeReuter, i b


^


I


I


4








Maher, 2b


5


I


I


I








Totals


W


12


10


27


?






B. H. S. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.

Quinn, 2b. ... ^ o ; i i ;

DeLondes, p. Ci i i i 10

Clisbee, ib.. 4 o o 10 o o

Wood, ss 320244

Hele, 3b 534310

Powell, c 1 2 I 5 o o

Jones, cf, I I 1000

Taylor, If ,. 2 i o o o i

Russey, rt 5 o 3 3 o c

Daniels, rt. o o o o o i

Brown, p 50020c



Totals.. 38 10 13 27 7 8

Summary.

Home runs Klunk, Hele. Three-base
hits Hele 2. Two-base hits Lowande,
Hele. Hit by pitched ball By Greene
2 (Clisbee and Taylo"). Struck out By
Greene 15, by Brown 7, by DesLondes 2.
Base on balls Off Greene 5, off Brown 3.
Earned runs Cristobal 8, Balboa 10.
Winning pitcher Greene. Losing pitcher
Brown

March 1 1 1 928 In the second game of
the series, played on the .Atlantic side,
Cristobal High School won her second
straight game from Balboa High School,
thereby making a clean sweep of the
series. The game was witnessed by a
crowd of rooters from both sides, who
packed Broadway Park. Balboa had her
force of backers present; having run a
special train. The crowd was given good
music between the innings by the Fort
De Lesseps band.

Things started in the first inning.
Quinn of Balboa, first man up, walked
and scored later on Wood's single to left.
Cristobal also scored in the first inning.
Klunk forced Days at second and then
stole second and scored on Greene's
single to left. Balboa secured another
run in the third inning on Hele's triple.
Hele scored when Lowande fell in catching
Klunk's throw to second.

In the sixth inning Cristobal put the
game safely away. With two men on,
Klunk hit a long homer to deep right
center. Later in the game Klunk hit a



72



THE CARIBBEAN.



triple. His batting during the series was
hard and timely, he making two homers
and a triple.

The game from this stage on was well
played. Balboa fought hard but was
unable to push runs across the plate.
Thus ended a well-played series, many
of the boys being sorry that more g:,mes
were not to be played.

Cristobal High School appre.i.ites the
coaching and advice rendered by Messrs.
Dundon, Picard, and Campbell during
the Cristobal-Balboa series.

Score, Cristobal 6, Bidbon 1.

SECOND C-4MF.

Balboa. -AB, R. H. E.

Pescod, cf 1 o I o

Quinn, cf 2

Dilling. 2b 4 i 1 c

Clisbee, ib 4 i i c

Wood, ss 4 o I c

He!e, 3b 4 i i o

Russey, c. If 4 o i 3

Brown, p, cf I o o o

Jones, If 3 o I I

Powell, rf 3 o o i

Des Londes, If, p. 4 o i o

Totals 35 3 8 5

Cristobal. AB. R. H. E.

Wertz rf 4 2 i o

Days, 3b 2200

Klunk c 4 3 2 o

Greene, p 4 o 2 o

VVikingstad, cf. 4000

Lowande, ss 4222

Maher, 2b 4 o 1 2

Pettit, If 3 o o o

De Reuter, ib .... 3 o o o

Totals 32 9 8 4

Summary.

Home run Klunk. Three-base hits
Hele, Klunk. Two base hit Dilling.
Base on balls Off Greene 2, off Des
Londes 4. Earned runs Balboa o,
Cristobal 3. Struck out By Greene 10,
by Des Londes 3, by Brown i.

On April 22, Cristobal High School de-
feated Fort De Lesseps by the score of
7 to 3 in a hotly contested game. This
game was the first of a 3-game series
between De Lesseps and the High School
to decide the championship ot the Atlantic
Twilight League for iy28. The ideal
weather conditions brought out a large
and enthusiastic crowd of rooters.

Both teams were noticeably nervous in
the early innings. Cristobal, first to bat.



was given one run on errors. De Lesseps
retaliated in their half with a home run,
tying the score. The tie held until the
fourth inning when Cristobal scored again.
Klunk hit a three-bagger and came in on a
sacrifice by Witherspoon. By errors on
the part of Cristobal in the field, De Les-
seps in their half raised the score by
two runs. Score, 3 to 2. Hayden's good
work in the box, supported ably by good
fielding, held De Lesseps scoreless the
remainder of the game. A double play
in the seventh, Lowande to Witherspoon
to De Reuter, helped Hayden out of a
difficult hole. The score was again tied
in the eighth, made possible by Klunk's
two bagger. The game was won in the
ninth. With two men on and two out
Wertz hit a homer, making the score 6 to
3. This was followed by another double
by Klunk, who scored on a single by
Witherspoon. This made the score 7 to 3
in Cristobal's favor. De Lesseps failed to
score, dying with three pop flies to Wither-
spoon at short.

I think Hayden, our pitcher, deserves
special mention for this game. He is
new at the business this year, and this
was the first game of real importance he
has pitched for the High School. He was
in hot water several times but he came
through with flying colors.

The score:

C. H. S. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.

Days, cf 4 2 i i o i

Wertz, If 4 I I I o o

Klunk, c 4 3 3 4 I o

Witherspoon,

ss 3 o 3 5 5 I

Lowande, 2b. 5 o o i 5 i

Wikingstad, If 5 o o o o o

DeReuter, ib 4 o o I4 o i

Hayden, p.. 4 o o o 4 o

Maher, 3b. 200 i 22

Maurer, cf. o i o o o o



Tota



3S



8 27 1-;



De Lesseps. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.

Dodgson, lb. 4 o o ro o o

Evans, If. 5 o i 2 o o

Galarza, 2b. 5 i i i 20

Frank, ss. 4 i i i 3 i

Carter, p. 3 o o i 5 o
Turner, 3b.. ,40121 1

Wilson, cf 4 1 o o o o

Harding, rf 40 i 000

Hirsh, c 4 o 2 10 o o



Totals 37



7 27 II



On .April 25, 1928, at 4.30 p. m., Cris-
tobal High School played the second game
of the .Atlantic Side Championship Series
with Fort De Lesseps, winning a very
exciting victory by a score of 8 to 6.

This game was very gratifying to the
students and rooters ot the High School
not to mention the colored contingent
which was there in force. Our team
throughout the game showed a marked
superiority, even though the luck broke
against us during the first three innings.

In the first half of the first inning, De-
Lesseps scored two runs, but were stopped
by a double play. Days to Witherspoon.
In our half a run was scored a homer by
Klunk.

Hayden, over-anxious to win, was not
at his best through these first innings,
and was relieved by Orsi in the fourth.
De Lesseps scored in the second, third,
and fourth innings. When we came to bat
in the 4th, the score was 5 to i against us.
In our half we scored two runs on a hit
and a sacrifice and two errors by De-
Lesseps.

After shutting out De Lesseps in the
fifth, for the first time, we staged the usual
batting rally, scoring four runs. Every-
body hit in spiteof the fact that De Lesseps
changed pitchers.

The soldiers were again shut-out in the
sixth. We scored one run this inning
on a pass and a base hit.

In the seventh De Lesseps scored their
final run on a three-bagger by Galarza
who was sent home by the umpire because
the ball was fielded by a spectator.

This game was very exciting to the
supporters ot the High School team, be-
cause of the poor start. It was later
retrieved by the excellent playing of the
team as a whole.

De Lesseps. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.

Dodgson, lb.

If 3 I 2 8 c I

Evans, if, p. 4 i i o o o
Galarza, 2b,

lb 4 I 2 4 I I

Frank, ss. If,

2b 4 o I I 3 3

Carter, p, ss.. 4 i 203c

Turner, 3b. 40 i i 3 i

Wilson, cf., 300000

Hersh, c 2 i o 4 i 2

Tomlinson, rf 3 I i o 1 i

Totals 31 6 10 18 12 9



THE CARIBBEAN.



7.1



C. H. S. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.

Days, :5b.... 4 o I 3 2 o

Klunk, c :j J I 8 2 I

Wertz, rf 3 o o i o o
Witherspoon,

ab, ss 2 o o J o I

Orsi, ss, p.. 4 I 2 o 4 I

Lowande, lb. 2 i i 600
Wikingstad,

cf 4 2 I o o o

Maurer, If. J i 1000

Hayden,p,2b. 201022



Totals.



:i 10 5



B.'VSEB.'VLL NOTES.

Mike Greene, our only pitcher, after
winning two games against Balboa, left
us at a critical period in the Twilight
Le.ague schedule. Without his pitching
arm and hitting prowess we were left
considerably weakened. Mike was con-
sidered the Twilight League's best pitcher
and was one of the High School's leading
hitters, finishing second among High
School batters, with an average of .314.

Jack Klunk enjoyed the best year of
his High School career, leading the High
School team in batting with an average of
.348, and le.iding the Twilight League in
runs scored. Jack was considered by far
the best backstop in the Twilight League
and one ot the fastest baserunners. He
was also one ot the League's home run
hitters, getting two in the Balboa Series.

Lowande, our first baseman, rapidly
picked up from a slow start and ended the
series brilliantly as DeLesseps can testify.
His batting during the second half was
loud and often, and his fielding was steady.
Lowande held the shortstop position dur-
ing the Balboa Series.



Porfirio DeReuter broke in as first
baseman during the Balboa games and
made such a good job of it that he was
put there and in the outfield so as to take
advantage of his hitting and fielding.

Jack Maher, utility second ba.seman,
was used only in the Balboa Series and
played his position well.

George Wertz, starting out as a rookie
outfielder, soon blossomed into a star
outfielder and was with Klunk the Ruth-
Gehrig twins of the Twilight League.
Wertz led the Twilight League in home
runs.

.Albert Days also enjoyed the best year
of his High School career. He developed
into a very dependable fielder. Although
he played third most of the season he was
used in other infield positions very effec-
tively. At bat he was always dangerous
and finished third in the lineup, with an
average ot .304.

Walter Wikingstad, our "flaming" out-
fielder, was as all Vikings steady.
Wicky's fielding was sure and his hitting
was dependable.

Jack Pettit was our flashy outfielder,
his fielding bordering on the sensational.
His hitting was developed during the
second halfof theTwilight League season.

Paul Hayden was not able to show his
ability during the first halfo'' the Twilight
League because of Mike Greene, but when
he did enter into the games he showed
enough to assure the team that they had
another pitcher besides Greene.

Kenneth Maurer was used during the
second half because ot his suri fielding
and hitting.

\'incent Lugli, our utility infielder, was
not used often enough to show his playing
abilitv.



BOWLING.

For the first time in our high school we
have had an opportunity to bring out our
material for bowling. This year we had a
real successful season. Our bowlers work-
ed hard at the game and came out victori-
ous against Balboa. The first match was
won by Balboa but we came through with
two decisive victories and by doing so won
the honors against Balboa. The results
are .".s fellows:

May /2, 1928, at Balboa Balboa,
1,233 pi'is; Cristobal, 1,216 pins.

May ig, 1928, at Cristobal. Balboa,
1,216 pins; Cristobal, 1,260 pins.

June 2, 1928, at Cristobal. Balboa,
1,165 pins; Cristobal, 1,225 pins.



Plaver.



B.4TT1NG AVERAGES.

G. AB. R. H. TB. 2B. jB. HR. SH. SB. Pet.



Klunk, c 28

Greene, p 22

Days, cf, 3b 28

Wertz, rf 27

Lowande, ib, c 28

DeReuter, ib 15

Wikingstad, If 27

Pettit, If, cf 18

Maurer 16

Lugli 5

Hayden, p 13

Maher, 3b 5



92


ii


32


46


(


I


2


4


8


.348


70


24


T 2


-9


3


2





.^


3


3"4


92


19


28


3S


2


1


2


1


4


3^4


85


20


22


45


6


1


5





2


.259


83


18


21


35


5


3


I


5


10


-53


38


4


9


12








I


3





- 237


80


8


15


16


I














.188


i3


2


6


8


2


1











182


39


5


7


7

















.180


'3


1


.>


3


1














^SS


26


3


4


4














I


154


12


4


I


I

















.083



B.ASKET BALL.

.A largenumberotcandidates turnedout
for basket ball this season. Six of these
were last-year men Klunk, Lowande,
Hayden, Days, Lugli, and Babbitt.
These six men practically made up the
High School team.

We played one practice game with the
Chase National Bank and came out vic-
torious 21 to 2c.

On May 19, we went to Balboa and
before a large crowd of Balboa's rooters
were badly defeated 40 to 10.

On May 23, Balboa came to Cristobal
and this time before a crowd of our rooters
they defeated us again. This time 50 to
10.

The teamwork of Balboa was fine.
They seemed to know just where every
other fellow was and where he was going.
Our players played more as individuals,
not being able to work together.



TENNIS.

Little interest was taken in tennis.
However, a few boys turned out and
practiced faithfully for the match with
Balboa, which occurred on February 18.
We were handed a severe beating. Gil-
man, of Balboa, showed the best playing.
His hard serve helping much to carry
his team to victory.

The score was 5 to o.



1. Oilman and Fidanque (B. H. S.)
defeated H. Mueller and R. Edwards
(C. H. S.). Score, 6-4, 6-3.

2. H. Meredith and J. Humphreys
(B. H. S.) defeated A. Mundberg and
Fishbough(C.H. S.). Score, 6-0, 6-2.



MR 10066-



74



THE CARIBBEAN.




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THE CARIBBEAN.



75



3. Gilman (B. H. S.) defeated R.
Edwards (C. H. S,). Score, 6-4, 6-2.

4. Hele (B. H. S.) defeated R. Sargent
(C. H. S.). Score, 6-2, 6-2.

5. F. Maduro (B. H. S.) defeated E.
Fishbough (C. H. S.). Score, 6-0, 6-0.



SWIMMING.

Although new material was plentihil
this year there was not much interest
taken in swimming. .An interclass meet
was held April 13, 1928, Junior-Senior
vs. Freshman-Sophomore. Only three
Seniors represented the upper classmen.
However, they were sufficient to defeat
the lower classes, 31 to 13.

On .April 21, eight days later, with
hardly any training, our swimming team
went to Balboa to compete in the annu.. I
swimming meet between Balboa High
and Cristobal High. We arrived on the
noon train, and went immediately to the
poo! to find the Balboa team ready and
waiting.

Jack Klunk, our aquatic star, was high
point scorer of the day with 194 points.
His closest rivals were Wm. Walston and
.A. Schwinderman, of Balboa, with 6 point:
each.

The meet was hard fought throughout,
sometimes we forged ahead only to have
Balboa take the lead in the next event.
When the events were ended we were one
point behind, 29-30.

Following are the official results of the
meet:

lOO-yard Free Style.

1. Klunk (C. H. S.). Time, 59 4(5 sec-
onds. 5 points.

2. Wm. Walston (B. H. S.). 3 points.

3. R. Sargent (C. H. S.). i point.

4. R. Watson (B. H. S.).

Points Cristobal 6, Balboa 3.

220-yard Free Style.

1. G. Lowe (B. H. S.). Time, 2 minutes
50 seconds. 5 points.

2. H. Mueller (C. H. S.). 3 points.

3 Wm. Rader (B. H. S. ). 1 point.
4. P. Hayden (C. H. S.).

Points Cristobal 3, Balboa 6.

^0-yard Free Style.

1. J. Klunk (C. H. S.). Time, 24 4!;
seconds. 5 points.

2. Wm. Walston (B. H.S.). 3 points.

3. E. Lowande (C. H. S.). i point.

4 A. Schwinderman (B. H. S.).

Points Cristobal 6, Balboa 3.



^0-yard Breast Stroke.

1. A. Schwinderman (B. H. S.) Time,

31 4I5 seconds. 5 points.

2. G. Halloran (B. H. S.) 3 points.

3. W. Wikingstad (C. H.S.). i point.

4. A. Mundberg (C. H. S.)

Points Cristobal i, Balboa 8.

50-yard Back Stroke.

1. H. Cranberry (B. H. S.). Time,

32 3I5 seconds. 5 points.

2. J. Klunk (C. H. S.). 3 points.

3. F. Key (B. H. S.). i point.

4. H. Mueller (C.H.S.)

Points Cristobal 3, Balboa 6.

Fancy Dicing.

1. J. Klunk (C. H. S.). 5 points.

2. J. Morrison (B. H. S. ). 3 points.

3. A. Schwinderman (B.H. S.) i point.

4. A. Days (C. H. S.).

Points Cristobal 5, Balboa 4.

iy6yard Relay.

1. Cristobal (E. Lowande, R. Sargent,
H. Mueller, J. Klunk). Time, i minute
34 seconds. 5 points.

2. Balboa (Grimison, Cranberry,

Schwinderman, Walston.)

Total points scored Cristobal 29,
Balboa 30.

Cristobal won four firsts.

Balboa won three firsts.

High point scorers J. Klunk (C.H.S.),
19 j|4 points. Wm. Walston (B. H. S.),
6 points. .A. Schwindeman (B. H. S.),
6 points.

Number of contestants Cristobal 8,
Balboa 10.



TRACK.

Track started with a bang this year and
on March 3, 1928, at Fort Davis, an inter-
class meet was held, Junior-Senior vs.
Freshmen-Sophomores. The final score
was 66 to 20, the upper classes on the
long end. From the winners ot this meet
a track team was chosen to meet Balboa.

On March 17, 1928, we traveled to
Balboa to see what we could do to them.
Our high hopes were soon shattered.
Balboa showed us that she also had some
track men and that they had done some
serious training. High honors were won
by Gayle McGuigan of Balboa, with 1 1 \
points. Lowande, of Cristobal, came
second with 8 points. Of the entire meet
we only won one first place, the shot put.
In this, two ol our men tied, Klunk and
Lowande.



Following are the official results:

50-yard Dash.

1. .August Schwindeman, B. H. S., 5.9
seconds.

2. Higgason, C. H. S.

3. Lowande, C. H. S.

lOO-yard Dash.

1. McGuigan, B. H. S. Time, 11
seconds.

2. Lowande, C. H. S.

3. Schwindeman, B. H. S.
DeReuter, C. H. S., ruled out.

220-yard Dash.

1. McGuigan, B. H. S. Time, 23. S
seconds.

2. DeReuter, C. H. S.

3. Lowande, C. H. S.

440-yard Dash.

1. Jones, B.H. S. Time, ^9.6 seconds.

2. Gelabert, B. H. S.

3. Melendez, C. H. S.

i2-pound Shot Put.

1. Klunk, C. H. S. Distance, 54 feet
6 inches.

2. Lowande, C.H.S. Distance, <:4 feet
6 inches.

3. Wood, Wm., E. H. S.

High Jump.

1. Lowe, B. H. S. Height, 5 feet 2
inches.

2. Miller, B. H. S. Height, 5 feet 2
inches.

3. Small, C. H. S.

Broad Jump.

1. Gelabert, B.H. S. Distance, 17 feet
5 1 inches.

2. Miller, B. H. S.

3. Lowande, C. H. S.

88^-yard Pe'ay.

1. Balboa High School. Time 1.44.

2. Cristobal High School.

Total Points Scored.

Balboa High School 46

Cristobal High School 22

Total 68

Individual Honors.

1. McGuigan, B. H. S., 11 J points.

2. Lowande, C. H. S., 8 points.



76



THE CARIBBEAN.




Moonlight Scene on the Pacific.



THE CARIBBEAN.



77




78



THE CARIBBEAN.



S'



I




THE EXCHANGE DEPARTMENT.

By Glady Elizabeth Beers, '28.



''S




-^



The exchanges that we receive at Cristobal are
always welcomed. We are always pleased to know
what is going on in the high schools in the United
States and how they like our book. Our department



The Tomahawk. Fernsdale Union High School, Fernsdale, Calif
Your general make-up of the book is excellent. Your
cover is beautiful and your cuts good. We like the
feature of running the jokes between the ads; also the
introductory page. The classification of the classes such
as Seniors as Golden Age Freshmen as Stone Age is
clever. A few unfavorable criticisms are: we suggest a
smaller staff. We also recommend using different back-
grounds and arrangements for group pictures. Why do
you not exxhange more with schools out of your State.'

The Reflector. H'oburn High School, IVoburn, Mass.

We like your magazine very much. The headings
are good, especially the one for "Stories." The poem
"Little Freshman" amused the Seniors in particular.

The Student. Holmes High School, Covington, Ky.

You have a neat magazine. Your headings are
excellent. The Exchange Department for November
is the cleverest we have seen.

The Blue Chick. Jt^ilmington High School, IFilmington, Del.
Your annual is the very best we have received.
The cover and cuts deserve special mention. The
material that is worked in with the advertisements
is a very clever idea.

The Cardinal. Girls Commercial High School, Brooklyn, N.Y.
The art department of your magazine is very good.
Your covers are very clever..

The Observer. CentralFalls HighSchool,CenlralFalls, N. Y.
You have a good magazine. The heading for U
and I is very attractive.

The Nutshell. Moorestown High School, Moorestown, N. J.
Your magazine is well compiled. The Literary
Department should have special mention.

The Stampede. Sunset High School, Dallas, Texas.

The idea of giving the staff the name of the "Stam-
pede Gang" and the names to the different depart-
ments is very suitable.

The Red and White. Rochester High School, Rochester, N. H.
The cover of your book is very neat. We especially
like the poetry written by Annie Phillips, 'igand James
Watson, '18.

I. a Reata. Albuquerque High School, Albuquerque, N. M.
We like your book as a whole. The border around
each page is very attractive. Your cuts are wonderful.
We are glad to see that you are able to produce an
annual without advertising. We suggest exchanging
with one or two eastern schools; also a permanent
cover.



is unable to comment on newspapers but neverthe-
less that does not mean that we do not read them
and keep in touch with the "doings" of the schools.
Our comments on the following annuals are:



The H'hisp. Wilmington High School, Wilmington, Del.

lour art editors should be praised and especially
the one who drew the picture of Lindbergh. The
Who's Who Directory is a clever ide.i.

We also acknowledge the following exchanges:

The Zonian, Balboa High School, Balboa, C. Z.

The Oracle, Jamaica High School, Jamaica, N. Y.

The Norihfield Star, Northfield High School, Northfield,

Mass.
The Roman, Rome High School, Rome, Ga.
The Garnet and White, West Chester High School, West

Chester, Pa.
The Exponent, Greenfield High School, Greenfield, Mass.
The Authentic, Stoneham High School, Stoneham, Mass.
The Nautilus, Waterville High School, Waterville, Me.
The Pai, Tamalpais High School, Sausalito, Calif.
The Spectator, Johnstown High School, Johnstown, Pa.
The Hermes, Hudson Falls High School, Hudson Falls,

N. Y.
The Beacon, Gloucester High School, Gloucester, Mass.
The Acorn, Oakcliff High School, Dallas, Texas.
The Taconic, Williamstown High School, Williamstown,

Mass.

The following are some comments that we have received:

The Caribbean. Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.

The pictures are very interesting to us. The cuts
are very appropriate. Your literary department is
the best we have ever seen in a school magazine.

The Exponent, Greenfield High School, Greenfield, Mass.

The Caribbean. Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.

'\s usual, we found your annual very clever and
interesting. It is arranged neatly and there are some
original features in this new publication.
The H'hisp, li'ilmington High School, Wilmington, Del

The Caribbean. Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z

.\n all-around good magazine with departments
well-arranged. The beautiful pictures add much to
the magazine.

The Student, Holmes High School, Covington, A'v

The Caribbean. Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.

We think your annual is very good. While your
literary work is excellent we suggest more pictures.
However, the pictures you have are arranged cleverly.
We also like your sport section and are glad to see your
girls taking such an active part in sports.

La Reata, Albuquerque High School, Albuquerque, N. M



THE CARIBBEAN.



79




JUL.



CaT Pee 1 h'pe th<^t di--j% ohiy c-ot- oh )fr,o



8o



THE CARIBBEAN.



OVERHEARD IN ENGLISH CLASS.

Miss Hesse. "Use Euripides in a sentence."
Bright Guy. "Euripides pants, I Is^ill you."

Ficldon. "Would you give me a iob?"
Barber. "Sure, paint that striped pole."
Fieldon. "O. K. Where do I find the striped
paint?"

Zola D. "I'd like to see you kiss me again!"
Royal. "All right, keep your eyes open this
time."

Air. Benson. "If you ever want to learn any-
thing, Eddie, you must always begin at the bot-
tom."

Eddie A. "Yes, Mr. Benson, but how about
swimming?"

Bill. "Hello, Bee, how do you like your new
electric washer?"

Bee. "Not so good. Every time I get in the
thing knocks me off my feet."

y. Whidden. "I wish I were like the rivers."
Roy. "How so?"

J. W. "To follow my course without leaving
my bed."

Miss Sewell (in Physics Class). "Roger, how
many magnetic poles are there?"
Roger. "Two."

Miss Sewell. "What are they?"
Roger. "Blondes and brunettes."

R. Axtell. "Say, .Arthur, did you ever hunt
bear?"

Arthur. "Of course not. I always wear
clothes."

Mr. Sawyers (in Economics Class). "Scott,
what is an organizer?"

Scott. "He is the guy that makes the music
in the church."

Freshman. "Say, I bought one of those suits

with two pair of pants."

Sophomore. "Well, how do you like it?"
Freshman. "Not so well. It's too hot with

two pair of pants."

Charles C. "Do you all want me to shoo these
flies for you?"

y.onclla B. "Oh no, let thtm run around in
their bare feet a little longer."



Soph. "I wonder why that Senior carries a
cane?"
Fresh. "I wonder?"
Soph. "Because it can't walk."

Gladys B. "Oh, I've been stung, it must have
been a bee."

Edward L. "Don't worry, don't worry. Just
put a little alcohol on it."

Gladys B. "Yes, but I'm sure it has flown a way."

Joe to Chloe. "You know you remind me of the
ocean."

Chloe. "Why, just because I'm wet and un-
tameable?"

Joe. "No, you 're all wet and you make me sick."

Jack P. (to stranger). "Haven't I seen your
face before?"

Stranger. "Probably, I'm not in the habit of
walking around backward."

Lee K. "Randolph, why are some women
called Amazon?"

Randolph. "Because they're so wide at the
mouth."

Walter W (to bus driver). "Slow up, I'm
going to jump at the next corner."

Other Passenger. "Well, don't scare it."

J'ineentL. "My girl goes wi^h only one party."
Victor M. "Which party the Democrats or
Republicans?"

Miss Sewell. "Can you prove that the square
on the hypotenuse is equal to the sum of the square?
on the two sides of this triangle?"

Royal H. "I don't have to prove it, I admit it."

FRESHMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTE.

Don't get discouraged; it takes some circuses
six years to train a jackass.

"My heart is with the ocean," the poet cried.
"You've gone me one better," said his seasick
friend as he took a firmer grip on the rail.

We call Kathryn "Kitty" because she dyed
nine times.

\\'hy, certainly! In Panama boys aren't allowed
to sell newspapers under I2 years of age.

R. Axtell (looking at picture of pinhead). "I
bet he's narrow minded."



THE CARIBBEAN.



8i



"What are you writing?"

"A joke."

"Well, give him my best regards."

Albert calls his best girl "garbage" because no
one can love him like his little garbage can.

He trod on the corn of the belle of the ball,
And then so the other girls tell
Slumbering echoes were aroused in the hall.
Because of the bawl of the belle.

Aliss Alarvin. "Vincent, who prompted you.-"
I distinctly heard someone whisper that date.
Was it you, James?"

James i^. "No, ma'am, it must have been
History repeating itself."

ErleF. "Say, Mister, call your dog off."
Mister. "Nothing doing, I've called him
Towser ever since he was a pup."

Which freshman is it that "rhinks "Bacteria"
is the rear entrance to a cafeteria?

Sweet Young Thbig. "I'd like to buy a petti-
coat."

Floor Walker. "Antique department on the
third floor, Miss."

CIGAR BAND STYLE.

Mary had a little dress

A dainty bit and airy.

It didn't show the dirt a bit.

But gee, how it showed Mary.

Klioik. "Did you know I was a life saver last
summer?"
Gladys. "Really, what flavor?"

Foolishness.

Roughnecks.

Egotism.

Silliness.

Hazy.

Mushy.

Evergreen.

Numbskull.

"Is that movie actor very much conceited?"
"Conceited! Why, every time he hears a
thunderclap he stands up and bows."

R. Axtell. "What does the Washington Monu-
ment stand for?"

Emma Banks. "Well, now, it would look funny
lying down."

MR 10066 11



Royal Higgason (to waiter in Canal Zone
restaurant). "This is a good restaurant, isn't it?"

Waiter. "Yes, if you order a fresh egg here
you get the freshest egg in the world. If you ordera
cup of coffee you get the best coffee in the world,
and ."

R. H. "Yes, I believe you. I ordered a small
steak."

Overheard in Physics Class after lengthy dis-
cussion by Morton Southard "Oh, boy, when
there's nothing more to be said, Morton always
says it."

Roy IValker. "Do you dance?"
Anita Rankin. "Yes, I love to."
Roy IValker. "Great, that beats dancing anv
day."

We can not change our nature,
That is beyond our reach;
The girl who's born a lemon
Can never be a peach.

In English. "What's the technical word for
snoring?"
Bright student. "Sheet music."

Miss Marvin. "This sonnet symbolizes to let
your mind have complete forgetfulness."

Jaek Maher (who has forgotten his sonnet). "I
have complete forgetfulness."

THE MODERN SHEIK.

(Taken from the Boston Post.)

Blessings on thee, modern sheik,

Millionaire on ten a week,

With thy hatless slickumed hair,

And thy flivver worse for wear

With thy sweater gaudier still

Than the sunset o'er the hill.

With thy b'loon pants miles too big

Thy whole comic valentine rig.

You'll always be an also ran;

I thank the stars I'm not a man.

The Sheik's Retort.

Blessings on thee, little dame.
Bare of neck and knee the same;
With thy rolled down silken hose.
And thy thin transparent clothes;
With thy pretty made-up face.
And thy bobbed hairs jaunty grace;
With thy red lips reddened more
With thy lipstick from the store;
With all my heart I wish thee joy
But I thank the Lord I was born a boy.



82 THE CARIBBEAN.



AUTOGRA


PH PAGE.































































HOTEL WASHINGTON



^^ I'nequaled for situation and comfort. A hotel in keeping ^2^
with the dignitv, spirit, and service ot the Panama Canal



Golf V^ Sivifnming



JAMES E. LEWIS, Manager



-^ Water Sports V^ T^a?'po?i Fishing

THE YEAR AROUND

P. O. Address, CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



THE CARIBBEAN.



83



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VIA PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI



(ALL CABIN SHIPS I

S. S. "ANCON" and S. S. "CRISTOBAL"

FORTNIGHTLY SERVICE



MONTHLY SAILINGS TO WEST COAST

S. S. "GUAYAQUIL" and S. S. "BUENAVENTURA"

CALLING AT

BUENAVENTURA, TUMACO, ESMERALDAS, BAHIA, MANTA,
PUERTO BOLIVAR and GUAYAQUIL



OFFICES ON THE ISTHMUS:

Superintendent, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone
Steamship Ticket Agent, Cristobal, Canal Zone
Receiving and Forwarding Agency, Cristobal, Canal Zone

OFFICES IN THE UNITED STATES:

No. 24 State Street, New York City, N. Y.




The Bureau of Clubs and Playgrounds

IS READY TO SER\'E YOU



fHH



SODA FOUNTAIN SERVICE

MOTION PICTURES

BOWLING ALLEYS

BILLIARD ROOMS

READING AND WRITING ROOMS



^ "Social, Physical, and Playground Activities"



84



THE CARIBBEAN.




UNITED FRUIT COMPANY



Regular Sailings

from

CRISTOBAL, C.Z.

to
NEW YORK
NEV/ ORLEANS
CUBA

COLOMBIA
JAMAICA and
COSTA RICA



For further particulars
apply to




PAUL WEST, Manager Cristobal Division, Cristobal, C. Z. :: T. H. JACOME, Agent, Panama City £




J^mcricnn ^^fauti] |^arlor



Specialist in
All Lines of Beauty Culture



g
I

i

I
I
I

I

S.O'jo Front Street ^

\

wmwmmmmmwcwmmmmmmmm



Nestle Permanent Waving



Phone 2oS



1 DRESSES AND HATS FROM PARIS

ARBOIX



Front & 9th Streets
COLON, R. P.

"^

HAND EMBROID ERED LINENS
m REAL SPA NISH SHAW LS

ENGLISH LUGGAGE HAND BAGS



Paris Novelties i



THE CARIBBEAN.



85



^m



a.

i
i



THE NATIONAL CITY BANK OF NEW YORK



Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits
$146,176,246.85 U. S. Cy.



PANAMA BRANCH:
CATHEDRAL PLAZA



COLON BRANCH:
FRONT & 7th STREETS



Phone Corp. No. 310



mMJM MMMMMMMM MMMM> Ml

i

^ p. O. Box No. 174

is. CHENALLOY

8.053 BALBOA AVENUE
COLON, R. P.



1



MH



AGENT FOR



The National Fire Insurance Company,
of Hartford, Conn., U. S. A.

Paid up Capital $3,000,000.00
Total Assets over 5^46,000,000.00



Pan-American Life Insurance Company,
of New Orleans, La., U. S. A.

Paid up Capital $1,000,000.00
Total Assets over §20,500,000.00



mmmwmmmwmmmmmmmmmm



im^MM



i
!



1



m We always carry in Stock a fresh assort-
ment of American and European
Diugs and Patent Medicines,
^ Rubber Goods, Toilet

Articles and
Perfumery



FARIACIA PRINCIPAL

DR. A. C. DA COSTA GOMEZ



i OUR PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENT
is under the cai e of a registered
chemist of wide experience



COLON

Corner of 9th and Bolivar Streets, No. 8122



^ Telephone 222 P. O. Box 84 E



86



THE CARIBBEAN.



mm^m^^m^^mmm^m^^mmmm^mmmmMmmmmmmmmmmm



COMPLIMENTS OF

Fidanque, Henriquez & Cia.



m



To the Graduating Students of the Cristobal High School



1
1



our very sincere good wishes,

for this auspicious occasion should
lend to your ambitions



WINGS



as would the PARAMOUNT super-special



The CINEMA PAN AMERICANO




SI



I Rathbun, Stilson & Company, Ltd=



mi



MMMMMMI



^MmmMMmmMMMMiMikmmmmmmmm



Hardware, Lumber, Paints and Oils



p. O. Box 140, Colon, R. de P.
Telephones: Branch Store 253 Main Store 114



Office 192 g



THE CARIBBEAN.



87



p. O. Box 675
CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



9.036 Front Street




Phone 255
CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



COLON, R. P.



m
i

I



C tJA.SUl_LO, Je^veler and Watchmaker p



LOOK!

BEFORE BUYING YOUR

PANAMA HATS

AIGRETTES and

SOUVENIRS

VISIT OUR STORE WHERE YOU WILL FIND
THE LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN



PERRONE & LOBATO

FRANCISCO F. LOBATO

(Successor)



Money Exchange



No. 57 FRONT STREET,



COLON



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Muebleria 'la Moderna''



MASA & RETTY



1

^ Qth St. and Balboa Avenue Phone 181, Colon

Furniture
Manufacturers



FIXTURES
SHOWCASES



WINDOWS
DOORS



S

I

^ Estimates Given Workmanship Guaranteed



n



SEE US BEFORE BUYING ELSEWHERE



mwmwmwm^mmmmmmw^m.m



m mMM jmmM



DUdUE COMPANY, Inc.

Hardware and Lumber Building Materials Arms and Ammunition

Agents for the FAMOUS DEVOE-RAYNOLDS PAINTS AND VARNISHES
Agents for COLT'S PATENT FIRE ARMS COMPANY



STORE: CENTRAL AVENUE and nth STREET
Teh 592




WAREHOUSE: NORTH AVENUE
Tel. 596



^



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88 THE CARIBBEAN.



^



DO YOU WONDER WHERE

THE BOYS GET SUCH SNAPPY HAIR CUTS?

AND THE GIRLS THEIR MODISH BOBS?
WHY, AT

Charley Payne's Barber Shop



COMPLIMENTS OF

HOSPITAL de PANAMA







Compliments of

Bilgray's Tropic Restaurant






THE CARIBBEAN.



89



[MMMMMI




% Cpirhi/vsJ*

I.. ""-"' J



COMPLIMENTS OF



PARAMOUNT FILMS, S. A



2^5;



If it's a Paramount Picture it's the best show in town



'm^mmmm^MMM



i




VICTROLAS FROM $20.00 UP



NEW VICTOR RECORDS EVERY MONTH



J. V. BEVERHOUDT



Colon



^^MmMmmMMMMmMMMi.



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I vjittens &: 1 aylor



FOR



Clothes o/^ Class



-



loth Street



COLON



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MR 10066 U



90



THE CARIBBEAN.






MMMMMMI



1



DRINK




DELICIOUS AND REFRESHING



Panama Coca-Cola Bottling Company

PHONE:
PANAMA 65 COLON 84

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm mmmm mm mmmmmwwwwmm^m



a



SPALDING ATHLETIC GOODS

L. J. GRAN IE

DISTRIBUTOR
COLON, R. P.



Whatever sport, we have the
supplies



i



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The Progressive Cleaning
and Pressing House i

Kg

13th & BOLIVAR STREETS, COLON I



WE SAY IT AS A STATEMENT OF FACT

"That we do satisfy the most p
critical and exacting customer"



Please call Phone 161, Colon



tearMMMMMMMMMMMMMMS



THE CARIBBEAN. gi



mmmmm^^^mmmmmmmmmmmmmMm^mM m mMMM mm mmmf^



COMPLIMENTS OF



9CJ)e Samaritan ^os^pital




MM^mmmmmMMMMmmmmmmmMmm mm



CHOCOLATE

I IS GOOD FOR YOU, GOOD FOR KIDDIES, AND KIDDIES LIKE IT



CHOCOLATE IS BOTH NOURISHING AND SUSTAINING



Eat More Chocolate

and

Ask for the Brand that stands for (Quality



NESTLE'S CHOCOLATE

I "RICHEST IN CREAM"



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GREBIEN & MARTmZ

ARCHITECTS AND CONTRACTORS

Builders of ARMY and NAVY Y. M. C. A.s

FIRST UNIT BOLIVARIAN UNIVERSITY, HOSPITALS, CHURCHES
^ And Many Other Public Buildings and Private Residences

PANAMA COLON

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92



THE CARIBBEAN.



^MMMSMM



Cable Address: IMPCO. A. B. C. 5th 6th Bentley's



P. O. Box 342 £



i



I



Colon Import & Export Co, Ltd.

JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS

DEALERS IN

General Merchandise and Native Products

COLON, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA



BRANCH RETAIL STORES AND TRADING STATIONS

PLAYA DAMA SANTA ISABEL PORVENIR

TUPILE ISLE OF PINES CARTI NARGANA

wmwwimmwmmwmwmwmwmmmwmwmwwmmw-wwmwwwmm



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COMPLIMENTS OF



THE



HOTEL ASTOR



BOB BROUGH, Proprietor
COLON



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mmMmmmmmMimMMiLmmmmm
i

i The Chinese Silk Store



^



NEW CHINA



^



^ We carry Genuine Chinese and
Japanese Silks and
Curiosities



^



Front Street
COLON



Central Avenue
PANAMA



s



THE CARIBBEAN.



93



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i

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I
I



COMPLIMENTS OF

THE HOTEL TIVOLI



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SOMETHING YOU CAN'T LEARN AT SCHOOL I



'^^^-



There is always a New and Large Assortment of

I CLOTHING, SPORTS WEAR and NOVELTIES

Arriving on every Steamer



ESPECIALLY SUITED FOR STUDENTS



^n^-



FRENCH BAZAAR



PANAMA :-: COLON

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m^Axm mmm^mmm^mmMMMMmji



imm



COMPLIMENTS OF

I Mv. Vtvn ^rier IBv. Carl ^afforb

CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



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94



THE CARIBBEAN.



S2E



MMMP



COMPLIMENTS OF



American Fruit & Steamship Corporation



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COMPLIMENTS OF

Kodak Panama, Ltd.

Grebmar Building
PANAMA, R. of P.



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The Cafeteria Idea



is quick service and elimination
of overhead expenses, bringing
patrons and service in direct and
immediate contact at ...
LOWEST POSSIBLE COST



MAKE OUR CAFETERIA
YOUR HEADQUARTERS

FOR GOOD THINGS TO EAT



The Panama Canal Restaurans

CARL STROM, Lessee



I



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-' I

I

COMPLIMENTS OF I

I

jAxMluS R. POWELL |

I



THE CARIBBEAN.



95



lMMMMSM£MISMMMMlSMMiHEMMMi£M2ilSMSK2S2Sl^EMMMlEMP



Compaiiia
Panameiia de Fuerza y Luz



(SUCURSAL DE COLON i



COLON, R. de P.



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RICHARDS' PHOTO STUDIO

(Next to National City Bank of New York) (^

Box 523 Cristobal, C. Z. t^



The Oldest and Most Reliable
Studio



m



PORTRAITS, VIEWS, ENLARGEMENTS

and

KODAK FINISHING



ALL WORK GUARANTEED



Mrs. N. C. REID

Proprietor



F. FINLAYSON
Manager and Photographer



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P. O Box 175, Cristobil, C. Z.
Phone 1345



Phones:
C jlon 500 cr 395



MAC'S

GARAGE AND TOURIST SERVICE

CARS WITH OR WITHOUT DRIVERS

GOOD SERVICE AT LOW PRICES



^><^



24 HOURS SERVICE



^



Try Us for Repairs, Supplies, Etc. M



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96



THE CARIBBEAN.



WWM

i



COMPLIMENTS OF



The Metropole Hotel



CENTRAL AVENUE PANAMA

fe^ (Opposite Santa Anna Plaza)

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Where to Shop in Colon or Panama



D. CHELLARAM

ORIENTAL MERCHANTS
WHOLESALE and RETAIL



47 Front Street
COLON



81-A Central Avenue
PANAMA



^



WORLD VARIETY SOUVENIRS

Specialty in Spanish Shawls, Nice Col-
lection in Ivory, Ready-made Pongee
Silk Suits, Always in Stock

OUR MOTTO IS:

SMALL PROFIT & QUICK RETURNS



Phones:



Panama 340



Colon 159



Before eye-strain wrinkles become
permanent and nervous fatigue
becomes chronic, have your
eyes examined. If you need
glasses, you will be sur-
prised to find what a
comfort they are
when accurately
and
becomingly
fitted to
YOU
HAVE YOUR EYES EXAMINED



^



i



I SCADRON OPTICAL CO.



Registered Optometrists and Opticians Estab-
lished in Panama Over 10 Years



PANAMA NEW YORK COLON

23 Central Ave. 9-034 Front St.



s



i



5 (^17171^17 5. COLON: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday
^ UJ^rH^il-a. GATUN: Monday. Wednesday, and Friday

Dr. E. A. URWILER

DENTIST



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THE CARIBBEAN.



97



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LA MASCOTA

37 CENTRAL AVENUE



LEADING MENS' FURNISHING HOUSE ON THE ISTHMUS

Tropical Clothing ot all Descriptions

FULL LINE OF WARDROBE TRUNKS & GENUINE LEATHER BAGS

A FINE ASSORTMENT OF TWEEDS, SERGES, LINEN AND KHAKI DRILLS,
BOOTS AND SHOES, HATS AND CAPS, SHIRTS, COLLARS, TIES, Etc.

CARLOS W. MULLER, Proprietor



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Central American
Plumbing & Supply Co.



A*



Supplies and Tools

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION

"Good Houses Deserve Good Plumbing"
TRY US



COLON
8th St. & Balboa Ave.

Phone No. 4
P. O Box No. 108



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PANAMA
58 Central Ave.

Phone No. 249 \^
P. O. Box No. 724 I

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AU BON MARCHE



CENTRAL AVENUE 54
Telephone 1320



-?-



The Most Complete Assortment

of Articles for

LADIES, GENTLEMEN AND

CHILDREN

-?-

Pay us a visit before you

buy elsewhere

NEW YORK, PARIS, MANCHESTER, JAPAN



mmmw(mwW:Wm:Wf^mmm\m\rf^mM\



MR 10066 13



98



THE CARIBBEAN.




DAY AND NIGHT GARAGE

REPAIRS AT FLAT RATES

Complete Line of Accessories at Low Prices

DISTRIBUTOR FOR FIRESTONE TIRES AND TUBES



PANAMA



COLON



I

i



MRS. PAULA M. CARDOZE

AT THE



i



I Panama Hat Store

No. 35 FRONT STREET
Offers Her Customers a Selected Assortment of

Panama Hats
Hand Bags

Birds ot Paradise
Feathers and

Many Other Different Curiosfites

All at Very Reasonable Prices
Without Equal in Town



COMPLIMENTS OF



WONG CHANG & Co., Ltd.



GENERAL HARDWARE



COLON
9.033 Front St.



and



PANAMA
93 Central Ave.



s

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The Pan-American Drug Store

SALAZAR



N.



Main Store:

9.038 Front Street
Phone 336



Branch Stores:

4.060 Bolivar Street, Phone 166
n.156 Bolivar Street, Phone 356



I

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THE CARIBBEAN.



99



i






p. O. Box IO-8



Specialty: FRENCH PERFUMERY

Felix B. Maduro

21 CENTRAL AVENUE

Telephone: Panama 24



Panama, R. P.



^



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''New Columbia Process"
Records



3



MADE THE NEW WAY ELECTRICALLY



Viva-Tonal Recording The
Records Without Scratch



MUEBLERIA "LA MODERNA'



MASA & RETTY

gth St. and Balboa Avenue
COLON, Rep. de P.



^ p. O. Address 410



^



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IN0CENCI8 GALINDO, Ir.

7th & Bolivar Streets
COLON



JOBBER AND COMMISSION
MERCHANT



REAL ESTATE BROKER AND
AGENT



i
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Compliments of

^ Jfrienb

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icx) THE CARIBBEAN.



j Improved Equipment Modern Methods

Efficient Service



3



i



^



JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY

BROADWAY, NEAR FOLKS RIVER



We Solicit the Patronage ot Canal Zone Employees



WEEKLY COLLECTIONS AND DELIVERIES OF LAUNDRY WORK
CHARGE ACCOUNT IF DESIRED



CLEANING, PRESSING and DYEING

A SPECIALTY
Phone: Colon 21 P. O. Box 1131, Cristobal, C. Z.



THE CARIBBEAN.



lOI



1



immmmMnEmmmmmmmmmm^mmMmmMmmxmmmMmm



a





COMPLIMENTS


OF







L. SALAS


&


Co.


COLON






PANAMA



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iSSiSMlSlSMffiffiMMMSSMlSiSMl



s



^



COMPLIMENTS OF



S Jfrienb



^^mmmmmmmmwmmmmmwim mmwmwmwwiwmmmwwwwmmmm



pSMMMMlS



p?



SMOKE
LUCKY STRIKE CIGARETTES



NO THROAT IRRITATION NO COUGH



mm



I02



THE CARIBBEAN.



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a



K^^ /\;!^h'^^ ^.:^/!^ ^%j'/^r. ^%y/Jr^^. ^cb'^"^'^'^ "^'^b^ '^'^
!'/ ^... :. \> '/ ;>,.:> \> '/ :;.',-v.v vw/^Kfe' \^'/.iK% \^'/:^ X*'/ ^1% \!ji'>^'ev|5' \|



Engravings of Unexcelled ^iality

for School and College
Publications



HOWARD-WESSON CO.

\YORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS



The College Engravers of New R?igland



The Engravings for this Pubhcation
were made by Howard-Wesson Co.



Ft%^'t




t
t








100 THE CARIBBEAN.

f~,~A~~~~B~8s~8n~~~~7 I zow:QIVAS


Improved Equipment


Modern Methods


Efficient Service






JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY
BROADWAY, NEAR FOLKS RIVER





We Solicit the Patronage of Canal Zone Employees





WEEKLY COLLECTIONS AND DELIVERIES OF LAUNDRY WORK
CHARGE ACCOUNT IF DESIRED





CLEANING, PRESSING and DYEING
A SPECIALTY


P. O. Box 1131, Cristobal, C. Z.


0 onawwwwwwwwAVmKIaaag^^


Phone: Colon 21








22 THE CARIBBEAN.


Name-Lucia Salazar. Nickname-Sucia.
Birthplace-David, Republic of Panama.
Date-December 17, 1908.
Home Address-Colon, Republic of Panama.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October I, 1921.
Grade-Sixth.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone-Panaman
School.
School Activities--"Kleptomaniac;" Chorus, 1924-25-26-27.
Favorite Expression-Down with Physics!
Chosen Vocation-Household Art Instruction.
Hobby-To read.
Favor te Pastime-To play the piano.

LUCIA SALAZAR.
Lucia is another joy to the heart of Miss
Sewell, because of her wondrous adventures in
the realm of Physics. Lesser stars gasp at her
marvelous adventure in the realm of Physics.
Lesser stars gasp at her marvelous understanding
of that study-the cause of many a downfall.
Although she is shy and somewhat retiring,
she is an important factor in the Senior Class-
far more important than she guesses. Full many
a student owes his rise to her. She never refuses
to aid.
She is not an athlete, 'tis true, but she is a
splendid student. Oh! that there were more like
her.


i. c. -t t~aar~t n re 1 . . .I rp
&'


Showing Steamer in Gatun Locks, to Transit the Panama Canal Southbound.







60 THE CARIBBEAN.








THE CARIBBEAN.


of expressing my affection for C. H. S. I'm
afraid I'll just have to say 'Sincere wishes
and regards to THE CARIBBEAN, its staff,
and all my schoolmates.' "
SURSE J. TAYLOR, Jr., 1814 West Avenue, Austin,
Texas.
JAMES VAN SCOTTER, Fort Davis, C. Z.
HELEN VINEYARD, Box 374, Women's College,
Newark, Del.
"One more year has rolled its course and
one more class is preparing to take its final
leave of old C. H. S. With all my heart I wish
the Class of '28 the greatest of success and all
the happy recollections that I have of 'back
home.' "
DOROTHY WERTZ, Box 259, Cristobal, C. Z.
"Seems ages since June, 1927, and yet it
has not been so long. Last year I promised
myself that I would answer all C. H. S. notes
promptly; this promise, of course, resulting
from my experience of waiting while on THE


CARIBBEAN staff of 1927. Of course, I have not
lived up to my promise.
"Now I am a stenographer at the United
Fruit Company in Cristobal and therefore not
a stranger to C. H. S. and her good work.
"Best wishes to the staff and the school.
Congratulations to the Class of '28 and may
your class play be the best ever. Hard to do,
isn't it?
"Howdy, Class of '27."
CHARLES WILL, 2423 Kindred Street, Astoria,
Long Island, New York City.
EUPHEMIA M. WOOLNOUGH, Cazenovia, N. Y.
"I greatly enjoy my studies in Cazenovia
Seminary and the new surroundings, but I
often wish to be back in good old C. H. S.
I know that this year's CARIBBEAN will excell
those of former years and I send my sincerest
wishes for this year's publication and to those
who work to make it the best ever."








THE CARIBBEAN. 39









34 THE CARIBBEAN.



... :. ,
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Peeled Head Brigade I' Ve-r-I s





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THE CARIBBEAN. 101

*t _______--;,_____ -7
COMPLIMENTS OF

J. L. SALAS & Co.

COLON PANAMA


'I 6







IN COMPLIMENTS OF










IA ILA i i.:AVA .,A' _'r: .'_'_' ,- 'L "'A' "," ,' ,' ,'" ,''' .

SMOKE

LUCKY STRIKE CIGARETTES

NO THROAT IRRITATION-NO COUGH
E ,, V 7,, 7 W, T -e I N I I, T I, V 1 -)












THE CARIBBEAN. 9


? 7


--p


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MR 10066--2


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-
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THE CARIBBEAN.


COMPLIMENTS OF


The Metropole Hotel

CENTRAL AVENUE PANAMA
(Opposite Santa Anna Plaza)




Where to Shop in Colon or Panama Before eye-strain wrinkles become
permanent and nervous fatigue
D. CHELLARAM becomes chronic, have your
eyes examined. If you need
ORIENTAL MERCHANTS glasses, you will be sur-
WHOLESALE and RETAIL prised to find what a
47 Front Street 8i-A Central Avenue Icomfort they are
COLON PANAMA when accurately
Sand
becomingly
WORLD VARIETY SOUVENIRS fitted to
Specialty in Spanish Shawls, Nice Col- YOU
election in Ivory, Ready-made Pongee HAVE YOUR EYES EXAMINED
Silk Suits, Always in Stock I
,| | SCADRON OPTICAL CO.
Registered Optometrists and Opticians Estab-
OUR MOTTO IS: listed in Panama Over zo Years
SMALL PROFIT & QUICK RETURNS
PANAMA NEW YORK COLON
Phones: Panama 340 Colon 159 23 Central Ave. 9.034 Front St.
W 'I MMMIio m. vp,. ____
OFICS COag^^ ^^LON:^g^ Tuesay, hursay, aturay, nd Snda
Fri~ iA^U^ ^i~~^~^


OFFICES:''Tl. COLON: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday
FF GATUN: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday


Dr. E. A. URWILER


DENTIST









76 THE CARIBBEAN.


Moonlight Scene on the Pacific.






THE CARIBBEAN. 3


d DEDICATION.


In grateful appreciation of his sin- .
cere interest and untiring efforts in
behalf of Cristobal High School,
we, the students, dedicate this,
the eleventh volume of
"The Caribbean" to our
Mr principal S

Mr. William A. Sawyers
L YB









THE CARIBBEAN. 51


TOURISTS IN COLON.

By Miargaret Hayes, '29.

1 .

One sunny morning in the city of Colon,
There came a group of tourists to town,
Buying shawls, beads, and all sorts of things,
Fit even for the greatest of kings.

2.

One little woman, short and fat,
Wearing a plaid coat and large black hat,
Pulls off her gloves, and gives a sigh,
"I don't see how they stand the heat!
Oh, my!"
3.
"Now isn't this a most gorgeous shawl?"
To her husband whispers a lady tall.
"Yes, yes, dear, but don't forget my advice
Never should one pay the first price."

4.

"Mother, mother, I want this box;
Look how it opens, and just how it locks.
First one has to find the key!
Mother, I want it. Oh, Jiminy Gee!"

5-

One old gentleman, perspiring with heat,
Looks at the cigarette holders, while taking a seat.
"It is just the kind for you, Meester."
"For me? No, no. For my sister."

6.

"And what is that queer animal's name?"
"Oh, he's the ant eater of great, great fame."
Comes from the jungle, not far from here.
He's dead, Miss, please have no fear."

7.

"Buy a lottery ticket," the vendors cry,
"Six is the number for the lucky guy.
Tink ob de gran surprise
When you wins de big first prize."

8.

"Say, there goes the Panama Railroad train,
And now, my gracious, 'tis beginning to rain.
I never did see such a dirty place,
Why look at that negro's good-natured face."

9.

Two young chaps in a hat store
Are trying on Panama hats galore.
"I know the weakness of we males,
But I think I resemble the Prince of Wales!"


There passes us, a foreign man,
A bunch of bananas in his hand.
He calls to his mate to hurry up,
Who growls in answer, "Aw, shut up."
II.
In a carametta, a curio of this town,
Sat two old ladies, riding up and down.
And enjoying themselves, forgetting th: heat
And thought the ride was such a treat.
12.
"Come, come, 'tis late; we must haste,
Back to the boat; there's no time to waste,
You know the boat will soon be leaving,
As it is scheduled to leave at six this evening."
13.
If you should wish to have some fun,
Go watch the tourists, every one,
When they visit this fair little town
Called the City of Colon.

IF I WERE A POET.
By Helen Logan, '3o.

I wish I were a poet,
With gift of thought sublime;
The kind who put elusive words
In magic verse and rhyme.

I'd write of the little golden stars,
That twinkle in a deep blue sky;
Or the moon like a beautiful lady,
Who goes slowly floating by.

Oh, I would write such interesting things
That nature tells to me;
(If I were a poet,
And could write it well, you see.)

But I am not a poet,
And my words sound stiff and dry.
So I think I'll put aside my pen
And let another try.

EVENTIDE.
By Alice E. lVestman, 'r.

The night is slowly coming on,
And the day is slowly fleeting.
The skies are aflame with red and gold,
And shadows now are creeping.
The palm trees near by the sea
Look black against the evening sky,
And seem to whisper tales of old
As the close of the day is drawing nigh.
The waters of the open sea
Sing songs of mystery to me,
And blackbirds now do cease their call
As the shades of night finally fall,












66 THE CARIBBEAN.


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Stbitorial .


By John G. Klunk, '28.

"Our sincerest laughter with some pain is fought;
Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thought."
-Shelley.


To write the appreciation of the Editorial Staff
of the Cristobal High School annual, THE CARIB-
BEAN, and of the Class of '28, to the community,
is a task deserving of another pen than ours;
because it is so real it is difficult to express. The
school and the community are close to each other,
working for the same things, the successful com-
pletion of a high school course for the students,
and high standards for the school.
Not until we are Seniors do we realize what the
community means to the school. When the time
arrives for the staff to start work on THE CARIB-
BEAN, to see the printers, to raise funds, to put on
the carnival and class play, to see to the adver-
tising, only then do we realize the kindly interest,
the generous support, and friendship of which each
day brings fresh proof. This is the spirit that
develops our students, brings out their best,
teaches them the meaning of community interest,
understanding, and friendship.


In our games you are with us; if we win, you
knew we could and are glad of it; if we lose, better
luck next time. We are proud of our school, our
faculty, and our community, who have given us
their best.
We wish THE CARIBBEAN, the last and greatest
effort of the Class of '28, to carry to you our
warmest and sincerest thanks. Peans of praise
could only tell us, as we have tried to do, of the
share this community has in the welfare of the
students of our school. In graduating honorably
we have in part fulfilled your hopes for us.
Happy, carefree school days are ended; Cris-
tobal High School for us is finished. Well may we
say, "Our sweetest songs are those that tell of
saddest thought." That it pays to be patient
with youth, and to give encouragement when
needed is the lesson we have learned as we too have
needed these helps from the men and women
who are our community.


Fishing Boats Along the Beach of Panama City.







62 THE CARIBBEAN.



EXTRACTS FROM MY DIARY.
Emma E. Banks, '28.
-- W[


Oct. 3. School opens with a bang. Mr. Wil-
liam A. Sawyers, the new principal, is full of pep
and good-looking. He promises to be popular
with both the boys and girls. C. H. S. is also
honored with two new teachers, Miss Marvin
and Miss Russell. Both have given very flatter-
ing "first impressions." The Seniors get room
27 for their den.
Oct. 4. The Juniors get room 32 for their happy
home. C. H. S. has a record attendance. Books
and assignments make their debut. The front
of the assembly hall is decorated by bald pates.
Oct. 5. The inevitable initiation is pending,
much to the sorrow of the Freshmen. The
hot-headed convicts dot the assembly as Mercuro-
chrome is daubed on those most noble domes of
the unfortunate bald Fresh.
Oct. 6. Seniors prove authority by ousting
Juniors from room 27.
Oct. 7. Room 32 sports warning "Keep Out"
sign.
Oct. o1. Athletic meeting is held and great
enthusiasm is aroused. The Seniors organize their
class. Adviser, Miss M. Marvin; President,
Jack Klunk; Vice President, Frank Kimbell;
Secretary-Treasurer, Gladys Beers.
Oct. 12. The Ancon comes in with many
C. H. S. students returning from the States.
Oct. 13. The Athletic Association elects officers.
President, Albert Days; Vice President, Wood-
ford Babbitt; Secretary, Rae Bliss.
Oct. 14. The Juniors and Seniors win an
interclass baseball game from the Freshmen and
Sophomores.
Oct. 18. Elections for officers of THE CARIBBEAN
Staff are held.
All are startled by an apparent thunderstorm
that proves to be the piano being moved down
the hall to another room. A Glee Club meeting
is held to get the yodelers together.
Oct. 19. THE CARIBBEAN Staff elections are
completed. New (loud) class bells added, nearly
cause Jumping-gitis. The doomed Freshmen
boys are commanded to wear their ties backward
until Friday. The girls are ordered to wear green


hair ribbons. The Staff meets in the library and
a unanimous vote makes Mr. Sawyers adviser.
Mr. Sawyers gives a general idea of the work
to be accomplished.
Oct. 21. The Junior Class organizes. Adviser,
Miss Hesse. President, Marion Lowande; Vice
President, Mike Green; Secretary, Rosemary
Keene; Treasurer, Gretchen Palm.
A Field Day (initiation) goes over big. Many
spectators witness the Freshmen carry away the
honors from the Sophomores. The girls are
decorated like Indians in grease and war paint.
Oct. 24. A Junior boy appears this morning bald
like a Freshman. The Junior room receives desks.
Oct. 26. Sophomore Class is organized. Ad-
viser, Miss Sewell; President, Rae Bliss; Vice
President, Fred Stewart; Secretary, Mavis Thirl-
wall; Treasurer, Della Raymond; Extra, Ralph
Crum.
More arrivals from States.
Oct. 27. Freshman Class organized. Adviser,
Miss Moore; President, Carlos Rankin; Vice
President, Robert Brough; Secretary-Treasurer,
Lillian Housel.
Oct. 28. Friday and Saturday, Balboa and Pedro
Miguel Supper Club officers come to Cristobal
Y. W. C. A. to plan Girl Reserve Conference.
The Staff has picture taken by Heron.
Oct. 30. (Sunday) Staff picture appears in
Star & Herald (Ahem!)
Oct. 31. Hallowe'en Black Cats (in the form of
class tests) cross many paths.
Nov. I. Senior rings discussed pro and con.
Nov. 3. Panama Independence Day. No
school. Three cheers for Panama!
Nov. 4. The Seniors give parties a debut by
giving a "Collegiate" Hop at the Masonic Temple.
Dwyer's orchestra furnished plenty of pep.
Nov. 9. A Staff meeting is held at school.
Nov. I I. The Senior Banner is stolen from the
Senior room. Call out the spies.
Nov. I1-13. Conference in Balboa-Girl
Reserves.
Nov. 14. Report cards (shiver me timbers).
Athletic meeting held by Mr. Seller in assembly








THE CARIBBEAN.


THE SAN BLAS INDIANS.
By Vita Lyew, '29.
The San Bias Indians live on islands less than in their noses and ears but no rings on the fingers
a hundred miles from Colon. These islands are until they are married.
free from mosquitoes, flies, and wild animals. The father of the girl makes all marriage ar-
The Indians cultivate little patches of corn, rangements. She does not leave the parental
yams, cane, and rice on the mainland, and un- roof-instead the husband lives with her family
like most uncivilized peoples their women do where he becomes more or less a servant. The
little work in the fields. They are not a war-like father naturally chooses one who will be a good
race, preferring a peaceful existence to one of worker for him. For this reason, girl babies are
fighting and bloodshed, but are capable of the mach more welcome among these Indians than
most savage practices when once roused. For among most uncivilized tribes. There are no
generations they defied every attempt to civilize bachelors of either sex among the San Bias.
them, holding their standard of race purity Matrimony is universal.
above all else. They rigidly enforce the rule that Their language is very simple, consisting of
no stranger should pass the night on their shores. about 500 words. They have no numbers beyond
Until 10 years ago the San Bias tribe was an ten and have no way of reckoning their ages.
absolutely pure race of people. Among them are found those strange freaks
They are peculiar in their appearance, having of nature-white indians. They have the usual
dwarf-sized bodies and large, box-like heads. dwarfed bodies, but their skins are absolutely
Their features are coarse but even, and their color colorless. Their eyes are usually weak, causing
is much like that of the North American Indian. them to wear a perpetual squint which, with their
stiff yellowish hair and Indian features, gives
The men wear cotton blouses and trousers, which the a weir aeaan
them a weird appearance.
they make themselves. The costumes of the te a i an
SMiss Anna Coope, an American missionary,
women and girls are both unique and pretty. was the first foreigner to be allowed to stay in
The fronts and backs of their blouses are of vari- their country. She lived there for 15 years,
ous colored materials, and their skirt is a long teaching them and helping them to learn better
piece of cloth wrapped around the body and ways of living. She found them very intelligent
tucked in at the belt. The women wear rings and eager to learn to read and write.


THE DESTRUCTION OF THE PANAMA
CANAL.
By David Ketchum, '3r.

It had been raining for three weeks without
stopping once. Gatun Lake was rising at a
fearful rate. Communication with the outside
world was impossible. The wireless masts were
washed away although the air would have been
full of interference to have sent real messages
anyway. None could go out without risking
life or limb in the streets that had turned into
beds of raging rivers. Many of the houses were
being washed away. Forts Sherman and Randolph,
and the Naval Base were under many feet of
water. Gatun Spillway, strained to the utmost,
could hold no longer and crashed. Then an old
and supposedly extinct volcano just outside the
breakwater erupted. Slowly the Isthmus began
to---
"John," cried Mrs. Okly, "John, now hurry
and dress for school."
MR 10066--7


THE OLD HIGHWAY.
By Roger Deakins, '29.
Among the many traces of ancient Spanish
occupation of Panama, left by the bold con-
quistadores, is the Las Cruces Road. Once a
well-traveled roadway, winding among the hills
and the dank fever-breeding swamps, stretching
from the massive walls of Old Panama City to
the beautiful harbor of Porto Bello. On this
highway, murder and thievery ran as unrestrained
as the luxuriant tropical jungle growth which
now almost completely obliterates it. Great
trees have grown in the road and their grasping
roots have dislodged the cobblestones in such a
manner that the parts of the road that can be
seen are barely recognizable. Once the air
tinkled with the sound of silver bells attached
to the pack mules that formed the gold train.
Now the harsh sound of the parrot's scream and
the squeak of a lizard as it scuttles over the blocks
are the only sounds heard, and the old road lies
and dreams of past days.













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THE CARIBBEAN. 15







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THE CARIBBEAN.


| THE NATIONAL CITY BANK OF NEW YORK


Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits
-4
$146,176,246.85 U. S. Cy.




PANAMA BRANCH: COLON BRANCH:
CATHEDRAL PLAZA FRONT & 7th STREETS


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P. O. Box No. 174 Phone Corp. No. 310

I S. CHENALLOY
8.053 BALBOA AVENUE I
COLON, R. P.

S--AGENT FOR---
SThe National Fire Insurance Company, I
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S Paid up Capital $3,000,000.00 .
Total Assets over $46,o000,000.00


SPan-American Life Insurance Company, ;
of New Orleans, La., U. S. A.
Paid up Capital 1,ooo,ooo.oo00
Total Assets over $20,00,ooo.oo00


r=- --- T -


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DR. A. C. DACOSTA GOMEZ


We always carry in Stock a fresh assort-
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OUR PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENT :-
is under the cai e of a registered
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Telephone 222 P. O. Box 84
wwwwwwwwwwwww


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56 THE CARIBBEAN.

ALUMNI.
The Alumni Department of THE CARIBBEAN continues to grow. Each year
a dozen or more names are added to the ever-lengthening list. This year we
have passed the hundred mark. Cristobal High School has o10 graduates.
Nearly half of these are still on the Isthmus. Several of them have visited us
at school. We are always pleased to see them and hope that they as well as those
who are in the States, will continue to be interested in C. H. S. and its activities.
ZONELLA BLISS,
Alumni Editor.


1918.

LULA MAY PULLING (Mrs. J. B.) COMAN, Cristobal,
C. Z.
MINOT COTTON, 81 John Street, New York City.
SUSIE HARRISON, Cristobal, C. Z.
CATHERINE WAID, 451 West 23d Street, New York
City.
BURKE WELCH (address unknown).
MARY VERNER, Chapel Hill, N. C.

1919.

ALICE ARLENE BALL, 118 Maple Avenue, Tacoma
Park, Md.
KENNETH EDWARDS, Wellsboro, Pa.
JAMES RAYMOND, Cristobal, C. Z.
DOROTHY WEIR (Mrs. JOHN) MONTANYE, Cristo-
bal, C. Z.
"It is always a pleasure to send greetings
to THE CARIBBEAN and to the graduating
class. I know this year's annual will be the
best ever and I am wishing success to all the
Seniors."
1920.
LINDALE DAVIS, 336 Commonwealth Ave., Boston,
Mass.
JACK B. FIELDS, care of Tela Railroad Engineering
Dept., Tela, Honduras.
KENNETH GREENE, Coudersport, Pa.
HARLAN HOLMWOOD, Balboa, C. Z.
ALSO SEARS, Balboa, C. Z.
KATHRYN BURGOON STEWART, Cristobal, C. Z.
ALICE STILSON, Colon, R. P.
LILLIAN COTTON VANWAGNER, 124 Elm Street,
Cranford, N. J.


AL DOYLE, Apartment 9, 1515 Tenth Street,
Sacramento, Calif.
ETHA BEVINGTON, Balboa Heights, C. Z.

1921.
CARL DUEY, Box 95, Lemon City, Fla.
KIRBY FERGUSON, Cristobal, C. Z.
ALICE HUNTER (Mrs. L. A.) HOHN, Cristobal,
C. Z.
CHARLES HENTER, Coast Guard Cutter Kimbal,
Norfolk, Va.
FRANK RAYMOND, 344 East I20th Street, New
York City.
ELEANOR ZIMMERMAN, 120 Kingsley Avenue.
Westerleigh, Staten Island, N. Y.
"To the Class of 1928. I wish you all the
success in the world in making this year's
CARIBBEAN the best ever."

1922.

MARJORIE BALL, 118 Maple Avenue, Tacoma
Park, Md.
IDA BROWN (Mrs. A. A.) DOYLE, Apartment 9,
1515 Tenth Street, Sacramento, Calif.
GEORGE CARTWRIGHT, 159 Boyle Avenue, Totowa
Borough, Paterson, N. J.
PAUL DOYLE, Cristobal, C. Z.
MARY GLENN FIELDS, Balboa Heights, C. Z.
LEROY MAGNUSON, Balboa, C. Z.
MILDRED STAFFORD, 395 North Henderson St.,
Cape Girardeau, Mo.
EMMA TOWNSEND (Mrs. ROBERT) NOE, Box I,
Cristobal, C. Z.
WESLEY TOWNSEND, 1195 Ruby Street, Houghton,
Mich.









16 THE CARIBBEAN.


Name-Ethel Katherine Westman. Nickname-"Westie."
Birthplace-Kansas City, Missouri. Date-July 26, 1912.
Home Address-4oo South Van Brunt, Kansas City, Mo.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October 1, 1926. Grade-
Junior.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone-Entered first
grade Balboa.
Class Offices Held-Vice President, Class of '28.
School Activities-High School Carnival, 1927; Supper Club,
1925-26-27.
School Athletics-Basket Ball, Indoor Baseball, and Track.
Favorite Expression-You're foolin'.
Chosen Vocation-Private Secretary.
What College Do You Expect to Enter-Business College.
Hobby-Athletics.
Favorite Pastime-Reading.
ETHEL WESTMAN.
"Ethics" and her smile can never be parted.
Ethel came to us from Balboa in her Junior year.
Since then she has been a constant delight both
to her own classmates and to her numerous
friends of C. H. S. She is also a shining star
in athletics. Is it a wonder she was chosen as a
heroine in our play? Her pep and popularity
well fit her in the part of young Dulcy.
When there is a good time to be had, Ethel is
there and her impersonations often lend to the
jollity of the hour. She has the art of throwing
one into spasms of laughter.


Name-John G. Klunk. Nicknan.c-Jack.
Birthplace-Columbus, Ohio. Dalte-April 3, i '90
Home Address-Columbus, Ohio.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-Oc robe r i, i c6.
Grade-First.
Other Schools Attended Before Comrng to Zoci--None.
Class Offices He.d-Secretary, Sophomore Class; President,
Senior Class.
School Activities-Orchestra, I92G-:t-2---8; Glee Club,
1925-26; Chorus, 1925-26-27; Senior Class Pla); Assistant
Editor, THE CARIBBEAN, 1927; Editor-in-Chief, THE C4RIB-
BEAN, 1928.
School Athletics-Baseball, 1925-26-2--:8; Captain, Base-
ball team, 1927; Swimming, 1925-26-2---; Captain, Swim-
ming, 1926-27; Track, 1928; Basket B.ll, r92--2:; Hand-
ball, 1927; Tennis, 1927.
Favorite Expression-You're a great man
Chosen Vocation-Musician.
What College Do You Expect to Enter-Columbia.
Hobby-Baseball. Favorite Pastime-Baseball.
JOHN G. KLUNK.
Jack's middle name must be "success" as he is
a success at whatever he tries. He is an excellent
musician on the cornet, at athletics he's a "whiz,"
a certain proof of his popularity and success in
the fact that he is Editor-in-Chief of THE CARIB-
BEAN, and President of the Senior Class.
He does not linger on the ladder of advance-
ment but reaches the top. During his High
School career Jack's name has found a prominent
place in everything he has taken part in, and
those are not few.
As Barton Hawley, the villian in the Senior
play, "Cupid Scores a Touchdown," he is a dash-
ing character.
Jack is also noted for having a good, clear voice
which has been a great help to our singing groups.







THE CARIBBEAN.


"Ah, land at last!" So exclaimed Jim Thorpe,
looking through the porthole upon the outline of
the land which was to be the home of his new
adventures. He was anxious to make a success of
the work which might place his name among the
foremost engineers of the day.
The commercial world demanded the exchange
of products between east and west in the shortest
possible time. Thus the project of the Panama
Canal. And young Jim was one of the engineers
detailed to work on the locks of the great water-
way.
After the strenuous work of drawing plans,
organizing details, and assembling materials,
Jim began to feel the need of companionship.
The monotony of the tropical heat by day and the
cries from the jungle by night did not furnish
enough excitement.
One day while wandering among the interesting
ruins of old Panama, he had a misfortune to fall
and hurt his ankle. While sitting on the ground
wondering what to do next, he heard voices.
Glad that some human beings were in calling
distance, he shouted for help. Much to his relief
a party of fine people soon loomed in sight.
Don Pedro, his daughter, Rosita, and his two
sons and their guide were returning from a fishing
trip. The injured man was carried on a hastily
made stretcher to their ranch house.
The injury, although not severe, kept him in
bed for several days. Every kindness was shown
him by his host and many a pleasant hour was
whiled away in teaching the young sefiorita to
understand the English language.
After his recovery he returned to his work but
not before he promised to come and see his bene-
factors. Many happy week ends were spent at
the ranch and the friendship soon became a
lasting one.


One morning the overseer received an unusually
large quantity of mail. Among the letters was an
official envelope bearing Thorpe's name. The
news it contained was both delightful and dis-
appointing. He had been promoted and this
meant his going back to the States. His new field
of work was to be in the Mississippi Valley. The
next day he went to bid his new friends farewell.
It was hard to say good-bye and Rosita's sorrow
was not hidden.
His work in the States lasted for several years.
Then came the anxious exciting days of the World
War. Thorpe was one of the first of America's
youths to rally to the Colors. After a few months
of hurried drills at training camp his company
was sent overseas.
During the gloomy, dreary days of the fall of
1917, while some soldiers were working on a
bridge, a bomb dropped from a German plane,
damaging the bridge and taking a heavy toll of
life and injuring many.
Thorpe was severely wounded and was knock-
ed unconscious. When he awakened he found
himself in a field hospital. It seemed that he
dreamed of a cool hand placed on his feverish
brow. It was in reality for an angel of mercy was
standing near murmuring, "Oh, Jim! Do you not
remember your old friend?" He stared and tried
to recall, but, soon exhausted, he fell into a
swoon-like sleep.
The next morning the angel said, "It is more
serious than the injury to your ankle, but I
hope to have the same success in making you
well." Then he remembered! "Rosita, you
have twice been my benefactress. I hope some
day to reward you." She only smiled in answer.
After peace was declared a ship bound for
Panama carried Mr. and Mrs. Thorpe on their
honeymoon.


THE SHORT STORY CONTEST.


The short story contest was eagerly sponsored
by the literary aspirants of the high school classes.
Stories of all descriptions were handed in, and
there was a wealth of material to choose from.


Mrs. Grunewald, Mrs. Kidd, and Mr. Cun-
ningham were the judges who chose the winning
stories. The Staff sincerely appreciates the serv-
ices rendered by the judges during the contest.







THE CARIBBEAN. 79













28 THE CARIBBEAN.


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84 THE CARIBBEAN.




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THE CARIBBEAN. 17


Name-Albert Days. Nickname-Daysie.
Birthplace-Ancon, Canal Zone. Date-May 8, 1910.
Home Address-Cristobal, Canal Zone.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-February, 1922.
Grade-Seventh.
Class Offices Held-None.
School Activities-Carnival, "Rip Van Winkle," Glee Club,
Orchestra.
School Athletics-Baseball, Swimming, Handball, Basket
Ball.
Favorite Expression-I'll betcha.
Chosen Vocation-Aeronautical Engineering.
What College Do You Expect to Enter-Northwestern Univer-
sity.
Hobby-Banjo, Violin.
Favorite Pastime-Baseball.
ALBERT DAYS.

Daysie is also called Tiney Days. Al has many
accomplishments. His fame as a violinist is well
known. Now he is on his way to be a banjo
player, and he will make the grade, we feel sure,
as he is a natural musician. He was also discovered
to have a good voice.
Often Daysie is called on for his drawing.
He is always ready to help his classmates.
As an athlete Albert also is good, as any one who
has seen the High School games and swimming
races can testify.
MR 10066--3


Name-Gladys Elizabeth Beers. Nickname-Glad Eyes.
Birthplace-Columbia, S. C. Date-December 30, 1909.
Home Address-Box 78, Watertown, Conn.
Date of Entering Cristobal School-October I, 1924.
Grade-Freshman.
Other Schools Attended Before Coming to Zone-Elyton
School, Birmingham, Ala.
Class Offces Held-Treasurer, Sophomore, 1925-26; Treas-
urer,Junior, 1926-27; Secretary and Treasurer, Senior, 1927-28.
School Activities-Carnival, 1925; Japanese Operetta, 1925;
Carnival, 1927; Kleptomaniac, 1927; Supper Club, 1925-26-
27-28.
Favorite Expression-Where y'all goin'.
Chosen Vocation-Private Secretary.
What College do You Expect to Enter-Business college.
Hobby-Sewing.
Favorite Pastime-Talking.

GLADYS BEERS.
When information is desired, or help needed,
we all ask for our Gladys. For the last three
years she has held the responsible position as
Treasurer of the Class of '28. Gladys is noted for
her ability in Domestic Science. When the Class
of '28 gives a party, she is at the head of the
Refreshment Committee, and has given fame to
our parties as having "good eats."
Her clear contralto voice has graced our Glee
Clubs for four years.
Our "Alabama" Gladys is everybody's friend
and she will help you whenever she can.





8 THE CARIBBEAN.






L
u,




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.t. e. s h.-
l,, o~oo,) !;i; .. <
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i. % ;. .i ... i ;:'" "
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,, ,..... -.- .,
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78 THE CARIBBEAN.




THE EXCHANGE DEPARTMENT.
By Glady Elizabeth Beers, '28.


The exchanges that we receive at Cristobal are is unable to comment on newspapers but neverthe-
always welcomed. We are always pleased to know less that does not mean that we do not read them
what is going on in the high schools in the United and keep in touch with the "doings" of the schools.
States and how they like our book. Our department Our comments on the following annuals are:

The Tomahawk. Fernsdale Union High School,Fernsdale, Calif. The Whisp. Wilmington High School, Wilmington, Del.
Your general make-up of the book is excellent. Your Your art editors should be praised and especially
cover is beautiful and your cuts good. We like the the one who drew the picture of Lindbergh. The
feature of running the jokes between the ads; also the Who's Who Directory is a clever idea.
introductory page. The classification of the classes such


as Seniors as Golden Age-Freshmen as Stone Age is
clever. A few unfavorable criticisms are: we suggest a
smaller staff. We also recommend using different back-
grounds and arrangements for group pictures. Why do
you not exchange more with schools out of your State?
The Reflector. Woburn High School, Woburn, Mass.
We like your magazine very much. The headings
are good, especially the one for "Stories." The poem
"Little Freshman" amused the Seniors in particular.
The Student. Holmes High School, Covington, Ky.
You have a neat magazine. Your headings are
excellent. The Exchange Department for November
is the cleverest we have seen.
The Blue Chick. Wilmington High School, Wilmington, Del.
Your annual is the very best we have received.
The cover and cuts deserve special mention. The
material that is worked in with the advertisements
is a very clever idea.
The Cardinal. Girls Commercial High School, Brooklyn,N.Y.
The art department of your magazine is very good.
Your covers are very clever..
The Observer. CentralFalls High School, CentralFalls, N. Y.
You have a good magazine. The heading for U
and I is very attractive.
The Nutshell. Moorestown High School, Moorestown, N. J.
Your magazine is well compiled. The Literary
Department should have special mention.
The Stampede. Sunset High School, Dallas, Texas.
The idea of giving the staff the name of the "Stam-
pede Gang" and the names to the different depart-
ments is very suitable.
The RedandWhite. Rochester High School, Rochester, N. H.
The cover of your book is very neat. We especially
like the poetry written by Annie Phillips, '29 and James
Watson, '28.
La Reata. Albuquerque High School, Albuquerque, N. M.
We like your book as a whole. The border around
each page is very attractive. Your cuts are wonderful.
We are glad to see that you are able to produce an
annual without advertising. We suggest exchanging
with one or two eastern schools; also a permanent
cover.


We also acknowledge the following exchanges:

TheZonian, Balboa High School, Balboa, C. Z.
The Oracle, Jamaica High School, Jamaica, N. Y.
The Northfield Star, Northfield High School, Northfield,
Mass.
The Roman, Rome High School, Rome, Ga.
The Garnet and White, West Chester High School, West
Chester, Pa.
The Exponent, Greenfield High School, Greenfield, Mass.
The Authentic, Stoneham High School, Stoneham, Mass.
The Nautilus, Waterville High School, Waterville, Me.
The Pai, Tamalpais High School, Sausalito, Calif.
The Spectator, Johnstown High School, Johnstown, Pa.
The Hermes, Hudson Falls High School, Hudson Falls,
N.Y.
The Beacon, Gloucester High School, Gloucester, Mass.
The Acorn, Oakcliff High School, Dallas, Texas.
The Taconic, Williamstown High School, Williamstown,
Mass.

The following are some comments that we have received:

The Caribbean. Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.
The pictures are very interesting to us. The cuts
are very appropriate. Your literary department is
the best we have ever seen in a school magazine.
The Exponent, Greenfield High School, Greenfield,Mass.

The Caribbean. Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.
As usual, we found your annual very clever and
interesting. It is arranged neatly and there are some
original features in this new publication.
The Whisp, Wilmington High School, Wilmington, Del

The Caribbean. Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z
An all-around good magazine with departments
well-arranged. The beautiful pictures add much to
the magazine.
The Student, Holmes High School, Covington, Ky

The Caribbean. Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.
We think your annual is very good. While your
literary work is excellent we suggest more pictures.
However, the pictures you have are arranged cleverly.
We also like your sport section and are glad to see your
girls taking such an active part in sports.
La Reata, Albuquerque High School, Albuquerque, N. M








44 THE CARIBBEAN.


hut a knife appeared, and the hand that held it was
one I had never seen before. I fired, the Kid fired
over my shoulder, and as I wheeled instinctively,
I saw Martinez fall and Farman pull a Colt
automatic from somewhere.
The scene, as I remember it before I went
down, impressed itself indelibly on my mind. The
Swede stood out plainest in the savage surround-
ings, because of his tall, huge frame as well as his
fairness of complexion. The coals were almost
out, and only a faint glow illuminated the scene,
lighted up the dark green of the jungle, and dis-
closed the body of Martinez who had fallen with
the knife still clutched in his hand. There was a
heavy, sweet odor of tropical flowers, and after a
last report, I remember remarking to Farman,
who still crouched with a heavy, smoking gun.
Well, I'll see you later, old chap," as I shot
for the last time.
Then I must have been unconscious for some
time, and when I awakened, I was in the hos-
pital, and Phil was leaning over my bed. He
smiled the old familiar smile that was typical
of his quiet way. I've learned to love that smile,
and I knew the game was up.
"Steve, you certainly had it over on us, didn't
you?"


"Sir?"
"None of that. Dad bought you out yester-
day."
"Pardon, sir, but I don't understand."
"Never mind. The boy didn't die, and besides,
young Hampton had been watching from the
window."
Then I must have cried. Phil held my head
saying, "You poor kid. We were almost too late."
Once a year, now, Phil and the Kid, now
Second Lieutenant A. J. Weseley, and I have asort
of reunion. As an Army Chaplain, I am very
happy, and when you and young Weseley are
married, I'll be as contented as an old man can
be. Phil is a famous surgeon now, and since you
are his niece, there will be a church full of im-
portant people at your wedding.
Your husband-to-be is very brave, but very
bashful. I'll leave him the task of explaining how
we cleared his record and sent him through the
academy. Also you must find out from him how
he held off the others, and took care of me until
Phil and his men arrived. Now, my dear, I must
go to see some of the men in the hospital.
Your devoted uncle,
FATHER STEPHEN, S. J.


55


STHE CAPTURE OF
By Fabian Englan
(Best Freshman
S, ===~=- ~-==-?=-


OLD PANAMA.
zder, '3y.
Story.)


(a


-9m


Governor Arias had received a note from
Morgan saying that he would appear within the
year and that he would take the city. Morgan
had just captured Fort San Lorenzo. Since I was
a personal friend of the governor, he told me that
he was very worried. He at once sent out an
order for stronger fortifications and more soldiers.
The work of fortifying the city and training the
men went on speedily. Ships, laden with gold
from Peru, were coming into port every few days.
Soon, however, the ships coming in told of the
hard time they had keeping away from the
English. Finally, one day, news was brought to
us that Morgan was coming. The governor was
very distressed, but nothing happened in the
next few days so we thought no more of it.
Months passed and still no sign of Morgan.


(I learned afterwards that he had taken his
ships apart on the Atlantic side and had crossed
over by land to the Pacific side and had put them
together on Taboga Island.)
Four months passed when finally we saw four
English ships come into the harbor. They
started firing at us and we fired back. Our men
were soon frightened as the English were pretty
good marksmen. They had blown big holes in
the Cathedral where many people had gathered
to pray.
I ordered my few belongings taken to a cave
just outside the city. The governor, by this time,
was panic stricken. The guns in our forts, which
had been booming for some time, suddenly
stopped firing. Our men came pouring out of the
forts saying that the English had blown our guns








THE CARIBBEAN.


Apr. 22. The first game of series for the
Governor's Cup in the League is won by C. H. S.
from De Lesseps.
Apr. 28. The Twilight League season closes
by C. H. S. capturing the Governor's Cup.
May 4. Girls roll stockings to their ankles and
boys roll their trousers to knees to create a new
sensation.
May 8. A complete rehearsal of "Cupid Scores
a Touchdown" was held at the Y. W. C. A.
building to-night.
May 25. "Cupid Scores a Touchdown" is given
by the Senior Class at the America Theatre
and is a big success. A matinee for the Grade
school was staged in the afternoon.
May 26. The play is repeated at Gatun Club-
house.
June II-12. Final examinations engulf us.
Hush, don't disturb us.
June 15. The Junior-Senior Banquet is given
by the Juniors to the Seniors at the Washington
Hotel. You know your onions, Class of '29.
June 17. Baccalaureate service is held at
Christ Church by the Sea. Bishop Morris
officiating.
June 20. Commencement exercises at the
Washington Hotel. The Seniors are left to face
the strife of life alone.
June 22. The last call. Report cards are out
and so are we.
At last 'tis arrived, the end of the year,
The time we've longed for now is here;
Yet there is sadness in many a heart.
It means that good friends soon must part,
Memories of the dear school will e'er be en-
shrined,
And many's the time we'll look behind,
As though in a crystal we'll clearly see
Those happy hours dear to you and me.


THE SENIOR PARTY.
By Lilybel Cox, '29.

The invitation to the Senior Party was received
by all classes of Cristobal High School with
great enthusiasm. It came out about o1 days
before the party, and these were spent in pleasant
anticipation.


On Friday night, November 4th, there
assembled at the Masonic Temple a large and
happy crowd. The Seniors, trying to excite
their guests, told them that the orchestra for
the evening was not able to be there. At this
everyone became disheartened.
From eight until nine, the High School Orches-
tra played several selections. Then a soldier from
Fort Davis offered several popular airs and gave
a "Charleston" exhibition.
The real orchestra then arrived. Everyone
was livened up and did his or her best to dance
when Mr. Dwyer and his orchestra gave forth
the "jazzy strains."
In the meantime punch and sandwiches were
welcomed by the guests. Dancing was again
resumed and kept up until 12 o'clock, when
everyone bade the Senior hosts and hostesses
"Good night."


THE JUNIOR PARTY.
By Evelyn Ganzemuller, '3o.

Friday evening, January 6th, the Juniors of
29 gave a clever leap year party at the Masonic
Temple.
The hall was beautifully decorated in the class
colors, blue and gold, and gay colored electric
lights.
As it was a leap year party, the Juniors an-
nounced that the girls would have to ask for
the dances. This caused much mirth among the
guests.
Dwyer's orchestra furnished the music which
was most enjoyable. Mr. and Mrs. Witherspoon
were the chaperons for the evening.
The first part of the evening was spent in
dancing. Later, Roy Walker and James Quinn
gave a humorous duet entitled "Romeo and
Juliet" for which they received much applause.
During the evening, delightful refreshments of
cake and punch were served.
The prize waltz was won by Ethel Westman
and Jack Maher, who were indeed worthy of it.
She received a Parker pencil and he a bill fold.
The remaining part of the evening was spent
in dancing until 11 o'clock when the party ended.
Everyone agreed that it was one of the most
enjoyable parties given this school year.






THE CARIBBEAN.


COMPLIMENTS OF A

PARAMOUNT FILMS, S. A.




If it's a Paramount Picture it's the best show in town





41 Gittens & aylor

1 lh FOR
II S
8 I
Clothes of Class :1




VICTROLAS FROM $20.00 UPoth Street
NEW VICTOR RECORDS EVERY MONTH COLON
J. V. BEVERHOUDT Colon

MR 10066--12







4 THE CARIBBEAN.


Sn tlemoriam






"Silent as midnight's falling meteor slides
Into the stillness of the far off land."


IT IS WITH FOND REMEMBRANCES
OF A LOYAL CLASSMATE THAT
WE, THE CLASS OF 1928,
DEDICATE THIS PAGE
TO


(Ebtarb lawurence n eene
April 13, 1909-July 24, 1927





Ir


-91 1






THE CARIBBEAN. 61


w-







THE CARIBBEAN.


COMPLIMENTS OF

THE HOTEL TIVOLI







SOMETHING YOU CAN'T LEARN AT SCHOOL



There is always a New and Large Assortment of

CLOTHING, SPORTS WEAR and NOVELTIES
Arriving on every Steamer


ESPECIALLY SUITED FOR STUDENTS



FRENCH BAZAAR

PANAMA :-: COLON
L wwwwwAM A vo..rw w w r w .*'*..... .,iW
r r lh- i -- T- i ri*r T T g


COMPLIMENTS OF

M ]r, Vern Jirier 3r. Carl (. 6afforb

CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE

___Wi, J ___









THE CARIBBEAN.


C. H. S. AB. R.
Days, 3b.... 4 0
Klunk, c...... 3 3
Wertz, rf 3 o
Witherspoon,
2b, ss .... 2 o
Orsi, ss, p.... 4 I
Lowande, b. 2 1
Wikingstad,
cf......... 4 2
Maurer, If... 3 I
Hayden, p,2b. 2 c


H. PO. A. E.


Totals.. ... 27 8 8 21 10 5

BASEBALL NOTES.

Mike Greene, our only pitcher, after
winning two games against Balboa, left
us at a critical period in the Twilight
League schedule. Without his pitching
arm and hitting prowess we were left
considerably weakened. Mike was con-
sidered the Twilight League's best pitcher
and was one of the High School's leading
hitters, finishing second among High
School batters, with an average of .314.
Jack Klunk enjoyed the best year of
his High School career, leading the High
School team in batting with an average of
.348, and leading the Twilight League in
runs scored. Jack was considered by far
the best backstop in the Twilight League
and one of the fastest baserunners. He
was also one of the League's home run
hitters, getting two in the Balboa Series.
Lowande, our first baseman, rapidly
picked up from a slow start and ended the
series brilliantly as DeLesseps can testify.
His batting during the second half was
loud and often, and his fielding was steady.
Lowande held the shortstop position dur-
ing the Balboa Series.


Player.


Porfirio DeReuter broke in as first BOWLING.
baseman during the Balboa games and
baseman during the Balboa games and For the first time in our high school we
made such a good job of it that he was
have had an opportunity to bring out our
put there and in the outfield so as to take hae ha a oorniy o bring o or
S of hs hin a material for bowling. This year we had a


Jack Maher, utility second baseman,
was used only in the Balboa Series and
played his position well.
George Wertz, starting out as a rookie
outfielder, soon blossomed into a star
outfielder and was with Klunk the Ruth-
Gehrig twins of the Twilight League.
Wertz led the Twilight League in home
runs.
Albert Days also enjoyed the best year
of his High School career. He developed
into a very dependable fielder. Although
he played third most of the season he was
used in other infield positions very effec-
tively. At bat he was always dangerous
and finished third in the lineup, with an
average of .304.
Walter Wikingstad, our "flaming" out-
fielder, was as all Vikings-steady.
Wicky's fielding was sure and his hitting
was dependable.
Jack Pettit was our flashy outfielder,
his fielding bordering on the sensational.
His hitting was developed during the
second half of the Twilight League season.
Paul Hayden was not able to show his
ability during the first half o the Twilight
League because of Mike Greene, but when
he did enter into the games he showed
enough to assure the team that they had
another pitcher besides Greene.
Kenneth Maurer was used during the
second half because of his sure fielding
and hitting.
Vincent Lugli, our utility infielder, was
not used often enough to show his playing
ability.


BATTING AVERAGES.

G. AB. R. H. TB. 2B. 3B. HR.


Klunk, c........... 28 92 33 32 46 < 2
Greene, p..... .... 22 70 24 22 29 3 2 0
Days, cf, 3b........ 28 92 19 28 38 2 1 2
Wertz, rf .......... 27 85 20 22 45 6 I 5
Lowande, Ib, c..... 28 83 i8 21 35 5 3 I
DeReuter, Ib...... 15 38 4 9 12 o o 1
Wikingstad, If..... 27 80 8 15 16 I o 0
Pettit, If, cf........ 8 33 2 6 8 2 I 0
M aurer............ 16 39 5 7 7 0 0 0
Lugli .............. 5 13 I 2 3 1 0o o
Hayden, p......... 13 26 3 4 4 0 0 0
Maher, 3b......... 5 12 4 i I 0 0 0


SH. SB. Pet.

4 8 348
. 3 314
1 4 304
0 2 .259
5 io .253
3 o .237
0 0 .I88
0 0 .182
0 0 .i8o
o o .155
0 I .154
a 0 .083


a van ag g .


MR 10066-10


real successful season. Our bowlers work-
ed hard at the game and came out victori-
ous against Balboa. The first match was
won by Balboa but we came through with
two decisive victories and by doing so won
the honors against Balboa. The results
are i;s follows:
May 12, 1928, at Balboa-Balboa,
1,233 pins; Cristobal, 1,216 pins.
lMay 19, 192S, at Cristobal.-Balboa,
1,216 pins; Cristobal, 1,260 pins.
June 2, I92S, at Cristobal.-Balboa.
1,165 pins; Cristobal, 1,225 pins.

BASKET BALL.

A large number ofcandidates turned out
for basket ball this season. Six of these
were last-year men-Klunk, Lowande,
Hayden, Days, Lugli, and Babbitt.
These six men practically made up the
High School team.
We played one practice game with the
Chase National Bank and came out vic-
torious-21 to 20.
On May 19, we went to Balboa and
before a large crowd of Balboa's rooters
were badly defeated 40 to 10.
On May 23, Balboa came to Cristobal
and this time before a crowd of our rooters
they defeated us again. This time 50 to
10.
The teamwork of Balboa was fine.
They seemed to know just where every
other fellow was and where he was going.
Our players played more as individuals,
not being able to work together.

TENNIS.
Little interest was taken in tennis.
However, a few boys turned out and
practiced faithfully for the match with
Balboa, which occurred on February 18.
We were handed a severe beating. Gil-
man, of Balboa, showed the best playing.
His hard serve helping much to carry
his team to victory.
The score was 5 to 0.

RESULTS.
I. Gilman and Fidanque (B. H. S.)
defeated H. Mueller and R. Edwards
(C. H. S.). Score, 6-4, 6-3.
2. H. Meredith and J. Humphreys
(B. H. S.) defeated A. Mundberg and
Fishbough (C. H. S.). Score, 6-0, 6-2.







38 THE CARIBBEAN.








THE CARIBBEAN.


Looking back over the history of the Class of
'28, I am reminded of a trip through the Panama
Canal. I seem to see a Phantom Ship bearing the
name Cristobal High School and flying its colors of
purple and gold. In my fancy its crew seem to be
my school fellows, its officers, my teachers. The
Canal represents the four years of training in
High School and each set of locks signifies the
advancements we have made from year to year
in the four classes.
We, the Class of '28, who have successfully
weathered our journey through "The Canal of
Learning" are now out on the sea of "Self Sup-
port," having just passed the "Buoy of Gradua-
tion."
On October I, 1924, we entered "The Break-
water of the Freshman Class." This was a year
of excitement, when we first learned to look down
upon the eighth graders and the grammar school
students.
We noticed many landmarks on our journey to
"The Locks of the Sophomore Class." The most
important was the initiation. Next in line came
the party which we gave for the whole crew and the
officers of our good ship Cristobal High School.
By the time we reached the "Locks of the Sopho-
more Class" we had lost many of our passengers.
As we passed through these locks the landmarks
became more numerous.
We then continued our journey to the "Locks
of the Junior Class." By the time we reached these
locks our group of passengers had grown smaller
and some of our old passengers had left and new


ones replaced them. At this time our journey
took on a more interesting aspect, as most journeys
do when they are nearing their end. The work
grew heavier for us and new types of work ap-
peared. No one will forget the Junior-Senior
Banquet which our captain, Miss Dodds, told us
was the best she had ever attended in her seven
years as captain of the Cristobal High School.
We slowly passed out of the "Locks of the Junior
Class" only to enter the "Locks of the Senior Class."
The first landmark of importance was the roll
call which made known to us that seven of the
girls and five of the boys who had started on the
journey were still with us and the other boy had
joined us at the "Locks of the Sophomore Class."
At the "Locks of the Senior Class" we changed
captains. The first step which our new captain
took was to organize the staff of THE CARIBBEAN.
After these members had straightened out their
affairs, we began to make ready for the Senior
Party. Having passed this landmark we made
ready for the Carnival. We presented "Cupid
Scores a Touchdown" under the able direction of
Mr. Robert Noe. Shortly after this the Junior-
Senior Banquet was the daily topic for discussion.
Day by day the very last landmark of our jour-
ney, the one which marked the end, grew closer,
the "Buoy of Graduation." We beganatonceto
make ready for embarkation and soon we will be
scattered far and wide, and hope by this history
of the Class of '28 to keep the life of the Class of
'28 fresh in your minds always.


Ab~


Monument to Builders of Panama Railroad, Hotel Washington
Grounds.








THE CARIBBEAN.


DERELICTS; HUMAN OR OTHERWISE.
Robert H. Axtell, '28.
GRAND PRIZE SHORT STORY.
1 *


"Robbers Still at Large." Thus screamed out
the 2-inch headlines of Colon's morning paper,
The Tribune. The column went on to relate how
two thieves had broken into the Front Street
jewelry store and before the very eyes of the
paralyzed night clerk, had made off with a large
packet of uncut diamonds and were last seen
boarding the night freight for Panama, immedi-
ately after quitting the rear exit of the shop.
The clerk, coming to his senses, had notified the
police, who in turn, stopped the freight at
Gatun, only to be met with no traces of
the escaped criminals. Only one clue had been
attainable. The purser of a large immigrant
ship lying in the harbor had notified the police
of the disappearance of two third-class passen-
gers, and pictures of the same had been forwarded
to the authorities, who had had them published
under the screaming headlines of the aforesaid
Tribune.
Little did Roy Smith of Gatun think of this,
however. Roy was a 13-year old boy in the eighth
grade. He and his chum, Bill Martin, were pre-
paring for a morning's outing in their cayuca upon
the island-dotted waters of Gatun Lake.
"Well, Bill, we had better put in the canteen
for we might get thirsty, and I don't favor drink-
ing lake water unless I have to."
"Yeah! That's a safe bet, Roy. You'd better
put a flash light in too, if we are going to board
that old ship. It might be dark down below."
The ship alluded to in this conversation was an
old boat anchored up in the lake. It had been
there a long time, and was put up in an island
cove used as a sort of ship's boneyard.
The two boys put off in their cayuca for the
island up the lake. After paddling for about an
hour the island was neared.
"Well, Bill, the old island seems to be about
abeam now."
"Yeah, and our old boat, the Mary F., seems
to be moving right along, too. Well, let's cut
around the point of the island. I know a short
cut, but the channel is full of stumps."


"Well, then, Bill, you come back here and take
the stern paddle and see if you can get through
without hitting about 'steen stumps."
The cayuca sped forward under the renewed
vigor of their strokes. Now and then the boat
would give a roll to one side or would be shoved
off its course, and a dull scraping noise would be
heard on the bottom, signifying the collision
with a stump. This amounted to nothing worse
than a trifling annoyance, and the boys made fun
out of it by seeing how few stumps they could hit.
"Say, you're some navigator, you are. How
much farther are we going, anyway?"
"Aw, Roy, you just keep your shirt on and
by the time we hit about two more stumps you'll
see the old ship herself."
A few hundred feet more and they were in a
sheltered cove where the old ship lay. She had
been once a good steamer but was now abandoned.
She was open to the caprices of the mild, tropical
weather.
Both of the boys remarked how picturesque
and queer the scene was with massive trees on
the bank nearly overreaching her decks as she
was anchored stem and stern. It seemed strange
that such an example of man's maritime progress
should be seen rotting away in the jungle-
bordered waters of the tropical lake.
There she lay, however, with ferns growing in
the damp corners of her deck and old canvas
awnings flapping in the breeze, while rotten
ropes trailed overboard into the pensive waters
of the lagoon below. On her foremost crosstrees
roosted a lone bird of the jungle, the only sign
of life in the drowsy heat of the landlocked cove.
"Let's tie up here to this ladder in the bow
and we'll go aboard. You can go up first, Bill,"
said Roy.
Bill suggested that Roy go up first as he was
the heavier and the ladder appeared somewhat
rotten. This, however, was only a cover for his
own reluctance to board such a spooky looking
craft.
Both boys were soon aboard her, and although
they spoke in subdued voices, as the situation









THE CARIBBEAN. 63


Nov. 15. The Senior Banner is returned painted
in Junior colors, blue and gold. Many Seniors
challenge the culprits.
A Senior meeting is held about class rings.
Nov. 16. A swimming meet is held at the
Washington pool by Mr. Seller for try outs for
both boys and girls.
Nov. 18. Staff meeting. Supper Club.
Nov. 24-25. Thanksgiving holidays. (We
thank you for more.)
Nov. 28. Edward Lowande returns from the
States, making 14 Seniors.
Dec. 7. Staff meeting.
Dec. 12. Yell practice, 2.45-3.00 p. m. First
game of season in baseball; C. H. S. 6, Outlaws i.
Dec. 17. C. H. S. defeats De Lesseps 6 to 5 in
baseball.
Dec. 20. Caroling in front of school by entire
student body. Home-room parties following.
Santa Claus is coming. Bring us some A's, please.
Dec. 2I-Jan. 2. Christmas holidays.
Dec. 23. C. H. S. defeats R. & F. A. 4 to 2.
Jan. 3. H. S. baseball record smashed by Out-
laws 8 to 2.
Jan. 6. Junior "Leap Year" Party at the
Masonic Temple enjoyed by all. How does it
feel to be asked to dance, boys?
Jan. 9. At 1.45 p. m., "Lindy" arrived in Pana-
ma. Hurrah for Lindy!
Jan. I1. C. H. S. defeats R. & F. A. 8 to 6 in
baseball.
Jan. 12. Holiday-All school children assemble
"en masse" at school to see "Lindy" pass in the
parade. Welcome, "Lindy." Come again.
Jan. 14. C. H. S. defeated the Maulers 10 to 7,
gaining first place in the Atlantic Twilight League.
Jan. 16. C. H. S. defeats the Outlaws 6 to 3.
Jan. 20. Supper Club.
Jan. 23. H. S. defeats De Lesseps 7 to 6.
Jan. 26. Cristobal School goes on special train
to France Field to see Colonel Lindbergh leaving
for Colombia. Bon Voyage.
Jan. 28. C. H. S. defeats the Maulers 14 to 4.
Feb. i. Girls conduct a candy sale at school
during recess and the noon hour to raise funds
for a special train February 4th, for the B. H. S.-
C. H. S. baseball game.
C. H. S. defeats R. & F. A. 5 to 4.
Feb. 2. Fort De Lesseps defeats C. H. S. 4 to 3.
Big "pep" meeting held this morning for Cristobal-
Balboa game.


Feb. 3. Special train takes Cristobal rooters
to Balboa to witness a victory of 12 to 10. (Many
throat gargles needed later.)
Feb. 7. Supper Club business meeting held in
library at 8.00 a. m.
Feb. 9-1o. Zone moisture increases owing to
toil and sweat of mid-year examinations.
Feb. 13. Senior library privilege taken away.
When do we get our rattles?
Feb. 15. Received invitations to take a flight
to the Masonic Temple this Friday.
C. H. S. defeats R. & F. A. 1 to 3. We win
the pennant for the first half of the Twilight
League. Won 14, lost 2.
Feb. 17. The Sophomores give a "Lindbergh
Hop" at the Masonic Temple. The flight was
thrilling.
Feb. 17-21. Colon celebrates Carnival. Viva
La Reina!
Feb. 21. School dismissed at 2.10 to enable
everyone to see the big parade. Boom-Boomety-
Boom!
Feb. 28. The fire alarm was rung by Mr. Saw-
yers so we could all go out to see the "Los Angeles,"
the monstrous dirigible, sail by.
Mar. 9. Monster Carnival held on grounds of
Fort DeLesseps. Great success, both financially
and socially.
Mar. 19. Mr. Robert Noe holds a Senior meet-
ing after school to choose characters for the
Senior play.
Mar. 20. Girls' Glee Club sings at the ninth
anniversary of the Y. W. C. A.
Mar. 21. Arrival of Senior rings causes great
joy and excitement among the Seniors.
Mar. 22. End of fourth six weeks; marks come
out.
Mar. 31. C. H. S. loses a popular fellow-
student, Mike Greene, to Mobile, Ala. We wish
you the same success in Mobile that you've had
here, Mike.
Apr. 13. The Freshmen Masquerade Ball at the
Washington Hotel is proclaimed the best party
of the year.
Apr. 17. A contest is staged. Prettiest girl,
Mary Maher. Best looking boy, Jack Maher.
Most popular girl,Eleanor Urwiler. Mostpopular
boy, Jack Klunk.
Apr. 20. Cheer meeting to encourage our boys'
swimming team on their trip to Balboa.
Apr. 21. Swimming meet lost by one point.








2 THE CARIBBEAN.


FOREWORD.


INI
ITHE Editorial Staff of
"THE CARIBBEAN"
has endeavored this year to portray
the school life of the pupils of Cris-
tobal High School. In years to come
we hope to be able to look through
our book .and remember our happy
school days. We have done our best
to publish the best book possible,
and it must now rest on its merits.
1^1 |


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THE CARIBBEAN.


DAY-DREAMS.
By BasilFrank, '31.
While sitting down beside a stream,
I watched the clouds. They began to seem
Like the things upon the earth below,
On this land long, long ago.
I saw a castle in the air;
I saw a lady in despair;
The castle stood on running sands
In the land of caravans.
And there a knight of the Table Round,
Stood below upon the ground,
Fighting bravely for to save
His lady from an Arab knave.
When this scene from before me flew,
The deep wide ocean came to view.
There was a ship with all sails set
Going where tle trade winds met.
It was a Spanish ship I saw;
Its splendor filled my soul with awe.
But what ship follows in its wake?
A vessel captained by Francis Drake!
Then I saw a flash of flame;
A roar as from a giant came;
Both ships disappeared from view,
And the scene was changed to something new.
I saw a scene, a scene of peace
In the lovely land of Greece.
A young man though his arm lacked brawn,
Was carving the figure of "September Morn."
He cut a smile upon her lips;
A graceful curve upon her hips;
The face was tilted in the air;
Wavy and curly was the hair.
The spell then broke, the spell of the dream,
And I found myself beside the stream.
All these things I had composed
From the clouds as I sat there and dozed.


PERPLEXITY.

By Elsie Darley, 'o0.

What shall I write about?
What shall it be?
These questions I'm stating
Are bothering me.
What sort of language and
What sort of rhyme?
Dear me, I am having
A troublesome time.
The more things to choose from
The harder the choice.
The sooner I've finished
The sooner I voice
My relief at just dropping
This burdensome job,
And write like the rest
Of the prose-writing mob.
A poet is born, and not made,
So they say;
And now I'll discreetly retire
For to-day.




THE LOCKS AT NIGHT.

By Ruth Duvall, '3r.

Have you seen the locks at night?
They are a very wondrous sight,
With great ships passing to and fro,
Going to lands we do not know.
And many lights along the way,
Standing there like sent'nels grey,
Seem to beckon you at sight,
To come and see the locks at night.


THE PALM TREES.

By David Ketchum, 'Jr.

You see them standing
In the sunlight,
Tall and proud, showing
Their royal might.
You see them on the borders
Of the romantic lagoon,
Bending and bowing while silhouetted
Against the moon.
You'll see them in the jungles
Where Morgan hid his gold,
Standing o'er all the trees,
Like sentinels of old.
If under tropical sun you have
Chanced to live,
Surely you'll appreciate the shade
This graceful tree gives.







102 THE CARIBBEAN.

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THE CARIBBEAN. 4t


seemed to demand, they both were eager to see
what the old ship contained.
"Say, Bill," said Roy, "did you notice that
fire ax lying on the deck and those splinters
beside it? It looks as though someone were aboard,
doesn't it?"
"Righto! But no one comes away out here,
you know."
"Nevertheless I have a hunch that someone
has been here, but we hear nothing of him at
present. Oh, well! We might as well forget
about it," observed Bill. "Let's go into the
forecastle and take a look below to start off
with."
Clambering cautiously down into the dimly
lighted forecastle, and brushing aside cobwebs
as they descended, they finally reached the crew's
quarters. On rounding the corner of the bulk-
head they suddenly came upon two rough-looking
men sprawled asleep on the dirty mattresses
spread on the floor. Both of the boys stopped on
tiptoe in blank amazement.
As Bill was the foremost he came to such an
abrupt stop that he braced his hands against the
bulkhead opposite him in such a manner as to
peel off a large cake of rust which fell on the
floor with a crash, awakening the sleepers.
"Schmidt, we're took," shrieked the wider
awake of the two men, "Beat it."
The men dashed down a dark passageway
leading into the forward hold. The thought of
the morning's headlines flashed through the boys'


Iz


Stede Bonnet's scarred and weather-beaten
face was very pale as he watched the water
gradually rising. The only light in the room came
from a flickering torch, which threw a ghastly
light over the water. The room in which he was
confined was below the level of the sea, which he
could faintly hear, beating on the rocks in front
of the fort, Fort San Lorenzo.
The hole through which the water was entering
the room was at the level of the sea at low tide.
(The tide rises only a few feet.) As the tide rose
the stream of water increased in size. When the
chamber was filled, Stede would be drowned.
MR 10066-6


minds. Instinctively they plunged after them
until they realized the danger of a possible en-
counter with the two men.
"Stop, Bill! They're liable to come back and
kill us if they come to their senses!" exclaimed
Roy, who immediately grasped the situation.
"Let's shut that iron door, and we will have
them."
Summoning all their strength the two boys
managed to swing the ponderous iron door upon
its hinges. Shouts arose from the entrapped
men who realized their desperate plight as they
heard the bolt dropped. The boys rushed out
and climbed over side into the cayuca. Paddling
furiously, they came out into the Gatun-Escobal
launch route. They hailed the first passing
launch, which happened to be bound for Gatun.
In fifteen minutes they were ashore in Gatun
and in another five were aboard the police launch
with the Mary F. in tow, bound for the old ship.
When the police boat reached the cove, the
anchor was dropped, and the boys, followed by
the two officers of the lake police force, jumped
into the cayuca and paddled quickly to the ship,
went into the hold, and after a short scuffle,
brought the men out handcuffed and carried
them aboard the launch.
"Well, boys," said officer Donnelly, "you
have those two robbers who broke into the Colon
jewelry store night before last. They stole a
cayuca and hid aboard the old ship, thinking
themselves safe from discovery."


~(NX8lI


He had been here only a short time and already
the salt water had reached his waist, entirely
covering the stone bench to which he was securely
fastened. The level was gradually rising. His
fate was inevitable.
The evening before, Sir Henry Morgan, the
famous English pirate who was so active around
Panama during the middle seventeenth century,
had personally ordered Stede and another man,
Dayton, to go ashore and see if they could gain
entrance to Fort San Lorenzo. They were to
bring him a report as to the strength of the fort,
and the best method of attack.


AN OLD TIME VISIT TO FORT SAN LORENZO.
By Woodford Babbitt, '2g.
(Best Junior Story.)









THE CARIBBEAN. 75


3. Gilman (B. H. S.) defeated R.
Edwards (C. H. S.). Score, 6-4, 6-2.
4. Hele (B. H. S.) defeated R. Sargent
(C. H. S.). Score, 6-2, 6-2.
5. F. Maduro (B. H. S.) defeated E.
Fishbough (C. H. S.). Score, 6-0, 6-o.

SWIMMING.
Although new material was plentiful
this year there was not much interest
taken in swimming. An interclass meet
was held April 13, 1928, Junior-Senior
vs. Freshman-Sophomore. Only three
Seniors represented the upper classmen.
However, they were sufficient to defeat
the lower classes, 31 to 13.
On April 21, eight days later, with
hardly any training, our swimming team
went to Balboa to compete in the annu,.l
swimming meet between Balboa High
and Cristobal High. We arrived on the
noon train, and went immediately to the
pool to find the Balboa team ready and
waiting.
Jack Klunk, our aquatic star, was high
point scorer of the day with 19a points.
His closest rivals were Win. Walston and
A. Schwinderman,of Balboa, with 6 point"
each.
The meet was hard fought throughout,
sometimes we forged ahead only to have
Balboa take the lead in the next event.
When the events were ended we were one
point behind, 29-30.

Following are the official results of the
meet:
zoo-yard Free Style.

I. Klunk (C. H. S.). Time, 59 415 sec-
onds. 5 points.
2. Win. Walston (B. H. S.). 3 points.
3. R. Sargent (C. H. S.). I point.
4. R. Watson (B. H. S.).
Points-Cristobal 6, Balboa 3.

22o-yard Free Style.

I. G. Lowe (B. H. S.). Time, 2 minutes
50 seconds. 5 points.
2. H. Mueller (C. H. S.). 3 points.
3 Wm. Rader (B. H. S.). 1 point.
4. P. Hayden (C. H. S.).
Points-Cristobal 3, Balboa 6.

5o-yard Free Style.

I. J. Klunk (C. H. S.). Time, 24 4!
seconds. 5 points.
2. Wmn. Walston (B. H.S.). 3 points.
3. E.Lowande (C. H. S.). point.
4 A. Schwinderman (B. H. S.).
Points-Cristobal 6, Balboa 3.


So-yard Breast Stroke.

i. A. Schwinderman (B. H. S.) Time,
31 415 seconds. 5 points.
2. G. Halloran (B. H. S.) 3 points.
3. W. Wikingstad (C. H.S.). i point.
4. A. Mundberg (C. H. S.)
Points-Cristobal I, Balboa 8.

o5-yard Back Stroke.

i. H. Granberry (B. H. S.). Time,
32 315 seconds. 5 points.
2. J. Klunk (C. H. S.). 3 points.
3. F. Key (B. H. S.). I point.
4. H. Mueller (C. H. S.)
Points-Cristobal 3, Balboa 6.

Fancy Diving.
I. J. Klunk (C. H. S.). 5 points.
2. J. Morrison (B. H. S.). 3 points.
3. A. Schwinderman(B.H.S.) i point.
4. A. Days (C. H. S.).
Points-Cristobal 5, Balboa 4.
176-yard Relay.
1. Cristobal (E. Lowande, R. Sargent,
H. Mueller, J. Klunk). Time, I minute
34 seconds. 5 points.
2. Balboa (Grimison, Granberry,
Schwinderman, Walston.)
Total points scored-Cristobal 29,
Balboa 30.
Cristobal won four firsts.
Balboa won three firsts.
High point scorers-J. Klunk (C.H.S.),
19 l 4 points. Win. Walston (B. H. S.),
6 points. A. Schwindeman (B. H. S.),
6 points.
Number of contestants-Cristobal 8,
Balboa 1o.

TRACK.
Track started with a bang this year and
on March 3, 1928, at Fort Davis, an inter-
class meet was held, Junior-Senior vs.
Freshmen-Sophomores. The final score
was 66 to 20, the upper classes on the
long end. From the winners of this meet
a track team was chosen to meet Balboa.
On March 17, 1928, we traveled to
Balboa to see what we could do to them.
Our high hopes were soon shattered.
Balboa showed us that she also had some
track men and that they had done some
serious training. High honors were won
by Gayle McGuigan of Balboa, with 11
points. Lowande, of Cristobal, came
second with 8 points. Of the entire meet
we only won one first place, the shot put.
In this, two of our men tied, Klunk and
Lowande.


Following are the official results:

5o-yard Dash.
1. August Schwindeman, B. H. S., 5.9
seconds.
2. Higgason, C. H. S.
3. Lowande, C. H. S.

ioo-yard Dash.
I. McGuigan, B. H. S. Time, I
seconds.
2. Lowande, C. H. S.
3. Schwindeman, B. H. S.
DeReuter, C. H. S., ruled out.

22o-yard Dash.
I. McGuigan, B. H. S. Time, 23.S
seconds.
2. DeReuter, C. H. S.
3. Lowande, C. H. S.

44o-yard Dash.

i. Jones, B. H. S. Time, 59.6 seconds.
2. Gelabert, B. H. S.
3. Melendez, C. H. S.

12-pound Shot Put.

I. Klunk, C. H. S. Distance, 54 feet
6 inches.
2. Lowande, C.H.S. Distance, 54feet
6 inches.
3. Wood, Win., B. H. S.

High Jump.

r. Lowe, B. H. S. Height, 5 feet 2
inches.
2. Miller, B. H. S. Height, 5 feet 2
inches.
3. Small, C. H. S.

Broad lumnp.
I. Gelabert, B. H.S. Distance, 17 feet
S inches.
2. Miller, B. H. S.
3. Lowande, C. H. S.
88 1-ard Re'ay.

i. Balboa High School. Time 1.44.
2. Cristobal High School.
Total Points Scored.

Balboa High School....... 46
Cristobal High School..... 22

Total............... 68

Individual Honors.

I. McGuigan, B. H. S., I i points.
2. Lowande, C. II. S., 8 points.








THE CARIBBEAN. 5









52 THE CARIBBEAN.


GLIMPSES OF LIMON BAY.

By Vita Lyew, '29.

I sit upon the old wall by the sea
\\ ]chimC the children at their play,
And the large waves coming toward me
Forgetful of the sun's scorching ray.

At evening still you find me there
When slowly the sun sinks,
Coloring the wall with its flare
And dyeing the bay with pinks.

The sunset must gradually fade away
Into the splendor of the night;
The children in their little beds lay,
And the bay glistens in the moonlight.

The lighthouse across the bay
Flashes out its ever faithful light
To guide the ship on its way
And emphasize the darkness of the night.

The tiny stars begin to shine
Like diamonds againstt the sky so blue,
And the wan white moon divine
Whose radiance lights the heart so true.

How calm and serene life seems
With all these beauties rare,
As if painted by an artist in his dreams
When freed from all sorrow and care.

Far from the city's adding roar
I revel in my quietude and dream.
The nearby chimes announce the late hour
And start me from my dream.

And as I homeward turn sleepily
The waves their adieu bid
The chimes are pealing sweetly,
Of hum:;n hic the wall is rid.


ODE TO FORT SAN LORENZO.

By Robert Axtell, '28.

Peace to thee, thou noble ruin;
Long may we see thee stand
Above the rocks, above the dune,
Above the coral strand.
With crumbling walls and long dried moat,
And cannon now in rust,
Thou listenest to the breaker's note,
To whispering palm trees hushed.
Oh, Glory of the Spaniard's fame,
Who fixed thy stones so high;
Their glory now is but a name,
But yours still brooks the sky.


A TRIO FROM THE ISTHMUS.

By Basil Frank, '31.

"Ripe bananas! Ripe bananas!
A dozen fo' a dime.
Dese am nice ones, lady
Fo' I sell dem all de time."

It's the old banana lady
With her tray upon her head.
I hear her early in the morning
When I am still in bed.

There is also the bootblack
With his "Shine, Mister? Shine?"
He'll clean your shoes up nicely
For the small cost of a "dime."

He's always around by the barber's
Where he finds a ready fee.
Sometimes he gets a five cent tip,
Then he's happy as can be.

Another one who is never sure
If he's going to get a dinner,
Is the age-bent driver of the orange cart.
His eyes have long lost their glimmer.

He may be seen in the morning
Apushing his cart along;
And if a "cochero" blocks his way
He rings his home-made gong.

They are just a few of the many
Who have lived on the Isthmus so long-
The banana lady, the bootblack,
And the orange-cart man with his gong.

But let me tell you something.
Of which you do not know,
These people are always satisfied.
They smile wherever they go.


OUR HIGH SCHOOL BOOK,
"THE CARIBBEAN."

By Mary Bretch, '3r.

A book of memories so fond and dear,
Of reminiscences you love to hear;
Of sports, alumni and literature too,
The fun and joy we've all passed through.

When other roads you travel, and new friends you meet,
Ponder oft' thoughts of childhood days so sweet.
Remember, yes! Remember the good old days of yore,
So gayly spent at Cristobal High on the Caribbean shore.







THE CARIBBEAN.


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MR 10066--13


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Telephone 1320



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46 THE CARIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN. 47

Ile


ALL HAIL! COLONEL LINDBERGH!
By Emma Banks, '28.


~(HX8ij


All, on entering Cristobal school this morning
of mornings, January 26, 1928, were greeted with
an air of intensity-a feeling of excitement and
expectancy. Quickly the joyous news reached
every ear. "We're going to France Field on a
special train to see Lindbergh hop off!"
The graded school marched in files. The High
School was left to take its own course. Some
skipped, some ran. Breathlessly they climbed
the train, and soon the long line of cars pulled
out with laughing, singing, chattering children.
At France Field all interests concentrated upon
catching the first glimpse of their hero. Soon a
Douglas transport plane landed. Colonel Lind-

BANANAS GWINE BY.

By Joyce Alberga, '3.

"Bananas' Bananas! Ripe bananas gwine by!
Come missus, tek a look! Bananas! Six fo' a
nickel; 12 fo' a dime!"
Such is the cry of an old colored woman selling
bananas to make a living.
She lives in a large tenement house in one of
the many alleys of Colon. Every morning rain
or shine, she rises at 5 o'clock in order to
begin her sale of bananas before anyone else.
Her clothes are always clean, but of course not
all of the latest fashion. On her head she wears
a piece of soiled cloth wound around it, somewhat
like a coolie turban. This is necessary because on
it she carries a big board in the form of a waiter.
It is filled with ripe bananas. She carries it on
her head all day, and never once does it fall.
It is really remarkable.
When Mammy, as she may be called, finds a
customer she is very pleased and talks the whole
time that she is selling. Her conversation may be
heard to be-"Yes, Mum, dey his lufly dis
martin'. Oh! hain't you going to take more
than that? Please, Missus, dey really ham
nice. Dere, das a good lady. I'se gwine to
give her hextra fo' dat. Good-bye and tank
you Mum. Hi'll come agin timmarrah."


bergh had taken eight "lucky" people up' 'Midst
clicking cameras and straining eyes, Lindbergh
climbed out and calmly walked to the hangar
where the "Spirit of St. Louis" was.
Then the gates of the hangar were thrown
wide and soldiers pushed "The Spirit" on to the
field.
Again the "Idol of the Air" made his entrance.
After the mechanic had tried the motor, Lindy
donned his aviator's helmet, shook hands with a
few of his personal friends, and climbed in.
Shortly, he waved good-bye to the eager throng,
glided across the field and into his kingdom-the
atmosphere.

THE TOM-TOMS.
By Arthur Rothenburt, '28.
Night after night I heard it. Always the
same irregular cadence of knocking coming from
off in the distance. Somehow, it always sug-
gested someone hitting on wood.
Whenever I heard it, romantic fancies of savage
Indians far off in the dense ungles beating on
tom-toms and performing their wild dances would
come to my mind.
One night I heard the sound louder than usual.
It seemed to come from an island a short distance
from shore. Hurriedly seizing a flash light, I
rushed to the beach. At first I heard nothing;
then to my hearing came the same irregular-
rythm of wooden thumps, but this time followed-
by mighty splashes.
Upon looking closely in the direction of the
noise, I perceived a dark, moving blur on the
water. It moved in a large circle, and finally
approached the beach where I stood.
Turning my light on it, it proved to be a
cayuca containing several fishermen, who had
been laying a seine. When I inquired the source
of the knocking and splashes, I was told that
fisherman when laying seines always beat on the
boat and water with their paddles to scare the
fish into the seine.
So perished my fancies of Indians, jungles, and
drums.


H0


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THE CARIBBEAN. 35





90 THE CARIBBEAN.
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DELICIOUS AND REFRESHING


PANAM


Panama Coca-Cola Bottling Company
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DISTRIBUTOR
COLON, R. P.


Whatever sport, we have the
supplies
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The Progressive Cleaning
and Pressing House
i3th & BOLIVAR STREETS, COLON
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WE SAY IT AS A STATEMENT OF FACT:
"That we do satisfy the most
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Please call Phone 161, Colon

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Cristobal High School.


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THE CARIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN.


P. O. Box 675 Phone 255
CRISTOBAL, C. Z. CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



9.036 Front Street COLON, R. P.

C. CASULLO, Jeweler and Watchmaker
n fyL: IV T& f aL 14' -L" ; A' ii 77 A 11 A Pi I. .' '< J


SMuebleria "La Moderna"

MASA & PRETTY
9th St. and Balboa Avenue Phone 18i, Colon


Furniture. .

lManufacturers


FIXTURES WINDOWS
'- SHOWCASES DOORS


SEstimates Given-Workmanship Guaranteed


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BEFORE BUYING YOUR

PANAMA HATS
AIGRETTES and
SOUVENIRS
VISIT OUR STORE WHERE YOU WILL FIND
THE LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN


PERRONE & LOBATO

FRANCISCO F. LOBATO ,
(Successor)


Money Exchange

No. 57 FRONT STREET, COLON
_ _ _


srv~-i,.11 m ~i 5 .fII M M ,I,, . .


S~ AlA' A~' ~. **~


DUQUE COMPANY, Inc.

SHardware and Lumber Building Materials Arms and Ammunition

Agents for the FAMOUS DEVOE-RAYNOLDS PAINTS AND VARNISHES
Agents for COLT'S PATENT FIRE ARMS COMPANY
STORE: CENTRAL AVENUE and Izth STREET WAREHOUSE: NORTH AVENUE
Tel. 592 Tel. 596
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THE CARIBBEAN. 69












































HOTEL WASHINGTON

Unequaled for situation and comfort. A hotel in keeping
with the dignity, spirit, and service of the Panama Canal


WJtater Sports
THE YEAR AROUND


, Tarpon Fis/hing


P. O. Address, CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE


JAMES E. LEWIS, Manager


Golf Swimmning









THE CARIBBEAN.


JUNIORS.

WHAT WE SHALL KNOW THEM BY.

MIRIAM ARTHUR-Her love (?) of Spanish II and her long
black hair.
WOODFORD BABBITT-His love (?) of Spanish II and his basket
ball fame.
MILDRED BATH-Her stately walk and her smile.
ETHEL BARNETT-Her smile and lack of enemies; also her
ability to be humorous.
MARION BOOMER-Her boyish bob and her tailored clothes.
FIELDON BRADFORD-His bigjade (?) ring and his pal "Higgie."
"TEDDY" BRANDON-His A (?) recitation in History class.
LILYBEL Cox-Her Southern dialect and jokes; also her
resemblance to Peter Pan.
CHARLES CRUM-His love of shouting "Phooee" and his poker
face.
PORFIRIO DE RLETER-The way he leaves class parties and his
love of playing basket ball with the girls.
ROGER DEAKIN-His inches up from his feet and his soulful
glances.
ROBERT EDWARDS-His rackett" on the tennis courts.
"MIKE" GREENE-His handsome face, his baseball fame, and
the downcast look on some of the girls' faces since he left.
"Sis" HACKETT-Her continual "Charleston" and her per-
manent wave.
PAULHAYDEN-Hisability to pitch and his love of basket ball;
also Dese, Dat and Doz.
MARGARET HAYEs-Her childish ways and her giggle.
DOROTHY HEIM-Her meek manner and her lack ofgrowth.
ROYAL HIGGASON-His ungodly bellow and his perpetual "I
don't agree."
LEE KARIGER-His love (?) ofSpanish II,hisshortstature,and
his love of tormenting the girls.


ROSEMARY KEENE-The future High School Gym teacher.
"MINNIE" KLEEFKEN.s-Hersunny smile and herloveofmusic,
swimming, and corresponding.
MARION LOWANDE-Her love of college and her ability to get
to school on time.
MORRIS LrcE-His continual grin and talent at "tickling the
ivories."
VITA LIYEw-Her jet black hair and the continual presence of
her name on the Honor Roll.
"BETTY" MONTGOMERY-Her habit of coming to school late
and her happy-go-lucky ways.
RANDOLPH ORBAIGH-His resemblance to "Doc" Webster
in the Collegiate Series; also his willingness to help at class
affairs.
GRETCHEN PALM-Her demand for class dues and her ability
to play the piano.
JaCK PeTTIT-His quiet ways, his deep bass voice, his slick
hair comb, and his baseball fame.
ANITA RANKIN-Her presence in the yellow car and her ability
to flirt.
VIRGINIA STEVENSON-Her ability to sing and the fact she is
such a good pal.
MORTON SOITHARD-His oratory in first periodEnglish Class,
and his ability to draw apes.
ADAIR TAYLOR-The parties she gives and her becoming
blonde bob; also the mysterious letters she receives
in first period in the afternoon.
RoY \\WALKER-His mop of curly hair, his yellow car, and his
asthenic dancing.
SAM PACHETT-Although Sam entered late and his picture
isn't here, we will list his name. His quietness and his
spunk when it comes to answering back.
Lois \\WILIAMS-Her love of good times, her attractiveness
and the fact she has a "Blue Heaven."


Hydroelectric Station at Gatun shom ing Gates of Spillway.








THE CARIBBEAN. 13


Name-EMILY RUSSELL.
Birthplace-Pine Bluff, Ark.
Home Address-1404 Olive, Pine Bluff, Ark.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-Pine Bluff High School.
Location-Pine Bluff, Ark.
College or University-University of Arkansas.
Dates Attended-I 920-1924.
Degrees Obtained-B. S. H. E.
Favorite Expression-All Right!
Date Entering Service on Canal Zone-October I, 1927.
Subjects Taught 1927-i1928-U. S. History, Household Arts.

Miss EMILY RUSSELL.
Miss Emily Russell, Household Arts and United
States History teacher, has been gladly hailed
by Cristobal.
As our Household Arts teacher, she has helped
the girls to become adept with the needle. Also
she has taught them to prepare many tasty,
delectable dishes. The girls demonstrated their
ability by serving a dinner to their guests, Mrs.
Sawyers, Mrs. Benson, and Miss Gustafson.
If one should happen to pass by the library
second period, he could see Miss Russell explain-
ing the details of United States History to a class
composed of Sophomores.
Because of Miss Russell's ability to teach and her
charming personality, many students are eagerly
looking forward to her classes next year.


Name-MARY B. MARVIN.
Birthplace-Duluth, Minn.
Home Address-5823 Oneida Street, Duluth, Minn.
EDUCATION.
Name of Secondary School-Central High School.
Location-Duluth, Minn.
College or University-University of Michigan.
Dates Attended-191- 15.
Degrees Obtained-A. B.
College or Univers:ty-Graduate work at Columbia Univer-
siy.
Dates Attended-1924 and Summer of 1927.
Favorite Expression-Le.lrn this poem for to-morrow.
Date Entering Service on CanalZone -October I, 1927.
Subjects Taught l927-l928-Fre hm:.n and Senior English,
U.S.History, and Modern History.
Sponsor for what Class-Senior.
Miss MARY B. MARVIN.
Miss Mary B. Marvin is also a new arrival
at our High School. She teaches Freshman and
Senior English, United States and Modern
History. She is also the sponsor for the "dignified"
Seniors and supervisor for the Feature Article
section of THE CARIBBEAN.
Because of Miss Marvin's extensive European
travels, all of her classes are made extremely
interesting by descriptions of places she visited
while in Europe.
We sincerely regret that Miss Marvin does not
expect to be with us next year-but we have
thoroughly enjoyed her this year.









THE CARIBBEAN.


Porte Cochere-Hotel Washington.


T



Foreword .........................

D education ........ ............................

In Memoriam........ ..

Staff. ............. ..... ... .

Editorial .............. .... .....

F aculty.......... ............

Seniors. ..... .... ........ .

C lass H istory....................... ......

Class Will ...... .........

Class Prophecy ... . ......

Juniors... ............ ..............


able of Contents.

Page.
2 Sophomores...

3 Freshmen.....

4 Literary......
6 Alumni.... .

7 School Notes.
Io Sports........

16 Exchanges ....

23 Jokes ........
24 Autographs. .

25 Advertisement

28


Cathedral at Central Plaza, Panama City.


MR 10066-Panama Canal-6-16-28-425


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