Caribbean

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Title:
Caribbean
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Serial
Language:
English
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Cristobal High School
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Yearbook House
Place of Publication:
Kansas City, Missouri
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Canal Zone
Yearbook
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serial   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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UF00093680:00014


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THE CARIBBEAN


VOL. X. CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE, 192- No .

PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL














S(T)k


CONTENTS.


Advertisements .
Alumni HHELEN VIN.YARD. 27
Canal Viewx
CARIBBEAN Staff
Class History CLARA MAY, "27
Class r 1 .wRIIi< E C. CALL.AWAY, Jr., '27
Class .1 EvPiEMIA i VoOI.NOI i (l, '27
a il DORIOTRY \VERK. '27
Dedication
Editorial CIARLE I. Wni.- '27
,My Idea of an Ideal Educatio i JOSiEPt C(RRii, \, 27
Educational Creed c LAWREN E C. CALLAWAY. Jr. '27
Exchalnge-'. Ei'PiEIiA WOLNI l., '27
Faculty.
Freshman Clas'
Graduates
Jokes JouN G, NI i sN. 27
Junior Class
Junior Directory
Literary l.it 1',E HlIMN. '27
A Costumne L\RA MAY, "27
A Mirror DOROI IY S!'-;N'SS(IN\. '27
\ MLysterv RomERI PAYNE;. '21
A l .,l; ". Cocwro. k i-i -i;i "27
A Tr,. I ,1 29l
An L'nexpected Re .vard HELN VINi YARDI. 27
CIarnival in Ptanai i AliilRED BA ili, '21
Chlristllas in Panala Jons (;. NELSON, '27
Conscience Roti;IER DEAKIN. '21)
Daily Impresions of Vairious Mlem'iner-; tiie Class of 1927
.1 ,' i, ('anal CLARA MAY.\ '27
h.n ..r Dax, on Our Bi a LOUIE, HEIM. '27
IFrom Our House El PII EMl A \VooI.sNOI' .H '27
I' ,ii,, x;l,, .J.AMES (RIi>ER, '27
'.I I -Ti. .'sor Mi. DoRiou IY SVENSSON, '27
Our Palm Tree JO.EPH (ORRirAN. '27
Sea. Sky, and Palme on NStn (riti blal Point
CHARLES \VWI,l, '27
The Reef S RSE J. TAYLOR. r. ..27
Toward tiie Breakwatvr HEI..EN MINTtiOMERY. '27
Desperation loIN (;, NiEi.SN. *27
Fort San Lorenzo FRANC ES SIMT(ONI. '30
Isla Sola TERESA K. (GAI LA .IkR. 27
Mache D)oIKOI itY SV EN SSIN. '27
One of Life's Little Tragedi>e SI1RSE J. TAYLOR, Jr.. 27
Panama's Visitors G(RETiI lEN \W. PALM. '29
Rover, the Rover LoF ISE J. IA( K. '29


Literary--Co't i:id.
Rusty
See Saw


Thei Snore
W\\ en ti F I.t i V.X In
\\il!i 'mn, tle hBs Drvcer
Mi,rt elluaemo VI 1,".
A Fablle
AXI, Ti,,' i S'
1l Troi al Storm
Mli< Sewell
SoIIe ickr arnd i Kmnp
T'ie Dock<
Tie r ; lulngle
Sch',.l '. i
GirK' G4e Club
('horii x

Junior Party
Juniiir Senior Banqtet
Mother' an'd Daughters'
Our ( arnivm
Senior Party
Short Story Coutest
Staff Htop
The Freshman Party
The High Scool Orchliestl;
The I Party.
T hie -., ,,
"I underr Twenty"
School Notes
Sports Snapshot,:

Sports. .
Boys'
Girls,
Sophomrnore (Class
Sophomore Sanitarium


JoSEPll C(ORK:(;AN.
DI)oili IxY x us. iN .
Doxrix Y S\1.x--\.
J\IS IO;GRlER.


lHEI EN VNt \RI),.


ElIIEL B\RNl I I '2i
Lo IS'E Hill M '27
ELSIE D.ARIEY. 4)0
l .o) Ii HIlMl 'I27
FREIIMAN (CASS
l int i W LI XX\!KIN( .STA1, "0l
DoRMI1v SVIFNSON. 27
DOKOTIIY SVENSHN. "27
DON\I u PoirI[, '210
GkEaIClEN \W, PALM. 21)
IK I IIHL BARNE IT, '29
GL.~lvY BiEEIk, '2h
aid ROYAL IIl,(;ASON. "28
Banqiiet AD.AIR TAYLOR, '29
DOROTHY SVENSSONx. 27
anid EiZA.iBElil HACKETT, 92i
LOUlISE HEIM, "27
and ExiMMA BANKS,. '28
DOROTHY L. WERTZ. 27
ROSEMARY KEENE. '29
ia RiOERT AXTELL, '28
and JACK KLUINK. '28
VITA LYEW, '29
ETiEL \VESTMAN. '28
LOVISE J. M'ACK. '2
DORiTHY L. WER IZ, '27



JAMEi RIDER. '27
I)DOROIiY SYENSSON,x '27







THE CARIBBE.-N.


\. "The Spirit of St. Louis," Captain Lindberg has but a few
.' days ago scored a world triumph-building an air brid,,e
V-1 between the New World and the Old.
i To-day we launch our thought ship, "The Spirit of Cristobal
l.. -- High School"-THE CARIBBEAN of 1927. We shall be proud
indeed if we can establish a thought bridge between the old friends of
our school and the new.




To Our Fricnd,'
The Personnel of Fort De Lesseps, Its Of'cers and hni/ist/ d Men,

ire, the St/.',i,.'s of Crist.,/o/, High School,

Gratefully Dedicate
this the Tenth Volume of

"TThe Cari/hlbe' ."



HEADQUARTERS. FORT DE LESSEPS. CANAL ZONE.
OFFICE OF THE COMMANDING OFFICER.
Fort De Lesseps, C. Z., May 28, 1927.
Mr. CHuAK.ES F. \ILL.,
Editor in ( IL i, The Caribbean,
Cristobal, C. Z.
D13EA SIR: Your kindness, and the gratitude you have
expressed for such small aid as we have been permitted to
render is very much appreciated. The close bond that exists
between the High School of Cristobal and the personnel at
Fort l)e L.esseps is most gratifying to me.
Srll.r I, ,
'1' 11'nl1 A. GREIC, Jr.,
Colonel, Ist C. A.,
Commanding.


Eq.










THE CARIBBEAN.


Staff Searh I. light:
Center: Mits Dhodds.\ dvistr.
(Reading clock-wise front "l i tvn o'cl ck"):
Charles Will. Editor-in-(Chif; Jak Klunk. Asitai t t thl Editor; T>rca Ga.llaighr. ( irculatioi M.iinager;
Albert Davs. Assistant toi the Circulation .Nanagcr; James n 'an Scotter. Art Fditor; Dorothy Wortz. School Note
Edlitor; Dorothy Svcnvson, G(irls Athlefic s Editor; Jhlin Nelson. Joke Eiitor; EuhllnITa IW00ln1-1ghi, xclhanItge Kriti;
L.uie Hlliin, Literary Editor; Jamei Grider. Boys' Athletics Editor; Hriln Vineiyarl. Alumni Editor; Foster Tultt.
Assistant to the Businetss Manager; Josephl Corrigan, BusinCss M ia er.








THE CARIBlB3BlN.


Charles F. ill, Editor-in-Chief.


"TAKING OFF."


Since we are adopting the aeroplane as the
theme for the 1927 CARIBBEAN, and since we,
the Seniors, will soon 'c l.lilncihinl forth ourselves,
it seems fitting that as editor we continue in this
figure.
Four years of training have gone by. We are
about to venture forth relying on the charts and
advice we have L.,incd from our flight com-
manders. All is about to be changed. The
..ii;,inrl hand on our shoulder is no more. Guid-
ance will have to be within ourselves.
Of course there are numerous matters we have
failed fully to understand, but being warned of
them, we shall be better able to cope with them in
the air currents of experience. For our life trip,
as f:r any other, we should be properly fitted


.!Y IDEA OF AN Il)EAL HF.D'CATION.
S. Corrtianl, '27-.
It i: .1l that education is a process of
pac aration. It should prepare a person to ap-
p:cciate life, to meet and handle its problems, and
to leave the world better for his having lived in it.
F education should ui n a man higher ideals and
a.ir.s. He should be trained to use his own re-
s urces; to rouse and use to the best adv.inrt.lwe his
latent powers, mental and phisi~;l. A well-
educated man should not or will not have the
same impulses as one not so well educated. He
should have, above all, a realization of and rever-
ence for the Supreme HB1ing, and love and under-
r.trlnin~ for his fellow man.


out. We hope that we are, in a measure, for we
have zealously followed advice. But it is each
one alone who will find out what he peculiarly
needs, where he has failed to provide the proper
Lq]uipmint, where he is too heavily loaded.
Though our goals lie in many different directions,
though our routes vary enormously, we believe
our traniiin, has been such that we shall get both
pleasure and profit along the way, shall fly safely
(though perhaps not always smoothly) and shall
choose a safe and worthy landing place.
We are ready to put off. The engine of initia-
tive is started and running smoothly. Common
sense is our lookout. Our companions are Deter-
mination, Eagerness, and Confidence. With eyes
alight, we cry, "We're off!" -Ch ries F. Will.


EDUCATIONAL CREED.
Lawrence C. Call/awst, 7r., '27.

I believe that an education does the following:
1. Helps us to broaden our knowledge on
different lines.
2. Helps us to obtain bigger and better
thine'.
3. Helps us to lead better and cleaner lives
mentally, physically, and morally.
4. Helps us to understand others better.
5. Helps us to give to and to receive from the
world the best.
Bearing the above in mind, one should strive for
the best education possible.






THE CARIBBEAN.


.is1j 5 trrs a n


JAil cNaunghten


eiuttl


XLi


an i~~-


1


Ai5 (61 nt's U aon


il i.i jTl~ o rr
p" ...


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*IHF C.ARIRHRFAN;.


Mr. JOHN E. GRASRID.
Minneapolis, Minnesota.
SI. Olaf College.
IU ivZity o4f Minnesota.
Ctolunia I university.
Superintendent of Schoo/s.


Mr. BEX M. WI.I.IAMS.
Statesloro, Georgia.
Meorcr UIiversity.
(C lunbia university .
Jssistanlt to ih/c Superintedent o/f Schools.


Miss J. ISABELLA IDoDS.
Claremont, Minnesota.
Principal
English, Social Problems and Economics.
Senior Class .Adviser. Caribbean .- .f A.dviser.

Seven years ..o, Miss J. Isabella Dodds came to
us from Minnesota and established herself, heart
and soul, in Cristobal High School.
For the first six years she was the principal of the
high school and this year has the principalship
of both the high and grammar schools. Each year
she has been the adviser to the senior class, a
position which she has certainly proved capable
of filling; as the faculty member of every CARIB-
BEAN Staff from 1921 to 1927, she has been success-
ful, by her Iuntlirine efforts, in making THE CARIB-
BEAN worthy of our school at its best. On her
arrival she organized the Girls' Supper Club and,
until recently, advised it. She has directed every
Senior play, working with zeal and interest to make
each production better than the one before. Last
but not least, she has ably i.il.'lh senior English,
social problems, and Latin, and has made her
classes more of a pleasure than a task.
In all of our sports we have had her steady back-
ing and constant ni ilr.ii~, ill. Ii
Firmly but k1in1l\ she has helped us out of our
troubles, taught us what is right, and inspired us
to keep the school's standards high.
M I-~ I)olds is liked by i r, ..ni, both inside and
outside of school, because of her delightful per-
sonality, her ever- rl. 11\ friendliness, and her eager-
ness to help everyone, especially the students of
Cristobal High School. She is the one who has
made (Cristohal High .i hi .I what it is to-day. We
are all proud of her.
-Clara .1. May, '27.


MIss LILLIAN B. GUSTAFSON.
Nunica, Michigan.
Northern Illinois Normal, De Kalb.
Assistant Principal.
\I i, Gustafson is the silent partner of Cristobal
High School. Outsiders seldom hear of her be-
cause she does not teach any students.
But Miss Gustafson has all the files and records
at her finger tips and is always willing to recall
to even the most forgetful student, a few times
when he was late or absent.
Thrown in with her office work are a few
assembly periods where she may be seen quite
frequently helping some lagging scholar.
\\-h,.- unexpected jobs appear, so dos. Miss
Gustafson to lend a helping hand. To tell the truth,
N.l. Gustafson is here, there, and I.cr%'whlcrc
doing this, that, and everything.
Thus one may see for one's self what it is to be a
silent partner in a hustling high school.
-Paul Hayden, '29.
Miss GRACE R. HEssr.
Shelbyville, Illinois.
University of Michigan.
Sophomore English juniorr English
Freshman Spanish Glee Club
Fortune smiled kindly on Cristobal High
School when Miss Grace Hesse became a member
of our faculty this year. As she has hitherto
been a college teacher, she found it difficult at
first to reconcile herself to the classroom antics
of high school students. With remarkable ver-
satility. however, she soon adapted herself-or
rather she made us adapt ourselves to her ideas.
She holds a very important place in our faculty,
our activities, and our hearts. Besides tc.ichin
three large English classes and two Spanish classes,
Miss Hesse accepted the position of Glee Club
instructress. Having studied both vocal music
and piano, she is able to fill this position excellent-
ly. Her knowledge in this field was very well
shown in the attractive musical revue which she
directed for our carnival.
Miss Hesse's classes are always instructive as
well as \cr\ frequently merry, for she is giftre
with a clever sense of humor.
Every student, who receives the benefit of
her extensive information on every branch of
her subjects, entertains a sincere expect for M\ is
Hesse, and it is our unanimous desire that she
return to Cristobal High School next Autumn.
-Teresa Gallagher, '27.
-Louise tleim, '27.
-Louise Mack, '29.








THE CARIBBEAN.


Mr. GEORGE J. BES\ONX
Saint Cloud, Minnesota.
S;ate Trachers' Colklge. Slint C( iidl
Bradh-y Polyt. chnic Inititut,
('Genera/ Science, Induistiria/ Su/tjcts.
I 'psilon Ga a Gaammn,' .I ,k,'r.
\1,. Benson is the only man teacher in Cristobal
High. He teaches general science and industrial
arts and also helps with the latter subject in the
grades. He has acquired the strictness of a
professor, hut he is always glad to help one when
he isn't busy. His classes in general science are
always interesting, with special topics, and ex-
periments. But let me tell you that a persIon
has to be just about perfect to get an "A" 1,n
his report from Mr. Benson.
\I1. Benson is always doing something. He helps
with the boy scouts; he takes us on hikes: often
he is seen in the kayak which he himself made.
\Ve feel that Mr. Benson is our friend and xwe
want to be his. -J a0r- (.,mp1arl,, ,4,.
Miss CARRIE A. SEW Eli..,
Carbondale, CIoorado.
l'niver4 ity 4, t Col,rad, .
.1/ lba, (Gro'metr, P%/v.ic. lreshima Cla..s I.i:.,',.
il-- S,.. r.l I kin.i, patient M iss Scwell- has
been for two years our teacher of algebra, geometry,
and physics. When slowlv but surely the marks
begin to descend it is she who inspires us to try.
She it is who is our companion when \ e sta\
after three o'clock and puzzle uthe xwhY's It)
our perplexing friend geometry! She is ever tair
and impartial to ever student in her classes.
And who is more indispensable to the I'reshman
Class than their trustworthy ad\ iser, Miss Sewell ?
()Out o school Miss Sewell greets all with a jovial
and sincere smile.
All hail to our "mathcmiatics wxhi/"! Nla she
see us through lmanly nimore terml-s!
-- 1lf-''t 7hir/:m:/[, ",;.
-El'izabeth 1/ /kac, 'e.
Miss .\\E J. McNAl ,HI4 .
Column s, 1 )hio.
()i. mi v rivs it .
'Fr'shnan i .!ebr. >. listorv and (.Ci:i ( s
Petite Miss Anne J. Naughten, who has been a
member of the Cristobal High School faculty for
two years, is our teacher and helper in Freshman
English, algebra, and United States history.
She is always jolly and smiling, and by her
appearance alone one can judge how interesting
she makes her classes. She is ever willing to help
us with our studies, and her pleasantness and
steadfastness have made her one of the favorite
members of our faculty. We hope to see her
here for many years to come.
--Evevn Ganzemil//er, 'o.


lMiss M14vAY ELIZABETLH MOORE.
West Alexander, Penn.
!'nivwrity 4f W\V-t Virginia.
I.tUn, .:cient 11istolry, Spanij/h.
fJu imr C/,Cla, .id:'iser.

Miss Moo4ie. the very capable Latin. Spanish,
and history teacher of Cristobal HIigh, cones from
Fennsylvania, and has been with us for txwo years.
Students always look forw ard to one of Miss
\I .... 's classes, made almost interesting Ib nuimer-
(ous anecdotes taken either from her own ex-
periences or fi om her reading. She has widened
many a student's vwcalulary, imiroxved his
enunciation, and tbroadened his interests.
Miss Moore has been the able adviser of the
Junior Class for two yeais. Ask any (of the Seniors
who attended the banquet, given in their honor, if
she doesn't know her business.
Miss \1.... has a very su51nn disposition. No
matter whether \you meet her in the hall, in the
class room, or on the street -there is always a
reaId smile awaiting you. E'ven when she finds
it necessary to be stern, we know that we deserve
it, and that when we hxave done our part, she will
do hers. /.oi, 1'i/iiams, '-).

4- i, lar ., L.oca0 t e, I,.
M I. s (./4/',4 c l. 1 /
(irccl s, C i or.ani.
ilo->.1 T .chr-' ( <.,I
i e laims a1un oNmics d otpi l It''t ISt il I,. .Lo
SiVpoo sens of humor.e /a.

Miss (Iete Pseteroso, Is e w (lconomircs and
general science teacher, is really admired for her
quiet ,enialily.
.l11 pupils \\(ho are lucky enough 1o ha\e this
kinds letacher declare that ti txhx wOuld like 1 flake
four years under her super\ ision. She makes all of
her clauses so very interesting that (oe hates to sbe
absent from them. Shie is always patient, and will-
ingly explains any o(f our stupid questions. Along
with all of these striking traits, I-- Peterson has
a good sense of humor.
Miss Peterson is the very capable Sophomore
adviser. When the Sophomores go to 1I--, Peter-
,son with their perplexing questions, she is always
able to solve them satisfactorily.
Miss Peterson came to us two years ago from
far away 'Colorado. She found this country (or us
students?) so enchantingthat she returned to spend
another enjoyable year in Panama. \We hope it's
not the last. -.-targaret Hayes, '29.









THE CARIBBEAN.


CLASS OF 1927.

TERESA K. GALLAGHER ...... ride
DOROTHY L. WERTZ. ....... .. 'icc Iresident
CLARA A. MAY. ..........cretar
CHARLES F. WILL ............. Tirea

Class flower-Red rose.
Class colors-Crimson and white.
Motto-Ad astra per aspera.


TERESA GALLAGHER.

"But 0, she dances such a way;
No sun upon an Easter day,
Is half so fine a sight."--
23-'24 Treasurer, Supper Club.
Chorus. Glee Club.
Spanish Operetta.
Track.
Basket Ball.
Baseball.
Swimming.
24-'2' Treasurer, Supper Club.
Chorus. Glee Club.
"Sailor's Reverie."
Japanese Operetta.
Basket Ball..
'25-'26 Treasurer, Supper Club.
Chorus. Glee Club.
"Rip Van Winkle."
'26-'27 Cl;ss President.
Chorus. Glee Club.
Circulation Manager, THE CARIBBEAN.


DOROTHY I.. WERTZ.

"So well she acted all and every part,
By turns, with that vivacious versatility."--Byron.

'23-'24 ,'1 ,I hi Chorus.
Supper Club.
'24-'25 Pitman High School, Pitman, N. J.
'25-'26 Pitman High School, Pitman, N. J.
'26-'27 Cristobal High School, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
Class Vice President.
Secretary-Trrasurer, Girls' Athletic Association.
Basket Ball.
Indoor Baseball.
Tennis, Captain.
School Notes Editor, THE CARIBBEAN.
"Under Twenty."
Chorus.
Glee Club.
Supper Club.
Carnival Committee.


MR 5590-2


CHARLES WILL.
"A bisier man other nowhere none is
And yet he sensed bisier thanne he was."-Chaucer.
'23-'24 Handball.
Chorus. Glee Club.
Spanish Operetta.
'24-'25 "Daddy-Long-Legs."
Sophomore prize in Short Story Contest.
Baseball. Basket ball.
Class Vice President.
First prize Advance Sale Contest.
'25- '26 Baseball.
Tennis.
Circulation Manager, THE CARIBBEAN.
Upsilon Gamma Gamma.
Basket ball.
Swimming. Track.
Class Secretary.
'26-'27 Editor-in-Chief, THE CARIBBEAN.
Class Treasurer.
Tennis Captain.
"Under Twenty."
Upsilon Gamma Galmma.
Baseball. Track.
Basket ball. Handball.









10 THE CARIBBEAN.



JOSEPH A. CORRIGAN, JR.
"He made all countries where he came his own."-Dryden.
'23-'24 Toms River High School, Toms River, N. J.
"The Gypsy Rovers."
'24-'25 Toms River High School, Toms River, N. J.
Class Treasurer.
Orchestra. Minstrel.
French Club.
25-'26 Toms River High School, Toms River, N. J.
Class Presidient.
Minstrel.
Assistant Football Man;ger.
Student Council.
Orchest ra.
French Club. Debating Club.
'26-'27 Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. Z.
Business Manager, THE CARBIBBEAN.
Upsilon Gamma Gamma.

DOROTHY SVENSSON.
"The joy of youth and Ie 'lth her eyes displayed,
And e ,se of he'rt her every look conveyed."
'23-'24 Winthrop High Scl:ool, Winthrop, Mass.
24-'25 Chorus. Glee Club. Supper Club.
"Tale of Two Cities."
Basket Ball.
Jt panese Operetta.
'25-'26 Basket Ball, Captain.
Chorus. Glee Club. Supper Club.
"Rip Van Winkle."
'26-'27 Basket Ball.
Baseball Manager.
"Tennis. Track.
S. Volley Ball.
Girls' Sports Editor, THE CARIBBEAN.
Vice President, Girls' Athletic Association.
"% (.Librarian.
Chorus. Glee Club.
Supper Club.

JAMES GRII)I-R
"Whose wit, in the combat, as gentle and bright,
Ne'er carried a heartstain away on its blade."

'23-'24 Baseball.
Basket Ball.
24 '25 Baseball.
Track.
Basket Ball.
Chorus. Gcle Club.
z5 '26 Baseball.
B..sket Ball.
Chorus. Glee C( Ih t.
'2 '27 Baseb; ll.
B skct Ball.
'Track.
"Under Twenty."
Athletic Editor, T'E CARIBBEAN.
-President, Boys' Athletic Association.









THE CARIBBEAN.


HEI.EN VINEYARD.

"God giverh speech to all, song to the few."--Smith.

'23-'24 Chorus.
Supper Club.
24-'25 "Sailor's Reverie."
Japanese Operetta.
Chorus. G!ee Club.
Class President.
Supper Club.
'25'26 Glee Club. Chorus.
"Rip Van Winkle."
Supper Club.
'26 '2 President, Girls' Glee Club.
Carnival Program.
"Under Twenty."
Chorus. Glee Club.
Alumni Editor, 'I'mt CARIBBEAN.






JOHN G. NELSON.

"Sir, your wit ambles \l,1 it goes easily."--Shake'spea'e.

'23-'26 Gonzaga High School, Spokane, \Wash.
'26-'2- Cristobal High School, Cri-tobal, C. Z.
"Under Twenty" publicity.
TIHE CARIBBEAN, Joke Editor.









EMILY BLEDI)SOE

"Sweet flowers are slow, and weeds make haste."-Richard I H.

'23-'24 Chorus.
Glee Club.
Supper Club.
'24 '25 Chorus.
Glee Club.
Supper Club.
"Sailor's Reverie."
Japanese Operetta.
'2-'26 Chorus.
Glee Club.
Supper Club.
"Rip Van Winkle."
'26-'27 Chorus.
G!ee Club.
Supper Club.
"Under Twenty."









THE CARIBBEAN.


EUPHEMI! WOOLNOUGH.
"How her fingers went when they moved by note,
Thruigh me Ibure, fine, as she marked them o'er
The i elhini. pl.ink- .. I'the ivory floor."-B.F. Taylor.
23-'24 Supper Club. Chorus.
Swimming.
'24-'25 Chorus. Supper Club.
Class Treasurer.
25-'26 Chorus.
"Rip Van Winkle."
Vice President, Supper Club.
Orchestra.
'26-'27 President, Supp.er Club.
Orchestra.
Chorus accompanist.
Baseball. Track.
Exchange Editor, THE CARIBBEAN.
Carnival accompanist.
Swimming.

JAMES VAN SCOTTER.
"In the lexicon of youth which
Fate reserves for a bright manhood, there is no such word
As--fail!"
'23-'24 Class Secretary.
Baseball. Basket Ball.
Chorus. Glee Club.
'24-'25 President, Boys' Athletic Association.
Class Basket Ball.
Class Baseball.
Class Track. Track. Basket Ball.
Chorus. Glee Club. "Sailor's Reverie."
'25-'26 President, Boys' Athletic Association.
Upsilon Gamma Gamma Scribe.
Baseball. Swimming. Track.
Chorus. Glee Club. "Rip Van Winkle."
'26-'27 Upsilon Gamma Gamma Oracle.
Art Editor, THE CARIBBEAN.
Chorus. "Under Twenty."
Courtesy Committee, Carnival.


HEI.EN MONTGOMERY.
H.IppI am I; from care I'm free;
Why aren't they all contented like me?"-l.a Bavadere.
23-'2-5 Huntington High School, Huntington, Long Island,
N.Y.
'2 -'26 Basket Ball.
Glee Club. Chorus.
Swimming.
"Rip Van Winkle" Supper Club.
Girls' Athletic Association.
'26 '27 Basket Ball, Captain.
Baseball. Tennis.
Chorus. Glee Club, Secretary-Treasurer.
President, Girls' Athletic Association.
Supper Club, Program Committee.
"Under Twenty."
High School Follies--Carnival. Carnival Hostess.









THE CARIBBEAN.


I.OUISE HEIM.

"For she was jes' the quiet kind
Whose naturs never vary,
Like streams that keep a summer mind
Snowhid in Jenoo:ary."-Lo:cll.

'23-'24 Supper Club.
Chorus.
24-'25 Supper Club.
Chorus.
"Daddy-Long-.egs."
'25-'26 Supper Club.
'26 '2 Literary Editor, THF CARIBBEAN.





SURSE J. TAYLOR, J..

"A man of no mean understanding."--La Ern-tere.
'23 '24 Swimming.
Chorus. Glee Club.
First Prize Advance Sale Contest.
24-'25 Swimming.
'2 -'26 Assistant Editor, THE CARIBBEAN.
Tie for best short story in Short Story Contest.
"The Goose Hangs High."
Upsilon Gamma Gamma.
"Rip Van Winkle."
Class President.
Chorus. Glee Club.
Cheer Leader.
Swimming. Golf.
'26-'27 Upsilon Gamma Gamma.
"Under Twenty."
Cheer Leader.




CLARA A. MAY.

"Consider that I labored not for myself only, but for all them
that seek learning."

'23-'24 Supper Club.
Chorus.
24-'25 Glee Club.
Chorus.
Supper Club.
"'Tale of Two Cities."
25-'26 Class Treasurer.
Chorus.
"Rip Van Winkle."
'26 '27 Class Secretary.
Chorus.
"Under Twenty."








THE CARIBBI-ANN.


I W\\'R NCI- C. CALLAWAY, Jit.

"Even though vanquished, he could argue still."-Goldsmith.

'23-'24 Swimming.
Chorus.
Glee Club.
24-'25 Chorus.
G!ee Club.
Assistant Business Manager, THE CARIBBEAN.
Business Manager, "Daddy-l.ong-Legs."
"Sailor's Reverie."
'25-'26 Assistant Business \LM.m .'cr, THE CARIBaAN.
Business Manager, "Goose H:Ings High."
"Rip Van Winkle."
Chorus.
Glee Club.
Upsilon Gamma Gamma.
Golf.
'6-'27 Business Manager, "Under Twenty."
Chorus.
Glee Club.
Upsilon Gamma Gamma.
Golf.


CLASS HISTORY.
Clara .fay, '27.


~' .1


To give a complete history of the Class of 1927
would only impose upon the patience and for-
bearance of my readers, and also might disclose
to the public eye certain carefully guarded secrets
of the past. With this in mind I have tried to
relate in the briefest manner possible the most
important events of our high school career.
Our grammar school life varies, for not all of
us spent those years in the Canal Zone schools.
We came from practically every State in the
Union and on the fifth day of October, entered
Cristobal High with an enrollment of forty-four.
That year solved for us the great mysteries of
high school which we had before looked at with
awe. Aside from the class party given under the
supervision of Mis Hornbeak, and the damage
done at the initiation, there is little to relate.
The next year, having lost several people from
our class, we entered as u:i\ young Sophomores
anl. we, in our turn, found -lim\nninlr at the
.xliinsr. of the poor Freshies. Miss O'Connell
was our class adviser, and with her help, we were
able to 1i I,: a successful party.
The next title of honor awaiting us was that of
Junior. Everyone knows the history of the


Junior year-that of the Junior-Senior Banquet.
After much hard work and unririrng efforts, we
were finally able to give the Seniors a banquet
which was equal to any of the previous years.
Our party was also a credit to our class. Miss
MoIir, as our class adviser, was a great help to
us in both of these events.
When in the future years, we look back over
our school life, our Senior year will stand out the
brightest and happiest of all. Into the hurried
days of our closing year, we have crowded many
events. The Senior play, "Under Twenty" was
successfully given under the capable direction of
Miss Dodds, our class adviser. The banquet given
us by the Class of '28 at the Hotel Washington
and the dinner given by I"11, D).dds at the Old
\\ shinnhrern Hotel are both worthy of mention
and the memory of them will linger long in our
lives.
Now as we have reached the :iprtine of the ways,
may the future years hold for each of us happiness
and success, in which shall always be min._,ld
the h:iapp memories of our school l;a in Cristobal
High.


~ --~--~


14


9,








THlE CARIBBI' AN.



CLASS W~ILL.
EifphJ'/ieit ItI 011Insu11Ii.2
IDxo-0/o1 'ICI.2;-.


We, the Pilots of the plane Cristobal 1l;i,
School, Numlber 1927, befhire taking the air do
hereby publish and proclaim this to be our last
will and testament, and do IL I the folloNing:
'I' the Junior Class our PRIVIIEGES (to be
cherished with the precious memento of the
Seniors which we bestowed upon them at the
Junior-Senior banquet); also the machine shop,
Room 27, to keep clean and cuiet and to respect
as we have done.
To the Sophomores, the inestimable privilceie
of moving into seats tow ard the rear of the as-
sembli room.
To the Freshmen, the ._..ni., (mental) of
geometry class, and regrets that initiations are
taboo at school.
To the entire school, for their benefit and that
of the faculty, our earnestness and attentiveness.
Joseph Corrigan's paiamia shirt to .Edward
L.owande to co-ordinate with his Costa Rican
shoes.
Surse Tavlor's convincing line to Albert I)as;
his cast-iron, never 1.. n,!id _, brass-plate nerve to
Theodore Henter.
Helen \ ., r.r, .... 5v's habit of t.ilkii,, fast to
Gladvs Beers -to be used on all occasions and
especially in 1'. S. History.
Lawrence Callawav's slenderness to Frank
Kimibell and his powerful physique to Arthur
Rothenburg.
Louise Heim's rude (?; and rough ?) vo ice to
Woodotrdl Babbitt and her sweet and modest
ways to Lucia Salazar, who has already taken
possession of much of her inheritance.
Dorothy Wertz's love o sports to IE'angcline
Smith and Ethel \\estman.l
Clara Mav's shrine in the faculty to Zonella


James Van Scotter's "Big Times" tl o FoI'ster
Tufts.
Helen vineyard'ss vamping ways t ) Arthur
Rothenlburg, who demonstrated at tie banquet
that he could use them.
Teresa ( i(ll il.-'.s art of dancing to Fmma
Banks; her gentle manner t ) Kathryn Lambert,
t be added to her supply.
Dorothy S\ensson's hysterical wavys to (ladvs
Beers, who is making a collection of them; and
her reign in the library t the Banks-Bliss
dynasty.
James (ri.lcr's "giit of gab" to Royal Higgason,
whose supply is almost exhausted; and his "foolin'
ways" and interest in the girls to Robert Axtell.
Charles \ill's affairs in the office and his in-
terests in athletics to Jack Klunk.
John Nelson's title of "Madame NMarie" to
Harold O(wen.
IEmily Bledsoe's opera voice to Gladys Beers.
F'ulphcmia Woolinough's Charlestonian feet to
('harles Crum.
In addition to tlle aftorelIcntindll'- goods and
chattels: The Senior i:ris Live all their good
limes, their IFords, and theli- good marks to the
Junior girls; and the Senior boys '. II! their posi-
tions in tlhe "Chink Shop" to the Junior boys.
In testimony w\hereCof, we set (our hand and
seal and publish this, our last ill and testament,
in the presence of the following witnesses, on
this 24th lda of Junel, 1927.

(Signed) S:xMIOR C.Ls..
Wii nesscs:
S \ I EI,.

\\WiN i.


Q








16 THE CARIBBEAN.



CLASS PROmPHLCI'.

i s
N-


T\ ]>,,, 1i> \i t,, June 24, 1945.
Dr. S. J. TAYLOR, Jr.,
Taylor H,,pitil,
New York City, N. Y.

DEAR Doc: Has it occurred to you thateighteen
years ago to-day we were graduated from Cris-
tobal High School? According to the custom of
the old class we are all iuppl,,ed to write to each
other to-day-our anniversary day. Say, old
boy, who under Mt. Vesuvius would ever have
dreamed that you would be a famous plastic
surgeon owning a couple of large hospitals and
having the reputation that you have!
You ia% that you've been too busy to keep
track of the old gang so I'll try to tell you what
I've found out about them in my travels. You
remember "Farmer" Grider? Well, you, being
of the same profession, probably know that he is
now running a large hospital of his own in Louis-
ville, Kentucky.
"Terry" Gallagher is one of Wall Street's
wizards. 'Iht has the stock market under her
thumb and squeezes every now and then.
"Dot" Wertz has married the Postmaster Gen-
eral. P '.. il'l \ I knew him when he used to work
in the P. O. at Cristobal. She and Euphemia
often L'.t together, for Euphemia is the head
st;,.nigraphli.r in the State Department at Wash-
irtin, D). C. Charlie Will is the chief accountant
for the Standard (il Company. He has a peach
of a job-no work--plenty of cash. Jimmy Van
Scotter is now in Brazil Iuidlliri a hrilL.'c across
the Amazon River for the Inter-Continental
Railroad Company. "Dot" Svensson has married


some millionaire. They live in Hawaii where her
husband has the leading pineapple concession.
Helen Montgomlery is in charge of physical train-
ing for the Chilean Government. Louise Heim
has gained quite a name in the literary world by
writing a book called So Small, for which she was
awarded the Nobel Prize. Joe Corrigan is the
suiprrr iinv engineer for The Panama Canal in
their project to make a third set of locks and
widen the Cut.
Emily Bledsoe, who is now one of the world's
greatest pianists, is soon giving a concert in
Vienna which all the nobility of the world will
attend. There aren't so many of them left now.
Of course you have heard that Helen Vineyard is
a famous prima donna and is now playing with
the largest opera company in Europe. I saw her
the day before yesterday when I flew over the
mill pond in my old crate. Gosh, that bus is old
fashioned! All she can go now is three hundred
seventy-five per hour. "Lord" Nelson is the
commanding general of the Ninth Corps Area and
is living in Miniin, ia, Calif.
Well, Doc, I guess that's all I can tell you now.
Oh, yes, I nearly forgot Clara M;ay. She's
become famous as an interior decorator for the
Dennison paper novelty company.
Say, boy, I just got an offer from some revo-
lutionists down in Pernambuco to go down and
start a revolution. It's about time they had
another onedown there ai.%\waR. If it weren't
for those re ,'lutiins, I'd go hungry.

Sincerely,


L. C. CALLAWAY, Jr., '27.









THE CARIBBEAN. 17


THE DOCKS.


Dorothr S.etsson, '27.

The docks!
Gray, barren-
Yet seething with life!
Romance i- not a thing of the past!
No! for here romance
Breathes-lives.
Why not?
The glamour of ships-
Cargoes from
Far ports -
Cairo -Singapore.
The tales of bold adventure,
Furious storms;
The swearing-
Laughter-
Kisses-
Tears-
No! for the docks-
The gray, seemingly souless, docks,
Romance breathes-lives.


A TROPICAL STORM.

l.ouise lCiim, '27.

The heavy clouds above an angry sea
Descend and darken slowly, warningly.
The waves like frenzied monsters dash with rage
On rocks which give to them a whitened death.
And then the rain in lashing torrents comes;
The clouds, the sea, all blotted from our sight.


A TROPIC NIGHT.

Elsie Darle,, '3o.

The stillness of a tropic night
Is broken by the sound
Of waves a-dashing on the shore,
And crickets in the ground.

TIhe moonbeams fall upon the sea
And make it sparkle brightly,
And now and then a gentle breeze
Stirs the palm leaves gently, lightly.


The stately palms are outlined
Against the starry sky,
They look like monstrous spiders
Suspended from on high.


A NEGRO CHILD).

l.ouise feimn, '27.


A negro child was standing there,
A dirty little wretch,
Black as coal her eye., and haiir-
A picture fit to sketch.


She looked at me as though to say,
"Well, don't you like my looks,
If not, just turn the other way."
Her name should have been Snooks.


THE LYING JUNGLE.

Dorothy Ao SCss on, '-7.

How sad the trees in (atun Lake appear!
Their lifeless bodies
Protruding from chill waters -
How sad-yet stern.
Their dead white forms
Seem reproachful.
They lift
Their hands up high
As if to point accusingly
At heavens above.
Their very desolation
Casts a spell around the lake.


M R 5590--3








18 THE C.ARIBBE N.


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THE C.RIBBF.AN.


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-FI I









THE CARIBBEAN.


FRESHMEN.
('enter: Ruth Lockwood. President; Walter Wikingstad. Vice President; Miss Sewcll, Advi-i; Fred Stewa t.
Secretary; Ramona Bliss. Treasurer;
Outside (reading book fashion):
Row 1. Rict .l -I .1 lavishs Thirlwall. Edward Henriquez. Elizabeth lMtgonrtgyo Bve. erlt- Turiner, Evlvyn
Ganzemuller. \' .1i .... Bi ... Ir Frances Sinm nds.
Row 2. Betty Bryan. Dan Coffey. Elsie Birkeland. James Campbell, Winnie Fred Jac ,b. William Nwmiiian.
Regina Colgrove, Arthur Mundberg.
Row 3. Edmund Fishhough. Maria Stewart, Ralph Cruin. Elaine Blauuvelt Martin S Charles Martin. Della Raymond.
Row 4. Dorothy Ford. John Whidden.
Row 5. Kenneth Maurer. Helen Logan.
Row 6. Rose Corrigan. Harry Davies.
Row 7. Victor Melende. Rita Joyce.
Row 8. Be trice Harris. Elizabeth Raymond.
Row 1) Robert Hanna, Valentine Payne.
Row 10. Virginia Eberinz. Haroldl Mueller. L.eah Frank. Nellie Berigr, Fl-ic Darley. IJoseph Davics, Wis..\ iing;t
Napoleon, Francisco Wong.
Row 11. Mabel Schulert. Juanita Schofield, Edward Alhin. Herbert Peterson. James I. -\lbin. Ruth Bank.s
Eleano- Fir-7 r-l-l
Not .. -i.. I. Robbins, Henry Steven., Frank Drake. Frances Days, Anna Fell. Matilda Hill, Ella Warren,
Lillian Housel. Helen Housel.

MISS SEWELL.
Shie's pleasant and good nature,
Altho' she teaches mathth"
And tries her best to keep ts all
Upon the "passing" path.


She's kindl v-ever helpful;
Her marks are always fair;
And erring students err the less
Because Miss Sewell is there.


we're e glad she's our adviser,
As such she has no peer;
And every school dax, more and more,
We're glad Miss Sewell is here!
rhe 'e.shiman C/ais.


Ruth Banks ..... .....
Nellie Berger........
Elsie Birkeland .... ...
Elaine Blauvelt......
Rae Bliss... .
Betty Bryan. ..
Regina Colgrove. ...
Rose Corrigan....
Elsie Darley........
Frances Days .

Virginia Eberenz .......
Eleanor Fitzgerald .
I.eah Frank. ... .
Evelyn Ganzemueller...
Alice Henter. ....
Winnie Fred Jacobs....
Rita Joyce...........

Ruth Lockwood ...
Helen L.ogan .. .
Elizabeth Montgolmery.

Washington Napoleon .
Della Raymondi .i
Elizabeth Raymond ....
Mabel Schulert .. ..
Frances Simonds... ..
Maria Stewart.... ..
Mavis Thirlwall. ......
Juanita Schofield
Lillian Housel (H. S. 8)..
Beatrice Harris (H. S. 8)
Dorothy Ford (H. S. 8).


GIRLS.

SShe looks demure.
l"Miss Cristobal High School."
Our Glee Club pianist.
SLong brown tresses.
SA "Blissful" miss.
She likes history.
Quiet and bashful.
She is seen and not heard.
An English daughter.
Tho' she's far away now we re-
member her jolly ways.
Spanish is her Nemesis.
S"Book reports due, Fit/."
Gone but not forgotten.
A striking brunette.
Ant attractive maid.
"With eyes so blue."
"Hope beameth biriglter" when
she's around.
Our class president.
From Fort Davis.
She's truly an experienced
"orator."
Likes household arts.
Misnamed "Doleful Della."
Gentleness defined.
A shy blonde.
SOur aspiring literary genius.
Good in all things.
An eternal honor student.
A converted Balboa-ite.
A shorty from Gatun.
She surely can jazz the piano.
. She's never bored.


Edward Albin (Sp) .
James Albin ISpl
William Blauvelt (H. S. s
James Camplbell
l)an Coffey .
Ralph Crumn .
Frank Drake (Sp .
Edmund ;ishboughl
Robert Hanna. ,. .
Edward Henrique/ .
Charles Martin. .
Kenneth Maurer .
Victor Melendez.. .
Harold Mueller .. ..


Arthur Mulndherg .... .


W\illiami Newman
Valentine Pai neI
I lerbert Peterson
Martin Schmoll ...
Richard Sergeant (H. S. Si
I'red Stewart .


Beverley Turner. ..
John Whidden. .
Walter Wikingstad.....
Francisco Wong
Harry Davis
Joseph Davis i


Sle plays his jokes.
lie can he told from Edward.
. He has an ubiquitous smile.
"Silence is golden."
He has a crown of glorv.
A budding saxophonist.
"Peanut" in name only.
Unlike his name.
Musicallyinclined.
Algebra holds no perils for him.
Another swimming fiend.
Al ways on hand when needed.
He vaults lofty heights.
SA shlinig star in the swimming
pool.
.HIe has tile wanderlust in the
assembly .
"Eolr he's a iolly good fellow."
A pleasIant by and a good worker.
"Baseball Pctie."
SHe is wot "'Schmoll."
SEnglish is his joy.
Good things come in small pack-
ages.
He loves the brinr deep.
S"I was only easing you.
"W\icky" surely clan play baseball.
Never shirks.

SWhich is which!







24 THE CARIBBEAN.


1918.


LULA MAE PULLING I Mrs. J. B.)
Canal Zone.


COMAN, Cristobal,


MINOT Co'roON, 81 John Street, New York City.
'Al sincerest wishes for the 1927 CARIB-
BEAN and to its producers. Greetings also
to those of the class of '18 who may chance
to see these words."
SCSIE HARRISON, 2600 Reisterstown Road, Brit-
ton Hall, Apt. 4-B, Baltimore, Md.

CATHERINE \WAID, 451 West 23d Street, New
York City.

HBRKE \WWELCH, address unknown.

MARY VERNER, Chapel Hill, N. C.

1919.

DOROTH lV \WEIR F \lMr. John) MONTANVE, Cristo-
hal, Canal Zone.
"Au.fin I send grL.tinly, and best wishes
(this time from Cristobal) to the Class of
I.:-, the faculty, and students of Cristobal
High. I am very anxious for my copy of
THE CARIBBEAN, for I know it will be the
best ever."


OUR ME.SSAGE.
Cristobal High School is broadcasting good
wishes to you and her other Alumni, all of whom
she is so proud.
h\\h. rc are you? How are you?
In what work are you?
What word for the old school?
HELEN VINEYARD,
Alumni Editor.
THEIR M11-SAGES.


ALICE ARLENE BALI., 118 M:l;lla Avenue, Tacoma
Park, Md.
KENNETH EDWARDS, W\Illsi, v.. Pa.

JAMES RAYMOND, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

1920.

LINDAIE DAVIS, 336 Commonwealth Avenue,
Boston, MIiasi.

JACK B. FIELDS, Gua(.L.;M11 Diti t, Tela,
Honduras (in care of Tela Railroad).

KENNETH (REENE, Coudersport, Pa.

HARLAN HOLMWOOD, Balboa, Canal Zone.

ALSON SEARS, Balboa, Canal Zone. *

KAT.RVN B :(OON S'TEwART, Cristobal, Canal
Zone.
AIICE STII.SON, Colon, Republic of Panama.

IILLIAN Co'roN VAN \WA(;NER, 124 Elm Street,
Cranford, N. J.

AL I)OYLE, 501 Normandie Street, Pasadena,
Calif.
ETHA BF.:\ I, o., Balboa Heights, Canal Zone.








THE CARIBBEAN.


1921.
CARL DUEY, Box 95, Lemon City, Florida.
KIRBY FERGUSON, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
CHARLES HENTER, Coast Guard, Room I5,
Custom House, Norfolk, Va.
ALICE HUNTER (Mrs. L. A.) HOHN, Quantico, Va.

FRANK RAYMOND, 344 East i20th Street, New
York City.
"Am still in New York going to the
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Colum-
bia University. Finishing third year medi-
cine is as great a thrill almost as finislhinL: the
senior year in C. H. S. Miss the old school
as had as ever, so much so that I must see it.
I shall be in Cristobal this summer to get
my annuals personally."
ELEANOR ZIMMERMAN, 120 Kingsley Avenue,
Westerleigh, Staten Island, N. Y.
"I do want to see this year's CARIBBEAN as
I was very anxious to have last year's.
"I have been living on Staten Island for
nearly three years and like it very much.
I am very well and am working as a steno-
grapher in a wholesale and retail lumber
company. I enjoy the work very much.
"I wish the class of 1927 the best of luck
and hope they all succeed in their work."
1922.
GEORGE CARTWRI(;HT, I 9 Boyle Avenue, lTotowa
Borough, Paterson, N. J.
IDA BROWN (Mr, A. D.) DOxYLE, ;o0 Normandy
Street, Pasadena, Calif.
MARY GLENN FIE.LS, Balboa Heights, Canal
Zone.
LE ROY MIA(GNSON, Balboa, Canal Zone.
JORDAN ZINMERM ANN, 202 Walnut Place, Syra-
cuse, N. Y.
"I'm still at Syracuse working for my de-
gree from the C .ll..e, of Forestry. I shall
be graduated in January of next year-and
then to work! THE CARIBBEAN has my best
wishes for a successful year. From the
start, it looks very bright for the annual.
Give my best regards to all who know me-
I don't imagine, though, that there are man\
who do remember who Zim is."
MILDRED STAFFORD, 2702 Mitchell Avenue,
Tampa, Florida.
MR 5590 --4


EMMA TOWNsEND (\liv Robert) NOE, Gatun,
Canal Zone.
WESLEY TOWNSENI, Gatun, Canal Zone.
NIAJoRIE BALL, 118 Maple Avenue, Tacoma
Park, Md.
PAt L )DOLE, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
1923.
EDWARD IMAy, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
I am anxious to see the Annual for this
year, because, judging from the comments
I have heard from the student body, it must
be a fine one.
Please extend to the faculty and student
body my hearty greetings and to the gradu-
ating class my sincere wishes for wonderful
success in their future endeavors.
.OUISE HENTER, Sydenham Hospital, Baltimore,
Md.
"I have been graduated from the Philadel-
phia General Hospital for almost a year and
am now taking a post-graduate course in
communicable diseases at the Sydenham
Hospital here. \lv work is very interesting
and I am enjoying my-still rather new-
independence.
"You can't know how I felt when I received
the Alumni Editor's card. Actually, I
stopped breathing for a few minutes when I
first opened the envelope. What memories
that scene brought back to me. I could
feel the trade winds lift my hair back over
my ears and hear them swishing through the
palms. How many times I have eaten my
lunch (what was left of it by noon) on that
very wall and even (deep, dark secret) taken
my shoes and stockings off and jumped
from one sunken, half-submerged foundation
stone to another!
"I am afraid myn best wishes may be too
late (as usual) but what possible wish could I
give with more confidence in its perfect ful-
fillment than that you should have the best
CARIBBEAN ever!-though (and I just can't
resist this) we feel we have had a definite part
in making it the latest successful achieve-
ment of C. H. S."

GERALD BLISS, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

ERNEST ELI'HRAT, 3935 Burwood Avenue, South
Norwood, Cincinnati, Ohio.








THE CARIBBEAN.


HENRY M,'IRF. 449 Home ~\enut. Fort Wads-
worth, Staten Island, N. Y.

EMOGENE NASH :Mrs. E. S. VAN BENSCHOTEN),
F. A. S. FI rt Sill, Oklahoma.
"I am living here in Fort Sill and expect to
be here three more years. After that no one
knows.
"'RKlh:irdl Nash Van Benschoten was born
at the station hospital on February 15, 1927.
He surely takes all my time so I don't get
much work done.
"I have not had a CARIBBEAN since 1923,
the year I was graduated. But I am going
to have one this year. Am sure that it will
be very good, although they will have to
go some' to beat the one of '23. Best
wishes for the class of 1927, and may Cristo-
bal High School be v\r% proud of them as
they go out into the world.
Accept my heartiest congratulations on
having the honor to be graduated from
Cristobal High School."

MATTISON PULLING (Mrs. J. I).) McCAULEV,
Cristobal, Canal Zone.
"Here's hoping that the annual of this year
will be the best one-which means of course-
hustle!-especially to beat the one of '23.
1\v best wishes for the success of your year
book, and three cheers for C. H. S.!"
1924.
FLORENCE ALBERT, 59 Seaside Boulevard, Rose-
bank, Staten Island, N. Y.
"I have a complete set of CARIBBEANS
from 1920 and I should dislike \trn much to
have to break the series. 'M\ main reason
in not writing was the fact that what I have
been doing since I came to the States is
:ii,thini that would prove very interesting
to read, for one day has been exactly like
another.
"I remember that Miss Dodds told me once
that I should rclrtt haiing stayed out ot
school a year instead of going straight on to
college. I do. I r.vgrLt it more than I regret
.in\ rhine else I've done. I lost the habit and
now I'm at loose ends. One inl learns by
r[,ritnt., ,,II know, but I consider that
lesson an expensive one, because colllcut
trained men and women have a greater chance,
if not to succeed, at least to get the start on


the road to success. Cristobal High School
will always have a warm place in my heart.
Best wishes for the future."
GEORGE O\ .>, Fort Banks, Massachusetts.
IRENE MCCOURT (Mlrs. George) RIECHEL, 14
Islington Place, Jamaica, LongIsland,N. Y.
CHESTER PIKE, 2148 Acton Street, Berkeley, Calif.
EDITH COULBOURN SMITH, 717 Colonial Avenue,
Norfolk, Va.
DOROTHY ABENDROTH Mrs. Arthur) FLOOD,
Cristobal, Canal Zone.
JOSE AROSEMENA, 1209 Thirteenth Street, Wash-
ington, D. C.
CHARLOTTE HOUSE (Mrs. R. W.) MACSPARRAN,
Gatun, Canal Zone.
GLADYS LOWANDE (Mrs. C. 0.) BALDWIN, Cristobal.
Canal Zone.
MORRIS MARCHOSKEY,Colon, Republic ofPanama.
INZA I~RKH l.1, 494 Lake Avenue, Rochester,
N. Y.
"Mithcr sends me the papers now and
then-and by them I see C. H. S. is still on
top-more power to her, for I am sure she
can beat them all. Though I feel as if I had
been out a hundred years, I still have a
warm spot in my heart for that concrete
building on Colon Beach,
"As for me, I am the same-just as natural
as an old shoe. I work every day with the
telephone company and surely like it."
ETHEL SONNEMAN, 98 Mac-n Street, Brooklyn,
N. Y.
ANDREW SMITH, Box 2, Foster Route, Richmond,
Texas.
"If I had a million or so dollars, I should
do naught but travel from one race of people
to another, learning their customs and
languagnts, and collc'tiing the best of their
literature. Though I should die poor,
possibly a pauper with no place to lay my
head, I should be satisfied, because I should
have accomplished my aim. That may be
utterly selfish but my soul would be content,
I believe. Undoubtedly, some of my friends
think I, as a hobo, have most interest in the
schedule of a freight or pa~s:nger train, but
I am interested in any and every thing that
is done on the 'long trail'-the planting,
harvesting, and thrashing of the various








THE CARIBBEAN.


grains, sawmilling, mining, and a multitude
of other things I have seen accomplished or
have had a part in.
"The longer I am away, the fonder my
recollections of the Isthmus. I am a Zonian-
heart and soul a Gold-Sider. I wish you the
best of success, and happiness that multiplies
itself as each year you take a new set into
the fold."
1925.
RUTH HOPKINS, Panama City, Rep. of Panama.
RUTrH DUEY (lMrs. Spencer) LINcOLN, corner of
Putman Avenue and Putman Drive, Port
Chester, N. Y.
WILLIAM COUSINS, 2623 Oakford Street, Phil-
adelphia, Pa.
HELEN ABENDROTH, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
KATHERINE FISCHER, IO9 Sipple Avenue, Garden-
ville, Baltimore, \1,1.
"I am working in the pay-roll department
of a clothing factory. I enter, add, subtract,
multiply figures five .l.l%, of the week, and
on the sixth, I check back the work of the
girls who are short in their money earned.
It is tiring and figures are not ii ticr. tiiL'. but
Sunday are my own and so are holidays.
"Remember me to all the folks, and give
Cristobal mv best wishes for the year--for
success in athletics, and in school and social
affairs."
HUBERT LEE, 2211 Speedway, Austin, Texas.
OL;A ARCIA, Colon, Republic of Panama.
IOROTHY DEIBERT, Fort Sill, Okla.
ANNIEL HEIM Mr. J. H.) BRENCHICK, Cristobal,
Canal Zone.
"I have given up nursing and am now
happily married. I wish THE CARIBBE.AN of
'27 the best-I am sure it will be a good one."
HARRIET STEENBERG(, Langley Field, Va.
1926.
FEDNA DUVALL, 171I Martha Street, Cincinnati,
Ohio.
IRENE HOPKINS, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
"Here are my best wishes to you all and f r
the best CARIBBEAN ever."
MAURICE EGGLESTON, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
ELIZABETH WARREN, Florida State College for
Women, Tallahassee, Fla.


CLARICE STEENBERG, William and Mary College,
Williamsburg, Va. (after June, Langlev
Field, Hampton, Va.).
"That picture with all the wind-blown
palm trees is enough to make everyone weep
with homesickness. I reckon the best way
to let you know how much I think of my old
home and school is to tell you that the height
of ambition of every girl in this dormitory
is to go to Panama, just from the things
I've told them! Best of luck to '27.
RICHARD BEVERLEY, 2 18 St. Paul Street, Balti-
more, \1i.
WILLIAM CLINCHARD, 140 North Eleventh Street,
Lincoln, Nebr.
"Here I am a whole year out of C. IH. S.
though it seems only yesterday that I sat
in the front row of the assembly, rubbing
my luminous ivory knob sans hair, and
wishing that I could coax some into sight
by the famous hair restorer method. Boy!
those were the days, and I've wished many
times, since, that I had to do it over again.
"Now I am in the Iniversity of Nebraska
completing my first year of a pre-dental
course. Next year 1 start in on regular
dentist work and hope to continue until I
have received my degrees in a period of some
four more cars.
"In the near future I hope to see dear old
C. H. S. and I surely shall be glad to see
some of my old classmates of '26. 1 am
sending wishes for a happy and successful
year to the entire student body, my regards
to the faculty, congratulations to the class
of '27. Andi mav THE CARIBBEAN be even
better than that of '26."
HEI-EN.A )DECKMAN, Cristobal, Canal Z:,ne.
CARLOS PIL(GAR, (atun, Canal Zone.
Loi..L MIONz, Panama City, Republic of Panama.
RAlE FISCHER, 109 Sipple Avenue, Gardenville,
Baltimore, Mdl.
D)ELILAH MAY (Mrs. G. W.) PARKIER, G(aton,
Canal Zone.
\li, I i) NEELV, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
"Heartiest congratulations to the Class of
1927. May this year's CARIBBEAN lie the
best ever."
HILDE(ARDE B1I.TrHE, Landham-Bouncc X ray
Clinic, Atlanta, (a.










GAY R. TL R\XR, Randolph-Macon \\rni;an's
Cullegte, LI nchburg, Va.
"I'm up here at R. M. trying to make
some kind of a record, and I'm 'working
like a trooper' and just managing to get
through. It really is quite an experience
though, and we do have some dandy times
d,,ing all the things that college girls are
said to do-and some more besides.
"I long for the 'old school' just the same.
Sometimes it seems impossible to stand being
aw:l\ from there. 1\ world still centers
around Cristobal High School, and I love to
hear of all you are doing. I hope to be at
home for Commencement. MI\ roommate
and I quarrelled this evening because I said
the two months left before I get home seem
longer than nine months seemed when I
came up. They do!
"NinTlcen hundred twenty-seven, we're
expecting great thing,, of you. Don't dis-
appoint us!"
HELEN J. KEENE, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
"You all know what a very good opinion
I have of Cristobal High School-so why
make me show my inability to express myself
l,,..:,i,',.,'? I have seen the play, and, as
you have probably been told a hundred times
or more, it was very, very good, and I must
say that I was greatly surprised by some
I c'.ik, although I certainly knew better than
to be that when I knew that Miss Dodds was
behind it.


"Before I had anything much to do with
an annual (especially having my own 'master-
pieces' published) I marvelled at the ability
of the Seniors; when I was a Senior (I insist
on spelling it with capital 'S') I wondered
at our ability; and now I am anxious to see
what other Seniors can do, but I need not be
anxious any more for I am sure that I shall
not be disappointed with the 1927 CARIB-
BEAN.
"Christopher Columbus! You asked me
to tell you where I am, how I am, and what
I am doing, and in all this nonsense I haven't
answered one question. Well, I am still
residing in Cristobal-in body at least.
Next, I am feeling fit for anything except
another attack by an Alumni Editor. Lastly
I am working as a stenographer for United
Artists' Corporation, Cristobal, Canal Zone,
Bastante?
M\ very best wishes to Freshmen, Sopho-
mores, Juniors, Seniors, and Faculty."
JOHANNA KLEEFKENS, Staten Island Hospital,
Staten Island, N. Y.
"Once more C. H. S. is to send forth a
class of which she is proud. Congratulations
to the graduating class and my best wishes
to the dear Alma Mater-C. H. S. I know
THE CARIBBEAN of '27 will be the best ever-
even though '26 was before you."
CHRISTIAN WIRTZ, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
WILLIAM COFFEY, Cristobal, Canal Zone.


Wind-swept Palm Trees on Colon Beach.


T'HE: CAR ] BI- AN.








THE CARIBBEAN.


-


Loitire Ikeiim, 27, Litereirv Editor.


A \1IY' I- RY


tAwarded Highest Honors in 192- 1927, Short Story Contest.)


"Eight-Bunch Bunch-Bunch-Eight-Seven
Seven-Seven-Bunch-Bunch. Heh! Throw that
one out. It's old. Eight-Bunch. Heh! Speed
up with that fruit! We have to--Bunch-Eight-
get it loaded by-Bunch-three o'clock. Eight
Seven-Six-Six. Whose fruit is that? Six-Seven-
Joe Haynes? Eight-I thought so. Bunch Six
Six-Bunch-Seven. Is that the last stem in that
barge?"
"Yas, Sah."
"Bring number 867 next."
"A'right, Cap."
Bill Harrison, a big six-footer, as muscular as an
ox, and as strong as an elephant, was th,lkii._
fruit on board the United Fruit steamerBowden,
which lay at anchor on Gatun Lake. He was a
picturesque figure in his Army pants, high top
boots, blue shirt, and big five-gallon Stetson with a
couple of bullet holes in it. He was sitting on the
rail watching the icL' r.i pass the bananas from
the barges into the hold of the boat and listening
to their conversation, which pertained to everything
under the sun.
All at once he heard the put-put-put of a motor
boat.
"Jos6, call that boat."
"Yas, sah! Jane West, Jane West, come here
and wait fo dis barge."
Then Bill again, "Heh, Al, come on up out of
that smoky cabin."
SPayment for stern, of bananas is lb.ti ed o, th number of han. s
a stem contains. "Bunch" means nine or more hirdrs,.


"All right! Wait until I get my hat-my hel-
met, you know." For Al Deering, a mechanic for
the United Fruit Company, was seldom seen with-
out his dirty sun helmet which had long sin:e seen
its day.
"Aw, leave the hat. Some day I'm going to
dump it."
"Never mind the hat. It suits me."
"All right, get a move on you and for gosh sakes,
don't stop to tinker with some piece of machinery
along the way."
A moment later the squat, helmeted Al was on
the deck beside Bill.
"Well, oul old banana bug, what Vou gotta
say ?"
"I can't figure it out, Al."
"Figure out what?"
"Of course you have the same thing on Votur
mind as I have?"
"About the disappearance of that fruit? Think
of it! Eight hundred stems. No stump could
sink three barges full of bananas and not leave a
few floating around."
"No, 1 guess not, and '"'.,klni of bananas, I've
heard some things about that new plantation oppo-
Bananas from Gatun Lake r ..: re brought down from the in-
terior by barges from about i. r, to about eight -five et in
ii, Ti e I ... -ry from one hundred to two tllousand five
......1. ,1 1 ,,, I I ..1 .... Tr I 1 .... .. and costly work on acco lnt
of n e ded tree in ti lae l e I 1. ', punch holes in the bottoms
Iof tle motor boats or the btrges and cluse them to sink. It costs a
large sium of money to raise a lunkeln boat. There have been four
or five motor bolts lsnk inside of six montik on ;Gatun Lake.


I
M1


0


i~a~s~r~-9








IlFIE C.ARl BB[-..AN.


site Cafia Saddle. which belongs to Jos6 Cerveza,
that old Mcxican bandit leader."
"Say, Bill, what do you say we go up there Sun-
day and look the place over and see what we can
find out and do about the disappearance of that
fruit."
"All right."
Sunday came with engines popping and boats
running around the docks picking up barges and
placing them in their right positions.
"W which one are you going on, Al?"
"On the Jane West. Come on along."
"All right. Got your six-shooter?"
"Yeh! How about the grub?"
"O. K. We have to get off at an island near
Cafia Saddle."
Soon they were off on the sturdy launch, Jane
West, with its tow of barges which were to be
distributed at various stopping places. While some
of the barges were being dropped at Escobal, the
two friends visited a little cantina, where they sat
chatting for a time with some natives whohadcome
in from their little farms to sell their bananas.
It was at Escobal that the only excitement of the
trip occurred. On going over to where the tow was
tied up, Al saw a man struggling in the water. He
slipped off his clothes and jumped in, rescuing a
drowning Spaniard whom they knew well as Pedro
Fraser. Pedro decided to "throw in" with Al and
Bill. As he was a good man in the jungles, they
were glad to have him.
They went about a mile to Joe Close's place and
asked him if they could camp on his farm. Per-
mission was speedily granted because Bill had
done many errands for Mr. Close.
Early Ml,ndla morning Bill started out.
"How about taking Pedro? He's a good bush
man."
"N,, I want to go, by myself."
"All riuht' What time will you be back?"
"About nine o'clock to-night."
"Why so late and lIIni;'"
"Oh, I have a hunch. You remember while we
were in Escobal, I was talking to a subbuyer?"
"Yeh! What about it?"
)h, tell you later."
And when Bill left f ,r Cafia Saddle, Al and Pedro
started lhi. inu Bl.a k Jack on top of a milk box.
But before I,,nu
Ca4la Sddle i the only other place beride-a (,atun where I 1111
or1 any 1 i wai neede-l i thr co h tru tion of Gatun Lake. "lldi. r,
I., r gu;rl it l during war lime. It i a tout fifteen miles from
.n ,Ilh


"Pedro, let's go and look over Close's farm and
see how the bananas are. This is too exciting."
"Bueno, Sefior."
"Let's go down that left trail. This section was
evidently planted about two months ago. The
shoots are just coming up. Be about six months
before Close will get any bananas from here.
Well, let's go into this section that's bearing. I
wonder why Close doesn't cut out the water suck-
ers. They absorb all the water that is needed for
the other shoots. And the old stalks that have
borne their bananas' should be cut out. Pedro,
here's one that has the blight.5 In this case it-is
best to dig up the tree and burn it with lime, isn't
it?"
"Si, Sefior."
"Aw, heck! Let's sit down under that tree and
talk a while. I have seen so many bananas that
I am tired of them. I can't eat bananas any more.
It makes me sick."
They sat talking for over two hours on different
subjects.
"It's about twelve o'clock. Let's go back to
camp and get some dinner."
"Bueno, Seior. Vamonos."
There was the rattling of pots and pans for
about fifteen minutes-then the sizzling of bacon
and eggs over a hot camp fire. Then dinner was
ready.
"Let's take the cai uc.a and go down and explore
the dam and the old iron barge the Government
left when building the dam-that is, if the cayuca
hasn't disappeared."
Buen,, Senor. Pues, dame los caneletes -pad-
dles) y una soga (rope)."
"Bueno, Sefior."
"Pedro, do you know anything about the dis-
appearance of those bananas that the Fruit Com-
pany lost?"
Pedro hesitated but a moment. Thenheplunged
with seeming relief into a long story about how his
brother, who was an engineer on Jose Cerveza's
schooner, Maria S, did not understand how his
employer was getting bananas to ship to Colon
when his farm had just been planted about two
months before.
Al interrupted the story.
"Pedro, will you get me that pretty orchid?"
'A stalk bears only I stem of bananas. A "tree" usually has from
3 to 6 stalks.
.No cure h ia been found for the insidious blight.







THE CARIBBEAN.


"Si, Sefor." Pedro began clambering up one
of the many dead trees in Gatun Lake's dying
jungle.
"Here's a machete. What's the matter?"
Pedro was so much excited that he couldn't get
the orchid and nearly fell out of the old tree. Al
went up in his turn and discovered, tied to three
stumps but a short distance away, the three lost
barges.
"Come, let's paddle over and explore them"
"Vamonos."
"We'll have to tell Bill about this."
They went over and explored the barges but
could not find any clue as to the mystery.
"Pedro, let her float. Don't paddle. I want to
think a while."
They floated around :iinr im the stumps forabout
an hour. Pedro wassound asleep when Al decided
it was time to get back tocamp. When they arrived
there, they found Bill making a fire.
"When did you get here?"
"Just about five minutes ago."
"What did you find?"
"Not a thing that amounts to anything. I'm
sure the old iron barge has some connection with
this mystery. But all I could find in the whole
day's search was some mule tracks. It seemed to
me that the tracks leading from the barge were
heavier than those going toward it, but I'm not


much of a detective. Did you take a snooze? If
so, I hope you didn't dream about a heavy supper
of canejo, tapir, or deer, for I didn't bag a thing."
"Well, Pedro and I bt.iL'eIc the three lost barges."
"What! ?!"
"Yep." Then he told his story of how they had
found the barges and what he thought had hap-
pened.
When he had finished, Bill was excited.
"That fits in with my theory. Here's what I
think happened. I think Jos6 Cerveza is behind all
of it. I think he sent up a man to work for us, and
his job was to cut loose the barges from the rest of
the tow. These barges would float to the edge of
the channel, and a man would come out in a motor
boat and tow them to the old iron barge where
Jos's men would load them on mules and carry
them to his place to be shipped to Colon."
"That's it exactly. Pedro, get a light and get
the cayuca ready, while I make a lunch. When
we reach Escobal, I'll go wake Ram6n and get
him to take us to Gatun, while you get the con-
spirator that let the barges loose. We have to
work fast, though."
The gang was caught and sent to Gamboa
penitentiary for ten years.
As a reward Al was made master mechanic.
Bill refused the managership until Al bought a
new sun helmet.


ONE OF LIFE'S LITTLE TRAGEDIES.
.'urse 7. Tayl/r, 7r., '27.


Fernando strode firmly out on the beach and
headed for "N.nilrc." The morning sun shone
bright and sparkling, and each la:iiiLhin,_ wave that
surged on to the beach gave up its life joyously in
tiny twinklings. The fresh, clean sea breeze
whipped the palms and made lively tattoos among
the jungle shrubs along the beach. All in all,
thought Fernando, it was a happy world. Here
he was, on his way to town to buy that bright
new machete with money he had saved over a
period of months. Ah, would not Maria be pleased
with the money he'd get cutting bananas with
that machete! Fernando thought she would.
Ah, the store!-that enticing place of luxuriously
displayed apparel, of tempting, shiny tools, of
bright guns, and, last of all, of beautiful machetes!
Self consciously Fernando edged up to the
counter. Scratching his leg and squirming about,
he waited for the Chinaman to serve a customer.
At last, "A machete?"


"Yes, a machete."
"You wishee dis one!"
\ ., the big one on the right. That's it."
Again Fernando was in the open air. The morn-
ing was twice as beautiful. Was not life wonder-
ful? Crossing the reef, Fernando suddenly heard a
call for help. Turning, he saw a tiny child in the
grip of a fairly large octopus. Skillfully he threw
his machete, the bright, shiny machete, and silent-
ly it slid into the slithering creature. The child was
free. Across the reef raced an anxious mother and
numerous praising relatives. Their praise and
thanks fell on deaf ears while Fernando thought of
a bright new machete slowly sinking into the
ooze of the ocean's bottom.
Across the bay came a rumble of thunder. The
sun slid behind a huge cloud bank. Long trembling
fingers of lightning flicked. Fernando trudged
home in the rain.







3: THE CARIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN.


ISLA SOLA.
Teresa K. Gallagher, '27.
(First-Senior English Class.)


Just a tiny village on an island far off the path
of ships that ply back and forth across the vast
Pacific-a village made up of forty native huts,
a large wooden community building, and a stone
church-that was Isla Sola-Lone Island. It
was buried island too, for the inhabitants were the
living dead-dead to all near and dear to them.
They were lepers-unclean-no longer desired in
the outside world.
Half a century before, the first inhabitants had
arrived. They were just six, four men and two
women. Since then, the village had grown to its
present size of nearly two hundred men and women.
Ten years after the arrival of the first boat load
of inhabitants for Isla Sola, Father O'Brien
had come. He was just a young man, but recently
ordained, who, in his unselfish eagerness to serve
God, had chosen this gruesome island as the place
where he would fulfill his duties.
It was the kind and patient Father O'Brien
who had supervised the making of the rugs, mats,
baskets, and other articles of weaving. It was he
who had taught them to read that they might pass
the dull hours in reading the few books and mag-
azines which the infrequent boats had brought.
He had never told them that the oil stove, which
was the greatest luxury of the village, and the
flower seeds which helped so much in brightening
what would have been plain dreary-fronted huts,
had been purchased with his own meager funds
from the boats which came out of their paths into
the little bay to drop their packets into the Isla
Sola lighter.
The small church that stood at the edge of the
lively stream, surrounded by palms and tropical
flowers, would always stand as a monument to the
priest who had built it. It was just a small church
made of stones that had been carried from the other


side of the island. In the belfry there was the bell
from a ship that the sea had tossed up on the shore.
Infinite care had been taken with the altar, and
the hand-carved cross was a piece of work fit for a
museum. No wonder that the good man who had
worked incessantly for those people had learned
to love them very dearly, and that they returned
the deep feeling of affection.
To-night there were gathered around the camp
fire, as had been the evening custom ever since
Father O'Brien had come, all the inhabitants of
the village. But now they were not jolly and talk-
ative. Everything was quiet. Everyone looked
silently at the flames darting into the air. Only
the cracking of the woodand coals broke thesilence.
It was Father O'Brien's last night with his people
and the work that he had learned to love so dearly.
He had been ordered to another parish, for his
Bishop felt that he needed a change after so many
years of faithful work. He stood up; he was going
to say a few words of farewell; but he choked, and
tears flooded his eyes. He sat again. He could
not even say good-bye to his friends. His head
was bowed, and with his left hand he thoughtfully
sifted the sand.
Suddenly with a cry of amazement and joy, he
leaped up and held out to the astonished group a
red hot coal. In a flash the truth dawned on them,
and all joined in the shouts of joy. Father O'Brien
held in his left hand a red hot coal, and he did not
feel its heat. He had become a leper.
Their shouts of joy turned to sighs of sorrow, for
the dear Father had earned a rest and was
anxious to return to see his sisters and brothers.
Then once again they were jubilant, for the dear
old priest, all smiles, assured them that he was
overjoyed, that now he would always stay with
his friends on Isla Sola.


CHRISTMAS IN PANAMA.
7ohn (. Nelson, '27.
On Wednesday, January 5, I attended the mo- here. Moreover, people instead of ii infl thought-
tion picture entertainment at Fort Davis. In ful enough to send Christmas cards early enough
the Pathe News was a message from the post- to pass on, let them arrive through at least half of
master general of the U. S. A., urging the public January. Presents may be expected, it seems, any
to mail early for Christmas. Now that is only one time the year through, except at Christmas.
example of the punctuality of Christmas down Christmas in Panama is slow but lastsalong time.
MR 5590-5


H 8


~iHXGiI







34 THF CARIBBEAN.


AN L'NEXPECTED RE\\ARD.
Helen Vineyard, '27.
(Second-Senior English Class.)
-- -*


F


It all happened unexpectedly as most great
things do. The Panaman Government had
offered a prize of two hundred and fifty dollars
for the best developed report on Panama. The
teacher of the social problems class, in order to
co-operate and to familiarize her students with the
history cf their surroundings, told each pupil in
the class to develop a long report on some historical
hi ilding of Papama. Clifton had been assiLned a
certain old cathedral in Panama City. Search as
he v, uId, he cold not for the life of him find a
history, almanac, magazine, or encyclopedia
which even so much as mentioned the name of the
cathedral. But at last a frien i of his came to the
rescue, as friends Lsually do. He told Clifton of
the library in the Municipal Building in Colon.
He saidhe had seen several volumes on Panama in
it, and st.uEggs'-c that Clifton look there for help.
The next day being Saturday, Clifton. went
down to the library about eight o'clock but found
to his st rprise that it would not open before
nine. He waited around a while until, after what
seemed ages, the doors were opened.
He entered breathlessly and glanced around the
room. From the door all the way around the room
were huge shelves filled with thick books. Clifton
was so bewildered and excited hedidn'tknowwhere
to begin first, but he decided that the best thing
to do was to start at the right of the door and keep
seemed going in that direction.
He began with the top shelf and took down
eicrr volume, but found to his surprise that not
even one so much as mentioned the cathedral's
name. "Well," thought Clifton, "perhaps the
next shelf will bring better luck." So he earnestly
set to work. Now after Clifton had searched every
shelf but the lower one, he was a miuhti tired boy.
The perspiration was running off his face; his
hands were dusty from handling the books, some
of which had never been off the shelf since first
placed there. Oh, how his back ached and how
hungry he was!
'Ihere was jost one more shelf. "Guess I'll
have to give it up," thot ght Clifton, but the vision
of the two hundred and fifty dollars came before
him. He just couldn't give that up-so he set to
work with new courage.


How dirty they were! Each book seemed older
and more .!rimv than the last The covers were so
thick with dust that Clifton had to use his hand-
kerchief to wipe them off so he could read the
titles.
At last he reached the other side of the room.
Just a few mo:e to be searched! Hedrewout huge
volume and wearily opened its covers, but it was
written in some kind of queer numerals. Clif'on
with disgust shoved the book back in place
hard. He heard a peculiar ring and then the book
seemed to be shoved once again in his lap. "Well!
Some-hing's wrong, but what it is is more than I
can figure out-especially on an empty stomach!"
He glanced down, however, to where the book had
been and, to his uttermost surprise, found a
small opening and in it a book.
Carefully he took out the volume. How mil-
dewed it was! The cover, which had been a bright
red, was now a faded old brown. The pages were
damp, yellow, and mildewed, and stuck together.
It must have been almost centuries since the little
volume had been opened.
After turning a few pages of the Spanish
printing, Clifton was astonished to find several
times mention of the name of the cathedral and,
on one page, a picture of it. Delighted. Clifton
took the book to the librarian and asked for per-
mission to borrow it. "Perhaps I can get some of
my friends to translate some of it for me." The
librarian seemed bewildered.as he gazed at the
book which Clifton placed in his hands. He began
to speak excitedly in Spanish, gesticulating frantic-
ally, and poor Clifton became so frightened and
nervous that he didn't know whether to run home
or get the police. He was about to carry out the
former idea when the librarian detained him. He
asked Clifton to tell him all about his discovery of
the book.
Cliftn, still bewildered, explained how he had
found the book and why he wanted it. After the
astonished librarian had gained enough breath,
he told Clifrri that he had won the sum of one
thousand dollars.
It seemed that this book contained a valuable
plan telling of a secret passage into the old cathe-
dral where a great treasure had been hidden- For








THE CARIHBH 4N.


years search had been made for the priceless book
in all the libraries, book stores, and museums in
the Republic of Panama. The search had seemed
hopeless, for though several rewards had been


offered, no one had ever come to claim them-
"until to-day" thought Clifton. "I'll bet my
paper will be the most valuable in the social prob-
lems class!"


PANAMA'S VISITORS.
Cretchen W. Palm, '29.
(First placc-Junior English Class.)


"Good-night! Ding dang! Do I have to wear
these short pants and rainbow-colored baby

"Yes, you most certainly do. All the elite society
wear golf clothes. Hurry now, Alex. Your sister
and I are ready to go."
Half an hour later a rather short, pompous man
of florid countenance joined his wife, Mrs. Alex-
ander Trevaine, and his sister, Leslie, on the deck
of the Santa Marta which was slowly dr:iulu in up
to Dock Six at Cristobal. Mrs. Trevaine was
attired in the "latest" from Paris, an ensemble
which included a pair of fawn-colored gloves. (It
might suddenly become chilly in Panama! One
can never tell!) Once on the dock, "los viajeros,"
after finding their "land legs," strolled toward
Colon, through Steamship Road, where the im-
portant shipping companies' offices are situated,
and thence to the Government commissary.
There, Mr. Alex, after having seen numerous
boat companions wearing the hated golf costume
and helmets, decided to complete his outfit with
one of "them white duck hats." They were so
"distinguishing like" he thought. Upstairs his
wife, with the air of a "hardened tourist" was
veiinl\ looking for the cameo shade of Phoenix
hosiery that Mrs. Reginald Vanderbilt always
wore. On the contrary, Miss Leslie was very
much interested in the displays of colorful kimonos
and Coolie coats.
*
After roaming through the foreign stores on
Front Street, Miss Leslie bought herself a
Panama hat, and some ivory and Satsuma trinkets
for her best friends. I r-. Trevaine, however, even
though she had bought a Canton luncheon set,
which she said "was far superior to Mrs. Van
Leeder's back home," was quite exasperated at all
Colon because she could not purchase Ivory soap
or cameo-colored hosiery in any of the ( ','.'
shops.


"See here, Alexander, Ieslie does not wish to
buy anything more and I haven't been able to find
anything else that I want so now I'm going into this
Hindu store to buy you a cane."
"Wait a minute, Janice, nothing doing-Wait
until I'm old and gray."
"It's the style, you know! Kuppenheimer's ad-
vertisements always include a cane in the costume
of a well-dressed man."
To the Hindu clerk awaiting her orders, "Now-
a-hem, do you have any walking canes, stylish?
Yes, carved a bit on the head."
"What-carved on the head! Poor me!-When
I get on board ship, that cane's going swimming
overboard."
"Ssh-Alex. Yes, that is lovely, of native
mahogany? Fine-and so fashionable; it will
look positively stunning with your suit. Five
dollars? That's pretty much, isn't it? Make it
four. No. Your best price, four fifty ? Im--um
- all right."
M.iir..hil., Miss Leslie, who had been peering
curiously around the shop, had come upon an
object which interested her greatly. "My! what
is that?"
The Hindu nearby replied, "That, madam, is a
shrunken human head."
"What! Good gracious-from where? Whose
head is it?"
"You can see by the features that it is a man's
head. There are certain Indian tribes in Ecuador
who practice this custom; when an Indian has an
enemy, he kills him and presto-cuts offhisheai,
shrinks it with hot sand by a process known only
to that tribe, and keeps it as a sort of trophy of his
victory."
"M1! how interesting-and it is so small, no
larger than a man's fist, and the skin and hair
left exactly as when the man was alive-only
shrunken. They are gruesome though! Io you
sell them ?"


a


I(hX~Ik


E g S !!!!!!!!i!!^ !!!! !!!!!!!! !!. !_ ,J !iP. ..... ,---








THE CARIBBFAN.


"Yes, madam. This one is four hundred fifty
dollars, t',r you understand that these heads are
verr valuable."
"Yes! I should like to have one, for I am inter-
ested in such novel things. You said that these
tribes are called head hunters. Just plain canni-
bals, in other words, I s'pose. \\ll, how did people
get these heads if the tribes are so fierce? Stole
them! I see! Yes, I'll take one."
*
'N Alc \, carry the cane and use it correctly."
"Holy Mses' Say, it's two-thirty now. We're
going riding. O-ho, there! Come on, ladies. The
Rolls-Royce awaits us."
"Look, folks, what I've bought. It's the head of
some poor fellow who was the enemy of an Indian
in Ecuador. Feel that hair. Just like yours,
Janice."
"Oh- h- -hi.w could you, Leslie. How terribly
hideous-Ooh, I'm going to dream of that
tonight. W\hat-?"
"I said that the Hindu in the shop told me after
I had bought it, that, as they were stolen, if ever
the owner of the head saw you and knew that you
had that certain head, he would probably take
very drastic measures to get it. And say" (here
Leslie winked at Alk\i, "did you notice that dark
sinister looking man standing outside the door of
that Hindu shop? Do you know he seemed to
watch me when I was buying this head and he
looked so curiously at us when we left. You saw
him, Alex-!"
"Yes, I did notice him," responded Alex. "And
I was just thinking that that fellow in that rig
behind us looked like him."
"Oh, dear-," cried \Mrs. Trevaine, "now look
what you've gotten us into-oh dear! I wonder
who it was!-Of course, it wasn't a cannibal-but
Leslie, Leslie, wh% did you do such a thing?
It's perhaps tnaid'at! to have such things in your
possession. That man might have been some sort
of detective. Hurry and get this drive over so


that I can get back on board the ship where I'll
at least be safer than in this place."
Even Leslie began to wonder whether there
might be something to the story she had made up,
for twice again, during the course of their ride
through Colon and Cristobal, they saw this same
man riding after them in a coach. The third time
he appeared to be frantically waving for them to
stop, and, Mrs. Trevaine, having such a "delicate
nervous disposition" as she had lately told Alex,
was, in reality, frightened and ordered the driver
to use all speed toward the dock.

"Back once more, ladies. Ten minutes to wait
before the boat leaves. Were you afraid of the
'cannibals' Janice ?" asked Mr. Trevaine, teasingly,
"Keep still! I was tired and wanted to get back.
None of your silliness."
Five minutes later, the "cannibal" came on the
dock, and, peering anxiously up at the deck, where
quite a few people were standing, saw the Tre-
vaines, and waved to attract their attention. The
"cannibal" proved to be a Hindu, and, hurrying
to Leslie, he explained his curious actions. He
was a partner in the store where Leslie had bought
the shunken head and after she had left, he had
realized that his co-worker had sold her a head
which had been particularly reserved for some one
else. The Hindu thought that Miss Leslie would
like another head which he had with him in ex-
change. "Would that be all right?"
Leslie agreed, and with that the man left, after
having apologized profusely for the mistake. Fel-
low voyagers crowded around.
-'My dear Mrs. Trevaine, where did you get tjat
interesting curio?"
"Oh, Leslie and I bought it. I thought it would
be so interesting to have in the house that I urged
her to get it. Such novelties have always appealed
to me."
Alex, aside to Leslie, merely said, "Bunk."


WILLIAM, THE BUS DRIVER.
Helen Vineyard, '27.


From six in the mi rnintg until six at night
\\illinm. the bus driver, makes his rounds, from
New Cristobal to the "Commy" and back-al-
ways in his neat khaki suit, clean shirt, black tie,
cap, and black shoes.
Is he jll ( iih, yes!-the best natured and
most .,, .mnri, Il..iin fellow you ever met-
always r-,vrl to greet one with a smilk from his


thick, black lips, showing a solid row of gold
teeth.
Some say he is married because he is so happy and
looks well fed, but I don't believe it. How many
times a day doesn't an interested maid give
William an Eskimo pie, a slice of cake, or an
apple for bringing her mistress' packages home?
And sweets are fattening.








THE CARIBBEAN.


I(9~a


For several years, Rover, the large tan Airedale,
had the honor, as official mascot, of wearing on his
leather collar a brass plate on which was inscribed
in large letters:
ROVER-CRISTOBAL COALING STATION.
He could not be expected to realize that this
largest bunker coaling plant in the worli, which
coaled so many ships from all parts of the globe,
cost three million dollars and is one of the most
important projects of the United States Govern-
ment on the Canal Zone. He did know, however,
that he liked it very much, especially when the
steamers were coaling.
Each morning he would ride to work with his
master in the coaling station bus and would return
with him at noon and in the evening. Although
Rover thoroughly disliked water, he would swim,
when the launches were not running, across the old
French Canal to Mindi Island,on which the coaling
station is built.
His friendly manner to everyone from the super-
intendent down to the colored water boys made
him a great favorite. His deep brown trustful eyes,
matching his dark, tan, shaggy coat, seemed almost
to speak. Underneath that rough coat was a great
affection for his friends, at home and at the coaling
plant.
Rover had learned how to climb adeptly a verti-
cal ships ladder by hooking his forepaws over the
rungs. He had a propensity for visiting the
steamers when they were at the coaling plant,
always with the intention of roving to the ship's
galley, where he would induce the cook to give him
some scraps of meat or hone.
One after on after Rover had stopped playing
tug-of-war with Wolf, the superintendent's hand.
some police dog, he decided to go aboard the S. S.
7Tagris of the Roland Line, which was t.il.;ni, coal-
Happily oblivious of the noise of the lofty reload-
ing towers high above him, Rover hastened to the
ship. After trotting up the steep gang plank, he
was soon begging the amiable cook for something
to eat. When the kind-hearted man saw how
quickly a few scraps disappeared, he gave Rover a
fine, generous beef bone, which was what Rover
liked.


While he was earnestly engaged in keeping the
bone firm between his large paws as hegnawedon it,
the loading of the coal ceased, and the coal handlers
began to go ashore. Soon the lines that held the
ship to the dock were being loosened preparatory
to departure, but the coal handlers, probably
believing the dog safe ashore, gave no thought to
Rover as they left the ship. The cook had for-
gotten the shaggy dog, chewing a bone in a dark
corner, and long before Rover was aware of it, the
steamer had left the coaling station and was on its
way out of Colon harbor.
Soon the peculiar motion of the ship ;iffe. red
Rover, who realized that something unusual had
happened. Suddenly he ran from the galley to the
deck where he was dismayed to finid-not the
familiar coaling plant-but instead a broad ex-
panse of blue water on every side. The break-
water of huge concrete blocks passed by him before
he fully realized what had happened. The cook,
who had been extremely surprised to see the dog
appear, told the captain immediately, but the
pilot had already returned to Cristobal, and the
only thing to do was to take Rover, the stowaway,
to Europe.
When Rover did not appear on the evening of
the departure of the Tagris, his master thought his
pet had gone home earlier in the afternoon as he
frequently did, but to his surprise the dog was
not there to greet him. A few days after Rover's
disappearance, it became evident that the affec-
tionate Airedale, everyone's friend, was gone.
His master diligently searched all Colon and Cris-
tobal, and Rover's many friends were constantly
looking for the fr:. In. pet they missed so much.
The police were notified of Rover's disappearance,
and people were questioned for information. Many
false reports were given by colored employees who
claimed that they had seen him in various places
in Colon. After weeks of futile searching failed to
bring any clue of his mysterious disappearance,
his friends gave up hope of ever seeing him again.
Meanwhile Rover missed his old associates and
the pleasant life in Cristobal and wished that
he were at home, for his roving nature did not
extend as far as actually taking long ocean voyages


1<(,\-F ,'l H l- Rl I V R









. THE C.RIBBF.AN.


alone. Not only was he lonesome, but he did not
like the unpleasant motion of the steamer. Then
too, he could not understand the German language,
though ere long he learned to obey commands
spoken in German, and became very intimate with
all the officer-. Twenty-three danv of this strange
life passed. The weather had grown cooler. Rover
had begun to feel uncomfortable because he had
alw avs lived in the tropics. Then the liner ap-
proached Hamburg, Germany, where she stayed
in port for ten days. This gave Rover a fine opp:rr-
tunity to forget the cold in touring the city. After
srNppingi at several ports, the Tagris docked at
Antwerp, Belgiuim, for a few hours before sailing
for Panama. Rover, true to his name and nature,
was extremely anxious to go ashore for a visit,
and, when he had a chance, he took shore leave
without attracting anyone's notice.
After covering more ground than a Cook's tour,
Rover decided that he had seen enough of Ant-
werp, but it took him longer to return than he had
expected, for he was confused by the bustle and
noise of the busy seaport. As the chimes of the
great Antwerp Cathedral were striking five, he
reached the pier where he had left the S. S. Tagris.
Seeing no familiar steamer, he ran to the next
dock, but the Tagris was not there either. Then
he realized that the steamer had already gone with-
out him.
When the captain of the Tagris saw Rover run
wildly up the dock which he had just cleared, he
radioed to the master of an inrinL'iinll steamer, the


S. S. Sebaris, which, in a few Jays, would follow
to Panama, asking him to pick up Rover and take
him to the Cristobal Coaling Station.
When the second captain docked, he looked for
Rover even though he did not knowhis appearance,
his ownership, nor his history. He found Rover in
charge of the superintendent of docks, who was
\vcr reluctant to part with such an intelligent,
friendly dog.
In a few days the Sebaris sailed from Antwerp
with Rover on board bound for Cristobal, Panama.
The crew on this steamer also enjoyed Rover's
pleasant companionship. When the weather grew
warmer and more tropical, Rover had a premon-
ition that he was going home. He knew! Now
he did not mind so much the stormy nights when
he had to brace himself underneath the captain's
sofa to keep from sliding around the room. When
the liner at last approached the harbor at Cristobal,
and began to near the well-known coaling station,
he could hardly contain hisjoy. He was at home!
And at the coaling station, waiting anxiously for
him who had made a round trip to Europe, were
his master, his family, and many of his old friends
who had just heard from the S. S. Tagris a few
days before that he was coming on the Sebaris.
So Rover returned triumphantly to Cristobal
after crossing the Atlantic for a stay of over three
months in Europe. His roving had taught him,
as it does everyone, that there is no place like
Home, Sweet Home (especially if it's Cristobal),
for now Rover never voluntarily boards a steamer.


A FABLE.
Ethel Barnett, '29.
(Second place-Junior I-ni.ih Class.)
INTRODUeIOrlx. The kind that has no foes.
Beside the Caribbean Sea He dusted off his gorgeous shell
There is a long stone wall; Of gray and brown and blue,
Though older than it used to be, For he was going out to see
It's fine and strong withal. A lady crab he knew.
But in its holes and crevices As he came up from out his home
A race of crabs doth dwell; (A large and mossy rock)
These crabs are well-behaved and still, He heard some voices from above-
And know these precincts well. A pair strolled on the walk.
The sea wall's rather low, but broad; The crab cared not; he knew these folk,
It's twixtt sea and a walk, This race of humans, well.
And couples .,r.,ll.ne by at night He also knew the silly things
Sit down on it and talk That they would nightly tell.
He clambered up upon the walk
SHF. FAB.LE ITSELF. And gazed out at the scene,
'pon a lovely moonlight night, Full many couples were in sight,
A handsome crab arose. For a lover's moon was queen!
He was the kind that all crabs love- The crab heard snatches of the talk









THE CARIBBEAN.


Of those who ambled by;
A dusky pair strolled arm in arm
And their young hopes soared high.
"Sweetie, Hi his yours foh true,
Hi gwine to be yo' hown."
The negro maid said, "Yes, milove."
The crab could only groan.
A Panamanian couple came
The youth cried -rdently-
"Dis heartt she brreak-she loff you so-o-o,
You no say yesss to she?"
A gentle silence; then the girl
Said softly, "Yesss-si, si."
Not far from there two Chine c sat;
This lad said tenderly,
"Me washee shirtee-makee dough,
Me wanted woman too;
You wanted me?" And then she said,
"Yes, John. Me wanted you!"
The crab looked 'round him in disgust,
For many more were there,
And youths of every race and hue
Courted their ladies fair.
He had no time for this nonsense,
He had something to do--
He crossed the wall-he headed for
The lady that he knew.
But then he stopped a little while-
A pair were very nigh!
So crabby slipped into a crack
To wait till they passed by.
But down they sat upon his crack,
(They both had ceased to walk)
And to the crab's disgusted ears
There came this man's fool talk.
"Adored," he said, "I love )ou so-
Oh, darling, please he mine-
Then I shall be your 'Sturdy Oak,'
And you my 'Cli,;nii' Vine.'"
She said, "I know those things aren't true,
No Cave Men roam these days,
And to each girl you sing the same
Old, rusty, worn-out lays."
"Oh, no!" he cried. "Beloved, no!
My love for you is true-"
And on he raved; the crah longed for
The lady friend he knew-
Imprisoned, agonized, he was,
With nothing else to do
But listen to the moonstruck swain
Proclaim his love was true!


For crabby's crack had one waY out
So nowhere could he go.
He sat within and cursed the fate
That brought on him such woe.
The moments passed; the love-sick youth
Made love unto his "Vine,"
And then she (oh, these women folk
Said sweetly, "I am thine."
More moments passed; the locked-up crab
Then he.ird a lusty "smack"-
And then he saw his exit cle r-
For they had left the crack!
One moment tho'-and then he saw
The crack no longer free,
For those simps leaned their arms on it
And gazed out at the sea.
The wrathful crab w:.s nigh to tears;
This spoiled that perfect night.
What had his warrior uncle said?
"Boy! when in trouble,; i. ',
One moment he did hesitate-
One moment-then he knew-
He knew the very desperate deed
He was about to do.
He raised his pincers sharp on high,
A shriek-and he was free.
And then the ( Iri .1.. Vine's" voice shrilled
"You brute! Don't speak to me!
You were the one who brought me here-
You wanted me to die-
And so you let wild beasts attack
lMe, while you, you cad, stood by!"
"But, dearest one, it was not nme,
Spoke the unlettered "Oak"
As he pursued the fleeing maid.
Oh dear! These women folk!
The silver moon smiled on the sea-
Smiled on a proud crab too,
\ho lost no time in being with
A lads crab he knew.

MORALS.
Oh, lovers! ye who stroll at night
Beside a moonlit sea,
Beware ye of the desperate crabs
Who insist that they be free!

And male crustaceans! ye who seek
I'o spend a pleasant night,
Remember that your noble kin
Said, "W\hen in trouble- ight! !


U. S. ViynAoming" pa-.mng throcugh tfhe Pan -inia Cim:&








THE CARIBBEAN.


FORT SAN LORENZO.

r-onst pliic- F'reshnin in Entglish -.~,'ie


When anyone speaks of ruins and old Spanish
forts, people in general-even the average in-
habitants of the Canal Zone-call to mind only
old Panama or Porto Bello, but one who has taken
the trip to San Lorenzo and has studied its construc-
tion and arrangement considers it by far the best
preserved and most interesting of our old Spanish
relics.
The fort occupies a high bluff that extends out
into the Caribbean Sea at the northeast of the
the mouth of the Chagres River. Since the sides
-i.,.ii.- the Caribbean and Chagres are ill per-
pendicular, the only approach to the fort is from
the rear. From its highest point one commands a
view of miles of the Caribbean Sea as '. II as the
Chagres River up to its first big turn into the
jungles. Surely a better position for a fortress
could not have been found.
The whole place offers a fine example of medieval
masonry. The ruins are so ". 11 preserved that a
very good idea of its construction can be obtained.
On all sides, immediately on tile edge of the preci-
pice, was an immense outer wall made of stone.
This pr .. ri. ill insured the fort from a surprise
raid. However, should the enemy conquer tlhe
outer wall, they would still have a wide, deep
moat to swim and then another high, wide wall to
gain. The fort proper xwas in this inner wall.
Many of the bricks are still preserved d nd are held
in place by mortar as hard as the rock itself.
Only in places has the wall caved in and then
only where the weight of the vegetation has forced
it. The old covered squad rooms and guard houses
with their sentry boxes are in perfect condition,
and one may even find cannon in the position
where, probably, a fleeing army left them. The
walls of the commandant's quarters show how
royally the old Spanish Dons lived-even when
they were out in the wilds of some foreign country y.
They certainly believed in the rule that the nobles
and people in command should have all, while the
poor who did nothing but follow and obey, got
practically nothing for their work and worries.
At that the world has not changed so much.
Perhaps the most talked of part of the old ft rt
is the well in the courtyard. It is fill of water the
M R 5590--6


entire year, and, since it is over a hundred feet
above sea level, this has been the cause of many
stories. Some sa\ that there is an underground
feed; others, that the well has no bottom; still
others claim that a huge treasure has been thro wni
into the well, and that if the bott m is ever ft.und
the finder will be very rich. )O course n ie t ofthe
rumors are true and would never have been
started if people had taken the time to investigate
the well. With iust a little energy and some shoxel-
ing of dirt that has been deposited on the flin ,)-
of the firt, an ambitious person will fin that this
very historic .II is nothing hut a largest >rage tank
for surface N\ater, as Ii -....i of the f. rt drain
water to te well. Thus we see that all rain water
failing in tlhe fort eventually finis its way t. this
huge tank, and, when the water reaches a certain
height, is drained through fair sized subterranean
drains into the sea. The reason for the water's
remaining one height throughout the entire year
is that the rainfall is about equal to the evapnra-
tion. So we find our fabulous stories are all shat-
tered and to hb completely discarded.
The questi n that naturally enters one's mind
is: Why did the old Spaniards go to so much
trouble and .nr- the inconveniences of this cli-
mate to build such a complete and almost perfect
fortifticaim n This question begins t) prey on
one's mind xhile gazing at the preci>itiius si.l<
and seemingly invincible walls. Man:- tale are
heard and many more read, most of which are
hearsay tales from the natives and otle" pe ) :.
However, it is positively established that the great
and ruthless pirate of EnglanId, none other than
Morgan himself, captured the fort an.d that it
later served him as a base on his march a'cro;,s tl:
Isthmus which ended in the sacking and burning
of Old Panama City. As bold as "I...i':.i was,
he had finally to resort to trickery to force the
Spaniards out of this stronghold. He utilized
his Indians to shoot burning arrows over the walls
to the thatched roofs of the tort within. During
the fire and the confusion l..11 ... i-,, he rushed the
drawbridges to the fort. This ruse resulted in tile
massacre of all within. ()ne can imagine the sur-
prise of the Spanish warriors to find themselves


0tXI


0








THE CARIBBEAN.


fighting hand to hand with an enemy who they
little dreamed would ever pass the first wall.
Poor fools! Their greed for gold had made them the
prey of the ruthless Murgan. Surely pande-
monium never reigned higher.


With such an interesting history as had mighty
San I.,rtnlu, it is no wonder that it is talked and
studied about so frequently. It is strange that
people so seldom visit its ruins-so romantically
interesting.


A TRAGEDY.
Michael Greene, '29.
(Second place-Sophomore English Class.)


Eight years I lived here before I was stricken
with this terrible disease-this slow, body-eating
disease, this disease which no power on earth can
cure, this disease whose agonies and terrible sen-
sations are so burdensome.
I first came to Panama on a pleasure trip, wish-
ing to see the Canal. I became attached to the
place and decided to stay for a few years. Did
I say a few years? God only knows how many
terrible years I shall spend here!
I especially :.niio cd my first few months in
Panama. Everything was so new and so inter-
esting; the customs of the people were so different.
Then one evening at a native ball, I met the
daughter of the United States Consul. We be-
came interested in one another, and after a few
months of happy courtship, were married. We
spent seven pleasant years together. Then came
the turning point in our lives. At the celebration
of our seventh wedding anniversary it was dis-
covered.
It was after a delightful waltz with .my wife.
\\.' had '. nc out onto the balcony and were
quietly thrilling over the beauty of the soft tropical
evening. \I wife looked up into my face and
asked, "John, whe is that dark brown spot on
your forehead?"
"I don't know, dear. Probably only a spot of
tan.
Just at that moment our very dear friend,
Charles HBrnklL'., came out to join us. Ioroth6
laughingly told him that soon she would have a
brown husband-as he was tanning in spots.
l. .irl. looked at me, then looked at me again,
and pressed the spot on my forehead. I told him I
could not feel the pressure. His face went white.
Horror was written upon it. He l, .in shaking as
if stricken with .act
He breathed out hoarsely, "\I' God, John! my
God!"
S,'inlL' that he was LgrL.tl\ :iL'i.iti.l and feeling


great concern for him, my wife and I asked in the
same breath what had happened.
Large tears began to roll down his face; he
seemed violently stricken. We asked him a
second time.
"You've got it, John. Of all the people in the
world, you had to get it!"
"Get what?"
And then he cried out strangely, "Lepros. "
My wife shrieked, "John!" and fell forward in a
dead faint.
Oh, shall I ever forget those few moments-
moments of terrific torment!
Things went black before me. I could not see.
I felt weak.
Charles tried to comfort me and to bring my
wife back to consciousness. But I did not hear him.
I had fainted away.
When I regained consciousness, I was in the
doctor's office. He had made the final test. The
look on his face told me what the outcome of the
examination had been.
\h:at could I do? What could anyone do?
No,thiLr, Absolutely nothing.
The doctor left the office for a few minutes,
during which time I began to ponder over my
situation. The terrible truth stood before me,
harsh and dark. Before, my brain had been in a
muddle; I had not had time to think clearly.
But now, thinking clearly, the terrible truth left
me paralyzed. I should be banished forever!
Banished from my wife, Panama, ter thing;
from all the world! \\'h:t a thought! This
thought was maddening, and mad I was! Stark,
raving mad! A man of my age to be stricken with
this disease! I charged up and down the office,
alternately u ringing my hands and clutclhing my
hair. To be banished to the leper settlement and
probably be the only white person there, as white
people rarely get the disease.
What a life I should sDend there!








THE CARIBBEAN.


I grew cold, and a great trembling seized me as
the office door opened and the doctor entered.
He told me that the boat left in two hours.
Just two more hours and I should start my
banishment.
I asked the doctor if it would be possible for me
to see my wife before I left. A sad shake of his
head was his only reply.
How I reached the boat I do not remember!
All I remember is that the boat's whistle revived
me.
I was on board, and the boat was leaving. A
great crowd had assembled on shore to bid good-
bve forever to the ones thev dearly loved.
Looking back on shoe I saw my wife standing
beside Charles. Charles was waving. My wife
was weeping bitterly and waving weakly to me.
I h.rlI'. remember how I waved good-bye to


Charles and the one dearer to me than all the
world.
The boat slowly drew away. The last thing I
saw was a white handkerchief slowly m w-ing up
and down, and 1 knew for whom it was waved.
We arrived at Palo Seco that night and 1 was
assigned to my quarters. Here in this lonesome
place I weep mournfully and cry out bitterly against
the sentence fate has dealt out to me.
*
NOTE: Just recently it has been d-iscovered that
injections of chaulmoolgra oil from the tree of the
same name which grows chiefly on the Malay
Peninsula will at least arrest a case of leprosy,
and, if it is in the first stages, perhaps cure it.
At Palo Seco, the leper colony on the Isthmus of
Panama, relatives of the patients are permitted to
visit them once a rmnth and talk to them.


CARNIVAL IN PANAMA.
1li/dred Ba.h, '-'e.,
First in Miscellaneous Fejiure Storic.)


Mlirth, laughter, and tinkling bells! Carnival
in full swing! There goes a duke arm in arm with a
cook. Yonder, a scarlet devil is having a pleasant
chat with a sober monk; and a little farther on, a
marquise comes arm in arm with a half-witted
Plebian. There goes the lovely Columbine flirting
with a handsome sailor; and the passionate Pierrot
has just passed, petting a beautiful servant girl.
What a gay and vet ironical mockerv of real
life! Such is Carnival everywhere. It is that sea-
son when social bars are levelled and personal pride
is forgotten. One sees the rich, the aristocrat, the
diplomat, the special agent, the poor, the needy,
the white, the fellow, the negro, and everyone
enjoying equally and gleefully the gaiety of the
moment. At this time the' wealthy man spends
some of his latest profits; the salaried man throws
away his latest earnings, and the poorest, ever-
if. H'rinig class, forgetting their troubles, needs,
and -iffi. rii', in an .. i-rr to be happ--squander
their entire year's savings having a goo.l time.
Many committees work t,.. r tir r in making
preparations for the Carnival. The most impor-
tant is that for choosing the queen. She is elected
by popular vote .mr.nm the prettiest "sefioritas"
of the city. The Queen-elect afterwards selects
among the defeated candidates or among her
prettiest girl friends, her "dames of honor,"


ranging in number from four to eight. The duty
of these yiung ladic's is to help Her Majestv to
fulfill h tis t her tics a t it her in all her under-
takins during, the rein of fun. The financial end


of the festival is attended to by donations from the
National governmentt and from local business
houses and individuals.







44 THE CARIBB-B AN.


The Carnival proper starts on the Saturday
l,',r,'; Ash W\\.dnd.iay, and the fun continues
until late Ash W.dne-d,.iay mrni,,.
Duriiin,' the Carnival there are free public dances
in .ll the parks from eight o'clock in the evening
,nil twelve midnight. The dances in the various
clubs last until four or five in the morning.
The first day, Saturday, is dedicated to the coro-
nation of the Queen. On this .l.i the people join-
iniL in the festivities usually wear the "Pollera"
(the national costume for the ladies) and the
\I,11torii.I" (the national costume for the men).
A man called Dios Mi.rn.,, v. c.rirni a large gro-
tesque head, announces the coming of Carnival.
The r.rrill'. yet fa.ninrrinrl head is so very gaudy
that he attracts a great deal of attention, and the
automobile in which he rides is followed by a great
]r ..,.--i' nI of people on foot, I ,iuri-l and crying
out '.. 1 I h'l'.
On Sunday and Monday everyone wears what
he has or what he chooses, for there is no special
costume.
Everywhere these evenings one hears the tom-
toms. \N.% they grow louder-now, die down.
L'%r\hliLrc is dancing. "Toldos," temporary
arbors with only an awning for coveriln--plcrha.p,
only a floor laid in a vacant lot-are surrounded
by onlookers who clap and sing while those within
are dancing. Usually there are only the tom-toms
for music; sometimes there are other native instru-
ments with perhaps an harmonica or two.
Automobiles, carriages, and trucks of various
kinds parade the streets every evening and on
Tuesday before, during, and after the grand


parade. These vehicles are hia vily decorated with
ribbons and banners of the most varying and
contrasting colors. Serpentines fly between them.
There comes one now! See! The hood of the car
is .1,,rppldl: the girls are sitting on it and lappingg
in time to their lusty singing of their native songs
or of other favorites. Look at that large, stout
negress over there in the gay l:itrr iniiluai cos-
tume sirrinji on the back of that car with her rlog,
flowing, stiffly-starched skirts spread carefully
over the edge. Again, farther on, there is one
on which three shy and dainty Panaman maidens
sit, singing tinml'., and laughing and chatting
quietly. How pretty they are in the picturesque
Pollera with the bright, quivering "tncl'lcqui:i"
in their hair!
At last comes Tuesday, the "Gala Day." This
is the final day of the Carnival of fun and every
soul feels ready for it. On this day one wears his
best costume. The merrymaking lasts until six
or seven o'clock A.h Wednesday morning. There
is also a long procession of Carnival floats, the
prettiest of them always being the Queen's float.
Every Carnival Club is represented by a float
in this monster parade and the Canal Zone often
contributes on this day a float or two and one or
two detachments of soldiers and sailors with their
bands, which make the procession and the festivi-
ties very impressive and beautiful.
This is Carnival in Panama. As is true wherever
this festivity takes place, the slogan is: "A stop in
the vicissitudes of life and a forgetfulness of the
morrow, to give one's self away to the most out-
rageous mirth."


A


A Carnival Queen.







THE CARIBBEAN. 45

a-------- *


THE DEATH WHISTLE.
Marion Lowande, '29.
(Second--Miscellaneous Feature Stories.)


Pat was whistling. Hadn't he a right?
Weren't his wife and two babies arriving to-
morrow? Yes, the Canal Zone was safe for them
now. There was little chance" of their being
overcome with malaria, or yellow fever. It was
a healthful place, the Canal Zone.
At last they arrived. Pat carried his two
children up the steps of their home. There
was not a prouder man on the Zone.
N;L'hIrf.ll--li,erini--Daddy must tell them a
story, and daddy willingly complied with the
request. Every night there must be a story
before \lllv and Jimmy would turn over and
sleep. Was there ever a happier man than Pat-
rising early in the nmrilin-, to go to his work and
returning in the afternoon to a loving wife and
h l dillr,_ ,,- '.'. hi-t liHL: ?
There would be a slide in the Cut. Dynamite
would be set, and the warning whistle would
sound. Then a flash and a roar-the Cut would
be open once more to traffic. Another whistle
would pierce the air, sinister in its meaning. It
was the death whistle-someone had been too


slowing in getting away from the charge. At
home the women felt a fear clutching their hearts;
it might be their loved one.
Jimmy's birthday came. Besides the big, red
automobile he must have an unusually good story.
What should it be? Deeply absorbed in thought,
but breaking out in a happy whistle whenever a
brilliant idea struck him, Pat failed to hear the
warning whistle. A low rumble; then-oblivion.
That sinister whistle pierced the sudden quiet.
At home, Pat's wife shivered and offered up a
silent prayer for the poor unfortunate's family.
Jimmy wondered why his father did not come.
Why was his mother crying? What were all the
people doing in his house? Pulling one big
man's hand, Jimmy asked when his daddy was
going to come home. A tear escaped from the
big man's eye and in a voice that managed to
catch, he said, "Your daddy has gone home,
Laddy."
But the big man must have been mistaken
'cause he hadn't heard his daddy come whistling
up the path.


SOME WICKS
By and
COMPLIMENTS
WALTER mW I INGSTAD, '30.


(Sc~ond place-Freshman English Class.)

The seniors in this high school,
As the seasons go and come,
Are pretty much like juniors--
They're apt to grumble some.

Then take the simple sophomores,
Those little bags of wind,
An'l compare them with the freslhmc.
Who never do give in.

This school is really not complete
Without the freshmen in it;
They do their work, and do not shirk,
And are modernists to the minute.


I92~


(a







THE CARIBBF..N.


RUSTY.
Joseph Corrigan, '*7.


Rur% paid no attention to those young bloods
who stood laughing at him. They looked fine
in their sleek, spotless coats. He, too, had once
looked like that. There had been a time when
he too had had nothing to do but play, and laugh
at the other old, battle-scarred veterans. If
Rusty cared to waste his time on these nunu fops
he could tell them a thing or two which would
make them respect his limp and his scarred coat.
In 1917 one could not have told him from one
of those young fops who now made sport of him.
But poor Ruit was on his last legs. One had
been hurt by a shell, and the others loudly
creaked as he wheezed along after his master.
True, he was not the dog he had been.
He had never liked other dogs, and his master
was the onl\ man he had ever cared for. When
his master had gone to war, Rusty had gone too.
He still remembered his trainiiu. first at Camp
Dix, and later in France. The training over,
Rusty had become a messenger. He could have
told you-but wouldn't-of his fight with the
German messenger, Roderick. If you had tried
to compliment him, he would have told you that
he had done nothing; merely fought a suspicious
looking stranger. Why should he brag when any
other dog, given the chance would have done the
same thine'
He wished people would let him alone! He
hated those old woman who said, "Oh, here's
dear Rusty! Isn't he cute! He looks so oldish
and battle-scarred."
"\ell," Rusty could answer, "am I not?"
"Dear Captain," the ladies would continue,
"please tell us how Rusty saved your life."
Then a lady would come over to his chair and pet
him. Why didn't she go and get one of those
.I,.II dogs. That's what they were for, petting.
He didn't want them to come around him with
their perfumey handkerchiefs.
Then the Captain would start. "Well, it was
on the fifth of June, 191g, when the Germans
made their attack. Our company had been


pretty badly cut up. We were just about to
get help when they found our nest. There were
ten of us citinging there in the dugout for the
shell that would bury us."
"We kept plugging away but it didn't seem to
stop the Boches at all. At last we heard a big
'zowie,' and the mouth of the nest was plugged.
We tried to dig away the dirt, but the air was
getting bad, and we were getting weak. Ever -
one was hurt, and we all gave ourselves up as
lost. The last thing I remember was hearing
a few dull thuds on the outside-then sleep.
"I woke up in the hospital. The occupant of
the next bed woke me up with some terrible
groans and yelps. I looked over to see what was
wrong with the poor fellow, and to my surprise
saw Rusty. The poor fellow! He was in as
bad a fix as I.
"The next day I was wakened by a lot of talking
and the sound of footsteps in the ward. The
general and some of the staff making an inspec-
tion? No, they had stopped at Rusty's bed. I
looked over and saw the general pin something
on Rusty's blanket. Why, Rusty was being
decorated!
"They told me then that I owed my life to
Rusty. He had been shot in the leg while he
was briligLinig a message to us. He had dragged
himself up to the dugout just after we had been
so nicely bottled up. Knowing that something
was wrong with the door, Rusty had started to
scratch the dirt from the lower rim. He had
succeeded in making a little hole which had served
as an air supply to us. That was what had kept
us alive. When the firing had let up 'unir, a
s ,utinz party came out to find us. When Rusty
saw them, he started NIlpinL and dragged him-
self up to the door. The party saw him and got
us out of the hole. If it hadn't been for Rusty,
here, we'd be a fine lot of mummies to-day."
"Well," thought Rusty, "If I'd known you
would talk about it like this, you might be a
mummy to-day."


9-


~pi --------








THE CARIBBEAN.


(a


..t' iT"OU OIS H ,iEAlLr, ,_ .. .



MOODS-THE SEA'S OR MINE?
l)orrtohv S.:ensson, '27.


There is a feeling of impatient restraint on the
part of the elements to-night-an apprehensive
mood suggestive of smouldering passions, con-
cealed hurts. The bay is enshrouded in foreboding
ink-like darkness upon which the pale searching
glances of the ghostly lighthouse make no im-
pression. An occasional dart of 'ihlliinL dis-
closes black lowering clouds.

The uneasy bay seems secretive, mysterious, as
if 1. ,imin_ some pillaging prank. The dark sky
bends closer-perhaps to catch those low whisper-
ings and join in with the schemes of the night.
The sea is a 11i.,. i.n seemingly uncontrollable
mass of roaring breakers defiant-proud. Sud-
denly with a fitful rush of sea-wind comes rain
rain-rain, to beat and hammer those haughty
waves into molten liquid.

Flashes of lh-liiinLe seek to pierce the cloud
cages in which .n'cr thunder may be heard mut-
tering and threatening. The rumbling of heavy
rushing surf and the awful roar of breakers con-
bine to make this a night of dread and fear.

To-night the sea is sullen, angry. The tempes-
tuous waves crash blindly against the gray rocks,
which unmercifully batter them into plain, color-
less particles of water. Above are no clouds. A
solid sky, dark and mysterious, blots out the friend-
ly stars. A palm tree, wind-torn and alone, adds
the only bit of tropical color to the anger-racked
picture.

The sea is a caldron of boiling, leaping waters;
the sky, the blackened lid, from under which warm
mist escapes.


The dark sea sullenly moves on, muttering to
itself, as a spoiled child, who has been repri-
manded by its mother, utters dire threats in a
cautious undertone.

Dark clouds dark hills and sea-and a great
silent loneliness which overwhelms one's heart.

The sea is a dismal, colorless prairie. The weary-
gray waves curl drearily about grayer rocks.
From above the ji,, ,,-.. of Fort Sherman a leaden
curtain descends concealing in its folds dank, dis-
agreeable rain.

Pearly gray dawn breaks over a sleepy ocean.
Far ..fi, one can see the crumpled gray smoke
ribbon from an outgoing steamer.

Midnight-and the moon, inmiu.f in a misty
veil of silvery gauze, watches over the slumberous
ocean.

A tiny sail, white as a snowy swan's wing, glides
noiselessly over the smooth mirror of the bay.

The hav is a silvery taffeta upon whose change-
able sheen a fairy craft, skimming gaily along,
carelessly inir. sparkling jewels.

Joyously, exultantly, the sea leaps in a dishev-
eled mass. It is one of the rare moments when the
wind and sea are found playing together in care-
free, sportive glee.

Far off, one can see the dreamy rise and fall of
the ocean's blue breast. Clouds wander lazily
and i nllI.; on. The scene is peaceful, serene.
The heart cries out in sheer joy.








48 THE CARIBBEAN.


DIFFERENT DAYS ON OL'R BAY.
Louise 11,,n. '27.

Th.ank-giving Day! The bay is calm and silent
as if it, too, were offering up to God a little prayer
of thank,;i ing

The bay is happy-hilariously happy. Each
little wave is trying to outdo the others in merry
laughter. The haughty palms overlooking these
irresponsible children are condescending to hold a
pleasant conversation with the surf which is trip-
ing gaily over the reef.

The bay with to-day's exquisite coloring might
be a delicate creation of some master artist.
The water is a deep, clear blue, flashing bright
smiles at the motherly azure sky where fleecy
white clouds are resting.

The whole bay is a beautiful reflection of an
enchanting yellow and rose sunset.

The setting sun makes the bay a veritable sea
of iuld. In the background, hovering around the
mountain tops like thieves to steal away this
splendor, are black clouds.

It is hard this morning for me to believe that the
sea can sometimes be a fearsome monster destroy-
ine ~ cr\ thing that comes into its grasp, because
it is now as calm and gentle as a lamb who would
not think of doing anything rash. I think the
sea has a dual personality.

The bay is calm, gray, and silent except for the
soft murmuring of the surf creeping lazily over the
reef. A foreboding black cloud hangs above the
water like a mysterious curtain ready to descend
and hide this peaceful scene in torrents of rain.

There is something about the bay to-day that
gives it a restless aspect. The small, greenish-
blue waves seem to be captives who want to
escape.

To-day the sea is a seething mass of budding
angcr. The gray waves seem to be gi' ing warning
that if rhc\ have the least provocation they will
stop at nirhinig

The bay is anur'. Great waves are rushing in
like giant steeds at war with some invisible force.


OUR PALM TREES.
Joseph Corrigan, '27.

It must be tiresome having to stand there watch-
ing the same old things come and go. Busses,
cars, sun, rain, and darkness pass by in the same
unending line day after day.
I wondered what you were doing. I looked
toward you but could not see you. Suddenly a
light found you. I see you now, Tree. You seem
lonesome out there in the rain. You wisely have
your back to the shower. You are bent so you will
not get your green head too wet. Isn't that so?
The sun is not yet up. Everything is still asleep.
Even the trees seems weary-leaning to one side
as they do. Has swaying to the music of the mid-
night rain fatigued them so?
The palm trees are prudently holding their
umbrella tops to the rain.
I can not even see the trees; the rain has swal-
lowed all.

TOWARD THE BREAKWATER.
Helen Montgomery, '27.

Waves lapped lazily against the wall, as if with-
out energy under the blinding sun.
A sheet of blue glass, lay the sea this morning.
A tiny cayuca alone broke the monotony.
A solid wall of gray sky and gray sea, broken
only by a discriminating line of beige wall, with
first the blink of a red light, then of white, then
of red.
The continuous blue of the sea and sky was
broken only by the passing of a white ship, as if a
fairy ship upon a fairy sea.
Huge breakers swept over the wall, then white
foam flashing and whipping at the stone. The
spray, forming a multicolored rainbow, fell back
in feathery showers.
They loomed up in the blackness, four long rows
of tiny lights. They 'swayed ever so slightly but
enough to be discernible. They drew nearer,
rather slowly, growing larger as they came. The
shadow of the ship formed an entrancing picture
against the gray sky. It passed on into the night.








THE CARIBBEAN.


FROM OUR HOUSE.
Euph:,mia Il /oinomght, '27.

Nl;'itfall is slowly .1pIr ..whingl. A boat is
being raised in the locks in order that it may go on
its way. The black mules* wait patiently beside
the boat until it is ready to go into the next cham-
ber. Men are seen, .r.iJll,_' by, holding in their
hands ropes that are attached to the boat. The
trees in the background can now scarcely be seen,
as it is quite dark. The locks, with their many
lights, look to be a little city.
The rain is drizzling down en the lake, and as
the sun gleams through the rain, the drops bounce
on the water like diamonds. The blue-green trees
stand out against a clear white sky.
The locks this evening look very dreary. The
mules* are moving slowly south to bring a boat
through. The trees in the background are so dark
that they appear black behind the ghostly white
lighthouse. The rain is beating down with great
force on the quiet surface of the little lake and on
the smooth green carpet of grass along the locks.
The calm little lake reflects this morning a
gorgeous rainbow which dips one end into the
Canal and rests the other on the mahogany trees
behind it.
*Electric locomotives for towing ships thru li the lock.


SEA, SKY, AND PAI.M\1 ON NEW
CRISTOBAL POINT.
Charles Iill, '27.

A leaden sky and listless sea like severe elders
watch the fragile palms frolicking with a fragrant
breeze.
Rain in silvery sheets falls with a mournful
patter on the dejected palms. The gray-blanketed
sea is quiet for the night.
With a dash of color and zest, the sea, in huge
white combers, rushes with a roar on the sandy
beach. A brisk breeze gently but firmly shakes
the water-logged palm fronds.
The lengthened shadows of the palms slowly
merge with the dusk, while the sea, calm and mute,
awaits the night.
The sun has set. The reflection of the .aifri~.l, .-
on the placid sea forms a remarkable background
for the fantastic silhouettes of the palms.
M R 5590--7


Nichr has stealthily stolen over sea and land.
Through the Stygian darkness the swish of the
palms can be heard, seemingly haranguing the
sea, trembling at their feet in smothered confusion.
The sea, grim and gray, in its temperamental
fashion appears to contemplate a change of mood.
The palms huddle together as if sensing the
volcanic disposition of the sea and their helpless-
ness before it.
The sea, with a deep-throated roar, rushes up on
the sandy point. The palms, bent backward before
the wind, seem retreating before a relentless enemy.
The sky is still gray and overcast. The sea rets
as if gasping for breath after violent exertion, while
the palms, thankful for the cessation of the storm,
droop with weariness.
The sea, blue, peaceful, and serene, utterly
content, slowly advances to the sandy shore and
suddenly seems to smile at the nodding palms, as
if paying tribute to those who have withstood
his assaults during his more turbulent moods.
Once again the h.-iiii ful sky, the slender palms,
and the volatile sea are in perfect accord.

THE REEF.
Surse 7. Ta/l) or, 7r., '27.

Great white waves are rushing in on the reef
this afternoon. They swell from the surface of
the ocean, tower in a huge mass of green, and
smash in a chaos of creamy white. A rock
stands in their path. Crash! High in the air
leaps a spout of white, and the spray is tossed
in all directions by the stiff breeze.
This morning I watched an interesting race
between a majestic comber and a fleecy white
cloud. As well as I could see through the flying
spray, the wave won. It is my idea that the
cloud should have had a handicap.
A changing panorama, now lighted by the sun,
now hidden in veils of rain which lend mystery
to the sound of ....i,.linL, unseen breakers.
To-day a sullen veil of rain and low flying
clouds gives one only an occasional glimpse of
cold looking spray and makes one think of cherry
log fires and raincoats.
The seas lift lazily and tumble to the tune of a
whistling wind.
Softly as cotton peeps from its wrapper, curls
the water on the reef to-day. Blue sea for a
wrapper, white breakers for cotton.








THE CARIRPBF \N.


GATUN AT \ I GHT.
James Grider, '27.
I).ark clouds, pushed ever forward by a strong
breeze, hang over the street t,,-niht.


Now a 'srinkk, now a rumble; and
pour. The streets are running water.
Rain! Rain! Only the street lights are
during the heavy downpour.


then a
Rain!
visible


It is raining. The pit-a-pat splashes upon the
pavement are minlgkl with the sound of steady
dripping on the palms. Above these sounds of
rain is heard only the occasional sound of a bus,
splashing its way through the water-covered
streets. First comes the low rumble of its ap-
proach, then the loud splashes as it darts by.
A.ainr the low rumble and it is gone. After this
there is only silence-except for the pit-a-pat
splashes upon the pavement and the sound of
steady dripping on the palms.
The palms along the .1it side hang their droop-
ing, dripping heads, and seem to wonder if this is
their last refreshment for many days. The pave-
ment, too, seems to give up reluctantly its cover-
ing of water as if in dread anticipation of the
approaching long hot days and steady dry winds.
To-night the broad road seems indeed a selected
way of comfortable travel, where motor cars slip
by and pedestrians walk peacefully. Yet, not so
many years ago, the Spanish seekers of Eldorado
struggled perhaps over this very path fighting the
jungle and its pestilent insects. These disillusioned
'p:ini.ird were wont to hate this future place of
pleasantness for its obstruction to their fame and
fortune.


ALONG THE CANAL.
C3ara M. y, '27.

Drearv and desolate lies the colorless water of
the Canal. A dark, threatening cloud overhead
slowly unfolds into a dense curtain of rain.

Streaks of blue, silver, grern, and gold appear
and disappear as the sun playfully casts its rays
upon the water.

Though the sun is still high, there is in the air
that indefinable freshness that tells of evening
coming on.

The trim whiteness of a boat as it slowly glides
down the Canal seems to have borrowed a rosy hue
from the clouds which herald the sunset.

Chameleon-like, the Canal has taken on the
opalescent color of the sky.

The sky and the Canal are illuminated by colors
blending from the lightest tint of yellow into a
deep orange, then into a fiery red, gradually shad-
ing out to blue.

To-night the peace of early evening enfolds
water and land with amethyst mists.

The red and green channel lights appear, and
the tall, massive, white lighthouse awakens sud-
denly and blinks her eye.

Iike a large, black monster a boat slowly comes
up the moonlit Canal.


(o, fjjo 1,;.!1 '. iI 1- ai, 1) uh tie Caal Leavin Upe Locks hme to Ennr te1n r M iraforeLaka








THE CARIBBEAN.


SEE SA\W.
Ii-h111V .V5'' o), '2;-


Characters--Prisoner.
Prison warden.
Also a familiar.
P/ae-Prison ro.m.
Time-Night.

Aclr 1.



[A rat-harass-d dungeon; the candl's ;L -
S ir.il, c:;azily, casting gruesome shad I .vs on1
the damp, noldy walls. A prisoner is seen sit-
ting on an old keg, which at one tiim p erhax;
harbored evil spirits. The prisoner is pale, yet
determined; his ashen face is cupped in firm
hands.]
Enter Warden-"Ah, man of vile ways, the
time draws near when vou must sever vour
lowly connections with man. Kill you I must,
th,' comb mny b.ain as I may, I canvt devise
a method which will please the public. I have
thought of burning, of arsenic, of gunpywde, ,of
L ii,_'_, but n'me suits me. Si. k. ()Oh fittl eC
corpse, have vou a suggestion?"



A .ITTLE. APPRECIATION )
'7 ,/n G. X.d\ tn, '27.
There is one person around Cristobal High
School who, while nit a member of the student
body, meets with the disapproval of nobody.
This person has never thrown anyone in the jug;
he has never given anyone a white slip. There ha
never in the history of the school been an occasion'
where this person was responsible for a failure-
nay, not even a condition. Nor has anyone ever-
been expelled, suspended on account of the same.
No hard feelings exist. He is everybody's friend,
and nobody has any grudge against him. It is
quite unusual to have all this friendship. The
person to whom I am referring is-Samuel.


Prisoner (over whose face a look of cunning
passes)-"Yes, yes, I have a new and entirely
original idea. I should like to die of old age."
Warden (filled with consternation)--"No,
foolish one. One more wise crack like that and-
but--f[ill Yto( CoWness?"
Prisoner (proudly)--"N;!"
Warden-"Submit him tr, the spiked mallet."
(It is done even as bidlden.) "Do you confess
now?"
Prisoner--"Never! Vo .V-er!''" (This la t
said emphatically).
\Warden-"You are a tough customer; all
my devices seem in vain. But-hold! I have
one more -my last and m );t h)r.-ible."(Whispers
to a familiar who no.s and departs, returning
with a gleaming instrument.)
Warden (hissing) -"See this-the S-a-w!"
Prisoner (screaming)-"The Saw--Merciful
heavens! Not that --no -not that! I confess
evervt li, _, .11 rl;I _'"
Warden (with gleam of triumph, mutters)-
"It was well yout confessed -for if you hadn't, I
should have playv,' upon it."
C 'RTAIN quick!



A\ O(W\LITY "COCHERO."
lItle' .1 ou ntgo tnery, '27.


Practically everyone has seen him as he sits on
the driver's seat of his coach. His black felt hat
resting at its particular jaunty angle, on his grey
woolly head; his -li;nliL ,black eves looking
straight ahead at his prized possession, his large,
chestnut hors-; his 'ii.i stiff collar seemingly
keeping his head from drooping or turning; his
neat black tie; the perpendicular outline of his
back; what a striking figure he makes. He re-
minds one of a driver in the days of the old South.


9


H0








52 THE CARIBBEAN.

DESPERATION.
John G. Nelson, '27.
Desperate Steve Poggin was a desperate man bite the dust. Pete Hankins lay dead, dead, cold
indeed. His battery was operated on the streak as the hair on a walrus's neck. Terrible C. A.
lightning priniiplc, and there was no man living Barber gave a sudden contortion; the muscles
that would court a blow from his huge fists, in his neck stiffened; then with a dving leap he
hardened and calloused as they were by cruel lay sprawling on the stairway, with hi. head
and inhuman mangling of vicious steers. He b t
between two banisters.
drank his liquor in kegs, and it was the .tr.riL csr
liquor in that county in the summer. In the Desperate Steve Poggln, seeing hi. ..rime and
winter he had to dilute it with alcohol to prevent the inenacing look in the eyes of th menri abour,
it from freezing. His heavy boots fairly shook left the saloon, mounted his prancing I.ll.dauler.
the Shonkin Saloon as he viciously kicked the and was off into the distance befor-c anI uf the
bar as a signal for a little service. Yes, through men could reach for their guns. Ihe sheriff',
and through, Desperate Steve P.ugin was a son men were soon hot on the trail.
of the great open spaces where men are men and 4 *
the plumbing is terrible. A sort of restlessness becomes apparent through-
Suddenly a shot grazed the ear of Desperate out the room. Euphemia's piano stops. Then
Steve Poggin. Ah, pity the poor unfortunate the lights flash, and the race is on-every man
whose erring shot brought the wrath of this for himself, and it is no place for a fat man-the
terrible desperado! There was blood in his eye, to- entrance to the theater at Fort Davis is so narrow
bacco on his teeth, and dandruff in his moustache. that you have to turn sideways to go through the
Bang! Bang! No, forty more redskins didn't door.

TITLE TO BE DETERMINED AFTER. MACHE.*
7ames Grider, '27. Dorothy Svensson, '27.
There has come upon us a great and national, Mache is not his real name, this little San Blas
yea, international epidemic. Shall I call it the boy indignantly tells us. No, it is Armadio Jose
white plague? Then I must also call it the black Carrido Alberto Grimaldo. What a long name for
plague, the green plague, and the striped plague. such a small boy! And what a large grin for such
The male species is especially susceptible to this a diminutive head. That same grin is a sight to
disease, although it often attacks the dumber sex, behold-it is seemingly toothless-the grin of an
especially those athletically inclined, old man. His small brown eyes shine gleefully from
After this dreaded malady obtains a strangle his little e.gg-h.ipwed monkey head when he sees
hold, the lower extremities are severely affected, our awe at his unusual actions. For what does
The shins become shriveled and ugly. Yet, the Mache-pardon me, Armadio-do, but casually
upper portions of the extremities are more directly and quickly climb a slender coconut tree, and as
attacked, casually-and more quickly ---a 11 off on his head-
After the disease once becomes bothersome, the possibly to test the endurance of his little fur-
victim is never cured. It is the penalty for satis- covered dome. Oh, yes, Mache is some boy!
fying foolish desires. Still, such popularity must A*Maih, me mn,. S ,n Bps.
be deserved. They satisfy.
After all, knickers have proved practical. A COSTUME.


A MIRR)KR.
Dorothy '. 27.
Just a little spot of water I ing tranquilly and
I,.al.tiill in a crevice of the road. A marvel-
ousy brave little spot of water it was, reflecting,
not the, lull, barren cheerlessnessof its surrounding,
but the delicate exquisite o.-l.r of the heavens as
pink and gold wisps blushingly kissed the sun
goIod night.


(lara May, '7.
Hil. fat, and untidy, Nlir, the laundress, wore
a faded green skirt, which hlun.i down to her ankles,
and a dark ,r.illi- blouse, apparently made of
curtain material, spotted and torn. An old pair
of black sandals, which did not fit her large
unshapely feet, slid on and off as she ,huffled
around, and did not cover the hluit holes in the
heels of her pink ~tockinll-.








THE CARIBBEAN.

THE SNORE.
Srse 7. TaYlor, 7r.,'27.


Slowly and precisely the diver went about his
work like an automaton. Bill Curry in his
diver's suit was a formidable figure, and to-day
his thoughts were anything but peaceful. Cun-
ningly he had arranged to survey the wreck
himself and now, alone in the great void of murky
water with only the salvaging tug above him, he
put his plans into action. It would be quite
simple; Jimmy would enter the main hatch to the
refrigerator room, Bill would swing the door shut,
the catch. Somewhat guiltily Bill entered the
engine room door. Iown in that dark space
they would find him hopelessly tangled and thus
able to furnish a perfect alibi for not coming to
his fellow diver's aid. Yes, it would be quite
simple-the door had shut on the air tube and
the catch had slipped. The rest would be easy;
he could tangle himself so nicely that another
diver would have to help him in unraveling his
line. Then Jim's body would be discovered.
Yes, he reasoned, as he slowly ascended from
the deck of the wrecked vessel, it would be child's
play. No one would ever know. And he had a
right to, although the two had been chums from
childhood; Jimmy, the lucky, good-looking,
cheerful fellow had always beaten Bill out. First
it had been at marbles, then the mathematics
prize in High School, that promotion in the salvag-
ing concern, and lastly Hill's girl. Yes, he had a
right to. He'd beat him at last.
When Bill reached the top, he reported the
vessel resting on good bottom and a slightly
uneven keel. Next day operations would begin
with Jimmy Ballard and Bill Curry working the
first shift. Bill's spirits were rather high that
night. He cracked jokes and played poker-
losing to Jimmy, as usual. Turning in early, he
slept but very little. Later- Jimmy came in.
Bill lay awake practically all night listening to
Jim snore and planning-planning.
At breakfast the next morning Bill's plans were
almost upset by little "Sherlock" Masterson's
offering to serve Jimmy's shift below. Bill broke
in with, "Now, Sherlock, Watson and I will be
back presently. You stay here and solve the
mystery of the I'nseen Hand!' The mess
broke into guffaws of laughter. Little Master-
son's passion for mysteries was certainly well
known.


At last the moment had arrived, the divers'
feet touched the wreck's deck almost simultane-
ously. Placing their helmets together they held
a short talk. Bill, as surveyor, had the seniority;
consequently he advised Jimmy to go down
through the refrigerating room and meet him in the
engine room. )bediently Jimmy lifted his leg
over the hatch and so made his last earthly move.
Bill swung the door shut, the catch slipped, an.1
only the life line and air tube dangled mutely
and uselessly, pointing to the tragedy. Calmly
Bill went aft to the engine room where he pro-
ceeded to get wound up very completely in the
ladders and pipes. overheadd the salvaging tug,
receiving no signals from the two divers, immedi-
ately prepared the one remaining diver, little
" LI ri..k Softly the dead man's body was
brought to the top, while far below Masterson
assisted Bill in wir.i,,,_ili i his fouled pipe an I
life line. As soon as Bill was loose he gave the
signal to be hoisted. Little Masterson lingered
below for a short while. When he was finally
taken out of his suit, his pale face wore a very
set look.
The lives of men may wax and wane but the
salvaging must go on. Jimmy Ballard was
buried next day. That night in New York a
flippant young woman shed a tear and went to
a musical show--with another fellow. As far as
the men on the tug were concerned, the episode
was a closed book, a chance they all took and
would have to meet face to face sooner or later.
One, or I might say two, did not forget the matter.
Bill was looking bad. He ate little and roamed
the deck at night. Masterson wore a strange
look and was often observed staring at Curry.
The men took no particular notice of Masterson's
change, and they attributed Curry's gloom to
grief for a pal. One day a week after the unfor-
tunate accident little Masterson had a long and
earnest conversation with the carpenter. Shortly
after, Masterson walked off to his cabin with a
very small and delicate saw. Masterson's cabin
was, by the way, next to Curry's.
The men noticed a change in Curry, but little
did they know of how great a change it was.
He slept but very little and often would awake
from a doze to find himself listening for Jimmns's
snore. He smoked package after package of








THE CARlI14I-.N;N.


cigarettes. Late at night he would get up and
pace the deck. He took, at last, to .rink. andi
in the mornings would come down to breakfast
with a hec., i1 flushed face and bloodshot eyes.
Masterson was forever watching him. Curry
noticed this one day and after that was very care-
ful to avoid him. He entered into none of the
IriLndl' little card games but would, instead,
stand in a darkened corner of the deck and gaze
abstractedly into the water. One night he turned
in fairly early. He dozed in fits. About one
o'clock he awoke from an unquiet slumber in a
cold sweat. Not moving a muscle, he stiffened
in a listening attitude. Aaah-there it was-
Jimmy's snore-Was he going crazy? He leaped
out of his bunk and flung on the lights to find-
nothing but an empty mattress in Jim's bunk.
He flung the mattress out, tore up the bunk, and
still found nothing. He slept no more that night.
He drank quite a bit from his private store.
In fact, he drank so much that he was unable to
report for duty next mnirning. The captain
decided Curry would have to be laid off next
time they reached port. The next night he was
again startled to hear that snore. It was a
slightly nasal snore, and all night he listened to
its rise and fall, too stupefied even to get up and
turn on the lights. The following day he reported
for duty wearing a haggard, haunted look. He
also asked if he might change his cabin. When
MaNI.t r,,.n heard this, his face relaxed. Masterson
spoke to the cabin boy during the day.
In the mess room that night the boys were
playing their game. \M:ir'.r~ .n was ,itti n in a
corner reaclin: a certain im.iL'./in commonly
known as a thriller. He appeared restless and
seemed to be waiting for something. A noise
of running sounded on the deck outside. The
door burst open and Curry r.agg ri-'L in, but what
a Curry!-"He's outside," he kept moaning,
"outside smoking just like he used to. He's
been in my cabin every nii'ht haunting me. Yes,
I kill i. him. I'll tell, but for-sake take him .mi.1 ."
Masterson was at his elbow in a second. In
his hand he clutched a pencil and paper. I *inur
Curry's fear as a tool, he fil:ill% wormed a full
i .ll'N..%,l in out of him. Curry broke down
completely. After that, he seemed to g,' out of
his head. "That snore him-that snore keep-
in' me awAke. \\,1'l, I got even with him."
They .I.wu,'..l him away and locked him up.
Sometime later when the tie was on its way
home, the men L..r little \I.iLr~,rni to gi6.' an


explanation. Masterson was reluctant, but he
gave in at last and told them.
"You fellows always kidded me about my
sleuthing, but I tell you it's my only weakness. I
spend hours making up crimes and solving them.
That day when both of those men fouled at once
in different parts of the wreck I smelled something.
Of course, I didn't know anything about either
of those l.,. ;, or I'd have suspected something
sooner. As it was, I wasn'" sure till Curry asked
to change his cabin. That made me positive.
One other little incident started me at first.
When I found Ballard behind the door, I noticed
distinctly that, considering the angle the vessel
was on, it was absolutely impossible for the door
to swing on him. It had to be pushed, and some
human had to do it. That wasn't very obvious,
or I suppose Curry would have noticed it.
Furthermore, the slip might have settled a little
so I couldn't bank on that. Another thing,
Curry was beautifully tangled in about three
places. Now you know, and I know that to
foul is a coincidence; three at once is too much.
After that I spoke to the carpenter and confided
in him. We hatched up a little plot. Being next
to Curry and Ballard, I couldn't help hearing
Ballard snore. I cut a hole between the cabins
under Ballard's bunk. I had been listening to
Curry moving about and I knew he was restless.
I just snored through that hole every time he
went to sleep. To-day I decided to bring things
to a close. I bribed the cabin boy not to fill
Curry's water bottle. He has been drinking
steadily, and consequently I knew he would
want water to-night. I just fixed it so that when
he came out of his cabin he'd find the carpenter,
who is about Jimn'.'s build, standing at the rail
smoking Jimmy's pipe and dressed in Jimmy's
clothes. These I took out of Curry's cabin while
he was diving to-day. You remember how Jimmy
used to stand outside his cabin after watch and
smoke his pipe? Well, Curry had noticed it too,
because he'd always call when Jimmy's time was
up. Well, that just finished him. The rest was
simple."
"One thing I want to know, Sherlock," said
one of the men, "Ho, could you imitate Jimmy's
snore well tni-,,'h to fool him?"
"I could tell that snore anywhere. It was a
slightly nasal snore, and many's the night it's
kept me awake," and Masterson's eyes blinked
at the homely memory.








THE CARIBBEAN.


S USANN E.
Dnrothy s'eesnou, '2;7.
She was staring blindly before her when we
first saw her. Her shrunken little figure looked
pain-wracked as she rigidly sat in her squeaky old
locking chair. She turned watery-weak eyes in our
direction as we entered the bare but neat room.
"Susanne," said )r. Tucker, this is a class from
Cristobal High School. They have come to say
hello to my very best patient."
"Oh, sir, no, sir," said old Suzanne. with a
pleased, yet wistful look, as she smiled lovingly at
the doctor. Then to us, "The doctor says such
nice tlli'-L. -
\\e stood around, embarrassed, wanting to say
the suitable thing to this lovable old woman who so
Iravely submitted to her terrible affliction
leprosy.
Finally the doctor said kindly. "Tell these nice
young people how you are, Susanne."
"I am getting along very well. The fingers on
my right hand are not treating me as wretchedly as
those on my left hand."
Mutely we gazed down at her left hand. twisted
and contorted into a hard lump, the fingers seem-
ing to have been melted and then shaped to form ;
hideous mass of brown scaly substance.
"Do not be sorry for me," she spoke as if dis-
cerning our very thoughts. "The Lord is good.
See!" She moved her left hand up and down.
"And nothing can hurt my hand. I could put a
hot iron on it. I wouldn't feel anything -would
I, octor Tucker?" and she looked trustfully up at
him.
"Oh." she i.-llt ii "the Lord is good, yes, yes
(now gently rocking back and forth), the Lord is
good is goodl"
e said good-bye t her that litiftold woman
whose beautiful trust in (;od so stirred our hearts.

CONSCIENCE.
A' r n ,'ak:, ''.
\ith shifting eyes and ever pivoting head which
continually turned to cast frightened glances
over his shoulder, Joe Winfries crept silently
through the I.'.r., white tunnel on his nightly
round of inspection.
This job of night watchman ot the tunnels on
the locks was getting on his nerves. On his
first week the voices had been mere whispers, and
he had only caught glimpses from the corner of
his eye of "The Thing" as it dodged around cor-
ners. Now the voices called him by name,


mocked him, laughed, and taunted him. He
could hear them nmo. "Winfries! Ha, Ha!
tou murderer. You're going to get caught.
Ho, Ho!"
A shadow fell from just around the bend. Ile
rushed forward but the long corridor, warm and
damp from the imprisoned air, was empty. The
thing that got him most, however, was a nightly
performance that took place regularly at the
ilH..i..n places. lie stopped. There it was
again this time in a room about three hdors ahead.
"Mi (od, \\infries, have mrc!" A cruel laugh,
a shot, some groans, and all was .ril
He leaped to the door and threw his ligh*
within. Empty. He had known it would be.
\Was he _'..; crazy ? If he had only not left his
temper run away with him and killed a man in
cold blood he would not be here hiding. If he
could only tT another o4b. But this was the
only one in which he could work nights and sleep
dluriil, the day.
He continued his round of inspection more
nervous than ever. An iron door swung open
ahead of him. Before it clanged shut he had a
glimpse of ghostly glowing eves. Lseless to
look. IHe kIno: hle would find nothing. He
felt like screaming.
Then the noises stopped. Everything ceased,
voices and all. The silence was worse than the
noise. le crept along fearfully, looking into the
rooms and down into the pits where the larger
machinery was.
Into one of these pits he peered, gave a little
gasp and ihokcd again. There it was. Surelv
that was it-"The Thing" that had been looking
at him and tormenting him.
licking his quivering lips and waiting a moment
to quiet his shaking limbs, hc climbed stealthily
over the guard rail and poised to leap on that
cloth-cvcereCd back, fifteen feet below.
At this ioiment the voice s broke out anew.
T hey were trying to warn "The Thing," but he
did not care, foir thlre worl be too late.
He clapedl; shrill scream echoed though the
tunnel, followed Iby others which became moans
and then died awax.
All was silent but the mournful croaking of the
frogs.
The next dav they found him--imipaled on a
long steel rod that leaned against a barrel. ()n
the barrel the coat of a careless laborer x as laid
in such a manner that it resembled the broad
back of a man.







THE C. k lHIB 1 1-N.


OUR CARNIVAL.
Dorothy Svensson, '27.
Elzabeth Hacke!t, '29.


Saturday night, M1.1% 7, Fort de Lesseps was the
scene of much jollity and merry-making. From
7 to I the grounds were crowded with friendsof the
school who came to help make the carnival the
success it proved to be.
The side shows came first. In one tent sat the
Bearded Lady from Australia, while Doleful Della
sighed mournfully in another. In other tents were
the horrifying red bats, the awe-inspiring Roman
Ladder, one hideous head'ess calf! A mysterious
fortune teller foretold such futures as to give joy
to the heaviest heart-money, travel, happiness!
The museum contained many noteworthy and price-
less objects. W h,. can forget Madame Nelsonnio,
the eccentric tight rope walker? (Certainly we
can't.)
The answers to many perplexing home questions
were to be found in the booths labeled "Why \1ln1
Leave Home" and "V'Wh Women Leave Home."
The "Canisloi Usae" direct from Alaska, caused
much excitement.
Being girls, we can not state what was to be seen
in the tent "I ,r Men Only," but we must admit
that the contents offered by the tent "For Women
Only" were quite .nligh lit Ill
Skating was c.li-'. .l from 7 to 9 in the tennis
court. IHere rm.i. people forgot their old age and
joined with the iii"-nL generation in reii\ inmg
.1'ilk and, incidentally, black and blue marks.
At 9 o'clock the floor was cleared and the F-',rr
de Lesseps orchestra, which had been giiinlL' a
,l.l;lihtfil concert at the farther end of the
erriunil,, moved up, and soon manI dancers were
sw...inyL to the %%irl, j.i'/\ tunes of that synco-


pating orchestra. Am..ing the dancers could be
seen, here and there, petite girls dressed in snappy
little black and white costumes. f ffiL ently direct-
ed by Miss Hesse and Teresa Gallagher, these girls
entertained the public with a peppy Musical Re-
vue. They jauntily sang the latest hits and
stepped lively, while the agile clowns, Ray Will
and Burt Hackett, brought down the house.
Dainty little Rae Bliss showed her remarkable
talent in a lively Russian dance.
Lois \\ llih.mn; and Helen \ Inciirr received
much applause for their excellent interpretation
of the songs which they sang. Two lovely violin
renditions by Albert Days charmed the attentive
audience.
Anita Rankin and Ruben Arcia, dressed in the
national costumes of Panama made a rare couple
as they whirled and dipped gracefully to the tune
of "Josephine."
After a hotly-contested battle, Nellie Berger
emerged victorious with over a thousand votes,
and was triumphantly acclaimed "Miss Cristobal
High School."
At the refreshment booth, boys, noisily shout-
ing, entreated one to refresh one's self with cooling
drinks, candy, cakes, and-hot dogs!!!
Though the students, faculty, and public in
general are greatly rn'lspn..ilhl for the success of
our u.il. ci. Illig, it is to the personnel of Fort de
Lesseps that most of our success should be
accredited.
VIVA! CARNIVAL!
VIVA! IF )RT DE .1- SSI- PS
VIVA!








THE CARIBBEAN.


"UNDER TWENTY."
Louise 7. HMack, '2y.


"Under Twenty" was an outstanding success
of which Cristobal High School is very proud.
Each year the Senior Class Plays continue to im-
prove until it seems that "Under Twenty," one
of the cleverest comedies ever presented by our
high school, has reached the highest excellence.
Our invaluable I rni;i;.-, Miss Dodds, used
her customary discernment in selecting a comedy
that was best adapted to the abilities of the senior
students. It was also I\l- Dodds who coached
the characters so perfectly and supervised the
entire performance. It was, in a great measure,
a result of her discrimination and effort that the
play was so well acted that it seemed to have
been written for those who portrayed the char-
acters.
The central figure of this delightful three-act
comedy of a modern family is captivating Peeks,
the younger daughter of Mr. Farnum, who pro-
fesses to be bankrupt in order to check his family's
extravagance. In spite of -il. liiri ., Peeks
arranges circumstances so that Grace, her elder
sister, can '\l.rry Money" in the person of
Donald, who has struck oil The day before
Grace's marriage to Donald, the Farnums
discover to their dismay that Ted, the suitor
whom Grace really loves, has inherited millions.
Infallible Peeks urges Ted to elope with Grace
while she succeeds in pacifying frustrated Donald
by marrying him herself.
Surse Taylor, as the head of the Farnum family,
was exceptionally proficient. He was not only
a good business man, but acted very well the role
of a loving father.
Peeks, upon whom rested largely the respon-
sibility for the play, although she was called the
baby of the family, was admirably portrayed by
Dorothy Wertz. Her natural charm and viva-
city endeared her immediately to the audience.
James Grider, representing Donald Brown,
deserves much praise for the sincere manner in
which he interpreted the leading role. His
manliness and force of character gave strength
to his acting.
MR ,5s)x--8


Helen Montgomery was most attractive as
Grace Farnum, though not as severe as an elder
sister might be. Her costumes, although not
quite as stunning as those of Diana, a rich vamp
who attempted to marry Donald, were very
becoming.
In the character of Diana, which was pictured
to perfection, Helen Vineyard exhibited all the
scheming qualities of a vamp with hbautiful
features and tine clothes.
The part of Mrs. Farnum was taken by Emily
I,.. ...... No one could have filled better than
she did the part of an hysterical, extravagant
mother.
Ted Rutherford was very well portrayed bv
James Van Scotter, whose good looks and pleasant
manner made him well liked on both sides of the
footlights.
Charles Will in the role of Bill Boyd, the list
less night watchman, and Clara May, portraying
the faithful vet domineering old servant, Rannie,
supplied amusing side comedy.
The plot of "l'nder Twenty" was most divert-
ing, crammed with rapid action and exciting
situations. The conversation of the characters,
which was spirited and Ihumrous, was spiced with
clever remarks delivered with ease and assurance.
The beautiful costumes of the actors combined
with the artistic arrangement of the stage prop-
erties contributed a note of elegance and refine-
ment to the home-like atmosphere.
Taking the performance as a whole, the produc-
tion of "L'nder Twenty" was an in i, ill fine
amateur achievement meriting the unanimous
applause which it received.
THI 1 PIACIF AND TIME.

Act I. Sun parlor of the Iarnum home at Sea.-sweep, Long
Islain., on a summer afternoon.
Act II. Scene I. The same place in the evening of the s une
day.i
Scene I. The same place on an afrernooi a month
Liter.
Act. Ill. R nnic's orni I iter rtIt evening.


9I1(I


L


BJ I -- -


0








THE CARIBBEAN.


THE PERFORMANCE.
Act I. "But how can I keep down the ,ill., if I can never
find out how high up they are?"
"You said you'd go diving-in the deep blue sea."
Act II. Scere I. "That sneak thief must be in here some-
where."
"Well, if you can't take care of yourself
with the women, nobody can help you."
Scene II. "There's nothing so pathetic as a wedding
veil."
"Well, ma'am, it will he like skinning a cat
to lock that one up."
Act III. "You mean you want to marry me to make yourself
suffer?"
"No second-hand wedding presents for me!"
THE PLAYERS.
(In the order in which they appear.)
Ida Fmrnum-who is not an expert accountant...........
EMILY BLEDSOE
Grace Farnum-who likes money better than she can count
it ...... ....... ..... ........ HELEN MONTGOMERY
Peeks Farnum-who is tired of being the baby.............
DOROTHY WERTZ
Bozo-whose nose knows...... ............HIMSELF
Rannie-who has her own ideais................CLARA MAY
Rus ell I;.rnum-wlho i. not bankrupt...... SURSE TAYLOR
Bill Boyd-who w :s in the Army .......... CHARLES WILL
Diana Edgerton-who knows her business..HELEN VINEYARD
Ted Rutherford-who is interested in chicle-and Grace....
JAMES VAN SCOTTER
Donald Brown-who is caught between the deep blue sea
:nd--Di n.i .... .......... JAMES GRIDER

THEIR ASSISTANTS.
I.AWREKCE C. CALLAWAY, JR., Business Manager.
JosEPH CORKIGAN, A.ssistant Business Manager.
DOROrTH SVENSSON, Prompter.
Elt 'HEMIA \WooLNorGH, Alusic Committee.
I s-l l HeIM and JOHS NELSOS, Publicity Committee.
ANE J. McNAC GHTEN- and TERESA GALLAGHER, Costumes.

STAFF HOP.
i).,' L. WIertz, '27.

Chaperoncs: \lr. and Mlr-. Frank Mack, Mr.
E. S. 11.ii.'i irran.
C(mmmittee in Charge: Teresa Gallagher;
Dorothy I.. Wertz, Charles Will, and Jack Klunk.
On J.iiii.ir\ 7, the staff cf THE CARIBBEAN
gave a I'1'i" at the Masonic Temple. "The
CIl. Li.iti.." an orchestra made up ofhigh school
students under the leadership of Mr. Seiler, fur-
nished excellent music. Besides the faculty,
the alumni, and members of the student body, a
few friends had been invited. Those present are
unanimous in Ir,, I.imring it one of the outstand-
;JL' social events of the year.


SENIOR PARTY.
Louise Heim, '27.
Emma Banks, '28.
One bright November morning, Cristobal
High School students were confronted by strange
hieroglyphics on the blackboard in the assembly
room. The curious (in other words, one and all I
fi nally managed to decipher that exceedingly queer
cssagec, which revealed that the class of went -
seven was giving a queer party on the nineteen th
of November, nineteen hundred and twenty-six.
On that night there gathered at the Masonic
Temple a motley crowd, representing every
walk in life from the Puritan to the gaudy
flapper. During the grand marLh, Mr. Arthur
Mundllerg, as a sailor boy, and Miss Winnie I:rced
Jacobs, who looked like Peter Pan himself, ani
the prizes for best costumes. We may add that
a tall slim maiden, Mister-ah-er-Miss Jhn
Nelson attracted no little attention.
Due to the kindly thoughtfulness of the enter-
tainment committee every one was enabled to
show his or her dramatic ability in a game of
stunts. Much enjoyment also was derived from
various other games. Instructions were given
to shake hands with everyone present to try to
find out who had the dime; some chewed the
string; while others endeavored to undo hands
tied in a puzzling style.
About nine-thirty Dwyer's orchestra and deli-
cious refreshments were welcomed by all, and
the revelers danced the rest of the evening away.

JUNIOR PARTY.
Gladys Beers, '28.
Royal Higgason, '28.

Friday, December 17th, the Junior Class gave
their annual party at the Y. W. C. A., entertain-
ing the faculty, students, and alumni. Being on
the last day prior to Christmas vacation, our
party was made a Christmas affair. To suit
the occasion, every one brought a present. Then,
later, Santa Claus, on his arrival, distributed
the gifts among hi children. (Fr.ryvnr was a
child that night.)
Dancing followed, the music being furnished
li the Fort DeLesseps orchestra. Refreshments
were then served, after which dancing continued
until eleven o'clock, when everyone gathered
around the piano and sang our Alma Mater song
and wished t %er, one else a Merry Christmas.
Thus ended the evening for the many joy makers.







THE CARIIBBEAN.


THE SOPHOMORE PARTY.
Vita Lyew, '29.
(Chaperones: Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Palm and Mr. and Mrs.
J. B. Coman.)

The Sophomores of C. H. S. had their party
the fourth of March, 1927, at the Y. W. C. A.
The first part of the evening was spent in a treas-
ure-hunt, which took the students four blocks
away from the Y. W. C. A. Joe Corrigan, '27,
found the treasure, a five dollar I-,.1.1 piece, which
was in an alabaster box behind the piano. He
deserved the prize, for he certainly worked hard.
On the whole, the hunt was enjoyed by everyone.
The hall was decorated with serpentines, and
confetti was distributed to the students, which
gave a touch cf carnival to the party.
When the orchestra tuned up at nine, the danc-
ing began. The music was alluring, the floor
wonderful, the hall spacious, and the evening cool
as it always is in the tropics. What else could the
dancers crave! Refreshments were served through-
out the evening.

THE FRESHMAN PARTY.
Rosemary Keene, '29.
(Chaperones: Mrs. G. H. Boomer and Mr I. I.. Bo.)

As amateurs, the Freshmen were quite success-
ful in giving an enjoyable party on Friday evening,
April 22, 1927, at the Y. W. C. A.
'Ihe auditorium was gayly lighted and was dec-
orated with large palm leaves which were arrayed
around the walls of the room. All enjoyed d.lanrin
to the music furnished by an excellent orchestra.
Early in the evening, cake was served and also
cool punch, which was eagerly received by the hot
and thirsty dancers.
During the course of the evening there were
numerous tag-dances, a string dance, and manv
others. At eleven o'clock, the party was closed
by singing our school song, and all left with gaiety
befitting the close of the last school party of the year.

THE SUPPER CLL'B.
Ethel Ifeslnian, 'J2S.
President, Er'PHEIMIA \OOLNoI G(H.
'ice President, ZNE.LLA BLss.
Secretary, EMILY GRIDER
Treasurer, EMMA BASKS.
On the evening of the second Friday of every
month, the Y. W. C. A. is the meeting place of the


Supper Club. Business is conducted during the
earlier part of the evening, and plans are made
for future activities of the club. Miss Euphemia
Woolnough, the president, presides, assisted by
Miss Dodds, Miss MacGillivrav and \Mri Grune-
wald. (\i.- Dodds, the club's adviser from its
beginning, has resigned, to the deep regret of all
the members.) After the reading of the minutes
reports are made by the various committees, and
are discussed.
After the business :iL'. rl.ri is ended, the mem-
bers proceed to the long table and grace is said.
The members of the various high school classes
take turns cooking and serving the meals. Sing-
ing and laughter are abundant. School songs are
in full swing and everyone participates.
After a brief social period, all depart for other
places.
That the club is both interesting and popular is
evidenced by the fact that forty-seven eirl, of the
sixty-:;ighr attending hiuh school this year belong
to it.


MOTHERS' AND DAl I ; rl F R,' BANQUET.
.dair Tayrlr, '29.

Saturday the fourteenth of May, one hundred
and fifty mothers and daughters attended the
Mothers' and Daughters' Banquet. The decor-
ations were in pink and blue. Each mother
and each |atuhrt r wore a little (ld-fashioned
paper cap tied with a blue crepe paper streamer.
After an enjoyable dinner at which our boys
shone as waiters, the pr,.Lr.inlllli was given.
1.i- Euphemia Woolnough was toast mistress
and filled the office very capably. Mrs. William
H. Sperry gave a most interesting talk on -"'Ir h-
ers of Yesterday," Mrs. H. I,. Phillips on "Girls
of To-day" and Mrs. G. H. Boomer on '\1 .thcr
of To-morrow." Gladys Beers sang "Little
\lirhcer O' Mine." Helen M.nrrg..-inrt Aloha
Slocum, and Emily Grider, who are interested
in Supper Club and Girl Reserves, gave interest-
ing talks on Mothers, a theme that can never
be exhausted.
When the pr..g.:lnim. was over, each girl had
a thoughtful look on her face as if she had
resolved to be to her mother a better "chum in
joy and comrade in distress," for after all who
can get along without mother!







60 THE CARIBBEAN.


THE HIGH SCH( J) <. ( RCIIHSTRA.
Robert .xtell, '2S.
fack Kilnnk, '2S.

'I he I'ihl school orchestra represents one end
.f C. H. S.'s musical talent. It is present when-
ever the high school requires music of quantity
and quality combined. Not content with play-
ing the cheap jazz of our modern :12,-, this or-
ganization is frequently heard at banquets, or at
the school's presentations of dramatic art, as, for
instance, the latest pr'-Iductiii n, "Under Twenty."
I her- are just enough in number for a small
theater orchestra. This thriving .'.'une sym-






















Mrs. Baker.
phony boasts as its able director, the well-known
Mr.. Baker. Under the rule of her agile baton
are the piano, seven violins, two trumpets, two
saxophones, and a clarinet.
Every Tuesday afternoon, this group r.il,. be
heard I.trinII the iurrnuundirin atmosphere in
vibration. Most of us are unable to tell the
IIffirc.-n.' between music and noise according to
\li'. LAll's definition, but we can very easily
hear the .liff',r ni i when listening to our orchestra.
We are ready to give thanks to the Irganiii/.i th
and its members, for the help it has rendered the
school and community. We sincerely hope that
it mn'. be as successful next year as it is the present
one.


BOYS' GLEE CLUB.
Donald Pohle, '29.

The Boys' Glee Club, asone of the school organi-
zations, was started with high interest at the be-
ginning of the school year of 1926-1927.
We were fortunate in having as a leader Mliss
Hesse, for she has had previous experience with
college choruses.
In all of the preceding years the accompani-
ments had been furnished by a lady pianist, but
finding one of the members well fitted to carry on
the work, the club this year elected Morris Luce.
Each member of the Glee Club is also a regular
member of the chorus led by Mrs. Baker, and
though interest has fallen until ,nlv eight mem-
bers are left, we still meet every Thursday at
three o'clock to sing the many songs learned and
to learn new ones equally as good as the former
ones.

CHORUS.
Gretchen W. Palm, '29.
Chorus, under the capable and enterprising
direction of Mrs. E. S. Baker (formerly our Miss
Currier), has been both pleasant and instructional.
There were some eighty students enrolled this
year-many of them for the love of the music
rather than for the credit. The chief undertaking
of the year was the learning and memorizing of
"The Rose Maiden," a very beautiful cantata by
Fred Cowen. Mrs. Baker has for seven years
been the director of the C. H. S. chorus and has
earnestly tried to instill into us some of that music
which is a part of her and of which she is a part.

GIRLS' GLEE CLUB.
Ethel Barnett, '2p.
On Wednesday, after school, the Girls' Glee
Club demonstrates its talents. The harmony of
these aspiring warblers is not always "heavenly,"
and many are the discords that clash on the long-
suffering MKs Hesse's ears.
Glee Club, however, boasts several "golden
throats" and when these are melodiously combined
with the less valuable vocal chords, the sound is
not .a/;a:tv. objectionable. Almost ;very year the
public is allowed to hear these songsters. On the
whole it is an institution creditable to C. H. S.
LcnL live the Girls' Glee Club.







THE CARIBBEAN. 61


JUNIOR-SENIOR BANQUET.
Never has there been a more successful Junior-
Senior Banquet in Cristobal High School than
the one Friday evening, June third, at which the
members of the class of 1928 were hosts to the
class of 1927, the faculty, and Mr. and Mrs.
V. E. Seller. Those present-forty-three in all-
were seated at a huge square U table in the Hotel
Washington dining room. Along the center ran
a row of tiny electric lights-almost hidden by a
bank of foliage and pink oleander blossoms. The
fun began when the guests tried to find their
places by the use of the clever place cards executed
by Morton Southard of the Sophomore Class.
Each card contained the face of the victim cut
from a small kodak picture. Then drawn above,
below, and around were backgrounds which
illustrated some pet foible or peculiarity. The
point was further impressed by clever couplets.
At each place, also, besides the "cracker"
favors with their surprise contents, were menu-
program books. Wht i these were opened it was
discovered that each guest among the ladies had
been given a dainty, hand-blocked yellow hand-
kerchief, while the gentlemen had larger editions
of the same articles in gray and blue.
The menu, prepared under the capable direction
of Mr. J. E. Lewis, was a delicious one.
The program of toasts was brief. Miss
Gladys Beers, the toastmistress, called first
upon the Junior president, Edward Lowande, who
expressed his class' appreciation of the seniors
and its pleasure in ':nrtiLri.inini them. To this,
Teresa Gallagher, president of the Senior Class,
responded, expressing gratitude to the Juniors
and a belief that the Juniors would "carry on"
the work and traditions of the school. Miss
Dodds then made brief remarks, closing with an
appeal to the students to remember that "the
set of the sail" rather than the direction of the
winds, is what really counts in life's voyage.
Last, Robert Axtell with deft clairvoyance,
pictured the future of each member of the Senior
Class-to the entire satisfaction of all.
The guests then repaired to the tea room where
they tni,1"cd a splendid program prepared by
the Juniors.
The first half was given by the girls. They had
prepared "The Klclt .n i.i, ," an old, but clever,
one-act farce, under the direction of Miss Moore.
The girls did some acting which bodes well for
the success of next year's Senior Play.


THE KLEPTOMANIAC.
(One-act play.)
CAST.
Mrs. John Burton (Peggy)) .. ETHI: WESTMAN
Mrs. Valerie Chase Armsby (a young widow) EMM, BANKS
Miss Freda Dixon .. ...... .. (.GLAr S E. BEER-
Mrs. Charles Dover (Mabel).. .... K.XIHRVX LAMBERT
Miss Evelyn Evans (a journalist) ..... l.It.CIA SALAZAR
Mrs. Preston Ashley (Pe-tha) .... .. ZoxEsl.LA Butss
Katie-Mrs. Burton's Maid ....... EVANGELINE SMInT
(Scene-Mrs. Burton's bedroom.)

For their part of the evening, the boys,
sponsored by Miss Hesse, presented a radio
program with Frank Kimbell as announcer.
First came the Discordant Seven, an orchestra
made up almost entirely of Junior boys; then,
Murderer's Row, in which Frank Kimbell and
Jack Klunk were featured in "Where do you
Work, John," with Alberta Days as the star-
no question.
The most laughter-producing event of the
evening was the drama, "Under Thirteen,"
a side-,plittiiii travesty on the Senior Play,
"Under Twenty," To see the delicate Keeps,
Frank Kimbell, bearing in her arms the bashful
Ron, Jack Klunk, who had "had his wind knocked
out"; to hear the ruthless vamp, Arthur Rothen-
burg, assuring the doughty father, Harold Owen,
that all good kissers marry young; to witness the
.ish1,ist with which the hysterical Mrs. Arnum,
Albert Days, viewed the bounding, barking,
belted Bozo, Foster Tufts, who was later le:
from the stage by the careful Ronnie, Woodford
Babbitt; to watch the "Grace"-ful fluttering of
Rage Farnum, Robert Axtell; the pitiful plight
of Red, Foster Tufts, and the listless lounging
of Fill Void, Teddy Henter-to see these was t,
explain the gales and shrieks of laughter which
were heard all during the brief playlet.
After a bedtime story by the announcer, the
evening festivities were over-the guests de-
lighted with a happy evening's entertainment, and
the hosts satisfied in the knowledge that a good
deed had been well done.


SHORT STORY CONTEST.
This year's short story contest brought in
much material from which one may prophesy a
"better CARIBBEAN" each year. Besides the
authors of the winning stories which are printed
many others received honorable mention.








THE CARIBBFAN.


Boys', James Grider, '27.
THE BOYS' ATHLETIC


ASS


-- -- 17,





Girls', Dorothy Svensson, '27.
THE GIRLS' ATHLETIC


SOCIATION. ASSOCIATION.
O()ifi, r Officer".


PrIeident .... .. .. JAME G DFR
irce Presiid t .... .... A. AI r RI)r
Secretlaiy avnd Treas'tr Ai1 \ N R K \

./k'in Rankin, '2,.
The B. A. A. was a gre.it help to the
bovs who entered tl.e .ihleric activities
of the school. At thle tings, the com-
ing athletic events \ere discussed and
captains and iman.ager. elected. This
association also help, to secure funds
for athletic suits iand other necessary
equipment.




13B(

In most things, success can be obtained only by
persistent effort. Athletic competition is no excep-
tion. The athletic program of Cristobal High
School for the year 1926- 92- has experienced the
extreme in victories and defeats. The reason is
simply that the students have been industrious
and persistent in some activities and very negli-
gent in others. Results have been achieved
accordingly. C. H. S. can lie successful in her
athletic competition in all branches if she will give
each the necessary attention.
Although, to date, C. H. S. has succeeded in
winning only once from Balboa High School, she
has fared exceedingly xv.Jl in the other attempts
where she has been faithful in preparation.


Pre.idtl F HELEN MONTGOMERY
I/ 't Pr'esilh,'t D)oROHYr SVE-\SS,
.,'r,'tirv--Tr'asrer D)ORTHY I... \\'VFIZ

DIorothvy L. II ertz, '27.
The \ear 1,27 proved to be a most
suctessiful one for the Girls' Athletic
Association. The girls paid dues of
rtif n cents a \earr. From this amount
suits for basketball, and letters for various
teams were purchased.
The G. A. A. encourages the girls' in-
terest in athletics and helps to promote
a feeling of good sportsmanship.


)YS.


Certainly C. H. S. can be thankful for possessing
the calibre of athletic director she has in Mr. V. E.
Seller. He has not only been industrious but has
brought to us a deep knowledge of every sport that
came under his supervision. The school in general
gratefully thanks Mr. Seller for his untiring and
successful efforts. We only hope that he mav
remain with us for years to come.
Finally, we are deeply indebted to the com-
munity for its strong backing and interest.
Next year we lose only two men-Grider and
Will. Both of these have taken part in several
sports but their places will be eagerly filled by the
remaining students. Thus, C. H. S. can look
forward to another fruitful year in athletic com-
petition.














The most outstanding proof that suc-
cess is obtained by persistent effort was
shown in our baseball. We entered the
twilight league and in the first half were
just able to escape the cellar, but in the
second half we finished second. Several
of ojr players were considered the best
in the league at the close of the season.
In fa:t, Greene, Lowande, and Will be-
came proficient enough to win regular
positions in the Isthmian League.
Jack Klunk, our catcher and captain,
hal one of the strongest :hrming arms
in the league. At bat, he was always
dangerous. He hit four homers in his last
fur games, finishing with an average of
.302.
Mike Greene was, by far, the best
first baseman and pitcher in the league.
He finished the season with a grand
average of .397. As a pitcher, Greene
had more speed and curves than any
other twirler. He made his debut in the
Isthmian League by losing a hard 10-
inning struggle by the score of 4-3.
Charles \\II. though left handed,
played second base and played it well.
At bat he was lead-off man and proved
his ability by batting for .385.
Edward Lowande was not quite the
swatter he was in 1925-1926. Neverthe-
less he was a brilliant fielder and batted
for the respectable average of .304. He
too played in the Isthmian League and
made a good job of it.
Rene Bissonette was our third baseman
but he remained with us only half of the
season. A steady fielder, he proved his
worth in the Balboa-Cristobal series by
inningu the on.l game with two timely
hits-a single and a double.
The outfield was made up of Days in
center, Arcia in left, and Peterson ar'
Wikingstad alternating in right. Pays
was the best hitting outfielder with
an average of .300, while Arcia was our
best defensive outfielder. \\ iknIg.1
and Peterson were not heavy hitters but
were always useful.
Grider was an improved pitcher over
his previous year but was inclined to be
wild at times. He finished with 12 wins
andi 5 losses
IThe following are the results of the
gaEn's in I' he Tu iliIl r League:
FIRST HAL-F.
Dat R'n. Opp. ftii:u
1926.
12 17 ('. I. S. 2, Fort l)el.sseps 8
12 23 ('.II.S. 3, R.&F.A. 5.


12-29
12-31
1927.
1-3
1-12
1-15
1-24
1-31
2-3
2-5
2-8
2-12


2-16
2-19
2 21
2-25
3-1
3-2
3-7
3-9
3-15
3-17
3-23
3-26
3-30
4-1
41-5
4-7


THE CARIBBEAN.


BASEBALL.
C. H. S. 11, Fort DeLesseps 2.
C. H. S. 2, Maulers 6.


C. H. S. 10,
C. H.S. 6,
C. H.S. 8,
C. H.S. 5,
C.H.S. 2,
C. H. S. 18,
C.H.S. 2,
C.H.S. 5,
C. H. S. 10,
SECOND
C.H.S. 5,
C. -H.S. 4,
C. H. S. 3,
C. H.S. 4,
C. H.S. 6,
C.H.S. 1,
C. H. S. 10,
C.H.S. 2,
C. H. S. 12,
C. H.S. 5,
C. H.S. 5,
C. H-. S. 3,
C. H.S. 7,
C.H.S. 1,
C. H. S. 10,
C.H.S. 9,


Outlaws 9.
Maulers 6. (tie)
Fort DeLesseps 2.
Maulers 8.
Outlaws 9.
R. & F. A. 6.
Outlaws 4.
Maulers 6.
Fort DeLesseps 9.
HALF.
R.&F. A. 3.
Outlaws 5.
Maulers 8.
Fort DeLessels 1.
R. & F. A. 1.
Outlaws 4.
Fort DeLesseps 7.
Maulers 4.
R. & F. A. 8.
Outlaws 7.
Maulers 3.
Fort DeLesseps 0.
R. & F. A. 6.
Outlaws 7.
Fort DeLesseps 2.
Maulers 10.


Total runs, C. H. S. 100; Opponents 148.
Percentage, .676.
FIRST GAME OF INTERSCHOOL. BASEBALL
SERIES.
Before a record-breaking crowd, Cris-
tobal High School defeated BalboaHigh
School in a hard fought contest. The final
score was 5 to 3.
It being the opening game of the high
school series, a very colorful ceremony
preceded the game. At 9.30, led by the.
Fort De Lesseps band, the Balboa and
Cristobal teams, and a large crowd of
rooters, paraded around the field.
Such an impressive opening was ac-
complished only by strong backing of the
civilian community and the personnel of
Fort De Lesseps. To these, Cristobal
High School is deeply indebted, and grate-
fully offers its thanks.
The game proved to be very thrilling
and interesting. Grider, the Cristobal
pitcher, w:as forced to reire due to an
injured finger. Greene replaced him and
pitched hitless hall.
Ball ou broke the ice in the second by
scoring one run on two walks and Clis-
hee's single. They added two more in the
sixth on a pass, a hit, an infield out, and
two hits.


Cristobal got to Reese in the fourth,
when they scored five runs. Days made
the only hit, but two passes by Reese,
an infield out, and three errors, gave Cris-
tobal the game.
Both Reese and Grider were constantly
in trouble, being saved by sensational
fielding. Will, Lowande, and Greene
executed a beautiful doubleplay in the
sixth.

Score:
Cristobal. A.B R. 11. PO. A. E.
Will, 2-b..... 3 o o 3 I o
Klunk, c... 4 o o 0 6 I
Lowande, ss.. 4 o o 3 2 o
Greene, lb.. 2 1 o 6 o
Arcia, If... 1i o o o o
Bissonnette,
3b .. 3 o o 3 I 1
Days, cf... 2 o 1 o o0
Wikenstad, cf I I 1 0 o o
Peterson, rf. 2 1 1 2 1 o
Grider, p. 3 I o o 2 o
Rankin, ib... 0 0 o 4 0 0

Totals.. 27 5 3 27 9 2


Balboa.
V.,,r siw-l, n.,
% ll. m. ss..
Wood, If.....
Reese, p.....
Russey, rf...
Clisbee, c... .
Jones, Ib....
Mihalitsianos
2b .......
Johnson, 3b..


H. PO.
o I
I I
I 0
I 2
1 0
2 10
o 8


4 0 0 2 0 1
I 0 0 0 3 0


Totals... 29 3 6 24 10 3

FINAL GAME OF INTER-SCHOOL SERIES.
January 29. The inter-school baseball
series ended to-day, when Cristobal
journeyed to Balboa and took its second
consecutive gar.e. The score was 5 to 3.
A large crowd witnessed the gar.e.
Only about 15 Cristobalites accompanied
the Cristobal team, but their presence
was always recognized.
Balboa scored one run in the first and
two more in the second due to errors and
hits. But both Grider and his teammates
settled down and prevented further scor-
ing.
Cristobal scored one run in the fourth
on three passes and Bissonnette's inrlc.
They repeated in the sixth in the same
way on Will's single.









THE CARIBBEAN.


Cristobal really won the game and Mr. V. C. Seller, our energetic physical The two most thrilling races of the day
series in the seventh. After Klunk had director, has coached the C. H. S. boys were the 5o and ioo-yard dashes. Each


doubled, and Lowande and Green hadl and has certainly imparted a great deal


walked, Days forced in K!unk with tlhe
tying run.
Bissonnette then proceeded to win the
game and series with a double to center,
scoring Lowande and Arci..
Reese and Gri'er pizchel we!l iin I.e
pinches and receive.! sensational sup: <,rt
Reese struck out 23 nce i in two gairi bu
passed the san e number. The fie.inmg
was of high calibre. Greene mn:i e c
putouts in the last gime ;:nd Clisbee
made 13. Wood, Pe.erson, Arciit, an,
Days played the outfield fliwle slI.
TI'he score:
Cristobal. AB. R. II. PO. A. E
Will, 2b 0 1 2 1
Klunk, c. 4 i I
Lowa.nde, ss. 4 2 4
Greene, i b. o c
Arcia, If 2 2 0 2 0 C
D.avs, cf o 2 o
Peterson, rf. 4 0 0 0 0
Bissonnette,
3b..
Cider, p 5 1


Totals..
Balbota.
Williams, ss..
Clisbee, ib.
Wood, If..
Reese, .
Russey, c
Jones, cf ....
Sihalitsianos
2b, ... .
Van Siclen, rf
Johnson, 3b.


Totals.. 31 3 4 2- 1
Summary.
Earned runs-Cristobal 4. Two-base
hits-Klunk, Bissonnetie. Struck out-
By Grider 8, by Reese I Base on balls
-Off Grider 3, off Reese 12. Stolen
bases-Cristobal I Balboa i. Umpires
-Currie and Burgoon.

BASKET BAIL..


of basket ball knowledge. Once
reported for practice, he conti
report, for Mr. Seller's method
interesting as they are beneitci.
A tc practice g.inmes were he
with the idea of deter:ni..iii a
ability, rather than attempting :t
. game. Those who prove. to lie
of ihe first team were: Grider
;.s fiorwt.rds, Lowande ..nd H.i
ceiaers, and \. Paine, Babbi:r
and Owen as guards.
BA B'A-CPItSOBAL BASKEI BALI.
First Game.
Ont Saturda y, June I I, the ft
w.,s play ed in the Cristohal plays
i,,rgc b.nd of r) .:ers was pre.e :t
ior C. H. S. The game w..s vc
.Ind wa.is m..rre,l o v by too miu.l
ing, on Balbo ';, p rc, aboard the

\t t'e end of the first half, t
wa.s t2 all. Howe.er,j, es andi
sianos, of c'. Z. A. A. famn c:iie
gaie, and I.ilboa began to ;: ke
Aticr a whirlwind finish by hbol
the final score showed I win for
37 27.
For Balbox, the le.;r llatel
Jones, Mihlalitsianos, and \\o(
Cristob 1, \ ill, (rider, and I
were the leading scorers. B..
running guard, played a nice flo
unlil relieved lb Hiadein, who
well. Payne replace i Oen is
guird, and stopped a gre.t m
rempts at scoring. Too much ini
pl.iy was shown in Cri ob. i's g,
was largely re.,tponsib'e for her
The score in line up:
Cristob.il H. S. Fd. I .
Grider, f
\\ f 3
Low;;nde, c 3.;
Babbitt, g
Owen, g o
Hayden, g .. .. o
V. Payne, g
9


A squad of 16 candidates turned out Score: C. H. S
for basket ball this year. Will, Grider, B. H. S
Babbitt, Lowande, and Owen, are veter- O June i8 Balboa High Scho
ans of last year. The others who com- defeated the Cristobal High Sc
I defeated the Cristobal High Sc
plere the squad are \. Payne, R. Payne, the score of32 to 2.
l.ugli, Klunk, Days, Mlaher, Greene,
Kimbell, Hayden, D)ekin, and Tufts. SWINIMMING-BOYS'.
All these players except Grider, W\ill, and The swimming meet of 1926
Owen will be available fir next year. one of the best and closest that
Thus C. H. S. may look forward to a taken place between the Cristt
prosperous basket ball season in j128. Balboa High Schools.
MR 5590--9


a player
nuedl to
s r.re a,

I, m in
pl.i er
N win it ie
me.n iers
Ind \\ i!,
yden as






;hel. A
to cheer
ry frast,
Swrn -.i
referee 's


of these races was a close, sprinting
struggle all the way, between Jack
Klunk of Cristobal and Fred Helmerichs
of B.dhoa. However, Klunk upheld his
.itle of the Isthmus' f.s.est swimmer, bh
winning bo.h r;ice-, with a final spurt.
His times for the 5o and loo-Yard dashes
were 2 .2 sevoonds and 59.i seconds,
respect ively.
Cristoh:d lost i:s chance of winning the
meet by failing to gain either a first
or second place in the 220-v:.rd dash.
\e won the relay, but Balboa's lead w .s
too great to overcot.oe.
D.i s and Klunk distinguished them-
selves by their fancy diving. l.owande,
Babbitt, Hayden, and, in f.ict, all it
Cristobal's competitors showed up well,
is the score indicates.


I NTERSCI 1001 SWIMMING MEE F.


he score o-yard Dash.
NM1halit- Klunk (C. H S.), 25.2 seconds.
into the 2. Helmerichs (B. H. S.).
the le.Ia. 1,owande (C. H. S.).
h teams, 4. Allen (B. H. S.).
Bal toa, ioo- vanr Dash.
Klunk (C. I. S.), 5).i seconds.
i were tlelmerichs (B. H. S.).
SL [ Allen (B. H. S.).
*w-ntt 4. Tufts (C. H. S.L

b t-v.r Hr Backstroke.
or t unte,
S.1, E. Allen (B. H. S.), 34 seconds.
,tt 2. ;ranberr\ (BI. H. S..
B. Babbitt (C. H. S.L


Wi, i llcY
it )n rai L'l D 'i b'! "c.
i c:t. 1. Humphrems, (B. H. S.IL
2. Klunk iC. H. S.).
( T. 3. D Ys (C. 11. S.).
4 10 4. R. Williams (B. H. S.).
; I 3o-yard Ereasistroke.
o i A. Swinnerman (B. H. S.t, 35.3
0 o seconds.
0 0 2. (;. Halloran (B. H. S.).
o o 3. Wikingstad (C. H. S.).
0 0 4. Arcia (C. H. S.).
o 27 220o-ard Dash.
27 i. Dorswit (B. H. S.), 2 minutes 53
3e7 seconds.
2. Swinermnan (B. H. S.).
ol easily
ol I v Hayden (C. H. S.).
hool bI
4. R. Piayne (C. H. S.).
Rehi v-120- yards.
\\on by Cristobal H. S. (L.owande,
-27 was Babbitt, Tufts, and Klunk),
has ever Total Points Scored.
bald and Balboa H. S., -7}.
Cristobal H. S., 70,.


0 I
0 I








THE CARIBBI AN.


MRS BA BBITT









.


BASKET BSLL


GIRLS.
Dorothy SvRnsson, '27, Girls' Athletics Editor.


This year a truly sportsmanlike feeling
was prevalent in all the sports. The
feeling of jealous rivalry, which in past
years seemed to be uppermost, was notice-
able by its absence. At the beginning of
the school yeir the girls out for gym were
many, and high hopes were entertained
for our chances in our major sports:


basket ball, baseball, track, tennis, and
swimming; but, as usual,the girls dwindled
down to a trusty few. With these trusty
few we managed to hold our own, and
Balboa did not run away with us. Al-
though we won no series-no champion-
ships-we feel that the Criszobal honor of
High School was uphecd.


B ASKT BAI.I.
BIket hall hIis always claimed more
interer thIn :n. other of the girls' sports
in Cristol.l High School. This year has
i,cn note elit ,no. "hlie season was mark-
e byI a wonderful coto icr.alive spirit with
no eviienri, orf i!1 I, lr, between the
scht lo.


I'EL GAMES.
lFebruars 2, the firstgameoftheseitson
was played at the Cristobal playshed.
T"he Cristobal girls showed fine te;amwork
wit h passing nothing short of remarkable
I he Balboa girls had no chance to locate
the baskets, and the game ended with the
score iv to 2, in favor of Cristobal.


'The second game was played February
26, it the Balboa playshed. The Cristobal
girls started right in wi.h their fine work,
hut the Balboa girls tightened up, bring-
ing the game to a 9 to 8 close. This game
was hotly contested-both sides strug-
gling fiercely for the ball. The game seem-
ed ours from the start, and many were


~a~a~A~ramr~e~
`ut









THE CARIBBEAN.


the astonished faces when the final SW-IMMING;.
whistle blew and the score was announced. Although we have easy access to th
Saturday, March 5, the Cristobal High Washington swiminin pool, s wimlin
School team again journeyed to the Silver is not made as much of as iwoud be e-
Side, playing this time at the Pedro pected. This yer inst six girls turine
Miguel playshed on a neutral floor.
iguel lshed neutral fl out for swimming, but by hard work and
Though the ball was almost continuallN
St b w rigorous training they were able to present
under our goal, our forwards could not of t
a teamn worthy of the nanme.
locate the baskets, and the game ended Saturay Ma i e Ci l one
Saturday, Mlav -, in the Canial Zone
Sto o, Ethel Carr of Balboa making the Inter-High School Swimn ing Meet held
only basket.
at the \\ashington s wiming pool, Ba.liboa
Fihe usual line uLP for both sides wds '
The usu line p both des High School defeated Cristolial Iligh
as follows:
School by a 27-2 score. T he meet was
Cristobal H. S. Balboa H. very close and exciting.
Helen Montgomery F .. Ethel Carr Summaries of the events are as follows:
Marion Boomer F Janice (;rimison 3 o-vard llF Sitrle
Dorothy Wertz. SC Marian Allen I Angela K emmer, B H. S., -
Dorothy Svensson. C Angela Kleummr seconds.
Evangeline Smith G ..Ruth John.n 2. arion Boomer, C. H. S.
Ethel Westman G Ruth Fraser L e M B H
3. 1liiiii'.e Ma~rtin, B. H S.


Thus ended the basket ball season. We
had started briskly and ended creditab ly
but not as successfully as we should have
wished. Next year Cristobal High School
hopes to do better although she loses hby
graduation this year three of her veteran
players: Helen Montgomnery, Dorothy
Wertz, and Dorothy Svensson.

INDOOR BASEBALL.
Indoor baseball was revived this year
after a four or five years' lapse from girls'
athletics. The interest shown in ills
game almost rivaled that shown in ihas-
ket ball.
Tie GAMES.

Saturday, March 2, at the Cristobal
playshed, the Balboa girls contended with
the Cristobal High School girls in indoor
baseball. They easily won from us iln a
game composed mainly of errors. The


?o- ard Breast .xtroke.
I. Louise Kerr, B. H. S., z -conds.
2. Kathr n Lambert, C. H. S.
3. Euphemia \\oolnough, C. 11. S.
'o-y ard Back Sit o '.
i. Marion Boomer, C. H. S., 21 <
seconds.
. cAngela Kleniier, B. HI. S.
3. Kath rn Lambert, C. H. S.
60- vardi l-)e Stvd.
I. Elsbeth Whaler, B. I. i 45 2 -
seconds.
2. .ucille Hearne, B. H. S.
3. Rita Joyce, C. H. S.
Fancy li:F i.
1. Angel.i Klemmer, B. H. S.
2. Rita Joyce, C. H. S.
3. Dorothy Heim, C. H. S.
I 2 o --y r l d .'- .
................,..I ....... .,........-..I ..i .t 0. .


final score was 35 to 24. l siiO., 1 ,, ii .i l...1 i. Eli/ziabth (Granberry and Aingela
March 9, at the Balboa playshed the i Joyce, Fuphenmia Woolnougih, Kathryn Kleimer, B. H. S, tied for first pllce.
final game was played. The sides this La"ibert, and Marion Boomer, defeated Height, 4 fect inches.
time were more evenly matched, and the Balbloa's team, Angela Klemmer, Els- 3 Ruth Friser, B. H. S.
fighting spirit was more evident. The helth W\haler, L.ouise Kerr, and lucille Broad Juinp.
Cristobal girls started full of pep and lHearne Rae Newhard, B. H. S. Distance,
ambition, but when the game was almost TExis feet i inches.
over our confidence vanished-and Bal- Tennis took a back seat in the sports 2. Jessie Banan, B. H. S.
boa again trampled over us to victory, this year. Although, hitherto, it had been 3. Edith Clark, B. H. S
The game closed with the score 14 to io second to basket ball in importance, the
in favor of Balboa. girls showed this year very little interest The Balboa team, composed of Rae
The girls who played for Cristobal in in it, and the elimination games for the Newhard, Agnes IMack, IDoci Clishee,
these games were: Marion Boomer, p; school team remained practically all and Louise Kerr, won the relay.
Dorothy Wertz, If; Dorothy Svensson, 3l; unplayed. Finally, on May -, the tour- This event ended the track meet, so
Ruth Lockwood, 2b; Ethel Westman, namentwith BalboaHigh School washed. disastrous for Cristobal High School.
Ib; Evangeline Smith, ss; Helen Mont- Helen Montgomery was matched with Though our team tried hard, they could
gomery, c; Rosemary Keene, rf; Eliza- Carey Walker, champion of Balboa High, not, through lack of practice, compete
beth Hackett, 2b; Emma Banks, rf; in the singles. Helen's usual snappy, successfully with Balboa. Rae New hard,
Euphemia Woolnough, cf; Betty Mont- energetic playing could not break Carey's of .11 ... carried off the individual lion
gomery, 2b; and Louise Mack ib. reserve, and she lost (6-0), (6-1). ors with 1 i) points.


SDorothy Wertz and Mairian Boomer
showed remarkable teamwork in the
doubles, but they too went down to a
i o-I i-o) defeat.
TRACK.
T his year with so much going on in
school, we thought we should never have
enough time to pick up a track team, bur
we did, and wve also inainaCge to hve aI
tfew practice sessions. Saturday A,.i
o saw us at the Balboa Stadium. The
ilmeet was very one-sided, resulting in a
score of4 to 5 in favor of Balboa. Though
we do not like to make excuses, we must
Iadinit that three of our best hopes were
'unable to compete-two through illness
land one for scholastic reasons The
results of the events of the girls' inter-
school track meet, as they took place,
are as follows:
5o-_ar, D),1,.
I. Agnes \lack, B. H S. Tune -
c ccoids.
Amneil Hutchiigs, B I. .
3. Iouise Kerr, B. H. S.
Baseball T7,r,,:i.
I. JaniccGrinison, B. H. S. Distance,
144 feet inches.
A2. Ameil Hutchings, B. IH S.
3. Jessie Banan, B. H. S.
j 75-Yard Dash.
i. RaeNewhard, B. I.S. *hiiein o
seconds.
2. Agnes IMack, B. H. S.
3. Fthel \Vestman, C. H. S.
Basket RiB Thr,,.:.
Amieil Hutchings, B. H. S. Distance,
I feet j in chess.
2 iiiia Banks, C. H. S.
Jamice (Grinison, B. H. S.
/igh 7XnJmp.








68 THE CARIBBEAN.


e,kc- 7i-V-_____ --


Dorothy L. Wertz, '27.


Oct. i. Plane C. H. S., Number 1927, takes off
at eight o'clock with forty-three Photographers
(frcshmani;. thirty-one Radio-operators (sopho-
mores), fifteen Mechanics (juniors), eleven Pilots
(seniors), and eight Officers (faculty), among them
two new ones, Officers Hesse and Gustafson.
Oct. 8. Supper Club Squadron reorganizes
with fifty members present. Old veterans serve.
Oct. II. Squadron Officers elected.
Oct. 12. Flight Officers of THE CARIBBEAN
elected; Fligh Commander-Miss Dodds.
Oct. 13. Boys' Athletic Squadron has meeting.
Oct. 14. Fire drill rules read to all members on
flight.
Oct. 15. Pursuit Squadron-Upsilon Gamma
Gamma organized-Officer Benson, Adviser.
Oct. 16. Girls' Athletic Squadron has meeting.
Nov. 3. All work on flight ceases for the day.
Nov. 5. Supper Club Squadron meets at Y. W.
C. A. Junior-Senior girls serve. Fifty-five
present.
Ni %. 8. First six weeks of flight completed with
everything in perfect order.
N' v. 12. Clara Ma11 joins flight, making sixteen
Pilots.
N\,. 12-14. Y. W. C. A. Squadron meets at
Cristobal for discussion concerning further im-
provements for new model plane. Representa-
tives from Balboa, Gatun, and Pedro lMiguicl
attend the conference.
Nov. 16. Reports sent out from headquarters.
N\,. 17. er.iff Squadron meets at Paul Rose's
home.
N',%. 18. Pilots meet and make plans for their
party.


Nov. 19. Pilots' Queer Party a success.
Nov. 24. Thanksgiving furlough.
Nov. 31. Mr. A. O. Tschiffely talks to the
members of C. H. S. Flying Field about his trip
here from Patagonia on horseback.
Dec. 2. Athletic Squadrons elect captains.
Dec. 3. Staff Squadron meets at the high
school. We rejoice to learn that THE CARIB-
BEAN 1926 has been adjudged a year book of
the second class-a step in advance of the 1925
edition-by the Central Interscholastic Press
Association. This contest includes annuals not
only from the largest high schools of the States
but also from colleges and universities.
Dec. 13. Donations received for free clinic.
Dec. 17. lMtchnniL give party.
Dec. 18. Christmas furlough highly satisfac-
tory.
Jan. 4. Flight Commander, lMi.s Dodds, ill.
Mrs. Robinson substitutes.
Jan. 6. Assistant Superintendent Williams ad-
dresses Pilots.
Jan. 7. Staff Squadron gives an invitation
li .p" at Masonic Temple.
Jan. 8. Girls' basket ball squadron practices
regularly.
Jan. 29. Fort DeLesseps dedicates Flash is-
sue to the members of C. H. S. Field.
Feb. 4. Staff Squadron meets at Pilot Wool-
nough's quarters.
Feb. I. Supper Squadron meets-with Photo-
graph-rs serving.
Feb. 17-19. Exams. given by headquarters
It may be necessary for some to make a forced
landing.








THE CARIBBEAN. 69


Feb. 22. Washington's birthday. Holiday given
all squadrons.
Mlar. 2. Pilots changed from assembly to Room
27 and given first privileges.
\l:r. 3. Staff Squadron meets at Pilot Will's
quarters.
M1:1r. 4. Radiomen give party..
Mar. 25. Supper Squadron meets and gives
Miss Dodds a beautiful friendship pin for her
seven years of service. Radiomen serve.
Apr. 5. Pilots receive play books.
Apr. 13-17. Home leave given during Easter
week. Shortened two days by extra K. P.
Apr. 18. Staff Squadron meets at field quarters.
Apr. 20. Play parts are assigned and work is
started at once.
Apr. 20. Short Story Contest is closed. Papers
go to judges: Miss Jean Mc( llil r.,., Mrs. E. C.
Jones, and Mr. R. R. Gregory.
Apr. 22. Pht..r .ii'lh.r, give party.
Apr. 25. Staff Squadron works on big carnival
to be held at Fort D)eLesseps on May 7.
Apr. 27. Pilots work hard on play, "Under
Twenty" to be given May 20-21.
May 2-7. All members of field prepare for big
carnival.
May 7. It's here! It's gone! Miss Nellie
Berger of the Class of hirty is elected as Miss
Cristobal High School.


MI.,i 19. Poster contest for "Under Twenty"
closes; winners Joseph Corrigan and Morton
Southard tying for first.
Mav 20. "Under Twenty" given at America
Theater.
May 21. "Under Twenty" given at Gatun
Clubhouse.
May 26. Advan-ce sale tickets contest for THE
CA. RIBBEA started.-Boys against girls.
June i. Pilots receive their inl.;yniia, the class
rings.
June 3. Mechanics give Pilots and Commanders
a big banquet at ihe Hotel Washington.
June o1. Supper Club Squadron meets at the
Y. W. C. A. for a farewell service for the Pilots.
Photographers serve.
June 13. Pilots receive announcements and
cards.
June 16. Flight Commander Dodds entertains
Pilots and other Commanders at a dinner in honor
of the former. Commander Peterson's department
caters.
June 19. Baccalaureate service at Christ Church
by the Sea. Bishop J. Craik Morris is the speaker.
June 20-21. Exams. given by headquarters.
June 21. Lieutenant A. M. Bryan, of the U. S.
Navy, addresses the economics class.
June 24. Commencement exercises at the Hotel
Washington.


WHEN THE FLEET \WAS IN.
Helen Vineyard, '27.


The fleet was in! It is iK..ll. to say that the
streets, stores, shops, and restaurants were crowd-
ed with the happy boys, glad to have shore leave
once more, and to be free to roam for awhile.
Through the"Commy"many of the boys passed,
pausing now and then at the lirtkr. iir counters,
looking at perfumes, beads, laces, and shawls.
From the crowd of men that passed by the
dry-goods counter, out stepped a young, handsome
man of twenty. He turned to the sales lady at
the dry goods counter and said with a smile,
"Would you please help me to select some nice
piece of material for a dress?"
"Why, certainly, I'll be glad to," said Miss -."
"Just what kind do you want?" She added.


"W\hy, something that's suitable for one of the
sweetest women in the world," he said with pride.
Miss -took up a bright piece of red fuji silk
and said, '\ ..., what girl wouldn't like a dress
from this _.i.' piece?"
"Oh, yes, it's quite pretty, but you see-"
W\\' I, now look at this piece of pink crepe de
chine, lovely quality."
"Yes, I think it's nice too, but-"
"What about a piece of voil ? "This piece of
green would look striking on her if she's a blonde."
"That's pretty, too," the lad said, confused,
"but-I want a nice piece of soft, dark silk for-
my mother."








70 THE CARIBBEAN.


30W.
=1


a __ -


EXCHANGE DEPARTMENT.

Euphemia Woolnough, '27, .>" ''i.n.' t*Editor.

We are always glad to welcome old or new
exchanges to our department. They aid us in
aIlipting new ideas to make our book a better
one each year, and give us information on activi-
ties taking place in the schools so far from us.
Our exchange list continues to grow. We are
unable to comment on all the magazines that
come to us. We find it impossible also, to com-
ment on weekly papers, but we appreciate them
and read them when they come.

OUTGOING MAIL.


The Cedar Chest. Toms River, New Jersey.
Welcome again to our exchange list. Your literary
department is very good.
The Student. Covington, Kentucky.
A splendid advertising section. Your book shows good
work.

The Whisp. lFilmington, Delaware.
You have splendid cover designs. Your exchange list
is a good one, but where are your comments?
The Curtis \I..!,tt.' Staten Island, N. Y.
A splendid little magazine. But why not comment on
other annuals?
The Beacon. Gloucester, Mass.
\\cl. ,lveloped literary department and a good joke
section. Your cartoons add greatly to your book.
The lpokeepsian. Poughkeepsie, N. Y.
Your book reveals splendid work, but why not add
an exchange section to complete your book?

The lyndonian. Willimantic, Conn.
We enjoyed your literary department very much. We
think a few cut-outs would improve your book.


The Red and Black. Newport. R. I.
Your book is very interesting. Your literary depart-
ment is good.

The Magnet. Butler, Penn.
Good literary ability. Your book shows splendid work.

The tuill. Staten Island, N. Y.
One of the best magazines that has come to us. Your
literary department is worth mentioning.

The Phiz. Pitman, N.J.
Good athletic department. Altogether a splendid book.

The Oracle. Jamaica, L. I.
Your "Poet's Corner" is excellent. Why not have a
larger literary department?

The Northfield Star. East Vrtfied. .(faV.j.
Welcome to our exchange again. We like your maga-
zine very much.

The Flicker. Gloucester, Mass.
You have a well-arranged book. Your advertising
section is very good. But where is the exchange?









THE CARIBBEAN.


The Clairtonian. Clairton, Pennsylvania.
Your book is an excellent one. The cartoons and other
cut-outs add greatly to the appearance. Don't Nou think
you can improve your magazine by having an exchange
department?

The Zonian. Balboa, Canal Zone.
We are always e.ger to welcome the only other annual
of the Canal Zone. The material in your book is splendid,
and we wish you success in your future productions.


The Broadcaster. A. 1. 7r. High School, Philadelphia.
Your historical selections are excellent. We hope to
keep up our exchange with you.


The Exponent.


(Greerfield, Mass


You have a well-written magazine, but why not enlarge
your exchange department with comments on other pul>-
lications?


COMNSItNI, ON THt (ARIBBEAN.


We consider TIHE CARIBBEAN the best annual itht lias
come to our notice. Your style is different from that i of
the average annuals.
.41/bquerque Hligh School, .1/biuqi'erqite, .\X; I/levio.

A very complete nma.gainc. Your editorial and liter.;r\
departments tatndl out. We like the thought e ressed
at the beginning of your exchtlnge department:
"From North to South, from East to West,
From near and far they've contre
We periscope, they periscope
To see how things are done.
\\e get encouragement from them,
We better grow bec tuse of them."
The A ag 'el, Butler lfigh, Bilt'r, Pennsiy/a.ia.

We wish that your magazine could he circulated
through all the schools. It would bie a good instructor.
The whole arrangement of the magazine is extremely
clever.
The Trident, (cean Grove,i .. X.

L.ift the mud hook! We're off to the Canal Zone' The
alluring snapshots and beguiling descrip, ons tf thi.
tropics in THE CARIBBEAN a.re almost irresistilieC
"Red rays anti golden gleams
Tint the ripples of the streams;
The first dark shades of night
Break with glints of glowing light;
Upon the silvery sands
A lonely palm tree stands,
Outlined against the sky.
The Mirror, Punxsit iawne'V, Penn.


\e mention the quintity and the quality of photo-
graphs which differentiate your paper from any other
exchange we receive. The adoption of nautical terms and
pictures used consistently throughout tour paper adds
greatly to the making of its trulv different pr .on::lit.

The .urth/i/ed Star, lFat .\wii/ithi, ss.

This has them all beaten. Best looking and best
material on the who e list. T'he photographs are the
most beautiful ever seen in a school magazine. Congrai l-
lations to Cristobal HIigh.

The (.edar Chest, 7Toms Kii'e \. 7.

Your athletic department is well arranged. Your stories
are quIite interesting.

The Student, Holmes Hligh Sch'/io, Co.il.gton, Keun.l/cv.

We certainly welcomed you to our Exchange column
again this year. \\e alwa s greatly enjoy THE CARIB-
r E. A. Your idea of ships was unique and well carried
out. You are to be congratulated on the excellent plan
and arrangement of your publication.

The Zoniian, Balboa Hglh Sc/ihool, Balboa, (Canal Zone.

A magazine that is interesting not only because it comes
from the Canal Zone, but also because its neat and at-
tractive material proves that extraordinary care has been
taken in its preparation. Keep up the excellent work and
let us hear from you again.

The Oracle, Jamnaica High, Jamanica, L. I.


Ruins -Old Panama.








72 TH F. CARIBBF.A N.













John G. Nelson, '.7, Joke Editar.
7ohm G. Nelson, '27, 7oke Editor.


(A joke box is maintained in the front of the
assembly hall. When the time for the harvest
draws near, we proceed to discover what unex-
pected surprises in the form of wit await us. We
find: Nine pieces of chalk; at least three bottles
of ink, in various forms; twenty-five fragments of
mutilated blotting paper; part of a broken eraser;
two hundred seventy-three pencil shavings, evi-
dently transferred f:om pencil sharpener; fourteen
crumple I sheets of paper; six pieces of broken
'1.1.i,, four dead cockroaches, one of them half
alive; and a thumb tack. We hope that no one
is overcome with convulsion.)
There is one ldi a:nt.L of a joke box. It con-
ceals what might otherwise disfigure the room!
0! 0! 0!
Miss M.-"That gives you zero for to-da. 's
work, you know."
Interested bystander.-"Zero means nothing to
him n''
A SLIGHT MISUNDERSTANDING.
Surse.-"The islands were a aiin to the United
States. Now, Callaway, don't contradict me-
a gain!"
Ith i odds (wearily).-"Surse, when will you
learn to pronounce that word? It's agen."
Surse.-"Would you say the islands were agen
to the United States, lisl Dodds?"
It was a first L'r:d'r who was optimistic enough
to assure his parents as he sobbed over their
disapproval of his report, "Well, I'm going to
get 'A' in "h hiplrinuL next timn, ain w.i."
lTh. S. S. Incon was crowded. Bobbie and his
older brother had to share a berth together. One
%.-ni;n Bobbie ur, .i.n.ld: "Father, just you come
here and see all the room I ain't g t'"'


One of the bright sunn7 DAYS in MAY when
the PALM trees lifted their faces to the sun,
and the S(ch)MOLL TUFTS of GREENe grass
grew Inrger, I felt so KEENe and full of BLISS
that I wanted to reJOYCE and FRISK in rh,:
summer ozone. I set out for town with thoughts
of COFFEY, BEERS, and wines fresh from tli-
VINEYARD-and incidentally to pay a little
TAYLOR bill. I a--pr(-oached the old FORD
and started to TURNER over, but, discovering
that the AX(t)ELL was LUCE, concluded it
would pay to WALKer. I had not proceeded
far when I spied a frog taking a BATH along the
BANKS of the Canal, as frogs WILL. I ap-
proached to PETTIT and perhaps to treat it
to a CRUM or two of bread, but, deciding that
this would be a deplorable waste, I went on my
CALLAWAY. --7. G. N., '27.

As Surse and Lowande were riding alhng, in
Surse's car, of course, they passed the "gallows."
"'Where would you be, Surse, if the 'gallows'
had its dues?" asked Lowande.
"Ri'i :' al.ng here alone."
"Alas, I've lost another pupil," sighed the poor
professor as his glass eye rolled down the sink pipe.
Miss Moore.-"Close your books." (Reads
sentence.)
L. Callaway.-"What page, Miss Moore?"


.11,:.s Hesse (in girls' glee club).
sopranos may take the air. "
(Big rush for the door.)


'N.iw the


Tourist (at Gatun Locks to guide).-"My, did
you have that finger cut flf;"
Guide.-"N.., I wore it down by painting at
the locks so much."












































HOTEL WASHINGTON

Unerualedfor situation and comfort. A hotel in keeping
with the dignity, spirit, and service of the Panama Canal


Golf Swimming


JAMES E. LEWIS, Manager


WI ater Sports
THE YEAR AROUND


P. 0. Address, CRI'Fl I R1, CANAL ZONE


S- 'Tarpon Fi'.",i,








THE CARIBBEAN.


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i -,ciii .ri ...r k har C rI .t. il H ijh I ..1 i r..,. .1 1, I.
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- - -


MR 5590--10






THE CARIBB-EAN.


The Pan-American Drug Store
N. SALAZAR, Proprietor


.' ll: Sc: Branch Stores: Io
. .,9038 Front Street 4.060 Bolivar Street, Phone 166
Phone 336 11.156 Bolivar Street, Phone 356

- JL 'f'.'L1! M i llllllllI ffhffI ff IIIK 1 fff~llff~lllllllUi 3


.1

*1
=1s


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Compafiia

Panamefia de Fuerza y Luz
(SUCURSAL DE COLON)




COLON, R. de P.


.121cm. Ii 'ifluVUfln 2121' Ilfl2L flIJulUflrPrrD'wuj [DEECThu mThCflfl0flfl'E ~


S. ...-.. .... ..... ..a a llI 111. i fll .ii n




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I~l~l11~1IYr Illlllilllill*i~lliillillYj


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THE CARIBBEAN.


[| Panama Railroad Steamship Line

CRISTOBAL TO NEVv' YORK
VIA Pi-'RT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

iALL CABIN SHIPSI
S. S. "ANCON" and S. S. "CRISTOBAL"
SFORTNIGHTLY SERVI.': R(

NI| MONTHLY S.AILINGS TO WI"T Ci.'A .
S. S. "GUAYAQUIL" and S. S. "BUENAVENTURA"
|CALLING Ai
|BL EN.\\E NTL R \. TI 1M.), ESIF.R \1 )\,%, 1B\II.l\. \\N r.\,
SP ERTO( B().l\ \R and (L \"i t II !

OFFICE, OH THE Ii `THM l' 1-
Superinienlenr Bjlh-.. HeiLhi Canal Z..rn
F l1Stea.m .nhrp Ticrk i A, -enrr, ICraib.iI, Can l Z.:,rni
| R ceitina and F'..r arJ nig g n, n C r,.r..bl l, C .n i1 Z:.::
OFFliE- IL THE I.UITED -TATE4
No 24 iavr -.-,r ,.,. N ,, N...rk N,.,, N ', i -

^__J_;~~~~~~~~ ~ ~ --ii -i =." --- -- -- - --








|| Itnique Cesgtimonial

ALL GOOD AMERICANS were justly thrilled with
pride when Commander Byrd successfully flew over the
North Pole.
THIS HISTORICAL EVENT, which commanded the
admiration of all nations, stands as a UNIQUE TESTI-
MONIAL of the FOOD VALUE OF HIGH QUALITY
CHOCOLATE. Why?
BECAUSE COMMANDER BYRD chose as his emer-
gency rations: Nestle's Milk Chocolate and Pemmican.
NESTLE'S MILK CHOCOLATE: "Richest in Cream" is
nourishing, wholesome, and its fine flavor appeals to every-
one.
BUY A BAR TO-DAY.





511







THE C RTBBFAN.


SrgSc rmifl CMa" |MLK" CA




I .



Duofold Pen and Duofold Pencil-
the New Duette: Satin-lined Gift
Case de luxe included
M EN learned from the Duofold Pen how an Over-
size Barrel affords a man-size grip that abolishes
finger cramp, relaxes hand and brain. Every Parker
Duc.folJ P. n has the super-smooth Duofold Point that
is guaranr'.-d, if not misused, for 25 years' wear.
Parker Lady Duofold Pen and Pencilarestill of small
girth ti fit lim fingers. But Parker Duofoid Ji. and
'"Big Brother" Duotold Pencils are now both built
i: Ovei-L-e..
Pak-r O ; D,.ofold Dui.tre Pr.. "; Pencil, $4; Parter Duo-
J.JJir. or L dt, Juofol. Dt.rcr, Pen. S; Penel. ,3.50 end $3
a i.g a- rM, rQl art.n ff n
KIu..SO-JORDArIl SAL.-ES Co.
MASONIC TEMPLE MANUFACTURERS' REPRESENTATIVES
-13 =..%,- _:..-. _.. '_ '_ i .li.i '31 t i-33 im M5. .yrn ,.j ,._A .__ 11.ll lllll5 131 M m, l F ,q'l--ll ^ i i ] 1 I ff I
L ~ .~ ~ IA .lL~L J .L


lMadame Melville
Graduate del'Ecole Profesiionnelle de Beaute
and La Societe Francaise Technique et
Commercial de la Coiffure de Paris



French Permanent Waving
MARCELLING. DYEII.;G
HAIR SCOUTING
HAIR DRESSING
SCAI P TREATMENT
MANICURING and CHIROPODY
BLEACHING and FACIALS
For Ladies and Gentlemen



| CLUBHOUSE BEAUTY PARLOR ||
CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE

Phones: Office, 1786 Residence, 1594 '


MILK
Pasteurized and Guaranteed

PURE
BY THE USE OF MODERN SANITARY EQUIPMENT.



Visit Our Stores-and Call Us by Phone for

GROCERIES
and Foreign Foods




ANTONIO TAGAROPULOS


MAIN STORE:
6.073 Bolivar Street


BRANCH STORE:
12.178 Bolivar Street







THE CARIBBEAN.


: 'iEIIJ:I:I,': L='-IIT:E:-i, ,: q- r T,' : i: 1 7- -, ---,77 : ---- -------- 7:: ---- : -: ---- ___ .... --- --_ ------------ _U

Rathbun, Stilson & Company, Ltd.


i ~ ~~----- -oN
H a, lw ,l'itt (t /.'ic> l Iu:s 'I ""I"

P. 0. B .LA 140, Colon, R. de P.
Telephones: Pranch Sto-e 253 Main Store 114 Office 192



4!

SOMETHING YOU CAN'T LEARN AT SCHOOL



There is Always a New and Large Assortment of
Clothing, Sports Wear, and Novelties
ARRIVING ON EVERY STEAMER

Especially Suited for Students .




FRENCH BAZAAR

PANAMA :COLON


a ffllifflmIiimIig illf LnumilIillagii iiBih m mniii nmTf m aiii=i nmij i I







-. THE CARIBI- A.N.




GREBIEN & MARTIN
ARCHITECTS AND CONTRACTORS
Builders of ARMY AND NAVY Y. M. C. A.'s
FIRST UNIT BOLIVARIAN UNIVERSITY, HOSPITALS, CHURCHES
SAnd Many Other Public Buildings and Private Residences
PANAMA COLON


---- j z Tr Fi a I I I -u' ,.-.. 1 rEm,_nl 1t.1-ii i.l iiIlhrm [ r7'ii[iiT 1Ii[i 21--.' 51 Fl' IjIi II IlI LiiiIh E : ri jEi'fEj1fif

I SPORTING GOODS

-A BRUNSWICK PANATROPES and GA
PHONOGRAPHS

KODAKS AND PHOTO SUPPLIES I
NEN I Nl





L. J. G RAN IE Mc.DEL 1IX-FORTY
COLON, R. P.
SCARDOZE & LINDO

AGENTS

il PANAMA
P o Adclf.,. ....D. E ,tl.ph .ne
P AddrT Dri.r E Tlphn Phone 323 Box 112
S CRJSTOBAl. C Z ., i
NI_______ 11A a 1m
IIL


SPECIALLY FOR 1MILADY"
S YOU ill find ,n our stuck, imung other well-knoun American and Eulpearn Brands, Ihe following perfumes:
CARON'S D'ORSAY LEUR COEIUR
NARCISSE rj(.lR LE PARFUM D'ANTON GUERLAIN'S
S'rUIT DE NOEl. IE SUCCESS L'HEURE BLEU
L E TABA BLOND GANIKA MirSOUKO
INFINI LE TRIOMPHE QUAND VENT L'ETE
A TRAVERS CHAMPS SHALIMAR
Ladies of Refined Taste will find here Perfumes to Suit their Requirements
PRICES RIGHT AND THE BEST OF SERVICE


RAT oMh STREFI CI ORRM ME'f MrmM R R1





THE CARIBBEAN.


Ing
Ing COMNPI-NIENTS OF|

HOSPITAL de PANAMA



in
~i~rnr mE~n







80 THE CARIBBEAN.


Central American

Plumbing & Supply Co. L




Supplies and Tools
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
.'Good House-z Des.-rve- Cood Plumb ng"
STRY US

SIIv

COLON PANAMA
8th St. & Balboa Ave. 58 Central Ave.
Ph.nf NPo 4 Phone No 2 ,o
P 0 Eri N.:. io P 0 Bu N.:x r;4

-- = yIl S ,ilury.i

















Take a Kodak
with you
The latest Kodak models are on
our shelves, r..naly for you to see.
S Let usshow you. $S up.
Kodak Film in the yellow box.
J. V. Beverhoudt Colon E,, l


COMPLIMENTS OF


Jark Wl lison's Zarber *bop


'",Ill "i li i l }i iiii I 1I1 I I llflffl[

Before eye-strain wrinkles become
Permanent and nervous fatigue
becomes chronic, have your
eyesexamined. If you need
glasses, you will be sur-
prised to find what a
comfort they are
when accurately
I and
becomingly
fitted to
YOU
HAVE YOUR EYES EXAMINED


SCADRON OPTICAL CO.
Registered Optometrist; and Opticians Estab-
lished in Panama Over to Years


PANAMA
23 Central Avenue


COLON
9.034 Front Street


M-11
FQ_ WOMIELva


=aflflii P111101M m







THE CARIBBEAN.


nw T' r i -' ,- ---- -- -. .
gaffla. =rn M i rn F, 5 mi nt u-r. fin a : L n L::::

I UNITED FRL'IT COMPANY 7:


Regular Sailings
from
I CRISTOBAL, C.Z.

SNEW YORK I
NEW ORLEANS
'1 CUBA
I COLOMBIA
SJAMAICA and -
SCOSTA RICA .


S For further pa iculars - -
Sapply -to- .I

PAUL WEST, Manager Cr*r..bail Ui\%-.n, Ci- L 1. 11 IA iM : '. [' im. r
i: : :; ---------------- --E----...........;-..::: .::;-.-.-:...........----------. --------


. "' i Zi :_ -_J___,-'' '--- ---- ---- : _:' : -- ..... --

SP 0 B...s u, P.- .n : I
1FIr,.n
lr .tbil, C r. I
711I
SPohoomull Bros.
Corner loth and Front Streets
|| ORIENTAL MERCHANTS



SA Rich Collection of Egyptian and Spanish
SMantilla Shawls, Drawn Thread Work I.i

Madeira Work and East Indian Silks



S ALL KIND OF EMBROIDERIES I
ALWAYS ON HAND



:| An Inspection Respectfully Invited r.

SEr i 3 rE:zn I Enin rn n:;: :- n nn5:l:tin;i::: __
M.idiR 55 .:. 0- .
MIR 5590--11


':1
.I . .







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THE CARIBB V.A.


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S Cable Address: IMPCO. A. B. C. 5th -6th-Benlley's P. O. Box 342

Colon Import & Export Co., Ltd.

0 JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS





a -rl ll ,' '

COLON, REPUBLIC of PANAMA


BRANCH RETAIL STORES AND TRADING STATIONS

PLAYA DAMA SANTA ISABEL PORVENIR
TUPILE ISLE OF PINES CARTI NARGANA :

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SWhere to Shop in Colon or Panama ;:

D CHELLARAM i
ORIENTAL MERCHANTS
WHOLESALE and RETAIL
=:: 4- Front Street 81-A Central Avenue
COLON PANAMA



WORLD VARIETY SOUVENIRS Ii
Specialty in Spanish Shawls, Nice Col-
Slection in Ivory, Ready-made Pongee I
Silk Suits, Always in Stock


j-r
OUR MOTTO IS
I SMALL PROFIT & QUICK RETURNS
SPhrnes Panama 340 Colon 159

I;.: .1i ... l .. .I..


r~jn gra ra m rTTmc Lm~in~iragn man a


|' RICHARDS' PHOTO STUDIO
i Next to Nahional C.ry Bank of New York)
Bo 523 Cricibal. C Z


The Oldest and Most Reliable
iJ Studio



PORTRAITS, VIEWS, ENLARGEMENTS
and
KODAK FINISHING



ALL WORK GUARANTEED
R91
s Myr N. C REID F FINLAYSON
Proprr' r M napper and Pholographer
fi 1_ __ .







THE CARIBBEAN.


a TEfn Ti L 11'1 Ilt \ 1 < i- ...

bel ,umnaritan jhospitali


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I CHEVROLET
OVER THE TOP ,


OFFICIAL FIGURES NOW AVAILABLE
SHOW THAT
CHEVROLET PRODUCTION
During iQ27 ha; been 4,000
1 "l"uni" tV rn- twenr" -lour houri.
The Rea-..:n i. Obv..u, '

1 Buy Chevrolet for
ECONOMY DURABILITY li
B1 BEAUTY PERFORMANCE

I-
SPanama Automobile & Suppl Co.

il PANAMA COLON


ii MRS. PAULA M. CARDOZE ;
AT THE !-
'::; ^
4 PIanama Hat Store iF:
SN.: j35 FRONT STREET


i- Offer: Her Cu-r..mer. ai i



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NMANY NTHER DIFFERENT CURIOSITIES

All at Very Reasonable Prices
::I Without Equal in Town
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1P 6-' Phone 255
CRISTOBAL, C. Z. CRISTOBAL, C. Z,


oo, Fiont Sir-v L 0.. P 11
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g|ll C. C ASLU 1 L- 1 Jtew lcr and \'zmtchIntimk.r
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THE CARIBBE-.AN.


WE DYE TO LIVE


TROTT, THE CLEANER

COLON and PANAMA
Phone 250 Phone 453 I
-I
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SThe Cafeteria Idea |I
COMPLIMENTS OF
"A Is quick service and elimmation'
of overhead expenses, bringing Il P
A patrons and service in direct and R F. HOPINSlc
immediate contact Distributor
:1" LOWEST POSSIBLE COST
FOR

S! Studebaker and Erskine Cars
MAKE OUR CAFETERIA
YOUR HEADQUARTERS
FOR GOOD THINGS TO EAT


CANAL ZONE and REP. OF PANAMA
The Panama Canal Restaurants I1,
i. CARL STROM, Lessee 11
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) 1)0 )L' \\NI)-.R \\'HIFRE THE BOYS GFT SUCH SNAPPY
HAIR CUTS?
iI'1 T it- (;i RLS THEIR MIODISH BOBS?
11 \\ l'u i1

Charley Payne's Barber Shop

taB:mflfainamsflp Ifl1H 511








THE CARIBBEAN.


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PANAMA COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY
,g Phones: Panama 65, Colon 84
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7-,rlU l~lllI IIIHIIIIW I II1;' 20~


GARAGE AND TOURIST SERVICE

CARS WITH OR WITHOUT DRIVERS

GOOD SERVICE AT LOW PRICES


i We take pleasure in offering to our
patrons the services of the only
GRADUATE PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMIST
In Colon who is Registered both in the
Republic of Panama and the Canal Zone






86 THI- CARIBBH '\.

,-J,-_ MEa_ iL "_ Si ('( ME- tE! .fl(LrLm W = C MEKIX p I fI C N

AMERICAN SUPPLY COMPANY


I Manufacturers of Native Hardwood Furniture

96 Central Avenue PANAMA 123 Central Avenue Nl




FINEST uo IN
PANAMA HATS '
S(GenuinR e Monte Crisii



SMotnev E II
|I I- ANONYMOUS
SExchange _ON



M S. Perrone & Lobato i M
Front Street Main Office M
COLON, R. de P. GUAYAQUIL, ECUADOR

52 iY F. n3. ^ ;:: ;;.:..::;; .~. a .;.f'..u a a n..n.I

| CI-hIM I'I Mlf"'I I I 111
11115 -IE- RflHrfIIf In rut! imIZIII YIn



I 30r. Vern -prier 30r. Carl (. Oafforb
LR i isi i ClA N-A1. Z ()N -

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THE CARIBBEAN.


| DUQI E C(:OIP.-ANY, Inc.

Hardware and Lumb:r Bu:lding Maer:als Arms and Ammunit;on .
Agents fro th FAF:\OUS DEVOE-RAYNOLDS PAINTS AND VARNISHES
Ag ni.t for COLT'S PATENT FIRE ARMS COMP-iNY
STORE CENTRAL AVE LIE .n.1 ir sTRE ET W \REHOLUiF iORTH .r ilj ;:
T- T.i f.,6
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PRINCIPAL DRUG STORE Panazone Garage co.
SR A C. DACOSTA G''MF7

I -.d
S"We :: C inEuicl and Oldsmobile Cars
Wealwayscan[\ in S-ock a ,n
fresh assortment of Ameri- G. M. C. "Buick Trucks"
canandEuropeanDrugsand Kelly-Springfield Tires
Patent Medicines, Ruhber | | Delco Light Plants
Goods, Toilet Articles and
Perfumery. 1 Exide Batteries
Harley-Davidson Motorcycles
OUR PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENT i
i is under the caie of a registered CFESSORIES AND PARTS
Chemist of wide experience I il


LON Panazone arage Co.
L C., ner ..I w'h I,, B I,, i t r. : .-- ,_I
Trlphnr 22ni p B .i COLON PANAMA
~- --- I




THE ANCON INN
"Jay Street Country Club" :- Arthur Weil, Proprietor


V-9

S SPECIAL -Fried Chicken, Country Style, and Tenderloin Steaks
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_ _THE C.ARIBBEAN.


Impro ?t.Z


JA


WVe


WEEKLY COLLECTIONS AND DELIVERIES OF LAUNDRY WORK
CHARGE ACCOUNT IF DESIRED




CLEANING, PRESSING and DYEING
A SPECIALTY


P. 0. Box 1131, Cristobal, C. Z.


~ E~aa~nn~nkn~h"1aanil.........""


Phone: Colon 21


'd EYuipmenit .loder.n Mlethods

Eficient Service




CKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY
BROADWAY, NEAR FOLKS RIVER




Solicit the Patronage of Canal Zone Employees
U,


ISHAM
























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S THF CECILIA THEATRE




ti
M: 3HTI- ILCLA. OF '2-
-:I --

SCRisTOIB -\L HIGH s.CHOOLu T

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MR 5593-PANAMA CANAL--S -25- 27-630




Full Text

PAGE 5

Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2010 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1927cris

PAGE 7

THE CARIBBEAN VOL. X I, PL' BLI S HED BY T H E C R I ST O BAL HI G H SC H(XlL CONTENTS. \d,','rth('ml'ut-. \IUlnni (".mal (ARlfIHE'''' Staff Cla .. PrOlllwq Cia", \\'ill OedlCalio! liI;u: ... \',,1:..\",\11.0, '11 (L.\II.,\ '27 1 'Witt -';0. (: [,1..1..'\\\',,". Jr, 'n EU'IIEIIIA \\ooL ... '2i ,11<1 DnRorll\' \\'EIiTl. '27 Edit(lri.ll (HARI.E<' F, WH_I. '27 :\lr hied of an Ideal Educalill'l JO'tl'lI ('mum;\s. '27 Education;,1 (r('('d L.\\\K.'II. C ('ll.L\I\ I\', Jr. '27 Exchatlj(\'" EII'lIh\ll\ \\'OOl-.;on,ll. '27 1-;ltu11) "r(,1I11I11,111 G r"du.ah' .. jok", .. Junior .. Junior Dirt'Ctflq LitenlT)" L"II'F I-IEI\I, '2; \ (o .. IUI11\ ('I\II.\:\ln J.i \ Liltll' \1111ft .. ;h.li
PAGE 8

THF C.-\RI BBE":\". :\ "The Spirit of St. Louis," Captain Lindberg has hut a few Jays ago sco red a world triulllphbuilLiillg an air bridge betw ee n the :'\ ew \\'o rld and the Old. w e launc h our though [ s hip, T he Spirit of Cristobal H igh 5chool"-THE CARIHBEA!\' o f 1927 \\'c s hall be proud indeed if we call establ ish a thought briuge b e tween the old friends of our sc hool and the new. 7'0 OltrFriellfi. .. 7he P ersollne! qf F ort D e Lesseps, i ts O./Jicers ({lid Mell, I F e the StltdelltJ of Cristobal H'th School Grato/it/(), D edicate this the 7 ellth f'olul/le q/ "7'lle Caribbeall HEADOUARTERS. FORT DE lESSEPS CANAL ZONE OFFICE OF THE COMMANDING OFfiCER. Fort lJ e LCS!>t:p"', C. Z ., !X. I<}!-. \Ir_ CUARI I. ... F \\ 11.1., h litor in Chu:f, Tlu Ctlllbbbl1l Cri!)wi>al, C. Z I)I:AII. SIll.: Your kindncs.." and the gr.llltudc \1/1 1 h.I\C cxprc ... f()r suc h slllall aid as \\c have been pcrmitted 10 render .... \en much appreciated. The do .... e hond Ihal exi .... t ... hctYoeen the Ilig h Sdu)(J 1 of Cri.!.whal ;U1d !Ill! at I'un D c L es ... eps is mo .... t gr,Ltifying 10 me, SlIa :cre ly, Signed I"'. J r., Culonel, IstC. \ Comm;ll\{hng.

PAGE 9

THE C :\RI BBE .-\:\. :x"n.h 0",\,'. (R,....\dllllot d(X'k-wi co tmlll "'d,,,;k"); Charll'''' \\'ill. J,u:k Klullk, .\ ,j .. t,lnl tu ErliWr; T,'n:",1 Cin-ul.ltioll \ll)trt Day .... \-'"j .. tanllo til(' Circu1.ltiun :\Ian.utl'r; Jame" \'an \rl DOTOll1\' \\'nll. &:hool :"\O{., Editor; Onr
PAGE 10

THE C.-\R I BBH:--'. Charlo F. Will, Editor-in-Chid. "T:\h:I:--'G OFF. Since \\ e are adopting the aeroplane as the thellle f or the 192-CARIBBEAN, and since we, the Seni ,I'S, \\ ill SOOI1 he launching forth ourseh-es, it ScelllS fining that as editor we continue ill t h i ... figure. Four YC:ll"S of training have gone \\'c arc ahOllt ro "el1ture forth relying on the charts anti alhice 'n.' ha,'e gained from our Hight commanders :\11 is ahout to be changed. The hand 011 our shoulder is no more. Guidance will have to he within ourseh,cs. Of course there are numerous m:1ttcrs we ha,'e failt.:d fully to ulldcrstanti, hut being warned of their, wc shall he hetter able tJ cope with them in Iht.' air nrTents of experience. For Ollr lif(' trip, ao; f II' :lily other, we s hould be properly titted '.,.,. IllI \ OF .-\' ED l 'C. -\T IO:--'. It j" :ig;ccd that education is a process of I I t shou l d prepare a person to app: lciate lif".', tcJ meet and handle its problems, and to k:nl: the world better for his having liv ed in it. I (,ucation o;hould gi"e a man higher ideals anti irr.s. lie s iwlIld be traineLi to USt his ow n re s ,un.:es; t) rouSe anti USt to the best advantage his latt:l1t ptJwers, mental and physical. :\ wcli t:dul'ated man should not or will not have the same impulst:s as one not so well eLiucated. lie .... h(Jllld haT c, ahove all, a realization of and rever encc fCJr the Suprtme B eing, and lo\'c and understanding fur his fdlow man. alit. \\'e h ope that we are, in a measure, f o r we have zea l o u s l y followed advice. Bu t it i s each one alone who will find out what h e peculiarlv needs, w here h e h as failed to provide the equipment, where h e is too h eavi l y l o ad ed T h ollg h our goals lie in many dif ferent though our routes enorm o u s l y, we b elieve o u r training ha s h ee n s u c h that we s h all ge t both pl e a s u re and profit a l o ng the way, s h all fly sa f e ly (though perhaps not smoothly) an d s hall choose a safe and landing place, "'c are ready to put oft'. T h e engine of initiative is starred an...l running Commo n se n se is our look out. QlIr companions are D e t e r mination, Eagerness, ami Confiden ce, \\'jth eyes alight, we cry, "\\'e're ofr!" Chir.'(! F. Will. E DUC.H ION:\L C R EE D believe t ha t a n educati o n does the follow ing: I. H e l ps u s to broaden Ollr knowledge o n ditferent lin es. '2. H e lp s llS to o h tain higgt"r and better things 3. H elps liS to lead hetter and deantr lives mc::ntally, p h ysically, and m o rall y. 4-. H elps u s to understand oth ers better. Ileips u s to gi,'e to and to receive from the world the hest B ea rin g the ahove in mind. one s h o uld strive for tht hc:st education p oss ihl e.

PAGE 11

TH E R I I -----

PAGE 12

6 THE C.-\Rl ;\I inncapoli", :\Iionesota. :--t Ol.lf \Iiun.'.;.ota ('"lullliJll \ \Ir B I"" \1. \\ 11.1.1"'''''. !-\(;\fc"horo Georgia. .. Iumhi . \Ii"" J l"AllfI I.'" DODO". Claremont. \It nnesota, P,-infll'lI/. EIJ,'(IiJh, Sori,,1 p,.obirms flud Efouomirs. Srlli(),-C/(ISS .hhiJn. Cnrioonw Slllif Iti.isn. Sc,'en year s ago l\ l i ssJ. I sa b ella J) oddscamc to us fro m l\ l inn csOla a nd h e rself. heart and soul, in C ri sto b a l Ili g h S c hool. F o r {he fir s t s i yea r s s h e was the principa l o f the hi g h school and thi s year has the princ ip a l ship of h o th the hi g h a nd grammar sc hool s. Each year s h e ha:::. been the ad,ist' r to the se ni o r class, a IX)silion w h ic h :::.h e has cen a inl y c.'pa bl e o f filli ng; as t h e facuil y m embe r o f C \'cry (' -\RIIl-1tF.\",StafTfrom192 1 t o 1927, s h c hasbec-n sliccess f u l. hy h e r ullliring efforts in m aking TilE C .\UIHnE,\ w onhy of our :;c hoo! a l its h es t. On her a rrival s h e o rganize d the Cirls Suppe r Cluh a nd until reccntly ac h i se d i t. Shc has direCle d Senior p lay, worki n g wi t h I.ea l and illt e re:::'l to m a k e each p rodu c ti o n bette r tha n the o n e befo r e. Last b u t !lot least. s h e has a hl y t a u ght senio r English, socia l probl ern:::.. a nd L atin, and has m ade h e r m o r e o f a p!ca:::.urc tha n a Las k I n all o f our s p orts W\.' h a \ 'c h a d he' r s tead y h i l C k ing ,Inc! c ncollrag<.'m cn t Firml y hut ki ndl y s lu' has h e lped u s out o f our trouhll:-.. tau g h t w hell right. and in!o.pinc1 u s {(j k(:(:p the school's !-.tand a rd s hi g h .M iss D odds i s l ik(: d b y (:\"(;'ryon c, h Olh inside and outsid(: of sc hool iK'('(llISl' o f h e r d elightful p c r h e r c\-e r read y f ric ndlillcss, a nd htr cagc l IW"'s to hel p e\ (:ryOl1(', ('S f) 'c i ally tht stllcl<:nts o r (risuJhal High S h e is lhe o n ( w h o has mmh : Crisl(lhal J l igh l..)rhoo\ what i t i s tod t y. \\\, ar' .all proud of Iwr. -Clam .1. \/1'..", '.!;. ;\ 1 [>;" LILLI A!\, B. GnTAr!';O .... '\'unic:l Norn); ;!. Dl' "'; ,Ib lUiS/IWI P rincipfl/. i\l i ss Gustafson i s the silent parrner ofCrisrobal High S c hool. Outsili.e r s se ld o m h ear o f h e r b ec ali se s h e d oes n o r t e a c h sTudents But ;\ l i ss Gustafson has all the files and records at h e r fing e r tips and i s always willing to recall ro e v e n the mos t forgetful student, a f e w times \\ h e n h e wa s late or absent. Thro\\ n in with h e r office \\or k aTe a f e w a sse mhl y periods" h e r e s h e may h e see n quitt.' f requently helping som e lagg ing scholar. \\' h e n unexp ec t e d j o h s appe :lr, so doe s l\l i ss Cusrafson t o l e nd a h e lpin g ham!. T o tell the tTuth, l\l i ss Gustafson i s h e re, there and c \ 'crnvherc doing this that, and everything. Thus lin e see f o r o n e s se l f what it i s ro b e a silent partne r in a hustling hi g h sc hool. ____ -Pdld f-I" y rl m '29. \Ii..;." (;RA(:F: I h -"q-, Soplirl11um: Ang.lisll l jnll1ll111/ Sp(Ulisll S h ell H \ illc Illinni ..... "ni\ ... r:it\ of ;l.I IC'.h:.\l1 71111;orElIgliJ/l GI'I'Clll b F'ortllil c s miled kindly o n Cristobal H igh S c hool whe n i\l i ss Grace Hesse became a m embe r o f our (a cuity this year. s h e has hithe rto been a te a c h e r s h e f ound it diffi cult at fir s t to recon cile h e r self [() the cla ss ro o m antics o f high sc hool students \\'ith rcmarkable v e r satility. h o wever s h e SOO Il adapte d h e r self-or rathe r s h e made li S adapt ourselves to h t:r ideas She h o ld s a ve ry important placc in o llr faculty, our a ctivities, a nd our h earts B es ides t e a c hin g three large Englis h c la sses and two Spanis h cla sses H esse a ccepte d the positi o n o f Glee Club in structress Ha\' ill g studie d b oth v oc al Illll s ic and piano, s h e i s able to fill this position e x cellently. H e r knowle d ge in this fie ld wa s verr well s h o wn in the :tttrac ti" c Illu s ic al r e vu e whi c h s hL' direct t:t l for o u r clrnival. 1 \ l i ss I h::s:--ic's dasst's arc always ill'-ltructive a s w d l a s ve r y f o r s h e i gifte d wit h a ci e \ 'e r se n se o f hUlll o r. E ve n student, wh o r ece i ves the hene fit o( ht:r informatio n o n evcry branc h o f h e r subject s entertains a s in ce r e r e xp ec t (or l\l i ss H csse, and it i s O llr unanimous des ire that s h e r durn to Cristohal H i g h S c ho o l n ext Autumll. TruSil Gill/fiX/la, ',?T. 1.(JI(i u I/,.im. '.1;. l..ouiS(" I/lIrK, i!y.

PAGE 13

T H E CA Rl BBE: \ :-\ j \ l r. GEORGE J BEI\,OO .... Saint Cloud, }'I inne!-ota. St;.tc Colic"c. SJ;llt (I"ud ijradky Poln,'..:hnic [n"t;tul, (,'oural I ndllJ/rial SlIbjafJ. .. ('pJlloIIGflmwaCllmllw" .-lrhiJl'r. i\I r. i s t h e o n ly Illan teach e r in Cristoh al H i g h. H e t e a c h es ge neral scie nce a n d i n d ustrial arts and also h e l ps with the latter subject in t h e g ra des. H e ha s acqui r ed t h e strictness o f a pro f esso r, bu t h e is g la d to help o n e \\ h cn h e i s n t H is classes i n general sc ie nce a r e always in te r esting, wit h s p ecia l topics, ami exp e r i m e llt s B u t let me tell yo u t hat a persun h a s 1O b e j uSt a b o u t perfect to ge t a n ":\" on his r e p o rr (r o m i' lr. B e n so n H e helps with t h e boy SCOlltS; h e tak es u s on h ikes : o ften h e i s see n in t h e whic h h e himself Illade, \\'c fed t hat '\ I r. Benson is our friend alld w e want to b e hi s ____ -Ja1llI'S (u11/puell, ";0. ,\ 1 iss CARRIE A $E\\ ELI.. C.lrbondale, Colorado. of C(llhr.ld .. PII)sies. FresluJI/lll elllss 1,h,ur. J \ l i ss S e w ellkind, pa tient J\I iss Se w ellh as heen for two ycarSOllr t e a c her of algebra, :tn d ph ys ics \\' h e n hu t sun:ly t h e m:trks begi n to descend it i s s h e w h o i ns p i res liS [0 try. She i t i s wh o is our co m p a n ion \\ h en \ \ e alte r three o'cloc k :tlld p u zz le out t h e \\ hy 's (;r our p e rpl e xin g frie n d geo metry! S h e is e' er fair and impa r t ial to stu de n t in her An d h o is m o r e i ndi!':p e n s ahl e to t h e F res hman C la ss than th e ir t rll S t\\ o['t h y ad, iser, !\ I i ss Sc\\ ell? Out o f sc hool Se w ell greets all \ \ j rh II jo,ial and since r e s mil e. .'\11 h ail to our mathema tics whit"! .\ I ay s h e See u s t h r o u g h Illa n y Illore te rlllS! -.\ hI6.1 'lJur/rt'llll. )0. -/IiZrlbdll "tlck/'", '.t/). "h'E J Columhus, OhiO. Ohi" F,(s/mulII Englis" .J/gt'urn L, S, !IrS/OI}' IIl1d Cit:lcs Pt:tite ;\ 1 iss Anne J !\' all g h te n wh o ha s b ee n a m embe r o f t h e Cristob a l H i g h Sc hool f ac ulty for twO y ears i s our te a c h e r and h e lp e r in F r es hm a n E n glis h alg ebra, an d L1nited S t a tes S h e i s a l ways jolly and s miling, and h e r appearance :tlo n e o n e can j u dge h o w intt:resting s h e makes h e r classes S h e i s e \'er willin g to h eir u s with O llr studies, a n d h e r p l e a santness and s t eadfastness ha,'e made h e r o n e o f the favo rite m embe r s o f our faculty. \\'e h o p e to see h e r h e r e f o r man)' y ears to corne C'lfIzt'11l1tllt'r, )0. i\lARY El.ILABETH \ 1 0011.. "esl : \lexander, Penn. 1,1/1111, ,llIcienl l/iS(01:\', Sp,IJIIsII JIIJlif)/" elllSf .ld,.'iur. 1'l oOlc tht.: \'(:r y cap a bl e L a tin Spanis h. a nd his t o r y teac her of Cristoh a l H ig h. co m es f r o m P e nnsyhania a nd has been with u s f o r tw o yea r s. S llIdclltS d l \ yay::; l oo k for w a rd to o n e o f i\l oo rc'::, classes made mOst int e restin g by nUllle r ous a n ec d o t es tak e n e ith e r fr olll h e r 0\\ n ex perie n ces o r flOlll h c r reading. S h e has \\ id e n e d Illany a \ocah u l a r y. im p l O\'e d h i s enunciatio n a nd broad e n e d hi s inte rests, i\l i ss l\l oo r e has b ee n t h e a b l e ach i se r o f th c J un io r C lass for t\\ 0 As k a n y o f t h e =e n io r:" \\ h o attend e d t h e ba n q uet. g i\-cn in t h ei r h o nOl, if sh<.:-knc)\\ her b usin ess. l\l i ss N l oo r e d \'e r y s unn y di spos iti o n 1\0 m atter w h e th e r yo u m eet h e r in th e h all. in t h e class room o r on th e street t h e r e i:; a l w a y s a read y a\\ai tin g yo u E,'e n \\ h e n s h e find s it neces::;ar y to be w e kn o w th a t \\'e d ese n 'e il, a nd th a t \\' h c n \\c don e our part s h e ,, ill d o h e r!.. l,fJIJII'illitll/lS, .!(). \ llIl"i(lII, LOIL'IIII,!t', '21). Color'ldo. IIolll/'I';C()1l0Illi(J ,/lId GnU/III Selt'lier. SQpl/o11lfJre Clliss .ld"lJa. CldCC Petcrson, hOllle Lcollomics a nd ge neral sc i e n ce te a(' h<:r i s g r eatly admir c d f o r her quiet g(n iality. .\11 pupil s \ \ hoarl" cllo u g h to tl'ilChl'rdec l.trt: t h
PAGE 14

THF C\RIBBF..-\:\. ---

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THE C\RIBBEc\:\. C LASS O F '92,. TERESA K GAtl.ACHER DOflOTHY L. WERTZ CI.ARA A. l\' I AY CHARI.ES F \\'II.L Presltlall i"ia Pruidtlll 'fret/SI/rer CI.1SS Rowe rRed rose. CJ.tSS colors-Crimson and white. J \ lotto-Ad astra per (upi'm. T E RESA GALL: \G H ER. But 0, she dances slIch a way: \'0 sun upon all E:lstcr I s hair so fine ;1 :.ight. '-Su ckling. 13-'14 T rc:lsurer, Supper Club. Chorus. Glee Club. Spanish Orerena. T rack. B askt't B ,dl. B asch.tll. Swimming. ',q-''l'i Supper Club. Chorus. Glee Clu h. "Sailor's Rel'erie," J apanese Opercu; .. B :lsket B all.. '25 '16 T re.lsurer, Supper Club. Chorus. Glee Club. R ip \'an Winkle," '16 '27 Pr esident. Choru". Glee Club. Circulation l\la nager, THE C."RIBBEAS. D O R OTHY I.. WER TZ. "So well s h e aCled .L11 and e\'err pan, B), t urn!>, with t hat \ i\'acious versatility."-BJroll. ':23-':2 4 Chorus. S upper C lub. '::4-':25 Pitman High Sc h ool, Pitman, :-.I. J ':25-':26 P it man High School, Pitman, N. J .!6-':!7 C r i!>tobal H igh Sc h ool, Cristobal Ca n al Zone. Cl ass Vice P reside n t. G irls' Ath letic B as k e t B a ll. InJoor Captain. Sc h ool Notes Editor, THE CARIBBEAI':. Under Twenty." C horus. Gl ce Club. Supper Club. Carni,'al ComrTILttee, C H ARLES \\' I L L. "A bisie r man ther nowher none is And yet he l;cmcd bisier thanne he was. "-C)IflItU", ''23-':24 H andball. Chorus. Glee Club. Spanish Operetta. ':24-':25 Daddy-L ongL egs." Sophomore prize in Shon Story Contest. B aseball. Basket ball. Class V ice P re s ident. First prize l\dvance Sale Contest. ':25-':26 B aseball. T cnnis. Circ ulation THE CARIBBEAN. Upsilon Gamma Gamma. Basket ba ll. Swimming. T ra ck. Clas s ':26-':27 Editorin-Chief, THE CARIBBEH', Clas s T rea s urer. T ennis Captain. "Under T wenty," Upsilon Gamma Gamma. B aseball. T rack. Basket ball. Handball.

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1 0 T H E C.-\RIRBFA:--'. .lOSEI'll .I,. "Ile made ;111 cuunrrie:-. where he caltle 0\\ n."-D,:"dt'll. '!J '2-+ Rl\ef H igh School, Tom .. J "The G\ R overs." '2-1 '2, T oms River H igh School. T om" RI\cr, N .I. .. Treasurer. OrCh('-.tf'l. ;\lln"lrc:' French Cluh. '26 Ri\cf I l i;;h SdlOUI T Ullis .I. l\lin .. trcl. ... tant l:ootl);ll1l\1 .IIl,I!:lT Student Council. On:hcst r.l. I' rcnch Club. Dch ::ting (lull. '26 'n Crl"toh,ll l llgh School. Cri ... to h,d, C. Z. BliMIlCSS i\1.II1; lgcr, THE C .\lUlllH'A:-'. U )silOll G.\lllrna Gamma. D O R OTHY The jO\ uf youth ,IIIlI I c lth hl'r ere!'> :\nd e ls e oj he n her cn' n look conVC} 'd," '23 '24 Winthrop I ligh Sci 001, Winthrop, i\lass. '':!..j. '2, Choru.... Glee Club. Supper Cluh. "")"a11.: of Two Cities." Ba:-.kct H all. J : pa n c' c Opcrett,l. ':!5 ':!6 B:':-.ket B.1l1 C:I I )[:III1. Chorus (;Ice Clu b Supper C l ub. "I.. Bop;' ,\ t h letic

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T H E C A RI BBE ":'\'. HEI.E N \ l:-..rEY '\ R D "Gnd giwrh <;pt:Cdl to a l l, <;ong to the few. "-Smillt. '2.1 '24 Chnru<;, Sllppc:r Cluh. '.! .... "S.ulor 's R t:\crlt"." .I'p.IIlt',e Open:tL/ Choru.... G1t:c:: Club. Cbss Prc: .. idcnl. Supper Chl1>. '.!f1 G lee Clllli. ('hOfU .... R ip \':10 \\ inklc," Supper Cluh. C:lrniv.tI P rogr.1I1l L'nder Twenl\," Chorus, G lee Clull. \lumni F dilOr, Till G. '1. 1 '26 Conlaga H ig h Sc h ool, Spok;tne. \ \ ';\sh. '26 '2-Slh ool, Cri .. tobal, C. z. l'nder T\\elll\''' CARI88r ... ,", J ukt: h tiror. (\IILY "S"cct A o\\er<: :In: .. 10\\. ,Jlul \\ cc:d" nuke ha<;tc." NlrJ'tlrd III '2,; '2 ... Chon,,,. G lee Clull. S u p per Cl uh. '24 Chorus, Gl ce Cluh. Slipper Cluh. "S,lilor'" Rt'\I'rie." J.tpanese Op.-:rt'tl,1 '2, ''16 Chorll'i. Glet: Cluh. Su ppa Cluh. \ ',1Il \Yinkk" '2() '2-C horu!-;. Cluh. Supper Cluh. l !nJt:r 1 \ \ t:111\."

PAGE 18

T H E C.-\Rl BB E A:-I II'OOLNO G H H ow her fingers Went w h en t hcy moved by note. Through rlleal>ures fine.:'Is s h e marked tht:m o'er T he ielding planks of t h e i ... H OOT." B .F. 1'1'."/0", Supper Clull. Chortt .. S\\;IllI1l;ng: '1, Chorus. Supper Cluh. CI,\l>' Treasurer. '16 Chorus. R ip \'a11 \\'ink l e," V ice President, S u ppe r Club. Orche s tra. '26 '1-P re sident, Supper Cluh. O rchestra. Chartl ... :lccornpanis[. H a ... ehall. Tr.tck. Exchange Editor, THE Carnival accompanist. Swimming. SCOTTER. I n the le'o:;con of \ Q ut h which Fate rc ... erve<; for .1 brig h t m : m h ood, t here i ... no wor d : \s-(tli/!" '13-.1 .... C l ass Se c rt:t.lry. Bascb;dl. n .lskc:t H a ll. Chorus. Glee Club. '1-* ''25 Boys' .-\t h letic Association Class Basket B a ll. Cbss Class Track. Track Basket B alJ. C horus. Glee Club. "Sailor's R everit:. '2 .. '26 President, 11m!>' : \ t hlelic .'\<;sociat ion. Up!>ilon G,lInma Gamllla Scribe. Swimmin g. Track. C h oru'i. Glee Club. R ip "an W i nkle." '26-'27 Up<;iloll Gamm a Garnm:1. OLlde. Art Editor. THE C."'RIIU\EAS. "Under T wenty." Commirlee. Carni, al. i\ I ON TGO:\I E R't. H app)' ;lm I ; (rom C.;ln: I 'm (ree; :1rcn', all conTented like me?" 1 .1 1 '23 '25 H ig h Srhool H UnlinglOl1. I. o n g I sla n d N. Y Glee Club. Chonl .. S\\unming. "nip ":111 Winkle" Supper Cluh. Girl ... Athletic A ssocia tion. '2'; '2-R a ... ket B all, C:1)ltain B ;lschall. T el1l" .... Choru.... G lee Cluh, Secr cfar), .Tre,lslIre r P reo,;idcllt. Cirl,,' At h letic Asso ciation. Supper C luh. P rol::r.lrll CfltlHniltee Illgh School Fll l lle<;-C arni,'a l C.lrnL"al I IO"le!.s.

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THE BBE:\". ----------------------------1.00 I SF For "he w;to. jc!>' the ql1iet kind 1I:lturs never "'at}. "lfe'IIl}', dut keep;1 summer mind Snrmhi.1 in 21 '24 Supper Cluh. Chom .... '2-+ '1, Supper Cilih. Choru .. D :uldyI .ong I.e:g .... '2 5 '26 Supper Clun. ':!(, '2-LUerar> .diTOr, THY C"RIBBF. ....... L IISI J T.'YI.OII. J'. "A man of no me.tn under .... r.lIlding."-LtI '2.1 '2-+ S\\imlllmg. Choru s. Glee Club. F irst Pri7c A dv:Jntc: S.lle ConIc"!. '24 Swimming. '2, '26 A ssist,lIlt .di I Ot, THE CARIBBEA'I. Tic (or he'" ... hon ... ,on in Short Sion Corlle,t. T he Gooc;c 1 1 ,lng' Upsilon G,lIllll1;t (;,1111111;1 "Rip \ 'a n \\' 1Ilklc." CI.,<;<; Pre.:;iden t. CourU'.. Glee Cluh. Cheer I.e.lder. Swimming. Golf. ''16 '2-L'psilon G,lmm;l G'lmnu. "Under I\.,enl\." Cheer L eader. "Con"idc:r thi n I !.lhored IWI for rnysdf onh, but (or all them tlt"'t "cck Ie lrning." '21 '14 Slippa ('11111. Chorus. 14 '15 (;Iec Cluh. Chorus. Supper Chlh. "Talc: of Two Cille ,, '16 Cia .... Tre,l"urc:r. Choru s. "Rip V an W inkle." 'll'> '1-Cia .. Scuetan. Chorus "l'ndc:r 13

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THE C :\RIBBEAN. .... 'II"IlE:--'CF. C. CALUII"AY, .I." "F\'ell t hough v:mqui .. he l, he ('"Quid :lrgue '24 S\\imming:. C h oru ... Gl ee Cluli. .! Chorm" Assist:lIlt Busine ss i\1 :U1:1ger, THE B usiness i\l:ln:lger, "I):tdd\I.ong-L egs," "S;tilor's ':!r; '16 A ssist;ml B usiness Tflr CAklllllrAN. Busines s 1 \1.1nagt:r, "Coose I Ings "Rip \';In Winkle." Chorus. Glt:e Cluh. Upsi lon G,lmm:1 G.l rnm :l. Golf. '26 Business \iall:!g.:r, L Inder T\\el\n." Chorus. Glee Cluh. L'psilon G,lmrna G,llllll1:1. Golr. C LASS HI ST O RY (lam Jltly, ':q. T o give a compl e t e history of the Class of 1927 wOlil d only irnpose lIpo n the patience and for hearance o f my readers, and also mi ght disclose to the public eye certain care full y guarded sec r e t s o f th e 11:'I.S[' \\'ith this in mind I ha ve tri ed to rela t e in the briefe s t manner p oss ibl e the IllOSt important events of our hig h sc h oo l ca r eer. Our grammar sc h ool life varies, for not all o f u s spent those years in the Canal Z o n e sc h oo l s \\'e came from practically eve r y State in the L 'nion and 011 t h e fifth day of Octoher, ente r ed Cristobal Hi gh wit h an enrol lm ent o f forty-four. That yea r so lv ed for u s th e g r eat Illyst eries of high sc h oo l which \\e ha d h e fore l oo k ed :H with awe. : \ side from th e class party give n unde r th e supervision of Ilornhcak, and the damage done at the initiation, th e r e i s little ro relate. The next year, having lost seve ral peopl e from our class, we entered as gay yo un g Sophomores and, we, in (Jur turn, f(llInd cl1joy rnellt at t h e C:XPCIlSC of the poor 'reshics !\t i!o;s O'Conncll was (Jllr cla ss adviser, and \\ ilh h e r help, we were ahlt: to give a suu:essful part)', The next title of hOllor awaiting LIS was that of J unior. l:.vcryonc knows the history o f t h e Junio r yeart hat o f the Junior-Senio r Banquet. Afte r Illu c h hard wo r k and untiring eft"orts w e were finall y abl e to g i ve t h e Seniors a banquet which wa s eq lla l to of the previous years, O u r part)" wa s also a credit to our c la ss !\l i ss rlli oo r e a s our class advise r, wa s a great h e lp to us in b o th o f these events \\' h e n in the future years, we look ba c k over o u r sc h oo l lif e, our Senior year will stand out th e hri ghtest and happies t o f a ll. I nro the h urri ed days o f ou r c l os in g we ha ve c rowd ed events. T h e Senior play, L I nd e r Twenry" wac;; s u ccessfully g iv e n under the capabl e direction of l\l i ss Dodds, our clas s adviser. T he hanquet given u s b y t h e C l a ss of ''28 at rhe Hotel \\' a shingron an d t h e dinnc:r g i ve n l\l i ss D odds at the O l d \\' a s hin g t ol1 Hotel arc hath worthy of m e nti o n and th e memory o f them \ \ ill lin ge r l o ng in o u r lives. N ow as we h:l ve r e a c h ed rhe l K I rti n g of [ h e w a may the furlln.! years h old for e a c h o f u S happint.:ss and s u ccess in w h i c h s ha l l a l ways h e min g l ed rhe happy Ille mori es o f our sc h oo l liars in Cristoual H i g h

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TilE CARIBBF,\ '-". '5 C,--"ss \\"11.1.. F.UpIUlIIlfl It'oo/nougb, '27. Dorothy /I'e,.,':., '27 \Ye, the P ilots of tht: plane Cristohal H igh School, "umber 192-, hc()re taking the air do hereby publish and proclaim this to be our last "ill and testament, and do offer the foIlO\\ing: To the .Junior Class our I'RI\IU".GES (to be cherished with the precioui> memento pf the Seniors \\ hich we blSW\\ed upon them at thl' J unior-Senior banquet); also the machine shop, R oom 1-, to keep clean and (;Uid and to ITS}"l'ct as we done. T o the Sophomores, the inestimahle pri\'ik,Z,' of moving intr ) to\\ ard the rcar of the as1'00111. T o the F rt:shmcl1, the gymnastics (mental) of class, and regrets that initiations arc tahoo at sch ool. T o the entire school, for their benefit and that of the faculty, our earnestness and attentiveness, Joseph Corrigan's pajama shirr to Edward L owande to co-ordinate wirh his Costa Hicall s h oes, Surse lor's con\ irKing lin e to Alh!2rt his cast-iron, nevcr-hending, brass-plate ncrvc to T heodore H elHe r. Helen j \ lol1tgomcry's habit o f talking fast to Gladys B eers-to be used 011 all occasions and especially in L ', S, History, I .awrence Callaway's slenderness to Frank K imhell and hi s powerful physique to Arthur Rothenburg, L o ui se I -icim's rude (?) and rough (E) voice to \\'ood ford l3ahbitt and her sweet and modest wa ys to I u cia Salal.ar, who has taken posscss ion of much of h e r inhl:rit:tllce, \\'crtz's Ion: of sports to angeline Smith and Ethel \\'l's trllan, Cbra :'\lay's shrine in the to ZUlldla miss, .James ran Scotter's "Big Times" to Foster Tufts, I -Idcn \"ineyard's \'alllping t) Arthur Rothellburg, who delllollstran.:d at thl: hanquet that he could lise them, Teresa Gallagher's art o f d;1l1cing to Emma Banks: her gentle manna t) n Lambert, t) he added ro her Dorothy S\ ensson's hysterical \\ ays [0 (jladys Beers, \\'ho is making a collet"tioll (If them; and her reign in the lihrary L> the Banks-Bli ss .lames GriJcr's "bifr-ofgah" to whose is almost e,hallsteo; and his "(oolin' ways" and interest in t h e girls to Robert ,\ xtell. Charles \\'ill's aft"airs in the 'office
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16 THE CUSS PROPHECY. T.\\II'ICO, ;\ IExlco. JUlI(" 2-/) '9-15 Dr. S .I. T "I.OR, J r., Taylor York City, Y. DL\R 1) 0<:: Has it occurred to "ou thareil!htecll years ago ro-day we were Cristobal H igh .. c hool? :\ccording to t h e c ustom of the old class we are all supposed to write to eac h other our Say, o l d boy, who unda ;\I t \ esu\ius "Duld ('\'cr have dreamed that Oll would be a famous plastic 0\\ ning a couple of large hospital s and ha\,lIlg the reputatio n that you have! Y ou say that you\'e been too busy to k ee p track o f the o ld gang so ( 'II try to tell "Oll what found Ollt about them in m y Y o u re,member "Farmer" Grider? \\'ell, being 0 1 the same profession, probably know that h e i s now running a large hospital of hi s own in L o uis,illc, Kentuckv. C;;lIagher is olle of \Yall Street's \\ i!.ards She has the stock market under h e r thumb and squeel..es every now and then. ,. Dot" \Yertz has married the Postmaster Gt.::nera!. Possibly you knt:\\ him when h e lIsed to work in the P O. at Cristobal. She and Eurhe mia often get together, for i:'.uphemia i s the head stenographu in the State Department at \\'ash ington, I). C. Charlie \\'ill i s the chief accountant for Standard Oil Company. H e has a peach of a Joh IlO \\{Jrk plenty uf cash limm\' ran Scotter is no\\ in B ra!.i l bui lding a ;lCross the .\ma!.ol1 Ri\'er fur the I Ilter-Contincntal Railroad Company. II1)0t" S\'ensson has married som e milli onaire. The y live in Hawaii where h e r husband has the leadin g pineapple concession. !-Iel e n i\Iol1tgomery i s in c harge of phys ical train Ing for t h e Chilean Government. I. o ui se H ei m has gained quite a name in the literary world O V writing a book calle d So SlIIa//, f o r whi 'c h s h e wa' s awarded t h e Prize. Joe Corrigan i s the supt:rvising engineer for The Panama Canal in t h ei r project to make a third set of lo c k s and widen the Cut. Emily Bledsoe, who i s n o w one o f the world's greatest pianists, i s soan givin g a con cert in rienna which all the nobility of the world will atte nd. There aren't so many o f the m left now. Of course you have heard [hat H e l e n \'inerard i s a famo u s prima donna and i s now playing with the largest o p era company in Euro p e I saw h e r th e b e f o r e yesterday wh e n I fle w ova t h e mill p ond in myo i d crate G osh, that bus i s o ld fas hioned! All s h e can go /lOW i s three hundre d p e r h o u r. L ord" Nelson i s the (otnmanding general o f the Ninth Corps Are a and i::, living in i\l onrovia, Calif. \rcdl, Doc, I guess that's all I can tell vo u 110W. Oh, yes, I nearly forgot Clara i\la);, S he's become fam o u s as an interior decorator f o r the D ennison paper novelty company. Say, o oy, I j u s t got an o frer fr o111 som e r e volutio ni s t s down in Pernambuco to go down and start a r e v olution. ] t's about time thev had another ollcdown the r e an\,wa". I f it w 'cren't fur t h ose rc"ulutions, I'd g'o IH;n gry.

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TI-I E C : \ R 3 B E_.'1_:-<_'_ ______________ TilE The Jock,;! (ir,I\, batten Yet ... eething: '" nh hfe! Romance I' not .\ [hmg of the past! So! for h e r e rom;1ncc B re'lt h es ll\-es. \\hy /lot> T he glamour o f :.hl" ... Cargoes from I'ar port .. T he tale ... of hold adventure. F urious storm ... : T he L;lUghter K isses Tears-, 'o! for the dock.., The gray, ..,eenllngly soule ... s, dod.,<;, I {omance b reatheslives, I TROPICII. S T O I OI. LQuiu The douds above an angry se;1 D escend ,Ind d,lrken slowh, w .. r ningly. T he w,l\es like (ren/ied ll1on"'[er ... d,tsh III! r.lgc On rock.., which gi\-e to them a whitened de.tth, ."-Ild then the r.lin in I.I ... hin!.! torrents come .. : T he clouds, t h e all hlotted from our ... ildll, TROPIC :-lI G H T Elsie Dllrlq, )0, The stillness of a tropic nig h t 1<; hroken the sound O f \\ a \ es a -d: l s h i n g on t h e s h ore, \ nd Hl..:kets in t h e ground. The moonbe,ms f,llIlIpOIl the sea \ nd make it spar kle brighdy And no and then a gentle b reele Stir ... t h e pal m lea v es gentl y, ligh tly, T he stateh pahm. are outlined \ g,lins[ t h e starr) T hey look like monslrous spide r s Suspended fro m on hIg h I CIlILD "S90-.1 \ nCl.!ro chrld wa!. standll1 there, \ ditt\ little \\feu: h. BLICk a"'l'u .ll her and h,lir \ JlIl'ture fit to :-kclt:h She looked :It me as though to say, W ell, dOll't l i ke m y looks, If nor, just turn the ot her W;I\'." Ilet n.une should ha\c been Snoo k s, ,IIF I;Y I\;C; JU:-IGLI /)o r o /h)" S': W SSf J1l, .. !i. I ow the tru:s in (;.Il u n 1 ake appclr! rlH:lr hodll" PrOltlldll1L: from ch[1I \\;ttl.:rs -110\ \ "ltI-\et <.tern. T hcir dead white tOrln... Seem rcprmll' hfu1. T hey lift I'hcir hand ... up high : h if to p oint accll ... _"-t heavens al:ove. Their very deso lation CaStS;1 spell aro un d t h e l a k e.

PAGE 24

THE C.-\RI BBE -\'I".

PAGE 25

'lame. Hohen j'hld[ \\'oodford Babbitr Emma R ink ... Glady:-; B eers Zonelb Ch,lr[e:-; Cnlnl Alhen Days Theodore 'lerHer R oya[ H igg.l ... on Fr;lI\k Kimhell John Klun k Kathryn Llmhen r.Jw;tni Lowande Harold Owen .-\rthur R (Hhenburg L ucia Sala/llr E v.ulgeline Smith Foster Tufts Ethel W eSlll1an jl'NI O R S. lillrizonldlly: R"w 1 \loon'. Edw,lnl Lnw.tmil, ROIW 1. (;Iadys Tn';\'iufI-r; EmlJl,l Bank .. /.olll'l1a :-;"('T!'I .. ry 1(0\\' Thl'I,[or,' 11"nlt'T, ,\II..ll'rl 0,1) ... ('rum, RO}':II ROil" ".tlll'l \\'""tllldn, Lut"il Sd.Il:.lr, Smith. K;ltli},rn L'llnl)t'rt, R"hnl \\11'11 Row (, Frank Kimbl'll. \rlhuT RUII ... nburj,t. \\'"",If,ml Ihhhitt. J 1-0

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00 THE CAR I BBE :\:-<. H',U',1n r"w: (.,,'!,I"'II P.,IIII. Tr. . unr: .\1111.1 1<..lIk,n, \';1'" I'n-.uk",, \ 1,_ h -\tr.on, TI"'"don' IIr;\I1(I"n, I'r ..... i,""', Ii.uno-t(, So .. tN'Uf. \l, ...... !<-"'-nn" ",.uIiIU(II"WIIW.wl fr(,m 1"1l tr,rillill). K" .... I "11.1 1.)"1'11'. '\'illwlllliIlO,l D"rnill. ]Io-;m 1),,11;,1111',,1,11', lto ..... .1 t .... "': ... tllt.-r, R .. ) \f','l"n It,Awrl 1' ,1\111', \Iotti, LUn', ltu"I. Eli.!.")!"II. 11.1\1.."11. \1.11)(.111'1 11,1\'-" P,nil II.'rdl'H U",.,lh} ... V ..... IIL 1(" nn.lr\' ..... ,.",. f(,," I. \1'li.un \rthtU. /tlllwlI .\n j .. \Ivin It,.uklll, Stott HI. I\{., \V,lIk('l, J.1l1. 1'''1111. \I",il,n I."W"'I/jl K.)w /, Itl'ltl-r J).'"kin k .. l"w kU'-rinlt ". . ,inl( )""II,,,nl.tlln 1(1 ...... \11,111 T.,vI.,t,I('-lI!H,. "n'II"I"', \ lull;II'I("('II,.lluuu, \11,(11 \\tlllill', "ill,,ul I .Ukli. K.;.1II1"h,h (,,11,,111/.10. kl,w 1. J ,,, k a.L,lwr, l'"t"tui" IJI' t("IIH" \1.1111111 11"" m, r, J a.r tldn'l l 11",1" 1\1. .. I Nul .Iwwn: (i(ordf}1I K.lrilC{' r "';cellc. Julill LI"nrH:" J,llk i\lluri""II, ),lIk \\';tll,ln',

PAGE 27

' ;tme. Rent." Roger D C;lkln R .llUlolph Orh.lugh \ \ I .lr;on 1.()I\ ;ln{lc P orn rio Dc H ellIer j\l rI,lred B .llh I.oi .. \\;lIi>lI1:'" 1 ee K.lnger ,li/;t1e'h H .llkelt \';ncent l. u;:li Dorothl Hell1l J .lck .I.II11e .. Robert 1',11 ne .I.lck PettH Donald Pohle Alvin H,mkin E thel Bartlett P .lul H.nden l\l. lrlon Boomer l\lorn., I.llIe ;'\1. Ila\c, Scott P .lr .. OIh K eene i\lorton rd Amt;1 1 {.lnkin Allan W ilhite Gretchen !"llm i\l ichacl Grl'l'nc Vita 1 ,\l'\1 L ouisc \1.\\'1.. HOI W ;liker ;'\llrI;,m-\rthur Blanca \\'.d ktr Homer Stil"on (Sp) I\l i, .. (jr.lce R uhen _-\ni.1 Adair TaIlor T edt!\ B r.tndon \ \'ilhclmina I)i!-.ea .. e. SheikHi.;. Brailll" fCI-er Booblorm P.11I1" P ianistic .. I ... H ighjl1l1lpiti .. B e.1Ulie\ ,ickne .. !-. .. P opulaTion" of heart. Smiling !.ickne ..... D am;c Ill.ldne .. B .I,kel ball fever mania 1.04uaciou .. fiT!-. Stacolllb (;eometn lever Hoar,e" di!.e;I"c Sale .. man!.hip itch Bo,mg.iti.,. \'iolin.t pain .. Poetic pain!. Science (fMe :\Thlel1t mama W igghw, Gigg:litis H c!prul complex C; lrlOOlli.,t, ... L;ght fC.)()tcdnc", Speed-iii .. ... ic ie\er B ;N:baJi pain' Schula:.tic canter .-\rrll;tion !<>unhurn P le.ls.mtness si!-. Long h.lir fever Gr;lceful-itis Wood\lorklllg fevcr \\'<.rking p;lins .\ll!-.cnu,:f fever H e;1rt complex complicarion., \ 'iol;n madness. S A N I T .-IRI U \1. Sugge!-.ted cure. P ugili .. t' .. rareer B e of T O!.t1IlIY;lIlatom} T o arlwe \\ith S1. Peter ['r.lglc Ion' atf;l1r -\u[{)muhile accidcnt I ncur;lhlc i' n he a \,rofe ... of geometr\ T n become .1 Sunday School Te.lcher 1 u he knocked OUT I {OIll.lnce T n lo .. e his leeth Bcn/mc lhld he.Hled and calculus B ecome an orator "\hllle\\" ,.Ihc -\ \'icI\ or (onstdlations I"iolill-t pain ... T r.1mlaTe Greek epic::! C 11. S \ 1 .ltrlIllOll} Str.llf:ht .jackcT T n '1. lmler B all .m.! d10lin T n hec.:wtle a .. imisr (;1"'e T o \le.1r ;lrmy hoot .. T o become ;J miner T o be proclaimed \\orthles!-. P;ldere\\,ki Two amputated ,\Iore homc\\ork T u hl' col1le 1 nun -\nnellt histoT\ \Ltrn ;t barber .I01ll the \];1tInes I OTC .. t nrc I nl'lJr,hle -\ tLlming card T o he di\orred time" } (1 he elettrocuted T o hetOll1t' a chiropr.lctor (uture ;tt'ter le;lving ';';lIlit,lriulll. !.peci.tii!.t. \ \ 'cll-knO\ \11 golf "pro." \\ ;ltIlen at B e a grelf s11lger. a dCHI ... t to torture the cruel \\orld. H uu .. ehold art, 1I1 ... :ructores'. ,\lol'le .. t.lr. T o he chIef ,,:umphoni ... t III the Cele""al orthestr.1. Ol'erltic stM. I l lIhln hOllle,
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T H E CA RI BBE '\:-I.

PAGE 29

THE C\RIBBE :\". FRESIUIEX. Center: Ruth Lockwood. Prt: ... \\"ahl'r \"io,;<, Pn:"idcTlt: Scwdl . Fred Stcwarl. ::;"-cfNary; Ramon'l Trca-.uTl!r; OULSidc (readinJ: book fa-;hion): Row L Richard Scrf!eant. Thirlwt:td F rancisco Wong H arr)" D avis Joseph D avis I lie ha s a crown oi : \ buddmg s
PAGE 30

T H E C\RIBBE .-\Y OUR Cristobal H ig h Sc h oo l i s broadc a s t i n g gvod wis h es to you and h e r o t h e r .'\ lulllni, all o f w hom s h e i s so pr o u d. \\' ht:r e a r c Y Ull? I l o w a rt: YOll? J 11 w hat wo r k are yo u ? What w o rd for t h e o ld sc h oo l ? HELEN \ 1NE\'ARD, Alulll n i Ed itor. THE I R L L L.' P L"l.L1G J B. ) COM. \N, Cris t o bal Canal Z o n e. ;\I I:,\,OT COTrON, 8 1 J ohn S treet, :'\le w Y o rk sinceres t wi s hes fo r th e 1927 C ARII3-!JEAN a n d to it s p r od ucer s Gr ee t i n gs a l s o to t h ose o f th e cla ss o f 1 8 who c h an ce to see t h ese words. SndE '26cx:J R e i s t e r stown R oad, Britton H all A p t 4 B Baltim o r e C.\THERI "-:E "'AID, 4 5 \rest 23d Stree t :,\Tew York B l Rt.;.E \\"EI.LH, addr ess unknuw n \1 'RY \'ERHR, C hapel H ill :-.I. C. IfJlfJ I)OI{OTH\ \YEIK (.\ I rs. J o hn ) j\ION I \:'\' \ 'r-: Cri stohal Cana l Z o nl:. A gain I se nd greetings and hest w i s h es fthis time from Cristobal ) w Class o f 1f)'27, thc fandty, and students o f Cristobal I l igh. I am very a n xious f o r Illy co p y o f THE CARIUIJEAN, for I know i t w ill be t h e best cver," ALIC E ,-\RLENE B ALL, '1 8 :-\\' c n u e, T a c o m a Park J\ld. KENN ETH EDWA RD S) \\'ells b o ro, P a j.. ,\IES R A Yio.ION D Cri s t o bal ) Canal Z o n e 9'20 LIN D .4.I.E D A V IS, JJ6 C Olll lllonwealth Avel1u e, B os t ol1, i\l a ss J A C K B FIE L DS, D i s tri c t T e l a H o nd uras ( in care o f T e la Railroad) "ENN E T H GKEENE, C o ud e r s por t Pa. H \IUf N HOI., \ I\\ uUl), B alh o a, Canal Z o n e AI.:-oN Balh o a, Canal Z Olle "\'I'IIR\' N IhR(;UUN STEW\I\'!. Cri s t o h al, Canal Z o n e ,"\LH.:r: S TII.:-O N, C o l oll, R c p u h l i ( o f Panama. I.IL I I ,\N CO'n-ON \ \ N \\' E R 1 24-Elm S tn:c t Cranfor d ,:-.I .I. AI. DOYLE, 501 N onnand i c Street, Pa s ad e na, Calif. ETI-fA B EV INGTON, B a l b o a H eig h t s, Canal Z one,

PAGE 31

THE C.-\R IHBE.-\;-':. 25 19'21. C ARL D eE\', Box 95. Lemon City, Fl orida. KIRBY Cristobal Canal Zone. HEi\TER, C oast Guard, R oo m '5, Cu s t o m H o u se r a. ALICE H L'XTE R (i\lrs. L.A. ) HOHi\, QUCllltit.:o, \ 'a. FRANK RAYMOND, .14-4-East l'2oth Stret't, ;\Cw Y o rk City "Am s till in :"ew York going to t h e C ollege o f Ph y s icians and Sllrgeon s of Colum bia University. Finishing third year medi. c in e i s as g reat it t hrill aimosl as fini s h ing t h e senio r year in C. H S. the o l d sc h ool as had a s ever, so much so that I must see it. I s h all b e in Cristobal this summer to get m y annuals ELEA!IIOR Zn.IMER,\IAX, 120 Kingsley :\\'ellllc, \\'es t erle i g h, Staten Y. ( do want to see this yea r 's CARIIJBEAN as I wa s very anxiou s to have last year's, I have b een livin g on Staten I sland for nearly three year s and lik e it muc h. I am ve r y well and am working as a sten o graphe r in a w h o lesale and retail lumber compa n y. I the work much. I wis h the class o f '92"" the hest of luck and hope all succeed in t heir work." 1 9 :22 GEORtrE CARTWRJ<,HT. 15Y Hoyle :\ven u e, T otO\\a B o r o u g h Paterson, .I. IDA BRO W N (i\lrs .. -\, D.) DOYLE, 5 0 1 Street, P a s adena, Calif. GLENN PI E I.D.." Balhoa H eights, Canal Z o n t'. L E Roy l\I M.Z\"l..,o\!, B albo:!, Canal ZUIlC. J O RDAN Z I::",\IER\I \ :":", 2 0 1 \\'alnllt Pla ce, c u sc, Y "111 still at SyraCll se working f o r my degree from thc Colleg e o f I s h all b e g raduated in J amlary or n ex t year-and th e n to work! THE C"\RII1BEA:" has my best w i s hes f o r a s u ccess ful year. Frorn the start, it look s \ 'en' bright for t h e annual. Give m y best rega;ds to-all who kno w me I don't imagine, though, t hat the r e are wh o do remt:mher wh o Zim is," MILDRED S T U fORD, '2701 i\litc h ell Avenue, Tampa, Florida. '\IR559Q--1 ":'\1.\1.-\ Robert) :'\ 'OE, Gatun, Canal Zont'. \\'F..'>I.E\ TOWXSE;\'D, Gatun, Canal Zonc. ;\ 1 \JORIE B \LI., liS ;\Iaple .-\\'eIlUe, Tacoma P ark, PAL L Don.r., Cristobal, Canal Zone. 19'23 EDWARD i\IAY, Cristobal, Canal Zone. I al11 anxi olls to see th e <\nnual for this year, because, judging f rom the comm ents I ha\'c heard from the student hody, i t must he a fine ont:o Please extend to the faculty and student hody my hearry g reetings and to the graduating class Illy sincer e wishes for wonderful success in their future endea\'ors. LOl H E:"'TER, Sydenham Hospital, Haltimore, 1 \ 1<1. '" have been graduated from the Philadelp h ia General Hospital (or almost a yea r and :1m now taking a post-graduate coursc in coml1'lunicable diseases at the Sydcnl1, Cristobal, Canal Zone. )--, lI'HRAT, 3935 Burwood .-\venue, South Cincinnati, Ohio.

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THE C.-\RIBBEA:--'. HEX'RY :\ IOORE, ++9 Home :''''emle, F ort \\"adsworth, taten I sland, Y I \IOGEX'E .\ThH (;\Irs E S. "'\X' F .. -\. S. Fort Sill, Oklahoma. "1 am living here in Fort ill and expen to he here three more ; \ fter that no o n e knows. Richard .\'ash "an B ellslhoten was hurn at the station hospital o n 1 5 1 927 H e takes all my time so I don't get much work done. I have nOt had a CARIBBE.\X' since 1 923, the year 1 \\as graduated. But I am going to ha\' e one this year. Am sure that it will be \'ery good, although they will have to 'go some' to beat the one o f '23 Best "ishes for the class o f 1927) and may Cri s t o bal H igh Schoo l be ve r y proud o f them a s they go out into the world. : \CCCpt my heartiest congratulations o n ha\ing the honor to be graduated from Cristobal H igh Sc hool." P t:l.L I G J D ) Cristobal Canal Z o n e. Here's hoping that the anmlal of t h is year will be the best one-whic h mean s o f course hustle!-especially to beat the o n e o f '23. \ly best "ishes for the s u ccess o f your year b ook, and three c h ee r s for C. H 5,1" 924 FLOREXCE ; \I.BERT, 59 Seaside B oulevard, R osebank) Staten I sla nd, N. Y I have a complete se t o f CARIBBEANS from 1920 and I s h ou l d disli k e very mu c h to ha\' e to break the series. main r easo n In not writing was the fact that what I ha vl' heen doing since I came to th e Stat es i s nothing that wOld d prove very interesting to read, for on c day has bl:en ex a c tl y lik e another. '" rem emher that: ;\liss Dodos told me onCe that' s h o uld regret having stayeu out 0 1 sc hool a year instead of going traight on to co llege I do. I regret it more than I regret anything else I ve uune. I lost the hahit an d now m at: loose ends. One only karns cx p erie n ce, you know, but I consider that an e x pen s ive onc, b ecause college traine d men and women have a greater chance, if n o t to s u c ceed, at least to get t h e start on th e r oad to slIccess. Cristo hal Hi gh S c h ool will always have a warm place in m y h eart. B es t wis h es for the future GEOR(.E F ort Banks, 1\la ssachusetts. IReNE Geo r ge) RIECHEJ., q I s lington Place, Jamaica, L o ng I sland, N. Y CH P I ... E, 2. q R Acton Str eet, B e rk e ley, Cal if. EDITH COlLBOl 'RN Sr-.IITH, 7 1 7 Col o nial A \,en u e, I a. DOROTHY ABENDROTH (Mrs Arthur) FLOOD, Cristoba l ) Canal Zon e. JO:"E 1209 Thirteenth Stree t ) \\'ash ington, D C. CJ.IM{L01-n: R \Y. ) l\IACSPARRAN, Gatlin, Canal Zon e. GLADYS LOWANDE (1\I r s C.O. ) B ALDW IN, Cristobal. Canal Z o n e ;\IARCHO!3KE",Col o n RepublicofPanama. INZA i\IARKHA' \ I 4 9 4 Lake Ave nu e, R oc h es t e r, Y "i\l o th e r se n ds m e the papers n o w an d th e n -and b y t h e m I sec C H. S. i s s till o n t o p m ore power to her, f o r I am sure s h e ca n h eat t h e m all. Thollg h J f ee l a s if I h ad be e n out a hundred years, I still have a warm spot in my h eart f o r that conc rete bui l di n g o n C o l o n B each. ":\s f o r m e, J a m the same-just a s natural a s an o l d s h oe. I work day with th e t e l e p h o n e company and sure l y lik e it." ETHEL SONNEio.IAN, 98 i\l a co n Street, Br ooklYll, N, Y ANDREW S \lITH, B ox 2) F oster R atite, R i c hm ond, T ex a s. I f I ha d a milli o n or so d ollars ) I s h ould do na u ght hut travel frolll o n e ra ce o f p eo pl e to another, l earning t h e ir c u Stom s and languages, and collec tin g t h e u es t of t h e i r literature. Tho ugh I s h ould die poor a pauper wit h n o pla ce t o lay my head, I s h o uld b e satisfied, b ecause I s h ould ha ve accomplished m y aim. That may b e utterl y selfis h but l11y soul wou l d b e content, I beli eve. l l nd oubted l y, so m e o f m y frie nd s think I a s a h oho) have m os t interes t in t h e sc h edule o f a fr eight o r pa sse n ger trai n but I am inte rested in any and every thing t hat is don e o n tht: 'l o n g trail'th e p lantin g, harvesting, and thras hin g o f the various

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T H E CARIIlIlI .. -\'\'. grains, sawmilling, mining, and a multitude of other things 1 hav e seen accomplished or have had a part in. "The longer I am a J the fonder recollections of the Isthmus. I am a Zonianhearr and soul a Gold-Sider. ] wish you the best of success, and happin ess that multiplies itsel f as eac h you take a new set into ,he fold." 1925. RUTH HOPKINS, Panama City, Rep. of Panama. Rn'H D UE\' Spencer) LI:--'COL!\', cornc: r of Putman Avenue and Putman Drive, Port Ches,er, :-<. Y \\'Il.L1AM 1623 Oakford Street, Phil adelphia, Pa. HELEN : \8ENDROTH, Cristobal, Canal Zone. KATHERINE 109 Sipple A.\'enuc, Gardenville, B altimore, i\lrl. '" am working in the pay-roll department of a clothing (actory. I enter, add, subtract, multiply figure s fiv e days o f the week, and on the sixth, I c heck back the work o f the girls who are s hort in their money earned. I t i s tiring and figurts arc not interesting, but Sundays arc my own and so are h olidays. me to all the folks, and gi\'l: Cristobal my best wishes for the year-for in athletics, and in sl'hoo\ and aWairs." HlBERr LEE, '2211 Speedway, Austin, Texas. OLGA ARC IA, Colon, Republic of Panama. DOROTHY DEIBERT, Fort Sill, Okla. : \NNIEI. HElM (i\l rs J. H .) BRENCHI C ..... Crisrohal, Canal Zone. '" have given up nursing and am now happily married. I wish 'rHE CAIUBBI-:\N 0 1 '2-the hest I am sure it will be a good onlo:." HARRIET STEENUI-:R(,\ Langley F ield, \":1. 1926. EDNA J)UV\l.I., 171' !\Iartha Street, Cincinnari, Ohio. I RENE HOPKIN!.' Cristobal, Canal Z ; lIll'. C P lL(;AR, Gattln) Canal Zone. l.oL_\ l\l l .... OZ, Panama City) Repllhlic of Pan:lIlla. R u FL 'CHER, 109 Sippl e -\\ "l'llul', (;ardcllvillL', Baltimore, l\J tI. J) EI.IL.-\H ('\lrs. G. \\'.) P \IU,ER, (;;ltUIl, Canal Zone. ,\IILDRED :"\TEEU, Cristobal, Canal Zone. Heartiest congratulations to the Cla ... s of 19'2'\ Iay this year's C-\RIBRE-\' he rhe hest ever." ) IILDE(,\RIJE RU' THE, LandhamB olillce X Clinic, .-\tlanta, Ga.

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THE C:\RIBBE. -\:'\ GAY H. T l RXER, College, Lvnchburg, a. "I'm up here at R i\1. trying to make some kind of a record, and I '01 'working like a trooper' and just managing to get through. I t really is quite an ex peri e nc e though, and we do have so m e dandy times doing all the things that college girls are said to do-and some mor e besides I long (or the 'old sc h oo l' just t h e sa m e Sometimes it see m s impossible to stan d being away from there. i\l y world still center s around Cristobal H igh c hool, and I l ove to hear o f all yo u are doi n g I hope to b e at home for Commencement. i\I y roommate and I quarrelled thi s evening because I said the two months left before 1 get h o m e see m longer than nine month s see m ed when I came up. They do! hundred twenty-seven we're expecting great things o f YOLI. D on't di sappoint LIS!" HELEX J Cristobal, Canal Zone. Y OLI all know what a very good opinion I have o ( Cristobal H igh School so why make me s h o w rny inability to express m yself I ha ve see n the play, and, a s yc. u have prohahl y been ro l d a hundred times or more, it \\as very, vcry good and I must that I was greatly surprised by some rcople, although I ("ertain ly knew b ette r than to he that \\ ht"1l I knew that f\l i ss Dodds was I I Lhind it. .. B e ( o r e I ha d anythin g mu c h to do with an annual (es pecially having my o wn 'masterp i eces' published ) 1 marvelled at the ability of the Seniors; when I was a Seni o r ( I insist o n spelling it with capital'S') 1 wondered at our ability; and no w I am anxious to see what othe r S eniors c an do, but I n eed not be anxious any more for 1 am sure that I s hall n o t b e disappointed with t h e 19'27 CARIB-BEAN. "Christophe r Columbus! Y o u asked m e to t ell yo u wh e r e j am, h ow I am, and what I am d o ing, and in all thi s non se n se I haven't an s w e r ed o n e q u es tion. \V ell, I am s till r es idin g in Cristobal in b ody at least. Next, I am f ee ling fit f o r anything except another attack by an Alumni Editor. Lastly I am working as a s t enographe r f o r United Artists' C orporatio n Cris t o bal, Canal Zone, Ba s t ante? M y very b es t wis h es to Fres hm e n, Sopho m o r es, J uni o r s, S enio r s and F aculty." JOHANNA KLEEFKENS, State n l sland Hospital, Staten I s land, N. 'f. "Once mor e C H. S. i s to se nd f o r t h it clas s o f whic h s h e i s prou d. Congratulations to th e graduating cla ss and my wishes to th e dear Alma H S. I kn ow TilE CARISIIEAN o f ''27 will b e the h es t c:v e r l'ven thou g h ''26 b e f o r e yo u. \\'IRTZ, Cristobal Canal Zon e \\'II.I.IAl\l COrrEY, Cristobal, Canal Z o n e P lm Tree. on (01011 Beach.

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THE CARlllllEAN. .... ;;" .. :J J'f.5 Louise /-feim, '27, Lile r tll) Edi t o r !fi e I Rohal P'I .. \"U, '29. ( Aw a rded H ighe s t H o n o r s in 1 9 1 61 9'2i, Sh ort S to r y Co n t e s d "EightBun c h I Bun c h Bull c h -EightSev e n S even Seven -Bul1c h Bull c h. H e h Throw that one out. I I S o ld. E ightB unc h Heh' Spe ed u p with that fruit! \\'e have toB un c h Eightget it loaded bvB unch t h re e o'clock. Eight Se ve n Six Six. \ \ h ose fruit i s that? Six S e ven J oe Haynes? E ightI t h o u g h t s o. BUllch Six Si x -Bunc h -Seven. I s t hat the la s t stem in that barge?" Y a s, Sah." B ring number H6, Ilt:),.t." "Nright, Cap." B ill Harrison, a big six -footer, a s mus cular a s an OX, and as strong a s an e lephant, wa s c h ecking fruit on board t h e United F r uit s t eame r Bowdl'n, w h i c h lay at anchor on Gatlin I.ake. H e was a pi cturesq u e figur e in h is pants high top boo t s, b l l J e shirt, and big five-gallon Stetso n with a cou p l e o f bullet h oles in i t. H e was sitting on th e rail watching the negroes pass t h e hananas from t h e barges into the h o l d of the boat and listening to thei r conversati o n which pertained to everything unde r t h e SUllo :\1\ at o n ce h e heard t h e put-put-put of a moto r h oar. "Jose, call that hoar." Y a s, sah Jane \\'est, .lane \\'est, cume h e re and wait f o d i s barge," The n B ill again, H e h .-\ 1 come on up out of that s m o k y cabin. Pa) 'menl f o r o f b m ana .. i I> ... ",e(l lM llL' IlIlfnl ll' r oj h.truJ", a slem c onlains. . Bunc h IIlcanll lIin c o r m o r e h.\lIc! s. "All right! \\'ait u ntil L get my hat-my h e l met, y o u know." For AI Deering, a mechanic for the Unite d Fruit wa s s eldom seen with Out his dirty SUIl helme t which had long sin: e seen its day. .-\w, l eave t h e hat. S o m e day I'm goin g to d ump it." ":,\Te v e r mind the har, ( t suits m e." All right, get a l11(we o n y o u and for gosh s:lkes, don't stop t o tinke r with som e piece of l11:l.c hinery a long th e way," .-\ m o m ent later the s qU:l.t, h e lm e t e d Al was on t h e d e ck b es ide B ill. "\\' ell, y o u o ld banana bug, what you gotta ?" ( can't figur e it out, .-\\. Figure out what?" "Of course rou have the same t hing on mind a s ( have ?" ":\hollt the lii s :l.pp earance of t hat fruit? Think o f it! Ei ght hundre d s t e m s stump c ould sink thre e barges.! full o f banan:l. s anli not l eave a f e w Roating around." '";"' 10 I gue s s 110t, and s p eaking of bananas I've heard some things about that new plantation oppo- B ,lIhlnaS fro m G ... tUli L a k e rel1.ions a r e bro u ght d o wn fr o m Ihc in ler io r b a r geS f r o m about fortr-fi\'c t o abou t eiglLly-fi\'c f ee l in le n gth. blT l!es carry f r o m one hundred 10 two Iho u sand fiv e h u ndred .. of bdnanJs. [I is d ,l ngcrOIlS and w ork on account u f Ihe dead tree,; in Ihe l a k e These lree" pUll c h h o les i n the o f thc mOlor bo;\ts o r the and Ihem t o sink. II COSI S a larg e sum of money 1 0 a sunken 1:10:11. The r e h a v e bec n f our o r fiv c m o lor bo:l l s "unk of on Gallln L a ke.

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30 I II E CARI BBEA:-.' sire Can a Sadd l e,J which belongs to J ose Cerveza, rhat o l d bandit l eader." "Say, Bill what do you say we g o up t h e r e Sunday and look th e place o\'t:r and see what w e ca n find out and do about the disappearance o f that fruit." .-\11 righ[.' Sunday came "irh engi n es p opping and boats running around the docks picking up barges and placing the m in their right p os ition s "\\"hic h one a r e y o u going o n, :\1?" "On the 7allr' /I'nl. Come o n along." ":\,11 right. Got your s i x-s hooter?" Yeh' H o w about [he g rub? '0. K. \Y e have to get oft' at 0111 i sland n ear Cana Saddl e. Soon they were o t f o n th e sturdy launc h, 7011(' /I 'es l, with its to w o f barges which w e r e to b e distributed at \'ariou s stopping places. \\' hil e some o f [he barges w ere being dropped a[ E scobal, [h e tWo f r iends visited a littl e clnrina, where th ey sat chatting for a rime with so m e natives who ha d co m e in from their little farms to sell th e ir bananas I t was a t E sco bal t hat th e on l y e x cite m ent o f th e t rip occurred On goi n g over t o w h ere th e tow wa s tied up, Al saw a man struggling in the wate r. H e slip p ed off his cloth es and jumped in r esc uin g a d r o wning Spaniard whom t h e y kn ew w ell a s P ed r o Frase r. P ed r o dec ided to "throw in" with AI and Bill. .-\S h e was a good man in the j un g l es th e y were glad to have him. I hey went about a mil e to J oe Clo se s pla ce and asked him if they co uld camp o n his farm. P e r mission was speedily granted b ec au se Bill ha d done many errands for Close Early morning Bill started out. H ow about taking P ed r o? H e's a good bu s h man. ':\0, I want to go by myself." ":\11 right! \ \ har time will yo u h e ha c k ?" ":\hour nin e o'cloc k to -nighr." "\\' hy so latt and long?" "Oh, I havt; a hllnch. YOll remtmht:r w hil e We Were in b,cohal, I was talking to a suhbuyer?" Y eh! \\'hat abollt it?" "Oh, tell you later." And when Hilllef[ for Calla Saddle, AI ami Pedro playing B lack J ack em top of a milk h "x. Il u [ before long ("IW th .. 1I1l1)' IIIIIN 1/1,.(, b, ,d{"iII will''' ., d.11II hi "ny ilf' w,&" 11 .... -11'(1 i, tl,.. (f,II_nU 111m fir "atun L .lkt !-.oldll .. II .. ,,. If) IU.trf! ,I durn,,, W." IHII" It" .,I..,1U1 fiftf"ln 11,,1.'1 f lom (,.,tun "Pedro, l et's go and l oo k over C l ose's farm and see h o w the bananas are. This i s too exciting. "Bueno, Se n o r "Let's go uown that l e ft traii. This secti o n was evidently planted about two m onths ago. The s h oo t s are just coming up. B e about six m onths before Cl ose will get bananas from h e r e. \\'ell, l e t 's go into thi s sec ti o n that's bearing. I wonder why Clos e doesn't cut out t h e wate r s u ck e r s. They absorb all t h e wate r t hat i s n ee d ed f o r [h e o ther s hoot s An d [he o l d s [alk s [hat have b o rn e the ir s h ou l d b e cut ou t. P ed r o, h e re's o n e that ha s th e bli g h[. 5 I n this case ir i s best to dig up the tree and burn it with lim e, i s n't it?" "Si, S e i ior." "Aw, h eck! L et's s it dow n u n de r t hat tree and talk a whil e, I have se e n so many bananas that I am t i r e d of the m. I can't eat bananas any m ore I t makes m e s i ck They sa t talkin g f o r over two h ours o n different s ubj ects. Je 's about tw e lv e o'clock. I. e t s go bac k to camp and get so m e d inner, "Bue n o, Senor. Vamonos. T h e r e was th e rattling of pots and pans for about fift ee n minutes-the n th e sizz lin g o f ba co n and eggs over a h o t camp fire, The n dinner wa s ready. "Let's take the cayuca an d go down and explore the dam and the o l d ir o n barge the Government l e ft when b uild in g rh e dam-that i s if t h e cayu c a hasn't disappeare d ., Bu e n o, Senor. P u es d am e l os ca n e l e t es ( paddies) y una soga ( r o p e) .' "Bue n o, S e n o r. "Pedro, do yo u kn ow anything about the di sappearance o f t h ose bananas that the Fruit Com pany l os t?" Pedro h esitated bu t a mom ent. "'h e n h e piung cl i \ \ irh seeming rdief into a l o n g story abo llt how his hrothe.::r, w h o was an e n g in ee r o n .lose Cerveza's sc hoont::l', Alana S, did not unde r stand h ow his t:mployt: r wa.., getting bananas to s hip to Col o n when his farm ha d jus t b eell planted about two m Ollt h s b e f o r e. AI interrupted th e story. P ed r o, will YOli get 111e.:: thar pretty orc hid ?" .,talk i)l'ar. fJnl r I ,11."111 of 1).lIIall.,... A tH,' u qu.llIy h .. frum I III t ,XII CUrl' h.I' 1If'1." (ound fflr till" in-Id i,m .. hlhlhl

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THE CA R IBBEAN. 3 "Si, Se nor." Ped r o b egan clam b e rin g up one of t h e many dead trees in Gatun La ke's j un g l e. Here's a mac h e t e. \\' hat's the matter?" P ed r o was so mu c h exc i ted t hat h e couldn't gt't t h e orchid and n early f ell Ollt of the o l d tree. :\\ w e n t up in his t urn and discove red, t i ed to three stumps but a s h ort distance away, t h e t h ree lost ba r ges. "Come, let's paddle ove r and explore t h em" ;' V arnonos "\\'e'li have to tell Bill abollt t h is They w ent ove r and expl ored t h e ba r ges b u t co uld not find an y clue as to t h e mystery. Pecir o, let her float. Don't padd le. I want to t hink a w h i l e." They Roated around among t h e stumps for abollt <1.n h our. P ed r o wa s soun d a s leep w h e n AI decided it was tim e to get back tocamp. \\'hen therarrived r h ere, t h ey found Bill making a fire "\\'he n did y ou ge t here?" J ust about five minutes ago." "\\'hat did ),Oll find''' ";\Tot a t hin g t hat amounts to anyth ing. I'm sure th e o ld iron barge h as so m e con nection with this myster y Bu t all I cou ld find in t h e w h o l e day's sea rch was so m e mule tracks. I t seemed to me that t h e tracks l e a di ng from t h e barge were heavier than t h ose goi ng toward it, but I'm not mll c h o f a detective. Di d YOlI take a s n ooze? If so, I hope you didn't dream abou t a heavy supper o f c an ejo, tapir, o r deer, for 1 didn't bag a thing." W e ll, Pedro and I bagged thethree lostbarges." \Yhat!? !" Yep." The n h e to l d his story o f how they had f o un d t h e barges and what h e t h o u g h t had happ e n ed. \\'he n h e had fini s hed, Bill was excited. ;'Tha t fit s in with my theory. Here's w hat think happened. I t h ink J ose Cerveza is be hin d all o f it. I think h e sent up a man to work for u s, and his job was to cut l oose t h e barges fro m the rest of t h e tow. These barges w ould float to t h e edge o f t h e c hannel and a man would co m e out in a motor boat and tow t h e m to the o l d ir o n barge wh e r e J ose's m e n w ou l d load t h e m o n mules and carry th e m to h is pla ce to b e shipped to Colon. "That's it ex a ctly Pedro, get a l ig h t and get t h e cayuca ready, whil e I make a lun c h \\'he n we reac h E scoba l, I 'll go wake Ramo n an d g e t him to take u s to Gatun, w hil e yo u get t h e COI1-spira to r t hat let t h e barges l oose. \\Oe ha ve to wor k fast, t h o u g h." The gang was caught and sent t o Gamboa penitentiary for ten years. A s a reward AI was made master m ec hanic, Bill refused t h e manage r s h ip until At bought a new SUIl helm et. ONI' O F LIFE'S UTTLE TR.-\GED I FS. Fernando strode firm l y o u t on the beach and h e a ded f o r ";'\'"ombre." The morning s un s h o n e ". bright and sparkli ng, an d eac h lau g h ing wave that surged o n to t h e beac h gave up irs lif e joyousl)' in ti n y twinklin gs. The fres h clean se a breeze whipped r h e pa lm s and m < ld e live l y tattoos among th e jungle s h ru b s a l o n g t h e b each. All in ail, r h o u g h t Fernando, i t was a happy world. H ere h e w a s, a ll his ro town to bu y t hat bri g h t new mac hete wit h m o n ey h e ha d saved over a p eriod o f m Oil th s. Ah would not l\laria be p l eased wit h r h e mon ey he'd ge t cutting bananas with that mac h ete! F ernando th o u g h t s h e w ould. :\h, t h e stor e -that enticing place ofluxuri ously dis pla yed apparel, o f tempting, s hin y t oo l s, of bright g UllS, and, last o f ail, of beautiful mac h e t es! Self consciously F ernando edged up t o t h e COlI/Her. S cratc h ing his l eg and squirming about, h e waited for th e Chinaman to se r ve a c U Sto mer . 4.t l ast) A mac hete?" Y es, a rnachere." Y o u wis h ee dis o ne!" "No, the big o n e on the right. That's it." A gai n Fernand o was in t h e open air The m o rn ing was twice as beautiful. \V as n o r l ife wonderful? Crossing t h e reef, F ernando s uddenl y h ea r d a call f o r h e lp. Turning, h e saw a tiny c hil d in th e g rip o f a fairly large octopu s. Skillfully h e threw his machete, the bright, s hin y mac hete, and silentl y ir s l id into r h e s lith e rin g creature. The c h i l d wa s free. A cross t h e reef ra ced an anxi o u s mother and numerous prai s in g relatives. The i r praise a n d t hanks f ell on deaf ears whi l e F ernando though t of a bright n e w mac hete s l ow l y s inkin g into th e ooze of the ocean's bottom. A c r oss th e ba y came a rumble of thunder. The s un slid b e h ind a huge cloud bank. I. o n g trembling fingers o f lightning flicked. Fernando trudged h o m e in t h e r ain.

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I HE CARIBBE.-\:\.

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THE C:\ R I BBEA;\!. 33 __ llili!!> "u SOL< I Teresa K. Gallagher, ':!7. ( First-Senior n _gl_ h C S _S._) ______________ _____ Just a tiny village on an island far oR" the path of ships ply back and forth across the ,"ast P acific a village mad e lip of (orty native huts) a large wood e n community building, and a Stone churc h-that was I s la Sola-Lone I s lan d. I t was buried i sland [00, (or the inhabitants were the liv ing dead dead to all neaT and dear to them. They were lep e rs unclean no longer desired in rhe outside world. Half a centur y be r OTt: t h e first in habitants had arrived. They wer e just six, four m e n and tw o women. Since then, the village had grown to its present s iz e o f nearly two hundred men and women. T e n years after the arrival of the first boat load of inhabitants f o r I s l a So l a, Father O'B rien had corne. H e was just a young man, but recently o rdained, wh o, in his un selfis h eagerness to se rv e God, had chosen this gruesome i s lan d as the place whe r e h e would fulfill his duties. I t was the kind and patient Father O'Br ien w h o had supervised the making of the ru gs, mats, bask e t s, and o ther articles of wea ving. I t was h e wh o ha d taught th em to read that they might pass th e dull h o urs in reading th e few books and magazines whi c h th e infrequent boats had brought. H e had neve r told them that th e oil stove, which wa s t h e greatest luxury of the village, and the flower seeds which h e lp ed so much in brightening what wou l d have b een plain dreary-fronted huts, had b ee n p urch ased with his o wn meager funds from th e boats w h ich came out of their paths into t h e littl e bay to drop their packets into the 1 sla Sola lighter. The small c hu rc h t hat :;tood at the edge of the liv e l y str eam, surrounded by palms and tropical flowe r s, would always stand as a monument to the priest w h o had b uilt ir. I t was JUSt a s mall churc h made of stones that h ad been c arried from the other side of the island. I n the there was the bell from a s hip that the sea had tossed up on the s h ore. I nfinite care had been taken with the altar, and th e hand-carved cross was a piece o f work fit for a museum. wonder t ha t t h e good man who had worked inces santly for those people had learned to love th e m very dearly, and that they returned the deep feeling of affection. T o-night there were gathered around the camp fire, as had been the evening custom ever si n ce Father O'B rien had come, atl the inhabitants of the \ itlage. But now they were not jolly and talkative. Everything was quiet. E ver y o n e l oo ked si l ently at th e flam es darting into the air. Onlr t h e cracking of the wood and coals broke the sil e n ce. I t was Father O'Brien's last night with his people and the work that he had learned to love so dearly. H e had been o rdered to another parish, for his B ishop felt t hat h e needed a c hange afte r so many years of faithful work. H e stood up; h e was going to say a few words of far ewe llj but h e c hoked, and tears flooded his eyes. H e sat again. H e cou l d not even say good-bye to his friends. H is head was bowed, and with his left.: hand h e thoughtfully sifted the sand. Suddenly with a cry of amazement and joy, he leaped up and h eld out to the astonished group a r ed hot coal. I n a fla s h the truth dawned on them, and altjoined in the s houts of joy. FatherO' B riell h e l d in his left hand a red hot coa l and h e d id not feel its heat. I I e had become a l eper. Their s houts of turned to sig h s o f sorrow, for the dear Father had earned a rest and was anxious to return to see his siste r s and hrothers. The n o n ce again they were jubilant, for the dear o l d priest, all smi l es, assured t h e m that h e was overjoyed, that now h e wou l d a lwa ys stay with his friends on I s l a So l a. C H R I STMAS I N PANAMA. JohllG .v,/son, '27 O n \\edllesday J a nu ary 5. I attended the mo h e r e. M o reover, people instead of being thought-tion picture ente n ai nm e n t at Fan Da\i s. I n ful enough to send C hristl11a:; cards early enough th e PaIll e VetUS was a m essage from the post LO pass o n. let them arrivc through allcast h a l f of master gc n e r a l o f the U. S. A., urgi n g th e publ i c Janu ary. Presents may b e expected, it seems, a n y to m ail early for Christmas. th a t i s onl y o n e timc th e ycar t h rough, excepl at Christmas. exampl e o f th e punctuality o f C hri stmas down C hristmas in P a n amaisslowbullastsal o nb ti m e

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THE CA R I BBEA N. :\;\ U N EXPECT E D RE\ Y :\RD. I _ ___________________________ H k n V i n, ya d __ _27_ __ __________ ____ __ Eng lish C l ass. ) I t all happened unexpectedl y as most grea t things do. The Panaman Governmen thad offered a prize of two hundred a n d fift), dollars for the best developed report o n Panama. The teacher of the social p roblems class, in o r de r to co-operate and to familiarize her stu de n ts w i t h t h e history c f their surroundi ngs, tol d each pupil i n the class to de"lelop a long report on som e h istorica l hl ilding of P aJlama. Clifton had been assigned a certain old cathectral in Panama Sear c h a s he w ould, he cmld not for t h e l i f e of h i m fin d a history, almanac, magazin e, or e ncyclopedi a which c\'en S0 much as mentioned the na m e o f the cathed:-al. But at last a frie n I o f hi s came t o tht" rescue, as friends Lsu ally do. H e tol d C l i fton o f the library in t h e i\l u n i cipa l Building in H e said he had seen several vo lu mes o n P a n a m a in it, and sl.gges'en that Clifton look t here for h el p. T he next be ing Saturday, Cl i ftCln w e nl down to the library abou t eight o'cluck but found (0 his Sl rprise t hat i t wou l d not 0lJe n b e fore nine. H e waiteJ aroLl1d a while unt il, af"er w h a t seemed ages : tht ooors were opened. H e entered breathl ess l), a n d glanced around the rooln. From r he door all --he way a r ound t h e rOOI11 were huge shelves filled with t h ick book s. C lift o n was so hewildered and excited hedi d n'tknowwhere to begin first, but h e decided that t h e best t hin g to do was to start at the r ig h t of the door a n d k ee p seemed going in t hat direc"io n H e began with t h e top s h el f and took down every \'olume, but found to his surp .... ise t hat not evc:n one so much as menl inned t h e cathedral' s name. "\\'e ll," though t C lift o n "perhaps the next shelf \\ ill bring better hick." So h e ea .... nes tl y set to work. after Clifton had searched every !
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THE CARIBBEAN. 35 years search had b ee n made f o r the pri ce l ess book in all the librari es, b oo k stores, and mu seums in t h e Republic o f Panama. The search had see m ed hopel ess, ( o r t h o ugh several rewards had b ee n offered, no one h ad ever come to claim them "until to-day" thought C l ifton. "I'll bet my paper will b e t h e m ost val uable in the soc ial prohl e m s cla ss !" ,m. I \ I SITORS. e I I ere/chen 1// Palm, '29 I ( F ir s T placl..J unior E ngli s h Cl:ls s J "Good-night! D ing dang! D o I ha\'c to w ea r t h ese s hort pants and rainbo w -co lored baby s tockings ?" "Yes, YOlll110St certai nly do. All the e lit e soc i ety wear golf clothes. Hurrr n ow, Alex Y our s ister and I are ready to go." Half an h our later a rather s h ort, p ompo u s man of florid co unten a n ce joi ned h is wife, f\l rs. Alexande r Trevain e and his s ister, L eslie o n th e deck of t h e Sanla i\l/arla which wa s s lowl y drawing up to D ock Six at Cristobal. f\1rs Trevaine was attired in th e "Iatest" fr o m P ari s an ense mbl e whic h included a pair o f fawn co l ored gloves. ( I t might s uddenly be come c hill y in Panama! One ca n never tell! ) On ce on th e dock, "los v i ajeros, afte r find ing th e ir "Iand l egs," strolled toward Col o n, through Steam s hip Road, where th e im portant shipping co m panies' offices are situated, and t h e n ce to the G overnment The r e, f\lr. Alex, a fter having seen numerou s boat co mpanio n s w ea ring th e hated golf COStume and helmets, dec ided to co mplete his outfit \\ i th one of "them white d u c k hats." They were so "di s tingui s hin g like" h e t h o u g h t. Upstairs his wife, with th e air o f a hardened tourist" wa vainly l oo king f o r th e cameo s h ade o f P h oeni" h osiery that Mrs R eginald "anderbilt always wore. On th e co n trary, f\l iss L eslie was very much inte rest ed in t h e d i s play s o f co l orful kirn onos and Cooli e coats. Afte r roami n g thro u g h the for e i g n s t ores 011 Front Street, f\l i ss L es lie b o u ght h erse lf a Panama hat, and so m e iv o ry and Satsuma trinkets f o r her best frie n ds. Mrs T r ev ain e h oweve r eve n t h ough s h e had b o ug h t a Canton lun c h eo n set, whic h s h e sa id "was far s uperior to f\lr s. V an L eeder's ba c k h orne wa s quite ex asperated at all Colon b eca u se s h e could n o t purc ha se I vory soap o r cameo-co l ored h os iery in any of the Chinest s hops "See h ere, Alexan der, I .eslie does not wish to buy anthing more and I haven't been able to find anything e l se t hat I want so no w I'm going in to t h is H indu stor e to bu y you a cane. "\\'a it a minute J anice, nothing doi ng -\\'ait until I'm o l d a n d gray." ] t's th e styl e, yo u kn ow! Kuppenheimer's ad vertise m ents always inclu de a cane in the co stume of a well-dressed man." T o t h e H indu clerk awaiting her orders, ":\Tow ah em, do yo u ha ve any walking canes, s t y l is h ? Y es, carved a bit o n rhe h e ad." \,"hat-carved o n the h e ad! P oo r me! -\\' h e n I ge t on b oard ship, t hat cane' s go in g swimming overb oa rd ... "Ssh-Alex. Y es, that is lovely, of native mahoga n y? rine-and so fashio nabl e; it will look p ositively stunning with your s uit. F ive dollars? That's pretty m uc h isn't it? Make it four. No. Your best price, f O llr fifty? Pmum all righ t." f\leanwh ile, i\ l i ss L es l ie, w h o ha d b ee n peering curiolls l y around the s hop, ha d corne upo n an o bject whi c h interested her greatly. "i\l y what i s that?" The H indu nearby r eplied, "That, madam, i s a shrunken human head." "\\' h at! Good gracious-frorn where? \\' h ose head i s it ?" Y o u ca n see by the features that it is a man's head. The r e are certain I n d ian tribes in E c uador wh o practice this c ustom; wh en an Indian ha s an e nem y, h e kill s him and presto-cuts ofl' his he;w:I, shrinks it with hot sa n d b y a process kn own to that tribe, and k eeps it as a sort of troph y o f his victory 1 \ l y h o w inte r esti ng -and it is s o s mall, n o large r than a man's fist, and t h e s kin and hair l e f t ex actl y a s w h e n the man was a l ive only shrunken. They are gruesome th o ugh D o you sell th e m 1"

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THE CARIBBEAN. Y es, madam. This one is f our hundred fifty dollars, for you understand that th ese heads are \'ery \aluable ,-"Yes! I s h o uld like t o have one, f o r I am interested in such novel things. Y o u said that these tribes are called head hunte r s Just plain cat1l1ibOlls, in other words, I s'pose. \\'e ll, h o w did people get these heads if the tribes are so fierce? Stole them! I see! Y es, I 'll take o n e ":\o\\', Al ex, carry the cane and use it co rrectly." H o l y ;\l oses! Say, it's tw o-thirty n ow \ \ 'e're going ridi ng. O-ho, th e re! Come on, ladi es. The R ollsR o y ce awaits u s." Look f ol k s what I '\'e bought. I t's t h e head of some poor fello w who wa s the enemy o f an Indian in Ecuador. Feel that h air. Just like yours, Janice." "Oh-oh h o w (ould y o u L eslie H o w terribl y hide o us O o h I'm g o ing to dream o f that tonight. \\hat-?" I s ai d that the Hindu in th e shop told m e after I ha d bought it, that, a s they were stol en) if ever the owner o f the h ead s aw you a n d kn ew that you had that certain head, h e wou l d probabl y take very drastic measures to g e t it. An d say" ( h e r e L eslie winked at !\lex), "did you notice that dark sinister l ook ing man standing outside th e door of that H indu shop? D o you kn ow h e seemed to watc h m e when 1 wa s buying thi s h e ad and h e looked so curio usly at u s when we left. Y o u saw him, Alex-!" Y es, I did noti ce him," r es p onded '\I ex. "And I was just thinking that that fellow in that ri g behind u s l oo k ed lik e him." "Oh, dear-," c ri ed n l rs Trev ain e, "no w look what yo u've gotten u s into-oh dear! I wo nder who it was!--Of course, it wa sn't a cannibal -but L eslie, I. eslie, why d id you do s u c h a thing? It's perhaps unlawful to have s u c h things in your possession That man might ha ve b ee n some sort of uetcctivc. Hurry and get thi s drive over so that I c an get back on b oard t h e s hip where I'll ntlenst be safe r than in thi s place." Even L eslie began to wonder whether there might be somethin g t o th e sror y s h e had made up, f o r twice again, durin g t h e cou r se o f th e ir ride thro ugh C o l o n and Cristobal, they s aw this sa m e man riding afte r them in a coac h The third time h e appeared t o b e fran tical l y waving f o r them to s t o p, and, J\l r s Trevaine) ha v in g s u c h a "del i cate n e r vous d i spos iti o n as s h e had latel y told A l ex, was, in reality, frighten ed and o rdered the d river 10 u se all speed toward th e dock. Ba c k o n ce more, l adi es T e n minutes to wait b e f o r e th e b oat l eaves. \\'e r e you afraid o f the 'cannibal s Janice?" asked J\1r. Trevain e, t e asingly. Keep s till! I was tired and wanted to g e t back. None of your s illiness." Five minutes later the cannibal came o n t h e doc k and, p ee rin g a n xio u s l y up at the deck, where quite a f e w peopl e were standing, saw the Trevaines, and waved to attract the ir attenti o n. The "cannibal proved t o b e a H in d u and, hurry ing to L es l i e, h e e xplained his c uri o u s a c t i o n s. H e wa s a partner in the store where L eslie ha d boug h t t h e shunke n head and afte r s h e had l e ft h e ha d r ealized that his co-wor ker h ad so l d h e r a head which had be e n particul arl y r eserved for some o ne e l se. The Hindu thought t hat Mi ss L eslie wou l d lik e anoth e r h ead w hich h e had with him in ex c h ange. "\\'o uld that b e all right?" L es l ie agreed, and with that the man l eft, afte r h avi n g apol ogized profus e ly for the mistak e F e l low voyage r s crowded arou n d "i\I )' d e ar i\ l r s Trevaine, wher e did you get that interesting curio?" "Oh L eslie and I b o u ght it. I thought it would be so interesting to have in the h Ollse that 1 urged h e r to get it. Such novelti es have always appealed to me." A l ex aside to L eslie, m e r e l y s aid B unk \\"ILLlAM, THE BUS DRIVER. IIt/OI !/i1ll'yard, ':q. From !-,jx in th e mornin g until si" a t n i ght thi c k bla c k lips, s h ow in g a sol id row o f gol d \rilliam, the hu s drive r m a k es hi s r o und s, frolll leeth. :-\(!w (ristobal to the and b ac k-al So mesayhei marriedbeca u se h e issoh appyand in his n 'at khaki su it. clean shirl, blac k l i c, l oo k s well fed, but I d on'L believe it. How many cap, an d black s h oes. lim es a day doesn't a n inte r es t e d m ai d gi 'c I s he jolly? Oh, yes! the best 113LU f C ci a nd \\'ilJia m a n E s kim o pi c, a s l ic e o f cak e, or a n most Hu'ornmodating f e llow yo u ('vcr mel appl e f o r brin gi n g h e r mi stress' packages h o m e? always r(,Hdy to g reet one with a & milc from his And s w ee t s are fattenin g

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T H E C: \RIBBFA:-..' e l R o n : R THE R O \ E R LOlltu]. \I,uk, '2Q. 1 Fin" place-Sophomore Ow ... !f.----For several years, R O\'er, the large ran .-\ireJale, ha d the honor, as officialm3scot, of wearing on his l eather collar a brass plate on which was inscribed in large letters: ROVER-CRISTOBAL COALING STATION. H e could nor h e expected to rea liLe that this largest bunker coaling plant in the warl(I, which cCelled so many ships f rom all pans of the glohe. cost three million dollars and. is one of the most important projects of the L 'llited States mell[ on the Canal Zone. H e did know} ho\\e\er. that he lik t'd it very Illuch, when the steamers were coa lin g Each morning he would ritle to work with his master in the coa ling station bus and would return with him at noon and in the e\'ening. ;\Ithough Rover disliked water, h e would swim when t h e l aullc h es Were not running, acro!)s the o l d F r e n c h Canal wi\l indi / sla llti,ollwhic h the coa lin g statio n is built. H is friendly manner 10 from the superintendent down to the coloreJ water hays made him a great fav o rit e. H is deep brown trustful eyes, matching his dark, ran, shaggy coal, seemed almost to speak. L 'ndernearll that rough coat was a affection for his friends, at home and at the coaling p lant. nover had learned how to climb adeptly a vertic al ships ladder hy hooking hi s forepaws the rungs H e had a propensity for visiting the steam ers wh e n they were at the coaling plant, always with t h e intention o f rovin g to the ship's g alley, where h e would indtl cc the cook to gi\'e him some scraps o f m eat or bone. One afterrno n after Rover had stopped playing t u g-o l -war with \\'o lf, the superintendent' s hand. some police dog. h e decided to go aboarJ t h e S S. T agris o f the Roland L ine, w h ic h was taking coal Happily obli\ious o f the noise of the lofty reloading towers high aho\'e him, Rover hastened to the s hip. Afte r trotting up the steep gang plank, h e wa s soon begging the amiable cook for something to eat. \\'hen the kind-hearted mall saw h o\\ quickly a fe\\ disappeared, h e ga\'t:! Rover a fine, generous heef hone, which was \\ hat Hover l iked. \\ hil e h e was engaged in keeping the bone firm betw een h is large paws ashegnawedon it, the loading of the coal ceased, and the coal handle rs began to go ashore. Soon t h e lin es t ha t h eld the ship to t h e dock were b e ing l oose ned preparatory to departure, but the coa l handl ers, probabl y helie\'ing the dog safe ashore, gave no thought to R O\'er as they left the s hip. The cook had forgotten the s haggy dog, c h e wing a bone in a dark corner, and long b efore R O\'e r was aware o f it, t h e steamer had left the coaling station and wac:; on its \\ayoutofColon harbor. Soon the peculiar motion o f the ship afl"ected H m"er, \\ h o realized that something unusual had Iltlppened. Suddenly h e ran from the galley to t h e deck where he was to fin d n o t t h e familiar coaling plant-but instead a broad e x panse 0 1 hlue water on side. The break\Va ter o f huge concrete bl oc k s passed by h im be f o r e h e fully realized what had happened. The coo k \\ h o ha d been extremely surprised to see the dog appear, rold the captain immediately, but t h e pilot ha d already returned to Cristohal, and t h e only thing to do was to take Rover, the srowa\Va\" to E urope. \\'hen Rover did not appear on the evenin g of the departure of the Tagri.r, his master thought hi s pet had gone home earl ier in the afternoon as h e did, but to hi s surprise the Jog was /lot there to greet hil11. :\ few days after Hover's disappe
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T H E a l one. =' o r o n ly w as h e l o n eso m e, but h e did n o t like t h e unpl e a sant moti o n o f th e steamer. T h e n too, h e could not u nderstand the G erman lan guage, though e r e long h e learn ell t o a b e\' commands spok en i n Germa n, a n d b ecame v e ry intimate with all t he officers. days o f th i s strange life passed. The w ea th e r h ad g r o wn coo l e r. R ove r had begu n ro feel ull comf.Jrtable b ecause h e h a d al ways !i\'ed in the rr opics The n r h e l i n e r a p p roach ed Hamburg, G errnany, w h e re s h e staye d in port for ten day s This ga ve Rover a fine oppo r r u nity to forget the co l d in touring the cit y A .ft e r stoppin g a t se \ 'e r a l por ts, t h e T ap'is d oc k e d ar Antwerp, B e lgium } f o r a f e w h ours b e f o r e s ailin g for Panama. Rover true to h i s name an d natur e } w as extre mel y anx i o u s t o go a s h o r e f o r a vis i t a nd, wh e n h e had a chance } h e t oo k s h ore l eave w itho u t attracting a n yo n e s n otice Afte r cO\'ering m o r e gro un d t h a n a Cook's t our, R ove r decided t h a t h e ha d see n e n o u g h o f .-\nt w e r p but it too k him l o n ge r t o r eturn than h e h a d expec t ed } for h e was co nfu sed b y th e bu s tl e and noise o f the busy seaport. A s the c h im es o f t h e g r eat Antwerp Carh edral w e r e s t r i k i ng five h e reac h ed t h e p i e r wh e r e h e h a d l eft th e S. S. T n gris Seeing n o familiar sreame r h e ran t o t h e n ext dock but t h e T ap-is was n o t t h e r e e ith e r. T h e n h e realized th a t t h e steamer had alre ady go n e with out h i m \\' h e n th e captai n o f t h e T agris s aw Rover r u n wild l y u p t h e dock whic h h e had j u s t c l eared} ht' r ad i oed to the m as t e r o f an in co m i n g s t eame r th e S. S. Se baris, w hich in a f e w d a ys, w o ul d f ollo w to Panama, a s k i n g him to p i c k up Rover and take h im t o t h e Cri s t o ba l C oaling Stat ion. \\' h e n t h e seco n d capt a in d oc k e d h e look ed f o r R o v e r e v e n t h o u g h h e did not know his appearance, his o wn e r s h ip n o r his hi s t o ry. H e f o u nd Rover i n c h a r g e of t h e supe ri ntenden t o r dock s, w h o w a s ve r y r e l u ctan t to part with s u c h a n intelligent, f r i e n dl y d o g. I n a f e w days t h e S e baris s ai l ed f ro m An t w erp with R ove r all b oard b o un d f o r Cristoba l Panama. The c r e w o n t h i s s t e a m e r a l so e njoye d Rover' s p l e a sant companio n ship. \Vhe n t h e weath e r g r ew warme r and m o r e t r o p i cal, R o v e r had a pre m o n i t i o n that h e wa s go i ng h o m e H e kn e w N o w h e d i d not m ind s o mu c h t h e storm y nights w h e n h e had to br a ce h i m sel f un d e rn e a t h th e captain's so f a t o k ee p f r o m s l id in g aroun d t h e r oo m. \Vhe n t h e l in e r at last appr o ac h ed t h e harbo r at Cri s t o b a l and b e ga n to n ear t h e w ell-k n ow n coalin g s tati o n h e c o u l d h a r d l y co n t a i n h i s j oy H e was at h o me! A.nd at t h e co aling station } waitin g a n x i o u s l y f o r h im w h o h a d made a ro un d trip to Europe w e r e h i s m a s t e r, his f ami l y } an d m a n y of h i s o l d f r i e n ds w h o ha d jus t h eard fr o m t h e S. S. T ag r is it f e w days b e f o r e t hat h e was c o m ing o n the Scbar is. S o Rover r eturne d tri um p hantly t::> C r i s t o bal afte r c r oss in g t h e A tla ntic f o r a stay o f over three m o n t h s in Euro p e H i s r o ving h ad t a u g h t h i m a s it d oes e v e r yo n e that t h e r e i s n o p l ace l ik e H o m e } Sw ee t H o m e ( es p e cially if it's Cris t o bal ) f o r n ow R ove r n e v e r vo luntari l y b oards a s t eame r. t\ FABLE. BarJulI, '29. (<;ccond place-J unior Cla-,>s.) I \;TkODl"l"TIO'. R eside the Carlbhean Sea There l!:o a long stone \".111; T hough older than II lIsed 10 he, It'.., nne and strong wit h al. But in ItS holes and cre\i,e, \ raCe of crahs doth dwell: The<;e crab., arc we11-bch.ln:d 'lnel slill, -\nd know these preoncls well. The -.t.!.1 wall.., r.:tlher low, but hroad; II'" 'twixt .. e.1 anLl .1 w.tlk -\nd wuplcs .. Irolling hr .11 nj!!hl Sit df)Wn on if and talk IHE IAHII lr'UI. l pon a lewel}' mf)(mliv:hl nillhr, \ h.lRd .. omc cr.lh oIrlJ't". lie: v..;1 .he km.l th.11 all Hah ... lo\,c T he "lilt! t hat has n o f oes. H e du!>tcd o ff h is gorgeou s s h el l O f gr:!} lIlti br o wn and hlu e. For h e was go in g out t o sec \ lady crab h e knew. As h e cam e u p f ro m out h is h Ollle (A. l arge a n d rnOl>SY r oc k ) H e ht!l r d some ,'cices fr o m t\ pai r 'Hro l lcd o n the w alk. The crab caretl not; h e k n e w t hest: f o lk Thi .. r .lcc of huma n s w e ll. lie a l so k ne w th e silly T hat r h ey w o ul d nightly rell. lIe damhc r ed lip upo n I h e "",Ik '\ nd g,lIcd O U I a l the sce n e co u p les \\c rc in F o r .1 lover's moon was q u een! The lr.lh heard sn; lt c h es o f the t a lk

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THE C'RI BBF .. ,:\. O f those who ambled :\ d usky pair strolled arm in arm \ nd t heir young hope ... <:o:m=d high. "Sweetie, H i his rOUtS foh In.:c, H i gwine to be yo' hown," T he negro maid said, Y es, milo,-,." T he crab could only grQ;IIl. .-\ Panamanlan couple Came T he cned rdendy-" D is 'cart :o.he brre.lk-she lotf yOll Y ou no sar yess .. to she?" A gentle silence; then the girl Said softl} Y e..,..,5-3i, 5i" :"ot far from there two Chine: e :-.;It; This!:td said tenderly, ""Ie wa!.hee .shinee-ma\;.ee dough, ;\I e wa n tee wom.1n too; You wantee me:" And then <;he s"id, John. ;\ It: w.lnlee rou!" The crab lool...ed 'round him in disgu..,l, F o r many mor e were thert:, A nd youths of C\'err race ;Ind hue Courted Ihelr ladie.s fair. H e had no time for Ihis H e had something to do--H e cro:.:.ed the wall" he he.lded fur The lady th .. t he klley,. But then he: stopped a lillie \\ hill' : \ pair wer e IlIgh! So c rabby .sl ipped IIIto a crack T o wait till they p;l!;sed by. But down they sat uron I,i; (rack, (The\ I.xlIh had to w.llk ) And 10 the cr;lb's di<;gu';[ed ears There came this man"" fool talk. ... -\dored," h e said, I love} au Oh, ciarling, picas\: he mineThe n J shall be your 'Sture\\" Oak; And you m y \inl.: ... S h e said, '" kilO .... those thing!; aren't !rue, :"0 Cave MI!Il ro.lm these days, l \nd to each vou sing the same Old, rusty, .... orn-out la)"o;." "Oh no!" he Belm'ed, no! .\t y love for you is Irue-" ,'\ nd all he r,,,'ed; thc cr.11> fur The I.ld}" friend he kne ..... I m p r isoned, .Igoniled, he \\'it h noth lllg e1!;C tu do Bu t l islcn to t h e moon:o.lrllck !., .... l1ll P roclaim his love \\ a.s !rue! For ('rahln"s crack had om' iJ..'II.," 0111 So nowhere COli I d he go. lie .... It wunlll and the f.lle Th.Lt brought all him such woe. The momcnb l'.:ts!:cJ; the lmc .... id. youth love unto his "mc," -\nd then "he (oh, these (r,U.l S,lid sweedy, ( .lm thine." :\ Iorc moments pas:o:cd; the lo..:kc.!.up (fab T hen he .. td a lusty "sm;lc""--\nd then he saw his c}.;it dc' r For thc,had lefr the crack! One moment Ino'-and then Ie S.L" The crack no longer free, For those I..:="ned their on If -\nd ga/ed out at the Sper;lte n.II>s "h(l in .. i!.t that they he frce! \nd m.de CfU .. t'ILl;:ans! ) c \\ ho T u .. pend ;1 n;g lll. Remember th;1t your noble kill Said, """hen ill trouhle-fig/,t!!!" l S" "\\)"olllin&" pa:,ing thrOl,:gh the Pall".m" l_II;1\ 39

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THE

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T H E CAR IBBF.-\'\. ------------------------------------------FORT S.-\'\ L O IHSZO. Frd1U(,i "Imf/w/" 31). place--Freshm In I m,dish \\'h en anyone speaks of ruins and old Spanish Cons, people in the :n'erage inhabitants o f t h e Canal Zone-cali to mind (mir old Panama or Porto B ello, hut Olle \\ho has taken the trip to San I.or ellzo and has studied its construction and arrangemcnt considers it by rar the hest preser\"t : d and most interesting of our old Spanish relics. 'The (orr occupies a high hlufr that extends out into the Carihbean Sea at the northeast of the the mOllth of d,c Chagres R ;\"Cf. Sinn: rhe sides facing the Carihhean-and Chagres are all perpendicular, the onl y appro:ll"h to the forr is f;-ol11 the rear. F rom its hight:st point ont: commands a \it:\\ of milt'S of the Carihhean S ea as well :I..; th.: Chagres Rin:r up to its first big turn into the j un gles Surely a hetter position for a fortress could not ha\'t: heen found. The \\ h o l e plact: oft'as a fine exampl e of medie\"al masonry. The ruins arc so well pn::sernxi that a good i dea o f its construction can be obtained. On all sides, immediately on the edge of the preci pice, was an immense outer wall made of stone. This practically insured the fort from a surprise raid. I i(mc\'cr, should the conqu'r thc outer wall, they would still ha\'c a wide, deep moat to s\\ im and then another high, \\ idc wall to gain. The fort proper was in ;his inner wall. ;\Iany of the bri cks are still prt:st:n-ed and arc: held in place by mortar as hard as the rock itself. Only in places has t h e wall ca\"ed in and then onl y \\ h ere the weight o f the \'egetation has f orce,1 it_ T h e old squad rooms and guard houses with t h eir sc nrry boxes arc in perfect cond iti on, and one may e\'en find cannon in the p osition \\ h e r e, probahly, a fleeing army left them. The walls of the commandante's quartas s how hm\ rorally the old Spanish Dons li\'ed -t:\'cn when the\' \\ere out in the \\ illls of some foreign countr\'. certainly believed in the rule tha; the and peopl e in command should have all, while the poor \\ ho did nothing but f o llow and obey, got practically nothing for ri1t:ir work and worri es. At that t h e world ha s not c hanged so much Perhaps t h e most talked of part of the o l d fort is th e \\ ell in th e I t i s full of \\ a ter the entire year, and, since it is (}\'er a hun dre.i feet ahm'e sea Icvel, this ha s heen t h e ca us e of mam stor;cs. Some that t h ere is an underground f ecd ; others, that the \ \ ell has no hnttom; still others c lnim that n huge treasure ha s hecn thnm n inro thc w ell, and that if the horr)111 i s e\-er f )lind the tinder will he rid1. Of co u rse n me of the rUlllors are true and would nc\"cr han: hL't'1l started if people had takcn the time to ill\'..:sttg:iltc the well. it h just a little energy and sOllle s hm-ding of dirt that ha..; h een deposited Oil t:1e t1oo!" of the fort, an amhitious person will find that thi .. \-ay historic wcll is nothing hut a largest )ragl'tank for surface w;tter, as all floors o f the f)rt drain water to the well. Thus we sec that all rain wata falling in the fort e\'entually nnJs its way t) t'li..; hu ge tank, and, wh e n the \\ater reaches a l"l'l"tain hL'ig h t, is drainL'd through fair sil.ed S lllHi.."rranean drains into the sea T h e r eason for thL' w;ttL'r's remaining one h eight thro u g h out t h e entirc year is thac thL' rainfall i s ahout to the e \-ap o ra tion_ S) wc find our fahulous stori es are all shattered and to h;! completely discarded_ The questi,)I1 that naturally enter s one'..; mind is: \\'hy did th e o l d Spaniards go ro so much trouhle and suffer the incol1\eniences of this cli matt.: to hutid suc h a com plete and almost perfect fortiticatt 1Il? This qucsti01l hegins t') prey ()'l one's mind \\hile gazing at t h e pre.:irliti ,)u ... siJ ..... and seemingly ilH-incible \\ ails. ;\1-1:1:,' tal ....... are heard and many more read, most o f whi c h are hearsay tales from the n<1ti\'es and ot'l;::r p e )rl\.:. Ilowc\cr, it is p os iti\ 'ely establish e l that the gr":i1t and ruthless pirate of England, none other than ;\lorgan himsdf, captured t h e f ,)rt a'1 I th1.t it latt'r st.'J"\'ed h im as a ha se on his marc:, a':rlhS t:,,: Isthmus \\ hic h ended in the sacki n g an J hurning o f Old Panama City_ : \ s hold as ;\i orgall \\'as, h e ha d finally to resort to trickery to force the Spaniards out o f strongh o l d H e utili zed his Indians to s hoot hurning arrows o \ er the walls to the thatche .. 1 roofs o f the fort within_ DurinJ the fire and the confusion f ollo w ing, h e rllsht'll the drawhridges to the fort This ruse resulteJ in t hl' massacrc o f all within. On e can imagine the surpri se of t h e Spani s h warriors to find thL"l11sd \ es

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THE fighting hand ro hand with an who they little: dreamed w ould e \ 'e r pass rhe first wall. P oor (ools! Their greed f o r gold ha d made them tht: prey of rhe rlHhless .\lorgan. Surely pantle. rnoniull1 Ilt'\'ef reigned higher. \ rith s u c h an interesting his tory as had mightr San L o r e n zo, it i s n o wonder that it i s talked and s tudi ed about so frequently. It i s strange that people so se ld o m visit its ruins-so r omantica lly interesting. A T RAGEDY. \/ifh,u/ (;rttlle, 29. (Second place Sophomore En glish Cla:-:s.) Ei,;ht years I here before I was s tri c k e n great concern for h ill1,"my wife and T a s k e.l in the \\ irh this terrible disease--this s l ow, body -eating sa m e breath what had happened. disease, this disea se whi c h 110 power on earth can Large tears b egan to roll down his fac e j he cure, this disease wh ose agonies and terrible sen-see med violently stricken. \V e asked him a sations are so hurdensome. I nr-.t came to Panama on a pl easure trip, wish ing to see the Canal. I becam e attac hed to the place and decided to stay for a few years. Di d I say a few years? God only knows h o w terrible years I s hall s p end h ere! especially e njoyed my first few months in Panama. was so new and so interesting; the customs of the peopl e werc so diA-"erent. Then o n e e \'ening at a native ball, I m e t the daugh te r of th e L nited States Consul. lI'e be came interested in one anothe r, and after a f e w months o f happy courtship, w e r e married. \ \ 'e srent Se\"t:n pleas;'lI1t years together. The n came the turning p oint in our lives. A t the celebration of our sen:nth wedding anniversary it was discovered. I t \\ as after a delightful waltz with .my wife \\" e had gone out onto the balcony and were quietly thrilling over the heauty o f the soft tropical t:\ening. :\Iy wift: lookt:d up into my face and asked, J ohn, wh .. is that dark brown spot o n your fOTC;:ht'ad?" '" don't kn()\\, dt:ar. Probabl y only a s pot o f tan. Just at that momt;:nt Ollr very dear friend, Charles Burnley, came out to join u s J) o roth e wid 11IITI that soo n s h e would have ;l. hr(1\'. hu ... hand as h e was tanning in spot s. Charle ... I()(}ked at me, then looked at m e again, and pressed the "pot on my forehead. I told him I l-rlult! nor feci the pressure. I lis face went \\ hite. Ilorror "as \\oTltlen upon It. l i e hegan shaking:1<.; if ,>trieken \\-Ith ague. J I e hreathed out hoarsely, \ I y (jod, J o hn mr Clod!" Ihal he \\as greatly agitated and f ee ling second time Y o u ve got it, J ohn. Of all th e p eop l e in the world, had to get it!" "Get what?" :'\nd then h e cried out strangely, i\l y wife s hri e k ed John!" and fell f orward in a dead faint. Oh, s hall I ever f orget those few momentsmoments of terrific torment! Things went black b e for e me. I could not See. I fel t weak. Charles tried to comfort me and to bring wife bac k to consciousness. But I did not h ear h im. I had fainted \Yh e n I regained cons cio u s ne ss, I was in the doctor's office. H e had made the final test. The look o n his face told m e what the outco m e o f the examination had been. \\'hat could I do? \\"hat co uld do? Nothing. Absolu t e l y nothing_ The doctor l e ft the office for a few minutes, during which time I began to p onder over my situation. 'rhe terrible truth stood b e for e m e, hars h and dark. B e for e, my brain had b ee n i n a muddle; I had not had time to t h ink clea r ly But now, thinking clearly, t h e t e rribl e truth left me paralyzed. I s h ould b e banis h ed forever! Bani s h ed (rom my wife Panama, everythingj from all the world! \Vhat a thought! This t hought wa s maddening, and rnad I was! Stark, raving mad! :\ man o f my age to b e s t ricken with thi s d i se a se! I charged up and down the office, alternately wringing m y hands and clutc hin g m)" hair. T o b e banished to the l e p e r settl ement and probably h e the only white p e rson there, a s white people rarely get the disease. \\'hat a lif e I s h o liid soe nd th ere!

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THE C.-\R I BBEt\". 43 T grew co ld, and a great trembling seized me as the office door opened and t h e doctor elltered. H e told me that the boat left ill two hours. joJst two more hours and I should start banishment. J asked rhe doctor if it wou lei be possi ble for me to see wife before I left. :\ sad shake of his head was his only reply. H ow I reached the boat do nor remember! All I remember is that the boat's whistle revived me. I was on board, and the boat was leaving. A. great crowd had assembl ed 011 shore to bid goodbye forever to t h e ones they dearly loved. Looking back on sho:-e I saw my wife standing beside Charl es. Charles was wt ill :'>.I isrelbnc:ou:-. Feature Stories.) ;\Iirth, laughter, and tinkling bells! Carnival in full swing! There goes a duke arm in arm with a cook. Yonder, a scarlet devil is having a pleasant c hat with a sober monk; and a little farther all, a marquise comes arm in arm with a half-witted P lebian. There goes the lovely Columbine flirtin g with a handsome sailor; and the passionate Pierrot has just passed, petting a heautiful sen'ant girl. \\'hat a and yet ironical mockery of real life! Such is Carni\Tal everywhere. I t is that season when social bars are 1t:\'el1ed and personal pride is forgotten. One sees the rich, the aristocrat, the diplomat, the special agent, the poor, the needy, t h e w hi te, the the negro, and enjoying equally and gleefully the gaiety of the m o ment .'\ [ t hi s time man spends some of his latest profits; the salari ed man throws his latest earnings, and the poorest, evers uffering class, forgetting their trouhles, needs, and suffering, in an effort to be their entire year's sa\ings having a goo I time. committees work together in making preparations (or the Carnival. The most important is that for c hoosing the queen. Sheiselected by popular vote among the prettiest "seiioritas" of t h e city. The Queen-e lect afterwards selects amon g the defeated candidates or among her prettiest girl friends, her "dames of honor," ranging in number from four ro eight. The duty of these lalii::s is to h elp Her ;\lajest)' ro fulfill her duties an.! to assist her in all her undertaking" durin: the reign of fun. T he financial end of the festival is attended to donations from the Gm'ernment and from local business h Ollses and imli viduals.

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T H E C:\RIBBE":\. The Carni\'al proper starts on tht:: before A sh and the fun continues until Ash mornin g. During the Carnival there arc free public dances in all the parks from eie:ht o'clock in the evening until midnight. The danc es in the variOliS duhs last until (our or n\'e in the m o rning. The first Satllrdar. is dedicated to t he coron;trivil of the Queen. On this day the people joininl.! in the festivities usualh' \\"o.::ar the P ollera" the national costume for' the ladi es) and the ",\ Ionruno" (the national costume f o r rhe m e n ) :\ man called Dios ;\ I OIllO, wearing a lar ge gro tesque head, announ ces the co ming o f Carnival. The terrible, yet fascinating h ,:ad is S0 gaudy thal he attracts a great deal o f atte nti on, and th e automohile in which h e rides i s followed a great procession of people all f oot, s h o uting anJ c rying out On and everyone wears what he has or \\ hat h e c h ooses, f or then.:: is no spec ial costume. Everyw h e r e these eve ning s o n e hear s th e tom[OIllS. :"ow th ey g r ow l ouder-n o w die down. n:rywh ere is dancing "Toldos," temporary arho r s \\ ith only an awning f o r covering-perhaps onh' a floor laid in a vacant lor -are s urround ed \\ h o clap and sin g whil e those within an;: dancing. there are 0111)' the tolll-toms for Il1l1si(; sornetimes there are o th e r native instruments with perhaps an harm onica or two ;\uwmobiles, carriages and trucks o f \"ario u s kinds parade the streets eve ning and o n Tuesday before, during, ami after th e grand parade. T hes e v e h icles are hea\ ily decorated wit h ribb o ns and banners of t h e m ost v a rying and COntrasting colors. Serpenti nes fly betwee n I h em. T h e re comes one now! Se e The hood of t h e car is dropped; t h e girls are sitting on it and clapping in tim e to the ir lusty s inging of t h eir native songs or of o th er fa\'orite s L oo k at t hat l arge, stout Il('gress over th ere in t h e ;\l artini q uan co stume sitting o n the ba c k of that car wit h her long, flo wing s tiffly -starch e d skirts spread carefully over t h e edge : \ gain, fart her on, t h ere is one on which three s hy and P all
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THE CARIBBEAN. i e I THE D EATH \\"H I STLE. I $ .. \ fnr;on Lowandt!, '29. Feature Storie:..) I !f. Par was whistling. Hadn'r he a right? \\'eren'r his wife and two babies arriving tomorrow? Y es, the Canal Zone was safe for them now. T here was little c hance' of t heir bei n g Q\'crcome with malari a, or fever. I twas a healthful place, t h e Callal ZOlle. .-\t last t hey arrived. Pat carried his two children lip the steps of thei r home. There ,\ as not a prouder man on the Zone. :'-.'ightfall-bedtime-Dadd, must tell them a story, and daddy willingly complied with t h e request. E very nig h t t h ere mllst be a before I\l olly and wou l d turn over and sleep. \\'as there ever a happier man than Patrising early in the morning to go to his work and returning in the afternoon to a loving \\ ife and ? T here would be a slide in the Cut. Dynamite would be set, and t h e warning whistle would sound. Then a A as h and a roar-the Cut wo ul d he open once more to traffic. A.nother w h istle wou l d pierce the air, sinister in its meaning. I r \\ as the death whistle-someone had hcc:n too slowing in getting from the charge. A.t home the women felt a fear clutching their hearts; it m i g h t be their loved one. Jimmy's birthday came. B esides t h e big, red aut o m obi l e h e mllst have an llllusually good story. \\ hat s hould it be? Deep" ahsorhed ill t h o u g ht, but breaking out in a happy whistle w henever a brilliant idea struck him, Pat failed to hear the warning whistle. .-\ low rumble; then-obli\, ion. That sinister whistle pierced the sudden quiet. A t home, Pat's wife s hivered and offered u p a silent prayer for t h e poor unfortunate's wondered w h y his father did not come. \\'hy was his mother crying? \\'hat were all t h e people doing in his house? Pulling one big man's hand, asked when his was going to come home. .-\ tcar escaped from the big man's eye and in a voice t hat managed to catch he said, Your daddy h as go n e home, Laddy." But t h e big Illan must have h een mist<1ke n 'cause he hadn't heard his daddy come whistling up the path. SO M E KlCh:S 1 3 and Y O M I' Ll ENTS \ L \ L T E R \\' 1 I:'-.'GSTAD, '30. (Second pl.lce-Fre<.hman Engli!>h Class. T he .. eniors in ,Ilis hIgh !>chool. h the go and cumc, :he prcuy much like junior .. T he) 'rc :1pt to grumhle some. Then rakc the !>imple sophomore .. Tho ... c little bags of wind -\n I (omp;lre tllt:m with the Ire ... ln r c l' W h o never do give in. T his schoo l is re:llly not complcte Without t h e fr.:shmen in it; The} do theIr work, and do not shirk, .-\nd :are moder ni!>Ts to the minute.

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THE C.'\RIBBE.-\:-I. RL STY. JouP" Corrigllll, ';1; paid no attention to those young bloods \\ ho stood laughing at him. looked fine in their sleek, spotless coats. H e, roo had once looked like that. There had been a time w h en he toO had had nothing to do but and laugh at the other old, banle-scarred veterans. I ( Ru sty cared to waste his time 011 these fops he could tdl them a thing or two which wou l d make them respect his limp and his scarred coat. I n 191""' one cou l d not have told him from one of [hose young fops who now made sparr o f him. Rut poor Rusty was on his last legs. One ha d heen hurt by a shell, and rhe oth ers creaked as he wheezed along after his master. True, h e was not the dog h e had been. H e ha d ne\'er liked o th e r dogs, and his master \\ as the only man h e had ever cared f or. \Vh ell his maSter had gone to war, Rusty ha d gone too. H e still remembaed his training, firs t at Camp Dix and late r in France. The train ing over, Rusty ha d become a Fie cou l d have tOld you but wou ldn't-of his fight wit h t h e German n :esse n ger, R oderic k. I f had tried to compliment him, h e w ould have told YOll t hat he had done nothingj merely fought a s uspi cio u s looking stranger. \\' h y s h o uld h e brag when any other dog, given the chance would have done the same thing? H e wished peopl e would let him alone! H e hated old woman who said, "Oh, hae's dear Rusty! Isn't h e cut!:! H e looks so o l dish and battlt: -scarred." "\\'ell," R u s ty could answt.:r, "am I not?" Captain," the ladi es wou l d continue, "please tell u s h ow saved YOll r life." Then a lady would come over to his chair and pet him \\'hy didn't s ht: go and get one of those doll dngs. That's \\ hat were f o r, petting. H e didn't ",ant them to rome around him with their perfumey handkerchiefs. The n rhe: Captain wOldd start, "\\'dl, it was on the fifth of J un e l()JX, wht:n the C;en'I1;llls made their attack. Our <:ompany had been C llt up. \\'e wer e j usr about to get help \\ h e n t h ey found our nest. The r e wer e tell of lIS w;liting t here in t h e d u go u t for the s h ell t ha t would u s." "\\'e k ept plugging away but it didn't see m to stop t h e B oc h es at all. A t last w e h eard ;l big 'zowil\' and th e m outh o f the nest was plu gged. \\'e tri ed to dig t h e dirt, but t h e air wa s gettin g had,
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TH E CAR IBBEAN. 4 7 DAILY i e I of vario u s members of the Class of 192-on viewing the same object or S Cene after day. SE.'\'S O R f)o r o lJIY S;'0IS50Il, '27. T h e r e i s a f ee ling of impatient restraint o n the part of t h e e l e ments to-nighta n apprehensi\ T e m ood s uggestiv e o f s m oulderin g passions, con cealed hurts The is e n shro uded in foreboding ink lik e darkness upon which t h e pale searc hin g glances o f the lighthouse make n o im pression. : \11 occasional dart of lightning dis c l oses bla c k lowering clouds. T h e ba y seems mysteriolls, as if planning some pillaging prank. The dark sky b e n ds closer perhaps to catc h those low whisper ings and join in with the sc h emes of the night. T h e sea is a heaving, seemingly uncontrollable mass of roaring breakers-defiant-proud. Suddenly with a fitful rush of sea-\\ind comes rain rain -rain, t o beat and hammer those haughty wav es into molten liqui d. F la s h es of lightning seek to pierce the clo u d c a ges in which angry thunder may be heard muttering and threatening. The rumhling of heavy ru s hin g surf and th e awful roar of breakers com bin e to make this a night of d read and fear. To-night t h e se a is su lkn, angry. The tempestu o u s wa\' es crash blindly against t h e rocks, which batter them into plain color l ess particles of \\ ater. :\bon,: arl' no clouds. : \ so l id sky, dark and blots out th e friend l y star s .-\ palm tree, \\ inti torn and alone, adds the o nl)' bit of tropical co lor to t h e anger-racked picture. T h e sea i s a ca ldron of boilin g leaping waters; t h e the bla c k e n ed lid, from under which warm mist escapes. T h e dark se a sullenly m oves on, m utte ring to itself, as a spoi l ed child, w h o has been repri manded by its m o th e r, utters dire t hreats In a cautiou s underton e. Dark clouds -dark hill s and se a a n d a g reat si l en t l o nelin ess whi c h ovtrw h elms o ne's heart, The sea is a dismal, co l o rle ss prairie. w ea r ygray waves c url drearily about grayer rocks. From above th e junglcs of Fort S herman a lead e n curtain desct:nds co n cea ling in its folds dank, dis agree abl e rain. P e arl y gray dawn break s over a s leepy ocean. Far off, o n e ca n see t h e c rumpled gray s m o ke ribbon from an outgoing s t e am er, l\lidnight-and the m OO I1, muffl ed in a mi s tv veil of silvery gauze, watches over t h e slumbe r o u's ocean, .-\ tiny sail, white as a swan's wing, g lides noiselessly O\'e r rhe smOot h mirro r of t h e bay. The bay i s a sil\ 'ery taffeta up o n w h ose c hange able s h een a craft, skimming ga i l )' a l o ng flings sparkling jewels. exultantly, the sea l eaps i n a dis h ev eled rnass. 1 t is one of rhe rare m oments w h en t h e wind and sca are fOllnd playing together in carefree, s p o rti ve glee. Far oR', o n e can see th e dreamy rise and fall of r h e ocean's blue br eas t. Clouds wande r lazi l y and endlessly on. The sce n e i s pea ce ful, se r e ne. The h eart cries out in s h eer jar.

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THE CARIBBEAN. DA. YS ON OUR B -\)". I..(JI/;U fhim, Thanksgiving The bay is calm and s ilent as if it, too, were off ering up to God a little prayer of thanksgi\jng. The bay is Each little wave i s trying to outdo the o thers in merry lau ghter. The haughty palms over l ooking these irresponsible c hildr e n are co ndescending to h o l d a pleasant co m 'e r sario n with th e surf which i s [riping gaily over rh e reef. The bay \\ irh tO-day's exquisite coloring might he a delicate c reati o n of so me ma s ter artist. The water i s a deep, dear blue, flas hin g bright smi l es at rhe moth e rly azure s ky w h ere A eecy white clouds afe resting. The whole bay i s a b e autiful reflecti o n of an e n chanting yellow and r ose sunset. The setting s un makes the bay a veritable sea o f go ld. j n the ba ckground, hovering around the m ountain topS like thieves to s t e al away this splendor} are black clouds. I t is hard this m o rning f o r me to beli e v e th.u the sea can someti m es be a f earsom e m o n S t e r destroying everything that comes into its grasp, because it is n ow as calm and gentle a s a lamb who would not think o f doing anything ra s h I think the sea h as a d ual p e r so nality. The bay is ca lm gray, and silent except f o r the soft murmuring of the surf c ree ping lazily over th e red. f orebod ing black cloud hangs abo v e th e water lik e a m ys t erio u s curtain r eady to d esce nd and hide this peaceful scene in t orrents of rain. There is something about th e bay to-day that gives it a restless aspect. The s mall, greenis h blue wa\'t:s seem to h e captives who want t o escape. To-clay the sea is a st:et hing mass of budding anger. gray waves see m to be giving warning that if they have th e provocation they will ,top at nothing. Tht: hay is angry. Great waVeS art: rushing in like giant steeds at war with some invisible f orce. OU R PALM TREES. 'lOUP}1 Corrigan, '27. I t must be tiresome having to stand there watching the same old things come and go. Busses, cars, s un rain, and darkness pass by in the same unending lin e day after day. ] wondered what you were doing I l ooked toward you but co uld not see yo u Suddenly a light found you. I see you now, Tree. Y ou see m lonesome out there in th e rain. Y ou wisely have your back to the s h ower. Y ou are bent so you will not get your green head too wet. Isn't that so? The s un i s not yet up. Everything i s still a s leep. Even the tre es seems weary l ea nin g to one side as t h ey do. H as sway ing to t h e mu sic of t h e mid nig h t rain fatigued them so? The palm trees are prudently holding their umbrella tops to the rain. 1 can not eve n see the trees ; t h e rain ha s s wal l owed all. T O W A RD THE BREA"\ \,.'ITER. \\'aves lapped la z ily against th e wall, a s if with out energy under the blinding SUllo A s heet of blue g l ass, la y the sea this morning. }\. tiny cayuca alone broke th e monoton),. A solid wall of gray s k y and g ray sea, brok e n on l y by a discriminatin g lin e of b e ige wall, with first the blink o f a red light, th en of white, th e n of red. The co n tinuous blue of th e sea and sky was broken on l y b y the passing o f a white ship, as if a fairy ship upon a fairy sea. H ug e breakers swept over the wall, then white: foam Aashing and whipping at t h e stone. The spray, f orming a multicolor ed rainbow, f ell ba c k in feath e ry s how e r s They loom e d IIp in the b l a c knes s four long row s of tiny lights They s wayed eve r so slig htl y but e nough t o b e disc e rnible. They drew nearer, rath e r s l ow l y, growing l arger as t h ey c arne. T h e shado w of the s hip formed an entrancing pictllr c :laain s t th e gray s ky. J t passed on into th e nig ht.

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___________________________ T __ H E __ C A R I B B E A N T ______________________ 4 9 OU R H OUSE uph,'miu II'QQ/mJUgh, '27. is s l ow l y approaching. :\ boat is being raised in the locks in Dreier that it mar go on its T he black Inules'" wait patien tly b eside the hoat until it is ready to go into the next chamber. i\l en are see n, standing by, holding in their hands ropes that are attached to the boat. T h e trees in the background can now b e seen as it i s quite dark. T h e lo cks, with their light s lo o k t o b e a little T h e rain is eil izzling down ('11 the lake, and as t h e S UIl g leams through tht.: rain, the dro;1s b ounce on the water lik e diamonds. T h e blue-green trees stand out against a clear white T he lock s thi s evening look very dreary. T h e l11ules* arc moving s l ow l y south to bring a boat through. T h e trees in the background are so dark that they appear black b e hin d the ghostly white lighthouse The rain i s beating down with great for ce o n the quiet surface of the little lak e and on the smooth green carpet of grass along the locks. T h e ca l m little lak e reAects this m orning a gorgeous rainbow whi c h dips one e n d into the Canal and rests the other o n the mahogal1)7 trees behind it. *Eleclne locomotilc.sfot to ... the lock.'!. SEA, SI;:Y, AND PAUl S ON NE\\' C RI STOBAl. P O I :-lT. C/ulrlu lI'i ll, ':?f. A l eaden sky and listless sea lik e severe elde r s watch the fragil e palms frolicking with a fragrant breeze R ain in s ilvery s h ee t s falls with a mournful patter on t h e dejected palms The gr a y-blanketed sea is quiet for the nig h t. \\'ith a dash of co l o r and zest, the sea, in huge w hite combers, ru s h es with a roar o n the b e ac h A bri s k breeze gently but shakes t h e wate r logged palm fro nds. The l engthe ned shadows of t h e palms merge with the dusk, whi l e the sea, calm and mute, awaits t h e nig h t. The sun ha s set. T h e r eflectio n o f the afte r g low on t h e placid se a f o rm s a r emarkable background for t h e fantastic s ilh o u ettes of the palms. \IR55<)G--i Night ha s stealthil y stol en over sea and lan d. Through the Stygian darkness the swis h o f the palms can be h eard, see mingl y haranguing the sea trembling at t h eir feet in smothe r ed confusion. The se a, grim and gray, in its t emperamental fas hi o n appears to contem plate a change of m ood The palms huddl e together as if se nsin g the vo lcani c dispositi o n o f the sea and their h e lpl ess n ess before it. T h e sea with a deep-throated roar, ru s h es lip o n the sandy p oint. T h e palms, bent backward b e f o re the win d, seem retreating before a relentless encm y The sky is still gray and overcast. The sea re 3t'i a s if gasping f o r bre a t h after vio lent exertion, whil e the palms thankful f o r the cessation of the storm, d roop with weariness. T h e se a blu e, p eaceful, and sere n e, utterly conten t, slow ly advances to the sandy s hore and suddenly seems to s mil e at the nodding palms, a s if paying tribute to those wh o have withstood hi s a ssaults during his more turbulent m oods. Once again the changefu l sky, the s l e nder pal m s, and the vo latil e se a are in perfect accord. T H E R EEF. Suru 7-Ta ylor, 7r., '2i Great white waves are rushing in o n the reef thi s afternoon. They swell from the surface of the ocea n tower in a huge Illa ss of green, and smas h in a c ha os o f c ream y white. :\ rock stands in their path. Crash! H igh in the air leaps a s p out of white, and the spray is tossed in all directions by the stiff breeze. This morning I watched an interesting race betwee n a majestic combe r and a fleecy white clo u d .'\s well as I could see through t h e flying spray, the wave won. I t i s my idea t hat the clo u d s h ou ld have ha d a handica p. :\. changing panorama, n o w lighted by the SUIl, now hidden in veils o f rain whic h lend to the sound of p o un d in g unsee n breake r s a sullen veil of rain and l o w flyin g clo uds gives one only an occasional glimpse o f co ld lookin g spray and makes o n e rhink of log fir es and rain coats T h e seas lift laz ily and tumble to the tunc o f a whisrling wind. Softly a s cotton peeps from its wrapper, curls the water o n t h e reef to-day. Blue sea for it wrapper) white breakers f u r cotton.

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; 0 THE C.-'lR IBBF.-'I:-.'. (;-'llT:-.' .-'1'1' 'IGHT. J.mUJ Grl.la, '.1;. Dark C\'cr forward a strong breeze. hang (}\'er the street to-night. :,\"{J\\ a sprinkle; 110\\ a Tumhle.:; and then a pour. The are Tunnin! \ \<1rCT. R ain! R ain! Rain! Only the street lights aTe \'isihle during tht: hea\'Y UO\\llpour. It is raining. The.: pit-a-pat splashes u p un t h e pa\'cmcnt are mingled with the sound of steady dripping on rhe palms. .-\bove these sounds of rain is heard o nly the occassional sOllnd of a bus, splashing its way through tht' water-covered streets. First comes the low Tumble of its approach, then the loud splashes as it darts by. :\gain the 10\\ rumble and it is gont'. A fter this there is onl) silence except for the pit-a-pat srlashes upon the ravemcnt and the sound of steady dripping on the palms. The palms along the wayside hang their droop ing, dripping heads, and seem to wonder if this is their last refreshment for days. The pavement, too, Seems tel gin: lip reluctantly its cove r ing of water as if in dread anticipation of t h e approaching long hot days and steady dry winds. To-night the broad road seems indeed a sdecred o f comfortabl e travtl, w h ere mOto r cars slip hy and pedestrians walk peace f ully. Yet, not so many ytars ago, the Spanish seekers of Eldorado perhaps over this path fighting the jungle and its pcstilelH insecrs. T hese disillusioned Spaniards were wont to hate this future place of plea5antnt'ss for its ohstnu.:tion to t h eir fame and fortune. \1.0:-.'G T H E c.-'I:--'.-'lL. a nd desolate lies t h e co l orless wa te r o f t h e Can al. .-\ dark, t h reate n ing clo u d ove rh e a d u nfo l ds into a dense curtain of ra in. Streaks of hlue, silver, gree n and go l d app ear and d isappear as t h e SUIl cas t s its upon t h e warcr. Though the ,;un is still high t h ere is in t h e air that indefinahle fres h ness t hat tells of e"en i n g coming on. T he trim \\ hiteness of a hoat a s it slu\\ I y glides down rhe Canal seems to ha\'t' borrowed a h ue from the clouds whic h h erald t h e s u nSt:t. C hamel eon-like, t h e Can a l h as t a k en o n r h e opalescent co lor of t h e sky. T he and the Canal are illuminated by co l o r s blending f rolll t h e lig h tes t tin t o f yellow into a deep o r a n ge, th en i n to a red, g radu ally s h a d ing out to b l ue. T o-nig h t the peace of early eve n ing enfo lds water and land wit h ameth yst mis ts. T he red and grel:1l c h an nel ligh ts appea r, a nd the [all, massi\tc, w h ite ligh t h o u se awa k ens s uddt'nly and bl inks her eye. I .ike a large, black monster a boar s l ow l y co m es up t h e moonlit Canal.

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T H E C.-\RI BBI -:.'\:'\. II C/wratlaJ Prisoner. P rison waak:l. .-\Iso a familiar Pltlrl' P rison rO;)l11. T ilJl( :'\'ighr. \('J I. StT'F. I I A rar-harass::d dungeon: the canJks flicke \\t'irdly. c:1./ily. <"';l;ring shaJ )',\'i 0;1 the damp, walls. :\ is seen sitring 011 an old keg, \\ hieh at one rim : perh:tT' harhored c\'il "pirirs. The prisoner is pale, his ashen face is clIppe,1 in lir m hallds I--:nrer 'rarden ":\h, man of vi le the timc draws nt'ar when muSt sc\'er your conaecrio;ts with m311. Kill rOll I 11H1'\t, rho' comh my "'ain in I may, I {(lI/'I)1 dc\,is: a Illl'r hud which will please the puhlic. I lun.' thmlgh t of Ilurning, or arsenic, of gunpo\\ Ie. of hal1ging, hut n )11';: suit.; me. Sp.:ak. 0:, flllll:1.: corpse. han:: you :t suggesrion?" LlTTI. E \ PPR EC I.-\T I O : There is onl.: around Cristobal H igh Sc h ool \ \ ho, \ \ hile n l[ a member of the srudent hody, meets with t h e disapproval of noboJy. This pe r son has l1ever thrown anyon e in the jug; h e ha.;; neva given a white slip. T here never in t h e history o r t:,e sch ool been an occa.,iol1 w here t his person was responsible for a f ail uren<1)". not t:\'CI1 a cOlhlition. h as e\'t!. been expelled, s u<;penLieJ on account of the :"\0 hard feelings exist. H e is friend. and nobody has any grudge against him. I t is q uite un usual to ha\'e all this triendship. T h e person to whom I am referring is -Samuel. Prisoner {over whose face a look of passe<;) Yec:;, I ha\'e a new and entirelv original idea, I s houl d like to die of old age." \\'arden ( fitled with fon lis h aile, One more wise crack like t har andIll! [ -II "ill } "nil Prisoner \\'arden "Suhmit him t.) the spiked l1l:ltler." ( I t is d lIle even as hidden,) "\).) you can fesc:; n o",?" Prisoner-"Xe\'er! \TOt'J!" ( Thii hit said \\'arden You are a rough customer; all my de\' ices st'em in \'ain, Buth o l d! I ha\'e one la<;t a:d m l;t :1Jr.-ihle,' (\\'his pers to a familiar who no.is anJ departs, returning with a gleaming instrllmcnr.) \\'arden ( hissing)-"See thist h e S-a -w!" Prisoner (screaming)-"The Saw-l\lerciful heavens! t harno -nor t hat! I confes,,> everything, anything!" " ard e n (with g leam of triumph Illutters) I t \\a'i \\L'tI ylIlI confessed-for if hadn't, I "hollld h:t\'e p/ayt't/ upon it." C I 'RT. -\I :'\ quick! \ (); \I.I T Y COC I I ERO. I/,.IOJ \lolll,'(omtry, 'J1. Practically has sccn h i m as h e nil t i l(' seat of h is coach, I l i s hlack f e l t hat at its particular jaunty a n g l e 011 h is grey woolly head: hii'> shi n i n g black eyes l ook in g ahead ill priLeci posses.-;ion. h i s la rge. horse; his high, stilT collar seem ing l y keeping his head from drooping or turning: his black tic: the perpen d icular outlin e of his IXlC'k; woat <1 striking figu r e he nnkes, H e mind ... 011(: of a dri\'c r in the day.;; of the old Sou t h

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THE ------OESPER. HJO:--'. 70h" G. XdJoll, '27. Desperate Steve P oggin was a desperate man bite the dust. Pete H ankin s la y dead, dead, cold indeed. His bauery was operated on the streak as th e hair on a walrus's n ec k. T e rribl e C. ; \ lighrning principle and there was no man living Barher gave a s udden the muscles that would court a hlo\\ (rom his huge fists, in his neck stiffened; then with a dying l eap h e hardened and callouseLi as they were by CfUei lay sprawlin g on the srain\:1v, with hi s h ead and inhuman mangling o f vicious steers. H e hetween two banisters. drank his liquor in k egs, and it was t h e strongest liqu o r in that COUlHY in the Slimmer. I n the "inter he had to dilute it with alcohol to prevent it from freezing. His hea\'y boots s h oo k the Shonkin alool1 as he \ 'iciolls l y kicked the bar as a signa l for a little se rvice. Y es, through and through, Desperate Steve P oggin was a son of the great open spaces where men are men a n d the plumbing is terri hie. Suddenly a shot grazed t h e ear of D espe rate te\'e P oggin. :\h, pity t h e poor unfortunate whose erring shot brought the wrath of this terrible desperado! T here was blood in his eye, to bacco o n his teeth, and dandruff' in his moustache. Bang! Bang! forty more redsk in s didn't T ITLE TO BE AFTER r.ridrr, '27. There has corne upon us a g reat and nati o n a l, yea, internatio nal epidemic. Shall I call it the white plague? Then I mllst also call it the black plague, the green plague, and t h e s triped plague. The male species is espec i ally s usceptibl e to this disease, although it often attacks th e dumber sex especially those athleti ca lly inclined. :\fte r this dreaded malady obtains a stran g l e hold, the l ower extremities are severely affeered The shins become shrive led and ugly. Yet, the upper portions of the extrem iti es are more attacked. : \.ft e r the disease once becomes th e victim is never cured. I t is the pena lt y for sati s fying foolish desires. Sti ll, s u c h must be descrved. Thev satis f\'. :\fter all, hnt:t>'proved practical. A WRROR. J)lirfJIh.\ SunJJrm, '27. Just a little spot o f water lying: tranquilly and peal:cfully in a crtvice of the road, -\ marvclhrave little spot o f water it was, reflecting, not the dull, harren t.:/1(:criessncss(J( its surrounding, hut the dclil"ate cxquisite glory of rhe heavcns as pink and gold wi!')ps hlushingly kissed rhl" s un good night. D es p erare Steve P ogg in, seeing his crime and the menacing l oo k in rhe e \ 'es of th e m e n about left the saloon, m ounted h'is prancing landaulet: and was of f into t h e distance before an\' o f the men could n:ach for their gu n s. The 'sh e riff"s men were soo n hot o n the trail. A. sort o f restlessness b eco m es apparent through out the room. Euphemi a 's pian o stops. T h e n the lights flas h, an d the race i s Oil-every man for him self, and it i s no place for a fat ma;l -the entranCe to the at I-;'ort Da v i s is so narrow that yo u ha ve to turn to go through th e door. MACH E.' Doro/h)' S(It'IIHOII, ':q. I V lach e is n o t his rea l namc, th i s lillie San B ias boy indi g n a ntl y tells u s. it i s Armadio J ose Carrido Albe rt o Crimaldo. \rhat a l o n g n a m e f o r s u c h a s m all hoy! And what a l a r g.: g rin f o r s u c h a diminuti\'c h ea d That sa m e g rin i s a s i ght to behold it i s see min g ly t oo th l ess the g rin o f an old m a n H i s s m all brown eyes s hin e g l ee f ull y from his littl e eggs haped m o nk ey head wh en h e sees our awe at his unus ual acti o n s F o r what d oes : Mach pardon m e, Armadio--do, but casu ally a nd quickly climb a s l e nd e r coconut lIee a nd as casu a lly a nd more quickly f alloff on his h ea d possibly to te!o.t the endu r a n ce of his little f u r cO\'e r e d dome. Oh, ycs, M ac h c i s so m e b oy .1I
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THE C'IRIBBEAN. 53 TH E Smw J. TIl v/or, Jr., '27 Slowly and preci se ly the di\'er went about his At last the moment ha d arrived, the divers' work like an automaton. Bill in his feet touched the wreck's deck almost sirnultanediver's su it wa s a formidable figur e, and to-day otlsiy. P lacing their helmets together they held his though ts were but peaceful. Cun-a s hort talk. B ilt, a5 ha d the h e ha d arranged to t h e wreck consequently h e advised Jimmy to go down him self and now, alone in the great vo id of t hrough the refrigerating room and meet him in rhe water with o nly the sah' aging tug abo\' e him h e engine room. Obedientlr J lifted his leg put his plan:s into action. I t would be quire over rhe ha tch and so made his last earthly mOVe. si mpl e; would enter the main hatc h to the Bill swung rhe door s hut, the catch slipped, an I refrigerator 1'00111, Bill would swing rhe door shut, rhe life line and air tube dangled l11utely the carch Somewhat Bill entered the and pointing to the tragedy. Calmly e ngin e rOOI11 door. D own in that dark space Bill \\ ent aft to the enginc room where h e pror her wOldd nnd him tangled and rhus ceeded to gt:t wound lip very com pletely in the abl e to furni s h a perfect alibi for not coming to ladders and pipes. Overhead the sa lvaging wg, his fcllow di\'cr's aid. Y es, it would be quite recei\ ;ng no signal s frol11 the two di\'ers, immedisimpl e -the door had shut on the air tube and atdy prepared r h e one remaining diver, liule the catch had slipped. The rest would be "Sh erlock." t h e dead man's body \\as h e could tanglt' himself so t ha t another brought to the top, while far below i\lasterson diver would hrl\ e to help h im in unraveling h is assisted Bill in untangling his fouled pipe an I line. Then .lim's body would he discovered. life line. :\s SOOI1 as Bill was l oose h e gave the Y es, h e reasoned, as he slowly ascendcu from signal to be h oisted. Little J\lasterson lingered t h e deck of the wrecked vessel, it would be c hild's helow for a s han while. \\'he n h e was play. N o one would ever know. An d h e ha d a taken out of his suit, his pale face wore a right to, although tht: two had heen chums from set look. childhood; jimmy, the good-looking, T he lives o f men may wax and wa'le hut thc c heerful f ellow had always beaten Bill out. First salvaging must go on. Jimmy Ballard wa ... it had been at marbles, then the mathemarics buried next day. That night in York ;1 prize in H igh School, that promotion in the sal vag-flippant young woman shcd a tear and went to ing conce rn and B ill's girl. Y es, he had a a musical s h ow -with another fellow. A s far as right to. He'd beat him at last. the mCIl on t h e rug were concerned, the episode \\' h en Bill reached t h e top, he reportt:d the \\ as a closed book, a chance t her all took and vesse l resting o n good bottom and a would ha\' e to meet face to face sooner or later. uneven keel. :'\'ext day operations would begin One, or I might say two, did not forget the matter. with Jimmy Ballard and Bill working the Bill was looking bad. H e ate little and roamed nrst s h ift. H ill's spirits wcre rather high that t h e deck at night. j \ lasterson wore a strang e night. H e cracked jok es and played pokerlook and was often observed staring at l osi ng to j il11mr, as usual. Turning in early, h e The men took no particular notice of i\lasterson's s l ept but very little. Later came in. change, and attributed Curry's gloom to B ill lay awake p ractically all night listening to grief for a pal. One a w eek after t h e unfor.lim snore and planning-planning. tllnare accident little i\lasterson had a l o ng and } \ t brea kfast the next morning B ill's plans were earnest conversation with the carpenter. almost upset b y little "Sherlock" after, i\lasterson walked ofr to his cabi n with a o frering to serve Jimmy's s h ift bela\\'. Bill broke srnall and delicate saw. i\lasterson's cabin in with, "Now, Sherlock, \\'atson and I will be was by the way, next to Curry's. back presently. YOti stay h ere and solve the The men noticed a c hange in Curry) but little mys t ery o f the 'Cnseen Hand!'" The mess did kno\\ of h ow great a change it was. h roke into guffaws o f laughter. Little i\fasrer-H e slept but littl e and often would awake son's pa ss i o n for mysterit's was certainly well from a doze [0 find him se lf listening for 's known. snore. H e smoked package after package of

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T H E C:IRIBBEA:\. cigarettes. Late at night he woulli get tip and pace the deck. H e roo". at last, to drink, and in the: would cOllle down [Q breakfast \\ irh a hea\-ihAushed face and hloodshot e 't:s .\Iasterson w;s forever \\ arching him. noticed this one day an(1 after that was very care ful to a\'oid him H e entered into nOlle o f the friend"-little card games but would, instead, stand j'n a darkened of t h e deck and gaze abstracted" in(Q the Water. One night h e turned 111 fairh-e;rh'. H e dozed i n firs. .-\.bour one o'clock he :lw'oke frOIll an unquiet slumber in a cold s\\eat. :,\'or 1n00'ing a muscle, h e stiff e n ed in a listening attitude. :\aah-there it was Jimmy's snore-\\'as h e going crazy? HI.: leaped out of his bunk and Rung o n the lights fa findnothing but an empty mattress in Jim's bunk. H e flung the mattress out, tore up the bunk) a n d still found nothing. H e slept no mo:-e that night. H e drank quite a bit from his pri vate stor e. I n fact. h e drank so much t ha t h e was unable to report for duty next morning. The captain decided Curr\" would ha\'e to be l aid aff next time ther port. The next night h e was again to hear that s nore. I t wa s a 'ilightly nasal snore, and all night h e lis t e ned to its rise and fall, too stupefied e \'en to get up and turn on the lights. The following day h e reported for duty \\earing a haggard, haunted l ook. H e also asked if he might change hi" cahin. \\' h en ;\l astersol1 heard t h is, his face relaxed. i\l a'iterson spoke w the cabin boy during the day. I n the meSS r oom that night the boys were playing their game. ;\I a sterson was sirring in a corner reading a certain magazine known as a thriller. H e appeared restless and seemed to he waiting for something. :\ noise of running sounded on the deck outside. The door hurst open and Curr y in, Ina \Vhu a Curry! "lie's outside," h e kept moaning, just like h e used to. I Ie's heen in m\' cahin eVt:r\, night haunting me. Y es, I killed I 'll tdl, b:Jt fo; sake take him \Iasterson was at his in a second. 1'1 hi" hand he a pencil and papa. lTsing Curn-'s fear a tool, hl: finally wormed a fuJI {Jut of him. Curry down that, h e seemed to go out of his hcad. "That snure hllll that snore keep-111' me aw:tkL. \\'e1I, I got cven with him." The\" dragged hllll aWin and I(Kked him lip. S(:mcti,-";c later \ .. the tug was on its home, the mcn got little \Ia.sterson [(J gi\'e an explanatio n. i\ l a s t e rson wa s reluctant, hut he ga\'e in at las-and told them. YOli f ellows always kidded m e about my s l euthing but I tell y o u it's my w eakness I spend h our:-. making up crirn es and so lving them. That da,' when b oth o f those m e n f o uled at o n ce in pans o f the wreck I s m e lled something. or course, I didn't kno w anything about either of those boys, or I'd ha ve s u s pected something sooncr. :\s it wa s I wa sn'-sure till Curry asked to change hi s ca bin. That made m e p ositive. One othe r little incident started m e at fir s t \\' h e n I found Rallard b ehind the door) I n oticed distinctly that, co n s id ering the angl e the vessel wa s o n, it wa s absolutel y imposs ibl e for t h e d oo r to swing o n hiI'll. I t had to b e pushed, and so m e human had to do it. That wasn't \'ery o bvi o u s or I supp ose Curry would have noti ced it. Furthermor e, the s lip might have settled a little so I couldn't bank on that. Anothe r thing, was b eautifully tangled in abollt three places. :"Jow you kn ow, and I know that to f o ul i s a coin c idence; three at once i s too rnllch. A.fter that I s p o k e to the carpenter and confided in him. \\'e hatched up a little plot. B e in g n ex t to Curr\' and Ballard, I couldn't h e lp h earing Ballard snore. I C lIt a h o l e between the cahins under Ballard's hunk. I had b ee n listening to Cllrry moving abOllt and I kn e w h e was r es tle ss I just s n o r e d thro u g h t ha t h o l e every h e to s l ee p. To-day I decided t o hring things to a I the ca bin hoy n o t to fill Curr\"'s water hotrie. H e ha s been drinking stea lii ly, and I knew h e would want wate r toni g h t. I just fixed it so that when h e ca m e O ll[ of hi s cabin he'd find the carpenter, who is about J build standing at the rail s m o kin g ',s pipe and dressed in J imlllY's clothes. These I rook ou[ o f Curry's cabin while h e wa s diving t o-dar. Y o u rem embe r h ow used to stand outs id e his cahin after watc h and s moke hi s pipe? \Ve ll, Currr ha d Ilotice d it ron, because h e'd alwa\'s r ail whell Jimmy s time.: \Va..; lip. \\'ell, that jl;St fini s hed hil11. The rest wa..; simple," "On e t hin g I want to know, Sh erloc k said one of the men, How co uld you imitate 's snore well e nough to f ool him ?" J cou l d tell that s nore anywhe r e I t w.t S a slightly nasal s n o r e, and many's the night it's kept me awake," and i\l asterson's eyes hlink e d a[ the h o mel )' m e m o r y

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THE SL1SAN:\E. Doro,fry S;;olJson, '.11-She \\as staring blind l y hefore her "'hell \\C first sa,,' her. H e r s h r u n k en littl e figure looked pai n-w rack ed as she rigidly sal in he r sq ueaky old lock ing c h air. She turned watery-weak eyes in QlII" di r ec t ion as ,,'c enter ed the hale hut neal r00111. "Susanne." said Dr. Tucker," this is a c lass from Cristobal H igh School. ha\'c C0111e to say hello LO III Y best pa t ien t. ,. "Oh, s i r. no, sir," said old S u zanne. \\ith a p leased, yet ,,-iSlful l oo k as s h e smiled at the doctor T hen to liS, ;'Th c doctor says such nice t h i ngs." \\'c stood arou nd. \\
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' I HE C\RIBBE.-\:\. OL R C\R:-JI\AL. Duralll." S,'olSJon, '27_ Eli-:.Iloellz IInckc: t, '29. aturday night, ;\lay Fort ue L esseps was the scene o f much jollity and merry-making. From to I I the grollnds were crowded wit h friendsof the sc h ool who came to h elp make t h e carni va l the success i [ pro\'ed to be. T he s id e s h ows cam e first. I n one tent sat the B earded (rom A u s tralia, while D oleful D e lla sig h ed mournfull y in anoth er. I n o ther tents were rhe h orrifying red bats, t h e awe-inspiring R oma n I.adder,olle hideous headless calf! } \ mysteri o u s fortune teller foretold slic h futures as to give joy to the heaviest travel, happiness! Tht' mliSeum contained noteworthy and pri ce Icss objects. \\' h o can forget i\ladame Nelsonnio, the eccentric tight rope walker? ( C ertainly we can't,) The answers to many pt;:rplexing home questi o n s were to be f ound in the booths labeled "\\' h y M e n L e3\"e Home" and "\\' h y \\'omel1 Leave H o m e." The "Canisl oi L T s a t:" din:ct from Alaska, ca used much excitement. Being girls, we ca n not state what wa s to b e see n in the tent For i\l cn hut we must admit that tht: contents offcrt:d h y the tent F ur \\'omen Only" wcre quite cnlightening. Skating was enjoyc.::d from 7 to I) in t h e tcnnis UJUrt. Ilert: man) people forgot their o l d ag\. and joined with the younger generation in r ece i ving ... pills and, in<:iden tall)" black and blue marks. -\t l.J o\:i{Jck the R oo r was tleared and the Fort de I .esseps orchestra, which had been giving a delightful concert at the fartht:r t nd o f t h e grounds, moved up, and soon man)' dancers we r e SWilylng to the weird, jazz), tUlles of that 5),11<:0-pating o r c h estra. Am o ng the dancer s could b e see n here and ther e, petite girls dressed in snapp), little bla c k and white costumes Effi c i ently directed by Miss H esse and T eresa Gallag her, these girls entertained the public with a peppy Musica l R e v u e. T h ey sang the lates t hits and stepp ed liv e l y, whil e the agi l e cl o wns, Ra)' \Vill and Burt H a c kett, br ought down t h e h ouse. little Rae Bli ss s howeJ her remarkable talent in a R ussian dance. I .o i s \\"illiam s and H elen r ece ived muc h applause for their excellent interpretation of t h e so n gs w h ic h they s ang. Two lovel y violin renditions by Albert c harmed t h e attentive audience. Anita Rankin and Ruben A rcia, dressed in the natio nal costumes of Panama made a rare couple a s t hey w h irled and dipped g ra ce full y to the tllne of ".Josephine.f Afte r a battle, Nellie B erger e merged victoriou s with over a tho usand votes, and was triumphantly a ccl, tim e d "Miss Cristobal H igh School." A t t h e refre shnlt:nt hooth, boys. noisily s h out i ng, entreated (Jnc to r efres h one's st.::1f with coo ling drinks, cakes, and-hot dogs!!! Though the students, faculty, and public in general are g r e atl y r es p o nsihle for th e S lICCeS:' of our gala eveni n g, it i s to the personn e l of F ort d e I .esseps t ha t most of (lu r s u cces", s h o uld b e a cc r edi t ed. \ 1\ 1\' CAR:-JI\'AI.! 1'1 \ F ORT DE I.ESSEPS! \,1 \ A!

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THE CARIBBEAN 5 7 "WIDER T \\" E:"TY."' L OlliSI']. .\{(UK, 29. I e 1 l l nder Twenty" was an cuts r
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58 THE CAR IBBEAN. THE .o\Ct I. Bu t how (':m I keep down the bills. if 1 can ne\"cr find Ollt how high up they arer' Y ou s:lid go di\'ing-in the deep blue se.I." -\cr II. I. "That slle;tk thief maSt be in h e r e somcwhere." "Well, if you c:lIl't t.Jke (:tfl! of yourself \\ilh the women, nobody call help you." Scene II. T here's nothing so pathetic :IS ;'\ wedding veil." "\Yell, Ill:t'anl, it will he like a c:1t TO lock th,lt up." \CI 111. "You mean you want to me to make suffer?" "Xo secondhand wedding presents for mel" THE PLAYERS. ( I n the order in which appear.) Id:1 F;,rnum-who is not :In expert accountant EMil. BLEDSOE Grace F :lr num-who likes mo n ey bener than she call cou nt it H E LEN r. !ONTGOMERY Peeks Farnum-who is tired of being t h e baby Bozo-w hDl,e nose knows. h:ts her own ide IS. F rnum-\\Lo not b:tnkrllpt,. Bill w:s in rhe Army DOROTHY WERTZ HIMSEU" CLARA i\ I A\' Sl'llSE TAYLOR CHARLES WILL O i.ln; Edgenon-\\ ho knows her business. HELEN YI NE"AR D Ted Ruth:rforJ-who is intt:!"t:sted in c hicle-and Grace JAMES \'AN SeonER D onrtU Brown-who is c;lught between t h e deep blue sea ;1nd-DI n I JAMES GRIDER THEIH ASSI STA:-ITS. LAWRE .... CE C. CALLAWA\', J R., HI/silins 11/al/agfT. jO\I'H CORRICA', ,-Issisltml HI/shuss DOkOTHY Sn::l"ssol", Prompur. I-'"HEMI.\ \\'OOL'OlCH, Ilust. Commillu. L (II'I"E IIEI\I and JOH:\ Publicif." Commiffu. A' .... E J . \IC),'At-CHTE. .... and TERE"A GAI.LACHER, Cosfllml'S. STAFF HOP f)oroth_\' L. ':q, Charerr,ncs: anti Frank Mac k Mr. I',. S. ;\lacSrarran. C( in Charge: T e r esa Gallagher; Dorothy L Irert" C harles \I'ill, and .I ack Klunk. On January -, the staff c..f THE CARIBBEAN gave a "hop" at the l\Jasonic T e mpl e. "The Colh:giates," an orc hestra made up of hig h sc h oo l students under the leadersh i;l of J\Jr. furni\hed exctlltnt music. B.::siJes t h e (acuity, the alumni, and mtmhcrs of t h e student hody, a (ew friends had heen invited. Those present are unanimous in prOf.:laiming it one of the outstanding social c.:\'Cllts of the year. SENI O R PARTY. L OlliSI' Htim, '2i. Emma B an k s, '28. One bright November morning, Cristobal High School students were confronted by strang e hieroglyphics on the blackboard in the assembly ro o m. The c urious ( in oth e r words, one and all ) finally managed todec iph e r that exceed in g ly queer m ess age, which reveal ed t hat the class o f twenryseve n was giving a queer party on the nineteenth of November, nin eteen hundred and twenty-six. On that night there gathered at the i\ lasonic Temple a motley crowd, r epresenting every walk in life from the Puritan to the gaud)' flapper. During th e grand marc h, l\1r. Arthur l\i unclberg, a s a s ail o r DOY, and i\l i ss '\'innie Fred Jacobs, wh o look ed like P e t e r P an him self, won th e pri zes f o r b es t Costumes. \\'e may acid that a tall s lim maiden, Mistcr-ah-er -l\l iss J o hn Nelson attracted no little attention. Du e to th e kindly thoughtfulness o ( the entertainment committee everyon e was enabl ed to s h o w his or h e r dramatic ability in a game of stunts, i\ l uch enjoyment also wa s derived from various other games. ] nstructions were given t o shake hands with ever yo n e present to rr y to find out who had the dime; so m e chewed the string; while others endeavored t o undo hands tied in a puzzling style. About nine -thirty Dwyer's orc hestra and cieli c i olts refreshments were welcomed b y all, and the rev e lers danced the rest o f th e even ing away, JUNI O R PARTY. Gladys B nl's, '28. Royal lIiggason, '28. Friday, D ecember 1 7th, the Junior Class gave the ir annual party at th e Y. \V. C A., entertain in g the faculty, students, and alumni. Bein g 011 the last prio r to Christmas vacation, our party was made a Christmas affair. T o suit th e occas i o n, everyo n e brought a prese nt. The n late r Santa Claus, on his arrival distribute d the gifts amo n g children. (Everyo n e was a c hild t hat nig ht. ) Dancing follo w e d the mu s i c b e ing furni s h ed b y the F ort D e l .esseps orc h estra. R efres hm en r s were t h e n se r ved, after whi c h dancing continue J until e leven o 'clo ck wh e n everyone gath e red around t h e piano and sang our Alma Mate r so ng :1nd wis h e d e l se a M e rr y Christmas, TIlli S the e v e nin g for many joy m:lk c r s

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THF. CAR I BBF.A;-.I. 59 THE PARTY. I'ifll 29 a n d .\ I r s. J D P a l m an,1 .\ t r. ,Lnli .\ I rs. J B C o m a n .) The Sop h o m o res o f C. H S. ha d th e ir party the f Ollrth o f ;\Iarc h, 1 92-, at the Y \Y. C . -\. The firs t part o f the eve nin g was spent i n a t r e a sure-hunt, whi c h t oo k the s t u dents ( our bl oc k s awa\' (rom t h e Y \ Y C. A J oe Corrigan, '2-, the tre a s u r e a fivt.: d ollar gol d piece, whi c h wa s in an alabas t e r h o x behind the pi a n o H e d ese n 'cd th e pri ze f o r h e certainly w o rk ed hard On the wh o l e, the hunt was e nj o yed b y c \'eryon e T h e hall wa s decorate u with scrpcntincs, and c onfetti wa s di stribute d t o the students whi c h ga\' c a t Ollc h c f c arn i 'al [Q t h e party. \\" h e n rh e o r c h es t r a tull ed lip a t n ;nt:, t h e d an cing b egan. T h e mu s i c wa s allu r in g the floor w o nd e rful, the hall spac i olls, and t h e evening coo l a s it ah\ ays i s in t h e tro p ics \\'hat e l se co ul d the dance r s cra ve! R e fr eshments w e r e se r ved thro u g h out the evening. THE P :\RTY. Kam:, '2(,). (Chaperone,: ) I r" G H R no:ner and '\ l r \1. L. B007, .-\s amateurs the F r eshme n w ere q u i t e Sllccess ful in g ivin g an e njoyabl e party a ll Friday cvening, : \ pril '22, 9 2 at the Y \\' C : \ T h e auditorium wa s gayly lighte d and w as d ec orate d with large p a lm l e a ves whi c h w e r e arrayed around the wall s o f the r oo m. : \11 e njoyed dancing to the mus i c furni s hed b y an excellent o r c h estra E arly in t h e evenin g cake wa s se r ved and also coo l punc h whi c h \\as eagcrl r r ece i ved br the hot and thirs t y dance r s During the course o f t h e e \ 'e nin g t h e r e we r e nume r o u s t a g -dances, a string dance a n d many othe r s At e lev e n o'cl oc k, rh e party wa s c losed by s in ging o u r sc h oo l so n g and all l e ft with g ai e t y befitting the close o f the l a s t sc h oo l party o f the year. THE S l PPER CLL' B /:Ihd ,,'urman '28, Presidl!lll, Ell'H e'll \ \\'OOI. ... OlCH. ria P (J idml, BI.I ..... E'III.\ GRIDER E'l\tA S A "''' ''. On t h e e v ening o f t h e seco n d F riday of e v e r y month t h e Y. \\' C A i s t h e m eeting place o f t h e Suppe r Club. B u s in ess is co n d u c ted duri n g t h e e arl ie r p art o f the e \'ening, and plans a rc made for future acti v i t ies o f the cl ub. 1\l i ss Eup h e m i a \\' oo ln o u g h the pres i de n t, pres i ues, assisted by l\l i ss Dodds, \ \ I i ss l\l a c Gillivray and l\l r s G rune w a l d D o dds, the club's advi se r fr o m its beginni ng, h as res i g ned, to the deep r egre t o f all the m embe r s ) Afte r t h c r e a ding o f the m inutes r e p o r ts are made b y the \'ario u s committees ) and are d i sc u ssed A.ft e r the bu s in ess m ee tin g i s e nded) the m c m bel'S proceed to the l o n g t abl e a n d g r ace is said. The m e m be r s o f the \'ariolls hi g h sc h oo l cla sses tak e turns coo kin g and se r v in g the m e al s Sin g in g and l a u g h t e r are abundant. S c h oo l so n gs are in full s wing nnci eve r yo n e participates ..\fte r a brier soci al p e ri o d all d epart ( o r othe r p l aces. That the club i s b oth inte resting and popular i s e \ ide n ced h y the ( ac t that ( orty-se ve n girls o f t h e sixty-eigh t atte n d in g high sc hool t his ye.r b e l o ng to it. \ IOTH E R S :\;-.1)) )) :\l' GHTE R S BA;-.IQUF.T S aturd a y the f ourteenth o r ;'\, I a y, o ne hund red and fift y mothe r s and daugh t e r s attended the I othe rs' and Daughte rs' Banque t. The d eco r a t i o n s W e r e in pin1c and b tu e E.a c h m o t h e r a n d e a c h daughte r wo r e 11 little o ld -fAshio nej paper ca p tied with a blue c r e p e paper streame r. A.ft e r an e njoyable dinne r at whi c h our b o y s s h o n e a s w aiters, the programme wa s gi ve n. i\l i ss Euphemia \\'ooln ough wa s toas t mist:-ess and filled the office v e r y capably W illiam H Sperry g a ve a m os t in-'crestin g talk o n '\ l othe r s o f Y esre rda)', " I rs H L P h i llip s o n Girls o f T o-day" :tn d 1\lr s G. H B oo m e r o n "l\l othe r s o f To-m orrow." Gladys B ee r s sang I ..ittle i\loth e r 0' i\l i ne. H e l e n i\l ontgom e r y, : \ I oha S locum, a n d Emily Gride r wh o a re inte r es ted in Sup per Club and Girl R ese r ves gave inter estin g talks o n a t h e m e tha t can never h e ex haus t eo. \\' h e n the progr amme wa s o v e r, e a c h girl had a tho u ghtful look o n h e r f ace a s if s h e had resolved to h e t o h e r m othe r a b ette r "chum in joy and comrade in d i stress," f o r afte r at! wh o can g e t al ong without m o t h er!

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60 THE CARIBB EAN. THF HIGH SCHOO L ORCHESTR:\. Rnhrl .-{\ul/, ?S. 7,1<+ ""I,mk, '28. high school orchestra represents cnd of C. 1-1. S:s Illusical I t is present whent,:\'er lhl.' high .school requires of q uantity and quality comhined. Xot content "ith playing the cheap jazz of our modern age, thi s organizarion is h eard at banquets, or at the school's presentations of dramatic art, a s, f or instance, the l:ttesr production) "LTnder Twent)'." There are just enough in number f or a sm all theater orchestra. Tbis thriving young s)' m -Mrs. Baker phcJIly boasts as its able Jirector, the well.known Baker. L'n"er the rule of h e r agile baton arc the piano, seven vio lin s, two trumpets, two saxophones, and a clarinet. "very T ucsdil)' afternoon, this group l11a), h e heard setting the surrounding atl11osphert: in \ ibrati(m. of liS are unabl e to tell t h e difference:: hetween music ilnd noise ilccording to \l1ss Sewell's definition, but we call vcr\' cilsi l v hear the difference when listening to mil' \\ c arc ready to give thanks to the organization and its mcmhcr't, for the help it ha s rendered the SdlOOI and c(.mmunity. \\'c sincerdy hopc that it rna)" be as sunessful neXt year as it is the present (1I1e. BOYS GLEE CLL 'B. Don(/Id Poh/r, '29. The Boys'GlecCluh,a'ion e of the sc h ou l o rgani zation s wa s started with high interest at the b eginning of the sc h ool year o f 19'26 1 9"27. \\'e were fortunate ill having as a leader i\l i ss I l esse, for s h e ha s ha d previolls ex p erie n ce with college c honlses. I n all o f t h e preceding years t ht.:: a ccompaniments had been furni s hed by a lad y piani s t, but findin g o n e o f th e m embe r s w ell fitted to ca rryon the work, t h e club thi s year e lected i\lorris L u ce. Eac h memberofthe Gl ee Club i s also a regular member of the c h o ru s l ed by i\l rs. Baker, and t hough interest has fallen until o nl y eight m e m bers arc l e ft, we s till m ee t ever y Thursd a y at thl'<.'c o'clock to s in g the so ng s learned and to learn new o n es equall y as good as the f o rm e r ones. C H O RUS. Grl'lclull II". P,,/m, '29. C h o ru s, under t h e capable and enterpri sing direction o f Mrs E. S. Hak eI' ( f o rm erly our Mi ss Currier), ha s h ee n both pleilsa llt and in struc ti o nal. The re we r e so m e e i g hty students e nr olle d this year-many o f t h e m f o r t h e love o f the mus i c rath e r than for the credit The chie f undertaking o f the year was the l earning and m e mori zing o f "The R ose i\l a iden," a very b eautiful cantata by Fred Cowen. i\l rs. Baker h as f o r seve n years b ee n the director of the C H S. c h o ru s and has earnestly tried to in s till into u s so m e o f that music whic h i s a part o f her and of w h ich s h e i s a part. GIRLS' GLEE C L U B Ellul Burnell, '29. On \\'ed n esd a ys a fter sc h oo l th e Girl s Glee C lub demonstrates its talents. The harmo n y o f t h ese aspiring warblers i s n o t alwa ys h e a venly," and many are t h e d iscords that c la s h o n the l o n g s uffering i\l i ss H esse's ear s. Gl ee luh, however, boasts several "golden dll'oats" and w h en these arc m e l od i o u s l y combin ed \\ ith the l ess valuable voca l c h ords, the sOllnd i s not tllwtl)s objectionable. Almost every year the public i s allowed to hear these songsters. On the w h o l e it i s an institution c reditable to C. H S. L o ng live the Girls' Gl ee Cilib.

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T H E CARI BBEAN. J UN I O R -SENI OR B.'\ NQUET. :"le v e r has the r e b ee n a m o r e s u ccess ful J uni o r S e ni o r Banque t in Cris t o bal H igh S c hool than th e o n e Fri d a y eve nin g, June third, at whi c h th e m em b e r s o f t h e cla ss o f 1 9 2 8 w e r e h os t s t o the cla ss o f 1 9 2 7 t h e and 1\lr. and Mrs \". E. S eiler. Those in all w e r e seated at a huge square U table in the H o t e l \Ya shingto n dining r OO I11. Al ong the cente r ran a r o w o f tin y e l ec tri c lights-alm os t hidde n a bank o f f o liag e an d pink o l e an de r bl osso m s The fun b egan wh e n th e guest s tried to find the ir pla ces b y rh e lise o f th e cle v e r pla ce cards executed J\l o r to n S outhard o f th e S opho m o r e Class Eac h card containe d th e (ace of the victim cut fro m a s mall k odak pi cture. The n drawn above b e l o w, and around w e r e ba ckgro un ds whi c h illu strate d so m e p e t f o ibl e o r p eculiarity. The p oint wa s furthe r impresse d b y c lever co upl e t s At e a c h place al so, v es i des th e "crac ker" favo r s with th e ir surpr i se contents w e r e m e nu program b o ok s. \ \ h e n th ese w e r e o p e n ed it wa s d i scove r ed t ha t e a c h g u es t amo n g th e la d i es ha d b ee n gi ve n a dainty, hand-bloc k ed hand k e r chie f whil e th e g entle m e n had large r editio n s o f th e same articl es in g ra y an d blu e The m enu, prepared under the capahle d ir t'c ti o n o f J E L ewis, wa s a delic i o u s o nt:. The pro grarn o f t oas t s wa s bri e f J\tiss Gladys B ee r s th e toastmistress, c all e d firs t upo n th e Junio r pres id ent, E dward I.owande, wh o expresse d his cla ss apprec iati o n of th e senio r s a n d it s pl e a sure in entertaining th e m. T o thi s, T e r es a Gallaghe r, pres id ent o f th e enio r Class r es p o nded, express in g gratitude to t h e J uni o r s an d a b elie f that th e Junio r s w o uld on" the w ork and trad iti o n s o f th e sc h ool. D o d ds th e n made brief r emarks c l os ing with an appeal to th e students to r e m embe r that th e se t o f th e sail" rathe r than th e direc ti o n o f th e wind s i s what r e all y counts in life's voyage L a st, R o b ert Ax tell with d e ft clairvoyan ce pi cture d th e future o f e a c h m embe r o f th e S enio r Class t o th e entire s ati sfac ti o n o f all. The gues t s th e n r epaired t o th e t e a r oo m wh e r e th ey enjoyed a s pl e n d i d program prepare d th e Junio r s The fir s t half was g iv e n b y the girl s They had prepare d "The Kleptomaniac," an o ld, but c l e v e r, on e-act far ce, un de r th e d ir ec ti o n o f Mi ss Moo r e The girl s di d s om e acting which b o d es w ell for tht: s u c c es s of n ext year's S e nior Play. THE ( One-act pl ay. ) CA ST. J o hn Ourton ( P eggy ) Valerie Cha se :\rm::.b r ( a w ida .... ) 1-1>1. \1<\ BAN .... .\ l i ss Freda D ixon (;1.1\0' ... E BEn:. Charles Dover ( l\labc\ ) K u IIRYS L A\lBRT E velyn E va n s (a journ a list ) ,\Irs Preston A s hl ey (l:'e. t h a ) LUCI \ SA LAZA It ZO"EI.I. A 81.1::.:; K a tie-i\lrs. Burton's E \ A'CELI:.!: SMITII (S((1u-.\lrs. Bmtons Oed room. ) F o r th e ir part o f the evening, th e boys, s p o n so r e d by i\l i ss H esse, presented a radio program with Frank h:imbell a s anno un cer. Fir s t c am e th e Discordant S e v e n an orc h es t r a made lip almcst entire l y o f Junior b o y s ; th e n !\Iurde r er's R o w in whi c h Frank h:imb ell
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61 THF CARIBBFAX. >w x:l!)

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THE C.'IRI HBE .'\;\. 80)'$', Ja1111'S G ri d e r '2i. T H F BOYS' ATHLFTI C Prnlt/t'lIf "iu Pn-siliml O ffiu!rs. J A\lE\; CJtlDFR ALBERT DAYS The B \ A \\;1S a fireH h elp 10 the hm's wh o entered tLc ath letic acm-irit's of t h e sch ool. :\t tht: meetings, the COI11-i n g athletic e"ent \\ere.! and ca ptai ns and m an;;!!:er,; elected. This associa tion a l so helpfd 10 secure ( unds f o r athletic suits and other Ilctt:ss:\n' e q u ipment. Girls', D oro/II)' Safl1SS01l, 2 i THE G I ill S ATHLETIC .'ISSOC I -IT IO:<. P rl's itiolJ '"iu Pri'Sitii'1I 1 Officer..:. i\loNT Go\lERY D O R OI"H\" /)orol ll.' L. II "I'r l-:'. ':q. The 192-pro v e d (0 be :J m os r <;uccesc;(ul o n e f o r rh e G i rls' Arhleti c h soci; n ion. The girl s p a id due .. o f fi(n cents a e:lr Fro m thi s am ount suits f o r b as ketb all, a nd lette r s f o r v a r iol!" teams w e r e pur c h :lse d The G : \ A e n co ura g e s the g i rl s inle r c'i t i n at h le tlcc; and helps to pro m ote ;J f ee lin g Ilf good c;port ... m .lIls hip. BO YS. Til most things s u ccess c all h e obtaine d only by persistent e ffort. ;'\ thl e ti c compe titi o n i s n o e x ce p tion. The athletic program o f Cri s t o bal H i g h S c h ool for the r ear J 9'26 92-ha s ex p erie n ced the extreme in victori es and d e f eats The r e a so n i s simply t hat the students have h ee n indu s tri o u s and persistent in so m e acti v iti es an d n egligent in o th e rs. R esults ha\'e b ee n achi e v e J accordingly. C. H S. c an b e s u ccessful in h e r athletic c ompe titi o n in all branc h es if s h e will gi ve eac h the ne c e ssary atte nti on. Al t hough to date C. 1-1. S. ha s s u ccee d e d in winning only on c e fr o m Balbo a H i g h S c h oo l s h e has fared exceedingly w ell in th e othe r attempts w h ere s h e h a s b ee n faithful in preparatio n. C ertainly C. H S. can b e t hankful for possessing th e calibre o f athleti c director s h e ha s in l'vl r. V. E. S eile r. H e ha s n o t b ee n industrious but has hrought to u s a d ee p kn o w ledge of eve ry s p ort that came unde r his supe rvision The sc h oo l i n ge n e ral grate fully thanks I\lr. Sei l e r for his untiring and s u c c essful e Rorts. \\' e onl)' hope t hat h e mar r emain with u s f o r y ears to corne. Finally, w e are dee ply i n de b ted to t h e co m munity f o r it s stro ng backing and interest. N ext w e l ose only two men-Grider and \\' ill. B o th or t h ese have taken part in seve ral s p orts but th e ir pla ce s will b e eagerly filled by t h e r emaining students Thus C H S. can look f orward to another fruitful year in athletic COI11-petition.

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The most outstanding proof that sucis obtained by persistent effort was sho,m in our b..'lseball. \\'e entered the t league and in the first half were ju-.t .1ble to escape rhe cellar, but in the second hair w..! finished second. Several of o.lr players w.!re considered the best in the league 3l the close of the seaso n I n (.l:-t, G r eene, Lowallde. and Wi l l be(,:lme proficient enough to win r egular positions in the Isthmian Leagu e Jack Klunk, our catcher and c..'lpt ain. ha-l one of the strongest thr owi n g arlll S in the l eague. At bat. he was a l ways H e hit four homer s in his last bur games, finishing with an ayer agc of 30l. :\Iikc GrC<'llc was, by far, the bes t fioit baseman and pilcher in t he leaglle lie finished the se"'s.)11 with a grand an:rage of .39i. AS:1 pitcher. Greene had morc speed and curves than any other twirl er. H e made hi s debut in the I::,lhmian League by losing a hard 10-inning ::.truggle hy the co re of Charles W ill, though left handed, played second base and played it well At bat he was le3d-otT man and proved his ability by battil:g for .385. Edward Lowande wa s not quite the swatter he wa s in 1925 1926. Nevertheless he was a brilliant fie lder and balled for the respectabl e avcrage of .30-l. H e too p layed in the I sthmian Leagut' a n d made a good job of it. Rene Bissonette \\as our third 1:>':'1Scman but he remained w ith u s onl)' half o f the season A steady fielder. he proved hi s worth in the Ball>O.:1.-Cristobal se ries by winning the second b'3me with two timely hits-a single and a double. The oulfl eld was made up of Days i n ('enter, Arcia in left, and P cter!:on 3 1 (' Wikingstad alternating in ri g l l!. ea).!' .... as the best hitting outfic:ldtr \\ith an 3\'crage of .300. while Arcia \\3<; our be<.t defensivc oUlfi e lder. and PeteJ"!;()n were nOt hea,'\ hiu('f"o, hU I were always u..efui. Crider was an improved pitcher ove r hi., pr vious y(oar hut ..... as inclined to I K' wild at time!;. lie fini.,hed \\ilh 1 2 \\i n s .Ind S losst:s. Tlw follo .... ing arc the rc!>uits of I ll(> ).:<11111'" in I'W T .... ilight League: folk'>T IIAU,. D.,I/ Jfun (JIll). Itlll' 1('2(,. 12 Ii ( II S. 2, Fort Dt"I.( ... <;('p ... R. 11 2.1 r. II. S. .1, I{.& F A .1. THE CARI BBEAN BASEBALL. 1 2-29 c. H S. II. Fort OcLesseps 2. 1 2-3 1 C. H S. 2. i\l a ulers 6. 192i. 1-3 C. H S. 10. Outln.ws9. 1 1 2 C. H.S. 6. l\l aule r s 6. ( ti e) 1 1 5 C. H.S. S. Fort D e Lesscps 2. 1 -2-4 C. H S. 5. l\laulers 8 1-31 C. H S. 2. Outla w s 9. 2-3 C. H S. 18. R.&F.A.6. 1 5 C. H S. 2. OUl laws4. 2-8 C. H S. 5. i\l aulers 6. 2 1 2 C. H S. 10. Fort D e L es!'Cps 9. SECON D HALF. 2-16 C. H.S. 5. R.&F.A .1. 2-1 9 C. II. S. Outlaw::. 5. 2 1 1 C. II. S. 3 i\laul c rsS. 2-25 C. II.S. FOri D e L esse l s 1. H C. H S. 6 R & F A. I. 3-2 C. H S. I Olltl, But both Grider and his t eammates pitched hitless b all. c;enll::d down :lnd prevented furt her sco r B:llloa broke the ice In Ihe second ing. scnrlng one run on twO walks and Clis. C r istobal sco red one nlll in t lte fourth .. inb le. T hey added tWO more in t h e on three p asse:; and Bissonnenc\ single. ..i\:lh on :l pass, a hit, ,Ill infield (Jill. ,tlltl The) repe.lled in the <;i)l(lh il\ Ih e snlne !WII In"'. way 011 Will's :.inglc.

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THE C A R IBBE A N 65 Cristobal really won the and I \ ', C. Seiler. our energetic T he fWO most thrilling races of the day series in the seventh. After Klunk had director, has coached the C. 1-1. S. bors were the 50 and loo-rnrd dashes. Each doubled, and Lowande and Green had and has cerrainly imparlcd a great de.tt of these f:lCeS was a close, sprinting w.llked, D:lYs forced in Klunk with the of blsket ball knowledge. Once a player struggle all the way. between Jack tying fun. repor:ed for pr.lctice, he continued to Klunk of Cristobal ;:nd F red Helmerich .. the;, pro.:eede.l to will tht! report, lor i\lr. Seiler's methods, re of B dboa. Howc\'cr. Junk upheld his game and widl a doub:t: to cent!.!r, scoring LO'N,mde and Arci 'l. interesting as they are benell..:i.l1. .ille of the I sthmus' f..s.est swimmer, n eese and Gr;,Jcr p;tdd well i, rI.e pinches and recei, eJ scns:ll;on:il sup: (Irr. n eese Sl ruck ou t 2::> n,1;' 1 in t .... 0 g:\lrc bu' passed the sane number. The fiel,jing was of high calibre. Greene mal:e I e putouts in the bst glint' ;:nd Clisbec.' made 1.1. \\'ood, .\rc;l, and D :\\s pbyed rhe outf.e:d A fe.1 pr.lc.i.:eg.!lne" \Iere held, lll .. winniag bo.h with a fina l spurt. with thl;' ide.! of determi.u.ld: .1 pI.li cr.'> H is time,; for the 50 and loo-y.lrd dashes ability, Lither rh:<.n attemptmg;o II ill I hI;' were 2.,.2 and 5,).1 seconds, 'o!.!me. Those who prove.! to be respectively. of the first te.11ll were: Grider .In.] \\ III Cristoll.lliost i:s eh:1I1ce of II inning tht: s forw::rds, L ow:mde ;,nt\ l:en ;to; meet by f.liling to g:1in either a ce.uers, and \ .. P .lyne B Iblli:l, J.\lllnk'l or second pl.lce in the 220-y; rd d:ISh. .Iml Ollen as guards. \\'e won rhe rd.IY, hut B .llbo;I's le :ld w ::s SA IH'A-Cf""TOBAI. 8ASJo..Er B,ILI. SERIES roo great [0 O l 'e rton c. T he score: Firs/ GmlU. D .ty ... and Klunk dis t inguisht:d t helll -..lB H. \\'ill,2b I I PO. I. I. On S.ltlIrdIY, j une 1[, the lir ... g.lmclsc!vcs br their diving. Lowande, w s played in rhe plap.hcd. A B.lbbirt, Hayden, :lml, in f.let, all HI Klunk, c. b.;nd of wa s pre,;e:t to cheer Cristob.d's <:ho\le.l up well, l .owalH!c, S5. Greene, Ih. A r ei;l If I for C. H S. T l'e game II" .. S l'er.1" .1<: the score indicates. .md II ,IS Ill.rre.lo,h by toomu..:h II LmgDays, cf Peterson, rf Bissonnette, .1b .. Gnder, p TOlnl s. 33 B ,llbo.1. A ll H. Williams,5s. Clisbee, Ih. \\'ood, If. R eese, p R us:;ey, e j ones, ef r-.lihalitsianos '" \:!Il Siden, rf Johnson, Jh. Torals .1' Summary. 1-1. PO. 0 '.1 ; C ling nil B.dbol'sp rr,aho;1t thereferec's ..\t e.,d 01 the first half, the score was r2all. H Olle,er, Joesand ] sianos, of .:. Z. :-\. A. f:l.ln.', C;1ll1e \tl:o the C g.lrne, and ILlho:! heg'1I1 10!; ke the Ic.ld. --\fter :1 w},irlwind 1)\ hoth 'e:lln ... .1 the final score s holled a win for B .lbo.l, I. I r r. For B ;llbo" the 1(:. [ 1 bIers IIcn!' c i\lilulitsianos, .md \\ood. F or I Cristoh I, \\ill, Grider, and I.OII .lIhh: C were the le,lding seonrs. B.lbbltt, ;:s a running gu.lrd, played a nice floor g.tme, C until relieved b y who did well. re,-.,hceJ Owen as <;t.lIlding o glLlrd, :1ml a gre.lt m .rll altempts a t scotlng. T oo much Indllidu:>1 o pl.l\ w as s hown in Cr;s oh, l's g;'ll'e. nl! \\,;IS brgeh re.,;po:"lsib!e for her defe :t. Tht.' score in line up: Cnstob:tl II. S. I' d. .G. 'I. Earned runs-Cristolul.,. TIl hitsKlunk, B is sonnetlc. Struck out B y Grider 8, by R eese II. B ase on balls -OR Grider 3, off R ee
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THE CA RII3BE :\:\. (;1 ({I. S. /)01"11111), S:;t'1JSJQII, ',q, Go'l/ .IIMrfleJ lI.tlr/or. This ye.\r a fcdinu wao; prevalent in ,Ill the sports. T he feeling o( jcatoU'. 1\ ha;h 111 1';1",1 C;ltS seemed to he UppctIllO,>t, I\'.\S noticeable h}' 11 ... \ \ the hChtmlllng of the !-ichool \'e:lr the out for gym \ICtC many, and Iwpcs Ilerc entertained for (Jur <:hancc'> in our major .... port..,: b,!'>kct hall, b.t .... chall, It.ICk, [ennis, lilt! but. a s usua l, the gi r lsdwindlc.t down to;\ trusty few. With these Irusl) few we managed to h o ld our own, and B .dho;1 tlld llot run :lllay with u ". Although we won no series-no champion... llLl's lIe feci ,h,1( the Cri<;;oh;tl honor of I h gh SdlOOI II ;t ... uphc.:'d. B\I.I. B I kCI kill h d.limc.l m.,re Inlcrc Ih.m III' the I,(irl" ... pon ... In en I.,h II IIBth Sth(),,1. Thb ye.lr h "" n1Ie""Cl'li,," "he "e.I-'<," wa'S mark c 1 I.> I "on.ltrfull.:l"ll>cralin "l'lril \Iilh IU. c\'i,II'nc-c Ilf ill. feeling hel"el:n Ihe ,,/u>I,I ... IIlL (. \\\1:;.... The !'occoml g,IIlIC was pl :lIe.l Febru;In I'ehruan 11, the fir ... g,lllleof the ... e.\ ... on 1(" at the R .d hl,l,L pia, ... hed. Till: Cri:'lohal ";, ... pl.L\cd ,If dlC Cr .... tob.1I pl;n ... hcd. l'irl ...... ,art .. d rig ht 11\ \11 ,11 thelf fine \\urk, The CrI"'lOh,d !4,rl ... ,hull cd fine le;lIlI"ork hut the B.llIm. 1 "!;Ir: ... up, hring. "."h Jl;l ..... l1othillJ.( ... hort ofren ... rk . hl!! I i lll! the game 10 ,I 9 to t;I do .. e. T h, ... g.II11C I he B.dhn had no dl.lnl.:C 10 loeMc W;L ... hotly conte!.led both sides st rug I he h,) kCI s, ;md 1 he game cnded "i, h I he I ding fur I he h,111. 'he gamc ... .. 'l)rel'101,lI1f,nurufCr' ... tobal. cd our:. frurn Ihe :.1;lrt, ;lIld m;lII} Ilcrc

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the a!)toni shed (,Ices when the hnal \\ histle blew and the score was announced. Saturd.IY, 5, the CrIStobal H igh School team again journeyed to the Silver Side, playing thi ... time at the P edro \ I igucl plays hed on ;1 ncutral Roar. Though the ball was ,dmosT under our goal, our for",lnis could not locatc the and the g,IIlH! ended to 0, Ethel Carr of B ,dbo,1 1ll.lking the only basket. The usu,d l ine up for bodl sides was as follow..,: Cristobal H S. H elen ;\Iontgomcn F i\Ltri o n Boomcr I Dorothy \\'ert!.. S C Dorothy Svensson. C E\'ange1inc Smith G Ethel \\'estman G B .1lhoa H S. Ethel Carr Janice Grilllison \brian-\llen \ngcl.1 Klt:mmer Ihuh johnson Ihuh Fr;lser Thus ended the hasket hall W e h.lll started ,lnd ended hut not .1" we .,hould h.He uished. Xext year School hopes to do better ,tlthough she gradu.ltion this ye;!r three 01 hcr \'eteran pl,lyers: H elen D orotll} \\'ert?, ;Ind Dorodn Sven..,soll. I:--:DOOR IlASEB .-II.I. Indoor baseball W,IS revived this year .ll"ter ,I four or tive rear:'!' !.Ipse from L!;irls' athletics. The s hown in IIlis TIl E C.-IRIIIIII-:.'1:-..'. >;\\1\1"1'(;. f \reru and ,\1.lrJilll Boomer :\Ithough we 1.'.1." .1((1.''''' to the .. holled rem,lrk'lhl.: te.I!ll\\ork 11\ the \\',I,hington 'WlIlllnmu; pool .,WlIl1ll11ng: doubles, but they too \Ient dO\I/1 to .1 IS not made much of .IS would he ex-16-I', '6-0 defeat. peeted. ThiS \car jll'H .. i, turned TR.\C .... out for swimming, hut hard \Iork and Thi .. ye<1r \llth so much Oil III riu;orouslrainin!.! thcy were ahle to present school, we thought \\1.' should nc,'cr h,I\'C a team wonhy of the name. enough lillie 10 pick up a tr.Ld. le.lIll, IHII -, in the C,\Il;d Zone 1\1.' did, .111<1 we also l1lana{.!'ed [() han: ,\ Inter-H igh School \lccI held I fel\ practice ses:-.ions. S.lturd'l\, ,\pril .ltthe\\'ashinll;tons\\immirH'(pool,ltllho;1 .10, us ,It the Balboa St.,.dWI11. The H igh School defeated Cristoh,d meet was \'cry one-Sided, rcsultlll1l: III ,I School b\' ,I 2-:n scorc, T he meet wa<; I score of q to:; in fa\'orof 13.1 1 bo,1. Thouc:h \'en" close and exciting. \\e do not to nuke eXCllses, \\e nll:st Summaries of the e\'cnts ,Ire as follows: admit that three of our best hope .. \\ere 30-."fml FtH ""'yit-un,lbk to compete-two thromdt dlness 1 "'lemmer, 13 II S., 12 :; ,md one for scholastic re.lsons. The seconds. \I,lrion Boomer. C I I S I .ollise ;\Llrtin, B II S. Slr()Kt I. Loui .. e Kerr, B II "'.2:; "I.'\.:ond ... K,lthnn Lamherl. C II S .1. Euphemia \\ oolnouch. C II .... [ \1.mon Boomer, C. II S, ., :; seconds. Klemmer, B I I 1 Kathnn Lambert, C. II S 6o_."1l,.d Fr(t' .\'Iv/( I El"heth Whalcr, B II results of the c\"ents of the i.(irls interschool track meet. as they took place, .Ire as follows: jO-.\"ilrd D.lJh. I. \ Ltck. B II l ime -3 :; "econds. -\meil B II .... LOUIse "-err. It II. S. BtlHbfll/ Tlm)fA.. I. J.lnlceGrullisoll,B II,S. D lsl,\!lce, IH feet .llllches. .-\meil I lutchmgs, B II. j. J essIe B,man, B II. S. 75-.\'(//"(I/)(u/t, I. R .le ,'ewh,lrd, B .II.S seconds. illlc 10 2 seconds. game .Llmost ri\'aled that shown In b;IS-Lucille Ile,lrIle, H II. S 2. Agnes .\ Iack, B II S. ket ball. I .1. C II S. I .1. F.the.l \\ estm.lIl, C II. S. TilE CA\IE'. Ball TIlm Fallcy J)/:/n.... \ I II h B II S I)"t"",c, Saturd.l), .\I.lrch 2, .n tht: Cri!otoh,,1 I .-\1lI!e1.. Klemmer, B II .... I. "rnCl utC 1Ilgs, .,. .. p layshcd, the B.alboa girls contended" Ith _. 1{1t,\ C II S. ,S feet IJ mche ... the Cristobal H igh School girls in indoor .1. l)oroth\ Ileull, C I I s. 2. i'.mma 8.1nk.." C II .... baseball. The\' won (rom in ,I 1 .I ,mIlt: GrtmlSOll, B II S game compose'd m,lIn" of error.., The __ \m 1 Rdm I III'{h Jllmp. fin a l score wasJ5 to '24 I Crt<;[()O,aI'" team. compmed ot Rlt.1 I 1 .. IIl:aheth C;ranbt!rn ;Ind \nucla ;\J.lr c h 9. at t h e B ,dboa pl.l\shed tht: jOHe. "uphenlll \\'oolnouch ,,-,1[hnn "-lemmer, B. 1--1 S . tied for pI.ICC. final game was pl.lyed. The this Lambert, ,lIld \l.lTlon Boomer, defe,lted Ileight,4 feet 2 inche .... time were more evenly matched, ,1110 the Balhoa' ... team. ,-\ nc:ela "lemmer, FI.., .1. Ruth l;r.lser, B fighting spIrit waS mort: The Louise Kerr, allli I. ucille BrOftd 7l1mp. Cristobal girl s started full of pep and [. Rae B H S. l),st,LlI\.:C, ambitio n but when the game was almost 1'2 feet [I inches. over our confidence vanished-an d B alTennis took a back seat in the sports 2. J essie Banan, B 1--1, S. boa again t rampled us to victory. thi s Although hitherto, it had been J. Edith Clark, B H S. The game closed with the score q to 1 0 second to basket b:111 in importance, the in favor of B a lboa. girl" "hawed this \"e;lr \'en-little interest The Balboa tealll, composed of R .le The girls who pb}'cd for CrIStobal in in It, and the dimination for the "ewh,lrd, :\gnes .\lack, Don,l Cllsbee, these games "ere: \lariol1 Roomer, p; school te,IITl remained !,ractic;!lhall and LOUIse I\:err, \\on the rela\". Dorothr\\'ertz,lf; DorothrSvensson,3b; unp1aved. Finalh', on ;\Ia\ -, the tour-ThiS e\'eIH t:nded the track meet. Lockwood, '2b; Ethel W e!otm,lIl, nament with B a lbo,1 was held. disastrous for Cristobal Iligh School. I b; E"angeline Smith, H elen H elen .\ Iontgomen was matched with Though our learn tried hard, they could gomery, c; Rosemar y l\:eene, rf; FliJ'a-Walker. champion of R.dhoa not, through lack of practice, comrete beth H,lckett, '2b; Emnu B a nks, rf; in the singles, H elen'., u .. ual succe ...... fulh with Balboa. R ;le ,'ewh;lrd, Euphemia W ool n ough, cf; Ben)" energetic playing coulJ not break I of B 'I.lboa, carried otf the individual hon gomer)' '2b; and L o ui se Ib, reserve, and s he lost (6-0), (6-1 ). ors \\Jth 11;4 points.

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68 THE CARIBBEAN. Oct. 1. Plan e C. H. S., Number 1917) takes oR' at eight o 'clock with forty-three Photograph e r s (freshman), thirty-one Radio-operat ors (so phomores), fift een '\ Iechanics (juni ors), eleven Pilots (sen i o rs), and eight Officer s (faculty), among them tw o new ones, Offic e r s H esse and Gu s tafson. O c t. 8 Supper Club Squadron reorganizes with fifty m e mber s pre sent. Old veterans sen'c. Oct. I I. Squadron Officer s elec ted. Oct. 12. Flight Offi cers o f TH E CARIBBEAN elected; Flight Dodds. O c t. 13. B o)'s' Athletic Squadron ha s meeting. Oct. q. Fir e drill rul es rcad to all members on Right. Oct. 15. P ursuit SquadronL p s ilon Gamma Gamma orgallized--Office r B e nson, A dviser. Oct. 16. Girl s' :\thletic Squadro n ha s m eeting. '\01'. 3 All work o n Right ce a ses for the da)'. 'ov. S Supper Club Squadron meets at Y \\' C :\. Juni or'c nior girls se rve. Fifty-five present. :\'ov. 8 F irst six weeks of flight completed with c\-crythin g in perfect order. ,', v 1'2. Clara joins flight making s ixte e n P ilots :'\ov. 1'2-14. Y. \\'. C. A. quad ron meets at Cristobal for discussion concerning further improvements f or new model p lan e. R e pre sentatives (rom B a lboa, Gatun, and P ed r o j\lig u e l atcend the con f erence ;\"ov. 16. Report s stnt out from headquarters. ;\ov. 17. taff Squadron meets at P aul Rose's home. Nov. 18. P i lots meet and makt: plans for their part). Nov. 19. Pilots' Quecr Part)' a success. 2+ Thanksgiving furlough. Nov. JI. Mr. iI. O. Tschiffel), talks to the members of C. H. S. Flving Fi eld about his trip here from POl. tagonia 011 horseback. Dec. '2. Athletic Squadrons e lect captains. Dec. J StafF Squadron m ee t s at th e high sc h ool. \\'c r ejoice to l earn that THE CAR1BBEAN 1926 has b ee n adjudged a year book of the second class-a step in advance of the 19'25 edition-by the Central I nt e r sc holastic P ress A ssociation. Thi s contest includes annuals not only from the largest high sc h ools of the States bur also from colleges and universities. D ec IJ. D onat i ons r ece iv ed for free clinic. D ec. 1 7 i\lechani cs give party. D ec. 1 8 Christmas furlough highl y satisfac to rr Jan. 4 Flight Commander, Dodds, ill. Robinson s ub stitutes. J an. 6 Assistant Superintt:ndent \\' illiams 1-110ugh's quarters. F eb. 1 I Supper quadron meets-with Photo grap h e r s se rving. F e b. 17-19. Exams. given b) headquart ers J t may be necessary for some to make a forced landing.

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THE CARIBB EAN. F eb. '2'2 \ V ashington's birthday. H o liday given all squadrons. i\l ar. 2 Pilots c hanged from assembl y to Room 27 and given first privileges. 1\lar. J Staff Squadron meets at P i lot \\" ill'!' quarters. !\lar. 4 Radiomen give party. I \ iar. 25-Supper Sqll atiron meets and gi\'cS i\l iss Dodds a beau tifu l frit'ndship pin for her seven years of service. Radiomen serve. : \ pr. 5. Pilots receive play book s A .. pr. IJ-17. I-.lo m e kaye given during Easter week S hortened two days by extra P ;,\pr. 18. StafF Squadron meets at field quarters. Apr. 20. Play parts are assigned and work is started at once. A pr. 20. Shorr Contest is closed. P apers go to judges: .lean :lIcGillivray, E C. J ones, and I r. R R Gregory. A.p r. 22. Photographers give party. Apr. 25-Stafr Squadron works 011 big cami\' a l to be h eld at Fort D e l ess e ps on 7. :\p r. '17 P ilots work hard on "Cnder Twenty" to be given '10-2 1 2 -7. All members of field prepare for big carni val. i\Jay 7. It's h ere! It's gone! i\l iss Nellie B e rger of t h e Class of 1 is e lected as Cristobal H igh School. :\ I a)' 19. Poster contest for L Tnder Twenty" closes; winners Joseph Corrigan and i\J o r toll Southard for first. 2 0 L lnder Twenty" gi\'cn at America Theater. L 'ndcr Twenty" given at Gattln Cl ubhou se. 26. Advan..:-e sale tickers c ontest far THE C \RIBBE.\N against girls. .I une I. P ilots receive t heir insignia, the class rings. June 3. i\lcchanicsgive PilatsanJ Commanders a big banquet at the H otel \\'ashingtol1. June 10. Slipper C lub Squadron meets at the Y \ \ '. C. A. for a farewell service for the P ilots. Photographers serve. June 13. P ilots receive announcements and cards. June 16. Flight Commander Dodds entertains P ilots and other Commanders at a dinner in honor of the former. Commander Peterson's department caters. Tune 19 Baccalaureate service at Christ C hufch by the Sea. Bishop] Craik is t h e speak er. J line 20-'21. Exams. given by headquarters. June '21. Lieutenant A. 1\1 Bryan, of t h e U S addresses t h e economics class. J line 24, Commencement exerc i ses at t h e Hotel \\'ashington. \\,H E:-I THE FLEET \\' AS 1:-..'. /-IdOl Vine yard, ': q The fleet was in! I t is needless [0 that the street s, stores, s hops, and restaurants were crowded w i t h t h e happy boys, glad to have shore leave once more, and to be free to roam for awhile. Through t h e "Cammy" many of the boys passed, pausin g now and then at t h e difFerent counters, l ooking at perfumes, beads, laces, and s h awls. F rom the crowd of men that passed by the dry-goods counter, out stepped a handsome mall o f twenty. H e tllmed to sales lady at t h e d r y goods counter a n d said \\ ith a smile, ';\\'ould you please help me to select some nice piece of material for a "\\' h y, certai nly, I 'll be glad to," said i\l iss -," '; J u s t wh a t kind do yo u want?" S h e added. something t hat's s uitable for one of t h e S\\ eetes t women in t h e world," h e said with p r ide. -took up a bri g h t piece of red f u ji silk and said, "Now, w hat girl wouldn't l i ke a dress from t his gay "Oh, yes it's quite pretty, but you see-" "\\'ell, now l oo k at this piece of pink crepe de chine, love l y quality. " Y es, I thin', it's nice too, but-" "\\' hat about a piece o f voi l e? "This p i ece of green would l ook striking all her if s he's a blonde, " That's too," t h e lad said, confused, "butI want a nice piece of soft, dark silk formy m other,"

PAGE 76

,0 THE CARIBBEAN. -=-:=-=---EXCHA:-.IGE DEP :\RnI ENT. Euplu:min If 'oob/ougll, 'Z7, .WIIllIlXe I:.ili/o,.. \\" e are alwars g la d to w elco m e o l d o r n e w exc h a n ges to o ur department. aid u s in adaptin g n ew idea s to make our b oo k a b ette r o n e eac h yea r, and g i ve u s informat i o n o n a ctiv i ties taki n g p la ce i n the sc h oo l s so far fro m u s O ur exc h a n ge lis t co n t inu es t o g r ow. \Vc are unable to co mm e n t on all th e ma g a zines that co m e t o u s \\'e find it imposs ibl e <1l so to c om m e n t o n w eekly pape r s but w e appreciate the m a n d re a d the m whe n they co m e OU TGOI:- Co r ne r is e xce llent. \Vh y n o t have a Llrger dCI M rt me n t? Tlu Norllifidd SI(/,.. W elcome to our exc h a n ge :"Isain line vcry much Enst Nor thfidd Mau. We lik e your m aga. Clouust e r A/ass. You h ave ;L w ell.arr:ll1ged book. Y our adverti s ing sectio n is very good. But w h e re i s the exchange?

PAGE 77

THE CAR IBBEAN Thee/airlouian. Clairt on, Pl'1mJ)'/uflnia. Your book is an excellent one. T he Cartoons and other cut-ou ts add g reatly to t he appe:lrance. Don't yOll t hink you c:ln improve rOUT mag : rzine by h:t\ ,jng an exch:lIlge department? The Zoniall. B(/Iboa, Cmw! ZOIlf'. W e are alw:l.Ys e.lger to welcome the only other anml.11 or the Can:d Z one. The m:neri:tl in your book j" splendid. and we wis h you s u ccess in rour (uture productions. TluBroadul!Ier. A. II. SJlIlw,7r.lligIISchoo/, Philadelphia. Your historical selections a re excellent. W e hope to keep lip OUT e'(chance \\;th YOli. Tht' F:xPOllI'lIf. C,.,mjidtl, ,\ItISS. YOll n:l\ e:l well-written mag.nine, out why nut enhtrl,;c your exch:l.IlgedepJ.nment withcommenl\on other publ'-I : \IL \re co n sid er TliE CARl SSE"" the best annll.t1 tlL;t h;J" come: to our notice. Your style is diR'ere:nt from th,H of the a\'e r ,lge ann u :ds. 1/1l11qlll'rqlu /fig/I Schon/, i lllllql!r'rq.'u, .\'t"l' I /,'.\!((). .'\ very complete rnag:oinc. Your editorial ;Jlld lite:r,ln sund our. \\'c like the thought 1.'''1 re .... cd at the he g inning of your exchmgc dcp;lrnncnr: From to South, from East to F rom nCJr :tnd far they\e: con'c. W e pe r iscope. Ihey periscope T o see h ow things ;Irc done. \re gel from them, We: bener grow bet luse of them." T/It' .l/a:CIt'I, /111t/,., IIi,'(h, B III/,.,, Pt'IIfls.v/r:nni,/. W e "ish that your rnaga'line could he circulated throu g h :til th e schools. I t would be a good in .. trucwr. The whole arr,mgement of the m:1ga'line is extremeh cleve r Thl' Tridmt, Qalln Grot',., S.:r L ift t hc Illud h ook We're DR to the C an:ll Zone l The a llur ing snapshots and beguiling descnp,ion" ur th:: tro p ics in THE CARI1l8E<\N ,.re :lImos! irresisrih!e. R ed r ays and go lden gleams Tint t h e ripple s of the sr r e,ullS; The first dark s hade s of night Bre:1k with gli n ts of glowing lig h l; Upon the silva)' sands A lonely palm tree st:l!lds, Ou tl ined again';t the sky. The ,11117,., PllnXSUltlit'1lty, POlll. \Ye mention the ,1Ild the of photogr,lphs which differentiate your paper from any Olher exchange we receive. T he adoption of naul ical :lnd picture!> u sed cons iSTently throughout you r p .lper add .. greatly to the Tllakingofits truly different rlr.on::liT\ TJIl' Xm/J{/i,./d Sltlr, FtlJl XfIIl/llit'id, 11(/$$. T his ha s them all be.Hen. B e!'t looking and hest materi:1 1 on the who!e list. The photogr,lphs :lre the most bea ut iful ever secn in a sc hoolmag'I'line. Congr,ltu lations to Cristob;tllligh. TJ U'Cl'dllrCltt'St. TUlli S Nif'r'I, S .J. Your ,1lhletic department is \\cli 'lrrangcd. Y our storie s arc qui Ie interesting. TJIt S tudenl, Iio/Illn IIig/1 Sdl?ol, Ca,il.-gtoll, hO,llfr"-\'. W e certainly welcomed you to our Elo:ch ange COIWlHl ag;lin this year. \\' e enjoy Tin: CAlI.lSYour i,!e.1 of s hips wa s unique and well c;lrried our. Y ou ;J.re to be congratulated o n the elo:cellent plan and arrangement of your publication. T hi' ZOll/tllI, /1I:1boll IIi.'{.I1 School, Btl/bOil, emili/ ZOlll'. :\ magazine t h :lt is inter esting not only because it comes from the Callal Zone, but :llso because its neal a n d attr,\ctive Jll:lterial proves that elo:traordinan' care h as b een taken in its preparation. f\:eep up the work :lnd let u s he;lr from you again. TJIt' Omdi', ](IIJlai(fl /-li gh, ]amaiCtl, L. 1. R uins -Old Pnn!lmo..

PAGE 78

THE C\RIBBE,\:-<. 10/111 C. C-\ jol..e h:1'\ is maint:lin ed in the front of rhe assembly hall. \Yh en t h t time for th e harves t draws near, we proceed to discover what unex reeted surprises in the form o f wit await us \\'e find: :\'ine pieces of chalk; at least three bottles of ink, in \arious fonT.s; twenty-five fragments of mutilated Iloning parer; part o f a broken eraser; two hunJred se\'enty-thr
PAGE 79

.. 1 1 HOTEL vVASHINGTON Umr;ual e djor situation alld A hotel ill keepillg the di gllif)' spirit allr! service if the P allollla Callol @)i Golf <....-, l('aler SportJ Tatpoll Fishillg T H f n A H J Al\ IES E LEWIS, ,\I(HItlXl'r P O. Address, CRI STOBA L (:\:,<,. \1. ZO:--:E

PAGE 81

THE o L 1 R thought s hip isending her B efore she glid es t o h e r landing place in your memories of what Cristobal H i g h as accomplished, we want to bro adcast a word o f thanks to you who, by your support, have made her Right possible. \\'e wis h especially to ex t e n d grateful greeti ng s to l\ I i ss H elen K ee n e of th e Class of 1 926, our willing and effic ient typist. \Y e m e n tion warmly our tri ed and true friends o f the Panama Canal P ress ever ready to do far more than their share f o r u s And now we commend to our 3lh-errisers. They are of rou r patronage. Tdl them s aw t h eir ad\'crtisements in THE C..\IUI3BEAX, 192 7 \\'e t ha nk a l so the Official P hotographer o f The P an:una Canal and the COlllmanding Officer o( France Fiel d (or the use o ( photographs. GREETINGS If It Can Be Done With Heat You Can Do It Better With Gas )IR CL: \SS OF 2 7 PANAMA-COLON GAS CO. At Y our Service" 73

PAGE 82

T H E CAR1BBE AN. T h e P a nA m e rica n Dru g S t o r e Jl tl ill Sto r e : 9.038 Fron t Street Phone 336 N S ALAZAR Pro pri e t o r B r an c h Sto r e s : 4.060 Boliva r Stree t Ph o n e 166 11.15 6 Boliva r S t reet, Ph o n e 3 5 6 C ompania Panamena de Fuer z a y Luz ( SUCURSA L DE COLON ) COLON, R de P. O F FirlClllljue, H ellriljltez (5 Cia.

PAGE 83

THE CARl 131310:\;\. ------Panama Railroad Steamship Line CRISTOBAL TO NEVV YOR K VI A P ORT-AU -PRINCE, H AITI (A LL C ABIN SHIPS) S. S. "ANCON" a n d S. S "CRISTOBAL" FORT N IGHTLY SER V I CE MONTHLY SAILINGS T O WEST COAST S. S. "GUAYAQUIL" and S. S. BUENAVENTURA C ALL I N G AT llUENAVENTURA, T UMACO, E SMERAL D AS, BAI-IIA, MAN TA, P UERTO BOLIVAR and G U A YAQUIL O FFICES ON T H E I ST H MUS : Supe r i ntendent, Balboa Heights Canal Zone S team s hip Ticket Agent, C ristobal, Ca n al Zone R ece i ving a n d Forwarding Age n cy, C r istobal, Ca n al Zone O FFICES I N THE UNITED STATES: N o. 24 S tate Strett, New Y o r k C i ty, N. Y. mlnique Ui:estimonial ALL GOOD A M E RICAN S were justly thrilled with p ri d e w h e n Commande r B y r d successfully flew ove r t h e N o rth Pol e. THIS H1S T O RICAL EVENT, wh i c h commanded the admirati on o f all n atio n s, stands as a UN IQUE TESTIMONIA L o f the F OO D VALUE OF HIG H Q U ALITY CHOCOL A T E. W h y? BECAUSE COMMANDER BYRD c hose as hi s e m e r ge n cy rati o ns; Nestle's Milk C h ocola t e and P e mmi ca n NE STLE'S MILK CHOC OL A TE: Richest i n C reamll i s n o uri shing, w h o lesome, and i ts fin e ftavo rappeals to everyone. BUY A B A R TODAY 75

PAGE 84

6 T H E C\RIBBE. -\N. __ 1 1 I .., PA:'::ER F -f,. .. . D uofold Pen and Duofold Pencil-the New Duette: Sat i n-lined Gi ft Case de luxe included finger cramp. r elaxes hand and b r ain. Every Parker Ouo fold Pen has the super-smooth Ouo f old Point that is guaranteed, if n o t misused, for 25 years' wear. Parker Lady Duofold P e n and Pencil are sti ll o f small girth t o fit slim fingers. But Parke r Ouo fold J r and "Big Brother" Duo f old Pencil s are now both built Oversize Parker Oyer_si;;:f1D"o{ol d D u{'tle, P e n,$7;P".u; il $4; P erltt, DuofoldJr. orLadyDuofoU Dltclte,Pcn, {l5; P crlci/$,$3."Ocnd RM !'lad, eombipatioa U.l:I.I'al.Offic& K ELSO-.JORDAN SALES Co. MASONIC TEMPLE Madame Melville Graduate del' Ec o le Pro fessi onnelle de B eaute and L a Societe Fra ncaise T echnique et Commerciale d e l a Coiffu r e de Pari s Waving MARCELLING, DYE I NG HAIR CUTT I NG HAIR DRESSI NG SCALP TREATMENT MAN I C U R I NG and CHIROPODY BLEACHlNG and FACIAL S For Ladie s and Gentlemen C LUBHOUSE BEAUTY PARLOR MANUFACTURERS' REPRESENTATIVES M ILK Pas teurized and Guaranteed PURE BY THE USE OF MODERN S A N ITARY EQUIPMENT. V isit Ou r Storesa nd Call U s b y Phone ( o r GROCERIES and Foreign Foods t' CR I S TOBAL, CANAL ZONE ANTONIO TAGA ROPULOS MAI N STORE: & .07.) Boli va r Street BRA NC H STORE: 12.178 B o l i v a r S treet Phones: Reside n ce, 1594

PAGE 85

THE CARIBBE .-\:-J. Rathbun, Stilson & Company, Ltd. Hardlt'are LlIlll ber, P aillts alld Oil,. P O. Box 140, Colon, R. de P. Telephones: Pranch Stoce 253 Main Store II4 SOMETHING YOU CAN'T LEARN AT SCHOOL There i s Always a N ew and L arge Asso rtm ent of Clothing, Sports Wear, and Novelties ARRIVING ON EVERY STEAMER E s pecially Suited ( or St ud e nt s FRENCH BAZAAR Office 192 PANAMA COLON of Tropic R estaltral/! i i

PAGE 86

THE C ARl GREBIEN & MARTINZ ARCHITECTS AND CONTRACTORS Builder s of ARMY AND NAVY Y. M C. A.'s FIRST UNIT BOLIVAR IAN UNIVERSITY, HOSPITALS, CHURCHES And Many Oth e r Public Building s and Private Re s idence s PANAMA CO L O N SPORTING GOODS BRUNSWICK PANATROPES and PHONOGRAPHS GRAY MARINE ENGINES KODAKS AND PHOTO SUPPLIES L. J. GRAN IE MODEL IX F O RTY COLON, R P. CARDOZE & LINDO P. O. Address, Draw er CRI S TOBAL, C. Z. Telephone 4'9 Phone 323 AGENTS P ANAMA Box 112 .. a .. ett YOU Will find in our stock, among o th e r w e ll-known Am erica n and Euro p ea n th e f ollo wing perf umes: NARC ISSE NOI R LE PARFUM O 'AN T ON GUE RLAIN'S HUIT DE NOEL LE SUCCES L 'HEURE BLEU m CARON'S D'ORS A Y LEUR COEUR to I.E TABAC BLOND GAN IKA M I T SO UKO tD INFI N l L'ETE PRICES RIGHT AND THE BEST OF SERVIC E ESPINOSA'S DRUG STORE PAN AMA eln Ladi es o f R e fined Ta s t e will find h e r e Perfumes to S uit the i r Requirement s

PAGE 87

THE C\RfBBEAN. 79 O F "'II.COXS-\E:\TGFR COi\ IP.-\:\fY THHO L GII The Cinema Pan-America CO;\IPUi\ I F:\TT S OF HOSPITAL d e PANAMA

PAGE 88

THE ".,. Central American Plumbing & Supply Co. Supplies and Tools OF EVERY DESCRIPTION "Good Houses D ese:-vc Good Plumb" ng" TI;Y US COLON 8th St. & Balboa Ave. Phone No .;$ P O. BOJ: No. 108 PANAMA 58 Central Ave Pho n e No. 3.19 P O. Be:r No. 714 Take a Kodak with you The latest K odak models are Oil our s h elves r ead y f o r you t o Sec. L e t u ssho w YOII $5 up. Film in Ihl ]i/lOW 6oJ{. lUI J. V. B everhoudt Colon Before eye-strain wrinkles become J:ermanent and nervous fatigue becomes chronic, have your eyes examined. If you need glasses, you will be surprised to find what a co mfort they are when accurately and becomingly fitted to YOU HA VE YOUR EYES EXAMINED SCADRON OPTICAL CO. R egiste r ed Optomctrist3 and Opticians E stablished in Panama Over 10 Year s PANAMA 23 Central Ave nu e COLON 9.034 Front Street

PAGE 89

I II THE CAR 1BB E : \:-\ UNITED FRUIT COMPANY Regular Sailing s from C RI STOBAL, C. Z. 10 NEW YORK NEW ORLEANS CUBA COLOMBIA J AMAICA and COSTA RICA For furth e r particular s apply to PAUL WEST, Manager Cristoh!ll Division, Cristobal, C. Z. m Pohoomull Bros. i Comer lot h and Fro nt Streets m ORIENTAL MERCHANTS Iii A Rich Collection of Egyptian and Spanish Mantill a Shawls, Drawn Thread Work Madeira Work and East Indian Silk s ALL KIND OF EMBROIDERIES ALWAYS ON HAND An Ins pecti o n Respectfull y Invited T. H. JACOME Agent, Panama C:ty OF SPECIALIST I N

PAGE 90

'1'1 -11-C\RIBBI -__ f C O., L &. '" J OBBE R S AND COMMISSION M E R CHA NT S MANUFACTU RERS' AGE NT S -!-DZALER 5 I N Gemral J r erchallrlise ami i V fllive Produce COLON, R EPUBLIC o f PANAMA BRA N C H R E T A IL S T ORES AND TRAD ING STA TION S PLAY A DAM A S ANTA I S ABEL PORVENIR NARGANA TUPILE ISL E OF PINES I Whe r e to S h o p in Col o n O r P an a ma W. D. CHELLARAM m OR I E N TAL M E R C H ANTS W H O L ESA L E a n d RETAIL pi 47 F ront Street 8 1 -A Cen t r a l Ave nu e COLON PANAMA I + m WORLD VARIETY SOUVENIRS Specia l ty in S p anis h Shaw l s, N ice C o l -l ection i n I vory, R ea d y-ma d e P o n gee IJ Sil k Sui t s, Always in S tock II OUR IS, S MAL L PRO FIT & QUI C K RETURN S Phones: Panama 340 Colon 159 ltJDJI1UnnWJDm> CART! ill! Ii RICHARDS' PHOTO STUDIO I (N", to N"io".1 CiI, Boo k of N,w y"k) m Box 5lJ Cristobal, C. Z. ,I The Old es t and Most R e liable I 8
PAGE 91

T H E O F m:be CHEVROLET OVER THE TOP OF F ICIAL FIG URES N O W AVAI L A BL E S HOW THAT CHEVROLET PRODUCTION During 19 2 7 has been 4 000 units eve ry tw e n tyf ou r h OUlS. Th e Reason is O bvious Bu y Ch ev r o l e t f o r ECONOMY DUR A B I LITY BEAUTY P E RFORMANCE 11 I I i Panama Automobile Supply Co. I PANAMA MRS P A ULA M C ARD OZE AT THE P a n a m a H a t Store No. 35 FRON T STREET Offe r s H e r C u s to m e r s a Selected Assortme n t of P allallla H a ts H alld B ags Birds 0/ P araciise F e a t h e rs alld MANY OTHER DIFFE R E NT C URIO SITI E S All at V e r y Reasonabl e Prices With o u t Eq u a l i n Town Il CO L O N I III P. O. B o x 67s C RISTOBAL C. Z. 9 .0)6 Fronl Street III Pho n e 2 5 5 ii C R I S TOBAL, C Z. I m COLON R P

PAGE 92

I I THE CARI BBEAN. WE DYE TO LIVE TROTT, THE CLEANER COLON Phone 250 The Cafeteria Idea is quick service and elimination of overhead expe nses, bring i n g patrons and service in direct a nd immedia te contact at LOWEST POSSIBLE COST MAKE OUR CAFETER I A YOUR HEADQUARTERS and PANAMA Phone 4SJ COl\ lPLlMENTS OF R. E. HOPKINS Distributor FOR Studebaker and Erskine Cars FOR GOOD THINGS TO EAT t,;tI Panama Canal Restaurants : ..,. CARL STROM, Lessee and R E P O F PANA!\IA r DO Y O \\'O\fDER WHE R E THE B O Y S GET SUC H SNAPPY H A I R CUTS? and T I I E G IRL S THEIR ]\I O Dl H B O B SI WHY, A T Charley Pa yne's Barber Shop __

PAGE 93

THE C\RIBBEAN. onmte-CRUSH H e r e i s a drink whic h i s '"cr y mu c h 1Il d e m a nd. Try it a nd be cOIl\"inceci of its s uperi o r qua l i ties. P ANAMA COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMP ANY Phones: Panama 65, Co l on 84 85 P O. B ox 175. C ristobal, C. Z. Pho n e 1345 Pho nes Cobn 500 or 395 The French Drug Stores V. DELG A DO M C OL O N MAC'S GARA G E AND T O URI S T S ERVI C E CARS WITH OR WITHOUT DRIVER S GOOD SER V I C E AT L O W PRI CES 24 H O UR S SERVICE T ry U s for R e p airs, Suppl ies Etc. I n Colo n who i s R e gi stered both i n the R e public o f Panama aDd t h e Canal Z o n e DOC T O R S S P EC IALLY IN V ITE D T O VIS I T OUR Prescription Department

PAGE 94

86 THE C\RI BBE -\:'\, -m AMERICAN SUPPLY COMPANY W I I I Manufa c t urers of Native Hardwood Furniture I m 96 Ce n t r a l A venue . PANAMA . 123 Central Avenue W __ mHRc-FINEST PANAMA HATS I ( G elluit1 e ,l(onte C ris(i) Money E x c hange s. Perrone & Lobato Fro n t Street M ain Office CO L O N R de P GUA YAQUIL, E CUADOR m iii I A NONYMOUS OF IJBr. l'ern "rier IJBr. ClCarl
PAGE 95

THE CARIBBEAN. DUQUE COMPANY, Inc. H ardware and Building Materials Arms and Am:nunition Agents fo:' th::! FA),!OU3 DEVOE-RAYNOLDS PAINTS AND VARNISHES Agent, for COLT'S PATENT FIRE ARMS CO M PANY STORE: CENTRAL AVE: :UE and 11th STRE!!:T Tel. 592 PRINCIPAL DRUG STORE DR. A. C. DACO STA GO!VIEZ We always ca..IIY in S toc.k a fresh assortment o f Ameri can and European Drugsa nd Patent Medi c ine s, Rubb e r Goods, Toilet Article s and Perfumery. OUR PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENT i s under the care of a registered Chemist of wide experience COLON Corner of 9th and B o livar t;;o. 8u:;!: Telephone 222 P.O. B ox 84 WAREHOUS E : NORTH Tel. 596 Panazone Garage Buick and Oldsmobile Cars G. M. C "Bui ck Trucks" Kelly-Springfield Tires Delco Light Plants Exide Batteries Harley-Davidso n Motorcycle s ACCESSORIES AND PARTS Panazone Garage Co. COLON PANAMA THE ANCON INN J ay Street Country Club" Arthur Wei l Proprietor Dillill g Room Upstairs SPECIAL-Fried Chicken, Country Style, and Tenderloin Steaks

PAGE 96

T H E CARIBBE A N !j Jill pro-ved Eljuipm e ll! J![o d enl Methods I I Ejjieiem S e rvie e JACKSON'S STEAM L AUNDRY BROADWAY, NEAR FOLKS RIVER /f/e Solicit the Pa troJlage of GallOl Zone EmplO)'ees WEEKLY COLLECTIONS AND DELIVERIES OF LAUNDRY WORK I CHARGE ACCOUNT IF DESIRED I I I I I I I II CLEANING, PRESSING and DYEING A SPECIALTY I ,,, ... ,, p o & ... en,"',', e i

PAGE 97

IItt ml-PANAMA CANAl 6 l5 -l1-6)l 1R. HAL WARDLAW MANAGER OF THE CECILIA THEATRE CONGRATUL A T ES THE CLASS OF '27 CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL O N THE EVE o r THEIR GRADUATION


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Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries



http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1927cris



THE CARIBBEAN



Vol. X.



CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE, 1927



No



PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL









^-



^




w

^!^
~







CONTENTS.














Page.








Page.


Advertisements






73


Literarv Continued.








Alumni


Helen \ ineyard,


2,


24


Rustv


Joseph Corrigan,


>;


<>








in




Dorothy Svenss on,

Dorothy Svensson

1 AUKS Gkider




51
55
52








.<




'27
'7


Class History


Clara May


27


14


Title to be Determined After


( lass Prophecy Lawrence C. Callaway, | r ..


'27


16


The Death Whistle


Marion Lowande


'20


45


Class Will


EUPHEMIA \\ 00LNOUGH,


27




The Snore


Si use J. Taylor. Jr..


'7


53




a id Dorothy \\ ertz,


'27


15


\\ \t<-n the Fleet W'.is In


Helen Vineyard,


'77


69








?




Helen Vineyard


27


36


ICrlit^ri.il


Charles F. Wn i
Joseph Corrigan


'27
'27


4
4


Mis< ellaneous \"iews
Poetry:


My [dea of an Ideal Educatiot








Educational ( reed Law


reni f: ( Callaway, Jr..


'27


4


\ Fable.


. Ethel Barm, i i


"}


38


Exchanges.


EUPHEMIA U 001 NOl GH,


27


70


A Negro Child


Lot'lsE Heim.





17


Faculty






5


A Tropic Night


. Elsie Darley


id


17


1' reshman ( lass






22


A Tropical Storm


Louise Heim,


' '7


17


( rraduates






X


Miss Sewell


Freshman Class


2<


Jokes


lOHN G. Nelson,


2,


72


Some Kicks .uid (Compliments


W M 1 l-.K Wikingst u>,


!|)


45








IX




Doroi iiy Svensson,
Dorothy Svenssi in,












19


The Dying Jungle
Si 1 1 \ tivities:


27




Literary


Louise Heim.


'27


29




\ I ostume


( l \r a May.


'27


52


Boys' Glee Club


Donald Pohle.


it


60


A Little Appreciation


John G. Nelson,


'27


5]


Chorus


.Gretchen \Y. Pai h,


n,


60


A Mirror


Dorothy Svensson,


'27.


. 52


Girls' Glee Club


Ethel Barnett,


'")


60


A Mystery


Robert Pai m


2

29


Junior Party


Gladys Beers.


!fl




A Quality i ... hero


Helen Montgomery.


'27


51




and Royal Higgason,


''X


58


A Tr-iRedy


Michael Greens,


19


. 42


Junior-Senior Banquet






61


An I nexpected Re a Lrd


Helen \ ineyard.


27


34


Mothers' and Daughters' Banquet Adair Taylor.


'")


59


( arnival in Panama


Mildred Bath,


29


13


( >ur t arnival




''7




Christmas in Panama.


John G. Nelson,


27


13




and Elizabeth Hackett,


?Q


56






>

55


Senior Party


.Louise Heim,


'27
'?




Daily Impressions oi Various Members of the Class of 1^27


47


58


Alone the Canal


(. lara May


'27
'27


50

4.H










Different Davs on Our Bav Louise Heim.


Staff Hop


Dorothy L. Wertz.


'7


58


From < >ur House


EUPHEMIA WOOLNOUGH,


27


49


The Freshman Partv




'79


59


Gatun at Night


.1 \MI 5 -RIDER,

J Dorothy Svensson,


2,
'27


50

47






'2X.
18




Moods TheSea'soi Min<






60


Our Palm Trees


Joseph ( orrigan,


2,


4X


The Sophomore Party.




'79


59








The Supper Club
1 rnder Twenty"


Ethel Westman,


'28
?9


59

. 57




Charles Wn i


27


49


The Reel


Surse J. Taylor. lr..


21


49


School Notes




'?7


68


Toward the Breakwater


Mil i \ MON rGOMERY,


'27


4X


Sports Snapshots:








Desperation


Iohn G. Nelson.


','7


52










Fort San Lorenzo


Frances Simonds,


'.in


41


( 7 i r N








Isla Sola


1 ERESA K. ( rALLAGHER,

Dorothy Svensson,


'27.
27


33

5 2


Sports

Bovs'






63


Mache




' >7




One of Life s Little 1 ragedies


Surse 1. Taylor. Jr..


'27


,U


Girls'








Panama s Visitors


.Gretchen \V. Palm.


'29.


. 35


Sophomore Class






20


Rover, the Rover


Louise J. Mack,


'29


. 37


Sophomore Sanitarium






21



THE CARIBBEAN".




JN "The Spirit of St. Louis," Captain Lindberg has but a few
days ago scored a world triumph building an air bridge
between the New World and the Old.

I o-day we launch our thought ship, "The Spirit of Cristobal
High School" The Caribbean- of 1927. We shall be proud
indeed if we can establish a thought bridge between the old friends of
our school and the new.




To Our Friends

The Personnel of Fort De Lesseps, Its Officers and Enlisted Men,

If i\ the Students of Cristobal High School

Gratefully Dedicate

this the Tenth Volume of

" The Caribbean."



)uu have



HEADQUARTERS. FORT DE LESSEPS. CANAL ZONE.
OFFICE OF THE COMMANDING OFFICER.

I'iii De Lesseps, C. '/.., May 2S, 192
Mr. Charles F. Will,

I 'liror in Chief, The Caribbean,
Cristobal, C. /..
I)i -k Sir: Your kindness, ami the gratitude
expressed for such small aid as we have been permitted t..
render is very much appreciated. The close bond thai exists
between the High School oTCrisioli.il and the personnel at
Port De Lesseps is most gratifying to me.
Sincerely,

Signed) A. Greic, Jr.,
Colonel, 1st C. A.,
Commanding.




THE CARIBBEAN.




Staff Search Light:

Center: Miss Dodds, \ I

(Reading clock-wise from "eleven o'clock"):

Charles Will, Editor-in-Chief: Jack Klunk, Assistant to the Editor: Teresa Gallagher, Circulation Manager;
Albert Davs, Assistant to the Circulation Manager; James Van Scotter, Art Editor; Dorothy Wen/, S. hool Notes
Editor; Dorothy Svensson. Girls' Athletics Editor; John Nelson. Joke Editor; Euphemia Woolnough, Exchange Ed.tor;
Louise Heim, Literary Editor; James Grider. Boys Atldeties Editor; Helen Vineyard,
Assistant to the Business Manager; Joseph Corrigan, Business Manager.



Alumni Editor; Foster Tufts



THE CARIBBEAN.




Charles F. in//, Editor-in-Chief.

"TAKING OFF."

Since we are adopting the aeroplane as the out. We hope that we are, in a measure, for we

theme tor the i < v 2 Cxribbeax, ami since we, have zealously followed advice. But it is each

the Seniors, will soon be launching forth ourselves, one alone who will find out what he peculiarly

it seems fitting that as editor we continue in this needs, where he has failed to provide the proper

figure. equipment, where he is too heavily loaded.

Four years of training have gone by. We are Though our goals lie in many different directions,
about to venture forth relying on the charts and
advice we have gained from our flight com-



manders. All is about t<> be changed. The
guiding hand on our shoulder is no more. Guid-
ance will have to be within ourselves.

< t course there are numerous matters we have
fully to understand, but being warned of



though our routes vary enormously, we believe
our training has been such that we shall get both
pleasure and profit along the way, shall fly safely
(though perhaps not always smoothly) and shall
choose a sate and worthy landing place.

We are ready to put off. The engine of initia-
tive is started and running smoothly. Common



> *> >v_\.i u*i j lvi un\i\.i juuiu, ijul Lf^lUC >>ilillv.vl wi liVv. IO ^lill ILLl UIK1 I Uilllllli; OIlIvM/Llll\. V^-U11II11UI

their, we shall be better able to cope with them in sense is our lookout. Our companions are Deter

the air currents of experience. For our life trip, mination, Eagerness, and Confidence. With eyes

as for any other, we should be properly fitted alight, we cry, "We're off!" Charles F. Will.



MY IDEA OF AN IDEAL EDUCATION.

Joseph Corrigan, 'jj.

Ir 1, agreed that education is a process of

preparation. It should prepare a person to ap-

ate life, to meet and handle its problems, and

to leave the world better for his having lived in ir.

I dui ation should give a man higher ideals and
aims. He should be trained to use his own re-
sources; to rouse -Ami use to the best advantage his
latent powers, mental and physical. A well-
educated man should not or will not have the
same impulses as one not so well educated. He
should hare, above all, a realization of and rever-
ence for the Supreme Being, and love and under-
standing tor his fellow man.



EDUCATIONAL CREED.

Lawrence ('. Callaway, Jr., '27.

I believe that an education does the following:

1. Helps us to broaden our knowledge on

different lines.

2. Helps us to obtain bigger and better

things.

3. Helps us to lead better and cleaner lives

mentally, physically, ami morally.

4. Helps us to understand others better.

5. Helps us to give to and to receive from the

world the best.

Bearing the above in mind, one should strive for
the best education possible.



THH CARIBBEAN.



r~;




i$* ffl £s aught* n



THE CARIBBEAN.



Mr. Joh\ E. Granrud.

Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Si iii,,i College.
Universitj of Mini
Columbia University.

Superintendent of $



Mr. Ben M. Williams.

Statesboro, Georgia.

Mercer 1 rniversity.
Columbia University.

Assistant to the Superintendent of Schools.



Miss J. [SABELL \ DODDS.

Claremonr, Minnesota.
Prim

English, Social Problems and Economics.



Senior Class Adviser.



Caribbean St tiff Adviser.



Seven years ago Miss J. Isabella Dodds came to
us from Minnesota and established herself, heart
and soul, in Cristobal High School.

For the first six years she was the principal of the
high school and this year has the principalship
ut both the high and grammar schools. Fach year
she has been the adviser to the senior class, a
position which she has certainly proved capable
of filling; as the faculty member of every Carib-
bean Staff from 1921 to 1927. she has been success-
ful, by her untiring efforts, in making The Carib-
bean worthy of our school at its best. On her
arrival she organized the Girls' Supper Club and,
until recently, advised it. She has directed every
Seniorplay, workingwith zeal and interest to make
each production better than the one before. Last
but not least, she has ably taught senior English,
social problems, and Latin, and has made her
i lasses more of a pleasure than a task.

In all of our spurts we have had her steady back-
ing and constant encouragement.

Firmly Inn kindly she has helped us out of our
troubles, taught Us what is right, and inspired us
io keep the school's standards high.

Miss Dodds is liked by everyone, both inside and
outside ot school, because of her delightful per-
sonality, her ever-ready friendliness, and her eager-
ness to help everyone, especially the students ol

Cristobal High School. She is the one who has
made ( nMobal High School what it is lo-da\ We
are all proud of her.

Clara L May. '27.



Miss Lillian B. Gistafson.

Nunica, Michigan.

Northern Iltiin.i> Normal. De ECalb.

. Assistant Principal.

Miss Gustafson is the silent partner of Cristobal
High School. Outsiders seldom hear of her be-
cause she does not teach any students.

But Miss Gustafson has all the files ami records
at her finger tips ami is always willing to recall
to even the most forgetful student, a few times
when he was late or absent.

Thrown in with her office work are a few
assembly periods where she may he seen quite
frequently helping some lagging scholar.

When unexpected jobs appear, so does Miss
Gustafson to lend a helping hand. To tell the truth,
Miss Gustafson is here, there, and everywhere
doing this, that, and everything.

Thus one may see tor one's self what it is to be a
silent partner in a hustling high school.

Paul Hay, /en, 2<).

Miss Grace R. Hesse.
Shelbyville, Illinois.
I tniversity of Michigan.

Sophomore English Junior English

Freshman Spanish Glee Club

Fortune smiled kindly on Cristobal High
School when Miss Grace Hesse became a member
ot our faculty this year. As she has hitherto
been a college teacher, she found it difficult at
first to reconcile herself to the classroom antics
of high school students. With remarkable ver-
satility, however, she soon adapted herself or
rather she made us adapt ourselves to her ideas.

She holds a very important place in our faculty,
our activities, and our hearts. Besides teaching
three large English classes and two Spanish classes,
Miss Hesse accepted the position of Glee Club
instructress. Having studied both vocal music
and piano, she is able to fill this position excellent-
ly. Her knowledge in this field was very well
shown in the attractive musical revue which she
directed tor our carnival.

Miss Hesse's classes are always instructive as
well as very frequently merry, tor she is gifted
with a clever sense ot humor.

Every student, who receives the benefit of
her extensive information on every branch of
her subjects, entertains a sincere rexpect for Miss
Hesse, and it is our unanimous desire that she
return to Cristobal High School next Autumn.

Teresa Gallagher, '27.

Louise lleim, j-
Louise \la< k, '^0.



THE CARIBBEAN".



Mr. George J. Benson.
Saint Cloud, Minnesota.

State Teachers' College. Saint Cloud.
Bradley Polytechnic Institute.

General Science, Industrial Subjects.

" Upsilon Gamma Gamma" Adviser.

Mr. Benson is the only man teacher in Cristobal
High. He teaches general science and industrial
arts and also helps with the latter subject in the
grades. He has acquired the strictness of a
professor, but he is always glad to help one when
he isn't busy. His classes in general science are
always interesting, with special topics, and ex-
periments. But let me tell you that a person
has to be just about perfect to get an "A" on
his report from Mr. Benson.

Mr. Benson is always doingsomething. He helps
with the boy scouts; he takes us on hikes: often
he is seen in the kayak which he himself made.

We feel that Mr. Benson is our friend and we
want to be his. James Campbell, 'jo.

Miss Carrie A. Sewell.

Carbondale, Colorado.
I niversitj ol Colorado
bra, Geometry, Pfy Freshman Clasi

Miss Sewell kind, patient Miss Sewell has
been tor two years our teacher of algebra, geometr)
and physics. When slowly but surely the marks
begin to descent! it is she who inspires us to try.

She it is who is our companion when we sta)
after three o'clock and puzzle out the why's of
our perplexing friend geometry! She is ever fair
and impartial to every student in her classes.
And who is more indispensable to the Freshman
Class than their trustworthy adviser, Miss Sewell?
Out of school Miss Sewell greets all with a jovial
and sincere smile.

All hail to our "mathematics whiz"! May she
see us through many more terms!

Mavis Thirlwall, ;o.
Elizabeth Hackett,

Miss Asm; |. McNaughten.

Columbus, Ohio.
Ohio U*rm ersit i
Freshman En Algebra I S. History and I

Petite Miss Anne J. Naughten, who has been a
member of the Cristobal High School faculty for
two years, is our teacher and helper in Freshman
English, algebra, and United States historj

She is always jolly and smiling, and by her
appearance alone one can judge how interesting
she makes her classes. She is ever willing to help
us with our studies, and her pleasantness and
steadfastness have made her one of the favorite
members of our faculty. We hope to see her
here tor many years to come.

Evelyn Ganzemuller, 'jo.



Miss Mary Elizabeth Moore.

West Alexander, Penn.

University <>i West Virginia,
Latin, Ancient History, Spanish.
'Junior Class Adviser.

Miss Moore, the very capable Latin, Spanish,
and history teacher of Cristobal High, comes from
Pennsylvania, and has been with us for two years.

Students always look forward to one of Miss
Moore's classes, made most interesting by numer-
ous anecdotes taken either from her own ex-
periences or from her reading. She has widened
many a student's vocabulary, improved his
enunciation, and broadened his interests.

Miss Moore has been the able adviser of the
Junior Class for two years. .Ask any of the Seniors
who attended the banquet, given in their honor, if
she doesn't know her business.

Miss Moore has a very sunny disposition. No
matter whether you meet her in the hall, in the
class room, or on the street there is always a
ready smile awaiting you. Even when she finds
it necessary to be stern, we know that we deserve
il, and that when we have done our part, she will
do hers. Loil Williams, '29.

Marion, Lowande, '29.



\1 iss Grace Pe i kksun.

Greeley, Colorado.
Greeley Teachei s' < olli :

Home Economics ami General Science.
Sophomore Glass Adviser.

Miss- Grace Peterson, home economics and
general science teacher, is greatly admired for her
quiet geniality.

All pupils who are lucky enough to have this
kindly teacher declare that they would like to take
lour years under her supervision. She makes all of
her classes so very interesting that one hates to be
absent from them. She is always patient, and will-
ingly explains any of our stupid questions. Along
with all of these striking traits, Miss Peterson has
a good sense of humor.

Miss Peterson is the very capable Sophomore
adviser. When the Sophomores go to Miss Peter-
son with their perplexing questions, she is alw,i\s
able to solve them satisfactorily.

Miss Peterson came to us two years ago from
tar away Colorado. She found this country (or us
students? ) so enchanting that she returned to spend
another enjoy able year in Panama. We hope it's
not the last. Margaret Hayes, '20.



THF. CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



CLASS OF 1927.

Teresa K. Gallagher President

Dorothy L. Wertz ... Vice President

Clara A. Mav Secretary

Charles F. Will Treasurer



Class flower Red rose.

Class colors Crimson and white.

Motto Ad astro per aspera.



TERESA GALLAGHER.

"But O, she dances such a waj ;
No sun upon an Easter day,
Is half so fine a sight." Suckling.
'l}-'H Treasurer, Supper Club.

Chorus. Glee Club.

Spanish Operetta.

Track.

Basket Ball.

Baseball.

Swimming.
'24~'25 Treasurer, Supper Club.

Chorus. Glee Club.

"Sailor's Reverie."

Japanese Operetta.

Basket Ball..
'25 '26 Treasurer, Supper Club.

Chorus. Glee Club.

"Rip Van Winkle."
'26-'27 Class President.

Chorus. Glee Club.

Circulation Manager, The Caribbean.



DOROTHY I.. WERTZ.

"So well she acted all and every part,
By turns, with that vivacious versatility.'



-Byron.



'2j-'24 (March) Chorus.

Supper Club.
'24-'25 Pitman High School, Pitman, N. J.
'25-'26 Pitman High School, Pitman, N. J.
'26-' 27 Cristobal High School, Cristobal Canal Zone.

Class Vice President.

Secretary-Treasurer, Girls' Athletic Association.

Basket Ball.

Indoor Baseball.

Tennis, Captain.

School Notes Editor, The Caribbean.

"L'nder Twenty."

Chorus.

Glee Club.

Supper Club.

Carnival Committee.



MR 5590-



CHARLES WILL.

"A bisier man ther nowher none is
And yet he semed bisier thanne he was." Chaucer.
'23-24 Handball.

Chorus. Glee Club.

Spanish Operetta.
'24-'2 5 "Daddy-Long-Legs."

Sophomore prize in Short Story Contest.

Baseball. Basket ball.

Class Vice President.

First prize Advance Sale Contest.
'25~'26 Baseball.

Tennis.

Circulation Manager, The Caribbean.

I'psilon Gamma Gamma.

Basket ball.

Swimming. Track.

Class Secretary.
'26-2-1 Editor-in-Chief, The Caribbean.

Class Treasurer.

Tennis Captain.

"LInder Twenty."

Upsilon Gamma Gamma.

Baseball. Track.

Basket ball. Handball.



io



THE CARIBBFW.




JOSEPH A. CORR1GAN, Jr.

"He made all countries where he came his own." Dryden.

':; '24 Toms River High School, Toms River, N. J.

"The G\ psy Rovers."
'i^-'is Toms River High School, Toms River, N. J.

Class Treasurer.

Orchestra. Minstrel.

French Chili.
"25-'26 Toms River High School, Toms River, \. J.

Class President.

Minstrel.

Asbistant Football Manager.

Student Council.

Orchestra.

French Club. Debating Club.
'26 '27 Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. '/..

Business Manager, The Caribbean.

Upsilon Gamma Gamma.

DOROTHY SVENSSON.

"The joy of youth and hedth her eyes displayed,
And e'sc of heart her every look convey'd."
'13 '24 Winthrop High School, Winthrop, Mass.
'24-'25 Chorus. Glee Club. Supper Club.

"Tale of Two Cilies."

Basket Ball.

Japanese Operetta.
'25~'26 Basket Ball, Captain.

Chorus. Glee Club. Supper Club.

"Rip Van Winkle."
'K, '27 Basket Ball.

Baseball Manager.

Tennis. Track.

Volley Ball.

Girls' Sports Editor, Thf. Caribbean.

Vice President, Girls' Athletic Association.

Librarian.

Chorus. Glee Club.

Supper Club.

JAMES GRIDER.

"Whose wit, in the combat, as gentle and bright,
Ne'er carried a heartstain away on its blade."

'2; '24 Baseball.

Basket Ball.
'24 '2< Baseball.

'Track.

Basket Ball.

Chorus. Glee Club.
2; '26 Baseball.

B.skct Ball.

Chorus, (dec ChJi,.
'26 '27 Baseball.

Basket Ball.

Track.

"I Inder Twenty."

Athletic Editor, The Caribbean.

President, Boys' Athletic Association.



THE CARIBBEAN".



1 1



HELEN VINEYARD.

"Gnil givetli speech to all, song to the tew." Smith.

'H-'24 Chorus.

Supper Club.
': 4 '25 "S.nlor's Reverie."

Japanese Operetta.

Chorus. Glee Club.

Class President.

Supper Clul'.
':;-':(i Glee Club. Chorus.

"Kip Van Winkle."

Supper Club.
':'> ':- President, Girls' Glee Club.

Carnival Program.

"Under Twent) ."

Chorus, Glee Club.

Alumni [ulitor, 'I'm Caribbean.



JOHN G. NELSON.

"Sir, your wit ambles well; it goes easily."

:; '26 Gonzaga High School, Spokane, Wash
ib-'i-j Cristobal High School, Cristobal, C. '/..

"Under Twenty" publicity.

The Caribbean', Joke Editor.



-Shakespeare.



EMILY BLEDSOE.



'Sweet flowers are slow, and weeds make haste." -Richard 111.



'3-



'24 Chorus.

Glee Club.

Supper Club.
'24-'2? Chorus.

Glee Club.

Supper Club.

"S.nlor's Reverie."

Japanese Operetta.
'25 '26 Chorus.

Glee Club.

Supper Club.

"Rip Van Winkle.'
'26-' 27 Chorus.

(ilee Club.

Supper Club.

"Under Twenty."




I :



THE CARIBBEAN.




EUPHEMIA WOOLNOUGH.

"How her fingers went when they moved by note.
Through measures fine, as she marked them o'er
The yielding planks of the ivory floor." R.F. Taylor,
'i^-'ij, Supper Club. Chorus.

Swimming.
'24-'25 Chorus. Supper Club.

Class Treasurer.
':; '26 Chorus.

"Rip Van Winkle."

Vice President, Supper Club.

Orchestra.
':
Orchestra.

Chorus accompanist.

Baseball. Track.

Exchange Editor, The Caribbean.

Carnival accompanist.

Swimming.

JAMES VAN SCOTTER.

"In the lexicon of youth which
bate reserves tor a bright manhood, there is no such word
As fail!"
'23 '24 Class Secretary.

Baseball. Basket Ball.

Chorus. Glee Club.
'24-*25 President, Boys' Athletic Association.

Class Basket Ball.

Class Baseball.

Class Track. Track. Basket Ball.

Chorus. Glee Club. "Sailor's Reverie."
'25-'26 President, Boys' Athletic Association.

Upsilon Gamma Gamma Scribe.

Baseball. Swimming. Track.

Chorus. Glee Club. "Rip Van Winkle."
'2n-'27 Upsilon Gamma Gamma Oracle.

Art Editor, The Caribbean.

Chorus. "Under Twenty."

Courtesv Committee, Carnival.



HELEN MONTGOMERY.
"Happy am 1; Irom care I'm free;

Why aren't they all contented like me?" La Raxadere.
'13-H Huntington High School, Huntington, Long Islan

N. V.
'2; '26 Basket Ball.

(dee Club. Chorus

Swimming.

"Rip Van Winkle" Supper Club.

Girls' Athletic Association.
'ii> '27 Basket Ball, Captain.

Baseball. 'Tennis.

Chorus, (ilee Club, Secretary-Treasurer.

President, Girls' Athletic Association.

Supper Club, Program Committee.

"I Inder Twenty."

High School Follies- Carnival, Carnival Hostess.



THE CARIBBEAN.



M



LOUISE HF.IM.

"For she was jes' the quiet kind
Whose naturs never vary,
Like streams that keep a summer mind
Snnwhiil in Jenooarv." Lonell.



'23 '24 Supper Club.

Chorus.
'2_i-'2s Supper Chili.

Chorus.

"Daddy-Long-Legs."
'25 ':o Supper Club.



'26 ':



Edi



, The Caribbean.



SI RSI- |. TAYLOR, Jr.

"A man of no mean understanding." La Rruyere.
'2 ; '24 Swimming.

Chorus. Glee Club.

First Prize Advance Sale Contest.
'24~'25 Swimming.
'25 '26 Assistant Editor, The Caribbean.

Tie tor liesi short story in Short Stor) Contest.

"The Goose Hangs High."

I'psilon Gamma Gamma.

"Rip Van Winkle."

Class President.

Chorus. Glee Club.

Cheer Leader.

Swimming. Golt.
'26-fj Upsilon Gamma Gamma.

"Under Twentj ."

Cheer Leader.



CLARA A. MAY

"Consider that I lahored not tor myself only, but lor all them
that seek learning."

'2 ; '24 Supper Club.

Chorus.
v 24-'25 Glee Chili.

Chorus.

Supper Chili.

"Tale ot Two Cities."
'2<;-'2() Class Treasurer.

Chorus.

"Rip Van Winkle."
'it> '2" Class Secretary.

Chorus.

"I'ndcr Twenty."




4



THF. CARIBBKAX.



LAWRENCE C. CALLAWAY, Jr.
'Even ttxiuszh vanquished, he could argue still.'



-Goldsmith.



-.!-'-4 Swimming.

Chorus.

Glee Club.
14 :; Chorus.

Glee Club.

Assistant Business Manager, The Caribbean.

Business Manager, "Daddy-Long-Legs."

"Sailor's Reverie."
:; '26 Assistant Business Manager, Tun Caribbean.

Business Manager, "Goose Hangs High."

"Rip Van Winkle."

Chorus.

Glee Club.

Upsilon Gamma Gamma.

Golf.
16 '27 Business Manager, "Under Twenty."

Chorus.

Glee Club.

Upsilon Gamma Gamma.

Golf.



SB-



'S




CLASS HISTORY
Clara May, '27.




:



To give a complete history of the Class of 1927
would only impose upon the patience and for-
bearance of my readers, and also might disclose
to the public eye certain carefully guarded secrets
of the past. With this in mind I have tried to
relate in the briefest manner possible the most
important events of our high school career.

Our grammar school life varies, tor not all of
us spent those years in the Canal Zone schools.
We came from practically every State in the
Union and on the titrh day of October, entered
Cristobal High with an enrollment of forty-four.
That year solved for us the great mysteries of
high school which we had before looked at with
awe. Aside from the class party given under the
supervision of Miss Hornbeak, and the damage
done at the initiation, there is little to relate.

The next year, basing lost several people from
our (.lass, we entered as gay young Sophomores
and, we, in our turn, found enjoyment at the
expense of the poor Ireshies. Miss O'Connell
was our class adviser, and with her help, we were
able to give a 1 lul party.

The next title of honor awaiting us was that of
Junior. Everyone knows the history of the



Junior year that of the Junior-Senior Banquet.
After much hard work and untiring efforts, we
were finally able to give the Seniors a banquet
which was equal to any of the previous years.
Our party was also a credit to our class. Miss
Moore, as our class adviser, was a great help to
us in both of these events.

When in the future years, we look back over
our school life, our Senior year will stand out the
brightest and happiest of all. Into the hurried
days of our closing year, we have crowded many
events. The Senior play, "Under Twenty" was
successfully given under the capable direction of
Miss Dodds, our class adviser. The banquet given
us by the Class of '28 at the Hotel Washington
and the dinner given by Miss Dodds at the Old
Washington Hotel arc both worthy of mention
and flic memory of them will linger long in our
lives.

Now as we haw reached the parting of l he wa\ s,
may the future years hold for each of us happiness
and success, in which shall always be mingled
the happy memories of our school daws in Cristobal
High.



THE CARIBBEAN*.



*5



m=



=K



K



CLASS WILL.

Euphemia Woolnough., '27.

Dorothy IVertz, '27.




-K



We, the Pilots of the plane Cristobal High

School, Number [927, before taking the air do
hereby publish and proclaim this to be our last
will and testament, and do offer the following:

To the Junior Class our PRIVILEGES (to be
cherished with the precious memento of the
Seniors which we bestowed upon them at the
Junior-Senior banquet); also the machine shop,
Room 27, to keep clean and quiet and to respect
as \\ e have done.

To the Sophomores, the inestimable privilege
of moving into seats toward the rear of the as-
sembly room.

To the Freshmen, the gymnastics 1 mental) of
geometry class, and regrets that initiations are
taboo at school.

To the entire school, for their benefit and that
of the faculty, our earnestness and attentiveness.

Joseph Corrigan's paiama shirt to Edward
Lowande to co-ordinate with his Costa Rican
shoes.

Surse Tax lot's convincing line to Albert Days;
his cast-iron, never-bending, brass-plate nerve to
Theodore Henter.

Helen Montgomery's habit of talking fast to
Gladys Beers to be used on all occasions and
especially in I S. History.

Lawrence Callaway's slenderness to Frank
Kimbell and his powerful physique to Arthur
Rothenburg.

Louise Heim's rude (?) and rough (?) voice to
Woodford Babbitt and her sweet and modest
ways to Lucia Salazar, who has already taken
possession of much of her inheritance.

Doroth) Wertz's love of sports to Evangeline
Smith and Ethel Westman.

Clara May's shrine in the faculty to Zonella

Bliss.



James Van Scotter's "Big Times" to Foster
Tufts.

Helen Vineyard's vamping ways to Arthur
Rothenburg, who demonstrated at the banquet
that he could use them.

Teresa Gallagher's art of dancing to Emma
Banks; her gentle manner to Kathryn Lambert,
t be added to her supply.

Dorothy Svensson's hysterical ways to Gladys
Beers, who is making a collection of them; and
her reign in the library to the Banks-Bliss
dynasty.

James Grider's "gift of gab" to Royal Higgason,
whose supply is almost exhausted; and his "foolin'
ways" and interest in the girls to Robert Axtell.

Charles Will's affairs in the office and his in-
terests in athletics to Jack Klunk.

John Nelson's title of "Madame Marie" to
Harold Owen.

Emily Bledsoe's opera voice to Gladys Beers.

Euphemia Woolnough's Charlestonian feet to
Charles Crum.

In addition to the aforementioned goods and
chattels: The Senior girls give all their good
times, their Fords, and their good marks to the
Junior girls; and the Senior boys will their posi-
tions in the "Chink Shop" to the Junior boys.

In testimony whereof, we set our hand and
seal and publish this, our last will and testament,
111 the presence of the following witnesses, on
this 24th day of June, [927.



(Signed) Senior Class.



Witnesses:
S \\n t;i..
Butler.
Winter.



i6



THF. CARIBBEAN.




Tami-ico, Mexico, June 24, i<;45-

Dr. S. J. Taylor, Jr.,
Taylor Hospital,

New York City, X. V.

Dear Doc: Has it occurred to you thateighteen
years ago to-day we were graduated from Cris-
tobal High School? According to the custom of
the old class we are all supposed to write to each
other to-day our anniversary day. Say, old
hoy, who under Mt. Vesuvius would ever have
dreamed that you would be a famous plastic
surgeon owning a couple of large hospitals and
having the reputation that you have!

You say that you've been too busy to keep
track of the old gang so I'll try to tell you what
I've found out about them in my travels. You
remember "Farmer" Grider? Well, you, being
of the same profession, probably know that he is
now running a large hospital of his own in Louis-
ville, Kentucky.

"Terry" Gallagher is one of Wall Street's
wizards. She has the stock market under her
thumb and squeezes every now and then.

"Dot" W'ertz has married the Postmaster Gen-
eral. Possibly you knew him when he used to work
in the P. 0. at Cristobal. She and Euphemia
often get together, for Euphemia is the head
stenographer in the State Department at Wash-
ington, 1). C. Charlie Will is the chief accountant
for the Standard Oil Company. He has a peach
of a job no work plenty of cash. Jimmy Van
Scotter is now in Brazil building a bridge across
the Amazon River for the Inter-Continental
Railroad Company. I )ot" Svensson has married



some millionaire. They live in Hawaii where her
husband has the leading pineapple concession.
Helen Montgomery is in charge of physical train-
ing for the Chilean Government. Louise Heim
has gained quite a name in the literary world by
writing a book called So Small, for which she was
awarded the Nobel Prize. Joe Corrigan is the
supervising engineer for The Panama Canal in
their project to make a third set of locks and
widen the Cut.

Emily Bledsoe, who is now one of the world's
greatest pianists, is soon giving a concert in
Vienna which all the nobility of the world will
attend. There aren't so many of them left now.
Of course you have heard that Helen Vineyard is
a famous prima donna and is now playing with
the largest opera company in Europe. I saw her
the day before yesterday when I flew over the
mill pond in my old crate. Gosh, that bus is old
fashioned! All she can go now is three hundred
seventy-five per hour. "Lord" Nelson is the
commanding general of the Ninth Corps Area and
is living in Monrovia, Calif.

Well, Doc, I guess that's all I can tell you now.
Oh, yes, I nearly forgot Clara May. She's
become famous as an interior decorator for the
Dennison paper novelty company.

Say, boy, 1 just got an offer from some revo-
lutionists down in Pernambuco to go down and
start a revolution. It's about time they had
another one down there anyway. If it weren't
for those revolutions, I'd go hungry.



Sincerely,



1.. C. Call iway, Jr., '27.



THE CARIBBEAN.



'7



THE DOCKS.

Dorothy Svensson, '2/.

The docks!

Gray, barren

Yet seething with lite!

Romance is not a thing of the past!

No! for here romance

Breathes lives.

Why not?

The glamour o! ships

Cargoes from

Far ports

Cairo Singapore.

The talcs nt hold adventure.

Furious storms;

The swearing

Laughter

Kisses

Tears

No! for the docks

The gr.n seemingly souless, docks,

Romance breathes lives.



A TROPICAL STORM.

Louise Helm, '2/.

The heavy clouds above an angry sea
Descend and darken slowly, warningly.
The waves like frenzied monsters dash with rage
On rocks which give to them a whitened death.
And then the rain in lashing torrents comes;
The clouds, the sea, all blotted trom our sight.



A TROPIC NIGHT.

Elsie Dar/ey, 'jo.

The stillness ot a tropic night
Is broken by the sound
( )t waves a-dashing on the shore,
And crickets in the ground.

The moonbeams fall upon the sea
And make it sparkle brightly,
And now and then a gentle breeze
Stirs the palm leaves gently, lightly

The starch palms are outlined
Against the starry sky,
They look like monstrous spiders
Suspended trom on high.



A NEGRO CHILD.

I e Heim, '27.



A negro child was standing there,
\ dirty little wretch.
Black as coal her eyes and h.ni
A picture fit to sketch.



She looked at me as though to sav,
"Well, don't you like my looks,
If not, just turn the other way."
Her name should have been Snooks.



THE LYING JUNGLE.
Dorothy Svensson, 2j.



I '1 1 sad the trees in Gatun Lake appear!

Their lifeless bodies

Protruding from chill waters

How sad yet stern.

Their dead white forms

Seem reproachful.

They lift

Their hands up high

As if to point accusingly

At heavens above.

Their very desolation

Casts a spell around the lake.



i8



IHF. CARIBBEAN'.




THE CARIBBEAN.



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President; Miss Peterson, \dvi



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N r.,w. Gretchen /*- 1 m Treasurer; \nit.. Rankin, Vic
Barnetl

ling downward from left to right): Row I. Vita Lyew, Wilhelmina Klecfkcns, Dorothy Heim, Donald Pohle. Row 2.
: rd Roberl Ps ni Horri Luci Row ), Elizabeth Hackctt, Margaret Hayes, Paul Hayden.
Doroth) Stewart R Kei i Row i Miriam Arthur, Ruben Vrcia, Alvfn Rankin, Scott Parsons, Row 5. Bfanca Walker, Jack

P ni. Row '. Rogi I leakin.

Below lettering (reading horizontally); Row I Vdair Taylor, Rene Bi Michael Greene, Homer Stilson, Vllan Wilhite. Vincent

Lugli, Randolph Orbaugh. Row2. Jack Maher, James Quinn. PnrnrioDcRcuter, Marion Bo r, Lois Williams, Mildred Bath, Louise Mack,

Nol shown: Gordon K.iriurr. Edward Kcene, John Meagher, ( larencc Moore, Jack Morrison, Jack Wallace, Frances Deas.



THE CARIBBEAN.



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THK CARIBBKAX.




. j I .'A 1_




i\J



THE CARIBBEAN.



23



FRESHMEN.

Center: Ruth Lockwood. President; Walter Wikingstad, Vice President; Miss Sewell. Adviser; Fred Stewart,
Si 1 n tary; Ramon. 1 Bliss. Treasurer;
Outside (reading book fashion):

Row 1. Richard Sergeant. Mavis Thirlwall. Edward Henriquez, Elizabeth Montgomery, Beverley Turner, Evelyn
Ganzemuller. William Blauvelt, Frances Simonds.

Row 2. Betty Bryan. Dan Coffey. Elsie Birkeland, James Campbell. Winnie Fred Jacobs, William Newman,
Regina Colgrove. Arthur Mundberg.

Row .i. Edmund Fishbough. Maria Stewart. Ralph Cram, Elaine Blauvelt, Martin Schmoll, Alice Henter,
Charles Martin. Delia Raymond.

Row 4. Dorothy Ford. John Whidden.

Row 5. Kenneth Maurer, Helen Logan.

Row 6. Rose Corrigan. Harry Davies.

Row 7. \"ictor Melendez, Rita Joyce.

Row S. Beatrice Harris. Elizabeth Raymond.

Row 9, Robert Hanna. Valentine Payne.

Row 10. Virginia Eberenz, Harold Mueller. Leah Frank. Nellie Berger, ElsieDarley, Joseph Davies, Washington
Napoleon, Francisco Wong.

Row 11. Mabel Schulert. Juanita Schofield, Edward Albin. Herbert Peterson, James H. Albin, Ruth Banks,
Eleanor Fitzgerald.

Not shown: Shelby Robbins. Henry Stevens. Frank Drake, Frances Days. Anna Fell. Matilda Hill. Ella Warren,
Lillian Housel. Helen Housel.



MISS SEWELL.

She's pleasant and good natured,
Altho' she reaches "math,"
And tries her best to keep us all
Upon the "passing" path.



She's kindly ever helpful;
Her marks are always tair;
And erring students err the less
Because Miss Sewell is there.



GIRLS.

Ruth Banks She looks demure.

Nellie Berger "Miss Cristobal High School."

Elsie Birkeland Our Glee Club pianist.

Elaine Blauvelt Long brown tresses.

Rae Bliss A "Blissful" miss.

Betty Bryan She likes histoi j

Regina Colgrove Quiet and bashful.

Rose Corrigan She is seen and not heard.

Elsie Darley An English daughter.

Frances Days Tho' she's tar away now we re-

member her jolly wa) s.

Virginia Eberenz Spanish is her Nemesis.

Eleanor Fitzgerald "Book reports due, Fit/."

Leah Frank Gone but not forgotten.

Evelyn Ganzemueller. A striking brunette.

Alice Henter \n attractive maid.

Winnie Fred Jacobs "With eyes so blue."

Rita Joyce "Hope beameth brighter" w hen

she's around.

Ruth Lockwood. Our class president,

Helen Logan From Fort Davis.

Elizabeth Montgomery. She's truly an experienced
"orator."

Washington Napoleon I. ikes household arts.

Delia Raymond Misnamed "Doleful Delia."

Elizabeth Raymond Gentleness defined.

Mabel Schulert A shy blonde.

Frances Simonds Our aspiring literary genius.

Maria Stewart Good in all things.

Mavis Thirlwall An eternal honor student.

Juanita Schofield A converted Balboa-ite.

Lillian Housel (H. S. 8) A shorty from Gatun.

Beatrice Harris (H. S. 8) She surely can jazz the piano.

Dorothy Ford (H. S. 8) She's never bored.



We're glad she's our adviser,

As such she has no peer;

And every school day, more and more,

We're glad Miss Sewell is here!

The Freshman Clas



BOYS.

Edward Albin (Sp) He plays his jokes.

James Albin (Sp) He can be told from Edward.

William Blauvelt 1 H. S. 8). He has an ubiquitous smile.

James Campbell "Silence is golden."

Dan Coffey He has a crown of glorj

Ralph Crum. A budding saxophonist.

Frank Drake 1 Sp 1 "Peanut" in name only.

Edmund Fishbough Unlike his name.

Robert Hanna Musicallyiiu lined.

Edward Henriquez Algebra holds no perils for him.

Charles Martin Another swimming fiend.

Kenneth Maurer Always on hand when needed.

Victor Melendez He vaults lofty heights.

Harold Mueller A shining star in the swimming

pool.

Arthur Mundberg He has the wanderlust in the

assembly.

William Newman "For he's a jolly good fellow."

Valentine Paj tie A pleasant boj and a good worker.

Herbert Peterson "Baseball Petie."

Martin Schmoll He is not "Schmoll. 1

Richard Sergeant iH. S. Si English is his joy.

F'red Stewart Good things come in small pack-

ages.

Beverley Turner He loves the briny deep.

John Whidden "I was only teasing you."

Walter Wikingstad "Wicky" surely can play baseball.

Francisco Wong Never shirks.

Harry Davis ,, ...

T V\ hich is which!

Joseph Davis |



4



THE CARIBBEAN.




OUR MESSAGE.

Cristobal High School is broadcasting good
wishes to you and her other Alumni, all of whom
she is so proud.

Where are you? How are you?

In what work are you?

What word for the old school?

Helen Vineyard,

Alumni Editor.
THEIR MESSAGES.



Lula Mae Puxlig (Mrs. J. B.) Coman, Cristobal,
Canal Zone.

Minot Cotton, Si John Street, New York City.
"My sincerest wishes for the 1927 Carib-
bean and to its producers. Greetings also
to those of the class of '18 who may chance
to see these words."
Susie Harrison, 2600 Reisterstown Road, Brit-
ton Hall, Apt. 4-B, Baltimore, Md.

Catherine Waid, 4^1 West 23d Street, New
York City.

Bi rki Wl m H, address unknown.

Mary Verner, Chapel Hill, N C.

1919.

Dorothy Weir (Mrs. John) Moni inye, Cristo-
bal, Canal Zone.
"Again I send greetings and best wishes
1 this time from Cristobal) to the Class ol
1927, the faculty, and students of Cristobal
High. I am very anxious for my copy of
The Caribbean, for 1 know it will be the
best ever."



Alice Arlene Ball, i iS Maple Avenue, Tacoma
Park, Md.

Kenneth Edwards, Wellsboro, Pa.

James Raymond, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

1920.

Eindai.e Davis, 336 Commonwealth Avenue,
Boston, Mass.

Jack B. Fields, Guayamas District, Tela,
Honduras (in care of Tela Railroad).

Kenneth Greene, Coudersport, Pa.

Harlan Holmwood, Balboa, Canal Zone.

Alson Sears, Balboa, Canal Zone.

Kathryn Burgoon Stewart, Cristobal, Canal
Zone.

Alice Stilson, Colon, Republic ol Panama.

Lillian Cotton Van Wagner, 124 Elm Street,
Cranford, N. J.

Ai. Doyle, <;oi Normandie Street, Pasadena,
Calif.

Etha BeVINGTON, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone.



THE CARIBBEAN".



25



1921
Carl Duey, Box 95, Lemon City, Florida.
Kirbv Ferguson, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

Charles Henter, Coast Guard, Room 15,
Custom House, Norfolk, Ya.

Alice Hunter (Mrs. L. A.) Hohn, Quantico, \ a.

Frank Raymond, 344 East 120th Street, New
York City.
"Am still in New York going to the
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Colum-
bia University. Finishing third year medi-
cine is as great a thrill almost as finishing the
senior year in C. H. S. Miss the old school
as bad as ever, so much so that I must see it.
I shall be in Cristobal this summer to get
my annuals personally."

Eleanor Zimmerman, 120 Kingsley Avenue,
Westerleigh, Staten Island, N. Y.

"I do want to see this year's Caribbean as
I was very anxious to have last year's.

"I have been living on Staten Island tor
nearly three years and like it very much.
I am very well and am working as a steno-
grapher in a wholesale and retail lumber
company. I enjoy the work very much.

"I wish the class of 1927 the best of luck
and hope they all succeed in their work."

1922.

George Cartwright, 1 59 Boyle Avenue, Totowa
Borough, Paterson, N. J.

Ida Brown (Mrs. A. D.) Doyle, soi Normandy
Street, Pasadena, Calif.

Mary Glenn Fields, Balboa Heights, Canal
Zone.

Le Roy Magni son, Balboa, Canal Zone.

Jordan Zimmf.rmann, 202 Walnut Place, Syra-
cuse, N. Y.
"I'm still at Syracuse working for my de-
gree from the College of Forestry. I shall
be graduated in January of next year anil
then to work! The Caribbean has my best
wishes for a successful year. From the
start, it looks very bright for the annual.
Give my best regards to all who know me
I don't imagine, though, that there are many
who do remember who Zim is."
Mildred Stafford, 2702 Mitchell Avenue,
Tampa, Florida.

MR 5590 4



Emma Townsend (Mrs. Robert) Noe, Gatun,
Canal Zone.

Wesley Townsend, Gatun, Canal Zone.

Majorie Ball, i 1 S Maple Avenue, Tacoma
Park, Md.

Paul Doyle, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

Edward May, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

I am anxious to see the Annual for this
year, because, judging from the comments
I have heard from the student body, it must
be a fine one.

Please extend to the faculty and student
body my hearty greetings and to the gradu-
ating class my sincere wishes tor wonderful
success in their future endeavors.
Louise Henter, Sydenham Hospital, Baltimore,
Md.

"I have been graduated from the Philadel-
phia General Hospital tor almost a year and
am now taking a post-graduate course in
communicable diseases at the Sydenham
Hospital here. My work is very interesting
ami I am enjoying my still rather new
independence.

"You can't know how I felt when I received
the Alumni Editor's card. Actually, I
stopped breathing for a tew minutes when I
first opened the envelope. What memories
that scene brought back to me. I could
feel the trade winds lift my hair back over
my ears and hear them swishing through the
palms. How many times I have eaten my
lunch (what was left of it by noon) on that
very wall and even (deep, dark secret) taken
my shoes and stockings off and jumped
from one sunken, half-submerged foundation
stone to another!

"I am afraid my best wishes may be too
late (as usual) but what possible wish could I
give with more confidence in its perfect ful-
fillment than that you should have the best
Caribbean ever! though (and I just can't
resist this) we feel we have had a definite part
in making it the latest successful achieve-
ment of C. H. S."

Gerald Bliss, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

Ernest Eufhrat, 3935 Burwood Avenue, South
Norwood, Cincinnati, Ohio.



26



THK CARIBBKAN.



Henry Moore, 449 Home Avenue, Fort Wads-
worth, Staten Island, N. Y.

Emocene Nash 1 Mrs. E. S. Van Benschoten),
F. A. S. Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

"I am living here in Fort Sill and expeet to
be here three more years. After that no one
knows.

"Richard Nash Van Benschoten was born
at the station hospital on February 15, 192-.
He surely takes all my time so I don't get
much work done.

"I have not had a Caribbean since 1923,
the year I was graduated. But I am going
to have one this year. Am sure that it will
be very good, although they will have to
'go some' to beat the one of '23. Best
wishes for the class of 1927, and may Cristo-
bal High School be very proud of them as
they go out into the world.

Accept my heartiest congratulations on
having the honor to be graduated from
Cristobal High School."

Mattison Pullig (Mrs. J. D.) McCauley,

Cristobal, Canal Zone.
"Here's hoping that the annual of this year
will be the best one which means of course
hustle! especially to beat the one of '23.
My best wishes for the success of your year
book, and three cheers for C. H. S.!"

1924.
Florence Albert, 59 Seaside Boulevard, Rose-
bank, Staten Island, N. Y.

"I have a complete set of Caribbeans
from 1920 and I should dislike very much to
have to break the series. My main reason
in not writing was the fact that what I have
been doing since I came to the States is
nothing that would prove very interesting
to read, for one day has been exactly like
another.

"I remember that Miss Dodds told me once
that I should regret having stayed out or
school a year instead of going straight on to
college. I do. I regret it more than I regret
anything else I've done. I lost the habit and
now I'm at loose ends. One only learns by
experience, you know, but I consider that
lesson an expensive one, because college
trained men and women have a greater chance,
if not to succeed, at least to get the start on



the road to success. Cristobal High School
will always have a warm place in my heart.
Best wishes tor the future."

George Oak.es, Fort Banks, Massachusetts.

Irene McCourt (Mrs. George) Riechel, 14
Islington Place, Jamaica, Long Island, N. Y.

Chester Pike, 214S Acton Street, Berkeley, Calif.

Edith Coulbourn Smith, 717 Colonial Avenue,
Norfolk, Va.

Dorothy Abendroth (Mrs. Arthur) Flood,
Cristobal, Canal Zone.

Jose Arosemena, 1209 Thirteenth Street, Wash-
ington, I). C.

Charlotte Housel (Mrs. R. W.) MacSparran,
Gatun, Canal Zone.

Gladys Lowaxde( Mrs. CO.) Baldwin, Cristobal.
Canal Zone.

Morris M a rchos key, Colon, Republic of Panama.

Inza Markham, 494 Lake Avenue, Rochester,
N. Y.

"Mother sends me the papers now ami
then and by them I see C. H. S. is still on
top more power to her, for I am sure she
can beat them all. Though I feel as it I had
been out a hundred years, I still have a
warm spot in my heart for that concrete
building on Colon Beach.

"As for me, I am the same just as natural
as an old shoe. I work every day with the
telephone company and surely like it."

Ethel Sonneman, 98 Macon Street, Brooklvn,
N. Y.

Andrew Smith, Box 2, Foster Route, Richmond,
Texas.
"If I had a million or so dollars, I should
do naught but travel from one race of people-
to another, learning their customs and
languages, and collecting the best of their
literature. Though I should die poor,
possibly a pauper with no place to lay my
head, I should be satisfied, because I should
have accomplished my aim. That may be
utterly selfish but my soul would be content,
I believe. Undoubtedly, some of my friends
think I, as a hobo, have most interest in the
schedule of a freight or passenger train, but
I am interested in any and every thing that
is done on the 'long trail' the planting,
harvesting, ami thrashing ot the various



THE CARIBBEAN.



27



grains, sawmilling, mining, and a multitude
of other things I have seen accomplished or
have had a part in.

"The longer I am away, the fonder my
recollections of the Isthmus. I am a Zonian
heart and soul a Gold-Sider. I wish you the
best of success, and happiness that multiplies
itself as each year you take a new set into
the fold."

1925.
Ruth Hopkins, Panama City, Rep. of Panama.
Ruth Duey (Mrs. Spencer) Lincoln, corner of
Putman Avenue and Putman Drive, Port
Chester, N. Y.

William Cousins, 2623 Oakford Street, Phil-
adelphia, Pa.

Helen Abendroth, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

Katherine Fischer, 109 Sipple Avenue, Garden-
ville, Baltimore, Md.
"I am working in the pay-roll department
of a clothing factory. I enter, add, subtract,
multiply figures five days of the week, and
on the sixth, I check back the work of the
girls who are short in their money earned.
It is tiring and figures are not interesting, but
Sundays are my own and so are holidays.
"Remember me to all the folks, and give
Cristobal my best wishes for the year for
success in athletics, anil in school and social
affairs."
Hubert Lee, 2211 Speedway, Austin, Texas.
Olga Arcia, Colon, Republic of Panama.
Dorothy Deibert, Fort Sill, Okla.
Anniel Heim (Mrs. J. H.) Brenchick, Cristobal,
Canal Zone.
"I have given up nursing and am now
happily married. I wish The Caribbean of
' 2~ the best I am sure it will be a good one."
Harriet Steenberg, Langley Field, Va.

1926.
Edna Duvall, 1711 Martha Street, Cincinnati,

Ohio.
Irene Hopkins, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

"Here are my best wishes to you all and fir
the best Caribbean ever."
Maurice Eggleston, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
Elizabeth Warren, Florida State College for
Women, Tallahassee, Fla.



Clarice Steenberg, William and Mary College,
Williamsburg, Ya. (after June, Langley
Field, Hampton, Va.).
"That picture with all the wind-blown
palm trees is enough to make everyone weep
with homesickness. I reckon the best way
to let you know how much I think of my old
home and school is to tell you that the height
of ambition of every girl in this dormitory
is to go to Panama, just from the things
I've told them! Best of luck to '27."
Richard Beverley, 2718 St. Paul Street, Balti-
more, Md.
William Ci.inchard, 140 North Eleventh Street,
Lincoln, Nebr.
"Here I am a whole year out of C. H. S.
though it seems only yesterday that I sat
in the front row of the assembly, rubbing
my luminous ivory knob sans hair, and
wishing that I could coax some into sight
by the famous hair restorer method. Boy!
those were the days, and I've wished many
times, since, that I had to do it over again.
"Now I am in the University of Nebraska
completing my first year of a pre-dental
course. Next year I start in on regular
dentist work and hope to continue until I
have received my degrees in a period of some
four more years.

"In the near future I hope to sec dear old
C. H. S. and I surely shall be glad to see
some of my old classmates of '26. I am
sending wishes for a happy and successful
year to the entire student body, my regards
to the faculty, congratulations to the class
of '2-. And may The Caribbean be even
better than that of 'ih."

Helena Deckman, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
Carlos Pi lgar, Gatun, Canal Zone.
Lola Munoz, Panama City, Republic of Panama.
Rae Fischer, 109 Sipple Avenue, Gardenville,

Baltimore, Md.
Delilah May (Mrs. G. W.) Parker, Gatun,

Canal Zone.
Mildred Neely, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

"Heartiest congratulations to the Class of
192-. May this year's Caribbean be the
best ever."
Hildegarde Blythe, Landham-Bounce X-ray
Clinic, Atlanta, Ga-.



THF CAR1BBKAN.



Gay R. Turner, Randolph-Macon Woman's
College, Lynchburg, Va.

"I'm up here at R. M. trying to make
some kind of a record, and I'm 'working
like a trooper' anil just managing to get
through. It really is quite an experience
though, and we do have some dandy times
doing all the things that college girls are
said to do and some more besides.

"I long tor the 'old school' just the same.
Sometimes it seems impossible to stand being
away from there. My world still centers
around Cristobal High School, and I love to
hear of all you are doing. I hope to be at
home for Commencement. My roommate
and I quarrelled this evening because I said
the two months left before I get home seem
longer than nine months seemed when I
came up. They do!

"Nineteen hundred twenty-seven, we're
expecting great things of you. Don't dis-
appoint us!"

Helen J. Kerne, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

"You all know what a very good opinion
1 have of Cristobal High School so why
make me show my inability to express myself
beautifully*: I have seen the play, and, as
you have probably been told a hundred times
or more, it was very, very good, and I must
say that I was greatly surprised by some
people, although I certainly knew better than
lo he that when I knew that Miss Dodds was
behind it.



"Before I had anything much to do with
an annual (especially having my own 'master-
pieces' published) I marvelled at the ability
of the Seniors; when I was a Senior (I insist
on spelling it with capital 'S') I wondered
at our ability; and noid I am anxious to see
what other Seniors can do, but I need not be
anxious any more for I am sure that I shall
not be disappointed with the 1927 Carib-
bean.

"Christopher Columbus! You asked me
to tell you where I am, how I am, and what
I am doing, and in all this nonsense I haven't
answered one question. Well, I am still
residing in Cristobal in body at least.
Next, I am feeling fit for anything except
another attack by an Alumni Editor. Lastly
I am working as a stenographer for United
Artists' Corporation, Cristobal, Canal Zone,
Bastante?

My very best wishes to Freshmen, Sopho-
mores, Juniors, Seniors, and Faculty."

Johanna Kleefkens, Staten Island Hospital,
Staten Island, N. Y.
"Once more C. H. S. is to send forth a
class of which she is proud. Congratulations
to the graduating class and my best wishes
to the dear Alma Mater C. H. S. I know
The Caribbean of '27 will be the best ever
even though '26 was before you."

Christian Wirtz, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

William Coffey, Cristobal, Canal Zone.




Wfnd-fwept Palm Tree* on ( olon Beach.



THE CARIBBEAN.




Louise Heim, '27, Literary Editor.





A MYSTERY.

Robert Payne, '29.
(Awarded Highest Honors in 1926-19;-, Short Story Contest.)



"Eight-Bunch Bunch-Bunch-Eight-Seven-
Seven-Seven-Bunch- Bunch. Heh! Throw that
one out. It's old. Eight-Bunch. Heh! Speed
up with that truit! We have to Bunch-Eight
get it loaded by Bunch three o'clock. Eight-
Seven-Six-Six. Whose fruit is that? Six-Seven
Joe Haynes? Eight I thought so. Bunch Six
Six-Bunch-Seven. Is that the last stem in that
barge?"

"Yas, Sah."

"Bring number S67 next."

"A'right, Cap."

Bill Harrison, a big six-footer, as muscular as an
ox, and as strong as an elephant, was checking
fruit on board the United Fruit steamer Bowden,
which lay at anchor on Gatun Lake. He was a
picturesque figure in his Army pants, high top
boots, blue shirt, and big five-gallon Stetson with a
couple ot bullet holes in it. He was sitting on the
rail watching the negroes pass the bananas from
the barges into the hold ot the boat and listening
to their conversation, which pertained to everything
under the sun.

All at once he heard the put-put-put of a motor
boat.

"Jose, call that boat."

"Yas, sah! Jane West, Jane West, come here
and wait to dis barge."

Then Bill again, "Heh, Al, come on up our of
that smoky cabin."

'Payment fur string of bananas is based .1,1 ill- number of hands
a stem contains. "Bunch" means nine or more hands.



"All right! Wait until I get my hat my hel-
met, you know." For Al Deering, a mechanic for
the I nited Fruit Company, was seldom seen with-
out his dirty sun helmet which had long sin;e seen
its day.

"Aw, leave the hat. Some day I'm going to

dump it."

"Never mind the hat. It suits me."

"All right, get a move on you and for gosh sakes,

don't stop to tinker with some piece ot machinery

along the way."

A moment later the squat, helmeted Al was on
the deck beside Bill.

"Well, you old banana bug, what you gotta
say ?"

"I can't figure it out, Al."

"Figure out what?"

"Of course you have the same thing on your
mind as I have?"

"About the disappearance of that fruit? Think
ot it! Fight hundred stems. No stump could
sink three barges 2 full of bananas and not leave a
tew floating around."

"No, I guess not, and speaking of bananas, I've
heard some things about that new plantation oppo-

1 Bananas from Gatun Lake regions are brought down from the in-
terior by barges from about forty-five to about eighty-five feet in
length. These barges earn- from one hundred to two thousand five
hundred stems of bananas. It is dangerous and costly work on account
nl the dead trees in the lake These trees punch holes in the bottoms
of the motor boats or the barges and cause them to sink. It costs a
large sum of money to raise a sunken boat. There have been four
or five motor boats sunk inside of six months on Gatun Lake.



THE CARIBBEAN.



site Cana Saddle, 3 which belongs to Jose Cerveza,
that old Mexican bandit leader."

"Say, Bill, what do you say we go up there Sun-
day and look the place ever and see what we can
find out and do about the disappearance of that
fruit."

"All right."

Sunday came with engines popping and boats
running around the docks picking up barges and
placing them in their right positions.

"Which one are you going on, Air"

"On thejtwt- West. Come on along."

"All right. Got your six-shooter?"

"Yeh! How about the grub?"

"O. K. We have to get off at an island near
Cana Saddle."

Soon they were off on the sturdy launch, Jane
IVest, with its tow of barges which were to be
distributed at various stopping places. While some
of the barges were being dropped at Escobal, the
two friends visited a little cantina, where they sat
chatting for a time with some natives who had come
in from their little farms to sell their bananas.

It was at Escobal that the only excitement of the
trip occurred. On going over to where the tow was
tied up, Al saw a man struggling in the water. He
slipped off his clothes and jumped in, rescuing a
drowning Spaniard whom they knew well as Pedro
Fraser. Pedro decided to "throw in" with Aland
Bill. As he was a good man in the jungles, they
were glad to have him.

They went about a mile to Joe Close's place and
asked him it they could camp on his farm. Per-
mission was speedily granted because Bill had
done many errands for Mr. Close.

harly Monday morning Bill started out.

"How about taking Pedro? He's a good bush
man."

"No, I want to go by myself."

"All right! What time will you be back?"

"About nine o'clock to-night."

"Why so late and long?"

"Oh, I have a hunch. You remember while we
were in Escobal, I was talking to a subbuyer?"

"Veh! What about if?"

"Oh, tell you later."

And when Bill left for Cana Saddle, Al and Pedro
started playing Black Jack on top of a milk box.
But before long

ol hci plai bi ide I ..it un where a dam
of any i con tru tion "t Gatun Lake. Soldlei

to guard it 'lurinK war inn- It i- .ilout tilt-in miles from
Gatun.



"Pedro, let's go and look over Close's farm and
see how the bananas are. This is too exciting."

"Bueno, Senor."

"Let's go down that left trail. This section was
evidently planted about two months ago. The
shoots are just coming up. Be about six months
before Close will get any bananas from here.
Well, let's go into this section that's bearing. I
wonder why Close doesn't cut out the water suck-
ers. They absorb all the water that is needed for
the other shoots. And the old stalks that have
borne their bananas 4 should be cut out. Pedro,
here's one that has the blight. s In this case it is
best to dig up the tree and burn it with lime, isn't
it?"

"Si, Senor."

"Aw, heck! Let's sit down under that tree and
talk a while. I have seen so many bananas that
I am tired of them. I can't eat bananas any more.
It makes me sick."

They sat talking for over two hours on different
subjects.

"It's about twelve o'clock. Let's go back to
camp and get some dinner."

"Bueno, Senor. Vamonos."

There was the rattling of pots and pans for
about fifteen minutes then the sizzling of bacon
and eggs over a hot camp fire. Then dinner was
ready.

"Let's take the cayuca and go down and explore
the dam and the old iron barge the Government
left when building the dam that is, if the cayuca
hasn't disappeared."

"Bueno, Senor. Pues, dame los caneletes (pad-
dles) y una soga (rope)."

"Bueno, Senor."

"Pedro, do you know anything about the dis-
appearance of those bananas that the bruit Com-
pany lost?"

Pedro hesitated Inita moment. Then heplunged
with seeming relief into a long story about how his
brother, who was an engineer on Jose Cerve/a's
schooner, Maria .S', did not understand how his
employer was getting bananas to ship to Colon
when his farm had just been planted about two
months before.

Al interrupted the Story.

"Pedro, will you get me that pretty orchid?"



'A st. ilk bears only I stemoi bananas. A "tree" usually has from

t t
N'n cure In- In-ill Found for tin- Insidious lilinlit



THF. CARIBBEAN.



3i



"Si, Senor." Pedro began clambering up one
of the many dead trees in Gatun Lake's dying
jungle.

"Here's a machete. What's the matter?"

Pedro was so much excited that he couldn't get
the orchid and nearly tell out ot the old tree. Al
went up in his turn and discovered, tied to three
stumps but a short distance away, the three lost
barges.

"Come, let's paddle over and explore them"

"Yamonos."

"We'll have to tell Bill about this."

They went over and explored the barges but
could not find any clue as to the mystery.

"Pedro, let her float. Don't paddle. I want to
think a while."

They floated around among the stumps torabout
an hour. Pedro wassound asleep when Al decided
it was time to get back tocamp. When they arrived
there, they found Bill making a fire.

"When did you get here?"

"Just about five minutes ago."

"What did you find?"

"Not a thing that amounts to anything. I'm
sure the old iron barge has some connection with
this mystery. But all I could find in the whole
day's search was some mule tracks. It seemed to
me that the tracks leading from the barge were
heavier than those going toward it, but I'm not



much of a detective. Did you take a snooze? If
so, I hope you didn't dream about a heavy supper
of canejo, tapir, or deer, for I didn't bag a thing."

"Well, Pedro and I bagged the threelost barges."

"What!?!"

"Yep." Then he told his story ot how they had
found the barges and what he thought had hap-
pened.

When he had finished, Bill was excited.

"That fits in with my theory. Here's what I
think happened. I think Jose Cerveza is behind all
ot it. I think he sent up a man to work for us, and
his job was to cut loose the barges from the rest of
the tow. These barges would float to the edge of
the channel, and a man would come out in a motor
boat and tow them to the old iron barge where
Jose's men would load them on mules and carry
them to his place to be shipped to Colon."

"That's it exactly. Pedro, get a light and get
the cayuca ready, while I make a lunch. When
we reach Escobal, I'll go wake Ramon and get
him to take us to Gatun, while you get the con-
spirator that let the barges loose. We have to
work fast, though."

The gang was caught and sent to Gamboa
penitentiary for ten years.

As a reward Al was made master mechanic.
Bill refused the managership until Al bought a
new sun helmet.



ONE OF LIFE'S LITTLE TRAGEDIES.



Surse J. Tax

Fernando strode firmly out on the beach and
headed tor "Nombre." The morning sun shone
bright and sparkling, and each laughing wave that
surged on to the beach gave up its life joyously in
tiny twinklings. The fresh, clean sea breeze
whipped the palms and made lively tattoos among
the jungle shrubs along the beach. All in all,
thought Fernando, it was a happy world. Here
he was, on his way to town to buy that bright
new machete with money he had saved over a
period ot months. Ah, would not Maria be pleased
with the money he'd get cutting bananas with
that machete! Fernando thought she would.

Ah, the store! that enticing place ot luxuriously
displayed apparel, ot tempting, shiny tools, of
bright guns, and, last of all, ot beautiful machetes!

Self consciously Fernando edged up to the
counter. Scratching his leg and squirming about,
he waited for the Chinaman to serve a customer.
At last, "A machete?"



lor, Jr., '27.

"Yes, a machete."

"You wishee dis one!"

"No, the big one on the right. That's it."

Again Fernando was in the open air. The morn-
ing was twice as beautiful. Was not life wonder-
ful? Crossing the reef, Fernando suddenly heard a
call for help. Turning, he saw a tiny child in the
grip of a fairly large octopus. Skillfully he threw
his machete, the bright, shiny machete, and silent-
ly if slid into the slithering creature. The child was
free. Across the reef raced an anxious mother and
numerous praising relatives. Their praise and
thanks fell on deaf ears while Fernando thought of
a bright new machete slowly sinking into the
ooze of the ocean's bottom.

Across the bay came a rumble of thunder. The
sun slid behind a huge cloud bank. Long trembling
fingers of lightning flicked. Fernando trudged
home in the rain.



32



'I HI- CARIBBEAN.




Most of CnZtot-J -" f



THK CARIBBEAN.



33



%-




I SLA SOLA.

Teresa K. Gallagher, '.'/.
I First Senior English Class. I




Just a tiny village on an island tar off the path
of ships that ply back and forth across the vast
Pacific a village made up of forty native huts,
a large wooden community building, and a stone
church that was Isla Sola Lone Island. It
was buried island too, for the inhabitants were the
living dead dead to all near and dear to them.
They were lepers unclean no longer desired in
the outside world.

Half a century before, the first inhabitants had
arrived. They were just six, four men and two
women. Since then, the village had grown to its
present size of nearly two hundred men and women.

Ten years after the arrival of the first boat load
of inhabitants for Isla Sola, Father O'Brien
had come. He was just a young man, but recently
ordained, who, in his unselfish eagerness to serve
God, had chosen this gruesome island as the place
where he would fulfill his duties.

It was the kind and patient Father O'Brien
who had supervised the making of the rugs, mats,
baskets, and other articles of weaving. It was he
who had taught them to read that they might pass
the dull hours in reading the tew books and mag-
azines which the infrequent boats had brought.
He had never told them that the oil stove, which
was the greatest luxury ot the village, and the
flower seeds which helped so much in brightening
what would have been plain dreary-fronted huts,
had been purchased with his own meager funds
from the boats which came out of their paths into
the little bay to drop their packets into the Isla
Sola lighter.

The small church that stood at the edge of the
lively stream, surrounded by palms and tropical
flowers, would always stand as a monument to the
priest who had built it. It was just a small church
made of stones that had been carried from the other

CHRISTMAS

John G. A'

On Wednesday, January 5, I attended the mo-
tion picture entertainment at Fort Davis. In
the Pathe News was a message from the post-
master general of the U. S. A., urging the public
to mail early for Christmas. Now that is only one
example of the punctuality of Christmas down

MR 5590 5



side of the island. In the belfry there was the bell
from a ship that the sea had tossed up on the shore.
Infinite care had been taken with the altar, and
the hand-carved cross was a piece of work fit tor a
museum. No wonder that the good man who had
worked incessantly for those people had learned
to love them very dearly, and that they returned
the deep feeling of affection.

To-night there were gathered around the camp
fire, as had been the evening custom ever since
Father O'Brien had come, all the inhabitants of
the village. But now they were not jolly and talk-
ative. Everything was quiet. Everyone looked
silently at the flames darting into the air. Only
the cracking of the wood and coals broke the silence.
It was Father O'Brien's last night with his people
and the work that he had learned to love so dearly.
He had been ordered to another parish, for his
Bishop felt that he needed a change after so many
years of faithful work. He stood up; he was going
to say a few words of farewell; but he choked, and
tears flooded his eyes. He sat again. He could
not even say good-bye to his friends. His head
was bowed, and with his left hand he thoughtfully
sifted the sand.

Suddenly with a cry ot amazement and joy, he
leaped up and held out to the astonished group a
red hot coal. In a flash the truth dawned on them,
and all joined in the shouts of joy. Father O'Brien
held in his left hand a red hot coal, and he did not
feel its heat. He had become a leper.

Their shouts of joy turned to sighs of sorrow, for
the dear Father had earned a rest and was
anxious to return to see his sisters and brothers.
Then once again they were jubilant, for the dear
old priest, all smiles, assured them that he was
overjoyed, that now he would always stay with
his friends on Isla Sola.

IN PANAMA.

elson, 2J.

here. Moreover, people instead of being thought-
ful enough to send Christmas cards early enough
to pass on, let them arrive through at least half of
January. Presents may be expected, it seems, any
time the year through, except at Christmas.
Christmas in Panama is slow but lasts a long time.



34



THE CARIBBEAN.




=s



AN UNEXPECTED REWARD.

Helen Vineyard, '27.

(Second Senior Fnglish Class.)




It all happened unexpectedly as most great
things do. The Panaman Government had
1 flfered a prize of two hundred and fifty dollars
for the best developed report on Panama. The
teacher ot the social problems class, in order to
co-operate and to familiarize her students with the
history cf their surroundings, told each pupil in
the class to develop a long report on some historical
bi tiding ot Panama. Clitton had been assigned a
certain old cathedral in Panama City. Search as
he would, he coi-ld not for the life of him find a
history, almanac, magazine, or encyclopedia
which even so much as mentioned the name of the
cathedral. Bui at last a frien 1 of his came to the
rescue, as friends usually do. He told Clifton of
the library in the Municipal Building in Colon.
He said he had seen several volumes on Panama in
it, and suggested that Clifton look there for help.

The next day being Saturday, Clifton went
down to the library about eight o'clock but found
to his si rprise that it would not open before
nine. He waited around a while until, af'er what
seemed ages, the doors were opened.

He entered breathlessly and glanced around the
room. From the door all the way around the room
were huge shelves filled with thick books. Clifton
was so bewildered and excited hedidn'tknow where
to begin first, but he decided that the best thing
to do was to start at the right of the door and keep
seemed going in that direction.

He began with the top shelf and took down
every volume, but found to his surprise that not
even one so much as mentioned the cathedral's
name. "Well," thought Clifton, "perhaps the
next shelf will bring better luck." So he earnestly-
set to work. Now after Clifton hail searched every
shelf but the lower one, he was a mighty tired boy.
'lie perspiration was running off his face; his
hands were dusty from handling the books, some
of which had never been off the shelf since first
placed here. Oh, how his back ached and how
hungry he was!

There was just one more shelf. "(iuess I'll

i vc if up," thoi ght Clifton, but the vision

of the two hundred and fifty dollars came before

him. He inst couldn't give that up SO he set to

work with new courage.



How dirty they were! Each book seemed older
and more grimy than the last The covers were so
thick with dust that Clifton had to use his hand-
kerchief to wipe them off so he could read the
diles.

At last he reached the other side of the room.
Just a few more 10 be searched! He drew out a huge
volume and wearily opened its covers, but it was
written in some kind ot queer numerals. Clifton
with disgust shoved the book back in place
hard. He heard a peculiar ring and then the book
seemed to be shoved once again in his lap. "Well!
Somehing's wrong, but what it is is more than I
can figure out especially on an empty stomach!"
He glanced down, however, to where the book had
been and, to his uttermost surprise, found a
small opening and in it a book.

Carefully he took out the volume. How mil-
dewed it was! The cover, which had been a bright
red, was now a faded old brown. The pages were
damp, yellow, and mildewed, and stuck together.
It must have been almost centuries since the little
volume had been opened.

After turning a few pages of the Spanish
printing, Clitton was astonished to find several
times mention of the name ot the cathedral and,
on one page, a picture of it. Delighted, Clifton
took the book to the librarian and asked for per-
mission to borrow it. "Perhaps I can get some of
my friends to translate some of it for me." The
librarian seemed bewildered as he gazed at the
book which Clifton placed in his hands. He began
to speak excitedly in Spanish, gesticulating frantic-
ally, and poor Clitton became so frightened and
nervous that he didn't know whether to run home
or get the police. He was about to carry out the
former idea when the librarian detained him. He
asked Clifton to tell him all about his discovery of
the book.

Clifton, still bewildered, explained how he had
found the book and why he wanted it. After the
astonished librarian had gained enough breath,
he told Clitton that he had won the sum of one
thousand dollars.

It seemed that this book contained a valuable
plan telling of a secret passage into the old cathe-
dral where a great treasure had been hidden* For



THK CARIBBKAX.



years search had been made for the priceless book offered, no one had ever come to claim them

in all the libraries, book stores, and museums in "until to-day" thought Clifton. "I'll bet my

the Republic ot Panama. The search had seemed paper will be the most valuable in the social proh-

hopeless, for though several rewards had been lems class!"



m-




PANAMA'S VISITORS.

Gretchen IV. Palm, 'sg.
(First place Junior English Class.)




Ini

"See here, Alexander, Leslie does not wish to
buy anthing more and / haven't been able to find
anything else that I want so now I'm going into this
Hindu store to buy you a cane."

"Wait a minute, Janice, nothing doing Wait
until I'm old and gray."

"It's the style, you know! Kuppenheimer's ad-
vertisements always include a cane in the costume
of a well-dressed man."

To the Hindu clerk awaiting her orders, "Now
a-hem, do you have any walking canes, stylish?
Yes, carved a bit on the head."

"What carved on the head! Poor me! When
I get on board ship, that cane's going swimming
overboard."

"Ssh Alex. Yes, that is lovely, of native
mahogany? Fine and so fashionable; it will
look positively stunning with your suit. Five
dollars? That's pretty much, isn't it? Make it
four. No. Your best price, four fifty? I'm um
-all right."

Meanwhile, Miss Leslie, who had been peering
curiously around the shop, had come upon an
object which interested her greatly. "My! what
is that?"

The Hindu nearby replied, "That, madam, is a
shrunken human head."

"What! Good gracious from where? Whose
head is it?"

"You can see by the features that it is a man's
head. There are certain Indian tribes in F.cuador
who practice this custom; when an Indian has an
enemy, he kills him and presto cuts offhisheatl,
shrinks it with hot sand by a process known only
to that tribe, and keeps it as a sort of trophy of his
victory."

"My! how interesting and it is so small, no
larger than a man's fist, and the skin and hair
left exactly as when the man was alive only
shrunken. They are gruesome though! Do you
sell them ?"



"Good-night! Ding dang! Do I have to wear
these short pants and rainbow-colored baby
stockings?"

"Yes, you most certainly do. All the elite society
wear golf clothes. Hurry now, Alex. Your sister
and I are ready to go."

Half an hour later a rather short, pompous man
of florid countenance joined his wife, Mrs. Alex-
ander Trevaine, and his sister, Leslie, on the deck
of the Santa Maria which was slowly drawing up
to Dock Six at Cristobal. Mrs. Trevaine was
attired in the "latest" from Paris, an ensemble
which included a pair of fawn-colored gloves. (It
might suddenly become chilly in Panama! One-
can never tell!) Once on the dock, "los viajeros,"
after finding their "land legs," strolled toward
Colon, through Steamship Road, where the im-
portant shipping companies' offices are situated,
and thence to the Government commissary.

There, Mr. Alex, after having seen numerous
boat companions wearing the hated golf costume
and helmets, decided to complete his outfit with
one of "them white duck hats." They were so
"distinguishing like" he thought. Upstairs his
wife, with the air of a "hardened tourist" was
vainly looking for the cameo shade of Phoenix
hosiery that Mrs. Reginald Vanderbilt always
wore. On the contrary, Miss Leslie was very
much interested in the displays of colorful kimonos
and Coolie coats.

-T* -T* -T- ^ :

After roaming through the foreign stores on
Front Street, Miss Leslie bought herself a
Panama hat, and some ivory and Satsuma trinkets
for her best friends. Mrs. Trevaine, however, even
though she had bought a Canton luncheon set,
which she said "was far superior to Mrs. Van
Leeder's back home," was quite exasperated at all
Colon because she could not purchase Ivory soap
or cameo-colored hosiery in any of the Chinese
shops.



36



THE CARIBBEAN.



"Yes, madam. This one is four hundred fifty that I can get back on board the ship where P
dollars, tor you understand that these heads are at least be safer than in this place.'



very valuable."

"Yes! 1 should like to have one, for I am inter-
ested in such novel things. You said that these
tribes are called head hunters. Just plain canni-
bals, in other words, I s'pose. Well, how did people



Even Leslie began to wonder whether there
might be something to the story she had made up,
for twice again, during the course of their ride
through Colon and Cristobal, they saw this same
man riding after them in a coach. The third time



eet these heads if the tribes are so fierce? Stole he appeared to be frantically waving for them to



stop, and, Mrs. Trevaine, having such a "delicate
nervous disposition" as she had lately told Alex,
was, in reality, frightened and ordered the driver
to use all speed toward the dock.
*****

"Back once more, ladies. Ten minutes to wait

before the boat leaves. Were you afraid of the

'cannibals' Janice?" asked Mr. Trevaine, teasingly.

"Keep still! I was tired and wanted to get back.

None of your silliness."

Five minutes later, the "cannibal" came on the
dock, and, peering anxiously up at the deck, where
'f said that the Hindu in the shop told me after quite a few people were standing, saw the Tre-
I had bought it, that, as thev were stolen, if ever vaines, and waved to attract their attention. The
the owner of the head saw you and knew that you "cannibal" proved to be a Hindu, and, hurrying
had that certain head, he would probably take to Leslie, he explained his curious actions. He
very drastic measures to get it. And say" (here was a partner in the store where Leslie had bought
Leslie winked at Alex), "did you notice that dark the shunken head and after she had left, he had
sinister looking man standing outside the door of realized that his co-worker had sold her a head



them! I see! Yes, I'll take one."

*****

"Now, Alex, carry the cane and use it correctly."

"Holy Moses! Say, it's two-thirty now. We're
going riding. O-ho, there! Come on, ladies. The
Rolls-Royce awaits us."

"Look, folks, what I've bought. It's the head of
some poor fellow who was the enemy of an Indian
in Ecuador. Feel that hair. Just like yours,
Janice."

"Oh-oh how could you, Leslie. How terribly
hideous Ooh, I'm going to dream of that
tonight. What-



that Hindu shop? Do you know he seemed to
watch me when I was buying this head and he
looked so curiously at us when we left. You saw
him, Alex !"

"Yes, I did notice him," responded Alex. "And
I was iust thinking that that fellow in that rig
behind us looked like him."

"Oh, dear ," cried Mrs. Trevaine, "now look



which had been particularly reserved for some one
else. The Hindu thought that Miss Leslie would
like another head which he had with him in ex-
change. "Would that be all right?"

Leslie agreed, and with that the man left, after
having apologized profusely for the mistake. Fel-
low voyagers crowded around.

"My dear Mrs. Trevaine, where did you get that



what you've gotten us into oh dear! I wonder interesting curio?"

who it was! Of course, it wasn't a cannibal but "Oh, Leslie and I bought it. I thought it would

Leslie, Leslie, why did you do such a thing? be so interesting to have in the house that I urged

It's perhaps unlawful to have such things in your her to get it. Such novelties have always appealed

possession. That man might have been some sort to me."

of detective. Hurry and get this drive over so Alex, aside to Leslie, merely said, "Bunk."

WILLIAM, THE BUS DRIVER.

Helen Vineyard, '27.

From six in the morning until six at nighl thick, black lips, showing a solid row of gold
William, the bus driver, makes his rounds, from
New Cristobal to the "Commy" and back al-
ways in his neat khaki suit, clean shirt, black tie,
cap, and black shot



teeth.

Some say he is married because he is so happy and
looks well fed, but I don't believe it. How many
times a day doesn't an interested maid give



Is he jollyi Oh, yes! the best natured and William an Eskimo pie, a slice of cake, or an
most accommodating fellow you ever met apple for bringing her mistress' packages home?
always ready to greet one with a smile from his And sweets are fattening.



THE CARIBBEAN.



37




ROVER, THE ROVER.

Louise J. Mack, 'jo.
(First place Sophomore English Class.)




For several years, Rover, the large tan Airedale,
had the honor, as official mascot, of wearing on his
leather collar a brass plate on which was inscribed
in large letters:

ROVER CRISTOBAL COALING STATION.

He could not be expected to realize that this
largest bunker coaling plant in the world, which
coaled so many ships from all parts of the globe,
cost three million dollars and is one of the most
important projects of the United Slates Govern-
ment on the Canal Zone. He did know, however,
that he liked it very much, especially when the
steamers were coaling.

Each morning he would ride to work with his
master in the coaling station bus and would return
with him at noon and in the evening. Although
Rover thoroughly disliked water, he would swim,
when the launches were not running, across the old
French Canal to Mindi Island, on which the coaling
station is built.

His friendly manner lo everyone from the super-
intendent down to the colored water boys made
him a great favorite. His deep brown trustful eyes,
matching his dark, tan, shaggy coal, seemed almost
to speak. Underneath that rough coat was a great
affection for his friends, at home and at the coaling
plant.

Rover had learned how to climb adeptly a verti-
cal ships ladder by hooking his forepaws over the
rungs. He had a propensity for visiting the
steamers when they were at the coaling plant,
always with the intention ot roving to the ship's
galley, where he would induce the cook to give him
some scraps of meat or bone.

One aftermon after Rover had stopped playing
tug-of-war with Wolf, the superintendent's hand,
some police dog, he decided to go aboard the S. S.
Tagris of the Roland Line, which was taking coal-
Happily oblivious of the noise of the lofty reload-
ing towers high above him, Rover hastened to the
ship. After trotting up the steep gang plank, he
was soon begging the amiable cook for something
to eat. When the kind-hearted man saw how
quickly a few scraps disappeared, he gave Rover a
fine, generous beet bone, which was what Rover
liked.^



While he was earnestly engaged in keeping the
bone firm between his large paws ashegnawedon it,
the loading of the coal ceased, and the coal handlers
began to go ashore. Soon the lines that held the
ship to the dock were being loosened preparatorv
to departure, but the coal handlers, probablv
believing the dog safe ashore, gave no thought to
Rover as they left the ship. The cook had for-
gotten the shaggy dog, chewing a bone in a dark
corner, and long before Rover was aware of it, the
steamer had left the coaling station and was on its
way out ot Colon harbor.

Soon the peculiar motion of the ship affected
Rover, who realized that something unusual had
happened. Suddenly he ran from the gallev to the
deck where he was dismayed to find not the
familiar coaling plant but instead a broad ex-
panse ot blue water on every side. The break-
water of huge concrete blocks passed by him before
he fully realized what had happened. The cook,
who had been extremely surprised to see the dog
appear, told the captain immediately, but the
pilot had already returned to Cristobal, and the
only thing to do was to take Rover, the stowaway,
to Europe.

When Rover did not appear on the evening of
the departure of the Tagris, his master thought his
pet had gone home earlier in the afternoon as he
frequently did, but to his surprise the dog was
not there to greet him. A few days after Rover's
disappearance, it became evident that the affec-
tionate Airedale, everyone's friend, was gone.
His master diligently searched all Colon and Cris-
tobal, and Rover's many friends were constantly
looking for the friendly pet they missed so much.
The police were notified of Rover's disappearance,
and people were questioned for information. Many
false reports were given by colored employees who
claimed that they had seen him in various places
in Colon. After weeks of futile searching failed to
bring any clue of his mysterious disappearance,
his friends gave up hope of ever seeing him again.

Meanwhile Rover missed his old associates and
the pleasant life in Cristobal and wished that
he were at home, for his roving nature did not
extend as tar as actually taking long ocean voyages






THE CARIBBEAN.



alone. Not only was he lonesome, but he did not S. S. Sebaris, which, in a few days, would follow

like the unpleasant motion of the steamer. Then to Panama, asking him to pick up Rover and take

too, he could not understand the German language, him to the Cristobal Coaling Station.
though ere long he learned to obev commands When the second captain docked, he looked for

spoken in German, and became very intimate with Rover even though he did not know his appearance,

all the officers. Twenty-three days of this strange his ownership, nor his history. He found Rover in

life passed. The weather had grown cooler. Rover charge of the superintendent of docks, who was

had begun to feel uncomfortable because he had very reluctant to part with such an intelligent,

always lived in the tropics. Then the liner ap- friendly dog.

proached Hamburg, Germany, where she stayed In a few days the Sebaris sailed from Antwerp

in port for ten days. This gave Rover a fine oppor- with Rover on board bound for Cristobal, Panama,

tunity to forget the cold in touring the city. After The crew on this steamer also enjoyed Rover's

stopping at several ports, the Tagris docked at pleasant companionship. When the weather grew

Antwerp, Belgium, for a few hours before sailing warmer and more tropical, Rover had a premon-

for Panama. Rover, true to his name and nature, ition that he was going home. He knew! Now

was extremely anxious to go ashore for a visit, he did not mind so much the stormy nights when



and, when he had a chance, he took shore leave
without attracting anyone's notice.

After covering more ground than a Cook's tour,
Rover decided that he had seen enough of Ant-



he had to brace himself underneath the captain's
sofa to keep from sliding around the room. When
the linerat last approached theharbor at Cristobal,
and began to near the well-known coaling station,



werp, but it took him longer to return than he had he could hardly contain his joy. He was at home!

expected, for he was confused by the bustle and And at the coaling station, waiting anxiously for

noise of the busy seaport. As the chimes of the him who had made a round trip to Europe, were

great Antwerp Cathedral were striking five, he his master, his family, and many of his old friends



reached the pier where he had left the S. S. Tagris.
Seeing no familiar steamer, he ran to the next
dock, but the Tagris was not there either. Then
he realized that the steamer had already gone with-
out him.

When the captain of the Tagris saw Rover run



who had just heard from the S. S. Tagris a few
days before that he was coming on the Sebaris.
So Rover returned triumphantly to Cristobal
after crossing the Atlantic for a stay of over three
months in Europe. His roving had taught him,
as it does everyone, that there is no place like



wildly up the dock which he had just cleared, he Home, Sweet Home (especially if it's Cristobal),
radioed to the master of an incoming steamer, the for now Rover never voluntarily boards a steamer.

A FABLE.

Ethel Burnett, 2().
(Second place Junior English Class.)

The kind that has no foes.



till,



INTRODUCTION.

Beside the Caribbean Sea
There is a long stone wall;
Though older than it used to be.
It's tine and strong withal.
Hut in its holes and crevices

\ race of crabs doth dwell;

These crabs are well-behaved an
Vnd know these precincts well.

The sea wall's rather low, bur broad

It's 'twixt sea and a walk,

And couples strolling by at night

Sit down on it and talk



i HE FABLE It si I i

I Ipon a lovely moonlighl night,

A handsome crab arose.

He was the kind that all crabs love



He dusted off his gorgeous shell
Of gray and brown and blue,
For he was going out to see
A lady crab he knew.
As he came up from out his home
(A large and mossy rock)
I le he ird some voices from above
A pair strolled on the walk.
'The crab cared not; he knew these folk,
This race of humans, well.
He also knew the silly things
That they would nightly tell.
He clambered up upon the walk
And gazed out at the scene,
Full many couples were in sight,
For a lover's moon was queen!
The i rah heard snatches ol the talk



THE CARIBBEAN.



39



Of those who ambled by;

A dusky pair strolled arm in arm

And their young hopes soared high.
"Sweetie, Hi his yours foh true,

Hi gwine to be yo' hown."

The negro maid said, "Yes, milove."

The crab could only groan.

A Panamanian couple came

The youth cried ardently
"Dis 'eart she brre.ik she lot}" you so-o-o,

You no say yesss to she?"

A gentle silence; then the girl

Said softly, "Yesss si, si ."

Not tar from there two Chine: e sat;

This lad said tenderly,
"Me washee shirtee makee dough,

Me wantee woman too;

You wantee me:" And then she said,
"Yes, John. Me wantee you!"

The crab looked 'round him in disgust,

For many more were there,

And youths of every race and hue

Courted their ladies fair.

He had no time tor this nonsense,

He had something to do

He crossed the wall he headed tor

The lady that he knew.

But then he stopped a little while

A pair were very nigh!

So crabby slipped into a crack

To wait till they passed by.

But down they sat upon his crack,

(They both had ceased to walk)

And to the crab's disgusted ears

There came this man's fool talk.
"Adored," he said, "I love you so

Oh, darling, please be mine

Then I shall be your 'Sturdy Oak,'

And you my 'Clinging Vine.'"

She said, "1 know those things aren't true,

No Cave Men roam these days,

And to each girl you sing the same

Old, rusty, worn-out lays."
"Oh, no!" he cried. "Beloved, mi'

My love tor you is true

And on he raved; the crab longed tor

The lady triend he knew

Imprisoned, agonized, he was.

With nothing else to do

But listen to the moonstruck swain

Proclaim his love was true!



For crabby 's crack had one nay out

So nowhere could he go.

He sat within and cursed the tate

That brought on him such woe.

The moments passed; the love-sick youth

Made love unto his "Vine,"

Ami then she (oh, these women folk

Said sweetly, "1 am thine."

More moments passed; the locked-up crab

Then he.:rd a lusty "smack"

And then he saw his exit cler.r

For they had lett the crack!

One moment tho' and then he saw

The crack no longer tree,

For those simps leaned their arms on it

And gazed out at the sea.

The wrathful crab was nigh to tears;

This spoiled that perfect night.

W hat had his warrior uncle said?
"Boy! when in trouble, fight!"

One moment he did hesitate

One moment then he knew

He knew the very desp'rate deed

He was about to do.

He raised his pincers sharp on high,

A shriek and he was tree.

And then the "Clinging Vine's" voice shrilled
"You brute! Don't speak to me!

You were the one who brought me here

You wanted me to die

And so you let wild beasts attack

Me, while you, you cad, stood by!"
"But, dearest one, it was not me,"

Spoke the unlettered "Oak"

As he pursued the fleeing maid.

Oh dear! These women folk!

The silver moon smiled on the sea

Smiled on a proud crab too,

Who lost no time in being with

A lady crab he knew.



Oh, lovers! ye who stroll at night
Besu!e a moonlit sea.
Beware ye ot the desperate crabs
Who insist that they be tree!

And male crustaceans! ye who seek
To spend a pleasant night,
Remember that your noble kin
Said, "When in trouble -fig ht .'/.'"




I S S. "Wyoming" passing throegh the Panama Canal.



JO



THE CARIBBEAN.



Panama City

*>FROflTHEAlR ^



PA.Nv^^BRlC.A fUSRS
S OVER THE SEA




APART ofSuamshipBc*
Cristobal



THE CARIBBEAN.



4 1





FORT SAX LORENZO.

Frances Simonds, jo.

(First place Freshman English stories.;



When anyone speaks of ruins and old Spanish
forts, people in general even the average in-
habitants of the Canal Zone call to mind only
old Panama or Porto Bello, hut one who has taken
the trip to San Lorenzo and has studied its construc-
tion and arrangement considers it by far the best
preserved and most interesting oi our old Spanish
relics.

The fort occupies a high bluff that extends out
into the Caribbean Sea at the northeast of the
the mouth of the Chagres River. Since the sides
facing the Caribbean and Chagres are all per-
pendicular, the only approach to the tort is from
the rear. From its highest point one commands a
view of miles of the Caribbean Sea as well as the
Chagres River up to its first big turn into the
jungles. Surely a better position for a fortress
could not have been found.

The whole place offers a fine example of medieval
masonry. The ruins are so well preserved that a
very good idea of its construction can be obtained.
On all sides, immediately on the edge of the preci-
pice, was an immense outer wall made of stone.
This practically insured the tort from a surprise
raid. However, should the enemy conquer the
outer wall, they would still have a wide, deep
moat to swim and then another high, wide wall to
gain. The tort proper was in this inner wall.
Many of the bricks are still preserved and are held
in place by mortar as hard as the ruck itself.
Only in places has the wall caved in and then
only where the weight of the vegetation has force!
it. The old covered squad rooms and guard houses
with their sentry boxes are in perfect condition,
and one may even find cannon in the position
where, probably, a fleeing army left them. The
walls of the commandante's quarters show how
royally the old Spanish Dons lived even when
they were out in the wilds of some foreign country.
They certainly believed in the rule that the nobles
and people in command should have all, while the
poor who did nothing but follow and obey, got
practically nothing tor their work and worries.
At that the world has not changed so much.

Perhaps the most talked of part of the old fort
is the well in the courtyard. It is full of water the

MR 5590 6



entire year, and, since it is over a hundred feet
above sea level, this has been the cause of many
stories. Some say that there is an underground
teed; others, that the well has no bottom; still
others claim that a huge treasure has been thrown
into the well, and that if the bottom is ever found
the finder will be very rich. Of course none of the
rumors are true and would never have been
started if people had taken the time to investigate
the well. With just a little energy and some shovel-
ing of dirt that has been deposited on the floor
of the tort, an ambitious person will find that this
very historic well is nothing but a largest iragetank
for surface water, as all floors of the t >rt drain
water to the well. Thus we see that all rain water
falling in the fort eventually finds its way to this
huge tank, and, when the water reaches a certain
height, is drained through fair sized subterranean
drains into the sea. The reason for the water's
remaining one height throughout the entire year
is that the rainfall is about equal to the evapora-
tion. So we find our fabulous stories are all shat-
tered and to be completely discarded.

The question that naturally enters one's mind
is: Why did the old Spaniards go to so much
trouble and suffer the inconveniences of this cli-
mate to build such a complete and almost perfect
fortification? This question begins to pre- i
one's mind while gazing at the precipitious sides
and seemingly invincible walls. Many tales are
heard and many more read, most of which are
hearsay tales from the natives and other pe iple.
However, it is positively established that the great
and ruthless pirate of England, none other than
Morgan himself, captured the fort and that it
later served him as a base on his march across the
Isthmus which ended in the sacking and burning
of Old Panama City. As bold as Morgan was,
he had finally to resort to trickery to force the
Spaniards out of this stronghold. He utilized
his Indians to shoot burning arrows over the walls
to the thatched roofs of the fort within. During
the tire and the confusion following, he rushed the
drawbridges to the fort. This ruse resulted in the
massacre of all within. One can imagine the sur-
prise of the Spanish warriors to find themselves



4-



THF. CARIBBEAN.



tightine hand to hand with an enemy who they With such an interesting history as had mighty

little dreamed would ever pass the first wall. San Lorenzo, it is no wonder that it is talked and

Poor tools! Their greed for gold had made them the studied about so frequently. It is strange that

prev of the ruthless Morgan. Surely pande- people so seldom visit its ruins so romantically

monium never reigned higher. interesting.

A TRAGEDY.

Michael Greene, '29.

(Second place Sophomore English Class.)



li;ht years 1 lived here before I was stricken
with this terrible disease this slow, body-eating
disease, this disease which no power on earth can
cure, this disease whose agonies and terrible sen-
sations are so burdensome.

I first came to Panama on a pleasure trip, wish-
ing to see the Canal. I became attached to the
place and decided to stay for a tew years. Did
I s:i\ a few years? God only knows how many
terrible J ears I shall spend here!



great concern for him, my wife and I asked in the
same breath what had happened.

Large tears began to roll down his face; he
seemed violently stricken. We asked him a
second time.

"You've got it, John. Of all the people in the
world, you had to get it!"

"Get what?"

And then he cried out strangely, "Leprosy!"

My wife shrieked, "John!" and fell forward in a



I especially enjoyed my first few months in dead faint.



Panama. Everything was so new and so inter-
esting; the customs of the people were so different.
Then one evening at a native ball, I met the
daughter of the United States Consul. We be-
came interested in one another, and after a few-
months of happy courtship, were married. We



Oh, shall I ever forget those few moments
moments of terrific torment!

Things went black before me. I could not see.
I felt weak.

Charles tried to comfort me and to bring my
wife back to consciousness. But 1 did not hear him.



spent seven pleasant years together. Then came I had fainted away,
the turning point in our lives. At the celebration
of our seventh wedding anniversary it was dis-
covered.

It was after a delightful waltz with .my wife.
We hail gone out onto the balcony and were

quietly thrilling over the beauty of the soft tropical Nothing. Absolutely nothing,
evening. My wife looked up into my face and
asked, "John, what is that dark brown spot on
your forehead?"

"I don't know, dear. Probably only a spot of
tan."

Just at that moment our very dear friend,
Charles Burnley, came out to join us. Dorothe me paralyzed. I should be banished forever!
laughingly told him that soon she would have a
brown husband as he was tanning in spots.
Charles looked at me, then looked at me again,
and pressed the spot on my forehead. I told him I
could not feel the pressure. I lis face went white.
I [orror was written upon it. I [1 began shaking as
if stricken with ague.

He breathed oui hoarsely, "My God, John! my
God!"

Seeing that lie was greatly agitated and feeling



When I regained consciousness, I was in the
doctor's office. He had made the final test. The
look on his face told me what the outcome of the
examination had been.

What could I do? What could anvone do?



The doctor left the office for a few minutes,
during which time I began to ponder over my
situation. The terrible truth stood before me,
harsh and dark. Before, my brain had been in a
muddle; 1 had not had time to think clearly.
But now, thinking clearly, the terrible truth left



Banished from my wife, Panama, everything;
from all the world! What a thought! This
thought was maddening, and mad I was! Stark,
raving mad! A man of my age to be stricken with
this disease! I charged up and down the office,
alternately wringing my hands and clutching my
hair. To be banished to the leper settlement and
probably be the only white person there, as white
people rarely get the disease.

What a life I should spend there!



THF. CARIBBEAN.



43



I grew cold, and a great trembling seized me as
the office door opened and the doctor entered.
He told me that the boat left in two hours.

Just two more hours and I should start my
banishment.

I asked the doctor if it would be possible for me
to see my wife before I left. A sad shake of his
head was his only reply.

How I reached the boar I do nor remember!
All I remember is that the boat's whistle revived
me.

I was on board, and the boat was leaving. A
great crowd had assembled on shore to bid good-
bye forever to the ones they dearly loved.

Looking back on sho~e I saw my wife standing
beside Charles. Charles was waving. My wife
was weeping bitterly and waving weakly to me.

I hardly remember how I waved good-bye to



Charles and the fine dearer to me than all the
world.

The boat slowly drew away. The last thing I
saw was a white handkerchief slowly moving up
and down, and I knew for whom it was waved.

We arrived at Palo Seco that night and I was

assigned to my quarters. Here in this lonesome

place I weep mournfully and cry out bitterly against

the sentence fate has dealt out to me.
*****

Note: Jusr recently it has been discovered that
injections of chaulmoolgra oil from the tree of the
same name which grows chiefly on the Malay
Peninsula will at least arrest a case of leprosy,
and, it it is in the first stages, perhaps cure it.

At Palo Seco, the leper colony on the Isthmus of
Panama, relatives of the patients are permitted to
visit them once a month and talk to them.



CARNIVAL IN PANAMA.

Mildred Bath, '29.
First in Miscellaneous Feature Stories.)



ranging in number from four to eight. The duty
of these young ladies is to help Her Majesty to
fulfill her duties and to assist her in all her under-
takings during the reign of fun. The financial end



Mirth, laughter, and tinkling bells! Carnival
in full swing! There goes a duke arm in arm with a
cook. Yonder, a scarlet devil is having a pleasant
chat with a sober monk; and a little farther on, a
marquise comes arm in arm with a half-witted
Plebian. There goes the lovely Columbine flirting
with a handsome sailor; and the passionate Pierrot
has just passed, petting a beautiful servant girl.

What a gay and yet ironical mockery of real
life! Such is Carnival everywhere. It is that sea-
son when social bars are levelled and personal pride
is forgotten. One sees the rich, the aristocrat, the
diplomat, the special agent, the poor, the needy,
the white, the yellow, the negro, and everyone
enjoying equally and gleefully the gaiety of the
moment. At this time the wealthy man spends
some of his latest profits; the salaried man throws
away his latest earnings, and the poorest, ever-
suffering class, forgetting their troubles, needs,
and suffering, 111 an effort to be happy squander
their entire year's savings having a goo.l time.

Many committees work together in making
preparations for the Carnival. The most impor-
tant is that tor choosing the queen. She is elected
by popular vote among the prettiest "senoritas"
of the city. The Queen-elect afterwards selects of the festival is attended to by donations from the
among the defeated candidates or among her National Government and from local business
prettiest girl friends, her "dames of honor," houses and individuals.




44



THE CARIBBEAN.



The Carnival proper starts on the Saturday
before Ash Wednesday, and the fun continues
until late Ash Wednesday morning.

During the Carnival there are tree public dances
in all the parks from eight o'clock in the evening
until twelve midnight. The dances in the various
clubs last until four or five in the morning.

The first day, Saturday, is dedicated to the coro-
nation of the Queen. On this day the people join-
ing in the festivities usually wear the "Pollera"
(the national costume for the ladies) and the
"Montuno" (the national costume for the men).

A man called Dios Momo, wearing a large gro-
tesque head, announces tlie coming of Carnival.
The terrible, yet fascinating head is so very gaudy
that he attracts a great deal of attention, and the
automobile in which he rides is followed by a great
procession of people on foot, shouting and crying
out deafeningly.

On Sunday and Monday everyone wears what
he has or what he chooses, for there is no special
costume.

Everywhere these evenings one hears the tom-
toms. Now they grow louder now, die down.
rywhere is dancing. "Toldos," temporary
arbors with only an awning for covering perhaps
only a floor laid in a vacant lot are surrounded
by onlookers who clap and sing while those within
are dancing. Usually there are only the tom-toms
for music; sometimes there are other native instru-
ments with perhaps an harmonica or two.

Automobiles, carriages, and trucks ot various
kinds parade the streets every evening and on
Tuesday before, during, and after the grand



parade. These vehicles are heavily decorated with
ribbons and banners ot the most varying and
contrasting colors. Serpentines fly between ;hem.
There comes one now! See! The hood of the car
is dropped; the girls are sitting on it and clapping
in time to their lusty singing of their native songs
or ot other favorites. Look at that large, stout
negress over there in the gay Martiniquan cos-
tume sitting on the back ot that car with her long,
flowing, stiffly-starched skirts spread carefully
over the edge. Again, farther on, there is one
on which three shy and dainty Panaman maidens
sit, singing timidly, and laughing and chatting
quietly. How pretty they are in the picturesque
Pollera with the bright, quivering "tembleques"
in their hair!

At last comes Tuesday, the "(Jala Day.'' This
is the final day of the Carnival of fun and every
soul teels ready for it. On this day one wears his
best costume. The merrymaking lasts until six
or seven o'clock Ash Wednesday morning. There
is also a long procession of Carnival floats, the
prettiest of them always being the Queen's float.
Every Carnival Club is represented by a float
in this monster parade and the Canal Zone often
contributes on this day a float or two and one or
two detachments ot soldiers and sailors with their
bands, which make the procession and the festivi-
ties very impressive and beautiful.

This is Carnival in Panama. As is true wherever
this festivity takes place, the slogan is: "A stop in
the vicissitudes of life ami a forgetfulness of the
morrow, to give one's self away to the most out-
rageous mirth."




A < it iiiv il Que u



THE CARIBBEAN.



45



m=




w.=



THE DEATH WHISTLE.

Marion Lowande, '39,
(Second Miscellaneous Feature Stories.)




Pat was whistling. Hadn't he a right?
Weren't his wife and two babies arriving to-
morrow? Yes, the Canal Zone was safe for them
now. There was little chance of their being
overcome with malaria, or yellow fever. It was
a healthful place, the Canal Zone.

At last they arrived. Pat carried his two
children up the steps of their home. There
was not a prouder man on the Zone.

Nightfall bedtime Daddy must tell them a
story, and daddy willingly complied with the
request. Every night there must be a story
before Molly and Jimmy would turn over and
sleep. Was there ever a happier man than Pat
rising early in the morning to go to his work and
returning in the afternoon to a loving wife and
children whistling ?

There would be a slide in the Cut. Dynamite
would be set, and the warning whistle would
sound. Then a flash and a roar the Cut would
be open once more to traffic. Another whistle
would pierce the air, sinister in its meaning. It
was the death whistle someone had been too



slowing in getting away from the charge. At
home the women felt a fear clutching their hearts;
it might be their loved one.

Jimmy's birthday came. Besides the big, red
automobile he must have an unusually good story.
What should it be? Deeply absorbed in thought,
but breaking out in a happy whistle whenever a
brilliant idea struck him, Pat failed to hear the
warning whistle. A low rumble; then oblivion.
That sinister whistle pierced the sudden quiet.
At home, Pat's wife shivered and offered up a
silent prayer tor the poor unfortunate's family.

Jimmy wondered why his father did not come.
Why was his mother crying? What were all the
people doing in his house? Pulling one big
man's hand, Jimmy asked when his daddy was
going to come home. A tear escaped from the
big man's eye and in a voice that managed to
catch, he said, "Your daddy has gone home,
Laddy."

But the big man must have been mistaken
'cause he hadn't heard his daddy come whistling
up the path.



SOME
By
WALTER WI



K



ICKS

and
OMPLIMENTS
INGSTAD, '30.



(Second place Freshman English Class.)

The seniors in this high school.
As the seasons go and come,
Are pretty much like juniors
They're apt to grumble some.

Then take the simple sophomores,
Those little bags of wind,
And compare them with the freshmen,
Who never do give in.

This school is really not complete
Without the freshmen in it;
They do their work, and do not shirk,
And are modernists to the minute.



46



THE CARIBBEAN.



-



£




RUSTY.

Joseph Corrigan, '27.




m



Rusty paid no attention to those young Moods
who stood laughing at him. They looked fine
in their sleek, spotless coats. He, too, had once
looked like that. There had been a time when
he too had had nothing to do but play, and laugh
at the other old, battle-scarred veterans. If
Rusty cared to waste his time on these young tops
he could tell them a thing or two which would
make them respect his limp and his scarred coat.

In 1917 one could not have told him from one
of those young tops who now made sport of him.
But poor Rusty was on his last legs. One had
been hurt by a shell, and the others loudly
creaked as he wheezed along after his master.
True, he was not the dog he had been.

He had never liked other dogs, and his master
was the only man he had ever cared for. When
his master had gone to war, Rusty had gone too.
He still remembered his training, first at Camp
Dix, and later in France. The training over,
Rusty had become a messenger. He could have
told you -but wouldn't of his fight with the
German messenger, Roderick. It you had tried
to compliment him, he would have told you that
he had done nothing; merely fought a suspicious
looking stranger. Why should he brag when any
other dog, given the chance would have done the
same thing?

lie wished people would let him alone! He
hated those old woman who said, "Oh, here's
dear Rusty! Isn't he cute! He looks so oldish
and battle-scarred."

"Well," Rusty could answer, "am I not?"

"Dear Captain," the ladies would continue,
"please tell us how Rusty saved your life."
Then a lady would come over to his chair and pet
him. Why didn't she go and get one of those
doll does. That's what they were tor, petting.
He didn't want them (o come around him with
their perfume)' handkerchiefs.

Then the Captain would start. "Will, it was
on the fifth of June, IOI8, when the Germans
made their attack. Our company had been



pretty badly cut up. We were just about to
get help when they found our nest. There were
ten ot us waiting there in the dugout for the
shell that would bury us."

"We kept plugging away but it didn't seem to
stop the Boches at all. At last we heard a big
'zowie,' anil the mouth of the nest was plugged.
We tried to dig away the dirt, but the air was
getting bad, and we were getting weak. Every-
one was hurt, and we all gave ourselves up as
lost. The last thing I remember was hearing
a few dull thuds on the outside then sleep.

"I woke up in the hospital. The occupant ot
the next bed woke me up with some terrible
groans ami yelps. I looked over to see what was
wrong with the poor fellow, and to my surprise
saw Rusty. The poor fellow! He was in as
bad a fix as I.

"The next day I was wakened by a lot of talking
and the sound of footsteps in the ward. The
general and some of the staff making an inspec-
tion? No, they had stopped at Rusty's bed. I
looked over and saw the general pin something
on Rusty's blanket. Why, Rusty was being
decorated!

"They told me then that I owed my life to
Rusty. He had been shot in the leg while he
was bringing a message to us. He had dragged
himself up to the dugout just after we had been
so nicely bottled up. Knowing that something
was wrong with the door, Rusts' had started to
scratch the dirt from the lower rim. He had
succeeded in making a little hole which hail served
as an air supply to us. That was what had kept
us alive. When the firing had let up some, a
scouting party came out to find us. When Rusty
saw them, he started yelping and dragged him-
self up tci the door. The party saw him and got
us out of the hole. If it hadn't been for Rusty,
here, we'd be a fine lot of mummies to-day."

"Well," thought Rust\', "If I'd known you
would talk about it like this, you might be a
mummy to day.



THE CARIBBEAN.



47




=r-=



DAILY IMPRESSIONS

of various members ot the Class of 1927 on viewing the same object or scene day arter da




\], k )DS THE SEA'S OR MINE-

Dorothy Svensson, 'jy.



There is a feeling ot impatient restraint on the
part of the elements to-night an apprehensive
mood suggestive of smouldering passions, con-
cealed hurts. The bay is enshrouded in foreboding
ink-like darkness upon which the pale searching
glances of the ghostly lighthouse make no im-
pression. An occasional dart of lightning dis-
closes black lowering clouds.

The uneasy bay seems secretive, mysterious, as
if planning some pillaging prank. The dark sky
bends closer perhaps to catch those low whisper-
ings and join in with the schemes ot the night.

The sea is a heaving, seemingly uncontrollable
mass of roaring breakers defiant proud. Sud-
denly with a fitful rush ot sea-wind comes rain
rain rain, to beat and hammer those haughty
waves into molten liquid.

Flashes ot lightning seek to pierce the cloud
cages in which angry thunder may be heard mut-
tering and threatening. The rumbling ot heavy
rushing surf and the awful roar of breakers com-
bine to make this a night of dread and fear.

To-night the sea is sullen, angry. The tempes-
tuous waves crash blindlv against the grav rocks,
which unmercifully batter them into plain, color-
less particles ot water. Above arc no clouds. A
solid sky, dark and mysterious, blots out the friend-
ly stars. A palm tree, w mil-torn and alone, adds
the only bit of tropical color to the anger-racked
picture.

The sea is a caldron of boiling, leaping waters;
the sky, the blackened lid, from under which warm
mist escapes.



The dark sea sullenly moves on, muttering to
itself, as a spoiled child, who has been repri-
manded by its mother, utters dire threats in a
cautious undertone.

Dark clouds dark hills and sea and a great
silent loneliness which overwhelms one's heart.

The sea is a dismal, colorless prairie. The weary-
gray waves curl drearily about grayer rocks.
From above the jungles of Fort Sherman a leaden
curtain descends concealing in its folds dank, dis-
agreeable rain.

Pearly gray dawn breaks over a sleepy ocean.
bar oft, one can see the crumpled gray smoke
ribbon from an outgoing steamer.

Midnight and the moon, muffled in a misty
veil of silvers- gauze, watches over the slumberous
ocean.

A tiny sail, white as a snowy swan's wing, glides
noiselessly over the smoth mirror of the bay.

The bay is a silvery taffeta upon whose change-
able sheen a fairy craft, skimming gaily along,
carelessly flings sparkling jewels.

Joyously, exultantly, the sea leaps in a dishev-
eled mass. It is one of the rare moments when the
wind and sea are found playing together in care-
free, sportive glee.

Far oft, one can see the dreamy rise and tall of
the ocean's blue breast. Clouds wander lazily
and endlessly on. The scene is peaceful, serene.
The heart cries out in sheer joy.



4 8



THE CARIBBEAN.



DIFFERENT DAYS ON OUR BAY.
Louise- ffeim, 'j~.

Thanksgiving Day! The bay is calm and silent
as if it, too, were offering up to God a little prayer
of thanksgiving.

The bay is happy hilariously happy. Each
little wave is trying to outdo the others in merry
laughter. The haughty palms overlooking these
irresponsible children are condescending to hold a
pleasant conversation with the surf which is trip-
ing gaily over the reef

The bay with to-day's exquisite coloring might
be a delicate creation of some master artist.
The water is a deep, clear blue, flashing bright
smiles at the motherly azure sky where fleecy
white clouds are resting.

The whole bay is a beautiful reflection ot an
enchanting yellow and rose sunset.

The setting sun makes the bay a veritable sea
of gold. In the background, hovering around the
mountain tops like thieves to steal away this
splendor, are black clouds.

It is hard this morning for me to believe that the
sea can sometimes be a fearsome monster destroy-
ing everything that comes into its grasp, because
it is now as calm and gentle as a lamb who would
not think of doing anything rash. I think the
sea has a dual personality.

The bay is calm, gray, and silent except for the
soft murmuring of the surf creeping lazily over the
reef A foreboding black cloud hangs above the
water like a mysterious curtain ready to descend
and hide this peaceful scene in torrents of rain.

There is something about the bay to-day that
uives it a restless aspect. The small, greenish-
blue waves seem to be captives who want to
escape.

To-day the sea is a seething mass of budding
anger. The gray waves seem to be giving warning
that if they have the least provocation they will

srop at nothing.

The bay is angry. Great waves are rushing in
like giant steeds at war with some invisible force.



OUR PALM TREES.
Joseph Corrigan, '27.

It must be tiresome having to stand there watch-
ing the same old things come and go. Busses,
cars, sun, rain, and darkness pass by in the same
unending line day alter day.

I wondered what you were doing. I looked
toward you but could not see you. Suddenly a
light found you. I see you now, Tree. You seem
lonesome out there in the rain. You wisely have
your back to the shower. You are bent so you will
not get your green head too wet. Isn't that so?

The sun is not yet up. Everything is still asleep.
Even the trees seems weary leaning to one side
as they do. Has swaying to the music of the mid-
night rain fatigued them so?

The palm trees are prudently holding their
umbrella tops to the rain.

I can not even see the trees; the rain has swal-
lowed all.



TOWARD THE BREAKWATER.

Helen Montgomery, '27.

Waves lapped lazily against the wall, as it with-
out energy under the blinding sun.

A sheet of blue glass, lay the sea this morning.
A tiny cayuca alone broke the monotony.

A solid wall of gray sky and gray sea, broken
only by a discriminating line of beige wall, with
first the blink of a red light, then of white, then
of red.

The continuous blue ot the sea and sky was
broken only by the passing of a white ship, as it a
fairy ship upon a fairy sea.

Huge breakers swept over the wall, then white
foam flashing and whipping at the stone. The
spray, forming a multicolored rainbow, fell back
in feathcr\- showers.

Thev loomed up in the blackness, tour long rows
of tiny lights. They swayed ever so slightly but
enough to be discernible. They drew nearer,
rather slowly, growing larger as thev came. The
shadow of the ship formed an entrancing picture
against the gray sky. It passed on into the night.



THE CARIBBEAN.



49



FROM OUR HOUSE.
Euphsmia IVoolnough, '27.

Nightfall is slowly approaching. A boat is
being raised in the locks in order that it may go on
its way. The black mules* wait patiently beside
the boat until it is ready to go into the next cham-
ber. Men are seen, standing by, holding in their
hands ropes that are attached to the boat. The
trees in the background can now scarcely be seen,
as it is quite dark. The locks, with their many
lights, look to be a little city.

The rain is diizzling down en the lake, and as
the sun gleams through the rain, the drops bounce
on the water like diamonds. The blue-green trees
stand out against a clear white sky.

The locks this evening look very dreary. The
mules* are moving slowly south to bring a boat
through. The trees in the background are so dark
that they appear black behind the ghostly white
lighthouse. The rain is beating down with great
force on the quiet surface of the little lake and on
the smooth green carpet of grass along the locks.

The calm little lake reflects this morning a
gorgeous rainbow which dips one end into the
Canal and rests the other on the mahogany trees
behind it.

* Electric locomotives for towing ships through the locks.



SEA, SKY, AND PALMS ON NEW
CRISTOBAL POINT.

Charles Will, '27.

A leaden sky and listless sea like severe elders
watch the fragile palms frolicking with a fragrant
breeze.

Rain in silvery sheets falls with a mournful
patter on the dejected palms. The gray-blanketed
sea is quiet for the night.

With a dash of color and zest, the sea, in huge
white combers, rushes with a roar on the sandy
beach. A brisk breeze gently but firmly shakes
the water-logged palm fronds.

The lengthened shadows of the palms slowly
merge with the dusk, while the sea, calm and mute,
awaits the night.

The sun has set. The reflection of the afterglow
on the placid sea forms a remarkable background
for the fantastic silhouettes of the palms.

MR 5590 7



Night has stealthily stolen over sea and land.
Through the Stygian darkness the swish of the
palms can be heard, seemingly haranguing the
sea, trembling at their feet in smothered confusion.

The sea, grim and gray, in its temperamental
fashion appears to contemplate a change of mood.
The palms huddle together as if sensing the
volcanic disposition of the sea and their helpless-
ness before it.

The sea, with a deep-throated roar, rushes up on
the sandy point. The palms, bent backward before
the wind, seem retreating before a relentless enemy.

The sky is still gray and overcast. The sea rests
as if gasping for breath after violent exertion, while
the palms, thankful for the cessation of the storm,
droop with weariness.

The sea, blue, peaceful, and serene, utterly
content, slowly advances to the sandy shore and
suddenly seems to smile at the nodding palms, as
if paying tribute to those who have withstood
his assaults during his more turbulent moods.
Once again the changeful sky, the slender palms,
and the volatile sea are in perfect accord.



THE REEF.

Surse J. Taylor, Jr., '27.

Great white waves are rushing in on the reef
this afternoon. They swell from the surface of
the ocean, tower in a huge mass of green, and
smash in a chaos of creamy white. A rock
stands in their path. Crash! High in the air
leaps a spout of white, and the spray is tossed
in all directions by the stiff breeze.

This morning I watched an interesting race
between a majestic comber and a fleecy white
cloud. As well as I could see through the flying
spray, the wave won. It is my idea that the
cloud should have hail a handicap.

A changing panorama, now lighted by the sun,
now hidden in veils of rain which lend mystery
to the sound of pounding, unseen breakers.

To-day a sullen veil of rain and low flying
clouds gives one only an occasional glimpse of
cold looking spray and makes one think of cherry
log fires and raincoats.

The seas lift lazily and tumble to the tune of a
whistling wind.

Softly as cotton peeps from its wrapper, curls
the water on the reef to-day. Blue sea tor a
wrapper, white breakers for cotton.






THE CARIBBEAN.



GATUN AT NIGHT.
fames Grider, '27.

Dark clouds, pushed ever forward by a strong
breeze, hang over the street to-night.

N>u a sprinkle; now a rumble; and then a
pour. The streets are running water. Rain!
Rain! Rain! Only the street lights are visible
during the heavy downpour.

It is raining. The pit-a-pat splashes upon the
pavement are mingled with the sound ot steady
dripping on the palms. Above these sounds of
rain is heard only the occassional sound ot a bus,
splashing its way through the water-covered
streets. First comes the low rumble of its ap-
proach, then the loud splashes as it darts by.
Again the low rumble and it is gone. After this
there is only silence except tor the pit-a-pat
splashes upon the pavement and the sound ot
steady dripping on the palms.

The palms along the wayside hang their droop-
ing, dripping heads, and seem to wonder it this is
their last refreshment tor many days. The pave-
ment, too, seems to give up reluctantly its cover-
ing of water as if in dread anticipation ot the
approaching long hot days and stead}' dry winds.

To-night the broad road seems indeed a selected
way of comfortable travel, where motor cars slip
by and pedestrians walk peacefully. Yet, not so
manv years ago, the Spanish seekers ot Eldorado
struggled perhaps over this very path fighting the
iuniilc and its pestilent insects. These disillusioned
Spaniards were wont to hate this future place of
pleasantness for its obstruction to their tame and
fortune.



ALONG THE CANAL.

Clara May, 'zj.

Dreary and desolate lies the colorless water ot
the Canal. A dark, threatening cloud overhead
slowly unfolds into a dense curtain of rain.

Streaks of blue, silver, green, and gold appear
and disappear as the sun playfully casts its rays
upon the water.

Though the sun is still high, there is in the air
that indefinable freshness that tells ot evening
coming on.

The trim whiteness ot" a boat as it slowly glides
down the Canal seems to have borrowed a rosy hue
from the clouds which herald the sunset.

Chameleon-like, the Canal has taken on the
opalescent color ot the sky.

The skv and the Canal are illuminated by colors
blending from the lightest tint of yellow into a
deep orange, then into a fiery red, gradually shad-
ing out to blue.

To-night the peace of early evening enfolds
water and land with amethyst mists.

The red and green channel lights appear, and
the tall, massive, white lighthouse awakens sud-
denly and blinks her eye.

Like a large, black monster a boat slowly comes
Lip the moonlit Canal.




1 rhrough ihe Canal, Leaving Upper Locks Chamber to Entei Mirafloree Lake



THE CARIBBEAN.



5'



K-=



m



m




SEE SAW.

Dorothy Ssensson, '_?-.




Characters Prisoner.

Prison warden.
Also a familiar.

Place Prison room.

Time Night.

Act I.

Scene I.

I A rat-harassed dungeon; the candles flicker
weirdly, crazily, casting gruesoms shadows on
the damp, moldy walls. A prisoner is seen sit-
ting on an old keg, which at one tim- perhaps
harbored evil spirits. The prisoner is pale, yet
determined; his ashen face is cupped in firm
hands. |

Enter Warden "Ah, man of vile ways, the
time draws near when you must sever your
lowly connections with man. Kill you I must,
rho' comb my b.-ain as I may, I cannot devis:
a method which will please the public. I have
thought of burning, of arsenic, of gunpowder, of
hanging, but none suits me. Speak, Oh future
corpse, have you a suggestion?"



Prisoner (over whose face a look of cunning
passes) "Yes, yes, I have a new and entirely
original idea. I should like to die of old age."

Warden (filled with consternation) "No,
foolish one. One more wise crack like that and
but Will You Con/ess?"

Prisoner (proudly) "No!"
Warden "Submit him to the spiked mallet."
(It is done even as bidden.) "Do you confess

now r"



Prisoner "Never! Not Nevt



(Thi



last



said emphatically).

Warden "You are a tough customer; all
my devices seem in vain. But hold! I have
one more my last and m >;t horrible. "(Whispers
to a familiar who nods and departs, returning
with a gleaming instrument.)

Warden (hissing) "See this the S-a-w!"

Prisoner (screaming) "The Saw Merciful
heavens! Not that no not that! I confess
everything, anything!"

Warden (with gleam of triumph, mutters)
"It was well you confessed for it you hadn't, I
should have played upon it."

CERTAIN quick!



A LITTLE APPRECIATIO J

J,ihn (',. Nelson, '2y.

There is one pers >n around Cristobal High
School who, while n it a member of the student
body, meets with the disapproval of nobody.
This person has never thrown anyone in the jug;
he has never given anyone a white slip. There has
never in the history oi the school been an occasion
where this person was responsible tor a failure
nay, not even a condition. Nor has anyone ever
been expelled, suspended on account of the same.
No hard feelings exist. He is everybody's friend,
and nobody has any grudge against him. It is
quite unusual to have all this friendship. The
person to whom I am referring is Samuel.



A QUALITY "COCHERO."
Helen Montgomery, 'ij.

Practically everyone has seen him as he sits on
the driver's seal of his coach. His black felt hat
resting at its particular jaunty angle, on his grey
woolly head; his shining black eyes looking
straight ahead at his prized possession, his large,
chestnut horse; his high, stiff collar seemingly
keeping his head from drooping or turning; his
neat black tie; the perpendicular outline of his
back; what a striking figure he makes. He re-
minds one of a driver in the days of the old South.



>-2



THE CARIBBEAN.



DESPERATION.



JohnG. A

Desperate Steve Poggin was a desperate man
indeed. His battery was operated on the streak
lightning principle, and there was no man living
that would court a blow from his huge fists,
hardened and calloused as they were by cruel
and inhuman mangling ot vicious steers. He
drank his liquor in kegs, and it was the strongest
liquor in that count) in the summer. In the
winter he had to dilute it with alcohol to prevent
it from freezing. His heavy boots fairly shook
the Shonkin Saloon as he viciously kicked the
bar as a signal tor a little service. Yes, through
and through, Desperate Steve Poggin was a son
of the great open spaces where men are men and
the plumbing is terrible.

Suddenly a shot grazed the ear of Desperate
Steve Poggin. Ah, pity the poor unfortunate
whose erring shot brought the wrath of this
terrible desperado! There was blood in his eye, to-
bacco on his teeth, and dandruff in his moustache.
Bang! Bang! No, forty more redskins didn't



clson, 'jj.

bite the dust. Pete Hankins lay dead, dead, cold
as the hair on a walrus's neck. Terrible C. A.
Barber gave a sudden contortion; the muscles
in his neck stiffened; then with a dying leap he
lay sprawling on the stairway, with his head
between two banisters.

Desperate Steve Poggin, seeing his crime and
the menacing look in the eyes of the men about,
left the saloon, mounted his prancing landaulet,
and was off into the distance before any of the
men could reach tor their guns. The sheriff's
men were soon hot on the trail.

********

A sort ot restlessness becomes apparent through-
out the room. Euphemia's piano stops. Then
the lights flash, and the race is on every man
for himself, and it is no place for a fat man the
entrance to the theater at Fort Davis is so narrow
that you have to turn sideways to go through the
door.



TITLE TO BE DETERMINED AFTER.
'James Grider, '27.

There has come upon us a great and national,
yea, international epidemic. Shall I call it the
white plague? Then I must also call it the black
plague, the green plague, and the striped plague.

The male species is especially susceptible to this
disease, although it often attacks the dumber sex,
especially those athletically inclined.

After this dreaded malady obtains a strangle
hold, the lower extremities are severely affected.
The shins become shriveled and ugh'. Yet, the
upper portions of the extremities are more directly
attacked.

After the disease once becomes bothersome, the
\n rim is never cured. It is the penalty for satis-
fying foolish desires. Still, such popularity must
be deserved. They satisfy.

After all, knickers have proved practical.

A MIRROR.

/) ,;<,//.-, Svensson, '-''
Just a little spot of water lying tranquilly ami
peacefully in a crevice of the road. A marvel-
ous) brave little spot of water it was, reflecting,
not the dull, barren cheerlessnessof its surrounding,
but the delicate exquisite glory of the heavens as
pink and gold wisps blushingly kissed the sun
good night.



MACHE.*

Dorothv Svensson, 2j

Mache is not his real name, this little San Bias
boy indignantly tells us. No, it is Armadio Jose
Carrido Alberto Grimaldo. What a long name for
such a small boy! And what a large grin for such
a diminutive head. That same grin is a sight to
behold it is seemingly toothless the grin of an
old man. His small brown eyes shine gleefully from
his little egg-shaped monkey head when he sees
our awe at his unusual actions. For what does
Mache pardon me, Armadio do, but casually
and quickly climb a slender coconut tiee, and as
casually and more quickly fall off on his head
possibly to test the endurance of his little fur-
covered dome. Oh, yes, Mache is some boy!

*Moche means San Bias.



A COSTUME

( Lira May, ij.

Big, fat, and untidy, Mary, the laundress, wore
a faded green skirt which hung down to her ankles,
and a dark orange blouse, apparently made of
curtain material, spotted and torn. An old pail
of black sandals, which did nol fit her large,
unshapely feet, slid on and off as she shuffled
around, and did nol cover the huge holes in the
heels oi her pink stockings.



THE CARIBBEAN.



THE SNORE.

Surse J. Taylor, Jr., '2/.



Slowly and precisely the diver went about his
work like an automaton. Bill Curry in his
diver's suit was a formidable figure, and to-day
his thoughts were anything but peaceful. Cun-
ningly he had arranged to survey the wreck
himself and now, alone in the great void of murky
water with only the salvaging tug above him, he
put his plans into action. It would be quite



At last the moment had arrived, the divers'
feet touched the wreck's deck almost simultane-
ously. Placing their helmets together they held
a short talk. Bill, as surveyor, had the seniority;
consequently he advised Jimmy to go down
through the refrigerating room and meet him in the
engine room. Obediently Jimmy lifted his leg
over the hatch and so made his last earthlv move.



simple; Jimmy would enter the main hatch to the Bill swung the door shut, the catch slipped, and

refrigerator room, Bill would swing the door shut, only the life line and air tube dangled mutely

the catch. Somewhat guiltily Bill entered the and uselessly, pointing to the tragedy. Calmly

engine room door. Down in that dark space Bill went aft to the engine room where he pro-

they would find him hopelessly tangled and thus ceeded r<> get wound up very completely in the

able to furnish a perfect alibi tor not coming to ladders and pipes. Overhead the salvaging tug.



his fellow diver's aid. Yes, it would be quite
simple the door had shut on the air tube and
the catch had slipped. The rest would be easy;
he could tantde himself so nicely that another



receiving no signals from the two divers, immedi-
atel) prepared the one remaining diver, little
"Sherlock." Softly the dead man's body was
brought to the top, while tar below Masterson



diver would have to help him in unraveling his assisted Bill in untangling his fouled pipe an;



line. Then Jim's body would be discovered.

Yes, he reasoned, as he slowly ascended from
the deck of the wrecked vessel, it would be child's
play. No one would ever know. And he had a
right to, although the two had been chums from
childhood; Jimmy, the lucky, good-looking,
cheerful fellow had always beaten Bill out. First
it had been at marbles, then the mathematics
prize in High School, that promotion in the salvag-
ing concern, and lastly Bill's girl. Yes, he had a
right to. He'd beat him at last.



life line. As soon as Bill was loose he gave the
signal to be hoisted. Little Masterson lingered
below for a short while. When he was finally
taken out of his suit, his pale face wore a very
set look.

The lives of men may wax and wane but the
salvaging must go on. Jimmy Ballard was
buried next day. That night in New York a
flippant young woman shed a tear and went to
a musical show with another fellow. As far as
the men on the tug were concerned, the episode



When Bill reached the top, he reported the was a closed book, a chance they all took and

vessel resting on good bottom and a slightly would have to meet face to face sooner or later,

uneven keel. Next day operations would begin One, or I might say two, did not forget the matter.

with Jimmy Ballard ami Bill Curry working the Bill was looking bad. He ate little and roamed

first shift. Bill's spirits were rather high that the deck at night. Masterson wore a strange

night. He cracked jokes and played poker look and was often observed staring at Curry.

losing to Jimmy, as usual. Turning in early, he The men took no particular notice of Masterson's

slept but very little. Eater- Jimmy came in. change, and they attributed Curry's gloom to

Bill lay awake practically all night listening to grief for a pal. One day a week after the unfor-

Jim snore and planning planning. tunate accident little Masterson had a long and

At breakfast the next morning Bill's plans were earnest conversation with the carpenter. Shortly

almost upset by little "Sherlock" Masterson's after, Masterson walked off to his cabin with a



offering to serve Jimmy's shift below. Bill broke
in with, "Now, Sherlock, Watson and I will be
back presently. You stay here and solve the
mystery of the 'Unseen Hand!' The mess
broke into guffaws of laughter. Little Master-
son's passion tor mysteries was certainly well
known.



very small and delicate saw. Masterson's cabin
was, by the way, next to Curry's.

The men noticed a change in Curry, but little
did they know of how great a change it was.
He slept but very little and often would awake
from a doze to find himself listening for Jimmy's
snore. He smoked package after package of



54



THF. CARIBBFAW



cigarettes. Late at night he would get up and
pace the deck. He took, at last, to drink, and
in the mornings would conic down to breakfast
with a heavily flushed face and bloodshot eyes.
Masterson was forever watching him. Curry
noticed this one day and after that was very care-
ful to avoid him. He entered into none of the
friendly little card games but would, instead,
stand in a darkened corner of the deck and gaze
abstractedly into the water. One night he turned
in fairly early. He dozed in fits. About one
o'clock he awoke from an unquiet slumber in a
cold sweat. Not moving a muscle, he stiffened
in a listening attitude. Aaah there it was
Jimmy's snore Was he going crazy? He leaped
out of" his bunk and flung on the lights to find
nothing but an empty mattress in Jim's bunk.
He flung the mattress out, tore up the bunk, and
still found nothing. He slept no more that night.

He drank quite a bit from his private store.
In fact, he drank so much that he was unable to
report for duty next morning. The captain
decided Curry would have to be laid off next
time they reached port. The next night he was
again startled to hear that snore. It was a
slightlv nasal snore, and all night he listened to
its rise ami fall, too stupefied even to get up and
turn on the lights. The following day he reported
for duty wearing a haggard, haunted look. He
also asked if he might change his cabin. When
Masterson heard this, his face relaxed. Masterson
spoke to the cabin boy during the day.

In the mess room that night the boys were
playing their game. Masterson was sitting in a
corner reading a certain magazine commonly
known as a thriller. He appeared restless and
seemed to be waiting for something. A noise
of running sounded on the deck outside. The
door burst open ami Curry staggered in, but what
a Curry! "He's outside," he kept moaning,
"outside smoking just like he used to. He's
been in my cabin every night haunting me. 'l es,
I killed him. I'll tell, but for sake take him away."

Masterson was at his rib >w in a second. In
his hand he clutched a pencil and paper. Using
Curry's fear as a tool, he finally wormed a full
confession our of him. Curry broke down
completely. After that, he seemed to go out of
his head. "Thar snore him that snore keep-
in' me awake. Well, I got even with him."
They dragged him away and locked him up.

Sometime later when the tug was on its way
home, the men got little Masterson to give an



explanation. Masterson was reluctant, but he
gave in at las" and told them.

"You fellows always kidded me about my
sleuthing, but I tell you it's my only weakness. I
spend hours making up crimes and solving them.
That day when both of those men fouled at once
in different parts of the wreck I smelled something.
Of course, I didn't know anything about either
of those boys, or I'd have suspected something
sooner. As it was, I wasn'* sure till Curry asked
to change his cabin. That made me positive.
One other little incident started me at first.
When I found Ballard behind the door, I noticed
distinctly that, considering the angle the vessel
was on, it was absolutely impossible for the door
to swing on him. It had to be pushed, and some
human had to do it. That wasn't very obvious,
or I suppose Curry would have noticed it.
Furthermore, the slip might have settled a little
so I couldn't bank on that. Another thing,
Curry was beautifully tangled in about three
places. Now you know, and I know that to
foul is a coincidence; three at once is too much.
After that I spoke to the carpenter and confided
in him. We hatched up a little plot. Being next
to Curry and Ballard, I couldn't help hearing
Ballard snore. I cut a hole between the cabins
under Ballard's bunk. I had been listening to
Curry moving about ami I knew he was restless.
I just snored through that hole every time he-
went to sleep. To-day I decided to bring things
to a close. I bribed the cabin boy not to fill
Curry's water bottle. He has been drinking
steadily, ami consequently I knew he would
want water to-night. I just fixed it so that when
he came out of his cabin he'd find the carpenter,
who is about Jimmy's build, standing at the rail
smoking Jimmy's pipe ami dressed in Jimmy's
clothes. These I took out of Curry's cabin while
he was diving to-day. You remember how Jimmy
used to Stand outside his cabin after watch ami
smoke his pipe? Well, Curry had noticed it too,
because he'd always call when Jimmy's time was
up. Well, that just finished him. The rest was
simple."

"One thing I want to know, Sherlock," said
one of the men, "How could you imitate Jimmy's
snore well enough to tool him?"

"I could tell that snore anywhere. It w.is a
slightly nasal snore, and main's the night it's
kept me awake," and Masterson's eyes blinked
at the homely memory.



THE CARIBBEAN.



55



SUSANNE.

Dorothy Svensson, '-?/.

She was staring blindly before her when we
first saw her. Her shrunken little figure looked
pain-wracked as she rigidly sat in her squeaky old
rocking chair. She turned watery-weak eyes in our
direction as we entered the bare but neat room.

"Susanne," said Dr. Tucker, "this is a class from
Cristobal High School. They have come to say
hello to my very best patient."

"Oh, sir, no, sir," said old Suzanne, with a
pleased, yet wistful look, as she smiled lovingly at
the doctor. Then to us, "The doctor says such
nice things."

We stood around, embarrassed, wanting to say
the suitable thing to this lo\ able old woman who so
bravely submitted to her terrible affliction
leprosy.

Finally the doctor said kindly, "Tell these nice
young people how you are, Susanne."

"I am getting along very well. The fingers on
my right hand are not treating me as wretchedly as
those on my left hand."

Mutely we gazed down at her left hand, twisted
and contorted into a hard lump, the fingers seem-
ing to have been melted and then shaped to form a
hideous mass of brown scab' substance.

"Do not be sorry for me," she spoke as if dis-
cerning our very thoughts. "The Lord is good.
See!" She moved her left hand up and down.
"And nothing can hurt my hand. I could put a
hot iron on it. I wouldn't feel anything would
I, Doctor Tucker?" and she looked trustfully upat
him.

"Oh," she reflected, "the Lord is good, yes, yes
(now gently rocking back and forth), the Lord is
good is good."

We said good-bye in her that pi I if til old woman
whose beautiful trust in God so stirred our hearts.



CONSCIENCE.

Rog >- I) akin, 2<).

W ith shifting eyes and ever pivoting head which
continually turned to cast frightened glances
over his shoulder, Joe Winfries crept silentlv
through the long, white tunnel on his nightly
round of inspection.

This job of night watchman of rhe tunnels on
the locks was getting on his nerves. On his
first week the voices hail been mere whispers, and
he had only caught glimpses from the corner of
his eye of "The Thing" as it dodged around cor-
ners. Now the voices called him by name,



mocked him, laughed, ami taunted him. He
could hear them now. "Winfries! Ha, Ha!
You murderer. You're going to get caught.
Ho, Ho!"

A shadow tell from just around the bend. He
rushed forward but the long corridor, warm and
damp from the imprisoned air, was empty. The
thing that got him most, however, was a nightly
performance that took place regularly at the
different places. He stopped. There it was
again this time in a room about three doors ahead.
"My God, Winfries, have mercy!" A cruel laugh,
a shot, some groans, and all was still.

He leaped to the door and threw his light
within. Empty. He had known it would he.
Was he going craz) r If he had only not left his
temper run awaj with him and killed a man in
cold blood he would not be here hiding. If he
could only get another job. But this was the
only one in which he could work nights and sleep
during the day.

He continued his round of inspection more
nervous than ever. An iron door swung open
ahead of him. Before it clanged shut he had a
glimpse of ghostly glowing eyes. Useless to
look. He knew he would find nothing. He
felt like screaming.

Then the noises stopped. Everything ceased,
voices and all. The silence was worse than the
noise. He crept along fearfully, looking into the
rooms and down into the pits where the larger
machinery was.

Into one of these pits he peered, gave a little
gasp and looked again. There it was. Surelv
that was it "The Thing" that had been looking
at him and tormenting him.

Licking his quivering lips and waiting a moment
to quiet his shaking limbs, he climbed stealthily
over the guard rail and poised to leap on that
cloth-covered back, fifteen feet below.

At this moment the voices broke out anew.
They were trying to warn "The Thing," hut he
did not care, for they would he too late.

He leaped; a shrill scream echoed through the
tunnel, followed by others which became moans
and then died away.

All was silent hut the mournful croaking of the
frogs.

The next day rhcy found him impaled on a
long steel rod that leaned against a barrel. On
the barrel the coat of a careless laborer was laid
in such a manner that it resembled the broad
back of a man.






THK CARIBBEAN.



,v >v




Ol R CARNIVAL.



Dorothy Svenssox,
Elizabeth Hackelt,



Saturday night, May 7, Fort de Lesseps was the pating orchestra. Among the dancers could he
scene of much jollity and merry-making. From seen, here and there, petite girls dressed in snappy
7 to II the grounds were crowded with friendsof the little black and white costumes. Efficiently direct-
school who came to help make the carnival the eci by Miss Hesse and Teresa Gallagher, these girls
success it proved to be. entertained the public with a peppy Musical Re-

The side shows came first. In one tent sat the vue. They jauntily sang the latest hits and

Bearded Lady from Australia, while Doleful Delia stepped lively, while the agile clowns, Ray Will

sighed mournfully in another. In other tents were and Burt Hackett, brought down the house.
the horrifying red bats, the awe-inspiring Roman
Ladder, one hideous headless calf! A mysterious
fortune teller foretold such futures as to give joy
to the heaviest heart money, travel, happiness!
The museum contained many noteworthy and price-
less objects. Who can forget Madame Nelsonnio,

the eccentric tight rope walker? (Certainly we audience.

can't.) Anita Rankin and Ruben Arcia, dressed in the

The answers to many perplexing home questions national costumes of Panama made a rare couple

were to be found in the booths labeled "Why Men as they whirled and dipped gracefully to the tune

Leave Home" and "Why Women Leave Home." of "Josephine."

The "Canisloi Lsae" direct from Alaska, caused After a hotly-contested battle, Nellie Berger

much excitement. emerged victorious with over a thousand votes,

Being girls, we can not state what was to be seen and was triumphantly acclaimed "Miss Cristobal

in the tent "For Men Only," but we must admit High School."



Dainty little Rae Bliss showed her remarkable
talent in a lively Russian dance.

Lois Williams and Helen Vineyard received
much applause tor their excellent interpretation
of the songs which they sang. Two lovely violin
renditions bv Albert Davs charmed the attentive



that the contents offered by the tent "For Women
Only" were quite enlightening.

Skating was enjoyed from 7 to <> in the tennis
< ourr. I [ere main people forgot their old age and
joined with the younger generation in receiving
spills and, incidentally, black and blue marks.

At <) o'clock the floor was (Tared and the Fort Lesseps that most of our success should be
de Lesseps orchestra, which had been giving a accredited.
delightful concert at the farther end of the VIVA! CARNIVAL!

grounds, moved up, and soon main- dancers were VIVA! FORT DE LESSEPS!

swaying to the weird, jazzy tunes of that synco- VIVA!



At the refreshment booth, boys, noisily shout-
ing, entreated one to refresh one's self with cooling
drinks, candy, cakes, and hot dogs!

Though the students, faculty, and public in

general are greatly responsible for the success of
our gala evening, it is to the personnel of Fort de



THE CARIBBEAN.



57



=s




"UNDER TWENTY

Louise J. Murk, '29.




=233



"Under Twenty" was an outstanding success
of which Cristobal High School is very proud.
Each year the Senior Class Plays continue to im-
prove until it seems that "Under Twenty," one
of the cleverest comedies ever presented by our
high school, has reached the highest excellency.

Our invaluable principal, Miss Dodds, used
her customary discernment in selecting a comedy
that was best adapted to the abilities of the senior
students. It was also Miss Dodds who coached
the characters so perfectly and supervised the
entire performance. It was, in a great measure,
a result of her discrimination and effort that the
play was so well acted that it seemed to have
been written for those who portrayed the char-
acters.

The central figure of this delightful three-act
comedy of a modern family is captivating Peeks,
the younger daughter of Mr. Farnum, who pro-
fesses to be bankrupt in order to check his family's
extravagance. In spite of difficulties, Pecks
arranges circumstances so that Grace, her elder
sister, can "Marry Money" in the person of
Donald, who has struck oil The day before
Grace's marriage to Donald, the Farnums
discover to their dismay that Ted, the suitor
whom Grace really loves, has inherited millions.
Infallible Peeks urges Ted to elope with Grace
while she succeeds in pacifying frustrated Donald
by marrying him herself.

Surse Taylor, as the head of the Farnum family,
was exceptionally proficient. He was not only
a good business man, but acted very well the role
of a loving father.

Peeks, upon whom rested largely the respon-
sibility for the play, although she was called the
baby of the family, was admirably portrayed by
Dorothy We'rtz. Her natural charm and viva-
city endeared her immediately to the audience.

James Grider, representing Donald Brown,
deserves much praise for the sincere manner in
which he interpreted the leading role. His
manliness and force of character gave strength
to his acting.

MR 5590 8



Helen Montgomery was most attractive as
Grace Farnum, though not as severe as an elder
sister might be. Her costumes, although not
quite as stunning as those of Diana, a rich vamp
who attempted to marry Donald, were very
becoming.

In the character of Diana, which was pictured
to perfection, Helen Vineyard exhibited all the
scheming qualities of a vamp with beautiful
features and fine clothes.

The part of Mrs. Farnum was taken by Emily
Bledsoe. No one could have filled better than
she did the part of an hysterical, extravagant
mother.

Ted Rutherford was very well portrayed by
James Van Scotter, \\ hose good looks and pleasant
manner made him well liked on both sides of the
footlights.

Charles Will in the role of Bill Boyd, the list
less night watchman, and Clara May, portraying
the faithful yet domineering old servant, Rannie,
supplied amusing side comedy.

The plot of "Under Twenty" was most divert-
ing, crammed with rapid action and exciting
situations. The conversation of the characters,
which was spirited and humorous, was spiced with
clever remarks delivered with ease and assurance.

The beautiful costumes of the actors combined
with the artistic arrangement of the stage prop-
erties contributed a note of elegance and refine-
ment to the home-like atmosphere.

Taking the performance as a whole, the produc-
tion of "Under Twenty" was an unusually fine
amateur achievement meriting the unanimous
applause which it received.

THE PLACE AND TIME.

Act I. Sun p.irlor of the Farnum home at Sea-sweep, Long

Island, on .1 summer afternoon.
Act II. Scene I. The same place in the evening ol the same

day.
Scene II. The same place on an afternoon a month

later.
Act. III. Rannie's room I iter that evening.



;S



THE CARIBBEAN.



THE PERFORMANCE.

\ct I. "But how can I keep down the bills, it I can never
find out how high up they are:"
"You s.iid you'd go diving in the deep blue sea."

Act II. Scene I. "That sneak thiet must be in here some-
where."
"Well, it you can't take care ot yourself
with the women, nobody can help you."

Scene II. "There's nothing so pathetic as a wedding
veil."
"Well, ma'am, it will be like skinning a cat
to lock that one up."
Act III. "You mean you want to marry me to make yourself
surfer?"
"No second-hand wedding presents for me!"

THE PLAYERS.
(In the order in which they appear.)

Ida Farnum who is nor an expert accountant

F.milv Bledsoe
Grace Farnum who likes money better than she can count

it Helen Montgomery

Peeks Farnum who is tired ot being the baby

Dorothy W'ertz

Bozo whose nose knows Himself

Rannie who has her own ideas Clara May

Rus ell !'. rnum who is not bankrupt Surse Taylor

Bill Boyd who w .s iii the Army Charles Will

Diana Edgerton who knows her business. Helen Vineyard
Ted Rutl ertor.l who is interested in chicle and Grace.

James Van Scotter
Donald Brown who is caught between the deep blue sea

and Di n i James Grider



THEIR ASSISTANTS.

Lawrence C. Callaway, Jr., Business Manager.

Joseph Corrigan, Assistant Business Manager.

Dorothy Svensson, Prompter.

I i Mi. mm Woolnough, Music Committee.

Lot ivF. Heim and John Nelson, Publicity Committee.

Anne J. Mc Nai ghten and Teresa Gallagher, Costumes.



STAFF HOP.

Dorothy I.. Il'ertz, '2J.

Chaperones: Mr. and Mrs. Frank Mack, Mr.
E S. Mai S| arran.

C( mm it tee in Charge: Teresa Gallagher;
Doroth) L. Writ/., Charles Will, and Jack Klunk.

On January 7, the start" < f The Caribbean
gave a "hop" ar the Masonic Temple. "The
Collegiates," an orchestra made up of high school
stucb under the leadership of Mr. Seiler, fur-
nished excellent music. Besides the faculty,
the alumni, and members of the student body, a
few friends had been invited. Those present are
unanimous in proi laiming ir one of the outstand-
ing sot ial 1 \< nt', of the year.



SENIOR PARTY.

Louise Heim, '27.
Emma Banks, '28.

One bright November morning, Cristobal
High School students were confronted by strange
hieroglyphics on the blackboard in the assembly
room. The curious (in other words, one and all)
finally managed to decipher that exceedingly queer
message, which revealed that the class of twenty-
seven was giving a queer party on the nineteenth
of November, nineteen hundred and twenty-six.

On that night there gathered at the Masonic
Temple a motley crowd, representing every
walk in life from the Puritan to the gaudy
flapper. During the grand march, Mr. Arthur
Mundberg, as a sailor boy, and Miss Winnie Fred
Jacobs, who looked like Peter Pan himself, won
the prizes for best costumes. We may add that
a tall slim maiden, Mister ah er Miss John
Nelson attracted no little attention.

Due to the kindly thoughtfulness of the enter-
tainment committee every one was enabled to
show his or her dramatic ability in a game of
stunts. Much enjoyment also was derived from
various other games. Instructions were given
to shake hands with everyone present to try to
find out who had the dime; some chewed the
string; while others endeavored to undo hands
tied in a puzzling style.

About nine-thirty Dwyer's orchestra and deli-
cious refreshments were welcomed by all, and
the revelers danced the rest of the evening away.



JUNIOR PARTY.

Gladys Beers, '28.
Royal ffiggason, '28.

Friday, December 17th, the Junior Class gave
their annual party at the Y. W. C. A., entertain-
ing the faculty, students, and alumni. Being on
the last day prior to Christmas vacation, our
party was made a Christmas affair. To suit
the occasion, every one brought a present. Then,
later, Santa Claus, on his arrival, distributed
the gifts among Iils children. (Everyone was a
child that night.)

Dancing followed, the music being furnished
by the Fort DeLesseps orchestra. Refreshments
were then served, after which dancing continued
until eleven o'clock, when everyone gathered
around the piano and sang our Alma Mater song
and wished everyone else a Merry Christmas.
Thus ended the evening for the many joy makers.



THF. CARIBBEAN.



59



THE SOPHOMORE PARTY.

Vita Lyew, '29.

(Chaperones: Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Palm and Mr. and Mrs.

J. B. Com an. I

The Sophomores of C. H. S. had their party
the fourth of March, 1927, at the Y. W. C. A.
The first part of the evening was spent in a treas-
ure-hunt, which took the students four blocks
away from the Y. W. C. A. Joe Corrigan, 'i~,
found the treasure, a five dollar gold piece, which
was in an alabaster box behind the piano. He
deserved the prize, for he certainly worked hard.
On the whole, the hunt was enjoyed by everyone.

The hall was decorated with serpentines, and
confetti was distributed to the students, which
gave a touch cf carnival to the party.

When the orchestra tuned up at nine, the danc-
ing began. The music was alluring, the floor
wonderful, the hall spacious, and the evening cool
as it always is in the tropics. What else could the
dancers crave! Refreshments were served through-
out the evening.



THE FRESHMAN PARTY.

Rosemary Keene, '-";.
(Chaperones: Mrs. (',. H. Boomer and Mr. M. I.. Booz.)

As amateurs, the Freshmen were quite success-
ful in giving an enjoyable party on Friday evening,
April 22, 1 92-, at the Y. W. C. A.

The auditorium was gayly lighted and was dec-
orated with large palm leaves which were arrayed
around the walls of the room. All enjoyed dancing
to the music furnished by an excellent orchestra.
F.arly in the evening, cake was served and also
cool punch, which was eagerly received by the hot
and thirsty dancers.

During the course of the evening there were
numerous tag-dances, a string dance, and main-
others. At eleven o'clock, the party was closed
by singing our school song, and all left with gaiety
befitting the closeofthe last school party of the year.



THE SLPPFR CLUB.

Ethel Westman, '28.

President, Eiphemia Woolxoi gh.
Vice President, Zonei.l.a Bi.iss.
Secretary, Emilv Grider
Treasurer, Emma Banks.

On the evening of the second Friday of every
month, the Y. W. C. A. is the meeting place of the



Supper Club. Business is conducted during the
earlier part of the evening, and plans are made
for future activities of the club. Miss Euphemia
Woolnough, the president, presides, assisted by
Miss Dodds, Miss MacGillivray and Mrs. Grune-
wald. (Miss Dodds, the club's adviser from its
beginning, has resigned, to the deep regret of all
the members.) After the reading of the minutes
reports are made by the various committees, and
are discussed.

After the business meeting is ended, the mem-
bers proceed to the long table and grace is said.
The members of the various high school classes
rake turns cooking and serving the meals. Sing-
ing and laughter are abundant. School songs are
in full swing and everyone participates.

After a brief social period, all depart for other
places.

That the club is both interesting and popular is
evidenced by the fact that forty-seven girls of the
sixty-eight attending high school this year belong
to it.



MOTHERS' AM) DAUGHTERS' BANQUET.

.Idair Taylor, 'jq.

Saturday rhe fourteenth of May, one hundred
and fifty mothers and daughters attended the
Mothers' and Daughters' Banquet. The decor-
ations were in pink and blue. Each mother
and each daughter wore a little old-fashioned
paper cap tied with a blue crepe paper streamer.

After an enjoyable dinner at which our boys
shone as waiters, the programme was given.
Miss Euphemia Woolnough was toast mistress
and filled the office very capably. Mrs. William
H. Sperry gave a most interesting talk on "Moth-
ers of Yesterday," Mrs. H. L. Phillips on "Girls
<>t To-day" and Mrs. G. H. Boomer on "Mothers
of To-morrow." Gladys Beers sang "Little
Mother O' Mine." Helen Montgomery, Aloha
Slocum, and Emily Grider, who are interested
in Supper Club and Girl Reserves, gave interest-
ing talks on Mothers, a theme that can never
be exhausted.

When the programme was over, each girl had
a thoughtful look on her face as if she had
resolved to be to her mother a better "chum in
joy and comrade in distress," for after all who
can get along without mother!



6o



THE CARIBBEAN.



THE HIGH SCHOOL ORCHESTRA.

K bcrt Axtell, '28.
K/utik, '28.

The high school orchestra represents one end
C. H. S.'s musical talent. It is present when-
ever the high sellout requires music of quantity
and quality combined. Not content with play-
ing the cheap jazz of our modern age, this or-
ganization is frequently heard at banquets, or at
the school's presentations of dramatic art, as, for
instance, the latest production, "Under Twenty."
There are just enough in number for a small
theater orchestra. This thriving young sym-




Mra B;iker.

phony boasts as its able director, the well-known
Mrs. Baker. Under the rule of her agile baton
are the piano, seven violins, two trumpets, two
saxophones, and a clarinet.

Every Tuesday afternoon, this group may be
heard setting the surrounding atmosphere in
vibration. Most ot us are unable to tell the
difference between music and noise according to
Miss Se well's definition, but we can very easily
hear the difference when listening to our orchestra.

We are ready to give thanks to the organization

and its members, for the help it has rendered the

lunity. We sincerely hope that

it may be as successful next year as it is the present

one.



BOYS' GLEE CLUB.

Donald Po/i/e, '29.

The Boys' Glee Club, as one of the school organi-
zations, was started with high interest at the be-
ginning of the sehool year ot 1926-1927.

We were fortunate in having as a leader Miss
Hesse, for she has had previous experience with
college choruses.

In all of the preceding years the accompani-
ments had been furnished by a lady pianist, but
finding one of the members well fitted to carry on
the work, the club this year elected Morris Luce.

Each member of the Glee Club is also a regular
member of the chorus led by Mrs. Baker, and
though interest has fallen until only eight mem-
bers are left, we still meet every Thursday at
three o'clock to sing the many songs learned and
to learn new ones equally as good as the former
ones.



CHORUS.

Crctchen II'. Palm, '29.

Chorus, under the capable and enterprising
direction of Mrs. E. S. Baker (formerly our Miss
Currier), has been both pleasant and instructional.
There were some eighty students enrolled this
year many of them for the love of the music
rather than for the credit. The chief undertaking
of the year was the learning and memorizing of
"The Rose Maiden," a very beautiful cantata by
Ered Cowen. Mrs. Baker has for seven years
been the director of the C. H. S. chorus and has
earnestly tried to instill into us some of that music
which is a part of her and of which she is a part.



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB.

Ethel Barnett, '29.

On Wednesdays, after school, the Girls' Glee
Club demonstrates its talents. The harmony of
these aspiring warblers is not always "heavenly,"
and many are the discords that clash on the long-
suffering Miss Hesse's ears.

Glee Club, however, boasts several "golden
throats" ami when these are melodiously combined
with the less valuable vocal chords, the sound is
not always objectionable. Almost every year the
public is allowed to hear these songsters. On the
whole it is an institution creditable to C. H. S.
Lons live the Girls' G lee Club.



THE CARIBBEAN.



61



JUNIOR-SENIOR BANQUET.
Never has there been a more successful Junior-
Senior Banquet in Cristobal High School than
the one Friday evening, June third, at which the
members of the class of 1928 were hosts to the
class of 1927, the faculty, and Mr. and Mrs.
V. E. Seiler. Those present forty-three in all
were seated at a huge square U table in the Hotel
Washington dining room. Along the center ran
a row of tiny electric lights almost hidden by a
bank of foliage and pink oleander blossoms. The
fun began when the guests tried to find their
places by the use of the clever place cards executed
by Morton Southard of the Sophomore Class.
Flach card contained the face of the victim cut
from a small kodak picture. Then drawn above,
below, and around were backgrounds which
illustrated some pet foible or peculiarity. The
point was further impressed by clever couplets.
At each place, also, besides the "cracker"
favors with their surprise contents, were menu-
program books. When these were opened it was
discovered that each guest among the ladies had
been given a dainty, hand-blocked yellow hand-
kerchief, while the gentlemen had larger editions
of the same articles in gray and blue.

The menu, prepared under the capable direction
of Mr. J. E. Lewis, was a delicious one.

The program of toasts was brief. Miss
Gladys Beers, the toastmistress, called first
upon the Junior president, Edward Lowande, who
expressed his class' appreciation of the seniors
and its pleasure in entertaining them. To this,
Teresa Gallagher, president of the Senior Class,
responded, expressing gratitude to the Juniors
and a belief that the Juniors would "carry on"
the work and traditions of the school. Miss
Dodds then made brief remarks, closing with an
appeal to the students to remember that "the
set of the sail" rather than the direction of the
winds, is what really counts in life's voyage.
Last, Robert Axtell with deft clairvoyance,
pictured the future of each member of the Senior
Class to the entire satisfaction of all.

The guests then repaired to the tea room where
they enjoyed a splendid program prepared by
the Juniors.

The first half was given by the girls. They had
prepared "The Kleptomaniac," an old, but clever,
one-act farce, under the direction of Miss Moore.
The girls did some acting which bodes well for
the success of next vear's Senior Plav.



THE KLEPTOMANIAC.
(One-act play. I

CAST.

Mrs. John Burton (Peggy) I 1 111:1. Westman

Mrs. Valerie Chase Armsby (a young widow ) Emma Banks

Miss Freda Dixon Gladys E. Beers

Mrs. Charles Dover (Mabel) Kathryn Lambert

Miss Evelyn Evans (a journalist) Lucia Salazak

Mrs. Preston Ashley (Pertha) Zonella Bliss

Katie Mrs. Burton's Maid Evangeline Smi i h

{Scene Mrs. Burton's bedroom.'

For their part of the evening, the boys,
sponsored by Miss Hesse, presented a radio
program with Frank Kimbell as announcer.

First came the Discordant Seven, an orchestra
made up almost entirely of Junior boys; then,
Murderer's Row, in which Frank Kimbell and
Jack Klunk were featured in "Where do you
Worka, John," with Alberta Days as the star
no question.

The most laughter-producing event of the
evening was the drama, "Under Thirteen,"
a side-splitting travesty on the Senior Play,
"Under Twenty," To see the delicate Keeps,
Frank Kimbell, bearing in her arms the bashful
Ron, Jack Klunk, who had "had his wind knocked
nut"; to hear the ruthless vamp, Arthur Rothen-
burg, assuring the doughty father, Harold Owen,
that all good kissers marry young; to witness the
disgust with which the hysterical Mrs. Arnum,
Albert Days, viewed the bounding, barking,
belted Bozo, Foster Tufts, who was later led
from the stage by the careful Ronnie, Woodford
Babbitt; to watch the "Grace"-ful fluttering of
Rage Farnum, Robert Axtell; the pitiful plight
of Red, Foster Tufts, and the listless lounging
of Fill Void, Teddy Henter to see these was to
explain the gales and shrieks of laughter which
were heard all during the brief playlet.

After a bedtime story by the announcer, the
evening festivities were over the guests de-
lighted with a happy evening's entertainment, and
the hosts satisfied in the knowledge that a good
deed had been well done.



SHORT STORY CONTEST.

This year's short story contest brought in
much material from which one may prophesy a
"better Caribbean" each year. Besides the
authors of the winning stories which are printed
many others received honorable mention.



62



THE CARIBBEAN".




THE CARIBBEAN.



63




Boys', James Glider, '?/.

THE BOYS' ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION.
Offii

President James Grider

Vice President Albert Days

retary and Treasurer. \\\\\ Rankin

Al:in Rankin, 21).

The I?. V A. was .1 great help to the
boys who entered the athletic activi
of the school. At the meetings, the com-
ing athletic events were discussed and
captains and managers elected. This
association also helped to secure hinds
tor athletic suits and other necessary
equipment.



Girls', Dorothy Svensson, '57.
THE GIRLS' ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION.
Officers.

President Helen Montgomery

Vice President Dorothy Svensson

Secretary-Treasurer Dorothy I.. Wf.rtz

Dorothy L. tl er/2, '>-.

The \ear 102- proved to lie a most
successful one for the Girls' Athletic
Association. The girls paid dues of
titty cents a year. From this amount
suits tor basketball, and letters for various
teams were purchased.

The G. A. A. encourages the girls' in-
terest in athletics and helps to promote
a feeling of good sportsmanship.



B( )YS.



In most things, success can be obtained only by-
persistent effort. Athletic competition is no excep-
tion. The athletic program of Cristobal High
School for the year 1926-192- has experienced the
extreme in victories and defeats. The reason is
simply that the students have been industrious
and persistent in some activities and very negli-
gent in others. Results have been achieved
accordingly. C. H. S. can be successful in her
athletic competition in all branches it she will give
each the necessary attention.

Although, to date, C. H. S. has succeeded in
winning only once from Balboa High School, she
has tared exceedingly well in the other attempts
where she has been faithful in preparation.



Certainly C. H. S. can be thankful for possessing
the calibre of athletic director she has in Mr. V. E.
Seller. He has not only been industrious but has
brought to us a deep knowledge of every sport that
came under his supervision. The school in general
gratefully thanks Mr. Seiler for his untiring and
successful efforts. We only hope that he mav
remain with us for years to come.

Finally, we are deeply indebted to the com-
munity for its strong backing and interest.

Next year we lose only two men Grider and
Will. Both of these have taken part in several
sports but their places will be eagerly filled by the
remaining students. Thus, C. H. S. can look
forward to another fruitful year in athletic com-
petition.



64



THE CARIBBEAN.



The most outstanding proof that suc-
oess is obtained by persistent effort was
shown in our baseball. We entered the
twilight league and in the first half were
just able to escape the cellar, but in the
second half we finished second. Several
of ojr players ware considered the best
in the league at the close of the season.
In lit, Greene, Lowande, and Will be-
came proficient enough to win regular
positions in the Isthmian League.

Jack Klunk, our catcher and captain,
ha I one of the strongest throwing arms
in the league. At bat, he was always
dangerous. He hit four homers in his last
four games, finishing with an average of
.302.

Mike Greene was, by tar, the best
first baseman and pitcher in the league.
He finished the season with a grand
average of .397. As a pitcher, Greene
had more speed and curves than an-
other twirler. He made his debut in the
Isthmian League by losing a hard 10-
inning struggle by the More of 4-.'.

Charles Will, though left handed,
played second base and played it well.
At bat he was lead-off man and proved
his ability by batting for .385.

Edward Lowande was not quite the
swatter he was in 1925- 1926. Neverthe
i' -- he was a brilliant fielder and batted
for the respectable average of .304. He
too played in the Isthmian League and
made a good job of it.

Rene Bissonette was our third baseman
but he remained with us only half of the
season. A steads fi;4der, he proved his
worth in the Balboa-Cristobal series by
winning the second game with two timely
hits a single and a double.

The outfield was made up of Days in
center, Arcia in left, and Peterson arc'
Wikingstad alternating in right. Days
was tin- best hitting outfielder with
an average of .MX), while Arcia was our
defensive out fie l< l and Peterson were not heavy hitlers but

were always useful.

'.rider was an improved pitcher ovt r

hie previous year but was inclined to be

wild at times. He finished with 12 wins

lo i

following are t he result s of t he

in the Twilight League:



1 IKvr


U lit.


Runs,


Opp Rui


1926.




12-17 C. H.S. 2,


Fort 1 )el .essepa 8.


12 23 ('. 11. S. 1,


R. & F. A. 5.



12-29

12-31

1927.

1-3

1-12

1-15

1-24

1-31

2-3

2-5

2-8

2-12



BASEBALL.

H.S. 11, Fort DeLesseps2.



H.S.

H.S.
H.S.
H.S.
H.S.
H.S.
H.S.
H.S.
H.S.
H.S.



2-16
2-19

2 21
2- 25

3-1

3-2

3-7

3-9
3-15
3-17
3-23
3-2b
3-30

4-1

4-5

4-7
Total runs,
Percentage



C.

c.

c.
c.
c.
c.
c.
c.
c.
c.
c.
c.
c.
c.
c.
c.



SECOND

H.S. 5,

H.S. 4,

H.S. 3,
H.S



H.S.



S.
S.
S.
S.

s.

H.S.

H.S.
H.S.
H. S.
U.S.
H.S.
C. H. S
676.



Maulers 6.

Outlaws 9.
Maulers 6. (tie)
Fort DeLesseps 2.
Maulers 8.
Outlaws 9.
R. & F. A. 6.
Outlaws 4.
Maulers 6.
Fort DeLesseps 9.

HALF.

R.&F.A.3.

Outlaws 5.
Maulers 8.
Fort DeLessers 1.
R. & F. A. 1.
Outlaw?. 4.
Fort DeLesseps 7.
Maulers 4.
R. & F. A. 8.
Outlaws 7.
Maulers 3.
Fort DeLesseps 0.
R. & F. A. 6.
( hit laws 7.
Fort DeLesseps 2.
Maulers 10.
100; Opponents 148.



FIRST GAME OF INTERSCHOOL BASEBALL
SERIES.

Before a record-breaking crowd, Cris-
tobal High School defeated Balboa High
School in a hard fought contest. The final
score was 5 to 3.

It being the opening game of the high
school series, a very colorful ceremony
preceded the game. At 9.30, led by the
Fort De I.esseps b:ind, the Balboa and
Cristobal teams, and a hirge crowd of
rooters, paraded around the field.

Such an impressive opening was ac-
complished only by strong hacking of the
civilian community and the personnel <>l
Fort De I.esseps. To these, Cristobal
I h'_'h School is deeply indebted, and gr.ite-
fully offers its thanks.

The game proved to he very thrilling
ami interesting. Grider, the Cristobal
pitcher, was forced to re. ire due to an
injured finger. Greene replaced him and
pitched hitless hall.

|{. Una broke the ne in the second by
Coring one run on two walks and Clis-
bee'ssingle. They added two more in the
sixth on a puss, a hit, an infield out, and
tWO lilts.



Cristobal got to Reese in the fourth,
when they scored live runs. Days made
the only hit, but two passes by Reese,
an infield out, and three errors, gave Cris-
tobal the game.

Both Reese and Grider were constantly
in trouble, being saved by sensational
fielding. Will, Lowande, and Greene
executed a beautiful doubleplay in the
sixth.



Score :














Cristobal.


A.B


R.


H.


PO.


A.


E.


Will, 2b


3








3


1





Klunk, c


4








l<


1


1


Lowande, ss.


4








3


2





Greene, 1 h.


2


1





6


1





Arcia, If


3


1














Bissonr.ette,














3l>


3








3


1


1


Days, cf


2





1











Wikenstad, ct


1


1


1











Peterson, rl


2


1


1


2


1





Grider, p


3


1








2





Rankin, lb..











4









Totals.. 27

Balboa. AB.

Van Siclen,cf. 4

Williams, ss. 3

Wood, If. 4

Reese, p 2

Russey, rf. 4

Clisbee, c. 4

Jones, lb. 3
Mihalitsianos

2I1 4

Johnson, 3I1. 1



R.

o

1
1
1

o
o
o

o
o



3 27

H. PO.

o 1



1
o

o

to

8



Totals..



b 24 10



FINAL GAME OF INTER-SCHOOL SERIES.

January 20. The inter-school baseball
series ended to-day, when Cristobal
journeyed to Balboa and took its second
consecutive game. The score was 5 to 3.

A large crowd witnessed the game.
Only about 1? Cristohalites accompanied
the Cristobal team, but their presence
was always recognized.

Balboa scored one run in the first iinil
two more in the second due to errors and
hits. Hut both (irider and his teammates
settled down and prevented further scor-
ing

Cristobal scored one run in the fourth
on three passes and Bissonnette's single.
Thej repeated in the sixth in the smiie
u ,i\ mi Will's single.



THE CARIBBEAN.



65



Cristobal really won the game and
series in the seventh. After Klunk had
doubled, and Lowande and Green had
walked, Days forced in Klunk wiih the
tying run.

Bissonnette then proceeded to win the
game and series with a double to center,
scoring Lowande and Ami.

Reese and Gri.'er pitched well in the
pinches and receive! sensational sup; ort.
Reese struck out 20 n.e 1 in two game but
passed the same number. The fielding
was of high calibre. Greene mace 1
pu touts in the last game and Clisbee
made 13. Wood, Pe.erson, Arcii, and
Days played the outfield flawlessly.

The score:

Cristobal. AB. R. II. PO. A. 1

Will, 2b 5 o 1 2 1 c

Klunk, c 4 I I K 1 1

Lowande, ss.. 40 1 24 1
Greene, lb. ., 1 o 10 o o

Arcia, If. ... : 2 o 2 o c

Days, cf 1 i o 2 o 1

Peterson, rf 4 o o o o
Bissonnette,

,-jb 5 o 2 1 o 1

(.'rider, p. 5 o o o 1



Totals.. 33 5 5 2~ 3

Balboa. AB. R. H. PO. A. E

Williams, ss. 4 1 o 2 1 c

Clisbee, rb.. 3 o o 13 1 c

Wood, If 200 1 01

Reese, p. . 3 o o o ; c

Ruvey, c. 3 o o 10 o O

Jones, cf 4 i 1 o o c

Mihalitsianos

2b 4 1 1 1 ; o

Van Siclen, rt 4 o 1 o o o
Johnson, 3b. .401010



Totals.. 31 3 42-10 1
Summary.
Earned runs Cristobal 4. Two-base
hits Klunk, Bissonnette. Struck out
By Grider 8, by Reese 1 1. Base on balls
Off Grider 3, off Reese 12. Stolen
bases Cristobal 11, Balboa 6. Umpires
Currie and Burgoon.

BASKET BALL.

A squad of 16 candidates turned out
for basket ball this year. Will, Grider,
Babbitt, Lowande, and Owen, are veter-
ans of last year. The others who com-
plete the squad are \ Payne, R. Payne,
I.ugli, Klunk, Days, Maker, Greene,
Kimbell, Hayden, Deakin, and Tufts.
All these players except Grider, Will, and
Owen will be available for next year.
Thus C. H. S. may look forward to a
prosperous basket ball season in 1 v 2 S



Mr. V. C. Seiler, our energetic physical
director, has coached the C. H. S. boys
and has certainly imparted a great deal
o( basket ball knowledge. Once a player
reported for practice, he continued to
report, for Mr. Seder's methods ire as
interesting as they are beneficial.

A few practice g :me> were held, 111 .in!;
with the idea of determining a player.,
ability, rather then attempting to win the
game. Those who proved to be me. 11 hers
of the first team were: Grider and \\ ill
;.s forwards, Lowande and Hayden as
centers, and V. Payne, Babbitt, Klunk,
and Owen as guards.
BA BOA-CPISTOBAI. BASKET BALI. SERIES
First Game.

On Saturday, June 11, the first game
was played in the Cristobal playshed. A
large band of rooters was prece : r to cheer
lor C. H. S. The game was very fast,
and was marred oily by too much wrang-
ling, "ii Balboa's p. rt, abo.it the referee's
decisions.

At the end of the first half, the scon-
was 1 2 all. Howe; er, Jo es and Mihalit-
sianos, of C Z. A. A. fam .-, came into the
game, and Balboa began to ;; kc the lead.
After a whirlwind finish by both teams,
the final score showed a win tor Balboa,

37 -'

For Balboa, the best | layers were:
Jones, Mihalitsianos. and Wood. For
Cristob I, Will, Grider, and Lowande
were I he leading scorers. Babbitt, as
running guard, played a nice floor game,
until relieved by Hayden, who also did
well. Payne replaced Owen as standing
guard, and stopped a gre .r many at-
tempts at scoring. Too much individual
plaj was shown in Cris ob. 1's g: me nd
was largelj responsible for her defeat.

The score in line up:

Cristobal H. S. Kd. EG. T.

Grider, f .; 4 10

Will, f. 3 5 11

Lowande, c 3 o 6

Babbitt, g o o o

Owen, g o o o

Hayden, g o o o

V. Payne, g 000

9 9--

Score: C. H. S 27

B.'H. S 37

On June 18 Balboa High School easily
defeated the Cristobal High School by
the score of 32 to 1 2.

SWIMMING BOYS'.

The swimming meet of 1926-27 was
one of the best and closest that has ever
taken place between the Cristobal and
Balboa High Schools.



The two most thrilling races of the day
were the 50 and 100-yard dashes. Each
of these races was a close, sprinting
struggle all the way, between Jack
Klunk of Cristobal and Fred Helmerichs
of Balboa. However, Klunk upheld his
dtle of the Isthmus' f..s. est swimmer, by
winning bo.h races, with a final spurt.
His times tor the 50 and 100-y ..rd dashes
were 25.2 seconds and 59.1 seconds,
respectively.

Cristobal lost i:s chance of winning the
meet by failing to gain either a first
or second place in the 22o-y;.rd dash.
We won the relay, but Balboa's lead was
too great to overcome.

Days and Klunk distinguished them-
selves by their fancy diving. Lowande,
Babbitt, Hayden, and, in fact, all ol
Cristobal's competitors showed up well,
is the score indicates.



INTERSCHOOL SWIMMING MEET.

50-yard Dash.

1. Klunk (C. H. S.I, 2;. 2 seconds.

2. Helmerichs (B. H. S.).

3. Lowande (C. H. S.).

4. Allen (B. H. S.).

100-yard Dash.

1. Klunk (C. H. S.), 59.1 seconds.

2. Helmerichs (B. H. S.).

3. Allen (B. H. S.I.

4. Tufts (C. H. S.).

50-yard Backstroke.

1. F. Allen (B. H. S.I, 34 seconds.

2. Gr.anberrj 1 B. H. S.l.

3. Babbitt (C. H. S.l.
.. Days (C. H. S.).

Fancy Diving.

1. Humphreys (B. H. S.i.

2. Klunk (C. H. S.).

3. Diys (C. II. Si.

4. K. Williams (B. H. S.).

50-yard Breaststroke.

1. A. Swinnerman (B. H. S.l, 35.3

seconds.

2. G. Halloran (B. H. S.).

3. Wikingstad (C. H. S.).

4. \rcia tC. H. S.).

220-yard Dash.

1. Dorswit (B. H. S.), 2 minutes $3

seconds.

2. Swinnerman (B. H. S.l.

3. Hayden (C. H. S.).

4. R. Payne (C. H. S.).

Relay / 20-yard s
Won by Cristobal H. S. (Lowande,

Babbitt, Tufts, and Klunk I.
Total Points Scored.

Balboa H. S.,75;-.

Cristobal H. S., 70J.



66



THE CARIBBEAN.




GIRLS.

Dorothy Svensson, '27, Girls' Athletia Editor,

This year a truly sportsmanlike feeling
v. .1 prevalent in all the sports. The
feeling of jealous rivalry, which in past
years seemed to be uppermost, was notice-
able bj its absenci ^t the beginning of
the school year the girls out for gym were
many, and high hopes were entertained
tor our chanci in our major sports:



basket ball, baseball, track, tennis, and
swimming; but, as usual, the girlsdwindled
down to a trusty tew. With these trusty
tew we managed to hold our own, and
Balboa did not vw\ away with us. Al-
though we won no series no champion-
ships we feel that the Cristobal honor of
I ligh St hool was upheld.



BASKE1 BALL.

til has always claimed more

interest than anj ipoi

' tl High Si hool. 'I hi 1 yt ai h u

been no I mark-

rit with

no evi ill feeling

ools.



I HI. G \MI S.

Pebruar) 1 2, the first game of the si on
was played at the Cristobal playshed.

I In ( ristobal girli showed fine teamwork
with passing nothing short of remarkable
The Balboa girls had no chance to loi ate
rhi I. iskets, and tin : ended with the

con 1 to 2, in la\ or of Cristobal.



The second game was played February
26, al the Balboa playshed. TheCristobal
girls started right in wi.h their tine work,
hut rhe Balboa girls tightened up, bring-
ing the game to a 9 to 8 close. This game
was hotly contested both sides strug-
gling fiercely lor the hall. The game seem-
ed ours from the start, ami many were



THE CARIBBEAN'.



6?



the astonished taces when the final
whistle blew and the score was announced.

Saturday, March 5, the Cristobal High
School team again journeyed to the Silver
Side, playing this time at the Pedro
Miguel playshed on a neutral floor.
Though the ball was almost continually
under our goal, our forwards could not
locate the baskets, and the game ended
2 to o, Ethel Carr of Balboa making the
only basket.

The usual line up tor both sides was
as follows:

Cristobal H. S. Balboa H. S.
Helen Montgomery F Ethel Can-
Marion Boomer F Janice Grimison
Dorothy Wertz. S C Marian Allen
Dorothy Svensson. C Angela Klemmer
Evangeline Smith G ..Ruth Johnson
Ethel Westman G Ruth Fraser

Thus ended the basket ball season. We
had started briskly and ended creditabl)
but not as successfully as we should have
wished. Next year Cristobal High School
hopes to do better although she loses by
graduation this year three of her veteran
players: Helen Montgomery, Dorothy
Wertz, and Dorothy Svensson.

INDOOR BASEBALL.

Indoor baseball was revived this pear
after a four or five years' lapse from girls'
athletics. The interest shown in this
game almost rivaled that shown in bas-
ket ball.

THE GAMES.

Saturday, March 2, at the Cristobal
playshed, the Balboa girls contended with
the Cristobal High School girls in indoor
baseball. They easily won from us in a
game composed mainly of errors. The
final score was 35 to 24.

March 9, at the Balboa playshed the
final game was played. The sides this
time were more evenly matched, and the
fighting spirit was more evident. The
Cristobal girls started full of pep and
ambition, but when the game was almost
over our confidence vanished and Bal-
boa again trampled over us to victory.
The game closed with the score 14 to 10
in favor of Balboa.

The girls who played for Cristobal in
these games were: Marion Boomer, p;
Dorothy Wertz, If; Dorothy Svensson, 3b;
Ruth Lockwood, 2b; Ethel Westman,
lb; Evangeline Smith, ss; Helen Mont-
gomery, c; Rosemary Keene, rf; Eliza-
beth Hackett, 2b; Emma Banks, rf;
Euphemia Woolnough, ct; Betty Mont-
gomery, 2b; and Louise Mack lb.



SWIMMING.

Although we have easy access to the
Washington swimming pool, swimming
is not made as much of as would he ex-
pected. This year just six girls turned
out tor swimming, but by hard work and
rigorous training they were able to present
a team worthy of the name.

Saturday, May 7, in rhe Canal Zone
Inter-High School Swimming Meet held
at the Washington swimming pool, Balboa
High School defeated Cristobal High
School by a 2723 score. The meet was
very close and exciting.

Summaries of the events are as follows:

30-yard Free Style.

1 Angela Klemmer, B. H. S., 172/5

seconds.

2. Marion Boomer, C. H. S.

3. Louise Martin, B. H. S.

JO-yard Breast Stroke.

1. Louise Kerr, B. H. S., 25 seconds.

2. Kathryn Lambert, C. H. S.

;. Euphemia Woolnough, C. H. S.

30-yard Rtiek Stroke.

1. Marion Boomer, C. H. S., 21 3/5

seconds.

2. Angela Klemmer, B. H. S.

3. Kathryn Lambert, C. H. S.

60-yard Free Style.
1. Elsbeth Whaler, B. II. S. 45 : 5

seconds,
:. Lucille Hearne, B. H. S.
3. Rita Joyce, C. H. S.

Fancy Dix

1. Angela Klemmer, B. H. S.

2. Rita Joyce, C. H. S.

;. Dorothy Heim, C. H. S.

120-yard Relay.
Cristobal's team, composed of Rita
Joyce, Euphemia Woolnough, Kathrj n
Lambert, and Marion Boomer, defeated
Balboa's ream, Angela Klemmer, Els-
beth Whaler, Louise Kerr, and Lucille
Hearne.

TENNIS.

Tennis took a back seat in the sports
this year. Although, hitherto, it had been
second to basket ball in importance, the
girls showed this year very little interest
in it, and the elimination games tor the
school team remained practically all
unplayed. Finally, on May 7, the tour-
nament with Balboa High School was held.

Helen Montgomery was matched with
Carey Walker, champion of Balboa High,
in the singles. Helen's usual snappy,
energetic playing could not break Carey's
reserve, and she lost (6-o), (6-1).



Dorothy Wertz and Marian Boomer
showed remarkable teamwork in the
doubles, but they too went down to a
(6-1 ), (6-0) defeat.

TRACK.
I his year with so much going on in
school, we thought we should never have
enough time to pick up a track team, but
we did, and we also managed to have a
tew practice sessions. Saturday, April
30, saw us at the Balboa Stadium. The
meet was very one-sided, resulting in a
score of 54 to 5 in favor of Balboa. Though
we do not like to make excuses, we must
admit that three of our best hopes were
unable to compete two through illness
and one for scholastic reasons. The
results of the events of the girls' inter-
school track meet, as they took place,
ire as follows:

^0-yard Dash.

1. Agnes Mack, B. H. S. Time .; ;
seconds.

2. Ameil Hutchings, B. H. S.

3. Louise Kerr, B. H. S.

Baseball Throw.

1. Janice Grimison, B. H. S. Distance,
144 feet 3 inches.

2. Ameil Hutchings, B. H. S.

3. Jessie Banan, B. H. S.

75-yard Dash.

1. RaeNewhard.B.H. Si Timeio2|5
seconds.

:. Agnes Mack, B. H. S.

3. Ethel Westman, C. H. S.
Basket Ball Thin.::.

1. Ameil Hutchings, B. H. S. Distance,
sS feet v inches.

:. Emma Banks, C. H. S.

3. Janice Grimison, B. H. S.
High Jump.

1. Elizabeth Granberry and Angela
Klemmer, B. H. S., tied for first place.
Height, 4 teet 1 inches.

3. Ruth Fraser, B. H. S.
Broad J 11 Dip.

1. Rae Newhard, B. H. S. Distance,
12 feet 1 1 inches.

:. Jessie Banan, B. H. S.

3. Edith Clark, B. H. S.

The Balboa team, composed of Rae
Newhard, Agnes Mack, Docia Clisbee,
and Louise Kerr, won the relay.

This event ended the track meet, so
disastrous for Cristobal High School.
Though our team tried hard, they could
not, through lack of practice, compel e
successfully with Balboa. Rae Newhard,
of Balboa, carried off the individual hon-
ors with 1 1^4 points.



68



THE CARIBBEAN.




Dorothy L. H'ertz, '27.



Oct. I. Plane C. H. S., Number 1927, takes off
at eight o'clock with forty-three Photographers
(freshman), thirty-one Radio-operators (sopho-
mores), fifteen Mechanics (juniors), eleven Pilots
(seniors), and eight Officers (faculty), among them
two new ones, Officers Hesse and Gustafson.

Oct. 8. Supper Club Squadron reorganizes
with fifty members present. Old veterans serve.

Oct. 11. Squadron Officers elected.

Oct. 12. Flight Officers of The Caribbean
elected; Flight Commander Miss Dodds.

Oct. 13. Boys' Athletic Squadron has meeting.

Oct. 14. Fire drill rules read to all members on
flight.

Oct. 15. Pursuit Squadron Upsilon Gamma
Gamma organized Officer Benson, Adviser.

1 li t. 16. Girls' Athletic Squadron has meeting.

Nov. ;. All work on flight ceases for the day.

Nov. 5. Supper Club Squadron meets at Y. W.
C. A. Junior-Senior girls serve. Fifty-five

present.

Nov. X. First six weeks of flight completed with
every thing in perfect order.

\ :. 12. Clara May joins flight, making sixteen

Pilots.

Nov. 12-14. V. W. C. A. Squadron meets at
Cristobal for discussion concerning further im-
provements for new model plane. Representa-
tives from Balboa, Gatun, and Pedro Miguel
attend the conference.

Nov. 1''. Reports sent out from headquarters.

Nov. 17. Staff Squadron meets at Paul Rose's

home.

Nov. 18. Pilots meet and make plans for their

party.



Nov. 19. Pilots' Queer Party a success.

Nov. 24. Thanksgiving furlough.

Nov. 31. Mr. A. O. Tschiffely talks to the
members of C. H. S. Flying Field about his trip
here from Patagonia on horseback.

Dec. 2. Athletic Squadrons elect captains.

Dec. 3. Staff Squadron meets at the high
school. We rejoice to learn that The Carib-
bean 1926 has been adjudged a year book ot
the second class a step in advance of the 1925
edition by the Central Interscholastic Press
Association. This contest includes annuals not
only from the largest high schools of the States
but also from colleges and universities.

Dec. 13. Donations received for free clinic.

Dec. 17. Mechanics give party.

Dec. 18. Christmas furlough highly satisfac-
tory.

Jan. 4. Flight Commander, Miss Dodds, ill.
Mrs. Robinson substitutes.

Jan. 6. Assistant Superintendent Williams ad-
dresses Pilots.

Jan. ". Staff Squadron gives an invitation
"hop" at Masonic Temple.

|an. 8. Girls' basket ball squadron practices
regularly.

Jan. 29. Fort DcLesseps dedicates Flash is-
sue to the members of C. H. S. Field.

Feb. 4. Staff Squadron meets at Pilot Wool-
nough's quarters.

Peli. 11. Supper Squadron meets with Photo-
graphers serving.

Feb. 17-19. Exams, given by headquarters
It may be necessary for some to make a forced
landing.



THE CARIBBEAN.



69



Feb. 22. Washington's birthday. Holiday given
all squadrons.

Mar. 2. Pilots changed from assembly to Room
27 and given first privileges.

Mar. 3. Staff Squadron meets at Pilot Will's
quarters.

Mar. 4. Radiomen give party.

Mar. 25. Supper Squadron meets and gives
Miss Dodds a beautiful friendship pin for her
seven years of service. Radiomen serve.

Apr. s. Pilots receive play books.

Apr. 13-17. Home leave given during Easter
week. Shortened two days by extra K. P.

Apr. 18. Staff Squadron meets at field quarters.

Apr. 20. Play parts are assigned and work is
started at once.

Apr. 20. Short Story Contest is closed. Papers
go to judges: Miss Jean McGillivray, Mrs. E. C.
Jones, and Mr. R. R. Gregory.

Apr. 22. Photographers give party.

Apr. 25. Staff Squadron works on big carnival
to be held at Fort DeLesseps on Mas 7.

Apr. 27. Pilots work hard on play, "Under
Twenty" to be given May 20-21.

May 2-7. All members of" field prepare for big
carnival.

May 7. It's here! It's gone! Miss Nellie
Berger of the Class of Thirty is elected as Miss
Cristobal High School.



May 19. Poster contest for "Under Twenty"
closes; winners Joseph Corrigan and Morton
Southard tying for first.

May 20. "Under Twenty" given at America
Theater.

May 21. "Under Twenty" given at Gatun
Clubhouse.

May ii>. Advance sale tickets contest for The
Caribbean started. Boys against girls.

June 1. Pilots receive their insignia, the class
rings.

June 3. Mechanics give Pilots and Commanders
a big banquet at the Hotel Washington.

June 10. Supper Club Squadron meets at the
Y. W. C. A. for a farewell service for the Pilots.
Photographers serve.

June 13. Pilots receive announcements and
cards.

June 16. Flight Commander Dodds entertains
Pilots and other Commanders at a dinner in honor
of the former. Commander Peterson's department
caters.

June 19. Baccalaureate service at Christ Church
by the Sea. Bishop J. Craik Morris is the speaker.

June 20-21. Exams, given by headquarters.

June 21. Lieutenant A. M. Bryan, of the U. S.
Navy, addresses the economics class.

June 24. Commencement exercises at the Hotel
Washington.



WHEN THE FLEET WAS IN.

He/en Vineyard, '27.



The fleet was in! It is needless to say that the
streets, stores, shops, and restaurants were crowd-
ed with the happy boys, glad t<> have shore leave
once more, and to be free to roam for awhde.

Through the"Commy"many of the boys passed,
pausing now and then at the different counters,
looking at perfumes, beads, laces, and shawls.

From the crowd of men that passed by the
dry-goods counter, out stepped a young, handsome
man of twenty. He turned to the sales lady at
the dry goods counter and said with a smile,
"Would you please help me to select some nice
piece of material for a dress?"

"Why, certainly, I'll be glad to," said Miss ."
"Just what kind do you want?" She added.



"Why, something that's suitable for one of the
sweetest women in the world," he said with pride.

Miss took up a bright piece of red fuji silk
and said, "Now, what girl wouldn't like a dress
from this gay piece?"

"Oh, yes, it's quite pretty, but you see

"Well, now look at this piece of pink crepe de
chine, lovely quality."

"Yes, I think it's nice too, but

"What about a piece of voile? "This piece of
green would look striking on her if she's a blonde."

"That's pretty, too," the lad said, confused,
"but I want a nice piece of soft, dark silk for
my mother."



"O



THE CARIBBEAN.




r Tntti~ '-



EXCHANGE DEPARTMENT.

Euphemia H'oolnough, '27, Exchange Editor.

We are always glad to welcome old or new
exchanges to our department. They aid us in
adapting new ideas to make our book a better
one each year, and give us information on activi-
ties taking place in the schools so far from us.
Our exchange list continues to grow. We are
unable to comment on all the magazines that
come to us. We find it impossible also, to com-
ment on weekly papers, but we appreciate them
and read them when they come.

OUTGOING MAIL.

The Cedar Chest Toms River, New Jersey. The Red and Black. Newport. R. I

Welcome again to our exchange list. Your literary Your book is very interesting. Your literary depart-

department is very good. mentis good.



The Student. Covington, Kentucky. ., .,

A splendid advertising section. Your book shows good
work.



Butler, Penn.
Good literary ability. Your book shows splendid work.



The If his p. Wilmington, Delaware. The $!'< 11 St te Island, N. Y.

You hive splendid cover designs. Your exchange list 0ne oi ~ the best magazines that has come to us. Your

is a good one, but where are your comments? literary department is worth mentioning.

The Curtis Monthly. Staten Island, N. Y- The Phiz. Pitman N.J.

A splendid little magazine. But why not comment on Good athletic department. Altogether a splendid book,
other annuals?



The Beaton. Gloucester, Mass-

Well-developed literary department and a good joke
section. Your cartoons ail I greatly to your book.



'The Oracle. Jamaica, L. I.

Your "Poet's Corner" is excellent. Why not have a

larger literary department?



t?



The Apokeepsian. Poughkeepsie, N. Y. The Northfield Star. East Northfield, Mass.

Your book reveals splendid work, but why not add Welcome to our exchange again. We like your maga-

an exchange section to complete your book? zine very much.



The It'yndonian. Willimantic, Conn. The Flicker. Gloucester, Mass.

We enjoyed your literar) department very much. We You have a well-arranged book. Your advertising

think a few cut-outs would improve your book. section is very good. But where is the exchange?



THE CARIBBEAN.



7i



The Clairtonian. Clairlon, Pennsylvania.

Your book is an excellent one. The cartoons and other
cut-outs add greatly to the appearance. Don't you think
you can improve your magazine by having an exchange
department?

The Zonian. Balboa, Canal Zone.

We are always eager to welcome the only other annual
of the Canal Zone. The material in your book is splendid,
and we wish you success in your future productions.



The Broadcaster. A. H.Shaw, Jr. High School, Philadelphia.
Your historical selections are excellent. We hope to
keep up our exchange with you.

The Exponent. Greenfield, Man.

You have a well-written magazine, but why not enlarge
your exchange department with comments on other pub-
lications?



INCOMING MAIL.
Comments on The Caribbean.



We consider The Caribbean' the best annual that has
come to our notice. Your style is different from that of
the average annuals.

Albuquerque High School, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

A very complete magazine. Your editorial and literarj
departments stand out. We like the thought expressed
at the beginning of your exchange department:

"From North to South, from Fast to West,
From near and far they've come.
We periscope, they periscope
To see how things are done.
We get encouragement from them,
We betier grow bee uise of them."

The Magnet, Butler High, Butler, Pennsylvania.

We wish that your magazine could be circulated
through all the schools. It would he a good instructor.
The whole arrangement of the magazine is extremely
clever.

The Trident, Ocean drove, N. J.

Lift the mud hook! We're off to the Canal Zone! The
alluring snapshots anil beguiling descriptions of the
tropics in The Caribbean ..re almost irresistible.
"Red rays and golden gleams
Tint the ripples of the streams;
The first dark shades of night
Break with glints of glowing light;
Upon the silvery sands
A lonely palm tree stands,
Outlined against the sky.

The Mirror, Punxsutawney, I'enu.



We mention the quantity and the quality of photo-
graphs which differentiate your paper from any other
exchange we receive. The adoption of nautical terms and
pictures used consistently throughout your paper adds
greatly to the making of its truly different personality.

The Northfield Si.tr, East Northfield, Mass.

Tins has them all beaten. liest looking and best
material on the whole list. The photographs are the
most beautiful ever seen in a school magazine. Congratu-
lations to Cristobal High.

The Cedar ('best, Toms River, X. 7.

Your athletic department is well arranged. Your stories
,uc quire interesting.

The Student, Holmes High School, Co-cington, Kentucky.

We certainly welcomed you to our Exchange column
again this year. We always greatly enjoy The Carib-
bean. Your idea of ships was unique and well carried
out. You are to be congratulated on the excellent plan
anil arrangement of your publication.

The Zonian, Balboa High School, Balboa, Canal Zone.

A magazine that is interesting not only because it comes
from the Canal Zone, but also because its neat and at-
tractive material proves that extraordinary care has been
taken in its preparation. Keep up the excellent work and
let us hear from you again.

The Oracle, Jamaica High, Jamaica, L. I




Ruins Old Panama.



72



THF. CARIBBEAN.




John G. Nelson, '27, 'Joke Edit >r.



(A joke box is maintained in the front ot the
assembly hall. When the time tor the harvest
draws near, we proceed to discover what unex-
pected surprises in the form of wit await us. We
find: Nine pieces of chalk; at least three bottles
of ink, in various forms; twenty-five fragments of
mutilated 1 fitting paper; part of a broken eraser;
two hundred seventy-three pencil shavings, evi-
dently transferred from pencil sharpener; fourteen
crumple 1 sheets o\ paper; six pieces of broken
idass; four dead cockroaches, one of them halt
alive; and a thumb tack. We hope that no one
is overcome with convulsion.)

There is one advantage ot a joke box. It con-
ceals what might otherwise disfigure the room!

()!()!()!

Miss M. "That gives you zero for to-day's
work, you know."

Interested bystander. "Zero means nothing to
him!"

\ SLIGHT MISUNDERSTANDING.

Su> "The islands were a gain to the United
States. Now, Callaway, don't contradict me
a gain!"

Miss Dodds (wearily). "Surse, when will you
learn to pronounce that word? It's agen."

Surse- -"Would you say the islands were agen
to the United States, Miss Dodds?"

It was a first grader who was optimistic enough
u, assure his parents as he sobbed over their
disapproval of his report, "Well, I'm going to
get 'A' in whispering next time, anyway."

The s. s. Ancon was crowded. Bobbie and his

older brother had to share a berth toge ther. One
evening Bobbie groaned: "father, just you come
here and see all the room I ain't got!"



One of the bright sunny DAYS in MAY when
the PALM trees lifted their faces to the sun,
and the S(ch)MOLL TUFTS of GREENe grass
grew larger, I felt so KEENe and full of BLISS
that I wanted to reJOYCE and FRISK in the
summer ozone. I set out tor town with thoughts
of COFFEY, BEERS, and wines fresh from the
VINEYARD and incidentally to pay a little
TAYLOR bill. I approached the old FORD
and started to TURNER over, but, discovering
that the AX(t)ELL was LUCE, concluded it
would pay to WALKer. I had not proceeded
far when I spied a frog taking a BATH along the
BANKS of the Canal, as frogs WILL. I ap-
proached to PETTIT and perhaps to treat it
to a CRUM or two of bread, but, deciding that
this would be a deplorable waste, I went on my
CALLAWAY. -J. G. X., '27.



As Surse and Lowande were riding along, in
Surse's car, of course, they passed the "gallows."

"Where would you be, Surse, if the 'gallows'
had its dues?" asked Lowande.

"Riding along here alone."

"Alas, I've lost another pupil," sighed the poor
professor as his glass eye rolled down the sink pipe.

Miss Moore. "Close your books." (Reads
sentence.)
/,. Callaway. "What page, Miss Moore?"

Miss Hesse (in girls' glee club). "Now the
sopranos may take the air.
( Big rush tor the door.)

Tourist (at Gatun Locks to guide). "My, did
you have that finger cut off?"

Guide. "No, I wore it down by pointing at
the locks so much."







HOTEL WASHINGTON



Unequaled for situation and comfort. A hotel in keeping
with the dignity, spirit, and service of the Panama Canal




Golf



Swi:



minim



x g



IFater Sports



'Tarpon Fishing



THh YEAR AROUND



JAMES E. LEWIS, Manager



P. O. Address, CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONK



THE CARIBBEAN.



73



/^\UR thought ship is ending her voyage. Before
^^^ she glides to her landing place in your happy
memories of what Cristobal High has accomplished,
we want to broadcast a word of thanks to you
who, by your support, have made her flight
possible. We wish especially to extend grateful
greetings to Miss Helen Keene of the Class of

1926, our willing and efficient typist. We men-
tion warmly our tried and true friends of the
Panama Canal Press ever ready to do tar more
than their share for us.

And now we commend to you our advertisers.
Thev are worthy of your patronage. Tell them
you saw their advertisements in The Caribbean-,

1927. We thank also the Official Photographer
of The Panama Canal and the Commanding
Officer of Prance Field for the use of photographs.




UilHl IIIHIIIIIIimillllHIHIIIIIIIIIIII Illl



i ii i i : i :' i 1 i : 1 1 1 -i i ' -'f- +



GREETINGS!!



CLASS OF '2-



4*



If It Can Be Done With Heat
You Can Do It Better With Gas



'1 ::::::::::::::: : :



annmll



i



r- !!! : li'v ::: i' : 1 ::: it :::::: ni' Mi'i.




PANAMA-COLON GAS CO

"At Your Service"



MR 5S90



-10



THE CARIBBEAN.




"' T "T -:- """ : "'"" ,f

j


The Pan-American Drug Store



N. SALAZAR, Proprietor
8^



Main Store:

9.038 Front Street
Phone 336



Branch Stores:

4.060 Bolivar Street, Phone 166
1 1. 156 Bolivar Street, Phone 356



irrri"i:":::::-::j::i::::::::::::^:::o:":::::: :::::::: I::::::::::::::::: :'::':':'::'::::'::::Ti^m^::i:::^^::^^::r:::io:::o:lx:^i:^:':T:T'M ; ;::IXElSi

;::::ii^^rjiiLv;:ii;:;:ninii;;iKi;;;^iin



Compania
Panamena de Fuerza y Luz



(SUCURSAL DE COLON)



COLON, R. de P.



:



COMPLIMENTS OF
Fidanque, Henrique^, eff Cia.



::;;;:!

i!



THE CARIBBEAN.



75



Panama Railroad Steamship Line

CRISTOBAL. TO NEIWYORK

VIA PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI



(ALL CABIN SHIPS)

S. S. "ANCON" and S. S. "CRISTOBAL"

FORTNIGHTLY SERVICE
MONTHLY SAILINGS TO WEST COAST

S. S. "GUAYAQUIL" and S. S. "BUENAVENTURA"

CALLING AT

BUENAVENTURA, TUMACO, ESMER\LDAS, BAHIA, MANTA,
PUERTO BOLIVAR and GUAYAQUIL



OFFICES ON THE ISTHMUS:

Superintendent, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone
Steamship Ticket Agent, Cristobal, Canal Zone
Receiving and Forwarding Agency, Cristobal, Canal Zone

OFFICES IN THE UNITED STATES:

No. 24 State Street, New York City, N. Y.



& Unique testimonial

ALL GOOD AMERICANS were justly thrilled with
pride when Commander Byrd successfully flew over the
North Pole.

THIS HISTORICAL EVENT, which commanded the
admiration of all nations, stands as a UNIQUE TESTI-
MONIAL of the FOOD VALUE OF HIGH QUALITY
CHOCOLATE. Why?

BECAUSE COMMANDER BYRD chose as his emer-
gency rations: Nestle's Milk Chocolate and Pemmican.

NESTLE'S MILK CHOCOLATE: "Richest in Cream" is
nourishing, wholesome, and its fine flavor appeals to every-
one.

BUY A BAR TO-DAY.




;;;;;: ; :::..::.;;.;;;



iiiiiiii Bj!j k::i::; ::': : :::::: 1 :::::::::: :




z*i:im'z'mmLZ2^%imm'i m mf



m umnnimoE^a!:



7 6



THE CARIBBEAN.









KE



MASONIC TEMPLE






PASJiER

fill




Duofold Pen and Duofold Pencil

the New Duette: Satin-lined Gift

Case de luxe included

MEN learned from the Duofold Pen how an Over-
size Barrel affords a man- size grip that abolishes
finger cramp, relaxes hand and brain. Every Parker
Duofold Pen has the super-smooth Duofold Point that
is guaranteed, if not misused, for 25 years' wear.

Parker Lady Duofol d Pen and Pencil are still of small
girth to fit slim fingers. But Parker Duofold Jr. and
"Big Brother" Duofold Pencils are now both built
Over-size.

Parker Oversize Duofold Duette, Pen, $7; Pencil, #4; Pcrkcr Duo-
fold Jr. or Lady Duofold Duette, Pen, $5; Pencils, S3.50 and £3



-JORDAN SA



niMiiiiiiiiiummiiiMiiijiiniiiiiiiiii






MANUFACTURERS' REPRESENTATIVES



::::r:i:::::-:::;:^:ij;r:i::;rrTi::":::::r:::^:::;ir:i:mir:j___

;..,:;:;;z::::::;.;:::";;iiinEmiii;iiiiiEii!nii:;^iii:iirzm;::::;;;;:::;;;::::::;;;:



Madame Melville



Graduate del'Ecole Professionnelle de Beaute |g;
and La Societe Francaise Technique et
Commerciale de la Coiffure de Paris



*



French Permanent Waving;

MARCELLING, DYEING
HAIR CUTTING
HAIR DRESSING
SCALP TREATMENT
MANICURING and CHIROPODY
BLEACHING and FACIALS




For Ladies and Gentlemen
CLUBHOUSE BEAUTY PARLOR

CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE
Phones: Office, 1786 Residence, 1594



MILK

Pasteurized and Guaranteed

PURE

BY THE USE OF MODERN SANITARY EQUIPMENT



!| Visit Our Stores and Call Us by Phone for

GROCERIES

and Foreign Foods



ANTONIO TAGAROPULOS



MAIN STORE:
6.073 Bolivar Street



BRANCH STORE:
12.178 Bolivar Street



THE CARIBBEAN.



77






Rathbun, Stilson & Company, Ltd.

Hardware, Lumber, Paints and Oils



P. O. Eox 140, Colon, R. de P.
Telephones: Pranch Store 253 Main Store 114





SOMETHING YOU CAN'T LEARN AT SCHOOL



There is Always a New and Large Assortment of

Clothing, Sports Wear, and Novelties

ARRIVING ON EVERY STEAMER

. Especially Suited for Students ....



a



FRENCH BAZAAR



PANAMA



COLON




THE CARIBBEAN.



:": ::::: :"::" :::::: :::::::::::::: ::::::::':::::' :::'::::::::: nmnnnmmiminm] rag



GREBIEN & MARTINZ

ARCHITECTS AND CONTRACTORS

Builders of ARMY AND NAVY Y. M. C. A.'s

FIRST UNIT BOLIVARIAN UNIVERSITY, HOSPITALS, CHURCHES
And Many Other Public Buildings and Private Residences



PANAMA



COLON



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imm:' nmzzTiTjn in i-j I- I'Miiiiiit; 22 ": m ::: ;:" : : ;::: :'::::::: :::' "i-iJTiz :::: ft niS

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iiiNiliiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiii 11111 1111 iiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiHi im t mniiniiiiiud



SPORTING GOODS

BRUNSWICK PANATROPES and
PHONOGRAPHS

KODAKS AND PHOTO SUPPLIES



L. J. G R A N I E



COLON, R. P.



P. O. Address, Drawer E
CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



Telephone
419



S =



BS



:::::: ::::'::::::: :::::r '::::::::::::':::rj::::'::::::::::::;:":i!i:r ;

,t :?:_.: .t :.:: :::: :::i;;;;:;i;:;:;;i;!-::it;i:iiin:{t{ ;i;ignnngg a-.



GRAY MARINE ENGINES



->




MODEL SIX-FORTY



CARDOZE & LINDO



AGENTS

PANAMA



Phone 323



Box 112



;,,:;::;;;ii;;ii::;;;ii;!,;;:;i;;;iiii;;;;iiu;;;ii;:;!:iiiinnniini!i:niiniiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiimiini,3



'.'..".',".".'...'.'..:.'.



' 11'I^'li'H'lljrjr.iLiljljIILjm.InlCB :



SPECIALLY FOR MILADY

YOU will find in our stock, among other well-known American and European Brands, the following perfumes:

CARON'S D'ORSAY LEUR COEUR

NARCISSE NOIR LE PARFUM D'ANTON GUERLAIN'S

NUIT DE NOEL I.E SUCCES L'HEURE BLEU

LE TABAC BLOND GANIKA MITSOUKO

IMFINI LE TRIOMPHE QUAND VIENT L'ETE

A TRAVERS CHAMPS SHALIMAR

Ladies of Refined Taste will find here Perfumes to Suit their Requirements
PRICES RIGHT AND THE BEST OF SERVICE



CENTRAL AVENUE
AT loth STREET



ESPINOSA'S DRUG STORE



PANAMA
CITY



THE CARIBBEAN.



79



COMPLIMENTS OF

WTLC( >X-SAENGER COMPANY

THROUGH

The Cinema Pan-America




' fj : £ ii iii i : : ; ; : : :' : : : : i '. : 1 : i : i* i : 1 i : : ; : -i i ; 1 i 1 ; 1 -ii >. 1



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: :

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: : 'i : : 'I til v



COMPLIMENTS OF



HOSPITAL de PANAMA



8o



THE CARIBBEAN.




THF. CARIBBEAN.



81




UNITED FRUIT COMPANY



Regular Sailings
from

CRISTOBAL, C.Z.

to

NEW YORK

NEW ORLEANS

CUBA

COLOMBIA

JAMAICA and

COSTA RICA



For further particulars
apply to




PAUL WEST, Manager Cristobal Division, Cristobal, C. Z.



T. H. JACOME, Agent, Panama Cty



iti^oTiili'ii-i'tmviiri^riri:': :::::::::::: j::::::::: : : :::::::: : :: : ::::".::: : : :: '::::::::::::: ::::::::: ::.:.. : : : : : : : : 111:1 s J3 XEP Seeheec Seeeboe

'--;;;:;,:.;.;.:- ; ;::.: ;:.;;:;; :::: ;: :..:: ..: ::::::; .: : : ;:




P. O. Box 34Q
Cristobal, C. Z.



Pohoomull Bros.



Corner 10th and Front Streets
ORIENTAL MERCHANTS



A Rich Collection of Egyptian and Spanish
Mantilla Shawls, Drawn Thread Work

Madeira Work and East Indian Silks



ALL KIND OF EMBROIDERIES
ALWAYS ON HAND



^ [.;;::: mm: mmmmimmmmm mmmmmm: :mmmmmm:mmmm>'^



COMPLIMENTS OF

American jB ratit p parlor



#



Specialist in

All Fixes of Beautv Culture

Hair Waving

Phone 29 :: 8.030 Front Street



An Inspection Respectfully Invited




.:; ...



MR 5590 11



82



THF. CARIHHKAX.



Cable Address: IMPCO. A. B. C. 5th 6th Bentley's



P. O. Box 342



Colon Import & Export Co., Ltd.

JOBBERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS



-*-



DEALERS IN



General Merchandise and Native Produce
COLON, REPUBLIC of PANAMA



BRANCH RETAIL STORES AND TRADING STATIONS

PLAYA DAMA SANTA ISABEL PORVENIR



TUPILE



ISLE OF PINES



CARTI



NARGANA









ism mi'irnnz: rrrr: 'j'rzi^^nc'jnnisngninEniEcniinEiimmiiiral



Where to Shop in Colon or Panama j||



D. CHELLARAM

ORIENTAL MERCHANTS
WHOLESALE and RETAIL



:::::v:::::::'::::::r ::::::'::






47 Front Street
COLON



81-A Central Avenue

PANAMA



WORLD VARIETY SOUVENIRS

Specialty in Spanish Shawls, Nice Col-
lection in Ivory, Ready-made Pongee
Silk Suits, Always in Stock



OUR MOTTO IS:

SMALL PROFIT & QUICK RETURNS



Phones: Panama 340



Colon 159



RICHARDS' PHOTO STODIO

(Next to National City Bank of New York)
Box 523 Cristobal, C Z.



The Oldest and Most Reliable
Studio




PORTRAITS, VIEWS, ENLARGEMENTS

and

KODAK FINISHING



ALL WORK GUARANTEED



F. FINLAYSON
Manager and Photographer



THE CARIBBEAN.



83



COMPLIMENTS OE



W>)t Samaritan Jlogpttal



'l^ii'iz. z.z.z.z. zi.z. ':-:: ::: :. z.z.mm-i. z.z.z. :::: :: : : : :_>! iin '::; ;:: :::;: 1 : i 11 j^ :; IhES'



CHEVROLET

OyJ51? THE TOP



OFFICIAL FIGURES NOW AVAILABLE
SHOW THAT

CHEVROLET PRODUCTION

During 1927 has been 4,000
units every twenty-four hours.
The Reason is Obvious



Buy Chevrolet for

ECONOMY DURABILITY

BEAUTY PERFORMANCE



I
3 \



Panama Automobile & Supply Co.

PANAMA COLON



. aiiiiiiii iiiiiiiinin : :::'::'::::::::::""::" -:::::: iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiir. mmTn



: : : :



,.;: ;::.;::;.;:::;:;;;:;;: ;;:;:;:;.;;:;;;.;:::::; ::;;;;;:':;;:;;;.;...: :,:;:.:::.:;:;::;::;;;:;;:;..:;:;:';;;,;::; ;: :



MRS. PAULA M. CARDOZE

AT THE

Panama Hat Store

No. 35 FRONT STREET



Offers Her Customers a
Selected Assortment of

Panama Hats
Hand Ba^s
Biro's of Paradise
Feathers and

MANY OTHER DIFFERENT CURIOSITIES



All at Very Reasonable Prices
Without Equal in Town



tiMi^r;:::: ":::::::::::: :;::!:;: ::::::: ;:-:":^r :::::}::: ::<:' iii- '2



. :::;;.;;:;.:,:;;;.;:::;;;, ;.:;..,.



Be



P. O. Box 675

CRISTOBAL, C.Z.

9.036 Front Street







Phone 255
CRISTOBAI, C.Z.



COLON, R. P.



C. CASULUO, Jeweler and Watchmaker

imai^E im i- i 1 1 1- 11 : 1 : 1 : r i : : i :. r i- x- !': .: i : i ; ; i i- 1- i ^ i- ;:i:-;:::i::::::i:;::i:: :;;;:;:::;;;;}i:;;;v;i;i: lii'i-iiiirriri'iijfxEiiTi:;; in-: in-' xiiiYznTzE-^



?4



THK CARIBBKAN.






WE DYE TO LIVE



TROTT, THE CLEANER



COLON

Phone 250



and



PANAMA

Phone 453



iMHnmmillllMIMlllMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIHIHMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIJI



. ::;;;;; ;.... ;; :;;;:::;.;;:;:






The Cafeteria Idea



is quick service and elimination
of overhead expenses, bringing
patrons and service in direct and
immediate contact at
LOWEST POSSIBLE COST



MAKE OUR CAFETERIA
YOUR HEADQUARTERS




i



FOR GOOD THINGS TO EAT



The Panama Canal Restaurants |

CARL STROM, Lessee

::

_ II

::::::;::::: :::,r:;;::;;:: ::;::-:;:;] ; h-TJ



it::;;:::::::-:::-: IS.

inmimpinmiJiiMEi III!



R. E. HOPKINS



Distributor



FOR



I Studebaker a?id Erskine Cars






CANAL ZONK and REP. OK PANAMA



: : : : : ; : : : : : : ;



5 ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; : ; ; : m 1 5 5 1 j



'":": ::^:: :r:::::



;::;:::.::;:;;;;:;:; rrfTt*iT*Tr ;i>.;:i.r:^i>>:i>.^;^i^^^

ill
DO VOL WONDER WHERE THE BOYS GET SUCH SNAPPY

HAIR CUTS?
and THE GIRLS THEIR MODISH BOBS?

WHY, AT

Charley Payne's Barber Shop



: ;::::::: ::;: i-'iJiii'i-i'insJin-i.

;^'in;Diiii[;i;iiifflniiiMiii]in[;(inniipij



THE CARIBBEAN.




Omnge-CNOSH.



Here is a drink which is very much in
demand.

Try it and be convinced of its superior
qualities.






PANAMA COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY

Phones: Panama 65, Colon 84



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- :*".:::.:::;::::' :r



- V..VV.V,



P. O. Box 175, Cristobal, C. Z.
Phone 1345



Phones
Cobn 500 or 395



MAC'S



GARAGE AND TOURIST SERVICE

CARS WITH OR WITHOUT DRIVERS

GOOD SERVICE AT LOW PRICES



24 HOURS SERVICE

Try Us for Repairs, Supplies, Etc.






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l The French Drug Stores



V. DELGADO M.



COLON



We take pleasure in offering to our
p.itrons the services of the only

GRADUATE PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMIST

In Colon who is Registered both in the
Republic of Panama and the Canal Zone



DOCTORS SPECIALLY INVITED



TO VISIT OUR

Prescription Department



' TTTTT ffi]MfflMiE rnnn JEE



86



THE CARIBBEAN.



" rz: : '.'"



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TTnunnnnnnMCj



AMERICAN SUPPLY COMPANY



Manufacturers of Native Hardwood Furniture



96 Central Avenue



PANAMA



123 Central Avenue






-. :::;-:-":;:;v:"::;;:.:^:.:~f^'"r:::r:: ;aBBMHHHgi




FINEST

PANAMA HATS

(Genuine Monte Cristi)



Money
Exchange



i 1





P£ '1 1 1 'I 'I I I 1 'I 'I I 'I I I II T-T T 'TT ~



S. Perrone & Lobato

Front Street Main Office

COLON, R. de P. GUAYAQUIL, ECUADOR



i



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::::-..::: :::::::: :::;::: :::: ::::::::::



:&



1 ;;



ANONYMOUS



: : ;:..;:.:: :;; : ;..;:::;::::.;.:::.:..;




COMPLIMENTS OF



r. #ern $rier



Br. Carl ^afforb



CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE



mmmmmmmmmwMmbi




THF. CARIBBKAN.



7






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I :: : z : : :. : : : ; : : : : : ; : ; !;; :



DUQUE COMPANY, Inc.

Hardware and Lumbar Building Materials Arms and Ammunition

Agents for the FAMOUS DEVOE-5AYNOLDS PAINTS AND VARNISHES
Agentj for COLT'S PATENT FIRE ARMS COMPANY



STORE: CENTRAL AVENUE and nth STREET
Tel. 592



WAREHOUSE: NORTH AVENUi
Tel. 596



:::^i: ::::: :::::: ; rr:::':^:':r^:.:^r:^:^::T:.:^:'::::':rr

";.;:; ;; ;;;.:::.,;;:.;;.:;;;::.:.;;;;::.,::.,;:v: ;;:




PRINCIPAL DRUG STORE

DR. A. C. DACOSTA GOMEZ



We always cairy in Stock a
fresh assortment of Ameri-
can and European Drugs a nd
Patent Medicines, Rubber
Goods, Toilet Articles and
Perfumery.

OUR PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENT

is under the care of a registered

Chemist of wide experience

COLON

Corner of 9th and Bolivar Streets, Ko. 8122
Telephone 222 P. O. Box 84






Li ?::::: : i:-: : :: :::::::::::: :: :: ::::::::.:::::::::::::"::::"::: :::: £3



.:"::: ';:'::':':":::::::: :::::::.:::: z: :::::'. 'r ."..::: ::::"':'::::

.g.^^^iix;^':^':;:::^;;; :::: izi .i-ii-iizi '.-ii'.mjL l.^-iiii^






Panazone Garage Co. ||



Euick and Oidsmobile Cars
G. M. C. "Buick Trucks"
Kelly-Springfield Tires
Delco Light Plants
Exide Batteries
Harley-Davidson Motorcycles

ACCESSORIES AND PARTS



Panazone Garage Co.

COLON PANAMA



!/:::::;:: ::::::: :::;::::: 5 ::::::: :::: '::::;-::: ::::i;:::::^n:mii



:::::::: ^:^ l t ;:;:;; ^ :;:':: ; -j *j :j -j ^" ^' ; v ; v ^ :j:: : ; ; ^: ; ^: -j :,: ;:; v :: :::" :':""/ .':::::';: : ;; :::r:r "ir: :':: :::: :::::::":': : ::::::'*:: ::: :::-



.;: : : : :: 1 : 1 :_ I i^ ;:: ;:-::'::::> :.t -ii : :"!;: : :::: -i ::: : ::: '::::::::;'':': : ;;:' it ::::::;:;::': t ::>! ; : ; >i ; : -i : ; : : -i 1 -i i 1 ': : -i .: >r i i_i' i -i' i' i :;:::' ; : :' :::; :;;:':;::' :



THE ANCON INN

"Jay Street Country Club" :-: Arthur Weil, Proprietor

Dining Room Upstairs



SPECIAL Fried Chicken, Country Style, and Tenderloin Steaks



..- ;....:.,.;..: :. ,:.: ;..:.,.; -.... :.;:;;:.:::;:;;:,:;.. :.;;;;;;.;;;;; nr,!.;:::'. :







THE CARIBBEAN.



^^^ISSa^SSSiffS^Si^^SS^TffiSsSS^^^fflsSSsffifflfflfflM



Improved Equipment



Modern Methods



Efficient Service



JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY



BROADWAY, NEAR FOLKS RIVER



We Solicit the Patronage of Canal Zone Employees



WEEKLY COLLECTIONS AND DELIVERIES OF LAUNDRY WORK
CHARGE ACCOUNT IF DESIRED



CLEANING, PRESSING and DYEING

A SPECIALTY



Phone: Colon 21



P. O. Box 1131, Cristobal, C. Z.




MR 559) PANAMA CANAL 6-25-27 6)0




Fnnniiifir n iriMriiiiinrMiirMiriiifM run m< i mi 1 11 1 1 mh rn 1 1 rm rrnnfc mm i rncrwiVf=i