Caribbean

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Title:
Caribbean
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Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Cristobal High School
Publisher:
Yearbook House
Place of Publication:
Kansas City, Missouri
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Canal Zone
Yearbook
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00093680:00012


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VoL. VIII.


CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE,


PUBLISHED


BY THE


CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL


CONTENTS


Advertisements .. ....
A lum ni....... ..... .
Beauty Spots .... ..
CARIBBEAN Staff......
Dedication . .. . ..
Editorials ... . .
RUTH E. HOPKINS, 25.
Education.......... ..
Exchanges ..... ... H
Faculty, The..... .
Freshman Class.........
Graduates.... .. ......
Jokes....... . .....
DOROTHY DEIBERT, 25.
Junior Class... ...., .
Literary .... ....... .
A Banana Woman.
A Lone Traveler... .


WILLIAM C. COUSINS,
.IRENE HOPKINS,


WILLI.AM C. CoUsixs
. IOLA MUNOz
LARRIET A. STEENBERGo


HUBERT LEE,


.....RUTH F. DUEY,
.RUTH E. HOPKINS,
..... .FRANK BOOTH,


Literary-Continued.
Essays-Continued.
On Being La'zy JACK COFFEY,
On Catching Butterflies JOHN ORDWAY,
The Diving Boys at Haiti . . . .


H'Oranges


MAURICE EGGLESTOX,
RUrTH DUErV


"Honesty is the Best Policy" RUTH E. HOPKINS,
Mi Pollera! ..... .... OLGA M. ARCIA,
Nature Impressions .. ....... .
A Foreigner in Panama RUTH F. DUEY,
From Along the Beach HELEN ABENDROTH,
My Inspiration W1LLIAM C. COUSINs,
My Tree ...... DOROTHY DEIBERT,
The Banana Palm DOROTHEA TUFTS,


The Bay .... ..
Santurce Golf Course


. ANNIEL HEIM,
RUTH E. HorPKINS,


The Sea. ... OLGA M. ARCIA,
Thoughts in Looking Across the Sea .
KATHERINE FISCHER,
"Not What We Give" . LOLA MUNOZ,
One of Life's Little Tragedies or Comedies? .
HELEN ABENDROTH,
Parlor Tricks ... HELEN ABENDROTH,
Rosalind in .Is You Like It. KATHERINE FISCHER
Soliloquy of a Cake. ETHEL BARNETT,
The Coming of Night ..... HUBERT LEE,
The Paper Boy-"Sta een rYeral!". ...


The Seaweed Doll
Treasure Seekers.
A Rhyme......
Prophecy by Palmistry
Poetry:
Ashore at Night.
Old Panama......
The Coming of Ni
The Pier ..... .
Weather Away !.
School Notes .... .
Sports..... .
Boys' . ...
z-**


DOROTHY DEIBERT,
HELEN J. KEENE,
MERCEDES JORDAN,
RUTH E. HOPKINS,


26.. 48
25.. 52
Q5.
25. 51
- 38
25 42
25. 40
25.. 39
25-. 41
'26.. 41
25- 39
25- 38
'25. 38

25 -.- 43
'26. 49
'25.. 50
25-.- 52
25.. 34
29. 30
25- 51

25.. 51
'26. 27
'28.. 29
'25 37
. . . 14


. KATHERINE FISCHER,
. .. . J. H. THRIFT,
..KATHERINE FISCHER,
.KATHERINE FISCHER,
. KATHERINE FISCHER,
.. ... ANNIEL HEIM


S- 45

S 53


. .JOHN ORDWAY,


I


A llegories.. .. . ... . ... .. . . . . . 36
The Building of a Boat. HELEN ABENDROTH,'25 36
Every Boy's Cruise .... ....... 37
Learning to Drive. .RUTH E. HOPKINS, 25. 36
A Corner of the Market Place ...........
HELEN ABENDROTH, '25. 49
A Speckled Beauty .CLARICE STEENBERG, '26 2
A Tragedy....... ...... RUTH E. HOPKINS, '25 50
A Tribute to a Mother-Inspired by a Christmas
Away from Home. KATHERINE FISCHER, '25 50
Blind Luck........... .CHARLES WILL, '27 28
D descriptions ...... .. ... .... ... .. 31
A Coach.... ...WILLIAM CLINCHARD, '26 34
"AGreenTranquillity"DOROTHYDEIBERT,'25 32
A Mud Puddle...... RUTH E. HOPKINS, '25 31
An Old Dungeon ...., RUTH DUEY, '25. 31
A Room. ... ... .. .. ANNIEL HEIM, '25. 31I
Dawn .. ... .. RUTH E. HOPKINS, 25. 31I
Dawn........ HELEN ABENDROTH, '25. 31
Morning .... .. ...... RUTH DUEY, '25 3I1
Taking on the Pilot. ...... RUTH Foos, '28.. 32
The Lighthouse... WILLIAM C. COUSINS, '25. 32
TheLocksatNight ...... RUTH DUEY, '25, 32
The School Building at Night . . . . ....


,
1


^ .-


. . .







THE CARIBBEAN.


U. S. Battleship in Miraflores Lock.


Seb itcation
IO THE MANY FRIENDS OF CRISTOBAL
*HIGH SCHOOL, WHO HAVE SO WIL-


LI NGLY


AND


UNTIRINGLY


AIDED


US IN OUR NUMEROUS


ENTERPRISES,


WE GRATEFULLY DEDICATE THIS, OUR
EIGHTH VOLUME OF "THE CARIBBEAN."







THE


CARIBBEAN.







THE CARIBBEAN.


TEAMWORK.


Ruth E. H


opkins, '25.


There is something about our own school that
in the afteryears makes us connect only good times
and cheery companionship with it; something that


makes us proud to say we belonged there.


That


something is school spirit-the same spirit that
sends a basket ball team onto the floor fighting,


Teamwork should


not stop


sports


athletics but should be carried out through the
routine of school work and through social activi-
ties.
We must be interested in our studies--anxious


that our marks are good.


But it is not enough


in the face of defeat, for their school;


the same


spirit that makes our annual possible; makes our


play worth


while-in fact, accounts for all


"big things" in high school life.
Reams could be written about school spirit-


been.


defined, illus-


treated, and lauded times without number.


makes school spirit?


Why do some


schools have it while others don't?
It rests entirely with the group. Kipling's
words about the army may be applied here with
equal truth:
"It's not the individual
Nor the army as a whole,


But the everlastin


Teamwork


Of every blooming' soul."


It is the teamwork of every single soul working
for one goal-the glory of the school. That is


that we think only of ourselves-we should ex-
plain the things we understand to those who do
not grasp them so readily, and so help the students
of our school to succeed.
Almost the same is true of our social activities,
for we find that if we put our work and ourselves
into the affair, we have enjoyed it much more. If
we can make others enjoy it too-we have added
another happy event to our school calendar.


Thus,


bv working with and for each other-


by constant teamwork-we can preserve and add
to that living, breathing thing-school spirit.

Miss RUTH HOPKINS.
William C. Cousins, 'a5.
There is surely a niche in the hall of fame for


our Senior Class President.
been president of her class
years and has been elected


Ruth Hopkins has


for the


three


to lead once more.


makes


the something


about


school


we remember and love.


School


spirit


comes only


when


students can


She is the editor-in-chief of our annual; was voted,
when only a Sophomore, the most popular girl,
and is duty, brains, and cheerfulness personified.


sacrifice personal praise for the greater praise of


their school;


when, as in a basket ball game, a


Ruth'
of will.


s kindness is exceeded only by her strength


tactful,


friendly,


and firm,


player is willing to forfeit his chance basket to
someone who is a "sure shot"-and so, working,
not through one man but as one man, the team


leads in all but sluggishness and procrastination.
Her company is just a step to higher things.
That intangible thing called school spirit and







THE CARIBBEAN, .


. *ii, I
xx x x : x -.


", :
--I--_


*" N


^'1
p1 1


mI55 BAKEVELL


CURRIER


142


-S. -


- r I. -








THE


MR. W. W. ANDREW.
Providence, Rhode Island.
Superintendent of Schools.


CARIBBEAN.


MR. JOHN E. LANZ.
Los Angeles, California.
University of Nebraska.
Columbia University.


Assistant to


acultp.


Claremont, Minnesota.
Macalester College.


Superintendent


of Schools.


Miss MABEl/JEAN BARNHOUSE.
Watsonville, California.
Leland Stanford Jr. University.


Principal.


Spanish.


English,


Cicero, Social


Problems and Economics.


Junior Class Adviser.


Girls' and Boys' Glee


Clubs.


Senior Class Adviser.


Caribbean


Staff Adoiser"


Adviser.


Miss
Spanish


Mabel


teacher in


Barnhouse, th
Cristobal High


competent
School, has


Miss J. Isabella Dodds has for five years been
the principal of Cristobal High School, and will,
we sincerely hope, remain with us for many more
terms.
From the cold climate of Minnesota to the humid


atmosphere
principal.
however.


a


of the tropics she


She has been
She has taught


more


came
than


us English


to act as
principal,
h, Latin,


social problems; she has been the adviser for each


senior class;


she has coached our plays;


she has


been the faculty member of the CARIBBEAN staff;
she has been the silent power behind all our or-
ganizations and has tried to imbue in others some
of the vim and vigor that are hers.
To her we are indebted for the Girls' Supper
Club. There she has not only always been will-
ing to help, but has made every girl desirous of


been for the last four years a constant inspiration


and friend to the pupils.
path have lightened t


many


Her kindness and sym-
he burden of routine for


of us, and her cheerful


assistance min


things will be long remembered by everyone.
As a class adviser Miss Barnhouse has been as


nearly perfect as


possible.


Her original ideas,


her unfailing energy, and her untiring aid have
so firmly established her in the hearts of the Class
of '26 that they have twice reelected her.
Miss Barnhouse is a native daughter of Califor-


nia where she


Stanford


Junio


was graduated
r University.


from
From


the Leland
her home


state she went to Colombia, and from Colombia
came to us. It is our hope that we may make her
stay with us so pleasant that it will always be a


memory.


-Ruth


entering.


E. Hopkins,


our sports


Dodds


has always


present; she is the energetic personality who cheers
and encourages, keeping up the spirit of the team


and the rooters even in


the face of


defeat;


before us we have ever in all our activities
definition of fair play and courtesy.
For originality what should we do if there w


MR. GEORGE J. BENSoN.O
Saint Cloud, Minnesota. k.j
State Teachers' College, Saint Cloud.
Bradley Polytechnic Institute.


her
General Science, Industrial Subjects.

,o Sophomore Class Adviser. Upsilon Gamma Gamma Adviser.


no Miss Dodds?


She is an encyclopedia of ideas


which are clever and entertaining;


she is always


in demand whenever there is a party or a program.
She is ever just and can see our side of a question
as well as turning it inside out to show us the other
side. Thus her strong power of reasoning comes
I


Mr. George J. Benson is just completing his
first term with Cristobal High. He has filled the
position in the faculty left vacant by Mr. Schnepp-
mueller, and that place in each boy's heart which
is always open for a true friend and partner.
Un-rt/4 A0^ Lc e-~r a-i4lt, rno ^-an ni~ar nC~ ero nrfa AI1Xrc V^ fT


&t t4C-


Supper Club







THE


CARI BBEAN.


has lent valuable aid to athletics in C. H. S., and is


to be commended


for his


assistance


one in


in putting


Cristobal


an opportunity


High School.


to learn


She provides us
our history, and


over the athletic night-a series of exhibitions for


the purpose of raising money for the boys


athletic


association.


Mr. Benson is well liked in school, both in class


and out of it, and in outside life as well.
may he--stay!!
IFiliam cos in


MISS 'MARGARETI H. O'CONNELL.


Long


possesses an almost uncanny knowledge of Eng-
lish---grammar, rhetoric, lives of authors, inter-
pretations, or anything we can ask.
Her ability in discussing books and plays and
in describing scenes and people is extraordinary


and enviable.


Her classes


enlivened


s, '5 graphic stories from her travels and experiences.
, .' She Is our guide in speech and writing from our
Freshman Year until we are Seniors.


Grand Rapids, Minnesota.
('relliton university.
University of Minnesota.
Mathematics, Physics.


In other words,


respected


for her i


Miss Hornbeak may


intelligence andi


well Ibe


individuality,


and loved for her readiness to help us when we
need her.


Freshman Class Adviser.


Dorothy Deibert


and Olga


Margaret


O'Connell,


ancient science of why's


teacher
how's i


s greatly


admired by the high school pupils for her natural


geniality.


It is not often that one


turbed by little things.


sees


Miss ADELA F. B/


AKEWELL.


Lansing, Iowa.


her dis-


She never scolds or fusses,


Iowa State College.
University of California.


but instead, talks quietly-still, it's true, some-
times with an edge that is quite effective.
She is patient with our stupidity in problems
and questions that are oh! so easy, after she has


explained.


She knows physics and algebra from


all points; more remarkable than that, she under-
stands and appreciates our hardships, and sym-


pathizes with us in


them.


Though


she is ever


ready to explain, yet, at the same time, she makes
us think.
As a native of Minnesota she first came to us,
but we hope she is sufficiently Panamanianized to
want to stay a while, for, although she has been
here less than two years, she has established her-
self firmly in the hearts of the pupils in Cristobal
High School.
Katherine Fischer and Helen Abendroth, '25.


Miss WA iE LEE ,ORNBEAK.
Waxahachie, Texas.


Trinity University.
Columbia University.


English,


Home Economics.


Miss Adela Bakewell came to us from


Lansing,


Iowa, bringing her store of learning from the Iowa
State College and from the University of Califor-
nia. She has taught in Cristobal High School for


four years.


Though she has a wonderful knowl-


edge of ancient and modern history, she confines


her teaching


to household


arts both


elementary and advanced.
To those students who know her only in the
assembly hall, and are not in any of her classes,


she seems unapproachable.


She has a firm belief


that anyone who does not do what he is told de-
serves reproof, and she doesn't hesitate to admin-
ister such to any deserving culprit.


But how different in her classes!


What


a help


she is to those of her students who are interested


in their work and show it!


they have


happens


foods,


U. AS. History and Civics.


W\hat good


together over something


class!


textiles,


those who seek it.


Information,


or parties,


funny


especially


is always


aughs
that
*y on


ready


Rules, illustrations, and out-


lines are three of her greatest interests in lessons.


- .. ..


But she is willing to heln in any school


activity


lrcia.


(,t'


Librarian.








THE CARIBBEAN.


Miss MILDRED C. RAUNER,.


Hartford, Michigan.
University of Michigan.
University of Chicago.
University of Madrid.


Latin, History, Spanish.


If Miss Mildred C. Rauner is typical of the in-


habitants of Michigan,


then New


has nothing on this, her home state.
Miss Rauner is exceedingly quick;


York's speed
In her work,
she keeps her


history, Spanish, and Latin classes wide-awake,
for if they miss one word they miss a sentence, if
they miss a sentence they miss the paragraph, if


miss


the paragraph


nm


except one thing, a big round zero.


uss everything
But her skill


lies in the fact that she is a fast thinker and knows
how to keep the attention of her class so that the


zeros are practically none.


at her work.


Such is Miss Rauner


At other times she forgets her work


to be pleasant to everyone, and finds the time to


look at us, smile, and then joke with us.


Added


to this winning nature, she is enthusiastic, and,
like most short people, likes mischief once in a


while.


Such qualities as these always go towards


making a person a good friend to everybody, and
Miss Rauner is no exception; she's all right!


MIss HELEN L., CARRIER. .
Minneapolis, Minnesota.
University of Minnesota.


Chorus, Orchestra.


Cristobal High School has indeed been fortu-
nate in having Miss Helen Currier as itstnusic
supervisor. For five years she has worked "wh
our choruses, and at the end of each year has Sup-
plied the commencement program with numbers
that fittingly express her lofty purpose in music:
It is no easy task to direct a chorus of boys and
girls. It demands tact, and willingness to meet
and conquer obstacles. Though, at times, we are
not attentive, Miss Currier never is impatientj a;
few well-chosen words rouse us into watchfulns,.
and encourage us to do better. ,
Not only do choruses claim her, but our school
orchestra takes up some of her time-where again
her skillful direction makes itself apparent
her reto ma e ret^ lr1
The instant one comes in contact with Miss.
Currier, he is conscious of a charming personality,
and a winning smile which accomplishes far more
rhan cteorn lrrook


* 4A 1a m j it&L J *'Jt/fh^ .


Lastly, although the grades of the Isthmus ahn
our friends of Balboa High School demand a good
share of her attention, we think of Miss Currier
as our very own, and shall continue to do so as
long as she resides in the Canal Zone.


-Hubert


Lee, '25.


-Ruth Duey,


THE PIER.


"Though I am not a poet, I have dreams sometimes,


Katherine

"-Ruskin.


Fischer


The heart, that in the night
Amidst its rows of cargo;


is still


SDarkened now,
Its doors closed tight,
The pier stands in the night.


Electric lights describe half


arcs,


But their beams pierce not the gloom,
Where crates and boxes
Round are stacked;
Where the musty smell of
Long-stored goods
Pervades the darkness;


Where by day, the human's


puny efforts


Are looked down on by the rafters,
From whose grim and dusty grayness
Echoes hack the mortal's cry.


The heart that throbs with life by day
Between its rows of cargo;
The heart that hears, now, only waves
Whose swish seeps thru the shadow.
But hears by day
The clanging bell,
The ship's shrill siren,
The clanking of the crane chains,
And the fall of freight to dock;
The heart that hears, as ships go out,
The stifled sob,
The farewell, carefully spoken;
That sees the kerchief flutter in the breeze
And the tear hastily concealed.


, .... .' I 1. *. I I I


A *


a









THE


CARIBBEAN.


TIE IDEAL GRADUATE.
To me the ideal graduate is not just the one who has always
acquired good marks. I think an ideal graduate is one who
has gained ia general idea of the various studies in high school
and can apply this knowledge to his everyday life; whose
high school education has made him abler to determine be-
tween right and wrong and strengthened him to choose be-
tween them; whose constant association with different kinds
of people has enlarged his sympathies and taught him con-
sideration for others; in short -whose mind has been broad-
ened, whose ability to reason has been developed, amnd whose
ambitions have been prompted. Irene Hopkins, '26.

EDUCATION.


Educ


action, a priceless thing! The imparting of knowl-


edge; mental and moraln training-the cultivation of the
mind and soul; cornTer stone of every great nation; wise
guide of men through generations, making children of to-
day far richer than the children of vesterday-richer in
knowledge, richer in earning power; the best of means to
put man in touch with his fellowmen for the betterment of
standards; at its best a preparation for complete living.


Education, a priceless thing.


-Lola


Alunoz,


THE QUALIFICATIONS OF


A 100'


HIGH


SCHOOL


GRADI)UATE.


n my opinion


A general


a 100oo


high school graduate


knowledge with the ability


should have:
to talk intelli-


gently on subjects of the day.
II. Efficiency in some subject which will enable him


earn a living


wage.


Ill. Ability and


willingness to see others


viewpoints and


to profit by them.
IV. A sense of right and wrong with will-power strong
enough to enable him to make the right choice.


V. A "learning attitude,
ing knowledge b3


" the desire to continue acquir-


conversation,


by reading,


by investigation.
VI. The qualities of a good leader-not one who does


nothing but "boss"


nor one who does all the work


while his helpers look on, but one who by work-


ing with


followers,


encourages them rather


than drives them.


VII. A spirit of adjustment which includes sympathy,


agreeability,


understanding,


not continually


speaking of what "1" did or said-the ability to
step forward or backward as the occasion de-
mands.


VIII. Reliability, making him dependable,


trustworthy-


one on whom one can safely place responsibilities;


whose word


is as solid as a rock.


IX. Steadiness or stick-to-it-iveness, not being swayed by
the silly and frivolous, but adhering to his ideals
whatever may come.


X. Agility


and physical strength, not carried


to ex-


tremes but enabling him to get the exercise which


will keep him physically fit antd will


relieve


some


of the mental strains that come to all.


1.
*
T 4 f I 1 1. 1 .. 1. ... f


*





THE CARIBBEAN.


S


a









THE CARIBBE.AN. t


SENIORS.

Class Colors-Purple and Green.
Class Flower-Passion Flower.


Motto--


"A man prepared has


halffituitht


the battle.


RUTH E. HOPKINS.


21 '22 Class


WII.I.IAM


Basket 1


Secretary, Supper Club. *


Chorus.


Glee Club.


Class President.


Vice President, Supper
Chorus.


Club.


Chorus.


Basket


Class Basker


Chorus.


"Silas Marner.


Glee Club.
Gypsy Operetta.
"Silas Marner."


'2-Z24 Class President.


A


'23'24 Assistant Business


Secretary


and I


reasu


ager.


rer. Athlet


Basket ball.


Assistant


Editor of THE


Class Basket ball.


CARIBBEAN.


President, Supper Club.
Chorus.


Glee Club.


Spanish Operetta.
2c Class President.


Editor, THE CARIBBEAN.


President,
Chorus.


Supper Club.
Glee Club.


"Sailor's Reverie


anese


Operetta.


Track.


"Upsilon Gamma


n31n1.


School."


Secretary


and 1


Manager, 1 iH i


Manager, Athletic
Basket ball.
Class Basket ball.
Class Baseball.


Association.


Track.


RUTH F.


DUEY.


iarnma.


President
Chorus.


21-'22 Basket ball.
Class Swimming.


"D)addy Long I.egs."


Chorus.


Supper Club.
'"-'23 Basket ball
Track.


Orchestra.


Chorus.


Supper Club.
"Silas Marner.


22- 23


Chorus.


'23-'24 Class Basket
Basket ball.


Editor, Girls' Athletics.
Indoor Baseball.


23- '24 Class


TI ennis.


Orchestra.


Chorus. Glee Club.
Spanish Operetta.
"Charm School"


Supper Club.


'2c Class


Literary Editor.
President, Girls' Athletic
Basket ball.


Baseball.
Tennis.


24-'25 Editor,
Tennis


Association.


Tennis.


etnnar. Ctn,


Chorus.


21-'22 Class President.


22-'23


C. C()Ol'SINS.


, CT EARlB$cSA.
ic Association.


"Charm
Chorus.


2:. Class
Business


treasurer.
ARIBBEA N.


Glee Club.


Glee Club.


V. HELEN ABENDROTH.


'21-- '22 Tennis.


Chorus.


Glee Club.


Supper Club.


enrns.


Glee Club.


er Club.


"Silas Marner.


Secretary and Treasurer


Vice President.


TH'e C


(Halft


Exchange Editor,
Chorus.
Glee Club.
Orchestra.


year


ARIBBEAN.


Girls' Athlet


Basket ball.


Baseball.


"Utnsilon Gamman














THE CARIBBEAN.


4.


f x x x : *


L

^dy.F
. T..
.b *. ,

hA


I .5 I*E F I


lJ


I


x xx x .









THE CARIBBEAN.


OLGA M. ARCIA.


DI)OROTI IY DEIBE RT


'2I-'22


Supper Club.


Chorus.


>1


Glee Club.


'22-'23 Chorus.
Glee Club.


21-'22 Mount HF
22-'2, Secretary,
Chorus.
Tennis.


lly, Newc
Athleri ic


T rack.


Supper Club.
Gypsy Operetta.
23-'24 Tennis
Chorus.


'23-"'4 Class
Chorus.


Tennis.


Bisker )hall.


G(lee Club.


Supper Club.
Spanish Operetta.
'24-'25 Assistant Business Manager, THE CARIHBrAN.
Chorus.


Indoor Baseball.
T'ra ick.
'C harmn SchI)L.


24- '25 Joke Editor,
Basket haltl.


ITHE CARBBEI: \.


C('horus.
Remove


Glee Club.


Supper Club.
Japanese Operetta.
"Daddy Long Legs.


I to M1


Seis)town,


KATHERINE FISCHER.


ANNIEL.


HELM.


'21-'22
'22-'23


Junior High School, Baltimore, Mid.
Eastern High School, Baltimore, Md.


21- 22 Newark High School, Newark, ()hio.


, ,-'2,


Newark Hiih School,


Newvark,


'23-'24 C. H.
Chorus.


Supper Club.


23-'24 C. H. S.
Chorus.
Supper Club.


'24-'25


Assistant Circulation Manager, THE CARIBBEAN.


2; School


Notes


Editor, TnE CAREIBLEAN.


Basket ball.


Supper Club.


Chorus.


"D addyv


.one i.egs.


Glee Club


<:>


Supper Club
"Daddy Long Legs.
Japanese Operetta.


HUBERT LEE.


HARRIET A. STEENJERG.


'2I-'22


Chorus.


'2I-'22 South Division High School, Milwaukee


'22-'23
23-'24
'24-'25


The Methodist


22-'2I Central High


School, Costa Rica.


23- 24
24- 2-


The Methodist School, Costa Rica.
Joke Editor, THE CARIBBEAN.


School, WXashington, D. C


Hampton High School, l1ampton, \ a.
C. H. S.


Exchange Editor, TnE


CA IRREiAN.


Class Basket ball.


Vice President,


Supper Club.


Chorus.


Upsilon Gamma Gamma.
"Daddy Long Legs."


Jersey.
Association.


Secretary


and T'rcasurer (1 I ear .


Glee Club.


)"Daddy Long Legs.







THE CARIBBEAN.


PROPHECY BY PALMISTRY
One small lamp throws out fitful beams to illu-
minate a circle of rapt senior faces, whose gazes
are intently concentrated upon the mysterious
one who relates our fortunes or misfortunes as
the case may be.
The mystic stares at the palm of our smallest


senior, and


sees grave newt


Helen is going to have a tr
agine our unsentimental,
Perhaps she isn't such a man
Next in turn is Olga, she
To learn that she is to have
is no shock, bet we listen
mystic announces that she
(So comforting in old age, d


of vast
agic lov
boyish
-hater a
of the
a great
Shorrif


importance-
e affair. Im-
little Helen!
after all.
demure looks.
deal of money


led


when


a


will have six children!
oncher know, Olga.)


Ruth D., ou
We can scarcely


ways


dignif


of a flirtationr
fair alumna c
Katherine,
next. We kni
fervor, so it
sent into the


raise the low ideals
On Anniel's palm
No doubt she will e


We hurriedly push Willie in front of the medium,
and she discovers what we have known a long
time-that Willie is willing to take a long chance
on anything, even on English unprepared. We
always knew he would be a good mariner too, for
he shows all the earmarks of becoming the pro-
verbial sailor who has a girl in every port.


r aspiring musician, follow
y believe our ears about h
ied, never stooping to the
We understand she will
last year in her conquest (
'ith doubtful eyes, deigns
, she was possessed of great
no surprise to us that she
ilds of Panama as a missi


of the
there
ncoun


vS
ier
vu
riv
)fl
to
re


Willie.
. She
Igarity
'al one
hearts.
I listen
ligious


!is to
onary


cannibals there!
is a long line of trash
ter all sorts of thrill


rel.
ing.
ing


adventures, and be beset by many difficulties as she
journeys from Colon to Panama, which is to be her
sphere of experience during the wandering period.
Our Class President, Ruth H., is assured success
in the business world. Her fair-mindedness will
be invaluable in the criminal courts where she will
preside. She will be especially severe with high
school students found appropriating articles from
desks other than their own.
The only born orator of our Class, Hubert, has
as his destiny an enviable position in the asylum
at Corozal, where he will endeavor to sway the


has decided that she will be the ministering angel
in the S. P. C. A.
Yes, the fortunes have been told, our seeress can
tell no more, so very quietly we leave the room.
Turning back, we see her bending low over a
crystal globe. She is chanting under her breath,
and the light continues to flicker and shed its
beams upon her until we pass out of sight.

THE SENIOR CLASS WILL.
We, the Class of 1925, of Cristobal High School,


knowing
uncerta
able an<
which
dearest,
Olga
right to
the priv
Helenr
to Bett'
titude f


g that we are about to pass on into the
in future, find that we have various valu-
i treasured possessions and characteristics
ve wish to bestow upon our nearest and
the Juniors.
Arcia leaves to Jack and Billy Coffey the
be late every morning; to Lola Mufioz,
ilege of spending her week ends in Panama.
i Abendroth leaves her aversion for boys
y Warren; to Hildegarde Blythe, her ap-
or Spanish.


to Mildred Neely her
Long, her ability to talk.
e deliberation, leaves to
judgment in saying the
place; to John Ordway
oratorical ability.


Harriet Steenberg leaves to Dorothea Tufts the
right to answer the telephone during Senior Eng-
i;L nr-rA. rn (Crlne Pnlarar her ease in making


William Cousins leaves to Maurice Eggleston
his audacity to argue with Miss Dodds; to William
McIntyre, the right to be chief bouncer in the
Seniors' Den.
Ruth Duey, after careful thought, leaves to
Delilah May and William Clinchard her interest
in the "subs" to be added to their already fast
growing supply.
Katherine Fischer leaves to Harry Moore and
Clarice Steenberg her ability to express lofty sen-
timent in prose and verse; this to be added to their
own genius. To Helen Keene and Gay Turner,
Katherine leaves her lofty stature.
Anniel Heim bestows upon Irene Hopkins, Edna
Duvall, and Manola Bliss her recipe for being seen
and not heard. To Johanna Kleefkens she leaves
her genius for refraining from asking questions.


Ruth Hopkins leaves
permanent wave; to Bess
Hubert Lee, after som
Jimmy Van Scotter his j
right thing in the right
and Christian Wirtz, his


S







THE


CARIBBEAN.


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THE CARIBBEAN.


^ SH- C


THE


CLASS


OF '26.


Mildred


Neely,


There's a class in Cristobal High Sch
Of students twenty-eight;
You'll hear of them in the future
At the top of every slate.

To tell you of these students rare
'Twill take a verse apiece,
Yet will not give them honor due,
Nor record each pet caprice.

Miss Barnhouse first we'll mention,
For she's our class adviser.
We do our best in school and play
To show how high we prize her.

To cap the Junior roster-


Our future


"Hall of Fame -


We'll open it with 'Nola Bliss,
And add, in turn, each name.

Manola's a Zone-born lassie,
Of whom we're very proud;
A happy-go-lucky youngster,
Who whispers more than's allowed.

From Canada came a lassie
About two years ago;
Hildegarde Blythe has won our lov
And she's loyal to us, we know.


The Junior Class is very proud,
WVilliam Clinchard to list your name;
So true-blue and trusty a lad
Ought in future to bring us fame.


ool A girl who


wins at


Is popular Rae Fischer.
She's good at school, at home,
In all, good luck we wish her.


basket ball,


at play;


year


Of all the class, for President
Irene Hopkins we have chosen-
None else could lead us thru the
With less friction and confusion.

We really think that Tennessee
Must be a grand old state,
Because Bess Long, a native,
Just came from there of late.

Helen Keene is a transfer
From the "silver side," Balboa;


She's tiny-but not too tiny
To be loved by all who know her.

To prove to us that all improve
Who really will to do it,
Johanna Kleefkins shows a gain
That makes us want to do it.

Last March there came a sad event,
When from us went a sailing
A loyal, ardent Junior,
Wallace Johnson we are naming.


When a dependable girl


is wan


One looks to the Junior Class,
And finds in it Delilah May,
Whom no one can surpass.


Carlos Pulgar's from Gatun, too;
His jokes are keen and deep.
His marks would be much better
If he'd work instead of sleep.

A shark she is at basket ball,
At jumping she is great,
Elizabeth Shepley just this year
Has walked in thru our gate.

When you want to read a story,
The kind you like the best,
Just read one of Clarice Steenburg's,
And-we'll leave to you the rest.

With those who come to us each day
From the edge of Gatun Pond,
Is Dorothea Tufts, a girl
Of whom every one is fond.

She is a studious student-
Which in Panama is rare-
But our Gay Turner studies well,
And is our secretary fair.

Just a little tiny noise


we see


her jump quite high.


Emma Lee Worsley's not nervous-
Oh! no! She's only shy.


When a poster's to be made
Or a sign of any kind,


Christian Wirtz


called on


And for it finds the time.


Ah! next upon this list of ours
Comes Jack Coffey, he who can


lDance and swim, and play


And is


and work,


a Senior fan.


w we come t


o Billy


Coffey-


In stature, he's somewhat short,
But he dives and swims and is at
In every water sport.


From Gatun comes our Edna-
Duvale's her other name-


She used


to love Balboa,


Now she loves us, just the same.


A great admirer of Shakespeare
H. Thornton Moore-'tis he
Who often quotes from Hamlet-
Knows English Lit. from A to Z.

Lola Muiroz, a Spanish maid,


Belongs to this bright


ease,


class-


But she goes across to Panama
To help the week-ends pass.


"What can Billy Mclntyre do?"
Is a question to which we respond:
"He can play every game that you can name,
And of every sport he is fond."


The public thinks Betty Warren
The best looking in C. H. S.
And all who look upon her


Will not think it


"a guess.


To finish the Junior roster-


Our future


"Hall of Fame"-


We'll end it with Dorothy Vaughan
She's gone, but we honor her name.

A good sport, a good friend,
A good player and comrade true,
Dorothy Vaughan is all of these,
And is a good worker, too.

P.S.












THE


CARIBBEAN.


* a 'r


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C S-WS


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THE CARIBBEAN.


THE SOPHOMORE LIBRARY.


Books have been called by one


great


man


"the legacy geniuses leave to humanity," and by
another, "man's greatest friend."


The Spanish Dancer


.... ...............Teresa Gallagher.


"Son of the Soil"......................... James Grider.


"Wisdom's


Daughter"....................... Louise Helm.


--- --- --- -- --- --- -- --- --- -- --- --- --- -- --- --- -- --- --- -- --- --- U ....... 4 .... .~A *
The Sophomore Class has a goodly representa- "The Flirt"...~................ ... .. .Ienetaadr
Je4eteKladr


tion, and whether we regard them as legacies or
friends, the longer we know them, the more we
prize them.

"Our Mutual Friend".................... ...Mr. Benson.
"A Pair of Blue Eyes"....................Marion Barrett.
"Flowing Gold".........................Emily Bledsoe.


"Peck's Bad Boy


.........................W ard Bronson.


"Come Out of the Kitchen"............ Genevieve Booth.
"The Man Who Laughs"...... .... Lawrence Callaway.


"Loyalties".................. ........... . . .. ..Clara May.


"Silence


"Daddy Long Legs"......................Fred Sonneman.
"Lass O'Laughter". ......................Wilhelmina Stute.
"Exercise and Health".................. Dorothy Svensson.
"Seventeen"....... ........ ..................Surse Taylor.
"The Nightingale".........................Helen Vineyard.
"Book of Athletics"....................James Van Scotter.
"Slim Princess"..................... Euphemia Woolnough.
"The New Yorker"............................. Charles Will.


CLASS OFFICERS.
President-Helen Vineyard.
Vice President-Charles Hill.
Secretary-Mary Heim.
Treasurer-Euphemia Woolnough.
Class Adviser-Mr. Benson.


THE FRESHMEN.......


......AS THEY ARE NOW.


Robert Axtell................. A "whooping" good student
Emma Banks................. ...........Silent but active.
Ellsworth Barrows. ......... ................. W killing helper.
Gladys Beers ......... ... ......... .... .What's in a name?
Zonella Bliss...... .. .. .......... .A good friend to all.
Frank Booth.........................Our gamboling guy.
Pauline Briggs................... .... A promising Duse.
Harry Brown ......... ... ."Where are the necessaries?"
Charles Crum...................... The Freshman Sheik.
Albert Days.... .. . . . .. . .. .. .Little in stature only.
John Everson........... The boy who is always on hand.
Ruth Foos ................ .Our automatic mathematician.
Charles Fourcher........ .. .. ... ...... .A radio bug.
Laura Grinaldo.......................Quiet, but Oh! Myl
Teddy Henter. ... ... .. ... .... ............ Our saxophonist.
William Henter,........... The answer to a maiden's prayer.
Dora Hill.... . . .. ... .. ... . .. ...."Viva la Reinal"
Matilda Hill..................The girl of the "Mi Pollera."
William Hobson.. .................. ."Where's the fight?"


Mary Jacobs........ ..Like lightning, she never strikes twice
in the same place.

CLASS OFFICERS.
President-William Henter.
Vice President-Mercedes Jordan.
Secretary-Treasurer-Harold Owen.
Adviser-Miss O'Connell.

FRESHMEN.
HORIZONTAL.


George Jordan.....
Mercedes Jordan....


-.............. "Give me some fudge!'
...- .............. A peach on stories"


Gordon Kariger. .......... Too anxious to recite out of turn-
Edward Keene..............A quiet boy, but give himn time
Rachel Key............. .......... A whiz at athletics.
Jack Klunk.... ................ Terpsichorean amphibian.
Kathryn Lambert....... .......... .A good swimmer.
Ralph Lucas............... High whether he jumps or not.
Harold Owen........ .. . .... ... ... ........ .. .Girl shy.
Jack Raymond.... . ............... .. . . .... Bashful.
Lucia Salazar..... .... .... ....... .Quiet as a mouse.
Evangeline Smith. ........ Our hope for the 1928 Olympics.
Julia Smith .............. A past master in the art of cooking.
Virginia Sonneman.....................A wonder at Latin.
Harry Thrift................. He has a good understanding.
Foster Tufts.......... .................. Where, Oh where?
Jane Toulon ........................ Short, but oh so sweet.
Rubio Walston...........She just loves (?) Ancient History.
Miss O'Connell..... ....... ...2b2 or not 2b.


o ,, .
Freckles Mar Herm


................ .......... .... Erm a Phillips.












THE CARIBBEAN.


7:

~ t


, UO l' >


l | t


y -


v.,v,


V-







THE CARIBBEAN.


Irene


We, of Cristobal High School, are very fortu-
nate in having so many alumni with us here on


the Isthmus.


A number


of them


visit us fre-


quently during the year and their visits are always


"I wish


annual this


5i WEST I6th STREET,
NEW YORK CITY, N. Y.
ou all the success in the world for your
year and I'd like to be remembered to


This year also an unusually large number


of the graduates have attended the class parties; we
sincerely hope that they have enjoyed being with
us as much as we have enjoyed having them with


us againm.


Even most of those who are far away


the Alumni and any of the boys and girls in High
School who knew this particular member of the
Class of 1918.
I was graduated from the School of Journalism
of Columbia University last June and am now on


remember us and send


us their greetings occa-


the staff of The


Pilgrims


' Almanack, a magazine


sionally.
Each
number.


our Alumni


department grows in


This annual finds thirteen more added


to the ranks of the graduates, and next year's will


supported by a group of artists and writers of New
York-and do free lance articles for some of the


newspapers.
Miss Katherine


Davis,


who was Principal of


ten more.


the interest in


But the


question


arises-does


the Alumni department increase


Cristobal School in my day, lives in New York and
occasionally we have tea together.


each year as does the number of graduates? It is
said that the average length of time in which the
alumnus is interested in his high school is two


Some of the


Alumni or the students may re-


member my brother, Bob


Waid.


He was grad-


uated from Annapolis last June the same day I


years.


We wonder whether that is true of the


finished at Columbia.


At present Bob is in the


graduates of Cristobal High School. We hope not.
1918.
LULA MAE PULLIG COMAN, Cristobal, Canal Zone.


Pacific maneuvers, probably plotting in the Plot-


ting Room (the very best place to plot)
easiest way to capture Hawaii.


Believe me, I


often yearn for the


as to the


tropic


MINOT COTTON,


Fourth


Ave., Apartment


BI, Brooklyn,N.Y.


SUSIE HARRISON, 21


East 25th Street, Baltimore,


CATHERINE WAID, 51 West 16th Street,
City, N. Y.


BURKE


WELCH.


York


letter returned


Sleep, Wyoming.


MARY VERNER, Chapel Hil


N.C.


when winter hits New York, but on the whole I
make a pretty good Eskimo."
CATHERINE TEESE WAID.


1919.
ALICE ARLENE BALL, I I8 Maple Avenue, Tacoma
Park, Md.
KENNETH EDWARDS, Wellsboro, Pa.
D)OROTHmY WEIR MONTANYE, Falls, Pa.
"Mar THE CARIBBEAN continue to be pub-


~IC


Hopkins,


welcome.


l








TilE


CART IBBIAN.


1920. IA IRLAN


I l. \ O()O W>,


6;rd Street,


()akland,


ETnA BEVINGTON,


Angelcs,


West


Street,


Caht.


"1 have been home since graduation tromi
business college owing to the illness of my dear
mother.
"I will always have a warm spot in my heart


for Cristobal 'H,


wish you loads of sue-


cess for this year s annual.


Calif"


"If you will (look in


TIlk (' ARIHBE'AN 01f tih


class of 1920 you will see propIhesied a reunion
of that class at Cristobalm High School. Rec


ccll yv, nv orc than ever before


hered


fulfill men
tv and in


that forecast and


t


have remllcnl-


have hoped


for its


lave been Out ol the unilvers-


business ei ht months nOW and ha\-


Ing1 made mainV new friends and cninlections,


LINDALE I)AVIS,
Mass.


c Bovlston


"Let me congratulate C. H.


the-milnute


manner in


w ilicli


Street,


Cambridge,


S.on the up-to-
the annual is


have found myself


thinking numan


times


of the old friends and surroundings and won-
dering what changes have come to them.


Mirs. holmwolid


and I expect to visit Pan-


being handled.
"To mv brother alum


ama sometime and I hope some of you mayv l)e


extend a wish for


there.


()ne olf our first calls will bIe mniade to


the renewal of happy friendships in the near
future.
"To the graduates of to-morrow who are
soon to join our ranks I extend a happy wel-


come and best wishes for


success


in the future.


"To the undergraduates I send a pledge of


Cristobal High School to whose students, fac-


ulty, and products we


wish all


good luck and


success.


l)ana


Berkeley


Hotel,


Dana


Street,


Calif.


faith in their ability to raise


CARIBBEAN


KATHE:RINE BtRGOON STEwART, Cristobal,


to even greater heights than have been at-


tamed.


"I was graduated


from( )l


T ufts


ALICE STI.SON, Colon, Republic


June.


I|I.IIA


Thanks to the fine training I received at C.
H. S., I entered the four-year course instead of


x COTTON VAN
Apartment B


WAGNER,


of Panama.


7223


i, Brooklyn,


N


Iourthl Ave.,
. Y.


the five year.


Since graduation I am special-


192/.


izing in Oral Surgery.


I had hoped to open


an office in my native land but financial condi-


tlions make it impossible.


Some day, when I


CARL Il)tEV,


South Avenu


e, Mariner's Harbor,


Staten Island,


have made my first million I


will return to


KIRBY FERCGUSON, Cristobal,


Can al


Zone.


the palm-fringed shore where we drink the
Chagres water and of the mango freely eat.
In other words amid all the thrills and joys
of a big city I still find time to be homesick
and hungry for news of the Canal Zone."


CHARLES CENTER, I,


S. Naval Air Station, Hamp-


ton Roads, V a.
ALICE HUNTER, Cristobal, Canal Zone.


FPRAN K


RAYMONID,
York City,


1 20th


AL DOYLE, Cristobal, Canal Zone.


JACK B. FIELDS, Box


Austin, Texas.


EI.AXNOR


ZIMMERMANN,


\\illard


Avenue,


KENNETH GREENE, R. F. I). No. 4,


"How's T'HE CARIBBEAN coming th


Coudersport,


s year?


Westerleigh, Staten Island,


"Since coming to Staten Island, I have at-
tended Brandon-Stevens Institute which is a


I hope you have lots of material, and I know
you are capable of producing an annual that


will be


up to scratch.


"As for myself I


am still


jumping


business school.


I went mainly to get up my


speed in shorthand and have passed the loo-
word test, which is the graduating test.


"l enjovedreadinuLTHECARIBBEAN for TI924,
-i H RBB A


Zone.


Cana


Street,


ALSOs







THE CARIBBEAN.


COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY,
NEW YORK CITY, N. Y.


"There is nothing like the first year at medical
school, for then you realize the value of time. We
have so much to do and very little time to do it in.
It is a case of the first and last, for it's the last of
my four years towards the A. B. degree but the


first towards the M. D.


Just think, four years


ago, we were getting ready for graduation at the
National Theater. Now it is happening all over
again but it wont be at the National Theater nor


will it be with a class of six.


years


It's great to have


in your favor, but I surely envy the


Seniors who are to become C. H.


S. Alumnim.


FRANK RAYMOND.


1922.


MARJORIE


BALL,


I1I8 Maple


Avenue,


Tacoma


Park, Md.


ERNST EUPHRAT, 3935 Burwood Avenue, South
Norwood, Cincinnati, Ohio.

LOUISE HENTER, Philadelphia General Hospital,
Philadelphia, Pa.
"To think that this is my second letter to
THE CARIBBEAN as an alumnus, or am I an


alumna?


Sometimes it seems like a hundred


years and then again like nothing at all since


the time we were busy
letters.


getting out alumni


"I notice you're to be graduated in '26. So
am I. I suppose you'll be planning to go away
and I-I'll be planning my trip back. Every-
one is raving about the smell of spring in the
air here, but nothing would please me better
than to smell Bolivar Street on my way to
school in the bus again-yes, even the fish
market.


GEORGE CARTWRIGHT,
College, Pa.


Cuheco Fraternity, State


wonderful


CARIBBEAN for '25.


rumors


about


We of '23 are anxious to


IDA BROWN DOYLE, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
PAUL DOYLE, Cristobal, Canal Zone.


MIARY GLENN FIELD


s, 1221 Marshall Lane, Austin,


Texas.


LEROY MAGNUSON, Balboa, Canal


MIL.DRED STAFFORD,
dence, R. I.


Zone.


166 Potters Avenue, Provi-


receive an early copy, we who thought that
any class would have to go far to put out an


annual equal to ours.


You see then we didn't


think it possible but we hear you've beaten
us and we hope you have."

EDWARD MAY, Box 408, Balboa, Canal Zone.


"The high school carnival


EMMA TOWNSEND, Gatun, Canal Zone.
WESLEY TOWNSEND, Gatun, Canal Zone.


JORDAN ZIMMERMANN,
N.Y.


am half way


221


Sims Hall, Syracuse,


through


year at College of Forestry.


my sophomore
I've just fin-


ished my semester exams, and they were stiff
ones too.


"THE CARIBBEA
prosperous year.


N has mv best wishes for a
I know that they get better


every year and that this year s annual will set
a new high standard.


"P. S.


Bill Mary, my roommate, sends his


regards along with mine to the ones who knew
us.
1923.
GERAL.D I). BLuss, JR., Cristobal, Canal Zone.
"I hope that this year's CARIBBEAN may


1 C*


* t*r


surely most enjoyable;


this year was


some of the booths


were unique, and the assembly hall program
was excellent.
"You no doubt know that I am again work-


ing in the village of Balboa.


I guess


it is to


be permanent this time.
"It is useless for me to say that I am anx-
ious to see THE CARIBBEAN, 1924, because I
am always interested anything pertaining
am always interested in anything pertaining


to Cristobal High School.
could be back there again.


often


We do not realize


what good times we have in high school until


it is too late.
It ls too late.


When we are there, we see noth-


ing but work, but when we are out every-
thing appears in different light.
"Please convey to the faculty, students,
and staff my hearty good wishes for the most
successful year and the best annual C. H. S.
has yet seen."


.. 4- I S' S a '-flr -6 - ^ qJB


^ **^








THE C


EMOGENE NASH, 1012 Monnett, Norman, Okla.
"College life is great and you don't want to
miss it if you can help it.
"The first two years of my college work are
to be here at the University of Oklahoma, and


:A RIB BEAN.


will put out a fine annual, this year, for tra-
dition of Cristohal Igh School demands it,


and I know that the Class of'


will not tail


Best wishes anyhow.


E[ni t C

SMIrri, P. ().


Box io6


the rest at Columbia UIn


versity in


New York


City.
"lI hope that this year's annual will be big-
IIU~JL ~~ rer s .11,u~..w.


ford, )elaware.
"At present I amr


visiting Mother an


Mvr-


tie here in Milf<)rd, but as soon as mnv husband


ger and better than ever, alth


hard to beat the one of '
nuals of'20 and '23 have
Al )Dovle about it."


ough it wil
I think the


returns from lonolulu we will lie


mouth,


been the best.


N. 1., and


the rest of the year.


in Ports.


L )ndon, Conn.,


"Here's wishing you the best o


' luick


MA'rrisON PULLI;, Cristoba


Canal Zone.


I hope you'll
bl)ut you'll Iha


have the best CAR!it E


to have a wonderful


AN ever


olne to


924.
DOROTHY ABENDROTH, Crisrobal, Canal Zone.


"Best wishes to THE CA\IBIEAS...


hear the Class of '24.
ANDREW SMIriT, Cristobal, Canal Z ne.
"I shall not follow the usual policy of my


FLORENCE ALBERTS


, Fort Randolph, Canal Zone.


fellow alumni and say


'that the CARIBBEAN of


JOSE AROSEMENA, Colon, Republic of Panama.
CHARLOTTE HOUSE, Gatun, Canal Zone.
GLADYS LIOWANDE, Balboa, Canal Zone.


MORRIS MARCHOSKY, Colon, Republic


of Panama.


24. (or whatever year) was the best ever, etc.,


but I


year passes it will have brought forth one bet-
ter than the preceding year, and still nearer


to that infinite degree,


'The Perfect.


MARKHAM,


Pa.
"This


morning


Wyoming Seminary,


it was twenty


Kingston,


)below


"I personally wish Miss Ruth Hopkins and
her corps of assistants such good success with
the annual that they will, when their time is


places around here at school.


It was snowing


done, lay down their tools and


say 'I am sat-


so this morning that we were unable to go to
chapel-some different from the Zone and I
surely wish I were there.
"Congratulations and best wishes for the
Class of'25 and all the success in the world for
THE CARIBBEAN."
IRENE McCouRT, Gatun, Canal Zone.
"I am sending my heartiest wishes to the
Class of'25, the faculty of Cristobal High, and
to the staff for a very successful annual."
GEORGE OAKES, Fort De Lesseps, Canal Zone.


isfied,


could do no better, as I have done my
I wish to pass on to those who worry


what the other fellow thinks or will


this quotation, from
Andrew Carnegie':


think,


the 'Autobiography of
'Thy reproach alone do


ETHEL SONNEMxN, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
"I think you all know that 1 am taking a


post graduate course at C. H.


preparing to


enter college next year.
"I hope this year's annual may be one of


CHESTER


I.. PIKE,


University


of Oregon,


Emerald Street, Eugene, Oreg.
"Here comes Spark Plug, two months late,
but better late than never.
"We have had a wonderful winter, snow and


the best, but


sa V,


'Yours can not be


better than ours in my estimation .


(ATirx, CANAL


ZoxE.


"I can hardly realize a year has passed since I


was one of you.


Ay, there's the rub, to think of


rain, sunshine


clouds--s tme l


you, hope for you, and yet not be with you.


different


from Panama with the palms and


warmth for every
Coast Range and it


day we look out to the
s snow-canned mountains:


It is almost time for the annual of


nineteen


twenty-five to take its place in the hall of fame
with those of yore.


heartivly wish that as each succeeding


mountain







THE CARIBBEAN.


Ruth I)uev,


MY GOO)D ENGLISH CREED.


Bld *Oil Profhssor Palmer'>


"Self Cultivation illn lnglishl


I believe in the use of good English, the greatest of all arts am


joy not only in reading but also in writing an


striving to mean what I say and


to sav what


evervdav


mean.


speech.
believe


ver


or great
clievc in


that a good


speaker keeps good company.
making our words continually


I believe that if we are watchful of our speech,
more true, free, and resourceful; that if we look


upon our occasions of writing as opportunities;
think of him who hears; that if we lean on our


vance not only in speech,


that if in all our utterances we
subject, we shall make a daily ad-


but in personal power, general serviceableness,


consequent


y, delight to ourselves


and others.


-filliam Cousins,


Me ultst


Contest.


A SPECKLED BEAUTY.


"Don't worry, Peggy, there's


method in her mad-


larnce Steenberg, '26. ness.


She sent me for the simple reason that my


This story was judged the best submitted in the whole high
school in the 1925 Short Story Contest.)
"Peggy darlin', what would you do if you had
to see what I do, every time you looked in the


ugliness will so set off your beauty that th


help but fall for you.


ev can t


She is going to


married well or die in the act.


"And I don't want


to get married.


I want to


mirror for the rest of vour life?"


The speaker


earn my own living, and live my own life.


You're


was seated before a dressing table scrutinizing her


not a beauty, Irish, but if you'd only realize it,


reflection relentlessly,


while she yanked a comb


through a mass of flaming red hair.


"It breaks


my heart to think that the only way my picture
would ever be able to get in the papers, would be
as an ad for freckle cream."


you really


v are cute.


Your little ways make all of


us boarding school girls simply fall in love with
you, but as soon as a man appears on the horizon,
you withdraw into your shell, and do a complete


fadeout.


They


won t


you up,


Irish!


You know


you re


awfully cute.


But you act like a wallflower, so naturally


Your


sweet


which I crave.


freckles


are the envied


possession


" Nevertheless, Peggy looked very


are going to treat you like one.


a new place;


Here


we don't know a soul.


we are at
Why, mv


much satisfied with her own dusky hair and lan-


dear, think of the opportunity!


In a few minutes


guid black eyes.


She was a beauty, and she knew


Mrs. Truesdale is going to take us to the country


25








THE CARIBBEAN.


Act as if you're so used to dancing every dance
and being cut in on all the time that they'll just


"Irish!
"Uh! Uh


They are simply staring at you.


!1


I bet they are counting my freckles!"


naturally be wild to dance with you.
own horn!"
"But I'm afraid of men, Peggy.


Blow your


The drum boomed, the saxophone wailed, and


the dance began.


I'm from a


toward Mrs.


In a body the stag line surged


Truesdale's corner.


She stood up


family of girls, I've been brought up with


and I go to school with girls.
when a bov comes near me.'


I'm scared to death


"But tell me that you'll try this, Irish.
For me?"


guess


"Peggy, I
good time."


"Attaboy,Irish.


I will.


Please.


I do so want to have a


to make introductions, but none were necessary.
Irish felt herself propelled across the floor, drift-
ing easily, seemingly without effort. She looked
up into a pair of laughing brown eyes that nearly
equaled her own for mischief. He spoke,-
"Where have you been all my life?"


was


I'll be rooting on the side lines.


customary


question.


mustn't give the customary answer.


But she
Something


An hour and a half later, a limousine drew up in


better.


She smiled up at him.


of the


country


A crowd


stags


"Why, waiting for you, of course!"


flanked the doorway.


There was a perfect silence


"Sav!


Are you really from Miss Perkins'? You


as the door of the car opened and a tall, slender,


look different somehow, from the rest.


Besides,


languid beauty,


wrapped in a gorgeous evening


cloak, stepped out, followed


by another figure,


from the dirty looks you're getting from the wall-
flowers, I don't think that you'd get along well


which slipped out and into the club like a streak of
blue and silver lightning topped by a flame of fire.
However, a tall slender youth standing close to
the door saw just a bit more than the rest. He


saw a pair of big blue


eyes,


just bubbling with


mischief, and a saucy, upturned nose, quivering
nevertheless, just a little with fright, like that of
a scared bunny.
Peggy and Irish remained in the dressing room
for a while, for Peggy said it would be best to let
the dance get well under way before they burston


with girls.


Too popular,


you know.


The stag


line is still standing where you left them."
And Irish, the beloved of all girls, usually the
wallflower, the flat tire, the girl who turned pale
at the sight of a boy, answered, "I haven't been
there long, and I'm not used to girls. There were
only boys in my family, so I feel at home only with


them.


I hope you boys will be nice to me.


As if in answer to her wish the stag line woke


to the fact


that they


could


cut in.


swarmed around her, and from then on, she


They
took


the public.


Irish was so white that her freckles


barely six steps with the same man.


Their re-


stood out in great, vivid bright spots, but as she
peeked out at the dancers, the excitement of the
moment returned, and her eyes and cheeks burned


with it.
Mrs. 1


They walked demurely over the floor to


Fruesdale's


chair


sat down.


Peggy


marks seemed jumbled together in her head.
"Gee, you've got the cutest freckles."
"I hope you don't call speckles of such a lovely
gold, freckles."


"Your


hair is


wonderful!


Your freckles


looked bored, drowsy, and rather like all the rest


of the


various


types


of blondes


scattered about the room.


There


and brunettes
was one red


match it."
In fact, she had a wonderful evening.
The brown-eyed boy did not appear again until


head, but, alas, she lacked the freckles
funny little nose of Irish.


"Gee!" thought Peggy,


nose insured."


and the


"she ought to get that


She gave Irish a poke in the ribs.


"Do your stuff, Irish!"


it was time to go home.


He came up and took


her hands.
"When shall I see you again, little gold girl?
Will you go riding with me in the morning?"


"Oh, I couldn't.


Horseback riding makes my


Inwardlyv


quaking,


and wishing


herself


miles


freckles pop out terribly.


away, Irish obediently cast her eyes toward the


stag line.


She just looked, but oh! what a look!


- V I.


"Your
merrier.


freckles!


more


Haven't you heard that little poem-


T








I'THEI CAR IBBIAN.


When Peggy and Irish were going tol bed after
^- **-'g-


hifllv and strEIndIV of the finest of fine reeds.


the dance
wanted
of freckli
to bed ui
never di
Peggy


(

I:1

i


e, Irish fort
eggyy to th
cream sto
i besmeared
Sandy good
was mvstinh


ot
ink
)od
wit
fl t *,


something. (Or rather she
she'd forgotten. Her jar
unopened and Irish went
h strange mixtures, which
way.
But later when she woke


up in the night, she heard Irish murmur something
in her sleep, and she leaned over to catch it.
"I.ittle freckles on my nose, 'n he loves ecrvc
one that grows."


THE SEAWVIEl) DOL)L.
(A Legend of Pananum.)
1hlen 7. Kene, '6.

(This story was, next to the grand prize story, the best sub-
mitted from the Junior Class in the 192 Short Story Conrestr.)


Ma
came
Spani
her fa
I> so,
anybo
dolly,
She l
practi


ny, many
and took
sh girl mai
their. Sh
for did sl
)dy else?
such as it
moved her
cally the


years ago-oh! long before Morgan
the rich city of Panama--a little
ide a hammock of strong reeds for
e worked very patiently, extreme-


le

t
OI
0)


not love


Also
was,
nun
nly*


, had
from
eca
play


her )addv more than


I

h


not fared very well in the
originally come from the blue

It was a wondrous doll f
of seaweed with slender, dai
shaping its peculiar body.
tend to the fat and bulgir
green reed bound it at the
fingers, as ordinary dolls
twelve on each hand. It
but Chiquita, as her family
said that she could hug and
tighter than if it were mor
the limp and queer doll ha
apple leaves, fastened toge
taken from plants which gr
of its ugliness and limpne,


he not rescued
drowning in the ri
learlv because it
ing she had. It
vater, although it
Depths of the dark


or those
nty reeds
The arn


ig neck,
wrist.
do, hIu
was a v
v loving,
squeeze
e solid.
d two I
their wii
ew nea
ss, Chit


t I
It
t
'e


t.


I


S1,
gl
i

)r


times-made
binding and
ns were fas-
and a sticky,
had not five
about ten or
ry limp doll,
y called her,
t better and
For a dress,
i2ht red star


h little s
rlb. In
luita love


ternm~
spitt
:d i


very much and therefore had been very grateful
to her father when he had saved the poor doll
from a watery grave.
PL.. ^ ........ tL.. c/uk ..." ....... I i I 1


Id he trir
star apple
the smoIU
this she
oms, for s
when or


star apple lcav
were at their Iu
their smoothest.
It was a lab<
delicate toclhes
hiad knowledge
for; love andi
marvelous hamr
I)addv was n
ccive; his little
occasional hint
strained her eve
scarce ly able to
But at last she
putting it in pl
sleep on the har
have nasty ants
or about him.


soft, fragrant or
the air, he Woul(
it passed through
high up in their


to b~
king.
most
Chiq
most
too,


nmed
z leav
thcst
w<>u
hie in t
anhasn
aN


es \'
*st, ;


wi
Ss.4

ld
"ent
w
etrC
',[ul


th the brightest
For a lining sl
the smIIootth Iananr
jiput swect-snmcllin
led that her task s
ere in blossom, \,
Sreddest, when t
when banana Ilea


>r Swhich knovwlct


to
kH
m<
ol
U

's,


w irk
t>wlcd
)ck.
t told
irl lit
fr(om
testci


gt )
:fi

act
d g
at

an
SI r
h
lit


e, according t(o
dlom. He wot
perfect orchi
uita had that
fragrant flower
yes, it was sti


father and
Chiquita's
So the h:
pared fir t
she saw hi
watched hi


At fi
wanted
around
on the
astonisi
Chiq
I.


: bright
w \ould
]cavt s.
orange
would he
/on thlc


recids
Swere


ove pJuts in litti
ge can not. Shi


she had
comlbined


prolduced a


f this gift he was to re-
done it secretly \with an
her mother. She had
her power until she was


( nishcd!
e. I)atd
around th
nd possib,
), \he woa
ge l eceCIve th4
the little
tie world
Chiquit:
uild inhale
ds that I
day gatl
'rs. This


0on


he weighed


enou gh


aie t


wnler
ii-
ng tif
sweet
artunit
I somt
mock
<) hold


great


would he
:iwin^on
a bed of
uld be in
breeze as
would be
he ought
heir little
odors of
him, t'r
of these
as strong
Juanita's


Ilolre


father.


,ok was made ready


me-coming


rst I
to k


look t
W1 wly w
icnt art
ta, thin


the di
preach
id not
where
or her a
roulhtr


stanlc
their
notice
Chiq
nd as
ham


the work of
king he did n
k" gt 1


of her
I she I
poor a
e tlhe
uita w\
he dild,
w>ck.
irt and
lot like'
'it'*-


father.
lid her
[bode.
ha 1 I
is. H
Ills cvi
lie s
beaut'*w
it, ran
I~c


When
elf and

ck and
turned
Rested
ared in


liur aml
i..i


I


I
I


And oh!


and she pr--


t








THE CARIBBEAN.


"Wait a minute, daughter, I have not said that


Captain Harrison, speeding down the coast in his


they are not the best.
is all this done for me


an honor?"
"Because,


" said she,


It is beautiful.


But why


Why do I deserve such


you rescued my doll when


DeHaviland


plane,


beauties of nature that day.
in a mechanical way with


no eve


for the


He guided the plane
the skill of a born


aviator, but his brow was clouded and his lips re-


she was drowning.


"Gracias,


muchas


gracias,


mil gracias,


peated over and over again the words:


blast 'em.


"Chinks,


Up to their infernal trade again.


mia!" he exclaimed happily.
And that night Chiquita's father slept soundly
and well on a bed of orange blossoms and received


a cool


breeze which


the other members of the


got to spot em soon.
His companion, Lieutenant Cont6 of the Pana-
ma National Police, at intervals scanned the coast


eagerly,


and after


one of these


observations,


family missed. He declared, in the morning, that
that was the best he had slept in years.
For many, many succeeding nights, Chiquita's
daddy slept on a soft bed until the hammock wore


Then his


wife and daughter made


another one, but the rest of his family slept on
cold, hard ground.
When his sons grew up they had hammocks of


reeds which their wives wove patiently and


fully for them.


down


care-


Thus, there grew up and passed


generation


to generation


present day the custom of the man of the house
having a hammock while the others slept on the
floor.
Now you may go to Old Panama or Juan Diaz,
look into any grass hut, and you will see one ham-
mock and one only-for the man of the family.
The hammocks are not nearly as beautiful nor
as carefully made as was the one Chiquita wove.
To-day they are mostly of cotton and of string,
tied in knots.
But mothers and fathers still tell their children
of how Chiquita made a wonderful hammock for


her father


because


he saved


her seaweed


Then they tell them that they are to follow her
example as their grandparents and great-grand-
parents have done before them.

BLIND LUCK.


shouted through the speaking tube to the captain:
"No sign of the hut yet, sir."


The pilot, hearing this, shouted back,


"We'll


continue for an hour more and if we don't strike
anything we'll return to the field."


The aeroplane


had proceeded


for almost


hour when Harrison noticed looming on the hori-


zon a bank of dark clouds.


It was one of those


short violent tropical storms which are so frequent


off the coast at


this time of


These


squalls are generally preceded by violent gusts of
wind which sometimes attain a velocity of fifty


miles.


As the plane approached the storm area,


it began to twist and turn, dive up and down,
seldom on an even keel; the wind howled through
the wing supports and at last the rain fell, striking
the wings like hail, and almost blinding the oc-


cupants.


It required all the skill of the pilot to


keep the ship headed into the wind, but he was
succeeding admirably when the motor began miss-


ing on two of the cylinders.


The decreased speed


had its effect on the plane and it dived and twisted
more than ever and once almost went into a tail-


spin which would have meant destruction.
ly, with a cough the engine stopped dead.


Final-
The


ship fell rapidly, the aviators straining their eyes
through the mist for a landing place. In a few
minutes Cont6 gave a shout and pointed ahead to


a small glade with a few stunted trees.


Here the


Charles


(This story


Will, '27.


was awarded first place among the
mitted by Sophomores.)


stories


It was off the coast of Panama on a balmy after-


noon


in March.


The blue sky, dotted here and


there by white fleecy clouds, reflected a still bluer
4 I


plane finally settled, its right wing snapping when
it struck a tree just as the plane reached the ground.
The two aviators, who had escaped with a few
scratches, immediately climbed out of the cockpit
and surveyed the wreck.
"Well, the only thing that we can do is make for


the nearest


town


and telephone


the Field,"


I I I


out.








THE CARIBBEAN.


A few hours later the moon rose over the dis-
tant mountains and spread her beams through the


T RE ASLRI SEEK ,RS.
3M ,rcetdes 7rJitan, 'S.


wet forest
trudging.


clearing


where


Suddenly


suffused


two hapless
ley emerged
moonlight


airmen
into a


and espied


This story won irst place among freshman

Not a breath of air was stirring


stories.


The azure


little bamboo hut at the farthest end.


sky, clear except for an occasional fleecy


cloud,


"There's a dry spot that we can appropriate for


was reflected in the mirrorlike surface ot the ha


the night,"


suggested ContC.


Ernest was lying on the end of the pier.


With-


"We might as well,"


can't make town unt


returned the other,


mlornm g.


out his realizing it,
bay. and the fleecv


the azure sky, the mirror-like
clouds were calling to all his


With this the two approached the hut and, with
a few pushes, opened the door.


Iboish


instilncts.


was dreaming


about


days when Morgan was in Panama, and was imag-


The shack contained only


one room.


A fire-


all sorts of


things


al out


hidden


treasure


near it on a table lay the
hut what surprised the air-


men was the numerous tin-covered


crates


labels denoting different destinations in the Tluted


States and South America.


As they stood there


when a cheerful voice broke the stillness, startling
him out of his reverie.
"Hello, there, Ernest. Waiting to go for a sail ?"
Ernest sat up. "(o sailing on this calm sea?
No! But, say, Joe, I was just wishing you would


contemplating


discovery,


the sound


a come along.


I.et's g>( out in the cavuco.


boat grating on the beach nearby was heard, and


"Sure,


get my paddles.


then footsteps approached the hut.


The captain


quickly pulled his companion behind some crates.


Through


the semi-darkness


of the cabin


say, he added as a new thought struck him
posing we go to that Morgan cave."


"That's where we'll go.


, "sup-


This is just the time.


aviators saw four figures enter.


Three of these


were Chinamen and the other, a Spaniard.
were jabbering in Spanish excitedly.


They


Hurry, Joe, and get your paddles.
for the gold, and a machete, too."


Both boys were soon in the cavuco.


Bring a


Joe, find-


"You are sure you closed the door when


you


ing his mother gone,


had taken


the liberty


left, Chong?"
"Positive,


asked the Spaniard.


senor


Diaz.


was with


me.


bringing his .22 along, and Ernest had borrowed
his father's shotgun-seeing that its owner was


Weren't you.


said the one who answered to the


not around.


name of Chong.
"That was a bad storm.


moved the door,


For nearly two hours they took turns paddling


T['he wind might have


" said Foo, thus appealed to.


and guiding the cayuco.


a small


stretch


At last they


of sandy


came in


beach.


"All right then,


replied


D)iaz, somewhat ap-


either


side and in the background


peased,


"let us begin packing.


An old trunk was dragged out of the corner and


opened.


The airmen saw Chong reach into the


nothing to be seen but jungle.
The two paddled straight for this beach and soon
had their cavuco up far enough on the sand so


bottom and touch a spring which revealed to their
astonished eyes a small secret compartment in the


that the tide could not reach it.


rifle and machete,


started


Taking up his
off toward the


trunk!


Diaz, the Spaniard, then proceeded to open


a crate and take out numerous tins which were


packed in the compartment.


The aviators looked


at each other exultantly and drew their revolvers.


underbrush. Ernest shouldered the shotgun, picked
up the large bag, and followed him.
With Joe leading, using the machete when it was
needed, they made their way through the under-


"Hands


" shouted


the lieutenant


coming


from behind a crate, with the captain following,
"I arrest you in the name of the Panaman Govern-


ment for smuggling opium.


growth, stopping once in a
look around.


while to rest or to


"I wonder how far we are from the place.
broke the silence of one of their brief stops.


SJoe


f-it '* ri, 1 1. .'


place was at one end;
remains of a meal. I


was







THE CARIBBEAN.


pected to.


Do you suppose that Morgan really


buried some of his gold


they started
the jungle.


again,


"Old Uncle Dan said"


never finished.


there?"


observed


Joe as


chopping their way through


-began Ernest, but he


Through the dark branches of a


low, overhanging tree gleamed a


eves.


Thev


seemed


to fascinate


pair of bright
him. Ernest


knew that if he did not move, the cat would, and


SOLILOQUY OF A CAKE.
(Made in Miss Bakewell's Freshman H. A. Class)
Ethel Barnett, '29.

This soliloquy was given first place in the miscellaneous
section-1925 contest.


Curiously enough, I am being made, not born,


but the being


made


is a terrible ordeal.


vet he could not.
"What's the matter, Ernest?


Come on.


" Joe's


voice brought him to his senses, and, raising the
gun to his shoulder, he fired at the gleaming eyes.
There was a hideous scream, and the next instant
a huge wildcat dropped to the ground with a thud.
Joe looked at Ernest with open admiration.


maker, a little girl with curly hair, first dashes
in the butter and sugar, then the eggs, then the
milk, then the flour and baking powder, and stirs


me vigorously together.


She should be more care-


ful of me in my infant stages.
Now I am being put in a dark cave which she


calls an oven.


I am not alone, for a few other


"You are some shot, Ernest.


I didn't even see


that thing."
Ernest stood over his victim with glowing pride.
"I'm not going on any farther, Joe. I'm going to
take this thing home and skin it," he said.


"Come on then. We'd better hurry.
run into this cat's mate," said Joe.


We might


embryo cakes are entombed with me.


how hot it is in here.


certainly


must


Gracious!


Look at me swelling!


a handsome


wish she would give me a mirror.


fellow


now.


The door opens.


I am released from that terrible dungeon, but I
can scarcely get time for a breathing spell before
she begins to slap that sticky mixture she calls


"If we should, I'd give him a shot, too.
"Huh, you are not the only one that's got a gun."
Both boys started back to the cayuco, Ernest
laboring under the weight of his dead cat and Joe
Just hoping that they would would run across the
mate. His eyes keenly alert for any movement
in the bushes, it was he who caught sight of a little


furry head sticking out of a hollow log.


and looked


An exclamation


He went
of delight


escaped his lips.
"Say, Ernest, you can have your old dead cat.
I've got some lives ones."
Ernest came up cautiously and together they
peered in at three little spitting kittens.
"Are you going to take those home?"
"Sure! Didn't you kill their mother?"
"Well, if you're going to take them, you'd better
hurry before their dad gets home."
In a few moments three indignant little balls
of fur were wriggling and fussing inside the treas-


ure bag.


With many cautious looks about them


the boys hurried back over their freshly cut path,
Ernest carrying his inert mother cat and Joe his
squirming kittens.


icing all over me.


keeps on.


She'll spoil my beauty if she


Now I am being adorned with pink


flowers and green leaves.


The flowers are pretty,


but I don't like the color of those green leaves.
Now I am to be presented to Miss Bakewell, the


little girl's teacher.


She, surely,


appreciate


my beauty.
What's this I hear Miss Bakewell say about me?
"Heavy as lead. I wouldn't want to be hit by it."
Why, the very idea!!! I am better looking than
any of those mutts over there and I'm not heavy


either.


Gracious! what a cruel world!


would


I were out of it.


Oh no!


I didn't mean that.


me at my word and eating me.


thank goodness!


She heard


she trying to do with me?
bage can? Impossible!!


But she's taking
She's stopped;
_! But what is


Throw me into a gar-


The indignity


of it!


How can I bear this disgrace?
Here I repose sadly, surrounded by lowly egg
shells, orange peeling, and a common cabbage.


This foul air is stifling!


Look at the dirty alley


What's he doing?-eating me!!


I won't be eaten by a cat!


Stop!!


Outrageous!


Stop!


- .- I








THE CARIBBEAN.


. ^ .^ ^ .....^- T 2


D)ESCRIPTI()NS.


DAWN
Rut/ I. Hopkins, '5.


A Mli'l) PI' I)I)I.1
ARuth /1. lHolpkins, '.


Slowly and magnificently


nature


painted


cold gray sky with warm glowing cardinal
ing here and there a spot of vivid blue, pa
or mellow yellow. Gradually the sea turn
emerald green to liquid gold. In the d
lights waned and faded away, while the g
sun steadily climbed over the horizon and
out the harm my of colors in the heavens.
ly, the faint chug-chug of a motor boat bI
th listeners ear, and thus another day be
the listener's ear, and thus another day be


daub-
le pink,
ed from
istance,
great red
blotted
I' i
jrj nia!-
roke on
gan.


It was just an
in a hole in the
turned it froni
mering gold that
ing over it, mak
Ihe sweet odor i
chantment over


humbl c


*o(d.
.*
lirlf oTr
g it 1
wild
11

ukdleC that nestled
he mioonilight had
to precious shint-
hick fhiliagc hover-
the finest tiligree.
cast a spejl of ln


A RIOOM.
innie 1 ltim, '-"


AN 0)1.1) 1)l N(;I()N.
(Sec illstratiorn in pI; 3A


ungeon


trance. Its
through tht
succession o
antique hun
Its walls wei
and at inter
in ancient d
Water ooze
ously upon
stone, and
had vainly 2
dungeon tel
forth only t


Ruth l Due, ".
s only li"ht C


floor was of hard,
e centuries, into si
)f the passing feet
ters, pleasure seeke


-ec


covered with adan


vals
iVys h
d fro
the
:lay
soug
I! h
weho


showed the
ad held man
m cracks a
floor, an]
showed wh
ht gold. W
hut its lips a


,11


rus


ime frinm the en-
cool clay, packed,
noothness by the
of Morgan's men,
rs, and what not.
mp, fungus growth,
ted shackles which
wretched prisoner.
dripped mnonoton-
upheaval of dirt,
some adventurer


'hat stories could this
ire sealed and it gives


echo ofa gir


laugh-.


ter or the rumble of an inquisitive man's voice.

DAWN.


Just outside t
pavement, its s
Beside it an oh.
charcoal stove,
articles useless 1
dior was visible


which th


ere was


Just inside t
a wooden fr
the rosm.
brass balls c
table, and a
stituted the
worn, partly
pale green v
actors and a
day, an] m
from marazi
All in a'l,
disagreeable


L door a glass case steyit
eet, sticky contents on
negro woman, hunched
at on a soap box amid
Sthe white man. Thro


St
u


on the
display.
over a
other
zh the


a small cubbl-hole of a room
scarcely space to move arou


he door several


ame
This I


nes o


formed
screen,
posts,
r with
ture.
red an
were p
>Cs who
bright
f ancie


Ar
ug
'ast
h
ly
nt


I newspapers
screen for o
white bed v
oil lamp on
broken cane
ag rug, soiled
ly gray floor,
:ed pictures


ad
cc
da


long
lored


nailed
ne side
vith gr
a rick
seat c
and w
. On
of mo


ago seen their
pictures torn


the room presented a most dreary and
appearance.


Helen .ibendroth. 25.


T he street


dark. Onl
peaceful q
a faint ray
brighter.
covered ea
. 1 i


lights


just gone


crowing of a


uietude of -
of light ap
It pierces t
rth. Long
1 .I 1


slum
ears i
e fog
hin re
r '


out.


cock disturb


being world.
n the east. I
and reaches t
ed arms reach
1


Soon,
t grows
he dew-
up into


MORNING.
Ruth Duo', '5."


Half darkness, andi al


stars, glimmering in
and over the brow
with yellow and cri
C


world was still.


a bowl
of the
mson, a!
9 I t *


e, begal
gray 'i!
d, folio


n to f
ght
wed I
*


I I


n*,


*
i








THE CARIBBEAN.


THE LIGHTHOUSE.
(See illustration on page 33.)


hanging trees, are a deep dull green. Off shore
the heart of the lake holds mirrored the blue-green


Wiliam Cousins, '?a.


of the heavens above.


For an


instant a zephyr,


Tall, ghostly, with single irradiant eye flashing,


you prove that the age of giants


Against


strength
the dark


has not passed.


are impressive,
vou are fearful.


brutal.
With


whispered


down


that blue-green


heaven,


awakens a restless ripple on the unruffled surface.
The zephyr goes on its way, and the lake sinks


back again


nto a quiet, motionless silence.


your helmet iron peaked, mouth of steel, and steel


collar,


you seem another


Mars.


How we poor


NIGHT.


mortals would quake and shiver with fear should
you strut the streets in your overbearing manner!
When the moon shines its stolen light, you seem
to taunt it with the sudden flashes of your eye.
It makes you seem more beastly-haughty thing.
In the day you seem to sleep, deceiver, but you
waken with the set of sun to lord it over the hum-
ble dwellings at your feet.

TAKING ON THE PILOT.
Ruth Foos, 'a8.


It was midnight, frosty and starlit.


Far on the


left, lights twinkled, the lights of the New Jersey


shore.


My sister and


I, squeezed in one deck


chair, for warmth, felt a thrill of happiness as we
recognized Barnegat light, and realized we were
opposite the very shore on which we had spent so
many happy hours.


William Cousins, 'as.


"At one stride comes the dark.


-Coleridge.


A small cayuco drifting down a long crimson


loomed


sharply


sweeping colors.


against


a background


The black


tanker crept quietly into the locks.


outline of


The world


seemed hushed as if musing.
One by one the lights of the town twinkled out.
High overhead against the dark red sky droned a
belated hydroplane, like a homing pigeon headed
straight for its roost.


Then it was over.


Night had fallen too soon.


THE SCHOOL BUILDING AT NIGHT.


Ruth E. Hopkins,


The boat slowed down.


Minutes passed, minm-


utes that seemed like hours, filled with the joy of


home-coming and


with shivering from the cold.


Dark forms loomed up from behind and spoke to


us, telling us


to come


"Just a little while,


pilot comes.


to the stateroom.


we pleaded,


'till the


" The forms retreated.


Huge, gray, and silent, looming out of the earth


to be swallowed


again


building was sleeping.
brooded, guarding it.


the ocean;


in darkness,


the school


Above, a blue-black sky
A quiet breeze floated from


only the lapping of the waves on the


rocks interrupted the melancholy silence.


Again the minutes that seemed
passed. The lights of the shore seemr
stars of night sprinkled on the horizon.


hours


THE LOCKS


led like the
The boat


AT NIGHT.


Ruth Duey, '25.


stopped.


A gentle swish-the


pilot's


boat.


green spotlight from the ship focused on a launch


that was drawn up to the side.


A man climbed


up the ladder that was slung from the deck.
launch departed-the boat moved on.


Dazed-almost


asleep-we


returned


our


stateroom, still with the exaltation that had pos-


sessed us


"A GREEN TRANQUILLITY."


A canopy of dark blue sky, through which
filtered myriad pin points of light, hung over the


locks.


The reflections from the lock lights made


queer figures on the surface of the water. The
footsteps of a laborer sounded on the path and
echoed to the control house, and the lap, lap of
water against the mossy, damp walls was heard.
At the far end of the canal a boat, laden with
rniu,-crc bri~ ni~nA fnru nlpiacnrnrtQ -a rthi










THE CARIBBEAN.


4 K K

j^i" K^


Twlc~d tAmyp


:p


ColIns


The Or


t' mrnt Cbrwnviyat' Ctiriese


''miiiiiiiiiim~f' -w/y w iv-


o.e art---


S.* .* : :t
SeA"T -fie


THE NESRl


aATJUS


yW+x ...
ammal- liii* !


- AN OUTFN&r


A LI&HTHOUSt"


*?4t
V^ua


LAUN ODRY


S^ ap


CC(OAN Ul


Flit sjLe.


-w V - -


33


KA K/. K


(aed*^


E


**::--







THE CARIBBEAN.


THE SUBMARINE DOCKS OF COCO SOLO.
Jane E. Toulon, 'a28.
Tied to the docks lie the long, gray submarines,
basking in the bright sun. Here and there a


A COACH.


William Clinchard,


(See illustration on page 54.


white-clad


sailor


moves


about


his duties.


murmur


comes


the sailors,


breaking


There stands the


"coche,


not the stately coach


lazy silence.


The water is tinted with oil from


read about in fairy tales, but the famous carro-


the motor boats, tied under a long shed at one
end of the docks.
A ripple breaks the still, glassy water as a motor


boat goes


put-putt-img


out.


The oily


waters


mata.


The leather top is folded back carelessly


to let the cotton-covered cushions dry under the


morning sun
dashboard.


The reins hang loosely


over the


The horse is standing limp with his


splash against the submarines, dance, then settle
back to that lazy, sunny calmness.


a submarine


is being


repaired.


Some


sailors are chipping the gray paint off one side,


while, on


the other side,


other


sailors


coat the


chipped surface with the protecting lead.
At one end of the docks are tied the tugs, the
Cur/lew,Fulton,and Quail, backing their places of rest
after accompanying the submarines on some trip.


flanks moving under his intermittent breathing.
His head is drooping; his eyes are closed, only to
be opened at the movement of occasional traffic.
Beneath the faded Coco-Cola umbrella, sits the
old Jamaican darkey with his elbows on his knees,
and his face hid in his calloused hands, trying to
snatch a nap to make up for his sleep lost during
the night.
A "P-s-s-s-s-t is heard in the still air, and at


As night comes on,
the boats melt into the
break the gray mist.


the gray submarines and


dusk,


and signal lights


once the driver is awake;


he slaps the horse on


the back with the reins, and with the clang of
their gong they are off for another passenger.


"But wh


did he say he would come and comes not."
-Rosalind in As You Like It.
Katherine Fischer, '25.


Rosalind sat alone on the terrace of the garden


She gathered her shawl still


closer with one


before the castle.


was autumn;


Dusk had fallen early, for it


and just above the trees that bor-


dered the western end of the estate the evening


hand, and extended


the other to him whom she


was expecting.
"Are you there, Orlando dear?"


she asked in


star twinkled brightly.


A breeze stirred the yel-


low leaves of the ivy that clambered over the gray


her soft quavering old voice.
But only a whippoorwill answered her mourn-


wall-the same ivy, Rosalind


remembered, that


fully from the woods.


The gray head drooped,


Orlando liked so well, because it gave the gray old
castle a more cheerful and homey look.
The breeze rustled Rosalind's skirts and blew
a strand of silvered hair across her withered cheek.
She shivered and drew her shawl closer about her


shoulders.


Orlando


would


come


to help


and the withered hands fell slowly together in the


silken lap.


A sigh mingled with the breeze.


lando had not come.
The realization brought the memory of another
time that he had not come, causing again the same
old heartache that she had felt then.


her to the house just as he had always done. She
could hear his footsteps coming along the stone


terrace.


She thought, as she listened, how faint


S. .. I .. 1 1 1 1 -


Elizabeth, sovereign queen of England, was
waging war with Phillip II on the Continent. All
.1 1 1 1 I I r .I 1.


*








THE CARIBBEAN.


35


Orlando was not to be left out.


the first to enlist in t
He would not hez
Southampton to see
would only cause hei
traveling was anyth
was dangerous as we
infested the roadwa*
on his departure he i


He was oneC of


he army.
ar of Rosalind's traveling to


)ror


I *


SIt


self and to return just as soon as possible.
Rosalind waved to him from the terrace until
he rode through the postern gate and ftrdetd the
Wyve. There were tears in her eyes, but she smiled
to him bravely. At the end of the forest, he
turned in his saddle and saluted her with his
sword. Then, spurring his horse, he disappeared
in the forest shadows.
Every evening she waited for him on the terrace
looking toward the postern gate and the Wye River,
for he had promised to return at evening, the
happiest hours of their day together. J)uring
these months it was young Orlando, who escorted
her to the great hall, and little Celia who soothed
her by her childish prattle. Then the Duke
Senior, her father, died, leaving her to bear her
sorrows alone. Rosalind yearned for Celia's
sympathy and comforting presence; but Cella and
Oliver were in France. She tried bravely, but
she failed to hide her heartache from the observ-
ing lad of sixteen summers. That she tried to
hide it made the boy tenderer to and more con-
siderate of his mother, and he tried to fill his
father's place during his absence. Thus a
comradeship grew up between the two, so that


they were almost


Then


inseparable.


one evening 0


the sun was s
was pacing u
linked in that
lando enter th
as he crossed
should turn
seemed ages u
the terrace.


inking behind
p and down
of her son.
e postern gate
the terrace.
and see him
until she reach
How slow he


returned-just as
: trees. Rosalind
terrace, her arm
did not hear ()r-
hear his footsteps
waited until she
ending there. It
the farther end of


r steps


were!


Then


stretched.
against his
had ceased
only one a
toward the
She turned


In another
waistcoat.
that she
rin around
other, and
her gaze to


explIana'tion. Then,
worn he looked, he


They rein:
on a stone I)b
his should er,
at home aga
The stars sh
the ivv leav
nightbirds.
The next
senger was s
bidding then
Hec was sent
surrt funding
preparation
ison, roast
fruits had to
The feast be
until everyth
the poorer tet
was spent in
and ()rlando


although
Ibv her
bedroom
oughly,
the tale
As t
Junior
turning
on the t


ailet


on the


:nch, sh
he tellii
in. ThL
tone cle,
es n in
And rh
lay was
ent to
I Colle
too, to
dukeldo
ftor the
ox, and
be garl
gan latt
ing was
plants.
danchtg
Junir


t


instant she wa
It was not unti
iticed that ()rl


She
was
e, mu
)w \Vr


terrace,


e leani
ng her
e moos
;ir an(
gled
-ev wer
declar<
all the
anrd we
trhe ft
ms.
LWCI e


althe
niiawt;.


s sol)bbing
I her sobs
aLnd( had
cd slolv
ack sling.
asking an
anld caret


lwin<(


seCa1


1e stai


w)yCed
his fI
ai x
Iepa
his
the
kiss


to gather


I)

I
tl
,'t


ames.
remain
) le c
rwa av
himself
e gloh
rance.


I ando
then,
using
)ther.


Rosalind smiled at him and blew one back to
him from the tips of her dainty fingers. She
turned to ()rlando and at his request went out on
the terrace with him.
The songs of the merrymakers om their home-


at last, she turned and saw him.
She was so startled that for a moment she just
stared. He was as tall, handsome, and soldierly


ward wav ec
out into the
cricket who


hoed back ac
silence, that
chirped a 1(


ross t
was
mel y


hills and died
ken only by a
it nevertheless


im saln, realizing that
eater sorrow. MNIoreo
but comfortable, an
for robbers and brigal
through the forests. I
nised to take care nf1 h


her.
there
his fac
einm h(
Eiwn s(s


mere trifles, as she rejiced in the light tiat shleI
from lhis eves.


day. A mes-
of the estate,
Cir lord hliome.
()rlando from
was spent in
vcre deer ven-


be proei
tskins o1
)ionl and
confisca
of the ce


ana in playing g
were allowed to
asleep and had t(
m


h Celia fell
father up th
n. Orlando
his eves gdis
s his father t
he last me
whispered se
, he skipped
t)pmost step


e ureat stole
Junior CJni(
tening and
old of Spain
rrv maker d
imethilng to
merrily up
to throw a


-


n<


- I


I
*








THE CARIBBEAN.


bravely you bore all that came.


It was selfish of


me---


he forget to escort her from her favorite seat on
the terrace to the great hall.


Orlando, you must not say


tested Rosalind softly,
and ever so much; bt


that,"


"I missed you, oh! ever
it our queen needed your


service and mine, and the only way Icould


serve


herwasto give you to her as long as she needed you.


"But I


promise you now, Rosalind, never to


leave you alone again, until death takes one of us.
"And then I shall be with you in spirit."
And the compact was sealed.


years


marks


slipped


in graying


hairs,


quavering voices. Orland
for his health was failing.


quickly,


leaving


withering cheeks, and
o's steps grew weaker,


Time


continued the


ravages begun by war. But never once did he
break his promise to Rosalind. Never once did


He would


come for her soon, now.


He had


never failed her before, and he wouldn't now.


Footsteps echoed along the terrace.


lifted her head and listened.


Rosalind


Surely that was his


step and now in a moment she would hear his


voice.


She waited, smiling.


And then a soft voice said caressingly,


"Come,


mother, it s getting chilly and you have only that
thin shawl over your shoulders."
Rosalind started, and then, remembering, she
sighed deeply.
A young arm aided her feeble steps across the
terrace and a young voice spoke soothingly to her.


The whippoorwill
stirred mournfully.


unfaithfu


called


the ivy


leaves


But Orlando had not been


for death had taken one.


ALLEGORIES.


THE BUILDING OF A BOAT.


He next


set to work to smooth and varnish the


Helen Abendroth,


sides with a strange solution of Seniordom, and so


The great shipbuilder, Destiny, had decided to
make another boat.
He first needed good strong timber which would
easily bend and shape itself to his purposes. For


put the necessary
made vessel.


At last


launch


the day


his boat.


finishing


came


touches


when


A holiday,


a well-


Destiny was to


Graduation


was declared, and everyone went down to see the


this wood


he went into the forest of Cristobal


good ship,


Ambition, launched upon the sea of life.


High School, and there he finally selected a few
good trees, Freshmen, that he hewed and set out
to season.


A year passed and


the seasoned wood


called


Sophomores was ready for use.


He then made the hull, laying it on a strong
indation. known as Hard Work and Good


When the last pin, Restraint, was knocked out,
the ship slid down the ways of Achievement, which
were greased with a substance called Diploma,
and into the waters of Life, where it was to sail
to the far distant port of Desire.


LEARNING TO DRIVE.


Marks.


Next he constructed a deck, Endurance,


Ruth E. Hopkins,


and made the boat water-tight with a rare mixture
of Patience and Determination.
Knowing that it would take time for this mix-
ture to soak in, he let the structure, Juniors, stand


Through the generosity of his parents, Kindness


and Encouragement, Average Boy was


choice


new


automobile,


School


given a
Career.


Bravely he started out min his shining car to get


for awhile,


cautioning


the watchman, Faculty,


his license, Diploma.


Glowing with enthusiasm,


Kr r o.n,-.1a," ,-.I4- ntn, -nk1,tr ;., hi0 c .t. Sol t i rinijnro.


"No,


foi








THE CARIBBEAN.


the accelerator of Physics, and the steering wheel


of English.
Examiner,


All this fascinated
Faculty, smiled-well


him; and the
pleased with


this intelligent driver.


crowded streets of Questions and urged him to
speed by the slower moving cars of Conscience.
Average Boy had not followed this course very
long when he was overtaken by the Speed Cop,


Finally, Average Boy grew indifterent to Nov-
elty; and Novelty, seeing this, deserted him.


iUnfortunately, about


was running


this time Average


into the traffic


of EXaminations.


Frightened, more or less, by this new experience,
he ,ladly picked up two new companions who had
asked to go with him; these were Carelessness and
Recklessness.
Carelessness was a friendly fellow who assured
him that it was not necessary to remember the
tiresome details of the mechanics of his curricu-
lum. Recklessness, equally as full of fun as Care-


lessness,


showed


him short


cuts through


Failure,


who sternly reproached him


sociation with such low characters.


for his as-
\verage Bov


was ashamed of this rebuff and quickly got rid of
Carelessness and Recklessness.
This time a more serious companion, Common
Sense, came to his aid and helped himn overcome
the had influence of his late friends, and chose for
him two others ofa different character; these were
Honor and School Spirit.
Aided by these, and by his parents, Kindness


and Encouragement,


and carefully


the Examiner, Faculty, Average Boy su


watched


(ccess


passed his try-out, Final Examination:,, and was


awarded his license,


)iploma.


EVERY BOY'S CRUISE.
William C. Cousins, '25.


Every


Boy had just received


a present from


his easy sailing he


did not pay attention to details


Father Time in the form of a new sailboat which
was called Scholarship and which had been built


in Grades.


It had been launched on Lake High


School and rigged by a
studies.


As Every Bov stepped


Wisdom with the best of


aboard he noticed


and instead of running around the stump Troubl)le,
he ran into it and was stuck-high and dry! D)e-
termination, however, came to his aid in the power-
boat Hard Study and with his help Every Boy
was pulled off.
He had easy sailing then until he was struck by


rain of Outside Attractions and, picking up the
can of Conscience, he bailed the ship so that the


a small


squall,


him about.


Quarterly


Exams,


which


tossed


He was weathering this well when,


planks


of Firmness


would


be dry to his feet.


Placing the oars of Cramming under the seat he
grasped the ropes Algebra, English, Spanish,
and Science, and pulled the mainsail (Good Report


without


flash,


warning,
1d down


Algebra
sagged


snapped


Good


Report


a red
Card!


Grasping the two ends he tied them with a knot,
Will, and pulled up Good Report Card.


to the masthead,


Parent's


l)emand.


sailed


along


accidents


also raised the flag Honor and the lib Steadiness.


(called Mistakes), for four


Making everything fast he cast off the lines of Sophomore,


Junior,


long days, Freshman,


and Senior.


Foolishness and Childishn


and the fair breeze


Faculty blew him steadily out of the cove Vacation


and on the right course.


Present


in the joy of


close of the last day he tied up at the dock, Grad-
uation, with his bow line, Education, and his stern
line, Common Sense.


A RHYME.


Ruth E.


Why can't I write poetry


When poet's


thoughts all come to me?


I lnve the ea. I i ee the unrprt-


Hopkins,


See palm leaves wave,
And white road paved
All shining. bri-ht


37


?
*"
J








THE CARIBBEAN.


taturet


Of the Senior English Class in one month's ob-
servation of an object as seen from day to day.
THE SEA.


Olga M.


Arcia, '23.


The sun, slowly rising in the east, is giving light
and vitality to the sea * The quiet, peaceful,


gray sea seems cyrstallized.


of yesterday


is furious


* * The calm sea


to-day.


gigantic


waves foam as if they were mad dragons dashing


against the breakwater.


* * To-day the break-


3ampreion .


S


* * This morning it is like a great green velvet
rug, bordered with the cold white curbing. * *


A great green stretch of shining


grass


jeweled


with tiny dew drops glistening in the early morn-


ing sunshine.


It is in its most beguiling mood-


tempting the ardent golfer from his work. * *
A beautiful morning! The golf course is a great
feathery surface of blue-green grass. A shiny
blue roadster drives up; from it emerge a young
thing in yellow and a stout middle-aged man in
gray knickers-with a golf bag swung over his


water is like a necklace of pearls encircling the


shoulder.


From


nowhere


appears


a swarm


blue bay with its tiny streaks of silver.


silent sailboat goes sliding by.


* * The creamy


breakwater seems like a snake, the silent sentinel


of the bay.


The furious waves dash against her


but still she holds them


strength.


* * Very


back with her


tiny ripples,


magic


grayish


color, are seen flirting with the sandy shore. * *
The dark blue waves are dashing against the beach
leaving vaporous white foam which slowly dis-


appears
gentle


* * The calm, light blue sea,with very


scarcely


noticeable,


looks


ripples


black-faced caddies.


I hope he gives his bag to


the little ragged fellow. * The smooth green
course is dotted with the bright dresses of the lady
golfers and the white or more somber colors worn
by the men. Bright faces smile their welcome to


arriving friends.


hides shyly


The weather is ideal.


behind


a gray


cloud


blows fresh and cool from the sea.


while


The sun
the air


* * Bluish


green and sparkling this morning, and, as usual,
a pleasing sight-surrounded on two sides by neat


a white cottages and several picturesque red brick


luxurious soft blue chiffon rug gently moved by


the breeze.


blackish


* *A dark grayish steamer, vomit-
smoke which becomes lighter and


lighter until it is confused with the light blue of


the clouds,
bay leaving


majestically
the surface


crosses
rippled


the dar
where


: blue
it has


traveled. * The ugly gray waves, the mo-
notonous sound of the dashingof the waves, the
impenetrable gray mist, the melancholy moaning


buildings.


Overhead the sky is deep blue speckled


with innumerable fluffy white clouds.


* *Ver-


dant, cool, and fragrant, peppered sparingly with


gay, boyish knickered figures.
fect; the world is in tune. *


a gray


mist hovers over the


mother bird over her young.


Golf Course?


The day is per-
* This morning
golf course like a


* * Why so sad, old


All your tiny blades of grass are


weighted down by the heavy raindrops that steadily


of the wind-all


is sadness and sorrow.


How different is this great beautiful ocean to-day!
Its uniform undulating waters are like rich light


beat your sparkling green surface.


What have


you done that the clouds scowl down at you so?
* * A great green stretch of wilted steaming


blue satin


gold on the sides.


the breakwater


* *


as a border of


* The snowy clouds, con-


trasting with the blue sky, rise high in peaks which
seem like snowdrifts, harmonizing with the frosted
blue white sea with its streaks of snowy ripples.
rw^r C. a r.TrrIrn s., r- n I r-rr .i-f nfn


grass beneath a torrid sun.


Limp, damp figures


drag their weary way over the links.


for golf! *


* Surrounded


What a day


heated


concrete


pavements, it is green and glaring under the blaze


of the morning sun.


inviting.


The golf course is most un-


In the distance, the red housetops stare


* * A







THE CARIBBEAN


houses in the distance seem washed in liquid gold.
* * The red of the roofs deepens, seeming to


reflect the cardinal of the sky.
is thrown over the world.


* * A gray cloak
The pink and gold


strips in the sky are fast sinking behind the house-


al! this noise for


ves.


nature?
Your lea
n'w leaf


In lish
^.


shake


that off vour


D)id you ever hear of enmmunini with
Well, this is that fearful pastime. * *


vcs g


row unusually fast.


Yesrterdav that


you have was all curled up like a cocoon.


The golf


course


strives


to brighten


N

somber world with its gay-green grass.


* i,
iS


Inkv blackness swallows the green of the course-


the outer edge is fringed with lamp lights.


(I read


a !:tt:e pale


a p(oeCm


* * this mining!)


Hit the


last niLght


sun will fix that.


which


dsccribes I


* 4 *


V' OI


As Amy Lowell would describe the Golf Course:
Grass,
Smooth grass,
Rough grass,
Pretty grass,
Ugly brown grass,
More grass-green grass;
Bright green,
Shining green,
Glowing growing green,
Soft feathery green,
Rough rugged green,
Blue green,
Yellow green,
Oh, the glorious greens of the grass.


"Curl and uncurl to the


kiss ,f the breeze


The leaf with the permanent wave.


\Vhy so dignified?


golfer who has just
to hide his elation.


You look like a sixty-five


made a round in par trying


flou must


but we all have for that m


Yvou see the moon


last night?


have a grand se-
aitter. * J)j
it looked like a


that those impish stars had rolled


from those deep snow banks that were in the sky,
-r, when the sun came p, t melted and slid dwn
for-, when the sun came up, it melted and shid do>wn


over thile horizon.


* * Slow, slumbering, sloppy.


Spreading soft, silken shadows.


plant.
lesslyv


* * Withered,


in warm


breezes


You, a banana


wilted wings, waving list-
"-- -?


from


sea. * ou look much


the
more


ever-wrinkled


cheerful


notw


MY INSPIRATION
William Cousins, '25.
(See illustration of banana tree, page 44.)


Buenas dias, Senor!
don't speak Spanish?


Panama!


Como esta- usted?


You are a fine native of


are not a native


Where in the Old World did you liv


Panama?


e before you


after lunch.


am almost ready to believe that


it is not you that changes but my own mood which
places you in a different light. * *
Underneath the spreading leaves
A bunch of bananas;
It's a great green bunch;
It came to me this morning-
Now we can not say


were


brought


to this hemisphere? *


* Your


Yes, we have no bananas.


name is Musa Sapientum?


That means muse of


the wise, doesn't it?
this straight. You


Wait a minute;


are called


let me get


that because you


THE BAY.
Anni/e 1eim, '5.-


were the chief food of the wise men of India? Well,
that explains why India belongs to England and


is not a nation in itself.
ting some new clothes.
old are well worn out.


I see you are get-


It is about time.
The edges of your 1


Your
eaves


look like the fragments of a wind-snapped flag.


can't


see anything.


Ah! now I know!


I am n


It is dark, dark, dark.
ear the bay, for I can


hear the water lapping against the rocks.


one black mass;


seen.


* * Night.


not a star, not a


light can


sea is fretful,


angry.


Say, I am tired of talking to you;


yo0


answer soon, I will not speak to vou again.


u don't
You,


The bay seems like a seething cauldron of ven-


geance.


The turbulent waves rush madvly against


the fruit of the wise men and yet so dumb!


the rocks in gigantic white-capped breakers.


Good morning!


what I t
->' I V f *


suppose
when


you have


forgotten


conversed


The bay


is uncanny


and forbidding.


waters, black, gray, green, and blue, seem to move


big snowball


- -n,







THE CARIBBEAN.


small lonesome star.


* * Morning.


The sky


is azure with snowy banks of fleecy white clouds


painted against it.


* * Calm and serene.


is marked down upon the books of time. * *
The sea lies like a mirror reflecting the awful glare of


a noonday


sun.


The milky


whiteness


of the


bay is like a great mirror reflecting everything
that passes over It from clouds in the skies to a
mast on a small sailboat. There is not a ripple
to mar the still, smooth waters. * The little


clouds combines to make this picture one torrid


terrible mass of heat.


A golden


sunlight makes its way across the waters of the
bay, blending its dazzling hue with the deeper,


wavelets with


their small


white caps sparkling


more somber color of the sea.


It rests there a


like diamonds under the sun are merry and gay.
Here is a patch of dark blue, and there a light
blue streak, and here again is a little silver ribbon


threading its way through the waters.


Now the


moment, setting the bay and sky on fire; then with
the beauty and grace of a Spanish dancer, it glides
from view, leaving its gorgeous shawl of vivid
scarlet and orange. * Like a myriad host of


sun hides behind a fleecy cloud and it is all a dark,
dark blue. * The bay is gay and merry. There
are millions upon millions oftinylittle ripples which
move on and on until they roll lightly upon the
reef. Overhead the white clouds hang like fairy
castles against the blue of the sky. * Blue


white-clothed


light plays upon


fairies


dancing,


the silver


moon-


the rippling waters of the bay.


Not a sound disturbs the quiet of the scene. *
Black, black, night-a velvet screen of darkness,


which completely obscures the


but which


can not muffle its dull thud as water meets rock.


and silver.


ribbons;
clouds;


Blue water with shimmering silver


blue sky patched with banks of silver
a mingling of blue and silver everywhere.


* * Evening.


if they were on fire.


ing and


thoughtful.


Sunset.


The heavens look as


* * The waters are brood-
The golden sun has at last


Moods.


it is a very


The sea to-day is playful, although


dangerous playmate.


With a


rough hand it tosses the boys in their small boats.


* * Mist! one obscuring blanketof mist.
Yes, fog-a heavy, dense curtain of fog,


completely hides the sea from view


Mist?
which


. But behind


gone


to rest behind


the fast-darkening


Overhead the stars begin to twinkle in the deep


this can be heard the angry roar of the waters,
acting as does a caged lion, mad with being held


blue sky.


All is calm and still.


captive.
up fury.


FROM ALONG THE BEACH.


rend the air.


* * The storm bursts in all its pent-


Great streaks of steel


The sea, an angry


blue lightning
lion, roars, and


then, its fury spent, it is quiet and, as if ashamed,


it hides behind a shielding screen of mist.


Colors.-(Description a la Amy Lowell.)


Water:
Blue water,


Green water,
Water with dots of white on it,
Rough water,
Rippling water, smooth water;


Then


the sun, the conqueror, comes forth to shine upon
a damp and very much chastened world. * *
The rain is over, all but a tiny drizzle that prom-
ises every minute to subside, and the setting sun
in all its golden glory, smiles its benediction upon


a fast-darkening world.


At the door of the west,


poised for flight, it lingers as if to see that all is


Water


everywhere,


dancing


in the


sunlight.


well, and


then, satisfied, it disappears,


leaving


A shining, silver surface, lying motionless


beneath


the midday


sun. * Green,


green,


behind a perfect harmony of colors stretched across


the sky.


* * Dotted with


innumerable


white


emerald green, like a meadow it lies before us. *
Blue, blue, blue, the color of melted turquoise.


caps the sea lies stretched out like a speckled white


field of


daisies.


The fishermen


in their


many


wide expanse of motionless blue.


A gray,


kinds of craft, are the children who go out to pick


sullen, and mysterious expanse of cold steel waters.


A Day.


As the sun rises it looks upon a


the flowers.
another-eac


Lured on by one bright spot, and then


h


one fairer


the first-they


sea shrouded with mist-a quiet sea; one not yet


1 1


, .iI Irnnan rnrni nnc" ruT"1 rn ifl i ci imfI

venture forth, some to return, but others to wan-
Arlr nn cnrl nn n-nvr the ftre of tihe egrth. always


Hlelen Abendroth,








THE' CAR1 BBIKAN.


MY TREE.


tern of leaves


is hlack-shath
lS Ui t ,iat


against


Dorothv DIlibkr, '25.


The Da
trunk throw
quivering I
The shining
secrets to
bird twitt
bhoughs mF
my tree, is
of the sut


y.

eal
ugg


ea
ers
)ve
ha
1.


Just a tree


h the lea1
f, it is like
0reen and
ch other
to his I
slow!v *
ppy and r:
* * The


From tilt' hare, brown
)wers, to the topmlost
yet unlike other trees.
Fellow leaves inmurmur


k
I a
sl


their drowsy heads, for ir
another day is here. The
day rock the branches to a
clear, sweet dew fall from
are singing. The tree seeCC
its beauty forth to all the
shines down with a glare ah
sultry, sticky air seems to
touches. Even the tree is
dry and wrinkled; the brat
unable to lift their heads
the oppressive heat. No
reigns. Perhaps it is a lull
A great cloud has spread
gray of it seems to have tou
tree has a dejected look, a:
ing their heads in sorrow.
seen. Gloom reigns supra
gods are visiting the ear
lightning sear the sky; the t
The tree is bent and
lash of the wind and rainm,
a hopeful thing. * Tht
The leaves bend and quiv
of the rain as an animal c


the bret
c. The
and foi
nt in tlt
eopy gr
lorninig
first co
nd fro,
the lcax
Ills to u
world.
IIiSt un


smor
Sliil)t
hot.
inches
and r
bird
hefo
over
ched
nd th
Not


ze.,
lor
rth.
.' da
een
has
ol W
while
VCS.
Ces.
nfob
* *
1)ear


ner e
The
are I)
id th
is sin
re a si
the s
every
e leave
a sign
* *


.111IC.
th.
hund<
stra
a het


e storm
er undo


owners un


The branches are bent back helpless
of the wind. * The gray cloud ha
The storm has gone. Again the bea
seems to have touched the tree.


stretches
rocks th
beauty*
sun has
fading a
The lea
* ti, .:.. < ti,


arms
m gent
f the
disappi
d natul
es havy
A ,- I ,i


children
she sighs
er tree!


. The
;etttng
.ted th


I'


light
read\
emsel
A\ \r.


I I
,ill
*

t
ve
VC


v
I
(,


g
t(
kL
b


A vcellow
ig, twisted
The tree,
wiling glow
leaves lift
comne andi
minds of the
Ie drops of
T'he )irds
d and po}ur
* The sun
ahle. 1ihe
crything it
eaves seem
wed down,
mselves of
ing; quiet
* *


, 111 a
.Va


nd tlhe


thing. The
'es are bow-
i of cheer is
The storm
streaks of
S ominouslV.
under the
yet perhaps


odis are a
the onsli
dtier the
;, at the
.s disapp
utV of th
In her
content.
abv. ()0
The ev
)f the d
o go to
s andi 1


ngry.
augh t
whip.
nercy
iared.
e day
wide-
She
hI, the
eninR
aay is
sleep.
)owed
in1,2 .


darkening l
raindrop or
are hudd!c
Ig tree sle
tree is silh<
ll[mo p(lea]
The leaves


nd- -for
t the tre
e tree sto
tch small
isten;
eor all. *


is silent


r)Uln


eps. -
iet ted again
S from untli
have turn
to-night an i


e is shivering.
rics of the far-(
1 leaf is holdin
and the go ldec
* The leav


other, tfor t


10WS Whlt
* I ha
called a
*r her sui
* The
r all the
ittcring
em are s
ill see tin


,re an
ve disc
senna
- lover
tree is
old '
:Iwav.

cattere
y greeC


ert little heads.
ew.


he casi
l not
overed
tree
shi)we
going
wvithere
(On tl
d. Bi
nl lrave


t
7-'
Cl
It
a
rs


t


l)w. The r tirov
darkness sett
w gravish shadl
a mackerel sky
oath a clutid.
their hacks ag
familiar wind i
* : Thewim

)d north Whlcnc
g ti its raci
i-glowing sun i
es are playing
wind has came
'en a tree can1
he name of m v
pretty name.
her with a gol


to hav
*d lea\
it: izrtv
it ift v(
s and


T he old


xu a new
mnd belov


a
v


save teir an


oI look closely
twils shown


is giving


, you
their


way to the


THE BANANA PALM.
Dorothea 7"/As, '26.

The banana plant holds a deep meaning for me.


How pati
-always
have con
in the air
tinuing h
reward.
plant is
leaves ha
Rain bea
tree. I t
stretched
banana p
like plah
told then
to play
morning
as it Stan
hi'n llL',,


repelling.
ng limnply
its a rhvt


s leaves


han
plant
'ful
Sa h
about
the I1


seC


Is wai
face
( od.
i me 1
en thi
Thi
It i
like t
hmic
Im lik


1ds of a
is happy.
children.
apply story.
t the tree
ianaia plan


ds asifwaiting
[r.v hy-c' h


ting for wha
in thing. I
With leavi
ike some po(
)ugh he maV
s morning
s dull and d
he arms of a
tattoo< on th
e the thin, cl
leper. *
Its leaves d
Perhaps the
The sun h
also. *
t sCUIes Ceol)
[or ce'mpanfv.


t ma
t se
:s di
or pO
* reet
rec
the
rear


scarecrow.
e shivering
ammy, out-
* The
Zance about
t wind has
as comne out
* This


in


vi itln
leaves
biuihl-


1


,ceasinal
sv\ leaves
lIs. Ihe
)\w of the
SA new
Moods.
ainst the
s allowing
I is telling
0 it came.
*ful head
s smiling
tag with
from wh rsist it.
tree. It
No won-
den love.
ress soon,
ruSS 50011,
lling and
many of


g
2r


t


r F/


-^








THE CARIBBEAN.


The banana plant stands on a floor of sea-green
grass, its leaves spread out like a fountain. The


* A light zephyr stirs among its branches,
swaying it this way and that, beckoning to those


sun probably tells the


seen


listens.


plant


on its travels


Dusk


looks


of something


tion


cast


black,
forlorn


upon


memory.


tree stories


and the


of what


tree quietly


is falling; the banana


and haunted.


water


appearance
Its reflec-


a black


* The banana plant stretches


its roots into the ground to hold its place as the
wind, in a mighty gale against it, makes its leaves


who love the out-of-doors.


Its leaves have been


washed a brighter green by yesterday's rain; per-
haps its soul has been cleansed too, for who knows
the heart of a tree? * I have often wondered
why the birds do not rest in your branches. I
have never seen one with you until to-day. Just
a tiny brown grass bird stopped long enough to
gossip about the latest scandal of the feathered
society; then he flew away with a final chirp about


blow straight out like the wind-swept


hair of a


the weather.


I hope he cheered your heart.


mermaid.


The leaf that


hangs at its side has


What story did you tell the humming bird that


turned a grayish-white color and is quite a con-


trast to its green brothers and sisters.


This morning the banana plant wears a spangled
dress as the sun sifts through its fringed leaves.


The wind seems to take away some of


the heat


just flew by?


His tiny vivid body glowed against


* yours until your green seemed pale by comparison.


* * Beautiful, luxuriant, verdant foliage, like
flounces on an old-fashioned gown. * A burn-
ing sun looking down at my pine, making it droop


and makes it seem cool and inviting to any pass-


erby who may glance in its direction. *
The banana plant seems cheery and green.


leaves are lazily tossed about by the wind, and


their shadows dart about on the grass.


This is


the last day it is to be criticized by me but there
is yet hidden beauty my eye has failed to see.


in wilted stillness.


* of sky.


One of th


* * A black, sombre, canopy
he stars is dead! Through the


dimness I feel that my pine tree has knelt to pray.
* * How supple you are! while other trees are
groaning beneath the strain of the mighty wind,


you slip,


twist,


and evade


* * It is


hateful tree this morning that obstructs the view


from our back window.


A FOREIGNER IN PANAMA.


The blue sky refuses to


blend with the green of the tree, and the tree it-


Ruth Duey,


self-why


doesn't it


have more spine ?-a mere


AN AUSTRALIAN PINE


passing fancy easily swayed by the will of the wind.
* * Why is it that moonlight can change the


All the outside is a canvas upon which Nature


uses her colors.


Blue sky, green tree, yellow pine-


apple mingle but do not spoil the picture. *
1850? The Tree Speaks to Me-"Perhaps if I


homeliest spot to a place of beauty


Silver shafts,


shot straight from the quiver of the moon, fall


upon our garden patch.


My lordly pine, clothed


in a white radiance, disdains to bow low to the


had not


bewitched


Mother


Nature, I


squat pineapple shrubs.


* * Utter lassitude in


should now be curtseying and swaying through


every line, a mute record of the cruel storm's ven-


the steps of the latest minuet.


mourn


geance.


strong


breeze


silently when the strains of a waltz are wafted


out to me.
ballroom; t


was snatched suddenly from


here was no trace;


all I have of my


former self is the grace and height which Nature


decided to leave me.


,, *


* As Carl


Sandborg


would see it:


A pine tree-
An ugly, lanky thing
That grows in loneliness.
Tc linpc nrp _chnrn----


canal, blowing against my pine tree, must remind


it of its original home.


and its


I imagine the wind teases


compamnions


different the soil must
roots into down here!


for hours. I
Sit stretches
:it stretches


Here there are no fellow


companions; all alone it stands, an alien, and the
strong wind comes but seldom. * *
The treetop's points are touched with mist,
The treetop s points are touched with mist,








THE CARIBBEAN.


THOUGHTS ON LOOKING ACROSS THE
SEA.
Katherine Fischer, 's5.


Sunday morning.
morning the sea is bliu
it is on week days?
the still-lingering nigh
the hills seem exultant.
wby the clear, sweet rin


* The st
too sleepy
just awake


a shining,
rose and si
below, the
palms are
darker blu
mist. Th
where ripp
The sea, c
cloud-castl
and gray o
The sea is
blue runni
ward give
ever going
T'he trees
blue expan


quiet
tired


ning the da
glistening
Liver, like fai
slender, gr
outlined, g
e of the ju
: shore itsel
les roll laz
aim and cl
es, the brig.
f the deep
blue, a dark
ng through
you the im
onward, bi:
beyond see


se of water;


Blue waves
That dance
And splash
On the cora
A blue and
lifting its a
And a blue
That seems
Spread over
Midafternoon
The sky is gra


Ir
a
T,
n
f
i
e
h


Why is it that on Sunday


er and more peaceful ti
The sky is a clearer azt
t clouds are whiter. EF
The silence is broken o
gingmg of the church bells
and colorless, as if it w
to move. * The s
', paints the clouds whir'
white, tinted with a r
y castles. Near the sh
y-white trunks of the c
ray and white against
igle, pale blue with ris
is a ribbon of white sa
ly in, their crests curli
ar, reflects the light fr
[tness fading into the h
... 1-. h..-. 1*


r waters.


IVTol I


LJ1


blue, with stripes of lig
it. Ripples moving
pression that the sea is
it never getting to its g
m farther away across
they seem shadowy. *


in the sun,
playfully
I reef;
green jungle
rms to the sky;
sky-
happy-
Sall.


in.
y, a


Everything is gloomy
if prophesying some evil


hanl
ire;
ven
nly
. *
*ere
un,
l lt

>aie
ale
)re,
oco
the
ing
nd,
ng.


om
'1)l l
n il<


utngle the sky
edges of gold.
lying half way
like the sky.
bright gold.
it, like some eni
ripples, splashi
Purple and
Silver and m
The clouds I
Above a gre
The gold is
And the sea
T'he jung!e li
Its head up-
in fast-dark<
Evening. Th
above the dark
the afterglow
pink and yel,
soft gray of q


'u U
I'he sky


lhter. black bl
sea. nor star,
for- a blue
oal. thunder
the distorts
* radiance
gence de
* V


the w
drips
my w
ity o:
Throu


, the s
o)t on
Sto riel
flash
gods,
the ft
and 1


parts, in
i htf


N 111 *1
ind shrieks
incessantly
indow for t
f the nigh
gh the win


's pur
The iu
across
* *
'he juni
chanted
ng gent
gold,
lauve,


le-clouded with
ngle is hid by a g
the bay. The se
Sunset. The sk
gleI is clearly etch
forest. liTheseai
ly against goldiln


rifts and
olden haze
a is azure,
y is clean,
ed against
sal! golden
soin. *


ie still
en and quiet sea.
mirrored in the sea,
in the sky above;


ies,
raised


lilt shadoNws.
sky is a clear apple green.
ing jungle, the clouds, tintec
the sun, hang blue and rr
/. The sea lies gray-a
ct and peace. * It is
S..L I- _!


e ht, j u n g l e


e atmc
re the
light
ig-zagg
tiliar s
mnges
to a de
The ni
throu
from
he sea
t green
d and


are on
re, wit


monotony.
ing, herald
ing across
cene bv a
the world,
eper obscure
eight is blac
gh slatted
the eaves.
, but only
ts my ev
the rain coi


I with
Iau ve,
lovelvy
night.
i -


ie; an unenduing
h neither moon
Now and then
of storm and
the blackness,
brilliant white
when the efful-
itv than before.
k and desolate;
doors; the rain
I look through
the wet obscur-
es. But listen!
mes the muffled


boom of the breakers on the rocks on the


to-day.
. The


sea is gray, reflecting the portent of the sky. The
jungle is a gray green. The very atmosphere is
gray and depressing. It makes one feel uneasy


and restless. * *
Gravncss:
Gray sea
And gray sky,
Gray rain,


shore.


The sea-
In long uneven swells,
Blue and silver
And gray by turns-
Hisses against the shore.
The hills
With rainy mist are seen
Gray against
The sun's bright sheen.
The purple rain clouds,
, 4 i 1 1


(
I


,sphei


ea
11







44 THE CARIBBEAN.








THE CARIBBEAN.



S1.OlNE TRAVEI.ER..
IFank Booth, 2S.


tIS m !!!!!!!!!"' ~^


days-- yfive


sun began


xwane:


birds


wakeful nights and glarin


A long, deep, re
eve down tohisc
and then on do
figure his featu
tongue was blaci
His clothing w
scratched, and b
he would falter
and look ahead,
the same slow
would stray, but
his mistake andt
Five days ago
then he had sucl
early morning.
occasional yam,
Two delays ago
gry jaguar; his
at his side had
death.


d ga
hinN
wn
res;
k an


hot davs


of torture.


h, extending from his right
here the white bone showed,
o his chest, helped to dis-
his lips were caked; his
[ swollen.


vas in tatters; his feet were sore,
espattered with mud. At times
, shade his eyes with his hand,
but always to move on again at


-I 1


pace, nortnwardu; son
Sooner or later he wot
head north.
he had his last big dr
ked the dew off the lea
Eating nothing but ro
he had managed to ca:
he had been set upon
hunting knife which
alone stood between


ictimnes he
aud correct


ink; since
Lves in the
ots and an
rry on.
by a hun-
had hung
him and


He was near the end of his journey, but e
hour, yes every minute, he was going slower
slower, his hopes flying fast ahead, he hir
crawling along at a snail's pace.
He heard a sound; he strained his ears to c
it; his heart beat fast. New-born hopes a
only to die again-the dry, hot, stifling wind
loosened an old dry limb which, unable to
up under the weight, fell crashing to the grn
below. The crash echoed and reechoed thro
out the jungles, and birds with shrill shriek
to another neighborhood-and then silence.
So on, always on-slower and slower-bu
ways moving closer to his goal.


very
and
self


atch
Arose
had
bear
Hind
ugh-
flew

t al-


their noisy cl
stars moved s
more disting
moved with a
Stumbling
poisoInous ne
spring away
he caught his
lay still, whi
impenetrable
green eves shi
then disappe
right they we


until
his pr
'Th
started
sleep
his ki
which
Aft
efforts
could
roots,
He
dew t
to dr\
He
Ah! t
staggn
paddle


one
eCV.
e st
d t


littering
oftlv out
uishable,
soft rust
through
Cedles of
with a i
foot in
le all ah
jungle.
fted tow
ared ;- n


and
ng so
)riars


seen again


ess dc?
ceaven
light
id a:on
Falling
k pahm
of pai
gz vine,
r \1Vas
[was


a sud eun,
the unconi
>r a few
---always


sccended;
and hcca
cotol brc
g the group
on the sh;
1, always
n, sudden
and fell;
dark, aim
Jtwo sitel
scionus $lee]
yards to
moving ,o


n the sleeper; then closer and closer
spring would carry the big panther to


in came out;


o chatted


r il


.r stirred, opcnci
inees; then, by
had become stil
er his weary mu
s, he sipped the
reach, dug arou
and then set out
walked and walk
disappeared into
'; the walker mi
heard a gurgling
here was water
bred toward it -
in j along in a


splash, steel
caught him,


lournev


red


the birds


nm<>ng
I his
it sio
fened
scles
dew I
;nd ai
again


the trce
eves anl
w process
over nigi
had rcsp
from all t
nd fund
on his we


ed; it began


the air; t
vced slower
sound; he
'--a whole
and fell.
cavuc(, at
the wideni


c


il monkeCvs
tops; the
then got on
to* his 1,- s


hr.
endedd
he lea
a few
tarv jio
get hc
earth
an at f
trted t(
ur fiul
native
cetd I
ripp l


ing him into the.tinv craft


I>,
Su-


to his
ves he
iuicv
urney.
t; the
began
irst.
( run.
I. i e
, idly
v the
s and
. The


was ended.


WEATHER AWAY!
Katherine Ftscher, '5.


Oh! the sting of the wind is on my face,
As it blows in from the sea
A nfl bncwintrhm ^ ma-i-nm -inA tKi~ r


And the rain is falling
From ledeln clouds


stopped


45


re


t








THE CARIBBEAN.


ESSAYS.


-SF


ON CATCHING BUTTERFLIES.
John Ordway, '26.

Almost everyone on seeing a beautiful butterfly
flit about under his nose feels an innate desire to


not there!
to be seen.


I looked about, but he was nowhere
I sank down on the ground tired,


disappointed, and angry
swarmed over their victim.


while


mosquitoes


While sitting there I


firmly resolved to chase no more elusive butterflies.


catch it and preserve it as


"a thing of beauty and


mv resolve


was no sooner


made


than


a joy forever;


proved no exception


to the


broken.


A short distance away I saw a beautiful


general rule and after being tempted on several
occasions, I sallied forth one morning with a hasti-
ly constructed butterfly net in one hand, a glass
jar in the other, and a handy size bottle of ether
bulging from my hip pocket.
I felt that I was the terror of every butterfly
within the radius of a mile, but to my surprise


seemed not in


presence.


the least disturbed


by my


One bold fellow with gorgeous yellow and


black wings even passed within a few feet of me.


creature of the specie commonly known as Prin-
cess, rise from a clump of flowers, circle gracefully


about, then insolently sail past me.


feet in an instant.


I was on my


This time my aim held good


and I saw him firmly entangled in the meshes of


the net.


But this was only half of it.


Carefully


I took him in my hand and put him in the jar; he
was followed by a few drops of ether, which was


in turn followed by the top of the jar.
while, Mr. Butterfly was not idle.


But mean-
Nay, on the


"Well, my fine fellow,
ly for your folly," and I


direction.


strange


" said I,


you'll pay dear-


swung my net over in his


he still flitted


about. I couldn't understand why I had missed
him; nevertheless I edged over in his general di-
rection again, but he deemed prudence the better
part of valor and quietly moved in the opposite
direction at a slightly greater speed than my own.
I was not to be trifled with; so I set out at a round


pace.


He increased his proportionately, and the


chase began in earnest.
Now you who have seen


Fort Sherman


contrary, he even beat the top of the jar to the
mouth and with his blue wings glittering in the
sunshine, he flew joyously away followed by my
silent execrations.
These are fair examples of how the rest of the
hour was spent-after which time I returned home
empty handed.
I was met at the door by my brother who eager-
ly asked what I had caught. "Say, kid," said I,
"if you ever think that you would like to hunt
butterflies, why take my advice and go fishing' in-


stead.


Yea, verily, I've had enough for a lifetime.


realize the advantage that the butterfly had over
me by being able to fly in a straight line while I
was forced to clamber up and down hills, hillocks,


Never again for me.


Once is enough.


But the beauty of it is that once isn't enough,


even


now I'm waiting for my


brother


hummocks, mounds, bumps, and ridges.


While


it was rather strenuous, the sight of the accursed
butterfly a few feet ahead of me spurred me on.
When at last 1 was ready to give in, we came onto
a le.el stretch and I resolved to end it then and


appear so that I can get him to go out and chase
butterflies with me. *

JOYS OF EATING IN A BIG FAMILY.


Christian


Wirtz, 'a6.


Gathering all my remaining strength into


the last effort, I gradually shortened the distance
between us and with unerring aim I prepared to


"Ding! Dong!" goes the bell. "Hooray! din-
ner's ready." Immediately the big table is sur-


rounded


eleven


yelling,


squirming


young


strike.
t


I plunged forward, swinging the net right
T-I 1.......I----------IL.


hoodlums, clamoring for food.


AA4..-. W-nlral- Tr.$nnrrr r-li-ilt l~nlfnn'i w~f


there.







THE CARIBBEAN.


A spoonful of beans catches


Tommy be-


hind the ear and a veritable battle of legumes en-
sues, until the opposing forces are quelled bv the


well-known rod.


Again Sue wails, r this time


All loafers are lazy.
one must have the gift.


But to head the category
While many of mv col-


leagues are gazing out of the window, dallying wi th
a pencil, I give the appearance of being intensely


somebody has stolen her fork.
"Don't take it all Piggy, yells Eddie to Bobbie,
who is helping himself to a lion's share of mashed


potatoes,
Bang!!


"I want some too.


Crash!


" Baby has shoved a bowl


of hot broth on Jane's new slippers, her pride and
joy, and consequently is lightly spanked by big
sister Ann to satisfy the grief-stricken Jane.


busy.


Yet I


do less.


plenty to do but don't do it.


That is the secret


lha\ e


My companion can


not enjoy his loafing as much as 1 can, because,
while he has nothing to do, I have plenty; and
idling, like kisses, to be sweet, must be stolen.
For instance, the time I like best to work my


four-year-old


brother's


kindergarten


puzzle is when I have to prepare three chapters in


"Here comes the pie,


yell all eleven as one man,


almost bringing the plaster down.


Cicero,


ten problems in geometry, a chapter in


U. S. history, and a book report.


With that for-


"'Children, children,


please he quiet,"


admon-


midable array before me, I can enjoy fifteen min-


ishes the tired voice of mother as she cuts the first


blackberry pie of the season.


Harry reaches


the first piece, but Jimmy, due to the advantage


utes to the utmost, looking


"a three-letter


word meaning something to wear on the head."
It is then also that my dinner tastes more delicious


of a longer arm, is victorious.


Eleven pieces of


than any


meal I have hitherto eaten.


pie disappear


in as many


seconds.


Six sticky


In the same way that some artists draw best at


hands reach for the twelfth wedge of mushy pie.
Eddie's grimy fingers grasp it but "there's many a


a certain time of the dav and some people


studv


best in the morning, and others at night, so it is


twixtt the cup and the lip,


" for, while his eyes


with my talent.


It is well-developed in the morn-


are gloating over his treasure, dripping


purple mice


through his fingers onto his clean blouse, Bobby,
a veritable dog in the manger, knocks it from his


ing. If, by any chance, it is necessary for me to
get up early, that is the time that I love best to


loll for a half-hour longer.


In fact, it is impossi-


hand.


It catches Freddie full in the face-a loud


ble for me to get up when I ought.


If I ought to


wai! ensues, and patient mother tenderly
away both tears and pie.


wipes


rise at eight I am up around eight-thirty.


eight-thirty, I am up at nine.


In fact it is said


Dinner is over, Jean carries the nodding babv


away for his nap;


the younger


boys rush out to


of me that I am punctually half an hour late. The
family has tried all sorts of devices to get me up.


play, whooping like Indians; and mother, assisted
by Sue and sister Ann, wearily lean away the
dinner dishes.


There


alarm


clocks


at the wrong time or didn't wake me.


went


They have


told my brother Bill to knock at the door.


Such are the joys which it may


be truthfully


knocks at the door, I mutter,


"All nri "


and turn


said are to be found only in bi


families.


over and go right back to sleep.


For a while they


ON BEING LAZY.


even got me up and shoved me under a cold shower.
But that did no good for I'd go right back to bed


Jack Coffey,


to get warm.


And then there was the problem


of dressing, and the more I'd think about that the


This is a subject on which I consider myself an
authority in every sense of the word.
\\When I was being grounded in my studies bv
the Rev. Brother Athanasius of St. Joseph's Col-
lege, of Colon, that austere gentleman showed his
acumen and foresight when he said that while it
was highly improbable that I could do all that I
k. l- ^ ^1J Jl L ^" . .. . .... 1 1: 1_ 1 1 .. : I |


more unpleasant it seemed.


The only time I am


ever ambitious about getting up in the morning


is the night


having


wasted


before.


to mvself--after


the whole evening-


"I'll do no


more work to-night so that I can get up early in


tne morning.
But when "e


" I'm full of determination then.
rly" comnies around, I find it is just


k_ _ -_____-


cross-word







THE CARIBBEAN.


THE DIVING BOYS AT HAITI.


Maurice Eggleston, '26.


thrown into the water they all dived after it.
They might not have good diving form but one of


(See illustration page 33.)
S S
I awoke early that morning and sat up with a jerk.
At first I thought we must be tied up at the dock be-
cause there was so little motion in the boat; but
then I heard the steady throb of the engines. I
jumped out of bed and took a hasty glance out of
the porthole at the mountains looming up in the
distance, the while pulling on the essential parts
of my clothing, leaving the rest until later.
After this negligible toilette I rushed out on deck,
and although it was only about five-thirty I found
other people already on deck-some of the men in
bath robes and slippers-all glad of the glimpse of
land, which surely is a welcome sight after several
days of seeing nothing but water.
I waited around on deck hoping to be the first


one to see Port-au-Prince.


At about seven o'clock


[ saw some white dots against the green mountains


ahead.


At seven-thirty we were almost there and


I could distinguish the separate buildings, most
of them white, with the cathedral and president's
palace standing out among the lesser buildings.
The only movement I could discern was that of a


peculiar


looking group of small


boats near


pier. Then the gong for breakfast sounded and
I was so hungry by that time that no sight in the
world could have kept me away from the table.
From the dining room I could hear the shouts
of the men, the clanking of the windlasses, and the
myriad other noises which accompany the prepara-
tions for docking a ship; and finally the dock sheds
of Port-au-Prince began to slide past the portholes
of the dining room.
Hurriedly finishing my breakfast I hastened out
on deck to see the docks, but I was soon attracted
to the other side of the boat by the sight of a large
number of passengers crowding to the rail, seem-


ingly throwing money into the water.


I ran over


and upon elbowing my way to the rail, there met
my eye a unique sight, which accounted for the
number of boats I had seen near the dock.
Alongside the ship was a fleet of small home-


made boats, manned by Haitian boys.


All that


them always got the money.


Some even assured


us that for a quarter they would dive down and
bring up some mud just to prove that they had
reached the bottom.
All of the boats had a supply of bricks and boards
and a fight was not uncommon.
Besides these bos there were also some older
Besides these boys there were also some oider


men in larger boats laden


oranges,


watermelons,


with alligator pears,


limes,


pieces


painted shells, chairs, and baskets.


did not shout or gesticulate


of coral,
These men


but merely rowed


slowly up and down the side of the ship watching


for prospective customers.


If one wanted any-


thing from one of the boats, upon a signal the man
would row over and toss up a line with a basket
attached to one end, into which he would put the


purchase.


The basket was then hauled up by the


customer and the purchase taken out, after which
it was lowered with the money in it.
I saw some boys get oranges and alligator pears
from these fellows by giving them small cakes of
soap which they had taken from the bathroom
and their staterooms.
When the boys became too noisy and quarrel-


some


the crew


drove them


away


by turning a


powerful stream of water from the fire hose on
them, and the last I saw of them they were rowing


toward


the city fighting among themselves and


hurling epithets at the crew.
.A MACHIGUA FROM


-n


SAN BLAS.
Olga Arcia, '25.
Pattering briskly along
Bolivar Street went a strong,
heavy, shortlegged Machi-
gua from San Bias. His
broad prominent cheek
bones gave a triangular form


to his face;
Asiatic shap
together wit
color of his


the peculiar
e of his eyes,


the
skin,


copper
gave


undeniable proof of his race.


His dirty blue


the boys wore was a pair of tights, except that
,,,-,cinn.liv one nf thrm had on a shirt which


blouse was


worn loosely over his black


4?








T[IHE CARl IBlEAN.


"Not what we give, but what we share
For the gift without the giver is bare."
ILtt /i.


if


ever have I been
quotation from I
as vividly as whcl
1ifestation of love
imnicanltS of the
)in Panama Cit.
,ach Christmas t
O1ll of reI)uildgl 1
e town of Bethlehb
devote th1emsel v
ng of their slende
gold and material
manv hours putt
labor of love.
t the close of midn
d bv the solemnity
altar. The smell


triall strains of the Ave
tck nearly two thousand
Before me seemed to lie
wn of Bethlehem. In
gged range of brown,


bareness reli
whereupon
a watchful
tenderly con
Rude little
pink, half h
nestled at t
color present
the backgrn
black-eyed


going alot
tiny grains
chickens;
a litter of
tiny silver
knelt toun
ing gav-col
*t-<


ut
0
a
f;
st
g
0o


eved
graze
shep
tern]
e ret
idde
he fi
ing a
Hund
peas
thei
,t vel
nothi
at, p
re an
girls
red g


impressed with the t
)IcllIs "Visi)1 o if S
i I beheld last Christr
and (ICdevoition offered
little church of Sant


:\01
:V <)t
t thile
ri.
to to
mean
whik


Lo/a MI

ruth of
* I -un-
mas the
by the
) l)oni-


e the beautiful
of the altar the
)or ats well as thle
offering, the por w
e rich contribut-
h work together


ing their whole hearts into

eight mass on Christmas Eve,
of the services, I approached
of the incense andi the ce-


NMaria had carried me
ears.
n reality tile picturesque
the background rose a
rocky mountains, their


Sby an occasionall patch of green
id snow-white sheep, attended hI
herd, leaning on his staff and
plating his little flock.
d-tiled huts of deep y yellow and
n in olive groves of gray-green,
oot of the mountains, their gay
Striking contrast to the brown of
. Near the huts were quaint
ant women in colorful dresses
r daily tasks. ()ne was throwing
low corn to at brood of fluffv-white
er was carrying a pail of milk to
inkish pigs. On the banks of a
i which wound through the grove,
washing, while others were hanr-
arments on low-hanging branches.


Before the doors of the huts played olive-skinned


lt'


InS, 26.


the midst of which teamed tiny lakes. The light
o)f candles shone on the glass j|tnes of the imposing


synagogue.
I.eading
the village
with people
mnierchant, i
ing leggar
the patient
shaped, red


shawle
play t
bright-
In the
of dirt
gentle,
owners
On i
quaint
stable


to th
were
from i
n hisl
in h
little
dish i


tl women
t> tempt
coli red be
middle of
y rumina
patient-e
bent ()n m
the outski
old inn,
in the ba<


e


market place in


narre
all w,


down
is mi\
brow
ars.
with
the
ads,
the sq
ring
yed
takin
rts o
l)but


iw C
alks
ng r'
iS.
n d(
\Vi
thei
pas
rich
luar
goat
OXC2 I
m g a i
f th
1 lo


ground d,


the star of hope. Within
bud of straw, lay the Chris
dling clothes, while bef

the center of


picturesque gingh
Farther on, an
shoulders were b
disfiguring goiter
vainly trying to
*

dress
, with
with
going
i S1om


which she displayed in tray


bandana.


rbadi
ght (
her
mall
ap.


anl, wnost
if a largt
chin, wa,
tomato,
Near her


oblhledI streets, thronged
of ile, friom the arrogant
ibes of silk, to the fawn-
()n the outskirts stood
mkevs laden with queer-
thin sat rows of patient,
r wares-spread in dis-
ser-b)y -uscious fruits,
draperies, and sandals.
e stood the motley array
:s, kneeling camels, and
, near which stood the
o )d trade.
e little village, stood a
oked beyond it to the
, radiant in the light of
, in a lowly manger om a
t Child, wrapped in swad-
him knelt in adoration


Joseph and the Virgin Mary.
I turned away, greatly impressed by this ex-
pression of love and faith of the comnmunicants of
Santo I)omingo. Not only had they given but
they had shared.

A C()RNFER ()F Illl 1' MARKET PLACE.
lt'/en .tbe nd foth '5.

n the background a number of American house-
wives were haggling over the price of a few bunch-
es of greens with a Martinique woman in her


and red
ered Bai
the wei
beneath
e few S
s in her I








5o THE


CARIBBEAN.


were viewing the many sized oranges neatly dis-


on breast and cap;


big brown basket overflowing


And at one side, bedrag-


gled but still lively American sailors were buying
great hands of bananas, as well as monkeys, par-
rots, parrakeets, and various other pets, all des-


tined,


the purchasers


hoped,


to become


ship's


mascots some day.

A TRIBUTE TO A MOTHER-INSPIRED
BY A CHRISTMAS AWAY FROM HOME.
Katherine Fischer, '25.
Dearest Mother:
Christmas is almost here, the first I have ever


spent without you.


Never until now have I fully


realized and appreciated all that you have done
for us. I shall miss your cakes and candy, the
Christmas dinner, and the bustle and excitement


of it all.


But more than these, I shall miss you.


I shall miss the light that shines in your eyes, ten-
der and beautiful, when you look at us, happy and


merry;


vour joyous participation in our delight


at our gifts;


the glad, mysterious note that just


will be heard in your voice, when you softly open
the bedroom door, and wake us with a kiss, and,


"A Merry Christmas;


" the happy girlish lilt that


rings, when you call us to see the tree first lighted;
the dreamy, far-away, patient expression in your
eyes, when, after tired baby eyes are tightly closed,
your ever-willing hand puts away with gentle care


childish


delights;


the tender,


loving


look that


accompanies each kiss bestowed on sleeping ones.
These are mostly Christmas specials, but I have
not forgotten the charming note that you supply
at all our parties, whether formal or informal,


special or


lust ordinary;


your jolly, low-toned


laugh-centered in your twinkling eyes and always


ready to bubble up;
your justness; and


your ever-ready sympathy;
rour tender never-dying love.


I thank you, mother, for all these things:


tenderness, sympathy, and


kindness;


confidence and help that you have given us.


Your
the
And


may I, as day by day, the years slip by, show more


fully by my
work for us.


life my appreciation of you and your
Your loving daughter,
Katherine.
THE CANDY MAN.


with sweets for clamoring school children-that
is the candy man at the Lincoln House.
A TRAGEDY.
Ruth E. Hopkins, '25.
It was with shiny face and slick hair that Jim-
my emerged from the bedroom, followed, of course,


by Rex.


The little terrier was his best pal and


constant companion.


In happiness, Rex leaped


about him and yelped his congratulations; in sor-
row, he wagged his tail and licked away his mas-
ter s tears.


"Here are the list and the money,


mother.


"Now


the crossings,


run along!


said Jimmy s


But be careful


" she warned him as she slipped a


note and some change into his pocket.


"Here


Here Rex!"


he dashed for the front doo
ready bounding after him.


Jimmy shouted as
ir. But Rex was al-
Now they raced pell-


mell down the street, each trying to outrun the


other.


At the end of several blocks, Jimmy halted


a minute to get a fresh breath;
waited with him.


Hoping


to surprise


the dog,


courteously, Rex


Jimmy


dashed


across the street-just in front of a big car that


slid around the corner.


Laughing with the thrill


of his escape, he turned, the call to


his lips


and his


features


Rex dead on


convulsed


tragic grief, for Rex was crumpled under the car.


With


tears streaming down his cheeks, Jimmy


rushed to the dog; tenderly he gathered the
shapeless heap in his arms, and sobbing over the
limp body, he trudged homeward.
ONE OF LIFE'S LITTLE TRAGEDIES-OR
COMEDIES?
Helen Abendroth, '25.


Jimmie was playing sick!


He was comfortably


reclining on his big cosy bed reading a Boy-Scout


Manual.


He was glad his ruse about not feeling


well had worked so easily.


He knew his mother


was deeply concerned about his health.


At least


it was better to be at home in bed than to be in
school puzzling over arithmetic and English.


He had


just seen the heroic scouts thwart a


villainous plot to destroy the Panama Canal,when


played for their benefit.








THE CARIBBEAN.


"What,


boys ?


No school


to-day


Teacher


easy matter to open his book to look up


those


That's


too bad!


No, Jimmie


can t


questions.


He determined


that after


fishing;


he's sick abed.


Just a touch of stomach


he would study them until he knew them, thus


trouble, I guess.
Jimmie groaned, and this time it was no ruse to


fool mother,


but a genuine sickness which had


settled upon him!


stilling his conscience.


He told himself that this


would not be the same as cheating, and still it
would keep him an E student in the eyes of his


teachers and classmates.


But the teacher, con-


THE COMING OF1 NIGH T.


ing to close a window, saw his opened book.


TIhus


n trying to preserve his reputation he ruined it.


Hubert Lee,


The night was coming on


* * TIhe


THE PAPER BOY-'"STA' EEN


oblique


YERAI.'."


D)orothy Deibert,


rays of the sun could not penetrate the dark andl


heavy


clouds


were


tentacles across the sky.


was damp;


spreading their ugly
The air was moist, it


the gloomy veil approached, gradually


thickening the atmosphere;


serted;


darkness


was


the street


embracing


the houses, and every little corner.


was de-
streets,


At one of the


doors, huddled into the smallest possible space, was
a haggard old woman, dressed in black, with her
head and face hidden bv a scarf of the same ill-


omened color.
was coming on.


be seen;


She gave a groan, for the night
* * The sky could no longer


the air was now fog.


* * The woman


gave a mournful groan, for the night was coming
on. * The street was becoming wet, sloppy,
muddy, for a disgusting little drizzle had begun to
fall; the corner lamp was lighted; but for what?
Its rays could not penetrate that thick, floating,


blanket of water.


The woman moved a bit and


Vaiting at the door for his five cents stood the


little paper bov.


\ ith one hand he held his news-


papers, while with the other he removed his cap,


displaying a mop of dark, curly hair.
was tattered, buttonless, and soiled;


were much too large for him.
were mud stained and dirtv.


into his little


His shirt


his trousers


His little bare feet
But when we looked


brown face, the expression in


deep, pathetic eves went straight to our hearts andi
we smiled, and as he turned to go, we saw a timid,


flashing grin flung back at us.


Then he put on


his dirty sailor cap and whistled on his way.


A BANANA


Ruth E.


WOMAN.


HIopkins, '2.


It was late at night, and the banana business


had all but expired.
box, among others


On a grimy old Nestl6 milk


of her


kind, sat


a banana


dropped her head a little lower, for the night was


woman, lost in slumber.


From under a tattered,


nearly


A well-dressed man came;


yellow straw hat, pulled low to


shield


her eves
V


put his hand on the knob of the door; and, think-
ing these wretched remains of life to be a stray dog,


from the street light, protruded the end of a burnt-


out cigar.


Below the hat, a wrinkled black neck


he mercilessly kicked it.


Through the darkness


was lost in a stifflv-starched


white blouse.


could
form;


be seen the collapse of


a last mournful


groan


a dark indefinite


was heard.


inch or so above the ground, two huge black shoes


* * dangled


moun tainous


white skirt.


And now, the night was on.


greasy brown tray, empty but for a few soured
bananas, told that business had been good, and


"HONESTY IS THE BEST POLICY."


that her dreams


were happy ones.


A Fable which might be true.


Rtth E. lHopkins,


Once a school bov, who had always earned very
good marks, returned from being absent to find


that there was to be a history test that day.


When


"Mi pollera, m


jovful


-. l


MI POILLERA.
O/ga .-,ci a, -.
{Sr illistrat ion Ipol :i3.)
i pollera, mi pollera


es colorada


y sang the pretty girls dressed in pollera,








52 THE CARIBBEAN.


The tom-tom of the tambor accompanied by


that's the way to do 5t.


Now we'll


start over


the vivacious tonadas,


the merry


coquettish and graceful dance of
the picturesque pollera with the


tembleques,
version. G


meant


ypsies, Arabs,


laughter, the
the tamborito,


again.


Come, help me build the wall.


What child's talk is this?


tinkling of the


happiness,


and di-


Colombines and Pier-


rots, Chinese, Japanese geishas, clowns, all looked
on and applauded, but no one was more quaint
and charming than the stately, gracious pollera-
clad damsels with their wide lacy skirts and their
lovely antique jewelry.


PARLOR TRICKS.


Helen


Abendroth,


Characters:


childish playing?
or is't Carthage?
thou have?


Bai. (disgustedly).
denser than
(Enter Anthony)


Build walls?


thou not passed thy days of
Wilt build a wall 'round Rome,


Speak man!


Well,


What


some


would'st


people


Cleo. (hastily jumping up). Enough of
In yonder distant door my Romeo awaits.
away to keep him company.
(Exit Cleopatra and Anthony).
Babbit wearily picks up tiles and puts


away.


Cleopatra, Anthony, and Babbit.
Place. The Main Street Country Club.
Time. Afternoon.


them


Mumbling to himself, he gathers up his


set and slumps dejectedly offstage.
Curtain.


Situation.

Babbit.


Babbit is teaching Cleopatra to play


Mah Jongg.
No! No!


All wrong again!


Take up


a tile first, then discard one.


And don't forget


not to dog your hand if you want to get


a good


About


"Oranges,


once


a week


a voice


saying,


and going to the back door I see an


score, old


man


in faded-blue patched


trousers


Cleo. Dog my hand?
ing of beasts?


(exasperated).


get the drift! I
Use vour brains.


serious.


Hast thou been speak-


Gosh,


woman, you never


mean, make use of your head.
Play with some technic. Be


Be-- (stops for lack of breath).


once white shirt, with his small straw hat tipped
to the back of his grizzled head. Nature didn't
provide him with shoes, so he travels around to
the different houses barefooted. On his back is
a large brown bag filled with oranges. Sometimes


he brings papayas.


His bleared brown eves look


(puzzled).


Drift


I am Egypt's queen" what m
Bab. (desperately patient).


Head? Technic?


eanest thou?


Listen, sweet one,


up to mine, and his face creases into many tiny
wrinkles when he asks, "Want something to-day?"


But when I


"No, nothing to-day,


" he still


in order to get a pung--(explains at great length,
the while Cleopatra keeps watching the doors,
and nodding absently at her instructor). Well,


smiles and goes pottering down the steps to the
next house, his back bent with the weight of the
fruit.


OLD PANAMA.


H. Thrift,


Beneath the southern


cross there stands


At times


cavaliers did ride


Along those streets no


A silent city wrapped in gloom;
Below it roll the ivory sands;


Behind


walls great trees do loom.


w wrapt min vine;


The ring of sword and stately stride-
All conquered easily by time.


And now its walls are crumbling stone;
Their glory long has passed away;
The wind now passes with a moan:


For Morgan came to that gay strand-
A pirate he both stern and strong-
The soldiers fought but could not stand,


f *tI


itr cepme n t:av.


o defeat them took not long.


H'ORANGES!
Ruth Duey, '25.


"l*nofii v morf*










THE CARIBBIKAN.


S

yJohn Ornhea", "a'.


(;-/is


Hlt'n .+Jbndrath, J"j


8000
e FIce 1

scores
or til
Bec u
dccudk

ina a)
But ho
+ver h


problemils

SStW'CC tS,
ec sake o0
se Our tec
dlv in thi
It first gi
Itk init) it
1IS lieel Ill


N eini*10 rc\t b0ok


'ri ngS oil
.e team t
and the
the gai
ltns this
e Iltter r
laiice, St'
more tl
iarkeC Ih


spirit shown in all h eticttis;


Ill n oc0 ,


ni crest


rthlough in tried;


Im)st id


OUt1 g:illl

e his lieS
Sthe rcst
',ults iare
In ereste
r t< the
every sc
v,)rk e I


hhnk they can't


cv can


vt. Ait uIts
t. : fl v, >u4


,t the whole s
furtherinlg athi
ec groups tli:
, the athletes,
; the second,
lal:,v, went on


and the third, those that know


tr pla, wenit out Ad yei Cled


IS Jis
is will


all pli
.dt eall

year

,e its
ih i


fijn irt
en het
one rt
and
sa me
great I
encce
xpect


am, nt
Icr, tor



talinels


(ZI st> !
to 5CC I


atbletit .


)ecemler IJ. (
wihitts accuston
round ot thle sC
played off to-day.
December 14.


champion,
feared John


round.
ing, coun

out the
Kuink ai
had not I
eliminate
H 6, amd
Oirdway,
danger,
)Ordw.x v


Is seasollopenied
when the first
)IFIramellct Was


red Son


retadwe
Ordw


So Ilneml l1


service


held his lead
6-4, 6-4.
CRISIS
IVWO


January
Interschol;


day wh,
~eitli ci,
Beach .
played
tday auld
quickly,
against
fliItch :
piave
nfl ,t I


en the Balb
shed with
court. All
in the hottr
I the player
. Fred Son
James \\
ld wonf 1i st
;t asedv


nil W


h tle lower i
.gamie, deft
on > e, 6 o
sy for ()rdw
toin i aI s
b! f 2, 6
Il was ievt
h set he br<
ill thle firs


throughout.


T he
CS X%;IS


0o:1 ligh
11our bOys
of these
est part
s seemed
,neman t<
oodruti
rightt se
g.ime fn


hr

Ih
ih


st of the
layed to-
ool teilnlis
thle Cohm
ches were
very hot
ire rather
the court
the first
\\oodrutf
the back


1 5
*
911 *htst?"Ine'sact


at every op
result was
6> 4, 6 +
The next
( )rdwvIy am
winning aft
which w.ts
started fast


Arno ld, i
steady
tip a lead
by play


ncl alli, last |ut
s title when saine
n tile tinial ran
ci the feiectr
11 )1 110 0' w a y
rouflds with- onlyt
eating Iboth b|egi
. The road tle
:ay who had w
core 0f i (,|
o. Against w'lil
r Ill SeriOLS like
oke through scout
t gallIC antd \\'itl
lie won at ()rdl


. Iromni then on, thie tion) for C(ristobal
doubt. lie won at not work well tog
drawn out of piS


t match was between Ioin adv
id I-'rank Arnold, the former set
er a protracted ,i-set mIatchi sul
full of surpri'ses. ()rdway wor
and won the first set at 6 2, strar


St


I[his had


le
Ca
t
t


good ni:a Ft
score lip to
9 7. ThesC
A special
t he doubles,
substituted
taini coinsi&
lone lbecau i
played off
doubles foll<
players wer


T< F i0 91strt


nothing da'
game and
ot 4" I ali
ilg hard,
tile set a
Its toll iII
perceptib
ly, seemed
er the COU
ers, TIhe
+cont aln


ad of _< 2
it staring
harder an
he desired
close cal


unt
, nil
1 th
pull
t 4
the
lyx
tir

thit,
thi
d


d stormed
effect and
Is, lie hrou


d finally won
4,4 6, 9 p.
was made c
v: One plax e


another if his
it necessary.
I the matches
Ie morning, a
the singles, andu
t logical choi
thought that
crs could rest


,1 nt* 71 n 1'-f


the
Bui
wa)
5 4
am!


anFiage
\x


at 6
stilfute
k of o
ited its
third
rters.
Sand
; but
I the B


of this


thle set


1incerlln g
Filirht be


really clap-
This was
had to bel
id, ats the
thesingles
ct for the
with this,
while the


The lant
her, bemn
ion; the


difMlcul


In the
for EgULe


)rdwav and
elf when the
set, Arm
This was a
Son neman
Son lneman
alboa bovs


the next
score: 6


pair couid
repeatedly
>rmer took


rv and
5Xt SCt


Sonnem
V won at
>ld subs
)tJ 5111)S
very las
securing
d dropped
jumped i


for thile m


won H
Orldw:
hlie tea
demoF
. F''
Uted ft
et, ()r
lead <
s servi'
iu11(i \V(


watch. 1in al


BASEBAILL.I


FORT PI t


Ll sI,' -S DEF


January 17, 1925. "1
as it did as our first g
called unsuccessful.
was featured by error
alter the sixth innini
confidence and played
every body, even the
that DIe lxesseps will n
time.
()nI the mound "Bill
eI a fine uphill game;
support from the iniiel
have a look in. The
I)e I.esseps.
Merril, p.
Sixberry, c.
Hallifielh, ib.
Roman, 2b.
Iti, ) H t .; 1 ]


EAiS C. H
.his gain
ame, can
Although
s and wi
g, our b<>
d a fine
spectator
ot have a


. 14 S.
coming
trdly be
he game
throws,
Gained
mile and
is sure
ow FeXt


y" Mcnt1 re pitch-
just give him more
d and Balboa won't
line-up:
C. H. S.
McIntyre, p.
Brown, c.
Klunk, it.
\V'il, 2b.
(it^+'v h


Ourch iand


tes there


spirit but with dihterent results,
Joh. n Q.wdiay,


ed, played his
i the next set,
ien 2. ()rd-
led up to 4 ,
6. The sun
third set and
slower. ()rd-
ed while Am-
making some
rd set started
Arnoli again
s own service.
in tle face.


BAL IDEIEA IS
MATCHEs TO


BAI .BO)
ONF.


inst Tild"FT #
"
(17 1>


1
II


t


n% O r^t v ar t

and that t


dollllmmJt


Si







54 THE CARIBBEAN.









THE


CARIIIBE:AN.


BALBOA WINS


January


FIRSI'TGAME


24, 1925.


of the


series


FROMCRISIOBAl.,


Balboa won the first


to-dav


when they


ted with the lonhmg end of


after to10 exciting


scheduled 7-11
Mclntvre
His pitching


nuing
again


innings


a 4-3


Two-base hits--Mclntvre and Ordway.


Satcritici
)bases


hits-Burgoon, (;rider.


Burmxom


\V, Coffev.


Sto leni


Clement ., .'iwalt,


EIarned runs


of their off Mcintyre I.


game.
starred for Cristobail.


was excellent,


support did more than he could undo,


and though pitchers,


as a rule,


are poor


hitters, he made three hits out of ftouir trips
to the plate and two of our three runs.


enemy


scored


one run in the first
down


and another in the fourth when


Klunk, thinking three


the ball into


were out, rolled


the field and


star


the dugout, while Burgoon, who
third, came home.
Our boys took the offensive


seventh and tied the


singled,


was sacrified to


home on the Texas
who, in turn, scored
Although Balboa
Mclntvre clouted


1t d o


was on


Intyre 13,


Off Blurgoon 2.


IuHnninw boadjunp.

*. Sulli.vm, BI I S.
2. igtgleston, C. I I. S.
,. llutchins. B II S.


Struck out -1\


I v Burgeon


Bascs


higih ju p.


ballls-off Burgoon 3.


!. Clnemens,


DEFEAr.


Ja Inuary
win from
verily I
nu lmerous


31,192 .


Really ,


we lost


l1e errors,
tor good


morale of the


that every
outfield it


Ilallhoa didn't


to B.ilboa.
in all, w
living and
team. It t


II. S,. (c


C. t.


(recni


ere too
i broke
seemed


time a ball was lifted to the


was


a hit, and


can't all be blamed on tlhe out fiel
the infield contributed a resc


share


in the
From


core when Coffey
second, and came


leaguer


of Mclntvre,


on Ordwav s


scored


double.


in the ninth,


the sphere


for two


and came home when Burgoon,


to catch him off the


threw


But, when they repeated in the
we didn't have the punch to send


another, and


game.
Although there


errors,


still the


whole, and
the errors.


we dropped the


last S


Th,1
I h
every
Uaturdt


a respect;


e game was a (Iisappo
angle and particularly


ay


s performance.


On the slab Mclnty
soon was so discoura
(or lack of it) that he


Klunk


re start


discouraged


ed well. but


ed byv his
seemed t<


support
lose his


came to his relief in the fifth


inning but could not


advance.


urgoon,


in fine form, vielding


entirely


Balboa


check the


stwirler,


on lY 4 hits.


while the Pacific-siders slashed out


WaS


leWan-
a 14 to


4 victory.


BALBOA


4"- -.


February 14, 1925. We suffered another


defeat


TRACK.


was a liberal st
earn was better


over-anxiety
With a little


seemed


upply


ply of
on the
to cause


more experience,


they should round into shape.


The box


score:


Balboa.


AB. R. H.


E o
2 0


March 7,
material a


great


1925.


TI rack opened


and small hope of


credit should


be given


groupofboyswho went out and gave


at the hands of


when Balboa


with little, to-da


made


not enough


copped


The races were


a brave stand,
swimmers


enter one or two


men


our ancient


swImmin llI


very good a
but there


t rivals
ig meet
and our
re were


and we could only


in each


best in order that the old fight could be Klunk of Cristobal showed


shown, and that it might be


Is never


times


entered


proved


again


was also high point


scorer,


event.


fine form and
"leading the


beaten although at pool


The


summaries


are:


I. C lemons,


B. II. S


B. II.


I 3
^i ) i


. intere, C. II.
3. Burgoon, B. I


Stanziola, c... .


TIhev lost <;;-


0 I1


5o-vard


while Eggleston


su mmaries


5o-yard dash.


earned 6 for


- .-37


4 9


AB. R. HI. E.


2. Golden,


\\W. Coffe tt, ss
O> eyl SSI ,-ti^-


toon-ard


2 0 0


C. H. S.
Ir. H. S.
rry, B. HI. S.


dash.


sunIp


iWit), *:


*.. t


ver the defeat


because
ablc (?i)


iintment


so after


SWIMMING.

WINSS SWIMMING


success;


to) that small


40 2
4 0 0 0o
4 o o o1


tOO-vard


o 0


zzo-vard


I
I


4. -i/., ,, t-p f .


to cause


*^ *^ .


- i ^>'


I


9
a


r *









THE CARIBBEAN.


So-yard back-stroke.
I. Hutchins, B. H. S.
2. Klunk, C. H. S.


3. Granberry,


B. H.


The Freshie-Sophs thought this was and kept up the pace until the last whistle
too easy, so another league was formed, blew. The score was 75-4 with Balboa
This time the pupils from Fort Randolph holding the 75. The line ups:
and Cristobal invited the invasions of


those from Fort Davis and Gatun, the


so-yard breast-stroke.
1. Allen, B. H. S.
2. Hutchings, B. H. S


3. J. Coffey,


C. H. S.


Fancy dice.
1. B. Coffey, C. H. S.
2. Allen, B. H. S.
3. Hutchins, B. H. S.


120o-yard relay.
i. B. H. S. (Hutchins, Allen, Granberry,
Golden).


2. C. H. S. (B. Coffey,


Klunk, Taylor,


J. Coffey).

BASKET BALL.


Knowing that there


were several


basket ball players in the school, a


games w


as arranged between the jun-


iors and seniors on one side and the fresh-
men and sophomores on the other.
In the first game the underclassmen
spilled the dope by beating the upper-


classmen


12-8.


victory, outplaying


all around.


They deserved


the upperclassmen


For the underclassmen, \Will


seemed to know best where the basket


while for the


upperclassmen McIn-'


tyre starred.
The line-ups:


FRESHMEN-
SOPHOMOREs.
Will, f.
Raymond, f.
Lucas, c.
Booth, g.
(Grider, g.
Lee, f.

In the second game


demonstrated


by 14-8.


showed up well for
The line-ups were:


FRESHMEN
SOPHOMORES.


Will, f.
Raymond, f.


UNIOR-
SENIORS.
Pulgar, f.
Johnson, f
Mclntyre, f.
Eggleston, c.
Moore, g.
Cousins, g.


the Freshie-Sophs


CRISTOBAL


latter winning three well-played games. McIntyre, f.
In the first game Gatun came from be- Pulgar, f.
hind after trailing, 16-2 at the end of the Will, f.


first half.


In a magnificent finish they


Eggleston,


took 20 points in the last frame and had a Booth,


slight edge on Cristobal when the final
whistle blew.
The second game was neck-and-neck,
until Gatun nosed out at 20-16.
The third also went to Gatun. This


time


they clearly


superiority and
The line-ups

I GATUN-DAVIS.


won at


demonstrated


28-I5.


were:


CRISTOBAL-


RANDOLPH.


Mclntyre, f.
Moore, f.
Pulgar, f.
Van Scotter,
Lucas, c.
Grider, g.
Cousins, g.


BALBOA


ay 16. Again


Raymond, f.
Eggleston, f.,
Will, f.
Booth, g., c.
Owens, g.
Barrows, g.


WINS 27-18.


we met defeat but


met it with our heads up and our chests
forward and with a spirit and courage


that fought


to the last.


are not


ashamed of it; we played, and


and the better team won.
Balboa played on a strange floor but
they got off their passwork well and


showed fine teamwork.


We played hard


and in the last half several times reached
a point but one marker behind Balboa,
but the latter, showing that true quality
of genius, ran up the score most when


pressed the hardest.

CRISTOBAL


their superiority, Pulgar, I.f.


ucas


and Grider Raymond, r. f.


victors.


J JUNIORS
SENIORs.


Mclntyre, f.
Pulgar, f.


Eggleston, c.
Mclntyre, c.
Grider, 1. g.
Booth, r. g.
Cousins, r. g.


May 29. Again


The line ups:

BALBOA
Jones, r. F.
Woodruff, r. f.
Anastaciado, 1. f.
Clements, c.
Burgoon, r. g.
Holzapfel, 1. g.
Trowbridge, 1. g.


we met


defeat;


Grider, g.
Cousins, !


BALBOA


Clements, f.
Anastaciado,
Jones, f.
Woodruff, F.
Sullivan, c.
Burgoon, g.
Knabenshue,
Holzapfel, g.


itrt '


Girls athletics this year seem to have
been of less importance than ever before.
The girls showed a lack of interest, which


was


increased


tenfold


by the lack of


proper equipment, and the difficulty of


getting


together for practices.


even


in the face of so many discouragements,


they managed


to play off their inter-


scholastic meets in tennis and basket ball


in a way


in which much credit is due them


for their sportsmanlike behavior.

BASKET BALL.


On February


7, 1925, the first basket


ball game of the season was played on the


Balboa floor.


Although our


never had a practice when all w


girls had
ere present,


lost; they showed excellent spirit, and after a


furious


game went down to a glorious


defeat, the score being 12 to
Balboa.


6 in favor of


February 21, 1925, saw a return


played on the Cristobal floor.


game


This time


none of the regular players participated.


to the absence


of our


two fo


awards,


a general shake-up of positions ensued,
and the end came quickly to the tune of
12 to I in favor of the opposing team.
On March 21, 1925, our girls again
journeyed to Balboa to play the deciding


- .. t I I t I II *


was,


again
winning


lthletics .









THE


CARIBBEAN.


through the good work of our girls in the to three all.


face of


we were able to


them down in the last half.


to Balboa, mak


However, ft ines Cristoba


Then a deuce
king the score 4
I evened it up,


gilame


wenit both singles


I Tlrcue regards


and twice


postpone hirther


and doubles


tcmiins,


play until


were evtn ais


ws idecidedI


sometime in


our rally came too late, and the final


whistle showed


in Balboa


a score of


I to 3, again


'" favor,


we had formerly agreed that the


best three out of five


termine thle
close of an in
too oneC-slded


WIiiner,


rcretnmg,


gLamles


Blalloa


score U --
playing
storming


were to de- nliiniaged


IIS gniec
though al


marched


ldhllba. As t
heat ofat the da
I
gratultrrcd on
Form or god I


of tin, thc


won in deuce


Then, with


back, an
the net,


to claim the


al [is.


The the
lIooth O


Abendroth I


this invincile "


sr1 Pre


saw the $-4.


together


S<,son.


In thcse doubles,
A -in M.Inn for her


pl iying,


TENNIS.


On April
over to the


us in a practice
The doubles,


2, three Balbo. girls


hd side
tennlS


consisting


c;mnc


to comperefC with
touirn Imeil .


)


and Peggy Price of Balboa


vieve Booth
Cristobal, w


start the games


f Alma
versus


and Helen Abendroth of


ere played first.


seemed


Irom the


to be in favor


the Balboa team; nevertheless,


kept them down, and


strong
of the


when the
visitors.


In the second


set ended


our girls


were still going
%%er II!


6 4 in


set with the


our girls rallied and brought


favor


3 -0,


a;nt PeggyI\


much crod
eXCeL Ct 1
Sexcrle ft
Prike to~r h<


is dh
IS it l


black line
*r steady


a ai nst


his match took place in the
v, neither girl could be con-


display


playing.


score being


to have sapped all


next,


Blyv


score up tired,


opponent,


this time
due to t


near hiturre.
)n Saurbix,


most before
up, the set


Sthe match!
Next car
ceiving the


Ruth


I)


here, there, and


ser seemed*


the whole


of her strength, for in which


was casilv


def teat


ed by her


glIlames


all the girls v
he excessive


wC ere un
heat.


usually


n nts
Lames


so conlisUsd


that she easily
6 :! Victory


the honor


j, l9


ot HIII R i irls pai

vistir, in order to
begun eairliecr.


pIay offthc


reCils


T his lifme %lchter (ondhhirini


;inul conseqlntl


pair


Vay n ,


team Ii


ic V


ot ( istubiil.


in tie .ce ot if the bl)IIlhant


:i V.


and ratrtedJ


took the


matches


bI } dOti Stead


;l Spedt


1 ;ullL


theirs!


each Iplayer ,


of her


support


r representative,


everywhere,


her oppto


set.


And thus


THE COMING


OF NIGHT.


ASIIOR 1K AT


NIHIT.


Kathe'rine Fisctr, '.2 .


Kathcrine


F is hrr,


Beyond the


sea wall,


Red stained by the sun,
The sea, like a piece of


Crumpled
Blue and


Out where the


satin, lay


gray.


waves


The blue-gray changed to white.

Each wave was tipped-


Now red. now


And raced


gold-


P rom tne great piers
Ghost-like hulks,
The fellow lights are
In a path
Straight to the shore,


Where the


waves


Rising,
Ebbinzg-
\Vith incessant


Where the


to greet


waves


er the coral


And dash


gray,


The sky


Across


west


sunset


rPv of


were


Pass down


In ever-changing,


darkness,


star or


serL


to rest.


(,cnevieve


d Helen


set hith the


same1


us aort her


In the singles, Ruth I)


Mere m)ore
the dlouid
TIC l0a ;


~l SOI'I ihi~
Wier" soon umef
, cliar: c te itled
kept up their


\ell a i po lIili of our
H eI Martn of


CXtsi()ord in trv


I T s


S rst set went quickly o Belle
T'he first set wcnt quinkly to) Belle


our girls


ended,
Victory


gCe w:rmeitd


end of


Slhowever, winning the first


mc the singles,


ardent
uICv, 0i1


court with long,


storrinng


otl Crstobal Iigh


School


was


foam o'er the reef


cammrg


Coming of the night.
Ladows falling soft and


are hurtling-


r(o) ar;


foilm


eyes


agamSt


*


tavorable
17if( hcs


I


k 1 J


and as upheld








THE CARIBBEAN.


Anniel 1eim, '25.


OCTOBER.


Nov. 14. Supper Club.


Seniors hostesses.


Oct. i. Cristobal


record


attendance and


School


opens


two new teachers,


Rauner and Mr. Benson.
Oct. 2-12. Organization of the different classes
and election of officers.
Oct. 13. Painted faces and a row of bald heads
bear evidence to the important event of freshman
initiation.
Oct. 17. First meeting of Supper Club girls at


Y. W.C.A.


The old members entertain the new


Nov. 18. First meeting of the upper class boys'
club, "Upsilon Gamma Gamma" is held to-day.
Oracle.-William Cousins.
Scribe.-Wallace Johnson.
Nov. 18-24. Hard rains remind us of the severity
of those of last year.


Nov. 21.


The boys


and girls'


athletic associa-


tions are organized with James Van Scotter and
Ruth Duey as presidents.


27-28.


Thanksgiving holidays!


ones at a jolly little gathering enjoyed by all. We
are again delighted with Miss Dodds's readings.
The election of new officers takes place:
President.-Ruth Hopkins.
Vice President.-Harriet Steenberg.


Secretary.-Gay


Turner.


Treasurer.-Teresa Gallagher.
Oct. 24. Election of staff officers is held at noon
hour.
Senior Class gives an automobile party at the


Y. W. C. A.
tires taste?


How did the axle grease,


DECEMBER.


5. Supper Club.


refreshments.
Dec. 12. Ju
ic Temple.
beautiful bli


Sophomores furnishing


mior party held on the roof of Mason-


Doesn't


fishing


Dorothy


bride ?


Vaughn
I what


make


think of Santa Claus? The presence of represen-
tatives of all classes from '18 on, except that of '21,
reminds us of old times.


Dec. 19. Christmas holidays
versal joy.


begin


NOVEMBER.


Dec. 22.


The senior rings have finally arrived.


i. New seats both in the front and back


of the assembly greet us this morning.
of growth!


Nov. 4. Hurrah for Coolidge!!


Evidence


In a straw vote


for president held at C. H. S. he is elected by a
majority of eight votes.
Nov. 6. Members of the Senior Class are now


granted their well-earned privileges.


ri


Everyone hurries to Ruth's house to obtain his
ring.


All back


JANUARY.
in school


again


stories of how good Santa has been.
Tan. 6. A teacher and his wife from


with many


Buenos


Aires visit Cristobal High School and entertain
the American history class with a very interesting


mi ~ rv C* F 4


* *








THE CARIBBEAN.


16. Staff meeting is held at


Abendroth's house.


Jan. 21.


Miss Helen


Everyone has a jolly


The high school andi the seventh and


March 10. Short story contest begins.
holy plans to win the first prize!


March


13-15.


Every-


Girls'


eighth grades visit Zane Gray's yacht, T/e'Fisher-
man. Commander Jacobs extends us the courtesy
of the Rotman.


and sleepless nights.
fine waiters.


March


The high school


Representative


bovs make


McSweeny


Mr. Arandla from the I.


S.


talks to the social problems class on


S.Savannah
his reasons


Ohio inspires us to-day in one
heard in C. H. S.


of the


best talks


for believing that his native land, the Philippines,
should be independent.
Jan. 24. Two officers from a Peruvian battle-
ship visit Cristobal High School to-day.
Jan. 30. A staff meeting is held at the home of
the Misses Harriet and Clarice Steenberg. Miss


March


26. Wallace


Johnson,


leaving


States, resigns his position on the staff an


for the


Law-


rence Callaway is elected to his place.
Begin practice on the operetta.
March 28. Social problems class visits Gamboa,
Corozal, Palo Seco, and other places of interest.


Pauline
us to-da


Fraas, a missionary from
y and tells exciting tales


Africa,


visits


of two-dollar


gasoline, Fords, native chauffeurs, and writing an
unwritten language.


April


A full day.


APRIL.


An auction is held to sell


the left-overs from the fair.


FEBRUARY.


Feb. 7. The Upsilon Gamma Gamma entertain
their girl friends and the teachers at a wiener roast.
Feb. 9-13. Examination week!
Feb. 13. The Supper Club entertain the boys
at a box social at the Y. W. C. A.
Feb. 16. Again we start on the routine of regu-
lar school work.


Feb. 18. DI)orothv Deibert,


States, and Hubert I
the staff.


21-24.


Colon


freshman as queen.


'25, leaves for the


ee is elected to her place on


Carnival!
Mi Pollera!


with a


C. H. S.


Mi Pollera!


M ARCH.


Sophomore class gives


us a glimpse


talent when they act out two scenes of "The Tale


of Two Cities.


The freshmen give a party at the


Y. W. C. A.


It's the best party of the year, Freshmen.


April 3-13.


Easter vacation


13. Short


Storyv


contest


ends.


many sure of prizes.


April 14. Advance sale tickets for
BEAN are distributed.


April 19. Miss Clarice
Class wins first prize in t


THE CARIB-


Steenberg of the Junior


short-story


contest.


Only one after all!
April 22. All the girls clamber to the top of the
desks when a huge centipede comes crawling down
the aisle of the assembly hall.


April 27.
r\ ?I1 L


The Boys


Athletic Association


gives


March 6.


The Sophomores entertain


an athletic exhibition at the Y. M. C. A


., closing


school at the


Y. W. C. A.


Think of


A real


with an


exciting


basket ball


game


betweenn


orchestra!


school boys and the Alumni.


March


Easter Fair!


Hot do.s and wild mi:n!


Soda pop and balloons!


Results of the Popularity Contest:


r. Staff meeting is held at the home of


Best looking-Elizabeth
Clinchard.


Warren


and William


Mr. William Cousins.


May 7-. The Supper Club girls give a farewell


Most


popular-Hildegarde


Blvthe


meeting in honor of Miss


Healy.


59


L'l, 1


MAY


Cimfercnce.







THE CARIBBEAN.


May 21. Over one hundred eighty (a record at-
tendance) are present at the Mothers' and Daugh-
ters' Banquet.


The Juniors entertain


the Seniors at


June 4. Dress Rehearsal is given at the Y.


"Daddy


Long Legs"


is presented at


the Gatun Clubhouse.


the annual


Junior-Senior


Banquet.


After


banquet the Seniors are welcomed with a delight-
ful program, the main event of which is a play,
"The Engaged Girl," in which Miss Clarice Steen-
berg and Mr. Maurice Eggleston take the leading
parts.


May 26-June 2.


The lights burning nightly in


June 6.


"Daddy


Long Legs


" is given at the


America Theatre.


June 12.


Flag Day exercises are held.


June 13. The High
"The Japanese Operetta


School


Chorus


presents


" at the Y. W.


Cristobal High School bear evidence of hard work
for the senior play.


June 15.


"The Japanese Operetta


" is given at


the Gatun Clubhouse.


Gatun Golf Links. Locks in the background.









CARl BIBAN.


, *- ^ *


The only


Wav We can k


in touch


with other


IT r" CARluI HL AS.


is through


a inspir)lation, anild
and to 1)c got)i Am
awav. [he cxcha
out to students sc
have attended, or


our cxchan


spur us


IrCs.


ev servec


on fto lttcr our lt Itials


erican cl tlt/sns


ngc editor


1Ol)


ver II


is kept


we arc far
v h1and1In


Wapref fh)m sch


Schools their frieninds now


as A very


wildly d


aIanicm1nCIit o
of ilt ulrations


ltres anr v'erv attrfacftivi.


good


fT' c


jokes would be


CveCped C


tcraryv


f it shIuld I be hecrterdc


L'r(utpfls


Ii adinj'iti


one miore step


tomardi


di'pirtmcnr
Tihe ltr "


number


oft the cIaSS
of a t'W I


>ertcct ron


I'he ITrad,,)nflt, BIsttn,


Ifan .


ARI B AN.


Our exchan


We are always happy


grows


wxhell o(lur


ger ea


old 1 f


I year.
arrive,


man a[ lc


are interestini.


cxtellelnt.


as well


as hiepful.


iImIICrous


It is .1 splendid


PC urce


paper.


and we welcome


all new


onies.


THE CARIBBEAN.
Your magazine
mented upon. A
your graduating c


of like nature rhiat


ITHE CARIURBEAN.
It is said that


is OI1 of thile finest


h it is issued


s, it surpasses
we receive.


nm any


0Co i-


t once a term by-
of the ni aga7ines
sure thit if we


hut rllis


rihg it nle


Ini proVCHeillt.


ainced departments


"there is ahva\s


will hav<
s Inailv


rooH MIr


I proventrile t


to go a loh r, nrig


pictures


and wr

make it an ideal publication.


She RI/ir or' i


didn't attend C
ing could keep
uir, Iatitons


urllts, ate
us fr),


re 'dint the CARIuuEAN,
hlie UIinI tr Cristobtl.


The (u'mris


hij{!th/v


ARIRBFAN.


ext'erpt


l visitors (
in unison):


from lintler;.


from other
t r is
Here IS


leW\ v ii It. vil 21~4e


side of the
the CARi!


rt)mni excljimn


HB AN


I'li (C.ARIBBEAN.


I lie pi
rIveness..


ctur sr
It is


ind stories no 0o
very well cited


ir paper add
and is : sp


to) ItS at trac-
Icld piecetC ot


work throughout.


The Red


'K dit or.,
jovotusly


from Cristohabl,


andu flack


Radi


RIKFLECTIONS.


Can al Zone."


Ex. Editor (e gerlyv :


"So it


I know you have somet


oiR R FI.IIXtFS


TO ) rE RNs.


ng novel to live US.
The aurr.


THE CA


RIBBEAN.


Your h


teriary


P'hiadelphia
department


Cathol/ic


IS very good.


are espe-


I have in my 1924 a number


of interesting


and edu-


ciailv interested


in vou becauseC


\ou have claimed our


national departments.
of Interest in Panama


'Education bv Travel


we consider


our best.


In these


Stewart.
been toA


iay his pep he


an Inspi


ration


to Vou Js it has


partmenrts


are definite


descriptions of the Canal, oft the


leper colonies,


and islands


near Cristobal, which I am


sure


The Pitnion.


i, engage your
Ex. Editor: "'


departments


yOu


attenCt)on.


appreciate


mlenti)oned,


your coming


we are fond oft


Besides the
your ['p-to-


A reallv live and exceeding


you because


you share the


touch with "States"'


Iv iterestin


g paper.


same struggles


schools though


\\e like


of keeping


so tar ;away.


Date Minute I)Dramas' too.


The Spertator,


THE CARIBBEAN.
We read every


word of your paper,


you are interested in


Johnsmown,


Though
as we are.


SO far away


The Broadcaster


The Stdtnt.
A. wel-arranged


would place


mI agal in.e


your magazine


An1 index


yond reproach.


iThe TridentL


covers


, Cmanl Zone,


shows


be tween


covers.


an interest
You are fineC


IS ot dsp-


i11 ever


I ITTT FTAT
'
R FC 71
*


Leofmardo,


la'aii.


T'HE CARIBBEAN,


C(>yinjknQ,


>/ztuckv.


lmore cuts


detai .


Th/e Aeip.


l*h; Schlool for


Itnihdnu.


Ocean Grt;r,


pointed


F


L
"
Wimp gg


lnm t lle unique








THE CARIBBEAN.


The Gleaner.


Pawtucket,


Your headings are clever.


We always enjoy


"The Tat-


Curtis Monthly.
A fine magazine.


Staten Island, N.
The department headings, "The


Post Office,


and the editorials deserve special mention.


The Academy Journal.
We enjoy reading
designs are attractive.
department.


the Academy


Journal.


Norwich, Conn.
Your cover


We should like to see an athletic


The Spectator.
We like the originality of your magazine.


tisming manager must


be an energetic person.


The Exhaust.
Your editorials


are good.


provement in the arrangement


You have


South Euclid, Ohio.
shown great im-


t of your magazine.


The Dalhi Journal. Dallas, Texas.
A fine literary department. Your magazine shows the
cooperation of the student body with the staff.


The Russ.
Your papers show that you
are very much alive.


The Red and Black.


A real, live-wire paper.
deserves special mention.
excellent.


San Diego,
have true school spirit


Tampa, Fla.
Your exchange department
Your literary department is


The Mirror.


We like your poetry-especially


"Simple


Syrup" is clever.


The Reflector.


Your editorials ought to be a source of inspiration to the


school.


Your headings are good.


The Monitor.


Wellesley Hills,


Mass.


The Cambridge


Review.


Your headings and cartoons are great.


Cambridge,


Mass.


We like the


Your literary department has greatly improved.
more cuts would be another step toward perfection.


A few


poem "Evening"


by Barbara C. Everett.


The Retina.


The Mirror.


Your Commencement
prophecy is clever.


Hasbrouck


Heights,


number is well arranged.


A well-arranged magazine.
are excellent.


Toledo, Ohio.
Your cover designs and cuts


Pebbles.


School of Commerce, Boston,


Mass.


A dandy


paper,


devoted


to school


Marshal/town,
activities.


Iowa.


A splendid


magazine.


We enj


oy your cartoons.


The Recorder.


High School/for


A peppy


paper.


Syracuse, N.
You have a fine literary department.


A worth-while


magazine.


You should be proud of the


"Poet's


Corner.


The Reflector.
Your exchanges


Leonardo,


are very


interesting.


We like


to see


The Broadcaster.


A. H. Shaw Jr.


High School,


Philadelphia.


your interest in athletics.


An interesting


magazine.


Your Student Council is a


worthy organization.


Vida E wcolar


Metodista.


Our Spanish students especially


enjoy


San Josi,
. But we


The Red and Black.


Boys' High


Your literary department and


School,


the editorials


Reading, Pa.
are excellent.


all interested


in you, especially because we


two years Hubert Lee, who


lent you for


now a member of our staff.


Johnstown, Pa.
Your adver-


Punxsatawney,
that of the Freshmen.


WVoburn, Mass.


The Tradesman.


The Torch.


West Philadelphia


b~i ". ..



at








TIlHE CARIBBIEAN.


Dorothy Deibert,


Hubert


One day while


was in imy office a


KEEN t


and I.AM BERT


because he ORDI) WAY


across


young fellow came to CAlI. AWAY


my steno.


the lake to-morrow.


He succeeded. I vowed a CHRISTIAN revenge
-none other than tocall him a moldv little CRUM.


I then took out mv KEY and locked mv


ICE chair to my desk, tor I am a


son, and, stepping


into a telephone


arranged to sign my WVIIL.


MALUR-


THRIFITv per-


BOOTH,


As I closed the door


on my good old office, I realized that I might not


Bert began to cry and the other son said, "You
will l)EI BERT if you don't stop that racket."
The SMITH went on playing hopscotch and I
began to dance with RUBIO. She asked me to
fasten her shoe and, while I was NEELIYng there,
she stepped on my hand and cut it. It Bl.EDSI)E
that I forgot all about the KEENE chap and my


see it again-until


next


day-and


could


steno.


And RUBIO) W\VALSTON.


All this while


hardly BARRETT, but I said,
CHARD to your resolution."


"William CLIN-


was saving


TURNER self around


FOOS-s-s-s


trvyinl


to LUCAS


I stepped out into the open air and 0 joy!


Now this is bad luck, so I took my hat and shoes,


BLISS!


It was spring!


The month of MAY had


climbed


over


the side of


my MACIN TYREd


just arrived after the passing of June.


TV FTS


JORDI)AN and climbed the HILL to the bottom


of DUEY


grass were peeping out


on MOOREF


and LEE, on BANKS and HILL.S, and, naturally,


where
some


went into a millinery store and bought


COFFEY,


a KALANDER,


and a lathe


out of the ground.


I hopped into my


JORI)AN


to TO1UION-all of


which an aSTT I E


young


and rolled serenely down the HIIL to the top on


lady sold me.


MACINTYREs


(Vacuum


guaranteed


stick to the road like glue) I passed a VINEYARD,


a rabbit


WARREN, the shops of a CI'RRIER


It is now eight p. m.
sprinkled the watershed.


I ate my breakfast and


U. AWSKMEY.


and a TAYLOR, and a MII4LER with two wheel-


BARROWS,


and at last


arrives


at the black-


SMITH's shop and found him BI.YTHEly
ing hopscotch with his family.


play-


Colonel!


(to rookie).-


next time I see you, I
tenant.


-"Well, young man,
hope you'll be a first


As I entered the shop, the cat, catty thing, said
F()S-s-s-s at me and began to mew quite loudly.
Now I shall tell you something about the SMITH.


Rookie (trying to be polite).
the same to you."


"Thank you sir,


He is a LONG chap and persists


BROWN


cap all


DI)AY


SHe lives


wearing a
a BARN-


Hardware Dealer (acting as host).
like to see the Gatun Locks?"


"Vould you


eve.







THE CARIBBEAN.


Miss O'Connell (entering class).-"Orderplease.


was absent-mindedlyv


menu of the Junior Senior Banquet).
chicken and (?)"

Aristocratic lady (seeing one of her ac


who was leaving a


pawn shop, and


reading the
-"Milk-fed


The following is the latest news given by our
papers:
Recently it stated that the ship of state was


slowly but surely ascending the hill;


:quaintances


who while


"That


powdering her nose, did not notice her).-


is disgraceful!
Companion.-


I shall never speak to her again.


"It was only a mistake.


It wasn't


that a room


was wanted to rent by a man with a bay window;
that a gold fountain pen had been lost by a student


half full;


and finally that the car that was guilty


of the accident was driven bv a man with an extra


long nose.


Can you beat it?


done purposely."
A. L.-"A mistake!


Bad manners, degrading


and degenerating is what I would call it.


Co p.--


"Forget it, it is only a misunderstand-


Father


(who had just had the engine stop while


riding with his family).
and get me a bendix."


Sam (at the


garage).


"Sam

"Say,


, go to the garage

have you got an


A. L.


"Do you call it misunderstanding when


appendix you can sell me?


a woman that pretends to be what she does, comes


out of


a pawn


powdering


nose


Jordan.-"Hey
nine medals?"


Klunk,


where did you get the


SECOND-HAND POWDER?"


Mother (to little son).-


"Jackie, when I used to


Klunk.- "I saved a poor fellow from drowning.
t.-"Yes, but why nine?"
K.-"A cat has nine lives hasn't it?"


go to school I was the first to have my hand up
when the teacher asked a question."


(aside).-


"And now, curse it, you're the


first tohave your hand up when I have any money.


Baseball


Fan.-"That thirdbaseman must


be a relative of the Ancient Mariner."
Second Baseball Fan.-"How's that?"


Baseball


Fan.-"Because he stoppeth one


Hornbeak


(in Civics Class).-"Carlos, can


of three.


you tell me who Mr. Kellog is?"
Carlos.-"Let's see, he's-Ah-he's, er-Oh, I


know


who he is-


man that makes


toasted corn flakes, isn't he?"


man.-"Oh, that I could find some-


Teddy (to whom the teacher had been trying to
explain the theory of evolution).-"Mother, I'm
not a monkey am I?"
Mother.-"No, Sonnie, who put that idea into
your head?"


body serious in this world, somebody that wouldn't
be a traitor, somebody that would not gossip the


way every human being


is doing to-day.


I would


Teddy.-


"And papa isn't a monkey is he?"


Mother.-"Why certainly not, what makes you
ask such silly questions?"


that I could find such a friend!"


(Enter little Bobby)
cold, sir."


Bobby.


give you my


Teddy.-
you?


"Well, then you aren't a monkey are


Mother.-"For heaven's sakes, no, who put that


The mother and six children found themselves
in a car with enough money to pay for all but one.


A notice re
of charge.


ead:


"Children under six are carried free


" The mother immediately piled the


into your head?"'
Teddy.-Well then I don't want to go


to school."


Mother.-"Why?"
Teddy.-"'Cause the teacher said you were a
monkey and papa too."


other five children on top of her nine year old
daughter, and she herself leaned against her, so
that the girl was pretty nearly out of sight. The
.- *


"Mother, complained
well."


George,


"I don't feel very


:- din, 9 1~rq 1 1r


Father


Pessimistic








THE CARIBBEAN.


A big Joke. -Mr. Benson's sunburn.
the cold sores?


Yet why


Christuian (trying to catch up with our heaviest


weight).-


"(ice she can walk


faster'n


thought


she could.


Student (who had just arrived from the StatesJ.-
"Miss Dodds, does the dry law extend to the Pan-
ama Canal.


Thimmv (making his pedal extremities
* *VKI


as he knew how).


as fast


"Sure she can, you poor fish;


cant yu see what a bin spread f canvas she's got
Cal t {R Se W1,5t I }g ;pratof canvas shle's got?


Miss Dodds.


*'Yes.


Mr. BInson (in science class).-


"WVhat is used


Stude. -"Then the Panama Canal is dry:?


for buttons?"


Miss D.'-- Y es, why ?"
Stude. -"Just because I


ames. --.


thought that the steam-


ers went through it, or rather, sailed through it,


but never mind


, guess


they are taken across by


the railroad.


"I don't know fh r sure what revervbod


clsc uses, but it seems to me that mv mother-
-


Mr. Renson.
with the question?


Hl f's5.
mother


...."\Veil,
It 1- '
\\ell,


\ hat has you mother got to do


Ans:wcr the question


was going


straight.


to sav


Mr. Benson


science


class).- r"Hnw


many


Mr. BRenson.
hasn't anv thin


"Ieave xour mother out of it, she
to do with it."


organs have you,


Thriftv ?"


yames.-


was gomng to sav


that--that


r/ntv -
piano.


W"e haven't any;
.- '


we've only got a


- -er--that myv


father's


wife uses safety pins for


buttons once in a while.


Fat Girl (to thin fellow).-"Good-bye, Shakes-
peare.
He.-"Good-bve, Bacon."


fones.---"Say, Bill, B
Bill (looking around


uff is around here isn't he?"
).-"Yes, there he is back


there, why?"
'.-Just because I knew his feet were rather
7.- Just because I knew his feet were rather


Cnear.


Levinsky, a modern business man, received the


following telegram:


"Your son Abie died: can em-


Htornb'ak (to Harry,


in English Cl


ass).-


balm him for fifty dollars, or freeze him fortwenty-


" Whereupon


Levinskv answered:


"Freeze


him from the knees up for fifteen dollars.
legs were frost-bitten last winter.


"Say in Shakespearean
bowlegged man'."
Harry.-"Behold.


proaching me


language,


comes


What is this I


see ap-


in parenthesis


I m-- - -m






THE CARIBBEAN.


HOTEL WASHINGTON
COLON BEACH
EUROPEAN PLAN :-: FACING THE CARIBBEAN












Aerial Photograph of Hotel Washington
COLON BEACH :-: REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
Post Office Address: Cristobal, Canal Zone

Hotel Washington is a Modern, Fireproof Building of
Beautiful Architecture, Built by the Construction
Forces of the Panama Canal
LARGE PRIVATE GROUNDS WITH PROMENADE ALONG THE SEA

Panama's Splendid Climate Offers Every Opportunity for All
Outdoor Sports
GOLF, TARPON FISHING, SWIMMING, MOTORING, and
TENNIS are ENJOYED THROUGH the YEAR


The Panama Railroad Company
Operated by The Supply Department, The Panama Canal






THE CARIBBEAN.


SI I *..,,..'
IA ii I~I I. Ji.. .* . **~1*
--'I -1
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____ -- - iifI(ICILjLIJJJjjjjjt


FOSTER


'S


STORE


(AMERICAN)


CENTRAL


AVENUE


PANAMA, R. P.


REASONABLE PRICED DRESSES FOR


Ladies


and


Misses


LATEST CREATIONS IN


DRESS


and


SPORT


HATS


EVENING
NEWEST I


GOWNS


DESIGNS


," i i -Tj -.- :, -"T.~^ '^ -,-f-, ,--7 ., -" .. 7-- -- -nnt "- - .. .. ...- - - w .... .
. ...f... ...i.. _a n.. .. ... . ...... ,-n- m... .. . 1... .. ... ...... ... ....I


P
W. A. TORBERT, P
CADILLAC
BUICK
OLDSMOBILE


OAKLAND


ANAZONIE
roprietor ............ -----__
Goodyear


MOTOR


ACCE


SA RA E
M. A. ALVARAI)O. Local Manager


Tires
SSORIES


HARLEY
DAVIDSON
MOTOR
CYCLES


CHEVROLET


Best Service Stations in Panama and Colon
BATTERY CHARGING STATION OR CONNECTION


CARS


OXIDE


BATTERIES


CASOLINES OILS CREASES

I E ULR KIR^.I^"H"CKH.-!;EK^S tl5".KZHI.HIZE]RZ aiL,3?ZHbZ,13^^ 2,g ^ ^^ ^ ^^ E2A] C. ^m,6J.^(sti pierce rrrrrrag g
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_E nffIII NEIIIIIIIIINi mllmnlnn1fi lwnlmlfilflf~lflI nfl u ..... llfl~frlI~fl~mlll~d!IINlf I___II .....
.A- --,,- ,.' --- ".- - ---. ........."- '" '-- .. . .. --td Jo ~ a [. $ :
- r. .. ...-. .. . -.- _. -. i. . .ij f c . m

FINEST PANAMA HATS
(GENUINE MONTECRISTI)
-IVONEY EXCHANGE
S. Perrone and Lobato
SFront Street :: Colon, R. de P.






THE CARIBBEAN.


I H ii: i iiPHH L jm~l11a


P/


Cristobal


CRI
CRI
POT


Superinten


R


NEW YORK OFF


LNAMA RAILROAD STEAMSHIP LINE
, C. Z. to New York City, N. Y.
CALLING AT PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI
SS "ANCON"
SS "CRISTOBAL"
SS PANAMAA"
(All "Cabin" Ships)
THREE SAILINGS MONTHLY
STOBAL TO NEW YORK CITY..... $100.00
STOBAL TO PORT-AU-PRINCE .... 45.00 |
RT-AU-PRINCE TO NEW YORK..... 75.00
Offices and Agents on the Isthmus
dent, Administration Building, Balboa Heights, C. Z.
Steamship Ticket Agent, Cristobal, C. Z.
Receiving & Forwarding Agent, Cristobal C. Z.
'ICES 24 State Street, NEW YORK CITY
SSMMSMM^WI __ S I^Bii


grrnmm nri~iImi11 i 11 mi itnnrmi~in mi[I ml111m imnL



BICYCLE

TIRES


* . .. .* ..* '
*^ -pi *. .?^^KA1^1
.... B LS
imIbEa L ll.
Co^ ____________^iA -a^ j


RATHBUN,


Hardware,


Lumber,


Pai


CfT"Tp


ON & CO.

nts, and Oils

T 1 IPI


STILS


* l B






THE CARIBBEAN.
^ ^ ........... ... ... ..........:..-:- ___ --- ^ - ^ ^ --- - -^..-. --- - -- -- -- - - "- - -- --- --- ---------. -- -- -- .


^jflIjljj-,.^j^ **gjjgjg~g t*i~~ji^~~g *^iM L


Keep


Cool


Our


Fresh


Water


Pool


/ Come Always
Right Room You
In Mongst
Start Youth Must
To-day & i
Outdoor Natatorial Come
I --^-^- ^^-e _, Bathing Athletics
I-- ^:----At Vigorate Again
'=" ^-' Leisure You
Open 9 a. m.-10 p.m. Ladies and Children 10c.
Entrance 15c. Tuesday, Friday
I .r ...lll..l .l ..UI I... .di. I ..&. .,- Li.,I l _..1 ..... *f..l &. .. "L,..J.I II .,.,h.l-i j.U. .4&_&2.A__ l .- ... L. _... .. .--------. ..... ......



HERON'S STUDIO
FOR ARTISTIC PORTRAITURE

LARGE CONSIGNMENT OF PICTURE FRAMES FOR PICTURES
16 x 20 and 20 x 24

PROMPT ATTENTION AND COURTEOUS TREATMENT TO ALL

mnnn-nnnnn nnfllfflfflnnnrmimmni
|mMB'Mlfffi SSllflHhilllls -niiff- m



NEW HOTEL ROYAL
BOLIVAR No. 8.103
Room and Board: $2.50-$2.00 PER DAY
Meals: $25.00 Per Month
ITALIAN COOKING A SPECIALTY ON THURSDAYS & SUNDAYS
MRS. PASCUAL DeLUCA Proprietor

^~~~~i i i i], ,,,, ,,,,I Z--S&. _. r .......... .................... .. ... ... ......_..... ..... -.. ^_
Wemammmrespunllnakmman fmmmmafriends ommthe CrmstomamHighmSchoolanm "ThCarieamn"

We respectfully ask all friends of the Cristobal High School and "The Caribbean"
:= ri i l~p







THE CARIBBEAN.


- I 4Erannra_____ _ _ _


C.


CASULLO


WATCHMAKER and JEWELER


Post Office Box
675
CRISTOBAL
Canal Zone






WE MA


No. 9.036 Front Street


Watch Repairing by an Expert


iKE YOUR WATCH A PERFECT TIME KEEPER


WATCH INSPECTOR FOR PANAMA R. R.


Phone
255
CRISTOBAL
Canal Zone





Colon, R. P.



Colon, R. P.


flfflfflfflffinfi^
Z1 -W aal -


American


jneautp


Sardor


SHAMPOOING

FACE MASSAGE



Colon 298


HAIR DRESSING


MANICURING


CUT


HAIR AND


A

HAIR


SCALP TREATMENTS


COMBINGS


MADE TO ORDER


Front


Street, 8.030


^~~~~~~I IF 1=111g^Ji i^L I j~ra~jB~gril jgji i :jlgsjj


THE STERLING STORE
WING YUEN CO.
COLON, R. P.
P. O. Box 5018 -- Telepho
CRISTOBAL, C. Z. COL4


ne 385
ON







T HE CARIBIEAN.


.. .. .. ...l I__a ikitgnfini nam aaurtnInrrTinrun uarnffnnu^^ -,


CECILIA


THEATRE


PANAMA


AMERICA


THEATRE


COLON


THE SHRINES OF PHOTO DRAMATIC ART

Cxfibitor5 of


Paramount,


United Artist,


First National,


Ilodkinson


, Metro-Goldwyn,


Associated Producers


, Warner, and Pathe Productions.


--- S ihsIrsH -TTIiTZTOiissT^STHHISIHH2i IsissHsH^
U lll m nTTlilm m TlTlmnrr lli ll-l ,;._,._:.^1^ 1:,pl,-ll^.^^lp 2::: :C.'--^^ :^i,^


1111a Itr itnimllmu Illlnininn h l lhIulTll!M '""!!nl"HUtlII "nvmll
^Jjld! ,,, .,. ., .
^f rggagyg^^-^ggrauagg^T^i~~Hssarmaaggauna ~
I Spaldings Athletic Goods '


TRACK -
BASEBALL W-
B--'"i H~1^^

BASKET BALL
I GOL F

TENNIS
-: BOXING I -

SWIMMING
I GYMNASIUM

AND ACCESSORIES

Sole Agents

The Maduro Company
21 Central Ave., Panama
P. 0. Box ...8 Telephone 24
r-' / I -'


______I_____ -r_______ -<




IlIJ-wUflfliI~iiijfihl ujiih nfihhif riil2t1'nTITTT1rTT UTTT YT2lr* TTP T__ an lit,
illill tlU~llIB~___llll.nnml.m.l nili~~mt 4 l0 EM tA __ E


HI
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- EP

u^* -

--<. ^ ^*"- -

A"^ l 440f4X rhllr: :S
^a 1! lf


-g rm U fi E U TEn L fjiR U IX S flaj fl3 X flflflflf -^- ^ -^.i ^u: !: -^ -- ;-. i" "- .__ -* ^4*_ ^ -j ^ -


I The Universal L
132-5th Street, Fronting the Park
ii-i- --K ^- .f
1 SPANISH PRODUCTS ARE SOLD WHOLESALE and RETAIL |
-:+ III+ -






THE CARIBBEAN.


H"WE DYE TO LIVE"

The Royal Cleaners and Dyers

E. V. TROTT
Phone 250 :: Colon, R. P.
l~nii~M~y~nfl^ ^ ^ni~


I-I
3









|1'L


VILLEGAS


5 Front St.


Colon


LUPI,


Box No.


Colon, R. of P


Importers and Exporters of Best


PANAMA HATS


WHOLESALE


(Montecristi)


RETAIL


- ONE PRICE -
Within the Reach of All


SCompliments
1 The American Trading Co., Ltd.
Bolivar Street, Between 7th and 8th


nl~ lil'li!Im mllHll"ill'~ i


ig~gis^^sia:^^^ HJEE ^pg~gj^&y^^
iiiimiijnimininini^fflinnmmniE[ niinmflimnmiiniiinm






TIlE i


CARIBBEAN.


C j .4a-T* ic *a **^ L J i fin i fl- f- *"'- t -, -=- ,lr**-- "J, fli ^- -*^ 4> .4
-- r ________


UNITED FRUIT COMPANY


Regular. Sailings -s
from ti
Cristobal, C. Z.
_ tto
New York,
New Orleans,
Cuba, ,
Colombia, I

Costa Rica.




apply: ---

PAUL WEST, Manager Cristobal Division, Cristobal, C. Z. T. H. JACOME, Agent, Panama City
unlmm mum Ill-im
I_ t -_ _ _ _ _ _ I_ _ _ __ - --'-








EnBORDE'S GRA _
~w n m nw n n I ~ a _i













] 1 COMPETENT CHAUFFEURS AND RELIABLE CARS

12th & Bolivar Streets Telephone 47 Colon, R. P.




THE STORE THAT SAVES YOUR MONEY

KWONG ON CHAN & CO.
nsa a_ _ ?"






















Visit Us First When You're Going To Shop
Corner 11th and Bolivar Streets
_ _ I Jnn _ _ _-1


1Laes Modeia Automobiles
hJ"""*jk kh^COM PETENT^J~ k4f r ^h^ ^ flJHt mf CHAFF UR AND^ RE IA L CASr ifLjii
1- CotIia .^^^^-"^^^r??^.^y~S^^: 5
12th &> Boia Stet .. Telephone'"' 47' Coln4 .
-I!*.. ______ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ __________________~~f~' f? ^ f -w~vn'v *>l^^
_ _ _ _ _ _ _- _-M~t^ ^~g ^ g~ gf>^ N >.^p~-^ "~f~ ^^ ,^
____to_ __________________..__ _________________- --- a _______^,S^ ^ ______- m n nr-.,W -.-.' va~~- ^^^I -
^E*-' ^ -- :>- ,' *^-^f^ ^^ ^ >^-^ S. ^---^^.^ ^r-



Corner- 11the^ and^-.' Bol^. i var Str et -I y^^^K.-^~--^"*iA~e^g^N
IEs^^ ^wt^'*-""^''/^S
||Frfrhrpriclrw^:- B





THE CARIBBEAN


COTES GARAGE
ESTABLISHED IN 1912 . FLORENTINO COTES, Prop.

. PHONES 56 and 232 .

Bicycles and Bicycle Supplies
Auto Accessories


I MICHELIN TIRES


REPAIR SHOP PREST-O-LITE BATTERY SERVICE STATION
_- --nn


GRAND HOTEL IMPERIAL
Opposite Railroad Station
COLON, R. of P.

Cleanest, Coolest and Best Hotel
in Colon
Special Apartments with Private
Baths
Excellent French and American
Cuisine

MODERATE RATES






TIl E


CARIBBEAN.


Compaiia Panamefia de Fuerza y uz
/
(SUCURSAL DE COLON)


COLON, R. P.
_ -- _ LS........^ ,,^ -n _r


'PIT ~ffi~l~lhT tuuaiuffllffl Uflfl rniin _____________tim!i
--* ___ iI
TO YOU
BOYS AND GIRLS
Go tell mother of how you have already learned that

NESTLE'S ND ST. CHARLES

are the best to give you strength and keep you healthy
and do not forget that NESTLE'S CHOCOLATES will
|| always keep you strong and happy. . . .

NESTLE'S

|The World's Best

U~ nlmmn nmmn wTI m im ninIml _ilmE l un l mIE l


OLD CHAGRES
P. O. Box 965 Corner K St. and Central Ave., No. 159 Phone 1143
.. PANAMA ..
I SPECIALTY IN
PANAMA HATS, GENUINE MONTECRISTI
S" .I*- fl -s< ._4- A- -i .- .1 _-'* -, .4 ^ --.^- n^ .. ^t fl.-. -Ar.n, nnA^/ 1VA*n^*n nt^ flnz^ tik..al r






THE CARIBBEAN.


fill' I


IMPROVED EQUIPMENT


MODERN METHODS


EFFICIENT SERVICE


'ss


BROADWAY, NEAR FOLKS RIVER


We Solicit the


Patronage of


Canal Employees


Weekly Collections and Deliveries of Laundry Work


Charge Account if Desired


CLEANING, PRESSING, and


DYEING


SPECIALTY


Phone Colon 21


P. O. Box 1131, Cristobal, C. Z.




Full Text
^^^/c/-/6- ^



TV\GLru^\::UtsucAvGuA CTL^



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries



http://www.archive.org/details/caribbean1925cris



THE CARIBBEAN



Vol. VIII.



CRISTOBAL, CANAL ZONE, 1915



PUBLISHED BY THE CRISTOBAL HIGH SCHOOL



No.




CONTENTS



Advertisements William C. Cousins,

.Alumni Irene Hopkins,

Beauty Spots

Caribbean Staff

Dedication

Editorials

Ruth E. Hopkins, '25. William C. Cousins,

Education Lola Munoz,

Exchanges Harriet A, Steenberg,

Faculty, The

F'reshman Class

Graduates

Jokes



25.
26,



i8-



Dorothy Deibert, '15. Hubert Lee, '25.

Junior Class

Literary .... Ruth F. Duev, '25 .

A Banana Woman Ruth E. Hopkins, '25

A Lone Traveler Frank Booth, '28

.Allegories

The Building of a Boat. Helen .Abendroth,'25 .

Every Boy's Cruise

Learning to Drive Ruth E. Hopkins, '25.

A Corner of the Market Place

Helen .Abendroth, '25.
A Speckled Beauty Clarice Steenberg, '26

.A Tragedy Ruth E. Hopkins, '25 .

A Tribute to a Mother Inspired by a Christmas

.Away from Home . Katherine Fischer, '25 .

Blind Luck Charles Will, '27

Descriptions

.A Coach William Clinchard, '26..

".A Green Tranquillity" Dorothy Deibert,'25 .



A Mud Puddle Ruth E. Hopkins,

An Old Dungeon Ruth Duey,

,A Room .Anniel Heim,

Dawn Ruth E. Hopkins,

Dawn Helen Abendroth,

Morning Ruth Duey,

Taking on the Pilot Ruth Foos,

The Lighthouse. . William C. Cousins,

The Locks at Night Ruth Duey,

The School Building at Night

Ruth E. Hopkins, '25

The Submarine Docks at Coco Solo

Jane E. Toulon, '28

Night William C. Cousins, '25.

Essays

.AMachigua from San BlasOucA M. Arcia, '25

Joys of Eating in a Big Family

Christian Wirtz, '26.



25.,
25.
25..
25..
25..
'25..
'28.
25..
25..



66

20

-4

3



9

61

5

-19

10

63

15
25
51
45
36
36
37
36

49

2;

50

5
28

3'

34
32
31
31
31
31
31
31
32
32
32



34
32
46
48

46



Literary Continued.
Essays Continued.

On Being Lazy Jack Coffev, '26

On Catching Butterflies John Ordway, '26

The Diving Boys at Haiti

Maurice Egglesto.v, '26..

H'Oranges Ruth Duey, '25 .

"Honesty is the Best Policy" Ruth E.Hopkins, '25.

Mi Pollera! Olga M. .Arcia, '25.

Nature Impressions

.A Foreigner in Panama Ruth F. Duey, '25.



'25-
'25-
26.

'25-
'25-
'25-



From .Along the Beach Helen .Abendroth,
My Inspiration. . William C. Cousins,

My Tree Dorothy Deibert,

The Banana Palm , Dorothea Tufts,

The Bay Anniel Heim,

SanturceGolt Course. .Ruth E.Hopkins,

The Sea Olga M. .Arcia,

Thoughts in Looking .Across the Sea

Katherine Fischer, '25..
"Not What We Give" Lola Munoz, '26.

One of Lite's Little Tragedies or Comedies?

Helen .Abendroth, '25.

Parlor Tricks Helen .Abendroth, '25.

Rosalind m.-ls Yon Like Ii.Katherike Fischer, '25

Soliloquy of a Cake Ethel Bar.nett, '29.

The Coming of Night Hubert Lee, '25.

The Paper Boy "Sta' een YeraV."

Dorothy Deibert, '25.

The Seaweed Doll Helen J. Keene, '26.

Treasure Seekers Mercedes Jordan, '28.

A Rhyme Ruth E. Hopkins, '25

Prophecy by Palmistry

Poetry:

Ashore at Night Katherine Fischer, '25.

Old Panama J. H. Thrift, '28.

The Coming of Night. Katherine Fischer, '25.

The Pier Katherine Fischer, '25

Weather Away! Katherine Fischer, '25.

School Notes Anniel Heim, '25

Sports

Boys' John Ordway, '26.

Girls' Helen .Abendroth, '25.

Sophomore Class

The Class of '26 Mildred Neely, '26

The Idea! Graduate Irene Hopki.ns, '26.

The Qualifications of a 100% High School Graduate. .

Mildred Neely, '26.

The Senior Class W ill

The Sophomore Library



47
46

48
52
<;i
5'
38
42
40
39
41
4I
39
38
38

43
49

50
52
34
30
51

51
27
29
37
14

57

52

57

8

45
58
53



17
16



THE CARIBBEAN.




U. S. Battleship in Miraflores Lock.



lOebication



To THE MAN\' FRIENDS OF CRISTOBAL
HICiH SCHOOL, WHO HAVE SO WIL-
LINGLY AND SO UNTIRINGLY AIDED
US IN OUR NUMEROUS ENTERPRISES,
WE GRATEFULLY DEDICATE THIS, OUR
EIGHTH VOLUME OF "THE CARIBBEAN."



THE CARIBBEAN.



es
CM






o

C3







THE CARIBBEAN.



III!



DITORIAI



TEAMWORK.

Rttth E. Hopkins, 'j^.



There is something about our own school that
in the afteryears makes us connect only good times
and cheery companionship with it; something that
makes us proud to say we belonged there. That
something is school spirit -the same spirit that
sends a basket ball team onto the floor fighting,
in the face of defeat, tor their school; the same
spirit that makes our annual possible; makes our
play worth while in fact, accounts for all the
"big things" in high school life.

Reams could be written about school spirit
and have been. It has been defined, illus-
trated, and lauded times without number. But
still, what makes school spirit? Why do some
schools have it while others don't?

It rests entirely with the group. Kipling's
words about the army may be applied here with
equal truth:

"It's not the individual
Nor the army as a whole,
But the everlastin' teamwork
Of every bloomin' soul."

It is the teamwork of every single soul working
for one goal the glory of the school. That is
what makes the something about school that
we remember and love.

School spirit comes only when students can
sacrifice personal praise for the greater praise of
their school; when, as in a basket ball game, a
player is willing to forfeit his chance basket to
someone who is a "sure shot" and so, working,
not through one man i)ut as one man, the team
rolls up the score.



Teamwork should not stop with sports and
athletics but should be carried out through the
routine of school work and through social activi-
ties.

We must be interested in our studies anxious
that our marks are good. But it is not enough
that we think only of ourselves we should ex-
plain the things we understand to those who do
not grasp them so readily, and so help the students
of our school to succeed.

Almost the same is true of our social activities,
tor we find that if we put our work and ourselves
into the atfair, we have enjoyed it much more. If
we can make others enjoy it too we have added
another happy event to our school calendar.

Thus, by working with and for each other
by constant teamwork vve can preserve and add
to that living, breathing thing school spirit.

Miss Ruth Hopkins.
JFilliam C. Cousins, '25.

There is surely a niche in the hall of fame for
our Senior Class President. Ruth Hopkins has
been president of her class for the past three
years and has been elected to lead once more.
She is the editor-in-chief of our annual; was voted,
when only a Sophomore, the most popular girl,
and is duty, brains, and cheerfulness personified.

Ruth's kindness is exceeded only by her strength
of will. Very tactful, friendly, and firm, she
leads in all but sluggishness and procrastination.
Her company is just a step to higher things.

That intangible thing called school spirit and
teamwork is her heart, her brain, her all.



THE CARIBBEAN.




THE CARIBBEAN.



Mr. W. \V. .\ndrew-.
Providence, Rhode Island.
Siiperinlendeni of Schools.



Mr. John E. Lanz.

Los .Angeles, California.

L'Tiivcrsity of Nebraska.

Columbia University.

JssislanI to Superintendent oj Schools.




^f)e Jfacultp.



Miss JTTS^-i'BSllS

Claremont, Minnesota.
Macolester College.

Principal.

English, Cicero, Socitil Problems and Economics.

Girls' and Boys' Glee Gluts. Caribbean Staff Adviser

Supper Club Jdi'iser.



oa.jz^



Senior Class ./dviser.



Miss J. Isabella Dodds has for five years been
the principal of Cristobal High School, and will,
we sincerely hope, remain with us for many more
terms.

From the cold climate of Minnesota to the humid
atmosphere of the tropics she came to act as
principal. She has been more than principal,
however. She has taught us English, Latin,
social problems; she has been the adviser for each
senior class; she has coached our plays; she has
been the faculty member of the C.4RiBBEA>f staff;
she has been the silent power behind all our or-
ganizations and has tried to imbue in others some
of the vim and vigor that are hers.

To her we are indebted for the Girls' Supper
Club. There she has not only always been will-
ing to help, but has made every girl desirous of
entering.

In our sports Miss Dodds has always been
present; she is the energetic personality who cheers
and encourages, keeping up the spirit of the team
and the rooters even in the face of defeat; and
before us we have ever in all our activities her
definition of fair play and courtesy.

For originality what should we do if there were
no Miss Dodds? She is an encyclopedia of ideas
which are clever and entertaining; she is always
in demand whenever there is a party or a program.



i\fiss Mabel Jean Barnhouse.

Watsonville, California.
Leland Stanford Jr. University.

Spanish.

Junior Class .Idviser.

Miss Mabel Jean Barnhouse, the competent
Spanish teacher in Cristobal High School, has
been for the last four years a constant inspiration
and friend to the pupils. Her kindness and sym-
pathy have lightened the burden of routine for
many of us, and her cheerful assistance in all
things will be long remembered by everyone.

As a class adviser Miss Barnhouse has been as
nearly perfect as possible. Her original ideas,
her unfailing energy, and her untiring aid have
so firmly established her in the hearts of the Class
of '26 that they have twice reelected her.

Miss Barnhouse is a native daughter of Califor-
nia where she was graduated from the Leland
Stanford Junior University. From her home
state she went to Colombia, and from Colombia
came to us. It is our hope that we may make her
stay with us so pleasant that it will always be a
happy memory.

Ruth E. Hopkins, '2^^




Mr. George J. Benson

Saint Cloud, Minnesota.

.State Teachers' College, .'^aint Cloud

Bradley Polytechnic Institute.

General Science, Industrial Subjects.
Sophomore Class .-Idviser. Upsilon Gamma Gamma .idviser.



Mr. George J. Benson is just completing his
first term with Cristobal High. He has filled the
She is ever just and can see our side of a question position in the faculty left vacant by Mr. Schnepp-
as well as turning it inside out to show us the other mueller, and that place in each boy's heart which
side. Thus her strong power of reasoning comes 's always open for a true friend and partner.
to good use. Besides his duties as teacher of science, drawing,

To us she has been an ideal -ever pointintr to 'iitl manual training, Mr. Benson is sophomore
the paths of kindness, honesty, and service. class adviser, adviser of the LJpsilon Gamma

Ruth Duey, '3^. Gamma and scout master of the local troop. He



THE CARIBBEAN.



has lent valuable aid to athletics in C. H. S., and is
to be commended for his assistance in putting
over the athletic night a series of exhibitions tor
the purpose of raising money for the boys' athletic
association.

Mr. Benson is well liked in school, both in class
and out of it, and in outside life as well. Long
may he stay!!

IVilliiim Cousins, 'JJ.

r



^.-^^^



Miss/Margaret H. O'Connell.

Grand Rapids, Minnesota.
Creighton University.
University of Minnesota.

Mathematics, Physics.
Freshman Class Jrifiser.

Miss Margaret O'Connell, teacher of the
ancient science of why's antl how's is greatly
admired by the high school pupils for her natural
geniality. It is not often that one sees her dis-
turbed by little things. She never scolds or fusses,
but instead, talks quietly still, it's true, some-
times with an edge that is quite effective.

She is patient with our stupidity in problems
and questions that are oh! so easy, after she has
explained. She knows physics and algebra from
all points; more remarkable than that, she under-
stands and appreciates our hardships, and sym-
pathizes with us in them. Though she is ever
ready to explain, yet, at the same time, she makes
us think.

.^s a native of Minnesota she first came to us,
but we hope she is sufficiently Panamanianized to
want to stay a while, for, although she has been
here less than two years, she has established her-
self firmly in the hearts of the pupils in Cristobal
High School.

Katherine Fischer and Helen Jbendroth, '2^.
Miss Hattie Lee Hornbeak.



one in Cristobal High School. She provides us
with an opportunity to learn our history, and
possesses an almost uncanny knowledge of Eng-
lish grammar, rhetoric, lives of authors, inter-
pretations, or anything we can ask.

Her ability in discussing books and pla\s antl
in describing scenes and people is extraordinary
and enviable. Her classes are enliveneil by
graphic stories from her travels and experiences.
She is our guitie in speech anti writing from our
Freshman \ear imtil we are Seniors.

In other words. Miss Hornbeak ma>' well be
respected for her intelligence and individuality,
and loved for her readiness to help us when we
need her.

Dorothy Deitert and Olga Jrcia.



Waxahachie, Texas.

Trinity University.
Columbia University.

English, V. S. History and Civics.



Librarian.



Miss Hattie Lee Hornbeak, our petite but de-
cidedly efficient English teacher, is well known as
an ardent worker and a friend and helper to every-




'^^(




iss Adela F. Bakewell.

Lansing, Iowa.

Iowa State College.
University of California.

Home Economics.

Miss .Adela Bakewell came to us from Lansing,
Iowa, bringing her store of learning from the fowa
State College and from the l^niversity of Califor-
nia. She has taught in Cristobal High School for
four years. Though she has a wonderful knowl-
edge of ancient and modern history, she confines
her teaching this year to household arts both
elementary and advanced.

To those students who know her only in the
assembly hall, and are not in any of her classes,
she seems unapproachable. She has a firm belief
that anyone who does not do what he is told de-
serves reproof, and she doesn't hesitate to admin-
ister such to any deserving culprit.

But how different in her classes! What a help
she is to those of her students who are interested
in their work and show it! What good laughs
they have together over something funnv that
happens in class! Information, especially on
foods, textiles, or parties, is always ready for
those who seek it. Rules, illustrations, and out-
lines are three of her greatest interests in lessons.
But she is willing to help in any school activity
from boys' basket ball Jerseys to plans for parties.

Katherine Fischer, '.?y.



iJfiJjL>.^JL



8



THE CARIBBEAN.



"S~7



CX.^iK^f^



^M^



Miss Mildred C. Rauner.

Hartford, Michigan.

University of Michigan,
l^niversity of Chicago.
University of Madrid.

Latin, History, Spanish.



Miss Helen L. Currier.

Minneapolis, Minnesota.
University of Minnesota.

Chorus, Orchestra.



Cristobal High School has indeed been fortu-
nate in having Miss Helen Currier as its music
If Miss Mildred C. Rauner is typical of the in- supervisor. For five years she has worked wjth
habitants of Michigan, then New York's speed our choruses, and at the end of each year has sup-
has nothing on this, her home state. In her work, Pl'^d the commencement program with numbers

^r D J- 1 ^ 1 u 1 ., u .. that fittingly express her loftv purpose in music.

Miss Rauner is exceedingly quick; she keeps her & / k j- f



history, Spanish, and Latin classes wide-awake,
for if they miss one word they miss a sentence, if
they miss a sentence they miss the paragraph, if
they miss the paragraph they miss everything
except one thing, a big round zero. But her skill
lies in the fact that she is a fast thinker and knows



It is no easy task to direct a chorus of boys and
girls. It demands tact, and willingness to meet
and conquer obstacles. Though, at times, we are
not attentive. Miss Currier never is impatient; a
few well-chosen words rouse us into watchfulness,
and encourage us to do better.

Not only do choruses claim her, but our school



how to keep the attention of her class so that the orchestra takes up some of her time where again



zeros are practically none. Such is Miss Rauner
at her work. At other times she forgets her work
to be pleasant to everyone, and finds the time to
look at us, smile, and then joke with us. Added
to this winning nature, she is enthusiastic, and,
like most short people, likes mischief once in a



her skillful direction makes itself apparent.

The instant one comes in contact with Miss
Currier, he is conscious of a charming personality,
and a winning smile which accomplishes far more
than stern looks.

Lastly, although the grades of the Isthmus and^



our friends of Balboa High School demand a good

while. Such qualities as these always go towards i , c u ^ ^^ ^- ^u- i r at- r

^ share of her attention, we think of Miss Currier

making a person a good friend to everybody, and ^s our very own, and shall continue to do so as
Miss Rauner is no exception; she's all right! long as she resides in the Canal Zone.

Hubert Lee, '2^. Ruth Duey, '2^.



THE PIER.

Katherine Fischer, '2^.



"Though I am not a poet, I have dreams sometimes," Rusiin.

Darkened now,

Its doors closed tight,

The pier stands in the night.

Electric lights describe half arcs,

But their beams pierce not the gloom,

Where crates and boxes

Round are stacked;

Where the musty smell ot

I-X)ng-stored goods

Ferv.ades the darkness;

Where by day, the human's puny efforts

.\re looked down on by the rafters,

From whose grim and dusty grayness

Echoes back the mortal's cry.

Electric lights describe hall arcs.

But their dim beams

Show not the heart within



The heart, that in the night is still

.Amidst its rows of cargo;

The heart that throbs with life by day

Between its rows of cargo;

The heart that hears, now, only waves

Whose swish seeps thru the shadow,

But hears by day

The clanging bell,

The ship's shrill siren,

The clanking of the crane chains,

.And the fall of freight to dock;

The heart that hears, as ships go out,

The stifled sob,

The farewell, carefully spoken;

That sees the kerchief flutter in the breeze

And the tear hastily concealed.

Electric lights describe half arcs.
But their dim beams can never pass
The massive wall of gray white stone
To the sou! of the pier at last.



THE CARIBBEAN.




IIIK IDKAI. GRADUATE.

To mc the ideal tiraihiate is not just the one who has always
acquired siood marks. I think an ideal traduate is one who
has gained a general idea of the various studies in high school
and can apply this knowledge to his everyday life; whose
high school education has made him ahler to determine be-
tween right and wrong and strengthened him to choose be-
tween them; whose constant association with different kinds
of people has enlarged his sympathies and taught him con-
siileration tor others; in short whose mind has been broad-
encil, whose ability to reason has been lievelopeti, and whose
ambitions have been prompted. Irene Hopkins, '36.



EDUCATION.

Education, a priceless thing! The imparting of knowl-
edge; mental and moral training the cultivation of the
mind and soul; corner stone ot every great nation; wise
guide of men through generations, making children of to-
day far richer than the children of yesterday richer in
knowleilge, richer in earning power; the best of means to
put man in touch with his fellowmen tor the betterment of
standards; at its best a preparation for complete living.
Education, a priceless thing. Lola Munoz, '26.



THE QUALIFICATIONS OF A looSi HIGH SCHOOL
GRADLUTE.

In my opinion a 100% high school graduate should have:

I. A general knowledge with the ability to talk intelli-
gently on subjects of the day.

Etiiciency in some subject which will enable him to
earn a living wage.

.'\bility and willingness to see others' viewpoints and
to profit by them.

.A sense of right and wrong with will-power strong
enough to enable him to make the right choice.

A "learning attitude," the desire to continue acquir-
ing knowledge by conversation, by reading, and
by investigation.

The qualities of a good leader not one who does
nothing but "boss" nor one who does all the work
while his helpers look on, but one who by work-
ing wilh his followers, encourages them rather
than drives them.

A spirit of adjustment which includes sympathy,
agreeability, understanding, not continually
speaking of what "1" did or said the ability to
step forward or backward as the occasion de-
mands.

Reliability, making him dependable, trustworthy
one on whom one can safely place responsibilities;
whose word is as solid as a rock.

Steadiness or stick-to-it-iveness, not being swayed by
the silly and frivolous, but adhering to his ideals
whatever may come.

.Agility and physical strength, not carried to ex-
tremes but enabling him to get the exercise which
will keep him physically fit and will relieve some
of the mental strains that come to all.

.A sense of humor large enough to keep him from
looking down on people's fun and frolic, and to
make him able to enjoy smiling and laughter,
but small enough to keep him from being ridic-
ulous and a fool.

the description too hot or too cold, too strong or too
" Burke. Mildred Neely, '26.



II.
III.
IV.

V.

VT.
VII.

vni.

IX.
X.



XI,



"Is
weak ?



MR 95193 2



lO



THE CARIBBEAN.



aa^IiE




THK CARIBBF.AN.



ri



SENIORS.

Purple and Green.



Class Colors-
Class Flower Passion Flower
Mollo "\ man prepared has



lalf touuht the Inirtle.'



(^



0-



RUTH K. HOPKINS.

'2i-'22 Class President.

Secretary, Supper Cluh.

Chorus. Glee Cluli.
'22-23 Class President.

Vice President, Supi'er Ckil).

Chorus.

Glee Club.

Gypsy Operetta.

"Silas Marner."
'23-'24 Class President.

Assistant Editor of The C.iribbeax.

President, Supper Club.

Chorus.

Glee Club.

Spanish Operetta.
'24-'25 Class President.

Editor, The Caribbean-.

President, Supper Club.

Chorus. Glee Club.

"Sailor's Reverie"

Japanese Operetta.

RUTH F. DURV.

2i-'22 Basket ball.

Class Swimming.

Chorus. Glee Club.

Supper Club.
'22-'23 Basket ball.

Track.

Orchestra.

Chorus. Glee Club.

Supper Club.

"Silas Marner."
'23-'24 Class Basket ball.

Basket ball.

Editor, Girls' .\thletics.

Indoor Baseball.

Tennis.

Orchestra.

Chorus. Glee Club.

Spanish Operetta.

"Charm School"

Supper Club.
'24-'25 Class Vice President.

Literary Editor.

President, Girls' .Athletic .Association

Basket ball.

Tennis.

Supper Club.

Chorus. Glee Club.

"Sailor's Reverie"

"Daddy Long Legs."



WILLIAM C. COrSINS.



^




^



^




/.



'21 -'22 Class Basket bal

Chorus. C^

'22-'23 Basket ball.

Class Basket ball.

Chorus.

"Silas Marner."
'23-'24 Assistant Business Manager, The Caribbean-.

Secretary and Tre.asurer, .Athletic .Association.

Basket ball.

Class Basket ball.

Track.

"Upsilon Gamma Gamma."

"Charm School."

Chorus.
'24-'25. Class Secretary and Treasurer.

Business Manager, The Caribbean.

Manager, .Athletic .Association.

Basket ball.

Class Basket ball.

Class Baseball.

Track.

President, "Upsilon Gamma Gamma."

Chorus.

"Daddy Long Legs."

V. HELEN ABENDROTH.



'2l-'22 Tennis.

Chorus.

Glee Club.

Supper Club.
'22-'23 Tennis.

Chorus.

Glee Club.

Supper Club.

"Silas Marner."
'23-' 24 Class Secretary and Treasurer (Half year).

Exchange Eilitor, The Caribbean.

Chorus. (

Glee Club.

Orchestra.

Baseball. ^

Tennis. i

24-'25 Editor, Girls' .Athletics. J

Tennis )

Basket ball.

Baseball.

Chorus.

Orchestra.

"Sailor's Reverie."

"Daddv Long Legs."



^



b



12



THE CARIBBEAN.



^H^Hn




THE CARIBBFAN.



OLGA M. ARCr.A.



DOROTHY DFIBI RT.



(



'2l-'22 Supper Chil

Chorus.

(ilee Clul).
';:-'2.i Chorus.

Glee Club.

Supper Club.

Gypsy Operetta.
'23~'24 Tennis

Chorus.

Glee Club.

Supper Club.
" Spanish Operetta.
'24-'25 .Assistant Business Manager, The Caribbean.

Chorus.

Glee Club.

Supper Club.

Japanese Operetta.

"Daddv Lone Letrs."



'2i-'22 Mount Holly, Xew Jerisey.
'22-'2j Secretary, .Athletic .A.ssociation.

Chorus.

Tennis.

Track.
'23-'24 Class Secretary and Treasurer (Half year).

Chorus.

Tennis.

Basket ball.

Indoor Baseball.

Track.

"Charm School."
'24-'25 Joke Kdiror, The Caribbf. w.

Basket ball.

Chorus,

Removed to M\crstoHn, P.\,



KATHERINF. FISCHER.



.ANNIEL HKIM.



'2i-'22 Junior High School, Baltimore, Md.
'22-'2.i Eastern High School, Baltimore, Md.
'23--24 C. H. S.

Chorus.

Supper Club.
'24-'25 .Assistant Circulation Manager, The Caribbean.

Basket ball.

Chorus.

Glee Club

Supper Club

'Daddy Long Legs."

Japanese Operetta.



2i-'22 Newark High School, Newark, Ohio.
22-'23 Newark High School, Newark, Ohio.
'23-'24 C. H. S.

Chorus.

Supper Club.
'24-'25 School Notes Editor, The Caribbean.

Supper Club.

"Daddy Long Legs."



{yt'1/''txT''V_A_-C


'^^



HUBERT LEE.

'2i-'22 Chorus.

Glee Club.

'22-'23 The Methodist School, Costa Rica
'23-'24 The .Methodist School, Costa Rica
'24-'25 Joke Editor, The Caribbean.

Class Basket ball.

Chorus.

LIpsilon Gamma Gamma.

"Daddy Long Legs."




HARRIET A. STEENBERc;.



u~



2i-'22 South Division High School, Milwaukee, Wis.
22-'23 Central High School, Washington, D. C.
23-'24 Hampton High School, Hampton, Va.
24-'25 C. H. S.

Exchange Editor, The Caribbean.

Vice President, Supper Club.
Daddy Long Legs."



14



THE CARIBBEAN.



PROPHECY BY PALMISTRY

One small lamp throws out fitful beams to illu-
minate a circle ot rapt senior faces, whose gazes
are intently concentrated upon the mysterious
one who relates our fortunes or misfortunes as
the case may be.

The mystic stares at the palm of our smallest
senior, and sees grave news ot vast importance
Helen is going to have a tragic love affair. Im-
agine our unsentimental, boyish little Helen!
Perhaps she isn't such a man-hater after all.

Next in turn is Olga, she ot the demure looks.
To learn that she is to have a great deal of money
is no shock, but we listen horrified when the
mystic announces that she will have six children!
(So comforting in old age, doncher know, Olga.)

We hurriedly push Willie in front of the medium,
and she discov-ers what we have known a long
time that Willie is willing to take a long chance
on anything, even on English unprepared. We
always knew he would be a good mariner too, tor
he shows all the earmarks of becoming the pro-
verbial sailor who has a girl in every port.

Ruth D., our aspiring musician, follows Willier
We can scarcely believe our ears about her. She
is always dignified, never stooping to the vulgarity
of a flirtation. We understand she will rival one
fair alumna ot last year in her conquest of hearts.

Katherine, with doubtful eyes, deigns to listen
next. We knew she was possessed of great religious
fervor, so it is no surprise to us that she is to be
sent into the wilds of Panama as a missionary to
raise the low ideals ot the cannibals there!

On Anniel's palm there is a long line of travel.
No doubt she will encounter all sorts of thrilling
adventures, and be beset by many difficulties as she
journeys from Colon to Panama, which is to be her
sphere of experience iluring the wandering period.

Our Class President, Ruth H., is assured success
in the business world. Her fair-mindedness will
be invaluable in the criminal courts where she will
presitle. She will be especially severe with high
school students found appropriating articles from
desks other than their own.

The only born f)rator of our Class, Hubert, has
as his destiny an enviable position in the as\lum
at Corozal, where he will endeavor to sway the
minds of the patients to his way of thinking and
will present orations on the absorbing question,
"How far is up?"

Harriet is the last to hear her doom. Her ready
sympathy, tact, and other charming attributes
make a pleasing combination for a nur.se, as fate



has decided that she will be the ministering angel
in the S. P. C. A.

Yes, the fortunes have been told, our seeress can
tell no more, so very quietly we leave the room.
Turning back, we see her bending low over a
crystal globe. She is chanting under her breath,
and the light continues to flicker and shed its
beams upon her until we pass out of sight.

THE SENIOR CLASS WILL.

We, the Class of 1925, of Cristobal High School,
knowing that we are about to pass on into the
uncertain future, find that we have various valu-
able and treasured possessions and characteristics
which we wish to bestow upon our nearest and
dearest, the Juniors.

Olga .-^rcia leaves to Jack and Billy Coffey the
right to be late every morning; to Lola Mufioz,
the privilege of spending her week ends in Panama.

Helen Abendroth leaves her aversion for boys
to Betty Warren; to Hildegarde Blythe, her ap-
titude for Spanish.

William Cousins leaves to Maurice Eggleston
his audacity to argue with Miss Dodds; to William
Mclntyre, the right to be chief bouncer in the
Seniors' Den.

Ruth Duey, after careful thought, leaves to
Delilah May and William Clinchard her interest
in the "subs" to be added to their already fast
growing supply.

Katherine Fischer leaves to Harry Moore and
Clarice Steenberg her ability to express lofty sen-
timent in prose and verse; this to be added to their
own genius. To Helen Keene and Gay Turner,
Katherine leaves her lofty stature.

Anniel Heim bestows upon Irene Hopkins, Edna
Duvall, and Manola Bliss her recipe tor being seen
and not heard. To Johanna Kleefkens she leaves
her genius for refraining from asking questions.

Ruth Hopkins leaves to Mildred Neely her
permanent wave; to Bess Long, her ability to talk.

Hubert Lee, after some deliberation, leaves to
Jimmy Yan Scotter his judgment in saying the
right thing in the right place; to John Ordway
and Christian Wirtz, his oratorical ability.

Harriet Steenberg leaves to Dorothea Tufts the
right to answer the telephone during Senior Eng-
lish period; to Carlos Pulgar, her ease in making
oral reports.

Dorothy Deibert leaves to Emma Lee Worsley
her faculty to withstand shocks; to Rae Fischer,
her talkativeness. (Signed)

The Seniors.



THK CARIBBKAN.



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THE CARIBBEAN.



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THE CLASS OF '26.

Mildred Neely, '26.




=^



There's a class in Cristobal High Scliool
Of students twenty-eight;
You'll hear of them in the future
At the top of every slate.

To tell >ou of these students rare
'Twill tiike a verse apiece,
Yet will not give them honor due,
Xor record each pet caprice.

Miss B^irnhouse first we'll mention.
For she's our class adviser.
We do our best in school and play
To show how high we prize her.

To cap the Junior roster
Our future "Hall of Fame"
We'll open it with 'Nola Bliss,
.\nd add, in turn, each name.

Manola's a Zone-born lassie.
Of whom we're very proud;
.\ happy-go-lucky youngster,
Who whispers more than's allowed.

From Canada came a lassie
About two years ago;
Hildegsrde Blythe has won our love.
And she's loyal to us, we know.

The Junior Class is very proud,
William Clinchard to list your name;
So true-blue and trusty a lad
Ought in future to bring us fame.

.Ah! next upon this list of ours
Conics Jack Coffey, he who can
Dance and swim, and play and work,
-And is a Senior faji.

Now we come to Billy Coftey
In stature, he's somewhat short.
But he dives and swims and is at case.
In every water sport.

From Gatun comes our Edna
Duvale's her other name
She used to love Balboa,
Now she loves us, just the same.

Oh! who is he who comes to school
Just one moment before eight?
If he couldn't sprint like Nurmi,
Maurice Egglcston would be late.



.\ girl who wins at basket b.ill,

Is popular Rae Fischer.

She's good at school, at home, at play;

In all, good luck we wish her.

Of all the class, for President
Irene Hopkins we have chosen
None else could leail us thru the year
With less friction and contusion.

We really think that Tennessee
Must be a grand old state.
Because Bess Long, a native,
Just came from there ot late.

Helen Keene is a transfer
From the "silver side," Balboa;
She's tinj but not too tiny
To be loved by all who know her.

To prove to us that all improve
Who really will to do it,
Johanna Kleefkins shows a gain
That makes us want to do it.

Last March there came a sad event,
W'hen from us went a sailing
A loyal, ardent Junior,
Wallace Johnson we arc naming.

When a dependable girl is wanted
One looks to the Junior Class,
And finds in it Delilah May,
Whom no one can surpass.

A great admirer of Shakespeare
H. Thornton Moore 'tis he
Who oftens quotes from Hamlet
Knows English Lit. from .\ to Z.

Lola Mur.oz, a Spanish maid.
Belongs to this bright class
But she goes across to Panama
To help the week-ends pass.

"What can Billy Mclntyre do?"
Is a queslion to which we respoml:
"He can play every game that you can name,
.'\nd of every sport he is fond."

John Ordway holds the office
Of treasurer of this class;
'Tis he who has the duty
Of collecting dues vietl past.



Carlos Pulgar's from Gatun, too;
His jokes are keen and deep.
His marks would be much better
If he'd work instead of sleep.

.A shark she is at basket ball,
.At jumping she is great,
Elizabeth Shepley just this year
Has walked in thru our gate.

When you want to read a story,
The kind you like the best.
Just read one of Clarice Steenburg's,
.And we'll leave to you the rest.

With those who come to us each day
From the edge of Gatun Pond,
Is Dorothea Tufts, a girl
Of whom every one is fond.

She is a studious student
Which in Panama is rare
But our Gay Turner studies well.
And is our secretary fair.

Just a little tiny noise
And we see her jump quite high.
Emma Lee Worsley's not nervous
Oh! no! She's only shy.

When a poster's to be made
Or a sign of any kind,
Christian Wirtz is called on
And for it finds the time.

The public thinks Betty Warren
The best looking in C. H. S.
.And all who look upon her
Will not think it is "a guess."

To finish the Junior roster
Our future "Hall of Fame"
We'll end it with Dorothy Vaughan
She's gone, but we honor her name.

.A good sport, a good friend,
.A good player and comrade true,
Dorothy Vaughan is all of these,
.Aiul is a good worker, too.



P. S.
Our Scribe's a busy lassie.
She's surely "up and coming;"
When work's to do, or fun's to plan
Mildred Neely keeps things humming.



THE CARIBBI'.AN.



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i8



THE CARIBBEAN.



THE SOPHOMORE LIBRARY.



Books have been called by one great man
"the legacy geniuses leave to humanity," and by
another, "man's greatest friend."

The Sophomore Class has a goodly representa-
tion, and whether we regard them as legacies or
friends, the longer we know them, the more we
prize them.

"Our Mutual Friend" Mr. Benson.

"A Pair of Blue Eyes" Marion Barrett.

"Flowing Gold" F.mily Bledsoe.

"Peck's Bad Boy" Ward Bronson.

"Come Out ot the Kitchen" Genevieve Booth.

"The Man Who Laughs" Lawrence Callaway.



"The Spanish Dancer" Teresa Gallagher.

"Son of the Soil" James Grider.

"Wisdom's Daughter" Louise Heim.

"Freckles" Mary Heim.

"The Flirt" Jeannette Kalander.

"Loyalties" Clara May.

"Silence" Erma Phillips.

"Daddy Long Legs" Fred Sonneman.

"Lass O'Laughter" Wilhelmina Stute.

"Exercise and Health" Dorothy Svensson.

"Seventeen" Suise Taylor.

"The Nightingale" Helen Vineyard.

"Book of .-Vthletics" James Van Scotter.

"Slim Princess" Euphemia Woolnough.

"The \ew Vorker" Charles Will.



CLASS OFFICERS.

President Helen Vineyard.
I'ice President Charles Hill.
Secretary Mary Heim.
Treasurer Euphemia Woolnough.
Class .Idviser Mr. Benson.

THE FRESHMEN AS THEY ARE NOW.



Robert -\xtell A "whooping" good student

Emma Banks Silent but active.

Ellsworth Barrows Willing helper.

Gladys Beers What's in a name?

Zonella Bliss A good friend to all.

Frank Booth Our gamboling guy.

Pauline Briggs -\ promising Duse.

Harry Brown "Where are the necessaries.'"

Charles Crum The Freshman Sheik.

.Albert Days Little in stature only.

John Everson The boy who is alwa>s on hand.

Ruth Foos Our automatic mathematician.

Charles Fourcher A radio bug.

Laura Grimaldo Quiet, but Oh! My!

Teddy Henter Our saxophonist.

William Henter The answer to a maiden's prayer.

Dora Hill "Viva la Reina!"

Matilda Hill The girl of the "Mi Pollera."

William Hobson "Where's the fight?"

Mary Jacobs Like lightning, she never strikes twice

in the same place.



George Jordan "Give me some fudge!''

Mercedes Jordan A peach on stories-
Gordon Kariger Too anxious to recite out of turn-
Edward Keene A quiet boy, but give him time-
Rachel Key A whiz at athletics-
Jack Klunk Terpsichorean amphibian.

Kathryn Lambert A good swimmer.

Ralph Lucas High whether he jumps or not-

Harold Owen Girl shy.

Jack Raymond Bashful.

Lucia Salazar Quiet as a mouse.

Evangeline Smith Our hope for the 1928 Olympics.

Julia Smith .\ past master in the art of cooking.

Virginia Sonneman A wonder at Latin.

Harry Thrift He has a good understanding.

Foster Tufts Where, Oh where?

Jane Toulon Short, but oh so sweet.

Rubio Walston She just loves (?) Ancient History.

Miss O'Connell 2b' or not 2b.



CL.ASS OFFICER.S.

President William Henter.
Fice President Mercedes Jordan.
Secretary-Treasurer Harold Owen.
Jdviser Miss O'Connell.



FRESHMEN.

HORIZONTAL.



Line l^PauMne BriKgu, Albert Daya, Corilon Kuriger, Charle-s Fourcher,

Virf^iriia .^ntienmn, Ruth Foa.s.
Line 2 Teddy Hctilir. RoWrt Axull.

Line 3 -Mary Jar-uU, Kubio Walaton. Jack Ruymund, John Evefdon.
Line 4 Harry Thrift. Frank Booth.
Line 5 Mercedes Jordan. Zonella Blifls.
Line 6 Kvangeline .Smith. Julia .Smith.
Line 9 Lucia .Salaz&r, Rachel Key.



Line 12~Kathryn Lambert. Gladys Beers.
Line l.f Ralph Lucas, Edward Keene.
Line Vi and t4--Billy Renter.
Line 14 Emma Banks. Matilda Hill.

Liue 1.1 Foster Tufts, Miss O'Connell, Adviser. Harold Owen, Charles Crum,
Line 16 Dora Hill, Harry Browi.

Line 17 William Hobson. George Jordan, Laura Grimaldo, Ellsworth Barrows,
Jack KlunK, Jane Toulon.



THE CARIBBKAX.



19




:jce Dames on bouom of page opposite.



2o



THE caribbp:ax.




Irene Hopkins,



We, of Cristobal High School, are very fortu-
nate in having so many alumni with us here on
the Isthmus. A number of them visit us fre-
quently during the year and their visits are always
welcome. This year also an unusually large number
of the graduates have attended the class parties; we
sincerely hope that they have enjoyed being with
us as much as we have enjoyed having them with
us again. Even most of those who are far away
remember us and send us their greetings occa-
sionally.

Each year our Alumni department grows in
number. This annual finds thirteen more added
to the ranks of the graduates, and next year's will
find ten more. But the question arises does
the interest in the Alumni department increase
each year as does the number of graduates? It is
said that the average length of time in which the
alumnus is interested in his high school is two
years. We wonder whether that is true of the
graduates of Cristobal High School. We hope not.

/9fS.
LuLA Mae Pullig Coman, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
MiNOT Cotton, 7223 Fourth Ave., Apartment

Bi. Brooklyn, N.Y.
Susie Harrison, 21 1 East 25th Street, Baltimore,

Md.
Catherine Waid, 51 West i6th Street, New York

City, N. Y.
BtRKE Welch. His letter rcturnetl from Ten

Sleep, Wyoming.
Marv Verner, Chapel Hill, \. C.

"I am back in the University of \. C,
studying French and a few other things.
Best wishes to The Caribbean antl all the
members of C. H. S,"



51 West i6th Street,
New York City, N. Y.

"I wish you all the success in the world for your
annual this year and I'd like to be remembered to
the Alumni and any of the boys and girls in High
School who knew this particular member of the
Class of 1918.

I was graduated from the School of Journalism
of Columbia University last June and am now on
tiic staff of The Pilgrims' Almanack, a magazine
supported by a group of artists and writers of New
York and do tree lance articles for some of the
newspapers.

Miss Katherine Davis, who was Principal of
Cristobal School in my day, lives in New York and
occasionally we have tea together.

Some ot the Alumni or the students may re-
member my brother, Bob Waid. He was grad-
uated from Annapolis last June the same day I
finished at Columbia. At present Bob is in the
Pacific maneuvers, probably plotting in the Plot-
ting Room (the very best place to plot) as to the
easiest way to capture Hawaii.

Believe me, I often yearn for the tropic isle
wiien winter hits New York, but on the whole I
make a pretty good Eskimo."

Catherine Teese Waid.

igrg.
.Alice Arlene Ball, i 18 Maple .Avenue, Tacoma

Park, Md.
Kenneth Edwards, Wellsboro, Pa.
Dorothy Weir Montanve, Falls, Pa.

"Ma\ The Caribbean continue to be pub-
lished for many more years, and may every
year be more successful than the last. There are
two little boys in the Montanve family now."
James Raymond, Cristobal, Canal Zone.



VUl: CAKIHHI.W.



21



F.THA Bi;viNc;i()\, i.5.io West 47rli Street, I.ms
Angeles, Calit.
"I have iK-eii lioiiie siiue graiiuaiicin troiii
l)iisincss college owing to the illness ot ni\' dear
mother.

"I will always have a warm spot in m\- heart
for Cristobal 'H,' so I wish noii loads ot suc-
cess for this year's annual."

L1NDAI.E Davis, 5 Boylston Street, Cambridge,
Mass.

"Let me congratulate C. H. S. on the up-to-
the-minute manner in which the annual is
being hantlletl.

"To mv brother alumni I extend a wish for
the renewal of happy friendships in the near
future.

"To the graduates of to-morrow who are
soon to join our ranks I extend a happy wel-
come and best wishes for success in the future.

"To the undergraduates I send a pledge of
faith in their ability to raise 'I"he Caribbean*
to even greater heights than ha\e been at-
tained.

"I was graduated trom Tufts last June.
Thanks to the fine training 1 recei\ed at C.
H. S., I entered the four-year course insteati of
the five year. Since gratluation I am special-
izing in Oral Surgery. I hatl hoped to open
an office in my native lanii but financial condi-
tions make it impossible. .Some da\', when I
have made my first million I will return to
the palm-fringed shore where we drink the
Chagres water anil ot the mango freely eat.
In other words amiil all the thrills and joys
of a big city I still find time to be homesick
and hungry tor news ot the Canal Zone."

Al Dovle, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
Jack B. Fields, Box 279, .Austin, Texas.

Kenneth Greene, R. F. I). Xu. 4, Couilersporr,
Pa.

"How's The Caribbean coming this \earr
I hope you have lots ot material, and I know
you are capable of producing an annual that
will be up to scratch.'

".As for myself I am still 'jumping the
stubble' on the hillsides ot Potter County,
Pennsylvania. I would like to hear trom any
of my friends who might care to write."



Hari.an Hoi.mwooi), ^^S furd .Street, Oakland,
Calif.

"If vou will look in Tin: CARir.BKW of the
class of 1920 you will see prophesied a reunion
of that class at Cristobal High School. Ke-
ceiuK, more than ever betore 1 lia\e remem-
bered that forecast and hax'c hoped tor its
fultillmeiit. I have been out ot the universi-
t\ ami in business eight months now and hav-
ing made many new friends ainl connections,
I ha\e found myselt thinking many times
of the old friends and surrouiulings and w(jn-
dering what changes have come to them.

"Mrs. Holmwooil and I expect to visit Pan-
ama sometime and I hope some of \ciu may be
there. One of our first calls will be made t(3
Cristobal High School to whose students, fac-
ulty', anil products we wish all gooil luck and
success."

.Alson Skars, Dana Hotel, 1422 Dana .Street,
Berkeley, Calif.

Katherine Burgoon Stewari, Cristobal, Canal
Zone.

.Alice Siilson, Colon, Republic of Panama.
Lillian Cotton Van Wagner, "225 T'ouith .Ave.,
.Apartment Bi, Brookl\n, N. Y.

n)2i

Carl Duev, 72 South .A\enue, Mariner's Harbor,
Staten Island, X. Y.

KiRBv Ferguson, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

Charles Henter, U. S. Na\al .Air Station, Hamp-
ton Roads, Va.

Alice Hunter, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

Frank Ravmonu, 344 Fast 120th Street, Xew
York City, X. Y.

Eleanor Zimmermann, 214 Willard .Avenue,
Westerleigh, Staten island, X. Y.

"Since coming to Staten Island, I ha\e at-
tended Brandon-Stevens Institute which is a
business school. I went mainly to get up my
speed in shorthand and have passed the 100-
word test, which is the graduating test.

"I enjoyed reading The Caribbean for 1 924,
and I sincerely hope that this year's may be
even better. Here's to success for the Class
of '2; and also to The Caribbean."



22



THE CARIBBEAN.



Columbia University,
New York Citv, N. Y.
"There is nothing like the first year at medical
school, for then you realize the value of time. We
have so much to do and very little time to do it in.
It is a case of the first and last, for it's the last of
my four years towards the A. B. degree but the
first towards the M. D. Just think, four years
ago, we were getting ready for graduation at the
National Theater. Now it is happening all over
again but it wont be at the National Theater nor
will it be with a class of six. It's great to have
four years in your favor, but I surely envy the
Seniors who are to become C. H. S. Alumni."

Frank. Raymond.
1922.
Marjorie Ball, 118 Maple Avenue, Tacoma

Park, Md.
George Cartwright, Cuheco Fraternity, State

College, Pa.
Ida Brown Doyle, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
Paul Doyle, Cristobal, Canal Zone.
Mary Glenn Fields, 1221 Marshall Lane, .Austin,

Texas.
LeRoy Magnuson, Balboa, Canal Zone.
Mildred Stafford, 166 Potters Avenue, Provi-
dence, R. I.
Emma Townsend, Gatun, Canal Zone.
Wesley Townsend, Gatun, Canal Zone.
Jorda.v Zimmermann, 221 Sims Hall, Svracuse,
N. Y.
"I am half way through my sophomore
year at College of Forestry. I've just fin-
ished my semester exams, ami they were stifi^
ones too.

"The Caribbean has my best wishes for a
prosperous year. I know that they get better
every year and that this year's annual will set
a new high standard.

"P. S. \\\\\ Mary, my roommate, sends his
rcgarils along with mine to the ones who knew
us.

^923-
Gerald D. Bi.iss, Jr., Cristobal, Canal Zone.
"I hope that this year's Caribbean may
continue to do what the ones before have
done eclipse its predecessor. So over the
top with the best of luck for C. H. S.' An-
nual for 1925."



Ernst Euphrat, 3935 Burwood .Avenue, South
Norwood, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Louise Henter, Philadelphia General Hospital,
Philadelphia, Pa.

"To think that this is my second letter to
The Caribbean as an alumnus, or am I an
alumna? Sometimes it seems like a hundred
\ears and then again like nothing at all since
the time itv were busy getting out alumni
letters.

"I notice you're to be graduated in '26. So
am I. I suppose you'll be planning to go away
and I I'll be planning my trip back. Every-
one is raving about the smell of spring in the
air here, but nothing would please me better
than to smell Bolivar Street on my way to
school in the bus again yes, even the fish
market.

"We hear wonderful rumors about The
Caribbean for '25. We of '23 are anxious to
receive an early copy, we who thought that
any class would have to go far to put out an
annual equal to ours. You see then we didn't
think it possible but we hear you've beaten
us and we hope you have."

Edward May, Box 40S, Balboa, Canal Zone.

"The high school carni\al this >ear was
surely most enjoyable; some of the booths
were unique, and the assembly hall ]irogram
was excellent.

"You no doubt know that I am again work-
ing in the village of Balboa. I guess it is to
be permanent this time.

"It is useless for me to say that I am anx-
ious to see The Caribbean, 19K, because I
am alwa>s interested in anything pertaining
to Cristobal High School. I often wish I
couUl be back there again. We do not realize
what good times we have in high school until
it is too late. When we are there, we see noth-
ing but work, but when we are out every-
thing ap]iears in different light.

"Please convey to the faculty, students,
aiui stafl-" m\' hearty good wishes for the most
successful year and the best annual C. H. S.
has yet seen."

Henry Moore, Catlet on S. S. San/a Paula.
"Best wishes for the success of the annual
and the Class of '2<;."



THF, CARIRRF.AN.



2J



Emogene Nash, 1012 Monnctt, Norman, Okla.

"College life is great ami you don't want to
miss it if you can help it.

"The first two years of my college work are
to be here at the L'niversity of Oklahoma, aiul
the rest at Coliimhia University in Ncu Vuik
City.

"I liojic tiiat this year's annual will he hit;-
ger and better than ever, although it will he
hard to beat the one of '2.5. 1 think the an-
nuals of '20 and '2', have been the best. Ask
.Al Doyle about ir."
M.A'i-risoN Pri.i.K., Cristobal, Canal /one.

/9-V.

DoROTin' Ahendro I H, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

"Best wishes to The CARUiiiEAx."
Florence Alberts, Fort Randolph, Canal Zone.
Jose .Arosemen'a, Colon, Republic of Panama.
Charlotte Housel, (jatiui, Canal Zone.
Gladys Fowande, Balboa, Canal Zone.
Morris XFarchoskv, Colon, Republic ot Panama.
Inza iNFarkham, Wyoming Seminary, Kingston,
Pa.
"This morning it was twenty below in
places around here at school. It was snowing
so this morning that we were unable to go to
chapel st)nie tlifferent from the Zone and I
surely wish I were tiiere.

"Congratulations and best wishes tor the
Class of '25 and all the success in the world tor
The Caribbean."
Irene McCourt, Gatun, Canal Zone.

"I am semling my heartiest wishes to the
Class of '25, the faculty of Cristobal High, and
to the staff for a very successtiil annual."
George Oakes, Fort De Fesseps, Canal Zone.
Chester L. Pike, L^niversity of Oregon, i;;^!
F.merald Street, Fugene, Oreg.
"Here comes Spark Plug, two months late,
but better late than never.

"We have had a wonderful winter, snow and
rain, sunshine and mountain cIoulIs some
ilitferent from Panama with the palms and
warmth, for every ilay we look out to the
Coast Range and its snow-cappeii mountains;
but, although almost five thousand miles of
salty brine separate the L'niversity ot Oregon
from the Canal Zone and the 'Office of the Eldi-
tor,' those letterheads of The Caribbean
surelv bring back memories. Ot course vou



will put out a fine annual, this year, for tra-
dition of Cristobal High School liemantls it,
and I know that the Class of '25 will not fail
her. Best wishes anyhow."

F.Dirii C toril, Delaware.
"At present I am visiting Mother anti Myr-
tle here in Milforcl, but as soon as my husbaml
returns from Honolulu we will be in I'orts-
moutli, X. IF, and New Fondon, Conn., tor
the rest ot the > ear.

"Here's wishing sou the best o' luck, and
I hope you'll have the best Caribbean ever,
but you'll have to have a wonderful one to
beat the Class of '24."

.Andrew Smi in, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

"I shall not tollow the usual policy of mv
fellow alumni ami say 'that the Caribbean of
'24 (or whatever year) was the best ever," etc.,
but I heartily wish that as each succeeding
year passes it will have brought forth one bet-
ter than the precetling year, and still nearer
to that infinite liegree, 'The Perfect.'

"I personally wish Miss Ruth Hopkins and
her corps ot assistants such good success with
the annual that they will, when their time is
done, la\' down their tools anil say 'I am sat-
isfied, I could do no better, as I ha\'e done m\-
best.' I wish to pass on to those who worrv
what the other fellow thinks or will think,
this quotation, from the 'Autobiography of
Andrew Carnegie': 'Fhy reproach alone do
fear'."

Ethel Sonneman, Cristobal, Canal Zone.

"I think you all know that I am taking a
post graduate course at C. H. S. preparing to
enter college next year.

"I hope this year's annual may be one of
the best, but I will say, 'Yours can not be
better than ours in my estimation'."

Gatun, Canal Zone.
"I can hartlly realize a year has passetl since I

was one of you. .Ay, there's the rub, to think ot

you, hope for you, and yet not be with you.

It is almost time for the annual of nineteen

twenty-five to take its place in the hall of fame

with those ot yore.

I thought our book of nineteen twenty-four

could never be surpassed, but all class priile asitle,

I know the annual of nineteen twenty-five will be

the best yet. Make it so, Cristobal."

Charlotte Holsel.



24



THR CARIBBEAN.




THK CARIBBEAN.



25




Kiilh Diirv,



MV GOOD ENGLISH CREED.

Based oil Prufussor I'alnicr's "Self Ctiltiv.itum in linglisli."

I believe in tlic use ot good English, the greatest of all arts anil giver of great
joy not only in reading but also in writing and everyda\- speech. 1 believe in
striving to mean what I say and to say what I mean. I believe that a gooti
speaker keeps gootl company. I believe that it we are watchhil ot our speech,
making our words continually more true, tree, and resourceful; that if we look
upon our occasions of writing as opportunities; that if in all our utterances we
think of him who hears; that if we lean on our subject, we shall make a daily ad-
vance not only in speech, but in personal power, general serviceableness, and,
consequently, delight to ourselves and others. William Cousins, '-^5.



l^e^ultsi of tijc Contesit.



A SPECKLED BEAUTY.

Clarice Sternberg, 'j6.

This story was judged the best submitted in the whole high

school in the 1915 Short .Story Contest.)

"Peggy darlin', what would you do if you had
to see what I do, every time you looked in the
mirror for the rest of your life.''" The speaker
was seated before a dressing table scrutinizing her
reflection relentlessly, while she yanked a comb
through a mass of flaming red hair. "It breaks
mv heart to think that the only way my picture
would ever be able to get in the papers, would be
as an ad for freckle cream."

"Oh, Irish! ^'ou know you're awfully cute,
^'our sweet freckles are the envied possession
which I crave." Nevertheless, Peggy looked very
much satisfied with her own dusky hair and lan-
guid black eyes. She was a beauty, and she knew
it. "Besides, didn't Miss Perkins choose you as
one of the two lucky ones to visit Mrs. Truesdale
tor the summer, and rope in one of those numerous
young millionares?"

MR 95 193 4



"Don't worry, Peggy, there's method in her mad-
ness. She sent me for the simple reason that my
ugliness will so set off your beauty that they can't
help but fall for you. She is going to get you
married well or die in the act."

".And I don't want to get married. I want to
earn my own living, and live my own life. You're
not a beauty, Irish, but if you'd only realize it,
you really are cute. Your little ways make all of
us boarding school girls simply fall in love with
you, but as soon as a man appears on the horizon,
you withdraw into your shell, and do a complete
fadeout. They won't eat you up, Irish dear.
But you act like a wallflower, so naturally they
are going to treat you like one. Here we are at
a new place; we don't know a soul. Why, my
dear, think of the opportunity! In a few minutes
Mrs. Truesdale is going to take us to the country
club, where all the rich sheiks are going to turn
out to see Mrs. Truesdale's annual shipment of
'beautiful but dumbs' from Miss Perkins' Select
Finishing School. Why not give 'em a treat?



26



THE CARIBBEAN.



Act as if you're so used to dancing every dance
and being cut in on all the time that they'll just
naturally be wild to dance with you. Blow your
own horn!"

"But I'm afraid of men, Peggy. I'm from a
family of girls, I've been brought up with girls,
and I go to school with girls. I'm scared to death
when a boy comes near me."

"But tell me that you'll try this, Irish. Please.
For me?"

"Peggy, I guess I will. I do so want to have a
good time."

"Attaboy, Irish. I'll be rooting on the side lines."

An hour and a half later, a limousine drew up in
front of the country club. A crowd of stags
flanked the doorway. There was a perfect silence
as the door of the car opened and a tall, slender,
languid beauty, wrapped in a gorgeous evening
cloak, stepped out, followed by another figure,
which slipped out and into the club like a streak of
blue and silver lightning topped by a flame of fire.
However, a tall slender youth standing close to
the door saw just a bit more than the rest. He
saw a pair of big blue eyes, just bubbling with
mischief, and a saucy, upturned nose, quivering
nevertheless, just a little with fright, like that of
a scared bunny.

Peggy and Irish remained in the dressing room
for a while, for Peggy said it would be best to let
the dance get well under way before they burst.on
the public. Irish was so white that her freckles
stood out in great, vivid bright spots, but as she
peeked out at the dancers, the excitement of the
moment returned, and her eyes and cheeks burned
with it. They walked demurely over the floor to
Mrs. Truesdale's chair and sat down. Peggy
looked bored, drowsy, and rather like all the rest
of the various types of blondes and brunettes
scattered about the room. There was one red
head, but, alas, she lacked the freckles and the
funny little nose of Irish.

"Gee!" thought Peggy, "she ought to get that
nose insured." She gave Irish a poke in the ribs.
"Do your stufl^, Irish!"

Inwardly quaking, and wishing herself miles
away, Irish obediently cast her eyes toward the
stag line. She just looked, but oh! what a look!
A ripple ran up and down the stag line. It wav-
ered. Irish shook her mop of red curls, and
looked again. It melted. Irish rcachetl out and
grabbed Peggy's hand.



"Irish! They are simply staring at you."

"Uh! Uh! I bet they are counting my freckles!"

The drum boomed, the saxophone wailed, and
the dance began. In a body the stag line surged
toward Mrs. Truesdale's corner. She stood up
to make introductions, but none were necessary.

Irish felt herself propelled across the floor, drift-
ing easily, seemingly without effort. She looked
up into a pair of laughing brown eyes that nearly
equaled her own for mischief. He spoke,

"Where have you been all my life?"

It was the customary question. But she
mustn't give the customary answer. Something
better. She smiled up at him.

"Why, waiting for you, of course!"

"Say! Are you really from Miss Perkins' ? You
look different somehow, from the rest. Besides,
from the dirty looks you're getting from the wall-
flowers, I don't think that you'd get along well
with girls. Too popular, you know. The stag
line is still standing where you left them."

And Irish, the beloved of all girls, usually the
wallflower, the flat tire, the girl who turned pale
at the sight of a boy, answered, "I haven't been
there long, and I'm not used to girls. There were
only boys in my family, so I feel at home only with
them. I hope you boys will be nice to me."

As if in answer to her wish the stag line woke
up to the fact that they could cut in. They
swarmed around her, and from then on, she took
barely six steps with the same man. Their re-
marks seemed jumbled together in her head.

"Gee, you've got the cutest freckles."

"I hope you don't call speckles of such a lovely
gold, freckles."

"Your hair is wonderful! Your freckles just
match it."

In fact, she had a wonderful evening.

The brown-eyed boy did not appear again until
it was time to go home. He came up and took
her hands.

"When shall I see you again, little gold girl?
Will you go riding with me in the morning?"

"Oh, I couldn't. Horseback riding makes my
freckles pop out terribly."

"Your freckles! Why not? The more the
merrier. Haven't you heard that little poem

'Little freckles on your nose
I love every one that grows'

And I do! I'll be around for you at ten."



THK CARIBBEAN.



%1



When Peggy aiul Irish were going to hetl after
the dance, Irish forgot something. Or rather she
wanted Peggy to think she'd forgotten. Her jar
ot treckle cream stood unopened antl Irish went
to bed unbesmeared with strange mixtures, which
never did any good anyway.

Peggy was mystified. But later when she woke
up in the night, she heartl Irish murmur something
in her sleep, and she leaneti over to catch it.

"I.irtle freckles on my nose, 'n he loves e\erv
one that grows."

THE SE.AWEED DOLL.

(A Legend of Panama.)
Helen J. Keetie, '26.

(This story was, next to the grand [irize story, the best sub-
mitted from the Junior Class in the 1925 Short Story Contest.)

Many, many years ago oh! long before Morgan
came and took the rich city of Panama a little
Spanish girl made a hammock of strong reeds for
her father. She worked very patiently, extreme-
ly so, for did she not love her Daddy more than
anybody else? .Also, had he not rescued her
dolly, such as it was, from drowning in the river?
She loved her "muiieca" dearly because it was
practically the only plaything she had. It had
not fared very well in the water, although it had
originally come from the blue depths of the dark sea.

It was a wondrous doll for those times made
of seaweed with slender, dainty reeds binding and
shaping its peculiar botly. The arms were fas-
tened to the fat and bulging neck, and a sticky,
green reed bound it at the wrist. It had not five
fingers, as ortlinary dolls do, but about ten or
twelve on each hand. It was a very limp (.loll,
bur Chii|uita, as her family lovingly called her,
saitl that she could hug and stiueeze it better and
tighter than if it were more solid. For a dress,
the limp and queer doll had two bright reii star
apple leaves, fastened together with little stems
taken from plants which grew nearby. In spite
of its ugliness antl limpness, Chiquita loved it
very much and therefore had been very grateful
to her father when he had saved the poor doll
from a watery gra\e.

Thus it was that Chiquita resolved to show her
appreciation by making a beautiful hammock in
which he might rest his weary body when he re-
turned from his labors. It should be woven care-



fully and strongi}- of the finest of fine reeds. It
should be trimmed with the brightest of bright
red star apple leaves, l-'or a lining she woukl
pick the smoothest of the smooth banana leaves.
Over this she would put sweet-smelling orange
blossoms, for she intended that her task shouUl be
clone when oranges were in blossom, when the
star apple leaves were reddest, when the reeds
were at their best, and when banana leaves were
their smoothest.

It was a labor of love, and love puts in little
tlelicate touches which knowledge can not. She
had knowledge to work by; she hati love to work
tor; love and knowledge combincii jiroduced a
marvelous hammock.

Daddy was not told of this gift he was to re-
ceive; his little girl had done it secretly with an
occasional hint from her mother. She had
strained her eyes, testeil her power until she was
scarcely able to go on.

But at last she finisheti! .And oh! The iov of
putting it in place. Daddy woukl not have to
sleep on the hard ground that night, nor woukl he
have nasty ants and possibly lizartls crawling on
or about him. No, he would sleep on a bed of
soft, fragrant orange blossoms. He would be in
the air, he woukl receive the cool, fresh breeze as
it passed through the little shack. He would be
high up in their little world ^just where he ought
to be, according to Chiquita king of their little
kingdom. He would inhale the sweet odors of
most perfect orchids that hung around him, for
Chiquita had that day gathered .some of the.se
most fragrant flowers. This hammock was strong
too, >es, it was strong enough to hold Juanita's
father and he weighed a great deal more than
Chiquita's father.

So the hammock was made ready and she pre-
pared f(jr the home-coming of her father. When
she saw him in the distance she hid herself anii
watched him approach their poor abode.

.At first he did not notice the hammock and
wanted to know where Chiquita was. He turned
around to look for her and as he did, his eyes rested
on the newly wrought hammock. He stared in
astonishment at the work of art and beauty.

Chiquita, thinking he did not like it, ran out and
exclaimed in a tiismayed voice, "Don't you like it,
Daildy? I tiid my very best. .Aren't the reeds
the finest? Aren't the orange blossoms the most
fragrant? .Aren't the ?"



28



THE CARIBBEAN.



"Wait a minute, daughter, 1 have not said that
they are not the best. It is beautiful. But why
is all this done for me? Why do I deserve such
an honor?"

"Because," said she, "you rescued my doll when
she was drowning."

"Gracias, muchas gracias, mil gracias, hija
mia!" he exclaimed happily.

And that night Chiquita's father slept soundly
and well on a bed of orange blossoms and received
a cool breeze which the other members of the
family missed. He declared, in the morning, that
that was the best he had slept in years.

For many, many succeeding nights, Chiquita's
daddy slept on a soft bed until the hammock wore
out. Then his wife and daughter made him
another one, but the rest of his family slept on
cold, hard ground.

When his sons grew up they had hammocks ot
reeds which their wives wove patiently and care-
fully for them. Thus, there grew up and passed
down from generation to generation until the
present day the custom of the man ot the house
having a hammock while the others slept on the
floor.

Now you may go to Old Panama or Juan Diaz,
look into any grass hut, and you will see one ham-
mock and one only for the niMi of the family.

The hammocks are not nearly as beautiful nor
as carefully made as was the one Chiquita wove.
'I'o-dav they are mostly of cotton and of string,
tied in knots.

But mothers and fathers still tell their children
of how Chiquita made a wonderful hammock for
her father because he saved her seaweed doll.
Then they tell them that they are to follow her
example as their grandparents and great-grand-
parents have done before them.

BLIND LUCK.

Charles Will, "2J.

(This story was awarded first place among the stories sub-
mitted by Sophomores.)

It was off the coast of Panama on a balmy after-
noon in March. The blue sky, dotted here and
there by white fleecy clouds, reflected a still bluer
sea which rolled up on the sanily beaches in
huge white combers. Scattered on the beaches
were palmettos and coconut palms, more numer-
ous as they approached the verdant jungle. But



Captain Harrison, speeding down the coast in his
trim DeHaviland plane, had no eye for the
beauties of nature that day. He guided the plane
in a mechanical way with the skill of a born
aviator, but his brow was clouded and his lips re-
peated over and over again the words: "Chinks,
blast 'em. Up to their internal trade again. I've
got to spot 'em soon."

His companion. Lieutenant Conte of the Pana-
ma National Police, at intervals scanned the coast
eagerly, and after one of these observations,
shouted througli the speaking tube to the captain:
"No sign of the hut yet, sir."

The pilot, hearing this, shouted back, "We'll
continue for an hour more and if we don't strike
anything we'll return to the field."

The aeroplane had proceeded for almost an
hour when Harrison noticed looming on the hori-
zon a bank of dark clouds. It was one of those
short violent tropical storms which are so frequent
ofl^ the coast at this time of the year. These
squalls are generally preceded by violent gusts of
wind which sometimes attain a velocity of fifty
miles. As the plane approached the storm area,
it began to twist and turn, dive up and down,
seldom on an even keel; the wind howled through
the wing supports and at last the rain fell, striking
the wings like hail, and almost blinding the oc-
cupants. It required all the skill of the pilot to
keep the ship headed into the wind, but he was
succeeding admirably when the motor began miss-
ing on two of ths cylinders. The decreased speed
had its effect on the plane and it dived and twisted
more than ever and once almost went into a tail-
spin which would have meant destruction. Final-
ly, with a cough the engine stopped dead. The
ship fell rapidly, the aviators straining their eyes
through the mist for a landing place. In a few
minutes Conte gave a shout and pointed ahead to
a small glade with a few stunted trees. Here the
plane finally settled, its right wing snapping when
it struck a tree just as the plane reached the ground.

The two aviators, who had escaped with a few
scratches, immediately climbed out of the cockpit
and surveyed the wreck.

"Well, the only thing that we can do is make for
the nearest town and telephone the Field," re-
marked Harrison gloomily.

'I"he airmen soon collected everything they
wanted and started through the jungle adjoining
the coast.



THE CARIBBEAN.



29



A few lioiirs later the moon rose over rhe tiis-
taiit mountains and spread her beams tlirough the
wet forest where tlie two hapless airmen were
truilging. Sikklenly the>- emerged into a little
clearing suffused with moonlight and espieil a
little bamhoo hut at the farthest end.

"There's a dry spot that we can ajipropriate tor
the night," suggestei.1 Conte.

"We might as well," returned rhe other, "we
can't make town until morning."

With this the two approachetl the hut and, with
a few pushes, opened the door.

The shack containeii only one room. .A fire-
place was at one enii; near it on a table lay the
remains of a meal. But what surprised the air-
men was the numerous tin-covered crates with
labels denoting different destinations in the United
States and South .'\merica. .As they stood there
contemplating their discovery, the sound ot a
boat grating on the beach nearby was heard, and
then footsteps approacheii the hut. The captain
quickly pulled his companion behind some crates.
Through the semi-darkness of the cabin the
aviators saw four figures enter. Three of these
were Chinamen and the other, a Spaniard. They
were jabbering in Spanish excitedh'.

"Vou are sure you closed the tloor when you
left, Chong?" asked the Spaniard.

"Positive, senor Diaz. Foo was with me.
Weren't you?" said the one who answered to the
name of Chong.

"That was a bad storm. The wind might have
moved the door," said Foo, thus appealed to.

"All right then," replied Diaz, somewhat ap-
peased, "let us begin packing."

.An old trunk was dragged out of the corner and
opened. The airmen saw Chong reach into the
bottom and touch a spring which revealed to their
astonished eyes a small secret compartment in the
trunk! Diaz, the Spaniard, then proceeded to open
a crate and take out numerous tins which were
packed in the compartment. The aviators looked
at each other exultantly and drew their revolvers.
"Hands up," shouted the lieutenant coming
from behind a crate, with the captain following,
"I arrest you in the name of the Panaman Govern-
ment for smuggling opium."

The culprits were so dumbfountled that they
offered no resistance as they were handcuffed.

.After the prisoners were made secure the captain
dryly remarked with a chuckle to the lieutenant,
"Blind luck."



TRF:.ASURE SEEKERS.

Mercedes Jordan, '28.
This story won first place among Krcsliman stories.

Not a breath of air was stirring The azure
sky, clear except for an (jccasional fleecy clouii,
was reflected in the mirror like surface of the bay.

Ernest was lying on the end of the pier. With-
out his realizing it, the azure sky, the mirror-like
bay, and the fleecy clouds were calling to all his
boyish instincts. He was dreaming about the
tiays when Morgan was in Panama, and was imag-
ining all sorts of things about hidden treasure
when a cheerful voice broke the stillness, startling
him out of his reverie.

"Hello, there, Ernest. Waiting to go for a sail ?"

Ernest sat up. "Go sailing on this calm sea?
No! But, say, Joe, I was just wishing you would
come along. Let's go out in the cayuco."

"Sure, we'll go. I'll get my padtlles. .And,
say," he added as a new thfiught struck him, "sup-
posing we go to that Morgan cave."

"That's where we'll go. This is just the time.
Hurr\ Joe, ami get your paddles. Bring a bag
for the gold, and a machete, too."

Both boys were soon in rhe cayuco. Joe, hntl-
ing his mother gone, had taken the libert\- of
bringing his .22 along, and Ernest had borrowed
his father's shotgun seeing that its owner was
not around.

For nearly two hours they took turns paddling
and guiding the cayuco. .At last they came in
sight of a small stretch of sandy beach. On
either side and in the background there was
nothing to be seen but jungle.

The two paddled straight tor this beach and soon
had their cayuco up far enough on the sand so
that the tide could not reach it. Taking up his
rifle and machete, Joe started off toward the
underbrush. Ernest shouldered the shotgun, picked
up the large bag, and followed him.

With Joe leading, using the machete when it was
needed, they made their way through the untler-
growth, stopping once in a while to rest or to
look around.

"I wonder how far we are from the place." Joe
broke the silence of one of their brief stops.

"It can't be very far away. Say, it's a good
thing we didn't tell our folks where we were going
or we wouldn't be here now."

"You know, after all that I've heard about that
cave I've always wanted to go there, but never ex-



30



THE CARIBBEAN.



pected to. Do you suppose that Morgan really
buried some of his gold there?" observed Joe as
they started again, chopping their way through
the jungle.

"Old I'ncle Dan said" began Ernest, but he
never finished. Through the dark branches of a
low, overhanging tree gleamed a pair ot bright
eves. They seemed to fascinate him. Ernest
knew that if he did not move, the cat would, and
yet he could not.

"What's the matter, Ernest? Come on." Joe's
voice brought him to his senses, and, raising the
gun to his shoulder, he fired at the gleaming eyes.
There was a hideous scream, and the next instant
a huge wildcat dropped to the ground with a thud.
Joe looked at Ernest with open admiration.
"You are some shot, Ernest. I didn't even see
that thing."

Ernest stood over his victim with glowing pride.
"Em not going on any farther, Joe. Em going to
take this thing home and skin it," he said.

"Come on then. We'd better hurry. ^Ve might
run into this cat's mate," said Joe.

"If we should, I'd give him a shot, too."
"Huh, you are not the only one that's got a gun."
Both boys started back to the cayuco, Ernest
laboring under the weight of his dead cat and Joe
just hoping that they would would run across the
mate. His eyes keenly alert tor any movement
in the bushes, it was he who caught sight of a little
furry head sticking out of a hollow log. He went
up and looked in. .^n exclamation of delight
escaped his lips.

"Say, Ernest, you can have your old dead cat.
I've got some lives ones."

Ernest came up cautiously and together they
peered in at three little spitting kittens.
".\re you going to take those home?"
"Sure! Didn't you kill their mother?"
"Well, if you're going to take them, you'd better
hurry before their dad gets home."

In a few moments three indignant little balls
of fur were wriggling and fussing inside the treas-
ure bag. With many cautious looks about them
the boys hurried back over their freshly cut path,
Ernest carrying his inert mother cat and Joe his
squirming kittens.

The end of this perfect day saw two liappy boys,
all forgetful of Morgan's treasure, eagerly trying
to relieve with baby bottles the distress of three
hungry little kittens.



SOLILOQUY OF A CAKE.

(Made in Miss Bakewell's Freshmun H. A. Cl.iss)
Ethel Barnetl, '2g.

This soliloqu>' w.is given first place in the misceHaneoiis
section 1925 contest.

Curiously enough, I am being made, not born,
but the being made is a terrible ordeal. My
maker, a little girl with curly hair, first dashes
in the butter and sugar, then the eggs, then the
milk, then the flour and baking powder, and stirs
me vigorously together. She should be more care-
ful of me in my infant stages.

Now I am being put in a dark cave which she
calls an oven. I am not alone, for a tew other
embryo cakes are entombed with me. Gracious!
how hot it is in here. Look at me swelling! I
certainly must be a handsome fellow now. I
wish she would give me a mirror. The door opens.
I am released from that terrible dungeon, but I
can scarcely get time for a breathing spell before
she begins to slap that sticky mixture she calls
icing all over me. She'll spoil my beauty if she
keeps on. Now I am being adorned with pink
flowers and green leaves. The flowers are pretty,
but I don't like the color of those green leaves.
Now I am to be presented to Miss Bakewell, the
little girl's teacher. She, surely, will appreciate
my beauty.

What's this I hear Miss Bakewell say about me?
"Heavy as lead. I wouldn't want to be hit by it."
Why, the very idea!!! I am better looking than
any of those mutts over there and I'm not heavy
either. Gracious! what a cruel world! I would
I were out ot it.

Oh no! I didn't mean that. But she's taking
me at my word and eating me. She's stopped;
thank goodness! She heard me! But what is
she trying to do with me? Throw me into a gar-
bage can? Impossible!! The indignity of it!
How can I bear this disgrace?

Here I repose sadly, surrounded by lowly egg
shells, orange peeling, and a common cabbage.
This foul air is stifling! Look at the dirty alley
cat! What's he doing? eating me!! Outrageous!
I won't be eaten by a cat! Stop!! Stop!

Alas! Alas! One more mouthful of me re-
mains to be lievoured by a thin, dirty, one-eyed
cat. I can bear no more. (jooti-!)ye, beautiful
world, good-bye. I am going, going, gone forever.



THK CARIBBEAN.



31




DAWN

Ruth E. Hopkins, 'sj.

Slowly and magnificently, nature painted the
cold gray sky with warm glowing cardinal daub-
ing here ami there a spot of viviii blue, pale pink,
or mci'ow yellow, (irailually the sea turneil from
emerald green fu liquid goKl. In the distance,
lights waned an 1 faded away, while the great red
svm steadil)' climi)ed over the horizon and blotted
out the harmnny of colors in the heavens. Final-
ly, the faint chug-chug of a motor boat broke on
the listener's ear, :intl thus another day began.

AN OLD DLINGEON.

(Sec illustration on paRC 3i.)
/\/(//! Ihiey, 'jf.

The dungeon's only light came from the en-
trance. Its floor was of hard, cool clay, packed,
through the centuries, into smoothness by the
succession of the passing feet of Morgan's men,
antique hunters, pleasure seekers, and what not.
Its walls were covered with a damp, fungus growth,
and at intervals showed the rusted shackles which
in ancient days had held many a wretched prisoner.
Water oozed from cracks and dripped monnton-
ously upon the floor, and an upheaval of dirt,
stone, and clay showed where some adventurer
had vainly sought gold. What stories could this
dungeon tell! But its lips are sealed and it gives
forth only the hollow echo of a girl's careless laugh-
ter or the rumble of an inquisitive man's voice.

DAWN.

Helen Ahendroth, '2^.

The street lights have just gone out. It is
tlark. Only the crowing of a cock disturbs the
peaceful quietude of a slumbering world. Soon,
a faint ray of light appears in the east. It grows
brighter. It pierces the fog and reaches the dew-
covered earth. Long thin red arms reach up into
the sky and then the sun, a fiery orb, appears over
the housetops over the treetops even and,
in its proper place again, looks down with a warm
and radiant smile, bidding the earth awake.



A MUD PUDDLE.

Rulli E. Hopkins, '25.

It was just an humble mud puddle that nestled
in a hole in the road, '^'et, the moonlight had
turned it from cloudy brown to jirecious shim-
mering gold that mirrored the thick foliage hover-
ing over it, making it look like the finest filigree.
The sweet odor of wiKi flowers cast a spell of en-
chantment t)\\.'r the i|uiet scene.

A ROOM.

Anniel Hcim, '2^.

Just outside the door a glass case stood on the
pavement, its sweet, sticky contents on display.
Beside it an old negro woman, hunched over a
charcoal stove, sat on a soap box amidst other
articles useless to the white man. Through the
door was visible a small cubby-hole of a room in
which there was scarcely space to move around.
Just inside the door several newspapers nailed to
a wooden frame formed a screen for one side of
the room. This screen, a white bed with great
brass balls on its posts, an oil lamp on a rickety
table, and a chair with a broken cane seat con-
stituted the furniture. -A rag rug, soiled and well-
worn, partly covered an ugly gray floor. On the
pale green walls were pasted pictures of movie
actors and actresses who had long ago seen their
day, and many brightly colored pictures torn
from magazines of ancient date.

All in all, the room presented a most dreary and
disagreeable appearance.

MORNING.

Ruth Duey, '25.

Half darkness, and all the world was still. The
stars, glimmering in a bowl of blue, began to fade,
and over the brow of the hill a gray light, shot
with yellow and crimson, appeared, followed by a
crescent of orange. The birds began to sing, cas-
cades of song bursting from their little throats.
.And lastly, the sun in full glory sprang from be-
hind the hill to shine down upon a new day.



32



THE CARIBBEAN.



THE LIGHTHOUSE.

(See illustration on page 33.)
irHliam Cousins, '^J.

Tall, ghostly, with single iri-adiant eye flashing,
you prove that the age of giants has not passed.
In your strength you are impressive, brutal.
Against the dark sky you are tearful. With
your helmet iron peaked, mouth of steel, and steel
collar, you seem another Mars. How we poor
mortals would quake and shiver with fear should
you strut the streets in your overbearing manner!

When the moon shines its stolen light, you seem
to taunt it with the sudden flashes of your eye.
It makes you seem more beastly haughty thing.

In the day you seem to sleep, deceiver, but you
waken with the set of sun to lord it over the hum-
ble dwellings at your feet.

TAKING ON THE PILOT.

Rulh Foos, '2S.

It was midnight, frosty and starlit. Far on the
left, lights twinkled, the lights of the New Jersey
shore. My sister and I, squeezed in one deck
chair, for warmth, felt a thrill of happiness as we
recognized Barnegat light, and realized we were
opposite the very shore on which we had spent so
many happy hours.

The boat slowed down. Minutes passed, min-
utes that seemed like hours, filled with the joy of
home-coming and with shivering from the cold.
Dark forms loomed up from behind and spoke to
us, telling us to come back to the stateroom.
"Just a little while," we pleaded, "just 'till the
pilot comes." The forms retreated.

.Again the minutes that seemed like hours
passed. The lights of the shore seemed like the
stars of night sprinkled on the horizon. The boat
stopped. .\ gentle swish the pilot's boat. A
green spotlight from the ship focussed on a launch
that was drawn up to the side. A man climbed
up the ladder that was slung from the deck. The
launch departed the boat moved on.

Dazed almost asleep we returned to our
stateroom, still with the exaltation that had pos-
sessed us.

"A GREEN TRANQUILLITY."

Dorothy Deiberl, '2^.

In the lap of the jungle rests a placid green lake.
Its edges, darkened by the shadows of the over-



hanging trees, are a deep dull green. Off shore
the heart of the lake holds mirrored the blue-green
of the heavens above. For an instant a zephyr,
whispered down from that blue-green heaven,
awakens a restless ripple on the unruffled surface.
The zephyr goes on its way, and the lake sinks
back again into a quiet, motionless silence.

NIGHT.

U'iUiam Cousins, '2^.
'"At one stride comes the dark." Coleridge.

A small cayuco drifting down a long crimson
road loomed sharply against a background of
bold sweeping colors. The black outline of a
tanker crept quietly into the locks. The world
seemed hushed as if musing.

One by one the lights of the town twinkled out.
High overhead against the dark red sky droned a
belated hydroplane, like a homing pigeon headed
straight for its roost.

Then it was over. Night had fallen too soon.

THE SCHOOL BUILDING AT NIGHT.

Ruth E. Hopkins, '2^.

Huge, gray, and silent, looming out of the earth
to be swallowed again in darkness, the school
building was sleeping. Above, a blue-black sky
brooded, guarding it. A quiet breeze floated from
the ocean; only the lapping of the waves on the
rocks interrupted the melancholy silence.

THE LOCKS AT NIGHT.

Ruth Duey, '25.

A canopy of dark blue sky, through which
filtered myriad pin points of light, hung over the
locks. The reflections from the lock lights made
queer figures on the surface of the water. The
footsteps of a laborer sounded on the path and
echoed to the control house, and the lap, lap of
water against the mossy, damp walls was heard.
At the far end of the canal a boat, laden with
tourists and bound for pleasure ports, awaited the
slaves of electricity, but at the other end, the
grim emergency dam jealously stood, guarding
the entrance.



THF. CARIBRF.AN.



33




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34



THE CARIBBEAN.



THE SUBMARINE DOCKS OF COCO SOLO.

Ja>ie E. Toulon, '2S.

Tied to the docks lie the long, gray submarines,
basking in the bright sun. Here and there a
white-clad sailor moves about his duties. A
murmur comes from the sailors, breaking the
lazy silence. The water is tinted with oil from
the motor boats, tied under a long shed at one
end ot the docks.

\ ripple breaks the still, glassy water as a motor
boat goes put-putt-ing out. The oily waters
splash against the submarines, dance, then settle
back to that lazy, sunny calmness.

Here a submarine is being repaired. Some
sailors are chipping the gray paint off one side,
while, on the other side, other sailors coat the
chipped surface with the protecting lead.

At one end of the docks are tied the tugs, the
Curlew, Fulton, and ^uail, back in their places of rest
after accompanying the submarines on some trip.

As night comes on, the gray submarines and
the boats melt into the dusk, and signal lights
break the gray mist.



A COACH.

IFilliam Clinchard, '26.
(See illustration on page ^4.)

There stands the "coche," not the stately coach
read about in fairy tales, but the famous carro-
mata. The leathern top is folded back carelessly
to let the cotton-covered cushions dry under the
morning sun. The reins hang loosely over the
dashboard. The horse is standing limp with his
flanks moving under his intermittent breathing.
His head is drooping; his eyes are closed, only to
be opened at the movement of occasional traffic.
Beneath the faded Coco-Cola umbrella, sits the
old Jamaican darkey with his elbows on his knees,
and his face hid in his calloused hands, trying to
snatch a nap to make up for his sleep lost during
the night.

A "P-s-s-s-s-t" is heard in the still air, and at
once the driver is awake; he slaps the horse on
the back with the reins, and with the clang of
their gong they are off for another passenger.



W.'




"But wh\- did he say he would come and comes not."

Rosalind in As You Like It.

Kalherine Fischer, '2^.




K=



=^Ji



Rosalind sat alone on the terrace of the garden
before the castle. Dusk had fallen early, for it
was autumn; and just above the trees that bor-
dered the western end of the estate the evening
star twinkled brightly. A breeze stirred the yel-
low leaves of the ivy that clambered over the gray
wall -the same ivy, Rosalind remembered, that
Orlando liked so well, because it gave the gray old
castle a more cheerful and homey look.

The breeze rustled Rosalind's skirts and blew
a strand of silvered hair across her withered cheek.
She shivered and drew her shawl closer about her
shoulders. Soon Orlando would come to help
her to the house just as he had always done. She
could hear his footsteps coming along the stone
terrace. She thought, as she listened, how faint
and uncertain his tread was, and she wished it
were steadier as it had bisn years ago. The steps
were wavering just behind her chair.



She gathered her shawl still closer with one
hand, and extended the other to him whom she
was expecting.

"Are you there, Orlando dear?" she asked in
her soft quavering old voice.

But only a whippoorwill answered her mourn-
fully from the woods. The gray head drooped,
and the withered hands fell slowly together in the
silken lap. A sigh mingled with the breeze. Or-
lando had not come.

The realization brought the memory of another
time that he had not come, causing again the same
old heartache that she had felt then.



Elizabeth, sovereign queen of England, was
waging war with Phillip II on the Continent. All
the nobles and knights left the courts of England
to enlist in Her Majesty's service. Some joined her
army, and some joined her navy under Drake.



THE CARIBBEAN.



35



Orlando was not to Ik- left out. He was one of
the first to enlist in the arm\'.

He would not hear of Rosaliiul's traveling to
Southampton to see him sail, realizing that it
Wviuhi only cause her greater sorrow. Moreover,
tra\eling was anything but comfortable, ani it
was dangerous as well, for robbers and brigantls
infesteil the roailways through the forests. But
on his departure he promiseil to take care of iiim-
self and to return just as soon as possible.

Rosalind wa\ed to him from the terrace until
he rode through the postern gate ant! forded the
Wye. There were tears in her eyes, but she smiled
to him bravely. At the end of the forest, he
turned in his saddle anil saluted her with his
swortl. Then, spurring his liorse, he disappeared
in the forest shadows.

Every ev'ening she waited for him on the terrace
looking toward the postern gate and the Wye River,
for he had promiseil to return at evening, the
happiest hours of their day together. During
these months it was young Orlando, who escorted
her to the great hall, and little Celia who soothed
her by her childish prattle. Then the Duke
Senior, her father, died, leaving her to bear her
sorrows alone. Rosalind yearned for Celia's
sympathy and comforting presence; but Celia and
Oliver were in France. She tried bravely, but
she failed to hide her heartache from the observ-
ing lad of sixteen summers. That she tried to
hide it made the boy tenderer to and more con-
siderate of his mother, and he tried to fill his
father's place during his absence. Thus a
comradeship grew up between the two, so that
they were almost inseparable.

Then one evening Orlando returneil just as
the sun was sinking behind the trees. Rosalind
was pacing up and down the terrace, her arm
linked in that of her son. She did not hear Or-
lando enter the postern gate nor hear his footsteps
as he crossed the terrace. He w^iitcd until she
should turn and see him .'tanding there. It
seemed ages until she reached the farther end of
the terrace. How slow her steps were! Then,
at last, she turned and saw him.

She was so startled that for a moment she just
stared. He was as tall, handsome, and soldierly
as ever; but somehow he seemeil older. He was
smiling, holding out his hand to her. With a
little cry of ioy she ran toward him, her arms out-



stretched. In another instant she was sobbing
against his waistcoat. It was not until her sobs
had ceased that she noticed that Orlando had
onl\- one arm around her. She looked slowly
toward the other, and there was a black sling.
She turned her gaze to his face, mutely asking an
explanation. I'hen, seeing how drawn and care-
worn he looked, her own sorrows dwindled to
mere trifles, as she rejoiced in the light that shone
from his e)es.

They remained on the terrace, seated together
on a stone bench, she leaning contentedly against
his shoulder, he telling her how glad he was to be
at home again. The moon gleamed on the Wye.
The stars shone clear and bright. The song of
the i\>' leaves mingled with the song of the
nightbirds. And they were happy.

The next day was declared a feast day. A mes-
senger was sent to all the tenants of the estate,
bidiling them come and welcome their lord home.
He was sent too, to the friends of Orlando from
surrounding dukedoms, '{"he day was spent in
preparation for the feast. There were deer ven-
ison, roast ox, and puddings to be prepared;
fruits had to be gathered; aiul goatskins opened.
The feast began late in the afternoon and lasted
until everything was either eaten or confiscated by
the poorer tenants. The remainiler of the evening
was spent in dancing aiul in playing games. Celia
and Orlanilo Junior were allowed to remain up,
although Celia fell asleep and had to be carried
by her father u]i the great stone stairway to her
bedroom. Orlando Junior enjoyed himself thor-
oughly, his eyes glistening and his face glowing at
the tales his father told of Spain and France.

-As the last merrymaker departed, Orlando
Junior whispered something to his father; then,
turning, he skipped merrily up the stairs, pausing
on the tr)pmost step to throw a kiss to his mother.
Rosalinii smileil at him and blew one back tf)
him from the tips of her dainty fingers. She
turned to Orlando and at his request went out on
the terrace with him.

The songs of the merrymakers on their home-
ward way echoed back across the hills and dieil
out into the silence, that was broken only by a
cricket who chirped a lonely but nevertheless
cheerful song to the moon, swinging low in the west.

"Orlanilo told me," said Orlando Senior, "of all
the sorrow you've had to bear alone and how



36



THE CARIBBEAN.



bravely you bore all that came. It was selfish of

me

"Xo, Orlando, you must not say that," pro-
tested Rosalind softly, "I missed you, oh! ever
and ever so much; but our queen needed your
service and mine, and the only way Icouldserve
her was togive you to her as long as she needed you."

"But I promise you now, Rosalind, never to
leave you alone again, until death takes one of us."

"And then I shall be with you in spirit."

And the compact was sealetl.

The vears slipped by quickly, leaving their
marks in graying hairs, withering cheeks, and
quavering voices. Orlando's steps grew weaker,
for his health was failing. Time continued the
ravages begun by war. But never once did he
break his promise to Rosalind. Never once did



he forget to escort her from her favorite seat on
the terrace to the great hall.

He would come for her soon, now. He had
never failed her before, and he wouldn't now.

Footsteps echoed along the terrace. Rosalind
lifted her head and listened. Surely that was his
step and now in a moment she would hear his
voice. She waited, smiling.

And then a soft vcjice said caressingly, "Come,
mother, it's getting chilly and you have only that
thin shawl over your shoulders."

Rosalind started, and then, remembering, she
sighed deeply.

A young arm aided her feeble steps across the
terrace and a young voice spoke soothingly to her.
The whippoorwill called, and the ivy leaves
stirred mournfully. But Orlando had not been
unfaithful, for death had taken one.




THE BUILDING OF A BOAT.

Helen Abendrolh, '2^.

The great shipbuilder. Destiny, had decided to
make another boat.

He first needed good strong timber which wouKl
easily bend and shape itself to his purposes. For
this wood he went into the forest of Cristobal
High School, and there he finally selected a few
good trees. Freshmen, that he hewed and set out
to season.

A year passed and the seasoned wood called
Sophomores was ready for use.

He then made the hull, laying it on a strong
foundation, known as Hard Work and Good
Marks. Next he constructed a deck. Endurance,
and made the boat water-tight with a rare mixture
of Patience and Determination.

Knowing that it would take time for this mix-
ture to soak in, he let the structure, Juniors, stand
for awhile, cautioning the watchman. Faculty,
to guard it well. It had been so strongly con-
structed and was so carefully protected by Fac-
ulty, thateven the furious storms of Monotony and
Distraction could not harm it.



He next set to work to smooth and varnish the
sides with a strange solution of Seniordom, and so
put the necessary finishing touches to a well-
made vessel.

At last the day came when Destiny was to
launch his boat. A holiday, Graduation Day,
was declared, and everyone went down to see the
good ship. Ambition, launched upon the sea of life.

When the last pin. Restraint, was knocked out,
the ship slid down the ways of Achievement, which
were greased with a substance called Diploma,
and into the waters of Life, where it was to sail
to the far distant port of Desire.

LEARNING TO DRIVE.

Ruth E. Hopkins, 'z^.

Through the generosity of his parents. Kindness
and Encouragement, Average Boy was given a
choice new automobile. High School Career.
Bravely he started out in his shining car to get
his license. Diploma. Glowing with enthusiasm,
he sank comfortably in his seat, Self-Confidence.

For some time he was accompanied by Novelty,
who aided him in understanding the workings of
the gears of Mathematics, the brakes of History,



THE CARIBBEAN.



37



tho accelerator of Physics, and the steering wheel
of English. All this fascinateil him; and the
Examiner, Faculty, smiled well pleased with
this intelligent driver.

Finally, Average Boy grew indifferent to Nov-
elty; and Novelty, seeing this, desertetl him.

L'nfortiinatcly, about this time Average Boy
was running into the traffic of Examinations.
Frightenetl, more or less, by this new experience,
he asked to go wirli him; these were Carelessness and
Recklessness.

Carelessness was a friendly fellow who assured
him that it was not necessary to remember the
tiresome details of the mechanics of his curricu-
lum. Recklessness, equally as full of fun as Care-
lessness, showed him short cuts through the



crowtled streets of Questions and urged him to
speed by the slower moving cars of Conscience.

Average Boy had not followed this course very
long when he was overtaken by the Speed Cop,
Failure, who sternly reproached him for his as-
sociation with such low characters. Average Boy
was ashamed of this rebuff' anil ijuickly got rid of
Carelessness anti Recklessness.

This time a more serious companion, Common
Sense, came to his aiti ami helped him overcome
the bad influence of his late friends, and chose for
him two others of a'tlifferent character; these were
Honor anil Srhnol Sj-.irit.

Aidctl by these, and by his parents, Kiminess
and Encouragement, and carefully watched by
the P'xaminer, Faculty, .'\verage Boy successfully
passed his try-out. Final ExaminationD, and was
awarded his license. Diploma.



EVERY BOY'S CRUISE.



miliam C.

Every Boy had just received a present from
Father Time in the form of a new sailboat which
was called Scholarship and which had been built
in Grades. It had been launched on Lake High
School and rigged by a Wisdom with the best of
studies.

As Every Boy stepped aboard he noticed the
rain of Outside .Attractions and, picking up the
can of Conscience, he bailed the ship so that the
planks of Firmness would be dry to his feet.
Placing the oars of Cramming under the seat he
grasped the ropes Algebra, English, Spanish,
and Science, and pulled the mainsail Good Report
Card to the masthead. Parent's Demand. He
also raised the flag Honor and the jib Steadiness.

Making everything fast he cast off the lines of
Foolishness and Childishness; and the fair breeze
Faculty blew him steadily out of the cove Vacation
and on the ritjht course. Presentlv in the iov of



Cousins, '25,

his easy sailing he did not pay attention to details
and instead of running around the stump Trouble,
he ran into it and was stuck high and dry! De-
termination, however, came to his aid in the power-
boat Hard Study and with his help Every Boy
was pulled off.

He had easy sailing then until he was struck by
a small squall, Quarterly Exams, which tossetl
him about. He was weathering this well when,
without wariiing. Algebra snapped with a red
flash, and down sagged Good Report Card!
Grasping the two ends he tied them with a knot.
Will, and pulled up Good Report Card.

He sailed along with such little accidents
(called Mistakes), for four long days. Freshman,
Sophomore, Junior, and Senior. And at the
close of the last day he tied up at the dock. Grad-
uation, with his bow line. Education, and his stern
line. Common Sense.



Why can't I write poetry

When poet's thoughts all come to me.'

I love the sea, I see the surge^

I know the urge the call

I feel it all.

I hear the trees

In cooling breeze.



A RHYME.
Ruth E. Hopkins, '25.



See palm leaves wave,

And white ro.acl paved

All shining, bright

Beneath the tropic sun's great might.

Poetry is made by poets true,

.And only rhymes are made by me and you.

But why can't we write poetry?



38



THE CARIBBEAN.




Of the Senior English Class in one month's ob-
servation of an object as seen from day to day.

THE SEA.

Olga M. Arcia, '25.

The sun, slowly rising in the east, is giving light
and vitality to the sea * The quiet, peaceful,
gray sea seems cyrstallized. * The calm sea
of yesterday is furious to-day. The gigantic
waves foam as if they were mad dragons dashing
against the breakwater. * To-day the break-
water is like a necklace of pearls encircling the
b!ue bay with its tiny streaks of silver. * A
silent sailboat goes sliding by. * The creamy
breakwater seems like a snake, the silent sentinel
of the bay. The furious waves dash against her
but still she holds them back with her magic
strength. * Very tiny ripples, grayish in
color, are seen flirting with the sandy shore. *
The dark blue waves are dashing against the beach
leaving vaporous white foam which slowly dis-
appears. * The calm, light blue sea, with very
gentle ripples scarcely noticeable, looks like a
luxurious soft blue chifl^on rug gently moved by
the breeze. * *A dark grayish steamer, vomit-
ing blackish smoke which becomes lighter and
lighter until it is confused with the light blue of
the clouds, majestically crosses the dark blue
bay leaving the surface rippled where it has
traveled. * The ugly gray waves, the mo-
notonous sound of the dashing of the waves, the
impenetrable gray mist, the melancholy moaning
of the wind all is sadness and sorrow. *
How different is this great beautiful ocean to-day!
Its uniform untiulating waters are like rich light
blue satin with the breakwater as a border of
gold on the sides. * The snowy clouds, con-
trasting with the blue sky, rise high in peaks which
seem like snowdrifts, harmonizing with the frosted
blue white sea with its streaks of snowy ripples.

THE SANTURCE GOLF COURSE.

Ruth E. Hopkins, '2^.

The golf course is a great fur robe to-tiay. The
shaggy blue hair waves gently in the soft breeze.



* * This morning it is like a great green velvet
rug, bordered with the cold white curbing. *
A great green stretch of shining grass jeweled
with tiny dew drops glistening in the early morn-
ing sunshine. It is in its most beguiling mood
tempting the ardent golfer from his work. *
A beautiful morning! The golf course is a great
feathery surface of blue -green grass. A shiny
blue roadster drives up; from it emerge a young
thing in yellow and a stout middle-aged man in
gray knickers with a golf bag swung over his
shoulder. From nowhere appears a swarm of
black-faced caddies. I hope he gives his bag to
the little ragged fellow. * The smooth green
course is dotted with the bright dresses of the lady
golfers and the white or more somber colors worn
by the men. Bright faces smile their welcome to
arriving friends. The weather is ideal. The sun
hides shyly behind a gray cloud while the air
blows fresh and cool from the sea. * Bluish
green and sparkling this morning, and, as usual,
a pleasing sight ."surrounded on two sides by neat
white cottages and several picturescjue red brick
buildings. Overhead the sky is deep blue speckled
with innumerable fluffy white clouds. * *Ver-
dant, cool, and fragrant, peppered sparingly with
gay, boyish knickered figures. The day is per-
fect; the world is in tune. * This morning
a gray mist hovers over the golf course like a
mother bird over her young. * Why so sad, old
Golf Course? All your tiny blades of grass are
weighted down by the heavy raindrops that steadily
beat your sparkling green surface. What have
you done that the clouds scowl down at you so?

* * A great green stretch of wilted steaming
grass beneath a torrid sun. Limp, damp figures
drag their weary way over the links. What a day
for golf! * Surrounded by heated concrete
pavements, it is green and glaring under the blaze
of the morning sun. The golf course is most un-
inviting. In the distance, the red housetops stare
back at one. * A glorious evening golden
sunshine rains abundantly on the green velvet
surface. The buildings facing the course streak
it with tall blue shadows. The gleaming white



THE CARIBBEAN.



39



houses in the distance seem washed in iiquiii gold.
* * The reii of the roofs deepens, seeming to
reflect the cardinal of the sky. * .A gray cloak
is thrown over the workl. The pink and gold
strips in the sky are fast sinking behind the house-
tops. The golf course strives to brighten the
somber world with its ga\-green grass. *
Inky blackness swallows the green ot the course^
the outer edge is fringed with lamp lights. *
As .Amy Lowell would describe the Golf Course:

Grass,

Smooth grass,

Rough grass,

Pretty grass,

Ugly brown grass.

More grass green grass;

Bright green,

Shining green.

Glowing growing green.

Soft feathery green,

Rough rugged green,

Blue green,

bellow green.

Oh, the glorious greens of the grass.

MYINSPIR.ATION.

ffiUiam Cousins, 'sj.
(See illustration of banana tree, page 44.)

Buenas dias, Senor! Como esta ustedr You
don't speak Spanish: You arc a fine native of
Panama! You are not a native of Panama:
Where in the Old World did you live before you
were brought to this hemisphere? * Your
name is Musa Sapientum? That means muse of
the wise, doesn't it? Wait a minute; let me get
this straight. You are called that because you
were the chief food of the wise men of India? ^Vcll,
that explains why India belongs to England and
is not a nation in itself. * I see you are get-
ting .some new clothes. It is about time. Your
old are well worn out. The edges of your leaves
look like the fragments of a winti-.snapped flag.
Say, I am tired of talking to you; if you don't
answer soon, I will not speak to you again. You,
the fruit of the wise men and yet so dumb! *
Good morning! I suppo.se you have forgotten
what I told you when we conversed last?
Did I hear you say something? Why don't I
keep still? Say, if you only knew why I bothered
you, why, in fact, you bother me! I must write



ai! this noise for English; shake that ofF voui-
leaves. Diil you ever hear ot communing wiih
niturc? Well, this is that fearful pastime. *
\ our leaves grow unusually fast. ^ esterilay that
n'-w leaf you ha\e was all curled up like a cocoon.
Now it is just as full of life as the other leaves. It
is a little pale but the sun will fix that. *
fl read a poem last night whi.h der.cribes yoi
this morning!)

"Curl and uncurl to he kiss of the breeze
The leat with the permanent wave."

Why so tiignified? '^'ou look like a sixty-fi\-e
goiter who has just made a rounii in piir trying
to hide his elation, ^'ou must have a grand se-
cret; but we all ha\e for that matter. * I)jj
you see the moon last night: It looked like a
big snowball that those impish stars had rolled
from those deep snow banks that were in the skv,
for, when the sun came up, it melted and slid down
over the horizon. * Slow, slumbering, sloppy.
Spreading soft, silken shadows. You, a banana
plant. * Withered, wilted wings, waving list-
lessly in warm breezes from the ever-wrinkleil
sea. * '\'ou look much more cheerful now
after lunch. I am almost ready to believe that
it is not you that changes but my own mood which
places you in a different light. *

Underneath the spreading leaves

A bunch of bananas;

It's a great green bunch;

It came to me this morning

Now we can not say

Yes, we have no bananas.

THE BAY.

/Inniel Heim, 'sj.

I can't see anything. It is dark, dark, daik.
Ah! now I know! I am near the bay, for I can
hear the water lapping against the rocks. It is
one black mass; not a star, not a light can be
seen. * Night. The sea is fretful, angrv.
The bay seems like a seething cauldron of ven-
geance. The turbulent wa\es rush mad!y against
the rocks in gigantic white-capped breakers. *

The bay is uncanny anti forbidding. The
waters, black, gray, green, and blue, seem to move
slowly in layers like hot lava flowing down a
mountain side. The sky is dark, dark blue with
vast black clouds; here antl there may be seen a



40



THE CARIBBEAN.



small lonesome star. * Morning. The sky
is azure with snowy banks of fleecy white clouds
painted against it. * Calm and serene. The
bay is like a great mirror reflecting everything
that passes over it from clouds in the skies to a
mast on a small sailboat. There is not a ripple
to mar the still, smooth waters. * The little
wavelets with their small white caps sparkling
like diamonds under the sun are merry and gay.
Here is a patch of dark blue, and there a light
blue streak, and here again is a little silver ribbon
threading its way through the waters. Now the
sun hides behind a fleecy cloud and it is all a dark,
dark blue. * The bay is gay and merry. There
are millions upon millions of tiny little ripples which
move on and on until they roll lightly upon the
reef. Overhead the white clouds hang like fairy
castles against the blue of the sky. * Blue
and silver. Blue water with shimmering silver
ribbons; blue sky patched with banks of silver
clouds; a mingling of blue and silver everywhere.

* * Evening. Sunset. The heavens look as
if they were on fire. * The waters are brood-
ing and thoughtful. The golden sun has at last
gone to rest behind the fast-darkening hills.
Overhead the stars begin to twinkle in the deep
blue sky. All is calm and still.

FROM ALONG THE BEACH.

Helen Abendroth, '2^.

Colors. (Description a la Amy Lowell.)
Water:
Blue water.
Green water,

Water with dots of white on it.
Rough water.

Rippling water, smooth water;
Water everywhere, dancing in the sunlight.

* * A shining, silver surface, lying motionless
beneath the midday sun. * Green, green,
emerald green, like a meadow it lies before us. *
Blue, blue, blue, the color of melted turquoise. A
wide expanse of motionless blue. * A gray,
sullen, and mysterious expanse of cold steel waters.

* * A Day. As the sun rises it looks upon a
sea shrouded with mist a quiet sea; one not yet
awakened from nocturnal slumbers. But as
higher and higher it rises, so the sea gradually
awakens to face a new day. And another sunrise



is marked down upon the books of time. *
The sea lies like a mirror reflecting the awful glare of
a noonda}- sun. The milky whiteness of the
clouds combines to make this picture one torrid
terrible mass of heat. * A golden path of
sunlight makes its way across the waters of the
bay, blending its dazzling hue with the deeper,
more somber color of the sea. It rests there a
moment, setting the bay and sky on fire; then with
the beauty and grace of a Spanish dancer, it glides
from view, leaving its gorgeous shawl of vivid
scarlet and orange. * Like a myriad host of
white-clothed fairies dancing, the silver moon-
light plays upon the rippling waters of the bay.
Not a sound disturbs the quiet of the scene. *
Black, black, night a velvet screen of darkness,
which completely obscures the sea, but which
can not muffle its dull thud as water meets rock.

Moods. The sea to-day is playful, although
it is a very dangerous playmate. With a very
rough hand it tosses the boys in their small boats.
* * Mist! one obscuring blanket of mist. Mist?
Yes, fog a heavy, dense curtain of fog, which
completely hides the sea from view. But behind
this can be heard the angry roar of the waters,
acting as does a caged lion, mad with being held



captive.



The storm bursts in all its pent-



up fury. Great streaks of steel blue lightning
rend the air. The sea, an angry lion, roars, and
then, its fury spent, it is quiet and, as if ashamed,
it hides behind a shielding screen of mist. Then
the sun, the conqueror, comes forth to shine upon
a damp and very much chastened world. *
The rain is over, all but a tiny drizzle that prom-
ises every minute to subside, and the setting sun
in all its golden glory, smiles its benediction upon
a fast-darkening world. At the door of the west,
poised for flight, it lingers as if to see that all is
well, and then, satisfied, it disappears, leaving
behind a perfect harmony of colors stretched across
the sky. * Dotted with innumerable white
caps the sea lies stretched out like a speckleci white
field of daisies. The fishermen in their many
kinds of craft, are the children who go out to pick
the flowers. Lured on by one bright spot, and then
another each one fairer than the first they
venture forth, some to return, but others to wan-
der on antl on over the face of the earth, always
fascinated by something brighter, more dazzling,
beyond. Such is the call of the sea.



THE CARIHHFIAN.



41



MV TRF.R.

Dorothy Deiberl, '2§.

The Day. Just a tree. From the bare, brown
trunk tliniugli the leafy bowers, to the t<)pmf)St
quivering leaf, it is like and yet unlike other trees.
The shining green ami dull yellow leaves murmur
secrets to each other in the breeze. A yellow
bird twitters to his mate. The long, twisted
b;)ughs move slowly back and forth. The tree,
my tree, is happy ami radiant in the dawning glow
of the sun. * The sleepy green leaves lift
their drowsy heads, for morning has come and
another day is here. The first cool winds of the
day rock the braciies to and fro, while drops of
clear, sweet dew fall from the leaves. The birds
are singing. The tree seems to unfold and pour
its beauty forth to all the world. * The sun
shines down with a glare almost unbearable. The
sultry, sticky air seems to smother everything it
touches. Even the tree is hot. The leaves seem
dry and w-rinkled; the branches are bowed down,
unable to lift their heads and rid themselves of
the oppressive heat. No bird is singing; c]uiet
reigns. Perhaps it is a lull before a storm. *
A great cloud has spread over the sky and the
gray of it seems to have touched everything. The
tree has a dejected look, and the leaves are bow-
ing their heads in sorrow. Not a sign of cheer is
seen. Gloom reigns supreme. * The storm
gods are visiting the earth. Vivid streaks of
lightning sear the sky; the thunder rolls ominously.
The tree is bent and strained under the
lash of the wind and rain, a helpless yet pei-haps
a hopeful thing. * The storm gods are angry.
The leaves bend and quiver under the onslaught
of the rain as an animal cowx'rs under the whip.
The branches are bent back^ helpless, at the mercy
of the wind. * The gray cloud has disappeared.
The storm has gone. .Again the beauty of the day
seems to have touched the tree. In her wide-
stretched arms her chiUlren are content. She
rocks them gently as she sighs a lullaby. Oh, the
beauty of the mother tree! * The evening
sun has disappeared. The lieht of the day is
fading and nature is getting reativ to go to sleep.
The leaves have folded themselves and bowed
their heads as if to pray. A cool sweet wind is
blowing from the east, rocking the many branches
with their weight of green leaf cradles. Darkness
deepens; the day is ilonc. * The lacy pat-

MR 9519.1 6



tern of leaves is black-shailowed against the fast-
darkening sky. .All is silent save for an occasional
raindrop on the ground below. The drowsy leaves
are huddled close. The darkness settles. The
big tree sleeps. * 'I'he grayish shadow of the
tree is silhouetted against a mackerel sky. A new
mr)on peeps from umlerneath a cloud. Moods.
The leaves have turned their backs against the
wind for to-night an unfamiliar wind is blowing
and the tree is shivering. * The wind is telling
the tree stories of the far-off north whence it came.
Each small leaf is holding up its graceful head
to listen; and the golden-glowing sun is smiling
over all. * The leaves are playing tag with
one another, for the east wind has came from who
knows where and not even a tree can resist it.

* * I have discovered the name of my tree. It
is called a senna tree a pretty name. No won-
der her sun-lover showers her with a golden love.

* * The tree is going to have a new dress soon,
for all the old withered leaves are falling and
fluttering away. On the ground below many of
them are scattered. But it you look closely, you
will see tiny green leaves and twigs showing their
pert little heads. The old is giving way to the
new.

THE BANANA PALM.

Dorothea Tiijts, '26.

The banana plant holds a deep meaning for me.
How patient it stands waiting for what may come
always ready to face anything. It seems to
have confidence in (lod. With leaves drooping
in the air it seems to me like some poor poet con-
tinuing his work even though he may receive no
reward. * yhj^ morning the banana
plant is repelling. It is tlull and dreary. Its
leaves hang limply like the arms of a scarecrow-.
Rain beats a rhxthmic tattoo on the shivering
tree. Its leaves seem like the thin, clammy, out-
stretched hands of a leper. * Xhe
banana plant is happy. Its leaves dance about
like playful children. Perhaps the wind has
told them a happy story. The sun has come out
to play about the tree also. * Xhjg
morning the banana plant seems cool and inviting
as it stands as if waiting for company. Its leaves
hang like gay banners from a decorated build-
ing. * Xhe banana plant has awakened
and, like a person, is stretching. It stamls
refreshed in the early morning breeze. *



THE CARIBBEAN.



The banana plant stands on a floor of sea-green
grass, its leaves spread out like a fountain. The
sun probably tells the tree stories ot what it
has seen on its travels and the tree quietly
listens. * Dusk is falling; the banana
plant looks black, and has the appearance
of something forlorn and haunted. Its reflec-
tion is cast upon the water like a black
memory. * 'phg banana plant stretches
its roots into the ground to hold its place as the
wind, in a mighty gale against it, makes its leaves
blow straight out like the wind-swept hair of a
mermaid. The leaf that hangs at its side has
turned a grayish-white color and is quite a con-
trast to its green brothers and sisters. *
This morning the banana plant wears a spangled
dress as the sun sifts through its fringed leaves.
The wind seems to take away some ot the heat
and makes it seem cool and inviting to any pass-
erby who may glance in its direction. *
The banana plant seems cheery and green. Its
leaves are lazily tossed about by the wind, and
their shadows dart about on the grass. This is
the last day it is to be criticized by me but there
is yet hidden beauty my eye has failed to see.

A FOREIGNER IN PANAMA.

Ruth Dttey, '.'J.
AN AUSTRALL-^N PINE

All the outside is a canvas upon which Nature
uses her colors. Blue sky, green tree, yellow pine-
apple mingle but do not spoil the picture. *
1850? The Tree Speaks to Me "Perhaps if I
had not been bewitched by Mother Nature, I
should now be curtseying and swaying through
the steps of the latest minuet. Now I mourn
silently when the strains of a waltz are wafted
out to me. I was snatched suddenly from a
ballroom; there was no trace; all I have of my
f(jrmer self is the grace and height which Nature
decided to leave me." * As Carl Sandborg
would see it:

A pine tree

An ugly, lanky thing

That grows in lonelines?.

Its lines are sharp

No softened outline

Gaunt, silent.

Sad.



* * A light zephyr stirs among its branches,
swaying it this way and that, beckoning to those
who love the out-ot-doors. Its leaves have been
washed a brighter green by yesterday's rain; per-
haps its soul has been cleansed too, for who knows
the heart of a tree? * I have often wondered
why the birds do not rest in your branches. I
have never seen one with you until to-dav. Just
a tiny brown grass bird stopped long enough to
gossip about the latest scandal of the feathered
society; then he flew away with a final chirp about
the weather. I hope he cheered your heart. *
What story did you tell the humming bird that
just flew by? His tiny vivid body glowed against
yours until your green seemed pale by comparison.

* * Beautiful, luxuriant, verdant foliage, like
flounces on an old-fashioned gown. * A burn-
ing sun looking down at my pine, making it droop
in wilted stillness. * A black, sombre, canopy
of sky. One ot the stars is dead! Through the
dimness I teel that my pine tree has knelt to pray.

* * How supple you are! while other trees are
groaning beneath the strain of the mighty wind,
you slip, tvi-ist, and evade him! * It is a
hateful tree this morning that obstructs the view
from our back window. The blue sky refuses to
blend with the green of the tree, and the tree it-
self why doesn't it have .Tiorc spine? a mere
passing fancy easily swayed by the will of the wind.

* * Why is it that moonlight can change the
homeliest spot to a place of beauty ? Silver shafts
shot straight from the quiver of the moon, fall
upon our garden patch. My lordly pine, clothed
in a white radiance, disdains to bow low to the
squat pineapple shrubs. * Utter lassitude in
every line, a mute record of the cruel storm's ven-
geance. * A strong cool breeze from the
canal, blowing against my pine tree, must remind
it of its original home. I imagine the wind teases
the pine and its companions for hours. How
different the soil must be that it stretches its
roots into down here! Here there are no fellow
companions; all alone it stands, an alien, and the
strong wind comes but seldom. *

The treetop's points are touched with mist.
As if the dew's cool breath had kissed
Each bough, and made their beauty seen,
As shining pearls among the green.



THE CARIBBEAN.



43



TnorcHTs OX i.ookincj across the

SEA.

Kalherine Fischer^ '2^.

Sunday morning. Why is it that on Sunday
morning the sea is bluer and more peaceful than
it is on week days? The sky is a clearer -i/ure;
the still-lingering night clouds are whiter. E\en
the hills seem exultant. The silence is broken only
by the clear, sweet ringing of the church bells.
* The sea lies quiet and colorless, as if it were
too sleepy anti tired to move. * The sun,
just awakening the day, paints the clouds white
a shining, glistening white, tinteil with a paic
rose and silver, like fairy castles. Near the shf)re,
below, the slender, gray-white trunks of the coco
palms are outlined, gray and white against the
darker blue of the jungle, pale blue with rising
mist. The shore itself is a ribbon of white sand,
where ripples roll lazily in, their crests curling.
The sea, calm and clear, reflects the light from
cloud-castles, the brightness hitling into the blue
and gray of the deeper waters. * Morning.
The sea is blue, a dark blue, with stripes of lighter
blue running through it. Ripples moving sea-
ward give you the impression that the sea is for-
ever going onward, but never getting to its goal.
Ihe trees beyontl seem farther away across the
blue expanse ot water; they seem shadowy. *

Blue waves

'I'hat dance in the sun,

.And splash playfully

On the coral reef;

-A blue and green jungle

Lifting its arms to the sky;

And a blue sky

I'hat seems happy

Spread over all.
Midafternoon. Everything is gloomy to-day.
The sky is gray, as if prophesying some evil. The
sea is gray, reflecting the portent of the sky. The
jungle is a gray green. The very atmosphere is
gray and depressing. It makes one feel uneasy
and restless. *

Gravncss:

Gray sea

And gray sky,

Gray rain.

Gray mist, and,

With it all,

(jray hearts that never die.
Sunset. The sky this evening is azure, streaked
with silver ribbons of cloud. Just above the



ungle the sky is purple-clouded with rifts and
edges of gold. The jungle is hid by a golden haze
lying halfway across the bay. The sea is azure,
like the sky. * Sunset. The sky is clean,
bright gold. The jungle is clearly etched against
it, like some enchanted forest. The sea isal! golden
ripples, splashing gently against golden san.l. *

Purple and gold,

Silver and mauve.

The clouds lie st'll

.Above a green and quiet sea.

The gold is mirrored in the .sea,

.And the sea in the sky above;

Ihe jungle lies.

Its heati up-raised,

III tasr-darkenini' shadows.
Evening. The sky is a clear apple green. High
above the darkening jungle, the clouds, tinted with
the afterglow of the sun, hang blue and mauve,
pink and yellow. The sea lies gray a lovely
soft gray of quiet and peace. * It is night.
The sk\-, the sea, the jungle are one; an unending
black blot on the atmosphere, with neither moon
nor stars to relieve the monotony. Now and then
a blue flash of lightning, herald of storm and
thunder gods, zig-zagging across the blackness,
distorts the familiar scene by a bril'iant white
radiance and plunges the world, when the efful-
gence departs, into a deeper obscurity than before.

* * Night. The night is black and desolate;
the ivind shrieks through slatted doors; the rain
drips incessantly from the eaves. I look through
my window for the sea, but only the wet obscur-
ity of the night greets my eyes. But listen!
Through the wind and the rain comes the muffled

boom of the breakers on the rocks on the shore.

* *

The sea

In long unev'en swells,

Blue and silver

.And gray by turns

Hisses against the shore.

The hills

With rainy mist are seen

Gray against

The sun's bright sheen.

The purple rain clouds,

Streaked with gold

(That tarnishes not

Nor yet grows old).

Hang low abov-e

The evening's rosy afterglow.



44



THE CARIBBEAN.




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Till. CARIBBEAN.



45



^'



=




A I.ONF. TRAVF.I.F.R.

Frank Booth, '2S.




He had been gone five days five days of
wakeful nights and glaring hot days, of torture.
.\ long, deep, red gash, extending from liis right
eye down to his chin where the white bone showeil,
and then on down to his chest, helped to dis-
figure his features; his lips were cakeil; his
tongue was black and swollen.

His clotliing was in tatters; his teet were sore,
scratched, and bespattered with mud. .At times
he would falter, shade his eyes with his hand,
and look ahead, but always to move on again at
the same slow pace, iiorthwarti; sometimes he
would stray, but sooner or later he would correct
his mistake and head north.

Five days ago he had his last big drink; since
then he had sucked the dew off the leaves in the
early morning. Eating nothing but roots and an
occasional yam, he had managed to carry on.

Two days ago he had been set upon by a hun-
gry jaguar; his hunting knife which had hung
at his side had alone stood between him anil
death.

He was near the end ot his journey, but every
hour, yes every minute, he was going slower and
slower, his hopes flying fast ahead, he himself
crawling along at a snail's pace.

He heard a sound; he strained his ears to catch
it; his heart beat fast. New-born hopes arose
only to die again the dry, hot, stifling wind had
loosened an old dry limb which, unable to bear
up under the weight, fell crashing to the ground
below. The crash echoed and reechoed through-
out the jungles, and birds with shrill shriek flew
to another neighborhood and then silence.

So on, always on slower and slower but al-
ways moving closer to his goal.



The sun began to wane; the birds stopped
their noisy chattering; darkness descended; the
stars moved softly out of the heaven and became
more distinguishable, and a light cool breeze
moved with a soft rustling sound along the ground.

Stumbling through briars, falling on the sharp
poisonous neetlles of a black palm, always to
spring away with a little cry of pain, suddenly
he caught his foot in a trailing vine, and fell; he
lay still, while all about him was dark, almost
impenetrable jungle. Of a sudden, two yellow-
green eyes shifted towards the unconscious sleeper
then disappeared; no! for a few yards to the
right they were seen again always moving down
wintl from the sleeper; then closer and closer
until one spring would carry the big panther to
his prey.

The sun came out; the birds and monkeys
started to chatter among the tree tops; the
sleeper stirred, opened his eyes and then got on
his knees; then, by a slow process, to his legs
which had become stiffened over night.

.After his weary muscles had responded to his
efforts, he sippeti the dew from all the leaves he
could reach, dug around and found a few juicy
roots, and then set out again on his weary journey.

He walked and walked; it began to get hot; the
dew disappeared into the air; the earth began
to dry; the walker moved slower than at first.

He heard a gurgling sound; he started to run.
.Ah! there was water a whole river full. He
staggered toward it and fell. A native, idly
paddling along in a cayuco, attracted by the
splash, steered into the widening ripples and
caught him, pulling him into the. tiny craft. The
iournev was ended.



Oh! the sting of the wind is on my face,

As it blows in from the sea

And brings the rain and the fog

."^nd perhaps

A ship from a far country.

The waves are d.ishing .-igainst the clitf

And flinging their salty spray,



WEATHER AWAY!
Katherine Fischer, 'sj.



And the rain is falling

From leaden clouds

That the wind can not drive away.

Oh! when the .sea is gray and sullen

.^nd the clouiis scud across the sky

\\ e love to wander along the beach

Kover, my dog, and I.



46



THE CARIBBEAN.




0\ CATCHING BUTTERFLIES.

John Ordivay, '26.

.\lmost everyone on seeinu; a beautiful butterfly
flit about under his nose feels an innate desire to
catch it and preserve it as "a thing ot beauty and
a joy forever;" I proved no exception to the
general rule and after being teinpted on several
occasions, I sallied forth one morning with a hasti-
ly constructed butterfly net in one hand, a glass
iar in the other, and a handy size bottle of ether
bulging from my hip pocket.

I felt that I v/as the terror of every butterfly
within the rndius of a mile, but to my surprise
thev seemed not in the least disturbed by my
presence. One bold fellowwith gorgeous yellowand
black wings even passed within a few teet of me.

"U ell, my fine fellov,-," said I, "you'll pay dear-
ly for your folly," and I swung my net over in his
direction. But, strange to say, he still flitted
aho\it. I couldn't understand why I had missed
him; nevertheless I edged over in his general di-
rection again, but he deemed prudence the better
parr of valor and quietly moved in the opposite
direction at a slightly greater speed than m.y own.
I was not to be trifled with; so I set out at a round
pace. He increased his proportionately, and the
chase began in earnest.

Now you who have seen Fort Sherman will
realize the advantage that the butterfly had over
me by being able to fly in a straight line while I
was forced to clamber up and down hills, hillocks,
hummocks, mounds, bumps, and ridges. While
it was rather strenuous, the sight of the accursed
butterfly a few feet ahead of me spurred me on.
^^hen at last 1 was ready to give in, we came onto
a le/el stretch and I resolved to end it then and
there. Gathering all my remaining strength into
the last effort, I gradually shortened the distance
between us and with unerring aim I prepared to
strike. I plunged forward, swinging the nst right
at him. But just as my face began to glow with
triumph, I saw the doggoned thing behind me. I
made another lunge. Ah! I knew I had him this
time, and I cautiously opened the net but he was



not there! I looked about, but he was nowhere
to be seen. I sank down on the ground tired,
disappointed, and angry while the mosquitoes
swarmed over their victim. While sitting there I
firmly resolv ed to chase no more elusive butterflies.

But my resolve was no sooner made than
broken. A short distance away I saw a beautiful
creature of the specie com.monly known as Prin-
cess, rise from a clump of flowers, circle gracefully
about, then insolently sail past me. I was on my
feet in an instant. This time my aim held good
and I saw him firmly entangled in the meshes of
the net. But this was only half of it. Carefully
I took him in my hand and put him in the jar; he
was followed by a few drops of ethe'-, which was
in turn followed by the top of the jar. But mean-
while, Mr. Butterfly was not idle. Nay, on the
contrary, he even beat the ton ot the jar to the
mouth and with his blue wings glittering in the
sunshine, he flew joyously away followed by my
silent execrations.

These are fair examples of how the rest of the
hour was spent after which time I returned home
empty handed.

I was met at the door by my brother who eager-
ly asked what I had caught. "Say, kid," said I,
"if you ever think that you would like to hunt
butterflies, why take my advice and go fishin' in-
stead. Yea, verily, I've had enough for a lifetim.e.
Never again for me. Once is enough."

But the beauty of it is that once isn't enough,
and even now I'm waiting for my brother to
appear so that I can get him to go out and chase
butterflies with me.

JOYS OF EATING IN A BIG FAMILY.

Christian JVirtz, '26.

"Ding! Dong!" goes the bell. "Hooray! din-
ner's ready." Immediately the big table is sur-
rounded by eleven yelling, squirming young
hoodlums, clamoring for food.

"Ouch! Mama make Johnny quit kicking me,"
wails little Sue from behind a barricade consisting
of the water pitcher and a plate already piled
high with eatables.



1111. CARIBBEAN.



47



Zip! A spoonful of l)cans catches Tommy be-
hind the ear and a veritable battle of legumes en-
sues, until the opposing forces are quelled bv the
well-known rod. .Again Sue wails, tor this time
somebody has stolen her fork.

"Don't take it all Piggy," yells Kdilic to Bobbie,
who is helping himself to a lion's share of mashed
potatoes, "I want some too."

Bang!! Crash! "Oh," Baby has shoNcd a bowl
of hot broth on Jane's new slippers, her pride and
joy, and consequently is lightly spanked by big
sister Ann to satisfy the grief-stricken Jane.

"Here comes the pie," yell all elesen as one man,
almost bringing the plaster down.

"Children, children, please be quiet," admon-
ishes the tired voice of mother as she cuts the first
blackberry pie of the season. Harry reaches for
the first piece, but Jimmy, due to the advantage
of a longer arm, is victorious. Eleven pieces of
pie disappear in as many seconds. Six sticky
hands reach for the twelfth wedge of mushy pie.
Eddie's grimy fingers grasp it but "there's many a
slip 'twixt the cup and the lip," for, while his eyes
are gloating over his treasure, dripping purple juice
through his fingers onto his clean blouse, Bobby,
a veritable dog in the manger, knocks it from his
hand. It catches Freddie full in the face a louil
wail ensues, and patient mother tenderly wipes
away both tears and pie.

Dinner is over, Jean carries the nodding baby
away for his nap; the younger boys rush out to
play, whooping like Indians; and mother, assisted
by Sue and sister .Ann, wearily tlean away the
dinner dishes.

Such are the joys which it may be truthfully
said are to be found only in big f.imilies.

ON BEING LAZY.

Jack Coffey, '26.

This is a subject on which I consider n^yself an
authority in every sense of the wortl.

^\ hen I was being grounded in my studies by
the Rev. Brother Athanasius of St. Joseph's Col-
lege, of Colon, that austere gentleiiian showed his
acumen and foresight when he said that while it
was highly improbable that I could do all that I
should do, the fact was established beyond doubt
that I would leave undone most of what I ought
to do. He pronounced me the most eminent of
that category who do the least work in the most
time.



.All loafers are lazy. But to head the category
one must have the gift. While many of my col-
leagues are gazing out of the wintlow, dallying with
a pencil, I give the appearance of being intense!)'
busy. Yet I do less. That is the secret -hase
plenty to do but don't do it. My companion can
not enjoy his loafing as much as 1 can, because,
while he has nothing to do, I have plenty; ami
idling, like kisses, to be sweet, must be stolen.

For instance, the time I like best to work my
four-year-old brother's kindergarten cross-word
puzzle is when I have tt) prepare three chapters in
Cicero, ten pioblems in geometry, a chapter in
U. S. history, and a book report. With that for-
midable array before me, [ can enjoy fifteen min-
utes to the utmost, looking for "a three-letter
word meaning something to wear on the head."
It is then also that my dinner tastes more delicious
than any meal I have hitherto eaten.

In the same way that some artists draw best at
a certain time of the day and some people study
best in the morning, and others at night, so it is
with my talent. It is well-developed in the morn-
ing. If, by any chance, it is necessary for me to
get up early, that is the time that I love best to
loll for a half-hour longer. In fact, it is impossi-
ble for me to get up when I ought-. If 1 ought to
rise at eight I am up around eight-thirty. If at
eight-thirty, I am up at nine. In fact it is saiil
of me that I am punctually half an hour late. The
family has tried all sorts of devices to get me up.
There have been alarm clocks that went off
at the wrong time or didn't wake me. They have
told my brother Bill to knock at the door. He
knocks at the door, I mutter, ".All ri' and turn
over and go right back to sleep. For a while they
even got me up and shoved me under a cold shower.
But that did no good for I'd go right back to bed
to get warm. .And then there was the problem
of dressing, and the more I'd think about that the
more unpleasant it seemed. The only time I am
ever ambitious about getting up in the morning
is the night before. I'll say to myself after
having wasted the whole evening "I'll do no
more work to-night so that I can get up early in
the morning." I'm full of determination theti.
But when "early" comes around, I find it is just
as impossible as ever to wrench my head away
from the pillow.

But stop! here I've been prating about my
propensities for loafing and now I've done some-
thing in an hour which might cost me my title.



THE CARIBBEAN.



THE DIVING BOYS AT HAI TI.

Maurice Eg^leslon, ^26.

(See illustration page 5i.)

I awoke early that morning and sat u;i with a jerk.
At first I thought we must be tied up at the dock be-
cause there was so little motion in the boat; but
then I heard the steady throb of the engines. I
jumped out of bed and took a hasty glance out of
the porthole at the mountains looming up in the
distance, the while pulling on the essential parts
of my clothing, leaving the rest until later.

After this negligible toilette I rushed out on deck,
and although it was only about ti\e-thirty I found
other people already on deck some of the men in
bath robes and slippers all glad ot the glimpse of
land, which surely is a welcome sight after several
days of seeing nothing but water.

I waited around on deck hoping to be the first
one to see Port-au-Prince. At about seven o'clock
I saw some white dots against the green mountains
ahead. At seven-thirty we were almost there and
I could distinguish the separate buildings, most
of them white, with the cathedral and president's
palace standing out among the lesser buildings.
The only movement I could discern was that of a
peculiar looking group of small boats near the
pier. Then the gong for breakfast sounded and
I was so hungry by that time that no sight in the
world could have kept me away from the table.

From the dining room I could hear the shouts
of the men, the clanking of the windlasses, and the
myriad other noises which accompany the prepara-
tions for docking a ship; and finally the dock sheds
of Port-au-Prince began to slide past the portholes
of the dining room.

Hurriedly finishing my breakfast I hastened out
on deck to see the docks, but I was soon attracted
to the other side of the boat by the sight of a large
number of passengers crowding to the rail, seem-
ingly throwing money into the water. I ran over
and upon elbowing my way to the rail, there met
my eye a unique sight, which accounted for the
number of boats I had seen near the dock.

Alongside the ship was a fleet of small home-
made boats, manned by Haitian boys. All that
the boys wore was a pair of tights, except that
occasionally one of them hatl on a shirt which
looked as if he had inherited it. 'I'hey were all
shouting, "N'ickle Cap," "Nickle Cap," or "Throw
me a nickle. Mum," all the time keeping a wary
lookout, and if anyone reacheti into his pocket or
opened n p-.irse, they immediately flocked arouml
shouting ail the more. As soon as any money was



thrown into the water they all dived after it.
They might not have good diving form but one of
them always got the money. Some even assured
us that for a quarter they would dive down and
brmg up some mud just to prove that they had
reached the bottom.

All of the boats had a supply of bricks and boards
and a fight was not uncommon.

Besides these boys there were also some older
men in larger boats laden with alligator pears,
oranges, watermelons, limes, pieces of coral,
painted shells, chairs, and baskets. These men
did not shout or gesticulate but merely rowed
slowly up and down the side of the ship watching
for prospective customers. If one wanted any-
thing from one of the boats, upon a signal the man
would row over and toss up a line with a basket
attached to one end, into which he would put the
purchase. The basket was then hauled up by the
customer and the purchase taken out, after which
it was lowered with the money in it.

I saw some boys get oranges and alligator pears
from these fellows by giving them small cakes of
soap which they had taken from the bathroom
and their staterooms.

When the boys became too noisy and quarrel-
some the crew drove them away by turning a
powerful stream of water from the fire hose on
them, and the last I saw of them they were rowing
toward the city fighting among themselves and
hurling epithets at the crew.

<- ^ A MACHIGUA FROM

^^^^ SAN BLAS.

''WSm Pattering briskly along

^^^ ~ -^ BolivarStreet went a strong,

heavy, shortlegged Machi-

gua from San Bias. His

broad prominent cheek

bones gave a triangular form

to his face; the peculiar

Asiatic shape of his eyes,

>.-.) together with the copper

\ color of his skin, gave

^ Jf ''-"^ undeniableproof of hisrace.

* n I His dirty blue blouse was

worn loosely over his black

red-patched trousers. In

remarkable contrast with

the bigness of his head was

a very small, soileti, yellow

straw hat which covered

only the crown.



4j^H^



11 IK CARIHBKAN'.



49



S =




"\ot what we give, but what we share-

l''i)r rhc trif't without the tjiver is liare.'



-Lowell.




W



-W



l.olii Mitiioz, '26.



Never have I been impressed with the trutli ot
this quotation from Low ell's "N'ision of Sir l.aun-
fa!" as vividly as when i beheld last Christmas the
manifestation ot love and devotion (offered by the
communicants of the little church of Santo Dom-
ingo in Panama City.

Each Christmas they observe the beautiful
custom of rebuilding at the foot of the altar the
little town of Bethlehem. The poor as well as the



the midst of which gleametl tiny lakes. The light
ot candles shone on the glass panes of the imposing
synagogue.

Leading to the market place in the center of
the village were narrow cobbled streets, thronged
with people from all walks of life, from thearrogant
merchant, in his flowing robes of silk, to the fawn-
ing beggar in his rags. On the outskirts stood
the patient little brown donkeys laden with queer-



rich devote themselves to this offering, the poor shapeti, reddish jars. Within sat rows ot patient,

giving of their slender means, the rich contribut- shawled women with their wares spread in di.s-

ing gold and material, while both work together play to tempt the passer-by luscious fruits,

for man\- hours jnitting their whole hearts into bright-cob)red beads, rich draperies, and santlals.

this labor of love. In the middle of the square stood the motley array

.At the close of midnight mass on Christmas Eve, oi dirty ruminating goats, kneeling camels, and

awed by the solemnity of the services, I approached gentle, patient-eyed oxen, near which stood the

the altar. The smell of the incense and the ce- owners bent on making a good trade,
lestial strains of the Ave Maria had carried me On the outskirts of the little village, stood a

back nearly two thousand years. quaint old inn, but 1 looked beyond it to the

Before me seemed to lie in realit>- the picturesque stable in the backgrouiul, radiant in the light of

town of Bethlehem. In the background rose a the star of hope. Within, in a lowly manger on a

rugged range of brown, rocky mountains, their bet! of straw, lay the Christ Child, wrapped in swad-



bareness relieved by an occasional patch of green
whereupon grazed snow-white sheep, attended b\-
a watchful shepherd, leaning on his staff and
tentlerly contemplating his little flock.

Rude little red-tiled huts of deep yellow anil
pink, half hidden in olive groves of gray-green,
nestled at the foot of the mountains, their gay
colorpresenting a striking contrast to the brown of
the background. Near the huts were quaint
black-eyed peasant women in colorful ilresses
going about their daily tasks. One was throwing



dling clothes, while before him knelt in adoration
Joseph and the Virgin Mary.

I turned away, greatly impressed by this ex-
pression ot love and faith of the communicants of
Santo Domingo. Not onl\ had they given but
they had shared.

A CORNER OF THE MARKET PLACE.

Helen Abendrolh, '25.

In the background a number ot American house-
wives were haggling over the price ot a few bunch-
tiny grains ot yellow corn to a brood of fluffy-white es of greens with a Martinique woman in her
chickens; another was carrying a pail of milk to picturesque gingham dress and red bandana,
a litter of fat, pinkish pigs. On the banks of a Farther on, an old, withered Barbatlian, whose

tiny silver stream which wound through the grove, shoulders were bent with the weight of a large
knelt yoiuig girls washing, while others were hang- disfiguring goiter hanging beneath her chin, was
ing gay-colored garments on low-hanging branches, vainly trying to sell some few small tomatoes
Before the doors of the huts playeil olive-skinned which she displayed in trays in her lap. Near her,
children. evidently attracted by the very cracked and high-

In the green valle\ below were stately homes of pitched voice of the seller, some English emigrants,
cream stone surrountleii by walled-in gardens, in holding by the hands their reluctant children,

MR 9519.i 7



50



THE CARIBBEAN.



were viewing the many sized oranges neatly dis-
played for their benefit. And at one side, bedrag-
gled but still lively American sailors were buying
great hands of bananas, as well as monkeys, par-
rots, parrakeets, and various other pets, all des-
tined, the purchasers hoped, to become ship's
mascots some day.

A i RIBLTE TO A MOTHER INSPIRED
B\- A CHRISTMAS AWAY FROM HOME.

Katherine Fischer, 'jj.

Dearest Mother:

Christmas is almost here, the first I have ever
spent without you. Never until now have I .Hilly
realized and appreciated all that you have done
for us. 1 shall miss your cakes and candy, the
Christmas dinner, and the bustle and excitement
of it all. But more than these, I shall miss you.
I shall miss the light that shines in your eyes, ten-
der and beautiful, when you look at us, happy and
merry; your joyous participation in our delight
at our gifts; the glad, mysterious note that just
will be heard in your voice, when you softly open
the bedroom door, and wake us with a kiss, and,
"A Merry Christmas;" the happy girlish lilt that
rings, when you call us to see the tree first hghted;
the dreamy, far-away, patient expression in your
eyes, when, after tired baby eyes are tightly closed,
vour ever-willing hand puts away with gentle care
childish delights; the tender, loving look that
accompanies each kiss bestowed on sleeping ones.

These are mostly Christmas specials, but I have
not forgotten the charming note that you supply
at all our parties, whether formal or informal,
special or just ordinary; your jolly, low-toned
laugh centered in your twinkling eyes and always
ready to bubble up; vour ever-ready sympathy;
vour justness; and your tender never-dying love.

I thank you, mother, for all these things: Your
love, tenderness, sympathy, and kindness; the
confidence and help that you have given us. .And
may I, as day by day, the years slip by, show more
fully by my life my appreciation of you and your
work for us. ^'our loving daughter,

Katherine.

THE C.ANDY MAN.

(See iHostration pai^c 33.)
JVilliam Cousins, '2$.

Sitting silently; starched coat shining in the
morning sun; khaki uniform with a dash of red



on breast and cap; big brown basket overflowing
with sweets tor clamoring school children that
is the candy man at the Lincoln House.

A TRAGEDY.

Rulh E. Hopkins, '^J.

It was with shiny face and slick hair that Jim-
my emerged from the bedroom, followed, of course,
by Rex. The little terrier was his best pal and
constant companion. In happiness. Rex leaped
about him and yelped his congratulations; in sor-
row, he wagged his tail and licked away his mas-
ter's tears.

"Here are the list and the money," said Jimmy's
mother. "Now run along! But be careful at
the crossings," she warned him as she slipped a
note and some change into his pocket.

"Here Rex! Here Rex!" Jimmy shouted as
he dashed for the front door. But Rex was al-
ready bounding after him. Now they raced pell-
mell down the street, each trying to outrun the
other. .At the end of several blocks, Jimmy halted
a minute to get a fresh breath; courteously, Rex
waited with him.

Hoping to surprise the dog, Jimmy dashed
across the street ^just in front of a big car that
slid around the corner. Laughing with the thrill
of his escape, he turned, the call to Rex dead on
his lips and his little features convulsed with
tragic grief, for Rex was crumpled under the car.
With tears streaming down his cheeks, Jimmy
rushed to the dog; tenderly he gathered the
shapeless heap in his arms, and sobbing over the
limp body, he trudged homeward.

ONE OF LIFE'S LITTLE TRAGEDIES OR
COMEDIES?

He/en Jbendroth, '25.

Jimmie was playing sick! He was comfortably
reclining on his big cosy bed reading a Boy-Scout
Manual. He was glad his ruse about not feeling
well had worked so easily. He knew his mother
was deeply concerned about his health. -At least
it was better to be at home in beti than to be in
school puzzling over arithmetic and English.

He had iust seen the heroic scouts thwart a
villainous plot to destroy the Panama Canal, when
a verv familiar whistle sounded outside his window.
He jumjieti out of bed, and seeing his classmates
below, was about to answer, when he heard his
mother talking.



IHK CARIBBEAN.



5'



"What, hoys? No school to-day? Teacher
sick? That's too bad! No, Jimmie can't go
fishing; he's sick abed. Just a touch of stomacli
trouble, I guess."

Jimmie groanetl, and this tunc it was no ruse to
tool mother, but a genuine sickness which had
settlctl upon him!

THE COMING OF NIGHT.

}hiberl Lee, 'iji.

The night was coming on * The ol)lu]ue
rays ot the sun could not penetrate the dark and
heavy cloutls that were spreading their ugl>-
tentacles across the sky. The air was moist, it
was damp; the gloomy veil approached, gradually
thickening the atmosphere; the street was de-
serted; darkness was embracing the streets,
the houses, ami ever\- little corner. .\t one of the
doors, huddled into the smallest possible space, was
a haggard old woman, dressed in black, with her
head and face hitlden by a scarf of the same ill-
omened color. She gave a groan, for the night
was coming on. * The sky could no longer
be seen; the air was now fog. * The woman
gave a mournful groan, for the night was coming
on. * The street was becoming wet, sloppy,
muddy, for a disgusting little drizzle had begun to
fall; the corner lamp was lighted; but for what?
Its rays coukl not penetrate that thick, floating,
blanket of water. The woman moved a bit and
dropped her head a little lower, for the night was
nearl)' on. * A well-dressed man came; he
put his hand on the knob of the door; and, think-
ing these wretched remains ot lite to be a stray dog,
he mercilessly kicked it. Through the darkness
could be seen the collapse of a dark indefinite
form; a last mournful groan was heard. *
And now, the night was on.

"HONESTY IS IHl-: HKSr I'JI.ICY."

A Kable which might he true.
RhI'i /','. Hopkins, '2/;.

Once a school boy, who had aKva\s earnctl verv
good marks, returned trnm being absent to find
that there was to be a history test that day. When
the questions were written on the board, he found
several among them that he could not answer.
Being in the back ot the room, he found it an



easy matter to open his book to look up those
questions. He tletermined that after the test
he woulil study them until he knew them, thus
stilling his conscience. He told himself that this
wouKl not be the same as cheating, and still it
wouki keep him an E student in the eyes of his
teachers and classmates. But the teacher, com-
ing to close a window, saw his opened book. Thus,
in trying to preserve his reputation he ruined it.

HIE PAIM-.R HOY "STA" EEN YERAL'."

Dorothy Deiberl, '25.

Waiting at the tloor for his five cents stood the
little pajier b.>\-. With one hand he held his news-
papers, while with the other he removed his cap,
displaying a mop of dark, curly hair. His shirt
was tattered, buttonless, and soiled; his trousers
were much too large for him. His little bare feet
were mud stained and dirty. But when we looked
into his little brown face, the expression in his
deep, pathetic eyes went straight to our hearts ami
we smiled, and as he turned to go, we saw a timid,
flashing grin flimg back at us. Then he put on
his dirty sailor cap and whistled on his way.

A BANANA WOMAN.

Ruth E. Hopkins, '2^.

It was late at night, ami the banana business
had ail but expired. On a grimy old Nestle milk
box, among others of her kind, sat a banana
woman, lost in slumber. From under a tattereil,
yellow straw hat, pulled low to shield her eyes
from the street light, protruded the end of a burnt-
out cigar. Below the hat, a wrinkled black neck
was lost in a stiffly-starched white blouse. An
inch or so above the ground, two huge black shoes
dangled from the mountainous white skirt. A
greasy brown tray, empty but for a few soured
bananas, told that business had been good, and
that her dreams were happy ones.

MI POELERA.

01 ga Arcia, '2^.
(Sw illiistration page 33.)

"Mi pollera, mi pollera, mi pollera es colorada,"
joyfully sang the pretty girls dressed in pollera,
dancing the tamborito. This tamborito was in
a typical Panaman toldo decorated with palm
leaves and multi-colored crepe paper.



52



THE CARIBBEAN.



The tom-tom of the tambor accompanied by
the vivacious tonadas, the merry laughter, the
coquettish and graceful dance ot the tamborito,
the picturesque poUera with the tinkling ot the
tembleques, all meant joy, happiness, and di-
version. Gypsies, Arabs, Colombines and Pier-
rots, Chinese, Japanese geishas, clowns, all looked
on and applauded, but no one was more quaint
and charming than the stately, gracious pollera-
clad damsels with their wide lacy skirts and their
lovely antique jewelry.

PARLOR TRICKS.

Helen Ahendrolh, '25.

Characters :

Cleopatra, Anthony, and Babbit.
Place. The Main Street Country Club.
Time. Afternooii.

Situalion. Babbit is teaching Cleopatra to play
Mah Jongg.

Babbit. No! No! All wrong again! Take up
a tile first, then discard one. And don't forget
not to dog your hand if you want to get a good
score.

Cleo. Dog my hand? Hast thou been speak-
ing of beasts?

Bab. (exasperated). Gosh, woman, you never
get the drift! I mean, make use of your head.
Use vour brains. Play with some technic. Be
serious. Be (stops for lack of breath).

Cleo. (puzzled). Drift? Head? Technic? "As
T am Egypt's queen" what meanest thou?

Bab. (desperately patientV Listen, sweet one,

in order to get a pung (explains at great length,

the while Cleopatra keeps watching the doors,
and nodding absently at her instructor). Well,



that's the way to do it. Now we'll start over
again. Come, help me build the wall.

Cleo. What child's talk is this? Build walls?
Fie! Fie! Hast thou not passed thy days of
childish playing? Wilt build a wall 'round Rome,
or is't Carthage? Speak man! What would'st
thou have?

Bab. (disgustedly). Well, some people are
denser than

(Enter Anthony)

Cleo. (hastily jumping up). Enough of this!
In yonder distant door my Romeo awaits. I'll
away to keep him company.

(Exit Cleopatra and Anthony).

Babbit wearily picks up tiles and puts them
away. Mumbling to himself, he gathers up his
set and slumps dejectedly offstage.
Curtai:-!.

H'OR.ANGES!

Ruth Duey, '2^.

About once a week I hear a voice saying,
"Oranges," and going to the back door I see an
old man in faded-blue patched trousers and a
once white shirt, with his small straw hat tipped
to the back of his grizzled head. Nature didn't
provide him with shoes, so he travels around to
the different houses barefooted. On his back is
a large brown bag filled with oranges. Sometimes
he brings papayas. His bleared brown eyes look
up to mine, and his face creases into many tiny
wrinkles when he asks, "Want something to-day?"

But when I say, "No, nothing to-day," he still
smiles and goes pottering down the steps to the
next house, his back bent with the weight of the
fruit.



OLD PANAM.'V.

7. H. Thrift, '2S.



Beneath the southern cross there stands
.A silent city wrapped in gloom;
Below it roll the ivory sands;
Behind its walls great trees do loorti.

And now its walls are crumbling stone;
Their glory long has passed away;
The wind now passes with a moan:
"Decay yet more," it seems to say.



\x times gay cavaliers did ride
Along those streets now wrapt in vine;
The ring of sword and stately stride
All conquereil easily by time.

For Morgan came to that gay strand
A pirate he both stern and strong
The soliliers (ought but could not stand,
hnA to defeat them took not long.



And now in ruin lies that town,
Its people killed, its captains fled,
No more a city of renown
.\ habitation of the dead.



THF. CARIBBEAN.



53



mR




SPORTS



Boys' Jo/iii Ordway, '26.



Girls' Htleyt Abendrolh^ '2$.




K-



lOurch anii Xeariny's text book in social
^"^ )irobl(.-ms brings out the great ilirter-
ence between the team that plays for big
scores, success, aiul the team that plays
for the sake of the game, achievement. |
Because our teams this year have been
Jeciileilly in the latter class, the season
may, at first glance, seem unsuccessful.
But look into it more thoroughly: This
year has been marked by the interest and
spirit shown in all athletics; though in



Shops' ;3[tljlctics.

TF.NNI.S.

December 13. Our tennis season opened
with its accustomed vim when the first
round of the school tournament was
played off to-day.

December 14. Fred .Sonncman, last
year's champion, retained his title when
he defeated John Ordway in the final
round. Sonneman dominated the meet-
ing, coming through the lower rounds with-
out the loss of a game, defeating both
Klunk and Bronson 6-0, 6-0. The road
had not been so easy tor Ordway who had
eliminated Eggleston by a score of 6-1,
8-6, and Wirtz by 6-1, 6-0. .Against
Ordway, Sonneman was never in serious
danger, as in each set he broke through
Ordway 's service in the first game and
held his lead throughout. He won at
6-4. 6-4.

CRISTOBAL DEFEATS BALBOA
TWO MATCHES TO OXE.

January 15, 1925. The first of the
interscholastic matches was played to-
day when the Balboa High School tennis
team clashed with our boys on the Colon
Beach court. All ot these matches were
played in the hottest part of a very hot
day and the players seemed to tire rather
quickly. Kred Sonneman took the court
against James Woodruff tor the first
match and won in straight sets. Woodruff
played a steady game from the back
court and rarely advanced to the net.
The players seemed evenly matched at
first when both stayed back, but atter the
score stood .^-.^ in the first set, Sonneman
changed his tactics and came to the net



most of our games there has been little
hope ol success, everyone has gone out
and done his best. .And, you may ask,
what are the results?

The results are that the whole school
has been interested in furthering athletics.
The first of the three groups that are
found in every school, the athletes, went
out and worked hard; the second, those
that think they can't play, went out and
tried; and the third, those that know



they can't play, went out and yelleil.

Wh:it is just as important, next year
out teams will be even better, for we lose
by graduation but one runner and one
basket ball player; and so, next year,
with practically the same teams that we
had this year but greatly superior be-
cause of the experience gaineii by this
year's defeats we expect to see the same
spirit but with different results.

'John Orduay, '26.



at every opportunity. From then on, the
result was never in doubt. He won at
6-4, 6-0.

The next match was between John
Ordway and Frank .Arnold, the former
winning after a protracted J-set match
which was full of surprises. Ordway
started fast and won the first set at 6-2,
but .Arnold, nothing daunted, played his
same steady game and, in the next set,
ran up a lead of 4-1 and then 5-2. Ord-
way, by playing hard, pulled up to 4-5,
only to drop the set at 4-6. The sun
began to take its toll in the third set and
the play was perceptibly slower. Ord-
way, e.specially, seemed tired while .Arn-
old ran all over the court, making some
wonderful "gets." The third set started
like the second, and .Arnold again
secured a lead of 5-2 on his own service.
With defeat staring him in the face,
Ordway hit harder and stormed the net.
This had the desired effect and after a
good many close calls, he brought the
score up to 5-5 and finally won the set at
Q--. The score: 6-4,4-6,9-7.

.A special ruling was made concerning
the doubles, namely: One player might be
substituted for another if his team cap-
tain considered it necessary. This was
done because all the matches had to be
played off in one morning, and, as the
doubles followed the singles, and thesingles
players were the logical choice tor the.
doubles, it was thought that with this,
the singles players could rest while the
first set or two was played and then come |
back fresh.

The match started with Butters and
Woodruff playing for Balboa and Sonne-
man and Eggleston (an untried combina-



tion) for Cristobal. The latter pair could
not work well together, being repeatedly
drawn out of position; the former took
advantage of this difficulty and won the
set at 6-3. In the next set Ordway
substituted for F.ggleston and the team
work of Ordway and Sonneman demon-
strated itself when they won at 6-1. For
the third set, .Arnold substituted for
Butters. This was a very fast set, Ord-
way and Sonneman securing a lead ot
5-4; but Sonneman dropped his service
and the Balboa boys jumped in and won
the next two games for the match. Final
score: 6-3,1-6,7-5.

B.ASEB.ALL.

FORT DE LESSEPS DEFEATS C. H. S. I4-8.

January 17, 1925. This game, coming
as it did as our first game, can hardly be
called unsuccessful. .Although the game
was featured by errors and wild throws,
after the sixth inning, our boys gained
confidence and played a fine game and
everybody, even the spectators, is sure
that De Lesseps will not have a show next
time.

On the mound "Billy" Mclntyre pitch-
ed a fine uphill game; just give him more
support from the infield and Balboa won't
have a look in. The line-up:

De Lesseps. C. H. S.

Merril, p. Mclntyre, p.

.Sixberry, c. Brown, c.

H.allifieid, 1 b. Klunk, lb.

Roman, 2b. Will, 2b.

Duggins, 3b. Coffey, .3b.

J.acox, If. Grider, If.

Ellis, cf. Johnson, ci.

Bird, rf. Eggleston, rf.

Hollenshade, ss. Van Scotter, ss.



54



THE CARIBBEAN.



r-






J






OUR TENNIS TEAM social PROBifMS cla55

IN PANAMA



TRACK TEAM



&.A.A. t '' PRE5.
Ruth duey




F



B.A.A. WW PRE5
J AS VAN XOTTER



y^ Q ip |A.|^euMj "J* J H g




TENNIS RIVALS




MORE TENNIS RIVALS




BA5KET BALL BUNCH



IHK CARIBHKAN.



55



BALBOA WINS HBSTGAME FROM CRISTOBAL.

January 24, i<>25. Balboa won the first
game of the series to-day when they
retreated with the long end of a 4-j
score after 10 exciting innings ot their
scheduled 7-inning game.

Mclntyre again starred for Cristobal.
His pitching was excellent, but poor
support did more than he could undo,
and though pitchers, as a rule, are poor
hitters, he made three hits out of four trips
to the plate antl two of our three runs.

The enemy scored one run in the first
inning and another in the fourth when
Klunk, thinking three were out, rolled
the ball into the field and started for
the dugout, while Burgoon, who was on
third, came home.

Our boys took the offensive in the
seventh and tietl the score when Coffey
singled, was sacrified to second, and came
home on the Texas leaguer of Mclntyre,
who, in turn, scored on Ordway's double.

.Although Balboa scored in the ninth,
Mclntyre clouted the sphere for two
bases and came home when Burgoon,
trying to catch him off the bag, threw
wild. But, when they repeated in the
tenth, we didn't have the punch to send
across another, and so we droppeii the
game.

.Although there was a liberal supply ol
errors, still the team was better on the
whole, and over-anxiety .seemed to cause
the errors. With a little more experience,
they should round into shape.

The box score:

Balboa. .AB. R. H. E.

Hutchings, jb 5 o 2 o

Sullivan, ss 5 I I o

Clement, lb 4 i i o

Stanziola, c 4 o i o

Burgoon, p 3 i o I

Knabenshue, cf. 4 o i o

Wedwalt, If 4 I I o

Lowande, 2b 4020

Rosendal, rt 4000

Totals 37 4 Q I

Cristobal. AH. K. H. E.

Will, 2b 4 o 1 I

W. Coffey, ss 4 i i i

Grider, lb 2 o o i

Klunk, c 4 o o 2

Mclntyre, p 4 2 .i 1

Ordway, 3b .5 o 2 J

Eggleston, cf 4 o o 1

J. Coffey, rf 1 o o o

Pulgar, rf 3 o o o

Wirtz, If 3 o o o



Totals 32



Two-base hits Mclntyre and Ordway.
Sacrifice hits Burgoon, Cjrider. Stolen
base.s Burgoon 2, Clement 2, Wedwalt,
W. Coffey. I-'arned runs Off' Burgoon 2,
off Mclntyre 1. Struck out^By Mc-
lntyre 13, by Burgoon 12. Bases on
balls off Burgoon 3.

UEFEAr.

January3l,i win from us; we lost to Balboa. Yea,
verily. The errors, in all, were too
numerous for good playing and broke
down the morale of the team. It seemed
that every time a ball was lifted to the
outfield it was a hit, and yet the defeat
can't all be blamed on the outfield because
the infieUI contributed a respectable (?)
share. The game was a disappointment
from every angle and particularly so after
last Saturday's performance.

On the slab Mclntyre started well, but
soon was so discouraged bj- his support
(or lack of it) that he seemed to lose his
pep. Klunk came to his relief in the fifth
inning but could not entirely check the
advance. Burgoon, Balboa's twirler, was
in fine form, yielding only 4 hits. Mean-
while the Pacific-siders slashed out a 14 to
4 victory.

TR.ACK.

March 7, 1925. Track opened with little
material and small hope of success; but
great credit should be given to that small
groupof boys who went out and gave their
best in order that the old fight could be
shown, and that it might be proved again
that C. H. S. is never beaten although at
times she is defeated. We had few men,
but they entered nearly all of the events
and worked like Trojans. They lost 55-
17. Sullivan starred for Balboa, taking
20 points, while Eggleston c.irned 6 for
Cristobal.

The summaries follow:

^0-yard dash.

1. Sullivan, B. H. .S.

2. Eggleston, C. H. S.

3. Cousins, C. H. .S.

/00-yard dash.

1. Sullivan, B. H. S.

2. Duran, B. H. S.

3. Lucas, C. H. S.

220-yard dash.

1. Sullivan, B. H. S.

2. Duran, B. H. S.

3. Lucas, C. H. S.



Running broad jump.

1. SuUivan, B. H. S.

2. F.ggleston, C. H. S.

3. Ilutchins, B. H. .S.

Rtoiniti'i hi^h jump.

1. Clemens, B. H. S. (5' 4").

2. Lucas, C. H. S.

3. Green, B. H. S.

I2-Ib. sh'il-pul.

1. Clemens, B. H. S. (31' 3").

2. Grider, C. H. S.

3. Burgoon, B. H. S.




.SWI.M.MING.

BALBOA WINS SWI.MMING 42-2?.

February 14,1525. We suffered another
defeat at the hands of our ancient rivals
when Balboa copped the swimming meet
to-day. The races were very good and our
boys made a brave stand, but there were
not enough swimmers and we could only
enter one or two men in each event. Jack
Klunk of Cristobal showed fine form and
was also high point scorer, "leading the
pool" with 13 points.

The summaries are:

^o-yard dash.

1. Klunk, C. H. S.

2. Hutchins, B. H. S.

3. Golden, B. H. S.

loo-ynrd dash.

1. Klunk, C. H. .S.

2. Golden, B. H. S.

3. Granberry, B. H. .S.

220-yard swim.

1. Helmerick, B. H. S.

2. Engeike, B. H. S.

Plunge.

1. J. Coffey, C. H. S.

2. Knight, B. H. S.

3. Taybr, C. H. S.



56



THE CARIBBEAN.



^0-yard iack-slroke.
I. Hutchins, B. H. S.
I. Klunk, C. H. S.
3. Cranberry, B. H. S.

jO-yiDii birast-slroke.
I. Allen, B.H. S.
;. Hurchings, B. H. S.
3. J. Cotfey, C. H. S.

Fancy dive.

1. B. CofFey,C. H. S.

2. Allen, B. H. S.

3. Hutchins, B. H. S.

120-yard relay.

1. B. H. S. (Hutchins, Allen, Cranberry,

Colden).

2. C. H. S. (B. Coffey, Klunk, Taylor,

J. Coffey).

BASKET BALL.

Knowing that there were several good
basket ball players in the school, a series
of games was arranged between the jun-
iors and seniors on one side and the fresh-
men and sophomores on the other.

In the first game the underclassmen
spilled the dope by beating the upper-
classmen 12 8. They deserved their
victory, outplaying the upperclassmen
all around. I'or the underclassmen. Will
seemed to know best where the basket
was, while for the upperclassmen Mcln-
tyre starred.

The line-ups:
Freshmen-
Sophomores.

Will, f.
Raymond,
Lucas, c.
Booth, g.
Crider, g.
Lee, f.



t.



Junior-
Seniors.

Pulgar, f.
Johnson, f.
Mclntyre, f.
Eggleston, c.
Moore, g.
Cousins, g.



The Freshie-Sophs thought this was
too easy, so another league was formed.
This time the pupils from Fort Randolph
and Cristobal invited the invasions of
those from Fort Davis and Gatun, the
latter winning three well-played games.

In the first game Gatun came from be-
hind after trailing, 16-2 at the end of the
first half. In a magnificent finish they
took 20 points in the last frame and had a
slight edge on Cristobal when the final
whistle blew.

The second game was neck-and-neck,
until Gatun nosed out at 20-16.

The third also went to Gatun. This
time they clearly demonstrated their
superiority and won at 28-15.

The line-ups were:



and kept up the pace until the last whistle
blew. The score was 75-4 with Balboa
holding the 75. The line ups:



GATUN-DAVIS.

Mclntyre, f.
Moore, t.
Pulgar, f.
\^tn Scotter, t.
Lucas, c.
Grider, g.
Cousins, g.



CRISTOB.4L-

RANDOLPH.

Raymond, t.
Eggleston, f., c.
Will, f.
Booth, g., c.
Owens, g.
Barrows, g.



BALBOA WINS 27 1 8.

May i(i. .'\gain we met defeat but we
met it with our heads up and our chests
forward and with a spirit and courage
that fought to the last. We are not
ashamed of it; we played, and we lost;
and the better team won.

Balboa played on a strange floor but
they got off their passwork well and
showed fine teamwork. We played hard
and in the last half several times reached
a point but one marker behind Balboa,
but the latter, showing that true quality
of genius, ran up the score most when
pressed the hardest. The line ups;



In the second game the Freshie-Sophs
again demonstrated their superiority,,
winning by 14-8. Lucas and Griderj
showed up well for the victors. 1

The line-ups were;



Freshmen-
Sophomores.

Will, f.
Raymond, f
I.ee, f.
Lucas, c.
Booth, g.
Grider, g.



Juniors

Seniors.

Mclntyre, f.
I'ulgar, f.
Eggleston, c.
Cousins, g.
Johnson, g.



CRISTOBAL

Pulgar, l.f.
Raymond, r. f.
Eggleston, c.
Mclntyre, c.
Grider, 1. g.
Booth, r. g.
Cousins, r. g.



BALBOA

Jones, r. f.
Woodruff, r. f.
.Anastaciado, I. f.
Clements, c.
Burgoon, r. g.
Holzaptel, I. g.
Trowbridge, 1. g.



May 2y. .Again we met defeat; again
our boys fought, but Balboa could not be
stopped; they played well as a team and
they played well as individuals. On their
home floor, they started out with a rush



CRIST0B.4L

Mclntyre, f.
Pulgar, f.
Will, f.'
Eggleston, c.
Booth, g.
Grider, g.
Cousins, g.



BALBOA

Clements, f.
Anastaciado, f
Jones, f.
Woodruff, f.
Sullivan, c.
Burgoon, g.
Knabenshue, g.
Holzapfel, g.



#irlg' ;atijlet(cs.



Girls athletics this year seem to have
been of less importance than ever before.
The girls showed a lack of interest, which
was increased tenfold by the lack of
proper equipment, and the difficulty of
getting together for practices. But even
in the face of so many discouragements,
they managed to play off their inter-
scholastic meets in tennis and basket ball
in a way in which much credit is due them
for their sportsmanlike behavior.

B.'VSKET BALL.

On February 7, 1925, the first basket
ball game of the season was played on the
Balboa floor. Although our girls had
never had a practice when all were present,
they showed excellent spirit, and after a
furious game went down to a glorious
defeat, the score being 12 to 6 in favor of
Balboa.

February 21, 1925, saw a return game
played on the Cristobal floor. This time
none of the regular players participated.




Due to the absence of our two forwards,
a general shake-up of positions ensued,
and the end came quickly to the tune of
12 to 1 in favor of the opposing team.

On March 21, 1925, our girls again
journeyed to Balboa to play the deciding
game of the basket ball series. This time
the players were more evenly matched
than ever before. During the first half,
Balboa made most of her score, but



THE CARIBBEAN.



57



through the gooil work of our girls in the'
face of great oiUls, we were :il>le to keep
them down in the last half. However,
our rally came too late, and the final
whistle showed a score of 15 to 3, again
in Ballioa's favor.

As we had formerly agreed that the
best three out of five games were to de-
termine the winner, this game saw thej
close of an intereiting, though altogether
too one-sided season. j

THXN'l.S. I

On .\]ir\\ 2?, three Balho.i girls came
over to the" gold side" to conipete with
us in a practice tennis tournament.

The doubles, consisting of Alma Mann
and Peggy Price of Balboa versus Gene-
vieve Booth and Helen .Abendroth of
Cristobal, were played first. I'Vom the
start the games seemed to be in favor of
the Balboa team; nevertheless, our girls
kept them down, and were still going
strong when the set ended () 4 in tavor
of the visitors.

In the second set with the games 3 o,
our girls rallied and brouglit the score up



to three all. Then a deuce game went
to Balboa, making the score 4 3. Three
times Cristobal evened it up, and twice
again Balboa won in deuce games. The
score 6 6. Then, with Genevieve Booth
playing back, and Helen Abendroth;
storming the net, this invincible pair'
managed to claim the set with the score
86.'

In these doubles, much credit is due
.Alma Mann for her excellent back line
pl.iying, and Peggy Price tor her steady,
good teamwork.

In the singles, Ruth Duey ol Cristobal,
was matched against Belle Martin of
Balboa. As this match took place in the
heat of the day, neither girl could be con-
gratulated on extraordinary display of
form or good playing.

The first set went quickly to Belle Mar-
tin, the score being 6 2.

However, winning the first set seemed
to have sapped all of her strength, for in
the next, she was easily defeated by her
opponent, the games being 6 3.

By this time all the girls were unusually
tiretl, due to the excessive heat, and as



both singles ami doubles were even as
regards both teams, if was decided to
postpone lurther play until sometime in
the near (ulure.

On Saturday, May 9, 1925, the same
group of Balboa girls paid us another
visit, in order to play oflF the tennis matches
begun earlier.

This time weather conditions were more
favorable, and consequently the double
matches were soon under way. 'I"he Bal-
boa pair, characteri/eil by good stc.uly
playing, kept up their good work even
in the face of the brilliant and spectacular
playing of our opposing team. Thu.s, al-
most before our girls could get warmed
up, the set ended, 6-2. The end of
the match! Victory theirs!

Next came the singles, each player re-
ceiving the ardent support of her team.

Ruth Uuey, our representative, was
here, there, and everywhere, storming
the whole court with long, hard drives,
which so confused and rattled her oppo-
nents that she easily took the set. The
games 6-2! Victory ours! And thus
the honor of Cristobal High School was
upheld.



THE COMING OF NIGHT.

Kalherhie Fischer, 'ij.

Beyond the sea wall.

Red stained by the sun,
The sea, like a piece of

Crumpled satin, lay

Blue and gray.
Out where the waves foam o'er the reet.
The blue-gray changed to white.

Each wave was tipped

Now red, now gold
.And raced to greet the

Coming of the night.
Shadows fallmg soft and gray.
Hid the jungles from the eyes of day.

The sky was blue

And in the west
The sunset clouds were tinted

In ever-changing,

Faster-tailing
Hues from the sun
Now sunk to rest.



ASHORE Al' XKiirr.
Kdlherine Fischer, '2§.

From the great piers'

Ghost-like hulks,

The yellow lights are gleaming

In a path

Straight to the shore,

Where the w-aves are hurtling

Rising,

Ebbing

\\ ith incessant roar;

Where the waves foam

O'er the coral reefs,

.And dash against the wall;

Where one can watch

The great tall ships,

With starboard lights agleam

.Across the harbor darkness.

Unlit by ray of star or moon.

Pass down unto the sea.



MR 95193-



S8



THE CARIBBEAN.




Anniel Ueini^ 'jj.



OCTOBER.



Oct. I. Cristobal High School opens with a
record attendance and two new teachers, Miss
Rauner and Mr. Benson.

Oct. 2-iz. Organization of the different classes
and election of officers.

Oct. 13. Painted faces and a row of hald heads
bear evidence to the important event of freshman
initiation.

Oct. 17. First meeting of Supper Club girls at
Y. W. C. A. The old members entertain the new
ones at a jolly little gathering enjoyed by all. We
are again delighted with Miss Doiids's readings.
The election of new officers takes place:

President. Ruth Hopkins.

Vice President. Harriet Steenberg.

Secretary. Gay Turner.

Treasurer. Teresa Cial 1 agher.

Oct. 24. Election of staff officers is held at noon
hour.

.Senior Class gives an automobile party at the
Y. \V. C. A. How did the axle grease, gas and
tires taste?

NOVEMBER.

Nov. I. New seats both in the front and back
of the assembly greet us this morning. Evidence
of growth!

Nov. 4. Hurrah for Coolidge!! In a straw vote
for president held at C. H. S. he is elected by a
majority of eight votes.

Nov. 6. Members of the Senior Class are now
granted their well-earned privileges.

Nov. 7. The first staff meeting of the year is
held at the home of the Misses Ruth and Irene
Hopkins. Many plans are made for The C.arib-
BEA>f of 1925.



Nov. 14. Supper Club. Seniors hostesses.

Nov. 18. First meeting of the upper class boys'
club, "Upsilon Gamma Gamma" is held to-daj'.

Oracle. William Cousins.

Scribe. Wallace Johnson.

Nov. 1 8-24. Hard rains remind us of the severity
of those of last year.

Nov. 21. The boys' and girls' athletic associa-
tions are organized with James Van Scotter and
Ruth Duey as presidents.

Nov. 27-28. Thanksgiving holidays!

DECEMBER.

Dec. 5. Supper Club. Sophomores furnishing
refreshments.

Dec. 12. Junior party held on the roof of Mason-
ic Temple. Doesn't Dorothy Vaughn make a
beautiful blushing bride? And what do you
think of Santa Claus? The presence of represen-
tatives of all classes from '18 on, except that of '21,
reminds us of old times.

Dec. 19. Christmas holidays begin amid uni-
versal joy.

Dec. 22. The senior rings have finally arrived.
Everyone hurries to Ruth's house to obtain his
ring.

JANUARY.

Jan. 5. All back in school again with many
stories of how good Santa has been.

Jan. 6. A teacher and his wife from Buenos
Aires visit Cristobal High School and entertain
the American history class with a very interesting
account of how the schools are conducted in
.South .'\merica.

Jan. 10. Supper Club. The Junior girls do the
cookin".



THF. CARIBBKAN.



59



Jan. 1 6. Staff meeting is held at Miss Helen
Alicnilrotli's house. K\'ery()ne has a j')!l\' rime.

Jan. 21. 'I'he high sihool aiul the se\enrh and
eighth grades visit Zane Gray's yacht, Theh'islnr-
mau. Commander Jaeolis extends us the courtesy
of the Rodnutii.

Jan. 2_^. Mr. .Aranila tVcmi the I'. .S. S. Savannah
talks to the social problems class on his reasons
for helieving that his native land, the Philippines,
should he independent.

Jan. 24. Two offieers from a Peruvian battle-
ship visit Cristobal High School to-day.

Jan. T,o. A staff meeting is held at the home of
the Misses Harriet and Clarice Steenberg. Miss
Pauline Fraas, a missionary from Africa, visits
us to-day and tells exciting tales of two-dollar
gasoline. Fords, native chauffeurs, and writing an
unwritten language.

FEBRL'.ARV.

Feb. 7. The Upsilon Gamma Gamma entertam
their girl friends and the teachers at a wiener roast.

Feb. 9-13. Examination week!

Feb. 1,3. The Supper Club entertain the bo)s
at a box social at the Y. W. C. .\.

Feb. 16. .Again we start on the routine of regu-
lar school work.

Feb. 18. Dorothy Deibert, '2;, leaves for the
States, and Hubert Lee is elected to her place on
the staff.

Feb. 2t-24. Colon Carnival! with a C. H. S.
freshman as queen. Mi Pollera! Mi Pollera!

MARCH.

March 6. The Sophomores entertain the hizh
school at the Y. W. C. A. Think of it! .A r.al
orchestra!

March 7. Easter Fair! Hot dogo an.l wild m.-n!
Soda pop and balloons!
Results of the Popularity Contest:

Best looking Elizabeth Warren aiul William
Clinchard.

Most popular Hildegarde BIythe and Jajk
KUmk.

Best all around Euphemia Woolnough and
William Coffev.



March 10. Short story contest begins. Every-
bo.ly plans to win the first prize!

March i.V5- Girls' Conference. Busy days
and sleepless nights. 'I"he high school boys make
fine waiters.

March 19. Representative McSweeny from
Ohio inspires us to-day in one of the best talks
heart! in C. H. S.

March 26. Wallace Johnson, leaving for the
States, resigns his position on the staff and Law-
rence Callaway is elected to his place.

Begin practice on the operetta.

March 28. Social problems class visits Gamboa,
Corozal, Palo Seco, and other places of interest.



.April J. .A full day. -An auction is held to sell
the left-overs from the fair.

Sophomore class gives us a glimpse of their
talent when they act out two scenes of "The Tale
of Two Cities."

The freshmen give a party at the Y. W. C. .A.
It's the best party of the year. Freshmen.

April ,5-13. Easter vacation!

.April 13. Short Story contest ends. Not so
many- sure of prizes.

April 14. Advance sale tickets for The Carib-
bean are distributed.

April 19. Miss Clarice Steenberg of the Junior
Class wins first prize in the short-story contest.
Only one after all!

.April 22. .All the girls clamber to the top of the
desks when a huge centipede comes crawling down
the aisle of the assembly hall.

April 27. The Boys' -Athletic Association gives
an athletic exhibition at the Y. M. C. A., closing
with an exciting basket ball game between the
high school boys anil the .Alumni.

MAV.

NLiy I. Staff meeting is held at the home of
Mr. William Cousins.

May 7. The Supper Club girls give a farewell
meeting in honor of .Miss Healy.

May I I. Senior play practice begins.

May 12-20. Practice for senior play and Jap-
anese Operetta keep many busy.



6o



THE CARIBBEAN.



May 21. Over one hundred eighty (a record at-
tendance) are present at the Mothers' and Daugh-
ters' Banquet.

May 2J. The Juniors entertain the Seniors at
the annual Junior-Senior Banquet. After the
banquet the Seniors are welcomed with a delight-
ful program, the main event ot which is a play,
"The Engaged Girl," in which Miss Clarice Steen-
berg and Mr. Maurice Eggleston take the leading
parts.

May 26-June 2. The lights burning nightly in
Cristobal High School bear evidence of hard work
for the senior play.



June 4. Dress Rehearsal is given at the Y. W.

June 5. "Daddy Long Legs" is presented at
the Gatun Clubhouse.

June 6. "Daddy Long Legs" is given at the
America Theatre.

June I 2. Flag Day exercises are held.

June ij. The High School Chorus presents
"The Japanese Operetta" at the Y. W.

June 15. "The Japanese Operetta" is given at
the Gatun Clubhouse.




Gatun Golf Links. Locks in the background.



THK carihhi;an.



6i



L



XEHCNAEGS



IlitriicI Sieenbei



X. -'.V



riif iiiil\' \\.i\' we- can kcL-p in tinuh wiih orhcT
schools is tliroiigh our cxchangL-s. I'licy serve as
an insjiiratinn, and spur us on to better our iileals
ami to iie t£ooti American citizens even it we are far
away. The exchange editor is kejit i)usy handing
out to students school papers from schools they
have attended, or schools their frienils now at-
tend. Our exchange list grows larger each year.
We are always happy when our old friends arrive,
and we welcome all new ones.

The Caribbean.

Your magazine is one of the finest that we have com-
mented upon. .Although it is issued but once a term by
your graduating class, it surpasses many of the magazines
of like nature that we receive. We're sure that if we
didn't attend Curtis, after re 'ding the Caribbean, noth-
ing could keep us frani holding fur Cristobal. Con-
gratulations!

The Ciirlis Monthly.
The Caribbean.

(.\n excerpt (rom interview with Hvchange Hditor. I

I'isilors (from other side of the room exclaim joyously
in unison): "Here is the Caribbean troni Cristobal,
Canal Zone."

£.v. £ thing novel to give us."

The Caribbean.

"Yes, I have in my 1924 a number of interesting and edu-
cational departments. 'Education by Travel' and 'Places
of Interest in Panama' we consider our best. In these de-
partments are definite descriptions of the Canal, of the
leper colonies, and islands near Cristobal, which I am sure
will engage your attention."

Ex. Editor: "We appreciate your coming. Besides the
departments you mentioned, we are fond of your 'Up-to-
Date Minute Dr.imas' too."

The Spectator, Johnstown Pa.
The Caribbean.

We read every word of your paper. Though so far away
you are interested in the same things as we are.

The Broadcaster.
The Caribbean.

The Caribbean, Cristobal, Canal Zone, shows marked
originality in its annual number. Its pictures are es-
pecially interesting. It is in every respect a model of good
printing.

The Red and Black, Tampa, Fla.



The Caribbean.

.\ very widely developeii literary department but the
arrangement of it should be bettered. The large number
ot illustrations and the unique groupings of the class pic-
tures are very attr.ictive. The .addition of a few more
good jokes would be one more step toward perfection.

The Tradesman, Boston, Mass.
The Caribbean.

Your magazine is excellent. The numerous pictures
are interesting as well as helpful. It is a splendid paper.

The Netop.
The Caribbean.

It is said that "there is always room for improvement"
but this magazine will have to go a long, long way for any
improvement. Its many pictures and wonderfully bal-
anced departments make it an ideal publication.

The Reflector, Leonardo, N. J.
The Caribbean.

The pictures and stories of your paper add to its attrac-
tiveness. It is very well edited and is a splendid piece of
work throughout.

The Red and Black, Reading, Pa.

REFLECTIONS.

orR REFLEXES to others.

The Burr. tVest Philadelphia Catholic High School for Boys.
Your literary department is very good. We are espe-
cially interested in you because you have claimed our Guy
Stewart. May his pep be an inspiration to you .is it has
been to us.

The Pinion. Honolulu, Hawaii.

.\ really live and exceedingly interesting paper. We like
you because you share the same struggles of keeping in
touch with "States" schools though so far away.

The Student. Cooinglon, Kentucky.

A well-arranged magazine. .An index and more cuts
would place your magazine beyond reproach.

The Trident. Ocean Grove, N. J.

\o\iT red covers arouse an interest that is not disap-
pointed between covers. You are fine in every detail.



The Netop.
A dandy
teresting.



Greenfield, Mass.
ittle magazine. Your cover designs are in-



62



THE CARIBBEAN.



The Gleaner. Pawliicket, R. I.

Your headings are clever. We always enjoy "The Tat-
ler."

The .icademy Journal. Norwich, Conn.

We enjoy reading the .icademy Journal. Vour cover
designs are attractive. We should like to see an athletic
department.

The Exhaust. South Euclid, Ohio.

Your editorials are good. You have shown great im-
provement in the arrangeinent ot your magazine.

The Russ. San Diego, Calif.

Your papers show that you have true school spirit and
are verv much alive.



Curtis Monthly. Staten Island, N. Y.

.\ fine magazine. The department headings, "The
Post Office," and the editorials deserve special mention.

The Spectator. Johnstown, Pa.

We like the originality of your magazine. Your adver-
tising manager must be an energetic person.

The Dalhi Journal. Dallas, Te.xas.

A fine literary department. Your magazine shows the
cooperation of the student body with the staff.

The .Mirror. Punxsatawney, Pa.

We like your poetry especially that of the Freshmen.
"Simple Syrup" is clever.



The Red and Black. Tampa, Fla

.\ real, live-wire paper. Your exchange department

deserves special mention. Your literary department is
excellent.

The Cambrid%e Rei^iew. Cambridge, Mass.

Your headings and cartoons are great. We like the
poem "Evening" by Barbara C. Everett.

The Mirror. Hasbrouck Heights, N. J.

Your Commencement number is well arranged. The
prophecy is clever.

The Tradesman. School of Commerce, Boston, Mass.

A splendid magazine. We enjoy your cartoons.

The Torch. JVest Philadelphia High School for Girls.

A worth-while magazine. You should be proud of the
"Poet's Corner."

The Broadcaster. A. H. Shaw Jr. High School, Philadelphia.
.\n interesting magazine. Your -Student Council is a
worthy organization.

The Red and Black. Boys' High School, Reading, Pa.

Your literary department and the editorials are excellent.



The Reflector. If'oburn, Mass.

Your editorials ought to be a source of inspiration to the
school. Your headings are good.

The Monitor. Jt'ellesley Hills, Mass.

Your literary department has greatly improved. A few
more cuts would be another step toward perfection.

The Retina. Toledo, Ohio.

.\ well-arranged magazine. Your cover designs and cuts
are excellent.

Pebbles. Marshalltown, Iowa.

.\ dandy paper, devoted to school activities.

The Recorder. Syracuse, N. Y.

.\ peppy paper. You have a fine literary department.

The Reflector. Leonardo, N. J.

Your exchanges are very interesting. We like to see
your interest in athletics.

I'ida E^colar Melodista. San Jose, C. R.

Our Spanish students especially enjoy you. But we are
all interested in you, especially because we lent you for
two years Hubert I.ee, who is now a member of our stafl^.




On the Gatun Highway.



Till' CAklHHKAX.



^'J




jaJ6J*-^-'5*^*"



Dorothy Deibert, '25.



lluberl Lee, V'J.



One day while I was in my office a KEENF.
young fellow came to CALL AWAY my steno.
He succeedeii. I vowed a CHRISTLAN revenge
noneotherthan tocall him a moldy little CRL'\L
I then took out my KEY and locked my ^LAUR-
ICE chair to my desk, for I am a THRIFTy per-
son, and, stepping into a telephone BOOTH,
arranged to sign my WILL. As I closed the door
on my good old office, I realized that I might not
see it again until the next day and I could
hardly BARREITT, but I said, "William CLIN-
CHARD to your resolution." And I did.

I stepped out into the open air and O ioy! O
BLISS! It was spring! The month of M.AY had
just arrived after the passing of June. TUFTS
of DL'EY grass were peeping out on MOORE
and LEE, on B.ANKS and HILLS, and, naturally,
out of the ground. I hopped into my JORDAN
and rolled serenely down the HILL to the top on
.MACTXTYREs (\'acuum cup guaranteed to
stick to the road like glue) I passed a VINEYARD,
a rabbit WARREN, the shops of a CURRIER
and a TAYLOR, and a MILLER with two wheel-
BARROWS, and at last arrived at the black-
SMITH's shop ami found him BLYTHEly play-
ing hopscotch with his family.

As I entered the shop, the cat, catty thing, said
FOOS-s-s-s at me and began to mew quite loudly.
Now I shall tell you something about the SMITH.
He is a LONG chap and persists in wearing a
BROWN cap all DAY. He lives in a BARN-
HOLSE and, besides the cat, has a parrot with
a HORNBEAK. He has a daughter, RUBIO
(who can B.AKEWELL) and two sons. To one
of these he said, "Put the kettle on the HOB SON



and LAM BERT because he ORD WA'i' across
the lake to-morrow."

Bert began to cry and the other son said, "You
will DEI BERT if you don't stop that racket."

The SMITH went on playing hopscotch ami I
began to dance with RUBIO. She asked me to
fasten her shoe and, while I was NEEL"^'ng there,
she stepped on m\- hand and cut it. It BLED.SOE
that I forgot all about the KEENE chap and my
steno. And Rl^BIO WALSTON. All this while
the cat was saying FOOS-s-s-s and trying to
TURNER self around to LUCAS in the \"ye.
Now this is bad luck, so I took my hat and shoes,
climbed over the side of my M.ACIN TYREd
JORD.AN and climbed the HILL to the bottom
where I went into a millinery store and bought
some COFFEY, a KALANDER, and a lathe
to TOULON all of which an aSTUTE young
lady sold me.

It is now eight p. m. I ate my breakfast and
sprinkled the watershed.

U. .AWSKMEY.



Colonel (to rookie). "Well, young man, the
next time I see you, I hope you'll be a first lieu-
tenant."

Rookie (trying to be polite). "Thank you sir,
the same to you."

Hardware Dealer (acting as host). "Would you
like to .see the Gatun Locks?"

Yale Lock .l^oit. ^"I should be very glad to see
them, but is is impossible for me to go to-day.
They may have good prices, but, would you mind
looking over my catalogue first?"



64



THE CARIBBEAN.



Mm O'Cowwf// (entering class). "Order please."
John (who was absent-mindedly reading the

menu of the Junior Senior Banquet). "Milk-fed

chicken and (?)"

Aristocratic lady (seeing one of her acquaintances
who was leaving a pawn shop, and who while
powdering her nose, did not notice her). "That
is disgraceful! I shall never speak to her again."

Companion. "It was only a mistake. It wasn't
done purposely."

A. L. ^"A mistake! Bad manners, degrading
and degenerating is what I would call it."

Comp. "Forget it, it is only a misunderstand-
ing-"

A. L. "Do you call it misunderstanding when

a woman that pretends to be what she does, comes
out of a pawn shop powdering her nose with
SECOND-HAND POWDER?"

Mother (to little son). "Jackie, when I used to
go to school I was the first to have my hand up
when the teacher asked a question."

Father (aside). "And now, curse it, you're the
first tohave your hand up when I have any money."

Miss Hornbeak (in Civics Class). "Carlos, can
you tell me who Mr. Kellog is?"

Carlos. "Let's see, he's Ah he's, er Oh, I
know who he is He's the man that makes
toasted corn flakes, isn't he?"

Pessimistic man. "Oh, that I could find some-
body serious in this world, somebody that wouldn't
be a traitor, somebody that would not gossip the
way every human being is tloing to-day. I would
that I could find such a friend!"

(Enter little Bobby) Bobby. "I'll give you my
cold, sir."

The mother and six children found themselves
in a car with enough money to pay for all but one.
.\ notice read: "Children under six are carried free
of charge." The mother immediately piled the
other five chiUiren on top (jf her nine year old
daughter, anil she herself leaned against her, so
that the girl was pretty nearly out of sight. The
conductfjr, seeing the girl, went up to her and de-
manded the fare. The girl popped her heatl out
and answered: "I'm under six, sir!"



The following is the latest news given by our
papers :

Recently it stated that the ship of state was
slowly but surely ascending the hill; that a room
was wanted to rent by a man with a bay window;
that a gold fountain pen had been lost by a student
half full; and finally that the car that was guilty
ot the accident was driven by a man with an extra
long nose. Can you beat it?

Father (who had just had the engine stop while
riding with his family). "Sam, go to the garage
and get me a bendix."

Sam (at the garage). "Say, have you got an
appendix you can sell me?"

Jordan. "Hey Klunk, where did you get the
nine medals?"

Klunk. "I saved a poor fellow from drowning."
J. "Yes, but why nine?"

A". "A cat has nine lives hasn't it?"

First Baseball Fan. "That thirdbaseman must
be a relative of the Ancient Mariner."
Seeotid Baseball Fan. "How's that?"
First Baseball Fan. "Because he stoppeth one
of three."

Teddy (to whom the teacher had been trying to
explain the theory of evolution). "Mother, I'm
not a monkey am I ?"

Mother. "No, Sonnie, who put that idea into
your head?"

Teddy. "And papa isn't a monkey is he?"

Mother. "Why certainly not, what makes you
ask such silly questions?"

Teddy. "Well, then you aren't a monkey are
you?"

Mother. "For heaven's sakes, no, who put that
into your head?"

Teddy. Well then I don't want to go to school."

Mo///-. "Why?"

Teddy. "'Cause the teacher said you were a
monkey and papa too."



'Mothe



.r, comp



hiined George, "I don't feel very



wel



Mother. "Tiiat's too baJ, where do )ou teel



worst



ct?'



Ceorg^e. "In school, mother."



THK CARIBBKAX.



65



.1 /'igjokc. Mr. Benson's sunlnirn. ^'ct \vh\'
the cold sores?

Student (who liaii iusrarrueil hnni the States).
"Miss Doiids, does tile dr\- law extenil to the Pan-
ama Canal r"

Miss Dodcis. "^es."

Stude. "Then the Panama Canal is dry?"

Miss /).--" Ves, why?"

Studc. "Just because I thought that the steam-
ers went through it, or rather, sailed through it,
but never miml, I guess they are taken across by
the railroad."

Mr. Benson (in science class). "How man\
organs have you, Thrifty?"

Thrifty. "We haven't an\'; we've only got a
piano."

Fat Girl (to thin fellow). ^"Good-bye, Shakes-
peare."

He. "Good-bye, Bacon."

Levinsky, a motlern business man, recei\ed the
following telegram: "Your son Abie died; can em-
balm him tor fifty dollars, or freeze him fortwenty-
five." Whereupon Levinsky answered: "Freeze
him from the knees up for fifteen dollars. His
legs were trost-bitten last winter."



Christian (trying to catch up with our heaviest
weight). "Gee she can walk fastcr'n I thought
she could."

Jiininy (making his peilal extremities go as fast
as he knew howj. "Sure she can, you poor fish;
can't you see what a big spread of canvas she's got ?'

Mr. Benson (in science class). "What is used
for buttons?"

James. "I don't know (or sure what everybody
else uses, but it seems to me that my mother "

Mr. Benson. "What has you mother got to do
with the question ? Answer the question straight."

James. "\\'ell, I was going to say that my
mother^

Mr. Benson. "Leave your mother out of it, she
hasn't anything to do with it."

James. "I was going to say that that my
er that m\- father's wife uses safety pins for
buttons once in a while."

Jones. "Say, Bill, Butf is around here isn't he?"
5/7/ (looking around). "Yes, there he is back

there, why?"

J. "Just because 1 knew his feet were rather

near."

Miss Hornl/eali (to Harry, in English Class).
"Say in Shakespearean language, 'here comes a
bowlegged man'."

Harry. "Behold. .Ah! What is this I see ap-
proaching me in parenthesis?"




Gaiilard Cut as it appears to-day the Emjtres* oj .iuttrolta.



MR951W



66



THE CARIBBF.AX.




HOTEL WASHINGTON



COLON BEACH
EUROPEAN PLAN :-: FACING THE CARIBBEAN




Aerial Photograph of Hoti/1 \\ .iMmiKtuii

COLON BEACH :-: REPUBLIC OF PANAMA

Post Office Address: Cristobal, Canal Zone



Hotel Washington is a Modern, Fireproof Building of

Beautiful Architecture, Built by the Construction

Forces of the Panama Canal

LARGE PRIVATE GROUNDS WITH PROMENADE ALONG THE SEA



Panama's Splendid Climate Offers Every Opportunity for All

Outdoor Sports

GOLF, TARPON FISHING, SWIMMING, MOTORING, and
TENNIS are ENJOYED THROUGHT the YEAR



The Panama Railroad Company

Operated by The Supply Department, The Panama Canal
JAMES E. LEWIS, Manager







1 1 IK CARIBBEAN.



67




FOSTER'S STORE



(AMERICAN)



22 CENTRAL AVENUE



PANAMA, R. P.



REASONABLE PRICED DRESSES FOR

Ladies and Misses



LATEST CREATIONS IN



DRESS and SPORT HATS



EVENING GOWNS

NEWEST DESIGNS



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Tmmiimn



H^^^S^S^S^^^S^^^^^^^^si^^s^^i



Timnnimimimmnni



inmiiiiiiiiiiiin iTnilluumilll



F=AN AZOINl

W. A. TORBKRT. I'ropriitiir

CADILLAC



csaf^aoe:

M. A. A!,\ AR ADO. local Manager

UARLEY



BUICK

OLDSMOBILE

OAKLAND

and

CHEVROLET

CARS



Goodyear Tires

MOTOR ACCESSORIES

Best Service Stations in Panama and Colon
BATTERY CHARGING STATION OR CONNECTION

CREASES



DAVIDSON

MOTOR

CYCLES

OXIDE
BATTERIES





rnmriiMiiiiiiMiiiiiiMiiiiiimmmimiiMmi'llllllimiTiTii



FINEST PANAMA HATS

GENUINE MONTECRISTI

S. Perrone and Lobato



Front Street
Main Office:



GUAYAQUIL



Colon, R. de P.

ECUADOR



miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiJiiiiini



fniniipimnmmmngjiiiiTm umiunminminniiiiMimmiiii i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiLiiLi



68



THE CARIBBEAN.



sy mjHiimwuiHiiHiiiHMimiitiniiiHii



nnnnni




PANAMA RAILROAD STEAMSHIP LINE

Cristobal, C. Z. to New York City, N. Y.

CALLING AT PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

SS "ANCON"
SS "CRISTOBAL"
SS "PANAMA"
(All "Cabin" Ships)
THREE SAILINGS MONTHLY



CRISTOBAL TO NEW YORK CITY $100.00

CRISTOBAL TO PORT-AU-PRINCE 45.00

PORT-AU-PRINCE TO NEW YORK 75.00



Offices and Agents on the Isthmus

Superintendent, Administration Building, Balboa Heights, C. Z,

Steamship Ticket Agent, Cristobal, C. Z.

Receiving & Forwarding Agent, Cristobal C. Z.

NEW YORK OFFICES - 24 State Street, - NEW YORK CITY




TT^l^ Vacoumoip

TIRES 'cordurb




TENNIS
BALLS



TnnTriimnT'iT




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RATHBUN, STILSON & CO.

Hardware, Lumber, Paints, and Oils

p. O. Box 140, COLON, R. P.








THE CARIBBEAN.



69




HERON'S STUDIO

FOR ARTISTIC PORTRAITURE

LARGE CONSIGNMENT OF PICTURE FRAMES FOR PICTURES

16 X 20 and 20 x 24

PROMPT ATTENTION AND COURTEOUS TREATMENT TO ALL




NEW HOTEL ROYAL

BOLIVAR No. 8.103

Room and Board: $2.50-$2.00 PER DAY

Meals: §25.00 Per Month

ITALIAN COOKING A SPECIALTY ON THURSDAYS & SUNDAYS




MRS. PASCUAL DeLUCA



Proprietor



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We respectfully ask all friends of the Cristobal High School ami "The Caribbean"

to patronize our advertisers.



UTTTTnifniTinirr-TT::::



nmimiffim^BnfflimiinimMnmmm^



70



THE CARIBBEAN.






>I .J u 1 >i iz II a ijUl -i TT^T'l ! 3 J r^jnccgju!t3:


O. OASU l_l_0

WATCHMAKER and JEWELER




Post Office Box
675

CRISTOBAL
Canal Zone



V/atch Repairing by an Expert
WE MAKE YOUR WATCH A PERFECT TIME KEEPER
WATCH INSPECTOR FOR PANAMA R. R.
No. 9.036 Front Street -



''-< yinrTi]iTiTT. Trn.T.TT rgT.1iI.TrTi^ .. I. II

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I American ^tantp parlor

I SHAMPOOING .-. .-. HAIR DRESSING

|1 MANICURING

!| FACE MASSAGE .-. .-. SCALP TREATMENTS

ij CUT HAIR AND HAIR COMBINGS

M MADE TO ORDER

i Colon 298 - Front Street, 8.030

133



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THE STERLING STORE



WING YUEN CO.

COLON, R. P.



P. O. Box 5018
CRISTOBAL, C. Z.



Telephone 385
COLON



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL



iSSSSaSSSSSSSSSSSSSBSSSfaffl



THE CARIBBEAN.



71



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CECILIA THEATRE



^



AMERICA THEATRE



PANAMA COLON

THE SHRINES OF PHOTO DRAMATIC ART



exl)il)itors! of



Paramount, United Artist, First National, Fox, Ilodkinson, Metro-Goldwyn,
Associated Producers, Warner, and Pathe Productions.

iJMMMimMiiiJMiiiiMuiii^^



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Spalding's Athletic Goods




TRACK

BASEBALL
BASKET BALL

GOLF

TENNIS

BOXING

SWIMMING

GYMNASIUM

AND ACCESSORIES

Sole Agents

The Maduro Company

21 Central Ave., Panama



m



p. O. Box 1078



Telephone 24



Ji^li^^if^IMi MHimifHiunlima^^^^^^^^^



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fen



A. PAPIO

AND

puilber



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The Universal

132-5tli Street, Fronting tlie Park

SPANISH PRODUCTS ARE SOLD WHOLESALE and RETAH.
Phone 279 Jose Padros



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72



THE CARIBBEAN.




?;rfrjj>H.T-iiigTTiriT.riiTTTirjtJ'iJ'i'i'Ugg'TgfrgT!L



"WE DYE TO LIVE"

The Royal Cleaners and Dyers



E. V. TROTT



Phone 250



Colon, R. P





LOND ON STORE

ESTABLISHED IN 1900

Antonio Rosania & Co.

No. 10-40 FRONT STREET

ENGLISH SUITINGS

MODERN TAILORS AND

HABERDASHERS




VILLEGAS & LUPI, Ir.



35 Front St. P. O. Box No. 38
Colon Colon, R. of P.



Importers and Exporters of Best

PANAMA HATS (Montecristi)



Compliments

The American Trading Co., Ltd.

Bolivar Street, Between 7th and 8th
COLON, Republic of Panama



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THE CARIBBEAN.



73



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UNITED FRUIT COMPANY |i



Regular. Sailings

from
Cristobal, C. Z.
to
New York,
New Orleans,
Cuba,
Colombia,
Jamaica, and
Costa Rica.



For further particulars,
apply:



1




I PAUL WEST, Manager Cristobal Division, Cristobal, C. Z. T. H. JACOME, Agent, Panama City \d



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BORDEN'S GARAGE

Latest Model Automobiles

COMPETENT CHAUFFEURS AND RELIABLE CARS




12th & Bolivar Streets



THE STORE THAT SAVES YOUR MONEY

KWONG ON CHAN & CO.

Visit Us First When You're Going To Shop
Corner 11th and Bolivar Streets




P. O. Box 95, Colon, R. P.






MR 95193 10 Panama Canal 6-25-25600 books



74



THE CARIBBEAN.




COTES GARAGE



ESTABLISHED IN 1912



FLORENTINO COTES. Prop.



. PHONES 56 and 232 .

Bicycles and Bicycle Supplies
Auto Accessories



MICHELIN TIRES




PREST-O-LITE BATTERY SERVICE STATION



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You will be glad to know
that we have an attractive line of
WHITMAN'S FINE CANDY

IN FANCY BOXES

MOIR'S DELICIOUS

CHOCOLATES
AND CONFECTIONS

IN i-LB., 1-LB., AND 2-LB. BOXES

Guaranteed Fresh or Money Back



1. V. Beverhoudt



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Front Street



COLON



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GRAND HOTEL IMPERIAL

Opposite Railroad Station
COLON, R. of P.



Cleanest, Coolest and Best Hotel

in Colon
Special Apartments with Private

Baths

Excellent French and American

Cuisine

MODERATE RATES



Telephone 53



P. O. Box 61, Colon



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THE CARIBBEAN.



75




Compania Panameiia de Fuerza y Luz

(SUCURSAL DE COLON)

COLON, R. P.



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TO YOU



BOYS AND GIRLS
Go tell mother of how you have already learned that

NESTLE'S IND ST. CHARLES

are the best to give you strength and keep you healthy
and do not forget that NESTLE'S CHOCOLATES will
always keep you strong and happy.

NESTLE'S

The World's Best




OLD CHAGRES

P.O. Box 965 Corner K St. and Central Ave., No. 159 Phone 1143

PANAMA

SPECIALTY IN
PANAMA HATS, GENUINE MONTECRISTI

Indian Bags, Hand-made Articles and Souvenirs. Birds of Paradise and Egrets of Best QuaJ'ty.

Eiilo Lnpi, Proprietor



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76



THE CARIBBEAN.




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IMPROVED EQUIPMENT



MODERN METHODS



EFFICIENT SERVICE



JACKSON'S STEAM LAUNDRY

BROADWAY, NEAR FOLKS RIVER






We Solicit the Patronage of Canal Employees



Weekly Collections and Deliveries of Laundry Work
Charge Account if Desired



CLEANING, PRESSING, and DYEING

A SPECIALTY




Phone Colon 21



P. O. Box 1131, Cristobal, C. Z.




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